(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue of English and American chapbooks and broadside ballads in Harvard College Library"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueofengliOOharvrich 






Xibrari? of Ibarvarb lllnivereiti? 



Bibliographical Contributions 

EDITED BY WILLIAM COOLIDGE LANE 

LIBRARIAN 

ISTo. 56 




CATALOGUE OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN 

CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDE BALLADS 

IN HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY 



Printed at the Expense of the Richard Manning Hodges Fund 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

J00uelj fjg tf)e Eibrarg of ?^ar&arli Winibtx&it^ 

1905 



Already issued or in preparation : 

[Some of these Contributions are out of print.] 

Volume I Nos. i to 20. 

Volume II Nos. 21 to 37. 

Volume III .... Nos. 38 to 51. 

Volume IV. 

52. Alfred C. Potter and Charles K. Bolton. The Librarians of 

Harvard College. 1667-1877. 
< 

53. William Garrott Brown. A List of Portraits in the Various 

Buildings of Harvard University. 

54. William F. Yust. A Bibliography of Justin Winsor. 

55. Alfred C. Potter. Notes on the Library of Harvard University. 

56. Catalogue of English and American Chap-books and Broadside Ballads 

in Harvard College Library. 

57. T. Franklin Currier and Ernest L. Gay. Catalogue of the Moliere 

collection in Harvard College Library. 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Prefatory Note v 

A List of the Colleciions of Chap-books and Broadsides included in the 

FOLLOWING Catalogue vii 

Reprints of Chap-books x 

Chap-books in Foreign Languages xi 

Catalogue of Chap-books and Broadsides 

I Religious and Moral : Sunday Reading i 

II Cheap Repository Tracts 8 

III Household Manuals ii 

IV Historical, Political, and Biographical ii 

V Geographical Description and Local History i6 

VI Travel and Adventure 17 

VII Odd Characters and Strange Events 19 

VIII Prose Fiction 21 

IX Legendary Romances, Fairy Stories, and Folk Tales in Prose . 26 

X Dramatic 36 

XI Metrical Tales and other Verse 37 

XII Song Books 67 

XIII Jest Books, Humorous Fiction, Riddles, etc 94 

XIV Humorous Metrical Tales, etc 106 

XV Dream Books, Fortune Telling, and Legerdemain 115 

XVI Demonology and Witchcraft 118 

XVII Prophecies 122 

XVIII Crime and Criminals: Collections 124 

XIX « " Trials 124 

XX " " Executions 125 

XXI " " Dreadful Warnings 126 

XXII " " Individual Criminals, and Persons accused 

of Crime 127 

XXIII Miscellaneous, including Social Satire, Chap-books on Matrimony, 

Manners and Customs, Proverbs, etc 133 

Addenda 139 

Index of Subjecps and Titles 145 

Index of Publishers, Printers, and Booksellers 168 



PREFATORY NOTE 



THE collection of chap-books and broadside ballads in the Harvard College 
Library owes its existence to the interest in popular literature of the late 
Professor Francis James Child, who found in these publications much of the 
material which he incorporated in his English and Scottish Popular Ballads. 
Several of the more extensive collections were acquired in 1878 from the library 
of the late William G. Medlicott of Springfield (see nos. 1-55, 61, 6"] y 102, 104, 
105, in the list of collections, pp. vii-ix) ; a number of others have been bought 
during the last three or four years from London, Edinburgh and Glasgow book- 
sellersi ; two volumes have been in the Library since 1855 and 1857 respectively 
(nos. 68, 62), and one, containing accounts of various cases of witchcraft and 
possession, was given to the Library in 1768 by Thomas Hollis, Esq., of Lincoln's 
Inn. Many of the volumes have interesting personal associations: nos. 1—55 
and 57 were collected by James Boswell and Sir Alexander Boswell; nos. 58 and 
^J were brought together by Joseph Ritson ; no. 106 by James Maidment; nos. 
56 and 100 belonged to Bishop Percy; no. 61 comes from the Heber library ; 
nos. 64-66 and 81— 89, from the Gibson-Craig collection; no, 98 belonged to 
Professor Henry W. Torrey; no. 99 to Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe ; no. 115 to 
W. J. Thoms ; no. 113 was bought at the William A. Whitmore sale in Boston 
in 1902, and no. 121 at the sale of William R, Alger's library in 1905. Attention 
is also called to the reprints of early chap-books, of which several good collec- 
tions have been issued (nos. 90—96, p. x). 

No catalogue of our chap-books and broadsides has existed hitherto. Their 
great number (probably 3000 separate pieces, including duplicates) has pre- 
vented their being taken up in the ordinary course of work ; moreover, a record 
on cards is unsatisfactory for fugitive pamphlets of this kind, generally anonymous 
and frequently issued under varying but closely similar titles. For such publica- 
tions the printed page offers a better means of description. In the absence of a 
catalogue it is not surprising that many duplicates have been received ; indeed, 
it is rather to be wondered at that, in a collection of some 3000 pieces, acquired 
for the most part in volumes made up of twenty or thirty different publications 
each, there should be almost 2500 different individual varieties. There are 
probably, in reality, even more than this, for many of the copies that are cata- 
logued as identical would doubtless be found, on a closer examination, to be 
distinct issues, so often were these little books reprinted. 

Some idea of the extent of the chap-book literature and of its widespread 
production may be got from the Index of Printers at the end of this Catalogue ; 
the titles of great numbers of individual books may also be gathered from 
the lists of books issued by the same printer to be found at the end of many 
chap-books. (Books containing such lists are distinguished by an asterisk in 
the index of printers.) An inspection of these lists indicates that the Harvard 



VI PREFATORY NOTE 



Collection, rich as it is, contains but an inconsiderable fraction of the books pub- 
lished to meet the chapmen's demand. For instance, of books printed by J. Bew, 
of 28 Paternoster Row, we have but two, but in "A catalogue of chapmen's books 
printed for and sold by J. Bew," inserted in a copy of "Guy of Warwick," printed 
by another printer but apparently bought up and offered for sale by Bew, there 
are 97 titles. Of these some fifteen or twenty only are to be found in the Harvard 
list in any shape, and only two with Bew's imprint. 

The chapmen travelled all over the kijigdom, visiting every town and hamlet ; 
a considerable number of these little books (generally of only 8, 12, or 16 pages), 
besides bundles of broadside ballads, could easily be carried in their packs and 
must have commanded a ready sale. The chapmen thus became the purveyors 
of literature to the common people before libraries, bookstores, easy means of 
communication, and modern methods of publication had made cheap books of a 
better grade accessible. They did their work effectively, and libraries and library 
commissions at the present day, in sending out travelling libraries, are beginning 
to adapt the chapmen's methods to their own ends. 

Chap-books cover a wide range of subjects ; they preserve a record of many 
details of manners and customs, superstitions and prejudices ; they reflect the 
popular point of view in ways that might otherwise disappear ; and they transmit 
to us a host of romances, songs, jests, and anecdotes in the form popular at the 
time of their production. 

For interesting modern books on Chap-books, see, beside the reprints noted 
on p. X, Charles Gerring's " Notes on printers and booksellers, with a chapter on 
chap books," 1900, Edwin Pearson's "Banbury chap books," 1890, and William 
Harvey's "Scottish chapbook literature," 1903. Mr. George Parker Winship, of 
Providence, calls my attention to an interesting little volume in the Library of the 
Rhode Island Historical Society, entitled " The traveller's and chapman's daily 
instructor : containing . . . the highways and roads, and how to travel from one 
place to another ; the market-towns, and the days of the week whereon they are 
kept; all the fairs in England, Scotland, and Ireland, etc.; an exact account of 
all the stage-coaches, waggoners, and carriers, that comes from all parts, etc. ; the 
places and signs of the inns they come to and the days of their setting out. . . . 
London. 1705." 

The Catalogue here printed was compiled in part by Mr. Charles Welsh, the 
author of several works on children's literature, to whom the Library is also 
indebted for notes and suggestions made while it has been passing through the 
press. Mr. Tillinghast, the Assistant Librarian, is responsible for the classification 
of titles, for the cataloguing of the broadsides and of many of the more recently 
acquired chap-books, and for a careful revision and inspection of the whole 
manuscript as well as for reading the proof of a large part of the Catalogue and 
of the whole of the indexes. Professor G. L. Kittredge has read the whole 
Catalogue in proof, and we are under obligation to him for many valuable 
references and suggestions. 

WILLIAM COOLIDGE LANE. 

September, 1905. 



A LIST OF THE COLLECTIONS OF CHAPBOOKS 

AND BROADSIDES INCLUDED IN THE 

FOLLOWING CATALOGUE 



*^* The heavy-face numbers in the Catalogue beyond refer to the numbers prefixed to the titles in this list, 
and indicate in what collections the several chap-books and broadsides are to be found. 

The portion of each title in black-face type is the binder's title; the rest of the title conforms to the record 
in the card catalogue of the Library. 



1-55. Histories, ballads, &c. — An ex- 
tensive collection of histories, ballads, songs, 
jest-books, trials, dying speeches, popular re- 
ligious tracts, etc., probably formed by James 
and Sir Alexander Boswell. 55 volumes. 

The collection is uniformly bound in half-calf, and 
each volume has the name *' Boswell " in the lower 
panel of the back. In volume 28 there is a ms. note 
in an old hand on the third fly-leaf: •' collected by 
Boswell, the Friend of Dr. Johnson." The whole 
number of pieces in the collection, counting dupli- 
cates, is X015. This collection includes a number of 
chap-books of a date subsequent to the death of 
James Boswell. It was acquired by the Library 
from the Medlicott library, Sept. 2, 1878 (No. 1307). 
Mr. Medlicott bought it of Quaritch, but its earlier 
history cannot be traced. 

56. A collection of 30 chap-books, im- 
bound, formerly belonging to Bishop Percy, 
and having annotations in his hand. 

Acquired through Quaritch, in London, from the 
Percy sale of April 29, 1884 (Catalogue, Sotheby, 
Wilkinson, & Hodge, Nos. 146 and 302). 

57. Curious productions. — A collection 
of 83 chap-books printed in London and 
Belfast; formed by James Boswell. 3 vol- 
umes. 

On the fly-leaf of the first volume is this MS. note : — 
"James Boswell, Inner Temple 1763. Having 
when a boy, been much entertained with Jack the 
Giant-Killer, and such little Story Books, I have 
always retained a kind of affection for them, as they 
recall my early days. I went to the Printing Office in 
Bow Churchyard, and bought this collection and had 
it bound up with the Title of Curious Productions. I 
shall certainly, some time or other, write a Uttle Story 
Book in the stile of these. It will not be a very easy 
task for me; it will require much nature and sim- 
plicity, and a great acquaintance with the humours 
and the traditions of the English common people. I 
shall be happy to succeed for He who pleases the 
children will be remembered with pleasure by the 
men." 

The set is the property of the Child Memorial 
library, of Harvard University, and was acquired 
Dec. 3, 1902, from Wm. Brown of Edinburgh. 



58. Penny histories. — London : col- 
lected and bound in the year mdccxii. 
4 volumes. 

The collection contains 104 chap-books. Each 
volume has a printed title-page, with the title as 
quoted. On that in the first volume is written, in ink, 
" by Mr. Ritson." The collection is described in the 
Heber (No. 1738), Roxburghe (No. 6386), and 
Ashburnham (No. 2859) catalogues. 

Acquired Dec. 3, 1902, from Wm. Brown of 
Edinburgh. 

59. Ballads. — 109 chap-books, collected 
by John Bell, Newcastle, i volume. 

A MS. note on the fly-leaf: — " This volume con- 
tains the duplicates in my collection. Jno. BeU, Novo 
Castro." 

Acquired Nov. 30, 1900, from Sotheran & co. 
of London. (Catalc^e 600, No. 86.) 

60. Chap-books. — A collection of 10 
pieces, i volume. 

Acquired Feb. 10, 1904, from Wm. Brown of 
Edinburgh. (Catalogue 150, No. 77.) 

61. Penny garlands. — A collection of 
71 garlands, i volume. 

MS. notes: — "Heber, pt. IV. 88"; "751 Utter- 
son's sale." The book was trimmed much too close 
in binding. MS. table of contents. 

It was acquired by the Library Sept. 2, 1878, 
from the Medlicott library (No. 642). 

62. Ballads and histories. — A collec- 
tion of 5 2 English and Scotch ballads, songs, 
etc. I volume. 

Acquired July 20, 1857. 

63. Chap-books, songs. — A collection 
of s^ Scotch chap-books, garlands, jest- 
books, etc., from the Gibson-Craig coUec 
tion. I volume. 

Acquired Dec. 19, 1888, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. (Catalogue 174, No. 347.) 



Vlll 



A LIST OF THE COLLECTIONS OF CHAP-BOOKS AND 



64. Chap-books, Scotch. — A collection 
of 17 Scotch chap-books from the Gibson- 
Craig collection, i volume. 

Acquired Dec. 19, 1888, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. (Catalogue 174, No. 330.) 

65, 66. Songs and garlands. — A collec- 
tion of 49 Scotch chap-books from the Gib- 
son-Craig collection. 2 volumes. 

Acquired Dec. 19, 1888, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. (Catalogue 1 74, No. 329.) 

67. Penny histories. — Twenty roman- 
ces, books of wit and drollery, etc., collected 
by Mr. Joseph Ritson. i volume. 

MS. note on the fly-leaf : — "Contains eighteen rare 
and curious pamphlets, collected by Mr. Ritson." 

Acquired Sept. 2, 1878, from the Medlicott library 
(No. 1308). 

68. Newcastle chap-books. — 12 histo- 
ries, ballads, etc., printed at Newcastle by 
W. & T. Fordyce. i volume. 

A clipping containing the song " Newcastle beer " 
is pasted on the front fly-leaf. 
Acquired April 21, 1855. 

69. Chap-books. — A collection of lo 
pieces, i volume. 

Acquired Feb. 10, 1904, from Wm. Brown of 
Edinburgh. (Catalogue 150, No. 62.) 

70. A collection of 11 chap-books, con- 
taining Scotch songs, printed at Stirling, by 
W. Macnie. i volume. Not lettered. 

Acquired June 4, 1884, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. (Catalogue 98, No. 572.) 

71-75. Chap-books. — A collection of 
88 Scotch chap-books. 5 volumes. 

Acquired Dec. 3, 1885, from Quaritch of London. 
(Rough list 72, No. 563.) 

76, 77. Chap-books. — A collection of 
26 chap-books, containing songs, tales, etc. 
2 volumes. 

Lettered (i) "Chap-Books," (2) " Chap-Books, 
North of England." 

Acquired June 17, 1889, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. 

78. Songs. — A collection of 20 song 
books of the eighteenth century, i volume. 

Book-plate with initials L I. F. and motto " Cordi 
dat animus alas." On the fly-leaf is the following 
MS. note: — "J. W. Fairholt, 1856. This volume con- 
tains 24 (20) cheap Song books printed for Hawkers 
to sell at one penny each. They are good examples 
of the wretched paper and print devoted to such pro- 
ductions. The cuts are sometimes older than the 
books, and the one to the Quizzical Songster seems to 
be as old as the time of Charles I. Hone, in his 
'Ancient Mysteries described ' has noted the con- 
stant habit of ballad printers to use the same cuts for 



a great length of time, because they were ' old 
favorites with their customers.' " 

Acquired April 14, 1886, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. 

79. Chap-books. — A collection of 34 
pieces, containing songs, ballads, and tales, 
printed at Glasgow, Paisley, Stirling, Airdrie, 
and Otley, cir. 1827-29. i volume. 

Acquired Aug. 4, 1891, from Wm. Brown of 
Edinburgh. (Catalogue 86, No. 146*.) 

80. Garland of new songs. — A collec- 
tion of 7 chap-books with this title, each 
containing a different set of songs, , printed 
at Newcastle upon Tyne, by J. Marshall. 
I volume. 

Acquired Oct. 29, 1891, from Taylor & son of 
Northampton. 

81-89. Chap-books. — A collection of 33 
Scotch chap-books, garlands, merry tales, 
etc., cir. 1819-1828, from the Gibson-Craig 
collection. 9 volumes. 

The volume numbers are arbitrary. Vol. i.-v. are 
lettered "Chap-books," vi. "Merry tales," vii. "Lo- 
thian tour," viii. "Adventures of B. M. Carew," 
ix. " Simple John." A chap-book has been inserted 
in vol. vi. since the collection came to this Library. 

Acquired Dec. 19, 1888, from Wm. Ridler of 
London. (Catalogue 174, No. 328.) 

*^* For numbers 90-96, see after No. 120. 

97. Chap-books. — A collection of i6 

pieces, i volume. 

Acquired Feb. 10, 1904, from Wm. Brown of 
Edinburgh. (Catalogue 150, No. 61.) 

98. Newcastle song-book. — A collection 
of 40 song-books printed at Newcastle by 
John Marshall. 2 volumes. 

Acquired Oct. 31, 1895, from the library of Prof. 
H. W. Torrey. 

99. Two-penny histories. — A collection 
of 13 English chap-books of the 17 th century, 
and of the early part of the i8th century. 
I volume. sm.4°. 

On the inside of the front cover there are manu- 
script entries: "Chas. Kirkpatrick Sharpe. I gave 
3 guineas for this vol. at Speare's sale in Prince's St. 
Edinburgh." "A. 1852. Catal. 7." "JohnBaynes 
Grey's Inn. 1781." Printed sUp: "Castlecraig 
Library." MS. contents on fly-leaf. 

Acquired by the Child Memorial library, March 25, 
1904, from Wm. Brown of Edinburgh. 

100. Broadsides and garlands. Percy- 
collection. — English broadsides and gar- 
lands, mostly printed early in the 1 8th cen- 
tury. 3 volumes, obi. folio. 

Acquired Sept. 11, 1884, through Quaritch of 
London, from the Percy sale. (Catalogue, Sotheby, 
Wilkinson & Hodge, No. 134.) 



BROADSIDES INCLUDED IN THE FOLLOWING CATALOGUE 



IX 



101. Old English ballads. — A collection 
of English ballads on slips or broadsides, 
mounted on 330 leaves. Mostly published 
in London, i volume. Folio. 

Acquired Dec. 21, 1861. 

102. English ballads. — A collection of 
133 English broadside ballads, ranging from 
about 1670 to the beginning of the 19th 
century, i volume. 

Formerly owned by W. B. D. D. TumbuH, 1837. 
With autograph. 

Acquired Sept. 2, 1878, from the Medlicott Kbrary 
(No. 606). 

103. Ballads and broadsides. — Mis- 
cellaneous collection of English ballads and 
broadsides, including many ms. copies of 
songs and ballads ; newspaper clippings, 
show-bills, valentines, Christmas cards, etc. 
2 volumes. Folio. 

Acquired Sept. 18, 1896, from Sotheran & co., of 
London. 

104. Ballads. — A miscellaneous collec- 
tion of poetical broadsides, made by W. G. 
Medlicott, ranging probably from 17 80-1 840. 
To which are appended a few miscellaneous 
pieces from other sources- i volume. Folio. 

Acquired Sept. 2, 1878, from the Medlicott library 
(Nos. 1 234- 1 236). 

105. Ballads. — A miscellaneous collec- 
tion of English broadside ballads, Christmas 
cards, carols for the New Year, and religious 
poetical broadsides printed early in the 19th 
century, made by W. G. Medlicott. i vol- 
ume. Folio. 

A large part of this collection was formerly owned 
by Mr. Burn. 

Acquired Sept. 2, 1878, from the Medlicott library 
(Nos. 607, 1 230-1 233). 

106. Old Scottish ballads, circa 1700- 

12. — A collection of old ballads and songs, 
chiefly Scottish, circa 1700-12. Collected 
by James Maidment. i volume. 4°. 

With MS. notes, and a bookplate of James Maidment. 
Acquired Dec. 18, 1884, the gift of Professor F. J. 
ChUd. 

107. A collection of 181 broadside bal- 
lads, chiefly of the early part of the 19th 
century, i volume. 4°. 

Not lettered. Acquired Apr. 9, 1 901, from Arthur 
Reader of London. (Catalogue 293.) 

108. Queen Eleanor's confession ; Flora's 
farewell ; The lamentation of Mr. Pages wife 
ofPlimouth; Coridon and Parthina. 4 broad- 
sides in I volume. Folio. 



With the exception of Queen Eleanor's confession, 
these ballads are printed in Gothic letter. 

Acquired May 29, 1901, from Ellis & Elvey of 
London. (Catalogue 96, No. 56.) 

109. A collection of 30 chap-books printed 
in Glasgow in the first half of the 19th cen- 
tury. I volume. 

Not lettered. Acquired March 30, 1904, in one 
lot with the two volumes following, from Oppenheim 
of Glasgow. 

1 1 o-i 1 1 . Quaint literature of the olden 
time. — Chap-books and penny histories. 
First series, comprising Scottish patriots 
and characters, superstitions and witchcraft. 
Third series, comprising nursery traditions 
and ghost stories. A collection of 46 chap- 
books printed in Glasgow in the first half of 
the 19th century. 2 volumes. 

Acquired in one lot with the preceding. 

112. A collection of 24 chap-books, un- 
bound, printed in Newcastle, etc., apparently 
in the early part of the 19th century. 

Acquired March 30, 1904, from Oppenheim of 
Gla^ow. 

113. A number of separate chap-books, 
acquired Nov. 20, 1902, at the Wm. A. Whit- 
more sale (C. F. Libbie & co., Boston). 

114. A collection of 18 small chap-books 
of children's literature printed in Banbury by 
J. G. Rusher. 

Acquired June 8, 1900, from C. S. Palmer of 
London. (Catalogue 125, No. 357.) 

115. Chap-books. — A collection of 32 
Scottish chap-books from the library of W. J. 
Thoms. I volume. 

With a portrait of Mr. Thoms inserted as a book- 
plate. 

Acquired July 5, 1904, from Maggs Bros, of 
London. 

116. Child MSS. — Manuscript texts of 
ballads, with letters, notes, and miscellaneous 
matter relating to the subject, including a 
few printed documents. A collection formed 
by Professor Francis James Child in prepar- 
ing his English and Scottish popular ballads. 
(Not yet fully arranged.) 

Given to the Library by Mrs. Child. 

117. A collection of penny song-books, 
unbound, the greater part printed for J. Pitts, 
14 Great St. Andrew St., London. 

Acquired Nov. 7, 1904, from Ellis & Elvey of 
London. (Catalogue VI.) 

118. Chap-books containing humorous 
sketches, stories, and anecdotes. 2 pam- 
phlets received Nov. 22, 1904, from the Bos- 
ton Athenaeum in exchange for duplicates. 



OF THE 



A LIST OF THE COLLECTIONS OF CHAP-BOOKS AND 



119. Tracts. Religious impostors. 

A volume received from Thomas Mollis, esq., of 
Lincoln's Inn, London, Sept. 30, 1768. It contains 
Cotton Mather's Wonders of the invisible world, 1693; 
papers by Zachary Taylor and others on the " Surrey 
demoniack," 1696-98; and various accounts of cases 
of witchcraft and possession. It is only the last group 
which has been recorded in this catalogue. 

120. Theological tracts. London, 1674. 

— A collection of scarce early chap-books, 
printed for W. Thackeray and other book- 
sellers, the greater part in black letter. 

Acquired Dec. 28, 1904, from A. R. Smith of 
London. (Catalogue 42, No. 311.) 

121. A collection of sixteen early American 
broadside ballads from the library of William 
R. Alger of Boston. 

Acquired May 10, 1905, at the sale of Mr. Alger's 
library. One was printed at the " Heart and Crown 
in Cornhill," five by Nathaniel Coverly, Milk St., 
two by L. Deming, all in Boston, and the others 
were probably printed in the same city. Three relate 
to contemporary politics (Hull's victory and sur- 
render and the Embargo) ; the others are popular 
ballads, some of them well known in England. 

122. A collection of eighteen early Ameri- 
can broadside ballads, some of a popular, 
others of a religious character. 

Acquired May 15, 1905, through Professor G. L. 
Kittredge, from a Boston bookseller. All were proba- 
bly printed in Boston. Four bear the imprint of 
Nathaniel Coverly, and others were printed by 
L. Deming, Hunts & Shaw, at the Bible and Heart, 
at 285 Water St., and at the corner of Cross and 
Fulton Sts. 



Reprints of Chap-books 

90. Crawhall, Joseph. — Crawhall's chap- 
book chaplets. 8 pts. (in i volume). Lon- 
don, Field & Tuer, etc. ; N. Y., Scribner & 
Welford. 1883. 4°. Colored illustrations. 

Each part has title-page and separate pagination. 
With the exception of No. 3 these pieces are also 
included in Crawhall's " Olde tayles newlye relayted," 
No. 94. 

Contents: — The Barkeshire lady's garland. — The 
babes in the wood. — I know what I know. — Jemmy 
and Nancy of Yarmouth. — The taming of a shrew. 
— Blew cap for me. — John and Joan. — George 
Barnewel. 

91. Graham, Dougal. — The collected 
writings of Dougal Graham, ' skellat ' bellman 
of Glasgow. Edited with notes, together 
with a biographical and bibliographical intro- 
duction, and a sketch of the chap literature of 
Scotland by George MacGregor. Glasgow, 



Thomas D. Morison. 
lUustr. 



2 volumes. 1. S'' 



92. Ashton, John, editor. — Chap-books 
of the eighteenth century, with facsimiles, 
notes, and introduction by John Ashton. 
London, Chatto & Windus. 1882. sm. 8°. 
Illustr. 

Some chap-books are reproduced in full; these are 
entered in the catalogue. Others are represented by 
extracts, or by title-pages only; to these reference is 
occasionally made in the notes. 

93. Cheap, John. — John Cheap, the 
chapman's library. The Scottish chap lit- 
erature of the last century, classified. With 
life of Dougal Graham. Glasgow, Robert 
Lindsay. 1877-78. 3 volumes. 12°. 

Contents: — (I) Comic and humorous. 1877. — 
(II) Religious and scriptural. 1877. — (III) Fairy 
tales, romances, and histories. 1878. 

94. Crawhall, Joseph. — Olde tayles 
newlye relayted. Enryched with all ye 
ancyente embellyshmentes. [London]^ The 
Leadenhall Press, [Field & Tuer. 1883.] 
4°. Wdcts. 

14 parts, each with title-page and separate paging. 
The cuts are not colored. Compare Crawhall's 
"Chap-book chaplets," No. 90. 

Contents : — The Barkeshire lady's garland. — The 
babes ia the wood. — Jemmy and Nancy of Yar- 
mouth. — The taming of a shrew. — Blew cap for me. 

— John & Joan. — George Barnewel. — Ye loveing 
ballad of Lorde Bateman. — A true relation of the 
apparition of Mrs. Veal to Mrs. Bargrave. — The long 
pack. — The sword dancers. — Ducks and green peas; 
a farce. — Andrew Robinson Stoney Bowes esquire. — 
The gloamin' buchte. 

An advertisement at the back of Crawhall's " Chap- 
book chaplets" announces as in preparation "Olde 
ffrendes with newe faces," by the same pubhshers, 
which was to contain the last 8 parts in the "Olde 
tayles," and as a ninth part : " Ducks and green peas, 
or the Newcastle rider: a tale in rhyme." The cuts 
were to be hand colored, like those in the " Chap- 
book chaplets," No. 90. 

95. Cunningham, Robert Hays, editor. 

— Amusing prose chap-books, chiefly of the 
last century. London, Hamilton, Adams 
& CO. ; Glasgow, Thomas D. Morison. 1889. 



96. Federer , Charles A . , editor. — York- 
shire chap-books, ist series. Comprising 
Thomas Gent's tracts on legendary subjects ; 
with a memoir of the author, and a select 
number of facsimile reproductions of the 
original woodcuts. London, Elliot Stock. 
1889. 8°. Illustr. 

*^* For numbers 97-122 see after number 89 
above. 



BROADSIDES INCLUDED IN THE FOLLOWING CATALOGUE 



XI 



Chap-books in Foreign Languages 

*** The collections of chap-books in foreign languages, 
summarily described here, are not recorded in the following 
catalogue, which is confined to publications in the English 
language. 

300-304. Bohemian popular tales. — 
A collection of 32 popular tales in the Bo- 
hemian language. W Gindrihowu Hradci, 
etc. 1 738-1863. 5 volumes. 16°. 

305. Chap-books. — A collection of 102 
ballads and romances in Castilian and Catalan. 
Barcelona, ^/r. 1833-53. i volume. 8°. 

306. Danish chap-books. — A collection 
of four Danish chap-books, i volume. 32°. 

307. Danish chap-books. Haderslev, 
etc., 1761-1870. — A collection of 15 Da- 
nish chap-books. Haderslev, etc. 1761— 
1870. I volume, sm. 8° and 24°. 

308. Samlung von danischen volks- 
biichern. — A collection of 28 Danish chap- 
books of the early part of the 19th century. 
Lund, etc. 1786-1867. i volume. 16°. 

309. Three Danish chap-books containing 
the history of the " Heathen king's daughter." 
I volume. 

310-312. Dutch chap-books. — A collec- 
tion of 150 Dutch popular songs and ballads 
printed at Amsterdam in the early part of 
the 19th century. 3 volumes. 8°. 

313. Liederen. Gent. — Oude liedekens 
in bladeren. 74 broadsides. Gend, L. van 
Paemel. i volume. Folio. 

314. German chap-books. — Four Ger- 
man chap-books. Koln, Christian Everaerts. 
[18 — .] I volume. 16°. 

315-316. Canzonette e storie populari 
napoletane. — A collection of 43 Italian 
chap-books, including a few in the Neapoli- 
tan dialect. Napoli. 2 volumes, sm. 12° 
and sm. 4°. 

317. Libri populari siciliani. — A col- 
lection of 15 popular tracts in verse and 
prose in the Sicilian dialect. Palermo. 
1872-75. I volume. 24°. 

318. Miscellanea siciliana. — Twelve 
chap-books, containing popular 'and religious 
poetry in the Sicilian dialect. Palermo, Vitt. 
Giliberti. 1874-94. i volume. 16°. 

319. Canzoni italiane. — Seventeen chap- 
books, containing popular and religious poetry, 
mostly in the Sicilian dialect. Palermo, 
Vitt. Giliberti. 1880-87. i volume. 16° 
and 24°. 



320-322. Swedish chap-books. 1741- 
1868. — A collection of 158 Swedish chap- 
books, containing songs and ballads, printed 
at Stockholm, Gefle, Upsala, Gotheborg, 
Fahlun, etc. 1 741-1868. 3 volumes. 

323-324. Swedish chap-books. 1785- 
1859. — A collection of 60 Swedish chap- 
books. Stockholm, etc. 1785-1856. 2 vol- 
umes. 

325. Swedish chap-books. — A collec- 
tion of 9 Swedish chap-books. Linkoping, 
etc. 1787-1819. I volume, sm. 8°. 

326-327. Swedish legends. — A collec- 
tion of 44 chap-books, bound in two volumes. 

These chap-books are arranged according to sub- 
ject, and contain the following tales: — 

The wishing-table, the golden ass, and the cudgel 
in the sack. 10 pam. 

Pelle Batsman. 12 pam. 

The legend of Bottle-hill. 3 pam. 

The bottle-imp ; or, The dwarf in the bottle. 4 pam. 

The history of the Hobergs-gubben. 3 pam. 

The master-thief. 2 pam. 

Puss -in -boots. 5 pam. 

Tom Thumb. 5 pam. 

328. Five Swedish chap-books, containing 
the related popular tales of " The five com- 
panions," "The six servants," and " How six 
men got on in the world." Translated from 
the German, i volume. 

329. Six Swedish chap-books, containing 
the story of Gray cap ; or. The Princess Ju- 
cunda and the Prince Rosimandro, by C. J. 
L. Almquist. i volume. 

330. Five Swedish chap-books, containing 
the tale of Griselda. i volume. 

331. Three Swedish chap-books, relating 
the history of Judas Iscariot. i volume. 

332. Five Swedish chap-books, contain- 
ing the tale of " Lyckans flygande fana." 
I volume. 

333. Three Swedish chap-books, contain- 
ing the tale of the Princess Snow-white. 
Translated from the German, i volume. 

334. Three Swedish chap-books, giving 
the history of King Solomon and Marcolf 
both in prose and verse, i volume. 

335. Three Swedish chap-books, relating 
the history of the Wandering Jew, the pun- 
ishment of the twelve tribes for their par- 
ticipation in the crucifixion, and the death of 
Pilate. I volume. 



CATALOGUE OF CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



*,* The following abbreviations occur in the notes: Ashton denotes "Chap books of the eighteenth 
century, by John Ashton," London, 1822; Child denotes "The English and Scottish popular ballads, edited 
by F. J. Child," 5 vol., Boston, etc., 1882-1898; Child (^British poets) denotes "English and Scottish 
ballads, selected and edited by F. J. Child," 8 vol., Boston, 1857-1859, in the series "British poets"; 
RoxBURGHE denotes "The Roxburghe ballads, with notes, vol. i-iii by W. Chappell, vol. iv-ix edited by 
J. W. Ebsworth," London, 1871-1897, printed for the Ballad Society. 

The numbers following the titles refer to the collections in which the pieces occur. Compare the List 
of Collections on p. vii. 

A word or sentence at the beginning of a title, separated by a bracket from the main title, does not occur 
in that position on the title-page, but has been inserted to make the alphabetical arrangement of the entries 
easier to follow. 

When the place or the date of publication is not given in a title it is not found on the title-page ; if it is 
given within brackets it has been taken from some other source. Words inserted in brackets in a title either 
do not occur on the title-page, or not in the precise form used here. 



Religious and Moral; Sunday Reading 

*^* The titles of a group of Chap-books containing 
stories of crime with moral applications are recorded under 
the rubric *' Dreadful Warnings," on page ia6. 

1 . The death of Abel ; in five books. At- 
tempted from the German of Mr. Gessner 
[by Mary CoUyer]. 19th ed. London, 
P. Wicks, sm. 12°. pp. xiv., 129. Wdct. 
front. 30- 1 

2. The history of Abraham, Isaac, and 
Jacob, embellished with cuts \ to which is 
added an account of Jonah's mission to the 
Ninevites. Glasgow. [No.] 42. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. I ID. 1 1 

2a. The same. Reprint. 93(ii).i6 

3. The afflicted parents ; or, The unduti- 
ful child punished. Being a surprising rela- 
tion [in verse] of two children ... of a 
gentleman in the city of Chester . . . how 
the daughter chiding her brother for his 
wickedness he struck her such a blow that 
she died on the spot. How he discovered 
the murder and was condemned. . . . How 
he was hanged . . . and being carried home 
he came to life again. How he sent for a 
minister, and discovered to him several 
strange things, which after he had related, 
was hung up again. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 3 cop. 

22.1, 25.30, 26.5 

4. The age and life of man ; or, A short 
description of his nature, rise, and fall, ac- 



cording to the twelve months of the year 
To the tune of. The isle of Kils. Broadside 
Wdcts. I00(i).i 

5 . The same. To be sung with the tune 
of, The isle of Kel. Broadside. 106.13 

6. The age of man displayed in ten differ- 
ent stages of life. Worcester, J. Grundy. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105-53 

7. The same. Birmingham, D. Wrighton. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I05'53 

8. The atheist converted ; or, The unbe- 
liever's eyes open'd. [Verse.] London, 
M. Bowley. nar. sm. 12°. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

32.13, 46.5 

How Mr. Wright, of Guernsey, was converted by 
his little daughter, ten years of age; being his funeral 
sermon by the Rev. Dr. Jones. 

9. An awakening call to Great Britain in 
a brief view of the violent persecutions . . . 
in the reign of popish Q. Mary in 1553, by 
her popish bishop of London, bloody Bonner, 
&c. . . . Being a collection of the book of 
martyrs. London, William Dicey, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(iv).i8 

" Penny books printed and sold by William 
Dicey." p. 24. 

10. The new pictorial Bible. Glasgow. 
[No.] 40. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. IIO.3 

A series of crude cuts, two on a page, with the 
texts of Scripture they illustrate printed beneath them. 



n. The same. Reprint. 



93(ii).iS 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



12. The blasphemers punishment ; or, The 
cries of the Son of God to the whole world. 
Being a true and faithful account of Eliza- 
beth Dover, a knight and baronet's daughter, 
twenty-one years of age, who never would 
believe that there was either God or devil, 
heaven or hell . . . till last Sunday was three 
weeks as she was walking in the fields with 
some of her wicked companions swearing, If 
there is a devil let me see him that I may 

.know him another time. London, R. Mar- 
shall, in Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 26.26 

A vision of hell and heaven. 

13. The Buckinghamshire miracle; or, 
The world's wonder. Containing the strange 
but true relation of Edward Barton, at Lud- 
low . . . Bucks, who was foretold by a vision 
that he had but a short time to live . . . adding, 
That there will be good times in England, and 
that vice, immorality, and profaneness will be 
suppressed, but that he should not live to 
see it. . . . Also, a sermon, preached at his 
funeral, by Dr. Bolton, vicar of said parish. 
London, sm. 8". pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

I.I 7, 26.6* 

14. The catechism : that is to say, an in- 
struction to be learned by every person 
before he be brought to be confirmed by 
the bishop. To which is added a catechism 
of the principles of religion, with prayers, &c. 
Kendal, M. and R. Branthwaite. 1822. 
sm. 12". pp. 12. 77.6 

1 5 . A choice drop of honey from the rock 
Christ ; or, A short word of advice to saints 
and sinners by Thomas Wilcocks. Glasgow. 
12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 

93(ii).ii 

16. The Christian monitor; or. The 
heathen's conversion. Shewing how an 
angel commanded Lord Winford in a dream 
to go to India to convert his heathen brother 
. . . how his youngest son and daughter were 
burnt . . . but their bodies being found un- 
consumed converted the king, who soon after 
died . . . how his [heathen] brother was con- 
verted and burnt with [Lord Winford] which 
converted thousands of the heathen. [Verse.] 
sm. 12°. pp.12. 38.20 

17. The Christian's pocket book; or, A 
bundle of familiar exhortations to the practice 
of piety . . . adapted to the meanest capacity 
both as to style and matter. By a minister 



of the gospel. ... To which are added, Di- 
rections for reading the Bible. . . . Edin- 
burgh, J. Morren. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 112. 6 

18. The Christian's selection. (No. 2.) 
Containing, The little innocent rescued, An 
excellent sermon, in verse. The death of 
St. Stephen, The frighted dove. London. 
R. PhilHps. 1800. 12°. pp. 2, 10. Wdct. 
on t. p. 18.4 

19. Christmas carols, fit to be sung at the 
nativity of our blessed Lord & Saviour Jesus 
Christ. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 112.7 

20. New Christmas carols, fit also to be 
sung at Easter, Whitsuntide, and other festi- 
vals of the year. London, J. Ranger. 1725. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 38.26 

21. David and Beersheba [j/V]. North- 
ampton, William Dicey. Broadside. Wdcts. 

iOO(i).S7 

22. King David and Bath-sheba. Broad- 
side. 2 cop. 102.125, 105-79 

23. The dead man's dream. To which is 
added. Lord Henry and fair Catharine. 
[Verse.] Belfast, R. McConnel. 1768. 
16°. pp. 8. Armorial wdct. on t. p. 

57(ii0-i8 
The first piece is a vision of heaven and hell : " The 
dead man's dream whose dwelling was near Basinghall 
in the city of London. To the tune of the Flying 
fame." Roxburghe, '\. 223. The second is the 
ballad beginning " In ancient times in Britain's isle." 

24. The dead man's song who lived near 
Basing-Hall, in the city of London. To the 
tune of Flying fame. Broadside. 2 cop. 

I00(i).64, 105.43 

25. The dead man's song. Broadside. 

106.16 

26. Death and the lady; or. The great 
messenger of mortality. [Verse.] Coven- 
try, J. Turner. Broadside. Wdct. 102.128 

Cut of Death grasping by the wrist a lady who 
holds a black mask. Roxburghe, vii. p. ix. 

27. Death and the lady. The great mes- 
senger of mortality. London, J. Evans. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 105.31 

Imperfect: — the first two lines have lost part of 
their first words. Some stanzas are misplaced. Sepa- 
rate cuts of Death, and of a lady with plumes in her 
hat and a fan. 

28. Death and the lady.] The great mes- 
senger of mortality ; or, A dialogue between 



T. RELIGIOUS AND MORAL 



Death and a beautiful lady ; from whence it 
appears that Death is no respecter of per- 
sons. . . . Wdcts. 105.32 

Printed, in italic type, on both sides of a single 
sheet. Omits the last two lines of the text. Sepa- 
rate cuts of Death and of a woman with a cap. 

29. Death and the lady.] The great mes- 
senger of mortality ; or, A dialogue between 
Death and a lady. London, C. Sympson. 
Broadside. Wdct. I03(i).72 

The text lacks the last two lines. Cut of a queen 
offering Death an orb. 

30. Death and the lady.] The great mes- 
senger of mortality ; or, A dialogue betwixt 
Death and a lady. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(i).6o 

The text lacks the last two lines. The cut is the 
same as that in no. 26. 

3 1 . Death and the lady.] The great mes- 
senger of mortality ; or, A dialogue betwixt 
Death and the lady. Banbury, Cheney. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.30 

Contains the full text. The cut is the same as in 
nos. 26, 30. 

32. Death and the lady.] The great mes- 
senger of mortality ; or, A dialogue betwixt 
Death and a lady. To which are added. 
My dogs and my gun. The wayward wife. 
The cuckold, The admired swain. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 28.9 

The text is complete. The cut shows Death with 
a scythe, and a lady in a voluminous gown. 

33. Death and the lady.] The messenger 
of mortality ; or, A dialogue between Death 
and the lady. Liverpool, W. Armstrong. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.31 

The text contains seven lines at the end not given 
in the other editions recorded here. The cut is large; 
the lady offers Death ;^icxx); a man and child stand 
at her side. 

34. Death and a rich man.] The mid- 
night messenger ; or, A sudden call from an 
earthly glory to the cold grave. In a dia- 
logue between Death and a rich man. . . . 
To the tune of — "Aim not too high, &c." 
[London], J. Pitts. Broadside. Wdcts. 

105.30 

35. A dialogue between a prisoner in his 
solitary cell and the angel of death. [Verse.] 
By N. Withy. Printed for the author. 1 795. 
sm. 8°. pp. 16. lO.ii 

"A view of the cells in Gloucester county gaol was 
the occasion of writing this pamphlet." 

36. A dissertation on the first day of the 
week and the last of the world ; or, a beau- 



tiful descant on the day of judgment, by a 
young gentleman, student in divinity at the 
university of Cambridge. Glasgow, J. and 
M.Robertson. 1792. sm. 8°. pp.8. 8.31 
A fine piece of fine writing. 

37. Divine songs attempted in easy lan- 
guage for the use of children, by I. Watts, D.D. 
London, W. & I, Sympson. 1778. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 2 cop. 21,2, 35.11 

38. Divine songs for the use of children, 
by L Watts, D.D. Glasgow, Francis Orr 
and Sons. 1847. pp. 24. Reprint. 

93(ii).9 

39. England timely remembrancer ; or, A 
warning from Heaven to vile sinners on earth ; 
being Mr. Brightly's last sermon, which he 
preached in his shroud and died when he 
had concluded it. . . . An account of . . . the 
Rev. Mr. Richard Brightly, minister of Wal- 
tham, in Leicestershire. . . . London, J. Evans, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 2 cop. 25.32,26.18 

An account of a trance and a vision. 

40. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 8°. pp.8. i.n 

4 1 . The happy man, and True gentleman. 
To which is added. The difference between 
to-day and to-morrow. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 103 (i). 71 

42. The heathen's conversion. In seven 

parts. The life of Johosophat, the son of 

King Avernio, of Barma in India. ... By 

Naphtal Turner, a blind man. London, 

Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 12. 

2 cop. 38.23, 45.8 

A metrical Christianized version of the legend of 
Barlaam and Joasaph. 

43. The same. London, L. How. sm. 12°. 
pp. 12. 42.17 

44. The heathen's conversion.] The power 
of almighty God set forth in the heathen's 
conversion, shewing the whole life of Prince 
Johosaphat, the son of King Avererio, of 
Barma, in India. In seven parts. ... By a 
reverend divine. London. 1783. Reprint. 
{In Barlaam and Josaphat. English lives of 
Buddha, edited and induced by J. Jacobs. 
London. D. Nutt. 1896.) 

45. The history of Charles Jones, the foot- 
man, shewing how he raised himself from the 
humble station of a foot boy, to a place of 
great eminence and trust, by his honesty and 
integrity. Also, On pride, and The country 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



clergyman [by Goldsmith]. Glasgow. 1839. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 109.14 
The " History of Charles Jones " was first issued 
as one of the Cheap Repository tracts, and is 
attributed to Hannah More by E. Green in his 
Bibliotheca Somersetensis, Taunton, 1902, iii. 74. 

46. Holofemes.] The overthrow of proud 
Holofemes, and the triumph of virtuous 
queen Judith. Northampton, William Dicey. 
Broadside. (Numb, i.) Wdct. I00(ii).74 

With a note, and a prose explanation, the latter 
taken from "A collection of old ballads," London, 
1723. ii. 166. The cut is copied from the copper- 
plate in that collection. 

47. An hundred godly lessons, which a 
mother on her death-bed gave to her child- 
ren. . . . [Verse.] London, J. Davenport, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8 Wdct. on t. p. 17.5 

48. Jesus Christ.] The history of the life 
and miracles of our blessed saviour Jesus 
Christ. . . . Done into verse for the delight 
and improvement of the weakest capacity, 
and not unworthy the perusal of the most 
knowing. . . . York, Tho. Gent. Reprint. 

96, pp. 177-200 

49. Job.] The pattern of piety; or, 
Tryals of patience, being the most faithful 
spiritual songs of the life and death of the 
once afflicted Job. [Verse.] Scarborough, 
Thomas Gent. 1734. Reprint. 

96, pp. 231-256 

50. The history of Joseph & his brethren 
embellished with cuts; to which is added, 
The life, journeyings, and death of the apostle 
Paul. Glasgow. [No.] 41. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. no. 6 

Joseph's story is in verse, the rest in prose. 

5 1 . The same. Reprint. 93 (ii ) . 1 8 

52. The history of Joseph and his brethren, 
with Jacob's journey into Egypt and his death 
and funeral, illustrated with twelve pictures 
describing the whole history. [Verse.] Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58 (iii). 1 6 

53. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane. Wdcts. Reprint. 

92, pp. 3-24 

54. A poem on Joseph and his brethren . . . 
by Joseph Brown, some time servant to the 
late . . . earl of Ayelsford \sic~\. . . . London, 
William Brown, etc. sm. 8°. pp.104. 20.12 

" To little boys of tender Ages, 
I dedicate these easy pages." 



55. Joseph of Arimathea.] The history 
of the holy disciple Joseph of Arimathea. .... 
London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2 cop. 

18.3, 20.6 

With an account of the White Thorn of Glaston- 
bury, which buds on Christmas morning, blossoms at 
noon, and fades at night, " for that it was the staff of 
Joseph of Arimathea, which he fixing it in the ground, 
it instantly took root , . . and proclaimed that spot a 
resting place for its master." 

56. Judas Iscariot.] Divine justice and 
mercy displayed ; set forth in the unhappy 
birth, wicked life, and miserable end of that 
deceitful apostle, Judas Iscariot. . . . [Verse.] 
By Thomas Gent, York. 1772. Reprint. 

96, pp. 201-230 

57. The life and death of Judas Iscariot; 
or, The lost and undone son of perdition. 
Glasgow. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct, on t. p. 
Reprint. . 93(ii).i9 

The text is that of nos. 58-60, but at the end is an 
account of the Ascension, which is not contained in 
them. 

The cut on title page shows an angry farmer 
threatening a boy who is in his apple tree stealing 
apples. 

58. Judas Iscariot.] The lost and undone 
son of perdition ; or. The life and death of 
Judas Iscariot. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 50.5 

Contains the legendary story of Judas, gives the 
constitution of Jerusalem's Black Tribunal, the exact 
words of the sentence pronounced on our Lord, etc. 

The cut on the title-page is double, representing 
on the left the kiss of Judas, on the right, Judas on 
the gallows. 

59. The same. Wotton-Underedge, J. 
Bence. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 54-2 

60. The lost and undone son of perdition ; 
or. The life and character of Judas sirnamed 
Iscariot. . . . London, L. How. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(iii).i7 

The title leaf is reversed in this copy. 

61. Knox.] The life and meritorious 
transactions of John Knox, the great Scottish 
reformer. Glasgow, pp. 24. Portr. on t. p. 
Reprint. 93(ii)-i 

62. A letter from a volunteer in the ser- 
vice of Immanuel to his friend, accompanied 
with a poetical invitation to enter the service 
of the King of Kings. ... By Thomas Mason, 
preacher of the gospel in Harwich. . . . Stir- 
ling, C. Randall. 1793. 16°. pp. 8. 33.4 

63. The London damsel. Coventry, J.Tur- 
ner. Broadside. Wdct. 102.111 

A vision of heaven and hell. 



I. RELIGIOUS AND MORAL 



64. The loyal martyrs ; or, Bloody inquisi- 
tor ; being a just account of the mercinary 
\_sic-'] and inhuman barbarity transacted in 
the inquisition of Spain. Broadside. 

103(1). 73 

65. The history of Mahomet, the great 
impostor. . . . Glasgow. [No.] 126. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 10.14 

The cut is a portrait of a clergyman. 

56. The life of the blessed Mary, mother 
of our Saviour, Jesus Christ. London, 
J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

Anti-Roman catholic. 9.5,20.14 

67. Maxims, observations, and reflections, 
moral, political, and divine, by Mr. Addison. 
London, E. Curll. 1719. sm. 8°. pp. (6), 
94,(2). Port, of Addison. 22.19 

The portrait is engraved after that by Kneller. 
" Books printed for E. Curll," 2 pp. at end. 

68. The history of Moses, giving an ac- 
count of his birth, his being found by Pha- 
roah's daughter . . . and the miracles wrought 
by him . . . Glasgow. [No.] 151. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 1 10.2 

69. The same. Reprint. 93(ii).i7 

70. Nicodemus.] The first book of the 
Gospel of Nicodemus translated from the 
original Hebrew. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Eight- 
pointed star on t. p. 35.6 

' ' This Gospel, brethren, plainly shows 
The spite and malice of the Jews 
Against the Saviour of mankind." 

71. The same. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 54.1 

Lacks the introductory verses. 

72. The second book of the Gopsel \_sic\ 
of Nicodemus. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 54,1 

73. The Norfolk wonder ; or. The maiden's 
trance. [Verse.] Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(ii).7o 

74. The Norfolk wonder ; or. The maiden's 
trance ; being a warning-piece to all wicked 
sinners to forsake their sins. . . . Account of 
one Mary Lawrence . . . how she saw . . . 
the joys and happiness of the righteous in 
the next world and the miserable state of the 
wicked. . . . London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 26.19 

This vision is entirely distinct from the preceding. 

75. An ode on the Incarnation. ... To 
which is added The true state of mortality. 



... By T. R. London, H. Hills. 1709. 
sm. 8°. pp. 24. 19. 1 1 

"A catalogue of poems, &c., printed and sold by 
Henry Hills, in Black-fryars, near the Water-side," 
p. 24. 

76. The old man's advice to his young 
friend setting out in life ; containing many 
useful directions for young or old people. 
[Verse.] 1792. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 

8.36 

77. Paine.] Extracts from the life of 
Thomas Paine, (author of the "Age of 
reason"). Paisley, [J. Neilson]. 1822. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.47 

A tract against Paine 's teaching. 

78. Paradise lost and paradise regain'd by 
the wonderful works of God . . . [Verse.] 
London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. Wdcts. 20.5 

A versification of the biblical narrative, having no 
relation to Milton's epics. 

7 9 . The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 26.22 

80. Paradise lost, and regain'd. Broad- 
side. Wdct. ioo(iii).i5 

8 1 . The parents best gift ; being a choice 
collection of several remarkable examples of 
God's judgments and mercies. To which is 
added. The child's manual; or. The church 
catechism, with prayers for every day in 
the week. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

21.3, 67.16 
This is one of a very numerous class of books for 
children of which perhaps Cotton Mather's Supple- 
ment to Janeway's "Token for children" may be 
taken as a chief example. Full of piety of a ghoulish 
sort — now banished from the domain of children's 
literature. See an article on " The history of children's 
books in New England ' ' in the ' ' New England maga- 
zine," April, 1899, pp. 147, etc. 

82. The pilgrim's progress, from this world 
to that which is to come. Glasgow. [No.] 
43. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. iio.io 

Pictures illustrating both parts of Bunyan's book, 
with explanatory text. On the back of the title are 
verses to the author of the third part of the Pilgrim's 
progress, signed B. D. 

The interesting cuts are from the same original as 
those in No. 84, but not from the same blocks. 

83. The same. Reprint. 93(ii).8 

84. The pilgrim's progress from this world 
to that which is to come, delivered under the 
similitude of a dream. Paisley, Caldwell and 
Son. 1839. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 66.21 

The text is more full than in the preceding, and 
sentences are taken directly from Bunyan. The cuts 
of ApoUyon and the Mouth of hell are omitted. 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



85 . The plain pathway to heaven ; or, A 
sure guide to eternity in fifteen excellent 
rules. To which is added those excellent 
sayings of old Mr. Dod. London, T. Bailey, 
sm. 8°. pp. 18. 2.3 

Compare No. 96. 

86. The plant of renown ; being two ser- 
mons preached by the Rev. Ebenezer Erskine, 
late minister of the gospel in Stirling. Glas- 
gow, pp. 24. Port, on t. p. Reprint. 

Sermons on Ezekiel, xxiv. 29. 9^(lv*^*^ 

87. Poems annent the keeping of Yule, 
pro and con. Broadside. 106.28 

88. A poetical request made by a youth 
(not quite 17 years of age) to his father, that 
he would permit him to have a wig; the 
present practice of dressing hair on the Lord's 
day morning being an offence to his con- 
science ; together with his father's reply. 
Also a Letter from Dean Swift to his friend, 
an ingenious Enigma, and Directions for a 
religious closing of the day. A new edition. 
To which are now first added, the Answer to 
Dean Swift's letter; The life of the happy 
man ; A play bill spiritualized ; and A letter 
from a spiritual mariner on board the ship 
Trial, in the sea of Tribulation. Salisbury, 
J. Hodson. sm. 12°. pp.38. 47.3 

Impe7-fect : — pp. l-io, 15-24 are lacking; the 
only pieces here are the Letter of Dean Swift, and 
the matter " now first added." The title-page is 
inserted after p. 38. 

89. The poor man's councellor ; or. The 
married man's guide. ... To the tune of, 
The poor man's comfort. Northampton, 
William Dicey. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).i2 

90. A prayer book for families and private 
persons upon various subjects and occasions. 
... To which are added graces for young 
persons. Glasgow, pp. 24. Reprint. 

93(ii).i4 
' ' So arranged that when any one is too long it can 
be shortened without injury to the connection." 

91. The presumptuous sinner; or, A dia- 
logue between a noble lord and a poor wood- 
man. [Verse.] London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).5 

The woodman complaining of Adam's sin, the 
nobleman takes him to his palace, and surrounds him 
with luxuries on condition that he shall refrain from 
touching one covered dish which is always placed on 
the table at meals. Curiosity finally triumphs, the 
woodman lifts the cover, releasing a mouse. The 
nobleman thereupon points the moral and dismisses 
his guest. 



92. The prodigal son, shewing how a young 
gentleman spent his money in riotous living 
. . . when being almost starved he returned 
to his father. , . . [Verse.] York, Carrall. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.88 

93. Profit and loss; or. The Christian 
merchant. Matt. xvi. 26. . . . Also an address 
to the unfortunate female, shewing how she 
may . . . become truly happy. Kilmarnock, 
H.Crawford. 1818. sm. 12''. pp.24. 

112.20 

94. St. Robert.] Piety displayed in the 
holy life and death of the antient and cele- 
brated St. Robert, hermit at Knaresborough. 
... 2d ed., with additions, adorn'd with cuts. 
York, Thomas Gent. Wdcts. Reprint. 

96, pp. 257-279 

95. St. Winifred.] The holy life and death 
of St. Winifred and other religious persons. 
In five parts . . . done into verse ... by 
Thomas Gent. York, Gent. 1743. Wdct. 
Reprint. 96, pp. 25-176 

This is the title of the complete volume. The five 
parts were issued separately under the title " British 
piety displayed in the glorious life, suffering, and death 
of the blessed St. Winifred." At the end is a long 
advertisement by Gent. 

96. The sayings of old Mr. Dod ; fit to be 
treasured up in the memory of every Chris- 
tian. In two parts, sm. 8°. pp.16. Wdcts. 

36.8 

"This was the celebrated puritan divine of Jesus 
College, Cambridge [i549?-i645]. Granger says in 
his ' Biographical history,' ed. 1779, i. 370, ' his Say- 
ings have been printed in various forms; many of 
them, on two sheets of paper, are still to be seen 
pasted on the walls of cottages.' " Halliwell, Cata- 
logue of chap-books, garlands, and popular histories, 
London, 1849, p. 94. To Mr. Dod is attributed the 
*' Sermon on malt; " see No. 2354 in this list. 

See also "The plain pathway to heaven," No. 85. 

97. A sermon on the unpardonable sin 
against the Holy Ghost, or, the sin unto death. 
By Robert Russell, at Wardhurst in Sussex. 
64th ed. Glasgow, W. I^ng. 1806. 12°. 
pp. 24. 112.23 

98. The sinner's sobs ; or, The way to 
Sion. A sermon ... by the Rev. Thos. 
Boston. [With A meditation on the four 
last things. Verse.] Edinburgh. 1818. 
12°. pp. 24. 112.22 

99. Sins and sorrows spread before God. 
A sermon by the Rev. Isaac Watts. Glasgow, 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 93(ii).i2 



I. RELIGIOUS AND MORAL 



100. The Sunday water party, with some 
account of the club at the Oak, of the trip to 
Richmond, and the melancholy disaster . . . 
whereby the whole party were drowned. 
[Verse.] Nottingham, C. Sutton. i6°. 
pp. 8. 112.24 

10 1. A Supplement to "Songs in the 
night," [By Susanna Harrington. With A 
remarkable scene in the author's life]. 
Ipswich, Punchard & Jermyn, etc. 1788. 
12°. pp.42. 15.2 

102. Theophilanthropes.] Manual of the 
theophilanthropes, or adorers of God and 
friends of men, containing the exposition of 
their dogmas, of their moral, and of their 
religious practices. . . . Arranged by certain 
citizens and adopted by the theophilanthropic 
societies established in Paris. 2d ed. Trans- 
lated by John Walker. London, Darton and 
Harvey. 1797- 12°. pp. vii., 32. 6.3 

103. A pleasant ballad of Tobias, wherein 
is shown what wonderful things befell him in 
his youth, and how he wedded a young damsel 
that had seven husbands, but never enjoyed 
their company, being slain by an evil spirit. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdct. I00(iii).2 

The story of Tobit in the Apocrypha. Roxburghe, 
ii. 620. 

104. A token for mourners, with a selec- 
tion of Scripture promises relative to the 
troubles of life. Glasgow, pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. Reprint. 93(ii).i3 

A sermon on 2 Kings, iv. 26 : And she answered, 
It is well. 

105. The Wandering Jew; or. The shoe- 
maker of Jerusalem, who lived when . . . 
Jesus Christ was crucified, and by him ap- 
pointed to wander until he comes again ; 
with his travels, method of living, and a dis- 
course with some clergymen about the end 
of the world. London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 18.2 

Cut of a shepherd piping. 

106. The same. London, J.Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 20.22, 25.28 

Cut of a man followed by a dog. 

107. The same. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 35.i9> 54-3 

Crude cut of a man's figure; perhaps intended for 
a beau. 

108. The Wandering Jew; or, The shoe- 
maker of Jerusalem, who lived when our 



Saviour, Jesus Christ, was crucified, and by 
him appointed to live till his coming again. 
[Verse.] London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).76 

With burden " Repent therefore, O England." 
Child (British poets), viii. 76. Roxburghe, vi. 687, 

693- 

Large cut of the Jew. 

109. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. IO2.80 
The same text and the same cut as No. 108. 

no. Dr. Watts.] The surprising wonder 
of Doctor Watts, who lay in a trance three 
days. To which is added a sermon preached 
at his intended funeral . . . also a sermon 
which he preached himself the Sunday after 
he recovered from the trance . . . London, 
J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

10.6, 18.1 



III. The same. 
Church Yard. sm. 8 



London, Aldermary 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 26.28 

The same title as No. no, but reading " after he 
came out of the trance." 



112. Weaver's garland.] The despairing 
husband ; or. The chearful wife's garland in 
twenty seven divine and moral lessons. Bel- 
fast, James Magee. 1767. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).8 

113. Weaver's garland.] A dialogue be- 
tween a despairing husband and a chearful 
wife, being several divine and pious precepts 
exorting everyone to the practice of patience. 
Birmingham, T. Bloomer. Broadside. Wdct. 

105.84 

114. The weaver's garland; or, A new 
school of Christian patience. London, J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Woodcut (ornament). 2 cop. 

102.33, 105.9 

115. The same. Banbury, T. Cheney. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 105.85 

116. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).69 

117. The same. Broadside. Wdct. 

Cut of a blind man and family begging. 102. 3 2 

118. The same. Broadside. Wdct. 105.9 
Crude cut of a loom. 

119. The weaver's garland; or, A Chris- 
tian's patience, in a divine & moral dialogue 
between a despairing husband & a chear- 
ful wife. Birmingham. Daniel Wrighton. 
Broadside. 105.86 



8 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1 20. The weaver's garland; or, A Chris- 
tian's patience. In twenty-seven divine and 
moral lessons between a despairing husband 
and a chearful wife. Broadside. Worcester, 
S. Gamidge. I00(iii).69 

121. A wedding ring fit for the finger, laid 
open in a sermon preached at a wedding in 
St. Edmonds by William Seeker . . . Glasgow, 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 93(ii).7 

122. J. Welch.] History of the Hfe & suf- 
ferings of the Rev. John Welch, sometime 
minister of the gospel at Ayr. Glasgow. 
[No.] 64. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Port, on t. p. 

II0.8 

The same portrait appears on all the other biogra- 
phies of divines in the Glasgow chap-books. 

This is the John Welch who married Elizabeth 
Knox, daughter of the famous John Knox. One of his 
descendants, a schoolmaster, Josiah or Josias Welch, 
settled at Godmersham, in Kent, in the i8th century. 
The name was written both Welch and Welsh. 



123. The same. Reprint. 



93(ii).2 



124. William and his little dog. {^In The 
comical story of Thrummy Cap, etc., Paisley, 
G. Caldwell, 1831, pp. 18-24.) 65.3 

125. The wonderful advantages of drunk- 
enness; to which is added Protest against 
whiskey. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 1828. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 73.15 



II 

Cheap Repository Tracts 

*** These tracts, "the first systematic issue of their 
sort," were written by Hannah More and a few friends, and 
published between 1^95 and 179S. "The idea was to sup- 
plant the ' corrupt vicious little books and ballads which 
have been hung out at windows in the most alluring iorms 
or hawked through town and country.'" The moral tales 
throw considerable light on the life of the times. 

An account of the series is given in " Bibliotheca Som- 
ersetensis," by Emanuel Green, Taunton, England, 1902, 
vol. i. p. xxii., and a list of the tracts is in vol. iii., pp. 64-94. 
Each tract has " Cheap repository " on the title-page. They 
were republished in three volumes in 1799 and 182:, and 
again by the American Tract Society in eight volumes. 

126. The affectionate orphans. London, 
John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. i6. Wdct. on 
t. p. 14.2 

127. The bad bargain; or. The world set- 
up to sale. [Verse.] London, J. Evans & 
Son. Broadside. 104.11 

Mr. Green states that the first issue consisted of 
single sheets, and that it was reprinted as a tract. 

128. The baker's dream ; or, Death no bad 
change to the poor and good. London, John 
Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 
(Sunday reading.) 18.21 

Signed M. "A list of tracts," pp. 15, 16. 



129. The bean-feast. [Verse.] London, 
John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 18.35 

Signed S S. A bean-feast is a feast annually given 
by an employer to his workmen. It was originally 
observed in France and afterwards in Germany and 
England on the evening before Twelfth day. Now 
it is almost always a summer festival. This describes 
the ropemaker's bean-feast and gives a picture of the 
drunken brawls with which they some times used to 
end. 

130. Betty Brown, the St. Giles orange 
girl ; with some account of Mrs. Sponge, the 
moneylender. London, J. Evans and Co., 
etc.; Bath, S. Hazard. sm. 8°. pp. 16. 
Wdct. on t. p. 9.12 

Signed Z. 

131. Black Giles the poacher ; with some 
account of a family who had rather live by 
their wits than their work. In two parts. 
London, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, 
sm. 8°. pp. 32. Wdct. on t. p. 9.23 

Signed Z. Cut of a poacher before the justice. 

132. The same. Part i. London, J. Mar- 
shall, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 16. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1.23 

Signed Z. Cut of a horseman riding through a 
farm gate -way. 

133. The black prince ... an account of 
the life and death of Naimbanna, an African 
king's son, who arrived in England in the 
year 1791 and set sail on his return in June, 
1793. London, J. Evans & Co., etc.; Bath, 
S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp.16. Wdct. on t. p. 

22.2 

134. The Cheapside apprentice; or. The 
history of Mr. Francis H * * * *, fully setting 
forth the danger of playing with edge tools 
. . . London, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, 
sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

9.17, 10.5 

135. Cicely; or. The power of honesty. 
[Verse.] London, John Marshall, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 18.14 

136. The contented cobler. [Verse.] 
London, John Marshall, etc. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 20.26 

Signed S. S. Cut of a cobbler's stall. 

137. The cottage cook; or, Mrs. Jones's 
cheap dishes ; shewing the way to do much 
good with little money. London, J. Evans 
& Co., etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 16. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 1 1.8, 18.5 



II. CHEAP REPOSITOKY TRACTS 



138. The deceitf Illness of pleasure; or, 
Some account of my lady Blithe. London, 
John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on 
t. p. 18.26 

"A list of tracts," p. 16. 

139. The distressed mother. [Verse.] 
London, John Marshall. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 18.30, 37 

Not included in Green's list of tracts by Hannah 
More. 

140. A dream. [Verse.] London, John 
Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

"A list of tracts," p. 8. 18.29 

The election, a quite new song. See 
No. 223. 

141. Elijah.] The miraculous supply ; or. 
The widow sustained in time of famine. 
[Verse.] London, John Marshall, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 18.6 

Signed S. S. 

142. Elisha; or, The only two ways of 
subduing our enemies, either by kindness or 
the sword. [Verse.] London, John Mar- 
shall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 18.32 

Closely trimmed. 

143. Esther.] Virtue triumphant; or. 
The history of Queen Esther. Ix)ndon, 
John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on 
t. p. (Sunday reading.) 18. li 

"A list of tracts," p. 16. 

144. The fall of Adam . . . with some ac- 
count of the creation of the world . . . Lon- 
don, J. Evans ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. (Sunday reading.) 

A list of tracts, p. 24. lO.lO 

145. The fatal choice. [A story in verse.] 
London, John Marshall. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. i7.7j 18.25 

146. The good aunt. [Verse.] London, 
John Marshall. sm. 8". pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 18.15 

147. The gravestone. Being an account 
(supposed to be written on a gravestone) of 
a wife who buried both her children on one 
day, and . . . became a very devout Christian. 
With a suitable Address to those who may be 
attending a funeral. [Verse.] London, J. 
Evans & Co., etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 18.13 

A list of tracts, p. 8. 



148. The happy waterman. London, J. 
Marshall, etc.; Bath, S. Hazard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 12. Wdct. on t. p. 32.16 

149. The harvest home. London, J. Mar- 
shall, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 12°. pp. 
24. Wdct. on t. p. (Sunday reading.) 
2 cop. 32.17, 46.2 

List of books, pp. 21, 23, 24. 

150. Here and there; or. This world and 
the next. . . . [Verse.] London, J. Evans 
& Co., etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 

Signed Z. A list of tracts, p. 7. 18.39 

The history of Charles Jones, the footman. 
See No. 45. 

151. The honest publican ; or. The power 
of perseverance in a good cause. London, 
John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on 
t. p. 17.18 

"A list of tracts," p. 17. 

152. Husbandry moralized ; pleasant Sim- 
day reading for a farmer's kitchen. Part i. 
London, J. Marshall, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 12. Wdct. on t. p. 33.20 

153. [The history of idle Jack Brown ; con- 
taining the merry story of the mountebank, 
with some account of the bay mare, Smiler. 
Being the third part of the Two shoemakers.] 
sm. 8°. pp. 21. II.I5 

Imperfect : — title-p^e missing. Signed Z. The 
title is taken from Green's " Bibliographia Som- 
ersetensis." 

154. Jeremiah Wilkins ; or. The error re- 
paired. London, John Marshall, sm. 8°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 22.26 

155. History of John the Baptist. Lon- 
don, John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp.16. Wdct. 
on t. p. (Sunday reading.) 18.17 

"A list of tracts," pp. 15, 16. 

156. John the shopkeeper turned sailor; 
or. The folly of going out of our element. 
In four parts. [Verse.] London, J. Evans, 

Bath, S. Hazard. sm. 8°. pp. 16. 
. 3 cop- 9-17, 19, 22.24 

157. The lady and the pye ; or. Know thy- 

[Verse.] Broadside. Wdct. 102.92 

Signed Z. Compare The presumptuous sinner 
(No. 91). A dish containing Uving sparrows is here 
the means of the lady's discomforture. 

158. The Lancashire collier girl; a true 
story. London, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, S. Haz- 
ard, sm. 8°. pp.16. Wdct. on t. p. 4 cop. 

9.21, 18.18, 20.27, 34.11 

Cut of the colliery, with the apparatus for hoisting 
coal by horse-power. A list of tracts, p. 15. 



etc 
Wdcts 



self. 



lO 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



159. Look at home; or, The accusers 
accused. . . . London, J. Marshall, etc. ; Bath, 
S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 
(Sunday reading.) 18.24 

On the story of the woman taken in adultery. 
A list of tracts, p. 16. 

160. Another copy, with the title-page 
reset, " 22.23 

161. The mistaken evil ; a true story. 
[Verse.] London, John Marshall, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 15.3, 18.27 

162. New-year's day; or. Gratitude for 
blessings received, [Verse.] London, John 
Marshall, sm. 8", pp. 8, Wdct. on t. p, 
2 cop. 18.31,38 

Signed S. S. "A list of tracts," p. 8. 

163. Noah. London, J. Marshall, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. (Sunday reading.) 

18.34 

164. Parley the porter, an allegory shew- 
ing how robbers without can never get into a 
house unless there are traitors within. Lon- 
don, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 1.2 1 

Signed Z. 

Old Tom Parr. See No. 336. 

165. Patient Joe; Wild Robert ; Dan and 
Jane; and The gin shop. [Verse.] Lon- 
don, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. 
pp.16. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 4.12,18.10 

The first, third, and fourth poems are signed Z. 

166. Richard's address to his Lucy on the 
first return of their wedding-day. [Verse.] 
London, John Marshall. sm. 8°.* pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 18.28 

167. The shepherd of SaHsbury plain. In 
two parts. London, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, 
S. Hazard, sm. 8°, pp.32, Wdct, on t. p. 
2 cop, i4-i8, 34.10 

Signed Z. The shepherd has been identified with 
David Saunders. 

168. The same. [Part i.] Manchester, 
J. Swindells. 16°. pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 

" Penny histories," p. 16. 7"'4 

169. The sorrows of Hannah ; a ballad (to 
the tune of the Lamentation of Mary, Queen 
of Scots) addressed to her husband, then 
under sentence of transportation for . . . dis- 
honesty, to which he had been tempted by 
extreme indigence. London, John Marshall. 
sm.8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 18.12 

Signed F. Cut of a court-room. 



170. The story of sinful Sally ; The Hamp- 
shire tragedy ; The bad bargain ; and Robert 
and Richard. [Verse.] London, J. Evans 
and Co., etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard. sm. d>°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 18.8, 22.27 

Cut of a wine-shop; the door-post marked with 
chequers in black and white. 

171. Tawney Rachel; or. The fortune 
teller. With some account of dreams, omens, 
and conjurers. London, J. Evans, etc. ; Bath, 
S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 

Signed Z. 20. 1 1 

172. The troubles of life ; being a familiar 
description of the troubles of the poor laborer, 
the little shopkeeper, the great tradesman, 
the sickly man, the disappointed lover, the 
unhappy husband, the widower, and lastly 
the child of sorrow. To which is added the 
story of the Guinea and the shilling, being a 
cure for trouble in general. London, J. Evans 
and Co. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 16, 
Wdct. on t. p. 4 cop. 4.8, 10.2, 12.7, 18.19 

173. The true heroes; or. The noble army 
of martyrs. [Verse,] Broadside, Wdct. 

i03(i).J9 

174. Turn the carpet. A new Christmas 
hymn. The noble army of martyrs. The 
plow-boy's dream. [Verse.] London, J. 
Evans and Co., etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, 
sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 18.22 

The first and third poems are signed Z, the last M. 
Cut of a carpet loom. A list of tracts, p. 15. 

The two shoemakers. See No. 153. 

175. The two soldiers. London, Evans & 
Co., etc. ; Bath, S. Hazard, sm. 8°. pp. 16. 
Wdct. on t. p. 4.32 

Shows the evils of drink. 

176. The wanderer; a fable [in verse]. 
London, John Marshall. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 18,36 

"A list of tracts," p. 8. 

177. The widow of Zarephath. London, 
John Marshall, sm. 8°. pp. 16. Wdct. 
on t. p. (Sunday reading.) 18.20 

"A list of tracts," p. 16. 

178. The wonderful advantages of adven- 
turing in the lottery ! ! London, J. Evans, 
etc.; Bath, S. Hazard. sm. 8°. pp. 16. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 22.25, 33'24 



III. HOUSEHOLD MANUALS, ETC. 



II 



III 

Household Manuals, etc. 

179. The art of swimming rendered easy; 
with directions to learners. To which is pre- 
fixed, Advice to bathers, by Dr. B. FrankUn, 
Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

109.26 

180. The complete family brewer ; or. The 
best method of brewing . . . good strong ale 
and small-beer . . . for the use of private 
families ... 12°. pp. 24. 6.6 

181. A complete guide for a servant maid ; 
or, The sure means of gaining love and es- 
teem . . . the whole calculated for making 
both the mistress and the maid happy. 5 th 
ed. London, T. Sabine and Son. [1787?] 
sm. 8°. pp. 60. Engr. front. 3 cop. 

1.2, 19.8, 27.10 

Advice concerning the morals and behaviour of the 
servant, together with many useful recipes for the 
household, the dairy, and the brewhouse. 

The preface, signed Ann Walker, complains of the 
" badness of servants," and admits that "corruption 
begins at the head." 

The frontispiece is entitled "The complete farm 
wife in her dairy. Published as the act directs Aug' 
30, 1787." 

182. The cook's best guide. Complete 
art of cookery; or. The thrifty housewife's 
companion. . . . With notices of the principal 
meats, fish, and vegetables for every month 
in the year, &c. Newcastle, W. Fordyce. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24°. 76.12 

183. A little young man's companion ; or, 
Common arithmetic turned into a song, as 
far as the rule of three direct. . . . To which 
is added one enigma, a new song in praise of 
London porter, and The wandering bard's 
farewel to Oxford. By N. Withey, of Hagley, 
in Worcestershire. 1 6th ed., with corrections 
and additions. . . . London, printed for the 
author. 1794. sm. 8°. pp.16. II. 14 

" Marmaduke Multiply's merry method of making 
minor mathematicians," published early in the nine- 
teenth century by John Harris, the successor of John 
Newbery, may have been inspired by this. 

184. The same. 17th ed. London. 1796. 
sm. 8°. pp. 16. 34.8 

185. The pleasing art of money-catching, 
and the way to thrive, by turning a penny to 
advantage. With a new method of regu- 
lating daily expenses. Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Armorial wdct. on t. p. 1 09. 12 

186. The shepherd's kalendar ; or, The 
citizen's and countryman's daily companion. 



. . . loth ed. with additions. London, J. Hol- 
lis. sm. 12°. pp.94, (2). Wdcts. 37.8 

" Books printed and sold by J. Hollis," pp. 95, 96. 
A multum in parvo, including: Lucky and unlucky 
days, The warrener's instructor how to manage conies 
or rabbits. The falconer's instructor. The art of bell 
ringing. To tell what it is o'clock (when the sun shines) 
by one's hand, etc. 

187. Sully's domestic physician; or. Every 
man his own doctor. . . . London, No. 11 
New Street Square. 1783. ' sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

54.7 

Gives recipes for the medicines with which the 
author has been travelling about the country. 

188. The universal toast master's com- 
panion ; a selection of the most appropriate 
naval, military, patriotic, & masonic toasts, 
with a choice selection of sentiments [and 
proverbs]. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 66.18 

189. The vermin killer; being a complete 
and necessary family book, shewing a ready 
way to destroy adders, badgers, bugs . . . 
wasps, weasels, worms in gardens, &c. Glas- 
gow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

109.29 

190. The way to wealth, being a prelimi- 
nary address prefixed to the Pennsylvania 
almanac for 1758, on oeconomy and frugality. 

. . By Dr. Franklin. To which is added, 
Select thoughts. London, J. Davenport. 
1797. 24°. pp. 24. 49.10 

191. The same. London, J. Bailey. 12°. 
pp. 12. Wdct. of Dr. Franklin on t. p. 4.1 

192. The way to wealth, containing rules 
for amassing riches, and to live honourably 
and happily in this world ; written by Dr. Ben- 
jamin Franklin. Also, The hermit, by Oliver 
Goldsmith, M.D. [and Maxims and moral 
reflections by the duke de La Rochefoucault]. 
Kilmarnock, H. Crawford, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 84.14 

IV 

Historical, Political, and Biographical 

193. An account of the late insurrection 
in Ireland ... in which is laid open the 
secret correspondence between the United 
Irish and the French government. . . . Read 
and then judge. . . . Taken from the reports 
of the secret committees of the Irish parlia- 
ment and other authentic papers. [ 1 1 th ed.] 
London, J. Evans, etc. [1799?] sm. 8°. 
pp. 32. Wdct. on t. p. 4.37 



12 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



194. A ballad of the cloak's knavery. 
Broadside, Wdct. 100(1)49 

The ballad is against presbyterianism, and dates 
from 1679-81. Koxburghe,\v. dod,. The cut in this 
copy is not the one noted there; this represents 
Charles I. losing his crown, but receiving the crown of 
martyrdom. 

195. The banishment of poverty by nis 
royal highness J. D. A. [James, Duke of Al- 
bany] . To the tune of, The last good night. 
Broadside. 106. i 

The MS. contents says " written by Sempill of Bel- 
trees," i. e. Francis Sempill, i6i6?-i682. The verses 
describe the adventures of the author. 

196. The battle of Trafalgar. Lord Nel- 
son's victory and death. London, A. Paris. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 105.5 1 

197. The British lion, or Constitutional 
chronicle, forming a pleasing political mis- 
cellany. . . . To be conducted by the author 
of Remarks on the convention bill, assisted 
by several literary patriots. London, J. Dav- 
enport. 1796. sm. 12°. pp.36. 24.6 

198. Bruce.] History of the life and death 
of the great warrior, Robert Bruce, king of 
Scotland. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24, Wdct. 
on t. p. 66.4 



199. The same. Reprint. 



93(iii).i9 



200. Buckingham.] The life of George 
Villiers, duke of Buckingham, (prime minis- 
ter to King James and King Charles the First) 
. . . London, T. Cooper. 1740. sm. 8°. 
pp. viii., 3-112. 3.4 

Also published with the title : The fate of favorites, 
etc. 

201. History of Robert Burns, the cele- 
brated Ayrshire poet. Newcastle, W. & T. 
Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Portr. on t. p. 

76.6 

202 An interesting history of Robert 
Bums, the Ayrshire bard. Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Portr. on t. p. 109.25 

203. Cameron.] The life of doctor Ar- 
chibald Cameron, brother to Donald Came- 
ron, of Lochiel, chief of that clan. . . . With 
a print of Miss Jenny Cameron in a Highland 
dress. London, J. Horn, in Turn-again-I^ne, 
near Snow-Hill. [1753?] 12°. pp.30. 
Wdct. 2.8 

204. The life of Cervantes, with remarks 
on his writings by Mr. de Florian. Trans- 
lated from the French by William Wallbeck. 



Leeds, J. Bowling. 
57- 



1785. 16°. 



pp. vui., 
41.2 



205. Charles!.] England's black tribunal ; 
or. King Charles's martyrdom. London, 
printed in Stonecutter-street, Fleet-market. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).34 

Cut of an execution by beheading. 

206. King Charles the Second's restora- 
tion. Tune, Where have you been, my 
lovely sailor bold. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(ii).35 
Cut of a man's face and three crowns in a tree. 

207. Charles XH.] The history of the 
remarkable life of the brave and renowned 
Charles XH., king of Sweden, giving an 
account of his many sieges and battles , , . 
his defeat ... his flight and . . . the manner 
of his death. London, Bow Church Yard. 
16°. pp. 24. 58(ii).ii 

208. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

67.3 

With an introduction in verse. Cut on the title- 
page : a man's head in profile, wearing a crowned 
helmet. 

209. The same. London, sm. 12''. pp. 
24. Wdct. on t. p. 32.1 

" Brave " is omitted from the title; same cut as the 
preceding. 

210. The same. London, sm. 12°. pp. 
24. Wdct. on t. p. 47.8 

Cut of a crowned head, full face. 

211. The history of Prince Charles Edward 
Stuart, commonly called the Pretender. 
Glasgow. 16°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 
3 cop. 7926, 109.23, 1 10.5 

212. The conquest of France; with the 
life and glorious actions of Edward, the Black 
Prince. . . . Being a history full of great and 
noble actions in love and arms to the honour 
of the English nation. London, C. Dicey, 
in Bow Church Yard ; sold also at his ware- 
house in Northampton. 16°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 58(i).25 

The rude cut represents bowmen, in armor, attack- 
ing a town. 

213. The converts. Broadside. 105.44 

"Of Earls, of Lords, of Knights I'll sing. 
That chang'd their faith to please their King." 

The earls of Peterborough, Salisbury, and Sunder- 
land, and Sir Edward Hales are satirized in these 
verses. Eoxburgke, iv. 302, 



IV. HISTORICAL, POLITICAL, AND BIOGRAPHICAL 



13 



214. The life of Oliver Cromwell, 1. pro- 
tector of the commonwealth of England, 
Scotland, and Ireland . . . relating matters of 
fact without partiality. London, T. Brad- 
shaw, etc. 1724. sm. 12°. pp. (4), 86. 

40.1 

215. History of the earl of Derwentwater ; 
his life, adventures, trial, and execution. New- 
castle, W. & T. Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 68.1 

James, 3d earl of Derwentwater, beheaded 24 Feb., 
1 716, for participation in the Jacobite rising, of 1715. 

216. Another issue, differing slightly in 
typography. 66.20 

217. Derwentwater.] Genuine and im- 
partial memoirs of the life and character of 
Charles RatclifTe, esq., who was beheaded on 
Tower-Hill, Dec. 8, 1746. . . . Wrote by a 
gentleman of the family. . . . London, B. Cole. 
1746. 16°. pp.31. 37-21 

Younger brother of the third earl of Derwentwater; 
he was condemned to death with his brother in 1716 
but escaped, was captured in 1746 and executed 
under his original sentence. 

218. The devil's cabinet broken open ; or, 
A hue and cry after Frederick, the tax master, 
Mr. Minden, and Jemmy Twitcher. With a 
merry and diverting dialogue between the 
bell-man. Jack Ketch, and the devil, to- 
gether with the lamentations of the above- 
mentioned gentlemen, and the epitaphs on 
their graves. Broadside. Wdcts. 103 (i). 89 

219. Dialogue between John and Thomas 
on the corn laws, the charter, teetotalism, 
and the probable remedy for the present 
disstresses [m-]. Paisley, for the author, by 
G. Caldwell. 1842. 16°. pp. 8. 62.42 

220. Directions to a painter for describing 
our naval business in imitation of W. Waller ; 
being the last works of Sir John Denham. 
Whereunto is annexed Clarindon's [j/r] house- 
warming, by an unknown author [A. Marvel]. 
1667. sm.8°. pp. (4), 27. 23.10 

Imperfect: — all after p. 27 missing. 
A satire in verse. 

221. The dream ; or, A flight to the regions 
of knowledge, and a rapid return with the 
produce ; shewing a true portrait of the 
times, past, present, and to come. London, 
printed for the author. 1782. sm.8°. 
pp. (2), 26. Engr. front., folded. i.i 

A protest against over-taxation and "that grand 
impostor" the national debt. 



2 2 2. The Dutch bribe; a ballad. Broad- 
side. 106.26 

223. The election; a quite new song shew- 
ing many things which are now doing, and 
which ought not to be done. Being a song 
very fit to be sung in all places where an 
election is going on. Broadside. Wdct. 
(Cheap repository.) 104.40 

Cut of an election scene. 

224. Elizabeth.] The history of the most 
renowned Queen Elizabeth, and her great 
favorite, the earl of Essex. In two parts. 
A romance. London, printed by W, O. and 
sold by the booksellers, sm. 4°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 99.4 

On verso of the first leaf is an advertisement of a 
balsam, as in the history of Don Bellianis(No. 444), 
but without a cut. 

225. The history of Queen Elizabeth and 
her great favorite, the earl of Essex. Part 
the first. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

35-15 

226. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 49.5 

Imperfect: — the last lines of pp. 9-16 are cut 
away. • 

227. The same. 2 pt. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24, 24. Wdcts. 
on t. p. 58.7, 8 

228. The secret history of the most re- 
nowned Q. Elizabeth, and earl of Essex, by 
a person of quality. 2 pt. Cologne, printed 
for Will with the wisp at the sign of the 
moon in the ecliptick. 1761. sm. 12°. pp. 
(2), 114. Wdct. front. 46.1 

Both parts have the same title-page and woodcut. 
The Library owns another copy with the date 1767. 

Ashton (p. 396) gives a title-page: "The history 
of the most renowned Queen Elizabeth," etc. New- 
castle, J. White. 

229. The end of oppression, being a dia- 
logue between an old mechanic and a young 
one concerning the establishment of the rights 
of man. 2d ed. London, printed for the 
author and sold by T. Spence . . . patriotic 
bookseller and publisher of Pig3 meat. 12°. 
pp. 12. 6.4 

230. Spence's recantation of the End of 
oppression. , . . London, T. Spence, etc. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. 6.5 

Spence's scheme for the common ownership of 
land attracted no little attention in the latter part of 
the eighteenth century. 



14 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



231. An entertaining history of the Jews. 
Part the first. By the author of the History 
of the four grand monarchies, etc. Printed 
for the author, and may be had of him at 
Beckenham, in Kent, etc. 1796. 12°. 
pp. 36. 7.4 

" Part the second will contain an Account of Jeru- 
salem, etc. Part the third will contain a Direct answer 
to ' The age of reason.' " 

232. George III.] A new song on the 
birth-day of his most gracious majesty King 
George the Third. [London], C. Smith. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).36 

233. The grand disappointment; or, A 
description of the several figures, the pope, 
pretender, cardinals, Jesuits and fryers that 
were design'd to disturb the government, 
being seized . . . the 17 th instant . . . and a 
description of the whole procession as it was 
to have been conducted . , . with the speeches 
that were to be made. London, F. Bland. 
17 1 1. Broadside. Wdct. 102.6 

233\ Lady Jane Gray.] The entertaining 
life and death of the amiable Lady Jean Gray, 
who reigned only nine days queen of England ; 
after which she and her husband were be- 
headed in one day ... by order of Q. Mary, 
her successor. Edinburgh, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1 15.2 1 

234. Grierson.] An elegy in memory of 
that valiant champion, Sir Robert Grierson, 
late Laird of Lag; or, the prince of dark- 
ness, his lamentation for and commendations 
of his trusty and well beloved Laird of Lag, 
who died Dec. 23, 1733. . . . Very useful to 
all who desire to be well infomied concerning 
the chief managers and management of the 
late persecuting period. Falkirk, T. John- 
ston. 1823. sm. 12°. pp.24. 62.16 

235. Grierson.] An elegy in memory of 
that valiant champion. Sir R. Grierson, late 
Laird of Lag, who died Dec. 23d, 1733; 
wherein the prince of darkness commends 
many of his best friends who were the chief 
managers of the late persecution. Glasgow, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

75.4, 109.15 

236. The same. Reprint. 93(ii).6 

237. The true life of Eleanor Gwinn, a cele- 
brated courtezan in the reign of Charles IL 
and mistress to that monarch. . . . London, 
T. Bailey, sm. 8°. pp. 40. 2.9 

As a fill-up "The 1753rd chapter of The Jews" 
is printed at the end. 



238. A historical catechism, containing 
ingenius answers to many notable questions 
of several wonderful matters in ancient his- 
tory. Glasgow. 1792. sm. 8°. pp.8. 

8.16 
The catechism deals with Biblical history, with the 
Great Mogul and his divining ape, Mahomet's tomb, 
the prophecies of the ten sybils, the seven sleepers, 
and the accounts by Josephus and Lentulus of the 
wonders attending the birth of Christ. 

239. The historical catechism, containing 
ingenious answers, etc. London, W. and C. 
Dicey in Bow Church Yard. 16°. pp. 24. 

35.20 

240. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. 16°. pp. 24. 58(iv).24 

In this copy the queries are in italic and the answers 
in Roman type. 

241. A new historical catechism, contain- 
ing answers to questions in ancient history. 
StirHng, William Macnie. 1828. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 64.17 

242. The same. Glasgow, pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. Reprint. 93(iii).20 

242". A new historical catechism, contain- 
ing witty answers to several questions of many 
wonderful matters in ancient history . . . 
Paisley, J. Neilson. 1815. sm. 12°. pp.24. 

I15.13 

243. History of the kings and queens of 
England from the reign of William the Con- 
queror to Victoria the First. Part i. Glas- 
gow. [No.] 133. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Portrs. 

110.23 

244. The same. 2 pt. Reprint. 

93(iii)-i5, 16 

245. The bubble bubble. To the tune of, 
Over the hills and far away. Broadside. 

106.25 

See "A pedlar's pack of ballads and songs, with 
illustrative notes by W. H. Logan," Edinburgh, 
W. Paterson, 1869, p. 196. 

246. Jefferys.] The life and character of 

the late Lord Chancellor Jefferys London, 

A.Moore. 1725. sm. 8°. pp. (14), 7. 3.5 

247. John Barley's welcome; or. Fare- 
well to whiskey; a new song. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 33-19 

On "An act that for sax months prohibits. Thro' 
Britain ilk distillery." 



IV. HISTORICAL, POLITICAL, AND BIOGRAPHICAL 



15 



248. Jure divino ; a satyr. The first book 
[-The twelfth book.] By the author of the 
True-born-Englishman [Daniel Defoe]. . . . 
London, P. Hills, sm. 8°. Wdcts. 22.3-13 

Imperfect: — pp. I -4 of the Twelfth book are 
missing. Each book was issued with a title-page, as 
an eight-page pamphlet. The title-page of Book i. 
has a woodcut representing Defoe in the pillory ; that 
of Book iv. has a woodcut of Defoe. 

249. Louis XVL] The history of the trial 
and execution of Louis the XVIth, late King 
of France. . . • Together with his last will and 
testament, sm. 12°. pp.24. 48.12 

250. Lord Lovat's reception and execution 
on Tower-Hill. Tune of, I wish I had never 
been marry'd. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(ii).55 

251. Marie Antoinette.] The history of 
the trial and execution of Marie Antoinette, 
late queen of France. . . . [London], No. 42 
Long Lane. sm. 12°. pp. ^4. 48.11 

252. Mars stript of his armour; or. The 
army display'd in all its true colours. . . . 
2d ed. By a lover of the mathematics [Ed- 
ward Ward] . London, J. CoUyer, etc. sm. 8°. 
pp. (8), 76. 27.14 

A satirical description of the characters of each 
grade in the army and of the army in general. 

253. The life and history of Mary, queen 
of Scots. Glasgow, Francis Orr & Sons. 
[No.] 165. sm. 12°. pp. 34 [24]. 2 cop. 

74.18, 110.4 

254. Nadir Shah]. The history of the life 
and surprising transactions of Thamas Kouli 
Khan, late sophi of Persia, including ... his 
conquest of India and deposition and restora- 
tion of the Great Moghol. 4th ed. Adorned 
with copper-plates. By W. H. Dilworth. 
London, William Anderson. 1759. sm. 12°. 
pp. viii., 136. 49-15 

Imperfect : — the plates are missing. 

255. Narrative of the battles of Drumclog 
and Bothwell Bridge. Glasgow. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 93(ii).5 

"Taken from an American newspaper entitled the 
National gazette. Written by the Laird of Torfoot, 
an officer in the Presbyterian army, whose estate is at 
this day in the possession of his lineal descendants of 
the fifth generation." — Page -x,. Initials at the end, 
W. C. B. 

256. The naval remembrancer, containing 
an account of every sea engagement of note 
fought between England and other powers 
from the year 893 up to the conclusion of the 



late war [1801]. London, J. Davenport, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 12.13,33.27 

257. Nelson and the British tars victo- 
rious !!!... Account of the total defeat and 
destruction of the Danish fleet ... on the 
2d of this month. . . . London, J. Evans. 
[1801.] sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

19.3, 26.11 

258. Nelson & victory ! Historical narra- 
tive of the desperate battle which was fought 
between the English and Danes on the 2d of 
April, at the . . . harbor of Copenhagen; 
wherein the Danes were totally defeated. A 
list of the killed and wounded. London, 
J.Davenport. [1801?] sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1. 1 5 

259. The new budget; or, The effects of 
war exposed ... by a lover of unity, society, 
peace and concord ... 2d ed., with addi- 
tions. Printed by the author of the Universal 
arithmetic, 1799. 24°. pp. 16. 52.21 

260. A new song on the present war, to 
which is added A new recruiting song. Dum- 
fries. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 13.18 

261. Peace and Dunkirk; being an excel- 
lent new song upon the surrender of Dunkirk 
to General Hill. To the tune of, The king 
shall enjoy his own again. Broadside. 106.24 

262. Peace and plenty. An account of 
the ratification of peace, which arrived at 
Lord Hawkesbury's office on Saturday, Oct. 
8, 1 80 1, with a detail of the preliminaries 
which were signed on the ist of October, 
1 80 1. London, J". Davenport. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. 9-9 

263. The republican procession; or. The 
tumultuous cavalcade ; a merry poem. [By 
Edward Ward.] 1714- sm.8°. pp.44- 4-35 

264. Rob Roy.] An account of the life, 
singular transactions, and death of Rob Roy 
Macgregor, a famous Highland chieftain. 
16°. pp.8. 97-4 

No title-page. 

265. Rymer, James.] Transplantation; 
or. Poor Crocus pluckt up by the roots. 
London, T. Evans. 1779. sm. 8°. pp. v., 
26. Engr. portr. 12.15 

A complaint by James Rymer, naval surgeon, against 

admiral R m, for having procurred his transferal 

from the Conquistador to the Marlborough. 



i6 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



266. The answer of Henry Sacheverell, 
D.D., to the articles of impeachment ex- 
hibited against him by the honourable House 
of Commons, &c., for preaching two sermons. 
... To which are prefix'd, The articles of 
impeachment, translated from the Leiden 
Gazette of the nth of February, N. S. 17 10. 
sm. 8°. pp. 24. 22.16 

267. Sacheverell.] The Bishop of Oxford, 
his speech in the House of Lords on the first 
article of the impeachment of Dr. Henry 
Sacheverell. London, Jonah Bowyer. 17 10. 
sm. 8°. pp. 16. 22.17 

268. Sacheverell.] The character of a low- 
churchman drawn in an answer to the True 
character of a churchman ; showing the false 
pretences to that name. ... 3d ed. . . . sm. 8°. 
pp. 24. Engr. portr. of Henry Sacheverell. 

22.14 

At the end is an advertisement of " books sold by 
G. Sawbridge, at the Three flower-de-luces in Little 
Britain." 

269. Sacheverell.] Four letters to a friend 
in North Britain upon the publishing the 
tryal of Dr. Sacheverell. . . . London. 17 10. 
sm. 8°. pp. 35. 22.18 

270. Sacheverell.] A speech without 
doors. . . . London, A. Baldwin. 17 10. 
sm. 8°. pp.20. 22.15 

271. Scotland's rejoicing for presbytery. 
To its own proper new tune. Broadside. 

106.29 

272. Seventeen hundred and twenty, or, 
bubble year; a poem in two cantos. . . . 
London, W. Boreham. sm. 8°. pp. (4), iv., 
32. 12.14 

Dedicated "to the two grand bubblemongers the 
founders of the S. S. and M-si-sippi companies." 

273. Sketches and characters of the most 
eminent and most singular persons now living. 
By several hands. Vol.i. Bristol, for John 
Wheble, London. 1770. 16°. pp. 143. 

46.6 

The characters are thinly veiled behind initials. 
The British Museum catalogue attributes this, doubt- 
fully, to P. Thicknesse. 

274. The speech of John Wilkes, esq., in 
the House of Commons on Wednesday, April 
1 6, 1 7 7 7 , on the motion of Lord North to refer 
to . . . the committee of supply his majesty's 
message respecting the civil list. Newcastle. 
1777. 12°. pp. 24. 14.15 



275. A true and authentic narrative of the 
action between the Northumberland and three 
French men-of-war. ... By an eye witness. 
London, W. Payne, etc. 1745. sm. 8°. 
pp. 20. II. 2 

276. The turn-coat, or Jack of all religions. 
To which are added : The British tars, The 
prentice boy. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. (2 cop.) 28.16, 29.31 

277. History of Sir William Wallace, the 
renowned Scottish champion. Glasgow. 
[No.] 107. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. no. I 

278. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).i8 

279. The famous and memorable history 
of Wat Tyler and Jack Straw. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

58(1). 26 

280. The famous history of Wat Tyler and 
Jack Straw. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(ii)-i7 

281. The history of Wat Tyler and Jack 
Straw. London, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 2 cop. 

42.3, 51.6 

282. The wit of the day ; or. The humours 
of Westminster, being a complete collection 
of the advertisements, handbills, puffs, para- 
graphs, squibs, songs, ballads, &c. . . . circu- 
lated during the late remarkable contest for 
that city. . . . Compiled by a clerk to a com- 
mittee. London, printed for the compiler 
and sold at J. Debrett's, etc. 1784. sm. 8°. 
pp. iv., 152. 31.2 

283. WooUey.] The benefit of starving; 
or. The advantages of hunger, cold, and naked- 
ness ... as a cordial for the poor and an 
apology for the rich, addressed to the Rev. 
Rowland Hill, M.A., by the Rev. W. Woolley, 
M.A. London, G. Terry, etc. 12°. pp.48. 

16.5 
A personal defence against an imputation of con- 
version to Roman Catholicism. 



Geographical Description and Local 
History 

284. Bastille.] The history of the castle 
of the Bastille. . . . London, Robert Turner. 
May, 1790. sm. 8°. pp.48. Wdct. front. 

9.14 

A valuable pamphlet ; in addition to the history of 
the prison there is a collection of anecdotes and an 
account of the French revolution. 



V, GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION AND LOCAL HISTORY 



17 



285. Botany Bay.] Great and new news 
from Botany Bay brought over to England 
by the Hercules of Bristol, Captain Parker, 
from Port Jackson. London, sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 2.12, 4.10 

Interesting description of Australian natives and 
animals. 

The convict ship Hercules reached Port Jackson in 
April, 1796. 

286. History of Carlisle. . . . Also Carlisle 
yetts, a poem allusive to the taking of the 
city by Prince Charles Stuart. Carlisle, 
J. Whinham & Co. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 68.12 

287. A description of the four parts of the 
world . . . with the religion, nature of the 
air, soil, and different traffick. . . . London, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 5I-I 

288. Eglington Castle.] Tournament at 
Eglington Castle, on Wednesday and Friday, 
28th and 30th August, 1839. Glasgow, Orr 
& Sons. 1839. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 109.17 

Many of the pages are misplaced. 

289. The Highlander delineated ; or. The 
character, customs, and manners of the High- 
landers. Chiefly from . . . George Buchanan 
and Mr. Drummond, of Hawthornden. . . . 
[With The Highland clans, a ballad, and 
A loyal song.] London, J. Roberts. 1745. 
sm. 8°. pp. (10), 22. 16.1 

290. A description of Ireland. Being the 
bishop of Cloyne's exhortation to the Roman- 
catholick clergy of Ireland. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. 58(iv).2i 

On the last page is a list of " histories " f or " country 
chapmen." 

291. A journey to London in the year 
1698; after the ingenious method of that 
made by Dr. Martin Lyster to Paris in the 
same year, &c. Writtten [j/V] originally in 
French by Monsieur Sorbiere and newly trans- 
lated into English. 2d ed., corrected. Lon- 
don, A. Baldwin. 1699. sm. 8°. pp. (6), 
36. 23.13 

292. London pocket pilot; or. Stranger's 
guide through the metropolis ... a com- 
panion to the Fortnight's ramble. . . . London, 
J. Roach. 1793. sm. 12°. pp.96. Engr. 
title-page. i3-3 

*' Books lately published by J. Roach," p. 96. 

293. The tricks of London laid open; 
being a true caution to both sexes in town 



and country. ... 7th ed., with considerable 
improvements. London, T. Sabine. 12°. 
pp. 74. Engr. front. 20.19 

The title-page is printed in red and black. 

294. A trip through London with remarks, 
serious and diverting. . . . London, J. Plumb. 
1745. 16°. pp. 143. 44-IO 

295. London.] The present state of the 
prison of Ludgate. . . . London, A. Baldwin. 
171 2. sm. 8°. pp. (6), 72. 3.3 

296. London.] An historical description 
of the Tower of London and its curiosities. 
. . . London. Thomas Caman. 1784. 12°. 
pp. 72. 16.7 

297. Oxford.] A companion to the Guide 
and a guide to the Companion ; being a com- 
plete supplement to all the accounts of Ox- 
ford hitherto published. . . . [By T. Warton.] 
3d ed., corrected and enlarged. London, 
H.Payne. 12^ pp.48. Wdcts. 7.8 

An amusing skit on the other guide books to Ox- 
ford, supplying some actual omissions. 

298. Rome.] A topographical and his- 
torical description of antient & modern Rome. 
By [Gasparo] Grimani. Bath, S. Hazard. 
1783. 12°. pp. vi., 38. 15.4 

299. An exact description of Scotland, 
with a true character of the people and their 
manners. . . . London, Bow Church Yard. 
16°. pp. 24. 58(iv).2o 

" Had Cain been Scot God had revers'd his Doom, 
Not forced him wander, but confin'd him Home." 
{^A/otto on title-page.'] 

300. History of Tynemouth, its priory and 
castle. . . . Newcastle, W. & T. Fordyce. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 68.7 



VI 

Travel and Adventure 

301. Affecting narrative of the sufferings 
of six soldiers who deserted from the garri- 
son of St. Helena in a small boat . . . After 
being driven about at sea for near a month 
they were forced by dreadful suffenngs and 
hunger to draw lots which of them should 
kill himself . . . and to eat human flesh till 
they reached land, &c., &c. . . . London, 
J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 10.4 



i8 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



302. Barker.] Just published, The unfor- 
tunate shipwright ; or, Cruel captain, being a 
faithful narrative of the unparalleled suffer- 
ings of Robert Barker ... on board the 
Thetis, snow, of Bristol, on a voyage thence 
to the coast of Guinea and Antigua. Lon- 
don, Robert Turner. 1795. sm. 8°. pp.39. 

12.3 

Imperfect : — half of the last leaf is missing, but the 
text is complete. 

303. Brisson.] An account of the ship- 
wreck and captivity of Mr. [Pierre Ray- 
mond] de Brisson, with a description of the 
deserts of Africa from Senegal to Morocco. 
. . . translated from the French. . . . London, 
Robert Barker. 1790. sm. S''. pp.112. 
Wdct. front. 26.13 

304. Drake.] The voyages & travels of 
... Sir Francis Drake into the West-Indies 
and round about the world . . . [London], 
printed for E. Tracy, at the Three Bibles on 
London-Bridge, sm. 4". pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 99-5 

305. The same. 
Church Yard. sm. 12 



London, Aldermary 
'. pp. 24. Wdcts. 
67.2 



306. Elliot.] A true narrative of the life 
of Mr. George Elliot, who was taken and sold 
for a slave ; with his travels, captivity, and 
miraculous escape from Salle in the kingdom 
of Fez. London, Bailey, sm. 8°. pp. 32. 

17.19 

307. Gwinett.] The life, strange voyages, 
and uncommon adventures of Ambrose Gwi- 
nett . . . the lame beggar, who for a long time 
swept the way at the Mews-Gate, Charing- 
Cross . . . 4th ed. London, J. Lever. 12°. 
pp. 36. Engr. front. 5-4 

Story of a man sentenced to be hanged for a murder 
never committed, how he escaped death and afterwards 
met the man he was supposed to have murdered. 

Others of Lever's books are advertised on pp. 2, 36. 

308. A true account of the loss of the 
Halsewell . . . bound to the East Indies . . . 
on the rocks near Portland, on Friday last, 
giving a particular account of Capt. Pierce's 
noble behaviour, who with his two daughters, 
five other ladies, and above two hundred 
souls, perished in the sea . . . also a mourn- 
ful copy of verses, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 

1.14 

309. Lithgow.] The travels and adven- 
tures of Wm. Lithgow, in Europe, Asia, and 
Africa, during nineteen years. Glasgow. 



[No.] 122. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. no. 13 

Lithgow ( 1 582-1645?) accomplished his travels, 
chiefly on foot, in the early part of the 1 7th century. 

310. Lowellin.] The admirable travels of 
Messieurs Thomas Jenkins and David Lo- 
wellin through the unknown tracts of Africa 
. . . London, printed from the original manu- 
script, in August, 1785, by the author's con- 
sent, for the benefit of Robert Barker, an 
unfortunate blind man. sm. 8°. pp. 48. 
Wdct. front. 15.9 

The story is told in the words of Lowellin. 

311. Mandeville.] The foreign travels 
and dangerous voyages of that renowned 
English knight. Sir John Mandeville ... an 
account of remote kingdoms, countries, rivers, 
castles . . . giants . . . and pigmies ... of 
people . . . without heads . . . dark inchanted 
wildernesses ... all very delightful to the 
reader. London, Bow Church Yard. 16°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t, p. 58(iv).22 

312. The foreign travels of Sir John Man- 
deville, containing an account of remote 
kingdoms. . . . Likewise, enchanted wilder- 
nesses, dragons, griffins, and many more won- 
derful beasts of prey, &c., &c., &c. London, 
Aldermary Church Yard. Wdct. on t. p. 
Reprint. 92, p. 405 

313. Massey.] The voyages, travels, and 
long captivity of James Massey, who was 
shipwrecked on a desolate coast, with the 
surprising adventures he and his companions 
met with . . . their desperate battles with the 
savages ; how he . . . was taken by an Algie- 
rine pirate and remained in slavery 23 years 
. . . and his safe arrival at last, in England, 
after an absence ... of fifty-five years. . . . 
London, J. Davenport, sm. 12^. pp. 12. 

38.3 

314. Revel.] The poor unhappy trans- 
ported felon's sorrowful account of his four- 
teen years transportation at Virginia in 
America. In six parts. Being ... a life of 
. . . James Revel. With an account of the 
way the transports work, and the punishment 
they receive for committing any fault . . . 
[Verse.] London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
2 cop. 2.19, 19.7 

315. The same. London, J. Marshall, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

20.1, 25.22 



316. The same. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. 



London, Sympson's. 
23.1 



ODD CHARACTERS AND STRANGE EVENTS 



19 



317. Sims.] The wonderful history and 
surprising adventures of Henry Sims. . . . To 
which is added the escapes of a young man 
. . . who was on board the Royal George 
when she went down. . . . London, 1788. 
12°. pp. 36. Engr. front. 42.9 

A sailor who went round the world with Admiral 
Anson, and had a marvellously chequered career both 
in England and in America. 

318. Smith.] A true and circumstantial 
account of the escape of Sir Sidney Smith 
from a French prison. London, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. 26.12 

Admiral Sir William Sidney Smith, 1764- 1840. 

319. Spearing.] A wonderful account of 
Mr. George Spearing, a lieutenant in the 
navy, who fell into a coal pit in Northwood- 
side, near Glasgow, where he remained seven 
days and seven nights without any other sup- 
port than rain water. . . . Paisley, G. Caldwell. 
24°. pp.8. 65.11 

320. Williamson.] French and Indian 
cruelty exemplified in the life ... of Peter 
Williamson, who was carried off from Aber- 
deen in his infancy, and sold for a slave in 
Pennsylvania. Containing ... his captivity 
among the Indians . . . To which is added 
an account of the proceedings of the magis- 
trates of Aberdeen against him on hi^ return 
. . . and a short dissertation on kidnapping. 
Edinburgh, J. Stewart. 1787. sm. 12°. 
pp. vi., 150. Engr. front. 24.1 

The frontispiece is a portrait of Williamson in the 
dress of a Delaware Indian, with explanatory notes. 

321. Winterton.] An . . . account of the 
unfortunate loss of the Winterton, East In- 
diaman ... at Madagascar, the 20th August 
last. . . . London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 16.12 

VII 

Odd Characters and Strange Events 

322. An account of a most surprizing sav- 
age girl who was caught wild in the woods of 
Champagne, a province in France. . . . Trans- 
lated from the French. Glasgow, J. and M. 
Robertson. 1795. sm. 12°. pp.24. 33.8 

323. Savage girl. A full . . . account of 
a wonderful savage girl who was caught in 
the woods of Champagne. . . . (Signed) 
Dr. Saisprieur, curate of St. Sulplice. Re- 
printed by J. Marshall, printer, Newcastle. 
Broadside. I03(ii).32 



324. An authentic, candid, and circum- 
stantial narrative of the astonishing transac- 
tions at Stockwell . . . on . . . the 6 th and 
7th January, 1772 . . . London, W. Bailey. 
1772. 12°. pp. 24. 3.2 

A case of mysterious furniture moving and dancing 
of other inanimate objects. 

325. Carew.] The adventures of Bam- 
fylde Moore Carew, for more than forty years 
king of the beggars; to which is added, The 
absent man, and Awkwardness in company. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 1822. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 88 

326. A brief relation of the adventures of 
Mr. Bamfylde Moore Carew, for more than 
forty years past the king of the beggars. 
London, J. Evans, pp.24. Wdcts. (3 cop.) 

42.2, 47.5, 50.8 

327. A brief relation of the adventures of 
Mr. Bampfylde-Moore Carew, who, tho' de- 
scended from and allied unto some of the 
best families in England, entered into a so- 
ciety of gypsies, and has been for more than 
40 years past the King of the beggars . . . be- 
ing now more than 60 years of age. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(ii).i2 

The cut is a portrait of a man holding a book, with 
the legend, running lengthwise of the page, "The 
laws of the beggars." 

328. A brief relation of the adventures of 
Bamfylde Moore Carew, who was for more 
than forty years king of the beggars, (ilasgow. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 93 (i). 3 

The cut represents a bird-seller. This edition con- 
ducts its hero to his abdication, retirement and death 
"beloved and esteemed by all." It is filled out with 
Anecdotes. 

329. The life and adventures of Bampfylde 
Moore Carew, commonly called the king of 
the beggars ... To which is added the origin, 
government, laws, and customs of the gyp- 
sies, with the method of electing their king. 
London, T. Sabine, sm. 12°. pp. (2), 96. 
Wdct. front. 

The frontispiece is a portrait, entitled "The cele- 
brated Bampfylde Moore Carew, king of the gypsies." 

On p. 35, 36 is a song said to have been sung 
by the gypsies upon Carew's election: "Cast your 
nabs and cares away. This is maunders holiday," etc. 
Much space is given to Carew's adventures in America, 
from Maryland to New London, Conn. 

330. Dancer.] The strange and unac- 
countable life of the penurious Daniel Dan- 
cer, esq., a miserable miser, who died in a 
sack, though worth upwards of ^^3000 per 



20 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



year. With singular anecdotes of . . . Jemmy 
Taylor, the Southwark usurer . . . To which 
is added The life of the Rev. G. Harvest, 
called the absent man ; or. Parson and player. 
5 th ed. London, printed for Ann Lemoine, 
and sold by Lee and Hurst. 1798. 12°. 
pp. 48. Engr. front. 5.1 

This is the story of the famous miser which Mr. 
Wegg read to Mr. Bofifin ("Our mutual friend," 
book iii., chap. vi.). Dancer was bom, according to 
the story, in 1716 and died in 1794. 

According to the " Dictionary of national biogra- 
phy ' ' Dancer was ' ' distinguished from the majority of 
misers in that he possessed . . . many praiseworthy 
qualities," he remembered and rewarded services done 
him, and could be generous upon occasion. 

The frontispiece represents ' ' Miss Dancer greet- 
ing her brother upon his good luck in finding a dead 
sheep upon the common." 

331. God's judgment against false swear- 
ing. . . . London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 3 cop. 9- 10, 18.16, 26.31 

A story which might have been the foundation for 
the Jackdaw of Rheims. A raven had hidden the 
things a girl had been convicted of stealing; this 
came to light when the girl was on the way to the 
scaffold. 

332. A guide for sinners to repent, being 
a very strange relation of two old men that 
were found living underground in Resington 
Wood, near the town of Doncaster, in York- 
shire, on the loth of last month. London, 
Long-Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

25.6, 26.33 

333. Life after death; or, Wonderful rela- 
tions, &c. ; being an inquiry concerning the 
state, order, and operations of departed souls, 
and unembodied spirits in a separate state, 
shewing their power and abilities to re-visit 
mankind on any particular occasion, if God 
permits, by giving warnings against death, 
threatened danger, and by the discoveries of 
murders, &c., by apparitions, or by visionary 
dreams as herein attested by several authen- 
tic relations. London, T. Sabine and Son. 
1787. 16°. pp.56. Engr. front. 1.6 

334. Mewis.] A faithful account of Cathe- 
rine Mewis, of Barton-under-Needwood, in 
Staffordshire, who is deprived of her eyesight 
six days out of seven, and can only see on the 
Sabbath. Nottingham, C. Sutton. [1810.] 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 1 12.18 

335. Parr.] The old, old, very old man; 
or, The age and long life of Thomas Parr . . . 
who was bom in the reign of King Edward 
the Fourth, and is now living in the Strand, 
being aged one hundred and fifty-two years 



and odd months . . . Written by John Taylor. 
London, printed for Henry Gorson, 1635, 
reprinted for James Caulfield, 1794. 12°. 
pp. (2), ii., 25. Engr. front. 7.5 

336. Old Tom Parr. A true story. Shew- 
ing . . . how he was brought up to London 
by the Earl of Arundel, 1635, ii^ which year 
he died, aged 152, according to some his- 
torians, others say in his one hundred and 
sixtieth year, but all agree that he had lived 
during the reign of ten different sovereigns. 
[Verse.] London, John Marshall, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. (Cheap repository.) 
2 cop. 14.28, 18.7 

337. Powell.] A short sketch of the life 
of Mr. Foster Powell, the great pedestrian, 
who departed this life April 15, 1793, in the 
59th year of his age. London, R. H. Westley. 
[1794.] 12°. pp. II. Engr. portr. 15.5 

" Powell was one of the first athletes of whom we 
possess any authentic records." — Dictionary of na- 
tional biography. 

338. A relation of a very extraordinary 
sleeper, at Tinsbury, near Bath, with a dis- 
sertation on the doctrine of sensation, the 
powers of the soul, and its several operations. 
... By W"". Oliver, M.D., F.R.S. London, 
A. Bell, at the Bible and Cross Keys in Corn- 
hill. 1707. 12°. pp. 24. 4.19 

339. Select histories of human nature . . . 
of giants ... of dwarfs ... of the vast strength 
of some persons ... of the swiftness of some 
persons ... of extraordinary long life ... of 
persons who have returned to life . . . The 
whole collected from the best authors in va- 
rious languages, with miscellaneous notes. 
London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

58(iv).23 

340. A strange and wonderful relation from 
the forest of Whichwood, in Oxford-shire. 
Being a true account of a keeper and his 
family, who were all poisoned, March the 
26th, 1 7 10, with invenomed herbs that grew 
in the forest aforesaid. To the tune of, 
Chevy-Chase. Broadside. I00(ii).77 

341. Toft.] A short narrative of an ex- 
traordinary delivery of rabbets perform'd by 
Mr. John Howard, Surgeon, at Guildford. 
Published by Mr. St. Andrd, surgeon and 
anatomist to his majesty. 2d ed. London, 
John Clark. 1727. sm. 8°. pp.40. 12. ir 

The case of Mary Toft. 



VIII. PROSE FICTION 



21 



342. The wonderful magazine for Decem- 
ber, 1764. No. 109, sm. 8°. pp. 145-190. 

A collection of strange events. 2.14 

343. Wonders and mysteries of animal 
magnetism displayed. . . . London, J. Sud- 
bury. 12°. pp. 5. Engr. front. 10.15 



VIII 
Prose Fiction 

344. Miss Adams.] Injur'd innocence ; 
or, Virtue in distress . . . containing the his- 
tory of Miss Adams and Lord Whatley, by his 
Lordship's chaplain. Manchester, A. Swin- 
dells, sm. 8°. pp. 48. Vigns. 19.5 

345. Miss Adams.] The love, joy, and 
distress of the beautiful and virtuous Miss 
Fanny Adams, that was trapan'd in a false mar- 
riage to Lord Whatley. London, T. Bailey, 
sm. 8°. pp. 32. 36.2 

346. Miss Adams.] The unguarded fair 
one ; or. Virtue in distress, an affecting nar- 
rative founded on facts ; containing the his- 
tory of Miss Adams and Lord Whatley, by 
his Lordship's chaplain. London, A. Miller. 
sm. 8°. pp. 38. Engr. front, and vign. 5.6 

347. The adventures of the extravagant 
wit ; or, The English swindler. Shewing the 
various frauds and tricks he committed in 
this metropolis . . . The whole displaying an 
infinite fund of good humor and witty ex- 
ploits. London. 1797. 12°. pp. 48. 
Engr. front. 15.7 

The plate is printed in blue. 

348. Almoran and Hamet ; an oriental 
tale. By Dr. Hawkesworth. 2 vol. (paged 
contin.). London, H. D. Symonds. 12°. 
pp. 94. Engr. front. 33-2 2 

Imperfect: — vol. ii. lacks the title-page. 

349. The history of Amelia ; or, A descrip- 
tion of a young lady who from a great for- 
tune was reduced almost to poverty by an 
attorney, with an account of her recovering 
it, for which he was hanged. 2d ed. London, 
R. Snagg. sm. 12°. pp. 84. 3 cop. 

24-5' 34.3, 43-2 

An abridgement of Fielding's novel. 

350. The history of Argalus and Parthe- 
nia ; being a choice flower gataered out of 
Sir Philip Sidney's rare garden. London, 



Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 2 1. 1 

From Sidney's "Arcadia." 

351. The same. London. Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 35.2 

In this copy ' ' gathered ' ' is printed correctly on the 
title-page, Philip is given as PhiUip, and the cuts vary 
in two cases. 

352. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(i).i4 

The title-page is differently arranged from those in 
the preceding editions, and some of the cuts vary. 

353. The basket maker; a Peruvian tale. 
... To which is added. Ingratitude punished ; 
an eastern tale [and The dutiful son, an anec- 
dote]. . . . London, J. Davenport, sold by 
C. Sheppard. i797- sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
2 cop. 44.2, 52.1 

In a motto Pope's line appears thus: "Worth 
makes the man and want of wit the fellow." 

354. The betrayed virgin; or, The per- 
jured lover. Being a true and melancholy 
account of Miss Sarah Smythe, a rich farmer's 
daughter, near Bifield, Warwickshire . . . who 
was decoyed from her parents by William 
Jones, esq. . . . Nottingham, C. Sutton, for 
the flying stationers, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 1 12.2 

The story is repeated in "A copy of verses " at the 
the end. 

355. Innocence betrayed; or. The per- 
jured lover. Being a true and melancholy 
account of Miss Sarah Morton, a rich farmer's 
daughter, near Cambridge . . . who was de- 
coyed from her parents by W M , 

esq. . . . London, M. Bowley. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 14.6 

Precisely the same, names excepted, as the preced- 
ing, and ending with the same verses. 

356. The black and the white ; a romance 
translated from M. Voltaire. To which is 
added, The good wives ; a true story. Lon- 
don, J. Davenport, sold by C. Sheppard. 
1797. sm. 12°. pp.24. 2 cop. 44.3,49.9 

" The good wives " is the anecdote of the wives of 
Weinsberg, here called Henshberg. 

" Le blanc et le noir " was published in 1764 in 
the " Contes de Guillaume Vade." 

357. Miss Charlotte.] The history of the 
affectionate Miss Charlotte, a young lady . . . 
who suddenly lost her fortune and with it her 
lovers . . . till an uncle from India came and 
gave Charlotte a better fortune than she ever 
had before. London, Bailey, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 

27-3 



22 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



358. The corsair; or, The nuptials of 
Gagliardo and Fiorita. Translated from the 
Italian of Geoffry Benini by J. Farley. Being 
the historical record on which the . . . Corsair 
. . . produced this season at the Haymarket 
theatre ... is founded. London, J. Roach, 
sm. 12°. pp. 41-64. 33.26 

Extracted from a larger work. See also No. 376. 

359. The Croydon forresters ; or. The his- 
tory of Collin Meager and Jenny Wood ; a 
tale of ancient times. . . . London, T. Hard- 
ing, sold by James Wilmott. 1799. sm. 12°. 
Wdct. front. 43.6 

A translation of "Annette et Lubin," from the 
" Contes moraux " of Marmontel. 

360. A dialogue between honest John and 
loving Kate, with their contrivances for mar- 
riage and way to get a livelihood. Part the 
first. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 67.20 

361. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 38.27 

362. The same. 2 pt. Manchester, A. Swin- 
dells. 16°. pp. 16, 16. Wdcts. on t. p. 

77.12, 13 

363. The same. Part the first. London, 
Evans and Co. sm. 12°. pp.24.- Wdct. 
on t. p. 21. 1 1 

364. The history of Dorastus and Fannia, 
setting forth their loves, misfortunes, and 
happy enjoyment of each other at last. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 58(i).i5 

Properly ' ' Dorastus and Fawnia, ' ' the second title 
of Robert Greene's " Pandosto; or, The triumph of 
time." 

365. Dorastus and Fawnia.] The royal 
shepherdess ; or. The life and adventures of 
a German princess. StirHng, C. Randall. 
1796. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 33.3 

366. Duncan Campbell and his dog; an 
interesting tale. [By James Hogg.] Dalkeith, 
David Lyle. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 64.6 

From " Winter evening tales." 

367. The history of Duncan Campbell and 
his dog Oscar. [By James Hogg.] Glasgow, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 74.19 

368. Edmund and Albina; or, Gothic 
times ; a romance. London, printed by 
T. Maiden for Ann Lemoine, etc. 1801. 
12°. pp.48. Engr. front, and vign. on t. p. 
(English nights entertainments.) IO.14 



369. The fair jilt; or, The amours of Prince 
Tarquin and Miranda. . . . [By Mrs. Aphra 
Behn.] London, T. Sabine, sm. 8°. pp. 64 
[66]. Engr. front. 2 cop. 11.5, 17.20 

Also contains "Cruelty disarmed and innocence 
triumphant," and "Matrimonial infidelity detected." 
The copy 17.20 lacks the frontispiece, which is dated 
Sept. I, 1787. 

370. The history of Florio & Fidelia; or, 
The fatal effects of too sudden joy. To which 
is added, The conjurer, a tale. London, 
Bailey, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 27.6 

371. The fortunate orphan ; or. Providen- 
tial meeting of Miss Fairfield and Mr. Stan- 
ton, containing the history of their lives. 
London, Robert Barker. 1792. sm. 8°. 
pp. 40. Wdct. front. 1. 9 

The cut is entitled " The lucky retreat to a Kentish 
farm." 

372. Four interesting tales: A singular 
adventure [escape of John Colter from In- 
dians], The robber. The red nose. The 
Newfoimdland dog. Glasgow. [No.] 98. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 1. 21 

373. Friburgh castle; or. The wife of two 
husbands. A tragic tale. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 97-1 6 

374. Memoirs of Mr. George Fane, a Lon- 
don merchant who suffered three years of 
slavery in . . . Algiers ; which was occasioned 
by an amour with the duke of * * * 's natural 
daughter; after which he returned to Eng- 
land, married the lady, and with her possessed 
an estate of ^6000 per annum. London, 
S. Bailey, sm. 8°. pp. 24. 27.1 

375. The ghost of my uncle. To which 
is added. The outwitted tax-gatherer. Glas- 
gow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 109.21, 1 1 1. 1 4 

Also contains " Scarlet discovered," a favorite 
"filler." 

376. The gipsy prince; or. The loves of 
Don Sebastian de Nurillo and the fair An- 
tonia, translated from the * Spanish [of Her- 
nandez de Feyjoo] by C. Moor. To which is 
added. The corsair ; or. The Italian nuptials. 
N. B. On these . . . narratives are founded 
I St. The new musical entertainment of the 
Gipsy prince, and 2d. The domestic romance 
of the Corsair . . . performing at the Hay- 
market theatre. . . . London, J. Roach. 12°. 
pp. 40. 33.25 

"(*The Spanish original may be seen in the British 
Museum.)" 

This note appears upon the title-page, but the only 
entry in the British Museum Catalogue under Hernan- 
dez de Feyjoo is the present work. See also No. 358. 



VIII. PROSE FICTION 



23 



377. The history of little Goody Two- 
shoes ; otherwise called Mrs. Margery Two- 
shoes, with the means by which she acquired 
her learning and wisdom, and, in consequence 
thereof, her estate, set forth at large for the 
benefit of those 

Who from a state of rags and care 
And having shoes but half a pair, 
Their fortune and their fame would fix, 
And gallop in a coach and six. 

York, T. Wilson and R, Spence. 1803. 24°. 
pp. 84. Wdcts. 113. 

378. Goody Two-shoes. A facsimile re- 
production of the edition of 1766. With an 
introduction by Charles Welsh. London, 
Griffith & Farran, successors to Newbery & 
Harris. 1881. sm. 12°. pp. xxiv., 156,(4). 
Wdcts. 17438.54 

The 3d ed., published by John Newbery, is here 
reproduced. 

379. The history of Goody Two-shoes. 
[Verse.] London, S. Marks & Sons. Col- 
ored wdcts. sm. 8°. pp. (16). 113 

Printed on one side of the leaf only. 

380. The modern Goody Two-shoes ; ex- 
emplifying the good consequences of early 
attention to learning and virtue. By Mary 
Belson. London, William Darton, jun. 1819. 
16°. pp. 64. 3 engrs. 113 

The frontispiece is a folding plate. 

381. The green coat and the brown coat, 
a pathetic tale .... To which is added. 
Rustic generosity rewarded. London, J, Dav- 
enport, etc., and sold by C. Sheppard. 1797. 
2 cop. 44.5, 49.1 

382. The happy bride ; or, Virtuous coun- 
trj' maid rewarded ; giving a true . . . account 
of Ann Forbes, of Epping, in Essex, who . . . 
was happily married to Sir George Walton, a 
young gentleman possessed of two thousand 
pounds per annum. London, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 5 cop. 2.25,4.4,11,11,25.26,26.9 

The story is told both in prose and verse. 

^8^. The history of Miss Harriot Fairfax. 
. . . Written by a lady. London, T. Sabine, 
sm. 8°. pp.64. Engr. front. 33.21 

384. The true and interesting history of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hartley ; or. Innocence pre- 
served ; showing the fatal effects of jealousy 
and its baneful influence on the human mind. 
... London, S. Bailey. 1794. sm. 8°. pp.26. 

1-3 



385. The history of Isaac Jenkins and 
Sarah, his wife, and their three children. [By 
Thomas Beddoes.] London, H. Murray and 
J.Johnson, sm. 12°. pp.36. 34.5 

386. The history of James p ***** n, 
esq., of the county of Devon. . . . [London], 
Bailey, sm. 8". pp.32. 19.12 

387. The long pack; a Northumberland 
tale an hundred years old. [By James Hogg.] 
Newcastle, W.&T.Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 68.6 

From " Winter evening tales." 

388. The long pack; a Northumbrian tale 
about an hundred & sixty year old. [By 
James Hogg. Illustrated by Joseph Crawhall. 
London, Field & Tuer, etc.] 1883. 4°. 
pp. 34. Wdcts. 94.10 

389. The pathetic sufferings of Louisa 
Harwood, who was seduced by Lieutenant 
Harris. . . . She was necessitated to pawn 
some of the furniture from her lodgings, for 
which she was . . . tried, convicted, and 
ordered for transportation &c, &c. ... In a 
letter written to her disconsolate parents. 
London, J. Davenport. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
2 cop. 25.41, 26.34 

390. Louisa Wharton ; a story founded on 
facts ; written ... in a series of letters . . . 
wherein is displayed some particular circum- 
stances which happened during the bloody 
contest in America. . . . London, T. Sabine, 
sm. 8°. pp.64. Engr. front. ii.i 

391. Love and loyalty; or. The generous 
deceit ; a true narrative translated from the 
French. Epsom [and London], M. Laugham. 
1746. 12°. pp.59. 41.7 

Professes to be translated from a book called " Re- 
markable events," written by a bishop, and printed in 
1 63 1 at Paris. 

392. The love of Evihna for Lord Armond, 
and The adventures of a young lady who was 
confined in the hollow of an oak tree. Fal- 
kirk, T. Johnston. 1821. 115. 10 

The first tale is "inscribed to Miss E. B. Airshire," 
signed W. C. B., and dated " Kilsyth, Sept. 10, 1805. 
Extracted from the Selector." The second is a story 
of Feliciana and Rosario; the scene is in Spain. 

393. Love rewarded ; a Spanish tale. The 
story ... is grounded on fact. A parallel 
event happened at Port Royal, in Jamaica 
... as may be seen in the Philosophical trans- 
actions, no. 209 [1694]. London, Bailey, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. 2 cop. 11.9,27.4 

Ends with "A description of a fashionable head- 
dress." 



24 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



394. The lover's stratagem ; or, The petti- 
coat plotter ; being a new way to get a wife. 
Shewing how Mr. A*ch*r . . . obtained that 
celebrated beauty, Miss G*ri*g, by wearing 
petticoats. . . . [London], London and Mid- 
dlesex printing office, sm. 8°. pp. 36 [32]. 
Wdct. 20.21 

395. The maid of the farm; or, Memoirs 
of Susanna James. ... By Theophilus James 
Bacon. [With The history of Florio and 
Fidelia.] London, T. Sabine, sm. 8°. pp. 
64. I5-IO 

396. The history of Mary Ann Edwards; 
or, The capricious beauty. . . . London, T. Sa- 
bine & Son. sm. 8°. pp.56. Engr. front. 
2 cop. 1.4, 12.6 

Contains also " The fortunate gypsey," " King Ed- 
gar's revenge on his treacherous favorite, ' ' and ' ' The 
story of Amanda." 

397. [The mercer; or. Fatal extrava- 
gance.] sm. 8°. pp.32. 9.22 

Imperfect : — title-page missing. 

398. Moll Flanders.] The fortunes and 
misfortunes of Moll Flanders who was born 
in Newgate, and during a life of continued 
variety for sixty years, was 1 7 times a whore, 
5 times a wife, whereof once to her own 
brother, 12 years a thief, 11 times in Bride- 
well, 9 times in New- Prison, 1 1 times in 
Woodstreet Compter, 6 times in the Poultry 
Compter, 14 times in the Gate-House, 25 
times in Newgate ... 8 years a transport to 
Virginia. At last grew rich, lived honest, and 
died penitent. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 1. 12 

Defoe's novel, on which this is founded, appeared 
in 1722. 

399. Noble revenge ; or. The king of Spain 
confederate with a cobler, who privately gave 
him leave to kill the archbishop of Toledo, 
who . . . had caused the cobler's father to be 
cruelly murdered. [With Jealousy without 
a cause.] London, T. Bailey. . . . Where 
Maredant's anti-scorbutic drops are sold at 
six shillings the bottle, etc. sm. 8°. pp. 16. 

36.1 

At the end a MS. note: " Sarah Palmer Robert her 

son at Boston in Newengland on Bord the hannah Brig 

Miles Palmer of Cambridge." Also MS. notes on p. 6 

and on t. p. 

400. The history of Oroonoko; or. The 
royal slave. Written originally by Mrs. 
[Aphra] Behn and revised by Mrs. Griffiths. 
London, printed by T. Maiden for Ann 
Lemoine. 1800. 12°. pp. 48. Wdct. on 
t. p. (English nights entertainments.) 30.6 



400". The history of Perourou ; or. The bel- 
lows mender ; an interesting tale. By Miss 
Williams. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 181 7. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 115.31 

401. The remarkable and entertaining his- 
tory of a reclaimed lady of pleasure and the 
grateful return she made her generous bene- 
factor. Glasgow. 1790. sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 8.15 

402. The rival twins; or. The history of 
William and Joseph Eaton, with their un- 
fortunate passion for Miss Hannah Hale, 
commonly called the fair maid of Easham. 
. . . London, T, Sabine. 12°. pp. 61+. 
Engr. front. 2 cop. Ii-i3, 17-24 

Contains also " The rival brothers," another story. 
" List of books printed and sold at T. Sabine's," 
at end. 

403. The life of Robinson Crusoe of York, 
mariner. Wotton-Underedge, J. Bence. 12". 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 32.2 

404. The satne. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 2 cop. 42.12, 51.4 

405. Robinson Crusoe.] The surprising 
life and most strange adventures of Robin- 
son Crusoe of York, mariner. London, 
L. How, Petticoat Lane. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(ii).io 

Ashton (p. 417) gives the title-page and some cuts 
from another edition with this title. 
Publisher's list on page 2. 

406. Robinson Crusoe.] The wonderful 
life and most surprising adventures of Robin- 
son Crusoe of York, mariner. . . . Carefully 
abridged. London, Wm. Cavell. 1791. 
12°. pp. 84. Wdcts. 5.5 

At the end is " Robinson Crusoe's vision of the 
angelic world." 

406*. The wonerful \sic\ life and most 
surprising adventures of Robinson Crusoe of 
York, mariner. . . . Edinburgh, J. Morren. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 115-29 

407. Life and adventures of Robinson Cru- 
soe. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp.16. 
Wdcts. II4-9 

408. The history of Miss Sally Johnson; 
or. The unfortunate Magdalen. . . . London, 
T.Sabine. Wdct. front, sm. 8°. pp.28. 
2 cop. 2.1, 14.12 

Sabine's Catalogue (8 pp. at end) gives titles and 
synopsis of contents of novels, which are interesting. 
Seduction, abduction, and unhappy marital relations 
are the prevailing themes. 

The copy 14.12 lacks the Catalogue. 



VIII. PROSE FICTION 



25 



409. The story of Sarah Durin ; dedicated 
to the advocates of an unjust and unnecessary 
war. . . . London, J. Parsons, etc. 1795. 
12°. pp. 22. 7.9 

410. [The secret history, &c.] sm. 8°. 
pp. 14. 2.5 

Impet-fect : — title-page missing. A plain-spoken 
story of seduction told by the victim, and signed 



N 



* * ]3 ♦ * * * 



411. The sham marriage ; or. Unfortunate 
wife ;• a melancholy love tale by the editor 
of The dutifuU daughter. London, Bailey, 
sm. 8°. pp. 28. Wdct. on t. p. 19.4 

412. The shepherdess of the Alps; or, 
Virtue's sure reward, being a very interest- 
ing, pathetic, and moral tale, founded on 
facts. ... London, T. Sabine, sm. 8°. pp.32. 
Engr. front. 1 2.1 

413. The same. York, J. Kendrew. sm. 12. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 77.9 

414. The same. Penrith, Joseph Allison, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 77.4 

415. The sincere love of the courageous 
and compassionate Zoa, the beautiful Indian. 
. . . London, Bailey, sm. 8". pp. 32. 36.2" 

With an announcement of "The true history of 
Henrietta de Bellgrave, the mother of Zoa." 

416. The story teller: The murder dis- 
covered ; The widow and her son ; En- 
counter with a lion; The soldier's wife; 
The conflict between Grant and McPherson 
at Hell bridge, a dangerous pass in the 
Highlands of Scotland. Glasgow. [No.] 80. 
sm. 12". pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. no. 16 

417. Storys of the Bewitched fiddler. 
Perilous situation, and John Hetherington's 
dream. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 65.4, 1 1 1. 1 5 

" Perilous situation," is a vivid and well written de- 
scription of the burning of the Tanjore at sea. 

418. Storys of the Three beggars. Soldier's 
wife. Baron Trenk, and Jack Easy. Glasgow. 
24°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 66.16 

419. Storys of the Wild huntsman and 
the Force of conscience, an interesting tale. 
Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

109.22 

420. Storys of the Young robber and Puss 
in boots. [With The lawyer and the chim- 
ney-sweeper.] Glasgow. [No.] 29. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 1.9 



42 1 . The same. Reprint. 



93(iii).i2 



422. The surprising history of a ballad 
singer. Falkirk, T. Johnston. 1818. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 115-27 

423. The history of Capt. Thomas Paris- 
mas ; containing a particular account of the 
cruel and barbarous treatment of a young lady, 
who was the wife of Mr. James Negocio, an 
English merchant in the East Indies. Bos- 
ton, J. White, near Charles-River Bridge. 
1802. 8°. pp. 34. Tr49i.i5 

424. The history of Tom Jones, a found- 
ling; by Henry Fielding, esq. Adorned 
with cuts. London, Sabine and Son. 12°. 
pp. 108. 45.5 

"A catalogue of books," p. 108. 

425. A trip to Bath and a tour through 
the West ; being the private history of Cap- 
tain Smith. . . . [With The memoirs of Bene- 
dict Nestor.] London, T. Sabine, sm. 8°. 
pp. 66. Folding map. 22.22 

A story of amorous intrigues in which a good deal 
of guide book description is interspersed. 

The map is "An improved map of Devonshire," 
etc., and this copy is printed on the back of a piece cut 
from the lower right hand corner of a map of Kentucky. 

426. A true relation of the apparition of 
Mrs. Veal to Mrs. Bargrave. [By Daniel 
DeFoe. Illustrated by Joseph Crawhall. 
London: Field & Tuer, etc.] 1883. 4°. 
pp. 38. Wdcts. 94.9 

427. The unfortunate happy lady ; or. Vir- 
tue and innocence rewarded, being the history 
of Harriot Wilding, the daughter of a baronet 
in the county of York. . . . London, T. Sabine, 
sm. 8°. pp. 64. Engr. front. 33-23 

428. The unfortunate pastry-cook, Leon- 
ard Sapajou. [London, Betham.] sm. 8''. 
pp. 10. Engr. plate. 27.13 

This is preceded by a leaf with the running title, 
"Sam Brown's jokes," the whole forming the end 
(part of fold C, and D) of a work not identified. 

429. The vicar of Wakefield, a tale. By 
Dr. Goldsmith. 2 vols. London, H.Fenwick. 
12°. pp. 60, 59. 36.5,6 

Imperfect : — title-page of vol. i lacking. 

430. The village curate; an interesting 
tale. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 74,14 

431. The vision of Almet, and No life 
pleasing to God, that is not useful to man ; 
two Eastern stories. ... To which is added, 
The art of growing rich, an instructive tale, 
London. J. Davenport, sold by C. Sheppard. 
1797. sm. 12°. pp.24. 2 cop. 44-4,52.6 



26 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



432. [A walk in Kensington gardens, &c.] 
sm. 8°. pp. 76. 23.3 

Imperfect : — title-page lacking. 
A story of a courtezan's career. 

433. Werter and Charlotte, a German 
story containing many wonderful and pathetic 
incidents. [Also, Virtue rewarded, and The 
advantages of a single life.] London, T. Sabine. 
sm.8°. pp.32. Engr. front. IS'H 

Abridged from Goethe's " Sorrows of Werther." 

434. The young beauty of Kent ; or, The 
history of Lucy Banks (daughter of a hop- 
planter in that county) and Colonel Stevens 
(of London) . . . London, T. Sabine, sm. 8°. 
Folding engr. front. 12. 2 

The frontispiece shows a Kentish scene with may- 
pole, etc., and has four stanzas entitled " May, the 
mother of love " printed beneath the engraving. 

IX 

Legendary Romances, Fairy Stories, and 
Folk Tales in Prose 

435. -^sop's fables, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 48.9 

I. A fox and a sick lion. — 2. The stag and the 
vine. — 3. The crane and geese. — 4. A trumpeter 
taken prisoner. — 5. The husbandman and stork. — 
6. The wasp and the partridges. — 7- A daw and 
pigeons. — 8. The fox and snake. — 9 The chough 
and swallow. — lo. A father and his sons. — 11. The 
fox that had lost his tail. — 12. The fox and huntsmen. 
— 13. The fox and bramble. 

The cuts are very crude; each fable is followed by 
"The moral," and "The remark." 

436. T/ie same. Reprint. 92, p. 463. 

The title-page is the same as in the preceding. In 
the text the " Morals " and the " Remarks " are omit- 
ted; the cuts and fables are the same except that " The 
fox that had lost his tail '.' is omitted. 

437. Aladdin; or, The wonderful lamp. 
An Eastern tale. Glasgow, pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. Reprint. 93(iii).io 

438. AliBaba; or. The forty thieves, an in- 
teresting tale. Glasgow. [No.] 3. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 1. 1 2 

439. T/ie same. Reprint. 93(iii).7 

440. Ali Baba ; or. The forty thieves de- 
stroyed by Morgiana, a female slave. On 
which is founded the new operatical romance 
of the Forty thieves. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 
12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

115.24, 60.4 

441. Bate man's tragedy ; or, The perjured 
bride justly rewarded ; being the history of 
German's wife and young Bateman. Not- 



tingham, S. Creswell. sm, 1 2°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(i).i7 

For the ballad from which this tale was probably 
elaborated see No. 654. 

442. The history of Beauty and the Beast. 
Glasgow, Francis Orr & Sons. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

111.4 

443. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).ii 

The same as the preceding except that the publish- 
ers are not named in the imprint. 

444. Belianis.] The honour of chivalry; 
or. The renowned and famous history of Don 
Bellianis of Greece, giving an account of his 
valiant and wonderful exploits and adven- 
tures ... his love for the fair princess Flor- 
isbella . . . and by what means he obtained 
her in marriage. [London], printed by W. O. 
[Wm. Onley] and sold by the booksellers of 
Pye-Corner and London- Bridge, sm. 6°. 
pp. (24). Wdcts. 99.2 

Imperfect: — the lowest line of pp. 18-20 has been 
trimmed off. 

On the verso of the title-page of the present edition 
is an advertisement, with a large cut, of a medicine 
" from Chili . . . a . . . Balsam, far exceeding that of 
Peru and Tolu; being a Remedy that no Man under 
the Sun can compose. It . . . corroborates the Stom- 
ach ... is good against the Stone ... is excellent in 
all Diseases of the Ears; especially Deafness," etc. 



445- 
Yard. 



The same. London, Bow Church 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(i).2 



446. The history of Don Bellianis of 
Greece, containing an account of his many 
wonderful exploits, and his obtaining the 
soldan of Babylon's daughter in marriage. 
London, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 47.7 

447. The history of the blind beggar of 
Bethnal Green . . . how he went to the wars, 
lost his sight, and turned beggar . . . How he 
got riches and educated his daughter. Of 
her being courted by a rich young knight, 
how the blind beggar dropped gold with the 
knight's uncle. Of the knight's marriage with 
the beggar's daughter, and lastly how the pedi- 
gree of this famous beggar was discovered. 
London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(i)-i6 

Most of the cuts really illustrate this prose version of 
the well-known ballad- See No. 701. 

448. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(i).23 

The cut on the title-page is the same as in the pre- 
ceding; the other cuts are differently placed. The 
last line of the title reads "the famous pedigree of 
the beggar." 

There is an advertisement of the printing office on 
p. 24. 



IX. LEGENDAKY ROMANCES, FAIRY STORIES, ETC. 



27 



449. The same. London, sm, 12°. pp.24. 

Wdcts. 47-13 

The title varies somewhat, and the cuts are still dif- 
ferently arranged. 

450. The same. London. No. 4, Alder- 
mary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

67.8 
The title and arrangement of text and cuts agree 
with the preceding, but the pages do not agree until 
p. 16, and the cuts on p. 16, 21, 23 differ. 

Ashton at p. 360 gives a title-page with the imprint 
" T. Norris, at the Looking-Glass on London Bridge " 
and a large cut of " Young Monford riding for the 
wars ' ' which Ashton thinks is more likely to represent 
" Prince Rupert and his dogge Pudle "; he gives other 
cuts from this edition, and at p. 365 the title page of 
an edition " Printed and sold in Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane, London." 

A version of the text is reprinted in 95 p. 324. 

451. The Story of Blue Beard; or, The 
effects of female curiosity. To which is added 
The murder hole, an ancient legend. Glas- 
gow. [No.] 20. sm. 12. pp.24. VVdct. 
on t. p. 111.6 

Gent's translation from Perrault, omitting the morals. 

452. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).4 

453. Blue Beard; or. Female curiosity; an 
entertaining fairy tale. Manchester, J. Swin- 
dells. 16°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 76,3 

454. The history of the two children in the 
wood. [London], S. Davis. 16°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 34.4 

There is no reference to Wayland or Norfolk, where 
the events are said by some versions to have taken 
place. 

The names of the parents are given as Pisaurus and 
Eugenia, the uncle is Androgus, the children are Cas- 
sander and Jane, the murderers Rawbones and Wood- 
kiU. 

The very rude cut on the title-page shows the ruffians 
fighting, the children under a bush, with a bird flying 
above them, houses in flames, a man on the gallows 
in the back-ground. For the ballad see No. 640. 

455. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(i).i9 

The woodcut on the title-page represents the same 
scene as in the preceding, but with more detail. " A 
catalogue of histories and merry books," p. 2. 

456. The history of the children in the 
wood ; or. Murder revenged. London, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 21.7 

The same story as the preceding titles, with the 
same cut on the title-page as the last. 

Ashton (p. 369) gives a title page having on the 
front a very large cut of the same character as those 
already described. Not only is the house of the wicked 
uncle in flames (as in the preceding) , but his cattle are 
lying dead near the right hand edge of the cut. On 
the back is a title beginning "The most lamentable 
an.^. deplorable history," etc. and the imprint " Lon- 
don; printed by and for W. O., and sold by the book- 



sellers." It contains the ballad in addition to the prose 
version. 

457. The history of the two children in the 
wood revived ; or. Murder revenged. Stir- 
ling, William Macnie. 1821. sm.i2°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1 15. 1 2 

Cut of two gentlemen fighting with swords. 

458. The history of the children in the 
wood, containing a true account of their un- 
happy fate, with the history of their parents 
and unnatural uncle, interspersed with morals 
for the instruction of children. To which is 
added. The history of Sir R. Whittington and 
his cat [and The story of Amurath]. Lon- 
don, T. Sabine, sm. 12°. pp.108. Wdct. 
front, and wdcts. 

In this production the tale is much elaborated. 
The parents are Pirarius and Eliza, the uncle Andro- 
gus, the children Betsey and Billy, the murderers Kill- 
child and Badthought. The prose tale is followed by 
the ballad. 

See also " The history of Cinderella," No. 461. 

459. The children in the wood restored 
by Honestas, the hermit of the forest ; or. 
Perfidy detected. . . . Being the sequel to the 
history of the Children in the wood. Ban- 
bury, J. G. Rusher. 48"^. pp. 16. Wdcts. 

II4-7 

460. Perfidy detected ! or. The children in 
the wood restored by Honestas, the hermit 
of the forest . . , The continuation of the his- 
tory of the Children in the wood. Banbury, 
J. G. Rusher. 32°. pp. 18. Wdcts. 113. 

A list of penny books sold by J. G. Rusher, on the 
inside of the covers. 

461. The history of Cinderella; or. The 
little glass slipper. To which is added. The 
babes in the wood. Glasgow. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

109.24, III. 10 

A revision of Gent's translation of Perrault's tale. 
Some metrical versions of Catskin are recorded under 
No. 733- The " Babes in the wood " is a modern prose 
rendering of that story. 

462. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).i 

463. The interesting story of Cinderella 
and her glass slipper. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 
48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 1 14.2 

464. History of Fair Rosamond, otherwise 
Eleanor Clifford, and her royal paramour, 
Henry the Second, king of England, with 
an affecting account of her melancholy and 
horrible death at the hands of the injured 
Queen Eleanor in the bower of Woodstock. 
[With Alonzo the Brave.] Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 93(iii).i7 



28 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



465. The history of Fair Rosamond and 
Henry the Second, king of England, &c. 
York, John White, etc. sm. 4°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 99-11 

At the end is the ballad : "A song on the death of 
Fair Rosamond," beginning "In Woodstock bower 
once grew a flower." 

466. The history of the life and death of 
Fair Rosamond, concubine to King Henry H, 
shewing how Queen Eleanor plotted to de- 
stroy fair Rosamond ; to prevent which she 
was removed to a stately bower at Woodstock 
near Oxford and while the King was in France 
Fair Rosamond was poisoned by Queen Elea- 
nor. Penrith, J. Allison, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 77.3 

467. The life and death of Fair Rosamond, 
King Henry the Second's concubine, shewing 
how she was poisoned by Queen Eleanor. 
London, Bow Church Yard. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 58(i).2 2 

The story is entirely different from that in the pre- 
ceding titles; it is shorter and less interesting. An 
epitaph is added and the ballad of Fair Rosamond 
beginning " When as king Henry ruled this land " is 
given under the title of " A mournful ditty of the fair 
lady Rosamond, King Henry the Second's concubine 
who was poisoned to death by Queen Eleanor." The 
cuts are numerous and interesting. 

The advertisement at the end claims that "at the 
office in Bow Church Yard, old ballads, new songs 
and histories are printed in a neater manner, with bet- 
ter cuts, more truly adapted to each story, than at any 
other place in England." 

468. The unfortunate concubines ; or. The 
history of Fair Rosamond, mistress to Henry 1 1, 
and Jane Shore, concubine to Edward IV . . . 
shewing how they came to be so. With their 
lives . . . and unhappy ends. London, J. Bew. 
1789. sm. 12". pp. 98. Front, and other 
wdcts. 55.5 

A work of fiction, telling the story at great length. 
At the end of the first part is added the ballad of Fair 
Rosamond beginning, " In Woodstock bower once 
grew a flower." 

469. The unfortunate concubines ; or. The 
history of Fair Rosamond . . . and Jane Shore 
. . . shewing how they came to be seduced ; 
with their unhappy ends. London, T. Sabine 
and Son. sm. 12°. pp. 90, (6). Front, 
and other wdcts. 47.1 

Imperfect: — leaf 59-60 have the front edge trim- 
med off into the text. 

This is the same text as the preceding, but the cuts, 
though nearly all the same in subject are not from the 
same blocks. Although the text and the paging stop 
at p. 90, it is probable that the three leaves which fol- 
Ijw in the volume were added to fill out fold H. They 



contain " Little Red Ridinghood," and " A catalogue 
of books printed and sold by T. Sabine and Son." 
For the ballad versions see No. 822. 

470. Fairy stories, containing : i . The blue 
bird and Fiorina. 1 1 . The king of the pea- 
cocks and Rosetta. To which is added an 
excellent new song entitled The fairies dance. 
London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(iii).24 

471. Fairy tales. Containing the stories 
of Cinderilla, or, the little glass slipper, Little 
Red Riding-hood, Princess Fair-star and 
Prince Cherry, and Ebouli Sina; to which 
is added. The fairy song. Edinburgh, J. Mor- 
ren. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

60.3, 115.20 

472. The right pleasant and delightful his- 
tory of Fortunatus and his two sons. In two 
parts. . . . First penned in the Dutch tongue, 
and thence translated, and now published in 
English. 13th edition. Illustrated with vari- 
ety of new pictures. London, printed for 
C. Hitch & L. Hawes, and S. Crowder in 
Paternoster Row, and J. King in Moorfields. 
24°. pp. 168. Wdcts. 25228.57.5 

Contains 48 chapters. 

" The sum and argument of this book," (pp. 4-7), 
gives the story in ballad form. " The moral documents 
and considerations which are to be noted in this book ' ' 
are tabulated in verse on p. 9. 

On the back of the title-page is an Advertisement 
warning against " some ill-minded persons " who have 
printed a counterfeit impression in duodecimo. A 
woodcut having no relation to the book has been in- 
serted on the fly-leaf. 

473. The history of Fortunatus and his two 
sons. . . . Translated from the Greek. 6th ed. 
London, T. Sabine, sm. 12°. pp.120. Wdct. 
front, and other wdcts. 2 cop. 51-2, 55-3 

Contains 40 chapters, omitting some of the earlier 
portion of the preceding. 

474. The history of Fortunatus, containing 
various surprising adventures, among which he 
acquired a purse that could not be emptied, 
and a hat that carried him wherever he wished 
to be. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

21.8 
This and the following are popular abridgments of 
the story. 

475. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Wdcts. Reprint. 

With prefatory note. 92- P- 1 25 

476. The same. London, C. Sympson. 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 35-3 

The text is the same as in the preceding, but the 
cuts are different. 



IX. LEGENDARY ROMANCES, FAIRY STORIES, ETC. 



29 



477. The same. Wotton-Underedge, J. 
Bence, sm, 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 32.5 

The same text, but a thi^d set of cuts. 

478. The delightful history of Fortunatus. 
The lady Fortune gave such a purse in Spain, 
When it was empty, strait 'twas full again. 

London, L. How, in Petticoat Lane, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(i).i3 

A second title is printed on the back of the first be- 
ginning: — The delightful history of Fortunatus, setting 
forth his birth, hfe, travels and adventures in most 
parts of the world, etc.; with imprint: — London, 
printed by L. How, in Love Court, Petticoat -Lane. 
The version is the same as the preceding, but the 
text differs in places. 

479. George Barnwell.] Youth's warning 
piece ; The tragical history of George Bam- 
well, who was undone by a strumpet, who 
caused him to rob his master, and murder his 
uncle. 

By others harm learn to be wise 
Aiid ye shall do full well. 

London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 

24. Wdcts. 58(i).i8 

" An excellent old ballad setting forth the weakness 
and folly of youth in following the steps of lewd women 
which always lead to destruction," pp. 14-24. For 
separate editions of the ballad see No. 852. 

On pages 2 and 3 are cuts labelled " George Barn- 
well " and " Sarah Millwood," though borrowed from 
some other work, with inscriptions "And behold there 
met him an Harlot, subtil of heart," etc., "The lips 
of a strange woman drop as an honeycomb," etc. 

Bishop Percy says of the ballad, "This tragical 
narrative seems to relate a real fact ; but when it hap- 
pened I have not been able to discover. ' ' Keliques of 
attcietii poetry, 1765, iii. 225. 

480. The same. London, sm. 12°. pp. 
24. Wdcts. 53-12 

The title is like the preceding except that it reads 
" or, The tragical " etc., and " thai caused him," etc. 
On the title page is an armorial cut. The verso is 
blank; on p. 3 is a portrait of a woman, entitled 
"Sarah Millwood," different from that in the preced- 
ing, but with the same quotation underneath. This 
edition does not contain the ballad. 

Ashton (p. 429) gives a title-page with this title and 
the imprint, "Stockton, printed and sold by R. Chris- 
topher," and two very curious cuts of Barnwell and 
Millwood. 

481. The same. 

Be wam'd ye youths, who see my sad despair, 
Avoid lewd women, false as they are fair. 

Birmingham, D. Wrighton. sm. 12°. pp.12. 
Wdcts. 97.2 

The version is the same as the preceding except at 
the very end. The ballad is not given. 

482. Pathetic history of George Barnwell, 
the London apprentice, who by keeping com- 
pany, and following the advice of a woman of 



the town named Milwood, was reduced to the 
lowest pitch of infamy . . . with the history of 
Maria, his sweetheart. Newcastle, W. For- 
dyce. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 76.7 
An entirely different version from the preceding. 

483. Great Britain's glory ; being the his- 
tory of King Arthur ; with the adventures of 
the knights of the round table. [London], 
printed by and for C. Brown, and sold by the 
book-sellers of Pye-Corner & London-Bridge. 
sm.4°. pp. (24). Wdcts. 99.6 

The address to the reader is signed "J. S." At 
the end are the verses : 

"Thus, Friendly Reader, I've abstracted here. 
King Arthur's Noble Acts, which doth appear 
More fully in the larger ten sheet Book, 
If thou therein, will cast a friendly Look." 

484. The renowned history (or the life 
and death) of Guy earl of Warwick, contain- 
ing his noble exploits and victories. London. 
[cir. 1700.] sm. 4°. pp. 79. Wdcts. 

27283.25.7 

The imprint is cut off the title-page. There is a 
large wood-cut representing Guy on horse-back on the 
title-page, and a number of smaller cuts in the text. 

The "Epistle to the reader" is signed "John 
Shurly " (i.e. Shirley). 

On p. 79 begins a list of books " printed for and 
sold by Charles Bates, at the Sun and Bible in Guilt- 
spur-street, and by John Foster, at the Golden Ball in 
I^e-corner; where any country chapmen or others 
may be furnished with all sorts of historys, small books, 
and ballads, at reasonable rates. ' ' The Huth catalogue, 
iv. 1354, has an edition without date, " printed by 
A. M. for C. Bates, at the Sun and Bible in Guilt- 
spur-street, and by J. Foster, at the Golden Ball in 
Pye corner," but with a slightly different title. The 
earliest impression of this version known is dated 1681 . 

485. The noble and renowned history of 
Guy, earl of Warwick ; containing a full and 
true account of his many famous and valiant 
actions, remarkable and brave exploits, and 
noble and renowned victories. Also his 
courtship to fair Phaelice, Earl Roband's 
daughter and heiress, and the many difficulties 
and hazards he went through to obtain her 
love. Extracted from authentick records, 
and the whole illustrated with cuts suitable 
to the history. Eleventh ed. London. 
Printed for Stanley Crowder. sm. 12°. 
Wdcts. 27283.25.4 

The dedication to Mr. Zachariah Heyward, signed 
" G. L.'," is followed by "A poem in praise of the 
following history." At the end is " A catalogue of 
chapmen's books, printed for and sold by J. Bew at 
no 28 Paternoster-row." 

This is a different version from the preceding. 

486. The history of Guy, earl of Warwick 
... his many valiant actions and noble and 
renowned victories also his courtship to fair 



so 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



Phaelice, earl Roband's daughter . . . Ex- 
tracted from authentic records. 12th ed. 
London, T. Sabine, sm. 12°. pp.108. Wdct. 
front, and other wdcts. 51.7 

Pages 98 to 103 contain " An old song of the vali- 
ant deeds of chivalry atchieved by the noble knight, 
Sir Guy of Warwick, &c, &c. Tune ' Was ever man,' 
&c." This is the ballad as given by Percy. See 
also No. 881. "The trj^cal story of Polidor and 
Livia " occupies pp. 104-108. 

487. The famous and renowned history 
of Guy, earl of Warwick. [London], Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

53(i).io 

488. Another issue. 58(i).6 

In this copy the imprint is in italic instead of Roman 
type, and contains " London." 

489. The history of Guy, earl of Warwick. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard. Wdcts. 
Reprint. 92. p. 140 

With prefatory note. Ashton (p. 154) also gives 
the title-page and two cuts from a Newcastle edition. 

490. The famous history of Hector, prince 
of Troy ; or. The three destructions of Troy ; 
the first and second time by the valiant Her- 
cules, the third and last by the Greeks . . . 
London, C. r3icey. sm. 12. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 58(i).i 

49 1 . The history of Hector, prince of Troy ; 
or, The three destructions of Troy ; the first 
and second time by Hercules, and the third 
time by the Greeks. . . . London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 35-14, 42.10 

The second copy is imperfect, lacking pp. 9, 10. 

492. The history of the destruction of 
Troy. Together with the mighty deeds and 
valorous exploits of the renowned warriors. 
Hector, prince of Troy, and Hercules the 
Grecian. Edinburgh, J. Morren. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 15.8 

493. The history of the life and glorious 
actions of the mighty Hercules of Greece, 
containing his encountering and overcoming 
serpents, lions, monsters, giants, tyrants, and 
powerful armies, his taking cities, towns, kings, 
and kingdoms, together with the unfortunate 
manner of his death. . . . London, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 50.6 

494. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 8°. pp.24. Wdcts. 67.14 

The text is the same in the two editions, but several 
of the cuts are different. 



495. Hero and Leander; or. The unfor- 
tunate lovers; an ancient and esteemed 
romance. To which is added Leander's 
Epistle to Hero; and Hero's answer, both 
translated from Ovid by N. Tate, esq. , . . 
London, A. Cleugh and C. Stalker. 12°. 
pp. (4), 56. 27.11 

496. Hero and Leander.] The famous 
and renowned history of the two unfortunate, 
but noble lovers. Hero and Leander . . . [Lon- 
don], printed by E. M. for T. Norris, at the 
Looking Glass on London-Bridge. sm. 4°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts, 99.8 

The Address to the reader is signed " J. S." 

497. The famous history of the two un- 
fortunate lovers, Hero & Leander. Glas- 
gow. [No.] 65. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. III. 17 

498. The famous history of the unfortunate 
lovers Hero and Leander, who ended their 
lives in the sea for each other. London, 
Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 67.15 

499. The history of Jack and the bean- 
stalk. Glasgow, pp. 24. Reprint. 93(iii).8 

A note on Michael Scott is added to fill out the 
sheet. 

500. The same. Glasgow, Francis Orr & 
Sons. [No,] 162. sm. 12°. pp. 24, 111.2 

501. The history of Jack and the giants. 
Part the first. London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(i).i 

502. The same. The second part. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12". pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(i).2 

503. The same. The first part. London, 
Bow Church Yard, sm, 12°, pp.24, Wdcts. 

58(i).8 

Differs from No. 501 in having the imprint in italic 
instead of Roman type. 

504. The second part of Jack and the 
giants, giving a full account of his fictorious 
{sic\ conquests over the North Country giants, 
how he destroyed the enchanted castle kept 
by Galigantus, dispersed the fiery griftins and 
released not only many knights and ladies but 
likewise a duke's daughter to whom he was 
honourably married. [London], Larkin How, 
in Petticoat- Lane, sm, 12°, pp. 24. Wdcts. 

58 (i). 9 

The last 4 pp. are transposed. The very interesting 
cut on the title-p^e is in three parts, illustrating Jack's 
adventures; the cuts in the text are merely ornamental 



IX. LEGENDARY ROMANCES, FAIRY STORIES, ETC. 



31 



tail-pieces. " A catalogue of histories and merry books 
printed and sold by Larkin How, in Petticoat-Lane, 
London," p. 24. 

Asktoii (p. 185) gives a title-page with this title and 
the cuts, with the imprint "Newcastle: printed and 
sold by J. White, 171 1." He also gives a title-page 
of a Nottingham edition of pt. i, with the title: " The 
pleasant and delightful history of Jack and the giants," 
and a cut representing David and Goliath (p. 184), 
and a title-page and some cuts from an Aldermary 
Church Yard edition (p. 186). 

505. The history of Jack and the giants. 
Part I, containing his wonderful exploits in 
the west of England and Wales. London, 
J. Davenport. 24°. pp. 18. Wdcts on t. p. 

The cut is in four parts. 32.8 

506. The second part of Jack and the 
giants, containing a full account of his vic- 
torious conquests over the North Country 
giants . . . London, J. Davenport, sm. 12°. 
pp. 20. Wdct. on t. p. 

The cut is in three parts, imitating that in No. 504. 

507. The history of Jack and the giants in 
all its parts. Containing i. Jack's birth and 
parentage, his dispute with a country vicar, 
&c. . . . [Edinburgh], J. Morren. 12°. pp. 
24. 2 cop. 60.8, Ii5-i6 

508. The history of Jack the giant killer. 
Glasgow, McKenzie & Hutchison, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 115-17 

509. History of Jack the giant killer, con- 
taining his birth and parentage, his meeting 
with the king's son, his noble conquests over 
many monstrous giants, and his relieving a 
beautiful lady, whom he afterwards married, 
&c. Glasgow, pp.24. 2 cop. 109.18,111.5 



5 I o. The same. Reprint. 



93(iii).3 



511. Jack the giant killer, a hero celebra- 
ted by ancient historians. Banbury, J. G. 
Rusher. 48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 114-8 

512. The pleasant and delightful history 
of Jack and the giants. 2 pt. Nottingham, 
printed for the running stationers. 12°. pp. 
12. Wdcts. 60.7,8 

513. Jack of Newbury.] The history of 
the famous clothier of England, called Jack 
of Newbury. London, Bow Church Yard. 
12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(ii)-5 

Jack of Newbury according to the tale, was John 
Winchcombe, in the time of Henry VHL He kept 
two hundred looms in his own house, and equipped a 
hundred men for Flodden Field. The description of 
the household is of interest, also the dialect of Jack's 
father-in-law. See the Dictionary of national biogra- 
phy, under Winchcombe. 



The text is the same in all these editions, and many 
of the cuts appear in each. The title-cut in 58(ii).5 
represents a man dancing; in the othere it represents 
a sheep. 

514. The same. London, Cluer Dicey, in 
Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

57(i).i7 

515. The history of Jack of Newbury, 
called the clothier of England. London, 
sm. 12°. pp. 94. Wdcts. 50-1 

516. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 67.12 

517. The life and death of Mrs. Jane 
Shore, concubine to Edward IV. London, 
Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 58(ii).2 

518. The same. [London], London and 
Middlesex printing office. No. 8 1 , Shoe Lane, 
Holborn. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 

35.18 

519. The same. London, J. Evans. sm.i2°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 42.14 

520. The life and transactions of Mrs. 
Jane Shore, concubine to King Edward IV, 
containing an account of her parentage, wit 
and beauty . . . Edinburgh, sm. 12°. pp. 
24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 12.2 1 

521. The same. [Also] Adventure of Allan 
Barclay, a private soldier in the regi- 
ment ; Love and torture. Glasgow. [No.] 8. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Ornamental wdct. on t. p. 

79-28 

The text is the same in all these editions, ending 
with "The dying lamentation of Jane Shore." Ash- 
toti (p. 393) gives the title-page of a Newcastle edi- 
tion. The tale was also published with the story of 
Fair Rosamond; see Nos. 468, 469. For the ballad, 
see No. 1080. 

522. The famous history of Johnny Arm- 
strong of Westmoreland. London, Alder- 
mary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

57(ii).i 
For the ballad see No. 906. The title-cut is the 
same in design in the three editions, but in No. 524 it 
is revised. The other cuts differ in each. 

523. The history of Johnny Armstrong of 
Westmoreland. [London] , London and Mid- 
dlesex printing office. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. 35.4, 57.5 

524. The pleasant and delightful history of 
Johnny Armstrong of Westmoreland. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(ii).6 



32 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



525. History of the Lambton worm, near 
Lambton castle, county of Durham. To which 
is annexed a prose account of the same, from 
Surtees History of Durham. Also, The laid- 
ley worm of Spindleston Heugh, by Duncan 
Frasier, the Cheviot bard. Newcastle, etc., 
W. and T. Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

68.2 
Child '\. 308, 311, ii. 502; Child (British poets) i. 
386. 

For the ballad see also No. 941. 

526. Little Red Riding-Hood. [London, 
T. Sabine and Son.] sm. 12°. pp. (6). 
Wdct. 47-2 

There is no title-page. The text is Gent's transla- 
tion from Perrault, omitting the moral. Pages 4-6 are 
devoted to " A catalogue of books printed and sold by 
T. Sabine and Son." 

527. London 'prentice.] The famous his- 
tory of the valiant London 'prentice. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 58(i).i2 

528. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(ii).9 

529. The same. London, J. Evans. 12°. 

pp. 24. 3 cop. 42.18, 50-13. 53.3 

Ashton (p. 227) gives a title-page of a Newcastle 
edition. For the ballad see No. 950. 

530. The history of Montelion, the most 
valiant and renowned knight of the oracle, 
son to Pericles, the valiant knight of Assyria, 
and the fair Constantia, the daughter of the 
emperor of Persia . . . London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 53-11 

531. Nine worthies.] The famous and 
renowned history of the nine worthies of 
the world . . . London, C. Brown, sold by 
the booksellers of Pye-Corner and London- 
Bridge, sm. 4°, pp. (24). Wdct. on t. p. 

99-7 

The nine worthies are : Hector, Alexander, Caesar, 
Joshua, David, Judas Maccabeus, Arthur, Charles the 
Great, Godfrey of Boulogne. 

532. The history of Parismus, prince of 
Bohemia. . . . [By Emanuel Ford.] London, 
sm, 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 53-13 

533. Patient Grisel.] The history of the 
most noble marquis of Salus ; or. Patient 
Grissel. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
Bowl^nce [j'/r]. sm. 12°, pp.24. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 35-66, 67.1 

See " The history of Patient Grisel, edited by H. B. 
Wheatley." London. 1885. For the ballad see 
No. 1003. 



534. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane. pp. 24. Wdcts. Reprint. 

92. p. 172 

With a prefatory note. The cuts are not wholly 
the same as in the preceding. 

535. The true and admirable history of the 
noble marquis of Salus and Patient Grissel. 
London, L. How. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 58(i).i6 

536. Storys of Prince Lupin, Yellow dwarf, 
and the Three wishes. Glasgow. [No.] 7. 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. iii.ii 



537. The sajne. Reprint. 



93(iii).6 



538. The master cat; or. Puss in Boots, a 
tale. To which is added. An historical story 
of Blue Beard. London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(iii).23 

Both these are from Gent's English version of Per- 
rault (1729), without the morals, Blue Beard being 
somewhat abbreviated. See also Nos. 451—53. A 
list of books, p. 2. 

539. Reynard the Fox.] The pleasant and 
delightful history of Reynard the Fox ; with 
morals and expositions on every chapter. 
The whole illustrated with cuts suitable to 
each story. [Ix)ndon], W. Onley, and sold 
by John Foster, in Pye-Corner. sm, 4°. 
pp. (24). Wdcts. 99.1 

" A catalogue of books sold by the book-sellers of 
London and Westmmster," pp. (23, 24). 

This and the following chap-books follow closely 
Caxton's version, though of course much abbreviated. 
The Ubrary possesses many other editions and versions 
of Reynard. 

540. The history of Reynard the Fox. 
London, J. Evans. 12°. pp. 24, Wdcts. 
3 cop, 42.13, 53-4, 55-1 

541. The same. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. 1780. Wdcts, Reprint, 92, p. 96 

542. The most pleasant history of Reynard 
the Fox, London, Bow Church Yard, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(iii),i5 

543. Robin Hood.] The celebrated his- 
tory of the renowned Robin Hood, the merry 
outlaw of Sherwood Forest. To which is 
added. The professor of signs. Glasgow. 
[No.] 23. sm. 12°. pp. 24, Wdct, on t, p. 

For the ballads see Nos. 1046, etc. II 1. 2 3 

544. The famous exploits of Robin Hood, 
Little John and his merry men all, including 
an account of his birth, education and death. 

95- P- 269 



IX. LEGENDARY ROMANCES, FAIRY STORIES, ETC. 



33 



545. The life and death of St. George, the 
noble champion of England. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(i).3 
Ashton (p. 163) gives title-page, abstract, and some 
cuts from an Aldermary Church Yard edition. 

546. Seven champions of Christendom.] 
The illustrious and renowned history of the 
seven famous champions of Christendom. 
In three parts. Containing their honourable 
births, victories, and noble atchievements 
. . . Also with the heroic adventures of St. 
George's three sons . . . 9th ed. London, 
L. Hawes and comp., etc. 1766. sm. 12°. 
pp. 156. Front, and other wdcts. 

27272.27.5 

Imperfect: — pp. 11-14, 107-1 10 missing. 

An abridgement of the ist and 2d parts of Richard 
Johnson's " Famous history of the seven champions of 
Christendom," London, 1597. The 2d part, corre- 
sponding to the 2d and 3d parts of this chap-book, has 
been more condensed and changed than the ist part. 

Beneath the cut on the frontispiece (which has 
served also for Sir Guy of Warwick) are ten verses 
beginning " This book relates what worthy deeds were 
done. ' ' There are book-advertisements on the back of 
the frontispiece and of the title-page. 

Of Johnson's book the Library has the editions of 
1696, 1766, and 1824. 

547. The same. London, T. Sabine and 
son. sm. 12°. pp. 120. Front, and other 
wdcts. 53.14 

In the main the same text as the preceding, but it 
is divided into two parts only, despite the title. The 
frontispiece has a different cut, but the same verses. 
A list of books is given on p. 120. 

548. The renowned history of the seven 
champions of Christendom : S. George of 
England, S. Denis of France, S. James of 
Spain, S. Anthony of Italy, S. Andrew of Scot- 
land, S. Patrick of Ireland, S. David of Wales, 
epitomiz'd . . . Newcastle upon Tine, J.White, 
sm. 4°. pp.20. Wdct. on t. p. 99.10 

Imperfect : — The last line on pp. 3-8, 10 has been 
trimmed off. 

This is an abridgement of the ist part of Johnson's 
work. Verses entitled "The author's muse upon the 
history " are given, but they are different from John- 
son's text in the edition of 1696. 

549. The history of the seven champions 
of Christendom. 2 pt. [London], Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24, 24. Wdcts. 

58(i).4,5 
Another abridgement, still more bold than the pre- 
ceding, of the first two parts of Johnson's romance. 

The title-cut, St. George killing the dragon, is the 
same in both parts. 

550. The same. Part the first. London, 
Cluer Dicey and Co. in Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i-3) 



The title-cut is the same as in the preceding; the 
others differ somewhat. 

551. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. \2° . pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(i)-4 

The title-cut represents a joust. The other cuts 
also differ somewhat from those in the preceding 
edition. 

552. The same. 2 pt. London, Alder- 
mary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24, 24. 
Wdcts. 53-1,2 

The title-cut in both parts is the joust, as in the 
preceding. The other cuts vary from Nos. 549-551. 

553. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, sm. 12°. pp.24. 35.17 

The same as the preceding, except that the cut 
which in this is on p. 8 is on p. 17 in that copy, 
while the cut on p. 17 in this copy does not appear at 
all in that. 

554. The history of the seven champions 
of Christendom. Edinburgh, printed and 
sold in Niddry's Wynd. 12°. pp.24 Wdcts. 

60.1 

This is the same as the first part of No. 552. On 

the title-page is a cut of St. George with the legend at 

the sides " Here I stand even The boldest of seven." 

555. Seven wise masters.] The pleasante 
and delyghtful narrations of the seven wise 
maisters. Adornede with cuts. Londone 
pryntedi625. 16°. ff[88]. Wdcts. Black 
letter. 27282.51.5 

The name of the publisher, "J. Wright at the 
King's Head in the Old Bailey," is given in the adver- 
tisement on the last page; as he was also the publisher 
of the following edition, 1673, and as that edition has a 
similar advertisement with some of the same titles, the 
date of this issue is probably fictitious. The title-page 
is on different paper from the rest of the book, and of 
a later typography, and has the appearance of being a 
forgery. 

Mr. G. L. Gomme, in the preface to his reprint of 
Wynkyn de Worde's edition (London, 1885), says 
that the chap-book of 1671, the earliest known to him, 
" is nearly identical with the Wynkyn de Worde, with 
the simple alteration of the spelling to the modern 
forms." This is the case with the present edition. 

556. The history of the seven wise masters 
of Rome, now newly corrected, better ex- 
plained in many places and enlarged with 
many pretty pictures, lively expressing the 
full history. London, E. Crowh for J. Wright, 
next to the Globe in Little-Brittain. 1673. 
16°. ff. [82]. Wdcts. Black letter. 

27282.51 

Imperfect: — six leaves missing. 

The text and cuts are the same as in the preceding; 
the two editions agreeing, for the most part, page for 
page. 



34 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



557. The history of the seven wise masters 
of Rome, containing many pleasant and witty 
narratives very delightful to read. London, 
T. Sabine and E. Sibley, sm. 12°. pp. 168. 
Wdcts. 39.5 

The text is the same as in the preceding editions. 
The cuts are more modern. 

558. Roman stories; or. The history of 
the seven wise masters of Rome, containing 
seven days entertainment in many pleasant 
narratives wherein the treachery of evil coun- 
sellors is discovered, innocency cleared, and 
the wisdom of the seven wise masters dis- 
played. 5th ed. Lx)ndon, T. Sabine and Son. 
sm. 12". pp. 84. Front, and other wdcts. 

27282.50.7 

This version is not the same as that of Wynkyn de 
Worde, having been rewritten, but not much abridged. 

559. The same. 41st ed. London, J. Hol- 
lis. 12°. pp.108. Front, and other wdcts. 
2 cop. 45.2, 50.14 

560. Wisdoms cabinet open'd; or. The 
famous history of the seven wise masters of 
Rome, containing many excellent and dehght- 
ful examples, with their explanations, and 
modern significations, which (by way of allu- 
sion) may be term'd, a historical comparison 
of sacred with civil transactions, the better to 
make an impression upon the minds of men. 
sm. 4°. pp. (24). Wdct. on t. p. 99.9 

This version is much abridged. 

The cut is in four divisions, each numbered and with 
a title printed above or below. The initials "I. W." 
are cut on the lower right-hand block. 

561. The history of the seven wise masters 
and mistresses of Rome containing many in- 
genious and entertaining stories wherein the 
treachery of evil counsellors is discovered 
. . . and the wisdom of the seven wise mas- 
ters and mistresses displayed. 38th ed. 
Dublin, A. Fox. 1814. sm. 12°. pp.144. 
Wdct. front. 27282.50.2 

Imperfect : — the lowest line on several pages has 
been trimmed off. 

562. The same. 39th ed. Dublin, C. M. 
Warren, sm. 12°. pp. 108. 27282.50.3 

List of books on the cover. 

563. Seven wise mistresses.] Roman 
stories; or. The history of the seven wise 
mistresses of Rome, containing seven days 
entertainment . . . wherein the treachery of 
evil counsellors is discovered . . . and the 
wisdom of seven wise mistresses displayed. 
. . . [By Thomas Howard.] Adorned with 
many pretty pictures lively expressing the 



history . . . 25th ed. [London], J. Hodges, 
at the Looking-Glass, over-against St. Magnus 
Church, or London-Bridge, and W. Johnston, 
at the Golden-Ball, in Saint Paul's Church 
Yard. 1754. sm. 12°. pp. 108, 12. Front, 
and other wdcts. 15493.24 

A close imitation of the Seven wise masters. The 
last twelve pages are occupied by a list of ' ' Choice 
novels. ' ' 

564. The same. 12th ed. London, T.Sa- 
bine. 12°. pp. 107, 13. Front, and other 
wdcts. 45-3 

565. The same. Adorned with cuts ex- 
pressing the history. 31st ed. London, 
J. HoUis. 12°. pp. 96. Front, and other 
wdcts. 50-15 

566. The shoemakers glory; or, The 
gentle craft, shewing what renowned princes 
and heroes have been of the shoemaker's 
trade . . . why it is called the gentle craft, 
and why we say, A shoemaker's son is a prince 
born. London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(1). 1 9 

This contains the story of St. Hugh and that of 
Crispin and Crispianus. 

Ashton (p. 222) gives a sketch of the story and two 
title-pages : I. Newcastle, 2. Aldermary Church Yard. 

567. The history of Sinbad the sailor, con- 
taining an account of his surprising voyages. 
Falkirk, T. Johnston. 1824. 12°. pp.36. 

60.6 

568. Sir Bevis of Southampton.] The 
gaUant history of the life and death of that 
most noble knight Sir Bevis of Southampton. 
. . . [London], A. M. for J. Deacon, at the 
Angel in Guilt-Spur-Street, without Newgate 
[1680?]. sm.4°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

27277.51.6 
" Books printed for & sold by J. Deacon, ' ' etc. p. 24. 

569. The gallant history of the life and 
death of that most nodle \jic\ knight Sir 
Bevis of Southampton. Wherein is con- 
tained much variety of pelasant [i"/V] and 
delightful reading. London, W. and C. Dicey, 
Bow Church Yard,and Northampton, sm.i 2°. 
pp. 24. 58(i).7 

Ashton (p. 156) gives title-page and abstract of a 
Newcastle edition. 

570. The sleeping beauty in the wood; a 
tale. London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(iii).2 2 

The text is the same in all the editions recorded 
here being Gent's translation from Perrault, including 
I the moral. 



IX. LEGENDARY ROMANCES, FAIRY STORIES, ETC. 



35 



571. The same. Wotton-under-Edge. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. 44.6 

572. The same. London, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

Wdcts. 35-21 

The title-cut is the same as in No, 570, a woman 
lying under a tree. 

573. The same. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 48.6 

The cut is the portrait of a woman, in an oval frame. 

574. [The sleeping beauty]. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 67.4 

Imperfect : — title-page wanting. 

575. The sleeping beauty in the wood ; 
an entertaining tale. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 
12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 60.5 

576. The sleeping beauty in the wood. 
From Mother Goose's tales. Part the second. 
London, C. Sympson. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Ornamental wdct. on t. p. 35-2 2 

Contains the complete story; it is called " tale iv " 
on p. 2. 

"A catalogue of histories " at the end, closing with 
" Mother Goose's tales," nine in number, 

577. The sleeping beauty of the wood ; an 
entertaining tale. To which is added, Paddy 
and the bear; a true story. Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 109.30 

Cut of a girl with a parrot. 

578. The same. Glasgow. [No.] 52. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 111.7 

Cut of a girl with birdcage and cat. 

579. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).5 
The same issue as the preceding. 

580. Story of the bitter wedding. Falkirk. 
24°. pp. 24, Wdct. on t. p. 66.9 

An alpine tale, 

581. The famous history of Thomas of 
Reading and other worthy clothiers of Eng- 
land, setting forth their mirth, great riches, 
and hospitality to the poor; and the great 
favour they gained with their prince. Con- 
cluding with the woeful death of Thomas of 
Reading, who was murdered by his host. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 35-7 

The chap-book follows the main outline of Deloney's 
Thomas of Reading [London, 1632], Nos. 581-583 
have the same cut on the title-page (a sheep) , but the 
other cuts are different. 



582. 
Yard. 



The same. London, Bow Church 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 



38.28, 58(i).20 



583. The same. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 50-2 

584. Thomas Hickathrift.] The pleasant 
and delightful history of Thomas Hickathrift. 
Part the First. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(i).io 

585. The same. Reprint. 92. p. 194. 
With an introductory note. Ashton also gives the 

title-page of a Newcastle edition, " printed by and for 
M. Angus in the Side," Both parts are reprinted in 
95- P- 35- 

586. The same. Part the Second. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(i).ii 

587. The pleasant history of Thomas Hic- 
ka-thrift. Printed by J. M. for W. Thackeray 
and T. Passinger. Reprint. (/« The history 
of Thomas Hickathrift, printed from the 
earliest extant copies, and edited, with an 
introduction, by E. L. Gomme, London, 
printed for the Villon Society, 1885.) 

25236.17 
Mr. Gomme reprinted part i. from a copy in the 
Pepysian library at Magdalene College, Cambridge 
(1660-90), and part ii. from a copy in the British 
Museum (cir, 1 780) ; he believes the first part to be 
much the older in origin. The text of No, 584 agrees 
with Ashton 's reprint, but varies considerably from 
the Pepysian copy. Part ii., also, varies somewhat 
from Gomme's text. 

588. The history of Thomas Hickathrift. 
[Part, i.] Printed for the booksellers. 24°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 66.19 

"Anecdote: Supervisor in danger," on p. 24. 

589. The same. [Part i.] Glasgow. 
[No.] 75. sm. 12°. pp. 24. III. 20 

590. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).i4 

591. The history of Tom Hickathrift. 
Part second. Manchester, A. Swindells. 16°. 
pp. 16. Wdcts. 77-14 

592. The winter evening's entertainment; 
or. The valiant exploits of Thomas Hicka- 
thrift, the wonderful giant-killer. In two 
parts. Palkirk, T. Johnston. 1809. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 60.2 

593. The famous history of Valentine and 
Orson, the two sons of the emperor of Greece. 
The 31st ed., revised and corrected, with an 
entire new set of cuts, giving a lively repre- 
sentation of the history. London, T. Sabine 
and Son. sm. 12°. pp. 120. Front, and 
other wdcts. 30.4 



36 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



594. The famous history of Valentine and 
Orson. [With The soldier's wife, and Com- 
bat between the horse and the lion.] Glas- 
gow. [No.] 128. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. III. 19 

595. The same. Reprint. 93(iii).2 

596. The history of Valentine & Orson. 
London, J. Evans and Co. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 24.2 

597. The same. Ix)ndon, Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane. Wdcts. Reprint. 92, p. no 

With introductory note. 

598. The history of Valentine and Orson. 

Reader, you '11 find this Uttle book contains 
Enough to answer thy expense and pains; 
And if with caution you will read it through, 
'Twill both instruct and delight thee too. 

Printed for the company of walking stationers. 
1 6°. pp. 1 6. Wdct. on t. p. 60.9 

599. White mouse.] The story of the 
little white mouse ; or, The overthrow of the 
tyrant king. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 109.16, 111.8 

A translation of "La bonne petite souris," by 
Countess D'Aulnoy. 

600. The same. Reprint. 63(iii).i3 

601. Whittington.] The famous and re- 
markable history of Sir Rich. Whittington, 
thrice lord mayor of London, who lived in the 
time of King Henry the Fifth, in the year 
141 9, with all the remarkable passages and 
things of note which happen'd in his time, 
with his life and death. [By T. H.] sm. 4°. 
pp. 20. Wdcts. 99.12 

602. The history of Sir Richard Whitting- 
ton, thrice lord-mayor of London. [Lon- 
don], Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(i).24 

The common chap-book version, different from 
that by T. H. [No. 601], and from that reprinted by 
Wheatley in his " History of Sir Richard Whitting- 
ton," London, 1885, pp. xxxii-xliii. This and the 
three following contain the epitaph and the ballad by 
Richard Johnson, beginning " Here must I tell the 
praise of worthy Whittington" (^Child, British poets, 
viii. 165). For the ballad in broadside form see 
No. 1 1 59. The title-cut represents Whittington and 
his cat. 

603. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(i).2i 

The title-cut is the same as in the preceding, the 
other cuts vary somewhat. 

604. The saf?ie. London, sm. 12°. pp.24 
Wdcts. 39.8 

The title-cut is the same as in the preceding, the 
other cuts vary considerably. 



605. The same. Wotton-Underedge, J. 
Bence. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 47.12 

606. The history of Richard Whittington, 
thrice lord mayor of London. Penrith, 
A. Soulby. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

The ballad varies somewhat from the text in the 
preceding editions. 

607. The history of Sir Richard Whitten- 
ton and his cat. {In The history of the 
children in the wood, London, T. Sabine, 
pp. 59-82, No. 458.) 

Contains the epitaph, but not the ballad. 

608. The history of Whittington and his 
cat, and the story of Puss in boots. Glasgow, 
pp. 24. Reprint. 93(iii).9 

Does not contain the epitaph or the ballad. 

609. The history of Whittington and his 
cat. Edinburgh. 12°.'^ pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 60.10 

The text differs from the preceding editions; it is 
that reprinted by Mr. Wheatley. (See note to 
No. 602.) Filled up with " Wonderful predictions," 
pp. 21-24. 

610. The history of Dick Whittington, lord 
mayor of London, with the adventures of his 
cat. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp. 16. 
Wdcts. II4-3 



Dramatic 

611. As you like it; a comedy. As it is 
acted at the Theatres-royal in Drury-Lane 
and Covent-Garden. By William Shakes- 
pear. London, W. Oxlade. 1777. Engr. 
title, sm. 12°. pp. 63. 40.5 

612. The cheats of Scapin; a farce, taken 
from the manager's book at the Theatre royal, 
Covent-Garden. London, R. Butters. Port, 
of Mr. Ryder as Scapin. 12°. pp. 42. 7.7 

Adapted from " Les fourberies de Scapin," Moliere. 

613. Comus; a masque. As it is acted 
at the Theatres royal, in Drury-Lane and 
Covent-Garden. Altered from Milton. . . . 
London, W. Oxlade. 1777. sm. 12°. pp.33. 

4.8 

614. Cupid & Psyche; a pantomine now 
in representation at Paris ; will be performed 
at Astley's . . . five nights only . . . Septem- 
ber, 1797. [London.] sm. 12°. pp. i8-|-. 
Vigns. 30.8 

" This description gratis." — Note. 



X. DRAMATIC 



37 



615. The dramatic budget; or, Olio of 
fancy. Being a choice collection of much- 
admired Comic scenes to which are added 
prologues, epilogues, and tales. London, 
printed by J. Plymsell . . . published by T. 
Hooper and J. Woodhouse, etc. 1800. 12°. 
pp. 46. Engr. front. 15. i 

The cut represents " Fustian & Silvester Dagger- 
wood." 

616. Ducks and green peas ; or. The New- 
castle rider. A farce, founded on fact, of one 
act. . . . To which is added. The adventures 
of Jack Okham & Tom SpHcewell ... Edin- 
burgh, J. Morren. sm. 12°- pp. 24, 

For the second piece see also No. 1716. 

617. Ducks and peas ; or, The Newcastle 
rider. Manchester, J. Swindells. 16°. pp.16. 
Wdcts. 76.1 

618. Ducks & green peas ; a farce. [Illus- 
trated by Joseph Crawhall. London, Field 
& Tuer, etc.] 1883. pp.34. Wdcts. 

94.12 

619. Fancy, fun, 8z frolic; a full account 
of the . . . new pantomine, called Harlequin's 
tour ; or, The dominion of fancy. Now per- 
forming at Covent Garden theatre to cram'd 
audiences with never-equal'd applause. . . . 
Deptford- Bridge, Delahoy. 1801. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Amiorial wdct. on t. p. 1. 5 

A play bill of a performance in which the fun and 
the foibles of the visitors to the fashionable watering 
places, Margate, Tunbridge Wells, Scarborough, Bath, 
Weymouth, and the Lakes are satirized. 

620. The gentle shepherd ; a Scots pas- 
toral comedy. By Allan Ramsay. With all 
the songs. Falkirk, Daniel Reid. 1782. 
16°. pp. 58. Wdct. 43.1 

621. The intended emigrants; a Scots 
rural comedy, in three acts. By W. Har- 
riston. Glasgow, printed for the author. 
1817. sm. 12°. pp.52. 63.11 

622. The marches day. A dramatic enter- 
tainment of three acts. As annually per- 
formed by the originals at**********. 
Falkirk, T. Johnston, 1814. sm. 12°, pp. 
108. 115.26 

" Where the scene ... is laid a day is devoted for 
the burgesses to traverse on horseback the limits of 
their royalty; this they call riding of the marches 
and hence the Marches day. The first act reviews 
part of the actors preparing for the ceremony .... the 
procession of the incorporation and fraternities, as they 
go to take horse is included in [the second] act. And 
the third act commences at the time of dining." — 
Preface. 

623. Olympus in an uproar.] A full ac- 
count of the splendid English burletta called 



Olympus in an uproar ... As now perform- 
ing at the Theatre-royal, Covent-Garden . . . 
I^ndon, prepared for the Company of flying 
stationers. 1796. sm. 8°. pp.8. 2 cop. 

4.7, 9.11 

624. The school of Roscius ; or. Theatri- 
cal orator, containing a collection of all the 
modern prologues and epilogues spoken at the 
Theatres royal, &c. with a preface on oratory 
and acting. London, J. Roach. 1792. 12°. 
pp. 94. Engr. front, and t. p. 13. i 

The frontispiece is Mrs. Mattocks as Widow War- 
ren, drawn by Cruikshank; the cut on the title-page 
shows Mr. Holman and Mrs. Merry as Harry Domton 
and Sophia in " The road to ruin." 

625. Sir William Wallace and Earl Percy; 
or. The battle of Glasgow. A tragedy by 
William Harriston. Glasgow, Thomas E)un- 
can. 1822. 12°. pp. 42. 63.13 

626. The soldier's return ; a Scots pastoral 
in two acts by Robert Tannahill ; with an 
original design by R. Austin. Paisley, George 
Caldwell. 24°. pp. 24. Engr. front. ; vign. 
on t. p. 65.7 

627. The tempest; a comedy. Written 
by William Shakespeare. Taken from the 
manager's book, at the Theatre royal, Drury- 
Lane. London, R. Butters. 12°. pp. 48. 
Engr. front. 16.13 

The frontispiece represents Miss Field as Ariel. 

628. [The Thespian oracle; prologues, 
epilogues, &c. London, J. Barker.] 12°. 

pp. 58. 43.5 

Imperfect : — title-page and frontispiece missing. 

629. The Thespian telegraph ; or. Dramatic 
mirror. Vol. i. London, J. Hammond, etc. 
1796. 12°. pp.24. Engr. front, 2 cop. 

12.5, 49.16 

Accounts and casts of new pieces, theatrical gossip, 
songs from the new plays, etc. 

630. Trick upon trick ; or. The vintner in 
the suds. In two acts. sm. 12°. pp. 117- 
132. 46.4 

Part of vol. V. of a collection of plays. 

XI 

Metrical Tales and other Verse 

631. Adam Bell, Clym of the Clough, and 
William of Cloudeslie. Glasgow, Francis Orr 
and Sons. sm. 12°. pp.24. Ornamental 
wdct. on t. p. 75.3 

Child, No. 116 (iii. 14-39). Ashton (p. 352) 
gives the title-page of a Newcastle edition. 



38 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



632. The history of Adam Bell, Clim of 
the Clough, and William of Cloudeslie. 

Who were three archers good enough, 
The best in the North Country. 

Gainsborough, H. Thompson. 16°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 58(ii).i6 

An older edition than the preceding, but a poorer 
version. 

633. The same. Paisley, J. Neilson. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 115-25 

634. An excellent old song called Adam 
o' Gordon ; to which is added, I'll never leave 
thee. 1795- sm. 8". pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 33-14 

The first piece is a form of the ballad Edom o' Gor- 
don. Child, No. 178 (iii. 423). 

635. The amorous lady's garland ; or. The 
handsome butcher of St. James's market. 
Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane, London. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 102. 24 

Begins, " Young men and pretty maidens, Be 
pleased to lend an ear." 

636. The Andover garland. In four parts. 
. . . London, E. Blare at the Looking-Glass 
on London-Bridge, sm. 8°. pp.8. 38.15 

Begins " Good Christian people all that do pass 
by." A story of a rake who robbed his father, killed 
his paramour, and was hung. 

637. Andrew Lammie ; or, Mill of Tif tie's 
Annie. A tragedy. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 
I6^ pp. 8, Wdct. on t. p. 59.2 

Child, No. 233 (iv. 300) ; this and the two follow- 
ing are variants of C. 

638. The old Scotch ballad of Andrew 
Lammie ; or. Mill of Tifty's Annie. Glas-. 
gow. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. (No. 6.) 

62.13 

639. The same. Falkirk. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.1 

"Scots" instead of " Scotch " in the title. 

640. The babes in the wood ; or. The 
Norfolk gentleman's last will and testament. 
Shewing how he committed the keeping of his 
children to his own brother who dealt most 
wickedly with them, and how God plagued 
him for it. To which are added, Hetrick 
Banks and the Answer. Belfast, James 
Magee. 1769. 16°. pp. 8. 57(ii)-7 

The ballad version of the story as given in Percy's 
" Reliques," (ed. Wheatley, iii. 169). For the prose 
tale see No. 454, etc. 

641. The two babes in the wood ; or. The 
Norfolk gentleman's last will and testament. 



To which are added. The chimney sweeper, 
and Bid the coachman drive, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 8.24 

642. The two babes in the wood. To 
which is added, Jonnny Coup's defeat at 
the battle of Preston Pans. Paisley, J. Neil- 
son. 1812. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-97 

643. Two favourite ballads. The babes in 
the wood. Lord Gregory. Glasgow. [No.] 7. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 74.9 

The second piece is Burns's song, based on the 
ballad of •' Lord Gregory; or. The lass of Loch 
Royal." Child, No. 76 (ii. 213). 

644. The children in the wood ; or. The 
Norfolk gentleman's last will and testament. 
Broadside. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Wdcts. . ioo(i).35 

645. The same. London, Petticoat- Lane. 
Broadside. Wdct. 103.3 

646. The children in the wood ; or. The 
Norfolk gentleman's last will and testament. 
A true story. London, Jennings. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 105.33 

The cuts have no relation to the text. 

647. The Norfolk gentleman's last will and 
testament : who on his death-bed committed 
the keeping of his two children ... to his 
own brother, who did most wickedly cause 
them to be destroyed ... To an excellent 
new tune call'd, Rogero, &c. Broadside. 
Wdct. 106.4 

The cut has the children on the left, cattle, etc., on 
the right. In the gallows the rope is omitted. An- 
other version of this cut is pasted on the back of p. 3 
of this collection. 

648. The interesting story of the children 
in the wood ; an historical ballad. Banbury, 
J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 114.7 

649. The babes in the wood. [Illustrated 
by Joseph Crawhall.] London : Field & 
Tuer ; New York : Scribner & Welford. 1 883. 
4°. pp. (24). Wdcts. 94.2 

650. The same, with colored wood-cuts. 

90.2 

651. The famous ballad of Badsworth hunt ; 
or. The fox-chace, by Mr. Bright's hounds, 
of Badsworth, near West-bridge, in Yorkshire, 
in the year 1729. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(ii).i6 
With notes explaining personal allusions. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



39 



652. Barbara Allen's cruelty; or, The 
young man's tragedy, with Barbara Allen's 
lamentation for her unkindness to her lover, 
and herself. London, Bow Church v^ard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(i).i2 

This is Child's version B, c (Percy broadside) 
No. 84 (ii. 279). 

653. Bonny Barbara Allan; to which are 
added. Yarrow braes. The hills of the High- 
lands, The lassie I lo'e best of a', Bessie Bell 
and Mary Gray, O meikle thinks my love. 
Edinburgh. 1823. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 62.30 

The first piece is the ballad as given by Child, 
No. 84, version A (ii. 276). 

654. Bateman's tragedy. A Godly warn- 
ing to all maidens shewed on Jerman's wife, 
of Clifton, in the county of Nottingham, who, 
lying in child-bed, was born away, and was 
never heard of after. London, William Dicey 
and Company, in Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdct. I00(i).i5 

At the top is written in Bishop Percy's hand "Batc- 
man that hang'd himself for love." For a prose ac- 
count see No. 441. Roxburghe, iii. 193. 

655. Bateman's tragedy. Broadside. 

102. 1 12 

656. The battle of the Boyn. To which 
are added. The milking pail. Thro' the wood, 
laddie. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1826. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.9 

657. Battle of Harlaw.] Two old histori- 
cal Scots poems giving an account of the 
battles of Harlaw and the Reid-Squair. Glas- 
gow, Robert Foulis. 1748. 16°. pp. 20. 

39- 1 

The Battle of Harlaw is the poem printed by Allan 
Ramsay in the Ever Green, 1724, i. 78, not the old 
ballad. Child, No. 163 (iii. 316). 

658. The battle of Prestonpans. To which 
is added, Johnnie Cope, Damon's treachery, 
The idol. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

28.18 

659. The same. To which is added, Waly, 
waly. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1825. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.7 

Different from the version given in Child, No. 204 
(iv. 92). 

660. The battle of Roslin ; fought on the 
pTains of Roslin, 1303 ; and John Highland- 
man's remarks on Glasgow. Falkirk. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 66(ii).2 

For the second piece see also No. 1967. 



661. The battle of Roslin, and John High- 
land man's remarks on Glasgow. Glasgow. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. (No. 6.) 62.6 

662. The famous battle of Waterloo. Bath, 
Whitford. Broadside. Wdct. 104.19 

663. Beautiful Nancy's garland. In four 
parts, etc. To which is added The Terrible, 
privateer. Belfast, James Magee. 1767. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).40 

Begins " Sir William the wealthy that liv'd in the 
west." 

A farmer's daughter courted by the squire is kid- 
napped and sent over seas but returns and weds the 
squire. 

The second piece is a ballad of the fight between 
the English privateer, Terrible, Capt. Death, and the 
French ships, Alexander and Vengeance, Dec. 1757. 
This version begins, " Ye Britons all of courage bold." 
Compare A pedlar's pack, etc. by \V. H. Logan, 
Edinburgh, 1869, p. 30, who gives a different ballad 
beginning "The muse with the heroes brave deeds 
being fired." See also No. 1475. 

664. The beautiful shepherdess of Arcadia. 
London, Aldermary Church -Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 100 (i) .8 

Child, No. no (ii. 464 etc.), version A. 

665. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

105.17 
The cuts are not the same as in the preceding edition. 

666. The beggars chorus; or, The jovial 
crew. . . . Broadside. Wdct. 105.41 

667. Beggar's wedding.] The beggar's 
garland. In three parts. Sheffield, John 
Garnett. Oct. — 50. [1750.] 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 38.30 

Begins " All you that delight in a jest that kills." 
A knight hires a beggar to kill his ward; the beggar 
conceals the ward and contrives his marriage with the 
knight's daughter. The story also appears under the 
title, The Dorsetshire garland. 

668. The beggar's wedding ; a garland in 
three parts . . . To which is added The birks 
of Endermary. Belfast, James Magee. 1764. 
i6^ pp. 8. 57(iii).42 

669. Beggar's wedding.] The Dorsetshire 
garland. In three parts. . . . Printed by T. M. 
16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 38.9,12 

670. The Dorsetshire garland; or. The 
beggar's wedding. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. 2 cop. lOO(i). 55 ; 105.6 

671. The same. Coventry, Turner. Broad- 
side. 102.108 



672. The same. Broadside. 



105.6 



40 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



673. The Berkshire lady's garland. In 
four parts .... To which is added, Meg 
o'Marley. Falkirk. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 63.9 

Begins " Batchelors of every station." 
A story of a " coy lady " of ;^5ooo a year who in- 
vited a gentleman to fight her in a duel on his refusing 
to wed her in a mask. Noticed in Roxburghe, viii. 804. 

674. The same. Glasgow. 16°. pp.8. 



Wdct. on t. p. 



64.12 



675. The same. Belfast, James Magee. 
1767. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

57(iii).24 

676. The same. (Appended to Remark- 
able & memorable history of Sir Robert 
Bewick and the laird Grahame, No. 1095.) 

68.5 

677. The Barkshire lady's garland. [Illus- 
trated by Joseph Crawhall.] London : Field 
& Tuer, etc. ; New York : Scribner & Welford. 
1883. 4°. pp. (32). Wdcts. 94.1 

678. The same, with colored wood cuts. 

90.1 

679. The Berkshire lady. In four parts. 
London, J. Evans. Broadside. Wdct. 

I03(i).i76 

680. The Berkshire tragedy ; or, The Wit- 
tam miller, n. p. 1796. Broadside. 

I03(i).i88 
Begins " Young men and maidens all, give ear." 

681. The Berkshire tragedy; or. The Wit- 
tam miller. Being an account of his mur- 
dering his sweetheart. Coventry, Turner. 
Broadside. 102. 107 

682. The same. [London], Pitts. Broad- 
side. 107.9 

683. The Berkshire tragedy; or, the Wit- 
tam miller. With an account of his mur- 
dering his sweetheart, &c. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(i).i4 

The cut illustrates the progress of the tale. 

684. The birds lamentation .... to the 
tune of. The bird-catcher's delight. North- 
ampton, Wm. Dicey, etc. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(i)3 

MS. note by Bishop Percy : " Pepys vol. iv. pag. 
267, 269. There's another something different, pag. 
268." This is the version given in Roxbun^he, vi. 
305. The cut is not the same as that in the next 
entry. The imprint names the following dealers: 
Burnham, Northampton; Mathias Dagnell, Ayles- 
bury; Paul Stevens, Bicester; William Ratten, Cov- 
entry; Caleb Ratten, Harborough; Thomas Williams 
Tring; Anthony Thorpe, St. Albans; William Peachey, 
Cambridge; Mary Timbs, Newport-Pagnell; John 



Timbs, Stony-Stratford; Jeremiah Roe in Derby; 
John Hirst, Leeds; Thomas Gent, York; John 
White, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; Churrude Brady, St. 
Ives. 

685. The woody choristers ; or. The birds 
harmony. In two parts. . . . Tune, The bird- 
catcher's delight. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(iii).67 
Roxburghe, vi, 299. This version is the same as 
that given on p. 301. The cut is slightly different. 

686. The blackamoor in the wood ; or, A 
lamentable ballad on the tragical end of a 
gallant lord and virtuous lady ; together with 
the untimely death of their two children, 
wickedly performed by a heathenish and 
bloodthirsty villain their servant. The like 
of which cruelty was never before heard of. 
To which is added, Jockie lad an' ye wad 
steal me. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. , 29.19,38 

687. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. I00(ii).7 

There are a few verbal differences in the title. 

688. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).4i 

The cut is different from that in the preceding. 

689. The blackamor \sic\ in the wood, 
a lamentable song. Falkirk, T. Johnston. 
1810. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.8 

690. The blackamoor of the wood ; being 
a tragical end of a gallant lord and virtuous 
lady . . . Stirling, W. Macnie. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. (2 cop.) 64.3, 70.3 

691. The blackamore. Broadside. Wdct. 

106.7 

692. Blackamoor in the wood.] A lament- 
able ballad of the tragical end of a gallant 
lord and virtuous lady; together with the 
untimely death of their two children. Lon- 
don, John Evans. Broadside. 101.5 

693. Blackamoor in the wood.] The 
lamentable ballad. A gallant lord and vir- 
tuous lady, together with the untimely death 
of their two children. London, No. 4 Alder- 
mary Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

102. t8 

694. Black-ey'd Susan's garland. [By 
John Gay.] In three parts. To which are 
added two new songs, i. Love in a tub ; or. 
The merchant outwitted. ii. John Hay's 
bonny lassie. Belfast, James Magee. 1764. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).i4 

The first piece begins " All in the Downs the fleet 
was moor'd." The two following entries are the 
same ballad. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



41 



695. William and Susan. Tune, Black- 
ey'd Susan. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(iii).79 

696. William and Susan. Broadside. 

Wdct. 102.128 

A different cut and different typog^raphical compo- 
sition. 

697. The blaeberry courtship; or, Allan's 
love to the farmer's daughter. To which is 
added, The sailor's pleasant life ; or, Why 
should we quarrel for riches. Falkirk, T. 
Johnston. 18 10. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59.9 

Begins, " Will you go to the Highlands my jewel 
with me ? ' ' 

698. The blaeberry courtship. Gateshead, 
Stephenson. Broadside. I03(i).207 

Also contained in "The goldfinch, a new song 
book." See No. 1343. 

699. Blew cap for mee ; [or, A Scottish lass 
her resolute chusing, Shee'l have bonny blew- 
cap, all other refusing. Illustrated by Joseph 
Crawhall.] London : Field & Tuer, etc. ; 
New York: Scribner & Welford. 1883. 
4°. pp. (28). Wdcts. 94.5 

700. The samcy with colored wood-cuts. 

90.6 

701. The blind beggar of Bednal-Green. 
In two parts. Sheffield, John Garnet. June 
— 52 [1752]. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 37.5, 38.10 

Child (British poets), iv. 161. The text varies 
slightly. For the prose versions see No, 447 etc. 

702. The same. Northampton, W. Dicey. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(i).6 

703. The blink-ey'd cobbler. Tune of 
The hog- tub. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(i).4 

Begins, "All you that delight in merriment." A 
knight's son loves his father's chambermaid, and, dis- 
guised as a cobbler, marries her. 

704. The blink-ey'd cobler. Broadside. 
Wdct. 102.124 

705. The same. Broadside. 101,4 

706. The bloody gardener's cruelty ; or. 
The shepherd's daughter betrayed. London, 
R. Powell. Broadside. Wdct. 100 (i). 17 

Begins, "Come all you constant lovers and to me 
lend an ear." 

707. The same. London, J. and C. Evans. 
Broadside. Wdct. I03(i).i74 

708. The same. London, Jennings. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 102.6 



709. The bonny lass of Banaphie, to which 
is added, The banks of Clyde. Stirling, W. 
Macnie. 1826. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 4 cop. 70.3, 81.2, 82,4, 84.8 

710. The bonny lass of Banaphie. To 
which a e [sic'] added. Hap me wi' thy petti- 
coat, and Lovely nymph. Stirling, C. Ran- 
dall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.19 

711. The bonny lassie. To its own proper 
tune. Broadside. 105.14 

Also known under the title, " The braes of Brank- 
som." Begins, " As I came down by Teviot side. And 
by the braes of Branksom," 

712. Bonny Lizie Bailie ; to which are 
added. The lover's lament, and The blind 
man's declaration, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 28.12, 29.42 

Child, No, 227 (iv, 266). 

713. The bonny milk-maid. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(i).i6 
A song beginning, " Ye nymphs and sylvan gods." 

714. The bride's burial ; or, The affection- 
ate lovers, a true love song. Falkirk, T. 
Johnston. 18 10. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59- 10 

Roxburghe, i, 185, 

715. The same. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(i).7 

716. The same. Coventry, Turner. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 102. 1 13 

The Bristol bridegroom. See No. 975, etc. 

717. The Bristol garland. In four parts. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 100 (i). 1 8 

"A merchant's son of worthy fame" marries a 
shepherd's daughter, is disinherited, finds a pot of gold, 
and rescues his parents from poverty. 

718. The Bristol tragedy. In three parts. 
Broadside. 105,22 

Begins " Come listen awhile and a story I'll tell." 
A tale of seduction, murder, and sudden death. 

719. The broken contract; or. The be- 
tray'd virgin's complaint. London. Broad- 
side. Wdct. I00(i).2 

Imperfect : — the name of the publisher and perhaps 
the last line of col. 3, missing. Begins " You pretty 
maidens all I pray draw near." Roxburghe, viii, 807, 

720. The broken contract ; or, The ruined 
virgin's garland. [London], J. Pitts. Broad- 
side. 102.29 

Begins "You pretty maidens all I pray g^ve ear." 
The same story as the preceding. 



42 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BEOADSIDES 



The Buchanshire tragedy ; or, Sir James 
the Ross. See No. 1085. 

The burgomaster. See No. 963. 

721. The Cambridgeshire tragedy. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(i).43 

A family, nearly starved, is rescued by a charitable 

gentleman. Compare the Cumberland tragedy, No. 771 . 

722. Captain Glen's unhappy voyage to 
New Barbary ; to which is added, The two 
constant lovers, sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 28.2 

Captain Glen's voyage contains several stanzas and 
lines not in the version printed in Christie's "Tradi- 
tional ballad airs." Compare "The Cork trader," 
No. 758. Capt. Glen is mentioned by Child in his 
notes to " Brown Robyn's confession," ii. 16. J^ox- 
burghe, vvi\. 141. 

723. Capt. Hinds progress and ramble. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 100 (i). 2 2 

For a prose account of Capt. Hind see No. 2161. 

724. Capt. Ward.] A famous sea-fight 
between Captain Ward, and the Rainbow. 
To the tune of Captain Ward, &c. North- 
ampton, William Dicey. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(iii).3i 
Begins " Strike up you lusty gallants, With musick 

and sound of drum." 

Child, No. 287 (v. 143). Fine cut of a vessel 

under sail. 



725. The same. 
Broadside. Wdct. 



[London], J. Pitts. 
102.83 



726. Capt. Ward and the Rainbow. To 
which are added, Tom Bowling, Moll in the 
wad. Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-24 

A different version, beginning, " Come all ye jolly 
sailors bold, who live by tuck of drum," and contain- 
ing several additional stanzas. At the end of this chap- 
book is a leaf 7-8 from another song-book, containing, 
" The absent Florinda " and " When William at eve." 

727. Captain Wedderburn's courtship. To 
which is added. Hey Johnnie Coup. Glas- 
gow. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 74.6 

Child, No. 46 (i. 414). A variety of puzzling 
questions are propounded lay the lady, which the cap- 
tain has to solve. Compare this with The maidens 
prize (No. 2355). 

728. The same. To which is added. The 
wandering boy. Stirling, W. Macnie. 24°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 70.4 

729. Capt. Wedderburn.] Lord Roslin's 
daughter. To which are added. The maid's 
complaint, Fair Ellen, and The faithless lover. 
Greenock, William Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-64 

Varies from the forms given by Child. 



730. Capt. Wedderburn.] Lord Roslin's 
daughter's garland, containing three excellent 
new songs, i. The drunkard reformed. 2. The 
devil and the grinder. 3. Lord Roslins 
daughter. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.6 

731. Carle, now the king's come; com- 
posed on the occasion of his majesty. King 
George IV.'s visit to Scotland, in August, 
1822. In two parts. Glasgow, printed for 
the booksellers. 1828. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
{star and garter) on t. p. 83.1 

732. A castle-builder ; a tale. Broadside. 
Wdct. 104.38 

A milk -maid and her disappointed hopes. 

733. Catskin.] The wandering young 
gentlewoman ; or. The cats-skins' garland ; 
in five parts, etc. Glasgow. [No.] 16. 16°. 
pp. 8. 2 cop. ■ 74-2, 84.1 

See also ' ' Cinderella, 345 variants of Cinderella, 
Catskin, and Cap-o 'rushes," by M. R. Cox, London, 
1893, pp. 53, etc. This story belongs to Miss Cox's 
group B of Cinderella variants. See also Child (British 
poets), viii. 172; Roxburghe, viii. 165; there are 43 
broadsides of this tale in the Roxburghe collection. 

734. Catskin.] The wandering young 
gentlewoman ; or, Catskin. London, Print- 
ing office in Stonecutter-Street, Fleet Market. 
Broadside. I00(i).3o 



735. The same. 
Broadside. 



London, J. Evans. 
101.7 



736. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. 102.9 

737. Catskin; or. The wandering lady. 
Coventry, Turner. Broadside. 102.10 

738. Cat's-Skin. Broadside. I03(ii).85 



739. The Chester garland. 
Broadside. 



In four parts. 
I00(i).47 

Begins " A merchant of London, as many report." 
Tale of a w£^er on a wife's chastity; agreeing better 
with the Decameron ii. 9, than with Cymbeline. 



740. Chevy Chase.] The famous and 
memorable history of Chevy-Chase by the 
river Tweed in Scotland, together with the 
fatal battle between Lord Piercy . . . and 
the earl of Douglas. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

67.11 

A prose account of the battle is followed by "The 
excellent old ballad," beginning "God prosper long 
our noble king." All the issues here recorded, both 
chap-books and broadsides, are variants of this form 
of the ballad. Child, No. 162, B, (iii. 311). 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



43 



741. The same. London. sm.i2°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 53.8 

In text and appearance closely resembling the pre- 
ceding, but the composition of the type is different 
and the cuts on pages 10 and 18 differ. 

742. Chevy-Chase.] The famous and re- 
nowned history of the memorable, but unhappy 
hunting on Chevy-Chase, by the river Tweed 
in Scotland, together with the great and mor- 
tal battles fought there . . . [London], printed 
by and for W. O., etc. sm. 4°. pp. (24). 
Wdcts. 99.3 

A prose account, followed by the ballad, "To the 
tune of, Flying fame, &c." "A catalogue of books 
newly printed," p. 23. 

743. The hunting of Chevy -Chase. 

Greenock, William Scott. 16°. pp. 8. 

Wdct. on t. p. 59-44 

This edition and the following contain the ballad 
only. 

744. The hunting of Chevy-Chase, a 
bloody battle fought by Earls Douglas and 
Percy .... Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 71.19, 79.10 

745. The same. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 65.25 

The cut represents a stag. 

746. The same. Falkirk. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.4 

The same cut as in the preceding. 

747. Chevy-Chase.] The renowned his- 
tory of the memorable hunting on Chevy- 
Chace by the river Tweed in Scotland. 
Together with the fatal battle fought be- 
tween the Lord Piercy of Northumberland 
and his fifteen hundred archers and the 
Earl Douglas, with twenty hundred Scots 
in which both these earls and most of their 
men were slain. London, Bow Church 
Yard. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

58(ii).i 

A list of chap-books published by W. & C. Dicey 
is given on the back of the title-page. 

748. The unhappy hunting of Chevy- 
Chase : between Earl Douglas of Scotland 
and Earl Piercy of England. Belfast, J. 
Magee. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

57(m).3 

749. Chevy-Chase. Broadside. Wdct. 

I03(ii).i9 

A modem print. Under the cut is written in pen- 
cil "T. Bewick." 



750. Chevy Chase.] The excellent old 
ballad of Chevy Chace ; describing the 
woeful hunting match on Cheviot Hill, with 
the bloody fight between the Earles Percy 
and Douglas. London, Jennings. Broad- 
side. i03(i).i2O 

751. Chevy-Chase.] A memorable song, 
on the unhappy hunting of Chevy-Chase, 
between Earl Douglas of Scotland, and Earl 
Piercy of England. Broadside. 106.2 

752. Chevy-Chase.] An unhappy memo- 
rable song of the hunting in Chevy-Chace 
between Earl Piercy of England, and Earl 
Douglas of Scotland. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 100 (i). 36 

MS. notes by Bishop Percy. At the head is printed 
a prose account of the ballad taken from ' ' A collection 
of old ballads," London, 1723, i. 108, (the cut in 
that collection is not copied) , and below it this " Note : 
As the use of these old songs is very great, in re- 
spect that many children who never would have learn'd 
to read had they not took a delight in poring over 
Jane Shore, or Robin Hood, &c. which has insensi- 
bly stole into them a curiosity and desire of read- 
ing other the Hke stories, till they have improv'd 
themselves more in a short time than perhaps they 
would have done in some years at school: in order 
still to make them more useful, I premise to affix an 
Introduction, in which I shall point out what is fact 
and what is fiction in each song; which will (as may 
be readUy suppos d) give not only children, but per- 
sons of more ripe years, an insight into the reality, in- 
tent and design, as well as many times the author and 
time when such song was made, which has not hitherto 
been explain 'd." 

753. Chevy-Chase.] The unhappy mem- 
orable song of the htmting of Chevy-Chace. 
London, Howard & Evans. 181 1. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 2 cop. loi.i, I03(ii).9i 



754. The same. 
181 1. Broadside. 



London, John Evans. 
Wdct. 103 (i). 90 



755. The choristers. [A satire.] Bir- 
mingham, T. Bloomer. Broadside. Wdcts. 

104.26 

756. The contented lovers ; or, A pleasant 
courtship between a shepherd and a nymph. 
London, L. How. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(ii).io 

Begins, " Shepherd Adonis being weary of his 
sport." 

757. Coridon and Parthenia, the languish- 
ing shepherd made happy ; or. Faithful love 
rewarded. Printed for * * * . Broadside. 
Wdcts. Black letter. 108.4 

Imperfect .• — part of the last stanza and the imprint 
missing. This is apparently another copy of that re- 
printed in Koxhurghe, iii. 567, which was " Printed for 
P. Brooksby, at the Golden Ball, in West Smithfield." 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



758. The Cork trader; or, Distressed pas- 
sengers. To which are added, My Nanny O, 
with the answer, Alexis and Clarinda. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.34 

The captain of the Cork trader was a murderer and 
a Jonah; not until he was thrown overboard was the 
vessel in safety. An imitation of "Captain Glen's 
voyage," No. 722. 

759. The Cornwall tragedy; or, The two 
faithful lovers. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(i).42 

Begins, " All you that do to love belong." 

760. Coventry made free by Godiva, 
countess of Chester. To the tune of. Prince 
Arthur died at Ludlow, &c. London, Bow 
Church Yard, etc. Broadside. Wdct. 

100 (i) .48 

With note of explanation, taken, with the cut of 
Godiva, from "A collection of old ballads," 1723, ii.34. 

761. The covetous mother; or. The terri- 
ble overthrow of two loyal lovers. Northamp- 
ton, William Dicey, etc. Broadside. Wdcts. 
(No. 8.) I00(i).25 

Mother-in-law sells the girl into slavery; the son 
kills himself. Koxburghe, viii. 131. 

A long list of booksellers is given in the imprint. 

762. An excellent new ballad entitled. The 
cripple of Cornwall, wherein is shown his dis- 
solute life and deserved death. To the tune 
of The blind beggar. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105-25 

Also contained in No. 1897. The churlish husband 
(65.9)- 

763. Cromlet's lilt. To be sung to its own 
proper tune. Broadside. 106.22 

Contains the original six stanzas, " Her reply," and 
" Another reply." Roxburghe, vii. 394. 

764. The cruel cooper of Ratcliff. In three 
parts. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 1 00 (i). 2 6 

Begins, " Near Ratcliff -Cross lived a cooper there." 
The cooper abuses his son, who goes to Turkey, 
where he marries a rich lady; later the cooper goes 
to Turkey; becomes slave to his son; is finally recog- 
nized and sent home with wealth. 
Cut of a cooper. 



765. The same. 
Broadside. Wdct. 



[London], J. Pitts. 
105.36 



The cruel knight. See No. 841, etc. 

766. The cruel lover; or, The credulous 
maid. Being an account of a young man . . . 
who, after he had courted a young maid 
. . . murder'd her, and afterwards threw her 
into Ann-is-so-clear, near Shoreditch, &c. 
Tune, George Barnwell. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(i).3i 



767. The cruel step mother; or, The un- 
happy son. [London], J. Pitts. Broadside. 

102.72 
Begins, " You most indulgent parents lend an ear." 
The step-mother procures her step-son to be sent over- 
seas; apparition of the mother; father hangs himself; 
son inherits and returns. 

768. The same. Coventry, Turner. Broad- 
side. 102.73 

769. The same. London, Jennings. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 103 (i). 88 

770. The same. London, J. Davenport. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.21 

771. The Cumberland tragedy. Being a 
full and true account of one Margaret Gra- 
ham, a widow woman, and two children that 
were starved to death at a place called Wall- 
beck. [London], Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 2 cop. ioo(i).4o.5i 

Compare the Cambridgeshire tragedy, No. 721. 
In the latter death is averted by charity. 

772. Cupid's courtesie ; or, The young gal- 
lant foiled at his own weapon .... Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 100 (i) .32 

MS. references by Bishop Percy: " Pepys, vol. 3, 
p. 219. Pitts vi. 44." Roxburghe, iii. 529. 

773. Cupid's revenge; or, An account of 
a king, who slighted all women, and at length 
was forced to marry a beggar. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

Roxburghe, vi. 658. 100 (i). 24 

774. Cupid's revenge; being an account 
of a certain Indian king who slighted and 
despised the most wealthy and beautiful 
women and at length was obliged (by the 
force of love) to marry a beggar. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 102.124 

775. Death and burial of Cock Robin. 
Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 

114.1 

The Derbyshire garland; or, Sir William 
Stanley's travels. See No. 1097, etc. 

776. The deserted village. By Dr. Gold- 
smith. Edinburgh, James Murray. 1782. 
24°. pp. 16. 39.3 

777. The Devonshire garland. In three 
parts. ... 16°. pp. 8. 69.10 

Begins, "You mortals all that deal unjust." A 
tale of incest. 

778. Devonshire garland.] The Guern- 
sey garland. In three parts. London, Alder- 
mary Church Yard. Broadside. I00(ii).6 

The same as the preceding. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



45 



779. The distracted sailor. Tune, What 
is greater joy and pleasure, &c. Printed and 
sold in Aldermary Church Yard, London. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.13 

Begins, " Oh, how pleasant are young lovers." 
Large cut of a port, two batteries, with a chain 
drawn between, etc. 

780. The distressed lady; or, A trial of 
true love. In five parts. Broadside. 

I00(i).69 

Begins, "Loyal lovers give attention." A lady 
tests her lovers by throwing her fan into the lion's 
den at the Tower. For a similar tale, see "The 
Bostonshire lady" in No. 1604. 

781. The distressed shepherd; or, Joy 
after sorrow. To a pleasant new tune. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. ioo(i).58, 102.70 

Begins, " I am a poor shepherd undone." 

782. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I03(i).39 

783. The Dorsetshire garland. To an ex- 
cellent tune. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(i).66 

Not the same story as the others of this title 
recorded under the Beggars' wedding, No. 669, etc. 
Begins, " Behold, near the borders of fair Dorsetshire, 
where labour is cheap, and money is dear." Sweet 
William, the son of a laborer, marries a knight's 
daughter. 

784. The duke of Anjou's farewel to 
Spain ; or, A hue and cry after a little stray 
king, that was lately lost in a fog; with a 
reward of ten thousand pistoles for any one 
that will bring him to his grandfather, the 
French king. London, B. Taylor. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 105.15 

785. The duke of Argyle's courtship to an 
English lady; to which is added, John of 
Badenyon, and The maid with her minutes 
lost. Printed in the year, 1791. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct, on t. p. 29.15 

The first ballad varies from the text in Buchan's 
•' Ancient ballads and songs of the north of Scotland," 
Edinburgh, 1825, ii. 149. 

786. The duke of Argyle's courtship to an 
English lady ; to which are added, The bonny 
Highland lad, Bessy Bell and Mary Gray, 
The county of Cavin, Too cruel nymph, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 28.15 

This ballad is also contained in " Four excellent new 
songs " (No. 1299), "The jolly beggar " (No. 910), 
and " The maidenhead's garland " (No. 1436). 

787. The life and death of the great duke 
of Buckingham, who came to an untimely 
end, for consenting to the deposing of the 
two gallant young princes, King Edward the 



Fourth's children. To the tune of Shore's 
wife. Northampton, William Dicey. Broad- 
side. Wdct. ioo(ii).52 

With a prose account of Buckingham taken from 
"A collection of old ballads," London, 1723, iii. 38. 

788. The duke of Gordon's daughters, to 
which is added. The challenge. Stirling, 
W. Macnie. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

Child, No. 237 (iv. 332). 70'5 

789. The duke of Gordon's three bonny 
daughter's; to which are added, Moll and 
her mistress ; or, O to be marry'd if this be 
the way. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

29.16 

790. The duke of Gordon's three daugh- 
ters ; to which are added, John Uproar's 
chant, and The frolicsome maid, who went 
to Gibralter, and from a single soldier turn'd 
a captain, and yet chaste, sm. 8°, pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.8,41 

791. The same. To which is added. Jack 
Ratclive, and The Edinburgh volunteers. Fal- 
kirk. 1826. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. (ornament) 
on t. p. 82.3 

792. The same. To which are added, 
Mary, I believ'd thee true, and Prince 
Chariie. Falkirk. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 63.8 

793. The same. To which are added, 
The brewer laddie, and The hero may perish. 
Glasgow. [No.] 18. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 74.5 

794. The duke of Gordon's garland, com- 
posed of two excellent new songs : The duke 
of Gordon's daughter, A new song called 
Newcastle ale. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 61.65, 56.4 

795. Duke Hamilton and Lord Moon. 
Slip. Wdct. 100 (i). 67 

Begins, "Duke Hamilton was as fine a lord, Fal 
la, etc.. As ever Scotland could afford, Fal la, etc." 
Roxburghe, viii. 234. 

796. The Durham garland. In four parts. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdct. 105.8 

Begins, "A worthy lord of vast estate." The 
opening suggests that of Guy Mannering. A noble 
lord becomes god-father to a forester's son, and casts 
his horoscope, which threatens him with hanging for 
theft. The boy, however, escapes a trick such as was 
practised upon Benjamin, and becomes son-in-law to 
his god-father. The garland appears in Ritson's 
"Northern garlands," London, 1810. Roxhurghe, 
viii. 804; the resemblance of the garland to the case 
of James Annesley, the Anglesea claimant, spoken of 
here, is not very evident. Compare the " Fisherman's 
garland," No, 841. 



46 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



797. The Durham garland. 



Broadside. 
ioo(i).54 



798. The dutiful daughter of Halifax. In 
four parts. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. VVdcts. ioo(i).59 

Begins, " In Halifax-town there lived one." The 
theme is the generous treatment of a cruel father. 

799. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I03(i).27 
The cuts are not the same as in the preceding. 

800. The dying tears of a true lover for- 
saken. Made on his death-bed the hour be- 
fore his death. To the tune of, Come live 
with me, &c. Northampton, William Dicey. 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(i).63 

Begins, " These gentle hearts that true love crave." 

801. Edwin and Angelina. [By Oliver 
Goldsmith.] Coventry, Turner, Broadside. 
Wdct. 102.129 

The original title of The hermit. Begins, "Turn, 
gentle hermit of the dale." 

802. Edwin and Emma [by David Mallet], 
to which are added, The meeting of the waters, 
I'm grieved to leave my comrades all, I ha'e 
a wife o' my ain. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1825. 
24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

73.14, 844 
Begins, " Yzx in the windings of a vale." 

The esquire and Susan garland. See 
No. 990. 

803. An essay on criticism. Written by 
Mr. Pope. The third edition. London, 
W. Lewis. 1 7 13. 18°. pp. 35. 40.3 

804. An essay on human life. London, 
J. Haberkorn. sm. 8°. pp.23. 23.14 

The advertisement says, "The following poems 
being omitted in Mr. Pope's own edition of his works 
has given grounds for some to imagine the Piece is 
none of his, and others have attributed it to a noble 
Peer; but whoever reads over his literary correspond- 
ence, will be fully convinced that he is the author." 

805 . The Exeter garland ; containing two 
excellent songs, i . Being a tragical account 
of two loyal lovers of Exeter, etc. 2. The 
ale-wives forced to spin. pp.8. 16°. Vigns. 

56.5 

Begins, *' Draw near you young gallants, while I 
do unfold." The young lady is sent to London; re- 
turning secretly she passes her lover on his way to 
London; on the third journey the lady dies on the 
road, the lover's heart breaks. 

806. Exeter garland.] The garland of 
withered roses containing A tragical account 



of two loyal lovers of Exeter ... To which 
are added two other songs, viz. : i. Sawney 
and Jockey. 2. The Galloway shepherds. 
Belfast. 1769. 16°. pp. 8. Ornamental 
wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).36 

807. Exeter garland.] The two loyal 
lovers of Exeter. [Coventry], Turner. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 102.110 

808. The same. In five parts. Tune of 
The disconsolate lover. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(i).7o 

809. The factor's garland. In four parts. 
. . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

8.32, 29.28 

Begins, " Behold here's a ditty the truth and no 
jest." How the factor of some London merchants 
found the corpse of a Christian lying on the ground in 
Turkey and caused it to be buried; how he rescued a 
young woman from being strangled : how " by a vest 
of her flow'ring " she was acknowledged as a prince's 
daughter; how the factor being cast over-board was 
rescued by the ghost of the Christian, and how he 
married the princess. The garland appears in " A 
collection of old ballads," London, 1723, iii. 221. 

The story is a variant of " The thankful dead man." 
See Herrig's Archiv, Ixxxi. 141, a monograph by 
Hippe. 

810. The same. Falkirk. 16°, pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.6 

811. The same. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 66.1 

812. The factor's garland. 16°. pp. 8. 
(No. 2.) 71.20 

There is no title-page. 

813. The factor's garland, a pathetic his- 
tory. . . . Also, the tragedy of Sir James the 
Rose. Newcastle, W. & T. Fordyce. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 68.9 

814. The Turkey factor. In four parts. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 

I00(iii).56 
Another issue. 103.65 

815. The same. Coven [try]. Turner. 
Broadside. 102. 115 

816. Fair Isabel's garland ; or. The wreath 
of willow revers'd. In four parts. . . . Lon- 
don, E. Brooksby, at the Golden Ball in Pye 
Corner. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

38.32 
Begins, ' ' All you that have been crowned with wil- 
low." How a jilted lady regained her lover. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



47 



817. Fair Marg'ret of Craignargat; or, 
The indulgent mother and the disobedient 
daughter; to which are added, Sweet Jean 
of Tyrone, and The rover, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.22, 29.27 

Begins, "Fair Margaret of Craignargat." Child 
(British poets), viii. 249. 

?i 8. Fair Margaret's misfortunes ; to which 
are added, A cogie of ale, The weary pund 
o' tow. Song in Rosina. Edinburgh. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 72.14, 85.6 

The first piece is a version of Fair Margaret and 
Sweet William; Child, No. 74 A (ii. 199). Begins, 
•' As it fell out on a summer's day." 

819. Fair Margaret's misfortunes; or. 
Sweet William's dream on his wedding 
night, with the sudden death of those noble 
lovers. London, Aldermary Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 102.16 

820. Fair Margaret's misfortunes; or. 
Sweet William's frightful dreams on his 
wedding night. With the sudden death 
and burial of those noble lovers. London, 
William and Cluer Dicey, at the printing- 
office in Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. I00(i).72 

MS. notes by Bishop Percy: "This old song is 
• twice quoted in Beaumont & Fletcher's K* of the 
Burning Pestle ; ' ' stanza 5 in the form given by 
Beaumont and Fletcher. 

821. William and Margaret. Coventry, 
J. Turner. Broadside. Wdct. 102.129 

Begins, "When all was wrapt in dark mid-night." 
This ballad appeared, with many variations from its 
present form, in The plain dealer in 1724. The edi- 
tor, Aaron Hill, stated that he reproduced it from a 
garland which he had accidentally found. In a later 
issue the authorship was claimed by David Mallet, and 
the ballad appeared as Mallet's work in The hive, 
1 724, with many changes, and with still more changes, 
in various editions of Mallet's works. Mallet was bom 
about 1700. In 1871 the British museum acquired a 
broadside copy of the ballad, dated 1 7 1 1 , closely cor- 
responding to the early editions of Mallet, but not to 
Hill's version. The present broadside gives the ballad 
in a form closely resembling The hive version, but with 
several lines as given by Hill. Thus we have here 
" pale ey'd " instead of "grimly" in i. 3; "dark," 
in vii. I, and "The birds sung out, the morning 
smil'd," in xv. i. 

There are also several variations which do not appear 
in Hill or in the later versions — some, probably, slips of 
the copyist or of the printer. 

The ballad has been much admired, but according 
to Mr. Child "it is simply ' Fair Margaret ' rewritten 
in what used to be called an elegant style." Child, ii. 
200. Roxbur^he, iii. 671. "Ballads and songs by 
David Mallet; a new edition with notes, etc., by F. 
Dinsdale," London, 1857, p. 69-147. 

Fair Mary of Wallington. See Lovely 
Jenny's garland. No. 1425. 



822. Fair Rosamond.] The life and 
death of Fair Rosamond, concubine to 
King Henry IL To which is added. The 
lass o' Gowrie. Stirling. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 71.18 

This is the ballad by Thomas Deloney, beginning 
" Whenas King Henry rul'd this land." Child (Brit- 
ish poets), vii. 283. For the prose story of Fair Rosa- 
mond see No. 464, etc. Roxhurghe, vi. 667 

823. The same. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. portr. of Henry VnL[ !] on t. p. 
(No. 14.) 62.8 

824. The same. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 8. 
Armorial wdct. on t. p. 65.18 

The title-page reads " concubine to King Henery 
the IL" 

825. The same. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. of 
crown on t. p. 65.20 

826. Fair Rosamond.] The life and death 
of Fair Rosamond, King Henry the Second's 
concubine. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(i).77 

827. Fair Rosamond, Henry the Second's 
concubine. Broadside. 103 (i). 180 

Nos. 822-827 are all Deloney's ballad. • 

828. Fair Rosamond.] The unfortunate 
concubine ; or, Rosamund's overthrow, occa- 
sion'd by her brother's unadvisedly praising 
her beauty to two young knights of Salisbury, 
as they rid on the road. To the tune of. The 
court lady. Northampton, William Dicey. 
Broadside. Wdct. 100 (i) .76 

This is the ballad beginning " Sweet youthful 
charming ladies fair." It is taken, with the prose 
introduction (almost entire), from "A collection of 
old ballads," London, 1723, i. i, etc. The cut is 
a woodcut reproduction of the engraved plate in 
that book. Child (British poets), vii. 283. Rox- 
burghe, vi. 676. 

829. The life and death of Fair Rosamond. 
Coventry, Turner. Broadside. 102. 121 

The same ballad as the preceding. 

830. Faithful friendship ; or, Alphonso 
and Ganselo. To the tune of. Flying fame. 
No. 3. Northampton, Wm. Dicey, etc. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(i).8i 

The imprint states that this was " sold by William 
Peachey, near St. Benet's Church, in Cambridge,' at 
Bumham's snuff-shop in Aylesbury; Mrs. Margaret 
Ward, in Sun Lane, Reading; Paul Stevens in Bices- 
ter; Tho. Williams in Tring; Anthony Thorpe in St. 
Albans; John Timbs and Henry Potter, in Stony 
Stratford; and by Churrude Brady in St. Ives. At 
all which places, chapmen, travellers, &c., may be 
furnish 'd with all sorts of old and new ballads, broad- 
sheets, histories, &c." 

With introductory note taken from "A collection 
of old ballads." 1723,11. 145. " The only existing 
broadside seems to be the one in the Roxburghe Col- 
lection," Roxburghe, iii. 204. 



48 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



83 1 . The faithless captain ; or, The be- 
tray'd virgin's garland. To which is added 
a new song call'd The northern lass. Belfast, 
James Magee. 1766. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 57(iii).29 

Begins, "All you maidens fair, pray awhile draw 
near." 

832. The faithless captain; or, The be- 
trayed virgin. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(i).73 

833. The same. Coventry, Turner. Broad- 
side. 102.116 

834. The faithless captain; or, Betrayed 
virgin. London, Jennings. Broadside. Wdct. 

103.172 

835. The famous flower of serving-men; 
or, The lady turn'd serving-man. To the 
tune of, Flora's farewell. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(i).78 

Child, No. 106 (ii. 428, etc.), Roxburghe, vi. 567. 
Stanzas 3-5 closely resemble the first three stanzas in 
the "Lament of the border widow" (Scott's Min- 
strelsy, ed. Henderson, iii. 108). 

836. The same. Coventry, Turner. Broad- 
side. 102. 1 19 

837. The same. London, J. Davenport. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.29 

838. Female sensibility; a pathetic tale 
in verse, founded upon an incident that 
occured in Flanders during the present war 
and strongly exemplifying the persecuting 
spirit of aristocracy, respectfully inscribed to 
that illustrious patriot Earl Stanhope. By 
John Purves. London, J. Berke. sm. 8°. 
pp. 34. 15-8 

839. Fine flowers of the valley. To which 
are added, Frennet Hall, and My Nanny, O. 
1795. sm. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

33.11 

The first piece is the form of the ballad of the 
"Cruel brother" given in Herds " Scottish songs," 
i. 88. Child, No. 11 (i. 148). 

"The modern, and extremely vapid, ballad of, 
'Frennet Hall' appeared originally (I suppose) in 
Herd's 'Scottish songs,' 1776, i. 142." Child, iv. 
39. The old ballad, "The fire of Frendraught," 
\Child, No. 196) tells the same story in greater 
detail. 

840. The fisherman's daughter. In three 
parts. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. I00(i).79 

Begins, "Sir Thomas the wealthy that lives in 
Kent." It is not the same as the Fisherman's gar- 
land. Here the knight's son loves the fisherman's 



daughter; the knight casts the lady into the sea, but 
she is saved, and the lovers are united. The ring and 
fish incident does not appear. 

841. The fisherman's garland; or, The 
cruel knight, in four parts .... 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 8.29, 29.25, 56.6 

Copy 56.6 has a MS. note by Bishop Percy. " Sent 
by R. Lambe, 1767." 

Begins, "In famous York city, a farmer did dwell." 
A knight casts a horoscope of the farmer's daughter; 
she is predestined to be his bride; twice the knight 
tries to procure her death ; twice she is saved ; he then 
throws a ring into the sea and bids her not to approach 
him until she brings the ring; she finds the ring in a 
fish, whereupon the knight marries her. Koxhurghe, 
viii. 800. Compare The Durham garland (No. 796) . 

842. The fortunate lady ; or. Fisherman's 
garland. In four parts. Falkirk, T. John- 
ston. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.36 

843. Fisherman's garland.] The cruel 
knight and the fortunate farmer's daughter. 
Broadside. 100 (i). 33 

844. Fisherman's garland.] The cruel 
knight ; or. The fortunate farmer's daughter. 
Coventry, Turner. Broadside. 102. 123 

845. Flora's farewel ; or. The shepherd's 
love passion song. Wherein he doth greatly 
complain Because his love was spent in vain. 
To a delicate tune ; or, A thousand times my 
love commend. [With] Fair Flora's answer 
. . . [London], printed for A. Milbourne, W. 
Onley, and T. Thackeray, at the Angel in 
Duck-Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. Black- 
letter. 2 cop. 105.12, 108.2 

Roxburghe, vi. 105. 

846. The forlorn lover declaring How a 
lass gave her lover three slips for a tester, 
And married another a week before Easter. 
To a pleasant new tune. Broadside. Wdct. 

Roxburghe, •<A. 2.7,7^. 102. 17 

847. A week before Easter; or. The for- 
lorn lover. A lass gave her lover three slips 
for a tester. And married another A Week 
before Easter. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(iii).84 

848. The four seasons of the year, to which 
are added Rural poems and pastoral dialogues 
imitated from Mr. Gay, etc. By Bob Short, 
author of The country squire, &c, &c. Lon- 
don, H. Turpin. 1787. 12°. pp.48. Wdcts. 

34.7 

" The Seasons of the year . . . are pourtrayed in the 
lively colours of the late Mr. Thomson, but in common 
verse, for the use of those who are not fond of blank 
verse, nor long descriptions. " — Advertisement 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



49 



849. The gallant seaman's resolution, whose 
full intent was to try his fortune at sea and at 
his return to marry his landlady. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(ii).i 
"Begins, "A gallant youth at Gravesend lived." 
Roxbiirghe, vii. 495. 

850. The garland of trials. Broadside. 

I00(ii),4 
Begins, " This noble relation which I am to write, 
Behold, 'tis concerning a great baronet." The baro- 
net has a daughter whose horoscope foretells "A whore, 
thief, and murderer she is bom to be " ; nevertheless she 
makes a good marriage. Roxburghe, viii. 1 82. 

851. The same. Broadside. I03(i).i5 
Trimmed close; imprint possibly cut off. 
Garland of withered roses. See No. 805 etc. 

852. An excellent ballad of George Barn- 
well, who was undone by a strumpet who 
caused him to rob his master and murder 
his uncle. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. 103.81 

Child (British poets), viii. 213. Roxburghe, viii. 
59. For the prose story see No. 479 etc. 

853. The same. London, L. How. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 100 (ii). 2 

The title as in the preceding, except " that caused 
him " etc., instead of " who caused him." 

854. George Barnwell.] An excellent old 
ballad setting forth the weakness and folly of 
youth in following the steps of lewd women 
.... (/« Youth's warning piece ; or. The tragi- 
cal history of George Barnwell. No. 479.) 

855. George Barnewel. [Illustrated by 
Joseph Crawhall.] London : Field & Tuer ; 
New York : Scribner & Welford. 1883. 4°. 
pp. 52. Wdcts. 94.7 

856. The sajne, with colored woodcuts. 

90.8 

857. Gilderoy.] The Scotch lover's lamen- 
tation; or, Gilderoy's last farewell. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 100 (ii). 3 

Begins, "Gilderoy was a bonny boy." Child 
(British poets) vi. 197. " Bagford ballads " (Ballad 
society), i. loi. This copy is from "A collection of 
old ballads," 1723, i. 271, and reprints a portion of 
the prefatory note. The cut shows a gallows, with a 
man on the ladder, and the hangman fastening the 
rope to the beam. 

For a prose account of Gilderoy see No. 2253. 

858. Gill Morice, an ancient Scottish poem. 
Second edition. Glasgow, printed and sold 
by Robert and Andrew Foulis m. dcc.lv. 4°. 
pp. 15. 116. 

This is a MS. copy in the handwriting of Mr. Wm. 
Macmath. See Child, No. 83 F, ii. 272, and his 
remarks, ii. 263, and iii. 514. 



858 a. Gill Morice, an ancient Scottish 
poem. The foundation of the tragedy called 
Douglas. 16°. pp. 8. No title-page. 1 16. 

This is the edition described by Child, ii. 263b, 
note, and iii. 514. It is a reprint of the edition of 
1755 (from which it differs in reading in only two 
places) or of the first edition (not now known to exist) . 

859. The tragical history of Gill Morice; 
an ancient ballad. To which is added, High- 
land Mary. Falkirk. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 65.28 

The ballad of Child Maurice; a variant of F in 
Child, No. 83 (ii. 272), with the eight stanzas added 
at the end in Percy's version, but without the other 
four stanzas inserted in the middle. 

The irregularity of the six verses in the first stanza 
is here corrected by changing verse 5 and inserting two 
verses before it. 

"His face was fair, lang was his hair, 

In the wild woods he staid 

But his fame was by a fair lady." 



859a. The same. Glasgow. 
Wdct. on t. p. (No. 4.) 



16= 



pp.8. 
62.2 



860. The tragical history of Gill Morice, 
to which is added, The field of battle. Edin- 
burgh, printed by J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 69.4 

861. The gloamin' buchte. [Illustrated 
by Joseph Crawhall. London : Field & 
Tuer, etc.] 1883. 4°. pp. 22. Wdcts. 

94.14 

862. The Gloucestershire tragedy; or, 
The true lover's downfall. Printed by John 
Evans, 42 Long- lane, West Smithfield, Lon- 
don. Broadside. lOi.io 

Begins, "Near Guildford town, I hear, Of late in 
Gloucestershire." The young man poisons himself, 
his ghost fetches his love in a coach to his grave, where 
she dies of poison, and the cruel father stabs himself. 
Roxburghe, viii. 573. 

863. The same. Broadside. 100 (i) .86 

864. The Gloucestershire tragedy; or, 
The unnatural mother. Broadside. 

ioo(i).85 

Begins, " Both young and old I pray draw near." 
Entirely different from the preceding tale; a mother 
abuses and finally kills her daughter; the daughter's 
ghost appears at the mother's wedding feast. Men- 
tioned, Roxburghe, viii. 576. 

865. The golden bull in four parts. ... To 
which is added. My Peggy gin thou die. 
Belfast, J. Magee. 1766. 16". pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 57 (iii). 34 

Begins, "Come listen, young lovers, awhile, and 
you'll find." A story of how a king courted his 
own daughter for marriage. 



50 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



866. The golden bull ; or, The crafty prin- 
cess, in four parts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 8.5 

867. The golden bull; or, The crafty 
princess's garland. In four parts. Edin- 
burgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 5940 

868. The golden bull ; or. The garland of 
love's craftiness. In four parts. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 2 issues. 

I00(i).87, 103.1 

869. The same. London, J. Evans. Broad- 
side. lOI.II 

870. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. 105.11 

Imperfect : — part of title torn away. 

871. The Gosport tragedy; or. The per- 
jured ship carpenter. To which are added, 
The jolly ploughman. The Scots bonnet, A 
new song. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
3 cop. 8.27, 28.5, 29.40 

Begins, " In Gosport of late a young damsel did 
dwell." A story of seduction, murder, ghostly visita- 
tion, and confession, Roxburghe, viii. 143, 173. 

872. The same. Tune, Peggy's gone over 
sea. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 100 (i) .84 

873. The Goudhurst garland in three parts 
... To which is added Why flutters my heart? 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

8.38, 29.43 

Begins, " A sailor courted a farmer's daughter, 
whose living was in the wild of Kent;" his mother 
thinks her below his fortune, but the sailor brings 
home his love in so rich a garb that his mother con- 
sents to the marriage. See "The Kentish garland, 
editedby J. H. L. De Vaynes," Hertford, 1881, i. 176. 

874. The Goodhurst garland. In three 
parts. Broadside. I00(ii).5 

875. Goudhurst garland.] The sailor and 
farmer's daughter. In three parts. Edin- 
burgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59-91 

876. Goudhurst garland.] Captain Barber. 
To which is added. The sailor's courtship, in 
three parts. . . Printed in the year, 1769. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).4 

The first piece is a song on " The gallant behaviour 
of Captain Barber, commander of the Resolution priva- 
teer." The second piece is the same tale as the Goud- 
hurst garland. 

877. Goudhurst garland.] Drouthy Tom. 
To which is added The sailor's courtship, 



in three parts. . . . 1769. 16°. pp. 8. 
Armorial wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).i 

The first piece is a song. 

878. A new song in praise of the Green- 
land fishery. To the tune of Alley Croaker. 
[London], Grub-street. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(ii).9 

Begins, "Our ship it is rigged & to Greenland is 
going." Not the same as The seaman's resolution to 
kill the Greenland whale, in No. 1346. 

879. The grave, a poem; or, A view of 
life, death, and immortality. By that sub- 
lime poet Mr. Robert Blair. 15 th ed. 
Humbly recommended to the perusal of all 
who wish to live and' die well. Falkirk, 
T. Johnston. 1821. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 115.14 

880. Poems. The gudeman of Ballan- 
geich; a royal tale. The twa lairds of 
Lesmahagow. The whiskey brewers' lamen- 
tation . . . Callum's hill. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 1822. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 83.3 

The Guernsey garland. See No. 778. 

881. Guy of Warwick.] The frolicksome 
sea captain, a new song ; to which is added 
Guy, Earl of Warwick. Belfast. 1769. 16°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).ii 

The second piece is the old ballad (with variations) 
as given by Percy, beginning " Was ever knight for 
lady's sake, so tost in love as I, Sir Guy." Child 
(British poets), i. 130. The first piece is the same as 
"Tit for tat," etc. No. 2029. 

882. The haughs of Crumdel ; giving a 
full account of that memorable battle fought 
by the great Montrose and the clans against 
Oliver Cromwell. To which are added. 
The broom of Cowdenknowes, The High- 
land plaid. Stirling, W. Macnie. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 70.6, 81.4, 85.4 

This version and the three following contain three 
stanzas (3-5) not in the Haws of Cromdale as printed 
by Ritson, " Scottish songs," ii. 40. It is thought 
that the first 8 (5) stanzas refer to an action fought in 
1690, and the remainder to the battle of Auldern, 4th 
of May, 1645. Child (British poets), vii, 234. 

883. The haughs of Crumdel. The charm- 
ing widow. I've dreamt that thou art fading. 
Love, and our ocean home. You'll find no 
change in me. Glasgow. [No.] 17. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 84.2 

884. The haughs of Crumdel. To which 
are added. The bush aboon Traquire, A 
new sea song. Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-49 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



Sr 



885. The haughs of Cramdel, to which are 
added, Harvest home, and John and Nell. 
Greenock, W. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.48 

886. The Indian lover' garland. In two 
parts. I. The Indian lovers; or, An account 
how one of the Indian kings fell in love 
with a lady that was walking in St. James's 
Park. 2. The pleasures of Sunderland town. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.18 

Begins, " Listen to a true relation, of four Indian 
kings of late." 

887. The four Indian kings. In two parts. 
Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(i).74 

The same tale as the preceding. 

888. The four Indian kings. Coventry, 
Turner. Broadside. Wdcts. 102. 120 

889. The same. Broadside. 2 cop. 

101.3, I03(i).i82 

890. The intire lovers. To an excellent 
new tune. The answer to The intire lovers. 
To the same tune. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(i).7i 

Begins, "I lov'd you dearly once, 'tis true." On 
the other side of the sheet is printed " The behaviour, 
confession, &c, of William Welford, who was executed 
at Northampton, April 25, 1740, for breaking open the 
house of William Green of Rothwell, and steaHng 
from thence a piece of tammy." 

891. The Isle of Wight's garland. In three 
parts. The outlandish lady's love to an Eng- 
lish sailor. The lady's love discover'd by her 
waiting-maid to her father. The wandering 
lady's return ; or. The stony heart softened. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.33 

Begins, " From the Isle of Wight, I have brought 
to light." 

892. The He of White, a garland in three 
parts. ... To which are added two new songs, 
I. Rule Britannia. 2. Hibernia, an answer to 
Rule Britannia. Belfast, James Magee. 1768. 
16°. pp.8. 57(iii)-2i 

The same story as The Isle of Wight's garland. 

893. The outlandish lady's love to an Eng- 
lish sailor in the Isle of Wight. Broadside. 
Wdct. I00(ii).i9 

894. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).29 

The cut is the same as in the preceding. 

895. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

" Isle of White " in the title. IO3.45 

896. Jamie and Nancy ; or. The Yarmouth 
tragedy : in iv. parts. Laying open how by 
the cruelty of parents, two lovers were de- 



stroyed. Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.5 1 

Begins, "Lovers, I pray, lend an ear to my 
story." The cruel father sends Jamie to sea, and 
procures his murder. The ghost of Jamie visits Nancy 
and leads her into the sea, where she is drowned. 

897. Jemmy and Nancy of Yarmouth ; or, 
The constant lovers. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 65.17 

898. The same. Falkirk, sm. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.7 

899. Jemmy & Nancy of Yarmouth; or, 
The constant lovers . . . also The bloody 
gardener; A brief history of the earl of 
Essex, with a lamentable ballad on his death, 
and Daft Watty's ramble to Carlisle. New- 
castle, W. & T. Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 68.8 

900. jemmy & nancy of Yarmouth. [Illus- 
trated by Joseph Crawhall.] London : Field 
& Tuer ; New York : Scribner & Welford. 
1883. 4°. pp. (36). Wdcts. 94.4 

901. The same, with colored wood cuts. 

90.4 

902. Jemmy and Nancy.] The Yarmouth 
tragedy ; or. The constant lovers. London, 
J. Evans. Broadside. 101.8 

903. The same. [London], John Evans. 
Broadside. 103.94 

904. The same. Exeter, Besley. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 101.25 

905. The same. Coventry, J. Turner. 
Broadside. 120.88 

906. John Armstrong's last good-nighl. 
Declaring how he and his eight score men 
fought a bloody bout at Edinburgh. To a 
pretty northern tune called, Fare thou well, 
Gilt-knock-hall, &c. [Also, The esquire and 
Susan's garland.] 16°. pp. 8. 56.9 

No title-page; much worn. Two MS. corrections 
on p. I. This and the two next versions of John 
Armstrong begin, " Is there ne'er a man in fair 
Scotland, from the highest rank to the lowest degree." 
Child, No. 169, B (iii. 368). Roxhurghe, vi. 600. 

907. John Armstrong's last good-night. 
Declaring how he and his eight score men 
fought a blood \sic\ battle at Edinburgh. To 
a pretty nothem \jic\ tune, called. Fare thou 
well Gilt-knock-hall. Broadside. Wdct. 

106.5 

The cut is a half length portrait of a man carrying 
a pan of flowers, and is labelled ' ' Armstrong. ' ' There 
is a MS. note about the ballad on the opposite page. 



52 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



908. John Armstrong.] The loyal sailor, 
with the Answer. To which is added, Johnny 
Armstrongs last good night. Belfast. 1766. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii)-7 

909. John's earnest request; or, Betty's 
compassionate love extended to him in a 
time of distress. Northampton, Wm. Dicey, 
etc. Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(ii).i7 

Begins, " Come open the door sweet Betty." The 
imprint gives a list of several booksellers, among them, 
" Myles Catlin, at his shops in Godmanchester, Hunt- 
ington, St. Neots, Kimbolton, and St. Ives." 

910. The jolly beggar; to which is added 
The duke of Argyle's courtship to an English 
lady, and The weaver's daughter. Glasgow. 
[No.] 61. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

62.37 

The first piece is version B in Child, No. 279 
(v. 109), with some variants. For the secx)nd piece 
see also No. 786. 

911. The jolly sailor's true description of 
a man-of-war. [London], Stonecutter-street, 
Fleet market. Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).2i 

912. Kelly the pirate ; to which are added 
The meeting of the lovers, The forsaken lovers, 
and Taste life's glad moments. Glasgow, 
R. Hutchinson & Co. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 104.66 

913. The Kentish garland. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(ii).22 

Begins, " Good people now I pray, give ear." 
In spite of some variations this is the same story as 
the Unfortunate grazier's daughter, No. 1134, with 
the same incident of the " perfect Roman letters blue." 
The lady is here daughter to a brazier instead of a gra- 
zier. See " The Kentish garland, edited by J. H. L. 
De Vaynes," Hertford, 1881, i. 224. 

914. The same. [London], J. Pitts. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 2 cop. 102.25, I05-IO 

915. The Kentish tragedy; or, A warning 
piece to all perjured young men. In three 
parts. London, Aldermary Church Yard. 
Broadside. I00(ii).23 

Begins, "Young lovers all, a while attend." A 
story of seduction, murder, ghostly warning, suicide. 
Not the same as the preceding. 

916. The king and the forester. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(ii).25 

Roxburghe vii. 763. Mentioned by Child in the 
preface to King Edward IV and a tanner of Tam- 
worth (v. 74). 

917. The king and the forester. London, 
Stonecutter-street, Fleet-Market. Broadside. 
Wdct. 2 cop. 102.90, 105.42 



918. The king and northern man, shewing 
how a poor Northumberland man, tenant to 
the king, was wrong'd by a lawyer, concern- 
ing five ashes, and how the poor man went 
to the king and made known his grievance. 
Northampton, Wm. Dicey. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(ii).29 

Roxburghe, i. 521. Reprinted by the Percy society. 
1840. "The extant broadsides are all abbreviations 
of Martin Parker's little book." See also note to 
"The pore man and the kinge " in "The Kentish 
garland, edited by G. H. L. De Vaynes," Hertford, 
1881, i. 122, 

919. The king and the northern man, 
shewing how a poor Northumberland man, 
tenant to the king, being wronged by a law- 
yer, his neighbor, went to the king himself to 
make known his grievances. To the tune 
of Slat. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, J. White. 
Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(ii).30 

920. The king and the tinker's garland. 
In four parts. . . . To which are added : 
I. The lass of the mill. 2. The millers 
wedding. Belfast, James Magee. 1767. 
16°. pp. 8. 57(iii).25 

Begins, " A king and his nobles, men of great race." 
Mentioned by Child in preface to " King Edward the 
Fourth and a tanner of Tamworth ' ' (v. 73) . 

921. King Alfred and the shepherd. With 
the humours of Gillian, the shepherd's wife. 
To the tune of Flying Jane. Northampton, 
WiUiam Dicey, etc. Broadside. Ornamental 
tail-piece. ioo(ii).28 

With the prose note from "A collection of old 
ballads," 1723, i. 43. Child, " Robin Hood and the 
shepherd" (iii. 165). 

922. A pleasant ballad of King Henry II. 
and the miller of Mansfield, shewing how he 
was entertain'd and lodg'd at the miller's 
house. Broadside. ioo(ii).24 

Both parts of the ballad are given here, but for 
want of space the stanza before the last is omitted. 
Child (British poets), viii. 32. Roxburghe, i. 537. 

923. The conquest of France by King 
Henry V. ; to which are added. The cares 
of a married life, The virgin's walk. The 
parson's fat wedder. Lovely Damon, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.46, 29.47 

Child, No. 164 (iii. 320). 

924. King Henry V. his conquest of 
France in revenge for the affront offered 
him by the French king in sending him 
(instead [x^V] of the tribute due) a ton of 
tennis-balls. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(ii).32 

Despite the title, only "three tennis-balls" are 
mentioned in the text. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



53 



625. King Henry V. his conquest of 
France, in revenge for the affront offer'd 
him by the French king ; in sending him 
three tennis-balls instead of the tribute due. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 105.38 

926. King James [I.] & the tinker. Slip. 

Wdcts. 105.45 

Not the same as "The king and the tinker," 
No. 920. Begins, "And now to be brief, let's pass 
over the rest." 

927. King John and the abbot' of Can- 
terbury. To the tune of, The king and lord 
abbot. Northampton, William Dicey. Broad- 
side. Wdct. I00(ii).2 6 

Child, No. 45 (i. 403), version B. Taken, with 
the prefatory note, from " A collection of old ballads," 
1723,11. 49. 

928. King John and the abbot of Canter- 
bury. Broadside. I03(i).i94 

929. King Lear and his three daughters. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).2 7 

Begins, " King Lear once ruled in this land, with 
princely pride and peace." Child (British poets), 
vii. 276. Roxburghe, vi. 714. 

930. An excellent ballad of t^e deposing 
of King Richard the Second, and how, after 
many miseries, he was barbarously murder'd 
in Pomfret castle. Tune of. Regard my sor- 
rows. Northampton, William Dicey, and 
sold by William Peachey, etc. Broadside. 
Wdcts. I00(ii).3i 

With a prose note taken from " A collection of old 
ballads," 1723, in. 23. The woodcut is a copy of the 
copper-plate in the book. The imprint names eight 
other dealers. 

931. K. William & the plowman; or. In- 
dustry rewarded; to which are added The 
power of love. The rakish butcher. The kind 
lassie, A beau is but an ass, Blinkover the 
burn sweet Betty, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 28.21,29.29 

932. A dialogue betwixt King William and 
a plow-man. Broadside. 106.8 

933. The kingly garland, being an account 
of a monarch of Greece who [killed his father 
and married his mother]. London, Alder- 
mary Church Yard, Bow Lane. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 26.1 

Begins, " You that have hard hearts that never 
could repent." This story bears some resemblance 
in its main incident to that related of CEdipus but 
not in its details. 



934. The knight of Elle; a scarce and 
favorite old Scotch ballad. Glasgow. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. (No. 2,7i-^ 62.11 

This is Percy's ballad with some variations. For 
the original see Earl Brand, Child, No. 7 (i. 88). 

935. Lady Arabella Stuart.] The true 
lovers knot unty'd. Being the right path 
to advise princely virgins how to behave 
themselves. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).49 

A ballad of Lady Arabella Stuart and Lord Sey- 
mour. Roxburghe, vii. 599. 

936. Lady Isabella's tragedy ; or, The step- 
mother's cruelty. Tune of, The lady's fall. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdct. lOO(ii). 38 

This contains the eight additional stanzas of the 
lamentation of the step mother and the master-cook, 
mentioned by Bishop Percy in his note to the ballad. 
Child (v. 34 n.) says "Though probably absolutely 
the silliest ballad that ever was made, and very far from 
silly sooth, the broadside was traditionally propagated 
in Scotland without so much change as is usual in such 
cases." The ballad is given by Child (British poets) , 
iii. 366. The woodcut, in three sections, shows the 
master-cook killing the lady Isabella, the scullion boy 
denouncing the murderer, and the execution of the 
criminals. 

937. The lady's fall.] A lamentable bal- 
lad of the lady's fall. To the tune of. In 
pescod time, &c. London, printed by Wil- 
liam and Cluer Dicey, in Bow Church Yard 
and sold at their ware-house in Northampton. 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(ii).44 

Begins, " Mark well my heavy doleful tale." Rox- 
burghe, vi. 764. 

938. The gallant lady's fall. Coventry, 
Turner. Broadside. 102.117 

The same as the preceding. 

939. The lady's garland. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(ii).39 
Begins, "A virtuous young lady, ingenious and 
fair." Elopement; husband imprisoned, lady shut 
up and induced to believe her child murdered; re- 
conciliation. Distinct from the preceding and from 
the following. 

940. The tragical ballad; or. The lady 
who fell in love with her serving-man. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(ii).45 

Begins, " Good people pray attend, Unto these 
lines I've penn'd." 

941. The laidley worm of Spindleston 
Heugh. ... A song above 500 years old, 
made by the old mountain bard, Duncan 
Frasier, living on Cheviot, a.d. 1270. Printed 



54 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



from an ancient manuscript. Newcastle, M. 

Angus and Son. i6°. pp. 8. Ornamental 

wdct. 59-62 

Child, i. 311. For the prose version see No, 525. 

The Lancashire garland; or, Sir William 
Stanley's travels. See No. 1099. 

942. The leaping lords garland, composed 
of three excellent new songs i. The leaping 
of the lords, ii. The waterman's complaint, 
iii. Darby and Joan. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 56.11 

Imperfect: — Contains only the first piece. A con- 
test between English and Scottish lords in presence of 
King James I. and Prince Charles. Roxburghe, 
viii. 135. 

943. Leather bottle.] An excellent old 
song in praise of the leather bottle. Ban- 
bury, T. Cheney. Broadside. 105.50 

944. A song in praise of the leather bottle. 
[London], J. Pitts, Broadside. Wdct. 

105.50 

945. The Leed's tragedy; or, The bloody 
brother. Broadside, Wdct. 2 cop, 

I00,(ii),4o,53 

Begins, "Good Christian people all, I pray." 
A story of incest and murder. Printed in italic letters. 

946. The same. Broadside. I03(i),i78 

947. The Leicestershire garland. In two 
parts. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
Bow Lane. Broadside. I00(ii).54 

Begins, "Of all the hearts that ever bled." Story 
of Thomas Hullman and Elizabeth, who killed them- 
selves for love. 

948. The Liverpool tragedy ; or, A warn- 
ing to disobedient children and covetous 
parents. , , . sm, 8°, pp, 8, 33,1 

Begins, "You tender parents that has children 
dear." A son goes to sea against his parents' wishes; 
after ten years he returns and not being recognized, is 
killed by his parents for his gold. They commit sui- 
cide; his sister goes mad and dies. It is said that this 
ballad found ready sale in 1874. " Ballads and songs 
of Lancashire, collected by J. Harland," 3d ed., Man- 
chester, etc., 1882, p. 99. 

949. The London garland; shewing how 
a gentelman in the Strand contrived to mur- 
der a young boy . , , to prevent his daughter 
marrying him when at age . . . how he was 
disappointed by the nurse, and their happy 
marriage afterwards. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct, 
on t. p. 56,12 

Begins, "Two young men there lived, as I under- 
stand." 



950. The honour of a London 'prentice, 
being an account of his matchless manhood, 
and brave adventures done in Turkey, and 
by what means he marry'd the king's daughter, 
&c, Northampton, W. Dicey, Broadside, 
Wdct, ioo(ii).46 

With a note taken from "A collection of old 
ballads," 1723, i. 199. The cut is a copy of the en- 
graved plate. Roxburghe, vii. 587. For the prose 
version see the Valiant London prentice, No. 527, etc. 

951. The London prentice. To which are 
added two other new songs, viz. i. Fickle 
Jenny, ii. The early horn. Belfast, J. 
Magee. 1763. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

57(iii).i7 

952. Lord Bateman. Printed and sold by 
J. Catnach, 2 Monmouth Court, 7 Dials, etc. 
Broadside. 2 cop. 103 (i). 196, 116. 

Begins, "Lord Bateman, he was a noble lord." 
Child, Young Beichan, No. 53 (i. 454, and especially, 
ii. 508). 

953. Lord Bateman. Broadside, 

I03(i).2o8 

953<z. Lord Bateman. E, Hodges from 
Pitt's printer, wholesale and retail toy and 
marble warehouse, 31, Dudley street. Seven 
Dials. Broadside. 116, 

953/^, The loving ballad of Lord Bateman, 
Illustrated by George Cruikshank, London : 
Charles Tilt, mdcccxxxix. 16°, pp. 40. 
II wdcts. and i p. of music. 21466,38 

Attributed to Charles Dickens. 

953<:. The same. With illustrations and 
notes by George Cruikshank. New York, 
G. W. Carieton & Co. 1871. 8°. pp. 16. 
Wdcts. 21466.39 

954. Ye loving ballad of Lorde Bateman, 
to itte's owne tune here in sette ffoorth. Illus- 
trated by Joseph Crawhall. [London : Field 
&Tuer, etc.] 1883. 4°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

94.8 
Contains a number of stanzas not in the broadsides. 

955. Lord Douglas tragedy; and Billy 
Taylor, a brisk young sailor ; with Tom and 
Dolly's courtship, sm, 8°, pp, 8. Wdct. 
on t. p, 28,10 

The first piece is a variant of the ballad as printed 
by Child, i. 492; see also Earl Brand, No. 7 (i. 88). 

956. Lord Henry and fair Katherine. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(ii).5i 

Begins, " In ancient times in Britain's isle." Rox- 
burghe, viii. 158. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



55 



957. The same. {In The dead man's 
dream, No, 23,) 57(iii).i8 

Lord Roslin's daughter. See No. 729, etc. 

958. Lord Thomas.] A tragical ballad of 
the unfortunate loves of Lord Thomas and fair 
Eleanor; together with the downfall of the 
brown girl. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(ii).42 

A variant of the ballad printed by Child, under 
"Lord Thomas and Fair Annet," No. 73, D; 
(ii. 187). The title resembles that in "A collec- 
tion of old ballads" (i. 249), and the cut is a copy 
of the copper-plate in that book, a favorite with chap- 
book makers without regard to appropriateness. The 
text differs slightly. 

Lord Thomas of VVinsbury. See Young 
Felix's complaint. No. 1665. 

959. The lover's tragedy ; or. The wronged 
lady's lamentation and untimely death. To the 
tune of, No more cruel nymph. Northampton, 
William Dicey, etc. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(ii).37 

Begins, " Sir William a knight of six thousand a 
year, He courted fair Susan of Somersetshire." Rox- 
hurghe, viii. 117. 

960. The Low-country soldier tum'd 
burgomaster. [London], Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. 103 (i). 63 

Begins, " Here you may see the turns of fate." 

961. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 102.43 



962. The same. Broadside. 



Wdct. 
I00(ii).48 

963. The burgomaster. Coventry, J. Tur- 
ner. Broadside. Wdct. 102.46 

"J. Turner . . . supplies shopkeepers & travellers 
with all sorts of histories, new and old ballads, Godly 
and other patters, carols. Cock Robin, Tom Thumb, 
London cries, and various other play books for children 
on reasonable terms." 

964. The loyal lovers ; or, Caermathen 
tragedy. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. I00(i).4i 

Begins, " Young lovers pray draw near, a story you 
shall hear." Story of a brother's jealousy; death of 
all the characters. Not the same as The two loyal 
lovers of Exeter (No. 807), or, The loyal lovers' gar- 
land (No. 965). 

965. The loyal lovers garland. In four 
parts. Broadside. I00(ii).43 

Begins, "You lovers that know what to love do 
belong." A merchant's daughter disguised as a man 
follows her sailor love to Jamaica. The " Wandering 
shepherdess" (No. 1151, etc.) begins with a similar 
line, but is an entirely different story. 



966. Mackphersons rant ; or. The last 
words of James Mackpherson, murderer. 
To its own proper tune. Broadside. 

106.19 

MS. contents says " Only copy known." With two 
clippings giving an account of Macpherson. Child 
(British poets), vi. 263, quotes the first of these ac- 
counts, and calls the ballad " worthy of a hangman's 
pen." 

967. The mad man's morice; or, His 
sorrowful lamentation, together with his ad- 
vice to all young people. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(ii).59 
Begins, " Heard you not lately of a man." By 
Humfrey Crouch. Roxburghe, ii. 153. 

968. The maiden's bloody garland ; or, 
High-street tragedy : shewing how Sarah 
Holly, a poor unfortunate serving-maid of 
the city of Oxford, being wronged by her 
sweetheart, cut her throat from ear to ear. 
. . . Tune : There were three pilgrims. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).65 

Begins, " A mournful ditty I will tell." 

969. The Maidstone garland. In four 
parts. I. The faithful courtship between 
Henry of Dover and beautiful Ruth of 
Maidstone . . . Sheffield, John Garnet, in the 
Castle-green Ma — 52. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 3 cop. 37.3,7 ; 38.25 

Begins, "A seaman of Dover, whose excellent 
parts." Ruth, in man's apparel, follows Henry to 
Cadiz. The ballad also appears under the title, " The 
beautiful lady of Kent." See " The Kentish garland, 
edited by J. H. L. DeVaynes," Hertford, 1881, i. 151. 

970. Maidstone garland.] The seaman of 
Dover. London, Aldermary Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(iii).33 

971. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. ,Wdct. I03(i).43 

972. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.69 

973. Mar>' Ambree.] The siege of Gaunt ; 
or. The valorous acts of Mary Ambree. 
Tune of. The blind beggar of Bethnal-Green. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. I00(iii).4o 

Child (British poets), vii. 108. 

974. The merchant of Bristol's daughter, 
and The lass of the brow of the hill. 1791. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.9 

The first piece begins, " You loyal lovers, far and 
near." A young girl disguised as a surgeon's mate, 
follows her lover to sea. Roxburghc, viii. 146. In 
the " Merchant's daughter of Bristow," Child (Brit- 
ish poets), iv. 328, Maudlin makes the voyage to 
Italy as a ship's boy, to seek her lover. The two pieces 
agree in nothing else. 



56 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



975. The Bristol bridegroom ; or, The ship- 
carpenter's love to the merchant's daughter. 
Broadside. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Wdct. 100 (i). 1 1 

976. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 102.82 

977. A miscellany of poems. Written by 
Mr. G. Jacob. London, Tho. Warner. 17 18. 
sm. 8°. pp. (8), 64. 12.12 

978. Moral essays in four epistles to several 
persons. By Alexander Pope. Edinburgh. 
1781. 12°. pp. 42. 16.2 

979. The mournful lady's garland. In three 
parts. [London], Bow Church Yard . . . 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(ii).64 

Begins, "True lovers all, both far and near." 
Seduction; death of mother and child by starvation; 
the seducer on seeing the bodies is thrown from his 
horse and killed. 

980. The mournful widow's garland. [Lon- 
don], J. Pitts. Broadside. Wdcts. 102.27 

Begins, "Good people now, both old and young 
draw near." How Charles Cox, a corker, from Port 
Royal, was pressed for the navy and killed in battle, 
and how his family were rescued from starvation by the 
Queen. See "The Kentish garland, edited by J. H. L. 
De Vaynes," Hertford, 1881, ii. 620. 

981. The same. In three parts. Broad- 
side. Wdct. ioo(ii).6i 

982. The murder'd minstrel; to which is 
added, Mary the maid of the inn and the 
comical story of Thrummy Cap. Glasgow, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 75.8 

Begins, " How sweetly shone the morning sun." 

983. Nature display'd ; a poem. [By 
Richard Collins.] Lo;idon, J. Crokatt. 
1727. 12°. pp. 82. 14.1 

984. An excellent new song entituled, No 
dominies for me ladie [laddie]. Broadside. 

106.10 

" This . . . was written — at least so says Mr. Peter 
Buchan — by the Rev. John Forbes, minister at Deer, 
Aberdeenshire." MS. note. Compare a note in "A 
pedlar's pack of ballads and songs, with illustrative 
notes by W. H. Logan," Edinburgh, W. Paterson, 
1869, p. 319- 

985. Noble lord's cruelty.] Dear love 
regard my grief; or, The trial of true love 
to you I will recite between a fair young 
lady and a courteous knight. Broadside. 

106.9 

This title is the first line of the ballad which appears 
also under the titles, "A pattern of true love" and 
"The noble lord's cruelty; or, A pattern of true love." 



The lovers attempt an elopement, but are betrayed 
by the master-cook; the noble lord locks up his daugh- 
ter, and brings her the headless body of "a hanged 
man," as that of her knight, but moved by her grief, 
yields to the marriage of the lovers. Roxburghe, 
vi. 682. 

986. Nobleman's cruelty.] The tragical 
garland ; or. The nobleman's cruelty to his 
son. In four parts. i. Shewing how a 
young squire fell in love with his mother's 
waiting gentlewoman. 2. How they were 
privately married ... 3. The cruelty of his 
parents ... 4. How they sent him to Cadiz 
where he had his head shot off by a cannon 
ball and how his ghost appeared to his par- 
ents. Sheffield, John Garnet. Jn. 53. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 37.4,13, 38.6 

Begins, " Both parents and lovers I pray now 
attend." 

987. The tragical ballad of the nobleman's 
cruelty to his son. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. 102.5 1 

988. The tragical ballad ; or, The noble- 
man's cruelty to his son. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. I00(ii).68 

989. Nobleman's cruelty to his son. Lon- 
don, J. Evans & Son. Broadside. 101.2 

990. Nobleman's cruelty.] The esquire 
and Susan's garland. {In John Armstrong's 
last good-night, pp. 3-8. No. 906.) 56.9 

991. The Norfolk tragedy; or. The un- 
fortunate squire and unhappy lady. . . . Lon- 
don, R. Marshall, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 26.2 

The paragraphs of the contents, on the title-page, 
are printed in the order iii, iv, i, 11. 

Begins, " Young men and maidens all, I pray draw 
near." A young gentlewoman of Burnham in Norfolk 
being seduced stifles her child, is imprisoned, and dies 
of grief in her lover's arms, who kills himself just 
before the arrival of a reprieve. 

992. The Northamptonshire tragedy. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 

I00(ii).66 

Begins, " Young lovers lend an ear, I'm sure you'll 
shed a tear." A tale of seduction, the murder of the 
seducer by his victim, and her execution. 

993. The northern garland. In four parts. 
Part I. How a northern lord made a sale of 
his fair and beautiful daughter to a wealthy 
knight ; the price being her weight in gold, 
which was borrowed of a Jew on a dreadful 
agreement . . . pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 56.21 

Begins, " A noble lord of high renown." The tale 
includes a modification of the story of Shylock. It is 
given in Child (British poets), viii. 270, under the 
title " The northern lord and the cruel Jew." 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



57 



994. The northen [j/V] lord. In four 
parts. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. 2 cop. I00(ii).67; 103. 13 



995. The northern lord. 
Pitts. Broadside. 



[London], J. 
102.55 



996. The same. Coventry, J. Turner. 
Broadside. 102.56 

997. A right merry garland of Northumber- 
land heroes. Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Bell. 
MDCCCxiv. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

25256.12 

With four verses printed lengthwise on the left of 
the t. p., wdct. and two verses on the right. A col- 
lection of verses in honor of Northumberland soldiers. 

998. The old man outwitted ; or, The 
fortunate lovers ; to which are added, Valen- 
tine's day, The lads of the village, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 8.41, 29.1 

Begins, " Let all loyal lovers which around me 
doth stand." An ancient farmer whose daughter falls 
in love with his servant-man has the young man pressed 
for a sea voyage. The servant escapes, dresses in his 
mistresss clothes, and induces the father to believe 
that the daughter was kidnapped in the servant's dress. 
The father gives his blessing and a promise of £2<xiO. 

999. The old man outwitted ; or. The for- 
tunate lovers. To which is added. The law- 
yer and client. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.80 

The outlandish lady's love to an English 
sailor. See No. 891. 

1000. The Oxfordshire garland. In four 
parts. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. I00(ii).76 

Begins, " Charming ladies fair, I'll to you declare.'' 
Girl trepanned on shipboard by her sisters; shipwreck, 
final restoration and marriage. 

The Oxfordshire tragedy. See No. 1069. 

1 00 1. The lamentation of Mr. Pages wife 
of Plimouth, who being forced to wed against 
her will, did consent to his murther, for the 
love of George Strangwidge, for which fact 
they suffered death at Barnstable in Devon- 
shire. The tune is. Fortune my foe. 

The lamentation of George Strangwidge 
who, for the consenting to the death of 
Mr. Page of Plimouth, suffered death at 
Barnstable. 

The complaint of Mis. Page for causing 
her husband to be murthered for the love 
of Strangwidge, who were executed to-gether. 
Printed for F. Coles, T. Vere, and I. Wright. 
Broadside. Black letter. 108.3 



These three ballads are printed on one sheet, so 
that the first, and the latter two could be cut apart 
and sold separately. Imperfect : — The ends of the 
last four verses are missing. 

" This ballad . . . was written by Deloney upon a 
contemporary event in the year 1591." The three 
ballads were reprinted by J. Payne Collier in " Broad- 
side black letter ballads, ' ' 1 868. None of the imprints 
quoted in " Roxburghe ballads" agrees exactly with 
this, though "Mr. Euing's (No. 112)" was "by 
Coles, Vere, and Gilbertson." Roxburghe, i, 553. 

A pamphlet account of the case is reprinted in 
" Shakspeare society's papers," ii. 79. 

1002. Patient Grissel.] An excellent bal- 
lad of a noble marquiss and patient Grissel. 
To the tune of. The bride's good-morrow, 
&c. London, William Dicey, in Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).ii 

Child (British poets), iv. 207. For prose versions 
see No. 533. 

1003. Patient Grissel. Birmingham, S. & 
T. Martin. Broadside. 105.40 

1004. Patient Grissel. An excellent bal- 
lad. Broadside. Wdct. I05.40 

Cut of a landscape with two beacons burning in 
background. 

1005. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(ii).83 

1006. The penny-worth of wit's garland, 
in three parts. Part i. Showing how a mer- 
chant was deluded from his lady by a harlot. 
Part 1 1 . And how he sailed into a far country. 
Part III. How he returned to the British 
shore. Glasgow. Printed for the booksellers. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 65.27 

Begins, like the other issues recorded below, " Here 
is a peimi-worth of wit, forthosethat ever went astray." 

See " A penni worth of witte . . . selected from 
the Auchinleck manuscript. Edinburgh. 1857. (Ab- 
botsford club.)" The editor, D. Laing, says in the 
preface (p. v.) " At a recent period the story assumed 
a more popular form in the common ballad, ' The 
pennyworth of wit.' " " The rakish husband " (No. 
1039, etc.), is a ballad on a similar theme. See also 
" The virtuous wife of Bristol " (No. 1 148). Another 
version, beginning, " In ancient years as books ex- 
press " is in " A collection of old ballads," London, 
1723, ii. 215. 

1007. The same. Glasgow, printed for 
the booksellers. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. (No. 19.) 62.43 

The cut and make-up differ from the preceding. 

1008. The choice penny-worth of wit. In 
three parts. 16°. pp. 8. 57(iii).9 

No title-page. 

1009. A choice penny-worth of wit. [Lon- 
don], Office in Grubstreet. Broadside. 

103.55 
loio. The same. Broadside. I00(ii).84 



58 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



loii. The pensive maid; or, The virgin's 
complaint for the loss of her lover. To the 
tune of, Through the cooll [j/V] shady woods, 
&c. Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).8i 

Begins, " When Sol did cast no light, all darken'd 
over." A sailor brings to a maid news of the death of 
her lover, and claims her love by bequest of the dying 
man. In this version the maid declines to make the 
transfer of her affections. See the next title. 

1012. The pensive maid.] The valiant 
seaman's return to his love. Full seven 
years vi^as he absent from his love [seven 
more verses]. Tune of, I am so deep in 
love; or. Through the cool shady woods, 
&c. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).64 

Begins like the preceding, but conducts the tale to 
a happy end, the messenger proving to be the original 
lover in disguise. Both versions are given in Rox- 
burghe, vii, 513. There is still another version by 
Cuthbert Birket in Roxburghe^ iii. 127. 

10 13. Two auld songs ; The perjured maid, 
and The waukrife mammy. Falkirk. , 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 74.4 

Begins, "Come lovers all, both maids and men." 
The perjured maid is carried off by the ghost of her 
first lover, on her marriage night. For the Waukrife 
minnie, see Child, iv. 389. 

1 01 4. The pleasures and pursuits of human 
life by Alex"' Pope Esq"". ; Edwin and Angelina 
by Oliver Goldsmith; The traveller; or, A 
prospect of society by D". ; Evening contem- 
plations in a college, imitated from Gray's 
Elegy, with notes and illustrations by the 
author of Solitary walks, &c. London, J. 
Roach. 1793. 12°. pp.60. Engr. front, 
and t. p. 41. 1 

1015. The ploughman's glory. Broadside. 

I03(ii).85 

1 01 6. The Plymouth tragedy furnished 
with two comical new songs, i. Beautiful 
Susan of Plymouth's overthrow by the per- 
suasions of her unkind parents. 11. The 
Adams and Eves; or. The comical robbery 
of the passengers in the Gloucestershire 
coach. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.40 

Despite the title there is but one " comical " song 
here; the first piece is a tragical ballad of William and 
Susan of Plymouth, ending with the death of the lovers. 
Begins, "Beautiful virgins of birth and breeding." 
Under the title "Sweet William of Plymouth" (No. 
mi), is a story somewhat akin to this, but with a 
"good ending " 

1017. The Plymouth tragedy; or, Fair 
Susan's overthrow. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(ii).82 

1 01 8. The Plymouth tragedy. Coventry, 
Turner. Broadside. 102. 106 



1019. Poems: The gudeman of Ballan- 
geich, a- royal tale ; The twa lairds of Lesma- 
hagow ; The whiskey brewers' lamentation ; 
and a new song called Callum's hill. Glas- 
gow, R. Hutchison. 1822. 16°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 83.3 

1020. Poems, elegiac, moral, humorous, 
and descriptive. By W. Harriston. Glasgow, 
A. Napier. 1818. sm. 12°. pp. 36 [34]. 

63.10 

102 1. The Portsmouth Ghost; or, A full 
and true account of a strange, wonderful and 
dreadful appearing of the ghost of Madam 
Johnson, a beautiful young lady of Ports- 
mouth. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. 25.19 

How a woman sold herself to the devil and how 
the devil carried her seducer away in a flame of fire. 
See Ashton, p. 70. 

1022. The pretty green coat boy. In four 
parts. ... To which is added, Moggy's lamen- 
tation for the loss of her jocky. Belfast, 
James Magee. 1769. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. • 57 (iii). 1 9 

Begins, ' ' You pretty young maidens and batchellors 
sweet." A farmer's daughter beloved by a rich lord's 
son follows her lover into banishment in guise of a 
green-coated page. 

1023. The pretty green coat boy's garland. 
To which is annexed, An anecdote of Fred- 
eric, late king of Prussia. Stirling, William 
Macnie. 1829. 24°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 65.1 

1024. The pretty green-coat boy's garland. 
In four parts. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. ioo(iii).i4 

With ornamental rules between the columns. 

1025. Another issue, without rules. 103.37 

1026. The green coat boy's garland. In 
four parts. Coventry, Turner. Broadside. 

102.87 

1027. Pretty Sally's garland ; or, Johnny's 
kind courtship. In two parts. Broadside. 



Wdct 



I03(i).2oo 



The first part is Henry Carey's " .Sally in our alley." 

1028. An excellent ballad of a prince of 
England's courtship to the king of France's 
daughter, and how the prince was disastrously 
slain, and the aforesaid princess was after- 
wards married to a forester. [By Thomas De- 
loney. London], Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 2 cop. I00(ii).8o, I03(i).29 

Begins, " In the days of old, When fair France 
did flourish." C^?A/ (British poets), iv. 216. Rox- 
burghe, i. 309, vi. 571. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



59 



1029. The princely lovers garland. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 2 cop. I00(iii).io, IO2.34 

Begins, " Once I read a noble volume, Or a his- 
tory book some call em." 

1030. Queen Catherine.] A song of the 
wooing of Queen Catherine by Owen Tudor, 
a young gentleman of Wales. Translated 
out of the Welsh. To the tune of, Light in 
love, ladies. Northampton, William Dicey. 
Broadside. Wdct. ioo(iii).83 

With a note, and the prose explanation from " A 
collection of old ballads," 1723, iii. 32. 

1 03 1. Queen Elednor's confession, shew- 
ing how King Henry, with the Earl Marshal, 
in friar's habits, came to her, instead of two 
friars from France which she sent for. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).i6 
Begins, "Queen Eleanor was a sick woman." 
Child, 156 A (iii. 225 etc.). The rude cuts illustrate 
the ballad. 

1032. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

108.1 

Imperfect : — part of the text of the last two verses 
is erased. 

1033. Queen Eleanor's confession, shew- 
ing how King Henry, with the Earl Martial, 
in friars habits came to her, instead of two 
friars from France, which she sent for. To a 
pleasant new tune. Newcastle upon Tyne, 
John White. Broadside. Wdcts. 105.19 

The cuts are curious. MS. note " White the ballad 
printer, Newcastle upon Tyne died in 1 769. Sant was 
his successor. ' ' 

1034. Queen Eleanor's fall.] A warning- 
piece to England, against pride and wicked- 
ness. Being the fall of Queen Eleanor, wife 
to Edward I, King of England, who for her 
pride, by God's judgment, sunk into the 
ground at Charing Cross and rose at Queen 
Hithe. To the tune of, Gentle and courteous. 
Northampton, William Dicey. Broadside. 

ioo(iii).77 

Begins, "When Edward was in England king." 
With note, and prose explanation from "A collection 
of old ballads," 1723, i. 97. Roxburghe, ii, 67, " In 
this absurdly false and ignorant production the well- 
beloved Eleanora of Castile is no doubt confounded 
with her most unpopular mother-in-law, Eleanor of 
Provence, the wife of Henry the Third." Child (Brit- 
ish poets), vii. 291. 

1035. Queen Elizabeth's champion; or. 
Great Britain's glory. Being a victory ob- 
tained by the young earl of Essex over the 
old emperor of Germany, by a fight at sea, in 



which he took the Emperor's son, and brought 
him a prisoner to Queen Elizabeth. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 105.18 
Child, No. 288, A (v. 145). 

1036. The death of Queen Jane. {In 
Caledonia garland. No. 1222.) 28.11 

Child, No. 170 (iii. 372). 

1037. Rab and Ringan ; a tale. To which 
is added Verses occasioned by seeing two men 
sawing timber in the open field, in defiance 
of a furious storm. By Alexander Wilson. 
Paisley, G. Caldwell. 1827. 16°. pp.8. 
4 cop. 62.15,65.6,73.11,79.20 

1038. The rakes complant \_sic\ in limbo. 
[London], J. Pitts. Broadside. Wdct. 

104.26 
Begins, "Once I was great, but Uttle am grown." 

1039. The rakish husband; shewing how 
a young gentleman extravagantly spent and 
consumed his estate on a lewd harlot. . . . To 
which is added four other songs, viz. i . The 
contented wife ; or. The reformed husband ; 
in two parts. 2. Sweet Rose of the vale. 
3. A new song to the tune of the Three 
topp'd hill. Belfast, James Magee. 1766. 
12°. pp. 8. 57 (iii). 32 

Begins, "You gallant beaus of pleasure observe 
but what I mean. ' ' Compare ' ' A pennyworth of wit's 
garland," No. 1006. 

1040. The rakish husband's garland. Lon- 
don, W. and C. Dicey, in St. Mary Alder- 
mary Church Yard, in Bow Lane. Broadside. 

ioo(iii).22 

1041. The same. Broadside. 103.47 
Title extends over three columns. 

1042. The rakish husband. [London], 
J. Pitts. Broadside. 102. 60 

1043. The same. Broadside. 103. 184 
Title over the first column. " Finis " at end. 

1044. The rich palatine lover's courtship 
to a tradesman's daughter in London. North- 
ampton, W. Dicey. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).i3 
Begins, " Since Palatines came o'er." 

1045. Robert de Bruce's garland; or, A 
heroic song [to the tune of Chevy Chace] on 
the battle of Bannock-burn fought by a Scots 
army of 30,000 on the 24th June 13 14 
against King Edward H. with a mighty 
army of 300,000 men. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 3 cop. 

8.37, 29.20,45 



6o 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1046. Robin Hood.] The life and death 
of Robin Hood, the renowned out-law, and 
the famous exploits performed by him and 
Little John. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 109.28 

This is Martin Parker's "True tale of Robin Hood." 
•' The water drinker " is added to fill out. 

1047. A true tale of Robin Hood. [By 
Martin Parker.] London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. 32.11, 39.10 

There are numerous variations from the text of 
1632 as printed by Child, No. 154 (iii. 227). 

1048. Another issue. 21.6 

Cuts on pp. 9, 23 differ from the preceding, and 
there are typographical variations. 

1049. Another issue. 50.3 

The cuts on pp. 9, 13, 23 differ from both the pre- 
ceding, and there are typographical variations. 

1050. The same. London, No. 4, Alder- 
mary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

67.13 

The cuts on pp. 9, 13, 23 E^ree with those in 50.3; 
that on p. 1 1 is different. 

1 05 1. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

58(ii).i7 

There are numerous variations from preceding nos. 
among the cuts. 

1052. Robin Hood's garland. Being a 
complete history of all the notable and 
merry exploits performed by him and his 
men on many occasions ; to which is added 
a preface giving a more full and particular 
account of his birth, &c. than any hitherto 
published. Adorned with twenty-seven neat 
and curious cuts adapted to the subject of 
each song. London, J. Marshall and Co. in 
Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane. sm. 8°. 
pp. 1-62. Wdcts. 25257.3 

Imperfect: — pp. 63-87 missing. 

1053. The same. London, R. Marshall, 
in Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane, 
sm. 8°. pp.91. Wdcts. 25257.3a 

Imperfect : — pp. 77-78 missing. On page 4 a MS. 
note by Professor Child says "This preface is taken 
(with shght changes) from Old ballads, 1723, i. 64." 

1054. Robin Hood's garland. Being a 
compleat history of all the clever & merry 
exploits performed by him & his men ; con- 
taining an account of his birth, life, and death. 
London, T. Sabine, sm. 12°. pp.60. Wdcts. 

27257.6.2 

The preface as in the preceding, but omitting a few 
ines at the end. Ballads 20 to 26 are omitted, and 



several have verses omitted at the end. The cuts for 
the most part are like those in Marshall's editions, but 
reversed. 

1055. The English archer; or, Robin 
Hood's garland. Lichfield, M. Morgan, 
sm. 12°. pp. (4), 91. Wdct. on t. p. 

272575 
The preface is signed S — M — . Twenty-seven 
ballads are given. 

1056. Robin Hood's garland; being a 
complete history of all the notable exploits 
performed by him and his merry men. In 
which is given a preface containing a more 
full and particular account of his birth &c. 
than any hitherto published. York, Thomas 
Wilson and Son. 181 7. 24°. pp. 106. 
Wdcts. 25257.4 

Contains the 27 ballads. The cuts differ from those 
in the preceding editions. 

1057. Robin Hood's garland; being a 
complete history of all the notable and 
merry exploits performed by him and his 
men on many occasions. A new and much 
improved edition adorned with twenty-eight 
neat and curious cuts adapted to the subject 
of each song. Kidderminster, Gower and Pen- 
nell, for Howard and Evans, No. 42 Long- 
Lane, West-Smithfield, London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 96. Wdcts. 27257.6 

1058. Robin Hood's garland; being a 
complete history of all the notable and 
merry exploits performed by him and his 
men, on divers occasions. To which is added 
a preface giving a more full and particular 
account of his birth, &c. than any hitherto 
published. Stirling, C. Randall. 181 1. 16". 
pp. 92. Wdct. on t. p. 25257.4.2 

Contains 26 ballads. 

1059. Robin Hood.] The bishop of Here- 
ford's entertainment by Robin Hood, Little 
John, &c. in merry Barnsdale. To an ex- 
cellent new tune. London, William Dicey 
and Company, in Bow Church Yard, etc. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).24 

Child, No, 144, A fiii. 193). This has a note and 
a prose explanation, similar to others from the " Col- 
lection of old ballads," 1723, but not taken therefrom. 

1060. Bold Robin Hood. [London], Pitts 
pinter \_sic\ Wholesale toy & marble ware- 
house, 6 Great St. Andrew street, 7 Dials. 
Broadside. 105-5 

This is version C of Child's " Robin Hood rescuing 
three squires," No. 140 (iii. 177). The last verse 
here is " Shall borrow three more of me," and there 
are numerous verbal variations. 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



6i 



1 06 1. Robin Hood.] The noble fisher- 
man ; or, Robin Hood's preferment. Tune 
of, In summer time. [Ltmdon], L. How in 
Petticoat Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).27 

Child, No. 148 (iii. 211). Stanza 2, verse i reads 
•' When the lilly leaf and the cowslip sweet " instead 
of " and the elephant;" in stanza 24, verses 2, 3 are 
omitted, and there are many other variations. 

1062. Robin Hood.] The pedigree, edu- 
cation, and marriage of Robin Hood, with 
Clorinda, queen of Titbury feast. Supposed 
to be related by the fidler who play'd at their 
wedding. Northampton, Robert Dicey, etc. 
Broadside. Wdct. 2 cop. 

I00(iii).25, 105.3 

Child, No. 149 (iii. 214). The title and prose 
introduction are taken from '* A collection of old bal- 
lads," 1723, i. 64, and the cut is an imitation of the 
copper-plate in that book. 

1063. Renowned Robin Hood ; or, His 
archery truly related in his exploits before 
Queen Catherine. London, L. How in Petti- 
coat Lane. Broadside. Wdct. 105.4 

'* Robin Hood and Queen Katherine." Child, 
No. 145, B (iii. 196). 

1064. Robin Hood and Little John. Being 
an account of their first meeting, and fierce 
encounter and conquest, to which is added 
their friendly agreement, and how he came 
to be call'd Little John. Northampton, Rob- 
ert Dicey, etc. Broadside. Wdct. 

i00(iii).2O 

Child, No. 125 (iii. 133). With a note, and the 
explanatory matter from " A collection of old ballads," 
1723,1- 75- 

1065. Robin Hood and the ranger; or. 
True friendship after a fierce fight. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(iii).i9 

Child, No. 131 (iii. 152). The last half of the first 
staaza in this version reads: " Bold Robin he would 
frolicksome be. To ramble abroad with his bow." 

1066. Robin Hood and the shepherd, 
shewing how Robin Hood, Little John and 
the shepherd fought a sore combat. Tune, 
Robin Hood and Queen Catherine. Lon- 
don, L. How, in Petticoat Lane. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 1 00 (iii). 2 6 

Child, 'Ho. 135 (iii. 165). This resembles d, with 
some verbal differences. 

1067. Robin Hood's golden prize : shew- 
ing how he robed \_sic'\ two priests of five 
hundred pounds. Tune, Robin Hood was a 



tall young man, &c. London, L. How, in 
Petticoat Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

Child, No. 147 (iii. 208). 100 (iii). 23 

1068. Robin Hood's rescuing Will Stutely 
from the sheriff and his men, who had taken 
him prisoner and were going to hang him, &c. 
To the tune of, Robin Hood and Queen 
Catherine. London, William and Cluer Dicey 
in Bow Church Yard, etc. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(iii).2i 

Child, No. 141 (iii. 185). With note, and the in- 
troductory matter from " A collection of old ballads," 
1723, i. 90; the cut is copied from the copper-plate in 
that book. 

1069. Rosanna, the Oxfordshire tragedy; 
in two parts. Part i. How fair Rosanna . . . 
was by a young gentleman betrayed of her 
virginity. Part ii. His cruelty in murdering 
her, and how a rose-bush sprung upon her 
grave, which blossoms all the year through ; 
and how murder came to be found out by his 
cropping the rose, &c. Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. (No. 20.) 62.5 

Begins, " Young virgins fair, of beauty bright." 

1070. Rosanna. The Oxfordshire tragedy ; 
or, The virgin's advice. Broadside. 

ioo(ii).75 

107 1. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. 102.56 

1072. The Oxfordshire tragedy; or, Ros- 
anna's overthrow. Coventry, J. Turner. 
Broadside. 102.57 

1073. The pleasant history of Roswal and 
Lillian. 24°. pp. 24. 57(iii).37 

No title-page. 

See Ellis's " Specimens of early English metrical 
romances," iii. 371. 

1074. The royal courtly garland; or, Joy 
after sorrow. Broadside. 103 (i). 25 

Begins, "A tragical story I have to relate." A 
king of Bohemia, through jealousy, sends his infant 
daughter afloat on the sea; she is adopted by a shep- 
herd, and marries a king's son. Compare the Win- 
ter's tale. 

1075. The royal dream; or, The forester's 
garland. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. 2 cop. I00(iii).i7, I03(i).i9 

Begins, "As I in my closet was reading alone." 
How an emperor of Rome lodged with a forester and 
dreamed that the forester's son, bom that night, 
should come to the throne, and how despite the 
contrivances of the emperor the dream came true. 



62 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1076. The sailor's tragedy; to which are 
added, Highland Mary, The Irish wedding. 
Stirhng, W. Macnie. 1825. 16°, pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 72.11, 79-2 1 

Begins, " I am a sailor and home I write." How 
a sailor deceived a maiden, who hanged herself, and 
her ghost coming in a little boat to the sailor's ship, the 
crew forced him into it, whereupon "The boat sunk 
in a flash of fire, Which made the sailors all admire." 

1077. The sailor's tragedy; to which is 
added. The wee Wifukie. Stirling, W. 
Macnie. 1825. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 62.21 

1078. Scotland's skaith ; or, The history of 
Will & Jean, an owre true tale. [By Hector 
Macneill.] loth ed. Dumfries, Cuthbert 
M'Lachlan. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 33.9 

1079. Scotland's skaith.] The history of 
Will and Jean ; or. The sad effects of drunken- 
ness. [By Hector Macneill.] Glasgow, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 109.27 

The seaman of Dover. See No. 969, etc. 

1080. Shore's wife.] The woful lamenta- 
tion of Jane Shore, a goldsmith's wife in Lon- 
don, sometime King Edward the Fourth's 
concubine. Northampton, Robert Dicey. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).i8 

With a prose introduction taken from " A collection 
of old ballads," 1723 (i. 145). The cut is a copy of 
the engraving in that book. For the prose versions, 
see No. 517, etc. 

1 08 1 . The woful lamentation of Jane Shore. 
Broadside. Wdct. 103-57 

In italic type. Cut is a portrait. 

1082. The woeful lamentation of Mrs. 
Jane Shore, a goldsmith's wife of London, 
sometime concubine to King Edward the 
Fourth. For her wanto [^zV] life came to 
a miserable end. An example to all lewd 
& wanton livers. [London], J. Pitts. Broad- 
side. 105-37 

The siege of Gaunt. See No. 973. 

1083. Sir Andrew Barton.] A true rela- 
tion of the life and death of Andrew Barton, 
pirate and robber on the seas. Belfast, 
James Magee. 1765. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 57(iii).26 

The ballad of Sir Andrew Barton, Child, No. 167, 
B (iii. 343-346). 

1084. A true relation of the death of Sir 
Andrew Barton, a pyrate and rover. London, 
Bow Yard, Church \_sic\. Broadside. 

1 00 (iii) .36 



1085. Sir James the Rose's garland, com- 
posed of three delightful new songs. Sir 
James the Rose, The broom of Cowden- 
knows. The flashy girls, pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 61.2, 56.27 

The first piece is the old ballad of Sir James the 
Rose, Child, No. 213 (iv. 155). 

1086. Sir James the Ross.] The Buchan- 
shire tragedy ; or, Sir James the Ross ; an 
historical ballad. [Tune — Gill Morice.] 
Edinburgh, Archibald Martin. 24°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 56.1 

With MS. notes. 

Not the old ballad, but the poem by Michael Bruce 
as printed by Logan. See " Works of Michael Bruce, 
edited by A. B. Grossart," Edinburgh, 1865, p. 258; 
Bruce's own text, p. 197. 

1087. The Buchanshire tragedy; or. Sir 
James the Ross. [By Michael Bruce.] 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.39 

1088. The old Scot's tragical song of Sir 
James the Rose. [By Michael Bruce.] Fal- 
kirk. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.3 

1089. The same. Falkirk. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 65.19 

The cut is not the same as in the preceding. 

1090. Sir James the Rose, an old Scottish 
tragic song. [By Michael Bruce.] Glasgow. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.12 

1 09 1. The tragedy of Sir James the Rose. 
[By Michael Bruce.] Stirling, W. Macnie. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 82.5, 84.9 

1092. The same. (Appended to the Fac- 
tor's garland. See No. 813.) 68.9 

1093. Sir Lancelot.] A famous battle 
fought between Sir Lancelot du Lake and 
the famous giant Tarquin. Broadside. 

I00(iii).42 

This is not Deloney's ballad. It begins, "Within 
this ancient British land, In Lancashire we under- 
stand." Child (British poets), i. 124. 

1094. Sir Neil and Glengyle, the Highland 
chieftains ; a tragical ballad, and The drunken 
exciseman. Glasgow. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. (No. 5.) 62.4 

Begins, " In yonder isle beyond Argyle." A ballad 
of a fatal duel, also known as Sir Neil and MacVan. 
Mentioned by Child (British poets, viii. 260) in the 
prefatory note to " The duel of Wharton and Stuart." 

1095. Sir Robert Bewick.] Remarkable 
& memorable history of Sir Robert Bewick 
and the Laird Graham, giving an account of 
Laird Graham's meeting with Sir Robert Be- 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



63 



wick ill the town of Carlisle, and they going 
to a tavern, a dispute happened betwixt them, 
which of their sons was the best man. How 
( "rraham rode home in a passion, and caused 
his son to fight young Bewick, which proved 
their deaths. Also the Berkshire lady's gar- 
land, in four parts. . . . Newcastle, VV. For- 
dyce. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 68.5 

For the first piece see Child, No. 211 (iv. 144); 
this copy agrees with "f," but some verses are wanting. 
" It is a fine-spirited ballad and very infectious." Ac- 
cording to Scott it contains probably the latest allusion 
to the institution of brotherhood-in-arms. Other edi- 
tions of the second piece are entered under that title, 
No. 676. 

1096. Sir William Stanley's garland, con- 
taining his twenty-one years travels through 
most parts of the world : and his safe return 
to I^tham Hall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 69.8 

Begins, " In Lancashire there liv'd a lord." 
Printed in "The Palatine anthology, edited by J. O. 
Halliwell," London, 1850, p. 272-282, with other 
poems relating to the Stanleys. 

1097. Sir William Stanley.] The Derby- 
shire garland ; or, Sir William Stanley's travels. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 56.2 

1098. Sir William Stanley.] The Derby- 
shire ballad ; or, Sir William Stanley's travels. 
Broadside. I00(i).65 

1099. Sir William Stanley.] The Lanca- 
shire garland ; or. Sir William Stanley's travels, 
pp. 8. 56.10 

1 100. The slighted father; or. The un- 
natural son justly reclaimed. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).32 
Begins, " A wealthy man of late, we hear." 

iioi. The same. Broadside. 2 cop. 

101.6, I03(i).i9o 

1 102. The Somersetshire garland ; or, The 
serving-man bound apprentice to his mis- 
tress. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. ioo(iii).28 

Begins, " Near Somersetshire lived a squire of fame. ' ' 

1 103. The Spanish lady's love. London, 
William Dicey. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(iii).35 

Begins, " Will you hear of a Spanish lady, How 
she woo'd an Englishman." The cut is an imitation 
of the copper-plate printed with the verses in "A col- 
lection of old ballads," 1723, ii. 191. The hero of 
"the noble old romance" was probably "one of 
Essex's companions in the Cadiz expedition," Child 
(British poets), iv. 201. Roxburghe, vi. 653. 



1 104. The Staffordshire maid. Lopdon, 
printing-office in Petticoat-Lane. Broadside. 

I00(iii).43 

Begins, "Come all ye young gallants, and listen 
awhile." How a servant maid killed a highwayman. 

1 105. The same. Worcester, S. Gamage, 
etc. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).44 

The text differs considerably from the preceding. 
Begins, " You gentlemen all come listen awhile." 

1 106. The Strand garland. In four parts. 

. . . 16°. pp. 8. 3 cop. 37-6,14, 38.11 

Begins, " You young men and damsels that to love 
belong." How a draper's daughter forced by her 
parents to promise marriage to a duke swooned at 
the minister's feet, and cried " I am married to my 
father's apprentice." How she was banished from 
her father's habitation and sold herself upon the 
Change to a sea-captain who restored her to her 
father's house. 

1 107. The Strand garland. In four parts. 
Broadside. I00(iii).3o 

1 108. Stukely.] The life and death of 
the famous Thomas Stukely, an English 
gentleman, in the time of Queen Elizabeth; 
who ended his life in the battle of the three 
kings of Barbary. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(iii).5i 

See Oz'A/ (British poets), vii. 305; Roxburghe, vii. 
573; Dictionary of national biography. 

X109. The Suffolk comedy. In three 
parts. To the tune of, Phillis the lovely. 
[London], Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. ioo(iii).38 

Begins, "You young men and maidens of beauty 
most bright." A lady disguises herself as a man and 
sues a gentleman on behalf of a supposed sister. 

1 1 10. The Suffolk miracle; or, A relation 
of a young man, who, a month after his death, 
appeared to his sweetheart, and carried her 
behind him forty miles in less than two hours, 
and was never seen afterwards, but in his 
grave. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side.. Wdcts. I00(iii).39 

Begins, "A wonder stranger ne'er was known." 
" This ballad . . in a blurred, enfeebled, and disfigured 
shape is the representative in England of one of the 
most impressive and beautiful ballads of the European 
continent," the ballad of the Spectre bridegroom, t)est 
known perhaps from its imitation in Burger's " Le- 
nore." Child, No. 272 (v. 58). 

1 1 1 1 . Sweet William of Plymouth. In four 
parts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.8 

Begins, "A seaman of Plymouth, Sweet William 
by name." The story has no resemblance to the bal- 
lads of Sweet William, or Sweet William's ghost. 
Compare "The Plymouth tragedy," No. 1016. The 
present tale ends happily. 



64 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1 1 12. Sweet William of Plymouth. Lon- 
don, William Dicey in Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(iii).37 



1 1 13. The same. 
Broadside. 



[London], J. Pitts. 
102.85 



1 1 14. The same. Broadside. 



103.21 



1 1 15. The sword dancers. [Illustrated by 
Joseph Crawhall. London : Field & Tuer, 
etc.] 1883. 4°. pp.20. Wdcts. 94.11 

1 1 16. Tam o'Shanter; a tale by Robert 
Burns. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 1825. 16°. 
pp. 8. 73.13 

1 1 17. Aloway kirk; or, Tam o' Shanter. 
A tale by Robert Bums, the Ayrshire poet. 
Paisley, J. Neilson. 1822. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.49 

1 1 18. The taming of a shrew. [Illustra- 
ted by Joseph Crawhall.] London : Field & 
Tuer ; New York : Scribner & Welford. 
1883. 4°. pp. (32). Wdcts. 94.4 

" From one of the Sloane Mss. in the British Mu- 
seum [No. 1489]. The writing of Charles the First's 
time." Note. 

1 1 19. The same, with colored wood-cuts. 

90.5 

1 1 20. The taylor's garland. In four parts. 
. . . [To the tune of The loyal forrister.] 
Printed for L. Hotham on London-Bridge. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 38.22 

Begins, " The son of a squire he courted a maid." 
Story of a tailor's daughter who went away to London 
with the squire's son. 

1 1 20 a. Teague's ramble to Hyde Park. 
Worcester, S. Gamidge. Broadside. 

ioo(iii).57 

1 1 2 1 . The Temple wedding ; or. Love at 
first sight. Bow Church Yard, London. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).48 

Begins, " In London fair city a young man and a 
maid." How a merchant married a merchant's serv- 
ant maid ; how he had her richly dressed and acknowl- 
edged her as his wife. 

1 1 22. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I03(i).3i 
Imperfect : — an upper corner missing. 

1 1 23. Three butchers.] A new ballad of 
the three merry butchers, and the ten high- 
waymen. How the three butchers went to 
pay five hundred pounds, and hearing a 
woman crying . . . went to relieve her and 
was there set upon by ten highway-men; 



how only stout Johnson fought . . . who killed 
eight . . . and was at last killed by the woman 
he went to save. Newcastle, Robert March- 
bank. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).47 

The cut, depicting a butcher's stall, is of the crudest. 
Roxburghe, vii. 62. 

1 1 24. The three merry butchers and ten 
highwaymen. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I03(i).i92 

1 125. Tom and Will; or. The shepherd's 
sheepfold. Both doated on a beautiful lass. 
Both were alike respected ; Both thought 
themselves i' th' better case. Both were at 
last neglected. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).52 

Roxburghe, vii. 256. 

1 1 26. Tommy Pots.] The lovers quarrel ; 
or, Cupids triumph, being the pleasant history 
of Fair Rosamond of Scotland, daughter of 
Lord Arundel. London, L. How. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(ii).2o 

The title is p. 4. On the first page is a cut of 
armed Highlanders, and above it the headline, " Tom- 
my Potts." 

" A catalogue of histories and many books printed 
and sold by Larkin How," etc., pp. 3, 4. 

Child, No. 109 (ii. 441). The last stanza runs 
" The lady she did loyal prove, As many do in Scot- 
land know, And how they spent their days in love. 
The second book shall plainly show." 

1 127. The history of Tommy Potts; or, 
The lovers quarrell. London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 3 cop. 

35.12, 47.9, 50.10 

1 128. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm, 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

67.19 

In this and the preceding edition the last two lines 
run " And many days they spent in love, 'Till death 
their bliss did overthrow." The cuts in this edition 
are not exactly the same as in the preceding; on p. 20 
the cut is up-side down. 

Ashton (p. 230) gives a title-page of a Newcastle 
edition with the title : " The lover's quarrel, or Cupid's 
triumph, being the pleasant and delightful history of 
Fair Rosamund who was bom in Scotland." The cut 
is the same as in the first edition noted above. An- 
other large cut is also reproduced and a brief account 
of the ballad added. 

The tragical ballad ; or. The nobleman's 
cruelty to his son. See No. 987. 

The tragical garland ; or. The nobleman's 
cruelty to his son. See No. 986. 

1 1 29. The traveller, a prospect of society, 
by Dr. Goldsmith. Edinburgh, James Mur- 
ray. 1782. 24°. pp. 17. 39-2 



XI. METRICAL TALES AND OTHER VERSE 



65 



1 130. True love requited ; or, The bailiff's 
daughter of Islington. Tune, I have a good 
old wife at home. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 100 (i). 9 

Child, No. 105 (ii. 426). Begins with the pre- 
liminary verses given by Child in the note. 

1 1 3 1 . True love rewarded with loyalty ; 
or, Mirth and joy after sorrow and sadness. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).54 

Begins, "As I walk'd forth to take the air." 
Roxburghe, vi. 259. 

1 132. The true lover's joy ; or, A discourse 
between a seaman and his love. Broadside. 
Wdcts. I00(iii).5o 

A maid implores Charon to convey her to Elysium ; 
her lover like others is "sailing to Virginia parts, 
where Neptune hath built a city;" the lover replies. 
Roxburghe, vii. 521. 

On the back of this broadside are printed four copies 
of an advertisement beginning : " This is to give Notice 
to all Gentlemen, Ladies, and Others, that there is 
come to Mr. Joseph William's at the Goat in Gold- 
Street, Northampton, a Person that has a Quantity of 
large and small Silver Plate, to be dispos'd of by Way 
of Diversion, at One Shilling each Throw, and the 
least Thing of Value you get, if requir'd, may have 
Six-pence for it again." 

Two loyal lovers of Exeter. See No. 807. 

1 133. The Ulster tragedy. [London], 
Jennings and Brimmbr \sic\ Broadside. 
Wdct. 105.23 

Begins, "In the province of Ulster a farmer did 
dwell." How the course of true love did not run 
smooth, but came to happiness at last, " For love 
it will creep where it dare not well go, And many 
strange matters doth often times shew." 

1 134. The unfortunate graziers daughter. 
Shewing how a rich 'squire married a poor 
grazier's daughter ; afterwards he married a 
rich lady . . . Shewing how the grazier's 
daughter . . . died with grief . . . how after 
her death she and her infant came to his 
bedside . . . and . . . killed him . . . and wrote 
his crime in blue Roman letters about his 
body. . . . Belfast. 1767. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).io 

Begins, "Attend you lovers, and give ear." The 
same story as the " Kentish garland," No. 913. 

1 135. The unfortunate love of a Lanca- 
shire gentleman and the hard fortune of a 
fair young bride. To the tune of. Come fol- 
low my love, &c. Northampton, William 
Dicey, etc. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).58 

Begins, " Look you faithful lovers, On my unhappy 

state." 



1 136. The unfortunate lovers; or, John 
True and Susan Mead. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).20 

Begins, "Attend, you lovers, and give ear, unto 
my mournful song." How John tried his love's con- 
stancy by seeming disloyalty, how she died and called 
to him from her grave. Roxburghe, ii. 643. 

1 137. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

102.77 

1 138. The unhappy lady of Hackney. To 
an excellent new tune. London, L. How, in 
Love Court, Petty-Coat-Lane. Broadside. 
Wdcts. ioo(iii).6o 

Begins, " You youthful, charming ladies fair." How 
a maid was seduced by her brother-in-law, and died. 
Roxburghe, viii. 658. 

1 139. The same. London, printing-office 
in Stonecutter-street, Fleet Market. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 102.78 

1140. The same. [Coventry], Turner. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.79 

1 141. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 2 cop. 102.79, 105-24 

1 142. The unhappy lover's garland. [Lon- 
don], R. Marshall, in Aldermary Church 
Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 105.7 

Begins, " Hard by a sweet delightful green." 
Trj^edy of a lady, a shepherd, and a cruel father. 

1 143. The same. In three parts. [Lon- 
don], Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).6i 

1 144. The unnatural father ; or, The duti- 
ful son's reward. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. 2 cop. 

ioo(iii).59, I03(i).i7 

Begins, " Here is a looking glass for children dear." 

The valiant seaman's return to his love. 
See No. 1012. 

1 1 45. The vile seducer; or, The young 
milliner trapan'd, as it was set forth in the 
public papers of December 31st, 1767. Lon- 
don, E. Sharp. Broadside. I00(iii).66 

MS. note: — " Alluding to the case of Lord Balti- 
more and Miss Woodcock." 

1 146. The virgin's complaint against young 
men's unkindness. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(iii).62 

Begins, " I am so in love I cannot hide it." Rox- 
burghe, vi. 253. The "young man's vindication" 
is not included in this issue. 



66 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1 147. The virtuous milk-maid's garland. 
Tune of, Ah, ah, ah, my dear. Broadside, 
Wdcts. ioo(iii).63 

Begins, " Draw near young lovers and I'll let you 
know." The milk-maid repulses the 'squire, wounds 
him with his own rapier, and finally marries him. " The 
squire in the grove " is added to fill up. 

1 148. The virtuous wife of Bristol. Broad- 
side. I00(iii).65 

Begins, "Come all ye husbands lewd and bold." 
How a wife reclaimed her husband from his harlot. 
Compare " A penny-worth of wit," No. 1006. 

1 149. Wallace; or, The knight of Ellers- 
lie. A poem in three parts, by W. Harnston. 
Glasgow, W. Lang. 1816. sm. 12°, pp.44. 

63.12 

1 150. An excellent old ballad entitled, 
The wandering prince of Troy. To the 
tune of Queen Dido. [London], Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(iii).75 

MS. corrections. Child (British poets), viii. 207; 
Roxburghe, vi. 547. 

1 15 1. The wand'ring shepherdess's gar- 
land, composed of two curious new songs. 
The wand'ring shepherdess ; or, The unfor- 
tunate lady. In two parts. Unfortunate 
Jockey ; or, Jenny's lamentation for the loss 
of Jockey. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.16 

Begins, " You lovers that know what to true love 
belongs." Story of a cruel squire and a merchant's 
daughter of Oxford. 

1 15 2. The wandering shepherdess. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).74 

1 153. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.8 1 

1 154. The same. Coventry, Turner. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.82 

1 155. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

105.16 

1 156. The Warwickshire tragedy ; or, Joy 
after sorrow. Coventry, printing 0[ffice] in 
Broad-gate. Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(iii).78 

Begins, " In the county of Warwick there was a 
murder done." How a wealthy, witty chambermaid 
saved the life of a noble knight who had chanced to 
kill a man. 

1 1 5 7 . The new West-country garland, in 
five parts, being a remarkable account of a 
young orphan's ramble into a foreign country, 
occasioned by her uncle striking her . . . also, 



the many difficulties the uncle underwent till 
she was found . . . with several other things 
as well entertaining as they are true. [Lon- 
don], No. 4 Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 25.1 

Begins, " You fathers and mothers, and children 
also." 

1 158. The same. [London], Dicey and 
Co. in Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 8. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 25256.45 

1 159. An old ballad of Whittington and 
his cat. Tune of. Come thou to me. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. ioo(iii).82 

Begins, " Here must I tell the praise of worthy 
Whittington." This is the second " Roxburghe ballad 
on Whittington, modern, a vulgar condensation of the 
earlier one." Roxburghe, vii. 578; this ballad given, 
p. 585. For the prose version see. No. 601, etc. 

1 1 60. The same. -[London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 102.84 

1 1 6 1 . Willy the Scotch rebel's letter to his 
sweetheart Jenny at Lochaber, with Jenny's 
answer. Tune of. As down in a meadow one 
morning I past. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(iii).85 

1 162. Windsor forest, by Alex^ Pope. 
Select extracts from Leonidas, by Glover. 
Ecstacy, by Thomas Parnell. On liberty, 
and in praise of M''. Howard, by Cowper, 
&c, &c. London, J. Roach. 1795. sm. 12°. 
pp. 60. Engr. front, and t. p. (Roach's 
Beauties of the poets, No. xxii.) 41.5 

1 1 63. The Windsor lady. To an excellent 
northern tune. London, Bow Church ,ard 
\sic\. Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(iii).7i 

Begins, "In Windsor famous town did dwell." 
The lady having refused and jeered her lover, he placed 
his gun against his breast ' ' Then let fly, and bounce 
it went. The lady scream'd with discontent," — how- 
ever, the lover recovered and wedded the lady. 

1 1 64. The woeful complaint and lament- 
able death of a forsaken lover. To a pleas- 
ant new tune. Broadside. I00(iii).8i 

Begins, " Down by a forest as I did pass." Rox- 
burghe, vii. 421. 

1 165. A worthy example of a virtuous wife, 
who fed her father with her own milk, he be- 
ing commanded by the emperor to be starved 
to death, but afterwards pardoned. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(iii).8o 

Begins, "In Rome, I read, a nobleman." With 
numerous MS. corrections. The cut illustrates the 
text. The ballad is also known as " Roman charity." 
Roxburghe, viii. 2. 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



67 



1 1 66. The Yarmouth tragedy; or, The 
constant lovers. [London], printing office 
in Stonecutter Street, Fleet Market. Broad- 
side. ioo(iii).86 

Begins, " Lovers, I beg, lend an ear to this story." 
The cruel father has Nancy's lover shipped off to Bar- 
badoes, where a lady kills herself for love of him; on 
the return the father has him drowned; his ghost 
appears to Nancy, who drowns herself. 

1 167. The same. [London], John Evans, 
printer, 42 Long-lane, West-smithfield. Broad- 
side. I03(i).94 

1 168. The same. London, J. Evans, 
Long Lane. Broadside. 10 1.8 

1 169. The same. Coventry, J. Turner. 
^ Broadside. 102.88 

1 1 70. The old Scotch song of Young 
Grigor's ghost. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

65.21 

Begins, "Come, all ye young lovers in Scotland, 
draw near." How young Grigor was slain by Indians 
at Fort Niagara in America, and how his ghost appeared 
to his beloved in Scotland, who died of grief. 



XII 

Song Books 

*^ In a few cases a song book which contains a ballad 
has Iseen placed with other editions of the ballad. 

1 1 7 1 . Address to the volunteers of Scot- 
land. To which are added : Mary's dream ; 
Sweet Alison; The lass of Richmond Hill. 
Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-1 

Note. — The phrase "To which are added" ap- 
pears on the title-pages of very many song books, but 
it has been omitted from these titles after this. 

1 172. The agreeable songster; being a 
collection of ... [19] convivial, sentimental, 
constitutional, love, pathetic, and humourous 
songs, . . . London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 25.34 

1 1 73. Allan Tine o' Harrow. . . . Highland 
laddies ; Bonny wood of Craigie Lea. Stir- 
ling, W. Macnie. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 70-1 

1 1 74. Allan Tine o' Harrow. . . . Jack in 
his element; The beds of roses. Falkirk. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.2 

1 1 7 5 . Apollo's budget. A new song book 
. . . [containing 23 songs]. Newcastle, J. 
Marshall, sm. 12°. pp.24. 2 cop. 

98(i).7, 98(ii).to 



1 176. Auld langsyne. . . . The whale ; The 
land o' the leal ; Bold dragoon ; From thee, 
Eliza, I must go. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.3 

In the text, instead of "The whale," "Weavers 
new prices," is given. 

1 1 7 7 . Auld Robin Gray, with the Answer. 
. . . The captain of love ; and The two con- 
stant lovers who died by the road. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.7, 29.11 

1 1 78. Auld Robin Gray's garland, fur- 
nished with four comical new songs. Auld 
Robin Gray ; Moderation and alteration ; 
Nobody; Taxatian \jic\. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.29 

" To mak' the Americans pa' for aer tea. 
He's ta'en sniff an tobacco, fra' ye an fra' me. 
Which famines the nose of an aid canker'd carlie, 
Ah ! at Laird North would tax hoole an fairle." 

I'm far' North o' the Tweed, nay I'm North o' 

Dindee, 
And yet this Lord North, he's too far North far 

me." — Taxation. 

1 1 79. Bailie Nicol Jarvie's journey to Aber- 
foil. ... St. Patrick was a gentleman ; and 
The auld sark sleeve. Glasgow, J. Neil. 
1829. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.32 

1 1 80. The banks of Clady. . . . Damon 
and Phillis ; Rejected Strephon ; Billy and 
Nancy's kind parting; The difference be- 
tween a good wife and a kept-up miss, 
with the Answer ; The royal oak-tree ; Bold 
Jockey ; The shepherd's holiday, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.30, 29.36 

1 181. The banks of Clyde. ... Ye mari- 
ners of England ; The grand lodge ; and 
Down the burn, Davie. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.16 

1 182. The banks of the Dee, with the 
Answer. ... To Lethe repair ; The beggar's 
resolution ; The toper's delight ; The return 
of the spring ; The glass eye. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.6, 29.17 

1 183. Bannocks o' barley meal. . . . Cap- 
tain Agra ; The reform'd drunkard ; Ixive 
& the sun-dial ; The farmer ; and The pilot. 
Greenock, W. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59- 1 8 

1 1 84. Barring o' the door. The sea, the 
sea. . . . March to the battle-field ; Go, youth 
beloved; The maid of Judan; My wife's 
dead ; Love is like a summer flower ; All's 
well. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. orna- 
ment on t. p. 66.3 

For the first piece see Child, No. 275 (v. 96J. 



6S 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1 1 85. Batchelar's theatrical songster [17 
songs]. . . . London, T. Batchelar. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 78.8 

1 186. The battle of Trafalgar. ... The 
battle ,of the Nile ; Kath'rine Ogie ; The 
flowers of the forest. Stirling, C. Randall. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.11 

1 187. The beds of roses. . . . Time caught 
and drown'd in wine ; The reformed drunk- 
ard ; The choice of a wife ; The choice of a 
husband ; O ! wonder to hear ! 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 69.7 

1 188. The bee hive; or. The sips of the 
seasons; being a choice collection [of 18] 
of the newest songs, now singing at all the 
public places of amusement. [London], 
J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 78.18, 117,1 

1 1 89. The Belfast damsel. . . . The praise 
of Molly; Colin and Jenny; Sylvia; Kill- 
eavy ; or, Unconstant Nelly. Belfast, James 
Magee. 1764. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t.p. 

57(iii)-3i 

1 190. Bess the gawkie ; or, Jamie slighted. 
. . . The broom of Cowden Knows ; The 
woman's praise of tea, with the man's answer ; 
Tea and brandy ; The thirsty lover, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.36, 29.46 

1 191. Bess the gawkie. . . . Again the 
wish'd for, festive hour ; I'm weel sair'd wi' 
spunk ; Cherry-cheek Patty ; Captain Wattle 
and Miss Roe; Dear is my native vale. 
Glasgow. 1828. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 71.12 

1 192. Betsey Baker. . . . Who's master ; or, 
A fight for the breeches ; York, youre wanted ; 
and Emigrants farewell. Glasgow, J. Neil. 
1829. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

72.19, 79.13 

1 193. Betsy Blossom The coolun ; The 

constant damsel ; Shawn a glanna. Dublin, 
B. Corcoran. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

44.7 
"The constant damsel" is printed first, and is in 
ballad form. 

1 194. The Birmingham button-maker. . . . 
The tell-tale; The battle of Killicrankie; 
Wit and beauty; Sylvia's marriage; A new 
song. [Also, O rare country lasses.] sm. 8°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.39,29.12 



1 1 95. The black bird. . . . Love is the 
cause of my mourning ; The betrayed dam- 
sel ; The four misses ; The contented man ; 
The lads of the village ; Who wou'd have a 
wife. sm. 8°. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

28.19, 29.35 

1 196. The blackbird . . . being a choice 
collection of 22 popular songs. Newcastle 
upon Tyne, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

98(ii).i4 

1 196*. The blackbird, or. Harmonious 
songster. Being a choice collection of [18] 
admired songs, now singing at all the public 
places of amusement. [London], J. Pitts, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. I17.2 

1 197. The blythsome bridal; or. The lass 
wi' the gowden hair. ... A new touch on the 
times ; This is no mine ain house ; Lovely 
Amora; Thefarewel. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 28.3 

11 98. The blythsome bridal. . . . The 
braes o' Balquhither ; and The thirsty lover. 
Greenock, William Scott. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.5 

1 199. The bonnet so blue. . . . The braes 
o' Gleniffer; Yougal harbour; Loudon's 
bonny woods and braes; The disguised 
squire. Paisley, J. Neilson. 1812. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-17 

1200. Bonny Jean. . . . Tweedside; Al- 
though my Meg's gi'en me the bag; Samuel 
Macaree's ghaist. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1824. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

62.22, 64.10 

1 201. Bonny Mally Stewart. . . . Her blue 
rollin' e'e; The braes o' Gleniffer; Waes 
me for prince Charly. Stirling, W. Macnie. 
1825. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

72.20, 79.3 
The first piece is a slovenly version of the ballad 
printed in Maidment's '• Scottish ballads and songs," 
1859, p. 128. 

1202. The breeches garland, composed of 
several excellent new songs. . . . The losing 
of the breeches ; The sailor Jack ; The sol- 
dier Jack; The happy marriage betweene 
blithsom John [and] pretty Betty. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.4 

1203. Britain's contest. ... I sigh for the 
girl I adore ; On beauty ; The maid that 
'tends the goats. Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.15 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



69 



1204. Britain's revenge. . . . My Nannie 
O, and Lovely Nan; The swallow; Never 
try him; and Lira lira la. Greenock, Wil- 
liam Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

5913 

1205. Britannia in tears for the hero of 
the Nile; The lass wi' the gleib o' gear; 
O'er Bogie wi' my love; Tibby Fowler in 
the glen; The bush aboon Traquair. Fal- 
kirk, T. Johnston. 18 10. 16°. pp. 8. 
Armorial wdct. on t. p. 59-1.4 

1206. Britannia's magazine ; or. The town 
and country songster, being ... [18] songs 
sung ... at the theatres, Vauxhall, and by 
Mr. Dibdin. London, J. Evans and Co. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 25.36 

1207. Britannia's new magazine; or, The 
tars vocal medley, being ... [18] songs sung 
... at the theatres, Vauxhall, and by Mr. 
Dibdin. London, J. Davenport. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. 25.38 

1208. The British Apollo; being a collec- 
tion of the following favourite songs : Poor 
Jack ; What care I ; Gypsey's life ; English 
ale; Brother sportsmen, I'm yours; Moll in 
the wad ; I love myself ; The man of my 
heart. London [J. Davenport], for C. Shep- 
pard. 24°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 52.9 

1209. The British Apollo; or, The con- 
vivial companion. Containing a choice col- 
lection of . . . [34] songs sung ... at the 
different places of polite amusement. [Lon- 
don], No. 4, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.21 

1 2 10. The British Apollo ; or. The conviv- 
ial companion. Containing a choice collec- 
tion of [20 songs] sung ... at the different 
places of polite amusement. London, J. 
Evans. sm.8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 17.25 

All but two songs the same as in the preceding. 

12 1 1. The British harmony. Part the 
second. Being a collection of ... [16] songs 
sung ... at both the theatres, Vaux-Hall, 
Ranelagh, Sadler's-Wells, &c. . . . Ornamental 
wdct. on t. p. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 17. 8 

1 21 2. The British soldier's garland, being 
a collection of . . . [16] songs sung about 
the present war by all loyal and true Britons. 
. . . London, J. Evans. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1.20 



1213. The same. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 20.4 

Imperfect: — imprint, and, on some pages, a line 
of text trimmed off. Probably issued by the same 
publisher as the preceding, but the cut is different. 

1 2 14. British valour. . . . The lass of Patty's 
[Patie's] mill ; Let's seek the bower ; Aid 
me Venus ; The auld man's best argument ; 
and She wakes, Sabina wakes. Greenock, 
W. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59.6 

1 2 1 5 . Bruce's address ; The deil cam 
fidd'ling ; The flower o' Dumblain ; The exile 
of Erin ; Blithe was she ; Tom Bowling. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison, sm. 12°. pp. (8.) 
Wdct. on t, p. 59.7 

Imperfect : — the last leaf is lacking. 

1 2 16. Bruce's address. . . . My love is like 
a red, red rose ; The ploughman ; Robin 
Adair ; Away with this sadness ; Highland 
whisky. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 1823. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

71.1, 72.3, 85-1 

1 216*. The budget of mirth; or, The 
sailor's pocket companion of [12] songs. 
[London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 1 17.3 

12 17. The bullfinch . . . containing . . . 
2 1 celebrated popular songs. . . . Newcastle, 
J.Marshall, sm. 12°. pp.24. 98(ii).i2 

1 2 18. Burns's songster; being a choice 
collection of . . . songs by Robert Bums, the 
Ayrshire bard. . . . Newcastle, J. Marshall, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 98(ii).9 

1 2 19. The busy bee. . . . [containing 35] 
monstrous good songs now singing at . . . 
places of polite and public amusement. . . . 
London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct, 
on t. p. 14.23 

1220. The cabinet of love; a collection of 
[23] new songs sung at Vauxhall, Ranelagh, 
the theatres. . . . London, sm. 8°. pp. 8, 
Wdct. on t. p. 14.4 

1 22 1. The cabinet of love; containing 
the following much admired songs : Sailor's 
journal ; The traveller ; Merry fellow ; No 
sport to the chace ; When bidden to the 
wake ; All on board a man of war ; Whither, 
my love ; The gleaner. London [J. Daven- 
port?], for C.Sheppard. 16°. pp.8. Wdcts. 

52.2 



70 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



12 22. The Caledonia garland. . . . Teazing 
me so, The beautiful damsel of Virgin City, 
King Henry & Queen Jeany, The toper's 
delight, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

28.11 

The first piece is a ballad beginning " Come all ye 
young lovers unto me give ear. ' ' 

The fourth is a version of the ballad of the Death 
of Queen Jane, Child, No. 170 (iii. 372). 

1 2 23. 'The canary; a new song book. . . . 
[21] of the most celebrated new songs. . . . 
Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(i).5 

1224. The careless batchelor's garland, 
containing several of the best new songs : 
The careless batchelor ; English courage dis- 
play'd, or, Brave news from Admiral Vernon ; 
Admiral Hosier's ghost ; Fond Damon's love 
for fair Flavella; A new hunting song. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.69 

1225. The catch club ... all the songs, 
catches, glees, duets, &c. as sung by Mr. Ban- 
nister, Mr. Leoni, Master Braham, Mr. Arrow- 
smith, Mr. Chapman, Mr. Gaudry, &c. at the 
Royalty theatre ... to which is added, Hip- 
pesley's Drunken-man as . . . spoken by Mr. 
Le Lewis. London, J. Skirven for J. Griffith, 
prompter. 12°. pp. 24. 1 1.4 

Imperfect : — a line has been cut from several pages. 

1226. The chaplet ; being a choice collec- 
tion of [16] songs. ... sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 14.5 

1227. The chearful companion; being a 
rare collection of new songs : Mary's dream ; 
Mary's death at Sandy's tomb ; Ted Blarney ; 
Dear Mary ; Affectionate soldier ; Nancy of 
the dale ; How stands the glass around ; A 
hunting glee. London [J. Davenport], for 
C. Sheppard. 16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 52.17 

1228. The chearful companion; or, Co- 
vent Garden concert. ... [26 songs. Lon- 
don,] Aldermary Church Yard. sm.8°. pp.8. 
2 cop. 4.13, II. 7 

1229. The cheerful songster . . . songs 
sung at Vauxhall, Sadler's Wells, and both 
the theatres : The answer to How sweet's the 
love ; The jolly dragoon ; Jemmy and Susan ; 
Hoist the grog ; The wild rover ; The mar- 
riage vow ; The answer to The marriage vow ; 
The lady and the 'prentice. [London], 42 
Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

17.11 



1230. The child of a tar. The midnigt 
[«V] bowl. Come gie's a sang, the lady 
cried; [or, Tullochgorum]. The winter sat 
lang on the spring o' the year. Edinburgh. 
1819. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 64.11 

1 23 1 . The china mettle garland, beautified 
with five excellent new songs : China mettle, 
or. The farmer's courtship to brisk young 
Mary ; The lass of the mill ; The distracted 
maid's lamentation ; William's kind answer 
to his mistress ; A new song call'd Worse and 
worse. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.53 

1232. The choice spirits delight: Happy 
miller ; Three weeks after marriage ; Braes of 
Yarrow ; If round the world ; The rose-bud ; 
Hark ! hark ! ; British fair ; Patty Clover. 
Ix)ndon [J. Davenport], for C. Sheppard. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 49.7, 52.13 

1233. The Clydesdale wedding. . . . Flora's 
lament for Charly ; The banks of the Dee ; 
Go, plaintive sounds. Edinburgh. 1822. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 73.12 

1234. Collection of the best Scottish 
songs : Lass of Patie's mill ; Ca' the yewes 
to the knows ; Charlie is my darling ; Away 
with melancholy ; She never blamed him ; 
[O, this is no my ain lassie]. Glasgow. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.34 

1235. A collection of new songs, sm. 12°. 
pp. 96. 41.4 

Imperfect : —me-^2jgG, pp. 9-12, 31, 32, 51-54 
missing. 

1236. Come under my plaidy. . . . Mary 
le More, or. The Irish maniac ; Dear Mary, 
adieu; Dunganna's lady. Stirling, C. Ran- 
dall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.25 

i236\ Comic songs ; a collection of origi- 
nals, as sung with applause at the London 
concerts. Written by John Labern. 4th col- 
lection. London, John Duncombe and Co. 
16°. pp. 107-140. Colored front. 117. 18 

On the back of the title-page is printed the 
following: — 

"A card. Mr. J. Labern requests to state that he 
attends Public or Private Dinner Parties, Concerts, &c., 
both in Town and Country. 

" *»* Professional Gentlemen provided. 

"Gentlemen wishing for Songs written upon any 
local subject will meet with prompt attention from the 
Author, by addressing, etc.^' 

1236''. The same. 6th collection. Lon- 
don, John Duncombe and Co. 16°. pp. (2), 
7-40. Colored front. Il7-i9 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



71 



1237. The comic songster; a new song 
book. . . . Pt. I, 2. Newcastle, J. Marshall, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24, 24. 98(ii).7, 8 

1238. The convivial songster. . . . [22] 
songs sung at the theatres royal, Sadler's- 
Wells, Vauxhall, Royal circus, Astley's . . . 
[London], Pitts. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 78.3 

1239. The country stroller's garland, fur- 
nished with several choice new songs : A 
pleasant new song entitled. The country 
stroller, or, Jack of all trades; The valiant 
trooper, or. Pretty Peggy's humble petition 
to her lover for marriage ; The maid's loy- 
alty; The marquis of Granby, a new song. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 51.61 

1240. The court of Apollo; being a col- 
lection of [15] songs sung ... at Ranelaugh, 
Vauxhall, Sadlers's Well, the theatres. . . . 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 14.16 

1 24 1. The Covent Garden concert . . . 
Maria, the unfortunate fair ; Sequel to Maria, 
the unfortunate fair ; Lawyer steals all ; You 
say you love me ; Let mirth go round ; Al- 
lowance of grog ; Ye sportsmen all ; Happy 
bride. London [J. Davenport], for C. Shep- 
pard. 16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

49.4", 52.20 

1242. The Covent Garden concert. . . . 
[24] songs and airs sung ... at Covent Gar- 
den, Drury Lane, Vauxhall . . . [London.] 
sm. 8°. pp.8 Wdct. on t. p. 2.17 

1243. The new Covent Garden concert 
. . . [29] songs and airs sung ... at Covent 
Garden and Drury Lane theatres, Vauxhall, 
... London, J . Evans, sm. 8''. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 20.7 

1244. The cuckold's cap garland, contain- 
ing some of the merriest new songs : The 
buxom dame of Reading; Young Molly's 
lamentation, &c. ; The Stockton sailor ; The 
sailors lamentation, with the Answer. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.58 

1245. Cupid wounded; or. The mischie- 
vous bee. ... [19] songs sung at all the places 
of public amusement. . . . [London], J. Pitts, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

78.11, 117.4 

1246. Cupid's magazine; being a choice 
collection of songs : When my money was 
gone ; Streamlet ; Week's work ; A hunt- 
ing song; Chloe; Attracting nymph; The 



lark ; The prophets. London [J. Daven- 
port], for C. Sheppard. 16°. pp.8. Wdcts. 

52.16 

1247. Cupid's magazine. . . . [24] songs 
sung at Vauxhall, Ranelagh, the theatres . . . 
[London], 42 Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 4.25 

1248. Daniel Blue. . . . Truth laid open; 
or. Every man's duty discovered, according to 
his circumstances ; and The farmer's daugh- 
ter. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 69.1 

1249. The delight of the Muses. [16] of 
Dibdon's [_stc] favorite songs. . . . London, 
J.Evans. [1801.] sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 3 cop. I.i6(i), 9.20, 25.40 

1250. The delights of the chace. Being 
a collection of [19] songs. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. i4-iij 20.13 

1 25 1. The delights of the spring . . . songs 
sung ... at public places of entertainment : 
The word of advice ; A dialogue between a 
young lady & a farmer ; Just the thing ; The 
judicious man ; Faithful Henry ; My lodging ; 
Bonnie Jamie O ; The knife grinder ; Ragged 
and true. London, M. Bowley. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2.16 

1252. The same. London, No. 4, Alder- 
mary Church Yard. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 14.10 

Contains the same songs as the preceding. 

1253. Dibden's humourous budget of sea 

songs Vol. i. [London], J. Pitts, sm. 8°. 

pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 78.16 

1 254. Dick and Nell ; or, Linky Lanky. . . . 
The real barber; Will the weaver; Thyrsis 
and Aurelia. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 28.34, 29.13 

1255. The disappointed lover. . . . Up in 
the morning; Wellington's address; My 
bonny Jean. Stirling, Macnie. 1825. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 71.6, 79.22 

1256. The distracted sailor's garland beau- 
tified with two delightful new songs : I. The 
distracted sailor's complaint for his sweet- 
heart marrying with another in his absence, 
they being betrothed together; H. A new 
Scots song called, Nancy 's to the green wood 
gane; IIL Tommy Linn. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 56.3 

The third piece is not the ballad of Tarn or Tom 
Linn, but a version of the popular humorous song 
mentioned by Child, i. 340. 



7^ 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BKOADSIDES 



1257. The drunken exciseman. . . . Young 
Donald of Dundee ; When I was young ; 
Langsyne beside the woodland burn; and 
Robin Hood. Glasgow. [No.] 65. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.38 

The last is a. song of two stanzas: — "A famous 
man is Robin Hood . . . But Scotland has a thief as 
good," i. e. Rob Roy. 

1258. The Drury-Lane concert; being a 
collection of the newest songs now in vogue : 
The sailor's departure from his true love, 
Susan; The sweet little angel; The Green- 
wich pensioner ; The honest waterman ; The 
Chelsea pensioner ; Sweet Nan of Hampton 
Green ; I'll go no more a cruizing ; Billy's 
return from sea; Tit for tat. London, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 17.16 

1259. The Drury-Lane concert; a new 
collection of the following much admired 
songs : The brown jug ; In early youth ; 
Modes of the court : Sound the brisk horn ; 
A drinking song ; Phelim's courtship ; Air in 
the Beggar's opera; Happy lover. London 
[J. Davenport], for C. Sheppard. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 52.18 

1260. The duchess of Newcastle's lament. 
. . . The deceived batchelor ; Sweet Jeany ; 
London Kate. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 28.28, 29.26 

1 26 1. Duenna.] Songs, duets, trios, etc. 
in The duenna ; or. The double elopement, 
as performed at the theatre-royal in Covent- 
Garden. London, J. Wilkie, etc. 1775. 
sm. 8°. pp. 20. II. 6 

1262. The duke of York's garland, being 
a collection of [ 1 2 of] the most approved 
songs . . . [London], J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 17.17 

1263. The duke of York's garland ; being 
a choice collection of the most favorite songs 
sung ... at the different places of public 
amusement. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

54.8 
Contains 11 songs including " Tom Pain's lamenta- 
tion." A different collection from the preceding. 

1264. Dulce domum. ... I'd think on 
thee, my love ; Highland Mary ; My wife 
has ta'en the gee; The variorum; The 
flowers of the forest. Stirling, C. Randall. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.29 

The cut is old, representing a man taking the alti- 
tude of a star with a jack-staff. 

1265. The dunghil-cock ; or, Turnpin's 
valiant exploits. . . . Saturday's night at sea ; 



Buxom Nan of Dover; Jamie Gay on the 
river Tweed ; Liberty much to be priz'd. 
Glasgow, J. & M, Robertson. 1809. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.28 

1266. Eight favourite songs. . . . Hurra for 
the bonnets o' blue ; A soldier's gratitude ; 
Thou has left me ever, Jamie ; Had I a heart 
for falsehood framed ; Up in the morning 
early ; On Belvidera's bosom lying ; Away 
with melancholy ; It is not so. Newton 
Stewart, J. M'^Naim. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 63.29 

1267. Eight songs: My Nannie, O ; The 
peck o' maut ; Willie Wastle ; Wandering 
Willie ; Jocky and Jenny ; The braw wooer ; 
Death of Sally Roy ; Oaths in fashion. Stir- 
ling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59.78 

1268. The English minstrel ; containing a 
selection of the most popular songs of Eng- 
land. No. i, ii. Glasgow. 1850. sm. 12°. 
pp. 46. 75.2,1. 

1269. The ewe-boughts Marion. . . . No- 
body coming to marry me ; The mountain 
flower ; Caledonia ; Beneath the willow tree ; 
The maid of the mill ; The king's anthem. 
Stirling, M. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 71.4 

1270. The ewie wi' the crooked horn's 
garland, containing four excellent new songs, 
etc. I. Ewie wi' the crooked horn ; 11. Sail- 
or's return to his sweetheart ; in. The keeper ; 
IV. Molly the rover. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 61.54 

1 27 1. An excellent collection of popular 
songs: Contented wi' little ; I hae a wife o' 
my ain ; A red, red rose ; The absent lover ; 
Lash'd to the helm ; Todlen butt, and todlen 
ben ; The mill, mill, O ; The maniac's song. 
Edinburgh. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

64.9 

1272. An excellent collection of popular 
songs. . . . Gude forgi'e me for lien ; Get up 
and bar the door ; Johnie Cope ; The soldier's 
return. Edinburgh. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 64.5 

1273. Excellent new songs. (No. 11.) 
Answer to Jessie ; Lash'd to the helm ; My 
only Jo and dearie O ; Three weeks after 
marriage ; For lack of gold she's left me. Oh. 
Alnwick, W. Davison. 24°. pp. 8. Orna- 
mental wdct. on t. p. 77* 10 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



73 



1274. The same. (No. 12.) The soldier's 
return ; The heaving of the lead ; Hal the 
woodman; The banks o' Doon. Alnwick, 
W. Davison. 24°. pp. 8. Ornamental wdct. 
on t. p. 77.11 

1275. The exile of Erin. The flower o' 
Dumblain. Bruce's address. The deil cam 
fiddling. Blithe was she. Tom Bowling. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.33 

1276. The face of our king is the picture 
for me. . . . Jamie Gay on the river Tweed ; 
Buxom Nan of Dover; and Molly Malone. 
Greenock, W. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.100 

1277. Fair widow, are ye wauking. O, 
I hae lost my silken snood. Madame Jane. 
When merry hearts were gay. The Irish 
fisherman. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. Orna- 
mental wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 72.4, 84.5 

1278. The farmer's daughter, with the 
Answer. . . . The disconsolate lover ; The 
sailor's lamentation, with the Answer, sm. 8°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.14,29.23 

1279. The farmer's son. . . . The captain 
of love ; My mother did so before me ; The 
frigate well mann'd ; Just the thing, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

28.45, 29.22,32 

The first piece is a short ballad telling "How a 
young lady was undone, By loving of a farmer's son." 

1280. The fashionable dandies' songster. 
Being a collection of [18 of] the most charm- 
ing, exquisite, popular and most approved 
dandy songs. Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Mar- 
shall, sm. 12°. pp.24. 98(1). II 

1 281. Five excellent new songs. . . . Ad- 
miral Lord Howe, or, The glorious first of 
June ; Something else to do ; A humourous 
song ; Hodge's courtship ; Anna, a favorite 
Irish song. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

33.17 

1282. Five excellent new songs : The beg- 
ging girl ; The beggar boy ; The galley slave ; 
Bleak was the morn ; The squire's frolic. 
[Also " My only joe and deary O."] Edin- 
burgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59.23 

1283. Five excellent new songs: Corun- 
naa's \jic\ lone shore ; Jack Brace the sailor ; 
The girl of my heart ; The lovely brown 
maid ; Pady's ramble. Edinburgh, J. Mor- 
ren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. on t. p. 59.27 



1284. Five excellent new songs: The 
flower of Dumblane ; The Highland laddie ; 
Jamie is slain in the war ; Paul and Nanny ; 
Contentment. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.32 

1285. Five excellent songs : The flower o' 
Dumblane ; The yellow-hair'd laddie ; The 
meeting of the waters ; Life is like a summer 
flower ; Bruce's address. Newton-Stewart, 
J. M'Naim. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

63.26,32 

1286. Five excellent new songs: Gragal 
ma Chree, with the Answer ; Contented shep- 
herdess ; William and Nancy's parting ; Bet- 
sey's desire for a man. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 
16". pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.42 

1287. Five excellent songs : I love thee bet- 
ter now ; The laird o' Lamington ; O mither ! 
ony body ; The exciseman ; Ye pugilists of 
England. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 65.24 

The second piece is a song; not the ballad of 
"Katharine Jaffray," which Scott published under 
the title, " The laird of Lamington." Child, No. 221 
(iv. 216-231). 

1 288. Five excellent new songs : The lady's 
love for the blue bonnet ; The happy stranger, 
with the Answer ; Highland laddie ; The em- 
peror done over. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.69 

" Highland laddie," is the ballad called " Glasgow 
Peggie." Child, No. 228 (iv. 270). 

1289. Five excellent songs, viz.: The 
Welchman in love ; Hap me with thy petti- 
coat ; The princess Elizabeth ; Queen Mary's 
lamentation; A sailor's song. 1794. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 33.15 

1290. Five favorite songs: The golden 
glove ; The answer ; Get up and bar the 
door ; The chough and crow ; Now ye're far 
away love. Glasgow. [No.] 15. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 74.1,10 

1 29 1. Five favourite songs : Royal Charlie ; 
John Anderson, my jo; Whistle, and I'll 
come to you my lad; Love and glory; 
Nobody coming to marry me. Newton- 
Stewart, J. M' Nairn. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 63.18 

1292. Five favorite songs: Ye mariners 
of England ; Thou'rt gane awa ; The auld 
men gaun to be married ; The warning moan ; 
The heather bell. Glasgow. [No.] 39. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.24 



74 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1293. Five Scotch songs: Somebody; 
Lassie wi'_ the Unt-white locks ; There's nae 
luck about the house ; Hey the bonnie breast 
knots ; John o' Badenyon. Glasgow. [No.] 
56. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.39 

1294. Five songs: Miss Drummond; 
Jockey's far awa' ; The blue ey'd lassie ; 
The maid of Lodi ; Maggy Lauder. Stirling, 
C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-30 

1295. The flowing can. . . . The Bena- 
son sportsmen ; and Sir Edward Hawke's 
engagement. Liverpool. 1791. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 37-2 

1296. Follow me over the mountain. . . . 
The answer ; and The sodger's return. Glas- 
gow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-35 

1297. The fond mother's garland, com- 
posed of several excellent new songs : i . The 
fond mother; 2. The pretty grey hawk; 
3. The jolly waggoner; 4. The answer to 
the jolly waggoner ; 5 . The gypsie laddie. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

61.45, 56-7 

1298. For a' that and a' that. . . . Saw 
ye Johnnie coming ; Corn rigs are bonny ; 
Burns' Farewell to the Tarbolton lodge ; My 
heart with love is beating ; A furnished table. 
Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-34 

1299. Four excellent new songs : Argylle's 
courtship ; The dyster's mistake ; Mary Neal ; 
The tiwg [j/V] of shellilah. Edinburgh, 
J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Coronet on t. p. 

59-4 

1300. Four excellent new songs: The 
bonny hawthorn ; True courage ; Bonaparte's 
retreat from Russia; The death of Queen 
Jean. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-2 2 

The last piece varies from all the forms given by 
Child, No. 170 (iii. 372). The queen is deUvered of 
"babes" instead of Prince Edward [VI.] only. 

1 30 1. Four excellent new songs : The fe- 
male drummer; Come under my pladdie, 
with the Answer; The kail brose of auld 
Scotland. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-31 

1302. Four excellent new songs: Jeany 
Diver; Lord Douglas's tragedy; Highland 



Mary; Captain O'Kaine. Edinburgh, J. 
Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-59 
"Lord Douglas's tragedy" is a variant of the 
form I of Earl Brand, as given by Child, 7 (i. 492) . 

1303. Four excellent new songs : The 
laird of Cockpen ; The lass of Arranteenie ; 
Mirren Gibb's public house ; Jack's the lad. 
Glasgow. [No.] 62. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 62.35 

1304. Four excellent new songs : The 
miller of Drone ; The land of the leal ; 
Love whom you please ; The chamber 
maid. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-71 

1305. Four excellent new songs: The 
Sheffield prentice ; I had a horse, I had nae 
mair; Welcome Lingo; Lass of Richmond 
Hill. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.89 

1306. Four excellent songs, viz. : The 
boatie rows ; The lass of Patie's mill ; Jack 
o' Hazledean ; Tak' your auld cloak about 
ye. Stirling, E. Johnstone. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 71- 1 6, 79.2 

1307. Four excellent songs (No. 13) : 
Home, sweet home ; Up and warn a', Wil- 
lie ; Royal Charlie ; The piper o' Dundee. 
Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 63.30 

1308. Four love songs : Mary, I believed 
thee true ; I had a horse ; The disappoint- 
ment ; Gaberlunzie man. Falkirk. 24°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 65.23 

The last piece is the ballad printed by Child as an 
appendix to "The jolly beggar," v. 115. It appears 
in other song-books in this collection. 

1309. Four popular songs, viz. : Alice 
Gray ; My mither men't my auld breeks ; 
Will the weaver; and O wat ye wha's in 
yon town. Stirling, E. Johnstone. 16''. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 74.3, 79.25 

13 10. Four songs : The big-bellied bottle ; 
Ugly wife ; Free-mason's song ; The braes of 
Yarrow. [Also, " The battle of the Nile."] 
Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-20 

131 1. [A fragment of a song-book, with 
five pieces of rudely printed music] pp. 1 7- 
24. Wdct. 21.9* 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



75 



1 3 1 2 . The f rolicksome lady's garland, com- 
posed of several excellent new songs : The 
frolicksome lady, or. The happy footman ; 
The stray'd lamb, or. The shepherdes's wish ; 
Bright Phoebus, and the Answer ; The bonny 
Irish girl. 1 6°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.51 

13 13. The gallant soldier ; being a collec- 
tion of [13] choice songs relating to the 
soldier's life. [London], J. Pitts, sm. 8°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. (Vocal repository.) 

, 78.14 

1 3 14. The Galloway shepherds. . . . The 
royal Highlanders farewel ; Love inviting 
reason ; The new way of Lochaber, with the 
Answer, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

28.25 

13 1 5. The garland of mirth and delight, 
beautified with several excellent new songs : 
Through the wood laddie ; King Jumes [j/V] 
the First and the tinker ; The husbandman ; 
The bonny, bonny broom. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.15 

13 1 6. A garland of new songs: Allen A 
Dale ; Paddy Carey ; Ma chere amie ; Wil- 
liam Tell ; Oh the moment was sad ; The 
cottage on the moor. Newcastle upon Tyne, 
J. Marshall. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

80.7 

1 3 1 7 . A garland of new songs : The bat- 
tle of the Nile ; Tom Starboard ; The sailor's 
adieu ; Tom Bowling ; True courage ; The 
sea boy. Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Marshall. 
24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 80.4 

13 18. A garland of new songs : The Bay 
of Biscay, O ; All's well ; Poor Joe, the ma- 
rine ; The mid watch ; The sea-boy ; The 
sailor's adieu. Newcastle, J. Marshall. 24°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 80.3, 1 12.8 

13 19. A garland of new songs : Bess the 
Gawkie ; Blythe was she ; Yorkshireman in 
London ; Pray Goody. Newcastle upon 
Tyne, J. Marshall. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 80.6, 1 12.9 

1320. A garland of new songs : The bonny 
Scotch lad and his bonnet so blue ; The 
blackbird ; My sailor dear shall guard my 
pillow ; Bundle of truths. Newcastle upon 
Tyne, J. Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 112. 10 

1 3 2 1 . A garland of new songs : The fairest 
of the fair ; Here's a health, &c. ; The sea- 



boy; Giles Scroggins' ghost; My only jo' 
an' dearie O ; The beautiful maid ; The 
royal love letter. Newcastle upon Tyne, 
J. Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

112.11 

1322. A garland of new songs : God save 
the king ; Rule, Britannia ; The jubilee ; 
General Wolfe ; The trumpet sounds a vic- 
tory. Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Marshall. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 1 12.12 

1323. A garland of new songs : Little Bess 
the ballad-singer ; I have a silent sorrow here ; 
The girl of my heart ; Here's hearts to sell ; 
Toby Philpot. Newcastle, J. Marshall. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. (harp) on t. p. 59.65 

1324. A garland of new songs : Lovely 
Kitty ; Woo'd and married and a' ; The 
battle of Sherra-muir ; If he will take the 
hint ; By the gaily circling glass. Newcastle 
upon Tyne, J. Marshall. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 80.2 

1325. A garland of new songs : Mingle's 
bill of fare ; A rosy cheek, a sparkling eye ; 
When a maiden's about to be wedded ; Rat- 
tan and Helen ; When love at first, with 
soft emotion ; The bewilder'd maid ; Heigho, 
heigho ! ; When a man weds, he must make 
up his mind ; I'm an old evergreen ; When 
fresh I wak'd to life's unfolding day. Gates- 
head and Newcastle, J. Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.76 

1 3'2 6. A garland of new songs : The mourn- 
ful prisoner's complaint ; or, Jamie Trotter, 
the strong man ; The merry chaise-driver. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.57 

1327. A garland of new songs : Muirland 
Willie ; Maggie Lauder ; As I walk'd by my- 
self ; Sandy o'er the lee. Newcastle, J. Mar- 
shall. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. I12.13 

1328. A garland of new songs : My Nan- 
nie, O ; Brisk Billy and Susan ; John Ander- 
son, my Joe ; Mr. O' Gallagher ; The Irish 
wedding ; The British constitution ; The 
thorn. Gateshead and Newcastle, J. Mar- 
shall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.77 

1329. A garland of new songs: The old 
cloaths man ; Giles Scroggins' ghost ; Roy's 
wife of Aldivalloch ; The trumjjet sounds a 
victory ; Sweet is life. Gateshead and New- 
castle, J. Marshall. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59.79 



1^ 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1330. A garland of new songs : The storm, 
by Mrs. Robinson ; A free mason's story ; 
My eye and Betty Martin. Newcastle upon 
Tyne, J. Marshall. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 80.1 

1 33 1. A garland of new songs: Tweed 
side ; My Nanie, O ; Highland laddie ; Up 
in the morning early ; Flowers of the forest. 
Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Marshall. 24°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 80.5, 112. 14 

1332. A garland of new songs: The wee 
bit wife-akie ; The bay of Biscay, O ; Lou- 
don's bonnie woods an' braes ; Far, far from 
me my lover flies. Gateshead and New- 
castle, J. Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-109 

1333. A garland of new songs : When o'er 
the midnight billow ; Ah ! should my love in 
fight be slain ; The fallen chieftain ; The 
willow tree ; Lodolin ; Nelson's glory ; Bend- 
ing o'er the lofty yard ; Lash'd to the helm ; 
The negro's complaint. Gateshead and New- 
castle, J. Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59-108 

1334. Garland of songs: The ugly club; 
Toby Philpot ; Rule Britannia ; The carroty 
'squire ; Of all the words in lexicon ; The 
banks of the Dee. Gateshead and New- 
castle, J. Marshall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-1 01 

1335. General Abercromby's last battle. 
... A patriotic song ; Beauty's blossom ; 
The parting kiss. Paisley, George Cald- 
well. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.38 

1336. Gentleman's concert, being a col- 
lection of [21] popular songs sung at public 
places of amusement. [London], J. Pitts, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 78.7 

1337. George and Britain save. . . . The 
plowman's ditty ; Lay thy loof in mine, 
lassie ; By Logan streams. Stirling, W. 
Macnie. 1825. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

71. II 

1338. The German songster. (The first 
part.) ... [15 songs.] sm, 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 23.5 

1339. The girl of my heart. . . . Mary; 
Cottage on th e moor ; Last night I sat me 
down ; and The siege of Gibralter. Greenock, 
William Scott. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-37 

1340. The glenn garland, composed of 
three excellent new songs : The humours 



of the glenn ; The fortunate taylor ; The 
spinning wheel. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

56.8 

1 34 1. The golden glove's garland con- 
taining . . . The golden glove ; The answer 
to the guardian angels ; The betray'd maiden ; 
A new song, etc. ; The bold stroke for a wife. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.14 

1342. The goldfinch, being a collection 
of [25] . . . songs now singing at the gardens, 
theatres and other places of public and polite 
amusement. . . . London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. 2 cop. 4-20, 25.15 

1343. The goldfinch, a new song book. 
. . . containing .... [17] celebrated songs. 
. . . Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

98(i).io 

1344. Gramachree Molly, with the Answer. 
. . . Scornfu' Nansy ; She rose and loot me 
in ; O'er bogie, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 28.17, 29.21 

1345. Grand musical festival, Newcastle 
upon Tyne. Songs, glees, duets, choruses, 
&c. sung at the grand concerts at the Theatre- 
Royal Oct. 5 th, 6th and 8th, 1824, . . . to which 
are added the songs omitted on account of 
the absence of some of the principal vocal 
performers. Also the admired songs " O say 
not woman's heart is bought," and "Worten 
wedding" in the Cumberland dialect. New- 
castle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 20. 

98(i).i2 

1346. The Greenland fisherman's garland, 
containing several of the best new songs .... 
The seaman's resolution to kill the Green- 
land whale ; The sailor's farewel to his sweet- 
heart ; The loving girl's invitation to a young 
sailor in his trowsers ; A new song call'd The 
maid's blush ; The bravery of Captain Barber ; 
When lovers for favours petition. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.7 

1347. The Greenock sailor. . . . The best 
thing of a' is wanting yet ; The bonny wood 
o' Craigie-lee ; and My charming Highland- 
man. Paisley, J. Neilson. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-39 

1348. The Greenwich lovers garland, com- 
posed of four excel nt \sic\ new songs : 
The Greenwich lovers, etc. ; Nancy's con- 
stancy to her faithful lover ; Haber my nab ; 
A new song, call'd, John and Nell. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.5 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



n 



1349. Grog. Row, brothers, row. On a 
bank of flowers. Here's to the soger wha 
bled. Lovely Jean. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Ornamental wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

71-13, 79-5, 84-7 

1350. Guardian angels, with the Answer. 
. . . The happy lover ; Take me Jenny ; 
Young Rosalind ; Temple of friendship. 
sm.8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

28.29, 29.33 

135 1. The guidman's grief for the ewie wi' 
the crooked horn. . . . John Highlandman's 
remarks on Glasgow ; Pretty Billy & smiling 
Nancy; Original of Tweedside. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 8.40, 29.7 

1352. The Hallow fair. . . . Queen Mary's 
lamentation ; The contented lover ; Ungrate- 
ful Nanny ; Homeward bound. Stirling, 
W. Macnie. 1826. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 3 cop. 72.8, 79.15, 85.5 

1353- The Hammersmith garland ; beau- 
tified with several merry new songs : The 
jolly painter of Hammersmith ; The bugle 
horn ; The merchant's youngest son's court- 
ship to fair Susan ; The country 'squire's 
courtship to the cutler's fair daughter. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.52 

1354. The happy clown's garland, contain- 
ing four excellent new songs : A comical dia- 
logue between wanton Jenny and the coy 
clown, or, Fearful Dickey at last perswaded 
to be loving ; Collin's complaint ; An answer 
to Collin's complaint ; Venus's delight. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.66 

1355. Happy couple's garland ; compos'd 
of three delightful new songs : The happy 
couple, etc. ; The devil's in the lady's mod- 
esty ; She wou'd and she wou'd not ; The 
dying lover. [London], J. Walter, at the 
Hand and Pen in High-Holborn. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 38.2 

No. 2 satirizes hoops and broad-brimmed hats. 

1356. Hark away. The boys of Kilkenny. 
The land of delight. The plowman. Love 
in the horrors. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 72.16 

1357. The harvest songster. A select col- 
lection of [14 of] the most approved songs in 
Matuewss mail coach adventures, & other 
popular entertainment' [«V]. . . . [London], 
J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

78.10 



1358. The haughs of Crumdell. For sev- 
eral song-books beginning with this ballad 
see Nos. 882-885. 

1359. Hawke's engagement. . . . Wap your 
wealth to-gether ; and Brose and butter. 
Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 5946 

1360. He comes from the wars. Love's 
young dream. A soldiers gratitude. Father 
Paul. My fond shepherds. King David 
was a soldier. Glasgow. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 72.15 

1 36 1. The hearty fellow's delight; or, 
Songster's panorama, . . . being a collection 
of .... [24] songs now singing at the differ- 
ent places of amusement. . . . London, How- 
ard and Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 78.5 

1362. The heather-bell songster. [15 
songs.] Newcastle, W. Fordyce. [1835?] 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Ornamental wdct. on. t. p. 

76.8 

1363. Herring in sa't, with the Answer. . . . 
The new way of the blind boy ; The old way 
of the blind boy ; My love is but a lassie yet. 
Stirling. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.47 

1364. Highland Harry. . . . The braes 
o' Gleniffer ; The H ghland \sic\ widow ; 
Jeanie's black e'e ; Jamie o' the glen ; My 
wife's a winsome wee thing ; The rosy brier. 
Glasgow. 1828. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 72.18 

1365. Highland Mary. . . . Donald M'Don- 
ald ; The miller ; O Willie brew'd a peck o' 
maut. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.45 

1366. The Highland piper's advice to 
drinkers. . . . Home, sweet, sweet home ; Wal- 
lace's lament ; Connel and Flora ; Here is 
the glen ; Oh, hey Johny lad ; and Charlie 
is my darling. Airdrie, J. & J. Neil. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 72.2, 79.7 

1367. Hills o' Gallowa. . . . Last May a 
braw wooer ; Green grow the rashes, O ; 
Sweet the rose blaws ; [Sic a wife as Willie 
had]. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1826. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 64.2, 70.7 

1368. The history of Donald and his dog; 
to which is added a collection of songs. 
Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 75.5, 85.2 



78 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



The first piece, telling how Donald outwitted the 
English robber, is also appended to ' ' Thrummy cap, ' ' 
75.7. Among the songs are several negro minstrel 
songs, " The jolly beggar " (^Chihl, 279, v. 109), and 
' ' Lord Lovell ' ' in the form 11 as given by Child, 
No. 75 (ii. 211). 

1369. Hodge of the mill; or, An old 
woman clothed in grey. . . . The Stafford- 
shire tragedy ; Sorrow and care ; Pipes and 
tobacco ; The pleasures of wooing, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 28.42 

1370. The horn-fair garland, composed 
with variety of the best new songs : The 
golden cuckold ; The sailor's promise to his 
sweetheart Molly ; A song in imitation of 
Dumbarton's drums ; The sailor's advice to 
his brother sailors. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
I. p. 61.67 

137 1. How sweet in the woodlands. . . . 
The boy and the flagelet ; The miller ; There's 
nae luck about the house ; Young Daphine ; 
and The beautiful maid. Greenock, William 
Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.43 

1372. The humourist; being a choice col- 
lection of [23] songs, sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2.18 

1373. The humourous adventures of Jump 
Jim Crow. Glasgow. No. 27. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 62.33, 74-7 

"Jim Crow" was brought out in Washington in 
1833 by T. D. Rice. Joseph Jefferson appeared with 
him in it at 4 years old. It was produced the next 
year in London at the Adelphi Theatre, and this little 
book of the Songs attests its immediate popularity. 

1374. Humourous poems; consisting of 
Hallowe'en ;The gudewife o'Guilston ; Scotch 
drink ; and The battle of Blenheim. Glasgow, 
Robert Hutchison. 1821. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 82.1 

1375. The hungry man's garland, com- 
posed of two choice new songs : The light 
ibaf ; or, The hungry man's song ; A maid 
and her mother contending about marriage. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.48 

1376. Hurrah for the bonnets of blue. 
Pray Goody. Donald of Dundee. The 
cypress wreath. I'd be a butterfly. Oh, say 
not women's -love is bought. He's o'er the 
hills that I lo'e weel. The captive maniac. 
Glasgow. 1829. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 71-14, 79'io 

1377. The Irish wedding. . . . Gramachree 
Molly ; The lass of Richmond Hill ; and Auld 
gude man ye're a drunken carle. Greenock, 
Wm. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-50 



1378. The jaunting car; or. The young 
wife's lament. . . . Billy and Nancy's parting ; 
and Judy O'Flannikin. Greenock, W. Scott. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.52 

1379. The jaunting car. . . . The light 
guitar ; The coronation ; and The isle of 
beauty. Glasgow. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 62.40, 65.26 

1380. Jemmy Gay's garland, consisting of 
a variety of new songs : Jemmy Gay, an ex- 
cellent new song ; Taylor and the louse ; 
The spinning wheel ; The true lover's yoke. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.56 

1 38 1. Jenne-Ren, be ng \sic\ a choice 
collection of the most favourite opera songs 
and all other valuable oones \sic\. Pt. i.-iv. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8, each. Ornamental wdcts. on 
the tide-pages. ■■ 23.6-8 

1382. Jenny lass, my bonny bird. (By 
Burns.) I've seen the roses blaw. The 
new-made mason, and The praise of masonry. 
Falkirk, T. Johnston. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 64.8 

1383. Jessy the flower o' Dumblain. . . . 
Of a' the airts the wind can blaw' ; The land 
o' the leal ; Auld langsyne ; Bruce's address ; 
The deil cam fidd'ling. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-56 

1384. Jockey the shepherd. . . . Mine ain 
dear somebody ; The braes o' Glenififer ; The 
braes of Balquhither ; Loudon's bonny woods 
and braes ; The disguised squire. Paisley, 
J. Neilson. [1810?] 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-54 

1385. Jockie to the fair, with the Answer. 
. . . The Turkish lady ; The happy beggars ; 
Artifice all. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 28.43, 29.41 

1386. John Anderson, my jo. Low down 
in the broom. It was upon a Lammas night. 
The banks of Doon. Land of the leal. 
Lubin is away. Glasgow. 1828. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 71.9, 84.10 

1387. John of Badenyon ; or, A man in 
search of a friend. ... Sir John Barleycorn ; 
The young maid's praise of her soldier ; Kitty 
and the sailor, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 28.4, 29.3 

1388. Johnny Coup. . . . My Nannie, O ; 
Answer to My Nannie, O ; The county of 
Cavin. Printed the year 1791. sm. 8". 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 28.1 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



79 



1389. The jolly broom -man's garland, 
wherein is contained three new songs ; The 
jolly broom - man ; or, The unhappy boy 
turn'd thrifty ; A comical dialogue between 
an old usurer of 80 years of age and a young 
lady of nineteen ; A comical dialogue between 
a rich old woman of 80 years of age and a 
brisk young man of twenty-five. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. on t. p. 61.22 

1390. Jolly sailors. Anna lamenting the 
loss of her sailor. The girl I left behind me. 
Lash'd to the helm. Greenock, W. Scott. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-53 

1 39 1. The jolly sailors garland composed 
of variety of the best new songs : The young 
woman's praise of the jolly sailor bold ; An 
occasional ode, &c. [on the dawn of the 
success of our arms] ; A new song [on the 
victory obtained over the French by Major 
Johnson in America] ; Mutual love. London. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t, p. 49-14 

"A famous Battle there was fought, 
Brave Britons still remember, 
'Twas at Lake George just by Crown-Point, 
The eighth Day of September,''^ 

" Within four Miles of yohnson's tent 
The French advanc'd in Order; 
A thousand Men with Williams went 
T' oppose their marching further." 

A new song. 

1392. Jolly sailor's ; or, The lady of Green- 
wich garland composed of four songs : The 
jolly sailor, &c. ; Tommy the marriner's fare- 
well, &c. ; The life & death of Sir John Barly- 
corn ; The roving young man. Sheffield, 
John Garnet. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

37.1 

1393. The jovial fellow's collection of 
[17] social, love, sea, and other songs. . . . 
London, J. Davenport. 12°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 25.4 

1394. The jovial fellow's convivial com- 
panion ... To which is added A collection 
of toasts and sentiments, Hippesley's Drunken 
man . . . London, sm. 12°. pp. 96. 40.4 

Imperfect : pp. 25-48, 81-88 missing. 

A Dutch and an English version of Katerfelto's 
song (p. 10) is given in MS. on the blank leaf at the 
end of the volume. 

1395. The jovial gamester's garland : The 
jovial gamester, or, Jack of all trades and 
master of none ; The young man's desire, or 
The maid's resolution ; The betray'd maid ; 
A new song ["Over hills, over dales"] ; The 



crafty maid out-witted by the old fortune- 
teller. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.39 
The cut represents three bell-ringers at work. 

1396. The jovial sons of Jove. Hark, the 
hollow woods resounding. Highland min- 
strel boy. Tell me when the maid is found. 
Forget me not. Men, what silly things you 
are. Farewell my darkey Neddy. Life is 
darkened o'er with woe. Let's drink, my 
friends. Dash along to the mellow-toned 
horn. Glasgow. [No.] 57. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.41 

1397. The joys of the harvest. . . . The 
tempest; The Cambridge tender, with the 
Answer ; Fair Susanna ; Why all this anger, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

28.27, 29.8 

1398. Jubilee for jubilee; or. Fifty years 
shepherd for fifty a king. . . . The Cambridge 
tender, with the Answer ; The death of Gen- 
eral Wolfe ; Mirky Nan the milk-maid ; The 
humble beggar. Glasgow, J. & M. Robert- 
son. 1809. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-57 

"A true copy of the simple and beautiful verses 
entitled 'An address to His Majesty on entering the 
50th year of his reign, by an old inhabitant of the 
Grampian mountains,' and who lives in the cottage in 
which Nerval (in the tragedy of Douglas) was bred." 

1399. Kail brose o' auld Scotland. Green 
grows the rashes O. Nae luck about the 
house. The woodpicker. I hae a wife o' 
my ain. Falkirk. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
(crown) on t. p. 83.2 

1400. Kate of Aberdeen. Flower of Edin- 
burgh. Bold Jack the sailor. Fee him father. 
Falkirk, T. Johnston. [1810.] 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.60 

1 40 1. Kate Dalrymple and The flowers of 
the forest. . . . I>oud roared the dreadful 
thunder [In the Bay of Biscay, O.] ; The 
bonny blue bonnet ; This is no my plaid ; 
Ye banks and braes. Glasgow. r6°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.31 

1402. Katharine Ogie. . . . John Ander- 
son, my jo ; Jean Anderson, my jo ; Maria. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 1823. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 72.9 

1403. Kelly the pirate. . . . Meeting of 
the lovers ; The forsaken lovers ; and Taste 
life's glad moments. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son & Co. 16°. pp.8. Wdct, on t. p. 

104,66 



8o 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1404. The king's muster. . . . Nae luck 
about the house : and Up in the morning 
early ; and Bauldy Baird. Glasgow, R. 
Hutchison. 1823. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 3 cop. 7I-IO, 79-i> 85.3 

1405. The ladies amusement. . . . Hawke's 
engagement. Greenock, Wm. Scott. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-63 

1406. The lady's concert, being a choice 
collection of [19] favourite songs . , . sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. on t. p. 4.18 

1407. The lady's evening companion, be- 
ing a choice collection of [18] songs sung 
... at Vauxhall. . . . London, M. Bowley. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct on t p. 3 cop. 

2.21, 4.29, 11.3 

1408. The ladies evening merry amuse- 
ment . . . love songs sung ... at Vaux-hall, 
Rnelaugh \_su'] .... The greenwood tree ; 
The wish ; Phillis ; Neddy and Molly's part- 
ing ; The fair possest ; Johnny and Molly ; 
The wanderer. London, T. Wise. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 25.10 

1409. Lament for Abercrombie . . . The 
harper of Mull ; John Anderson, my jo John ; 
Wood of Craigie lea ; Let drunkards. Stir- 
ling, W. Macnie. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 62.29 

14 10. The lass of Peatie's mill [By Allan 
Ramsay] .... Ca' the ewes to the knows ; 
Barbadoes bells ; The maid of Islay ; and 
With horns and hounds. Greenock, William 
Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on L p. 59.67 

141 1. Last time I cam o'er the muir. 
Before the sun had drunk the dew. Nancy. 
Mary-Ann, Her blue roUin' e'e. Edinburgh. 
1819. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on L p. 64.4 

Imperfect : — pp. 3-6 missing. 

141 2. The lawyer, a new song . . . Thurot's 
defeat ; The soldier's dream ; and The scold- 
ing wife. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.66 

1413. The linnet; or, A collection of 
[25] songs sung at the theatres, Vauxhall, &c. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 9.24 

141 4. The linnet, an entirely new choice 
collection of . . . [14] songs, sung at the Thea- 
tre royal, Covent Garden, in the English fleet. 
[London], J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 78.6 

Entirely different from the preceding. 



14 15. The linnet; a new song book. Con- 
taining . . . [11] songs. Newcastle, J. Mar- 
shall, sm. 12°. pp.24. 76.10 

1416. The same. Newcastle, J. Marshall, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 98(ii).i5 

Contains 1 3 songs, including those in the preceding, 
except Auld lang syne. 

141 7. The little carpenter's garland, con- 
taining several excellent new songs : A new 
song written by a sailor ; A new song ; The 
little carpenter ; The constant lovers ; The 
young man's complaint. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 61.63, ^9-9 

141 8. Lochaber no more. Wattie & Wab- 
ster Jock. Nobody comes to marry me. Fal- 
kirk, T. Johnston. 181 3. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 59.61 

Contains " Old way " and " New way " of Locha- 
ber no more, and the "Answr," the latter two being 
laments after Culloden. 

1 41 9. The London astrologer. . . . The 
praise of light infantry; and British valour. 
Greenock, W. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.68 

1420. The London beaux's garland, con- 
taining some delightful new songs : The Lon- 
don beaux; The lass with the delicate air; 
The Scotch wedding ; The way to keep him ; 
Love was the cause of my mourning. 16°. 
pp. 8, Wdct. on t. p. 61.42 

142 1. London jingles and country tales 
for young people. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 
48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 1 14-5 

1422. The longing maid's garland com- 
posed of five delightful new songs : The 
longing maid ; A new Irish song ; The young 
man's request to his mistress ; Robert Wilson 
and John West ; The Norfolk maiden : a new 
song. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.60 

1423. Lord Granby's garland, beautified 
with five excellent new songs : Granby's 
grenadiers; The British hero's valour dis- 
play'd in taking the town of Montreal ; 
The miller and lass ; The seige [j/V] of Belle- 
isle ; Betty Brown, a new song. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.62 

1424. The lord of Warwickshire's garland, 
containing some delightful new songs : The 
lord of Warwickshire ; A new song call'd 
Take me Jenny; The sailor's departure 
from his true love Nancy; A new song 
called the Butcher's daughter. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 61.41, 56.13 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



8 1 



1425. Lovely Jenny's garland, furnished 
with some delightful new songs : The young 
man's address to lovely Jenny ; A new song 
on the taking of the Havanna ; The Darling- 
ton maid; Fair Mary of Wallington. 16°. 
pp. 8°. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 61.59, 56.16 

For " Fair Mary of Wallington " see Child, No. 91 
(ii. 309) . Cut of a man and a woman holding a heart 
pierced by an arrow. 

1426. The same. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 56.15 

Cut of a man and woman standing under trees, 
the man holding a three cornered hat. 

1427. The same. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 

on t. p. 56.14 

With MS. notes on Fair Mary of Wallington. Cut 
of a man and woman, with Cupid in the upper comer 
and a pierced heart on the right. 

1428. The lover's jubilee, being a choice 
collection of [20] new songs sung ... at Rane- 
laugh, Vauxhall, Sadler's Wells, the theatres, 
and in the politest company. . . . [London], 
42 Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
L p. 14.25 

A curious cut of a trap for lovers. 

1429. The lover's magazine; being a 
choice collection of [20] songs, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.3 

1 430. The lover's magazine, being a choice 
collection of songs : The market lass ; Father, 
mother, and Joe ; Tom Bowling ; When Wil- 
liam at eve ; Her mouth with a smile ; I sit 
o' my sunky ; Lullaby ; Echoing horn. Xx)n- 
don, [J. Davenport?] for C. Sheppard. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 52.7 

143 1. The lover's songster . . . being a 
choice collection of [25] celebrated love 
songs. Newcastle, J. Marshall. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 2 cop. 76.11, 98(i).i9 

1432. The loyal songster's magazine, being 
the most favourite constitutional, loyal, senti- 
mental, love and hunting songs now in vogue. 
. . . London, No. 4 Aldermary Church Yard- 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Armorial wdct. on t. p. 
3 cop. 4.9, 16.9, 25.29 

1433. Mad Tom's garland, composed of 
six excellent songs : Old mad Tom of Bed- 
lam ; Jack a Latton's courtship ; Comical 
Kate's answer and denial ; The farmer's wish 
for a good spring and a plentiful harvest; 
Sylvia's cruelty to her kind lover; The red 
joke. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.26 

1434. Maggie Lauder's garland; com- 
posed of four deHghtful new songs : The 



new way of Maggie Lauder; The morning 
fresh, the sun in the east ; Damon and Chloe ; 
A new song called False Willie. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 56.17 

Of Maggy Lauder, Hardiman in his Irish min- 
strelsy, 1831, i. 176, says: "The air as well as the 
words of Maggy Laider though long naturalized in 
North Britain, is Irish. When our Scottish kinsmen 
were detected appropriating the ancient saints of Ire- 
land, they took a fancy to its music. Not satisfied 
with borrowing the art, they despoiled us of some of 
our sweetest airs, and amongst others, that of Maggy 
Laidir. This name signifies, in the original, strong, 
or powerful Maggy, and by it was meant Ireland also, 
designated by our bards under the names of Sherla na 
Guira, Grauna Weak, Roisin Duhli, etc. By an 
easy change, the adjective laidir, strong, was con- 
verted into Lauder, the patronymic of a Scotch family, 
and the air was employed to celebrate a famous courte- 
zan of Crail." 

1435. Maggy Lauther. . . . The pitcher; 
Bonny Jean ; Yarrow braes ; [Of a' the airts 
the wind can blaw]. Stirling, W. Macnie. 
1823. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 72.12 

1436. The maidenhead's garland, beauti- 
fied with several excellent new songs : The 
maids moan for the loss of their maidenheads ; 
The woman's weapon, etc.; The duke of 
Argyle's courtship to an English lady. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.30 

For the last piece see also No. 786. 

1437. The mariner's concert. . . . [18] 
sea songs written and sung by Dibden \_sic'\, 
Dignum, Fawcett, &c., and sung at the places 
of public amusement in the year 1797. Lon- 
don, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 25.31 

1438. Mary's dream. . . . Mine ain dear 
somebody ; The braes o ' Gleniffer ; The 
braes of Balquhither ; Loudon's bonny woods 
and braes; Sleeping Maggie. Paisley, J. 
Neilson. 1812. 16°. pp.8. WdcL on t. p. 

59-74 

1439. The Marybone concert, a collection 
of . . . [28] songs sung ... at Vauxhall, 
Ranelaugh, and Marybone . . . [London], 
42 Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. , 17.10 

1440. Massena's retreat from Portugal. . . . 
Sportin[g] Moren; Paddy's trip from Lon- 
don ; What is life of love bereft. Greenock, 
Wm- Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-75 

1 44 1. The matrimonial songster [contain- 
ing 20 songs]. . . . Birmingham, T. Bloomer, 
sm. 8°. pp. (8). Wdct. on t. p. 78.19 



82 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1442. The may day garland ; being a 
choice collection of poetical flowers, or 
songs, suited to that day and season. . . . 
[London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Orna- 
mental wdct. on t. p. (The vocal reposi- 
tory; second series.) 78.17 

Contains 18 songs. 

1443. The meal-monger's garland ; com- 
posed of two excellent new songs : The meal- 
monger's rant ; A song in praise of the earl 
of Mar. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 56.18 

1444. The medley, a new song book, be- 
ing a choice collection of 27 . . . songs . . . 
Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp.24. 

98(i).20 

1445. The melodist; a new song book, 
being a rare and choice collection of [19] . . . 
songs .... Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(ii).i9 

1446. Merry batchelor's medley; being a 
choice collection of [12] admired songs, now 
singing at all the public places of amusement. 
[London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. I17.6 

1447. The merry batchelor's medley; be- 
ing a choice collection of [9] favorite airs 
sung in the entertainment of The poor sol- 
dier. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

4-31 

1448. The merry companion; or. Feast 
for the sons of Comus, containing the hu- 
mourous, ludicrous, droll . . . songs that are 
sung by the merry and diverting choice 
spirits ... By direction of the goddess of 
mirth and health, the beautiful Vestina. 3d 
ed. London, W. Lane. 1786. 12°. pp.96. 

32.15 

1449. The merry companion; or. The 
songster's delight, being a new collection of 
[25 of] the most approved songs sung ... at 
Vauxhall, the Apollo Gardens, &c. [Lon- 
don], 42 Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 14.7 

1450. The merry companion; or. The 
songster's delight, being a new collection of 
[17 of] the most approved songs sung ... at 
Vauxhall, Apollo Gardens, &c. [London], 
J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

2.15 
Imperfect : — pp. 5-6 missing. 
The songs are the same as Nos. 1-17 in the pre- 
ceding collection. The cuts are different. 



145 1. The merry gentleman; a choice 
collection of ... [11] songs sung at Vaux- 
hall, Sadler's Wells, and both the theatres . . . 
[London], No. i Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 41.6 

1452. The merry roundelay; being a col- 
lection of ... [20] songs sung at all the pub- 
lic places of polite amusement. London, J. 
Evans, No. 41 Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 25.13 

1453. Merry songs calculated to please 
everybody, and offend nobody . . . now sing- 
ing at the theatres, Vauxhall, and by the 
choice spirits at the different convivial meet- 
ings ... [19 songs.] London, J. Daven- 
port, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

9.15, 25.5, 105.48 

1 454. The merry Wakefield garland, beauti- 
fy'd with several excellent new songs : The 
farmer's daughter of merry Wakefield ; The 
London prentice ; or. The wanton mistress ; 
Lysander's complaint to fair Silvia. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. on t. p. 61.19 

For the second piece see also No. 951. 

1455. The miller's garland, beautified with 
four excellent new songs : The miller out- 
witted by his man Jack ; The touching of 
the string, &c. ; The bishoprick tragedy, or. 
The unfortunate young lady; The happy 
marriage. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.68 

1456. The minstrel . . . containing the 
following [19] new and popular songs . . . 
Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

98(ii).i3 

Imperfect: — pp. 3-8, 1 1-1 4 missing. 

1457. Mirth's magazine ; or, Momus's fund : 
a collection of humourous songs, &c., selected 
from the most celebrated authors, with several 
original odes, cantatas, and medleys, never 
before publish'd. By Robert Pickersgill. 
London, D. Steel, sm. 8°, pp. 8. 27.5 

1458. Molly O'Riggs. Sit ye awhile and 
tipple a bit. The delights of wine. Cale- 
donia ! Native land ! The warrior bard. 
Beadle of the parish. Glasgow. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.25 

1459. The Momus; or. Annual songster. 
Containing [13] popular sea songs. [Lon- 
don], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

I17.7 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



83 



1460. Muirland Willie's garland, composed 
with variety of the best new songs : Muirland 
Willie's courtship to biythe Maggie ; A dia- 
logue between William Lick-ladle and Thomas 
Clean-cogue who were feeding their sheep 
upon the Ockel- hills, upon the 13 th of No- 
vember, 1 7 15, being the day the battle of 
Sheriff-moor was fought. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 56.20 

1 46 1. The muses. Being a choice collec- 
tion of [22 of] the most celebrated and popu- 
lar songs. Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp.24. 98(i).2i 

1462. The muses delight; being a choice 
collection of the newest songs now singing at 
all the public places of amusement. [Lon- 
don], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

117.8 

1463. The muses magazme ; being a choice 
collection of [15] songs sung at Vauxhall, 
Ranelah, the theatres . . . London, J. Evans. 
12°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

25.17, 20.9 
Includes a song on the French Telegraphe. 

1464. The musical companion; being a 
chosen collection of ... [18] songs sung at 
the theatres and public gardens . . . sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.34 

1465. The musical miscellany ; . . . con- 
taining a choice collection of 24 celebrated 
songs. Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(0-9 

1466. My boy Tammy . . . Tak' your auld 
cloak about ye ; The seven days works ; and 
Virtue only in the mind. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.72 

1467. My Poll and my partner Joe . . . 
Jack at Greenwich; The sailor's return; 
Jack in his element. Stirling, C. Randall. 
16°. pp. 73. Wdct. on t. p. 59-73 

1468. The myrtle of Venus; being a 
choice collection of . . . [29] songs sung 
... at Vauxhall, Ranelagh, Apollo Gardens, 
Sadler's Wells, the theatres, &c. London, 
J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

25-23 

1469. Nancy's fancy. A new song book 
containing a choice collection of 23 popular 
and esteemed songs . . . Newcastle, J. Mar- 
shall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 98(1). I 

1470. The brave Nelson's garland ... all 
the songs made and sung on his lordship's 



glorious victory, and all those sung ... at 
Vauxhall, the theatres and other places of pub- 
lic amusement. London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 4.11,25.27 

Contains 19 songs. The cut shows a street parade 
in honor of victory. 

147 1. Brave Nelson's last victory and 
death. The siege of Copenhagen. The bold 
mariners, and The funny racers. Glasgow, 
R. Hutchison. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on. t. p. 

59-12 

1472. Great Nelson's laurels, being a 
choice collection of [14] admired songs on 
the glorious victory off Trafalgar. [London], 
J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

78.9 

1473. Nelson's wreath ; or, British glory 
... [17] sea, convivial and other songs . . . 
London, J. Davenport. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 25.8 

1474. The same. London, Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on. t. p. 1 17.9 

The same as the last except the imprint. 

1475. A new ballad wrote at the forecastle 
of the Marlborough man of war, whilst they 
were silencing the forts and debarking the 
troops at Martinico. Together with four other 
new songs, viz. : i. The Terrible, privateer; 
2. My lovely swain carries the sway; 3. Da- 
mon and Phillis ; 4. Dear Sylvia no longer my 
passion despise. Belfast, James Magee. 1762. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).27 

1476. The new bower Apollo; being a 
choice collection of [18] admired songs 
now singing at all the public places of amuse- 
ment. [London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 7. 10 

1477. The new London songster; being 
a choice collection of ... [14] songs. New- 
castle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

98(ii).ii 

1478. The new Pantheon concert; being 
a choice collection of . . . [20] songs sung 
... at the Pantheon, Vauxhall, Ranelaugh 
. . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 14.21 

1479. The new play-house garland, con- 
taining several of the best new songs : A new 
song before the royal family; The female 
sea-captain ; or. The painful damsel ; A new 
play-house song, in the Beggars opera ; The 
tradesman's resolution. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 61.55 



84 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1480. The new Sadler's Well's concert ; be- 
ing a choice collection of [21] admired songs 
now singing at all the public places of amuse- 
ment. [London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 7. 1 1 

1481. A new song called Auld Scotia free. 
. . . O Helen thou art my darling ; The lovely 
lass of Allan-down; Will ye go to the ewe 
bughts; and A lamentation for the deatd 
[j'/V] of the brave McKay. Airdrie, J. & J. 
Neil. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

72.1, 79.9 

1482. A new song called John of Bena- 
chie . . . The bunch of green ribbons ; The 
green garters ; and O Fortune, hear my 
prayer. Stirling, sm. 12°. pp. 12. Wdct. 
on t. p. 81.3 

1483. The new theatrical songster; being 
a choice collection of 28 celebrated new 
songs. Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(i).6 

1484. The new way of Johnny's grey- 
breeks. . . . The mucking of Geordie's byre ; 
My jo Janet ; Billy's courtship, with the An- 
swer ; Blushes eloquently speak ; Rule Britan- 
nia, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 28.38 

1485. The New Years garland; compos'd 
of three excellent new songs : The jovial 
lover, etc. ; The wealthy widow, or, The old 
woman's resolution to be marry'd at the age 
of fourscore and three to her eighth husband, 
etc. ; The sailors courant, or. His jovial tak- 
ing leave of his old wife. [London], J. Wal- 
ter, at the Hand and Pen in High Holbom. 
16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 38.17 

i486. The Newcastle songster ; being a col- 
lection of curious & interesting local songs 

New series. No. i-v. Newcastle, W. & T. 
Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp. 24, each. AVdcts. 
on title-pages. 68.4 

1487. The Newcastle songster; being . . . 
songs descriptive of the language and man- 
ners of the common people of Newcastle 
upon Tyne and the neighborhood. . . . Pt. i-vi. 
Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24, each. 98(ii).i-6 

Imperfect: — pt. 2 lacks pp. 1-6. 

1488. The nightingale ; a new song book. 
Being a choice collection of ... [21] songs. 
Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

98(1). 14 



1489. The same. [20 songs.] New- 
castle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24, 76.9 

Imperfect : — pp. ii-i4missing. 

Of the songs, 1 7 axe also in the preceding collection. 

1490. The Northumberland garland; con- 
taining four excellent new songs : The young 
ladies love for the Northumberland grena- 
diers ; Peggy Bond ; Britons conquests ; The 
fumbling old man, a new song. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 56.22 

1491. The same. The young ladies love 
for the Northumberland grenadiers ; Peggy 
Bond ; The answer ; Britons conquests. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 56.23 

The cut and type are the same as in the preceding. 

1492. Nursery poems from the ancient and 
modern poets. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. 
pp. 16. Wdcts. 1 14.6 

1493. Nursery rhymes from the royal col- 
lections. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. 
pp. 16. Wdcts. 1144 

1494. O let me in this ae night. . . . Old 
England, O ; The flowers of the forest ; The 
desponding negro ; Roy's wife of Aldivalloch ; 
The land o' the leal. Stirling, C. Randall. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.83 

1495. O'^'" the muir amang the heather. 
. . . Tibby Fowler ; The broom of Cowden 
Knowes ; Three weeks after marriage. Stir- 
ling, C. Randall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 59.84 

The third piece is not the ballad given by Child, 
217 (iv. 191-209), although the first two verses are 
the same as those of version G. 

1496. Of a' the airts the wind can blaw. 
. . . The land o' the leal ; Auld langsyne ; 
Bold dragoon ; From thee, Eliza, I must go. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.82 

1497. Old Adam garland, containing sev- 
eral excellent new songs : Old Adam ; A new 
song call'd The bonny lad ; Miss Betty's 
sorrowful parting with John the jolly brisk 
tar ; Paul and Nanny's unfortunate marriage ; 
If love's a sweet passion ; O what pleasures 
will abound. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.10 

1498. The old hulk laid up ; or, The new 
way of Tom Tough. . . . Jenny dang the 
weaver ; Lang and dreary is the night ; Im- 
prove the present hour ; Bonny banks o'Doon ; 
Och hey, Johnny lad. Glasgow, J. & M. 
Robertson. 1809. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 

59.81 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



85 



1499. The old maid's garland, composed 
of four curious new songs : The old maid's 
lamentation for her Philander ; The young 
maiden's hearty thanks for the old virgin's 
good advice ; The valiant Irish captain's love 
tQ the young maidens ; Bumper 'Squire Jones, 
etc. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 61. 11 

1500. The orange boven songster; being 
a choice collection of. . . . [12] songs. . . . 
Tondon, J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 1 17. 1 2 

1 50 1. The parson's garland, composed of 
several excellent new songs : The parson and 
the boy ; Truth laid open, etc. ; The amorous 
lovers. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61. i 

1502. Peggy Bawn, a new song, to which 
are added three other new songs, viz. : Wan- 
ton Kitty, or. Sleepy Davy's ravishment ; 
The banks of the Shannon ; A new song, 
call'd Liberty. Belfast. 1764. 16°. pp.8. 
W^dct. on t. p. 57(iii).3o 

1503. Philander's garland, composed of 
five delightful new songs : Philander's com- 
plaint to his beautiful Phillis ; Beautiful Phil- 
lis's kind answer, etc. ; A comical dialogue 
between an honest sailor and his deluding 
landlady, etc. ; Jemmy the plough boy ; The 
young man's courtship, etc. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.47 

1504. The pilgrim; together with three 
other songs, viz. : The maid's hopes in the 
lottery ; The answer ; The seamens distress. 
Belfast, James Magee. 1769. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 57(ii).i2 

1505. The pink garland, beautified with 
several excellent new songs : Pinks and lil- 
lies, or, Phillis at a nonplus ; The answer to 
the Pinks and lillies ; The ladies new whim- 
wham ; Arthur O'Bradley. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 61.28, 56.24 

1506. The pink shoes garland, composed 
of some delightful new songs : The pink 
shoes and white stockings ; A new song on 
taking Fort Palais in Belleisle ; The young 
damsel's wilful mistake ; A new song in 
praise of the brave Cap. Death, commander 
of the Terrible, privateer, as it was sung by 
Mr. Dennis, at Sadler's Wells ; The dis- 
tracted maiden's love for the farmer's son. 
16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.64 

1507. Poetic trifles for young gentlemen 
and ladies. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. 
pp. 16. Wdcts. 1 14-3 



1508. The Polhymnia. No. 3. Contain- 
ing the Answer to the last love-letter ; Maria's 
sweeter notes excel ; The grave of Susan ; 
and The lovely exile. Glasgow, John Mur- 
doch. 16°. pp. 8. 33.5 

1509. Poor Jack; or. The contented tar. 
. . . Bonny Molly of Adamsley ; Logan water, 
with the Answer ; The king's hunting song ; 
Wealth breeds care ; Free from confinement 
& strife, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct- on t. p. 
2 cop. 28.31, 29.2 

15 10. The pope's knavery ; or, Old Nick's 
invention. . . . The fortunate young farmer ; 
The young lady's praise ; The Dublin baker. 
Entered, etc. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 28.32 

15 11. Pretty Betty's garland, containing 
three excellent new songs : Pretty Betty ; A 
new song call'd the butcher and parson; 
Once I had a heart. 18°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 61.21 

15 1 2. The pretty maiden's amusement; 
being a choice collection of ... [12] songs 
sung at both the theatres, Vaux Hall, Rene- 
lagh, Marybone, Sadler's -Well's, &c. . . . 
London, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

17.14 

15 13. The pretty maiden's delight; being 
a collection of the following favourite songs : 
Good Queen Bess ; Love's a gentle passion ; 
Betty Blossom ; 'Twas within a mile of Edin- 
boro' town ; How sweet in the woodlands ; 
My fond shepherds ; Why droops my Nan. 
London, [J. Davenport?] for C. Sheppard. 
24°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 52.3 

15 14. The pretty milk -maid's garland, 
composed of several excellent new songs : 
The pretty milk-maid ; The lass at St. Osyth ; 
The answer ; On the bloody battle of Al- 
manza ; A new song in praise of Capt. 
Hornsby. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 56.25 

15 15. The Primrose hill collection, con- 
taining an elegant selection of [18 of] the 
most admired songs now in estimation. 
[London], J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 78.1 

1 5 16. The provok'd wife's garland of four 
new songs : The provok'd wife, or, Repenting 
taylor ; The maid at her last prayers for want 
of a man ; King George's welcome to Lon- 
don from Hampton Court ; Prince Eugene's 
health, on his bravely beating the Turks. 
[London], J. Walter at the Golden-Ball in 
Pye-Corner. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

38.16 



86 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



15 1 7. Queen Mary's lamentation. . . . The 
orange and blue ; Lord Gregory ; Tak' your 
auld cloke about ye ; and The sailor's return. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 1823. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p 72.5 

1518. Queen Mary's lamentation. . . . The 
sodger laddie ; The minstrel boy ; Jockey's 
far awa ; The Highland laddie ; Bonny Leslie. 
Edinburgh. 1824. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 71.8 

15 19. The queer old man. . . . And sae 
will we yet ; Logan braes ; When John and 
me were married ; Though prim as saints. 
Stirling, W. Macnie. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 64.7 

1520. The quizzical songster; being an 
entire new and choice collection of [13 of] 
the most admired songs sung at the theatres, 
Vauxhall, Astley's circus, &c. &c. • . . [Lon- 
don], T. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 78.13 

' ' The cuts are sometimes older than the books, 
and the one to the Quizzical Songster seems to be as 
old as the time of Charles I." MS. note by F. W. 
Fairholt, on fly-leaf of the volume. 

152 1. The radical reformers' new book. 
Being a choice collection of patriotic songs. 
. . . Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Marshall, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. 98(i).i5 

1522. The rake's garland, beautified with 
four delightful new songs : A new song ; The 
sailor's wife ; The rake and his mistress ; The 
batchelor's ragged breeches. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.38 

1523. The rambling boy, with the Answer. 
. . . The gallant sailor ; The new way of 
Adm. Benbow ; The cheating tribe, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.26, 29.30 

1524. The Ranelaugh concert ... a col- 
lection of [3 1 of] the newest songs sung at all 
the public places of entertainment. . . . Lon- 
don, Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2.22 

1525. The reapers garland, composed with 
variety of the best new songs : The reaper's 
rant, or, The toil of shearing o't; She's 
gone and left me bird alone ; The answer. 
i6°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 56.26 

With MS. notes to the first piece. 

1526. The regency collection, containing 
... [15] songs now singing at Covent-Garden 



theatre, Sadler's Wells, Astley's, &c. &c. . . . 
[London], J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 78.2 

1527. Resolute Dick's garland, composed 
of several excellent new songs : The old wife 
and the wi' pickle tow ; New Jockey ; The 
new Highland laddie ; General Wolfe's dying 
words, or. The conquest of Quebeck ; Reso- 
lute Dick. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.49 

1528. A right merry garland of Northum- 
berland heroes. Newcastle upon Tyne, J. Bell. 
1814. pp. 24. Wdcts. 25256.12 

1529. The robin redbreast. . . . being a 
choice collection of 23 popular songs. New- 
castle upon Tyne, J. Marshall. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(i).8 

1530. The roving maids garland, contain- 
ing several choice new songs : The roving 
maids of Aberdeen ; A new song call'd Scotch 
Sandy ; The injured fair. 16". pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 61.3 

1 53 1. Roy's wife of Aldivalloch. . . . The 
Highland plaid ; Neil Gow's fareweel ; John 
Anderson my jo ; Maria. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 1823. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 72.6, 79'ii 

1532. The royal songster; or, The British 
chaunter : being a collection of . . . [13] 
songs. [London], J. Evans, sm. 8°, pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 17.13 

1533. The royal sportsman's delight; be- 
ing a choice collection of [19] hunting songs 
. . . . [London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 117-13 

1534. The royal wedding garland, com- 
posed with variety of the best new songs : 
Nanny of the vale ; The jovial sailor, or. 
The biter bit; The young woman's con- 
stancy ; Polly, are you waking? 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.25 

1535. The rural lovers delight; being a 
choice collection of the newest songs sung . . . 
at Renelagh, Vauxhall, Sadler's Wells . . . The 
black cow ; Death by the way ; Legalaw ; 
Amo, amas ; Jack Tar's drunken frolic in 
Wapping ; A new flash song, called The 
Bridewell keeper, sung by Mr. Edwin, etc. 
[London], No. 4 Aldermary Church Yard. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 16.6,17.12 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



87 



1536. Sadler's Wells concert; being a 
choice collection of . . . [23] songs sung 
... at both the theatres, Vauxhall, Ranelagh, 
Sadler's Wells, &c. . . . [London], 42 Long 
Lane. 12°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.27 

The last song is: "The encouraging general, a 
song sung by that truly gallant officer, General Wolfe, 
the evening before he received the mortal wound which 
occasioned his death." 

1537. The sailors' companion ; being a 
choice collection of [15 of] the most favour- 
ite sea songs now in vogue .... [London], 
42 Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2.20 

1538. The sailors' companion; being a 
collection of the following favourite songs : 
Sailor's consolation ; Strew the rude crosses of 
life o'er with flowers ; Mount your coursers 
and follow the chace ; Je pense a vous ; Jack 
Flourish ; Sweet Robin ; The lass for a wife ; 
Harry Halliard. London, [J. Davenport] 
for C. Sheppard. 16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 

52.19 

1539. The sailor's journal. . . . Yo, yea; 
The sailor's adieu ; Every inch a sailor ; Wil- 
liam and Nancy. Stirling, C. Randall. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.87 

1540. The sailor's magazine; being a col- 
lection of the newest sea songs now in vogue 
. . . The siege of Gibraltar. Hood's concjuest 
over the comte de Grasse. General How's 
victory over the rebels at Boston. A new 
song on the siege of Gibraltar. The honour 
of Admiral Hood. The royal sailor. The 
Culloden's jovial crew. [London], No. 42 
Long Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

14.13 

1541. The sailor's songster; a new song 
book [20 songs]. Newcastle, J. Marshall, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 98(1). 1 7 

1542. The sailor's whim; or, Saturday 
night at sea : containing twenty two of the 
newest and most favorite sea, hunting, love, 
and convivial songs .... London, J. Daven- 
port, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 9.3 

1543. The sailor's whim ; being a collec- 
tion of the following favourite songs : Tack 
and half tack; I am ready to resign her; 
Woman seduces all mankind; If love; Ma 
cherie amie ; The comparison ; When a wife's 
in a pout; House of her father. London, 
[J. Davenport] for C. Sheppard. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 52.15 



1544. Sair, sair was my heart . . . The 
hero's orphant girls ; The lass o' Balloch- 
myle; Allister M' AUister ; The Highland 
plaid. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1826. 24°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 70.8, 79.12 

1545. Saturday night at sea .... The mar- 
ried man ; Poor little Jane ; Lucy Gray of 
Allendale ; Blue ey'd Sue ; and The cabin 
boy. Greenock, William Scott. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-92 

1546. Sawney's garland, containing four 
excellent new songs : Sawney in England ; 
My charming lovely Molly, O ; The country 
plowman ; The yoimg man's lamentation for 
the loss of his lover, etc. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 61.71 

1547. The Scoth [.fzV] lovers garland, 
containing several excellent new songs : 
The young man's praise of his coy mistress, 
etc. ; The charms of Phillis prefer'd before 
the juice of the grape ; The maiden's com- 
plaint, &c. ; The taylor's wedding whose wife 
was brought to bed in a month after marriage. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.12 

1548. Scots medley . . . Jamie frae Dun- 
dee ; The cogie ; Roslin castle. Edinburgh. 
1820. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 82.2 

The first is a song of 8 verses composed of the first 
lines or titles of popular songs. 

1549. Scots songs by Allan Ramsay. 2d 
ed. Edinburgh, printed for the author at 
the Mercury, opposite to Niddrey's-Wynd. 
1 7 19. sm. 12°. pp.20. Wdct. (ornament) 
on t. p. 49.13 

This copy is much worn and closely trimmed. 

1550. The Scottish minstrel; containing 
a selection of the most popular songs of Scot- 
land, as sung by Wilson, Templeton, &c. 
Fourth series. Glasgow. 1850. sm. 12°. 
pp. 69-134. 75.2" 

Imperfect: — all before p. 69 is lacking. 

1 55 1. The seven days work. , . . The blue- 
ey'd lassie ; The bold mariners ; and, The 
lammie. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.86 

1552. Seven excellent songs: Fair Eliza; 
Helen's tomb; Strathallan's lament; The 
land o' the leal ; To the evening star ; The 
banks of Nith; Bonnie Doon. Newton- 
Stewart, J. M' Nairn. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 63.20 



8^ 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1553. Seven excellent songs: The year 
that's awa ; Blue bonnets over the Border ; 
The laird o' Cockpen ; Jock o' Hazeldean ; 
Pity and protect the slave ; Hurrah for the 
bonnets of blue ; Here's a health to all good 
lasses ; A glee. Newton-Stewart, J. M'Naim. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.27 

1554. Seven favourite songs: Blink bon- 
niely, thou e'ening star ; The despairing goat- 
herd ; See the moon o'er cloudless Jura ; 
I gaed a waefu' gate yestreen ; The maid 
of Arundel ; Sweet evening bells ; Life let 
us cherish. Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.24 

1555. Seven favourite songs: A Scots 
sang ; The song of the olden time ; Can- 
dran side ; Roy's wife ; The bonnie wee 
wife ; Tweedside ; Rule Britannia. New- 
ton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 63.14 

1556. Seven of the most popular songs: 
The bridal ring ; What are you going to stand ; 
The lassies of Scotland ; The MacGregor's 
gathering ; Farewell to the mountain ; The 
banks of the blue Mozelle ; 'Twas merry in 
the hall. Glasgow. [No.] 45. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.20 

1557. Seven select songs : Willie brew'd a 
peck o' maut ; This is no my ain lassie ; Wil- 
lie Wastle ; The day returns ; Hey for a lass 
wi' a tocher ; I gaed a waefu' gate yestreen ; 
I hae a wife o' my ain. Edinburgh. 16°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.17 

1558. The Shad well garland; being a 
collection of four new songs of mirth and 
pastime : The Shadwell shoufler ; or, The 
Welsh-man's cunning contrivance, &c. ; Rob- 
bing of Redding, etc. ; The sporting couple, 
or, Kensington frolick ; The Scotch lasses 
pursuit after her sweet-heart Jokey, etc. 
J. Shooter. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. of crown 
on t. p. 38.1 

1559. The shady grove. . . . The soldier's 
return ; and Jamie with his trousers on. 
Greenock, William Scott. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-94 

1560. The sheep-shearers' ga'-land ; being 
a collection of [16] choice songs to be sung 
at sheep-shearing. [London], J. Pitts. sm.8°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. (Vocal repository.) 

The cut represents a sheep-shearing. 7"'l5 

1561 . Shepherd Adonia's [i-/V] garland, con- 
taining four songs : The contented lovers, etc. ; 



The Greenwich lovers, etc. ; Nancy's con- 
stancy to William, etc. Sheffield, John Gar- 
net. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 
Contains but three songs. 37* 1 5 > ^ ° 

1562. The shepherd's garland, furnished 
with some delightful new songs : The shep- 
herd's lamentation ; The deserter's lamenta- 
tion ; Poor Anthony misfortune. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.36 

1563. The shepherd's pastime, or pas- 
toral songster ; being a selection of elegant 
pastorals. 2d ed. London, L. Wayland, etc. 
1789. sm. 12°. pp. 124. 40.2 

1564. The shepherd's son's garland, com- 
posed of fiVe songs : The shepherd's son out- 
witted ; Davy and Kate, a loving couple ; 
The forlorn lover ; The answer ; Willy's the 
lad for me. Sheffield, John Garnet. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 37-1 6 

1565. The shipwreck' d tar, . . . The banks 
of the Shannon ; Tom Starboard ; Beneath a 
shady tree ; and The lass in yon town. 
Greenock, W. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59-93 

1566. The shoe-maker's garland, composed 
of four delightful new songs : Jolly Crispin's 
rambles ; An excellent new song ; The blind 
boy; The recruiting officer. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 61.17 

1567. The siren ; a new song book, being 
a choice collection of ... [16] songs. New- 
castle uponTyne, J. Marshall, sm. 1 2 . pp. 24. 

98(i).i3 

1568. Six excellent songs : Clarinda ; The 
Highland plaid ; Musing on the roaring ocean ; 
A red, red rose ; The young Highland rover ; 
A mother's lament for the death of her son. 
Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.22 

1569. Six excellent songs: Farewell to 
Lochaber ; Harvest home ; Mary's dream ; 
Roslin castle ; The soldier slumbering after 
war ; All's well. Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.23 

1570. Six excellent songs : It was upon a 
Lammas night ; How cruel are the parents ; 
The bonnie wee thing ; O condescend, dear 
charming maid ; Thine am I ; Why, why 
tell thy lover. Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.28 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



89 



157 1. Six favourite songs: John Ander- 
son, my jo; There's nae luck about the 
house ; I gaed a waefu gate yestreen ; Auld 
langsyne; Blythe and happy are we; The 
rose will cease to blow. Newton-Stewart, 
J. M'Naim. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

63.15 

1572. Six love songs : Jockey to the fair; 
Wha's at the window, wha ? Fairest of the 
fair ; The flower o' Dumblane ; The maid of 
Arundel ; Farewell, farewell. Glasgow. [No.] 
34. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. . 62.28 

1573. Six love songs : See the ship ; I sigh 
for the girl I adore ; Haud awa frae me, 
Donald ; Had I the wyte ; The fair young 
knight; Banks of Doun. Falkirk. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.33 

1574. Six popular songs: Alice Gray; 
England, Europe's glory; A light heart & 
thin pair of breeches ; The braes of Busbie ; 
Waes me for Prince Charlie ; Scotland yet. 
Glasgow. [No.] 46. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 62.36 

1575. Six popular songs : The deuks dang 
o'er my daddie ; John Anderson my jo ; Fy, 
gar rub her owre with strae ; My boy Tam- 
my ; An auld man would be wooing ; Banks 
of Allan water. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.27 

1576. Six songs: Braes of Galloway ; Mine 
ain dear somebody ; Oh ! Send me Lewis 
Gordon hame ; Bonny winsome Mary ; Why 
unite to banish care ; Wat ye wha's in yon 
town. Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. (No. 6.) 
16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.16 

1577. The skylark. A new song book; 
being a choice collection of [16] celebrated 
new songs. . . . Newcastle upon Tyne, J. 
Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 98(i).2 

1578. The skylark; being an entire new 
and choice collection of ... [16] songs sung 
... at Vauxhall, Sadler's Wells, and by 
Mr. Dibden [jzV]. . . . London, J. Evans and 
CO. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 25.25 

1579. The smirking lass's garland, beau- 
tified with five excellent new songs : The 
smirking smiling lass well pleased ; The sol- 
dier's song, or. The lillies of France; The 
answer to the Lillies of France ; The fortunate 
wedding, or. Good luck to the lady's wait- 
ing-maid ; A new song call'd Ally Croaker. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.70 



1580. The soldier's delight, being a col- 
lection of [18] songs. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2.23 

1 581. Soldier's dream. . . . Hap me with 
thy petticoat ; At the dead of the night ; 
Bonny Mally Stewart ; Lochaber no more ; 
Down the burn, Davie. Stirling, W. Macnie. 
24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 70.9 

1582. The soldier's festival, or vocal maga- 
zine, containing twenty-three . . . martial, 
convivial, sea, and love songs. . . . Lon- 
don, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 9.8 

1583. The songster's companion ; being a 
rare collection of new songs : Black ey'd 
Susan; A hunting song; Plato's advice; 
Advice to the fair sex ; My friend and 
pitcher ; Wandering sailor ; Jockey said to 
Jenny ; If a body loves a body. London, 
[J. Davenport] for C. Sheppard. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 52.5 

1584. The songster's companion ; being a 
choice collection of . . . [24] songs sung . . . 
at Covent Garden and Drury Lane theatres, 
Ranelaugh, Vauxhall . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 4.2, 20.8 

1585. The songsters magazine; being a 
choice collection of . . . [46] songs sung at 
Ranelagh and Vauxhall gardens, the theatres 
royal . . . London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2.24 

1586. The same. London, 42 Long Lane, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.6 

1587. The sour milk garland, composed 
in three excellent new songs : The sour milk 
garland ; The humours of the age ; The arch 
denial. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.35 

1588. The sportsman's garland, composed 
of some delightful new songs : The early 
horn, etc ; A new hunting song ; The sailor's 
courtship ; The young man's resolution for 
contentment ; The sighing swain's praise of 
Mary Scot ; The bold boatswain of Dover ; 
A new song call'd Admiral Benbow. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.27 

1589. The sprightly songster, containing 
the following much admired songs : Sally of 
our alley ; Twins of Latona ; Sailor's return ; 
You're welcome ; Midnight hark-away ; E're 
round the huge oak; The wish; O bonny 
lass London, [J. Davenport] for C. Shep- 
pard. 16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

494, 52.14 



90 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1590. The storm. . . . The lady's diary; 
Orphan Mary ; and Farewell each bliss, each 
joy farewell. Greenock, William Scott. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-95 

159 1. The summer's amusement; a new 
collection of the following much admired 
songs : Caledonian laddy ; Nong Tong Paw ; 
Tom Trigger's adieu ; Welcome, mirth and 
glee ; Poor Tom ; Jack Junk ; Hunting song ; 
General toast. London, [J. Davenport] for 
C. Sheppard. 16°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 
• 49.2, 52.10 

1592. Susan's garland, containing several 
of the best new songs : Susan's bay ; The 
young house-keeper ; Young Nelly the milk 
maid; Cupid's confession ; To-morrow. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.43 

1593. Sweet echo ; or, The vocalist's com- 
panion . . . [20] songs now in high repute at 
the various public places of entertainment 

[London], Pitts, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 

on t. p. 78.12 

1594. Sweet Polly's garland, composed of 
several excellent new songs : Sweet Polly ; 
The answer ; Through the wood laddie ; The 
answer ; The true-hearted woman ; A new 
song call'd Grandywell ; The hunting song. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.34 

1595. Sweet Robin ; or. The children in the 
wood : a select collection of the choicest songs, 
ancient and modern. London, J. Roach, 
sm. 12°. pp. 72. 46.3 

The first piece is the ballad of the "Children in 
the wood." (See No. 640, etc.) The book also con- 
tains songs, duets, etc., from the "Children in the 
wood, "as performed at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket; 
and the " Miller of Mansfield." 

1596. The sweet robin collection; con- 
taining the newest [15] songs now singing 
at all the public places of amusement. 
[London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 117-13 

1597. Tak' your auld cloak about ye. . . . 
Nelson's last victory and death ; and Wan- 
dering Nelly. Glasgow, Hutchison. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-96 

For the first song, see Percy's FoUo MS., Hales 
and Furnivall, ii. 320 ff. (" Bell my wife.") 

1598. Tamie Lamie's cure for a drunken 
wife. . . . The ploughman's rant ; Gowf my 
logic ; Nature's richest mine ; Mira's charms, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct, on t. p. 2 cop. 

28.35, 29-24 

1599. The tandem, or bang-up songster; 
a choice collection of . . . [13] songs, now 



singing at all the pulic [x/<r] places of 
amusement. . . . [London], J, Pitts, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 78.4 

1600. Teague's garland, beautified with 
several choice new songs : Teague's ramble 
to Hyde-park ; The world turn'd upside 
down ; The lass of Patie's mill ; A new 
song call'd, Hooly and fairly ; An excellent 
new love song. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. op t. p. 

61.37 

1601. Teague's ramble to Hyde Park . . . 
four songs : A song from the Greek ; Sawney 
and Teague at the wind-mill ; The flower of 
Edinburgh ; The answer to the Flower of 
Edinburgh. Belfast, J. Magee. 1763. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(ii)-5 

1602. Ten favourite songs : Loch na Gar ; 
On wi' the tartan ; Oft in the stilly night ; 
Charlie is my darling ; The last rose of sum- 
mer ; Farewell thou fair day ; Alice Gray ; 
Oh no ! we never mention her ; O, come to 
me when daylight sets ; The king's anthem. 
Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.25 

1603. The Thespian songster; being . . . 
[17] songs, some of them sung at the Theatre- 
Royal, Newcastle by Messrs. Braham, Gri- 
maldi, Newton, Lancaster, Miss Byrne, &c. 
. . . Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

98(ii).i6 

1604. Three excellent new songs: The 
Bostonshire lady ; The parson's fat wedder ; 
The hopeless lover. Edinburgh, J Morren. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-2 1 

In the first song a lady tests her two lovers by 
throwing her fan into a cage of lions. One fetches it 
out: 

" By his manly action and good behaviour 
two of these creatures soon did fall." 



" And when the king he came to hear it, 
that two of his lions were slain. 
He was not the least displeased, 

but recommended him for the same. 
He chang'd him from being third lieutenant 

and made him admiral of the blue; 
This lady to him that night was marry'd 
see what the power of love can do." 
For a different rendering of the same story see 
"The distressed lady," No. 780. 

1605, Three excellent new songs : Gallop- 
ing's all at an end ; The old woman clothed 
in gray ; The kings of the sea. Edinburgh, 
J. M[orren]. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-41 

The last piece has 15 stanzas, beginning: " Up 
starts the herring the king of the sea, " " Up starts 
the mackrel with his bonny back," "Up starts the 
cod with his chiechal head," etc. 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



91 



1606. Three exellent {_sic'\ new songs: 
The sailor dear, with the Answer ; Jack the 
tar ; Johnny Coup. Edbuinrgh [wV], J. Mor- 
ren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.88 

1607. Three exellent [j/V] new songs : 
The soldier's return ; Answer to the Soldier's 
return ; The Blanch frigate. Edinburgh, 
J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-90 

1608. Three excellent songs: The com- 
plying shepherdess ; The Bothwick wedding ; 
The banks of the Bawn. Edinburgh, J. Mor- 
ren. i6°- pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.26 

1609. Three excellent songs: Jockey to 
the fair; Andrew Car; Dowsey for sport. 
Edinburgh, J. Morren. 1 6°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.58 

1 6 10. Three famous new songs called 
Effects of whisky ; The valley below ; Larry 
O' Gaff. Paisley, G. Caldwell, jun. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

73-17, 79-6,14 

1 6 1 1 . Three favourite songs : As I stood 
by yon roofless tower ; John Barleycorn ; 
Husband, husband, cease your strife. New- 
ton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 63.21 

1 6 1 2 . Three favourite songs : Highland 
lad and lowland lass ; Bonnie Jean ; The 
storm. Newton-Stewart, J. M'Nairn. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 63.31 

1 613. Three old Scottish songs: Jockey 
and Jenny ; Jockey's lamentation ; I yield, 
dear lassie. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

65.22 

1 6 14. Three songs: Admiral Benbow; 
Donald and Bess ; O wha's that but Finlay. 
Kilmarnock. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

72.10 

1 6 1 5 . Three songs : The constant shep- 
herd ; Jack Munroe ; Don't be in such a 
hurry. Edinburgh, J. Morren. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 69.5 

16 16. The thrush; a new song book . . . 
[19 songs]. Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(i).i8 

161 7. The tired soldier. . . . Mrs. Hall; 
Auld lang syne ; Begone, dull care ; Queen 
Mary's lamentation ; The death of Sally 
Roy ; and Inconstant Sue ; [Midnight bowl] . 
Greenock, Wm. Scott. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.99 



1618. Todlen hame. The bandy-legged 
officer. What have we with day to do. Hae 
ye seen in the calm dewy morning. It was 
in and about the Martinmas time. Deserted 
by the waning moon. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 71-5- 85.7 

The cut is a rude imitation of one of the printer's 
marks used by Robert Estienne — the tree with lopped 
branches. 

16 19. Songs, duets, choruses, &c. in Tom 
& Jerry as sung at the Newcastle theatre . . . 
With a glossary of all the cant and flash 
phrases. To which are added the following 
. . . songs. . . . Newcastle, J. Marshall. sm.i2°. 
pp. 24. 98(ii).i7 

1620. Tom Bowling. The whale. Bruce's 
address. The exile of Erin. Blithe was she. 
Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 59.98 

162 1. True-blue; or, The press-gang. . . . 
Ridges of rye ; and The lassie lost her 
maidenhead for a' her waukrif mammie. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 28.44 

1622. TuUochgorum. . . . The Highland 
plaid ; Hallow fair. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 
1823. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

62.45, 72.7 

1623. The twa weavers. The minstrel 
boy. Canadian boat song. Gaily still the 
moments roll. Tho' you leave me now in 
sorrow. The year that's awa'. I gaed a 
waefu' gate yestreen. Rule Britannia. Glas- 
gow. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

71-7; 84-6 

1624. 'Twas on the morn of sweet May 
day. . . . Lovely Jean ; Haluket Meg ; Blythe, 
blythe, an' merry are we. Glasgow, J. Neil. 
1829. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

73-16, 79.17 

1625. Twine weel the plaiden. Beadle of 
the parish. O Jeanie there's naethiug [stc^ 
to fear ye. The Irish fisherman. Meeting 
of the waters. The deer hunter. Native 
land. Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. Ornamental 
wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 72.13, 79.4 

1626. Two excellent new songs. The lass 
of Benochie. The Sherra-muir. Edinburgh, 
J. Morren. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-70 
The Sherra-muir is Bum's song '« The battle of 
Sherra-muir"' ("Scots musical museum," Johnson, 
iii. 290) which he adapted from "A dialogue between 
Will Lick-Ladle and Tom Clean-Cogue," by Rev. 
John Barclay [No. 1460]. See C/ti7d (Brilish poets), 
vii. 156. 



92 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1627. Two excellent songs, viz. : The pren- 
tice boy; The rock and a wee pickle tow. 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 33- 16 

1628. Unconstant Moggy's garland, com- 
posed of four curious new songs : Willie's 
courtship to blythe Moggy ; The game cock 
conquer'd ; The kittle-bender ; or, The sham 
doctor's advice; The remembrancer; or, 
The true protestant general Charles of Swe- 
den. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

61.23, 56.28 

1629. The unfortunate weaver. . . . The 
sailor's dream ; Duncan Gray ; and One bot- 
tle more. Greenock, W. Scott. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59.102 

1630. The valiant soldier's garland, com- 
posed of some delightful new songs : The 
valiant soldier's farewel to Old England ; 
New-market horse race ; Faults on both 
sides; or, The couple well match'd. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.46 

1 63 1. The Vaux-hall concert; being a 
choice collection of [27] songs sung ... at 
Vaux-hall, Ranelaugh, Marybone . . . sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.17 

1632. The Vauxhall songster; a choice 
collection. . . . [of 1 8] songs. . . . [London], 
J.Pitts. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 117.15 

1633. The village sexton. . . . The boatie 
rows ; The days o' lang syne ; The lass o' Gow- 
rie ; We're a noddin'. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 1823. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

62.23, 72.17 

1634. The vocal charmer. A new song 
book ; being a choice collection of . , . [14] 
songs. . . . Newcastle upon Tyne. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(i).i6 

" The bonny lass of Bannachie," pp. 2-5. 

1635. The vocal companion, a new col- 
lection of the following much admired songs : 
The soldier's adieu ; Air, in Abroad and at 
home ; Tom Splice 'em ; When Phcebus ; 
Pleasures of retirement ; When in war on the 
ocean ; Tak your auld cloak about ye ; Ca- 
pering on the shore. London, [Davenport] 
for C. Sheppard. 16°. pp.8. Wdcts. 48.10 

1636. The vocal companion; a new col- 
lection of [29 of] the newest and most enter- 
taining songs sung at all the public places of 
amusement. . . . [London], No. i Long- Lane, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.15 

1637. The vocal harmony; or, Loyal Bri- 
ton's concert ; being a choice collection of . . . 



[21] songs sung ... at Vauxhall, the thea- 
tres, and by Mr. Dibaen [sic'] . . . London, 
J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. I4'i4) 25.21 

1638. The same. London, Howard and 
Evans. sm.-8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

117.16 
The same as the last except the imprint. 

1639. The new vocal harmony; or, The 
merry fellow's companion ; being a choice 
collection of [22] songs sung at all the places 
of public entertainment. . . . London, J. Dav- 
enport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 25.2 

1640. The vocalist; a new song book; 
being a choice collection of [14] celebrated 
new songs, some of them sung by Mr. Liston 
and Mathews, at various theatres. . . . New- 
castle, J. Marshall. sm.i2°. pp.24. 98(i).4 

1 64 1. Wae's me for Prince Charlie ; Sweet 
home ; Billy O'Rourke ; and Though I'm 
forsaken. [The fryar of orders gray. Catch 
for three voices.] Glasgow. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.44 

1642. Wandering Nelly; or, Corunna's 
lone shore. ... Ye mariners of England ; 
Down the burn, Davie ; and The blue-ey'd 
lassie. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59- 105 

1643. The warbler. A new song book, 
containing the following [18] celebrated 
songs. . . . Newcastle, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 98(i).3 

1644. The warbler of the woods; being a 
new and choice collection of . . . [25] songs. 
[London], J. Pitts. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 117-17 

1645. The warblers ; being a collection of 
[17] songs. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 17.1 

1646. The Warwickshire lad's garland, 
composed of several excellent new songs : 
The Warwickshire lad ; A new song call'd 
Be quiet ; The spendthrift ; or. The young 
man clap'd up in limbo ; A new song call'd 
Tea and brandy. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 61.20 

1647. Watty's travels to Carslile \_sic\ in 
search of a place. . . . Will ye go to the Tro- 
sachs ; Blue bonnets over the Border ; Down 
the burn, Davie. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 1826. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

65.8, 73.10, 79.8 



XII. SONG BOOKS 



93 



1648. The way to be happy ; or, The new 
way of Tullochgoruni. . . . Ready money 
and no trust ; The gentle sailor ; The cruel 
nymph ; Dumbarton drums, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 28.23, 29.9 

1649. Weavers new prices. . . . The land 
o' the leal; Auld langsyne; Bold dragoon; 
From thee, Eliza, I must go, Glasgow, 
R. Hutchison. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

59-103 

1650. Welcome, Charlie, o'er the main . . . 
The day returns ; Hills of Gallowa ; Oh, 
Nancy, wilt thou fly with me ; The sailor 
boy ; The sailor's return. Stirling, W. Mac- 
nie. 1826. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

70.10 

165 1. The whale. Bruce's address. The 
exile of Erin. Blithe was she. Tom Bow- 
ling. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59- 1 07 

1652. The wild rover. . . . The damsel's 
complaint for the loss of her sailor ; A fiddle's 
hard case ; Johnny and Molly, or. The loyal 
comrades ; A new song. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 28.20 

"The Americans are fierce and that we'll understand, 
sure they are our brethren, and as brave as can be. 
But his Majesty & Parliament proclaim'd them rebel 
band, 
and for to conquer them we now must away." 

yohnny and Molly. 

1653. The willing batchelor's garland, 
beautify'd with several excellent new songs : 
The willing batchelor; The young man's 
courtship to his beautiful Cloe ; The maid's 
answer ; Moggy's lamentation for Jockey's 
going to the wars ; The jolly breeze, or. The 
crystal streams. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.24 

1654. The Windsor lady. . . . The merry 
maid ; The maiden's wish ; The revenge ; 
The maid's charms riffled ; Charming fel- 
low, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

28.33, 29-34 

1655. The winter's amusement and jolly 
toper's companion . . . [25 songs]. . . . [Lon- 
don], 42 Long-Lane. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 17.4 

1656. The new winter's amusement and 
jolly toper's companion ... [26 songs]. . . . 
London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 18.33 

All but three of these songs are also in the preced- 
ing collection. 



1657. The winter's amusement; contain- 
ing the following much admired songs : De- 
sponding negro ; Why should we quarrel for 
riches ; A health to the king ; Happy meet- 
ing ; Tweed-side ; O'Whack in love ; Sprightly 
horn ; Country lass. London, [J. Davenport] 
for C. Sheppard. 16°. pp.8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

49.8,52.11 

1658. The woodlark. A new song book, 
being a choice collection of the most cele- 
brated new songs [16]. . . . Newcastle, 
J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 98(ii).i8 

1659. The woodman. . . . The galley slave ; 
I'm weel sair'd wi' spunk ; Jock of Hazeldean ; 
William's farewell ; Jenny, the maid of the 
moor ; Oh ! lady fair. Stirling, W. Macnie. 
24''. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 70.11 

1660. The woodpecker Maggy Lauder; 

and an Advice to lasses. Stirling, W. Mac- 
nie. 1825. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 71.3, 79.18 

1 66 1 . The woody choristers ; being a choice 
collection of [29] new songs sung ... at Rane- 
laugh-House, Vaux-Hall, Marybone gardens, 
Sadler's Wells, and both the theatres &c. . . . 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 14.3 

1662. The Worcestershire garland; com- 
pos'd of three excellent new songs : The 
constant lover of Worcestershire ; The shool- 
master's \sic\ advice about choosing of a 
wife; The downfal of piracy; . . . account 
of a ... sea-fight between lieutenant May- 
nard and . . . captain Teach, commonly call'd 
... Black-Beard, etc. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 61.32, 56.29 

1663. The wounded hussar. . . . The 
tempest ; Midnight watch ; Sweet Poll of 
Plymouth ; A hunting song. Stirling, C. Ran- 
dall. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59.106 

1664. The year that's awa'. Waes me for 
Prince Charlie. A man without a wife. 
Blythe, blythe, an' merry are we. The 
Irish farmer. Kelvin grove. The dashing 
white sergeant. Glasgow. 1829. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

62.26, 71.15, 79.16 

1665. Young Felix's complaint, with Mol- 
ly's answer. . . . Lord Thomas of Winsbery ; 
John and Nell's parting; Totterdown-Hill ; 
I love you for that. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 28.13, 29.18 

Lord Thomas of Winsbery is a variant of Willie o 
Winsbury, version I, Child, No. 100 (ii. 398-406). 



94 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1666. Young Lochinvar. . . . The rose of 
Dunmore; Scottish whisky; Blythe was she 
but and ben ; Sleeping Maggie ; Shepherds, 
I have lost my love. Glasgow. 1828. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 71-2 

1667. The young men and maids delight; 
being a choice collection of ... [28] songs 
sung ... at Vauxhall, Ranelagh, Marybon 
gardens, Sadler's-wells, and both the thea- 
tres &c. . . . [London], No. 42 Long Lane, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4.23 

XIII 

Jest Books, Humorous Fiction, 

Riddles, etc. 

1668. Ally Croaker.] The history of that 
celebrated lady Ally Croaker, in which is 
contained more fun than ever was sold at so 
small an expence, consisting of funny joaks" 
and blunders. . . , London, Middlesex Print- 
ing office, 81 Shoe Lane. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 47.15 

Halliwell states that this jest-book was " printed 
about 1 760, and was . . . impertinently connected with 
name of Alicia Croker " who married C. Langley of the 
Lisnarnock, Ireland. She was a great beauty and the 
subject of many verses and some music. The popular 
air of Ally Croker is said to have been composed by 
Mr. Grogan of Wexford in commendation of her 
charms. "A catalogue of chap-books, garlands," 
1849, p. 84. 

1669. Amusements, serious and comical 
. . . bons-mots, keen-jests, ingenious thoughts, 
pleasant tales, and comical adventures. Lon- 
don, P. and L Vaillant. 1719. 16°. pp.134. 

24-3 

1670. The art of courtship, containing an 
entertaining dialogue . . . between William 
Lawson and his sweetheart Bessy Gibb. . . . 
Very beneficial for such blate wooers . . . 
as have not gotten the art of courting. 
Glasgow. 176-? sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 8.6 

Characteristic Scotch story of the period. Perhaps 
written or edited by Dougal Graham. See "Scottish 
chapbook literature," by William Harvey, Paisley, A. 
Gardner, 1903, p. 68. " Humorous chap-books of 
Scotland" by John Fraser, N.Y., 1873, pp. 247-252. 

1 67 1. The cabinet of fancy; or, Bon ton 
of the day . . . suitable to amuse morn- 
ing, noon and night. Written by Tymothy 
Tickle-pitcher. London, J. M'Laen. 1790. 
sm. 12°. pp. 60. 24.7 

1672. The cabinet of wit; or, A feast for 
the mind, containing droll and merry stories 
in prose and verse. London, J. Davenport, 



sold by C. Sheppard. 
pp. 24. Vign. 



1797. 



sm. 12 . 
52.8 



1673. Cambridge jests; being wit's rec- 
reation. 

If what's here said don't every humour fit 
Cease to find fault, 'till you can find more wit. 

London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 58(iv).4 

1674. Canterbury tales, compos'd for the 
entertainment of all ingenious young men and 
maids at their merry meetings at Christmas, 
Easter, Whitsontide or any other time, espe- 
cially on the long winter evenings to keep 
wits employ'd. Intermix'd with pleasant 
stories, witty jests, and delightful songs. 
Very proper for either city, town or country. 
By Chaucer, jun. London, William Dicey 
and company in Bow Church Yard, etc. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 58(iii).26 

1675. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church- Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24.- Wdct. on 
t. p. 35-8 

This edition and the following contain four anecdotes 
not in the preceding edition. The title reads: "to 
keep his wits employed." 

1676. The same. London, J. Evans and 
CO. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 4 cop. 

32.18,48.7, 52.12, 55.2 

The title reads: "to keep their wits employed." 
The copy 32.18, has different tail pieces on pp. 18 and 
24, from the other three. 

1677. The coalman's courtship to the 
creel-wife's daughter. In three parts, i. Con- 
taining a . . . diologue . . . [on] the true art 
of courtship. 11. Sawny's visit to his sweet- 
heart . . . III. Description of his second 
visit . . . with an account of the wedding . . . 
the whole abounding with the most laughable 
occurrences. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 66.8 

The authorship is attributed, probably correctly, to 
Dougal Graham. Fraser, " Humorous chap-books of 
Scotland," pp. 152, 236-247. 

1678. The same. Glasgow, pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. Reprint. 93(i).i2 . 

The typography of the title-page differs from that 
in the preceding. 

1679. The young coalman's courtship with 
a creel-wife's daughter. Being a dialogue 
between an old woman and her son, wherein 
she instructs him in the real art of courtship. 
In three parts. Very beneficial for blate 
wooers, or young beginners. Printed in the 
year 1820. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

115.22 



XIII. JEST BOOKS, HUMOROUS FICTION, RIDDLES, ETC. 



95 



I 



1680. The young coal-man's courtship to 
a creel-wife's daughter ; or, A dialogue. . . . 
loth ed. Glasgow, J. J. Robertson. 1782. 
Reprint. 9i(ii).47 

1 68 1. The comedian's tales; or, Jests, 
songs, and pleasant adventures of several 
famous players. . . . London, T. Warner, at 
the Black -Boy in Pater- Noster- Row, and 
W. Pepper, at the Crown in Maiden-lane, 
Covent Garden. 1729. sm. 8°. pp. (4), 
92. Wdct. front. 1 1445.4 

"This curious volume is full of low humour, and 
contains some odd anecdotes of the old actors, Spiller, 
Joe Haynes, Ant^ Leigh, &c &c no where else to be 
found. George Daniel, Canonbury," MS. note. 

With the book-plate of Thos. Gaisford, and the 
arms of John Delaware Lewis. 

1682. The compleat jester, being an entire 
new collection of jests, both humourous and 
comical, collected by the greatest wits of 
Oxford and Cambridge. Lcjndon, J. Wade. 
1763. sm. 12°. pp.88. 46.7 

In this copy pp. I, 2 are repeated with a different 
heading. 

1683. Copy of a letter, wrote by a young 
shepherd of Borrowdale, at his return from 
Dublin . . . with a glossary. To which is 
added a curious anecdote. Penrith, Soulby. 
16''. pp. 16. Ornamental wdct. on t. p. 

In the Cumberland dialect. 77-2 

1684. Daniel O'Rourke's wonderful voyage 
to the moon. Also, Master and man ; or, 
The adventures of Billy MacDaniel. Glas- 
gow, pp. 24. Reprint. 93 (i) -4 

The text is reprinted in Cunningham, "Amusing 
prose chap-books," pp. 150-158. 95-iSO 

"Daniel O'Rourke's Voyage to the moon" was 
written by William Maginn, with several other stories, 
for Thomas Crofton Croker, the pioneer collector of 
Irish folk tales, about 1825, and was included by the 
latter, without a signature, in his book of " Fairy 
legends." Hence it was for many years erroneously 
credited to Croker. 

1685. Diversion upon diversion, joak upon 
joak ; or. The play-house dialogue : as it was 
spoken by the comedians. Being the Jealous 
man convinced that he is no cuckold ; or, 
The way of the world represented. Belfast, 
James Magee. 1764. 16°. pp. 8. 

57(iii).4i 

1686. A diverting dialogue, both serious 
and comical . . . between a noted shoemaker 
and his wife living in this neighbourhood, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.33 

Resembles " Hughson the cobler and Meu-gery his 
wife," a dialogue in verse; but it is a different story. 



The cut is in two parts, the lower representing a 
tailor's shop. 

1687. The same. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 33-7 

A single cut, different from either in the preceding. 

1688. A new and diverting dialogue . . . 
between a noted shoemaker & his wife . . . 
Taken down in short-hand by a nimble pen- 
man, one of his boon companions. London, 
J. Evans, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 4 cop. 

10.13, 14-24, 20.10, 25.12 

1689. Doctor Merryman ; or. Nothing but 
mirth. Being a poesy of pleasant poems and 
witty jests. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(ii).26 

1690. The ears of Lord Chesterfield and 
Parson Goodman. Translated from the French 
of M. Voltaire, by J. Knight. Bern, Wm. 
Lavalar and son. 1786. 16°. pp. (2), 
5-100. 39.4 

1 69 1. Edwin's jests, humours, frolics, and 
bonmots, containing all the good things he has 
said and done . . . with traits of . . . eminent 
persons in England and Ireland. London, 
J. Roach. 1794. 12°. pp. 60. Front. 

John Edwin, the actor, died in 1790. 1 3 -4 

1692. The elogy of nothing dedicated to 
nobody, with a postface by T. Trifler, esq., of 
the Middle Temple. London, T. Cooper. 
1742. sm. 12°. pp. viii, 24. 34-12 

Compare "The story of nobody" in "Granny's 
story box," a famous book for children in the last half 
of the nineteenth century. 

1693. England's witty and ingenious jester ; 
containing a choice collection . . . extracted 
from . . . Killigrew, Joe Miller, &c. Part ii. 
[London], Sympson's. sm. 12°. pp. 12. 
Wdct. on t. p. 35.1 

Called inside " The second part of Rochester's 
joaks." 

1694. Entertaining history of the female 
Quixote ; or, The adventures of Arabella. 
2d ed. London, R. Snagg. 12°. pp. 93. 
2 cop. 34.2, 43.4 

Her reading of romances " had such an effect on her 
that every man she saw on horseback she imagined a 
knight and every farm house a castle." 

1695. An Exmoor scolding between two 
sisters, Wilmot Moreman, & Thomasin More- 
man, as they were spinning ; also an Exmoor 
courtship ; both in the propriety and decency 
of the Exmoor dialect, Devon. To which is 
prefixed a translation of the same into plain 



96 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



English. Exeter, J. M'Kenzie and son. 1795. 
sm. 8°. pp. 24. 27.8 

Printed in parallel columns. 

The " Exmoor scolding" and "Courtship" were 
first published in the Gentleman's magazine, 1746, 
and have been often reprinted since. The Library has 
also editions of 1768 and 1827, and that edited by 
F. T. Elworthy and published by the English Dialect 
Society in 1879. The authorship is disputed. 

1696. The folly of witless women displayed ; 
or, The history of Haverel wives written by 
Humphray Clinker the clashing wives clerk 
[Dougal Graham]. Glasgow. 1781. Re- 
print. 9i(ii).i3i 

Also given, almost entire, in Eraser's " Humorous 
chap-books of Scotland," p. 263. 

1697. The frisky jester; or, A feast of 
laughter for the comical fellows ; being such 
a collection of wit and humour as far exceed 
any thing of the kind hitherto published, 
consisting of humorous jests, smart repartees, 
pleasant stories, funny jokes, comical adven- 
tures and entertaining humbugs. London. 
1786. 12°. pp. 70. 54.15 

1698. Funny Joe's budget of wit ; a selec- 
tion of choice bon mots, repartees, anecdotes, 
&c. Kilmarnock, H. Crawford. 16°. pp.24. 

64.13 

1699. Gammer Gurton's garland of nursery 
songs, and Toby Tickle's collection of riddles, 
compiled by Peter Puzzlecap, esq. Embel- 
lished with a variety of cuts. Glasgow, Lums- 
den and son. 32°. pp.32. Wdcts. 113. 

1700. George Buchanan.] The witty ex- 
ploits of George Buchanan, commonly called 
the king's fool. In six parts complete. 1 780. 
sm. 12°. pp. 40. Wdct. on t. p. 58(iv).i 

Attributed to Dougal Graham but doubted by Eraser, 
"Humorous chap-books of Scotland," p. 151. See 
also Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, 
p. 78. 

1 701. George Buchanan.] The witty and 
entertaining exploits of George Buchanan, 
commonly called the king's fool. Newcastle, 
W. & T. Fordyce. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 66.12 

1702. The same. Reprint. 93(i).2 

1703. The satne. Reprint. 9i(ii).239 

1704. George Buchanan.] The first book 
of the witty and entertaining exploits of 
George Buchanan, commonly called the king's 
fool. Penrith, Ann Bell. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1 12.3 



1705. George Buchanan.] The merry and 
diverting exploits of George Buchanan, com- 
monly called the king's fool. Edinburgh. 
1818. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

112.4 

1706. Grinning made easy; or, Funny 
Dick's unrivalled collection of curious, comi- 
cal, odd, droll, humorous, witty, whimsical, 
laughable, and eccentric jests, jokes, bulls, 
epigrams, &c. With many other descriptions 
of wit and humour. 16°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 66.17 

1707. Grinning made easy; or. Funny 
Dick's unrivalled collection of jests, jokes, 
bulls, epigrams, &c, with many other descrip- 
tions of wit and humour. Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 109.9 



1708. The same. Reprint. 



93(i)-i9 



1709, Henry Blyd's contract, who lived in 
the Carse of Gowrie near Dundee. In a 
fine elegant discourse to his mistress, the 
minister's wife. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 69.2 

In dialect. 

1 7 10. The history of Buchaven in Fife- 
shire, containing the witty and entertaining 
exploits of Wise Willy, and Witty Eppy, 
the ale wife. With a description of their 
college, coat of arms, &c. [By Dougal 
Graham.] Adorned with woodcuts. 24°. 
pp. 24. 2 cop. 66.7, 109.4 

Graham's authorship is doubted by Eraser, " Humor- 
ous chap-books of Scotland," p. 151. 



1 7 1 1 . The same. Reprint. 



93(i).i3 



17 1 2. The same. Complete edition. 

9i(ii).27 

1 7 13. The history of four kings, their 
queens and daughters. Kings of Canterbury, 
Colchester, Cornwall, and Cumberland. Be- 
ing the merry tales of Tom Hodge, and his 
school-fellows. London, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 47-14 

1 7 14. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(iii).25 

The cuts are not the same as in the preceding. The 
text is reprinted in Cunningham, "Amusing prose 
chap-books," p. 187. 

1 7 15. A humourous recital of a citizen's 
Saturday evening adventure at Vauxhall. 16°. 
pp. 8. 41.3 

Showing how he spent ly. 6d. and what little 
entertainment he had. 



XIII. JEST BOOKS, HUMOROUS FICTION, RIDDLES, ETC. 



97 



1 716. The adventures of Jack Ocum & 
Tom Splicewell, two sailors went a pirating 
on the king's highway ; how that Tom SpHce- 
well was taken and condem'd to be hang'd ; 
how his messmate Jack appHed to the king 
and got him pardoned, with a copy of Jack's 
poHte letter to His Majesty. Glasgow. 1 790. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. VVdct. on t. p. 8.1 

1 7 17. The adventures of Jack Oakham 
and Tom Splicewell. Being an account of 
two sailors who went a-pirating on the king's 
highway. . • . [Edinburgh.] 16°. pp. 8. 

No title-page. " 97-6 

17 18. The generous monarch; or, The 
history of Jack Oakum & Tom Splicewell, 
etc. 16°. pp. 8. . 39.9 

1 7 19. The jester's gimcrack ; or, Two- 
pennyworth of fun. Containing merry stories, 
smart repartees, droll sayings, youthful pranks, 
ridiculous bulls, funny jokes, &c. of the Eng- 
lish, Irish, Scotch, and Welch manufacture. 
To which are added a variety of conundrums, 
toasts, sentiments, hob-nobs, &c. The whole 
adapted to the capacities of youth as well as 
infants six feet high, and calculated for the 
entertainment of persons of both sexes of 
whatever age, size, sect, or denomination. 
Multum in parvo. Compiled (with additions) 
by John Pendred. York, printed by some- 
body, sold to any body, may be read by 
every body excepting nobody, either when 
he is in company or when nobody's with him 
but himself alone at sea. 1772. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 58(iv).5 

"Advertisement to all friends round St. Paul's," by 
F. Jackson, printer, in Peter-gate, York, p. 2. 

" Irish bulls, &c. verbatim as they were utter'd by 
Turlogh Malahone, whilst in service with Mr. Skin- 
flint, an eminent attorney in the Middle-Temple, Lon- 
don," pp. 7-21. 

1720. Jockey and Maggy.] The whole 
proceedings of Jockey and Maggy. In five 
parts, i. Jockey and Maggy's courtship. . . . 
ii. The wonderful works of our John, shewing 
how he made Janet like an Elshin shaft and 
got his ain Maggy wi' bairn forby. iii. The 
wonderful works of our John made manifest 
before the minister, iv. How Jockey and 
his mother went away to see his bastard 
child. V. How Jockey had another child, 
and could not get it baptised until he 
mounted the stool. . . . Carefully corrected 
and revised by the author [Dougal Graham]. 
Stirling, C. Randall, sm. 12°. pp. 32. 

115-30 



One of the most popular of Graham's productions. 
See Fraser's " Humorous chap-books of Scotland," 
p. 221. 

1 72 1. Jockey and Maggy.] The whole 
proceedings of Jocky and Maggy's court- 
ship, with the great diversion that ensued 
at their bedding. In three parts. Glasgow. 
12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 

93(i).ii 



1722. The same. Reprint. 



9i(ii).i 



Reprinted from a copy printed in 1779 by J. and J. 
Robertson. 

1723. Joe Miller's comical and diverting 
jests for winter evenings. Falkirk, T. John- 
ston. 1816. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

115.14 

1724. Joe Miller's jests, being a collection 
of the most brilliant jests and most pleasant 
short stories in the English language ; the 
greater part taken from the mouth of that 
facetious gentleman whose name they bear. 
London. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

45.6 

1725. Joe Miller's jests improved. . . . 
New edition. London, R. Randall. 1787. 
12°. pp. 72. Engr. front. 9.16 

The frontispiece represents " Joe Miller and his 
merry companions." 

1726. Joe Miller's jests ; or, The wits vade- 
mecum ; being a collection of the most bril- 
liant jests. ... To which are added . . . moral 
sentences and . . . epigrams. . . . Most humbly 
inscribed to those choice spirits of the age, 
His Majesty's poet laureat, Mr. David Gar- 
rick, Mr. The. Cibber, Mr. Justice Lodens's 
horse, Tom Jones, the most impudent man 
living, the Rev. Mr. Henley, and Job Baker, 
the kettle drummer. London. 12°. pp.84. 
Wdct. front. 30.7 

1727. John and his mistress ; or, A merry 
dialogue between the wanton wife and her 
handsome 'prentice, intermix'd with several 
merry songs. Wheretmto is added The art- 
ful wife, a tale. York, F. Jackson, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 58(iv).ii 

This is not the same as the •' Crafty London pren- 
tice." (No. 191 7.) 

1728. John Barleycorn.] The arraigning 
and indicting of Sir John Barleycorn, Knt. 
Newly composed by a well wisher to Sir John 
and all that love him. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

. 35.5 



98 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1729. The same. London, Aldermary 

Church Yard, Bow-Lane. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

Wdcts. 54.10 

A number of the cuts differ from those in the 
preceding. 

1730. The same. London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 38.13 

All but one cut as in the preceding. 

1 7 3 1 . The same. [London] , Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iii).i4 

A number of cuts differ from those in either of the 
preceding. 

1732. The whole tryal and indictment of 
Sir John Barley-corn, knight. A person of 
noble birth and extraction, and well known 
to both rich and poor throughout the King- 
dom of Great Britain and Ireland : being 
accused of several misdemanners by him 
committed against His Majestys liege people : 
by killing some, wounding others, and bring- 
ing thousands to beggary to the ruin of many 
a good family. Taken in short hand by 
Timothy Toss-pot, foreman of the jury. Bel- 
fast, James Magee. 1 761. 16°. pp.8. 

57(m).35 

The tale is the same as that in the preceding entry, 
but it is differently arranged and differently written. 
See HaUiwell, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, 

Ashton (p. 314) gives a title-page with a similar 
title, but reading " poor " instead of " good" family, 
and " Thomas Tosspot" instead of " Timothy Toss- 
pot. ' ' After " family " is a sentence beginning ' ' Here 
you have the substance of the evidence." There is a 
curious cut. 

1733. The dying groans of Sir John Bar- 
leycorn ... his complaint against the brew- 
ers of bad ale . . . Donald Drouths reply, . . . 
also the copy of a summons for any drunken 
person. p[). 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

8.2, 29.10 

MacGregor, in his edition of Dougal Graham's col- 
lected writings (vol. i., p. 62) states that he could not 
find a copy of this chap-book, which had been at- 
tributed to Graham. It is entirely different from " The 
arraigning and indicting of Sir John Barleycorn." 

1734. Entertaining history of John Cheap, 
the chapman; containing above a hundred 
merry exploits done by him and his fellow 
traveller and companion, Drouthy Tom, a 
sticked shaver. In three parts. [By Dougal 
Graham.] Glasgow. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 66.6, 109.7 

1735. The same. Reprint. 93(i)-7 

1736. The same. Reprint. 9i(ii).p. 87 

The editor MacGregor says '* It has been usual to 
suspect that this work is autobiographical to some 
extent." 



1737. The history of John Cheap, the 
chapman. . . . Glasgow, R. Hutchison & co. 
1817. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 112. 5 

1738. The same. Printed in the year 
1816. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

" Drowthy Tom " in the title. 1 15-1 1 

1739. John Cole.] The delightful ad- 
ventures of honest John Cole, that merry old 
soul, who for his antipa[t]hy to every thing 
that was white, became a president to the 
Japanners company, and chairman tg \sic\ 
the Society of chimney, sweepers. . . . Lon- 
don, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 25.7 

1740. The same. [London], Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 26.8 

1 741. John Falkirk's cariches. [By Dou- 
gal Graham.] To which is added Tarn Mer- 
rilees, a capital story. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 66.14, 109.13 

Questions and answers on all sorts of subjects, some 
serious, more vulgar, most of the nature of a catch. 



1742. The same. Reprint. 



93(i).i8 



1743. The Scots piper's queries; or, John 
Falkirk's cariches. [Stirling, C. Randall.] 
Reprint. 9i(ii)' P- 165 

This contains a biographical preface taken from " an 
edition published in Glasgow in 1779, probably after 
Graham's death." 

1744. John Falkirk.] The comical and 
witty jokes of John Falkirk, the merry piper, 
when in courtship to an old widow who 
wanted all the teeth. Edinburgh. 1777. 
Reprint. 9i(ii)- P- i55 

1745. John Franks.] Birth, life, and 
death of John Franks, with the pranks he 
played though a meer fool. London, Al- 
dermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 67.10 

'* From the preface, and its general internal evi- 
dence, this chap-book seems to be recollections of a 
real person, who was locally famous." Ashton{^. 254) . 
See also Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, 
p. 44. 

1746. The birth, life, and death of John 
Franks, with the pranks and jests he play'd 
though a meer fool. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iii).5 

Most of the cuts are the same as in the preceding 
edition. 

1747. John Ogle.] Joaks upon joaks ; 
or, No joak like a true joak. Being the di- 
verting humours of John Ogle . . . the merry 
pranks of the Lord Mohun, the earls of War- 



XIII. JEST BOOKS, HUMOROUS FICTION, RIDDLES, ETC. 



99 



wick and Pembroke with the Lord Roches- 
ter's dream . . . the diverting fancies and 
frolicks of King Charles and his three concu- 
bines. London, Cluer Dicey, in Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).ii 

See Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, 
p. 12. 

Ashton (p. 349) gives a title-page with some verbal 
differences from the preceding, and the imprint 
"Printed and sold in London." 

1748. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

Has one cut not in the preceding. 5°(iv).2 

1749. The jolly jockey; or, The pleasant 
adventures of Anthony, who was sent by the 
French to buy horses in Flanders, in the time 
of war . . . being the most comical history 
that ever was in print. Belfast, James Magee. 
1764. 24°. pp. 24. 57(iii).i5 

1750. The jovial companion ; or, The alive 
and merry fellow, being a new collection of 
the most ingenious tales, diverting stories, 
pleasant joakes . . . and ridiculous bulls. . . . 
London, T. Bailey. 12°. pp. 38. 2.10 

Imperfect : — pp. 29-32 missing. 

1 75 1. The history of the king and the 
cobbler. The first part. [London], Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

57(i).20 

1752. The same. Part the second. [Lon- 
don], Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(i).2i 

" How King Henry the Eighth used to visit the 
watches in the city; and how he became acquainted 
with a merry cobbler," whom he afterward invited to 
court, directing him to inquire for Harry Tudor. See 
Child, ' ' King Edward IV. and a tanner of Tamworth ' ' 
(v. 74) for a sketch of this and similar tales. The 
title cut is in two pieces, the first showing the cob- 
bler's stall, the second, the king on his throne; it is 
used for both parts. See Halliwell, "Catalogue of 
chap-books," 1849, p. 48. 

1753. The same. Part the first. London, 
Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(ii).3 

The cuts vary from the preceding editions; the 
title cut is from Sir Richard Whittington. An adver- 
tisement of the " Printing office "is on the verso of 
title, with a half-title on p. 3. 

1754. The same. Part 11. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

58(ii).4 

The title-cut is in two parts, the first showing the 
cobbler brought to the king, the second the cobbler's 
stall; the other cuts vary somewhat from the preced- 
ing edition. 



1755. The same. Part the first. London, 
J.Evans, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

47-4, 55-4 

1756. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, J. Evans, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 47.4", 55.4" 

1757. The history of the king and the 
cobler, shewing how Henry VIII used to visit 
the watches in the city ; — his acquaintance 
with a merry cobler ; how he was entertained 
in the cobler's cellar ; and what had like to 
have befallen him there. Stirling, W. Mac- 
nie. 1825. 24°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 65.13 

This is the first part, closing with a paragraph 
advertising the second part. 

1758. The comical history of the king and 
the cobbler, containing the entertaining and 
merry tricks and droll frolicks played by the 
cobbler. How he got acquainted with the 
king, became a great man and lived at court 
ever after. Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 66.13, Iii-i6 

This is the first part of the story, and has two 
incongruous anecdotes at the end to make up the 
regulation 24 pages. 

1759. The same. Reprint. 93(i)'6 

1760. The same. Edinburgh, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 112. 15 

Ashton (p. 232) reprints the title-page of an edi- 
tion " Printed and sold at the London and Middlesex 
printing office 81 Shoe Lane Holbom"; he adds a 
sketch of the story and a few small cuts. The text of 
the first part is also reprinted in Cunningham, "Amus- 
ing prose chap-books," 1889, p. 13. 

1 76 1. Laugh and grow fat ; or, A cure for 
melancholy, being a collection of witty say- 
ings, arch waggeries, wonderful observations, 
anecdotes, &c. &c. London, printed by 
J. Davenport and sold by C. Sheppard. 
1797. 16°. pp. 24. 52.4 

1762. The laugher's companion ; or, Town 
and country story-teller. Calculated to ex- 
cite mirth and festivity, and make a winter's 
fire-side cheerful. London, J. Sudbury. 12°. 
pp. 50. 2 cop. 17-21, 49-17 

The second copy lacks the title-page. 

1 763. The history of Lawrence Lazy ; con- 
taining his birth and slothful breeding, how 
he served the shoemaker, his wife, the squire's 
cook, and the farmer, which by the laws of 
Lubberland was accounted high treason, — his 
arraignment and trial and his happy deliver- 
ance from the many treasons laid to his charge. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(ii)-i5 



lOO 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1764. The pleasant and delightful history 
of Lawrence Lazy, containing his birth and 
slothful breeding, and also as he grew to ma- 
turity how he served the schoolmaster and 
his wife, the squire's cook, and Mr. Wheatley 
the farmer, which was accounted by the laws 
of Lubberland high-treason, and lastly his 
arraignment and trial before Sir James Jobson 
in the town-hall of Never -Work ; concluding 
with his happy deliverance from those trea- 
sons laid to his charge. [London], Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

58(iii).i3 

1765. Leper.] Fun upon fun; or, The 
comical and merry tricks of Leper the tailor. 
In two parts. [By Dougal Graham.] Pais- 
ley, G. Caldwell. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 65.10 

For an account of Leper the tailor, Simple John, 
Tom Long, Tom Tram, etc., see "The humorous 
chap-books of Scotland," by John Fraser, New York, 
1873, pp. 125-130. 

1766. The same. To which is added. The 
wicked life and most deplorable death of Mr. 
John Macgriggor. Kilmarnock, H. Craw- 
ford. 1820. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 112. 16 

The second piece is the story of the Golden farmer. 
(No. 2206.) 

1767. Fun upon fun ; or. Leper the tailor. 
In two parts. With a selection of entertain- 
ing anecdotes. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 109.5 

1768. The same. Reprint. 93(i).i7 

1769. The same. Reprint. 9i(ii).p. iii 
This is a reprint of the full version printed by 

C. Randall, Stirling, 1799, with notes by the editor. 

1770. Long Meg.] The famous history 
of Long Meg of Westminster, containing all 
her comical pranks at home with her valiant 
actions abroad in the wars ; being full of 
pleasing delight, wonder, and admiration, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(ii).2 7 

Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap-books, etc.," 1849, 
p. I. 

- 1 77 1. Long Meg.] The whole life and 
death of Long Meg of Westminster. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. Wdcts. Re- 
print. 92. p. 325 etc. 
The cuts are not those of the preceding edition, 
and the text differs. A version of the text is reprinted 
in 95, p. 299. 

1772. Lothian Tom.] The comical trans- 
actions of Lothian Tom ; in five parts ... a 
collection of diverting exploits done by him 
both in Scotland and England. [By Dougal 



Graham.] Glasgow. 1828. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 87 

In this edition part 6 begins with the second para- 
graph on p. 23, without a heading, and the text stops 
more than a page short of the true end, and omits 
Tom's song. 

1773. The comical tricks of Lothian Tom ; 
with a selection of anecdotes. Glasgow, pp.24 
Wdct. on t. p. 109.6 

1774. The same. Reprint. 93(i)-5 

1775. The history and comical transactions 
of Lothian Tom. In six parts. Wherein is 
contained a collection of roguish exploits, 
done by him, both in Scotland and England. 
Stirling, C. Randall, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 

112. 17 

1776. The life and comical transactions of 
Lothian Tom. Reprint. 9i(ii). p. 67 

1777. The life of Mansie Wauch, tailor in 
Dalkeith. Glasgow. [No.] 79. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 1. 1 8 

Condensed from a larger work written by David 
MacBeth Moir (" Delta "). A simple story of Scot- 
tish life, with a humorous description of the hero's 
first and last visit to the theatre. The text of the 
chap-book is reprinted in 95, p. 236. 

1777". The same. Reprint. 93(i).io 

1778. Mathews & Yates at home. Mr. Ma- 
thews' new entertainment; being a lecture 
on peculiarities and manners, entitled, The 
spring meeting. . . . Also, Mr. Yates' singular 
report of a breach of promise marriage, in 
the Irish court of justice, before Chief Jus- 
tice Punbury, called. Love among the lawyers. 
. . . London, J. Duncombe. 12°. pp. 24. 
Folded colored plate. (Liston's drolleries.) 

118.1 

1778*. Mr. Mathews at home! in his 
youthful days. [London], M. Me tford. 12°. 
pp. 26. Folded colored plate. (Liston's 
drolleries.) 118.2 

1779. The merry droll, or pleasing com- 
panion . . . facetious and engaging stories, 
adventures, instances of love and gallantry 
elegantly displayed ; including some poeti- 
cal recreations . . . London, C. Parker. 1 769. 
12°. pp. viii, 184 [208]. 7.2 

1780. Merryfield's jests; or. Wit's com- 
panion ; containing all the fun, humour, 
learning, and judgment, which have lately 
flowed from the universities, the theatres, 
from the Beef-Steak Club, Spouting Club, and 
Choice Spirits Clubs. London, J. Roach, 
pp. 60. Engr. front. 2 cop. 48.3, 55-io 



XIII. JEST BOOKS, HUMOROUS FICTION, RIDDLES, ETC. 



lOI 



1 781. Mirth's museum ; or, The humorous 
jester; containing select and original jests, 
bon mots, repartees, droll stories and laugha- 
ble bulls, both English and Irish. Southwark, 
W. Kemmish. 12°. pp. 48. Engr. front. 

31-4 

1782. Momus's present to the lovers of 
mirth for the year 1802, being the most 
original selection of jests, bon mots, witti- 
cisms, anecdotes . . . supplied by some of 
the most eminent wits of the age. London, 
A. Young. 1 80 1. 12°. pp. 36. Engr. 
front. 2 cop. 10.16, 27.12 

The second copy has an engraving inserted, "The 
adventurous hero," which does not belong in the 
book. 

1783. Munchausen.] The surprising ad- 
ventures, miraculous escapes, and wonderful 
travels of the renowned Baron Munchausen 
. . . i6^ pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 74.11 

1784. The muses choice; or, The merry 
fellow. Being a collection of wit and humour 
. . . Extracted, partly, from the works of . . . 
Congreve, Pope, Swift, Gay, Prior, &c., and 
partly, from originals, taken from private 
manuscripts. [Verse.] 3d edition. Lon- 
don, J. Warcus. 1759- pp. 144. Engr. 
front. 31.3 

1785. A new collection of riddles, charades, 
and conundrums written for the juvenile world. 
Kendal, M. and R. Branthwaite. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 77.7 

1786. The new game at cards ; or, A pack 
of cards changed into a compleat and per- 
petual almanack . . . Glasgow. 1790. 16°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.17 

Story of a servant who justified his use of cards by 
showing how he made of them an almanac and a 
monitor or prayer book. 

1787. The same. Also an account of the 
shoemaker cuckold by the devil, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. 2 cop. 14.20, 26.14 

The first piece is abridged in this edition. 

1788. A new jest book, for the winter- 
evenings ; containing a variety of merry tales, 
and diverting stories. Falkirk, T. Johnston. 
1831. 16°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 64(1) 

1789. The new scrap-book. A selection 
of choice bon mots, Irish blunders, repartees, 
anecdotes, &c. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 109. 1 

This is the same collection of anecdotes as the 
"Scotch haggis," etc. No. 1810. 

1790. The oddest of all oddities, being an 
odd book of all the odd sermons that have 



been preached in the fields, and such odd 
chapels in every odd year, odd month, or odd 
day since the odd year seventy one : humbly 
dedicated to the use of those odd gentlemen 
who shew the odd strength of their odd 
lungs every odd opportunity in the above 
odd chapels, &c. To which is added as an 
odd end to the odd book, the most curious of 
all curiosities, consisting of curious histories, 
epistles, &c. compiled for the use of every 
odd subject of Great Britain, from curious six 
inches to odd seven feet by their odd and 
curious humble servant Oddicurious, philoso- 
pher and member of the odd club of odd 
fellows. London, [S. Bailey]. 16°. pp.72, 
(4). Engr. front. 52.22 

At the end, on four pages numbered 67-70, and 
placed just before the pages properly bearing those 
numbers, the publisher sets forth in verse the various 
arts he pursues, i. e., the goods he has for sale. 

The frontispiece, containing four reversible heads, 
is printed upon part of an advertising handbill. 

"An extempore sermon on malt " in this collection 
is almost the same as one appended to ' ' The love 
enquiry," No. 2354. 

1 79 1. Odds and ends ; or, A groats worth 
of fun for a penny. Being a collection of the 
best jokes, comic stories, anecdotes, bon mots, 
&c. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 

93(i).iS 
The cut, which represents a Scotch piper, and is a 
common title-page cut on Glasgow chap-books, is 
labelled ' ' The piper who was carried away for dead 
during the plague in London, but revived before inter- 
ment. — See p. 22." 

1792. Paddy from Cork.] The comical 
sayings of Paddy from Cork with his coat 
buttoned behind; being an elegant confer- 
ence between English Tom and Irish Teague, 
with Paddy's catechism and his supplication 
when a mountain sailor. [By Dougal Gra- 
ham.] Glasgow. [No.] 21. sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1 1 1. 2 2 

1793. The same. Reprint. 93(i).i6 

1794. The same. Reprint. 9i(ii).p. 181 

1795. A particular description of a certain 
lady at present concealed . . . with an account 
of her library, the furniture of her house, also 
a slight sketch of her niece, the fair Incognita. 
London, M. Cooper. 1752. 12°. pp. 28. 

9.25 

Qualities, etc., set forth in a series of rebuses. 

1796. The old lady and her niece ; the fair 
Incognita detected and brought to justice. 
London, M. Cooper. 1752. 12°. pp. 32. 

An answer to the preceding. 18.40 



I02 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1797. Peregrine Pickle.] The history and 
adventures of Peregrine Pickle, with the many 
droll tricks that Peregrine played his mother 
and others ... 2d edition. London, R. Snagg. 
12°. pp. 84. 43.3 

A condensation of Smollett's novel. 

1798. Pettegrew.] The comical notes and 
sayings of the Reverend Mr. J. Pettegrew, late 
minister of the Gospel at Langgoven near 
Glasgow. Edinburgh, printed, and Belfast, 
reprinted. 1765. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 57(iii)-33 

1799. Poor Robin.] The pleasant history 
of Poor Robin, the merry sadler of Walden, 
shewing many merry passages of his life of 
harmless mirth, to lengthen delight, and drive 
away melancholy. Belfast, James Magee. 
1759. sm. 12°. pp.24. 57(iii).23 

1800. The puzzle; being a choice col- 
lection of conundrums containing near five 
hundred short questions concerning wit and 
humour, being very entertaining and instruc- 
tive and necessary to prevent the spleen and 
melancholy in both young and old people. 
London, Jonathan Carpenter, sm. 12°. pp.24. 

58(iv).6 

1 80 1. The nutt's crack'd : being an answer 
to The puzzle ; or, A choice collection of 
conundrums. London, Jonathan Carpenter, 
sm. 12°. pp. 12. 58(iv).7 

1802. Ranger's repository; or. Annual 
packet of mirth, whim, and humour for 
the year 1794, containing several entertaining 
anecdotes, whimsical tales, smart repartees, 
pleasant memoirs, &c., &c. To which is added 
a Dramatic review or impartial account of 
new performers, pieces, &c., &c. London, 
J. Roach. 12°. pp. 96. 13.2 

1803. The royal riddle book, a collection 
of the most curious and ingenious puzzles ; 
also the never-failing method for young 
women to get good husbands, and the new 
interpreter of dreams and visions. Stirling, 
William Macnie. 1828. 16°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 64.15 

1804. The royal riddle book; a new col- 
lection of riddles, for the entertainment of 
youth. Glasgow, J. Lumsden & son. 1820. 
16°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 64.16 

1805. Rochester's jokes; containing the 
merry pranks of Lord Rochester, Lord Mo- 
hun, the earls of Warwick and Pembroke, 
Benjamin Johnson, and Ogle the life-guards- 
man, with the diverting frolics and fancies of 



King Charles and his concubines. London, 
J. Evans. 12°. pp. 12. Wdcts. 42.4 

1806. The same. London, M. Bowley. 
12°. pp. 12. Wdcts. 49.6 

1807. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 12. Wdcts. 

58(iv).3 

1808. Rochester's joaks. 16°. pp. 12. 
Wdcts. 67.6 

Rochester's jokes. Part. ii. See England's 
witty and ingenious jester. (No. 1693.) 

1809. Saimders Watson.] A remarkable 
family adventure of Saunders Watson. Ghost 
of Bill Jones. Mysterious murders. Fal- 
kirk. 24°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 66.11 

1 810. The Scotch haggis; a selection of 
choice bon mots, Irish blunders, repartees, 
anecdotes, &c. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 79-2 7, no. 12 

This is the same collection of anecdotes as "A new 
scrap-book, etc." No. 1789. 

1811. The sa7ne. Reprint. 93(i).20 

181 2. Simple John.] The comical history 
of simple John and his twelve misfortunes 
which happened all in twelve days after 
the unhappy day of his marriage. Glasgow. 
1828. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 89 

The first part of this chap-book, up to " Misfor- 
tune I," was printed separately as "The miseries of 
poor, simple, innocent silly Tam " (MacGregor, Com- 
plete works of Dougal GraJiam, ii. 211, note) . Fraser, 
"Humorous chap-books of Scotland," p. 150, limits 
Graham's work to the introduction, but MacGregor 
thinks the whole may be safely attributed to him. 

1813. The same. Paisley, Caldwell and 
son. 1839. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct on t. p. 

66.5 

1814. The same. Glasgow. sm. 12". 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 109.8 

1815. The same. Glasgow. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. on t. p. Reprint. 93 (i)-^ 

1 81 6. The same. Reprint. 91 (ii). p. 205 

181 7. Simple Simon's misfortunes and his 
wife Margery's cruelty which began the very 
next morning after their marriage. London, 
Evans, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 3 cop. 

47.6,49.12,55.9 
Resembles "The comical history of simple John " 
(No. 1 81 2) and " The miseries of poor simple inno- 
cent silly Tam " (No. 1820). 

This edition contains only the prose tale, and ends: 
"At length it pleased God to visit the merciful Mar- 
gery with a fever, of which she died," etc. 



XIII. JEST BOOKS, HUMOROUS FICTION, RIDDLES, ETC. 



103 



1818. The same. [With A pleasant song 
of many more of the miserable misfortunes 
of simple Simon. . . .] London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 

58(iii).io 

The text is reprinted in Cunningham. "Amusing 
prose chap-books," 1889, p. 69. 

1 8 19. Simple Simon's misfortunes, and 
Margery's cruelty. Shewing how he drank 
a bottle of sack to poison himself, being 
weary of his life. To the tune of. The de- 
lights of the bottle. [London], Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. I0'0(iii).45 

1820. Simple Tam.] The miseries of poor 
simple innocent silly Tam. 16°. pp. 8. 

62.51 

No title-page. This consists of the first pages of 
'Simple John. See Graham, Dougal, " Collected 
writings," 1883, ii. 211, note. 

1 82 1. A strange and wonderful relation of 
the old woman who was drowned at Ratcliflf- 
Highway, a fortnight ago, to which is added. 
The old woman's dream a little after her 
death. Part the first. London, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 48.5 

1822. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 48.5^ 

The title cuts are the same in the two parts, repre- 
senting a ducking-stool in operation. Besides this 
there are 40 other cuts, of all sorts of subjects, but 
none relating to the text, which is a jumble of nonsense, 
beginning: "It was the last Monday morning about 
four o'clock in the afternoon, before sun-rising, going 
over High-gate hill I asked him if the old woman was 
dead." Halliwell, " Catalogue of chap-books, " 1849, 
p. 151. 

1823. The same. Part the first. 58(iii).ii 

This is the same as 1821, but the typography varies 
a trifle. 

1824. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(iii).i2 

Has the same title-cut as 1822, but the other cuts 
(21 in number) are different. 

1825. The same. Part the first. London, 
Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 67.18 

Has the same cuts as 182 1. 

1826. Swalpo.] Merry frolicks; or. The 
comical cheats of Swalpo, a notorious pick- 
pocket, and the merry pranks of Roger the 
clown. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 67.17 

Roger the clown is sometimes Jack the clown in 
other editions. The practices at Bartholomew Fair 
are set forth. The tricks are coarse and vulgar, but 
ingenious and laughable enough. 



1827. The merry frolics; or. The comical 
cheats of Swalpo, a notorious pick-pocket, and 
the merry pranks of Jack the clown. [Dar- 
lington, W. Appleton.] 1788. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 37.12, 54.6 

"A catalogue of histories printed and sold at 
W. Appleton's, Darlington," p. 2. 

1828. The merry frolick ; or, The comical 
cheats of Swalpo . . . and the merry pranks 
of Roger the clown. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(iii).9 

The cuts are the same as in the preceding, but set 
differently in the text. 

1829. The same. Boston, [Mass.], W. 
M' Alpine. 1767. 16°. pp. 16. 25276.8 

Imperfect: — pp. 13, 14 wanting. 

1830. Tom King's new book of oddities; 
or, A precious droll selection of deveUsh comi- 
cal things . . . Compiled for the use of the 
larned "Why not." Bristol, T. King. 12°. 
pp. 48. Engr. front. 16.4 

1 83 1 . Tom Long.] The History of Tom 
Long the carrier. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).i8 

"Although the address ' To the reader ' says — 

* Of all the Toms that ever yet was nam'd 
Was ever Tom like Tom Long fam'd, 
Tom Tram, who mad pranks shews 
Unto Tom Long, will prove a goose, ' 

yet the chap-book is very dreary fun . . . but is valua- 
ble for its frontispiece, which represents a chapman of 
Elizabethan or Jacobean time, a veritable Autolycus." 
Ashlon, p. 264. 

A ballad entitled "Tom Longe the Caryer " was 
entered in the register of the Stationers' Company, 
1562. Halliwell, " Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, 
P- 73- 

1832. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

57(ii).8 
Has the same title-cut as the preceding edition, but 
more cuts in the text, 

1833. The same. London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 50.7 

The same title-cut as the preceding editions, but 
other cuts in the text. The horse on p. 17 is one of 
the crudest of chap-book cuts. 

1834. Tom Long the carrier. London, 
L. How, in Petticoat Lane. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 58(ii]).i 

A second title reads : " The merry conceits of Tom 
Long, the carrier, being many pleasant passages and 
mad pranks which he observed in his travels . . . The 
nineteenth edition." No imprint. 

The address to the readers differs from that in the 
preceding. The cut is like that in the preceding edi- 
tions but is from a different block. 

"A catalogue of histories and merry books printed 
and sold by Larkin How," p. 24. 



104 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1835. The entertaining history of Tom 
Long, the carrier. London, [Sabine's] Lon- 
don and Middlesex printing ofifice, 81 Shoe- 
lane, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

53.10 

The cut is a rude imitation, reversed, of that in the 
other editions. 

There is a second title-page, with the same title as 
in How's edition, except that it reads "The twentieth 
edition." The address to the reader is the same as in 
How's edition. 

"A catalogue of histories printed and sold at Sa- 
bine's London and Middlesex printing-office," etc., 
p. 24. 

1836. Tom Tram.] The mad pranks of 
Tom Tram, son-in-law to Mother Winter; 
whereunto is added his merry jests, odd con- 
ceits, and pleasant tales very delightful to 
read. Part the first. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 57(ii).2, 58(iii).2 

The last four pages contain " Several merry tales," 
which have no connection with the hero of the book. 

Ascribed by W. C. Hazlitt to Humphrey Crouch, 
the author of The Welsh traveller. See his " Remains 
of the early popular poetry of England," 1866, iv. 326. 

1837. The same. The second part. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 57(ii)-3, 58(iii).3 

1838. The same. Part the third. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(ii)-4 

According to Halliwell, " Catalogue of chap- 
books," 1849, p. 30, this was probably written in the 
seventeenth century, and was often reprinted through 
the eighteenth and well into the nineteenth century. 

1839. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 42.7 

1840. The same. Part the third. Lon- 
don, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 42.8 

1 84 1. The third part of Tom Tram's mad 
pranks and merry conceits. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(iii).4 

"A catalogue of histories and merry books printed 
and sold by William and Cluer Dicey," etc., p. 2. 

Ashton (p. 248, etc.) gives the title-page of a New- 
castle edition, with a cut representing several scenes 
from the book, and a title-page which varies from the 
first title quoted above in the following phrases only : 
"to which is added," "The first part," "Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane." 

1842. The true trial of understanding ; or. 
Wit newly reviv'd, being a book of riddles 
adorned with variety of pictures. 

New riddles make both wit and mirth 
The price a penny, yet not half the worth. 

By S.M. 



London. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

37.11,54.9, 

The title-page has a wood-cut border. 
The title and selections are reprinted in Ashton, 
p. 304. 

1843. Wanton Tom ; or. The merry history 
of Tom Stich, the taylor. Part the first. 
London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(i).i3 

1844. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(iii).7 

1845. Wanon \_sic\ Tom; or, The merry 
history of Tom Stitch, the taylor. Part the 
first. London, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

47.10 

1846. Wanton Tom; or, The merry history 
of Tom Stitch, the taytor. Part the second. 
London. 1786. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

47.11 

1847. Wanton Tom; or. The merry his- 
tory of Tom Stitch, the vaylor \_sic\. Part 
the first. London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iii).6 

1848. The merry history of Tom Stich 
the taylor. Part the second. Being a con- 
tinuation of the merry pranks he play'd in his 
travels through different parts of England, 
&c., exceeding arch and comical. — Never 
before made public. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).i4 

1849. The Welch traveller; or. The un- 
fortunate Welchman. By Humphrey Crouch. 
London, William Whitwood. 1671. (Re- 
printed, with notes, in Hazlitt, W. C, Re- 
mains of the early popular poetry of England, 
1866, iv. 321-353-) 

1849*. The Welsh traveller; or. The un- 
fortunate Welshman. [Verse.] London, 
Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(ii).2i 

1850. The same. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

54-5 

This has all but one cut the same as in the preceding. 

1 85 1. The same. By Humphrey Cornish. 
Belfast. 1 76 1. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 57(iii)-38 

Should be attributed to Humphrey Crouch. Halli- 
well, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, p. 70. 

Ashton (p. 344) gives the title-page of a Newcastle 
edition, with a cut showing several of Taffy's adven- 
tures, and several of the cuts from the text. 



XIII. JEST BOOKS, HUMOROUS FICTION, RIDDLES, ETC. 



105 



1852. A whetstone for dull wits; or, A 
poesy of new and ingenious riddles ; to which 
is added Merry tales & comical jests. Lon- 
don, J. Evans and co. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 
3 cop. 32.19, 35.23, 38.7 

1853. The same. [With Merry tales and 
comical jests.] London. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 54.14 

Contains more cuts than the preceding. 

1854. The whetstone; or. Spawn of puz- 
zles : being a fresh collection of conundrums 
fit for the use of the gay and polite. Lon- 
don. 12°. pp. 8. Ornamental wdct. on 
t. p. 26.16 

1855. Will Summers.] A pleasant history 
of the life and death of Will Summers : how 
he came first to be known at court, and by 
what means he got to be King Henry the 
Eighth's jester ; with the entertainment that 
his cousin Patch, Cardinal Woolsey's fool, 
gave him at his lord's house ; and how the 
hogsheads of gold were known by his means. 
London, printed by T. Vere and J. Wright 
1676 ; reprinted and sold by James Caulfield 
. . . 1794. sm. 8°. pp. 34. Engrs. 16.8 

The pranks of Will Summers bear a strong family 
likeness to those of Till Eulenspiegel. The illustra- 
tions are very interesting engiavings on copper. 

1856. Wise men of Gotham.] The merry 
tales of the mad men of Gottam. (/« Haz- 
litt, W. C, Shakespeare jest-books, Lon- 
don, 1864, iii. 1-26.) 

A reprint of the text of the edition of London, 
1630. The title-page of this edition attributes the 
collection to "A. B. of Phisike Doctour," who is 
sometimes identified with Andrew Borde. See Fur- 
nivall's preface to Andrew Borde's Introduction and 
Dyetary, etc. 1870 (Early English text society), p. 27. 

" Descriptive notices of popular English histories." 
(Percy society, vol. xxiii.) 1848, p. 71. Halliwell, in 
his "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, p. 71, says 
the first known edition was probably published be- 
tween 1556 and 1566. See also Stapleton, "All 
about the merry taJes of Gotham," Nottingham, 
R. N. Pearson, 1900. 

The story of "The wise men of Gotham," of the 
nursery rhymes, who "went to sea in a bowl," is 
not found in these collections of the original twenty 
stories. 

1857. The merry tales of the wise men 
of Gotham. London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(iii).2 7 

On the title-page is the woodcut of the hedging-in 
of the cuckoo, representing a bird and a man in a 
wattled enclosure, the man saying " Coocou " and the 
bird " Gotam." The other cuts are tail-pieces. 

"A catalogue of histories and merry books printed 
and sold by William and Cluer Dicey," p. 24. 

The text agrees fairly well with that of 1630, and 
tales XV. and xvi. appear in the same order. The last 



sentence is omitted from viii., xv., and x%m., and there 
are numerous verbal changes, as there are in other 
chap-book issues. 

1858. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

57(i).7 

The cut is the same as in the preceding. The text 

varies more from that of 1 630 in the applications of 

the tales, several additions being made, and tales xv. 

and xvi. are reversed in position. 

1859. The same. London. sm. 12°. 

pp. 24. Wdcts. 54-12 

The title-cut is the same as in the preceding. Tales 
XV. and xvi. are reversed. 

i860. The same. Wotton -Underedge, 
J. Bence. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

30.5, 38.5 

The title-page has two separate cuts, one of a 
bird, inserted lengthwise of the page, with the word 
" cukow ! " above it, the other of two men approach- 
ing a door, and "Gotham! " above the cut. Tales 
XV. and xvi, are reversed. 

1861. The same. Edinburgh, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. I15.5 

1862. The same. To which is added a 
collection of jests. Glasgow, R. Hutchison 
& CO. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

86.1 

Tales XV. and xvi. are reversed. Cut represents a 
young pig. 

1863. The same. Glasgow. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

66.10, 86.2, 109.2 

Copy 86.2 has MS. signature " David Fitzgerald, 
1877," on title-page. Tales xv. and xvi. are reversed. 

1864. The same. Reprint. 93 (i) .9 

1865. The same. Nottingham, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 25276.10.5 

A modem print. The cut is the hedging-in of the 
cuckoo, and is from the same block as the cut given 
by Stapleton (p. 135), a "direct impression from the 
Newark woodcut (now in possession of the author) ' ' ; 
in this cut the bird's name is spelled "Cuckoo." 
Tales XV. and xvi. are reversed. 

1866. The same. Edited by James Or- 
chard Halliwell. London, John Russell 
Smith. 1840. 12°. pp. 24. 25276.10 

" Reprinted from a copy printed at Hull in the 
present century, in the possession of the Rev. Joseph 
Hunter, F.S.A." With Introduction. In the re- 
print tales XV. and xvi. are in the order of the edition 
of 1630. 

1867. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Wdct. on t. p. 
Reprint. 92. p. 276 

A bowdlerized reprint. The full text is reprinted 
in Cunningham, "Amusing prose chap-books," 1889, 
p. 23. 



io6 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1868. Wit and folly in a maze. [Pages 
13-16, 5-12 of a book of riddles.] 23.2 

1869. The world turned upside-down ; or, 
The folly of man exemplified in twelve comi- 
cal relations upon uncommon subjects. Illus 
trated with twelve curious cuts truly adapted 
to each story. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. 42.5, 54.13 

In verse. The ox turned farmer, The horse turned 
groom, etc. The reference to the cuts in the title 
shows that the pubHsher and the pubUc were alive to 
the practice of making the same cuts do all sorts of 
different duties. This is a very popular and often 
reprinted chap-book. 

1870. The world turn'd upside-down; or, 
The folly of man exemplyfy'd in twelve comi- 
cal relations upon uncommon subjects, viz. 
. . . Illustrated with as many curious cuts 
representing each story to the life. London, 
cut, printed and sold by C. Dicey, in Bow 
Church Yard, etc. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(ii).25 

The cuts are the same as in the preceding, except 
that the title-cut is omitted, and the cut on page 12, 
though of the same general design as in the preceding, 
is not from the same block. 

187 1. Yorick turned trimmer; or. The 
gentleman's jester, and newest collection of 
songs, embellished with three copper-plate 
cuts, the most interesting scenes in Yorick's 
works, viz. — i. Yorick riding through the 
village; 2. Dr. Slop and Obadiah ; 3. Uncle 
Toby and Corporal Trim ; — containing . . . 
songs . . . sung at . . . Royalty theatre, the 
Haymarket, the Beef-steak club, and the 
Anacreontic society, with pieces of wit of 
the choicest spirits, etc. The three prints, 
printed in a beautiful picturesque manner, in 
black, blossom, and green, are worth the pur- 
chase money of the whole. London, W. Nicoll. 
sm. 12°. pp. 72. Engrs. 6.8 

1872. Young men and maidens delight; 
or, A new book containing fifty eight merry 
riddles with their explanations. Being both 
entertaining, and useful, to entice the younger 
to spell and read. Adorned with proper cuts. 
Belfast, James Magee. 1768. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdcts. 57(iii).39 

XIV 

Humorous metrical tales, etc. 

1873. An account of a curious wedding 
that took place the other day between a 
young batchelor and an old widow at Wal- 
sall. Birmingham, T. Bloomer. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 104.16 



Begins, "A batchellor of some forty-nine." 
On the opposite side is printed ' ' The beauties of 
the Bible," 

1874. The same. Birmingham, T. Bloomer. 
Broadside. 104. 19 

The words " at Walsall " are omitted from the title. 

1875. [M]acgregor Aurara, Savourna de- 
lish. Poor Jack, and If I shall get laughing 
at [that]. Stirling, J. Fraser. 1817. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 97.3 

1876. The baffled knight; or. The lady's 
policy. Northampton, William Dicey. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 100 (i). 10 

Child, No. 112, version C (ii. 484). Roxburghe, 
vii. 437. 

1877. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

102.41 

1878. The battle of the flying dragon and 
the man of Heaton, [By John Collier.] 
Manchester, printed for the author, Tim Bob- 
bin, and Mr. Haslingden, bookseller. 12°. 
pp. 33. 2 plates. (Appended to The mis- 
cellaneous works of Tim Bobbin, etc., Man- 
chester, 1793.) 36.4 

1879. The Berkshire butcher; or, The 
bawdy batchelour's garland. 1706. 16°. 
PP..8. 38.29 

Apparently based on some local cause celebre. Be- 
gins, ' ' In Stanford-deanly there does live a butcher of 
great fame." 

1880. Bite upon bite; or. The miser out- 
witted. To which is added, The wandering 
sailor, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

8.21, 29.44 

Begins, " Young women if you draw near a while." 
A miser wishes to marry his beautiful daughter to 
an old parson; she prefers a young sailor, whom the 
miser therefore plots to have murdered. The sailor 
haunts his would be murderer, who dies, and all ends 
well. 

The "London butcher" (No. 1970), and "The 
politic lovers " (No. 2006), are stories with a similar 
plot, but otherwise entirely different. 

1 88 1. Bite upon the miser; or, A trick 
upon the parson by the sailor. [London], 
J. Pitts. Broadside. Wdct. 105.39 

The same as the preceding. 

1882. Bite upon bite; or. The miser out- 
witted by the country lass. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(i).2o 

Begins, "You pretty young maidens I'd have you 
draw near." 

Not the same story as the preceding. A " sell " of 
the same sort as that in "The cunnie's garland" 
(No. 1928). 



XIV. HUMOROUS METRICAL TALES, ETC. 



107 



1883. Bite upon bite.] The miser out- 
witted. Printed by J. Evans & son, 42 Long- 
lane, West-Smithfield, London. 101.9 

The same as the preceding. 

1884. The biter bit; or, The farmer's 
blunder : a tale. London, Dean and Munday. 
Broadside. 104.29 

Begins, "A farmer once to London went," 

1885. The biter bit.] The farmer's blunder. 
London, J. Plymsell for T. Hooper. Broad- 
side. 104.30 

1886. The biter bit.] The farmer's blunder, 
a merry tale, [and] The trial of Nathaniel 
Woodland [for stealing four shillings from 
Sarah Davis], sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2.7 

Imperfect: — there is no title-page. Page i has 
the signature B. The first piece is the same as the 
preceding, the second the alleged evidence of a street- 
walker complaining of having been robbed. 

1887. A new song called Bloxwich wake 
bull-baiting. Tune, Wednesbury cocking. 
Broadside. 104.25 

Printed on one sheet with "A new song called , 
Darlastone wake bull-baiting." 

1888. Bonny Dundee ; or, Jockey's deliver- 
ance. Benig his viliant \sic'\ escape from 
Dundee, and the parson's daughter, whom 
he had mov'd. To an excellent tune call'd 
Bonny Dundee. Broadside. Wdct. I00(i).5 

1889. The breath of life. Being an ac- 
count of a young man that went to sea, 
thinking it a pleasant life, but soon found 
his mistake. Prettily expressed in sea-terms. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 100 (i). 2 1 

1890. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. 105.14 



i8qi. The same. Broadside. 



105.14 



1892. The bullock banker's medley. [Lon- 
don], J. Pitts. Broadside. Wdct. 104.27 

How a bull was driven out of Smithfield. 

1893. The bunter's wedding. Coventry, 
Turner. Broadside. 102. 126 

Begins, "Good people attend, I'll discover." 

1894. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 105.28 

1895. The butcher's daughter's policy ; 
or. The lustful lord well fitted. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(i).i9 
Begins, " I pray draw near, all you that love fun." 



1896. Christ's kirk on the green, in three 
cantos. Containing a very humorous de- 
scription of a country wedding, with a squab- 
ble that ensued ; also, how a peace was made 
up, and a' things 'greed again. Written by 
King James the First, when confined a pris- 
oner in England. Falkirk, T. Johnston. 1821. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 115.23 

With annotations. 

" This edition of the first canto is taken from an old 
manuscript collection of Scots poems written 380 years 
ago, where it is found that James the first of that 
name, king of Scots, was the author. . . . The follow- 
ing cantoes were wrote the one in 171 5, the other in 
1718." pp. 2, 10. The ascription of the author- 
ship to James I. is not generally accepted. 

1897. The churlish husband. To which 
are added The cripple of Cornwall, Mary's 
dream. Stirling, W. Macnie. 1826. 24°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 65.9 

Begins, '* Tis of an ancient farmer, you'll hear 
without delay." 

1898. The comical history of the collier's 
wedding, at Benwell, near Newcastle upon 
Tyne. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

II5-2 

1899. The collier's wedding. By Edward 
Chicken. Newcastl \sic\. 1791. sm. 12°. 

49.11 

Imperfect : — all after p. 12 is missing. The same 
as the preceding; entirely different from the following. 

1900. The commical \_sic\ wedding; a 
garland in four parts. . . . Belfast. 1766. 
16°. pp. 8. 57("i).6 

Begins, " You maidens all that here do dwell." 
A gentlewoman will not let her daughter marry a 

sailor; the daughter, in man's attire, courts her 

mother, and marries the sailor. 



1 90 1. Comical wedding.] 
mother's garland. Broadside. 



The doating 
Wdcts. 
ioo(i).6i 



1902. The same. Coventry, Turner. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.109 

1903. The cook-maid's garland; or. The 
out-of-the-way devil. Showing how four 
highwaymen were bit by an ingenious cook- 
maid. Broadside. Wdct. 2 cop. 

I00(i).39, 102.21 
Begins, " You gallants all in London." 

1904. The cooper of Norfolk; or, A jest 
of a brewer and a cooper's wife. Broadside. 
Wdcts. I00(i).27 

Begins, "Attend my masters, and listen well." 



io8 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1905. The country girl's policy; or, The 
cockney outwitted. To a pleasant new tune. 
London, W. and C. Dicey, etc. Broadside. 
Wdct. ioo(i).28 

Begins, "All you that are to mirth inclined, come 
tarry a little while." Compare Bite upon bite 
TNo. 1880), and The cunnie's garland (No. 1928). 
See The crafty farmer of Norfolk (No. 1916) for an 
account of the use to which this broadside has been put. 

1906. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 100 (i). 29 

1907. The countryman's garland. In two 
parts. London, Stonecutter Street, Fleet 
Market. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(i).38 

Begins, " You young men that down in the country 
do dwell." 

Countryman cheated by a London miss, and his 
revenge. 

1908. The same. Broadside. Wdcts. 

102.22 

1909. Courtier and tinker.] The pleasant 
history of the frolicksome courtier and the 
jovial tinker. London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).9 

The preface attributes these mad pranks to Sir John 
Percy, allied to the family of the earl of Northumber- 
land, and traces them to the reaction which followed 
" the long jarring wars and bloodshed" which ended 
in the union of England and Scotland under James I. 

"A curious medley of tales, the first of which is 
the same story as the induction to the Taming of 
the shrew." Halliwell, " Catalogue of chap-books," 
1849, P- 9- 

1 9 10. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iii).8 

Part of the text is differently set in this edition. 

1911. The same. London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 53.7 

Lacks the preface. 

1912. The crafty chambermaid. In three 
parts, etc. To which is. added a new song, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 

8.28, 29.39 

Begins, "Let every young lover that's constant 
and free." 

1 9 1 3 . The crafty chambermaid ; or. Beauty 
and virtue rewarded. In three parts, etc. 
London, J. Davenport. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. 9.1, 34.9 

1 9 14. The crafty chambermaid.] The 
merchant outwitted ; or. The chamber-maid's 
policy. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(ii).6o 

1914*. The same. Broadside. Wdct. 

102.122 



1 9 15. The crafty farmer. To which are 
added, Bright Belinda, The faithful swain. 
Young Daphne. 1796. sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 33.6 

The first piece is the old ballad, showing how a 
highwayman was outwitted by a farmer. Child, 282 
(v. 128). Begins, "The song that I'm going to 
sing. ' ' 

19 1 6. The crafty farmer of Norfolk; or 
The subtle doctor. Being a pleasant way 
invented for the cure of a great belly. To 
the tune of. The plowman's health. London, 
William and Cluer Dicey, etc. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 100 (i). 28 

Begins, " There was a rich farmer that had a fair 
maid." Entirely different from the preceding. This 
broadside is pasted to a copy of " The country girl's 
policy" (No. 1905). On the back of the two is 
printed "An elegy sacred to the memory of . . . Fred- 
erick, prince of Wales, who departed this life . . . 
March 20, 1 750-1." 

The crafty lass's garland. See No. 3928*. 

191 7. The crafty London apprentice ; or, 
Bow-bells. Broadside. London, printing- 
ofifice in Stonecutter-street, near the Fleet- 
Market. Wdcts. 100 (i). 3 7 

Begins, " You London dames that love to range 
The city round about." Also appears in " The merry 
Wakefield garland " (No. 1454). 

19 1 8. The crafty London prentice; or. 
The cruel miss well fitted. 2'^. The Mary 
Gaily ; or. The new ship lately mann'd. 
3*^. Philander and Diana ; or. Love in a 
grove. J.Lee. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 

38.33 

1919. The London 'prentice; or. The 
wanton mistress. To which are added, Wel- 
come brother debtor, Down the burn Davie, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Ornamental wdct. on t. p. 

The same as the preceding. 8.14 

1920. The crafty lover; or. The lawyer 
outwitted. Northampton, W. Dicey. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. ioo(i).34 

Begins, "Of a rich councellor I write." A lover 
buys advice of his beloved's father, how to marry her 
without incurring the penalty for stealing an heiress. 

192 1. The same. Tune, I'll love thee 
more and more. Broadside. Wdct. 

I03(i).i86 

1922. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 105.35 

The second copy is imperfect, lacking part of the 
imprint. 



XIV. HUMOROUS METRICAL TALES, ETC. 



109 



1923. The crafty miller; or, Mistaken 
batchellor. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. I00(i),45 

Begins, " You gallants of England I pray now draw 



1924. The crafty miller and his she-ass. 
Worcester, J. Grundy. Broadside. Wdcts. 

104.33 

The same story as the preceding, rewritten and 
condensed. 

1925. The crafty plowman's garland, con- 
taining several of the best new songs. The 
farmer's son's falling in love with a young 
lady, &c. The farmer's son's policy in gain- 
ing the young lady. Love in a tub ; or, The 
old merchant outwitted. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 61.8 

Begins, ' ' Attend all young lovers wherever you be. " 
The farmer's son, who " had the Latin tongue per- 
fectly well," disguised himself as the Prince of Mo- 
rocco and thus won the lady. 

1926. The crafty ploughman's garland ; or. 
The young farmer's policy to gain a fair lady. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. 
Wdcts. 100 (i). 2 3 

1927. The crafty sailor; or, The old 
woman disappointed of her nuptial enjoy- 
ment. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 1 00 (i). 46 

Begins, ' ' Good people draw near and listen awhile . ' ' 

1928. The cunnie's garland. To which 
are added, Britons to arms. Com riggs are 
bonny, Nancy Gay. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 28.40, 29.5 

Begins, " Come all that love to be merry." 

1928*. The crafty lass's garland. Who'll 
buy the rabbit; or, The coney brought to 
a fair market. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 100 (i) .50 

The same as the preceding. 

1929. The renowned history of Dame Trot 
and her cat. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. 
pp. 16. Wdcts. 1 14. 1 

1930. Darlastone wake bull-baiting. Broad- 
side. 104.21 

1 93 1. The satne. Broadside. 104.24 

1932. The same. Birmingham, J. Russell. 
Broadside. 104.22 

1933. The same. A new song. Broad- 
side. 104.23 



1934. A new song called Darlastone wake 
bull-baiting. Broadside. 2 cop. 104.22, 25 

The second copy is printed on one sheet with " A 
new song called Bloxwich wake bull-baiting," No. 
1887. 

1935. The Deptford garland, beauifiied 
[sic\ with several excellent new songs. 
I. The Deptford frolick ; or. An account of 
the comical smock wedding. 11. The maid- 
en's lamentation for the loss of her love. 
III. A comical dialogue between Betty and 
her mistress. ... 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

61.9 
Begins, " Good people please a while for to wait." 

1936. The difficult batchelor; or. The 
nice clown well fitted with an industrious 
wife. Broadside. Wdcts. 100 (i). 5 6 

Begins, "A batchelor, whose name was Ned." 

1937. The same. [London], Stonecutter 
Street, Fleet Market. Broadside. Wdcts. 

102.12 

The doating mother's garland. See No. 
1901. 

1938. The dominie deposed, with the se- 
quel. By William Forbes, A.M., late school- 
master at Petercoulter. To which is added, 
Maggy Johnston's elegy. Glasgow. [No.] 
141. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 62.17, 75-6 

A story of seduction; in dialect. 



1939. The same. Reprint. 



93(i).i4 



1940. Dragon of Wantley.] An excellent 
ballad of that most dreadful combate fought 
between Moore of Moore-Hall and the dragon 
of Wantley, to a pleasant tune much in re- 
quest. Entered according to order. London, 
printed by John Pugh, and sold by Joseph 
Davies, on London-bridge. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(i).62 
Cut shows a curious but satisfactory dragon carrying 
away a monk. Notes on this burlesque in Child 
(British poets), viii. 128; Roxburghe, viii. 415. 

1 94 1. Dunwhistle's testament; or, A di- 
verting tale of three bonnets. In four cantos. 
Falkirk, T. Johnston. 1820. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 15.9 

1942. Elegy on Jamie Gemmill, tailor. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.14 

1 943. The fair maid of Islington. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(i).8o 
Begins, " There was a lass of Islington." 



no 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1944. The friar and boy; or, The young 
piper's pleasant pastime. Containing his 
witty pranks, in relation to his step-mother, 
whom he fitted for her unkind treatment. 
Part the first. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(ii)-i3 

Title cut, friar in thorn-bush, which also appears on 
the titles of Nos. 1945-1949. Halliwell, " Catalogue 
of chap-books," p. 51. Ashton (p. 237) gives title- 
page of a Newcastle edition. 

For the history of the tale see Bolte, " Das marchen 
vom tanze des monches im dombusch," in Festschrift 
zur begriissung des 5ten allgemeinen deutschen Neu- 
philologentages, Berlin, 1892; Herrig's Archiv, xc. 
57, 289; xcv. 168; Anglia, xxvi. 104. 

1945. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(ii).i4 

1946. The same. Part the first. London, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(ii).i8 

1947. The same. Part the second. [Lon- 
don] Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(ii).i9 

Cuts on p. II and p. 14 are transposed from the 
order of No. 1945; cut on p. 21 is new. 

1948. The same. Part the first. Lon- 
do[n]. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 21.4 

The same as No. 1946, cuts and text, but having 
"Finis" at the end. 

1949. The same. Part the second. Lon- 
don, sm. i2°- pp. 24. Wdcts. 2 1.5 

Cuts differ slightly from the preceding editions. 
Text begins on p. 3. 

1950. The same. Part the first. London, 
J. Evans and CO. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 42.6, 49.3 

The cut shows a shepherd piping. 

1 95 1. The second part of Jack the merry 
piper ; or. The friar and the boy, etc. Gates- 
head, G. Watson. 16°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 65.5 

1952. The fryer well-fitted; or, A pretty 
jest that once befel How a maid put a fryer 
to cool in the well. Northampton, R. Raikes 
and W. Dicey, etc. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(i).75 
Begins, "As I lay musing all alone. Fa la la la la." 

1953. Fun in an alley; or. The footman 
trapp'd. [London], Stonecutter St., Fleet 
Market. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(i).82 

Begins, " Come all ye young gallants that's passing 
along." Substitution of an infant for a sucking-pig. 

1954. Fun upon fun ; or, The stark-naked 
west country wedding. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 100 (i) .83 



1955. The hasty bridegroom; or. The 
rarest sport that ever was try'd Between a 
bridegroom and his bride : with The bride's 
loving reply. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. Broadside. ioo(ii).i2 

1956. Hughson the cobler.] A diverting 
and choice dialogue between Hughson the 
cobler and Margery his wife, which happened 
about 1 2 o'clock at his arrival home from the 
alehouse, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 25.39 

Resembles " The shoemaker and his wife," a dia- 
logue in prose (No. 1686), but it is a different story. 

1957. Curious and diverting dialogue be- 
tween Hughson the cobler and Margery his 
wife. London, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 26.32 

1958. The hunting of the hare; with her 
last will and testament. As 'twas perform'd 
on Banstead-downs By- coney catchers and 
their hounds. Broadside. Wdct. I00(ii).ii 

1959. Jack & Jill, and old Dame Gill. 
Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp.16. Wdcts. 

114.6 

i960. Jack Horner.] The pleasant his- 
tory of Jack Horner, contining \sic\ the 
witty tricks and pranks he play'd from his 
youth to his reper \_sic'\ years, being pleasant 
for winters evenings. Loodon \sic'\. Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 58(ii).22 

" Little Jack besure would eat 
His Christmas Pye in Rhyne [xzV]. 
And said, yack Horner in the Corner, 
Eats good Christmas Pye, 
With his thumbs pulls out the plumbs. 
Crying what a good Boy was I." — Page 3. 

This story has some resemblance to ' ' The friar and 
the boy." It also includes (as chap, vi.) a version of 
" The tale of the basyn." See Thos. Wright, " The 
tale of the basyn and the frere and the boy," London, 
1836; Hazlitt, "Early popular poetry," iii. 42 ff. 
Ashton (p. 245) gives the title-page of a Newcastle 
edition, much like this. The cut here is in four parts. 

1 96 1. The history of Jack Horner. Con- 
taining the witty pranks he play'd from his 
youth to his riper years, being pleasant for 
winter evenings. Stirling, C. Randall. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 69.3 

1962. The life of Jack Sprat. Banbury, 
J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp.16. Wdcts. 114.5 

1963. Jacob's return from London, or 
his ramble to Bath. Written and delivered 
by Mr. Knight, at the theatre, Bath. [Lon- 
don], J. Pitts. Broadside. 102.36 

" Jacob Gawkey is a Somersetshire clown, a well 
drawn character in Miss Lee's excellent comedy, ' The 
chapter of accidents.' " — Note. In dialect. 



XIV. HUMOROUS METRICAL TALES 



III 



1964. John & Joan. [Illustrated by Joseph 
Crawhall.] London : Field & Tuer ; New 
York: Scribner & Welford. 1883. 4°. 
pp. (20). Wdcts. 94.6 

" From an old black letter copy in the British 
Museum, with the initials M.P., without doubt 
M artin Parker . " — Note. 

1965. The same, with colored woodcuts. 

90.7 

1966. John Gilpin.] The facetious story 
of John Gilpin ... by Mr. Cowper, and a 
second part, containing an account of the 
disastrous accidents which befel his wife on 
her return to London ; by Henry Lemoine. 
To which is added Gilpin's second holiday, 
written by the late John Oakman. [London], 
A. Lemoine. sm. 12°. pp.24. Engr. front. 
2 cop. 7-6, 66.3 

1967. J. Highlandman's remarks on Glas-" 
gow. [By Dougal Graham.] To which are 
added. The good ship Rover, The sailor's 
return, Lydia, or The heavenly fair. 1796. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 33.10 

Also appears in "The battle of Roslin " (No. 660) . 

1968. John Highlandman's remarks on 
the city of Glasgow, to which are added, 
Johnny and Molly, Original of Tweedside. 
Greenock, William Scott. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 59-55 

1968*. The same. Reprint. 91 (i). p. 255 

1969. The leg of mutton., Modem idola- 
try. [Verse. With The learned dominie ; a 
copy of a letter.] sm. 12°. pp.18. 62.50 

Imperfect: — the lower part of the title-page has 
been cut away. A local personal squib. 

1970. The London butcher ; or. The miser 
outwitted, sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.7 

Begins "Of all the merry frolics that lately have 
been done." A miserly father wishes his daughter to 
marry a parson; her lover, a butcher, dresses as the 
devil and frightens the parson away. The " Politick 
lovers " is the same tale. It is quite different from 
"Bite upon bite" and "Bite upon the miser" 
(Nos. 1 880-1), though the plot is similar. 

197 1. London butcher.] The politick 
lovers ; or. The Windsor miser outwitted. 
Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(iii).4 

The London prentice ; or. The wanton 
mistress. See No. 19 19. 

1972. The loss of the pack; to which is 
added The pack's address. 16°. pp.8. 

Without title-page. 79- 2 3 



1973. Love in a bam; or. Right country 
courtship, shewing how a London lord was 
tricked by a farmer's daughter, sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 8.35 

Begins, " Come all ye country girls so fair, and 
London lasses too." A story of exactly the same 
order as "The crafty chambermaid," No. 1913. 

1974. Love in a bam; or, The cotmtry 
courtship, to which are added two other new 
songs, viz. I. Sally Salsbury. 2. To my own 
mind. Belfast, James Magee. 1763. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).28 

1975. Love in a barn ; or. Right country 
courtship. Broadside. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

I00(ii).49, 103.61 

1976. Love in a tub; or, The merchant 
outwitted ; to which are added. Honest Mall 
Boye, O to be married if this be the way, 
Gay Damon. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 2 cop. 28.37, 29.37 

Begins, " Let every one that to mirth is inclin'd." 
How a lover bought his love in a hogshead from her 
father, a vintner. 

1977. Love in a tub ; or. The [mi]ser out- 
witted. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. ioo(ii).5o 

Imperfect : — a comer, with part of the title, is torn 
away. 

1978. The magic pill ; or, Davie and Bess ; 
a tale. . . . Glasgow, J. Lumsden & son. 
[J. Neilson, printer.] 1819. 16°. pp.8. 

81.1 

1979. Margaret and the minister; a true 
tale. To which is added, Soda water. Pais- 
ley. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

62.1, 71.17, 79.19 

See also "The comical stories of Thrummy Cap 
and the ghaist," etc.. No. 2028. 

1980. The merchant lady's garland. In 
three parts. . . . [London], J. Walter, at the 
Hand and Pen next the White Hart Inn, in 
High-Holburn, near Drury- Lane. 16°. pp.8. 

38.18 

Begins, " We London fair ladies of beautiful 
charms." Tale of a lady who wanted a child and 
took a lover in place of her husband. Compare the 
" Squire of St. James's," No. 2021. 

The merchant out-witted ; or, The cham- 
ber-maid's policy. See No. 19 14. 

1 98 1. The merchant's son and the beggar- 
wench of Hull. London, Aldermary Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 102.48 

Roxburghe, vii. 379. 



I 12 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



1982. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 100 (i). 13 



1983. The same. 
Broadside. Wdct. 



Coventry, Turner. 
102.49 

1984. The merry broom-field; or, The 
west-country wager. To a pleasant new tune. 
Broadside. Wdcts. ioo(ii).57 

See Child, 43, F. (ii. 398). 

1985. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.46 

1986. The merry cuckold and kind wife. 
London, Wise and co. Broadside. Wdct. 

102.47 

Begins, " Oh, I went into the stable and there for 
to see." Cut, rude and curious, of five women, each 
with a pair of horns. 

This is Child, No. 274B (v. 93). Cf. Roxburghe, 
vii. 434. 

1987. The Milford garland, composed of 
two new songs: i. The Milford galloway's 
ramble to the North. 2. A copy of verses 
on a young woman in this town. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 56.19, 61.31 

The first piece occupies six pages. 

1988. The miller's advice to his three 
sons, in taking of toll. Broadside. Wdct. 
2 cop. I00(ii).62, 105.20 

The miller, on his death bed, asks his three sons 
what toll they will take; the eldest takes a peck out 
of a bushel, the second, half of each bushel; the mill 
is refused to each because " By such toll no man can 
live," and is given to the third son who declares 
" Before I will a good living lack, I'll take it all and 
forsware the sack." 

1989. The miraculous farmer ; or. No cock 
like a west country cock. Broadside. 

I00(ii).56 
Begins, " You women in dty and country, I pray.' 

1990. The mistaken ladys' garland, com 
posed with variety of the best new songs 
I . The mistaken lady ; or. The crafty cham- 
ber maid. 2. The soldier's call to arms 
3. The frigate well mann'd. 16°. pp. 8 
Wdct. 61.13 

A young lady is courted by a wealthy squire; her 
chambermaid passes herself off as her mistress, and 
is married to him. 

1 99 1. The mistaken lady's garland. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(ii).63 

1992. The monk and the miller's wife. 
By Allan Ramsay. 24°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 65.16 

1993. The monk and the miller's wife; 
or, All parties pleased. [With The loss of 



the pack.] Penrith, Anthony Soulby. 16°. 
pp. 16. Wdct. on t. p. 77.5 

1994. The same. 16°. pp.8. 62.3 

Imperfect : — title-page lacking. 

1995. Monsieur Tonson, a tale recited 
by Mr. Fawcett at Covent Garden theatre. 
Written by J. Taylor. London, A. Macpher- 
son, etc. 1795. 12°. pp. 8. 39.6 

1996. Monsieur Tonson. A tale written 
by J. Taylor, Esq., and spoken by Mr. Faw- 
cett. [London], J. Pitts. Broadside. 

104.35 

1997. The same. London, J. Davenport. 
Broadside. 104.36 

1998. The new way to make love; or. 
The crafty doctor's medicine to gain a fair 
lady. [London], Sympon's, in Stonecutter 
street, Fleet-Market. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(ii).73 

Begins, " Young lovers, for love I'd not have you 

despair." The lover is substituted for a chambermaid. 

1999. Old Mother Hubbard and her dog. 
Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp.16. Wdcts. 

114.4 

2000. A new dialogue between Jack and 
his master. Broadside. 104.32 

A series of quips, each verse ending " I thank you. 
Jack. You are welcome, master." 

2001 . The news, to which is added The hu- 
mours of Glasgow fair. Glasgow, R. Hutchi- 
son. 1823. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 

62.46 

The first piece is a song beginning ' ' O cam ye east 

or cam ye west." The second is a humorous poem 

beginning " O the sun frae the eastward was peeping." 

2002. News from Hyde-Park ; or, A merry 
passage that happened between a north coun- 
try gentleman and a very gaudy gallant lady 
of pleasure. . . . Tune of the Cros'd couple. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. I00(ii).69 

2003. No joke like a true joke ; or, A 
quack well roasted. [Coventry], Turner. 
Broadside. 104.37 

Begins, " Its of a quack doctor that I'm going to tell 
Most people in Warwick they know him too well." 

2004. The northern ditty ; or, the Scotch- 
man out-witted by the country damsel. To 
a new Scotch tune. London, W. Dicey, in 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(ii).7i 

Of the same type as "The baffled knight" 

(No. 1876). The woodcut is imitated (and reversed) 

from the copper-plate in "A collection of old ballads," 

1723. i. 211. 



XIV. HUMOROUS METRICAL TALES 



113 



2005. Patrick O'Neal. Broadside. Wdct. 

104.17 

The experience of an Irishman who was taken by 
the press-gang. 

The politic lovers. See The London 
butcher. No. 197 1. 

2006. The politick lovers ; or, The young 
gentleman's frolick, outwitting his sweetheart 
with a bottle of sack. [London], Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).3 

Begins, "You lovers of England, whatever you 
be . " Entirely different from ' ' The London butcher. ' ' 

2007. The politick maid of Suffolk; or, 
The lawyer outwitted. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).9 

Begins, "Come all ye young men and maids Of 
high and low degree." How Nell, disguised as the 
devil, frightened her lover into marrying her. 

2008. The same. Coventry, Turner. 
Broadside. Wdct. 102.58 

2009. The politick squire ; or, The high- 
waymen catched in their own play. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 102. 1 14 

2010. The politick wife; or. The devil 
outwitted by a woman. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).6 

Begins, "Of all the plagues upon the earth." 
How a man made a league with Dumkin the devil, 
and was saved by the wit of his wife. 

201 1. Pretty Kate of Windsor; or, The 
miller's daughter. London, W. & C. Dicey 
in St. Mary Aldermary Church Yard, etc. 
Broadside. Wdcts. I00(iii).7 

Begins, "Near to the town of Windsor." How 
Kate refused the squire, the lawyer, the trooper, and 
other suitors. On the back of this copy and a blank 
sheet pasted to it is printed a broadside, "A genuine 
account of the trials ... of Francis Townley," etc. 

2012. Raising the wind ; or, Habbie Symp- 
son & his wife baith deid. As originally writ- 
ten and spoken by John Andrews in the 
Exchange rooms. Moss street. Together 
with The lyfe and deithe of Habbie Simpson, 
the famous pyper of Kilbarchan, written by 
Robert Sempill, of Belltreis, between the 
years 1630 and 1640. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 
16°. pp. 8. 75.10 

One of those chap-books which " furnish the choi- 
cest specimens of national humour and customs, and 
are replete with graphic descriptions of persons and 
manners." Eraser's " Humorous chap-books of Scot- 
and," 1873, p. 131. 

" The Paisley repository, no. xxiii." (73.3) contains 
some notes on Habby Simpson. " Raising the wind " 
is in prose; "Lyfe and deithe" is in verse. The 
title on p. 6 reads " written ... in the year 1598." 



2013. Ralph and Nell's ramble to Oxford. 
[London], J. Pitts. Broadside. Wdct. 

102.61 

2014. The same. Banbury, T. Cheney. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 102.69 

2015. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

105.34 

2016. The rock and the wee pickle tow, 
with the Answer. Falkirk, T. Johnston. 1813. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-85 

Contains 17 stanzas, not including the Answer; 
the first, and the third to the sixth, appear in Herd's 
"Ancient and modem Scottish songs," 1870, ii. 92, 
attributed to Alex. Ross." Even these verses are 
much changed here. 

2017. St. George & the dragon. Coventry, 
J. Turner. Broadside. Wdct. 102. 125 

Begins, " Why should we boast of Arthur and his 
knights." A burlesque. "A roll-call of chivalric 
tales." Roxburghe, vi. 724. 

2018. A new ballad of St. George and the 
dragon. Broadside. Wdct. ioo(iii).4i 

The same as the preceding. 

2019. Saturday night at Birmingham. 
Tune, "Nottingham ale." Birmingham, 
D. Wrighton. Broadside. 104.28 

2020. Six humourous poems : Loss of the 
pack ; Auld sark sleeve ; Margaret and the 
minister ; Soda water ; Watty and Meg ; 
The farmer's blunder. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 
16°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 65.14 

202 1. The 'squire of St. James's. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).46 

Begins, " It is of a young 'squire I mean for to 
write." Similar to " The merchant lady's garland" 
(No. 1980). 

2022. The Stammerers ; a tale. London, 
J. Davenport. Broadside. 104.31 

2023. The swimming lady; or, A wanton 
discovery. London, Bow Church Yard. 
Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).34 

The cut is a rude imitation of the copper-plate 
printed with the verses in "A collection of old bal- 
lads," 1723, ii. 133. " Bagford ballads " (Ballad 
society), vol. i. p. 142. 

2024. The tavern kitchen fray; or, A dia- 
logue between Nell and her mistress. Lon- 
don, Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(iii).53 

2024*. Another issue. ioo(ii).33 

Imperfect: — part of the title missing. Differs 
slightly from the preceding. 



ri4 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2025. Teague's ramble [to Hyde Park]. 
Worcester, S. Gamidge. Broadside. Wdct. 

I00(iii).57 

2026. The comical story of Thrummy Cap, 
and the ghaist. [By John Burness.] To 
which is added the Highland story of Donald 
& his dog. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 75.7 

2027. The same. To which is added " Wil- 
liam and his little dog." Paisley, G. Cald- 
well. 1 83 1, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 65.3 

2028. The comical stories of Thrummy 
Cap and the ghaist ; Margaret and the min- 
ister; Soda water; [The water-drinker]. 
Glasgow. [No.] 16. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. III-I3 

2029. Tit for tat ; or, The merry wives of 
Wapping. [Ix)ndon], Printing office. Stone- 
cutter Fleet Market. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).55 

The same as " The frolicksome sea-captain," which 
is found in an edition of "Guy, earl of Warwick," 
No. 881. 

2030. The history of Tom Thumb, wherein 
is declared his marvellous acts of manhood, 
full of wonder and merriment. Part the first. 
[London], Petticoat Lane. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(ii).i3 

The title-cut shows Tom mounted on an immense 
war-horse. 

Ashton (p. 207 etc.) gives a title-page of pt. i. 
from an Aldermary Church Yard edition with the title 
" The famous history of Tom Thumb," etc. 

203 1 . The life and aciions of Tom Thumb ; 
furnished with pleasant miraculous tales, and 
wonderful adventures perform'd by him after 
his second return from fairy-land. The sec- 
ond part. London, L. How, Petticoat-lane, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(ii).i4 

The title-cut shows Tom as king of fairy-land. 

2032. The famous history of Tom Thumb ; 
his marvellous acts of manhood. Full of 
wonder and merriment. Part the third. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(ii).i5 

The title-cut is the same as for part i. 

The three parts of Tom Thumb were reprinted by 
J. O. Halliwell : " The metrical history of Tom Thumb 
the Little," London, i860. The first part was 
printed in 1630, the second and third were added 
about 1 700. ' ' Notwithstanding their great popularity 
it is exceedingly difficult at the present day to meet 
with a complete copy." In our copy of pt. iii. which 
formerly belonged to Ritson are several MS. correc- 
tions of the text. See also W. C. Hazlitt, " Remains 
of the early popular poetry of England," ii. 193. 



2033. The famous history of Tom Thumb, 
wherein is declared his marvellous acts of 
manhood, full of wonderful merriment, per- 
formed after his first return from fairy land. 
Part the second. London. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. 32.12, 37.19 

The title-cut is like that in No. 2031, but from 
another block; of the other cuts some appear in both 
editions and some in one only. 

2034. The history of Tom Thumb, wherein 
is declared his marvellous acts of manhood, 
full of wonder and merriment, performed 
after his second return from fairy land. Part 
the third, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 37.20 

The title-cut is the same as in No. 2032; of the 
other cuts some appear in both editions and some in 
one only. 

2035. The history of Tom Thumb. Ban- 
bury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 

114.2 

2036. The turnip-sack garland, containing 
three excellent new songs : i. The London 
whore out-witted ; or. The devil catch'd in a 
turnip sack. 11. The careful maiden, iii. A 
Yorkshire bite put upon the biter; or The 
highwayman catch'd in his own trap. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.50 

The third song "The Yorkshire bite" is similar 
to "The crafty farmer" (^Child, No. 283), and is 
mentioned in Child, v. 128. 

2037. Tythe for tythe ! or, The parson 
and sow. London, J. Davenport. Broadside. 

104.34 

2038. Unfortunate daughter.] The pleas- 
ant and delightful history of the unfortunate 
daughter : 

The unfortunate son you have had before. 
Accept the daughter and then no more. 

Set forth in two parts, sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 58(ii).24 

The cut is quaint, showing the incidents of the 
story in rude succession. Halliwell, "Catalogue of 
chap-books," 1849, P- 80. 

2039. The unfortunate Frenchman's gar- 
land, beautified with several merry new songs : 
I. The unfortunate Frenchman. 11. The 
maiden's complaint for want of a husband. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 61.44 

2040. The unfortunate son ; or, A kind 
wife is worth gold. Full of mirth and pas- 
time. London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(ii).23 

Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, p. 80. 



XV. DREAM BOOKS, FORTUNE TELLING, AND LEGERDEMAIN 



I 



2041. The same. m,dcc,xcvii. [1797.] 
12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 69.6 

2042. The vicar and Moses. Burslem, 
J. Tregortha. Broadside. Wdcts. 104. 18 

2043. The wanton virgins frightened, with 
the spy's downfal from the tree-top to the 
pond-bottom ; or, The old man strangely 
surprized and bugbear'd . . . London, Alder- 
mary Church Yard, Bow-Land \_sic\. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 3 cop. 104, 71, 72, 105.2 

2044. The wanton virgins frighted . . . 
London. Broadside. Wdct. 103 (i). 5 

Imperfect: — part of imprint missing. The cutis 
not the same as in the preceding, though both illustrate 
the text. 

2045. The wanton virgins frighted, with 
the spy's downfall from the tree-top to the 
pond-bottom. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(iii).73 
The large cut is the same as in No. 2043. 

2046. Watty & Meg; or, The wife re- 
formed ; owere true a tale. [By Alexander 
Wilson.] Paisley, G. Caldwell. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 63.19 

2047. Watty and Meg; or, The wife re- 
formed. Falkirk. 16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 63.5 

2048. The sa?ne. Glasgow, R. Hutchison. 
16°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 59-I04 

2049. ^^^ same. To which is added The 
ladies' petition to the doctors. Glasgow. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 62.18 

Contains also ' ' The fate of MacGregor, " " The 
dying Christian to his soul," "A beth Gelert," and 
a Scottish anecdote to make up the 24 pages. 

2050. Wednesbury cocking. Birmingham, 
J. Russell. Broadside. 2 cop. 104.20, 21 



2051. The same. Broadside. 



104.20 



2052. The Welsh wedding; shewing how 
Shon-ap-Morgan rode up to London upon a 
goat to get a wife .... London, 41 Long- 
Lane, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 17.2 

26.23 



2053. Another copy. 
With a different cut on page 6. 



2054. The wife of Beith reformed and 
corrected. Giving an account of her death 
and of her journey to heaven ; how on the 
road she fell in with Judas, who led her to 
the gates of hell, and what converse she had 
with the devil, who would not let her in ; 



also how at last she got to heaven. . . . An 
allegorical dialogue containing nothing but 
that which is recorded in Scripture for our 
example. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 24°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 65.15 

In this poem the theological intention and the 
religious feeling are apparent despite the humor. The 
ballad Wanton wife of Bath [No. 2059] is more dis- 
tinctly humorous. See Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap- 
books," p. 16. 

"The new wife of Beath much better reformed 
enlarged and corrected. . . . Glasgow, Robert Sanders, 
17CX)," is reprinted in "Fugitive tracts written in 
verse, printed for private circulation,'" [London], 
1875, 2d series, No. 28. 

2055. The same. Glasgow. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 109.20 

2056. The wife of Beith; with a descrip- 
tion of her journey to heaven. Falkirk, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 75.9 

The same text as the preceding. 

2057. The wife of Beith; being an alle- 
gorical dialogue, containing nothing but what 
is recorded in Scripture. Glasgow. [No.] 49. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 110.9 

The same text as the preceding. 

2058. The same. Reprint. 93(ii).20 

2059. The wanton wife of Bath. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(iii).72 

Child (British poets), viii. 152. Roxburghe, vii. 
212. 

2060. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.26 

2061. The same. Tune of, The flying 
flame, &c. Broadside. Wdcts. 105.26 

2062. The Winchester wedding ; or, Ralph 
of Reading and Black Bess of the Green. 
Tune — The king's jigg. London, Bow 
Church Yard. London. Broadside. Wdcts. 

Roxburghe, vii. 207. I00(iii).7O 

XV 

Dream Books, Fortune Telling, and 
Legerdemain 

2063. Arcandam's astrology ; or, Book of 
destiny. . . . With an addition of phisiog- 
nomy. . . . Translated from the French of 
J. Fr. Neveau, astronomer, many years con- 
fined in the Bastile ^or foretelling the death 
of the dauphin of France. . . . Tendon, 
J.Bew. 1774. sm. 12°. pp. iv., 68. Wdcts. 

40.6 



ii6 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BKOADSIDES 



2064; An astrological catechism, wherein 
the principles of astrology are fully demon- 
strated . . . objections . . . answered, and 
the utility of it proved to be highly neces- 
sary ; with instructions for acquiring a per- 
fect knowledge . . . Translated from Leovitius, 
revised and corrected by Robert Turner, 
astro-philo. London, G. Kearsley, etc. 1786. 
sm. 12°. pp. XX., 28. 42.19 

2o'64*. The book of knowledge, treating of 
the wisdom of the ancients. In four parts. 
• . . Written by Erra Pater, . . . made English 
by W. Lilly. . . . To which is added The true 
form of all sorts of bills, bonds, &c. Suffield, 
[Conn.], Edward Gray. 1799. sm. 12°. 
pp. 117. Wdcts. 24232.10.2 

Also another edition printed by Isaiah Thomas, Jun., 
in Worcester, Mass., without date. 24232.10 

2065. Dreams and moles interpreted. 
By several famous astrologers. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 15-6 

2066. Dreams and moles with their inter- 
pretation and signification. . . . First compiled 
in Greek and now faithfully rendered into 
English by a fellow of the Royal society and 
a true lover of learning. London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. 

58(iv).i5 

2067. The same. [London], London and 
Middlesex printing office, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdcts. 21.12 

2068. The same. London, Stonecutter- 
street, Fleet market. sm. 12°. pp. 12. 
Wdct. on t. p. 21.15 

Only the pages devoted to dreams are here given. 

2069. The same. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 12°. pp.12. Wdct. on t. p. 32.6 

Contains only the pages on dreams, like the pre- 
ceding, but a page on moles takes the place of the 
preface. From the title the paragraph about the 
origin of the collection is omitted. 

2070. The Dutch fortune teller, discov- 
ering thirty six several questions, which old 
and young, married men and women, batche- 
lors and maids, delight to be resolved of. 
Brought into England by John Booker. 
[Verse.] Printed for the author. 1766. 
sm. 8°. pp. 50. Wdct. on t. p. and 5 fold- 
ing plates. 6.2 

"This work was brought out of Turkey by the 
chaus or Turkish ambassador . . . and was translated 
out of the Turkish into the German language." — 
To the reader. 

207 1 . The golden cabinet ; or. The com- 
pleat fortune-teller, wherein the meanest 



capacities are taught to understand their 
good and bad fortunes, not only in the 
wheel of fortune . . . but also by . . . palm- 
estry and physiognomy. . . . London, Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 

57(ii).i6 

2072. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

21.17 

Some of the cuts are the same as in the preceding. 
The address to the reader is omitted. 

2073. The golden dreamer; or. Dreams 
realised, containing the interpretation of a 
great variety of dreams. Glasgow. [No.] 17. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. (diagram) on t. p. 

110.18 
Not the same text as the following. A note at the 
end states that the work is published to show the 
superstitions of a past age, and readers are warned not 
to ' ' attach the slightest importance to the solutions of 
the dreams" given, "as dreams are generally the re- 
sult of a disordered stomach or an excited imagination. ' ' 

2074. I^ugh & grow fat ! ! The golden 
dreamer, or dreams interpreted ; also amorous 
dreams in verse. To which is added, a trea- 
tise on moles, with their significations. 16°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 65.2 

2075. A groatsworth of wit for a penny; 
or, The interpretation of dreams. London, 
Cluer Dicey, and co., in Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).22 

- A small abstract of ' ' the more laborious works ' ' of 
the famous Mr. Lilly. — Preface. 

2076. The same. London. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 35- 10 

Has the same title- cut as the preceding; the other 
cuts vary somewhat. 

2077. The same. London, Evans & co. 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 54-17 

2078. The High German fortune teller. . . . 
To which is added the whole art of palmestry. 
Written by the High German artist, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 21.19 

2079. '^^^ same. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 12°. pp. 12. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

32.10, 50.6 

Contains the text of the preceding so far as p. 12 
only. On the verso of title-page is " The signification 
of moles" instead of " How to discover truth from 
falsehood. ' ' 

2080. The history of dreams ; or. Dreams 
interpreted, &c. Containing i. Lessons to 
batchelors, maids, widowers and widows, &c. 
2. A true interpretation of dreams. 3. The 
birth of children on every day of the week. 
4. A division of man's age by 12 times 



XV. DREAM BOOKS, FORTUNE TELLING, AND LEGERDEMAIN 



117 



6 years. 5. Whether the party may live or 
die that falleth sick on any day of the month. 
6. To know, if a woman be with child, 
whether male or female. ... 9. A receipt to 
make a maid's face fair. 10. A ready way 
to cure the felon. 1 1 , How to heal one that 
is scalded with liquor. 12. The signification 
of moles. ... 14. How to choose a good hus- 
band or wife. 15. To know whether a 
woman be a virgin or not. 16. To know 
whether a man be a chaste bachelor or not. 
... By John Booker, astrologer. Edinburgh, 
J. Morren. sm. 12°. pp.24. II5-7 

2081. Lilly's new Erra Pater; or, A prog- 
nostication for ever whereby a man may learn 
to give certain judgment of the weather . . . 
may prophecy of peace or war, sickness, 
want or plenty, or dearth of corn or cattle, 
that may befal in any year according to Haly, 
Guido, Ptolomy and Lilly. With . . . rules 
for . . . health. . . , Observations in hus- 
bandry. . . . London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. 58(iv).i2 

" Compiled by Erra Pater, a Jew, doctor in as- 
tronomy and physick, born at Bethany in Judea; 
made English by WilHam Lilly, student in physick 
and astrology. " — at end. 

For other books by Lilly, see Nos. 2154, 2155, 
beyond. 

2082. Mother Bunch's closet newly broke 
open ; containing rare secrets of art & na- 
ture tried and experienced by learned phi- 
losophers and recommended to all ingenious 
young men and maids ; teaching them, in a 
natural way, how to get good wives and hus- 
bands. By your loving friend Poor Tom, for 
the king a lover of mirth but a hater of trea- 
son. Part the first. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).5 

For the second part see "The history of mother 
Bunch," below. The first part is said to be much 
the older. 

For a full account of this book see " Mother 
Bunch's closet," edited by G. L. Gomme, London, 
1885. It is reprinted in R. H. Cunningham's "Amus- 
ing prose chap-books," pp. 159—178. Some cuts and 
extracts are given by Ashton, p. 84. 

2083. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(iv).i3 

The title-cut is from a different block; the other 
cuts, except one, are the same as in the preceding. 

2084. The same. London, J. Evans. 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 48.4 

2085. The history of mother Bunch of the 
West ; containing many rarities out of her 
golden closet of curiosities. Part the second-. 



London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(0-6 

2086. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iv).i4 

The cuts differ somewhat from those in the 
preceding. 

2087. The same. London, Evans & co. 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 48.5 

2088. Mother Bunch's golden fortune- 
teller. Contents. How to see a future hus- 
band or wife . . . How to make the dumb 
cake. . . . Glasgow. [No.] 94. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 110.20 

2089. A new and ingenious fortune book 
for batchelors, maids, wives and widows . . . 
To which are added ten choice remedies. . . . 
Belfast. 1763. 16°. pp. 8. 57(iii).i3 

2090. A new and well-experienced card 
fortune-book . . . from the astrologer's office 
in Greenwich Park, for the benefit of young 
men and blooming maids. . . . Manchester, 
J. Swindells. 16°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 76.2 

Advertisement of books printed by J. Swindells, 
p. 24. 

2091. The new card fortune book, with 
the book of moles and dreams. Printed for 
the running stationers. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 58(iv).i7 

2092. A new dream book ; with some re- 
markable observations on dreams. Kendal, 
M. and R. Branthwaite. 16°. pp.8. Wdcts. 

77.8 

2093. The new hocus-pocus ! Containing 
the art of performing the newest tricks with 
dice, cards, cups, &c. By the great magician. 
Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 

109.10 

2094. The Norwood gipsey ; or. Mother 
Bridget's last legacy ; being a universal for- 
tune book discovering six hundred and forty 
six answers to different questions. . . . Part 
the first. . . . The manuscript was found by 
the editor at the root of a hollow tree, in 
Norwood. London, 50 Bishopsgate-Street, 
within. 1793. sm. 12°. pp.60. Engr. 
front. 48.8 

On the lower half of the frontispiece a table-turning 
scene is shown; it will be observed that while the 
woman's gaze is averted, the man's foot is materially 
assisting the spirits. 

2095. Partridge and Flamsted's new and 
well experienced fortune book, delivered to 



ii8 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BEOADSIDES 



the world from the astrologer's office in 
Greenwich Park. For the benefit of all young 
men, maids, wives and widows. . . . To which is 
added The whimsical lady [a dialogue written 
by T. Donovan]. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iv).i6 

Card divinations. "The whimsical lady" has a 
half-title page. 

2096. The same. To which is added, The 
whimsical lady, a dialogue. London, J. Evans 
and CO. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

21.13, 32.20 

" Flamstead " instead of " Flamsted " on the title- 
page. 

2097. Another issue. 2 cop. 42.15,54.16 

With different tail-pieces, a cut on p. 21, and the 
cut on p. 23 omitted. 

2098. Another issue, without The whim- 
sical lady, 37.9 

The title-cut is the same as in the preceding, but 
that on p. 12 is larger, and half the text on the page 
is omitted. 

2099. Thespaewife; or, Universal fortune- 
teller, wherein your future welfare may be 
known by physiognomy, cards, palmistrj', 
and coffee grounds. Also a distinct treatise 
on moles. [Glasgow. No.] 76. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. IIO.17 

2100. The true Egyptian fortune teller, 
shewing physiognomy in general . . . very 
advantageous ways relating to love and mar- 
riage. ... To make sport with an egg. To 
make a ring dance. How to light a candle 
by a glass of water. How to eat fire . . . 
The art of palmistry. . . . [London], Stone- 
cutter-street, Fleet-market, sm. 12°. pp.12. 
Wdcts. 2 cop. 21.14, 37-IO 

2101. The same. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 12°. pp. 12. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

21.20, 32.14 

2102. The true fortune teller; or. Uni- 
versal book of fate, containing . . . directions 
by which any one may know under what 
planet he was born, an account of the evil 
and perilous days of every month of the year, 
how to choose a husband or wife by the hair, 
eyes, &c., &c. [With an account of Mother 
Bridget.] Glasgow. [No.] 78. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 1 10. 1 9 

The cut is the "tree of fate," with numbered 
leaves; a key is given on the reverse. At the 
end is the note quoted under "Golden dreamer" 
(No. 2073). 



2103. The whole art of legerdemain; or. 
Hocus pocus in perfection . . . without a 
teacher, with the use of all the instruments, 
abundance of new and rare inventions, the 
like never before in print but much desired 
by many. By Henry Dean. loth ed., with 
additions. London, T. Sabine and son. 
sm. 12°. pp. 96. Wdcts. 45.7 

" Books printed and sold by T. Sabine and son," 
p. 96. 

2104. The whole art of legerdemain; or. 
Hocus pocus in perfection. . . . To which 
are added several tricks of cups and balls, 
&c., as performed by the little man without 
hands or feet. The wonderful art of fire 
eating. London, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 
3 cop. 21.18,54.18,55.8 

This consists of extracts from the preceding work. 
The title-page of 21.18 is badly torn. 



XVI 

Demonology and Witchcraft 

2105. Faustus.] The devil and Doctor 
Faustus, containing the history of the wicked 
life and horrid death of Doctor John Faustus, 
and shewing how he sold himself to the devil. 
. . . Also the strange things done by him and 

Mephostophiles Montpelier, C. C. Darling. 

1807. 12°. pp. 12. 26295.16.2 

2106. The history of Dr. John Faustus, 
shewing how he sold himself to the devil to 
have power to do what he pleased for twenty- 
four years. Also, strange things done by him 
and his servant Mephistopholes. With an 
account how the devil came for him and tore 
him to pieces. London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 57(i).8 

2107. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(iii).i8 
The cuts are the same, but those on pp. 8, 1 1 are 
transposed in this edition. 



2108. The same. 
pp. 24. Wdcts. 



London. 



sm. 12 . 
39-7 

Most of the cuts are the same as in the preceding 
editions. 



2109. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, Bow Lane. Wdcts. Reprint. 

92.39 

With a prefatory note. The cut in chap. vii. is not 

the same as in the Aldermary Church Yard edition 

quoted above, and the other cuts differ slightly in 

details. 



XVI. DEMONOLOGY AND WITCHCRAFT 



119 



2 1 10. History of Dr. Faustus, shewing his 
wicked life and horrid death . . . also many 
strange things done by him with the assistance 
of Mephostophiles. . . . Glasgow, sm. 12°. 
pp.24. Wdct. ont. p. 2 cop. 109.11,111.1 

The text is reprinted in Cunningham's "Amusing 
prose chap-books," p. 286J 

21 1 1. The history of the wicked life and 
horrid death of Dr. John Faustus, shewing 
how he sold himself to the devil. . . . Also 
strange things done by him and Mephos- 
tophiles. . . . Stirling, M. Randall, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. 115-19 

21 12. The rematKable life of Dr. John 
Faustus, relating the means by which he 
raised the devil, to whom he sold his soul and 
body on condition that Lucifer should give 
him unlimited power for twenty-four years. 
Edinburgh. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. I15.18 

21 13. The surprizing life and death of 
Doctor John Faustus. To which is now 
added, The necromancer, or Harlequin, Doc- 
tor Faustus, as performed at the Theater 
royal in Lincoln's Inn-Fields. Likewise, 
The whole life of Fryar Bacon. . . . London, 
printed for A. Bettesworth and G. Hitch, 
at the Red- Lyon in Pater-noster-row and 
R. Ware, at the Sun and Bible in Amen 
Corner, and J. Hodges at the Looking-glass 
on London-bridge, sm. 12°. pp.156. Wdct. 
on t. p. 26295.16.4 

Other books published by Ware and by Hodges 
are advertised on the last page. 

2 1 14. The surprising life and death of 
Dr. John Faustus, D.D., commonly called 
The history of the devil and Dr. Faustus. 
To which is now added The necromancer ; 
or, Harlaquin Doctor Faustus, as performed 
at the theatres. Truly translated from the 
original copies. [To which are apppended 
Witty stories.] Worcester. 1795. 24°. 
pp. 142. 26295.16.3 

21 15. Friar Bacon.] The history of the 
learned Friar Bacon. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(ii).6 

Ashton, p. 53. A version of the text is reprinted in 
Cunningham's "Amusing prose chap-books," p. 309. 

2 1 16. The famous history of the learned 
Friar Bacon. London, Bow Church Yard, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 58(i).24 

The cuts differ somewhat from the preceding. 



2 1 1 7 . The same. London, Evans and co. 
sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on t. p. 35-13 

2 1 18. The famous history of P'ryar Bacon ; 
containing the wonderful things that he did 
in his life ; also the manner of his death ; 
with the lives and deaths of the two conjur- 
ors Bungey and Vandermast. [With The 
jealous sister, a moral tale.] London, T. Sa- 
bine, sm. 12°. pp.96. Wdct. front. 2 cop. 

34-6, 42.1 
" Books printed and sold by T. Sabine," pp. 95, 96. 

2 1 19. The history of witches and wizards, 
giving a true account of all their tryals in 
England, Scotland, Sweedland, France, and 
New England, with their confession and con- 
demnation. Collected from Bishop Hall, 
Bishop Morton [and others] by W. P. Lon- 
don, printed for C. Hitch and L. Haws, at the 
Red Lion in Paternoster Row ; etc. sm. 12°. 
pp. (10), 144. Wdcts. 24244.19 

2120. Lancashire witches.] The famous 
history of the I^ncashire witches, containing 
their manner of becoming such ; their en- 
chantments, spells, revels, merry pranks, 
raising storms and tempests, riding on winds, 
&c. . . . With the loves and humours of Roger 
and Dorothy. Also A treatise of witches in 
general. . . . London, Bow Church Yard. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 57(i).i2 

212 1. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(iii).20 

Some of the cuts are the same as in the preceding 
edition. 

2122. The history of the Lancashire 
witches. ... 12°, pp. 24. Wdcts. 50.12 

Most of the cuts appear in one or the other of the 
preceding editions. 

2123. The same. Wotton-Underedge, J. 
Bence. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 38.4 

2124. Satan's invisible world discovered, 
detailing . . . strange pranks played by the 
devil, together with a particular account of 
several apparitions, witches, and invisible 
spirits, to which is added the marvellous his- 
tory of Major Weir and his sister. Glasgow. 
[No.] 116. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 110.18 

2125. The witch of the woodlands; or, 
The cobler's new translation. 

Here Robin the cobler, for his former evils, 
Is punished bad as Faustus with his devils. 



I20 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
VVdcts. 57(i).23 

The cobbler, who lived in "the wild [weald] of 
Kent, not far from Romney Marsh," is a kind of 
Wanton Tom (No. 1843, etc.), and gets into the 
same sort of troubles. 

2126. Thesame, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

54-11 

The title-cut is the same as in the preceding, but 
the type, and all but two of the other cuts, are quite 
different. 

2127. Thesame. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(iii).i9 
All the cuts are entirely different from those in the 
preceding editions; they are very crude. 

2128. The same. London, J. Evans & co. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. 34.1 

2129. Witchcraft detected and prevented ; 
or, The school of black art newly opened. 
The greater part . . . selected from the ancient 
and scarce works of the principal writers on 
these subjects, particularly from Scott's Dis- 
covery of witchcraft. ... It also contains a 
variety of the most approved charms in 
magic, receipts in medicine, natural philoso- 
phy and chemistry, &c. By a member of 
the school of black art, Italy. 3d ed. Peter- 
head, P. Buchan, and London, W. Suther- 
land. 1826, 16°. pp. iv., 112 [no]. 
Wdct. front. 24242.3.1 

*»* The following titles are arranged by date. 

2130. The examination and confession of 
certain witches at Chelmsford in the county 
of Essex. [1566.] Communicated and 
prefaced by Hermann Beigel. [London. 
1864.] 16°. pp. 49. 24246.19 

A reprint for the Philobiblon society of a unique copy 
in Lambeth palace of a 12° pamphlet of 22 ff, " im- 
prynted at London by Wyllyam Powell for Wyllyam 
Pickeringe ... at Sainte Magnus corner . . . anno 
1566, the 13 August." Included in the same is " The 
second examination and confession of mother Agnes 
Waterhouse and Jone her daughter " and "The ende 
and last confession of mother Waterhouse at her death 
whiche was the xxix daye of July. Anno 1566" 
printed by the same printer Aug. 13 and 23. 

2 1 3 1 . Newes from Scotland, declaring the 
damnable life of Doctor Fian, a notable sor- 
cerer, who was burned at Edenbrough in 
Januarie last. 1591. London, from the 
Shakespeare press, by W. Bulmer and co. 
1816. 4°. pp. (33). Wdcts. (Rox- 
burghe club.) 24246.15 

36 copies printed. Reprint of a contemporary 
pamphlet entitled " Newes from Scotland. Declaring 
the damnable life of Doctor Fian, a notable sorcerer, 
who was burned at Edenbrough in Januarie last, 
1 591. Which doctor was register to the deviil that 
sundrie times preached at North Baricke kirke to a 



number of notorious witches. With the true exami- 
nations of the said doctor and witches, as they uttered 
them in the presence of the Scottish king. Discover- 
ing how they pretended to bewitch and drowne His 
Majestic in the sea comming from Denmarke. . . , 
Published according to the Scottish copie. Printed 
for William Wright." 

2132. The sa?ne. Edinburgh, re-printed 
for D. Webster, 1820. {In A collection of 
rare and curious tracts on witchcraft and sec- 
ond sight, Edinburgh, 1820, 12°, pp. 13-35.) 

24242.3.3 

2133. The wonderful discoverie of the 
witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower, 
daughters of Joan Flower, neere Bever castle, 
executed at Lincolne, March 11, 1618, who 
were specially arraigned & condemned . , . 
for confessing themselves actors in the de- 
struction of Henry, Lord Rosse, with their 
damnable practises against others the children 
of . . . Francis, earle of Rutland. Together 
with the severall examinations and confes- 
sions of Anne Baker, Joan Willimot, and Ellen 
Greene, witches in Leicestershire. London, 
G. Eld for I. Barnes. 16 19. [^Reprinted 
Greenwich, H. S. Richardson.] 8°. pp. 26. 
Wdcts. 24242.2.3 

2134. The examination, confession, triall, 
and execution of Joane Williford, Joan Ca- 
riden, and Jane Hott, who were executed at 
Feversham in Kent, for being witches, on 
Monday, the 29 of Sep. 1645. Being a true 
copy of their evill lives and wjcked deeds, 
taken by the major of Feversham and jurors 
for the said inquest. With the examination 
and confession of Elizabeth Harris, not yet 
executed. All attested under the head of 
Robert Greenstreet, major of Feversham. 
London, printed for J. G. 1645. \_Reprinted 
London. 1837.] 8°. pp. 9. 24242.2.2 

2134*. The discovery of witches: in an- 
swer to severall queries, lately delivered to the 
judges of assize for the county of Norfolk. 
And now published by Matthew Hopkins, 
witch-finder. For the benefit of the whole 
kingdome. London, printed for R. Royston, 
at the Angell in Ivie Lane. And are to be 
sold by Edward Martin, at the upper Halfe- 
Moone in Norwich. 1647. sm.4°. pp. (2), 
10. 24245.17 

Extremely rare. Lacks the original frontispiece, 
but a plate " correctly copied from an extremely rare 
print in the collection of J. Bindley, esq.," representing 
Hopkins, two witches and their "imps," and a por- 
trait of " Matthew Hopkins . . . who in only one 
year, during the reign of James I. hanged 60 reputed 
witches, & was himself at last executed for a wizard," 
are inserted in the front of the book. 



XVI. DEMONOLOGY AND WITCHCRAFT 



121 



2135. A prodigious & tragicall history of 
the arraignment, tryall, confession, and con- 
demnation of six witches at Maidstone in 
Kent, at the assizes there held in July, Fry- 
day 30, this present year, 1652, before . . . 
Peter Warburton. . . . Collected from the 
observations of E. G., gent., . . . and digested 
by H. F., gent. To which is added A true 
relation of one Mrs. Atkins . . . who was 
strangely carried away from her house in 
July last, and hath not been heard of since. 
London, printed for Richard Harper in Smith- 
field. 1652. \Reprinted London. 1837.] 
8°. pp. II. 24242.2.2 

2136. A tryal of witches, at the assizes 
held at Bury St. Edmonds, for the county of 
Suffolk; on the loth day of March, 1664, 
before Sir Matthew Hale, Kt., then lord chief 
baron of His Majesties court of exchequer. 
Taken by a person then attending the court. 
London, William Shrewsbery, at the Bible in 
Duck-Lane. 1682. 16°. pp. 59. 21.10 

Gives full details of the evidence. 

2137. The same. Reprinted verbatim 
from the original edition of 1682. With an 
appendix by C. Clark. . . . London, J. R. 
Smith. 1838. 8°. pp. 28. 24242.2.1 

2138. The Lord's arm stretched out in an 
answer of prayer ; or, A true relation of the 
wonderful deliverance of James Barrow, the 
son of John Barrow of Olaves Southwark, 
who was possessed of evil spirits near two 
years. . . . Published by me, John Barrow. 
London. 1664. sm. 4°. pp.20. 1 19.8 

2 139. A relation of the diabolical practices 
of above twenty wizards and witches of the 
sheriffdom of Renfrew in the kingdom of 
Scotland, contain'd in their tryalls, examina- 
tions, and confessions, and for which several 
of them have been executed this present year, 

1697. London, printed for Hugh Newman. 
[1697.] sm. 4°. pp.24. II9-9 

2140. Sadducismus debellatus ; or, A true 
narrative of the sorceries and witchcrafts ex- 
ercis'd by the devii and his instruments upon 
Mrs. Christian Shaw, daughter of Mr. John 
Shaw, of Bargarran, in the county of Renfrew 
in the West of Scotland, from Aug. 1696 to 
Apr. 1697. . . . Together with reflexions upon 
witchcraft in general, and the learned argu- 
ments of the lawyers ... at the trial of seven 
of those witches who were condemned. . . . 
London, printed for H. Newman and A. Bell. 

1698. sm. 4°. pp. (8), 60. 119. 10 



2 141. The second part of The boy of 
Bilson ; or, A true and particular relation of 
the impostor Susanna Fowles, wife of John 
Fowles of Hammersmith, in the county of 
Middlesex, who pretended her self possess'd 
with the devil. . . . The whole being writ 
and attested by Robert Howson, clerk. Cap- 
tain John Bonsey, and Mr. Nicholas Wade. 
. . . London, E. Whitlock. 1698. sm.4°. 
pp. (4), 24. 119.7 

2142. An answer of a letter from a gentle- 
man in Fife to a nobleman, containing a 
brief account of the barbarous and illegal 
treatment these poor women accused of 
witchcraft met with from the baillies of Pit- 
tenweem and others, with some observations 
thereon. To which is added An account of 
the horrid and barbarous murder, in a letter 
from a gentleman in Fife to his friend in 
Edinburgh, Feb. 5 th, 1705. [Also A just 
reproof to the false reports and unjust calum- 
nies in the foregoing letters.] 1705. {Re- 
printed in A collection of rare and curious 
tracts on witchcraft and the second sight, 
Edinburgh, 1820, 12°, pp. 67-94.) 24242.3.3 

2143. A narrative of some strange events 
that took place in Island Magee and neigh- 
bourhood in 171 1, in consequence of which 
several persons were tried and convicted at 
Carrickergus for witchcraft. By an eye wit- 
ness. Belfast, Joseph Smyth. 1822. 12°. 
pp. 57. 24242.3.2 

2144. A full and impartial account of the 
discovery of sorcery and witchcraft practis'd 
by Jane Wenham of Walkerne in Hertford- 
shire upon the bodies of Anne Thorn, Anne 
Street, &c. ; the proceedings against her. . . . 
Also her tryal at the assizes at Hertford be- 
fofe Mr. Justice Powell, where she was found 
guilty of felony and witchcraft, and received 
sentence of death for the same, March 4, 
1711-12. [By Francis Bragge.] 5th ed. 
London, printed for E. Curll. 1712. sm. 8°. 
pp. (4), 36. 24246.12.5 

2145. Witchcraft farther display'd : con- 
taining i. ' An account of the witchcraft prac- 
tis'd by Jane Wenham of Walkerne in Hert- 
fordshire, since her condemnation, upon the 
bodies of Anne Thorn and Anne Street ; . . . 
ii. An answer to the most general objections 
against the being and power of witches, with 
some remarks upon the case of Jane Wenham 
in particular. ... To which are added The 
tryals of Florence Newton. . . . 1661 ; as 
also of two witches ... in Suffolk, anno 1664, 



122 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



before Sir Matthew Hale. . . . [By Francis 
Bragge.] London, printed for E. Curll. 
1712. sm. 8°. pp. (4), 39 + . 24246.12.2 

"Pamphlets lately printed for E. Curll," on the 
verso of p. 39. 

2146. The impossibility of witchcraft; 
plainly proving from Scripture and reason 
that there never was a witch, and that it is 
both irrational and impious to believe there 
ever was. In which the depositions against 
Jane VVenham, lately try'd and condemn' d 
for a witch, at Hertford, are confuted and 
expos'd. London, J. Baker. 17 12. sm. 8°. 
pp. (8), 32. 24246.11. 1 

Imperfect: — pp. 33-36 wanting. 

2147. The belief of witchcraft vindicated ; 
proving from Scripture there have been 
witches, and from reason that there may be 
such still. In answer to a late pamphlet 
intituled The impossibility of witchcraft, etc. 
By G. R., A. M. London, printed for 
J.Baker. 17 12. sm. 8°. pp.40. 

24246.11. 2 

2148. A defense of the proceedings against 
Jane Wenham, wherein the possibility and 
reality of witchcraft are demonstrated from 
Scripture and the concurrent testimonies of 
all ages. In answer to two pamphlets, enti- 
tuled, i. The impossibility of witchcraft, &c., 
ii. A full confutation of witchcraft. By Fran- 
cis Bragge. . . . London, printed for E. Curll. 
1712. sm. 8°. pp. (4), 36. 24246.12 

2 149. The expulsion of seven devils — who 
had taken diabolical possession of G. Lukins, 
a taylor, of Yatton, in Somersetshire, and for 
eighteen years tormented him. . . . The efforts 
of seven clergymen ... on the 13th of June 
1788 to relieve [him] . . . which they accord- 
ingly performed. . . . sm. 12°. pp. 12. 38.31 

*^* See also Nos. 2229, 2230. 

XVII 
Prophecies 

2150. Cargill.] The life and wonderful 
prophecies of Donald Cargill, who was exe- 
cuted at the Cross of Edinburgh, on the 26th 
July, 1680, for his adherence to the cove- 
nant, and work of reformation. Glasgow, 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 93(ii).4 

Reprint. 

2 15 1. The Christian's diary; or. An al- 
manack for one day, predicting that there will 
be great wars and commotions in several 



parts of the world. . . . Glasgow. 1790. 

sm. 8°. pp. 8. 8.20 

A prediction of the manner of the end of the world. 

2152. The same. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 3 cop. 

18.23, 20.16, 20.23 

2153. Gantier.] The remarkable prophe- 
cies and predictions, for the year 1795, of 
that great and wonderful prophet Don Johan- 
nes Gantier. . . . Also, The true account of a 
wonderful star which appears in the sky every 
evening. London. [1794?] sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 9.18 

2154. Lilly.] Anglicus, peace, or no peace, 
1645 ; 3, probable conjecture of the state of 
England and the present differences betwixt 
His Majestie and the Parliament of England 
now sitting at Westminster, . . . 1645. An 
exact ephemeris of the daily motions of the 
planets, with an easie introduction to the use 
thereof. Monethly-observations. A table 
of houses and explanation thereof. To which 
is added A modest reply to M. Wharton and 
the prognostication of his present almanak 
. ... for 1645. By William Lilly, student in 
astrologie. Printed according to order. 
London, printed by J. R. for John Partridge 
and Humphrey Blunden, ^/V-. 1645. sm. 4°. 
pp. (8), 45. Diagrs. 24232.15.3 

2155. An astrologicall prediction of the 
occurrances in England, part of the yeers 
1648, 1649, 1650. ... By William Lilly, stu- 
dent in astrologie. London, printed by T. B. 
for John Partridge and Humfrey Blunden, 
etc. 1648. 4°. pp. (8), 71. Diagrs. and 
wdct. 24232.15.5 

2156. Nicholson.] Great news from Bed- 
lam 1 or. The wonderful prophecies of Marga- 
ret Nicholson ; which were found written in 
a letter under the walls of Bedlam. Being 
her account of a vision which appeared . . . 
and related . . . wonderful things that will 
happen in Europe, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 

1. 10 
Margaret Nicholson was a woman of unbalanced 
mind who made an attempt to stab George III. 
See No. 2281. 

2157. Prophecy on prophecies; being a 
true and exact account of the dream of Mar- 
garet Nicholcholson [jzV]. Also the won- 
derful prognostications of Mr. Thomas Stone, 
and the vision seen by Lord George G. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 19.1 

The date 1787 is written in ink on the title-page. 



XVII. PROPHECIES 



123 



2158. Nixon's Cheshire prophecy at large, 
published from Lady Cowper's correct copy, 
in the reign of Queen Anne. With . . . sev- 
eral instances wherein it has been fulfilled. 
Also, his life. London, 41 Long-lane, 
sm. 12^ pp. 24. 35.9 

2159. Another issue. 2 cop. 42.11,53.6 

In this edition the "Nixon's" is in italics, while 
the verse on the title-page is in smaller type than in 
the preceding, and the type-page is different. — 
Ashton, p. 93. 

2 1 60. The same. By John Oldmixon, Esq. 
A new edition with a beautiful frontispiece 
elegantly engraved. London, H. Turpin. 
[1784.] 12°. pp. 36. 23.4 

Frontispiece lacking. 

"A great choice of children's books for 1784," 
pp. 30-34; 80 items. " Great allowance to boarding 
schools in general." " Where likewise may be had the 
following books," pp. 35-36. Both lists are priced. 

The verses on the title-page differ from the pre- 
ceding, the last line " For Brunswick's arm shall con- 
quer wily France " reads " For Brunswick's arms shall 
conquer France and Spain." 

2 161. Peden.] The life and prophecies 
of Alexander Peden. Glasgow. [No.] 115. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 110.7 



2162. The same. Reprint. 



93(ii).3 



2163. The explication of the prophecies 
of Thomas Rymer. ... By the famous Allan 
Boyd, M.A. [Verse.] 1791. sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 8.10 

Scotch prophecies, chiefly concerning the Jacobites. 

2164. [Mother Shipton's] prophesie, with 
three and XX. more, all most terrible and 
wonderfull, predicting strange alterations to 
befall this climate of England. . . . London. 
4°. pp. (8). Wdct. on t. p. 4444.5.4 

Trimmed too close; the first line of the title, part of 
the imprint, and part of the text are trimmed off. 

The title-cut represents Mother Shipton, Cardinal 
Wolsey in a castle, and the gate of York. 

2165. The prophesie of Mother Shipton 
in the raigne of King Henry the Eighth, for- 
telling the death of Cardinall Wolsey, the 
Lord Percy, and others, as also what should 
happen in insuing times. London, printed 
for Richard Lownds, at his shop adjoyning 
to Ludgate. 1641. Wdct. on t. p. {Re- 
printed in The old book collector's miscel- 
lany, ed. by Charles Hindley, 1873, vol. 3, 
no. 17.) 15428.19.17 



2166. The same. {Reprinted in OccB-siondX 
facsimile reprints of rare and curious tracts 
of the 1 6th and 17 th centuries, [edited by] 
E. W. Ashbee, [1868-72], vol. i, no. 6.) 

15428.24.6 

The title-cut is not the same as in the preceding. 
See also Harrison, W. H. *' Mother Shipton 
investigated," London, 1881, p. 27. 

2167. The strange and wonderful history 
of Mother Shipton, plainly setting forth her 
prodigious birth, life, death, and burial. 
With an exact collection of all her famous 
prophecys, . . . and large explanations, shew- 
ing how they have all along been fulfilled to 
this very year. [London], printed for W. H. 
and sold by J. Conyers in Fetterlane. 1686. 
\_Reprinted London, 1870.] 4°. pp. (2), 
21-j-. Wdcts. 24279.1 

"The quaint old wood engravings which illustrate 
this reprint are not mere facsimiles, but are printed 
from the original wood blocks (used in various early 
editions of this celebrated book upwards of 200 years 
ago) now in the possession of the publisher." 

2168. The strange and wonderful history 
and prophecies of Mother Shipton. London, 
Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 57(ii).io 

2169. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12''. pp.24. Wdcts. 58(iii).2i 

2170. The history of Mother Shipton. 
London, Evans and Co. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 55.7 

2171. The life and history of the famous 
Mother Shipton, and her daughter Peggy. 
Collected from an antient Caledonian chron- 
icle in the Scottish dialect. Part i . London, 
J. Davenport, C. Sheppard. 1797. sm. 12". 
pp. 24. 44.9 

The greater part of the text is different from that 
of the preceding editions. 

2172. Strange and wonderful prophecies 
for 1 80 1. To which is added. An account 
of the dreadful fire at Manchester, with the 
remarkable appearance of the word God 
during that shocking conflagration. London, 
J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 18.9 

•»* The Library also has an interesting and exten- 
sive collection of the prophecies of Richard Brothers 
and Joanna Southcote, and of pamphlets relating to 
them, which are necessarilly omitted from this cata- 
Ic^e because of their number. 



124 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



XVIII 
Crime and Criminals : Collections 

2173. The history and lives of all the most 
notorious pirates, and their crews. ... A new 
edition adorned with twenty beautiful cuts, 
being the representation of each pirate. To 
which is prefixed An abstract of the laws 
against piracy. London, T. Sabine. 1787. 
s"m. 12°. pp. xii., 120, Wdcts. 5i-3 

Halliwell, "Catalogue of chap-books," 1849, 
p. 159- 

2174. The history of notorious highway- 
men ; amongst others are the famous DuVall, 
Gilder Roy, Hinton, Captain Uratz for rob- 
bing Mr. Thynne, &c. London, J. Lever, 
London Wall. sm. 8°. pp. 100. Engr. 
front. 5-7 

The frontispiece depicts " DuVal robbing Sq^ Roper, 
master of the buck hounds to K. Charles y 2 on Wind- 
sor Forest." 

2175. Lives of most remarkable female 
robbers. The German princess, a robber 
and impostor ; Moll Cutpurse, a pickpocket 
and highwayman ; Mary Read, Anne Bonny, 
pirates ; Nan Hereford, a cheat and im- 
postor. By Captain C. Johnson. London, 
T, Maiden for Ann Lemoine, etc. 1801. 
12°. pp. 48. Engr. front. 20.17 

2176. Murders. True examples of the 
interposition of Providence in the discovery 
and punishment of murder. [By that famous 
magistrate Mr. Justice Fielding.] 1799. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 97.7 

2177. The same. Bath, S. Hazard ; Lon- 
don, J. Marshall, etc. 12°. pp. 12. Wdct. 
on t. p. 7-1 

XIX 
Crime and Criminals: Trials 

*»* For accounts of the trials of individual criminals see 
Section XXII. 

2178. A genuine account of the trials, be- 
haviour after sentence of death, and execution 
of Francis Townley, John Berwick, Andrew 
Blood, Thomas David Morgan, Thomas Dea- 
con, Thomas Siddal, James Dawson, George 
Fletcher, and Thomas Chadwick, who were 
drawn, hang'd and quarter'd on Kennington 
common, in the county of Surry, on Wednes- 
day, the 30th of July, 1746, for high trea- 
son in levying war against his majesty, King 



George the Second. With George Fletcher's 
letter to his wife. Broadside. Wdcts. 

ioo(iii).7 

Two of the cuts depict an execution. The broad- 
side consists of two sheets pasted together. On the 
back of the lower sheet is the ballad " Pretty Kate of 
Windsor." 

2179. List of the prisoners convicted and 
acquitted at the Old Bailey sessions, . . . 
April 28, 1802, etc. London, J. Davenport, 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 33-2 2 

2 1 80. Old Bailey trials ; List of the prison- 
ers, convicted and acquitted . . . Wednesday, 
December 2, 1801. . . . London, J. Davenport, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 9.26 

The cut gives a view of a court room. 

2 18 1. Trial of the mutineers, late of His 
Majesty's ship Temeraire, held on board His 
Majesty's ship Gladiator, Portsmouth har- 
bour. London, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 

27.2 

2182. Trials and sentences; list of the 
prisoners convicted and acquitted at the Old 
Bailey sessions, . . . October 28, 1801 . Lon- 
don, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 27.7 

2183. Trials and sentences. List of pris- 
oners convicted and acquitted at the Old 
Bailey sessions, January 13, 1802. . . . With 
the trial of Governor Wall for murder. Lon- 
don, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 2 cop. 27.9,15 

2184. Trials and sentences. List of the 
prisoners found guilty and acquitted, at the 
. . . Old Bailey . . . including the . . . trials of 
Thomas Burrell, aged 10, and John Westcott, 
aged II, for privately stealing . . . and . . . 
Mary Dean, 16, for stripping children, who 
confessed that she had stolen 296 in the last 
two years. London, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. 
pp.8. 19.9 

2185. The trials of all the felon prisoners, 
tried, cast, and condemned, at Justice hall, 
in the Old Bailey. London, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct, on t. p. 1. 1 3 

There is nothing to indicate the year in which these 
trials took place. All the offences upon which sen- 
tence of death was pronounced were against property, 
from stealing a silver watch to perjury. All the 
offenders charged with crimes against the person were 
acquitted. First case, Thomas Price, alias Pearce, for 
stealing a letter directed to Mrs. Martha Davis. 

2186. The trials of all the felon prisoners, 
tried, cast, and condemned, this session at 



XIX. CRIME AND CRIMINALS: TRIALS 



125 



the Old Bailey, including those of John 
Baylis . . . Also the remarkable trial of John 
Bond, who was found guilty of the murder of 
his wife. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 4.33 

2187. The trials of all the felon prisoners, 
tried, cast and condemned at Justice hall, 
in the Old Baily. With the remarkable 
trials of James Catling . . . Henry Peers . . . 
and Thomas Crump . . . London, M. Bowley. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. 14-9 

2188. A true and particular account of the 
trials of all the prisoners tried at Surrey as- 
sizes, on Monday the 30th of July. With the 
remarkalile trials of Nicholas Arbrathat and 
John Spears. . . . London, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 

1.26 

Assisting in carrying away "unaccustomed to- 
bacco," i. e. tobacco that had not paid duty, was one 
of the crimes for which a prisoner suffered. 



XX 

Crime and Criminals: Executions 

*^* For accounts of the executions of individual criminals 
see Section XXII. 

2189. An account of the executions in 
Scotland for the past 200 years. Paisley. 
1866. 16°. pp.8. 75.11 

With the life of Calcraft prefixed, and a paragraph 
appended on " The EngHsh criminal code." 

2190. Account of the lives and transac- 
tions of Rich. Shepherd, alias Hurst, James 
Seamons, Richard Morley, alias Smith, and 
Patrick Summers ; all daring highwaymen ; 
who were executed yesterday morning. 
Mar. 25 [1801 ?], at Shooter's hill. London, 
J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wd^t. on 
t. p. 1.25 

2 191. An account of the lives and trans- 
actions of Sylvester Smith [and seven others] 
who were executed . . . opposite the debtor's 
door, Newgate. . . . London, J. Davenport, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. 4.22 

2192. Dying behaviour, &c, of the five 
unfortunate malefactors who were executed 
... at the new goal, Horsemonger-lane, . . . 
April 6, 1 80 1. To which is added. The trials 
and sentences of the prisoners at the Surry 
assizes, held at Kingston, . . . March 25, 
1801. London, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp.8. 

1. 18 



2193. Executions in Scotland from the 
year 1600 up to the present time. Also, a 
sketch of the life of the Newgate executioner, 
Wm. Calcraft. Glasgow. 1853. 24°. pp.8. 

84.3 
Also gives the oath taken by Calcraft and the man- 
ner of installing him in his office. 

2194. The last dying speech, and confes- 
sion, birth, parentage and education, of the 
unfortunate malefactors, executed this day 
[2 April, 1787] upon Kennington common, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. I.19 

2195. The last dying speech and confes- 
sion, life, character, and behaviour, of the 
four unfortunate malefactors, executed this 
day [April 13, 1798] upon Kennington- 
common. To which is added . . . the con- 
fession of John Chambers ; an account of 
the last farewel Mrs. Clark took of her son. 
. . . This book . . . discloses facts relating to 
the murder of Mr. Fryer, never before pub- 
lished. [1798.] sm. 12°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 4.28 

2196. The last dying speech and confes- 
sion of the unfortunate malefactors who were 
executed on Wednesday last on a scaffold 
erected in front of Newgate. With the true 
copy of a moving letter which Mr. Shaw wrote 
to his wife. . . . Broadside. Wdcts. 103 (ii). 5 

2197. The last dying words of the noted 
John Poulter, alias Baxter, who was appre- 
hended for robbing Dr. Hancock, of Salis- 
bury . . . and was executed . . . 25 th of Feb- 
ruary, 1754. Containing the many useful 
discoveries he has made ; with some precau- 
tions to secure horses from being stolen and 
houses from being broke open ; very con- 
venient for all families. To which is added, 
The life and adventures of Dennis Neal, alias 
Turpin the second . . . Sherborne printed, 
London re-printed. 1754. sm. 8°. pp.36. 
Wdct. front. 2.4 

Reveals some tricks of the horse-stealing trade. 
The cut shows "the manner of [Poulter's] confine- 
ment . . . after he was re-taken." 

2198. Particulars of the lives and transac- 
tions of James M' In tosh, and James Woold- 
ridge for forgery, James Riley, Joseph Roberts, 
Wm. Cross and Robert Nutts, for highway 
robbery, who were executed this morning, op- 
posite the debtor's door, Newgate. London, 
J. Davenport. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 20.18 



126 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2199. Transactions and dying behaviour 
of the 18 unfortunate malefactors, who were 
tried, condemned, and ordered for execu- 
tion at the assizes held at Maidstone . . . 
[March, 1801?] Also, an account of the 
horrid murder of Mary Palmer . . . Likewise, 
an account of B. Wilson . . . and T. Dun- 
combe, executed at Aylesbury. London, 
J. Davenport. [1801?] sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 1.24 

See also No. 2190 for a further account of some of 
the same persons. 

XXI 

Crime: Dreadful Warnings 

%* These tracts are often fictitious or merely suggested by 
some notable crime. 

2200. The bloody tragedy ; or, A dreadful 
warning to disobedient children ; giving a 
dreadful account of John Gill, in the town of 
Woborn, Bedfordshire, who lived a wicked 
life ; how he murdered his father and mother 
. . . ravished and killed the servant maid, and 
fired the house . . . after he had stolen the 
plate and money ; how the ghost of the dead 
bodies appeared to him. . . . Bowness. 16°. 
pp. 8. Ornamental wdct. on t. p., and tail 
piece. 97.8 

2201. The cruel husband ; or, Devonshire 
tragedy. Wherein is related the account of 
Mr. J. Barton, of Topsham, who . . . married 
his master's maid-servant . . . but . . . was 
instigated by the devil to murder her . . . 
Also a remarkable dream of the landlady 
where they lodged, discovering where the 
body of his wife was concealed . . . London, 
J.Davenport, sm. 8°. pp.8. 10.17 

2202. A dreadful example for wicked hus- 
bands ; or, The virtuous wife in distress. 
Being a true relation of Mr. John Fox, living 
in the town of Lynn, in Norfolk. Shewing 
how he married ... a lady . . . How he spent 
his and her substance in a riotous and de- ' 
bauched manner . . . How he . . . hanged 
himself . . . How the apparition was seen 
and heard . . . making most terrible noises 

. . . 1 791. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 2 cop. 

8.25, 29.4 

2203. Dreadful news from Taunton-Dean. 
God's judgments against jealous persons, 
being the whole account of the most horrid 
murder committed by Sir William Watts. . . . 
London, J. Marshall, sm. 8°. pp.8. 20.15 

Tells how the devil appeared to Sir William, in the 
shape of a nobleman, and induced him to murder his 
wife and two children. 



2204. The Glocestershire tragedy; being 
an account of Miss Mary Smith, in Thorn- 
bury, who poisoned her father. Sir John 
Smith, for love of a young man. . . . [Verse.] 
London, J. Evans, sm. 12°. pp.12. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 30.2, 50.4 

The cut on p. 12 shows a woman drawn in a 
hurdle underneath the gallows. 

2205. The same. London, Aldermary 
Church Yard, J. Marshall, sm. 12°. pp. 12. 
Wdcts. 38.19 

The two ballads with the title "Gloucestershire 
tragedy" in Section XI. (Nos. 862-864), both differ 
completely from this, which may well be the versifica- 
tion of an actual occurrence. It begins "This pat- 
tern here I shall unfold." In ko.xburghe, viii. 576, 
mention is made of a ballad (Madden Coll. ii. 345) 
beginning "This pattern here I will unfold," and it 
is called " another version " of " The Gloucestershire 
tragedy; or, The unnatural mother: " the present 
ballad is, however, not related to "The unnatural 
mother." 

2206. The golden farmer: a strange and 
wonderful account of Mr. James Macgrigor 
who departed this life the 14th day of July 
last, but rose up in his bed, twelve hours 
after his death . . . making confession of 
many heinous sins . . . Also the substance 
of a sermon ... by the Rev. Mr. Jones. 16°. 
pp. 8. 97.9 

2207. Golden farmer.] The strange and 
wonderful account of the wicked life and 
deplorable death of Mr. Alexander Parkinson, 
otherwise known by the name of the golden 
farmer. Who departed this life on June 15, 
1788, but arose up in his bed 12 hours after 
his death . . . making confession of many 
hainous sins . . . Also the substance of a 
sermon . . . preached ... by the Rev. Mr. 
Jones. Published for the benefit of mankind. 
Entered according to order. 16°. pp. 8. 

97.10 

2208. The same. Entered according to 
order, sm. 8°. pp.8. 8.1 1 

The title differs slightly from the preceding. 

2209. Golden farmer.] A strange and 
wonderful relation of Peter Himter, laird of 
Knap, in the parish of Ross, in the shire of 
Perth, about four miles from Dundee . , . 
shewing how he rose up, after he had been 
some time dead . . . confessing many great 
sins. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2 cop. 8.13 

This is the story of Macgrigor, and of Parkinson, 
told with some variations and sometimes in the exact 
words. See note on The golden farmer (with ballad) 
in " Bagford ballads " (Ballad society), 1878, i. 239. 



XXII. INDIVIDUAL CRIMINALS AND PERSONS ACCUSED OF CRIME 1 27 



London, J. Evans. 
101.22, 105.27 



2210. Murder found out, and cruelty re- 
warded ; being a true and faithful narrative, 
containing the history of Richard Sutton and 
Sally Miles, near Dartmouth, in Devonshire. 
. . . London, T. Sabine. sm. 8°. pp. 32. 
Engr. front. 12.4 

According to the book this narrative is "an un- 
doubted fact." There is appended another tale: 
"Memoirs of William and Matilda." 

22 1 1. The prodigal daughter; or. The 
disobedient lady reclaim'd. Broadside. 

I00(iii).8 
A long moral tale, including a trance and vision, 
the ending borrowed from The wanton wife of Bath 
(No. 2059) . In this copy the title is in one hne. 

2212. The same. Broadside. 3 cop. 

102.58, 91, I03(i).4i 
Title in two lines; smaller type than the preceding. 

2213. The same. [London], J. Pitts. 
Broadside. 2 cop. 102.59, lOS-S? 

2214. The same. 
Broadside. 2 cop. 

On the copy 105.27 is a MS. note: "Evidently 
founded on the Wanton Wife of Bath in the latter 
part." 

2215. The reprobate's reward ; or, A look- 
ing glass for disobedient children, giving [an] 
. . . account of a barbarous murder committed 
on the body of Mrs. Wood ... by her own 
son . . . and of the murder being found out 
by the apparition of the ghost . . . [Verse.] 
sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 14.27 

2216. The servant maid's tragedy; or, A 
dreadful warning to all wild and thoughtless 
young women. Being a true . . . account of 
Elizabeth Parker . . . who was courted by 
one William Gilton . . . when he took an 
opportunity to ruin her . . . but she proving 
with child ... he decoyed her into the fields 
and there cut her throat . . . [With A copy 
of verses. London], No. 42 Long Lane. 
sm.8°. pp.8. 33.2 

2217. The undutiful daughter; or. The 
Hampshire wonder. Being a . . . relation of 
one Mrs. Walter, who had a daughter that 
took to all manner of evil courses . . . con- 
tinually making game of her aged mother. 
How she . . . murdered [her] infant . . . sold 
herself to the devil . . . and was executed . . . 
[Verse.] London, Aldermary Church Yard, 
sm. 8°. Wdct. on t. p. 26.27 

2218. The unjust man rewarded ; being a 
dreadful warning to all perjured and forsworn 
people. [Verse.] In four parts. Shewing 



I. The endeavors of Mr. Green to debauch 
his servant maid. 11. On her refusal he falsely 
swears away her life. in. Her behaviour at 
prison . . . iv. The king's pardon to the ser- 
vant whom he entitled to Green's estate. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane, 
sm. 8". pp.8. Wdcts. 26.10 

Supernatural retribution; the master having called 
on the devil to tear his body in pieces if the maid were 
not guilty, he was taken at his word, and " in flames 
he disappeared And left a horrid stench behind. ' ' 

2219. The weeping mother. In four parts. 
. . . [Verse.] London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 1.8,17.9,36.7 

A story of a wanton, wicked daughter, and her 
conversion by a trance or dream. The story is similar 
to the Prodigal daughter (No. 221 1), but the text is 
not the same. 

2220. The wonderful surprize; or. The 
cruel daughter of the city of York. London, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 9.4 

Imperfect : — pp. 3-6 missing. 

Story of Mary Lavender, who for love of James 
Parker poisoned her father, two brothers and a sister, 
and by false accusation caused her mother to be burnt 
aUve; overcome by her guilt she then threw herself 
into the flames and perished, while her lover drowned 
himself in a well. 



XXII 

Individual Criminals and Persons 
Accused of Crime 

2221. Abershaw.] The life, trial, and 
execution of Jeremiah Abershaw, who was 
executed on Kennington-Common August 3, 
1795, etc. London, Robert Turner. [1795?] 
sm. 8°. pp.24. Wdct. front. 23.12 

Contains a letter complaining of the administration 
of the sacrament to Abershaw, and the detailed reply 
of the chaplain, Rev. W. Winkworth. 

2222. History of James Allen, the cele- 
brated Northumberland piper ... his ex- 
traordinary adventures and exploits, his 
numerous enlistings and wonderful escapes 
... his last confinement and death in Dur- 
ham gaol, which happened in 1810. New- 
castle, W. & T. Fordyce. .sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 68.3, 76.5 

2223. The same. Glasgow. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 74.17 

2224. The trial of the Reverend John 
Allen . . . held at Justice-hall in the Old- 
Bailey on Thursday the 12th — Tuesday the 
17th of Jan. 1769. Boston, Kneeland and 
Davis. 1773. 16°. pp. 2o[t8]. Tr 491.9 



128 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2225. History of Eugene Aram, who was 
convicted at York assizes of the murder of 
Dan'. Clark of Knaresborough, fourteen years 
after the crime was committed. . . . Singular 
and talented defence he made on his trial — 
his own account of himself . . . Newcastle, 
W. & T. Fordyce. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 79-30 

2226. Baker.] London's wonder, and the 
coimtry's amazement. Being a new garland 
of one Mrs. Mary Baker who was hang'd at 
Tyburn . . . the 23d of December, 17 13 for 
marrying three and twenty husbands . . . and 
an exact account of all her husbands names 
. . . and the losses they sustained by her, etc. 
[Verse.] Sold by John Stevens. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 20.2 

2227. Banks.] A full and particular nar- 
rative of the life, character, and conduct of 
John Banks, a native of Nieuport in Austrian 
Flanders, who is to be executed on the nth 
day of July, 1806, for the wilful murder" of 
his wife, Margaret Banks. To which is pre- 
fixed a correct copy of his trial & con- 
demnation, with an appendix containing his 
confession. . . . New- York. 1806. sm. 8°. 
pp.22. Wdct. Tr 491.16 

2228. Barrington.] The life & adven- 
tures of George Barrington, lately transported 
to Botany Bay. ... 16°. pp. 8. I12.1 

2229. Bateman.] Extraordinary life and 
character of Mary Bateman, the Yorkshire 
witch, traced from the earliest thefts of her 
infancy till her execution at the new drop, 
March, 1809. 2d ed. Leeds. [1809.] 8°. 
pp. 56. Port. 25276.25.5 

2230. Bateman.] The Yorkshire witch; 
or. The extraordinary life & character of 
Mary Bateman. Giving an account of her 
various frauds, impositions, crimes and mur- 
ders, her supposed dealings with the devil, 
and her execution at the castle of York, on 
the 20th March, 1809. Otley, Willain [jzV] 
Walker, sm. 12°. pp.24. 79-24 

2231. Beane.] The history of Sawney 
Beane and his family, robbers and murderers 
who took up their abode in a cave . . . where 
they lived twenty-five years . . . they robbed 
and murdered about one thousand persons 
whom they eat ; but at last were happily dis- 
covered by a pack of blood-hounds, etc. 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 26.3 

The scene of these murders is placed in "the 
county of Oalgay," near Edinburgh. See "The his- 
tory of John Gregg" (No. 2255), which gives the 



same story, but shifts the scene to Clovelly in England. 
See also " The life of Richard Turpin " (No. 2294). 
The same story appears in Johnson's " Most famous 
highwaymen," p. 132. 

2232. Bell.] A circumstatial \_sic'] ac- 
count of that unfortunate young lady Miss 
Bell, otherwise Sharpe, who died at Marybone 
on Saturday, October 4, containing a series 
of very extraordinary facts . . . especially her 
remarkable relation to Captain Thomas Hol- 
land, of the manner she came by her wounds, 
to whom (and to whom only) she related all 
the particulars of that horrid transaction. 
London, T. Trueman. 1761. 12°. pp.32. 

14.17 

2233. The trial of J. Bellingham for the 
assassination of the Rt. Hon. Spencer Per- 
ceval, in the lobby of the House of Commons, 
on Monday, May 11, 181 2, including his exe- 
cution, &c. &c. 16°. • pp. 16. 97-12 

2234. The trial of the marq. of Blandford, 
for adultery with Lady Mary Ann Sturt, at 
the court of King's Bench, Westminster . . . 
on Wednesday, the 27 th of May, 1801. Lon- 
don, A. Young. [1801.] sm. 8°. pp.16. 

20.28 

2235. History of Stoney Bowes, otherwise 
Andrew Robinson Bowes. Being a minute 
memoir of this infamous and notorious char- 
acter. His marriage to Miss Newton ... his- 
cruel usage . . . she dies of a broken heart. 
He afterwards marries the countess of Strath- 
more. . . . Bowes' horrid character fully 
developed in his savage treatment of the 
countess ... his trial and imprisonment. 
Bowes a member of Parliament for New- 
castle and . . . high sheriff for Northumber- 
land. . . . Jan. 16, 1 8 10 death closes his 
career of infamy and disgrace. Newcastle 
and Hull, W. & T. Fordyce. sm. 1 2°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 68.11 

2236. Andrew Robinson Stoney Bowes, 
esquire, M. P. &c. [Illustrated by Joseph 
Crawhall. London : Field & Tuer, etc. 
1883.] 4°. pp.48. Wdcts. 94.13 

2237. Broderick.] The fatal effects of 
inconstancy verified in the life and uncom- 
mon proceedings of Miss Broderick, who was 
tried, on July 17, 1795, at the Chelmsford 
assizes, for the murder of Mr. Errington, her 
lover . . . and proved insane to the satisfac- 
tion of a crowded audience, as appeared by 
the clapping of hands on hearing the verdict 
given. London, Robert Turner, in Jan. 
1796. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. port, of Miss 
Broderick. 23.11 



XXII. INDIVIDUAL CRIMINALS AND PERSONS ACCUSED OF CRIME 1 29 



2238. Burke.] A correct account of the 
life, confession, and execution of Will'" Burke, 
who was executed at Edinburgh, Wednesday, 
28 Jan. 1829. Paisley, G. Caldwell. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 62. 1 9, 65. 1 2 

William Burke, like Capt. Boycott, gave a new 
word to the language. Burke and his accomplice. 
Hare, suffocated their victims and sold the bodies to the 
surgeons. See "The history of Burke and Hare and 
of the resurrectionist times," by George MacGregor, 
Glasgow, 1884. The cut on the title-page of this 
chap-book purports to give portraits of the two 
criminals. 

2239. An account of the trial and con- 
viction of William Burke for the murder of 
Mary Campbell, or Docherty. . . . Gateshead, 
Stephenson. Broadside. I03(ii).i6 

2240. Cadwallader. ] The Leominster 
tragedy (written by W. Cartwright) on the 
murder of Mary Cadwallader, by her hus- 
band, a blacksmith of that town. [London], 
J. Pitts. [18 1 6.] Broadside. 102.42 

2241. Charteris.] Some authentick mem- 
oirs of the life of Colonel Ch s, rape- 
master - general of Great Britain. By an 
impartial hand. London and Westminster. 
1730. sm. 12°. pp.62. 31. 1 

An account of Francis Charteris. See " Lives of 
twelve bad men," by Thomas Seccombe, London, 
1894, pp. 200-218. 

2242. Coleman.] A genuine narrative of 
the life and adventures of the celebrated 
Richard Coleman, an incorrigible offender, 
who received his third sentence of trans- 
portation Dec. nth, 1798. . . . London, 
T. Sorrell for E. Basnitt. 1802. sm. 12°. 
pp. 40. Port. 24.4 

2243. Cook.] Brownrig revived. Inhu- 
man monster ; or. An account of John Cook, 
alias Smith, who was committed on Thurs- 
day, Aug. 21, 1800, to the new gaol ... for 
the murder of his daughter ... for refusing to 
eat the carcases of dead dogs, with which he 
fed his children on [j/V.]. To which is added. 
Another instance of cruelty towards a creole 
girl. . . . [London], J. Davenport, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. 19.5" 

2244. Cox.] The genuine life of William 
Cox, the notorious robber, who was executed 
. . . Oct. 27, 1773 . . . London, J. Long. 
12°. pp. 32. Port. 19-13 

2 245 . Currie.] True and genuine account 
of Murdoch Currie, taken from his own 
mouth at the place of execution in short- 



hand ... at Dumbarton, 14th day of June, 
1754. 16". pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 62.48 

2246. Davies.] An authentic narrative of 
the most remarkable adventures and curious 
intrigues exhibited in the life of Miss Fanny 
Davies the celebrated modern Amazon who 
received sentence of death on the 6th of 
March, 1786 . . . for steaUng above 1250 1. 
London, W. Bailey. [1787?] 12°. pp.32. 
Engr. front. 1 1. 12 

Ashton (p. 449) gives the title-page reading "The 
whole life and adventures of Miss Davis, commonly 
called the beauty in disguise," etc. " Printed in the 
year 1785." He gives the history of her case from 
the "Annual register," and reproduces her full length 
portrait from the chap-book. 

2247. Davison.] The extraordinary and 
interesting trial and sentence of Capt. John 
Davison, only 28 years of age, of the royal 
marines, for feloniously stealing a piece of 
muslin from the shop of Mr. James Bunter, 
silk mercer of Taunton ^(Somerset), on the 
25 th day of July, 1809, with the evidence at 
full length, and the judge's speech to the 
prisoner. London, J. Pitts, sm. 8°. pp.8. 

78.20 

2248. Donkin.] The surprising life and 
dying-speech of Tobias Donkin, the quaker, 
and famous Yorkshire highwayman, who was 
executed at Tyburn, near York, October 6, 
1754. London, R. Marshall, in Aldermary 
Church Yard. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 
2 cop. 25.24, 26.7 

2249. Dul-Bruce.] The French bite ; or, 
A . . . narrative of the exploit and transac- 
tions of the Marquis Dul-Bruce during his 
six-weeks residence in England ... by what 
means he rais'd himself from the most de- 
spicable condition to flash in his chariot, shine 
in equipage and be attended with a gay and 
numerous retinue. Also ... his attempts to 

claim kindred with his M y . . . Likewise 

his several intrigues and amours . . . and lastly 
his sudden fall . . . The whole taken from 
the mouth of one of his French domesticks 
whom he left in the lurch. . . . London, 
W. Webb, etc. 1749. 12°. pp. 31 [29]. 

17.23 

2250. Fairbanks.] The solemn declara- 
tion of the late unfortunate Jason Fairbanks ; 
from the original manuscript, composed and 
signed by himself a very short time before 
his death. To which is added some account 
of his life and character. The whole col- 
lected and published by Ebenezer Fairbanks, 



I^O 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



jun. . . . Dedham, from the Minerva press of 
H.Mann, etc. 1801. 8°. pp.54. 10333.59.9 

Imperfect : — last page wanting. 

Newspaper cuttings relating to the Fairbanks house 
in Dedham have been inserted. 

2251. A deed of horror! Trial of Jason 
Fairbanks at the Supreme judicial court 
holden at Dedham, . . . Massachusetts, . . . 
August 4, 1 80 1, for the murder of Elizabeth 
Fales, his sweetheart. ... Salem. 16°. pp.8. 

I0333-59-9 

2252. Ferguson.] The life and remarkable 
transactions of Richard Ferguson, alias Gal- 
loping Dick, a noted highwayman who was 
lately executed at Aylesbury. . . . London, 
Davenport, sm. 8°. pp.8. i7-i5 

Ferguson was executed in 1800. Newgate cal- 
endar, iv. 157. 

2253. Gilderoy.] The wonderful life of 
Gilder Roy, a noted murderer, ravisher, in- 
cendiary, and highwayman. A native of the 
Highlands of Perthshire, who was executed, 
at Edinburgh, about the year 1656, and hung 
in chains on a gibbet forty feet high, on Leith 
Walk. Edinburgh: 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on 
t. p. 97.5 

For the ballad see No. 857. 

2254. Gillan.] A particular account of 
the trial, sentence and death of Alexander 
Gillan, who was executed . . . near Inverness, 
on Wednesday, the 14th November, 18 10 
for the horrid, bloody and barbarous crimes 
of murdering Elizabeth Lamb after commit- 
ing \jic\ a rape on her body. Printed for 
Edward Anderson. 16°. pp.8. 97- n 

2255. Gregg.] The history of John Gregg, 
and his family of robbers and murderers, etc. 
Glasgow, sm. 8°. pp.8. 2 cop. 8.19,29.6 

This is a similar story to that of " Sawney Beane " 
(No. 2231), and some paragraphs are identical in both 
books, though the characters and the localities differ. 

2256. Gregson.] The remarkable life and 
most extraordinary adventures of Benjamin 
Gregson ; commonly called the man of 
fashion, who was under sentence of death 
in Newgate for forgery and who made his 
escape from thence on Tuesday, the 15 th 
of May, 1787 ... in what manner he sawed 
thro' an iron door. Also, a full . . . account 
of his being re-taken near Newington, &c. 
sm.8°. pp.8. Wdct. 1.7 

2257. Hadfield.] The complete trial of 
James Hadfield . . . charged with high trea- 
son for . . . firing at the king, in Drury Lane 
theatre, on the 15 th of May last [1800]. . . . 



To which is added some account of James 
Hadfield. London, J. Evans and co. sm, 8^. 
pp. 8. Port, on t. p. 26.30 

Hadfield was adjudged insane. 

2258. Haggart.] The singular life, ad- 
ventures, and depredations of David Hag- 
gart, the murderer . . . related by himself. . . . 
With an account of his execution, at Edin- 
burgh, July 18, 182 1 . . . and a copy of 
verses, written by Haggart . . . Newcastle, 
W. & T. Fordyce. 16°. pp. 24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 68.10 

The cut on the title shows the mode of execution 
from the cart. 

The story of David Haggart is humorously intro- 
duced by William Black in his novel, " Wild Eelin." 

2259. The life and adventures of David 
Haggart, written by himself while under sen- 
tence of death ; with an account of his exe- 
cution. Glasgow. C^o.] 44. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 110.22 

2260. Hallam.] Life, trial, &c. of Robert 
Hallam ... for the wilful murder of his wife 
... by throwing her out of a one pair of stairs 
window. . . . London, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. 2 cop. 20.3, 25.20 

2261. Hind.] The delightful history of 
the life and death of that most famous robber 
Captain James Hind. York, Thomas Gent. 
sm.4°. pp. 24 [20]. Wdcts. 99-13 

The first sheet is paged [i]-[4], the second sheet 
begins, in another type, with p. 9, and this paging 
continues to the end. The running-title from p. 9 
on is "The English Gusman." 

2262. Hind.] The history of the merry 
life and exploits of Capt. James Hind, the 
great robber of England, together with the 
close of his life at Worcester, where he was 
hanged, drawn, and quartered for high trea- 
son against the commonwealth. Belfast. 
1765. 24°. pp. 24. 57(iii).i6 

2263. Hind.] The life and exploits of 
Captain James Hind, the great robber of 
England, who died for high treason, on Fri- 
day, Sept. 24th, 1652. Edinburgh, sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 115-15 

2264. Hind.] The merry life and mad 
exploits of Captain James Hynd, the great 
robber of England ; with the close of all 
at Worcester, where he was drawn, hanged 
and quartered for high treason against the 
commonwealth, Sept. 24, 1652. Edinburgh, 
J. Morren. 12°. pp. 24°. • Wdct. on t. p. 

97-1 

Ashton, p. 433, gives the title-page of a Newcastle 
edition with a similar title. 



XXII. INDIVIDUAL CRIMINALS AND PERSONS ACCUSED OF CRIME 131 



2265. Hind.] No jest like a true jest; 
being a compendious record of the merry 
life and mad exploits of Capt. James Hind, 
the great robber of England ; together with 
the close of all at Worcester, where he was 
drawn, hanged, and quarter'd for high trea- 
son against the commonwealth, Sept. 24, 
1652. London, Bow Church Yard. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 57(i)-i5 

2266. The same. London, Bow Church 
Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

,58(ii).9 
The cut is not the same as in the preceding. 

2267. Jauvaux.] The trial, conviction 
and sentence of J. Jauvaux [May 22, 1801] 
for half-starving and ill-treating Susanna 
Archer and other apprentices. . . . London, 
J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2 cop. 

, 9.2, 10.7 
The defendant, a muslin- worker, employed seven- 
teen apprentices from the parish of Greenwich and 
elsewhere, bound out to him by the parish officers. 
The justice remarked " that much mischief accrued to 
the poor apprenticed from parishes, originating from 
the inattention of the officers, that . . . they were liable 
to punishment for such shameful inattention, and that 
the court had it in contemplation to order that more 
frequent visits should be made." 

2268. Johnstone.] The address of Abra- 
ham Johnstone, a black man, who was hanged 
at Woodbury, in the county of Glocester and 
state of New Jersey, on Saturday, the 8th 
day of July last, to the people of colour. To 
which is added his dying confession or dec- 
laration, also a copy of a letter to his wife, 
written the day previous to his execution. 
Philadelphia. 1797. 12°. pp. 47. 

Tr 491.14 

2269. Johnstone.] Cruel murder com- 
mitted by Robert Johnstone on the body of 
Miss Jane Henderson, near Rosevale village 
on the banks of the Humber, a few miles 
from Hull, on Saturday, 27th June, 1863. 
Printed for the book-sellers. 1863. 16°. 
pp. 8. 97.15 

2270. Jones.] An account of two bar- 
barous murders ! ! A full . . . account of the 
murder of Mr. Winter ... by Mary Jones 
. . . she first knocked him down with a quart 
pot, and afterwards stabbed him with a knife, 
at the Royal Oak in Whitechapel . . . Also 
. . . the . , . murder of J. Watts ... by a 
vilain who fled, after throwing a dagger at 
the watchman, sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 1.22 

2271. Jordan.] An interesting trial of 
Edward Jordan and Margaret his wife, who 
were tried at Halifax, N. S., Nov. 15 th, 1809, 



for the horrid crime of piracy and murder 
committed on board the schooner Three 
Sisters, Captain John Stairs, on their passage 
from Perce to Halifax. With a particular 
account of the execution of said Jordan. 
Boston, 75 State street. 12°. pp. 36. 

Tr 491.19 

" Price 20 cents single, 150 per dozen," 

2272. Joyce.] Confession of John Joyce, 
alias Davis [and of Peter Matthias, alias 
Mathews], who was executed on Monday, 
the 14th of March, 1808, for the murder of 
Mrs. Sarah Cross ; with an address to the 
public and people of colour. Together with 
the substance of the trial, and the address of 
Chief Justice Tilghman on his condemnation. 
Philadelphia, 12 Walnut-street. 1808. 12°. 
pp. 36. Tr 491.18 

The "Confession of Peter Matthias, etc.^^ has a 
separate title-page, but is paged continuously, pp. 19- 
36. 

2273. Lamb.] A genuine narrative of the 
sacrilegious \sic\ impiety of John Lamb, the 
sexton, and William Bilby, the grave-digger, 
of St. Andrew's, Holborn. . . . Including 
the nature of the high office of sexton in the 
ancient church, and the veneration of the 
Romans for the reliques of their departed 
friends. London, W. Price, sm. 8°. pp. 20. 
Wdct. front. 19. 10 

Grave robbing to obtain the lead of the coffins. 
The frontispiece is in two parts, the upper shows the 
criminals robbing the dead in the vaults. In the lower, 
the two are seated at a table. Lamb is represented as 
saying "The weight of this lead, Bilby, lies heavy on 
my shoulders," to which Bilby replies " Ne'er mind it, 
old cock, a light heart and thin pair of breeches will 
carry us thro' the world." 

2274. Lambe.] A brief e description of 
the notorious life of John Lambe, otherwise 
called Doctor Lambe, together with his ig- 
nominious death. Amsterdam. 1628. \_Re- 
printed.'] 8°. pp. (2), 21. Wdct. on t. p. 

24246.9 

2275. M y.] The affectionate hus- 
band and unfortunate lady ; or. An example 
worthy of notice. In a cause between Richard 

Maddocks, gent, plaintiff, and Dr. M y, 

defendant, physician and man-midwife . . . 
try'd March the 2d, 1754. . . . With the 
learned charge gave by the plaintiff's council 
to the jury, and advice to all married men. 
London, T. Bailey. 12°. pp. 17. 2.2 

2276. M'Kinnon.] Genuine account of 
the life & execution of Mary M'Kinnon, con- 
taining her life and transactions as related by 
herself while in prison. ... 16°. pp. 8. 97.13 



132 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2277. Massey.] Life, trial, and execution 
of Henry Griffin, otherwise George Hobart, 
otherwise Lord Massey . . . for . . . forgery. 
London, Robert Turner. 1793- sm. 8°. 
pp. 32. Wdct. front. 16. 10 

An entertaining account of Hobart, said to have 
been a Virginia gentleman by birth, who lived by his 
wits. The frontispiece (in two sections) purports to 
represent Hobart, but is the same that appears in the 
Life of Jeremiah Abershaw (No. 2221). 

2278. Miller.] A warning to the fair sex ; 
or, The matrimonial deceiver, being the his- 
tory of the noted George Miller, who was 
married to upwards of thirty different women 
on purpose to plunder them. . . . London, 
T.Sabine, sm. 8°. pp.32. Engr. front. 
2 cop. 10.12, 20.20 

The frontispiece shows the hero in the pillory, 
pelted by a crowd of women. 

2279. WiUiam Montgomery's last farewel, 
who was executed at Belfast on the 15 th of 
April, 1738. To which is added. The poor 
man's counsel ; or. The married man's guide. 
Belfast, James Magee. 1769. 16°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).2 

A dying speech and assertion of innocence, in 
verse. 

2280. Muschet.] A true and genuine 
copy of the last speech, confession, and 
dying words of Nicol Muschet, of Boghall, 
esq., who was execute at Edinburgh, 1721, 
for the horrid and bloody murder of his own 
wife . . . being one of the greatest and most 
penitent speeches ever was published. 12°. 
pp. 52. Wdcts. 97-14 

2281. Nicholson.] A true and particular 
account of Margaret Nicholson's attempt to 
stab his most gracious majesty George IIL 
... at St. James's on Aug. 2, 1786. London, 
T.Sabine, sm. 8°. pp.32. Engr. front. 

4.36 
Margaret Nicholson was of unsound mind. See 
her "Prophecies" (No. 2156). 

2282. O'Hanlon.] The surprising life and 
adventures of the gentleman-robber, Red- 
mond O'Hanlon, generally called captain 
general of the Irish robbers, protector of the 
rights and properties of his benefactors, and 
redresser of the wrongs of the poor and dis- 
tressed. Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. 
on t. p. 79-31 

Flourished toward the end of the 1 7th century. 

2283. Olive.] Case of George Olive, 
condemned for setting fire to the house of 
Joseph Parsloe of St. James's-Street. Lon- 
don, H. Reynell. sm. 8°. pp.17. 23.15 



The accused was a boy, fifteen years of age; the 
pamphlet states evidence of his innocence which was 
not presented at the trial but had since procured for 
him a reprieve. 

2284. Parker.] A true and particular 
account of the execution of Richard Parker, 
on board the Sandwich, at the Nore. . . . 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 4.5 

2285. Patch.] Important trial ! The 
trial, condemnation, & execution of Richard 
Patch for the murder of Mr. Isaac Blight, at 
a court held at the Surrey quarter sessions in 
England. . . . Boston, re-printed by E. Lin- 
coln for Etheridge & Bliss, ^f/r. 1807. 12°. 
pp.35. Tr 491.17 

2286. Powell.] Memoirs of the life of 
Lacy Powell, who was executed at Derby, 
on Friday, August 14, 1801 . . . also a copy 
of a letter to his wife and another to his 
parents. ... 2d ed. [With a short account of 
the four prisoners who suffered with Powell.] 
Derby, G. Wilkins. 12°. pp. 32. 112. 19 

Executed for robbery and murder. 

2287. Robertson.] Particulars of the 
noted transactions of the notoriously cele- 
brated Miss Robertson and Miss Sharp, who 
pretended to be an heiress to large estates in 
Scotland and lived in the highest style, and 
under various pretences had the address to 
obtain cash and property from several trades- 
men to the amount of upwards of 20,000/. 
. . . London, J. Davenport, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 

9.6 
A new song on the subject is added; there is nothing 
to show the year in which the affair occurred. 

2288. Sheppard.] The life and surprising 
exploits of that notorious house-breaker and 
foot-pad. Jack Sheppard ; containing his won- 
derful escapes from roundhouses and prisons. 
... To this is subjoined the witty dialogue 
in the shades between him and Julius Caesar. 
London, S. Fisher. 1797. 12°. pp.53. 3.1 

2289. Thompson.] An account of the 
life, trial, & execution of Alexander Thomp- 
son ... in the city of York ... 15 Dec. 1843 
for the cruel murders of his wife and four 
children, and afterwards hung his aged mother 
on a tree in the garden. With The Dumfries 
tragedy. [Verse.] York, Peter Brown. 16°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 74.8 

2290. Thompson.] The life, trial, & exe- 
cution of Mary Thompson, aged nineteen, who 
was executed at York on the 22nd March 
for the murder of her master and mistress, 
with an account of her innocence being 
proved, and the real murderer discovered. 



XXIII. MISCELLANEOUS 



133 



Paisley, G. Caldwell. 1841. 16°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 62.52 

Her sweetheart confessed to being the murderer 
just after she was hanged. 

Added to this are " Copy of verses written in jail," 
and " Melancholy loss of life by fire." 

2291. Three fingered Jack.] The ex- 
traordinary and surprizing adventures of that 
famous robber, Three-fingered Jack, the ter- 
ror of Jamaica for nearly two years. Includ- 
ing a particular account of the Obi, a kind 
of witch-craft . , . London, J. Davenport, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2 cop. 2.1 1, 26.4 

The Story of Obi, a drama, was played at the 
Theatre royal, Haymarket. Some of the songs are 
added to this narrative. 

2292. The famous negro robber, and ter- 
ror of Jamaica ; or. The history and adven- 
tures of Jack Mansong. Glasgow. [No.] 
121. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct, on t. p. 

The story of ' ' Three-fingered Jack. " 1 1 0. 2 1 

2293. Turpin.] The life of Richard Tur- 
pin, a notorious highwayman ; containing a 
particular account of his adventures. ... To 
which is added, The life of Sawney Beane, 
the man-eater. London, T. Maiden, for Ann 
Lemoine, etc. 1800. 12°. pp. 48. Engr. 
front. 5.3 

2294. The life of Richard Turpin, a most 
notorious highwayman ; a particular account 
of all his daring robberies and burglaries, 
his trial, execution, burial, &c. Glasgow, 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 74-i3 

2295. Turton.] 5000/. damages. Trial 
of Sir Thomas Turton, bart., for adultery 
with Mrs. Dunnage, at Guildhall, London, on 
Wednesday, the 14th of June, 1797. Lon- 
don, No. 8, White Hart Yard. sm. 8°. pp. 1 5 . 

2.13 

2296. Wall.] Murder! murder! murder! 
The trial of Governor Wall for a murder 
committed nearly twenty years ago, at Goree, 
in Africa. Tried and convicted . . . January 
20, 1802. . . .London, J. Evans. [1802.] 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 10.3 

The Governor was executed for having had a man 
flogged to death twenty years before for alleged mutiny. 
Another account is given in Trials and sentences, Lon- 
don, Davenport, pp. 7-8 (No. 2183). 

See "Newgate calendar," iv. 119. 

2297. Watt.] The remarkable life and 
transactions of Robert Watt, a member of 
the British convention, who was executed on 
Wednesday last at Edinburgh for high treason, 
to which is added the behaviour of David 



Downie, on receiving a respite of one month. 
London, J. Evans, sm. 8°, pp.8. 9.13 

Watt and Downie ware tried Aug.-Sept. 1794, for 
conspiring to overturn the government. Howell's 
State tri^, xxiii. 1167, etc. 

2298. White.] A narrative of the life 
and conversion of Alexander White, set. 23, 
who was executed at Cambridge, Nov. 18, 
1784, for the murder of a Captain White at 
sea ; containing extracts from his manu- 
scripts and some letters written by him a 
short time before his execution. Boston, 
Powars and Willis. [1784.] sm. 8°. pp.23. 

Tr 491. 1 1 

2299. Wood.] The lives and extraordi- 
nary adventures of Burton Wood and Will, 
Harling, who were executed upon Ken- 
nington-Common, on Monday, August 21, 
[1797]. . . . sm. 8°. pp. 8. 2 cop. 

No title-page. 4-I4> I7«3 

XXIII 

Miscellaneous, including Social Satire. 
Chap-books on Matrimony, Manners 
and Customs, Proverbs, etc. 

2300. The a la mode catechism, . . . con- 
taining thirty notable questions and answers 
. . . shewing how our ladies relieve foreigners 
before their own country folks. Belfast. 
MDCCLXi. [1761.] 16°. pp. 8. Wdct.on 
t. p. 57(iii).2 2 

A plea for using home goods, home manners, 
home customs and home morals, rather than foreign 
ones. See " The English lady's catechism " below. 

2301. The academy of compliments ; being 
the rarest and most exact way of wooing a 
maid or widow by the way of dialogue and 
complimental expressions. With passionate 
love letters . . . poesies for rings . . . Together 
with a choice collection of songs. London, 
Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdcts. 67.9 

2302. The same. London, C. Sympson. 
sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 21.16 

"A catalogue of histories," p. 24. 
The collection of songs is different from that in the 
preceding. 

2303. An accurate description of the mar- 
riage ceremonies used by every nation in the 
world ; showing the oddity of some, the ab- 
surdity of others, the drollery of many, and 
the real or intended piety of all. Stirling, 
C. Randall. [1796.] sm. 12°. pp. 24. 
Wdct. on t. p. 33.13 



134 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2304. Amilec ; or, The seeds of mankind : 
translated from the French, mdccliii. Lon- 
don, printed for W. Needham and sold by 
M.Cooper, mdccliii. [1753.] 12°. pp. iii. 

6.7 
Satirical speculation about the origin of life, etc., in 
the similitude of a dream. 

2305. The art of courtship; or, Witts 
academy. London, L. How. sm. 12°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 58(iv).9 

On page 2 is a longer title : " The art of courtship; 
or, The school of delight, containing amorous dia- 
logues . . . rules for carving of flesh, fish, fowl, and 
cutting up pastry . . . with . . . the signification of 
moles in any part of the body . . . likewise the inter- 
pretation of dreams." 

2306. The book of beasts for young per- 
sons. Banbury, J. G. Rusher. 48°. pp.16. 
Wdcts. 1 14.9 

2307. A brief description of . . . figures 
of the human anatomy in wax . . . the works 
of . . . Mons. Denoue. . . . Now to be seen 
at Mr. Racstrow's opposite Serjeant's-Inn, in 
Fleet-Street, sm. 8°. pp.12. ii.io 

2308. Callipaedia; or, The art of getting 
pretty children, in four books. Translated 
from the original Latin of Claudius Quillettus, 
by several hands. London, Samuel Toplis. 
1776. 12°. pp, 72. 5.2 

2309. The charms of a rich old woman ; 
or, The mystery of courtship discover'd, in 
a dialogue between an old gentlewoman of 
three score and ten and a youth of nineteen 
just come from the university. Belfast. 
1768. 16°. pp.8. Wdct. on t. p. 57(iii).5 

2310. The Lincolnshire wonder; or, A 
comical dialogue which lately happened in 
this neighbourhood between an old woman of 
three score and ten and a youth about twenty, 
whom she lately married. London, J. Evans, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdcts. 3 cop. 

16.11, 17,6, 20.24 

In some copies the story is carried to a legitimate 
conclusion, beyond the limits of the present narrative. 
"Scottish chap-book literature," by William Harvey, 
Paisley, A. Gardner, 1903, p. 69, note. 

The same as the preceding, with some variations in 
the text. 

231 1. The same. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 25.18 

2312. The coachman's and footman's cate- 
chism. . . . Compiled for the edification of 
the young fraternity. Also an account of 
Betty the cook maid, Mary the kitchen maid, 
butler, and steward, porter, gardner, pos- 



tillion and groom, house keeper, house maid, 
chamber maid, laundry maid, nursery maid, 
and that sweet pretty creature call'd the lady's 
woman, that will really tell a hundred and 
fifty lies while she is dressing her lady ; pray 
what is that for, but to turn the servants out 
of their places, and beg a silk gown now and 
then with ruffle cuffs to it and their three 
story church steeple maccaroni cap. London, 
D.Brown, sm. 8°. pp.8. 26.15 

2313. The cockney's miscellany. Con- 
taining I. The picture of a drinking club : 
in which is introduced several songs and all 
the cries of London verbatim as they were 
cry'd by the numerous ambulators, &c. of 
that great metropolis. 11. The Englishman's 
political catechism : a dialogue between Tom 
and Jack. By John Pendred. York, F. Jack- 
son, sm. 12°. pp.24. 58(iv).8 

2314. A collection of Scotch proverbs 
containing all the wise sayings and observa- 
tions of the old people of Scotland. By 
Allan Ramsay. Paisley, G. Caldwell, sm. r 2°. 
pp. 24. Wdct. (ornament) on t. p. 2 cop. 

75.12, 79.29 

2315. The complete letter writer; or, 
Cupid's messenger, being a trusty friend 
stored with sundry sorts of serious, witty, 
pleasant, amorous, and delightful letters on 
love and business. Newly written, by Rich- 
ard Overlove. 4 pts. London, T. Bailey, 
etc. sm. 8°. pp. 32 + 32 + 324-32. I9'i6 

Part 4 contains a collection of " Posies for rings." 

2316. The crossing of proverbs, or a 
book divided into two parts, i. Containing 
witty and ingenious proverbs, with the man- 
ner of crossing them. 11. Ingenious and 
profitable short questions and answers proper 
for all people, but more especially for youth. 
London, S. Cooms. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 26.17 

For example: "P. There is a time appointed for 
all things. C. Not so, for there is none to do evil." 
" P. The more haste the worse speed. C. Not in 
the haste, but in the want of heed." 

2317. Confusion; or. The world in dis- 
order ; a new and true song. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. 8.26 

A rhyming description of the vices of the times, 
exemplified in every career from the archbishop's 
down. 

2318. The cries of Banbury and London, 
and celebrated stories. Banbury, J. G. 
Rusher. 48°. pp. 16. Wdcts. 114.8 



XXIII. MISCELLANEOUS 



135 



2319. The cries of London. Tune, The 
merry Christ-Church bells. London, Bow 
Church Yard. Broadside. Wdcts. 

I00(i).44 

2320. The same. Broadside. 102. 127 

2321. The cupboard door broke open; 
or, Joyful news for apprentices. [In verse.] 
Glasgow. 1790. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 8.12 

Throws light on the terms on which apprentices 
lived in the houses of their masters. 

2322. The cup-board door open'd ; or. 
Joyful news for apprentices and servant 
maids, being a merry dialogue [in verse] 
that passed between a master and mistress 
concerning locking the cup -board door, 
London, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 19. 2 

The same as the preceding. 

2323. Curious dialogue between four sel- 
fish landlords, Sack-but, a tavern-keeper. 
Skin-flint, an inn -keeper, Swill-tub and 
Double-chalk, two pothouse keepers, all 
living on the fat of the land. Birmingham, 
J. Russell. Broadside. Wdcts. 104.28 

2324. The dame of honour; or. Hospi- 
tality. Salop. 1738. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(i).68 

A song of *'good Queen Bess's golden days." 
Begins, " Since now the world's turn'd upside down." 

2325. The same. Broadside. Wdct. 

103(1). 125 

2326. The delights of the bottle ; or. The 
compleat vintner ; with the humours of bub- 
ble upstarts, stingy wranglers, dinner spun- 
gers, jill tiplers, beef beggars, cook teasers, 
pan soppers, plate twirlers, table whitlers, 
drawer biters, spoon pinchers, and other tav- 
ern tormentors ; a merry poem. To which 
is added, A south-sea song upon the late 
bubbles. By the author of the Cavalcade 
[Edward Ward]. London, W. Downing. 
1720. sm.8°. pp.56. 23.9 

A MS. note on the title-page attributes the poem to 
" Mr. Ward, a vintner." 

2327. The description of a bawdy house 
by Richard Brown . . . who was ruined in a 
very noted one, setting forth all the tricks of 
the old bawd and young whores to delude 
unwary men. London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 4 cop. 

14.26, 19.5, 25.9, 26.24 

2328. Don Quevedo's son's arrival at Dub- 
lin from the kingdom of death, the land of 
purgatory, the Elizian shades, and the do- 



minions of hell. ' In which last place hap- 
pened a most terrible scufile between the 
griping lawyers, and murdering physicians, 
the thieving taylors and dingy blacksmiths. 
...16". pp.8. 57(ii)-ii 

2329. An elegy on the death of Andrew 
Scott Couper in Calton of Glasgow, with the 
manner of his resurrection, together with 
the vision he saw in his departed state. To 
which is added, Watty and Madge, an imita- 
tion of William and Margaret ; also The daft 
bargain, a tale. 1766. 16°. pp.8. 

57(iii).i2 

The first piece is aimed at "meal-mongers" and 
distillers who starve the poor. 

2330. The English lady's catechism, shew- 
ing the pride and vanity of the English 
quality in relieving foreigners before their own 
country folks. London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 4 cop. 

4.26, 14.8, 20.25, 25-3 
A condensed version of *' The a la mode catechism ' ' 
(No. 2300). 

2331. Epilogue to the Minor ; or, A metho- 
dist sermon written by Samuel Foote, esq. 
Deptford - Bridge, Kent printing office. 
Broadside. 104.39 

The closing lines of Foote 's play " The minor." 

2332. An excellent collection of the best 
Scotch proverbs, selected by Allan Ramsay. 
Glasgow, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

109.19 

2333. An explanation of the vices of the 
age, wherein are explained the knavery of 
landlords, the imposition of quack doctors, 
the roguery of pettifogging lawyers, the cheats 
of bum-bailiffs and the intrigues of lewd wo- 
men. Glasgow. 1792. sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 8.4 

2334. The same. London, 41 Long- 
Lane, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 4 cop. 

14-5% 25-35, 26.6, 32.7 

2335. Female policy detected; or. The 
arts of a designing woman laid open. . . . To 
which is added a poetical description of a 
maid, wife, and widow. By Edward Ward. 
London. 1795. 12°. pp. viii., 100. 6.1 

2336. The first and second part of the 
New proverbs on the pride of women ; or. The 
vanity of this world displayed. To which is 
added an excellent receipt to all young men, 
who want a wife, how to wale her by the 
mouth ; besides ... an account of the girls 
that wear the high heads and the high-crown'd 



136 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



caps, piled on their heads like a bee-scap or 
a quoil of hay. . . . 1792. sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 8.3 

2337. Free masonry the highway to hell; 
a sermon wherein is clearly proved both from 
reason and scripture that all who profess these 
mysteries are in a state of eternal damnation. 
London. 1768. 12°. pp. 24. 41. 9 

2338. The good housewife's coat of arms ; 
or, The spinning- wheel's glory. London, 
Bow Church Yard. Broadside. Wdct. 

ioo(ii).8 

A contest between the spinning-wheel and the tea- 
table, which had turned the spinning-wheel out. 

2339. A good husband for five shillings; 
or, A lottery for ladies. Wherein those who 
want bed fellows in an honest way, will have 
a fair chance to be well-fitted. Printed in 
this present year. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 8.18 

2340. Honesty in distress, but reliev'd by 
no party. Giving an account of how she 
went to court but was scorn'd and slighted ; 
next she went to Westminster-hall, which set 
the lawyers in an uproar, etc. [By Edward 
Ward. London.] sm. 12°. pp.12. 2 cop. 

In dramatic form. 45- 1> ^7'5 

2341. The same. [London], printed and 
sold in Grub-street, sm. 12°. pp.12. 38.24 

2342. The humourous bites of the world. 
Bite upon bite, bite as bite can ; He that 
bites cleanest, is thought the best man. 
London, Bow Church Yard. Broadside, 
Wdcts. I00(ii).i3 

2343. The humours of the age; or, A 
touch on all trades : to which are added. 
The young man's declaration, A posey of 
thyme, A bonny wee wifie. The pleasures of 
love, A new song. sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 28.24 

2344. The humours of rag-fair ; or, The 
countryman's description of their several 
trades and callings. London, Bow Church 
Yard. Broadside. Wdct. I00(iii).i8 

2345. The same. London, Stonecutter 
Street, Fleet Market. Broadside. Wdct. 

102.35 

2346. The same. Lincoln, W. Wood and 
son. Broadside. Wdct. I03(ii).85 

» 2347. TJie same. Worcester, S. Gamage, 
etc. Broadside. Wdcts. I00(ii).i4 

2348. I know what I know. [Illustrated 
by Joseph Crawhall.] London : Field & 



Tuer, etc. ; New York : Scribner & Welford. 
1883. 4°. pp. (28). Colored cuts. 90.3 
A satire on the times. Roxburghe, i. 115. 

2349. Johnsoniana; or, A collection of 
bon mots, &c., by Dr. Johnson and others, 
together with the choice sentences of Publius 
Syrus. Now first translated into English. 
London, J. Ridley, etc. 1776. 16°. pp.172. 

44.8 

2350. The lady's magazine and weekly 
speculist. No. i. . . . June 4, 1747. Pub- 
lish' d under the direction of Mrs. Penelope 
Pry. London, W. Owen. 1747. sm.8°. 
pp. 20. 37-22 

2351. The laird of Cool's ghost. Being 
several conferences and meetings betwixt the 
Reverend Mr. Ogilvie, late minister of the 
gospel at Innerwick, and the ghost of 
Mr. Maxwell, late laird of Cool, as it was 
found in Mr. Ogilvie's closet after his death, 
written with his own hand. Glasgow. 
[No. 48.] sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

74.12 

2352. The sa?ne. [With Alonzo the Brave 
and fair Imogine.] Kilmarnock, H. Craw- 
ford, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 
(Crawford's tracts, No. 3.) II5-3 

The title of this edition contains a few verbal addi- 
tions compared with the preceding. From notes in 
this edition it would seem that the account was origi- 
nally published in the Armiiiian magazine for 1785. 
The tract consists of statements concerning the condi- 
tion of souls after death, with a confession of various 
frauds, etc. 

2353. A letter from a Scotch nun to a 
bachelor, containing the reasons why so few 
are married, and wholesome advices to both 
sexes in all ranks how to get married, and 
that soon. London, C. Dilly, etc. 1791. 
12°. pp.32. 7.3 

2354. The love enquiry, in a dialogue 
between Dorinda, a virgin, and Clelia, a mar- 
ried lady . . . with A dialogue between coun- 
try Robin and bonny black Bess [and A merry 
tale]. To which is added An extempore 
sermon preach'd at the request of two schol- 
lars (by a lover of ale) out of a hollow tree. 
London, J. Lewis, at T. Bailey's, sm. 8°. 
pp. 16. 2.6 

The sermon is commonly attributed to the Rev. 
John Dod, of whom the story is told that he was one 
day met by a party of Cambridge students who set 
him in a hollow tree and required him to preach a 
sermon on malt, whereupon he discoursed upon 
drunkenness, using as a text the letters in malt, mak- 
ing one acrostic after another, as Much Ale, Little 
Thrift, etc. 



XXIII. MISCELLANEOUS 



137 



2355. Lucifer's lectures; or, The infernal 
tribune . . . wherein it is proved that all the 
inhabitants of Great Britain . . . are . . . going 
to hell as fast as they can. London. Printed 
for the president of the Stygian council and 
sold by J. Sudbury, sm. 8°. pp.31. 10. i 

2356. The maiden's prize ; or, Batchelor's 
puzzle ; being a miscellany of theological and 
philosophical queries proposed to all the in- 
genious married men and batchelors in the 
kingdom of England. By Mrs. Ann Ward, 
a beautiful young lady of five hundred pounds 
a year, who vows never to marry any man 
but him who resolves the following questions, 
she likewise promises the ingenious married 
man an hundred guineas for his trouble. 
London, Aldermary Church Yard. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 26.25 

Compare the ballad of Capt. Wedderburn's court- 
ship, No. 727. 

2357. Masonry dissected ... [a] descrip- 
tion of all its branches . . , with a . . . list of 
regular lodges. ... By Samuel Prichard. . . . 
A new edition. London, S. Chandler. 1774. 
sm. 8°. pp. 28. 19.14 

2358. Mirth in perfection; or, The char- 
acter of a loving wife described, showing how 
a man undergoes a thousand times more 
plagues and torments, by a loving and kind 
wife, than those that are married either to a 
jealous wife, a wanton wife, a drunken wife, 
or a scolding wife. By Mr. Telltruth, in a 
letter to a friend. Glasgow. 1791. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 8.30 

2359. The miscellaneous works of Tim 
Bobbin, esq. [John Collier], containing his 
View of the Lancashire dialect; with large 
additions and improvements. Also his poem 
of the Flying dragon and the man of Heaton, 
together with other his whimsical amusements, 
in prose and verse, some of which never be- 
fore published. The whole embellished with 
ten copper plates. Manchester, printed for 
J. Haslingden and sold in London by VV. Rich- 
ardson, 1793. 12°. pp. 203, ;^^. Plates. 

36.3, 4 
"A glossary of Lancashire words and phrases, con- 
taining about 800 words more than were in any of the 
five former impressions," pp. (7i)-(iio). This 
copy contains but 9 plates. 

The "Battle of the flying dragon and the man of 
Heaton " has a separate title-page and paging. 
The Library has also several other editions. 

2360. The new art and mystery of gos- 
siping. Being a genuine account of all the 



women's clubs ... of London, Bath, and 
Bristol, with the manner of their club orders. 
The weaver's wives club in Spital-Fields, The 
milliner's club by the Royal Exchange . . . 
To which is added The explanation of a foot- 
man, and a ballad call'd The gossip's delight ; 
or. Tea table chat. London, J, Evans, 
sm. 8°. pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 3 cop. 

4.30, 10.8, 26.21 

2361. The same. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdct. 
on t. p. 25.33 

A different cut, showing a number of women 
around a table. 

2362. The new guide to matrimony ; or, 
The whole art of courtship, containing a 
collection of ingenious letters on love and 
marriage and hints to young women. New- 
castle-on-Tyne, Bowman, sm. 12°. pp.24. 
Wdct. (ornament) on t. p. 111.3 

2363. Nimble and quick. Pick and chuse 
where you will, here is something to fit and 
please everybody, containing the humours of 
the age. . . . With useful remarks on the vir- 
tues and vices of the times, sm. 8°. pp. 8. 
Wdcts. 25.14 

2364. An oration on the virtues of the old 
women and the pride of the young ; with a 
direction for young men what sort of women 
to take and for women what sort of men to 
marry. Dictated by Janet Clinker and writ- 
ten by Humphray Clinker, the clashing wives 
clerk. Glasgow. 1792. sm. 8°. pp.8. 
Wdct. on t. p. 2 cop. 8.22, 29.14 

2365. The Paisley repository ; being chiefly 
a collection of poetry, original and selected. 
No. iii., vi., xii., xvii., xviii., xix., xxi., xxiii., 
xxiv. Paisley, J. Neilson. sm. 12°. 73.1-9 

The same. No. ix., xvi., xxiii. 

(pp. 1-8). 79-32-34 

No. ix. has the same contents as No. xii., and 
No. xvi. the same as No. vi. in the preceding entry. 

2366. The pleasures of a single life ; or, 
The misery of matrimony, together with the 
sweet entertainment of the most charming 
pleasures of a country life. Dedicated to 
all young batchelors, widows, and maids. 
[Verse. London], Sympson's, Stonecutter 
St., Fleet Market, sm. 12°. pp.12. 37.17 

2367. The same. London, J. Evans. 12°. 
pp. 12. Wdct. on t. p. 38.21 

2368. The same. sm. 12°. pp.12. Wdct. 
on t. p. 67.7 



138 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2369. The whole pleasures of matrimony ; 
interwoven with sundry comical and delight- 
ful stories, with the charming delights and rav- 
ishing sweets of wooLig and wedlock in all its 
divering [j/<r] enjoyments. [London], Bow 
Church Yard. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdcts. 

58(iv).io 

2370. The pleasures of matrimony. . . . 
London. 12°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 50. 11 

Closely resembles the preceding in typography, 

2371. The same. By Author Reid, Glas- 
gow. [With the bachelor's miseries exempli- 
fied in the history of Mess John Magopico.] 
Glasgow. 24°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 
2 cop. 66.15, 109.3 

Cut of a man on a cask of beer. 

2372. The pleasures of matrimony, with 
sundry comical and delightful stories. [With 
the bachelor's miseries exemplified in the 
history of Mess John Magopico.] Glasgow. 
[No.] 109. sm. 12°. pp.24. Wdct. on 
t. p. 74.15 

Cut of two lovers. 

2373. The pocket magazine; or. Elegant 
repository of useful and polite literature. . . . 
Vol. i. [No. I, August 1794.] London, 
Harrison & co. 1794. sm. 12°. pp. 72. 
Engrs. 44. 1 

"Foreign intelligence" gives an account of the 
fall of Robespierre." 

2374. The poor client's complaint, ex 
Georgii Buchanani Scoti Epigrammate in 
Aulum . . . Englished thus. On Aulus the 
lawyer. Broadside. 106.27 

2375- Poor Robin's dream, commonly 
called Poor charity. I know no reason but 
that this harmless riddle May as well be 
printed as sung to a fiddle. Broadside. 
Wdct. I00(iii).i 

A satire on the times. 

2376. The same. [London], Howard and 
Evans, 42 Long Lane. Broadside. Wdcts. 

101.12 

2377. The same. Birmingham, D.Wrighton. 
Broadside. Wdct. 105.80 

Commonly in the title is misspelled " comonly." 

2378. The prisoner's advocate; or, A ca- 
veat that was laid before the king and Par- 
liament against under sheriffs, and their 
officers, jayl- keepers, and their agents. 
Shewing i. The great abuse all persons suffer 



both before and after they are committed to 
prison. 11. The notorious imposition ... of 
sponging-houses detected, iii. The order of 
the Court of king's bench for regulating all 
the jayls in England. . • . rv. An exact table 
of the fees belonging to the Fleet and King's- 
Bench prisons . . . and the regal expence of 
removing any person from one to the other, 
by habeas corpus. With an abstract of the 
ten pound bill. [London], T. Donovan. 
16°. pp. 24. 58(iv).i9 

A plea against imprisonment for debt. 

2379. Reason against coition. A discourse 
[on I Cor. vii. 1.27] deliver'd to a private 
congregation. By the reverend Stephen 
M * * * * *, D.D., chaplain to the . . . earl of 
******. . . .To which is added A proposal 
for making religion and the clergy useful ; 
with the author's obseryations on the cause 
and cure of the piles. . . . London, H. Hook. 
1732. sm. 8°. pp.64. 3.6 

A plea for the extinction of the human race in 
Ireland. Books lately published, pp. 63, 64. 

2380. The scolding woman's delight. 
Broadside. 106.23 

2381. A short survey of the difficulties and 
inconveniences that may attend a married 
life, with some observations thereupon. By 
John Thompson's man. Belfast, James Ma- 
gee. 1764. 24°. pp. 24. 57(iii).20 

2382. The thirtieth account of the progress 
made in . . . London ... by the societies for 
promoting a reformation of manners, by fur- 
thering the laws against profaneness and im- 
morality. [1725?] sm. 8°. pp.8. 17.22 

2383. A song on the famous peal of 7308 
grandsire cators rung by the Society of All 
Saints ringers, in Worcester, on the 28th of 
November, 1774. Broadside. Wdct. 105.52 

The ringing occupied \\ hours. 

2384. A touch on the times ; a poem. 
London. 1776. sm. 8°. pp.8. 15.6 

Motto: — " There is none that doeth good, no not 
one." Rom. iii. 12. The note To the reader is 
signed "A country taylor." 

2385. The trial of Betty the cook-maid 
before the worshipful justice Feeler for laying 
abed in the morning. London. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdcts. 3 cop. 4.24, 25.11, 26.10 

A satire on the servant girl question, showing what 
was expected from a maid employed as cook at seven 
pounds a year. The cuts are of the crudest. 



ADDENDA 



139 



2386. A true and real dialogue between 
Mr. Steel, the butcher, Mr. Deadman, the 
baker, Mr. Double Chalk, the publican, 
Mr. Gripe, the churchwarden, and Mr. Dip, 
the overseer. London, J. Evans. pp. 8. 
3 cop. 10.9, 22.20, 54.4 

An exposure of tradesmen's extortions and imposi- 
tions on the public. 

2387. The true blues of Hall's Mill. A 
free mason's song. Birmingham, H. Wads- 
worth. Broadside. Wdcts. 104.17 

2388. The watchman. No. 5. Saturday, 
April 2, 1796. Published by the author, 
S. T. Coleridge, Bristol, and by Parsons, Pater- 
noster Row, London, sm. 8°. pp. 129-160. 

1.27 

Contains a letter from Coleridge justifying his 
disapproval of Wm. Godwin's works. 

2389. The weekly entertainer. Vol. xxi., 
pp. 483-502. 22.21 

Contains the continuation of an article on the earl 
of Barrymore, and the first part of an article "On 
wagers." 

2390. The same. [Vol. xxx.] For Mon- 
day, July 3, 10, 17, 31, 1797. 4nos. sm.8°. 

12.8-10 



1-60, 81-100. The nos. are here bound in 
irregular order. Those for July 3, 10, 17 contain an 
account of the trial of Richard Parker, naval mutineer. 

2391. The whimsical lady; a dialogue 
written by Timothy Donovan, gent. sm. 8". 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 25.37 

A lady very difficult to please, who objects to any 
and every trade or profession for her husband, satiriz- 
ing all. 

2392. The sanie. (Appended to Part- 
ridge and Flamstead's fortune-book, Lon- 
don, J. Evans, No. 2096-2097.) 

2393. Wonder upon wonder ; or, A receipt 
to make a true methodist. Broadside. Wdct. 

102.7 
Cut shows a preacher addressing a congregation. 

2394. The five strange wonders of the 
world ! or, A new merry book of all fives, 
which was written on purpose to make all the 
people of England merry who have no occa- 
sion to be sad. London, J. Evans, sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. Wdct. on t. p. 14-19 

"To hear a lawyer tell truth, to see a prodigal 
turn thrifty, to see an informer refuse a bribe, to see a 
usurer throw away money, and to see a whore turn 
honest." The book consists of a series of similar 
groupings. 



2395. The same. sm. 8°. pp.8. Wdcts. 

25.16 

2396. A York dialogue between Ned and 
Harry ; or, Ned giving Harry an account of 
his courtship and marriage state. To which 
is added two excellent new songs. [London], 
John White. 16°. pp. 24. Wdcts. 21.9 

Imperfect: — pp. 5/6 missing. 
The text is reprinted in Cunningham, "Amusing 
prose chap-books," 1889, p. 141. 

*^,* Several of the titles under this last section are 
not properly chap-books, but they are included here 
because they were included in the volumes of chap- 
books as originally collected. Such are Nos. 2349, 
2350. 2359. 2365, 2373, 2382, 2388, 2389, 2390. 



ADDENDA 

Titles received too late for insertion in 
their proper place 

2397. The black book of conscience; or, 
God's high court of justice in the soul. . . . 
36. edition. By Andrew Jones. . . . London, 
Will Thackery, T. Passenger, Phil. Brooksby, 
and John Williamson. 1679. 24°. pp. (24). 

120.8 

" Books printed for Will Thackery, etc.''^ p. 24. 
Three pence and two pence apiece. 

In the addresses to the "courteous reader" con- 
tained in "The plain man's plain path-way to heaven," 
in "Morbus satanicus," and in "Dooms-day " (see 
beyond), this tract, as well as Nos. 2398, 2399, and 
2405, ascribed on their title-pages to Andrew Jones 
or William Jones, and Nos. 2400, 2401, 2402, 2406, 
and 2407, which bear no author's name, are con- 
tained in a list of books which are said to be "all 
written by John Hart, Dr. of Divinity." 

2398. Death triumphant ; or. The most 
renowned, mighty, puissant, and irresistible 
champion and conqueror general of the whole 
world, death, described. . . . The fifth edition. 
By Andrew Jones. London, Will. Thackery 
at the sign of the Angel in Ducklane. 1674. 
24°. pp. (24). Wdct. front. 120.2 

" Books printed for William Thackery, ^/c." p. 24. 
See note under No. 2397. 

2399. Dooms-day ; or, The great day of 
the Lord drawing nigh ; by certain signs and 
tokens thereof, foretold by our Lord Jesus 
Christ. . . . The 25th edition, with addi- 
tions. ... By Andrew Jones, M.A. London, 
W. Thackeray, T. Passinger, P. Brooksby 
and J. Williamson. 1678. 24°. pp. (14). 
Black-letter. 120.5 

With regard to the authorship see note to No. 2397. 



140 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



2400. The dreadful character of a drunk- 
ard ; or, The odious and beastly sin of 
drunkenness, described and condemned. 
Shewing the fearful judgments that have 
befallen notorious drunkards. . . . [By John 
Hart. London], printed by A. P. & T. H. 
for W. Thackeray, T. Passenger, P. Brooksby, 
and J. Williamson. 1678. 24°. pp. (24). 
Black-letter. Wdct. on t. p. 120.7 

" Books printed for W. Thackeray, etcJ'^ p. 2. 

2401. Englands faithful physican, or Pre- 
cious soul-saving and soul-searching remedies 
... for the healing and preserving this sinful 
sin sick nation from ruine and destruction. 
[By John Hart.] . . . [London], printed by 
P. L. for William Thackeray at the Angel in 
Duck-lane. 1674. 24°. pp. (24). Port. 

120. 1 

" Books printed for William Thackeray, etc." 
p. 24. 

2402. A godly sermon of Peter's repent- 
ance, after he had denyed his lord and mas- 
ter Jesus Christ, as it is in his repentance, he 
wept bitterly for his sins. The eleventh edi- 
tion corrected and enlarged. ... By a godly 
pastor [John Hart]. . . . London, printed for 
W. Thackeray, and are to be sold by J. Hose, 
over against Staples-Inn in Holbourn. 24°. 
pp. (20). Black-letter. 120.9 

2403. Hero and Leander.] An excellent 
sonnet of the unfortunate loves of Hero and 
Leander. Southwark, C. Lee in Blue-Maid- 
Alley, near the Marshalsea. Broadside. 

104.76 

2404. Hickelty Pickelty ; or, A medly of 
characters adapted to the age. Relating to 
different persons and perswasions. . . . Lon- 
don. 1708. 8°. pp. 16. Front. 15496.31 

2405. Morbus satanicus. The devils dis- 
ease, or The sin of pride arraigned and con- 
demned. . . . The 25 edition, with many 
additions. By William Jones, student in 
divinity. London, printed by W. L. and 
T. J. for W. Thackery, Phil. Brooksby, John 
Williamson and J. Hose. 1677. 24°. 
pp. (24). Black-letter. Wdct. head on 
t. p. 120.4 

With regard to the authorship see note under 
No. 2397. 

2406. The plain mans plain path-way to 
heaven, directing every man how he may 
be saved. . . . The 53d edition, with many 
additions. [By John Hart.] London, W. 
Thackeray at the sign of the Angel in Duck- 



Lane. 1675. 24°. pp. (24). Black-letter. 
Port, on t. p. 120.3 

2407. A warning-piece to the sloathful, 
idle, careless, drunken, and secure ones, of 
these last and worst of times. . . . [By John 
Hart.] London, William Thackery in Duck- 
Lane. 1678. 24°. pp. (47). Black- 
letter. 120.6 

2408. The wisdom of God displayed in 
the works of creation. To which is annexed 
A meditation on the glory of the sun. By 
an eminent divine. Falkirk, T. Johnston. 
1 82 1, sm. 12°. pp. 24. Wdct. on t. p. 

115.28 

2409. The amorous lady's garland ; or, 
The handsome butcher of St. James's mar- 
ket. Worcester, J. Butler, sold by J. Grundy. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 123.5 

2410. Catskin.] The wandering lady; 
or, Catskin. [Boston], N. Coverly, Milk St. 
Broadside. Wdcts. 121.2 

241 1. Chevy - Chase. ] The unhappy 
memorable song of the hunting of Chevy- 
chase. Broadside. Wdct. 123.4 

2412. The children in the woods. Being 
a true relation of the inhuman murder of 
two children of a deceased gentleman in 
Norfolk. . . . [Boston], sold at the Bible and 
Heart in Cornhill. Broadside. Wdct. 

122.10 

2413. The same. Broadside. 104.78 

The imprint has been torn off, but the sheet was 
doubtless printed in Boston like the preceding, to which 
it conforms closely in text. 

2414. Constitution and Guerr[iere], or 
Hull's victory. [Boston?] Broadside. Wdct. 

The margins are badly torn. 121. 1 

2415. Cure for consumptions. Address of 
Kitty Plume to Dickey Dandy, just arrived 
from FoUey-Alley, Paris. Kitty's arguments 
in favor of busks, that damsels wear to dis- 
tort nature. Printed for the purchasers. 
[Boston?] Broadside. 122.9 

2416. Death and the lady.] A dialogue 
between death and a lady. Very suitable for 
these times. Boston, sold at the Heart and 
Crown in Cornhill. Broadside, 121. i 

2417. Dialogue between death and a lady ; 
very suitable to be learned by heart in these 
degenerate times. [Boston?] Broadside. 

122.2 
On the same sheet with "The factor's garland," 
No. 2420. 



ADDENDA 



141 



2418. Death of the embargo. [Boston], 
Nathaniel Coverly, jun'r. Broadside. Wdct. 

121. 12 

2419. The Dorsetshire garland, or The 
miser outwitted. Shewing how a rich gen- 
tleman of Dorsetshire, who had but one 
child, a daughter, about 14 years old, when 
he died, left her to the care of his brother, 
a rich miser, how the miser contrived to 
murder his neice [jzV], for the sake of her 
money, but was disappointed of his wicked 
purpose ; and how he was forced • to part 
with all his gold to save his life. Boston, 
Nathaniel Coverly, jun'r. Corner Theatre 
Alley. Broadside. Wdct. 122. i 

Not the same as "The Dorsetshire garland," 
Nos. 669-672, and 783. Neither has it any connec- 
tion with " Bite upon bite, or The miser outwitted," 
No. 1880, or "The London butcher, or The miser 
outwitted," No. 1970. 

2420. The factor's garland. A strange 
and wonderful story. [Boston?] Broadside. 

122.2 

Printed on the same sheet, but intended to be cut 
apart, are "A good wife," "A remarkable dream," 
and " Dialogue between death and a lady." 

2421. Factory maid, and The clove-hitch 
knot. [Boston? 1833.] Broadside. 121.9 

These verses relate to the case of Sarah Maria 
Cornell, a factory girl of Fall River, who was found 
dead, and apparently murdered, in Tiverton, R. I., 
Dec. 21, 1832. See " Report of the trial of Rev. 
Ephraim K. Avery for the murder of Sarah M. Cor- 
nell," Providence, 1833. 

2422. Fair Rosamond, a lamentable ditty. 
Boston, Nathaniel Coverly, jun. Milk-Street. 
Broadside. Wdct. 121.3 

2423. A good wife. [Boston?] Broad- 
side. 122.2 

On the same sheet with "The factor's garland," 
No. 2420. 

2424. Handsome Harry ; or, The deceitful 
young man. [Boston?] Broadside. 121.4 

2425. Handsome Harry, or The deceitful 
young man. Shewing how a sailor courted a 
fair maiden, named Ruth, and having got her 
with child, he went to sea and left her, and 
how her ghost appeared to him &c. [Bos- 
ton?] Broadside. Wdct. of a ship. 122.4 

2426. The same. Boston, Nathaniel 
Coverly, Jr. Milk-street. Corner Theatre- 
Alley. Broadside. Wdcts. 12 1.5 

On the reverse is printed "The jug of rum," 
No. 2433. 



2427. The happy child. Being a narra- 
tive of the holy life and peaceable death of 
a remarkable pious child of Hertfordshire, 
England. Boston, Nathaniel Coverly, corner 
of Theatre Alley. Broadside. Wdcts. 

122.16 

2428. The happy ship-carpenter. [Bos- 
ton. 1822.] Broadside. Wdct. 104.77 

Printed on the reverse of an account in pretended 
negro dialect of an anti-slavery meeting in Boston in 
1822. 

2429. Hints to Elder Pottle, or The ne- 
cessity of mortifying the deeds of the body. 
By Jonathan Plummer, a travelling preacher, 
physician, poet, and trader. Broadside. 

121. 16 

The author is Plummer, the "poet laureate" of 
Lord Timothy Dexter, and " had been city and coun- 
try ballad-monger for more than forty years." See 
Samuel L. Knapp's "Life of Lord Timothy Dexter," 
Newbury port, 1848, pp. 86 ff. 

2430. The honour of Bristol ; shewing how 
the "Angel Gabriel" fought three Spanish 
ships, who boarding her many times, she 
clear'd the deck, kill'd 500 Spaniards, and 
forc'd them to fly into Cales ; with the loss of 
three men only. Broadside. Wdcts, 123.3 

2431. Hull's surrender, or Villany some- 
where. Boston, Nathaniel Coverly, jun. 
[18 1 2.] Broadside. Wdct. 121. 11 

The margins are badly torn. Refers to Gen. Wil- 
liam Hull's surrender to Gen. Brock at Detroit, Aug. 
16, 1812. 

2432. The Irish robber. Wind thy horn, 
my hunter boy. De coal black rose. It 
won't be my fault if I die an old maid. 
Tho' 'tis all but a dream. Boatman's wel- 
come home. Battle field. Cherry ripe. 
Philad'a, R. Swift, sm. 8°. pp.8. 124.1 

2433. The jug of rum, together with The 
dish of tea. Boston, N. Coverly, Jun. Broad- 
side. 1 2 1. 5 

On the reverse is printed " Handsome Harry," 
No. 2426. 

2434. Capt. Kidd, a noted pirate, hanged 
at Execution dock, in England. Boston, 
Hunts & Shaw, at N. E. corner Faneuil Hall 
Market. Broadside. Wdct. of a ship. 122.5 

2435. The dying words of Captain Robert 
Kid, a noted pirate who was hanged at Exe- 
cution Dock. [Boston], 285 Water-street. 
Broadside. 122.6 



142 



CHAP-BOOKS AND BROADSIDES 



Broad - 
123-9 



2436. The king and the forester, 
side. Wdct. 

Child, V. 74. 

2437. A pleasant ballad of King Henry II. 
and the miller of Mansfield, shewing how he 
was entertain'd and lodg'd at the miller's 
house. London, Bow Church Yard. Broad- 
side. 123.8 

Child, V. 69, where references will be found, and 
pp. 84 ff. for the text. 

2438. King Henry V. his conquest of 
France, in revenge for the affront offered by 
the French King, in sending him (instead of 
the tribute) a ton of tennis-balls. London, 
Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 123.10 

Child, No. 164. 

2439. The lamp lighter's address to his 

enlightened patrons. January i, 1828. 

[Signed] J. Trumbull. Broadside. Wdct. 

of a lamp lighter. 122.18 

A companion to the "Watchman's address," 
No. 2459. 

2440. The last words of an amiable lady, 
Mrs. Mary-Anne Burr. [Boston?] Broad- 
side. 122.14 

2441. The last words of Polly Goold. 
Boston, Nathaniel Coverly, jun'r. Corner of 
Theatre- Alley. Broadside. Wdct. 12 1. 15 

2442. The lawyer outwitted. [Boston?] 
Broadside. Wdct. 122.12 

2443. The Lexington miller, and Johnny 
Jarman. Boston, comer of Cross and Ful- 
ton sts. Broadside. 122.7 

2444. The Lincolnshire poachers, and 
Grey goose's wing. Boston, L. Deming, 
62 Hanover Street. Broadside. Wdcts. 

121. 7 

2445. London prentice.] The great 
honour of a valiant London prentice : being 
an account of his matchless manhood, and 
brave adventures, done in Turkey. . . . [Bos- 
ton?] Broadside. 122. 11 

2446. Major's only son. Boston, Na- 
thaniel Coverly, Jnn \^sic.~\ Milk -Street. 
Broadside. 122.8 

2447. An ode on the comet. [Boston?] 
Broadside. Wdct. of a comet. 122.15 

A note at the bottom reads: "It may perhaps 
soften the rigor of wmter, and many people think it 
wiU." 



2448. Polly Hopkins, and Tommy Tom- 
kins. Boston, L. Deming, 62 Hanover St. 
Broadside. 122.3 

2449. Rare sights, or Hue boys hue. Bos- 
ton, Nathaniel Coverly, Milk-Street. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 1 2 1. 1 4 

2450. A remarkable dream. The follow- 
ing were the meditations of a minister of 
Vermont, while sleeping in a shady grove. 
[Boston?] Broadside. 122.2 

On the same sheet with "The factor's garland," 
No. 2420. 

2451. [Robin] Bohugh's reason why he 
married such an ill-looking wife. Boston, 
Nathaniel Coverly, corner of Theatre-Alley, 
Milk-Street. Broadside. 122.13 

2452. Robin Hood newly reviv'd ; or. His 
meeting and fighting with his cousin Scarlet. 
To a new tune. London, L. How. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 123.2 

Child, No. 128. 

2453. Robin Hood and Will Stutly ; shew- 
ing, how he rescued him from the sheriff and 
his men, who were going to hang him. Tune, 
Robin Hood and Queen Catherine. Broad- 
side. Wdct. 123. 1 

Child, No. 141, 

2454. Robin Hoods chace; or, A merry 
progress between Robin Hood and King 
Henry. Tune, Robin Hood and the beggar. 
London, L. How in Petticoat-lane. Broad- 
side. Wdcts. 123. 1 1 

Child, No. 146. 

2455. Robin Hood's garland; being a 
compleat history of all the notable and merry 
exploits perform'd by him and his men on 
divers accounts and occasions. To which is 
added The whole life of bold Robin Hood, 
earl of Huntington, being a more particular 
account of his birth, &c., than any hitherto 
publish'd. Printed in the year mdccxlix. 
16°. pp. 104, (8). 56.30 

2456. The roving bachelor. Tom Haliard. 
Betsy Baker. Bruce's address to his army. 
Phil'a, No. 28 Mead Alley. 1830. sm. 8°. 
pp. 8. 124.2 

2457. Tid the gray mare, and Sandy and 
Jenny. Boston, L. Deming, 62 Hanover 
Street. Broadside. Wdcts. 12 1.8 



ADDENDA 



143 



2458. The unknown world. Composed 
on the tolling of a bell. Boston, Nathaniel 
Coverly, Jun., Milk-Street. Broadside. Wdct. 

121. 13 

2459. The watchman's address to his pro- 
tected friends. January i, 1828. Broad- 
side. Wdct. of a watchman and burning 
house. 122.17 

"A companion to the "Lamplighter's address," 
No. 2439. 



2460. The western tragedy. [The ballad 
of May Collean and false Sir John. Boston ?] 
Broadside. 121.6 

Child, No. 4. 

2461. Woodland Mary. Crop'y boy. 
Wild rover. Kelly the pirate. Larry O'Gaff. 
Hark the goddess Dianna. Orphan boy. 
[Philadelphia?] sm.8°. pp.8. 124.3 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



A beth Gelert, 2049, note. 

A la mode catechism, 2300; also 2330. 

A*ch*r, Mr. See tlie Lover's stratagem, 

394. 
Abel, death of, 1. 
Abercrombie, Lament for, 1409. 
Abercromby. General Abercromby's last 

battle, 1335. 
Aberdeen, kidnapping at, 320. 
Abershaw, Jeremiah, execution of, 2221. 
Abroad and at home, 1635. 
Absent Florinda, 726, note. 
Absent lover, 1271. 
Absent man, 325, 330. 
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, 2. 
Academy of compliments, 2301-2. 
Account of a curious wedding between 

a young batchelor and an old widow, 

1873-4. 
Account of Jerusalem, 231, note. 
Account of the executions in Scotland 

for the past 200 years, 2189. 
Account of the late insurrection in Ire- 
land, 193. 
Account of the lives and transactions of 

Richard Shepherd, etc., 2190. 
Account of the lives and transactions of 

Sylvester Smith, etc., 2191. 
Accurate description of the marriage 

ceremonies, etc., 2303. 
Accusers accused, 159, 160. 
Adam, fall of, 144. 
Adam's sin, 91. 
Adam Bell, 631-3. 
Adam o' Gordon, 634. 
Adams, Miss, and Lord Whatley, 344-6. 
Adams and Eves, 1016. 
Addison, Joseph. Maxims, observations, 

etc., 67. 

portrait, 67. 

Address to the volunteers of Scotland, 

1171. 
Admiral Benbow, 1523, 1588, 1614. 
Advantages of a single life, 433. 
Adventure, Travel and. Section VI, 

p. 17. 
Adventure of Allan Barclay, 521. 
Adventures of a young lady, confined in 

the hoUow of an oak tree, 392. 
Adventures of Baron Munchausen, 1783. 
Adventures of Billy MacDaniel, 1684. 
Adventures of the extravagant wit, 347. 
Advice to bathers, 179. 
Advice to lasses, 1660. 
Advice to the fair sex, 1583. 
Aesop's Fables, 435, 436. 
Affectionate husband and unfortunate 

lady, 2275. 
Affectionate lovers, 714-16. 
Affectionate orphans, 126. 
Affectionate soldier, 1227. 
Afflicted parents, 3. 
Africa, travels in: — De Brisson, 303; 

Elliott, 306; LoweUin and Jenkins, 

310; Massey, 313. 
Again the wish'd for festive hour, 1191. 
Age and life of man, 4, 5. 
Age of man displayed, 6, 7. 
Age of reason, Direct answer to, 231, 

note. 
Agreeable songster, 1172. 
All ! should my love in fight be slain, 

1333. 
Aid me Venus, 1214. 
Airshire, Miss A. B., dedication to, 392, 

note. 
Albany, James, duke of, 195. 
Aladdin ; or, The wonderful lamp, 437. 
Ale-wives forced to spin, 805. 



Alexander the Great, 531. 
Alexis and Clarinda, 758. 
Alger, William R., early American broad- 
side ballads from tlie library of, p. x. 
Algiers, Massey's captivity in, 313. 

Memoirs of George Fane, 374. 

Ali Baba, 437-440. 

Alice Gray, 1309, 1574, 1602. 

All on board a man of war, 1221. 

All parties pleased, 1993-94. 

All's well, 1184, 1318, 1569. 

Allan's love to the farmer's daughter, 

697-8. 
Allan Tine o'Harrow, 1173-4. 
Allen a Dale, 1316. 
Allen, James, Northumberland papers, 

2222-3. 
Allen, Rev. John, trial of, 2224. 
Allister M'Allister, 1544. 
Allowance of grog, 1241. 
Ally Croaker. See Croaker. 
Almet, Vision of, 431. 
Almoran and Ilamet, 348. 
Alonzo the Brave, 4()4, 2352. 
Aloway kirk ; or, Tam o'Shanter, 1117. 
Alphonso and Ganselo, 830. 
Alps, Sliepherdess of the, 412-414. 
Although my Meg's gi'en me the bag, 

1200. 
Amanda, Story of, 396, note. 
Amelia. By llenrj- Fielding, 349. 
America, travels in: — Anson, 317; Ca- 
rew, 329; Revel, 314-316; Sims, 317; 
Williamson, 320. 
American broadside ballads, collection 

of, p. X. 
American revolution, a story of the, 390. 
Amilec ; or, The seeds of mankind, 2304. 
Amo, amas, 1535. 

Amorous lady's garland, 635, 2409. 
Amorous lovers, 1501. 
Amours of Prince Tarquin and Miranda, 

369. 
Amurath, Story of, 458. 
Amusements, serious and comical, bon 

mots, etc., 1669. 
Anatomy, wax figures of, the work of 

M. Denoue, 2;B07. 
And sae will we vet, 1519. 
Andover garlancf, 636. 
Andrew, St., of Scotland, 548. 
Andrew Car, 1609. 
Andrew Lammie; or. Mill of Tiftie's 

Annie, 637-9. 
Andrews, John. Raising the wind, 2012. 
Anglicus, peace, or no peace. By W, 

LiUy, 2154. 
Animal magnetism, 343. 
Anjou, Duke of, fiirewel to Spain, 784. 
Anna, a favorite Irish song, 1281. 
Anna lamenting the loss of her sailor, 

1390. 
Annette et Lubin, 359. 
Annual packet of mirth, whim, and 

liumour, 1802. 
Anson, Admiral, 317, note. 
Answer of a letter from a gentleman in 

Fife, 2142. 
Anthony, Pleasant adventures of, 1749. 
Antigua, voyage to, 302. 
Anti-scorbutic drops, 399. 
Apollo gardens, songs sung at, 1450, 

1468. 
Apollo, The new bower, 1476. 
Apollo's budget, 1175. 
Apparitions, 333. 
Apprentice, Cheapside, 134. 
Apprentice, London. See London 'pren- 
tice. 



Apprentices, condition of, 2267. 

Apprentices, Joyful news for, 3021-2. 

Arabella, the female Quixote, Adven- 
tures of, 1694. 

Aram, Eugene, history of, 2225. 

Arbrathat, Nicholas, trial of, 2188. 

Arcandam's astrology, 2063. 

Arch denial, 1587. 

Argalus and Parthenia, 350-352. 

Argyle, Duke of, courtship to an Eng- 
lish lady, 785-6, 910, 1299, 1436. 

Arithmetic. A little young man's com- 
panion, 183, 184. 

AiTnstrong, Johnny. See John Arm- 
strong. 

Army display'd in its true colors, 252. 

Art of bell-ringing, 186, note. 

Art of cookery. Complete, 182. 

Art of courtship, 1670, 2305, 2362. 

Art of growing rich, 431, note. 

Art of legerdemain, 2103-4. 

Art of money-catching. Pleasing, 185. 

Art of swimming, 179. 

Arthur, King, 5.31. 

Great Britain's glorv, 483. 

Arthur O'Bradley, 1505." 

Arrowsmith, Mr., song sung by, 1225. 

Artifice all, 1385. 

Arundel, Earl of, brings old Tom Parr to 
London, 336. 

As I stood by yon roofless tower, 1611. 

As I walk'd by myself, 1327. 

As you like it. By William Shakespear, 
611. 

Astley's circus, songs sung at, 1238, 1520, 
1526. 

Astrological catechism. Translated from 
Leovitius by Robert Turner, 2064. 

Astrological prediction of the occur- 
rances in England, 21.55. 

Astrology. See Section XV, p. 115. 

Astrology, Arcandam's, 2063. 

At tlie dead of the night, 1581. 

Atheist converted, 8. 

Atkins, Mrs., true relation of, 2135. 

Attracting nymph, 1246. 

Auld gude man, ye're a drunken carle, 
1377. 

Auld lanesyne, 1176, 1383, 1496, 1571, 
1617, 1649. 

Auld man would be wooing, 1575. 

Auld man's best argument, 1214. 

Auld men gaun to be married, 1292. 

Auld Robin Gray, 1177-8. 

Auld Robin Gray's garland, 1178. 

Auld sark sleeve, 1179, 2020. 

Auld Scotia free, 1481. 

Auldem, battle of, 882, note. 

Aulnoy, Countess d'. La bonne petite 
souris, 599, note. 

Avery, Rev. Ephraim K., trial of, 2421, 
note. 

Awakening call to Great Britain, 9. 

Away with melancholy, 1234, 1266, 

Away with this sadness, 1216. 

Avemio, king of Burma, 42-4. 

Awkwardness in company, 325. 

Aylesbury, execution at, 2199. 

Ayr, John Welch, minister at, 122-3. 



B., W. C. The love of Eviluia, etc., 392, 

note. 
Babes in the wood. See Children in the 

wood. 
Bacon, Friar, 2113, 2115-18. 
Bacon, Theo. James. Tlie maid of the 

farm, 395. 
Bad bargain, 127. 



146 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Bads worth hunt, 60I. 

Baffled knight, 1876-7. 

Bailie Nieol Jarvie's journey to Aberfoil, 
1179. 

Bailili's daughter of Islington, 1130. 

Baker, Dublin, 1510. 

Baker, Mrs. Mary, execution of, 2226. 

Baker's dream, 128. 

Bakers. True and real dialogue, 2386. 

Ballad of the cloak's knavery, 194. 

Ballad singer, History of a, 422. 

Ballangeich, Gudeman of, 880. 

Banaphie, Bonny lass of, 709-10. See also 
Bonny lass of Banaphie. 

Baubury, Cries of, 2318. 

Banily -legged officer, 1618. 

Banishment of poverty, 195. 

Banks of Allan water," 1575. 

Banks of Cladv, 1180. 

Banks of Clyde, 709, 1181. 

Banks o'Doon, 1274, 1386, 1498, 1552, 1573. 

Banks of Nith, 1552. [1401. 

Banks of the Bawn, 1608. 

Banks of the blue Mozelle, 1556. 

Banks of the Dee, 1182, 1233, 1334. 

Banks of the Shannon, 1.502, 1565. 

Banks, John, murderer, 2227. 

Banks, Lucy, History of, 434. 

Bannachie , Bonny la'^s of, 1634, note . See 
also Bonnie lass of Banaphie.' 

Bannister, Mr., songs sung by, 1225. 

Bannock-burn, Heroic song on the battle 
of, 1045. 

Bannocks o'barlev meal, 1183. 

Barbadocs bells, 1410. 

Barbara Allen, Bonny, 653. 

Barbara Allen's cruelty, 652. 

Barber, Captain, 876, 1346. 

Barclay, Allan, Adventure of, 521. 

Barclay, John. Dialogue between Wil- 
liam Lick-ladle ana Thomas Clean- 
cogue, 1460, 1626, note. 

Barker, R., the unfortunate shipwright, 
302. 

Barkshire ladj's garland, 677-8. See 
also Berksliire ladj-'s garland. 

Barlaam and Joasaph, 42^. 

Barley, Jolin. John Barle}-'s welcome, 
247. 

Barleycorn, John, 1611. 

Barleycorn, Sir John, 1387. 

Arraigning and indicting of, 1728-31. 

Dying groans of, 1733. 

Life iind death of, 1392. 

Whole tryal and indictment of, 1732. 

Barnwell, George, History of (prose), 

479-82. 

(ballad), 479, note, 852-6. 

Barring o' the door, 1184, 1272, 1290. 
Barrington, George, life and adventures 

of, 222s. 
Barrow, James, deliverance of, from 

possession by spirits, 2138. 
Barrymore, Earl of, 2389. 
Bartholomew fair, 1826, note. 
Barton, Andrew, life and death of, 1083-4. 
Barton, Edward, vision of, 13. 
Barton, J., murderer, 2201. 
Barton-mider-Xeedwood, 334. 
BasinghaU, Dead man's dream who lived 

near, 23-25. 
Basket maker, 3.53. 
Bastille, history of the, 284. 
Batchelar's theatrical song.ster, 1185. 
Batchelor's ragged breeches, 1522. 
Batchelour's garland, Bawdy, 1879. 
Bateman, I/ord, ballad of, 952-953, 953a, 

953b, 953c, 9.-)4. 
Bateman, Mary, Yorkshire witch,2229-30. 
Bateman's tragedy (prose), 441; (verse), 

6')4-55. 
Bath, A trip to, 425. 
Bath, Wanton wife of, 2059-61, 2211. 
Bath. Wife of Beith reformed, 2054-58. 
Bathers, advice to, 179. 
Battle field, 24;}2. 
Battle of Auldem, 882, note. 
Battle of Bannock-burn, 1045. 
Battle of Blenheim, 1374. 
Battle of Bothwell Bridge, 255. 
Battle of Bunker's Hill, 1540. 
Battle of Copenhagen, 257, 258. 
Battle of Crown-Point, 1391. 
Battle of Drumclog, 255. 
Battle of Glasgow, 625. 



Battle of Ilarlaw, 657. 

Battle of Killicrankie, 1194. 

Battle of Prestonpans, 658-9. 

Battle ofRoslin, 660-1. 

Battle of Sherra-muir, 1324, 1626, note. 

Battle of the Boyue, 656. 

Battle of the flying dragon and the man 
of Ileaton. By John Collier, 1878, 
2359. 

Battle of the NUe, 1186, 1310, 1317. 

Battle of the Reid-Squair, 657. 

Battle of Trafalgar, 196, 1186. 

Battle of Waterloo, 662. 

Bauldy Baird, 1404. 

Bawdy batchelour's garland, 1879. 

Bawdy house, description of, 2327. 

Bav of Biscay, O, 1318, 1332, 1401. 

Baylis, John, trial of, 2186. 

Bajnies, John, autograph, p. viii. 

Be quiet, 1646. 

Beadle of the parish, 1458, 1625. 

Bean-feast, 129. 

Beane, Sawney, life of, 2231, 2255, note, 
2293. 

Beau is but an ass. A, 931. 

Beautiful damsel of Virgin City, 1222. 

Beautiful maid, 1321, 1371. 

Beautiful Nancy's garland, 663. 

Beautiful PhiUis's kind answer, 1503. 

Beautiful shepherdess of Arcadia, 664-5. 

Beautiful Susan of Plymouth's over- 
throw, 1016. 

Beauty, On, 1203. 

Beauty and the Beast, 442-3. 

Beauty and virtue rewarded, 1913. 

Beauty's blossom, 1335. 

Beddoes, Thomas. History of Isaac 
Jenkins, 385. 

Bedlam, Great news from, 2156. 

Bednal-Green, Blind beggar of, 701-2. 
See also Bethnal Green. 

Beds of roses, 1174, 1187. 

Bee hive ; or, The sips of the seasons, 
1188. 

Before the sun had drunk the dew, 1411. 

Beggar boy, 1282. 

Beggar's chorus, 666. 

Beggar's garland, 667. 

Beggar's resolution, 1182. 

Beggar's wedding, 667-72. 

Beggars, Care w, king of the, 325-29. 

Begging girl, 1282. 

Begone, dull care, 1617. 

Belin, Mrs. Aphra. The fair jUt, 369. 

Oroonoko, 400. 

Beith, wife of. See Bath. 

Belfiist damsel, 1189. 

Belianis, Don, History of, 444-45. 

Belief of witchcraft vindicated, 2147. 

Bell my wife, 1597, note. 

Bell-ringers, cut of, 1395, note. 

Bell-ringing, art of, 186, note. 

BeU-ringing. Song on the famous peal 
of 7308 grandsire cators, 2383. 

Bell, Miss, circumstantial account of, 
2232. 

BeU, John, chap-books collected by, with 
autograph note, p. vii. 

BeUeisie, New song on taking Fort Pa- 
lais in, 1506. 

siege of, 1423. 

Bellgrave, Henrietta de, Story of, 415, 
note. 

Bellianis, Don. See Belianis. 

Bellingham, J., mrrderer, 2233. 

Bellows mender, 400a. 

Belson, Mary. The modem Goody Two- 
shoes, 380. 

Benason sportsmen, 1295. 

Benbow, Admh-al, 1523, 1588, 1614. 

Bending o'er the lofty yard, 1333. 

Beneath a shady tree, 1565. 

Beneath the willow tree, 1269. 

Benefit of starving. By W. Woolley, 283. 

Benhii, Geoflry. The corsair, 358, 376. 

Benocliie, Lass of, 1626. See also Bonny 
lass of Banaphie. 

Berkshire butcher, 1879. 

Berkshire lady, 679. 

Berkshire lady's garland, 673-78, 1095. 
See also Barkshire lady's garland. 

Berkshire tragedy; or, The Wittam 
miller, 680-3. 

Berwick, John, trial of, 2178. 

Bess the gawkie, 1190-1, 1319. 



Bessie Bell and Maiy Gray, 653. 

Bessy BeU, 786. 

Best thing of a' is wanting yet, 1347. 

Bethnal tireen. Blind beggar of, 447-450. 
See also Bednal-Green. 

Betrayed damsel, 1195. 

Betray'd maid, 1395. 

Betray'd maiden, 1341. 

Betrayed virgin, 354. 

Betray'd virgin's complaint, 719. 

Betray'd virgin's garland, 831-4. 

Betsey Baker, 1192, 2456. 

Betsey's desire for a man, 1286. 

Betsy Blossom, 1193; Betty Blossom, 
1513. 

Betty and her mistress. Comical dialogue 
between, 1935. 

Betty Blossom, 1513; Betsy Blossom, 
1193. 

Betty Brown, a new song, 1423. 

Betty Brown, the St. GDes orange girl, 
130. 

Bettj, the cook-maid, trial of, 2385. 

Bevis, Sir, of Southampton, 568-9. 

Bewick, Sir Robert, and the Laird Gra- 
ham, 1095. 

Bewilder'd maid, 1325. 

Bewitched fiddler, 417. 

Bible, Directions for reading, 17. 

Bible, New pictorial, 10, 11. 

Bid the coachman drive, 641 

Big-bellied bottle, 1310. 

Bilby, William, grave-digger, 2273. 

Billy and Nancy's parting, 1180, 1378. 

Billy and Susan, 1328. 

Billy MacDaniel, Adventures of, 1684. 

Billy O'Rourke, 1641. 

Billy Taylor, a brisk young sailor, 955. 

Billy's courtship, 1484. 

Billy's return from sea, 1258. 

Bilson, Boy of, second part, 2141. 

Biographical chap-books. See Histori- 
cal, etc., 193-283; also Odd characters, 
322-343; Witchcraft, 2130-49; Crimi- 
nals, 2173-2299. 

Birds harmony, 685. 

Birds lamentation, 684. 

Birks of Endermary, 668. 

Birmingham button-maker, 1194. 

Bishoprick tragedv, 1455. 

Bite upon bite, 1880, 1882-3. 

Bite upon bite, bite as bite can, 2342. 

Bite upon the miser, 1881. 

Biter bit, 1884-6. 

Bitter wedding, Story of the, 580. 

Black and the white. By Voltaire, 356. 

Black bird, 1195; Blackbird, 1196, 1196a. 
1320. 

Black book of conscience. Bv Andrew 
Jones, 2397. 

Black cow, 1535. 

Black ey'd Susan, 1583. 

Black-ey'd Susan's garland. By John 
Gay, 694-6. 

Black Giles, the poacher, 131, 132. 

Black Prince, Edward, the, 212. 

Black prince, Naimbanna, 133. 

Blackamoor in the wood, 686-Q3. 

Blackbird, 1196, 1196a, 1320; Black bird. 
1195. 

Blaeberry courtship, 697-8. 

Blair, Robert. The grave, a poem, 879, 

Blanc et le uoir, 356. 

Blanch frigate, 1607. 

Blandford, marquis of, trial, 2234. 

Blasphemer's punishment, 12. 

Bleak was the mom, 1282. 

Blenheim, Battle of, 1374. 

Blew cap for mee, 699-700. 

Blight, Isaac, murder of, 2285. 

Blind beggar of Bethnal Green (prose), 
447-450; (verse), 701-2. 

Blmd boy, 1363, 1566. 

Blind girl who could see on the Sabbath, 
334. 

Blind man's declaration, 712. 

Blink bonniely, thou e'ening star, 1554. 

Blink-ey'd cobbler, 703-5. 

Blink over the bum sweet Betty, 931. 

Blithe. See also Blythe. 

Blithe, My lady, 138. 

Blithe was she, 1215, 1275, 1620, 1651 ; also 
1319, 1666. 

Blood, Andrew, trial and execution of, 
217& 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



147 



Bloody brother, 945-6. 

Bloody gardcuer, 899. 

Bloody gardener's cruelty, 706-8. 

Bloody inquisition, 64. 

Bloody tragedy ; or, A dreadful warning 

to disobedient children, 2200. 
Bloxwich wake bull-baiting, 1887. 
Blue Beard, 4)1^53, 538. 
Blue bird and Fiorina, 470. 
Blue bonnets over the Border, 1553, 

1647. 
Blue cap for me. See Blew cap. 
Blue ey'd lassie, 1294, 1551, 1642. 
Blue ey'd Sue, 1545. 
Blushes eloquently speak, 1484. 
Blyd's contract, 1709. 
Blythe. See also Blithe. 
Blythe and happy are we, 1571. 
Blythe, blythe, an' merry are we, 1624, 

1664. 
Blythe was she, 1319, 1666; also 1215, 

1275, 1620, 1651. 
Blythsome bridal, 1197-8. 
Boatie rows. The, 1306, 1633. 
Boatman's welcome liome, 2432. 
Bobbin, Tim. Miscellaneous works, 

2359. 
Bohemia, Parismus, prince of, 532. 
Bold boatswain of Dover, 1588. 
Bold dragoon, 1176, 1496, 1649. 
Bold Jack the sailor, 1400. 
Bold Jockey, 1180. 
Bold mariners, 1471, 1551. 
Bold stroke for a wife, 1341. 
Bolton, Dr. Sermon, 13. 
Bonaparte's retreat from Russia, 1300. 
Bond, John, trial of, 2186. 
Boimet so blue, 1199. 
Bonnie or Bonny : — 
Bonny banks o'Doon. See Banks o'Doon. 
Bonny Barbara Allen, 653. See also 

Barbara Allen's cruelty. 
Bonny blue bonnet, 1401. 
Bonny, bonny broom, 1315. 
Bonnie Doon. See Banks o' Doon. 
Bonny Dundee, 1888. 
Bomiy hawthorn, 1300. 
Bonny Highland lad, 786. 
Bonnj^ Irish girl, 1312. 
Bonnie Jamie 0, 1251. 
Bonny Jean, 1200, 1435, 1612. 
Bonny lad, 1497. 
Bonnv lass of Banaphie, 709-10; of Ban- 

nachie, 1634, note ; of Benochie, 1626. 

(The same ballad.) 
Bonny lassie, 711. 
Bonnie Leslie, 1518. 
Bonny Lizie Bailie, 712. 
Bonny Mally Stewart, 1201, 1581. 
Bonny milk-maid, 713. 
Bonny Molly of Adamsley, 1509. 
Bonny Scotch lad and his bonnet so blue, 

1320. 
Bomiie wee tiling, 1570. 
Bonnie wee wife, 1555. 
Bonny wee wifie, 2343. 
Bonny winsome Mary, 1576. 
Bonny wood of Craigie Lea, 1173, 1347, 

1409. 
Bonny, Anne, pirate, 2175. 
Book of beasts for young persons, 2306. 
Book of knowledge ; tlie wisdom of the 

ancients. By Erra Pater, 2064a. 
Book of martyrs, 9. 
Booker, John. Dutch fortune teller, 

2070. 

Historj' of dreams, 2080. 

Borde, Andrew. Merry tales of the mad 

men of Gottain, 1856, note. 
Borrowdale, Young shepherd of, letter 

from, 1683. 
Boston, New England. 399, note. 
Boston, Thomas. The sinner's sobs, 98. 
Bostonshire lady, 1604. 
BosweU, Su' Alexander, p. vii. 
Boswell, James, collections of chap- 
books made by, p. vii. 

autograph note on chap-books, p. vii. 

Botany Bav, 285. 

Bothwell Bridge, battle of, 255. 

Bothwick wedding, 1608. 

Bow-bells, 1917, 1454. 

Bowes, Stoney, history of, 2235-6. 

Boy and the flagelet, 1371. 



Boy of Bilson, second part, 2141. 
Boyd, Allan. Explication of the prophe- 
cies of Thomas Rymer, 2163. 
Bovue, battle of the, 656. 
Boys of Kilkenny, 1356. 
Braes o' Balquhither, 1198, 1384, 1438. 
Braes of Branksom, 711, note. 
Braes of Busbie, 1574. 
Braes of Galloway, 1576. 
Braes o' Gleniflcr, 1199, 1201, 1364, 1384, 

1438. 
Braes of Yarrow, 1232, 1310, 653, 1435. 
Braggo, F. Defense of the proceedings 

against Jane Wenham, 2148. 
FuU and impartial account of the 

discovery of sorcery .... practised by 

Jane Wenham, 2144. 

Witclicraft farther display'd, 2145. 

Braham, Master, songs smig by, 1225, 

1603. 
Brand, Earl, 934, note; 955, note; 1302, 

note. 
Brave Nelson's garland, 1470. 
Brave Nelson's last victory and death, 

1471. 
Bravery of Captain Barber, 1346. 
Braw wooer, 1267. 
Breath of life, 1889-91. 
Breeches garland, 1202. 
Brewer laddie, 793. 
Brewing. The complete family brewer, 

180. 
Bridal ring, 1556. 
Bride's burial; or, The affectionate 

lovers, 714-16. 
BrideweU, 398. 
Bridewell keeper, 1535. 
Brief description of . . . figures of the 

human anatomy in wax, 2307. 
Bright, Mr. Foxchase by Mr. Bright' s 

hounds, 651. 
Bright Belinda, 1915. 
Bright Plioebus, 1312. 
Brightlev, Rev. R. Last sermon, 39, 40. 
Brisk Billy and Susan, 1328. 
Brisson, M. de. Shipwreck and captivity 

of, 303. 
Bristol, Honor of, 2430 
The merchant of Bristol's daughter, 

974. 
Bristol bridegroom, 975-6. 
Bristol garland, 717. 
Bristol tragedy, 718. 
Britain's contest, 1203. 
Britain's revenge, 1204. 
Britannia in tears for the hero of the Nile, 

1205. 
Britannia's magazine, 1206. 
Britannia's new magazine, 1207. 
British Apollo, 1208-10. 
British constitution, 1328. 
British fair, 1232. 
British harmony, 1211. 
British hero's valour display'd in taking 

the town of Montreal, 1423. 
British lion, 197. 

British soldier's garland, 1212-13. 
British tars, 276. 
British valour, 1214, 1419. 
Briton's conquests, 1490-91. 
Britons to arms, 1928. 
Broderick, Miss, trial of, 2237. 
Broken contract, 719-20. 
Broom of Cowdenknowes, 882, 1085, 1190, 

1495. 
Brose and butter, 1359. 
Brother sportsmen, I'm yours, 1208. 
Brothers, Richard, prophecies of, 2172, 

note. 
Brown jug, 1259. 
Brown, Betty, the St. Giles orange girl, 

130. 
Brown, Joseph. Poem on Joseph and 

his brothers, 54. 
Brown, Richard. Description of a 

bawdy liouse, 2327. 
Brownrig revived, 2243. 
Bruce, Michael. The old Scot's tragical 

song of Sir James the Rose, 1088-92. 
Bruce. Robert de Bruce's garland, 1045. 
Bruce, Robert, history of, 198, 199. 
Bruce's address, 1215-16, 1275, 1285, 

1383, 1620, 1651, 2456. 
Bubble year, 272. 



Buchanan, George. Highlander deline- 
ated, 289. 

Witty exploits of, 1700-1705. 

Buchanshire tragedy, 1086-7. 
Buchaveu, History of, 1710-12. 
Buckingham. Life and death of the 

great duke of Buckingham, 787. 
Life of George Villiers, duke of 

Buckingham, 200. 
Buckingshamsliire miracle, 13. 
Budget of mirth, 1216a. 
Bugle horn, 13.53. 
Bull-baiting, Bloxwich wake, 1887. 

Darlastone wake, 1930-34. 

Bullfinch, The, 1217. 

Bullock banker's medley, 1892. 

Bum-bailiffs, cheats of, 2333. 

Bumper 'Squire Jones, 1499. 

Bunch of green ribbons, 1482. 

Bundle ofiarailiar exhortations, 17. 

Bundle of truths, 1320. 

Bungey, conjuror, life and death of, 2118. 

Bunker Hill, battle of, 1540. 

Bunter's wedding, 1893-4. 

Bunyan, John. The pilgrims progress, 

82-4. 
Burgomaster, The, 963. 
Burke, William, resurrectionist, 2238-9. 
Burking, 2238, note. 
Burma, king of, Avemio, 42-4. 
Burns, Robert. The battle of Sherrar 

muir, 1626, note. 

Jenny lass, my bonny bird, 1382. 

The lass of Loch Royal, 643, note. 

Tam o' Shanter, 1116-17. 

Bums, Robert, life of, 201-2. 

Burns's Farewell to the Tarbolton lodge, 

1298. 
Burns's songster, 1218. 
Burr, Mrs. Alary Anne, last words of, 

2440. 
Burrell, Thomas, trial of, 2148. 
Bury St. Edmunds, trial of witches at, 

2136-7. 
Bush aboon Traquire (Traquair), 884, 

1205. 
Busks, argument in favor of, 2415. 
Busy bee, 1219. 
Butclier and parson, 1511. 
Butcher, London, 1970-1. 
Butcher's ilaugliter, 1424. 
Butt^her's daughter's policv, 1895. 
Butchers. True and real dialogue, 2386. 
Buxom dame of Reading, 1244. 
Buxom Nan of Dover, 1265, 1276. 
By Logan streams, 1337. 
By the gaily circling glass, 1324. 
Byrne, Miss, songs sung by, 1803. 



Ca' the ewes to the knows, 1234, 1410. 

Cabin boy, 1545. 

Cabinet of fancy, 1671. 

Cabinet of love, 1220-21. 

Cabinet of wit, 1672. 

CadwaUader, Mary, murder of, 2240. 

Caermathen tragedy, 964. 

Caesar, Julius, 531. 

Calcraft, William, executioner, 2189, 

note, 2193. 
Caledonia, 1269, 1458. 
Caledonia garland, 1222. 
Caledonian laddy, 1591. 
Calendar, Shepherd's, 186. 
CaUipaedia ; or. The art of getting pretty 

children, 2308. 
CaUum's hill, 880, 1019. 
Cambridge, Mass., mentioned in Ms. 

note, 399, note. 
Cambridge jests, 1673. 
Cambridge tender, 1397-8. 
Cambridgeshire tragedy, 721. 
Cameron, Dr. Archibald, Life of, 203. 
Cameron, Jenny, cut of, 203. 
Canadian boat song, 1623. 
Canary, Tlie, 1223. 
Candran side, 1555. 
Cannibalism of deserters from St. Helena, 

301 ; John Gregg, 2255; Sawney Beaue, 

2231. 
Canterbury, King of, 713-4. 
Canterbm-y tales. By Chaucer, jun., 

1674-6. 
Capering on the shore, 1635. 



148 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Capririous beauty, 396. 

Captain Agra, 1183. 

Captain Barber, 876. 

Captain Glen's unhappy voyage to New 
Barbary, 722. 

Oapt. Hind's progress and ramble, 723. 

Captain O'Kaine, 1302. 

Captain of love, 1177, 1279. 

Captain Wattle and Miss Roe, 1191. 

Captain Wedderburn's courtship, 727-30. 

Captive maniac, 1376. 

Captivities. See Section VI, p. 17. 

Card fortune book, new, 2091. 

Cards, The new game at, 1786. 

Careful maiden, 2036. 

Careless batchelor, 1224. 

Careless batehelor's garland, 1224. 

Cares of a married life, 923. 

Carew, Bamfylde Moore, adventures of, 
325-329. 

Carey, Henry. SaUy in our alley, 1027, 
note; 1589. 

CargiU, Donald, life and wonderful 
prophecies of, 2150. 

Cariches, John Falkirk's, 1741-3. 

Cariden, Joan, executed for witchcraft, 
2134 

Carle, now the king's come, 731. 

Carlisle, Daft Watty's ramble to, 899, 
1647. 

History of, 286. 

Carlisle yetts, 286. 

Carols. See Christmas carols. 

Carpet loom, cut of, 174, note. 

Carroty 'squire, 1334. 

Cartwright,W. The Leominster tragedy, 
2240. 

Carving, rules for, 2305, note. 

Cast your nabs and cares away, 329. 

Castle-builder, A, 732. 

Catch club, 1225. 

Catechism, 14. 

A la mode, 2300. 

Astrological, 2064. 

Church, 81. 

Coachman's and footman's, 2312. 

English lady's, 2330. 

Englishman's political, 2313. 

Historical, 238-40. 

New historical, 241-42a. 

Catling, James, trial of, 2187. 

Catskin, 73-3-38, 2410. 

Cats-skms' garland, 733. 

Caxton. Rej-nard the Fox, 539, note. 
Cervantes, Life of, 204. 

Ch s. Col., memoirs of, 2241. 

Chadwiek, Thomas, trial and execution 

of, 2178. 
Challenge, 788. 
Chamber maid, 1304. 
Chambermaid, Crafty, 1912-14, 1914a. 
Chambermaid's policy, 1914, 1914a. 
Chambers, John, confession of, 2195. 
. Champagne, Savage girl of, 322-3. 
Chaplet, 1226. 

Chapman, Mr., songs sung by, 1225. 
Chapman, John Cheap, the, 1734-8. 
Character of a drunkard, 2400 
Character of a low churchman, 268. 
Characters. Hickelty pickelty; or, A 

medley of characters, 2404. 
Charades. See Section XIII, p. 94. 
Charles the Great, 531. 
Charles I, king of England, cut of, 194. 

England's black tribunal, 205. 

Charles II's restoration, 206. 
King Charles and his three concu- 
bines, 1747. 
Charles XII, king of Sweden, life of, 
207-10. 

True protestant general, 1628. 

Charles Edward Stuart, the Pretender, 

211. 
Charles Jones, the tootraan, 45. 
Charlie is my darling, 1234, 1366, 1602. 
Charlotte, Miss, the affectionate, 357. 
Charming fellow, 1654. 
Charming widow, 883. 
Charms of a rich old woman, 2309. See 

also 1389, 2310-11. 
Charms of Phillis prefer'd before the 

juice of the grape, 1547. 
Charter, the, dialogue on, 219. 
Charteris, CoL, memoirs of, 2241. 



Chaucer, jun. Canterbury tales, 1674r-6. 

Cheap, John, the Chapman, 1734-8. 

Cheap repositokt tracts, 126-178. 

Cheapside apprentice, 134. 

Chearful companion, 1227-8. 

Chearful wife's garland, 112-120. 

Cheating tribe, 1523. 

Cheats of Scapin, 612. 

Cheerful songster, 1229. 

Chelmsford. Examination and confes- 
sion of certain witches at Chelms- 
ford, 21.30. 

Chelsea pensioner, 1258. 

Cherry-cheek Patty, 1191. 

Clierry ripe, 2432. 

('heshire prophecy, Nixon's, 2158-60. 

Chester, Tlie afflicted parents of, 3. 

Chester garland, 739. 

Chesterfield, Lord, The ears of, and 
Parson Goodman, 1690. 

Chevy Chase, 740-54, 2411. 

Chicken, Edward. The collier's wed- 
ding, 1899. 

Child Maurice, 858, 858a, 859, note. 

Child of a tar, 1230. 

Child, F. J., MS. ballads collected by, 
p. ix. 

Child's manual, 81. 

Children in the wood (prose), 454-8, 
461. 

(verse), 640-50, 1595, 2412-13. 

Children in the wood restored, 459, 460. 

Cliimney-sweep, Lawyer and, 420, 421. 

Chimney sweeper, 641. 

China mettle garland, 1231. 

Chloe, 1246. 

Choice drop of honey from the rock, 
Christ, 15. 

Choice of a husband, 1187. 

Choice of a wife, 1187. 

Choice penny-worth of wit, 1008-10; also 
1006-7. 

Choice spirits' delight, 1232. 

Choristers, 755. 

Chough and crow, 1290. 

Christ's kirk on the gi'een, 1896. 
Christian merchant; a sermon, 93. 

Christian monitor, 16. 
Christian's diary, 2151-2. 
Christian's patience, 112-120. 
Christian's pocket-book, 17. 
Christian's selection, (no. 2), 18. 
Christmas. Poems anent the keeping of 

Yule, 87. 
Christmas carols, 19, 20. 
Christmas hymn, A new, 174. 
Churchwarden. True and real dialogue, 

2386. 
Churlish husband, 1897. 
Cicely ; or. The power of honesty, 135. 
CindereUa, 461-3, 471. 
Civil list, John WUkes' speech on, 274. 
Clarendon's housewarming. By A. Mar- 
veil, 220. 
Clarinda, 1568. 

Clark, Mrs., farewell to her son, 2195. 
Clean-cogue, Thomas, 1460, 1626, note. 
Clifford, Eleanor. See Fair Rosamund. 
ClimoftheClough, 632. See also Clym. 
Cloak's knavery, Ballad of the, 194. 
Clothier of England (Jack of Newbui-y), 

513-516. 
Cloudeslie, "William of, 631-3. 
Clove-hitch knot, 2421. 
ClojTie, Bishop of Exhortation to 
Roman Catholick Clergy of Ireland, 
290. 
Clubs, women's, 2360-1. 
Clydesdale wedding, 1233. 
Clym of the Clough, 631-3. 
Coachman's and footman's catechism, 

2312. 
Coal black rose, 2432. 
Coalman's courtship to the creel-wife's 

daughter, 1677-«. 
Coalpit, Mr. Spearing lives a week in a, 

319. 
Cobbler and king of Spain, 399. 
Cobbler, Blinkey 'd, 703-5. 
Cobbler, Contented, 136. 
Cobbler, Hughson, the, 1686, note, 

1956-7. 
Cobbler, King and the, 1751-60. 
Cobbler's stall, cut of, 136, note. 



Cock Robin, Death and burial of, 775. 

Cockney outwitted, 1905-6. 

Cockney's miscellany, 2313. 

Cogie, 'The, 1548. 

Cogie of ale, 818. 

Colchester, King of, 1713-14. 

Cole, John, Delightful adventures of, 

1739-40. 
Coleman, Richard, life and adventures 

of, 2242. 
Coleridge, S. T. The Watchman, 2388. 
Colin and Jenny, 1189. 
Collection of new songs, 1235. 
Collection of rare and curious tracts on 

witchcraft, 2142. 
Collection of riddles, charades, and co- 
nundrums. New, 1785. 
Collection of the best Scottish songs, 

12.34. ^ 

Collection of toasts and sentiments, 

1394. 
Collier girl, Lancashire, 158. 
Collier, John. Battle of the flving dra- 
gon and the man of Heaton, 1878. 

Miscellaneous works, 2359. 

Collier's wedding. By Edward Chicken, 

1898-9, 
Colliery, cut of, 158, note. 
Collin Meager and Jenny Wood, 359. 
Collin's complaint, 1354. 
Collins, Richard. Nature display'd, 983. 
CoUyer, Mary. Death of Abel, 1. 
Colter, John, his escape from Indians, 

372. 
Combat between horse and lion, 594 
Combat between Moore of Moore-Hall 

and the dragon of Wantley, 1940. 
Come g'c's a sang, the lady cried; [or, 

Tullochgorum], 1230. 
Come under my plaidy, 1236, 1301. 
Comedian's tales, 1681. 
Comet, ode on, 2447. 
Comic songs. By John Labem, 1236a-b. 
Comic songster, 1237. 
Comical history of the collier's wedding, 

1898. 
Comical history of the king and the cob- 
bler, 1758-60. 
Comical Kate's answer and denial, 1433. 
Comical robbery of the passengers in the 

Gloucestershire coach, 1016. 
Comical transactions of Lothian Tom. 

By Dougal Graham, 1772. 
Comical wedding, 1900-2. 
Common arithmbtic turned into a song, 
183. ^ 

Companion, Little young man's, 183. 
Companion, Thrifty housewife's, 182. 
Comparison, The, 1543. 
Complaint of Mis. Page for causing her 

husband to be murtliered, 1001. 
Compleat .jester, 1682. 
Complete "art of cookery, 182. 
Complete family brewer, 180. 
Complete guide for a servant-maid, 181. 
Complete letter writer; or, Cupid's mes- 
senger, 2315. 
Compliments, academy of, 2301. 
Complying shepherdess, 1608. 
Comus; a masque. Altered from Mil- 
ton, 613. 
Confusion; or. The world in disorder, 

2317. 
Conjurer, The, 370. 
Connel and Flora, 1366. 
Conquest of France, by the Black Prince, 

212. 
Conquest of France, by King Henry V, 

923. 
Conquest of Quebeck, 1527. 
Conquistador, The, 265, note. 
Constant damsel, 1193. 
Constant lover of Worcestershire, 1662. 
Constant lovers, 897-9,. 902-5, 1166-9, 

1417. 
Constant shepherd, 1615. 
Constantia, daughter of the emperor of 

Persia, 530. 
Constitution and Guerrifere, 2414. 
Constitutional chronicle, 197. 
Consumptions, Cure for, 2415. 
Contented cobbler, 136. 
Contented lover, 1352. 
Contented lovers, 756, 1661 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



149 



Contented man, 1195. 

Contented sheplierdess, 1286. 

Contented tar, 1509. 

Contented wi' little, 1271. 

Contented wife; or, The reformed hus- 
band, 1039. 

Contentment, 1284. 

Conundrums. See Section XIII, p. 94. 

Converts, The, 213. 

Convivial songster, 1238. 

Cook, John, murderer, 2243. 

Cook, Cottage, 137. 

Cookery, Complete art of, 182, 

Cook-niaid's garland ; or, The out-of-the 
way devil, 1903. 

Cook's best guide, 182. 

Cool. Laird of Cool's ghost, 2351-2. 

Coolun, The, 1193. 

Cooper of Norfolk, 1904. 

Cooper of Katelitt, Cruel, 764-5. 

Cope. See Johnny Cope. 

Copenhagen, battle of, 257, 268. 

Copy of a letter, wrote by a young shep- 
herd of Borrowdale, 1683. 

Coridon and Parthenia, 757. 

Cork trader, 758. 

Com laws, dialogue on, 219. 

Cora rigs are bonny, 1298, 1928. 

Cornell, Sarah Maria, death of, 2421, 
note. 

Cornish, Humphrey. The Welsh travel- 
ler, 1851. 

Cornwall, The cripple of, 762, 1897. 

King of, 171^14. 

Cornwall tragedy, 759. 

Coronation, Tlie, 1379. 

Corsair, The, 358, 376. 

Corunna's lone shore, 1283, 1642. 

Cottage cook, 137. 

Cottage on the moor, 1316, 1339. 

Country courtship, 1974. 

Country girl's policy; or. The cockney 
outwitted, 1905-06. 

Country liiss, 1657. 

Country plowman, 1546. 

Country squire's courtship, 1353. 

Countiy stroller; or. Jack of all trades, 
1239. 

Country stroller's garland, 1239. 

Countryman's garland, 1907-8. 

County of Cavin, 786, 1388. 

Couper, Andrew Scott, elegy on the 
death of, 2329. 

Couple well match'd, 1630, 

Courtof Apollo, 1240. 

Courtier and tinker, 1909-11. 

Courtship and marriage, York dialogue 
on, 2396. 

Art of, 1670, 2305. 

Country, 1974. 

Country 'squire's, 1353. 

Mystery of, discover'd, 2309. 

New proverbs on the pride of 

women, 2336. 

Whole art of, 2362. 

Covent Garden concert, 1241-2. 

Covent Garden concert. New, 1243. 

Covent Garden theatre, songs sung at, 
1242-43, 1261, 1414, 1526, 1584. See also 
titles under Section X, p. 36. 

Coventry made free by Godiva, 760. 

Covetous mother, 761. 

Co>vper, William. On liberty, and in 
praise of Mr. Howard, 1162. 

John Gilpin, 1966. 

Cox, William, robber, 2244. 

Crafty chambermaid, 1912-14, 1914a. 

Crafty doctor's medicine to gain a fair 
lady, 1998. 

Crafty farmer, 1915. 

Crafty farmer of Norfolk, 1916 

Crafty lass's garland, 1928a. 

Crafty London apprentice, 1917-19, 1454. 

Crafty lover, 1920-2. [951. 

Crafty maid outwitted by the old fortune 
teller, 1395. 

Crafty miller, 1923-4. 

Crafty plowman's garland, 1925-6 

Crafty princess, 866-7. 

Crafty sailor, 1927. 

Craigie Lea, Bonny wood of, 1173, 1347, 
1409. 

Crawhall's Chap-book chaplets, p. x. 

Olde tayles newlye relaytea, p. x. 



Credulous maid, 766. 
Cries of Banbury and London, 2318. 
Cries of London, 2319-20. 
Cries of London verbatim, 2313. 
Cries of the Son of God, 12. 
Crime and criminals, 2173-2299. 
Cripple of Cornwall, 762, 1897. 
Crispin and Crispianus, 566, note. 
Croaker, Ally ; jest-book, 1668. 

song, 1579. 

Crocus, Poor, pluckt up by the roots, 265. 

Croker, Alicia, 1668, note. 

Croker, Thomas Crofton. Daniel O' 

Rourke's voyage to the moon, 1684, 

note. 
Cromdale, Haws of, 882, note. See also 

Haughs of C^rumdel, 882-5. 
Cromlet's lilt, 763. 
Cromwell, Oliver. See Haughs of Crum- 

del, 882-5. 

life of, 214. 

Crop'y boy, 2461. 

Cross, Mrs. Sarah, murder of, 2272. 

Cross, William, highwayman, 2198. 

Crossing of proverbs, 2316. 

Crouch, Humphrey. Mad pranks of 

Tom Tram, 1836, note. 

The Welsh traveUer, 1849. 

Crown-Point, battle of, 1391. 

Croydon foresters, 359. 

Cruel captain, 302. 

Cruel cooper of Ratcliff, 764-5. 

Cruel daughter of the city of York, 

2220. 
Cruel husband ; or, Devonshire tragedy, 

2201. 
Cruel knight, and the fortunate farmer's 

daughter, 843. 
Cruel lover; or. The credulons maid, 

766. 
Cruel miss well fitted, 1918. 
Cruel nymph, 1648. 
Cruel step mother ; or. The unhappy son, 

767-70. See also Stepmother's cruelty, 

936. 
Cruelty disarmed, 369, note. 
Crumdel, Haughs of, 882-5. 
Crump, Thomas, trial of, 2187. 
Cuckold's cap garland, 1244. 
Culloden's jovial crew, 1540. 
Cumberland dialect. See Shepherd of 

Borrowdale, 1682. 
Cumberland, King of, 1713-14. 
Cumberland tragedy, 771. 
Cunnie's garland, 1928. 
Cupboard door broke open, 2321. 
Cup-board door open'd, 2322. 
Cupid & Psyche ; a pantomime, 614. 
Cupid wounded; or, The mischievous 

bee, 1245. 
Cupid's confession, 1592. 
Cupid's courtesie, 772. 
Cupid's magazine, 1246-7. 
Cupid's messenger, 2315. 
Cupid's revenge, 773-4. 
Cure for consumptions, 2415. 
Curious dialogue between four selfish 

landlords, 2323. 
CuiTie, Murdoch, True and genuine ac- 
count of, 2245. 
Cypress wreath, 1376. 
D, B. Verses to the author of the third 

part of Pilgrim's progress, 83, note. 
13*****, N****. The secret history, 410. 
Daft bargain, 2329. 
Daft Watty's ramble to Carlisle, 899, also 

1647. 
Dalkeith, tailor of. See Mansie Waugh, 

1777-8. 
Dame of honour, 2324-5. 
Dame Trot, Renowned history of, 1929. 
Damon and Chloe, 1434. 
Damon and Phillis, 1180, 1475. 
Damon's treachery, 658. 
Damsel's complaint for the loss of her 

sailor, 1652. 
Dan and Jane, 165. 

Dancer, Daniel, Strange and unaccount- 
able life of, 330. 
Daniel Blue, 1248. 
Daniel O'Rourke's wonderful vo3-age to 

the moon. By WiUiam Maginn, 1684. 
Darby and Joan, 942. 
Darlastone wake bull-baiting, 1930-4. 



Darlington maid, 1425. 

Dash along to the mellow-toned horn, 

1396. 
Dashing white sergeant, 1664. 
David and Bath-sheba, 21, 22. 
David and (ioliath, cut of, 504, note. 
David, King, 531. 
David, St., of Wales, 548. 
Davie and Bess, 1978. 
Davies, Fannie, modern Amazon, 2246. 
Davis, Sarah, street-walker, 1886. 
Davison, Capt. John, trial of, 2247. 
Davy and Kate, 1564. 
Dawson, James, tilal and execution of, 

2178. 
Day of judgment, Descant on, 36. 
Day returns, 1557, 1650. 
Days o' lang syne, 1633. 
Deacon, Thomas, trial and execution of, 

2178. 
Dead man's dream, 23-5. 
Dead man's song, 24-5. 
Dean, Henry. Whole art of legerde- 
main, 2103-4. 
Dean, Mary, trial of, 2184. 
Dear is my native vale, 1191. 
Dear love, regard my grief, 985. 
Dear Mary, 1227. 
Dear Marj;, adieu, 1236. 
Dear Sylvia, no longer my passion de- 
spise, 1475. 
Death and a rich man, 34. 
Death and burial of Cock Robin, 775. 
Death and the lady, 26-33, 2416-17. 
Death, angel of. Dialogue between a 

prisoner and the angel of deatli, 35. 
Death by the way, 1535. 
Death no bad change, 128. 
Death of Abel, 1. 

Death of Queen Jane, 1036, 1222, note. 
Death of Queen Jean, 1300. 
Death of Sally Roy, 1267, 1617. 
Death of the embargo, 2418. 
Death triumphant. By Andrew Jones, 

2398. 
Death, Capt., commander of the Terrible, 

privateer, 1506. 
Deceitful yoimg man, 2424-5. 
Deceitfulness of pleasure, 138. 
Deceived batchelor, 1260 — 

Deer hunter, 1625. 
Defense of the proceedings against Jane 

Wenham, 2148. 
Defoe, D. Apparition of Mrs. Veal, 426. 

jure divmo, 248. 

Moll Flanders, 398. 

Robinson Crusoe, 403-7. 

Deil cam fidd'ling, 1215, 1275, 1383. 

Delight of the muses, 1249. 

Delights of the bottle, 2326. 

Delights of the chace, 1250. 

Delights of the spring, 1251-2 

Delights of wine, 1458. 

Deloney, Thomas. Prince of England's 

courtship to the king of France's 

daughter, 1028. 
The lamentation of Mr. Pages wife 

of Plimouth, 1001, note. 
The life and death of Fair Rosa- 
mond, 822, note. 

Thomas of Reading, 581, note. 

Demonologt and witchcrait, 2105- 

2149. 
Denham, Sir John. Directions to a 

painter, 220. 
Denis, St., of France, 548. 
Dennis, Mr., song sung by, 1506. 
Denoue, Mons., wax figures of, 2307. 
Deptford frolick, 1935. 
Deptford garland, 1935. 
Derbyshire garland, 1097. See also Sir 

William Stanley's garland, 1096-9. 
Derwentwater, James 3d earl of, history 

of, 215-16. 
Derwentwater, Charles Batclifie, called 

earl of, memoirs, 217. 
Description of Ireland, 290. 
Description of the fom- parts of the world, 

287. 
Deserted by the waning moon, 1618. 
Deserted village. By Dr. Goldsmith, 

776. 
Deserter's lamentation, 1562. 
Despau-ing goatherd, 1554. 



I50 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Despairing husband and cheerful wife, 

112-20. 
Despoudmg negro, 1494, 1657. 
Deuks, The, dang o'er my daddie, 1575. 
Devil and Doctor Faustus, 2105. 
Devil and tlie grinder, 730. 
Devil cateli'd in a turnip sack, 2036. 
Devil outwitted by a woman, 2010. 
Devil's cabinet broken open, 218. 
Devil's in tlie ladj-'s modesty, 1355. 
Devons)iire garland, 777-8. 
Dcvonsliire, map of, 425, note. 
Devonshire tragedy, 2201. 
Dexter, Lord Timothy, his poet-laureate, 

2429, note. 
Dialogue between a despairing husband 

and a cheerful wife, 112-20. 
Dialogue between a noble lord and a 

woodman, 91. 
Dialogue between a noted shoemaker 

and his wife, 1686-8. See also Hugh- 
son the cobbler. 
Dialogue between a prisoner and the 

angel of death, 35. 
Dialogue between a rich old woman and 

a brisk young man, 1389, 2309-11. 
Dialogue between a young lady and a 

farmer, 1251. 
Dialogue between an honest sailor and 

his deluding landlady, 1503. 
Dialogue between an old usurer and a 

young lady, 1389. 
Dialogue between countrj' Robin and 

bonny black Bess, 2354. 
Dialogue between death and a lady, 

26-33, 2416-17. 
Dialogue between four selfish landlords, 

Dialogue between honest John and lov- 
ing Kate, aOlV3. 

Dialogue between William Lickladle and 
Thomas t'lian-cogue, 1460, 1626, note. 

Dialogue betwixt King William and a 
plowman, 932. 

Dialogue on the corn-laws, etc., 219. 

Dialogue, True and real, between Mr. 
Steel, the butcher, etc., 2386. 

Dialogue, York, 2396. 

Dibden, Charles. Delight of the muses, 
1249. 

Humorous budget of sea songs, 1253. 

Vocal harmony, 1637. 

Dibdin, Charles, songs sung bj-, 1206-7, 
1249, 12^3, 1437, 1578, 1637. 

Dick and Nell, 1254. 

Ditt'erence between a good wife and a 
kept-up miss, 1180. 

Diflerence between to-day and to- 
morrow, 41. 

Diflicult batchelor, 1936-7. 

Dignum, Mr., songs sung by, 1437. 

Dilworth, W. H. History of Thamas 
Kouli Khan, 254. 

Directions for a religious closing of the 
day, 88. 

Directions for reading the Bible, 17. 

Directions to a painter. By Sir John 
Denham, 220. 

Disappointed lover, 1255. 

Disappointment, 1308. 

Disconsolate lover, 1278. 

Discovery of witches, 2134a. 

Disguised squire, 1199, 1384. 

Dish of tea, 2433. 

Disobedient lady reclaim'd, 2211-14. 

Dissertation on the doctrine of sensation, 
338. 

Dissertation on the first day of the week, 
36. 

Distracted maid's lamentation, 1231. 

Distracted maiden's Ioa'c for the farmer's 
son, 1506. 

Distracted sailor, 779. 

Distracted sailor's complaint, 1256. 

Distracted sailor's garland, 1256. 

Distressed lady, 780. 

Distressed mother, 139. 

Distressed passengers, 758. 

Distressed shepherd, 781-2. 

Diversion upon diversion, joak upon 
joak, 1685. 

Diverting dialogue, between a shoe- 
maker and his wife, 1686-8. See also 
Uughson the cobbler. 



Diverting tale of three bonnets, 1941. 
Doating mother's garland, 1901-2. 
Doctor Merryman, 1689. 
Dod, John. The sayings of old Mr. 
Dod, 85, 96. 

Sermon on malt, 2354, note; 1790, 

note. 

Domestic physician, SuUv's. 

Dominie deposed. By William Forbes, 

1938-9. 
Don Quevedo's son's arrival at Dul>lin, 

2328. •^ 

Donald and Bess, 1614. 
Donald & his dog, 1368, 2026. 
Donahl of Dundee, 1376. 
Donald M'Donald, 1365. 
Doncaster, Old men living underground 

near, 332. 
Donkin, Tobias, quaker and highway- 
man, 2248. 
Donovan, Timothy. The whimsical lady, 

2095-7, 2391-2. 
Don't be in sucli a hurry, 1615. 
Dooms-day; or, Tlie gi-eat day of the 

Lord drawing uigb. By Andrew 

Jones, 2399. 
Dorastus and Fannia (Fawnia), History 

of, 364-5. 
Dorsetshire garland, 669-72, also 667-8. 

(A different tale), 783. 

(A different tale), 2419. 

Double elopement, 1261. 

Douglas, Lord. liOrd Douglas's tragedy, 
955, 1302. See also, 858a. 

Douglas and Percy, Earls, A bloody bat- 
tle fought by. See Chevy Chase. 

Dover, Bold boatswain of, 1588. 

Henry of, 969. 

Seaman of, 970-71. 

Dover, Elizabeth. Sec The blasphemer's 
punishment, 12. 

Down the burn, Davie, 1181, 1581, 1642, 
1647, 1919. 

Downfal of piracy, 1662. 

Downie, David, 2297. 

Dowsey for sport, 1609. 

Dragon of Wantley, 1940. 

Drake, Sir Francis. Voyages and travels, 
304-5. 

Dramatic, 611-630. 

Dramatic budget; or, Olio of fancy, 615. 

Dramatic review, 1802. 

Dreadful character of a drunkard, 2400. 

Dreadful example for wicked husbands, 
2202. 

Dreadful news from Taunton-Dean, 2203. 

Dreadful warning to all wild and thought- 
less young women, 2216. 

Dreadful wabnings, 2200-2220. 

Dream, A, 140. 

Dream, Tlie ; or, A flight to the regions 
of knowledge, 221. 

Dream books, fortune telling, and 
legerdemain, 2063-2104. 

Dream of a \''ermont minister, 2450. 

Dream, Plow-boy's, 174. 

Dreams, interpretation of, 2305, note. 

Dreams and moles interpreted, 2065. 

Dreams and moles witli their interpreta- 
tion and signification, 2066-9. 

Drinking club, picture of, 2313. 

Drinking song, 1259. 

Drouthy Tom, 877, 1738, note. 

Drumdog, battle of, 255. 

Drummoud of Hawthornden. High- 
lander delineated, 289. 

Drunkard, Dreadful character of a, 2400. 

Drunkard reformed, 730. 

Drunken exciseman, 1094, 1257. 

Drunken-man. By Hippesley, 1225, 1394. 

Drunkenness, Wonderful advantages of, 
125. 

Drury-Lane concert, 1258-9. 

Drury Lane theatre, songs sung at, 1242- 
43, 1584. See also titles under Section 
X, p. 36. 

Dublin baker, 1510. 

Duchess of Newcastle's lament, 1260. 

Ducks and green peas; or, The New- 
castle rider, 616-18. 

Duenna, The, 1261. 

Duke of Anjou's farewel to Spain, 784. 

Duke of Argyle's courtship to an Eng- 
lish lady, 785-6, 910, 1299, 1436. 



Duke of Gordon's daughters, 788-94 
Duke of Gordon's garland, 794 
Duke Hamilton and Lord Moon, 795 
Duke of York's gariand, 1262-3 
Dul-Bruce, Marquis, exploit and trans- 
actions of, 2249. 
Dulce domum, 1264. 
Dumbarton drums, 1370, 1648. 
Dumbarton, execution at, 2245. 
Duncan Campbell and his doe Oscar 
366-7. ^ '-'•Lar, 

Duncan Grav, 1629. 

Duncombe, T., criminal, 2199. 

Dunganna's lady, 1236. 

Dunghil-cock, 1265. 

Dunkirk, Peace and, 261. 

Dunnage, Mrs. See trial of Sir Thomas 
Turton, 2295. 

Diinwhistle's testament, 1941. 

Durham garland, 796-7. 

Durin, Sarah, Story of, 409. 

Dutch bribe, Tlie ; a ballad, 222. 

Dutch fortune teller, 2070. 

Dutiful daughter, editor of, 411 

Dutiful daughter of Halifax, 798-9 

Dutiful son, 353. 

Dutiful son's reward, 1144. 

Du Vail, highwayman, 2174 

Dwarfs, 339. 

Dying behaviour &c. of the five unfortu- 
nate malefactors, etc., 2192. 

Dying Christian to his soul, 2049, note 

Dying lover, 1355. 

Dying tears of a true lover forsaken, 800 

Dyster's mistake, 1299. 

Earl Brand, 934, note; 955, note; 1302 

note. * 

Early horn, 951, 1588. 
Ears of Lord Chesterfield and Parson 

Goodman. By Voltaire, 1690. 
Easham, the fair maid of, 402. 
Ebouli Sina, 471. 
Echoing horn, 1430. 
Ecstacy. By Thomas Pamell, 1162. 
Edgar, King, 396, note. 
Edinburgh volunteers, 791. 
Edmund and Albina, 368. 
Edom o' Gordon, 634, note. See also 

Adam o' Gordon. 
Edward the Black Prince, Life of, 212 
Edwin, Mr., songs sung bv, 1535. 
Edwin and Angelina. By Oliver Gold- 

smith, 801, 1014. 
Edwin and Emma. By David Mallet 

802. ' 

Edwin's jests, humours, frolics, and bon- 

mots, 1691. 
Effects of war exposed, 259. 
Effects of whiskey, 1610. 
Eglington castle. Tournament at, 288. 
Egyptian fortune teller, True, 2100-1. 
Eight favourite songs, 1266. 
Eight songs, 1267. 

Election, The ; a quite new song, 223. 
Elegy on Jamie Gemmill, 1942. 
Elisha, 142. 
Ehza, 141. 
Elizabeth, Queen, and the earl of Essex, 

History of, 224-28. 
Ellerslie, Knight of. See Wallace, etc.. 

bj W. Hamston, 1149. 
EUiot, G. Life and travels in Fez, 306. 
Elogy of nothmg dedicated to nobody, 

1692. -^ 

Embargo, death of, 2418. 
Emigrant's farewell, 1192. 
Emperor done over, 1288. 
Encouraging general, 1536, note. 
End of oppres'sion, 229-30. 
England, Europe's glory, 1674. 
England, History of the kings and queens 

of, 243-4. 
England's black tribunal, 205. 
England's faithful phy.sician, 2401. 
England's timely remembrances, 39, 40. 
England's witty and ingenious jester, 

1693. 
English ale, 1208. 

English archer; or, Robin Hood's gar- 
land, 1055. 
English courage display'd, 1224. 
English lady's catechism, 2330. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



151 



English minstrel, 1268. 
Englisli night's euteitaiumeuts, 368, 400. 
English swindler, 347. 
Englishman's political catechism, 2313. 
Enigma, 88. 

Entertaining history of the female Quix- 
ote, 1694. 
Entertaining history of the Jews, 231. 
Epilogues and prologues. See the Dra- 
matic budget, 615; School of Roscius, 

624; Thespian oracle, 629. 
E're round the huge oak, 1589. 
Erringtou, Mr., murder of, 2237. 
Error repaired, 154. 
Erskine, E. The plant of renown, 86. 
Esquire and Susan's garland, 906, 990. 
Essay on criticism. By Alexander Pope, 

803. 
Essay on human life, 804. 
Essex, earl of, Brief history of the, 899. 
History of Queen Elizabeth and the 

earl of Essex, 224-228. 
A victory obtained by the young 

earl of Essex over the old emperor of 

Germany, 1035. 
Esther, Queen, 143. 
Eugene, Prince, health on liis beating 

the Turks, 1516. 
Evening contemplations in a college, 

1014. 
Every inch a sailor, 1539. 
Every man his own doctor, 187. 
Every man's duty discovered, 1248. 
Evilina. Love of Eviliua for Lord Ar- 

mond, 392. 
Ewe-boughts, Marion, 1269, 1481. 
Ewio wi' the crooked horn's garland, 

1270. Also, i:vi1. 
Examination, confession, triall, and exe- 
cution of Joane Williford, Joan Cari- 

den, and Jane Hott, 2134. 
Examination and confession of certain 

witches at Chelmsford, 2130. 
Excellent collection of popular songs, 

1271-2. 
Excellent new love song, 1600. 
Excellent new songs, 1273-4. 
Exciseman, 1287. 

Executioner, his oath and oflSce, 2193. 
Executions, 2189-2199. 
Executions in Scotland for the past 200 

years, 2189. 
Executions in Scotland from the year 

1600, 2193. 
Exeter, Two loyal lovers of, 805-8, also 

1177. 
Exeter garland, 805. 
Exile of Erin, 1215, 1275, 1620, 1651. 
Exmoor courtship, 1695. 
Exrnoor scolding, 1695. 
Explanation of the vices of the age, 

2333. 
Expulsion of seven devils [from] G. 

Lukins, 2149. 
Extempore sermon on malt, 1790, note; 

23.54. 
Extravagant wit, Adventures of the, 347. 



Fables of Aesop, 435-6. 

Face of our king is the picture for me, 

1276. 
Factor's garland, 809-13, 2420. 
Factory maid, 2421. 
Fair Eliza, 1552. 
Fair Ellen, 729. 
Fair Flora's answer, 845. 
Fair Isabel's garland, 816. 
Fair jilt, 369. 

Fair muid of Easham, 402. 
Fair maid of Islington, 1943. 
Fair Margaret and Sweet William, 818- 

20, 818, note. 
Fair Margaret's misfortunes, 818-20. 
Fair Marg'ret of Craignargat, 817. 
Fair Mary of Wallington, 1425. 
Fair possest, The, 1408. 
Fair Rosamond, History of (prose), 

464-9. 
Deloney's ballad, " Whenas King 

Henrv rul'd this land," 467, note, 822- 

7,2422. 

ballad, " In Woodstock bower," 

• 465, note, 468, note, 469. 



Fair Rosamond, ballad, " Sweet youthful 
charming ladies fair," 828-9. 

of Scotland, daughter of Lord Arun- 
del, 1126. 

Fair-star, Pi-incess, 471. 

Fair Susan's overthrow, 1017. 

Fair Susanna, 1397. 

Fair widow, are ve wauking, 1277. 

Fair young knight, 1573. 

Fairbanks, Jason, Solemn declaration of, 
2250. 

trial of, 2251. • 

Fairest of the fair, 1320, 1572. 

Fan-fax, Harriot, History of, 383. 

Fairies dance, a song, 470. 

Fairholt, J. W., collection of chap-books 
with autogi-aph note by, p. viii. 

Fairy stories. See Section IX., p. 26. 

Fairy stories: — The blue bird, etc., 470. 

Fairy tales, 471. 

Faithfrtl friendship; or, Alphonso and 
Ganselo, 830. 

Faithful Henry, 1251. 

Faithful love rewarded, 757. 

Faithful swain, 1915. 

Faithless captain, 831-4. 

Faithless lover, 729. 

Falconer's instructor, 186, note. 

Falkirk, John, Comical and witty jokes 
of, 1744. 

Falkirk's cariches, 1741-3. 

FaUof Adam, 144. 

Fallen chieftain, 1333. 

False swearing, God's judgment against, 

False Willie, 1434. 

Famous flower of serving-men, 835-7. 
Fancy, fun, & frolic, 619. 
Fane, George, memoirs of, 374. 
Far, far from me my lover flies, 1332. 
Farewel, The, 1197. 
Farewell, each bliss, 1590. 
Farewell, farewell, 1572. 
Farewell, my darkey Neddy, 1396. 
Farewell, thou fair day, 1602. 
Farewell to Lochaber, 1569. 
Farewell to the mountain, 1566; 
Farewell to whiskey, 247 
Farley, J., translator, 358 
Farmer, The, 1183. 

Farmer and young lady, Dialogue be- 
tween, 1251. 
Fanner, Crafty, 1915-16. 
Farmer, Fortunate young, 1510. 
Farmer, Miraculous, 1989. 
Farmer's blunder, 1884-6, 2020. 
Farmer's courtship to brisk young Mary, 

1231. 
Farmer's daughter, 1248, 1278. 
Farmer's daughter. Fortunate, 844. 
Farmer's daughter of meiTy Wakefield, 

1454. 
Farmer's son, 1279. 
Fanner's son falling in love with a young 

lady, 1925. 
Farmer's son's policy in gaining the 

young lady, 1925. 
Fanner's wish, 1433. 
Fashionable dandies' songster, 1280. 
Fatal choice, 145. 

Fatal effects of too sudden joy, 370. 
Fatal extravagance, 397. 
Fate of favorites, 200, note. 
Fate of MacGregor, 2049, note. 
Father, mother, and Joe, 1430. 
Father Paul, 1360. 
Faults on both sides, 1630. 
Faustus, 2105-14. 

Fawcett, Mr., songs sung by, 1437. 
Monsieur Tonson, recited by Mr. 

Fawcett, 1995-7. 
Fearful Dickey, 1354. 
Feast for the sons of Comus, 1448. 
Feast of laughter for the comical fellows, 

1697. 
Fee him, father, 1400. 
Feliciana and Rosario, 392, note. 
Female drummer, 1301. 
Female policy detected, 2335. 
Female Quixote, 1694. 
Female robbers. Lives of, 2175. 
Female sea-captain, 1479. 
Female sensibility, 838. 
Ferguson, Richard, highwayman, 2252. 



Fez, Mr. Elliot's travels in, 306. 

Fian, Doctor. See Newes from Scotland, 

2131-2. 
Fickle Jenny, 951. 
Fiction, Prose, 344-434. 
Verse. See Section XL, p. 37; 

XIV., p. 106. 
Fiction. Lists of novels, with analyses, 

408, note. 
Fiddle's hard case, 1652. 
Field of battle, 860. 
Fielding, Henry. Amelia (abridged), 

349. 
Murders. True examples of the 

interposition of I'rovidence, 2176-7. 

Tom Jones, 424. 

Fifty years shepherd for fifty a king, 1398. 

Fine flowers of the valley, 839. 

Fire of Frendraught, 839, note. 

Fisherman's daughter, 840. 

Fisherman's garland, 841-4. 

Five excellent new songs, 1281-1284, 

1286, 1288. 
Five excellent songs, 1285, 1287, 1289. 
Five favorite songs, 1290-1292. 
Five Scotch songs, 1293. 
Five songs, 1294. 
Five strange wonders of the world, 

2394-5. 
Flashy girls, 1085. 

Fleet, English, songs sung in the, 1414. 
Fletcher, George, trial and execution of, 

2178. 
Flight to the regions of knowledge, 221, 
Flora's farewel, 845. 
Flora's lament for Charly, 1233. 
Florian's Life of Cervantes, 204. 
Florio and Fidelia, 370, 395. 
Flower o' Dumblain, 1215, 1275, 1383. 
Flower o' Dumblane, 1284, 1285, 1572. 
Flower of Edinburgh, 1400, 1601. 
Flower of Edinburgh, Answer to the, 

1601. 
Flower of serving-men. Famous, 835-7. 
Flower, Margaret and Philip, Wonder- 

derful discoverie of the witchcrafts of, 

2133. 
Flowers of the forest, 1186, 1264, 1331, 

1401, 1494. 
Flowing can, 1295. 
Flying dragon and the man of Heaton, 

1878, 2359. 
Folk Tales. See Section IX., p. 26. 
Follow me over the mountain, 1296. 
Folly of going out of our element, 156. 
Folly of witless women displayed, 1696. 
Fond Damon's love for fair FlaveUa, 

1224. 
Fond mother's garland, 1297. 
Foote, Samuel. Epilogue to the Minor, 

2331. 
Footman, explanation of, 2360-1. 
Footman, History of Charles Jones, the, 

45. 
Footman trapp'd, 1953. 
Footman's catechism, 2312. 
For a' that and a' that, 1298. 
For lack of gold she's left me. Oh, 1273. 
Forbes, John. No dominies for me, 

ladie, 984, note. 
Forbes, William. The dominie deposed, 

1938-9. 
Force of conscience, 419. 
Ford, Emanuel. Parismus, prince of 

Bohemia, 532. 
Forester's garland, 1075. 
Forget me not, 1396. 
Forlorn lover, 846-7, 1564. 
Forsaken lovers, 912, 1403. 
Fort Palais in BcUeisle, taking of, 1506. 
Fortnight's ramble. Companion to, 292. 
Fortunate farmer's daughter, 844. 
Fortunate gipsy, 396, note. 
Fortunate lady, 842. 
Fortunate orplian, 371. 
Fortunate taylor, 1340. 
Fortunate wedding, 1579. 
Fortunate young fanner, 1510. 
Fortunatus, 472-478. 
Fortune teller, 171. 
Fortune telling. See Section XV., 

p. 115. 
Forty thieves, Ali Baba, or the, 437-40. 
Forty thieves, operatic romance, 440. 



152 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Four expcllent songs, 1306, 1307. 

P'our excellent new songs, 1299-1305. 

Four Indian kings, 887-9. 

Four kings, History of, 1713-14. 

Four interesting tales, 372. 

Four love songs, 1308. 

Four misses, 1195. 

Four parts of the world, 287. 

Four popular songs, 1309. 

Four seasons of the year, 848. 

Four songs, 1310. 

Fourberies de Scapin. By Molifere, 612, 

note. 
Fowles, Susanna, impostor, 2141. 
Fox-chace by Mr. Bright's hounds, 651. 
Fox, John, 2202. 
Franks, John, Birth, life, and death of, 

1744-5. 
Franklin, B. Advice to bathers, 179. 

The way to wealth, 190-2. 

Frasier, Duncan. The laidlev worm of 

Spindleston Ileugh, 525, 941. 
Frederic, late king of Prussia, Anecdote 

of, 1023. 
Frederick, the tax-master, 218. 
Free from confinement & strife, 1509. 
Free masonry the highway to hell, 2337. 
Freemasonry. Masonry dissected, 2357. 
Free-mason's song, 1310, 2387. 
Free mason's story, 1330. 
French and Indian cruelty exemplified. 

By P. Williamson, 320. 
French revolution, 284. 
French telegraphe. Song on the, 1463, 

note. 
Frendraught, Fire of, 839, note. 
Frennet Hall, 839. 
Friar and boy, 1944-51. 
Friar. See also Fryar; Fryer. 
Friburgh castle, 373. 
Frigate well mann'd, 1279, 1990. 
Frighted dove, 18. 
Frisky jester, 1697. 
Frolicksome lady's garland, 1312. 
Frolicksome maid, who went to Gibral- 

ter, 790. 
Frolicksome sea captain, 881, 2029, note. 
From thee, Eliza, I must go, 1176, 1496, 

1649. 
Fryar of orders gray, 1641. 
Fryer well-fitted, 1952. 
Fryer, Mr., murder of, 2195. 
Full and impartial account of the dis- 
covery of sorcery . . of Jane Wen- 
ham, 2144. 
Fumbling old man, 1490. 
Fun in an alley, 19.53. 
Fun upon fun; or. Leper the tailor, 

1765-9. 
Fun upon fun ; or, The stark-naked west 

country wedding, 1954. 
Funny Dick's unrivalled collection of 

jests, 1706-8. 
rimny Joe's budget of wit, 1698. 
Funny racers, 1471. 
Furnished table, 1298. 
Fy, gar rub her owre with strae, 1575. 



Gaberlunzie man, 1308. Also, 910, 1.363. 

Gagliardo and Fiorita, Nuptials of, 358, 
376. 

Gailj- still the moments roll, 1623. 

Galigantus, 504. 

Gallant lady's fall, 938. 

Gallant sailor, 1523. 

(iallant seaman's resolution, 849. 

Gallant soldier, 1.313. 

Galley slave, 1282, 1659. 

Galloping Dick, highwayman, 2252. 

Galloping's all at an encl, 1605. 

Galloway shepherds, 806, 1314. 

Galloway's ramble to the north, 1987. 

Game cock conquer'd, 1628. 

Gammer Gurton's garland of nursery 
songs, 1699. 

Ganselo, Alphonso and, 830. 

Gantier, Don Johannes, remarkable pro- 
phecies and predictions of, 2153. 

Gardener, Bloody, 706-8, 899. 

Garland of love's craftiness, 868-70. 

Garland of mirth and delight, 1315. 

Garland of new songs, 1316-1333. 

Garland of songs, 1334. 



Garland of trials, 850-1. 
Garland of withered roses, 806. 
Garlands (ballads). See Section XI., 
XIV., p. 37, 106. 

(collections of songs). See Section 

XII., p. 67. 

Gatehouse, 398. 

Gaudry, Mr., songs sung by, 1225. 

Gaunt, siege of, 973. 

Gay Damon, 1976. 

Gay, John. Black-ey'd Susan's garland, 

694-6. 
The seasons, and Rural poems and 

pastoral dialogues imitatea from Mr. 

Gay. By Bob Short, 848. 
Gelert, 2049, note. 
Gemmell, Jamie, Elegy on, 1942. 
General How's vic^tory over the rebels at 

Boston, 1540. 
General toast, 1591. 
General Wolfe, 1322. 
Generous deceit, 391. 
Generous monarch, 1718. 
Gent, Thomas. Blue-beard, 451-3, 538. 

Cinderella, 461. 

Little Red Ridinghood, 526. 

Pattern of pietj', 49. 

Piety displayed (St. Robert), 94. 

Puss in boots, 538. 

St. Winifred, 95. 

Gentle craft, 566. 
Gentle sailor, 1648. 

Gentle shepherd. By Allan Ramsay, 620. 
Gentleman's concert, 1336. 
Gentleman's jester, and newest collection 

of songs, 1871. 
Genuine account of the trials, behaviour 

after sentence of death, etc., 2178. 
Geographical Description and Lo- 
cal History, 284-300. 
George and Britain save, 1337. 
George, St., of England, 545-6, 548, 2017- 

18. 
George III, king of England, Birthday 

song, 2.32. 
George IV' s visit to Scotland, 731. 
German princess, Life and adventures 

of, 365. 
German songster, 1338. 
German's wife and young Bateman 

(prose), 441 ; (verse), 654-5. 
Gessner. Death of Abel, 1. 
Get up and bar the door, 1184, 1272, 1290. 
Ghost of Bill Jones, 1809. 
Ghost of my uncle, 375. 
Giants, Account of, 339. 
Gibralter, Siege of, 1339-40. 
Gibson-Craig library, chap-books from, 

p. vii, viii. 
Gilder Roy, highwayman, 2174, 2253. 
Gilderoy's last farewell, 857. 
Giles Scroggins' ghost, 1321, 1329. 
Gill, John," murderer, 2200. 
Gill Morice, 858-60. 
Gillan, Alex., murderer, 22.54. 
Gillian, the shepherd's wife. Humours 

of, 921. 
Gilpin, John, Facetious story of. By W. 

Cowper, 1966. 
Gilpin's second holiday. By John Oak- 
man, 1966. 
Gilton, William, murderer, 2216. 
Gin shop, 165. 

Gipsies, Carew, king of the, 325-329. 
Gipsies, origin, government, etc., 329. 
Gipsy, fortunate, 396, note. 
Gipsy prince, 376. 
Gipsy song, 329, note. 
Gipsy. See also Gj'psie. 
(iirl I left behind me, 1390. 
Giri of my heart, 1283, 1323, 1339. 
Glasgow, battle of, 625. 
John Ilighlandman's remarks on, 

660-1, 1967-68a. 
Glasgow fair. Humors of, 2001. 
Glasgow Peggie, 1288, note. 
Glass eve, 1182. 
Gleaner, The, 1221. 
Glee, A., 1553. 
Glen, Captain. Captain Glen's unhappy 

voyage to New Barbary, 722. 
Glenn grarland, 1340. 
Gloamin' buchte, 861. 
Gloucestershire tragedy, 862-4. 



Gloucestershire tragedy (a dift'erent bal- 
lad), 2204-5. 

Glover, Richard. Leonidas, 1162. 

Go, plaintive sounds, 1233. 

Go, youth beloved, 1184. 

God save the king, 1322. 

God's judgment against false swearing, 
331. 

Godfrey of Boulogne, 531. 

Godiva, Coventry made free by, 760. 

Godly lessons, 47. 

Godly sermon of Peter's repentance, 2402. 

(xodmersham, 122, note. 

Goethe, J. W. Werther and Charlotte, 
433. 

Golden bull, 865-70. 

Golden cabinet; or. The compleat for- 
tune-teller, 2071-2. 

Golden cuckold, 1370. 

Golden dreamer ; or. Dreams interpreted, 
2074. 

Golden dreamer; or. Dreams realised, 
2073. 

Golden farmer, 1766, 2206-9. 

Golden glove, 1290, 1341. 

Golden glove's garland, 1341. 

Goldfinch, 1342-3. 

Goldsmith, Oliver. The country clergy- 
man, 45. 

The deserted village, 776. 

Edwin and Angelina, 801, 1014. 

The hermit, 192. 

The traveller, 1014, 1129. 

Vicar of Wakefield, 429. 

Gomme, E. L. Thomas Hickathrift, 587. 
(iood aunt, 146. 

Good housewife's coat of arms, 2338. 
Good husband for five shillings, 23.39. 
Good luck to the lady's waiting-maid, 

1579. 
Good Oueen Bess, 1513. 
Good ship Rover, 1967. 
Good wife, 2423. 
Good wives, 356. 

Goodhurst garland, 874. Also 873, 875-7. 
Goodman, Parson, and the ears of Lord 

Chesterfield, 1690. 
Goody Two-shoes, History of, 377-9. 

The modem. By Mary Belson, 380. 

Goold, Polly, last words of, 2441. 
Gordon, Adam (or Edom) o', 634. 
Gordon, Duke of. Three daughters of, 

788-94. 
Gosport tragedy, 871-2. 
Gossip's delight, 2.360-1. 
Gotham, Wise men of, 1856-67. 
Gothic times, 368. 

Goudhurst garland, 873, 875-7. Also 874. 
Gowf my logie, 1598. 
Graces for young persons, 90. 
Gragal ma Chree, and Answer, 1286. 
Graham, Dougal. The art of courtship, 

1670, note. 

The coalman's courtship to the 

creel-wife's daughter, 1677. 

Comical history of simple John, 

1812-16. 

Comical sayings of Paddy from 

Cork, 1792-4. 

Comical transactions of Lothian 

Tom, 1772-6. 

Dying groans of Sir John Barley- 
corn, 1733, note. 

Entertaining history of Jolm Cheap, 

the chapman, 1734-8. 

The folly of witless women dis- 
played, 1696'. 

Fun upon fun ; or. The comical and 

merry tricks of Leper the tailor, 1765-9. 

J. Highlandman's remarks on Glas- 
gow, 660-1, ]967-68a. 

John Falkirk's cariches, 1741-3. 

The miseries of poor simple inno- 
cent silly Tam, 1820. 

Whole proceedings of Jockey and 

Maggy, 1720-2. 

Witty exploits of George Buchanan, 

1700. 

Graham, The laird, and Sir Robert Be- 
wick, 1095. 

Graham, Margaret, starvation of, 771. 

Gramachree Molly, 1377 ; with the Ans- 
wer, 1344. 

Granby's grenadiers, 1423. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



153 



Grand disappointment, 233. 

Grand lodge, 1181. 

Grand musical festival, Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne, 1345. 

(JrandyweU, 1594. 

Granny's storj- box, 1692, note. 

Grant "and McPherson, conflict between, 
416. 

Gratitude for blessings received, 162. 

Grave, The. By Robert Blair, 879. 

Grave of Susan, 1508. 

Grave robbing, 2273. 

Gravestone, 147. 

Gray, Lady Jane, life of, 233a. 

Great Britain's glory: history of king 
Arthur, 48.3. 

Great honour of a valiant London pren- 
tice, 2445. See also London prentice. 

Great messeneer of mortality (Death and 
the lady), 26-33. 

(Jreat Nelson's laurels, 1472. 

Great news from Bedlam !, 2156. 

Green coat and brown coat, 381. 

Green coat boy's garland, 1026. Also 
1022-^. 

Green garters, 1482. 

Green grow the rashes, O, 1367, 1399. 

(ireen, Mr., rake and perjurer, 2218. 

Greene, Robert. Pandosto, 364, note. 

Greenland fisherman's garland, 1346. 

Greenland fisherv, A new song in praise 
of the, 878. 

Greenock sailor, 1347 

Greenwich, lady of, 1392. 

Greenwich lovers, 1348, 1561. 

Greenwich lovers' garland, 1348. 

Greenwich pensioner, 1258. 

Greenwood tree, 1408. 

Gregg, John, history of, 2255. 

(Jregson, Benj., the man of fashion, 2256. 

(irey goose's wing, 2444. 

Grierson, Sir Robert, elegy in memory 
of, 235-7. *'•' ^ 

Griffin, Henry, alias Lord Massey, 2277. 

Griffiths, Mrs. Oroonoko, 400. 

Grimaldi, Mr., songs sung by, 1603. 

Grimani, (J. Topographical and histori- 
cal description of Rome, 298. 

Grinning made easy, 1706-8. 

Grisel, Patient, 1002-5. 

(iroatsworth of wit for a penny, 2075-7. 

Grog, 1241, 1349. 

Grogan, Mr., composer of Ally C'roker, 
1668, note. 

Guardian angels, with Answer, 1350. 

Guardian angels. Answer to, 1341. 

Gude forgi'e me for lien, 1272. 

Gudeman of Ballangeich, 880. The same 
copy is recorded again, by error, under 
no. 1019. 

Gudemfe o' Guilston, 1374. 

Guernsey garland, 778. 

Guide for sinners to repent, 332. 

Guidman's grief for the ewie wi' the 
crooked horn, 1270, 1351. 

Guinea and the shilling. Story of the, 172. 

(ininea, voyage to, 302. 

Guy of Warwick (prose), 484-9; (verse), 
486, note, 881. 

Gwinett, Ambrose, life of, 307. 

Gwinn, Eleanor, life of, 237. 

Gypsey's life, 1208. 

Gypsie laddie, 1297. 

Gypsie. See also Gipsy. 

Habbie Sympson, 2012. 

Haber my nab, 1348. 

Hackney, unhappy lady of, 1138-41. 

Had I a heart for falsehood framed, 

1266. 
Had I the wyte, 1573. 
Hadfield, James, trial of, 2257. 
Hae ye seen in the calm dewy morning, 

Haggart, David, murderer, 2258-9. 

Hal the woodman, 1274. 

Hale, Haimah, the fair maid of Easham, 
402. 

Hale, Sir Matthew, trials of witches be- 
fore, 213G-7, 2145. 

Hales, Sir Edward, 213, note. 

Halifax, The dutiful daughter of, 798-9. 

Hallam, Robert, murderer, 2260. 



Halliwell, James Orchard. Metrical his- 
tory of Tom Thumb the Little, 2032. 

Hallow fair, 1352, 1622. 

Hallowe'en, 1374. 

Hall's Mill, true blues of, 2387. 

Halsewell, loss of the, 308. 

Haluket Meg, 1624. 

Hamilton, Duke, and Lord Moon, 795. 

Haramersmitli garland, 1353. 

Hammersmith, jolly painter of, 1353. 

Hampshire wonder, 2217. 

Handsome butcher of St. James's mar- 
ket, 635, 2409. 

Handsome Harry, 2424-26. 

Hannah, brig, 399, note. 

Hannah, sorrows of, 169. 

Hap me wi' thy petticoat, 710, 1289, 1581. 

Happy beggars, 1385. 

Happy bride (a song), 1241. 

Happy bride; or. Virtuous countrj'-maid 
rewarded, 382. 

Happy child, 2427. 

Happy clown's garland, 1353. 

Happy couple's garland, 1355. 

Happy footman, 1312. 

Happy lover, 12.")9, 13.50. 

Happy man, and True gentleman, 41. 

Happy man, life of the, 88. 

Happy marriage, 1455. 

Happv marriage betweene blithsom John 
and"prctty Betty, 1202. 

Happy meeting, 1657. 

Happy miller, 1232. 

Happy ship-carpenter, 2428. 

Happy stranger, 1288. 

Happy waterman, 148. 

Hark awar, 1356. 

Hark! hark!, 1232. 

Hark, the goddess Diana, 2461. 

Hark, the hollow woods resounding, 
1396. 

Harlaw, battle of, 657. 

Harlequin's tour, 619. 

Harling, Will, adventures of, 2299. 

Harmonious songster, 1196a. 

Harper of Mull, 1409. 

Harrington, Susanna. Supplement to 
Songs in the night, 101. 

Harris, Elizabeth, Examination and con- 
fession of, 2134. 

Ilarriston, William. The intended emi- 
grants, 621. 

Poems, elegiac, moral, humorous, 

and descriptive, 1020. 

Sir WilUam Wallace and Earl Percy, 

625. 

Wallace ; or, The knight of Ellers- 

lie, 1149. 

Harry Halliard, 1538. 

Hart, John, books written by, 2397, note. 

Dreadful character of a drunkard, 

2400. 

England's faithful physician, 2401. 

Godly sermon of Peter's repentance, 

2402. 

Plain man's plain pathway, 2406 

Warning-piece to the sloathful, 2407. 

Hartley, Mr. and Mrs., true and interest- 
ing history of, 384. 

Harvest, Rev. (i., life of, 330. 

Harvest home (Cheap repository tract), 

149. 
Harvest home (songs), 885, 1569. 
Harvest songster, 1357. 
Ilarwood, Louisa, pathetic suflerings of, 

389. 
Hasty bridegroom, 1955. 
Hand awa frae me, Donald, 1573. 
Haughs of Crumdel, 882-5. 
Havanna, new song on the taking of, 

1425. 
Haverel wives, historj- of, 1696. 
Hawke, Sir Edward. Sir Edward 

Hawke's engagement, 1295, 1359, 1405. 
Hawkesbury, Lord, 262. 
Hawkesworith, Dr. Almoran and Hamet, 

348. 
Haws of Cromdale, 882, note. Sep also 

Haughs of Crumdel. 
Hay's bonny lassie, 694. 
Haymarket theatre. The corsair, 358, 376. 
HaJ^les, Joe, anecdotes of, 1681. 
He comes from the wars, 1.360. 
He's o'er the hills that I lo'e weel, 1376. 



and 



Head-dress, description of a fashionable, 

393, note. 
Health to the king, 1657. 
Hearty fellow's delight, 1361. 
Heathen's conversion (Barlaam 

Josaphat), 42-4. 
Heathen's conversion (Lord Winford), 

16. 
Heather bell, 1292. 
Heather-bell songster, 1362. 
Heaton, Man of. Battle of the flying 

dragon and the man of Heaton. By 

Tim Bobbin [John Collier], 1878, 2359. 
Heaven, plain pathway to, 85. 
Heavenly fair, 1967. 
Heaving of the lead, 1274. 
Hector of Troy, 490-1, 531. 
Heigho, Heiffho!, 1325. 
Hell bridge, Scotland, conflict at, 416. 
Hellen's tomb, 1552. 
llenrietta de Bellgrave, story of, 415, 

note. 
Henry, king of England. See King 

Henry and Queen Jeany, 1222, and 

1036, 1300. 
Henry II, king of England. See Fair 

Rosamond, 822-29. 
King Henry II and the miller of 

Mansfield, 922, 2437. 
Henry V, king of England. Conquest 

ofFrance, 924-5, 2438. 
Henry VIII, king of England. See The 

king and the cobbler, 1751-60. 
See Will Summers, King Henry's 

jester, 1855. 
Henry, Lord, and fair Catharine, 23. 
Henry Blj'd's contract, who lived in the 

Carse of Gowrle near Dundee, 1709. 
Henry of Dover and beautiful Ruth of 

Maidstone, 969-72. 
Her blue rollin' e'e, 1201, 1411. 
Her mouth with a smile, 1430. 
Hercules, history of, 493-494. 
Hercules and the destruction of Troy, 

490-92. 
Hercules, of Bristol, convict ship, 285. 
Here and there, 150. 
Here is the glen, 1366. 
Here's a health to all good lasses, 1321, 

1553. 
Here's hearts to sell, 1323. 
Here's to the soger wha bled, 1349. 
Hereford, bishop of. The bishop of 

Hereford's entertainment by Robin 

Hood, 1059. 
Hereford, Nan, cheat and impostor, 2175. 
Hermit, The. By Oliver Goldsmith, 192, 

801. 
Hernandez de Feyjoo. Tlie gipsy prince, 

376. 
Hero and Leander, 496-8. 
Excellent sonnet of the unfortunate 

loves of, 2403. 
Hero may perish, 793. 
Hero's orphant girls, 1544. 
Herring in sa't, 1363. 
Hetheruigton, John, dream of, 417. 
Hetrick banks, 640. 
Hey the bonnie breast knots, 1293. 
Hey for a lass wi' a tocher, 1557. 
Hey Johnnie Coup, 727. See also .Johnny 

Coup's defeat. 
Heyward, Zachariah, dedication to, 485, 

note. 
Ilibemia, 892. 
HickathrifY, Tom, 584-92. 
Hickelty pickelty, 2404. 
High (ierman fortune teller, 2078-9. 
Highland <'lans, a ballad, 289. 
Highland Harry, 1364. 
Iligliland lad and lowland lass, 1612. 
Highland laddie, 1284, 1288, 1331, 1518. 
Highland laddie, new, 1527. 
Highland laddies, 1173. 
Highland Maiy, 859, 1076, 1264, 1302, 1365. 
Highland minstrel boy, 1396. 
Iligldand piper's advice to drinkers, 

1366. 
Highland plaid, 882, 1531, 1544, 1568, 1622. 
Higliland story of Donald & his dog, 

2026. 
Highland whisky, 1216. 
Highland widow, 1364. 
Highlander delineated, 289. 



154 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



BUghlandman's remarks on Glasgow, 
660-1, 13.)1, 1968, 1968a. 

lligliwayiiiau catch'd in liis own trap, 
2036. 

Highwaymen, account of tlie lives and 
transactions of, 2190. 

Highwaymen catched in their own play, 
2009. 

lligliwaymen, notorious, history of, 2174. 

Hill, General, song on the surrender of 
Dunkirk to, 261. 

Hill, Rev. Rowland, 283. 

Hills o' Gallowa, 1367, 1650. 

Hills of tlie Highlands, 653. 

Hin I, Capt. James, the great robber of 
England, 2261-6. 

Capt. Hind's progress and ramble, 

723. 

Ilinton, highwayman, 2174. 

Hints to Elder Pottle, 2429. 

Hippesley's Drunken man, 1225, 1394. 

Historical, Political, and Biograph- 
ical Chap-books, 19.3-283. 

Historical catechism, 238-40. 

Historical catechism, A new, 241-42a. 

History and lives of all the most notorious 
pirates, 2173. 

History of dreams; or. Dreams inter- 
preted. By John Booker, 2080. 

History of four kings, their queens and 
daughters, 1713-14. 

History of the four grand monarchies, 
author of, 231. 

History of notorious highwaymen, 2174. 

History of witches and wizards, 2119. 

Hobart, (ieo., alias Lord Massey, 2277. 

Hocus pociis in perfection, 2103-4. 

Hodge ofthe will, 1369. 

Hodge, Tom, merry tales of, 1713-14. 

Hodge's courtsliip, 1281. 

Hogg, James. Duncan Campbell, 366-7. 

The long pack, 387-8. 

Hoist the grog, 1229. 

HoUis, Tliomas, of Lincoln's Inn, col- 
lection of pamphlets on witchcraft and 
possession, p. x. 

Holly, Sarah. See The maiden's bloody 
garland, 968. 

Ilolofernes, 46. 

Holy Ghost, sermon on the sin against, 
97. 

Home, sweet home, 1.107, 1366, 1641. 

Homeward bound, 1352. 

Honest Mall Boye, 1976. 

Honest publican, 151. 

Honest waterman, 1258. 

Honesty in distress, 2340-1. 

Honour of Admiral Hood, 1540. 

Honour of Bristol, 2430. 

Honour of a London prentice, 950. See 
also Tlie London prentice. 

Hood, Admiral, honour of, 1540. 

Hood's conquest over the comte de 

(jrasse, 1540. 

Hood, Robin. See Robin Hood. 

Hooly and fairly, 1600. 

Hopeless lover, 1604. 

Hopkins, Matthew. Discovery of 

witches, 2134a. 
Horn-fair garland, 1370. 
Hornsby, Capt., new song in praise of, 

1514. 
Horse and lion, combat between, 594. 
Horsemonger Lane gaol, executions at, 

2192. 
Hosier, Admiral. Admiral Hosier's 

ghost, 1224. 
Hott, Jane, executed for witchcraft, 2134. 
House of her father, 1543. 
Household Manuals, 179-192. 
Housewife's coat of arms, 2338 
How cruel are the parents, 1570. 
How stands the glass around, 1227. 
How sweet in the woodlands, 1371, 1513. 
How sweet's the love. Answer to, 1229. 
Howard, John. See An extraordinary 

delivery of rabbits, 341. 
Howard, "Thomas. Roman stories, 563-5. 
Howe, Admiral Lord. Admiral I^ord 

Howe; or. The glorious first of June, 

1281. 
Howe, General. General How's victory 

over the rebels at Boston, 1540. 
Hubble bubble, The, 245. 



Hue and cry after a little stray king, 784. 

Hue and cry after Frederick the tax- 
master, 218. 

Hugh, St., 566, note. 

Hughson the cobbler and Margery his 
wife, 1686, note, 1956-7. See also Dia- 
logue of a noted shoemaker and his 
wife, 1686-8. 

Hull, Gen. William, victory of, 2414. 

surrender of, 2431. 

Hullman, Thomas. See Leicestershire 

garland, 947, note. 
Human nature. Select histories of, 339. 
Humble beggar, 1398. 
Humorous Fiction. See Section XIII., 

p. 94. 
Humorous Metrical Tales, 1873-2062. 
Humourist, 1372. 
Humourous adventures of Jump Jim 

Crow, 1373. 
Humourous bites of the world, 2342. 
Humourous budget of sea song^, 1253. 
Humourous poems, 1374. 
Humourous recital of a citizen's Saturday 

evening adventure at Vauxhall, 1715. 
Humourous song, 1281. 
Humours of the age ; or, A touch on all 

trades, 2343. Also 1587. 
Humours of Glasgow fair, 2001 
Humours of rag-fair, 2344-7. 
Humours of the glenn, 1340. 
Hundred godly lessons, 47. 
Hungry man's garland, 1375. 
Hungry man's song, 1375. 
Hunt, Bads worth, 651. 
Hunter, Peter, laird of Knap, wonderful 

relation of, 2209. 
Hunting of Chevy-Chase, 74-3-6. 
Hunting glee, 1227. 
Hunting ofthe hare, 1958. 
Hunting song, 1246, 1583, 1591, 1594, 1663. 

(Dilferent songs.) 

A new, 1588. 

Hurra for he bonnets o' blue, 1266. 
Hurrah for the bonnets of blue, 1376, 1553. 
Husband for five shillings, A good, 2339. 
Husband, husband, cease your strife, 

1611. 
Husband, The rakish, 1039. 
Husbandman, 1315. 
Husbandry moralized, 152. 
Hyde Park, iS'ews from, 2002. 
Teague's ramble to, 1200a, 1600-1, 

2025. 



I am ready to resign her, 1543. 

I gaed a waefu' gate yestreen, 1554, 1557, 

1571, 1623. 
I liad a horse, 1305, 1308. 
I liae a wife o' my ain, 802, 1271, 1399, 

1557. 
I have a silent soitow here, 1323. 
I know what I know, 2348. 
I love myself, 1208. 
I love thee better now, 1287. 
I love you for that, 1665. 
I sigh for the girl I adore, 1203, 1573. 
I sit o' my suiiky, 1430. 
I wish I had never been married, 152. 
I yield, dear lassie, 1613. 
I'd be a butterfly, 1376. 
I'd think on thee, my love, 1264. 
I'U go no more a cruizing, 1258. 
I'll never leave thee, 634. 
I'm an old evergreen, 1325. 
I'm grieved to leave my comrades all, 

802. , 
I'm weel salr'd wi' spunk, 1191, 1659. 
I've dreamt that thou art fading, 883. 
I've seen the roses blaw, 1382. 
Idol, The, 658. 
If a body loves a body, 1.583. 
If he will take the hint, 1324. 
If I shall gc t laugliing at that, 1875. 
If love [the virgin heart invade], 1543. 
If love's a sweet passion, 1497. 
If round the world, 1232. 
He of White, 892. See also Isle of Wight. 
Impossibility of witchcraft, 2146. 
Improve the present hour, 1498. 
In early youth, 1259. 
Incarnation, ode on the, 75. 
Inconstant Sue, 1617. 



Indian captivities. See Section VI., p. 17. 
Indian kings, four, 887-8. 
Indian lover's garland, 886. 
Indian, Zoa, the beautiful, 415. 
Indulgent mother and disobedient 

daughter, 817. 
Industry rewarded, 931. 
Ingratitude punished, 353. 
Injured fair, 1530. 
Injured innocence. (Miss Adams and 

Lord Whatley), 344. 
Innocence betrayed, 355. 
Innocence preserved, 384. 
Inquisition, Spanish, 64. 
Intended emigrants. By W. Harriston, 

621. 
Intire lovers, 890. 
Ireland, A description of, 290. 
Ireland, account of the late insurrection 

in, 193. 
Ireland, extinction ofthe human race in. 

See Reason against coition, 2379. 
Irish bulls, &c., as they were utter'd by 

Turlogh Malahone, 1719, note. 
Irish captain's love, valiant, 1499. 
Irish farmer, 1664. 
Irish fisherman, 1277, 1625. 
Irish robber, 2432. 
Irish wedding, 1076, 1328, 1377. 
Isaac, patriarch, 2. 
Isabella, Lady. Lady Isabella's tragedy, 

936. 
Isle of beauty, 1379. 
Isle of Wight's garland, 891-6. 
Islington, bailifl''s daughter of, 1130. 
It is not so, 1266. 
It was in and about the Martinmas time, 

1618. 
It was upon a Lammas ni^ht, 1386, 1570. 
It won't be my fault if I die an old maid, 

2432. 



J. Highlandman's remarks on (Glasgow. 

By Dougal Graham, 1967. See also 

John Highlandman. 
Jack a Latton's courtship, 1433. 
Jack and his master, new dialogue be- 
tween, 2000 
Jack & Jill, 1959. 
Jack and the beanstalk, 499-500. 
Jack and the giants, 501-7, 612; Jack the 

giant-killer, 508-11. 
Jack at Greenwich, 1467. 
Jack Brace, the sailor, 1283. 
Jack Brown, history of idle, 153. 
Jack Easy, 418. 
Jack Flourish, 1538. 
Jack Horner, 1960-1. 
Jack in his element, 1174, 1467. 
Jack Junk, 1591. 
Jack Monroe, 1615. 
Jack o' Hazledeau, 1306. Also Jock 

o' Hazeldean, 1553, 1659. 
Jack Ocum (Oakham, Okham) & Tom 

SpliceweU, adventures of, 616, 1716-17. 
Jack of all religions, 276. 
Jack of all trades, 1239, 1396. 
Jack of Newbury, 51.3-6. 
Jack Ratclive, 791. 
Jack Sprat, 1962. 
Jack Straw, history of, 279-81. 
Jack Tar's drunken frolic in Wapping, 

1535. ^ 

Jack the giant-killer, 508-11; Jack and 

the giants, 501-7, 512. 
Jack the merry piper; or. The friar and 

the bov, 1951. Also 1944-50. 
Jack the" sailor. Bold, 1400. 
Jack the tar, 1606. 
Jack's the lad, 1303. 
Jackdaw of Rheims, story similar to, 

331. 
Jacob, patriarch, 2. 

Jacob, G. A miscellany of poems, 977. 
Jacob's return from London, 1963. 
Jacobite plot, 233. 
Jail-keepers, caveat against, 2378. 
Jails, order for the regulation of, 2378. 
Jamaica, 393. 
Jamaica, the terror of (Jack Mansong, 

or. Three-fingered Jack), 2291-2. 
James, St., of Spain, 648. 
James I and the tinker, 926, 1315. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



155 



Jame? I, king of Scotland. Christ's kirk 

on the green, 1896. 
James, Susanna, Memoirs of, 395. 
Jamie and Nancy; or, The Yarmouth 

tragedy, 89<3; Jemmy and Nancy, 897- 

905. Also 1166-9. 
Jamie frae Dundee, 1548. 
Jamie is slain in the war, 1284. 
Jamie o' tlie glen, 1364. 
Jamie slighted, 1190. 
Jamie witli his trousers on, 1559. 
Jamie Gay on the river Tweed, 1265, 

1276. Also Jemmy Gay, 1380. 
Jamie Gemmill, elegy on, 1942. 
Jamie Trotter, the strong man, 1326 
Janeway's Token for children, quoted, 

81, note. 
Jarv-ie, Bailie Nicol, 1179. 
Jaunting car, 1378-9. 
Jauvaux, J., trial of, 2267. 
Je pcnse a vous, 1538. 
Jealous man convinced that he is no 

cuckold, 1685. 
Jealous sister, 2118. 
Jealousy without a rival, 399. 
Jean Anderson, mj' jo, 1402. 
Jeanie's black e'e, 1364. 
Jeany Diver, 1302. 
Jefferys, Francis, Lord, life of, 246. • 
Jemmy and Naucv of Yarmouth, 896- 

905. AIS0II6&-9". 
Jemmy and Susan, 1229. 
Jemmy the plougli boy, 1503. 
Jemmy Gay's garland, 1380. Also Jamie 

Gay, 1265, 1276. 
Jemmy Twitcher, 218. 
Jenkins, Isaac. The history of Isaac 

Jenkins and his wife, 385. 
Jenkins, Thomas, travels in Africa, 310. 
Jenne-Ren, 1381. 
Jenny dang the weaver, 1498. 
Jenny lass, my bonny bird. By Bums, 

1382. 
Jennj', the maid of the moor, 1659. 
Jenny's lamentation for the loss of 

Jockey, 1151. 
Jeremiah Wilkins, 154. 
Jerusalem, account of, 231, note. 
Jessie, Answer to, 1273. 
Jessy the flower o' Dumblain, 1383. See 

also Flower o' Dumblain. 
Jest book, new, for the winter-evenings, 

1788. 
Jest Books, Humorous Fiction, Rid- 
dles, 1668-1872. 
Jest of a brewer and a cooper's wife, 1904. 
Jester, compleat, 1682. 
Jester's gimcrack. By John Pendred, 

1719. 
Jests, songs, and pleasant adventures of 

several famous players, 1681. 
Jesus Christ, life and miracles, 48. 
Jew, The wandering, 105-9. 
Jews, entertaining history of, 231. 
Jews, The, 17.53d chapter of, 237. 
Jim Crow, Jump, humourous adventures 

of, 1373. 
Joaks upon joaks; or. No joak like a 

true joak, 1747-8. 
Joasaph, Barlaam and, 42-4. 
Job. Tlie pattern of pietv, 49. 
Jock o' Ilazeldean, 1553, 1659. Also 

Jack o' llazledean, 1306. 
Jockey. See also Jockie, and Jock)'. 
Jockey and Jenny, 1267, 1583, 1613. 
Jockey and Maggv, whole proceedings 
, of. By Dougal Graham, 1720-2. 
Jockey to the fair, 1385, 1572, 1609. 
Jockey said to Jenny, 1267, 1583, 1613. 
Jockey the shepherd, 1384. 
Jockey's deliverance, 1888. 
Jockey's far awa', 1294, 1518. 
Jockey's lamentation, 1613. 
Jockie. See also Jockey, and Jocky. 
Jockie to the fair, 1385, 1572, 1609. 
Jockie lad an' ye wad steal me, 686. 
Jocky. See also Jockey, and Jockie. 
Jocky and Jeunj;, 1267, 1583, 1613. 
Joe Miller's comical and diverting jests, 

1723. 
Joe Miller's jests, 1724-6. 
John, king of England. King John and 

the abbot of Canterbury, 927-8. 
John and his mistress, 1727. 



John & Joan, 1964-5. 

John and Betty, happy man-iage of, 1202. 

John and Nell, 885, 1348. 

John and Nell's parting, 1665. 

John and Thomas, Dialogue between, 
219. 

John Anderson, mv jo, 1291, 1328, 1386, 
1402, 1409, 1531, lb71, 1575. 

John Armstrong's last good-night, 906-8. 
See also Johnny Annstrong. 

Jolin Barley's welcome, 247. 

John Barleycorn. See Barleycorn. 

John Falkirk's cariches. By Dougal 
Graham, 1741-2. 

John Hay's bonny lassie, 694. 

John Iletlieriugton's dream, 417. 

John Ilighlandman's remarks on Glas- 
gow, 661-1, 1351, 1967-S, 1968a. 

John, honest, and loving Kate, 360-3. 

John of Badenyon, 785, 1293, 1387. 

John of Benachie, 1482. 

John the Baptist, 155. 

John the shopkeeper turned sailor, 156. 

John Uproar's chant, 790. 

John's earnest request, 909. 

Johnnie Cope's defeat, 642, 658, 727, 1272, 
1388, 1606. 

Johnny and MoUy, 1408, 1652, 1968, 1968a. 

Johnny Armstrong, history of (prose), 
522-4; (verse), 906-8 

Johnny Armstrong's last good-night, 90S. 

Johnny Coup. See Johnnie Cope. 

Johnny Jarman, 2443. 

Jolmny's grey-breeks, 1484. 

Johnny's kmd courtship, 1027. 

Johnson, Madame. See The Portsmouth 
ghost, 1021. 

Johnson, Major, new song on the victory 
obtained over the Frencli in America 
by, 1391. 

Johnson, Benjamin, merry pranks of, 
1805. 

Johnson, C. Lives of most remarkable 
female robbers, 2175. 

Johnson, Richard. Epitapli and ballad 
of Sir Richard Whittiugton, 602, note. 

Seven champions, 546, note. 

Johnson, Miss Sally, history of, 408. 

Johnsoniana, 2349. 

Johnstone, Abraham, hanged at Wood- 
bury, N.J., 2268. 

Johnstone, Robert, murderer, 2269. 

Johosaphat, Prince (Barlaam and Joa- 
saph), 42--4. 

Jokes. See Joaks. 

Jolly beggar (Gaberlunzie man), 910; 
1308, note ; 1368, note. 

Jolly breeze, 1653. 

Jolly broom-man's garland, 1389. 

Jolly Crispin's rambles, 1566. 

Jolly dragoon, 1229. 

Jolly jockey, 1749. 

Jolly painter of Hammersmith, 1353. 

JoUy ploughman, 871. 

Jolly sailor, 1392. 

Jolly sailor's true description of a man- 
o^war, 911. 

JoUy sailors, 1390. 

Jolly sailor's garland (song-book), 1391. 

(a different song-book), 1392. 

Jolly waggoner, 1297. 

Jonah, 2. 

Jones, Mrs. Mrs. Jones's cheap dishes, 
137. 

Jones, Rev. Dr., funeral sermon by, 8. 

Jones, Rev. Mr. Sermon on death of 
Alex. Parkinson, 2207-8. 

Jones, Andrew. The black book of con- 
science, 2397. 

Death triumphant, 2398. 

Dooms-dav, 2399. 

Jones, Bill, ghost of, 1809. 

Jones, Man", murderer, 2270. 

Jones, William. M«rbus «atanicus, 2405. 

Jordan, Edward and Mai-garet, trial of, 
2271. 

Josaphat (Barlaam and Joasaph), 42-4. 

Joseph and his brethren, 50-4. 

Joseph of Arimatliea, 55. 

Joshua, 531. 

Journey to London, 291. 

Joust, cut of, 551, note, 552, note. 

Jovial companion, 1750. 

Jovial crew, 666. 



Jovial fellow's collection, 1393. 

Jovial fellow's convivial companion, 1394. 

Jovial gamester's garland, 1395. 

Jovial lover, 1485. 

Jovial sailor, 1534. 

Jovial sous of Jove, 1396. 

Joy after sorrow, 781-2. 

Joyce, John, Confession of, 2272. 

Joys of the harvest, 1397. 

Jubilee, The, 1322. 

Jubilee for jubilee, 1398. 

Judas Iscariot, 56-60. 

Judas Maccabeus, 531. 

Judgment day, descant on, 36. 

Judicious man, 1251. 

Judith and Holofernes, 46. 

Judy O'Flannikin, 1378. 

Jug of rum, 2433. 

Jump Jim Crow, humourous adventures 

of, 1373. 
Jura. See the moon o'er cloudless Jurai 

1554. 
Jure divine. By Defoe, 248. 
Just the tiling, 1251, 1279. 



Kail brose of auld Scotland, 1301, 1399. 

Kalendar, shepherd's, 186. 

Kate Dalrj'mple, 1401. 

Kate of Aberdeen, 1400. 

Katerfelto's song, 1394, note. 

Katharme Ogie, 1186, 1402. 

Keeper, The, 1270. 

Kellj; the pirate, 912, 1403, 2461. 

Kelvin grove, 1664. 

Kenuington common, execution at, 2194- 

5, 2221. 
Kensington frolick, 1558. 
Kensington gardens, A walk in, 432. 
Kentish farm, woodcut, 371, note. 
Kentish garland, 91.3-4. 
Kentish scene, 434, note. 
Kentish tragedy, 915. 
Kentucky, map of, 425, note. 
Kidd, Ca'pt. Robert, execution of, 2434-5. 
Kidnapping at Aberdeen, 320. 
KDbarchan, the famous piper of. See 

Raising the wind, 2012. 
Kilkenny, boys of, 1356. 
Killeavy, 1189. 
Killiecrankie, battle of, 1194. 
KUligrew. See England's witty jester, 

1693. 
Kind lassie, 931. 
Kind wife is worth gold, 2040-1. 
King Alfred and the shepherd, 921. 
King and northern man, 918-9. 
Kmg and the cobbler, 1751-60. 
King and the forester, 916-7, 2436. 
King and tlie pore man, 918, note. 
King and the tinker's garland, 920. Also, 

926, 1315. 
King Charles's martyrdom, 205. 
King Charles the Second's restoration, 

209. 
King David was a soldier, 1360. 
King Edgar's revenge, 396, note. 
Kmg George's welcome to London from 

Hampton Court, 1516. 
King Ilenrv & Queen Jeany, 1222. Also, 

1036, 1300. 
King Henry II. and the miller of Mans- 
field, 922, 2437. 
King Henry Y., his conquest of France, 

9-M-5, 2438. 
King James the First and the tinker, 920, 

926, 1315. 
King John and the abbot of Canterbury, 

927-8. 
King Lear and his three daughters, 929. 
King of the peacocks and Rosetta, 470. 
King of Spain confederate with a cobbler, 

399. 
King Richard the Second, ballad of the 

deposing of, 930. 
King William and a plow-man, 931-2. 
King wlio manieil a beggar, 773-4. 
King, Tom. Tom King's new book of 

oddities, 18.30. 
Kinglj' garland, 933. 
King's anthem, 1269, 1602. 
Kings, four Indian, 887-9. 
Kings, history of four, 171.3-4. 
King's hunting song, 1509. 



156 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Kiner's muster, 1404. 

Kings aud queens of England, 243-4. 

Kings of tlie sea, 1605. 

Kingston, assizes at, 2192. 

Kittle-bender, 1628. 

Kitty and the sailor, 1387. 

Knap, Peter Hunter, laird of, strange and 
wonderful relation of, 2209. 

Knaresborough, St. Robert, hermit of, 94. 

Knife grinder, 1251. 

Kniglit of Elle, 934. 

Knight of the oracle, 530. 

Kniglit, J. The ears of Lord Chester- 
field and Parson Goodman. Translated 
from Voltaire, 1690. 

Know thyself, 157. 

Knox, Elizabeth, 122, note. 

Knox, John, 61, 122, note. 

Kouli Khan, life of, 254. 



Labem, John. Comic songs, 1236a-b. 

Ladies' anmsement, 1405. 

Ladies' evening merry amusement, 1408. 

Ladies' new whim-wham, 1505. 

Ladies' petition to the doctors, 2049. 

Lads of the viUage, 998, 1195. 

Lady and the 'prentice, 1229. 

Lady and the pye, 157. 

Lady Arabella Stuart, 935. 

Lady Blithe, 138. 

Lady Isabella's tragedy, 936. 

Lady of Greenwich garland, 1392. 

Lady of pleasm-e, history of a reclaimed, 

401. 
Lady turn'd serving-man, 835-7. 
Lady who fell in love with her serving- 
man, 940. 
Lady's concert, 1406. 
Lady's diary, 1590. 
Lady's evening companion, 1407. 
Lady's fall, 937-8. 
Lady's garland, 939. 
Lady's love for the blue bonnet, 1288. 
Lady's love discover'd by her waiting- 
maid to her father, 891. 
Lady's magazine and weekly speculist, 

2350. 
Lady's policy, 1876-7. 
Lag, laird ot. An elegy on, 234-6. 
Laidlej- worm of Spindleston lleugh. By 

Duncan Frasier, 525, 941. 
Laird of Cockpen, 1303, 1553. 
Laird of Cool's ghost, 2351-2. 
Laird of Knap, Peter Hunter, strange 

and wonderful relation of, 2209. 
Laird o' Lamingtou, 1287. 
Lamb, John, sexton, sacrilegious impiety 

of, 2273. 
Lambe, Dr. John, notorious life and 

ignominious death of, 2274. 
Lambton worm, 525. 
Lament for Abercrombie, 1409. 
Lamentable ballad of the lady's fall, 

937. 
Lamentable ballad of the tragical end 

of a gallant lord and virtuous lady 

(Blackamoor in tlie wood), 692-3. 

Also, 686-91. 
Lamentation of George Strangwidge, 

1001. 
Lamentation of Mr. Page's wife of Pli- 

mouth, 1001. 
Lammie, The, 1551. 
Lammie, Andrew; or, Mill of Tiftie's 

Annie, 637-9. 
Lamp lighter's address to his enlightened 

patrons, 2439. 
Lancashire collier girl, 158. 
Lancashire dialect, Tim Bobbin's View 

of, 2359. 
Lancashire garland, 1099. 
Lancashire witches, 2120-3. 
Lancaster, Mr., songs sung by, 1603. 
Lancelot du Lake, Sir, and Tarquin, 

1093. 
Land o' the leal, 1176, 1304, 1383, 1386, 

1494, 1496, 1552, 1649. 
Land of delight, 1356. 
Landlords, Cui-ious dialogue between 

four selfish, 2323. 
knavery of. See Vices of the age, 

2333-4. 
Langley, C, 1668, note. 



Langsyne beside the woodland bum, 

1257. 
Lark, The, 1246. 
La Rochefoucauld, Due de. Maxims, 

192. 
Larry O'GafF, 1610, 2461. 
Lash'd to the helm, 1271, 1273, 1333, 1390. 
Lass at St. Osyth, 1514. 
Lass for a wife, 1538. 
Lass in yon town, 1565. 
Lass o' Ballochmyle, 1544. 
Lass o' Gowrie, 822, 1633. 
Lass of Arranteenie, 1303. 
Lass of Benochie, 1626 ; also Bonnie lass 

of Bannachie, 1634, note ; of Banaphie, 

709-10. 
Lass of Loch Royal. By Robert Burns, 

643, note. 
Lass of Patie's mill. By Allan Ramsay, 

1214, 1234, 1306, 1410, 1600. 
Lass of Peatie's [Patie's] mUl, 1410. 
Lass of Richmond Hill, 1171, 1305, 1377. 
Lass of the brow of the hill, 974. 
Lass of the mill, 920, 1231. 
Lass wi' the gleib o' gear, 1205. 
Lass wi' the gowden hair, 1197. 
Lass with the delicate air, 1420. 
Lassie, I lo'e best of a', 653. 
Lassie lost her maidenhead, 1621. 
Lassie wi' the ILnt-white locks, 1293. 
Lassies of Scotland, 1556. 
Last da^, dissertation on, 36. 
Last dying speech and confession, etc 

of unfortunate malefactors, 2194-6. 
Last dying words of the noted John 

Poulter, alias Baxter, 2197. 
Last love-letter. Answer to the, 1508. 
Last May a braw wooer, 1367. 
Last night I sat me down, 1339. 
Last rose of summer, 1602. 
La.st time I cam o'er the muir, 1411. 
Last words of an amiable lady, 2440. 
Last words of Polly Gookl, 2441. 
Laugh and gi-ow fat. Collection of witty 

sayings, 1761. 
Laugh & grow fat ! (Dream-book) , 2074. 
Laugher's companion, 1762. 
Lavender, Marj', 2220, note. 
Lawrence Lazy, history of, 1763-4. 
Lawson, William, and his sweetheart, 

Bessy Gibbs, 1670. 
Lawyer, The, 1412. 
Lawyer and chimney-sweep, 420-1. 
Lawyer and client, 999. 
Lawyer outwitted, 2007-8, 2442. 
Lawyer steals all, 1241. 
Lawj'ers, roguery of. See Vices of the 

age, 2333-4. 
Lay thy loof in mine, lassie, 1337. 
Leaping lords garland, 942. 
Lear, King, and his three daughters, 929. 
Learned dominie, 1969. 
Leather bottle, song in praise of the, 

943-4. 
Leed's tragedy, 945-6. 
Leg of mutton, 1969. 
Legalaw, 1535. 
Legendary romances, fairy stories, 

and folk tales in prose, 43.5-610. 
Legerdemain. See Section XV, p. 115. 
Legerdemain, whole art of, 2103-4. 
Leicestershire garland, 947. 
Leiden gazette, 266. 
Leigh, Anthonj', anecdotes of, 1681. 
Le Lewis, Mr., song sung by, 1225. 
Lemoine, Henry. Second "part of the 

facetious story of Joliu Gilpin, 1966. 
Leominster tragedy, 2240. 
Leoni, Mr., songs sung bj', 1225. 
Leonidas. By R. Glover, 1162. 
Leovitius. Astrological catechism, 2064. 
Leper the tailor, comical and merry 

tricks of. By Dougal Graham, 1765-9. 
Lesmahagow, twa lairds of, 880, 1019. 
Let drunkards, 1409. 
Let mirth go round, 1241, 
Let's drink, my friends, 1396. 
Let's seek the bower, 1214. 
Letter from a Scotch mm to a bachelor, 

2353. 
Letter from a spiritual mariner, 88. 
Letter from a volunteer, see Mason, 

Thomas. 
Letter writer, complete, 2315. 



Letter wrote by a young shepherd of 
Borrowdale, 1683. 

Lexington miller, 2443. 

Liberty ; new song, 1502. 

Liberty much to be priz'd, 1265. 

Liberty, On, aud in praise of Mr. How- 
ard. By Cowper, 1162. 

Lick-ladle, William, and Thomas Clean- 
cogue, dialogue between, 1460, 1626, 
note. 

Life after death, 333. 

Life is darkened o'er with woe, 1396. 

Life is like a summer flower, 1285. 

Life let us cherish, 1554. 

Life. Persons returned to life, 339. 

Light guitar, 1379. 

Light heart & thin pair of breeches, 1574. 

Light loaf, 1375. 

Lillies of France, 1579. 

Lilly, William. Anglicus, peace, or no 
peace, 2154. 

Astrological prediction of the occur- 

raiK'es in England, 2155. 

Book of knowledge, 2064a. 

New Erra Pater, 2081. 

Lincolnshire poachers, 2444. 
Lincolnshire wonder, 2310-1. 
Linky Lanky, 1254. 
Linnet, The, 1413-16. 

Lion, encounter with, 416. 

Lira lira la, 1204. 

List of tlie prisoners convicted and 

acquitted at the Old Bailey sessions, 

2179. 
Liston, Mr., songs sung by, 1640. 
Lithgow, William, travels of, 309. 
Little Bess, the ballad-singer, 1323. 
Little carpenter's garland, 1417. 
Little innocent rescued, in Cliristian's 

selection, 18. 
Little Red Riding-hood, 471, 526. 
Little white mouse, 599-600. 
Little young men's companion, 183-4. 
Liverpool tragedy, 948. 
Lives of most remarkable female rob- 
bers, 2175. 
Lizie Bailie, Bonny, 712. 
Local history. See Section V, p. 16. 
Loch na Gar, 1602. 
Lochaber, Farewell to, 1569. See also 

Lochaber no more. 
Lochaber, New way of, with the Answer, 

1314, 1418. 
Lochaber no more, 1418, 1569, 1581. 
Lodolin, 1333. 
Logan braes, 1519. 
Logan water, 1509. 
Logan, W. H. A pedlar's pack, 663, 

note. 
London, cries of, 2313, 2318-20. 

guides to, 291-6. 

Jacob's return from, 1963. 

journey to, in 1698, 291. 

King George's welcome to, 1516. 

Paddy's trip from, 1440. 

Places of public amusement. Nu- 
merous collections of songs sung at the 
theatres, gardens, etc., are recorded 
under Song books (pp. 67-94). See in 
this Index': Apollo gardens, Astley's, 
Covent Garden theatre, Drury Lane 
theatre, Marybone gardens. Pantheon, 
Ranelagh, Royal circus, Sadler'sWells, 
Vauxhall. 

tower of, 296. 

tricks of, 293. 

trip through, 294. 

Yorkshireinan in, 1319. 

London apprentice. See London pren- 
tice. 

London astrologer, 1419. 

London beaux's garland, 1420. 

London butcher, 1970-1. 

London damsel, 63. 

London garland, 949. 

London jingles and country tales, 1421. 

London pocket pilot, 292. 

London prentice, crafty. The crafty Lon- 
don ^pprentice; or. Bow-bells, 1917. 

The crafty London 'prentice; or, 

The cruel miss well fitted, 1918. 

The London prentice, 951. 

The London prentice; or. The wan- 
ton mistress, 14»4, 1919. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



157 



London prentice, valiant. Famous his- 
tory of tlie valiant London prentice 
(prose), 527-9. 

Honour of (verse), 950, 2445. 

London songster, new, 1477. 

London wbore out-witted, 2036. 

Loudon's wonder, and the country's 
aniiizenient, 2226. 

Long and dreary is the night, 1498. 

Long life, extraordinary, 339. 

Long Meg of Westminster, 1770-1. 

Long pack, The, 387-8. 

liOUg, 'J'oni, 1765, note; 1831-5. 

Longinir maid's garland, 1422. 

Look at home, 159, 160. 

Looking glass for disobedient children, 
2215. 

Loom, cut of, 118, 174. 

Lord and woodman, 91. 

Lord Batcman, 952-3, 983a-c, 954. 

Lord Douglas tragedy, 955, 1302. 

Lord Granbv's garland, 1423. 

Lord Gregory, 643, 1517. 

Lord Henry and fair Katherine, 23, 956-7. 

Lord Lovell, 1368, note. 

Lord Moon, Duke Hamilton and, 795. 

Lord of Warwickshire's garland, 1424. 

I>ord Roslin's daugliter, 729. 

Lord Thomas and fair Annet, 958, note. 

Lord Thomas and fair Eleanor, 958. 

Lord Thomas of Winsberj', 1665. 

Lord Wliatley, Miss Adams and, 344-6. 

Lord's arm stretched out in an answer to 
prayer, 2138. 

Losing of the breeches, 1202. 

Loss of the pack, 1972, 1993, 2020. 

Lost and undone son of perdition. See 
Judas Iscariot, 57-60. 

Lothian Tom, comical transactions of, 
1772-6. 

Lottery, wonderful advantages of adven- 
turmg in, 178. 

Loud roared the dreadful thunder, 1401 . 

Loudon's bonny woods and braes, 1199, 
13.'52, 1384, 1438. 

Louis XVI, king of France, trial and 
execution of, 249. 

Louisa Harwood, pathetic sufferings of, 
389. 

Louisa Wharton, a story, 390. 

Lovat, Simon, Lord, execution of, 250. 

Love and glory, 1291. 

Love and loj-alty, 391. 

Love and our ocean home, 883. 

liove & the sun-dial, 1183. 

Love and torture, 521. 

Love enquiry, in a dialogue, 2354. 

Love in a bam, 1973-5. 

Love in a tub; or. The merchant out- 
witted, 694, 1925, 1976-7. 

Love in the horrors, 1356. 

Love inviting reason, 1314. 

Love is like a summer flower, 1184. 

Love is the cause of my mourning, 1195, 
1420. 

Love letters, 2301-2. 

Love of Evilina for Lord Armond, 392. 

Love, power of, 931. 

Love rewarded, 393. 

Love was the cause of my mourning, 
1195, 1420. 

Love whom you please, 1304. 

Love's a gentle passion, 1513. 

Love's craftiness, garland of, 868-70. 

Love's young dream, 1360. 

Lovely Amora, 1197 

Lovely brown maid, 1283. 

Lovely Damon, 923. 

Lovelv exile, 1508. 

Lovely Jean, 1349, 1624. 

Lovely Jenny's garland, 1425-7. 

Lovely Kitty, 1324. 

Lovely lass of Allan-down, 1481. 

Lovely Js'an, 1204. 

Lovely nymph, 710. 

Lover, cruel, 766. 

Lover disappointed, 1255. 

Lover, disconsolate, 1278. 

Lover, dying, 1355. 

Lover, faithless, 729. 

Lover, forlorn, 846-7, 1564. 

Lover, forsaken, woeful complaint of the, 
1164. 

Lover, hopeless, 1604. 



Lovers, forsaken, 912, 1403 

Lovers' garland, loyal, 965. 

Lover's jubilee, 1428. 

Lover's lament, 712. 

Lover's magazine, 1429-30. 

Lovers, meeting of the, 912, 1403. 

Lovers, The politick. See London 

butcher; or, The politick lovers, 

1970, note; 1971. 
Lovers, The politick; or. The young 

gentleman's frolik, 2006. 
Lovers' quarrel; or, Cupid's triumph, 

1126-8. 
Lover's songster, 1431. 
Lover's stratagem, 394. 
Lover's tragedy, 959. 
Loving ballad of Lord Bateman, 953b-o, 

954. 
Loving girl's invitation to a j'oung sailor 

in his trousers, 1346. 
Low churchman, character of a, 268. 
Low-countrj' soldier tuni'd burgomaster, 

960-2. 
Low down in the broom, 1386. 
Lowellen, D., travels in Africa, 310. 
Loyal Briton's concert, 1637-8. 
Loj'al comrades, 1652. 
Loyal lovers' garland, 965. 
Loyal martyrs, 64. 
Loyal sailor, with the Answer, 908. 
Loyal song, 289. 

Loyal songster's magazine, 1432. 
Lubin is away, 1386. 
Lucifer's lectures, 2355. 
Lucky and unlucky days, 186, note. 
Lucy Gray of Allendale, 1545. 
Ludgate prison, 295. 
Lukms, G., expulsion of seven devils 

from, 2149. 
Lullaby, 1430. 
Jaipin, Prince, 536-37. 
Lustful lord weU fitted, 1895. 
Lydia, 1967. 

Lysander's complaint to fair Silvia, 1454, 
Lyster, Martin, Journey to Paris, men- 
tioned, 291. 



Ma chfere amie, 1316. 
Ma clierie amie, 1543. 
Macaree, Samuel, ghaist of, 1200. 
MacDauiel, Billy, adventures of, 1684. 
Mcgregor Aurara, 1875. 
Mac(ircgor, fate of, 2049, note. 
Macgregor, Rob Roy, life of, 264. 
MacGregor's gathering, 1556. 
Macgriggor, John, wiclced life and most 

deplorable death of, 1766. 
Macgrigor, James, the golden farmer, 

2206. 
M'Intosh, James, forger, 2198. 
McKay, A lamentation for the death of 

the brave, 1481. 
McKinnon, Maiy, execution of, 2276. 
Mackpherson's rant, 966. 
Macneill, Hector. Scotland's skaith, 

1078-9. 
McPherson and Grant, conflict between, 

416. 
Mad man's morice, 967. 
Mad men of Gottam, merry tales of the, 

1856. See also Wise men of Gotham. 
Mad Tom of Bedlam, 1433. 
Mad Tom's garland, 1433. 
Madagascar, loss of an Indiaman at, 321. 
Madame Jane, 1277. 
Maddocks, Richard, case of, 2275. 
Magee, Island, strange events in, 2143. 
Maggie Lauder's garland, 1434. See also 

>faggy Lauder. 
Maggy Johnston's elegy, 1938-9. 
Maggy Lauder, 1294, 1327, 1434-5, 1660. 
Maggy Lauthcr, 1435. See also Maggy 

Lauder. 
Magic pill, 1978. 
Maginn, William. Daniel O'Rourke's 

voyage to the moon, 1684. 
Magopico, Mess John, 2371-2. 
Mahomet, history of, 65. 
Maid and her mother contending about 

marriage, 1375. 
Maid at her last prayers for want of a 

man, 1516. 
Maid, frolicksome, 790. 



Maid of Arundel, 1554, 1572. 

Maid oflslay, 1410. 

Maid of Judah, 1184. 

Maid of Lodi, 1294. 

Maid of Suflolk, politick, 2007-8. 

Maid of the farm, 395. 

Maid ofthe mill, 1269. 

Maid that 'tends the goats, 1203. 

Maid with her minutes lost, 785. 

Maidenhead's garland, 14.36. 

Maiden's bloody garland, 968. 

Maiden's complaint, 1547. 

Maiden's [Susan's] complaint for want 
of a husband, 2039. 

Maiden's lamentation for the loss of her 
love, 1935. 

Maiden's prize; or, Batchclor's puzzle, 
2356. 

Maiden's trance, 73. 

(Mary Lawrence), 74. 

Maiden's wish, 1654. 

Maid's answer to the young man's court- 
ship, 1653. 

Maid's blush, 1346. 

Maid's charms riffled, 1654. 

Maid's complaint [for Jockey], 729. 

Maid's hopes in the lottery, 1504. 

Maid's loyalty, 1239. 

Maid's resolution, 1395. 

Maids' moan for tlie loss of their maiden- 
heads, 1436. 

Maidment, James, broadside ballads and 
songs collected by, p. ix. 

Maidstone assizes, trials at, 2199. 

Maidstone garland, 969-72. 

Maidstone, Kent, trial of six witches at, 
2135. 

Major's only son, 2446. 

Mallet, David. Edwin and Emma, 802. 

William and Margaret, 821, note. 

Mally Stewart, Bonny, 1201, 1581. 

Malt, sermon on, 1790, 2354, note. 

Man, age and life of, 4, 5. 

Man, age of, displayed, 6, 7. 

Man of Heaton, 1878, 2359. 

Man of my heart, 1208. 

Man of war, jolly sailor's true descrip- 
tion of, 911. 

Man without a wife, 1664. 

Manchester, dreadful fire at, 2172. 

Mandeville, Sir John. Foreign travels, 
311-12. 

Maniac's song, 1271. 

Manners and Customs. See Section 
XXIII, p. 133. 

Mansie Wauch, life of, 1777-8. 

Mansong, Jack, negro robber, 2292. 

Manual ofthe theophilanthropes, 102. 

Mar, earl of, song in praise of, 1443. 

March to the battle-field, 1184. 

Marches day. The, 622. 

Maredant's anti-scorbutic drops, 399. 

Margaretandtheminister, 1979,2020,2028. 

Mam, 1402, 1531. 

Maria, the unfortunate fair, with Sequel, 
1241. 

Maria's sweeter notes excel, 1508. 

Marie Antoinette, trial and execution of, 
251. 

Mariner's concert, 1437. 

Market lass, 1430. 

Marlborough, The, 265, note. 

Marlborough, man of war, new ballad 
wrote at the forecastle of the, 1475. 

Marmaduke Multiply's merry method of 
making minor mathematicians, 183, 
note. 

Marmontel. Croyden foresters, 359. 

Marquis of Granby, 12.39. 

Marriage. A good husband for five 
shillings, 2339. 

Mamage ceremonies used by every na- 
tion, 2303. 

Marriage, directions for, 2364. 

Marriage, happy, 1455. 

Marriage, happy, of blithsome John and 
pretty Betty, 1202. 

Marriage. Letter from a Scotch nun to 
a bachelor, 2353. 

Marriage, misery of, 2566-8. 

Marriage. New guide to matrimony, 
2362. 

Marriage. Pleasures of matrimony, 
2370-2. 



158 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Marriage, short survey of the difficulties 
of, 2381. 

Marriage vow, 1229. 

Marriage. Whole pleasures of matri- 
mony, 2369. 

Married mau, 1545. 

Married man's guide, 89. 

Mars stript of his armor. By E. Wp.rd, 
252. 

Martyrs, book of, 9. 

Martyrs, loyal, 64. 

Martyrs, noble army of, 173-4. 

Marvell, A. Clarendon's house-warm- 
ing, 220. 

Mary, Mother of Christ. Life of the 
blessed Mary, 66. 

Mary, queen of Scots, life of, 253. 

Mary, 1.339. 

Mary Ambree, 973. 

Mary-Ann, 1411. 

Mary Ann Edwards, history of, 396. 

Mary Gaily, Tlie; or. The new ship 
latelv mann'd, 1918i 

Mary Gray, 786. 

Mary, I believ'd thee true, 792, 1308. 

Mary le More; or. The Irish maniac, 
1236. 

Mary Neal, 1299. 

Mary, the maid of the inn, 982. 

Mary's death at Sandy's tomb, 1227. 

Mary's dream, 1171, 1227, 1438, 1569, 
1897. 

Marybone concert, 1439. 

Mar3'bone gardens, songs sung at, 1439, 
1512, 1661, 1667. 

Mason, T. l^etter from a volunteer, 62. 

Masonry dissected. By S. I'ritchard, 
2357. 

Masscna's retreat from Portugal, 1440. 

Massey, Lord, forger, 2277. 

Massey, James, voyages, travels, and 
captivity of, 313. 

Master and man, 1684. 

Master cat. See Puss in boots. 

Mather, Cotton, 81, note. 

Mathews, Mr., at home !, 1778b. 

Mathews, Mr., songs sung by, 1640. 

Mathews & Yates at liome, 1778a. 

Mathews's mailcoadi adventures, 1357. 

Matrimonial iniidelity detected, 369, note. 

Matrimonial songster, 1441. 

Matrimony. See Courtship; Marriage; 
Wedding. 

Matthias, Peter, Confession of, 2272. 

Maxims and moral reflections. By I^a 
Rochefoucault, 192. 

Maxwell, Mr., laird of Cool, his ghost, 
2351-2. 

May Collean and false Sir John, 2460. 

May day garland, 1442. 

May, the mother of love, 434, note. 

Maynard, Lieut., and Capt. Teach, sea- 
fight between, 1662. 

Meal-monger's garland, 1443. 

Meal-monger's rant, 1443. 

Medical recipes, 187. 

Medley, 1444. 

Medlicott library, chap-books from, p.vii, 
broadsides from, p. ix. 

Meeting of the lovers, 912, 1403. 

Meeting of the waters, 802, 1285, 1625. 

Meg o' Marley, 673. 

Melodist, 1445. 

Men, what silly things you are, 1396. 

Mercer, The ; or, 1 atal extravagance, 
397. 

Merchant of Bristol's daughter, 974. 

Merchant lady's garland, 1980. 

Merchant outwitted. (Love in a tub), 
1976. 

Merchant outwitted; or, The chamber- 
maid's policy, 1914, 1914a. 

Merchant's daughter of Bristow, 974, 
note. 

Merchant's son and the beggar-wench of 
Hull, 1981-3. 

Merchant's son's courtship to fair Susan, 
1353. 

Merry batchelor's medley, 1446. 

(Songs from The poor soldier), 1447. 

Merry broom-field, 1984r-5. 

Merry chaise-driver, 1326. 

Men-y companion, 1448-50. 

Merry cuckold and kind wife, 1986. 



Merry droll; or. Pleasing companion, 

1779. 
Merry fellow, 1221. 

(The muses' choice), 1784. 

Merry fellow's companion, 1639. 
Merry frolicks, 1826-9. 
Merry gentleman, 1451. 
Merry maid, 1654. 
Merry roundelay, 1452. 
Merry songs cal<;ulated to please every- 
body, 1453. 
Merry tales & comical jests, 1852-3. 
Merry Wakefield garland, 1454. 
Merry wives of Wapping, 2029. 
Merryfleld's jests, 1780. 
Methodist, receipt to make a true, 2393. 
Metrical tales and other verse, 

631-1170. 
Mewis, Catherine, having sight on the 

Sabbatli only, 334. 
Mid watch, 1318. 
Michiiglit l)<)wl, 1230, 1617. 
Midnight hark-away, 1589. 
Mitlniglit watch, 1663. 
Miles, Sally, murder of, 2210. 
Milford galloway's ramble to the north, 

1987. 
Milford garland, 1987. 
Milking pail, 656. 

Milkmaid's garland, virtuous, 1147. 
Mill, mill, O, 1271. 
Mill of Tiftie's Annie, 637-9. 
Miller, The, 1365, 1371. 
Miller and lass, 1423. 
Miller, crafty, 1923-4. 
Miller, happy, 1232. 
Miller, Lexington, 2443. 
Miller of Drone, 1304. 
Miller of Mansfield, 922, 1595. 
Miller outwitted by his man, Jack, 1455. 
Miller, Wittam, 680-3. 
Miller, Geo., matrimonial deceiver, 2278. 
Miller, J. Joe Miller's comical and di- 
verting jests, 1723. 

Joe Miller's jests, 1724. 

Joe Miller's jests improved, 1725. 

Joe Miller's' jests; or. The wits' 

vade-mecum, 1726. 
Miller's advice to his three sons in taking 

of toll, 1988. 
Miller's garland, 1455. 
Miller's wedding, 920. 
Milton, Jolm. Comus; a masque, 613. 
Minden, Mr. See The devil's cabinet 

broke open, 218. 
Mine ain dear somebody, 1384, 1438, 1576. 
Mingle's bill of fare, 1325. 
Minstrel, Tlie, 1456. 
Minstrel boy, 1518, 1623. 
Mira's charms, 1598. 
Miraculous farmer, 1989. 
Miraculous supply, 141. 
Mirky Nan the milk-maid, 1398. 
Mirren Gibb's public house, 1303. 
Mirth and joy after sorrow and sadness, 

1131. 
Mirth in perfection, 2358. 
Mirth's magazine, 1457. 
Mirth's museum, 1781. 
Miscellaneous, 2300-2396, 
Miscellany of poems. By G. Jacob, 977. 
Miser, bite upon the, 1881. Also, 1880, 
Miser outwitted. See Bite upon bite, 1880, 

See Dorsetshire garland, 2419. 

See London butcner, 1970-1. 

Miser outwitted by the country lass. See 

Bite upon bite, 1882-3. 
Miss Betty's sorrowful parting with John, 

1497. 
Miss Drummond, 1294. 
Mississippi bubble, 272. 
Mistaken batchellor, 1923. 
Mistaken evil, 161. 
Mistaken lady's garland, 1990-1. 
Moderation and alteration, 1178. 
Modern idolatry, 1969. 
Modes of the court, 1259. 
Moggy's lamentation for Jockey's going 

to tlie wars, 1653. 
Moggy's lamentation for the loss of her 

Joeky, 1022. 
Mohun, Lord, merrv pranks of, 1747. 
Moir, David Macbeth, The life of 

Mansie Wauch, 1777-8. 



Moles. Book of moles and dreams. See 
The new card fortune book, 2091. 

Dreams and moles interpreted, 2065. 

Dreams and moles with their inter- 
pretation, 2066-7, 2069. 

Signification of, 2079, note; 2080, 

2305, note. 

treatise on, 2074, 2099. 

Molifere, J. B. The cheats of Scapin, 612. 

Moll and her mistress, 789. 

Moll in the wad, 726, 1208. 

Moll Cutpurse, 2175. 

Moll Flanders, 398. 

Molly Malone, 1276. 

Molly of Adamsley, Bonny, 1509. 

Molly O'Riggs, 1458. 

Molly the rover, 1270. 

Momus, The ; or, Annual songster, 1459. 

Momus's present to the lovers of mirth, 
1782. 

Money-catching, pleasing art of, 185. 

Monk and the miller's wife. By Allan 
Ramsay, 1992-4. 

Monsieur Tonson, recited by Mr. Faw- 
cett. Written by J. Taylor, 1995-7. 

Montelion, history of, 530. 

Montgomery, William, last farewell, 2279. 

Montreal, taking of, 1423. 

Moon. Daniel O'Rourke's voyage to the 
moon, 1684. 

Moon, Lord, Duke Hamilton and, 795. 

Moral essays. By Alexander Pope, 978. 

Morbus satanicus. Bj' W. Jones, 2405. 

More, Hannah, cheap repository tracts, 
126-178. 

Morgan, Thomas David, trial and execu- 
tion of, 21 78. 

Morice, Gill, 858-60. 

Morley, Richard, highwayman, 2190. 

Morning fresh, the sun in the east, 14.34. 

Morton, Sarah, true and melar.choly 
account of, 355. 

Moses, history of, 68-9. 

Mother Bridget, 2102. 

Mother Bridget's last legacy, 2094. 

Mother Bunch of the West, 208.')-7. 

Mother Bunch's closet newly broke 
open, 2082-4. 

Mother Bunch's golden fortune-teller, 
2088. 

Mother Goose's tales, 576, note. 

Mother Hubbard and her dog, 1999. 

Mother Shipton's prophecy, 2164-2171. 

Mother's lament for the death other son, 
1568. 

Mount your coursers, 1538. 

Mountain flower, 1269. 

Mourners, A token for, 104. 

Mournful lady's garland, 979. 

Mournful prisoner's complaint, 1326. 
Mournful widow's garland, 98()-l. 

Mouse, story of the little white, 599-600. 
Mr. O'Gallagher (a song), 1328. 
Mrs. Hall (a song), 1617. 
Mucking of Geordie's byre, 1484. 
Muirland Willie, 1327, 1460. 
Munchausen, Baron, adventures of, 1783, 
Murder discovered, 416. 
Murder found out, and cruelty rewarded, 

2210. 
Murder hole, 451. 
Murder'd minstrel, 982. 
Murders, Mysterious, 1809. 
Murders. True examples of the inter- 
position of Providence. By H. Field- 
ing, 2176-7. 
Murillo, Sebastian de, and Antonia, 376. 
Muschet, Nicol, murderer, 2280. 
Muses, The, 1461. 
Muses' choice; or. The merry fellow, 

1784. 
Muses' delight, 1462. 
Muses' magazine, 1463. 
Musing on the roaring ocean, 1568. 
Musical companion, 1464. 
Musical miscellany, 1465. 
Mutineers of Teineraire, trial of, 2181. 
Mutton, The leg of, 1969. 
Mutual love, 1391. 
My bonny Jean, 1255. 
My boy Tammy, 1466, 1575. 
My charming Ilighlandman, 1347. 
My charming lovelv Molly, O, 1546. 
My eye and Betty Martin, 1330. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



159 



My foud shepherds, 1360, 1513. 

My friend and pitcher, 1583. 

My lieart with love is beating, 1298. 

My I0, Janet, 1484. 

My lodging, 1251. 

My love is but a lassie yet, 1363. 

My love is like a red, red rose, 1216. 

My lovely swain carries the sway, 1475. 

My niither men't my auld breeks, 1309. 

My mother did so before me, 1279. 

My Nanny, O, 758, 839, 1204, 1267, 1328, 

1331, 1388. 
My only jo and dearie, 0, 1273, 1282, 1321. 
My Peggy gin thou die, 865. 
My Poll and my partner Joe, 1467. 
My sailor dear shall guard my pillow, 

1320. 
My wife has ta'en the gee, 1264. 
My wife's a winsome wee thing, 1364. 
My wife's dead, 1184. 
Myrtle of Venus, 1468. 
Mysterious murders, 1809. 
Mystery of courtship dlscover'd, 2309. 



Nadir Shah, life of, 254. • 

Nae luck about the house, 1399, 1404. 

Naunbanna, the black prince, 133. 

Nancy, 1411. 

Nancy (iay, 1928. 

Nancy of the dale, 1227. 

Nancy's constancy to her faithful lover, 

1348. 
' Nancy's constancy to William, 1561. 
Nancy's fancy, 1469. 
Nancy's garland, Beautiful, 663. 
Nancy's to the green wood gane, 1256. 
Nanny of the vale, 1534. 
Narrative of some strange events that 

took place in Island Magee, 2143. 
National debt, protest against, 221. 
National gazette, 255, note. 
Native laud, 1625. 

Nature display'd. By R. Collins, 983. 
Nature's richest mine, 1598. 
Naval remembrances, 256. 
Neal, Dennis, life and adventures of, 

2197. 
Necromancer; or. Harlequin Doctor 

Faustus, 2113-14. 
Ned and Ilariy, York dialogue between, 

2396. 
Neddy and Molly's parting, 1408. 
Negro's complaint, 1333. 
Neil, Sir, and Glengyle, 1094. 
Neil Gow's fareweel, 1531. 
Nell and her mistress, dialogue between, 

2024, 2024a. 
Nelson, Lord. Battle of Trafalgar, 196. 
Britannia in tears for the hero of 

the Nile, 1205. 
Nelson and the British tars victorious 

(Copenhagen), 257. 
Nelson and victory (Copenhagen), 258. 
Nelson's garland. The brave, 1470. 
Nelson's glory, 1333. 
Nelson's last victory and death, 1471, 

1597. 
Nelson's laurels. Great, 1472. 
Nelson's wreath; or, British glory, 

1473-4. 
Nestor, Benedict, memoirs of, 425. 
Neveau, J. Fr. Arcandam's astrology, 

2063. 
Never trv him, 1204. 
New and diverting dialogue between a 

noted shoemaker & his wife, 1688. 
New and ingenious fortune book, 2089. 
New and well-experienced card fortune- 
book, 2090. 
New art and mystery of gossiping, 

2360-1. 
New ballad wrote at the forecastle of the 

Marlborough man of war, 1475. 
New bower Apollo, 1476. 
New budget, 259. 
New caru fortune book, with the book of 

moles and dreams, 2091. 
New collection of riddles, charades, and 

conundrums, 1785. 
New dream book, 2032. 
New game at cards, 1786-7. 
New guide to matrimony, 2362. 
New llighland laddie, 1527. 



New historical catechism, 240-242a. 

New hocus-pocus!, 2093, 

New Irish song, 1422. 

New jest book for the winter-evenings, 
1788. 

New Jockey, 1527. 

New London songster, 1477. 

New-made mason, 1382. 

New Pantheon concert, 1478. 

New plaj'-houso garland, 1479. 

New proverbs on the pride of women, 
2336. 

New recruiting song, 260. 

New Sadler's Well's concert, 1480. 

New school of Christian patience, 112-20. 

New scrap book. Selection of bon-inots, 
Irish blunders, repartees, &c., 1789. 

New song before the royal familv, 1479. 

New song in praise of Capt. Ilornsby, 
1514. 

New song on the present war, 260. 

New theatrical songster, 1483. 

New touch on the times, 1197. 

New way to make love, 1998. 

New year's day, 162. 

New Year's garland, 1485. 

Newbery, John, publisher, 183, note. 

Newbury, Jack of, 613-16. 

Newcastle ale, 794. 

Newcastle beer; song, p. viii. 

Newcastle, duchess of, lament of, 1260. 

Newcastle, Grand musical festival, 1345. 

Newcastle rider, 616-8. 

Newcastle songster (language and man- 
ners of the common people), 1486-7. 

Newcastle. Theatre royal, songs sung at, 
1603, 1619. 

Newfoundland dog, 372. 

Newgate prison, executions at, 2191, 
2196, 2198. 

New-market horse race, 1630. 

Newes from Scotland, 2131-2. 

News, The, 2001. 

News from Hyde-Park, 2002. 

Newton, Mr., songs sung by, 1602. 

Newton, Florence, tryals of, 2145. 

Nicholson, Margaret, attempt to stab 
George III, 2281. 

wonderful prophecies of, 2156-7. 

Nieodemus, gospel of, 70-2. 

Nightingale, 1488-9. 

Nile, battle of the, 1186, 1310, 1317. 

Nimble and quick, 2563. 

Nine worthies of the world, 531. 

Nixon's Cheshire prophecy at large, 
2158-60. 

No cock like a west country cock, 1989. 

No dominies for me, ladie, 984. 

No jest like a true jest, 2265-6. 

No joke like a true joke, 2003. 

No life pleasing to God that is not useful 
to man, 431. 

No sport to the chace, 1221. 

Noah, 163. 

Noble army of raartj'rs, 173-4. 

Noble fisherman; or, llobin Hood's pre- 
ferment, 1061. 

Noble lord's cruelty, 985. 

Noble revenge, 399. 

Nobleman's cruelty to his son, 986-90. 

Nobody, 1178. 

Nobody comes to marry me, 1418. 

Nobody coining to marry me, 1269, 1291. 

Nong Tong Paw, 1591. 

Norfolk, crafty farmer of, 1916. 

Norfolk gentleman's last will and testa- 
ment, 040-1, 644-7. See also Children in 
the wood. 

Norfolk maiden, 1422. 

Norfolk tragedy, 991. 

Norfolk wonder; or, The maiden's trance, 
. 73. 

(Mary Lawrence), 74. 

North, Lord, verses on, 1178. 

Northamptonshire tragedy, 992. 

Northern ditty, 2004. 

Northern lass, 831. 

Northern garland, 993. Also 994-6. 

Northern lord, 993-6. 

Northern lord. The kmg and, 918-19. 

Northumberland, The ; action with three 
French men of war, 275. 

Northumberland garland, 1490-1. 

Northumberland grenadiers, 1490-1. 



Northumberland heroes, A right merry 
garland of, 997. 

Norwood gipsev; or, Mother Bridget's 
last legacy, 2094. ' 

Nothing, elogy of, 1692. 

Novels, synopses of popular, 408, note. 

Now ye're far away love, 1290. 

Nursery poems from tlie ancient and 
modem poets, 1492. 

Nursery rhymes from the royal collec- 
tions, 1493. 

Nutt's crack'd ; an answer to the Puzzle, 
1801. 

Nutts, Robert, highwayman, 2198. 



O bonny lass, 1589. 

O come to me when daylight sets, 1602. 

O condescend, dear charming maid, 1570. 

O Fortune, hear my prayer, 1482. 

O Helen, tliou art my darling, 1481. 

O I hae lost my silken snood, 1277. 

O Jeanie, there's naething to fear ye, 

1625. 
O let me in this ae night, 1494. 
O meikle thinks mv love, 653. 
O mither ! ony bodj% 1287. 
O rare country lasses, 1194. 
O say not woman's heart is bought, 1345, 

1376. 
O this is no my ain lassie, 1234. 
O to be marrj''d if this be the way, 789, 

1976. 
O wat ye wha's in yon town, 1309. 
O wha's that but Finlay, 1614. 
O what pleasures will abound, 1497. 

Willie brew'd a peck o' maut, 1365. 

1 wonder to hear !, 1187. 
Oak-tree, young lady confined in, 392. 
Oakham, Jack. See Ocum. 
Oakman, J. (iilpiii's second holiday, 1966. 
Oaths in fashion, 1267. 

Obi, a kind of witchcraft, 2291. 
Occasional facsimile reprints of rare and 

curious tracts, 2166. 
Och hey, Johny lad, 1498. 
Ocum, Jack, and Tom Splicewell, 616, 

1716-17. 
Odd characters and strange events, 

322-343. 
Oddest of all oddities ; an odd book of 

all the odd sermons, etc., 1790. 
Odds and ends. Collection of the best 

jokes, anecdotes, bon mots, &c., 1791. 
Ode on the comet, 2447. 
Ode on the incaiTiation, 75. 
(Edipus, 933, note. 
O'er Bogie, 1344. 
O'er Bogie wi' my love, 1205. 
O'er the muir aniang the heather, 1495. 
Of a' the airts the wind can blaw', 1383, 

1435, 1496. 
Of all the words in lexicon, 1334. 
Oft in the stilly night, 1602. 
Ogle, John, diverting humours of, 1747-8. 
O'llanlon, Redmond, captain general of 

Irish robbers, 2282. 
Oh, hey, Johny lad, 1366. 
Oh! lady fair, 1659. 
Oh, Nancy wilt thou fly with me, 1650. 
Oh no ! we never mention her, 1602. 
Oh, say not women's love is bought, 

1345, 1376. 
Ohl send me Lewis Gordon hame, 1576, 
Oh, the moment was sad, 1316. 
Okliam, Jack. See Ocum. 
Old Adam garland, 1497. 
Old Bailey sessions, trials, and sentences 

at, 2179-87. 
Old book collector's miscellany, 2166. 
Old cloaths man, 1329. 
Old England, 0, 1494. 
Old hulk laid un. 1498. 
Old lady and her niece, 1796. See also, 

1795 
Old mild Tom of Bedlam, 1433. 
Old maid's garland, 1499. 
Old maid's lamentation for her Philander, 

1499. 
Old man outwitted, 998-9. 
Old man's advice to his young friend, 76, 
Old men living underground, 332. 
Old Mother Hubbard and her dog, 1999, 
Old Nick's invention, 1510 



i6o 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Old usurer and young lady, 1389. 
Old wife and the wi' pickle tow, 1527. 
Old woman and young man, 1389, 2309-11. 
Old woman clothed in grey, 1369, 1605. 
Old woman disappointed of her nuptial 

enjoyment, 1927. 
Old woman who was drowned at Ratcliff- 

Highway, 1821. 
Old woman's dream a little after her 

death, 1821. 
Old woman's resolution to be married, 

1485. 
Old women. Oration on the virtues of, 

2364. 
Oldmixon, John. Nixon's Cheshire 

prophecy at large, 2160. 
Olio of fancy, 615. 
Olive, George, case of, 2283. 
Olympus in an uproar, 623. 
On a bank of flowers, 1349. 
On beauty, 1203. 

On Belvidera's bosom lying, 1266. 
On the bloody battle of Almanza, 1514. 
On wi' the tartan, 1602. 
Once I had a heart, 1511. 
One bottle more, 1629. 
Orange and blue, 1517. 
Orange boven songster, 1500. 
Orange gii-1, 130. 
Oration on the virtues of the old women, 

2364. 
Orphan boy, 2461. 
Orphan, fortunate, 371. 
Orplian Mary, 1590. 
Outlandish lady's love to an English 

sailor, 891, 893-5. 
Outwitted tax-gatherer, 375. 
Over hills, over dales, 1395. 
Overlove, Richard. Complete letter 

writer, 2315. 
Overthrow of the tyrant king, 599-600. 
Ovid. Hero and Leander, 495. 
O'Whack in love, 1657. 
Oxford. Companion to the Guide, 297. 
Ralph and Kell's ramble to, 2013-15. 

wandering bard's farewel to, 183-4. 

Oxfordshire garland, 1000. 
Oxfordshire tragedy ; or, Rosanna's over- 
throw, 1072. Also, 1069-71. 

P ***** n, James, history of, 386. 
Pack of cards changed into a compleat 

and perpetual almanack, 1786-7. 
Pack's address, 1972. 
Paddy and the bear, 577. 
Paddy Carey, 1316. 
Paddy from Cork, comical sayings of. 

By Dougal Graham, 1792-4. 
Paddy's trip from London, 1440. 
Pady's ramble, 1283. 
Page. Lamentation of Mr. Page's wife 

ofPlimouth, 1001. 
Paine, Thomas, Extracts from the life of, 

77. 

Tom Pain's lamentation, 1263, note. 

Paisley repository, 2365. 
Palatine lover's courtship, 1044. 
Palmer, Mary, murder of, 2199. 
Palmer, Miles, Robert, Sarah, 399, note. 
Pandosto; or. The triumph of time, 364, 

note. 
Pantheon, song sung at, 1478. 
Paradise lost and Paradise regained, 

78-80. 
Parents best gift, 81. 
Parismas, Capt. Thomas, history of, 423. 
Parismus, prince of Bohemia, 532. 
Parker, Capt., of the convict ship Hercu- 
les, 285. 
Parker, Elizabeth, murder of, 2216. 
Parker, Martin. John and Joan, 1964, 

note. 

See The king and northern man, 

918, note. 

True tale of Robin Hood, 1046. 

Parker, Richard, naval mutineer, 2284, 

2390. 

Parkinson, Alex., wicked life and deplor- 
able death of, 2207-8. 

Parley, the porter, 164. 

Parnell, Thomas. Ecstacy, 1162. 

Parr, Thomas, the old, old, vei-y old man, 
335-6. 



Parson and player, 330. 

Parson and sow, 2037. 

Parson and the boy, 1501. 

Parson's fat wedder, 923, 1604. 

Parson's garland, 1501. 

Particular description of a certain lady at 

present concealed, also a sketch of Iier 

niece, 1795. 
Particulars of the lives and transactions 

of James M'Intosh, etc., 2198. 
Parting kiss, 1335. 
Partridge and Flamsted's new and well 

experienced fortune book, 2095-8. 
Pastoral songster, 1563. 
Pastry cook, unfortunate, 428. 
Patch, Richard, murderer, 2285. 
Pater, Erra. Book of knowledge, 2064a. 

Lilly's new Erra Pater, 2081. 

Patient Grissel (prose), 533-5; (verse), 

1002-5. 
Patient Joe, 165. 
Patrick, St., of Ireland, 548. 

St. Patrick was a gentleman, 1179. 

Patrick O'Neal, 2005. 

Patriotic song, 1335. 

Pattern of piety (Job), 49. 

Pattern of true love, 985, note. 

Patty Clover, 1232. 

Paul, St., life and death of, 50. 

Paul and Nanny, 1284, 1497. 

Peace and Dunkirk, a new song, 261. 

Peace and plenty (1801), 262. 

Peck o' maut, 1267. 

Peden, Alex., life and prophecies of, 

2161-2. 
Peers, Henry, trial of, 2187. 
Peggy Bawn, 1502. 
Peggy Bond, 1490-1. 
Pembroke, earl of, merry pranks of, 

1805. 
Pendred, John. The cockney's miscel- 
lany, 2313. 

The jester's gimcrack, 1719. 

Penny-worth of wit. Choice, 1008-10. 
Penny-worth of wit's garland, 1006-7. 
Pensive maid, 1011-12. 
Perceval, Spencer, assassination of, 2233. 
Percy, Thomas, bishop, chap-books from 

the library of, p. vii; broadsides and 

garlands from the library of, p. viii. 
Peregi'ine Pickle, history and adventures 

of, 1797. 
Pericles, knight of Assyria, 530. 
Perilous situation, 417. 
Perjured bride justly rewarded, 441. 
Perjured lover, 354-5. 
Perjured maid, 1013. 
Perjured ship carpenter, 871-2. 
Perourou, history of, 400a. 
Perrault, Cliarles. Blue Beard, 451-3, 

538. 

Cinderella, 461. 

Little Red Riding-hood, 526. 

Puss in boots, 53S. 

Peterborough, earl of, satirized, 213. 
Peter's repentance, sermon on, 2402. 
Pette|n"ew, Mr. J., comical notes and 

saymgs of, 1798. 
Petticoat plotter, 394. 
Phelim's courtship, 1259. 
Philander and Diana, 1918. 
Philander's complaint to his beautiful 

Phillis, 1503. 
Philander's garland, 1503. 
Phillis, 1408. 

Phillis at a nonplus, 1505. 
Phillis, Damon and, 1180, 1475. 
Phillis's kind answer. Beautiful, 1503. 
Philosophical transactions, 393. 
Pickersgill, R. Mirth's magazine, 1457. 
Pierce, Captain, of the Halsewell, his 

heroism, 308. 
Piles, observations on, 2379. 
Pilgrim, The, 1504. 
Pilgi'im's progress, 82-4. 
Pilot, The, 1183. 
Pink garland, 1505. 
Pink shoes and white stockings, 1506. 
Pink shoes garland, 1506. 
Pinks and lillies, 1505. 
Piper o' Dundee, 1307. 
Pipes and tobacco, 1369. 
Piracy, downfal of, 1662. 
Piracy, laws against, 2173, 



Pirates, notorious, history and lives of, 

2173. 
Pitcher, Tlie, 1435. 
Pittenweem, witches of, 2142. 
Pity and protect the slave, 1553. 
Plain man's plain pathway to heaven, 

2406. 
Plant of renown. By E. Erskine, 86. 
Plato's advice, 1583. 
Play-bill spiritualized, 88. 
Play-house dialogue, 1685. 
Pleasant adventures of Anthony, 1749. 
Pleasant history of the frolicksome cour- 
tier and the jovial tinker, 1909-11. 
Pleasmg art of money-catching, 185. 
Pleasures and pursuits of human life. 

By Alexr Pope, 1014. 
Pleasures of a single life, 2566-8. 
Pleasures of love, 2343. 
Pleasures of matrimony, 2370-2. 
Pleasures of retirement, 1635. 
Pleasures of Sunderland town, 886. 
Pleasures of wooing, 1369. 
Ploughman, The, 1216. 
Ploughman's glory, 1015. 
Ploughman's rant, 1598. 
Plow-boy's dream, 174. 
Plowman, The, 1356. 
Plowman's dittv, 1337. 
Plowman's garland, crafty, 1925-6. 
Plummer, Jonathan. Hints to Elder 

Pottle, 2429. 
Plymouth,"Sweet Poll of, 1663. 
Plymouth, Sweet William of, 1111-14. 
Plymouth tragedy, 1016-18. 
Poacher, Black Giles, the, 131. 
Poachers, Lincolnshire, 2444. 
Pocket magazine, 2373. 
Poems anent the keeping of Yule, 87. 
Poems, elegiac, moi-al, humorous, and 

descriptive. By W. Harriston, 1020. 
Poems: Tlie gudcman of Ballangeich 

[and others], 880, 1019. 
Poesies for rings, 2301-2. 
Poetic trifles for young gentlemen and 

ladies, 1507. 
Poetical chap-books. See Section XI, 

p. 37, XII, p. 67, XIV, p. 106. 
Poetical request made by a youth, 88. 
Poisoning by inveuomea herbs, 340. 
Polhymnia, 1508. 
Polidor and Livia, 486, note. 
Political chap-books. See Section IV, 

p. 11. 
Politick lovers, The London butcher, or, 

1970, note ; 1971. 
Politick lovers; or. The young gentle- 
man's frolick, 2006. 
Politick maid of Suffolk, 2007-8. 
Politick squire, 2009. 
Politick wife, 2010. 
Polly, are you waking?, 1534. 
Polly Hopkins and Tommy Tomkins, 

2448. 
Poor Anthony's misfortunes, 1562. 
Poor charity, 2375-6. 
Poor client's complaint, 2374. 
Poor Jack, 1208, 1509, 1875. 
Poor Joe, the marine, 1318. 
Poor little Jane, 1545. 
Poor man and tlie king (King and 

northern man), 918-19. 
Poor man's councellor, 89. 
Poor man's counsel, 2279. 
Poor Robin, pleasant histoiy of, 1799. 
Poor Robin's dream, 2375-7. 
Poor soldier, 1447. 
Poor Tom, 1591. 
Pope, Alexander. An essay on criticism, 

803. 
Essay on human life. [Attributed 

to Pope], 804. 

Moral essaj's, 978. 

The pleasures and pursuits of hu- 
man life, 1014. 

Windsor forest, 1162. 

Pope's knavery. The, 1509. 

Pore man and the kinge, 918, note. 

Port Royal, Jamaica, 393. 

Porter, London, praise of, 183-4. 

Portsmouth ghost, 1021. 

Posey of thyme, 2343. 

Poulter, John, last dying words of, 2197. 

Powell, Foster, the great pedestrian, 337. 



INDEX OP SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



l6l 



Powell, Lacy, memoirs of the life of, 2286. 

Power of love, 931. 

Praise of light infantrj^ 1419. 

Praise of masonry, 1382. 

Praise of Molly, 1189. 

Pray Goody, 1319, 1376. 

Prayer book for families, 90. 

Prentice boy, 276, 1627. 

Prentice, London. See London prentice. 

Prentice, Sheffield, 1.305. 

Press-gang, 1621. 

Prestonpans, battle of, 6-58-9. 

Preston Pans, Jonny Coup's defeat at, 

642. See also Johnny Coup. 
Presumptuous .sinner, 91,157, note. 
Pretender, the, history of, 211. 
Pretty Betty's garland, 1511. 
Pretty Billy & smiling Nancy, 1351. 
Pretty green coat boy, 1022-5. 
Pretty gieen coat boy's garland, 1023-5. 
Pretty grey hawk, 1297. ~ 
Pietty Kate of Windsor, 2011. 
Pretty maiden's amusement, 1512. 
Pi-etty maiden's delight, 1513. 
Pretty milk-maid's garland, 1514. 
Pretty Peggj''s humble petition to her 

lover for marriage, 1239. 
Pretty Sally's garland, 1027. 
Pri('hard, Samuel. Masonry dissected, 

2357. 
Pride, On, 45. 
Pride, sin of, arraigned and condemned, 

2405. 
Primrose hill collection, 1515. 
Prince Charlie, 792. 
Prince Charly, Waes me for, 1201, 1574, 

1641, 1664. 
Prince Eugene's health, on his beating 

the Turks, 1516. 
Prince Liipin, 536-7. 
Prince of England's courtship to the king 

of France's daughter, 1028. 
Princely lovers garland, 1029. 
Princess, crafty, 866-7. 
Prin<«ss Elizabeth, 1289. 
Pi'incess Fair-star and Prince Cherry, 

471. 
Prisoner's advocate, 2378. 
Prodigal daugliter, 2211-14. 
Prodigal son, 92. 
Prodigious & tragicall history of the 

arraignment .... of six witches at 

Maidstone, 2135. 
Profaneness and immorality, laws 

against, 2382. 
Professor of signs, 543. 
Profit and loss ; a sermon, 93. 
Prologues, epilogues, etc., 615, 624, 628. 
Prophecies, 2150-2177. 
Prophecy on prophecies, 2157. 
Prophets, The, 1246. 
Prose fiction, 3 11 1 34. 
Protest against whiskey, 125. 
Proverbs. See Section XXIII, p. 133. 
Proverbs, choice selection of, 188. 
Proverbs, crossing of, 2316. 
Proverbs on the pride of women, 2336. 
Proverbs, Scotch, collection of, 2314. 
Proverbs, Scotch, excellent collection of 

the best, 2332. 
Provok'd wife's garland, 1516. 
Pry, Mrs. Penelope. The lady's maga- 
zine, 2350. 
Publican, The honest, 151. 
Publicans. True and real dialogue, 2386. 
Publius Syrus, choice sentences of, 2349. 
Puss in boots, 420-1, 538, 608. 
Puzzle, The ; choice collection of conun- 
drums, 1800. 
Puzzles. See Section XUI, p. 94. 



Quack well roasted, 2003. 

Quebeck, conquest of, 1527. 

Queen Bess, good, 1513. 

Queen Catherine, The wooing of, by 

Owen Tudor, 1030. 
Queen Eleanor, fall of, 1034. 
Queen Eleanor's confession, 1031-3. 
Queen Elizabeth and the earl of Essex, 

224-8. 
Queen Elizabeth's champion, 1035. 
Queen Esther, 143. 
Queen Jane, death of, 1036, 1222, 1300. 



Queen Marv's lamentation, 1289, 1352, 

1517-18, 1617. 
Queer old man, 1519. 
Quillettus, Claudius. Callipaedia, 2308. 
Quixote, Entertaining history of the 

female, 1694. 
Quizzical songster, 1520. 



R., T. Ode on the incarnation, 75. 

Rab and Ringan, 1037. 

Rabbits, extraordinary delivery of, 341. 

Radical reformers' new book, 1521. 

Rag-fair, humours of, 2344-7. 

Ragged and true, 12')1. 

Rainbow, The, sea-tight between Capt. 

Ward and, 724-6. 
Raising the wind. By J. Andrews, 2012. 
Rake and his mistress, 1522. 
Rake's complaint in limbo, 1038. 
Rake's garland, 1522. 
Rakish butcher, 931. 
Rakish husband, 1039-43. 
Rakish husband's garland, 1040-3. 
Ralph and Nell's ramble to Oxford, 

1013-15. 
Ralph of Reading and Black Bess of the 

Green, 2062. 
Rambling boy, 1523. 
Ramsay, Allan. Collection of Scotch 

proverbs, 2314. 

Excellent collection of the best 

Scotch proverbs, 2332. 

The gentle shepherd, 620. 

Lass of Patie's [Patty's, Peatie's] 

mill, 1214, 1234, 1306, 1410, 1600. 
The monk and the miller's wife, 

1992-4. 

Scots songs, 1549. 

Ranelagh, songs sung at, 1211, 1220, 

1240, 1247, 1408, 1428, 1439, 1463, 1468, 

1478, 1512, 1535-6, 1584-5, 1631, 1601, 

1661, 1667. 
Ranelaugh concert, 1524. 
Ranger's repository, 1802. 
Rare sights; or. Hue boys, hue, 2449. 
Ratclili, cruel cooper of, 764-5. 
Ratclift" highway, old woman drowned 

at, 1821-5 
Ratclifle, Charles, called earl of Der- 

went water, 217. 
Ratclive, Jack, 791. 
Rattan and Helen, 1325. 
Raven. Woman condemned for theft 

committed by a raven, 301. 
Read, Mary, pirate, 2175. 
Reading, Thomas of, 581-3. 
Ready money and no trust, 1648. 
Real barber,' 1254. 
Reaper's garland, 1525. 
Reaper's rant, 1525, 
Reason against coition, 2379. 
Reclaimed lady of pleasure, history of, 

401. 
Recruiting officer, 1566. 
Red joke, 1433. 
Red nose, 372. 

Red, red rose. A, 1216, 1271, 1568. 
Red Riding-hood, 471, 526. 
Reform'd drunkard, 1183, 1187. 
Regency collection, 1526. 
Rcid, — . Pleasures of matrimony, 

2370-2. 
Reid-Squair, battle of the, 657. 
Rejected Strephon, 1180. 
Relation of a very extraordinary sleeper, 

338. 
Relation of the diabolical practices of 

witches of Renfrew, 2139. 
Religion and the clergy, proposal to 

make them useful, 2379. 
Religious and moral chap-books, 

1-125. 
Remarkable and entertaining history of 

a reclaimed lady of pleasure, 401. 
Remarkable dream, 2450. 
Remarkable events, 391, note. 
Remembrancer, The, 1628. 
Renfrew, witches of, diabolical practices, 

2139-40. 
Repository tracts, 126-78. 
Reprobate's reward, 2215. 
Republican procession. By E. Ward, 

263. 



Resolute Dick's garland, 1527. 

Return of the spring, 1182. 

Revell, James. The poor, unhappy, 

transported felon, 314-16. 
Revenge, The, 1654. 
Reynard the Fox, 539-42. 
Rich palatine lover's courtship, 1044. 
Richard II, king of England. Ballad of 

the deposing of King Richard II, 930. 
Richard's address to his Lucy, 166. 
Riddle book, royal, 1803-4. 
Riddles. See Section XIII, p. 94. 
Ridges of rye, 1621. 
Right country courtship, 1973, 1975. 
Right merry garland of Northumberland 

heroes, 997, 1528. 
Riley, James, highwayman, 2198. 
Rings, poesies for, 2301. 
Ritson, Joseph, chap-books collected by, 

p. vii, viii. 
Rival brothers, 402, note. 
Rival twins, 402. 
Rob Roy, life of, 264. 
Robber, The, 372. 
Robber, young, 420-1. 
Robbers, female, lives of, 2175. 
Robbing of Redding, 1558. 
Robert, St., hermit at Knaresborough, 

94. 
Robert de Bruce's garland, 1045. 
Robert Wilson and John West (a song), 

1422. 
Roberts, Joseph, highwayman, 2198. 
Robertson, Miss, noted transactions of, 

2287. 
Robin Adair, 1216. 
Robin Bohugh's reason why he married 

such an ill-looking wife, 2451. 
Robin Gray, Auld, 1177. 
Robin Hood, history of (prose), 543-4; 

(verse), 1046-63, 1257. 
Robin Hood and King Henry, 2454. 
Robin Hood and Little John, 1064. 
Robin Hood and the ranger, 1065. 
Robin Hood and the sliepherd, 1066. 
Robin Hood and Will Stutly, 1068, 2463. 
Robin Hood newly rcviv'd, 2452. 
Robin Hood, Whole life of, 2455. 
Robin Hood's chase, 2454. 
Robin Hood's garland, 1052-8, 2455. 
Robin Hood's golden prize, 1067. 
Robin Hood's preferment, 1061. 
Robin redbreast, 1529. 
Robin the cobler, 212.5-8 
Robinson, Mrs. The storm, 1330. 
Robinson Crusoe, 403-7. 
Rochester, Lord. Lord Rochester's 

dream, 1747. 

Rochester's jokes, 1693, note ; 1805-8. 

Rock, The, and a wee pickle tow, 1627, 

2016. 
Roger and Dorothy, loves and humours 

of, 2120. 
Roger the clown, 1826, 1828-9. 
Roman charity, 1165. 
Roman stories; or. The liistory of the 

seven wise masters, 558-9. 
Roman stories ; or. The history of the 

seven wise mistresses. By Thomas 

Howard, 563-5. 
Romances (prose fiction). See Sec- 
tion VIII, p. 21. 

(prose legends). See Section IX, 

p. 26. 

(metrical tales). See Sectiou XI, 

p. 37. 

Rome, A topographical description of. 
By (i. (Jlrimani, 298. 

Rosamond, Fair. See Fair Rosamond. 

Rosanua, the Oxfordshire tragedy, 1069- 
72. 

Roscius, nie school of, 624. 

Rose (or Ross), Sir James the, (old bal- 
lad), 1085. 

(poem by Bruce), 1086-92. 

Rose-bud, The, 1232. 

Rose of Dunmore, 1666. 

Rose will cease to blow, 1571. 

Roslin, battle of, 660-1. 

Roslin castle, 1548, 1.569. 

Ross, Alexander. The rock and the wee 

pi(;kle tow, 2016, note. 
Ross, Sir James the. See Rose (or Ross). 
Rosse, Kenry, Lord, 2133. 



l62 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Roswal and Lillian, 1073. 

Rosy brier, 1364. 

Rosy cheek. A, a sparkling eye, 1325. 

Rover, The, 817. 

Rover, The good ship, 1967. 

Roving bachelor, 2456. 

Roving maids' garland, 1530. 

Roving maids of Aberdeen, 1530. 

Roving young man, 1392. 

Row, brothers, row, 1349. 

Roy's wife of Aldivalloeh, 1329, 1494, 
1531 1555 

Royal Charlie, 1291, 1307. 

Royal cii'cus, songs sung at, 1238. 

Royal courtly garland, 1074. 

Ro3'al dream, 1075. 

Ro3al George, Escape of a sailor on the, 
317. 

Roval Highlanders' farewel, 1314. 

RoVal love letter, 1321. 

Royal oak-tree, 1180. 

Royal riddle book, a collection of puz- 
zles, 1803. 

Royal riddle book; a new collection of 
riddles, 1804. 

Royal sailor, 1540. 

Roval shepherdess (Dorastus and Faw- 
nia), 365. 

Roj-al songster, 1532. 

Royal sportsman's delight, 1533. 

Royal wedding garland, 1534. 

Roj-altv theatre, songs sung at, 1225. 

Ruined virgin's garland, 720. 

Rule Brittauia, 892, 1322, 1334, 1484, 1555, 
1623. 

Rupert, Prince, 450, note. 

Rural lovers' delight, 1535. 

Rural poems and pastoral dialogues imi- 
tated from Mr. Gay. By Bob Short, 848. 

Rustic generosity rewarded, 381. 

Rutland, Francis, earl of, 2133. 

Rymer, James. Transplantation, 265. 

Rymer, Thomas, explication of the 
prophecies of, 2163. 



Sabina wakes, 1214. 

Sacheverell controversy, 267-70. 

Sacheverell, Henry. Answer to articles 
of impeachment, 266. 

Sadducismus debellatus, 2140. 

Sadler's Wells concert, 1536. 

Sadler's Wells concert. The new, 1480. 

Sadler's Wells, songs sung at, 1211, 1238, 
1240, 1428, 1451, 1468, 1506, 1512, 1526, 
1535, 1578, 1667. 

Sailor and fiirmer's daughter, 875. 

Sailor and his landlady, 1603. 

Sailor boy, 1650. 

Sailor, crafty, 1927. 

Sailor dear, 1606. 

Sailor, distracted, 779, 1256. 

Sailor Jack, 1202. 

Sailor's adieu, 1317-18, 1539. 

Sailor's advice to his brother sailors, 
1370. 

Sailors' companion, 1537-8. 

Sailor's consolation, 1538. 

Sailor's courant, 1485. 

Sailor's courtship, 876-7, 1588. 

Sailor's departure from his true love 
Nancy, 1424. 

Sailor's departure from his true love, 
Susan, 1258. 

Sailoa-'s dream, 1629. 

Sailor's farewel to his sweetheart, 1346. 

Sailor's journal, 1221, 1539. 

Sailor's lamentation, 1244, 1278. 

Sailor's magazine, 1540. 

Sailor's pleasant life, 697. 

Sailor's promise to his sweetheart, Molly, 
1370. 

Sailor's return, 1517, 1467, 1589, 1650, 
1967. 

Sailor's return to his sweetheart, 1270. 

Sailor's song, 1289. 

Sailor's songster, 1541. 

Sailor's triigedy, 1076-7. 

Sailor's whim, 1542-3. 

Sailor's wife, 1522. 

St. Andr6, N. Short narrative of a de- 
livery of rabbits, 341. 

St. Andrew, St. George, etc. See An- 
drew, St., George, St., etc. 



St. George & the dragon, 2017-18. 

St. Helena, deserters from, 301. 

St. James's market. The handsome 

butcher of, 635. 
St. Patrick was a gentleman, 1179. 
Sair, sair was my lieart, 1544. 
Saisprieur, Dr., 323. 
Salisbury, earl of, satirized, 213. 
Salle, Mr. Elliot's escape from, 306. 
SaUy in our alley. By Henry Carey, 

1027, 1589. 
SaUy Rov, death of, 1267, 1677. 
Sally Salsbury, 1974. 
Sally, sinful, story of, 170. 
Salvation. Plain man's plain pathway 

to lieaven, 2406. 
Sam Brown's jokes, 428, note. 
Samuel Macaree's ghaist, 1200. 
Sandy and Jenny, 2457. 
Sandy o'er the lee, 1327. 
Sapajou, Leonard, 428. 
Satan's invisible world discovered, 2124. 
Saturday niglit at Birmingham, 2019. 
Saturday night at sea, 1265, 1542, 1545. 
Savage girl of Champagne, 322-3. 
Savourna delish, 1875. 
Saw ye Johnnie coming, 1298 
Sawney and Jockey, 806. 
Sawney and Teague at the wind-miU,1601. 
Sawney in England, 1546. 
Sawney's garland, 1546. 
Scapiu, The cheats of, 612. 
Scarlet discovered, 375. 
School of Roscius; or. Theatrical orator, 

624. 
Schoolmaster's advice about choosing of 

a wife, 1662. 
Scolding wife, 1412. 
Scolding woman's delight, 2380. 
Scornfu' Nansj', 1344. 
Scot, Mary, sighing swain's praise of, 

1588. 
Scot, R. Discovery of witchcraft, 2129. 
Scotch drink, 1374. 
Scotch haggis, 1789, note ; 1810-11. 
Scotch lasses pursuit after her sweet- 
heart Jokey, 1558. 
Scotch lover's garland, 1547. 
Scotch lover's lamentation, 857. 
Scotch nun, letter from, 2353. 
Scotch proverbs. By Allan Ramsay, 

2314, 2332. 
Scotch Sandy, 1530. 
Scotch wedding, 1420. 
Scotchman out-witted by the country 

damsel, 2004. 
Scotland, Address to the volunteers of, 

1171. 
Scotland, An exact description of, 299. 
Scotland, executions in, 2189, 2193. 
Scotland, George IV's visit to, 731. 
Scotland yet, 1574. 

Scotland's rejoic^ing for presbytery, 271. 
Scotland's skaith. By Hector Macneill, 

1078-9. 
Scots bonnet, 871. 
Scots medley, 1548. 
Scots piper's queries, 1743. 
Scots song, 1555. 

Scots songs. By Allan Ramsay, 1549. 
Scottish lass, her resolute chusing, 699- 

700. 
Scottish minstrel, 1550. 
Scottish whisky, 1666. 
Scrap-book, The new, 1789. 
Scroggins, Giles, his ghost, 1321, 1329. 
Sea boy, 1317-8, 1321. 
Sea, the sea, 1184. 
Sea-captain, female, 1479. 
Sea-captain, frolieksome, 881, 2029, note. 
Sea-flght between Captain Ward and the 

Rainbow, 724-6. 
Sea-fight between lieutenant Maynard 

and Captain Teach, 1662. 
Seaman of Dover, 970-2. 
Seaman's resolution to kill the Green- 
land whale, 1346. 
Seaman's resolution to try his fortune at 

sea, 849 
Seaman's return to his love, 1012. 
Seamen's distress, 1504. 
Seamons, James, highwayman, 2190. 
Seeker, Wm. A wedding ring fit for the 

finger, 121. 



Secret uistory, Tlie, 410. 

See the moon o'er cloudless Jura, 1554. 

See the ship, 1573. 

Seeds of mankind, 2304. 

Select histories of human nature, 339. 

Select thoughts, 190. 

Selector, The, 392, note. 

8empill,rrancis. Banishment of poverty, 

195. 
Sempill, Robert. Lyfe and deithe of 

Habbie Simpson, 2U12. 
Sentiments, A collection of, 1394. 
Sentiments, A selection of, 188. 
Sermon, A godly, of Peter's repentance, 

2402. 
Sermon, An excellent, in verse, 18. 
Sermon, extempore, preached out of a 
hollow tree by a lover of ale, 1790, 
2354. 
Sermon on malt, 1790, 23.54. 
Sermons, odd book of all the odd, 1790. 
Servant maids, complete guide for, 181. 
Servant maid's tragedy, 2216. 
Servants. Trial of Betty the cook-maid, 

2385. 
Serving-man bound apprentice to his 

mistress, 1102. 
Serving-man, lady turned, 835-7. 
Serving-man, lady who fell in love with 

her, 940. 
Sei-ving-mcu, famous flower of; or. The 

lady turned serving-man, 835-7. 
Seven champions of Christendom, 546-54. 
Seven days work, 1466, 1551. 
Seven excellent songs, 1552-3. 

Seven favourite songs, 1554-5. 

Seven oi the most popular songs, 1556. 

Se^ven select songs, 1557. 

Seven wise masters of Rome, 555-60. 

Seven wise masters and mistresses of 
Rome, 561-2. 

Seven wise mistresses of Rome, 563-5. 

Seventeen hundred and twenty; or, 
Bubble year, 272. 

Several merry tales, 1836, note. 

Sexton, nature of the office of, 2273. 

Seymour, Lord. Ballad of Lady Ara- 
bella Stuart and Lord Seymour, 935. 

Shadwell garland, 1558. 

Shadwell shoufler, 1558. 

Shady grove, 1559. 

Shakespeare, William. As you like it,611. 

The tempest, 627. 

Sham doctor's advice, 1628. 

Sham marriage, 411. 

Sharp, Miss, impostor, 2287. 

Sliarpe, Miss (otherwise Bell), account 
of, 2232. 

Sharpe, Chas. Kirkpatrick, autograph 
note by, p. viii. 

Shaw, Mrs. Christian, witchcraft exer- 
cised upon, 21411 

Shawn a glanna, 1193. 

She never blamed him, 1234. 

She rose and loot me in, 1344. 

She wakes, Sabina wakes, 1214. 

She wou'd and she wou'd not, 1355. 

She's gone and left me bird alone, 1525. 

Sheep-shearer's garland, 1560. 

Sheffield prentice, 1305. 

Shepherd Adonis's garland, 1561. 

Shepherd, constant, 1615. 

Shepherd, distressed, 781-2. 

Shepherd, gentle. By A. Ramsay, 620. 

Shepherd of Borrowcfale, letter by, 1683. 

Shepherd of Salisbury plain, 167-8. 

Shepherd, Richard, highwayman, 2190. 

Sliepherd's daughter betrayed, 706-8. 

Shepherd's garland, 1562. 

Shepherd's holiday, 1180. 

Sliepherds, 1 have lost my love, 1666. 

Shepherd's kaleudcr, 186. 

Shepherd's lamentation, 1562. 

Shepherd's love passion song, 845. 

Shepherd's pastime, 1563. 

Shepherd's son outwitted, 1564. 

Shepherd's son's garland, 1564. 

Shepherdess of the Alps, 412-14. 

Shepherdess of Arcadia, beautiful, 664-5. 

Shepherdess, complying, 1608. 

Shepherdess, contented, 1286. 

Shepherdess, royal, 365. 

Shepherdess, wandering, 965, note: 
1162-5. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



163 



Shepherdess's wish, 1312. 

Sheppard, Jack, housebreaker and foot- 
pad, 2288. 

Sherra-iuuu-, battle of, 1324, 1326, note; 
1460. 

Ship-carpenter, happy, 2428. 

Sliip-carpeiiter, perjured, 871-2. 

Sliip-cai-penter's love to the merchant's 
daugliter, 975-6. 

Shipton, Motlier, her prophecy, 2164-71. 

Shipwreck'd tar, 1565. 

Slioemaker and his wife, A diverting 
dialogue between a, 1686-7. 

New and diverting dialogue be- 
tween, 1688. 

See also Hughson the cobbler, 1956. 

Shoemaker cuckold by the devil, 1787. 

Shoemaker of Jerusalem, 105-9. 

Shoe-maker's garland, 1566. 

Shoemakers' glory; or. The gentle craft, 
566. 

Shooter's BKU, execution at, 2190. 

Siiore, Jane, history of (prose), 468-9. 

Life and death of, 517-21. 

Tlie unfortunate concubines, 468-9. 

Woful lamentation of (verse), 

1080-2. 

Short survev of tlie difficulties that 

may attend a maiTied life, 2381. 
Short word of advice to sinners, 15. 
Short, Bob. The four seasons and rural 

poems and pastoral dialogues imitated 

from Mr. Gay, 848. 
Shylock, 993, note. 
Sic a wife as Willie had, 1367. 
Siddal, Thomas, trial and execution of, 

2178. 
Sidney, Sir Philip. Argalus and Par- 

thenia, 350-2. 
Siege of Copenhagen, 1471. 
Siege of Gaunt, 973. 
Siege of Gibraltar, 1339, 1540. 
Sighing swain's praise of Mary Scot, 1588. 
Simple John, comical history of, 1765, 

note; 1812-16; 1829, note. 
Simple Simon, song of many more of the 

misfortmies of, 1818. 
Simple Simon's misfortunes and his wife 

Margery's cruelty, 1817-19. 
Simple Tarn, misencs of poor, 1812, note ; 

1820. 
Simpson. Habbie Sympson & his wife 

baith deid, 2012. 

hyfe and deithe of Ilabbie Simpson, 

2012. 

Sims, Henry, history and adventures, 
317. 

Sui against the Holy Ghost, sermon on, 
97. 

Sinbad the sailor, 567. 

Sincere love of the courageous and com- 
passionate Zoa, 415. 

Sinful Sally, story of, 170. 

Singers, public, collection of songs sung 
by. See Arrowsmith, Bannister, Bra- 
bam, Byrne, Chapman, Dennis, Dib- 
din, Dignum, Edwin, Fawcett.Gaudry, 
Grimaldi, Lancaster, Le Lewis, Leoni, 
Liston, Mathews, Ne wton,Templeman, 
WUson. 

Single life, advantages of a, 433. 

pleasures of, 2566-8. 

Singular adventure (John Colter's 
escape), 372. 

Sinner's sobs; a sermon. By Thomas 
Boston, 98. 

Sins and sorrows spread before God. 
By I. Watts, 99. 

Sir Andrew Barton, 1083-4. 

Sir Be vis of Southampton, 568-9. 

Sir Edward Hawke's engagement, 1295. 

Sir Guy of Warwick. See Guy of War- 
wick. 

Sir James the Rose, tragedy of, 813. 

Sir James the Rose's garland, 1085. 

Sir James the Ross, 1086-92. 

Sir John Barleycorn. See Barleycorn. 

Sir l>ancelot du Lake and Tarqum, 1093. 

Sir Neil and Glengyle, 1094. 

Sir Richard Whittington and his cat 
(prose), 601-10; (verse), 1159-60. 

Sir Robert Bewick, 1095. 

Sir William Stanley's garland, 1096-9. 

Siren, The, 1567. 



Sit ye a while and tipple a bit, 1458. 

Six excellent songs, 1568-70. 

Six favourite songs, 1571. 

Six humourous poems, 2020. 

Six love songs, 1572-3. 

Six popular songs, 1574-5. 

Six songs, 1576. 

Sketches and characters of eminent per- 
sons, 273. 

Skylark, The, 1577-8. 

Sleeper, An extraordinar)', 338. 

Sleeping beauty in the wood, 570-9. 

Sleeping Maggie, 1438, 1666. 

Sleepy Davy's ravishment, 1502. 

Slighted father, llOO-l. 

Sloatliful, warning piece to the, 2407. 

Smirking lass's garland, 1579. 

Smirking, smiling lass well pleased, 1579. 

Smith, Mary, 2204-5. 

Smith, Sylvester, life of, 2191. 

Smithi Sir William Sidney, admiral, 
escape from a French prison, 318. 

SmoUet, T. (i. Peregrine Pickle, 1797. 

Smvthe, Miss Sarah, true and melan- 
cholly account of, 354. 

Social satire. See Section XXIII, 
p. 133. 

Societies for promoting a reformation of 
manners, 2382. 

Soda water, 1979, 2020, 2028. 

Sodger laddie, I0I8. 

Sodgcr's return, 1296. See also Soldier's 
return. 

Soldier Jack, 1202. 

Soldier slumbering after war, 1569. 

Soldier's adieu, 1635. 

Soldier's call to arms, 1990. 

Soldier's delight, 1580. 

Soldier's dream, 1412, 1581. 

Soldier's farewell to Old England, 1630. 

Soldier's festival, 1582. 

Soldier's garland, valiant, 1630. 

Soldier's gratitude, 1266, 1360. 

Soldier's return, 1272, 1274, 1559, 1607. 
See also Sodger's return, 1296. 

Soldier's return. By R. Tannahill, 626. 

Soldier's return. Answer to the, 1607. 

Soldier's song, 1579. 

Soldiers, Two, 175. 

Soldier's wife, 416, 418, 594 

Some authentick memoirs of the life of 
Colonel Ch * * * s, 2241. 

Somebody, 1293. 

Somersetshire garland, 1102. 

Something else to do, 1281. 

Song books, 1171-1667. 

Song from the Greek, 1601. 

Song in imitation of Dumbarton's drums, 
1370. 

Song in praise of the earl of Mar, 1443. 

Song of the olden time, 1555. 

Song on the famous peal of 7308 grand- 
sire cators, 2383. 

Songs, duets, choruses, in Tom & Jerry, 
1619. 

Songs in the night, supplement to, 101. 

Songster's companion, 1583-4. 

Songster's magazine, 1585-6. 

Songster's panorama, 1361. 

Sorblere, Mons. Journey to London in 
1698, 291. 

Son'ow and care, 1369. 

Sorrows of Hannah, 169. 

Sound the brisk horn, 1259. 

Sour milk garland, 1587. 

South sea bubble. The bubble bubble, 
.245. 

Seventeen hundred and twenty, 272. 

South-sea song upon the late bubbles, 
2326. 

Southcote, Joanna, prophecies of, 2172, 
note. 

Southwalk usurer, 330. 

Spaewife, The; or. Universal fortune- 
teller, 2099. 

Spanish lady's love, 1103. 

Spanish tale, 393. 

Spawn of puzzles : a collection of conun- 
drums, 1854. 

Spearing, George. Wonderful account 
of, 319. 

Spears, John, trial of, 2188. 

Spectre bridegroom, baUad of, 1110, note. 

Speech without doors, 270. 



Spence, T. End of oppression, 229. 

Recantation, 230. 

Spendthrift, The, 1646. 
Spiller, anecdotes of, 1681. 
Spinnmg wheel, 1340, 1380, 
Spinning wheel's glorv, 2338. 
Splicewell, Tom, Jack Ocum and, 616, 

1716-17. 
Sponging-houses, notorious imposition 

of, 2378. 
Sporting couple, 1558. 
Sporting Moren, 1440. 
Sportsman's garland, 1588. 
Sprightly horn, 1657. 
Sprightly songster, 1589. 
'Squire of St. James's, 2021. 
Squire, politick, 2009. 
Squire. See also Esquire. 
Squire's frolic, 1282. 
Staffordshire maid, 1104-5. 
Staffordshire tragedy, 1369. 
Stammerers, The, 2022. 
Stanley, Sir William, his travels, 1096-9. 
Stanton, Mr., and Miss Fairfield, provi- 
dential meeting of, 371. 
Stark-naked west country wedding, 1954. 
Starving, the benefits of. By W. Wooley, 

283. 
Stephen, St., death of, 18. 
Stepmother, cruel, 767-70. 
Stepmother's cruelty, 936. 
Stevens, Col., and Lucy Banks, 434. 
Stitch, Tom, the taylor, 1843-8. 
Stockton sailor, 1244. 
Stockwell, astonishing transactions at, 

324. 
Stone, Tliomas, wonderful prognostica- 
tions of, 2157. 
Stony heart softened, 891. 
Stories. See Storys. 
Storm, The (" Cease rude Boreas," etc.), 

1590, 1612. 
Storm, The. By Mrs. Robmson, 1330. 
Story of nobody, 1692, note. 
Story of tlie bitter wedding, 580. 
Story of the little white mouse, 599-600. 
Story teller, 416. 

Storys of Prince Lupin, etc., 536. 
Storys of the bewitdied fiddler, etc., 417. 
Storys of the three beggars, etc., 418. 
Storys of the wild huntsman, etc., 419. 
Storys of the young robber, etc., 420-21. 
Strand garland, 1106-7. 
Strange and wonderful prophecies for 

1801, 2172. 
Strange antl wonderful relation froni the 

forest of Whichwood, 340. 
Strange and wonderful relation of the 

old woman who was drowned at Rat- 

clitt-Highway, 1821-5. 
Strange events. See Section VII, 

p. 19. 
Strangwidge, George, Lamentation of, 

1001. 
Strathallan's lament, 1552. 
Straw, Jack, 279-81. 
Stray'd lamb, 1312. 
Streamlet, 1246. 
Strength of some persons, 339. 
Strew the rude crosses of life o'er with 

flowers, 1538. 
Stuart, Lady Arabella, 935. 
Stukely, Thomas, life and death of the 

famous, 1108. 
Sturt, Lady Mary Ann, 2234. 
Subtle doctor, 1916. 
Suffolk comedy, 1109. 
Suffolk miracle, 1110. 
Suflolk, politick maid of, 2007-8. 
Sully's domestic physician, 187. 
Summer's amusement, 1591. 
Summers, Patrick, highwavman, 2190. 
Summers, Will., pleasimt history of, 1855. 
Sun, Meditation on the glory of, 2408. 
Sunday. A dissertation on the first day 

of the week, 36. 
Sunday reading. See Section I, p. 1 ; 

II, p. 8. 
Sunday water party, 100. 
Sunderland, carl of, satirized, 213. 
Sunderland town, pleasures of, 886. 
Surprising history of a ballad-singer, 

422. 
Surrey assizes, trials at, 2188, 2192. 



1 64 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Susan, Black ey'd, 694-6, 1583. 
Susan of Plymouth's overthrow, 1016. 

Susan's bay, 1592. 

Susan's complaint for want of a husband, 
2039. 

Susan's p:arland, 1592. 

Sutton, Richard, and Sally Miles, history 
of, 2210. 

Swallow, The, 1204. 

Swalpo, comical cheats of, 1826-9. 

Sweet Alison, 1171. 

Sweet echo, 1593. 

Sweet evening bells, 1554. 

Sweet home, 1641. 

Sweet is life, 1329. 

Sweet Jean of Tyrone, 817. 

Sweet Jeany, 1260. 

Sweet little angel, 1258. 

Sweet Nan of Hampton Green, 1258. 

Sweet Poll of Plymouth, 1663. 

Sweet Polly's garland, 1594. 

Sweet Robin, 15.38, 1595. 

Sweet robin collection, 1596 

Sweet Rose of the vale, 1039. 

Sweet the rose blaws, 1367. 

Sweet William of PljTuouth, 1111-14. 

Sweet William's dream on his wedding 
night (Fair Margaret and Sweet Wil- 
liam), 819-20. 

Swift, J. A letter to his friend, 88. 

Swiftness of some persons, 339. 

Swimming, art of, 179. 

Swimming lady, 2023. 

Sword dancers, 1115. 

Sylvia. 1189. 

Sylvia's cruelty to her kind lover, 1433, 

Sylvia's marriage, 1194. 



Tack and half tack, 1543. 
Tailor, Leper the, 1765-9. 
Tailor. See also Taylor. 
Tak' your auld cloak about ye, 1306, 

1466, 1517, 1597, 1635. 
Take me, Jennv, 1350, 1424. 
Taking of the llavanna, new song on the, 

1425. 
Tale of the basyn, 1960, note. 
Tale of three bonnets, 1941. 
Tam Merilees, 1741. 
Tam o'Shanter. By R. Bums, 1116-17. 
Tamie Lamie's cure for a drunken wife, 

1.598. 
Taming of a shrew, 1118-19. 
Tandem, The, 1599. 
Taujoi-e, burning of the, 417. 
Tannahill, R. The soldier's return, 626. 
Tarquin, Prince, and Miranda, 369. 
Tarquin, Sir Lancelot du Lake and, 1093. 
Tar's vocal medley, 1207. 
Taste life's glad moments, 912, 1403. 
Taunton-Dean, dreadful news from, 2203. 
Tavern kitclien fray, 2024, 2024a. 
Tawney Rachel, 171. 
Taxation, 1178. 
Taylor and the louse, 1380. 
Taylor, fortunate, 1340. 
Tavlor. Mansie Waugh, taylor in Dal- 

Ueith, 1777-8. 
Taylor, Tom Stitch the, 1843-8. 
Taylor. See also Tailor. 
Taylor, J. Monsieur Tonson, 1995-7. 
Taylor, Jemmy, the Southwark usurer, 

330. 
Taylor, John. Tlie old, old, very old 

man (Parr), 335. 
Taylor's garland, 1120. 
Taylor's wedding, 1547. 
Tea and brandy, 1190, 1646. 
Tea, woman's praise of, 451. 
Teague's garland, 1600. 
Teague's ramble to Hyde Park, 1120a, 

1600-01, 2025. 
Teazing me so, 1222. 
Ted Blarney, 1227. 
Tcetotalism, dialogue on, 219 
Telegraph, The French, 1463. 
Tell me when the maid is found, 1396. 
Tell, William (a song), 1316. 
Tell-tale, 1194. 

Telltruth, Mr. Mirth in perfection, 2358. 
Tcmeraire, H. M. S., trial of mutineers 

of, 2181. 
Tempest, The, 1397, 1663. 



Tempest, Tlie. Bv W. Shakespeare, 627. 
Temple of friendship, 1350. 
Temple wedding, 1121-2. 
Templeman, Mr., songs sung by, 1550. 
Ten favourite songs, 1602. 
Terrible, The, privateer. Song in praise 
of Capt. Death, 663, 1475. 

New song in praise of Cap. Death, 

1506. 
Theophilanthropes, Manual of the, 102. 
There's nae luck about the house, 1293, 

1371, 1571. 
Thespian oracle, 628. 
Thespian songster, 1603. 
Thespian telegraph, 629. 
Tlietis, wreck of, 302. 

Thicknesse, P. Sketches and characters 
of eminent persons, 273. 

Thine am I, 1570. 

Thirsty lover, 1190, 1198. 

This is no mine ain house, 1197. 

This is no my ain lassie, 1557. 

This is no my plaid, 1401. 

Tho' 'tis all but a dream, 2432. 

Tho' you leave me now in sorrow, 1623. 

Tliomas of Reading, 581-3. 

Thomas of Winsbery, Lord, 1665. 

Thompson, Alex., murderer, 2289. 

Thompson, Mary, life and trial of, 2290. 

Thoms, W. J., collection of chap-books 
from the library of, p. ix. 

Thorn, The, 1328. 

Thou hast left me ever, Jamie, 1266. 

Thou'rt gane awa, 1292. 

Though I'm forsaken, 1641. 

Though prim as saints, 1519. 

Three beggars, 418. 

Three excellent new songs, 1604-7. 

Three excellent songs, 1608-9. 

Three famous new songs, 1610. 

Three favourite songs, 1611-12. 

Three fingered Jack, 2291-2. 

Three merry butchers, and the ten high- 
waymen, 1123-4. 

Three old Scottish songs, 1613. 

Three Sisters, schooner, piracy and mur- 
der on, 2271. 

Three songs, 1614-15. 

Three weeks after marriage, 1232, 1273, 
1495. 

Three wishes, 536-7. 

Thro' the wood, laddie, 656, 1315, 1594. 

Thrummy Cap and the ghaist. By J. 
Burness, 982, 2026-8. 

Thrush, The, 1616. 

Thurot's defeat, 1412. 

Thyrsis and Aurelia, 1254. 

Tibby Fowler in the glen, 1205, 1495. 

Tickle-pitcher, T. The cabinet of fancy, 
1671. 

Tid the gray mare, 2457. 

Tilgliman, Chief Justice. Address at 
condemnation of John Joyce, 2272. 

Time caught and drown'd in wine, 1187. 

Time. To tell time by one's hand, 186, 
note. 

Tinker, courtier and, 1909-11. 

Tinker. King and tinker's garland, 920. 

Tinker, King James I and the, 926, 1315. 

Tired soldier, 1617. 

Tit for tat (The lace-merchant and the 
farmer's wife), 1258. 

Tit for tat ; or. The merry wives of Wap- 
ping, 2029. Also, 881. 

To Lethe repair, 1182. 

To my own mind, 1974. 

To the evening star, 1552. 

Toast-master's companion, 188. 

Toasts, A collection of, 1394. 

Tobias, pleasant ballad of, 103. 

Toby Philpot, 1323, 1334. 

Toby Tickle's collection of riddles, 1699. 

Todlen butt, and todlen ben, 1271. 

Todlen hame, 1618. 

Toft, Mary, case of, 341. 

Toil of shearing o't, 1525. 

Token for children, 81, note. 

Token for mourners, 104. 

Toledo, Archbishop of, 399. 

Tom and Dolly's courtship, 955. 

Tom & Jerry, Songs, etc., in, 1619. 

Tom and Will, 1125. 

Tom Bowling, 726, 1215, 1275, 1317, 1430, 
1620, 1651. 



Tom Ilaliard, 2456. 

Tom Hickathrift, 584-92. 

Tom Hodge, merry tales of, 1713-14. 

Tom rlones. By H. Fielding, 424. 

Tom King's new book of oddities, 1830. 

Tom Long the carrier, 1765, note : 1831-5. 

Tom of Bedlam, 1433. 

Tom Pain's lamentation, 1263, note. 

Tom Splice 'em, 1635. 

Tom Starboard, 1317, 1565. 

Tom Stitch, the taylor, 1843-8. 

Tom Thumb, 2030-5. 

Tom Tough, 1498. 

Tom Tram, mad pranks of, 1836-41. 

Tom Trow, 1765, note. 

Tom Trigger's adieu, 1591. 

Tommy Lmn, 1256. 

Tommy Potts, ballad of, 1126-8. 

Tommy the man-iner's farewell, 1392. 

To-morrow, 1592. 

Too cruel nymph, 786. 

Toper's delight, 1182, 1222. 

Torfoot, laird of, 255, note. 

Totterdown Hill, 1665. 

Touch on the times, 2384. 

Touching of the string, 1455. 

Tournament at Eglington castle, 288. 

Town and country story-teller, 1762. 

Townley, Francis, trial and execution ol, 
2011, 2178. 

Trades and callings, countryman's de- 
scription of, 2344-7. 

Trades, satire upon, 2391-2. 

Trades, touch on all, 2343. 

Tradesman's resolution, 1479. 

Tradesmen's extortions. True and real 
dialogue, 2.386. 

Trafalgar, battle of, 196, 1186. 

Tragical ballad, The ; or, The lady who 
fell in love with her serving-man, 940. 

or. The nobleman's cruelty to his 

son, 988. Also, 986-7, 989-90. 

Tragical garland, Tlie; or. The noble- 
man's cruelty to his son, 986. Also, 
987-90. 

Tram, Tom, mad pranks of, 1836-41. 

Trances. See Visions. 

Transactions and dying behavior of the 
18 unfortunate malefactors, etc., 2199. 

Transplantation. By J. Rymer, 265. 

Travel and Adventure, 301-321. 

Traveller, The ("A traveller stopt at 
a widow's gate "), 1221. 

Traveller, The. By Oliver Goldsmith, 
1014. 1129. 

Trenck, Baron, 418. 

Trial of Betty the cook-maid, 2385. 

Trial of the mutineers, late of H. M. S. 

Temerairc, 2181. 
Trial of true love, 780. 
Trial. See also Trj-al. 
Trials, 2178-88. 
Trials and sentences, Old Bailey sessions. 

2182-4. 
Trials for witchcraft. See Section XVI. 

p. 118. 
Trials, garland of, 850-1. 
Trials of all the felon prisoners, at the 

Old Bailey, 2185-7. 
Tribulation, sea of, 88. 
Trick upon the parson by the sailor, 1881. 
Trick upon trick; or. The vintner in tlie 

suds, 630. 
Tricks of London laid open, 293. 
Trifler, T. An elogy of nothing, 1692. 
Trip through London, 294. 
Trip to Bath, etc., a story, 425. 
Trotter, Jamie, the strong man, 1326. 
Troubles of life, 172. 
Troy, destruction of, 490-2. 
Troy, wandering prince of, 1150. 
True and particular account of the trials 

.... at Surrey assizes, 2188. 
True and real dialogue between Mr. 

Steel, the butcher, etc., 2386. 
True-blue, 1621. 
True blues of Hall's Mill, 2387. 
True character of a churchman. Answer 

to, 268. 
True courage, 1300, 1317. 
True Egyptian fortune-teller, 2100-1. 
True fortune teller, 2102. 
True gentleman, 41. 
True-hearted woman, 1594. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



165 



True heroes, 173. 

True love requited, 1130. 

True love rewarded with loyalty, 1131. 

True lover's downfall, 862-3. 

True lover's joy, 1132. 

True lovers knot unty'd, 935. 

True lover's yoke, 1380. 

True state of mortality, 75. 

True trial of understanding, 1842. 

True, John, and Susan Mead, 1136-7. 

Trumbull, J. Lamplighter's address, 

2439. 
Trumpet sounds a victory, 1322, 1329. 
Truth laid open, 1248, 1501. 
Tiyal of witches at tlie assizes held at 

Bui-y St. Edmonds, 2136-7. 
Tryal. See also Trial. 
Tudor, Owen, his wooing of Queen 

Catherine, 1030. 
Tullochgorum, 1230, 1622, 1648. 
Tumultuous cavalcade, 263. 
Turkey factor, 814-15. Also, 809-13. 
Turkish lady, 1385. 
Turn tlie carpet, 174. 
Tumbull, W. B. D. D., collection of chap- 
books owned by, with autograph, p. ix. 
Turncoat, The, 276. 
Turner, N. The heathen's conversion, 

42. 
Turner, R, Astrological catechism, 2064. 
Turnip-sack garland, 2036. 
Tumpin's valiant exploits, 1265. 
Turpin, Richard, highwayman, 2293-4. 
Turpin the second, life and adventures 

of, 2197. 
Turton, Sir Tliomas, trial of, 2295. 
Twa lairds of Lesmahagow, 880, 1019. 
Twa weavers, 1623. 
'Twas merry in the hall, 1556. 
'Twas on the mom of sweet May day, 

1624. 
'Twas within a mile of Edinboro town, 

1513. 
Twecdsidc, 1200, 1331, 1351, 1555, 1657, 

1968, 1968a. 
Twig of shellilah, 1299. 
Twine weel the plaiden, 1625. 
Twins of Latona, 1589. 
Two auld songs, 1013. 
Two babes in the wood, 641-2. See also 

Children in the wood. 
Two constant lovers, 722. 
Two constant lovers who died by the 

road, 1177. Also, 805-8. 
Two excellent new songs, 1626. 
Two excellent songs, 1627. 
Two faithful lovers, 759. 
Two favourite ballads (Babes in the 

wood; Lord Gregory), 643. 
Two-pennyworth of fun, 1719. 
Two shoemakers. Part iii, 153. 
Two soldiers, 175. 
Tyler, Wat, history of, 279-«l. 
Tyuemouth, history of, 300. 
Tythe for tythe !, 2037. 



Ugly club, 1334. 

Ugly wife, 1310. 

Ulster tragedy, 1133. 

Unconstant Moggy's garland, 1628. 

Unconstant Nelly, 1189. 

UndutLful daughter, 2217. 

Unfortunate concubine, 828. 

Unfortunate daughter, 2038. 

Unfortunate female, address to, 93. 

Unfortunate Frenchman's garland, 2039. 

Unfortunate grazier's daughter, 1134 

Unfortunate happy lady, 427. 

Unfortunate Jockey, 1151. 

Unfortunate lady (Wandering shep- 
herdess), 1151. 

Unfortunate love of a Lancashire gentle- 
man, 1135. 

Unfortunate lovers, 1136-7. 

Unfortunate Magdalen, 408. 

Unfortunate pastry-cook, 428. 

Unfortunate shipwright (R. Barker) , 302. 

Unfortunate son, 2040-1, 

Unfortunate weaver, 1629. 

Unfortunate Welshman. By H. Crouch, 
1849-51. 

Unfortunate wife, 411. 

Unfortimate young lady, 1455. 



Ungrateful Nanny, 1352. 
Unguarded fair one, 346. 
Unhappy bov turn'd thrifty, 1389. 
Unhappy lady of Hackney, 1138-41. 
Unhappy lover's garland,' 1142-3. 
Unhappy memorable song of the hunting 

of Cnevy-Chaie. See Chevy -Chase. 
Unhappy son, 767-70. 
Universal toastmaster's companion, 188. 
Uniust man rewarded, 2218. 
Unknown world, 2458. 
Unnatural father, 1144. 
Unnatural mother, 864. 
Unnatural son justly reclaimed, 1100-1. 
Up and warn a*, Willie, 1307. 
Up in the mornmg early, 1255, 1266, 1331, 

1404. 
Uratz, Capt., highwayman, 2174. 



Valentine and Orson, 593-8. 

Valentine's day, 998. 

Valiant Irish captain's love, 1499. 

Valiant London prentice. See London 
prentice. 

Valiant seaman's return to his love, 1012. 

Valiant soldier's farewel to Old-England, 
1630. 

Valiant soldier's garland, 1630. 

Valiant trooper, 1239. 

Valley below, 1610. 

Vandermast, life and death of, 2118. 

Variorum, The, 1264. 

Vauxhall. Humourous recital of a citi- 
zen's Saturday evening adventure at 
Vauxhall, 1715. 

Vaux-hall concert, 1631. 

Vauxhall, songs sung at, 1206-7, 1211, 
1220, 1238, 1240, 1242-3, 1247, 1408, 
1413, 1438-9, 1449, 1451, 1453, 1463, 
1468, 1470, 1478, 1512, 1520, 1535-6, 
1578, 1584-5, 1637, 1661, 1667. 

Vauxhall songster, 1632. 

Veal, Mrs., apparition of. By D. Defoe, 
426. 

Venus's delight, 1354. 

Vermin killer, 189. 

Vermont minister, dream of, 2450. 

Vernon, Admiral, brave news from, 1224. 

Verses on a young woman in this town, 
1987. 

Vicar and Moses, 2042. 

Vicar of Wakefield. By O. Goldsmith, 
429. 

Vices of the age, explanation of, 2333-4. 

Vile seducer, 1145. 

Village curate, 430. 

Village sexton, 1633. 

Vintner, complete, 2326 

Vintner in the suds, 630. 

Virgin's complaint against young men's 
unkindness, 1146. 

Virgin's complaint, betraved, 719. 

Virgin's complaint for the loss of her 
lover, 1011. 

Virgin's garland, betrayed, 831-4. 

Virgin's walk, 923. 

Virginia, transported felon in, 314^16. 

Virtue only in the mind, 1466. 

Virtue rewarded, 433. 

Virtue triumphant, 143. 

Virtues and vices of the times, 2363. 

Virtuous milk-maid's garland, 1147. 

Virtuous wife in distress, 2202. 

Virtuous wife of Bristol, 1006, note, 1148. 

Vision of Alraet, 431. 

Visions. Afflicted parents, 3. 

Blasphemer's punishment, 12. 

Buckinghamshire miracle, 13. 

Dead man's dream, 23-5. 

England's timely remembrances, 

39, 40. 

London damsel, 63. 

Norfolk wonder, 73-4. 

Prodigal daughter, 2211. 

Remarkable clream, 2450. 

Watts, Dr., trance of, 110-11. 

Weeping mother, 2219. 

Vocal charmer, 1634. 

Vocal companion, 1635-6. 

Vocal harmony, 1637-8. 

Vocal harmony. The new, 1639. 

Vocalist, The, 1640. 

Vocalist's companion, 1593. 



Voltaire. Tlie black and the white, 356. 

The ears of Lord Chesterfield and 

Parson Goodman, 1690. 



Waes me for Prince Charly, 1201, 1574, 

1641, 1664. 
Wagers, 2389. 
Wake, Bloxwich, 1887. 

Darlastone, 1930-4. 

Wakefield garland, merry, 1454. 
Walk in Kensington gardens, 432. 
Walker, Ann. Complete guide for a 

servant maid, 181. 
Walker, John, Manual of theophilan- 

thropes, 102. 
Wall, Gov., trial of, 1283, 2296. 
Wallace ; or. The knight of EUerslie. 

By W. Harriston, 1149, 
Wallace, Sir William, life of, 277-8. 
Wallace, Sir WiUiam, and Earl Percy. 

By W. Harriston, 625. 
Wallace's lament, 1366. 
Waller, W., Directions to a painter in 

imitation of, 220. 
Walton, Sir George. See Tlie happy 

bride, 382. 
Waly, waly, 659. 

Wanderer, The (Cheap repository tract), 
176. 

(a song), 1408. 

Wandering bard's farewell to Oxford, 

183-4, 
Wandering boy, 728. 
Wandering Jew, 105-9. 
Wanderinglady; or, Catskin,2410. Also, 

733-«. 
Wandering lady's return, 891. 
Wandering Nelly, 1597, 1642. 
Wandering prince of Troy, 1150. 
Wandering sailor, 1583, 1880. 
Wandering shepherdess, 965, note; 

1151-5. 
Wand'ring shepherdess's garland, 1151. 
Wandering Willie, 1267. 
Wandering young gentlewoman; or, 

Catskin, 733-6. Also, 737-8, 2410, 
Wanton discovery, 2023, 
Wanton Jenny and the coy clown, 1354, 
Wanton Kitty, 1502. 
Wanton mistress, 1454, 1919. Also, 951, 

1917-18. 
Wanton Tom, 1843-7, 2125, note. 
Wanton virgins frightened, 2043-5, 
Wanton wife of Bath, 2059-61, 2211, note. 

Also, 2054-8, 
Wap your wealth to-gether, 1359, 
Wapping, merry wives of, 2029, 
War, effects of, exposed, 259, 
War, new song on the present, 260, 
War. Story of Sarah Durin; dedicated to 

advocates of an unjust war, 409. 
Warbler, The, 1643. 
Warbler of the woods, 1644, 
Warblers, The, 1645, 
Ward, Captain. Sea-fight between Cap- 
tain Ward , and the Rainbow, 724-6, 
Ward, Mrs, Ann, The maiden's prize, 

2356. 
Ward, Edward, The delights of the bot- 
tle, 2326, 

Female policy detected, 2335, 

Honesty in distress, 234W-1. 

Mars stripped of his armor, 252, 

The republican procession, 263, 

Warning moan, 1292. 

Warning piece to all pequred young 

men, 915, 
Warning-piece to England, 1034. 
Warning-piece to the sloathful, 2407, 
Warning to the fair sex, 2278, 
Warrener's instructor, 186, note. 
Warrior bard, 1458, 
Warton, T, A companion to the Guide, 

297, 
Warwick, carl of, merry pranks of, 1805, 
Warwickshire lad's garland, 1646, 
Warwickshire tragedy, 1156, 
Wat ye wha's in yon town, 1576, 
Watchman, The. Published by S. T. 

Coleridge, 2388. 
Watchman's address to his protected 

friends, 2459. 
Water drinker, 1046, note; 2028. 



1 66 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



Waterhouse, Mother Agnes, examination 

and confession of, 2130, note. 
Waterloo, battle of, 662. 
Waterman, The happy, 148. 
Waterman's complamt, 942. 
Watson, Saunders, remarkable family 

adventure of, 1809. 
Watt, Robert, life and transactions of, 

2297 
Wattie & Wabster Jock, 1418. 
Watts, Dr., surprising wonder of, 110-11. 
Watts, Isaac. Divine songs (London, 

1778), 37; (Glasgow, 1847), 38. 
Sin and sorrow spread before God, 

99. 
Watts, J., murder of, 2270. 
Watts, Sir William, murderer, 2203. 
Watty and Madge, 2329. 
Watty & Meg. liy Alexander Wilson, 

2020, 2046-9. 
Watty's travels to Carlisle, 1647. Also, 

899. 
Waukrife mammv, 1013. Also, 1621. 
Wax figures of Alons. Denoue, 2307. 
Way of the world represented, 1685. 
Way to be happy, 1648. 
Way to keep nun, 1420. 
Way to wealth. By B. Franklin, 190-2. 
WeVe a noddin', 1633. 
Wealth breeds care, 1509. 
Wealthy widow; or, The old woman's 

resolution to be marry'd, 1485. 
Weary pund o' tow, 818. 
Weaver's daughter, 910. 
Weaver's garland, 112-20. 
Weavers' new prices, 1176, 1649. 
Wedderburn, ('apt. Captain Wedder- 

burn's courtship, 727-30. 
Wedding, beggar's, 667-72. 
Wedding between a young batchelor and 

old widow, 1873-4. 
Wedding, bitter, 580. 
Wedding, Bothwick, 1608. 
Wedding, bimter's, 1893-4. 
Wedding, Clydesdale, 1233. 
Wedding, collier's, 1899. 
Wedding, comical, 1900-2. 
Wedding, fortunate, 1579. 
Wedding, Irish, 1076, 1328, 1377. 
Wedding, miller's, 920. 
Wedding, royal, 1534. 
Wedding, Scotch, 1420. 
Wedding, stark-naked west-country,1954. 
AVedding, taj'lor's, 1547. 
Wedding, Temple, 1121-2. 
Wedding, Welsh, 2052-3. 
Wedding, Winchester, 2062. 
Wedding, Worten, 1345. 
Wedding. See also Blythsome bridal, 

1197-8; Marriage. 
Wedding ring fit for the finger, 121. 
Wednesbuiy cocking, 2050-1. 
Wee bit wife-akie, 1332. 
Wee wifukie, 1077. 
Week before Easter, 847. 
Week's work, 1246. 
Weekly entertainer, 2389-90. 
Weeping mother, 2219. 
Weir, Major, and his sister, 2124. 
Welch, Rev. John, life of, 122-3. 
Welch, Josias, 122, note. 
Welch. See also Welsh. 
Welchman m love, 1289. 
Welcome brother debtor, 1919. 
Welcome, Charlie, o'er the main, 1650. 
Welcome Lingo, 1305. 
Welcome, mirth and glee, 1591. 
Welford, William, behaviour, confession, 

&c., of, 890, note. 
Wellington's address, 1255. 
Welsh traveller; or. The unfortunate 

Welshman. By H. Crouch, 1849-51. 
Welsh wedding, 2052-3. 
Welsh, Charles. Introduction to Goody 

Two-shoes, 378. 
Welsh. See also Welch. 
Welsh-man's cunning contrivance, 1558. 
Welshman, unfortunate, 1849-51. 
Wenham, Jane, witchcraft of, 2144-9. 
Werter and Charlotte, 433. 
Westcott, John, trial of, 2184. 
West-country garland, 1157-8. 
West-country wager, 1984-5. 
Western tragedy, 2460. 



Westminster election, humours of, 282. 
Westminster, Long Meg of, 1771. 
Wha's at the window, wha?, 1572. 
Whale, The, 1176, 1620, 1651. 
Wharton and Stuart, duel of, 1094, note. 
Wharton, Louisa ; a story, 390 
What are you going to stand, 1556. 
What care I, 1208. 
What have we with day to do, 1618. 
Wliat is life of love bereft, 1440. 
Whatley, Lord, and Miss Adams, 344-6. 
When a maiden's about to be wedded, 

1325. 
When a man weds, he must make up his 

mind, 1325. 
Wlien a wife's in a pout, 1543. 
When bidden to the wake, 1221. 
When fresh I wak'd to life's unfolding 

day, 1325. 
When I was young, 1257. 
When in war on the ocean, 1635. 
When John and me were married, 1519. 
When love at first, with soft emotion, 

1325. 
When lovers for favours petition, 1346. 
Wlien merry hearts were gay, 1277. 
When my money was gone, 1246. 
When o'er the midnight billow, 1333. 
When Phcebus, 1635. 
Wlien William at eve, 726, note; 1430. 
Wlietstone, The, 1854. 
AVhetstone for dull wits, 1852-3. 
Wliichwood, forest of, case of poisoning 

in, 340. 
Whimsical lady. By T. Donovan, 2095-7, 

2391-2. 
WTiiskey brewers' lamentation, 880, 1019. 
Whiskey, Farewell to, 247. 
Wliiskey, Highland, 1216. 
Whiskey, Protest against, 125. 
Whistle, and I'll come to you my lad, 

1291. 
White mouse, story of the little, 599-600. 
WTiite, Alex, life and conversion of, 2298. 
Wliither, my love, 1221. 
Whitmore, Wm. A., chapbooks from the 

library of, p. ix. 
Whittington and his cat (verse), 1159-60. 
WTiittington, Sir Richard, history of 

(prose), 601-10. 
Who wou'd have a wife, 1195. 
Who'll buy the rabbit, 1928a. 
Wlio's master; or, A fight for the 

breeches, 1192. 
Wliole art of legerdemain. By H. Dean, 

2103-4. 
Whole pleasures of matrimony, 2369. 
WTiy all this anger, 1397. 
Why droops my Nan, 1513. 
Why flutters my heart., 873. 
Why should we quarrel for riches, 1657. 
Why unite to banish care, 1576. 
Why, why tell thy lover, 1570. 
Wife. Dilference between a good wife 

and a kept-up miss, 1180. 
Wife, good, 2423. 
Wife in distress, virtuous, 2202. 
Wife, loving, character of, described, 

2358 
Wife of Bath, wanton, 2059-61. 
Wife of Beith, 2054-8. 
Wife of Bristol, virtuous, 1006, 1148. 
Wife of two husbands, 373. 
Wife, politick, 2010. 

Wife, schoolmaster's advice about choos- 
ing a, 1162. 
Wife, scoldmg, 1412. 
Wife, virtuous, worthy example of a 

(Roman charity), 1165. 
Wife. Yoimg wife's lament, 1378. 
Widow and her son, 416. 
Widow of Zarephath, 177. 
Wilcocks, Thomas. A choice drop of 

honey, 15. 
Wild huntsman, 419. 
Wild Robert, 165. 
WUd rover, 1229, 1652, 2461. 
Wilding, Harriot, history of, 427. 
Wilkes, John, speech on the civil list, 

274. 
Will ye go to the ewe bughts, 1269, 1481. 
Will ye eo to the Trosachs, 1647. 
Will & Jean, 1078-9. 
Will the weaver, 1264, 1309. 



William and his little dog, 124, 2027. 
William and Margaret, 821. 
William and Margaret, imitation of, 2329. 
William and Matilda, memoirs of, 2210, 

note. 
William and Nancy, 1539. 
William and Nancy's parting, 1286. 
William and Susan, 695-6. Also, 694, 

1583. 
WUliam, Sweet, Fair Margaret and, 

818-20. 
William III, king of England. King 

William and the plow-man, 931-2. 
William of Cloudeslie, 631-3. 
William Tell (a song), 1316. 
Williams, Miss. The history of Perou- 

ron, 400a. 
William's farewell, 1659. 
William's kind answer to his mistress, 

1231. 
Williamson, Peter. French and Indian 

cruelty exemplified, 320. 
Willie brew'd a peck o' maut, 1557. 
Willie o' Winsbury, 1665, note. 
Willie Wastle, 1267, 1557. 
Willie's coui-tship to blj-the Moggy, 1628. 
Williford, Joane, examination, confes- 
sion, triall, and execution of, 2134. 
Willing batchelor's garland, 1653. 
Willow tree, 1333. 
Willy the, Scotch rebel's letter to his 

sweetheart Jenny at Lochaber, 1161. 
Willy's the lad for me, 1564. 
Wilson, Mr., songs sung by, 1550. 
WUson, Alexander. Verses occasioned 

by seeing two men sawing timber in 

the open field in defiance of a furious 

storm, 1037. 

Watty & Meg, 2046-9. 

Wilson, B., criminal, 2199. 
Winchcombe, John. See Jack of New- 
bury, 513. 
Winchester wedding, 2062. 
Wind thy horn, my hunter boy, 2432. 
Windsor forest. By A. Pope, 1162. 
Windsor lady, 1163, 1654. 
Windsor miser outwitted, 1971. Also, 

1970. 
Windsor, Pretty Kate of, 2011. 
Winford, Lord, mart3'rdom of, 16. 
Wmifred. St., life of, 95. 
Winsbery, Lord Thomas of, 1665. 
Winsbury, Willie o', 1665, note. 
Winter evening's enteitainment, 592. 
Winter sat lang on the spring o' the year, 

1230. 
Winter, Mr., murder of, 2270. 
Winter's amusement, 1657. 
Winter's amusement and joUy toper's 

companion, 1655. 
Winter's amusement and jolly toper's 

companion, new, 1656. 
Winterton, East Indiaman, loss of, 321. 
Wisdom of God displayed, 2408. 
Wisdom's cabinet open'd, 560. 
Wise men of Gotham, 1856-67. 
Wise Willv and witty Eppy, 1710-12. 
Wish, The', 1408, 1589. 
Wit and beauty, 1194. 
Wit and folly in a maze (riddles), 1868. 
Wit, extravagant, 347. 
Wit newly reviv'd, a book of riddles, 

1842. 
Witch of the woodlands, 2125-8. 
Witchcraft. See Section XVI, p. 118. 
Witchcraft detected and prevented, 2129. 
Witchcraft farther display'd, 2146. 
Witchcraft, obi, 2291. 
With horns and hounds, 1410. 
Withered roses, garland of, 806. 
Withey, N. A dialogrue between a 

prisoner and the angel of death, 35. 
A little yoimg man's companion, 

183^. 
Wit of the day ; or. Humours of West- 
minster, 282. 
Witts academy, 2305. 
Wit's compamon, 1780. 
Wit's vade mecum, 1726. 
Wittam miller, 680-3. 
Witt's. See Wit's. 
Woeful complaint and lamentable death 

of a forsaken lover, 1164. 
Wolfe, General, 1322. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TITLES 



167 



Wolfe, General, death of, 1398. 

The encouraging general, song sung 

by (ieneral Wolfe, 1536, note. 

General Wolfe's dying words, 1527. 

Wolsev, Cardinal, death ' foretold by 

Mother Shipton, 2165. 

Woman seduces all mankind, 1543. 

Woman taken in adultery, 159-60. 

Woman's praise of tea, 1190. 

Woman's weapon, 1436. 

Women, pride of, new proverbs on, 2336. 

Women's clubs in England, 2360-1. 

Wonder upon wonder, 2393. 

Wonderful advantages of adventuring in 
the lottery, 178. 

Wonderful advantages of drunkeness, 
125. 

Wonderful discoverie of the witchcrafts 
of Margaret and Philip Flower, 2133. 

Wonderful magazine, 342. 

Wonderful predictions, 609. 

Wonderful sui-prize, 2220. 

Wonders and mysteries of animal mag- 
netism, 353. 

Wonders of the world, 2394-5. 

Wood of Craigie lea, 1173, 1347, 1409. 

Wood, Mrs., murder of, 2215. 

Wood, Burton, adventures of, 2299. 

Woodland Mary, 2461. 

Woodland, Natlianiel, trial of, 1886. 

Woodlark, The, 1658. 

Woodman, The, 1659. 

Woodman, dialogue between a noble 
lord and a, 91. 

Woodpecker, The, 1660. 

Wood picker, 1399. 

Woody choristers; a collection of new 
songs, 1661. 

Woody choristers; or, The birds' har- 
mony, 685. 

Woo'(f and married and a', 1324. 

Wooing, pleasures of, 1369. 

Wooing, rarest and most exact way of, 
2301. 

Wooldridge, James, forger, 2198. 

Woolley, W. Benefit of starving, 283. 

Worcestershire garland, 1662. 

Word of advice, 1251. 

World, four parts of the, 287. 



World in disorder, 2317. 

World set up for sale, 127. 

World turn'd up«ide down (a song), 1600. 

World turned upside-down; or. The 
folly of man exemplified, 1869-70. 

Worse and worse, 1231. 

Worten wedding, 1345. 

Worthy example of a virtuous wife 
(Roman charity), 1165. 

Wounded hussar, 1663. 

Wreath of willow revers'd, 816. 

Wright, Mr., conversion of, 8. 

Wronged lady's lamentation and un- 
timely death, 959. 



Yarmouth, Jemmy and Nancy of,896-905. 
Also, 1166-9. 

Yarmouth tragedv, 896-905, 1166-9. 

Yarrow braes,'653", 1232, 1310, 1435. 

Ye mariners of England, 1181, 1292, 1642. 

Ye pugilists of England, 1287. 

Ye sportsmen all, 1241. 

Year that's awa, 1553, 1623, 1664. 

Yellow dwarf, 536-7. 

Yellow-hair'd laddie, 1285. 

Yo, yea, 1539. 

Yorick turned trimmer, 1871. 

York, cruel daughter of, 2220. 

York dialogue between Ned and Harry, 
2396. 

York. Duke of York's garland, 1262-3. 

York, you're wanted, 1192. 

Yorkshire bite put upon the biter, 2036. 

Yorkshire witch, 2230. 

Yorkshireman in Loudon, 1319. 

You say you love me, 1241. 

You'll find no change in me, 883. 

You're welcome, 1589. 

Yougal harbour, 1199. 

Youiig beauty of Kent, 434. 

Young coalman's courtship with a creel- 
wife's daughter, 1679-80. 

Young damsel's wilful mistake, 1506. 

Young Daphine (Young Daphne), 1371, 
1915. 

Young Donald of Dundee, 1257. 

Young Felix's complaint, with Molly's 
answer, 1665. 



Young gentleman's frolick, 2006. 

Young Grigor's ghost, 1170. 

Young Iligliland rover, 1568. 

Young house-keeper, 1592. 

Young ladies' love for the Northumber- 
land grenadiers, 1490-1 

Young lady confined in an oak tree, 392. 

Young lady's praise, 1510. 

Young Lochinvar, 1666. 

Young maiden's hearty thanks for the 
old virgin's good advice, 1499. 

Young maid's praise of her soldier, 1387. 

Young man clap'd up in limbo, 1646. 

Young man's address to lovely Jenny, 
1425. 

Young man's companion, A little, 183-4. 

Young man's complaint, 1417. 

Young man's courtship, etc., 1503. 

With The maid's answer, 1653. 

Young man's declaration, 2343. 

Young man's desire, 1395. 

Young man's lamentation, 1546. 

Young man's praise of his coy mistress, 
1547. 

Young man's request to his mistress, 
1422. 

Young man's resolution for contentment, 
1588. 

Young man's tragedy, 652. 

Young men and maiden's delight (rid- 
dles), 1872. 

Young men and maids' delight (songs), 
1667. 

Young men, perjured, warning piece to 
all, 915. 

Young Molly's lamentation, 1244. 

Young Nelly the milk maid, 1592. 

Young piper's pleasant pastime, 1944-50. 

Young robber, 420-1. 

Young Rosalind, 1350. 

Young wife's lament, 1378. 

Young woman's constancy, 1534. 

Young woman's praise of the jolly sailor 
bold, 1391. 



Zarephath, widow of, 177. 
Zoa, the beautiful Indian, 415. 



Additional Entries 



Almanac, pack of cards changed into, 

1786. 
Apollo, Court of, 1240. 
Battle of Almanza, 1514. 
Birmingham, Saturday night at, 2019. 
Binich, Motlier. See Mother Bunch. 
Carrickergus, witchcraft at, 2143. 
Cope. See Johnnie Cope's defeat. 
Coup. See Johnnie Cope's defeat. 



Crafty London prentice. See also Lon- 
don prentice. 

Dialogue between Nell and her mistress, 
2024, 2024a 

Dialogue between Jack and his master, 
2000. 

Dialogue between John and Thomas, 219. 

Dialogue on teetotalism, 219. 



Dreams, history of, 2080. 
Edwards, Mary Ann, history of, 396. 
Elizabeth, Princess, 1289. 
Elle, Knight of, 934. 
Mall Boye, Honest, 1976. 
Mr. Matthews at home!, 1778b. 
Youth's warning piece (George Bam- 
well), 854. 



INDEX OF PUBLISHERS, PRINTERS, AND 
BOOKSELLERS 



An asterisk denotes that the book described by the title referred to contains an advertisement of 
books issued by the publisher 



Airdrie. J. & J. Neil, 1366, 1481. 

Alnwick. W. Davison, 1273-4. 

Amsterdam. 2274. 

Aylesbury. Burnham's snuff shop, 761, 830, 
909, 921, 930. — Mathias Dagnell, 684, 761, 909, 
921 930 1952. 

Banbury. Cheney, 31, 115. — T. Cheney, 943, 
2014.— J. G. Rusher, 407, 459, 460, 463, 511, 610, 
648, 775, 1421, 1492, 1507, 1929, 1959, 1962, 1999, 
2035, 2306, 2318. See p. ix. 

Bath. S. Hazard, *150, *158, *159, *174; also 
others bet\yeen 130 and 178; 298, 2177. — Whit- 
ford, 662. 

Beckenham. 231. 

Belfast. 806, 881, 908, 1134, 1502, 1798, 1851, 
1900, 2089, 2262, 2300, 2309. — J. Magee, 865, 
951, 1601. — James Magee, 112, 640, 663, 668, 
675, 694, 748, 831, 892, 920, 1022, 1039, 1083, 
1189, 1475, 1504, 1685, 1732, 1749, 1799, 1872, 
1974, 2279, 2381. — R. McConnel, 23. — Joseph 
Smyth, 2143. 

Bern. Wm. Lavalar and Son, 1690. 

Bicester. Paul Stevens, 684, 761, 830, 921, 930, 
1952. 

Birmingham. T. Bloomer, 113, 755, 1441, 
1873-4. — S. & T. Martin, 1003. — J. Russell, 
1932, 2050, 2323. — H. Wadsworth, 2387. — D. 
Wrighton, 7, 119, 481, 2019, 2377. 

Boston, Mass. 2413-15, 2417, 2420-1, 2423-5, 
2428, 2440, 2442, 2445, 2447, 2450, 2460.— Bible 
and Heart in Cornhill, 2412. — Corner of Cross 
and Fulton Sts., 2443. — N. Coverlv, 2410. — 
Nathaniel Coverly, 2419, 2427, 2449, 2451. — N. 
Coverly, jr., 2433. — Nathaniel Coverly, jr., 2418, 
2422, 2426, 2431, 2441, 2446, 2458. — L. Deming, 
2444, 2448, 2457. — Etheridge & Bliss, 2285.— 
Heart and Crovrn, Cornhill, 2416. — Hunts & Shaw, 
2434. — Kneeland and Davis, 2224. — E. Lin- 
coln, 2285. — W. McAlpine. 1829. — Povrars and 
Willis, 2298. — No. 75 State St., 2271. — No. 285 
Water St., 2435. —J. White, 423. 

Bowness. 2200. 

Bristol. 273, 2388. — T. King, 1830. 

Burslem. J. Tregortha, 2042. 

Cambridge. William Peachey. 684, 761, 830, 
909, 921. 

Carlisle. J. Whinham & Co., 286. 

Chesham. Stephen Dagnell, 1952. 

Chipping-Norton. Hannah Kite, 761. 

Cologne. Will with the Wisp at the sign of the 
Moon in the Ecliptick. (Fictitious imprint ; prob- 
ably London), 228. 

Coventry. Printing office in Broadgate, 1156. — 
William Ratten, 684, 1952. — Turner, 716, 737, 
768, 801, 807, 815, 828, 833, 836, 844, 888, 938, 
1018, 1026, 1072, 1140, 1154, 1893, 1902, 1983, 



2003, 2008. — J. Turner, 26, 63, 671, 681, 821, 
905, *963, 996, 1169, 2017. 

Dalkeith. David Lyle, 366. 

Darlington. W. Appleton, *1827. 

Dedham, Mass. H. Mann. 

Deptford-Bridge. Delahoy, 619. — Kent print- 
ing office, 2331. 

Derby. Jeremiah Roe, 684. — Wilkins, 2286. 

Dublin. B. Corcoran, .1193. — A. Fox, 561.— 
C. M. Warren, *562. 

Dumfries. 260. — Cuthbert McLachlan, 1078. 

Edinburgh. 98, 233a, 520, 609, 818, 978, 1230, 
1233, 1271-2, 1411, 1518, 1548, 1557, 1705, 1717, 
1744, 1760, 1798, 1861, 2112, 2253, 2263. — Archi- 
bald Martin, 1086. — The Mercury, 1549. — J. 
Morren, 17, 400a, 406a, 440, 471, 492, 507, 575, 
616, 860, 867, 875, 999, 1282-4, 1286, 1288, 1299, 
1300, 1301-2, 1304-5, 1604-9, 1615, 1626, 2080, 
2264. — James Murray,776,1129. — Niddry'sWynd, 
554. — J. Stewart, 320. — D. Webster, 2132. 

Epsom. M. Laugham, 391. 

Exeter. Besley, 904. — J. M'Kenzie and Son, 
1695. 

Falkirk. 580, 639, 660, 673, 746, 791, 792, 810, 
859, 898, 1013, 1088-9, 1174, 1308, 1399, 1573, 
1809, 2047, 2056. — T. Johnston, 234, 392, 422, 
567, 592, 622, 689, 697, 714, 842, 879, 1205, 1382, 
1400, 1418, 1723, 1788, 1896, 1941, 2016, 2408.— 
Daniel Reid, 620. 

Gainsborough. H. Thompson, 632. 

Gateshead. J. Marshall, 1325, 1328-9, 1332-4. 
Stephenson, 698, 2239.— G. Watson, 1951. 

Glasgow. The very numerous imprints without 
the name of printer or publisher are not recorded 
here. See p. ix. — Thomas Duncan, 625. — R. 4 
Foulis, 657. — Robert and Andrew Foulis, 858. — 
Hutchison, 1597. —R. Hutchison, 325, 637, 880, 
1019, 1176, 1181, 1215-16, 1275, 1296, 1365, 1383, 
1402, 1404, 1411, 1466, 1471, 1496, 1517, 1531, 
1551, 1620, 1622, 1633, 1642, 1649, 1651, 2001, 
2048. — Robert Hutchison, 1374. — Robert Hutchi- . 
son & Co., 912, 1403, 1737, 1862. — W. Lang, 97, ^; 
1149. — Lumsden and Son, 1699. — J. Lumsden & » 
Son, 1804, 1978. — McKenzie & Hutchison, 508.— ' 
John Murdoch, 1509. — A. Napier, 1020. —J. Neil, 
1179, 1192, 1624. — Francis Orr and Sons, 38, 253, 
442-3, 500, 631. — Orr & Sons, 288. —J. J. Robert- 
son, 1680. —J. & M. Robertson. 36, 322, 1265, 
1398, 1498. 

Godmanchester. Myles Catlin, 909. See also, 
Huntington, Kimbolton, St. Ives, St. Neots. 

Greenock. W. Scott, 885, 1183, 1214, 1276, 
1378, 1390, 1419, 1565, 1629. — William Scott, 
729, 743, 1198, 1204, 1339, 1371, 1377, 1405, 
1440, 1545, 1559, 1590, 1617, 1968. 

Greenwich. H. S. Richardson, 2133. 



INDEX OF PUBLISHERS, PRINTERS, AND BOOKSELLERS 



169 



Harborough. Caleb Ratten, 684. 

HuU. 1866, note. — W. & T. Fordyce, 2235. 

Huntington. Mylos Catlin, 909. See also, God- 
manchester, Kimbolton, St. Ives, St. Neots. 

Ipswich. Punchard & Jermyn, 101. 

Kendal. M. and R. Branthwaite, 14, 1785, 2092. 

Kidderminster. Gower and Pennell, 1057. — 
Mr. Taylor, 1105. 

Kilmarnock. 1614. — H. Crawford, 93, 192, 
1698, 1766, 2352. 

Kimbolton. Myles Catlin, 909. See also, God- 
manchester, Huntington, St. Ives, St. Neots. 

Leeds. 2229. — J. Bowling, 204. — John Hirst, 
684. 

Lichfield. M. Morgan, 1055. 

Liverpool. 1295. — W. Armstrong, 33. 

London. The numerous imprints without the 
name of printer or publisher are not recorded here. 

Aldermary Church Yard, Bow Lane. Very 
numerous and not recorded here. See also, Mar- 
shall. — William Anderson, 254. 

T. B., 2155. — Bailey, 306, 357, 370, 386, 393, 
411, 415. — J. Bailey, 191. — S. Bailey, 374, 384, 
*1790. — T. Bailey, 85, 237, 345, 399, 1750, 2275, 
2315, 2354. — W. Bailey, 324, 2246. — J. Baker, 
2146-7. — A. Baldwin, 270, 291, 295. — J. Barker, 
628. — Robert Barker, 303, 371. — I. Barnes, 2133. 

— John Barrow, 2138. — E. Basnit, 2242. — T. 
Batchelar, 1185. — Charles Bates, *484. — A. Bell, 
338, 2140. — J. Berke, 838. — Betham, 428. — A. 
Bett€sforth and G. Hitch, 2113. — J. Bew, 468. 
*485, note, 2063. — No. 50 Bishopsgate-Street 
within, 2094. — F. Bland, 233. — E. Blare, 636. 

— Humphrey Blunden, 2154-5. — W. Boreham, 
272. — Bow Church Yard, *290, *448, *455, *467, 
*747, *1753, *1841, *1857. Of the very numerous 
entries of this imprint those only are referred to 
which contain an advertisement of the printing 
office. See also. Dicey. — M. Bowley, 8, 355, 
1251, 1407, 1806, 2187. — Jonah Bowyer, 267.— 
T. Bradshaw, 214. — Brirambr (sic), 1133. — E. 
Brooksby, 816. — P. Brooksby, 757, note; *2400. 

— Phil. Brooksby, *2397, 2405. — C. Brown, 483, 
531. — D. Brown, 2312. — William Brown, 54.— 
W. Bulwer & Co., 2131. — R. Butters, 612, 627. 

Thomas Carnan, 296. — Jonathan Carpenter, 
1800, 1801. — J. Catnach, 952.— James Caulfield, 
335, 1855. — Wra. Cavell, 406. — S. Chandler, 
2357. — John Clark, 341. — A. Cleugh, 495. — B. 
Cole, 217.— F. Coles, 1001.— J. Collyer, 252. 
J. Conyers, 2167.— S. Cooms, 2316. — M. Cooper, 
1795-6, 2304. —T. Cooper, 200, 1692.— J Crokatt, 
983.— S. Crowder, 472. — Stanley Crowder, 485. 

— E. Crowh, 556. — E. Curll, *67, 2144, *2145, 
2147. 

Darton and Harvey, 102. — William Darton, jun., 
380. — Davenport, 1635, 2252. — J. Davenport. 
Numerous entries, not recorded here. See Shep- 
pard, for whom Davenport printed. — Joseph 
Davies, 1940. — S. Davis, 454. — J. Deacon, ♦568. 

— Dean and Munday, 1884. — J. Debrett, 282. 
Divej and Co., 11.58. — C. Dicey, 212, 490, 1870. 

— Cluer Dicey, 514, 1747. — Cluer Dicev and Co., 
550, 2075. — W. Dicey, 2004. — William Dicey, 
♦9, 1002, 1103, 1112. — William Dicey and Com- 
pany, 654, 1059, 1674. — W. and C. Dicey, 239, 
569, *747, 1040, 1905, 2011. — William and Cluer 
Dicey, 820, 937, 1068, *1841, *1857, 1916. Issues 
by the Diceys with the imprint " Bow Church 
Yard " only, are too numerous to be entered in 
this index. See also, Northampton. C. Dilly, 



2353. — T. Donovan, 2378. — W. Downing, 2326. 

— J. Duncombe, 1778a. — John Duncombe and 
Co., 1236a, 1236b. 

G. Eld, 2133. — Evans, 1474, 1817. —Evans and 
Co., 363, 2077, 2087, 2117, 2170, 2394. — J. Evans, 
♦158. There are very many other entries not re- 
corded here. — John Evans, 692, 754, 862, 903, 
1167. — J. Evans & Co., 130. 133, 137, 147, ♦ISO, 
170, 172, ^174, 175, 596, 1206, 1578, 1676, 1852, 
1950, 2096-7, 2128, 2257. See also. Long Lane. 

— J. Evans & Son, 127, 989, 1883. — J. and C. 
E^'ans, 707. — T. Evans, 265, 1520. 

Field & Tuer. See Crawhall's Chapbook chap- 
lets, and Olde tayles newlye related, p. x. — H. 
Fenwick, 429. — S. Fisher, 2288. — John Foster, 
484, note, 539. 

J. G., 2134. — Henry Gorson. — 335. — J. Grif- 
fith, 1225. — Griffith & Farran, 378. — Grub-street, 
878, 1009, 2341. 

T. H., 2400. — W. H., 2167. — W. Haberkorn, 
804. — J. Hammond, 629. —T. Harding, 359.— 
Richard Harper, 2135. — Harrison & Co., 2373. 

— Harvey, 102. — L. Hawes [Haws], 472, 2119.— 
L. Hawes and Comp., ♦546. — Henry Hills, ^75. 

— P. Hills, 248. — C. Hitch & L. Hawes, 472.— 
C. Hitch and L. Haws, 2119. — G. Hitch, 2113.— 
E. Hodges, 935a.— J. Hodges, +563, +2113.- J. 
Hollis, ♦186, 559, 565. — H. Hook, 2379. — T. 
Hooper, 615, 1885. — J. Horn. 203. — J. Hose, 
2402, 2405. — L. Hotham, 1120. — L. How, 43, 
60, ^405, 478, 478, note, 535, 756, 853, 1061, 1063, 
1066, 1067, ^1126, 1138, +1834, 2031, 2305, 2452, 
2454. — Larkin How, ^504. See also, Petticoat 
Lane. — Howard & Evans, 753, 1057, 1361, 1638, 
2376. — Hurst, 330. 

T. J., 2405. — Jennings, 646, 708, 750, 769, 834. 

— Jennings and Brimmbr (sic), 1133. — J. John- 
son, 385. — W.Johnston, ^563. 

G. Kearsley. 2064. — W. Kemmish, 1781. — J. 
King, 472. 

P. L., ^2401. — W. L. and T. J., 2405, — W. 
Lane, 1448. — M. Laugham, 391. — C. Lee, 2403. 

— Lee and Hurst, 330. — A. Lemoine, 1966. — 
Ann Lemoine, 330, 368, 400, 2175, 2293. —J. 
Lever, *307, 2174. — J. Lewis, 2354. — W. Lewis, 
603. — London and Middlesex printing office, 394, 
518, 523, 1760, note, 2067. See also, Sabine.— 
J. Long, 2244. — Long Lane, 332, 1524. —No. 1, 
1452, 16,S6. — No. 41, 2052, 2158-9. 2334. — No. 
42, 251, 1229, 1247, 1428, 1439, 1449, 1536-7, 1540, 
1586, 1655, 1667, 2216. See also, J. Evans.— 
Richard Lownds, 2165. 

A. M., 484, note, 568. — E. M., 496. —J. M. 
[John Millet?], 687. — T. M. [Thomas Moore?], 
669. — J. M'Laen, 1671. — A. Macpherson, 1995. 

— T. Maiden, 368, 400, 2175, 2293. — S. Marks & 
Sons, 379. — J. Marshall, 315, 2177, 2203, 2205. 

— John Marshall, 126, *128, 129, 132, 135-6, 
138-43, 145-6, 148, +149, ♦ISl, 1.52. 154, ♦ISS, 
♦15i», +160, 161, +162, 163, 166, 169, ^176, ^177, 
336. — J. Marshall and Co., 1052. — R. Marshall, 
12, 991, 1503, 1142, 2248. — Issues by the Mar- 
shalls, with the imprint "Aldermary Church Yard" 
only, are too numerous to be recorded in this 
index. — Edward Martin, 2134a. — M. Metford, 
1778b. — Middlesex printing office, 1668. — A. 
Milboume, 845. — A. Miller, 346. — [John Mil- 
let?], 587. — A. Moore, 246. — [Thoma« Moore?], 
669.— Munday, 1884. — H. Murray, 385. 

W. Needham, 2304.— No. 11 New Street Square, 
187. — John Newbery, 378, note. — Newbery & 



170 



INDEX OF PUBLISHERS, PRINTERS, AND BOOKSELLERS 



Harris, 378.— H. Newman, 2140.— Hugh New- 
man, 2139.— W. Nicoll, 1871. — T. Norris, 450, 
note, 496. — D. Nutt, 44. 

W. O. [W. Onley?], 224, 444, 456, note, *742. 

— W. Onley, *539, 845. — W. Owen, 2350. — W. 
Oxlade, 611, 613. 

A. P. & T. H., *2400. — A. Paris, 19G. — J. 
Parsons, 409. — C. Parker, 1779. — Parsons, 2288. 

— John Partridge, 2154-5. — T. Passinger, 587, 
*2397, *2399, 2400. — H. Payne, 297. — W. Payne, 
275. — W. Pepper, 1681. — Petticoat Lane, 645, 
1104, 2040. See also L. How. — R. Phillips, 18. 

— Wyllyam Piekeringe, 2130, note. — Pitts, 682, 
953a, 1060, 1238, 1593.— J. Pitts. Very numer- 
ous and not recorded here. See also p. ix. — J. 
Plumb, 294. — J. Plymsell, 615, 1885. — R. Pow- 
ell, 706. — Wyllyam Powell, 2130, note. — W. 
Price, 2273. — John Pugh, 1940. 

J. R., 2154. — R. Randall, 1725. — J. Ranger, 
20. — H. Reynell, 2283. — W. Richardson, 2359. 
J. Ridley, 2349. — J. Roach. *292, 358, 376, 624, 
1014, 1162, 1595, 1691, 1780, 1802. — J. Roberts, 
289. — R. Royston, 2134a. 

Sabine's London and Middlesex printing-office, 
*1835. See also, London and Middlesex print- 
ing office. — T. Sabine, 293, 329, 369, 383, 390, 
395, *402, *408, 412, 425, 427, 433, 434, 458, 
473, 486, 564, 1054, *2118, 2173, 2210, 2278, 2281. 

— Sabine and Son, *424. — T. Sabine and Son, 
181, 333, 396, *469, *526, *547, 558, 593, *2103. 

— T. Sabine and E. Sibley, 557. — G. Sawbridge, 
*268. — E. Sharp, 1145. — C. Sheppard, 353, 356, 
381, 431, 1208, 1221, 1227, 1232, 1241, 1246, 1259, 
1430, 1513, 1538, 1543, 1583, 1589, 1591, 1635, 
1657, 1672, 1761, 2171. — J. Shooter, 1558. — Wil- 
liam Shrewsberv, 2136. — E. Sibley, 557. — J. 
Skirven, 1225. — C. Smith, 232. — J. R. Smith, 
2137. — John Russell Smith, 1866. — R. Snagg, 
349, 1694, 1797. — T. Sorrell, 2242. — T. Spence, 
229, 230. — C. Stalker, 495. — D. Steel, 1457.— 
Stonecutter Street, 205. 734, 911, 917, 1139, 1166, 
1907, 1917, 1937, 1953, 2029, 2068, 2100, 2345. 
See also Sympson.- J. Sudbury, 343, 1762, 2355. 

— W. Sutherland, 2129. — H. D. Symonds, 348. 

— Sympson's, 316, 1693, 1998,2366.-0. Symp- 
son, 29, 476, *576, *2302. See also. Stonecutter 
Street. — W. & I. Sympson, 37. 

B. Taylor, 784. — G. Terry, 283. — T. Thack- 
eray, 845. — W. Thackeray, 587, *2399, *2400, 
2402, 2405, 2406. — William Thackeray, *2401, 
2407. — Will Thackeray, 2378. *2397. — Charles 
Tilt, 953b. — Samuel Toplis, 2308.— E. Tracy, 
304. — T. Trueman, 2232. — Robert Turner, 284, 
302, 2221, 2237, 2277. — H. Turpin, 848, *2160. 

P. and I. Vaillant, 1669. — T. Vere, 1001, 1855. 

J. Wade, 1682. — J. Walter, 1355, 1485, 1516, 
1980. — J. Warcus, 1784. — R. Ware, *2113.— 
T. Warner, 1681. — Tho. Warner, 977. — L. Way- 
land, 1563. — W. Webb, 2249. — R. H. Westley, 
337. — John Wheble, 273. — John White, 2396.— 
No. 8, White Hart Yard, 2295. — E. Whitlock, 
2141. — William Whitwood, 1849. — P. Wicks, 1. 
—J. Wilkie, 1261. — J. Williamson, *2399, *2400. 

— John Williamson, *2397, 2405. — James Wil- 
mott, 359. —T. Wise, 1408, — Wise and Co., 1986. 

— W. Wood and Son, 2346. — J. Woodhouse, 615. 

— J. Wright, *555, *556, 1001, 1855. 
A. Young, 1782, 2234. 

Manchester. Mr. Haslingden, 1878. — J. Has- 
lingden, 2367. — A. Swindells, 344, 362, 591.— J. 
Swindells, *168, 453, 617, *2090. 



Montpelier. C. C. Darling, 2105. 

Mortimer-CIeobury. W. Lloyd, 1105, 2347. 

Newcastle. 274, 521 note, 529 note, 1634, 1899. 
See p. ix. — M. Angus, 585, note. — M. Angus and 
Son, 941. — J. Bell, 997, 1528. —Bowman, 2362. 

— W. Fordyce, 182, 482, 1095, 1362. — W. & T. 
Fordyce, 201, 215-16, 300, 387, 525, 813, 899, I486, 
1701-3, 2222, 2225, 2235, 2258. See p. viii. — 
Robert Marchbank, 1112. — J. Marshall, 323, and 
numerous entries between 1175 and 1658. See 
p. viii. — J. White, 228, note, 504, note, 548, 919. 

— John White, 684, 1033. 
Newport-Pagnell. Elizabeth Price, 761. — Mary 

Timbs, 684. 

Newton Stewart. J. M'Nairn, 1266, 1285. 1291, 
1307, 1552-5, 1668-71, 1576, 1602, 1611-12. 

New York. 2227. — G. W. Carleton & Co., 
953c. — Scribner & Welford, p. x. 

Northampton. Burnham, 684. — C. Dicey, 212. 

— Robert Dicey, 1062, 1064, 1080. — W. Dicey, 
702, 950, 1044, 1920, 1952.— Wm. Dicey, 830, 909, 
918. — William Dicey, 21, 46, 89. 684, 724, 761, 
787, 800, 828, 921, 927, 930, 959, 1030, 1034-5, 
1876. — W. & C. Dicey, 569. — William and Cluer 
Dicey, 937. See also, London, Dicey. — R. Raikes 
and C. Dicey, 1952. 

Nottingham. 504, note, 512, 1865. — S. Cres- 
well, 441. — C. Sutton, 100, 334, 354. 

Otley. William Walker, 2230. 

Oxford. Josiah Eustace, 761, 909. — William 
Royce, 1952. 

Paisley. 1979, 2189. — Caldwell and Son, 84, 
1813.— G. Caldwell, 125, 219, 319, 1037, 1116, 
1647, 1765, 2012, 2020, 2027, 2046, 2054, 2238, 
2290, 2314. — George Caldwell, jr., 1610. — J. 
Neilson, 77, 242a, 633, 642, 1117, 1199, 1347, 1384, 
1438, 1978,2365. 

Penrith. J. Allison, 466. — Joseph Allison, 414. 

— Ann Bell, 1704. — Soulby, 1683. — A. Soulby, 
606. — Anthony Soulby, 1993. 

Peterhead. P. Buchan, 2129. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 2268. 2461. — No. 28 Mead 
Alley, 2456. — R. Swift, 2432. —No. 12 Walnut 
St., 2272. 

Reading. Mrs. Margaret Ward, 830, 9.30. — N. 
Ward, 1952. 

St. Albans. Anthony Thorpe, 684, 761, 830, 
909, 921, 930. 

St. Ives. Churrude Brady, 684, 761, 830, 921, 
930. — Myles Catlin, 909. See also, Godman- 
chester, Huntington, Kimbolton, St. Neots. 

St. Neots. Myles Catlin, 909. 

Salem, Mass. 2251. 

Salisbury. J. Hodson, 88. 

Salop. 2324. 

Scarborough. Thomas Gent, 49. See also, 
York. 

Shefaeld. John Garnet, 667, 701, 969, 986, 
1392, 1561, 1564. 

Sherborne. 2197. 

Stirling. 822, 1363, 1482. — J. Eraser, 1875.— 
E. Johnstone, 1306, 1309. — Macnie, 1255. — W. 
Macnie, 656, 659, 690, 709, 728, 788, 802, 882, 1023, 
1076-7, 1091, 1173, 1200, 1201, 1337, 1352, 1367, 
1409, 1435, 1519, 1544, 1581, 1650, 1659-60, 1757, 
1897. — William Macnie, 241, 457, 1803. See 
p. viii. — C. Randall, 62, 365, 710, 726, 884, 896, 
1058, 1171, 1186, 1203, 1236, 1264. 1267, 1294, 
1298, 1310, 1359, 1467, 1494, 1495, 1539, 1663, 
1720, 1743, 1769, 1775, 1961, 2303.— M. Randall, 
1269, 2111. 



INDEX OF PUBLISHERS, PRINTERS, AND BOOKSELLERS 



171 



Stockton. R. Christopher, 480, note. 
. Stony-Stratford. Henry Potter, 761, 830.— 
John Timbs, 084, 761, 8;50, 921, i)30. 

Suffield, Conn. Edward Gray, 2064a. 

Tewkesbury. S. Harward, 1105, 2347. 

Tring. Thomas Williams, 684, 761, 830, 909, 
921, 930, 1952. 

Worcester. 2114. — J. Butler, 2409. — S. Gam- 
idge, 120, 1105, 1120a, 2025, 2347.— J. Grundy, 
6, 1924, 2409. 

Worcester, Mass. Isaiah Thomas, 2064a, note. 

Wotton-under-Edge. 571. — J. Bence, 59, 403, 
477, 605, 1860, 2123. 



York. Peter Brown, 2289. — Carrall, 92.— Tho. 
Gent, 48, 56, 94, *95, 684, 2261. See also, Scar- 
borough.— F. Jackson, 1719, 1727, 2313. — J. 
Kendrew, 413. — John White, 465. — Thomas Wil- 
son and Son, 1056. — T. Wilson and R. Spence, 
377. 

*^* Place of publication not given. 



Edward Anderson, 2254. — J. Lee, 1918. — John 
Stevens, 2226. — William Wright, 2131, note. — 
Flying stationers, 354, 623. — Running stationers, 
512, 2091. —Walking stationers, 598. 



OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

OF 




RETURN TO: CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 
198 Main Stacks 



LOAN PERIOD 1 
Home Use 



ALL BOOKS MAY BE RECALLED AFTER 7 DAYS 

Renewals and Recharges may be made 4 days prior to the due date. 
Books may be renewed by calling 642-3405. 



DUE AS STAMPED BELOW 




FORM NO. DD 6 
50M 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY 
Berkeley, California 94720-6000 



ij L BLRKELEY LIBRARIES 




CD5^7afcl^A^ 



i