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A CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

POETSMOUTH COLLECTION OF 
BOOKS AND PAPERS 

WRITTEN BY OR BELONGING TO 

SIR ISAAC NEWTON 



C. J. CLAY AND SONS, 

CAMBEIDGE UNIVEBSITY PKESS WAEEHOUSE, 
AVE MARIA LANE. 




DEIGHTON, BELL, AND CO. 
F. A. BEOCKHAUS. 



A CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



PORTSMOUTH COLLECTION 

OF BOOKS AND PAPERS 

WBITTEN BY OB BELONGING TO 

SIE ISAAC NEWTON 



THE SCIENTIFIC POKTION OF WHICH 

HAS BEEN PRESENTED BY THE EARL OF PORTSMOUTH 

TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE 



DRAWN UP BY THE SYNDICATE APPOINTED 
THE Qth NOVEMBER 1872 



CAMBRIDGE 

AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 
1888 




CAMBRIDGE: 

PRINTED BY C. J. CLAY,' M.A. AND SONS, 
AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS. 



CONTENTS. 



PKEFACE . . . . . ix 

APPENDIX TO PREFACE , . . . . xxi 

CATALOGUE. 
SECTION I. 

PAGE 

MATHEMATICS. 

I. Early papers by Newton ........ 1 

II. Elementary Mathematics . ...... . . .2 

III. Fluxions . . , '..... . . . ib. 

IV. Enumeration of Lines of the Third Order ... . . ib. 
V. On the Quadrature of Curves . ' . . . . : .3 

VI. Papers relating to Geometry . . . . ' . , . . . ib. 

VII. Miscellaneous Mathematical subjects . . '. . . .4 

VIII. Papers connected with the' Principia.' A. General . . . ib. 

IX. B. Lunar Theory . . 5 

X. C. Mathematical Problems 6 

XI. Papers relating to the dispute respecting the invention of 

Fluxions . . . . . . . '. . . . ib. 

XII. Astronomy . . *. . ... . .. .'. 9 

XIII. Hydrostatics, Optics, Sound, and Heat . . . . . ib. 

XIV. Miscellaneous copies of Letters and Papers . . ... .10 

XV. Papers on finding the Longitude at Sea ib. 



SECTION II. 

CHEMISTRY. 

*I. Parcels containing Transcripts from Alchemical authors . . 11 

*II. Papers on Alchemy .... .... 18 

*III. Books on Alchemy . ...... 19 

IV. Notes of Experiments . . . . . . . . ib. 

V. Miscellaneous Notes . r 20 

VI. A MS. Note-book ' . .2] 

* These have been returned to Lord Portsmouth. 



253259 



VI CONTENTS. 

* SECTION III. 

PAGE 

CHBONOLOGY . . . ' . .25 

* SECTION IV. 

HISTORY . . . . 26 

* SECTION V. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS, chiefly on Theological Subjects . . . .29 



SECTION VI. 

LETTERS. 

I. Correspondence with Oldenburg 32 

II. Correspondence with Collins and Wallis ib. 

III. Letters of A. Storer to Dr Babington and to Newton . . .33 

IV. Correspondence with Flamsteed 34 

V. Letters of Gregory to Newton 35 

VI. Letters from Halley to Newton on the first publication of the 

' Principia ' ib. 

VII. Letters of Halley to Newton about Comets' Orbits . . .36 
*VIII. Letters of Halley to Newton and Molyneux, relating to the 

Chester Mint ib. 

IX. Letters from Cotes to Newton on the 2nd edition of the 'Principia' 37 
X. Hough drafts of some of Newton's Letters to Cotes . .38 

XI. Letters of Keill to Newton 39 

XII. Letters of Pemberton to Newton while editing the 3rd edition of 

the ' Principia ' ib. 

*XIII. Letters of N. Facio Duillier to Newton and others . . . 40 

*XIV. Miscellaneous Letters ib. 

*XV. Copies of Newton's Letters, published in the Macclesfield Cor- 
respondence 45 



SECTION VII. 

BOOKS. [Some of these have been returned to Lord Portsmouth.] . . 46 

SECTION VIII. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS. [Some of these have been returned to Lord Ports- 
mouth.] .49 

* These have been returned to Lord Portsmouth. 



CONTENTS. Vll 

SECTION IX. 

PAGE 

Correspondence, Articles of Agreement, &c., about the publication of 

Flamsteed's Observations 51 

* SECTION X. 

I. Correspondence between Conduitt and Fontenelle about the Eloge 52 

II. Conduitt's Memoirs of Newton ib. 

III. London Gazette with account of Newton's funeral . . . ib. 

* SECTION XI. 

Drafts of Fragments of Conduitt's intended Life of Newton . . . .53 

* SECTION XII. 

Letters and Memoranda relating to Newton after his death . . . .54 

* SECTION XIII. 

Papers on Newton's family matters and on the Mint . . . . .55 

* SECTION XI Y. 

Books and Papers not by Newton . . . . . -.. . .55 

* SECTION XV. 

Complimentary Letters to Newton from distinguished foreigners . . .56 



* These have been returned to Lord Portsmouth. 



PREFACE. 



IT has been long known that Sir Isaac Newton left, at his 
death, a large mass of papers, consisting partly of copies of 
his works written out or corrected for the press, partly of notes 
relating to the various subjects in which he was interested, 
and of an extensive correspondence with English and Foreign 
mathematicians. These came immediately on his death into 
the possession of Mr Conduitt, who married Catharine Barton, 
Newton's favourite and accomplished niece. By the marriage 
of their only child to the first Lord Lymington, they passed into 
the hands of the first Lord Lymington, and we find them in 
October 1751 in the hands of Mr Saunderson of Sheer Lane, for 
Lord Lymington 1 . Since that time they have remained in the 
possession of the Portsmouth family. 

Several years ago the present Earl of Portsmouth expressed 
a wish to present to the University all that portion of the papers 
and correspondence which related to science, as he felt that 
these would find a more appropriate home in the Library of 
Newton's own University than in that of a private individual. 
Lord Portsmouth entrusted the whole collection of papers to 
the University, and the present syndicate was appointed to 
examine, classify, and divide them. This has proved a lengthy 
and laborious business, as many of the papers were found to be 
in great confusion mathematical notes being often inserted in 
the middle of theological treatises, and even numbered leaves of 
MSS. having got out of order. Moreover a large portion of the 
collection has been grievously damaged by fire and damp. The 

1 See Stukeley's Memoirs (Surt. Soc., 1887) iii. p. 15. 



X PREFACE. 

correspondence, however, is in a very fair condition throughout, 
and had been arranged in an orderly manner. 

On receiving a preliminary report on the contents of the 
collection, Lord Portsmouth expressed a wish that the papers 
relating to Theology, Chronology, History, and Alchemy, should 
be returned to him at Hurstbourne, where they would be care- 
fully preserved. On account of his connection with the Newton 
family, Lord Portsmouth also naturally wished to have returned 
to him all the papers relating to private, personal, and family 
matters. These, however, are comparatively few, and not of 
much interest, with the exception of a short note from Newton's 
mother, written to him when a boy at College. 

Although till the present time the papers have never been 
thoroughly examined, they have been looked at and partially 
used by various persons since Newton's death. When that 
occurred (in 1727) Dr Pellett was appointed by the executors to 
examine them and to select such as he deemed fit for publica- 
tion. A rough catalogue of the papers is appended to a bond 
given by Mr Conduitt to the administrators of Newton's estate, 
in which he binds himself to account for any profit he may 
make by their publication. This list, with some remarks of 
Dr Pellett, will be found in Hutton's Mathematical Dictionary. 
All which Dr Pellett deemed fit to be printed were An Abstract 
of the Chronology in 12 half-sheets folio, and The Chronology of 
Ancient Kingdoms Amended in 92 half-sheets folio; and these 
were printed in 1728 under the care of Mr Conduitt. 

The whole collection was inspected by Dr Horsley, who 
edited in 1779 the well-known edition of Newton's works in five 
quarto volumes. He left a few unimportant remarks on some 
of the papers, but he made no use of them in his edition. 

It was again placed in the hands of Sir David Brewster, for 
his second and elaborate life of Newton in 1855; he made some 
use of the scattered mathematical notes and papers, and printed 
a considerable portion of the correspondence. 

The character of the collection will be made clear by the 
catalogue which is now put forth. It divides itself (excluding 
the correspondence) into the heads of Mathematics, Chemistry 



PREFACE. XI 

and Alchemy, Chronology, History, and Theology. Many of 
the Mathematical papers contain Newton's preparations for the 
Principia, and notes which spring out of questions that were 
started by his correspondents. It must be recollected that 
Newton practically gave up his mathematical studies after 1696, 
even the superintendence of the second edition of the Principia 
being given to Cotes, and thus that after this date there is little 
of value in these subjects ; and as most of what is contained in 
them, especially all that relates to the revision of the Principia, 
has been published, there is little to be found beyond what has 
already appeared. 

The case is different, however, with respect to the papers 
referring to three subjects, viz. 1st, the Lunar Theory, 2nd, the 
Theory of Atmospheric Refraction, and 3rd, the Determination 
of the Form of the Solid of Least Resistance. 

It is expressly stated by Newton himself that the Lunar 
Theory as given in his Principia is a mere specimen or fragment 
of the subject, intended to show how some of the more prominent 
lunar inequalities could be traced to the disturbing action of 
the Sun, and how their amounts could be calculated approxi- 
mately by theory. 

The only part which is developed with any fulness of detail 
is that relating to the inequality called the variation, and also 
that which treats of the motion of the node and the change of 
inclination of the orbit to the ecliptic. 

In a short scholium given in the first edition of the Principia, 
Newton mentions that by similar computations he has found 
the motion of the moon's apogee, and he states some of the 
numerical results which he has obtained, but he does not give 
the calculations themselves, as he considers them too complicated 
and not sufficiently accurate. 

In the second edition this short scholium is replaced by a 
long one, in which Newton states many of the principal results 
of the Lunar Theory, partly as found from theory alone and partly 
as deduced by combining his theory with observation ; but he 
confines himself to results alone, and does not give the method 
by which these results have been obtained. Unfortunately also, 
the statement given in the first edition, as to the result which 



Xll PREFACE. 

he had found by theory for the motion of the moon's apogee, is 
omitted in the new scholium. 

It is interesting to find among the papers on the Lunar 
Theory a good many containing Newton's calculations relating 
to the inequalities which are described in the above scholium. 
These papers are unfortunately very imperfect, and they have 
greatly suffered from fire and damp, but there is enough re- 
maining to give a general idea of Newton's mode of proceeding. 
The most interesting of these papers relate to the motion of the 
moon's apogee. Two lemmas are first established which give 
the motion of the apogee in an elliptic orbit of very small 
eccentricity due to given small disturbing forces acting, (1) in 
the direction of the radius vector, and (2) in the direction 
perpendicular to it. 

These lemmas are carefully written out, as if in preparation 
for the press, and they were probably at first intended to form 
part of the Principia. 

Next follows the application of the lemmas to the particular 
case of the Moon, in which the supposition that the disturbances 
are represented by changes in the elements of a purely elliptic 
orbit of small eccentricity would lead to practical inconvenience, 
and consequently Newton is led to modify that supposition. 
In the Principia he shows that if the moon's orbit be supposed 
to have no independent eccentricity, its form will be approxi- 
mately an oval with the earth in the centre, the smaller axis 
being in the line of syzygies and the larger in that of quadra- 
tures, the ratio of these axes being nearly that of 69 to 70. 
Now when the proper eccentricity of the orbit is taken into 
account, supposing that eccentricity to be small, Newton 
assumes that the form of the orbit in which the moon really 
moves will be related to the form of the oval orbit before 
mentioned, nearly as an elliptic orbit of small eccentricity with 
the earth in its focus is related to a circular orbit about the 
earth in the centre. He then attempts to deduce the horary 
motion of the moon's apogee for any given position of the 
apogee with respect to the sun, and his conclusion is that if C 
denote the cosine of double the angle of elongation of the sun 
from the moon's apogee, then the mean hourly motion of the 



PREFACE. Xlll 

moon's apogee when in that position is to the mean hourly 
motion of the moon as 

l + Jf<7 : 238^. 

The investigation on this point is not entirely satisfactory, 
and from the alterations made in the MS. Newton evidently 
felt doubts about the correctness of the coefficient ^ which 
occurs in this formula. 

From this, however, he deduces quite correctly that the 
mean annual motion of the apogee resulting would amount 
to 38 51' 51", whereas the annual motion given in the Astro- 
nomical Tables is 40 41f . 

The result stated in the scholium to the 1st Edition appears 
to have been found by a more complete and probably a much 
more complicated investigation than that contained in the 
extant MSS. 

The papers also contain a long list of propositions in the 
Lunar Theory which were evidently intended to be inserted in 
a second edition, upon which Newton appears to have been 
engaged in 1694. This list, together with the two lemmas on 
the motion of the apogee mentioned above, will be found in 
the Appendix. 

Halley inserted in the Philosophical Transactiom of 1721 a 
Table of Refractions by Newton, without giving any idea of 
the method of its formation. 

Kramp, in his Analyse des Refractions, published in 1799, 
investigates by a new and powerful analytical method the law 
of atmospheric refraction for rays in the neighbourhood of the 
horizon. 

On comparing his theoretical results with Newton's Table, 
he finds a remarkably close agreement, which is enough to show 
that the Table was also the result of theory, and therefore that 
Newton must have had some method of his own of solving the 
difficult problem of horizontal refraction. 

Nothing was known of this method, however, until the pub- 
lication of the correspondence between Newton and Flamsteed 
by Mr Baily in 1835. In a letter to Flamsteed, dated De- 
cember 20th, 1694 1 , Newton tries to explain the foundation of 

1 Baily's Flamsteed p. 145. 



XIV PEE FACE. 

his theory of refraction by giving a theorem from which it is 
clear that Newton then understood how to form the differential 
equation to the path of a ray of light through our atmosphere. 
It is true that, for the sake of greater simplicity in this com- 
munication to Flamsteed, Newton restricts the enunciation of 
his theorem to the particular case where the density decreases 
uniformly as the height increases, but it is obvious from the 
form of'the enunciation of Newton's theorem that the method 
is general, provided that the differential of the density which is 
appropriate to any given law of diminution be employed in 
finding the corresponding differential of the refraction. In an 
interesting article in the Journal des Savants for 1836, M. Biot 
directs particular attention to this subject, and tries to repro- 
duce the method which Newton may be supposed to have 
employed in order to calculate his table of refractions. M. Biot 
closes his article in the following terms : 

"II est done prouve, par ce qui precede, que Newton a forme 
1'equation differentielle exacte de la refraction pour les atmospheres 
de composition uniforme; qu'il Fa appliquee exactement au cas ou 
les densites des couches sont proportionelles aux pressions, ce qui 
rend leur temperature constante; et qu'enfm, pour ce cas, il a obtenu 
les vraies valeurs des refractions a toute distance du zenith, sans 
avoir eu besoin d'employer les integrations analytiques qu'il a du 
tres-vraisemblablement ignorer. II est done le createur de cette 
theorie importante de 1'astronomie physique, qui serait probablement 
aujourd'hui plus perfectionee, si Ton avait connu plus tot ses premiers 
efforts." 

Judging from Newton's account of the time which he 
employed in making these calculations, there must have been a 
considerable mass of papers devoted to them which have not 
been preserved. Fortunately, however, among the Portsmouth 
papers we find a detailed calculation of the refraction corre- 
sponding to the altitudes 0, 3, 12 and 30. In order to 
make this calculation the path of a ray of light through the 
atmosphere is divided into a number of parts subtending given 
small angles at the centre of the earth. Hence are found by 
the fluxional method quantities which are proportional to the 
refractions suffered by the ray in passing over the successive 



PREFACE. XV 

portions of the path, and from these the actual refractions in 
passing over these portions are derived by making the total 
horizontal refraction equal to the amount given by observation. 
It should be remarked that the above calculation requires an 
approximate knowledge of the path of the ray, whereas this 
path is at first unknown, and cannot be accurately determined 
without a knowledge of the refraction itself. Newton solves 
the difficulty by an indirect method, making repeated ap- 
proximations to the form of the path, and thus at length 
succeeding in satisfying all the required conditions. 

The papers show that the well-known approximate formula 
for refraction commonly known as Bradley's was really due to 
Newton. This formula is only applicable when the object is 
not very near to the horizon, but the method of calculation 
employed by Newton is equally valid whatever be the apparent 
zenith distance. 

It is well known that in the Principia Newton determines 
the form of the solid of least resistance, thus affording the first 
example of a class of problems which we now solve by means 
of the Calculus of Variations. He there gives what is equivalent 
to the differential equation to the curve by the revolution of 
which the above-named solid is generated, without explaining 
the method by which he has obtained it. Now among the 
Newton papers we have found the draft of a letter to a 
correspondent at Oxford, no doubt Professor David Gregory, 
in which Newton gives a clear explanation of his method, which 
is very simple and ingenious. The draft has no date, but from 
internal evidence it was probably written about 1694. A 
small part of the letter has perished but it is very easy to restore 
the missing portion. The letter will be found in the Appendix 
at the end of this preface. It may be remarked that a similar 
method is immediately applicable to the problem of finding the 
line of quickest descent. 

A great many of the Newton papers relate to the dis- 
pute with Leibnitz about the discovery of Fluxions or the 
Differential Calculus. They show that Newton's feelings were 
greatly excited on this subject, and that he considered that 

N. b 



XVI PKEFACE. 

Leibnitz had shown towards him in reference to it great 
unfairness and want of candour. Newton always maintained 
that Leibnitz was the aggressor in this dispute, and that he 
had, by his language in the Leipsic Acts, covertly accused him 
of plagiarism, whereas he might have known from the corre- 
spondence that formerly took place between them, that Newton's 
method was in his possession long before he himself became 
acquainted with the Differential Calculus. 

On the other hand Leibnitz, without avowing himself the 
author of the article in the Leipsic Acts, denied that it really 
bore the meaning attributed to it by Newton, and maintained 
that Newton had either been deceived by a false friend into 
imagining that he had been accused of plagiarism, or else that 
he was not sorry to find a pretext for attributing to himself the 
invention of the new Calculus, contrary to the avowal he had 
made in the Scholium in the 1st Edition of the Principia. 

From a paper by Leibnitz, which has been published by 
Dr Gerhardt, it appears that the article in the Leipsic Acts, of 
which Newton complained, was really written by Leibnitz, and it 
also seems probable that the ambiguity of its language was not 
unintentional. We cannot wonder, then, that Newton, firmly 
believing that Leibnitz had charged him with plagiarism, 
should have experienced a strong feeling of resentment, and 
should have been induced to retort the charge upon his accuser 1 . 
It was not unnatural that this embittered feeling should still 
survive even after the death of Leibnitz. 

, It is clear from these Portsmouth papers that Newton 
believed that Leibnitz, during his second visit to England in 
October 1676, had obtained access to his MS. entitled De 
Analysi per Equationes numero terminorum infinitas, which 
was in the hands of Collins, and that he had thus been 
materially assisted in discovering the Differential Calculus. 
This tract of Newton's is printed in full in the Commercium 
Epistolicum, and is there used merely in order to prove 
Newton's priority to Leibnitz. It is nowhere asserted or even 
implied in the Commercium that this tract of Newton had ever 

1 In connection with this Newton makes the following quotation from Ovid : 
"Nee lex est justior ilia, etc." (Artis Amatorice, i. 656.) 



PREFACE. XV11 

been seen by Leibnitz. There can now be no doubt, however, 
that Newton was right in thinking that Leibnitz had been 
shown this MS., since a copy of part of it, in Leibnitz's hand, has 
been found among the papers of Leibnitz preserved in the Royal 
Library at Hanover 1 . It is, of course, possible that at the time 
when this copy was taken Leibnitz was already acquainted in 
some degree with the Differential Calculus, but it is difficult to 
acquit him of a want of candour in never avowing in the course 
of the long controversy respecting the discovery of Fluxions, 
that he had not only seen this tract of Newton's, but had 
actually taken a copy of part of it. He must have seen, also, 
at the same time, that the MS. was an old one, and although 
it does not contain the pointed letters which Newton sometimes 
but by no means invariably employed to denote Fluxions, 
Leibnitz could hardly fail to see, if he was acquainted with the 
Differential Calculus, that the principle of Newton's method 
was the same as that of his own. It is repeatedly stated by 
Newton that what he claims is the first invention of the 
method, and that he does not dispute about the particular 
signs and symbols in which the method may be expressed. 
Again, he often states that although, in the sense which he 
employs, the method can have but one inventor, yet the method 
may be improved, and the improvements belong to those who 
make them. 

In some of these papers relating to the dispute with Leib- 
nitz, Newton gives us some interesting information respecting 
the times when several of his discoveries were made. Thus in 
a passage, which has been quoted by Brewster 2 , he states that 
he wrote the Principia in seventeen or eighteen months, begin- 
ning in the end of December 1684, and sending it to the Royal 
Society in May 1686, excepting that about ten or twelve of the 
propositions were composed before, viz. the 1st and llth in 
December 1679, the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 12th, 13th and 17th, 
Lib. i, and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th, Lib. II, in June and July 
1684. The following extract will give an idea of Newton's pro- 
digious mental activity at an earlier period of his life. 

1 See Gerhardt, Mathem. Schriften Leibnitzens, i. p. 7. 

2 Brewster's Life, Vol. i. p. 471. 



XV111 PREFACE. 

"In the beginning of the year 1665 I found the method of 
approximating Series and the Rule for reducing any dignity of any 
Binomial into such a series. The same year in May I found the 
method of tangents of Gregory and Slusius, and in November had 
the direct method of Fluxions, and the next year in January had 
the Theory of Colours, and in May following I had entrance into the 
inverse method of Fluxions. And the same year I began to think of 
gravity extending to the orb of the Moon, and having found out 
how to estimate the force with which [a] globe revolving within a 
sphere presses the surface of the sphere, from Kepler's Rule of the 
periodical times of the Planets being in a sesquialterate proportion 
of their distances from the centers of their orbs I deduced that the 
forces which keep the Planets in their Orbs must [be] reciprocally 
as the squares of their distances from the centers about which they 
revolve : and thereby compared the force requisite to keep the Moon 
in her orb with the force of gravity at the surface of the earth, and 
found them answer pretty nearly. All this was in the two plague 
years of 1665 and 1666 ^ for in those days I was in the prime of my 
age for invention, and minded Mathematicks and Philosophy more 
than at any time since. What Mr Hugens has published since 
about centrifugal forces I suppose he had before me. At length in 
the winter between the years 1676 and 1677 2 1 found the Proposition 
that by a centrifugal force reciprocally as the square of the distance 
a Planet must revolve in an Ellipsis about the center of the force 
placed in the lower umbilicus of the Ellipsis and with a radius 
drawn to that center describe areas proportional to the times. And 
in the winter between the years 1683 and 1684 3 this Proposition 
with the Demonstration was entered in the Register book of the R. 
Society. And this is the first instance upon record of any Proposi- 
tion in the higher Geometry found out by the method in dispute. In 
the year 1689 Mr Leibnitz, endeavouring to rival me, published a 
Demonstration of the same Proposition upon another supposition, 
but his Demonstration proved erroneous for want of skill in the 
method." 

The above extract has been given here on account of its 
intrinsic interest, although in writing it so many years after 

1 In 1666 Newton was in the 24th year of his age. 

2 Probably this should be changed to 1679 and 1680. 

3 Probably this should be changed to 1684 and 1685. 



PREFACE. XIX 

the events to which it relates, Newton appears to have made 
one or two mistakes of date, and probably for this reason has 
drawn his pen through the entire passage. 

Newton's manuscripts on Alchemy are of very little interest 
in themselves. He seems to have made transcripts from a 
variety of authors, and, if we may judge by the number of 
praxes of their contents which he began and left unfinished, he 
seems to have striven in vain to trace a connected system in 
the processes described. He has left, however, notes of a 
number of his own chemical experiments made at various 
dates between 1678 and 1696. Some of these are quantitative. 
Those of most interest relate to alloys. He mentions several 
easily fusible alloys of bismuth, tin and lead, and gives as the 
most fusible that which contains 5 parts of lead + 7 of tin + 12 
of bismuth. He says that an alloy consisting of 2 parts of 
lead + 3 of tin + 4 of bismuth will melt in the sun in summer. 
The alloy which goes by his name is not in the proportions of 
either of these two ; but, as he states that tinglas (bismuth) is 
more fusible than tin, he could not have used pure metal. 

The note-book which contains the longest record of his 
chemical experiments contains also the account of a few optical 
and other physical experiments and the paper on the decussa- 
tion of the optic nerve published by Harris and from him by 
Brewster. Harris, according to Brewster, published from a 
copy in the Macclesfield Collection; but the copy seems to have 
been identical with that in this book, except that a paragraph 
at the end is omitted. Brewster overlooked the paper in this 
book, though he has quoted from other parts of the book. 

The Historical and Theological MSS. cannot be considered 
of any great value. A great portion of Newton's later years 
must have been spent in writing and rewriting his ideas on 
certain points of Theology and Chronology. Much is written 
out, as if prepared for the press, much apparently from the mere 
love of writing. His power of writing a beautiful hand was 
evidently a snare to him. And his fastidiousness as to the 
expression of what he wrote comes out very curiously in these 



XX PREFACE. 

papers; thus there are six drafts of the scheme for founding the 
Royal Society, seven drafts of his remarks on the chronology 
published under his name at Paris (which made him very angry), 
many of the Observations on the Prophecies, several of the 
scheme of mathematical learning proposed for Christ's Hospital, 
&c. 

The four elaborately bound volumes, containing ' the Chro- 
nology of Ancient Kingdoms Amended/ the Chronicle to the 
Conquest of Persia by Alexander, Observations on the Prophe- 
cies, and the treatise " De Mundi Systemate," are very remark- 
able specimens of their author's care in writing out his works, 
and of his beautiful handwriting ( vii. 2). They are all con- 
tained in Horsley's collection. 

It is believed that in the present catalogue nothing has 
been omitted, and that thus a very fair idea may be obtained of 
what occupied Newton's time throughout his life. The papers 
date from his earliest time, giving his accounts when first he 
began college life as a sizar of Trinity College, and his mathe- 
matical notes while still an undergraduate: and they continue 
till his death. All the papers or books which have been re- 
turned to Lord Portsmouth are marked with an asterisk * in 
the catalogue. Of the more important letters, which have not 
been retained by the University, copies have been taken by 
the permission of Lord Portsmouth, and these are retained with 
the portion of the MSS. presented by him to the University. 
In addition to this a copy of Brewster's Life of Newton has 
been placed with the collection, in which the letters there given 
have been carefully collated with their originals ; so that prac- 
tically the student of Newton's works has all the scientific 
correspondence at his command. 

H. R. LUARD. 
G. G. STOKES. 
J. C. ADAMS. 
G. D. LIVEING. 

CAMBRIDGE, 
26 May 1888. 



APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. 



IT may be interesting to give a few extracts from the Newton 
papers on some of the subjects which have been referred to in the 
above Preface. These relate to 

I. The form of the Solid of Least Resistance. Principia, 

Lib. II. Prop. 35, Schol. 

II. A List of Propositions in the Lunar Theory intended 

to be inserted in a second edition of the Principia. 

III. The motion of the Apogee in an elliptic orbit of very 

small eccentricity, caused by given disturbing forces. 

I. ON THE FORM OF THE SOLID OF LEAST RESISTANCE. 
LIB. II., PROP. XXXV. SCHOL., p. 326, 1st Ed. 

Draft of a Letter in Newton's hand, no doubt to Professor David 
Gregory, and probably written in 1694. 

SIR, 

I now thank you heartily both for the very kind visit 
you made me here and for the errata you gave me notice of in my 
book and also for your care of Mr Paget's business. The Lem. 1 
in the third book I could not recover as tis there stated, but I have 
don't another way with a Demonstration, and altered very much the 
Proposition which follows upon it concerning the precession of the 
Equinox. The whole is too long to set down. The figure which 
feels the least resistance in the Schol. of Prop. xxxv. Lib. n. is 
demonstrable by these steps. 



XX11 



APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. 



1. If upon EM be erected infinitely narrow parallelograms 
BGhb and MNom and their distance Mb and altitudes MN, BG be 

Mm + Bb . 
given, and the semi sum of their bases be also given and 

called s and their semi difference - - be called x : and if the 

2i 

lines BG, bh, MN, mo, butt upon the curve nNgG in the points 
n, N, g, and G, and the infinitely little lines on and kg be equal to 
one another and called c, and the figure mnNgGB be turned about 
its axis BM to generate a solid, and this solid move uniformly 
in water from M to B according to the direction of its axis BM : 




m M 



the summ of the resistances of the two surfaces generated by the 
infinitely little lines Gg, Nn shall be least when gG qq is to nN n as 
BG x Bb to MN x Mm. 

For the resistances of the surfaces generated by the revolution 



of Gg and Nn are as 






and 






, that is, if 



and 



be called p and a. as and - and their summ 
P 9 



BG MN . , , A , a . x , 

-- 1 - is least when the fluxion thereot 
p q 

BGxp MNxq 
nothing, or -- f = + - - . 
pp qq 



pp 



qq 



is 



p = Gcfi& = Bbwiid + ^^quad _ ss _ % sx + X x + cc and there- 
fore p "2sx + 2xx, and by the same argument q = 2sx + 2xx and 

BG x 2sx - 2xx MNx2sx+2xx BG x T^x MNxs+x 
therefore - - = - , or 



pp 



qq 



pp 



qq 



and thence pp is to qq as BG x s x to MN x s + x, that is, gG qq to 
nN qq as BG x Bb to MN x Mm. 



APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. XX111 

2. If the curve line DnNgG be such that the surface of the 
solid generated by its revolution feels the least resistance of any 
solid with the same top and bottom BG and CD, then the resistance 
of the two narrow annular surfaces generated by the revolution of 
the [infinitely little lines nN~\ and Gg is less then if the intermediate 
solid bgNM be removed [along CB without altering Mb, until 
bg comes [to BG], supposing as before that on is equal to Jig,] and by 
consequence it is the least that can be, and therefore gG qq is to nN qq 
as BG x Bb [is to MN x Mm]. 

*[Also if] gh be equal to hG so that the angle [gGh is 45 de s r ] then 
will Bb qq be [to nN qq as BG x Bb is to] MN x Mm, and by conse- 
quence BG qq is to GR qq as BG q is to MN x BR or BG q x BR is to 
GR^ [as GR to MN}. 

Whence the proposition to be demonstrated easily follows. 

But its to be noted that in the booke pag 327 lin. 7 instead of 
Quod si figura DNFB it should be written Quod si figura DNFGB, 
and that DNFG is an uniform curve meeting with the right line GB 
in G in an angle of 135degr. 

I have not yet made any experiments about the resistance of the 
air and water nor am resolved to see Oxford this year. But perhaps 
the next year I may. I had answered your letter sooner but that I 
wanted time to examin this Theorem and the Lem. 1 in the 3 d Book. 
I do not see how to derive the resistance of the air from the ascent of 
water. The reasoning which must be about it seems too complicate 
to come under an exact calculus, and what allowance must be made 
for the retardation of the water by the contact of the pipe or hole at 
its going out of the vessel is hard to know. 



II. LIST OF PROPOSITIONS APPARENTLY INTENDED TO BE INSERTED 
IN A 2ND EDITION OF THE PRINCIPIA. 

In Theoria Lunae tractentur hae Propositiones. 

8 PROP. XXV. PROB. v. PAGE 434, PRINCIP. 
Orbem Lunae ad aequilibrium reducere. 

* If the altitude of the frustum of the cone spoken of in the preceding para- 
graph be infinitely small, the semi-angle of the cone becomes equal to 45. 
Hence when the total resistance is a minimum, the curve meets the extreme 
ordinate GB at an angle of 45. 



XXIV APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. 

5 PROP. XXVI. 

Aream orbis totius Lunaris in piano immobili descriptam mensi 
synodico proportionalem esse. 

6 PROP. XXVII. 
Invenire distantiam mediam Lunae a Terra. 

7 PROP. XXVIII. 
Invenire motum medium Lunae. 

I PROP. XXIX. 

In mediocri distantia Terrae a Sole invenire vires solis tarn ad 
perturbandos motus Lunae quam ad mare movendum. 

2 PROP. 
Invenire vires Lunae ad mare movendum. 

3 PROP. XXX. 

Invenire incrementum horarium areae quam Luna in orbe non 
excentrico revolvens radio ad terrain ducto in piano immobili describit. 

4 PROP. XXXI. 

Ex motu horario Lunae invenire distantiam ejus a terra. 

10 PROP. 
Invenire formam orbis Lunaris non excentrici. 

II PROP. 

Invenire variationem Lunae in orbe non excentrico. 

9 PROP. 
Invenire aequationem parallacticam. 

12 PROP. 
Invenire formam orbis Lunaris excentrici. 

13 PROP. 

Invenire incrementum horarium areae quam Luna in orbe excen- 
trico revolvens radio ad terram ducto in piano immobili describit. 

14 PROP. 

Invenire variationem Lunae in orbe excentrico. 



APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. XXV 

PROP. 
Inveiiire aequationem parallacticam in orbe excentrico. 

PROP. 
Inveiiire parallaxim solis. 

PROP. 

Invenire motum horarium Apogaei Lunaris in Quadraturis con- 
sis tentis. 

PROP. 

Invenire motum horarium Apogaei Lunaris in conjunctione et 
oppositione consistentis. 

PROP. 
Ex motu medio Apogaei invenire ejus motum verum. 

De Sole. 
PROP. 

Invenire locum solis. 

Ex Solis motu medio et prostaphaeresi dabitur locus centri gravi- 
tatis Terrae et Lunae deinde ex hoc loco et parallaxi menstrua (quae 
in quadraturis Lunae est 20" vel 30" circiter) dabitur locus terrae 
cum loco opposite solis. 

PROP. 

Invenire motum Apheliorum. 

PROP. 

Invenire motum nodorum. 

Nodus orbium Jovis et Saturni movetur in piano immobili 
quod transit per nodum ilium & secat angulum orbium in ratione 
corporum in distantias ductorum inverse, id est in ratione equalitatis 
circiter, existente angulo quern hoc planum continet cum angulo 
orbis Jovis minore quam angulo altero quern continet cum orbe 
Saturni. Serventur forte inclinationes orbium omnium ad hoc 
planum, & quaerantur motus intersectionum quas orbes cum ipso 
faciunt et habebuntur motus planorum orbium respectu fixarum. 

PROP. 

Invenire perturbationes Orbis Saturni ab ejus gravitate in Jovem 
oriundas. 



XXVI APPENDIX TO THE PKEFACE. 

PROP. 

Invenire perturbationes Orbis Jovis ab ejus gravitate in Saturnum 
oriundas. 

PROB. 

In systemate Planetarum in venire planum immobile. 

A centre solis per orbes Planetarum ducatur linea recta sic ut si 
Planetae singuli in minimas suas ab hac linea distantias ducantur, 
summa contentorum ad unam lineae partem aequetur summa con- 
ten torum ad alteram; et haec linea jacebit in piano immobili quam 
proxime. 

Yel sic accuratius : 

Per solem et orbes Planetarum et commune centrum gravitatis 
eorum omnium ducatur linea recta sic ut si sol et semisses Plane- 
taram in minimis orbium ab hac linea distantiis ad utramque solis 
partem siti augeantur vel minuantur in ratione distantiarum verarum 
a centro solis ad distantias mediocres ab eodem centro, deinde ducan- 
tur in distantias suas ab hac linea : summa productorum ab una rectse 
parte et ab una etiam parte communis centri gravitatis, conjuncta 
cum summa productorum ex altera utriusque parte aequetur surnmae 
productorum reliquorum : jacebit haec recta in piano immobili, et 
hujusmodi rectae duae planum illud determinabunt. 



III. ON THE MOTION OF THE APOGEE IN AN ELLIPTIC ORBIT OF 

VERY SMALL ECCENTRICITY. 

From a somewhat mutilated MS. vihich seems to have been prepared 

for the press. 

LEMMA. 

Si Luna P in orbe elliptico QPR axem QE, umbilicos S, F 
habente, revolvatur circa Terram S et interea vi aliqua V a pondere 
suo in Terram diversa continub impellatur versus Terram; sit autem 
umbilicorum distantia SF infinite parva : erit motus Apogaei ab im- 
pulsibus illis oriundus ad motum medium Lunae circa Terram in 
ratione composita ex ratione duplae vis V ad Lunae pondus mediocre 



APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. 



XXV11 



P, et ratione lineae SE quae centre Terrae et perpendiculo PE inter- 
jacet ad umbilicorum distantiam SF. 




N D 



CAS. 1. Fingamus vires P & V non esse continuas sed singulis 
temporis particulis aequalibus et quam niinimis semel agere, agat 
autem vis utraque in P sintque irP particulae ellipseos quas Lima 
praecedente temporis particula descripsit. Pp particula ejusdem 
Ellipseos [quam Luna] per impulsum vis solius P absque impulsu 
vis V posteriore temporis particula describere deberet et PG parti- 
cula orbis novi quern Luna per impulsum vis utriusque V & P in 
loco P factum eadem posteriore temporis particula describit. Et erit 
angulus pPG ad angulum quern lineola pP cum lineola proximo ante 
appulsum Lunae ad locum P descripta et producta contineat, id est ad 
angulum PSG seu motum angularem Lunae ut vis V qua angulus 
prior genitus est ad vim ponderis P qua angulus posterior genitus est. 
Agatur Pf ea lege ut angulus fPG- complementum sit anguli SPG ad 
duos rectos et P/"transibit per umbilicum superiorem Ellipseos novae, 
et quoniam angulus FPp, (ex natura Ellipseos) complementum sit 
anguli SPp ad duos rectos, angulus FPf duiplo major erit angulojt?P6r, 
adeoque earn habebit rationem ad angulum PSG quam habet vis 2 V 
ad vim P. Sit f umbilicus iste superior, et in PF ac Pf demittantur 
perpendicula SK et Sk, quorum Sk secet ' PF in I. Et per ea quae 
in Prop. LIB. 1 ostensa sunt, erit PF ad SP + PF ut ellipseos 



XXviii APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. 

latus rectum quod nominabimus L ad 2/SP + 2PK, et divisim PF 

ferit adl SP ut L ad 2SP + 2PK- L, seu PF aeq ualis .., * ,. r , 

-Z/jjT 4- 2iJrJ\. Li 



et [eodlem argumento Pf aequalis ^-^D ~^ -- 5^. Nam latus 





rectum quod sit (per Prop. Lib. 1. Princip.) in duplicata ratione 
arese quam Luna radio ad terrain ducto singulis temporis particulis 
describit, et quantitas arese illius per impulsum vis V nil mutetur, 
idem manet in Ellipsi utraque. Cum autem 2SP et L ob in- 
finite parvam distantiarn SF aequentur, deleatur 2SP L et erit 

FP aequalis -=-=. et Pf aequalis ^=- quarum differentia est 

Jr i\. 1 K 



seu IK. Est autem IK ad Ik ut SK ad Pk, ideoque (ob infinite 
parvam SF) est IK infinite minor quam Ik seu Ff, et propterea Ff 
perpendicularis est ad PK. Quare si jungatur Ef t anguli FEf & 
FPf, in segmento circuli per puncta P, E, F, f transeuntis con- 
sistentes, aequales erunt inter se. Ideoque cum angulus FSfsit ad 
angulum FEf ut FE vel SE ad FS seu 20 S, et angulus FPf supra 
fuerit ad angulum PSG ut vis 2V ad vim P: erit ex aequo angulus 
FSf ad angulum PSG, id est motus Apogaei ad motum medium 
Lunae ut 2V*SE ad PxSF seu VxSE ad PxOS. Concipe jam 
numerum impulsuum augeri et intervalla diniinui in infinitum ut 
actiones virium V et P reddantur continuae et constabit Propositio. 

Q.E.D. 

COROL. Valet Propositio quam proxime ubi excentricitas finitae 
est magnitudinis, si modo parva sit. 



LEMMA. 

Si Luna P in orbe Elliptico QPR axem QR et umbilicos S, F 
habente revolvatur circa Terram, et interea vi aliqua W a pondere 
suo diversa secundum lineam distantiae SP perpendicularem impella- 
tur ; sit autem excentricitas OS infinite parva : erit motus Aphelii J ab 
impulsu illo oriundus ad motum medium Lunae in ratione composita 
ex ratione quadruplae vis W ad pondus P et ratione perpendiculi PE 
ad excentricitatem OS. 2 

1 This should be Apogasi. 

2 This should be umbilicorum distantiam SF. 



APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. XXIX 

CAS. 1. Distinguatur enim tern pus in particulas aequales et 
quam minimas, et agat vis W non continue sed singulis temporis 
particulis semel. Sit autem T velocitas Lunae [in] P ante impulsum 
vis W ibi factum et t incrementum [velojcitatis ex impulsu et L 
latus rectum Orbis Lunaris ante [impulsum]. Et quoniam area 
quam Luna radio ad Terrain [ducto singulis temjporis particulis 
aequalibus describit, sit ante impulsum ad eandem aream post im- 
pulsum ut T ad T + t, et latus rectum (per Prop. xiv. Lib. i. Princip.) 
sit in duplicata ratione arese, erit (per Lem. Lib. n. Princip.) 

fjl . o^ O/ 

L seu L + ^= L latus rectum post impulsum. Est autem (ut in 

Lemmate superiore) ^-^ ^^ T longitude PF qua Luna distabat 
A&jT 4- ArJi. Li 



ab umbilico superiore ante impulsum ; et propterea cum situs lineae 
PF, si modo excentricitas SF infinite parva sit, ex impulsu illo nil 
mutetur, ideoque PK maneat eadem quae prius et solum L mutetur, 
si producatur PF ad </> ut sit <jf> umbilicus superior post impulsum; 



erit Pcf> aequalis 9 . De hac longitudine subdu- 



catur longitude ipsius PF superius inventa, nempe -~p- 



2SP+2PK-L' 
et interea in utraque pro 2SP + ZPK scribatur 2L & nianebit 

differentia F<J> aequalis SP seu SP. Unde longitude per- 

pendiculi <f>g quod in diametrum QR ab umbilico (f> demittitur, erit 

4t 

PE. Jam vero in Lemmate superiore, velocitas quam vis V 

impulsu unico generare potest, est ad velocitatem Lunae ut lineola 
pG quam Luna vi impulsus illius dato tern pore describere posset ad 
lineolam Pp quam Luna velocitate sua data T eodem tempore descri- 
bat, id est ut Ff&d PF. 1 Ideoque si velocitas prior nominetur S erit 

2SxPF 
Ff aequalis ^ - ob angulum FPf anguli GPp duplum, et per- 

pendiculum fJi quod ab umbilico f in ellipseos axem QR demittitur 

o & 
aequale -= EF. Proinde cum angulus <j>SF sit ad angulum FSf ut 

<j>g ad fh, et angulus FSf ad angulum PSp ut V x SE ad P x OS, 

1 This should be pG ad Pp. 



XXX APPENDIX TO THE PREFACE. 

erit angulus <f>SF ad angulum PSp, hoc est motus Apogaei a vi W 
genitus ad niotum medium Lunae ut -= PE ad EF et V x SE ad 

P x OS conjunctim, id est (ob aequales EF ad SE et proportionales 
t & S, W & V) ut 2W x PE ad P x OS. Q.E.D. 

COROL. Obtinet etiam Propositio quam proxime ubi [quam 
minima sit] excentricitas etiamsi non sit infinite parva. 



SECTION I. 

MATHEMATICS. 

I. EARLY PAPERS BY NEWTON. (Holograph.) 

1. Extracts by Newton 

From Hooke's Micrographia, 
From the History of the Royal Society, 
From the Philosophical Transactions. 
Notes of some Mines in Derbyshire and Cardiganshire. 

2. Scraps and Extracts made by Newton, including two little 
notes on tangents arid musical semi-tones. 

3. A tract in English written in 1666, entitled "To resolve pro- 
blems by Motion." 

Also short tracts entitled 

De Solutione Problematum per Motuin. 
De Gravitate Conicarum. 
Problems of Curves. 

4. Calculation of the Area of the Hyperbola. 

5. On the Laws of Motion. 
On the Laws of Reflection. 
On Motion in a Cycloid. 

6. Problems in Geometrical Optics. 



N. 



2 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

II. ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS. (Holograph.) 

1. Observations on the Algebra of Kinckhuysen. 

2. The first Ten Propositions of the 2nd book of Euclid, suc- 
cinctly enunciated and demonstrated. 

3. Theorem on the Area of a Triangle. 

4. Trigonometria succincte proposita et nova methodo demon- 
strata a S* Joanne Hareo Arm. 

5. A few MS. leaves, containing Compendium Trigonometriae. 
It includes Spherical Trigonometry. Intended for learners. 

6. Table of sines to every half degree. 



III. FLUXIONS. 

1. Transcript of a Tract on Fluxions said to have been written 
by Newton in November, 1666. 

2. Tract relating to the History of Fluxions, transcribed from 
one which was probably written by Jones. 

3. Part of Newton's method of Fluxions and Infinite Series, with 
a fragment of the same treatise. (Holograph. ) 

4. Part of a Tract on Fluxions. 

5. Some Propositions in Fluxions. ["I think this fragment 
very proper to be published." Horsley, Oct. 22, 1777.] 

6. Analysis per quantitates fluentes et eorum momenta. 

7. Method of Fluxions and Infinite Series. 

8. On the solution of Fluxional Equations. 

9. Fluxions applied to Curves. 

10. Propositions in the Method of Fluxions (dotted letters em- 
ployed). 

11. Propositions in Fluxions (dotted letters employed). 

12. An early paper on deducing the subnormal in a curve from 
a given rational relation between x and y, and the converse operation. 

1 3. Fragments on Fluxions. 

14. Method of Curves and Infinite Series, and application to the 
Geometry of Curves. Complete all but the 1st leaf. 



IV. ENUMERATION OF LINES OF THE THIRD ORDER. (Holograph/ 

1. An early copy. 

2. A later copy. 



SECTION I. MATHEMATICS. 6 

3. On the curves of the third order, produced by the projections 
of the Parabola Neiliana. 

4. Fragments concerning lines of the third order, and some mis- 
takes of Descartes ["not worth publishing." S. Horsley, Oct. 23, 

1777]. 



V. ON THE QUADRATURE OF CURVES. (Holograph.) 

1. A copy which appears to be pretty complete. 

2. A fragment on the same subject. 

3. Scattered papers on the same subject, in great confusion 

4. Another fragment on the same. 

5. Note on Quadrature of Curves, intended as a Supplement to 
Section 10 of Book I. of the Principia. 

6. Fragment on the Quadrature of Curves whose equations con- 
sist of but three terms. 



VI. PAPERS RELATING TO GEOMETRY. (Holograph.) 

1. De Problematum resolutione Synthetica. 

2. Geometria. Liber 1. A fragment. 

3. Geometry, a fragment on Porisms. 

4. Analysis Geometrica. 
Regula Datorum. 

5. Newton's Regula Fratrum. 

6. Fragment relating to Curves. 

7. Geometria Curvilinea and Fluxions. 

8. Scraps containing Propositions in Geometry ; viz. : 

(a) To describe a Conic Section through five given points ; 

and 

(b) To describe a Conic Section passing through two points 

and touching three given straight lines. 

9. Tract on the construction of Equations, unfinished. 

10. On the Properties of Curves. 

11. Part of a Treatise on Geometry (in Latin). 

12. De Compositione Locorum Solidorum. 

13. Solutio Problematis Veterum de Loco Solido. 

14. Fragments relating to the writings of the Ancients in 
general, but especially to the Porisms of Euclid, and the Loci of 

12 



4 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

Apollonius ["very curious and fit to be published." S. Horsley, Oct. 
26, 1777]. 

15. Remarks on the nature and objects of Arithmetic, Geometry, 
and Mechanics. 

16. A fragment, relating to the Comparison of Curved Superficies. 



VII. MISCELLANEOUS MATHEMATICAL SUBJECTS. (Holograph, exc. 7.) 

1. Problemata Numeralia. 

2. Arithmetica Universalis. A chapter on the limits of the 
roots of equations (see p. 184 of Leyden Ed. of Univ. Arith. 1732). 

3. De serierum proprietatibus. 

4. On Quadrature by Ordinates. 

5. Regula differentiarum &c. 

6. Bernoulli's problem on drawing lines cutting a series of 
curves according to any given law. Phil. Trans. 1716. 

7. Errata in Dr Barrow's Conicks and in his Archimedes, with 
a letter to Newton about the latter Errata. 

8. Scraps of calculations. 



VIII. PAPERS CONNECTED WITH THE PRINCIPIA. (Mostly Holograph.) 

A. General. 

1. Propositions on Elliptic Motion. 

2. A fragment in which Fluxions are employed in finding the 
Centripetal force in an Orbit. 

3. Propositions afterwards included in the Principia, but 
differently numbered. 

4. A small fragment (early) of the Principia. 

5. De Motu Corporum. 

6. Propositiones De Motu Corporum. 

The references do not agree with the Principia. 

7. Propositiones de Motu. 

Several copies differing somewhat from each other, of which 
one is printed in Rigaud's " Historical Essay" Appendix, No 1. 

8. Corrections to copy of Propositions on Motion forming pro- 
bably an early draft of part of the Principia. 

9. Proposed Corrections probably for 1st Edition of the Principia. 

10. On the Resistance of fluids ; account of Hauksbee's experi- 
ments, with Newton's deductions ; chiefly rough notes. 



SECTION I. MATHEMATICS. 5 

11. Revision of the Principia. Notes relating to Calculation of 
orbits of Comets. 

12. Additions and Corrections to 1st Edition of the Principia. 

13. Additions and Corrections to the 2nd Edition of the 
Principia. 

14. Observations and Calculations about Comets. 

15. Draft of part of the Preface to the 1st Edition of the 
Principia. Not quite as printed, in part fuller. 

1 6. Preface and Preparations for 3rd Edition of the Principia. 

17. Very rough fragments relating to the Principia. 

18. Miscellaneous Calculations. 

19. Corrections to 1st Edition of the Principia (terribly damaged 
by fire). 

20. Dr Halley's account of the Principia given to K. James II. 



IX. PAPERS CONNECTED WITH THE PRINCIPIA. 
B. Lunar Theory. 

1. Papers on the Lunar Theory found in interleaved copy of 
1st Edition of Principia (damaged by fire). 

2. Propositions prepared to be used in the Lunar Theory 
(greatly damaged by fire). 

3. Fragments on the Lunar Theory (greatly damaged by fire). 

4. Propositions in the Lunar Theory, found on loose sheets placed 
at the end of the interleaved copy of the 1st Edition of the 
Principia. 

These were probably intended to be employed in a 2nd Edition, 
but the design was not carried out. 

5. Notes on the law of change of the Moon's variation according 
to the change of the Sun's distance; and on the mutual action of 
Jupiter and Saturn. 

6. Unarranged fragments connected with points of the Lunar 
Theory. 

7. On change of the variation in an excentric orbit, and on the 
motion of the Moon's Apogee. 

8. A list of Propositions in the Lunar Theory, prepared for a 
2nd Edition of the Principia, but not used. 



6 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

9. Propositions relating to the Lunar Theory, including a 
Scholium, differing from that inserted in the 2nd Edition. 

10. On the Theory of the Moon. 

(Various statements of the principal points of this Theory.) 

11. Propositions ' De motu nodorum Lunse,' prepared for the 
3rd Edition of the Principia. 

12. Motion of the Moon's Apogee. This consists of two Lemmas, 
prepared for press; two Propositions, in duplicate ; and an imperfect 
copy of one of these propositions, with a rough draft of an investiga- 
tion of the horary variation of the Inclination. 

The Propositions are not numbered, and therefore they were 
perhaps intended to be worked up for the 1st Edition. 

13. Calculations for forming Lunar Tables. 

14. Various Lunar Tables. 

15. Comparisons of calculated places of the Moon with Obser- 
vations. 



X. PAPERS CONNECTED WITH THE PRINCIPIA. 
C. Mathematical Problems. 

1. To find the True Anomaly from the Mean. 

2. Fragment on the Solid of least resistance. 

3. Atmospheric Refraction, with detailed calculation of the 
Refraction at the altitudes 0, 3, 12 and 30. 

4. Altitudes by the Barometer. 



XI. PAPERS RELATING TO THE DISPUTE RESPECTING THE INVENTION 
OF FLUXIONS. 

1. Apographum Schediasmatis a Newtono olim scripti, 13 Nov. 
1665. 

2. Printed Title-page of the 1st Edition of the Commercium 
Epistolicum, with proposed additions to the Title of the 2nd Edition. 

3. Notes on the Correspondence in Wallis's Works, Vol. 3. 

4. Notae ad Acta Eruditorum. 

5. Rough drafts of the Leibnitz Scholium in the 2nd Edition of 
the Principia, and proposed additions to it. 



SECTION I. MATHEMATICS. 7 

6. Enarratio plenior Scholii prsecedentis. 

7. Mens Scholii prsecedentis. 

8. An account of the Commercium Epistolicum (several vary- 
ing copies). 

9. Papers relating to the origin of the Dispute. 

10. Collations for the History of the Infinitesimal Analysis. 

11. Fragment of "An account of the Differential Method from 
the year 1677 inclusively." 

12. History of the Method of Fluxions. (Several copies with 
varying Titles.) 

13. "Historia Methodi Infinitesimalis" (several varying copies), 
with Corrigenda to the English copy of the " Recensio" published in 
Phil. Trans. Jan., Feb., 1714-5. 

14. Annotationes in Commercium Epistolicum. 

15. Appendix containing Newton's proofs of his priority to 
Leibnitz, &c. (A fragment.) 

16. Newton's Statement of the case in dispute between Leibnitz 
and himself. 

17. Draft (holograph) of Newton's Letter to the Editor of 
Memoirs of Literature, May, 1712 (never published). (See Brewster, 
ii. 283.) 

18. Copy in Newton's hand of Leibnitz's letter to Hans Sloan, 
29th Dec., 1711. 

19. References to the original letters contained, or intended to 
be contained, in the Commercium Epistolicum. 

20. Latin translation (copy) of the Recensio given in Phil. 
Trans. No. 342, differing from that given in the Second Edition of 
the Commercium Epistolicum. 

21. ' Ad Lectorem,' prefixed to the 2nd Edition of the Com- 
mercium Epistolicum. (Several drafts.) 

22. Latin letter (copy) of John Keill to Hans Sloan. May, 1711. 

23. Keill's letter (copy) to John Bernouilli, translated into 
French after July, 1716, with some notes on it in Newton's hand. 

24. Extract from a letter of Leibnitz complaining of an attack 
on his " bonne foi." 

25. Bernoulli's problem in the Acta Eruditorum for Oct. 1698. 

26. Historical Annotations on the Elogium of Leibnitz. 



8 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

27. Several drafts of letters of Newton to Des Maizeaux after 
the death of Leibnitz. (Holograph.) 

28. Remarks on Leibnitz's first Letter to the Abb6 Conti. 

29. Proposed addition to the "Remarks" on Leibnitz's second 
Letter to the Abbe Conti after Leibnitz's death. (Des Maizeaux, 
Vol. 2, pp. 82-106.) 

30. Drafts of a letter to a friend of Leibnitz (probably Cham- 
berlayne), defending Keill. Also copy of English translation of 
Leibnitz's letter to Chamberlayne (in Newton's hand). 

31. Copy by Newton of Leibnitz's letter of 9th Ap. 1716, to De 
Monmort, and draft of Newton's Observations upon it given in 
Raphson's Hist, of Fluxions, App. p. 111. 

32. Newton's observations on the Synopsis given in the Leipzic 
Acts of Jones's "Analysis per quantitatum Series," &c. (Lond. 1711). 

33. Animadversions on Monmort's letter to N. Bernouilli, dated 
20th Aug. 1713, and printed in the 2nd Edition of his Analysis upon 
the play of Hazard. 

34. John Bernouilli's letter of 7th June, 1713, with Newton's 
Observations upon it. 

35. Extract from Bernouilli's Notice of July, 1713 (the Charta 
Volans), and "Remarques sur la dispute entre Mons. Leibnitz et Mons. 
Newton," &c., with Newton's Observations upon them. 

36. Contents of Des Maizeaux's Recueil, &c. Copies of letters 
which are published in Des Maizeaux's Recueil. 

37. Several drafts of an intended Preface to the Commercium 
Epistolicum. 

38. Letter of Newton to the Abbe Conti in reply to the Post- 
script of Leibnitz to the same. This letter refers to the 1st Postscript 
given in Des Maizeaux. 

39. Draft of part of the "Account of the Commercium Epi- 
stolicum," &c., inserted in the Phil. Trans. 

40. Errata in Raphson's History of Fluxions. 

41. Unarranged fragments relating to the dispute with 
Leibnitz. 

42. Drafts of Letters of Newton to Yarignon and others, 
relating to Bernouilli's Letter of 7 June, 1713, which had been 
disavowed by the writer. 



SECTION I. MATHEMATICS. 
XII. ASTKONOMY. 

1. Astronomical communications from Flamsteed, including 
longitudes and latitudes of stars for 1686, and of 21 stars compared 
with the comet of 1680. 

2. Lunar distances in 1677 and in 1685, by Flamsteed, with 
copies of these two papers, one by Newton. 

3. Equations of Moon's Apogee. Table by Newton for Flamsteed. 
Elements of the Comets of 1472, 1580, 1585, 1652, 1661, 1665, 

1672, 1677, and 1686, as calculated by Halley. 

4. Eclipse Tables for a period of 18 years, by Halley. 

5. Observations of Eclipses, sent to Newton from various 
quarters, with a diagram of the annular eclipse of 1686 * by 
E. de Louville (Paris). 

6. Transits of Satellites of Jupiter and of their shadows across 
the disc of the planet, observed by Pound at Wanstead. 

7. Table of Declinations of every 5 th degree of the Zodiac. 



XIII. HYDROSTATICS, OPTICS, SOUND, AND HEAT. 

1. A treatise, with a table, on the Division of a Monochord. 
Not in Newton's hand, but apparently of his composition. Followed 
by an extract in his hand " out of Mr Sympson's Division Violist." 

2. Scrap relating to the velocity of sound; also on the back a 
note on the proportionality of mass to weight. 

3. Manuscript copy of Newton's Optical writings, and of con- 
troversies about them. 

4. Latin draft of the Opticks, Book I., Part I. (1 sheet). 

5. Answer to objections made to Newton's Optical Theories. 
Also a scrap with memoranda about the Newtonian telescope. 

6. Scrap. Memorandum of observations on the colours of thick 
plates. 

7. Fragments on Light and Heat. 

8. Proposed addition to Newton's Opticks. 

On the Refraction, observed in Iceland Spar, and Note "to the 
Reader" relating to it. 



10 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

9. Fragments on Opticks. 

10. Optical experiments. 

11. Figure and description of a sheep's eye. Printed by 
Brewster i. 420. 

12. Speculations as to the constitution of matter and the nature 
of the action of heat. 



XIY. MISCELLANEOUS COPIES OF LETTERS AND PAPERS. 

1. Copies of Letters from Leibnitz, Slusius, &c. to Oldenburgh. 

2. Copies of various Mathematical papers by Tschirnhausen, 
Leibnitz, Slusius, &c. 

3. "Sur la Cubature du coin Spherique" par M. de Lagny. 

4. Fragments on Mathematical subjects by Cassini, Craig, and 
Morland. 



XV. PAPERS ON FINDING THE LONGITUDE AT SEA. 

1. Various proposals for finding the Longitude at Sea. 

2. Several drafts of a Report by Newton to the Lords of the 
Admiralty on the different projects for determining the Longitude 
at Sea. 

3. Draft of a letter by Newton on the same subject. 

4. Two shorter drafts of the same letter. 



SECTION II. 



CHEMISTRY. 

*I. FIVE PARCELS CONTAINING TRANSCRIPTS FROM VARIOUS ALCHEMICAL 
AUTHORS IN NEWTON'S HANDWRITING, WITH NOTES AND ABSTRACTS. 

(1) 

1. Notes out of Philalethes. 

2. On Ripley's Vision; 'Sir G. Ripley his letter to K. Ed. IV. 
unfolded.' 

3. 3 tracts. De metallorum metamorphosi, Brevis manductio ad 
rubinum cselestem, Fons Chemicse Philosophise. 

4. Extracts from Raymond Lully. 

5. an author unnamed. 

6. various authors. 

7. "Artephius, his secret book." 

8. Basil Valentine; on the minerals of Hungary, Carinthia &c., 
and the conditions of their formation, and on the transmutation of 
metals and the separation of the three principles, and of vitriol. 

Jodochus a Rehe; Processes for preparing the Philosopher's / 
stone from MSS. in possession of Dr Twysden. Copies of 4 letters * 
from Faber to Dr Twysden, 1673 4, recounting success of ex- 
periments in preparing spirits of mercury. 

Notes on Faber's work. 

9. Hermes. Tabula smaragdina et commentarium. 

10. The same in English. 

11. "The Epitome of the treasure of health written by Edvardus 
generosus Anglicus innominatus, who lived A. D. 1562." 

12. Hadrian Mynsicht. Aureum seculum redivivum. Testa- 
mentum de philosophorum lapide. Both in hexameters. 



12 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPEKS. 

13. Ex Turba philosophorum. 

14. Preparatio Mercurii, ex MSS. Philosophi American!. 

15. Liber Mercuriorum Corporum. On the back an explanation 
of the symbols in it. 

16. 47 Alchemical recipes, the work of an old Priest, viz. B. 

17. Ex Rosario magno. 

18. Emblemata Michaelis Maieri, comitis Germani. 

1 9. Of chemical authors and their writings. 

20. Collectiones ex novo lumine chemico. 

21. Ex codicillo R. Lullii (Colon. 1563). 

22. Notes mythological and alchemical. 

23. Account of furnaces, &c. 

24. Extracts from Flamel and several other authors. 

25. A page of references to a work not named. 

26. Loca difficilia in novo lumine Chymico explicata. 

27. Extracts: clavis aureae portse, medulla Alchemiae, de Lapide 
vegetabili, Pupilla Alchemise, &c. 

28. Basil Yalentini Currus triumphalis antimonii. 

29. Alphabetical explanation of common chemical words. 

30. Miscellaneous references. 

^ . 31. Abstract of a treatise on Nature's obvious laws and processes 
in vegetation. 

32. 'Out of Schroder's Pharmacopoeia.' 

(2) 

1. The book of N. Flamel, in English. 

2. The metamorphoses of the planets, with two folios of notes 
which are in the nature of memoranda of points adverted to in 
the treatise. 

3. Maier's tracts: 

Symbola aurese mensse duodecim nationum (an account of 
chemical writers in 1 2 books). 

Lusus serius. (On the medicinal virtues of mercury, tutty, &c.) 

Atalanta fugiens. 

Yiatorium. (A chemical interpretation of some parts of ancient 
mythology.) 

Septimana philosophica, 6 days, 7th day wanting. 



SECTION II. CHEMISTRY. 13- 

4. Notanda chymica. Out of Maier (1 f.). 

5. Regulse...de lapide philosophico authore anon, and Maier's 
figures prefixed to Valentine's keys (If.). 

6. Ex Epistola Edm. Dickenson ad Theodoruin Mundanum (2 f.). 

7. Tabula Smaragdina and other extracts. Hieroglypliica Plane- 
tarum (If.). 

8. Extracts apparently from Van Helmont. On the 3rd page, 
last line but two, occurs "Terra juxta parallelos rotunda est, juxta 
meridianos ovalis. Hallucinatur." 

9. Notes chiefly from Philalethes on Bipley. 

10. On Bipley's gates (2 f.). 

11. Kipley expounded (2f.). 

12. Notes on Bipley (an abstract). 

13. Thesaurus thesaurorum, in English (If.). 

14. A key to Snyders. 

15. Sententise notabiles expositse (If.). 

16. Sententise luciferse et conclusiones notabiles (4 f.). A note 
relating to mint affairs on top of first page. 

17. Practica Marise Prophetissse in artem Alchemicam (If.). 

18. De igne sophorum et materia quam calefacit (1 f.) extr. from 
various authors. 

19. Notanda chemica from various authors (If.). 

20. De secreto solutionis (1 f.) from various authors. 

21. The three fires. The work with sol vulgar. The several 
works (If.). 

22. "Clavis." 

23. Extracts from various authors, chiefly alchemical, but some 
notes also about the occurrence of minerals (1 f.). 

24. Verses at the end of B. Valentine's mystery of the microcosm. 

25. The standing of the glass for the time of Putrefaction. The 
hunting of the Green Lyon, in verse, with some notes by Newton. 

26. "Pearce the black monck upon the Elixir" (verse). 

27. "Out of Bloomfield's Blossoms, and a short work that 
beareth the name of Sir George Bipley." 

28. Extracts from Norton's ordinal, Chaucer's tale of the 
Chanon's yeoman, the work of Richard Carpenter, Dastin's dream. 

29. Several questions concerning the Philosopher's stone, no 
author named (1 f.). 



14 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

30. Observations of the matter in the glass, Authore Anonymo ; 
also a recipe for an elixir (If.). 

31. Sendivogius explained (4f.). 

32. The same in Latin, an abstract (2 f.). 

33. Epistola ad veros Hermetis discipulos. S. Didier. 

34. The seven chapters of Hermes, with part of an unfinished 
letter on the back. 

35. Latin letter communicated by Frederick duke of Holstein, 
1656, giving an account of the death of a Jewish magician, of his 
oratory, instruments, perpetual fire in a crystal, &c. with no writer's 
name (If.). 

(3) 

1. Jodochus a Rehe. Precede universelle. 

2. Artephius, de arte occulta lib. secretus. 

3. Abstract of Flamel's account of his hieroglyphics with a 
sketch of the figures. 

4. Novum lumen Chymicum Sendivogii (abstract). 

5. Extracts from Joh. Spagnetus. Enchiridion Physicse, ar- 
canum Hermeticse Philosophise opus. 

6. Extracts from Norton's Ordinal, Dastin's dream, Black monk, 
the hunting of the Green Lyon, Eipley, &c. 

7. Ex Augurelli Chrysopceia, and the Marrow of Alchemy. 

8. Extracts from Ripley and others. Tabula Smaragdina, and 
De metallorum metamorphosi (a leaf missing at the beginning). 

9. Observanda. Instructio de Arbore Solari. Area Arcani. 
Epistola Grasseei. Occultae naturae mysterium. Appendix ad aurum 
potabile. Lucerna salis philosophorum. Auriga chemicus. Rosarium 
magnum. 

10. Snyders' Commentatio de Pharmaco Catholico. 

11. References to B. Valentine's works, his process, 12 keys, 
and Extracts from his Testament. 

12. Miscellaneous Notes and quotations. 

13. Note of information received from a Londoner as to pre- 
cautions in preparation of the philosopher's stone. Mar. 3, 1695 6. 

14. Notes de scriptoribus chemicis. 

15. Notes and memoranda relating to alchemy (2 ). 



SECTION II. CHEMISTRY. 15 

16. Table of contents of some work on Alchemy. 

17. Notes and memoranda (2 f.). 

18. Abstract of some work, with commencement of a letter to 
Mr Proctor an attorney relating to a bond of Mr Tongue to Newton 
on the back. 

19. Annotationes, being extracts from several works. 

20. Account of S. Didier's keys, and what various other authors 
have written on the same subject. This seems to be an attempt to 
co-ordinate the accounts of processes described mystically by the 
several authors (5 f.). 

21. Chemical nomenclature of the Egyptians, and a praxis of 
alchemy extracted from various authors, with a duplicate folio partly 
cancelled. 

22. De mineralibus. Extracts from Geber and others. 
References and extracts (one on the back of a letter). 

23. Diagram of lapis philosophicus cum rotis elementaribus. 

24. Memoranda about chemicals. 

25. Notes of some process. On the back of memoranda of sums 
owing from Mr George Gates, Mr Day, and Richard Rawlins. 

26. Receipt for some compound of sulphur, mercury, antimony 
and silver, apparently with a view to multiplication of the silver. 

27. Alchemical receipts. 

28. Receipts for medicines, ink, etc. 

29. Table of contents of some work. 

30. Part of a treatise, containing 
Lapidis compositio, out of L. Ventura, 
Elementorum conversio, from the same, 
Regimen ignis, from the same and Is. Hollandus, 
Materia, out of Philalethes and others, 

Decoctio, Regimen Mercurii, Saturni, Jovis, Lunse, Veneris, 
Martis, et Solis, out of various authors, and a rough copy of part of 
the Decoctio. 

31. Another treatise in the form of extracts from various authors, 
some parts repeated, altered, and fragmentary; part Latin, part 
English, but no original matter. 

32. Tables of contents to a similar treatise. 

33. Another treatise, apparently earlier, edges partly burnt. 



16 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

34. Table of contents, with a chapter de virga mercurii. 

35. A collection of nine papers in a cover (originally ten), con- 
sisting of notes and extracts, the 10th paper, of ancient hieroglyphics, 
missing. 

36. Three odd papers on the Regimen. 

(*) 

1. A common-place book, in paper cover, containing notanda 
and sententise notabiles from various alchemical authors. Greater 
part blank. 

2. A list of chemical authors. 

3. Several Indices Chemici. 

4. De peste. Van Helmont. 

5. Note as to Terra lemna, and Terra sigillata, with Leibnitz's 
address. 

6. List of books on Chemistry with shelf-marks (perhaps in 
Trinity Library). 

7. An alchemical recipe headed " Roth Mallor's work." On the 
back of the folio a recipe for making aqua regia from calcium 
chloride and aqua fortis, and for another menstruum which seems to 
be a solution of antimony chloride. The 2nd Period (a part of the 
foregoing recipe), but not in Newton's hand. 

8. Notes of reference to some alchemical works. Diagrams of 
furnaces. Sundry recipes for making clay for furnaces and lutes. 
Note that "for rectifying spirits and ethereal oyles, nothing is 
better than the bladder of an ox or hogg," and a recipe for calcining 
gold which seems only getting it into a fine powder. 

9. Dr Goddard's experiments of refining gold with antimony, 
extracted from Phil. Trans. 

10. Part of a letter ordering some one to procure for Newton 
from Hamburg various metallic ores. On the back a note about 
something being true when angles due to difference of refraction are 
taken small enough, and a recipe for some plaster. 

11. Notes of stannic chloride, and some chemical reactions. 

12. An alchemical experiment, not in Newton's hand, which 
seems part of some larger work. There is a note in Newton's 
hand on it relating to quantities obtained in some distillation. 



SECTION II. CHEMISTRY. 17 

(5) 

1. Anagrams of " Isaacus Newtonus " on draft of a letter to 
the Council about some matter at the Mint. Note of quotations in 
ludo puerorum, scala philosophorum, and rosario. 

2. Directions as to some details of an alchemical process given 
by a Londoner acquainted with Mr Boyle and Dr Dickinson. On 
the back the beginning of a letter in which mention is made of 
Mr Pepys asking Sir I. N. for a method of finding the longitude 
at sea. 

3. List of Alchemical works. A classification of the same with 
dates. On the back an account of gold and silver moneys coined 
since Christmas (no year), in which the guinea is put at 21s. 6d. 

4. Another list of Alchemical authors with dates. 

5. Another list of Alchemical authors, with extracts from Act 
of Parl. 5 Car. II., on coinage, on the back. 

6. Extracts " ex lumine de tenebris." 

7. A treatise on Chemistry, extracted from various authors, 
similar to nos. 18, 31, above ; with some odd papers partly duplicates. 

8. Two chapters apparently of another such treatise, headed 
" Reductio et sublimatio " (2 fol.), and " Separatio elementorum" 
(1 fol.) compiled as before. 

9. Recipes for cements. Address of 2 stampmakers. Mathemati- 
cal diagrams and lists of alchemical works. 

10. Opus Galli Anonymi. With a note by Newton " Simile est 
hoc opus operi Fabri..." It gives a recipe for the Philosopher's stone \J 
and medicine but it does not state what the material operated on is ; 
the preparation consists in repeated digestions and distillations. 

11. Alchemical operations references to the pages of several 
books. 

12. Experimenta Raymundi (2 fol.). 

13. Observationes (heads of Alchemical process). 

14. Ex Fabri Hydrographo Spagyrico (1 f.). 

15. Ex Hercule prochymico (1 f.). 

16. Miscellanea from Raymund and others (1 f.). 

17. The Regimen, in seven aphorisms and notes thereon (2 f.). 

18. Index chemicus (commencement only). 

19. Various extracts from alchemical works (9 f.). 

N. 2 



18 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

20. Out of ' La Lumiere sortant des Tenebres ' [above, no. 6], 
and commentary thereon (1 f.), but incomplete. 

21. Fragment out of some treatise with pictures no beginning 
or end. 

22. Recipes for lutes, with some addresses on the back. 

23. Recipes for some alchemical medicines, with address of a 
druggist. 

24. Other alchemical operations, one a translation, and one not 
in Newton's hand. 

25. Abstract of Yarworth's " Processus " incomplete, extending 
to Chap. v. 

26. An alchemical tract entitled " Manna," not in Newton's 
hand, but with additions and notes at the end in his hand. 

27. Recipe for Regulus Martis; on the back some arithmetical 
calculation. 

28. Copy (not in Newton's handwriting) of a letter from Mr 
John Casswell, Oxford, Oct. 14, 1694, to Mr John Flamsteed, giving 
an account of some observations on magnetism. 

29. Account of a method for making aqua fortis and for re- 
fining silver, in Conduitt's hand. 

30. "Experimentum Bellini." 

31. Theatrum Astronomies Terrestris. 



Packet marked VI. containing the following papers on Alchemy : 

1. Some alchemical receipts, not in Newton's hand. 

2. Queries, not in Newton's hand. 

3. A medicine to transmute copper, ditto. 

4. Alchemical receipts, ditto. 

5. To make artificial pearl, ditto. 

6. No. 73. An incomplete copy (76 pp.) of Yarworth's 
"Processus," not in Newton's hand. 

N.B. The several copies of Yarworth are not identical. 



SECTION II. CHEMISTRY. 19 

*rn. 

Two bound MS. copies of Yarworth's "Processus," both incomplete. 
A MS. book on Alchemy, containing 

The apocalyps or revelation of the secret spirit, by an un- 
known author. 

Quotations from divers writers on alchemy. 

An unknown author upon the philosopher's stone. 

Ex epistola Johannis pauperis. 

De Alkymiae veritate Se Aa7rtSi/3vs &c. 

The breefe of Sir Edward Vere's book. Aug. 18, 1610. 



IV. NOTES OF EXPERIMENTS, ALL IN NEWTON'S HAND. 

1. Dec. 10. 1678 to Jan. 15. Subliming antimony with salam- 
moniac. Alloying antimony with lead and other metals. (No definite 
result of value.) 

2. Jan. 1679 80. Subliming antimonial sublimate with lead 
antimoniate &c. Jan. 22. Action of nitric acid and salammoniac on 
antimony sulphide &c. and further sublimations. (Most of these 
experiments are roughly quantitative.) 

3. Feb. 1679 80. Fusing antimony with vitriol and other 
things. Sublimation of various metals by help of antimony and 
salammoniac &c. Action of oil of vitriol on galena, of nitric acid 
on sublimate of antimony, and others of a like kind. 

4. Aug. 1682. Similar experiments; some on lead ore, others 
on an alloy of tin and bismuth which he seems to call Diana. 

5. July 10 (no year), "vidi >j<philosophicum." Sublimations of 
calx albus with salammoniac. 

6. April 26, 1686. On a volatile salt of zinc (apparently the 
chloride), and on an alloy derived from ores of iron, antimony, tin, 
lead, and bismuth. May 16. "On ven. vol." 

7. Mar. 5, 1690 1 and Mar. 16. On some bismuth compounds 
and the action of aqua fortis on alloys of tin and bismuth and zinc. 

8. Experiments and observations, Dec. 1692 and Jan. 1692 3. 
Working of barm. He says " in distilling new wine before fermenta- 
tion, the flegm rises first, and then the spirit, but after fermentation, 
the spirit rises before the flegm." Other experiments. Comparison of 
the fusibility of alloys of lead, tin, and bismuth, in which is given 

22 



20 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

as the most fusible an alloy of 5 of lead + 7 of tin + 12 of bismuth. 
April 1693 and June 1693, further experiments. 

9. April 1695. Experiments with antimony and ores of iron, 
copper, and tin, and sublimations with salammoniac. Feb. 1695 6, 
sublimations of antimony with iron ore. 

10. Notes of Chemical Experiments, without date: 
Action of aqua fortis on antimony sulphide, &c. 
Sublimation of alloy of antimony and lead with salammoniac, &c. 
Experiments on lead ore and other things. 

Do. on copper &c. 
Other experiments. 

11. De metallo ad conficiendum speculum componendo et fun- 
dendo. Printed by Brewster, ii. 535. 



V. MISCELLANEOUS NOTES. 

1. Notes on Magnetism. It does not appear whence they are 
taken. The observations (some of which are erroneous) do not seem 
to be Newton's, though here and there remarks upon them seem to 
be his. 

2. De Natura Acidorum, with a copy. This is printed in 
Horsley's Newton, iv. pp. 397400. 

3. Eleven points for enquiry in Physics. 

4. De Gemmis in genere, notes, mostly from Berquen, Boethius, 
Tavernier, and Boyle. Index of refraction in diamonds is given 
-3^ on the authority of Halley. On p. 3 is mentioned a very 
fragile and soft western Topaz which he found to have a specific 
gravity 4.27, though the sines of refraction were as 14 to 23 (could 
this be Baryte ?). On p. 7 he deduces from the cleavage that gems 
are crystallized like salts from juices which turn to stone. At the 
end are the gold and silver standards of different countries. 

5. De Gemmis. Other notes mostly included in the preceding, 
but on p. 1 are given reasons for thinking the diamond coagulated 
from a fluid and fat substance, which he does not seem to have in- 
corporated in the preceding. 

6. Of Gemms. Part of the foregoing in English. 

7. Extracts from Berquen. 

8. Odd notes 011 gems. 

9. Gemmarum pretia. 



SECTION II. CHEMISTRY. 21 

VI. A MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 
containing 

On the fly-leaf Notes of the value, hardness and other qualities 
of gems. 

pp. 1 to 22, of colours. Articles 1 5 from Boyle's experiments 
and considerations touching colour, 1664. 

Arts. 6 to 21, experiments with prisms; 22 and 26 on internal 
reflection at or near the critical angle ; 27 to 43 on effects of thin 
plates of air between glasses. 

44 47. further experiments with prisms ; 48, colours from 
admixture; 49, reflection at two contiguous surfaces of glass; 50, 
colours of thin plates of glass, soap-bubbles, &c. ; 51 53, on colours 
by internal reflection in spheres of water ; 54, effect of oblique rays 
on the size of the spot at contact of 2 glasses ; 55, diminished re- 
flection of glass in water ; 56 and 57, light reflected from powders, 
&c. ; 58 62, effects of distorting the eye-ball ; 63, coloured im- 
pressions of objects remaining when the eye is no longer directed 
to them; 64, on the action of the retina and optic nerve (quoted by 
Brewster i. 432 from Harris, omitting the last paragraph), and on 
p. 22, notes of the thickness of vibrations of light. 

p. 22, notes from Boyle on increased sensitiveness of sight and 
hearing produced by sickness. Of vegetable substances precipitating 
vitriol black. 

p. 23, a receipt for ink. 

pp. 25 41, extracts from Boyle " on the mechanical origin of 
Heat and Cold," Oxford, 1675. The observations on p. 25 as to 
the expansion of glass, and those on the elasticity of springs are 
not in Boyle on Heat and Cold. The book quoted in the MS. is 
called the "History of Cold," which is not the title of the 1675 
edition, but forms part of the title in the collected works. 

p. 45, quotations from Boyle. Some incomplete trials of the 
height at which a thermometer stands in several substances melting 
wax, tin, lead, &c. on Mar. 10, 1692 3. An experiment for deter- 
mining the expansion of air by heat, also that of linseed oil 
(Brewster, ii. 366). 

p. 49, extracts from Boyle's new experiments touching the spring 
of the air. At the bottom of this page and on 

p. 50, account of experiments on flame with conclusion that 
flame and vapour differ only as bodies red-hot and not red-hot. 



22 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPEES. 

p. 51, guesses heat to be made by division of parts, for when two 
particles are parted it makes the aether rush in betwixt them and 
so vibrate. Eeceipt for making Phosphorus (Brandt's). 

pp. 53 60, blank; pp. 61 65, extracts from Boyle on formes. 

p. 65, extracts from Starkey's Pyrotechny asserted. 

p. 66, note of a petrifying spring in Peru, from a Spanish treatise 
translated by the Earl of Sandwich. 

pp. 57 70, blank; pp. 71 80, extracts from Boyle on formes. 

p. 80, experiments on the extraction of mercury from the nitrate 
and from corrosive sublimate by various other metals. 

pp. 81, 82, receipts for making regulus of antimony by different 
metals. 

p. 83, notes of alloys which fuse at low temperatures, and others 
which give a crystalline mass from fusion. Notes of the action of 
aquafortis, and of salammoniac, on salt, and oil of tartar or po- 
tassium carbonate ; and of crude tartar on the same, and of tartarum 
vitriolatum (potassium bisulphate) on same : with 

p. 84, the remark that some fools call the result of the last 
reaction magisterium tartari vitriolati. 

note, that salammoniac is less volatile than muriatic acid or 
ammonium carbonate, which seems to explain a quotation from D. 
von der Becke which follows. 

note of calcination of lead with salt of antimony and salammo- 
niac and of volatilization of arsenical tin when heated with corrosive 
sublimate and salammoniac. 

pp. 85 92, extracts from Boyle. 

pp. 93 100, sundry receipts and extracts on various chemical 
reactions, chiefly from Boyle. 

p. 101, receipts for making sundry preparations of antimony. 
Note of the action of corrosive sublimate on various ores. 

p. 102, notes of experiments in the preparation of regulus of 
antimony. 

p. 103, do. and of action of corrosive sublimate on antimony, 
silver, and mercury; of the heat produced by mixing oil of vitriol 
with water or spirit of wine ; of the preparation of ether and oil of 
wine not differing much from the account quoted on p. 64. 

pp. 104, 105, note of warmth emitted on mixing water with 
spirit of antimony, and of sundry chemical reactions the last on 



SECTION II. CHEMISTRY. 23 

saturation of spirit of antimony by different substances has blanks 
left for the quantities. 

pp. 106, 107, other chemical experiments. Note of composition 
of fusible metal " which in summer will melt in the sun," with the 
(erroneous) remark that tinglas is more fusible than tin. 

pp. 108 112, chemical experiments chiefly on preparations of 
antimony and scoria of regulus. Some of these (e.g. p. Ill) are 
marked with an N in the margin. 

p. 113, action of distilled liquor of antimony on salts of lead, 
iron and copper ; action of heat on tartarised antimony. 

p. 114, action of spar on distilled liquor of antimony, vinegar, 
and aquafortis, and of salt from clay of lead mines on do. ; action of 
nitre on antimony. 

pp. 115, 116, action of oil of vitriol on lead ore, and of an anti- 
monial sublimate on several substances. 

pp. 117 120, experiments with a substance to which the name 
" ven. vol." is given. 

p. 121, note, that on May 10, 1681, and on the 14th and 15th he 
comprehended sundry alchemical names. This note has been 
scratched out, apparently in consequence of its having nothing to 
do with the subject of the other notes, but it is not certain that the 
foregoing experiments have not something to do with it. 

p. 122, another note, that on May 18 he completed the solution 
of the alchemical symbol of the caduceus, followed by experiments 
on June 10 on sublimation of green and blue vitriol with salam- 
moniac and the resulting sublimate with lead ore. Perhaps these 
experiments on sublimation were designed to test his interpretation 
of some alchemical symbols. 

pp. 123 sqq. to 126, account of experiments in May and June, 
1682; on sublimation of some salts with salammoniac, and some 
metals and alloys with the same, and with antimony. 

pp. 127 to 130, June 26, 1682, and July 4, 1682, account of 
experiments on obtaining regulus from mixture of lead ores, anti- 
mony and bismuth ; and others similar. 

p. 131, experiments on the action of various reguluses with 
spirit (1 of salt). 

pp. 132 4, other experiments on sublimation the date, Tuesday, 
July 19, is given on p. 133 ; this must have been in 1683. 

pp. 135 sqq., Feb. 29, 1683 4. An experiment in which he 
prepared the chlorides of mercury. 



24 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

pp. 140 sqq., further experiments on "the net" which seems to 
contain iron and copper, and others of a similar kind. On p. 149 is 
the date, Friday, May 23. 

p. 150, experiments on the spirit of zinc, Apr. 26, 1686. 

pp. 151 to 158, experiments on some alloys of copper, antimony 
and iron, and continued on p. 267. 

pp. 159 to 193, extracts from Boyle on the medical virtues of 
saline and other preparations. 

pp. 194 to 206, blank; p. 207, extracts from Boyle on volatile salts 
of animal and vegetable substances. 

pp. 209 223, extracts from Starkey's Pyrotechny asserted on 
alkalies. 

pp. 224 to 242, blank, except some headings. 

pp. 243 4, some extracts from "Secrets Revealed" and other 
alchemical works. 

pp. 245 to 260, blank, except heading. 

p. 261, some references to alchemical works, pp. 262 4, blank. 

p. 265, recipe for ether, and its uses in medicine. 

p. 266, some recipes for medicines. 

pp. 267, 8, continuation of experiments from p. 158. On this 
page is mentioned a liquor which dissolves the tinctures out of gold, 
silver, &c. and leaves only a white calx but no directions for pre- 
paring it. Further experiments. 

pp. 269 283, on regulus of antimony and alloys ; similar in 
character to the former : rest of book blank, except 3 pages at 
end, where is a list of prices of some chemicals in 1687 and again in 
1693, and some notes of sublimation of vitriol with salammoniac. 



* SECTION III. 

CHRONOLOGY. 

1 . Chapter v. of the Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms amended. 
A description of the Temple of Solomon. (Horsley's Newton, v. 
pp. 236 seqq.) 

2. Transcript of part of the work on Chronology. 

3. Considerations about rectifying the Julian Calendar. 

4. Considerations about the Julian Calendar. 

5. On the Chronology of the Egyptians, of the Gospel, &c. 
(confused). 

6. Seven drafts (all in Newton's hand) of his remarks on the 
Chronology published under his name at Paris. 

7. Some notes on the "Chronologie Abregee." 

8. Dedication (in French) of Newton's Chronology to the 
Queen. 



SECTION IV. 



HISTORY. 

Papers on various historical subjects, chiefly of the reign of James II. , 
relating to the Father Francis business, &c. 

1. Certain arguments collected out of the Scriptures, out of the 
Civill Law, and the Common, exhibited to the Queen's Majestic by 
some of both houses against the Queen of Scots. Anno 13 Elizabeth. 

2. An instance of Queen Elizabeth's power of dispensing with 
Acts of Parliament offered to the consideration of the Gentlemen of 
the University of Cambridge. 

3. An argument pers wading that the Queen's Majestic ought to 
have in conscience a great care of the safety of her own person. 

4. A copy of the association and Act of Parliament enforcing it 
in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 

5. Royal Commission of James II. for a search and examination 
into the statutes of the Universities, Cathedral bodies, Grammar 
Schools, and other Ecclesiastical corporations. 

6. The answer of the Vice-chancellor and Senate of the Univer- 
sity of Cambridge to the question why they did not admit Alban 
Francis to the degree of M. A. 

7. The answer to some questions propounded by the Lord 
Chancellor at the appearance of the Vice-chancellor and deputies of 
the Senate of the University of Cambridge before the Lords Com- 
missioners. May 7, 1687. (5 copies.) 

8. Sentence of deposition of the Vice-chancellor, J. Pechell, 
Master of Magdalene. 7 May, 1687. 

9. An account of the Cambridge case, and all the proceedings 
thereon, ending with the sentence on Dr. Pechell. 



SECTION IV. HISTORY. 27 

10. Aii apology for the Church of England with relation to the 
spirit of persecution for which she is accused. 

11. A letter of the Rev. F. Peter Jesuite, Almoner to the 
King of England, written to the Rev. F. le Chaise, confessor to the 
most Christian King, touching the present affairs of England. 
(2 copies.) 

12. Copie d'une lettre d'un Jesuite de Leige ecrit a un 
Jesuite de Friburge, le 2 Fevr. 1687. In Latin. (2 copies.) 

13. The draft of an act for the better prevention of illegal 
exaction of money from the subject and preservation of the right and 
freedom of the subjects of this realm. 

14. Notes of an argument in the case of Godden versus Sir 
Edw. Hales. 16 June, 1686. 

15. The answer of the Fellows of S. Mary Magdalen College, 
[Oxford], to the question why they did not elect and admit Mr. 
Anthony Farmer to be President of the same College in the room of 
Dr. Clarke deceased, in complyance with his Majesties Letters 
mandatory. 

16. The attempt of Dr. Fairfax to be heard before the com- 
missioners, June 13, 1687. Followed by a second draft of the 
answer of the Yice-President and other Fellows of S. Mary Magda- 
len, Oxon., and a piece of a letter to the E. of Sunderland. 

17. Reasons for subscribing the Oxford Address by the Clergy of 
the diocese. 

18. 14 Directions in aid of the king's government. 

19. Notes upon the dispensing power. 

20. The case of the Bishops' courts. 

21. A series of extracts from the Decretals, &c. "Principis man- 
data contemnentes quomodo puniantur." 

22. A paper beginning, "His Majesties promise is no argument, 
for abrogating the Laws." On the other side, some "Rules" respect- 
ing Acts for Liberty of Conscience, Election of Parliaments, <fec. 

23. Some queries concerning liberty of conscience directed to 
William Penn and Henry Care. 

24. The petition of the seven Bishops. (3 copies.) 

25. Notes out of the Diary of the Parliament, 1660. 



28 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

26. Address of the Lord -Lieutenant, Gentlemen, and Freeholders 
of the County of Cambridge to William of Orange. 

27. The Bishop of London's Protestation. 

28. The Bishop of London's narrative of the proceedings against 
him before the High Commissioners, August, 1686. 

29. Letter of Newton to , 19 Feb. 1687-8, on the 

mandamus to admit Father Francis to M.A. 

30. Notes of Egyptian mythology, out of Plutarch, 
do. do. Theology, from various authors. 

Mythological notes, do. (3 f). 

31. The original of Monarchies, chapter I. 

32. Antiquarian Fragments. 
On the Tyrrhenians, &c. 



* SECTION V. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS, CHIEFLY ON THEOLOGICAL SUBJECTS. 

1. The question stated about abstaining from Blood, in Newton's 
hand. 

2. Prophecies concerning Christ's second coming, chiefly a 
collection of texts, followed by some extracts from the Talmud, &c., 
in five sheets : all in Newton's hand. 

3. Ireiiicum, or Ecclesiastical Polyty tending to peace. Two 
separate drafts, both in Newton's hand. Part printed by Brew- 
ster, ii. 526. 

4. Quaeres regarding the word o'/xoouo-ios. Printed by Brew- 
ster, ii. 532. 

5. Extract by Newton Ex Marci Maximi Csesaraugustani in 
Hispaniis Episcopi Chronico. 

6. Draft in Newton's hand on the rise of the Apostasy in point 
of religion. 

7. Chronological notes, notes on the site of the seven churches 
of Asia, &c., in Newton's hand. 

8. Extracts by Newton "out of Cudworth," two sheets. 

9. Profession of faith by Roman Bishops and Presbyters. 

10. Loose papers with notes on the Prophecies, and other 
Theological notes and extracts, with some relating to Chronology, 
almost all in Newton's hand. 

11. Paradoxical questions concerning the morals and actions of 
Athanasius and his followers. All in Newton's hand. Partly 
printed by Brewster, ii. 342. 

12. A collection of papers, apparently being the draft of a work 
on " Religion," the chapters headed " a short scheme of the true 
religion," "of the religion of the Jews and Christians," "of the rise of 
the R. C. church in ecclesiastical dominion." All in Newton's hand. 
Brewster, ii. p. 347. 



30 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPEKS. 

13. Note in Newton's hand, " God made and governs the 
world, &c." Printed by Brewster, ii. 354. 

14. A sermon on 2 Kings xvii. 15, 16, in Newton's hand. 

15. Lexici Prophetici pars secunda, in quibus agitur De forma 
sanctuarii Judaici. This is a treatise in Latin on the Temple of 
Solomon. 

16. Miscellaneous extracts from Maimonides, Irenseus adversus 
hsereses, and some notes partly mythological. 

17. (1), (2), (3). Three drafts of the observations on the Pro- 
phecies of Holy Writ, written on loose sheets, backs of letters, &c. 

(1) Contains also two sheets of Spicilegia variantium lectionum 
in Apocalypsi. 

(2) Contains also various observations on the way of printing 
the book. 

(3) Contains also a Synopsis of the Synchronism of the 
Apocalypse. 

18. Some chapters of the work on the Corruption of religion, 
the Host of Heaven, &c. 

19. A bundle containing 

(1) Collections for the work on the Prophecies. 

(2) A treatise divided into chapters against the R. C. Church. 

(3) Attempt to form a universal language. This contains 
also a genealogical tree of the Newton family, and at the other end 
an English and Latin phrase-book, not in N.'s hand. 

(4) A treatise in Latin on the "Tuba quarta" of the 
Apocalypse. 

20. Corrupted duorum celebrium in sacris literis locorum 
historica narratio ; vid. 1 John v. 7, 1 Tim. in. 16. Amstelse- 
dami, 1709. 

This is a Latin version of the first part of the " Historical account 
of two notable corruptions of Scripture," published in the 5th volume 
of Horsley's Newton, p. 495. It is not in Newton's hand, but contains 
a few corrections by him. Though the title speaks of two texts, it 
only treats of the first: it is however complete, ending w\\h finis. 
It is rather fuller than the English treatise, e.g. the Slavonick 
version of the passages, which is only alluded to in the English 
(Horsley, p. 504), is written out in this Latin MS. 

Also a short note on 1 Joh. v. 7. 

21. Decretum Synodi Orientalium. 



SECTION V. MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS. 31 

22. Several chapters of the work on the Church, its cor- 
ruptions, &c., with three drafts of a table of contents. 

23. On the language of the Prophecies paged perfect. 

24. On the Origin of all religion, with other chapters of the 
Theological works (imperfect). 

25. Transcript of part of a work on the Prophecies, paged 
from 25 to 173, imp. at both ends. 

26. Yariantes Lectiones Apocalypticse. 

27. Latin Theological Treatises, all imperfect. 

28. A bundle containing 

(1) Introductio continent Apocalypseos rationem generalem. 

(2) Procemium histories ecclesiasticae. 

(3) De monachismo. 

(4) Historia de concilio Nicen. 

(5) A treatise beginning "Fidei vero formula," &c. 

(6) Extr. ex Sibyllinorum oraculis. 
These are all perfect. 

(7) De annis prsedicationis Christi (imperfect). 

29. Rough drafts of some of the chapters of the work on the 
Prophecies. 

30. Some chapters of the treatise on " The working of the 
mystery of Iniquity," " the Host of Heaven," &c. 

31. Of the original of pious frauds. Paradoxical questions 
in a wretched state. 

32. The synchronism of the three parts of the prophetick 
interpretation, with other loose sheets on the prophecies. 

33. Several chapters of the work on the Prophecies, written 
out fairly for the press, others not included in that work. 

34. On the Papacy and the prophecies relating thereto. 

35. Loose papers concerning worship, the Irenicum, &c. 

36. Preparations in English and Latin for the work on the 
Revelation : hopelessly confused. 

37. A treatise on the Revelation in English, imperfect, with 
several copies of parts. The beginning- (containing the introduction) 
is complete. 

38. Miscellaneous Theological notes and extracts. 

39. Theologise Gentilis Origiiies Philosophies. 

40. Theological scraps. 



SECTION VI. 



LETTEES. 

I. 
CORRESPONDENCE WITH OLDENBURG. 



Oldenburg to Newton, 
Newton to Oldenburg, 

Oldenburg to Newton, 
Newton to Oldenburg, 
Oldenburg to Newton, 
Newton to Oldenburg, 

Oldenburg to Newton, 
Newton to Oldenburg, 
Oldenburg to Newton, 



Newton to Oldenburg, 



Jan. 18, 1672. 
March 26, 1672. 
March 30, 1672. 
Early in April, 1672. 
April 13, 1672, in reply to the above. 
May 2, 1672. 
May 4, 1672. 
May 21, 1672. 
July 2, 1672. 
July 11, 1672. 
Sept. 24, 1672. 
June 4, 1673. 
June 7, 1673. 
Sept. 14, 1673. 
Feb. 19, 1676. 

Sept. 2, 1676, Brewster, i. 129. 
planting cyder-trees, with a copy. 
Nov. 28, 1676. 



On 



Oldenburg to Newton, Jan. 2, 1677. 



II. 
CORRESPONDENCE WITH COLLINS AND WALLIS. 

Newton to Collins, Aug. 20, 1672, on a logarithmick ruler. 
Collins to Newton, July 5, 1671, with draft of Newton's answer. 

Aug. 31, 1676. 

Sept. 9, 1676. 
Collins to Wallis, no date. 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 33 

Copy of Newton's letters to Oldenburg, dated June 13 and 
Oct. 24, 1676, made for Wallis. 

Another copy, somewhat mutilated, of the same letters. 
Draft of Newton's letter to Wallis about them. 
Draft of a later letter to Wallis containing corrections to typo- 
graphical errors in Wallis's printed account of Newton's method in 
Vol. 2, and Newton's remarks on his own and Leibnitz's letters 
printed in Vol. 3. 

Wallis to Newton, April 10, 1695. Copy. Edleston, p. 300. 
April 30, 1695. Published in Brewster, 

Vol. ii. p. 427. 
May 30, 1695. 
July 3, 1695. 
July 1, 1695, on Leibnitz's letter of 28 May. 

Brewster, ii. 429. 
Jan. 9, 1698-9. 

Extract of two letters from Wallis concerning a change in the 
Calendar, June 13, 30, 1699. 



III. 

LETTERS FROM ARTHUR STORER TO DE BABINGTON 
AND TO NEWTON, 

Containing some Astronomical Tables, and Communications 
respecting the Comets of 1680 and 1682. 

Arthur Storer to Mr Newton, Boothby, Aug. 10, 1678, with 
Table showing hourly Altitude and Azimuth of the " North Star." 

Arthur Storer to Mr Newton. London, Sept. 4, 1678, with Table 
of the Sun's Azimuth. 

Arthur Storer to Dr Babington; London, Sept. 19, 1678. 

Arthur Storer to Dr Babington, Oct. 1, 1678, with an Astro- 
nomical Table " to find the Sun or any Star's Altitude," &c. 

Arthur Storer to Dr Babington, from Patuxant River in Mary- 
land, April 18, 1681, about the Comet of 1680 as observed in 
Maryland. 

Arthur Storer to Mr Isaac Newton, from Patuxant River in 
Maryland, April 26, 1683, with observations of a Comet which 
appeared in Maryland, Aug. 14, 1682, till Sept. 12, 1682. 

3 



CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 



IV. 
CORRESPONDENCE WITH FLAMSTEED. 

Flamsteed to Newton, Dec. 15, 1680. 

Flamsteed to Crompton (for Newton) March 7, 1680-1, 
with an extract in Newton's hand from a letter of Flamsteed dated 
Feb. 12fch, 1680-1. 

Newton to Flamsteed, April 12, 1681. 

Draft of Newton to Flamsteed, April 16, 1681, pr. by 

Brewster, ii. 455. 

Draft of Newton to Flamsteed 1 . .~ 

I imperfect. Dec. 29, 1681. 
Canterbury, Dec. 29th, J 

The above all relate to the comet of 1680. 
Flamsteed to Newton, Dec. 27, 1684. 
Jan. 5, 1684-5. 
Jan. 27, 1684-5. 
Sept. 26, 1685. 

Oct. 10, 1685. 
Sept. 9, 1686. 

April 10, 1693. Concerning earth- 
quakes. Copy made for Newton, with 
a note concerning Flamsteed's star- 
maps. 

Sept. 7, 1694. 
Oct. 11, 1694. (Printed in Baily's 

Flamsteed, p. 134.) 
Oct. 25, 1694. 
Oct. 29, 1694. 
Nov. 3, 1694. 
Nov. 27, 1694. 
Dec. 10, 1694. 
Dec. 31, 1694. 
Jan. 18, 1694-5. 
Jan. 29, 1694-5. 
Feb. 7, 1694-5. 
March 2, 1694-5. 
March 21, 1694-5. 
April 20, 1695. 
April 27, 1695. 
May 6, 1695. 
July 2, 1695. 



Flamsteed to Mr Glen, 



Flamsteed to Newton, 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 



35 



Flamsteed to Newton, 



Flamsteed to Dr Wallis, 
Flamsteed to Newton, 



July 13, 1695. 

July 18, 1695. 

July 23, 1695. 

Aug. 4, 1695. 

Aug. 6, 1695. 

Sept. 19, 1695. 

Jan. 11, 1696. 

Sept. 4, 1697. 

Dec. 10, 1697. 

Dec. 29, 1698. Note by Flamsteed 
of the no. of observations of planets 
taken between 1675 and 1689. 

Dec. 20, 1698. Printed copy of Latin 
letter. 

Jan. 2, 1698-9. 



V. 

GREGORY TO NEWTON. 

David Gregory to Newton, June 9, 1684. 
Sept. 2, 1684. 

August 27, 1691. 
Oct. 10, 1691. 
Nov. 7, 1691. 
Nov, 7, 1691. ' 
Nov. 26, 1691. 
Sept. 24, 1694. 

Dec. 23, 1697. 

Sept. 30, 1702. 

Newton to Gregory (draft), no date, about 1691. 



VI. 

LETTERS FROM HALLEY TO NEWTON RELATING TO 
THE PUBLICATION OF THE FIRST EDITION OF 
THE 'PRINCIPIA.' 

May 22, 1686. Printed in Brewster's Life of Newton, 

Append. 8 & 12 to Vol. i. p. 438 

June 29, 1686. p. 446 

32 



36 



CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 



June 7, 1686. Printed in Brewster's Life of Newton, 

Append. 8 & 12 to Vol. i. p. 472 

p. 473 
p. 474 
p. 475 
p. 476 
p. 477 



Oct. 14, 1686. 
Feb. 24, 1686-7. 
March 7, 1686-7. 
March 14, 1686-7. 
April 5, 1687. 
July, 5, 1687. 



Vol. ii. p. Ill 



VII. 
HALLEY TO NEWTON ABOUT COMETS' ORBITS. 

Halley to Newton, Sept. 7, 1695. 

Sept. 28, 1695. 

early in Oct. 1695. 

Oct. 15, 1695, with observations of a Comet 

May 1665. 

Newton to Halley, Oct. 17, 1695, with draft of same letter. 
Halley to Newton, Oct. 21, 1695. 
Draft of a letter by Newton to Halley. 
Halley to Newton, Feb. 16, 1725. 

Newton to Halley, March 1, 1725, with draft of same letter. 
A calculation of Halley relating to the Comet of 1680 on a 
separate sheet. 



*vm. 

HALLEY TO NEWTON AND MOLYNEUX, RELATING 
TO THE CHESTER MINT. 

Halley to Newton, Nov. 28, 1696. 

Feb. 13, 1697. 

August 2, 1697. 

Dec. 30, 1697. 
Halley to Molyneux, July 21, 1697. 

July 31, 1697. 
August 25, 1697. 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 37 

IX. 

COTES'S LETTERS TO NEWTON, MOSTLY PUBLISHED 
IN EDLESTON'S CORRESPONDENCE OF NEWTON 
AND COTES, 

Together with three Letters and a Memorandum by Robert Smith 
relating to the foregoing letters and the publication of Cotes's works. 

Edleston. 



Page 


Cotes to Newton. April 15, 1710, 


8 


j? 


5) 


April 29, 


12 





55 


May 7, 


16 


JJ 


55 


May 20, 


20 


J) 


)) 


June 1, 


25 








June 11, 


28 








June 30, ,, 


31 


J? 





Sept. 21, 


34 






imperfect in Edleston. 




)> 


}> 


Oct. 5, referred to in p. 


37 


J> 


J> 


Oct. 26, 











March 31, 1711 


40 





)> 


June 4, 


)> 


J> 


JJ 


June 9, 


42 






only a fragment in Edleston. 




55 


?) 


June 23, 


44 



Crownfield (printer) 

to Newton July 11, 1711 

Cotes to Newton. July 19, ... 50 

July 30, ... 52 

Sept. 4, ... 54 
Oct. 25, not in Edleston. 

Feb. 7, 171112 ... 57 

Feb. 16, ... 61 

Feb. 28, ... 75 

March 13, ... 79 

April 14, 1712 ... 91 

April 15, ... 93 

April 26, ... 100 

May in MS. wrongly. 

May 1, ... 103 

May 3, ... 106 



38 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPEKS. 

Edleston. 

Page 

Cotes to Newton, May 13, 1712 ... 114 

Aug. 10, ... 121 

Aug. 17, ... 127 

Aug. 28, ... 132 

Sept. 6, ... 136 

Sept. 15, ... 140 

Oct. 23, ... 143 

Cotes to Bentley. March 10,171213 ... 149 

Dec. 22, 1713 ... 166 

Cotes to Newton. April 29, 1715, On the Eclipse of the Sun, 
22nd April, partly given in Edleston, p. 179. 

Robert Smith to Newton, relating to the publication of Cotes's 
works, Dec. -23, 1718; Aug. 12, 1720. 

Robert mith to John Conduitt, Esq re ., Feb. 4, 1732 3, asking 
for the loan to him of the foregoing letter of Cotes on the Eclipse. 

Also a memorandum dated June 6, 1738, acknowledging the 
receipt of certain letters of Cotes to Newton lent to him by 
Mrs Conduitt. 



X. 

ROUGH DRAFTS OF SOME OF NEWTON'S LETTERS 

TO COTES. 

The letters in Edleston and the pages to which these drafts 
relate are given in the following list : 



Letter 


VI. 


page 1 4 


5) 


VIII 


19 


J5 


XI 


24 


w 


XIII 


27 




XV 


30 


55 


XLII 


83 




XLIII 


89 


JJ 


XLVI 


94-98 





LXI 


129 




LXXXI 


154 



This is rather fuller than the letter printed by Edleston. 
Letter LXXXII page 156 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 39 

XI. 
KEILL TO NEWTON. 

Keill to Newton, April 3, 1711. 

Copy of Keill's answer to the letter u pro eminente Mathematico," 
in the Journal Litteraire, 29th July, 1713. 
Keill to Newton, Nov. 9, 1713. 

Feb. 8, 1713-4. Answer in Edleston, Cor- 

respondence of Newton and Cotes, p. 169, 
dated April 2. 

Johnson to Keill, Feb. 9, 1713-4. 

Keill to Newton, April 20, 1714. Answer in Edleston, p. 170. 
May 2, 1714. 
May 14, 1714. 

(Draft of a letter from Newton to Keill dated May 15, 1714, is 
printed in Edleston, p. 176.) 

Keill to Newton, May 17, 1714. 
May 21, 1714. 
May 25, 1714. 
June 2, 1714. 
June 24, 1714. 
Aug. 6, 1714. 

Oct. 29, 1715. 
Nov. 10, 1715. 
May 17, 1717. 
May 23, 1718. 

(On the back of Keill's letter of Oct. 29, 1715, there is a scrap in 
Newton's hand in answer to an objection of Bernouilli.) 



XII. 

PEMBERTON'S LETTERS TO NEWTON WHILE EDITING 
THE 3RD EDITION OF THE 'PRINCIPIA.' 

Pemberton to Newton, Feb. 11, 1723-4. 
Feb. 18, 1723-4. 
May 17, 1725. 

Monday, May 31, 1725. 

Tuesday Morning, June 22, 1725. 

July 17, 1725. 
Feb. 9, 1725-6. 

Besides these, 16 undated letters and 7 sheets of queries. 



40 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 



LETTERS FROM N. FACIO DUILLIER 
TO NEWTON AND OTHERS. 

N. Eacio Duillier to Newton, Nov. 17, 1 692. 
Nov. 22, 1692. 

May 4, 1693. 

June 15, 1717. 

April 1, 1724. 

N. Eacio Duillier to Conduitt, Aug. 8, 1730 (with proposed 
Epitaphs on Newton). 

N. Eacio Duillier to Conduitt, Aug. 12, 1730. 

Aug. 26, 1730. 

Abstract of Facio's Letter to Dr Worth, Jan. 26, 1731-2. 
N. Eacio Duillier to Conduitt, April 5, 1732. 
, April 10, 1732. 

April 12, 1732, with enclosed 

petition to the king. 

Petition to the Commons. 

A printed copy of a Latin Eclogue on Newton by M. Eacio de 
Duillier. 



*XIV. 
MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS. 

1. Venan(?) to Huyghens, Aug. 20, 1664. 

2. Borellius to Wallis (Latin), Dec. 6, 1670. 

3. Collins to Borellius, Junii 8, 1672. 

4. Robert Hooke to Newton, Feb. 16756. Brewster, i. 140. 

5. Newton to Hook (on thin plates), Feb. 5, 1675 6. Brewster, 
i. 141. 

6. Thomas Burnet to Newton, Jan. 13, 1680-81. 

7. Newton to Thomas Burnet, s. d. (Jan. 1 680 1 ?). Brewster, 
ii. 447. 

8. Boyle to Newton, Aug. 19, 1682. 

9. Newton to Jan. 11, 16878 (dated, but not signed). 
Brewster, ii. 546. 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 41 

10. Gilbert Clerke to Newton, on difficulties in the Principia, 

26 Sept. 1687, with draft of Newton's answer. 
Gilbert Clerke to Newton, Oct. 3, 1687. 

Nov. 7, 1687. 
Nov. 21, 1687. 

11. John Locke to Newton, July 26 [1692]. Brewster, ii. 461. 

12. Richard Bentley to Newton, Feb. 18, 1692-3. Brewster, 
ii. 463. 

13. John Mill to Newton, Nov. 7, 1693. Brewster, ii. 472. 

14. Samuel Pepys to Newton, Dec. 21, 1693. Brewster, ii. 471. 

15. Nath. Hawes to Newton, May 29, 1694. 

16. Basnage de Bonval to Newton, Aug. 22 (no year), De la 
Haye. 

17. Charles Montague to Newton, March 19, 1695 (offering the 
mastership of the Mint). Brewster, ii. 191. 

18. Cassini to Newton, April 6, 1698, on the Satellites of 
Saturn. 

19. Truchet to Newton (no date), acknowledgment of a copy of 
Newton's Optics translated into French. 

20. T. Home to Newton, Aug. 22 (no year). 

21. John Hockett to Newton, Sept. 14, 1699 (asking interest for 
his son at Trinity, with some chron. notes of Newton on the back). 

22. to Lady Norris, proposing marriage (copy in 

Conduct's hand), 17034. Brewster, ii. 211. 

23. Lord Halifax to Newton, March 17 [17045]. Brewster, 
ii. 216. 

24. Lord Halifax to Newton, May 5, 1705. Brewster, ii. 217. 

25. 26. Two drafts of Newton's letter to a friend at Cambridge, 
about the election [1705]. Brewster, ii. 215. 

27. Draft of part of a letter from Newton to [F. Godolphin?] 
[1705.] 

28. D. Gregory to Newton, Sept. 16, 1707, about the Scottish 
coinage. 

29. R. Bentley to Newton, June 10, 1708. Brewster, ii. 248. 

30. Oct. 20, 1709. Brewster, ii. 250. 

31. Remond de Monmort to Newton, Feb. 16, 1709-10. 

32. ,, ,, to Newton, giving an account of the 
quarrel between Drs Sloane and Woodward, about stones in the 
gall-bladder, March 28, 1711. Brewster, ii. 244. 



42 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

33. J. Derham to Newton, Feb. 20, 17123. Brewster, ii. 519. 

34. R. Bentley to Newton, July 1 [1713]. Brewster, ii. 254. 

35. The Abbe Bignon to Newton, Nov. 30, 1713. 

36. 37. Draft of a letter from Newton to the Abbe Bignon, with 
a copy by Conduitt. 

38. Varignon to Newton, Dec. 5, 1713. 

39. R. Bentley to Newton, Jan. 6, 1713-4. 

40. J. Derhain to Newton, about his physico-theology, May 11, 
1714 (with some notes by Newton on Osiris, the length of the 
year, etc.). 

41. John Chamberlayne to Newton, May 20, 1714. 

42. Fontenelle to Newton, June 9, 1714. 

43. A. Menzikoff to Newton, asking admission to the Royal 
Society, Aug. 23, 1714. 

44. Three drafts of Newton's answer, Oct. 21, 1714. 

45. John Chamberlayne to Newton, Oct. 28, 1714. 

46. (no date) Friday morning. 

47. Varignon to Newton, Nov. 18, 1714. 

48. Fontenelle to Newton, Feb. 4, 17145. Brewster, ii. 518. 

49. Sir Alex. Cunningham to Newton, Feb. 21, 1716. Venice. 

50. Draft of letter from Newton to Bernouilli about the 
omission of his name from the list of Fellows of the Royal Society. 

51. Brook Taylor to Newton, April 22, 1716. Brewster, ii. 509. 
52 Sir Alex. Cunningham to Newton, May 1, 1716. Venice. 

53. Conti to Newton, Dec. 10, 1716. Brewster, ii. 434. 

54. Letter of Remond de Montmort to Newton, dated Paris, 
Feb. 25, 1716-7. 

55. John Bernouilli to R. de Monmort, Apr. 8, 1717 (copy, 
with an addition by Newton). Brewster, ii. 437. 

56. Nich. Bernouilli to Newton, May 31, 1717. 

57. Fontenelle to Chamberlayne, July 6, 1717 (extract in 
Mrs Barton's hand). Brewster, ii. 289. 

58. Remond de Monmort to Newton, March 27, 1718. 

59. Letter from Brook Taylor to Mr Innys, dated Aug. 12, 
1718, containing an extract of a letter from M. Riccati to M. Poleni 
forwarded by M. Montmort, 5 Aug. 1718. 

60. Newton to Varignon, Oct. 13, 1718. Draft. 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 43 

61. Varignon to Newton, Nov. 17, 1718. 

62. Remond de Monmort to Taylor, Dec. 18, 1718. (Copy.) 
Brewster, ii. 511. 

63. Yarignon to Newton, July 26, 1719. 

64. Newton to Varignon, 1719. Draft. Answer to 63, printed 
Maccl. Corres. Yol. n. p. 436. 

65. James Stirling to Newton, Aug. 17, 1719. Brewster, ii. 516 

66. A. H. de Sallengre to Newton, Sept. 22, 1719. 

67. Joh. Bernouilli to Newton, Dec. 21, 1719. Brewster, ii. 504. 

68. Newton, in. Non. Quintil. [July 5] 1719. 
Brewster, ii. 502. 

69. Job. Bernouilli to Newton. Copy of latter part of do. in 
Newton's hand. 

70. Yarignon to Newton, after April 28, 1720. 

71. Nov. 28, 1720. Brewster, ii. 496. 

72. James Wilson to Newton, Dec. 15, 1720 (signed A. B.). 
Brewster, ii. 440. 

73. Rizzetti to the Royal Society, containing objections to 
Newton's Optical Experiments (s. d.). 

Also a letter of Rizzetti to Christine Martinello, of Yenice, on the 
same subject. 

74. James Wilson to Newton, Jan. 21, 1720 1. Brewster, 
ii. 443. 

75. Cotet to Newton, on the edition of Newton's Opticks 
printing at Paris, Aug. 16, 1721. 

76. G. J. Gravesande to Newton, Aug. 18, 1721. 

77. Yarignon to Newton, Sept. 18, 1721. 

78. Oct. 2, 1721. 

79. Letter from Hen. Fr. Daguesseau to Newton, Oct. 1721. 

80. Yarignon to Newton, Dec. 9, 1721. 

81. 82. Yarignon to Bernouilli, 2 copies, April 4, 1722. 

83. Yarignon to Newton, April 4, 1722. 

84. April 28, 1722. 

85. Aug. 4, 1722. 

86. Newton to Yarignon. Draft reply to 83. 

87. July 0)13, 1722. 



44 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

88, 89. Newton to Varignon. Draft. About August, 1722. 
2 copies. 

90. Fontenelle to Newton, Nov. 22, 1722. 

91. Draft of a letter from Newton to Fontenelle. No date. 

92. Newton to Varignon, Dec. 13, 1722. Draft. 

93. Letter from Newton to some one at Paris about Varignon's 
picture after Varignon's death, which took place Dec. 23, 1722. 
Brewster, p. 295. 

94. Joh. Bernouilli to Newton, Feb. 6, 1723. Brewster, ii. 507. 

95. Philip Naude to Newton, on the Calculus, Feb. 6, 1723-4. 

96. De L'Isle to Newton, thanking him for his election to the 
Royal Society, April 2, 1724. 

97. G. Cavelier to Newton, on the publication of his Chrono- 
logy, May 11, 1724. 

98. A. F. Marsili to Newton, Aug. 1724. 

99. De L'Isle to Newton, Dec. 21, 1724. 

100. A. F. Marsili to Newton, March 11, 17245. 

101. G. Cavelier to Newton, March 20, 1724 5, about publica- 
tion of his Chronology. 

102. J. T. Desaguliers to Newton, ' April 29, 1725. 

103. Jombert to Newton, Sept. 12, 1725. (2 copies.) 

104. Draft of a letter from Newton to Daguesseau on Bernoulli's 
letter, complaining of being called ' eques errationis.' 

105. Colin Maclaurin to Newton, Oct. 25, 1725. Brewster, 
ii. 385. 

106. Fontenelle to Newton, acknowledging the receipt of the 
third edition of the Principia, July 14, 1726. 

107. Thomas Mason to Conduitt, March 23, 1726-7. 

108. J. Craig to Conduitt, April 7, 1727, partly printed by 
Brewster, ii. 315. 

109. William Stukeley to Dr Mead, June 26, 1727 July 15, 
1727, four sheets, written consecutively, but sent at intervals. 

110. W. Stukeley to Conduitt, July 15, 1727. 

111. July 22, 1727. 

112. Memorandums relating to Sir I. N. given to A. Demoivre 
by Conduitt, Nov. 1727. 



SECTION VI. LETTERS. 



45 



*xv. 

LIST OF THE LETTERS OF NEWTON, MOSTLY PUB- 
LISHED IN THE MACCLESFIELD CORREPSONDENCE. 



Newton to Collins 



These are fair copies. 

No. 
Maccl. Corr. ccxxiv 



Jan. 1669 
Feb. 6, 1669 
Feb. 23, 1668-9 



and comment by Collins 
Newton to Aston May 18, 1669 

Collins 



Oldenburg 



Feb. 18, 1669-70 
July 11, 1670 
July 16, 1670 

Sept. 27, 1670 
July 20, 1671 

Jan. 6, 1671-2 

Jan. 18, 1671-2 

Jan. 29, 1671-2 

Feb. 10, 1671-2 

Feb. 20, 1671-2 



ccxxv 

CCXXVI 

CCXXVII 

CCXXVII1 

CCXXIX 

CCXXXI 

CCXXXIII 

CCXXXIV 

ccxxxv 

CCXXXVI 

CCXXXVII 

CCXXXVIII 



Collins 
Oldenburg 



CCXXXIX 

March 26, 1672 Phil. Trans. No. 82, p. 4032 
March 30, 1672 No. 82, p. 4034 
April 13, 1672 No. 83, p. 4059 
May 4, 1672 No. 83, p. 4057 

May 21, 1672 not in Phil. Trans. 
May 25, 1672 Maccl. Corr. CCXLI 
June 19, 1672 CCXLII 
July 6, 1672 CCXLIIT 

July 11, 1672 Phil. Trans. No. 88, p. 5084 
a long letter on Optics in reply to Mr Hook's "Con- 
siderations". 

Collins July 13, 1672 Maccl. Corr. CCXLV 

Oldenburg July 13, 1672 CCXLVI 
Collins July 30, 1672 CCXLVII 

Oldenburg Sept. 21, 1672 CCXLIX 

March 8, 1673 CCLI 

Oldenburg? April 3, 1673 CCLII 
in answer to Hugenius' letter of Jan. 14, 1673. 



Newton to Collins 



April 9, 1673 
May 20, 1673 



CCLIII 
CCLIV 



46 



CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 



Newton to Collins 



Sept. 17, 1673 Maccl. Corr. CCLV 
Nov. 17, 1674 CCLVIII 

Oldenburg Dec. 9, 1674 CCLIX 

[printed Dec. 5 in Mace. Corr.] 
Dary 
Collins 

Oldenburg 



Jan. 


22, 


1675 


Maccl 


, Corr. CCLX 


July 


24, 


1675 





?? 


CCLXI 


Aug. 


27, 


1675 





?, 


CCLXII 


Dec. 


14, 


1675 





,j 


CCLXIII 


Dec. 


21, 


1675 


>) 


j> 


CCLXIV 


Jan. 


10, 


1675-6 


>> 


?? 


CCLXV 


Feb. 


15, 


1675-6 


,5 


?? 


CCLXVII 


Feb. 


19, 


1676 








June 


13, 


1676. 


Latin 


letter 


for Leib 



Collins Sept. 5, 1676 

Oldenburg (?) Oct. 24, 1676 
Oldenburg Nov. 18, 1676 
Nov. 28, 1676 



Comm. Epist. p. 131 
Maccl. Corr. CCLXIX 
CCLXX 

CCLXXIII 




SECTION VII. 
BOOKS. 

*1. A Theological Common-place Book, written from both ends, 
in Newton's hand. 

2. Four folio MS. volumes, bound in red morocco, and labelled 
" John Conduitt," entirely in Newton's hand. 

(1) The Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms amended. Horsley, 
v. pp. 28263. 

(2) i. A short chronicle from the first memory of things in 
Europe to the conquest of Persia by Alexander the Great. Printed 
twice by Horsley, v. pp. 3 27 and pp. 267291. 

ii. Another copy of the Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms 
amended. 

(3) Observations on the Prophecies. Horsley, v. pp. 297 491. 

(4) De motu Corporum Liber Secundus. 

This is the treatise De Mundi Systemate. Horsley, iii. pp. 
180242. 

*3. A volume of extracts on Alchemical subjects, in Newton's 
hand. 

4. (1) A copy of the 1st edition of the Principia, interleaved 
with notes in Newton's hand. Among the leaves inserted is the 
preface to the 3rd edition. In a miserable plight from damp and 
ill-treatment. 

(2) A copy of the second edition of the Principia, interleaved 
with notes and additions in Newton's hand. 

5. A MS. copy of a portion of the Arithmetica Universalis, 
apparently an early copy. 

6. A copy of Schooten's edition of Des Cartes' Geometry, 
Lugd. 1649, with a few notes in Newton's hand. 

7. A short treatise on the beginning of Algebra, in Newton's 
hand : at the other end are extracts from Quintus Curtius, and a 
long prayer, and a sermon on Lev. xix. 18, not in N.'s hand. 

8. A common-place book written from both ends, with " Isaac 
Newton, Trin. Coll. Cant. 1661," in the beginning. 

This contains, at one end, Definitions from Aristotle's Organon, 
an abridgement of the Phisiologia peripatetica of John Magirus, and 
some Astronomical notes by Newton : at the other, Sentences from 
Aristotle's Ethicks, Annotationes ex Eustachii Ethic., Axiomata, 



48 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

Epitome G. J. Vossii partionum oratoriarum, a note on the word 
Idea, Remarks on " Qusestiones qusedam Philosophies," details of 
the observation of the comet of 1664, of the effect of sunlight on 
the eyes, etc. 

*9. A copy of " Secrets revealed, or an open entrance to the shut 
palace of the King," &c., by W. C., London, 1669, with notes in 
Newton's hand. 

*10. A bound MS. book containing at one end memoranda of 
Newton's expenses at College, and at the other a short outline of 
Trigonometry and Conic Sections in Newton's hand. 

11, 12. Two MS. note books, bound, containing a Compendium 
of Elementary Mathematics, apparently made by St John Hare. 
In one of the volumes Abotesley is added to the name, and the fol- 
lowing " Sibi, non aliis hsec." To the other volume the date 1675 is 
given after the name. 

13. Lettres de M. Leibnitz and M. le Chevalier Newton sur 
1'invention des Fluxions et du Calcul Differentiel. 

This is a proof of part of the 1st edition of Desmaizeaux's 
E/ecueil, with corrections. (Several pages are wanting at the end.) 

14. A college note-book, written from both ends, containing 
early exercises extraction of the square and cube root, elementary 
Geometry, &c. followed by annotations of Wallis's Arithmetica In- 
fmitorum. This is preceded by a note of Newton's fixing by an 
entry in his account-book the date of the annotations as being in 
the winter 1664 5, at which time he says he found the method of 
infinite series. Also notes on music, chances, &c. 

This is the note-book referred to in Brewster's Life of Newton, 
Vol. i. p. 22. 

15. Proof sheets of the edition of Newton's Opticks, with a few 
MS. additions by Newton. 

16. An early copy (MS.) of the Lectiones Opticse, Jan. 1669. 

17. A book, containing the commencement of a work on Hydro- 
statics, the greater part consisting of a dissertation partly meta- 
physical, partly theistic, on the constitution of matter, motion, the 
Cartesian philosophy, etc. 

18. A common-place book, written originally by B. Smith, D.D., 
with calculations by Newton written in the blank spaces. This 
contains Newton's first idea of Fluxions. 



SECTION VIII. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS. 

*1. Copy of the agreement relating to Sir I. Newton's MSS. 
Copy of bond given by Conduitt in relation to Sir I. Newton's papers. 
An account of John Conduitt's right to the MSS. of Sir I. Newton. 

2. Six drafts (all in Newton's hand) of a scheme for establishing 
the Royal Society. 

3. Two printed copies of Newton's letter to the Abbe Conti 
dated Feb. 26, 1716, with remarks of Newton on the letter of 
Leibnitz to the Abbe Conti the latter dated |~f May 1716 (printed 
in Des Maizeaux. Recueil, Tome ii. pp. 20, 82, 107). 

4. Advertisement of the Book "De Systemate Mundi" in Con- 
duitt's hand, with memoranda and modern letters on Newton's life. 

5. On Education, <fec. 

On educating youth in the Universities. 

Testimonial to Mr David Gregory for Astr. Prof, at Oxford. 

Dr Gregory on the method of teaching in the Colleges in Scotland. 

Two Chapters on Cosmography. 

Beginning of "the Elements of Mechanicks." 

6. Systema Mundi. 

7. Miscellaneous. 

An account of the System of the World described in Mr New- 
ton's principles of Philosophy. 

8. Astronomia, cap. 1, 2, 3, 4. This contains a drawing and 
description of a quadrant or sextant for measuring angles by re- 
flexion. 

9. Phenomena 1 15. 

10. Scheme of Observations recommended to a traveller. 
*11. Papers relating to legal matters. 

12. General proportions for the parts of a ship. 
* 13. Estimates of the expenses of Government in 1668 and 1675, 
and a chronological tree of the royal family 1689. 

N. 4 



50 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

*14. John Conrad de Hatzfeld on a scheme for Perpetual Motion. 
List of proposed machines by le Sieur Balesme, with fragments 
on finding the Longitude. 

15. Extracts from Phil. Trans, and other fragmentary Papers. 
Graphical construction by Newton, relating to the conjunction of 
Jupiter and Saturn, &c. 

*16. Fragments of the Historia Cselestis. 

*17. " Barometri altitudines per totum itineris mei Alpini 
decursum." June 25 July 13. No author's name or year. 

*18. Testimonial for E. Paget, M.A., *Trin., as a person fit to 
teach navigation to the King's satisfaction. 3 April, 1682. 

19. A scheme of Mathematical learning proposed for Mr Stone's 
foundation (at Christ's hospital). Several drafts. 

20. Newton's remarks on this. 

21. Draft of his letter on the subject. 

22. Long letter by Newton in answer. 

*23. Two drafts of a paper headed, The case of Trin. Coll., on 
the fellowship dividends. 

*24. Henricus Sextus, apparently a College or University decla- 
mation. 

*25. A Latin phrase-book, under the heads of English words in 
alphabetical order, the first word abate, the last conduct. At the 
other end are extracts from Epiphanius, S. Augustine, &c. 

*26. Phrases from Terence's Andria, with occasional translations. 

*27. Miscellaneous fragments relating to personal matters. The 
packet contains a torn scrap of a letter from Newton's mother to 
him, 6 May, 1665, and one from Catharine Conduitt to Newton. 
28. A Problem in Chances, not in Newton's hand. 

*29. A Demonstration in French on the Quadrature of the 
Circle, by Dan Waeijwel of Amsterdam. 

*30. Scraps. 



SECTION IX. 

CORRESPONDENCE, ARTICLES OP AGREEMENT, &c. ABOUT THE 

PUBLICATION OF FLAMSTEED's OBSERVATIONS, &C. 

Catalogue of Manuscripts of Tycho Brahe. 

Draft of Latin letter to Roemer relating to Tycho's observations ; 
similar letter in English; both in Newton's handwriting. 

Arbuthnot to [Newton]'? July 30, 1706. 

Letter from Newton and the other Referees to Prince George of 
Denmark concerning the publication of Flamsteed's observations, 
Jan. 23, 1705. 

Two drafts of Articles of Agreement made between the Referees 
and Mr John Flamsteed. 

Flamsteed to Newton, Oct. 25, 1705. 
April 10, 1708. 

Copy of an Order sent to Mr Flamsteed, July 14, 1708. 

Flamsteed to Sir Christopher Wren, July 19, 1708. 

The Referees to Sir Isaac Newton. 

Account of the expense of printing Mr John Flamsteed's Obsei> 
vations. 

Order to pay 125 to Flamsteed for his first Catalogue of fixed 
stars. 

Receipt for the same from Ja. Hodgson. 

Flamsteed to Newton, April 23, 1716 (asking for the return of 
his MSS.) printed in Baily's Flamsteed, p. 322. 

Order by Queen Anne for the appointment of a Board of Visitors 
of the Royal Observatory dated Dec. 12, 1710. 

Drafts of Correspondence relating thereto. 

Petition to the Queen of the President, Council and Fellows of 
the Royal Society of London, for the grant of a new place of Meeting. 



* SECTION X. 
I. CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN CONDUITT AND FONTENELLE 

ABOUT THE ^LOGE. 

Conduitt to Fontenelle, 27th March, 1727. O. S. 

Fontenelle to Conduitt, 14th April, 1727. N. S. 

Conduitt to Fontenelle, No date given, but must be about 21st 

July, 1727. 
31st July, 1727. 

5th October, 1727. 0. S. 

Fontenelle to Conduitt, 15 Nov. 1727. N. S. 
Conduitt to Fontenelle, 23rd Nov. 1727. 
1st Jan. 1727-8. 



The above are inclosed in a portion of Mists' Weekly Journal for 
Saturday, April 8, 1727, containing Reflections occasioned by the 
Death of Sir I. Newton. 



II. Conduitt's Memoirs of Sir I. Newton, sent to Fontenelle for 
the loge. 

1. English copy, containing 29 numbered pages, No. 21 

repeated, and 1 page of corrections. 

2. French copy, containing 27 pages. This includes a trans- 

lation of the account of Newton's funeral from the 
London Gazette of 4th April, 1727. 

III. A copy of the London Gazette for 4th April, 1727, contain- 
ing the account of Sir I. Newton's funeral. 



* SECTION XI. 

DRAFTS OF FRAGMENTS OF CONDUITT'S INTENDED LIFE OF 
SIR I. NEWTON. 

1. 42 pages, giving an account of Newton's life to the time of his 
going to Cambridge. 

2. 35 J pages, containing a more finished copy of the same. [This 
was intended to be followed by an account of the state of Philosophy 
when Newton began his discoveries.] 

3. Four copies of suggestions addressed to some one from whom 
Conduitt expected to obtain a popular account of the state of phi- 
losophy when Sir I. Newton first appeared, and also a similar account 
of his discoveries, and of the improvements that several persons have 
made in various parts of them. 7| pages. 

4. 16 pages, relating to his life and work at Cambridge. 

5. 17 pages of Miscellanea, containing anecdotes, &c. 

6. 17 pages relating to Newton's character. 

7. 2 copies, each about 1 \ page, on his love and gratitude to his 
mother. 

8. 2 pages on Sir I. Newton's manual dexterity. 

9. 2 copies of 2 pages, each on the same subject, illustrated by a 
custom in the house of Austria. 

10. Paper with date 31st of August, 1726, containing 4 large 
and 4 small pages, containing anecdotes of Newton, relating to 
various times. 

11. 2 pages, containing an account of a conversation of Conduitt 
with Newton, on Sunday the 7th March, 1724-5. 

12. 2 pages, containing various scraps from Newton's note-books. 

13. Scrap of 4 small pages, on Newton's dispute with Hook. 

14. Scrap of 2 small pages, in glorification of Newton. 

15. Scrap of 1 J large pages, containing rough notes relating to 
Newton's last illness, and brief references to anecdotes. 

16. A compliment on Pope, 

17. Sketch of a preface. 

18. Extracts from Journal books of the R. Soc. relating to the 
late Sir I. Newton with a letter from W. Rutty, R. S. Sec. to 
Conduitt. 

Dates of what passed at the University (so endorsed by Conduitt). 



* SECTION XII. 
LETTERS AND MEMORANDA, RELATING TO NEWTON, AFTER HIS DEATH. 

1. Thomas Mason to Coiidnitt, 13 March, 1726-7. 

2. J. Craig to Conduitt, 7 Apr. 1727, partly printed by 
Brewster, ii. 315. 

3. Wm. Stukeley to Conduitt, 26 June, 1727. 

4. Wm. Stukeley to Dr Mead, 26 June, 172715 July, 1727 
(four sheets written at intervals). 

5. Dr Mead to Conduitt, 7 July, 1727. 

6. Wm. Stukeley to Conduitt, 15 July, 1727. 

7. Wm. Stukeley to Conduitt, 22 July, 1727. 

8. Memoranda of Newton, given by A. Demoivre to Conduitt, 
Nov. 1727 (in Conduct's hand). 

9. Draft of a letter from Conduitt to A. Pope, 8 Nov. 1727, 
enclosing 

10. The dedication to the Queen of Sir I. N.'s chronology, and 

11. An account of the chief events of Newton's life. 

12. A. Pope to Conduitt, 10 Nov. 1727, printed by Brewster, 
ii. 521. 

13. Nicholas Wickins to Prof. Smith, 16 Jan. 1727-8, printed 
by Brewster, ii. 88. 

14. W. Stukeley to Conduitt, 16 Jan. 1727-8. 

15. Humphrey Newton to Conduitt, 17 Jan. 1727-8, printed by 
Brewster, ii. 91. 

16. J. Conduitt to - , 6 Feb. 1727-8, printed by Brewster, 
i. viii. 

17. W. Stukeley to Conduitt, 13 Feb. 1727-8. 

18. Humphrey Newton to Conduitt, 14 Feb. 1727-8, printed by 
Brewster, ii. 95. 

19. W. Stukeley to Conduitt, 29 Feb. 1727-8. 

20. J. Conduitt to , 4 June, 1729 ; see Brewster i. x. n 1 . 

21. Bp. Sherlock to - ,10 June, 1731. 

22. Note of Newton's elections at the Royal Society. 

23. Nevil Maskelyne to Dr Horsley, with remarks on Horsley's 
ed. of Newton, by one Robison, 8 May, 1782. 

24. Seward to Horsley, s. d. 

25. W. Derham's account of conversations with Newton. 

26. Account of Newton's mother, "given me [Conduitt] by Mrs 
Hutton, whose maiden name was Aiscough." 



* SECTION XIII. 
PAPERS ON NEWTON'S FAMILY MATTERS, AND ON THE MINT. 

1. Statement of Lord Halifax's legacy to Mrs Barton, and of 
the transfer from the Executor George Lord Halifax, giving the date 
of the trust, 26 October, 1706. With some notes on Miracles. 

2. An account of what his majesty may lose by renewing for 
seven years the contract with Cornwall and Devonshire for Tynn. 

3. An account of the gold and silver coined at the Mint, from 
1713 to 1715, with some notes on Repentance at the back. 

4. Draft of a letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury 
with this account, some notes on the Controversy on Fluxions at 
the back. 

5. The accounts of Mr Ambrose Warren, Agent for the 
Trustees, &c., of the charity of his Grace Thomas Archbishop of 
Canterbury, founded at the Tabernacle by Golden Square, for the 
quarter ending Christmas, 1700. 

6. Paper of calculations, apparently for the Mint. 

7. Proposal for a medal to commemorate the Union of England 
and Scotland. 

8. Various letters and fragments on family matters. 

9. Pedigree and papers relating to his family, all in Newton's 
hand excepting the pedigree, which is a copy. 



* SECTION XIV. 
BOOKS AND PAPERS NOT BY NEWTON. 

1. Essaies and Meditations concerning morality and religion. 
The first part. A folio, with no author's name, written in the same 
hand throughout. 

2. Sir C. Wren's cipher, describing three instruments proper for 
discovering the longitude at sea. In Halley's hand. Printed by 
Brewster, ii. p. 263. 



56 CATALOGUE OF NEWTON PAPERS. 

3. Drawing of the arms of the Swinfords of Swinford, with some 
notes. In Mrs Barton's hand. 

4. Catherine Conduitt's will, 9 July, 1731. 

5. Epitaph on F s Oh is (Charteris). 

6. Epigrammes ecrites en vieux Gaulois en imitation de Clement 
Marot, per Mons. Rousseau. Copied at Geneva, 1709. 

7. Problem in Spherical Trigonometry, in French. 

8. A scheme of the Longitude, signed Laurans. 

9. Several copies (printed) of Leibnitz's Charta volans. 29 July, 
1713. 

10. An abridgement of a Manuscript of Sir Robert Southwell's 
concerning travelling. Writt. 1658, Feb. 20. Written from the 
other end are " Chansons Frangoises." 

11. A MS. of Cicero de Senectute, about 1480. 

12. Treatise in French, on the Infinite Divisibility of Matter. 
No name ; handwriting unknown. 

13. Metaphysical Speculations on Astronomy. No name ; hand 
unknown ; of no interest. 

14. Viaticum Nautarum, or the Sailor's Vade Mecum, by 
Robert Wright, B.A., formerly of Jesus College in Cambridge. 

15. CEdipus Sphingi, Auctore R. P. Nicolas Augustino Venetiis, 
1709. (Incomplete.) 

16. A MS. book on the Motions of the Secondary Planets, 
divided into six chapters. 

17. Elementary calculations and figures relating to Spherical 
Trigonometry, possibly by St John Hare. 



* SECTION XV. 
Complimentary letters to Newton from distinguished foreigners. 



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