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Full text of "Catalogue of the officers and pupils of the S. C. Female Institute at Barhamville, near Columbia: under the direction of Dr. E. Marks and Rev. W. H. Tyler; during the first session of the academic year 1840-41"

1.. 



CATALOGUE 

OFFICERS AND PUPILS 

OF 

THE S. C. FEMALE INSTITUTE, 

AT BARHAMVILIE, NEAR COLUMBFL 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

BR. E. MARKS AND REV. W. H. TYLER. 

DURING THE FIRST SESSION 

OF THE 

Academic Year 1840-41. 



sJ3c 
$72. 757 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 

PRINTED BY I. C. MORGAN, 

1841. 



DIRECTORS. 



Dr. Elias Marks, 
Rev. Wellington H. Tyler, 
Mrs. Julia P. Marks, 
Mrs. C. E. Tyler. 



INSTRUCTORS, 



Rev. WELLINGTON H. TYLER, A. M., 

Principal and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, History, 
and Ancient Languages. 

Mrs. CAROLINE E. TYLER, 

Principal, Instructress in Composition and English Literature, 
and Superintendent of Literary Duties. 

BENJ. RICHARDS, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science and Mathematics. 

Monsieur VICTOR H. MANGET, 

Professor of Modern Languages, French, Spanish, and Italian. 

Madame FELICIE MANGET, 

Instructress in Drawing, Painting, Perspective, and Embroidery. 

ARCHIBALD H. BUTTERWORTH, 

Professor of Music. 

Miss MARY ANN JOHNSON, 

Instructress in Music. 

Miss CAROLINE BRADLEY. 

Instructress in English Branches. 

Miss ELIZA C. HERRINGTON, 
Teacher of Penmanship and English Branches. 

Miss MARY CHURCH, 

Assistant Pupil. 



PUPILS. 



NAMES. 

Bates, Georgiana E. 
Bookter, Faustina 
Bookter, Sarah 
Bossard, Eleanor E. 
Bradley, Isabel 
Brockinton, Martha A. - 
Cantey, Emma S. 
Church, Mary 
Cloud, Mary S. - 
Cloud, Susan A. - 
Davis, Thorn asin a S. 
Deveaux, Elizabeth 
Deveaux, Selina G. 
Edwards, Elizabeth W. - 
Ervin, Elvira A. - 
Ervin, Sarah W. - 



RESIDENCE. 

Lexington Dist. 
Richland " 
Richland * " 
Bradford Springs. 
Sumter Dist. 
Williamsburg Dist. 
Camden. 

Litchfield, Connecticut. 
Chester District. 
Chester " 
Sumter " 
Charleston " 
Charleston " 
Society Hill. 
Darlington Dist. 
Darlington - 



Evans, Elizabeth M. 
Fitzsimons, Catherine 
G-aillard, Elizabeth A. 
Gourdin, Martha S. 
Gregg, Julia R. 
Hampton, Anne M. 
Hampton, Caroline L. 
Howell, Grace 
Hunter, Mary C. - 
Hunter, Margaret E. 
Manning, Susan M. 
Maner, Catherine M. 
Marks, Edwina P. 
Marks, Joan B. 
McDuffie, Mary S. 
Mclver, Anne S. - 
Mickle, Elizabeth S. 
Mickle, Sarah W. 
Muldrow, Jane M. 
Nott, Caroline A. - 
Porcher, Catherine G. 
Porcher, Elizabeth S. 
Salley, Mary K. - 
Sitgreaves, Amelia L. 



Society Hill. 

Charleston. 

Charleston Dist. 

Charleston " 

Society Hill. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Natchitoches, La. 

Natchitoches, La. 

Clarendon. 

Beaufort District. 

Barhamville. 

Barhamville. 

Abbeville Dist. 

Society Hill. 

Kershaw Dist. 

Kershaw " 

Sumter " 

Columbia. 

Charleston Dist. 

Chaileston " 

Orangeburg Dist. 

Yorkville. 
2 



Snipes, Mary J. - 
Stairley, Mary E. - 
Strom an, Ann M. - 
Taylor, Virginia - 
Taylor, Sarah C. - 
Taylor, Anne W. - 
Taylor, Eliza R. - 



Irwinton, Ala. 

Greenville. 

Orangeburg. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



The regular course of study, for those prepared to 
enter upon it, occupies three years ; to which the ele- 
mentary branches named below are preliminary. — 
These preparatory studies are also pursued with great 
advantage, at the Institute. 

PREPARATORY STUDIES. 

Reading, Writing, Spelling, and the general principles of 
Grammar, Geography, and Arithmetic. 

STUDIES OF THE FIRST YEAR. 

Geography, Grammar, and Arithmetic, completed. Text 
Books, Colburn's first lessons. Smith's Grammar and Arithme- 
tic. Woodbridge and Willard's Geography, Ancient and 
Modern. History — Hale's United States. Outlines of Chiono- 
logy and Ancient History. Outline of Botany. Geography of 
the Heavens — Burritt. Watts on the Mind. English Composi- 
tion — Parker's Progressive Exercises. Analysis of the English 
Language — Town. Drawing Maps. 

STUDIES OF THE SECOND YEAR. 

History — Tytler's Universal History, in 2 vols. Astronomy — 
Wilkins. Rhetoric — Jamieson. Botany — Mrs. Lincoln. Natu- 
ral Philosophy — Grand. Physiology — Lee. Algebra — Day. — 
Philosophy of Natural History— Smellie. Grammar and Criti- 
cism. Pope's Essay on Man : and Cowper's Task. 

STUDIES OF THE THIRD YEAR. 

Logic — Hedge. Intellectual and Moral Philosophy — Aber- 
crombie. Chemistry — Beck. Evidences of Christianity — Paley. 



Sullivan's Political Class Book. Geology — Hitchcock. Play- 
fair'sEuclid (old edition.) Rhetoiic — Whately. Book-keeping. 
Marsh's Single Entry. 

Studks and Instructions carried on simultaneously 
throughout the Course: 

Music — Jnstiumental and vocal. Languages — Latin, French, 
Spanish and Italian. Drawing, Painting and Embroidery. — 
Reading and Writing, English and French Compositions. — 
French conversation over the Table. Lectures on History, on 
Natural Science, and on various Branches of Philosophy. 

The Institute is furnished with a good apparatus — philosophi- 
cal and chemical — and with abundant means of ocular demon- 
stration in Geography, History, Astronomy, and other scien 
ces. 

It will be seen by recurring to the list of our teach- 
ers, that we carry forward this system of instruction 
upon the principle of great division and subdivision 
in labor. Each department of study has its responsi- 
ble head; while the Principals, in addition to the du- 
ties of personal instruction, labor, by a watchful over- 
sight of all the parts, to give efficiency and unity to the 
whole system. 

It would be a serious mistake, however, to suppose 
that the education we contemplate is limited to any 
course of mere instruction, however systematic or 
complete. Our plan embraces physical and moral 
as well as mental culture ; and any thing short of the 
most assiduous attention to the health and general 
character of our pupils, would prove us unworthy 
the high trust reposed in us, when a child of tender 



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years and unformed character is confided to our sole 
charge. 

We wish it to be understood, that in order to en- 
sure the highest benefits from the advantages of the 
Institute it is indispensable, that pupils begin with us 
early and continue through the course without inter- 
ruption. And this we say in reference alike to any 
practice of deferring entrance until the foundations 
of an education for better or for worse have been laid 
elsewhere, or of delaying entrance at the opening of 
the year until some part of the terra has elapsed, or 
of leaving before the year closes, or of frequent and 
long visiting at home or elsewhere during term time. 

The importance of these suggestions is duly felt in 
our Institutions for the education of young men ; and 
an impartial public sentiment will not long, we are 
persuaded, judge it any more fit that a young lady 
should lose a considerable part of the much shorter 
period allotted to her education. Our course is tho- 
rough, and our standard such as cannot be reached 
in a less period of time than we have here assigned. 

While the above is an accurate outline of the regu- 
lar course of instruction here, it is proper to state, that 
pupils who have made considerable advancement 
elsewhere, will be allowed at the option of parents or 
as may seem to us best, to fall into classes above or 
below those of the year, to which she more properly 
belongs. 

In conducting the education of those committed to 
our care, we studiously avoid all appeals to the prin- 



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ciple of emulation. So far as relates to deportment 
and scholarship, each young lady is referred to a stan- 
dard of perfect punctuality and correctness ; in regard 
to her attainments, she is compared, not with her as- 
sociates, but with herself — with what she is capable of 
doing, and what she is expected to do. This is done 
daily, in the recitations ; weekly, in the report given 
in from Teacher's meeting ; and monthly, in a writ- 
ten record, made by the teachers at the close of the 
month, which indicates the advancement each pupil 
has made, and which is preserved for the inspection 
of the parent or guardian only. 

No member of the Institution is permitted to pay 
or receive visits on the Sabbath. Public worship 
is attended in the Chapel of the Institute on the 
morning of that day — and in the evening a Biblical 
Exercise or familiar lecture, at which all are present. 

The Academic year commences on the 2nd Mon- 
day in October, and terminates on the 15th day of 
June. Pupils who can more cenveniently come at 
the opening of College in Columbia, will be received 
at that time without additional charge. 

The first session of the term or academic year, will 
close on 14th February. Each session payablo in 
advance. 

The Institution will be open five days of the week, 
during the hours of recitation, from 6 A. M. to 5 P. 
M., to the inspection of Patrons and those interested 
in the cause of Female Eduaction. 



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TERMS. 

Board and entire course in English Literature, 

inclusive of washing, fire-wood, candles, &c. $200 for Ac. yr- 

Chemistry, with use of chemical apparatus, 16 " 

Botany - - - - - 10 " 

Latin, French, Spanish, and Italian, each, - 32 " 

Music— Piano and Guitar, each, - - 50 "j 

Use of Piano in practice, - - - 6 " 

Drawing and Painting, each, - - 32 " 

Embroidery, - - - - - 12 " 

An additional charge of Si 00 will be made for pu- 
pils who remain at the Institute during vacation. — 

The actual expenditures of the Institute, for In- 
structors and others engaged, date from the commence- 
ment of Term ; arrangements to meet these must be 
made accordingly- Pupils therefore who enter at 
the commencement -of Term, are charged agreeably 
to the above rates. Those who enter for a less pe- 
riod, will, after the present year, be charged for the 
entire year, or at their option from the time of their 
entrance, at the rate of $250 per scholastic year for 
board and literary course, and for extras in the same 
proportion.