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ThH USIVERSIxr BULLBTINH SlTTH SfiRCEa I NO. 2— pART 2 

University of Pennsylvania 
CATALOGUE 



i905'-i9o6 



PHILADELPHIA 

Published by the Universitt 

DECEMBER, igij 
Bi-MoNrHLv 



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CATALOGUE 

University of Pennsylvania 



190^-1906 



PHILADELPHIA 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Part I. — Thb University 5-48 

General Information 7 

Calendar for 1905-06 8-10 

Chronolo^cal Table .~. 11, 11 

Historical Sketch 11-20 

Organization 30 

Board of Trustees ai,ai 

Administrative Officers ^i-'^ 

Officers of Instruction 37-48 

Part II. — Faculties and Dbpartmemts of Instruc- 
tion 49-44.1 

The College Si-'So 

The School of Arts 88- 93 

The Towne Scientific School g6-i»J 

The Wharton School of Finance and Commerce. 134-137 

The Evening School of Accounts and Finance . . 3 18-134 

The Courses for Teachers 315-336 

The Summer School (1905) 137-350 

Department of Philosophy {Graduate School) .... 351-394 

Department of Law »9S~3°3 

Department of Medicine 304-393 

University Hospital 394~397 

Department of Dentistry 398-434 

Department of Veterinary Medicine 435-441 

Veterinary Hospital 44a. 443 

Part HI. — Auxiliart Departments 445-474 

University Library 447-453 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology 4S4-4S7 

Laboratory of Hygiene 458-463 

Flower Astronomical Observatory 464 

Department of Physical Education 465-468 

Department of Arch.-eology 469-474 

Free Museum of Science and Art 471 

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4 TABLB OP CONT8NTS. 

Pabt IV, — Standind Comuittbbs 475-484 

On Graduates' Appointments 477, 478 

On Publications 479-481 

On Athletics 48a. 483 

On Non-Athletic Organizations 484 

Part V. — Financial Obligations and Dormitoribs. . . 485-494 

Rvdes Governing Payments 487-490 

Dormitories 490-494 

Dining Hall 494 

Part VI. — Dbgrbbs, Honors and Prices — 1905 49S-Si» 

Part VII. — Undbrgraduate and Aluuni Socibties . 513-339 

Part VIII. — Lists of Students Sii-645 

Part IX. — Dirbctorv of Officers 647-657 

Part X. — Gbnbral Svuuaries and Index 659-665 



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PART I 



THE jnHIVERBTSY 



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THE UNrVEBSITY. 

General Inlbnnatkni. 



The buildings of the University of Pennsylvania, thirty in num- 
ber, are situated in Philadelphia, on propertv covering an area of 
over fifty-nine acres. The tlnivereity may be reached from the 
various raih-oad stations as follows: From the West Philadelphia 
station of the Pennsylvania Railroad, on foot west on Woodland 
avenue, a walk of less than ten minutes; from the Philadelphia and 
Reading Terminal station, by the electric cars on Market street 
west to Thirty-fourth street, thence on foot south to Woodland 
avenue, a trip of about fifteen minutes; or from the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad station by a walk of one square south to Walnut 
street, thence by car over the bridge west to Thirty-fourth street, a 
ride of about five u ' 



APPLICATIOKS POR CATALOG UBS, BTC. 

Applications for copies of the annual University Catalogue 'pub- 
lished in December) should be addressed to the Secretary of the 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. The Catalogtu is 
sold at ttventy'jiva cents a copy. 

Special announcements, relating either to the separate Depart- 
ments of the University, or to the various courses (liberal and 
scientific) offered in the College proper, unll be mailed free to any- 
one upon receipt of name and address. Such applications should be 
addressed to the Deans of the several Departments, 

All letters of inquiry regarding the internal regulations and re- 
quirements in each separate Department of the University should 
be addressed to the Dean of that Department (see Administrattvt 
Officers, following) and net to the Secretary of the University. 

A ceo U HOD ATI ON S FOR STUDENTS. 

Lodging for students to the number of over six hundred is 
provided in the present dormitory system, which comprises an 
extended group of contiguous houses fronting upon three open 
courts. Plans of the dormitories, prices, and other details may be 
(ditained upon application to the Bursar of the University, College 

A lai^ temporary dining hall, or "Commons," is situated on a 
plot of ground adiacent to the Dormitories. 

Board and lodgii^ may be obtained also in the immediate vicinity 

of the University. Upon application at the offices of the Deans 

of the several Departments (see Adminislralive Officers, following), 

lists of apiproved boarding-houses may be seen. 

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CALEin>AIC FOK 1905-1906. 

Kaadan of tlw Corpoiatlou ■>« h«Id vn tlw flntToaaday In •■oIi montb. 
190S. 

Sept. 89, Friday Session begins: College, lo a.m.; Depart- 
ment of Law, II A. M.; Departments 
of Medicine and Veterinaiy Medicine, 
8 p. u. 

Sept, 30, Saturday Session begins: Department of Philca- 

ophv, 3 P- M. 

Oct. a, Monday Session begins : Department of Dentistry, 

e p. u. 

Nov. »9, Wednesday. , . .Thanksgiving Recess begins: all Depart- 
ments, 6 p. H. 

Dec. 4, Monday Thanksgiving Recess ends: all Depart- 
ments, 9 A.M. 

Dec. II, Friday Christmas Recess begins: all Depart- 
ments, 6 F. It 

1906. 

Jon. 3. Wednesday Christmas Recess ends: all Departments, 

A. M. 

la, Monday Mid-Year Examinations: College, 9 a. m. 

»9, Monday Second Term bepns: Colleee, g a, u. 

_'eb. ai, Thursday University Day: Recess, all Departments. 

April 13, Thursday Easter Recess begins: all Departments, 

April 16, Monday Easter Recess ends: Departments of Law, 

Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary 
Medicine, 9 a. m. 

April 13, Monday Easter Recess ends : College, and Depart- 
ment of Philosophy, g a. m. 

Hay I, Tuesday Last day for receipt of Theses, Prize 

Essays, and Reports: College, and 
Deparbnents of Law and Medicine. 

May 7, Monday Post-Graduate Course begins: Depart- 
ment of Medicine, 9 a. h. 

Hay 38, Monday Final Examinations : College, and Depart- 
ment of Law, g A. M. 
J line 13, Wednesday. .. .Commencement, 11 a.m. 
une 14, Thursday Registration of Candidates for Admission : 

College, and Department of 'Medi- 



F. 



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lO CALENDAR. 

June 14, Thursday Entrance Examinations: College, and 

Departments of Law, Medicine and 
Veterinary Medicine, ii a. m. 

July s, Thursday Summer School Session begins: College, 

9 A. M. 

Aug. t6, Thursday Summer Schocrf Season ends: College, 

6 p. II. 

Summer Rbcbss. 

Sept. 1 1 , Friday Re-examination of Conditioned Students: 

College, 9 A. H. 

Sept. II, Friday Competitive Examination for Dental 

Scholarships, ii a.m. 

Sept. 11, Friday Registration of Candidates for Admis- 
sion: College, and Department of 
*Mcdicine, 9 a. M. to ii a. h. 

Sept. II, Friday Entrance Examinations: College, and 

Departments of Law and Medicine, 

Sept. 14, Monday Competitive Examination for Medical 

Scholarships, 10 a. m. 

Sept. 14, Monday Re-examinations, and Examinations for 

Admission to Advanced Standing: 
Department of Medicine, 3 p. m. 

Sept. 35, Tuesday Entrance Examinations: Department of 

Veterinary Medicine, 10 a. m. 

Sept. 15, Tuesday Entrance Examinations! Department of 

Dentistry, g a. m. 

Sept. 35, Tuesday Re-examination of Conditioned Students, 

and Examinations for Admission to 
Advanced Standing: Department of 

Sept. 38, Friday Session begins: College, 10 a.m.; Depart- 
ment of Law, II A. M, ; Departments 
of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, 
8 p. M. 

Sept. ii», Saturday Ses^on begins: Department of Philos- 

Oct. 1 , Monday Session begins : Department of Dentistry, 

8 p, H. 

Nov. j8. Wednesday. . . .Thanksgiving Recess begins: all Depart- 
ments, 6 p. H. 

Dec. 3 , Monday Thanksgiving Recess ends: all Depart- 

Dec. II, Friday Christmas Recess b^ins: all Depa^^ 



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UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



CHRONOLOOICAIi TABLE. 



1740 — "Charity School" founded. 

1749— The "Academy" established, with which the Charity 
School was combined. 

'7S3 — Charter granted by Thomas and Richard Penn, incorporat- 
ing " The Academy and Charitable School. " 

I7SS — "Confirmatory Charter " granted by Thomas and Richard 
Penn, incorporating "The College, Academy and Chari- 
table School." 

1765 — Medical School founded. 



From September, 1777, to June, 1778, owing to the 
occupation of Philadelphia by British troops, recitationa 



uspended 



1779 — ^Withdrawal of the chartered rights and privileges of The 
College by the State Assembly, and incorporation of 
the " University of the State of Pennsylvania." 

1789 — Restoration of its chartered rights and privileges to The 
College. 

1790 — Law School founded (re-established in 1850). 

1791 — Union of the University.of the State of Pennsylvania with 
The College, under the title of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

1874 — University Hospital established. 

1875 — Towne Scientific School founded. 

1877 — Department of Music established. 

187S — Dental School founded. 

iSSi — Wharton School of Finance and Commerce founded. 

i88» — Department of Philosophy (Graduate School) founded. 

1884 — Veterinary School founded, 

18S5 — Veterinary Hospital established. 



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13 UNIVBRSITY C 

1885 — Department of PhyBieal Education established. 

1889 — Department of Archieology established. 

1892 — Laboratory of Hygiene established. 

1891 — Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology established. 

1894— Teachers' Courses established. 

189& — Houston Club organized. ' 

i8g& — Flower Astronomical Observatory opened. 

1904 — Summer School (College) established. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

On November 13, 1749, soon after the publication of a pamphlet 
■written by Benjamin Franklin, and entitled, "Proposals relating 
to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania," twenty-four public- 
spirited citizens of Philadelphia associated themselves for the pur- 
pose of establishing an Academy, and "laying a Foundation for 
Posterity to erect a Seminary of Learning more extensive and suit- 
able to their future Circumstances," One of their first acts was to 
negotiate for the possession of a building constructed under a trust 
established in 1740, and intended to be used for a "Charity School" 
and as a "House of Publick Worship," This building had been 
used for the second purpose as early as November. 1740, when the 
celebrated Whiteficld first preached in it ; but the charity school had 
never been set in operation. The Trustees, recognizing the oppor- 
tunity to have the full purpose of their trust carried out, and "in 
order that said building may at length be applyed to the good and 
pious uses originally intended," conveyed it on February i, 1750, 
to the Trustees of the Academy by an Indenture, which bound the 
latter to place, erect, found, establish, or keep a "House of Publick 
Worship" and also "one free school for the instruction, teaching 
and education of poor children or scholars within two years from 
the date of these presents" : and which further provided that they 
"shall have full power to found, erect, establish and continue in 
and upon the said house and premises such other school, Academy, 
college or other seminary of learning" as should not conflict with 
the original objects of the elder trust. Under these agreements — 
which in due time were faithfully fulfilled^the Trustees of the 
Academy took possession of the "New Building," as it was then 
called, fitted it up for its enlarged uses, engaged a Rector and sub- 



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r PENNSTLVANIA. IJ 

ordiiiftte instructors, and formally opened the Academy in the pres- 
ence of a distmguished company on January 7, i7S>- So success- 
ful was the undertaking that in 175 j the Trustees secured a Charter 
for the Academy in the following terms 1 — 

"Thomas Pgkk and Richard Pbkh, true and absolute pro- 
prietaries and governors in chief of the province of Pennsylvania 
and counties of Newcastle, Kent and Sussex, on Delaware, To all 
persons to whom these presents shall come, greeting: Whereas, the 
well-being of a society depends on the education of their youth, as 
well as, in great measure, the eternal welfare of every individual, 
by intpressing on their tender minds principles of morality and 
religion, instructing them in the several duties they owe to the 
society m which they live, and one towards another, giving them 
tbe knowledge of languages, and other parts of useful learning 
necesswy thereto, in order to render them serviceable in the several 
public stations to which they may be called. And whereas, it hath 
been represented to us by Thomas Lawrence, William Allen, John 
Inglis, Tench Francis, William Masters, Lloyd Zachary, Samuel 
H'Coll, junior, Joseph Turner, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Leech, 
William Shippen, Robert Strettell, Philip Syng, Charles Willing, 
Phineas Bond, Richard Peters, Abraham Taylor, Thomas Bond, 
JdehuA Haddox, William Plumsted, Thomas White, William Cole- 
man, Isaac Norris, and Thomas Cadwatader, of our city of Phila- 
delphia, gentlemen, that for the erecting, establishing, and main- 
taining an academy within our said cit^, as well to instruct youth 
for reward, as poor children whose indigent and helpless circum- 
stances demand the charity of the opulent part of mankind, several 
benevolent and charitable persons have generously paid, and by 
■ubscriptions promised hereafter to pay, into their hands as trustees, 
for the use of the said academy, divers sums of money, which sums 
already paid, they, the said trustees, have expended in the purchase 
of lands well situated, and a building commodious for the uses afore- 
said, within our said city, in maintaining an academy there as well 
for the instruction of poor children on charity, as others whose cir- 
cumstances have enabled them to pay for their learning, for some 
time past, and in furnishing the said academy with books, maps. 
mathematical instruments, and other necessaries of general use 
therein, according to the intentions of the donors. And whereas. 
tbe said trustees, to faciUtate the progress of so good a work, and 
to perfect and perpetuate the same, have humbly besought us to 
incorporate them and their successors. 

"Now know yt. That we favoring such pious, useful, generous, and 



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chftriUble designs, hoping, through the favor of Almighty God, this 
academy may prove a nursery of virtue and wisdom, and that it will 
produce men of dispositions and capacities beneficial to mankind in 
the various occupations of life; but more particularly suited to the 
infant state of North America in general, and for other causes and 
considerations us hereto specially moving, havt granted, ordained, 
declared, constituted, and appointed, and by these presents we do 
tor us, our heirs and successors, grant, ordain, declare, constitute, 
and appoint. That the said Thomas Lawrence, and others, as before 
recited, and such others as shall be froni time to time chosen, nomi- 
nated or elected in their place and stead, shall be one community, 
corporation and body politic, to have continuance for ever, by the 
name of The Trustees of the Academy and Charitable School in the 
Province of Pennsylvania 

"In urilness whereof, we have caused these our letters to be made 
patent; in the twenty -seventh year of the reign of our sovereign 
lord, George the second, who now is king of Great Britain, Prance, 
and Ireland, etc., and in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven 
hundred and fifty-three." 

Under the skilful training of the learned Rev. William Smith, the 
highest class in this Academy attained that proficiency which, in a 
College course, would entitle it to a Degree, Accordingly, two 
years later the Proprietaries were again petitioned to convert the 
Academy into a College with the power of conferring collegiate 
degrees. The petition was granted substantially as follows: 

"Thouas Penn and Richard Pbnn, true and absolute proprie- 
taries of the province of Pennsylvania, etc., to all persons to whom 
these presents shall come, greeting: 

"And whereas, the said tnistees have .... represented. That 
since our granting our said recited charter, the academy therein 
mentioned, by the blessing of Almighty God, is greatly improved, 
being now well provided with masters, not only in the learned Ian- , 
guages, but also in the liberal arts and sciences, and that one class 
of hopeful students has now attained to that station in learning and 
science, by which, in all well -constituted seminaries, youth are en- 
titled to their first degree. Now know ye also, That wq do hereby, 
for us, our heirs and successors, give and grant full power and 
authority to the said trustees and their successors to con- 
stitute and appoint a Provost and Vice-Provost of the said college 
and academy, who shall be severally named and styled Provost and 
Vice- Provost of the same. And also to nominate and appoint pro- 
fessors in all the liberal arts and sciences, the ancient languages and 



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the English tongue, which Provost, Vice-Provost, and Professors, 
SO constituted and appointed, shall be known and distinguished as 
one body and faculty, by the name of The Provost, Vice-Provost, and 
Professors of the CoUege and Academy of Philadelphia, in th4 Province 
of Pennsylvania; and by that name shall be capable of exercising 
*ncb powers and authorities as the said trustees and their successors 
■hall think necessary to delegate to them, for the discipline and 
government of the said college, academy, and charitable school r 
Provided always. That the said trustees, the Provost and Vice-Prov- 
ost, and each Professor, before they shall exercise their several and 
respective powers or authorities, offices, and duties, do and shall 
take and subscribe the three first written oaths appointed to be 
taken and subscribed, in and by one act of Parliament, passed in 
the first year of the reign of our late sovereign lord, George the first, 
intituled. An Act for the further security of bis Majesty's Person 
and Government ; and the Succession of the Crown in the Heirs of 
the late Princess Sophia, being protestants, and for extinguishing 
the hopes of the preteaded Prince of Wales, and his open and secret 
abettors; and shall also make and subscribe the declaration ap- 
pointed to be made and subscribed by one other act of parliament, 
passed in the twenty-fifth year of the reign of king Charles the 
second, intituled. An Act for preventing dangers which may hap- 
pen, etc excepting only the people called Quakers, who, 

upon talcing, tnaJdng, and subscribing the affirmations and declara- 
tions appointed to be taken, made, and subscribed, by the acts of 
General Assembly of the province of Pennsylvania to qualify them 
for the exercise of civil offices, shall be admitted to the exercise of 
all and every the powers, authorities, offices, and duties above 
mentioned, any thing in this provision to the contrary notwith- 
standing And we do hereby, at the desire and request 

of the siud trustees, constitute and appoint the Reverend William 
Smith, M. A., to be the first and present Provost of the said college 
and academy, and the Reverend Francis Allison, M. A., to be the 

first and present Vice-Provost of the same And we do 

furlher, for hs, our heirs and successors, give and grant to the trustees 
of tiu said college and academy, That for animating and encouraging 
the students thereof to a laudable diligence, industry, and progress 
in useful literature and science, they and their successors, met 
together on such day or days as they shall appoint for that purpose, 

shall have full power and,^uthority, by the provost to 

admit any of the students within the said college and academy, or 
any other person or persons meriting the same, to any degree or 



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degrees, in any of the faculties, arts, and sciences, to which persons 
are usually admitted, in any or either of the univeraities or collegea 

in the kingdom of Great Britain Provided ahiiaja, and 

it is hereby declsred to be our true meaning and express will, That 
no student or students, within the said college and academy, shall 
ever, or at any time or times hereafter, be admitted to any degree 
or degrees, until such student or students have been first recom- 
menlded and presented as worthy of the same, by a written ntan- 
date, given under the hands of at least thirteen of the trusteea of 
the said college and academy 

"In testimony whereof, we have caused these our letters to be 
made patent, and the great seal of our said province to be hereunto 
affixed . , . this fourteenth day of May, in the twenty-eighth 
year of the reign of our sovereign lord, George the second, king of 
Great Britain, France, and Ireland, etc., and in the year of our Lord, 
one thousand seven hundred and fifty-five." 

The Fii^t Commencement was held Hay 17, 1757, when Paul 
Jackson, Jacob Duch^, Francis Hopkinson, Samuel Magaw, Hugh 
Williamson, James Latta, and John Morgan received the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. In the agitated times that followed, during the 
wars with the French, the Provost, Mr. Smith, opposed so vehe- 
mently the non-resistance policy of the legislature of Pennsylvania, 
that by an arbitrary stretch of power he was thrown into prison. 
In faithfulness to his duties as Provost, however, he received hia 
classes in gaol, and continued his instructions to them there while 
still a prisoner. Finally he was set at liberty, for the purpose of 
going to England to make a personal appeal to the king, and hia 
kindly reception there was not lessened by the strain to which hia 
loyalty at home had been put. Oxford conferred on him the Degree 
of Doctor of Divinity. On his return home so highly did his fello^- 
citisens rate his influence abroad, that when in 1761 the Trustees 
were hard bestead, they sent him back to England to raise funds 
for an endowment. It happened that King's College (now Colum- 
bia) in New York was in similar straits, and had resolved on similar 
efforts. The two commissioners met in England and amicably 
resolved to "divide the land between them" and share the proceeds. 
Through the infiuence of the Archbishop of Canterbury they re- 
ceived a circular letter from the king to all the churches, and suc- 
ceeded in raising a very considerable endowment for each college. 

On Dr. Smith's return, as it appears on the minutes of the t^th of 
June, 1764, a letter was received from the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Thomas and Richard Penn, and the Rev. Samuel Chandler, 



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UHIVBRSITV OP PENNSYLVANIA. IJ 

D. D., addressed to the trustees, in which the trustees are congratu- 
lated on the success of Dr. Smith's, the Provost's, collection in Eng- 
land, and advised of what would be further necessary to the due 
improvement of the collection and the future prosperity of the 
institution. "That the institution was originally founded and 
carried on for the general benefit of a mixed body of people — that 
on the king's brief it is represented as a seminary that would be of 
great use for securing capable instructors and teachers, as well for 
the service of the society for propagating the gospel in foreign parts, 
as for other protestant denominations in the colonies. — That at the 
time of making the collection, the provost was a clergyman of the 
Church of England — the vice-provost, a Presbyterian — a principal 
professor, a Baptist, with other useful professors and tutors, all 
carrying on the education of youth with great harmony, and people 
of various denominations have heretofore contributed liberally and 
fully. — That jealousies had arisen lest the foundation should be nar- 
rowed, and some party exclude the rest, or put them on a worse foot- 
ing than they have been or were at the time of the collection, which 
would be unjust and productive of contentions unfriendly to reli- 
gion." It was therefore recommended to the trustees, by the 
writers of the letter (who had a principal share in procuring the 
collection), to make a fundamental rule or declaration, to prevent 
inconvenience of this kind, and in doing which, they were advised 
that the more closely they kept in view the plan on which the semi- 
nary was at the time of the royal brief, and on which it was carried 
on from the beginning, so much the less cause would any party have 
to be dissatisfied. 

A committee having been appointed to frame a fundamental 
Reiolv* or declaration, in consequence of the letter, the following 
was reported and adopted: 

"The trustees being ever desirous to promote the peace and pros- 
perity of this seminary, and to give satisfaction to all its worthy 
benefactors, have taken the above letter into their serious considera- 
tion, and perfectly approving the sentiments therein contained, do 
order the same to be inserted in their books, that it may remain per- 
petually declaratory of the present iduU and excellent plan of this 
institution, which hath not only met with the approbation of the 
great and worthy personages above mentioned, but even the royal 
patronage of his majesty himself. They further declare that they 
will keep this plan closely in their view, and use their uttnoil en- 
deavors that the same be not narrowed, nor the members of tha 
church of England, or those dissenting from them (tn any fitUtr* 



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iS UNtVBRSITT OP PKHNSVLVANIA. 

tUctioM to th* principal officer metttiontd in the aforeiaid leittr.) be put 
on any worst jooting in this Beminary, than they were at the time of 
obtaining ike royal brief. They subscribe this with their names, and 
ordain that the same be read and subscribed by every new trustee 
that shall hereafter be elected, before he takes his seat at the board." 

Perhaps no more striking instance can be given of the distortion 
to which men's minds were subject in those days of political com- 
oiotion, than the fact that in 1779 this resolution was construed by 
the Legislature into a "narrowing of the foundation," and seized 
as a pretext for confiscating aU the rights and properties of the 
College, which were bestowed upon a new organisation called in 
its charter the "Trustees of the University of the State of Penn- 
sylvania." Ten yean later, these rights and properties were all 
restored, and in 179c an act was passed amalgamating th« old 
College with the new University, as follows : 

Whbkbas, the trustees of the University of the State of Penn- 
sylvania, and the trustees of the College, Academy, and Charitable 
School of Philadelphia, in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, by 
their several petitions have set forth, that they have agreed to cer- 
tain terms of union of the said twoinstitutions, which are as follows: 

First: That the name of the institution be " The University of 
Pennsylvania," and that it be stationed in the city of Philadelphia. 

Second: That each of the two boards shall elect, from among 
themselves, twelve persons, who, with the governor for the time 
being, shall constitute the board of trustees of the University of 
Pennsylvania; and that the governor shall be president. 



And the said trustees by their several petitions have prayed, that 
a law may be passed to enable them to carry the said terms of union 
into effect, and to incorporate them in one body, according to the 
purpose and intention expressed in the said terms of union. 

Sec. I. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the comntonwealtk of Pennsylvania in general assembly 
met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same. That, in pur- 
suance of the second article of the said terms of union, the trustees 
of the University shall elect twelve persons from among themselves 
s of the said University after the union, and shall cer- 



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UNIVRRSITV OF PBHKSVLVANIA. I9 

tifjr the n&mes of the said twelve persons, so elected, to the governor 
of this commonwealth, on or before the first day of December nent; 
and that the trustees of the said College, Academy, and Charitable 
School, shall elect twelve persons from among themselves, to be 
trustees of the said University, after the union, and shall certify the 
names of the said twelve persons, so elected, to the governor of this 
commonwealth, on or before the first day of December next. 

Sec. I. Atid b€ it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
from and after such certificates of the elections being so made to the 
governor, as aforesaid, the said twenty-four persons so elected and 
certified,. together with the governor for the time being, who shall 
always be president, and their successors duly elected and appointed 
as herein and by the said terms of union is directed, be, and they are 
hereby made and constituted a corporation and body politick, in 
law and in fact, to have continuance forever by the aforesaid name, 
style, and title of ' ' The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, ' ' 
and that the said University shall at all times be stationed in the 
city of Philadelphia. 



For the guidance of thoee who may desire — during life, or by 
testamentary bequest — to make benefactions to the University, 
the following information is given: 

(i) The corporate name is: The Trusters of thr Univbrsitt 

OF Pbnnsylvakia. 
(1) The sum of Sioo,ooo is the amount necessary to found a 

full Professorship in any one of the Departments. This 
Catalogue gives the names of all those who hold full Pro- 
fessoi^hips in the College and Professional Schools. The 
principal is invested and the income alone used, and the 
donor has the privilege of naming the Profcssoiship. 

(3) The sum of $50,000 is the cost of a dormitory house ; the 

contributor having the privilege of naming the house. 
There can be no more substantial or beneficent memoriaU 
than such additions to the University's beautiful, but 
incomplete, dormitory system. 

(4) The sum of $10,000 is the principal sum to establish a Fellow- 

ship in any one of the Departments: the income being 
paid to the Fellow, who devotes his time to original woric 



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"» UKIVBRSITT OP PENNSTLTftNIA. 

and study ; with the privilege of a very moderate amount 
of teaching work, under the pennission of the Dean of the 
Department. 

(5) The sum of Ss.ooo endows a Free Scholarship in the College, 

or in any one o£ the Professional Sdiools. The income of 
this sum remits tuition fees, and the donor has the right, 
during life, to nominate to the Scholarship, subject to all 
the rules of the University. 

(6) A like sum ($5,000) endows a Free Bed in the Hospital of 

the University; and 

(7) The sum of Sio, 000 endows a Private Room in the Hospital. 

The Provost of the Univereity will be glad to give full informa- 
tion upon any question relating to Foundations, as above stated, 
to any person or peisons who may desire more detailed knowledge. 



The University of Pennsylvania comprehends the followii^ 
departments: 

Tkb Collbob, including 

Thb School of Arts. 

Thb Towns Scibmtii'IC School. 

The Wharton School of Fihancb and Cohmbrcb. 

Thb Courses for Teachers. 

The Summb School. 
Thb Departuent of Fhilosophv (Graduate School). 
The Department of Law. 
Thb Dbparthbnt op Medicine. 
Thb Department of Dentistry. 
The Department of Vbtbrimary Medicine. 
Thb University Hospital. 

Thb Wistar Institute op Anatouy and Biology. 
The Laboratory of Hyoienb. 
The Veterinary Hospital, 
The University Library. 
The Department op ARCHiBOLOor. 
The Flowbr Astronomical Observatory. 
Thb Dbpaktmbkt op Physical Education. 



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PBorocrri 

CHARLES CUSTIS HARRISON. LL. D., 
President fro tempore of the Trustees. 

TICB-PROTOBT : 

EDGAR FAHS SMITH. Ph.D.. Sc.D., LL. D. 

CORPORATION. 

THE TBUSTBES OP THE UlflVEBSITT OP 

PEiraSYLVANIA. 

THE GOVERNOR OP PENNSYLVANIA: Preside 



1870. JOHN VAUGHAN MERRICK. 
1873. RICHARD WOOD. 

1875, SILAS WEIR MITCHELL. M. D.. LL. D. (Edin.). 

1876. CHARLES CUSTIS HARRISON, LL. D. 
WHARTON BARKER. 
SAMUEL DICKSON. 

HOK. SAMUEL WHITAKER PENNYPACKER, LL. D. 
Rt. Rbv. OZI WILLIAM WHITAKER, D. D., LL. D. 

1887. JOHN BARNARD GEST. 
1889. JOSEPH SMITH HARRIS, Sc. D. 
1891. WALTER GEORGE SMITH. 
1896. MORRIS JAMES LEWIS. M. D. 

JOSEPH GEORGE ROSENGARTEN. 
1896. RANDAL MORGAN. 
1898. SAMUEL FREDERIC HOUSTON. 

JOSEPH LEVERING JONES. 

ROBERT GRIER Lb CONTE, M. D. 
(") 



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93 CORFOKATION. 

ELECT ED. 

1903. CHARLES STUART WOOD PACKARD. 

1903. JOSHUA BERTRAM LIPPINCOTT. 

1905. WHARTON SINKLER, M. D. 

1905. ARTHUR LATHAM CHURCH. 



CHAIRMEN OP STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance and Propbrtv: 

MR. MORGAN Broad and Arch Streets. 

On tub Library and Museums: 
MR. ROSENGARTEN 1704 Walnut s'treet 

On the Coi.LBGB AND Dbpartmsnt op Philosophy: 
MR. MERRICK Rojtborough. 

On the Department of Medicine and Allied Schools: 
DR. MITCHELL 1314 Walnut Street. 

On the Department op Law and Legal Relations: 
MR. DICKSON 901 Clinton Street 

On the Dbparthbnt op Physical Education: 
MR. HOUSTON 307 Walnut Street 

On Religious Services and the Boardman Foundation: 
BISHOP WHITAKER Walnut and Twelfth Streets. 

On Audit: 
MR. GEST 319 Chestnut Strtet 

On the Univbrsity: 

THE PROVOST 400 Chestaut Street 

[Compowd d llw Cluirmea of lU Standing Comnutlan.] 



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ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS. 



OF THE CORPORATION. 

The Oenend Ollliws kts on Uie third floor of 400 C^estDat Street. 

Pfotmii— Charles C. Harrison, LL. D. 
General Offices, 400 Chestnut Street. 
Vice-Provost— Edgak F. Smith, Ph, D„ Sc. D.. LL.D. 

Office in the John Harrison Laboratory of Chemistry, Thirty- 
fourth and Spruce Streets. Office fiouTB, 8 A. H. to 6 F. u. 
Saturdays. 8 a. m, to i p. M. 
Secretary — J. Hartley Merrick, A. B. 

Office. loi Cotlcge Hall. ' Office hours, 9.30 a. u. to 4.30 p. h 
Saturdays, 9,30 A. M. to 13.3a p. m. 

Treasurer — -■ 

General Offices, 400 Chestnut Street. 
AssisUmt Treasurer — Henry R. Lawrbncb, 

General Offices, 400 Chestnut SUcet. 
Buriar— Edward W. Mumpord, Ph. B. 

Office, loi College Hall. Office hours, 9 a. u. to i p. M., dtuly. 
The Bursar's office is open from 8.45 a. u. to 5 p. h. Satur- 
days, 6.45 A. M. to 1 P. V. 

Assislartt to the Provost — Clavton F. McMichabl. 
General Offices, 400 Chestnut Street. 



OF THE COLLEGE AND PROFESSIONAL FACULTIES. 
Deart of Ike College Faculty — Josiah H. Penniman, Ph. D. 

Office, 103 College Hall, Woodland Avenue. Office hours, 
9 A. M. to 13 M., daily. 
Dean of Ike Faculty of Philosophy—CLKKStiCB G. Child, Ph. D.. 
L. H. D. Office, 105 College Hall. Woodland Avenue. Office 
hours, 10 A. M. to 11 M., daily. 



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14 ADMINISTKATIVB OPPICBRS. 

Deanof lAeLauFofWlji—Wif. Draper Lbwis.B.S., LL. B., Ph. D. 
Office in the Law Departmeot Building, Thirty-fourth and 
Chestnut Streets. Office hours, ii a. m. to i p. u., daily. 
Dean of the Medical Faculty — Charles H. Prazibr, M. D. 

The Dean's Office (in the New Medical Laboratories, Hamilton 
Walk) is open from 9 a. H. to 5 p. m.; Saturdays, 9 a. m. 

to s p. H. 

Dean of the Denial Ftuu^t:!'— Edward C. Kirk, D. D. S., Sc. D. 
Office, Dental Hall, Thirty-fourth and Locust Streets. Office 
hours, 9 A. u. to I p. H., daily. 
Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine — Leonard Pearson, 
B. S., V. M. D. 
Office, Logan Hall, Thirty-sixth Street below Woodland Ave- 
nue. Office hours, 8.30 a. u. to 11 «., daily. 



OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 
■ Director — R. Tait McKbnzib, B. A, M.D. 

Office in the Gymnasium, Thirty-third and Spruce Streets, 
Office hours, 3 p. m. to 6 p. u., daily, except Saturdays. 
Physician — Robert N. Willson, M. D., 1708 Locust Street. 

Office hotus daily, until to a, u., and from 7 to 8 p. h. 
Telephone connection. 
Ophthalmologist — William Campbbll Posey, M. D., 1835 Chest- 
nut Street. 
Office hours, from 8.30 a. m. to i p. 11., daily. Telephone con- 



OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 
Librarian of the University — M0RRI8 Jastrow, Jr., Ph. D. 

Office in the Library, Thirty-fourth Street below Walnut. Office 

hours, 10 A. u. to I P. M., daily. 
The Library is open daily during term-time, except Sundays 
and holidays, from 8.30 a. m. to 10 p. h. During recess, 
from 9 A. «. to s P. M. 
AssisUini Librarian of the University — Susan W. Randall. 
Office in the Library. Office hours, 1 P. M. to $ P. H., daily. 



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ADKINISTRATIVB OPPICBRS. 2$ 

Librarian of ih« BiddU Law Library — Mrs. Haroarbt C. Klinobl- 
sutTH, LL. B. 
Office in tbe Law Department Building. Thirty-fourth and 
CbcGtnut Streets. Office hours, lo a. u. to ; p. u., daily. . 

Manager of ike Bureau of Publicity-^aosGB E. Nitischb, LL. B, 
Office in Houston Hall (third floor), Spruce Street above 
Thirty- fourth. Office hours, 9 a. u. to 6 p. «., daily. 

Suptrintrndent of the University Hospital — Marion E. Smith. 
The Hospital is on Spruce Street above Thirty- fourth. Com- 
munications concerning the business of the Hospital and the 
admission of patients should be addressed to the Su[)enn- 
tendent. 

Director of ifc« WiUiant Pepper Clinical Laboratory — Alp red 
Stbncbl, M. D. 
OfKce in the Laboratory. Office hours, 1 p. m, to 3 p. M., daily. 
The Laboratory is on Spruce Street below Thirty-sixth, 
adjoining the Hospital. 
Director of (A# Wistar Institute — Miltoh J. Grbbnhan, Ph. B., M.D 
OfBce in the Institute, Thirty-sixth Street and Woodland Ave- 
nue. Office hours, from 9 a. u., daily, except Saturdays. 
Director of tke John Harrison Laboratory of Chemistry — Bdoab F. 
SutTH, Ph. D., Sc. D.. LL. D. 
(For office and office hours, see under Vice-Provost.) 
Director of the Laboratory of Hygiene — Albxamdbr C. Abbott, 
M.D. 
Office in the Laboratory, Thirty-fourth Street below Walnut. 
First Assistant in the Laboratory of Hygiene — David Hbndrictcs 
Bbroby, a. M., M. D. 
Office in the Laboratory. Office hours, 9 A. h. to ti h,, and 
a p. M. to 5 F. M., daily. 
Director of Ike Light and Heat Station — Hbnry W. Spanolbr, M. S. 
Office in the Laboratory of Mechanical Engineering, Thirty- 
fourth and Spruce Streets. The Laboratory is open from 9 

Director of Ike Botanic Garden — John M, Macparlanb, D. Sc. 
The Botanic Garden is adjacent to Biological Hall, on Hamil- 
ton Walk, and is open daily from 7 a. h. to 6 p. u. The 
greeohouses are open from 8 a. u. to 5 p. u. 



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36 

DirtcUtT of tke Flower Astronomical Observatory — Charles L. 
DooLITTLB, C, E., Sc. D. 
The Observatory is situated on the West Chester Pike, one 
and three-fourths miles beyond the city limits. (Take car 
west on Market Street to Sixty-third Street, then change to 
Ardmore or Newtown Square car.) The residence of the 
Director is adjacent to the Observatory. 
Director of the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce — Jahbs 
T. Young, Ph. D. 
Office, Logan Hall, Thirty-sixth Street below Woodland Ave- 
nue. Office hours. 9 a. u. to la M., daily, Saturdays ex- 
cepted. 



Thb Prbb Museum op Science and Art. 
The Museum contains the archaeological and ethnological collec- 
tions of the University, and is situated on Spruce Street below 
Thirty-fourth, opposite Franklin Field. The collections are open 
to visitors daily, New Year's Day, Good Friday and Christmas Day 
excepted, ix<an 10 a. u. to 5 p. u.; on Sundays, from 3 p. h. to 6 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION.* 



RICHARD ALEXANDER FULLERTON PENROSE. M. D., 
LL. D., Emeritus Professor ot Obstetrics and of the Diseases of 
Women and Children. 

HORATIO C WOOD, M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica, Pharmacy and General Thera> 

Hon-. JOHN INNES CLARK HARE, LL. D., 

Emeritus Professor of the Institutes of Law, including, inter 
alia. International, Gjnstitutional, Commercial and Civil 
Law. 
GEORGE FREDERICK BARKER, M. D., Sc. D., LL. D.. 

Emeritus Professor of Physics. 
JAMES TYSON, M. D., 

Professor of Medicine. 
LOUIS ADOLPHUS DUHRING, M. D.. 

Professor of Dermatology. 
HUGH ARCHIBALD CLARKE, Mus. Doc. 

Professor of the Science of Music. 
tJOSEPH TRIMBLE ROTHROCK, B. S., M. D.. 

Professor of Botany. 
EDWIN TYLER DARBY. M. D.. D. D, S.. 

Profes.'ior of Operative Dentistry and Denial Histology, 
MORTON WILLIAM EASTON, Pii. D.. 

Professor ot English and Comparative Philology. 
JAMES TRUMAN, D. D, S.. LL, D . 

Professor ot Dental Pathology, Therapeutics and Materia 
Medica. 
JOHN BACH McMASTER. A. M., Litt. D., LL. D., 

Professor of American Historj-. 



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GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM. A.M., LL. B.. 
Professor of Equity Jurisprudence. 



ADAM SEYBEBT ProfessoT of Intellectual and Moral Ptulosophj. 
EDWARD TYSON REICHERT, M, D-, 

Professor of Physiology. 
JAMES WILLIAM WHITE, M. D., 

JOHN RHBA BARTON Pfofessor of SuTgeiy. 

Rbv. HERMANN VOLLRAT HILPRECHT, Ph.D.. D.D., LL.D.. 
ciJiRK Research Professor of Assyrioiogy, and Professor of 
Semitic Philology and Archaeology. 

MORRIS JASTROW, Jr., Ph. D.. 

Professor of Semitic Languages, and Libnuian of the University. 

HENRY WILSON SPANGLER, M. S., 

WHtTNBT Professor of Dynamical Engineering, and Director of 
the Light and Heat Station. 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER LAMBERTON, A. M., Litt. D., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

SIMON NELSON PATTEN, Ph. D., LL, D., 

Professor of Political Economy. 
FELIX EMMANUEL SCHELLING, A.M., Ph.D., Litt. D., 

JOHN WELSH CBNTBNNiAL ProfcssoT of HistoTy and English 
Literature. 
EDGAR FAHS SMITH, Ph.D., Sc. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Chemistry, and Vicb-Provost of the University. 
DbFOREST WILLARD, a. M., M. D., Ph. D., 

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
GEORGE ARTHUR PIERSOL, M. D., Sc. D.. 

Professor of Anatomy. 
JOHN HERR MUSSER, M. D.. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ARTHUR WILLIS GOODSPEED. Ph. D., 

Professor of Fh^ics. 



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EDWIN SCHOPIELD CRAWLEY, Ph. D., 
THOMAS A. SCOTT PfofessoT of Mathematics. 

JOHN MARSHALL. M. D., Nat.Sc. D.. LL. D., 
Proteasor of Chemistry and Toxicology. 

GEORGE EGBERT FISHER. A. M., Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
SIMON JACOB JOHN HARGER, V. M. D.. 

Professor of Veterinary Anatomy and ZoAtcchnics. 

EDWARD POTTS CHEYNEY, A.M.. 
Professor of European History. 



EDWARD MARTIN, A. M., M. D.. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
LEONARD PEARSON. B. S.. V. M. D.. 

Professor of the Theory and Practice of Veterinary Medicine, 
and Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 
HUGO ALBERT RENNERT, Ph. D.. 

Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. 
EDGAR MARBURG. C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 
JOHN MUIRHEAD MACFARLANE, D. Sc, 

Professor of Botany, and Director of the Botanic Garden. 
CHARLES KARSNER MILLS. M. D.. 

Professor of Neurology. 
GEORGE WHARTON PEPPER, A.M.. LL. B., 

A. STDNXY BiDDLB Professor of Law. 
JOHN WILLIAM ADAMS, A. B.. V M. D., 

Professor of Veterinary Surgery and Obstetrics. 



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MARTIN GROVE BRUMBAUGH, A. M., Ph, D., LL. D., 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

AMOS PEASLEE BROWN. Ph. D.. 
Professor of Mineralogy and Geology, 



•HERBERT EDWARD EVERETT, 

Professor of the History of Art. 
LIGHTNER WITMER, Ph- D., 

Professor of Psychology. 

WILLIAM ROMAINE NEWBOLD. Ph. D., 
Professor of Philosophy. 

HENRY GIBBONS, A. M.. 

Professor of Latin Literature. 

CHARLES LEANDER DOOHTTLE, C. E.. Sc. D., 

FLOWER Professor of Astronomy, and Director of the flowbr 
Astronomical Observatory. 

MARION DEXTER LEARNED, Ph. D., L. H. D„ 

Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literatores. 

EDWIN GRANT CONKLIN, Ph. D., 
Professor of ZoSlogy. 

EDWARD CAMERON KIRK, D. D.S., Sc. D.. 

Professor of Clinical Dentistry, and Dean of the Faculty of 
Dentistry. 

JOSIAH HARMAR PENNIMAN, Ph. D.. 

Professor of English Literature, and Dean of the College 

Facility. 

EMORY RICHARD JOHNSON, Ph. D., 

Professor of Transportation and Commerce, 
LEO STANTON ROWE, Ph. D., 

Professor of Political Science. 
SAMUEL McCUNE LINDSAY, Ph. D.. 

Professor of Sociology. 



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♦ALEXANDER CREVER ABBOTT. M. D., 

PBPPBR Professor of Hygiene and Bacteriology, and Director of 
the Laboratory of Hypene. 

WILLIAM DRAPER LEWIS, B, S,. LL. B., Ph. D., 
Professor of Law, and Dean of the Faculty of Law. 

MATTHEW HENRY CRYER. M. D.. D. D. S., 
Professor of Oral Surgery. 



GEORGE GRENVILLE MILLIKEN, M. D., D. D.S.. 

Assistant Professor of Operative Technics. 
ALFRED STENGEL, M. D., 

Professor of Clinical Medicine, and Director of the williau 
PBppBR. Laboratory of Clinical Medicine. 

HoM. JOHN BAYARD McPHERSON, A. M.. LL. D., 
Professor of Law. 

GWILYM GEORGE DAVIS, M. D., M. R. C. S. (Eng.), 

Associate Professor of Applied Anatomy. 
JOHN GOODRICH CLARK, M. D„ 

Professor of Gynecology. 
WILLIAM EPHRAIM MIKELL, B, S„ 

Professor of Law. 
CHARLES HARRISON FRAZIER, M. D., 

Professor of Qinical Sui^ery, and Dean of the Faculty of 
Medicine. 
DANIEL BUSSIER SHUMWAY, Ph, D., 

Assistant Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literatures. 
THOMAS RUNDLE NEILSON, A. M., M, D., 

Clinical Professor of Genito- Urinary Diseases. 

* Atnent on Public Buaiiiea. 



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MILTON HOWARD FUSSELL, M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

WILLIAM EASBY, Jr., B. S., C. E.. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engioeering. 



CLARENCE GRIFFIN CHILD. Ph. D., L. H. D., 

Assistant Professor of English, and Dean of Qie Faculty of 
Philosophy. 
FRANCIS HERMANN BOHLEN, LL. B.. 

Professor of Law. 
WILLIAM GIBSON SPILLER, M. D- 

Professor of Neuro-pathology, and Associate Professor of 
Neurology. 
CHARLES WALTS BURR, M. D., 

Professor of Mental Diseases. 
GEORGE EDMUND db SCHWEINITZ, A.M., M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 
JOHN CAREW ROLFE, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 
CHARLES ROOT TURNER, D. D. S., M. D., 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry and Metallurgy, 
ALLEN JOHN SMITH, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Pathology. 
HERMAN VANDENBURG AMES, A.M., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of American History. 
EDGAR ARTHUR SINGER, Jr., Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
WILLIAM EZRA LINGELBACH, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of European History. 



ALFRED CONARD WOOD, M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Surgery. 



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CHARLES PREVOST GRAYSON, M. D., 

Clinical Professor of Laryngology and Rbinology. 

JOSEPH ALISON SCOTT. A. B., M. D., 
Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 

J VERNE STANFORD. B. S.. M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



DAVID HENDRICKS BERGEY. A. M., M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Rbv. albert TOBIAS CLAY, Ph. D.. 

. Assistant Professor of Semitic Philology and Arctueology. 
RICHARD HICKMAN HARTE, M. D., 

Adjunct Professor of Surgery. 
HERBERT SPENCER JENNINGS, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Zofilogy. 
PAUL PHILIPPE CRET, Arch. Diplom* du Gouvemement 
Fran^ais, 

Assistant Professor of Design. 
HOWARD CHAPIN IVES, Ph. B., C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
CRAWFORD DAWES HENING. A. B., 

Professor of Law. 
ROBERT HAMILL DAVIS SWING, D. D. S., 

Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery and Anesthesia. 
A DbWITT GRITMAN, D. D. S., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Dentistry. 
EDWARD CHARLES WESSELHOEFT, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of German. 

HORACE CLARK RICHARDS. Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Physics. 
GEORGE HERVEY HALLETT, A. M., Pa. D.. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
ARTHUR HOBSON QUINN, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of English. ' 



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JAMES THOMAS YOUNG, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Administration, and Director of tne 
H School of Finance and Commerce. 



ERIC DOOLITTLE, C. E.. 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

CORNELIUS WEYGANDT, Ph. D., 
Assistant Professor of English. 

EDWARD SHERWOOD MEADE. Ph. D.. 
Assistant Professor of Finance. 

THOMAS NOLAN, M. S., A, M„ 

Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

CARL KELSEY, B. A., Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Sociology. 



ARTHUR CHARLES HOWLAND, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Medieval History, 
LEO LOEB. M. D- 

Assistant Professor of Experimental Pathology. 
DANIEL JOSEF McCARTHY. M. D,, 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
HAROLD WARNER BROWN, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
JAMES PEMBERTON HUTCHINSON, M. D., 

Adjunct Professor of Surgery. 

THOMAS GEORGE ASHTON, M.D.. 
Adjrmct Professor of Medicine. 

ROBERT TAIT McKENZIE, B. A., H.D., 

Professor of Physical Education, and Director of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education. 



OWEN LOUIS SHINN, Ph.D.. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 



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WALTER THOMAS TAGGART. Ph.D.. 
Aasist&nt Professor of Chemistry. 



WILLIAM DIEHL, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
ALEXANDER GLASS. V. S., 

Lecturer on the Theory and Practice of Canine Medicine. 
GEORGE HAMILTON CHAMBERS. M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Normal Histology. 
JAMES KELLY YOUNG. M. D., 

Associate in Orthopedic Sui^ry. 



FREDERICK AMEND, Jr., D, D. S., 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 
ARTHUR ALBERT STEVENS. M. D.. 

Lecturer on Medical Terminology, and Lecturer and Instmcbir 
in Physical Diagnosis 
JESSE EDWARD DUNWOODY. D.D, S., 

Demonstrator of Crown- and- Bridge Work. 
MILTON NEWTON KEIM,Jh-. D. D.S., 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STAHL, M. D., 

Lecturer on the Dietetics of the Sick, and Instractor in Physical 
Diagnosis. 



MILTON BIXLER HARTZELL. M. D., 

Associate in Dermatology. 
JOHN PERCY MOORE. Ph. D., 

Instructor in Zofilogy. 
JOHN WILLIAM HARSHBERGER. Ph. D., 

Instructor in Botany, General Biology and Zoology. 
CHARLES SOWER POTTS, M. D., 

Associate in Neurology. 



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EDWIN STANTON MUIR. V. M. D.. 

Instructor in Vetarinary Materia Medica and Pharmacy, 

JOHN JAY MORRIS, 

Inatntctor in Mechanical Engineering. 
JAMES GRANT LANE, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry, 

HERMAN BRYDEN ALLYN, M. D., 

Associate in Medicine. 

DANIEL LINCOLN WALLACE, 

Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 
WILLIAM SCHLEIF, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Practical Phannacy. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SENSEMAN, V. M. D., 
Demonstrator of Veterinary Anatomy. 

PHILIP POWELL CALVERT, Ph. D.. 
Instructor in Zoology. 

CHARLES WINSLOW DULLES, M. D.. 
Lecturer on the History of Medicine. 

GEORGE WALTER DAWSON, 
Instructor in Drawing. 

HUGH WINSTON McCONNELL, 

Instructor in. Mechanical Engineering. 
FRANZ ENGE, 

Demonstrator of Forging and Horseshoeing. 

DANIEL WEBSTER FETTEROLF, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

THOMAS HARVEY DOUGHERTY, 

Assistant Instructor in ZoSlogy. 
ROBERT JOHNSTON SEYMOUR, D. D. S., , 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 
MEYER LOUIS RHEIN. M. D., D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Dental Pathology. 



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FRANK ALLISON HAYS, 

InGtructor in Pen-and-ink Rendering, 
HENRY DORRANCE BEYEA, M. D., 

Associate in Gynecology. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER NEWMAN BORLAND, M. D.. 
Assistant Instructor in Obstetrics. 

MILTON EVERARD CONARD, V. M. D,. 

Lecturer on Veterinary Obstetrics, and Demonstrator of Veteri- 
nary Surgery. 



•WARD FREMONT SPRENKEL. M. D., 
Assistant Instructor in ObGtetrics. 

SAFFORD GOODWIN PERRY. D. D. S., 
Lecturer on Operative Dentistry. 

CLARENCE JAMES MARSHALL, V. M. D., 

Demonstrator of Clinical Veterinary Medicine. 



ANDREW SWANTON BURKE, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 
JOSEPH REX HOBENSACK. M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
ALOYSIUS OLIVER JOSEPH KELLY, M. D.. 

Associate in Medicine. 
JAMES AUGUSTINE DOWDEN, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry, 
WILLIAM COOPER MARSH, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

FREDERICK EHRENFELD, Ph. D.. 

Instructor in Geology and Mineralogy. 
THOMPSON SEISER WESTCOTT, M. D., 

Associate in Pediatrics. 

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LEWIS HARRY ADLER, Jr.. M. D.. 

Prosector to the Professor of Anatomy. 
LEON ALONZO RYAN. Ph. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Chemistry, 
EDWIN BURKET TWITMYER, M. S.. Ph. D., 

Instructor in Psychology. 

WILLIAM HORACE HOSKINS. D. V. S., 

Instructor in Veterinary Jurisprudence, Ethics and Business 

Methods. 

WILSON ZERFING, D. D. S.. 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

AUGUSTUS OTTO KOENIG, B. S.. M. D.. 
Demonstrator of Dental Metallurgy. 

HORATIO C WOOD, Jr., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Pharmacodynamics. 
HENRY AUSTIE NEWBOLD, M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Practical Pharmacy. 
GEORGE DOUGLAS MORTON, M. D.. 

Assistant Instructor in Sui^ery. 
GEORGE FETTEROLF, A. B-, M. D., 

Acting Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
THOMAS TURNER THOMAS, M. D., 

Assistant Instructor in Siu^ery. 
GEORGE JANVIER PAYNTER, D. D.S.. 

Demonstrator of Tooth Modeling. 
WILLIAM RUFUS NICHOLSON, Ph. B.. M. D.. 

Assistant Instructor in Obstetrics. 
JOHN JOSEPH ROBRECHT, M, D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 



SHERBOURNE WILLIAM DOUGHERTY, A. B.. 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 
HENRY DRAPER JUMP, M.D., 
Instructor in Medicine. 



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FREDERICK WILLIAM ALLEN, D, D. S.. 

Demonstrator of Operative Technics. 
RICHARD FRANCIS GERLACH, M. D., 

As^tant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 



WALTER GRAY ELMER, M, D.. 
Assistant Instructor in Medicine. 

NORMAN GREY, 

Lecturer on New Jersey Practice. 



CHARLES FRANCIS OSBORNE, 

Instructor in the History of Architecture. 

JOHN ANDREW McCLAIN, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

JOSEPH GARRETT RICKEY, D. D. S., 
Assistant Demonstrator of Physiology. 

JOHN FRANCIS WALSH. M. D., 

Assistant Prosector to the Professor of Anatomy. 
BROOKE MELANCTHON ANSPACH, M. D., 

Instructor in Gynecology. 
EDWARD LODHOLZ, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Physiology. 
WALTER SCOTT HANLEY, M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Physiology. 

ROBERT NEWTON WILLSON, A. B., M. D., 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis, and Students' Physician. 



HENRY KUHNRATH PANCOAST, M, D., 

Lecturer on Skiagraphy, and Assistant Instnictor in Surgery. 
CLARENCE GILBERT HOAG, A. M., 

Instructor in English. 



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OPFtCBRS. 



NATHANIEL GILDERSLEEVE, U. D.. 

First Assistant in Bacteriology. 
NORMAN BEECHEY GWYN, M. B., 

Instructor in Medicine. 



WILLIAM EDWARD QUICKSALL, M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
MAURICE OSTHEIMER, A. B., M. D., 

Instructor in Pediatrics. 
CHARLES CAMBLOS NORRIS. M. D., 

Instructor in Gynecology. 
HOWARD ANDERSON SUTTON, B. A., M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 
JOHN BERTON CARNETT, M. D., 

Instructor in Surgery. 
•NORTON DOWNS. M. D., 

Assistant Instructor in Obstetrics. 
STEPHEN MERRILL WEEKS, D, D. S., 

Demonstrator of Orthodontia. 
GEORGE OGLEVIE JARVIS, Ph. B., M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Applied Anatomy. 
VICTOR BAYNARD WOOLLEY. B.S., 

Lecturer on New Jersey Practice, 



WILLIAM GUY BRYAN HARLAND, M. D., 

Instructor in Laryngology. 
HOLMES WALKER, M. D., 

Instructor in Laryngology. 
HORACE PUGH FRY, B. S. in E. E.. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 
WILLIAM THOMAS LYLE. C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

• Resigned. 



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JOSEPH HALL HART, Ph.D., 

Instructor in PhyBics. 
JOHN FRANKLIN MEYER, A. M., Pa. D., 

Instructor in Physics, 

JOHN THOMAS CARPENTER. M. D., 

Lecturer on Ophthalmology. 
ALBERT WADE JARMAN, D. D. S.. 

Demonstrator o( Prosthetic Dentistry. 
WALTER WARNER McKAY, D. D.S., 

DemonstTBtor of Operative Dentistry. 
WILLIAM RUSSELL ANDRESS, V. M. D., 

Demonstrator of Meat Inspection. 
RAE SHEPARD DORSETT, B.S., M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

HENRY NORRIS, M. D„ 

Assistant Instructor in Surgery. 

JEHU THOMAS GORE, D. D. S.. 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
DANIEL MANSFIELD HOYT, M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Pharmacodynamics, 
HENRY EDWARD EHLERS, B. S. in M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 



CHESTER EDWARD DIMICK, A. B., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 



ROBERT HARBISON HOUGH, A. M., Ph. D,. 

Instructor in Physics. 
flAROLD CHARLES BARKER, B. S., A. M.. 

Instructor in Physics. 



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AUTHOR HENDRIX GILL. M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 



JAMES WILLIAM McCONNELL, M. D., 

Instructor in Neurology. 
THEODORE HERMAN WEISENBURG. M. D.. 

Instructor in Neurology and in Neuro-pathology. 
EDWARD ADAMS SHUMWAY, B.S., M. D.. 

Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
JOHN HOWARD JOPSON, M. D., 

Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN WEAVER LUTHER, M. D., 

Instructor in Gynecology. 
PHILIP BOVIER HAWK, M. S., Ph, D., 

Demonstrator of Physiological Chemistry. 
ELIJAH HOLLINGSWORTH SITER, M. D., 

Instructor in Gen ito- Urinary Diseases. 
WALTER STEWART CORNELL, B. S.. M. D., 

Demonstrator of Osteology, and Assistant Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 
WILLIAM TAYLOR CUMMINS, M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology. 
HENRY RIHL ALBURGER, M. D., 

Acting Demonstrator of Pathology. 
CHARLES JAMES HATFIELD, A.M., M. D.. 

Assistant Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES HOMER JACO, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
ALFRED PYLE LEE. D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
GEORGE PAUL MULLER, M.D., 

Instructor in Surgery. 



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JOSEPH SPRAGG EVANS, Jr.. A. B., M. D.. 

Instmctor in Medicine. 
•BERNARD KOHN, M. S., M. D., 

Assistant Instructor in Medicine. 

GEORGE MORRIS DORRANCE, M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, and Assistctnt Instructor 
in Sureery. 
CARL DUDLEY CAMP. M. D.. 

Assistant in Neuro-pathology. 
UYER SOLIS-COHEN, A. B., M. D., 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 

HEILNER MAXWELL LANGDON. M. D., 
Instructor in Ophthalmology. 



GEORGE BYRON GORDON, Sc. D.. 

Instructor in Anthropology. 
HENRY WOLF BIKL£, A. M., LL. B., 

Lecturer on Law. 



JOHN FRAZER, B.S. in Chem,, A.M., 
Instructor in General Chemistry. 

THOMAS POTTER McCUTCHEON, Jr. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 



EDWARD PRESTON MOXEY, Jr.. B. S. in E 

Assistant in Accounting. 
JOHN CHRISTIE DUNCAN, M. S., 

Assistant Instructor in American Industries. 
SOLOMON HUEBNER. M. S.. Ph. D., 

Instructor in Commerce and Insurance. 



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WILLIAM MELLOR. 

Instructor in Wood Working. 

HENRY GEBHART, B, S. in E. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, 
WORRALL ELIZABETH SHARPLESS TEMPLE, B. S. in E.E., 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

WILLIAM EDWARD BARROWS, Jr., B.S.in E. E., 
Instructor in Electrical Engineering, 

DANIEL ROBERTS HARPER, 3d, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

LOUIS KRAUTTER, Jr., B. S. in Biol., 
Assistant in Botany. 

EDWIN MILLER FOGEL, A. B,, 
Assistant in German. 

EDWARD BROWNING MEIGS, M. D.. 

Assistant in Physiology. 
HENRY STRAUSS WIEDER. M. D.. 

AssistantDemonstratorof Anatomy, and of Surgical Pathology. 

SAMUEL LEOPOLD. M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology 

PHILIP SAMUEL STOUT. M. D.. 

Voluntary Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology, 

ASTLEY PASTON COOPER ASHHURST. A. B., M.D., 

Prosector to the Associate Professor of Applied Anatwny. 
MICHAEL THOMAS BARRETT, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 
FREDERICK AUSTIN PEESO, D.D. S., 

Lecturer and Special Instructor in Crown-aod-Bridge Work. 
REUBEN, ARNOLD BOGIA. M. D.. . . 

Astistant in Physiology. 



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JOHN BUSCH, M. D., 

Assistant Instructor in Surgery. 

JEAN JACQUES ABRAM VAN KAATHOVEN, M. D., 

Asastant Instructor in Surgery. 
I VALENTINE LEVI, M. D., 

Assistant Instructor in Pediatrics. 



THOMAS STOTESBURY GITHENS. M. D.. 

Voluntary Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology. 

ALEXANDER AUGUSTUS UHLE. M, D.. 

Assistant InstruAor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

EWING TAYLOR. A. B., M. D., 
Associate in Anatomy. 

WILLIAM HENRY FITZGERALD ADDISON. B. A., M. B., 
Demonstrator of Normal Histology. 

RUFUS BELL SCARLETT, M. D.. 

Voluntary Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology, 

WILKIE NELSON COLLINS, A. B.. 

AssiBtaiit in English. 
HERMAN CLAUDE BERRY. A. B.. B. S. in C. E. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
HAROLD EZRA HILTS. B. S. in C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

ALBERT WILLIAM KIEFER. B. S. in C. E.. 
Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

ALBERT JOSEPH HOULE, E. M., B. S.. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
RAYMOND C SEMPLE, 

Assistant in Civil Engineering. 
ROGER CLARK WELLS. Ph. D,. 

Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
DUNLAP JAMISON McADAM, A. M., 

Assistant in Chemistry. 



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4^ OFFICBKS. 

WILLIAM MILTON BARR, B. S., M. A., 

Afisistaat in General Chemistry. 
GEORGE EMERSON CROPOOT. B. S. in M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
CHARLES ARTHUR FULLER, B. S. in M. E.. 

loEtructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON PAYNE. A. M.. B. M. E., 
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

MARTIN AUGUSTUS DOYLE, B, M, E.. 
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

EARL DEAN HOWARD. Ph. M., 
Instructor in Banking. 



LOUIS WILLIAM FLACCUS, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Philosophy. 
HENRY LAMAR CROSBY, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Greek, 
MAURICE JEFFERIS BABB, B. S.. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
WALTER KELLER HARDT, B. S. in Ecoi 

As^stant in Accounting. 
GEORGE BENJAMIN MANGOLD. A. M., 

Instructor in Sociology. 
JOSEPH HENRY STANNARD. Jr., 

Instructor in Drawing. 
THOMAS CONWAY, Jr., B. S. in Econ., 

Assistant in Finance. 
GEORGE WILLIAM KELLER, 

Assistant in Drawing. 
LIVINGSTON CORSON, B. S.. 

Assistant in English. 



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PERCY VAN DYKE SHELLY, B. S.. 

Assistant in English. 
JACOB LYNFORD BEAVER, E. E.,. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 
PHILIPPE DE LA ROCHELLE. B-te-L., 

Assistant in French, 



LOUIS HENRY LOSSE, B. S. in C. E.. 
Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

FRANCIS MARKOE RIVINUS, A. B., 
Assistant in English. 

LEWIS BURTON HESSLER, A, B., 
Asmstant in English. 

HUGER ELLIOTT, B. S., 
Instructor in Architecture. 

ELON KANAGA. D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Crown-and -Bridge Woric 

NORMAN LOREY ROBERTS, T). D. S., 
Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 



PENN-GASKELL SKILLERN, Jr., M. D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Normal Histology. 

HAROLD BACON WOOD, M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Normal Histology. 

CLIFFORD BAILEY FARR, A. B , M. D., 
Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 

DAVID KAPP, 

Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology. 

WILLIAM WARDER CADBURY, A. M., M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Pathology ,and of Pharmacodyn- 



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48 oppicsRB. 

RALPH S LAVENSON, M. D.. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Gross Morbid Anatomy. 
JOHN SPEESE, M. D.. 

Voluntary Asmstant Demonatrator of Surgical Pathdogy. 
THOMAS BEAVER HOLLOWAY, M. S., M. D., 

Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
CHARLES ANDREW FIFE, A. B., M. D., 

Instructor in Pediatrics. 

NAEFIE EPRIGHT SUTPHEN, 
Inatmctor in Wood-working. 



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PART II 



FACtrijTIES Aia> DEPABTKOBNTS OF 
1M8TBUCTION 



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THE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 

CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D.. Provost. 

EDGAR F. SMITH, Ph. D., Sc. D.. LL. D., Vicb-Pkotost, and 
Professor of Chemistry. 

GEORGE F. BARKER. M. D., Sc. D., LL. D.. Emeritus Professor 
of Physics. 

HUGH A. CLARKE, Mus. Doc. Professor of the Science of 
Music. 

JOSEPH T- ROTHROCK. B. S., M. D.. Professor of Botany. 

MORTON W. EASTON, Pk. D.. Professor of English and Com- 
parative Philology. 

JOHN BACH McMASTER, A. M.. Lirr. D.. LL. D., Professor of 
American History. 

ADAU EBTBBKT ProfcssoT of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy. 
Rbv. HERMANN V. HILPRECHT, Ph. D., D. D.. LL. D., clark 

Research Professor of Assyriology, and Professor of Semitic 

Philology and Archsol<^ry. 
MORRIS JASTROW, Jr.. Ph. D., Professor of Semitic Languages. 
HENRY W. SPANGLER, M. S., whitnby Professor of Dynamical 

Engineering. 
WILLIAM A. LAMBERTON. A, M.. Litt. D.. Professor of the 

Greek Language and Literature. 
SIMON N. PATTEN. Ph. D., LL. D., Professor of PoUtical 

Economy, 
FELIX E. SCHELLING. A. M.. Ph. D.. Litt. D.. johk wblsb 

CBNTBNMiAL Professor of History and English Literature. 
ARTHUR W. GOODSPEED, Ph. D„ Professor of Phj-sics. 
EDWIN S. CRAWLEY. Ph. D., thomas a. bcott Professor of 

Mathematics. 
GEORGE E. FISHER. A. M.. Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics. 
EDWARD P. CHEYNEY. A. M.. Professor of Europwn History. 



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S' THE COLLBOB. 

WARREN P. LAIRD, Professor of Architecture. 

HUGO A. RENNERT, Ph. D., Professor of Romance Lauguagn 
aad Literatures. 

EDGAR MARBURG, C. E„ Professor of CivU Engineering. 

JOHN M. MACFARLANE, D. Sc, Professor of Botaay". 

MARTIN G. BRUMBAUGH, A. M., Ph. D.. LL. D„ Professor of 
Pedagogy. 

AMOS P. BROWN, Ph. D., Professor of Mineralogy and Ge- 
ology. 

•HERBERT E. EVERETT, Professor of the History of Art. 

LIGHTNER WITHER, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

WILLIAM ROMAINE NEWBOLD, Ph. D.. Professor of Phi- 
losophy. 

HENRY GIBBONS, A. M., Professor of Latin Literature. 

CHARLES L. DOOLITTLE, C. E., Sc. D., plowbr Professor of 
Astronomy. 

MARION D. LEARNED. Ph. D., L. H. D., Professor of the Ger- 
manic Languages and Literatures. 

EDWIN G. CONKLIN. Ph, D., Professor of ZoOlogy. 

JOSIAH H. PENNIMAN, Ph. D., Professor of English Literature, 
and Dean of the Facultt. 

EMORY R. JOHNSON. Ph. D., Professor of Transportation and 
Commerce. 

LEO S. ROWE, Ph. D., Professor of Political Science. 

SAMUEL McC. LINDSAY, Ph. D.. Professor of Sociology. 

tALEXANDER C. ABBOTT, M. D , pbppbr Professor of Hygiene 
and Bacteriology. 

ISAAC J, SCHWATT. Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

DANIEL B. SHUMWAY, Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of the 
Germanic Languages and Literatures. 

WILLIAM EASBY, Jr., B. S.. C. E., Assistant Professor of Civil 
Engineering. 

♦WILLIAM N. BATES, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Greek. 



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»ACULTY. 53 

CLARENCE G. CHILD, Ph. D., L. H. D.. Assistant Professor of 
English. 

JOHN C. ROLFE, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of the I^tin Language 
and Literature. 

HERMAN V. AMES. A. M„ Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of Ameri- 
can History. 

EDGAR A. SINGER, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Phi- 
losophy. 

WILLIAM E. LINGELBACH, Pb. D.. Assistant Professor of 
European History, 

WALTON B. McDANlEL. A. M.. Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of 

J. VERNE STANFORD, B. S.. M. E., Assistant Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering. 

DAVID H. BERGEY, A. M., H. D., Assistant Professor of Bacteri- 
ology. 

Rbv. ALBERT T. CLAY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Semitic 
Philology and Archsology. 

HERBERT S. JENNINGS, Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of 
Zoology. 

PAUL P. CRET, Arch. Diploma du Gouvemement Tzan^aa, 
Assistant Professor of Design. 

HOWARD C. IVES, Ph. B., C. E., Assistant Professor of Clvfl 
Engineering. 

EDWARD C. WESSELHOEFT, A. M., Assistant Professor of 
German. 

HORACE CLARK RICHARDS, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 
Physics. 

GEORGE H. HALLETT, A.M., Ph. D,. Assistant Profesaor of 
Mathematics. 

ARTHUR H. QUINN, Ph.D., Assbtant Professor of English. 

JAMES T. YOUNG, Pb. D., Assistant Professor of Administra- 
tion, and Director of the wharton School of Finance and 
Commerce. 

ERIC DOOLITTLE, C. E., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

CORNELIUS WEYGANDT, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 



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54 THE COLLBGB. 

EDWARD S. HEADS, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Finance. 
THOMAS NOLAN, M.S., A.M.. Assistant Professor of ArcH- 

tecture. 
CARL KELSEY, B. A., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Sodology. 
HENRY B. EVANS, M. E., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe< 

matics. 
ARTHUR C. ROWLAND, Ph.D., AssistantProfessorof Medieval 

History. 
HAROLD W. BROWN, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical 

Engineering, 
OWEN L. SHINN, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
WALTER T. TAGGART, Pa, D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

INSTRUCTORS, 
J. PERCY MOORE, Ph. D., Instructor in Zodlogy. 
JOHN W. HARSHBERGER, Ph. D,, Instructor in Botany. 
JOHN J, MORRIS, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
DANIEL L. WALLACE, Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 
PHILIP P. CALVERT. Ph. D., Instructor in Zoology. 
GEORGE WALTER DAWSON, Instructor in Drawing. 
HUGH W. McCONNELL, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
T. HARVEY DOUGHERTY, Assistant Instructor in Zoology. 
FRANK ALLISON HAYS, Instructor in Pen-and-ink Rendering. 
FREDERICK EHRENFELD, Ph.D., Instructor in Geology and 

Mineralogy. 
EDWIN B. TWITMYER. M. S., Ph. D.. Instructor in Psychology. 
Rbv. FLORIAN J. C. VURPILLOT, B. A.. B. D,, Instructor in 

French. 
CHARLES P. OSBORNE, Instructor in the History of Architec- 

ture, 
CLARENCE G. HOAG, A. M., Instructor in English. 
HORACE P. FRY. B, S, in E. E., Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 
WILLIAM T. LYLE, C, E,, Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
FREDERICK H. SAFFORD, A. M., Ph. D,, Instructor in Matb«- 

matJcB. 
JOSEPH H. HART. Ph, D., Instructor in Physics. 



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IMBTKUCTOKS. 55 

J. FRANKLIN MEYER, A. M., Pb. D., Instructor in Physics. 
HENRY E. EHLERS. 6. S. in U. E., Instructor in Mechanical 



J. RUSSELL SMITH, Ph. D., Instmctor in Commerce. 
CHESTER E. DIMICK, A. B., Instructor in Mathematics. 
SOMERS F. RANDOLPH, Instructor in Iron Work. 
ROBERT H. HOUGH, A. M., Ph. D., Instructor in Physic*. 
HAROLD C. BARKER, B. S.. A. M., Instructor in Physica. 
AUTHOR H. GILL. M. E.. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
THOMAS D. BOLGER, B. S-, Instructor in English. 
GEORGE B. GORDON, Sc. D., Instructor in Anthropology. 
PHILIP R. WHITNEY, S. B., Instructor in Architecture. 
JOHN FRAZER, B. S. in Chem., A. M., Instructor in General 

Chemistry. 
THOMAS P. McCUTCHEON, Jr., A. B., Instructor in Chem- 

isti7. 
WARD W. PIERSON, B. S., Instructor in Political Science. 
EDWARD P. MOXEY,Jr., B.S. in Econ., Assistant in Account- 



SOLOMON HUEBNER, M. S., Ph. D., Instructor in Commerce 

and Insurance. 
EDWARD Z. DAVIS, Ph. D., Instructor in German. 
ROLAND fe. KENT. A. M.. Ph. D., Instructor in Greek and Latin. 
WILLIAM MELLOR, Instructor in Wood Working. 
HENRY GEBHART, B. S. in E. E., Instructor in Mechanical 

Engineering. 
WORRALL E. S. TEMPLE. B. S. in E. E., Instructor in Elec 

trical En^neeriag. 
WILLIAM E, BARROWS, Jr., B. S. in E. E.. Instructor in 

Electrical Engineering. 
D. ROBERTS HARPER, 3d, B. S.. Instructor in Physico. 
LOUIS KRAUTTER, Jr., B. S. in Biol., Assistant in Botany. 
EDWIN M. FOGEL, A. B,. Assistant in German. 
WILKIE N. COLLINS, A. B,, Assistant in Engjish. 



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50 THB COLLBOB. 

HERMAN C. BERRY. A, B„ B. S. in C. E.. Instructor in Civil 
Engineering. 

HAROLD E. HILTS, B. S. in C. E., Instructor in Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

ALBERT W. KIEFER, B. S. in C. E., Instructor in CivU Engi- 
neering. 

ALBERT J. HOULE, E. M., B. S., Instructor in Civil Engi- 
neering. 

RAYMOND C. SEMPLE, Assistant in Civfl Engineering. 

ROGER C. WELLS. Ph. D., Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

DUNLAP J. McADAM. A. M., Assistant in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM M. BARR. B. S.. M. A., Assistant in General 
Chemistry. 

GEORGE E. CROFOOT, B. S. in M. E., Instructor in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

CHARLES A. FULLER. B. S. in M. E., Instructor in Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

WILLIAM J. PAYNE. A. M., B. M. E., Instructor in Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

MARTIN A, DOYLE. B. M. E.. Instructor in Mechanical Engi- 

EARL D. HOWARD, Ph. M., Instructor in Banking. 
JOSEPH A. BECK. B. S. in Econ., Assistant in Political Science. 
ENOCH M. BANKS, Ph. D., Instructor in Economics. 
LOUIS W. FLACCUS, Ph. D.. Instructor in Philosophy. 
HENRY L. CROSBY, Ph. D., Instructor in Greek. 
MAURICE J. BABB. B. S., Instructor in Mathematics. 
WALTER K. HARDT. B. S. in Econ., Assistant in Accounting. 
GEORGE B. MANGOLD, A. M., Instructor in Sociology. 
JOSEPH H. STANNARD, Jr., Instructor in Drawing. 
THOMAS CONWAY, Jr., B. S. in Econ., Assistant in Finance. 
GEORGE W. KELLER. Assistant in Drawing. 
LIVINGSTON CORSON, B. S., Assistant in English. 
PERCY V. D. SHELLY, B. S.. Assistant in English. 
JACOB L. BEAVER, E. E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 



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FACULTY COMUITTBBS. 57 

PHILIPPE DE LA ROCUELLE, B-ds-L., Assistant in French. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, A. M., LL. B.. Instructor in Commercial 

Uw. 
LOUIS H. LOSSE, B. S. in C. E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
P. MARKOE RIVINUS, A. B., Assistant in English. 
LEWIS B. HESSLBR, A. B., Assistant in English. 
HUGER ELLIOTT, B. S., Instructor in Architecture. 
NEAPIE E. SUTPHEN, Instructor in Wood-worldng. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL. 
Ancient Lakouaobs. — Professor Laubbktoh. 
HoDBKN Languaqbs. — Professor Rbhnbkt. 
Enoush. — Professor Schbllino. 
Phiix>sophy. — Professor Witubb. 
HiSTOKT. — Professor HcMastbr. 
Econouics. — Professor Pattbk. 

Matubuatics — AsTRONOUY, — ProfessoT C. L. Doolittlb. 
pHTSica. — Professor Goodspbbd. 
Chbuistry. — Professor Smith. 
BlOLOOV. — Professor CoHKUM. 
Architbcturb. — Professor Laird. 
Mechanical Enginbbrikq. — Professor Spanolbr. 
Civil Enoinbbrino. — Professor Marburo. 



FACULTY STANDING COMMITTEES. 



a. On thb Admission o^ Spbcial and Partial Students. — Pro- 
fessor Marburo, Professor Laird, Professor C. L. Doolittlb, Pro- 
fessor Macfarlanb. 

3. On Advancbd Standing and ok Special and Partial 
Students. — Professor Crawlbt, Professor McDanibl, Professor 
Richards. 



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TBB COLLKOB. 



J. On Students' Rbsidbhcbs. — Dr. Srinn, Dr. Harsbbbrobk. 

6. On Athlbtic Orcanizations, — Professor Suiih. 

7. Oh Non-Athletic Organ izatiohs. — Professor Child. 

8. Om Rostbr. — Professor Singer, Professor Laird, Professor 
Easbt, Professor Young, Professor Stanford, Professor Evans, 
Dr. Calvert, Dr. Shinn. 

9. On Library, — Professor Lambbrtoh, Professor Crbtnby, 
Professor Nbwbold, Professor C. L. Doolittlb. 

—Professor Suith, Professor Brown, 



13. On Nowinations.— The Dban, Professor Spanglbr, Pro- 
fessor CoNKLiN, Professor Schbllinc, Professor Marburg, Pro- 
fessor Laubebton. 



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I>IVISIONS OF THE COLLBOE. 



The Cc4Iege Faculty conducts the following counet: 
I. — (In thb School op Akts.) 
I. The Course in Arte and Science. 
a. The Courses in Biology.* 
3, The Course in Music.* 

II. — (In thb Towns Scientific School.) 
I. The Courses in Architecture, 
a. The Courses in Mechanical and in Electrical Engineering. 

3. The Couree in Civil Engineering. 

4. The Course in Chemistry. 

5. The Couree in Chemical En^eering. 

III. — (In thb Wharton School of Pihance and Cohmbkcb.) 
I. The Course in Finance and Commerce. 
9. The Evening School of Accounts and Finance. 
IV. — ^Tbb Courses for Tbachbrs.* 
V. — ^Trb Suhmbr School Coursbs.* 



I.— CouRSBS !{« THB School of Arts. 

I. Th* Count tw Arts and Science .—T^as course leads to the 
d^ree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, according to the 
languages studied. These students who present Latin and Greek 
for admisGion, and who take in College Greek 331, and Latin 431 
and 43a, receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts; other students 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

a. Tfu Courst in Biology.^-Ttda courae embraces a certain 
■mount of required work in biological studies, and in English, Math- 
ematics, Langu^es, Physics, Chemistry, etc. In the latter portion 
of the course the elective principle is active. Graduates receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Biology. 



* Open to both m 



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6o 1 

ta. A Sp*CMl Count \n Biology. — This course extends over two 
ye&re, and embraces principally studies in Botany. Zoology and 
Anatomy, It leads to a certificate of proficiency. 

3. The Course in Music. — This course extends over four yean 
and leads to a certificate of proficiency. Those who obtain such 
certificate may proceed after further study to the degree of Bach- 
dor of Music. The course is open to special students only. 



II. — Courses in thb Towns ScrENTtFic School. 
Candidates intending to take any one of the technical courses in the 
College are strongly recommended to devote, if possible, at least one 
year to general studies, before taking up their technical taork. 

(a). // the candidate presents for admission the requirements for 
the course in Arts and Science, he enters that course for one or more 
years, during uAicA period he takes the additional Mathematics and 
Physics required for admission to the technical courses, and pursues 
such other studies as he may elect. Only those students, however, 
fufro have studied Plane Trigonometry prior to entering College may 
lake Physics as a part of the course in the first year. Students intend- 
ing to lake only one year in the course in Arts and Science before 
entering a technical course are advised, therefore, to offer Physics for 
admission, if possible, in addition to the regular entrance require- 
ments to the course in Arts and Science, if such students have not 
previously taken Plane Trigonometry. 

(b). // the candidate presents for admission the requirements for 
the technical courses, and wishes to spend a year in general studies, 
it is suggested that he lake, in the course in Arts and Science, the fol- 
lowing subjects: 

History four hours a week. 

Economics two hours a week. 

Foreign Languages (1) ..about six hours (fhre* in each). 

English three hours a week. 

Public Speaking one hour a week. 

Accounting three hours a week. 

It is not intended that the list of studies here outlined shall b* pre- 
scribed, in the sense that no variations will be permitted. 

I. The Course in Architecture. — This course extends over four 
years, devoted principally to technical studies in Architecture, and 



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DIVISIONS or TBB COLLBGB. 6l 

leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science ic Architecture. By a 
prescribed comtiiiiation of subjects in this course with thoee oSered 
in the course in Arts and Science, a c&ndidate for the A. B. degree 
may obtain also the Bachelor's degree in Architecture by devoting 
JM years of work to both courses. 

la. A Special Course in Architecture. — This course extends over 
two years, and embraces technical studies in Architecture. It leads 
to a certificate of proficiency. 

1. The Course in Mechanical Engineering. — This course extends 
over four years, devoted principally to tec^inical studies in Mechan- 
ical Engineering, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Ifechanical Engineering. 

3. Th« CouTS* in Electrical Engineering, — This course extends 
over four years, devoted principally to technical studies in Blectncal 
Engiaeerii^, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

4. The Course in Cwil Engineering. — This course extends over 
four years, devoted principally to technical studies in Civil Engi- 
neeiing, and leads to the d^ree of Bachelor of Science in Civil 



5. The Course in Chemistry. — This course extends over four 
years, devoted principally to studies in theoretical and practical 
Chemistry. It leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry. 

6. The Course in Chemical Engineering. — This course extends 
over four years, and embraces technical studies selected from the 
couises in Chemistry and Mechanical Engineering. It leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering. 



Ill, — COOKSBS I 

I. The Course in Finance and Commerce. — This course embraces 
studies in Economics, Political and Social Science, Business Law, 
Banking and Finance, History, English Language, etc. The work 
Ji designed to equip students for definite careers in business, the 
(tudy of law, the public service, social work and teaching. Grad- 
nates receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics. 

iffl. A Special Course in Business Practice and Banking. — This 
coune extends over two years, and leads to a certificate of pro- 
ficiency. 



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6a TBB COLLBQB. 

3. Tht Evtuing School of AccrmKts and Finance. — This couise of 
three yeais, four evenings in each week, is intended for those who 
are prevented by business occupations during the day from taking 
regular college work. For the current year the «rork consists of 
studies in Bu^ess Law, Accounting, Finance and Industrial Han- 
agcment. 



IV, — The Courses for Teachers.' 
These courses are spegally arranged to meet the needs of teachers 
who wish to puisue work in one or more subjects. The classes meet 
on Sattu^ays at hours convenient to the students who attend them. 
They lead to no degree, but a certificate of study is awarded upon 
the satisfactory completion of any couise. The Courees for 
Teachers are open to both men and women. 



V. — The StiuwBK Sckooi, Courses. 

Diuing the summer of 1905 the College Faculty offered courses 
of instruction in the following subjects: Architecture, Botany, 
Chemistry, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathe- 
matics, Music, Physics, Political Science, and Psychology. 

Students who pursue Summer School courses with satisfaction 
to the instructors, and pass the assigned eiuuninations, receive 
certificates of study. No entrance examinations are required, and 
all courses are open to both men and women. 



ADMISSION TO COLLSGE. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class of the College 
enter either (i) by examination; or (1) upon diplomas of public 
high schools. Such diplomas may be accepted as complete or par- 
tial certificates in lieu of entrance examinations. For the regula- 
tions governing the admission of public high school graduates, see 
next page. 

(i) Admission BY Examination; Candidates may attend either 
the examinations conducted by the University, or those conducted 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. The following arc 
the portions of the Board's requirements which correspond, as 
nearly as may be, to the College reqtiirements as defined on pp. 
66-70. 



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63 

English A and B: 

History A (= A and B), C (= C) and D (=D); 
Latin A, B, C, D. L and M; 
Greek A. B. C, F and G; 
French A ( = Aand B); 
German A ( = A and B) ; 
Mathematics A, C, D, E; 

Physics; (in the College requirement, as it stands at present,' no 
laboratory work is included.) 

(i) Aduission on Public Hioh School Diplomas*: The diploma 
should bear date of the year in which the candidate proposes to 
cnler College; or, if it bear an earlier date, should be accompanied 
by a letter front a teacher, certifying that the candidate has been 
engaged in study during the twelve months immediately preced- 
ing his proposed entrance to College. 

With the diploma an official statement from the high school must 
be presented, giving in detail, by subjects and portions of subjects, 
the course pursued by the individual candidate in the high school to 
obtain the diploma, and the marks or grades he received from the 
school in his several subjects and portions of subjects during at 
least the last year of his attendance in the high school. These 
official statements should mention the amount of ground covered in 
each subject, as well as the time devoted to it. 

In addition to the above, it is required that specific information 
be given with regard to the course pursued by the candidate in each 
of the subjects required for admission, as stated below. 

In Enclish, state whether the reading prescribed by the New 
England Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools, or by 
the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle 
States and Maryland, has been completed, or give the list of books 
read in the course. 

in History, state what histories have been studied, what text- 
books have been used, and the total number of study periods 
devoted to each subject. 

In Mathematics, state whether the course in Algebra has been 
to quadratic equations, w has included quadratic equations, propor- 
tion and the progressions; whether that in Geometry has covered 

diplomai issued by the Regents of the University of the Slat* ot 
maa, and are credited according to the 
3t accomimila] by a diploma an not 



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64 1 

Plane Geometry, or Plane, Solid and Spheric&l Geometry ; whether 
Plane, or Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, have been studied- 
Give the names of the text-books used. 

In Foreign Languages, give the names o£ the authora and woris 
read and the number of books (in Ancient Languages) or pages (in 
Modern Languages) in each work. 

In Physics, the text-book used and the character of the wcn'k 
done should be stated. 

Blank forms, which may be used by high school principals in 
making out the statement of work done by candidates for admis- 
sion, may be had upon application to the Dean of the Collc^. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations are held in June and September. Cir- 
culars stating the days and the subjects of examinations for each day 
can be had. after April i , on appUcatio:i to the Dean of the College. 
In addition to the examination held at the University, examinations 
for entrance are held simultaneotisly in June in a number of places 
outside of Philadelphia. Information regarding the places and 
dates of these examinations in 1906 may be obtained upon appli- 
cation to the Dean. 

Every candidate for admission is required to furnish a testimonial 
of honorable dismissal from the school or college which he last 
attended, or from the tutor with whom he has studied. He must 
also refer- to two persons, preferably his teachers or employers, from 
whom information may be obtained. Testimonials and referencti 
must be sent to the Dean not later than Ike first day of the entranct 
examinations in June and September (June 14 and September ai, 
respectively, in ]9o6). 

Candidates who do not desire to take all their examinations in 
June or September may take part at one time and part at the other, 
making such division as they may elect; or they may take a part of 
their examinations one year in advance of their admission to College, 
OS follows : 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS. 
Candidates may present themselves one year in advance of their 
admission to College for examination in any portion of the subjects 
required for admission to the course they propose to enter, provided 
at least four topics are so ofEered. Every candidate for suck prelim*- 
nary examinations must present to the Dean of the College a certifi- 
cate of preparation from tke kead master of his school, or from his 



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ADMISSION TO COLLBCB. 65 

tutor, luaning the mbjecls in uihKh he is prepared, before he can be 
admitted to Ike examinations. When a candidate, hovjeuer. has been . 
in regular attendance at a school or academy during the year pre- 
ceding his application for admission, a certificate from a private 
tutor wiii not in itself be sufficient. 

Blank certificate forms may be obtained upon application to the 
Dean. 

Candidates may take preliminary examinations in June or Sep- 
tember. In cases where such examinations are to be taken at one 
of the authorized places outside of Philadelphia, certificates of 
preparation must be forwarded to the Dean of the College in time 
to reach him ten days before the first day set for the entrance 



No certificate giving credit for subjects passed at a preliminary 
examination will be issued imless the candidate passes in at least 
four subjects.* 

A candidate who presents himself for preliminary examinations 
in June may not present himself at the entrance examinations in 
the September following with the view of taking examinations in 
addition to those stated in the preliminary certificate received 
from his school in June. This rule, however, is not to be construed 
as forbidding a candidate for admission in any year from dividing 
his examinations between June and September of that year, if he 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO EACH COURSE. 
For trb Coubsb in Arts and Scibncb: 

All of the subjects contained in Ifi and two of the lan- 
guages contained in lit' (Candidates for the degree of 
A. B. are required to present Latin and Greek.) 
For tbb Coursb in Finance and Comubrcb (Wharton School): 
All of the subjects contained in I, and two of the lan- 
guages contained in II. 
Or, 
All of the subjects contained in I and mt, and one of 
the languages contained in 11. 

• The word " nibject " u here used refera to the mbdiviaon of the siamiiia- 
tioni in the diSenut bnnchn deagiuted by letten, u: English A. Ua,theniatici 
C, Greek D., etc. 

t The*e Roman numerala refer to aubdivinoas of tbeliit of subject* in wbkh 
entrance examliutionj ue held. See pp. 66-70. 



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66 THB COLLBOK. 

For THB CouBSB in Biolooy: 

All of the subjects contained in I, and two of the Ian- 
guagea contained in n, 

PoR THB Course in Music (see under Admission to Special and 

Partial Couises). 

For thr Course in Architecture: 

All of the subjects contained in I; French or German as 
contained in II; Mathematics D, and Physics, as contained 
in m. 
N. B.^It is strongly recommended that candidates offer French 
rather than German for admission to this course. 



All of the subjects contained in I; French or German as 
contained in 11; and all of the subjects contained in III. 

For the Course in Chemistry: 

All of the subjects contained in I; French or German 
as contained in II; and all of the subjects craitained in 



SUBJECTS OF EXAMINATION. 

The subjects of examination are in part the same for all candi- 
dates, in part dependent upon the course that the candidate desires 
to pursue. Under the captions I, II and HI, following, is given a 
list of all subjects in which entrance examinations are held. No 
candidate is required to pass in all of these subjects. The require- 
ments for each course are given in detail on the preceding page, 
and above. 

I. 
English. 

No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is notably- 
defective in spelling, punctuation, idiom or division into paragraphs. 

A. (i) Grammar and Analysis (as in Abbott's Hovi to Parse, 
or Murray's Advanced Lessons in Ettglish Composition, Analysis 
and Grammar), (a) The writing of several pa«^aphs, correct in 
Bpelling, punctuation, grammar and expression, written on subjects 



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taken from the foUowicg works, a general knowledge of which is 
required: 

For 1906, 1907 and 1908: Shakespeare's Macbeth and The Mer- 
chant of Venice; The Sir Roger die Coverley Papers in The Spectator; 
Irving's Life of Goldsmith; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner; Scott's 
Ivankoe and The Lady of ike Lake; Tennyson's Gareth and Lynelie, 
LanctU>l and Elaine and Passing of Arthur; Lowell's Vision of Sir 
Laanfal; George Eliot's Silas Mamer. 

B. A special knowledge of the subject-matter, form and structure 
of the following works: 

For 1906, 1907 and 1908: Shakespeare's Julius Ciesar; Milton's 
Lycidas, Comus, L'Allegro and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on 
Conciliation with America; Macaulay's Essay on Addison and Life 
of Johnson. 

History. 

Each candidate is examined in two of the four subjects, A, B, 
C, D. 

Outline maps will be furnished for the questions in historical 
gec^aphy which will form a part of each paper. 

Extra credit will be given for student note-books giving abstracts 
of collateral reading, notes of lectures, or digests of the text-book 
used. Such books should be certified by the candidate's teacher. 

A. Gbeek History to the death of Alexander, with due reference 
to Greek life, hterature and art. 

B. Roman History to the accession of Commodus. with due 
reference to litCTature and government. 

C. English History, with due reference to social and political 
development. 

D. Ambricah History. The questions will be upon the four 
following topics: 

1. Historical geography. Questions are to be answered by 
drawing on an outline map certain geographical boundaries. 

». The Colonial period, 

3. The Revolutionary period, 

4- The Constitutional period. Under this topic will be a few 
questions on civil government. 

Mathematics. 

A. Algebra to Quadratics, The tour fundamental operations for 

rational algebraic expressions; factoring; highest common factor; 

lowest common multiple; fractions, including complex fractions, 



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TRB COLLBOB. 



ratio and proportioi); linear equations, both numerical ftnd literal, 

contaimng one or more unknown quantities ; problems depending 
on linear equations ; radicals, including the extraction of the square 
root oC polynomials and of numbers; fractional and n^ative 



B> Quadratics, and beyond. Quadratic equations, and eqtUL- 
tions containing one or more unknown quantities that can be solved 
by the methods of quadratic equations ; problems depending upon 
such equations; the binomial theorem for positive integral ex- 
ponents; arithmetical and geometrical progressions, with appHca- 

C. Plane Geometry. The usual theorems and constnxctions of 
good text-booka, including the general properties of plane recti- 
linear figures; the circle, and the measurement of angles; similar 
polygons; areas; regular polygons, and the measurement of the 
circle. The solution of numerous original exercises, including loci 
problems. Applications to the mensuratioD of lines and plane 
surfaces. 

n. 

Greek. 
NoTB. — No separate grammar paper will henceforth be set: 
instead, questiona on inflection, derivation, oompoejtion ot words 
and on syntax will be asked under B and C. 

B. Xenophon; The first four books of the Anabasii. 

C. Homer: The first three books of the Iliad (omitting II; 484- 
end). 

D. Prose composition: continuous prose based upon Xenophon 
and other Attic prose of similar dif&culty. 

E. Sight translation, based on prose of no greater difficulty than 
Xenophon 's Anabasis. 

Latin. 

'Note. — In place of special papers, questions will hereafter be 

asked in connection with B, C and D on the infection, derivation, 

and composition of words, on syntax, and on geography, history, 

and mythology. 

B. Ccesar: Four books of the GaUtc War, preferably the first 

C. Cicero : Six Orations . The order of preference is indicated in 
the following list; The four against Catiline, those for Archias, th« 



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ADUI5SIOH TO COLLBOB. 69 

Hanilian Law, Marcellus, Sextus Roscius, Milo, Seslius, LigariuE, 
the fourteenth. Philippic. 

D. Vergil: the fiist six books of the Aeneid, with the scanning of 
the dactylic hexameter. 

P. Translation at sight: prose of no greater difficulty than the 
easier passages in Cicero's Orations. 

G. Latin prose C9nipositian : the translation into Latin of con- 
tinuous English prose based upon passages of moderate difficitlty in 
Cesar or Cicero. 

Fkencb. 

A. Grammar. The conjugation of the regular verbs and of the 
more frequently recurring irregular verbs; the forms and positions 
of the various pronouns and pronominal, demonstrative and inter- 
rogative adjectives; the inflections of nouns and adjectives; the 
use of the articles and the partitive constructions. This will be 
tested by the translation into French of sentences, or of a short 
connected passage. Questions upon points of grammar may be 

The satisfactory completion of this subject will involve the read- 
ing of at least one hundred duodecimo pages out of the four hundred 
prescribed under B. 

B. Sight Translation. Ability to render into good English 
ft pasGi^ of nineteenth century prose. The passage set will be 
adapted to the proEdency of students who have read not less than 
four hundred duodecimo pages from at least three authors. 

A. Grammar. The declension of nouns, articles (according to 

the historical classification), adjectives, pronouns; the conjugation 
of both strong and weak verbs (including the modal auxiharies); 
the elementary rules of syntax and word order. The test will 
consist in part of direct grammatical questions, and in part of 
translation of simple English into German. 

The satisfactory completion of this subject will involve the read- 
ing of at least one hundred duodecimo pages out of the two hundred 
prescribed under B. 

B. Sight Translation. The translation at sight of easy German 
prose into idiomatic English. The passages set will be selected from 
not less than three representative nineteenth century prose writers, 
and will presuppose the reading of not less than two hundred duo- 
decimo pages of easy German. 



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m. 

Mathematics. 

D. Solid Geometry. The usual theorems and constructions ot 
good t«xt-books, including the relations of planes and lines in 
space; the properties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, 
cylinders and cones; the sphere and the spherical triangle. The 
solution of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. 
Applications to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. 

E. Trigonomety. Plane Trigonometry, including the definitions 
and relations of the six trigonometrical functions as ratios; proof 
of important formulas; theory of logarithms and use of tables; 
solution of right and oblique plane triangles. 

Physics. 
As in Carhart and Chute's, or Gage's, Elements of Physics. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

(i) Students who present themselves for admission to advanced 
standing will be examined (a) in the subjects required for admission 
to the Freshman Class, and (6) in those subjects in the course for 
which the applicant desires to receive advance credit. 

At its option, the Committee on Admission to Advanced Stand- 
ing may accept, in the case of students who come from other col- 
leges, the work done at such colleges in any subject or subjects in 
lieu of examination, provided a statement is submitted properly 
certified by the authorities of such colleges, stating in detail the 
extent and character of the work done, and the grades attained. 

(2) Every applicant for admission to advanced standing who 
comes from another college must present a letter of honorable dis- 
missal from such college. Applicants who do not come from other 
colleges must conform in this regard to the regulations governing 
candidates for admission to the Freshman Class. 

<3) A graduate of another college of sufficient standing may be 
admitted without examination to the Senior Class as a regular 
student, provided (a) that his previous course has been such that 
in the judgment of the Committee on Admission to Advanced 
Standing he will be able to complete in one year the work required 
for the Bachelor's degree, in the course which he proposes to enter; 
and (6) that the professors in charge of the subjects which he pro- 
poses to take find that he has had the requisite preparation. 

(4) No student may be admitted as a candidate for a degree after 
the beginning of the Senior year. 



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ADMISSION TO COLLBOB. Jl 

ADMISSION TO SPECIAL AND PARTIAL COURSES. 

Every applicant for admission as a Special or Partial student is 
required to fill out a blank containing such questions as may seem 
necessary to detennine his general educational fitness, the reason- 
ableness of his application, and the propriety of entertainingit. The 
Committee on Admission to Special and Partial Courses may make 
supplementary inquiries of former teachers of the applicant, and 
ot others to whom it may be referred. 

In the case of special courses for which technical requirements are 
prescribed, or partial courses involving subjects requiring technical 
preparation, the head of the department concerned decides whether 
these requirements are satisfied. His decision on this point is final. 

The Committee, with this additional evidence, accepts or rejects 
the application, or makes the admission of the candidate conditional 
on his passing such entrance examinations as it may see fit to pre- 

Tbe requirements for admission to the several authorized special 
courses are as follows: 

Spbcial Coubse in Architbcturb. 

Candidates for admission to the two-year Special Course in Archi- 
tecture must be at least twenty-one years of age (unless graduates 
of public high schools), and must have spent two years at work in 
the office of a practicing architect; or must have had such other 
technical training as may, in the judgment of the Professor of 
Architecture, be considered an equivalent. 

They must further pass examinations in Mathematics A, C and D, 
and in Freehand and Instrumental Drawing. Tl.ose who desire 
to take the optional work in Mechanics of Materials are required 
to pass entrance examinations also in Mathematics E. 

Candidates who do not, at the time of admission, satisfy fully the 
requirements in Mathematics A, C and D, and in Freehand Draw- 
ing, must postpone work for which these are directly preparatory 
until a subsequent examination is passed. 

Special Course in Biolooy. 

The candidate must be at least eighteen years of age, and must 

satisfy the requirements for admission to the regular course, except 

in Latin, when only B and C or D are required. (For admission to 

the regular course in Biology see p. 66.) 



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SrsciAL Course in Business Practice and Banking. 

A two-year Special Course is offered in Business Practice and 
Banldiig. 

A candidate must satisfy one of the following requirements: 

I. He must be at least twenty-one years old, and must satisfy 
the professors in charge that he is qualified to take the work. 

a. He must be at least eighteen years old, and must show either: 
(a) that he has completed a public high school course of three years, 
or its equivalent, of a grade satisfactofy to the Committee on 
Finance and Commerce, or (6) that he is a graduate of a normal 

Special Course in Music. 
The qualifications required to enter the course are, first, a knowl- 
edge of the rudiments of music ; second, the abiUty to play on some 
instrument — preferably the piano or organ; and Utird, that portion 
of the entrance requirements designated as English A. 



OENGRAI, INFORMATION. 

STATUS AND CLASSIFICATION OP STUDENTS. 

A student under the College Faculty may be a Full Student, 
Special Student or Partial Student. 

A Full Student is one who pursues, in the manner prescribed 
by the Academic Council, one of the courses leading to a degree. 

A Special Student is one who pursues a course laid down by a 
professor or professors with the approbation of the Academic 
Council, with a view to a certificate of proficiency on the comple- 
tion of that course, (See page 71 and above.) 

A Partial Student is one who, under certain provisions, is 
permitted to pursue such individual subjects as he is competent 
to take. 

Full students in the courses in Arts and Science, Finance and 
Commerce, and in Biology are graduated upon the satisfactory com- 
pletion of sixty (60) units of work, a unit of work being one hour a 
week of attendance at lecture or recilalion, or two hours of laboratory 
work a week for one year. Full students in other courses which lead 
to a degree are graduated upon the satisfactory completion of tk4 
prescribed work. 



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OBHBKAL INFORMATION. J J 

(a) In trb School or Arts. 

A student with less than twelve (ii) units of work to his credit 
ftt the beginning of any college year shall be classed as a Freshman. 

A student who has to his credit at the beginning of any college 
year more than eleven (ir) and less than twenty-four (24) units 
of work shall be classed during that year as a Sophomore. 

A student who has to his credit at the beginning of any college 
year more than twenty-three (73) and less than thirty-nine (39) 
units of work shall be classed during that year as a Junior. 

A student who has to his credit at the beginning of any college 
year from thirty-nine (39) to forty-seven (47) units o£ work shall 
be classed during that year as a Junior, unless he gives notice of his 
inteation to try for his degree that year, in which case he shall be 
classed as a Senior. 

A student with forty-eight (4S) or more units of work to his 
credit at the beginning of any college year shall be classed as a 

(b) In ths Townb Scibmtimc School. 

A student in a course in the Towne Scientific School will be 

advanced to the nest higher class if, at the opening of the college 

year, he has credit in 60 per cent, of the total number of hours 

■cheduled in the University Catalogue as the work of the preceding 

FEES AND DEPOSITS. 
The amounts noted in the appended schedule are for Regular and 
Special Studenti, and are for the full academic year. Tuition fees 
are payable in two equal parts, on October t and February 1, 
re^>ectively. Remittances should be in c4sh, or by bank draft, 
certified cheque or postal money order, drawn for the exact amount 
due, made payable to the University of Pennsylvania, and sent to 
E. W. Mumford, Burear, Room 10a College Hall. An addition is 
made to fees not paid within thirty-one days. 

ConsBB. AMomn. 

Arts and Science -> / $150 00 

Pmance and Commerce i see statement on next page. -J 1 50 00 

Biology ' ^ JSo 00 

•Biology (Two-year Couree) 150 00 

• The fee for itudonU in the two-yesr coune in Biology who "fe ngaUnd &t 
a* nine tuna in tlw Deputownt of Uedidne. ii <ioa. 



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74 THB COLLEGE. 

CODRSB, AllOUHT 

Architecture Iijo i 

Mechanical or Electrical Engineering loo c 

Civil Engineering aoo c 

Chemical Engineering aoo e 

Chemistry aoo c 

Music 30 c 



The tuition fees for the courses in Arts and Science, Finance and 
Commerce, and Biology, are siic hundred dollars ($600.00) for 
the period, of instruction leading to the degree, one hundred and 
fifty dollars {$150.00) being paid by a regular student in each of 
the four years of his course. Students taking five years to finish 
the course may not be required to pay more than six hundred 
dollars ($600.00). Students who finish the course in less than 
tour years will, nevertheless, pay a total of six hundred dollars 
tuition before the degree is granted. Special arrangements as to 
fees will be made upon application in cases of students admitted 
to advanced standing on credits from other institutions. 

Feb for Gymnasium and Houston Club. 
A fee of ten dollars ($10.00) is added to the tuition fee of every 
male student in the college, for the privileges of the Gymnasium 
and the Houston Club. This fee is payable in two equal parts in . 
October 1 and February 1. Students in the (special) Mu^c and 
Teachers' Courses are not required to pay this tee. 

Pebs op Partial Students. 

The tuition tees of a Partial student in any course of the College 
are ten dollars ($10.00) a term tor each hour a week, or, in the case 
of laboratory or drawing-room work, ten dollars ($to.oo) a teim 
for each two hours a week. 

Feb for RE-ExAMtNATtON. 

A fee of five dollars ($5.00) is charged for every re-examination, 
after the first, that the student is permitted to take. 



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- tKPORUATION. 75 

Deposits. 
Each student (except students in Music and in the Teachers' 
Courses) is required to deposit on entering College ten dollais 
(Sio.oo) to cover loss of books, keys, etc., breakage in the labora- 
tories, or damage to University property. Students in Music 
deposit five dollars ($5,00). Students in Tf^achtTs' Courses, unless 
they take work in laboratories, arc not required to make a deposit. 
For students in the courses in Chemistry, and in Civil, Mechani- 
cal, Electrical or Chemical Engineering, the required deposit at 
entrance is twenty-five dollars ($15.00). Special and Partial stu- 
dents in these courses deposit twenty dollars ($20.00). Any 
balance is returned on graduation or withdrawal from College. 

Graduation and Certificate Fees. 



A graduation tee of twenty dollars ($30.00) is charged to each 
candidate for a baccalaureate degree, and of ten dollars ($10.00) to 
each candidate for the degree of Master of Science in Architec- 
ture. A like fee of ten dollars ($10.00) is charged to each candidate 
for the technical degree of Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, 
Chemical Engineer, or Electrical Engineer. The fee for Certifi- 
cates of Proficiency in Special Courses is ten dollars ($10.00). No 
student will be recommended for a degree or certificate unlU all fees 
due the University hove been paid. 

BOARD AND LODGING. 

Accommodation for students is provided in the Dormitories. 

Plans, prices, and all other information relating to the Dormitories 

may be had upon application to the Bursar. In order to make 

sure of rooms, students are advised to apply as early as April t if 

A large temporary Dining Hall, or " Commons," is located at the 
comer of Spruce and Thirty-sixth streets, where about seven 
hundred students may obtain board, at the rate of $3,50 a week. 

Students who prefer to take board and Icdging elsewhere than in 
the Dining Hall and Dormitories, may obtain accommodations in 
houses near College Hall for $5.00 a week and upwards. A printed 
list of approved lodgings may be obtained at the Dean's office. 
College Hall, after September 15. The average price paid by 
students in such quarters is $5.50 a week. The figures given here- 
with are based upon the cost of Hving either in the Dormitories and 
Dining Hall, or in a boarding-house. 



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76 I 

Hin. Uu. 

Board and lodging — thirty-seven weeks $185 00 (350 00 

Tuition and other fees (according to the character 

and year of the course) 160 00 210 00 

Text-books (estimated) 10 00 as '^ 

Graduation or Certificate Fee 10 00 ao 00 

$365 00 $605 00 

DIVISION OF SESSIONS. 
The College year is divided into two terms of about eighteen 
weeks each. The first term began in 1905. on September ag, at - 
10 o'clock A. M. The second term will begin on January 99, 1906, 
at 9 o'clock, and will end with Commencement on June 13. The 
examinations for entrance will begin on June 14 and September ai, 
The next College year will begin on September 38, 1906, at 10 a, if. 

TERM EXAMINATIONS. 
Examinattons are held at the close of each term. Students are 
given a term "standing" in each study pursued during that term. 
These "standings" are d (distinguished), g (good), p (passed), n 
(not passed, or deficient), and a (absent). If a student is deficient 
in one or more subjects, he is attached to his class conditionally until 
the deficiency or deficiencies are made up. 

THESES. 
The theses required of candidates for the Bachelor of Science 
and technical degrees mttst be sent to the Dean on or before May 
I in each year. 

DEGREES. 

The degree of Bachtlor of Arts {A. B.) is conferred on gradtiation 
upon students in the Arts and Science courses who have presented 
Latin and Greek for admission and who have completed in College 
Greek 331, and Latin 431 and 43a, 

The degree of Bachelor of Science (_B. S.) .is conferred on gradua- 
tion (1) upon students in the Arts and Science courses who have 
not taken Latin and Greek in College for at least one year three 
hours a week each. 

The degree of Master of Science t« Architecture (M. S. in Arch.) 
is conferred uf>on students who complete satisfactorily the work of 
the fifth, or graduate, year in the course in Architecture. 



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77 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics is conferred on 
graduation upon students in the course in Finance and Commerce. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, Architecture, 
Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering or Biology is conferred on students who com- 
plete the four-year course in one of these subjects. 

The technical degrees of Civil Engineer {C. E.), Mechanical 
Engineer (Af. £.), Electrical Engineer (E, E.) and Chemical Engineer 
(_Ch. E.) are conferred not less than three years after receipt of 
the baccalaureate degree, upon graduates of the four-year courses 
in these subjects who have successfully pursued their professions 
during such period, and who have also presented original theses 
acceptable to the Academic Council. 

The degree of Bachelor of Music. — None but holders of Certifi- 
cates of Proficiency in Music may proceed to this degree, which is 
conferred only upon satisfaction of the following requirements; 
(i) At least one year must elapse after the receipt of the Certificate 
before presentation of the thesis for the degree; (») Candidates 
must pass an examination, both oral and written, in Harmony, 
Counterpoint, Composition and Orchestration; (3) They must sub- 
mit (as thesis) an original composition in the form of a cantata, of 
such length as to require at least twenty minutes for its perform- 
ance. The composition must be for soli and chorus. It must 
include at least one tonal fugue, and must be scored for full orches- 
tra with a short orchestral prelude. 

CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY. 

Certificates of Proficiency are awarded to students who pursue, 
and complete satisfactorily, the several authorized Special Courses 
offered by the College Faculty. fSee pp. 71 and 7;). 

Students who have pursued Partial Courses, and who have com- 
pleted satisfactorily the individual subjects selected in each case, 
are entitled to an ofhcial Statement of Study, signed by the Dean of 
the College. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
Scholarships open to undergraduates in the College may be 
divided into two groups: first, those which may be held only by 
students from certain localities; and second, those which are 
general in their allotment. All candidates for scholarships must 
present themselves for the usual entrance examinations, excepting 



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78 THB COLLGCB. 

those who may be admitted to College on satisfactory diplomas 
granted by public high or normal schools. 

. No award of scholarships ttiill be made until after the enlratiee 
txatitinatioHs in June. Only such persons mil be eligible for scholar- 
skips as have been admitted to the College wttkout conditions in June 
preceding At opening of the College -year for which the scholarship is 

All candidates for scholarships (except those awarded by tk» 
Philadelphia Board of Public Education) in the College miist trans- 
mit their appUcations and credentials to the Dean on or before the 
i^th day of May preceding the opening of the academic year in 
which they desire to enter. 

Special attention is called to the fact that, while possession of a 
scholarship entitles the holder to free tuition, such holders are 
bound by all College rules and regulations equally with pay stu- 
dents; and any infraction of these regulations will render a bolder 
liable to the forfeiture of his privileges. 

Group i. 

1. Thb Pbnn Scholarships, two in number, founded in 1816, 
are filled by the Governor of the State from time to time as vacancies 
occur. They exist by virtue of a privilege confirmed to the heirs of 
Thomas Penn, one of the original Proprietaries of the Province of 
Pennsylvania. 

a. The Philadelphia Free Citv ScHOLARSHiPS.^-Under an 
agreement with the City of Philadelphia, of date iSSi, fifty free 
acholarships exist in the University for the benefit of graduates from 
the public schools. Of these. Thb Bbnjauik Franklin Scholar- 
ships, three in number, were endowed by the late Dr. William 
Pepper, and Thb Samuel V. Merrick Scholarship by J. Vaughan 
Merrick, Esq. Candidates are examined by the Board of Public 
Education, and the scholarships, according to the number becoming 
vacant at the end of each academic year, are awarded to those who 
reach the highest grade in examination, provided that such grade 
be at least sJKty-live per cent. Each scholarship entitles the 
holder to free tuition in any regular course in any department of 
the University. All inquiries concerning the City Scholarships 
should be addressed to tht Secretary of ike Board of Public Education, 
City HaU. 

3. The Fbnnstlvania State Scholarships. — In addition to the 
Philadelphia City Scholarships, five free (wmpetitive scholarships 
■re open annually to students from the graduating classes of public 



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GENERAL IKFOBUATIOH. 79 

htgh schools m the State of Pennsylvania ouUide of Pkiladttphia. 
Eaaminatioa papers must be marked as in competition for the 
Pennsylvania Scholarships. The examinations may be tal^en «t 
any place where the University holds examinations through its 
representatives. Successful candidates may elect to enter any 
ngular couise in the College. 

4. The General Aluuni Society Scholarships, — Under the 
terms of this Foundation, Scholarship No. i, the first of a limited 
number of prize scholarships to be established by the General 
Society, became available in 1899. Award is made to that appli- 
cant resident in, or preparing at any school located in, the following 
counties of the State of Pennsylvania: Blair, Cambria, Indiana, 
Westmoreland, Beaver, Allegheny or Washington. The only special 
requirement is that the applicant shall obtain the highest average 
among such candidates ia these counties as may take the regular 



Group a. 

I. The Baird Scholarship, founded in iSSij by Mrs. Matthew 
Baird. provides free tuition for one student. 

t. The Muhr Scholarships, founded in 1S95 by the late Simon 
Huhr, provide free tuition for three students. 

3, 4 and 5. The Jambs Latta (founded by William J. Latta, 
Esq.), Robert Morris and John Locan Scholarships, estab- 
lished in 1900, provide free tuition tor three students. 

6. The Louise Harrison Scholarship, foimded in iqoo by 
Thomas S. Harrison, Esq,, provides free tuition for one student 
in the Department of Chemistry. 

7. The Thomas S, Stewart Scholarship, founded in 1901 by 
Mrs. Thomas S. Stewart and the Messrs. Thomas S. and Ralph C. 
Stewart, provides free tuition for one student in Architecture. In 
the event of no suitable person presenting himself at any time in 
Architecture, the scholarship may be awarded in other depart- 
ments of the College. 

S. Trb Hartuan Kuhn Scholarship, founded in igot by C. 
Hartman Kuhn, Esq., in memory of his grandfather, of the Class of 
iSoo, College. 

9. The Thomas H. Powers Scholarship, founded in 1901 by 
Mrs. Mary Powers Harris, in memory of her father. 

10. The Charles Brinton Coxb Scholarship, founded in 1901 
by Eckley Brinton Coxe, Jr., in memory of his father, of the Class 
of 1861, College. 



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So THE COLLEGE. 

ri. Thk E. Otis Ksndall Scholarship, founded in 1901 by the 
Class of 1879, College, in memory of the late Vice-Provost of the 
Univereity. 

II. Tub Cadwalader Scholarship, founded in igoi by John 
Codwalader, Esq. 

13. The Stephen Greene Scholarship, founded in 1901. 

14. The Class OP 1S78 Memorial Scholarship, founded in 1903. 

15. The Architectural Alumni Scholarship, founded in 1903, 
provides free tuition for one student in Architecture, the nominm- 
tion being vested in the Architectural Alumni Society of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

16. The George Schleichbr Scholarship. — Under the will of 
the late George Schleicher, of Philadelphia, the German Society of 
Pennsylvania holds in trust a fund for maintaining in this Univer- 
sity a perpetual scholarship named after the testator. The income 
from J5,ooo is awarded annually to assist any worthy person of 
German birth or descent in the pursuit of his studies at Pennsyl- 
vania in any branch of. learning except religion. 

17. The Aleert Monroe Wilson Scholarship, founded in 1Q04 
by the Alumni of the College, in memory ofthe late Janitor of Col- 
lege Hall, and as a tribute to his zealous fidelity to du^ during 
nearly fifty years of service in the University. 

18. The George Barnett Scholarship in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, founded in 1904 by his daughter, Mrs. Irene Barnett Halstead. 

ig. The Ecklbv B. Coxb Scholarship, founded in 1904 by 
Mrs. Eckley B. Coxe, in memory of her husband, of the Class of 
1858, College, 

ao. A Travsling Scholarship, established in 1904 by the 
Philadelphia. Group of the Alliance Fran^aise, awarded annually 
upon the recommendation of the Department of French to that 
student in the College considered best prepared for study at some 
one of the French universities. 

ai. The Martha Austin McDowell Scholarship, founded in 
1905 by J. Austin McDowell, in memory of his wife, to be awarded 
without limitation as to department. 

33. Univbrbitv Scholarships.— In place of the nxteen scholar- 
ships given each year to members of the entering class, and here- 
tofore known as University Scholarships, the University wiU, begin- 
ning with September, 1906. grant to sixteen students of the entering 
class, eight in the School of Arts, and eight in the Towne Scientific 
School, the privilege of postponing tuition fees until after gradua- 
tion. The terms upon which this privilege will be granted may 



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GBNBBAI. INFORMATION. Si 

be had from the Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Scholar-- 
ships, who will provide a blank form of application. The Commit- 
tee will ask the applicant to furnish satisfactory evidence of cred- 
ita^ble scholarship standing, seriousness of purpose, and inability 
to pay any part of his fees during his course. 

PRIZES. 
PRBSRWAK BNTRAKCtC PRIZES. 

I . The Eucbnb Dblano Prizb of fifty dollars for the best special 
examination in the French and German required for entrance to 
College. 

a, A prize of fifty dollars, offered by Thb Class of 1880, for the 
best special examination in Mathematics by a candidate for admis- 
sion to the course in Aris and Science. 

The following prizes are o&ered annually: 

NoTB. — Ail taayi in comptiitien fpr priti mmi bt haiultd to Hit Dtan on or 

b^ort May I w tach ytar, must bt liffwd milk a fiditioiti hoium, a«dbt aaompanitd 

At wriltr's rtat Hamt mid addrtil. No prtH viit bt awarded UMltss tht work dont 
far it rtodut a kith naiulard of netUtna. Unltti mtitrmiit itaud, tht prittt art 
aptH le fuU ttudnU im/v. 

I, Faculty Prizes: 

I. A prize of thirty dollars for the beat Essay in Intellectual and 
Moral Philosophy by a member of the Senior Class, Subject: 
What are At Axioms of LogicT 

3. A prize of ten dollars for the best examination by a member of 
the Freshman Class on Greek Prose Composition with the Accents. 

3. A prize of thirty dollars to a member of the Senior Class for 
the most meritorious work in the German Language and Literature 
over and above the regular course. 

4. A prize of thirty dollars to a member of the Senior Class for 
the most meritorious work in the French Language and Literature 
over and above the regular course. 

5. A first prize of fifteen dollars, and a second prize of ten dollars, 
for the best examination on the Lectures on Quaternions given to 
the voluntary Jtmior Class. 

6. A prize of thirty dollars for the best Essay in History and 
English Literature by a member of the Senior Class. Subject: 
Political Satire of the Revolution. 

7. A prize of twenty dollars for the best Essay in English Litera- 
ture by a member of the Junior Class. Subject: College Verse 
in the Uniuersity of Pennsylvania. 



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8l THE COLLBOB. 

8. A prize of twenty-five dollars, to be divided among the best 
three speakers in the annual Sophomore -Freshman cootest in 
debate, the contest being open to the public. 

Q. A first prize o£ twenty-five dollars, and a second prize of fifteen 
dollars, for the best and second best preparations illustrating the 
anatomy of any vegetable. Open only to students in the Biologi- 
cal courses in Botany. The conditions are as follows: (a) Ten . 
alcoholic preparations, illustrating stages in the germination and 
seedling growth of at least seven plants; (b) A complete set of 
microscopic slides, illustrating the year's work in Botany; (c) An 
identified collection of the Algct of Fairmount Park, prepared as 
dried specimens, and mounted as slides. 

10. A first prize of twenty-five dollars, and a second prize of 
fifteen dollars, for the best and second best preparations illus- 
trating the anatomy or embryology of any animal. Open only to 
students in the Biological courses in Zoftlogy. The conditions are 
as follows: (a) Four dissections illustrating the anatomy of any 
simple Invertebrate; (6) Four dissections illustrating the compara- 
tive neurology of four Invertebrate types; (c) A complete series of 
mounted slides illustrating the histology or embryology of any 
animal; (dj Three preparations of distinct organic systems of from 
one to three species of Invertcbrata. 

1 1. A prize of ten dollars to the member of the Sophomore Class 
who shall pass the best special examination in sight reading of 

ta. A prize of ten dollars to the member of the Sophomore Class 
who shall pass the best special examination in s^ht reading of 
Greek. 

IT. Prizes Founded by Organizations: 

I. The Henry Reed Prize, founded by the Society or thb 
Alumni (College) for the best English Essay by a member of the 
Senior Class, entitles the successful competitor to one year's interest 
on six. hundred dollars, and to a diploma of merit. Essays in com- 
petition for this pri^.e are handed to the Dean for transmission to 
a committee of the Board of Trustees, by whom the prize is awarded. 
Subject: The Plays of John Wilson. 

t. A prize for the best, and a prize tor the second best, Latin 
Essay by a member of the Graduating Class, offered by the Society 
OP the Alumni (College). The first prize of forty dollars, and the 
second prize of twenty-five dollars, are awarded by a committee of 
the Society. 



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GEHBIIAL INFORMATIOK. 83 

3. Thb Joseph Warnbk Yardley Prize, founded by The Class 
OP 1877 in memory of their classmate, for the best Thesis in Political 
Economjr by a member of the Senior Class. It entitles the suc- 
cessful competitor to one year's interest on five hundred dollars. 
Subject: Tke Effect of the High Prke of Coal on Manufactures in 
Easttnt Pennsylvania. 

4. A priie founded by the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity in 
honor of their founder, Samuel Brown Wylie Mitchell. M. D., of 
the Class of 185a, for the most meritorious work done in the course 
in English Composition of the second year. It entitles the suc- 
cessful competitor to one year's interest on four hundred dollars. 

5. The Assayers and Miners Ganguh offers a prize of the value 
of twenty-five dollars in books or apparatus, to Post-Seniors in 
Chemistry and to Seniors in Chemistry (four- year course) ; the prize 
to be awarded by the Gangue with the advice of the professor in 

6. Thb National Society op the Sons op the Auerican 
Revolution offers annually a Silver Medal for the best essay on 
some subject connected with American Revolutionary History. 
The essay receiving the Medal will be sent to the officers of the 
Society, and will come in competition with the prize essays from 
other colleges and universities, the best of these receiving- a Gold 
Hedal. Open only to Juniors. Subject; The Principles Fought for 
in the Revolution, 

7. Thb Priestley Club, composed of Alumni of the Chemical 
Department, offers a prize of twenty dollars each year to Uiat 
member of the Graduating Class (Post-Senior or Senior, four-year 
course, R^^ular or Special), whose work for that year is most 
satisfactory. The award of the prize is to be determined by the 
Director of the John Harrison Laboratory of Chemistry, based 
upon the student's application, the grades obtained by examination 
and the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. 

8. A prize of fifty dollars is offered annually by The Society op 
Colonial Wars, for the best essay presented by any member of the 
Junior and Senior Classes in the College, on a subject relating to 
pre- Revolutionary Colonial History, and approved by the Society. 
Award ia madW by a committee of judges appointed by the Depart- 
inent of History, the successful essay to become the property of the 
Sodety. The priie will not be awarded to a member of the Senior 
Class who may have won it as a member of the Junior Class. Sub- 
ject: CiAoHiai Taxation and tk* Atneriean Rnolution. 



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84 THE COLLEOB. 

9. Tkb T-SguAKB Club of Philadelphia o&ers annually two 
prizes of membership in the organizatioji. They are granted in 
October of each year to those two members of the Senior and 
Second-year Special Classes in Architecture, respectively, who 
shall have attained the highest standing in the preceding years of 
their courses, and who comply with the Club's general- regulation 
regarding the submission of drawings. These prize memberships 
cover the period of the student's connection with the University 
without the payment of dues. 

10. Thb Dantb Socibty ofiers annually a prize of one hundred 
dollsra for the best essay on a subject drawn from the life and 
works of Dante. Competition is open to all students, and graduates 
of not more than three years' standing, of any college or university 
in the United States. The judges of the essays submitted are a 
committee of the Society. For further information address the 
Secretary of the Society, Prof. F, N. Robinson, Longfellow Park, 
Cambridge, Mass. 



III. Prizbs Founded by Individuals: 

I. A prize founded by Hbnrt LaBarrb Jathb, Esq., of the 
Class of 1S79, for the best English CompoGition by a member of 
the Freshman Class. It entitles the successful competitor to one 
year's interest on two htmdred dollars. Subject: Tht Last Fight 
of tli« " Revenge." 

3. A prize, originally founded by the late D. Van Nostrand and 
generously continued by his business successors, for the member 
of the Junior Class in Civil Eo^neering who attains the highest 
general average of scholarship during the Junior year. The prize 
consists of twenty-five dollars, 

3. Thb Gborgb Allen Memorial Prizes, founded by Joseph G. 
RosENGARTBN, Esq., of twenty dollars each, are offered to members 
of the Junior Class taking the Greek and Latin courses as follows: 
In Greek, for the best examination on the Oration of Drmostiunts 
on the Crown, read as an extra subject; and in Latin, ior the best 
examination upon selections from Latin Literature of the Empire 
(Seneca Rhetor, Quintilian. Pliny the Younger and Suetonius), to 
be read as an extra subject. 

Second prizes of ten dollais each are offered by the Faculty in 
both of these branches. 

4. Two Debating Prizbs, established by Wiluau West Fra- 
siBR, Jr., a first prize of seventy-five dollars and a second prize of 



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twenty-five dolUn, to be awarded in a public debating contest, gov- 
erned by the following conditions: 

a. Any student of the University of Pennsylvania who is a candi- 
date for a degree may become a competitor. 

b. A committee appointed annually by the Provoet of the Univer- 
sity shall select from the whole body of competitors, in such manner 
as it may deem best, the debaters, not to exceed ten in number, who 
shall take part in the final competitian. 

c. The question for debate shall be selected by the Provost of the 
University, and shall be pubhcly announced by him at least four 
weeks before the date set for the final competition. 

d. The prizes shall be awarded by a committee of three judges, 
not officers of instruction of the University, appointed by the 
Provost, to those competitors who shall be deemed by them the 
most effective debaters, account being taken both of thought and 
ils expression. 

J. Thb Frazibr Prize. — Gbosob H. Frazizr, Efq., of the Class 
of 1887, offers annually a prize of a standard work in literature, to 
be chosen by him. and of a value of one hundred dollars, to the 
student in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, who, being 
a member of the Football team, Baseball team,. Track team, or of 
the Crew, shall attain the highest standing in scholarship. 

6. Thb Arthur Spavo Brookb Memorial Prize in the School of 
Architecture, of a cash value of fifty dollars, is awarded annually, in 
the form of medals, for meritorious work in Design, as follows; for 
the best record of distinguished rank, a Gold Medal of about forty 
dollars in value; for records of second and third place and of 
superior excellence, a Silver and a Bronze Medal, respectively. 
This prize has been established by Maria Wbarton Brooke, as 
a memorial to her son, Arthur Spayd Brooke, a graduate in 
Architecture of the Class of 1897. 

7. The J. S. H. Prizes.— -The following prizes are oHered annually 
to students in the courses in Biology : 

a. A prize of twenty-five dollars is offered to .the student in the 
first-year class in the four-year course, or the two-year course, who, 
having taken the entrance examinations without condition, shall 
have the highest standing in the class ; the term standing and con- 
duct to be determining factors, as well as the standing in examina- 
tions. 

b. A prize of fifty doUars to the student, in the second year of the 
above-named coureea, who shall stand first in the class, under simi- 
lar conditions. 



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86 THB COLLEQB. 

c. A prize of seventy-five dollars to the third-year student in tbe 
above-named courses, who shall stand first in the class, under simi- 
lar conditions. 

d. Beginning with the year 1904-05, and thereafter annually 
until further notice, a prize of two hundred and fifty dollars to the 
fourth-year student in the foiu--year course, who shall stand first in 
tbe class, luider similar conditions, the standing for the whole four 
years to be taken into account. 

S. A prize of fifty dollars is offered annually, through the generos- 
ity of Dr. S. Weir Mitchrll, for the best thesis on The Autumnal 
Coloration of Plant Parts. Competition is open to advanced under- 
graduate and graduate students in Botany, tnvestigationB to be 
pursued for not longer than two years. 

9. The Mulpord Psizb, established through the generosity of 
WiLLiAu H. MuLFORD, B&s., of thc Class of 190Z, is awarded 
annually to that member of the Graduating Class who shall attain 
the highest excellence in the expressive reading of Latin Prose and 
Verse, as shown by a special examination. The value of the prize 
is twenty-five dollars. 

10. Thb George Schleicher Prize. — tinder the will of the late 
George Schleicher, of Philadelphia, the German Society of Penn- 
sylvania holds in trust a fund for maintaining in perpetmty a priae 
to be named after the testator. This prize is of a value of fifty 
dollars, and is awarded annually to the best student — of whatever 
nationality he may be — in the German Language, or German Lit* 
erature, or both. 

11. The John Stewardson Memorial Scholarship in Archi- 
tecture. — The value of this scholarship (established in 1897) is 
one thousand dollars, and the holder is required to spend one year in 
travel and in the study of Architecture in Etirope under the direction 
of the Managing Committee. Candidates must be architectural stu- 
dents or practitioners- under thirty years of age, resident in the State 
of Pennsylvania for at least one year immediately preceding the 
date of preliminary eicami nations, which must be passed unless 
acceptable certificates therefor are presented. The award is made 
annually to that candidate successful in the final examination in 

13. Thb Alumni Fbllowship in Architbctorb. — Open only to 
Pennsylvania Alumni: of a cash value of one thousand dollars, the 
holder being required to spend not less than one year in foreign 
travel and study, under a program arranged with the PrefiBscr c^ 



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CBNBRAL INFORMATION. 87 

Architectvire, and approved by the Provost. Persons who have 
taken either the degree of the four-year course or the certificate of 
the two-year special course, and who have neither secured another 
traveling scholarship nor admission to the Ecole des Beaux Arts, 
are eligible to the competitions, which are held annually. Estab- 
lished in ii)03-oj, and to continue for five years. 



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J— the; school op abts. 

COURSES IN ARTS AND SCIENCE, IN BIOLOGY, AND IN 
MUSIC. 

In the courses in Arte and Science, and in Biology, a student will 
graduate upon tbe successful completion of sixty (60) unitsofworlc; a. 
unit of work being the amount involved in attendance upon lectures 
or recitations for one hour a week for one year, or upon labora- 
tory work for two hours a week for one year. 

The curricula have been planned with the view of making it pos- 
sible tor a student to complete the couree in three, four or five years, 
at his option. Fifteen units of work a year will normally constitute 
full work for a student who wishes to complete the course in four 
years; but students wishing to complete the course in the mini- 
mum time will take twenty (ao) units of work each year, while 
those wishing to devote five years to the course will take twelve (ii) 
units «f work each year. Students will not ordinarily be permitted 
to take less than twelve (i>) units of work in one year. 



THE COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCE. 
The work of this course consists of required studies, group work 

and free electives. The required studies amoiuit to twenty-two 
(31) .units of work, the group studies to eighteen (18) units, and the 
remaining twenty (10) units are made up of free electives. 

No restrictions are laid upon the student as to the order in which 
he shall take any of the subjects in the course, excepting such as 
may follow from the natural sequence of related subjects, and from 
the limitations of the roster. The student usually will take as the 
required work in each of the branches named below the most ele- 
mentary subjects offered, as tbese form in most cases the necessary 
basis for further advance in the same subjects. 

Required Studies. — Each student must take in 

Chemistry 2 nnib. 

English 6 " 

Foreign Languages: 3 units in each of two, 

6 " 

(88) 

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TBB SCHOOL OP AKTS. 89 

History a units. 

Logic and Ethics a " 

Mathematics » " 

Riysica 3 

Note. — The required work in Foreign Language may consist of 
work in any two foreign languages in which instruction to the 
extent of three units of work each is offered; but no student 
will be permitted to take in satisfaction of such requirement 
either French 381, German 311, Greek 343 (and 343 A), or Latin 
430 (and 430 A, B, C). 

Lc^ and Ethics will be found listed under Uie general title 
Philosophy. 

Group Work. — Each student elects for his group either two .or 
three of the eighteen subjects mentioned below. If he elects two, 
he is required to do nine units of work in each; if be electe three, 
he is required to do six units of work in each. After choosing the 
branches which shall constitute his group, the student is at liberty 
to select any subjects from the list of those ofFered in these' branches 
to make up the required six or nine units, except in so far as his 
choice may be restricted by the necessary sequence of studies and 
by the roster. Students are advised to plan their work in consulta- 
tion with the professors in charge of the different branches. 

Astronomy, French, Mathematics, 

Botany, Geology,* Philosophy, f 

Chemistry, German, Physics, 

Economics, Greek, Political Science, 

English, History, Sociology, 

Fine Arts, Latin, Zo6logy. 

Frie Electiot$. — The required studies and group work, together, 
amount to forty (40} units of work. The student takes the remain- 
ing twenty (»o) units in free electives. Any subject open to a stu- 
dent in the course in Arts and Science may be taken as a free elec- 
tive, provided the student's previous work qualifies him to pursue 
the subiect, and the roster permits. 

The subjects open to students in the course in Arts and Science 
are given in the list of subjects of instruction under the following 
beads: Anthropology, Astronomy, Botany, Chemistry, Economics 

* TM* title cov«n alio UettUiatvy vid Uiuenlocy. 
t Ttkii title earn ilio Piycbolosy ud Voitvn- 



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90 THB COLLBGB. 

(eatcept as otherwise noted), English, Fine Arts, French. Geology, 
Gennan. Greek, Hebrew, History, Italian, Latin, Linguistics, Math- 
ematics, Metallurgy, Mineralogy, Pedagogy, Philosophy, Physics, 
Political Science (except as otherwise noted), Psychology, San- 
skrit, Sociology (except as otherwise noted), Spanish, Zoology. 

Note.- — It is Tecontmended that students who desire to complete 
the course in Ikree years enter with credits for six (6) units in Foreign 
Language, Mathematics, or History. 

Roster. — See folding sheet facing p. ii8. 

Degrees .^-StMdcnis in the course in Arts and Science who present 
Latin and Greek for admission, and who take in College Greek 331, 
and Latin 431 and 431. receive on graduation the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts. Other students receive on graduation the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. 

CouposiTB Ybar in Mbdicine. 
A student in the course in Arts and Science may. in his Senior 
year, register also as a regular student in the First-year Class in 
the Department of Medicine. Students wii^hiug to avail them- 
selves of this privilege are required to do only fifty-two (53) units 
of purely College work, the other eight (3) units required for grad- 
uation being credited to them from the studies of the First-year 
Class in Medicine. The fifty-two (ja) imits taken in the College by- 
such students must include at least sixteen (16) units in Biology, 
and three (3) units in Chemistry, in addition to the prescribed 
Chemistry. 

Combinbd Coursbs in Arts and Science and in Architbcturb. 
The course in Arts and Science and the course in Architecture 
may be so combined that a student at the end of the fourth year may 
receive his Bachelor's degree in Arts, and at the end otihesixth year 
his Bachelor's degree in Architecture. During the first two years of 
the combined courses, his work will be wholly in the course in Arts 
and Science; during the next two years, partly in both courses; and 
during the last two years, entirely in the course in Architecture. 



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THB SCHOOL ( 



9« 



THE COURSES IN BIOLOGY.* 

Fol-r-Veab Coursb. 
Required Studies. — All students take the following subjects, 
amounting to 48J units of work: 



Bubjecta. 


Houffi 


z 


Page where 
dewiiptloQ 
tatoiid. 


English, 131, 232,333. 334. 335. *S7 

German, 311, 333, 1 


6 
6 

term) 

J 


6 
6 
■i 

S 


w 


German, 321, French, aSij 


164-159 








161 




143 




Zoology, 681, 681, 683, 684, 685, 686 


ao3 



Elective Studies. — The remaining : 
must complete before graduation, an 
lowing list: 



i\ units, which the student 
to be made up from the tol- 



BnbjetW. 


Iloure 

3 

I 
6 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 

<L 

term) 

4 
6 

6 

3 
8 


Work. 
I 

4 

'i 

3 

4 
4 

4 

4 


ti found. 




140 






:: !!::::;::;: 


All given inl 
alternate 
years. For } 
details consult 

pp. 139-141. J 


;:; 


■' l\ '.'.'.'.:.'.'.'. 




•• V, ...... . 




•■ IS . 




















■' 688 (Only one oU 

" 689 -j these is given \ 

690 K each year. ) 


ao3 
ao3 
303 

ao3 

303 


" §'.;.;.";.;;..";;:;;;;:::::;:: 


Research Work in Botany or Zo6logy 



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Chemistry, 93 . . . 
™ ". 9S ■ ■ . 

Physics, 60J .... 
Psychology. 582 . 
583- 

584 ■ 

585 ■ 
German, 337, 328 
Pedagogy, 591 . . 









ArrangenuiU of Work. — In planning his course, the student muEt 
observe carefully the necessary sequence of studies as set down in 
the tables giving the lists ot subjects in the difierent branches. 
Apart from the restriction thua imposed, and from the limitations 
of the roster, the subjects may be taken in any order the student 
may prefer. 

Roster. — See folding sheet facing p. 118. 

Degree. — Graduates of this course receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Biology. 

Note. — If is recommended that students who desire to complete tiu 
course in three years enter with advanced credits for one and a half 
(ij) vnits in Mathematics and three (3) uniis in Foreign Language; 
and thai they do at least one summer's work in Botany or Zodlogy 
under provisions approved by the Committee of Instruction in Biology. 

Two-Year Special Coursb. 

This course is designed for students who are unable to take the 
regular course leading to a degree, and especially for those who 
intend later to take up the study of Medicine. A certi&cate of pro- 
ficiency is granted to those who complete the course satisfactorily. 

The work for the first year is the same for all students. In the 
second year alternative courses are offered. One is a con tinuatian of 
the work of the first year in the Natural Sciences; the other consists 
of the first year's work in Medicine, together with certain specified 
subjects given in the College. Human Anatomy, Bacteriology 
and Physiological Chemistry are given in the Department of Medi- 
cine; Histology, Embryology and Chemistry, in the College. 

Students who choose the second alternative, and who are also 
registered as regular first-year students in the Department of Med- 



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THB SCHOOL OF ARTS. 93 

kine, are, on passing the required examinations, advanced with 
their class to the second year in Medicine. Men only are admitted 
to the cxmrses in the Department of Medicine. 

Rtxptiremettls for Admission. — The candidate must be at least 
eighteen years of age, and must satisfy the requirements for admis- 
sion to the regular course, except in Latin, in which B and CorV 
are the required topics. 



Botany, 71 

General and Invertebrate Zoology, 681 and 683 

Uammalian Anatomy, 683 

Vertebrate Morphology, 684 

Gen^^ Chemistry, 91 

German. 333 

Elective. 
•Physics. 631 



SECOND TEAR. 



First Altertiative. 

Botany, J3 

Embryology and Histology, 686 

Physiology, 685 

Chemical Analysis, 93 

Psychology, 581 

Eleclioe. 
Any other Biological course for which students 
prepared and can find the time. 



a pRrcquinU for the coun* in Pbyiici 



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THE COLLBOB. 



Second Alternativs. 
and Histology, 686 



No. of hoOT* 



Chemical Analysis, , 
♦Physiological Chemistry . . 
•Human Anatomy (about).. 
•Bacteriology 



* Ciiven in the DepartnunC of Medicine. 

THE COURSE IN MUSIC. 

The course in Music extends over a period of four years, and is 
open to both men and women. The qualifications for admission are 
as follows: (a) a thorough knowledge of the rudiments of Music; 
(6) the ability to play on some musical instrument — preferably the 
piano or organ ; and {c) that portion of the requirements for admis- 
sion to the College designated as English A (see pp. 66 and 67.) 

The session begins on the first Monday in October, and is divided 
into two terms of fifteen weeks each, during which lectures are deliv- 
ered twice a week. Examinations are held at the close of each year, 
A certificate of proficiency is awarded to those students who com- 
plete the course and pass the final examinations satisfactorily. - The 
fee for each term is fifteen dollars ($15.00), and a further fee of ten 
dollars (Sio.oo) is required prior to the award of the certificate. 

Outline op iHSTRUctioH.t 

First Year. — Harmony. Combinations arid successions of 
sounds. 

Second Year. — Melody. The use of Unharmonized Disso- 
nances. Forma of accompaniment. The simpler "Forms" of 
Composition. The Five Species of Strict Counterpoint in two, 
three and four parts. Instruction will also be given in the Elements 
of Rhetoric and Versification. 

t For description in detail. >ee pp. 191 iiiiil 193. 



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Third Year. — The larger "Forms" of Composition, Modem 
Counterpoint, Fugue, Canon. 

PouKTH Ybar. — The Orchestra. Instrumentation. The scoring 
of some of the exercises already written, together with the compoei- 
tha and scoring of the graduation exercise. 

Degree op Mub. Bac* 

None but holders of certificates, awarded as above, may proceed 
to the degree of Bachelor oj Music, which is conferred only upon 
satisfaction of the following requirements : 

I. At least one year must elapse after the receipt of the certificate 
before presentation of the thesis for the degree. 

1. Candidates must pass an examination both oral and written 
in Harmony, Counterpoint, Composition and Orchestration. 

3. They must submit (as thesis) an original composition in the 
form of a cantata, of such length as to require at least twenty min- 
utes for its performance. The composition must be for soli and 
chorus. It must include at least one tonal fugue, and must be 
scored for full orchestra with a short orchestral prelude. 

Candidates for the degree of Mus. Bac. will be required to pass an 
examination in English equivalent to that demanded of all students 
for admission to College (English A and B) ; and also to tako courses 
in English Composition and Literatiu« as offered to students in 
tbeCourses for Teachers, amounting to two hours aweek throughout 
the year.f 

Candidates are recommended to take a course of two years in 
Physics, the equivalent of that offered in the Courses for Teachers, 
as well as thecourse in the Historyof Music.f 



For further information, address Professor Huoh A. Clakkb, 
»»3 South Thirty-eighth street. 

* The desIH of Doctor of M ustc (Mus. Doc. ) is conferred honoris coma onlr, 
upon compoien who nuy have atuined distinction in the field of Mucic by the 
piDdictioa of ■ome notable work in one or more of the larger " Farm*." 

t See indca. Teachers. Connn for. 



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n.— THE TOWNE SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

A regular scientific course leading to a degree baa existed in 
tlie College since the year 1651. In 1871, this course was enlarged 
and o ganized as a Department of Science, which, in 1875, was in 
Urge part endowed under the provisions of the will of the late 
John Henky Townb, a trustee of the University. In honor of his 
memory the Department of Science was named Th« Towtu Scien- 
iifie School, which now comprehends the courses in Architecture, 
in Mechanical Engineering, in Electrical Engineering, in Civil 
Engineering, in Chemistry, and in Chemical Engineering. A brief 
description of the several courses offered thereiu will be found on 
pp. 60 and 6 1 , while the requirements for admission are set forth in 
detail on pp. 66 to 70. 

New Engihbbrino Buildiho. 

A separate building is now in course of erection for the accommo- 
dation of the Mechanical, Electrical, Civil and Chemical Engineering 
departments of the Towne Scientilic School. The building is 300 
feet long and 160 feet deep, with a wing 50 feet wide and 40 feet 
long at one end, the total floor-space being approximately 118,00a 
square feet. The construction is fireproof throughout. 

The building, which will be ready for occupancy during the 
current academic year, will contain extensive laboratories equipped 
with the best modern apparatus for experimental wort pertaining 
to mechanical, electrical, civil engineering; including the testing of 
steam and gas engines; boilers; electric and hydraulic motors; 
dynamos, transform and electrical apparatus; pumpa and fans; 
refrigerating apparatus; the investigation of the physical properties 
of the materials of engineering; the study of the laws governing 
the flow and discharge of water through orifices, weirs and tubes; 
facilities for calorimetric and geodetic work, etc. Ample provision 
will be made for practical instruction in wood and iron working, 
forge and foundry work. 



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THE COURSES IN ARCHITECTURE. 
Of PIC BUS. 
Cbari-ES C. Harkison, LL.D., Provost. 
Edgak F. Smith, Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Vice-Provo^. 
JosiAB H. Pbnnihan, Ph.D., Dean of the College. 
Warren Powers Laird, Architecture; Professor in Charge. 
•Herbert E. Everett, Drawing and History of Painting, 
Paul P. Crbt, A. D. G. F., Design. 
George Walter Dawson, Drawing. 
Frank Allison Hays, Pen-and-ink Rendering, 
Thomas Nolan, M. S., A. M., Architectural Engineering. 
Charles F. Osborne, Architectural History. 
Philip R. Whitney, S. B. in Arch., Architecture. 
HuGER Elliott, B. S. in Arch., Design. 

The University offers three separate courses in Architecture, 
These are: the four-year course, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Architecture ; the graduate year, leading to the degree 
of UaEt«r of Science in Architecture; and a. two-year special course 
leading to a certificate of proficiency. 

An option in Architectural Engineering is offered, also, in the four- 
year course, and to qualified special students. 

Tuition fees for the courses in Architecture are one hundred and 
fifty dollars ($150.00) a year. 

Combined Course in Arts and Science and in Ahchitkcturb. 
A candidate for the A, B. degree may secure also the Bache- 
lor's degree in Architecture by devoting six years of work to both 
courses. To effect this, the first two years are given to subjects 
in the course in Arts and Science ; the next two to the completion 
of this course (upon which the A. B. degreeis granted), and to the 
first part of the course in Architectiu^ ; and the final two years to the 
completion of the latter, upon which the degree of B. S. in Arch, is 
granted. For the details of this arrangement, see schedule of work 
on pp. T06 and 107. 

OUTLINE OF INSTRUCTION. 
The Four-Year Course. 
The aim of this course is to secure to its graduates the general 
prerequisite to the demands of the best professional ^xac- 



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tdce. To that end its scheme of study combines a full course of 
sound technical instruction with the essentials of a liberal education. 
The purely technical work is so arranged as to lay a broad and solid 
foundation for the future needs of the practicing architect, while 
incidentally preparing the student to become, upon graduation, of 
immediate usefulness as an architect's assistant. The liberal ele- 
ments of the course include both those studies essential to a general 
college education, and those forming that part of the professional 
curriculum in which special stress is laid on the esthetic side of 
architecture. 

The course of study is organized upon the principle that archi- 
tecture is primarily a fine art. The study of design is therefore 
emphasized, the student being required to give to it and to its prep- 
aratory and accessory subjects the greater portion of his time 
throughout four years. Supporting this line of study and broad- 
ening the general view of the student are the history courses, cover- 
ing exhaustively the field of architecture and giving general treat- 
ment to that of painting. Careful study is given to the nature of 
building materials, and the theory and practice of construction 
and of sanitation. Draughtsmanship receives constant attention 
throughout the course, not only in the courses in design, but also 
in various lines of instruction in pure drawing. 

The professional work thus outlined covers some three-fourths of 
the time required of the student. The remainder is devoted to gen- 
eral studies, which art pursued during the first half of the course, 
and which include two years each of English composition, rhetoric 
and literature; of French or German; and of Mathematics (Trig- 
onometry, Analytic Geometry and the Calculus); and one year 
each of Chemistry and of Physics. The instruction is that given 
also in the course in Arts and Science. 

In point of material equipment the School of Architecture pos- 
sesses a working library of about eight hundred volumes; a large 
file of American and foreign periodicals; some twenty thousand 
mounted photographs, plates, illustrations, and lantern slides, 
classified for ready reference; numerous autograph drawings and 
models ; and a collection of casts . The school occupies the third 
floor of College Hall, using a suite of fourteen rooms for library, 
draughting, lecture, studio and other purposes. 

The Option in Architecturai. Encinbgrino Subjects. 

The subjects forming this course are offered to architectural 

students desirii^ to specialize in that field of construction whose 



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TBB TOWNS SCIV4TIPIC SCHOOL. gg 

problems, relating to buildings, are comprehended under the gen- 
eral term "Architectural Engineering." This course is adiSerentia- 
tionfrom the advanced work in the four-year course is architecture, 
by which regular work in design, drawing, etc., gives place to 
structural design and kindred subjects, and may be electa in the 
fourth year. No change in the regular course is necessary previous 
to the fourth year. 

_Thb Gkaduatb Yeab. 

The fifth year in Architecture provides opportunities for spedal- 
izatioD not to be found in undergraduate courses. 

If the student can devote a final year of study to that particular 
field toward which his tastes and abilities direct him, the value of 
his technical training cannot butbe greatly enhanced. The nature 
ot this fifth-year course is such that it can be adjusted to the needs 
either of those who may desire to specialize, or of those who wish to 
round out broadly the work of the four-year course by advanced 
training and research. 

Thb Two-Ybar Speciai. Course. 

Architectural draughtsmen of experience, desiring to supply defi- 
ciencies in technical training and unable to give the time necessary 
to the completion of the four-year course, are admitted as Special 
students, if eligible under certain requirements indicated on p. 71. 
Such students pursue a definite course of study, arranged to permit 
the completion, in two years, ot much of the advanced technical 
work of the four-year course; and they may, when prepared, elect 
work ID the Architectural Engineering option. 

A satisfactory completion of this course is recognized by the 
airard of a certificate of proficiency. 

AovANCEn Standing. 
0>llege graduates may, upon presentation of their diplomas, 
secure advanced standing in the four-year course. In all such 
cases the University reserves the right to decide whether the diploma 
presented covers satisfactorily the academic work required. Such 
persons who have had, in addition, a requisite technical prepara- 
tion may secure the degree in Architecture by two years of study. 
This preparation (comprising architectural subjects i, 3, 6, 7, 9, 11, 
13 and 15) can be secured in the Summer School. (See index.) 



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lOO THB CPLLBOB. 

Thb Atblibr. 

This course, for the study of desigri alone, is open to practidng 
architects and to "principal" draughtsmen in charge o( designing. 
It affords an opportunity of exceptional character in which work 
may be done under the criticism of Professor Cret, upon subjects 
adapted to the needs and tastes of the individual, and with the full 
resources of the School of Architecture at command. 

As the course is intended for the mature architect, its work is 
conducted apart from that of the undergraduate student body, the 
members of the Atelier receiving criticism in quarters set aside for 
their use. Here also those who prefer to work at the University 
will find facilities for so doing either day or evening, although 
studies may be developed elsewhere and brought to the Univer- 
sity for criticism. This will be given any weekday afternoon but 
Saturday, during the hour from 4 to 5. 

The current season opened November ij, 1903, and will comprise 
two terms of three months each, closing May 15, igo6. Work may 
be taken up at any time and carried forward as convenient. Fees 
arc nominal, a chaige of five dollars a month or ten dollars a term, 
payable in advance, being made to cover incidental expenses. 

Inquiries for further information and applications for member- 
ship should be addressed to Professor Warren P. Laird, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

Prizes and Scholarships. 

The following Prizes, Scholarships, etc., are open to students in 
the School of Architecture, or to its graduates, and are briefly 
described elsewhere: 

Thb Alumni Fellowship in Architbcturb, pp. S6 and 87. 

The John Stewabdson Memorial Scholarship in Architbc- 
turb, p. 86, 

The Arthur Spayd Bhookb Memorial Prize, p. 85, 

The T-Squarb Club Prizb Memberships, p. 84. 

The Thomas S. Stewart Scholarship, p. 79. 

Thb Architbctural Alumni Society Scholarship, p. 80. 



The Four- Year Coursb. 

The requirements for admission to this course are : English A and 

B; Histcffy A, B, C, D (any two of these four) ; Mathematics A, B, 

C, D.; French A and B, or German A and B, and Physics. It is 



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THB TOWNS SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 101 

strongly recommended that French be the language offered. For 
details, see pp. 61-70. 

This course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Archi- 



FRESHMAN TBAB. 





Houraaweek. 


UnIM 

of 
Work. 




SnbJeclL 


Term. 


M 


pe«e 


nuiaber 


Ardittectural Drawing 


34 

3 
3 
3 

4 


84 


1*4 


134 
134 
134 

■34 
134 
134 
"55 
iSS 
■55 
iS9 
164 
iSi 
181 
•43 


1 


Elements of Architecture . . . 

Descriptive Geometry 

Shades and Shadows 


1 

7 

9 

331 

»3a 

III 

480 
91A 


Enghsh Composition 




French f one only \ 

German \ required / 

PI. and Spher, Trigonometry 
Analytical Geometry 







SOPHOMOBE TEAR. 



Order Problems ....... 

Fre^and Drawing 

Architectural History: 

Ancient 

Medieval 

Summer Work 

English Crmposition . . . 

English Literature 

French / one only 1 

German I required ) 

Calculus, with applicationsf 
PhSTBicsf 



333. »S7 
487 



• The degree in AreHtecturc of the Univermt 
tha Amsicui InatitDie of ArchitacU in liou of ii 

t After iBO)-o6, Phxrics 601 will be substitu 
by ui Increase in hours of Architecture ii a' 
required for Bdralsdon. and the applicstioaa of 
theCdcdltu 184. 



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TUB COLLBGB. 
S TEAR. 





Hounawe«k. 


Unitt 


For descripUon, an 


Snb]M(& 


Til. 


Term. 


Wort. 


P««9 


nombei 


Design 


3 

6 
3 


38 

3 
1 




"35 

'35 
"35 
I3S 
"35 

"35 
"35 

135 
I3S 

"74 
"3S 
"35 
"35 




Freehand Drawing: 

Historic Ornament 


»3 


Water-Color Drawing 

Pen-and-ink Rendering 

Architectural History: 

Renaissance and Modem. 
Mechanics of Materials 


'9 

30 
3" 
33 

f 39' 

i 33 

y 34 

35 


Building Construction* 

Sanitary Engineering of 
Buildings: 

Hygiene 1 

Heating and Ventilation [■ 
Plumbing and Drainage) 





SEiriOB YKAB. 



Thesis Design 

Freehand Drawing: Life 
Water-Color Rendering . 
Pen-and-ink Rendering 

History of Paintingt 

Building Construction* . 
Professional Practice .. , 

Special Lectures 

Summer Work 



• ]> required of Ju 


nioiB und Senior! in 


igos-06: 46 of Sophomore*. Judiorennd 






■nd Junior* in lOoj-oS. 


t Taken in 1904-0 


by Junior, and Sen 





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GBADCATB TEAK. 





Houre & iteet 




For dtaaripU(H>, •« 


Subieot*. 


t™. 


2d 


wL. 


PM. 


number 


Design 


36 
4 

5 


36 

4 

• s 


15 


'37 
137 

137 

'37 




Pre^iand Drawing: Life 

Water-Color Rendering 

History of Architecture: Re- 
search and Conference .... 

Pine Arts: History or Theory; 
Research and Conference. . 


53 

SS 

57 
59 



The Option im Architectural Encinbi 



5 Subjects. 



Students taking this option will omit in the Senior year, Design 
36, Tbe^ Design 38, Freehand-Life 40, Water-Color Rendering 
41, Pen-and-ink Rendering 4a, History of Painting 44, a total of 
19 units; and will substitute for these the following subjects; 



SENIOBTEAB. 





Houn 


>»Hk 






BnblMU. 


tI^. 


T^ 


w£ 


ff 


nombCT 




16 

9 
3 

3 


30 
9 

3 

3 




137 
'37 

'38 

■38 
'5° 
150 








Arch. Eog. : Theory 

Masonry and Foundations . . 
Specifications. Estimates and 


60C 
60D 


Materials of Construction . . . 
Testing Laboratory 


141 



The foregoing Senior subjects, together with those taken by all 
fourth-year men (3a or 46, 47. 48 and 50; 4 units) constitute the 
Senior year's work for students graduating under the Option in 
Architectural Engineering. 



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Thr Two-Ybar Special Couksb. 
For the detailed requirements under which candidates are ad- 
mitted to this course, see p- 71. A certilicate of profideDcy is 
awarded upon its satisfactory completion. 



Houn A ireek. 



Shatfes and Shadows 

Freenand Drawin);: 

Historic Ornament .... 

Antique 

Water-Color Drawing . . , , 
Pen-and-ink Rendenng . . 
Architectural History: 

Ancient 

Medieval 

Graphic Statics 

BTiilding Construction* ,,. 
Sanitary Engineering of 
Buildings : 

Hygiene 

Heating and Ventilation V 
Plumbmg and Drainage) 
Mechanics of Materialsf .... 
(Elective for students who 
have had the Mathematics 
of the four-year course). 

•31 required ol first Brd second year Special students in iooj-06; «6in IS106-07. 
t StudenU who h&ve taken entrance AJgebra and Trisonometiv (lUthematia 
A and E} may attend dasMi In this subject la auditon. 



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TBB TOWMB SCIBNTIPIC SCHOOL. 



SECOND TSAB. 










Boon ■ week. 




Fot dwcriptioo, He 


Bnbjwti. 


Tarm. 


T^ 


wK 


PV 


number 


Desi ■ Tunior 


'1 

4 
3 

6 


36 

4 
3 




>3S 
135 

'36 

ii 

136 
I3T 




Desiea: First-term Senior ... 

Fre^and Drawing: Life 

Water-Color Ktndering 

Pen-and-ink Rendering 

Architectural History: 

Renaissance and Modem . 

Buildine Cot stniction* 

Professional Practice 


36 

40 
41 
4a 

18 

46 

:? 

5° 







1 miuiiHl of fint uid Kcond you Specwl iludenti 



os-06; 46 in 1906-e]. 



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(Concluded on opposite page,) 

Providing for their completion in six years; the degree o( A. B. 
being conferred at the close of the fourth year, and that of B. S, 
in Architecture two years later. 





Fi«ST Yba>. 
ArU. 


Sbcohd Ymb. 
ArU. 


Trasn Yba>. 

Junior Year in Arte. 

Preihman Year in 

AnJiitectu™. 




SubJKt. No. 


1 


Subject. No. 


s 

I 




1 


RbOUIhid 


Math.*. .J and 

—is} 

History . . 363 
ChemiMry 01 


Greek jji 

Uigicand(s*il 

Ethics 1 56") 

Phyacs...6oi 


Prediin«iArchi- 

jecti 

Plum Coureee n 

(See footnote.) 


• 






u 




.« 




,4 








Group Wosk 
and PiiB 

BLICT1VB3 . 


Number of Unite 


J 


Number Qt Units 
needed 


. 


TUrdYeu-*... 
(See opp. page.) 


, 


ToUl OniU in 




.. 




.. 

















It ii advised that the Pieehnnd Drawing of the third and fonrlh years — 
it unita — be transferred to 5rat and second y«an. 

* These thm subject!, and Uatbematics 461 and 487. are lequiied for the degree 



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scibntipic school. 1b7 

Courses in Arts and Scibncb 



r TUB COUBI) 

AND IN Architbctukb. 



{Concluded from oppo ite page ) 

Detailed mformation concerning the course in / 
is given on pages 88-90, and conceniii^g the cours< 
on pages 97-100. 



Fourth Yiab. 
Senior Ye«r in ArM. 


FlPTB Y«A«. 

Junior Yur in 
Ardut«!tur«. 


SlMH Y.AB. 

Senior Yur in 
Aruhitecture. 










i 

s 




1 




Sopbomore Ar- 

SubJKtaHiDU! 




Junior Architec- 
tunl SubjccU 
Umu> Cou[» 


" 


Senior Arehilec- 
tuial SubjecU 
Minn. Court* 












Plu» Coiuw aS. . 
(See fooUoU.) 


KBOVIRBD 
SUBJBCT*. 




8 




*. 




-- 












Fourth Y«T"-. 


.] 








■nd P»l 

ELBCTIVB9. 




" 




" 




" 








V-,. 



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THE COLLBCB. 



Opficbrs. 
Charles C. Harrison, LL. D., Provost. 
Edoar p. Smith, Ph. D., Sc. D., LL, D-. Vice-ProvoH. 
JosiAH H. Pbnniman, Ph. D., Dean of the ColUge. 
HsNRY W. Spanglbr, M, S., Dyitamkal EnginefTing: Professor 

J. Vbrnb Stanford, B. S.. M. E., Mechanical Enginetring. 

Harold W. Brown, B.S., Electrical Engineering. 

John J. Morris, Shop Work. 

Hugh W. McConkell. Iron Working. 

Horace P, Fry, B. S. in E. E., Meckanic(d Drawing. 

Henrv E. Ehlers, B. S. in M. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

SoUBRS F. Randolph, Iron Working. 

Author H. Gill, M. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

William Mbllor, Wood Working. 

Henrv Ghbhart, B. S. in E. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

WoRRALL E. S. Temple, B. S. in E. E., Electrical Engineering. 

William E. Barrows, Jr., B. S. in E. E., Electrical Engineering. 

Joseph H. Stannaho, Mechanical Dmaring. 

William J. Payne, A.M., B. M. E., Mecfcinica/ £ng»«e<riBg. 

Gboroe E. Crofoot, B. S. in M. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

Martin A. Doyle, B. M. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

Charles A. Fuller, B. S. in M. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

George W. Keller, Mechanical Drawing. 

Jacob L. Beavbr, E. E., Electrical Engineering. 

Neafib E. Sutphbn, Wood Working. 

The course in Mechanical Engineering covers a period of four 
years, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

The course in Electrical Engineering covers a period of four years, 
and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Graduates of either of these courses who continue in the practice 
of their profession receive the appropriate technical degree three 
years after the Bachelor's degree has been conferred, upon presenta- 
tion of an acceptable thesis. {See p. 77,} 

New Students are admitted to advanced standing, provided they 
have pursued similar courses elsewhere. 



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THB TOWNB SCIBNTIPIC SCHOOL. lOfl 

Tbe tuition fee for the courses in Mechanical and in Electrical 
Engineering is two hundred dollars ($900.00) a year. 

Methods and Equipment. 

The technical instruction in the class-room is carried on chiefly 
wi^i the aid of text-books, lectures being given only by way of 
supplementary aid. 

A short course in nomenclature renders the student familiar with 
the names and uses of the various kinds and parts of machinery. 
The subject of Applied Mechanics is taught under the heads of 
graphic statics, statics, hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, kine- 
matics and dynamics. The work in Steam Engineering covers the 
subject of thennodynamics. and the designing of steam engines and 
boiteis. In Hydrodynamics, the object of the course is to teach the 
theory and practice of building water- wheels and turbines. In Elec- 
trodynamics, the general methods of generating, transmitting and 
iBing the electric current, together with the details of the apparatus 
required, are covered in the course. 

Students talcing Electrical Engineering are given more extended 
drilling ia dectrical subjects than those taking Mechanical Engi- 
neering; although tbe object of the instruction is to give to every 
student such a fundamental knowledge of the various methods of 
developir^, transmitting and utilizing power that he will be able to 
take up any of the general divisions of Mechanical or Electrical 



The technical work is carried on in the Engineering Laboratory, 
and in the Dca~th building of the Randal Morgan Laboratory of 
Physics, there being about sixteen thousand square feet of floor- 
space devoted exclusively to technical training. The apparatus 
used for laboratory work has been greatly increased during the past 
yeare, and is ampleia quantity for the work to be done. 

The de[)artment library is equipped with the latest works relating 
to Mechajiical and Electrical Engineering, together with the beet 
technical and trade journals. 



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no THE COLLBGB. 

THE COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The requirements tor admission to this course are: English A 
andB; History A, B,C, D (any two of these four); Mathematics A, 
B, C, D, E and P ; Physics ; and French A and B, or German A and 
B. For details, see pp. 63-70. 

This course leads to the degree of B. S. in Mechanical Engineering 
at the end of the Senior year. The technical degree of M. E. is 
conferred under the provisions stated on page 77. 

FBKBHMAN CI.ABS. 



Descriptive Geometry 

Elementarjr Drawing 

Steam Engine 

Shop Wort 

English Composition 

English Language 

English Literature 

Frendi ( one only 1 

German \ required J 

Trigonometry 

Algebra 

Physics 

Chemistry 



aOPHOMOBB CLASS. 



Mechanical Drawing and Sketching 

Kinematics 

Advanced Shop Work 

English Composition 

English Literature 

French I one only \ 

German I required J 

Analytic Geometry 

Calculus 

Physics 

Analytic Mechanics 

Chemistry (Qualitative) 



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THE TOWNS S 

JUNIOR CI.ABS. 



NumbeiDf I Forabi 



Working Drawings, Kinematic Design 

Sutics 

Hjrdraulics 

Graphics 

Tbermodjnamics 

Mechanical Laboratory 

Electrodynamics 

Alternating Currents 

Electrical Laboratory 

•Calculus 

Physical Measurements 

Analytic Mechanics 

Metallurgy 



n in tbe Juniot year, i 



SENIOR CI.A89. 



Hydrodynamics 

Engine Calculations 

Engine Design 

Boiler Calculations 

Boiler Design 

Applied Thermodynamics 

Advanced Mechanical Laboratory 

tMarine Engines 

jNaval Architecture 

Machine Design 

Shop Visits 

Specifications 

llieBis 

Advanced Electrodynamics 

Electrical Measurements 

Electricity and Magnetism 

Electrical Testing : 

Business Law 



1 


, 


iSS 






tRfl 






i8R 






iRfi 






i«« 






iS8 


6 


3 


.89 






.»Q 






i8o 






.80 




t 


i8q 


.1 




190 






IQO 






190 


3 


3 


190 



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THE COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
Admission, Etc. 
The requirements for admission to this course are the same as 
for the course in Mechanical Engineering. (See page ito.) 

This course leads to the degree of B, S. in Electrical Engineering 
at the end of the Senior year. The technical degree of £. E. is given 
under the provisions stated on page 77. 

FBEBHHAIf CI.Aa8. 

Same as course in Mechanical Engineering. (See page no.) 

sOFHOHOKE cu^aa. 
Same as course in Mecfaanica] Engineering. (See p^o no.) 

JDNIOK CI-ASS. 



Working Drawings, Kinematic Design . . 

Statics 

Hydraulics 

Graphics 

Thermodynamics 

Mechanical Laboratory 

Electrodynamics 

Telegraphy and Telephony 

Alternating Currents 

Electrical Laboratory 

♦Calculus 

Phjrsical Measurements 

Analytic Mechanics 



•Given 






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THE TOWNS SCIENTIFIC 31 
8KNIOIC CLASS. 



Hydrodynainics 

Engine Calculations 

Boiler Calculations 

Applied Thermodynamics 

Advanced Mechanical Laboratory 

Machine Design 

Shop Visits 

Specifications 

Advanced Electrodynamics 

Electrical Measurements 

Dynamo Design 

Alternating Current Applications . 

Electricitv and Magnetism 

Electrical Testing 

Thesis 



THE COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Craklbs C. Harrison, LL. D., Provost. 

EoOfiR F. Smith, Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D., Vice-Provost. 

JosiAH H. Pbnnimam, Ph. D., Dean of the CoUege. 

Edgar Marboro, C. E., Civil Engineering: Projtssor in Chargf. 

William Easbv. Jr„ C. E., 

Howard C. Ives, C.E., 

William T. Lyle, C. E.. 

Herman C. Bbbrv, A. B.,.B. S. in C. E., 

Louis H, LossE. B S. inC. E.. 

Albert J. Houlb, E. M., B. S., 

Harold E. Hilts. B, S. in C. E., 

Albsrt W. Kieper, B. S. in C. E., 

Ratuond C, Semple, 

The Course in Civil Engineering extends over a period of four 
years, and leads to the degree of Bachelor (d Science in Civil Engi- 



Civa 
Engineeritig. 



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neering. The tuition fee is two hundred dollars (laoo.oo) a year. 
Graduates who continue in the practice of their profession may 
receive the technical degree of Civil Engineer under the provisions 
stated on page 77. 

The requirements for admission to this course are : Eoglish A and 
B; History A, B, C, D (any two of these tour); Mathematics A, B, 
C, D, E; Physics: and German A and B, or French A and B, For 
details, see pp. 62-70. 

Methods and EguiPMSNT. 

The couree in Civil Engineering is designed to meet, as thor- 
oughly as practicable, the demands of modem engineering practice. 
The studies are sufficiently advanced and comprehensive to ensure 
to the graduate that broad technical training essential to the suc- 
cessful prosecution of his subsequent professional work. 

Text-books are used in general as a basis of instruction. Supple- 
mental matter is given in the form of notes and lectiffes. The aim 
is to keep the class work intimately in touch with the methods of 
current practice. 

The equipment of surveying instruments includes a theodolite 
reading to single seconds, and a level of precision, in Eiddition to an 
extensive outfit of transits, levels, sextants, etc. After the students 
have been made familiar with the adjustment and use of the various 
instruments, complete surveys are undertaken. During the first 
term a special farm survey is made, in connection with the regular 
weekly field practice. During the summer, two entire weeks are 
devoted to a topographic and hydrographic survey, and a like 
period to the survey of a railroad line. The data collected in the 
field serve as a basis for subsequent class-room instruction in the 
preparation of drawings and estimates. 

The courses in the Theory of Stresses are supplemented by 
courses covering the practical application of the principles involved. 
Complete designs, accompanied by detail drawings, are made of a 
plate-girder and a pin-connected truss bridge. 

Similarly, the courses in the Theory of Hydraulics, Sanitary 
Engineering. Railroad Engineering, and Masonry are followed by 
courses in the general design of a distributing system for a municipal 
water-supply; the sewerage of a town; the elements of the derign 
of railroad yards, terminals and track details; and the design <^ 
masonry structures. 

The instruction relating to the materials of construction is sup- 
plemented by work in the Civil Engineering Testing Laboratcoy. 



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THB TOWHB SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 11$ 

The latter is equipped with one 100,00a pounds and two 30,000 
pounds universal testing machines suitable for making tensile, 
compressive and transverse tests of steel, iron, stone, timber, etc. 
Cement and mortar tests axe made on three machines of diSerent 
types, having each a capacity of 1,000 pounds. Special apparatus 
is provided for the testing of paving brick. Instruction is given to 
all students in making the more common tests of materials. The 
^>paratus is further at the disposal of advanced students in con- 
nection with experimental thesis work. 

The facilities for testing materials win be largely increased in 
the equipment of the new engineeeringbuilding, which will be ready 
for occupancy before the beginning of the faU term, 1906. Provision 
is also made in this building for a large and completely equipped 
hydraulic laboratory. 

Tours of inspection to manufacturing plants and to engineering 
works, completed or in course of construction, are made from time 
to time during the year, but only in so far as they have a direct 
bearing on the work of the class-room. 

During the summer vacation following the Sophomore and Junior 
yean, each student is required to prepare a memoir descriptive of 
some engineering work or manufacturing plant, based on his direct 
personal inquiries and observation. 

A thoroughly elaborated thesis on a professional subject is re- 
quired of every candidate for a degree. These theses must embody 
either a design or a review of an engineering plant, process or 
structure; or the results of an experimental investigation. They 
must be fully illustrated by drawings and models, where needed, 
and upon graduation the latter must be deposited with the Uni- 
versity. 

The department library contains an excellent collection of the 
most recent technical works, supplementing the very complete col- 
lection of bound volumes of engineering journals and of the trans- 
actions of engineering societies in the Evans Rogers collection in the 
University Library. The leading technical journals are kept on 



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Number of 



Pen Topography 

Lettering 

Projections 

Descriptive Geometry 

Mechanical Drawing 

Trigonometry 

Algebra 

Physics 

English Composition 

English Language 

English Literature 

Gennan f one only \ 

French \ required { 

Chemistry 

SOPHOMORE CI^SS. 

Colored Topography 

Mechanical Drawing 

Stereotomy 

Surveying, Theory 

Surveying. Practice 

Railroad Surveying, Theory 

Railroad Surveying, Practice 



English Composition 

English Literature 

Gennan f one only 1 

French I required / 

Analytic Geometry \ 

Calculus J 

Analytic Mechanics 

Physics 

Chemistry (Qualitative) 



Ihain 
and two 



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I TOWNS SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 
JOmOB 0I.A8S. 



Mechanics of Materials 

Graphic Statics 

Framed Structtires 

Bridge Design 

Masonry 

Railroad Construction and Maintenance 

Railroad Office Work 

Hydromechanics 

Water-Supplies 

Sanitary En^neering 

Roads and Pavements 

Map I>rflwing 

Calculus 

Physical Measurements 

Analytic Mechanics 

Hineraloey 



8BNIOB CLASS. 



Hateriate of Construction 

Testing Laboratory 

Framed Structures 

Bridge Design 

Railroad Economics 

Railroad Design 

Geodesy, Theory 

Geodesy. Practice 

Hydraulic Works Dedgn 

Hasoniy Design 

Inspection Tours 

Thesis 

Steam Engines and Boilers 

Applied Electricity 

Astronomy 

Practical Astronomy and Geodesy . 

Metallurgy 

Geology 



, 


_ 


ISO 


^ 


S 


150 






ISO 


4 


4 


iS» 






150 






ISO 






IS* 




1 


150 


5 




'SO 


at hours 




assigned 




1 




IS" 

IQO 






n« 






nH 






i6a 


' 


-~ 


161 



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Chemistry. 



Il8 THE COLLBCB. 

THE COURSE IN CHEMISTRY. 
Officers. 
Charles C. Harrison, LL. D., Provost. 
Edgar F. Smith, Pu. D., Sc. D., LL. D., VUe-Provost: CJwfW- 

isiry; and Director of the John Harrison Laboratory of 

Chemistry. 
JosiAH H. pKKNiMAN, Ph. D., Dean of tht College. 
Owen L. Shinn, Ph. D,, 
Walter T. Tagcart, Ph.D., 
Daniel L. Wallace, 
Thquas p. McCutcheon, B. S., 
John Praeer, B. S., A. M., 
Roger C. Wells, Ph. D., 
WiLUAM M. Barr, B. S., M. a., 
DuNLAP-J. McAdau, Jr., A. M., 

The Course in Chemistry extends over a period of four yean, and 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. The tui- 
tion fee is two hundred dollars ($300.00) a year. 

The requirements for admission to this course are: English A and 
B; History A, B, C, D (any two of these four); Mathematics A, B, 
C.DandF; Physics; and either French A and fi, or German A and 
B. For details, see pp. 6»-7o. 

Methods and Equipmbnts. 

The work of the first year consists in the execution of a 
somewhat extended series of experiments upon the metals and non- 
metals. The student omits only those of greater difficulty, and 
such as require a skilled manipulator for their performance. In 
addition, he attends lectures and recitations, and solves numerous 
examples based upon the various reactions that he conducts prac- 
tically. The skill and familiarity with chemical methods acquired 
in this way will fully prepare him for the work of the second year, 
which b mainly analytical, though considerable time is allotted to 
the preparation of a selected series of inorganic salts. 

In quantitative analysis he is given every opportunity to familiar- 
ize himself with purely scientific methods in gravimetric, electro- 
lytic and volumetric analysis; also with gas analysis, the use of the 
spectroscope, and the. methods of technical analysis applied in the 
various branches of Chemistry. The instruction in Theoretical 
Chemistry is given by lee tures ; that in Applied Chemistry by lectures. 



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Bnpplemented by frequent visits to chemical plants in Philadel- 
|>tua and adjacent cities. The lectures and recitations in Organic 
Cbenustry- are conducted parallel with practical work upon this 
subject. The aim is to have the student prepare typical substances 
from the ivhole field of Organic Chemistry. The most recent meth- 
ods of analysis peculiar to this field receive due attention. In the 
last year the student pursues advanced work in the direction ot 
Pure Inorganic, Oi^anic, or Technical Chemistry. The solution of 
some problem in one of these branches will constitute the thesis that 
must be prepared before presenting himself for the final examination. 
The J ORN Harbison Laboratoryof Chemistry provides ft complete 
modem equipment for the prosecution of chemical studies, both 
undergraduate and graduate. A pamphlet containing plans of the 
Laboratory will be mailed upon application to the Director. 



General Chemistry 

Solid Geometry 

German I one only \ 

French \ required / 

English Composition 

English Literature 

English Langua^ 

Preeband Drawing 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Qualitative Anal;^ 
English Composition 
English Literatnre . . 

German 

Scientific German J one onlv 

French 1 required 

Scientific French 
Uinenlogy 



dptionai — Mathematics, Botany, Physics. 



I5S-7 
164 
'65 



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THB COLt-BGB. 
JCmOK CI.AS8. 



guantitative Analysis 
rganic Chemistry 

Assaying , 

Ethics , 

German I one only 1 

French \ required J 

English Literature 

Mineralogy, Descriptive 

Mineralogy, Determinative 

Metallurgy 

Optional — Physics, Microscopic Botany. . . 



94A 
562 



SENIOR CI,ASB. 

Organic Chemistry 

Practical Organic Chemistry 

•Applied Chemistry 

Analysis of Foods , 

Theoretical Chemistry 

Electro- Chemistry 

Practical Electro- Chemistry 

Physical Chemistry , 

Economics 

Geology 

Business Law 



THE COURSE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 
Officers. 
Charlss C. Harrison, LL. D., Provost. 
Edgar F. Smith. Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D., Viet-Provost: Chem- 
istry; and Director of ti%e John Harrison Laboratory of 
Chemistry. 
JosiAH H. Pekniman, Ph. D., Dean of the ColUge. 
Hbnry W. Spanglbr, M. S., Dynamical Engineering. 
J. Verne Stanford, B. S., M, £., Meehanieal Engineering. 



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THE TOWNE SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. lat 

Harold W. Brown, B. S., Electrical Engineerirtg. 

OwBN L. Shinn, Ph. D., I 

Walter T. Taggart. Ph. D., 

Daniel L. Wallace, 

John Frazer, B. S., A. M., ■ Chemistry. 

Thomas P. McCutchbon, B. S , 

William M. Barr, B. S., A. M., 

DuNLAP J. McAdau, Jr., A. M., 

John J. Morris, Wood Working. 

Hugh W. McConnbll, Iron Working. 

Horace P. Fry, B. S. in E. E., Mechanical Drawing. 

HsNRy E. Ehlbrs, B. S. in M. E., Mechanical Engineering. 

WiLBVB F. Smith, Mechanical Drawing. 

Author H.Gill, M. E,, Mechanical Engineering. 

SouBRS P. Randolph, Iron Working. 

William Mbllor, .IVood Working. 

Henry Gebhart, B. S. in E. E., Electrical Engineering. 

Worrall E. S. Templb, B. S. in E. E., Electrical Engineering. 

Julius G. Kirby, B. S. in M. E., Mechanical Engineering. ■ 

William E. Barbows, Jr., B. S. in E. E., Electrical Engi- 



Tbe Course in Chemical Engineering covers a period of four years, 
and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engi- 
neering The tuitian fee is two hundred doUars (lioo.oo) a year. 
Graduates who continue in the practice of their profesaon may 
receive the technical degree of Chemical Engineer under the pro- 
visions stated on page 77. 

The chemical studies introduced into this course will not only 
give the student a thorough acquaintance with the fundamental 
principles of cheirical science, but will also afford him a complete 
drill in analysis, and in the preparation of inorganic and organic 
products. Instruction in technical analysis and applied chemistry 
is reserved iintil the last year. Frequent excursions are made to 
adjacent plants for the purpose of studying practical processes in 
operation, and examining in detail the mechanical appliances in 

The requirements fbr admission to this course are: English A and 
B; History A, B, C, D (any two of these four) ; Mathematics A, B, 
C, D, E;' Physics; and German A and B, or French A and B. Por 
details, see pp. 62-70. 



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J 



THB COLLXOK. 



General Chemistry 

Drawing 

Steam Enzine 

Shop Work 

English Composttion 

English Language 

English Literature 

Frendi ( one only 1 

German \ required / 

Trwonometry 

Algebra 

Physics 

BOPHOHOBB CI.ABfl, 

Analytical Chemistry (Qualitative) 

Mechanical Drawing and Sketching 

Kinematics 

Shop Work ._. 

English Composition .'. 

English Literature 

French /one only \ 

German I required J 

Analytic Geometry ) 

Calculus / 

Physics 

Analytic Mechanics 




tizedoyGOOJ^If 



3WNB SCIENTIFIC SC 
JVNIOB f^LABS, 



Analytical Chemistry (Quantitative) 

Assaying 

Statics 

Hydrostatics 

Etectro dynamics 

Mechanical Laboratory 

Electrical Laboratory 

Graphic Statics 

Thermo dynamics 

Physical Measurements 

Metallurgy 

Calculus 

Analytic Mechanics 



SEKIOR GI-ASa. 



Organic Chemistry 

Practical Organic Chemistry 

•Applied Chemistry 

Electro-chemistry 

Steam Enzine 

Steam Boilers 

Thermodynamics 

Designing 

Electrodynamics 

Electricity and Magnetism . . 

Electrical Laboratory 

Business Law 



* Omitted in ipop^. 



tizedoy Google 



THB COLLBQB. 



The Wharton School of Finance and Commerce was founded by 
JosBPH Wharton, Esq., of Philadelphia, in 1881, to provide instruc- 
tion and special training in Finance and Commerce. The founder 
expressed the desire that the School should offer facilities for 
obtaining: (j) "An adequate education in the principles underlying 
successful civil government"; (a) "a training suitable for those who 
intend to engage in business or to undertake the management of 
property." The course has been constructed in accordance with 
these ideals. 

Recent years have witnessed the growth of a great mass of sys- 
tematized knowledge concerning business facts, methods and prin- 
ciples. At the same time the increasing tendency toward narrow 
specialization in active life has made it more difficult for a young 
man in a subordinate position to obtain a broad, general knowledge 
of business principles. It is therefore essential to secure adequate 
training in the fundamentals of business science before entering 
into active practice. 

In addition to the training for industry, commerce and finance, 
the courses in the Wharton School prepare young men for the study 
of the law, for entrance into the public service, and for teaching. 

The work of the first two years is mainly prescribed; that of the 
last two is elective, and is specialized along the lines selected by 
each student for his chosen career. In all courses, emphasJs is laid 
upon original research work. The degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Economics (B. S. in Econ.) is conferred upon satisfactory com- 
pletion of 60 units of work. A Special Two- Year Course in Busi- 
ness Practice and Banking, leading to a certificate of proficiency, 
is also given in the Wharton School. 

The Evening School of Accounts and Finance of the Wharton 
School offers courses in Accounting, Money and Credit, Commercial 
Law and Industrial Management, to those who are occupied during 
the regular college hours. For details and description, see later 
pages. 

All subjects taken by students in the Wharton School of Finance 
and Commerce are grouped under three heads, as follows: 



tizedoy Google 



! WHARTON 

I. Pkbshman Rbquikbd Work. 



Ho. 


BubJecU. 


Hoon 








3 
3 








108 














63' 
»3' 

»'7 


Government of the United States 


ai5 

143 

an 




Money. Credit and Foreign Exchange 



a. Sophomore Requirbd Work. 



«5S 



Advanced Economics 

Nineteenth Century Novelists 

Hodem EsEayists 

Composition 

Citizenship — Federal and State 

In Addition to these, six units in Poreisn Luiffua^e 
■nd two uniti in Hiitory must be taken befon gradu' 



3. ELBCTIVES.f 



>93 



English Civilization 

Pohtical Geography F 

Commercial and Econonuc Geography .. £ 
American Commerce and Commercial Re- 
lations S 

Commercial Policy S 

Transportation 

Railway Rat«s and Traffic 

Organization of International Commerce S 

Social Reform 

Charities and Correction 



• ija mar be taken instead of iji. 

t Subjecu marlcod " P " may be elected by Preshmen'or other students. Sob- 
iect* marked " S " may be taken by Sophomores. Juiuon or Senion Subjects 
not marked either " F " or " S " miy only be taken by J niors and Seniors. No 
ttbject may be taken by a itudent who baa not bad the necessary pref)arat]ai&. 



t,i.a,G00glt' " 



THB COLLBGB. 

3. Elbctivbs — Continned. 



».. 


Snbtaeu. 


Houn 


Pace when 


194 

III 

III 

199* 
303^ 








American Social Problems S 


aji 






Sodolorical Field Work. 




Tariff History of the United States S 

Industrial Processes F 

Indus trial Management S 


Vil 


;s 


Business Law F 


7^> 


ao7* 






Life Insurance S 

Fir«. Marine and FideUty Insurance .... S 
The Law and Practice of Insurance 


a 13 
"3 
»i3 
»I3 


V,f 




"I 


Money, Credit and Foreign Exchange . . F 
PubKc Finance P 


114 
»14 








lit 

636 


City Government and City Problems ... £ 
PubUc Administration S 










tjg* 


Foreign Policy of the United States S 


ai6 


64" 
t>S3* 


Blackstone's Commentaries i 

Government Regulation of Industry anc 

Commerce S 

Labor Legislation S 


217 
217 







• Omitted in iijos-ofl. 

Sixty units of work are required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Economics. Of these sixty, eight units of elective work 
may be taken from the courses offered primarily to the students in 
Arts and Science. Gymnasium work is not counted as part of the 
sixty units which are necessary for the degree. 



tizedoy Google 



\. op FINANCE i 



) COUMERCB. 



Two-Ybab Special Coursb im Businbss Practicb and Banking. 
The Two- Year Course in Business Practice and Banking is 
designed to meet the needs of those who are prevented, by lack of 
time, from taking the regular course for a degree. All the subjects 
in the two-year course are required. The satisfactory completion 
of the course entitles the student to a certificate of proficiency. 



Mo. 


anblww. 


Hour* 
Wwk. 


i» found. 


•.ni 




■■ 


an 








ai7 


Money, Credit and Foreign Exchange 


v.t 








631 

331 
"34 


Government of the United States 


"S 




'5S 









a 19 




3 


"4 






rS^ 












303 
'33 
ass 



















t,i.a,Google 



SUBJECTS OF INSTBUCTIOX 
THE COLLEGE FACULTY. 



Amtrropoi^gy. 
Architbcturx. 
AsTKONoyy, 

Chbuistrt. 

Civil EnoinbsrihO 

Economics {see also Financb 

andCohmbrcb). 
Electrical Enoinbbrimo (set 

Mbch. Eno.}. 
English. 

Ethics {ses Philosophy). 
Finance and Coumbrcb (str 

pp. ao4-ai7). 
PiNB Arts. 
French. 
Geology, Mbtallurot and 

Uinbraloot. 
Gbruan. 
Grbbk. 
Hbbrbw. 
History. 



Hyoibmb. 
Italian. 
Latin. 

LtKOUISTlCS. 

Looic (m< Philosophy). 
Hatrbiiatics. 
Mechanical Enoinbbriko, 
Metallurqy (s£f Gbolooy), 
Mineralogy (m« Geology). 
Music. 

Pedagogy {see Philosophy). 
Philosophy, Psychology and 
Pbdagocy. 

Political Scibhcb (im alio 
Finance and ComiBRcB). 
Psychology (set Philosophy). 
Sanskrit. 
Sociology (se* also Finance and 

Commerce). 
Spanish. 
Zoology, 
ia8) 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



Aathropolos] 



Hiemiiitry 



rGaolocy ■ - - 
IHiMraloci' - 



Phil(w)phy ■ 
(PedHtoKV' 



Phrdca . 
Piriitieal Bei">J 



-^ 



t,i.a,Google 



t,i.a,Google 



THB COLLBOB. 

ANTHROPOLOGY. 





BubJecB. 


Hounaveek. 


tjDlH 
Ol 

WO*. 


"^■^■Sf"' 


No. 


tS. 


•^ 


701 


enteral Anlhropol- 
ogy. 

Gordon. 


> 








701 


Am«TKan ArclKgol- 
Gordon. 


-~ 


' 


^ 


701 


703 


Ethnology of 
Europe. 

Gordon. 


' 


" 


' 


701. 



Dbscription. 

701. General Anthropology. — The principles of somatology: tnan's 
poeilion in the animal kingdom; races and varieties of 
man. Prehistoric archsology; the evidence of man's 
anUqiiity; the time and place of his origin ; his distribu- 
tion in geological time and his movements down to the 
historical period; physical characteristics and types of 
culture in the prehistoric period. Ethnology: social 
life of primitive man ; origin and development of the 
utilitarian and esthetic arts ; theories of language. 
Illustrated by collections in the University Museum 
and by lantern slides. 

70a. American Archeology and Etknalogy. — The remains of pre- 
historic man in America and their relation to the his- 
toric peoples of this continent; the characteristics of 
aboriginal American culture, and its bearing on the 
question of origin. The linguistic stocks and their affili- 
ations; mode of life, domestic arts, social organizations 
and religious beliefs of the Indian tribes. Illustrated 
by collections in the University Museum and by lantern 

703. European Ethnology. — The races of Europe; the paleolithic 
and neolithic cultures; the physical characters, racial 
rdationships and early migrations of the several ele- 
ments forming the European population. The social 
and industrial development of prehistoric Europe. 
The ethmc affinities of th« modem population. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



ARCHITECTURE. 





BubJecB. 


Bonn > week. 


Units 
Work. 




Mo. 


,a.|,i. 


Renurki. 


1 


ArchiUctural Draw- 


1* 








ing. 

Whitney. 


■^1 






= 


Freehand Drooling. 
Dawson. 


if 






aA 








3 


Elements of Archi- 
Ueture. 
Laird. 
Whitney. 
Elliott. 


II. 




ist term, i} anits; 
3d term, 4! units. 
(Special students. 
5 unite.) 


6 
7 


Descriptive Geome- 
try. 

Whitney. 

Shades and Shadows 
Whitney. 


1- 

1: 


1 
1 
1 






9 


Perspective 

Whitney. 








» 


Order Problems 

Elliott. 


14 


_ 


=1 


(Special students, 
a units.) 




Design 


~ 


«4 


«i 






Eliiott.' 
Laird. 




"5 


Freehand Drawing. 
Dawson. 


4 


4 






"7 


Architectural His- 
tory; Ancient. 
Osborne. 


6 


— 






■9 


Architectural His- 
tory; Medieval. 
Osborne. 


— 


6 






« 


Summer Work 

Laird. 


- 


- 







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subject.. 


Houn 


week. 


z 


'-SSX^' 


KO. 


Term. 


2d 




. 


30 


38 


" 


1st term, 4I units; 
id term, 6) units. 
(Special students, 




Laird. 


"3 


Freehand Dramng; 
Historic Or«a- 

Dawson. 


— 


4 






34 


Freehand Drawing; 
Antique. 

Dawson. 

Water-Color Draui- 
ing. 

Dawson. 


3 


3 






36 


Pett'Ond-Ink Ren- 
dering. 
Hays. 


' 


* 






38 


Architectural His- 
tory; Renaissance 

and Modem. 
Osborne. 


6 


" 






30 


Mechanics of Ma- 
terials. 

Nolan. 


3 


— 


■i 


Math. 463, 480 and 

487. 


3' 


Graphic Statics .... 
Nolan. 


- 


3 


li 




33 


Building Construc- 
tion. 

Nolan. 

Sanitary Engineer- 
ing 0} Buildings 
(393, 33, 34). 


■ 


■ 




For description of 
Hygiene (39'). «» 
p. 174. 


39a 


Hygiene 


— 


- 


- 


Ten lectures. 


Bergey. 




33 


Heating and Venti- 
lation. 

Nolan. 


— 


— 


— 


Ten lectures, follow- 
ing 393. 



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THB COLL BOX. 





Sabjeettu 


Bonn 


kw«ek. 


Vaiu 
WOTk. 


"-sixr-' 


m. 


A. 


^ 


34 


Plumbing and 
Drainaee. 
Noltm. 


- 


- 


- 


Ten lectures, foUow- 
»nK33- 


35 


Summer Work .... 
Laird. 


- 


- 






36 


Design 


3° 


30 


" 


ist terra, j units; 


Cret. 


ad term (minor 
part), 3 units. 
(Special students, 
8 units.) 


38 


Thesis Design .... 
Cret. 


- 


30 


4 


Major part of ad 
term. 


39 


{Design). 
Everett. 


9 




4 


Omitted in 1905-06. 


40 


Freehand Drawing 
iLifey 

Dawson. 






' 




41 


Water-Cdor Ren- 
Pen-and-ink Ren- 






' 




44 


History of Painting. 

Everett. 






' 


Omitted in 1905-06. 


46 


Building Construc- 
tion. 

Nolan. 






• 




47 


Professional Prac- 
tice. 

Laird. 






• 




48 


SpmAdLeclHrts ... 






• 


See description for 
topics and speak- 
erain 1904-05. 


5° 


Summer Work .... 
Laird. 


- 


- 


• 





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SDbjuu. 


Houni 


ft week. 


UnlB 

A. 


'TSX'^"?™'- 


No. 


^. 


^ 


S' 


Design 


36 


36 


'S 




Cret. 




53 


Freehand Drawing 
(Life). 

Dawson. 


4 


4 


' 




55 


Waler^ohr Rtn- 

derine. 

ElUott. 


s 


5 


' 




57 


History of Architec- 
ture: Research and 
Conference. 
Osborne. 


' 


* 


* 




59 


Fine Arts: History 
or Theory. Re- 
search and Con- 
ference. 

Elliott. 


^ 


* 


' 




6oA 


ATchiiectural Engi- 
neering: Design. 
Kolan. 


a6 


-^ 


5 




6oB 


Architectural Engi- 

neering: Thesis. 

Nolan. 


— 


30 


6 




6oC 


ArchiUetural Engi- 

nering: Thtory. 

Nolan. 


9 


9 


4 




6<.D 


Masonry and Foun- 
dations. 
Nolan. 


3 


— 


^ 




«oE 


SpecHkatians, Esti- 
mates and Con. 
tracts. 

Nolan. 




3 




These subjects, with 

those - numbered 
141 and 141, con- 
stitute the Option 
in Architectural 
Engineering. 


aA 


Freehand Droving. 
Dawson. 


' 


■ 


' 


For Freshmen in 
Chemistry. 



t,i.a,Google 



Description. 

I. ArekittcUtral Drawing. — Exercises in instrumental drawing, 
brush work and lettering, with particular application to 
architectural subjects. 

a. Freehand Drawing, from simple and common forms, in pen- 
cil and charcoal. 

aA. Drawing in Pencil from the Ofc/cti.— Taken by FieBbmen 
in Chemistry. 

3. The Eiemettts of Architecture. — Lectures on the nature o£ 
architecture, the Order as a type of architectural form, 
the Oassic Orders, the Fi^'e Orders, their affiliated torms 
and derivatives and other elements of Renaissance de- 
sign. Exercises in drawing and rendering the Orders, 
and problems in elementary design involving the use 
of Orders and other elements. Memory exercises and 
written recitations. 

6. Descriptim Geometry. — Orthographic projections; revolutions; 

single and double curved surfaces of revolution; inter- 
sections of lines, planes and solids; tangents and 
developments. Lectures and exercises. (The subjects 
of shades and shadows and perspective are separately 
treated, as follows:) 

7. Shades and Shadows. — Lectures upon principles, accompa- 

nied by exercises, with especial reference to architectural 
practise. 
9. Perspeclive. — Lectures upton principles, accompanied by exer- 
cises, with especial reference to architectural practise. 

II. Order Problems. — I, Exercises in composition and rendering. 
II, Sketch problems in the elementary design of the 
email ensemble. 

13. Design. — ^Problems in the elementary design of the small 
ensemble involving the application of the principles of 
architectural drawing; problems in the design of archi- 
tectural motifs, two to four weeks each. Exercises in 
memory and imagination. 

ij. Freehand Drawing. — Drawing from the cast; elementary 
architectural ornament and parts of the human figure; 
in pencil and charcoal. 

17 History of Ancient ArckitecluTe.—Compiisrng the study of 
the monuments of architecture from prehistoric times to 
the time of the Emperor Diocletian. Lectures, two hoim; 
research, four hours. 



tizedoy Google 



COURSBS IN THE COLLEGB. 135 

19. History of Medieval Arckitecture. — Prom the fall of the 
Roman Empire to the Fifteenth Century. Lecturaa 
two hours; research, four hours. 

30. 3S and S°' Summer Work, consisting of the preparation of a 
certain number of drawings or sketches; or of work for 
a definite period in the emploj' of a practicing architect, 
as specified in a program. 

SI. Design. — Problems in (a) the design of component motifs of 
architectural composition, (6) the design of the ensem- 
ble; three to four weeks each. One-day sketch problems 
in the plan of the larger ensemble. Exercises in the 
analysis of architectural form. 

33. Freehand Drawing. — From motifs in historic ornament, 
involving composition. 

14. Freehand Drawing front the Antique. 

15. Water-Color Drawing. — Drawing in water color from still hfe 

and from nature. 
»6. Pen-and-ink Rendering. — Theory of the composition of line 
drawings and rendering of architectural drawings in pen 

aS. History of Renaissance and Modern Architecture. — From 
Brunelleschi to the close of the Nineteenth Century. 
Lectures, two hours; research, four hours. 

30. Mechanics of Materials. — Strength of the materials of con- 

struction; application of the principles of mechanics to 
girders, columns, trusses, arches and to structural form 
in general. 

31. Graphic Statics. — The application of graphic methods to the 

analysis of stresses in trusses, piers, arches and abut- 

33. Building Construction. — Nature and properties of woods used 
in buildings. Carpentry, heavy framing and mill con- 
struction. Lectures and drawings. (3a and 46 form a 
two-year course, 32 being given in 1905-06). 

33 and 34. Sanitary Engineering of Buildings — 33, Heating and 
Ventilation; 34, Plumbing andDrainagc. Preceded by 
Hygiene, 39a. Scientific principles of Sanitary Engi- 
neering and their appUcation in building practise. 

35- See 10. 

36. Design. — Problems in the composition of the ensemble, four 
to five weeks each; in plan composition, one week each; 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



Ijti TRB COLLEGE. 



and in the composition o£ inI«riorB, one week each. One- 
day sketch problems in decorative architecture. 

38. Th«sis Design, — An extended problem in the composition of 

the ensemble with descriptive memoir, upon a subject 
chosen by the student with the approval of the Professor 
of Architecture. 

39. Design in Historic Ornament. — Problems in the composition 

of ornament. Elective as a substitute for nine hours in 
courses 3O and 38 and, in the case of Special Students, 
course 31. Omitted in 1905-06. 

40. Freehand Drawing from the Life. 

41. WaleT'Color Rendering. — Studies in rendering; first, from 

archteological fragments; second, from architectural 

drawings. 
41. Pen-and-ink Rendering.— Advajxctd studies in the rendering 

of architectural drawings in pen and ink, 
44. History of Painting — A course of lectures upon the history 

of painting, (Taken by Juniors and Senioisin 1904-05, 

and omitted in 1905-06. To be resumed for Seniora 

in 1906-07.) 

46. Bnilding Construction. — Masonry and foundations: iron 

and steel work. Lectures and drawing. (46 and 3» fonn 
a two-year course, 3a being given in 1905-06.) 

47. Professional Practice. — I, Aspects and problems of practice; 

professional ethics, competitions, preliminary cost com- 
putations, utilities in the planning of schools, libraries, 
courthouses, etc., etc. Lectures and research. II, Cur- 
rent practice as reflected in technical periodicals; sum- 
maries, reports and discussions. 

48. Special Lectures on Arckitectural and Allied Subjtcis (aa ^ven 

m >9=4-=S.) 
Design and History. — Ten lectures, via: 
The history and technique of Heraldry and of Tapestry, 
four lectures, Charles E. Dana, C. E., Sometime Pro- 
fessor of Art, University of Pennsylvania; President 
Antiquarian and Numismatic Society. 
Recent Municipal Improvements in the United States, one 
lecture, Frank Miles Day, B. S., Vice-President Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects. 
Qualitative Engineering, one lecture, Henry Hombostel, 
Ph. B. in Arch., A. D. G. F., Architect East River 
Bridges, New York. 



tizedoy Google 



COUESB8 m TBB COLLBGB. I3f 

The Domestic Life of the Greeks, two lectures, William A. 

Lamberton, A. M., Litt D., University of Pennsylvania. 
The Domestic Life of the Romans, two lectures, Walton 

B. McDaoiel, A. M., Ph. D., University of Pennsylvama. 
Conftntfiion and Practice. — Seventeen lectures, viz: 

Some t'Cga) Questions Confronting the Architect, one lec- 
ture, Henry Wolf BM6, A. M., LL. B., University of 

Pennsylvania. 
The Weathering of Building Stones, two lectures, Amos 

P. Brown. Ph. D., Univciaity of Penn^lvania. 
The Execution of the Design, two lectures, John McArthur 

Harris, A. M., Architect. 
Reinforced Concrete, four lectures, Mr. Emlle G. Perrot, 

Architect. 
Electrical Installation, four lectttrea, Clayton W. Pike, 

S. B., Electrical Engineer. 
Ventilation, four lectures, Wm. G. Snow, S. B., Steam 

Heating Engineer. 

50. See 30. 

51. Design. — Problems in the composition of the large ensemble, 

permitting special lines of study. 

J3. Freehand Drawing from the Life. 

55. Water-Color Rendering. — Advanced studies in the rendering 
of architectural perspectives. 

57. Historical Research. — Research, conference and memoir in 
special fields of architectural history. 

59. The Fine Arts. — Special Unes of study in the theory or his- 
tory of the Pine Arts. Research and conference. 

The ft^owing subjects, together with those numbered 141 and 

143 , constitute the Option in Architectiual Engineering. 

60A- Arehiieclural Engineering; Design, — Practical problems of 

four to five weelcs each in architectural constructive 

design. Buildings designed and analyzed as structural 

tmita and the details in each problem carefully worked 

60B. Architectural Engineering: Thesis — An extended problem 
in architectural constructive design, consisting of a sub- 
ject chosen by the student with the approval of the 
Professor of Architecture. Descriptive memoir and 
specification accompanying the design. 

60C. Arekitectmal Engineering: Theory. — Typical skeleton stmc- 



tizedoyGOOJ^If — 



tures. Plans of column, girder, and beam frammg. 
Details of framed metal connections, Plate and box 
girders. Wind-bracing Truss design and details. 

6oD, Specifications, Eslitnales and Coniracls, — General and special 
clauses of spcci6cations for the different kinds of mate- 
rial and labor. Forma of contracts and their relations 
to building operations. Examination and compari- 
son of typical and model forms. Practice in writing. 
Methods of estimating cost of work. 

6oE. Advanced Masonry and Foundations. — Consideration of spe- 
cial problems relating to foundations for heavy build- 
ings. Pile foundations. Grillage. Caissons Canti- 
lever foundations. Foundations under water. Walls, 
arches, domes. 



ASTRONOMY 





SubJecU. 


Houn. 


week. 


Uiill* 


"-SSW?-- 


^0. 


A. 


Term. 


6i 


Astronomy 

C. L. Doolittle 


i 


- 


li 


Mathematics 461 and 
461. 


61 


Practical Astronomy 
and Geodesy, 

C. L. Doolittle 


- 


4 


' 


61, and Mathe- 
matics 46s and 
467. 


63 


Practical Astronomy 
E. Doolittle. 


3 


3 


3 


62. 


64 


Thtorttical Astron- 
'^^. Doolittle. 


3 


3 


3 


61, and Matbemat- 

A reading knowl- 
edge of French 
and German is 
desirable. 



Dbscription. 

. Aitronomy. — Young's Manual of Astronomy. 

. Practical Astronomy and Geodesy. — Doolittle's Practical 
Astronomy. Lectures. Use of sextant, transit and 
zenith telescope in determination of time, latitude and 
azimuth. Method of Least Squares, with applications. 



tizedoy Google 



139 

63. Praclictd Astronomy. — Continuation of 62 

64. Theoretical Astronomy. -^Oihit determination based upon 

Watson's Theoretical Astronomy and Oppolzer'a Lthr- 
buch tuT Baknbtstimm«ng, Vol. I. 



BOTANY. 







Boon 


Keek. 


z 




Na 


T^^. 


~~M~ 


71 


StruciMTt and Func- 
tions of Plants. 
Macfarlane. 
Krautter. 


6 


6 


4 




« 


Systematic Study of 
Plants. 

Harshberger. 


6 


6 


4 


71- 


73 


Comparative Histol- 
agy of Plants. 
Macfarlane. 
Krautter. 




3 


' 


71. Omitted in 1 905 

-06. 


74 


Comparative Taxon- 
omy of Plants. 
n arsn ber^cr 




3 


* 


71 and 71. Omitted 
in 1905-06. 


75 


Irritability and Nu- 

Macfarlane. 
Krautter, 




6 


4 


7t- 


J6 


Morphology of the 

Gymnospermia. 

Maifarlane. 


6 


6 


4 


71 and 71 


77 


Morphclogy of the 
""Sarshberger, 




3 


' 


71 and 71. Omitted 
in 1 go 5-06 


78 


Morphology of the 
Alga«. 

HELTshbergor. 




3 


2 


71 and 7a. 












79 


Angiosptrmia. 

Macfarlane. 




6 


4 


71. Omittedini90S 
-06. 



t,i.a,Google 



THE COLLBOB. 





Subject! 


HounawMk. 


IT 


remark*, etc. 


Ha. 


T«rai. 


Tenn. 


80 


Morpkolcgy of tfu 
Bryo-Pterido' . 
fhyui. 


i 
3 


3 
3 


' 


71 and 7a. Omitt«d 
in 1905-06. 


81 
8> 


Ecology and Distri- 
bution. 

Harshberger. 

Plant Life andPlant 
Economics. 

Macf&rl&ne. 
Harshberger. 
Krautter. 


7*. 



Dbscription. 

71. StrtictuTt and Functions of Plants. — Lectures and kborator? 
work. Study of two leading types of higher plants, cell 
structure and history, tissue tormation, structure and 
functions of root, stem and leaf organs ot the Sperma- 
topbyta. A large part of the work in plant physiology 
is performed in the greenhouses or in the Physiological 
Laboratory. 

71, Systtinatic Study of Plants. — Lectures and laboratory work. 
Special types are studied, beginning with the simplest 
and advancing to the most complex. In the lectures 
the leading lines of morphological evolution from type 
to type are traced. During the second term a compara- 
tive study is made of twenty-five orders of flowering 
plants, and species belonging to these are identified by 
the aid of manuals. 

73. Comparative Histology of Plants. — Lectures and laboratory 

work. Cell units, tissue differentiation, special his- 
tology of the Pteridophyta and Spermatophyta, the 
relation of tissue formation to physiological and envi- 
ronmental conditions, are considered. 

74. Comparative Taxonomy of Plants. — Lectures and laboratory 

wori£. The principal native and exotic orders of plants 
are studied from living and alcoholic mAterial. Con- 



tizedoy Google 



COURSES IN THB COLLBGE. 



Btaot use IS made of Gpecin 



groups of plants sjrstematically arranged there are 
examined. 
75- Irritability and Nutrition. — Lectures and laboratory ■work. 
Advanced work on the phenomena of irritability and 
iiritocontractility of plants; their reactions to changed 
esvironmeTital surroundings; the sources of food, its 
utilization, transformations and ultimate assimilation 
or decomposition. 

76. Comparative Morphology of the Gymnospermia. — Two hours 

lecture, four hours laboratory and seminary work. 

77. Comparativt Morphology and Taxonomy of the Myxomycetes 

and Fungi. — One hour lecture, four hours laboratory 
and seminary work. 

Study of the structure and development of the fungi, 
including culture methods with study of the diagnostic 
charactere of the principal families. 

78. Comparative Morphology attd Taxonomy oj the Algae. — One 

hour lecture, two hours laboratory work. 

The principal groups of fresh-water and marine Algae. 
with special reference to their microscopic structure, 
evolution and relationship. 

79. Comparativt Morphology of the Angioipermia. — Two hours 

lecture, four hours laboratory and seminary work. 
So. Comparative Morphology of the Bryophyta and Pteridophyta. 
81. Comparative Plant Ecology and Distribution. — Lecture one 

hour; laboratory work two hours. 

The adaptive structure of plants and the methods of 

ecology will be studied, as well as plant formations, plant 

associations, and the philosophy of plant distribution. 

The course necessitates constant use of the microscope, 

alcoholic specimens, material -afforded by the herbarium, 

greenhouses, and garden, and plant foiroations in the 

vicinity of the city. 
8a. Plant Lift and Plant Economies. — ^Two houiB lecture work, 

and lecture-laboratory study. 
The life history of important economic plants, their 

geographical distribution, mode of culture, and their 

products. 



tizedoyGOOJ^Ic 



THB COLLBOB. 

CHEMISTRY. 





BubJecW. 


Houmaweeli. 


UnlM 
WOTk. 


renu.rlu,'^ ' 


No. 


Tem. 


Term. 


9" 


Geti^ral ItioTgaHk 
Chemistry. 

E. F. Smith. 

Shino. 

Frazer, 


* 


* 


* 


This subject must 
precede all other 
work in Chemistrr. 












9.A 


General [norganic 
Chemistry. 


9 


9 


6 


Prescribed for Fresh- 
men in Chemistry 
and in Chemical 

Engineering. 


gi 


Analytical Chemis- 

^' E. F. Smith. 
McCutchcon. 


S 


5 


3 


91. Recitation, I hr. 
Laboratory, 4 hrs. 


gaA 


Analytical Chem- 
istry. 


10-18 


10-18 


si-.° 


9 1 A. Prescribed for 
Sophomores in 
Chemistry and in 
Chemical Engi- 
neering. 


93 


Analytical Chemis- 
try. 

E. F. Smith 
Wallace. 


s 




3 


92. Recitation, I hr. 
Laboratory, 4 hrs. 


94A 


Organic Chemistry. 
Taggart. 


' 




' 


93. 


94B 


Organic Chemistry. 
Taggart. 


' 




' 


94A. Given in con- 
junction with gS. 


95 


Organic Chemistry. 

(knor Course.) 

Taggart. 


s 




3 


91. Recitation. I hr. 
Laboratory, 4 hrs. 


96 


Practical Organic 
Chemistry. 

Taggart. 


6 




3 


93. Must be accom- 
panied by g4A or 
95- 


97 


Applied Chemistry. 
Shinn. 


' 




' 


93. 95. Omitted in 

190S-06. 


98 


Analysis of Foods, 
etc. 

Taggart. 


6 




3 


93- 



t,i.a,Google 



C00R5BS IN 1 





BobJecM. 


Hounaweek. 


S° 


■•"nSXT!* 




xSi., 


tS.. 


99 


Theoretical Chem- 
istry. 

E. F. Smith. 


■ 






91, 9a. 93, 94A. 


.00 


Electro-chemistry .. 
E. P. Smith. 


- 






93- 


ini 


Sfmiiuiry. 


- 










E. F. Smith. 






. - 


4 






91. 




Vaiii«»: ■■■ 


103 


Gw Analysis 

(Minor Course.) 

McCutcheon. 


— 






91. 


104 


E. F. Smith. 


■ 






91. 


105 


Practical Electro- 
Chemistry. 
E. F. Smith. 


■ 






■00. 


106 


Physical Chemistry 


■ 






93- 



Dbscriptiom. 
91. General Inorganic Chemistry. — Recitation, conversational lee- 

tures and laboratory work. Experiments illustrating 

the principles of Chemistry, 
91A. Same as gi. Given in greater detail. Intended for 

students pursuing Chemistry as a major subject. 
91. Analytical CJKtnutr^. ^Qualitative analysis, Laboratot; 

practice with recitations. Preparation of a series cd 

inorganic salts. 
9aA. This course is to 91 what 91A is to 91. 
93. Analytical Chemistry. — Quantitative analysis. Gravimetric 

and volumetric analy^, with drill in mineral analysis. 

Inorganic preparations continued. 
94A. OfXon»cCACT»i*ifry{ElementaryCourse).— Illustratedlecttirt 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



144 THB C0LLB08. 

couTse, preliminary to 94B. It 18 intended to give the 
student a general knowledge of the carbon compounds. 
Special attention is paid to practical applicati<»i. 
94B. Organic Chemistry (^Advanced). — Can only be taken b7 those 
who have completed 94A. 

95. Organic Chemistry (Minor Course). — Lectures and laboratory 

work. 

96. Praelical Organic Chemistry. — Preparation of a series of 

typical organic cconpounda, together with ultimate 
analysidV 
97' Applied Chemistry. — Lectures upon subjects pertaining both 
to Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, supplemented by 
regular excursions to chemical plants. 

98. Anaiysis of Foods and Technicai Products. — Analysis of milk, 

butter, bread, honey, cofiee, chocolate, sugar (with the 
use of the polariscope) , pepper, water, soaps, cast-tron, 
steel, lubricating oils, paints, tanning materials, etc., 
.etc. Lectures and recitations, with practical exercises. 

99. Theoretical Chemistry.— Lectures and recitations. 

100. Electro-Chemistry. — Lectures, setting forth the theoretical side 
of the subject, with applications of the electric current 
to analysis, and to the preparation of chemical products. 

toi. Seminary. — The hour devoted to this feature of the instruc- 
tion is given to the reading of current chemical liteia- 
ture. to the discussion of papers on special topics in 
Chemistry, or to lectures delivered by advanced students. 

loa. Assaying.— Go\A, silver, lead, iron and coal assays. Labo- 

103. Gas Analysis (Minor Course), — Determination of the con- 

stituents of furnace and illuminating gas. Practice in 
the use of the Hempel and the Orsat gas apparatus. 

104. Organic Chemistry. — Lectures. 

loj. Practical Electro-Chemistry.—Labontory. 

106. Physical Chemistry. ^Lectures, one hour a week, dealing 
with relations between theories and facts, as well as with 
the properties, and phase and energy relations of matter. 
Laboratory, three hours a week, measurement of 
densities of gases and liquids, bcMling points, freenng 
points, practice with spectrometer, polarimeter, lefrac- 
tometer and various physico-cheiiiical apparatus. 



tizedoy Google 



COUKSB3 IM THE COLL BOB. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 





8<ib)«ni. 


Hours ■ week. 


P™,^^,^ul»d. 


Ho. 


tS.. 


^ 






" 


- 






Easbr. 




in 


M^hankal Drawing... 
Houle. 
Hilte. 
Kiefer. 


4 


4 




113 


Mtchankal Drawing . . . 
Easby. 
LoGse. 
Kiefer. 


' 


~ 


'"■ 


114 


P^To^^phy 

LoGse. 

Hilts. 


~ 


* 




"S 


Colortd To^apky . . . 
Hilts.' 


' 


(A. 

half) 


114. 


1 16 


Map Drawing 


' 


- 


Its, 114, ia6. 




Houle. 
Lo6se. 
Kiefer. 




»i 


Descriptive Geometry . . . 

Houle. 
Hilta. 
Kiefer^ 


- 


3 


I30. 










m 


Slereolomy 




" 


■ 31 




I^'e. 
Kiefer. 





t,i.a, Google 



THB COLLKGB. 





SubJecU. 


HonnaWMk. 


^TSX-Z?^' 


No. 


T^. 


T."i. 


lis 


Ives. 


4 


- 


. 










1 16 


S«nw^ng.- Practiee . . . 

Lyle'. 
Houle. 
Hilts. 
Kiefer. 


4 


„3, 

w'ks. 


Concurrent with i a 5. 








laj 


Theory. 
Ives. 
- Hilts. 
Kiefer. 


- 


3 


126. 










1 38 


Railroad Surveying: 
Practice. 
Ives. 
Losse. 
Hilts. 
Kiefer. 


- 


3 


Concurrent with 117. 






ad 
half 
and» 
w'ke. 




"9 


Railroad Construction 

and Maintenance. 
Ives. 
Hilts. 


* 


_ 


127, laS. 


130 


Railroad Office Work... 
Ives. 
Losse. 
Kiefer. 


, 


_ 


Concurrent with laj. 










131 


Railroad Economics . . . 
Ives. 


■ 


- 


ia<). 


13" 


Railroad Design 

Ives. 
Hilts. 


, 


— 


139. '30. 










»33 


Geodesy: Theory 


- 


^ 


116. 



t,i.a,Google 





COURSES 


N THB 




OB. 147 




SubJeeUL 


Boon a week. 


•iSUrtalaj. ' 


No. 


Totd. 


Totd. 


'34 


Gtodesy: Practice 

Hilti. 
Kiefer. 


— 


3 . 


116. 


'3S 


BasbT. 
Lylc' 


— 


3 


486. 


'3* 




— 


' 


486. Concturent with 
■35- 


Easby. 
Lyle. 


"37 


Easby. 
Lyle. 


~ 


' 


Concurrent with 135. 


138 


Hydraulic Works Df- 
Lyle. 


S 


~ 


13s. 136. 137- 


140 


Mechanics of Maurials. 
Uarburg. 
Berry. 
Losse. 


4 


" 


48s. 


141 


Materials of Constntc- 
titm. 

Marburg. 
Berry. 


* 


" 


140. 


14a 


TestineLaboratory 

Berry. 
Losse. 


3 


3 


Concurrent with or fol- 


MS 


Graphic Statics 

Marburg. 
Berry. 


— 


^ 


Concurrent with 146, 


146 


Framed Structures 

Marburg. 
Berry. 


— 


S 


140. 


u: 


Framed Stnielures 

Harbui^. 


' 


- 


X46. 



t,i.a, Google 



THB COLLBOB. 





Babfecb. 


Hoonaweek. 


raiDufai,e&. 




■^. 


id 

Tenn. 


148 


Bridgi Design 

Loose. 


- 


t- 


146. 


149 


Brtrfg* i?Mfg« 

Marbui^. 
LoEse. 


4 


4. 


148. 


li-n 




- 


3 


140 




Lyle. 
Berry. 




iSr 


Masonry Design 

Ives. 
Lyle. 


— 


a 


150. 










iSS 


Roads and Pavements . . 
Easby. 


■ 


- 




ijfi 


Inspection Tours 

Marburg. 

Easby. 

Ives. 


At hours 
assigned. 




1S7 


Summer Memoir 


Vacation 
work. 




•S8 


Summer Memoir 


Vacation 
work. 




'59 






6 




Marburg. 

Easby. 

Ives. 





Dbscription. 
III. LtUering. — Freehand lettering. 
III. Mechanical Drawing. — Drafting instruments and operations; 

elementary projection; lineshading; coloring; graining; 

representation of earthwork and masonry. 
113. Mtckanieal Drawing. — Drawings based on sketches and 

measureiseats of objects. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



COUKSB9 IN THB COL,LBGB. I49 

■ 14. Pm Topography. — Conventional methods of representation. 
Elementary exercises. 

115. Colond Topograpky.—CoaventioTtal methods of representa- 

tioD. Elementary exercises. 

116. Map Drawing. — Map of hydrographic and topographic sur- 

vey made during the previous summer. 

isio. ProjtetioHS. — Elementary plane problems. Orthographic 
projections in one quadrant. Isometric and oblique 
projections. Elementary problems in shades and 
shadons, and linear perspective. 

131. Dtscriptiot ffeomrtry.— Problems of the point, line and plane ; 
single-curved, double-curved and warped surfaces; in- 
tersections, tangencies and developments. Shades and 
shadows. Perspective. 

lat. SUreolomy. — Stone cutting. Determination of the forms and 
sizes of stones in masonry constructions. 

1*5. Svrveying: Theory. — Theory relating to the use and adjust- 
ments of the instruments; theory of topographic, hydro- 
graphic, mining and city surveying. 

n6. Survtying: ProciJc*.— Practice in the adjustment and use of 
field and office instruments. 

Four hours a week are devoted to field practice 
throughout the year, including a special farm survey 
which is made during the firBt term; and, at the end of 
the second term, two entire weeks are devoted to an 
extended topographic and hydrographic survey. 

i»7. Railroad Surveying: Theory. — Simple, compoimd, reversed 
and transition curves. Turn-outs and switches. The- 
ory of the computation of earthwork. 

118. Railroad Surveying: Practice. — Practice in staking out 
curves, cross -sectioning, setting of slope stakes, etc. 

In addition to three hours a week during the latter 
half of the Eccoud term, two entire weeks, at the end of 
that t«rm, are devoted to field practice in laying out a 
short line of railroad ; including reconnaissance, pre- 
liminary survey, location, determination of grades, 
craes-sectioning, drawing of Ihe map and profile. 

1)9. Railroad Construction and Mainttnance. — Trestles, t-unnels, 
signaling, etc. Maintenance of railway track and struc- 
tures. Rolling stock and train resistance. 

130. Railroad Office Work. — Computaticm and distribution of 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



150 THE COLLBCB. 

earthwork. Paper location of a line of railroad; con' 

struction of the profile; estimates of quantities and cost. 

131. Railroad Economics. — General theory of the inception and 
completion of railroad projects; probable volume of 
traffic and it£ probable growth; effect of detaik of al^^- 
ment on operating expenses and revenue. 

13J. Railroad Design. — Elements of the design of yards, terminals 
and sidings; slip -switches, crossings and track details. 

133. Geodesy: Theory. — Study of the instruments and field 

methods used in geodetic surveying. 

134. Geodesy: ProcfKf.— Practice in the use of instruments of pre- 

cision for the measurement of base-lines, angles, and 
differences of level. 

135. Hydromeckanics. — Pressure and energy of fluids. Flow by 

orifices, tubes and weirs. Flow in pipes, conduits, 
canals and natural streams. Current meters. Hydrau- 
he motors. Measurement of water-power. 

136. WaUT-Si*pplies. — Consumption by municipalities. Yields 

from various sources. Examination of water-supplies. 
Impounding reservoirs. Purification. Distribution. 

137. Sanitary Engineering.—SeweTS and drains. Construction 

and ventilation. Disposal of sewage. 

138. Hydraulic Works Design. — The designing of water and sewer- 

age works. 

140. Mechanics of Materials, — The resistance and elasticity of 

materials. Theory of flexure appUed to beams and 
columns. Torsion. Effect of impact. Resilience, 
fatigue, etc. 

141. Materials of Construction. — Physical characteristics of the 

materials of construction, and the conditions by which 
these are influenced. 
14a. Testing Laboratory. — Tests for determining the physical 
properties of the materials of engineering. 

145. Graphic Statics. — Graphic methods applied to the determi- 

nation of stresses, bending moments, shears, etc. 

146. Framed SirucUires. — Determination of stresses by analytic 

methods. Relative merits of different types of bridge 
and roof trusses. Skeleton construction of buildings, 
viaducts, turn-tables, stand-pipes, etc. Details of con- 



147. Framed Stntelures.—Strtsaiea in cantilever, arch, swing and 
suspension bridges. 



tizedoy Google 



. Bridge Design. — Complete design of a plate-girder bridge. 
Computations and detail drawings. 

I. Bridge Design. — Complete design of a railroad bridge, Pratt 
truss. Computations and detail drawings. 

I. Masonry — Foundations, dams, retaining walls, piers, abut- 
ments, culverts, arches and concrete constructions, 

. Masonry Design. — General design of a variety of masonry 
structures, including estimates of quantities and cost. 

. Roads and Pavements. — Construction, maintenance and cost. 
Consideration of the relative merits of the various types. 

, Inspection Tours. — Visits to engineering works and manu- 
facturing establishments. 

. Summer Memoir. — A memoir of not less than twelve hundred 
words, prepared during the summer vacation following 
the Sophomore year, descriptive of some engineering 
work or manufacturing plant, based on direct personal 
inqiiiries and observations. 

. Summer Memoir, — A memoir of not less than sixteen hun- 
dred words, prepared during the summer vacation fol- 
lowing the Junior year, descriptive of some engineering 
work or manufacturing plant, based on direct personal 
inquiries and observations. 

. Tktsis. — Thesis on a professional subject. 







ECONOMICS 


.• 






Subjeota. 


Hour, a week. 






No. 


■&. 


2d 


nmHk.. An. 


l6i 


Banki, 

Howard. 


' 


■ 






i6> 


Advanced Econom- 

Patten. 


' 


■ 




161. 


■63 


English Civaiaation 
Patten. 


' 


• 


" 


162. 



St and iM an the only coon 
% elective or group nibiecu. For couivee in 
to Wharton School students, and for ■ dMcriptlon of aU 
9 Id Eeenonucs, «ee Whahtoh School op Pihahci and Cowciitcs (pp- >04~ 



t,i.a,Google 





Bubiwu. 


Hours ■ week. 


UulUt 


^^^"sr"- 


No. 


Ter'm. 


T±. 


171 


^'""flSS' 


' 


' 


' 




17a 


Politicai Geography 
Jotmson. 


' 


' 


' 




iSi 


Commercial and 
Economic Geogra- 
phy. 

J. R. Sniith. 


' 


' 




171. 


IS6 


Organixaiion of 
International 
Commerc*. 

J. R. Smith. 


' 


* 




171. 





BubJecU. 


aounaireek. 


Until 

Work. 




Mo. 


tS,. 


Ti. 


331 


Composition 

Child. 

Quinn. 

Weygandt. 

Hoag. 

Bolger. 

Shelly. 

CoUins. 

Rivinus 

Hessler. 

Corson. 








A and B (admis- 
don). 


a3» 


English Language.. 

Easton. 
Child. 

fidge"'. 




' 


■ 


A and B (adm»- 

Bion). 


a33 


Novelists. 
Schelling. 
Quinn. 
Weygandt. 


' 


— 


' 


A and B (admia. 
sion). 













t,i.a,Google 



COURSES IN THB 





■ 


Hooniireek. 


s 


^"-^SX^S^ 


Mo. 1 SubJecn. 


I^. 


Id 


^34 


History of EnglUh 

Child. 

Wejfgandt 

Hoag. 


* 


" 


• 


A and B (admis- 
sion). 


"35 


ComposUion 

Child. 

Quiim. 

Wejgandt. 

Hoag. 

Boteer. 

Colliis. 
Corson. 
RivinuB. 








«3i. 


»36 


PubUeSfeakiHe... 
Hoag. 


' 


' 




VLaj be taken nmol. 
taneously with aj i- 
>35- 


237 


""^l^c^^J!^- 


' 


» 




May be taken simul- 


»38 


An^Saxon 

Easton. 


' 


' 




»zi, 'z^, 334. 


»39 


ComposUioH 

™- 
^nn. 
Weygaadt. 


. 


. 




a3». "33. "34, "35- 












a+o 


■"•ISf- 


~ 


' 




331, Jsa, 334. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 190S-06. 


941 


Sevttittvnth and 
EiektemA Cen- 

Schelling. 


" 


~ 




*3r, J3», »34- Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 


14) 


LiUratitr* of tkt 

UmttdStaits. 

Quins. 




' 




331, 331, 334. Alter- 
nate years. Omit> 
ted in .906-07. 



t,i.a, Google 



THE COLLBOB. 





Siib]«c(a. 


HOUKBWWk. 


s 


■^^s.^^* 


No. 


tJ^ 


T^. 


a« 


P«I«r* 


' 


- 




331, 333, 334. Altetv 


Quinn. 


nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 


a44 


j^neio-Soxon and 
Middle English 
Literature. 
Child. 


" 


' 




131, 333. 334. Alter- 
nate yeais. Omit- 
ted in 1 90s -06. 


»*5 


Chattcer 


— 


■ 




331. »3a. *34. Alter- 


Child.' 


nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1906-07. 


»a6 


Nineteenth Century 
Drama. 

Weygandt. 




- 




331. 33a, »34- Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1906-07. 


847 


En^iu* Philology . . 
Easton. 




' 




338. 


J 48 


Composition 

Weygandt. 




> 




339- 












"49 

a SO 


Debating 




J 




336 or its equivalent. 


Hoag. 
English BihU 




- 




"3i.»3a,a34. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1906-07. 


»5i 


atists. 

Schelling. 




— 




a3'.93». »34. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1906-07. 


as* 


Elizabethan Gram- 
mar. 

Easton. 


' 


— 




a3i. *3». »34- 


»53 


Seventeenth Century 
Drama. 

Schelling. 


— 


' 




831. »3*. '34 Alter- 
nate yeare. Omit- 
ted in 1906-07. 


354 


Nineteenth Century 
Poets. 

Schelling. 


' 


~ 




331,133,334. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 



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SDbJectK 


Hoii»a»^k. 


lTn„„ 


'"fSSS.S"*'' 




T^. 


T^. 


of 
Work. 


»S7 


ConiempoTary 
Potts. 

Weygandt. 

English Essayists. . 


- 


' 




23^ "3*. *34. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 

'31. =3* »34- 



DBSCKtPTtON. 

Three objects are contemplated in the arrangement of the under- 
graduate work in English: (i) proficiency in writing, with some 
practice in speaking and debate; (i) a general acquaintance with 
English Literature; (3) a study of the nature and history of the 
language. 
J31. Composition. — Weekly themes on assigned subjects, popular 
and literary, corrected and commented on by the in- 
structor in charge. 
133. En^ish Language. — An historical treatment of the English 
Language. Recitations, followed by lectures on the 
English vocabulary, the nature of language, the history 
of the alphabet and allied subjects. 
*33- Nituletntk Century Novelists. — Development of the Novel 
through the century. Lectures, recitations, writing of 
papers based on readings in the works of the authors 



334. History of English Lit^ature. — From Anglo-Saxon times to 
the present day. Lectures, coUatcral reading, prepara- 
tion of papers. 

835. Cowi^Jttton.— Weekly themes: descriptive, narrative, ex- 
pository, argumentative; read and discussed in class; 
corrected by the instructor and rettuTied with individual 
criticism, 

136. Public Speaking. — Practice in the preparation and deKveiy 
of speeches and debates. 

337. Netaspaptr Writing. — Weekly or bi-weekly themes. Re- 

porting, correspondence, special articles, editorials, 
dramatic criticism, book-reviewing. 

338, An^oSaxon. — Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Primtr. Cock's Frfrt 

Book in Old Englisk. This subject involves a compara- 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



156 THE COLLBOB. 

tive Study of Anglo-Saxon, Middle English and Uodem 
English, and the elements of Phonetics. 

239. Composition. — Themes on popular and literary subjects 
assigned, with special reference to the gathering and 
ordering of material. 

140. Tkf Age of Elixabeth. — English Literature from the Revival 
of Learning to Milton, Lectives with collateral reading 
and reports. 

Ht. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Literature. — Ei^lish Lit- 
erature from Waller to Cowper. Lectures with col- 
lateral reading and reports. 

34a. Literature of the United States. — Its history and relation to 
national life and thought, with brief introduction on 
English Literature in the colonies. Lectures. 

943. Poetics. — Nature of English poetry and structure of English 
verse, with an historical treatment of English metres. 
Lectures, with study of poetical forms and practice in 



»44, Anglo-Saxon and Middle English Literature. — History of the 
language from the earliest period to Chaucer, and its 
relation to the historical and social development of the 
people. 

a45. Literary Study of Chaucer. — Reading and critical study of 
selected works. Lectures on Chaucer's life, his relation 
to his time, the sources of his works, etc. 

146. Nineteenth Century Drama. — ^The development of the stage 
from Sheridan to Pinero; plays of the Romantic Re- 
vival; Robertson and his school; the influences of 
Dumas. Ibsen and Maeterlinck. 

947. English Philology. — Middle English texts (generally Chaucer, 
and Skeat's Piers Plowman). 

S48. Composition. — Themes, creative and expository; individual 
criticism by the instructor. 

949. Debating. — Practice in the preparation and delivery of 
debates. 

a%a. Tk* English Bible. — Pormandstructureof the various books; 
study of the kinds of poetry in the Psalms. 

951. EliecAetkan Dramatists, — Lectures on the origins and growth 
of the English Drama from its beginning to the close of 
the reign of Queen Elizabeth, Preparation of papers 
involving the principles of dronuitic constnctitm, com- 
parison, and origins. 



tizedoy Google 



f THB COLLBOR. 



157 



tji. ElitabeAait Grammar. — Stud]r of an Elizabethan text (gen- 
erally a plajr of Shakespeare), Abbot's Skakesptarean 
Grammar. 

aS3. Snienl^gtitk Century Drama. — Lectures oa the history of Eng. 
lish Drama from the death of Queen Elizabeth to the 
clomng of the theatres in 1641. Preparation of papers 
as in jji. 

jj*. Nituleenlh Century Poets.^-The Romantic Revival; Poetiy 
of Revolt; Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, 
Whitman and Swinburne. Lectures; recitations; col- 
lateral reading and discussion. 

ajS- Contemporary Poeiry.— Meredith, Dobson, Robert Bridges, 
Henley, Kipling, Davidson, William Watson, Yeats, 
Phillips, and others. Lectures. 

a57. Modem Essayists. — The nature and growth of the modem 
literary and critical essay. Collateral reading and dis- 







FINE 


ARTS. 








SubJeeO. 


Hoora a week. 


s. 


remarm'Mc. ' 


Ko. 


^. 


T^. 


»7I 
s7* 


History of Painting. 
Everett. 

PrincipUs of De- 
sign. 

Everett. 


' 


^ 


' 


Omitted i 

Omitted i 


n 190S-0& 


»T3 


History of Arcki. 
lecture. 

Osborne. 


' 


^ 


' 







Drscriptioh. 

, History of Painting. — Introduction on Greek and RomaA 
Painting, and extended treatment on that of Europe 
from early Renaissance to modem times. 

. Principles of Drawing and Painting. — Practical work in 
drawing in pencil and charcoal, and painting in water 
color and oils from objects and life, with criticism and. 
collateral reading involving the universal principlea 
underlying all art. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



[58 THE COLLBQB. 

373. History of ArckttecUire. — Lectures on the great historical 
styles in their order of development. The subject is 
treated from the sociolc^ical and architectural points of 
view, and includes an analysis of the principles of com- 
position as applied to architectural design. This course 
does not require any previous knowledge of drawing 
or construction, and is intended primarily to stimulate 
a correct appreciation of architecture. 

FINANCE AND COMMERCE. 
(See Wharton School of Financb akd Coumbrcb, pp. 104 





BablecU. 


Houmaweek. 


Work. 




No. 


fl. 


ad 


*»8i 


RodieUe. 


4 






May not be taken to 
remove conditions 
in A and B (admis- 
sion). 


383 


M0(UTMFTgflch.... 

VurpiUot. 


3 




3 


A and B (admis- 
sion). 


383 


Modern French 

Vurpillot. 


3 




3 


383. 


a84 


Classical Drama ... 
Rennert. 


3 




3 


»83. 


aSs 


Old French 

Rennert. 


3 


3 


3 


384. 


a86 


Classical Drama . . . 


' 


3 


' 


383. 


387 


Sci«Htific French . . . 
Vurpillot. 


' 




' 


38j. 


388 


Scientific French. . . 
Vurpillot. 


3 




3 


98». 


189 


Scientific French .. 
Vurpillot. 


* 




' 


383 or 387. 



,Googlt' 



COURSBS IN 1 






aSi. Eismtnlary French. — For begiimers. 

s8i. Modem Fretick. — A. France, L* Crimt de Sytvtstre Btmttard; 
Bruno; Le Tow d« la France; Jules Verne, Vitt^l mille 
Ueues sous Ics mers. Sight reading of French plays. 
Grammar and prose composition. 

383. Modem French, — Taine, Origines de la France contemporaine; 
Ste. Beuve, Les causeries du lundi. Sight reading of 
French plays. Prose composition, and review of gram- 

3S4. Classical Drama. — Comeille, Racine, Moli^re; language of 
the sixteenth century; Dannesteter and Hatzfeld, L0 
XVle Sticte en France. History o£ French Literature: 
Petit de Julleville, Legons de LitUrature Franfaise. 

385. Old French. — Toynbee, Specimens of Old French; Historical 
Grammar; Toynbee-Brachet, Fr^nc/i Crummor. Read- 
ing of an Anglo-Norman Text. History of French 
Literaturei Petit de Julleville, Le{ons de LitUraUere 
Franfaise. 

286. Classical Drama. — Selected plays of Racine, Moli^re. Cor- 
neille. Exercises in grammar. 

387. Scientific French .—HerdliT , Scientific French Reader. 

lis. Scientific French. — Foncin, Le Pays de France. 

3S9. Scientific French. — La Revue Scientifique. 



GEOLOGY, MINERALOGY, METALLURGY. 
GEOLOGY. 





SabJectE. 


Honraaweek. 


UQlto 


"•S.-W?"^ 




T^^. 


T^. 


J9I 




" 


- 


■ 




A. P. Brown. 


301 or 305 precede 
or accompany 391. 


jgi 


Petrography 

A. P. Brown. 


' 


' 


■ 


agi. 


'93 


General Geology . . . 
A. P. Brown. 


' 


' 


' 


It is desirable that 
301 or 305 precede 
or accompany 1^3. 



t,i.a,Google 



THS COLLBOB. 



So. 


Subject*. 


Houn 


a week. 


wSrt 


^'"^'JSS^T^- 


994 


FMd Work 

A. P. Brown. 


- 


3 




»9i or 393 precede 
or accompany 194. 


"95 


Dynamic Geology . . 
Ehrenfeia. 


4 


- 


li 




.,6 


Physiographic Geol- 
ogy. 

Ehrenfeld. 


~ 


4 


•1 


«95. 


297 


Ehrenfeld, 


* 


- 




301 or JOS. 


198 


Invtrlebratt Pakoii- 
^. Smith, 


3 


3 






199 


Inorganic Geology. . 
Ehrenfeld. 


" 


— 




Chemistiy .91. For 
Civil Engineeiing 
students only. 





MINERALOGY. 






Bobjec*. 


Horns 


week. 


Work. 




No. 


T^. 


Term. 


301 


Mineralogy 

A. P. Brown. 


- 


• 


' 


Chemistry 91. 


302 


Mineraloiy 

A.P.Brown. 


' 


" 


' 


301. 


303 


A. P. Brown. 

Ehrenfeld. 








301 or 305. and 
Chemistxy 91. It 
is- desirable that 
this subject be pre- 
ceded or accom- 
panied by Chem- 
istry 9a. 


304 


Physical Mineral- 
ogy. 

A. P. Brown, 


* 


_ 


' 


301 or 305, and 
Physics 601. 



,Googlc 



I Hours > wi-ek. 
I Term. Term. 



Chemistry 91. 
Chemistry 91. 



METALLURGY. 



No. 


SubJfctB. 


^ Irt ^ M 
Term. : Term. 


WOTk. 


nta»tHK flo. 


3" 


Theory of Meial- 

lurgical Processes. 

A.P.Brown. 


i 


Chemistry 91. 



Students electing a group containing Geology may take work in 
Mineralogy and Metallurgy, counting it toward the group work in 
Geology. 

igi. Liihology. — Lectures on the claEsificatJon of rocks, and their 
determination in hand specimens. 

ii)». Petrography. — Laboratory work. Practice in the prepara- 
tion of thin sections of rocks, and their examination wiih 
the microscope. Preparation of photomicrographs of 

J93. General Geology. — Stratigraphy of the rock systems in con- 
nection with paleontology. Laws of dynamic gcolog}'. 
Structural geology of North America with reference to 
that of Europe. The principal economic minerals and 
fos^ls and distribution of metals, ores and fuels, 

»94. Field Work. — Examination of rock structures in the fivld, 
and practice in geological sta~^reying. 

895. Dynamic Geology. — An account of the nature and methods 



tizedoy Google 



I of work of the forces, inorgamc and organic, which, 

operatiiig at the surface or vinderground, lead to the 

I formation, alteration or disturbance of rocks. Two 

hours lecture, two hours laboratory work. 

I agfi. Physiographic Geology, — A study of the history of the birtb, 

growth and decay of forms of land and the existing sur- 

I face features of tiie earth as the result of geok^c forces. 

Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory work. 
397. Economic Geology, — Lectures on the naturally occurring geo- 
logic products of economic importance. 
agS. InveriebratM Paieonlology. — A study of characteristic types 
representing the more important orders of fossil Inverte- 

199. Inorganic Geology. — Dynamic, structural and physiographic 
geology, with descriptions of the occurrence of ores 
and other economic minerals. 

HINBRAU>aT. 

! elements, sulphides, 

309. Mineralogy, — Carbonates, silicates, sulphates, phosphates, etc. 

303. Determinative Mineraiogy. — Laboratory work. Determina- 
tion of minerals by pyrognostic and chemical proper- 
ties. 

304. Physical Mineralogy, — -Determination of minerals by phydcal 
properties, use of contact and reflecting goniometer, 
polariscope. stauroscope, refractometer, etc. 

305. Mineralogy. — Embraces saUent points of 301 and 30a, but 
only such minerals as are of economic importance are 
considered. 

306. Mineraiogy. — Short course in Descriptive and Determinative 
Mineralogy. 

UBTALLURCY. 

311. Theory of Metallurgical Processes. — The 
lurgical treatment of ores. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 





Bubjeota. 


Houn K week. 


UniM 

A. 




Mo. 


M 


M 

Term. 


•3JI 


Elementary German. 
Fogel. 




4 


4 




311A 


Pfose Reading 

Wesselhoeft. 
Davis. 




' 


» 


A and B f admis- 
sion), or an ap- 
proximate equiv- 
alent. 


3«B 


Composition 

^Wesselhoeft. 
Davis. 
Fogel. 
Wiehr, 




' 


' 




3*3A 


SehiUer's Dramas. 
Learned. 




- 


' 


3>» A and B. 


3«3B 


Historical Prose . . . 
D.B.Shiunway 


- 


' 


' 




3»3C 


Composition and 
Conversation, 
Weaselhoeft. 




■ 


' 




3»4A 
3^48 


Modem German 
Novel. 
Learned. 

Lessin^s Dramas. . 
D. B. Shumway 


— 


2 


, 


313 A and B. Open 
to students other 
than those taking 
the German group. 


334C 


Composition and 
Conversation. 
Weaselhoeft. 




' 


' 




3'SA 


Modem German 
Lyrics. 
Learned. 


— 


= 


■ 


323 A and B. 


3*SB 


Goethe' s Dramas .. 
D. B. Shumway 




— 


^ 





t,i.a,Google 



Ko. 


Slibji*l«. 


Hours a week. 


Uuilii 




3-SC 


German Essays 

Weaselhoett. 


■ 


■ 






3-6A 


Goethe's Fausl 

D. B.Shumway. 


' i - 






32(.B 


History of the 
Modern German 
Drama. 
Learned, 


" 






313 A and B, Open 
lo students other 
than those taking 
the Cicrman group. 


3ibC 


Selected Plays 


— 








3*7A 


Scientific Keading. J. z 
Davis. 






32J A and B. 


3>7B 


Prose Reading 

Davis. 


■ 








328 


Scientific Reading. . 
Wcsselhoeft. 


• 






322 A and B. 


329 


Advanced Scientific 
Reading. 
D. B. Shumway 








328. 



3'3C. 
324A. 



Dbscription. 

Elementary German. Grammar and reading, 

Reading of literary prose and eighteenth century drama. 

Grammar and composition. Written and oral exercises. 

Lectures on Schiller's life and works, and the literary move' 
ments of his time. Reading of selected texts. 

Reading of selected historical prose. 

German composition and conversation. 

Lectures on the rise and development of the German novel 
of the nineteenth century, and its relation to the contem- 
poraneous ^lovel of other countries. Reading of selected 



314B. Reading and discussion of I^essing'; 

dramas. 
334C. Writing of essays in German. German 



important 



tizedoy Google 



i6S 

3a5A. Lectures on the modern German lyric and reading of se- 
lected texts. Goethe's lyrics. 

315B. Goethe's dramas. Lectures and reading of texts. 

31SC. Original German essays and discussions in German. 

3a6A. Goethe's Faust. Lectures on the genesis of the drama, 
and interpretation of the text. Reading of selected 
ptays discussed in 316B, 

3aCB. History of the Modem German drama. Lectures on the 
development of the German 'drama of the nineteenth 
century, and reading and discussion of selected plays. 

316C. Selected plays of Kleist, Grillpazer, Sudermann or Haupt- 

337 A. Scientific Reading. 
3J7B. Prose Reading. 

318. Scientific Reading. 

319, Advanced Scientific Reading. 

GREEK. 





Bubjecli. 


Honnaireek. 


Unlta 
Work. 


'-^SSS.'S-' 




lat 
Term. 


3d 

Term. 






3 

3 


3 
3 


3 
3 


B, C, D, E (ad- 




Lamberton. 




Bates. 


331. May be taken 
with 333. 

33" or 333- Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1906-07. 

taken by term or 
by year. Omitted 
in 1905-06. 

taken by term or 

by year. 




Bates. 




Bates. 


336 


Lamberton. 


Crosby. 



(•) ■» ^v«ii b7 Dr. HovAiD L. Cbowt. 



tizedoyGoOJ^If 



THE COLLBOB. 





aobieala. 


Hounaweek, 


Wgrk. 


■""^SSMT^' 


».. 


t™. 


2d 

Tenn. 






3 
3 




3 

3 


33"0'333- Maybe 
taken by term or 
by year. Alter- 
nate years. 

Alternate years. 

Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 

06. 

m-iiiaray for the 
George Allen 
Prize. When so 
taken it does not 
count towards a 
degree. 

331 or 333. Alter- 
nate years. Omil^ 
ted in 1905-06. 

331. May be taken 
by term or by 
year. 


338 

339 


Lamberton. 

Greek LiUrature . . . 
Lamberton. 

GretkLife 

Lambert^jn. 


341 


Lamberton. 

Arclueology 

Bates. 




Lamberton. 


343A 


Kent. 




Kent. 


33^o''333- Maybe 
taken by term or 
by year. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06, 




Lamberton. 



Description. 
. Lysias, Selected Orations; PU^to, A l>ology said Crito; Homei, 

Selections from the Odyssey. Greek Composition. 
. Plato, Laches; Euripides, Iphigtnia Among At Tattrians; 



t,i.a,Google 



COURSES IX TBB COLLBOB. 167 

Aristophanes, Achamians; Aadoddes, d« Mysleriis. 
Greek Composition. 

333. Course in rapid reading. Herodotus, Book II; Lucian, Vera 

Historia, and Dialogues. 

334. Sophocles, Otdipus Rex, and Oedipus ColoMeus; Pindar; 

Bacchylides. 
335- Euripides, Hippotyttis; Thucydides; private reading, Plu- , 
tarch, Nkias; Sophocles, Pkiiocteles. 

336. .£scfaylus, Agamemnon; Demosthenes, Philippics; private 

reading. Plutarch, Pericles; Sophocles, Antigone. 

337. Theocritus; Plato, Gorgias. 

338. Greek Literature. Jevons, Greek Literatttre, with lectures. 
33g. Greek Life. Bliimner, Lift of the Ancient Greeks, with leo- 

340. Demosthenes, de Corona. 

341. Archsolc^y. Lectures and conferences. Architecture, sculp- 

ture, terra cottas, vase painting. History of Greek 
Archeology. 
349. New Testament: Acts of the Apostles and an Epistle of 
St. Paul. 

343. I Elementary Greek: a two-year course, covering the 
343A. ) entrance requirements. 

344. Ariatophanes^Woifw and Frogs. 

HEBREW. 





.... 


Honnaweek. 


Work. 


^"'sa.'sr^' 


Ka 


t™. 


Tenn. 






" 


* 








Clay. 


3SI. 




aay. 



Dbsckiption. 

351. For beginners. Exercises in reading and pronundation. 
Outlines of the grammar. Reading of historical chap- 
ters. Davidson's Hebrew Grammar. 

351. Review of Davidson's Hebrew Grammar. Syntax. Reading 
of selections from historical and poetical books. Sight 
readily. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



THB COLLBGB. 
HISTORY. 





aubjocu. 


HouKXfeek. 


z 


remMkB.'rtc ' 


No. 


^ 


^ 


36' 


Material Develop- 
ment 0} Ae United 
Stales. 

McMastor. 


* 


' 


• 


Omitted in jgo5-o6. 


363 


Political History of 

the UnilcdStaUs. 

Terry. 


* 


" 


* 




3f>3 


American Colonial 
History. 


' 


' 


' 




364 


Medieval History . . 
Howland. 


' 


' 


" 




365 


Europe in the Nine- 
teenth Century. 
Lingelbach. 


' 


' 


' 




366 


Studies in United 
States History. 
McMaster. 


' 


' 


' 


361, 363. or 363. 
Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. 


367 


Studies in History 
oj Our Own Time. 

Terry, 


" 


' 


' 


361, 36a. or 363. 
Alternate years. 


368 


tory of the United 
States. 

Ames. 


' 


' 


.1 


See note. 


369 


Foreign Relations 
of the United 
Stales. 

Ames. 


' 


' 




Alternate years. See 
iKJte. 


370 


The Civil War and 
Reconstruction. 

Ames. 


— 






Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. See note. 


37" 


History of American 

Political Ideas. 

Ames. 


' 


_ 




Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. See note. 



B 361. ]6>, 36J. 364, 365 a a prerequisite. 



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COURSES IN 


THE C 


OLLEO 


.6, 


No. 

37» 


aabjwtt. 


Hour. 

lit 

Term. 


2d 
Term. 


UdIU 
Work. 


"■sx:*^- 


/fDBKWi History 

Howland. 


' 


~" 


■ 


Alternate yeare. See 
note. 


374 \CkttTck History .... 
Howload. 


' 


' 


■ 


Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 


3JS Enffish Ctmslitu- 
Itonal History. 
Cheyney. 


3 


i 


3 


Altcmate years. 
Omitted in 1 goe— 
06. See note. 


3!6 English Social Hii- 


3 


3 


s 


Alternate years. See 




Cheyney. 








note. 


)77 


Er^nd and the 
Continent. 
Cheyney 








Alternate years. 
Open only to Jun- 
iors and Seniors. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. Sec note. 


37« 


Rw of the British 
Empire. 

Cheyney. 


' 


^ 


' 


Alternate years. 
Open only to Jun- 
iors and SeniorB, 
See note. 


37<1 


The Renaissance . . . 
Lingelbach. 


' 


— 


■ 


Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. See note. 


j8o 


The Reformation. 
Lingelbach. 


— 


^ 


■ 


Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. See note. 


38. 


Europe from 1648 


2 


- 


I 


Alternate years. See 


j ~"'LTngelbach. 








note. 


J«i 1 The French Revolu- 
1 lion and Napoleon 
Lingclbach. 


- 


' 


■ 


Alternate yean. See 


3«J 


The Risf of Prussia. 
Lingelbach. 


' 


" 


■ 


Alternate years. See 
note. 



t,i.a, Google 



Dbsckiptioh. 

361, Material Development of the United Slates, 1783-1883. — This 
subject oimprises (a) lectures, (b) BUpplementaiy read- 
ing with synopsis of books, speeches and documents, 
(c) maps and diagrams, {d) essays. The lectures are 
confined to the history of the social, economic, financial 
and industrial growth of our country. 

361. Political Parties, Leaders, Issues, Platforms, 1783-1877. — 
The system followed is the same as in 361; but the 
subject of the lectures is political history, and not that 
covered in 361. An elementary knowledge of our politi- 
cal history is expected, the work being chiefly witli the 
sources. 

363. American Colonial and Revduttcnary History. — The begin- 

nings of the American nation; European inheritance; 
development of American institutions; expansion of 
English colonies, rivalry of French and English; under- 
lying causes of the Revolution; growth toward inde- 
pendence and union; formation and dissolution of the 
Confederation. Lectures, collateral reading, map work, 
and written exercises. An outline is prepared for the 

364. Medieval History. — The history of Europe from 395 to 1300. 

The disintegration of the Roman Empire; the German 
tribes and their settlement in the Empire; the church 
and its inHuence; Charlemagne; feudal institutions; 
the crusades; the church at the end of the Middle Ages; 
commerce and the rise of cities; rise of the modem 
nations. Text<book, lectures and required reading. 

365. Europe in the NineteettihCerUtfry. — Euroije after the overthrow 

of Napoleon; the restorations and reaction; the struggle 
for constitutional government and the rights of nation- 
ality; the Greek revolution; the revolutions of 1830 
and 1S48; the Crimean war and the Eastern Question; 
Cavour and Italian unification; Bismarck and the 
founding of the German Empire; Prance under the 
Third Republic; the dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary; 
the expansion of Russia and the far Eastern Question; 
the partition of Africa, and the main characteristica of 
contemporary European history. Text-book, lectures 
and required readings. 



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COURSES IN THB COLLBCB. I7I 

366. Sladits in the History of the United States. — An advanced 
course. The topics selected for special study will be 
different each year. No student is admitted to this 
course who has not taken some one of courses 361-363. 

367 Studies in the History of Our Ovm Times, 1860-1900. — Also 
an advanced course, and as far as possible will treat of 
our history as it bears on current issues. No student is 
admitted to this course who has not taken some one of 
courses 36 '-3 63. 

36S, Constitutional History of the United States to i860. — Prelimi- 
nary survey of colonial governments and development 
during colonial and revolutionary periods. Formation 
of State and Federal Constitutions; growth of nation- 
ality; broad versits strict construction; influence of the 
judiciary; conflict between States and Federal Govern- 
ment; theory and practice of nullification; the slavery 
struggle ; amendments to the Federal Constitution ; 
evolution of State Constitutions. Lectures, special 
reports and required readirg. 

3*9- The Foreign Relations of the United States. — A survey of the 
diief questions connected with the history of our foreign 
relations, from the appointment of the Committee on 
Foreign Relations in the Continental Congress to the 
present time, with especial reference to the last half 
century. 

37"- The Civil War and Reconstruction. — The Constitution during 
the Civil War; theories and actual process of reconstruc- 
tion; the new amendments and their interpretation; 
constitutional results of the war; the "undoing" of 
reconstruction; new problems of the last quarter of the 
century. 

371- History of American Political Ideas. — Chief topics: written 
constitutions, the constitutional convention, the nomi- 
nating convention, the electoral college, the suSrage, 
instruction of representatives, development of the execu- 
tive, legislative and judicial departments, the veto, the 
right of the judiciary to pronounce on the constitution- 
ality of a legis'ative act, the initiative and referendum, 
territorial government, extension of individual rights. 

3"' Roman History. — History of the Roman Republic and the 
Roman Empire from the reforniB of the Gracchi (133 
B. C.) to the death of Theodosius (395 A. D.). Form 



tizedoVGOOJ^If 



of the Roman constituticm in the second century B, C. ; 
economic and social problems of the Republic ; the strug- 
gle between the orders; formation of the principate; 
imperial rule; social conditions in the Empire; spread 
of Christianity; causes of the weakness of the imperial 
government. Lectures, required reading, etc. 

374. Church History. — To the beginning of the fifteenth century. 

Early organization of the church; the persecutions; 
Christianity as the state religion; rise of the papacy; 
monaGticism and the conversion of Europe; nature of 
the medieval church; its powers, jurisdiction and 
influence; heresies; the popes at Avignon; the Great 
Schism. Lectures, required reading, etc. 

375. English Constilulional History, — Political organization of 

England in the Anglo-Saxon period ; developmen t of the 
forms of the constitution as shown in the principal docu- 
ments; constitutional changes of the seventeenth, eight- 
eenth and nineteenth centuries. Outline study of the 
general narrative history of England. 

376. English Social History. — Organization of society in early Eng- 

land ; the rural manor, the town guilds, fairs, and foreign 
trading; popular movements of the fourteenth century; 
changes from medieval to modem times; industrial rev- 
olution, and the other principal changes in subsequent 
periods. Outline study of the general narrative history 
of England. 

377. England and the Continent. — Comparison of the economic. 

political, ecclesiastical, and intellectual development of 
England with that of the principal continental coimtrics 
from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century. Chief 
topics; the Hanse League; the Staple; the Florentine 
bankers; trade with Venice and the Far East; rise iif 
Parliament and the Estates General; Jacquerie anii 
peasant rebellions of England and Germany; organi?a- 
tion of the church ; statutes of Provisors and Pnemu- 
nire; Lollards and Hussites; invention of printing; the 



378. Rise 0} the British Empire. — ^England and the growth of her 
colonies from the Sixteenth to the nineteenth century; 
explorations of the period of Elizabeth: growth of the 
commercial companies: colonial settlements: wars with 
Holland, Spain and Prance; Empire of India; attain- 



tizedoy Google 



'73 

ment of self-government by the colonies; changes in 
England most closely related to this external develop- 
ment. Lectures and required reading. 

379. The Renaissance. — Italian city republics; renaissance in 

Italy, the Medici and Savonarola; the papacy; centrali- 
zation of governments ; geographical discoveries, changes 
in trade routes, inventions and displacement of capital; 
renaissance north of the Alps. 

380. Tl» Reformation. — Economic and ecclesiastical conditions 

underlying the Reformation; Luther and the Reforma- 
tion in Germany; wars of religion in France; Coun- 
ter-Reformation and the Thirty Years' war. Lectures 
and required reading. 

381. Europe from 164S to 1789. — Europe at the Peace of West- 

phalia; dynastic and colonial aggrandizement; Louis 
the Fourteenth; England; rise of Prussia and Russia; 
diplomatic revolution; Seven Years' war; enlight- 
ened despotism; partitions of Poland; EastemQues- 
tion. Lectures and required reading. 

j8i. The French Revolution and Napoleon. — French society and 
state before the Revolution ; States General; the Revo- 
lution; foreign wars; Reign of Terror and reaction; 
constitution of 1795; Directory and Napoleon, 'text- 
book, lectures and required reading. 

383. Tlu Rise of Prussia. — Geography and climate of northern 
Germany; the electorate of Brandenburg, the Teutonic 
Knights, union of Brapdenbuig and Prussia; the Great 
Electors and rise of the Prussian monarchy; Frederick 
the Great and the leadership of Prussia; overthrow of 
Prussia by Napoleon; regeneration; the Zollverein, 
and its signiiii^ance ; struggle for constitutional govern- 
ment; Schleswig-Holstein question; war with Austria; 
the Franco-German war and the attainment of German 
unity; Germany of to-day. 



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>74 




HYGIENE. 






eubjecta. 


HouMaweot. 




Ko. 


in 


2d 


'TSXT™- 


39t 

39" 


BatUrioh 


■ 


- 




Abbott. 
Bergey, 

Hygiew 

Bergey. 


Hrpi 1 tnifi flry tO AlX;bl~ 

lecture 33 and 34. 



Dbscription. 

391. Bacteriology. — Pirst-year Bacteriology of the Medical Course. 
Opes to men only. For details and roster, see announce- 
ment of the Department of Medicine, elsewhere. 

391. Hygiene. — Lectures, with special reference to application is 
architectural practice. 







ITALIAN 








Subjecbt. 


Honre a WHek. 


Unltai 


"-SKS"-' 


No. 


T."i. 


Term. 








■ 


■ 


Latin 431 or French 




Rennert. 



Dbscription. 

4ai. Young's Italian Grammar. Pellico, Z^ Mie Prigioni. Gol- 

doni, La Locandiera. Prose Composition. 







LATIN. 








Sab]«oM. 


Hoon a week. 


Unit. 
Work. 


remarks, elc 


No. 


Term. 


2d 
Tenn. 






3 


3 






430A 


Kent. 




Kent. 








t,i.a,Google 



eoUttSBS IN tHB COLLBOB. 



PrepkratlaD Teqnlrad, 
iemuka,eta. 



Rotfe. 

McDaniel. 

Kent. 



Gibbons. 
Rolfe. 



UcDaniel. 

McDaniel. 

McDaniel. 

Gibbons. 

McDaniel. 

Gibbons. 



McDaniel. 
Gibbons. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



Tern. Term. 




Dbscriptioh. 

430. Elementary Latin. 
430A. Ciesar. 

430B. Cicero- 
4joC. Vergil 

431. Livy. Selections from Books I, XXI and XXIT. Latin writ- 

ing. 

43a. Cicero, De Senectute and De Amicitia. Roman history and 
antiquities. 

431A. Rapid reading of easy Latin. 

433. Horace. Odei and Epodes. Metres; poetic usage; mythol- 
ogy- 



tizedoy Google 



COURSES IN THE COLLEGE, I7- 

434. Horace, Satires and Epistles. 

435. Plautus, selected comedies. 
43SA. Terence, selected comedies. 

4)6. Cicero, TuscidaruB. .Lives of the Philosophers. 

437. Pliny. Letters. Illustrated lectures on Roman private life. 

438. Horaix, Ats Poetica. Latin writers on Rhetoric. Juvenal, 

Satires. Roman society in the time of the Twelve 

439. Elegiac Poetry. Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, PropertiuK 

and Ovid, 

440. Tacitus, Agricola and Germania. Provincial policy of the 

Roman government. Martial, Epigrams. 

441. Ovid. The Ffljlt, with studies in Roman topography and 

mythology. 
443. Cicero, De Officiis. Seneca, Latin works on Ethics and 

their sources. 
443A. Petronius. Cena Trimalchionis. Lectures on the Latin 

language. 

443. Vergil. Metrical translations. Expressive reading of Latin 

verse. Uses of mythology in literature and nrt. 

444. Suetonius. Selected Lives, with studies in Roman history 

and political institutions. 
444A. Tacitus, selections from the Histories and Annals. 

445. Latin Prose Composition. 

446. Latin Prose Composition. 

447. The Private Life of the Romans. Lectures illustrated by 

the stcreopticon. 
44S. The Earliest Literature concerning Christianity. Minucius 
Felix, the Oclavius. 







LINGUISTICS. 






Subjecti. 


HODiuBweek. 


UnilF 


PreMralloii rMuIreil, 
remarks, eU: 


No. 


Term. | Term. 


45' 


Lingu^ties 

Eastoo. 


- 


" 


■ 





. Nature and growtlt of language; roots, stems, inflections. 
characteristics of various languages and litrr:>ture'i: 



tizedoy Google 



TKB COLL BOB. 

classification of languages; methods of writing, etc. 
Whitney, Language and lh» Study of Language. Lee- 
tures and recitations. 

MATHEMATICS. 





Bubjecbi. 


Hauraaireek. 


z 


lTepM»tion required, 
remarto, etc. 


No. 


iBt 


T^. 


461 


Solid Geottittry .... 
Crawley. 

Hallett. 
Dimick. 
Babb. 


" 


3 


li 


A, B, C.« 


46a 


Plane Trigononteiry 
Crawley. 
Hallett. 
Safford. 
Dimick. 
Babb. 


3 


- 


ij 


A. B, C* 












463 


Algebra 


- 


4 




A. B, C* 


Schwatt. 




464 


Analylu Geometry. 
Babb. 


^ 


- 


' 


461 and 461. 


46s 


Differential and In- 
tegral Calculus. 
Fisher. 


- 


^ 


' 


463 and 464- 


466 


Theory of Equa- 
tions and Deter- 

Hailett. 


' 


* 


' 


463 and 464. 


467 


Advanced Plane 
Trigonometry, and 
Spherical Trigo- 
nametry. 

Crawley. 




3 


>J 


461 and 46a. 


468 


Introduction to 
Higher Algebra 
and Ike Galois The- 
ory of Equations. 
Hallett. 




3 


.1 


466, and preferably 
preceded or accom- 
panied by 465- 
Al temate years . 
Omitted in igos- 
06. 



t,i.a, Google 



COURSES tK 1 





Subjecli. 


HounaveelL 




""^•E.-a?"- 


No. 


tS.. 


,r™. 


w£ 


469 


Solid Analytic Ge- 
ometry. 

Crawley, 


' 




■ 


46s and 466. Alter- 
nate years. Given 
in 1905-06. 


470 


Advanced Plant 
Analytic Geom- 
etry. 

Crawley. 


' 




' • 


465 and 46fi. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 


471 


liom. 

PUher. 


' 




" 


465'and4fi6. Altera 
nate years. Given 
in 1905-06. 


47' 


Advanced Calctdus. 

Fisher. 


' 




■ 


465. Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1905- 

06. 


473 


Qitalerttitms* 

Fisher. 


' 




, 


464, and should pref- 
erably be preceded 
or accompanied by 
465- 


474 


InfiniU Sfries and 
ProdMcls. 

Schwatt. 






.1 


Must be preceded by 
or taken simulta- 
neously with 465. 
Alternate years. 
Given in 1905-06. 


480 


Analytie Geometry . 
Safford. 






■i 


A, B. C, D.t 










' 


A, B, C.t 




Schwatt. 

HaUett. 

Evans. 

Diinick. 

Babb. 



■ OSend primuily to memba 
Funilty PriH far *pecU] weak 11 
tomrdi > decree. 

t 8Mpp. 6t, eSaad >• 



Ukthcoutiea. Whai an talcea it does not count 



t,i.a, Google 



PUme and Spherical 

Trigonometry. 
Schwatt. 
Haltett. 



AtuUytic Geonutty. 

Differential- and In- 
tegral CcUculus. 
Crawley. 
Fisher. 
Schwatt. 
Evans. 
Safford. 

Integral Calculus . . 
Crawley. 
Fisher. 
Hallett. 

Safford. 

Elements of Calcu- 
lus, with A ppli - - 

Safford. 



Houra a week. 



4Si,and483. 

A part of the first 
term (about fift^ 
hours in all) is 
given to 4S4, and 
th; test of the first 
term and all of the 
second tenn (about 
100 hours in all), 
is given to Cal- 



NoTE. — Subjects 461 to 474 are offered primarily for students in the 
courses in Arts and Science, Biology, and in Finance and Com- 
merce. Subjects 480 to 4S7 are offered primarily for students 
in the technical < 



461. SiAid Geometry.— SciiMlXz^ and Sevenoak's Geometry. Books 
VI, VII, VIII. 



tizedoy Google 



461. Plane Trigonomttry. — Crawley's EUtnenis oj Trigonometry 
(second edition), and Tables of Logarithms. 

463. Algebra. — Fisher and Schwatt's Higher Algebra. 

464. Analytic Geometry. — C. Smith's Conic Sections, 

465. Differential and Integral Calculus. — Snyder and Hutchinson's 

Differential and Integral Calculus. 

466. Theory of Equations and Determinants.— Bucimde and Pan- 

ton's Theory of Equations, with supplementary lectures. 

467. Advanced Plane Trigonometry and Spherical Trigonometry. 

Crawley's Elementsof Trigonometry, Chaps. VII to XII, 
supplemented by problem work, outside reading and 
lectures. 

468. Introduction to Higher Algebra and the Galois Theory of 

Equations. — Lectures. 

469. Solid Analytic Geometry. — C. Smith's Solid Geometry. 

470. Advanced Plane Analytic Geometry. — Homogeneous co-ordi- 

nate systems as applied to the study of the Conies. 
C. A. Scott's Analytic Geometry. 

471. Differential Equations. — Ordinary and partial difEerential 

equations. Forsyth's Differential Equations, and lee- 

471. Advanced Calculus. — Advanced work in differential and 
integral calculus. 

473. Quaternions. ^-The elements of the theory of quatemiona 

with apphcations to Geometry and Physics. Lectures. 
Open to properly qualified students in all courses in the 
College. 

474. Infinite Series and Products. — Convergency and divergency 

of series. Expansion of trigonometric functions of man- 
ifold angles into infinite series and products. Hyper- 
geometric series. Series of Fourier and Lagrange. 

480. Analytic Geometry. — Siiggs' Analytic Geometry. For students 

in the Course in Architecture. 

481. Algebra. — Pisher'and Schwatt's Higher Algebra. This sub- 

ject differs from 463 mainly in the fact that more atten- 
tion is given to the general theory of equations. 

483. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. - Crawley's Elements of 

Trigonometry (second edition) , and Tables of Logarithms. 
supplemented by problems and exercises. 

484. Analytic Geometry. — Bailey and Woods' Analytic Geometry, 

The fundamental properties of the Right Line, Circle 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



iSa THE COLLBGB. 

and Conies, with an introduction to Solid Analytic 
Geometry. 

485. Differential and Integral Calculus. — Snyder and Hutchimion's 
Calculus. 

4S6. Iniegral Calculus. — Snyder and Hutchinson's Calcidus, sup- 
plemented by problem work. 

487. Elements of Calculus with Applicatums. — Merriman's EIoMettli 
of Mechanics, and Hayes' Calculus. For students in 
the Course in Architecture. 





MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 


ENGINEERING. 




SnbJecM. 


Houra.week. 


iTe^^r^Ulred, 


Na 


m 


Id 


491 


Spangler. 

Ehlers. 

Gill. 

Gebhart. 

Crofoot. 

Fuller. 








491 


Fry. 

Stannard. 


3 


3 




493 


Mechanical Drawing . . . 
Stannard. 


3 


3 


491 and 49a. 


494 


Worhii^prawings 

Staiinard. 


3 


3 


493- 


495 










Gill. 
G«bhart 




496 


Kinematics 


3 




495. 


Doyle. 

Crofoot. 

Payne, 



t,i.a,Google 



COURSES IN t 



Statics 

Spongier. 

Stanford. 

EUers. 

GUI. 

Fuller. 

Doyl«. 

Hydraulics 

Stanford. 
Gebhart. 
Crofoot. 

Hydrodynamics 

Stanford. 
Gebhart. 
Payne. 

ShopWork 

McConnell. 
Randolph. 
Mellor. 
Sutphen. 

ShopWork 

Morris. 

McConnell. 

Randolph. 

Mellor. 

Sutphen. 

Advanced Shop Work 

McConnell. 
Randolph. 
Mellor. 



Advanctd Shop Work . 
Morris. 
McConnell. 



49'.49». 49S.SOO- 



tizedoy Google 





Bubjit-l*. 


Hounaweek. 


'"STKr"- 


No. 


T^. 


M 


504 


Engiru Calculations . . . 
Stanford. 

Gill. 


' 


— 


493.495. 497. Soo.fiaj 
9». 103- 


SOS 


Engine Design 

Stanford. 
GiU. 


~ 


* 


504. 


506 


Boiler Caicukaion 

Stanford. 
Gill. 
Payne. 
Doyle. 






Same as 504. 


507 




~ 


' 


S06. 


Stanford. 

Gill. 


508 


Graohics 


4 




493. *=a- 


Gebhart. 
Crofoot. 
Fuller. 


509 


Thermodynamics 

Gill. 




3 


495. 485- Caj. 


Sio 




* 


- 


509. 




Spangler. 
Stanford. 
Ehlers. 








511 


Mechanical LahoTaiory. 
Gebhart. 
Payne. 
Crofoot. 
Fuller. 
Doyle. 


3 


3 


493. >96. S«> or 501. 
and concurrent with 
486. 


5" 


Mechanical Laboratory. 
Ehlere. 


3 


" 


493. 49^. fU)d concur- 
rent with 500 or SOI, 
and with 4S6. 



t,i.a,Google 





COURSBS 


N THE 


COLLEGE. 185 


.. 


Subjucta. 


Hours 
Term. 


week. 
Term, 


'■^"?£,-ar'' 


S.3 


Advanced Mechanical 
Laboratory. 
Stanford. 


3 


3 


S09. 5". 


5'4 
SIS 


Advanced Mechanical 
Laboratory. 
Ehlers. 
Gill. 

Marine Engines 

IE'- 


6 


3 


509, 511 or 513. 
493. 495. 485- 


SI7 


Naval Architecture 

Machine Design 

Pry. 
Stannard. 


3 


3 


Same as 515. 

494. 496. 497. 502 Of 
503. 508- 






3 


" 


or<i» 521 




Payne. ' 




519 


Specifications (volun- 
tary), 

Spangler. 


— 


• 


acs (ist termj. 


Sao 


Mechanical Thesis 


~' 


9 


498, 504, S06, 510, sii 
or $13. and concur- 
rent with S13 or 514, 
and with 517, 


531 


Electrodynamics 

H. W. Brown. 
Temple. 
Barrows. 
Beaver. 


' 


" 


634. 


Sia 


Telegraphy and Teleph- 
Temple. 


' 


' 


6*4. 



t,i.a,Google 



THB COLLBOB. 





Bnbject* 


HounawMk, 


remarks, elc 


No. 


1^. 


■2A 

Term. 


513 


Alltmating Currents .. . 
H. W. Brown. 
Temple. 
Barrows. 
Beaver, 


— 


' 


634. and concurrent 
with 486. 


S»4 


Advanced Electrody- 

""'"if.W. Brown. 
Temple. 
Barrows. 
Beaver. 






S»i. 


5»S 


Electrical Measure- 

H. W. Brown. 

Barrows. 

Beaver. 






S»i. S*9 0^S3<>• 


S»6 
S'7 


Dynamo Design 

H. W. Brown. 
Barrows. 

plicalions. 

H. W. Brown. 






5»t, 5*4. 486. 
S»t, S»3- 










S>8 


Etectricily and Magnet- 

H. W. Brown. 
Temple. 
Barrows. 
Beaver. 




3 


614. 


S'9 


Electrical Laboratory . . . 
H. W. Brown. 
Temple. 
Barrows. 
Beaver. 




3 


6j4. and concurrent 
with 5". 


53° 


H. W. Brown. 
Barrows. 


_ 


3 


634. and concurrent 
with S3I. 


S3' 


EUctrieal Testing 

H. W. Brown. 

Temple, 




3 


529, aad concurrent 
with 535. 



t,i.a,Google 





Subjecw. 


Hours 


:iweck. 


reniHiIu. elc. 


Ka 


1st 


T^ 


533 


EUctrical Testing 

Barrows, 


6 


3 


539. 533. and concur- 
rent with 535 and 


533 


EUctrwtd Thesis 


- 


9 


533, 334. S»5. 5^9 or 
530, and concurrent 
with 531 or 53a, and 
with S3S. 


539 


Beaver. 


' 


' 


614- 


S40 


Steam Engines and 
BoUers. 

Stanford. 
GiU. 


* 


" 


633. 633. 



Dbscription. 
491. DtseripUve Geometry. — Problems worked out to scale in the 

drawing-room. Faunce's Descriptive Geometry. 
4ga. Elementary Drawing. — Use of instruments. Making simple 

mechanical drawings from working sketches. Freehand 

lettering. 

493. Mechanical Drawing. — Continuation of 493, Sectioning, 

tinting and tracing detail drawings made from sketches. 
Blue printing. Machine sketching. 

494. Working Drawings. — Making complete tracings of assembly 

drawing and details from sketches. Kinematic design. 

495. Steam EngifW,— Nomenclature of steam machinery. Gen- 

eral principles of the construction of machines. Power 



496. Kinematics.— hecws of motion. Combinations of pure mech- 

anism. Pulleys and belts. Trains of gearing and forms 
of teeth of wheels. Link work, epicyclic trains, etc. 

497. Statics. — Application of the principles of statics to rigid 

bodies. Elasticity and strength of materials. Forma 
of uniform strength. Design of beams, columns and 
shafts. Combined and repeated stresses. 

498. Hydraulics. — ^Transmission of pressures. Determining cen- 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



l83 THE COLLEGE. 

tres of amount and [iri-sKUre. Depth of fiotiiliou an.! 
stability. I'low through orificts, over weirs, through 
tubes, pipes and conduits. Water meters and the 
measurement of water-power. 

499. Hydrodjmamics. — Theory of turbines and water wheels and 
turbine design. 

joo. Sltop I KiJrfe.— Elements of machine ajid wood working. Col- 
lateral reading and monthly examinations, 

501. Shop Work. — Short course for Chemical Engineering students 

501. Advanced Shop Work. — Pattern making. Use of machine 
tools. Principles of foundry practice. Laying out 

503. Advanced Shop Work. — Short course for Chemical Engineer- 

ing students only. 

504. Engine Calculations. — Determining the proper proportions 

for cylinders, valves, piston rods, shafts, fly wheels, etc. 
The design of the principal parts of an engine of a par- 
ticular type, calculating where a question of strength 
enttrs. and following the chosen type for proportions that 
are determined solely from experience. 

505. Engine Design. ^Completion of calculation and making 

assembly and working drawings of details. 

506. BoHer Cakuiation. — Value of fuels, determination of proper 

proportions for grate and beating surfaces, height of 
chimney, thickness of shell, size of braces, etc. ; Ihe 
work following the general lines of course 504. 

507. Boiler ZJesign.— Working out details of boilers and making 

working drawings. 

508. Graphics. — Principles of graphic statics and their application 

to cranes, bridgos, roof trusses and other framed stntc- 
tures. The graphics of machinery with and without 
friction, graphic combination of stresses in sliafls, 

Soq. Thermodynamics. ^i\ec\>anica\ theory of heat. Woik done 
and heat expended in expansion. Cycles of pcrftct 
gases and vapors. Expansion of steam, animonia and 
carbonic acid, work done and I'.t-at required. Mixtures 
of vapors. 

jio. Applied Thermodynamics. — Heat engines, various efficiencies. 
Commercial results obtained and possibilities of develop- 



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COURSES IN THE COLLBOB. lAi) 

ment of steam, air, gas and oil engines. Refngcraling 
machines using air, ammonia, carbonic acid, etc. Plow 
of steam, injectors and condensers. 

511. Meckanieal Laboratory. — Testing mechanical apparatus^ Ad- 
justing scales, indicators, counters, gauges, etc. Deter- 
miiuiig the effidencjr of various machines and the values 
of the materials of construction. 

513. Mechanical Laboratory. — (Omitted after 1906.) 

513. Advanced Mechanical Laboratory. — For Electrical Engineer- 

ing students only. 

514. Advanced Mechanical Laboratory. — Testing steam, gas and air 

en^nes, and boilers, determining duty of pumps, inject- 
ors, air compressors, nieasurement of flow of steam. 
calorimetric work. 

515. Marine Engines, — History. Details of marine boilers, en- 

gines and accessories. Propulsion, safety devices, man- 
agement of marine machinery. Compound and triple 
• expansion engines. 

516. Naval Archilectwc. — Displacement, stability, strength of 

structure, power required, water lines, fineness, etc. 

517. Machine Design. — Applications of the principles of machine 

design to special machinery. 

Si8. Shop Visits. — Students are required to visit machine shops, 
foundries, ship yards, and electric power stations; and 
to make reports on the general arrangement of plant. 
power distribution, handling of materials, etc., and on 
special toots and processes. 

519. Specifications. — Methods of drawing specifications for engines, 
boilers, foundations, etc. Making estimates as to cost. 
weight, etc. 

$10. Mechanical Thesis: — Special work in Mechanical Laboratory. 

511. Electrodynamics. — The construction of commercial instru- 
. ments and of direct and alternating current dynamos 
and motors. 

S»». TeUpaphy and Telephony. — Telegraph and telephone sys- 
tems; duplex, quadruplex, multiplex, printing and mes- 
senger service telegraphs and signal systems. Simple. 
mviltiple and common battery telephone systems. Reci- 
tation; and drawing of diagrams of connections for 
various systems and switchboards, illustrated by mod- 
em apparatus and laboratory work in making connec- 



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[QO THB COLLBOB. 

533. Alitmating CuTrents. — Time constant, impedance, reactance, 

U%, Poiirier's expansion, form factor, measurement of 
power, currents in circuits havii^ inductance and capa- 
city. 

534. Advanced EUctrodynam-ics. — Principles and construction of 

motors, arc and incandescent lamps, secondary cells, 
transformers, photometry, circuits and meters. 

535. EUctrical Measttrements. — The study of electrical and mag- 

netic measurements and laboratory methods. 

5*6. Dynamo Design. — Study of principles, and the development 
on the drawing board of a design of armature, commu- 
tator and field magnets, for a dynamo or motor. 

537. Alternating Current Applications. — Mutual inductance, syn- 
chronous motors, parallel running, polj^hase currents, 
rotating field, induction motors, power transmission and 
alternating networks. 

518. Electricity and Magnetism.^A study and review of phenom' 
ena, principles and laws, and the derivation of units. 

539. Electrical Laboralory. — Elementary measurement of resist- 
ance, potential and current, and calibration of com- 
mercial instruments. 

530. Electrical LairoraJory, -^(Omitted after 1906,) 

531. Electrical Testing.— For Mechanical and Chemical Engineer- 

ing students only. 
533, Electrical Testing. — Measurement of instdation resistance, 

capacity, induction, etc. Testing direct and alternating 

current dynamos, motors and transformers. Power 

measurements. Photometry. 
533. Electrical Thesis. — Special work in Electrical Laboratory. 

539. Applied Electricity. — Electricity and magnetism, as applied 

to industrial electrical apparatus and installations. For 
Civil Engineering students only. 

540. Steam Engines and Boilers. — Short course for Civil £ 

ing students only. 



tizedoy Google 





SubJeclB. 


Houm a week. 


Un[U 


remark!, etc. 




TeJm. 


Tenn. 


54' 

S4I 

543 

544 


Harmony, Thor- 
ough-bass. 

Clarke. 

Melody, Rhythm, 
Strict Counter- 
point. 

Clarke. 

Larger •'Forms," 
Suite. Modern 
Counterpoint. 
Clarke. 

The Orchestra 

Clarke. 


' 






541. Candidates who 
can pass an exami- 
nation in Harmony 
may be admitted 
to this course. 

543. Open to candi- 
dates who can pass 
an examination in 
S4a. 

543. Open to candi- 
dates who can pass 
an examination in 
543- 



Dbschiptiok. 

541. First Year. — Harmony, intervals, scales (major). Chords 
of major scales; their progressions and inversions. 
Minor scale. Relation of scales. Dissonant groups; 
their origin, formation and progression. Modulation 
i>r transition. The course includes all that is embraced 
in the study of Harmony or Thoroughbass. 

541, Seiond Vfiir. — Melody, Rhythm. The harmonic basis of 
melody. The iLse of djssonances foreign to the har- 
mony, t. (.. changing notes, passing notes, suspensions, 
retardations. Lyric or dance "form." The simpler 
forms developeil from the Lyric. The origin of Strict 
Counterpoint, The rules for the cembination of inde- 
pendent parts in llie five species of Counterpoint, in two, 
three and four part.'!. Double Counterpoint. 

54J. Third Year. — Larger "Forms," Suite, Sonata, developed 
Rondo, Modern Counterpoint. Five species in two, 
three and four parts. "Imitation" Fugue (Real ami 
Tonal), Fuguf with Counter-subject. Canon. 



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S44- Fcmrik Year. — ^The Orchestra. Compass aod character of 
orchestral instruments. Rules for their combinatioiis, 
with and without voices. Analysis of scores. Scoring 
for various combinations. 

PEDAGOGY. 
See under Philosophy. 

PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY. 
No subject under these titles can be taken before a student's 
second year in College. 



PHILOSOPHY. 







H^aweet 


UdJU 


'nniu'k*,c(c 


No. 


1."^. 


T^. 


S6' 

565 
566 
567 

see 


Lok 


- 


- 


* 




* singer. 




Newbold. 

History of AncietU 
Philosophy. 
Newbold. 

History of Modem 
Philosophy. 
Singer. 

Philosophy of Na- 

UtT4. 

Singer. 

tUT«. 

Singer. 

Contimporary Mor- 
alists. 

Flaccus. 

RtadingsinArKieftt 

Newbold. 


563. Alternates with 
563. Omitted in 
190S-06. 



t,i.a,Google 



C0URS88 IN THB COLLBGB. 





Bnbjecti. 


Hoonaweet 


Unite 






1st 
Term, 


2d 

Tena 


''"^SX'X"^' 


S69 


Readings in Modem 

Philosophy. 


- 


• 


■ 




S70 


Plato's Metaphys- 
ics, Anthropology 


' 


' 


' 




S7I 


Analysis of Ethical 


' 


' 


' 






Placcus. 




PSYCHOLOGY. 




Snbjecla 


Hours a week. 


Dnltt 
of 




i-u 


T^ 


M 




58. 


General Psychology. 

Witmer. 


' 


- 


■ 




582 


Analytic Psychol- 
ogy. 

Witmer. 
Twitmyer. 


3 


~ 


' 




S83 


Witmer. 
Twitmyer. 


- 


3 


■ 














584 


Genetic Psychology. 
Twitmyer. 


' 


3 


" 


583 and S83. 


585 


Witmer. 

Twitmyer. 


3 
S 


3 
5 


3 


581. May be taken 

for one term only. 


586 


Abnormal Psychol- 
ogy. 

Witmer. 


•~ 


' 


" 





t,i.a,Google 





PEDAGOG 

Houn a wevk. 


^. 






Work. 


ProparaUon required, 
renuTki, etc. 


No. Suhjecto. 


in 

Tarn,. 


2d 

Tctm. 




■ 




' 




59, fe "E^^-^y^-j; ■ 





PHILOSOPHY. 

561. Logic. — Lectures and recitations. 

561. Ethics. — A sketch of the history of ethical theory, designed as 

an introduction to the study of ethics. Lectures. 
363. History of Ancient FkHosopky. — Lectures, with readings from 

selected sources. 
5(14. History of Modem Philosophy. — Lectures, with readings 

from selected sources. 
5(15. Philosophy of Nature. — Types of ancient and medieval con- 
ceptions of nature. 
56(1. Philosophy of Nature. — Development of the modem sciences. 

567. Contemporary Moralists. — Readings and discussions. The 

work of the year 1903-06 is designed as an introduc- 
tion to Idealistic Ethics, and will be based on Mackeniie, 
Palmer, and Muirhead. 

568, Readings in A ncient Philosophy. — The texts selected will vary 

from year to year. 

1905-06, Lucrtlius, (Munro' 8 translation). 
1906-07. Cicero, de Nalura Deomm. 
560. Readings in Modern Philosophy. — The, texts selected will varj- 
from year to year. 
1905-06, Locke, On the Human Understanding. 

Berkeley, Principles of Human Knowledge. 
1906-07. Hume, Treatise on Human Nature. 
Selections from Imill and Spencer. 

570. Plato's Metaphysics, Anthropology and Cosmology. — Reading 

of the more important dialogues. 

571. Analysis 0} Eihicat Theories.— Based upon Sidgwick, M«fAo<fo 

of Ethics. 



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PSYCHO LOG V. 

S8t. Genial Psychology. — An elementary outline of the more im- 
portant facts and theories concerning the human mind; 
the relation of the problems of modem psychology to 
certain of the other sciences, the arts and education. 

583, AitalylK Psychology. — An introspective and experimental 

analysis of perception; the role of apperception, mem- 
ory, attention and association; perceptions of space; 
the sense organs; the physical stimuli or objects of per- 
ception. Lectures and laboratory work. 
5S3. Pkysiological Psychology. — Mind and body; the nature of the 
will, automatic and reflex movements, inherited ii 
and acquired habits, impulse and emotion ; the s' 
and functions of the human nervous system. Dissec- 
tion of the brain and experimentation upon voluntary 
and reflex movements. Lectures and laboratory 

584. Genetic Psychology. — Development and organization of the 

individual mind; permanent effects of sensation and 
movement upon the brain; sensory after-images; mem- 
ory innages; cerebration and association; organization 
of imagination and memory; the development of ideas, 
the intellect and reason; the growth of attention and 
the individual will. Lectures and laboratory work. 

385. Expermenial Psyckology.'-OMtline of methods and results of 
measurement of mental processes. Problems assigned 
from the following topics: qualitative analysis of sensa- 
tion-complexes, memory and simpler emotions; psycho- 
physical methods and laws; specific sense energies; rate 
and force of voluntary movements; time of sensory- 
motor reaction, discrimination, association, etc.; varia- 
tions in physiol<^cal processes affected by mental con- 
ditions. Lectures and laboratory work. 

586. Abnormal Psychology. — The nature of hallucination, delu- 
sion, and illusion; suggestibility, automatism, and 
hypnotism ; double consciousness and the development 
of secondary personalities: telepathy or thought trans- 
ference; mental and emotional variability in relation 
to individual and race development; degeneration and 
arrest or retardation of mental development. Lectures. 



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PEDAGOGY. 

5QI. Ptdagogy. — A critical study of educational principles; their 
origin and comparative value; the present condition 
of educational systems in England, Germany, and the 
United SUtes. 





Bqbfecti. 


Hook » week. 


DalB 
Wrak. 


-'^sX'^f-' 


Ho. 


T^ 


M 


601 


Gentrai Physics . . . 
Goodspeed. 
Meyer 

H. C. Barker. 
Wenner. 


3 


3 


" 


Mathematics 461. 


603 


Physical Mtasufc 
ments. 

Meyer. 

Hart. 

Hough. 

H.C Barker. 

Harper, 

Wenner. 


4 


4 


»1 


6oi, 610. or6i>-6a5. 
Methods I hour; 
laboratory 3 horns. 












603 


Advanced L<d>ora- 
tory Work. 
Richards. 


3 
6 


3 
6 


or 
3 


6oa, and Mathemat- 
ics 465, and must 
be preceded or ac- 


604 


Harmonic Motion 
and Sound. 
Richards. 


* 




' 


601, and Mathemat- 
ics 41^4: and must be 
preceded or accom- 
panied by Mathe- 
matics 465. Alter- 
nate years. 


605 


Physical Optics .... 
Richards. 


- 


3 


ri 


604. Alternate years. 


606 


Theory of Heat .... 
Hart. 


' 


- 


' 


Same as 604. Alter- 
nate years. Omit- 
ted in X90S-O6, 


607 


EleclricUy and 
Magnetism. 
Richards. 


_ 


3 


>1 


Same as 604. Alter- 
nate yeais. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 



t,i.a,Google 



COURSES IN THB COLLBOB. 





Boblectt. 


Hounkweek. 


Unit! 
Work. 


^-isxa-^ 




lit 

Term. 


riS,. 


6d8 


Tluoretical Dynam- 


" 


* 


* 


6oi,tiio, and Uatbe- 
matics 465. It is 
denrable that Ma- 
thematics 471 ac- 
company or pre- 
cede thii. 


609 


Theory of Pobmtial. 
Goodspeed. 








601. and Mathemat- 
ics 465. It la de- 
sirable that Mathe- 
matics 471 accom- 
pany or precede 
this. 


fiio 


EUmtntary Dynam- 
ies. 

Richards. 




— 


■ 


Mathematics 46a. 


618 


Dynamics. Sound, 
ktat, and Light. 
Goodspwd. 
Hart. 


' 


" 


" 


Entrance Pbyrics, 
and Mathematics E 
or 46a. 


610 


G*n*rai Physics . . . 
Warner. 


3 


3 


3 


Entrance Physics, 
and Mathematics E 
or46>. 


634 


EUetrieity and 
Magnetism. 
Hough. 
Harper. 


3 


~ 


li 


618. 


615 


ondRa^lion. 
Hough. 
Harper. 


" 


3 


li 


634, and Mathemat- 
ics 484. 


636 


Analytic Mechan- 
ics. 

Richards. 

Meyer. 

H. 6. Barker. 








(This subject begins 
in the second term.) 
61 8. Must be ac- 
companied by Ma- 
thematics 485 and 
486. 



t,i.a,Google 



198 THE COLLBGB. 

EtBSCRIPTlON. 

General Retnarks. — Course 6oi constitutes the required work in 
Physics, and is preliminary to all other courses. 610 may be sub- 
stituted for it. Students electing Physics are advised to take 610 
the same year as 6ot, as a desirable introduction to the other 



601 Generai Physics. — Descriptive Physics, lectures and recita- 
tions. J. S. Ames' Theory oj Physks. 
60a. PhysKoi MeasuremenU.^'Vhe theory and practice of ijuanti- 

tattve laboratory methods. Lectures and practical 

laboratory work. 
603. Advaticed Laboratory Work. — Experimental Physics. 
604 10607. — These subjects treat of special departments of Physics, 

They consist of experimental lectures and recitations. 

with an introduction to the mathematical theory. 
608. Theoretical Dynamics. — Chiefly problems involving selected 

topics in both Statics and Kinetics. Walton's Probletns 

in Theoretical Mechanics. 
60Q. Theory of Potential. — The law of inverse squares in its various 

applications to Physics, Pierce's Naflonian Potential 

Function. 
610. Elementary Dynamics. — A course in the fundamental prind- 

pies of Dynamics, without the use of higher mathematics. 

Introductory to 608, 
618 to 616. — These subjects are primarily for students in the 

technical courses. 





POLITICAL SCIENCE. 






SubiMU. 


Hours amek. 


Wwk. 


remartuhX.!. 


No. 


Term. 


T^. 


631 


United States. 
Yotuig. 
Pierson. 
Beck. 


' 


^ 


' 





• Courses 6ji. 6]i, 634, 63s. 6j6, 6}i. 6ji and 6sj are the only cour«e» 
d Science open to ArtA and Science students as dective or group Bubjec 
lurses in Poliiical Science open imty to Wharton School students, and [or a 
:>n Dfall courses in Political Science, see Wharton School of Fihahcb a: 
SHCB (pp. 104-in). 



tizedoy Google 



< THB COLLBGB. 





SDbjeel.. 


Houm.weet 


Work. 


'"■sx'ir'' 




iBt 


2d 

Term. 


631 


Rowe. 


■ 


■ 


■ 


ej'. 


634 


City Government and 

City Problems. 

Rowc. 


■ 


> 


■ 


631. 


6JS 


Public Administra- 
tion. 

Young. 


" 


' 




Sji. 


636 


Current Political 
Problems. 
Pierson. 


^ 


" 




63". 


638 


Rowe. 


" 


• 




'SI- 


651 


item 0/ Commerce 
and Industry. 
PiereOQ. 




* 




63"- 


653 


Comparative Gov- 
ernments. 


" 


' 




6.;t. Omitted in 
1905-06. 





Bubjecti 


Hoonawoek. 


L-,„. 


renuirkB, etc. 


So. 


Tenn. 




661 
66» 




■ 


Alternate years. 
Omitted in 1906- 
07- 

661. Alternate yean. 
Omitted in 1905- 
06. 


Easton. 


Bsston. 



Description. 

661. Whilney's Sanskrit Grammar; hanraan's Reader. 

662. Lanman's Reader, continued. 



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THB COLLBOB. 

SOCIOLOGY.* 





Bnbjeoti. 


HounkiTMk. 




^""^^raf-- 




T^. 


t2^. 


igi 
191 


Rtux Dmelopttunt. . 
Lindsay, 
Mangold. 

Social Reform 

_ Mangold. 








191. 
191. 

191, and 19a or 193. 
191, and 19a or 193. 


194 
'95 


Kelsoy. 


American Social 
Problems. 
Kelsey. 



■Counea ipi. i9>. igj. 1D4, and ip5 an the only c<nmea in Sod 
Arta uid Science studeau u Elective or gniup nilijecta. For couim 
open only to Wharton School itudenta, a^d for a. deAcription of ill cc 
ology. see Whakton School of Fihahci ahd Cohiiircb (pp. *o4 to 





BQbJeoU. 


Hours a week. 


OnJtB 
work. 


^•-'issx'ir* 


Mo. 


■A. 


tS, 


67. 




' 


■ 


^ 


Latin 431 or French 
j8a. 


Rennert. 



Dbsckiption. 
671. Hills &. Ford, Spanish Grammar; Le Sage, Gil Bias de SatoS- 
lana; Alarcoti, El Capitan Vefieiut; Valdes, Jos4. 







ZOOLOGY 








Subjecn. 


Hoonaweek. 


Woik. 


P«i-«OM»^rea, 




1st 
Term. 


Term. 


6SI 


General Zoology . . . 
Conklin. 
Tennings, 

Calvert. 


3 


3 


' 





t,i.a,Google 





COUH 


SES IN 


THE 


COLLEGB. 301 




».«««. 


Boon 


avcek. 


z 


ramartif^T™'' 


So. 


A 


^. 


683 


Iiwtrlebrale Zo6t- 
Dougherty. 


3 


3 


' 




683 


Mamnudion Anai- 
amy. 

Hoore. 


6 


- 


* 




68, 


VtrU^ateMotphtA. 


- 


6 


' 


683. 


68s 


General Pkysiclogy. 
Jennings. 


6 


6 


4 


681 or 683. 


686 


'"^^. 


6 


6 


4 


683. 


687 


Recent and FossS 
VerUbraia. 
Moore. 


4 


4 


3 


684. Primarily for 
gr^uates. Omit- 
ted in 1905-06. 


688 


Comparative Em~ 
Moore. 


6 


6 


4 


684 and 686. Prima- 
rily for graduates. 
Given in alternate 
years with 687. 


6S9 


Anatomy and Em- 
bryology of the 
Inverlebrata. 

ConkUn. 

Calvert. 


6 


6 


* 


683 and 686. Priiqa- 
rily for graduates. 
Omittedmi!.os-o6. 


690 


Anatomy and Pkys- 
idogy of the CeU. 


6 


6 


4 


686. Primarily for 
graduates. Given 
m alternate years 
with 689. 


691 


"""^^ 


3 


3 


" 


6S1 or 68a. 


69a Animal Bihavivr . . 
Jaaiiags. 


' 


' 


' 




693 


Prototoa 


3 


3 


' 


681 or 68a. 


Jennings. 



t,i.a, Google 



68i. General Zoology. — Introdttction to clasGilication, morpfaol- 
ogy, physiol<^;y and natural history. Fundamental 
properties of animals. General anatomy and physiology. 
Relations of animals to their physical and organic envi- 
ronment. Types of reproduction. Principles of devel- 
opment, heredity and evolution. The work is conducted 
in the laboratory and vivarium. 

68i. InfCTiebrate Ziwingy.— Representatives of various groups of 
invertebrate animals are studied in the laboratory and 
vivarium with reference to their structure, functions, life 
history and classification. 

683. Mammalian ^ tfatomy,— Comparative morphology of the 

Mammalia, bas;d upon the study of the anatomy of 
the cat. Attention is given to anatomical technique. 
Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory work. 

684. Veriebrale Morphology. — Comparative morphology of the 

Vertebrata exclusive of the mammals. Lectures and 
laboratory work. The work is designed for prospective 
students in Medicine, as well as for those intending to 
teach or to pursue researches in this field. 

685. Genial Physiology. — The processes occurring in Ijvingmatter, 

and especially those common to all organisms. Phy»- 
cal and chemical factors in the activities of organisms. 
Physiology of metabolism, movement and development. 
This course is intended to lay a foundation for modem 
experimental work in biology, as well as to serve as an 
introduction to courses dealing with the special phy^- 
ology of man. Lectures and laboratory. 

686. Embryology and Histology. — A study of the development and 

microscopical anatomy of tissues and organs, (a) Typi- 
cal cell structures and functions, egg and sperm, fertiliza- 
tion and cleavage, (6) Tissues and their differentjation 
from embryonic cells, (c) The development and micro- 
scopical anatomy of organs, as shown in the embryology 
of the frog, chick, and pig. 

687. Recent and Fossil Vertebrata. — Advanced study of the com- 

parative anatomy, taxonomy and paleontology of the 
Vertebrata, Anatomical features, geolc^ca) and geo- 
graphical distribution and phylogenetic relationships of 
the more important families. 



tizedoy Google 



688. Comparative Embryology oj the Verltbrala. — Advanced course 

on the development of different classes of the Chordata. 
Lectures and laboratory, 

689. Anatomy and Embryology of the Invertebrata. — Advanced 

course on the structure, development and phylogenettc 
relationships of various groups of Invertebrata, exclu- 
tave of Protozoa aad Insecta. 

690. Anatomy and Physiology of Ike Ceil. — Comparative morphol- 

ogy of cell structures. . Indirect and direct cell division, 
and chromaUc reduction. Conjugation and fertiliza- 
tion, cleavage and differentiation, regeneration, d^en- 
eration. Lectures and laboratory. 

691. Entomology, — The anatomy, physiology, development and 

classification of insects, including also some reference to 
the means of checking the ravages of injurious species. 
69a. Animal Behavior. — Comparative psychology of animals, be- 
ginning with a study of the movements and reactions 
of the lowest organisms and proceeding upward. An 
attempt is made to trace the development of instinct, 
intelligence, and other mental characteristics, so far as is 
possible in the present state of knowledge, and to point 
out the special fields where further investigation is 

695. The Protoaoa. — The structure, development, and physiology 
of the unicellular organisms are treated in their bearing 
on numerous problems of general interest. Special 
attention is devoted to parasitism and the production 
of disease by Protozoa. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



The subjects oSered in the Wharton School of Finance and Com- 
merce are arranged tinder three main heads: 

'Economics; incltiding Economic Science, Finance, Transpor- 
tation, Commerce and Business. 

• Political Scibncb. 

♦ Sociology. 

ECONOMICS. 





Sobittrta. 


Hoar. > mk. 


UtlM 
Work. 


^"'TSXr^- 


Mo. 


t™. 


2d 
T«m, 


x6i 


Economics 

Banks. 
Howard. 


' 




' 




i6a 


Advanced Econom- 
ics, 

Patten. 






' 


161. 


•63 
173 


English CiviiifcUion 
Patten. 

Physicai Geography 
J. R. Smith. 

Pidiltcai Geography. 
Johnson. 






' 


i6a. 


181 


Economic atid Com- 






' 


171 or 17a. 


iSi 


American Commeret 

and Commercial 
Relations. 
Huebner. 






' 


171 or 17J. Omitted 
in 1905-06. 



* The couraei enumemted bek>w under tJuoe hi 
nudents oHty, For coanea open to Art* uid Sdi 
nibjecu, lee pwa M (oUl 

les. ie«: Sodcjogr. p- '«■ 



1* ue open to Whuton Schocd 
X rtudenti w dective or snnip 
II, is»: FoUtkal Scianco, jip. 



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SCHOOL OP FINANCE AMD COUHBRCB. 





Bnbi«U. 


Hounawwk. 


Work. 




No. 


Twm. 


2d 
T«™. 


imurki, eU,. 


•83 


Commerciiil Policy. 
Johnson. 


■ 


' 




171 or 173. Omitted 
in 190S-06. 


184 


Transporlatiott 


' 


' 




181. 


i8S 


RaUway RaUs and 
Johnson. 


" 


' 




184. Alt«niat« years. 


1S6 


Urnaiional Trade. 
J. R. Smith. 


" 


' 




171. 


187 


Stock and Produce 
Exchanges. 
Huebner. 


" 






161. 


199 


Tariff History of the 
United Stales. 


- 






161. Omitted in 
1905-^6. 


«i 


Accounting 

Moxey. 
Hardt. 


3 








.0. 


Industrial Processes 

Duncan. 


' 








»o3 


Industrial Manage- 
ment. 


' 






.03. 


204 


Marketing of Prod- 
ucts. 
Duncan. 


' 






103. Omitted in 
1905-36. 


JOS 


Business Law 

Sullivan. 


' 








»o6 


Advanced Account- 


3 






"'■ 


ao7 


Cost Accounts 

Moxey. 


' 


" 




aoi. Omitted in 
1905-06. 



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Houn 


«w«k. 


Z\ -^^^' 


No. 


Item. 


Tetm. 


,.o 


Life Insurance .... 
Huebner. 




' 


' 


i6i. 


'" 


Fire. Marine and 
Fidelity Insurance 
Huebner. 






' 


aio. 


3.» 


Law and Practice o] 
Insurance. 
Huebner. 






^ 


Jio. Omitted in 
190S-06, 


.u 


Investments 

Meade. 




3 


3 


117, 119. 


lib 

ai7 


Practical Banking . 
Howard. 

Money. Credit and 
Foreign Exchange 
Conway. 




3 


3 


317. 

Must be taken with 
161, 171 and 101. 


»i9 


Public Finance 

Beck. 

Corporation Finance 
Meade. 




3 


3 


117. 


a»S 


Real Estate 

Conway. 




' 


' 


For Juniors. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE. 



... 


Hours 


.«k. 


"if 

Wnrk. 


■ " ■ ~ 


Nn. BubJKIK. 


Term, lerni. 


''"^■r?f.:^«""^• 


63a 


Go^-etnmenV. of the 
United Stales. 
Young. 
Pierson. 
Beck. 

Citizenship: Federal 
and State. 
Rowe. 


> 


'■ 


631. 



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Bubjeots. 


Hour, 


™ . 


llmls 


. 


No. 


1W. 


3d 

Term. 


"'SSilT 


634 


CfVy GoDernmenl and 
City Problems. 
■ Rowe. 


\ \ , 


'3>- 






1 




63s 


Public AdtHinistra- 
Young. 


' 


' 




63.. 


636 


Current Polilical 
Problems. 
Pieraon. 


' 


" 




«3I- 


637 


Colonies and De- 
pendencies. 
Young. 


' 


■ 




63 ■■ 


638 


Internatiottal Law. . 
Rowe. 


' 


' 




63>- 


639 


Foreign Policy of 
the United States. 


= 


■ 




631. Omitted in 
1905-06. 


641 


The Police Power . . 
PieiBon. 


' 




<i3>. 


642 


Blackstone's Com- 


' 


" 


' 




<>S' 


Go-.ernment Regula- 
tion 0} Commerce 
and InduslTV. 
Pierson. 


' 


^ 




Ii3t. 


65* 


Young. 


' 


' 


" 


63'. 


'>S3 


Comparative Gov- 
ernments. 




' 


" 


631. Omitted in 
1905-06. 



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SOCIOLOGY. 





SobiMt.. 


Hounftireek. 


Unita 
Work. 




No. 


li^. 


Ti. 


191 


Lindsay, 
Mangofd. 


■ 








191 


Social Reform 

Mangold. 


" 






191. 


'93 




» 






191. 


Kelsey. 


194 


•iivinlnev 


■ 








Sey.- 




"95 


American Social 
Problems. 
Kelsey. 


" 






ipi. 


.96 


Criminology 

Kelsey. 


" 






191. 


197 


Social and Vital 
Slaiislics. 
Mangold. 


" 




' 


191. 


198 


Sociological Field 
Work. 
Mangold. 


. 






191. 













161. EcoMomics. — Introduction. Seager's Hcotuimtc!. lectures and 
Special reports. 

163. Advanced Economics. — Designed primarily as an introduction 
to social philosophy. Mill's Political Economy. Each 
of the leading doctrines is traced through the various 
phases of its development imtil it assumes its final form 
in the writings of Mill. 

163. English CvuUigation. — Social progress of England during the 
last three centuries. Facts in regard to each great 
industrial epoch are presented, and their influence on 
national life, thought and activity considered. 

171. Physical Geography. — The development of the fundamental 



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TBB WHARTON SCHOOL OP PINAKCB AND COMUBBGB. 209 

pbysic&l factors necessary for man's industrial and social 
prioress. The general agents o£ erosion, and the result- 
ing earth forms, the character and formation of soils and 
useful minerals. The atmosphere, its circulation, the 
development of stonns, the distribution of rainfall and 
of plant and animal Uie. The ocean, its currents and 
effect upon climate. 

17a, Political Geography. — A study of the geographic forces that 
have influenced the formation and development of the 
leading nations of the world. An examination of the 
geographic facts connected with recent and present inter- 
national questions. The course is so conducted as to 
require the student to acquaint himself with the main 
facts of the geography of each country studied. Mill's 
tntemational Geography and Longmans' School Alias. 

181. Commercial and Economic Geography, — Economic and com- 
mercial geography of the United States. Resources and 
leading industries of the different sections of the coun- 
try, and the foreign trade to which these industries give 
rise. Basis of our iormga trade shown by examination 
of resources and industries in leading foreign countries. 

181. American Commerce and Commercial Relations. — -History of 
American commerce; commercial treaties in force be- 
tween the United States and the leading foreign nations. 
The latter part of the course deals with commercial 
policy. Lectures, assigned readings and reports. 

183. Commercial Policy. — A study of the commercial policy and 

commercial relations of European countries, with special 
reference to their relation to American commerce. Lec- 
tures, assigned readings and reports. 

184. Transportation. — A study of the American railway system, 

the several branches of the railway service, and the 
questions of public aid and public control. A study of 
inland navigation and ocean shipping, with special refer- 
ence to the United States, Johnson's Americdn Rail- 
way Tratisporlalion. Lectures, assigned readings and 
reports. 

185. Railway Rates and Traffic. — An examination of the actual 

organization and methods prevailing in the several 
branches of the railway service, in the manufacture of 
railway equipment, in ship brokerage, in the forward- 
ss, and in ship-building. 



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i86. Organization of Intemalional Comtneree. — A study of inter- 
national trado and Iransportation. The organization of 
the ocean-caiTying trade; line traffic, charter traffic, 
ocean trade routes and coaling stations. Leading con- 
tinental routes of international trade. The theory and 
development of trade centres, and an examination of 
those of the present. The commercial activities within 
the trade centre. International payments and the bal- 
ance of trade. 

187. Stock and Produce Exchanges. — The evolution of stock and 
produce exchanges; the benefits growing out of such 
exchanges; the terminology used in the stock and pro- 
duce market; stock and produce speculation; invest- 
ment brokerage ; the internal organization of an exchange ; 
the tools and methods employed in the conduct of busi- 
ness on exchanges; the purpose and extent of dealing 
in "futures"; the warehouse and elevator systenis and 
systems of inspecting and classifying commodities; the 
listing of securities; the clearing house system; the 
broker and his work; the law affecting brokers and their 
customers; and the relation of the stock and produce 
market to the money market. 

191. Race Development.— KeXaMons of physical and social environ- 
ment to beliefs, social standards and social ideals of dif- 
ferent races. Patten's Development of English Thought; 
Ripley's Races of Europe; Brinton's Races and Peoples. 
Lectures, syllabus and discussion of written reports. 

191. Social Reform in ike Nineleenih Century. — A study of the 
writings of four groups of social reformers: (a) the 
Utopists: Saint-Simon. Fourier, Owen, Bellamy and 
Hertzka; (b) the Moral and Ethical group: Kingsley, 
Maurice, Carlyle, Ruskin. William Morris and Henry 
George; (c) the Proletarian-Socialistic group: Blanc. 
Proudhon, Lassalle, Schultz-Dclitsch, Marx, Engfls, 
Bebcl and Licbknecht; (d) the Government Meliorists: 
Shaftesbury, Nicholls. the Fabians and others. 

193. Charities and Correction. — A study of social failures, and of 
the efforts to restore social-debtor classes and individuals 
to social efficiency. The causes of poverty; the prob- 
lems of pauperism; the development and administration 
of charities and forward social movements; public and 
private agencies in dealing with pauperism, with particu- 



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) COMMEHCU. Jll 

lar reference to existing American agencies for dealing 
with the various classes studied. Lectures, assigned 
readings, reports. 

194. Socuiliygy. — I. Ancient and modern social ideals, projected 

types of an ideal society. Social elements and hiitory 
of sociological theories : modem theories concerning 
social organization, Plato's Republic. Aristotle's Poli- 
tics and Ideal Commonweallks , 11, Historical and exist- 
ing societies ; sociological theories; modern theories con- 
cerning social psychology, requisites of social survival, 
social efficiency, and social control. Lectures and 
assigned readings, 

195. Amcrkan Social Problems. — A study of the Negro, Indian. 

Chinese and other race problems. Immigration and 
race adjustment. Marriage and divorce, labor prob- 
lems, etc. Lectures, assigned readings and reports. 
^96, Criminology. — A study of the criminal and the causesot crimes. 
An historical survey of the treatment of the criminal and 
a constructive criticism uf existing legal and penal 
machinery. Lectures and assigned readings, reports, 

197, Social and Vital Slalislics. — The object of this course is to 

prepare the student to collect, arrange, and make prac- 
tical use of the most importiint material in the fields of 
economic and sociological research. Special emphasis 
is laid upon the interpretation of statistical data. The 
course is open to Seniors and Graduate students. 

198, Sociological Field Work. — A study of actual social conditions 

and of methods employed in the care of dependent and 
delinquent classes. The course consists largely of trips 
to various institutions for social betterment in and near 
the city, supplemented by class work and reports. Stu- 
dents are advised to take 193 and 196 as a preparation 
for this course. 

199, Tarifi History oj the U. 5,— A series of introductory lectures 

on the development of the "balance of trade" theory, 
followed by a survey of tariff legislation in the United 
States, and concluding with a summary of American 
and European tarifi regulations, 
301. Accoutring. — Theoretical and practical bookkeeping; prac- 
tice employed in different forms of business — mer- 
cantile, manufacturing and banking. Lectures and 



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aiJ THB COLLBOB. 

bookkeeping practice. Lectures on die elements of 
corporation accounting. 

301. IndMSfrial Processes. — The course confiistG of lectures and a 
number of visits to industritil plants in Philadelphia and 
vicinity. The subjects studied are the sources of power, 
the genera] ways in which power is applied in industi;, 
followed by a description of the principal industries in 
the United States. On the visits of inspection students 
are required to observe the methods of production and 
the means of organizing the plant, and to make a written 
report on each trip. 

103. Industrial Management. — An analysis of the chief influences 
and present tendencies in the location of industries, tbe 
situation of establishments, the airangemeot of shops, 
methods of business orgaiuzation and management, 
manufacturing methods and policy. Lectures, assigned 
readings, class discussions and qiiizzes. 

3C4. Marketing of Products. — The methods now practiced in tfie 
organization and conduct of the selling branch of indus- 
trial and mcrchandL^g business. The principal sub- 
jects of Study in this field are: publicity, agency, adver- 
tisiiig, forms and correspondence, credit and di-^counts, 
and terms of sale. These are made Ihe topics of lec- 
tures, assigned readings and investigation. 

105. Business Law, — The study of the elementary principles of the 
law relating to the more common business transactions, 
including contracts, sales, promissory notes and bills of 
exchange, contracts of common carriers, agency, part- 
nership and corporations. 

ao6. Aduonceii^ceoHnftng.— Manufacturing partnership. Admis- 
sion of new partner. Revenue accounts and balance 
sheets: treatment of depreciation, bad and doubtful 
debts, etc. Voluntary dissolution, accounts in dissolu- 
tion, partnership adjustment. Involuntary dissolution, 
reorganization, relation of cost books to commercial 
books. Corporation accounts. Accounting systems of 
special forms of business. 

S07. Cost Accounts. — Cost accounts in a manufacturing business. 
Stores accounts. Manufacture of stock goods — direct 
and indirect costs— department costs. Manufacture of 
special orders — record of direct costs; distribution of 
•uperint«ndents', managen', financial, and other "on 



tizedoy Google 



THB WBARTOK SCHOOL C 

con" charges. Valuation of goods in process of manu- 
facture in constructing the balance sheet. 

aio. Lif« InsitratKe. — The history and financial development of life 
insurance; description of various types of policies and the 
calculation of the premium for each. A study of the sur- 
plus, reLnsurance reserve and surrender values. A study 
of the different systemsof life insurance, "old line," assess- 
ment, fraternal and industrial. Policy provisions and 
the policy contract. The law of life insurance. The in- 
vestment of insurance funds. A study of the organiza- 
tion of the oSice, the work of the several departments, and 
the practice of the business. Relations of the business to 
the State as shown by an analysis of State statutes. The 
course wiU also include a study of (a) Accident and 
Health Insurance, and (jb) Employer's Liability Insur- 
ance. Lectures, special reports and assigned readings. 
Instruction b reinforced by lectures delivered through- 
out the year by men prominent in the insurance busi- 
ness. 

311. Fitv, Marine and Fidelity Insurance. (X^vo units, two temts.) 
— A consideration of (a) the historical development; (6) 
the process of rate-making; (c) the policy contract; (d) 
various types of policies; («) State statutes on policies; 
(/) the organisation and management of the insurance 
system, and the practice of the business. In the study 
of fire insurance the course also deals with the subject 
of fire prevention. Lectures, special reports, assigned 
readings, and discussions by prominent insurance officials, 

919. Tfu Law and Practice of Insurance.— An advanced course 
dedgned fortboee who have taken courses no and an. 
In this course an opportiuiity is given for special investi- 
gation in thoeo branches of insurance which members of 
the class may wish to choose as a profession. The work 
win consist mainly of reports and ass^ned readings. 

914. InvKtments. — The nature, methods and laws of investment, 
and of the relation of speculation to investment. The 
relative merits of railway stocks, bonds, farm mort- 
gages, street railways, gas and water securities, munici- 
pal and county bond<!. etc.. ai investments. Lec- 
tures, assigmnents and class discussion. 

ai6. Praetieal Banking. — A study of the theory and practice of 
baaldng, including a thorough drill in the Law of Nego- 



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liable Invcsttnenta. (a) The National Bank. Organi- 
zation; departments and duties of officers. Operations. 
Loans, discounts, deposits, commercial credit; collec- 
tions; cheques and clearing machinery; circulation. 
Accounting system and records. Examinations, state- 
ments and reports. Bank failures, (b) State and Private 
Banks, (c) Foreign exchange and international bank- 
ing, (d) Banking systems — American and European. 
[17. Money. Credit and Foreign Exchattge. — The history and uses 
of money; the nature of credit, and the development of 
credit uses. The phenomena of the money market in 
their relation to trade, industry and speculation. The 
machinery of the domestic and foreign exchanges. 
Goschen's Foreign Exchange; Jevona' Money and Ihe 
Ulecluiaism of Exchange; McLeod's Theory of Credit; 
Clare's A B C of Foreign Exchange. 

118. Public Finance. — Fall term: a topical study of the finances of 

the United States, including budgetary legislation, the 
customs and excise sen,-icc. and the treasury as a fiscal 
agency. Spring term: a topical study of the principles 
of taxation — the natiu^ of a tax. proportional and pro- 
gressive taxation, apportionment, incidence, segregation 
and public credit. 

119. Corporation Finance. — A study of the financial methods 

peculiar to the railroad and industrial corporation, and of 
the special advantages of the se'\'eral financial methods 
that may properly be employed. Astudy of the financial 
operations in promotion, construction, operation and 
consolidation of manufacturing and railroad enterprises. 
Special attention is gi^-en to the methods employed in 
the financiering of trusts. Lectures, assignments and 
class discussion. Dill's New Jersey Corporations; 
Meade's Trust Finance; Greene's Corporation Finance. 
laS- Real Estate. — A course dealing with the legal and business 
problems connected with the sale, purchase and manage- 
ment of real property. After completing a study of the 
law and practice relating to titles, mortgagesaod ground 
rents, the remainder of the course is devoted to the con- 
sideration of particular classes of real estate. The valu- 
ation, management and location of office buildings and 
business properties, the development of suburban real 
estate, the work of the operative builder and the functions 



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TBB WHARTON SCHOOL OF FINANCE AND COMHBRCE. Ilg 

peiformed by building and loan essodations are con- 
sidered. 

631. OovfTtttnent of the United Slat's. — A study of the theory and 
present practical operation of the Federal Constitution. 
Recent changes and present tendencies. Foreign gov- 
ernments compared with the American system. Growth 
of the federal form. Lectures and required readings. 

631. Cititenship: Federal and State. — The acquisition and loss of 
citizenship. Protection to the rights of citizenship. 
The distinction between State and Federal citizenship. 
Protection to foreigners residing in the United States 
Status of inhabitants of newly acquired territory, with 
special reference to Alaska, Hawaii, Porto Rico and the 
Philippines. 

634. City Government and City Problems. — A comparative study of 
city government in Europe and the United States. 

Part I. The problems of city life in ancient and 
medieval times. Changes in political and social con- 
ditions accompanying the rise of the modem city. 
The political and social consequences of city growth. 

Part II. The form of municipal government in the 
United States as compared with England, France and 
Germany. The relation of the municipaUty to quasi- 
public works, such as street railways, gas and water 
supply. The social activities of the municipality. 
Shaw's Municipal Government in Great Britain; Good- 
now's City Government in the United States, Municipal 
Problems, and Municipal Home Rule. 

63s. Public Adtninistration. — A study of the executive power. 
Its positian of leadership in modem government. The 
means by which the executive infltiences legislation, 
determines government policy, inspires public confidence 
and moulds public opinion. Industrial and commercial 
reasons for growth of one-man power. The President, 
the Governor and the Mayor compared in relation to 
their powers and influence. The methods of organizing 
e^cecutive departments and the principal administrative 
problems of the present time. Lectures and essays. 

636. Current Political Problems. — The present activities of political 
parties in the United States. A discussion of party 
organization and party regulations in County, State and 
Nation. An examination of the movements for political 



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Sl6 THE COLLBCB. 

improvement, with special reference to nominating con- 
ventions, "primaries." compulsory voting, referendum, 
personal registration and proportional representation. 

637. Colonies and Dependencies. — The dependencies of tlie United 

States and of foreign countries. Discussion of the eco- 
nomic and political conditions of Porto Rico, Hawaii, tb« 
Philippines and Cuba. The colonial systems of Eng- 
land, France, Germany and Holland. Special attentiot) 
is paid to such questions as representative government, 
suffrage, colonial civil service, protectorates, relation 
of church and state, educational problems, etc. 

638. Inlemational Law. — Nature and source of international law. 

The evolution of the rules of international law. Con- 
tributions of the United States to the development of 
international law. The law of peace with special refer- 
ence to the rights and obligations connected with inde- 
pendence, jurisdiction and equality. The growth of the 
"European Concert" and of the primacy of the United 
States in American affairs. The law of neutrality with 
special referen<X! to the duties of belligerent towards 
neutral states and of neutral states towards belligerent 
states. Discussion of blockade, contraband and unneu- 
tral service. The law of war with special reference to 
enemy, person and property on land and at sea. Law- 
rence's Principles of Intemalionai Law; Scott's Ca'es 
on International Law. 

639. Foreign Policy of the United Stales. — A study of the treaty- 

making power in its relation to the legislative power of 
Congress and to State legislation. Brief r&um^ of the 
history of foreign relations, followed by consideration of 
international questions in which the United States is 
interested, especially those concerning the Par East. 
Poster's Century of American Diplomacy and Ameri- 
can Diplomacy in the Orient; Conant's UniUd States Mt 
the Far East; Reinsch's World Politics. 
641. The Police Power. — Lectures, cases and text-book. Preund'a 
Police Power is used as a guide. A study of the common 
law and constitutional principles regarding the execution 
and enforcement of police legislation. Special empharis 
is put upon State control of social and economic interests, 
particularly those restraints and regulations which pro- 
mote the general weUac*. 



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TRB WHARTON SCHOOL OF FINANCE AND COUMBRCR. tlj 

643. Blackslont's Commentarus. — Open to Seniors and Juniors in 

the Wharton School. 

651. Gaoemmmt Regulation of Industry and Commercr. — Discus- 
sion of the relation between Federal and State regulation. 
Power of Federal Govemment under interstate and for- 
eign commerce clause: interstate commerce act, anti- 
trust law, contracts in restraint of trade; regulation 
through the power of taxation. State corporation laws, 
legislation with reference to industrial and commercial 
combinations and consolidations. 

653. Labor Legisiation. — The more important recent laws and 
decisions affecting the protection of labor and the regu- 
lation of labor unions. The purpose of the course is 
to afford a general view of the relations of the govern- 
ment to labor interests. 

653. Cotttparative Goverfttnents. — A comparative study of the fed- 
eral governments of the United States, the Swiss Fed- 
eration, the Australian Federation, the Dominion of 
Canada and the German Empire. 



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The Evening School of Accounts and Finance was established 
in iqD4, for the purpose of offering advanced inEtruction in financial 
and commercial subjects to men who are prepared to pursue Uni- 
versity work, but who are prevented by their employment from 
uttending the day classes in the Wharton School. The regular 
course covers a period of three years, and upon the satisfactory 
completion of twenty.four units of work, a certificate of proficiency 
is awarded. 

Instruction is given by the following officers of the Wharton 
School: 

Assistant Professor Mbadb, Dtnctor of the Evening School; 
Finance. 

Professor Johnson, Transportation. 

Dr. J. Russell Smith, Geography. 

Dr. S. HuEBNER, Insurance^ and Slockand Produce Exchanges. 

Thomas Conway, Jr., Secretary of the Evening School; Real 
Estate. 

John J. Sullivan, Commercial Law. 

John C. Duncan, Industrial Management. 

Edward P. Moxey, Jr., Accounting. 

Waltbr K. Hardt, Accounting. 



The following Special Lecturers also cooperate in the work of 
instruction : 

Herbert G. Stockwell, C. P. A., Accottnting. 
William W. Rorbr, C. P. A., Accounting. 
John T. Holdsworth, Banking. 

ADMISSION. 
Applicants for admission must be at least eighteen years of age. 
If over eighteen years, but less than twenty-one years, they must 
have pursued a preparatory course equivalent to three years in a 
High School or a Preparatory School, For candidates over twenty- 
one years of age, who have not pursued such a preparatory course of 
study, an amount of business experience sufficient to familiariic them 
with the ordinary forms, accounts and methods of business will be 
required. Each application will be given separate consideration. 



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TUITION FRI'.S, 
All tuition fees are payable in two instalments — on October 
15 and March t. The tuition charges for the regular course for 
the tirst year will be $50; while for the second and third yeais, 
the fees will be $65 each. The tuition fees for a single course will 
be %a$; for two courses. $40, and for three couVses, Jjo. All other 
expenses, as for example, books and syllabi of lectures, are la. 50 



SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

FIRST YEAR. ^^^. 

1. Accounting, I a 

a. Money, Credit and Foreign Exchange a 

3. Commercial Law, I a 

4. Business Geography and Industry a 

ACCOrNTINO I. 

Mr. MoxEv and Mr. Roheh. 

This course, which assumes that the student is already familiar 
with the ordinary processes of bookkeeping, consists largely of 
the consideration of special problems. The student is given prac- 
tice in making up revenue accounts, recdization and liquidation 
accounts, adjustment accounts in the dissolution of partnerships 
and corporations, accounts in insolvency and trus 
These problems are supplemented by lectures upon such r 
:iR treatment of depreciation, doubtful and bad debts, and antici- 
pated discounts in the revenue accounts. Exercises are given illus- 
1 rating accounts peculiar to corporate enterprises, the method of 
(-hanging from the partnership to the corporate form, and the con- 
solidation of corporations. 

MOMET. CREDIT AND FOREION EXCHAMOK. 

Assistant Professor Mbadb. 

This course lays the ground work for a more advanced study in 
Finance and Banking. After describing the nature of money in 
its relation to credit, the nature of the demand for money, the con- 
siderations affecting its supply, and the factors which influence 
the rat« of interest, the students are made familiar with the forces 
operating upon prices. Special attention is given to the nature of 
bank credit, the factors determining its amount, and its influence 



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upon prices of commodities and securitiea. The course concludes 
vith a study of the foreign exchange market. 



This course is intended to ^ve a thorough grounding in the prin- 
ciples of law governing and directly affecting bunness transactions, 
and to give facility in the application of these principles. The 
technical terms, forms and details, a knowledge of which is neces- 
sary to the lawyer, but only confusing to a business man, are 
omitted. Most of the first year's work will be devoted to contracts 
and negotiable instruments. Under contracts are considered form 
and consideration; negotiation; capacity of parties; and the pay- 
ment necessary to make a contract binding. Negotiable instm- 
menta are discussed under the following heads; the construction, 
form, capacity of parties to the instrument, and the liabilities of 
indorsers. The concluding lectures will be devoted to a study of 
the law of agency. 



Dr. J. RussBLL Smith. 

This course considers the geographical and climatic factors which 
determine the location of industry in the United States and the 
principles governing the location of a manufacturing plant. Special 
topics considered are, the location of the iron and steel industry, 
the change in the center of wheat cultivation, the causes determin- 
ing the extension of manufacturing industry in the South and 
West and the location of industry in Philadelphia. 

SECOND YEAR. ^"^S 

S- Accounting, II » 

6. Corporation Finance a 

7. Commercial Law, II 3 

8. Railway Transportation a 

9. Real Estate a 

10, Banking a 

1 1 . Stock and Produce Exchanges, and the Marketing 

of Products a 

la. Life Insurance a 

13. Fire Insurance a 

14, Industrial Man^ement a 



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BVBNINO SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTS AND FIKANCB. 311 

Courses 5, 6 and 7 are required for all regular students. Besides 
these three courses, the regular student is required to dect one of 
the speciBl courses enumerated above. 

REGULAR COURSES. 
accodkthto, ii. 

Ur. HoXBT. 

A continuation of Accounting, I, consisting of practical prol^ems 
to be worked out by the student, supplemented by explanatory 
and critical lectures. The first sessions are devoted to the making 
up of revenue accounts of different kinds of business, especially of 
joint stock companies, and corporations; the disposition of profits 
and losses, the declaration and payment of dividends, and to the 
establishment and utilization of contingent and secret reserves. 
Cost accounts and forms of accounts for manufacturing, gas and 
electric companies, commercial and savings banks, insurance com- 
panies, accounts of parent and branch houses, and trustee and 
executorship accounts are considered and explained. The student 
is given practice in analyzing and interpreting railroad and other 
corporatioii reports. 

CORPOBATIOIf FINANCE. 

A study of the financial organization and conduct of corporations, 
especially railroads and industrials. The first lectures are devoted 
to a review of the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Corporation Laws, 
including the powers of a corporation, the procedure to be followed 
in the incorporation of a company, the rights and liabilities of stock- 
holders, the various securities which may be issued, and the methods 
of corporation government. The methods of promotion, capitaliza- 
tion and underwriting; the methods of obtaining new capital, the 
management of floating debt and sinking funds, the determination 
of profits, the proper division of proiita between surplus and divi- 
dends, the various methods of consolidation, and the causes <^ 
bankruptcy are conadered. The provisions of corporate leases and 
mortgages, the legal position of the mortgage trustee, and the prac- 
tice followed in receiverships and reorganizations are finally dis- 

COMMEBCtAI, I^W, II. 

Mr. SuLUVAN. 

A continuation of the first year's course, taking up the legal 
liability of common carriers; the rights and privileges of shippeisi 



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the law relating to warehouses and commission merchants; guar- 
dian and ward; trustees and eitecutors.aiid guarantee and suretyship. 

ELECTIVE COURSES.* 

BAILWAT TBANBPOBTATIOM. 

Professor Johnson. 

An advanced course in railway transportation, compri^g a 
study of the areas of production of the important commodities 
grown and manufactured in this country; of the railway S3rstems 
that have developed to handle these commodities, and of the main 
traffic problems connected with each industry. This study is 
intended to familiarize the student with the peculiarities in the 
traffic of each of these great railroad systems. The theory and 
practice of making rates and fares, and the work of the traffic 
associations will receive careful analysis. Problems of securing , 
and developing traffic on the important systems and the effects of 
trafiic fluctuations on the income and balance sheet, are set forth. 
(Omitted in 1905-06.) 

ICEAl. K8TATE. 

Mr. Conway. 

A course dealing with the legal and business problems connected 
with the Gale, purchase and management of real property. After 
completing a study of the law and practice rdating to Titles, Mort- 
giiges and Ground Rents, the remainder of the course is devoted 
to the consideration of particular classes of real estate. The valua- 
tion, management and location of office buildings and business 
properties, the development of suburban real estate, the work of 
the operative builder and the functions performed by building and 
loan associations are considered. 



Mr. HoLDSWORTH. 

This course deals with the organization and management of 
banks and trust companies. After becoming familiar with the 
duties of the important officers and the organization and relation 
of the various departments, the remainder of the year is devoted 
to a study ~af the business of financial institutions. The considera- 
tions affecting the extension of credit; the process of discounting 
and collecting loans and other claims; the probleniE arising out of 

y ri«tive coiiiM at the btginninB of the 
K does not warrant its bang givm. 



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the management of deposits and reserves; and the different methods 
of clearings and collections are explained. The methods of the 
principal foreign banks are also discussed. 

STOCK AND PRODUCE KXOHAITOES, AND THE M ABKBTIKG 
or PBODtlCTS. 

Dr. HUEBNER. 

A study of the'methods of transacting business on the leading 
stock and produce exchanges of the country. The course opens 
with a discussion of the requirements for listing stocks; the way 
in which margin transactions are financed, and the rules under 
which the members of the stock and produce exchanges do business. 
Next comes a review of the commercial aspects of the grain, coal, 
iron, steel, oil, lumber and packing industries. The various com- 
mercial agencies employed in the marketing of products are con- 
sidered, and the methods of making payment, the system of inspect- 
ing, sampling and grading commodities, and the part played by 
storage warehouses are discussed. Special attention is given to 
the study of prices and the factors which determine values. 

LIFE urSDRAHCE. 

Dr. HUEBNER. 

This course deals with the principles, methods and problems of 
Life, Accident and Employer's Liability Insurance. The several 
systems of Life Insurance are discussed, together with the assess- 
ment, fraternal, industrial and level premium plans; the mortality 
table; the fundamental principles of probabilities, and the pro- 
visions of the various types of policies. The factors determining 
the fixing of premium rates and the investment of insurance funds 
are next considered. The concluding lectures discuss the organiia- 
lir)n of the home office and the field force of a typical insurance 
company. 

FIRE INHrBANCE. 

Dr. HVBBNER. 

After becoming familiar with the theory of Fire Insurance, the 
process of rate making is considered. This involves the classifica- 
tion of losses, the organization and work of rating bureaus, the 
practice of co-insurance, and the various schedules used in rating 
risks (particularly the "Universal Mercantile Schedule" and the 
"A. F. Dean Schedule"), the types of insurance policies, and the 
organization and management of the companies. 



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INDrSTBIAI. HANAGEHKMT. 

Mr. Duncan, 

A study of the practice of business in the collection of raw materials 
the location, arrangement, organization and management of manu- 
facturing enterprises, and the marketing of products. 



In the third )'ear, besides the regular course in Investments, th« 
student will be required to elect three courses, which hi has not 
already taken in the second year. Students in Accounting will be 
required to take the course in Auditing as a part of tbMr third year's 

AUDITING. 

Mr. STOCKWBtL, 

After discussing the duties and qualifications of an auditor, the 
kinds of audits and the comparative advantages and disadvantages 
of each method, the various precautions to prevent and detect fraud 
are presented. The remainder of the course is devoted to a con- 
sideration of the audit from the trial balance to the balance 
sheet, with special reference to the subject of reserves for various 
purposes, the division and arrangement of the revenue accounts, 
valuation of property, and the valuation of goods in the process of 
manufacture, 

INTESTMENT8. 

Dr. Mbadb. 

The course aims to qualify the student for that critical analysis 
of a security which is necessary to a conservative estimate of its 
value. The nature and value of government bonds; the factors 
determining the desirability of municipal bonds and the conditions 
affecting their legality will be treated. The investment portion of 
railroad stocks and bonds will be determined, an extended examina- 
tion being made of the influences of fluctuations in earnings upon the 
value of these securities. The securities issued by street railways, 
gas, electric lighting, telephone, telegraph and shipping companies 
will be next considered. The reasons for the unpopularity of mining 
stocks and the securities of other industrial corporations will be 
discussed. Attention will he given to the movement of stock and 
bond prices during the last fifteen years, in order that the student 
may get a definite idea of the various influences which act upon 
stock and bond values. (Omitted in 1905-06.) 



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C0UII9BS FOR TRACHGHS. 



COUKSE8 FOR TEACHERS. 



These courses are offered to teachers and prospective teachers 
who have had a normal or high-school training or its equivalent. 
The; are given at times which do not conflict with the duties of tlie 
class-room, and are intended the better to fit those pursuing them 
for practical and progressive work in teaching and in superintending 
schools. In arranging these courses, the University has in view the 
needs of a definite class in the conununity; and, in offering them, 
it does not enter into competition with existing institutions or with 
private teachers in the field of secondary instruction. The courses 
embrace a wide range of topics, and aim to ^ve the student an 
opportunity to cany on systematic work in one study, or in a group 
of studies, for periods of from two to four years. 

No degree is offered, but satisfactory completion of any course 
entitles the student to a certificate of study. 

ADMISSION. 
The admission of candidates to these courses is in the bands of 
the following committee of the College Faculty : 

Professor BauUBAUOK, Chairman, 
Professor With BR, 
Professor Rolfb. 
Teachers and, in some cases, others, who can give satisfactory 
evidence of ability to pursue the work with profit, may be admitted 
upon application, which should be made to the Chairman of the 
above-named committee. 

All candidates for admission are required to fill out the re^tra- 
tion blank prescribed by the College for matriculating students. 
This must be done at the office of the Dean of the College, Room 
103, College Hall, Students must complete registration and obtain 
matricolatioD cards before attending classes. 

EXPENSES AND SESSION. 

The tuition fees are as follows, the amount stated in each case 
being the fee for the full college year of two terms. If the course 
extends through only one term, or if the student is in attendance 
for but one tenn, one-half the amount stated will be the fee. 

Tbn Dollars: Any course of one hour a week throughout the 



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aafi THR CflLLEOR. 

FiFTBBN Dollars: Latin (a), two hours; Sociology, two hotiTG; 
Botany, two hours; European History, two hours. 

TwBNTv Dollars: Chemistry, three hours; Experimental 
Physics, three hours; p3ychol<^y, three hours; Zodlogy, three 

Deposits RsauiRBD: A deposit of $10.00, to cover materials 
and possible dame^, is required of all students taking courses in 
Chemistry and Psychology, and may be required of students in 
other laboratory courses. 

Pees are- payable at the Bursar's ofGce, Room loa. College Hall, 
on October i and February i for the first and second terms, respec- 
tively. An addition is made to any fee not paid within one month. 
Students in arrears can receive no credit for work, and carmot be 
admitted to examinations. 

NoTicB OP WITHDRAWAL from couTses should be in writing, accom- 
panied by the matriculation card, and should be sent, ftol to thi 
instructor, but io the offiees af Ike Dean and Bursar. When a student 
is registered for a course which is given in both terms, it is assumed 
that he wishes to continue work in the second term unless the office 
is notified to Che contrary. Any change in courses should be 
approved by the Chairman of the Committee on Courses for 
Teachers, recorded in the office, and noted on the matriculation 
card. 

The SESSION OF 1905-06 opened on Saturday, September 30, 1905, 
and will close on Saturday, May 16, 1906. Instruction is given on 
Saturdays, between the hours of 9.15 a, h. and 5.15 p. m., unless 
the class and the instructor agree upon some other more con- 
venient time. Lectures will not be given upon those Saturdays 
which fall within the Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter recesses 
of the College, nor upon legal holidays. 

If less than six students apply for any course, or if the number of 
students in a course falls below six, the course may be discontinued. 



Instruction is offered 

Astronomy. 

Botany. 

Chemistry. 

English. 

German. 



SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION, 
in the following branches: 
History. Physics. 

Latin. Political and Social 

Mathematics. Sciences. 

Music. Psychology. 

Pedagogy. Zodlogy. 

Philosophy. 



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ASTBONORtr. 

Assistant Professor E. Doouttlb. 

Descriptive Aslronoviy.—This course will include a general outline 
of observatory methods and results in Astronomy. The con- 
stellations will be studied with Young's Urattograpky, and col- 
lateral reading will be assigned. Young's Manual of Astron- 
omy and Newcomb's The Stars will be used as texts. The 
students will use a small telescope or an opera-glass. 19.15- 
1.15, Room 109. 

BOTAMT. 

Professor Macparlane, Dr. Harsmbbrger, Mr. Krautteb. 
Biological Hall, 10.15-13.15. 
During 1905-06 a study will be made of the life histories of some 
of the more important economic plants, including the apple, banana, 
bean, cherry, cabbage, clover, com, cotton, oak, onion, orange, 
parsnip, pea, peach, pear, pine, plum, potato and sweet potato, 
rose, strawberry and tobacco. Each of these plants will be con- 
sidered from the standpoint of nature-study, and with special 
reference to the needs of teachers who conduct classes in nature- 
study subjects. The course will consist of lectures and laboratory 
work, and will be abundantly illustrated by hand specimens and 
by microscopic and lantern demonstrations. The ample facilities 
furnished by the Botanic Garden and Greenhouses of the Univer- 
sity will be utilized for practical demonstration, and walks will be 
taken through these as occasion requires. Saturday field excur- 
sions will be conducted during the spring and early summer months. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Smith, Dr. Shinn, Dr. Tagcart, Mr. Wallace, Mr. 
McCuTCHBON, Mr. Frazer. Four years; three hours, each 
course extending throughout a year. 9,15-18.15. 

(a) General Chemistry. — Lectures and practical work. Properties 
of elements and compounds. Determination of the weight of a 
liter of various elementary and compoimd gases, of the specific 
beat of several metals, of the atomic weight of one or two 
metals. 

(b) Reaction of the Metals. — ^Preparation of interesting and impor- 
tant salts. 

(c) Quantitative Analysis. Foods, salts and technical products, 
inorganic preparations. 



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(d) Organic Chemistry. — Lectures, preparation of type compounds. 
Determinations of vapor density and molecular weight. His- 
tory of the development of chemical theory. 

Professor Schblliho, Professor Pbnnihan, Assistant Professors 
Child, Quinn and Wbvgandt, and Mr. Hoao. 
Three objects are contemplated in the courses in these subjects; 
(i) a year's study of the English Language; (3) a course in Com- 
position ; (3) a survey of the History of English Literature. The 
courses in Literature are graded to cover a period of three years ; 
those in Composition, a period of two years. 

(a) English Language. — Assistant Professor Quinn. First and 
Second Terms. This course is designed to aid those who are 
teaching English Grammar, by giving them an insight into the 
earlier forms oE the language, with some knowledge of the 
principles that have governed its later development. (Omitted 
in 1905-06.) 

(b) Composition. — First Year. Mr. Hoag. First and Second 
Terms. 11.15-13.15, Room 303. This course aims to develop 
readiness and accuracy of perception in matters of thought and 
style. It involves the preparation each week of a narrative, 
descriptive, expository or argumentative theme, which is read 
and discussed in class, and then returned with individual 
criticism. 

(c) Composition. — Second Year. Mr. Hoad. First and Second 
Terms. This course aims to develop an ability to collect and 
arrange materials. It continues the work of course (6), with 
minute attention to correct literary form. (Omitted in 
1905-06.) Course (c) is open only to students who have satis- 
factorily completed course (6). 

(d) The History of English Literature, (?) The English Novel 
(/) Modern Poets, (g) Modern Essayists, (A) The Drama of 
the Age of Elizabeth, and (j) English Literature in America, 
courses formerly given, will be omitted until further notice. 

(k) The Literary Study of the English Bible. — Professor Penniman. 
First Term. 10.15-11.15, Room 305. This course com.prises 
a study of the form and structure of the various books. A 
study of the kinds of poetry found in the Book of Psalois, and 
the relation of the English Bible to English literature in 
general. 



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(f) The Larger Literary Forms, — Professors Schelling, Pbnnim 
Child, Quinn and Wbygandt. Secintd Term. 10.15-11 
Room ios. Lectures on the epic, the ballad, the t 
the lyric, the drama, the novel, the short story and other 

(m) Elitabethan Literature. — Professor Screlling. Lectures on 
the history of English Literature, from the accession of Eliza- 
beth to the close of the reign of King James. (Omitted in 
1905-06,) 
(n) Contemporary Poetry. — Assistant Professor Wevgandt. Lec- 
tures on English Poetry, from the death of Mathew Arnold 
to the present day — the Wordsworthians, the Poets of Empire, 
the Celtic Renaissance, the Decadents, (Omitted in 1905-06.) 

All of the courses in literature involve collateral reading, and 
the preparation of papers upon topics arising out of the lectures 
and the student's reading. 



Mr. VVRPILLOT. Three years. 

These courses are intended to enable the student to read and to 
speak French. Only two courses are offered each year: 

(a) Elementary French. — Grammar and Reading. The object of 
the course is to prepare students to follow the more advanced 
courses. The work consists largely of translation from French 
into English, of sight reading of simple French, and of transla- 
tion from English into French, with oral exercises illustrating 
the elementary rules of grammar and the simpler rules of syn- 
tax. Grandgent's Essentials of French Grammar (Heath & 
Co.); 0. Kuhns" French Reading for Beginners (H. Holt &. Co.). 
9.15-10.15. Room iij. 

(6) Intermediate French. — Speaking, Reading, Composition. The 
objects of this course are to lead the student to understand both 
the spoken and the written language, to enable him to read 
easily at sight and to write with a fair degree of accuracy. 
The work consists of exercises in composition, illustrating the 
principles of the grammar and the more frequent rules of 
syntax, of short summaries of the books read, of translation 
of English into French, and of French into English, with oral 
reproductionsof stories told by the instructor. A. H. Edgren's 
French Grammar (Heath & Co.); O, Gueriac'a Selections from 



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Standard French Authors (Ginn & Co.). 11.15-11.15. Room 
317. 
(c) French Pronunciation. — Conversation and reading. The chief 
object of this course is to fit advanced students for public 
speaking and reading of French, by giving them correctness 
both in pronunciation and elocution. (Omitted in 1905-06). 

GERHAH. 

Assistant Professor Wkssblhobft. 

The aim of the course is to enable students to master the prin- 
ciples of German grammar, to acquire a correct pronunciation, 
to read German at sight, and to interpret German masterpieces 
intelligently. The course will be so arranged that much of the 
work can be done as private reading. Only two courses are offered 
each year. Two hours, 
(o) Grammar and Reading. — First Year. Leamed's German Grom- 

mar. Easy German reading. 11.15-11.15, Room aiS. 
(6) Composition and Reading. — Second Year. Wesselhoeft's Ger- 
man Composition; Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans, (Omitted 
in 1 905-06.) 
(c) Advanced Composition and Reading. — Third Year. Jage- 
mann's German Composition; Goethe's Egmont. Prose Read- 
, ing. la.iS-i.iS. Room aiS. 

BIBTOBT. 

European History. 
Professor Chbynbv. As^stant Professors Lingblbach and How- 



The courses in European history are arranged with the object of 
giving a Eu^estive outline of the period treated , with special atten- 
tion to the more significant topics. The lectures will be supple- 
mented by prescribed reading; one hour will be given to the lec- 
ture, and the remainder of the time to a study of some particular 
related question. Illustrations from original sources or by lantern 

One course only will be given in each year. In 1905-06 course 
(a) will be given. 

(fl) Medieval History, A. D. soS'i^SS' — iiiS-iai5. Room 330. 
Assistant Professor Howland. Chief topics: The Roman 
Empire in the fourth century; the civilization of the early 



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COURSBS K>R TEACHERS. I31 

Germans and their settlement in the Empire; the gradual 
fusion of the two elements; the spread of Christianity and 
the earlier organisation of the Church, foundation of the 
Medieval Empire; feudalism; the development of the Papacy 
and the struggle between church and state; the Crusades as 
ail illustration of medieval ideals; economic and political 
development in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries; the 
Hundred Yeara War; the fail of the Medieval Papacy and the 
attempt at reform within the Church. 

(6) Modern History, 1453-1815. — Assistant Professor Lingelbach. 
The Renaissance; the Reformation; the wars of religion: 
Louis XIV. and the ascendancy of France; the rise of Prussia, 
and. of Russia; the partitions of Poland; the Ancient R^me. 
the French Revolution, and Napoleon. (Omitted in 1905-06.) 

(c) Europe in the Ninetrcntk CentHry. — Assistant Professor Lin- 
CBLBACH, The heritage of the French Revolution and Napo- 
leon; the Congress of Vienna and the reaction; the struggle 
for constitutions and the rights of nationality; the Greek 
Revolution; Cavour and Italian unification; Bismarck and 
the founding of the German Empire; the Franco-German 
War; France under the Third Rejmblic; problems of Austro- 
Hungary; the Eastern Question; Russian expansion and the 
question of the Far East. (Omitted in igo5-o6.) 

'd) English History. — Professor Chbyney. Certain periods, move- 
ments and institutions will be chosen for study, leaving the 
connection between them to be worked out by the student. 
The subjects will be: the Race Origin of the English People. 
Roman Britain, the English Settlement, the Norman Con- 
quest, English Feudalism. Henry II,. Parliament. Manorial 
Life, Town and Guild Life, the Reformation, Puritanism, 
Greater Britain, the Factory System, the Reform Bill, Democ- 
racy, (Omitted in 1905-06.) 



American History. 
Assistant Professor Ames and Dr. Willard. 

History of the United States in Recent Times. — 10.15-11. 15 A. m.. 
Room ao6. Topics in our domestic problems and in our foreign 
relations, chiefly since the Civil War, with especial reference to the 
work of Reconstruction and its undoing, and the development of 
the United States to its position as a world power. 



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THB COLLUUB. 



e elected 

(a) Beginners' CoMric— Forms and Syntax, as in Bennett's 
Foundations of Latin. Caisar. ao to 25 pages. 11.15-1.15, 

(f>) Teachers' Courses. — In all these courses special attention will 
be given to the bibliography of the subject, and to the problems 
of instruction in secondary schools. In order to obtain credit, 
it will be necessary to do some reading outside of the class- 
room, to prepare such papers as are set, and to pass the required 
examinations. The courses will, however, be adapted also. 
as far as possible, to the needs of those who may be reading 
Csesar, Cicero, or Vergil for the first time. Course (6), (2) or {b). 
(3) may possibly be given in igo5-«6, in addition to (6), (1). 

(1) Citsar. — Lectures and conferences on topics relating to the 
teaching and study of C^sar. Reading of selections. Prep- 
aration of papers. 11.15-12.15. Room aio. 

(2) Cicero. — Lectures and conferences on topics relating to the 
teaching and study of Cicero. Reading of selections. Prep- 
aration of papers, (Omitted in 1505-06,) 

(3) Vergil. — Lectures and conferences on topics relating to the 
teaching and study of Vergil. Reading of selections. Prep- 
aration of papers. (Omitted in 1905-06.) 



Assistant Professors Fisher and Schwatt, and Dr. Hallbtt. 

Each of the following courses (except b) OBCUpies one year. 
Students are supposed to have studied algel)ra through quadrat- 
ics, and plane geometry. This preparation will admit to (a) or 
(c). More advanced students will be admitted to any course 
for which their preparation fits them. 

{a) Solid Geometry. — First Tnm. Assistant Professor ScHwatt. 
Lines and planes in space; polyhedra; the cylinder, cone and 
sphere. (Omitted in 1905-06.) 
Wi The Teaching of Elementary Mathen%atics. — Second Term, As- 
sistant Professor Schwatt. Historical development of num- 
ber. Number systems; in particular, the decimal and the 
duodecimal systems. The conception of number among sav- 



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233 

ages and children. DiSerentmethodsof presenting the subject 
of arithmetic, with special reference to Gnibe's method and the 
Spiral system. In Algebra, special emphasis will be laid upon 
the importance of securing a better insight into the funda- 
mental processes and results, equivalence of equations, multi- 
plicity of roots, etc. ,The axioms of Geometry; Observational 
Geometry; Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry; labora- 
tory method of teaching elementary mathematics. The Perry 
movement. ii,rs-t».i5, Room J04. 

(c) Algebra. — Assistant Professor Fisher. Quadratic equations, 
ratio and proportion, scries, theory of exponents and loga- 
rithms, permutations, combinations and simple probability, 
continued fractions, undetermined coefficients. (Omitted in 
1905-06.) 

(d) Plane and Spherkal Trigonometry. — Assistant Professor 
SCHWATT. The trigonometric functions, simplifications of 
trigonometric expressions, the solutions of right and oblique 
triangles. This course requires a knowledge of course (a). 

(0 Theory of Equations and Determinants. — Assistant Professor 
FiSHBR. General theory of rational, integral algebraic expres- 
sions, special theory and solutions of the cubic and biquadratic, 
theory of determinants and of symmetric functions. This 
course requires a knowledge of course (c). 10.15-11.15, 
Room 304. 

(J) Analytic Geometry. — Dr. Hallett. The fundamental prop- 
erties of the conic sections, with an introduction to solid 
analytic geometry and higher plane curves. This course 
requires a knowledge of courses (c) and (d), (Omitted in 
1905-06.) 

(g) Differential and Integral Caicuius. — Dr. Hallett. The method 
of differentiation and integration, maxima and minima, areas, 
volumes, etc. This course requires a knowledge of course (/). 
13. 15-1. 15, Room III, 

MUSIC 

Professor Clarke. 10.15-1t.15. University Library. 

History of Music. — The object of this course ia to give an his- 
torical and analytical account of the development of Music. It is 
designed primarily to meet the needs of those who are not special 
students of Music. 

Sound as the material of music ; the varieties of scales, primitive 
music; the beginning of organized music; the ecclesiastical scales. 



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134 THB 

or modes: the origin and growth of notation ; the earljr attempts at 
combining sounds; counterpoint; the fusion of popular and scien- 
tific music; the growth of harmony; the modem tempered scale, 
modem music; opera and oratorio; the orchestra. 

FEDAOOGT. . 

Professor Brumbaugh. 

(a) American Education, First Year. — A study of the distinctive 
features of American educational development, followed by a 
study of school management. Text-books recommended: 
White's Pedagogy, White's School Management, Tompkin's 
School Management, Brumbaugh's The Making of a Teacher, 
Schaeffer's Thinking and Learning to Think. (Omitted in 
1905-06.) 

(6) English and Continental Education, Second Year. — Principles 
will be exhibited as presented in Spencer's Education: a con- 
sideration of methods and the practice of the best schools will 
follow. Besides Spencer, the works of Payne, Fitch, and 
Laurie, with Sharpless' English Education, will be used. 
9.15-10.15. University Library. 

FHILOSOFBT. 

Professor Nbwbold and Assistant Professor Sinobb. 

(a) History of Ancient Philosophy. — Professor Nswaold. Lec- 
tures. Hours to be arrajiged. 

(^) History of Modern Philosophy ■ — Assistant Professor Singer. 
Lectures, and study of sources. Hours to be arranged. 

(c) Logic. — Assistant Professor Singer. Jevons' Lessonsin Logic. 
followed by lectures on the modem development of logic, 
Second Term. (Omitted in 1905-06.) 

(d) Ethics. — Professor Newbold. Lectures. First Term. (Omitteai 
in 1905-06.) 

PKTSICS.* 

(a) Dynamics, Sound, Heat and Light. — One hour, first year. 

(6) Electricity and Magnetism. — One hour, second year, first term, 
(o) and (6) together constitute a complete course in general 
physics, conducted in the class-rooms, and will be freely illus- 
trated experimentally. Algebra and Plane Trigonometry are 

• Oivsn in the Randal Uotsbd LalMrstDTV of PhTrics. 



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COURSES FOB TEACHBHS. aJS 

required for admission, and Ana])'lic Geometry should l>e 
studied at the same time as rourse (a). 
(c) Experimental Physics: Laboratory Course. — Three hours. This 
course presupposes a knowledge of elementary general physics, 
and will be adapted to the qualifications and the needs of the 
students. 

FOUTICAI. AND !H>€IAJ:. 8CIENCKS. 

Professors Fatten. Lindsay, Rowe, and Assistant Professor 

(a) Political Economy. — A general course designed tor beginners. 
During the second term, special attention will be given to the 
theory of money and the labor problem. Text-book and 
lectures. Two hours. 

(6) Sociology. — Historical development and present practical 
problems of social organization in the United States. Social 
classes in their relation to each other, and the social basis of 
the public school, its curriculum and its discipline. Educa- 
tion tor citizenship and for industrial efficiency. The social 
basis of moral training in the public schools. The work con- 
sists of lectures, assigned reading, and reports by students, 
to be read and criticised in the class-room. Two hours. 

(c) Modern GmiernmenU. — An examination of the political sys- 
tems of the United States, England, France and Germany, 
The structure of government and its practical operation, the 
political parties, their platforms and leaders; the relation of 
economic classes to political issues. Two hours. 

(d) Political Science. — The protection to personal and property 
rights under the Constitution. Comparisons with individual 
liberty in Germany, Prance and England. Two hours. 

PSTCBOLOGT. 

Professor Wither and Dr. Twituvbr. 

Psychological Laboratory, entrance west end of College Hall. 

Courses (a), {b) and (c) ti^ether constitute a general outline of 
Psychology. The lectures may be attended without taking the 
laboratory work; but students may not enter the Seminary for 
Practical Work in Comparative and Genetic Psychology unless 
they have taken both the lectures and laboratory work of courses 
(o). {(>) and (c). 



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3j6 THE COLLBCB. 

(a) Analytic Psychology. — Dr, Twitmyeh. An introspective and 
experimental analysis of perception: the role of apperception, 
memory, attention and association; perceptions of space; the 
sense oi^ans; the physical stimuli or objects of perception. 
First Term. Lecture 10.15-11.15. Laboratory, two hours 
additional. 

(6) Physiological Psychology. — Dr. Twitmyeh. Mind and body; 
the natnre of the will, automatic and reflex 
herited instincts and acquired habits, impulse and 
the structure and functions of the human nervous system. 
Dissection of the brain and experimentation upon voluntary 
and reflex movements. Second Term. Lecture, 10. 15-11. 15. 
Laboratory, two hours additional. 

(c) Cent-tic Psychology. — Dr. Twitmybr. Development and oi^an- 
izatioD of the individual mind: permanent effects of sensation 
and movement upon the brain; sensory after-images ; memory 
images; cerebration and association; organization of imagina- 
tion and memory; the development of ideas, the intellect and 
reason; the growth of attention and the individual will. 
(Omitted in 1905-06.) 
(d) Advanced Course.— Proiessoi Wither. Seminary for Practi- 
cal Work in Comparative and Genetic Psychology. One hour. 
Intended to give instmction. and especially practice, in 
methods of observation and experimentation. A psychologi- 
cal clinic furnishes the opportunity for the study of retarded 
and abnormal mental development. 



Professor Conklin, Assistant Professor Jennings, and Drs. Moorb 
and Calvert. Biological Hall, 9. 15-11. 15. 
General Zodlogy. — An introduction to the classification, mor- 
phology, physiology and natural history of animals. The work is 
conducted in the laboratory and vivarium, and comprises a study of 
fundamental life-processes as illustrated by the Protozoa, the general 
anatomy and physiology of the Metazoa. the relations of animals to 
their environment, types of reproduction, principles of develop- 
ment, heredity and evolution. 



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SUUUBR SCHOOL. 



SUAIMGB SCHOOL. 



OFFICERS. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D,. Provost. 
EDGAR F. SMITH, Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D., Vice-Provost, and 
Professor o£ Chemistry. 



During the summer of 1905 courses of 
in the following subjects: 

Architecture, Greek, 

Astronomy, History, 

Botany, Latin, 

Chemistry, Mathematics, 

English, Music, 

French, Physics, 

German, Psychology. 

The session of 1903 ojtened on Wednesday, July 5, and closed 
on Saturday, August 13. 

During the summer of 1906, Ihe seszitm will be open on Thursday, 
July s. and close on Thursday, Augtisl 16. 

CREDITS. 

In most of the courses lectures are given in periods of one hour 
during every day in the week, except on Saturdays, and for such 
courses of five hours a week one unit credit may be allowed. Lab- 
oratory courses will be subject to special regulation. 

Students Ivho pursue courses with satisfaction to the instructors. 
and pass the necessary examinations, receive certificates. No 



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entrance examinations are required for adntission to the Summer 
School. 

When, in theopinionof any department, the instruction offered in 
any subject in that department becomes equivalent to the instruc- 
tion given in any specified subject in the regular College course, 
credit toward a degree may be given to those who pursue these 
Summer School subjects successfully, and who pass satisfactory 

Regularly matriculated students in the University may remove 
their conditions by attendance upon the Summer School courses, 
and by passing satisfactory examinations therein, provided the 
work done covers substantially the same ground covered by the 
subject in which the condition was given. 

GRADUATE WORK. 

When courses are offered in any department of the grade of grad- 
uate work, students may receive credit for such work if they ma- 
triculate afterwards in the Department of Philosophy. 

FEES.* 

For one lecture course of five hours a week $13 00 

For each additional course 10 00 

tArchltectur.(':°»"""'3'''"''S "> ~ 

I Courses t, 6 and 7 »o 00 

Laboratory fees: 

Botany: Lecture course and two hours laboratory work. .$10 00 
Chemistry: Lecture course and three hours laboratory 

Physics: Lecture course and three hours laboratory work 25 00 
Psychology: Lecture course and two hours la'x>ratory 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. 

For information as to particular courses, address the instructors 
in charge of those courses, at College Halt, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

For all other information, address the Director of the Summer 
School, College Hall, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Pa 

• Subject to change, 

t No single fee in Architecture will exceed tsj.oo. 



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OUTLINE OF COURSES— SESSION OF 1905.* 

ARCH ITECTUKK. 

Philip R. Whitney. S, B., Instructor in Architecture. 

Ahchitecturk I. Architectural Drawing. — A course in instru- 
mental drawing, brush-work and lettering as applied to architec- 
tural subjects. 

Architecture i. Eltments of Architecture. — A course of exer- 
ciscG in drawing and rendering the Orders. 

Architecture 3, Graphics. — A course in projections and inter- 
sections as required for the course in Shades and Shadows. 

Architecture 4. Shades and Shadow-:. — Problems peculiar to 
a'chiteetural subjects. 

Architecture 5. Perspective. — The principles employed in 
making architectural perspective drawings. 

Architecture 6. Rendering and Order Prohl'^ms. — Exercises in 
rendering architectural drawings, with problems in elementary 

Architecture 7. Design. — Problems in elementary design of 
the small ensemble, involving the applications of the principles of 
architectural drawing. 

ASTRONOMY. 

Esic DooLiTTLE. C, E., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

Astronomy i. — Young's Manual oj Astronumy, with informal 
lectures. An acquaintance with the elements of geometry, algebra, 
trigonometry and theoretical mechanics is desirable, although the 
last two are not essential. Daily, at 9. 

BOTANT. 

John W. Harshbbrcer, Ph. D., Instructor in Botany. 

BoTANV I . The Structures and Functions of Plants, with Method.^ 
of Botanic Study and Preparation. — The plant as a whole is described. 
followed by detailed study of forms and functions of root, stem, leaf. 
flower and fruit, and the liearing of these on classification. The 
preparation of objects for study; collecting, dissection, hand-sec- 
tioning, microtome-sectioning, staining and mounting; preparation 
and use of reagents. This course is equivalent to two units in the 
College. Daily, 10— i. 

■ A circuUr, txmtaininfi dcKriptioiis of th« I'ourwi offeicd in tha Summer Schoc^ 



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340 'THB CULLEOB. 

CUBMiaTRY. 

Edcar F. Smith. Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D., Vice-Provost of the Uni- 
versity, and Professor of Chemistry. 
Owen L. Shinn, Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Daniel L. Wallace, Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 
Thomas P. McCutcheon, Jr., A, B., Instructor in Analytical Chem- 

Chemisthy I. Elementary Chemistry. — The lectures consider 
the metals and non-metals. The laboratory work consists of care- 
ful drill in experimentation, with emphasis upon those points which 
are of fundamental value. Lecture daily, at 9. Professor Shinn. 

Chemistry a. Qualitative Analysis. — This course is conducted 
with experiments by the instructor, accompanied by laboratory 
work on the part of the student. The aim is also to include as many 
of the rare metals as possible. Lecture daily, at 10. Mr. Mc- 
Cutcheon. 

Chbuistry 3. Quantitative Analysis.— In addition to elemen- 
tary drill in this subject, an opportunity is given all who arc suffi- 
ciently advanced to acquaint themselves with mineral analysis, 
in order that the student may learn some of the more difficult 
methods of quantitative analysis. Professor Smith and Mr. Wal- 

Chehistry 4. EUctro-Chemistry.^-This subject is given only to 
students who have had experience in chemistry. The course con- 
sists chiefly in practical laboratory work, with conversational lec- 
tures. Professor Smith. 

Chemistry 5. Assaying. — Practical work, in the valuation of 
gold, silver and lead ores. Mr. Wallace, 

Chemistry 6. Preparations. — Laboratory practice in the prep- 
aration of simple and complex inorganic bodies. Professor Shinn. 

KNOLISH. 

Arthur H. Qtiimn, Ph, D., Assistant Professor of English, and 

Director of the Summer School. 
Thomas D. Bolger. 6. S., Assistant in English. 

English i. Composition. — This course affords practice in the 
four main forms of composition — narration, description, exposi- 
tion and argumentation. 

The work aims at the development of a feeling for style and the 
presentation of thought in clear, idiomatic English. Individual 

" " tn, suited to each writer's particular case, is given on all work 



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SUMMER SCHOOL. J41 

presented; and an attempt is made to reduce to the simplest and 
most serviceable form all rules touching those general principles ot 
judgment, arrangement and method that are the foregone require- 
ments of good writing. These rules will be formulated on a basis 
of experience in teaching rather than on theoretic grounds. Daily, 
at II. Mr. Boix:er. 

English a. College Entrance RequtTements. — This course con- 
Msts of a careful study of the books in English prescribed for 
entrance to College. Papers are assigned from time to time. 

For special study: — 

Shakespeare's Julius C<ssar; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, V Allegro, 
and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; and 
Macaulay's Essay on Milton, and Life of Johnson. 

For general study: — 

Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Merchant of Venice; The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers in The Spectator; Coleridge's The Ancient Mari- 
ner; Scott's Ivanhoe, and The Lady of the Lake; Tennyson's Gareth 
and Lyneite, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Low- 
ell's Vision of Sir Launfat; and George Elliot's Silas Mamer. Daily, 
at 10. Mr, BoLGBB. 

Eholisb 3. Advanced Composition. — This course consists of the 
writing of a limited number of themes upon topics suggested by the 
instructor. For example, the Sigurd and Brynhild story is studied 
in its development from the old Germanic myth to its modem treat- 
ment by Morris and Ibsen, and an essay written, in which special 
attention is paid to the arrangement of material and its presenta- 
tion in an attractive form. Short stories are written, some verse 
forms are studied experimentally, and such objects as the modem 
movement toward a literary drama in prose and verse, are assigned. 
Daily, at 11. Professor Qvink. 

English 4. Four Representative Essayists of Ike Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. — The course consists of lectures and readings aiming at an 
appreciation of the literary style, the critical or interpretative atti- 
tude, and the principles of judgment of four great masters of thought 
in the nineteenth century, — De Quincey, the rhetorician; Carlyle, 
the moralist; Pater, the ssthete; and Stevenson, the i 
Daily, at 11. Mr. Bolcbr. 

English 5. Literary History of America. — This c 
of lectures on the history of the Literature of the United States, pre- 
ceded by an introduction dealing with English Literature in the 
Colonies. It deals with the writings of the early discoverers and 
settlers; with the theological controversies of the eighteenth cen- 



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tury; the political satire of the Revolution; the works of Barlow, 
Dwight. Trumbull, and other writers of the late eighteenth century; 
and then proceeds to take up at greater length the writers of the 
nineteenth century. Particular attention is paid to the works of 
Charles Brockden Brown, Irving, Cooper, Bryant, Halleck, Drake, 
Willis, Simins. Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Longfellow. Lowell, 
Holmes, Whittier, Taylor, Thoreau, Lanier and Whitman. Daily, 
at 9. Professor Quinn. 



Rbv. Plorian J. C. VoRPiLLOT, B. A., B. D., Instructor in French. 

Pbbnch I. Elementary Fre»«cA. ^Intended for beginners, to 
enable them to read easy French and write simple sentences. The 
course consists of object-lessons, short sentences, outline of gram- 
mar, study of present, future and past indeiinite tenses, peisonal 
pronouns, most common irregular verbs, with oral and written 
exercises. Text-book: E. S. Joynes' Miniwutn French Grammar 
atui Reader. Daily, at 10. 

French a. Intermediate French. — Review of grammar, includ- 
ing translation. Study of past definite and imperfect tenses; sub- 
junctive mood; partitive sign, uses of voices and auxiliary verbs; 
oral exercises and prose composition. Text-books: A. Muzzatelli, 
A Brief French Course; Jules Verne, Vingl mille lieues sous Us mers; 
Labiche, La Grammaire. Daily, at ir. 

French 3. Advanced French.— ^tuAy of the syntax. This 
course deals n-ith the most specific differences between French and 
English grammar, special attention being given to the study of the 
idiomatic forms used in speaking and writing. Oral reproduction 
of stories by French writers, told by the instructor and so selected 
as to bring out the national aspects of French life. Text-books: 
A. H. Edgren, French Grammar; Labiche, La cagnotie. Daily, 

French 4. French Pronunciation. Elocution and Reading. — The 
chief object of this course is to fit advanced students for public 
speaking and reading of French, by giving them correctness both 
in pronunciation and elocution. Daily, at 9. 

OEBMAN. 

Edward C. Wesselhobpt, A. M.. Assistant Professor of German. 
German 1. Elementary German, — This is intended for begin- 
ners, or for those who wish to review the elements of the language. 



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SUMMER SCHOOL. 243 

The instruction is practical, and consists of a thoroiigh drill in 
the elements of the grammar and in pronunciation. Daily, at ii. 
German ». Beginner's Course in Reading German. — This course 
confines itself entirely to the reading of German, the aim being to 
pve the beginner facility in reading independently. The reading 
in class is done partly after preparation, partly at sight. Daily, 

Note. — Courses i and a cover in part the entrance requirements 
for College. 

German 3. Intermediate German. — This course is designed for 
those who have already familiarised themselves with. the elements 
of the language, and who are able to read at sight easy German 
prose. The study of grammar is continued, and the syntax of the 
various parts of speech carefully treated. Stress is laid on German 
prose composition. Reading of the classical drama and prose. 
Daily, at 10. 

German 4. Cottrse in German Conversation. — This is intended 
for beginners, or for more advanced students who wish to acquire 
facility in understanding and in speaking German. Students taking 
Courses i, 1 or 3 are advised, if possible, to take this course in addi- 
tion. Especial attention is paid in this course to the pronunciation 
of each individual student. Daily, at 12. 

Gbbmak 5, Advanced (German.— Reading and discussion of some 
classical work. Writing of German essays and conversation. The 
entire course is conducted in German, and is adapted for students 
who have had some practice in understanding spoken German- 
Daily, at 3. 

German 6. Sdentifie German. — This course consists of the rapid 
reading of texts, especially adapted for students who have a reading 
knowledge of easy German prose and wish to acquire facility in 
reading technical German. Daily, at 4' 

GREEK. 

Roland G. Kbnt, A. M.. Ph. D., Instructor in Greek and Latin. 

Grbbk I. Beginners' Course. — Grammar, with written exer- 
cises to ensure the mastery of the forms and of the more elementary 
principles of syntax. The aim will be to prepare the student as 
rapidly as possible for the reading of simple Greek texts. White's 
First Greek Book. Daily, at 9. 

Greek a. Xenophon's Awibasis, Books III and IV. Literal 
and free translation, with study of the syntax and the forms as 



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344 THE COLLEGE. 

illustrated by the text. The aim is to make the student aUe to 
render Greek prose texts into good idiomatic English, Goodwin 
and White's Anabasis, revised edition (iRgt); Goodwin's Greek 
Grammar (revised edition, iSga), Daily, at lo. 

HIBTOBT. 

WiLLiAK £. LiKCELBACH, Ph. D.. Asdstant ProfeGsor of European 

History, 
Albert E, McKinlbv, Ph, D., Professor of History at Temple 

College; Lecturer on American History, 
HiSTOilv I. Europe from the Beginning of the Modern Period to 
ike Overcrow of Napoleon. — The object of this course is to give a 
thorough survey of the epochs of European history of this period 
beginning with the Renaissance in its varied manifestations in liter- 
ature, art and architecture; and followed in order by the reforma- 
tion, the counter-reformation and the religious wars, dynastic and 
colonial aggrandizement, Louis XIV, rise of Prussia and Russia, 
the Diplomatic Revolution and the Seven Years' War, Enlightened 
Despotism, the Partitions of Poland, the Ancient Regime, the 
French Revolution and Napoleon. Daily, at 9. Professor Lim- 

GELBACH. 

History a, Europe in the Nineteenth Century. — Europe imme- 
diately after the Napoleonic wars; the Congress of Vienna; the 
Holy Alliance and reaction; the struggle of the peoples for con- 
stitutional government and nationality; the Greek Revolution ; the 
revolutions of 1830 and 1848; the rise of Bismarck, Prussian ascend- 
ancy in Germany and the establishment of the German Empare; 
Cavour and Italian unification; France under Louis Napoleon, 
the Franco-Prussian War and the Third Republic; the dual mon- 
archy in Austria -Hungary, with its problems; the minor States; 
autocracy in Russia and Russian Expansion; the powers in Asia; 
the partition of Africa; survey of contemporary Europe, Daily, 
at 10. Professor Lingelback. 

History 3, Political History of the United States, 1765-1830. — 
A study of the political organization and political customs which 
developed during the formative period of American History. 
Bmpha^s will be laid upon the political ideas as a factor in institu- 
tional growth, and upon economic life as fumishing a background 
for that development. Students are expected to possess a knowl- 
edge of the principial facts of the period. Daily, at 11. Dr. Uc- 
Kjnlby. 



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SUUUER SCHOOL. 345 

HiSTORT 4. Colonial History; InstiMtional Development in the 
English Colonies. — This course is designed to show the manner in 
which colonial institutions developed from English practices under 
the new world conditions. The principal topics treated will be the 
origin of colonial political organization both general and local, the 
growth of the representative system, the suffrage under colonial 
coiiditions, and the development of religious toleration. Daily, at 
11. Dr. HcKiHLBY. 



Henry Gibbons, A. M., Professor of Latin Literature. 

Latin i . Beginners' Course. — Essentials of grammar, with 
literal translation of fifteen or twenty pages of Oesar's Gallic War. 
Daily, at 10. 

Latin a. Cicero's Orations. — Part of the time will be devoted 
to rapid reading and translation, and part to the idiomatic transla- 
tion, with more thorough grammatical and historical study, of the 
instructive passages. Daily, at 11. 

Latin 3. Vergil's jEneid, with translations into the best Eng- 
lish, and with special attention to prosody, poetic usage and the 
derivation of words. Daily, at n. 

Latin 4. Advanced Course in Csesar's Gallic War, with selec- 
tions from Nepos for rapid readii^. Daily, at 3. 

Latin 5. Latin Prose Composition. — Daily, at 9. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Edwin S. Crawley, Ph. D.. Thomas A. Scott Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Gborgs £. Pi&HER. Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Isaac J. Schwatt, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Georob H. Hallett, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Predbrice H. Safford, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Matkbmatics r. The Teaching of Elementary Mathematics. — 
The historical developnient of numbers; integral and fractional, 
positive and negative, rational and irrational, real and imaginary. 
Number systems; in particular, the decimal and duodecimal sys- 
tems. The conception of number with savages and children. A 
comparative study of different methods of presenting the subject 
of arithmetic, especially Grube's method and the sjnral system. 
In algebra, emphasis is laid upon the importance of securing a 
better insight into fundamental processes and results. Obserra- 



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346 THB COLLKCB. 

tional geometry; the axioms of geometry; the differences between 
Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. Laboratory methods of 
teaching elementary mathematics. Consideration of the amount 
of mathematics to be given in each grade of elementary schools, and 
in secondary schools, with special reference to the tendency to 
form requirements for admission to colleges and 
Daily, at 10. Professor Schwatt, 

Preparation required: Elementary Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

Mathematics 2. Kicntcntary Algebra.~A rapid review of the 
fundamental processes of algebra, in respect to their logical develop- 
ment. Special attention is given to factoring, the reduction of 
plex fractions, surd and imaginary expressions, linear and quadratic 
equations and systems of such equations (including irrational equa- 
tions), with emphasis upon the equivalence of equations. The 
caurse covers the ground of the entrance requirements to colleges 
and universities. Fisher and Schwatt's Higher Algebra. Daily, 
at II. Professor Fishbb. . 

Mathematics 3. Plane Geometry. — A rapid review of the funda- 
mental propositions, to be followed by the discussion and solution 
of a targe number of original exercises. Chauvenet's Georrietry 
(Byerly edition). Daily, at 9. Dr. Saffohd. 

Preparation required: Plane Geometry. 

Mathematics 4. Solid Geometry. — Special attention is given to 
the working out of original exercises and numerical problems. 
Chauvenet's Geometry (Byerly edition). Daily, at li. Professor 
Schwatt. 

Preparation required: Plane Geometry. 

Mathematics s- Advanced Algebra; — Permutations and com- 
binations, probability, variables and limits; undetermined coeffi- 
cients; continued fractions; summation of series; determinants; 
theory of the solution of numerical equations. Fisher and Schwatt's 
Higher Algebra. Daily, at 10. Professor Hallett. 

Preparation required : Algebra, through quadratic equations. 

Mathematics 6. Trigonometry.' — Plane trigonometry, includ- 
ing some discusaon of De Moivre's theorem and hyperbolic func- 
tions, and a brief introduction to spherical trigonometry. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to exercises and drill in handling 
and reducing trigonometric expressions, and in the solution of 
problems involving the use of trigonometric functions. Crawley's 
Elements of Trigonometry (second edition) and Tables of Logarithms. 
Daily, at 9. Professor Crawley. 

Preparation required: Elementary Algebra and Plane Geometry. 



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BUMMER SCHOOL. 247 

Mathematics 7. AnalytK Geometry. — The fundamental proper- 
tics of the conic sections, and a brief introduction to the geometry 
of three dimensions. Particular attention is given to the solution 
of problems. Bailey and Woods' Analytic Ceometry. Daily, at la. 
Dr, Sapford. 

Preparation required: Algebra, through quadratics; and Plane 
Trigonometry. 

Mathematics 8. Infinitesimal Cakttliis. ^-Snyder and Hutchin- 
son's Differential and InUgral Calculus. The character of the 
course is indicated by the text-book used. Lectures based on the 
text. Daily, at 11. Professor Hallett. 

Preparation required ; Plane Trigonometry; Analytic Geometry. 

Mathematics tj. Differential Equations. — Ordinary and partial 
differential equations, with applications to geometry and mechanics. 
Murray's Differential Equations. Daily, at 11. Dr. Safford. 

Mathematics 10. Definite Integrals. — Integrability of continu- 
ous and discontinuous functions. Beta and Gamma functions, 
evaluation of definite integrals, expansion of functions and sum- 
mation of series by means of definite integrals. The fimctions of 
Bessel, Laplace and Lam£, Applications to problems of mechanics. 
Daily, at 9. Professor Schwatt. 

Mathematics 11. Invariants and Covariants. — The elements of 
the theory of invariants and covariants of binary forms and systems 
of forms, and briefly of ternary forms, with numerous applications. 
The symbolic method will be followed, in the main, but not exclu- 
sively. Lectures and collateral reading. Daily, at la. Professor 
Pish BR. 

Mathematics 13. Theory of Numbers. — Linear congniences, 
quadratic residues, the law of quadratic reciprocity, and theory 
of quadratic forms. Daily, at 10. Professor Crawley. 

Mathbmatics 13. Theory of Abstract Groups. — The elements of 
the theory, including Abelian groups, the group of isomorphisms, 
actual construction of all groups of orders p'. pqr, p'q, [p, q, r being 
prime numbers). Daily, at 1. Professor Hallett. 

MW9IC. 

HtJGR A. Clarke, Mus. Doc., Professor of the Science of Mtisic. 

Music 1. Course in Harmony. — Formation of scales, of chorda 
and their inversions; of dissonant chords, their progressions and 
revolutions. Melody; accompaniment. The simpler lyric forms. 
The following subjects are treated in the appropriate places; .the 



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THE COLLBGB. 



c basis of music: the bistoo' of tb« modem scales; the begin- 
nings of harmony, the charge from the "contrapuntal " to the "har- 
monic" method of musical construction. Daily, at lo. 



Arthur W. Goodspbbd, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Horace Clark Richards, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Phyacs. 

Physics i. General Physics. — A two-hour course is given, using 
Ames's Theory of Physics as a basis. The time each day is divided 
between a lecture and a recitation. The lectures are fully illus- 
trated by experiments. A knowledge of Plane Trigonometry is 
recommended. Daily, ii-i. 

Physics a. Experimental Physics. — This couise presupposes 
some knowledge of General Physics as well as of Plane Trigo- 
nometry. The theory and practice of the various methods of physical 
measurement are developed by a daily lecture, followed by tiree 
hours of laboratory practice. Daily, 1.30-5,30. 

Physics 3. Advanced Laboratory Work. — For those who have 
had course 2, or its equivalent, an advanced laboratory course of 
three hours is offered. This course may be modified to suit the 
needs of the individual student. Experiments are taken up of a 
more advanced character than those given under course a. Daily, 
3.30-5.30. 

Physics 4. If there is sufficient demand, a laboratory couise 
will be given covering the laboratory work required by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. One hour will be devoted to lec- 
tures and discussion of experiments, and two hours to work in the 
laboratory. Daily, 3.30—5.30. 

Physics 5. Analytical Mechanics-~A practical course in the 
principles of Statics and Kinetics consisting largely of problems. 
Bowser's Analytical Mechanics is used as a text-book. This course 
must be preceded or accompanied by a course on the Differential 
Calculus. Daily, at 9. 

Physics 6. Heat. — This comprises a descriptive course in Heat, 
with an introduction to the mathematical theory of Thermo- 
dynamics. A practical use of the Calculus is most desirable. 
Daily, at 10. 

Physics 7. Harmonic Motion and Sound. — The course will open 
with a detailed discussion of the properties of harmonic motion 
and of the composition of several such motions. The general 
properties of wave motion mil then be invest^ted, preparatory 



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SUMMER SCHOOL. 349 

to acoustical and optical phenomena. The various divisions of 
acoustics are discussed, and the theory developed. Reference 
book: Poynting.and Thomson's Sound. Tyndall's Sound is also 
Fecommended. Daily, at lo. 

Physics 8. Optics. — After an introduction on geometrical 
jptics and photometry, the electromagnetic theory of radiation is 
^nitlined, and its consequences developed. Special stress is laid 
in the phenomena of interference, diffraction, and polarization, 
vhich are fully illustrated by experiments. References; Preston's 
Theory of Light, and Edscr's Light. Daily, at ii. 

Physics 9. Theory of Magnetism and Electricity. — This course 
begins with a study of the magnetic field, followed by an investiga- 
tion of the nature and phenomena of the electrostatic field in the 
light of Maxwell's theory. This leads up to the study of the elec- 
tric current, and its properties. The laws of electromagnetism are 
then developed, and their applications illustrated, J. J. Thomson's 
Elements of Electricity and Magnetism is used as a reference. Daily, 



PSTOBOI,OOT. 

Edwin B. Twitmybr, M. S,, Ph. D,, Instructor in Psychology. 

Psychology i. Modern Psychology. — An introductory course 
of twenty-nine lectures; presenting an outline of the problems and 
theories of modem psychology. Daily, at 1 1 . 

(a) Analytic Psychology. — An analysis of perception based 
upon the results of experimentation and introspection ; 
the role of apperception ; memory, attention and associa- 
tion; perceptions of space; the sense organs; the physical 
stimuli or objects of perception. Ten lectiires. 

(6) Physiological Psychology. — Mind and body; the nature of 
the will; automatic and refieit movements, inherited instincts 
and acquired habits, impulse and emotion; the structure 
and functions of the human nervous system. Ten lectures. 

(c) Genetic Psychology. — Development and organization of the 
individual mind; permanent effects of sensation and move- 
ment upon the brain; sensory after-images; memory images; 
cerebration and association ; organization of imagination 
and memory; the development of ideas, the intellect and 
reason; the growth of attention and the individual will. 
Nine lectiires. 
Psychology a. Experimenial Psychohgy. — ^The object of this 



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ago THE COLLBGB. 

course is to demonstrate the fundamental facts and principles of 
psychology by tfae use of simple experiments. Under the direction 
of the instructor a series of illustrative experiments are performed 
by each student, and described and commented upon by him in a 
laboratory note-book. Supplementary work is given on the gross 
and minute structure of the nervous S5«tem. The human brain 
and that of the ox are dissected. In addition to the hours of class 
work, students are directed in the prosecution of as much individual 
work as each has time and inclination to do. Text-book; Witmer's 
Analyl-kal Psychology. Daily, 3.30-4,30. 

Psychology 3. Individual Laboratory Work. — The purpose of 
this course is to acquaint more advanced students with the general 
methods of experimentation. Selected topics are studied experi- 
mentally and original authorities and the results of recent research 
consulted. One hour seminar and two or four hours laboratory 
work. Hours will be arranged to meet the convenience of students. 
Text-book: Titchener's Manual of Experimental Psychology. 



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DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY. 



FACULTY, 
CHARLES C. HARRISON. LL. D., Provost. 
EDGAR P. SMITH. Ph. D., Sc. D.. LL. D., Vicb-Provost, and 

Professor ot Chemistry. 
GEORGE F. BARKER, M. D.. Sc. D., LL. D., Emeritus Professor 

of Physics, 
MORTON W. EASTON, Ph. D.. Professor of Eo^ish and Com- 
parative Philology. 
•JOHN BACH McMASTER. A. M.. Litt. D,, LL. D., Professor 

of American History. 
Rbv. HERMANN V. HILPRECHT. Ph. D., D. D.. LL. D., clabk 

Research Professor of Assyriology. and Professor of Semitic 

Philology and Archteology. 
MORRIS JASTROW, Jr.. Ph. D,. Professor of Semitic Languages. 
WILLIAM A. LAMBERTON. A. M., Litt. D., Professor of the 

Greek Language and Literature. 
SIMON N. PATTEN. Ph. D., LL.D., Professor of Political Econ- 

FELIX E. SCHELLING. A. M„ Ph. D., Litt. D., Professor of 

English Literature. 
ARTHUR W. GOODSPEED, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 
EDWIN S. CRAWLEY, Ph. D,. Professor of Mathematics. 
GEORGE E. FISHER, A. M.. Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics. 
EDWARD P. CHEYNEY, A. M.. Professor of European History. 
HUGO A. RENNERT, Ph. D., Professor of Romanic Languages 

and Literatures. 
JOHN M. MACFARLANE. D. Sc„ Professor ot Botany. 
MARTIN G. BRUMBAUGH, A. M., Pb. D., LL. D.. Professor of 

Pedagogy. 
AMOS P. BROWN, Ph, D,. Professor of Mineral(«y and Geolog>'. 

• Ab»nt on k«vo. 

C"SO 



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aja DEPARTMENT < 

Lir.HTNER WITMER. Ph. D,. Professor of Psychology. 

WILLIAM ROMAINE NEWBOLD, Ph, D., Professor of Phi- 
losophy. 

CHARLES L. DOOLITTLE, C. E., Sc. D., Protessor of Astronomy. 

MARION D. LEARNED, Ph. D., Professor of the Germanic Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

EDWIN GRANT CONKLIN, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

JOSIAH H. PENNIMAN. Ph. D.. Professor of English Literature. 

EMORY R. JOHNSON, Ph. D., Professor of Transportation and 
Commerce. 

LEO S. ROWE, Ph. D., Professor of Political Science. 

SAMUEL McC. LINDSAY, Ph. D.. Professor of Sociology, 

ISAAC J. SCHWATT, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

DANIEL B. SHUMWAY. Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of the Ger- 
manic Languages and Literatures. 

•WILLIAM N. BATES, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Greek. 

CLARENCE G. CHILD, Ph. D., L. H. D., Assistant Protessor of 
English, and Dban of the Faculty. 

JOHN C. ROLFE, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of the Latin Language 
and Literature. 

HERMAN V. AMES, A. M.. Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Ameri- 
can History. 

EDGAR A.- SINGER. Jb , Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of Phi- 
losophy. 

WILLIAM E. LINGELBACH. Ph. D , Assistant Professor of 
European History. 

WALTON B. McDANIEL, A, M,, Ph, D., Assistant Professor of 
Latin. 

Rev. ALBERT T. CLAY, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Semitic 
Philology and Archieology. 

HERBERT S. JENNINGS, Ph, D, Assistant Professor of Zo5logy. 

HORACE C. RICHARDS, Ph, D,. Assistant Professor of Physics, 

GEORGE H, HALLETT, A, M,. Ph, D,, Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, 

ARTHUR H, QUINN. Ph, D,. Assistant Professor of English, 

JAMES T, YOUNG, Ph. D., .Assistant Proft'ssor of Administration, 



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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. *53 

ERIC DOOLITTLE, C, E., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

CORNELIUS WEYGANDT, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 
English. 

EDWARD S. MEADE, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Finance. 

CARL KELSEY. B. A.. Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

ARTHUR C. HOWLAND, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Medi- 
eval History. 

OWEN L. SHINN. Ph. D.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

WALTER T. TAGGART, Ph. D. , Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

LECTURERS. 
J. PERCY MOORE, Ph. D., Zoology. 
JOHN W. HARSHBERGER, Ph. D., Botany. 
PHILIP P. CALVERT, Ph. D., Zoology. 

FREDERICK EHRENFELD, Ph. D., Mineralogy and Geology. 
EDWIN B. TWITMYER, Ph. D,, Psychology. 
FREDERICK H. SAFPORD, A. M., Ph. D., Mathematics. 
JOSEPH H, HART, Pii, D.. Physics. 
J. FRANKLIN MEYER, A.M., Ph.D., Physics. 
J. RUSSELL SMITH, Ph. D., Commerce. 
ALLEN ROGERS, Ph. D., Chemistry. 
ROBERT H. HOUGH, Ph. D., Physics. 
GEORGE B. GORDON, Sc. D., Anthropology. 
ROLAND G. KENT, A. M.. Ph. D., Greek. 
ROGER C. WELLS, Ph. D., Chemistry. 
LOUIS W. FLACCUS, Ph. D., Philosophy. 
HENRY L. CROSBY, Ph. D., Gr^k. 
GEORGE B. MANGOLD. A. M.. Sociology. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.* 
Assistant Professor Child, Dean, Chairman, ex-officio; Professor 
Smith, Vice-Provost, ex-officio; Professor Doo little. Professor 
CoNKLiN, Professor Schellikg, Professor Rolfe, Professor 
RowB. 



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3 54 DRPARTMBNT OF 

The Faculty o£ Philosophy (Graduate School) ofiers advnuced 
instruction in the various branches of Literature and Science. The 
instruction is intended primarily for persons who have profited by 
the advantages of a full college course, and who are desirous of 
continuing their studies upon lines more strictly defined and special- 
ised. Others, however, may be admitted to study in the Depart- 
ment under the provisions hereinafter specified. 

The session of 1905-06 opened on Saturday, September 19, 1906. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES. 
The courses of instruction offered in this Department are arranged 
under the sixteen following groups: 

I. Archaeology and Ethnology. 
II. Astronomy. 

III. Botany and Zoology, 

IV. Chemistry. 

V. Classical Languages. 
VI. Economics, Politics and Sociology. 
VII. English. 
VIII. Geology and Mineralogy. 
IX. Germanic Languages. 
X. History. 
XI. Indo-European Philology. 
XII. Mathematics. 

XIII. Philosophy, Ethics, Psychology and Pedagogy. 

XIV. Physics. 

XV. Romanic Languages. 
XVI. Semitics. 
All persons authorized to give instruction within a group con- 
stitute the "Group Committee." The several Group Committees 
have charge of the arrangement of courses, and the oversight of 
students taking their principal subject within the groups. 

The instruction given within a group is classified under the 
headings, "lecture courses," "seminary courses," and "laboratory 

In stating the minimum requirements for residence and degrees 
a "standard" course is used as a unit: this is a lecture course of 
one hour a week for one academic year. The lecture courses as 
actually given may be rither multiples or fractional parts of this 
standard. The credit value of seminary and laboratory courses in 
terms of the standard is variable, and is determined in each case by 
the Group Committee. 



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ADMISSION. 

Students desiring to enter this Department must present them- 
selves in person to the Dean. 

Any person holding a baccalaureate degree in Arts. Letters, Phi- 
losophy, or in Pure or Applied Science, granted by the University 
of Pennsylvania, or by any college or university whose degrees are 
recognized by this University, will be admitted as a regular student 
by the Dean, provided he be found prepared to undertake the grad- 
uate work selected. Degrees in Law, Music, Theology, Medicine, 
Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine, or Pharmacy, are not included. 
Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply candi- 
dacy for a degree, but does imply that Ike student possesses the ability 
to pursue the work he undertakes with profit. 

Students already registered as candidates for a degree in other 
departments of the University are allowed to pursue courses in this 
Department, and regular students of this department are allowed 
to pursue courses in other departments, upon receiving the consent 
in writing of the Deans of the departments concerned. 

After admission, each student will be furnished with a matricula- 
tion card : no student who cannot show his matriculation card will 
be allowed to take any course. Matriculation cards must be re- 
newed at the beginning of each year. For such renewal, personal 
application must be made to the Dean. 

Upon application to the Dean, a person who does not hold a 
satisfactory baccalaureate degree, but who is qualified to pursue 
a course or courses with profit, may be admitted as an "auditor" 
to any course, subject to the consent of the instructor in charge of 
the course. Auditors will not be permitted to become candidates 
for a higher degree. 

candidacy: 

Regular students only are qualified to become candidates for 
degrees. Special application for admission to candidacy must be 
made to the Executive Committee. 

A student who desires to become a candidate for the Master's 
degree should apply for candidacy as soon as possible after matricu- 

A student who is entering upon graduate work for the first time, 
and who desires to become a candidate for the Doctor's degree, 
should not apply for candidacy until he has worked for some months 
in the Department, and has becotne known to his instructo.-s 



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2$6 DBPARTMBNT OP PHILOSOPHY. 

The application for candidacy for the Doctor's degree must be 
endorsed by the chairman of the Group Committee in which the 
applicant proposes to take his major subject, and must include 
certificates setting forth that he possesses a good reading knowledge 
of French and German. 

RESIDENCE. 

All candidates for higher degrees are required to spend at least 
one year in residence at this University. To be regarded as in resi- 
dence at this University, a student must complete within one aca- 
demic year not less than six standard courses or their equivalent. 

Work done at other universities may be accepted by the several 
Group Committees in lieu of a part of the work required (or a 
degree. 

Leave of absence is granted by the Executive Committee under 
the following circumstances only: 

(a) To a student who has completed all resident work required 
of him by the Group Cominittee with which h« takes his major work, 
provided the total amount of his resident work be not less than 
twenty-four standard courses or their equivalent, and who now 
desires to prepare the thesis in absentia under conditions satisfactory 
to the Committee. 

(b) To a student who, having had at least one year of work in 
this Department, is working in residence at another university, 
with the intention of returning to this University to take his degree. 

(c) For a term, or part of a term, to a student presenting an appli- 
cation explaining the reasons for his proposed absence and affirm- 
ing his intention to resume work the following term. 

DEGREES. 

The degrees conferred in the Faculty of Philosophy are Master of 
Arts (A. M.), Master of Science (M. S.), and Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph. D.). 

All recommendations for the higher degree must originate with 
the Group Committees under whose supervision the candidate has 
been pursuing his work. No stttdeni can acquire a right lo inch 
recommendation merely by attending lectures, passing examinations, 
or by formal compliance with prescribed conditions. The require- 
ments hereinafter specified must therefore be regarded as minimum 
requirements only, the right remaining with any Group Committee 
to refuse to admit a student to examination for a higher degree. 



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857 

THE mastbh's dborrb. 
The work for the Master's degree must include one year in resi- 
dence, as defined above. The candidate will be allowed to elect 
any courses offered by the Faculty, subject to the consent of the 
Dean. He will be required to complete not less than twelve stan- 
dard courses, or their equivalent, to the satisfaction of the Com- 
mittees offering them, but, except for the provision regarding resi- 
dence, he need not pursue them simultaneously. He must then 
present himself for written examinations under the direction of his 
instructors. The completion of the minimum requirement of tvelve 
courses confers no right upon Ike student to be admitted to examination. 
If be passes his examinations he will be presented by the Dean to 
the Faculty of Philosophy as a candidate for the Master's degree. 
The Faculty will inquire into his credentials, and, if these are found 
satisfactory, will recommend him to the Corporation for the degree. 

THS doctor's dborbe. 

The degree ot Doctor of Philosophy is conferred solely in recog- 
nition of marked ability and high attainments in some definite 
branch of learning. 

The degree will in no case be conferred before the expiration ot 
two years from the date of the candidate's baccalaureate degree, 
or upon any candidate who has not completed in this University. 
or in other universities, twenty-four standard courses or their equiv- 
alent. The aim of the latter requirement is to insure the candidate's 
having had the equivalent of at least two full academic years of 
resident study, under competent direction, as a foundation for the 
private reading and research which constitute the more important 
part of his work. A student of ability will usually be able to attain 
his degree in three years, but one who cannot devote his undivided 
attention to the work will require a longer period. 

The candidate for the Doctor's degree must, upon entering the 
Department, elect the group within which he intends to do the 
greater part of his work, and will then pass under the jurisdiction 
of the Committee in charge of that group. He must designate, 
with the consent of the Committee, three branches of learning in 
which he desires to become proficient. One of these, known as his 
"major," or principal, subject, must lie within the group, although 
the Group Committee may direct him to courses given in other 
groups, and may allow them to be accounted part of the major 
work. The other two are termed his "minor,", or subordinate, 
subjects. It is recommended that at least one minor be taken 



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outside the group in which the major lies, but in every case the 
minor subjects shall be so related to the major as to conduce to 
some approved end. The work done for the completion of each 
minor subject must comprise not less than four standard courses 
or their equivalent. 

Every candidate for the Doctor's degree raust possess a good 
reading knowledge of those languages which are adjudged by the 
Committee in charge of the major to be essentia] to the prosecution 
of his major work, in. addition to a knowledge of French and Ger- 
man as required by the rules. 

He must also present a thesis upon some topic in the line of his 
major subject, showing high attainment and power of independent 
research. This thesis must be presented to, and approved by, the 
Group Committee in which his major lies. 

The thesis, if accepted, must be printed, and 350 copies must be 
delivered to the Dean before the candidate is recommended to the 
Board of Trustees for the degree. Exceptions to this rule may be 
made by the ExecutiveCommittee.butinnocasewill an exception be 
made unless the student be able to guarantee to the satisfaction of 
the Committee that the thesis will be printed within a limited period. 

The candidate for the Doctor's degree must present himself i<ft 
written examinations conducted by his instructors. Examinations 
in a minor may be held at any time approved by the Group Com- 
mittee in charge of that minor. The exaniinations in the major 
will not be held until the candidate has completed all the resident 
and lecture work required by the rules of this Department and by 
the Group Committee in charge of the major; and no candidate will 
be admitted to these examinations who has not had one year of 
resident work in this University. But it is not required that the 
thesis be completed before the candidate is admitted to the final 
examinations in the major. 

The completion of the minimum requirements of twenty-four hours 
confers no right upon the student to be admitted to examittalion. His 
acceptance, after the completion of the minimum requirements, 
depends solely upon his natural abilities and stage of scholarly 
advancement. 

After his examinations have been passed, and the printed the^ 
has been delivered to the Dean, the candidate will be presented to 
the Faculty of Philosophy by a representative of the Group Com- 
mittee in charge of his major work. The presenter will make a 
statement of the academic record of the candidate, and of the 
scope and value of his the^, and will recommend him to the Faculty 



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on behiilf of the Group Committee in question U'v tlii; Dtntor's 
degree. The Dean will certify that the candidate has complied 
with all the formal rules of the Faculty governing suth cases. Any 
member of the Faculty will then be at liberty to ask of the candidate 
or of the presenter any questions he may desire. Upon this evi- 
dence the Faculty will then decide by vote whether the candidate 
shall or shall not be recommended to the Corporation for the degree. 

FEES AND DEPOSITS. 

Tuition Fees, — The fee for a "standard lOurBc" (seep. 254) is 
$11.50 for the year. The fee for a course may l>c computed by 
multiplying this amount by the number of hours indicated, or by 
the number of "standard courses" it represents in cases where this 
number is specially designated. 

Laboratory Fbes. — In addition to the tuition fee, a laboratory 
fee of $5-00 an hour a week per annum is miide tor each laboratory 
hour included in a course in the five laboratories of Chemistry, 
Physics, Geology and Mineralogy, Botany and ZoOlogy, Psychology. 
But the laboratory fee tor work taken in any one of the five labor- 
atories in any one year may not exceed a maximum charge of $20.00. 
• The total amount of tuition and laboratory fees paid by any 
student shall not exceed $130.00. 

Bills for tuition and laboratory fees are rendered semi-annually. 

All Fellows and Scholars arc exempted from the payment of tuition 
fees, but must pay laboratory and gradualion fees, and trtust make the 
itsual deposits. Fellows for Research and Instructors in the Univer- 
sity are exempt from the payment of all fivs, with the excfption of the 
graduation fee. 

Deposits. — All students must make a deposit with the Bursar, 
when matriculating, to cover breakage and all charges against the 
student not otherwise provided for. For the lalioratories of Chem- 
istry and of Physics the deposit is tao.oo. For the laboratories 
of Geology and Mineralogy. Botany and Zoology, and I'sychology, 
the deposit is $10.00, If courses arc taken in two or more labor- 
atories, the maximum deposit will be Jao 00. Students not work- 
ing in any laboratory will make a deposit of 85 oo. After deducting 
charges, the balance remaining will be repaid at the close of the 
academic year. Should the charges against any student be found 
in the course of the year to exceed the amount of this deposit, he 
must make with the Bursar a second deposit equal in amount to 
the first. Fellows for Research and InstriKtors in the University are 
not required to make deposits. 

The Graduation Fee is twenty-five dollars ($25.00). 



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»6o DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS, 

This University recognizes three general classes of Fellowships 
and Scholarships: 

1. Fellowships for Research. 

3. Fellowships. 

3. Scholarships. 
These include the Fellowships for Research, Fellowships and 
Scholarships on the George Leib Harrison Foundation; Fellow- 
ships on the Hector Tyndale, the John Fries Fhazer, the Joseph 
M. Bennett, the Francis Sergeant Pepper, and the Mrs. Bloom- 
field MoOHB Foundations; and University Fellowships tor Re- 
search Feliowships, and Scholarships especially created, of perma- 
nently established, by the Corporation. 



Eligibiltiy. — Men only are eligible to all Fellowships and Scholar- 
ships on the Harrison, Tyndale, and Frazer Foundations. Women 
only are eligible to the Fellowships upon the Bennett, Pepper, and 
Moore Foundations. Both men and women are eligible to all Uni- 
versity Fellowships and Scholarships, and to all Fellowships and 
Scholarships established for a limited period of time, unless the 
contrary be specified by that act of the Trustees which created the 
Fellowship or Scholarship in question. 

Appointment. — All appointments are made by the Board of 
Trustees. Under ordinary conditions the Board acts solely upon 
the recommendation of the Exeiutive Committee of the Depart- 
ment of Philosophy. Applications for Fellowships and Scholar- 
ships for a given academic year are considered on and after March 
I of the year preceding, those received after March i being given 
consideration if any vacancies still remain. Applications should 
be addressed to the Dean of the Department of Philosophy, 



THE CBORGG LBIB HARRISON f 

Through the generosity of the Provost, a permanent fund of Five 
Hundred Thousand Dollars has been presented to the University, 
This fund is known as the George Leib Harrison Foundation. 
The income, by the terms of the Foundation, is applied to the estab- 
lishment of Fellowships and Scholarships, to the enrichment of the 
Library, to the support of courses of lectures by men of scientific 
eminence and to such other purposes as may promote the cause of 
advanced scientific study and research. 

Under the provisions of this Foundation, there have been insti- 



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PELLOWBHIPS AKD SCHOLARSHIPS. aSl 

tuted ID the Department of Philosophy eight Scholarships, luQeteeo 
PellowBhips, and ax Fellowships for Research. 



Upon the George Leib Harrison Foutidation. 

Of these Fdlowships, six have been established, 
(a) Five Fellowships-at -large for Research, 
(ft) One Fellowship for Research in Assyriology. 

(a) The Fellowship-at-large for Research. 

The title subjects of the five Fellowships-at-lar^e for Research 
are determined by the Corporation each year, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee. 

The candidate must hold a Ph. D. degree granted under condi- 
tions satisfactory to the Executive Committee of the Department 
of Philosophy, and must submit plans for the prosecution of a line 
of research acceptable to that Committee. During his tenure of 
the Fellowship, the Fellow will be required to devote his entire 
time to his work. He may, further, give instruction in the Gradu- 
ate School or in the College of this University, provided such instruc- 
tion does not exceed four hours a week during any one year. 

No individual can hold a Harrison Fellowship for Research for 
more than three academic years. 

(6) The Fellowship for Research in Assyriology, igoi-o;. 

This Fellowship has been established for a period of five years, 
beginning September i, 1901. The conditions of appointment and 
of tenure are identical with those of the Fellowships -at-large for 
Research, with tlie following exceptions: The work pursued by 
the Fellow is determined by Professor Hermann V. Hilprecht, in 
consultation with and subject to the approval of the Provost. 
The instruction which the Fellow may give is not restricted to 
four hours a week per axmum. The Fellow is granted a vacation 
of two months in each year. The Fellowship may be held by one 
individual for more than three years. 

The holder of a Fellowship for Research upon the George Lbib 
Harsisoh Foundation receives a stipend of SSoo per annum. He 
is allowed unrcistricted use of all the facilities of the Department 
of Philosophy, and of the Library, without payment of the usual 
fees, and without making the usual deposits. Men only are eligible. 

Umversity Feiiawships for Research. 
The Corporation will, frcm time to time, upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Executive Committee create additional Fellowships 



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36l 

for Research. The applicant for such a Fellowship will be required 
to submit plans for the prosecution of a definite and practicable 
line of research. He will be granted the unrestricted use of the 
facilities aflorded by the Department of Philosophy, and of the 
Library, without the payment of tuition or lalwratory tees, and 
without making a deposit. As a rule he wiU not receive a stipend. 
The University Fellowships for Research created for the current 
year will be found enumerated in the list of Fellows and Scholars. 



Upon Ike George Lcib Harriwn Foundation. 

Nineteen Fellowships have been created upon the Gborgb Lbib 
Harrison Foundation. The title subjects are determined from 
year to year by the Board of Trustees upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee. The candidate for such a Fellowship 
is required lo hold a baccalaureate degree, and to have had one year 
of graduate work, both of which must be satisfactory to the Execu- 
tive Committee. He must possess a good reading knowledge of 
French and German, 

During the tenure of his Fellowship the Fellow must devote his 
undivided time to the prosecution of his studies. No teaching or 
other outside work is permitted. 

A stipend of S500 per annum is attached to each of these Fellow- 
ships. Holders are exempt from the payment of tuition fees, but 
are required to pay laboratory and graduation fees. 

No individual can bold a Harrison Fellowship for more than two 
years. Men only are eligSMe, 

The Harrison FeUowskip Funds. 
To each one of the nineteen Fellowships upon the Gborqe Leib 
Harrison Foundation is attached the additional sum of $100 per 
annum. This sum is expended upon the equipment of the Depart- 
ment, with primary reference to the facilitation of the work of the 
Fellow. The manner in which each fund is to be expended is deter- 
mined by the Provost, after consultation with the Dean and with 
the representatives of the Department in which the Fellow is to 

Upon the Hector Tyttdale Foundation: In Physics. 

This Fellowship was endowed in 1885 by Professor John Tyndall, 

The candidate is required to hold a baccalaureate degree, and must 



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FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 363 

intend to pursue advanced studies in Physics. The holder of the 
Pdlowship may, with the sanction of the Faculty, pursue hia 
studies at any university here or abroad. He receives a stipend of 
$500 per annum. He is exempt from the payment of tuition fees, 
but is required to pay laboratory and graduation fees. 

No individual can hold this Fellowship for more than three years. 
Men only are eligible. 

Upon the John Fries Fraser Foitndatiott: In Physics. 
This Fellowship has been established in memory of John Pries 
Frazer, Professor of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry in this 
University, 1844-73, by his daughter, Mrs. Thomas K. Conrad. 
and others of his kinsfolk. The conditions of appointment and 
of tenure are the same as those of the Harrison Pellowahips. 



Upon the Joseph M. Bennett Foundation. 

The late Colonel Joseph M. Bennett endowed two Fdlowships 
for the use of women. They are assigned to the various subjects 
of instruction, from year to year, by the Board of Trustees as are 
the Harrison Fellow^ips. The holder is required to possess a 
baccalaureate degree satisfactory to the Executive Committee, 
and to qualify as a candidate for the Doctorate. She is required 
to reside, during her tenure of the Fellowship, at the University 
of Pennsylvania. She receives a stipend of (235 per annum, is 
exempt from the payment of tuition tees, but is required to pay 
laboratory and graduation fees. 

No individual can bold one of these Fellowships for more than 
three years. 

Upon the Frances Sergeant Pepper Foundation. 
This Fellowship was endowed by the late William Pepper. M. D,, 
Provost of the University, 1881-94. The conditions of appoint- 
ment and of tenure are identical with those of the Bennett Fellow- 

Upon the Mrs. Blaomfieid Moore Foundation. 
Two Fellowships for the use of women were endowed by the 
late Mrs. Bloomfield Moore. The conditions of appointment and 
of tenure are identical with those of the Bennett and Pepper Fellow- 
ships, excepting that the candidate must intend to become a 
teacher. The stipend is laoo per annum. 



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a64 DBPARTMENT OP PHILOSOPHY, 



The Corporation may, from time to time, upon the reconunenda- 
tion of the Executive Committee, create special University Fellow- 
ships tor a year, or term of years, with or without a stipend, as the 
resolution creating the Fellowship may direct. Such Fellowships 
are usually created in consequence of a special endowment. Both 
men and women are eligible. 



The Scholarships are assigned by the Board of Trustees annually 
to the various subjects of instruction. 

A candidate for a Scholarship is required to hold a baccalaureate 
degree satisfactory to the Executive Committee, During the tenure 
of the Scholarship the holder is required to reside at the University 
of Pennsylvania, and to pursue to the satisfaction of his instructors 
not less than eight standard courses in each academic year. He is 
exempt from the payment of tuition fees, but is required to pay 
laboratory and graduation fees. He may or may not receive a 
stipend. 

Upon the George Letb Harrison Foundation. 
Eight Scholarships have been created upon the Georob Lbib 
Harrison Foundation. The holder is entitled to free tuition, and 
to a stipend of Sioe per annum; he is allowed to engage in outside 
work only upon receiving the written consent of the Dean, No 
individual is permitted to hold a Harrison Scholarship for more 
than one year. Men only are eligible. 

University Scholarships. 

Thirty Scholarships have been created by the Corporation. 

Holders are exempt from the payment of tuition fees, but receive 



For blank forms of application for Fellowships and Scholarships, 
and for all further information concerning the Department of Phi- 
losophy, address 

Clarbkcb G, Child. Dean, 

College Hall , University of Pennsylvania. 
The Dean is in his ofBce, lo; College Hall, daily, from g a. u. 



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, i6$ 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The major subjects offered by each Croup Committee represent those 
divisions of topics tvhich arc commonly recognized. Other divisions 
may be allowed in special cases. 

Any arrangement of courses approved by the Croup Committee 
offering them, may, with the consent of the Committee in charge of 
the major, be elected as a minor subject, provided it be equivalent to not 
less than four standard courses. But no student tvill be required to 
complete for a minor more than six standard courses. 

Except where the contrary is staled, leclare or seminary courses of 
one hour or laboratory courses of two hours extending over a year, and 
lecture or seminary courses of two hours or laboratory courses of four 
hours extending over a term, are accounted standard courses. 

The University reserves the right to make changes in the hours at 
which the courses are given, in the personnel of the teaching staff, and 
in the courses announced. 



AI>MIMNTKATIONi See Economics. 
ANTRROPOIAGY: See Archa:ology. 

ARABIC I see Semitic Languages. 

ARAMAIC I see Semitic Languages. 

I. ARCHEOLOGY AMD ETHNOLOOT. 

Professor Hilprbcht, Chairman. 

Professor ROLFE, Assistant Professors Bates*, McDanibl 

and Clay. Dt. Gordon. 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 

offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

A. SEMITIC ARCHEOLOGY. 

Professor Hilprbcht. "^ 

. Babylonian Paleography. (Omitted in 1505-06) 1 

. (a) Interpretations of the Collections of the Babylonian 
and General Semitic Museum. {One Term: every fort- 
nigbt) 1 

Assistant Professor Clat. 

. Hebrew Archajology. (Omitted in iQos-ofi) i 

' Absent on leave as Anniul ProCenor of Gre^ in the American School of d 
iX Studies at Athena. 



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!66 DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY, 



B. CLASSICAL ARCH^^OLOGY. 
GREEK. 
Assistant Professor Batbs*. Hou 

I. Greek Epigraphy. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

3. Greek Inscriptions. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

LATIN. 
Professor Rolfb. 

1. Introduction to Latin Paleography. (M., W., 4.15)... 3 

2. Elements of Latin Epigraphy. (M., W., 4.15) 3 

3. Roman Topography. (Omitted in 1905-06) _. a 

Assistant Professor McDaniel. 

4. Private Antiquities. (Tu., 7.30) a 

C. ANTHROPOLOGY. 
Dr. Gordon. 

I. General Anthropology (M., W., i.is"! 3 

3, American Archa-ology and Ethnology (M., W., 315) .... a 

ASSX'B.iA.'S : Bce Semitic Languages. 



. ASTHONOHT. 



Professor C. L. Doolittlb. Chairman; Assistant Professor 

E. Doolittlb, 
[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 
Method of Least Squares, historically and practic^dly con- 
sidered. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

Reduction of stellar coordinates to a homogeneous system. 
Investigation of the constants of precession, nutation and 
aberration, and the variations of terrestrial latitude, 

(.First Term: Tu.,Th„9.is a. m.) 6 

History of Astronomy. iSecondTerm:Tti.,Th.,g,is a.m.) 3 

Observatory Practice. (One Coarse) 6 

Practical Astronomy. (Th,, S,, 10,15) a 



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COURSBS OP INSTRUCTION. : 

Assistant Professor E. Doolittlb. Hoi 

. Theoretical Astronomy (a) (M., 1.15; W, 1. 15-4. 15) .... 1 

Theoretical Astronomy (b) (Tu., 3.1 s) a 

Astronomical Seminary. (F., 3.15) 1 

Secular Perturbations. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

Note.— The observatory, equipped with an iS-inch 
equatorial telescope and other instruments of the latest 
and most approved design, offers every facility to those 
students who wish to familiarize themselves with the prac- 
tical details of astronomical work. 



m. BOTANY AND ZOOIX>QV. 

Professor CoNKLiN, Chaimtait; Professor Macparlanb, 
Assistant Professor Jennings, Dr. Moorb, 
Dr. Harshbbrqbr, Dr. Calvbrt. 
Majors — Botany: Morphology and Physiology; Taxon- 
omy and Distribution. 
Zoirtogy: Human Anatomy; Mammalian Oste- 
ology; Comparative Anatomy and Com- 
parative Embryology. 
[For a full statement and description of the courses 
oflered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

A. BOTANY. 

Professor Macfarlanb. 

. Comparative Histology of Plants. Lecture one hour; 

laboratory work two hours {Two Courses). (Omitted in 

1905-06). 
. Plant Irritability and Nutrition. One hour lecture, five 

hours laboratory and seminary work. (M., lo-i*) {Three 

Courses) . 
. Comparative Morphology of the Gymnospermia. Two 

hours lecture, four hours laboratory and seminary work. 

(M., »-5*) lFo»r Courses). 

' Addilkma] houn will be arranse^ to me«t the convenience of inatructorg a 



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368 , DBPARTHBNT OP PHILOSOPHY. 

79. Comparative Morphology of the Angiospermia. Two 
hours lecture, four hours laboratory and seminary work 

{Four Courses). (Omitted in 1905-06). 

Dr. Harshbbrger. 
74. Comparative Taxonomy of Plants. One hour lecture, two 
hours laboratory work (,Tuio Courses), (Omitted in 1905- 
06), 

77. Comparative Morphology and Taxonomy of the Myxomy- 
cetes and Fungi. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory 
and seminary work. (Omitted in 1905-06). 

78. Comparative Morphology and Taxonomy of the Algae. 
One hour lecture, two hours laboratory work (Th., ».is-5) 
{Two Courses), 

Si. Comparative Plant Ecology and Distribution, One hour 
lecture; two hours laboratory work (Tu., a. 15-5) (row 
Courses). 

80. Comparative Morphology of the Bryophyta and Pteri- 
dophyta. (Omitted in 1905-06), 

Graduate Botanical Club. 

The instructors and advanced students in Botany meet 
on alternate Monday evenings, from 7.30 to 9.30, to pre- 
sent original communications, review recent papers, and 
discuss the general principles of plant evolution. 

NoTB. — Students taking a major in Botany will be 
required, before presenting themselves for the Doctor's 
degree, to study for not less than eleven consecutive 
months in the Botanic Garden of the University or of some 
other institution possessing equal facilities for practical 
work in Botany. 

B. ZOOLOGY. 
Dr. MooRB. 

687. Recent and Fossil Vertcbrata. ' One hour lecture, two 
hours laboratory or seminary work. {Omitted in 1905- 
06). 

688. Comparative Embryology of the Vertebrata, One hour 
lecture, five hours laboratory or seminary work. (M., P., 
9-12) {Three Courses). 



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COURSES OP IMSTRUCTION. 3 

Professor Conki.in and Dr. Cai.vert. 

689. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology of the Inverte- 
brata. One hour lecture, five hours laboratory or semi- 
nary work, (Omitted in 1905-06). 

Professor Conklin, 

690. Cytology. One hour lecture, five hours laboratory or 
seminary work. (Th., 9-1, j-5) {Three Courses). 

Dr. Calvert. 

691. Entomolc^y. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory 
or seminary work. {W. 8-5) (Two Courses). 



Assistant Professor Je; 
69a. Animal Behavior. Two hours lecture. {M., W,, 4) ITwo 

Courses) . 
693. The Protozoa. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory 
or seminary work. (Omitted in 1905-06). 

Note.— <;ourses B 687, 688, 689, 690 are each equiva- 
lent to three standard courses; B 691, 692, 693 to two. 



Zo-5l(^cal Seminary. (F,, 4). (.Vii Credit). 



IV. GHEMI8TRV. 



Majors in Inorganic Chemistry; Organic Chemistry; Elec- 
tro-chemistry. 
Minors — i. Courses 1 and 8, with laboratory work, six 

1. Courses 3 and s, with laboratory work, six . 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 



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370 

Professor EDr.AR F. Smith. H™" 

1. Adv&nced Inorganic Chemistry. (M., 9.15; W., 12 15). 1 

2. Electro-chemistry (Tu., 11.15) ' 

3. Mineral Analysis {First Term: F., 9.15) i 

ja. Determination of Atomic Weights (Seconil Term: P., 

9-.S) I 

4. Seminar. (Tu,, ia.15) 1 

Assistant Professor Shinn. 

5. Industrial Chemistr>\ (Th.. 9.15) i 

6. Analytical Chemistry. (Tu.. 10.15) - ■ • i 

Assistant Professor Taggart. 

7. Oi^anic Chemistry. (M.. 10.15; I"*"-. '*-'S) a 



. Physical Chemistry. (M., 11.15) ' 

, History of Chemistry. (First Term: P., 12.15) 1 

I. Theories of Chemistry. {Second Term: P., ia.15) . . , . 1 

The above schedule comprises mainly lecture courses. 
Much practical work is given in connection with ail but 
Courses 2, 2(a) and 10. This is carried on in the John 
Harrison Laboratory of Chemistry, which is thoroughly 
equipped for graduate study. After the student has 
received that training in the several departments of Chem- 
istry which will give him a broad outlook in the science, 
and has displayed evidence of ability to follow research 
under guidance, he may be permitted to undertake inves- 
tigation in his major subject {or ina minor topicif approved 
by the chairman of the Group Committee). Special re- 
search rooms are set aside for advanced students. They 
have also for use all modem apparatus necessary for the 
application of physico-chemical methods, for gas analysis 
and spectroscopy. The opportunities offered for thorough 
drill in practical electro-chemistry are had in laboratories 
especially arranged for this branch of chemical science. 
The rarer elements receive more than ordinary attention. 



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COURSES OP tMSTRUCTION. 3'J I 

V. OIjASSICAli liAMGUAOES. 

Professor Lambbrtom, Chainttan; Professor Rolfb, 
Assistant Professors Batbb* and McOakibl, 
Dr. Kbnt and Dr. Chosbv. 
Majors — Greek; Latin. 

The authors and worke read in the group vary from 
yeai to year in such wise as to enable each student taking 
the work as a major to cover the principal periods and 
spheres of the literature. 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department,] 

A. GREEK. 
Professor Lakbbrton. '^■SS 

1. Euripides, ^fcertM (M., s; Th., 4.15) a 

a. P\a.to. The Reptiilk {Tm.. s; S.. 11.15) ' 

Similar courses of two hours a week each will be ^ven 
in succeeding years in the following authors: Aristotle, 
Sophocles, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Aeschylus. 

Assistant Professor Bates.* 

3. Pausanias, Periegesis, with a special study of the Monu- 
ments. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

4. The Pi>e(»cj of Aristotle; Longinus.ZJcSiib/ifHiMi?. (Omit- 
ted in I gos-06) a 

For courses in Greek Epigraphy and Greek Inscriptions, 
see Group II, B i and a. 

Dr. Kent. 

S- GreekComedy. (Omitted in 1905-06) ^ a 

6. Greek Historians. {Fir a Term: W., 1-15) a 

7. Historical Greek Grammar. {Second Term: W., 1-15).. a 

Dr. Crosby. 

8. Homer. (M., 3; F, 3) a 

* Ab»nt on Iesvc bb Annual Professor of Gnek in the American School of etas' 
■inl Studies st Athens. 



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B. LATIN, 

The following courses are intended to cover a period of 
three years. The order in which they are offered depends 
on the needs of the students in attendance each year. 
I. Latin Literature: 

Note. — The following courses may be repeated in suc- 
cessive years, with a change in the n-orks read. 

Professor Rolfe. ^'" 

, The Historians. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

. The Writers on Mythology. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

. Selections from Representative Authors (W., 5.15) i 

Assistant Professor McDaniel. 

. Comedy. (First Term; Tm.. Tb.,F.. 3.15) 3 

. The Literature of Christianity. (First Term) (Omitted 

. The History of Latin Literature, Lectures and reading 
of representative writers (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

IL Latin Writing i 

Professor Rolpe and Assistant Professor McDanibl. 

. Introductory course {Omitted in 1905-06) 9 

. Advanced course (Omitted in 1905-06) 1 

in. Classicai. Philology: 

Professor Rolpe. 

. The History and Problems of Classical Philology (Omit- 
ted in 1 905—06) 1 

. Historical Latin Grammar (Omitted in 1905-06) ; 

. Introduction to Latin Paleography. {First Term: M,, 

W..4.1S) ; 

. Elements of Latin Epigraphy. (Second Term: M,, W., 

t-S) ! 

The following courses are offered at irregular intervals: 

, Roman Topography s 

, Elements of Oscan and Umbrian ! 

. Colloquial Latin : 



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COURSBS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Assistant Professor McDanibl. 
15. Private Antiqiiities. {Second Term; Tu., 7.30) . 



Assistant Professor McDanibl. 

17. Introduction to the methods of textual and exegetical 
criticism (a special study of Catullus. Martia.1, or Tacitus). 
Practice in using the philological periodicals, and the books 
of reference that are of most importance to the teacher 
of Latin, as well as the dissertations and works that especi- 
ally deal with the author chosen as the basis of the year's 
work, (M., 7.30-9.30 p. M.) {Three Courses). 

SBMINAKV. 

Professor Rolfb. 

18. Training in Criticism and Research. Presentation of 
papers. (P,, 4-*) {Three Courses) 

COMMKBCBt see Economics. 



VI. ECONOMICS, POXJTICB AND SOCIOIiOOT. 

Professor Pattbn, Chairman; Professors Johnson, 

Lindsay and Rows; Assistant Professors 

YouNC, Mbade and Kblsby; Dr. J. R. 

Smith, Mr. Mangold. 

Mnjore-^Political Science; Economics; Transportation 

and Osmmerce; Sociology. 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 

offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 



Professor RowB. 

. Municipal Government and Institutions. (S., 11) , 

. International Law. (W.. P., 10) 

The Individual and the State. (Omitted in 1905-06) . . , 



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!»74 DEPAHTHBNT OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Assistant Professor Young. **"" 

4. The Government of Colonies and Dependencies. (Tu., 
Th., 10) 2 

5. The Political Institutions of the Manufacturing State. 
(Omitted in 1905-06) a 

B. ECONOMICS. 

Professor Patten. 

I. History of Political Economy. (Omitted in 1905-06).. a 
3. Recent Development of Political Economy, (Omitted in 

1905-oe) a 

3. The Development of English Civilization. (Tu.,Th., 5). 2 

4. Heredity and Social Progress. (Omitted in 1905-06) ... a 

5. Theory of Prosperity. (Omitted in 1905-06) 1 

6. Theory of Social Forces. (P., 4-6) 1 

Assistant Professor Mbadb. 

7. Investment Securities. (P., 4) 3 

8. Industrial Organization and Management. {Two Courses) 
(Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

C. SOCIOLOGY. 

Professor Lindsay. 

1. Theory of Sociology. {Two Years) (M., 4-6) 2 

A systematic course in four parts; each part requiring 
two hours a week for half a year, and constituting an 
independent course. In 1905-06, parts (c) and (d) will 
be given. 

(a) Methodology of the Social Sciences. (6) Primitive 
Society, (c) Structure of Modem Society, (rf) Social 
Movements of Modem Times. 

2. Social Reformers and Reform Movements of the 19th Cen- 
tury. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

3. Sociological Field Work (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

Assistant Professor Kblsby. 

4. Social Debtor Classes. (S., 9) g 

5. American Race Problems. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 



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INSTRUCTION. a 

, Mr. Mangold. Hm 
6. Social and Vital Statistics. (M., W., la) a 

D. TRANSPORTATION. COMMERCE AND ECONOMIC 

GEOGRAPHY. 

professor Johnson. 

t. Railway Transportation. (First Term: Tu,. Th., 4) a 

2. .OceaiJ Transportation. {Second Term: Tu., Th., 4).... a 

3. .American Cwnmerce. (Second Term: Tu., Th., 13.15). - " 

Dr. J. R. Smith. 

4. Economic Geography. (W,, 4) a 

E. SEMINARY. 

I. Seminary in Political Science, Economics and Sociology, a 
(Equivalent to two standard courses, if the student com- 
plete sttlisjaciorily a prescribed amount of originai inves- 
tigaiion.) 



EDUCATION! see Pedagogy, 
EOTPTiANi see Semitic Languages. 



VU. ENOUBH. 

Professor Schelling, Chairman; Professor Easton, 
Professor Penniman. Assistant Professors Child, 

QUINH AND WeYGANDT. 

Majors — English Literature; English Philology 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
ofiered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

A. ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Professor Schelling. 

. The Elizabethan Lyric. (First Term: '^h., 4.15; S., 9-11) 3 

Poetry of the Seventeenth Century. (Second Term: Th., 

4.1S ; s., 9-1 1) 3 



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3- English Drama from the Beginnings to the Death of 
Shakespeare. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

4. English Drama from Shakespeare to Dryden. (Omitted 
iiiiQOS-06) 3 

Professor Pbhniman. 

5. The Romantic Movement in Modem English Literature. 
(First Term: W„ 2.15) 2 

6. English Literary Criticism,. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

Assistant ProfesGor Child. 

7. Old Ei^lish Literature to the Reign of <£Ured. (First 
Term: S., it. 15-1. 15) 2 

S. Old English Literature from j£lfred to the Norman Con- 
quest. (Second Temt: S., 1r.15-1.15) a 

9. Middle English Literature from the Conquest to 1350. 

(Omitted in 1905-06) 2 

10. Middle English Literature from 135° ^ 1500. (Omitted 

in 1905-06) I 

ji. Literary Study of Chaucer. (Omitted in 1905-06) 2 

Assistant Professor Quinn. 

12. Theory and History of English Versification. (Omitted 
in 1905-06) a 

13. English Literature in America. (Second Term: W., 2.15). 2 

Assistant Professor Weyoandt. 

14. The Development of English Poetry from 1850 to the 
Present Day. (Omitted in 1905-06) 2 

15. Bibliography and Method. (Th., 3,15) i 

This course is required of all students taking work in 
English Literature either as a major or minor. 

Note.- — Each of these courses involves the preparation 
and discussion of papera embodying original work within 
the range of the general subject. A course in English 
Philology, equivalent to a minor, will be required of all 
who take English Literature as a major. Some work in 
English History may also be demanded of students taking 
major or minor courses in English Literature. 



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COURSES or INSTRUCTION. 

B. ENGLISH PHILOLOGY. 
Professor Easton. 
English Philology; elementary (M., Tu., 5). . 

Mainly Anglo-Saxon grammar and texts. 
English Philology; advanced (Tu.. W.. 3)... 

Mainly Middle English Texts, 
Elizabethan English. (One Term: Th„ 3) . . 



I see Philosophy. 
ETHNOLOOTi see Archttology. 
TIIfANCE I see Economu:s. 
nUENCHi see Romanic Languagfs. 
OEOGRAFHY; See Economics. 



Tm. OEOIjOOY and HINERAIiOOY. 

Professor A. P. Brown, Chairman; Dr. Bhrenfbld, 
Dr. BuRNBTT Smith. 
Majors — Geology; Mineralogy, 

A. GEOLOGY. 

Professor A, P. Browh. 

, Petrography. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory. 

(M., II. is) (Three Courses). 
. Chemical Geology. One hour lecture (One Term), four 
hours laboratory (Two Courses). 

Dr. Ehrbnpbld. 
. Physical Geology and Phj^iography. Two hours lecture, 
two hours laboratory. {S,, 10-n) (Three Courses), 

Professors A. P, Brown and Dr. Ehbenfbld. 
Paleontology of the Invertebrata. Laboratory, five 
hours (Two and a half Courses). 

Dr. Burnett Smith. 
Historical Geology, One hour lecture, four hours labora- 
tory. (Tu., t.i^) (Three Courses). 

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B. MINERALOGY. 

Professor A. P. Brown. 

MathemaLical and Physical Crystallography. One hour 

lecture, four hours laboratory. (Th., 4.15) {Tkret 

CoKTSes.y 

Chemical and Synthetic Mineralogy. One hour l«tuTe 
(Oms Term) and three hours laboratory. (On« Year: M., 
la.iS) (Two Courses). 

Determination of Minerals by physical and pyrognostic 
properties. Four hours laboratory. (Th., 10.15-1.15; 
^■15-3. 'S) i.Two Courses). 

Dr. Ehre!4pbld. 
Systematic Mineralogy. Two hours lecture, two hours 
laboratory, (Tu,. W., 9.15) (_Three Courses). 

The laboratory hours arc the minimum required for 
minor work. Students taking Geology or Mineralogy as 
a major spend more time in laboratory work than noted 



All students in Mineralogy and Geology are expected to 
participate in the occasional lield excursions, in addition to 
such field work as may be assigned to students taking 
major work in this group. 

■ In the laboratory courses, the study from specimens is 
carried on in the mincralogical and geological museuma. 
Other practical work is done in the mincralogical labora- 
tory, which is supplied with instruments and appliances 
for advanced work in the subjects embraced in this group. 
Power machines are provided for slicing and grinding 
minerals and rocks; the chemical laboratory is equipped 
for the qualitative and quantitative examination of min- 
erals; the goniometer room is provided with apparatus for 
work in mathematical and physical crystallography; the 
dark-room is arranged for photographic work, including 
photomicrography In the Library will be found the 
works and journals on Geology and Mineralogy most fre- 
quently consulted by the student, while, in addition, the 
Museum is supplied with those works of reference necessary 
for the courses in practical Paleontolc^y and Mineralogy. 



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IX. OEHHAMO liANODAOES. 

Professor Learned, Ckatrvtan; Assistant Professor 
Shuhway, Dr. RibtbmCller. 

The graduate courses in Germanic Philology are grouped 
in cycles of three years, in order to enable the student to 
pursue his studies in all the representative periods of Ger- 
manic languages and literatures — Gothic, Old High Ger- 
man. Middle High German, New High German (including 
the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 
turies). During the cycle of three years at least one semi- 
nary course will be offered in each of the more important 
periods. For a full statement and description of the 
courses offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Departs 

Professor Lbarnbd. ,"^. 

1. Old Norse, (Two Years: Th., 3.30-5) i.'4 

(a) Icelandic Prose Sagas. 
(fc) Elder Edda. (Omitted in 1905-06). 
This course involves collateral reading, and is equiv- 
alent to three standard courses each year. 

Assistant Professor Shumwat. 

3. Gothic. (One Term: M., 4; Tu., 3) a 

3. Old High German. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

4. Middle High German. (Firsl Term: M., 3; W., 3) t 

Hartmann von Aue, Cregorius (ed. Paul). 

5. Wolfram von Eschenbach, Parzifal. (Stcond Term: M.. 
W.. 3) a 

6. History of the Growth of Modem German. (Second Term) 
M.4;Th.3) ' 

Professor Lbarhbd. 

7. Germanic Seminary. (Tu., W., 4) 1 

Relations of English and Giennan Literature in the 
nineteenth century. 

8. German Literature in America. (Omitted in 11)05-06).. a 

9. German Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (Omitted 
in 1905-06) 1 

10. Goethe's Lyric Poetry. (W., 5; F.. 3) 1 

11. German Novel of the Nineteenth Century. (Omitted in 
1905-06) 3 



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. Journal Meeting. (Third Thursday eveningof themonth) i 
. The Germanic Association. — The work of this association, 

of which the instructors and advanced graduate students 
are members, is an essential part of the work in Ger- 
man. An original paper is presented at each meeting. 
This may be followed by minor communications. (Even- 
ing of the first Wednesday in each month.) 

Dr. RiethiiOllbr, 

, German Ljrric Poetry of the Nineteenth Century i 

Note. — German Conversation : Students who elect 
German as a major, are required to join the class in Ger- 
man conversation, unless they already have a satisfactory 
command of colloquial German. 

OOTHiCt sec Germanic Languages. 
I sec Classical Languages. 



X. HISTORY. 



Professor McMasteb,* Chairman; Professor Chbynby, 
Assistant Professors Ames, Lingelbach and 

HOWLAND, Dr. WiLLARD 

Majors — American HHstory; American Constitutional His- 
tory ; Medieval History ; Modern European 
History; English Hstory. 
[For a full statement and description of the courses 

offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

A. AMERICAN HISTORY 



r COURSES. 
Professor McMastbb.* 
Political Parties, Leaders and Platforms (from 1840 to 
1850). (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 



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COURSES OF INBTHUCTION. 



■ mek. 



, Studies in United States History. (Omitted in 1905-06). 
The United States since the Civil War. (Omitted in 
1905-06) 3 

Assistant Professor Aues. 

The Constitutional History of the Colonies. (Tu., F., 4)- 3 
. History of the Foreign Relations of the United States. 

(Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (Omittedin 1905-06). 3 

LBCrURB COURSES. 

Assistant Professor Ambs. 
The Constitutional History of the United States. (Tu., 
Th., U..5) » 

B. EUROPEAN HISTORY. 

■ The courses in European History are of three classes: 
methodological courses, involving the technical discussion 
of scientific methods of study ; seminary courses, intended 
to give practical training in investigation; and lecture 
courses, the object of which is more especially to convey 
information in the subjects discussed. 



COURSES m I 

Primarily intended for students taking a major in Euro- 
pean History. 

Professor Chbynbv, Assistant Professors Lincblbach and 

HOWLANO. 

Bibliography. (M.,3) i 

. Assistant Professor Howland, 

Paleography. {Second Term: W., 4) i 

A continuation of Course 10, Classical Languages, B. 

Professor Cheynby. 
, Historical Construction. (Omitted in 1905-06) x 



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»8l DBPARTWBNT ( 






Intended for students taldng either a 
n European History. 



Professor Chbynbt. 



4. English Constitutional History from the Eleventh to the 
Fourteenth Century. (Omitted in 1905-06) g 

5. English Social and Economic History, from the Thirteeoth 
to the Sixteenth Century. (Omitted in 1905-06) 9 

6. The Last Fifteen Years of Elizabeth's Reign (S, 9) a 

Assistant Professor Lcngblbach. 
S. England in the Sevtenteenth Century. (Omitted in 1905- 

06) a 

9. The Establishment of the First Republic in Prance, 1791. 

(W..4) = 

10. The Relations between France and England during the 
first years of the French Revolution. (Omitted in 1905- 



Assistant Professor Howlakd. 
II. The Carolingian Capitularies. (Omitted in 1905-06). ... a 
13. The Penal System of the Medieval Church (M., 4) a 

LECTURE COURSBS. 

Primarily intended for students taking a minor in Euro- 
pean History. 

Professor Chbynby. 

1 5 . Relations between England and the Continental Countries 
from the Fourteenth to the Sixteenth Century. (Omitted 
in 1905-06) a 

16. The British Empire. (Tu,, Th., 3.15) a 

Dr. WiLLARD. 

1 7. Parliamentary TB:iation under Edward III (Th-. 4) I 



HEBREW I see Setnitic Langtiages, 

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XI. I14DO-KCROPKAN PHIIX>IX>OY. 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

Professor Eabton. ,",S22 

Major or Minor — Sanskrit and Indo-European Philology. 

Elementary Sanskrit. (First Year: M,, 4; Th., 5) 2 

Elementary Sanskrit. (Seeond Year: TU..5; Th.,4) a 

Advanced Sanskrit a 

ITAI.IAN1 see Rotttanic Languages. 
Unmns see Classical Languages. 



Xn. HATHEHATICH. 

Professor Crawlbv, Chairman; Assistant Professors Piehbr, 

ScHWATT and Hallbtt, Dr. Sapford. 
M aj ora — M athematjcs . 
Minors — Any six courses. 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

Professor Crawley. 

I. Plane Analytic Geometry. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

a. Solid Analytic Geometry. (Omitted in i9o5-t36) a 

3. Higher Plane Curves. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

4. Theory of Numbers. (Tu., Th, a.15) a 

40. Theory of Numbers. Seminary. (M., 3-5) a 

Assistant Professor Pishek. 

5. Differential Equations. (W,, P., 9.15) a 

6. Advanced Calculus. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

7. Theory of Ptmctions of a Complex Variable. (Omitted in 
1905-06) 3 

8. Elliptic Functions. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

9. Invariants and Covariants. {First Term: W., 1.15; Th., 
lo.is; S.,9.is) 3 

10. Linear Differential Equations. {Second Term: W., 1.15; 
Th.. lo.is; S., 9.15) 3 



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184 DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Assistant Professor Scwhatt. Haan 

II. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. (M., Th., P., 4). 3 
la. Infinite Series and Products. (Omitted in 1905-06). ... 3 

13. Definite Integrals. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

Assistant Professor Hallett. 

14. Theory of Surfaces. {Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

15. Theory of Groups, (Tu., W.,Th.. 9.15) 3 

16. An introduction to the Lie theory of continuous groups, 
with applications to differential equations and to geometry, 
{Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

17. Calculus of Variations, (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

Dr, Sapford. 
ao. Partial Differential Equations, (Omitted in 1905-06) . . 3 
31. Curvilinear coardinates, and orthogonal transformations, 
with applications to the Theory of Potential (Tu,, 3,15- 
5,15; Th„3,i5) 3 

SEMINARY WORK. 

A part of the work in each course consists of segiinary 
work. For this no additional credit is allowed. 



MINEBALOOT: se€ Geolog-y. 
NOR-tE. OLD;, see Germanv- Languages. 
PEDAOOOV: see Philosophy. 
PHILOt,oaYi Bee the several languages. 



Professor Wither, Chairman; Professors Brumbaugh 
and Nbwbold, Assistant Professor Singer, 
Dr. TwiTMYBR, Dr. Flaccus. 
Majors — Philosophy; Psychology; Pedagogy, 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department,] 



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. s 

A. PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 
The courses in Philosophy are given with special refer- 
ence to the hiBtorical development of thought, and fait 
into two divisions, Introductory' and Advanced. The 
introductory courses are open both to undergraduates and 
to, graduate students, and are designed to give a general 
survey of the periods or topics with which they deal. 
The advanced courses are primarily designed for graduate 
students, and are based upon a detailed study of the texts. 



f COURSES. 

Professor Nbwbold. b w* 
I. History of Ancient Philosophy. (Tu, Th,, la.is) a 

Assistant Professor Sikgbr. 

a. History of Modem Philosophy. (Th., 8 p. M.) a 

Courses i and a will deal especially with Metaphysics 

and Epistomotogy. 

Assistant Professor Sikgbr. 

3. Philosophy of Nature. (M., F., 11.15) a 

Parallel to i and a, but deals with the history of the 
natural s 



Dr. Flaccus. 
, Analy^ ot Ethical Theories. (Tu,, 7 p. m 
Based upon Sidgwick, Methods of Ethic. 



Professor Newbold. 

5. The Pre-Socratic Period. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

6. Plato's Metaphysics, Anthropology and Cosmology. (Th., 
4) » 

7. Aristotle's Metaphysics. (M., 8 p. m,) a 

8. Aristotle's Psychology. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

9. History of Greek Ethical Theories, First Period. (Omitted 
in 1905-06) 3 

10. Readings in Ancient Philosophy. {One Term: F., a.jo). a 



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a86 DBPARTMBNT C 

a week. 

iz. Philosophy and Religion in the Later Age. (Omitted 
in 1905-^6} a 

Assistant Professor Sinobk. 

13. German IdeaUsm. (b) Seminary. (M., 4) a 

14. German Idealism, (a) Seminary. (Omitted in 1905-06). a 

15. Modem Logic (Omitted in 1905-06) » 

16. Development of Scientific Thought. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

17. Readings in Modem Philosophy. (One Term) a 

Dr. Flaccus. 
1 1 . History of Ethical Theory in England. (Omitted in 1905- 

06) a 

ao. Problems of Ethics (M., 5.15; F.,4.15) a 

32. The Ethics of Kant and Hegel. (Omitted in 1905-06). . 1 

33. Neo-Hegelian Ethics. (Omitted in 1905-06) 3 

EBUINARV. 

18. Students taking Philosophy as a major are expected, and 
other students of Philosophy are invited, to meet each week 
with the instructors for the purpose of presenting thesis 
material, reviewing current literature, and discussing 
papers on topics of philosophic interest 3 

B. PSYCHOLOGY. 
Professor Witmbr, Dr. Twitmyer. 
1. Analytic Psychology. (FirsI Term:Tn., 2.15, or S., 10.15) 

(.One Course) 3 

3. Physiological Psychology. {Second Term: Tu., a. 15, or 

S., 10.15) (0»w Course) 3 

3. Genetic Psychology. (M., 3.15) {pouble Course) 3 

5. Modem Psychological Theory. {Double Course) (Omitted 
in 1905-06) a 

6. Experimental Psychology — Laboratory and Seminary 
{Double Courses) 3 

The topics selected vafy from year to year. In 1905-06 
they include the following separate courses: 

(a) General laboratory methods, one hour seminary, 



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? INSTRUCTION. 



three or four hours laboratory. Under the direction of 
Dr. Twittnyer. 

(6) Psycho- Physics. One hour seminary and two hours 
laboratory. Under the direction of Professor Witmer. 

(c) Psychometry, One hour seminary and four hours 
laboratory. Under the direction of Professor Witmer 
and Dr. Twitmyer. 

Child Psychology. (S., 9.30) (Double Course) a 

Individual Laboratory Work. {Number of hours not 
ass^ed.) May be either laboratory experimentation, or 
such as may be made upon children in the schoolroom. 

For advancedstudents only, who have taken one or more 
courses in Experimental Psychology, and who are compe- 
tent to carry on original research. 
, General Seminary (Single Course) i 

Fc* the report and discussion of the results of original 
research conducted in the laboratory and of current lit- 
erature. 

Note. — With permission of the Executive Committee 
of the Department of Philosophy and of the Dean of the 
Medical School, courses in Psychiatry and Neuro-Path- 
ology may be taken in the Medical School, either as a minor 
subject in this group or in partial fulfilment of the require- 
ments for a minor or major in Psychology. (See also An- 
thropology I and 3, and ZoOlogy 693.) 

C. PEDAGOGY. 
Professor Brumbaugh. 

, Institutes of Education. (S., a) a 

. History of Education. (Omitted in 1905-06) g 

. Educational Systems and Ideals. (Two Years) g 

(a) Ancient Systems and Ideals. (Th., S-io p. u.) 

(b) Modem Systems and Ideals. (Omitted in 1905-06). 

. Educalional Seminary. (P., S f. h.) 9 

Students are required to make an inductive study of 
administrative and educational problems presented by our 
American schools, and of current interest. 

Except in special cases, -only those who elect Pedagogy 
as a major subject will be admitted to this seminary. 



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XIV. PHYSICS. 

Professor Goodspbbd, Chairman; Assistant Professor 

Richards, Dr. Hart, Dr. Meyer, Dr. Houoh. 
Major — Theoretical and Experimental Phyeics. 
Minor — Work equivalent to eix standard courses, one- 
third of which should be laboratory work.* 
[Pot a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

Professor Goodspeed. , ^^ 
9. Tneory of the Potential Function, {First Term: Tu., 4; 
F-,5) " 

6. Radiophysics. iSecond Term: Tu,, 4; F., 5) 3 

S. Introduction to Mathematical Physics. (JSecond T»rm: 

Tu., Th., 4). 

3. Analytic Statics. (First Term: Tu., W., 5) a 

4. Dynamics of a Particle. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

7. Rigid Dynamics. (Second Term: Tu., W., s) ' 

8. Thermodynamics. (Omitted in 1905-06) a 

5. Theoretical and Practical Radiography. Laboratory. 
{One Course) 3 

Assistant Professor Richards. 

4. Electricity and Magnetism. (Omitted in 1905-06) ,. a 

I. Application of Harmonic Series to Physical Problems. 

(Omitted in 1905-06) -. x 

a. Theory of Sound. {One Term). (Omitted in 1905-06). a 

1, Constitution of Matter, (FirstTerm: M.,a; Th., 10)... a 
a. Radiation (Electromagnetic Theory). (M., 3; Th., a) . . a 
%. Geometrical Optics. {One Term) (Omitted in 1905-06). a 

Professor Goodspeed and Assistant Professor Richards. 

5, Absolute Physical Measurements. Laboratory. (Tu., 
Th„ F.. a-5) {One to Three Courses) 3 to 9 

3. Practical Spectroscopy. Laboratory. (W., a-s) {One 
Course) 3 

2, Seminary. Discussion of special subjects, and journal 
analysis (Th- ")- 

• Three houn of Uboratory work for one week are equivalent to one itandanl 



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Dr. Hart. "^ 

i6. Optical Interference Methods and their Applications. 

(Second Term) a 

17. Kinetic Theory of Gases, (Omitted in 1905-06) i 

Dr. Houon. 

ai. Theory of Alternating Currents. (First Term: M., Th., 
5) ' 

13. Theory of Alternating Currents (Advanced Course) (Sec- 
ond Tarm) (M.pTh., s) » 

23. Alternating Ciirrent Measurement, Laboratory. {Om* 
Course) {M., 3-5) 3 

Dr. Mbybb. 
34. Chemical Physics. (M., W., 11.15) ■ 

poiiTnCAi. sciBMCEi see Economics. 
pk(]venj;ai.i see Romanic Languages, 
F8TCH01.0GT1 see Philosophy. 



XT. ROMANIC liANODAOES. 

[For a full statement and description of the courses 
offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Department.] 

Professor Ren nest. 
Majors — Old French and Provenfal; Italian and Proven- 
cal; Italian and Spanish; Spanish and Fortu- 



, Old French. (M., a) i 

Erec und Enid (ed. FOrster). 
, Old Provenpal. (Tu,, a) i 

Appel, Provenxalische Ckrestomatkie. 
. Early Italian. The Sicilian Poets. (Omittad in 1905-06) 1 
. Old Spanish i 

Poema del Cid. Mentedez Ptdal, Gramatica hislorica 
EspaSoia (Madrid, 1904). 
, Petrarch (ed. Rijutino, Milan, iqoi) i 



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The Spanish Drama i 

Tirso de Molina, Don Gil de las Calsas Vcrdes; Lope de 
Vega, El Perro del Horlelano; Moreto. El DesdM con el Des- 



7. The Spanish Theatre in the Period of Lope de Vega. 
SANSKRiTi see Indo-European Philohgy. 



XVI. SEMITIO liANGDAOES.* 

Professor J as 



Majors — Assyrian, Arabic, Ethiopic, Hebrew, Syriac. 
Minors — Students electing a minor in the group must 
confine their work to one of the above-mentioned 
languages. 
The courses offered every year in Semitic Iai:^;uages 
include grammar, interpretation of the difierent branches 
of literature, and paleography. Courses on the life, cus- 
toms, religion and history of the Semitic nations wilt be 
^ven at stated intervals. (See also courses offered in 
Group L} For a full statement and description of the 
courses offered, see the special Fasciculus of the Depart- 
In view of the intimate relation which existed between 
the earliest languages and civilizations of Egypt and of 
Mesopotamia, a. certain amount of work in Egyptian is 
offered under the jurisdiction of Group Committee l-t 

COMPARATIVE SEMITIC PHILOLOGY. 
Professor J astro w. 
, Introduction to the study of the Semitic Languages. 
(Omitted in 1905-06) i 



• Owing to the demands of the Univemty'a wcffk in the East, chanse* in 
courses announce in SpmLtics frsjuently become neceasary. Intendiof; atud 
arc advised to consult the Dun before making definite plana. 

t Infcnnation coiKeniing cautia in Egyptian may be obtained of tin Dean. 



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COURSES OP INSTRUCTION, a 

ASSYRIAN. 
Professor Hilprbcht, Assistant Professor Clay. ^^ 

7. Assyrian Grammar. (Tu., Th., a) a 

For begmners and students of Comparative Semitic 

Grammar. Exercises in reading cuneiform writing, and 

interpretation of easy historical texts, Delitzsch, Assyrian 

Grammar; and Assyrische Lesestucke. 

yt. Interpretation of Assyrian Historical and Babylonian 

Building Inscriptions. (One Term: W., lo) a 

Rawlinson, Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia, 
Vols. I. Ill, V. 
(6) Babylonian Letters and Religious Texts, {One Term: 

W,.I0) 3 

Winkler's TeU-Amarna Tablets, and Rawlinson's Cunei- 
form Inscriptions of Western Asia. Vol. IV, 

4. Neo- Babylonian Contract Tablets from Babylonian 
Archives, (W,, 11) 1 

Oay, Tablets dated in the reign of Darius II. (Vol. X of 
Hilprecht. The Babylonian Expedition of the University of 
Pennsylvania, Series A), and Strassmaier, Nabonidus. 

5. Interpretation of the Code of Hammurabi. (Th., 4). 1 

Harper, The Code of Hammurabi. 

7. Assyrian Seminary (One Term: Th.. P., 4) (Cf. II, At)., a 

Exercises in deciphering and copying original Baby- 
lonian documents, and in determining the age of cuneiform 
taUets. For advanced students only. Philological, 
archteological and historical papers are required at stated 
intervals, 

SUMERIAN. 
Professor Hilprecht. 

8, Sumerian Grammar, and interpretation of bilingual reli- 
gious texts. (Unit Course) (One Term: Th., 10) i 

Hommel, Sumerische LesestUcke; Weissbach, Die Sume- 
riscke Frage; Rawlinson, Cuneiform Inscriptions of West- 
em Asia. Vol. IV (ind ed.>. 

HEBREW. 
Prrfessor Jabtbow. 

6. Outlines of the History of the Ancient Orient. (Ffrrf 
Term) i 



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DB PARTUS NT OF 



13. Interpretation of Poetical Books of the Old Testament. . 1 

Critical study, with themes. 
9. Lectures on the Mofpbology and Syntax of the Hebrew 

Language, (Omitted in 1905-06) i 

iS. Rabbinical Literature. (Omitted in 1905-06) i 

Dalman, Aramaische LeseslHeke. 
90. The Hebrew Fragments of the Book of Eccle^asticus. . . i 
31. Historical and Archsological Study of the Pentateochal 
Laws. (Omitted in 1905-06) i 

Assistant Professor Ci.Ay. 

10. Interpretation of Prophetical Books of the Old Testament. 
(Omitted in 1905-06) i 

Philological, historical, theological. 

11. Interpretation of Historical Books of the Old Testament, 
with a review of the Hebrew Grammar. (Tu.,3).... i 

II. Introduction to the Old Testament. (Omitted in 

19OJ— 06) I 

These three courses (14, 15 and 16) are planned with 
especial reference to the interest of theological students 
and ministers of all denominations. The collections in 
the ArchsMlogical Museum are used to illustrate the life of 
the people, and to furnish the historical background of the 
periods treated. 

ARAMAIC. 
Professor Jastrow. 

19. Elementary Aramaic i 

All the Aramaic portions of the Old Testament will be 
read. Strack, Abriss dts Biblisck-Araniaiscken, 

SYRIAC. 
Professor Jastrow. 

33. Selected Readings from Syriac TexU. (W., 3) i 

Brockelmann, Syrische Grammaiik. 



Professor Jastrow. 
Elements of Arabic Grammar. (M., a 



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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Socin, Arabic Grammar, supplemented by lectui«s on 
the grammatical features of the language. 

14. Selections from the Koran, and from the Historical Texts 
{W..») > 

15. Selections from the Hadith Literature and from Poetical 
Texts. (P..11.1S) 1 

16. Outlines of the History of Arabic Literature. {Steond 
Term: M„ 11.15) • 

SEMITIC EPIGRAPHY. 
Professor J as trow. 

17. Semitic Eingraphy, (Omitted in igos-oi5) i 

Selected Phcenician, Nabtsan and Palmyrene inscrip- 
tions. 



SOCIOIAKITi see Economics. 
8PAKIBH1 see Romanic La^^uages. 
BUMBBlANi see Semitic Languages, 
BTBIACi see Semitic Languages, 
TRAIfSPOKTATION AKD fM>MXBBOKi I 
ZOOLOQli see Botany. 



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GRADUATE I 



ORADCATE DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN. 



board of managers. 

Charles C. Harrison. LL. D. 

Provost and ex-ofjUio President, 

Edgar F. Smith, Ph. D., Sc. D., Chas. L. Doolittlb, C. E., Sc. D. 

LL. D. Fblix E. Schelling. A. M., 

Edwin G. Conklin, Ph. D. Ph. D., Litt. D. 

John C. Rolpb. A. M., Ph. D. Clarence G. Child, Ph.D., L.H.D 

The Graduate Department for Women is under the direct control 
of a Board of Managers appointed by the Corporation. As an 
integral part of the Department of Philosophy, the courses of 
instruction are given by the same instructors, and lead to the same 
degrees. A statement of these courses will be found in the pages 
immediately preceding 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 
For Fellowships and Scholarships open to women, see p. 363, 



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DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

FACULTY. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D., Provost. 
EDGAR F. SMITH. Ph. D.. Sc. D.. LL. D.. Vicb-Provost. 



Hon. J. I. CLARKE HARE, LL. D., Emeritus Professor of Consti- 
tutional Law. 

GEO. TUCKER BISPHAM, A. M.. LL. B.. Professor of Equity 
Jurisprudence. 

Hon. GEORGE M. DALLAS, LL. D., Professor of Law. 



GEO. STUART PATTERSON, A. B.. LL. B.. Professor of Law. 



REYNOLDS D. BROWN, A. B., LL. B-. Professor of Law. 

JOHN W. PATTON. A. M.. Professor of Law. 

Hon. JOHN B. McPHERSON. LL. D., Professor of Law. 

WILLIAM E. MIKELL, B. S., Professor of Law. 

FRANCIS H. BOHLEN. LL. B.. Professor of Law. 

CRAWFORD D. HENING, A. B., Professor of Law. 

OWEN J. ROBERTS, A. B., LL. B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

HENRY WOLF BIKLE. A. B.. LL. B., Lwrturer on Law. 

NORMAN GREY, Lecturer on New Jersey Practice. 

VICTOR B. WOOLLEY, B. S.. Lecturer on Delaware Practice. 

Stanlbt Folz, a. B., LL. B., i „ ,. 

> Fellows. 
Henry S. Drinker, A. B., LL. B., ) 



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DEPART MBNT C 



Librarian of the BiiUle Law Library. 
Mkb. Marcarbt C. Klingblshith, LL. B. 



3. M. Snover, 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

The first law lectures delivered in any university in the United 
States were given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1790. The 
Department, on its present foundation, has had a continuous exist- 
ence since 1850. 

In the past it has numbered among its professors the Hon. Jaubs 
Wilson, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
States; the Hon. Gborgb Sharswood, Chief Justice of Pennsyl- 
vania: the Hon. J. I. Clarkb Hare, President Judge of the Court 
of Common Pleas of Philadelphia; Charlbs Willing Hare, Peter 
McCall, E. Spencer Miller, P. Pbhbbrtoh Morris, E. Copp^b 
Mitchell, A. Sydney Biddlb and Samuel S. Hollincs worth. 

LOCATION. 
The building occupied by the Law Department is situated at 
the southwest comer of Thirty-fourth and Chestnut streets, ad- 
jacent to the other University buildings. At present it is the 
largest building in the United States devoted exclusively to the use 
of law students. The class-rooms and executive offices, quiz and 
student club-rooms, are on the ground floor. The entire second 
floor is devoted to the library and reading-rooms. The two reading- 
rooms for undergraduate students contain nearly six hundred sepa- 
rate desks or reading tables. Each registered student has one of 
these desks assigned to him, and is thus enabled to enjoy an undis- 
turbed place of study. The graduate reading-room contains twenty- 
six large tables for the use of advanced students, members of the 
Bar, or others engaged in legal research. 

ADMISSION. 

All applications for admission must be made to William Draper 

Lewis, Dean, southwest comer of Thirty-fourth and Chestnut 



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EXAMINATION IN BLACK5TONE. 397 

An; one holding the degree of Bachelor o£ Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a recognized' college or university is admitted as a regular 
student without examination. 

Any one holding a certificate from the Permeylvania State Board 
of Law Examiners to the effect that he has passed the preliminary 
examination of said Board for the study of law is admitted as a reg- 
ular student without examinatioii. 

A graduate of one of the more advanced public high schools will 
be excused from the entrance examinations in those subjects in 
which he has received high grades, as evidenced by a certificate 
from the authorities of the school in question. 

Persons not coming under either of the classifications stated above 
must take the entrance examinations, which are the same as those 
required for admission to the College, except that the applicant 
must present both English and American History. 

The above requirements will be in force in the fall of 1905, Duo 
notice will be given of the reqtdrements for admission in the fall of 
1906. Information concerning the examination requirements, and 
the dates and places of examination , may be had upon application to 
the Dean. 

Entrance on High Schoii Diplomas and Certificates. — Any can- 
didate holding a public high school diploma will be furnished by the 
Dean with a blank form of application for admission. The applica- 
tion having been filed with the Dean, the applicant will be informed 
if he can be excused from all or any of the entrance examinations. 

Admission on College Diplomas. — Whether the baccalaureate 
degree from a particular college will admit, depends on the stand- 
ing of the institution, and the course taken by the appUcant. Each 
case is considered separately. 

ADVANCED STANDING. 
Any person who, being entitled to admission to the first-year 
class, has been in regular attendance for at least one academic year 
of not less than ei^t months at another law school having a three 
years' course for its degree, will be admitted to the second-year class 
upon passing, in June, the annual examinations in the studies of the 
first year. 

EXAMINATION IN BLACKSTONE. 

An examination in Blackstone's Commentaries is held in June and 

September, along with the other entrance examinations. Those 



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who do not present themselves for this examination will be required 
to pass such an examination at one of the regular examination 
periods in course. The examination will not include the "Intro- 
duction," or the not«s of any of the editors. The applicant is. 
however, recommended to read such notes. He will not be 
examined on those portions of Book I dealing with the organiia- 
tion of the English government (Chaps. II to XIII, inclusive); or 
on those portions of Book III (Chaps. Ill to VI, inclusive), dealing 
with the organization of the English courts. He is recommended 
to read, instead, any standard work on the organization of govern- 
ment in the United States; and, for information on the present 
government of England, Anson's Laui and CuslotH of the CoHsUtu- 
ticn. He will not, however, be examined on either of these subjects. 

STATUS OF STUDENTS. 
(Rbgular, Special and Partial.) 

A rtgular student is one who is regularly admitted to the Depart- 
ment, and who is a candidate for a degree. 

A special student is one who is regularly admitted to the Depart- 
ment, but who, not being a candidate for a degree, does not take the 
tegidar course. 

A partial student is one who is not regularly admitted to the 
Department, but who attends one or more courses. The admission 
of partial students is in the discretion of the Faculty, 

DEGREE. 
The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) is granted to students 
who have completed satisfactorily the full course of instruction in 
the Department of Law; and to those who, having been r^;ularly 
admitted to advanced standing, have satisfactorily completed the 
work of the second and third years. In both cases, candidates must 
have passed satisfactory examinations upon all subjects of instruc- 



ACADEMIC YEAR. 
The academic year begins on the last Friday of September, and 
ends on the third Wednesday in June, both inclusive. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

The couTse'of instruction extends through tliree full academic 

yeais. The object of the Department is to teach the principles of 



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COURSB OP INSTRUCTION. 399 

the common law in such a wajr eis to fit its graduates for successful 
practice. It is, therefore, the aim of the members of the Faculty 
so to conduct their respective coiirses that the student may acquire 
not only a knowledge of the rules of law, but also the ability to deal 
with legal probloRis. 

Every candidate for a degree will be required to take all of the 
subjects of the first and second year, except second-year Practice. 
The third-year course is elective: the candidate is required in this 
year to take a minimum of fourteen hours a week. It the student 
omits the course in Practice in the second year, he must elect a third- 
year subject in its place; or, on application to the Faculty, he tnay 
be permitted to substitute, under the supervision of the Dean, the 
study of the practice or statutes of the jurisdiction in whic^ be 
expects to practice. 

FIRST TKAB. ."iSSk. 

•Equity:- (History). Bispham'a Princif^es of Equity i 

Professor Bisphah. 

t Torts 3 

Professor Dallas. 

Pleading: Ames' Cases on Pleading i 

Professor pATTEkSOK. 

Equity: (Bills of Peace, Interpleader, Quia Timet, Removal 
of Cloud upon Title, Jurisdiction of Equity over Torts). 

Lewis' Cases (advance sheets) a 

Professor La wis. 

Property: (Personal Property: Historical Introduction to 
Real Property; Nature of Ownership of Real Property, 
and Rights in Another's Land). Gray's Cases in Prop- 

*rty a 

Professor Brown. 

Criminal Law: Mikell's Cases on Criminal Law a 

Professor M IK ell. 

Contracts 3 

Professor Hbninc. 

* Pcurt««n weeks. 

t Two of these houn are given by Profeaor Bahkn. 



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30a DBPARTMBHT OF LAW. 

SECXIND YEAR. "iSS 

• Evidence 3 

Professor Dallas. 

Law of Associatioii ; (Partnership and Corporations) a 

Professor Pbppeb 

Equity: (Trusts) a 

Professor Lewis. 

Practice: (Orphans' Court) i 

Professor Patton. 

Contracts: (Sales). Burdick's Cases ojt SaUs a 

Professor Mikbll. 

Quasi Contracts t 

Professor Bohlbh. 

Property; (Acquisition of Property, I titer Vivos, and on 

Deatii of Former Owner). Gray's Cases on Property a 

Assistant Professor Robbrts. 

THIKD YBAK. 

Law of Association: (Partnership and Corporations). Syllabus 

and Selected Cases a 

Professor Pepfbr. 

Constitutional Law 3 

Professor Pattbbbon. 

Equity: (The Jurisdiction of Equity over Contracts, includ- 
ing the specific performance, reformation and retdsion 
thereof; Account; Equitable Conversion). Lewis' Cases 

(advance sheets) 3 

Professor Lewis. 

Property: (Acquisition of Real Property. Inter Vivos, and on 
Death of Former Owner; Priority, including Fraudulent 
Conveyances and the Recording Laws). Gray's Coses iw» 

Property a 

Professor Brown. 

* One □[ theae honn la stven by PlOtaaor Boblen. 



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THE BIPDLE MEMORIAL LAW LIBNARV. 



301 
Houn 



Practice (Pennsylvania) a 

Professor Patton. 

Insurance a 

Professor McPhbrson. 

' Conflict of Laws 9 

Professor Mikkll. 

• Bills and Notes li 

Negligence and Damages * 1 

Professor Bohlbh. 

Suretyship i 

Professor Hbnino. 

Carriers i 

Mr. BiEL^. 

Practice : (New Jersey) a 

Mr. Grey, 

Practice; (Delaware) 1 

Mr. WooLLBY. 

Practice: (Code) .',. i 

Mr. BikU. 

t Pennsylvania Law a 

Mr. B1KL&. 

THE BIDDLE MEMORIAL LAW LIBRARY. 
The Library of the Law School was founded by the family of 
George W. Biddle, as a memorial to hia three sons, George, Alger- 
non Sydney, and Arthur Biddle. The original gift of five thousand 
volumes was supplemented in 1897 by the presentation by Mrs, 
Arthur Biddle of over four thousand volumes, which had formed 
the library of the late Arthur Biddle, Esq. Many other valuable 
gifts have been received from families and individual donors. 



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3°' 



DEPARTMENT OP LAW. 



Aljout six thousand dollars is expended annually in the purchase of 
lxx)ks. The number of volumes at present exceeds 33,000. 

Each student is entitled to the use of one of the desks in the 
reading-rooms connected with the Library, and this desk is the 
property of the student during his connection with the Department. 
- The Library is open during the term every day. except Sundays, 
from 8 A. M. to II P. M.; and during the silmrner recess from 9 a. 11. 



ATTENDANCE ON COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 
Students in the Department of Law may attend, without extra 
charge, the lectures given in any of the other Departments of the 
University, on obtaining the consent of the Dean of the Law 
Faculty, and of the Dean of the Faculty under which they desire 
instruction. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
I. Faculty Scholarships. — -Three scholarships are granted by 
the Faculty in each class. These scholarships are granted only to 
those who hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a recognized university or college. The Faculty reserves the 
right to withdraw any of these scholarships at any time when, in 
their judgment, the progress of the holder does not justify it« con- 



3. Public School Prizb Scholarships. — Under an agreement 
with the city of Philadelphia, fifty freo scholarships exist in the Uni- 
versity for the benefit of graduates from the public schools. The 
candidates for these scholarships are examined by the Board of 
Public Education, whenever vacancies occur, and award is tnade to 
those who reach the highest grade in the examination. 

PRIZES. 

Essay Prizbs. — ^The Sodety of the Alumni of the Department 
of Law has established two prizes, one of seventy-five dollars, called 
the Sharswooo Prizb, and one of fifty dollars, called the Meredith 
Prize. They are awarded annually by the Faculty for the best 
and second-best essay written by members of the graduating class. 

The P, Pbmbertoh Morris Prize of forty dollars is awarded 
annually to that member of the graduating class who submits the 
best examinations in Evidence, Pleading and Practice. 



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TUITION PBBS AND BXPBKSBS. 303 

MOOT COURTS. 
There are several student Law Qubs, under the auspices of which 
Moot Courts are held. Cases prepared by the Professors and in- 
structors are argued. Each of these courts meets once a week dur- 
ing the term, some member of the Faculty usually presiding. 

TUITION FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Each regular student pays on entering a matriculation fee of 
$5.00 and makes a deposit with the Bursar of $5.00. The deposit 
will be returned upon graduation or withdrawal, provided there is 
no charge against the same. In addition, each regular student 
pays an annual tuition fee of $160.00, and an annual tee of tio.oo 
for the privil^es of the Gyninasium and Houston Club. 

Bach special or partial student pays the matriculation fee, the 
deposit and the annual Gymnasium and Houston Chib fee. The 
annual tuition fee for special and partial students is determined 
in each case by the number of subjects taken. 

Fees are payable in two parts of eighty-five dollars (t8s.oo)each, 
due on October 1 , and on February i. 

An addition is made to jees not paid within Ihirty-one days of the 
day when ikrybeconte due. All fees are payable at the Bursar's office. 
Room 102, College Hall. Remittances should be in cash, or by bank 
draft, certified cheque, or postal money order, drawn for the exact 
amount due. 



The University Dormitories are situated within five minutes' walk 
of the Law Building. Those who desire to secure dormitory rooms 
in advance should communicate with the Bursar of the University. 
Board and lodging may also be obtained in the neighborhood of the 
University ranging from $5.00 a week upward. 

UINIMUH ANNUAL EXPBNSBS.* 

Matriculation Fee (paid once only) $5 00 

Tuition 160 00 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

Board and Lod^ng 175°° 

Total $350 00 

•ThcGCMtof books ihcmld not «ic«d«TS.ooBy»t. 



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DEFAKTMENT OF MEDICINE. 



FACULTY. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D., Provost. 
EDGAR F. SMITH, Ph. D.. Sc. D.. LL. D., Vice-Pbovost. 



PROFESSORS. 
JAMES TYSON, M. D., Professor of Medicine. 
HORATIO C. WOOD, M. D., LL. D., Professor of Materia Medica. 

Pharmacy and General Therapeuiics. 
EDWARD T. REICHERT, M, D„ Professor of Physiology. 
BARTON COOKE HIRST, M. D„ Professor of Obstetrics. 
J. WILLIAM WHITE, M. D., john rhba barton Professor of 

Surgery. 
GEORGE A. PIERSOL. M. D,, Professor of Anatomy. 
JOHN MARSHALL, M. D., Nat. Sc. D.. LL. D., Professor of 

Chemistry and Toxicology. 
LOUIS A. DUHRING, M. D., Professor of Dermatologj-. 
♦ALEXANDER C. ABBOTT, M. D., pbpper Professor of Hypene, 

and Bacteriology. 
JOHN G. CLARK, M. D., Professor of Gynecology. 
GEORGE E. DB SCHWEINIT2, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmol- 

CHARLES H. FRAZIER, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery, 

and Dean op the Faculty. 
ALLEN J, SMITH, M. D., Professor of Pathology. 
De FOREST WILLARD, M. D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgerj'. 

• Atsmt on Public Buaineat. 



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ADJUMCT PROFESSORS. 305 

JOHN H. MUSSER, M. D., Professor of CKnical Medicine. 
ALFRED STENGEL, M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
EDWARD MARTIN, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
CHARLES K. MILLS, M. D., Professor of Neurology. 
WILLIAM G. SPILLER, M. D.. Professor of N euro-pathology, and 

Associate Professor of Neurology. 
CHARLES W. BURR, M. D., Professor of Mental Diseases. 
R. TAIT McKENZIE, B. A., M. D., Professor of Physical Edu- 

Om thb GEORGE B. WOOD Foundation. 
DANIEL J. McCarthy. M.D., Professor of Medical Juris- 
prudence. 

Professor of Botany. 



CLINICAL PROFESSORS. 

B. ALEXANDER RANDALL, M. D., Clinical Professor of Dis- 
eases of the Ear, 

J. P. CROZER GRIFFITH, M. D., CTinieal Professor of Diseases 
of Children. 

THOMAS R. NEILSON, M. D.. Clinical Professor of Genito- 
urinary Diseases. 

CHARLES P. GRAYSON, M. D., Clinical Professor of Laryngol- 
ogy and Rhinology. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS. 
GWILYM O. DAVIS, M. D., M. R. C. S. (Eng.). Associate Pro- 

lessor of Applied Anatomy. 
WILLIAM G. SPILLER, M. D„ Associate Professor of Neurology. 

ADJUNCT PROFESSORS. 
J. ALISON SCOTT, M. D., Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 
RICHARD H. HARTE. M. D., Adjunct Professor of Surgery. 
JAMES P. HUTCHINSON, M. D„ Adjunct Professor of Surgery. 
THOMAS G, ASHTON. M. D., Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 



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3o6 DBPARTMENT OF » 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 
M. HOWARD FUSSELL, M. D.. Assistant Proffssorof Medicine. 
ALFRED C. WOOD. M. D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
RICHARD C. NORRIS. M. D.. Assistant Professor of Obstetries. 
DAVID H. BERGEY, M. D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 
LEO LOEB, Nf. D., Assistant Professor of Eiperimenul Palhologj'. 
DAVID L. EDSALL, M. D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

DEMONSTRATORS. 

DANIEL W, FETTEROLF, M. D., Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

WILLIAM SCHLEIF. M. D., Demonstrator of Pharmacy. 

HORATIO C. WOOD, Jr.. M. D., Demonstrator of Pharmaco- 
dynamics. 

PHILIP B. HAWK, Ph. D., Demonstrator of Physiological Chem- 
istry. 

EDWARD LODHOLZ, M. D., Demonstrator of Physiology. 

GEORGE FETTEROLF, M. D„ Acting DemonsUator of Anatomy. 

HENRY R. ALBURGER, M. D., Acting Demonstrator of Pa- 
thology. 

WALTER S. CORNELL. M. D., Demonstrator of Osteology. 

WILLIAM H. F. ADDISON. M. D.. Demonstrator of Histology. 

ASSOCIATES. 
MILTON B. HARTZELL, M. D,, Associate in Dermatology. 
CHARLES S. POTTS, M. D.. Associate in Neurology. 
DAVID RIESMAN, M. D., Associate in Medicine 
HENRY D. BEYEA. M. D., Associate in Gynecology. 
J. DUTTON STEELE. M. D.. Associate in Medicine, 
ALOYSIUS O. J. KELLY, M. D,, Associate in Medicine. 
THOMPSON S. WESTCOTT, M. D.. Associate in Pediatrics. 
JOSEPH SAILER, M, D„ Associate in Medidne. 
JAMES K. YOUNG. M, D.. Associate in Orthopedic Sargery. 
HERMAN B. ALLYN. M. D . Associate in Medicine. 
EWING TAYLOR, M. D,. Associate in Anatomy. 



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ASSISTANT DEMONSTRATORS. 307 

LECTURERS. 
ARTHUR A. STEVENS. M. D., Lecturer on Medical Tcmiinology 

and Physical Diagnosis. 
B. FRANKLIN STAHL, M. D., Lecturer on Dietetics of the Sick. 
CHARLES W. DULLES, M.D., Lecturer on the History of Medicine. 
HENRY K. PANCOAST, M. D., Lecturer on Skiagraphy. 
JOHN T. CARPENTER. M. D,. Lecturer on Ophthahnology. 



INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANT DEMONSTRATORS. 
GEORGE H. CHAMBERS. M, D.. Assistant Demonstrator of* 

Normal Histology. 
HENRY A. NEWBOLD. M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of 

Phannacy, 
ARTHUR A. STEVENS, M. D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 
B, FRANKLIN STAHL, M. D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 
JOHN H. GIRVIN, M. D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
J. REX HOBENSACK, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
LEON A. RYAN, Pb. D., Assistant DemonsUator of Chemistry. 
SHERBOURNE W. DOUGHERTY, M. D., Instructor in Physical 

HENRY D. JUMP, M, D.. Instructor in Medicine. 

JOHN J. ROBRECHT, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

RICHARD F. GERLACH, M, D,. Assistant Demonstrator of Anat- 

WILLIAM PEPPER. M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

BROOKE M. ANSPACH, M. D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

ROBERT N. WILLSON, M. D., Instructor in Medidne. 

JOHN M. CRUICE, M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

NORMAN B. GWYN, M. B., Instructor in Medicine. 

ALBERT P. FRANCINE, M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 

MAURICE OSTHEIMER. M. D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

WILLIAM E. QUICKSALL. M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

HOWARD A. SUTTON, M. D.. Assistant Demonstrator of "Anat- 
omy. 



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333 DBPAKTIIBNT OF MBDICIKB. 

CHARLES C, NORRIS, M. D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
JOHN B. CARNETT, M. D„ Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIAM G. B. HARLAND, M. D„ Instructor in Laryngology. 
HOLMES WALKER, M. D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
RAE S, DORSETT, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator ot Anatomy. 
DANIEL M. HOYT, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Phannaco^ 

dynamics. 
GEORGE P. MULLER. M. D., Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES W. McCONNELL, M. D.. Instructor in Neurology. 
THEODORE H. WEISENBURG, M. D„ Instructor in Neurology, 

and in Neuro-pathology, 
EDWARD A. SHUMWAY, M. D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
WALTER S. CORNELL. M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anat- 

JOHN H. JOPSON, M. D., Instructor in Surgery. 

JOHN W. LUTHER, M. D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

WILLIAM T. CUMMINS, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of 
Pathology. 

GEORGE M. DORRANCE, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

E. HOLLINGSWORTH SITER, M. D., Instructor in Genito- 
urinary Diseases. 

JOSEPH S. EVANS, M. D„ Instructor in Medicine. 

MYER SOLIS-COHEN, M. D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 

H,- MAXWELL LANGDON, M. D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

HENRY S. WIEDER, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
and of Surgical Pathology. 

SAMUEL LEOPOLD, M. D., Assbtant Demonstrator of Pathol- 
ogy. 

THOMAS B. HOLLOWAY, M. D., Instroctor in Ophthalmology. 

CLIFFORD B. FARR, M. D.. Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 

CHARLES A. FIFE, M. D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

HOWARD C. CARPENTER, M. D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

HAROLD B. WOOD, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Normal 
Histology. 



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r ASSISTANT DEMOKETBATOBS. 309 

WILLIAM W. CADBURY, M. D.. Assistant Demonstrator of 

Pathology and of Pharmacodynamics. 
RALPH S. LAVENSON, M. 0„ Assistant Demonstrator of Gross 

Morbid Anatomy. 
DAVID KAPP, As^tant Demonstrator of Pathology. 



ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS. 

WILLIAM A. N. DORLAND, M. D., Assistant Instructor in 
Obstetrics. 

GEORGE D. MORTON, M. D.. AssisUnt Instructor in Surgery. 

T. TURNER THOMAS, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM R. NICHOLSON, M. D„ Assistant Instructor in Ob- 
stetrics. 

HENRY NORRIS, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Surgery. 

CHARLES J, HATFIELD, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Medicine. 

BERNARD KOHN, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Medicine. 

JOHN C. HIRST, M. D.. Assistant Instructor in Obstetrics. 

JOHN BUSCH, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Surgery, 

GEORGE M. DORRANCE, M. D.. Assistant Instructor in Sur- 
gery, 

JEAN J. A. VAN KAATHOVEN, M. D., AssUtant Instructor in 
Surgery. 

I. VALENTINE LEVI, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Pediatrics. 

J. CLAXTON GITTINGS, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Pediat- 
rics. 

ALEXANDER H. UHLE, M. D., Assistant Instmctor in Genito- 
urinary Diseases. 

FRED H. KLAER, M. D., Assistant Instructor in Surgery. 



VOLUNTARY ASSISTANT DEMONSTRATORS. 
PHILIP S. STOUT, M. D., Voluntary Assistant Demonstrator of 

Pathology. 
THOMAS S. GITHENS, M, D„ Voluntaiy Assistant Demonstrator 

of Palhology. 



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DEPABTUBHT OF UBDtCINB. 



RUFUS B. SCARLETT, M. D., Voluntary Assistant Demon- 
strator of Pathology. 
JOHN SPEESB, M. D., Voluntary Aasistant Demonstrator of 

Sui^cal Pathology. 



PROSECTORS. 

LEWIS H. ADLER, Jr., M. D., Prosector to the Professor of 

Anatomy. 
J. FRANCIS WALSH, M. D., Assistant Prosector to the Professor 

of Anatomy, 
ASTLEY P. C. ASHHURST. M. D., Prosector to the Associate 

Professor of Applied Anatomy. 



ASSISTANTS. 

NATHANIEL GILDERSLEEVE, M, D., Firat Aasistant i: 

■ teriotogy. 
CARL D. CAMP, M. D., Assistant in Neuro-pathology. 
EDWARD B. MEIGS, M. D., Assistant in Physiology. 
REUBEN A. BOGIA, M. D., Assistant in Physiology. 



HARRY B. MELLER. Secretary to Uie Faculty of Medicine. 



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' THE umVERSITT 



MEDICAL STAFF OF TUB TJIflVEBSlTT 
HOSPITAL. 



Medicine. 
Jambs Tyson, M. D Professor of Medicine. 



John H, Hu<:sBit, M. D 

Alfred Stbhgbl, M. D. 

M. Howard Fussbll, M. D., .. 

Roland G. Curtin, M. D 

T. Hellor Tyson, M, D 

Alovsius O. J. Kelly, M. D.,. , 

David L, Edsall. M. D 

William Pepper, U, D., 

Joseph Sailer, M. D 



. . Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
. .Professor of CUnical Medicine. 



Assistaot Physicians. 



J. William White, M. D., 

Edward Hartin, M. D., 

Charles H. Praeibr, M. D, 

Alprbo C. Wood, M. D 

J. Bbrton Carnett, M, D.,. 

John H. Jopsoh, M. D 

Henry Norris, H. D. 

T. Turner Thomas, M. D., . 
Gborob D. Morton, M. D.,. 

John Busch, M. D., 

JosBPH M. Abbbs, M. D., . . 



Professor of Surgery. 

. Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
, . Professor of Clinical Surgery. 



Assistant Surgeons, 



Surgical Anestlietizers. 



Barton Cookb Hirst, M. D., . . 

Richard C. Norris, M. D. 

William A. N. Dorland, M. D., 

John C. Hirst, M. D., 

William R, Nicholson, M. D., . 
Edward W. Bbach, M. D 



. . . Professor of Obstetrics. 

Assistant Obstetricians. 

. Obstetrical Anesthetizer. 



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3ia DBPAKTMBNT OP UBDICINB. 

Neurology. 

Charles K. Mills, H. D., Professor of Neurology. 

WiLLiAU G. Spiller, M. D., . . Associate Professor of Neurology. 
Charles S. Potts, M. D Assistant Neurologist. 

GynectAogy. 

John G. Clark, U. D. Professor of Gynecology. 

Hbnrv D. Bbyba, M. D. 1 

Brooke M. Anspach. M. D I ^"^"^^ Gynecologists. 

EvBRETT p. Barnard, M. D Anesthetiier. 

Orthcpedic Suf^ry. 

Db Forest Willard, M, D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Jambs K. Youno, M, D ■, Assistant 

Joseph M. Spellisst, M. D. J Orthopedic Surgeons. 

CUARLBS A. WoRDBN, M. D,, . .Orthopedic Surgery Anesthetizer. 



Ophtkatmology, 
Gborob E. db ScHWEtNiTZ, M. D., .. Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Howard Mbllor. M. D 

John T. Carpenter, M. D 

Edward A. Shumway, M. D., . . 
Archibald G. Thomson, M. D., . 



Assistant 
Ophthalmic Surgeons. 



Dermalology, 

Louis A. Duhrinc, M. D Professor of Dermatology. 

Milton B. Hartebll, M. D Assistant Dermatologist. 

Laryngology and Rkinology. 
Charlbs p. Grayson, M. D., Clinical Professor of Larrngology 
and Rhinology. 

Otology. 

., Clinical Professor of Diseaaes of 



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DBPAKTUBNT. 3I3 



Pediatrics. 
J. P. Crozbr Griffith, M. D., Clinical Professor of 
Children. 



Gtnilo-Urinary Diseases. 
TuoHAS R. Nbilson, M. D., Clinical Professor of Genito-VriiiAry 
Diseases. 

Pathtilcgy. 
Allen J. Suith, M. D., Professor of Pathology, and Pftthotogist 

to the Hospital. 

Resident Physicians. 
Prbd H. Klabr. M. D., Chief. 
Thos. C. Kbllt, M. D., Gborge M. Laws, M. D., 

Geo. W. Stimson, M. D., Paul A. BmL£. M, D., 

Robert L. Gray, M. D., Georgb M. Pibrsol, M. D., 

Plovd E. Kbbnb, M. D., Howard G. Schleitbr, M. D., 

Phiup No.rris, H. D., Eldbidgb L. Eliason. M. D. 



HBOICAIi STAFF OF THE OUT-FATIKM DEPAKTMENT. 

Medical Dispensary. 
H. Howard Fussell, M. 
Henry D. Jump, M. D., . 
John M. Cruicb, M. D.. 
Albert P. Francinb, M. D., 
Charles J. Hatfield, M. D., 
M. SoLis-CoHBN, M. D., . . 
Charles A. Fife, M. D., . 
Clifford B. Parr, M. D., . 

Howard K. Hill, M. D., ^ Assistant Phrsidans. 

Robert S. HcCoubs, M. O., 
Gborob T. Lukbns, M. D., 
Hbnry Cui,uma«, M. D., . 



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DBPARTHBNT OF HBDtCINB. 



^ f Recorders. 

Milton K. Htbrs, H. D MicroscofnBt. 



Sttrgictd Dupttaary. 

Macy Brooks. M. D. Chief 

John Busch, M. D 

Joseph M. AsHER, M. D 

Edward Y, Rich, M, D 

John Spbbsb, M. D. 



Assistant Surgeons. 



Obstelrical Dispensary. 

L. F. Luburg, M. D Chief Surgeon. 

Edward W. Beach, M. D AsnEtant Surgeon. 

Dispensary jor Nervous Diseases. 

Charles S. Potts, M. D., Qiief Physician. 

Henry A, Newbold, M. D. 

Walter W. Naylor, M. D., 

Eugene Lindaubr, M. D 

Jaubs W. McCoknbll, M. D 

Theo. H. Weissnburo, M. O., 

Carl D. Camp, M. D 

Thomas J. Obbison 



Assistant Physicians. 



Gynecotogtcat Dispensary. 

William B. Small, M. D Chief Surgeon. 

John W. Luthbr, M. D 



Orthopedic Dispensary. 

Jambs K. Young, M. D., Chief Surgeon. 

Joseph M. Spbllissy, M. D. 

Thomas O'Hara, H. D 

Walter G. Elhbr. M. D As^taat Stugeont. 

Charles A. Wordeh, M. D 

James Kellt, M. D., 



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' KBDICAL STAri 



I OUT-PATIBMT DBPARTMBKT. 



Dispensary for Diseases of ike Eye. 

John T. Carpenter, M. D 

Edward A. Shumwav, M. D., 

Oarl Williams, M. D. 

Thomas B. Hollowat, M. D., 
Bbnjahin F. Babr, Jk., M. D., 
H Haxwbll Lamgdon, H. D., 
Charles M. Hoshbr, M. D., . 
J. E. Rhoads, M. D., 



Assistant Surgeotu. 



Dispensary for Diseases of the Skin. 
Hilton B. Hartzbll, M. D. 
Sauubl H. Brown, M. O., 
Prank C. Khowles. M. D... 



Chief Physician. 
" " \ Assistant Physicians. 



Dispensary far Diseases of Ikt Nose and Throat. 

Charlbs p. Grayson, M. D Chief Physician. 

Wm. G. B. Harland, M. D 

Bbnjamin L. Singbr, M. D !■ Assistant Physicians. 

Bbniauin C. Gill, H. D., 



Dispensary for Diseases of the Ear. 

Levi J. Hammond, M. D., Chief Surgeon, 

Ralph Butler, M. D 1 

John L. Dukbs, M. D \ Assistant Surgeons. 

Duncan L. Dbspabd, M. D J 

Dispensary for Diseases of Children. 

Mauricb OstRbiwbr, M. D., Chief Physician. 

I. Valbhtihb Levi, M. D., Assistant Physician. 

Dispensary for Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

E, HoLLiNCSWORTH Sitbr, M. D., Chief Sui^eon. 

Albxandbr A. Uhlb, M. D. 

William R. Bbbady, Jr., M. D }• Assistant Surgeons. 

J. J. A. Van Kaathoven, M. D., . . 



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3l6 DEPARTMENT OP MEDICINE. 

PBEPATOBY NOTE. 

This venerable institution, the oldest Medical School in the XJnited 
States, was fotmded in 1765 by Dr. John Moroan, who filled in it 
the first medical professorship created in America. In his opening 
"Discourse upon the Institution of Medical Schools in America," 
delivered in the College of Philadelphia, May 30, 1765, Dr. Morgan 
uttered these prophetic words; "Perhaps this medical institution, 
the hrst of its kind in America, though small in its beginning, may 
receive a constant increase of strength, and annually exert new- 
vigor. It may collect a number of young persons, of more than 
ordinary abilities, and so improve their knowledge as to spread its 
reputation to distant parts. By sending these abroad duly quali- 
fied, or by exciting an emulation amongst men of parts and liter- 
ature, it may give birth to other useful institutions of a similar 
nature, or occasional rise, by its example, to numerous societies of 
different kinds, calculated to spread the light of knowledge through 
the whole American continent, wherever inhabited." 

Through Dr, Morgan, the pupil of HOntek in London and of 
CuLLEN in Edinburgh, the graduates of this school take a just pride 
in regarding it as the lineal descendant of the best medical schools 
of Great Britain in the last century. To Dr. Morgan was soon joined 
another pupil of Cullen, Dr. William Srippen, as Professor of 
Anatomy and Surgery, thus forming another tie of relationship to 
the celebrated University of Edinburgh, whose methods of instruc- 
tion were substantially adopted here. In the next year Dr. Adam 
KUHN was added as Professor of Botany and Materia Medica; and 
on June ai, 1768, a Commencement was held, at which medical 
honors were bestowed, the first in point of time in America. In 
1769, Dr. Benjamin Rusk was elected to the Professorship of 
Chemistry, while Dr. Thomas Bond, one of the trustees of the 
College of Philadelphia, delivered lectures on CUnical Medicine in 
the Pennsylvania Hospital. 

To the faculty thus composed of Mokqan, Shippbn, Kvhn and 
Rush have succeeded, at various times, professors whose reputation 
has been national, such as Barton, Wistar, Chapman, Phvsick, 
Dhwbks, Horner, Hare, Gibson, Jackson, George B. Woob, 
HonoB, Jaurs B. Rogers, Carson, Pepper, Francis Guhnev 
Smith, Neill, Henrt H, Smith, Leidy. D. Haves Agnew, 
Goodell, the younger Pepper, STIi.Lfi, Ashhurst, and NoRRiS. 

The number of graduates of the Department of Medicine is 
ia.839. 



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ADUI3SION RBguISBUBNTS. 317 

ADMISSION REQUTBEMENTS.* 

Admission to the Department of Medicine may be obtained either 
I, by diploma; or II, by examination; or in certain cases, as speci- 
fied below under I, by a combination of both methods. 

I. Admission bv Diploma : Any candidate who may have 
received a degree in Arts or Science from a college recognized by 
this University will be admitted without examination. Candidates 
who may have been admitted by examination to the two-year 
course in Biology of this University, and who may have completed 
the course satisfactorily, will be exempt from the entrance exami- 
nation. Any candidate who may present written evidence of 
having passed the entrance examinations of a recognized college, 
in which the requirements are equivalent to those demanded for 
entrance to the Freshman Class of the College (course in Arts 
and Science) of this University, will be admitted without exam- 
ination. 

Diplomas of public high schoolsf may be accepted as complete or 
partial certificates. All diplomas presented by candidates will be 
i-eferred to the Committee on Schools and Entrance Requirements 
of the College Faculty, who will examine each case and decide 
whether the diplomas shall be accepted in lieu of examinations, 
and what subjects they properly cover. The diploma must be 
transmitted to the Dean of the Medical Faculty not later than 
June 10 or September 10 in each year, and must be accompanied 
by a certificate signed by the principal of the school, stating the 
exact amount of each subject covered by the diploma, and the 
mark or grade attained in each subject. 

II. Admission bv Examination: Examinations for admission to 
the first-year class in 1905 will be held in College Hall, beginning 
respectively on Thursday, June 15, at 11 a. m., and Friday, Septem- 

1, before enuring upon the sludy 
rioufily talcen the desree either of 

of the UniverBity of Pennsylvania. Should this be impracticable, two years^ time 
■hould be devoted to the «udy of the followins branchei: Chemistry or Biology, 
with laboratory iroric in etkch amounting to Bxhoun a week for eight months in 
each year: UamnuUan and Human Anatomy ; Hiatology and Physiolotn. including 
the practical ute of the micioKope and culture methoda in Bacteriotoffy. Fiee- 
hand EIrawing is al» an important preliminary study. Attention is called lo the 
two-year coune in Biology given in the Cullege of this University, as indicating 
the character and amount of studies advised. 

tPiplomaa of Normal and Manual Traininti Schools are included. 



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3lS DEPARTUBNT C 

ber 31, at ii a, u* Candidates may elect between these two 
dates. 

Caadidat«s will be required to register in College Hall between 
9 and 1 1 A. H., either on Thursday, June 14, or on Friday, Septem- 
ber 31, and to undergo the examinations beginning at 11 a. u., on 

Tbe required niM^cts of examfamtloa (or entnnce to tfie 
Departmeot of Medicine are tbe ume as tbose prescribed for 
admission to tbe Fresbnuui Class of the CoUe^. Ttaey wOl 
be found set forth In detail on pages 66 to 70- Candidates 
for admission to tbe Rrst-year Class of tbe Department of 
Medicine, who do not possess the qualifications specMed In 
paragraph I, preceding, will be required to pass examinations 
In die subiects referred to below. In accordance wtth tbe 
followlag scbedule, viz: 

Candidates for admission by examination must present: 
either 1: 

English; A and B. 

Hiilory; (any two of the four topics A, B, C and D). 
Mathematics; A, B and C. 

Any two of the four languages; Greek (B, C, D, E): Latin 
(B, C, D, E, F, 0} : French (A, B) : and German (A, B) : 

•The Mlowhis indinduali conduct eummatioiiB for admissiini to the first-ycnr 
gImia in the respective cities in whicrh they reside, about the middle of Ju 
fixaminatioria for AdmiBsion to advanced standing art conducts ottty at the U 
versity. Dr. J. L, Rothroclc, Lowry Arcade, St. Paul. Minn. ; Dr. W. S. Elldn. 
Luekie Street. Atlanta. Ga.: Dr. J. W. Whitbecli. 115 East Avenue, Rochester. 
N.Y.: Dr.W.T.Bell. r3jPDwellStreet,SanFranci5co.Cal.; Dr. Edward Rar 
Jr.. GBlveslon, Texas; Dr. B. M, WalVer. Danville. Va.; Rev. D. McNeill, ( 
loltetown, P.E.I.; Dr. Benj. B. Cate«, Knonville.Tenn.: Dr. G. Qowes Van Wart, 
Predricton, N. B.; Dr. J. W. Sherer, New Rid((e Building. Kansas C 
Oilliert A. PfouU. Mercantile Building, Salt Lake Cily, Utah; L. 
Friend. i4> Wiscon^n Street. Milwaukee. Wis. ; Dr. Fronk H. Edsall. 514 N. Henry 
Street. Madison, Wis.; W, B. Seeley, Ph. D.. ign K. Florea Street. San Antonio. 
Teias; Dr. B. J. Angle, 1 115 O Street. Lincohi, Neb.; Dr. T. F. 
Avenue, Boston. Mast. 

and address are given, for exact information as to the place of the examination. 
and the dale and houn. For other information, the applicant should address the 
Dean of the Department of Medicine. Specimen examinaUon papers and descrip- 
tive circulars mil be aent by the Dean upon rwiuest. 
A fM ot ts.eo. payabte to the examitier, is chareed to every student taking 
' IS outside of Philadelphia 



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REQUIREMENTS. 

Or II: 

English; A and B. 

History; (any (uk> of the four topics A, B, C and D). 
Malhtmattcs: A, B, C and D. 
And any two of the following languages ; 

Latin; B, C and three books of the iEneid; and 
French; A and B; and 
Gtrman: A and B, 
Or III: 

English; A and B. 

History: (any (wo of the f<mT topics A, B, C and D). 

Mathematics; A, B and C. 

And any two of the following languages: 
Latin; B, C and three books of the Mneid; and 
French; A and B; and 
German; A and B. 
Or IV: 

English; A and B. 

History; (any two of the four topics A, B, C and D). 

Mathematics; A, B, C, D and E. 

Physics; and either 

Latin; B, C and three books of the Mneid; at 

French; A and B; or 

German; A and B. 



ADVANCED BXANDINa IN BUBJEOTa. 

Any graduate in Arts or Science of a college recognized by this 
University who has completed any of the studies of the first year of 
the Medical Course, viz: General Chemistry, Physiological Chem- 
istry, Anatomy (excepting the Central Nervous System and the 
Organs of Special Sense) or Bacteriology, and who has passed 
satisfactorily the examination given by the professor of the respec- 
tive branch in this medical school, may be excused from that 
portion of the study given in the first year of the course, pro- 
vided that he utilize the time scheduled for that study in advanced 
work in Chemistry, Anatomy, or Bacteriology, according to his 
preference and capabilities; or in anticipating work of the second 
year in so far as the roster may permit. 



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3IO DBPAKTUBNT OF MBDICINB. 

ADMIB8ION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Candidates for admission to advanced standing who have not 
received a collegiate degree, or who have not passed the examina- 
tion for admission to the Freshman Class of a recognized college 
conferring degrees in course; or who have not received a diploma 
from an acceptable high or nom)al school, will be required to pass 
the examination required of candidates for admission to the First- 
year Class, in addition to the examination in the subjects italicized 
below. Results of examinations in these several subjects which 
may have been passed at other medical schools will not be accepted 
in lieu of the requirements here prescribed. 

Examinations for admission to advanced standing for the session 
1906-07 will begin in the new Medical Laboratories on Monday, 
September 14, 1906, at a p. m.* 

Candidates who have attended one course in a recognized medical 
school (not Homceopathic or Eclectic) in which the reqtiired aimual 
session is not less than eight months in length, are admitted to the 
SecoND-YBAR Class upon passing a satisfactory examination in 
General and Physiological Chemistry, Bacteriology, Anatomy (except- 
ing the Central Nervous System and the Organs of Special Sense) and 
Pomology. 

Candidates who have attended two courses in a recognized regular 
medical school in which the required annual session is not less than 
eight months in length, are admitted to the Tbird-ybah Class upon 
passing a satisfactory examination in General and Physiological 
Chemistry, Bacteriology, Pathology, Materia Medica and Pharmacy, 
and the entire subjects of Anatomy and Physiology. 

Candidates who have attended three courses in a recognized 
regular medical school in which the required annual session is not 
less than eight months in length, are admitted to the Fourth-ybar 
Class upon passing a satisfactory examination in Genial and 
Physiological Chemistry, Bacteriology, Materia Medica and Pharmacy, 
the entire subjects of Anatomy and Physiology, Applied Anatomy, 
Pathology and Gross Pathology, Therapeutics, Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, and Ophthalmology. 

Graduates of recognized regular medical schools, in which the 

* student! f ram other caUeges Bdmitted to the Second-year CIabi. who have not 
had instruction in Practical Normal Hutology. Physiological Chemidry and in 
Bacteriology, will be reiuircd to moke up such deficiency by taking a special 
course. Students admitted to the Third-year Class vill be required to makeup 
deficiencies in Piactical Nontial Histology. Physiological ChemBtcy, Bacteriology, 
and in Practical Pathological Hiitology. 



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ADMISSION REOUII 

required annual session is not less than eight months tn length, 
and in which four years' attendance upon instruction is required to 
obtain the degree in Medicine, are admitted to the Fourth-year 
Class mth the understanding that they pass examinations in 
ObsbHrus, Therapeutics, Pathology and Gross Pathology, either at 
the beginning or at the end of the fourth year, in addition to the 
regular examinations of that year. 



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1.— rNDEBGBADVATG IKSTBUCTIOIT. 

PIBST PBKIOD. 

The course of instruction extends over a period of four Tears, 
with one session in each year, beginning on the last Friday of Sep- 
tember and ending on the third Wednesday in Jvme. 

The course may be said to be divided into two periods of two 
years each: the first period devoted to the fundamental medical 
sciences, Chemistry, Anatoiny, Physiology, and Pathology; the 
second period to the clinical subjects, Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics 
and the specialties. 

The subjects of the first two years have been arranged according 
to a modification of the concentration system. By this system the 
student is enabled to concentrate his energy upon one or two sub- 
jects, and must master these before he is allowed to continue the 
course. Thus the first year is devoted chiefly to anatomy, including 
embryology, normal histology, osteology, and to chemistry — general 
and physiological. In order that the student may enter upon hia 
study of pathology in the second year with a clear conception of 
the factors that play so important a part in the etiology o£ disease, 
he receives in the first year his instruction in bacteriology. 

The subjects of the second year follow in logical sequence thoee 
of the year preceding. Having been grounded in the structure of 
the human subject in a state of health, and having familiarized 
himself with the chemistry of normal tissties and body fluids, the 
student enters upon the study of the functions which the tissues 
of the body perform in a state of health, and the disturbance of 
functions and alterations of structures that are manifested In 
disease. The time of the second year is thus given o^■er almost 
wholly to physiology and pathology. In addition to these the 
work of the second year includes two subjects preparatory to the 
studies of the third year — Materia Medica and Phaimacy. and 
Physical Diagnosis. 

Instruction upon the subjects of the first two years is almost 
entirely practical, so that the greater part of the student's time Ss 
spent in the laboratories. In the new Laboratories of Pathology, 
Physiology and Pharmacology, which were opened in June. 1904,' 
the students of this department are afforded imsiupassed facilities 
for practical work in these fundamental subjects 



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UNDERGRADUATE INSTRUCTION. 3I3 

SECOND FEBIOD. 

With the beginning of the third year the student enters upon the 
Gecond period, which covers the third and fourth years, and is 
devoted almost exclusively to instruction in the so-called clinical 
subjects — Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and the specialties. 
There is no sharp dividing line between the work of the third and 
fourth years, so that the courses in the clinical subjects may be 
eaid to cover a period of two years. 

From a glance at the tabular representation of the hours of 
instruction for the third and fourth years (later pages), it will be 
seen that arrangements have been made to keep tlie student fully 
occupied throughout each day. No especial opportunities arc 
offered the student to engage in special lines of work before he 
graduates. In point of fact, any desire to specialize before grad- 
uation is rather discouraged. It has always been the object and 
aim of this institution to prepare its students for the practice of 
general medicine, not to graduate them as "specialists." lis policy 
fcu been to offer the student a wetl-gTmltd , vclt-proporiumrd and com- 
prehensive course, so that upon his graduation he stands prepared 
to practice medicine. Should he decide to take up a specialty or 
to engage in teaching or investigation after graduation, he will be 
the better prepared by his broad education, and still better prepared 
if he has had several years of clinical experience. 

The methods of instruction are varied, but mostly practical. 
The Utter include ward visit-s, ward classes, clinical conferences 
and practical observation in the wards and out-patient department 
of the University Hospital, Didactic lectures, general clinics and 
recitations have been found indispensable, but play a less con- 
spicuous part in the coiuse. 

The fadlities for instruction are abundant. It is possible to 
offer to each student opportunities to come into personal contact 
under proper supervision with a large and varied series of cases. 
The University Hospital, with its capacity of 300 beds, is operated 
exclusively for the benefit of the Department of Medicine. Ad- 
joining the University campus is the Philadelphia Hospital, with 
a capacity of 1,000 beds, where the wards are open to both teachers 
and students throughout the year. 

In addition to these, extramural teaching is conducted in the 
Children's and Pennsylvania Hospitals by members of the teaching 
■taS. A voluntary course upon the contagious diseases, conducted 
at the Municipal Hospital, is offered to the members of the Gradu- 
ating Class. 



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ANATOMT. 



Professor of Anatomy. 

Associate Professor of Ap- 
plied Anatomy. 

Acting , Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Demonstrator of Histology 
and Embryology. 

Demonstrator of Osteology. 

Associate in Anatomy. 



Assistant Demonstrators of 
Anatomy. 



\ Assistant Demonstrators of 
i Histology. 
Prosector to Professor of 

Anatomy. 
Assistant Prosector to Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy. 
Prosector to Associate Pro- 
fessor of Applied Anaf- 

} Voluntary Assistants in 
Histological Laboratory. 



Of the following courses in Anatomy, I to XII, inclusive, are 
required of candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, All 
arc completed during the first year, except Courses III and XI. 
which are completed during the second year, and Course IV, 
completed during the third year. Courses XIII to XVII are not 
reqturcd, but may be taken by students who have had satisfactory 
preparatory training. 

I. SvsTBMATic Anatomy, including Cytology, Gbnbral E«- 
BRvoLOGY, General Histology, Ostbology, and Myology. 
Professor Piersol. — October t to February i ; four hours weekly. 



GeORGB a. PlERSOL. M. D 

GwiLVM G. Davis, M. D.. M.R.C.S. 

(Eng.), 
Gborgb Fbtteholf. M. D., , 

William H. F. Addison, M. D., . 

Walter S. Cornell. M, D., . . . 

EwiNG Taylor, M. D. 

J. Rex HoBENsAcK, M, D., 

John J. Robrecht, M. D 

Richard F. Gbhlack, M. D„ . . 

Wm. E. Quicksall, M- D 

Howard A. Sutton, M. D., . . . 

Rae S. Dorsett, M. D. 

Walter S. Cornell, M. D 

George M. Dorrancb, M. D., . . 

Henry S. Wieder, M. D., 

George H. Chambers, M. D.. . 

Harold B. Wood, M. D 

Lewis H. Adler, Jr., M. D., 

J. Francis Walsh, M. D 

ASTLEY P. C. ASHHURET, M. D., 



J. Leon Herman 

Carl Roscow Stbinkb, 
P. F. Williams 



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VHDERGRADUATE INSTRUCTION, 335 

II. Systematic Anatomy of thb Okcans. Professor Pierstd. — 
February i to May 19; four hours weekly. 

III. Anatouy op thb Central Nbrvous Svstbu and Organs 
OP Special Sense. Professor Piersol. — February i to May 11; 
each section of class three hours weekly. 

IV. Course in Applied Anatomy. Dt. Davis. — October 1 to 
May 1 2 ; each section of class one hour weekly. 

V. Laboratory Course in General Histology. Dr. Addison 
and assistants .-^October i until December 20; each section two 
mornings weekly. 

VI. Laboratory Course »n the Histology of Organs, Dr. 
Addison and assistants. — January i to April 1 ; each section two 
mornings weekly, 

VII. Laboratory Coursb in Embryology. Dt. Addison and 
assistants. — April i to May la; each section two mornings weekly. 

VIII. Osteology, Dr. Cornell. — October i to February i ; two 
hours weekly, 

IX. Laboratory Course in Osteology. Drs, Cornell and Sul- 
foH,— October i to February 1 ; each section eleven hours for seven 

X. Practical Study op the Extreuities by Dissection, Dr. 
Fctlerolf and assistants. — October 1 to May 11; each section two 
hours daily for foml^een weeks. 

XL Practical Study of the Head, Neck, Thorax and Abdo- 
men. Dr. Fetlerolf and assistants. — October i to May 1 1 ; each sec- 
tion two hours daily tor fourteen weeks. 

XII. Demonstrations. Dr. Taylor. — October 9 to May 13; 
one hour weekly. 

XIII, Special Course on Anatomy op Sense Organs. Pro- 
fessor Piersol. — October 15 to December 15; Wednesday mornings. 

7 Fractures and Luxa- 

XV. Advancbd Laboratory Course in Vbrtbbratb Embry- 
ology. Professor Piersol and Dr. Taylor. — October 15 to May i; 
mornings. 



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3l6 DBPAKTHBNT C 

XVI. Laboratory Course IN Microscopical Technique. Pro- 
fessor Pier sol and Dr. Addison. — April i to May 13; three mornings 
weekly. 

XVII. Advakced Work and Original Investigation. Pra- 
jessoT Piersol. — October ij to May 12. 

Courses I and II, four lectures a week throughout the session 
present systematically the principles, as well as details, of human 
anatomy, including structure and development. Beginning with 
the structiire and lite history of the cell, the fundamental processes 
of development are traced as far as the evolution of the general 
body-form. The tissues in general, and the connective substances 
in particular as an introduction to osteology, next claim attention. 
Succeeding the study of the human skeleton, including the joints, 
the muscular system is presented. Consideration of the digestive 
tract and its appendages, and of the respiratory oif ans, is followed 
by that of the gen i to-urinary orgajis. The discussion of the vascu- 
lar and nervous systems is next undertaken; the detailed study of 
the cerebro-spinal axis, and the organs of special sense, however, 
being deferred until the second year. Especial pains are taken to 
impress the broader morphological significance of the details of 
human anatomy. These courses are exceptionally well illtistratcd 
by means of charts, lantern, models, museum preparations and 
fresh dissections, the unusual resources of the Wistar Institute of 
Anatomy and Biology being additionally available, not only for 
class-instruction, but also for individual study. 

Courses V and VI occupy two roomings each week, until April i, 
during which time the student is required to mount, study and 
draw preparations of all of the important tissues and organs of 
the human body, as well as to learn the methods employed in 
their preparation. 

Course VII is devoted to the mounting and study of series of 
chick and mammalian embryos. The laboratory is equipped with 
excellent microscopes of recent model, and supplied with the most 
approved apparatus for histological and embryological work. 

Course IX. in the osteologicat laboratory, is conducted for a 
period of forty-two days, two and one-quarter hours daily, for 
each section into which the class is divided. The exercises include 
the detailed study of the skeleton, each student being provided 
with bones which he is required to draw, noting the important 
features and principal muscular attachments. The joints are also 



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VNDBRGIIADUATB INSTRUCTION. 317 

studied on finished dissections. Bones are loaned to students upon 
conditions similar to those governing the issue of books from a 

Courses X and XI form a most important part of the first and 
second year work, every student being required to carefully dissect 
and pass practical examination upon the cadaver. The class is 
divided into sections, each of which works at least two hours 
daily for two periods of forty-two days each, under the close super- 
vision of the Demonstrator of Anatomy and his assistants. Excel- 
lent and abundant dissecting- material is assured by the improved 
methods of preservation and the facilities for cold storage. Oppor- 
tunity for additional work is afforded to students who deare to 
devote more time to practical anatomy. 

Course III, continuing the systematic instruction in the second 
year, is given in sections, two mornings each week, after February i . 
These hours are devoted to teaching each student individually the 
details of the central nervous ssratem and the organs of special 
sense. A generous supply of dissections, microscopical prepara- 
tions and models insures adequate illustration of these subjects. 
Careful dissection of the brain by each student under the immediate 
direction of the Professor of Anatomy and his assistants is a feature 
of the course. Permanent demonstrations of the anatomy of the 
central nervous system are available at all times for individual 
study and review. In addition to the tests held at the completion 
of his dissections, each student is required to pass on the cadaver 
an examination, held by the Professor of Anatomy, covering the 
entire body, as a preliminary to the written examination at the 
end of the second year. 

Course IV is a continuation of the study of anatomy, but from 
the standpoint of its application, and not as an abstract science. 
The course embraces surface anatomy, the outlines of the organs, 
the position of the joints, significance of bony points, muscular 
swells, the position and means of recognizing the various nerves 
and arteries; the influence of the muscles in fractures; the con- 
struction of joints in reference to luxations; a knowledge of the 
parts incised in amputations; how the parts influence and direct 
the progress of abscesses; a knowledge of the lymphatics in refer- 
ence to pyogenic and carcinomatous infections; a knowledge of 
the position and relation of the abdominal oi^ans necessary for 
diagnostic and operative purposes; also those of the chest; cerebral 
localization, paralysis, etc., and innumerable other facts. Atten- 
tion is given to the relation of the various tissues and ta^aa to 



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JlS OBPARTMBNT t 

each other, so that the operations on those parts may be under- 
stood. It is the object of the course to present to the student the 
subject of anatomy in such manner as to enable him to utilize it 
in forming diagnoses and applying methods of treatment. 

Instruction is given by demonstrations. These embrace the 
living and dead body and anatomical preparations. Special dis- 
sections and preparations are made to illustrate and eitplain 
fractures, dislocations, amputations, ligation of arteries, the position 
and relation of organs by frozen sections, etc,, and also by injec- 
tions of wax, the affections of the joints, palmar and other abscesses, 
etc. 

The class is divided into three sections, each of which attends 
one hour a week. 

Two minor examinations are given during the term and a final 
one, both written and practical, at the completion of the term. 



BACTEBIOIMQ-X AND HTGIENE. 

Alexander C. Abbott, M. D.,* Pepper Professor of Hygiene. 

and Bacteriology. 
David H. Bbrgey, M. D., Assistant Professor of Bacterid 

dogy. 
Nathaniel Gilderslebvb, M.D,, First Assistant in Bacteriology. 
James B. Rucker, Jr., M. D.,. . Second Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Sylvester J. Dbehan, M. D.,. . Third Assistant in Bacteriology. 

BACrBBIOLOOT. 

I. Lectures. Prof essor Abbott. — A course of lectures preparatory 

to the practical work of the first-year students is given from October 
1 until the Christmas recess, one lecture weekly. This course com- 
prehends those elementary phases of the subject with which the 
student should be familiar at the time he begins his practical work. 

II. Laboratory Course, Drs. Bergey and Gildersleeve.—Tbe 
course of lectures is followed by the laboratory exercises. These 
begin February i, and continue until the end of the year. 

The number of hours given to the practical work in this branch 
is about eighty to each student of the First-year Class. During 
this time they receive instruction in the use of the microscope in 
bacteriological work; the methods of cultivating bacteria and of 
isolating them in pure cultures; the steps necessary to the identi- 

* Abwnt on PuUic BusiiHW. 



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UNDSRGRADUATB INSTRUCTION. 3:9 

fication of particular species of bacteria; the relation of bacteria lo 
infection: and the methods of sterilization and disinfection. Such 
students as den>onstrate ability to advance beyond the class work 
are given the opportunity to do so, and are encouraged to pursue 
such studies providing the latter do not interfere with hours 
assigned to other subjects. 

The course in detail covers the following subjects: 
1. Apparatus employed — sterilizers, incubators, pressure regu- 
lators, thermostats, etc. 

3. Culture media, methods of preparation, sterilization methods. 

3. Characteristics of cultures of bacteria in general and of special 
fomu. 

4. Methods of obtaining, from mixtures of different bacteria, 
individual species in pure cultures. 

5. HicroscofHC technique. Use and care of instruments, staining 
from cultures, section cutting, and staining and mounting of tissues. 

6. Pathogenic bacteria isolation, identificatian and inoculation. 

7. Disinfection, thermal and chemical, methods and apparatus, 
modes of testing efficiency. 

8. Bacteriological investigation of water. 
g. Bacteriological investigation of air, 

10. Bacteriological investigation of soil. 

H¥OfEMK. 

III. Lectures, Professor Abbott. — The teaching in Hygienecon- 
sists of a course of didactic lectures to the Fourth-year Medical 
students, and of practical exercises in the laboratory. The didactic 
course is compulsory upon all students receiving the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, while the practical course is voluntary. 

The lectures are given twice weekly, from February 1 until the 
end of the term. They cover the following topics of general sani- 
tary importance: 

A consideration of the factors concerned in the direct causation 
of disease, and the manifold conditions of life that indirectly favor 
the occurrence of disease among individuals, groups of individuals 
and communities. 

A brief sketch of the important transmissible and epidemic 
diseases, embracing a discussion of their modes of transmission, 
portals of infection, geographical and seasonal distribution and 
the approved methods of thdr prevention. 

A consideration of prophjdaxis in general, embracing disinfec- 



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330 

tion and disinfectants, protective vaccination and the anti-toxic 

state, the dispoial of the dead after infectious diseases, and quaran- 

The atmosphere, from the chemical, physical, and biolc^cal 
Standpoints; the air of enclosed spaces; the problems of ventila- 
tion and heating; the various pollutions of the atmosphere, such, 
for instance, as those from the soil, from industries, from sewers. 
etc., and their influence on health and disease. 

Water — its sanitary agnificance; the characteristics of waters 
from various sources and their suitability to domestic needs; the 
pollutions to which waters from different sources are liable; the 
biological significance of these pollutions; interpretations of the 
results of analyses; natural and artificial purification of waters; 
the relation of water to health and disease. 

Sewage — the part taken by the soil and its constituents in the 
disposal of organic waste; the characteristics of sewage from differ- 
ent sources; the various methods for the disposal of sewage; the 
influence of sewage disposal upon the health of communities. 

IV. Practical Course. Professor Abbott and Dr. Bergey. — The 
following subjects, arranged especially for the needs of those stu- 
dents intending to enter upon the practical pursuit of sanitary 
work, are taken up: 

1. The atmosphere, climate and meteorological observations 
and records, chemical analysis, bacteriological investigation, 
methods of investigation, methods of ventilation and heating. 

2. Water — physical, chemical and bacteriological investigation 
of water-supplies; methods of obtaining samples; qualitative and 
quantitative analysis for impurities; collection, storage and puri- 
fication of water intended for domestic use; effects of filters, aera- 
tion, etc. 

3. Sewage disposal, sewers, house drainage and the air of sewers. 

4. Disposal of refuse, cremation of garbage, etc. 

5. Soils and building sites, physical, chemical and bacteriological 
investigation, soil and moisture, ground air, 

6. Foods — adulteration, milk and meat inspections. 

7. Clothing — microscopic examination, poisonous dyes. 

S. Management of contagious diseases. Practical tests of dif- 
ferent methods of disinfection, chemical and thermal; notification, 
isolation and quarantine. 

g. Vital statistics, registration and methods of tabulation. 
10. OSenrave and dangerous trades. 



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DUATE INSTRUCTION. 33I 

V. ORtODJAL Invbstigation, In addition to the foregoing set 
couraes, facilities are offered by the Laboratory for special work. 
Students and graduates of this school or elsewhere will find oppor- 
tunities for advanced work on any of the subjects propedy coming 
within the scope of the Laboratory. Arrangements for such work 
can be made by correspondeiice with the Diiector of the Labora- 
tory. 



(Bbginnino October i, 1906.) 

The authorities of the University of Pennsylvania realize the 
efforts which are being made in communities throughout the coun- 
try to obtain officials who have had some special training in matters 
pertaining to public health. Each year the demand for men of 
this type (either as chiefs of departments or in some subordinate 
position) is increased, and at the present time there is a lack of 
men qualified to fill such positions. To meet the needs of such 
instruction, the University has introduced into its curriculum a 
course in public health, which includes instruction under the fol- 
lowing headings: 

Sanitary BNOiHBBRtNO. Including the subject of water sup- 
plies, sewerage systems, street cleaning, disposal of waste, etc. 

Sanitary Legislation. A study of the movement for sanitary 
reform, and of the laws enacted relating to public health, and the 
methods of enforcement employed in Great Britain and the United 
Sutes. 

iNSPBcTtON OF Meat, Milk and Othbr Animal Products. The . 
methods of preparation and preservation of the same, the conduct 
of dairies, creameries, etc., and demonstrations of the diseases of 
animals transmissible to man. 

The Sanitary Enoineering or Buildinos. Including demon- 
strations of systems of heating, ventilation, plumbing and drainage, 
the study of plans, etc. 

Social and Vital Statistics in the United States. An 
examination of statistical methods and their results, with special 
reference to vital statistics and to city 'populations. 

Practical Methods Used in Sanitary Work, Indudirw 
water, air and milk analyses, studies in ventilation and heutinj;. 



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investigation of the soil, methods of disinfection, Sterilization, etc. 
{This is purely laboratory instruction.) 

Gbnbral Hygiene. As applied to the community, including 
lectures upon the causation of disease — exciting and predisposing, 
methods of prevention- — including isolation, quarantine, natural 
and acquired immunity, protective inoculation, vaccination, and 
the antitoxic state, methods of house disinfection, the means em- 
ployed, suggestions for the organization of sanitary work, the influ- 
ence of water supplies and sewage disposal on the public health, etc. 

Personal Hygiene. Including the physiology of exercise, the 
adaptation of exercise to the various physical requirements, the 
use of exercise for the prevention and correction of deformities, 
the methods of examination and record keeping, the routine physi- 
cal examination of growing children and the relation of air, food, 
bathing, etc., to health and development; the byi^ene of the school 



CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOIiOGlT. 

John Marshall, M. D., Professor of Chemistry and Toxi- 

Nat. Sc. D., LL. D., colagy. 

Daniel W. Fettbrolp, M, D,, . . .DemonstTalor of Chemistry. 

Philip B. Hawk, Ph. D., Demonstrator of Physiological 

Chemistry. 
Leon A. Ryan. Ph. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Chem- 

Instruction in General and Physiological Chemistry for the 
■ degree in Medicine is confined to the first year of the course, and 
consists of lectures and laboratory work. 

I. General Chemistry; 

1. Lectures. Professor Marshall. — During the period from the 
beginning of the session until February i, three lectures weekly 
are given, in which theoretical chemistry, stoichiometry, system- 
atic chemistry, and the general principles of volumetric analysis 
are considered, 

2. Laboratory Work. Drs. Fetterolf and Ryan. — During the 
period from the beginning of the session imtil February i. six 
hours' attendance in the laboratory in two periods of three hou's 
each in each week is required of each student. Qualitative analysis 



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INSTRUCTION. 333 

in which tests are made, and the equations pcrta.iiiiiig thereto are 
written, for the commonly occurring bases and acids, and separa- 
tions of bases and acids contained in complex mixtures are made. 
Gravimetric analysis. Acidimetiyand alkalimetry in which normal, 
semi-nonnal, deci-normal, etc., solutions are prepared and are 
employed in actual quantitative determinations. 

II. pHvsiOLoaiCAL Chemistry and Toxicology: 

1, Lbcturbs, Prof tssor Marshall. — During the period from Feb- 
ruary I until the end of the session two lectures are given weekly 
in which the important parts of the subjects are treated. 

3. Laboratory Work. Dr. Hawk. — During the period from 
February 1 until the end of the session six hours' attendance in 
the laboratory in two periods of three hours each in each week is 
required of each student. The course consists of studies of carbo- 
hydrates, proteins, the soUd tissues, salivary, pancreatic, and gastric 
digestion, bile, biliary concretions, milk, blood, stomach contents. 
normal and pathological urine, feces, general food analysts, and 
examination of patholo^cal fluids and solids whenever such material 
is available. 

Toxicology: Examination for volatile poisons, alkaloids, and 
metallic poisons placed in organic tissues by the instructor, dcteC' 
tion of blood-stains, spectroscopic and chemical examination of 
hemoglobin and its various derivatives. 

III. AnvANCBD Lasoratory Course in Physiolooical Chem- 
istry open to persons sufdciently prepared to undertake such work. 

IV. Advancbd Laboratory Course in Urine Analysis open 
to peT«)iis qualified by previous preparation to undertake such work 

V. Laboratory Course in Toxicology open to persons quali- 
fied by previous training in chemical technique to undertake such 

VL Research Work for those qualified by previous training to 
undertake it. 



PHY8IOLOOT. 

Edward T. Rkichbkt, M. D Professor of Physiology. 

Edward Lodholz, M. D., Demonstrator of Physiology. 

E»w«.D B. M.,0., M. D ) t„i^^ i„ Phriohg,. 

Rbubxh a. Booia, M. D. / 

D„t,i.a,G00glt' 



334 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

The instruction in Physiology embraces systematic courses of 
lectures, practical work by the student, demonstrations and con- 
ferences given during and extending throughout the second year. 
The students, therefore, before entering upon their work in this 
department, have been trained in Chemistry, Anatomy and Normal 
Histology. 

I. Lecturbs. Professor Reieherl. — Four lectures a week on the 
general subject of Nutrition, from October i to February i. 

II. Lbctuhes, Professor Reichert, — Four lectures a week on the 
Heat Mechanism and the Nervous and Muscular Systems, from 
February i to May »o. 

The lectiues are copiously illustrated by tables, charts, diagrams 
and drawings, this being supplemented and considerably extended 
by the courses of instruction in the demonstration room and labora- 

ni. Students' Laboratory Work, in illustration and ex- 
tension OP Course I. Professor Reichert, Dr. Lodholx and assis- 

IV. Students' Laboratory Work, bbaring a similar rela- 
tion TO Course II. Professor Reichert, Dr. Lodkoit and assistants. 

The course of practical work has been carefully and system- 
atically planned, chiefly upon the inductive method of instruction, 
and from seven to ten hours a week are assigned to each student 
for this work, together with demonstrations and conferences. The 
main objects sought in the laboratory are: the illustration of the 
lectures by the moat impressive methods; the supplementation of 
collateral work to further impress important fundamental facts and 
broaden their application; the training in the use of instruments 
of precision, with especial reference to the use of apparatus in clinical 
and experimental medicine; the cultivation of the individual's 
powers of observation and deduction; the encouragement of accu- 
racy of expression and method, of collateral work, and the co- 
ordination of facts. 

The instruction in the practical work is given under the direction 
of the Professor of Physiology by the Demonstrator and his assis- 
tants. Each student is assigned a table and the necessary apparatus, 
and works under the direct supervision of the teaching staff. He 
b directed in technique and in what to observe, but he is self- 
dependent as to his results and conclusions, an4 roust present 



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UNDBRCItADUATB INSTRUCTION. 335 

them for examination in the form of "graphic records" and written 
reports at the end of each exercise. 

V and VI. Demonstrations. Dr. Lodholz atid Dr. Mrigs. — 
Two corresponding series of demonstrations, which take the place 
of practical work when the latter is of a character too difficult or 
otherwise undesirable for the student to pursue; as, for instance, 
work involving the use of complicated or very expensive apparatus, 
the employment of mammals, etc. These demonstrations arc given 
in their proper relation to a series of conferences, in which the work 
covered by the lectures is reviewed. 

VII. CoNFBRENCBS. Dr. Lodkoh and Dr. Meigs. — Conferences, 
which cover the subject-matter of the lectures, are held at appro- 
priate times. 

VIII. Journal Club. Recent work in Physiology is reported by 
the members of the department, and by those actively engaged in 
research and advanced work in the laboratories. 

IX. Seminary. Problems under investigation in the depart- 
ment are introduced for the mutual advantages of discussion. 
Conducted by Professor Reichert and the stafE of the depart- 

X. Graduatb Courses. Professor Reichert. — These courses are 
arranged to suit the requirements of those presenting themselves 
for the work. Rooms and apparatus are placed at the disposal of 
such students, and every facility is offered for the prosecution of 
research. 

XI. Elective Courses in Advanced P«vsiologt. Professor 
Reichert. — These are offered to students of the third and fourth years 
in Medicine. The int<:ntion is to give to those who may desire it an 
opportunity to continue the laboratory work of the previous year 
in ways that are impossible with large classes, and as a foundation 
for the prosecution of research. 

XII. Elective. Dr. Lodhoh. — Elective course of lectures on 
digestion and metabolism in domesticated animals, one hour 
weekly from October i to January 15, 

Xin. Research. The laboratory offers all the advantages of its 
facilities and equipment for the investigation of problems in Physi- 
ology. This may be arranged for at any time by ci 
with Professor Reichert. 



£1 



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33^ DBPARTMBNT OP MBDICINB. 

PATHOWM3T. 

Allen J. Suith, M. D. Professor of PaHult^gy. 

Leo Loeb, M. D,, . .AssistatU Professor of Experimental Pathology. 
Henry R. Alburdbb. M. D., . .Acting Demtmstraior of Pathology. 

wllliau t. cumuins, m. d 1 

Sahubl Leopold, M. D., 

Philip S. Stout. M. D 

Thomas S.GiTHBNS, M, D Assistant Denumslrators of 

RuFus B. ScARLBTT, M. D., Pothology. 

William W. Cadhcrv, M. D. 

Ralph S. Lavbnson, M. D., 

David Kapp, J 

SCBOICAI. r ATHOLOOT, 

Charlbs H. Frazibr, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery, 

Georob p. MOllbr, M. D. Instrucior in Surgery, 

Hbnry S. Wiedbr, M. D Assistant Demonstralor of Surgical 

Pathology. 
John Speesb, M. D Voluntary Assistant Demonstrator of 

Surgical Pathology. 



M BDRO-PATHOLOGT. 

William G. Sfillbr, M. D. Professor of N euro-Pathology. 

Theodore H. Wbisknbubg, M. D., Instructor in N euro- Pathology. 
Carl D. Camp, M. D.. , Assistant in Neuropathology. 

OYNECOLOGICAI. FATHOLUOT. 

John G. Clark. M. D- Professor of Gynecology. 

Brooke M. Anspach. M. D., 1 , . ^ 

Charles C. Norris, M. D I '"^-"^^ '" Gynecology, 

OPHTBAI-MIO PATHOLOOT. 

George E. de Schweinit2, M. D , . . .Professor of O^tthaltuology. 
Charles M. Hosmer, M. D,, 

Alfred R. Allen, M. D., Director of Pholomicrography. 

Louis Schmidt \ Artists 

Erwin p. Fabbr i 



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UNDBKGRADUATB INSTRUCTION. 337 

Instruction in Pathology extends over the second half of the 
first year and the fiUl second and third yeais of the medical ciuric- 
nlum. The plan of instruction embraces a general course in 
pathology under the direct supervision of the chair of Pathology. 
and a group of courses of applied special pathology, limited to the 
third year, in charge of the staff of instructors of the clinical branch 
concerned. In this latter group, which looks eventually toward 
the presentation of all special applications advantageously taught 
by laboratory methods, there have thus far been organized courses 
in Surgical Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Neuro- pathology. Gyn- 
ecological Pathology and Ophthalmologic Pathology. In each 
division of the subject except the last named, in which the labora- 
tory work is liniited to demonstrations, the plan of teaching includes 
systematic lectures, demonstrations and practical class exercises. 

The general instruction in pathology includes the following 

I. Blbhbntary Pathology and Etiologv. Professor Smith. — 
A series of lectures, occupying two hours each week in the second 
half of the term, is ^ven to the First-year Class upon elementary 
pathology; including consideration of the types of disease, classi- 
fication of disease, termination of disease, the dgns of death, and 
upon etiology. In the latter connection, among other subjects, the 
outlines of animal parasitology and the immediate pathologic rela- 
tions of the vegetable parasites are taken up. Illustrative demon- 
strations as required by the subject arc employed. In addition, 
where suitable, as in connection with embolism, thrombosis, regen- 
eration and inflammation, work of an experimental type is included 
to aid in the explanation of such processes. 

II. Gbnbral Pathology. Professor Smith aitd assistants. — This 
subject is given to the Second-year Class. Three lectures each 
week for the first halt of the term are devoted to the various retro- 
grade and progressive elementary pathological processes, to regen- 
eration, inflammation, the specific inflammations, tumor formation 
and to teratology. In the laboratory of pathological histology, 
each student devotes three periods of two and one-half hours each 
week to the preparation and study of illustrative tissues by the 
microscope, the gross features of the processes discussed being cor- 
rdated by frequent demonstration of material in the laboratory 

III. Spbcial Pathology. Professor Smith avd assistants. — In- 
Btruction in the special pathology of the various organs, with partic- 



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333 DEPARTMENT C 

ular reference to the pathological phyBiology of each and the devel- 
opment of symptoms of disease, is taken up systematically in lectures 
in the second half uf the second year; and in the laboratory of 
pathological histology the minute changes of the more important 
diseases of each organ arc studied in as close relation as possible 
with the lecture instruction. At the same time brief demonstra- 
tions of the gross appearances of the diseased organs are made; and 
when profitable, as in connection with the subject of immunity 
from infectious diseases, experimental work is introduced for the 
elucidation of special problems. 

In the third year the lectures on special patbolc^y are continued 
two hours each week — the entire instruction in the branch thus 
covering one and one-half years. 

IV, Gross Morbid Anatomy and Autopsy -Ma king. Professor 
Stnilh and assistants.- — For one and one-half hours each week during 
the third year for each student, demonstrations of general and 
special gross morbid anatomical specimens are given; and instruc- 
tions carried out in the performance of autopsies. The class is 
divided into small sections, and as autopsies are being performed in 
the University Hospital and Blockley Hospital, the students are 
required to attend, and participate in the work. 

Opportunity for the completion of such investigations by histo- 
logical and bacteriological methods is afforded the student in the 
laboratories of the department. 

V. Advanced Work. Professor Smith and assistants. — With 
the increased space and added facilities afforded by the McManes 
Laboratory of Pathology, material development of class instruction 
in the line of special pathology and pathological technology has been 
obtained; and there are oRered to advanced students and post- 
graduates, as elective studies, special courses in advanced patho- 
logical histology, museum work and autopsy-making, in experi- 
mental pathology, in pathological bacteriology and animal parasit- 
ology; and opportunity is afforded those suitably trained to under- 
take special investigations in the one or other type pathological 
problems, such work being open at any period during the term or 



In addition to the above, the following courses are presented by 
the various clinical groups in the special departments of the Mc- 
Manes Liiboratory of Pathology: 

VI. Surgical Pathology. Drs. Fraaer and Mullcr, — (See Sur- 
gery . page 347-) 



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VII. Clinical PATHOLOor. 

VIII. Nburo-Pathologv. Dr. Spillcr.—{See Ncu 
iSS) 

IX, Gynbcolocical Pathology. 

X, Ophthalmic Pathology. 



PHABHACV, HATBRIA HEDICA AND THEBAPEUTICS. 



Horatio C. Wood, M. D., LL. D., 
Horatio C. Wood, Jr., M. D., 

WiLLlAU SCHLBIP, M. D., . . . 

Henry A. Newbold, M. D., . 

Daniel M, Hoyt, M. D., 

William W. Cadburv, M. D., 



Projfssor of Materia Mcdica, 
Pharmacy and General 

Demonstrator oj Pkarmaco- 

Dcmonstrator of Practical 

Pharmacy. 
Assistant Drmonstrator oj 

Practical Pharmacy. 
First Assistant Demonstra- 

t<fr of Pharmacodynamics. 
Second Assistant Demoti- 

strator of Pharmacodyna- 



Medica and Pharmacy is given during 



Instruction in Materii 
the second year of the c 

I. Lbctubbs, Dr. Wood, Jr. — During the first term of the 
session, two lectures a week are given on Materia Medica. At the 
opening of each lecture specimens of the drugs to be lectured upon 
are given to each individual in the class. 

II. Instruction IN Pharmacy. Dts. Scklcif and Newbold. — This 
consists of infonnal talks, in which the primary principles of the 
art of pharmacy are explained; and of laboratory work, which is 
so directed as to give the student practical ideas; first, in regard 
to the chemical compatibilities of drugs; second, of the relations 
of the different preparations of drugs to the proper form of exhibi- 
tion, extracts to pills, tinctures to mixtures, etc.; third, of the art 
of prescribing. The effort is not to make pharmacists of the stu- 
dents, but to have them thoroughly inculcated in the art of pre- 
scribing. For these purposes the class is divided into sections. 



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340 DBPAKTHENT OP HBDICIHB. 

each of which is given twdve lesaona, each lesson requiring three 
hours of actual work by the student in the pharmaceutical labora- 

The instruction in Therapeutics, including PharmacodynaniicB. 
is given during the third year. This consists of didactic lectures, 
recitations, demonstrations, and practical work in the laboratory. 

in. Didactic Lectures. Professor Wood and Dr. Wood, Jr. — 
These are upon the physiological action of drugs in the animal 
and human body, and th«r effect in health and disease; the proper 
methods and time of administration, and all details relating to 
theoretical and practical therapeutics; and the application of such 
action to the needs of the practitioner of medicine. This course 
consists of two lectures a week throughout the year. 

IV. Recitations. Dr. Hoyt. — Examinations or recitations, not 
based upon test-books, but upon the teaching of the Professor and 
Demonstrators. For the purpose of such instruction the class is 
divided into sections, each section receiving one hour a week through- 
out the session. 

V. Demonstrations. Dt. Wood, Jr. — Demonstrations on the 
action of drugs upon the circulation of mammals. Each station 
of the class receives one hour a week of demonstrations for two 
months, in which extreme care is taken, by the use of anesthetics 
and analgesics, to prevent suffering on the part of the animal 
operated upon, the animal being killed directly after the demon- 



VI. Laboratory Work. Drs. Wood, Jr., Hoyt and Cadbuty. — 
Nerve, muscle and heart work performed by the student himself 
upon frogs. For this purpose the class is divided into sections, and 
each section is allotted one meeting of three hours a week for two 
months. 

VII, Prescription Writing. Professor Wood, Drs. Wood, Jr., 
and Schleif. — Practical instruction is given in prescription writing 
by the Professor and the Demonstrators. In this course, hypo- 
thetical cases are taken, and the student is required to write a pre- 
scription suiting the case, which is criticised, and the prescription 
returned to the student so that he may see wherein are the mistake*. 
For this course the class is divided into sections, each section having 
one hour a week for half of the sesaon. 



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UNDERORADUATB INSTRUCTION. 



MEDICINE. 



James Ttson. M. D„ 

John H. Mussbr. M. D., ... 
Alfred Stbngbl, M. D., . . . 
M. Howard Fussell, M. D., 
David L. Edsall. M. D., . . . 

J. Alison Scott, M. D 

Thouas G. Ashton, M. D., . 
Arthur A. Stevens, M. D., 



B. Franklin Stahl, M. D., 

Charles W. Dulles, M. D., 

David Ribsuan, M. D., . . . 
J. Dutton Steele, M. D., 
Alovsios O. J. Kbllt, M. D. 

Joseph Sailer, M. D 

Henry D. Jump, M, D 

William Pepper, M. D„ , . 
John M. Chuicb, M. D., . , 
Norman B. Gwvn, M. D., . 
Albbrt p. Francine, M. D. 
Hbrhak B. Alltn, M. D., 
Josrph S. Evans, M. D., .. 
Robert N. Willson, M. D., , 
Arthur A. Stevens, M. D., 
B. Pranklik Stahl, M, D., 
Sherbourne W. Dougherty, 
CuPFORD B. Farr, M. D., , 
Htbr Solis-Cohen, M. D.,. 
Charles J. Hatfield, M. D. 
Bernard Kohn, M. D... . . 
George W. Norris, M. D., 
Waltrer E. Rahtb, M. D., 
Thomas S. Cope, M. D 



Proftssor of Medicine. 
■t Professors of CUnicai Medi- 

\ Assistant Professors of Med- 

S icine. 

\ Adjunct Professors of Med- 

Lecturer on Medical Ter- 

tninology, and Physical 

Diagnosis. 
Lecturer on Dietetics of the 

Sick. 
Lecturer on Ike History of 

Medicine. 



Instructors in Medicine. 



Instructors in Physical Di- 
agnosis. 



The instruction in Medicine begins in the first jrear with lectures 
in Medical Terminology and extends throughout the course, beirg 



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34a DEPARTUBNT <: 

graded in such a way that one year's work leads up syGteinatically 
to that of the next. 

In the second year the student is taught the principles of 
physical diagnosis and the methods of applying them. 

In the third year, the instruction consisla of didactic lectures in 
medicine, recitations, medical clinics, observation classes, ward 
classes, practical work in the clinical laboratory, history- taking, 
and practice in the laryngological dispensary. 

In the fourth year, didactic lectures, medical clinics, clinical con- 
ferences, recitations, and ward classes and special work in the dis- 
pensaries occupy the student's time. 

Much of the instruction of the three years is intramural, but in 
part the required work is extramural; and in addition abundant 
opportunity is given at various hospitals for optional exlraniural 
work. Two didactic lectures are given each week to students of 
the third and fourth years, during which the entire subject of medi- 
cine is covered in a systematic manner. At the same time the 
"bedside" method is fully appreciated, and forms an essential 
part of the teaching. This form of teaching has beer greatly 
enlarged as compared with former years, and the hours devoted 
to ward visits especially have been increased. 

FIBST TBAB. 

I. Medical Terminology. Dr. Stevens. — One lecture a week 
during the first half of the year to the members of the First-year 
Class. The object of this course is to familiarize the student with 
elementary Medical Terminology. 



II. Phtsical Diagnosis. Dr. Slefens. — The lectures in Physical 
Diagnosis {one hour a week during one-half of the year) are devoted 
to an exposition of the general principles of the subject, rather 
than to the study of physical signs in sjtecial diseases. At this 
period the student is as yet unfamiliar with the pathology and 
symptoms of disease, and is not therefore prepared to study special 
physical diagnosis. The main purpose of the lectures and practical 
work is to teach the student the physical signs in health, and the 
fundamental conditions involved in the development of such signs 
in the normal and diseased subject. 

In addition to the lectures, practical work is conducted by 
Drs. Stevens. Stahl, Dougherty. Cohen and Farr. The class is 
divided into small sections of from six to ten students, and each 



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UNDERGRADUATE IN STRUCT TON. 343 

section has one hour and a half a week during one-half of the year, 
with a demonstration given to a larger group one hour a week 
during one-half of the year. As in the lectures which these prac- 
tical exercises are intended to illustrate, attention is directed 
mainly to normal conditions, so that the student may become 
thoroughly familiar with physical signs in health. 

THIBS TEAR. 

III. Didactic Lectures. Professor Tyson. — Two didactic lec- 
tures a week on the Theory and Pracliee of Medicine are given in the 
New Medical Laboratories. These lectures cover the subject of 
medicine systematically and are illustrated by numerous drawings, 
casts, etc., from the George B, Wood. Stillf, and Pepper collections. 

IV. Medical Clinics. Professor Tyson.— The whole class at- 
tends one general medical clinic a week, given at the University 
Hospital. 

V. Observation Classes. Dr. Fusseil. — These classes are in- 
tended to continue the study of Physical Diagnosis onward from 
the point to which it was carried in the second year. Cases illus- 

, trating objective symptoms and visible clinical signs are presented 
in such a way as to train the student's powers of observation, and 
to familiarize him with the external signs of disease. The class is 
divided into sections of twenty to thirty students, and each section 
receives one hour of instruction a week during twelve weeks, 

VL Ward Classes. Drs. Jump. Crutch. Hatfield and Franciiic. 
— The ward classes in medicine are conducted in the dispensary of 
the University Hospital. The class is divided into sections of from 
six to eight students, and each section receives one hour of instruc- 
tion a week during the entire year. The ward classes of the third 
year are devoted especially to Special Physical Diagnosis, thus 
continuing the work of the second year, and illustrating in the 
diseased the general principles learned in the normal person, 

VIL Clinical Laboratory. Dts. Pepper and Gwyn. — The clini- 
cal laboratory course is conducted in the New Medical Laboratories. 
The class is divided into three sections, each attending two houra 
a week during the entire year. The course consists of instruction 
in the chemical and microscopic examination of urine, blood, 
sputum, stomach contents, feces, etc. with the aid of various 
instruments of precision. To a certain extent, especially in the 
examinations of the urine and blood, the laboratory course is a 



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;view of the work done in the first and second years ii 
1 histol(%y, pathology and chemistry. 



VIII. Didactic Lectures. Professor Tyson. — ^The members of 
the Fourth-year Class attend, together with the Third-year Class. 
The lectures are not repeated in both years, excepting those per- 
taining to certain important chapters of medicine, but the two years 
are required to cover the entire ground. 

IX. Medical Clinics. Professor Tyson. — One clinical lecture a 
week is conducted at the University Hospital. 

X. Clinical Confbrbhcbs. Drs. Muaser and Slengd each 
meet the entire Fourth-year Class one hour weekly in the medical 
amphitheatre of the University Hospital (or occasionally in the am- 
phitheatre of the Philadelphia Hospital). This hour is devoted to a 
modified medical clinic, in which a limited number of the students 
are called to the bedside to assist in the examination of the patient^ 
and to confirm the conditions observed by the lecturer. The 
students are called to this work in rotation, so that as far as possible 
the hour may be a clinical conference rather than a general clinic. 

Drs. Musser and Stengel each conduct two additional clinical 
conferences weekly, each conference being an hour and a half in 
duration. These conferences are held in rooms so arranged Oiat 
students are closely grouped about the patient and instructor, and 
at tlie same time in full view of the blackboard and screen, where 
charts and lantern demonstrations can be used to illustrate the case 
under discussion. Two students are assigned to each case that is 
presented before the class, and are required to examine their patient 
during the week preceding his presentation at the conference. The 
report of the students on the history, physical examination, and 
diagnosis of the case is read, and the case is then fully discussed. 
In every case the blood and urine examinations must be reported. 
and when of interest in connection with the patient, examinations 
of the stomach contents, sputum, etc. Particular attention ia 
paid in the conference to questions in di^TQosis, the larger cUnical 
conferences being reserved for discussions of medical treatment, 
and demonstrations of methods of applied therapeutics such as 
the administration of thermal and medicinal baths, hydrotherapy, 
methods of exploration of serous cavities for effusions, the use of 
stomach tubes, esophageal bougies, various kinds of atomizers and 
spraying apparatus, and the like. 



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FE INSTRUCTION. 34^ 

XI, Ward Classes. Professor Tyson; Drs. I'usscU. Riesntan. 
Kelly, Sailer, Atlyn and Steele. — The medical ward classes of the 
fourth year are devoted especially to differential diagnosis and 
treatment, thus advancing somewhat beyond the point to which 
the ward classes of the third year had carried the students. The 
class is divided into small sections of from six to ten students, and 
each section attends one ward class a week throughout the year 
in the University Hospital or in the Philadelphia Hospital; and 
an additional hour weekly during one-half of the year. Professor 
Tyson conducts one of the ward classes each week. 

Dr. J. Alison Scoli meets one-third of the class one hour weekly 
for a special ward class at, the Pennsyli-ania Hospital. The abun- 
dance of acute cases in this hospital makes it possibk to bring 
the students in contact with a large number of cases of a type not 
readily presented in clinics. 

XII. Ward Work. One-third of the class is assigned to duty in 
the University Hospital, another third in the Philadelphia Hospital, 
for a third of the year. This gives to each student ward work during 
two-thirds of the year. The work is arranged as follows: The 
student reports at the ward at lo a. m., and is occupied for two 
houfB; daily, excepting Saturday and Sunday. From lo to 1 1 a.m. 
he examines the cases assigned to him, each member of the group 
having a certain number of cases under his sole care. All physical and 
clinical examinations are made under the guidance of the Resident 
Physicians. At ii a. m. one of the Physiciansor Assistant Physicians 
makes the rounds accompanied by the students on duty in the ward. 
The student in charge of each case reports on the progress of the case 
and on his examinations, and criticisms and explanations arc made 
by the instructor. In this way the student is taught the methods of 
clinical work and is trained to observe his cases carefully. It is 
not intended that the ward visits should supplant ward classes, in 
which detailed demonstration of cases familiarizes the student with 

XIH. Other ExtramubalTbachino. The roster is so arranged 
that the students of the Third and Fourth-ye^ Classes are able to 
attend the medical clinics at the Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia 
Hospitals on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Other medical clinics 
may also be attended by the members of the Third and Fourth- 
year Classes. 

XIV. HisTOHT OF Medicine. Dr. Dulles. One lecture weekly 
during one-half of the year is devoted to this subject, ■ 



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(4$ DBPARTUBHT OP MBDICWS. 

NuKBBR OF Hours Devotbd bv Each Studbnt to Mbdicimb.* . 

First Year. Hour., 

Lectures on Turminology 16 

Second Year. 

Lectures on Physical Di^nosis 16 

Demonstrations on Physical Diagnosis 40 

Third Year. 

Didactic Lectures in Medicine 64 

Medical Clinics 31 

Observation Classes 1 1 

Ward Classes , 31 

Clinical Laborutory 64 

Fourth Year. 

Didactic Lectures 64 

Medical Clinics 3a 

Clinical Conferences 160 

Ward Classes Sg 

Ward Work 90 

Total 6S1 



SDRGBRV. 

Whitb, M. D., John Rhea Barton Professor 

of Surgery. 
. \ Professors of Clinical Sur- 
■ i gery. 

Assistant Professor of Stir- 
gery. 



Edward Martin. M. D 

Charlbs H. Frazibr, M. D., 
Alfrbd C. Wood, M. D,, . . . 



Richard H. Hartb, M. D., . . . 
James P. Hutchinson, M. D.,, 
Hbnry K. Pancoast, M. D,, . 

John B. Carnett, M. D 

John H. Jopson, M. D., 

George P. MOllbr. M. D 

■Tlu hoDim given to Itctuics on Ihe 



1 Adjunct Professors of Smt- 
1 e^y. 
Lecturer on Skiagraphy. 

I Instructors in Surgery. 



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instruction. 

Geokge D. Morton, M. D., . 
T. Turner Thomas, M. D... . 

Hbnrv Norris, M, D 

John Busch, M. D ^ Assistant Itisiruclor^ in Surgery. 

Gborgb M, Dorkancr, M. D.,. . 
Jean J. A.Van Kaathoven,M.D. 

FrbdH. Klabr, M. D., J 

Hbnrt S. Wibder, M. D., Asstslanf Demonstrator of Sur- 
gical Pathology. 
John Spebsb, M. D. Voluntary Assistant Demonstra- 
tor of Surgical Pathology. 

The couTGe in Surgery extends over a period of two years (the 
third and fourth years), and is conducted by the Professor of 
Surgery, two Professors of Clinical Surgery, an Assistant Professor, 
two Adjunct Professors, and a corps of clinical instructors. The 
course,' which includes instruction in surgical pathology, in the 
principles and practice of surgery, in practical minor surgery and 
in operative surgery, is so arranged that every student shall have 
received at its termination systematic instruction in every subject. 

The methods are varied, and are designed to give the student 
thorough training in the fundamental principles concerning the 
pathogenesis of all surgical affections; to develop his powers of 
observation ; to make him thoroughly conversant with the principles 
underlying every plan of treatment; and, as far as possible, to give 
him opportunity under the direction of instructors to put in practice 
certain major and minor operative procediu-es. They include; (i) 
Demonstrations in Surgical Pathology; (a) Didactic Lectures; (j) 
Surgical Clinics; (4) Surgical Ward Classes; {5) Clinical Conferences 
in Surgery ; (6) Courses in Practical Minor Surgery, including Band- 
aging, Fracture Dressing, and Dispensary Work; {7) Operative Stu-- 
gery; (8) General Reviews; and (ij) Ward Visits. 

I, Surgical Pathology. Professor Frasier. — Once a week 
throughout the year, a lecture and demonstration to the Third-year 
Class, The projection of lantern slides and microscopic sections 
upon the screen, and demonstrations of fresh specimens from the 
surgical clinic and from the museum, serve to illustrate the lee- 

Dr. MiUer. — I>emonstrations of microscopic sections and gross 
apecimens, to each member of the class, one and one-half hours a 
week. This course is supplemental to the course given by I>r. Fra- 



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348 DBPARTUBHT OP UEDtClNB. 

Eier. The following subjects arc included in the course in sursical 
pathology: the local and constitutional cSectsoftraumatisin, surgi- 
cal bacteriology, the local and constitutional eftects of inflammation, 
including ulcer, gangrene, tetanus, erysipelas, and the bites of ani- 
mals and insects; congenital malformation, traumatism, inflamma- 
tion and neoplasms, as affecting the glandular, lymphatic, vascular, 
nervous, cutaneous, subcutaneous, muscular, osseous and articular 
systems. 

II. Didactic Lectures. Professor WkiU. — Two didactic lec- 
tures a week to the Third and Fourth-year Classes, outlining the 
etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis and treatment of the more 
important surgical conditions. 

III. Surgical Clinics. Professor White. — One surgical clinic a 
week is given to the Third and Pourth-ycar Classes. 

Professor Martin: One surgical clinic a week to the Fourth-year 
Class. 

Professor Fraeier: One surreal clinic a week to the Fourth-year 
Class, 

Drs. Wood, Camett and Mdikr: One surgical dinic a week to 
the Third-year Class. 

IV. Slrgical Ward Classes. — Each student attends three ward 
classes a week throughout the session. The student personally 
examines cases, expresses his views as to the diagnosis and treat- 
mcnC, performs certain minor operations, assists in operations, and 
is given opportunity to administer anesthetics, with the assistance of 
an instructor. 

Professor White: One hour a week at the Univerwty Hospital. 

Dr. Wood: One hour a week at the University or Philadelphia 
Hospital. 

Dr. Ilaric or Dr. Hutchinson: One hour a week at the Pennsylvania 
Hospital. 

Drs. Carnctt and Thomas: Alternately, one hour a week at the 
Philadelphia Hospital. 

V. Surgical Diagnosis. Professor Mar/jii.— One hour a week 
to the Third-year Class, 

VI. Practical Minor Surgery. Dr. Wood and assistants. — One 
hour a week throughout the year. This course, for which the class is 



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UNDERGRADUATE IKSTKUCTtON. 349 

divided into sections, is given in the Hospital and the Surgical Out- 
patient Department. The course is chiefly practical, and includes 
the following exercises: application of dressings to minor surgical 
cases, cerebral localization, application of heat and eold, hcmostasis, 
application of plaster-of- Paris and adhesive dressings, catheteriza- 
tion, irrigation, intravenous injection, hypodcraioctysis, local anes- 
thesia, the preparation and care of patients, and the aft^r- treatment. 
In addition to the course in the Out-Patieht Department, a system- 
atic course is given in bandaging to the Second-year Class (four and 
one-half hours a week for a period of seven weeks) and to the Third- 
year Class in fracture dressings (one hour a week for a period of ten 

VII. Operative Suroery. Dr. Jopson and Dts. Dorrance, 
Buseh and Van Kaalhoven. — In this course each stuSent performs, 
or assists in the performance, of the major operations upon the 
cadaver (n) upon the extremities (ligations, amputations, disarticu- 
lations and excisions); (6) upon the abdominal cavity (appendec- 
tomy, intestinal anastomosis, herniotomy, operations upon the gall 
bladder); (c) upon the head (trephining): id) and upon the neck 
(tracheotomy and intubation). 

VIII. SuROiCAL Review. Periodically throughout the year 
both the Third and Fourth-year Classes are examined upon the 
subjects in which they have received instruction. 

IX. Ward Work. One-third of the class is assigned to duty in 
the University Hospital, another third in the Philadelphia Hospital, 
for a third of the year. This gives to each student ward work during 
two-thirds of the year. The work is arranged as follows: The student 
reports at the ward at 10 a. v., and is occupied for two hours, daily, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. From 10 to it a.m. he examines 
the cases assigned to him, each member of the group hav'ing a certain 
number of cases under his sole care. All physical and clinical exam- 
inations are made under the guidance of the Resident Physicians. 
At It A. u. one of the I*hysictans or Assistant Phy^cians makes the 
rounds accompanied by the students on duty in the ward. The stu- 
dent in charge of each case reports on the progress of the case and 
on his examinations, and criticisms and explanations are made by 
the instructor. In this way the student is taught the methods of 
clinical work and is trained to observe his cases carefully. It is not 
intended that the ward visits should supplant ward classes, in which 
detailed demonstration of cases familiarizes the student with thor- 
ou^^ess and system in his examinations. 



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35° DEPARTMENT OP MEDICINE. 

X. Surgical Physiology. A course consisting of a scries of 
demonstrations is contemplated, illustrating the application of 
physiological principles to surgical practice. 

Number of Hours Devoted bv Each Student to Surobry. 

Houn. 

Surgical Pathology 83 

Didactic Lectures 131 

Surgical Clinics 165 

Surgical Ward Classes 88 

Minor Surgery 33 

Operative Surgery 14 

Practical Surgery and Surgical Diagnosis 33 

Ward Work 60 

Total 608 



ORTHOPEDIC STIRQERY. 

De Forest Willard, M. D Professor oj Orthopedic Sur- 
gery. 

James K. Young. M, D Associate in Ortkopcdic Sur- 
gery. 

Joseph M. Spellisbv, M. D.. \ Assistant Instructors in Or- 

Walter G. Elmer, M. D. I Ihopedic Surgery. 

The instruction in Orthopedic Surgery is confined to the fourth 

I. Clinical Instruction. Professor WiUard. — Clinical instruc- 
tion is given one hour a week from October i to February 1. This 
course includes the surgical and mechanical treatment of congenital 
malformations, deficiencies and deformities; also of acquired dis- 
tortions and deformities the result of disease or injury, joint dis- 
eases, rickets, infantile spinal and cerebral paralyses, etc., etc. 

II. Ward Class Work. Drs. Young, SpeUissy and Elmer. — For 
ward teaching, the Fourth-year Class is divided into small sec- 
tions, which meet once a week. Cases in the wards arc employed 
to perfect each student in personal diagnosis and treatment. In- 
struction is also given in Uie apphcation of apparatus, plaster-of- 



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35' 

Paris and corrwtivc dri-ssings; the- cimst ruction of braces; the treat- 
ment of lat<'ral curvature, paralyses, etc. Each student is expected 
personally to i)crform all the necessary manipulations. 

A specially cfjuippcd orthopedic gymnasium connected with 
this department is in daily use for demonstrating methods for the 
correction of deformities and the development of muscular power. 

III. Work in Out-Patiest Departmbnt. Dispensary work is 
continued daily throughout the year. Students desiring special 
practical work can arrange for certain jH-riods in the Dispensary. 



OYNBCOIjOGY, 

John G. Clark, M. D., Projessor of Gynecdogy. 

Henry D. Beyea, M. D., Assixiate in Gynecology. 

Brooke M, Anspach, M. D. -, 

Charles C. Norris, M. D I InsirucWrs in Gynecology. 

John W. Luther, M. D J 

The instruction in Gynecology extends throughout the third and 
fourth years and comprehends: 

THIRD YEAR. 

I. Recitations and Lantern Demonstrations. One hour a 
week devoted either to recitations conducted by Drs. Anspach, 
Norris and Luther, or to lantern demonstrations by Professor Clark. 

During this year recitations are conducted by the instructors, 
preceding the lantern demonstrations by the Professor of Gynecol- 
ogy. It is intended that the demonstrations shall fully supple- 
ment the recitations, thus rendering as clear as possible the histo- 
loijic. anatomic, and pathologic, as well as the operative side of 
Gynecology. The third year instruction is entirely theoretic, 
and is intended to prepare the student for his practical work of 
the fourth year. 

FOCRTH TBAB. 

II. Clinical Ward Classes. Professor Clark or Dr. Anspach. — 
Three times a week. The class is divided into sectiotis, which 
attend the clinical ward classes. These sections are further sub- 
divided into small groups of students who sec all cases with the 
professor or instructors before any plan of treatment is instituted. 
The history of the case is carefully reviewed; and, instead of the 
usual clinical lecture preceding an operation, the special group of 



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3S» I 

students for the day are closely quizzed on all points relative to 
diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Immediately after the oper- 
ation, all points on the technique of the operation, the post-opera- 
tive care of the patient, the possible complications, and the ultimate 
prognosis are fully considered. 



DERHATOLOOY. 

Louis A. DuHRiNG, M. D., Proffssor of Dermatology. 

Milton B. Hartzell, M. D Assoctale in Dermatology. 

I. Lectures. Professor Duhring. — Two lectures weekly are given 
to the members of the entire class, the subject-matter being de- 
scriptive of the commoner diseases of the skin as met with in this 
country. The lectures are abundantly illustrated by charts, paint- 
ings, photographs, wax and papicr-mach^ models. The course 
bc^ns October i and terminates December ao. 

II. Clinics. Professor Duhring. — Once weekly, in the amphi- 
theatre of the Hospital. A large number of cases are exhibited 
and commented on in such a manner as to render the clinical 
features of the disease plain. 



OPHTHAI.iMOIjOGT. 

Gborge E. de ScHWBiNiTZ, M. D. Professor of Ophthalmology. 

John T. Carpenter. M. D lecturer on Ophthalmology. 

Edward A. Shumway, M. D., i , .„.,,, 

H. MAXWE1.L Langdon, M. D [Instruclors rn Ophthalmol- 

Thomas B. Hoi,lowav, M. D J ''^^■ 

I. Practical Work IN the Phvsiolocical Laboratory. The 
second-year men are each provided with suitable appliances, an 
optical box, an ophthalmoscope, an artificial eye, color tests, etc., 
and are instructed in the rudiments of physiological optics and in 
the physiology of the eye. This course, which consists of a series 
of laboratory hours, is conducted by the Professor of Physiology 
and his a 



II. Lecture Demonstbations and Clinical Lectures, Pro- 
fessor de Schweinils. — These are given twice a week, from the first 
of October until the first of February, to members of the Third- 



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TJMDBRORADUATB 

year Class. The subjects covtred in this course "comprise the 
methods o£ examining the patient and the externa] examination 
of the eye; functional testing; diseases and injuries of the eye; the 
eye in its relation to general diseases; medical ophthalmoscopy 
and medical ophthalmology; and operative ophthalmology. The 
clinical lectures in this course continue throughout the academic 
year. Forty-seven hours are devoted to the entire course. 

III. Practical Work. Dr. Carpenter and the Instrttctcrs in 
Ophthalmology, — Daily clinics are given in the Dispensary and in 
the wards of the Philadelphia Hospital. The students of the Third- 
year Class are divided into sections of about thirty men, and each 
of these sections subdivided into smaller sections of ten. Each 
subsection has the opportunity in turn of closely inspecting the 
patients with external inflammatory diseases of the eye, of seeing 
the method of applying the remedies, of making the commoner 
applications utilized in the treatment, of learning the use of the 
ophthalmoscope so that each student may recognize the healthy 
fundus and its important diseased conditions; and of ascertaining 
the results secured by functional testing, such as the pupillary 
reflexes, the visual acuity, the field of vision, the balance of the 
external ocular muscles, and the refractive errors. The number 
of hours devoted to this course is forty-eight. 

IV. The students of the fourth year have the opportunity of con- 
tinuing the instruction in Ophthalmology 1^ attendance on the 
clinical lecture, which continues throughout the academic year. 



OBSTKTRIC8. 

Barton Cooke HiHST, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Richard C. Nohris, M. D Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

John H. Girvin, M. D. Itistmcior in Obsti'trks. 

William A. N Borland M^D., . . ■) ^„,„„„, Instructors in Ob- 
William R. Nicholson, M. D., .- -' i sietrics 
John C. Hirst, M. D., J 

A graduated course of instruction in Obstetrics is given to the 
members of the Third and Fourth-year Classes in the Maternity 
Pavilion of the University Hospital, in the New Medical Labora- 
tories and in the Out-Patient Department of the Hospital, con- 
ducted under the direct control of the Professor of Obstetrics. 



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354 

I. Clinics. Proji-sior Hirst. — Two clinical lectures a week are 
given to the Third-year Class, the large clinical material of the 
Hatemity Department being used to iUuslrate a s>'steinatic couise 
of lectures on the complications of gestation, labor and the puer- 

II. Demon ST RAT (OKS. Demonstrations of palpation, pelvimetry 
and the signs of pregnancy are given to sections of four students; 
routine examinations of urine; attendance on labor cases; demon- 
strations of the injuries of parturition and their repair. 

III. Clinical and Operative Obstetrics. Professor Hirst. — 
One clinic a week to the Fourth-year Class, devoted to the surgical 
treatment of all the compUcatioDS of the childbearing act, is given 
in the maternity amphitheatre. 

IV. Ward Work. Every morning from lo to ii a small section 
of the class, under the supervision of the interne, study the cases in 
the wards, and under the direction of an instructor, assist in the 
repair of injuries of the genital canal, in the local treatment of 
genital infections, the final examination of the puerpera, etc. 

V. Obstetrical Operations, Professor Hirs'.— In the Anna 
Dike Scott Memorial Amphitheatre an exhibition of all the obstet- 
rical operations is given to the members of both the Third and 
Fourth-year Classes. 

VI. Practical Exercises with Manikins and Fcbtal Bodies. 
Each student devotes eight hours to the practice upon the mani. . 
kin of the obstetrical operations, 

VII. Practical Exercisks in the Out-Patient Departubkt. 
This department is under the direct control of the Professor of 
Obstetrics. The total indoor and outdoor service amounts to 
1 200 cases a year. The complicated cases in this service demanding 
operative treatment are transported to the University Hospital, and 
the operations arc exhibited to the combined Third and Fourth-year 
Classes. Each student attends in confinement from two to five 



NEUROLOOr. 

d. D., Professor of Neurology, 

. . Professor of N euro-Pathology and 
Associate Professor of Neurology. 



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UNDERGRADUATE INSTRUCTION. 355 

Charles S. Potts, M. D., Associate in Neurology. 

Jambs W. McConnell, M. D., Instrvctor in Neurology. 

Theodore H. Wbisehsurg, M. D., Instructor in Neurology, 

and in Neuro-Pathdogy. 
Carl D. Camp, M. D„ Assistant in N euro-Pathology. 

I. Clinical Lectures. Professors Mills and SpiUer. — One clin- 
ical lecture a week is given to the Fourth-year students at the Uni- 
versity Hospital throughout the entire year, during the first half o£ 
the session by Professor Mills, and during the second half by Pro- 
fessor SpiUer. 

II. Clinical Lectures {Continued), One lecture a week is also 
given to the Pourth-ycar Class during the first half of the session at 
the Philadelphia Hospital. An effort is made to systematize 
the teaching, especially at the Philadelphia Hospital, where the 
large amount of material always at command enables the teacher 
to select and arrange beforehand the subjects to be discussed, 

III. Ward Class Instruction. Dr. Polls and Instructors. — This 
instruction is given during one-half of the year, both in the Uni- 
versity and in the Philadelphia Hospital. The class is divided 
into small sections, so as to give each student the opportunity of 
personally investigating the cases under the supervision of the 



IV. Instruction in Out-Patibnt Department. Dr. Polls and 
Instructors. — In connection with the teaching given in the wards of 
the University and Philadelphia Hospitals, advantage is taken of 
the large outdoor neurological service, sections being instructed in 
the dispensary at times previously arranged. In this way the 
students are brought in contact with nervous diseases in their 
earlier as well as in their later manifestations. The methods of 
studying, recording and treating cases are taught. Especial atten- 
tion is paid to electro-diagnosis and electro-therapeutics. 

V. Neuro- Pathology. Professor SpUler. assisted by Drs. Wei- 
senburg and Camp. — One hour and a half a week to each member of 
the Third-year Class, before February i. The course is open also to 
post-graduate students. The work is in part clinical. The stu- 
dents are shown various gross pathological specimens, and are 
taught the signs and symptoms caused by the lesions repre- 
sented by these specimens. Where considered desirable, the clinical 
history of the case illustrated is given. The students arc by this 
instruction mtich better prepared for their fourth-year clinical work 



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350 DEPARTMENT OF UBDIC1NB. 

in neurology. Microscopical sections illustrating many pathological 

conditions are demonstrated by the lantern, so that the students 
are enabled to study the more minute morbid changes occurring 
in diseases of the nervous system. The techmque employed in 
investigation is also taught so far as possible, so as to include the 
methods of embedding, cutting, staining, etc., employed ia this 
branch of medicine. The students are in this way prepared to 
conduct original investigations in the pathology of the nervotis 
system after their graduation, if they so desire. Instruction is also 
given in the methods of preparation of the brain and cord for gross 
examination, so that the nervous tissues may not be injured for 
microscopical study. 



PBDIATRICS. 

J. P. Crozbr Griffith, M. D., . . . .Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Thompson S. Westcott, M. D Associate in Pediatrics. 

Maurice Ostheiher, M. D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

s A, Fife, M. D., . 



Howard C. Carpenter, M. D. 

I, Valentine Levi, M. D.,. . . , 
J. Clakton GiTTiNGS, M. D., . . 



Assistant Instructors in Pediatric: 



The course in Pediatrics consists of lectures, ward classes and 
ward work at the University Hospital and at the Children's Hospital. 

The lectures are conducted by the Clinical Professor of Pediatrics 
ji the medical amphitheatre of the University Hospital once a 
week. Special lectures are given upon the general diagnosis, symp- 
Uimatology and treatment of disease in children. The more impor- 
^nt subjects receive systematic and full discussion, among these 
seing such topics as pneumonia of childhood, gastroint«stinal dis- 
iascs, typhoid fever in infancy and childhood, forms of paralysis, 
the feeding of infants, etc., etc. In addition to these, the Children's 
Ward and Dispensary are drawn upon for clinical lectures on the 
irarious diseases presenting themselves. 

The ward classes arc ' conducted at the University Hospital by 
Or. Ostheimer, at the Children's Hospital by Dr. Westcott, and at 
;he Philadelphia Hospital by Drs. Carpenter and Fife. Subsec- 
tions of the class, consisting of from eight to fifteen students, 
ittcnd these ward classes three times a week and have the oppor- 
tunity of examining the patients under the direction of the in- 
ttruetor, and in addition learn the practical management of the 



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diseases of children as conducted la the Hospital wards. The ex- 
ceptional richness and variety of material afforded by the Children's 
Hospital make this part of the course a valuable feature. 



IxARTfNGOliOGT AND BHINOliOGT. 



Charle 


sP. Gbavson, M. D 


. . . Clinical Professor of Laryn- 
gology and Rhinology. 


Wm. G. 


B. Harland, M. D.,... 


\ Instructors t« Laryngology. 


Bbnjah 


UN L. SiNGBR, M. D 



I. Lbctures and Clinics. Professor Grayson. — From January 
to May there is a course of weekly lectures given to the Third-year 
Class, covering the anatomy and physiology of the upper air and 
digestive tracts, these being illustrated by drawings and by dry 
and wet preparations. The diseases of the nose and its accessory 
cavities, of the pharynx, the fauces and the larynx, are systemati- 
cally studied; and in connection with their causation and treatment, 
emphasis is laid upon the pathologic and therapeutic importance 
of the systemic conditions with which they are often associated. 
The surgery of these special regions is also thoroi^hly demon- 
strated during the course by a scries of clinics. 

II. Practical Work in Out-Patient Department. Professor 
Grayson and assistants. — Throughout equal periods of the session the 
Fourth-year Class attends this course, divided into sections of such 
size that each student receives an abundance of practical work 
under the personal supervision of Dr. Grayson and his assistants. 
The very large service of this dispensary provides ample material 
for the members of the class to acquire proficiency in the use of 
the various instruments of examination and treatment, and to 
become expert in the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases that 
are more often encountered in general practice. 



OTOLOGY. 

B. Alexander Randall, M. D., Clinical Professor of Diseases (4 

the Ear. 

I. Lectures. Professor Randall. — The instruction in the second 
half of the third year consists of a course of lectures, largely clini- 
cal, but with abundant illustrations by anatomical and patho- 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



3S8 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICIKE, 

logical preparations, models, charts and the stereopticon. Opera- 
tions for diseases of the mastoid and lateral sinus and abscess 
of the brain are demonstrated on the cadaver, if not upon patients. 
11. Practical Work. Prajessor RanrfoW.— Practical work is 
giventotheFourth-year Class in subsections of ten or less, in the Out- 
patient Department or wards of the University Hospital. Indi- 
vidual instruction is given by the dispensary staff in the examina- 
tion, recording and treatment of patients, the work being delegated 
to the students so far as they may show themselves competent. 
All are thus drilled in the use of the head-mirror, in rhinoscopy and 
Eustachian catheterization, as well as in simpler measures. In 
mastoid and other operations, selected students assist or operate 
under strict supervision, and follow the cases in the later dressings. 
Stress is laid throughout upon simplicity in the essential methods 
nf diagnosis and treatment, with minute and c 
application. 



OENTTO-URINABY DISEABCS. 

Thomas R. Nbilsc n, M. D Clinical Projessor of Genito- 

Urinary Diseases. 

E. HoLLiNGSwoHTH SiTBR, M, D., . . InslTuctor in Genito-Urinary 
Diseases. 

Alexander A. Uhle. M. D., Assistant Instructor in 

Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Instruction in Genito-Urinary Diseases is g^ven in the fourth 

year. 

Ward Classes. Professor Neilson and Drs. Siter and Uhle. — 
Ward classes, for which the class is divided into sections, are held 
three times a week throughout the year in the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment. The students are afforded excellent opportunity to become 
familiar with the methods of diagnosis and treatment of diseases of 
the genito-urinary apparatus by personal observation, and by prac- 
tical work under the guidance of the teachers. House cases requir- 
ing operation are operated on by the professor before the class. 

ELECnVES. 

FouRTH-vEAR Class. — A member of the Fourth-year Class may. 
with the approval of the professor in charge, inscribe his name for 



tizedoy Google 



BLBCTIVBS. 3S9 

special instruction in any of the clinical branches taught in the 

school, provided he gives at least one hour a week, for a period of 
not more than one-half of the academic year, to the work. He may 
inscribe his name likewise for specia.1 work in the fundamental 
branches, pro^'ided, in the opinion of the professor in charge of the 
department, he be qualified to undertake it, and has at his disposal 
the time necessary to its successful performance. 

Third-vbar Class. — A member of the Third-year Class will be 
privileged to take special work in the fundamental branches on the 
same conditions as offered to the members of the Fourth-year Class 
in these branches. 

Students contemplating the election of special work in addition 
to the regular scheduled work of the fourth and third years are 
expected to obEer\'e the following regulations: 

(a) The number of electives selected may depend upon the 
number of hours at the disposal of the student, and the absence of 
all conflict with the work scheduled on the general roster. 

(6) The qualifications on the part of the student for the pursuit 
of any given subject shall be decided by the professor in charge of 
the department. 

(c) The decision as to the time necessary or desirable to give to 
the special subject shall rest with the professor in charge. 

(ft) The practicability of affording special opportunities in any 
subject or subjects to any or all students electing them will be 
decided by the professors in charge of the departments. 

(e) Consent to enter upon special work must be obtained from 
the professor tn charge in the form of a permit on special blanks 
prepared for the purpose, to be presented at the office of the Dean 
before entering upon the work specified. 

(/) The right is reserved to the professor of the department to 
terminate at any time the special privileges of a student for lack of 
qualifications to pursue profitably the work imdertaken, or for 
irregularity in attendance. 

(g) No examination will be held or mark given, for elective work 
done under these conditions. 



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3^0 DEPARTMENT OP UBD1C1HB. 

OBDEB or nraT&tJCnoN, daily, BEFORE feb. i.- 



-FIB8T YKAB.-1WW-I9M, 



Bar. 


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Ptki. Wort Id 

udO«nlc«T- 


ClHdllldCd 

laUKcUoHftw 


PncL Work In 


nHdlTMcd 

UHlOA«l(«r. 


Hid OalHliiKr. 


(silSi.) 


.,.. 


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FIBffT-TEAB CIuUW. 

SPECIAL ROSTER OF PRACTICAL WORK. 
BEFORE Fbbbuart ist. 



Histology and Embryology 9 to i 
Saturday 12 t« 
lion. 
Histology and Embryology — 

Chemistry — 

Dissection A 

Osteology B 

Histology and Embryology — 

Chemistry — 

Dissection B 

Osteology A 



; Chemistry 9 to la; Dissection 1.30 to 3.45. 
> to 3.45- 



B 1 First period of 
, 4» working 

days, from Oct 
A g to Nov. »s 

— J inclusive. 



Second period 
of 43 working 
days, from Nov. 
27. to Jan. a7 
inclusive. 



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ORDER OF INSTRUCTION. DAILY, AFTER FEB. 1.— FIRST TEAR. 


-1906-ieoe. 


lfo«r. 1 M^BV. 


ruadotf. 


IF«l««fav. 


TAHTBiair. 


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Clua divided 
P«ct. Work In 

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CtiwdlTlded 


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liililmjtLoMftir 

■nd Id™ 
ItecMtrlologr. 


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FIRST-XKAK CI-ASS, 

SPECIAL ROSTER OF PRACl'ICAL WORK. 
AFTER Pebbuary ist. 

THE CLASS IS I 



Histology and Embryology g to 
to 3-45, Saturday i 

Histology and Embryology — 
Physiological Chemistry ... — 
Dissection A 

Bacteriology B 

Histology and Embryology — 

Physiological Chemistfy . . . — 

Dissection B 

Bacteriology A 



Wed. Thur. Pri. 



; Medical Chemistry 9 to ii; Dissection 1.30 
to »; Bacteriology 1.30 to 3.45- 



First period of 

41 working 
days, from Feb. 
S to March 34 

inclusive. 



Second period 
of 40 working 
days, from Mar. 
»6 to May la 
inclusive. 



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ORDt. 

How. 


nolf INSTBCCTION, DAII 


V, BEFORE VKB. l.—SECONDTEAR 


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SPECIAL ROSTER OF PRACTICAL WORK. 
BEFORE Fei 



3 TWO SECTIONS, 



Physiology 9 to 11.30; Path»logy 9 to 
to a. Physical Diagnosis i 

Mon. Tue. 

Physiology A B 

Pathology B A 

Dissection A A 

Physical Diagnosis B B 

Pharmacy — — 

Physiology A B 

Pathology B A 

Dissection B B 

Physical Diagnosis 

Pharmacy 



r.30; Dissection 1.30 to 3.45. Saturday i 
|o to 3.45, Pharmacy la to t. 



First period of 
43 working 

days, from Oct 

9 to Nov. as 

inclusive. 






Second period 
of 41 working 
days, from Nov. 
»7.to Jan. 3j 
inclusive. 



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ORDER OF IHSTRUCnON. DAILY. AFTER IfKB. l.-SUCOND TEAB.-l«05-lftM 



IIOHT. 


Uandau. 


7Wa„. 


TTtdnodav. 


ThuTMtay. 


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Sdlurdaii. 


»A. K. 


ClnndlTldcd 
)atoiHtMD>«>r 


""{suSiir'''' 


ansdlrldtd 

Pruct. Work In' 

(» to 11^ 

ana PalhologT. 


aum dlvtdtd 
InloweHanufcr 

!■ to 11.30) 


BDd Pi[)iol<igy. 


Ct«g dlvldnl 
InloMcUoMftir 
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PhyriolcjCT 


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(11,» W IS.30) 


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Spwiil AdM. 
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SECOND-TKAR CLABS. 

SPECIAL ROSTER OF PRACTICAL WORK 
AFTER Pbbruakt ist. 

TUB CLASS 13 DIVIDED INTO TWO SBCTIONS. DESIGNATED 
RBSPECTIVBI.Y A AND B. 

Physiology 9 to 11.30, Wednesday and Saturday 9 t< 

to 13.30; Dissection 1,30 to 3.45, Saturday 

and Pharmacy u to a. 

Mon. Tut. Wed. Thur. 

Physiolc^y A B A B 

Pathology B A B A 

Special ?iiatoiny B A — A 

Dissection A A A A 

Bandaging B B — — 

Pharmacy — — — — 

Physiology A B A B 

Pathology B A B A 

Special Anatomy B A — A 

Dissection B B B B 

Banding A A — — 

Pharmacy — — — — 



30; Special Anatomy i 
D 1; Bandaging 



First period of 
41 working 

days, from Feb. 

S to Mar. 10 

inclusive. 



Second period 
of 40 working 
days, from Mar. 
36 to May la 
inclusive. 



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ORDER OF INSTRUCTION. 365 

SESSION 1905-1906. 
Sclie<liile of Pra«ti»-iil Instrnctlou for Tbird-Year ClaxH. 

nlo thi« tertians {A, B and C). ra 

A*. A') for Ward CIomh in Mrdicii 

and Gron Pathology. 9 to '°-ip a. m. ; Phanuacodynanii 

imvt Surgical Pathaloey and Practical Therap«utici, 10. 

. . .. ..__j J Thursday, n to I FriH; 



;ticaJ instruction in 



mDnrtrationi in N euro-Pathology and Gi 
« A. u. to II u.: Applied Anatomy, £ 

A. M, to u M.; Surgical Ward ClaasM, . — , _. 

Urdical Obaervation. i toir.M.; Medical Clinical Laboiatoiy, 
Medidne and Ophthaliaology. } to 4 r. u. 



Subject. Hon. 

NeuTO-Pathology B 

Gross Pathology C 

Pharmacodynamics A 

Applied Anatomy B 

Surgical Pathology C 

Surgical Ward Class AaB 

Medical Observatioii 

Medical Clinical Laboratory, 

Medical Ward Class A 

Ophthalmological Ward Class B 



Tue. Wed, TTiur, 

— C A 

— A B 

— B C 

~ C A 

~ A B 

— — A 



First 
period of 57 
working 
days, from 
Oct. 9 to 
Dec. 16 
inclusive. 



Sutiical Ward €-__ . 
Medical Observation . 

Medical Clinical Laboratory . A 

Medical Ward Class B 

Ophthalmological Ward Class C 

Ncuro-Pathology A 

Gross Pathology B 

Practical Therapeutics C 

Applied Anatomy A 

Surgical Patholwy B 

Surgical Ward Class A*C 

Medical Observation — 

Medical Clinical Laboratory . B 

Medical Ward Class C 



period of 56 
working 
days, from 
Dec. 18 to 
March 3 
inclusive. 



Third 

period of 58 

working 
days, from 
March 5 to 

inclusive. 



BUBSKCnONS OF WARD CI^SS I 



MKDICnrE. 





Oct. e to Dec. 16. 


Dec. 


i h> Mar. .V 


Mar. s to April 7, 


April 9 to May .., 




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TuM. 


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TEXT-BOOKS. 

First Year. 

Teit-Books, Collateral Reading. 

Chemistry: Richter's Inorganic Wurtz's Elements of Modem 

Chemistry; Medicus' Quali- Chemistry. 
tative Analysis. {Fifth edi- 
tion,) 

PhysitAogicai Chemistry: Rem- Wormley's Micro-chemistry of 

sen's Organic Chemistry; Ty- Poisons. (Fourth edition.) 

son's Practical Eitamination Schimpf's Text-book of Volu- 

of Urine; Ogden's Clinical metric Analysis. 

Examination of the Urine; Hammarst«n's Physiological 

Simon's Text-book of Physi- Chemistry. 
ological Chemistry ; Mason's 
Examination of Water. 



Anatomy: Cimninghar 
book of Anatomy; 
Normal Histology. 



i's Text- Cunningham's Practical Anat- 
Piersol's omy ; Gray ; Morris ; Sobot- 
ta's Histology (edited by 
Hubcr) ; Hcisler's Embryol- 
ogy ; McMurrich's Embry- 



BacieriiAogy: Abbott's Principles Enzymes and their Application; 



of Bacteriology; Flflgge's Die 
Mikro-organismen ; Gflnther's 
Einfuhrung in das Studium 
der Baktcriologie; Sternberg's 
Text-book of Bacteriology; 
Harris' edition of Muir and 
Ritchie's Manual of Bacteri- 
ology; Lehman and Neu- 
mann's Atlas of Bacteriology. 



Eftront; Prescott; Frank- 
land's Micro-organisms in 
Water; Baumgarten's Patho- 
logische Mykologie; Slater 
and Spitta's Atlas of Bac- 
teriology, 



Second and Third Years. 

Anatomy: Cunningham's Text- Gray; Morris; Quain; Edinger's 

book of Anatomy. Anatomy of the Central Ncr- 

Physialogy: Stewart's Manual of American Text-book of Physi- 
PhysJology; Waller's Human ology. 
Physiology. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



no 

TenI-BooVs. 
Pathology: For general use, 
Stengel's Text-book of Path- 
ology ; for pathological anat- 
omy and histology, Delatield 
and Prudden; for pathologi- 
cal technology, Mallory and 
Wright. 



Therapeutics and Materia Med- 
ico: H. C. Wood; Mann on 
Prescription Writing. 

Surgery: An American Text- 
book of Surgery. 



Collatosl Reading. 
Thoma's General Pathology; 
Lazarus-Barlow General Path- 
ology ; Cohnheim's Lectures 
on General Pathology; Zieg- 
ler's General and Special Path- 
ological Anatomy ; Orth's 
Lehrbuch der specicUen path- 
ologischen Anatomic; McFar- 
land's Text-book of Pathology . 

United States Dispensatory. 



Physical Diagnosis: Tyson. 
Applied Anatomy: Thomas' Syl- 
labus of Sui^cal Anatomy. 



White and Martin's Genito-Uri- 
nary Surgery; Davis on Ban- 
daging; Young's Orthopedic 
Surgery; Martin's Essentials 
of Surgery and Bandaging. 

Norris' American Text-book of 
Obstetrics; Edgar's Obstet- 
rics ; Webster's Obstetrics ; 
Williams' Obstetrics. 

Woolsey's Applied Surgical 
Anatomy. 



Third and Fourth Years. 

Medicine: Tyson's Text-book of Strumpel's Text of Medicine; 

Medicine; Osier; Strumpel; Tyson on Bright's Disease and 

Muascr's Medical Diagnosis. Diabetes; McBride's Diseases 

of Throat, Nose and Ear. 



Ner 



Mill's Diseases of the Brain and 
Cranial Nerves, with a Gen- 
eral Introduction on the 
Study and Treatment of 
Nervous Diseases; Oppen- 
heim's Diseases of the Ner- 
vous System, translated by 
E. E. Mayer; Dana's Text- 
book of Nervous Diseases. 



t,i.a,Google 



TEXT- BOOKS. 



371 



Tut-Book*. 

Surgery: An American Text- 
book of Surgery, 



Diseases of Chiidreti: Ashby luid 
Holt; Wright; Rotch. 



Medical Jurisprudence: 



Collatcial Reading. 

Whit« and Martin's Genito- 
urinary Surgery; Davis on 
Bandaging; Young's Ortho- 
pedic Surgery; Martin's Es- 
sentials of Surgery and Ban- 
daging. 

Norris' American Text-book of 
Obstetrics ; Edgar's Obstet- 
rics; Williams' Obstetrics. 

Kelley's Operative Gynecology; 
Reed's Text-book of Gynecol- 
ogy ; Montgomery's Text- 
book of Gynecology; Hirst's 
Text-book of GjTiecology; 
Gilliam's Text-book of Prac- 
tical Gynecology. 

J. Lewis Smith; American Text- 
book of the Diseases of Chil- 
dren; Cyclopedia of Diseases 
of Children. 

Reese's Medical Jurisprudence; 
Herold's Legal Medicine; 
Taylor's Medical Jurispru- 



Dermatdiogy: Duhring's Cutane- 
ous Medicine; Stelwagon's 
Treatise. 
Ophthalmology: de Schweinitz's American Text-book of Diseases 
Diseases of the Eye. of the Eye, Ear, Nose and 

Throat, by de Schweinttz and 
Randall. 



Hygiene: Bergey's Principles of 
Hygiene; Sedgwick's Hygiene 
and the Public Health; FlOg- 
ge's Grundriss der Hygiene; 
Notter's Treatise on Hygiene; 
Abbott's Hygiene of Trans- 
missible Diseases. 



Sykes' Public Health Problems; 
Bashore's Rural Hygiene; 
Waring's Modem Methods 
of Sewage Disposal; Mason's 
Water Supply; Meniman'a 
Elements of Sanitary Engi- 
neering: Rosenall's Disinfec- 
tion and Disinfectants. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



a.— POST-GBATHJATE UfSTBrCTION. 



The regular course, t. e., that provided in the roster for the regular 
session, is open to all graduates of the Department without charge, 
except as to fees for laboratory material. 



Beginning May 7, 1906, the University wiU conduct a spring 
course in Medicine, designed especially for practitioners, but open 
also, in the laboratory courses, to advanced students in Medicine. 
It embraces almost the entire cturiculum of Medicine, and has been 
devised to meet the requirements of a wide group of practitioners 
and students. 

The course will extend over a period not exceeding six weeks. 

In designing the instruction offered in the spring course, the needs 
of the practitioner have been kept in view and, so far as possible, 
the work has been made of purely practical character. While this 
feature is emphasized in the clinical branches and specialties, it has 
not been tost sight of in the laboratories. In ail the courses the 
work is of a nature to appeal to the surgeon and general practitioner 
who wish to revive or complete their knowledge of certain subjects, 
and to advanced students in Medicine who may not have had equal 
opportunities to pursue their courses of study. 

The number of attendants upon certain clinical courses will be 
necessarily Umitcd, in order that close personal attention may be 
accorded the patients. This number will vary with the nature of 
the course; and the admission, under these circumstances, will be 
made in the order of application. 

The schedule of hours for post-graduate study is so arranged that 
a comprehensive coTirse may be taken without conflict of hours, and 
for this purpose the subjects have been divided into two groups. 

Grolp I is devoted entirely to Internal Medicine, including 
laboratory and clinical work, and to the following specialties: 
Pediatrics, Neurology, Ophthalmology. Otology, Rhinology and 
Laryngology. 

Group II is devoted entirely to General Surgery, including Sur- 
gical Anatomy and Pathology, and to Gynecology. Obstetrics, 
Orthopedic Suigery, Genitourinary Diseases, and Dermatology. 



tizedoy Google 



POBT-GRAOUATB 

To those, however, who are desirous of devoting more time than 
is allotted on the schedule to any one subject, special courses and 
opportumti«s are offered for more advanced work. 

LECTURE SERIES. 

MEDICINE. 

1. Medical CtiNiC. Dr. Tyson, in the Medical Amphitheatre, 
University Hospital, Saturdays at 9 a. m. 

2. Medical Clinic, or Bedside Instruction, Dt. Mtisser, 
University Hospital, Thursdays at la noon. 

3. Medical Clinic, or Bedside Instruction. Dt. Stengel, 
University Hospital, Mondays at 11 noon. 

4. Clinical Medicine. Dr. Fussell, in the Out-patient Depart- 
ment of the University Hospital, Thursdays at i p.m. 

5- Clinical Medicine, with Especial Rbperence to Physical 
Diagnosis. Dr. Sailer, at the Philadelphia Hospital, Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays at la noon. 

6. Clinical Medicine, with Especial REPERENtE to the 
Diagnosis and Treatment of Diseases of the Gas tro- intestinal 
System. Dr. Steele, University Hospital, Mondays at i p. m., and 
Saturdays at 11 noon. 

7. Clinical Medicine, with Especial Repebencb to the 
Diagnosis akd Treatment of Cardjo-vascvlar Diseases. Dr. 
Herman B. AUyn, at the Philadelphia Hospital, on Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays at i p. M. 

8. Clinical Laboratory Methods, A course including Meth- 
ods of Examining the Blood. Sputum, Urine, and Stomach Con- 
tents, to be given by Dr. WiUiam Pepper, at the William Pepper 
Clinical Laboratory, daily, from 11 a. m. to is noon, throughout 
the course. 

9. The Treatment op Pulmonary Tuberciilosis. Dr. W. B. 
SlanUm, in the Pavilions for Tuberculosis of the Philadelphia 
Hospital, two afternoons a week. 

pediatrics. 

I. Clinical Instruction in the Diseases of Children. Drs. 
Griffith and OsHieitner, in the Wards of the University Hospital, 
on Wednesdays at 4 P. m., throughout the course. 

a. Feeding in Infancy, Dr. Thompsons. Weslcoit. on Mondays 
and Fridays, in the Amphitheatre of the Children's Hospital, from 
4.15 to 5.15 ?. H., throughout the course. 



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OF HBDICINB. 
EURGBKV. 

I. Clinical Surgbrv. University Hospital, daily at i i>. u., 
including operations in the Surgical Clinic, Siu^cal Diagnosis. 
Ward Rounds, and demonstratioos of the modern methods of 
administering anesthetics. 

J. SuRoiCAL Pathologv. Dr. Midler. — Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days, from II A. H. to 1 P. M., at the New Medical Laboratories. 
This course consists in the demonstrations of the gross and micro- 
scopic lesions of the more common surgical affections, in so far as 
they apply to diagnosis and treatment. 

3. Opbrativb Surgery on Cadavers and Animals. Dr. 
Carnelt. — Mondays and Fridays, 11 a. m. to i p. m. This course 
will include intra-abdominal operations upon animals (operations 
Upon the stomach, gall-bladder, and intestines), and such opera- 
tions upon the cadaver as cannot be demonstrated to advantage 
Upon the living animal. The course will be arranged in accord- 
ance with the special needs of the student. (Limited to ten.) 

4. Surgical Anatomy. Dr. Davis. — Mondays and Fridays, 
a to 3 P. M,, Lc^an Hall. With especial reference to the anatomy 
of the peritoneal cavity, of fractures and dislocations, including 
demonstrations of methods of reducing dislocations. 

5- Skiagraphy, Radiotherapy, and Phototherapy. Dr. 
Pancoast.- — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 9 to 11 a. m,, 
X-ray Department, University Hospital. Preliminary instruction 
in the various parts of an r-ray equipment, the handling of the 
apparatus, and in the principles of electric currents used in the 
production of the i-rays. The therapeutic application of «-rays, 
with technique required for treating various pathological con- 
ditions, with demonstrations by treatment of patients. The 
therapeutic use of Finsen rays and "High Frequency Currents:" 

6. Orthopedic Surgery. Orthopedic Clinic, Dr. Wiilard, 
Tuesdays, 13 to i; Drs. Young, Spellissy, and Elmer, Mondays, 
Thursdays, and Fridays, u to i; Operations, Demonstrations, 
and Practical Work in the Orthopedic Ward and Dispensary. 
The Special Orthopedic Gymnasium for the treatment of Paralyses, 
Deformities, Curvatures, etc., is open daily from 12 to 2. 

7. Pediatric Surgery. Dr. Jopson. — Wednesdays and Satur- 
days, Children's Hospital, 11 a. u. to i p. m, 

8. Genito-urinary Diseases. Drs. Neilson and Siler. — In 
the Out-patient Department of the University Hospital, Mondays, 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, la to 1. 

9. Minor Surgery. Dr. Noiris. — Univeraty Hospital, daily 
from II to I p. M. 



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POST-GRADUATE INSTRUCTION. 375 

GVNBCOLOGY. 

I. Gynecological Clinic. Dt. Clark. — Wednesdays and Fri- 
days. 2 to 4 p, M,, University Hospital. The practical work in 
this course will be limited to five graduate students. 

a. Gynecological Clinic. Dr. Beyea. — Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days, II A. M, to I p. M., Gynccean Hospital. 

3, Gynbcolocical Pathology, Dr. Anspack.-^Kovas to be 
arranged for the convenience of those taking the course, (Limited 

OBSTBTRICS. 

Dr. Hirst and assistants. — Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3 lo 4 P, it., 
in the Maternity Pavilion of the University Hospital. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

Dr. Hartteil. — Mondays. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, 
II to 1 p. M. This course is given in the Out-patient Department 
o( the University Hospital and Wards of the Philadelphia Hospital. 
and will be devoted to the Examination, Diagnosis, and Treatment 
of patients in daily attendance at the clinic. 

NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY. 

I. Clinics. Dr. Mills on Mondays and Dr. SpilUr on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays. 3 p. m., at the University or the Philadelphia 
Hospital. 

3. Neuro-pathology. Dr. Spiller will give practical instruc- 
tion either by the lantern or in the laboratory once a week for those 
desiring to take Neuro-pathology in connection with the clinical 

3. ELECTRO-THERAPeUTtCS AND WakD CLASS DEMONSTRATIONS. 

At least once a week, by Dr. Polls and assistants, University 
Hospital. 

4. Psychiatry. Dr. Burr. — Instruction in Mental Diseases 
either by lectures or by ward class demonstrations. Wednesdays 
and Fridays, 3 p. m,, Philadelphia Hospital. 

5. Special Col'Hse. The course announced above is open to all 
students of the post-graduate department. Any student wishing 
to take Neurology and Psychiatry as a special subject, or in com- 
bination with one or two other subjects, can make arrangements 
with the Dean of the Faculty and the Teachers in the Neurological 
Department for the fuller course. 



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DBPARTUENT C 



This course is designed for those who are especially interested 
in the eye, and is limited to ten. 

I. Operative Clinic. Dr. de SchweiniU. — Thursdays, 3 to 4 p. u., 
University Hospital. 

i. External Diseases of thb Eyb, in the Eye Dispensary of 
the Univeraty Hospital, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays, 3 to 4 p. u. 

3. Operations on Amiuals' Eyes. Dr. de SchweiniU, assisted 
by Dr. Melior. — Tuesdays, 4.30 to S-30 P- m. 

4. Functional Testing op the Eve, including the principles of 
Refraction, Muscle-balance Testing, Retinoacopy, and Ophthal- 
mometry. Dr. Carpenter, in the Eye Dispensary of the University 
Hospital, Mondays, ■ Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, a to 
3 P. M. 

5. Pat HOLOGicAi. Histology. Dr. Shumway. — Mondays, Wednes- 
days, and Fridays, 4 to 6 p. m. 



Dr. Randall. — (o) Daily Clinics at the University Hospital. 
(6) Instruction in the Anatomy op the Ear by means of lantern 
demonstrations and anatomical preparations in connection with 
the Wistar Museum of Anatomy. 

In demonstrating operative procedures, it is expected that 
either clinical material or cadavers will be used. 



Dr. Grayson. — Daily in the Laryngological Clinic of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, at 3.30 p. m. A course in Instrumental Technique 
and in the Diagnosis and Treatment ai Diseases of the Nose and 
Throat. The microscope will be used to supplement the clinical 
di^nosis of neoplasms and exudative inflammations, and in the 
treatment. Instruction will be given in the ordinary methods of 
local therapcusis, but opportunities will be offered to perform the . 
various operations for deflection of the nasal septum, for the 
removal of polyps, the faucial tonsils, adenoid growths, etc. 

Note. — Those desiring to take the course in both Otology and 
Laryngology may take these subjects on alternate days. 



I. Elementary Bacteriology. Dr. Gildersleeve, daily, g to 
I A. u., in the Laboratory of Hygiene. This course is designed to 



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KIST.CRADUATE INSTRUCTION. 377 

supply the needs of the practitioner of medicine. It comprehends 
the preparation of culture media, the methods of sterilization, the 
methods of isolation and study of bacteria in pure culture, the 
study of the best known and most important of the pathogenic 
species, the methods of disinfection, the use of the microscope, 
and the methods of staining employed in bacteriological worlc, 

a. Advanced Work in Bacteriology. Dr. Bergey, daily, 
9 to II A. «., in the Laboratory of Hygiene, This ccmrse will be 
arranged in accordance with tlie qualifications and inclinations of 
each individual student. 

3. Practical Hygiene. Dr. Bergey, 9 to ii a. m., daily, in 
the Laboratory of Hygiene. Applicants for the course must possess 
a working knowledge of quantitative chemical analysis. The 
course covers exercises in the phyacal and chemical study of the 
atmosphere, with methods of recording results; studies in ventila- 
tion and heating, and methods for estimating extent of the same; 
physical, chemical, and bacteriological study of water ; the artificial 
and natural methods of water purification; pollutions to which 
water is liable; interpretation of results of analysis; studies uf 
milk from the sanitary standpoint; sanitary food inspection and 
analysis. 

CHBMlSTIiy. 

I. Analysis of the Urine. Drs. MarskaU, D. W. FeOerotf, 
Ryan, and Hawk. — Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 to it A. m., Robert 
Hare Chemical Laboratory. 

a. Toxicology. Tucsdaysand Thursdays, 9 to ii a. m., Robert 
Hare Chemical Laboratory. 

3. Elementary Physiological, Chemistry. This course will 
consist of a systematic study of the carbohydrates, fats, proteids; 
salivary, gastric, and pancreatic digestions, and of the bile, milk, 
and blood. If desired, work will be given in tissue chemistry and 
in general food analysis. (This course will only be given in the 
event of there being at least six students.) 

anatomy. 
I. Embryology. Dt, Piersol. — Tuesdays, Thursdays, Satur- 
days, 9 to II A. M., Logan Hall. i. Microscopic Technique. 
Drs. Piersol and Formad. 3. Practical Anatomy. Dr. C. 
Fellerolf. 

pathology. 

Drs. Smiik, Loeb, and Alburger. — i. Autopsy-making, a. Sb. 

LBCTBD Experimental Pathology. 3. Elementary Patho- 



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37B DEPARTMENT OP UEDtCINB. 

ix)GicAL Histology. 4. Advanced Pathological Histoloot. 
New Medical Laboratories. (This course will not be given to 
classes of less than six.) 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

Dm. Reickert and Lodhohi. — i. Elementary Course in Practi- 
cal Physiology, i. Advanced Cot-RSB IN Practical Physiolocv. 
(These courses will not be given to classes of less than six.) Hours 
to be arranged to suit the convenience of those taking the courses. 
New Medical Laboratories. 

For further particulars apply to 

Dr. CHARLES H, FRAZIER, Dean. 
Thirty-rixth Street and Hamilton Walk, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



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BUILDtNOS AND EQUIPMENT. 379 

BUTLMNOS AND EQUIPMENT. 

ME3>1CAL HALIi. 

The Mbdicai, Hall contains the Laboratories of Hiatolc^y and 
Embryology, and Osteo-syndesmology. 

The Histological Laboratory is under the supervJEion of the 
Professor of Anatomy and the Demonstrator of Histoli^y. The 
Laboratory is furnished with excellent microscopes, and all appa- 
ratus necessary to enable the student to become practically familiar 
with the most approved methods of microscopical technology, as 
well as with the normal histology of all the tissues and organs. 
Special facilities are afforded for original research and work in 
Practical Embryoiogy; for this purpose the Laboratory is open 
throughout the year except during July and August. 

The OsTBO-SYNDESMOLOGiCAL Laboratoky IS Under the super- 
vision of the Professor of Anatomy and Demonstrator of Osteology. 
In this Laboratory, the first-year student is required to make 
himself familiar with the skeleton and the articulations as a part 
of his instruction in practical anatomy. 



The new Laboratories o? Pathology, Physiology, and Phar- 
macology, were formally opened June, 1904. This building is 
unsurpassed in facilities and equipment for graduate and under- 
graduate worlc. The building is two stories in height, above a high 
basement, and measures 340 feet front by nearly 300 feet in depth. 
The long front faces north, securing a maximum amount of light for 
laboratory purposes. All along the front are arranged small rooms 
for research, rooms for professors and their assistants, libraries, etc., 
these opening into a private corridor so that those employed in 
these rooms may be free from interruption by persons passing 
through the main halls. Perfect lighting of all the laboratories has 
been obtained through the front or through large courts, which sepa- 
rate the two main parallel groups of rooms. 

The first floor of the new laboratory is devoted to physiology 
and pharmacodynamics. The portion assigned to the former con- 
sisting of laboratories tor practical instruction, for general research 
work, for subsection teaching, rooms for the professor and assist- 
ants, etc. The section for pharmacodynamics consists of a large 



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380 DEPARTUBNT OP UBDICINB. 

general laboratory, a laboratory for teaching practical pharmacody- 
namics; rooms for original research, a commodious museum, etc. 
The second floor is devoted exclusively to pathology, the entire 
north front being given over to laboratories for advanced students 
in pathology and pathological bacteriology and to the special 
research and assistants' rooms. The wings accommodate the labo- 
ratory of experimental pathology, the museum, the demonstration- 
rooms, the laboratory for physiological chemistry and the prepara- 
tion-rooms. The demonstration-room commimicates with the 
general pathological-histologtcal laboratory, the front of which con- 
sists almost entirely of glass and looks north into a spacious court. 
Another section of this floor, also looking into the court, is sub- 
divided into smalleT laboratories for instruction in n-nimal diseases, 
n euro-pathology and surgical pathology. 

Besides numerous laboratories, research-rooms, etc., there are 
four lecture-rooms in the building, two of these being demonstra- 
tion-rooms with a seating capacity of 185 ; the others being lecture- 
rooms with a seating capacity of 400. The building is entirely fire- 
proof, of the most modem construction, supplied with power, 
electric light, and many kinds of accessories for promoting the 
teaching and research work. 

LABORATORIES OF GHBHI8TRY ANB ANATOMT. 

The Chbmical Laboratories occupy the first, second and third 
floors; on the second floor is the Laboratory of General Chemistry, 
and on the third floor that of Physiological Chemistry. In addition 
to the main rooms, there are smaller rooms, prowded with an ade- 
quate number of balances for quantitative work, and special rooms 
set apart for research. 

The Anatomical Laboratory is at the top of the building, and 
is 140 feet in length by 40 feet in width. It is lighted with win- 
dows on all sides, and by skylights. The most perfect ventilation 
is thus secured. There are numerous washstands, with hot and cold 
water, and private closets for the use of each student. Clcanlinessis 
rigidly enforced. The cadavers furnished the dissecting-room are 
preserved by refrigeration. Dissection is legalized in Pennsylvania. 

liABORATORT OP HTOIENS:. 

Alexander C. Abbott, M, D., Direclor. 

The Laboratory of Hygiene was the gift of Mr. Henry Charles 

Lea, and the equipment was provided through the munificence of 



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BUILDINGS AND BQUIPMBHT. 3S1 

the late Henry C. Gibson, of Philadelphia. The building is devoted 
to graduate and undergraduate work in bacteriology and hygiene. 
The student laboratory is a commodious, well-ttghted and heated 
room, with a seating capacity for eighty-three students. Each 
student is supplied with an individual microscope, and with such 
apparatus as is necessary to conduct elementary studies in Bac- 
teriology. 

Research m Advancbd Hyoibnb and Bactbrioloct. — Oppor- 
tiwities for research work in these subjects are offered to those 
having the requisite preliminary training. AH work coming under 
this head is done under the direct supervision of the laboratory 
staff. 



WISTAR INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY. [ 

Hilton J. Grebnuan, Pk. B., M. D., Director. 

The WtSTAR Institute of Anatout was founded in iSga for 
the preservation and increase of the Wistar and Homer Museum 
and for the promotion of advanced study and research in Anatomy 
and Biology. 

The Wistar and Hornbr Museum, founded nearly one hundred 
years ago, has been annually 'augmented, and is unsurpassed in 
the United States for the number and variety of its specimens 
illustrating normal and morbid human anatomy, as well as compar- 
ative anatomy. Through the munificence of the late General Isaac 
J. Wistar, the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology has been 
erected, and therein the collections of the Museum are contained. 
The Museum is open daily, except Sunday, from 9 a. h. to 4 p. m., 
and Saturday, 9 a. u. to 11 u., throughout the season, to the public, 
as well as to students. 

The Institute is endowed sufficiently to provide means for prose- 
cuting the advanced and original work for which it was intended. 
Well-equipped laboratories and offices adjoin the Museum proper, 
and every facility is provided for the work of original investigaton. 
While the Museum, under suitable regulations, is free for inspection 
to all teachers and students, the object of its laboratories and 
workrooms and 'of the instruction given in the Institute, is to 
afford facilities and assistance to post-graduatea and advanced 
students. 



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382 DEPARTMENT OP MBDICINB. 

WILLIAM PKPPKR CLINlCAIi LABORATORY. 

Associates. 
Alfred Stengel, M. D., Director. 

, Assistant Director. 

Samuel S. Kheass, M. D., Verner Nisbet, M. D., 

Davii> L. Edsall, M. D.. Courtland Y. White. M. D., 

Charles A. Fife, M. D., Joseph S. Evans, Jr.. M. D., 

Daniel J. McCarthy, M. D. 

Volunteer Associates. 
WiLUAM Pepper, M. D.. Caspar Wistar Miller, M. D., 

Herbert Fox, M. D., Thomas A. Cope. M. D., 

Milton K. Mvbrs, M. D.. Ralph S. Lavenson, M. D.. 

John W, Hunter. M. D.. Howard K. Hill. M. D,. 

Ralph Pbmberton, M. D, 

The William Pepper Laboratory op Clinical Medicine, 

erected through the generosity of the late Dr. William Pepper aa 
a memorial to his father, adjoins the University Hospital. The 
purposes of the Laboratory are: to promote the interests of the 
patients by providing facilities for the prosecution of minute clinical 
studies and original researches; and to advance the interests of 
science by the publication of the results of such work. No instruc- 
tion in the Laboratory is given to undergraduates. 

The Associates and Volunteer Associates of the Laboratory are 
appointed for the purpose of carrying out certain lines of investi- 
gation for which they have special preparation. The Laboratory 
does not encourage post-graduate teaching, but has received a 
limited number of post-graduate students from time to time for the 
purpose of training them to carry on investigations. 

The publications of the Laboratory are issued in the form of 
contributions, which arc the collecttd reprints of articles issued 
from the Laboratory and published in various medical journals. 
One or two numbers containing from fifteen to twenty or more 
separate articles appear each year. A limited number of these may 
be had by interested persons on application, 

THE UNIVERSmr HOSPITAL. 

Robert E. Hastings, Chairman 

George H. McFadden, Executive Com. 

John Sailer millce of Board 

Charles W. Dulles, M. D. 0} Managers. 

Mrs. Charles C. Harrison, J 



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BVlCDtNOS *ND EQUIPMENT. 383 

The Univbhsity Hospital, situated on the University Cam- 
pus, is an integral part of the Department of Medicine, and 
one of the most important agents in the training of the students. 
is operated solely in the interests of the students of the School. 
The clinical members of the Faculty arc members of the Hos- 
pital Staff. With accommodations for 350 patients, it affords 
excellent facilities for bedside instruction. The Hospital is con- 
structed especially for teaching purposes; and, togetlier with the 
Out-Patient Department, furnishes ample provision for the teaching 
of clinical medicine according to the most approved methods. 

Five positions as resident physicians in the University Hospital 
are awarded annually to five members of the Graduating Class of 
the Department of Medicine, selected from the twenty-five mem- 
bers of the class who have the highest general average at the end 
of the third year of the course. 

The Maternity Pavilion, with a capacity of 50 beds, com- 
prises a main building, to which the patients arc admitted two weeks 
before delivery, two wings containing delivery- rooms, and the Anna 
DiKB Scott Amphitheatre. This department is under the charge 
of the Professor of Obstetrics. Under the supervision of the clinical 
staff, the students conduct cases of labor and make daily visits, 
during the puerperium, to the mother and child. 

UBBART FACIUTIES. 

The basis of the Medical Section of the University Library is 
formed by the Stills Collection, presented by the late Alfred J. 
Stiil^, to which additions have been made from the William Pepper 
Medical Foundation, established by the late Dr. William Pepper. 
In addition to purchases, the Medical Section has grown consid 
erably through gifts presented by a number of medical publishers 
more particularly Messrs, W. B. Saunders, Lea Brothers the J B 
Lippineott Company and P. Blakiston's Son & Co. From most of 
these are received regularly the new publications issued by them 
A third source contributing to the increase of the Library is the 
arrangement made with the University of Pennsyhanta Mtdical 
Bulietin, by which some forty medical periodicals received in ex- 
change are forwarded regularly to the University Library and incor- 
porated into the medical collection. In addition to these the Uni- 
versity subscribes to about 100 medical periodicals, which, together 
with those received through the University 0/ Pennsylvania Medical 
Bullnin, represent a choice selection of the leading medical periodi- 



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3^4 DBPARTUENT OF MRDICtNB. 

cala ot this country and Europe. A special fund recently placed 
at the disposal of the Medical Section has enabled the authorities to 
complete the sets of all the more important periodicals and puUi- 
cations of medical societies. 

The Pbppbr Medical Alcove contains sets of the more impor- 
tant medical periodicals, general reference works covering the 
various departments of medicine and surgery, text-books, serial 
publications and all the more important new medical books received 
at the University. 

LlBRARV OP THE COLLEGE OP PHYSICIAHS OP PHILADELPHIA. 

In addition to the Medical Section of the University Library, 
students have access to the Library of the Collie of Physicians, 
the second largest medical library in the United States. 



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INPORMATIOM. 385 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

ARKANOEHENT OF SESSION. 

The academic year consists of one session, beginning on the last 
Friday in September, and ending at Commencement on the third 
Wednesday in June. 

TUITION FEES AND EXPENSES. 
Under no circumstances are any changes made in the established 
fees. The only free scholarships granted are those under the 
regulations hereinafter referred to. 

First Year. 

Matriculation Fee $5 00 

For General Tuition Ticket, admitting to all the lec- 
tures, and including all the laboratory work and 
dissection assigned to this year $100 00 

Use of Dissecting Material {two parts) ti-so a part. 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee $10 00 

Second Year. 

For General Tuition Ticket, admitting to all the lec- 
tures, and including all the laboratory work and 
dissection assigned to this year tjoo 00 

Use of Dissecting Material (Juw parts) ti-SO a part. 

Gymnasium and Houston Qub Fee tio 00 

Third Year. 
For General Tuition Ticket, admitting to all the lec- 
tures and practical courses assigned to this year . Sioo 00 
Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee Sio 00 

Fourth Year. 

For General Tuition Ticket, admitting to all the lec- 
tures and the practical courses assigned to this 
year (no graduation fee) I^oo 00 

Use of Material for operations in Surgery (one part) . .ti.oo a part. 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Pee Sio 00 

FsBs FOR Special Courses. 
{Students taking special or partial courses, if not already tnalricu- 
laied, or if not graduates of the School, are required to pay the matricu- 
lation fee in addition to the fees named below.) 



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3S6 DEPARTMENT OP MBDICtNB. 

For any single Course of Lectures, except Materia Medica. -Sao oo 

For the Course of Lecturt^s on Materia Medica lo oo 

For Practical Course in the Chemical Laboratory 25 oo 

For the Course in Practical Gynecology of the foiirth year . 25 00 
For any one of the remaining Practical Courses 15 00. 

Graduates in Medicine of this University are admitted to the 
courses free of charge; but they are required to pay for any labcra- 
tory materia] which they may use. 

ROIiES m RELATION TO FEES. 

AH payments should be made to E. W. Mumtord, Bursar, Room 
loi. College Hall. 

A matriculation fee of $5.00 must be paid by all new students in 
the department, whether previously registered in another depart- 

Every student shall upon entering the University make a depodt 
of Sio.oo to cover loss, damage, or breakage of University property, 
library fines, or any charge not paid by the student in some other 
way. A student whose deposit is by charges against it reduced to 
$».So or less shall be required to pay a sum sufficient to restore the 
deposit to its original amount. No deposit or balance remaining on a 
deposit shall be finally repaid to a student until he shall have been 
graduated or shall have formally withdrawn from the University. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

First Year. — Examination in General Chemistry, and the mid-year 
examination in Anatomy (including Osteology. Syndesmology, Myo- 
logy, and such other subjects as may have been covered by the lec- 
tures on Anatomy before February i), will be held about February 1. 

Final examinations at end of year: Physiological Chemistry, 
Bacteriology, Anatomy (excepting the Central Nervous System and 
the Organs of Special Sense), Pathology. 

Second Year. — Examinations in Materia Medica, Pathology, 
Physical Diagnosis, and the mid-year examination in Physiology 
(on the subjects covered by the lectures on Physiology before 
February i), will be held about February i. 

Final examinations at end of year: Anatomy (including the 
Central Nervous System, the Organs of Special Sense and Special 
Regions) , Physiology (on the subjects of the lectures delivered after 
February 1), and Pharmacy. 



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GENERAL INFORMATION. 387 

Third Year, — Examination in Ophthalmology will be held about 
February i. 

Final examinations at end of year: Applied Anatomy, Gross 
Pathology, Medicine, Therapeutics, Surgery, and Obstetrics. 

Fourth Year. — Examination in Dermatology will be held about 
December 30. 

Final examinations at end of year; Medicine, Surgery, Obstet- 
rics, Gynecology, and Hygiene. The examinations include ques- 
tions on Diseases of the Ear, Children's Diseases, and Neurology, 
from lists furnished by the Clinical Professors of those branches. 

OBADITATION.* 

At the end of the fourth year a student who has passed all the 
required examinations satisfactorily will receive the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine under the following provisions: 

1 . He must be 2 1 years of age, and of good moral character. 

3. He must have passed satisfactory examinations in all of the 
required branches of the curriculum, must have attended the prac- 
tical instruction in all departments, and. his last year of instruction 
must have been at this school. 

3. He must have attended at least two cases of Obstetrics. 

4. He must be present at Commencement, unless excused by 
the Dean of Hie Faculty. 



A competitive examination of candidates to fill three free scholar- 
ships is held -annually, (In 1906. on Monday, September 24, at 

* The DEpartnienl of Hcdirine nf thr Univcnity of PennBylvBniB is reeogniied 
by the Royal Collese of Phyiiciani. London, and by the Koyal College of Surgeons, 

and are admitted to the second and third examinations o£ the joint examining 
board, upon the following baaia: 

They xuuflt exhibit their diploma. togeCher with evidence of having passed an 
Approved preliminary examination in general education; and they mu^t also 
pKoent evidence of Sve yean' professional study, aad certificates to show th«t 
the cuinculum required ^3y the examining board has been substantially fulfilled. 

Further information may be obtained from PmnBHic G. Hallbtt, M. L., Secre- 
tary, Examination Hal], Victoria Embankment, London, W. C, England. 

Graduates of the Department of Medicine of the University oi Pennsylvania 
are also admitted, on presentation of the diploma and certificates to verify the 
curriculum, together with evidence of a aatisfoftory preliminary examination or 
degree in Arts, to the final examination for the triple qualification of the Royal 
CcJlegcB of Physicians and Surgeons of Edinburgh, and Faculty oC Pfaysiciaiis and 
Surgeons of Glasgow. 



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388 OEPARTUBNT OF UEDICINB. 

10 A. u.. in the New Medical Laboratories.) Each candidate will 
be required: 

First. To furnish satisfactory evidence in writing, from three 
reputable persons, that he is without means to defray the expenses 
of a medical education. 

Second. To write a brief autobiography of about 300 words in 
length, which will serve as a l«st of his qualifications in orthography 
and grammar. 

Third. To undergo examinations in the following subjects; 

I. Any two of the four languages: 

(a) Latin (first book of Horace's Odes). 

(b) Greek (first four books of the Iliad). The examina- 

tion will include prosody, syntajc and Homeric 
dialect. 

(c) French. — Elementary French, including grammar, prose 

composition (Joynes' Minimum French Grammar and 
Reader), and reading at sight in the following books; 

Francisque Sarcey, Le Siige de Paris. 

Beaumarchais, Le Barbier de Seville. 

Anatole France, Le crime de Sylveslre Bonnard. 

(d) German. — Elementary German, including Learned's 

German Grammar, Wesselhoeft's or Harris' Prose 
Composition, and reading at sight in the following 

Heinp's Hanreise. 

Eichendorff's Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts. 

Wildenbruch's Das edle Blul. 

a. Pht^cs. 

3. Solid Geometry, 

(Candidates who do not possess the qualilications specified in 
paragraph I, p. 317, will in addition be required to pass the exami- 
nations for admission to the First-year Class.) 

Fourth. — To pay an examination fee of S5.00, which is not re- 
turned, but is accepted as the matriculation fee in case the candidate 
is successful. 

The application of candidates who propose presenting themselves 
for examination, together with the certificates demanded by the 
first requirement of the competition, must be in the hands of the 
Dean before September 10. This requirement having been complied 
with, candidates will appear without further notice at the time 
stated for examinatiotis. 



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INFOKUATION. 3S9 

PRIZES TO BE AWARDED, JUNE, ieO». 

NOTB, — Theses and Reports in competition for Prites must be 
presented to the Dean on or before May 1 . Prizes unli riot be awarded 
uniess the work submitted reaches a high standard of excellence. 

The Alumni Medal is offered by the Society of the Alumni of 
the Department of Medicine of the University, to the member of 
the Graduating Class who attains the highest general average in 
examinations. (Only those members of the Graduating Class who 
have taken the last three years of the course in Medicine at this 
University are eligible.) 

The Dr. Spencer Morris pRiie. — The annual income, derived 
from the investment of Ten Thousand Dollars, will be awarded each 
year to that Medical Student of the Graduating Class who shall 
pass the best examination for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

The Frederick A. Packard Prize of One Hundred Dollars is 
offered by a friend of the University to the member of the Grad- 
uating Class who has proven himself to be the most proficient in 
the course in Clinical Medicine. 

The Professor of Obstetrics offers a Prize of an Obstetrical For- 
ceps to the member of the Graduating Class who furnishes the best 
report of a case of Obstetrics occurring in the University Maternity 
Hospital. 

The Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery ofiers a Prize of 
an Antiseptic Minor Operating Case for the best practical work in 
Orthopedic Surgery, or for the best report of his clinic, or for an 
acceptable original design in apparatus. 

APPOINTMENTS TO HOSPITAIiS. 

The following graduates of the Department of Medicine. Class of 
1905. arranged in alphabetical order, were the successful candidates 
in competitive examinations for positions as Resident Physicians 
in the various Hospitals: 

University Hospital: Episcopal Hospital: 

Eliason, E. L. Buddenbrock, E. 

Moorhead. S. W. Gill, A. B. 

0-Neal, A. H. Owen, H. R. 

Piersol, G. M. Price, J. W., Jr. 

Prime. P., Jr. Woodwaid, W. W. 
Robertson. H. E. 
Schleiter, H. G. 



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DBPARTtlBNT C 



St. Joseph's Hospital: 
CuUen, J. G. 

Pehnsylvania Hospital: 
Bradbury, S,, 3d. 
Leonard, E, A., Jr. 



1 Hospital: 
Bartle. H. J.,Jr. 
Bud den brock, E. 
Campbell, J. M. 
EKntenfass, H. 
Guilfoyle, W. P., Jr. 
Hunt, C- J. 
Konantz, O. F. 
Lloyd. P. M. 
Luckett, T. O. 
McLaughlin, D. C. 
Moore. W. F. 
Piersol, G. M, 
Repp, J. J. 
Schatz, H. A. 

Methodist Episcopal Hospital: 
Grouse, H. S. 
Moore, J. L. 



GsRMAS Hospital; 
Schenberg, J. 
Stone, M. P. 

St. Agnes' Hospital: 
Dempsey, W. T. 
NauUy,C. W., Jr. 
Payne, R. L,, Jr. 
WesttaU, L. M. 
Woodward. W. W. 



St. Timothy's Hospital: 
Bartle. H.J. .Jr. 
MathewH, R. F. 
Raby, M. R. 

Howard Hospital; 
Berst, W. L. 
Hills, O. F. 

Gssmantown Hospital: 
Bradbury, S., 3d, 
Kelton, W. 

Perrow, F. M. 

St. Marv's Hospital: 
Cullen. J, G. 
O'Donncll, D. S. 
WestfaU. L. M. 

Presbyterian Hospital: 
Dickson, T. D. 
Gill. A. B. 
Guilfoyle, W.P„ Jr. 
Hunt. C. J. 
O'Neal, A. H. 
Price. J. W., Jr. 

Children's Hospital: 
Luckett. T. O. 

Jewish Hospital: 

Katzenstcin. M. B. 

Polyclinic Hospital: 
Hildreth, E. A., 3d. 
West, C. W. 

Samaritan Hospital: 
Leedom. J. 



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INFORMATION. 



. Christopher's Hospital: 
Leonard, £. A. 
Moore, W. F, 
Roberts, W. R. 



WiLKBSBARRB HOSPITAL, 
WlLKESBARRB, pA.: 

Guthrie. G. D. 
Kirschner. J. W. 



Hercy Hospital. Pittsburo: Mbrcv Hospital, Wilkbb- 



Konantz, O. F. 
. Lotz, O. 
Mclntire, D. B. 
O'NetJ, A, H, 

Allbghenv Gekeral 
pital, Allbghemy, ] 
Dickson, T. D. 
Schleiter, H. G. 
Stewart, R. V. 
West, C. W. 



BARRB, Pa.: 
Dintenfass, H. 

Lancaster General Hos- 
pital, Lancaster, Pa.: 
Baer, W. K. 

St. Lure's Hospital, South 
Bethlehem. Pa.: 
Weaber. T. H. 



West Pbnn Hospital, Pitts- Pottsville Hospital, Potts- 



burg, Pa.: 

Hoffman. H. C. 
Kunkel, H. W. 



VILLB, Pa.: 
Mehring, J. W. 



Moses Taylor Hospital, 
ScRANTON, Pa.: 
Inksetter, F. S. 

ScK ANTON State Hospital, 
ScRANTON, Pa.: 
Guffey, D. C. 
Lawrance, J. S, 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Read- 
iNQ, Pa.: 
Pox, O. E. 

Children's Seaside House. 
St. Timothy's Hospital, Read- Atlantic City, N. J.: 
"*G, Pa.: Moore. W. F. 

Guffey, D. C. West, C. W. 



Delaney, C. W. 
Tomlin, H. H. 

Packer Hospital. Savre, Pa.: 
Evans, T., Jr. 

Chester Hospital. Chester, 

Pa.: 
Campbell, E. A. 

Lauffer. C. A. 



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39a 



DEPARTHBKT C 



UBDICINB. 



CooFBR Hospital, Camden, 
N.J.: 
Davia, A. B. 
Laws, G. M. 

Gbbman Hospital, Newark, 
N. J.: 

Buvinger, C. W. 

Mbrcbr Hospital, Trenton, 
N. J.: 
Baer, W. K. 
Hunt, C. J. 

Mercer Hospital, Atlantic 
City, N. J.: 
lams, S. H. 

St. Frakcis' Hospital, Tren- 
ton, N. J.: 
West, E. L. 

Embbgbncy Hospital, Tren- 
ton, N. J.: 

Schmoyer, H. J. 



Mbrcy Hospital, Sprino- 

piELD, Mass.: 
Streeter, J. F. 



Hartporp City Hi 

Hartford, Conn.: 

Wiedman, O. G. 

Rhode Island General Hos- 
pital, Providence, R. I.: 
Richardson, D. L. 

Bellbvub Hospital, Harleu 
Division, New York City: 

Luckott, T. O. 

Faxton Hospital. Utica, 
N. Y.: 

Powell, L. L, 



Marshall, W., Jr. 
Boston City Hospital, Bos- 

Bisbee, E. S. 
Orton, S. T. 

Boston Emergency and Gen- 
eral Hospital, Boston, 
Mass.: 

Gray, C. H. 

Mathews, R. F. 



Sarah Leigh Hospital, Nob- 
Cul pepper, J. H. 

Seattle General Hospital, 

Seattle, Wash.: 
Eliason, E. L. 

Bbhificencia Portuoukza. 
Brazil: 

Pedroso, A. de M. 



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GENERAL 1 
APPOINTHENTS lO HOSPITALS IN PHrXiABEIiPHIA. 



Ntma of Uo^Ml. 


ToUl 

number of 
ratddenti. 


S 


Philadelphia (Blockley) HoBpital 


i6 
9 

6 
6 

8 

7 
7 
4 
5 
3 
6 
5 
3 


■3 






































St. Agnes' Hospital 

St. Christopher's Hospital 














114 


7<i 





Percentage of appointments received by University of Penn- 
sylvania graduates, 66.6 per cent, 

PUBLICATION. 

The University op Pennsylvania Medical Bulletin, issued 
monthly, is the official organ of the Department. It contains only 
contributions from the teaching stall of the Department of Medi- 
cine. The subscription price is t>.oo a year. Editorial office. 
1714 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 



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UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D., Provost. 

JOHN SAILER. President. 

JAMES TYSON, M. D., Vice-Pbesidbnt. 

THOMAS G. ASHTON. M. D., Sbcretarv. 

Ok thb part or the contributors to the Endowubnt Fund 
GEO. FALES baker, M. D., De FOREST WILLARD, M. D., 
ROBERT E. HASTINGS, GEORGE H. McFADDEN, 

JOHN SAILER, HARRY A. BERWIND, 

THOMAS G. ASHTON. M, D. 

On the part op the University Trustees. 

RICHARD WOOD, WALTER GEORGE SMITH, 

MORRIS J. LEWIS. M. D. 

Om tub part op the Medical Facui.tv. 

J.WILLIAM WHITE, M. D., BARTON COOKE HIRST.M.D., 

JAMES TYSON, M.D. 

On the part of the Medical Alumni. 

RICHARD A. CLEEMANN. M.D., WHARTON SINKLER. M.D., 

CHARLES W. DULLES. M. D. 

On the tart op the Board of Women Visitors. 
MRS. CHARLES C. HARRISON, 
MRS. GEORGE WHARTON PEPPER, 
MRS. WILLIAM W. ARNETT. 



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Chairmen or Standing Committees. 
On Finance: GEORGE H. McFADDEN. 
On Propbrtv and Repairs: JAMES TYSON, M. D. 
On Library and Museum; JOHN SAILER. 
Op Exbcutivb Committee: ROBERT E, HASTINGS, 



The University Hospital is under the immediate direction of a 
Board of Managers, constituted as above. It is situated on a lot of 
ground between Thirty-fourth and Thirty-sixth streets, and Spruce 
and Pine streets, given by the city of Philadelphia to the University. 
The main building and one wing were opened for the reception of 
patients and for purposes of clinical instruction in 1874, 

The Gibson Wing for Chronic Diseases, especially of the heart 
and luugs, was erected in 1883 through the liberaUty of the late 
Henry C. Gibson. Here unusual opportunities are afforded for the 
study of these important affections. 

The D. Haves Acnew Memorial Pavilion, dedicated in 1897, 
comprising four large wards, and one large and two small clinic 
amphitheatres, is also used for clinical instruction. 

The Maternity Pavilion is separate from the main building, and 
provides accommodations for forty paticnis. The amphitheatre in 
connection with it was completed in 1901, and has a seating capacity 
of two hundred. 

The WiLLUM Pepper Laboratory of Clinical Medicine, erected 
through the generosity of the late Dr. WilHam Pepper as a memorial 
to his father, adjoins the University Hospital. The purposes of the 
Laboratory are; to promote the interests of the patients by provid- 
ing facilities for the prosecution of minute clinical studies and 
original researches; and to advance the interests of science by the 
publication of the results of such work. No instruction in the Labo- 
ratory is given to undergraduates. 

The main building, besides the odiccs and the rooms of the officers, 
has a large clinical amphitheatre, which will scat six hundred stti- 
dents, and a smaller one seating one hundred and lifty. It also hai 
six roums for private patients. The wing adjoining has foiu- wards, 
with a capacity of one hundred and ten patients, and twenty-one 
private rooms. The wing for Chronic Diseases has room for sixty- 
two patients in its four wards. There is, therefore, with the Agncw 
wing and the Maternity, full accommodation for thri'e hundred and 
ten patients. In the basement are surgical and niedieal dispen- 
saries, also special dis]>ensaries for diseases of the throat and nose. 



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3^6 HOSPITAL. 

diseases of children, diseases of the skin, the eye and ear, t 
diseases, diseases of women, for orthopedics and for venereal dis- 
eases, and for out-door patients. In connection with the Ortlio- 
pedic Dispensary is a workshop, in which braces and other appli- 
ances are made. 

All cases of accident occurring in the State of Pennsylvania, which 
are brought to the Hospital within twenty-four hours after their 
occurrence, are admitted at any hour of the day or night. 

Charity patients are admitted by the members of the Medical Staff 
on a written order to the Superintendent; provided that a bed be 
vacant in the department to which the member of the Medical Staff 
is attached. 

Paying patients are received at the Hospital on application to the 
Superintendent, subject to the approval of the proper attending 
medical officer. The charge in the wards is $7.00 a week; in the 
private rooms, of which there are thirty-three, the prices range from 
$20.00 to tioo.oo a week. 

. No patient with acute venereal disease, or mania-A-potn, is ad- 
mitted as a free patient, but is charged such rates for board as may 
be agreed upon. 

Visitors are admitted to see patients in the private rooms from 
9 A. M. to 9 p. H. 

Visitors are admitted to the wards on Sundays, Wednesdays 
and Fridays from i to 3 p. m. 

Five positions as resident physicians in the University Hospital 
are awarded annually to five members of the Graduating Class Qf 
tlie Department of Medicine, selected from the twenty-five mem- 
bers of the class who have the highest general average at the end 
of the third year of the course. Only those members of the Gradu- 
ating Class who have taken the last three years of the course in Medi- 
cine at this University are eligible for the positions. The resident 
physicians go on duty at intervals of three months, and serve during 
a term of two years. 

An Annual Report of the Hospital is published, giving detailed 
statistics of the year. Copies may be had on application to the 
Superintendent . 



Communications concerning the business of the Hospital and the 
admission of patients should be addressed to the Superintendent, 
Marion E. Smith (Hiss), and not to Ike Dean of the Faculty of 

Medicine. 



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ROSPtTAL. 397 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

The Training School for Nurses, attached to the Hospital of the 
University, was organized in iSSfi. In that year a Hoke for 
NvRSBS was erected in memory of Mrs. Richard D. Wood by her 
children, and has since been considerably enlarged. The build- 
ing was completely furnished by the women members of the 
Training School Committee, and every provision is made for the 
healthful and comfortable home life of the pupil nurses. Owing 
Ui the increased size of the Hospital, more nurses have become 
necessary, and to lodge them properly a large addition to the 
Nurses' Home has been built. 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years. Besides 
the regular ward and class instruction, courses of lectures are given 
in Hygiene, Anatomy, Physiology, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
Materia Hedica, Toxicology, Urinalysis, Use of Splints, Banda^g, 
Gynecology, Obstetrics, Diseases of Children, Diseases of Eye, Ear 
and Nervous System, Rest Cure, Electro-Therapeutics, Massage, 
Care of the Insane, Contagion, Nutrition and Cookery for the Sick. 

Ail eammunications relating io the School for Nurses should be 
addressed to 

LVDIA A. Whiton, 

Assistant Superintendent and Directress of Nurses, 

University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 



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DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 



FACULTY. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D.. Provost. 
EDGAR F. SMITH. Ph. D.. Sc. D., LL. D.. Vice-Provost. 



EDWIN T, DARBY. D. D. S., M. D., Professor of Operative Den- 
tistry and Dental Histology, 

JAMES TRUMAN, D. D. S, LL. D„ Professor of Dental Path- 
ology. Therapeutics and Materia Medica. 

EDWARD C. KIRK. D. D, S., Sc. D., Professor of Oinieal Den- 
tistry, and Dean op the Faculty. 

MATTHEW H. CRYER, D. D. S-, M. D.. Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery, 

CHARLES R. TURNER. D. D. S., M. D., Professor of Mechanical 
Dentistry and Metallurgy. 

EDWARD T. REICHERT, M. D.. Professor of Physiology. 

GEORGE A. PIERSOL, M. D.. Professor of Anatomy. 

JOHN MARSHALL. M, D,, Nat, ScD,. LL. D., Professor of 
Chemistry and Toxicology. 

• ALEXANDER C, ABBOTT, M, D,. Profes.sor of Bacteriology. 



GEORGE G. MILLIKEN. D, D, S., M, D.. As.sistant Professor of 
Operative Technics. 

R. HAMILL D. SWING, D. D, S,, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery and Anesthesia. 

A. DbWITT GRITMAN. D, D. S,. As.sistant Professor of Mechan- 
ical Dentistrj', 

DAVID H. BERGEY, A. M.. M. D.. Assistant Professor of Bac- 
teriology. 



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LECTURERS. 
JOHN D. THOMAS. D. D, S., Lecturer on Nitrous Oxide. 
MEYER L. RHEIN. D.D. S,. M, D., Lecturer on Dental Path- 

SAFFORD G. PERRY. D, D. S., Lecturer on Operative Dentistry. 
JULIO ENDELMAN, D. D. S., Lecturer on Materia Medica. 
FREDERIC A. PEESO. D. D. S.. Lecturer and Special Instructor 
in Crown -and -Bridge Work. 

DEMONSTRATORS. 
WILLIAM DIEHL, D- D- S.. Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
JAMES G, LANE, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 
AMBLER TEES, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Dental Ceramics. 
FREDERICK AMEND, Jr., D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
MILTON N. KEIM, Jr., D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
J. EDWARD DUNWOODY, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Crown- 

and- Bridge Work. 
ROBERT J. SEYMOUR, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
A. SWANTON BURKE, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
WILLIAM C. MARSH, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Operative Den- 

JAMES A. DOWDEN, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical Den- 

WILSON ZERFING, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Operative Den- 
tistry. 

G, JANVIER PAYNTER, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Tooth Model- 
ing. 

FREDERICK W. ALLEN, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Operative 
Technics. 

JOHN A. McCLAIN, D.D. S„ Demonstrator of Operative Den tistiy. 

GEORGE H. CHAMBERS, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of 
Noiroal Histology. 



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4O0 DEPARTMENT C 

AUGUSTUS 0. KOENIG, B. S., M. D., Demonstrator of Dental 

Metallurgy. 
DANIEL W. PETTEROLF, M. D., Demonstrator of Chemistry. 
S. MERRILL WEEKS, D. D. S- Demonstrator of Orthodontia. 
WALTER W. McKAY, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Porcelain InUy 

Work. 
ALBERT W. JARMAN, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
JEHU T. GORE, D. D. S,. Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
J. GARRETT HICKEY. D. D. S., Demonstrator of Physiology. 
GEORGE O. JARVIS. M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Applied 

Anatomy. 
CHARLES H. JACO, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Operative Den- 

ALFRED P. LEE, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
MICHAEL T. BARRETT, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
ELON KANAGA, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Crown-aad- Bridge 

Work. 
NORMAN L. ROBERTS, D. D. S., Demonstrator of Operative 

Dentistry. 
WILLIAM H. F. ADDISON, M. D., Demonstrator of Histology. 
PENN-GASKELL SKILLERN, Jr., M. D„ Assistant Demonstrator 

of Normal Histology. 
WALTER S. CORNELL. M. D., Demonstrator of Osteology. 



Clinical Instructobs. 
Dr. Charles S. Beck, Dr. Daniel N. McQuillbn, 

Dr. Edward I. Kefper, Dr. Henry C. Registeb, 

Dr. John R. Yohrs. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 
The Department of Dentistry of the University of Pennsylvania 
wa,s organized in the early part of 1878. It was the third school 
created as the dental department of a ■university, having been pre- 
ceded in this respect by the Harvard School of Dentistry (organ- 



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ORGANIZATION OP TKB DENTAL SCHOOL. 40I 

i«ed in 1867), and the Dental Department of the University of 
Michigan (organized in 1875). 

The motive leading to the creation of dental schools as regular 
departments of the university educational system was the rapid 
growth of dentistry as a profession. This was shown by the im- 
provement in the educational equipment of its practitioners, and 
by the tendency to broaden the courses of instruction furnished by 
dental schools to meet the continual necessity for more thorough 
training. 

Realizing that but two conceptions of the status of dentistry were 
possible, viz. : that it was either a branch of medicine, or else a sepa- 
rate profession ; and believing that its close relationship with medi- 
cine called for the future development of dentistry in conformity 
therewith, the TriL^tecs took action resulting in the creation of the 
Department of Dentistry of the University of Pennsylvania. The 
plan of instruction was so arranged that the branches common to 
both medicine and dentistry were taught concurrently by teachers 
who held corresponding chairs in both medical and dental faculties ', 
while the strictly dental teaching was provided for by the creation 
of chairs whose incumbents were specially qualified for giving in- 
struction in their respective branches. This arrangement is in 
stiict accordance with the university idea, by which the teaching 
of allied branches is centralized in different departments. It does 
not imply that the Department of Dentistry is a branch of the De- 
partment of Medicine, for, as a matter of fact, both are distinct 
Departments of the University. 

It is worthy of note that the Department of Dentistry is actually, 
as well as in name, a Department of the University. Its position 
as a recognized member of the University family confers upon its 
students certain advantages pertaining to that relationship. Its 
students enjoy in common with all other students of the University 
the privileges and social relationships pertaining to the student life 
of the whole body. Prominent among these features is member- 
ship in the Houston Club, an organization governed by students 
and domiciled in a club house which in its fittings and appointments 
is second to no other club house in Philadelphia. Its students have 
also the use of the Dormitories, and are admitted to all of the ath- 
letic features of the University; while, with reasonable restrictions, 
the opportunity is afforded them to pursue such allied lines of study 
as in the judgment of the authorities may tend to add strength and 
fullness to the dental educational equipment. 

The practical advantages that accrue to the dental student by 



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403 rBPABTMENT Ol" DENTISTBT. 

such a broad policy arc at once manifest. Its effects upon the stettis 
of the dental practitioner must be recognized when it is considered 
that during the student life, his association with the students of the 
other Departments of the University is upon a basis of equality in 
all that concerns the student life of the institution. The influence 
of this feature in bringing about a close relationship between 
dental and medical students develops a mutual respect and 
recognition, which in their career as practitioners is of the utmost 
importance, 

EQUIPMENT. 

The arrangement of the interior of the Dental Hall is such that 
facilities are provided for the thorough education of the student 
in every important detail of his professional work. The clinical 
operating-room occupies one entire floor of the main building, giving 
a floor space i8o by 50 feet, furnished with one hundred latest pat- 
tern Wilkerson operating chairs, each provided with a fountain cuS' 
pidor. with running water attached, and attachment for the Fisk 
saliva ejector. Each chair is provided with a bracket arm, and 
table for holding instruments, besides a separate table for the 
instrument case. Electric service is provided for each chair. 
A complete locker system in connection with the operative clinic 
furnishes means for the storage of instruments when not in use. 
In the fitting up of the operating-room, the aim has been to make 
the appointments as nearly as possible like those of a first- 
class private office, so that from the beginning of his course the 
student is familiarized with the conditions he will meet in actual 
practice. 

One large general laboratory for prosthetic work is provided, and 
separate departments for crown-and-b ridge work, orthodontia tech- 
nics, prosthetic technics, ojjerative technics, porcelain work includ- 
ing inlays, crown-and -bridge and continuous gum work, metal- 
lurgical work, vulcanizing and modeling; also special clinic-rooms 
and laboratories. Ample arrangements are provided for the con- 
venience and comfort of the students in the care of instruments, 
tools, etc. There are also hat and coat rooms, lavatories, etc., a 
bicycle-room, laundry, store-rooms, and living apartments of the 
janitor; and an assembly-room for the exclusive use and recrea- 
tion of the students when not on duty. The laboratories are fitted 
with the most approved appliances for work and instruction in the 
several departments of dentistry. Compressed air is supplied to 
the laboratory tables for melting and soldering operations, as well 



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REQUIREMENTS. 403 

as for metallurgical work. The laboratory lathes are driven by 
electric motor, and no feature which could add to the facilities for 
thorough and accurate work has been omitted. 

The lecture amphitheatre will comfortably seat 550. It joins the 
main building by a corridor, and in relation with it are arranged the 
dental museum and library. 

As the laboratory, or manual- training, method forms a prominent 
and necessary adjunct to didactic teaching, facilities for carrying out 
the technjc system of instruction are provided in connection with 
each subject to which the system is applicable. 



ADMISSION. 

By action of the National Association oj Dental Faculties at a meet- 
ing held in St. Louis, July 16, 1904, it v;as ruled that the degree of Doctor 
0/ Dental Surgery may be conferred upon the completion of a three 
years' curriculum by colleges holding membership in the Association. 

IVhile the University of Pennsylvania favors a four years' curric- 
ulum, the Administration has decided to conform to the foregoing 
regulation of the Faculties' Association, at the same time offering and 
recommending a four years' course, optional for tlie present, and upon 
the completion of which students mill be graduated tvitk special dis- 

Special attention is called to the rule adopted by the National 
Association of Dental Faculties, August, 1896, reqiiiring all appli- 
cants for matriculation to be present and enter their names not later 
than ten days after the official date of opening. 

Candidates for admission will not be permitted to matriculate for 
any session other than that immediately succeeding the date of 
matriculation. No candidate will be allowed to matriculate for 



PRELIMINARY EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS. 

The educational standard for admission into this Department is 
a three years' completed course in in approved high school, or its 
equivalent. 

To assist in deciding whether a candidate has or has not the 
necessary educational requirements tor entrance to this Department, 
and to prevent uncertainty and delay in replying to conununications 
from applicants for matriculation, the followiiig regulations have 
been adopted for the session oi 1906-07 ■' 



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A. For matriculation in the Freshman Class without e 
tion, the candidate must present a diploma of graduation from a 
literary or scientific college, a state normal school, a diploma of an 
approved high school having a three years' course; or a certificate 
showing satisfactory completion of three years' work of a high 
school having a four years' course, or a certificate from a prepara- 
tory or other school showing an equivalent education; and such 
certificate must be signed by the principal of the school issuing it, 
stating the studies pursued by the applicant, the extent to which, 
in each case, they have been covered, and the grade attained in each, 

B. In lieu of such diploma or certificate, the applicant will be 
required to pass a matriculate examination, which shall be the 
eiiuivalent of that forming the basis of the certificate of required 
preliminary education, as follows: 

Language. 
English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose 
work is notably defective in spelling, pimctuation, idiom or divi- 
sion into paragraphs. 

A. (i) Grammar and Analysis (as in Abbott's How to Parse, 
or Murray's Advanced Lessons in English Composition, Analysis, 
and Gratnmar. (2) The writing of several paragraphs, correct in 
spelling, punctuation, grammar, and expression, written bn subjects 
taken from the following works, a general knowledge of which is 
required. For 1906 and 1907. 

Shakespeare's The Merchant 0} Venice and Julius Ccesar; The 
Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in The Spectator: Goldsmith's The 
Vicar of Wakefield; Scott's Ivanhoe; Coleridge's The Rime of Ike 
Ancient Mariner; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Tennyson's The Prin- 
cess; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas 
Marner. 

B. A special knowledge of the subject-matter, form and struc- 
ture of the following works: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's 
Lycidas, Cotnus, L' Allegro and H Pcnseroso; Burke's Speech on Con- 
dilation with America. Macaulay's Essays an Millott and Addison. 

Latin. — (1) A thorough knowledge of elementary grammar, as 
in Bennett's Latin Grammar. 

(i) Cnssar (any standard edition): 

Or an equivalent course in German, French or Spanish. 

NoTi.— The entrance examination for Ihc session uf iqo6-i«a7 »-ill be held in 
Roberts Vaux School -buildios. Wood Street below Twelfth, on Tuesday. Sep- 



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prbliminarv educational .rbquireuents. 405 

History. 

A. American history, with the elements of civil government. 
This will include colonial history, with a view to the origin and 
development of our institutions; and the period of discovery and 
early settlement, so as to set forth the relations of peoples in America 
and the mieaning of the struggle for mastery; geographical knowl- 
edge involved; the general plan and important provisions of the 
Constitution. As in McMastcr, or Piske (school edition). 

B. General history, — including Greek, Roman and English his- 
tory; leading events. As in Meyer, or Anderson. 

Mathematics. 

A. Algebra. — Fundamental operations; factors; common divi- 
sors and multiples; fractions; equations of the first degree with one 
or more imknown quantities; quadratic equations; the binomial 
theorem. As in Brooks, or Wentworth (Shorter Course). 

B. Plane Geometry,^ — including the solution of simple original 
exercises and numerical problems. As in Wentworth, or Phillips 
and Fisher. 

Science. 

Physics. — As in Carhart and Chute, or Gage's Elements of Physics. 

Chemistry. — As in Remsen's Elemenlary Course in Chetttislry, or 
Arey's Elementary Chemisiry will be accepted in lieu of Physics. 

Other text-books than those mentioned may be used at the pleas- 
ure of teacher or student, provided they cover the subjects to the 
extent indicated. 

N. B. — Official certification of the work done in other subjects of a 
standard equivalent to three years' work in an approved high school, 
will be received and duly credited. 

An applicant whose credentials do not fully meet the require- 
ments outlined above, or who does not pass the entrance examina- 
tions with a percentage of 70 in every subject, may be admitted 
on condition that be make up the required work in any branch or 
branches (not exceeding two) to the extent required. 

Matriculates who are conditioned in any branch or branches 
must pass a satisfactory examination in such branch or branches 
before being permitted to take the final Freshman examination. 

Registration cards and permits for the entrance examination 
must first be obtained from the office of the Dean of the Depart- 
ment of Dentistry in Dental Hall, Thirty-third and Locust streets, 
Philadelphia. 



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406 DBPARTMI'.NT OP DENTISTRY. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING.* 

Students possessing tlie requisite preliminary education, and who 
have attended one full term in a dental school recognized by this 
University, will be admitted to the second year, subject to the rules 
governing admission to advanced standing. 

Graduates of a recognized medical school will be admitted to the 
Second-year Dental Class without examination. 

Applicants for advanced standing, who have not had instruction 
' in Practical Histology and Practical Chemistry c<]uivalcnt to that 
required by this department, will be permitted to make up such 
deficiency by taking special courecs, for which an extra fee of fifteen 
dollars is charged for each branch. Classes for special courses in 
these branches are organized during the second week in September 
for the benefit of those desiring to take the laboratory work before 
the work of the regular session. 

Students who have credit for the completed work of two or more 
terms in a recognized dental school, and who possess the re'juisitc 
preliminary educational qualifications, arc eligible for admission to 
the third year, subject to the rules governing admission to advanced 
standing. 

Graduates of foreign dental schools are retjuired to conform to the 
rules governing advanced standing, and to the ruling of the National 
Association of Dental Faculties that their credentials must receive 
the approval of the Advisory Board for their country before they 
can be accepted. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

1, UuivBRSiTY Scholarships. — The Trustees have established 
two University Scholarships in Dentistry, the award of which is 
based upon the result of a comi>etitive examination equivalent to 
that demanded for admission to the technical courses in the College. 
They arc not awarded for less than the entire course. 

Examinations for these scholarships are held on the same day 
with those fixed for entrance to the College (Friday, September ii, 
1906), and are open to all applicants otherwise eligible for admis- 
sion to the Department of Dentistry. Circulars setting forth in 
detail the plan of the scholarship examination may be had upon 
application to the Dean of the Department of Dentistry. 

* All appUcanta for advanced stundin^ muKt pass the exdminationi of tbe vb^'^ 
they desi™ to omit, or fumiih proof that they have passed iqutvaUtU ezanunm- 
tJOM in some recogni«d dental or medical school. 



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PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 407 

A registration fee of five dollars is required of all candidates for 
scholarship and entrance examination, and is not returnable in case 
of failure to pass. 

1. Public School Prize Scholarships. — Under an agreement 
with the city of Philadelphia, fifty free scholarships exist in the 
University for the benefit of graduates of the public schools. The 
candidates for these scholarships are examined by the Board of 
PubUc Education, and award is made to those who reach the highest 
grade, as vacancies occur from year to year. 

STATUS OF STUDENTS. 

A regular student is one who is regidarly admitted to the Depart- 
ment, and who is a candidate for the degree of D. D. S, 

A special student is one who is regularly admitted to the Depart- 
ment, but who, not being a candidate for the degree, does not take 
the regular course. The admission of sf)ecial students is at the dis- 
cretion of the Dean. 

SPECIAL COURSES. 



and do not lead to the dental degree. The fees for the special 
courses are $50.00, $100.00 or $150.00, depending upon whether the 
student remains under instruction for three months, six months 
or the entire session respectively. These course fees are in all 
cases additional to the regular matriculation fee of $5.00. 

HOUSTON CLUB AND GYMNASIUM. 
A uniform charge of $10.00 a year is made upon all students, 
to include membership in Houston Club with all of the usual club 
privileges, and the use of the gymnasium and its facilities, includ- 
ing locker and the use of Franklin Field, excepting only at such 
times as the Field may be in use by athletic teams. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
In the Department of Dentistry two hours a week of graded 
physical culture is an obligatory part of the curriculum for all stu- 
dents ot the first year, excepting those who have previously had 
an equivalent course of physical training elsewhere and those who 
for reasons of physical disability may be excused by the Director. 



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408 DEPARTHBNT OP DBMTISTBV. 

ARRANGEMENT OF SESSION. 

The academic year conosts of one seEdon begmning on the last 
Friday in September, and ending at Commencement, on the third 
Wednesday in June. The course of instruction is graded. 

Laboratory instruction, not only in all of the practical dental 
branches, but also in Practical Chemistry. Metallurgy, Histology, 
Bacteriology, Physiology and Osteolc^y, forms a prominent feature 
of the course. 

The session of 1906-07 will begin on Friday, September 38, 1906, 
and will end on Wednesday, June 19, 1907. 

MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS. 

The arrangement of subjects constituting the curriculum of the 
first, second, and third years as specified here and on pp. 411 and 
414 el seq., is provisional only, and subject to change before the 
opening of the following session. 

In the first-year course a mid-term examination is held about 
February i in Chemistry, Histology and Elementary Anatomy. 

In the second-year course, at the same date, a mid-temi exami- 
nation is held in Elementary Physiology and Bacteriology. 

In the third-year course a mid-term examination is held in 
Metallurgy. 

RULES GOVERNING MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS, 
t. Non-Phbsentation and Failures. 

A student who has not undergone examination, or who haa 
failed to attain a mark of 50 in any examination, may be re- 
examined! 

(a) At the first re-examination about March i ; or, failing then 

(6) At the second re- examination about one week prior to the 
final examinations of the academic year in May. 
a. Failure to Make a General Average op 60. 

A student having passed all the examinations, but failing to 
attain a general average of 60, may avail himself of the privileges 
of the re-examinations at the times designated in paragraph 1, in 
all of the subjects in which a mark of less than 60 was attained. 

3. Eligibilitt por Final Examinations in May. 

All the mid-year examinations must be passed before the 
candidate becomes eligible for the final examinations for the 
academic year, held in May. 



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examination fok graduation. 409 

. Rbpbtition of the Studies op thb Year. 

The general rules governing the repetition of the Btudiea of 
any year shall apply to those students who failed to pass or to 
attain the required general average, or who were eligible to 
appear at the final examinations of the academic year, held in 
May. 

RULES GOVERNING TERM EXAlillNATIONS. 



t. The examination marks of this Department are based on a 
scale of 100. Each student must obtain a general average of 60 to 
pass the examinations of the year. 50 on a single branch will entitle 
him to average; less than 50 constitutes a failure in that branch. 

I. Students who have failed to pass in any or all the branches 
are given an opportimity for a second examination, before the open- 
ing of the next regular session, on the stated day in September desig- 
nated for re-examinations in the official calendar in this Catalogue; 
but if the student fail to appear, or if his general avc^rage be less than 
60, he shall repeat the studies of the year except those in which he 
received a grade of not less than 70, 

3. A student may be permitted to matriculate in the succeeding 
year, if he has successfully passed all but one branch, on condition 
that the one in which he has been found deficient must be passed on 
or about November 1 of the year in which he has been maBiculated. 
Failing at the November examination to pass the branch in which 
he is conditioned, the student will be required to repeat the work of 
the year as provided in Rule a. This rule applies to laboratory and 
clinical requirements as well as to didactic work. 

4. No student will be eligible for examination if any portion of 
his fees remains unpaid. 

EXAMINATION FOR GRADUATION. 

1. The examination marks shall be upon a scale of 100. 

2. Each candidate must attain at least 50 in any single branch, 
and have a general average of 60, before he can be recommended 
for graduation. 

3. Candidates who attain a general averse of at least 90 shall 
be conddered to have gained Honors of the first class, and will 
receive Honorable Mention. 

4. The graduation average shall be based on the examination 
marks of the whole curriculum. 



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4IO DBPA8TI1ENT OF DBNTISTBY. 

5. Gxaiiiina lions arc held immediately after the completion of 
the lecture courses. 

No student can b« examined before that time except by consent of 
the Faculty. 

GRADUATION, 

At the close ot the coursr, a student who has fulfilled al! require- 
ments satisfactorily receives the di'groc of Doctor of Dental Surgery 
(D. D. S.), under the following regulations: 
I. He must be of good moral character. 

II. He must have passed a satisfactory examination in all the 
branches of the curriculum; must ha\-c attended the practical in- 
struction and performed the required practical work in all depart- 
ments; and his last year of instruction must have been at the De- 
partment of Dentistry of this University. 

HI. He must have dissected at least two parts; must have per- 
formed thoroughly, and to the satisfaction of tha Professor of 
Ojierative Dentistry, all the usual dental operations; must have 
undertaken at least one artificial case, and brought it completed, 
with the patient, to the Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, thirty 
days before the close of the term; and must have prepared for pre- 
sentation to the Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, before the first 
of May, a specimen case to be deposited in the University collection. 
The required operations, as well as the work on the artificial case, 
must have been performed in Dental Hall, 

IV. After receiving notice of having successfully passed the final 
examination, he must enter his name on the Register of Candidates 
tor the Degree. 

V. He must be present at Commencement, unless excused by 
the Dean of the Faculty. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND WORKS OF REFERENCE.* 

Tat-Books. Works of Refeience. 

Operative Dentistry: 

Kirk, the American Text- Johnson, Principles and Practice 
Book of Operative Dentis- of Filling Teeth. 

try. (Third edition ) Kingsley, Ora] Deformities. 



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Prosthetic Dentistry and Metal- 
lurgy: 
Turner, The American Text- 
Book of Prosthetic Dentis- 
try. (Third edition.) 
Essig-Koenig, Dental Metal- 
lurgy. Second edition. 

Denial Pathology and Tkera- 

Burchard-Inglis, Dental Path- 
ology, Therapeutics and Phar- 
macology. (Second edition.) 

Materia Medico: 
Gorgas, Dental Medicine. H. C. Wood, Therapeutics. 

Wood & Bache, United States 



Dispensatory. 



Orthodontia: 

Angle. Treatment of Maloe- 



Chemistry: 

Richter, Inof^anic Chemistry. Mitchell, Dental Chemistry. 
Medicus, Qualitative Analysis. 
(Fifth edition.) 

Histology: 

Piersol, Normal Histology. 

Anatomy: 
Cunningham, Text-Book of Gray, Human Anatomy. 
Anatomy. Tomes, Dental Anatomy. 

Black, Dental Anatomy. 

Dissection Manual: 
Cunningham, Practical Anat- 
omy. Vol. I. 



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4ia DEPARTUENT OP DENTISTRY. 

Text-Booki. Work! of Reference. 

Applied Anatomy: 

Cryet, Studies of the Internal 
Anatomy of the Face. 

Pkysichgy: 

Stewart, Manual of Physi- 
ology. 

Oral Surgery: 

Bergmann, A System of Prac- Marshall, Injuries and Sur- 
tical Surgery. Vol. 1. gical Diseases of the Face, 

Mouth and Jaws. 

BacUrioicgy: 

Abbott, Principles of Bacteri- Miller, Micro- Organisms of the 
ology. Human Mouth, 



Dictionary: 

Gould, Student's Medical Dic- 
tionary 



* ROSTER. 

FIB8T-TEAB GLAS8.-SESSION JMS-IOOB. 
n befopfl PebrnMTT 1. 





AfmAw. 


Tu«day. 


Wtdne«iau. 


TkuriM/- 


Friday 


Satvniav- 


OrteolosyW 


c^S?;.. 


CiM divided 


sr^i™ 


Dantiitry. 






Manhall. 


Dental 
tooth forma. 


10 A. u. 


fflSS'i. 


for IiutTuotian 
in Prosthetic 
and Operative 




„.... 


eSS, 


■nd Operative 


IJO 
4r. H. 


due divided 


Clue divided 
into Seetians 
fof PrMt.Wort 

«idm!?d^ 
Aoatomy. 


for Pract.Work 


Han divided 
into Sections 
forPoicl.Work 
io (ftamislry 

Anatomy. 


Education. 




4p. H. 


Pl»«l. 

Anatomy. 




.,... 


tani*. 
AnKlomy 
SMitftllonik 











* Roaten ai* subjaet to reamnaenu 



i( of eaoh aoadumc year. 



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H«b: 


Jfmdov. 


'-^- 


ir«iB«*w. 


TA«nd«B. 


frti™ 


M-dw. 


»A.H. 


St 


Wt 


B-'Si,. 




III 


"SSI" 


10i.>i 


!X"«r^ 






11 A. » 






Dwitutry. 


<«'S5„. 


SsiSs. 


sssss: 


cjasw. 






1^ 


SaotioDWoA. 


BactioD Woric 

Demon Mratn 


SaotloD Work. 


B«tionWork. 
IMnsotinf, 






.... 


Phrtotojy. 


pW&. 


Truman. 
Hataria 

Medka. 


pSStt. 


pRiast. 




Sr. ■. 


iSfe 


DenliiUy. 


S; 




^■^rS,:- 









Order oft 






Hovr. 


if«d.>v. 






TAuTKiav. 


CHnioal PrMt. 

Caramin. 




»*.-. 


Clinioal Praot 

Cer«iii<» 

Crown am) 
Bridsa Wok. 


Canmioa. 

Crown and 
Bridge Work. 


CUnieal PTBit. 


Teohniiw. 




10 a.m. 


Cliaigal Praet. 
Brid^^^. 


"EH^." 


UK. 




KIrtc. 

CUnioal 
DantUtry. 


OralfiSiery. 






OralS?!^ 


l.SOto 


iDlarWork. 

I?«ali«l 
MataUursr. 

DentiMry. 


Inlar Work. 

Prutical 
MetiJlurcy. 


InUyWoA. 

nkotical 
Matallnrcy. 




tolay Work. 
BridsaWork 




Sp.m. 


Danliatry. 


Dentistry. 


sa- 


Sȣ? 





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414 DEPARTUBNT OP DBNTISTKY. 

Medical and Surgical Clinics at the University Hospital are held 
from 12 M. to I p. M., on 'Wednesdays and Saturdays, and arc open 
to the Second and Third-year Classes. These are in addition to 
the dental clinics at the Philadelphia Hospital, on Saturdays at 
13 o'clock, and to the Oral Surgical Clinics as noted on the roster. 

OPERATING-ROOM, LABORATORIES. ETC. 

The operative clinic room and laboratories are spacious and 
well equipped, affording ample facilities for the practical training 
of the student. 

The dissecting-room is large, well lighted, thoroughly ventilated, 
and furnished with ample material for the successful prosecution of 
anatomical studies. 

GRADATION OF THE COURSE. 

In order to facilitate work in the practical branches, and to 
economize the student's time, the regular session is so arranged 
that students during the first year are required to devote the time 
equally to dental, histological and chemical laboratory work. 

During the second and third years, the student has practically the 
entire forenoon of each day for dental work. Thus ample oppor- 
tunity is afforded for practice in Operative and Prosthetic Den- 
tistry, In the latter branches, the students are divided into sec- 
tions, devoting the time not otherwise engaged to practice in the 
operating-rooms. 

This plan of gradation enables the First-year student to present 
himself for examination in the following branches: Chemistry, 
Histology and Anatomy, including Osteology and Myology, and on 
Progress in Mechanical Dnetistry, Operative Technics and Materia 
Medica, The Second-year student will be examined on Materia 
Medica, Bacteriology, Applied Anatomy and Physiology, and en 
Progress in Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry, Such an arrange- 
ment is economical not only in point of rime, but also in facilitating 
a student's acquirement of knowledge in the remaining branches. 

OUTLINE OF THE COURSE.* 

FIRST VBAR. 

Students of the First-year Class will be required to attend instruc- 
tion in and pass examinatjons upon the following 1:n'anches: 
I. Chemistry. Three lectures a week. Five hours laboratory. 

• S« first paragraph unda Mid-Term Examinatioiu. p. 408. 



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4IS 

. Anatomy. Four lectures a week. One-half the requirod work 

in dissecting is done during; this year. 
. Histology. Five hours laboratory a week. 
. Osteology. Two lectures a week. 
. Materia Medica. One lecture a week. 
. Students of the First-year Class will be trained in Operative and 

Prosthetic Technics during hours not otherwise occupied. 
. They will, in addition to the subjects named, attend lectures on 

Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry. Each one hour a week. 
. Physical Education. Two hours a week. 



1. Students of the Second-year Class will attend lectures on Ma- 
teria Medica, Physiology, Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry 
and Metallurgy, Dental Pathology and Therapeutics, Clinical 
Dentistry, Bacteriology, Applied Anatomy and Oral Surgery. 
Work in Practical Anatomy (dissecting) is finished during this 

9. They will pursue Operative and Mechanical Work, with the 
privilege of the operating-room and appliances during the 
morning and afternoon clinics. 

3. The final exaininations of the second year will be upon Materia 
Medica, Physiology, Bacteriology. Applied Anatomy and 
Progress in Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry. 



I. Students of the Third-year Class will continue the pracrical 
work in Operative Dentistry, Prosthetic Dentistry and Dental 
Metallurgy, and the lectures on these subjects, together with 
Dental Pathology and Therapeutics, Clinical Dentistry, Oral 
Surgery and Orthodontia. 

3. At the close of the term they will be required t 
lions in these branches, 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 
The lectures on operative dentistkv ^ 
embrace the comparative anatomy of the teeth; the functions and 
microscopical peculiarities of the dental organs: the development 
of teeth and their component tissues; a full description of the 
elucidation of all dental operations, such as filling, extracting and 
regulating; the pathological relations of the teeth to the other parts 



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416 DEPARTMBNT 

of the system; and a minute description of all diseases related to 
di-'ntal surgery or of interest to the dentist. The methods taught 
are demonstrated in cUnics. 

The course of instruction in prosthetic dentibtrt is a graded 
one, and is arranged to embody in the teaching of the first year the 
fundamental principles of prosthetic work, including the properties 
of the materials used for prosthetic purposes and the various 
mechanical processes involved in their utilization; in the second 
year a more specific and extended instruction in these procedures is 
given, and the finger-skill necessary in the usual mechanical opera- 
tions is developed; while in the third year the student is instructed 
in the choice of means for attaining a given end, and the selection <rf 
this means in accordance with the requirements of specific cases. 
During the third year attention is given to the more highly special- 
ized branches of Prosthetic Dentistry tmdcr quahfied demon- 



Instruction in Prosthetic Dentistry is accomplished by didactic 
lectures illustrated by means of heroic models, lantern slides, and 
blackboard drawing; by graded technic courses, which include in 
each year illustration of the lecture topics by actual demonstration 
of the processes before the class, and the manufacture of the appli- 
ances so illustrated by the class, divided into small sections for 
systematic work ; by specimens on exhibition in the general labora- 
tory illustrative of successive stages in the technic requirements; 
and by abundant clinical practice. 

The lecture course will include, in addition to dental prosthesis, 
the replacement of tissues about the mouth not strictly dental, and 
the manufacture of aj^pliances for the remedy of palatal defects. 

The instruction in orthodontia will be by means of lectures, 
quizzes, a technic eoiuse and clinical practice; and attention will be 
specially paid to the treatment of cases in the light of their etiology. 

The lectures on chemistry embrace the study of chemical physics 
and principles of chemical philosophy, together with a detailed ron- 
sideration of the principal elementary substances and their com- 
poimds; and of the fundamental principles of Organic Chemistrj-, 
including the classification of organic compounds, and the special 
study of typical members of the different classes. Special attention 
is also given to the laws of chemical affinity, and the conditions 
under which they are modified, especially as they relate to the prep- 
aration of mixtures and prescriptions. 

The course in practical chemistry in the laboratory include* 
exercises in chemical manipulation ; the study of the chemical prop- 



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COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 417 

crtios of the principal metals; the reactions of adds and their com- 
binations; and the general principles of qualitative analysis, espe- 
cially as they relate to the detection and separation of the metals and 
compounds of interest to practitioners of Dentistry. Each student 
is provided with a, separate table and apparatus, and is required to 
perform atl the usual chemical manipulations under the directions of 
demonstrators, as well as to exhibit by written formula all reac- 
tions involved in his tests. 

Human Anatomy is taiight in its relations to all the branches of 
medical science, including Dentistrj-, The lectures arc illustrated 
by fresh dissections of the human body, and by a rich museum of 
anatomical specimens, well-executed models and drawings. 

In addition to the lectures and demonstrations by the Professor of 
Anatoniy, a course of demonstrations in Applied Anatomy is given 
to the students of the second year. The course consists of a drill 
by recitations and demonstrations of dissections upon those ana- 
tomical regions with which the dental and oral surgeon is especially 
concerned. Practical instruction in general and special histology 
will be given in the histological laboratory to the students of the 
first year, the class being divided into sections. The laboratory is 
furnished with excellent microscopes, and all apparatus necessary 
to enable the student to become familiar with the most approved 
methods of microscopical technology and with the minute structure 
of all the tissues and organs. Special facilities are afforded for 
original research; for this purpose the laboratory is open through- 
out the year, except during July and August. 

The osTBO-SYNDESMOLOoicAL LABORATORY IS undcT the Super- 
vision of the Professor of Anatomy and Demonstrator of Osteology. 
In this laboratory, the first-year student is required to make him- 
self familiar with the skeleton and the articulations as a part of his 
instruction in practical anatomy. 

The course in physiology includes thorough instruction on the 
subject of animal physiology, with special reference to the physi- 
ology of Man. 

The lectures on dental patholooy include such portions of gen- 
eral pathology as have a bearing upon the special subjects taught 

Dentition and its possible pathological results receive careful at- 
tention, followed by a detailed consideration of all the ((jseoses to 
which the teeth and surrounding parts are Uable; the normal and 
abnormal character of the oral secretions, and the direct and remote 
relations that the pathological conditions of the mouth sustain to 
other portions of the system. 



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4t8 

The treatment required under each head is explained, and the 
recognized processes necessary to secure a return to normal condi- 
tions are minutely detailed. 

Materia Meuica is taught with special reference to the character 
and value of those remedies which have any bearing upon dental 
therapeutics. 

Bacteriolocv. — The study of bactbriologv is an obligatory 
part of the second year curriculum. The growing importance of 
this subject in relation to dental pathology and therapeutics has 
made necessary certain modifications in the technique of nearly all 
dental operations. A clear understanding of the practical bearing 
of bacterial life-processes has become a necessity for intelligent 
and successful dental practice, just as it has similarly for siu'gical 

The course is so arranged with respect to the requirements of the 
dental practitioner that he will afterwards be able not only to apply 
correctlj the most approved methods for preventing and combat- 
ing bacterial action, and to develop an efficient system of antiseptic 
technique in connection with his work; but he will also be trained 
in the several methods that will enable him to study the bacterial 
factor which is the exciter of pathological conditions in special cases 
arising in his practice. 

The instruction in Bactbriology. which is under the direction of 
Dr. A. C. Abbott, Professor of Bacteriology and Director of the 
Laboratory of Hygiene, is principally practical and embraces full 
laboratory instruction, covering the following subjects: 

1. Apparatus employed — sterilizers, incubators, pressure regula- 
tors, thermostats, etc. 
a. Culture media, methods of preparation, sterilization methods. 

3. Microscopic charactaristics of cultures of bacteria in general 
and of special forms. 

4, Methods of obtaining, from mixtures of different bacteria, indi- 
vidual species in pure cultiu-es. 

S- Microscopic technique. Use and care of instruments, staining 
from cultures, section cutting and staining and mounting of 

6. Pathogenic bacteria, isolation, identification and inoculation. 

7. Disinfection of instruments, appliances, etc., thermal and chem- 
ical, methods and apparatus, modes of testing efficiency. 

8. Antisepsis and asepsis in dental surgery, preparation of dress- 
ings, instruments, operator and assistants and of patients. 



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COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 419 

Following this, the special study of BacterioloEy in relation to 
dental pathological conditions will receive full consideration and 
elaboration. The classification, life-history, modus of infection and 
pathological significance of all bacterial forms having distinct dental 
importance will be studied in detail. 

The lecttu-es on these subjects are appropriately illustrated, and 
accompanied by smtable demonstrations whenever possible. The 
Laboratory of Hygiene has a thoroughly equipped department for 
practical instruction in Bacteriology, including an ample number 
of high-grade microscopes for the special use of dental students in 
the study of this branch. Examination upon the subject will be a 
prerequisite to the obtaining of the dental degree. 

Clintcal Dentistry, — The instruction in this department has 
for its object the study of the whole range of dental operations as 
they arise in practice, especially from the clinical point of view. 

The valuable clinical material which is afforded by the lai^e 
Dental Infirmary service of the University is utilized as the basis of 
the instruction given, both didactically and by demonstration. 
Cases arc continually presenting for treatment in the Infirmary 
which furnish important points for study, and whenever these form 
suitable subjects for demonstration a study of the case is made for 
the benefit of the class. The student is thus brought into close con- 
tact with a great variety of dental and oral disorders, and is made 
familiar with the methods of diagnosis and the etiology and treat' 
ment of the conditions with the actual cases before him. 

The teaching in this department includes, besides the foregoing, 
a study of the professional relations of the dentist to his patients, 
involving matters of deportment, habits of personal cleanliness, etc. ; 
in short, all those factors of professional conduct and bearing 
which, taken altogether, determine the measure of his professional 

In the lectures on clinical dbntistrv, all of the latest develop- 
ments in operative procedures, so far as they may have value from 
the clinical standpoint, are presented and critically considered. 

Oral Surgery is a specialty which is a distinct outgrowth from 
Dentistry. As the work of the dentist came to include operations 
upon the surrounding tissues, as well as upon the teeth themselves, 
the adoption of surgical methods and more thorough training in 
the principles and practice of surgery became necessary. The addi- 
tion of instruction in this branch to the dental curriculum includes 
thorough instruction in the surgical and pathological anatomy of 
the mouth, jaws, and associate parts; the etiology, diagnosis utd 



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t of lesions of these parts; the most advanced methods of 
operative technique, including the use of the stxrgicaJ engine, 
surgical anesthesia, asepsis and antisepsis, and after-treatment of 
the case. 

The instruction is both didactic and clinical, and students arc 
encouraged to study and personally treat cases luider the supervision 
of the Professor of Oral Surgery and his assistants. 

Special facilities for the performance of oral surgical operations 
and for the care of patients are provided in the University Hospital 
and the Philadelphia Hospital. 

. CLINICAL PRACTICE. 
Seven hours daily (except on Saturdays) are spent in actual prac- 
tice under the supervision of the demonstrators; on Saturdays 
from 9 A, M. to IS M. Every student is required to provide his own 
instruments, except those for extracting. He is expected to keep 
them in perfect order, and H-ill be furnished with a place in which 
they can be locked when not in use. 

INFIRMARY AND LABORATORIES. 

The Infirmary and Laboratories are open to the students for 
practice every day during the week, except on Saturday afternoons, 
which are reserved for clinics that may be given by members of the 
Faculty or instructors. 

The Infirmary and Laboratories are open throughout the year. 
except diuing July and August. 

MUSEUM AND CABINETS- 
The WiETAR AND HoBNER MiSKfM, fouiidfd nearly one hundred 
years ago, and annually augmented, is unequalled in the United 
States for the number and variety t-f its specin:ens of the normal 
and the morbid anatomy of the human body. It also contains a 
large number of preparations in Comparative Anatomy; a rich col- 
lection relating to Dentistry, such as the different stages of denti- 
tion, abnormal conditions of the tcclh, mandibles of the lower 
animals, etc.; and an extensive collection of models. This collec- 
tion is deposited in the building opposite Medical Hall, erected 
by the late General Isaac J. Wistar, and called the Wistar Insti- 
TUTii OP Anatomy and Biology. The Museum is open every 
week-day, excepting holidays, from g a. m. to 3.30 p. m., throughout 
the sessions. The matriculation fee in the Department of Den- 
tistry confers admission to the Museum, 



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TUITION FEES AND EXPENSES. 431 

TUITION FEES AND EXPENSES.* 
The tuition fee is Si 50 per annum and is due and payable in two 
equal parts., on October 1 and February i, respectively. Remit- 
tances should be in cash, or by bank draft, certified cheque, or 
postal money order drawn for the exact amount due, made payable 
to the University of Pennsylvania, and sent to E. W. Mumford, 
Bursar, Roam 101, College Hall. A percentage is added to fees 
not paid within thirty-one days. 

A matriculation fee of {5.00 must be paid by all new students in 
the department, whether previously registered in another depart- 

Under.no circumstances are any changes made in the established 

Every student shall upon entering the University make a deposit 
of $5.00 to cover loss, damage, or breakage of University property, 
library fines, or any charge not paid by the student in some other 
way. A student whose deposit is by charges against it reduced to 
$1.50 or less shall be required to pay a sum sufficient to restore the 
deposit to its original amount. No deposit or balance remaining 
on a deposit shall be finally repaid to a student until he sli^iU hnve 
been graduated or shall have formally withdrawn from the Uni- 

Students of the Department of Dentistry may attend, without 
additional charge, the lectures and recitations in any other dcjiart- 
ment of the University. This privilege may be obtained. only by 
the concurrent approval, in writing, of the rcspeclivc Deans. 

Instruments for the first year can be procured at from $6o to $75. 
A dental engine will be needed for the second year, costing from $40 
to 860. Additional instruments will be required for the second- 
year and third-year work. These instruments may be utilized 
in general practice. 

Rooms may be had at the University Dormitories or in houses 
near the University, and board may be had in the University 
Dining Hall or in private boarding houses. In any case the cost of 
board and lodging will be from $5.00 a week upward. 

Dental Hall is provided with locker facilities for the storage of 
instruments, apparel, etc. It is to be understood, however, that 
the lockers are provided solely as an accommodation, and that in 
renting them to the students the Department assumes no respon- 
sibility whatever with respect to the care or loss of the c 

'For Edinutc ol Expeiuec. see pages 41] and 414. 



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413 DBPABTMENT OP DENTISTRY. 

First Year. 

Matriculation Fee {paid once only) Is oo 

Tuition Fee 150 oo 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

Fee tor Dissection 5 00 

Use of Dissecting Material (one part) i 50 

Breakage Deposit 5 00 

Second Year. 

Tuition Fee $1 50 00 

. Gymnasiuni and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

Fee tor Dissection , 5 00 

Use of Dissecting Material (one part) ■. i 50 

Third Year. 

Tuition Fee $150 00 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

• Graduation Fee (paid by old matriculali's only) 30 00 

FurthiT information may be obtained from 

EDWARD C. KIRK, Dean. 
The Dean's office is in Room 39, Dental Hall, Thirty-third and 
Locust streets. Office hours: 9 a. m. to i p, u., daily. 

The total number of new matriculates for the present session, 
including those admitted to advanced standing, is 156. 

Since Ihc foundation of this department, the total number of 
graduates has been 3,081. 

The subjoined reports give some conception of the character and 
mass of work performed in the OperatiA-e and Prosthetic Depart- 
ments; but the amount of costly material and careful attention 
necessary for the insertion of 8,838 gold fillings can be appreciated 
only by the experienced operator. 

The number of patients (14,637) exhibits the extent of the Dental 
Infirmary ser\'ice to a large class of persons of limited means, 

* Beginning with Che session of t«D5-o6 Che tuition iee for b11 new inaUiculal«t 
for the regular course in Iha Depanment of Dentistry of the Univeraity o( Pennsyl- 
vania mil be tr 50 far each term thereof, and the present HniduatioT (ee of »jo wiU 
be abrtlished in the case of all candidati>s for degrees coming under the foTegoin^ 

This rcBulalion does not apply to those who are already matriculated in the 
Deportment under the previous standard of tuition fees. 



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ESTIMATE OP EXPENSES. 413 

OPERATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Gold fillings 8,838 

Tin filUngs 5,653 

Amalgam fillings a. 787 

Cement fillings i.aag 

Treatment of pulp and pulp canals 4i333 

Extractions 3.6ta 

Porcelain Inlays 775 

Miscellaneous 978 

Tolal 38,194 

Ninety-five <niiici's (7 lbs. 1 1 ozs.) of gold were used for filling, 
excl,usivc of that uscti for plate and crown work in the Laboratory. 

PROSTHETIC DEPARTMENT. 

Full Dentures (Clinical, 168— Technic, 846) 1,014 

Partial Di^nturcs (Clinical. 1 16— Technic. 510) 636 

Artificial Crown Work (Clinical. 333 — Technic, i,o3o) i.3S* 

Repair cases 154 

Bridge Work — Clinical 73 

Bridge Work — Technic 413 

Continuous Gum Bridge 163 

Interdental Splints - 167 

Regulating Plates and Appliances 183 

Total 4.1SS 

ESTIMATE OP EXPENSES. 

Matriculation Fee %$ 00 

General Tuition Fee 1 50 00 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

Dissecting Fee 5 00 

Use of Dissecting Material (one part) t 50 

Breakage Deposit 5 00 

Books (about) 30 00 

Instruments (about) 70 00 

Deposit for lockcre 1 00 

Materials for Histological and Prosthetic Work 6 00 

Board, 35 weeks at $5.00 175 00 

Washing. 35 weeks at 75 cents a6 15 

Total, first year (485 75 



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4^4 DBPARTIIBNT or DBNTISTKY. 

SBCOHD VBAB. 

General Tuition Fee I150 00 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

Dissecting Fee 5 00 

Use of Dissecting Material (one part) i 50 

Dental Engine, instrument (about) 50 00 

Additional instruments (about) 90 00 

Books (about) 20 00 

Deposit for lockers 3 00 

Material for Prosthetic Technic Work j 00 

Board, 35 weeks at S5.00 175 oo 

Washing, 35 weeks at 75 cents 16 aS 

Total, second year $531 75 



General Tuition Ticket $1 50 00 

Gymnasium and Houston Club Fee 10 00 

Class expenses: rental of Cap, Gown, and Hood 5 00 

Instruments (about) so 00 

Deposit for lockers . , 3 00 

Material for Prosthetic Technic Work 1 00 

Material for Ceramic Work 5 00 

Board. 37 weeks at J5.00 185 00 

Washing, 37 weeks at 75 cents »7 75 

Total, third year $406 75 



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DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

FACULTY. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON. LL. D.. Provost. 
EDGAR P. SMITH, Ph. D-. Sc. D.. LL. D., Vice-Phovost. 

HORATIO C. WOOD, M. D., LL. D-. Professor of Materia Medica, 
Pharmacy and General Therapeutics. 

EDWARD T. REICHERT, M. D.. Professor of Physiology. 

JOHN MARSHALL, M. D., Nat. Sc. D., LL. D., Professor of 
Chemistry and Toxicology. 

SIMON J. J. HARGER, V. M. D-, Professor of Veterinary Anat- 
omy and ZoOtechnics. 

LEONARD PEARSON, B. S.. V. M, D., Professor of the Theory 
and Practice of Veterinary Medicine, and Deak ov thb Fac- 

JOHN W. ADAMS, A B,, V, M. D., Professor of Veterinary Sur- 
gery and Obstetrics, and Lecturer on Horseshoeing. 

ALLEN J. SMITH, A. M., M. D., Professor of Pathology. 

DAVID H. BERGEY. A. M., M. D-, Assistant Professor of Bac- 
teriology. 

LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS. 

ALEXANDER GLASS. V. S.. Lecturer on the Theory and Prac- 
tice of Canine Medicine. 

JOHN W. HARSHBERGER. Ph. D., Instructor in Botany. Gen- 
eral Biology and Zo6logy. 

EDWIN S. MUIR. V. M. D.. Inatruetor in Veterinary Materia 
Medica and Pharmacy. 

B. FRANKLIN SENSEMAN, V. M. D., Demonstrator of Vet- 
erinary Anatomy. 

FRANZ ENGE, Demonstrator ot Forging and Horseshoeing. 

MILTON E. CONARD, V. M. D.. Lecturer on Veterinary Ob- 
stetrics and Dairy and Milk Inspection. 
(4^5) 



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4a6 DRPARTUBNT C 

CLARENCE J. MARSHALL, V. M. D., Demonstrator of Clinical 

Veterinary Medicine. 
W. HORACE HOSKINS, D. V. S., Instructor in Veterinary 

Jurisprudence, Ethics and Business Methods. 
COURTLAND Y. WHITE, M. D,, Lecturer and Demonstrator 

in Morbid Anatomy. 
WILLIAM R. ANDRESS. V. M. D„ Demonstrator o£ Meat Inspec- 

DANIEL W. FETTEROLF, M. D., Demonstrator of General 
Chemistry. 

EDWARD LODHOLZ, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Phy- 
siology. 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., Demonstrator of Veterinary Surgery. 

PHILIP B. HAWK, Ph. D., Demonstrator of Physiological Chem- 

J. GARRETT HICKEY, D. D. S., Assistant Demonstrator of Physi- 
ology. 

HENRY R. ALBURGER, M. D., Demonstrator of Pathology. 

WILLIAM H, F, ADDISON, M. B„ Demonstrator of Normal 
Histology. 

SAMUEL H. GILLILAND, V. M. D,, M, D.. Demonstrator of 
Veterinary Medical Diagnosis. 

ORGANIZATION, AIMS AND EQUIPMENT. 

The importance of establishing a Department of Veterinary 
Medicine in connection with the University was originally urged 
by Dr. Benjamin Rush as far back as 1807, but no definite steps 
were taken to found such a department until the academic year of 
1B83-84, when a suitable site was procured, the necessary buildings 
erected, nnd a dean and faculty created. 

The Department aims to provide a thorough education in all 
that pertains to Veterinary Medicine. At every step the student 
is drilled under personal guidance in 3I! the practical and technical 
details of the profession. Too much stress cannot be laid on the 
importance of thus combining theory and practice. It is solely 
by careful and extensive training in this way that the practitioner 
can meet the complex problems of Veterinary Pathology — prob- 
lems which, owing to the absence of com muni cat ion between prac- 
titioner itnd patient, demand highly trained powers of observation. 



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SCHPLARSHIPS, 427 

An important step in the development of the Department was 
taken recently when the Trustees of the University purchased a 
plot of ground on Thirty-ninth street extending from Woodland 
avenue to DeLancey street, and comprising SS'°°° square feet. 
Plans are now almost completed for a thoroughly equipped building 
to accommodate the various divisions of the work of the Depart- 
ment. 

For the present, the clinical work, farriery, dissecting and some 
lectures are provided for in a temporary building on Woodland 
avenue, east of Thirty-ninth street; while in the New Laboratories 
of the Department of Medicine unsurpassed facilities exist for the 
prosecution of practical work. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS. 

Candidates who have received a collegiate degree, or who have 

passed the matriculate examination of a recognized college, or who 

hold a certificate coverinp the requirements stated below, from 

a recognized normal or high school, arc admitted without examina- 

Other candidates for admission are required; (i) to write an essay 
of about three hundred words, as a test of Orth<^aphy and Gram- 
mar; (1) to pass an examination in Elementary Physics (as in 
G^e's Introdxiction to Physical Science). 

Graduates of recognized Veterinary schools requiring three years' 
attendance may enter the third year without examination. Stu- 
dents who have attended one or more sessions in a recognized 
Veterinary school will be allowed credit tor time, but must pass 
an examination upon entrance. 

Graduates of recognized colleges of Pharmacy are admitted to 
the first year without an entrance examination; and, on passing 
examinations in General Chemistry, Materia Medica and Phar- 
macy, are excused from attending k'cturt'S in those branches, and 
from performing the correspunding practical work in the Chemical 
and Pharmaceutical laboratories, 

SCHOLARSHIPS, 
I, State Scholarships, — There are twelve State scholarships, 
founded by the Trustees in i83q, and granted on nomination of 
the Governor of the Commonwealth to residents of Pennsylvania. 
They arc open only to students entering the First-year Class, and 
entitle the holder to free tuition in the regular Veterinary course. 



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Candidates are siibjoct to the same nfiiiircmcnts for admission 
as other students. These requirements must be fulfilled, and the 
Governor's certificate of nomination presented, on or before October 
t of each year. 

II. Public School Prieb Scholarships. — Under agreement 
with the city of Philadelphia, fifty free scholarships exist in the 
University for the benefit of graduates from the public schools. 
The candidates for these scholarships are examined by the Board of 
Public Education, and award is made to those who reach the highest 
grade in examination, whenever vacancies occur from year to year, 

COURSE OF STUDY. 
The course of instruction extends over three years, with one ses- 
sion beginning on the last Friday in September, and ending on the 



First Year. — General Chemistry, Pkysiclogical Chemistry. Ma- 
teria Medica and Pharmacy, General Biology, Histology, Veterinary 
Anaiomy. Horseshoeing and Botany. 

The examinations in General Chemistry. General Biology, and 
Horseshoeing are held about February i. Examinations in all of 
the remaining studies are held at the end of the first year. 

Second Ybah, — Physiology. General Pathology, Practical Bacter- 
iology. Veterinary Anatomy, Zoology, Veterinary Surgery. Theory and 
Practice of Veterinary Medicine. 

A mid-year examination in Physiology is lield about February 
I, and at the end of the year examinations are held in Veterinary 
Anatomy, Physiology, General Pathology, Pathulogical Histology, 
Bacteriology and Zoology. 

Third Year. — Therapeutics, Veterinary Surgery and Opera- 
tive Surgery, Theory and Practice of Veterinary Medicine, Morbid 
Anatomy, Theory and Practice of Canine Medicine, Veterinary 
Sanitary Science. Jurisprudence. Obstetrics. Zoolcchnics and Meal 
Inspection. 

Examinations at the end of the third year: Theory and Practice 
of Veterinary Medicine, Vcteriruiry Surgery and Operative Surgery, 
Jurisprudence, Obstetrics. Therapeutics, Zootecknics, Theory and 
Practice of Canine Medicine, and Veterinary Sanitary Science. 



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TBXT AND REPBRBNCB BOOKS. 42t) 

In the second year the student attends clinics, and serves as aid 
in the Hospital; in the third year he is placed in charge of sick 
animals, and is required to prepare clinical reports and make au- 
topsies. He also makes visits to breeding and dairy farms, and to 
slaughter houses, in order to familiarize himself with the races of 
animals, the economical means employed in their care, and the 
varieties of butcher meat. Graduates of the Department of Veter- 
inary Medicine are admitted to the Third-year Class of the Depart- 
ment of Medicine, with the understanding that they pass the exami- 
nation for matriculation in the Department of Medicine in force 
at the time they enter the Department of Medicine, and that 
they perform the required amount of dissecting, and pass the exami- 
nation in Human Anatomy. Of the third-year studies of the De- 
partment of Medicine, they are exempt from the practical work and 
examination in Pathology, 

TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS. 



— Richter's Inorganic Chemistry; Medicus' Qualitative 
Analysis (fifth edition); Remscn's Organic Chemistry; Tyson's 
Practical Examination of the Urine; Ogden's Clinical Exami- 
nation of the Urine; Hammarstcn's Physiological Chemistry; 
Schimpf's Text-book of Volumetric Analysis. 

iTERiA Medica and THERAPEUTICS.— H. C. Wood ; Winslow's 
Veterinary Materia Medica and Therapeutics; Mann's Pre- 

scription Writing. 



HisTOLOov. — Piersol's Text-book of Histology. 

Phvsiology. — American Text-book of Physiology; Robert Meade 
Smith's Physiology of the Domestic Animals. 

Horseshoeing. — Adams' translation of Lungwitz on Horseshoeing; 
Fleming; Dollar's translation of Leisering and Hartman's Foot 
of the Horse. 

Botany. — Bessey; Gray's Lessons and Manual. 

Dictionary. — American Pocket Medical Dictionary. 



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430 DEPARTMHNT flP VETERINARY MEt)ICINB. 

SeCaUD AND THIRD VBARS. 

Thedrv and Practicb of Veterinary Medicin-e. — Friedberger 
and Froehner'a Pathology and Therapeutics of Domestic Ani- 
mals; Robertson's Practice of Equine Medicine: Williams' 
Principles and Practice of Veterinary Medicine; Fleming's 
Manual of Veterinary Sanitary Science and Police; Glass' trans- 
lation of Muller's Diseases of the Dog. 

Surgery. — Mocllcr's Operative Veterinary Surgery; Fleming's 
Operative Veterinary Surgery; Hobday's Canine and Feline 
Surgery; Williams' Principles and Practice of Veterinary Sur- 
gery; Zundcl on the Horse's Foot (translated by Liautard); 
Pfcifler and Williams' Surgical Operations; Cadiot's Exercises 
in Surgery (translated by Bitting). 

Bacteriology.— Abbott; Bowhill; Conn; Chester; Kitt. 

ZodLOGY, — Nicholson's Manual. 

Obbtbtricb. — Fleming; Dalrymple; De Bniin's Bovine Obstetrics. 





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SUBJECTS OP INSTRUCTION. 
The subjects ot inBtructioit offered by tb« Faculty of Veterinary 
Medidne are described bdow under the following heads: Chemis- 
try; Materia Medica and Pharmacy; Physiology; General Biology; 
Botany; Zoology; Anatomy; Histology; Horseshoeing; Thera- 
peutics; Pathology; Theory and Practice of Veterinary Medicine; 
Surgery; Obotetiics; ZoOtechnics, and Veterinaiy Sanitary Science. 

CHEUISTRY. 

Instruction in Chemistry is confined to the first year of the course. 

During the period from the beginning of the sesaon until February 
I, three lectures on general chemiEtry are given each week, in 
which theoretical chemistry, systematic chemistry, and the gen- 
eral principles of volumetric analysis are covered. The course 
in the chemical laboratory requires six houis* attendance, in two 
periods of three hours each in each week, froin the beginning of 
the session until Pebniaiy i. The course in the laboratory covers 
qualitative analysis, induding the writing of equations, and add- 
imetry and alkaliuMtry. 



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434 OEPARTUBNT OI> VBTBRIKART UEDICINE. 

During the period from February t until the end of the sessioii, 
two lectures are given each week, in which physiological and path- 
ological chemistry, urine analysis, and toxicology are covered. 
The course in the chemical laboratory requires six hours' attend- 
ance, in two periods of three hours each in each week, from Feb- 
ruary I until the end of the session. The course in the laboratory 
covers physiological and pathological chemistry, urine analysis, and 
toxicology. 

Materia Medica is taught in a series of about thirty-five lectures 
by the Instructor in Materia Medica. end Pharmacy is taught by 
lectures and practical work in the Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 
These courses include the study of all the drugs and preparations in 
the U. S. Pharmacopceia that are in use in Veterinary Medicine; 
with the addition of other remedies, the use of which is adapted 
especially to any one class of animals studied in Veterinary Medicine 
(Herbivora or Camivora). The student is required to handle the 
various drugs, in order to recognize their physical characteristics; to 
make the ordinary pharmaceutical preparations, (infusions, tinc- 
t\ires, extracts, powders, balls, ointments and blisters) ; and is 
instructed practically in the manual required for the administration 
of remedies in powder, ball or fluid form to the Horse, Ox, Hog, and 
Camivora. 

During the second year, details of two students each, in alpha- 
bctical order, serve two weeks in the Pharmacy of the Hospital, 
and assist in compounding all the prescriptions used in the De- 
partment. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

The course in Physiology conasts of lectures and demonstrations. 
in which the chemical and physical processes and constituents of the 
animal body are considered, and the different functions traced from 
their appearance in the lowest animal forms to their highest develop- 
ment in the domestic animals and man. Especial attention is given 
to the nutritive functions in the domestic animal, rules being given 
for the adjustment of diet to the work reqiiired of the animal 
whether in beasts of burden, milk or wool producers, or in animals 
destined for food purposes. The lectures are fully illustrated by 
experiments, diagrams and tables. In connection with the course, 
the students arc required to work in the Physiological Laboratory, 



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where they study the chemical properties and general characteristics 
of food-stuffs, the analysis of milk, the action of the digestive juices. 

The Physiological Laboratory is fitted with the most approved 
instruments for physiological research, and opportunity is odered 
to advanced students for conducting original research under the 
immediate Bupervision of the Professor. 

GENERAL BIOLOGY. 

In this course Students are given practical training in the methods 
employed in biolc^cal research. . They are thus prepared to under- 
take the study of botany, zo6logy, histology, etnbryoli^y. etc., with- 
out loss of time, and with considerable facility in the use of the 
instrunnents and processes required in these branches. This is es- 
pecially true in the bearing of the training on the histological work 
that is required of veterinarians. 

BOTANY. 

The botanical instruction requires five hours each peek during 
the first half of the first year. 

Two objects are kept in view. The first is to give such a general 
idea of the anatomy and physiology of plants, of the principles of 
classification, and of the doctrines of evolution, as is essential to 
every one claiming to have a scientific education. This should be 
gained by the course of lectures in which these subjects are treated. 

The second object is to train observers, as well as to teach the 
practical relation of forage plants, "loco" plants and noxious weeds, 
to the veterinary art. Special attention is paid to the study of the 
grasses, clovers and economic plants used as food for animals. It 
cannot be impressed too fully upon the student that, owing to the 
intimate relations between agriculture and veterinary medicine, his 
future prosperity and usefulness may be determined largely by his 
ability to recognize promptly plants known or supposed to be in- 
jurious to our domestic animals, as well as the weeds aod useful 
forage plants met with in cultivated ground. 



General Zoology and Comparative Anatomy embrace the study of 
the animal kingdom; the organic cell, and its aggregates; a short 
accotint of the tissues, and their production ; organs; (heir structure 
reproduction ; general facta of embryology, metamorphosis, altema- 



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436 DBPARTUBNT or VBTBR1NARY UEPIGINB. 

tion of generfttion: eystenw of classification, the evolution theory, 
species and varieties; with a succinct account of the various groups 
of animals, their anatomy, development, and distribution. 

ANATOUY. 

The instruction in Descriptive Anatomy extends over two entire 
sessions, and embraces the study of the bones, articulations, 
muscles, digestive tract, respiratory apparatus, urino-genital oi^ans, 
organs of circulation of the blood and lymph, nervous system, oi^nns 
of special sense, and embryology of the Horse, the Mule, the AsB, the 
Ox, the Sheep and Goat, Ht^, Dog, Cat and Poultry. Constant 
dissection is required. The horse is used as the type until the parts 
have been thoroughly learned, and the student is then given other 
animals, to learn existing differences. During the first year the dis- 
sections are made with special reference to the bones, articulations, 
and muscles, while the second year is devoted to blood-vessels and 
nerves. The dissections are under the supervision of the Professor 
of Anatomy, aided by the Demonstrators. A detail is made of 
students of the Second-year Class, who dissect in the laboratory of 
the Professor of Anatomy, and prepare the parts to be used in his 
lectures. 

HISTOLOGY. 

The laboratory is fitted with the most apiproved apparatus for 
microscopic and biological research. The anatomical elements arc 
studied from the tissues of each of the classes of domestic animals 
included in the Veterinary Medicine. 

HORSESROBtMG. 

The course in Shoeing for first-year students embraces about 
thirty lectures illustrated by charts, prepared hoofs and shoes, 
frequent visits to the shoeing forge, and practical demons trations 
upon the living horse at rest and in motion. Instruction is given 
under the following headings : the foot; bones, joints, ligaments, ten- 
dons, blood-vessels, nerves, elastic structures, keratogenous tissues, 
and horn capsule. Foot in relation to the entire limb, direction of 
limb, form of foot and hoof, gait, growth of horn, and hoof mechan- 
ism. Trimming of hoof, making of shoe, fitting and nailing. Shoe- 
ing for interfering and forging. Winter shoeing. Hoof nurture. 
Pathological shoeing, pricking, nailing, calking, corns, laminitis, 
keraphyllocele ; changes in form of the hoof, fiat and dropped-sole, 
upright hoof, contracted heels, wry hoof, crooked hoof, os^cation 



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SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION. 437 

of lateral cartilages; solutions of continuity of hoofs, clefts, cracks, 
loose wall, hollow wall, and thrush. 

In addition to shoeing for lameness, a large amount of ordinary 
shoeing is done at the forges of the Hospital, aflording ample expe- 
rience in methods demanded by different classes of horses, and by 
tbe various forms of the horse's foot. 



BACTERIOLOGY. 

The course in Bacteriology consists of lectures and demonstra- 
tions to the students of the second year in which the elementary 
principles of the science are explained as well as the practical appli- 
catitm of Bacteriology to Veterinary practice. Each student is 
assigned a place in the laboratory and is given the necessary appa- 
ratus and appliances to make it possible for him to familiarize him- 
self with the methods of cultivating bacteria and of isolating them 
in pure cultures; the steps necessary for the identification of par- 
ticular species of bacteria; the relation of bacteria to infection; 
and the methods of sterilization and disinfection. Special atten- 
tion win be given to those bacteria which are concerned in animal 
pathology, and the methods of combating the diseases produced 
by these bacteria. 

As far as time and available material will permit the student 
will be introduced to the important field of microbiology, especially 
to the organisms of the vegetable kingdom which are of a higher 
order and of greater complexity than the bacteria, and to the 
microscopic animal parasites which are concerned in animal 
pathology. 



This course, extending over one session of the Medical Depart- 
ment, is devoted especially to the physiological action of drugs. 



Instruction in Pathology is given to the students of the Second- 
year Class. It consists of lectures: (i) on General Pathological 
Anatomy, in which are treated the degenerations, atrophy, hyper- 
trophy, inflammations, and tumors; (i) on Special Pathological 
Anatomy, in which is considered the morbid anatomy of each organ 
of the body. In addition to this, the students arc taught practical 
Pathological Histology in the Pathological Laboratory, and are 
given weekly demonstrations in Microscopic and Gross Patholog)'. 



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For the latter purpose Lhorc are always at hand a suiKcicnt number 
of morbid specimens, both fresh and preserved. 



THEORY It 

The instruction in the Theory and Practice of Veterinary Medi- 
cine, completed in two years, is given under the following headings: 

Origin of Veterinary Medicine; history of Veterinary Science and 
of Veterinary Schools; medical doctrines; classes of diseases; symp- 
tomatology, and clinical examination; diseases of the systems and 
groups of organs; general diseases, and contagious and zymotic dis- 
KOSKS, with the laws of sanitary police in force in various parts of 
the United States and in Europe; parasitic diseases and hehninths. 



This branch of Veterinary Medicine is taught to the Second and 
Third-year Classes by a graded course of didactic lectures, and by 
chnical instruction, extending over a period of two years. 

One year is devoted to General Surgery, and comprises a course 
of about one hundred lectures. The remaining year is devoted to 
Special Surgery, and comprises about ninety lectures. In addition, 
the Second and Third-year Classes are given two hours of clinical 
instruction daily, from S to lo a. m. 

The Third-year Class is required to devote five hours of each week 
to Practical Operative Surgery, when the modus operandi of every 
operation likely to occiu" in veterinary practice is taught. Instruc- 
tion in Bandaging and Dressing is given in connection with Oper- 
ative Surgery, 



A full course of instruction is given in this branch to the Third- 
year Class, about forty lectures being devoted to this subject. The 
instruction is mainly confined to demonstrations on the manikin; 
although, whenever possible, cases of natural labor are utilized to 
the best practical advantage. 

zoOtbchnics 
include the study of the origin and domestication of animals em- 
ployed for profit by man, the laws of breeding and production. 
heredity, race characteristics, and individual impression, the effect 
of climate, ailment, work, and the means to be employed in the 
selection and handling of animals so as to derive from them the 



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VBTBRINARY E 

This branch is taught by lectures in which the following topics 
are discussed; origin of sanitary science; enzootic, epizoiitic and 
panzootic diseases; influence of civilization and traffic on animal 
plagucs;aptitude; immunity, contagion, infection and miasm; Ihcir 
origin, nature, diffusion, reception and mode of access; prevention 
and suppression of contagious diseases; general prophylactic, pre- 
ventive and repressive measures; utilization of the carcasses. Dis- 
infection and disinfectants. Inspection of meat; general physical 
and chemical properties of the meat of \'arious animals used for 
food; principal qualities of meat; noxious and injurious meat; meat 
undergoing putrid decomposition; meat in constitutional or blood 
diseases; meat in cachectic conditions; meat infected with animal 
parasites; cchinococcfe, cysticcreus, psorospermine and trichim. 
Meat infected with vegetable parasites; actinomycosis, anthracoid 
diseases, contagious plcuro-pncumonia, tuberculosis, etc. Inspec- 
tion of milk: physical properties and chemical constituents of milk; 
adulterated milk and its detection; abnormal constituents of milk. 

MUSEUM. 

The Veterinary Museum has grown since the organization of the 

Department, both through the preparations made in the dissecting 

and post-mortem rooms and throi:^h the UBerality of veterinarians. 

HOSPITAL. 

Third-year students are placed directly in charge of cases, and 
under direction of the House Surgeon, keep the clinical records, 
administer the medicines, attend to the surgical dressings; and arc 
allowed, under the supervision of the Clinical Professors, to per- 
form whatever operations arc necessary, in so far as this can be doiii.' 
with perfect safety to the animal. Two students from the Third- 
year Class are assigned to reside in the Hospital and act as aids to 
the Resident Surgeon. 

A detail from the Second-year Class assists in compounding all 
medicines used in the Hospital. 

The large number of animals in the wards of the Hospital, and 
those from the extensive free dispensary practice of the Hospital 
treated at the clinic daily, from 8 to lo a m., furnish abundant 
material for clinical lectures and practical instruction. 



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440 DEPARTMENT or VBTEaiNAUT 

EXAMINATIONS AND DEGREE. 
ExaminationB are held in February and at the close of each year. 
These the student must duly pass before he is allowed to proceed to 
the studies of the next year. At the close of the course, and after 
passing a satisfactory examination, the student receives tbe degree 
of Doctor of VeUrinary Medicitte (V. M. D.). 

PRIZES. 

The J. B. LippiNCOTT Prize of One Hundred Dollars is offered 
to the member of the Graduating Class who, in the three years spent 
in the Veterinary Department of the University, attains the high- 
est general average in examinations. 

A Prize of an Ecraseur is offered by a friend of the Department 
to the member of the Second-year ClaGE who passes the best exami- 
nations in Veterinary Anatomy. 

TUITION FEES AND EXPENSES. 
A matriculation fee of $5.00 is charged to every candidate for 
admission. The tuition fee is Sioo per annum, of which one half 
($SO-oo) is due October i, and one half ($50.00), February i. A 
feeof $10.00 is added to the tuition fee of every student in the Veteri- 
nary Department for the privileges of the G3'mnasium and Houston 
Club. This fee is payable in two equal parts, on October t and 
February i. Remittances should be for the exact amount due. 
and should be in cash or by bank draft, certified cheque, or postal 
money order. Under no circumstances are any changes made in 
the established fees. 

Each student is required to make a deposit of ten dollars ($10.00) 
in the Bursar's office, to cover breakage in the Department, Any 
balance remaining at the end of the year is returned to the depositor. 
Material for dissection is charged for at the rate of $1.40 a part. 
The fee for raateriid used in operative surgery is in proportion to 
the amount of material used. 

A penalty is added to fees not paid within thirty days of the time 
they are due. All fees are payable at the Bursar's office, Room loa. 
College Hall. 

First Year. 

Matriculation Fee $5 00 

Tuition Pee too 00 

Use of Dissecting Material (about) 6 00 

Fee for Gymnasium and Houston Club 10 00 



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Second Year. 

Tuition Fee Jioo oo 

Use of Dissecting Material (about) 6 oo 

Fee for Gj^mnasium and Houston Club - . . . , lo oo 

Third Year. 

Tuition Fee Sioo oo 

Use of Material for Operative Surgery (about) lo oo 
Fee for Gymnasium and Houston Club lo oo 



Books and instruments in the first year of the course will cost 
about $18.00; in the second year, about S15.00; and in the third 
year, including a. case of surgical instruments, about $31.00. All of 
the instruments used in the course will be required by the graduate 
in the practice of his profession. 



For further information apply to 

Leonard Pbakson, Dean. 
Logan Hall, S. B. cor. Thirty-sixth street and 
Woodland avenue, Philadelphia. 
Office hours, 8.30 a. h. to 11 h., daily. 



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VETERINARY HOSPITAL. 

Thirty-ninth street and Woodland avenue, Philadelphia. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

•Joseph E. GaLiNCiiAM, Prcsidenl. 

J. Bertram Lcppincott, Treasurer. 

John W. Adams, Secretary. 
S. WeiR Mitchell, Paul Fahnum, 

John Marshall, Harrison K. Caner, 

Richard Wood. John R. Valentine, 

Walter R. Furness. Leonard Pearson. 

HOSPITAL STAFF. 



Leonard Pearson, B. S., V. M. D., Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Veterinary Medicine. 

John W. Adams, A, B., V. M. D., Professor of Veterinary Sur- 
gery and Obstetrics. 

Enoch Barneti, V. M, D., Resident Surgeon. 

Frank R. Trowbridge, Clerk to the Hospital. 



The Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania is 
supplied with every facility for the handling and care of sick and 
injured animals of all kinds'. Animals are admitted into the Hos- 
pital at any time, day or night. 



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443 

Two ambulances are provided for the conveyance of sick and 
lame animals, one for horses and the other for small animals. For 
this service the charges are made according to the distance traveled. 

A free dispensary clinic is conducted by the members of the 
Hospital Staff daily, except Sundays, between 8 and :o a, M, 

The animals arc under the professional care of the Hospital Staff 
and of the Resident Physician. 

4185 animals were treated in the Hospital during the year ending 
August 31, igoj.* 

A competent farrier is attached to the Hospital, who b prepared 
to do a limited amount of ordinary shoeing, in addition to shoeing 
for lameness; the latter only under the direction of the Hospital 
Staff. 



* This number is Bmaller than usuai. bsciuM the HosiitB] wu buned in July. 



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PART III 



AVXIUAST I>B»>ABTMENTS 



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T7NIVERSITY LIBRARY. 



CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D.. Provost, 

EDGAR F. SMITH, Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D-, Vice-Phovost. 

MORRIS JASTROW, Jr., Ph, D, Librarian. 
SUSAN W. RANDALL. Assistant Librarian. 

The Library is one of the original Departments of the University, 
possessing among its treasures works presented to the Academy of 
Philadelphia in 1749; others purchased by a committee, of which 
Benjamin Franklin was chairman, in 1750; and still others given by 
the Rev. William Smith, D. D., first Provost of the College and 
Academy of Philadelphia; by Louis XVI,; and by other early 
friends and patrons. It now contains 244,856 catalogued volumes 
and upwards of 50.000 unboiwd pamphlets. 

Special libraries obtained throiigh gift or purchase form the basis 
of collections as follows; 

Philosophy, Chemistry, 

Spiritualism, Botany and Zoology, 

United States Laws, Geology and Paleontology, 

Law, Mathematics, 

Economics, Civil and Mechanical Engineering, 

Philology, Medicine. 

Classical Literature, Agriculture. 

English Literature, Horsemanship, 

Germanics, American History, 

Italian Literature, Music, 

Semitics, Archeology and Ethnology, 

Russian Literattve, Official Publicaticois of the United 

American Languages, States and Foreign Govem- 

Chinesc and Japanese, ments. 

The Krauth Library, founded by the Society of the Alumni in 
honor of the late Vice-Provost of the University, the Rev. Charles 
P. Krauth, D.D.,andthe Benjsmin- Babtis Comecys, Jr., Library, 
CMver the subjects of Philosophy and Ethics, 

3» (447) 



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448 UNIVERSITY MBRAtty. 

Numerous and valuable additions to the collection in Philosophy 
have been made through a fund of $1,750 presented by the College 
Class of 1889. 

The Henry Sbybert Library of Modem Spiritualism embraces 
a large collection of works on that and cognate subjects. 

The BiDDLB Memorial Law Library, founded in 1S86, con- 
stitutes the library of the Department cf Law, and occupies the 
entire second floor of the building of that department. The library 
was established by the family of George W. Biddle as a memorial 
to his three sons, George, Algernon Sydney, and Arthur Biddle. 
The original gift of five thousand volumes from the Biddle family 
was supplemented in 1897 by the presentation by Mrs. Arthur 
Biddle of over four thousand volumes which had formed the library 
of the late Arthur Biddle. Esq. Many valuable gifts have also 
been received from families and individual donors. Provision was 
made for the support of the library by a stipulation in the deed of 
pft that a certain proportion of the receipts of the Law Department 
should be devoted to the purchase of books for the Biddle Memorial 
Library each year. This wise provision has enabled the library 
to show a steady growth, the total number now being 33,311. This 
collection not only represents a complete working librarj' for the 
undergraduate students, but it also offers to the graduate student a 
very valuable, and in some respects unique, collection of the earlier 
legal treatises published during the sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries. 

The Bhinton Coxe Library, deposited by the late Brinton Coxe, 
and subsequently presented to the University, consists of several 
hundred works dealing largely with Constitutional Law. 

The CoLWBLL Library, the munificent gift of the late Stephen 
Colwell. consists of over 7,000 volumes, and is an exceedingly rich 
and complete collection of works and pamphlets on Finance and 
Political Economy published before 1S60. It is supplemented by 
the Carey Library, the bequest of the late Henry C. Carey, which 
embraces many books of more recent date. 

The Carey Library is especially rich in statistics, European gov- 
€?mment reports, and the like, and includes about 3,000 English 
pamphlets, bound in chronological order, and covering the period 
from the close of the seventeenth century to our own time. 

The Allen Library includes about s.°*° volumes relating to 
BibUography. Greek and Latin Literature. Military Science, and 
Shakespeare, selected with great care by their former owner, the 
late Professor George Allen, LL. D., of the University. 



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UKIVEBSITV LIBRARY. 449 

The Pott Librarv, purchased by private subscription, embraces 
the philological library of the late Professor F. A. Pott, of the 
Univcreity of Halle, and contains about 4,000 works, representing 
almost every language and dialect of any prominence. 

The Lbutsch Librarv, likewise purchased by private subscrip- 
tion, comprises the classical library of the late Professor Ernst von 
Leutsch, of Gottingen. It contains about 20000 volumes, and is 
one of the best classical collections in this country. 

The WvLiE Library, presented by the executors of the late Rev. 
Dr. T. W. J. Wylie, consists of about 350 works, chiefly old editions 
of the Greek and Latin writers. 

The J. B. LlPPiNcoTT Library, founded by the family of the late 
J, B. Lippincott, embraces an ever-growing collection of books on 
English Literature. A special fund has been secured by private 
subscription for the purchase of early editions of old English plays. 

The Bbchstein Library, comprising books relating to Germanic 
Philology and Literature, contains about 15,000 volumes and pam- 
phlets. This collection, which bi'longcd to the late Professor R. 
Bcchstcin, of the University of Rostock, is particularly rich in 
standard editions of the works of all the representative German 
writers from the beginning to the present time. The special fea- 
tures of the collection are reviews and publications of learned socie- 
ties (including about lifty complete sets), and a unique collection of 
about 3,000 pamphlets relating to German Philology and Literature. 

The Francis C, Macauley Library bequeathed by him to the 
University, comprises a most valuable collection on Dante. Pftrarch 
and Tasso, besides a large number of Italian, Spanish and Portu- 
guese works, amounting to about 5.500 bound volumes, pamphlets 
and periodicals. The Dante collection ranks second of those in 
this country. 

The Library of Semitic Philology and Literature, comprising col- 
lections in Arabic, Assyrian, Hebrew and Semitic Epigraphy, baa 
been augmented by the purchase of the greater portion of the 
library of the late Professor C. P. Caspari, of Copenhagen, which 
was especially rich in older works dealing with Hebrew and the Old 
Testament, Church History and Christian Theology, The nucleus 
of a manuscript collection has been formed through the purchase of 
some Arabic and Ethiopic manuscripts. 

The Marcus Jastrow Memorial Library, presented to the 
University in memory of the late Rev. Marcus Jastrow, Litt. D., 
consists of about 1,500 volumes, covering chiefly Hebrew and 
Rabbinical literature. 



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45a 

The McCartbe Library, prcscnwd by the late Dr. D. B. McCar- 
tcc. comprises nearly i,ooo volumes in Chinese and Japanese, and 
over 200 in European languages concerning the history and litera- 
ture of China and Japan. 

The Brinton Libharv, presented by the late Professor Daniel 
Garrison Brinton, consists of over 4,000 bound volumes, and about 
1. 000 bound pamphlets. It deals chiefly with the languages and 
archaeology of Mexico and Central and North America, but also 
contains numerous works on Physical Anthropology, Ethnology and 
General Archa;ology. A unique feature of this library is the Be- 
rcndt collection uf 183 manuscripts, constituting original sources 
for the study of American languages. 

The Tower Library, presented by the Hon. Charlemagne Tower, 
consists of about 2,300 volumes in Russian, covering chiefly the 
fields of Literature and History. 

The Frazer Library, presented by pupils and friends of the late 
Professor John F. Frazer, consists of about i,ooo volumes on 
Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy. 

The Wbtherill Library consists of works on Chemistry. 

The Hayden, Lbidy and Ryder Libraries comprise 'several 
thousand works on Geology, Paleontology, Zoology and Botany. 

The valuable Biological library of the late Professor E, D. Copb 
was, by his will, conveyed to the Univ'ersity. It includes about 
,1,000 volumes, and is especially rich in works of Vertebrate Anat- 
omy and Paleontology. 

The Bartram Mbmorial Library, collected by the John Bar- 
tram Association, and presented to the L'niversity, consists at pres- 
ent of about 150 works on Botany. 

The Kendall Library of Mathematics, consisting of several 
hundred volumes, was presented by the late Professor E. Otis 
Kendall. 

The Evans Rogers Library is composed of standard works on 
drawing, mathematics, astronomy, physics, surveying and explo- 
rations; as well as of technical works on roads, strength and prop- 
erties of materials, railroads, tunnels, canals, water-supply, drain- 
oge, architecture, mechanics, navigation, harbor improvements, and 
park and landscape engineering. It contains also a valuable col- 
lection of reports of American, English and French Engineering 
Societies, periodicals, coast survey and hydrographic charts, mapf, 
diagrams and drawings. 

The STiLLfe Library, presented by the late Dr. Alfred StilW, and 
the William Pepper Library, representing purchases out of a fund 



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presented by the laic Dr. William Pepper, embrace about eight 
thousand works on the subject of Medicine. 

The Rush S. Huidekoper Library on Veterinary Medicine, 
presented by Dr. Thomas B. Rayrcr, in memory of his son. Moncore 
R. Rayner, and consisting of about 1,000 volumes, embraces sets of 
important periodicals, standard works and numerous monographs 
on Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. 

The LiBHARV of the PHiLAOBLPinA Society por Promoting 
Agriculture, the oldest organization of the kind in the United 
States, consists of about 700 volumes, many of them now rare, per- 
taining to agriculture. It was presented by the Society to the 
University in 1888. 

The Medical Library of the West Philadelphia Medical 
Library Club, presented by the Club to the University, consists 
of sets of important medical periodicals, and a large number of 
separate works covering the various branches of Medicine. 

The Fairman Rogers Library, presented by the late Painnan 
Rogers, consists of a large and valuable collection of works on 
Horses and Equitation. 

The Henry Morton Loverinc, Jr.. Memorial Colkciion, 
presented by Mrs. J. Hartley Merrick, consists of violoncello 
scores, to which additions are made from time to time. 

The collection of books relating to American History and Insti- 
tutions consists of about 11,000 volumes, classified and arranged as 
follows; National Documents — a practically complete legislative 
record of the Government of the United States, 1 789 to date; State 
Documents: Canadian Public Documents, 1843-1S90; Municipal 
Ordinances and Documents of American Cities; the Laws of the 
States and Territories, 1840-1890; the Laws of the United States; 
the John A. Jameson Library of American Constitutional Conven- 
tions, Debates, Journals, etc.; the Robert Purvis Collection of Anti- 
Slavery Literature; the Friends' Library; works on American 
History and Government; and a collection of pamphlets and 
newspapers. 

The Charles J. Still^ Library of Medieval and General His- 
tory embraces a piortion of the historical library of the late Dr. 
StilW (Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, i868-i88o>. to 
which additions are made from a special fund contributed by 
Mrs, C. J. StilW, 

The Lauborn Library, deposited by the late Dr. Robert H. 
Lambom, and subsequently presented by his heirs, consists of 
about 3,500 volumes on ethnology, travels and archeology. It 



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45^ 



I large numl>cr of ^-cry valuable and rare works, and is 
L'!ipiK:ially rich in books pertaining to the anti'juitios of Mexico. 

The HoL'cir Collection, forming part of the library of the late 
Dr. J, Stockton Hoi^h, and purchased by private subscription, con- 
sists of i,goo volumt-s, and is of special value in its biblii^raphical 
and biographical sections. 

The William Camac Memorial Collection, presented by his son, 
William Masters Camac, Esq.,consistsof certain Arabic and Hebrew 
manuscripts, and a number of rare and curious books of a mis- 
cellaneous character. 

Large additions have been made to the University collections of 
public documents of foreign countries. Among the more impor- 
tant may be mentioned a complete set of Hansard's Parliamentary 
Debates, presented by the Hon. William Potter; an extensive 
collection of English government publications purchased out of a 
special fund given by Miss Mary K. Gibson; 900 volumes of French 
legislative documents; and the entire proceedings and other docu- 
ments of the Reichstag since the founding of the German Empire. 

Valiiable additions have been made to the department of history 
and hterature from the income of the Tobias Wagner Library 
Fl'nd, given to the University in memory of a deceased Trustee. 

The Isaac Norris Library, representing purchases out of a 
fund given by Mrs. Mary Cochran Norris, comprises a steadily 
increasing number of books on various subjects. 

The Crawford Library, the gift of Major-General Samuel Wylie 
Crawford, M. D., LL. D., consists of about 1,000 volumes on a great 
variety of subjects, literary, scientific and historical. 

The Zelosophic Society of the University (founded iSag), has 
presented its collection, consisting of about 400 volumes, to the 
University Library. 

Mrs, Julia Biddle bequeathed to the University the library of 
her husband, the late Thomas A. Biddle. It consists of nearly 
1.800 volumes of standard English and French Literature, including 
many handsomely illustrated works. 

The Library is also engaged in an effort to collect publications 
and memorabilia bearing on the history of the University. In this 
effort it has been assisted by Dr. William Pepper, who has from 
time to time presented early and rare publications of professors 
and others connected with the institution, and also by Mr. J. Hartley 
Merrick, who has presented an almost complete file of undergradu- 
ate periodicals and journals issued during the past thirty years. 

In exchange for copies of various University publications, the 



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Library is in annual receipt of a large number of periodicals, and of 
periodical publications and monographs of learned societies in 
various parts of the world, as well as the journals, dissertations and 
scientific contributions of the leading educational institutions in this 
country and abroad. In addition, the Library receives as a depos- 
itory the documents and publications of the United States Govern- 
ment, and from foreign governments likewise official publications 
in considerable numbers. The reports of all the important railroad 
corporations and banking associations are forwarded to the Library ; 
and arrangements have been made to receive regularly state docu- 
ments and ofhcial reports of the more important mimicipalitics in 
the United States and Europe. The Library has also been made a 
depository for the printed catalogue cards of the Congressional 
Library, which are kept in separate catalogue cases. 

The Library is open daily, except Sundays and holidays, from 
8.30 A. u. to 10 p. M. (during the summer vacation, 9 a. m. to 5 
p. 11.), and the Seminary rooms in the Library building till 11 p. m,; 
and both professors and students <the latter upon presenting their 
matriculation cards) arc permitted to take out books. Graduates 
of all departments of the University, and other persons recom- 
mended by officers of the University, arc granted the same privilege, 
on the annual payment of three dollars. The Library is open freely 
to the public for consultation, including the unrestricted use of its 
collections within the library building. 



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WISTAB INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY 
AND BIOLOGY. 



TRUSTEES OF THE ENDOWMENT, 

TBB TRi 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

ARTHUR ERWIN BROWN, 

SAMUEL DICKSON, 

SAMUEL G. DIXON, M. D., 

JOSEPH S, HARRIS, Sc. D, 

CHARLES C. HARRISON. LL. D., 

ROBERT G, LECONTE. M, D., 

MORRIS J. LEWIS, M. D., 

S. WEIR MITCHELL, M. D., LL. D. 



CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D,, President. 
MILTON J. GREENMAN, Ph. B., M. D.. Secretary. 
HENRY G. BRENGLE. Trcasurfr. 

ADVISORY BOARD OF ANATOMISTS. 

LEWELLYS F. BARKER. M. B.. Professor of the Principles and 
Practice of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

HENRY H. DONALDSON, Ph. D . Professor of Neurology, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Chicago, III. 

SIMON H. GAGE, B. S,. Professor of Histologi' and Embryologj'. 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

G. CARL HUBER. M. D,, Professor of Histology and Embryolt^, 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
(4S4) 



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WiSTAR INSTiriTE Ot ANATOMY AND BIOLOCV. 455 

GEORGES HUNTINGTON, M.D., Sc. D., Professor of Anatomy, 
Columbia University, New York. 

FRANKLIN P. MALL. M. D., LL. D.. Professor of Anatomy. 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

J. PLAYFAIR McMURRlCH. Ph. D., Professor of Anatomy, 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

CHARLES S, MINOT. S. D., LL. D., D. Sc. Professor of Histol- 
ogy and Human Embryology. Harvard Medical School, Boston, 

GEORGE A.PIERSOL, M. D., Professor of Anatomy, University 

of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 
EDWIN G. CONKLIN, Ph.D.. Professor of Zoology, University 

of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. 

SCIENTIFIC STAFF. 
MILTON J. GREENMAN. Ph, B., M. D.. Director. 
HENRY H. DONALDSON, Ph. D„ Professor of Neurology. 

— ■ — -— — ■ , Assiiciale i» Neurology. 

J. MACPHERSON STOTSENBURG, M. D., Junior AssociaU in 

A'laiomy. 
HAROLD D. SENIOR, M. B., F. R. C. S., Junior Associate in 

A natomy. 



Clara N. Perine. Secretary and LOiTarian, 
Wharton Hubbr, Technical AssiOant. 



The origin of the Wistar Institute was due to the efforts of the 
University of Pennsylvania and the late General Isaac J, Wistar 
to secure a permanent home for the anatomical musc-iini originally 
instituted by Dr. Caspar Wistar in rSoS-iacS. to provide for its 
conservation and growth, and to establish a laboratory for advanced 
researches in anatomy and biology. 

In iSga a charter was secured by General Isaac J. Wistar, of 
Philadelphia, from and under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, conferring perpetual incorporation, with the right 
of perpetual stjccession and a corporate seal, upon a corporation 
to be called "The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology. " 



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456 WISTAR INSTITUTE OP ANATOMY > 

The museum commonly known, tor many years, as the Wistar, 
or Wistar and Homer, Museian and a plot of ground were presented 
by the UniversLty of Pennsylvania to the Wistar Institute. 

A modem fireproof building was erected in 1893, and an addition 
in 1897, costing in all about (170,000. An endowment yielding an 
annual income of about (40,000 was established. The buildings 
and endowment were gifts of General Isaac J, Wistar, and by his 
will the Institute becomes the residuary legatee to his estate, thus 
insuring a most promising and stable future. 

The Wistar Institute was established as a corporation to serve 
all univeisitieB alike in the encouragement of original scientific 
research in anatomy and biology. Its laboratories and collections 
are open to investigators from all institutions, and to private indi- 
viduals, who are capaUe of making proper use of its advantages, 
without reserve and without cost. No undergraduate teaching oi 
any kind is permitted. 

The Wistar Institute publishes no regular catalogue or annual 
announcement, but its aims, facilities, reports and information 
which may be of interest to investigators in the promotion of this 
department of science will be published from time to time in the 
Bulletin of the Wistar Institute. This Bulletin may also contain 
information upon new methods, special apparatus, calls for material, 
offers of material, exchange of duplicate specimens as well as pre- 
liminary reports of monographs and such other scientific papers as 
may be expected of a central anaiomkal institute. 

In April. 1905, at the suggestion of the Director and with the 
approval of General Wistar, the donor, a broad and liberal step was 
taken by the Board of Managers, Invitations were issued by the 
Managers to ten leading American anatomists to meet at the Insti- 
tute and discuss its future activity. The result of this conference 
was to organize an Advisory Board of Anatomists of the Wistar 
Institute, with authority to recommend to the Institute methods 
for the promotion of research anatomy and the organization of a 
central anatomical institute or "clearing house" for anatomy in 
America. 

The Advisory Board recommended that the chief aim of the 
Institute be research; that the research should be in Neurolc^y, 
Comparative Anatomy and Embryology; that research chiefs be 
appointed in one or more of these branches, and that relations be 
established with individual anatomists and American and European 
organizations whose aims were similar in the promotion of collec- 
tive and co-operative investigation. 



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) BIOLOGY. 457 

The organization of the present staff ts a beginning in accordance . 
with this advice. Collective and co-operative research is en- 
couriiged and directed by the Advisory Board, Three members 
of this Board, namely, Drs. Minot, Donaldson and Mall, are mem- 
bers of the Centra] Commission of the International Association of 
Academies for Brain Investigation, thus placing the Institute in 
tlosc touch with the work abroad. 

At present the Institute does not undertake any independent 
publications but will utilize, so far as possible, the existing scientific 
journals. 

The Institute will act as conservator of scries of specimens or 
other material already studied which should be preserved for future 
reference, and whii'h may for this ro;ison be presented to the Insti' 
tutc. It is hoped that individual workers and institutions will 
assist in the collection of research materials, and that this Institute 
may act as a store-house and exchange bureau for materials of this 

It will send out to investigators in other laboratories material tor 
research work, which it may have in its museum or collect and pre- 
pare such material whenever this is possible. 

Communications relative to any research work in anatomy for 
which materials or laboratory facilities may Ije desired may be 
addressed to the Director of the Institute in Philadelphia.. 



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LABORATORY OF HYGIENE. 



CHARLES C. HARRISON. LL. D., Provost. 

EDGAR F, SMITH, Ph. D., Sc. D.. LL. D., Vicb-Provost. 

Dir«/^.— ALEXANDER C. ABBOTT. M. D.* 
First Assistant— DAWW H. BERGEY, A. M.. M. D. 

First Assistant in Ba^'eriology.—KATHANIEL GILDERSLEEVE. 

M,D, 
Second Assistant in Bactcriology.^Ai/lBS B. RUCKER, Jr., A. M., 

M. D. 
Third Assistant in BacUriology.— SYLVESTER }. DEEHAN. M. D. 

Thomas A. Si;ott Fellow in Hygiene. 

The Laboratory op Hycibnb o£ the University ot Pennsylvania 
was formally opened on February jj, iSga, The buLldinR was the 
gift uf Mr. Henry Charles Lba, of Philadelphia, and the equip- 
mccit wai> provided through the munificence of the late Hbnrv C. 
Gibson, of Philadelphia. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTlON.t 
I. Course in Practical Hvgiene. 
The course in Practical Hygiene consists of laboratory work upon 
the following subjects: 

(i) The atmosphere, climate and meteorological observations and 
records, chemical analysis, bacteriological investigation, methods of 
investigation, methods of ventilation and healing. 

(2) Water — physical, chemical and bacteriological investiga- 
tions ot water-supplies; methods of obtaining samples: qualitative 
and quantitative analysis for impurities; collection, storage, and 
purification of water intended for domestic use; effects of fillers, 

(3) Sewage disposal, sewers, house drainage and the air of 



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(4) Disposal of refuse, cremation of garbage, etc. 

(s) Soils and building sites, physical, chemical and bacteriologi- 
cal investigation, soil and moisture, ground air. 

(6) Foods — adulteration, milk and meat inspections, 

(7) Clothing — microscopic examination, poisonous dyes, 

(5) Management of contagious diseases. Practical tests of dif- 
ferent methods of disinfection, chemical and thermal; notification, 
isolation and quarantine, 

(g) Vital statistics, registration and methods of tabulation. 
(10) Offensive and dangerous trades. 



The above course of instruction begins February i and ends April 
I. It occupies five days in each week from g a. m. until 11 m. The 
course will not be given to less than five applicants. In order that 
persons taking the course may derive the greatest benefit from it, it 
is desirable for them to possess a practical familiarity with methods 
of chemical analysis. It is also advisable that those who take the 
course attend at the same time the lectures on General Hygiene that 
are arranged for the fourth-year students of the Medical Depart- 
ment. These lectures are given twice a week from February i to 
the end of the session, and cover topics of general sanitary impor. 
tance, including: 

A consideration of the factors concerned in the direct causation 
of disease, and the manifold conditions of life that indirectly favor 
the occurrence of disease among individuals, groups of individuals 
and communities. 

A brief sketch of the important transmis,iiblc and epidemic dis- 
eases, embracing a discussion of their modes of transmission, portals 
of infection, gcc^aphical and seasonal distribution, and the ap- 
proved methods of prevention. 

A consideration of prophylaxis in general, embracing disinfection 
and disinfectants, prot<.'tti\-e vaccination and the anti-toxic state, 
the disposal of the dead after infectious diseases, and quarantine. 

The atmosphere, from the chemical, physical and biological stand- 
points; the air of enclosed spaces; the problems of ventilation and 
heating; the various pollutions of the atmosphere, such for instance 
as those from the soil, from industries, from sewers, e'c., and their 
Inlluence on health and disease. 

Water — -its sanitary significance; the characteristics of waters 
from various sources and their suitability to domestic needs; the 
pollutions t" which waters from diflercnt sourci'S arc liable; the 
biolt^ca! signilicance uf lln-so piilhilions; iiitcrpnliiliins of the 



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46o LABORATORY 

results of analjrsis; natural and artilicial purification of waters; 
tiie relation of water to health and disease. 

Sewage — the part taken by the soil and its constituents in the 
disposal of organic waste; the characteristics of sewage from dif- 
ferent sources; the various methods tor the disposal of sewage; the 
influence of sewage disposal upon the health of communities. 

n. Eleubntary Course in Bactbrioloov. 
This course covers the following subjects: 
(i) Apparatus employed — sterilizers, incubators, pressure regu- 
lators, thermostats, etc. 

(s) Culture media, methods of preparation, sterilization 
methods. 

(3) Microscopic characteristics of cultures of bacteria in general 
and of special forms. 

(4) Methods of obtaining, from miictures of different bacteria, 
individual species in pure cultures, 

(5) Microscopic technique. Use and care of instnunents, stain- 
ing from cultures, section cutting, and staining and mounting of 

(6) Pathogenic bacteria isolation, identification and inoculation. 
(;) Disinfection, thermal and chemical, methods and apparatus, 

modes of testing efficiency. 

(8) Bacteriological investigation of water. 
(g) Bacteriological investigation of air. 
(10) Bacteriological investigation of soil. 

This course begins on. the first Monday in May and continues 
eight weeks, five days a week, from 9 a, m. till la m. 

m. Research ik Advanced Hvgibnb and Bactbrioixict. 
Opportunities for research work in Advanced Hygiene and Bac- 
teriology arc offered to students having the requisite preliminary 
training. All work coming under this head is done under the direct 
supervision of the Laboratory staff. 

FEES AND DEPOSITS.* 

Tuition fees are as follows: For Course I, thirty-five dollars 

($35.00) ; for Course 11, twenty-five dollars ($aS'°o) I *or Course m, 



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46 1 

twenty-five dollars (t»soo)' For Courses I and n taken in succes- 
sion with the privileges of the Laboratory and attendance upon 
lectures on Hygiene, the fee is fifty dollars ($50.00). 

All payments must be made in advance to the Bursar of the Uni- 
versity, Room 10a, College Hall. 

All students taking courses, or otherwise working in the Labora- 
tories, must make a deposit of ten dollars ($10.00) in addition to the 
regular fee, to insure the Laboratory against loss by breakage, etc. 
All accounts held by the Laboratory against students for breakage, 
and materials used, will be deducted from the caution deposit, the 
balance being returned to the student at the end of the course 
(unless otherwise arranged). 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

Pereons who have had courses in the Laboratory and detnon- 
Btrated their capacity for independent work, or those who come 
from other laboratories with proper recommendations, and who 
desire to pursue special researches coming within the scope of this 
Laboratory, can obtain the privilege of working in the Laboratory 
by the payment of the necessary tee. This does not include atten- 
tion from the instructors for any definite time, but pays only for the 
place in which to work. The Laboratory reserves the right to 
refuse these privileges to any one who is not prepared to pursue 
independent studies of the proper character. Individuals to whom 
these privileges are granted must submit to the rules and regu- 
tions of the Laboratory. They will make the usual caution deposit 
and pay the regular prices for materials. 

Should the work of an independent student be of such a nature 
as either to advance the teaching or to contribute to the value of 
researches being conducted as the property of the Laboratory, the 
Director may offer to such student the privileges of the Laboratory 
without the payment of the regular fee, providing the work of the 
student is placed at the disposal of the Laboratory, Due credit will 
be given to the student for his work thus utilized. 

Only those students who give evidence of fitness to profit by the 
courses will be received. It is desirable that students should have 
some practical knowledge of chemical manipulation and of the use 
of the microscope, before applying for places in the Laboratory. 

The rules of the Laboratory as to order and discipline must be 
observed, and the right is reserved to request the withdrawal of anv 
student who may not obey them. 



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THE THOMAS A. SCOTT FELLOWSHIP. 

Since the opening of the Laboratory this Fellowship has been 
founded and generously endowed by Mrs. Scott as a memorial of 
the late Thomas A. Scott, Escj., of Philadelphia. Its object is to aid 
talented sttidents who desire to bttoric investigators or teachers 
in the "field of sanitary science, and to promote the increase of 
knowledge in that field. 

The power of appointment to this Fellowship rests with the Cor- 
poration, who will act upon recommendation made to it by the 
Electors to the Fdlowshir-, comprising the Provost of the University, 
the Chairman of the ('ommittce of the Corporation on the Depart- 
ment of Medicine and Allied Schools, and the Director of the 
Laboratory. 

The salary attached to the position is the annual income arising 
from $10,000, the amount of endowment of the Fellowship. 

General Regvlatiuns. 

I. Applications should be made in writing t^ the Provost of the 
University not later than June i of the elapsing year. The aca- 
demic year begins on the la-st Friday in September. 

1, The holder of the Fellowship shall not be more than thirty 
years of age at the time of his appointment. 

3. The application must be accompanied by evidence of a liberal 
education, such as the diploma of a college of good repute (the 
appointment being regarded as an equivalent to the baccalaureate 
degree). The applicant is re<iuired to possess a reading knowledge 
of French and German, and to have performed practical work in 
this Laboratory, or to give evidence of the completion of a previous 
research elsewhere, such as will meet with the approval of the 
Electors. 

4. The holder of the Fellowship will be expected to perform such 
duties as may be allotted to him by the Director of the Laboratory 

n with his course of study: to act, when called upon, as 
iminer; to use his influence for the promotion of the 
objects and good order of the department; and, in general, to for- 
ward the cfTicicncy of the University as tar as may be in his power. 

5. The primary purpose of the Fellowship is the prosecution, 
imder the direction of the head of the department, of special 
studies relating to the causation and prevention of disease. Before 
the close of the year the Fellow is n'qnired to demonstrate the 
progress he has made by presenting a thesis upon the results of his 



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.. SCOTT PELLOWBHIP. 4fi; 

research; jy the delivery of special lectures bearing upon the sub- 
ject of his investigations; or by some similar method that will be 
satisfactory to the Electors. 

6. While holding the Fellowship he will not be permitted to en- 
gage in any work other thaji that directly bearing upon the interests 
of the department. 

7- AU work performed is to be considered the property of the 
Laboratory, and to be published only with the consent and appro\'al 
of the Director. 

8. The Fellow is not called upon to aid in the routine teaching of 
the Laboratory. He may be requested to deliver a brief course of 
special lectures upon the subject of his research, providing such 
lectures would materially aid in the work of the department. While 
holding the Fellowship he will not be permitted to engage in teaching 
in any other institution or in any work not bearing directly on the 
University's interest. 

Q. He may be reappointed at the end of the year, but only for 
exceptional reasons. 

10. The holder is exempt from tuition fees. In case of resigna- 
tion, promotion or removal from the Fellowship, payments will be 
made for the time during which the office shall have been actually 
held. 

1 1 . The Electors have the right to declare the Fellowship vacant 
if the holder prove in their opinion unworthy, and no further salary 
shall be paid to the person thus removed. 



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THE FLOWER ASTBONOMICAIi 
OBSERVATORY. 



CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D., Provost. 

EDGAR F. SMITH, Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D.. Vice-Provost. 

CHARLES L. DOOLITTLE. C. E., Sc. D., flowbr Professor 

of Astrortomy, and Director of the Observatory. 
ERIC DOOLITTLE, C, E., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

The Astronomical Observatory is situated on the "Flower Farm," 
a gift to the University by the will o£ the late Reese Wall Flower, 
about two miles beyond the city limits, on the West Chester Turn- 
pike, The Observatory buildings are three in number, viz.: the 
equatorial bui ding, of brick; the meridian building, of wood; and 
the residence of the Director: one wing of the latter containing 
the Astronomical library, the office and computing rooms. The 
principal instruments comprising the equipment are: an Equatorial 
of i8-inch aperture, with Spectroscope; a Meridian Circle of 4-inch 
aperture; a Zenith Telescope of sS-'nch aperture; and a 3-inch 
Universal Transit. A Reflex Zenith Tube of 8-inch aperture has 
i-ecently been installed, the gift of Mr, Joseph Wharton. It will 
be known as the Wharton Zenith Tube. 

Graduate students in Practical Astronomy are instructed in the 
details of observatory practice, and participate in the regular work, 
which includes systematic observation of comets, small planets and 
double stars, investigation of variation of latitude, and spectroscopy. 

There is a small working observatory situated on the University 
grotmds in West Philadelphia, for the convenience of undergradu- 
ates taking the course in Practical Astronomy. This building is 
efimpped with a Transit Instrument, a 4-inch Equatorial and a 
Sidereal Clock. The Equatorial and Clock were presented by Mr. 
Horace Howard Furness, Jr. 

The Flower Observatory is open to visitors every Thursday 
evening, holidays excepted, between the hours of 7 and 10 p. u. 



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DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 



OFFICERS. 
CHARLES C. HARRISON, LL. D.. Provost. 
EDGAR F. SMITH. Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D., Vice-Pbotost. 

R. TAIT McKENZIE, B. A., M, D., Prof essor o! Physical Education, 

and Director of the Department. 
W. CAMPBELL POSEY, M. D., Ophthalmologist. 
J. LEONARD MASON, Instructor in Gymnastics. 
F. HOMER CURTISS, Assistant Instructor in Gymnastics. 
ELLIS F, WARD, Instructor in Rowing. 

MICHAEL C. MURPHY, Instructor in Track and Field Athletics. 
GEORGE KISTLER. Instructor in Swimming. 
LEONARDO TERRONE, InslrMtor in Fencing. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held in May, 1904, it was 
resolved that the course in Physical Education be made an integral 
part of the University curriculum. The following regulations were 
subsequently adopted and are now in force: 

The Gymnasium fee will be collected from all undergraduates of 
the University, except those of the Department ot Philosophy, 
those taking special post-graduate work in the Department of 
Dentistry, and those taking Teachers' Courses or the course in 
Music in the College. 

The Bursar's receipt entitles the holder to the use of the Gym- 
nasium, shower-baths, swimming-pool and Franklin Field, except 
when any or all of them are specially reserved, as, for example, in 
the case of intercollegiate games. Due notice of such reservation 
will be posted on the bulletin boards at the Gymnasium. 

Every locker holder is entitled to a physical examination, in- 
cluding his measurements, a strength test, an examination of his 
heart, lungs, and general condition, with a special examination 
of his eyes. On the basis of this examination the kind and 
amount of exercise best adapted to his needs are outlined, and class 
C465) 



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466 DBPARTMBNT OP PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

instructioii ia given as amuiKed in the roster at the b^;iimuig of 
the college year. 

In the following caaes a certain minimum amount of gymnastic or 
Athletic work is required, tor which the student receives credit on 
the basis of laboratory work counting toward his degree. In aQ 
other cases the work is optional. 

The College. — Two periods a week are required in the College, 
tasting one hour each, of all full students, and of partial and special 
students as provided by a special form; the work to be graded 
and mode progressive throughout the four yean. 

Professional Schools. — The same amount of work is required 
from members of the first and second year classes in the Depart- 
ment of Medicine, and from members of the first year classes in 
the Departments of Law, Dentistry, and Veterinary Medicine. 

E:tceptional cases may be excused from this requirement when 
approved jointly by the Director of the Department of Physical 
Education and the Dean of the Department; and also the fol- 
lowing cases: 

First, all full students who have, in the opinion of the Director of 
the Department of Physical Education, bad an equivalent amount 
of work at this, or another, univei«ity or college. 

Second, holders of a college degree in Arts or Science. 

Third, those having some physical disability. 

Membership, and regular attendance at the practice, of any of 
the athletic squads of the University is taken as an equivalent for 
gymnasium work while the man is in active training, Ike attetidance 
being reported weekly. 



FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT. 

I. The Univbrsitt Gyunasiuu, recently completed and pres- 
sented to the Trustees by a committee of the Alumni. 

The main exerdse hall, 144 by 68 feet, is well lifted by a roof of 
glass, and has a specially designed system of ventilation, thus ensur- 
ing a constant supply of fresh air. The iron-work overhead gives 
attachment to the heavy apparatus. The equipment is so arranged 
as to be quickly put in pUce or hoisted out of the way, leaving a 
clear floor space for large classes ; while the fioor can be divided into 
three equal spaces by nets, so as to permit the playing of games in 
which balls are used without interfering with Other work. A small 
Bpectatois' gallery occupies each end. 

On the same floor are two rooms, one at each end, with 1500 ex- 



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• PHYSICAL BDUCATION. 467 

panded metal lockers, and space for more than twice that nnmber, 
and two small dressing-rooms, with shower-baths, for the mem- 
bers of the Faculty and graduates. On the floor beneath are the 
towel-rooms and shower-baths. The floor belov 
is occupied by the swimming-pool, the rowing-n 
ing, fencing and wrestling-rooms. 

The pool, 100 by 30 feet, is supplied by a 
filtered water, which is completely changed once a week. It is 
commanded on three sides by a spectators' gallery. All the appa* 
latus for teaching swimming is supplied, and the Instructor or his 
assistant is always in attendance. 

The Rowing-Room, 75 by 30 feet, is used as an accessory gym- 
nasium, with sixteen machines on which the crew do their winter 
training; and in it are found special apphances for corrective 
work. The two rooms, 30 by 30 feet each, at either end of the 
Rowing-Room, are fitted with all the appliances for teaching box- 
ing, fencing and wrestling. 

The Director's office and examining rooms are situated in the 
north wing, while the corresponding rooms of the south wing con- 
tain the offices and committee rooms of the Athletic Association. 

The basement of each wing is taken up by the special 'Varsity 
dressing-rooms, baths, drying-rooms, repair shop and Instructor's 

II. Franklin Field, situated to the east of the gymnasium 
building, and overlooked by it. It is encircled by a }-mi1e cinder 
path and has permanent stands of brick on its north, east and south 
sides, capable of seating zo,ooo spectators. Beneath them are the 
squash courts and an in-door running track. The stands are con- 
nected to the north and south wings of the gymnasium building by 
brick andies, spanning the entrances to the field. 

INSTRUCTION. 

Instruction is given in both the theory and practice of Physical 
Education. . 

The theoretical instruction, which is in process of organization, 
will include courses oSered to students who have bad two years 
of medical training, on the application of Anatomy and Physiology 
to exercise, and the many quesCions with whkh it is allied, such as 
blood pressure, strain, fatigue and exhaustion. Anthropometry 
as applied to the laws of growth and development in children, and 
to the variation in measurements that can be produced by system- 



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468 L>BPARTMENT OF PHVSICAI. BOt'CATION. 

atic exercise. The tests employed in determining the efficiency of 

hearing and of sight. Lectures and demonstrations on school 
hygiene and sanitation. The application of eKercise to such con- 
ditions as curvature of the spine, locomotor ataxia, disturbances of 
nutrition, and backward development in its various phases. With 
the co-operation of other departments, these courses will be de- 
signed to give a training that will enable a graduate to install and 
supervise a system of physical training in public schools and col- 
leges. Students taking this couree are given an opportunity for 
practical experience in instruction by appointment as class leaders 
in floor work, and assistants in the physical examinations. 

The practical work of the department applies to the general 
student body. A careful medical examination, including a thorough 
test of the sight, is made of all men coming under the regulations 
on entering college. A series of measurements is taken, particular 
stress being laid on those which can be changed by judicious 
exercise; while tests are made also of the strength of the legs, back 
and shoulders, chest, arms and forearms. On the basis of the infor- 
mation obtained at this examination the students are divided into 
three classes according to their physical condition, (n) Those who 
are below the normal are given special work to remedy or correct 
such defects as scoliosis, flat-foot, weak chest, round shoulders, etc., 
which are susceptible to improvement by prescribed gymnastic 
exercise, (t) For the average man a regular gymnastic courae is 
given, beginning with light free-hand movements, and going for- 
ward by easy and progressive steps to the most advanced work on 
the whole range of gymnastic apparatus. 1-or men who are rep- 
resenting the University on the athletic field, or who are trying 
for any of the teams or crews, credit is given on the basis of gym- 
nastic work while they are "in training," When not "in training." 
an equivalent amount of gymnastic work will be required of all 
who come under the rule for retiuired work. 

All candidates for teams or crews must pass a satisfactory medical 
examination by the Director before being considered eligible to 
represent the University. 

Proficiency in swimming is required of all the candidates for 
crews, and it will be taught to all students of the first year. 



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DEPARTMENT OF ARCHJEOIjOQY. 



Vice-Presidents : 
SAMUEL F. HOUSTON. 
JOHN WANAMAKER. 
JOHN H. CONVERSE. 
ECKLEY BRINTON COXE, Jr. 

Secretary: 
B. FRANKLIN PEPPER. 

Assistant Secretary: 
JANE M. McHUGH. 



Assistant Treasurer: 
JANE M. McHUGH 



CuTolors: 
GEORGE B. GORDON, Sc. D., American Archteoiogy. 
GEORGE B. GORDON. Sc-D.. General Ethnology. 

HERMANN V. HILPRECHT, i „ ^ , . , ^ , c- ^ 

Ph D D D LL D [Babylontan and General Semtfic 

' ' _ I Section. 

ALBERT T. CLAY, Ph. D., -> 

Egyptian Section. 

WILLIAM N. BATES, Ph. D., Mediterranean Section. 
(469) 



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4T« 

BOARD OP MANAGERS: 
lEx-OIHac.) 
Thr Mayor op the City of Philadelphia. 
Thb Prbsidbht of the Select Council op the City of Phila- 
delphia. 
The President op the Common Council op the City of Phila- 
delphia. 
The Presidbnt of the Commissioners of Pairhount Pakk. 

Chablbs C. Harrison, LL. D., Provost, ex-officio, 
Joseph S. Harris, Sc. D., Samuel F. Houston, 

J, Levbring Jones, Robert G. Lb Contb, M. D., 

George P. Baer, E, W. Clark, Jr., 

Daniel Bauch, John H. Converse, 

EcKLEY Brinton Coxb, Jr., 
John Wanauakbr, 
Talcott Williams, LL. D. 

Board of Advisory Managers: 

Thomas G, Ashton, M. D., Joseph Leidy, Jr., M. D., 

D. MoREAU Barringbr, John F. Lewis, 

Henry Chapman, Jr., Walter Lippincott, 

Isaac H. Clothier, Benjamin Smith Lyman, 

Miss Clara Combgys, George W, Ochs, 

Charles H. Cramp, Sc. D., George Wharton Pbppbr, 

Thouas Dolan. Silas W. Pettit, 

Mrs. Lucy Wharton Orbxbl, Mrs. Charles Platt, Jr., 

Theodore N. Ely, John Sailer, 

Bernard N, Farren, Miss M. Carey Thomas, 

Mrs. William Frishmuth, Charles G Trumbull, 

William P. Henszey, Alexander Van Rensselaer, 

Frank K. Hipple, George Vaux, Jr., 

Mrs. Walter M, James, Peter A. B. Widbner, 

Charles M. Lea, Mrs. Jones Wistbr, 

Stuart Wood. 

The MusBUM op Arch.«ologv was organized in 18S9 to pro- 
vide (or instruction and original research, and tor the incidental 
formation of illustrative collectious. In 1891, in consequence 



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of the great interest manifested in this Museum, and the successful 
extension of its work, it was constituted a Department of the 
University. 

By ordinance approved March 30, 1S94, the city of Philadelphia 
transferred to the Corporation a tract of eight acres of land in trust, 
to maintain as a park and botanic garden, and to erect thereon a 
Free Museum of Science and Art. By ordinance of City Councils. 
October 29. 1895, an additional piece of ground measuring one and 
two-scvcnths acres was made over by the City to the Corporation 
upon the same terms as the former grant. 

The complete plans for the new Museum call for an extensive 
'group of buildings, go arranged as to be capable of construction by 
sections. They will cover ultimately almost twelve acres of ground, 
the total cost being estimated at $2,150,000. The northwestern sec- 
tion, situated at Thirty-third and Spruce streets, was begun in 1897, 
and dedicated December 10, 1S91). Its cost, including the mechan- 
ical plant and the furniture and equipment, was 8389,000. To 
cover this, $150,000 was appropriated by the State and $239,000 was 
subscribed by individuals. In 1899 the transfer of the collections 
from the Library to the new building was accomplished, and the 
Free Museum of Science and Art was opened to the public. 

The Museum is divided into five sections, each one of which is 
in charge of Curators. 

The American Section contains a number of fine exhibits illus- 
trating the customs, arts and industries of the great historic tribes 
as well as those pertaining to the ancient peoples of the two conti- 
nents. Among the former, the extensive Indian collections from 
the southwestern, western and northwestern sections of the United 
States and from Point Barrow, Alaska, all provided by the liber- 
ality of Mr. John Wanaraaker, deserve especial mention. They are 
displayed on either side of the hall devoted to American Ethnology. 

The ancient peoples of America are represented by many articles 
of pottery and of stone from the ancient earthworks of the central 
region of the United States: by the collection excavated by the late 
Frank Hamilton Cushing on the Southwest Coast of Florida; "by 
pottery from the ruined pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona, form- 
ing part of the gift of Mr. John Wanamakcr; and by an exhibit of 
antiquities from the ancient cliff dwellers of Colorado, presented 
by Mrs. Phebe A. Hearst. Prom Mexico and Cwitral America the 
section is si^Ued witb costs of some of the great carved monoliths 
of Copan and Quirigua, and with pottery and stone objects from 
the prehistoric graves of that region. Turning to South America. 



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471 DBPAllTHBNT OP ARCHAOLOOT. 

the section contains a very extensive collection of pottery, 
textiles, and numerous articles of use and adornment, obtained by 
Dr. Max Uhle in Pent and Bolivia. The greater part of this collec- 
tion was excavated by Dr. Uhle on the site of the ancient coast city 
of Pachacamac, one of the most important places of old Peru. 
This valuable collection, presented to the University by the late Dr. 
Pepper, forms one of the principal features of the section. 

The Brinton Lisrarv of works relating to the Aboriginal Amer- 
icans, deposited by special arrangement with the University Trus- 
tees in the Museum Library, greatly facilitates research work in the 

The Ethnological Collections from countries other than America 
occupy three halls, one of which is devoted to the collections made 
in Borneo by Dr. Fumess, Dr. Hose, Dr. Hiller, and Mr. Harrison. 
Dr. Fumess has also donated a collection made by hint among the 
Naga Hill tribes in Assam, and more recently a similar collection 
from the Caroline Islands. Dr. Hillcr and Mr, Harrison have pre- 
sented their Sumatra collections and a collection from the Ainos of 
Japan. Other collections deserving of mention are those from the 
Polynesian and Melanesian groups, from West Africa, from Morocco 
and from different portions of Europe and Asia. Notable features 
of this section are comparative collections of musical instrtuncnts, 
fans, the Sommerville collection of objects pertaining to Buddhist 
worship, and a comprehensive collection of coins. 

The Babylonian and General Semitic Section contains a large and 
extremely valuable collection of antifiuities, the greater portion of 
which is the result of extensive excavations conducted by the Uni- 
versity at the ruins of Nippur, in Central Babylonia. Much time 
and labor have been expended in a thorough exploration of the prin- 
cipal mound of these ruins, which cover the temple of B^l. presum- 
ably the oldest sanctuary in Babylonia. Among the most important 
objects thus secured may be mentioned about fifty thousand cunei- 
form documents in clay. Hundreds of terra-cotta and glass vases; 
Hebrew, Mandaic and Syriac bowls; about 700 fragments of the 
most ancient inscribed stones, vases, and votive tablets; nearly 600 
seal-cylinders ; clay coffins; charms; a large amount of gold and 
silver jewelry, and other objects of art; all serve to illustrate the 
life and customs of the ancient inhabitants of Mesopotamia, and 
of the Semites in general. 

The Egyptian Section has secured important series of objects 
illustrating the history, arts and industries of Egypt, from pre- 
historic times down to the Greco-Roman period. From the Egypt 



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DEPARTMENT OP ARCHEOLOGY. 4J3.> 

Exploration Fund, the American Exploration Society and the 
Egyptian Research Account, the convmittee in charge each year 
receives a share of the objects discovered. 

Having obtained the permission of the Egyptian Government to 
go over the ground excavated by a French syndicate at Abydos, Mr. 
Petric's finds and scientific results have been of the utmost interest. 
Through the liberality of the American Exploration Society, which 
assumed the financial responsibility inviilved in co-operating with 
the Egypt Exploration Fund' on behalf of the Department of 
Archaeology, a liberal share of the objects discovered has come to 
Philadelphia. Among these are a stele of King Qa, and several 
stone fragments and ivory tablets, inscribed in the names oi other 
early successors of King Mena. Of the founder of the United 
Egyptian Empire himself, an ebony tablet inscribed in his name 
may be seen, as well as other inscribed fragments and objects of his 
reign. Inscriptions and objects from the tombs of the Kings of the 
I. II and III Dj-nastics are among the new series. 

During this year the Museum has been enriched by a valuable 
gift from Hon. John Wanamaker of a complete mastaba or original 
tomb of Ra-ka-pu, of the pyramid builders. It ia not only unique 
in this country, but in any museum outside of Berlin. 

The Mediterranean collection comprise? an important series from 
Cyprus, and Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities. 

The excavation of some Etruscan tombs at Naree, Chiusi, Cer- 
vetri. Vulci, Bizentium, Ascoli. Civita-Castellana, Orvieto, Cometo 
and Tarentum, undertaken for this section, resulted in a splendid 
series containing a number of unique specimens. These collections 
are the gifts of the late Dr. Pepper, of Mrs. Hearst and the American 
Exploration Society, and of the Hon. John Wanamaker. The five 
Etruscan sarcophagi of stone representing the defunct reclining on 
his bier, excavated for the Museum from a necropolis at Civita- 
Musama, near Vitcrbo (third century b, c), the great bas-rclicfs of 
Trajan's Arch at Bcneventum, and the Dillwyn Parrish Collection of 
fragments of ancient mosaics from Carthage and Rome, are striking 
features. The important collection of marbles found in the neigh- 
borhood of Lake Nemi, on the site of a temple of Diana Arecina. 
as well as other valuable series of Greco-Roman sculptures, pre- 
sented by Mrs. Lucy Wharton Drexel, are worthy of specialincntion. 
The Wanamaker collection of replicas of the bronzes from Pom-- 
peti and Herculancum in the Naples Museum forms one of the most 
striking as well as most educational features. The Dillwyn Parrish 
collection has been enriched by a collection of Demotic papyri. 



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which will be added to its already important series of andeot 
manuscripts. 

An expedition sent to Crete on behalf of the Museum by the 
Amencan Exploration Society in 1901-1904, under the direction of 
Miss Harriet A. Boyd, resulted in the discovery at Goumia of a 
Mycencan town of about 1100 B. c. Paved and drained, albeit 
narrow streets, houses, a shrine, and a palace were brought to view, 
and many objects of pottery, bronze, stone, etc., were discovered. 
A complete series of enlarged photographs illustrate this impiortant 
discovery. 

Last season Vasiliki, another site two miles away, yielded, upon 
examination, important vestiges of a still earlier date. The 
Museum has recently been enriched by a collection of objects which, 
under the new laws governing excavations in Crete, was, for the 
first time, allowed to be exported. The educational importance of 
this collection of Mycencan and pre-Mycenean objects, unique on 
this continent, and indeed in any museum out of Greek lands, 
cannot be overestimated. 

An interesting exhibit in the Museum consists of a collection of 
engraved gems and amulets, presented to the Univernty by the 
late Professor Sommerville. 



The collections are open to visitors daily during the academic 
year, Christmas, New Year's Day and Good Friday excepted, from 
10 A. M. to 5 p. u. On Simdays, they are open from 1 p. y. to 
6 p. M. 

For the prosecution of special studies in the Museum, application 
should be made to the various Curators in charge of the several 
Sections. 



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PART IV 



STAHSrae COHMITTBBS 



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GRADUATES' APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE. 



EDGAR P. SMITH. Ph. D., Sc, D., LL. D., Vice-Provost, and 

Professor of Chetnistty: Chairman. 
HENRY W. SPANGLER. M. S., Professor of Dynamical Engi- 

neering. 
EDWIN G. CONKLIN, Ph. D., Professor of Zofilogy. 
J. HARTLEY MERRICK, A. B., Secretary of the University: 

Secretary. 

The University maintains a Graduates' Appointment Committee, 
through the medium of which graduates and other members of the 
University seeking positions are brought into contact with persons 
having vacancies to fili. especially in the line of teaching 9r tutoring. 

Applicants for positions may register their names with the Com- 
mittee, and fill out blank forms with detailed information as to per- 
sonal history and qualifications, kind of work desired, etc. The 
Committee keeps these records on file, together with classified lists 
of schools, colleges or individuals desirous of filling vacancies, and 
thus endeavors to bring applicants into touch, either in person or by 
letter, with possible employers. The Committee does not guarantee 
positions to those who may apply, but acts merely as an intermedi- 
aiy by conducting all necessary correspondence, and by assuming 
all expenses incidental to the case. No fees of any kind are charged, 
but no assistance is given to applicants who are not members of the 
University. 

While the primary purpose of the Committee is to secure positions 
for thoGe who have none in prospect, it is glad to register also the 
applications of graduates who already have employment as teachers, 
but who may wish to consider a change to other fields. 

Further information as to scope and methods, and blanks for 
registration, may be obtained from the Secretary of the University, 
College Hall. 

Student Selp-Support. 

In addition to the Committee mentioned above, there exists a 

Students' Employtnetit Bureau, through the medium of which, tot 

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478 OKADUATES' APPOINTMENT COMUITTBB. 

outside work during both term-time and vacation, students may 
obtain information and assistance. Compensation varies oatnrally 
with the kind of employment, the aptitude of the individual, and 
the time he can afford to give to outside work, it is possible for a 
student who economizes time and applies himself diligently to his 
chosen line of employment to pay all his University expenses and 
have something left over besides. 

The Biu-eau is under the direction of the Custodian of the Houston 
Club, to whom all inquiries should be sent. 



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UNIVERSITY PUBIilCATIONS 

AMD UnIT£IISITX- FuBUOATION CO] 



Group I. — AhkuoI PtMicatUms. 

Universitj' Catalogue (published in December). 

FascicuU of the Department of Philosophy (Graduate School), 
Law, Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine; also 
separate pamphlets concerning the various coturses offered 
in the College, as follows: Arts and Science; Finance and 
Commerce ; Biology ; Music ; Architecture ; Mechanical 
Engineering: Electrical Engineering: Civil Engineering: 
Chemistry; Chemical Engineering; Teachers' Courses; 
Suntmer School. 

Report of the Provost (published in November). 

*Groiip II. — Strial Publtcations. 
Series in Philology and Literature. 
Series in Philosophy. 

Series in Political Economy and Public Law. 
Series in Astronomy. 
Series in History. 

Contributions from the Botanical Laboratory. 
Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory. 
Contributions from the Department of Mathematics. 
Contributions from the Laboratory of Hygiene. 

Group III. — Occasional Publications. 
Theses presented for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

*Group IV.—AfjiliaUd P%Mications. 
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. 
Translations and Reprints from the Original Sources of European 

History (occasional). 
American Law Register (monthly). 
University Medical Magazine (monthly). 
Proceedings of the Department of Archtcology (occasional). 

• Por equivalent eichangE only, ih- for nk. 

n (479) 



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48o UMIVBkStTy PuBLtCATlOK^. 

DESCRIPTION OF GROUPS 

Group I consists of publications issued annually under the direct 
auspices of the Provost and Trustees, 

The UniveTGity Catalogue contains detailed information coocen- 
ing all departments, lists of officers and students with addresses, 
etc. The CakUogiM is sold for tivenly-five cents a copy. It is sent 
without charge to alumni of the University (upon request), to 
libraries, and to educational and other learned institutions. 

The Fasciculus of each department ccmtains information concern- 
ing that department only, while the circular of information cover- 
ing the several courses ofiered in the college is in like manner 
restricted as to its contents. Copies are mailed free <m request. 

The Report of the Provost, made by him annually to the Cor- 
poration, constitutes a general review of University activities 
during the year, and contains inter alia reports from the Treas- 
urer and the several Deans. Single copies are mailed free upon 
request. 

Group 11 consists of publications in the several fields of literature, 
science and philology. They are issued in separate series at irreg- 
ular intervals (for the most part), and represent the results of ori^- 
nal research by, or under the direction of, members of the staff of 
instruction of the University. The titles of the several series follow: 
Philology and Literature; Philosophy; Political Economy and Pub- 
lic Law; Botany; Zoology; Mathematics; Hygiene; Astronomy, and 
History. Descriptive circulars will be mailed free upon request. 
Croup II is pubhshed under the editorial supervision of the Univer- 
sity Publication Committee.* 

Group III consists of theses presented in partial fulfilment of the 
requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Group IV consists of affiliated publications, issued as separate 
periodicals, not under the control of the University, but edited in 
part by officers of the University of Pennsylvania. 



• The membership of this Committee ii composed of the faUowing officen: 
Edwin G. Conklin, ProfeaoT of ZoUosTl Chairman- Jomepb G. Raieiinkrteii, 

Trustee: Morton W.Bdston. Piofessorof Compamtive Philolosv; Pelix E. Schelltns. 

Prcfessor of Engliih; Morria Janrow. Jr.. Libruun; Arthur W. Goodspeed. 

ProfeHor of Physici: Ednrd P. Cbeyney. Profenor of History; Emory R. 

Johiaon, Pr ofe m w of Trantportatlon and Commerue; J. Hartley Merrick. SacietaiT 

of the Univeitity; StCTtiary. 



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VHIVBRSITY PUBLIC A TtOH9. 48 1 

EXCHANGE BUREAU. 

In connection with its publications, tlie University tnaititnitia aa 
Exchange Bureau. Through the medium of this Bnrean, the pub- 
lications noted tmder the various group headings are distributed to 
some one hundred and fifty home and foreign universities and 
learned societies, which, in exchange, forward to the University 
Library publications embodying the results of original research, etc., 
issued under their several auspices. Much valuable materiAl is 
thus added to the shelves of the Library, while the exchange system 
enables the University to extend its own sphere of usefulness, and at 
the same time to come into closer contact with the best centres of 
educational activity, both at home and abroad. 

All correspondence relating to the publications of the University, 
or to the managenjcnt of the Exchange Bureau, should be addressed 
to the Secretary of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Pa. 



MiSCBLLANBOUS PUBLICATIONS. 

In addition to the foregoing, mention may be made of the fol* 
lowing publicati<»is managed and edited by the students: The Penn- 
sylvanian, a daily newspaper; The Red Mid Blue, a literary monthly; 
The Punch Bowl, a comic monthly; The Penn Dental Jourttat, 
issued four times during the session by the students in the Depart- 
ment of Dentistry; and The Record, an annual, issued in June by 
the Graduating Class of the College. 

Old Penn, a weekly review of current activities, and containing 
an ofRcial calendar of daily events, is issued under University aus- 
pices. The Alamni Register, a literary and news-monthly, is pub- 
hshed by the General Alumni Society, as the organ of the a 
departmental alumni societies. 



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UNIVEBSITY COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS. 



EDGAR F. SMITH. Ph. D„ Sc. D., LL. D.. Vicb-Provost: Pro- 
fessoT of Chemistry: Chairman. 

(On the part of the College Faculty.) 
ARTHUR W. GOODSPEED, Ph. D., Professor of Physics: Stcre- 

(On the part of the Faculty of Philosophy.) 

(On the part of the Faculty of Law.) 
J. WILLIAM WHITE, M. D., Professor of Surgery. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Medicine.) 
MATTHEW H. CRYER, M. D.. D. D. S.. Professor of Oral 
Surgery. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Dentistry.) 
JOHN W. ADAMS, A B., V. M. D., Professor of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.) 
SAMUEL F. HOUSTON, 
RANDAL MORGAN. 

(On the part of the Corporation.) 
H, LAUSSAT GEYELIN 
CHARLES S. W. PACKARD. 

(On the part of the Athletic Association.) 



(On the part of the Undergraduates.) 

The ultimate control of the athletic sports of students is in the 
hands of the University Committee on Athletics. 

Thia committee was created by action of the Corporation and 

consists of the chairmen of the several committees on athletics in 

the College, the Philosophical, Law, Medical, Dental and Veterinary 

Schools, together with two representatives each from the COTpora- 

(483) 



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UNIVBKSITl COMHITTBB ON ATHLETICS. 483 

tiim, from tfae Athletic Association, and from the student body. 
This committee is charged with the general supervision of the 
heaith of students, including an examination into the hygienic 
conditions of their lodgings; a supervision of the gymnasium, tmd 
the arrangement of suitable times and methods of exercise; the 
making of reg^ations to govern athletic contests, both iuter-class 
and inter-collegiate; the determination, through the reports of the 
Deans of the several faculties, of the eligibility (in point of scholar- 
ship) of students who may desire to serve on any athletic teams; 
and other kindred matters. 



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UWTVERSITY COMMITTEE ON 
NON-ATHLETIC ORGANIZATIONS. 



CLARENCE G. CHILD. Ps. D., L. H. D., AssisUnt Professor of 
English, and Dean of the Faculty of Philosophy: Chairman. 
(On the part of the College Faculty.) 
WALTON B. McDANIEL, A. M.. Ph. D., Asastant Professor of 
Latin. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Philosophy.) 
WILLIAM E. MIKELL. Professor of Law. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Law.) 
EDWARD LODHOLZ, M. D., Assistant Demonstrator of Phy^- 
ology. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Medicine.) 
JAMES TRUMAN, D. D. S., Professor of Dental Pathology. 
Therapeutics and Materia Medica. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Dentistry.) 
SIMON J. J. HARGER, V. M. D., Professor of Veterinary Anatomy 
and Zo6technics. 

(On the part of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.) 

I . Students desiring to establish newspapers, magazines, dramatic 
and mu^cal societies, and other organizations that may bring them 
in relation with the public, must submit a draft of their proposed 
undertaking to the Committee on Non-Athletic Organizations, to- 
gether with a list of men interested therein. If the proposed organ- 
ization be approved by the Committee, a certificate of approval will 
be given to the promoterB of the project. Without a certificate, no 
such organizations may be formed by the students. 

a. All organizations referred to in Section i, whether old or new, 
must submit to the Committee within thirty days from the com- 
mencement of each college year, a list of their officers, with their 
respective city residences, and must report to the Committee all 
changes that may occur during the year. 

3. All students taking part in such organizations as are referred 
to in Section i must be in good standing. No student will be 
allowed to take part in $uch organizations if he has more than one 
condition. Special and partial students shall not be eligible unless 
taldng regularly an amount of work equivalent to the minim nm 
required of regular students under usual conditions. 
(484) 



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PART V 



Fnf AirClAI, OBLIOATIONS AND DOBHITOBIES 



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FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS AND 
DORMITORIES. 



RULES GOVERNING PAYMENTS. 



I. CHARGES AND DEPOSITS, 
I. Matriculation Fees: In the department where a matricula- 
tion fee is charged that f«e shall be paid by aJI new students in the 
department, whether previously registered in another department 

a. Deposits ; Every student shall, upon entering the Univer- 
sity, make a deposit of at least $5.00 to cover toss, damage, or 
breakage of University property, library fines, or any charge not 
paid by the student in some other way. A student whose deposit 
is by charges against it reduced to one-half its original amount or 
less, shall be required to pay a sum sufficient to restore the deposit 
to the original amount. A student entering another class or depart- 
ment shall make up his deposit to the amount required in that class 
or department, if the amount be larger, or may reduce his' deposit 
if the amount be smaller. No deposit or balance remaining on a 
deposit shall be finally repaid to a student until he shall have been 
graduated, or shall have formally withdrawn from the University. 

3. Every student, before beginning the work of any given aca- 
demic year, must register at the office of the Dean of his Depart- 
ment and receive a "charge card," which shall be presented with- 
out delay to the Bursar. If a student fail to deposit the card with 
the Bursar within ten days, the Dean shall notify him that his 
name has been dropped from the rolls. To be reinstated he must 
then register again. By the date of registration in these Rules 
shall be meant the date stamped by the Department office on the 
charge card and the matriculation card attached thereto. 

11. ALLOWANCES AND REDUCTIONS. 

I. Reductions for Courses Rbpbatbd: A student who has 

paid the full tuition fee for a year shall pay one-half the tuition fee 

if he repeats the studies of the year. 

C487) 



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48S FINAHCIAL OBL1OAT10N3 AND I>0S1CIT0SIBS. 

A Student who is regularly advanced with his class, but who for 
any reason repeats one or more subjects, shall not be required to 
pay any tuition fee for the subjects so repeated, but will be required 
to pay laboratory charges. 

3. Allowance in Cabs op Withdrawal., etc.: A student who 
withdraws within one week of the date on which he registers shall 
be entitled to a return of the full amount of the tuition fee paid, but 
in no case shall the matriculation fee be returned. 

A student who on account of illness or other disability withdraws 
during the term shall be required to pay a fee the amount of which 
shall be such proportionate part of the entire tuition fee as the num- 
ber of weeks of his attendance bears to the number of weeks in the 
academic session. If he shall have paid before withdrawal a greater 
fee than that required by this rule, the excess paid shall be returned 
to him, 

A student who is transferred during the year from one depart- 
ment to another shall pay in each department a fee proportionate 
to the length of attendance. 

3. Latb Registration and Absbncb: Neither late registration 
nor absence during the term shall entitle the student to a reduction 
in fees, except where the student signifies in writing his intention 
not to take examinations or claim credit for the term's work. But 
a student registering in the Department of Philosophy after Novem- 
ber I shall be charged a fee proportionate to the period of attend- 
ance, unless full credit is allowed. 

III. DUE DATES. 

I. Charges Payable in Two Equal Parts: Annual tuition 
and laboratory fees, dormitory rents, and other University fees, 
except as otherwise provided in these Rules, are due and payable 
in two equal parts, on October i and February i, respectively. 

a. Charges roR Special Courses: The Dean may fix October 
I as the date when the entire fees become due for a special course 
or a course which is to be completed by February i. 

3. Dormitory Rents and Charges: Rents are due one-half on 
October i and one-half on February i. If the lease is signed after 
October i, the first half of the rent is due when the lease is signed, 
and the second half is due February i . If signed after February i , 
the entire rent is due when the lease is signed. Charges are due as 
they are incurred. 

4. Graduation Fbbs: Graduation and certificate fees shall be 
due May 15. 



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FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS AND DORUITORIBS. 489 

IV. CONSEQUENCE OF DEFAULT IN PAYMENT. 
I. Failure to Pay within One Month: Any f«e or other Uni- 
versity charge not paid in full within one month from the time of 
the falling due of the charge shall be increased by three per cent of 
its full amount; the month shall be held to expire at 5 P. M. of 
the thirty-first day after the charge falls due. the day the charge 
falls due being counted as the first day. If the thirty-first day shall 
fall on Sunday or a legal or University holiday, the payment shall be 
made in full by 5 p. u. the following day. When money to pay fees 
or other charges is ient through the mails or otherwise before, but 
delivered after, the expiration of the time limit set by this rule, the 
payment shall be regarded as not made within that limit, and the 
addition of three per cent shall be made to such fees or charges. As 
far as possible, bills shall be sent for fees, rents, and other charges, 
within ten days after the time when they become due; but failure 
to receive a bill will in no case excuse the student or tenant from 
the obligation to pay the additional charge of throe per cent if pay- 
ment be not made within the time limit set by the rule. Fees for 
dissection, or for materials to be furnished to students in the labo- 
ratories, are not subject to the additional charge provided for 

a, Failurb to Pay within Two Months; If a student fail to 
pay his tuition fee in full, together with the increase of three per 
cent above noted, within two months (69 days) of the falling due 
of said fee, the Bursar shall notify the Dean of the Department in 
which the student is registered, and the Dean shall notify such stu- 
dent that he is suspended and excluded from lectures, recitations, 
practical work, and examinations until payment in full be made. 
Fees for dissection and materials are not subject to this rule, but 
laboratory fees in the Department of Philosophy are subject to it. 

If a student after being suspended for non-payment shall fail to 
settle his account by Commencement Day, the Dean shall at that 
time record him as dropped for non-payment of fees. 

3. Failure to Pay Rent within Three Months: If a student 
fail to pay his rent or dormitory charges within three months of the 
date when they fall due, he may be required to vacate his room. 

4. Right to an Examination : No student shall be admitted 
to examination or receive credit for work done until all tuition fees 
and department charges are paid, irrespective of whether such 
charge or any part thereof fell due two months before such examina- 
tion or not. 

5. Right to Re-Reoistbr: No student may register for a 






49° FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS AND DORHITOBIBS. 

new year so long as he has tuition tees, dormitory rent, or other 
Univeraty charges overdue and umpaid, nor may any person 
sign a new lease for a dormitory room so long as he owes rent or 
charges. 

6. Right to Withdraw oh Graddatb: No one shall be granted 
a certificate of withdrawal or be graduated who has not paid in full 
all his financial obligations to the University. 

V. LATE REGISTRATION. 

1. Dates whbn Febs arb Dub: If a student register after 
October i, the first half of his fees for the year will be considered 
as due October ]. If he register on or after February i, his fees 
will be considered as due February i. 

3. Failure to Pay in One Month: The additional charge pro- 
vided in Section IV, Rule i, will be incurred in every case where 
payment for any reason is delayed beyond one month (ji days), 
the day of registration being counted as the first day. 

3. Failure to Pay in Two Months: The fees of a student 
registered late being (by Rule t of this Section) due on October 1 
and February 1, he is subject to the provision of Section IV, Rule 3, 
suspending him from all classwork, if payment be not made within 
two months (6a days) of those dates. If registered on or after 
the sixty-second day, therefore, his fees must be paid when he 
registers. 

VI. PAYMENTS— CASHING STUDENTS' DRAFTS. 

Payments due the University must be made in cash, or by certi- 
fied cheque, bank draft, or postal money order, drawn for the exact 
amount due. 

As an accommodation to students the Bursar will cash at his 
office, io» College Hall, bank drafts on Philadelphia or New York 
and postal money orders, for not over $150.00. 

It should be especially noted that no change can be given on 
cheques presented for tees, rents, etc. Change ivill be given on bank 
drafts and postal money orders only. 

DORMITOBIES. 

The dormitory buildings are in one continuous group surrounding 
two open courts. The most recent buildings are on one side of 
what will in time be a third endosed court. Lists of vacant rooms. 



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MNANCtAL OBLIGATIONS AND DORHITORIRS. 49I 

prices and other infonnation will be furnished by the Bursar of 
the University, Room loa, CoUege Hall. 

Rooms 'are of five classes, viz. : tripU suites, consisting of bed- 
rooms and study for three students; double suites, consisting each 
of two bedrooms and one study, tor two students; single SHiles,coa- 
BSting each of one study and one bedroom for one student; double 
rooms, which are large single apartments furnished for two students; 
and single rooms, of various sizes, each furnished for one student. 

All rooms and halls are heated by steam and lighted by elec- 
tricity. The buildings aje on the "separate staircase" system, 
all doors opening into the courts. On every staircase, and (in 
nearly all the houses) on each floor, are lavatories, with hot and 
cold shower-baths, etc Almost all the suites and double rooms, 
and many of the single rooms, have open fireplaces. The Univer- 
sity supplies for each student the following furniture: bedstead, - 
mattress, bureau, washetand, table, bookcase, chairs and toilet 

Dormitory rentals are payable in advance in two equal instal- 
ments, due October i and February i, respectively. To rents or 
other charges not paid within thirty-one days 3 per cent of the full 
charge is added. No exception to this rule can be made on account 
of failure to receive a biil. 

Rents and charges must in any case be paid within three months 
of the time when they become due. Failure to make payments 
within the prescribed time may result in the cancellation of the 

Present occupants of rooms, who intend to be matriculated as 
students in some department of the University during the academic 
year 1906-1907, may engage their present rooms for that year by 
signing new room agreements. These must be filed with the 
Bursar not later than April 3, 1906. No student may apply for a 
loom for 1906-1907 if the rent or charges for the year 1905-1906 
remain unpaid. A room may not be leased in the spring by the 
present occupant, held until the fall, and transferred at that time 
to another student. If the room is to be re-assigned, it must be 
oSered first to those on the "waiting list" for dormitory rooms. 

Other rooms for 1906-1907 will be assigned by lot. A list of the 
rooms to be as^ned will be ready for distribution on April 18, 1906. 
Applications from present students of the University in any depart- 
ment, or from those intending to be students during the year 1906- 
1907, will be received until noon on May 9, 1906. Assignments 
will be made by lot. When the name of an applicant is drawn the 



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OBUOATtONS AMD DOftKITOIllBS. 

first number on his list will, if possible, be assigned to him. But if 
that is already taken the second number on his list will be assigned, 
if possible, and so on. No room will be assigned unless clearly 
covered by the application. 

Assignments will be announced on May i6. Leases must be 
ragned by May 13, igo6. No preference in the assignment will be 
given on account of length of residence at the University or in the 
dormitories, or on account of membership in any particular depart- 
ment of the University. A student not yet matriculated must file 
with his application a certificate signed by two teachers stating that 
he is prepared and intends to enter the University. If he has 
already filed such a certificate as part of his credentials for admis- 
sion to the University, he should mention that fact in his dormitory 
application, stating to whom the certificate was sent. 

Any rooms remaining unassigned on May 16 will be assigned in 
the order in which applications are received. When all the rooms 
have been assigned the Bursar will receive applications for places 
on the "waiting list." Rooms thrown open for re- assignment will 
be offered first to those on this list. AU tenants must complete 
registration and show matriculation cards for the year 1906-1907 
at the dormitory office by October 6, X906. Attention is called 
to the following regulation of the Board of Deans with regard to 
the occupation of dormitory rooms by special and partial students: 

"Except by special permission of the Provost, no special or par- 
tial student may be assigned to a room in the dormitories unless he 
is taking in the University 50 per cent of the number of hours a week 
required of regular students in the department in which he is regis- 
tered. When, however, the number of hours a week required of 
regular students in the department varies as between two or wan 
classes, the hours required of a special or partial student to entitle 
him to be assigned to a room will be calculated upon the basis of 
hours required of regular students in that class in his department 
which is required to take the greatest number of hours a week. 
Regular students in the Department of Philosophy who are not 'in 
residence,' in the sense of that term as defined in the rulea of the 
department, are considered as falling within the class of 'special 
and partial students' as regards dormitory rooms." 

"A student who holds a dormitory room loses his right to such 
room (i) when he ceases to be a student in any department of the 
University; (a) when he seriously infringes the rules regulating his 
conduct in the dormitories; (3) when, being a regular student, he 
becomes a special or partial student taking less than the number of 



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FINAKCIAL OBLIOATIOHS AND DOSMITORIBS. 493 

hours required of such students as stated above; or whea, b^ing a 
special or partial student, be ceases to take the number of hours 
required of such students as above stated; and, (4) when he or hts 
rooni'inate ceases to occupy the room regularly." 

In the assignment of a suite or double room, preference will be 
given to an application signed by two Btudents who will use the 
room together. Two students wishing to apply for a room together 
should both sign an application for the room; such an application 
will be given two chwices in the allotment, and any room drawn 
will be assigned to both the applicants. The University, however, 
reserves the right to cancel any assignment of a room if it is sot 
duly claimed and occupied throughout the year by the student or 
students signing the application. Suspension or expulsion from the 
University, or serious infringement of the rules, will be considered 
sufficient grounds for the cancellation by the University of any lease. 
Sub-letting or exchange of rooms is not permitted. Voluntary with- 
drawal from the University does not of itself cancel a lease. The 
student who wishes to withdraw should apply to the Bursar for the 
terms upon which his lease may be cancelled. 

If one of two room-mates is expelled or suspended, or so infringes 
University rules as to make his removal from the dormitory neces- 
sary, the other room-mate may. have the room assigned to him by 
immediately signing a new application; provided that there are not 
two other students applying together for the room. Or he may 
hold the room by taking another room-mate, who must be qualified 
by filing an application and bond. If he fails to hold the room in 
one of these two ways the University may, after giving him notice, 
require him to vacate the room. 

Every student wishing to occupy a University room must file 
with his application a bond securing the full amount of the rent and 
charges; the printed form for the bond may be had upon application 
to the Bursar. When two students wish to occupy a room together, 
each must file a bond. The bond must be signed by two responsible 
property owners, of whom one must be a citizen of the United 
States. No student or officer of the University will be accepted 
as bonosroan. The bond may not be signed by a married woman 
whose husband is Uving, and it is preferred that botb sureties should 
be men. Or, ins'^ad of filing a bond, the student may pay in ad- 
vance the full year's rent of the room, and make a depomt of ten 
dollars to cover possible damage, any balance remaining to be 
returned when the room is finally given up. Each tenant will he 
held for the full year's rent and charges i^ainst the room; but when 



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494 FINANCIAL OBLIOATtOHS AND DOKUITaRIBS. 

the room is vacated before the end of the college year, the b 

shall not be held responsible for the rent of the room for the rest of 

the year if the room js rented to another tenant. 

Rentals are for the full college year: that is, from the Saturday 
before the opening of the University to the Saturday after Com- 
mencement Day , incluBive. Occupancy of rooms during any time 
not included within the regular lease must be paid for as an extra 
charge. Rents include heat and all reasonable care of rooms, and 
also light, except in the Memorial Tower, Bodine, Robert Morris, 
Edgar F. Smith, John Morgan and James Wilson Houses, and 
House No. 39. in which the rooms are supplied with meters, tenants 
being charged according to the amount of light used. Additional 
service in the care of rooms must be paid for as an extra, and ntust, 
in all cases, be performed by persons authorized by the University. 
Cooldng of food in the rooms is strictly prohibited. 

The Parietal Committee, appointed by the Trustees to have 
charge of the discipline of the dormitories, consists of the four 
Proctors, resident in the dorrnitories, and one other person, ap- 
pointed by the Provost. The students in each house of the dormi- 
tories elect one of their number as a Representative, and these 
Representatives form a Board which meets regularly and acts with 
the Parietal Committee in matters concerning the order and com- 
fort of those in the houses. 



DININQ HAIiL. 

A Dining Hall, situated on a plot of ground adjacent to the 
dormitories, furnishes good table board at S3. 50 a week. This 
price includes service. 



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PART VI 



DEGREES, HONORS Ain> PRIZES— 1005 



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DEGREES, HONORS AND PRIZES, 

1905. 



In University Council, Wednesday, February 33, rgoj: 
HONORART DEOBEBS. 
Doctor of Science. — Robert Siupson Woodward. 
Doctor of Laws. — David Thompson Watson. 
Philander Chase Knox. 
Chaklbg Edoar Clark. 
Sir Henry Mortimer Durand. 
His Majesty Priedrich W11.11ELM II., Gbruan 

Emperor and Kino of Prussia. 
Theodore Roosevelt. 



At Commencement, Wednesday, June 14, 1905: 
DliORESS IN COORBE. 



Bachelor of Arts: 
Charles Hahn Albrecht, 
Benjamin Newcomer Bird, 
WUton Wallace Blanckg, 
Joseph Carson, 
Robert Arnold Chace, 
Frederic Anthony Child, 
Luther Bushong Deck, 
Maturin Marie Dondo, 
William Seddinger Dye, Jr., 
Ooyd Benton Ewing, 
Howard Wilson Gamer, 
Frank Macknight Gray, 
Lewis Burtron Hessler, 
Logan Howard -Smith, 

Bachelor of Science: 
James Harold Austin, 
John Mitchell Baker, 
Claude Webster Bankes, 



Merfd 



;ph Wolstan Huff, 
_.__.-ke] Henry Jacobs, 
Kerwin Weidman Kinard, 
Edwin Conover Leedom, 
John Lisle, 

Charles WUliam Meadowcroft, Jr. 
Reynolds Combs Moorhead, 
Qiarles Aloysius Joseph Murphy, 
Henry Pepper N orris, 
Alexander Bums Roe, 
Alfred de Forest Snivelv. 
Stanley Simpson Swartley, 
George Herbert Walsh, 
Joseph Barnard Walton. 



Hansford Mix Beach, 

iared Sperry Bc^rduB, 
Lollin Cantwell Bortle, 



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498 

Vincent Bean Brecht, 
■ Alfred Bayard Crewitt, 
Samuel Wanamaker Pales, 
Thomas Brown Wrentham Pales, 
Paul Freeman, 
Sidney Byron Goldsmith, 
Wakeman Griffin Gribbel, 
Hadett Gardiner Hall, 
Daniel Roberts Harper, 3d, 
Edward H 00 pes, 
John Rudolph Hunsickor, 
Herbert Eugene Ives, 
Walter Muliord Johnson, 
Jonathan Jones, 
Jaffles Dougherty Kirkbride, 
Willitun John Long. 

DeForest P. 



mpson A 

Allen Sahm Martin, 
Norwood Deal Matthias, 
Joseph MedoS, 
Michael Monaghan, 
Spencer Kennard Mulford, Jr. 
John Herr Musser, Jr., 
Desaix Brown Myers, 
Frederic Edwin Peeso, 
Oliver Hazard Perry Pepper, 
David Rupp. 3d, 
Percy Van Dyke Shelly. 
Charles Keen Taylor, 
Walter Kurt Van Haagen, 
Harry Edward Weir. 
Sidney Louis Wdlhouse, 
nter Willard. 



Bachelor of Science in Archiiectwe: 
Charles Elvin Haupt, Jr., Charies Polk Rabenold, 

Carl Eugene Howell, Fraiik Waldner, 

Stanley Makepeace, James Smyth Warner. 

Bachelor of Science in Biology: 
Hannah Hay Blake, Eleanor Fulton Karsner, 

Marguerite Irene Boyer, Mary Macafee McCurdy, 

Clara Edna Bramble, Manon Mackenzie, 

Elizabeth Gibson Connor, Josephine Lindsay Reed, 

Elizabeth Evans, Ida May Solly, 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering: 
Joseph Hugh Goodwin, Amos Laurence Miller. 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: 
Joseph Samuel Carlitz. Samuel Wallace Oglesby, 

William Henry Moench, John Morris Weiss, 

Frederick Valentin Wunderle. 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Er^neering: 



£»eph Boyd Baker, 3d, 
ind Mason Baker, 
Frederick Bay, 
Harold Boericke, 
Louis Schumann Bruner, 
Arthur Wellesley Coombs, 
Charles Howe Cummings, 
John Carlyle Evans, 



Harry Abe Hyman, 
Albert WiUiam Kiefer, 
Philip George Lang, Jr., 
Michael Joseph McCrudden, 
William Parvin Starr, 
Joseph Smith Wilds, Jr.. 



Waldo Sherman Wilson. 



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Bachdor of Scieiue in Economics: 

Charles Edwin Bartlett, X^*^"^ Loeb Langsdorf, 

iames Slingluft Boyd, Frederick Warren Marshall, 

ohn Arthur Brown, G«orge William Mcrkle, 

ohn Hugh McQuillen Carter, Scott Nearing, 

lobert Caswell Crowell, Henry Clay Parker, Jr., 

Louis Stanislaus DeLone, Herbert Marseilles Ramsey, 

Charles Ellis Goodin, Adam Reber, 

Walter Keller Hardt, Josiah Richards. 

Frank Wilson Howard, Roy Blake Seyfert, 

Albert Edwin Koch. Francis Dekker Watson, 

Adolph Teller Kohn. Henry Conner Weeks, 
George Daniel Weschler. 

Engineering: 
William Henderson, Jr., 
Eli Allen HcElheny, 

Marriner Orum. 

al Engineering: 
Harry Ottinger, 
Walter Samans, 
Harry Samuel Tinkler, 
Magruder Craighead, Clarence Lauer Waite, 

WiUiam Henry Hughes, Alban Warren Way. 

EHwood Walter Kimber, Henry Morgan Weidner, 

William Henry Norris. Jr., Francis Sims White, 

Alexander Coxe Williams. 

Civil Engineer: 

Spencer Fullerton Weaver. 

Electrical Engineer: 
William Canby Tanney, 

Wal' 

Mechanical Engineer: 



Master of Science (Tecknicaf): 

Edward Hoopes. 

Doctor of PkiloiOpky: 
Clarence WiUiam Balke, 
Matthew Hume Bedford. 
Charles Frederic fir^^, Edward Samuel Corwin, 



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Alice L«nore Davison, 
- Tames Walker Downer, 
Henry Fox, 
Robert Harvey Gault, 
Oliver Edmunds Glenn, 

iulius Hillel Greenstone, 
'lysses Sherman Hanna, 
Ernest Godfrey Hoffsten, 
Robert Harbison Hough, 
Solomon Huebner, 

Master of Aris: 
William Radcliffe Anson, 
Harold Charles Barker, 
Arthur Cleveland. 
Frank Levis Cloud, 
Minnie Gertrude Eckels, 
Ferdinand Harry Graaer, 
Samuel B Heckman, 

Winton }• 

Bachelor of Laws: 
Harry Lewis Baroway, 
Richard Warren Barrett, 
Willard Prentice Barrows, 
Gordon Alexander Block, 
Edgar Howard Boles, 
David Bortin. 
Raymond Elliott Brown, 
Thomas Alexander Butkiewicz, 
John Grafius Candor, 



Thomas Warner Mitchell, 
Richard RiethmOlIer, 
Burnett Smith, 
Ralph Ogden Smith, 
Charles Wharton Stork, 
Clarence Stratton, 
Samuel Edwin Weber, 
JuneG Renwick Withrow. 



John Boyd Crumrine, 
Georpe David Cummings, 
■ank Frederick deLisle, 



LeRoy Carroll Eddy, 
Joseph Benjamin Englander, 
Darnel Longaker Evans, 
Ralph Berrell Evans, 
Percy Carroll Feger. 
John Arthur Fitzgibbon, 
Walter John Fitzpatrick, 
lames Lawrence Pocht, 
Francis Carroll Fow, 
Benjamin Otis Friek, 
Clarence Hexter Goldsmith, 
Harry Morris Gosch, 
Luther Albert Gray, 
Ernest LeRoy Green. 
Abraham Puhrman Greenberg, 
Samuel Augustus Guldin. 
Tomliuson Kent Hawley, 



Howard Franklin Morgan, 
Amo Paul Mowitz, 
William Henry Musser, 
Edward Isaac Nathan, 
Henry John Nelson, 
Bevan Aubrey Pennypacker, 
Frank Antony Piekarski. 

iohn Joseph Rahilly, 
larshall Stark Reynolds, 
Eugene Stanley Richardson, 

John Francis Xavier Ries, 
[elvin Guy Ro^rs, 
Maurice Bower Saul, 
Prank Geesaman Sayre, 
Samuel Gilbert Schwartz, 
tames Hay Simms. 
William Smith Snyder. 



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Luther Franklin Stoudt, 
Joseph Simon Swaim. 
Maurice Golomb Weinberg, 
Bruce Fairbum Wilson. 



Doctor of Medicine: 
Matthew Howard Ames. 
Harry Stanley Bachman, 
Walter Kreider Baer, 
Henry John Bartle, Jr., 
William Lawson Berst, 



William Thomas Dempsey, 
Frank Dake Dickson. 
Henry Dintenfass. 
Eld ridge Lyon Eliason, 
Thomas Evans. Jr.. 
Cornelius Thomas Ferry, 
Charles Mackall Fisher, 
Oscar Edwin Fox. 
Fred Leon Gage. 
Charles Herbert Gerhard, 
Nate Ginsburg, 
Arthur Bruce Gill, 
Clarence Hamilton Gray, 
William Henry GreisB, 
Don Carlos Guffey. 
WUliam Prank Guilfoyle, Jr., 
George Donald Guthne, 
John Andrew Hardenbergh, 
Walter Samuel Hareett. 
Eugene Augustus Hildreth. 3d, 
Oscar Freer Hills. 
Harry Clyde Hoffman, 
Charles Jack Hunt. 
Samuel Harvey lams, 
Frank Stewart lnkeett«r, 
Moses Jacob, 



Milton Boyd Katzenstein, 

Walter Elmo Kelton, 
John William Kirschner, 
Orion Frank Konants, 
Howard Watkin Kunkel, 
Charles Alpheus Lauffer, 
Jackson Stuart Laurance, 
George Malcolm Laws. 
John Leedom. 

Edward Aloysius Leonard, Jr., 
Presley McCance Lloyd, 
Oscar Loti, 
Tom Odom Luckett, 
William Marshall, Jr.. 
Robert Francis Mathews. Jr., 
John Weigk Mehring. 
Thomas El wood Mendenhall, 
Henry Martyn Metcalf, 
Hubert Livingstone Miller, 
Albert William Moore. 
Joseph Leslie Moore, 
Wilham Frederic Moore, 
Stirling Walker Moorhead, 
Timothy Joseph Moran, 
David Blair Mclntire, 
Daniel Charles McLaughlin, 
Charles William Naulty, Jr., 
Percival Nicholson, 
Thomas Aloysius O'Brien, 
David Stanislaus O'Donnell, 
Alexander Hay O'Neal, 
Samuel Torrey Orton, 
Hubley Raborg Owen, 
Arthur Hilton Paine, 
Robert Lee Payne, Jr., 
Amaldo de Moraes Pedroso, 
Ferdinand Mitchell Perrow, 
George Morris Piersol, 
Lester Lovett Powell, 
John Williamson Price, Jr., 
Frederick Prime. Jr., 
Mahlon Richardson Raby, 
Reuben Stanley Raub, 
Edward Urbane Reed, 
John Jacob Repp, 



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Dennett LeRoy Richardson, 
Willis Read Roberts, Jr., 
Harold Eugene Robertson, 
James Cobum Rogers, 
Harry Abraham Schatz, 
Howard Gustav Schleiter, 
Joseph Schenberv, 
Herbert John Schmoyer, 
William Magill SchulUs. 
George Meade Settle. 
Robert Vance Stewart, 
Marvin Price Stone, 
John Frank Streeter, 



Henry Htirlburt Tomlin, 
Noms Wistar Vaux, 
Thomas Hewitt Weaber, 
Charles William West, 
Edgar Lee West, 
Ledie Marshall Westfall. 
Edward Clendenning White, 
Otto George Wiedman, 
Edward Mercur Williams, 
Robert Edward Williams, 
Fred Bailey Wilson, 
Tom Bush WofEord. 
William Wellington Woodward. 



Doctor of Derttal Surgery: 
William James Resch Akeroyd, 
Percy Roy Ashplant, 
Benjamin Pranlclin Aumiller, 
RoMrt Austin, 
Charles Edgar Bain, 
William Adams Barker, 
Leland Barrett, 

William Custer Sylvester Barry, 
Henry George Baumann, 
Michael Smith Bennett, 

John Dunn Benson. 
'rederic Seward Blackmar, 
William Francis Brady, 
Oscar William Briner, 



Nelson Amos Burr, 
Percival Arthur Burton, 
George Cadwell Butler. 
David Kenneth Campbell, 
William Ambrose Capell, 
James Henry Carey, 
Leon Barker Cary, 
Adolfo Casires, 
Frank Vest Cason, 
Harold Chapman, 

{ohn William Clay, 
lorman Garfield Cline, 
Walter Frederick Coe, 
Carl Sargent Coffin, 
Frederick William Constien, 
William Gladden Cook, 
Jesse Frank Cooper, 
Stanley Moore Cordeaux, 
Charles Henry Cordick, 
Eric Burgoyne Owen Cowlishaw, 



Arthur meoaorus t-aton, 
Leslie Emerson Eaton, 
Albert Eberle, 
Wilhelm Tophus Elvero, 
Edward Evan-Jones,. 
Charles Agncw Ewing, 
Carl Eves. 

Hermann Fahrlftnder, 
George Christopher Fahy, 
Leon Rex Felt, 
Whitman George Ferrin, 
Carlton Byford Frank, 
Ernst Frey, 
Julius FrOlich, 
Harold Laurence Furbush, 
William Louis Gibb, 
Maurice Alan Glaspey, 
Thomas Henry Glynn, 
Walter Nathan Goldsmith, 
Bernard Clement Graffam, 
Francis Dennis Griffin, 
Claude Hamilton Griffith, 
John Carlton Grout, 
Henry William Hardt, Jr., 
Foster Flagg Harrower, 
Theodore Kenney Hayward, 
Milo Hellman, 
Frederick William Herr, 



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John Coffey Hollenback, 
Ctecar Homburger. 
Marcos Garcia Huidobro, 
Arthur Munson Hunter, 
Arthur Cyril Husband, 
Percy Durston Jones, 
WiU Robert Tones. 
Charles Maydole Kellogg, 
Harold Williams Lamb, 
Erwin Robert Lamp, 
Prank Peter Layman, 
George Thomas Lemis, 
James Thomas Lillis, Jr., 
Alfred Cookman Locltett, 
Lester David Lockwood, 
Brett Baxter Loomer, 
Robert Rensselaer Luce. 
James A. Garfield Macdonald, 
James Train MacDonald, 
Thotnaa Forrester Macdonald, 
lames Bemaid McEnany, 
John Francis McEnany, 
James Fraser McEwen, 
George Ernest McKenge, 
James Hirsh Massell, 
Charles Sextus Medcalf, 
Walter Melick, 
William Newton Moffett. 
Eric Frederick Molle, 
Seymour Victor Moore, 
Rufus Kelsay Morgan, 
Ira Lesgar Neill. 
Harold Hyde Ogden. 
Guy Edward O'Neil, 
Hubert Wesley Orr, 



Waldemar von Ostrowski, 
George Walter Peck, 
Henry Arthur Peterson, 
Walter Francis Praul, 
John Heil Vincent Reese, 
James Bernard Reckers, 
Ernst Reichenbergor, 
Edward Louis Richards, 
Willard Huhn Richards, 
Arthur Samuel Sandsteiii, 
Gordon Lee Scheffer, 
Philip Henry Senior, 
John Winey Shaffer, 
Frank Munson Sherman, 
John Conrad Sippel, 
Samuel Styer Pnmroee Smith, 
J. Wright Spencer, 
Albert Hamilton Spicer, Jr., 
Charles James Spnggs, 

fc;ob Oswin Steeley, 
ward Stuart Stevenson, 
Valentine August Stoltze, 
Arnold Harwood Sutherland, 
Charles Cecil Sweeting. 
Deane Pettis Taggart, 
Dillard JeSerson Thomas. 

iohn Hedgt "" 
lewellynTracy, 
John Wilbert Updagrafi, 
Robert Jean Valette. 



Charles Christopher Voelker, 
Miles Delroy Wagner. 
Andrew Robertson Walker, 



Clarence Watland, 
WUliam Charles Webb, 
Karl Edwards Wenk, 



Ernest Wright, 
William Stewart Ztele, 
t Zulauf. 



Doctor of VeterinaTy Medicine: 

Enoch Bamett, William David Howatt, 

Eugene Wilfred Bradley, Thomas Jefferson Maha&y, 

William Wallace Courtright, Oscar Nelson, 

Ezra Strickland Deubler, William Henry Faxson, 

William Bullock Fleming, Carroll Thorpe Rogers, 
Charles Walker Springer. 



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$04 CBRTIPICATBS OP PROFICIENCY, 

In University Council, Thursday, December 7, 1905: 
DBQRISES IN GOUBSE. 

Bachelor of Science; as of the Class of 1S81: 
William Thomas Robinson. 

BaekeloT of Laws; as of the Class of 1905: 
Frank Dundore Arnold, Cyrus Dressier Mart«r, 

John Sellers Barnes, Harold Sa^'in Shertz, 

Stanley Bright. Aloysius Holland Twibv 

Doctor of Medicint; as of the Qass of 1905 : 
James Eade Ash, I. Franklin Cohn. 



certificates op pboficibncr. 

By the College Faculty. 

In Architecture: 
Arthur Gustave Bein. 
Cornelius Van Reypen Bogert, 
Charles Louis Emm art, 
George Comer Fenhagen, 

/« Civil Engineering: 

Edwin Dickinson Cassel. 

In Mechanical Engineering: 

Warren Winfield Wooster. 



Irwin Sylvester Stoudt. 

In Finance and Commerce: 
Frederick Locke Holman, 
William Pepper Norris. 
Franklin Uhrich Shugar, Ernest Garfield Windle. 

In Music: 
Jooeph Samuel Carlitz, Maria Margaret Frauds Carrcdl, 

Haimanus Ne£E. 



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HONOBS. 

Senior Honors. 



In Arts: 
Charles Hahn Albbecht, 

tiMES Harold Austin, 
ENJAUIN NBWCOMBR BiRD, 

WiLTOM Wallace Blakck£, 
ALFtt£D Bayard Crewitt, 
Paul Freeman. 
Daniel Roberts Harper, 3d, 



Lewis Burtron Hbsslbr, 
Hbrbbrt Euobnb Ivbs, 
Mbrkel Henry Jacobs, 
Charles William Meai>ow- 

CROFT, Jr., 
Stanley Simpson Swartley, 
Joseph Barnard Walton. 



In Finance and Economy; 

Waltbb Keller Hardt. 



In Science and Technology: 

Jonathan Jones. 



John Horris Weiss. 



Hannah May Blaks. 



Sophomore Honors. 
In Arts: 
Guy Davis Gold, 
Michael William Jacobs, Jr. 

In Civil Engineering: 
William John Pitzuauricb, Jr., John Francis Grbathbad, 
Alfred Daniel Wolff, Jr. 



Pkbdbrick Wtnkoop. 



In Biology: 
Mart Louise Constable, Plorbncb Hulton, 

Bbssib Graham Hanlbv, Helen Marie Wherry. 

In Finance and Commerce: 
Charles Arthur Blass, 



Robert Augustus Jacobs, 



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In tub Collbdb. 

I. 

Entrance Prizes. 

t. The Eugene Delano Prize, for the best special exammation 

in the French and German required for entrance to College. To 

Ethel Chodowski. 

1. A prize, offered by the Class OF iS8o, for the best special exam- 
ination in Mathematics, by a candidate for admission to the courses 
in Arts and Science. To George Wanger. 



' Faculty Prizes. 

I . A prize for the best Essay in Intellectual and Moral Philosophy 
by a member of the Senior Class, Subject: The Development of Eng- 

lish Logic from Hamiiiott to Venn. (Not competed for.) 

a. A prize for the best examination by a member of the Freshman 
Class on Greek Prose Composition with the Accents. To Gershon 
Lazarus Oliensis. 

3. A prize to a member of the Senior Class, for the most meritori- 
ous work in the German Language and Literature over and above 
the regular course. To Charles Hahn Albrecht. 

4. A prize to a member of the Senior Class, for the most meritori- 
ous work in the French Language and Literature over and above 
the regular course. (Not competed for.) 

5. A first prize and a second prize for the best and second best 
examination on the Lectures on Quaternions given to the Voluntary 
Junior Class. To Walton Powell Linton. Second prize not 
awarded, 

6. A prize for the best Essay in History and English Literature by 
a member of the Senior Class. Subject : The Travels of Fynes Mory- 
son. To PEkcv Van Dyke Shelly. 

7. A prize for the best Essay by a member of the Junior Class. 
Subject ; The Fiction of Maurice Hewlett. To John Louia 

8. A prize of twenty-five dollars to be divided among the best 
three speakers in the annual Sophomore-Freshman contest in 
debate. Equally to H Van Coi'Bt Carwithen, Norman CasserES 
Vendig, and Frank Albkbt Paul, 

9. A first prize and a second prise for the best and second beet 



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PRIZBS. SOJ 

preparations illustrating the anatomy of any vegetable. First prise 
to Bavard Hbhrv Long, of the Freshman Class. Second prize to 
jESStB EuzABBTH Jones, of the Junior Class. 

10. A first prize and a second prize for the best and second best 
preparations illustrating the anatomy or embryology of any animal. 
To Faith Thompson, of the Junior Class; second prize to Edward 
RocKHiLL Hbacock, of the Junior Oass; with Honorable Mention 
of Anna Elizabbth Heick, of the Junior Class, 

1 1. A prize to the member of the Sophomore Class who shall pass 
the best special examination in sight reading of Latin. To John 
CoopRR Mendbnhall, with Honorable Mention of Oliphant 
Gibbons. 

13, A prize to the member of the Sophomore Class who shall pass 
the best special examination in sight reading of Greek. To Michael 
WiLUAM Jacobs, Jb. 

in. 

Prizes Founded by Oroanizations. 

I. The Henry Reed Prize, founded by the Society of the 
Alumni, for the best English Essay by a member of the Senior Class. 
Subject: The Lift t""* Works of Lord Herbert of Cherbury. To 
Percy Van Dyke Shelly, with Honorable Mention of Frbdkric 
Anthony Child. 

3. A prize for the best, and a prize for the second best, Latin 
E^ssay by a member of the Graduating Class, offered by the Society 
of the Alumni. First prize to Wilton Wallace Blancr6. Sec- 
ond priie not awarded. 

3. The Joseph Warner Vardlby Prize, founded by the Class of 
1877 in memory of their classmate, for the best Thesis in Political 
Economy by a member of the Senior Class, Subject : The Effect of 
the High Price of Coal on Manufactures in Eastern Pennsylvania. 
(Not competed for.) 

4. A prize founded by the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity in 
honor of their founder, Samuel Brown Wylie Mitchell, M. D., of 
the Class of 1S53, for the most meritorious work done in the Course 
in English Composition of the second year. To William Ward 
Watkin, with Honorable Mention of Robert Augustus Jacobs, 
Paul R. Loos, Louis Joseph Francis Moohe, and Urban Augus- 
TiN Lavbry, 

S- The Assayers and Miners Gangue offers a prize to Post- 
Seniors in Chemistry and Seniors in Chemistry (four-year course). 
To Samuel Wallace Oglesbv. 



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SoS PSIZBS. 

6. Thb National Socibtv of thb Sons of thb American 
Revolution Prize for the best essay on some subject connected 
with American Revolutionary History. Open only to Juniors. 
Subject: The Principles Fought for in Ike Revotntton. (Not com- 
peted for.) 

7. The Society of Colonial Wars offers fmnn^lly a price for 
the best essay presented by any member of the Junior and Senior 
Classes in the College, on a subject relating to pre-Revolutionary 
Colonial History, and approved by the Society. Subject: A Sttidy 
in the Colonial Law of Pennsylvania. To PBRCY Van Dvkb 
Shelly. 

S. The Priestley Club, composed of Alumni of the Chemical 
Department, offers annually a prize to that member of the Gradu- 
ating Class (Post-Senior or Senior, four-year courses. Regular or 
Special), whose work in Chemistry for that year ts most meritorious. 
To John Morris Weiss. 

9. The T-Square Club of Philadelphia offcre annually two prizes 
of membership in the organization. They are awarded in October 
of each year to those two members of the Senior and Second-year 
Special Classes in Architecture, respectively, who present the best 
set of drawings exat^ted in course. The prize memberships cover 
the period of the student's connection with the University, without 
the payment of dues. To Carl Eugene Howell, of the Senior 
Class, and George Corner Fenhagbn, of the Second-year Special 
Class. 

10. The Philadslphia Ghoupb op thb Alliancb Pbancais has 
established a Traveling Scholarship, of the value of three hundred 
dollars, awarded upon the recommendation of the Department of 
French to the student best prepared for study at a French uni- 
versity. To Solomon Leopold Rosbnbbro, of the Class of 1906 
College. 

IV. 
Prizes Founded by Individuals. 

I. A prize founded by Henry LaBarre Jayng. of the Class of 
1S79, for the best English Composition by a member of the Fresh- 
man Class. Subject: The Poetry of Austin Dobson. To Ethel 
Chodowski. 

1. A prize founded by the late D. Van Nostrand and generously 
continued by his business successors, for the member of the Junior 
Class in Civil Engineering who attains the highest general average 
of scholarship. To Albert Thbodorb Goldbeck. 



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nuiES. 509 

3. The Gborob Allen Mbuorial Prizes, founded by Joseph G. 
RosENGARTEN, EsQ., and offered to members of the Junior Class 
taking the Greek and Latin courees, as follows: 

In Latin, for the best examination upon selections from Latin 
Literature of the Empire. To John Louis Reiner. Second Prize 
(offered by the Faculty). To John Joseph Stetser, with Honor- 
able Mention of Eugene Stock McCartnbv. 

In Greek, for the best eitamination in the Oration of Demosthefxes 
on the Crown. To Francis Cahr Stifleh. Second Prize (offered 
by the Faculty). To Euobne Stock McCartney. 

4. Two Dbbatins Prizes, established by William West Fra- 
ziER, Jr., a first prize and a second prize, awarded in a public 
debating contest. To (i) William Homer Walker, of the Class 
of igo6 College; (3) Charles Edward Asnis, of the Class of 1907 

5. The Frazibr Prub. — Gzoroe H. Frazibr, Esq,, of the Class 
of 1887, offers annually a prize of a standard work in literature, to be 
chosen by him, and of a value of one hundred dollars, to the student 
in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, who, being a mem- 
ber of the football team, baseball team, track team, or of the crew, 
shall attain the highest standing in scholarship. To Walter 
Sauans. of the Class of 1905, and a member of the Track Team. 

6. Tub Arthur Spa yd Brooke Memorial Prize in the School of 
Architecture, of a cash value of fifty dollars, is awarded annually in 
the form of gold, silver and bronze medals for merit in a subject of 
study, as designated. The prize has been established by Maria 
Wharton Brooke as a memorial to her son, Arthur Spayd Brooke, a 
graduate in Architecture of the Class of 1897. Awarded in 1904-05 
in the Senior Class, for high and constant excellence in Design, the 
Gold Medal to Charles Polk Rabenold; the Silver Medal to 
James Smyth Warnbr; Bronze Medal not awarded. 

7. Thb J. S. H. Prize offered to students in Biology in the four- 
year couiw, or the two-year course, who, having taken the entrance 
examinations without conditions, shall have the highest standing in 
the class; the term standing and conduct to be determining factors, 
as well as the standing in examinations. To Edward Rockhili. 
Heacock, of the Junior Class. 

8. A prize is offered annually by Dr. S, Weir Mitchell for the 
besttheaison The Autumnal Coloration of Plant Parts. Competition 
is open to advanced luidergraduate and graduate students in 
Botany, investigations to be puraued for not longer than two yean. 
(Not competed for.) 



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5TO PRI2BS. 

9- The Mulford Prize, established through tho generosity of 
William H. Mulford, Esq.. of the Class of 1901, is awarded 
annually to that member of the Graduating Class who shall attain 
the highest excellence in the expressive reading of Latin Prose and 
Verse, as shown by a special examination. To Wilton Wallace 
Blanck^, 

10. The Gborqb Schleicher Prize. — Under the will of the late 
George Schleicher, of Philadelphia. The German Society of Penn- 
sylvania holds in trust a fund for maintaining in perpetuity a prize 
to be named after the testator. This prize is awarded annually to 
the best student — of whatever nationality he may be — in the Ger- 
man Language or German Literature or both. Equally to Otto 
GuSTAV Herbrbcht, and Mary Macafeb McCurdy. 

11. The John Stewardson Mbuorial Scholarship in Archi- 
TBCTURE. — The value of this Scholarship is one thousand doUars, 
and the holder is required to spend one year in travel and in the 
study of architecture in Europe under the direction of the Manag- 
ing Committee. The award is made annually to that candidate 
successful in the final examination in design. To Carl Eugene 
Howell. 

la. The Alumni Fellowship in Architecture. — Open only to 
Pennsylvania Alumni, the holder being required to spend not less 
than one year in foreign travel and study, under a program arranged 
with the Professor of Architecture, and approved by the Provost. 
Persons who have taken either the degree of the four-year course 
or the certificate of the two-year special course, and who have 
neither secured another traveling scholarship nor admission to the 
Ecole des Beaux Arts, are eligible to the competitions, which are 
held annually. Established in 1901-03, and to continue for five 
years. To Walter Thompson Karcher, B. S. in Arch. (1901); 
with Honorable Mention of Petbr Db Gbllekb, Jr. (Certificate 
of Proficiency in Arch., 1901). 

13. The Willis Terry Prizes. — The following prizes open only 
to students in the course in Finance and Commerce, have been 
established by Henry C. Terbv, Esq., as a memorial to his son, 
Willis Terry, a graduate of the Class of 1896: 

a. A prize for the student of the Freshman Class who shall have 
the best standing for the year. To Norman Casseres Vendiq. 

b. A prize tor the student of the Sophomore Class who shall have 
the best standing for the year. To Robert Augustus Jacobs. 

c. A prize for the student of the Junior Class who shall have the 
best standing for the year. To Otto Kraus, Jr. 



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d. A prize for the student of the Senior Class who shall have the 
best standing for the year. To Walter Keller Hardt. 



In the Departuent of Law. 

The Facultt Prizbs, for the best written examinations with all 
the Professors. (Not awarded.) 

The p. Pbussrton Morris Pbizh, for the best written examina- 
tion in Evidence, Pleading and Practice at Law and in Equity. To 
Allen Hichbnbr Stbarnb, with Honorable Mention of Ernest 
LeRov Grbbn. 

The Sharswood Prize, established by the Alumni of the Depart- 
ment of Law, for the best Essay by a member of the Graduating 
Gass. (Not awarded.) 

The Meredith Prize, established by the Alumni of the Depart- 
ment of Law, for the second best Essay by a member of the Gradu- 
ating Class. (Not awarded.) 

The following students received h<Miors for their third year work: 
Ernest LeRoy Green, Louis Einstinb Leoi>old, 

Mblvin Guv Rogbbs, Allen Hichbner Stbarnb, 

Prahk Gbbsauan Savrb, Ralph Bbrrbll Etahs, 

Maurice Bowbr Saul, Hbrbbbt Vbldb Stbbuiah. 

The following third j'ear students received a general average of go 
and above in the combined work of their second and third year 
courses, and have therefore received their degrees cum laude: 
Ernest LbRov Grsbn, Maurice Bower Saul, 

Mblvin Guy Roqbrs, Allen Michbnbr Stbarnb, 

Frank Gbesaman Savrb, Hbbbbrt Vbldb Stbeluan. 



In the Departuent of Medicine. 

The Aluuhi Medal to the member of the Graduating Class who 
attains the highest general average in examination. To Harry 
Abraham Schatz. * 

The Prize of an Antiseptic Minor Operating Case, offered by the 
Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, for the best practical 
work in Orthopedic Surgery, or for the best report of his Clinic, or 
for an acceptable origins'' 4esign in Apparatus. To Hublbt 
Raboro Owen. 



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The Priae of an Obstetrical Forceps, offered by the Professor of 
Obstetrics, to the member of the Graduating Qafis who furnishes 
the best report of a case of Obstetrics occurring in the University 
Maternity Hospital. To Arthur Hilton Paine. 

The Frbdbrick A. Packard Prizb of One Hundred Dollars, 
offered by a friend of the University to the member of the Graduat- 
ing Class who has proven himself to be the most proficient in the 
course in Clinical Medicine. To Don Caklos Guffby. 

Tub Dr. Spencer Morris Prizb. — The annual income derived 
from the investment of Ten Thousand Dollars, will be awarded each 
year to that Medical Student of the Graduating Class who shall pass 
the best examination for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. To 
Georgb Morris Piersol. 



In the Department of Veterinary Medicine. 

The J. B. Lippincott Prize of One Hundred Dollars, awarded to 
the member of the Graduating Class who, in the three years spent 
in the Veterinary Department of the University, attains the highest 
general average in examinations. To Ezra Strickland Deublbr. 

A prixe of an Ecraseur, offered by a friend of the Department to 
the member of the Second-year Class who passes the best examina- 
tions in Veterinary Anatomy. To Stephen Loccbtt. 



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PART VII 



DNDEBOBADtTATE AND AI.UMI(I SOCIETIES 



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UNDEBGBADUATE ANB AliUHia 
SOCIETIES. 



BTDDENT 80< 

The Houston Club, to membership in which any member of the 
University is eligible, is the exponent of the social side of Pennsyl- 
vania life. Its home is Howard Houston Hall, which is located in 
almost the exact geographical centre of the University's group of 
buildings. This situation embodies to a large extent the main 
idea of its existence as a centralization of undergraduate interests. 
Here tJie students of all departments may meet on common ground, 
and pass their leisure hours in healthy recreation and anausement. 
The Hall was erected through the generosity of the late H. H, 
Houston, a trustee of the University, and his wife, as a memorial 
to their eldest son, Henrv Howard Houston, Jr., a member of 
the Class of 1878, College. 

The Hall was formally dedicated on January z, 1896. Its equip- 
ment includes a large central lobby, a library and icading-room ; 
billiard and pool tables, bowling alley, post-office "sub-station," * 
barber shop, book and general supply store; a luncheon buffet 
and dining-room; athletic trophy rooms; a large auditorium with 
grand organ; rooms for the University papers and other organiza- 
tions; a dark-room for photographic purposes; etc. 

Any student, alumnus or officer of the University of Peimsyl- 
vania may became a member of the Club. There are live classes 
of membership — Honorary, Life, Active, Associate Resident, 
and Associate Non-Resident. An active member is one who is 
pursuing a course at the University. The Associate membership 
is composed of officers, alumni and ex-students who have left in 
good standing. Membership fees: Life, S^o; Active, S3 a year; 
Associate Resident, tj a year (living within a radius of 15 miles 
from Philadelphia); Associate Non-Resident, Si a year. 

The Pbilouathban Society, founded in 1813, holds meetings 
weekly during the College year at its rooms in College Hall. All 
undergraduates of the College are eligible to membership. The 
order of exercises includes orations, essays and a debate, besides 
the usual general business; and these afiord excellent practice 19 
(51S) 



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5l6 IINDEROKADUATB AND ALUI 

the principles of parliuneRtary law. A valuable library is owned 
by the Society. 

The Zblosophic Society, founded in 1839, holds weekly meet- 
ings at its rooms in CoU^fe Hall during the Collie year. AU stu- 
dents in the University are eligible to membership. The work of 
the Society is carried on through the ustial medium of essays, 
orations and debates. 

The Penksylvania Union, modeled after the Oxford and Cam- 
bridge (England) Unions, was organized to promote and foster the 
art of debate and public speaking. Membership is open to students 
of all departments. Regular meetings are held, at which topics 
relating to both public and University affairs are discussed ; while 
a public meeting is held annually, an address being delivered by 
some distinguished man of afiairs. The Union occupies a large 
debating ball in the Law School building. 

The Coubinbd Musical Clubs consist of the Glee, Banjo and 
Mandolin Clubs, with a total active membership of about seventy- 
five. The Clubs give a concert each year in New York, and one or 
more in and near Philadelphia. It is ctistomuy also for the Clubs 
to take a trip, generally either in the South or West, giving concerts 
in prominent cities. 

The Mask and Wig Club was founded in 1889 (incorporated 
in 1892) to foster the dramatic interests of the University, and to 
promote social intercourse among its members. An amiual per- 
formance is given at the time of the Easter Recess, usually running 
for one week at some Philadelphia theatre. The general manage- 
ment of the Qub, and of its unique house, is in the hands of the 
graduate members, while the undergraduates carry out all the 
details of its annual productions. These latter, which are given 
in the interest of amusement solely, are among the most pleasant 
relaxations of the student from the serious work of the class-room. 

The Cerclb Francais, organized in 1S99, has for its purpose the 
study and cultivation of the French language, and is managed 
exclusively by the undergraduates. The undergraduate member- 
ship of the Cercle is limited to twenty-five, students of any depart- 
ment of the University being eligible. There are also honorary and 
associate members. Lectures are given, under the auspices of the 
Cercle, by prominent French lecturers; and a play, in which the 
parts are taken by undergraduates, has become an annual feature 
of the Cercle, as well as one of the social events of the University 
year. A French library has been started, which, on completion, 
will add materially to the convenience of the Cercle. 



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UNDBRGRADUATB AND ALUUNI SOCIETIES. 517 

Tbb Dbutschbr Vbrein, founded in 1903, seeks to unite all 
students of the Universitr iaterested in the study of the German 
langu^e and German thought. It holds weekly meetings, which 
are also open to those in the company of members. Readings, 
recitations and debates, varied by visits to the German Theatre, 
and talks by the Professors of the Germanic Department and other 
German scholare, constitute the chief interests of the club. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

President.— Fbilip E. Howard. 

University Service CommiOee.— Edgar F. Smith, Ph. D., Sc. D.. LL. D., 

Vice-Provost; Josiah H. Penniman. Ph. D., Dean of the 

College; Martin G, Brumbaugh, Ph. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

Advisory Board of Preachers. 
Rt. Rev. Cyrus D. Foss, D. D., Rev. J.Sparhawk Jones, S. T. D.. 

LL. D., Bishop of the Metho- Calvary Presbyterian Church. 

dist Episcopal Church. Rev. Kerr Boycc Tupper, D. D., 

Rev. Floyd W. Tomldns. S, T, D., LL. D., Baptist Church. 

Holy Trinity Protestant Epis- Rev. Albert T. Clay, Ph. D., 

copal Church, Lutheran Church. 

The activities of the Association are as follow ; 
(fl) Univeraty Service each Sunday morning at 1 1 o'clock, con- 
ducted by distinguished clergymen and Christian leaders. 
(6) The University Christian Settlement, in four departments: 
For Young Men, at i6og Lombard St. 
For Small Boys, at 403 South Taney St. 
For Men and Boys, at 2635 Christian St. 
For Women, Girls and Children, at 403 South Taney St. 
A new building for Settlement uses is now in course of erection, 
and will probably be finished about March i, 1906. 
(<r) Bible Lectures and Group Bible Classes. Forty-three groups 
enrolled 370 students last year in devotional study, with 
weekly meelingH. 
(d> Foreign Missionary Lectures. Study aasses, and the partial 
financial 8ui^>ort of a representative ia the fieH. 



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5l8 UNDBRGRADUATC AND ALUUNI SOCIBTISS. 

(«) Supplying of Epeakera from the University to Churches, Mis- 
sions, Societies, Preparatory Schools, etc. 
(J) Individual calls upon students in their rooms, and personal 

effort to lead them into permanent good-living, 
(g) Supplying of ■' Hand Books" and infonnation to new students 
concerning life and customs at the Univemty. 
For information on any of the above subjects apply as follows: 
Thomas St. Clair Evans, General Secretary. Houston Hall. 
Prank Van Hart Slack. College Secretary. Dormitories. 
Harvey J. Howard, Medical Secretary, Houston Hall. 
Edward Cope Wood, Treasurer, Houston Hall. 
The corporate name of the organization is "Christian AssodatioQ 
of the University of Pennsylvania." 



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UNDBRORADUATB AND ALUMNI SOCIKTIB8. 



AliUHNI SOOimiEB. 

The Altunni of the University are organized (i) in local societies, 
throughout the United States and foreign countries; (i) in depart- 
mental societies, with headquarters in the city of Philadelphia; 
and (3) in bodies of a wider representative character, with head- 
quarters in the same city. 

Of the first group there are at present in active existence thirty 
societies; of the second group there are six, embracing respec- 
tively members of (a) Oie College; (6) the Department of Law; 
(c) the Department of Medicine; (d) the Department of Dentistry; 
(f) the Department of Veterinary Medicine; and (f) the School of 
Architecture. Of the third group, there are two organizations, to 
wit: the Central Committee of the Alumni, and the General 
Alumni Society. 

A schedule of these bodies is appended. For the sake of greater 
convenience, the above grouping is reversed below. The local 
societies aie listed geographically and alphabetically. 



CENTRAL COMMITTEE OP THE ALUMNI. 

President. — Henry Budd. 
Stcretory. — Dr. Ewing Jordan, 1510 Walnut St., Philadelphia. 
rr*o«tf#r.— Dr. William H. KUpp, 1733 Pine St.. Philadelphia. 

This Committee was established by enactment of the Corpora- 
tion in March, 1882. 

Under the Revised Statutes (Sec. 33)^ the Central Committee is 
authorized, for every third vacancy which may occur in the Board 
of Trustees, to nominate four candidates, one of whom may be 
elected a member of the Board. If none of these be elected, others 
are to be ncnninated until the vacancy shall have been filled. 

The members are thirty in number, six elected annually for a 
teem of five years, of whom two must be graduates of the Ci,llege 
of at least three years' standing, two of the Medical and allied 
Departments, and two of the Law Department. Stated meetings 
are held on the fourth Mondays of March, May, September and 
December, 



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C30 UNDBRCRADUATB AND ALUUKI SOCIBTIBC 

GENERAL ALUMNI SOCIETY. 

Fresidtnt. — Samuel F. Houston. 
Vict-PresidtnU. — H. Laussat Geyelin; Dr. Horatio C, Wood; 
Hampton L. Carson; Dr. Leonard Pearson; 
Dr. Morris I. Schamberg. 
Secretary-TrtasureT. — Thomas B. Donaldson, 34S' Woodland Ave- 
nue, Philadelphia. 

This Society was organized ia June, 1895, and incorporated in 

June. 1897. 

Objects: "(I) The promotion of the welfare of the Universi^of 
Pennsylvania through the stimulation of the interest therein of all 
graduates and non-graduates, matriculates of aS departments, by 
keeping them in touch with and informed of the doings of tbeir 
Alma Mater, and the cultivation among them of a fraternal spirit 
on the University principles. (II) The furnishing of such specific 
information as may be sought by any graduate or former matricu- 
late upon any subject in connection with the University, or any of' 
its organizations. (Ill) The disbursing of any contributions made 
by the alumni for specific objects connected with the University. 
(IV) The maintenance of a list, as nearly correct as possible, of the 
names and addresses of all matriculates of the University." The 
Society publishes The Alumni Register monthly, except during 
August and September. 

Mbubbrs: a graduate of any department of the University; a 
matriculate of a class which has graduated; a member of the Board 
of Trustees, or an officer of instruction, or a holder of an honorary 
degree from the University ; may become a member of the Society 
upon payment of a subscription in such amounts as he may elect, 
but not less than one dollar, to the Treasurer of the Socie^. Such 
subscriptions cover one calendar year from the date of payment, 
and include one year's subscription to The Alumni RegisUr. 

The offices of the Society are at 3451 Woodland avenue, West 
Philadelphia, where a. directory is kept of all those connected with 
the University as students, alumni or officers, and where a file of 
collie and university periodicals is maintained. The offices are 
open daDy from g a. u to 5 p. it {Saturdays, t p. m.). Tele- 
phone connection. 



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undbroraduatb and alvl 

dbpabtheiNtaij societies. 

society op the (college) alumni. 

President. — Henry Budd. 

Vice-Presidents. — A. Lewis Smith, Charles C, Harrison, Joe. G. 

Rosengarten, Edward P. Cbeyney. 

Secretary. — Edgar A. Singer, Jr., University Dormitories. 

TreasuriT. — Morris Jastrow, Jr., 248 S. 23d St., Philadelphia. 

Historiograptier. — Gregoiy B. Keen. 



SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI OF THE LAW DEPARTMENT 

President. — Hon. William B. Hanna. 

Vice-Presidents. — Prank P. Pricluud, H. Laussat Geyelin. 

Recording Secretary. — Charles Francis Gummey. 

Corresponding Secretary. — John Douglass Brown, 517 Drexel 

Building. 

Treasurer. — Hany S. Hopper. 803 Land Title Building, 

Philadelphia. 



SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI OF THE DEPARTMENT OP 
MEDICINE. 



President. — Dr. Richard A, Glee 

Vice-Presidents. — Dr. De Forest Willard, Dr. Wharton Sinlder, 

Dr. Theodore DiUer. Dr. Alonzo E, Taylor, Dr. De Witt 

Sherman, Dr. Allen J. Smith, Dr. Augustus Thayer. 

Secretary-Treasurer. — Dr. Edwin T. Robinson, 1326 Pine St., 

Philadelphia. 

Historian. — Dr. RoUod G. Curtin. 



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\t VNDBKOKADUATB AKD ALtlllNI SOCIBTIBS. 

DENTAL ALUHNI SOCIETY. 

Preiidetil. — Dr. Lutber M. Weaver. 

Vice-PresuUnls. — Dr. John M. Fogg. Dr. Benj. P. Place, 

Dr. Wm. G. Cook. 

Stcrelary-Treasurer. — Dr. Victor Cochran, i6a8 N. 17th St., 

Philadelphia. 



SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI OF THE DEPARTMENT OP 

VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

PresidetU.—Di. W. H, Ridge. 

Vice-President. — Dr. A. F. Schreiber. 

Secrelary- Treasurer— Dr. Benjamin T. Woodward, Oxford, Pa. 

Historian. — Dr. Simon J. J. Hai;ger. 



GENERAL ARCHITECTURAL ALUMNI SOCIETY. 

Presiden . — Arthur E. Wiltauer. 

Vice-President. — Walter H. Thomas, 

Treasurer. — Oscar M. Holcaneon. 

Corresponding Secretary. — James E. Willing, 53a Walnut St., 

Philadelphia. 

Recording Secretary. — Frank A. Rommd. 



IiOCAIi SOCIETIES. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Southwestern Alumni Association, Los Angblbs, Cal. 

President. — Dr. W. LeMoyne WilU. 

Vice-Presiden-. — Rev. Chas. T. Murphy. 

Secreiary-Treaswer. — Dr. Chas. G. Stivers, Los Ang<des, Cal. 



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DUATS AMD ALUMNt SOCIRTt&S. 51J 

COLORADO. 

Colorado Alvukt Association. 

Prtsident. — Benj. C. ADeii. 

Vice-President. 

Sfcrttary-Treasurer. — Henry Russell Wray, Colorado Springs, Col. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

DtSTKiCT OF Columbia Aluuni Association, Washington. D. C. 

President. — J. Hubley Ashton. 

Vice-PresidetUs.—Gm. Cecil Clay. Dr. J. R. Mohler. 

Dr. C. H. Lincoln. 

Treasurer. — Dr. Jas. G. McKay, 1739 S St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 



ILLINOIS. 

Chicago Aluhni Association. 

Presidera. — Dr. Jas. N. Hyde. 

Vice-President. — Dr. Chas. H. Lodor. 

Steretary-Treasurer. — Dr. Geo. W. Boot, 1945 Maple Ave., 



INDIANA. 

IwDiANA Alumni Socibtt. 

President. — Dr. Albert M. Cole. 

Vic*.Presidenl.—X>i. Jonathan B. Clarie. 

Stcretarjf-Trtasurer. — Oscar Schmidt, Germany Fire Insurance Co.. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



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UNDRRQRADUATB > 



Ukitbrsitt of Pbnkstlvania Club op Dbs Moimbs, Iowa. 

PrtsidnU. — Dr. Jas. T. Priestly. 

Vice-PTisident. — Dr. J, C. Rockafellow. 

Stemary-TreasitreT. — Ralph H. Pliimb, 141S Centre St., 

Dei Moines, Iowa. 



MARYLAND. 
Maryland Alumni Association. 

Presidmt. 

Vie«-Pr€sid«nU.—Qr. Thos. Opie, Dr. J. McP. Scott, 

Wm. M. EUicott. 

Stcretary-Treasurer. — Dr. Joseph C. Bloodgood, 933 North Charles 

St., Baltimore, Md. 



MINNESOTA. 

Northwest Alumni Association. 

President. — Dr. Howard McI. Morton. 

VKe-Presidenl. — Dr. Jas. S. Gilfillan. 

Secretary-Treasurer. — Rev. A. J. D. Haupt, 175 I^ehart £ 

St. Paul, Hinn. 



MISSOURI. 

Kaksas City Alukni Associatiok. 

Prestdeta.—Dr. B. E. Fryer. 

VKe-Prestdeitt.—Chas. H. Small. 

Sttrrtary-Treantrer — Dr. Scott P. Child, Bryant I 

Kansas City. Mo. 



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undbrgraduatb and alumni socibtibs. 

Ukivbksitv op Pennsylvania Aluuhi Association, 
St. Louis, Ho. 

President. 

Secretary-Treasurer. — A. H. S. CantUn. 



NEW ENGLAND. 

Nbw England Aluuni Association. 

President. — Capt. John C. White. 

Vice-Presidents.— Dt. W. E. Synan, Dr. W. R. Wdser. 

Secretary-Treastirer. — Geo. A. Sagendorph, 559 Atlantic Ave,, 

Boston, Mass. 



NEW JERSEY. 

Atlantic City Club op the Univbrsity or Pennstlvakia. 

President. — Dr. Emery Marvel, Jr. 

Vice-President.— Dt. J C. Marshall. 

Secretary-Treasvrer. — Dr. Jesse B. Thompson, Atlantic City, N. J. 

North Jersey Alumni Association. 
President. — Dr. Wm. H. Hanrahan. 

Vice-Presidenl.-DT. Elbert S. Sherman. 

Secretary-Treastirer. — Dr. Wm. H, Parry, Esq., 800 N. Broad St., 

Newark, N. J. 



NEW YORK. 

Western New York Alumni Association. 

President. — Dr. Fred. W. Zimmer. 

Vice-President. — Dr. Ernest Wende. 

Secreiary-Treasurer.—CbarUs A. Upson, Lockport, N. Y. 



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dHDBRGRADIrATB AMD ALDUMI SOCIBTIBS. 

Nbw York City Alumni AssoctATtON. 

Prtsidmt.—Wta. B. Boulton. 

Vict-Presidtnt. — Wm, Guftgenhcini. 

Dr. S&muel McCullagh, 68 W. 38th St., H. Y. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Berks Coitnty Alumni Association. 

Presidettt. — Dr. Wilson D. DeLong. 

Viee-PresidtTit. — Dr. Henry W. Bohn. 

S*cntary-Trtaiurtr.—T)T. Hiester Bucher, Reftding, P*. 



Dauphin County Alumni Sociitt. 
President. — Rev. George S. ChMubera. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. — A. Boyd Hamilton, Jr., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Treasurer. — Dr. George B. Kunkle, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Lancastbr County Alumni Society. 

PresidetU.~-DT. Walter B. Weidler. 
Vice-President.— Ht. B. Frank Witmer. 



—James F. McCoy, 56 N. Duke S 
Lancaster, Pa. 



Lbbamon County Alumni Asbociatioh. 

President. — Dr. Wm. M. Guilford. 

Vice-PresiderU.— Dr. Charles L. Miller. 

Seeretory-Treasurer. — George S. Reinoehl, Penna. Telephone Co., 



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UMdSKCRADUATB AMD ALUUNt SO^IBTrBS. $: 

North Cbmtrai. Aluhni Associatiom. 

President.— Dt. George D, Nutt. 

Vice-Presidents.— T>T. Frank P. BaU, Wm. P. Beeber. 

Dr. Charles C. Walker. 

SecTtlary-TreasuTtr. — Dr. Edward Lyon, Willianiaport, Pa. 



Northumberland County Aluhni Assocution. 

President. — Rev. Charles Morison 

Vice.President.—Dr. U. S. Grant Moore. 

Secretary-Treasurer. — Leopold C. Glass, Shamokin, P». 



Philadelphia Alumni Society op thb Medical Dbparthknt. 

President. — Dr. John B. Shober. 

Honorary Vice-President. — Charles C. Harrison. 

Vice-Presidents. — Dr. W. C. Posey, Dr. J. Alison Scott, Dr. P. P. 

Long, Dr. David Riesman. 

Treamrer. — Dr. Herbert B. Carpenter, 1805 Spruce St. 

Secrttary. — Dr. B. Franklin SUhl, 17^7 Pine St., Philadelphia. 



Pittsburg Aluuni Association. 
President. — Dr. Charles A. Wishart. 
e-Presidents.— Dr. W. W. Jones, Dr. J. A. Lichty. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



President. — Dr. John L. Wentz. 

SttreUiry. — Wm. H. Davis, Esq., Scranton. Pa, 

Treasurer. — Dr. Walter H. Pordham, Scranton, Pa. 



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5a8 vhdbkoraduatb amd aluhhi bociictibs. 

York Countt Aluuhi Asbociatiom. 

President. — Dr. A. A. Long. 
Vict-Prtsident.—Gea. S. Schmidt, Esq. 
StcTetafy-TreaswtT.—'DoaaXA H. Yost, Esq., Ycwk. P». 



TEXAS. 

Texas Aluuni Association. 

Prtsident. — Dr. Bryce W. Fontaine. 

VKt-PresidnU. 

S*ereUiry-Tr«asMr*r. — Dr. W. P. Breath, Galveston, Texas. 



WASHINGTON. 

PACirtc North WBST Alumni Association. 

Prtsideri. — P. C. Kauffman, Esq. 

Vict-PresidetU. — Dr. R. C. Yenney. 

Stcretary-TreaaiTer. — Dr. Jas. W. Rawlings, Tacoma, Washington. 



WISCONSIN. 

Wisconsin Alumni Association. 

Presidettt. — Dr. Wm C. Wendd. 

Vue-President. — E. O. Kuenzli. 



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UATB AND ALUMNI BOCIETIES. 5 

FOBE3QN SOCIETIBS. 

JAPAN. 
Japanssk Alumni Socibtt, (" Same Window" Society.) 
Stcretary-TreasHrer. — Sadajiio Suguira, Tokio, Japan. 



MANILA, P. I. 

Orient Alumni Association. 

Prtsident. — Dr. John A. MurUgh, U. S. A. 

Trea^rer. — Dr, M, A. DeLaney, U. S. N. 

SecretaTy.—Hi. J. C. Whinnery. Dental Surgeon. U. S. A., 

Manila. P. I. 



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t,i.a, Google 



PART VIII 



USTS OF STUDEim 



t,i.a,Google 



,Googlt' 



LISTS OP STUDENTS.* 
THE COLLEGE. 



The College Courses are indicated as follows: — Arts and Scimct, A.; Finanet 
and Commerce, Wk.; Biology, B.; Science and TeehtKlogy : (Upper Years). Pure and 
Applied Chemistry, Sc. i; Civil Engineering, Sc. a; Mechanical Engineering, Sc. 3; 
Four-Year Technical Courses, Chemistry, Ch.; Chemical Engineering, Ch. E.; Civil 
Engineering, C. E.; Mechanical Engineering, M. £.; Electrical Engineering, E. E.; 
Arckitecture, Arch. ; Music, M. 



a. S. (Peaiuylvf 
Tones, Jonathan, 

A. B., B. S, (Per 
Monashan, Michael, 

B. S. (Pennsylvania). 
Warner, James Smvth. 

B. S. in Arch., (Pennsylvania). 



poarr-SENioBa. 

Couth, Residence. 

Sc. a, Mt. Vernon, ( 



Albrecht, Herman Carl, 

Andersen, Howard Bruce, 
Appleton, Harry Lewis, 
Arkin, Morris L., 
Armstrong, James, 
Ashmead, Duffield, Jr., 
Ashton, John Hilton, 
Bary. George, 
Bement, Russell, 
Berv-hausen, Alfred, 
Bird, William Gibson, 
Birldnbine, Henry Edgar, 
Blakeley, Abratuun Gustavus, 
Bockius, Charles Albert, 
Bo^s, Joseph Watson, 
B(^, Arthur Phillips, 
Bolton, Charles Lewis, 
Bond, Geoi^ Wells, 
BouCherle, Paul, 



Sc. 1, Philadelphia 
Arch., Erie, 



SBNIOBA. 

E. E„ Philadelphia, 

M. E., Lansdowne. 

Wh., Philadelphia. 

A., Allegheny, 

A., Columbia. 

AnJ)., Philadelphia, 

A., Johns^wn, 

Wh., Philadelphia, 
■■" do. 



Citr Addreu. 
3438 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 363 Baird. 
62 N. 36th St. 
Dorm. 40 Morgan. 



3400 Walnut St. 

4434 Sansom St. 
lorm. a I Bodine. 
£641 Locust St. 
lorm. 435 Baird. 
3438 Walnut St. 
3817 Spruce St. 
Dorm. 35 a Baldwin. 
[408 E. 4th St.] 



E., Cincinnati, Ohio, 
E., Chester. 
5., Cynwyd. 

Chester. 
E., Merchantville, N. J. ' 

Philadelphia, 
h., Chicago, 111., 
h., Philadelphia, 
., Norwood. 
b., Yotmgstown, Ohio, Dorm. 340 Hopkiiisoii. 



[14th and Walnut Sts.] 

I a 06 Master St. 
Dorm^i Wilson. 
17 13 W. Norris St. 



* HoTB. — Wb«n M Stat* ii naswd after nndaoce, le. Pmnqdvaaia. 
(533) 



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Bowen, Edward Rose, 
Bradford, James Sydney, 
Broadbelt, Oscar Garfidd, 
Brownlee, Edward Gould, Jr., 
Budd. Francis Herbert, 
Bums. Eugene L., 
Bye, Frank Pajtson, 
Campbell, William Alexander, 
Chadwick, Edward Wallace. 
Chillas, Richard Burt, Jr., 
Coleman. Arnold Reynolds, 
Colgan, Robert Joseph, 
Conderman, Norman Kerr, 
Constable. Mary Luise. 
Conwell, Edward Laurence, 
Cortright, Edwin Keen, 
Craske, Charles Edmund. 

Crawford. Winfield Wilson, 

Culler, Aaron Andrew, 
Dading, Charles Henry, 
David, William Morris, 
Davis, Robert William, Jr.. 
Deininger, Howard Franklin, 
De Victor, William Knight, 
Dewhurst, Richard Miles, 
Dickhut, Roger Milton, 
Dickson, Reid Stuart, 
Diefendorf, Edward G., 
Dieterle, George Andreas, 
Dise, Homer Allen, 
Docker, Horace Stokes, 



Doran, Tohn Francis, 
Dout, Edgar Philip, 
Dripps, Harold, 
Eamshaw, Frederic Smyth, 
Eaton, Robert Smith, 
Eckels, Lauren Samuel, 
Eckman, Hensel, 
Ecob, Robert Gilbert, 
EUett. Thomas Harlan, 
Entwisle, Alfred Lindsey, 
Essen, Willis Lilbum, 
Ewing, Maskell, Jr., 
Peldst^, Lemic^, 
Feigel, John Henry, 
Foreter, Arthur Oscar, 



THE COLLBOB. 



C. E., Sbarpsbuig, 



Arch., 
Arch-, 
M. E. 



Ch.. 
C. E., 
C.E.. 



Chester, 

., Baltimore, Md., 
Silver City, N. Me 
Berwyn. 
Philadelphia, 

Chestei^, 
Beverly. N. J., 
Woodbridge, N. J., 

W. Conshohocken. 
Lucas, Ohio, 
Philadelphia, 

do. 
Melrose, 
Philadelphia, 

do. 
Allegheny. 
Quincv, 111., 
Fhilaoelphia, 
Erie, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Glen Rock, 
Philadelphia, 



Upper Darby. 
Norristown. 
Media. 
Philadelphia, 

do. 
Norwich, N. Y., 
Philadelphia, 
Pulaski, Va., 
Philadelphia, 
Red Oak, Iowa, 
Philadelphia, 
Cape May City. N.J. 
Villa Nova, 



OtrAddi™. 

3U4 N. Van Pelt St. 

345 S. 45th St. 

4300 Market St. 

404 High St., Gtn. 
, iSjd and Lancaster Ave. 
, 300 S. 36th St. 

Dorm. 43 Horgan. 
Dorm. 363 Baird. 
Dorm. 418 Franklin. 
,, Dorm. II Morris. 



2 W. Logan 
S N. 30U1 S 



ifioj Locust St. 
lorm. 48 E.F.Smith. 
»a6 E. Penn St.. Gtn. 
Oak Laoe P. O. 
3 1 19 Master St. 
4735 Baltimore Ave. 
J908 Baltimore Ave. 

L. 44S Lippincott 
41 II Locust St. 
Dormjs4 Class of '87. 
3400 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 391 Leidy. 
Lawn ton Ave., 

Oak Lane. 
1531 Wallace St. 



iC 



Philadelphia, 



Dorm. ID Morgan, 
sot 1 Cedar Ave. 
3537 Locust St. 
i37l)orm.Claflsof '87. 
600 S. Broad St. 
[Wyncote, Pa.] 
3^406 PoweltOD Ave. 
Dorm. 314 Franklin. 
374* N. i6thSt. 
Dorm. 313 Leidy. 
Dorm. 935 Baird. 
3038 Woodstock St. 
3603 Sansom St. 
4354 Manayunk Ave., 



"fc 



t,i.a,Google 



Poulkrod, Predericlc Shelton, 



Fulweiler, John Edwin, 
Galey, Frank Holt, 
Geisler, William Henry, 
German, Harry James, 

G«yelin, Henry Rawie, 
Gold, Guy Davis, 
Goldbeck, Albert Theodore, 
Goldstein, Horace. 
Govan, Elwood Millard, 
Gregory, Albert Main, 
Griest, Thomas Haines, 
Griffith. Robert Eads, 
Haag, Frederick, Jr., 
Haasz, George Neiler, 
Hamilton, Robert Devitt, 
Harbeson. William Page, 
Hardt, John Wilham, 
Harris, Morrison , 
Hartley, James Hugh, 
Heacock, Edward RockhiU, 
Heick, Anna Elizabeth, 
Hepburn. Joseph Samuel, 
Hewson, William, 
Hicl^, John Frederick Gross, 

Hitchcock, Edward Fithian, 
Hobbs, Raymond Maaon, 
Hopkins, John Edwin, 
Hunt, Biddle Newbold. 
IngersoU, Edward, 
Jenkins. David Evana. 
Tones, Jessie Elizabeth, 
Kelley, Edward, 
Kelley, John, 
Kemp. Alexander Singer, 
Kepler, Walter Emerson. 
Knipe. Albertson Floyd, 
Koronski, Stephen, 
Kraus, Otto, Jr.. 
Lamberton, Robert Eneas 
Lang, Henry Christian, 

Laj>e, Marion, 
Latimer. Lewis Spann, 
Lavery, Urban Augustin, 



C. E., Philadelphia, 470 Lyceum Ave. 

Roxborough. 



Villa Nova, 

McEwensville, 

Philadelphia, 



Arch.E 
C. E.. 
A., 



E. E. 
C, E., 
Wh., 



do. 
Palmyra. N. J., 
Wyncote, 
Louisville, Ky., 
Lansdale. 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 
loliet. 111.. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Kirkwood. N. J. 
Penllj^n, 
, Danville, 
Louisville, Ky., 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 
Potts town, 
, Ardmore, 
Philadelphia, 



Overbrook, 
Bronxville, N. Y. 



;oxborough. 

Wissahickon Ave., ab. 

Manheim St., Gtn. 
3604 Walnut St. 
3438 Walnut St, 
103 High St., Gtn. 
Dorm. a43 Provost 

Smith. 
Dorm. »35 Baird. 
3430 Sansom St. 
3811 Poplar St. 
18S7N. sthSt. 
1116 N. 40th St. 
irSpN.aistSt. 
3331 WaUace St. 
, 3614 WabiutSt. 
17 N. 40th St. 
1733 N. asthSt. 
1818 S. Broad St. 
1531 Fairmount Ave. 
3303 Powelton Ave. 
Dorm. 207 Leidy. 

3613 Woodland Ave. 

3701 Locust St. 
1013 E. ColumbiaAv. 
3 1 JO Spruce St. 
Girard Ave. and 65th 

St. 
9r7 S. 48th St. 
3400 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 340 Hopkinson. 

Dorm. 137 Hopkinson. 
314 S. 37th St, 
S 1 7 Woodland Terrace 
1611 S. Broad St. 
1738 N. i6thSt, 

601 S. 3ISt St. 

3413 Walnut St. 

3431 Sansom St. 
3801 Poplar St, 

rot Osage Ave, 
E. Cor. 43d and 
Ludlow Sts. 
6715 Lansdowne Ave. 

3614 Walnut St. 
116 S. 37th St. 



tizedoy Google 



Lendennan. Walson Beatty, Jr., ( 
•Linton, Walter Powell, • 

Lipper, Milton William, 
Logo, Victor Le Van, i 

Lupton, Lewis Morris Green, i 

Ksle, Frederic Bowers, ' 

Cartney, Eugene Stock, 
McCaughcy Wflliam John, ' 

McConnell, Thomas Leo, ' 

McElwain, Clarence Stanley, 
McMullcn, Irvine Stuart, 
Martin, Edward Burk, 
Mason, Lennox Stirling, 
Mattson, John Danskin, 
Mayer, Henry Christian, Jr., 
Mondcnhall, Barl, 
Merwin. Charles Merrill, 
Millar. Willis Norman, 
Mills, Charles Peale, 
Milner. Byron Albert, 
Mitchell. Paul George, 
Morrison, Max Philip. 
Murphy. William Robert, 
Myers, John Andrew, 

Newbold, Richard Sydney, 

Ntclds, John Lent, 

Nields. Mosraer Aldewin. 

Page, Joseph French, 3d, 

Perkins, Francis Drinker, Jr., 

Perkins, Rowan Penrose, 

Perry, Lynn El wood, 

Potter, Clarence Wonderly, 

Rambo, Harold Sibley, 

Read. John Smilie, j 

Redding, Charles Summerfield, 

Reeves. Rufus Sargent, 

Reiner. John Louis, 

Riley, Charles Madison, 

Ringe, Henry Ralph, 

Robinson, Laurence Eugene. 

Rodman, Thomas Ernest, 
Rogers. Frank Henkels, 
Rommel, William Gus, ' 

Saious, Louis Theodore de Medici, 
Salcai, Yunosuke, 

•Salomon Benjamin Louis, 1 

Scott, Forrester Holmes, 1 

Sewell, Harry Dickey, j 



do. 

do. 

Woodbury, N. J. 
Philadelphia, 
Boothwyn. 
Philadelphia, 
Kittannmg, 
Sewickley, 
Erie, 

Philadelphia, 
do. 



Mendenhall, 
, Washington, D. C. 
Pittsburg. 
Philadelphia, 



do. 

Nonistown, 
Philadelphia, 
West Chester, 
Paoli, 

Beverly, N. J., 
Philadelphia, 
Salisbury, Md., 
Philadelphia, 



Philadelphia, 
, Wyncote, 
Wilmington, Del., 
Philaddphia. 

Kamiine^ori, 
Nagano- ken, Japan, 
Louisville, Ky 
Philadelphia, 
Mafis&eld, Ohio, 



Qtr AddresL 
Dorm. 124 McKcan. 
434 S. 40th St. 
Dorm. 143 Lippjncott. 1 
3833 Girard Ave. 

846 N. aid St. 

3138 N. Sth St. 
DonnjS Bodine. 
36i4WdnutSt. 
Dorm. a45Lippiiicott. 
3009 Columbia Ave. 
351 S. 44th St. 
735 Finest. 
a6S. Z3d St. 
4818 Florence Ave. 
^414 Sansom St. 
Dorm. 31 WilsOD. 
1909' Chestnut St. 
1 1 06 Morris St. 
Dorm. 357 Craig. 
618 Parnsh St. 

33J S. 37th St. 

" The Newport," i6th 

and Spruce Sts. 
3337 Walnut St. 
707 S. siBtSt. 
3705 Wahiut St. 
Dorm. ao7 Leidv. 
Dorm. 134 Mcl^ean. 
3005 De Laocey PI, 
Dorm. 13 Bodine. \ 

135 Tidpehoc^en.Gto. 
1909 W. Dauphin St. 
[604 Cooper St] 

eiiS. lothst 

1535 Spruce St. 
117 S. 34th St. 
500 GirEwl Building. 

Dorm. 140 Provost 

Smith, 
ion S. 48th St. 
Dorm. 136 Pitler. 
[333 Broome St.] 
ao43 Walnut St. 
3433 Sansom St. 



4041 Spruce St 
3614 Walnut St. 



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Shoemaker, Louia Jack, 

Sinkler, Wharton, Jr., 
Sledge, Edward Simmons, 
Smith, Arthur Thomas, 
Smith, Ridgwaj Pancoast, 
Snyder, Edward Reigle, 
Snyder, John Amos, 
Staflord, Morton Ogden, 

Stem, Julitts David, 
Stetser, John Joseph, 
Stifler, Francis Carr, 
Sullivan t, Andrew Denny Rodger 
Taylor. James Depue, 
Terry, Samuel Heebner. 
Thompson, Faith, 
Travcr, Harrison Baxter, 
•Tunnell, Frederic Harold. 
•Van Clcve, Morrison Robb, 
Walter, Cornelius Jacob, 
Weddlc, Albert Studebaker, 
Wetlls. William Edgar, 
Weiss, Harry BischoS, 
Welsh, Raymond Wilmer, 
Wetherill, Francis Macomb, 
Wherry, Edgar Theodore, 
Willing, Charles, 

Willson, Laurence Merrill, 
Wittkorn, Thomas Henry, 
Wolf, Eugene, 

Wolf, Franz Herman Dcrcum, 
Wood, Richard Francis, Jr., 
Yocum, Isaac De Haven, Jr., 



Abrams, Joseph Addison, 
Alburger, Elmer Russell, 
Apeldom. Guy Scott, 
At kin, Hercules Boyd, 
Bailey, Harrington Morell, 
Baker, FrarkUn Wharton, 
Bandman, Chester Gabrid, 
Bauder, Charles Franklin, 
Beard, Walter EUwood, 

*Ab*eat on love. 



Ch.. Philadelphia 



Arch., 
C.E., 
M. E., 



City AddreM. 
1931 N. Park Ave. 
249 Harvey St., Gtn. 
6366 Sherwood Road, 

Over brook. 
1606 Walnut St. 

113 a 37th St. 

i439 Germantown Av. 
)orm. 10 Morgan. 
3409 N. 17th St. 
3403 N. Broad St. 
616 E. Leverington 
Ave., Roxborough. 
I N. ijth St. 



A., 


Chester. 




A., 


Augusta, Me., 


Dorm. 36 Bodine- 


, Arch., 


Plainfield, N. J., 
Lockport. N. Y., 


514 Queen Lane, Gtn. 

307 S. 39th St. 


C. E„ 


Ch. E., 


Philadelphia, 


1706 Wallace St. 




do. 


1 406 Lenox A V. , Tioga. 


Arch., 


Hudson. N. Y., 


3303 Walnut St. 

3 5 oTulpehocken ,G tn. 


Sc. 1, 


Philadelphia, 
Mansfield. Ohio. 


A.. 




A., 


Philadelphia, 
Troy. Ohio, 


6610 Woodland Ave. 


A., 


3705 Walnut St. 


A,. 


Harrisburg, 


3334 Chestnut St. 


B,. 


Philadelphia, 


aQS6 Frankford Ave. 


E. E.. 


do. 


3413 Baring St. 


A., 


do. 


3734 Walnut St. 


Ch., 


do. 


i739NorrisSt. 


Arch., 


do. 


Summit St., Chest- 
nut Hill. 


Sc. 3, 


do. 


307 S. 39th St. 


Wh., 


Swarthmore. 




A., 


Philadelphia, 


1333 N. Broad St. 


M.E., 


do. 


5033 Knox St.. Gtn. 


A„ 


■ do. 


4.0S. ,=thSt. 


A., 


do. 


36i4SpnngGardenSt. 


E-E-, 


Burlington. N J. 




A., 


Tyrone, 


3606 Locust St. 


A., 


11OB8. 

Philadelphia, 


3438 Walnut St. 


M. E., 


do. 


14*1 S. 58th St. 
3113 N.Howard St. 


M. E., 


do. 


M. E., 


do. 


36 IS Baring St, 


M. E., 


do. 


311 1 Montgomery Av. 


C.E., 


do. 


331 Winona Ave,,Gtn. 


A., 


Birmingham, Ala,, 
Philadelphia. 


Dorm, 338 Foerderer. 


E E., 


2826 Columbia Ave. 


Wh,. 


York. 


Dorm, 341 Smith. 



■I.C, Google 



Bell, Joseph Horace, 
Benjamin, Joel Malvern, 
Benners, Alfred Eugene, Jr., 
Bilyeu, Charles Smith, 
Blass, Charles Arthur, 
Bolard, David Albert. 
Booth, George, 
BoTtdn, Harry, 
Brautigam, Ernest Laffitte, 
Bright, Dudley Seymour, 
Bn^bent. Alfred Lee, 
Brooke, George Albert, Jr., 
Brooks, George Reitzle, 
Brown, Charles T., 
Brown, John Tabele, Jr., 

Brown, Samuel Lehman, 

Bryans, Henry BusscU, 

Butler, Samud, 
Buiby, Percy Woodward, 
Cadwailader, Wallace Laird, 
Caldwell, Ralph Grant, 
•Calhoun, John EUwood. 
Cannon, James Louis, 
Carter, Oscar Scdjrwicke, 
Carson. John Baker, 
Carwithcn, VanCourt, 
Chance, Edwin Mickley. 
Cbristiani, Carl Antoine. 



Cooper, Stanley Fenimore, 
Cope. Edge Taylor, 3d. 
•Croasdale, Laurence Brodhead. 
Cupitt, Frank Raymond. 
Dallam, David English. Jr., 

Dalton, John Franklin, Jr., 
Damon /[ames Graham. 
Dana, William, Jay. 
Davis. Henry Blaine, 
Davis, John Ralph, 
DeLone, Joseph Michael, 

Dennis, Bruce Wallah an, 
DeVan, Rugeley Pierson, 
Duke, Alfred Wilson. 
Dulles. James Batcman. 
Drayton. Newbold, 
Dyer, Charles Dickey, Jr., 
■Abcent on leave. 



THE COLLEGE. 


Courae. 




Ch., 


Norwich, N. Y.. 


M. E. 


Atlanta. Ga., 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


C. E., 


do. 


Wh., 


Erie. 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


M. E. 


do. 


C. E., 


do. 


C. E,, 


do. 


C. E-, 


Washington. D. C 
PhiladeTphia. 


Ch., 


E. E.. 


Norristown, 


C. E., 





M. E., 
M. E„ 
M. E., 

Wh., 



Delaware Water Gap. 



Doim. 197 Class of '87 
3334 Chestnut St. 
' 4aiS Spruce St. 
3400 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 331 Ciwg. 
824 N. sth St. 
3533 Locust St. 
1333 S. 4th St. 
537 S- 43d St. 
3705 Walnut St. 
44SS Frankford Ave. 
Dorm. 378 Hopkinson. 
1146 N. Park Ave. 
ia8W.UpsalSt.,Gtn. 
Prospect Ave., Chest- 
nut Hill. 
Prospect Ave., 
Chestnut Hill. 



4711 Chester Ave. 
430S. 4SthSt. 
1819 Venango St. 
333oCathanne St. 
1346 N. Front St. 

1033 Spruce St. 
636 N. 17th St. 
4419 Chestnut St. 
, "The Normaodie." 
Dorm. 306 Brooks. 
48 E. Oapier St., Gtn. 
i8>6 N. Broad St. 
4 Brooks. 



Burlington, N. J., 

Norristown. 
Harrisbttfg, 

Goshen, N. Y,. 
WythevilIe,Va., 
Hewlett, Va., 
Philadelphia, 
Penllyn, 
Ben Avon, 



German town. 



3411 Walnut St. 
[315 Stanbridge St.] 
Dorm. 135 Provost 

Smith, 
Dorm. 341 McKean. 
3S33 I-ocust St. 
306 S. 37th St. 
300 S. 36th St. 
SS. a:stSt. 
370<; WahiutSt. 



tizedoy Google 



hlers, Carl Herman, 
lliott, Marcus HoUaday, 
vans, Henry Sebastian, 
vans, Wayne Standley, 

stterolf, Horace Mann, 
Lske, Charles PtMneroy,' 
itzmaimce, William John, Jr., 
letcher, Guatavus Bergner, 
sisythe, James Hutchison, 
oster, Alexander, Jr., 
rank, Benjamin, 
artland, John Joseph, 2d, 
aston, Frederick Harold, 
eorge, Howard Howell, 
Lbbons, Oliphant, 
ill, Calvert Buike, 
imbel, Bernard Feustmann. 
□Idbauni, Jacob Samuel, 
odfrey, Ross Orange, 
alder, Mandes L., 
oldsmith, Herbert Nathaniel, 
aodfellow, Arthur Norton, 
[xidman, John Smith, 
raham, Donald, 
reathead, John Francis, 
all, James Scott, 
anley, Bessie Graham, 
ansen, Mary, 
arris ,Henry Samuel, 

arrv, Carolus Powel, 
artJey, Hairy, 
artzell, Henry Kerr, Jr., 
aug, Thaddeus Leon Euclid. 
awley, Samuel Davis 
eller, Archibald Carl, 
apbum Minor DancnhoH 
erbrecht. Otto Gustave, 
in, Everett Wentworth, 
odge, Horace Bush, 

ood, Warren Blake, 
opkinson, Edward, Jr., 
opper, Thomas B, 

oskins. Francis Guild, 
awcU, Gersham Mott, 
ubley, Francis Curtis, 
uch, Alwin Frank, 
uff, Thomas EUwood, Jr., 
uggins, John Robinson, 



»d. 



Cour«. 




City AddreM. 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


3317 N. 17th St. 
Bonn, so Smith. 


A.. 


Englewood, N. J. 


E. E., 


West Chester. 




M. E., 


Philadelphia. 


46i6LeiperSt.,Pkd. 


Wh., 


CoUegeville, 


3303 Walnut St. 


Ch. E. 


, Buffalo, N. Y., 


3605 Locust St. 


C. E.. 


Philadelphia. 


i5o8N.StillmanSt. 


M. E., 


Radnor, 




Arch., 


Mercer. 


Dorm. 380 Lippincott. 


C. E.. 


Philadelphia, 


Arch., 


Baltimore, Md,, 


Dorm. 2 3 Morgan, 


• C. E.. 


Philadelphia, 


38i6Spg. Garden St. 
6341 Woodbine Ave. 


A., 


do. 


C. E-, 


Camden, N. J. 


[i44S Kenwood Ave.] 
333 Pine St. 


A,. 


Philadelphia. 


E. E., 


Baltimore, Md., 


3303 Walnut St. 
Dorm. it7 McKean. 


Wh,. 


Philadelphia. 


Ch., 


do. 


1745 N. 8th St. 


Ch, E. 


do. 


3437 Nicholas St. 


C. E.. 


do. 


1434 S. nth St. 


M. E., 


do. 


2336 N. Broad St. 


M. E„ 


do. 


3530 Locust St. 
830 S.St. Bernard St. 


C. E., 


do. 


C. E.. 


do. 


4304 Walnut St. 


C.E.. 


do. 


3007 Poplar St. 


Wh., 


do. 


1615 Bambridge St. 


B.. 


do. 


iiSSN. lothSt, 


B., 


Warwick. N. Y.. 


3215 Summer St, 
Dorm. 136 Fitier. 


A. B., 


Columbia, Ch.E-, 




New York, N, Y 




A., 


Norristown. 




B., 


Narberth. 




Ch.. 


Allen town. 


Dorm. 35 E.F.Smith. 


M, E.. 


Berkeley, Cal-, 


4126 Chester Ave. 


Arch.. 


Philadelphia, 


Hamilton Court. 


A„ 


Factoryville. 




Ch., 


Lansdale. 


1013 E. Columbia A v. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 
Russell, Ttan., 


J336 St. Alban's PI. 


Wh-. 


Dorm. 227 Baldwin. 


C. E., 


Palatine Bridge. 

N. Y. 
Philadelphia, 




M. E., 


5 141 Thompson St. 


A., 


do. 


isJaiS^reAve. 


M. E., 


Chesapeake City, 

Philadelphia, 

Morrisville, 


C. E., 


4051 Aspen St. 
Dorm. 216 Baldwin 


Wh.. 


M. E., 


Philadelphia, 


3714 Chestnut St. 


C. E-, 


do. 


1218 N, Franklin SU 


Ch., 


do. 


331 Dickinson St. 


A., 


do. 


3613 N. Jessup St. 



t,i.a, Google 



54* 


THE COLLEGE. 




name 


Count. 


RcBilsnco. 




Hulin, George Hyde. 


Arch. 


Franklin, 




Hulton, Florence, 


B., 


Philadelphia, 


3853 Boudinot St. 


Hummer, Wayne, 


wh.. 


La Salle, lU., 


Dorm. 14 Morris. 


ngle, Mark James, 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


ao49 Wallace St. 


acobs. Michael WiCiam, Jr., 


A., 


HarrisbuiK, 

Somerfield, 


3604 Wahiut St. 
Doim. 3a6 Baldwin. 


acobs, Robert Augustus, 


Wh., 


enldns. Warren Carrol, 


E. E.. 


Lansdale. 




ones, Charles Ramey, 


E. E., 


Norristown. 




ones. Lloyd Peniston, 


M, E, 


PhUadelphia. 


Dorm. 106 Lcidy. 


oyce, Bryan Pope, 


M. E.. 


Louisville. Ky. 


211 S. 37th St. 
1800 S. Logan Sq. 


Kennedy, William Ernst. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


Kirk. Carrie Miller, 


B., 


Lansdowne. 




Kister, Alfred B., 


C. E., 


Philadelphia, 


3339N. College Ave. 


Cnowles, Eramett Bryan, 
iCoenig. Waldemir Addison. 


M. E., 


do. 


3315 Arlington St. 


Ch., 


do. 


i4ig Poplar St. 


Krauss, Edward Eugen, 


M. E., 


do. 


1937 N. Napa St. 
Dorm. 339 Franklin. 


;.ayton. Caleb Sipple. 


A., 


Georgetown, Del., 


jee, Lothrop, 


A., 


Haverford. 


3S37 Locust St. 


jfivene, Israel George, 


C. E., 


Philadelphia. 


7ai» Saybrooke Ave. 
Dorm. 333 Class of 

■87. 
3453 Woodland Ave. 


Lewis, Henry Martyn, Jr., 


C. E., 


Staunton. Va.. 


J.ewis. Robert Morton. 


A.. 


Philadelphia, 


jewis, Shippen. 
Lo«, PauIR.. 


A., 


do. 


3453 Woodland Ave. 


M. E. 


Narberth. 




McCormick, George Wylie, 


C.E.. 


Philadelphia. 


1 01 9 Brown St. 


McCuUoh, George. 
McGoodwin. Robert Rodes, 


A., 


do. 


3215 Locust St. 


Arch., 


Bowling Or«en, Ky 

Philadelphia, 


..Dorm. 434 Class of '87. 


McKnight, Howard Allison, 
rtacfarlan, Donald, 


A., 


400 N. 40th St. 


A., 


do. 


180S Chestnut St. 


Mackay, Robert Ronald. 
MacMillan, Frederick Ebenezer, 


A., 


do. 


1416N. i6thSt, 


A., 


Haverhill. Mass.. 


3533 Locust St. 
Dorm. 43 Bodine. 


Mails. Charles Buckley. 


A.. 


Pittsburg. 
Beverly, N. J. 


Mann. Philip Leopold, 
Marshall. JoW Theodore, 


E. E.. 




A.. 




1718 HneSt. 


ilartin, Sydney Errington, 
Martin, Thomas Scott, 


Arch. 


Fox Chase, 


3339 Walnut St. 


C.E., 


Philadelphia. 


770 N. 41st St. 


Mason, John Alden, 


A., 


do. 


».3 W. Chelten Ave.. 
Gtn. 

413 S. 40th St. 


Masters. Albert Ralph. 


C. E.. 


Haddonfield. N.T., 




A.. 


Philadelphia, 


4734 Penn St, r'rank 

ford. 
Dorm.j: Wilson. 

330 S, Broad St. 


Millar, Bruce Drum, 


A.. 


Pittsburg. 


Miller, Arthur Persons. 


Ch.. 


Philadelphia, 


Mills, Albert Burd, 


Wh.. 


do 


iQogChestjiutSt. 


Mink, George Washington. Jr.. 


Wh.. 


do. 


3618 Ellsworth St. 


Moench, Theodore Frederic, 


A., 


do. 


639 N. 3othSt. 


Moffitt. Thomas Robinson, 


A., 


Harrisburg, 


3600 Walnut. 


Monaghan, Paul, 


Arch. 


Philadelphia. 


63 N. 36th St. 
3S37 Locust St. 


Montgomery, Archibald Roger, ad 


. C, E., 


Radnor. 


♦Moore, Arthiu- Roland, 


C.E., 


Buffalo. N. Y. 




Moor^, Louis Joseph Francis, 


C. E., 


Sharon Hill. 





t,i.a,Google 



Nume. 


Cou«e. 




City Addno. 


Morgan, Ralph. 
MiUfer. Hugo Arthur, 


A., 


Philadelphia, 

HaddonSeld, N.J. 


44r8 Osage Ave. 


A., 


Dorm. 34 Memorial. 


Murray, UsUe Walter, 


Arch., 


PorUand, Oregon, 


3319 N. BouvierSt. 


Neely, Walter Clarloon. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


44iHansbcrrySt., 


Nibecker, Karl, 


M. E., 


Glen Mills. 


Nicholaon, William Shomo, 


E, E.. 


Kansas City, Mo.. 
PhiladelphM. 


3705 Walnut St. 


Olson, Ray Leander, 


Arch.. 


306 So. 36th St. 


Pierce, Stanky Ladomua. 


E. E., 


do.*^ 


5053 Wade St., Gtn. 


PlummEr, George William, 


Oh., 


do. 


1301 W. Susquehanna 

Ave. 
1738 Gillingham St.. 

Prankford. 


Pollitt, Edward, 


C.E.. 


do. 








Raine, Wendell Phillips, 


Wh., 


Harrishurg. 
Philadelphia, 


3604 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 251 New York 
Alumni. 


Riley, Henry Joyce, 


A.. 


Refsnyder, Hairy Price, 


C.E.. 


Phoenixville, 


Robertson, George Franklin, 
Ross, Edward Men, 


E. E.. 


Whaleyville. Va.. 
Philadelphia, 


3134 Chestnut St 


C. E.. 


iiilN.isthSt. 


Ryder. Robert Beahm, 


E. E., 


Norristown . 




Sawyer, William Alfred, 
Scarlett, Hunter Watt. 


A,. 


Des Moines. Iowa, 


3400 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 10 Bodine. 


A.. 


Erie, 




Wh., 


do. 


113 S. 37th St. 


SchTOn, Henry John, 1 


Arch., 


Sioux Palis. S. D.. 


Dorm. 360 Cr^g. 
3337 Walnut St. 


Service, William Spencer. 
Shiclc, Augustus Walton, 


Wh.. 


Bala, 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


1307 Somerset St. 


Shoemaker, Joseph Moore, 
Simpers, Thomas Eder, 


Wh,. 


do. 


415 W.Price St.. Gtn. 


Ch.. 


Knox. 


37i» Locust St. 


E.E., 


Philadelphia. 
Narbertfi. 


930 Farragut Terrace, 


Simpson, Bertine Gillette, 
Simtins. Eugene Schuyler, 


M. E.. 




E. E.. 


Lansdowne. 




Smith. Francis Pahner. 
Smith Louis Christian 


Arch.. 
M E 


Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Philadelphia. 
Palmyra, N. J. 


Dorm. 389 Lippincott. 

83s N. 41st St. 


Stager". William Edson! 


e.'e.',* 


Stanton. William Cyril, 


Arch., 


Philadelphia, 


4616 Cedar Ave. 


Stine, Sidney Livingston. 
Strain, John Doueal, 
Stuclcert. Howard Morris, 


M. E., 


Toledo. Ohio, 


3400 Walnut St. 


A.. 




aoo6 E. Sergeant St. 


A., 


do. 


150) Diamond St. 


Swain, Warner McKechnie, 


A., 


do. 


3303 Race St. 
Dorm. 13 1 Franklin. 
40 W. Wahiut Lane 


Thompson, John Small, 


C.E., 


Carlisle. 


Thomas, Frederick Throckmorton 


;, Wh., 


Philadelphia. 








German town. 


Todd, Joseph Zook. 


Wh., 


Tacoma. Wash., 


Dorm. 139 Provost 
Smith. 


Topping. Wilbur Baird. 


A., 


Httsburg. 


300 S. 36th St. 
Dorm. 107 Leidy. 


Townsend. Tcdin William, Jr., 
Troelsch. Henry William, 


C.E.. 


Bryn Mawr. 


C,E.. 


Philadelphia, 


3637 Girard Ave, 


Turner, Charles Alexander, 


M. E., 


do. 


i46Pclham Rd.Gtn. 


Van Horn, William Thomas, Jr., 


Ch. E. 


, Newtown, 


3605 Locust St, 


Van Scoyoc. Harry Stewart, 


C. E., 


Altoona. 


4735 Spruce St. 
1837 Venango St. 


Vondercrone, John Walter, 


E. E., 


Philadelphia. 



t,i.a,Google 



THE COLLBGS. 



'Walker, James Abraham, 
Wanner, Henry Eckert, 
Wamick, John -Hagey, 

•Watkin, William Ward, 
Watson, William Shermer, 
Way, John Harold. 
Weiss, Charles Robert, 
Wherry, Helen Marie, 
Williams, Carlton, 
Williams, Kenneth, 
Williamson, Clarence Heiss, 
Willoughby, Alfred Slocum, 
Wilson, Luther Elgin, 



in. Otto Alfred, 
Wolf. Daniel Doraey. 
Wolff, Alfred Daniel, Jr., 
Wood, Robert Learning, 
Woodroffe, George Henry, 
Wynkoop. Frederick. 
Yrigoyen, Pedro Juan, 
Young, Edwin Starr, 
Young, lames Barclay, 
Young, Rowland Lawrence, 
Young, Thomas Gorsuch, 



Abbott Edwin Littleton, 
Adler, Julius, 
Albrecnt, Emil Rudolph, 
Allen, Alonzo Rush ton, 

Ashbridge, Donald MacQuee 
Astlcy, Royden Jefferson, 
Atkinson, waiter Franklin, 
Bailey, Frank Guinn, 
Baker. John William, 
Baldwin. Allen Thomas, 
Baltzell, Edward Digby, 
Barakat, Samuel Wickies, 
Barclay, Sally Mark, 
Barker, Joseph Hudson, 
Bartholomew, Paul A., 
Bassette, Roy Donald, 
Baxter, Osmond Monroe, 
Bear. Grover Esidor, 
Beekley, Waldron Cheyney. 
Bickham, Martin Hays, 
"Bloch, Carl, 



E- E., 
M. E., 
C. E., 
C. E., 
M. B., 



Philadelphia. 

York, 

Philadelphia, 

Danville. 
PhQadelphia, 
St. Davids, 
Philadelphia, 

do, 
Blackwood, N. J. 

Bell wood, 
Philadelphia, 
Bimiingnam, Ala., 

Philadelphia. 



do. 

do. 

Brownsbur^, 

, City of Mexico, Mex. 

Philadelphia, 

Washington, D. C, 

Philadelphia. 

. Baltimore. Md., 



atr Adilitti 
1617 Green St. 
Dorm. 13 Bodinc 
a »8 W. Wyoniing At, 
Germantown. 



5333 Wayne St., GB. 
3614 Walnut St. 
3529 Locust St. 
i7i9NorrisSt. 
3134 WalnatSl 
Dorm. 5 a Hemerial 
3614. Walnut St. 
1433 W. NornsSt 
Dorm, 39p New Y«* 

Alumni. 
1635 CayugA St 
1833 Fontain St. 
a73oN. 13th St. 
410 S. 15U1 St. 
3600 Walnut St. 
331 S. 37th St. 
Dorm. 33 E.P.Soilt 
1 601 Brown St. 
4047 Locust St. 
3605 Chestnut St. 
3303 Walnut St. j 



SOPHOMOBEB. 



do. 



do. 

Camden, N. J.. 
. Philadelphia, 
Mobile, Ala.. 
West Chester, 
Fox Chase. 



Arch,, 
Arch., 
Arch.. 



Birmingham, Ala. 

Prospect, 

New Britain, Conn.. 

Cold Spring, N.Y., 

Fogelsville, 

Philadelphia, 

Churchtown. 

Macon, Ga. 



[Essex and Woodali 

Ave., Norberthl 
Oak Lane. 

sail Girard Aw. . 
f6o4N. sthSt-l 1 
3614 Walnut St. 
Ill S. 34th St. 
Dorm. 309 Brooks. 

;6 S. 44th St. 

69, Ridley Fui 
I. 407 La^f. 
— ..J. 373HoiJmt 
3539 Locust St. 
3715 Woodland Aw- 
3737 Spruce St 
6735 Leeds St. 
aig S. 33d St. 



t. 



t,i.a, Google 



Brooks, Edwin Hinchman. 
Brown, Thomas Wistar, 3d, 
Brown, Walter Earle, 
Brown, William Laird. 
Buckley, William Robert, 
Bythiner. Eugene, 
Camion, Horace HL-nry, 
Cathcart, Robert Henry, Jr., 
Chodowsld. Ethel, 
Chamberlain', Lewis Boyer, 
Clark, Edward Lyon, 
Clayton, Albert Joshua, 
Cleaver, Horace Jones, 
Cochran, Joseph Hunsicker, 
Codv, Harold Bryant, 
Collins, Archie Stewart, 
Connor, Isaac Baum, 
Conway, Adam Southern, 
Cooke, Charles Bokcr, Jr., 
Cope, Robert Harper, 
Cornell, Herbert Watson. 
Corson, Egbert Dexter, 
Coyne, James Kitchenman, 
Crawford, Alexander LoHcr, 
Crawford, Charles Montgomery, Jr 
Crowell, Abraham Albert. 
Cuskaden. Millard, Erwin, 
Darlington, Henry Saulnier, 
Davis, Malcolm Irvin. 
Day, Beaver Wade, 
Dean, Harry Clinton, 
Del Rossi, Alfred, 
Dettre, Linn Ambrose, 
DeVan, Howard Gove, 
Dever, Harvey Conc|uest, 
Dickerman, Franklin Forrest, 



Dixon, John Shipley, 
Doberstme, John Noble, 

Dod^, Henry Henley, 
Doenng, William Helwij 
Donnelly, Augustine Le 
Doriss, Howard, 

Dwyer, Tames Kun, 



Cour«. 




City AMnu. 


M. E., 


Rochester. N. Y., 


Dorm, 408 Lcidy. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


School Lane, Gtn. 


C. E., 


do. 


40a: Spg. Garden St. 


E. E., 


Lansdowne. 




A., 


Wilkesbarre, 


Dorm. 33 Memorial. 


E, E., 


Philadelphia. ■ 


171 5 Master St. 


E.E., 


Camden, N. J., 


[576 Benson St.] 


Wh., 


Newbut^, N. Y., 


3438 Walnut St. 


B., 


Philadelphia, 


1436 N. Franklin St. 


C. E., 






B. E., 


do. 


3398. axstSt. 


E. E., 


do. 


4216 Chester Ave. 


C. E., 


Ardmore. 




Wh., 


Wyncote, 


34S3 Woodland Ave. 


Arch., 


Ene. 


3619 Sansom St. 


Arch., 


Philadelphia. 


843 N. -40th St. 


M. E., 


. FrankUn, 


3614 Walnut St. 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


iSii Green St. 


E. E., 


do. 


11 IS N. 13th St. 


M. E., 


Media, 


Dorm. 4 n Leidy. 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


172s N. i6th St. 


Wh„ 


Lockport, N. Y., 


Dorm. 34 Bodine. 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


1116 W.Lehigh Ave. 


Wh., 


do. 


4033 Spruce St. 


.A.. 


Hartford, Conn., 


3S37 Locust St. 


C. E., 


do. 


S45 N. "h St. 


A., 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


, 1506 N. 19th St. 


C. E., 


Media. 




Wh., 


Phdadelphia. 
Fargo, N. D„ 
Phifadelphia. 


II S. 38th St. 
3608 Walnut at. 


Arch., 


M.E., 


3S4I N. Broad St. 


E. E.. 


do. 


735 Montrose St. 


Wh., 


Norristown, 


3705 Walnut St. 


C. E.. 


Wytheviile. Va., 


3533 Locust St. 


C. E„ 


Philadelphia, 


4436 Sansom St. 


M. E.. 


do. 


51st and Wynnefield 
Avenue. 


E.E.. 


do. 


4 S, 4.ld St. 


A., 


do. 


3337 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 133 Baird. 


A., 


WaHingford, 


A., 


Aldcn, 


Div. School, 50th and 
Woodland Ave. 


C. E., 


Washington. D. C, 


. 307 S. 3gth St. 


Ch., 


PhUadclphia, 


1729 N. ijth Ct. 


E. E., 


do. 


ijai Wall.iceSl. 


C. E., 


do. 


220 W. Coulter St., 
Gtn. 


E.E.. 


Antrim, 


3330 Walnut St. 


M. E., 


Louisville, Ky., 


3617 Locust St. 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


1507 French St. 


Wh., 


York, 


Dorm. 34 Morris. 



t,i.a,Google 



Edelman, Samuel, 
Eichengreen, Leon B, 
Emig. Howard Abraham, 
Emory, Lloyd Tilghman, 
Esrey, William Provost. 
Evans, John Clifford, 
Eysenbach, George Giftord, 
Fairlamb, Horace West, Jr., 
Feinberg, Fanny Polano, 
Felton, John Garret, 
Femberger, Samuel Weiller. 
Fitzpatnck, James Anthony, 
Fleisher, Maurice Tracy, 
Folger, Oliver Hayward. 
Folwell. Robert Cook, Jr., 
Foster, Walter Chapin, 
Franz^, Carl Gustavc Frederick, 
Fromme, Murray Btmard. 
Fulweiler, Howard Wells, 
Geiger, Arthur Edwin, 
Goo, Byron Heazelton, 

Good, Marriott Augustus, 
Goodwin, Harold, Jr., 
Grabb, Eugene Granville, 
Gray, Frederick James, 
Greene, Edward Laurence, 
Greene, Garton Spence, 
Griffiths, Charles Hayden, 
Grunwell, John Roscoe, 
Halberstadt, George Moore, 
Haldeman, Clifford Lloyd, 
Haldeman, Guy KammererFrancis 
de Hamel, John Bclleau, 
Hare, Alfred Guillon, 
Harker, Norman Woolston, 
Hams, Henry Frazer, 
Heilraan, John Jacob, 
Heller, Harry, 
Helton, Roy Addison, 
Hepburn, Barry Hayes, 
Hess, Willard MalUUcu, 
HDl, Horace Greenwood, Jr., 
Hilton, William Stanford, 
Holcombe, Herbert Dwight, 
HoUand. Tames Bumette. 
Holmes. Gerald Anderson, 
•Horn, Max, 
Homer, Edgell, 
Hotaling, George Ryer, 
Howell, John Lewis, 



A.. 

Arch., 
E. E.. 



Philadelphia, 
, Merchantville, N. J. 

York, 

Centerville, Md.. 
, Chester, 
., Philadelphia, 

do. 
„ Chester, 

PhUadelphia, 

Olney, 

Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 

, Buffalo, N. Y.. 

Sharon Hill. 

Washington. D. C, 

Hartford, Conn., 

New York, N. Y. 

Wayne, 

Phitadclphia, 

Pittsburg, 

, Riverton, N. J. 

Philadelphia, 
., Louisville, Ky., 

Philadelphia, 
, New Haven, Conn., 
Philadelphia, 
Wilkesbarre, 
Washington, D. C, 
Pottsvillc, 
Philadelphia. 

do. 
Mcrchantville, N. J. 
Strafford. 
Mt. Holly, N. J., 

Walberts, 

;. Philadelphia, 
Washington, D.C., 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Troy. 

Conshohocken. 
Philadelphia, 

do. 
Detroit, Mich., 
New York, N. Y., 
Morris ville. 



3234 Chestnut St. 

Dorm. 104 Brooks. 
Dorm. 45 E. P. Smith. 

3S33 Locust St. 
igoi Tioga St. 
fill N. loth St. 
[705 E. 14th St.] 
117 N. 7th St. 
Front & Tabor Sts. 
1306 N. Broad St- 
»3oi Spg, Garden St. 
Domi. 350 Baldwin. 
3347 Woodland Ave. 
6x$ Chestnut St. 
1705 Walnut St. 
Ardmore, Pa. 
Dorm. 31 Memorial. 
3S33 Locust St. 
2330 Ridge Ave. 
[147 S. Illinois Ave.. 
Atlantic City.N. j.] 

35^7 Locust St- 
3134 Chestnut St. 
431 S. 43d St. 
3703 Wdnut St. 
1034 Race St. 
Dorm. 33 Memorial. 
Dorm. 3ZO McKean. 
Dorm. 4» Memorial. 
1635 Park Ave. 
3^13 Hamilton St. 
,3400 Walnut St. 
33 S. a ad St. 
Dorm. 379 Lippincott. 

3340 Walnut St. 
934 N. Franklin St. 
3134 Chestnut St. 
1728 Pine St. 
1410 Christian St. 
361a Hamilton St. 
aiJj Ontario St. 
Dorm. 138 Fitlcr. 

i7i8N.sadSt. 
9019 S. 5th St. 
5331 Laurens St., Gtn. 
Dorm. 37 Mor^. 
Dorm.368 Hoplanson. 



tizedoy Google 





STUDENTS. 


545 


N>i». 


ConXK. 




at; Addii». 


Hughes, Harold Knight, 


C. E.. 


Philadelphia, 


II W. Upsa]St.,Gtn 


Humphrey, Laurence Paschal, 
Hunter, WilUam, 


wh.. 


N.Tonawanda,N.Y 


., Dorm. 104 Brooks. 


M. E.. 


Philadelphia 


ijoa Cayuga St. 


Hurahmaa, Abraham Eleazer, 


A., 


do.*^ 


753 Passyunk Ave. 


Hyman, Arthur David, 


C. E.. 


Mt, Vernon, Ohio, 


3466 Sansom St. 


ack, Richard 'Outton, 


Wh., 


ToWo. Japan, 


3400 Walnut St. 


M, E., 


Chester, 


3533 Locust St. 


ames. Jesse Evans, 
ajrne. Charles Adams, 
oim, Rutherford Lewis, 


C. E.. 


Elverson, 


105 S. 34th St. 
931 N. Broad St. 


Arch., 


Philadelphia, 


A.. 


Media. 






A.. 


Castleton-on-Hud- 

son. N- Y., 
Philaddphia. 


Dorm. :3i Craig. 


ohnson, Edward Earie, 


A., 


Dorm. 13s Fitler. 


ohnson, Lindley, Jr., 
ones, Roy Childs, 


A., 


Rosemont. 


3537 Locust St. 
Dorm. 451 New York 


Arch., 


Garrett, Ind., 








Aluiam. 


Kane, WiUiam Reno. 


C. E., 


Philadelphia, 


Dorm. =3 Morris. 

53 W. Duval St., Gtn. 


Keaat, William Richard Morton, 


Arch., 


do. 


Keely, David Fulmer, 


Wh., 


do. 


433 Lyceum Ave., 
Rox borough. 








Keely, Edmund Mark, Jr., 


Ch.. 


do. 


113 So. 37th St. 


Keenan, Walter Francis, Jr., 


M. E.. 


Montelair, N. J., 
Miller's FaUs, Mass. 


3533 Locust St. 


Kcrvick, Francis William, 


Arch., 


, 34ie Sansom St. 


Kiefaber, Arthur Blaine, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


aa29 W. Tioga St. 


Kinley, Arthur Ernest, 


A., 


do. 


Dorm. 10 Memorial. 


Kirkpatrick, Clarence Appleton, 


A„ 


do. 


203 DeKalb Sq. 


Klebsattel, Christian Frederick, 


A., 


Buffalo, N. Y.. 


157 N, aotbSt. 


Klein, Percy Samuel, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia. 


a,i7N. UberSt. 


Laise, Clemens Albert, 


Ch. E, 


do. 


Oak Lane. 


Lavery, James Flavian, 
Lee, Ruckman, 


A.. 


Lavery. 


!n6 S. 37th St. 


A., 


Haverford, 


3S37 Locust St. 


Levy, Lionel Faraday, 
Lippincott, Joseph Wharton, 


Ch, E, 




854 N. 8th St. 


Wh., 


do. 


Lopan Station. 


Long, Bayard Henry, 


C. E., 


Mount Holly. N. J., 


Dorm. 41 Bodine. 




Ashbourne. 




Lowe, Robert Launitz, 


A., 


Elizabeth, N. J., 


3SJ9 Locust St. 
Dorm. SI E.F.Smith. 


McCaffrey, John Carroll, 


Ch.. 




McCandless, Thomas Wattson, 


Wh.. 


do. 


1423 Mt. Vernon St. 


McCurdy. J ames Aubrey. 


A., 


do. 


S90I Ovcrbrook Ave. 


Macfarlan, Doi^las, 


A.. 


do. 


1805 Chestnut St. 


Mackay. Robert Ronald, 


A,. 


do. 


1416 N. i6th St. 


Mann, Benson. Jr., 


M. E., 


do. 


Dorm, 108 Leidy. 


Martin, Samuel Babbitt. 


Wh., 


do. 


3820 Locust St, 


Melvin. Franklin Worthington, 


Wh., 


do. 


31 35 Montgomery Ave. 


Heaanger. William, 
MichaeUs. Frederick Henry, 


M, E.. 


do. 


457 N- Third St. 


Arch.. 


Kansas City, Mo., 


3604 Walnut St. 


Monville, Francis Xavier, 


E. E.. 


PhUadelphia. 


3637 Market St. 



4154 Parkside Ave. 
4535 Pulaski Ave., 
Germ an town. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



Name. 


Cotira. 


Residence. 


at7 Address 


Moore, Robert DeWitt, 


C. E., 


PhiUdelphia. 


6713 8th St., Oak 

Lane. 
3337 Walnut Street. 


Morgan, Randal, Jr., 


A., 


Chestnut Hill. 


MorriB, Leland Burnette, 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


536 Lincoln Drive, 
German town. 


Muzzarelli, Gladstone Stuart Alo 








ysius Edward, 


" E. E., 


do. 


1908 N. 13th St. 


Myers, Frank Albert. 


C.E., 


do. 


413 Fairmount Ave 


Nachod, Julius Ernest, 


A.. 


Glenside. 




Nash, Joseph Harold, 
NeaU, Emma Valeria. 


Arch., 


Leadville, Colo., 


41 IS Pin= St- 


B., 


Philadelphia. 


2106 Hunting Park 
Ave. 

3337 Walnut St. 


Newbold, John DaCosta, Jr., 
Newbold, Richard Claxton. 


M. E.. 


Norristown. 


C. E., 


Washington, D. C, 


, 100 S. 43d St. 


Nides. Emanuel, 


C,E., 


Philadelphia, 


408 S. Watts St. 


Nowack Ernest William, 


E. E., 


do. 


860 N. oth St. 
3ao8 Hunting Park 
Ave. 

1335 N, 7th St. 


Ogden. Geoi^ Steeiman. 


M. E., 


do. 


Oliensis, Gershon Lazarus, 


A., 


do. 


Paddock. Ralph Lathrop, 
Paul. Frank Albert, 


M. E., 


Denver, Colo., 


300 S. 36th St. 
4819 Windaor Ave. 


A-, 


Philadelphia, 


Peirson, Christopher Loflin, 
Philler. Richard Montgomery, 


Ch., 


Radnor. 




Wh., 


Philadelphia, 
Wallingford. 


3537 Locust St. 


Piatt, Frederick Epenetus, 
Pickles, John Frederick, 
Pollock, "WiUiam John, 


A., 




M. E,. 


Buckland, Conn., 


3717 Spruce St. 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


i^eooS isthSt. 


Potta, Thomas Swagar, 


E. E., 


do. 


10*5 S. 46th St. 


Powers. Frank Etheiwulf, 


C. E., 


Pottsville, 


Dorm.378 Hopkiiison. 


Raiguel, William Magee. 


C. E„ 


Philadelphia, 


603 N. 17th St. 


Ramsey, David Madron, 


A., 


Bryn Mawr, 


300 S. 36th St. 
Dorm. 30J Brooks. 


Rati iff, Thomas Asbury, 


A., 


Dayton. Ohio, 


Reeves, Edmund HoSnaan. 


A„ 


Bridgeton, N. J., 


Dorm. 337 New York 

Dorm. 397 New York 
Alumni. 


Reeves, John Franklin, 


A., 


do. 


•Reger, Carl, 


Arch-, 


Rural Dale. W. Va 


Richmond, Carl Edward. 


Wh.. 


Adams. Mass.. 


Dorm. 37s Hopkinson. 

1723 N. nth St. 


Rinehart. Harry Paul. Jr., 
Rishel, Harry Armstrong, 


Arch., 


Philadelphia, 


E. E,. 


do. 


303S Diamond St. 


Rodman, Qarence Wignall, 


Ch.. 


do. 


ion S. 48th St. 


Rt^ers, Karl Henkels, 


A.. 


Wyncote. 




Rosengarten, George. 


C. E.. 


Philadelphia. 


37»S Fairmotint Ave. 


Rothschild, LeRoy Berman. 


Arch-, 


do. 


183a N, 17th St. 


Royce, Lewis Glenn, 


Ch., 


Ardmore. 


307 S 3ath St. 
ion Dakota St. 


Rumig, Edward Francis, 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


Rushtoo. Allen Alonzo. 


Wh.. 


do. 


I7J2 N. 38th St. 


Russell, Howard Wootten, 


C. E., 


Farmington, Del., 
Philadelphia, 


Dorm 363 Baird. 


SSier, John Morris, 


M. E.. 


3533 Locust St. 


Wh.. 


do. 


9039 Spruce St, 


Scheling, George Louis. 


Arch., 


Brooklyn. N. Y,, 


3539 L<>cust St. 


Schilling, George Edward, 


Wh„ 


Philadelphia, 


IOI7 S. 46th St. 



•Abwnt on leave 



tizedoy Google 



Name. 


Course. 




City Addnss. 


Sehneeberg, David, 


Wh., 


PhiUdelphia, 


sgiaN. sthSt 


Scott. John Harry. 
Seaton, Hartley Hawley, 


Wh,. 


do. 


5008 Penn St.. Fkd. 
Dorm. 31 Morris. 


Arch, 


JacksonviUc, Fla.. 
Philadelphia, 


Sellers, Stanley Lincoln, 


Arch.. 


1517 Marshall St. 


Shoemaker, Dudley. 


M. E. 


do. 


6366 Sherwood Road. 

Overbrook. 
303 E. Hamilton Ct. 


Simm. Irene May, 
Simon, Carroll WUliams, 


B.. 


Louisville, Ky., 


C. E., 


Philadelphia , 
Kansas City, Mo., 


1034 E. Allegheny Av. 


Small, Edwin Weed. 


A.. 


3705 Walnut St. 


Smith, Albert Tate, 


C. E.. 




3438 Walnut St. 


Smith, Gilbert Haven, 


A., 


do. ' 


511 S. 47th St. 


Smith, Hoxie Harrison. 


A., 


Bryn Mawr, 


aois Locust St 


Snyder, Clarence M„ 


A., 


East Lenox. 




Snyder, Francis Berry, 


A., 


Philadelph.'a, 


3402 N. Broad St. 


Smith, George Lathrop, 


M. E.. 


do. 


4415 Pine St. 


Spanglcr, Evan McKinlcy, 


Wh.. 


York. 


Dorm. 33 Morris, 


Spruance, Frank Palin, 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


6505 N. 6th St., 

Oak Lane. 
Dorm, io Morris. 


Stifft, Perry William, 


Wh., 


Little Rock, Ark., 


Stockhausen, Thomas George, 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


lOTiS. 4SthSt. 


Sunderland, John Norman, 


C. E„ 


do. 


5919 Girard Ave. 


Swoycr, Alfrtd Edward. 


M. E. 


Honesdale, 


3614 Walnut St. 


Takaki, Shun>:o, 


Wh., 


Tokio, Japan, 


3400 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 344 Lippincott. 


Taylor. Leonard Mulford, 


Ch. E 


Phitadclphia, 


Tcich, Frederic Charles. 


Arch. 


New Britain, Conn 


,371s Woodland Ave. 


Tener. Henry Brown, Jr., 
Thompson, David, 


C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


»»»3 Tioga St. 
3333 W^aee St. 


C.E., 


do. 


♦Throckmorton. John Bayard. 


M. E., 


Red Bank. N. J. 




Thumd, Augustus Bernard, 


Arch. 


Cumberland, Md., 


Dorm. 454 N. Y. 

Alumni. 
McKean Ave., Gtn. 


Tilden. Herbert Marmaduke. 


A„ 


Philadelphia, 


Townscnd, Joseph Brevitt. 3d, 
Tuck, Arthur Elmer. Jr., 


A., 


Overbrook. 


Dorm. 130 McKean. 


E.E., 


Camden, N. J.. 




Tustin, Tones Buckwalter. 

Tuttie. John Betley, 
Ungemach, Dena Daisy, 


C.E., 


Philadelphia. 


1813 N. 23d St. 


A., 


do. 


U.S. 33th St. 
3548 N.Douglas St. 


B.. 


do. 


Van Osten, Andrew Maurice, 


M. E. 


do. 


911 S, St, Bernard St. 


Vendig, Norman Casseres. 


Wh., 


do. 


1933 N. T3thSt. 


Vogdes, Joseph Johnson, 


C.E., 


do. 


Ridgdand, W. Fair- 
mount Park. 


Waite, Ralph John. 


E. E„ 


do. 


1713S. ijthSt. 


Walling, Ritner Kelsey. 


C.E., 


do. 








St., German town. 


Wanger, George, 


A., 


Norristowa 




Watson. John Warren, 


Wh^ 


Wayne, 
Philadelphia, 


300 S. 36th St. 
6373 Woodbine Ave. 


Watt. James Cniickshank, 
Way, LeRoy Bailiet, 


M. ^. 


Wh., 


WilUamsport, 


Dorm. 49 Morris. 


•Webb, Henry Phelps, 


C. E., 


Philadelphia, 


1631 Jackson St. 
3537 Locust St. 


Weed, Joseph Dunmng, ?d. 
White, Walter Rhoads, 


M. E. 


tackson\-ille, Fla.. 
Lansdowne. 


A., 




White, William McKcan, 


M. E. 


Philadelphia. 


800 S. St. Bernard St. 



t,i.a,Google 



Nkme. 

Widmcr. Louis Charles, 
Wilbrabam, Rossiter William, 
Wilensky, Max Harris, 
Wilson, Thomas Batcman, 
Withers, Benjamin Thomas, 
Wood, Clarence Hall, 
Wood, George Shaffer. 
Wykes. Thomas Edward, Jr., 
Yarnall, Charles Herbert, "Jr., 
Yetman. William Hcm-y. jr., 
Zeckwer, Jamard Richard, 



Adams. Robert Rogers, 
Akahoshi, Tetsuma. 
Aldrich, John Terrell, 
Allen, John Edward, 
Arnold, John Carlisle, 
Arrott, William, 
Baker, William Ellis, 
Ballard, Frederic Lyman, id. 
Bamberger, Morton DcWitt, 
Bamford, William Taylor. 
Bankart. Henry Ke^nald, 
Bankes, Earl Frederick, 
Barrett. Wilton Agnew, 



Beck. Alfred Fortin, 

Bell, Howard James, 
Bellinger, Wilsey Simon, 
Bcneker, Albert Lawrence, 
Benton. Emory Sherwood, 

BcuttcnmuUcr, Rudolph William. 



Blank. Henry Valentine, 
Bond, Walter Loucks, 
Bonsack. Edwin. 
Borne, Alexander McGaw, 
Bradbury, Frederic Wootten, 



C. E.. 


Philadelphia, 


2946 W. Dauphin St. 
3313 Walnut St. 
Donn. s I Morris. 
...i.N.^aronSt. 


M. E., 


do. 


A.. 


Atlanta. Ga., 


M.E.. 


Havre deGrace,Md 


A.. 


Washington, D. C, 


41a S. 18th St. 


M. E., 


Hatboro, 


ia8 S. 17th St. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


3213 Columhia Ave. 
i.Dorm. 301 Brooks. 


Wh. 


Grand Rapids.Mich 
Philadelphia, 


A., 


4T05 Baltimore Ave. 


C. E,. 


do. 


3834 N. Eighth St. 


M. E., 


do. 


106 N. 34th St. 


FKE8HMEN. 




A., 


Philadelphia, 


Sjoi Girard Ave. 


Wh., 


Tokio, Japan, 
Philadelphia. 


3400 Walnut St. 


C.E.. 


3419 N. 93d St. 
Dorm. 33 E. P. Smith. 


M. E., 


Erie, 


A.. 


DuBois, 


Dorm. 145 Camith. 


Wh.. 


St. David's. 




C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


S141 Chestnut St. 


A., 


Chestnut Hill. 




Wh., 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dorm. ia4 Baldwin. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia. 


1 1 1 7 Shackamaxon St. 


Wh.. 


Bridgton, Me., 
Middleport. 


3330 Walnut St. 
Dotm. 387 Lippincott. 
6330 Burbndge St., 

Germ an town. 
2816 Columhia Ave. 


Arch,, 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


C.E„ 


do. 


Arch,, 


do. 


1630 W. Allegheny 


A„ 


Chester Valley. 


C-E., 


Philadelphia, 


73a E. Chelten Ave, 
German town. 


A., 


Aubum. N. Y., 


1813 Bouvier St. 


E. E., 


La Salle, N. Y., 


Dorm. lag Craig. 


Areh., 






A,. 


So. Manchester, 
Conn., 


135 S. 46th St. 


C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


lath and Wagner Av., 

Logan. 
1844 North jith St. 


C. E.. 


do. 


A., 


do. 


E. Gorgas Lane, Ht. 


C. E., 


do. 


Airy. 
Dorm. 39 Morris. 


Wh., 


York, 


M. E., 


, Philadelphia, 


3453 Woodland Ave. 
Dorm. 31 E. F. Smith. 
5413 Wayne Ave., 


C. E., 


Newark, N. J., 


ch., 











i,Googlt' 





STUDENTS. 


549 


Nune. 


Course. 


Rcsidenet. 


Cily AddrtM. 


Bradbury, Henry Wilson, 


M, E., 


PhUadelphia, 


139 W. Rittcnhouse 

St., Germantown. 
[Spring & Elkins Ave ] 
350 Pelham Road. 


Bradford, James Frederick, 


M. E., 


El kins Park. 


Braun. WiUiam Frederic Harold. 


M. E., 


Philadelphia. 








Germantown. 


Brcitinger. Frederick William, 
Britt, Walter Francis, 


A., 


do. 


2.25 N. list St. 


Arch., 


do. 


2at>8 Tioga St. 


Broadbelt, Wiiford Fake. 


C, E.. 


do. 


4300 Market St. 


Broad well, Howard, 


E. E.. 


do. 


17358. 8th St. 


Brook. John Andrews, 


C. E.. 


Ardmore. 




Brooks, Walter Wimpenny. 


E. E.. 


Philadelphia. 

Coatesville, 


5300 Girard Ave. 


Brown. Eugene Baker, 


C. E., 


". S. 34th St. 


Brown. Everett Henry, Jr., 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


5414 Greene St., Gtn. 
Dorm. 502 Baldwin. 


Brown, George Levi, 
Brown. Harold Stacy, 


Wh., 


Williamsport. 
Hudson. Mass.. 


Wh., 


3707 Locust St. 


Brown, Henry Paul, Jr., 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


laS W. UpsalSt., 
Germantown. 


Brown, James Laird. Jr., 
Brown. John Henry. Jr., 
Burleigh, Charles Carroll. 
Buseck, Fred Louis, 


Wh„ 


Lancaster. 


Dorm. 13 E.F.Smith. 


C.E.. 


Philadelphia, 


17 S. 14th St, 


Ch.. 


MerchantvUie, N. J. [i lo E. Maple Ave ) 


Wh.. 


Erie, 


108 S. 37th St. 


B5TTie, Charles Lawrence. 


C. E.. 




Dorm. 53 Morris. 


CadwaUadcr, Charles Girton. Jr.. 


M. E,. 


Philadelphia, 


430 S. 45th St. 


Caldwell, Edward Baker, Jr.. 


Arch., 


Mansfield. Ohio, 


Dorm. 328 Franklin. 


CaldweU, William Taylor, 
Callender, Clarence N., 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


1819 Venango St. 
Dorm. 249 Carruth. 


Wh.. 


Scranton. 


CaUow, Edwin Bert, 


C, E., 


Lansdowne. 




Carr, Harry Germaine Downward, 


, A., 


Colwyn. 
Charleston. W. Va. 




Carver. Enoch, Jr., 


M. E., 


, Dorm. 25 Morgan. 


Cavanna, Elmer Robair, 


Wh.. 


Camden, N. J., 


[S3 7 Cooper St.l 
441? Chestnut St. 
3118 Chestnut St. 


Chance, Thomas Mitchell. 


Arch.. 


Philadelphia, 


Chang, Henry Kunphrcy. 


Wh., 


Canton. China, 


Cheston, George Morris, 


A., 


NewYorlcCity.N.Y 


3453 Woodland Ave. 
. Dorm. 232 Craig. 
S. W. Cor. Cumber. 


Christopher, Donald, 


M. E., 


Clj^ham, John Hartman, 


E, E., 


Philadelphia, 








land & Emerald Sts. 


aart. LesUe Dent, 


A.. 


Fresno, Cal., 


102 S. 36th St. 


aay. Edwaid Biddle. 


Wh. 


I'hiladclphia. 


Dorm. 108 Leidy. 


Qay, William Thomas, 


C. E.. 


do. 


3431 Fairmount Ave, 


Clowes. George Archer, 


A.. 


do. 


1517 Venango St. 


Coffman, Elwood Foster, 


Ch.. 


Phoenix villc. 




Cogan, Clement J., 
Cole, Charles James, Jr., 


E. E.. 


Bayoi.ne, N. J., 


3531 Locust St. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


1712 N. isthSt. 


Coles, Walter Francis, 


A., 


do. 


aispN.WoodstockSt. 


Conovcr, Courtney. 
Corkran, Sewell Hopkins, 


Ch.. 

A., 


Spartansburg, 


1438 N. 6th St. 


Cox, Charles Howard, 


Ch.. 


Bridgeton, N. J., 


3608 Locust St. 


Cratty. Jay Weinman, 
Criswell. George Stuart, Jr., 


A,. 


Wilkinsburg, 


1225 S. s7thSt. 


A., 


Franklin, 


Dorm. II Bodine. 


Curtzc, Edwin Herman, 


Wh., 


Erie. 


Dorm. 32 E. F. Smith. 


Curry, Charles Hill, 


A.. 


Woodbury, N. J.. 


1524 Chestnut St. 



t,i.a,Google 



THB COLLEGE, 



Namt. 


Course. 


Rco<fenc« 


City Address. 


Curtis. John Pollock. 


Arch. 


Abilene. Tex., 


I09 S. 33d St. 


Dal ton, James Morris, 


A.. 


Philadelphia, 


ii6 E. Washington 
Lane, Germant n. 




Ch., 


do. 


3811 Poplar St. 


DarlinBton, Norman Seal, 
Day, Samuel Harvey, 


M. E. 


West Chester. 




Ch. E 


Wilmington. Del., 


fRocktord.l 
Dorm, 16 Bodine. 


Decrow. Vcrc Roycc, 
Derinjr, Edward Mnlford. Jr., 


M. E. 


Buffalo, N. Y., 


E. E.. 


Philadelphia, 


41SS Leidy Ave. 


Dickson. Thomas Sinclair. 


A.. 


do. 


41 11 Locust St. 


Disc, Joseph Ivan, 
DocUncr, Frederick Henry, 


Arch.. 


Glen Rock, 


Dorm, 400 Lcidy. 


C. E., 


Philadelphia, 
Upper Darby. 
m-lt Chester, 


241S N. 15th St, 


•Doolittle. Harold, 


M. E, 




Dowlin, William Augustus, 
•Drucding^ Bernhard John, 
du Pont, Elcuthcre Paul, 


Ch., 


Dorm, 350 Lippincoti 
517 W. Girard Ave, 
Dorm. 206 Leidy. 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


E. E., 


Montchanin. Del., 


Dunbar. Louis Smith, 


Arch., 


Bloomficid, N. J., 


Dorm, J02 S. 37th St. 


Eagle, Stephen Harry, 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


1613S. 4th St. 


Eamshaw, John Benjamin, 


A., 


Washington, D. C. 


Dorm.35sClassof "S;. 


Eastwood, Abraham Bagot, 


E. E., 


Wcldon. 




Eckhardt, Enijclhardt August, 
Edwards, William Ncilsoii, 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


903 N, 5th St. 


M. E. 


do. 


ajio DcLancey St. 


Eggcrs. Herman Diedirieh. Jr., 


Ch, E. 


Louisville, Ky., 


3418 Powelton A\-c. 


Egglcston. Richard Cunningham 


A.. 


Philadelphia. 


136 Buckingham PI. 


Engcl, Francis Joseph. 
Erichson, William Bowers. 


M. E., 


do. 


4707 Chester Ave. 


C. E.. 


do. 


1848 N. i.thSt. 


Ewing. Buchanan. 


C. E., 


Villa Nova, 


Dorm. »o6 Leidy. 


Fairbairn, Archibald Bate. 


E. E., 


Conshohocken. 




Farenwald, John. 


C. E„ 


Roslyn. 




Fcglcy, John Thomas, 


Ch.. 


FhUadelphia, 


1423 Ontario St. 


Feinberg, Louis, 
Fetter, Theodore Search, 


A., 


do. 


413 Christian St. 


Arch.. 


do. 


ig3i N. 3iatSt. 


Flack. Howard Watson. 


A., 


Grenoble. 




Fleck, Louis Aurand Ferdinand, 


Wh.. 


Lansford, 


3307 Ridge Ave. 


Fleishcr, Alexander, 


A-. 


Philadelphia, 


2045 Green St. 


Fleisher. Horace Teller, 


Wh.. 


do. 


2213 Green St. 


Fogel, Isaac, 


C.E.. 


do. 


216 N. 2d S- 


Folger. Wayne Harrison. 


Wh., 


Lockport. N. J., 


Dorm. 40 Bodine. 


Fort, Leon Bergen, 


Wh,, 


Trenton, N, J. 


E428 E. State St.] 


Foust, Clement Edgar, 


A., 


North Wales. 




Frame. PtTcv Tindall, 


Ch-. 


Philadelphia, 


3331 N. 3oth St. 


Frocdlcy, Paul. 


M. E.. 


Overbrook, 


[5918 Drexel Road.] 


Freeman. Addison B., 


Ch. E. 




206 E. Penn St.; Gtn. 


French, Francis Ra>Tnond, 


Wh., 


Washington. D. C. 


Dorm, 29 Morris. 


Freund, Henry Herman, Jr., 


Ch. E. 


Philadelphia, 
Toledo, Ohio, 


t3:oS. sthSt. 


Gardiner. Roy James, 


V,'h., 


3400 Wahiut St. 


Garrison, Leon Benjamin, 


C.E.. 


Philadelphia, 


2020 Arch St, J 
Dorm. 132 Craig. 


Gcvelin, Antony Laussat, 


A., 


VilU Nova, 


Gitb, William Massell, 


A.. 


Philadelphia, 


6381 Dreiel Road. 


Gibbons-Neff. Morton, 


Wh.. 


do. 


1031 Spruce St. 


Gibson. Gaylord Mesey, 


Wh., 


Erie, 


3643 Locust St. 


Gibson, Henry Clay. 


M. E., 


Philadelphia, 


2001 Walnut St. 


•Ahsciit em leave. 




Dig 


zedoyGOOglf 



Goldemith, Bcrthold Henry, 
Gormley, Robert Richard, 
Graw, Newton Hughes, 
tJretz, William. Jr., 
Griscom. Walter Stewart, 
Grove, William Garrett, 
Guilbert, Charles Howard, Jr., 
ilalkett, Walter Ainslie, 
Hamilton, Russell Donohugh, 
Hammer, John Levering, 

Hammond. Hany Parker, 
Hance, Wallace Eugene, 
HanscU, Howard Forde, Jr., 
Hanson, Wilmer Crooks, 
Haring, Arthur Winficid, 
Harned, Herbert Speneer, 
Harris, Harry Cleveland, 
Harris, Harold Roscnan, 
Harris, Myron I.ouis, 
Hart, Samuel Corin^di, 
Harvey, Edmund Newton, 

Haupt, Lewis Herman, 
Havenstritc, Joseph Arthur, 
Hawkins, George Zeller, 
Hdlycr, Harold. 
Hitchens, William Frank, 
Hitner, William Perry Evcland, 
Hoffeckcr, Joseph Van Gasken, 
Hofmann, Arthur Albert, 
Hokanson, Horace Milton, 

Hopkinson, Richard Dale, 
Homberger, Harry, 
Hovey, Walter Freeman, 
Howie, Kenneth, 
Howze, Samuel Perry, 
Huckel, Earle Wentworth, 

Huckins, Allan Irving, 
Hughes, Edward MorriE, 
Hughes, William Harold, 
•Hume, Errington Burnley, Jr., 

Hummel. Frederick Charles, 
Huist, Thomas Edwin, 
Husik, Maurice, 

•Absent on leave. 



C, E., 


Greensburg, 


3430 Sansom St. 
Dorm. 452 New York 


A., 


Wilkinsburg, 






Alumni. 


A.. 


Philadelphia, 


a N. 38th St. 


M. E. 


Camden, N. J. 


600 State St.! 


E. E., 


do. 


SiiMickleSt.l 
S40 Franklin St. 


M. E. 


Philadelphia, 


A.. 


do. 


S3d and Berks Sts. 


C. E., 


do. 


.943 N. 13th St. 
903 S. 47th St. 


M. E. 


do. 


Wb„ 


Ridley Park. 


40 N. 3d St. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


Shawmont Ave. 


Wh., 


do. 


30 Gowen Ave., Mt. 

Airy. 
Dorm. 124 Baldwin. 


C. E.. 




Arch. 


Boothwyn. 

Philadelphia, 




A.. 


1S18 Walnut St. 


E. E„ 


do. 


5635 Market St. 


M. E. 


do. 


642 Diamond St. 


A„ 


do. 


Dorm, 16 Morris. 


A., 


do. 


1145 N. i6th St. 


Wh., 


do. 


1939 N. 33d St. 


M. E- 


do. 


'939 N. 33d St. 


E. E., 


Jamaica, B. W. I., 
Philadelphia. 


3213 Sansom St. 


B., 


»36 W. Hortter St., 






German town. 


M. E. 


do. 


.07 N. 35th St. 


A., 


Moscow, 


1304 S. loth St. 


E. E., 




sag Market St. 


C. E., 


Penn's Park. 




Arch. 


Philadelphia, 


3210 Powclton Ave. 


M. E. 


do. 


1313 W. Lehigh Ave. 


Arch. 


do. 


3108 Ridge Ave. 
Dorm. 118 Class of '87. 


Wh., 


Pittsburg, 


Arch. 


St. Paul, Minn., 


HUldale Road, Lans- 
downe. 


A.. 
Ch. E 


Philadelphia, 
do. 


1414 Spruce St. 


E. E., 


Beverly, K. J. 




M. E. 


Philadelphia. 


48SedteewickSt.,Gtn. 


A., 


Marion, Ala., 


Dorm. 93 Morgan. 
50a W. Chelten Ave., 


A., 


Philadelphia, 






German town. 


A.. 


do. 


4117 Girard Ave. 


Ch., 


Tredyffrin. 




C.l, 


Philadelphia, 


4006 Pine St. 


M. E. 


Charleston, S. C„ 


Ill Rochelle Ave., 
Wissahickon. 


Arch. 


Boise. Idaho, 


3715 Woodland Ave. 


A., 


Fall River, Mass., 


aio S. 36th St. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


1325 S. 6th St. 



t,i.a,Google 



Ilult, Robert Bines Woodivard, 
Hyni'tnan, Heiiry Isaac, 
Ifffcris, Paul Gricr, 
Jtnnc, Lylc Lorcn. 

Johnson, lames Hcrtcrt, 
Johnson, William Keating, 
Jones, William Dowlin, 

Kawasaki, Hajime, 



Kcelcr, John Reese, 
Kcil, Raymond Humphrey, 
Kcinath, Charles, 
Kitson, Arthur, Jr., 
Klaer, Henry Jacob, 
Klauber, Edward, Jr., 
Kline, Clarence, 

Klopfcr, Norman WilHs, 
Koflce, Harry Conrad. 
Koyl, George Simpson, 
Krantz, Gcoi^e Buckley, Jr., 
Kunymann, John Melanchton, 
Kyle, Elmer Langham, 
Lafean, Leroy Krone, 
Laird, Robert Fisher, 



Lavino, Edwin Maurice. 

Leap, Sedgwick Rusling,Jr. 
Lee. John Kidd, 
Lemon. Thomas Henry, 
Levi. Newton Reginalcl. 
Levinthal, Israel Herbert, 
Levy. Augustus, 
Levy, Fabian Franklin, 



City Addm*. 
igoS Pairmount Ave. 
1103 Chestnut St. 



Worcester, Mass., 
Rosemont. 
Chester. 
Suidocho, Tokio, 

Wawa. 
, Philadelphia, 

Phoenix ville. 
Bellcvue. Ky. 
Philadelphia, 
do. 
. Milford. 
Louisville. Ky.. 
Allen town, 

Washington, D. C. 
Bridcsburg. 
Denver. Colo., 
Philadelphia, 



Pcnn's Grove, N. J 
Philadelphia. 
Mansfield. Ohio, 
Philadelphia. 



1453 Woodland Ave. 
103 W.^' • - ■ - 
Gtn. 



'. Walnut Lane, 



33g a. oth at. 
1.3 W.UpsalSt.,Gtn. 
Dorm. 43 Morris. 
Dorm. 319 Leidy. 
Dorm. 243 Provost 

Smith. 
3705 Walnut St. 
2700 Ash St. 
3313 Woodland Ave. 
1937 E. Orleans St. 
4407 Chestnut St. 
3131 Franktord Ave. 
3614 Walnut St. 
320 E. Logan St., 

Dorm. SS Memorial. 
47 Phil-EUena St., 
German town. 
■.3319 Walnut St, 

Kloo Chestnut St, 
orm. 411 Leidy. 
1408 N. 15th St. 
716 Pine St. 
3136 Sanaom St. 

ilewood Ave., 



Livingston, Charles Harold. 



Savannah. Ga., 
Pittsburg. 

Philadelphia, 



4940 Hazel Ave. 
1158 S. Broad St. 
ia»3 N. 17th St. 
1716 BailySt. 
813 Vine St. 



tizedoy Google 



McEwaji, William George, j... 
McHugb, Franklin Stanislaus, 
McMsJion, Charles Omar, 
McManus, Charles Joseph. 
McNichol, Henry Aloysius, 
McQ^en. Darnel Neall. Jr., 
Ma^arland, Walter Griffith, Jr., 



Major. 
M^oney, John Carroll, 
Mann, Garner Benson, 
Manwaring, Roy Artimus, 
Martin, Sergeant Price, 
Maurer, Conrad Brown, 
Mcrrell, William, 
Merrick, Rodney King, 

Metz, Louis Charles, 
Meyer, Jerome Kaufman, 
Miller, Alphonse Bertram, 
Miller, Arthur Hagen, 
Miller, Richard Gladden, 
Mills, Alan Baleh, 
Mitchell, John Howard, Jr., 
Montgomery, Manlie, 
Moore, James Arthur, 
Moorshead, Albert Henry, 
Moran, Williani Cuthbert, 
Morgan, William Richard, 

Morison, Rodney, Jr., 

Morton, Charles Bickley, 

Moscrip, William Henry, 

Moxey, John Gray, 

Muller, Henry John, 
Mulvihill, Francis John, 
Murphy, Walter Bispham, 
Myere, Joseph S., 
Nelson, Fred Amsden, 
Netoffsky, William, 
Newell, Charles WiUiam, 
Newell, Palmer Farraaut, 
O'Ndl, Sydney Daniel, 



STUDENTS. 


SS3 


Coune. 


R^ddMce. 


Gly Addren. 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


1347 S. 7th St. 
aj47 N. Park Ave. 


Arch., 


Charleroi, 


C. E,. 


Philadelphia, 


3417 Columbia Ave. 


E, E., 


do. 


ai34 S. Broad St. 


Wh., 


Locust Gap, 


Dorm. 51 Memorial. 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


3517 Cleveland Ave, 


C. E., 


do. 


1404 N. isthSt. 


C. E., 


do. 


121 N. i9ttiSt. 


Wh^ 


Ovcrbrook, 


Dorm. DO McKean. 


M. 1, 


Philadelphia, 


Oak Lane, Asbury 
Terrace. 


A.. 


Torrosdale. 


M. E., 


Philadelphia, 


3717 Powelton Ave. 


Wh., 


do. 


1504 Tioga St. 
Manheim St., Gtn. 


A., 


do. 


Wh., 


do. 


ao33 N, 33d St. 


A., 


do. 


Dorm. 105 Lcidy. 
aig Richmond St. 


A., 


do. 


Ch., 


do. 


2950 Frankford Ave. 


A., 


do. 


5219 Wayne Ave., 


E. E., 


do. 


20S9 Franklin St. 


E. E., 


Baltimore, Md., 


3340 Walnut St. 


A.. 


Philadelphia. 


1851 N. 17th St. 


A., 


do. 


317 Green St. 

"The Covington." 


E, E., 


do. 


M. E., 


do. 


aaio Locust St. 


M. E., 


do. 


3316 Race St. 


B., 


Madison, Ind.. 


4305 Sansom St. 


M. E., 


Panama, R. de P., 


.04 S. 33d St. 


C. E., 


Lansdowne. 




M. E„ 


Philadelphia, 
Passaic, N. J.. 


5244 Walton Ave. 
Dorm. 39a New York 


C. E., 






Alumni. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


303s Susquehanna 
Avenue. 


E. E.. 


do, 


W. Lcverington Ave., 
Roxborough. 


C. E., 


do. 


4320 Manayunk Ave., 
Roxborough. 


M. E., 


do. 


7t»3 Boyer St., Mt. 

1501 Poplar St. 
183s Kensington Ave. 


C. E., 


do. 


M. E., 


do. 


M. E., 


do. 


303 So. 3gth St. 
Chestnut Hill. 


C. E., 


do. 


Arch., 


Scran ton, 


Dorm. 388 Lippincott. 


Ch.. 


Louisville, Ky., 


Dorm. 151 Alumni. 


C. E., 


Philadelphia. 


337 Wyota St. 
3347 Woodland Ave. 


C. E.. 


BuSalo. N- Y., 


C. E., 


ChippewaFalls.Wis 


. 52 N. 36th St. 



t,i.a,Google 



Nmnc 


Coune. 


Raid«a. 


CitrAdd««. 


Ocha. Robert Emanuel, 


Arch., 


Allen town. 


Dorm. IS Mofsan. 


Orme. Albert Mansfield, 


Wh.. 


Wayne, 
Philadelphia, 


3S33 Locust St. 


Ott, Lambert, Jr.. 


Wh., 


8,1 N. Broad St. 


Ottman, Robert Emery, 


A., 


Central Bridge, N.Y.iin N. tgth St. 


Parker, Harbach Lcroy, 


Wh„ 


Philadelphia, 


3438 N. isth St. 


Parsons, Harold Mead, 


E. E., 


do. 


64 N. 36th St. 


Patterson, John Douglas, 


M. E., 


Wilmington. Del., 


Dorm. 134 Baldwin. 


Paxson, Charles Edward, 


Wh., 


Camden, N. J., 


tiaaMainSt.] 


Perkins, Joseph LeComte, 

Perry, William Waller, 


M. E., 


Philadelphia, 


413 S. Broad St. 


E. E., 


Salisbury, Md.. 


Dorm. 148 New York 








Alumni. 


Perztn, Leo. 


C. E.. 


Kisehincv, Russia, 


718 N. 8th St. 
Dorm. 13 Morris. 


Peterman, Claude Lewis, 


Wh., 


York, 


Peterman, Roy Lewis, 


E. E.. 


West Chester. 




PitTcc, Raymond. 


M, E., 


Homellsvillc, N. Y 


..Dorrn. 30 Morris. 
,o6W.UpsalSt.,Gtn. 


Pilling, Joseph Ross, 
Pipping, William Otlo, 
Piatt, HavUand Hull, 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


E. E., 


do. 


6353 Greene St., Gta. 


E. E„ 


Wallingford, 




Plumly, Franeis Lasher, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia. 


II4S. 33d St. 


Porter, Andrew Wagencr, 


A.. 


do. 


ioiS Walnut St. 


Potter, Sheldon Frothingham, 


M.E., 


do. 


300 S. 36th St. 
3604 Walnut St. 


Potts, Easlbum, 


Wh.. 


Potts town. 


Price, Julius Joseph. 
Radcliff, Robert Llewellyn, 


A., 


Norfolk, Va., 


3163 Locust St. 


M. E.. 


Conahohockcn. 




Register, Henry Bartol, 


A., 


Ardmore, 


Dorm. 334 Baird. 
8iiiSt.flartin-sLane. 


Reichcrt, Edward Tyson, Jr., 


E. E., 


Philadelphia, 


Roberts, Albert Charles, 


A.. 


do. 


109 S. 38th St. 


Roberts. William Wallaec, 


A., 


do. 


4138 Spruce St. 


Robinette, Edward Burton, 


A„ 


Everett, 


Chestnut Hill Acad'y. 

Wiss'h'n Heights. 
4aia Parkstdc Ave. 


Roedelheim, William Steve, 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


Rogers, Edmund Henkels, 


Wh., 


Wyncote. 




Rogers, Francis Churehill, 
Roflinson. James Wells, 


M. E.. 


WUmington, Del. 


J'i30i Delaware Ave.l 
Dorm. 38 Morgan. 


Arch-, 


Buffalo, N, Y., 


Roop, James Clawson, 
Rose, Harry Burnley, 


E. E., 


Upland. 




M. E., 


Camden. N. J. 
Theodosia, Russia, 


[6i9 N. 4th St.] 


Rosen, Alexis. 


M. E., 


993 N. Marshall St- 


Rosenblatt. Jerome Harry, 


A., 


Philadelphia, 


5305 BayntonSt., 
German town. 


Rosin, Joseph. 
Rossheim. frving David, 

Rothstein. Uda David, 


Ch„ 


do. 


430 Catharine St. 


Wh., 


do. 


5003 Hazel Ave. 


A., 


Johnstown, 
Indianapolis. Ind., 

Phil^elp^' 


3336 Walnut St. 


Sahm, Roy, 


Arch., 


lasN. 32dSt. 


Saito, Kosuke, 


Wh., 


Dorm. iioMcKean. 
IIS W. Washington 
Lane, Gtn. 


Sautcr, William Rodgcrs, 


C. E., 


Sehaefer, Charles Henry, 
Schaefer, William Charles, Jr., 


C, E., 


do. 


i»i3_WallaceSt. 

a I W. Tulpehocken 

St., Gtn. 
Dorm. 131 McKean. 


Wh., 


do. 


Sehellens. Richard, 


A.. 


Groton. Conn., 


Schncebcfg, Bcrtrand, 


Ch., 


Camden, N. J. 


[1036 Broadway.] 



t,i.a,Google 



Schoch, Charles Leonard, 
Schopbach, Charles Henry„ 
Schutiinann, Geo^ Linder, 
Schwab, Harvey Arthur, 

Scott, Charles Henry, Jr„ 
Scoville, William Hamsoti, 
Seully, Charles Alison, 
Senior, Harold Benedict, 
Sessler, Grover Cleveland, 
Shallom, Abraham, 
Shaw, John Wilson, 

Sheble, Warren, 

Shioss, Sam, 
Sibley, Hinson Smith, 
Simmons, Berkeley Leo, 
Sloan, Paul Milliken, 
Smith, Abram Walter, 
Smith, Maybuiry Mcllor, 
Smythe, J, Henry, Jr., 
Sobs-Cohen, David Hays, 
Souder, EUwood, Jr., 
Spindler, Frank, 
Steen, John Dee. 
Sterrett, Frank William. 
Stratton, Leon Duprce, 
Strauss, Percival Smith, 
Stroud, Morris Wistar, jr., 
Stuart. Milton Caleb, 
Sutnner, John Newman, 
Taylor. Charles Carter. 
TiBxler, Thompson Arthur, 
Thomas, Edward Whctlock, 
Townend, Ernest S., 
Townsend, Stockton, 
Teubner, Edmund Rudulph, 
Tumen, Louis Isaac, 



- -„ er, John, 
Walliser, Emile Rivoir, 
Walton. Tesae Pusey, 
Warner, William Richard, 3d. 
Wamick, Henry Clay, 
Warwick. Charles Laurence. 
Webb, Lanphear Wesley, Jr.. 
Weber, Theodore George, 
Webster, Maurice Anderson, 

Wcimer, Peter Leibrandt, 



E.E., 
Ch. E., 
M. E., 
Arch., 



Philadelphia, 

do. 
Reading, 
New Pffiladelphia. 

Ohio, 
Philadelphia, 
So. Omaha. Neb. 
Philadelphia, 
Bethel, Conn., 
Philadelphia, 

do. 



E. E., Philadelphia, 

Wh^ Des Moines. la., 

E. E., Wilmington, Del, 

A., Washington, D. C. 

A., Allegheny, 

A., Ashton. Md., 

A.. Philadelphia. 

Wh., do. 

Wh., do. 

M. E., Wilmington, Del. 

Ch., Philaddphia, 

A., MUlville. N. J. 

A., E. Downingtown, 

Ch., Paulsboro, N. J. 

A., Williamson School. 

E. E., Villa Nova. 

M. E., Berwick, 

M. E., Norristown, 

A., Philadelphia, 

E. E„ Sunbury, 

Wh., Washington. D. C, 

Wh„ Wilkes-Barre, 

A., Bryn Mawr, 

C. E., Philadelphia, 

A., Atlantic Highlands, 

N.J., 

E. E.. Philadelphia, 

do. 



City AddRH. 

SI 01 Pine St. 
orm. 46 Morgan. 
Dorm. 3Q Bodinc. 
»o6 S. 37th St. 

1915 Spruce St. 
110 S. 33d St. 
140 S. 3gth St. 
Dorm. 410 Leidy. 
1345 Lambert St. 
934 S- 5th St. 
iJonn. 251 New York 

Alumni. 
6a 1 E. Washington 

Lane, Gtn, 
Dorm. 214 Carxuth. 
509 N. E. F. Bldg. 
Dorm, II Wilson. 
3701 Spruce St. 
3733 Walnut St. 
39 E. Penn St.. Gtn. 
1933 Wallace St. 
1525 Walnut St. 
[1 704 Washington St,] 
1336 N. 19th St. 

5000 Woodland Ave. 



George School. 
Duffryn Mawr. 
Philadelphia, 



Dorm. 105 Leidy. 
S3J7 DeLancey " 
[16E. MainStJ 
4105 Walnut St, 
1138. 37th St. 
3705 Walnut St. 
Dorm. 15 Bodin 
2103 Walnut St. 
3438 Walnut St. 
1234 S. sthSt. 



St. 



607 N. 33d St. 
6023 Kershaw St. 
1426 Diamond St. 
Dorm. 50 Morris. 
4900 Penn St., Frank- 
ford. 
Dorm. 31 Morris. 



tizedoy Google 



556 


THR 


COLLEGB. 




Nurne. 


Course. 






Wendel, Harry Forrest, 


A., 


Wauwatosa. Wis., 


Dorm. 36 Morgan. 


Wcstcott, Bayse Ncwcotnb, 


M. E. 


Philadelphia, 


Dorm. 11 Moivan. 

2014 Walnut St. 


WetheriU. Wmiam Chattin, 


A., 


do. 


White. Gilbert Newman. 


A., 


do. 


4125 Pine St. 


White, Lucius Read, Jr., 


Areh. 


Baltimore, Md., 


3312 Sansom St. 


White, Maurice Seal. 


M. E. 


PhUadelphia, 


3417 Raee St. 


Whiteman, F. Heber, 


C. E., 


do. 


6140 Ridge Ave., 

Rox borough. 
3604 Walnut St. 


Whitmoyer, Howard Brightbill, 


Wh., 


Harrisburg, 


Whitworth, Horace Clarke, 


A,. 


Paoti. 




Wilken. Joseph Robert, 


M. E. 


Louisville, Ky,. 


3617 Locust St. 


Williams, Herbert Lewis, 


C. E„ 


Philadelphia, 


m^RitnerSt. 


Williams, ohn Archibald, 


Wh., 


Scran ton. 


Dorm, 330 Hopkinson 


Williams, ohn Francis, 


C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


3516 KSt. 

Dorm, 339 Hopkinson 


Williams, Lewis H., 


Wh., 


Seranton, 


Wills, Louis Albert, 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


S537 Germantown Av 


Wilson, John Esler, 
Wilson, Ray Clifford, 


E..E., 


New Centreville. 




C. E., 


Manor. 


17*4 Race St. 


Winbigler, Cecil Meredith, 


Arch. 


Philadefphia, 


Dorm. 42s McKean. 


Woemer, Albert Henry, 


C. E., 


4415 Manayunk Ave. 








Roxborough. 
Dorm, no Franljlin. 


WolBtenholme, HolUs, 


Wh., 


do. 


Wood, Frank Herman, 


Arch. 


BurUngton, N. J., 


3421 Wahiut gt. 
[(Jt4 State St.] 


Wood, Percy Hollinshead. 
Woodroffe, William Philipps, 


Areh. 


Camden. N. J. 


M. E. 


Barbadoes, B.W.I 


,31 W. Johnson St.. 

Germantown, 

Dorm, 414 Franklin. 


Worden. Arthur Morley. 


M. ^, 


Batavia. N. Y., 


Wright, Arnold Ainley, 


Philadelphia, 


878 N. 13d St. 


Wright, John Waller. 


E. E., 


do. 


igo3 N, lathSt, 


Wright, Spencer Disston, 
YcrgtT, William Clarence, 


A., 


do. 


3ng Summer St. 


Ch. E 


do. 


642 N. 52d St, 
113W. UpsalSt,.Gtn. 


Yergcr. Wilson Stearly, 
Yerkes, Stephen Douglas, 


Ch, E 


do. 


Wh,, 


Hatboro, 




Zieber, Edward Herman. 


M. E. 


Philadelphia. 


4806 Springfield Ave. 


Zinsser, Harry Frederick, 


A,, 


Pittsburg. 


3250 Sansom St. 



t,i.a, Google 



N THB TWO AKD FOUR YEAR SPECIAL COURSES, 



Asheafelder. Newton. 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


1348 E. Susquehanna 
4gsN.4thSt. 


Chalfin, Elbabeth Miriam, 


M., 


do. 


Egbert, Harriet Newell, 




do. 


1517 N, 19th St, 


Giihens, Marie Louise, 


M., 


do. 


1716 Chestnut St. 


Graf. Grace, 


M., 


Haddonfield. N. J. 




McGuire, Lillian Woods, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


i304ParrishSt. 


Munro. Aneta Letitia, 


M., 


do. 


4131 Market St. 


Root, Grace Hall, 


M., 


do. 


888 N. 42d St. 


Schofield, Robert Le Roy, 


M., 


Northfield, Minn,, 


igii S. Broad St. 


Thomas, John Ramsey, 
Young, Helen Virpnia, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


1064 E. Dauphin St. 


M., 


do. 


1S06 Catharine St, 


STUDBKTS OF 


THE THIkD YEAR. 




Gorman, Stella Cecilia, 


M., 




163a Stiles St. 


Hustler, Albert, 


M., 


do. ' 


819 E, Chelten Ave. 


Lutz. Flavius Josephns. 
Patten, Mrs. Rose May, 


M., 


Swarthmore. 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


3729 Locust St. 


Wallace, Clarence Lee, 


M.. 


Lykcns, 


3604 Locust St. 


8TVDENTS OF 1 


HE SECOND YEAR. 




Bniyere, Louis Underwood, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


1818 N, r7thSt. 


Arc-h. 


New York. N. Y.. 


3303 Walnut St. 


Burchard, Frederick Leonard, 


Wh„ 


Norwich, N. Y., 


Dorm. ao3 Brooks. 




Arch. 


Fresno, Cal., 


3303 Walnut St, 


Cook, Dorothy, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


1716 Chestnut St. 


Gibbons, Mary Fulton, 
Grant. Edna Stuart. 


M., 


Philadelphia. 


40SS. 4.stSt. 


M., 


Hammonton, N.J. 


iGo N. 20th St, 


Hardenberg, Albert, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 
Denver, Colo., 


iSioCaytjgaSt, 


Ireland, Frederick William, Jr., 


Arch. 


3704 Ixwust St. 


Keepers, Walter Merritt, 


M„ 


Philadelphia. 


3044 Susquehanna Av 
Dorm. 327 Franklin. 

2i8S,37t{iSt. 


Koetz. Peter. 


Arch. 


Altoona, 


Lee, Chester Brooks, 


Arch. 


Toledo, Ohio, 


McDonald, Albert Clayton, 


Arch. 


Detroit, Mich,, 


Dorm, 326 Franklin. 


McDowell, Charles Jay, 
McGrath, William Edward John, 


Arch. 


Port Deposit, Md.. 


Dorm. 32 Morris. 


Wh., 


Chicago. 111., 
Philadelphia. 


Dorm. 202 Brooks. 


MacLean, Sarah Jones, 


M., 


277 S. 4th St. 


Miller, Mary Alice, 


M„ 


do. 


3017 E, Cumberiand 


Perkins, Benjamin, 


Arch. 


Oakland, Cal., 


301 S, 40th St. 


Porter, Harry Louis, 


Arch, 


Washington, 


3745 Spruce St, 
2121 ivft. Vernon St. 


Reinhardt, Lydia Ludwig, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


Shields, Joseph Cramer. 
Shiner, Walter Robinson. 


Wh., 


Washington. N. J. 


Dorm. 307 Brooks, 


Arch. 


New Haven. Conn 


3933 Pine St, 


Stanfield, Henry, 


Wh., 


Mt. Clair, N. J., 


3744 Irving St. 



t,i.a,Google 



Nsrae. 


Course. 


Retidence. 


GtyAddnw. 


Stanley, John Charles. 


Arch. 


Seattle, Wash.. 


34ig Walnut St. 
Dorm. $6 E. P. Smith, 


Stone, Charles Henry, 


B., 


Coatesville, 


Stubbs, Ethel, 


M., 


Merion. 




Taylor Laura May, 
Van MctCT, Cecil W., 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


533 S, 49tl» St. 


Arch. 


Columbus, Ohio, 


3704 Locust St. 


Watt. Charles Channing. Jr.. 


B., 


Germ an town. 


3641 Locust St. 


Wenzell, Herbert, 


Arch. 


Detroit, Mich., 


3932 Pine St. 


Wicke, Carl Frederick H., 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


3 34 Church Laoe, 

German town. 
Dorm, 3 6 9 Hopkinson. 


Wise, Heniy Mosea, 


B., 


- Portsmouth, Ohio, 


AUen, Haviland Woolverton, 


Arch- 


Jackson, Mich., 

Union town. 


4104 Chestnut St. 


•Altman, Harry Westley, 


Arch- 




Appel, Theodore Otto, 


Arch. 


New Haven, Conn 


3933 Pine St. 


Bacon, James Kerr, 


B.. 


York. 


3615 Locust St. 


Breitinger, Charles MacCaughn, 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


3531 N. Broad St. 


Breneman, Robert M., 


Wh.. 


Saston. 




Brokaw, Walter Samuel, 


W*., 




937 N. 42d St. 


Brown, Henry Armitt, 


Arch. 


Burlington, N. J. 
Columbus. Ohio. 




Brust, William George, 
Bryant. Arthur Justin, 


Arch. 


361 1 Locust St. 
Dorm. 336 Filler, 


Wh., 


Middleboro, Mass., 


Buck, Francis Douglass. 


Wh., 


State Road, Del. 




Campbell, Stephen, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


1910 Moyamensing 


Carwithen. Walter Metlar, 


Wh.. 


Doylestown. 




Collins, John Moulton, 
Damm, William Henry, Jr., 
DijBow, Richard Edgar Adamsor 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


3oaW. UpsalSt.,Gtn. 


M, 


do. 


333 Wolf St. 


. Wh., 


do. 


989 N. sth St. 


DeMert, Louis Richmond, 


Wh., 


Spokane, Wash,, 
Philadelphia, 


3605 Locust St. 


Diton, Carl Rossini, 


M,. 


1431 S, loth St. 


Dorwarth, Charles Votteler, 


B.. 


do. 


300 N- sth St. 


Downing, Charles Robert, 
Foster, Arthur, 


Wh.. 


do. 


3926 Spruce St. 


Wh., 


Dover. N. H., 


St^Klf- 


Gery, Howard Krauss, 


M-. 


Philadelphia, 


Oilier. Karl Watkin. 


Wh.. 


do. 


1601 Girard Ave. 


Glover, Louis Antonia, 


Arch., 


Houston, Texas, 


3264 Woodland Ave. 


Goodwin, John William, Jr., 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


S330 Baynton St., 

German town. 


Groves, Edward Augustine, Jr., 


B., 


do. 


Sgao Wayne Ave.. 
German town . 


Hays, Herbert CHfton, 


Wh.. 


Cyn\vyd. 

San Francisco. Cal 




Headman. August Goonic, 


Arch,. 


»o8 S, 37th St. 

45 Phil-Ellena St., 

Gcrmantown. 


Hesse, WilUam Charles, Jr., 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


Hicks, Ruth, 


M., 


Bryn Athyn, 


Hildebrand, Ernst Henry, 


Arch.. 


San Francisco, Cal 


908 S, 37th St. 


Hill. Philiaa Franklin, 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


1443 E. Gordon St. 


Huber, John Y,, Jr., 
Hulin, Stuart Morris, 


Wh,. 


do. 


1419 N. Broad St. 


Wh.. 


Franklin, 


Donn. 34 MemoriaJ. 



t,i.a,Google 





STlrnENiS. 


SS<> 


N«n*. 


Owiw. 


Rn-deoce. 




Hummel, Frederick Charles, 


Arch. 


Boise. Idaho, 


3715 Woodland Ave. 


Ito. Ryozo. 


Wh.. 


Nagoya. Japan. 


3739 Locust St. 


jacoby, John Frecdley. Jt., 
Kohne, Charles Christian, 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


t2i N. jothSt. 


Wh., 


Pittsburg, 


3619 Locust St. 


Lasbury, Howard Alonzo, 


B., 


East Windsor, Conn 


.,3419 Walnut St. 


Leo. Mary Martin, 
McCall, George Archibald. 
McConnick. Frank Ncff, 


M.. 


PhUadelphia, 


413 1 Baltimore Ave. 


Wh., 


do. 


1106 Spruce St. 


Wh.. 


Elkins Park. 




McCulloch. William Ross. 


Wh.. 


Newport. 


3731 Spruce St. 
1J35W; Allegheny Av 


McGarrity. Robert Seaton, 
Marble. Eugene Cleveland. 


Wh.. 




Wh. 


Chicago. III. 


3703 Locust St. 


Mattson. Norman Bernard, 


M.. 


Chester Heights. 


1411 N. 18th St. 


Miller, George Lewis. 


Wh.. 


York. 


Dorm, ig Morris. 


Milne, Caleb Jones, 3d. 


Wh., 


Hiiladelphia. 


J019 Walnut St. 


Mockbee. Maurice Lyne. 


Wh.. 


Cincinnati, Ohio. 


Dorm. 3SJ Baldwin. 


Murray. Earl Nelson, 


B.. 


Bradford, Mass.. 


3615 Locust St. 


NewhaU. EUen Melissa. 


M.. 


Philadelphia. 


4141 Manayunk Ave.. 

Roxborough. 
3034 Oxford St. 


Noble, Charles Greylock. 
Patterson, Elliott Remington, 


B.. 


do. 


Wh.. 


do. 


403J Green St. 


Patterson. Stonn Van Wycfc. 


Wh.. 


Ardmore. 


ISO S, Broad St. 


Pettit, Mortlock Stratton. 


Wh., 


New York, N. Y. 


Dorm. 45 Bodine. 


Reinhart. Charles Stanley, 


Wh.. 


Flushing, N. Y., 


Dorm. 3SI Baldwin. 


Pierce. Harry Llewellyn. 
Rathmann. Walter Lincoln. 


Arch. 
Arch. 


Columbia. Mo., 
St. Louis. Mo. 


iJiS. 33d St, 
Windsor Hotel. 


Read. Isabel Oliver. 


M., 


Philadelphia, 


2049 E. Dauphin St. 


Reed. Charles Beecher, 


B.. ■ 


Wysoi, 


316 De Kalb Square. 


Righter, George Harold, 


Wh., 




3eth and Walnut Sts 


Royce, Edward Glenn. 


Wh.. 


Ardmore. 




Russell. William. 


Wh.. 


Leivislown. 


Dorm.356 Class of '87 
1034 W, Lehigh Ave. 


Scanlin. John. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 




M.. 


do. 


5643 Girard Ave. 


Shay, Urban Kennedy, 


Wh.. 


do. 


4904 Woodland Ave. 


SheafEer, Daniel Miller, 


Wh., 


Wayne, 
Philadelphia, 


Dorm. 131 MoKean. 


Shortland. Helena, 


M., 


6303 Girard Ave. 


Smith. Horace, Jr.. 
Smith, Robert Duane, 


Wh., 


Merion. 




Wh., 


Duluth, Minn., 


Dorm. 431 MrKcan 


Stcen, James Howard, 


Arch. 


Pittsburg. 

Seattle. Wash., 


Dorm, 366 Baird. 
3429 Walnut St. 


Stephen, Fred Bennett. 


Arch. 


Trump. William Henry. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia. 


530 Lincoln Drive. 

German town. 
6300 DrescI Road 


Van Roden, Frank. Jr.. 


Wh.. 


do. 








Ovcrbrook. 


W^ner, Louis Maisdcn, 


Wh.. 


do. 


506 Locust Ave.. Gtn 


Wanner, Louis Albright. 


Wh.. 


Fleetwood, 


3156 Chestnut St. 


Wasserman. Herbert Bcnard, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


1845 N. 17th St. 


Watt, John Marshall. 


Wh., 


do. 


618 N. 43d St. 


Webb, Lanphear Wesley, 


B,. 


do 


1436 Diamond St. 


Wilson, Frank Post. 


Wh.. 


Brooklyn, N. Y 
Elkins Park. 


Dorm. 45 Bodine. 


Wilmsen. Bemhard, Jr.. 


Wh., 


3539 Locust St. 


Wood. Bernard Henry. Jr.. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


411 S. .9th St. 



t,i.a,Google 



S6o 


THE 


COLLBGX. 




Name. 


G.urK. 






Wood, Edward Cope, A, B., 


M.. 


Philadelphia, 


Houston Hall. 


(Pennsylvania), 
YouoK. Charles Blanchard, 








Arch. 


Oil City, 


3218 Sansom St 




PABTIAKi artTDBNTS. 




Albright, George Oscar, Jr., 


A.. 


Allen town. 


Dorm. »i7 Foerderer. 


Arias, Frank Antonio, 


Wh,. 


Panama.. R. de P. 


3408 Sansom St. 


Armstrong, Andrew Kirk, 


C. E., 


Philadelphia, 


4045 Poplar St. 


Ash, George Washington. 


Wh., 


do. 


JJ49N. t3thSt. 


Baizley, John, 

Barr, John Walter, 
Bell. Katharine. 


Wh.. 


do. 


637 N. nth St. 


M. E. 


Reading, 


Dorm. 13 Morgan. 


B, 


Ardmore. 




Bary, Victor Alexander, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 
Louisville, Ky. 


4»4 Wister St., Ota 


Bemheim, Frank Dreyfus, 


Wh., 


Dorm. 21 Wilson. 


Benham, Charles, Jr., 
Blaisdell, Ferren Frank, 


C, E., 


Philadelphia, 


5405 Haverford Ave. 


Wh.. 


Red Bank, N. J„ 


331a Woodland Ave. 


Bowes. Henry Joseph, 
Boyd, Alfred (X. 


M. E. 


Philadelphia, 


1511 Green St. 


Wh., 


Panama, R. de P., 


aioS. 36th St. 


Bresnahan. John Francis. 
Brooker, Albert George, 
Brown, Horace Hamilton, 


B.. 


Boston, Mass., 


Donn. 31 Morgan. 


C.E.. 


Palmyra. N. Y. 


3743 Spruce St. 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 


67th Ave., Oak Law 


Bryant. John Ewart Gladstone, 


Wh., 


Lansdowne. 




Budd, Burkitt, 


C.E., 


Pittsburg, 


330s Walnut St. 


Carothers, Edward John. 


A.. 


Philadelphia. 
LonisvUfe. Ky.. 
London. England, 


3827 Walnut St. 


Cartmell, Nathan John, 


Wh., 


iraS. 37thSt. 


Cassel, Hany Spencer. 


Ch., 


Dorm. 148 New Yak 

Alumni. 
8229 German town 

Ave. 
lOSS. 34thSt. 


Chapman, Richard Henry, Jr., 


Ch.. 


Warminster, 


Cole, William Ido. 


Arch. 


Dallas, Tex.. 


Collins, Wilbur Jones, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


154s N^ nth St. 


Cook, Ernest FuUerton. 


A.. 


do. 


5149 Parrish St. 


Coraori. Charles Schell, 


Arch. 


Norwood, 


300 S. 36lh St. 


Costelio, Edward Grant, 


C. E. 


Tacony. 




Costello, John Noble, 

Cotton. Wilham Joseph Henry. 


C. E.. 


do. 


3S33 Locust St. 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


y 11 saver St. 
Broad Street StatiOB- 


County, Albert John, 
Cowell. Henry aayinaker. 


Wh.. 


St. David's, 


C. E., 


Philadelphia, 


3301 Spr. Garden St 


Craven, Henry Thornton. 
Crist, Edward Nev, 


A., 


do. 


321 S. i8lh St. 
Dorm. 3s8 Craig 


A., 


Columbia, 


Dancy, John Wendell Philip. 


Wh., 


Washington. D. C 

Philadelphia, 


412 S. i8th St. 


Delany, Howard Sharpless. 
Delk. Edward Buehler. 


Ch.. 


1231N. Broad St. 


Arch. 


do. 


630 N. Broad St. 
"The Covington. " 


Diaz. F. R.. 


Wh., 


Nabana, Cuba, 


Doran, John Kenry. 
Doran, Warner Erwin, 


M. E. 


Philadelphia. 


3453 Woodland Am 


A., 


do. 


i»oS. igthSt. 


Duenas, Geoi^e Zarate, 


E. E. 


City of Meidco, 

Mexico. 


1409 Arch St. 


Edwards. Robert Lehman, 


A., 


Holmesburg. 




Ehrhart, John Philtp, 


Ch.. 


Jamestown, 


Dorm. 364 Baird, 



i,Googlt' 



nnen trout, Charles Benton, 
agan, i>ouiE Bstelle, 



oetl. Frederick Kline. 

c&m. Donald Brayton Nichols, 


M. E.. 


Allentown. 


, Arch.. 


Philadelphia. 


reihofer, William Albert. 


Ch., 


do. 


arrett, Erwin Clarkson, 


A., 


do. 


emmi, Louis B prion. 


Wh., 


do. 


illan, Charles McDowell, 


Ch.. 


do. 


oldbereer. Joshua Samuel, 
raeff, George David, 
ranlees, WUliam Sletor, 


Ch., 


do. 


A.. 


Columbia, 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


raveU, William Henry, 


C. E.. 


do. 


reims, Merton, 


Wh,. 


do. 


ribbel. John Bancker. 


Wh., 


Wyncote, 


:acl£ett, Stanton Halleck, Jr., 


Wh.. 


Philadelphia, 
Ridley Park. 


iaU, Zachary Taylor, Jr., 

[amaker, John Forry, 


Wh.. 


A., 




lare, Emien Spencer, 


Arch.. 


Strafford. 


[eiman, Charles. 


Wh.. 




[endrie, DonaU, 


A., 


do. 


[endrie, John Gibson. 


C. E.. 


do. 


[essenbruch, Theophilus Eaward 


. M. E., 


do. 


m, WilUam Corcoran, Jr.. 


E. E.. 


Pittsburg, 


[off man, Leon. 


Ch.. 


Philadelphia, 



[ood, Arthur WiUiam. Wh.. 

uaes, Elizabeth Kingston, B., 

uiney, Benjamin Stansbury, A., 

jhnston. Frank. Wh.. 

mes, George Paxson, C. E., 

iames. Crawford Jenkins, Wh., 

iaruza, Roman Laurentius, Wh,. 

iats, John Augustus, M. B., 

^th, Raymond Hendrick. Arch., 

^mmerer, Arthur Euccne, Wh., 

eown, Walter Samuel, Wh.. 

.err, Joseph Michael. C. E.. 

ershaw, William Henir. C. E., 

jeyser, Charles Maris, Jr., Arch,, 

iefer, George Croney, '^'- 
illiam, Paul, 



do. 

York, 

Worcester, Mass., 
Facloryville, 
Camden, N. J., 

Bridgeport, Conn, 
, Baltimore, Md,, 
do. 



^irkbride, Hary Butler, 
"ite, George Edmund, 
Snges, John Peter, Jr., 
oons, Robert Wright, 
oronski. Andr^. 
rauskopf. Harold Coriime, 



Wh., Philadelphia, 



C. E., Norristown. 

Arch., Philadelphia, 
Ch., do. 

C. E., Philadelphia, 



Donn. 149 McKean. 
Queen Lane Station, 

Geimantown. 
3615 Locust St. 
3745 Spruce St. 
33tg Diamond St. 
3711 Woodland Ave. 
307 S. 39th St. 
a46a N. 19th St. 
1834 N. Franklin St. 
5000 Woodland Ave. 
Dorm. 140 I^vost 

Smith. 
1335 N. iQtliSt. 
919 N. 9oth St. 
3641 Locust St. 
4009 Pine St. 
3400 Walnut St. 
5000 Woodland Ave. 

606 N. 6th St. 
3400 Walnut St. 
3400 Walnut St. 
3417 Spg. Garden St. 
3453 Woodland Ave. 
17 W. Wahiut Lane, 

German town, 
3519 Locust St. 
4 1 Z4 Westminster Av. 
435 S. 5 'St St. 
Sumac St., Wissa- 

3264 Sansom St. 
3303 Walnut St. 
3o»N. .3th St. 
Dorm. 53 E.F.Smith. 
33Z1 Sansom St. 
3136 Sansom St. 
Q.8N, 3d St.] 
Dorrn^i Memorial. 
, 3604 Walnut St. 
300 S, 36th St. 
300 S. 36th St, 
Donn. 396 New York 

Alumni, 
1406 Spruce Ct. 
[iS33 DeKalb St. 
Dorm. 46 Morris. 
3117 Spruce St. 
3439 Samom St. 
471s Pulaski Ave,, 

Germantown. 

DigtizedoyGOOJ^If 



Mam-. 


Cur^. 


Rcsidoico. 




Krieger, Frank Emil Ludwig, 


\Vh., 


Johnstown. 
Bronxville, N. Y., 


3641 Locust St, 


Latimer, Alfred Faxon, 


A., 


3614 Walnut St. 


Latimer, Roy Springer, 
Laurance, Edward Shinn, 


M, E.. 


Wilmington, Del., 
Philadelphia. 


113 S. 37th St. 


Wh.. 


4401 Baltimore Ave. 


Lay, John Tracy, 


A.. 


do. 


401 S Pin i St. 


Levy, Mortimore G., 


Wh., 


do. 


4140 Parkside Ave. 


Lee, William Harold 


Arch.. 


Shamokin. 


3607 Locust St. 


Lewis, F. Mortimer, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


SI Cliveden Ave., Gta. 


Loder, Arthur Beard, 


Wh., 


Wynne wood. 




Lonpiecker. Jacob Haldeman, 
Ludlow. Aldcn Rodney, 


A.. 


Harrisburg, 


34S3 Woodland Ave. 


M, E.. 


Swart hmore. 


3400 Walnut St. 


Lukens, Hiram Stanhope, 


Ch-, 


Philadelphia, 
Mobile, Ala., 


3.11 Tioga St. 


McClure, Matthew Simpson. 


A., 


Dorm. 41 Memorial. 


McCoskcr, Joseph R., 
Mcintosh, Henry Payne, 
Mann, Benson, Jr., 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


660 N. 39th St. 


"Wh., 


Cleveland, Ohio, 


Dorm. 134 Baird. 


M. £., 


Philadelphia. 


Manheim St.. Gtn. 


Mann, David Isaac, 


A., 


do. 


334 Christian St. 


March. George Ralph, 
Marsh, Charles Reed, 


C. E.. 


do. 


704 N. 16th St. 


C. E., 


do. 


1923 N. 18th St. 


Marshall, Clyde Brig^, 
Martin, Julius Christian, 
Martin, Sherwood Earl, 


C, E., 


Walden. N. Y., 


3430 Sansom St 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


3t33 Clifford St. 


Wh., 


Pittsburg. 


300 S. 36th St. 
Dorm. 10s Lddy. 


Martin, Sergeant Price, 
Marvin. S. Tom, 


A.. 




Wh.. 


HiUsdale, Mich., 


Dorm. 330 Craig. 


Mathews, Charles Archie, 


C. E., 


Philadelphia. 


34.0 Race St. 
. Dorm. 20 Tower. 


May, Leon Victor, 
Meighan, John, 
Metlar, Mary James. 


Wh., 


Charleston, W. Va. 


B., 


Chester. 


[.33 W. .4th St.] . 


B,, 


Doylestown. 




Miller, Emlen Hare. 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


31a S. lothSt. 
Dorm. 130 Craig 


MUler. Glenn Beaty, 


Wh., 


Defiance. Ohio, 


Miller, George Raul, 


Arch-, 


I'illsburR, 


33 S. 34th St. 


Miller, Harrison, 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


145E, Duval St.. Gtn. 


Mitchell. Geoije, 
Montalvo, P. Sanchci, 


M. E„ 


Clearfield, 


201 N. 34th St. 


M. E., 


Philadelphia, 


713 N. 6th St. 


Moyer. Mott LeRoy. 


Ch.. 


Souderton. 




Mueller, Frieda, 


B., 


Philadelphia, 


4434 Lancaster Av. 


MQllcr, John Hughes. 


Ch., 


Swarthniore. 




Murphy, John Prentice. 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


1310 S. 15th St. 


Northup. Willard Close. 
Null. Harold Miller, 


Arch., 


AsheviUe, N. C. 


Dorm.374Hopkinsoa. 
.70s Wallace'St. 


A., 


PhUadelphia, 


Park, Richard Gray, Jr.. 


Wh.. 


do. 


Dorm. 13s FitJer. 


Patterson. John Paul, Jr., 
Peacock, Walter Gordon Booth, 


C. E„ 


do. 


204 S. 13th St. 


A., 


do. 


3038 N. 8th St. 


Peiper, Samuel, 


A.. 


do. 


1435 N- Fawn St. 


Peterkin, John Boddington. 


Arch.. 


Bloomficld. N. J., 


JoaS. 37thSt. 
49^6 Walton Ave. 


Pierce, George. 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


Porter, Harry Louis. 


Arch., 


Warren, Ohio, 


374.S Spruce St 


Porter, Isaac Theodore, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


3068 Prankford Ave 
Dorm. 35 Morgan. 
3600 W^ut St. 


Protheroe, Howard Probert, 


Ch., 


Dunmore, 


Puaey. WiUiam Josiah, 


M. E., 


Germantown, 


Riche. Jesse Austin, 


Ch., 


Durham, Conn., 


3asa Sansom St. 



t,i.a,Google 



N:uw. 


Couiw, 




City Addrm 


bel, Alfred Tennyson, 


Wh., 


Philadelphia, 


1507 N. lOth St. 
Dorm. 398 New York 

Alumni. 
1803 N. Van Pelt St. 


kett, Arthur Johnson, 


C. E„ 


Jacksonville. Fla.. 


J, Maurice Bower, 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


TG, Frank Gcesaman, 


A., 


do. 


4636 Wayne Ave. 
S08 Reed St, 


aeffer, Abraham Lincohi, 


Wh„ 


do. 


erman, Hany, 


Wh.. 


do. 


1747 N. 15th St. 


ipper, Frcdnck Gerheardt, 


Wh., 


Pekin. 111., 


3529 Locust St. 


lultz, Charles Frederick, 


C. E„ 


Mcriden, Conn., 


115 S. 34th St. 
■'The Sonnandie." 


ily. Walter Smith, 


Wh., 


PhUadelphia, 


iplc, Raymond Canning, 
irplcss, Anna E., 
:ble, John Howard, Jr.. 


C. E., 


do. 


3310 Catharine St. 


B., 


West Chester. 




A., 


Philadelphia. 


6»i S. Washington 
•Lane. Gtn. 
.. IS9 Mayland St., Gtn 


vers, Charles Hendry deTurck 


. Wh., 


Atlantic City, N. J 


>emakcr. Martha Bailey, 


B., 


Philadelphia, 


1715 Green St. 


igluff, Donald. 
.5o, William Morris. 


Arch., 


Baltimore, Md., 


34S3 Woodland Ave. 


C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


712 Dickinson St. 


ith, Andrew Latham, 


Ch., 


Dubois. 


370s Walnut St. 


ith, Walter Bell, 


C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


i7r9N. ladSt. 


ith. Wilbert Barnes, 


Wh.. 


Factory villc. 


Dorm. 51 Memorial. 


fer. Joseph, 


M, E., 


Nikolajew. Russia, 


800 S. 9th St. 


ly. foscph Lawrence. 


C.E., 


Philadelphia, 


Dorm. 344 Lippincott. 
7111 Boyer St., Mt. 

3443 Chestnut St. 


wilding, Harold Preston, 


Wh., 


do. 


.nford. James. Jr., 


Ch., 


ireat Falls. Mont., 


hie, Frank Kraramer, 


Ch., 


efEcrsonville. 




veiison. Vincent Moore, 


A., 


300 S. 36th St. 


jera. Harry Wallace, 


Ch.. 


:naon, Leonard Karl Underhill, 


, M. E., 


do. 


3637 Leh^h Ave. 


vester, Guy Carter, 


M. E.. 


do. 


1831 Wallace St. 


t. Lewis Edgar, 


M. E.. 


Catasauqua. 


3312 Woodland Ave. 


butt, lames Felix, 
Icott, Louis Hart, 


Arch.. 


Lexington. Ky., 
Talcottville, Conn., 


2658. 38th St. 


Wh., 


,340 Pine St. 


laka, Aijiro, 


Wh., 


Yokohama, Japan. 
Buffalo. N. v.. 




per, Charles Henry, 


C.E., 


258 S. 38th St. 


nycr, Russell, Jr.. 

smpson, Russell Darrah Addiso 


Ch., 


Philadelphia, 


Dorm. 137 Hopkinson, 


n,A., 


Pittsburi, 
Mexico City, Mex., 


"The Covington." 
"The Ivan,^ 


'vino, Joseph Geromino, 




rap, Robert W,, 


Wh., 


Hanisburg, 


Dorm. lis Foerdener. 


>ys. Robert William, 


Wh., 


do. 


I>omi. ai5 Poerderer. 


itsky, Maurice M., 


Wh„ 


Philadelphia, 


1330 Fraiilin St, 


a, James Garrett, 

n Kirk, Walter Moseley, 


Ch., 


Media. 




Arch., 


Philadelphia, 
Haddonfield, N. J., 


r333 Pine St, 


ughan. Charles Zimmennan, 
ilker. James Abraham, 


C, E., 


Dorm. 33 Memorial. 


A., 


Philadelphia. 


1617 Green St. 


itt, James Cruickshank, 
ly, Catharine E,, 


M. E., 


do. 


6373 Woodbine Ave. 


B.. 


do. 


»6i Zeralda St., Gtn. 


ly. Lawrence Eavensot.. 


Wh., 


St. David's. 




lite, Raymond A., Jr., 
rde, William Henry. Jr., 


Wh., 


Melrxjae. 




A., 


Philadelphia, 


3331 Woodland Av». 






t,i.a, Google 



THB COLLBOB. 



Willcojc, John Keating, 
Williams, Hany Leigh ton, 
Wilson, Thomson Huff, 
Winokur, Joseph Benjamin, 
Wood, Percy Hoxie, 
Woodward, Laura Embrec, 
Yerkes, Jonathan, 
Yokoyama, Yasbshichiro, 
Yost, Frederick Randolph, 
Young. Reuben Leonara, 
Ziegler, Augustus Bergey, 



A., 
Wh., 



Philadelphia. 
Scran ton, 
Philadelphia, 



Memphis, Tenn., 

D., West Chester, 

C. E.. Jacksonville, Fla., 

Arch., Tokio, Japan, 

Ch., York, 

Wh., Fredonia, N. Y 

C. E., SchwenksviUe, 



CltyAddma, 
341 S. i8(b St. 
3531 Locust St. 
5015 Market St. 
3146 Clifford St. 
3739 Locust St. 

3603 IrOCUGt St. 

3338 Chestnut St. 
3641 Locust St. 
3615 Locust St. 
3745 Spruce St 



tizedoy Google 



SIDDENT8 TAKING COURSES FOR TEACHERS. 

Nunc. 
Albcrlson, Alice Owen, 
Anders, Mabel Gilling, 
Anderson, Elizabeth Necly, 
Ashmore, Laura, 
Balch. Alfred C, 
Balke, Mrs. Clarence Willtan 
Bard, Blanche Smith, 

Barnes, Wesley, 
Bauman, Kate Jones, 
Bean, Margaret Stuart, 
Bedford, Flora, 
Beim. Mary Cecelia, 
BeU, Martha Christian, 

Bennett, Rebecca Forsythe, 
Biddle. Edith Precis, 
Birtwell, Alice, 
BischofE, Emilic Anna, 
Blank, Anna, 
Boling, Sara Masten, 
Bonstein, Ellen Stark, 
Borden, Lydia Prichett, 
Boyer, Martha E., 
Boyle, Margaret, 

Boyle, Mary Anna, 
Brack, Emma LorriUicre, 
Brearley, Mary Calharine, 
Brock, Maria Louise, 
Broom ell, Emma Judith, 
Buchanan, Mary Fosa, 
Calvert, Amelia Catherine 
Smith, 
rev, Mary 
Carir. Helen I . 
Carver, Josephine Tamps, 
Chalfin,"Eliaabeth Miriam, 
Cheston, Anna W., 
Chrism an, Jessie L., 
Clampitt, Xenia Claudine, 
Cleary, Mary L., 
Cochran, George Caldwell, 
Collins, Henrietta, 
Collins, Ruth. 
Cooling, Catharine Eva, 
Cooper, Anna Elizabeth, 
Cooper, Carrie L., 





CityAddnv. 


Philadelphia. 


140 N. i6th St. 


do. 


1836 Wallace St. 


do. 


1741 N. 19th St. 


do. 


40J8 Chestnut St. 


Lansdowne. 




, Philadelphia, 


3607 Sansom St. 


do. 


71M Boyer St., Mt. 
9j6fr'BroadSl. 


Riverside, N. J,, 


Philadelphia, 


3144 Catharine St. 


Cynwyd. 




Philadelphia, 


818 Oxford St. 


do. 


314S. lothSt. 
Wissinoming Hall, Mt. 

Airy. 
835 S, St. Bernard St. 


Fulton, Mo., 


Philadelphia, 


do. 


1821 De Lancey Place. 


Chester, 


(526 E. t4th St.] 


Haddonfidd, N. J., 


[31 Ellis St ] 


Philadelphia. 


3431 Spg. Garden St. 


do. 


1713 BwnbridgeSt. 


Pittston, - 


Manoa. 




Philadelphia, 


319 Green St. 


do. 


338 W. Hortter St., 




Germ an town. 


do. 


181a S. igthSt. 
530 Lindley Ave. ' 

[403 Market St.] 


do. 


Trenton, N. J., 


West Chester. 




Baltimore, Md., 


ao8 N. 36th St. 


Trenton, N, J.. 


[Sti Market St.l 
4003 Powelton Ave. 


Philadelphia, 


Woodbury. N. J. 
Camden, N. J., 
Mozart. 
Philadelphia, 




[319 S. 6th St.] 


49S N. 4th St. 


do. 


1318 Spruce St. 


Media. 






nth St., Oak Lane. 


do. 


1373 Unity St., Fkd. 


do. 


917 Moore St. 


do. 


4944 Franklin St., Fkd 


PitmanGrove,N,J, 


,,4-iN. 34thSt. 


Philadelphia, 


i833N.VanPBltSt. 


do. 


640 N. 7th St. 


Wihnington, Del., 


[904 W. 4th St] 



t,i.a, Google 



Cramp, Laura Grace, 
Davis, Iva Elizabeth, 
Davis, Jennie Morris, 
Deckman, Alice Anna, 
Dodds. Man" Copeiand, 
E)onne1ly, Mary Winifred, 
Doxund, Marie, 
Dudley, Albert W.. 
Dufficld. Louise Coralie, 
Dunbar, Alice Moore, 
Duncan, Kate, 
Dunn, Agnes, 
Dwier, Mary Elizabeth, 
Eckard, Elizabeth Troth, 
EngoU, Annis Gilbert, 
Eschncr, Beatrice, 



Filbert, May W.. 
Finley, Ella Jane, 
Flchinghaua, Agnes, 
Foley, Nathalie Regina, 
Frederick. Edith Gertnide, 
Friend, Lillian, 
Fussell, Ellen, 
Gandy, Roxana Smith, 
Garrett, Mary Maris, 
Gaskill, Sue A., 
George, Mary Matilda, 
Gilbert, May Chaplain, 

Gill, Mar|;aret Louise, 
Ginrieh. Florence May, 
Godshalk, Cornelia W., 
Graham, Emily Louisa, 

Gray, Irene Rebecca, 
Greene. Ida Beck, 
GuL'st. Sarah Ashley, 
Guiithcr. Sophie M.. 
Hadry, Charlotte Augusta, 
Huigh, Emma Muench, 

Hall, Anne-Heygate, 
Hanauer, Jeanne tte Lottie, 
Hannum, Anna Laura, 
Harper, Jennie Watt, 
Harris, Minnie E., 
Hart, Mary Sheard, 
Har\'ey, Bessie Homiler, 
Haydock, Mary Thornton. 



THB C0LLEO8. 

Residence. 

Philadelphia, 

West Chester, 
Philadelphia, 
Street, Md.. 
Philadelphia, 

Philadelphia, 
do. 
do. 



do. 

Wilmington, Del., 
Williamson School. 

Dennisville, N. J. 

Lansdowne. 

Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 



Wilmington, Del., 

do, 
Camden, N, J. 

Lansdowne, 
Philadelphia, 
Booth wyn. 
Philadelphia. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Philadelphia, 
Somerton. 
Philadelphia, 



3344 N. 17th St. 
3619 N. tgthSt. 
661 N. isthSt. 
Merchantville, N. J. 
3399 Catharine St. 

3313 Ridge Ave, 
1713 N. 19th St. 
3933 Brown St. 
[1008 French St.] 
535 Levering St. 
171 1 S. iSthSt. 
Normal School. 
1311 N. ijthSt. 
781 Preston St. 
9004 N. Park Ave. 
3640 Chestnut St. 
1331 N. i2thSt. 
1524 Gratz St. 
719 N. i6thSt. 
1425 Spruce St. 
i6ai S. 13th St. 
[815 Monroe St.l 



[3 a Owen Ave.] 
403 1 Spg. Garden St. 
141S W.York St. 
1534 E. Montgomery 

62S Morris St. 
2625 N. 30th St. 
[41 Yard Ave.] 
1511 W. Susquehanna 

[526 Haddon Ave,] 
igji N. jid St. 
3427 N. Alarshall St. 
[714 N.Harrison St.] 
1513 Swain St. 
[24 Southard St., Tren- 
ton, N. J.] 
Normal School. 
1740 N. 1 5th St, 

2540 N. 6lh St. 
[1209 Jefferson St.] 

Castor Road, Fkd. 



tizedoy Google 



Hegarty, Margaret Regina, 
Heidinger, Blanche Lamon, 
Heidinger, Minnie Howell, 
Ilcllycr, George Wairen, 
Helms, M. Elk. 
Herbert, Minne Margaret, 
Heritage, Evaline Day, 
Hibbs, Laura Gerhard, 
Hill, EmiUe Br^gy, 
HoSmann, Dora, 
Horn, Blanche Campbell, 
Howard, James Tomas, 
Hoy, Jennie St. Clair, 
HuSord, Josephine M., 

Hiuiter, Mary Brazer. 
Hutchinson, Katharine 

■Preston, 
Hutchinson, Nancy P. 
Hykes, Frances Cornelia, 

Iackson, Roberta, 
acob, Louisa M., 
aggard, Cora, 
amcs, Elizabeth Kingston, 
aquette, Helen, 
fiikins, Martha Campbell, 
ourdan, Ruth E., 
[atzenbcrg, Bessie D., 
Kc'cler, Caroline Niece, 
Kclley, Margaret, 



Kern, Oliver Blaine, 
Killen, Mary Louise, 
Kintzki, Otea Hedwig, 
Kirkland, William Reid, 
KIcefeld, Anna Christine, 
Knowlton, Mrs. Mary Cutler, 
Krouse, Amelia Louisa, 
Lahr, Jerome Banks, 
Laib, Nell Virginia, 
Lambcrton, Bertha, 
Latimer, Anna Austin, 
Lee, Mrs. Mary Martin, 
Levis, William Bittle, 
Licber, Esther, 
Lippincott, Alice Viola, 
Lippincott, Mary Woolman, 
Lockheod, Catherine P., 
LiOdor, Elisabeth, 
Long, Emma M., 



Kennett Square. 
Bridgeport, N. J. 
Camden, N. J. 
Philadelphia, 
Riverton, N, J. 
Philadelphia, 
Salzburg, Austria, 
Philaderphia, 

do. 

do. 



aty AddKO. 

634 N. 36th St. 

301 Lemonte St., Rox, 

301 Lemonte St., Rox, 



906 S. 48th St. 
1406 Spruce St. 
1538 S. sSthSt. 
1920 Lombard St. 
3513 Hftverford St. 
Belmont and Monu- 

ao4S N. College Ave, 
133 S. land St. 



do. 

Burlington, N. J. 

Philadelphia. 

Lansdowne. 

Haddonfield, N. J. 

Philadelphia, 

Woodstown, N. J. 

Camden, N, J.. [3^4 Cooper St.] 

Merchantville, N. J. 

Philadelphia, 



133 S. 22nd St. 
3131 Powclton Ave. 

41 14 Westminster Ave. 



do. 



do. 



L, Del., 



Philadelphia, 
Natick, Mass., 
Philadelphia, 
Williamson School. 
Philadelphia, 
do. 



jiort N. Broad St. 
4059 Spruce St. 
[413 E. 8th St.] 
113 Race St. 
134 N. loth St- 
(532 Cooper St.] 
3843 N. nth St. 
333 S.I 3th St. 
3320 Haverford Ave. 
628 N. 34th St. 
1517 Chestnut St, 
1605 N, 9th St. 



Bristol. 
Salem, N. J., 
Philadelphia, 



4931 Baltimore Ave. 
1516 Market St. 
6»6 N. aid St. 

[21 Market St.] 
826 N. i6th St. 
1313 N. 13th St. 
iSioBuckiusSt. 



tizedoy Google 



THB COLLBOB. 



Lyon, Kthd . 
McClintock. 1 
McManus, Marie R.. 
McMichael, Sarah Ruth, 
McNutt, Emest Thomas, 
McEhec. Jane Riddell. 

Mampc, WiUiclmina, 
Mallon, Zita Elizabeth. 
Margolin, Fannie Bezman, 
Marv-cl, Ella M.. 
Maskings, Wilhelmina 

Josephine, 
May, Florence Edith, 
Minster, Carrie G., 
Mongol, Rosalia M., 
Montgomery, Emily Hailing^ 

Moore, Julia Anna. 
Mott, Jennie Moms. 
Mullen, Katherine Regina, 
My res, Lizzie Dutton, 
Nell, Katherine, ■ 
Nicholas. Isaac Alonzo, 
Nisbett, Ellen, 
O'Donnell, Teresa, 
Oakford, Elsie, 



Wayne, 

Philadel 



West Chester, 
Palmyra, N. J. 
Philadelphia, 



Trenton, N. J., 
Philadelphia, 
Linwooa. 
Philadelphia, 
Doylestown, 
Philadelphia, 
do. 



do. 

, Philadel, 

Packer, Augusta Woodhull, Trenton, N. J. 

Paige, Alice Browning, ^JT""' Mass. 
Palmatary, Helen Constance, Wilmington, Del. 

Parmenttr, Eleanor Bertha, Trenton, N. J., 

Patterson, Mary Eliza, Georgetown, N. J, 

Patton, Margaret Ganders, Philadelphia, 

Paul, Florence Aimfe, Ft. Thomas. Ky., 

Paul, Mary Lindsay, Philadelphia, 
Pennypacker, Susan Edna, do. 

Peter, Mary, do. 

Poley. Helen Catharine, 



Price. Helen M., 
Price, Mary Perrine, 
Price, Susan Blanchard, 
Pyk, Edith J., 
Rawley, Jessie, 
Rcdeker, Carrie Rebecca. 
Redfem, Grace Helen, 



Jen kin town. 

Philadelphia, 



West Chester. 
Philadelphia, 
Bloomsbur^, 
Philadelphia, 



St 



Laiisdowne. 
Philadelphia, 
Wilmington, Del. 
PhiladeTphia, . 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Bristol. 

Philadelphia, 



aty Addnia. 
1139 N. 13th St. 
2053 E. Someise 
[405 Oak Lane.] 
iSrg Master St. 
3 Cresheim Road. 
3^34 N. 13th St. 
[124 S. Walnut St.] 

8303 Norwood St., 

Chestnut Hill. 
1 1 14 Poplar St. 

534 S. 4th St. 
[nil West St.] 
936 N. 7th St. 



1009 Green St. 
[323 Market St.] 
1339 S. 17th St. 

3835 Ridge Ave. 

2207 Pine St. 
2953 N. 7th St. 
619 E, Chelten Ave. 

i3i N. Marshall St. 
iij W. Hanover St. 
Westtown, Pa.) 
loio Monroe St.] 
14 Southard St.] 

509 S. 44th St. 
4037 Powelton Ave. 
1420 Christian St. 
39 N. 60th St. 
2462 N. iSth St. 
[Abii^ton Friends' 

School.] 
3131 Columbia Ave. 
191 9 Master St. 
1919 Master St. 

391 Lvceum Ave., Rax. 
2o»6 N. Park Ave. 
3ii4N.28thSt. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



N4me. 


RaxOaet. 


CityAddiw. 


Reeves, Anna R.. 


Woodbury, N. J. 




Richardson, EUa Rebecca, 


Moorestown, N.J. 




Richie, Sarah, 


do. 




Ridgway, Mary Ella, 


Camden, N. J. 


[6is S. isth St.] 
i6isN, ithSt. 


Rica, Rebecca, 


Philadelphia, 


Roberts, Gertrude, 


Worcester, Mass., 


140 N. i6th St. 


Rodman, Hildegard 

Ernestine, 
Rosa, Robert Bruce, 


Philadelphia, 


loii S. 48th St. 


do. 


3708 Sydenham St. 
174a Green St. 


Ryan. Louise Deacon, 


do. 


Saybolt, Mary I., 
Schlater, Lillie. 


do. 


1419 N. 15th St. 


do. 


1814 Vineyard St. 


Schoenian, Carrie M., 


Norristown. 






Northficld, Minn., 


igai S. Broad St. 


Sensenig, Anna, 
SerriU. Rate WUlis, 


Wayne. 




Darby. 




Shaw, Sallie Reid, 


Philadelphia, 




Sherburne, Susan Seymour. 


731 N. 26th St. 


Simpson. Nellie, 


do. 


4314 Pine St. 


Sinkler, Ella Brock, 


do. 


1606 Walnut St. 


Sinkler, Julia Ursula, 
Smith, Ella P., 


do. 


1606 Walnut St. 


Downingtown. 




Spiess. Madeleine Taulane, 


Philadelphia. 


am W. Venango St. 


Stein, Elva Esther, 


do. 


3016 N. 13th St. 


Stephens, M. Athalia. 


do. 


406a Irving St. 


Sterling, Sara Hawks, 


do. 


5409 Spruce St. 


Stetler, Isaac Eugene, 
Stetser. James Blaine, 


do. 


4030 Spg. Garden St. 


Chester. 




Stewart. Mary, 


Philadelphia, 


iia8 S. S7th St. 
i»i8S. Broad St. 


Stewart, Mary Weldon, 


do. 


StoTTie. William A., 


Woodbury, N. J. 




Stout, Helen Dodds. 


Wilmineton. Del.. 


I81S Franklin St.] 
fMoorestown, N. J.] 


Swan.Martha Catharine Hale, New Sharon, Me. 


SweetoQ, Hannah May, 


Philadelphia. 
Glen Mil^. 


iSig S. Broad St. 


Swinehart, Isaac W., 




Thomas, Bessie Estellc, 


West Chester. 




Thompson. Bertha Frances, 


Camden, N. J.. 


fio3 N. 7th St.] 


Titick, Agnes Marie, 


LQbeck, Gennany. 


403 N. 41st St. 
eCresheim Road. Mt. 

Airy. 
Friends' Asylum, Fkd. 


Tourison, Eleanor, 


Philadelphia. 


Town, Clara Harrison, 


do. 


Treat, Blanch Evelyn, 


Chelsea. Mass.. 


170 Manheim St., Gtn. 


Tustin, Dora May. 
Tweed, Harriet Arthur, 


Paoli. 




Philadelphia, 


'739 Willington St. 


Vansant, Myrtle Sabina, 


do. 


1432 Jackson St. 
4417 Chestnut St. 


Vallette. Clarisse. 


do. 


Venables, Esther Marie, 


do. 


1839 S. i6thSt. 
44C%denSt. 


Wallace, Nellie Mattison, 


Trenton, N. J., 


Walters, Florence Emily, 


Wayne. 
Williamson School. 




Weber, Emma Walker, 




Well*, Robert C, 


Uanerch. 





t,i.a,G00glt' ^ 



Wetherald, Mary CoUum, 
White, Grace Elizabeth, 
Whitson, Mary Hannah, 
Wickereham, Edna. 
WiUdneon, Jessie R., 

Williams, Julia Evna, 

Williams, Richard Lloyd, 

WillianiKon. Etta Lucile. 

Wilson, Annie, 

WoUe. Blanche. 

Wolfe, Elizabeth Timnelle, 

Wood, Marion, 

Woodman, Elizabeth 

Atkinson, 
Woodmansee, Mary, 
Woods, Maiy, 
Woodward, Adelaide H., 
Yancy, Roxana, 
Young, E valine. 
Young. Marianne Roitana 

Seward, 



THB COLLBOB. 
Red deuce. 

Bryan town, Md., 
Bloomfield, N. J., 
Philadelphia, 
Camden. N. J. 
Philadelphia, 



aty AddrcM. 

Lansdowne. 
Friends' Asylum, Fkd. 
i6j3 Race St. 
[1198. 6th St.] 
431 W. Chelten Ave., 
German town. 



773 N. 38th St. 
191 Q Master St. 
1844 E. Monmouth St. 



Newtown. 

Noma town, 
Philadelphia, 

West Chester. 
Woodstown, N. J. 
Philadelphia, 
do. 



tizedoy Google 



BUMMER 6CHOOI> STUDEaVTS. 



Aitken, Ellen M. M., 


Moorettown, N, J. 


, [ill N. Church St.] 


Albert, Guy Elmore, 
Andrews, Lucille, 


York Springs, 


1693 BouvierSt. 


Woodbury, N. J., 


School for SrU. 


Arnold, T. Herbert, 


Ardmore, 




Atkinson, John Donaldson. 


Berwyn. 




Bair, Agnes, 
Ban-, John iValtcr. 


Philadelphia. 


ISIJ Dickinson St. 


Reading, 

Philadelphia, 


Dorm. 14 House P. 


Bary, George, 


3438 Walnut St. 


Bear, Herbert K., 


do. 


4032 Baring St. 


Bedford. Flora, 


do. 


818 Oxford St. 


Black, Matthew B., 


Avon. 




Booz, Florence Miller, ' 


Philadelphia, 
Milford, Del., 


13 06 Master St. 




Bowers, R. Bnice, 


Philadelphia, 


J149 N. 2d St. Pike. 


Boyle, Howard Peterson, 


do. 


404 Ledger Bldg. 


Boyle, Margaret, 


do. 


338 W, Hortter St. 
German town. 


Brautigam, Ernest Laffitte, 


do. 


537 S. 42d St. 
Dorm. 333 Franklin. 


Brown, Calvin Austin, 


FriedcnsbuTE', 


Burk, Charles Hergest David Philadelphia, 


409 Arch St. 


Burk, Edwin H., 


do. 


i6n N. .«dSt. 


Caldwell. Hugh Wright, 


Chesapeake City, Md. 


Campbell, Frazelia, 


Philadelphia. 


738 S. lathSt. 


Carman, Emma I'ruden. 


do. 


1414 Christian St. 


Caipenter, Leonora E., 


Baltimore, Md.. 


[29 St. Paul's Road. 
Ardmore J 


Chapman, Richard Henry, 

CUw. Elsie, 

dark. Matilda Rebecca, 


Warminster. 


8139 Germantown Ave. 


Philadelphia. 


307s E. Tioga St. 


do. 


1416 Clifford St. 


Cleaver, Horace J., 


Ardmore. 




Clever, G. Charles, 


Shippensburg. 
Philadelphia, 


3713 Spruce St. 


Cochran, George C, 


917 Moore St. 


Coffin, EUaabeth Fussell, 


do. 


3521 Hamilton St. 


Colby Jlnth. 


Holly Oak, Del. 




Cole. William Ide, 


Dallas. Tenas, 


105 S. 34th St. 


Colhns, Archie Stewart. 


Philadelphia. 


842 N. 40th St. 


Collins, Wilbur Jones, 


do. 


3400 Walnut St. 


Conover, Courtney, 


Spartansburg. 
Pliiladelphia. 




Conway, Adam Southern. 


3400 Walnut St. 


Coonahan, William Joseph, 


do. 


48 E. Clapier St.. Gtn. 


Corkran, Sewell Hopkins, 


Media. 




Costello, John N., 


Tacony. 
Woodburv. N. J.. 




Curry, Charle* Hill, 


iS»4 Chestnut St. 


Dalton, John Franklin. Jr., 


Chester. 





t,i.a,Google 



Delany, Howard Sharpless, 
Delk, Edward Buehler, 
DeLone, Joseph Michael, 
Del Rosa. Alfred, 
Deppisch, Alma Louise, 
Dever, Harvey Conquest, 
DeVictor, WiUiam Knight, 
Dieterle, George Andreas, 
Donnelly, C.Jessica J„ 
Drueding, Bemhard John, 
Duncan, Winifred, 



THB COLLEGE. 
Rendence, 

Philadelphia, 
Harrisburg, 
Philadelphia, 
Ridley Park. 
Philadelphia, 
do. 



do. 



do. 



630 N. Broad St. 
Donn, 139 Smith. 
735 Montrose St. 

4436 SaoEom St. 
4735 Baltimore Ave. 
3400 Walnut St. 
1511 Wallace St. 
517 W. Girard Ave, 
1415S. Broad St. 



Evans, Henry Simpson, 
Eysenbach, George (^ord. 
Fitch, Edward Doolittle, 
Fletcher, Gustavus Bergner, 
Freeman , Addi son B ampf y ld( 
Gallagher, Elizabeth 

Hildagarde, 
Gardinier, Charles Henry, 
Garrett, Erwin Clarkson, 
Gartland, John J., ad, 
Gaston, Frederick Harold, 

Gerhard, Mary A., 
Gibbons, Helen Wilson, 
Gibbons, Lois O., 
Gibson, Henry Clay, 
Gill, Calvert Burke. 
Gillan, Charles McDoweU, 
Goff, Byron Heazelton, 
Graham, Donald, 
Granlecs, William Sletor, 
Griffith Mary Dechert, 
Guest, Sarah Ashley, 
Gunther, Albert George, 
Hall, Elizabeth Rantoi, 
Hampshire, Iva M 
Hayward, Thomas Eccleston, 
Haynes, C. D., 
Hewson, William, 
Hickey, Susanna Goode. 
Hicks, John Frederick Groi " 
Hires, Linda Smith, 
Hoffman, Bertha Livingsto 
Hoflfsten, Ernest Godfrey, 
Holdridge, Newton Clark, 
Hombe^er, Harry, 
Hunt, Biddle Newbold, 
Hunter, Jane, 



Bustleton. 
Philadelphia, 
Hollidaysburg, 
Philadelphia, 

Radnor, 
, Philadelphia, 
Warkworth, Canada, 105 S. 34th St. 



600 S. Broad St. 
3717 Spruce St. 
61 1 N. loth St. 



do. 
Jenkintown, 
Baltimore, Md., 
Philadelphia, 
Pittsburg, 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do- 
do. 

do. 
Middletown, Del., 
Philadelphia. 
Minneapolis, Minn,, 
Petersburg, Va. 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 
Bryn Mawr. 
I, Chadd's Ford, 
Philadelphia, 
Hammonton, N. J. 
Phildaelphia, 
Ku-kwood, N. J. 
Philadelphia, 



3713 Spruce St. 
3331 Walnut St. 
3816 Sw;, Garden St. 
6341 Woodbine Ave., 

Overbrook, 
3337 N. 6th St. 

40s S. 4IBt St. 

4058. 41st St. 
aooi Walnut St. 
3303 Walnut St. 
346* N. agth St. 
3519 Locust St. 
4304 Walnut St, 
Dorm. N. Y. AlumnL 
1529 Green St. 
3417 N. Marshall St. 
4642 Westminster Ave. 
759 N. 40th St. 
351 Lyceum Ave. Rox. 
435 S. 43d St. 

1 115 Spruce St. 
373S Spruce St. 
Girard Ave. & 65th St. 



5339 Angora Ave. 



tizedoy Google 



Hunter, Rolland Mitchell, 
Irons Sallie B., 

Iames, Jesse Evans, 
ayne, Charles Adams, 
enldns, Martha Campbell, 
ohnson, Arthur Charles, Ji 

Kasugai, Jo tare, 
Keating, Peter McCall, 
Keely, Edmund Mark, Jr., 
Kem, John Williams, 
Kite. Albanae, 
Klauber, Edward. Jr., 
Knoll, Lloyd Monroe, 
Knowles, Emmctt Bryan, 
Lampe, Willard, 
Lancaster, Antoinette, 
Lane, Irene Veronica, 
Lang, Henry Christian, 



Lenderman, Watson Beatty, 

Levy, Howard Spenee, 
Levrnel, Zygmunt Stephen, 
Lollis, Harwick Arthur, 
Lukens, Hiram Stanhope, 
Luttrell, Mary Eliza, 
Lybrand, Lenore Mont- 
gomery, 
McCaffrey, John Carrotl. 
HcCalUe. Joseph Madison, 
McElwain, C. Stanley, 
McGrane, James Bernard, 
McManua, Marie R., 
McSorley, Lewis Bernard, 
MacLean, Sarah Jones, 
Major, Paul Langdon, 
Mathay, Jacob, Jr.. 
Mattson, John Danskin, 
Margolin, Fannie B., 
Martin, Edward Burk, 
Maxfield, Francis Norton, 
Mayer, Albert Ignace, 



do. 

do. 
Elverson. 
Philadelphia, 
Camden, N. J., 

.,Castleton-on-Hud- 
son. N. Y., 
New York, N. Y., 
Philadelphia, 

do. 
Hamilton. N. Y., 
Philadelphia, 
Louisville, Ky., 
Reading. 
Philaddphia, 
Omaha, Neb. 
Forksville, 
Pedricktown, N. J., 
Trevose, 

Baltic, S. Dakota, 
Emporium, 
Villa Nova. 
Clemson College. 

S. Carolina. 
Wilmingtoij, Del, 

Philadelphia, 
Wilkesbarre, 
Philadelphia, 



Trenton, N. J, 

Sewickley, 

Philadelphia, 



Cincinnati, Ohio, 



031 N. Broad St. 
(%U Cooper St.] 
Dorm. 131 Craig. 

3920 Sansmn St. 
34S3 Woodland Ave. 
350 Green Lane, Rox, 

3703 Locust St. 

B) N. St. Bernard St. 
orm. 140 Smith. 
3361 Chestnut St. 
3115 Arlington St. 

3737 Spruce St. 
3829 Cambridge St. 
Seminary, 43d & Chest- 



854 N. 8th St. 
3617 Locust St. 
5000 Woodland Ave. 
I Tioga St. 



36 N. 40th St. 

3618 Walnut St. 
3046 Bainbridge St. 
3334 N. 13th St. 
740 N. 3oth St. 
377 S, 4th St. 
3717 Powelton Ave. 
4134 Powelton Ave. 
7»S Pine St. 
534 S. 4th St. 
1009 Columbia Ave. 
164 May land St. 
[830N. 3d St., Camden, 

NJ] 
3ia S. loth St. 
3341 N. aistSt. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



rHB COLLBCS. 



Nam*. 

HOls, Alan BtOch, 
Mitchell, George, 
Moorshead, A!bert H., 
Morgan, Mabel Taylor, 
Morrow, Helen Harcourt, 
Moyer, Herbert Baldwin, 
Myers, JoBeph S., 
Needham, Dora Louise, 
NeweU. Charles W., 
Nibecker, Karl, 
Nields, Mosmer Aldewin, 
Noble, Charles Greylock, 
Noble, Raymond Hull, 
O'Neil, Sydney D., 

Ott, George Warren, 
Park, Richard G., Jr., 
Perkins, Rowan Penrose, 
Pfister, John Anthony, 
Pierce, Stanley Ladomtis, 
Ramsey, Emily Yocmn, 
Reich wein, Lena, 
Reinhardt, Lydia Ludwig, 
Rhoad. John Necly, 
Richardson, Francis Allen, 
Ries, Rebecca, 
Ringe, Henry Ralph, 
Ross, Robert Bruce, 
Russel, William C- (Mre), 
Russell, Howard Wootten, 
Rutter, Albert Curtis, 
Schlater, Lillie, 
Schopbach, Charles Henry, 
Seipt, Allen Anders, 
Seipt, Howard Anders, 
Service, William Spencer, 
Shoemaker, Charles Chalmers, 
Siegmann, Edward William, 
Smelo, WiUiam M., 
Smith, Harvey Newcomb, 
South, Florence Tingley, 
Spangler, Elmer E., 
Stackhouse, Laura N., 
Stalberg, Samuel. 
Steen, Mary Ellen, 
Stehle, Prank Krammer. 
Sterling, Sara Hawks, 
Stem, Arthur K., 
Stem. Julius David, 
Stradley. Leighton Paxton, 
Straus, Bertram, 



Cynwyd. 
Clearfield, 
Lansdowne. 
Philadelphia, 



Glen MilU. 
West Chester. 
Philadelphia, 

do. 
Chippewa Falb, 

Philadelphia, 

West Chester. 

Philadelphia, 

do. 



do. 



Farmington, 

Pcrkasie. 
Philadelphia 



Bala, 

Saint David's, 

Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 
Berwyn. 
Philadelphia, 
Lansdowne. 
Philadelphia, 
Trenton, N. J., 
Teffersonville. 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 



1935 N. 8th St. 
3700 Sansom St. 
1337 DeKalbSt. 
Chestnut Hill. 
916 Lombard St. 
337 Wyota St, 



3034 Oxford St, 
3034 Oxford St. 
$3 N. 36th St. 



3005 DeLance7 PL 
4438 Fleming St. 
5053 Wade St., Gtn. 



3I2I Mt. VemonSt. 
1635 S. Broad St. 
319 s. 33d St. 
»6is N. 8th St. 



1814 Vineyard St. 
1701 W. Norris St. 
3935 Pine St. 



933 Arch St. 
1136 Columbia Ave. 
733 Dickinson St. 
3IIO N. 3oth St. 

5337 Larchwood Ave. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



Stuckert, Howard Morris, 
Taite. Frank Griffitha, 
Taylor, Laura May, 
Tener, Henry Brown, Jr., 
Thomas, John RamEey, 
Thompson, Elizabeth, 
Thompson, Russell Darrah 

Topping, Wilbur Baird, 
Traver, Hamson Baxter, 
Tremain, Eloiae Ruthven, 
Ungemach, Dena Daisy, 
VaU, James Garrett, 
Vaughan, Charles Zimmer- 

Vaughn, Roscoe Ingersol, 
Verlenden, Edith L., 
Vick. Albert Fisher, 
Wain, Emma, 

Welsh, Raymond Wilmer, 
Wesley, Charles Frederick, 
Wicke, Carl Frederick H., 
Wiley, Hedwig, 
Wilson, George Hamilton, 
Winterstein, Otto Alfred, 
Wolf, Bessie Alwilda. 
Woodward. Laura Embree, 
Wright, Charles F., 
WuTBter. Nettie, 
Yei«er, William Clarence, 
Yo<fer, Arthur Lee, 
Zuber, William Henry, 



QUA 



ISO* I- - - 

9tj S. 47th St. 
S33B.49thSt. 

3913 Tio^ §t. 

2064 E. Dauphin 
140 N. 15th St. 
3400 Wakut St. 

300 S. t6th St. 



Washington, D. C, 

Darby. 

Philadelphia, 



Wayne. 
Philadelphia, 
Geigertown, 
West Chester. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Philadelphia, 

do. 

do. 



3»33 Woodland Ave. 

Sop N. 63d St. 
Fnends' School, isth 

and Race St*. 
3413 Baring St. 



4»39 Powelton Ave. 



3430 S 
tjao Jefferson St. 
5110 Kershaw St. 
335 N. Felton St. 
a 01 7 Columbi* Ave. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



THB COLLBOB. 



mmiiB SCHOOL of accounts and FINMCE. 

nsar TXAB BB01II.AB BTUDKNTg. 



Adama, Carson Wilacm, 
Alexander, Washington 

Wallace, 
Allen, Prank Louia, 
AlliBoa, James Ndson, 
Aitz, Wayne Zero, 
Bach, Charles Yamme, 
Baer, Jomefi Walter, 
Balliet, Walter, 
Baum, RuGsell Ernest, 
Bechtel, F. M., 
fiihlmaier, William Thomas, 
Blair, James Edgar, 
Boraske, George Gnstav, 
Brunt, Thomas Bayard, 
Carrigan, Charles Philip, 
Ctuismao, Gei^e Albert, 
Clark, Marvin Ray, 
Colbeck, Samud, 
Conndt, Archibald Grant, 
Corson, Charles Perdval, 
Crompton, George Samuel, 
Da vies, John Colfax, 
Deck, John Milton, 
Edi^, Harry Solomon, 
Elmer, Arthur Read, 
Eves, Prank Cleo, 
Fellons, John Randolph, 
Penn, Theodore, Jr., 
Finney, Clinton Mendenhall, 
Finnigan, William Russell, 
Fletcher, Charles Mann, 
Ford, Joseph Michael, 
Frantz, Seth Unas, 
Gabel, John Femandea, 
Griffey, John Stephen, 
Ha^, Chaiies Carroll, 

Haig, Clifford Wesley, 

Hamilton, Tames Garfield, 
Hare, Frank Ellwood, 
Hartz, Richard Alexander, 
Hausmian, Harry Craig, 
Heins, John Wesley, 
Herknwa, Benjamm Leander, 







Philaddphia, 


.8.6 N. Van Pdt St. 


do. 


435 Hansberry St.. 


Wayne. 
Hiiladdphia, 


423 West Chelten Ave. 


do. 


.6j7 S. .sth St. 


do. 


3445 N. 1 7th St. 


do. 


514a Ludlow St. 


do. 


704 S. Sid St. 


do. 


37.4 Locust St. 


Camden, N. J., 


Isjt Caiman St.] 


Philadelphia, 
do. 


;;jfcrsf- 


do. 


3944 Flora St. 


Riverton, N. J. 




Philaddphia, 


9136 Diamoikd St. 


Wayne. 
Philadelphia, 
do. 


3 735 Spnice St. 
9741 Howard St. 


Camden, N. J., 


[593 Linden St.] 


Philadelphia, 


814 Montgomery Ave. 
3894 Hancock St. 


do. 


do. 


1738 Harrison St. 


do. 


13.0 S. .oth St. 


do. 


4944 Wyalusing Av» 


do. 


180. Pine St. 


do. 


3895 Baring St. 
3399 Spg. Garden St. 
ao.6 ft. yzd St. 
.691 N. Park Ave. 


do. 

do. 


do. 


do. 


1414 S. ijth St. 


do. 


.696 Christian St. 


do. 


3615 Fairmount Ave. 


do. 


3797 Locust St. 


do. 


3656 N. i.thSt. 


do. 


6725 Lansdowne Ave. 
S. W. Cor. 7th St. and 


do. 




Oak Lane. 


do. 


S. W. Cor. 7th St. and 




Oak Lane. 


do. 


.933 Butler St. 


do. 


717 Berks St. 


do. 


.907 S. 13th St. 


do. 


.90S S. 46th St. 


do. 


.gii FitiwaterSt. 


. do.. 


650 N. I.thSt. 



t,i.a,Google 



STUDENTS. 



HilsM, Charles IJiller. Philadelphia, 
Horton, Chaiies RATmoiid, do. 

iacoba, ^^ceIlt Adolpb, do. 

ones, J. Walter, Ridley Park, 

ordan, William, Philaddphia, 
^ing, Louis William, do. 

Knapp, WilHam Penton, do. 

Kohler, John Benedict. do. 

Lantping, Pranlc William, Ridley Park. 

Lancaster, Walter Dutton, Philadelphia, 

LaughUn, Prank Sistz, do. 

Levensohn, Solomon Joel, do. 

Linvill, Walker Eachus, do. 

Loughridge, William, do. 

Ludwig, John Phillip, do. 

Lukens, Harry Hutchings, Wilmington, Dd., 

McBumey, Andrew Harvill, Philadelphia, 

McCaffrey, John Joseph, Camden, N. J., 

HcColler, Eugene Cocran, Philaddphia. 
HcGee, Francis Grover, do. 

Mcllhonney, Clarence Aloy- do. 

HcNaily, John, do. 

Magee, James Tracy, Camden, N. J., 

Uarkmann, Uordecai Jacob, Philadelphia, 
Hoore, Dean, do. 

Murphy, Edward Joseph, do. 

Murren, Herbert Washington, do. 
O'Brien, James Patrick, do. 

O'Brien, Joeeph Raymond, do. 

O'Donndl, Jolm Patrick, do. 

Oesterich, George Wash- do. 



4310 Stiles St. 
5613 Market St. 
8539 N. 16th St. 

Morris and Logan Sta. 
4706 Windsor Ave. 
ISIS Porter St. 
91a W. Dauphin St. 

81 E. Bringhurst St.. 

Germantown. 
104S Tioga St. 
1330 N. Franklin St. 
1931 N. GratzSt. 
4413 Sansom St. 
1934 Mt. Vernon St. 
[911 Waahinrton St.] 
4738 Cedar Ave. 
[8 1 5 Carpenter St.] 
4933 Hazel Ave. 
iSio Wolf St. 
4716 Haael Ave. 

ar*i-3i Arch St. 
[8a8 Federal St.] 
9433 N. Park Ave. 
3405 N. 15th St. 
SI17 Hazel Ave. 
4338 Wyosing Ave. 
3336 Diamond St. 
3336 Diamond St. 
1733 Girard Ave. 
1643 W.Huntington St 



Patteraon, Robert James, 
Patton, Charles, Jr., 
Reed, Frank Leidy, 
Reeve, John Michener, 
Roberts,John Roth, 
Sample, Leslie Payson, 
Schvutz, John Martin, 
Sutler, Allen, 
Senges, Cbaries, 
SetUe. Paul Smith. 
Smith, Ernest, 
Smith, Lewis Doyle, 
Smith, Joeeph Rosa, 
Speakman, Frank Marion, 
Spencer, Howard Miller, 
Stager, Stanley Ray, 



1638 N. 8th St. 
1938 Wallace St. 
530 N. ith St. 
1638 filavia St., Gtn 

1339 N. 53d St. 
540 N. sth St. 
1S14 N. 34th St. 
1539 N. 38th St. 
4337 Powelton Ave. 
658 Union St. 
737 S. 33d St. 
1330 W. Dauphin St. 
3135 N. aSthSt. 
[»I9 W. 7th St.] 
1 106 S. 46th St. 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



TBI COLLBOS. 



Stehfest, Hernion Wallace, 
Straka, Prank Joseph, Jr., 
Taggart, Andrew, 
Tatman, Robert Fry, 
TimanuB, John Heroert 

Reading, 
Vandewalker, Clarence 

Edmond, 
Woemer, Matthew John, 
Wood, Walter Alan, 



[308 Walmit St.] 
83 1 Corinthian Ave. 
33SS Firth St. 
aoa; Mt. Vernon St. 

Overbrook Institute 

for Blind. 
3319 N. Hancock St. 



SECOND TEAR BBOCX^B STUDENTS. 



Aih, Alexander, Philaddphia, 
Benner, Edwin Francis, do, 

Bertolette, John Shenken, Wilmington, E 

Borden, George Washington, PhUadnphiB, 
Borden, James Bean. do. 

Brown, Albert Ernest, do. 

Bums, James Joseph, do. 



Carroll, Dennis Francis, 
Craige, Arthur Henry, Philaddphia, 

Cranch, Raymond Greenleaf, do. 

Fenninger, Cari Wiker, do. 

Fisher, Francis Marion, Jr., do. 

Flint, William, Jr., do. 

Frederick, William Paul, do. 

Fuigle, Joseph Sylvester, do. 

Gallagher, Walter Lindlejr, do. 

Gerdau, Herman, do. 

Godwin, John Walker, do. 

Griffith, Horace Price, do. 

Grow. George Hagy, do. 

Harrison, Samuel William, do. 
Hemphill, Edward Augustus, do. 

Holtzmon, Robert Morris, do. 

Kirk, Albert, do. 

Knox, John Carlyle, do. 

Latimer, James Dobbin, do. 

Lewin, Prank Charles, do. 

McGaw, Samuel Hall, do. 

McMenamin, Neal. do. 

McNeill, Thomas Emanuel. do. 

Malatesta, Prank Charles, do. 

Miller, John. do. 

Newkirk, Elmer Detwiler, do. 
Nieukirk, Philip Ford, Camden. N. J., 
Pickford, Albert William, Philadelphia, 



3567 Pennsgrovo St. 
1943 N. iqihSt. 
[710 Market St.] 
1737 Vine St. 
3739 Spruce St. 
495S Walton Ave. 
I9»3 N. aad St. 

f495 De Lancey St. 
tio4 Potter St.] 
i9Ja N. a4th St. 
iioW.LuraySt.,Gtn. 
S. E. Cor. 30th asd 

Race Sts. 
1711 N. 4»dSt. 
131a RitnerSt. 
706 S. Washington Sq. 
jaSS Leopard St. 
a44oN. 1 7th St. " 
raiSS. 46th St. 
ajo W. Horttor St., 

German town, 
aoai N. 7th St. 
Manayunk P. O. 
3639 Paiimount Ave. 
5373 Jefieraon St. 
1934 Mt. Vernon St. 
1238 W. Tucker St. 
3aio Baring St. 
3736 Hamilton St. 
loii Spruce St. 
53 N. 5. St St. 
r34S N. lathSt. 
38 N. 36th St. 
4814 Baltimore Ave. 
i8a8 Columbia Ave. 
1348 Catharine St. 



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Preusclier, Robert Alexander, Philadelphia 

Raine, Alfred Milton, do. 

Schafihaucer, Charies, do. 

Scheidel, Jphn Jacob, Jr., do. 

Schmidt, Robert Junius, do. 

Shaffer, Philip Caton, Jr., do. 

Smith, Thomas Wiltbiitger, do. 

Snyder, Freas Brown, Lansdowne, 

Sped, Henry William, Philadelphia, 

"ickney, Pranlc Alexander, do. 



afker, William Torrey, 
Ward, Frank Stepleton, Jr., 
Weiss, Oscar Ervm, 
Weissinger, Charles, 



City A 
344> Cheshiut S. 
6005 Westminster A 
3039 Girard Ave. 
1613 W.Cumberland St. 
I9I1 N. 30th St. 
- ' " rsth St. 



t St. I 
ister Ave. 
ive. I 



faS Dudley 



St. 



ley Ave.] 
oil i>. 3oth St. 
337N. S3dSt. 
510 King St.,Gtn. 
a 13 7 Summer St. 
1410 Snyder Ave. 
3ao< Race St. 
5. E. Cor. a 7th and 

Cabot Sts. 
1095 Foulkrod St. 
155 W. Sharpnack St., 

Germantown. 

9044 N. 7t)i St. 



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STUDENTS. 581 

DfiPABTBTENT OF PHtLOSOPHT. 

FKIXOWS AKD 8GHOI.AB8, IVOft-M. 

ON THE GEORGE LEIB HARRISON FOUNDATIOH. 

Pkllowships for Rssbakch. 

In Atsyriolagy: 

Name. Reiideaca. Citr AMxtaa, 

Arao Poebel, Eisenach, Germany, 3935 Pine St. 

Gmdiute, Evt-PriEdrich GymnBsium in EiKiuch, igoii. Studsat in Tlwikwj 
and OricDtKl LanBiugH, Univenjly of HiddelberE. Rutcr 1900-1(101: Hu- 
buiB, Eaiter, 1901-Oclotier 1901 ; Jenn, October, iodi-BuUt, iddi ; ZUridi, 
Euter igoi-Octabrr igoi : Jena. October, igoi-Octobcr i(ia*. Candidate in 
ThenloKy. 1004 Harruon Peilow lo: Reiearch in AsyriidaEy. Januarr i> 
'90S. to date, under special ternu of appointment. Stmitic '-"r~y 

In Chemistry: 
Clarence William Bailee, Aiibum, Ohio, 3607 

A.B.,Ph. D. (Oberiin. tool " 
and Chemistry, Kenyon, 



In European History: 
James Field Willard, Philadelphia, Dorm. iiS HcKean. 

B.S.,Ph.D. (Peniwylvania, 180S, KHJi). Harrison Scholar in European Hii- 
tory. iSpa-iBwi. Scholar in European History, Uiuveniiy of wiaconiin 
iBoe-ipoo. Fellow in European History, University of Wisconsin, 1900-iiKn. 
Harrison Felloirfor Researcfa in European History, riKi4-igD5. 

In Geology: 
Btmirtt Smith, Skaneateles, N. Y., _.. 

B. S. in rhemistry,' Ph. D. (Pennsylvania, 1900, 1905). 
and Mineralogy, igoi-ipo5. 

In Germanic Languages: 
Richard Heinrich Hermaim Gachingen-Urach, 3934 Pine St. 
Christian Karl Ludwig Germany, 

Riethmiiller, 

Ph. D. (Pennsylvania. loort. Oraduata of KaHsgymnasimn, Heilhronn. a. M.; 
TtaeolngiBchei Seminar. Maalbroan und Blaubenren. Unlveniity of TUbinjien. 
Fellow of Kd. Eberhardtstift. ifl»o-oi; Candidat* PhiloBiohy. University 
" da GrenobI* ^Prance), rooi. Traveling Felloi. at l.ondon of the Onivemity 
of T&binfren. i«oi; Pennsylvania, rooi-ivoj. Hanjaon Fellow in Ga- 
in Psychology: 
FHedrich Maria Urban, Brflna, Austria. 

t Leipiig, itoi-rgoj; Harrard, 



a November, igej. 



Digtma, Google 



58a DBFAKTUENT OP PHILOSOPHT. 

Fbllow SHIPS. 
In American History: 

Uvea. Rendencs. Gt7 flililiiw 

Praulc Fletcher SUpheiu, Topcka, Kans., 3918 Sansoin IK. 

Pk. B., Ph. H. (Chlcsso, 19114, igcj). History; tint yur. 

In Astronomy: 
Samud Goodwin Barton, Iv}4aiid, Uanerch, Del. Co. 

A. B. (Temple College. 1903). Univmitr Scholar in Aatraaomr, i»a4-i»o3. 
Aitmnomy, Matbematiis, Phjrsici: third yeai. 

In Zo^gy: 
Frank Macy Sur&c«, Eaton, O., 3611 Locust St. 

A. B.,A. If. (Ohio StaU Uoivendty. i»d4. 1095). ZoOagr; 6m yax. 

In Classical Languages: 
Wilton Wallace Blanck^, Philadelphia, Dorm. 54 Morns. 

A. B. (PeruKylvania, iftos). Clasaical LanfiugBs; fint year, 

Frank Levis Cloud, Conshohockeo. 

A. B.. A. M. (Penntylvinik, 1904. i«os). Greek, Litia, SuMbit; aicaad 
jew. 

In Economic Geography: 

Walter Sheldon Tower, West Bridgewater, Dorm. 344 UcKean 

Mass., 

A.B.,A.K. <Har™rf, 



In European History: 
Louis John Paetow, Milwaukee, Wis. aoS N. 3eth St. 

B. L.. If. L. (Wiuonrin, igoi, igoj). HaRJun Fellow in Eoropsu History 
toa4-ioss. Rurapein History. Ameiican 11111017, ClUBcal Idngiugu. 

"■" In Germanics: 

William Godfrey Bek, Hermann, Mo., 199 S. 33d St. 

A. B. (Miwouri. isojj. Univenoty Scholar in Germanic*, 1903-1904, 8tB- 

Josef Wiehr, Iowa City. Iowa, iii S. 34th St. 

Ph. B.. A. If. riowa Sute Univenity, 1904. igcsX Anistant in Germu, 
1001-1904: Fellon in German, 1904-199:, Iowa Stats Univenit]'. Garman, 

In liuio-EuTopean FkOology: 
.Ellwood Austin Welden, Philaddphia, Dorm. 55 E. P. Smith 

B. S. (Pennsylvania, 1903). Hairiaon Scholar in Indo-European Fhilokcr. 



tizedoy Google 



In Mathematics: 

RB^dein. atrAddno, 

4038 Locuet St. 

1004). GruJuate student of the Univenity of dhicaso portion* of the yrtn 
lit J, 1806, 1897, 1894, 1900. Membtrof the American SlBthematksISocirty 
uid the London Mathematicia SMiety. Editor of the A-mrrican Malktmali- 
ad Monlkly^ "- '- "-- " -' -^ . ™ - ^ 



In Mineralogy: 
Charles Travis, Philadelphia, sog DeKalb Square. 

B. S. in Gvil Ensiflamns, (Poantyivuniti, 1901). Huriioa Scholar in Uinei- 
alosy. iao}-i(Ki4: Hairuon Pellov, 19114-1905. Uinenilogy; third yor. 

In Physics: 
WaiTcs Peter Haseman, Linton, Ind., 39 S. Yew^ell St. 

A. B., A.U. (Indiuu, 190J, 1904). AnistEni in Phyiks. 190J-1904: Initnic- 
toT, 1904—1905, Indiana UnivBnity, Fhyucg; fint year. 

In Political Science: 
Chester Lloyd Jones, Hillside, Wis. 

B. L. CWiaconnn. i^). Unirmity Schdar In Potiticsl Science. Wiioootin. 



In Psychology: 
Alfred Httuy Stroh, Bryn Athyn, Dorm. 310 Brooks. 

A, B.,-B. Th. (Bryn Alhyo CoUwe 1890; TbeoSoincal Seminary of the New 
Church. Bryn Athyn, 1901). Student. University of Stockholm, SumtTier 
Se n i ea ter, 1903. University Scholar in Psychology, 1904-1905. Appointed 
by the Royal Swediih Academy of Scieiicn, editor of the uninibliiihed gcien- 
tinc worla of Emanuel Swedenbors;, now being issued by the Academy. Phfl- 
OKiphy, Psychology: third yor. 

/» Semities: 
Daniel David Lnckenbill, Souderton, 

In Semltks. 1903-1904: Hai> 

In Zodlogy: 
e Francis McQendon, Austin, Tex., 

B. S.. M. S., <Teiai. 1901. 1904). Student Aaristant id ZoDIokt. Utdnraty 
otTeui. 1900-1903. Fellow in ZoOlo^, Univemty of Texas, - - 
HarrisDn Fdlow in ZoOlocy, 1904-1905. Tr" ~ - ■->-- 



PeDow in ZoOlo^, UniveiBty of Texas, 1903-1904. 
Zoelocy, 1904-1905. ZoOlosy, Phyiiolocy, Botany, 

D„t,i.a,G00glt' 



584 dbpaktmbnt op fhilosofht. 

Scholarships. 
In Botany: 
KuBc Randencc 

Herlcd HeniT Jacobo, 

In Ckemitlry: 
Joet Henry Hildebnuid, Wayne. 

B. S. (Penurlvwik, 1901). Chenlitrr. Pbyrics, Hiscniogy; tiUrd fW, 

Walter Kurt Van Haag«n, Philaddphia, 749 N. 40th St. 

B. S. (PenniylvBiiiB. i(k>s). CheininTy, Pbyaics! fint year. 

In Classics: 
Sditisgrove. 

m, CollcBc, 1S9O. CluBcal Languaaa; fint jrcar. 

/n Economics: 
Frederick Bittle Kegley. Wytheville, Va., 3734 LocuBt St. 

A. B.. A. M. (Roanoke CoUe«c. i»ao. i«oi). Eomomka, Politicml SoBice^ 
Sociology ; fiiit year. 

In History: 
Joaftph Wolston Huff, Philadelphia, 331 Dicldnson St. 

A. B. <Pei]iia]'lv»iiia, 190)). Hiatory; flnt year. 

In MalkemaUcs: 
George Gailey Chambers, Ridley Pork. 

A. B. (Dlckbiion, ISO*). Piindpal of the PuMIe Sdioob, Ridky Puk. 
[^, tvai to data. Bathematici, Pedagogy. Physka; aecond year. 

In Philosophy: 
Henry Bradford Smith. Philadelphia, Donn. 115 Poenderar. 

A- B. (Pennaylvftfua, 1^3). Hamson Scholar in Philoaophyt 190^-1904. 
PUloaopbyi Kcoud year. 



ON THE HECTOR TYNDALE FOUNDATION. 
Fbllowbhip. 
/« Physics: 
J<An Esra Hoyt, Hammonton, N. J., 3*64 Sanaom St. 

A. B. (Urslnus. 1904}, Initructor in Phyaca. Uniniu Academy, ipo>-igoj^ 



t,i.a,Google 



■TUDBNTS. 

ON THE JOHN FRIES PRAZER FOUNDATION. 
FsLLOweHiP. 
In Physics: 

NuBB. RntdoKW. aty AiOnm. 

Charies Aaron Culver, Hankato, Minn., 3164 Sansom S 

B. S. (Culton CoUest, ijei). Inalructor m Scienca, Hifih Sc 



ON THE JOSEPH M. BENNETT FOUNDATION. 
FBLLQW8HIP8. 
In Classical Lanptagts: 
Wx^xuA Judith Craig, Spriaf^Geld, Ho., 210 DeKalb Square. 

A. B., H. A. (Dniiy, ipoi; WMhington UnivBTiity, ijo*), Imtructor in 
Enoliih, Lktin uid Gcnnaa, Hicn School. St. Chulc*. Uo., 1001-1004. 
QuBC^ Lsnguiigci 1 Kcoad ye«r. 

In History: 
Elizabeth Girdler Evans, Dayton, Ohio, 4196 Chester Ave. 

A. B. (WelleilBy, iSot). GisdiuU itudcnt, Summer School, Huvud, ifoi. 
ImtnictiiT in Buglijli, Steele Hish School, Dayton, O.. 1)0^1904 Hutory, 
EngUidt l4t£retura ; aecond year. 



ON THE MRS. BLOOMPIELD MOORE FOUNDATION. 
Pbllowbhips. 
In Chemistry: 
Julia Langness, Baltic, S. D., 116 S. 34th St. 

B. S. (Ceiieton Collect. 1901), Chematry: tbird yMt. 

In Zoology: 
Alios Hiddleton Boring, Philadelphia, 931 Fairmonnt Ave. 

A. B., A. H. (Brvfi Uawr, i«o4. i»as). AviMut In Biolosy. Bryn lU*rr, 
1904-1901. ZoAlosy; Grit yvti. 



ON THE FRANCES SERGEANT PEPPER FOUNDATION. 
Fbllowship. 
In English: 
Mmv Grier WillBtm, Allegheny, 1918 Wallace St 



tizedoyGOOJ^If 



DBCARTHENT OP I 

UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Fellowships fob Rbsbarch. 

In American Hiftory: 

Nbum. RandmiM. Citr AiUtcm. 



L.._Pli.D. (WtKoniin, i»tSj PHUuylvu^,i(iD>). GisdtuU itudent. jtnd. 



G«org;e Danid Luetscher, Philaddphia, 414 S. 43d St. 

- - - - — iiin, i»»8; PenmylmuiU, idoi) " 
■□ Pellow m Amencaa History, 

In Economics: 

Frank Julian Wame, Parkerabui^, W.Va,, Dorm, ao Smith. 

Cert. Fin. and Econ., A. M., Ph. D. {Pennsylvania. 1S06. 1890, taoi). Um- 
veTBty Scholar in Economics, 1808-1501. Harrison Stmior Felbw in Eco- 
nomics, 1901-10C3- UDivercit]' Pellow for RoeanJi in Hcocomici. t«o]-ip;5. 

In English: 

John Louis Haney, Philadelphia, 934 N. nth St. 

B. S., Ph. D. (Pmnaylvania. iSgg. i«oi). Harriun Scholar in En^liih and 
HiMory, 1899-1899. Marriton PcUow in English. iSw-igco. Reappoiatad 
lor i»oo-iiioi, but naigiied. Inalnictot in English imd History. Cent™! 
High School. PhiUdeljAia. 1900 to DEcemher. loo]: Aasistant Profeiur, 
January i. 1904, to daU, HonotBry Pellow in Enaliih. 1901-1903. Uni. 
vcMity PellowforlLcaearcliin Eiwliah, igoj-ivoj. 

Charles Wharton Stork, Philadelphia, 600 Church Lane, Gtn 

A. B.. A. U., Ph. D. (HaTttford, 1001; Harvard, 190J; Peonaylvaoia, 190s). 
Aatinant in Engliah. University oC Pennaylvania, 1903-190$. 

In Philosophy: 

Isaac Hnsik, Philadelphia, 616 Morris St. 

A.. B., A. U., Ph. D. (Penniylvania. 189T, iSo9. "eo.i). Univeraity Scholar 
in Uathematics and AatnHiomy. lAor-iSw, University Scholar in Claaiic^ 
1899-1901. UniverBty Fallow for RcKarcb in Philoaophy, i»oi-i905. 

In Latin: 
James Walker Downer, Gordoneville, Va., 3940 Pine St. 

A.B..A. H.. Ph. D. (UnivenityofVii«inia. 189;. 1897; Pennn^vanla. 1905 
Graduate student, ibid.. iSsS-iHdt. Instructor in I«tin. Uuion Midtaiy 
Institute. Harion, Ala., igoo to date. Vood Fellow, 1903-1904. Harrteft 
PtUow in I^tln, 1004-1005. 

Fellowships. 

In Sociology: 

Richard Robert Wright, Jr.. Savannah, Ga., ifisiPineSt 



In Transpartaiion and Commerce: 
Gsorgtt Thomas Surface, Emory, Va., 3725 Locust St. 

B.A..M.S. (Polytechnic Inititate.Blackibuis.Va.. 1895.1^96). Profe<s 



y. EconinmcsL &rat year. 

D„t,i.a,Google 



STODBNTS. 58 

ScaoLAKSHiPs. 

In Amtrican History: 

UtiBC Aavdoiee. Cbty Adjlna. 

Carrie Bumham Kilgore, Swarthmore, (Elm Ave.) 

A. B,. A. U. (Swarthmon, igoi, 1004). ITniveriity Scholar m American Hii- 
toTT. 1004-11101. American, Engliih. uid Europetm Histoty: wcood jtiar. 

It* Astronomy: 
Edith Dabele Kast, Berlin Center, O., Upper Darby, 

(Marietta College, looj; Pennsylvani*, looj). UniTonitr 
!»»,,•.« Tr_: ity Scholar in Aatronomy, 1904- 



joi: Uni 
s, Physici 



/n Biology: 
Margaret Harris Cook, Camden, N. J., 

B. S. in Bioloffv. (Peaaiylvuiia. tqoi). Univen 
1005. Zo^ogy, Fhyiiolofly, Botany; accaad y 

Manon Mackenzie, Philadelphia, 4S16 Florence Ave. 

B. S. (Pennsylvania, inoj). Biology, Pedaaogy; firit year. 

■ In Chemistry: 
Anna Lockhart Flanigen, South Hadley, Mass. [Mount Holyoke 
College.] 

■Pmmylvania. 1B78). Student at Pennsylvania, iSlB- 
>_._. . .. ^ „. „,. „ „. siucleni at Univer- 



'"" ' mdon. iBnS-.Biio-. „„ ., 

,. Mount Holyol 



;. London, iSbS-iBoo', Berlin, iBoo-iflOi; Harvard Sumi 
■ ■ - ol,,, College, 100 



AbKnt on leave for fint ti 
Reuben Taylor Shaw, Delaware, O., 18 N. 38th St. 

B. S. (Ohio Wedeyan, isKJj). Chemistry; tint year. 

Luther Ferree Witmer, Lancaster, Dorm. 367 HopkinHni. 

Ph. B. (Franklin and Manhall. 1004). Univenity Scholar in Cbemiilryi KK14- 
190s. ElectTo.Cbemistry, Oisanic and Inorganic Chemittryi •econd year. 

/« Economics: 
Cloyd Benton Ewing, Mount Union, 3313 Walnut St. 

A. B. (Pennaytvania 190s). Economical fiist year. 

Scott Nearing, Philadelphia, 1427 N. i6th St. 

B, S. (Pennsylvania. t»i>i>. Economics, Sociology, Philooophy; first year. 

In English: 
Isabella Rachel Gill, Hulmeville, 3633 N. Broad St. 

A. B. (Smith, igos). Engliih Litarstun. Philaiophy. History; Brat year. 

Frederick Anthony Child, Philadelphia, 318 S. 40th St. 

A, B. (Pemuylvsnia, i(K>)]. English; first year. 



t,i.a, Google 



DBPABTMBHT OF PBILOSOFHY. 



George Edward Roth, Philadelpfaia, 

A. B. (Oiokiiuoa, i^oj). Priiict[> ' 

Inatitute, ipsj-inM. Inatnictor 



I^j). Principal and Teacher td EoffiA, Omxnbafmia 
1004. Inatmctor in Latin, Cantral Hl^ Scbogl, BftDliic 
date, fingLiiti Litflmtun ; aecand year. 



In Germanics: 
Winiam Radclifte Anson, Phoecixville, [aij Gay St.] 

A. B. (Unoiiu, ipoj). University SchoUr in Oennanica, igoA-spos. Gcr- 
nn"<~i Prawh 1 third yaar. 

Robert Rutherford Bangor, Me., 3445 Woodland Ave. 

Drununond, 

B. S. CUaine, iiK>5). Germanic Lan^uasei i flnt year. 

Im History: 
York, 919 S. 37th St, 

>i»). History, Political Science; lint year. 

In MathenuUies: 
Philaddphia, &06 St. Bernard St 

1904). Attmnomy. Hatbematics: ■ocood year. 
In Pedagogy: 
Charles Calvert Ellis, PerkioinenviUe. 

A. B. (JmOt^*, 1898). Instructor in Engliah, ibid. iftoS-iSfp. DaiTenity 
Schcil^ in ndasoffy. Peonbylvimia. 184(^1901. InEtiuctor in ^^'^g***^, 
Juniata, isoc-ivot. Studied Gardon BifaU TrsitiiaB School. Botton. 1901- 
1901. InMnictor in Eiwliah. Zion Call«e and Pnncrpal Ncnnal Scbool. 
ipoi to date. PeQnwihTp in Pcdago^, Clark Unlvenity, ii>o4-i90S. Re- 
Bgned. Pedaffosy, Paycholosy; Engllah; third year. 

Jacob Daniel HeQioan, Allentown, 334o Walnut St. 

A. B. (lluhlsnberg. i»oj). Pedasosy. Pfailoaophy. Piycbolocy: lecoDd yau. 

William Samuel Keiter, Hedfoid, N. J. 

A. B. (Uninui, itioi). Pedaffogy, Fgycholosy: ircond year. 

In Physics: 
Bertha Ha:r Clark, Baltimore, Md.. 3411 Walnut St. 

A. B. (Wooun't College of Baltlmoiv, loao). Graduate Etudent. Biyn UaVK 
i9oa-t«ei. Instructor in Woman's CoUege of Baltimore. i9Di-i«aj. Cnd. 
data Student, Univer^ty of 06ttinsca, Gennany, 1003-iao;. Hiyitci, 
Uathematici: liiBt year. 

Lloyd Monroe Knoll, Reading, 396a Chestnut St. 

A.B. (Urdnoa. i»oO. OiaduateoEUrBnuaBidioolatTlwMcgy, 1904. Pbyria 

Hatbeniatic*: second year. 

In Psychology: 
Berbert Baldwin Hoyer, Norristown, [1905 Willow St.] 

A.B., A. U. (Bueknall. 1891. iB*!). StudaaL Conm* for "" 
sjrlvania. iBgS-ipDo. PedJkSocy- PsycholoBy, tourth year. 



t,i.a, Google 



In Romanica: 
Maturia Harius Dondo, Philadelphia, 769 S. loth St. 

A. B. (Peniuylwi^ 1905). Romance I^nsiugea: fint ytar. 

Grace Edith McLean, Cobalt, Conn., 3230 Woodland Ave. 

A.B.,A.U. (Temple CotlFge, igo] : Peniuylvinia. igoj). Univenitr Scholar 
in Romviics. 1903-1004. RomviijcA. English, Germ^nici: tbird year. 

Attaio Sbedico, Philadelphia, 800 S. loth St. 

DjMoma dl UceniK Uceale <CaIk«io GnmliattisU Vico in Chieti. Italy. i«oj). 
Romania; hnt year. 

In Sociology:' 
Francis Dekker Watson, Philadelphia, 1810 N. 13th St. 

B. S. (Peuuylwiia, 1905}. Sodolosy, Pedasogy, Pbitosaphy; fint year. 

In Zodlogy: 
Huinah Hay Blake, Philadelphia, 431 E. Walnut Laoe, 

Gemiantown. 
B. S. (Pemuylvmaia, 1905). ZoAlogy. Botany; fint year. 

Haiy Alice Bowera, Saco, Me., 3S04 Locust St. 

B. L., U. A. (Smith. iBaj; Raddiffe. 1S98). Initnictorin Zo«k«v. Wetledey. 
1S99-1904; leav* of abaeoce. 1904-1906. ZoMosyi first year. 



BXOVUA 8TUDBKTB. 

AbboU, Uabd Loiuk, Watertown, Mass., 6063 Drexel Road. 

A. B., A. U. (RaddifFa, 1901, 1901). Sociology; fint year. 
Ackennan, Sabisa Claire, Easton, 3447 Woodland Ave. 



A. B. (Woman'B CoHece of Biltimon. 1903). A^itant in CheRiintry. Won 
"— — '"'-■- ,j; Traveling p ■•-- •-- - - . '- 



t Fellow for 1901-1906. Chem- 



Adanu, Robert Thompson, Lebanon. 

A. B., A. U. (AUesheny, ■.S91 ; Pennsylvania, loo*), SuperviainB Principal 
of School!. Fort Allesany. iSgi-iSgi; Giikrd. i89}-il)94: Wayneabcmi, 
Pa., 1^94-1899. Superintendent of Schools, Lebanon, Pa., iSgg to date, 
PeugDffy, Psychology ; fourth year. 

AJdmofi, Nicholas Wladimir, Nicolaleff. South S05 Spruce St. 

U. B. (UoKOW Imprrisl Schnol of Technology. 1901). Sorbonne UniTenHy. 

Faculty del Sciences. Paris. T90i'i9a>. Physcs, UathemaCic*. second year. 

AltllOtiM, Calvin Oabome, Philadelphia, 

B. S. in Bconomics. (Pennsylvania. 1901). loitmetor in 
19135 to date. Bnsllshi firtt year. 



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t 



DBPARTMBNT OP PHILOSOPHT. 

3710 Locust St. 
5597 MortoD St.. Gtn. 
Austin, Winifred, ' Norton, Uass., Ogonts School 

A. B. (Brown, ift«B). Hebrew; fiftb yax. 

Babb, Maurice Jefferis, Haverford. 

A. B. (Haverford, igos). Asaiatant In Uftthenutics, PeniuHvuiIa isas V 
date- llathematici. Astronomy; fii^ year. 

Bailey, Hajtha Logan, Dillsburg, 503S Summer St. 

A. B. <Wilwn, 1901). Padasngyi firM year. 

Baiker, Harold Charles, CoUmgdale. 

B. S.. A. U. (PennsylvBnia. idol t»os). TnatnictOT in Phyiki Faamfi- 
vaola, i«o4 to date. Physics, UaChEmatici; third year. 

a MUton, GrinneU, Iowa, 3713 LocuBt St. 



Beach, Robert Mills, Trenton, N. J., ' [307 Hamilton Ave.] 

Student at Yale, iSjo-iaSi. B. D. (Proteitant Bpiscoiial Seminarr. Cam- 
bridge, llan. . iSos)- Romanici. European History. Greek. Graduate its- 
dent, Pennsylvania, iSbi-i»oj- Absent on leave 

Beck, Joseph Albert, Erie, 



Bell. Herbert Clifford, Hamilton, Ont., Can- 

■ iO«j)- Univenity Scholar io Eunipcan History, i«o}-iga4- 



Blake, Harriet Manning, Philadelphia, 715 Corinthian Avc. 

B. A. (Wellesley, iG»4). Bngliih Utosture; aecond yesr- 

Blattenberger, Helen, 

A. B. (Temple College, 

Boewig. Harriet, Philadelphia, ajjy Bolton St. 

B- S. in Biolottr. (Pennsylvania- 1901), Student Marine Biolosical Labo- 
ratory. Woods Hole, i9oa-i»9i. Botany, Pedagogy, Oennanica. /bsmi 

Bolger, Thomas Denis, Philadelphia ^05 DeKalb Square 

B. S. (Pennsylvania, 1401)- Aoistani in EukIIiIi, Pennlylvanla, tpei to 
date, English Literature. Enfdish Pbilal<«v. second ycar- 

Brecht, Samuel Kriebel, Norristown, [647 Haws A\e.] 

B. S- (Haveiford, iS«6). European History. Gcrmanica 
year. 



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atyAMiwm. 

Bright, Henry WaUw, Rev., Norristown. 

A. B.. A. U. (Pranklia ud Uuilull. iB«i)- Sodolcwy: fint jeu. 

Brooks, John David, MiUord, Del. 

A. B. (Dkldnson, 1901). Pirchotogy. Pedagosr; third year. 

Biyan, James Edmund, Camden, N. J., 

A. B. Qobai Hopldns. 1S90). Gimduats nu 
eogy,P>ychology, Philosophy; third yemr. 

Biyan, John Thomas Philadelphia, 

Ingram, Rev., 

B. A.. M. A.. B. a. (Kins'i College, N. S.. it 

Bot^uh lad of Commercuil Gcogmpiiy, I ■■ 

Toliio, Jkpan, April, ivot. to April, 7904 

Bumsted, Clarence Van AUenhoist, N. J., Dorm, an Franklin. 

Reynegom, 

Ph. B. (Bnnm. i»9j). ZoO\ogT: third yeu. 

Btarchett. Eliiabeth Rebecca, Philadelphia, 4438 Paul St.. Pkd. 

A. B. (Tempte, igoj). Latin, Onnk; third yeu. 

Btirke, Edward Washington, Norristown, [38 E. Oak St.] 

Rev., 

A. B. <We>leyu, 1SS8). Sorlolo^; lint r«'. 

CadwaOader, Carrie Virginia, Philadelphia, 1711 N. 17th St. 

B. S. (Temple, 1905) Engliib. Gemiao: fint year. 

Carpenter, Mabel Adeline, St. Johnsbury, Vt., 1808 Spruce St. 

A. B. M. A, <IUdcliiIe. loei; CohimbU, Iff*). Edcliih litoatura, English 
Philolacy; Kcond year. 

Chew, Samud Laverell, Philadelphia, 3404 N. 17th St. 

B. S. (Temple, i«oi). Enropeaa History. Economica, Sociolosyi fiiat year. 

Christo{Aer, John, Philadelphia, 1515 S. loth St. 

B. S. (Temple, 190s). CUuici: fint you-. 
Cleveland, Arthur, Philadelphia, 9518. aietSt. 

A. B. (Penoaylrania, 1904). English Literature, English Philotogy, Latin; 

Cober, Emmanuel Wilson, Philadelphia, lais N. 56th St. 

A. B. (Bucknell. 18(19}. PhilDSOphy, Pedagogy: fourth year. 
Collins, Willde Nelson, Alpena, Mich., Dorm. 333 Franklin. 

A. B. (Uichlgan, i9as). English; first year, 

C<dtOii, Harold Sellers, Philadelphia, 3409 Powelton Ave. 

B. S. {Pennsylvania, ibo«). Zofilogy, C^enlngy; second year. 

Connor, Hiram Blackstone, Philadelphia, 3658 Frankford Ave. 

A. B. (Temple, 190.1). American History: third year. 

Conway, Thomas, Jr., Lansdowne. 

B. a. (Penosylyania, 1904). Assistant in Economies, Pennsylvania, 1904(0 
date. Bconomica, Political Science, Sociolagy', secocd year. 

IS 

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f 



593 DSPAKTUBNT OP PHILOSOPHY. 

Nuna. Reddence, City Addrtn. 

Cooper, Milton Coiiard, Philadelphia, 1447 Venango St. 

B. S. (Temple, 19^$). Phytici: fint ym, 

Corson, LivingBton, Norristown, 

B. S. (PeniuylTuik. i«a4) Assiitiuit in Eo 
isn; to date. Eogliih Litentore, Englnh 

Coulomb, Charles Augusttn, Philadelphia, 4^49 Gimrd Ave. 

B. S. (Temple. 1905). Hiatrry: lint year. 

Craig, WUliam Frederick, Philadelphia, 1045 Tioga St. 

B. A., U. D, (Temple, 1S9T; Penn>yl™niii, 1901). Iiutnictor in Anatomy, 
Uedico^Chinusical tiiUcse, 1*98-1901. Lecturer on Peychiatry, Temple 
C^kge, 1931-1903. I^hdosy. ZoAlcgy: first year. 

Philadelphia, 1714 Mt. Vernon St. 

A. B. '(PRinaylvania, 1901). HarriKin Scholar in Romanic Ltmeuasea, ivoi- 
190J. Romanic!. Engliih Liten.ture, Bumpean Hiitory. Abient on lave. 

Cressman, Pavd Gerbardt, Lewistown. 

A. B.. M. 8. (Peniuylvania Collie, igoi; Penniylvania. 1904). Cbemiitry. 
Absest on leave. 

Daniels, Lloyd Cadie, Atlanta, Ga. 

B. S. (CSeoiKia School of Tpchnology, 1901). UnivefBity Seholar jo Chcmjitry, 
i^S'TQw; rengned Decnnher, 190J. ChemiGtry. first year, 

Davis, James Mercer, Pedrickton, N. J., [Crozer Seminary, 

Chester.] 
A. B. (Bnnni, i«03). Piycholi-gy; fint year. 

De Maris, Fimum Adison, Camden, N. J., [543 State St.] 

Ph. B. (Illlnon Weelsyan. 1905). Eniilieb: fint year. 

Dembitt, Arthtir Aaron, Philadelphia, 1834 N. Franklin St. 

A. B. (Johni Hopldna, iSaO. Initnictor in Jeviih Hiitory. Cintii Collese, 
■S«Tto<la(e. Semltici; accoad year. 

Dimick, Chester Edward, Manchester, N. H., (kiUege Hall. 

A. B. (Harvaid. looi). Instnictor in Uathematic*. Univenity of Poid- 
■ytvania, i(k>j t^ OMte. Mathenutki: third year. 

Dowlin, Howard Husted, West Chester, Dorm. 390 Lippincott. 

A. B. (Penniylvania, 1901). Classical language! ; fint year. 

Duffidd, Orville Strang, Camden. N. J., Usi Benson St.] 

A. B. (Penniylvania. i«a4). Engliih: second year, 

Dtmcan, John Christie, Philadelphia, 395S Aspen St. 

B. S„ U. S. (Pennsylvania. 1904). Asuitant in Induitry. Univenitr of 
Pennsytrania. 1904 to date. Economics, Political Science. Transportatioa 
and Science: second year. 

Dye, William Seddinger, Philadelphia, 1509 E. Montgomery 

A. B. (Penniylvania. 190;}. History, English; firat year. 

BailA Doris, Philadelphia, Chestnut Hill. 

A. B. (Bryn Mawr, .903), Hiitory; first year. 



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STUDENTS. 
StBrn. Rnddence. Cit<f Addnn. 

Eastbum, I6U Kajr, Hockessin, Del., 1609 Summer St. 



dyear! 

Filler, Mervin Grant, Carlisl«. [DicldoBoti College] 

A. B., A. H. (DtcktDMa, t»93, iSss). Profsaor of Latia, Dickinxio Collase, 
i&ltO to date. Claucu lADfuasn; fint year, 

FUcIonger, James Rudy, Lock Haven. 

A. B.. A. U., D. S. (Priaoetoa, iSIT, i^^: Bucknell. 1901). Admitted to the 
Bar of PnintylTuiu. iSSj; to the Supremf Court, 1887; CnlarsdD Supreme 
Comt, iSSg. UcnbcT of the L-gUlsturr of Pi-niiBylvHiiia. iSSi : of Colondo, 
1801. President of the Pmn8yrv.iiia Stats Educational Asmcimioit ,i(».. 
Pliic^Hl Bdinboro SUte Normal School, 1S96 to i»<h>. PHndpal of the 
CentiBl State Nonnat School, imo to dale History, Politiail Science, 
Pedagogy; third year. 

Foeel, Edwin Miller, Fogelaville, Donn. 37 Morris. 

A. B. (Unimia. iHpf), Oraduate slodent Johns Hopkina Univcrnly. 1894- 
iftgd. Inatmctcr in Oennan, Litin, and dink, Uoravian Parocllial School, 
Bechlfhem, Pa., 18(16-1004. Aniatant in Gennan, Univovty of Penniytra- 
nia, 1904 to dale Goinanks: Kctmd year. 

Frazer, John, Philadelpliia, gaS Spruce St. 

B. S. io ChnniatTy; A. M, (Pennaylvania. 1903. i«e4>. Chemistry; third year. 
Frets, FranMin Kline, Philadelphia, 1834 N. Camac St 

A. B.. A. U. (Uuhlenlws. ito7. lOw). Sodology; fint year. 

Fugate, Edwin Lindsay, Philadelphia, iioo Ellsworth St. 

A. B. CTemph CoUcki, iffoj). Beonomica, Sociology, Political Sdeaca; thiid 
year. 

Garbrick, Clarence Arthur, Bellefonte, 9015 Green St. 

A. B. (Princeton, 1901}. Amrriran History, Pedas.''Cy: finl year. 

Garwood, Helen, Williamstown, N. J, 

A. B. (Wetteatey, i8«8>. En«1iih Literatur«. Abaent on leaye for Bnt halt 
year. 

Gaw, AlUaon, Philadelphia, .1739 Sansom St. 

B.S. (PenntylraBia, i«oo). HarriBoa Scholar In Brwiish. iaoD-1901. Pro. 
Itmat al Bngliih, Tsmpto Cclkae, i«oi to datCL Bngliih Litsratuia, Bnx- 

liab Pbilalggy, CSennan Ijtersture; fourth year. 

Ger«0D, Annand Jaqnee, Philadelphia, 1109 N. 40th St. 

B. S. (Temple CoUeRe, ipojl. Hlatery: fint year. 

Gerson, Oscar, Philadelpbia, tajS N, 56th St. 

Ph. D. (Peniu^Tanla. iB«8). Instmclor In English, Ccntfal Manual Ttmintog 



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594 DBPAKTUBNT OP PHILOSOPHT. 

Nuhb. Readam. Oty Addrm. 

G«ttel, RaTmond GarMd, Shippenburg, Dorm, ii House P. 

A. B. (Uninui, 1004). Imtnictar in Bnglish and History, Uniaui CoUtge. 
i9o^-inos. Paliliria Science. Sociology. Economia: fint yew. 

Grabosky. Hynmn Leo, Philadelphia, 610 S. loth St. 

A. B., U. A. (Peansylvuia. i«o] 1004). Ham.'an SrhoUr in Clusicaa I^n- 
euagea, 1901-1903. Hatrison Fellow iti ClaBiical Laoffuucfl. 1003-1004. 
Univenity Scholar in CluucaJ LuisuagH, ip04-igos. Xolin, Greek, Phil- 
OK>phy; fourth yiar. 

Graaer, Ferdinand Harry, Philadelphia, 1940N. iitb St. 

B. S., A. M. (Peni»y1vuua. looj. 1905). Hutuod Scholar in Bcotiofnlcfl, 

Oriscom.Lucjr Middleton, Philadelphia, 153 S. 17th St. 

B. S. (Penn»ylviuii», 1903). ZoClogy; »econd year. 

Groth, Benno Humbert Philadelphia, 1443 N. 56) St. 

Alfred, 



oei. 10D3). Instnictor in German and Pm 
■. N. H,. iBoj-ioo*. - ■ " ■ ■ ' 



PhiUipa' Academy, Ere'ter. N. H.. igoj-igc*. Economic Bounii 

Conuneieial Uuaeums, PhilBdelphia. 1904 to date. BoUny. ZoAltfy; fint 

Gununey, Henry Riley, Jr., Philadelphia, 163 W. Penn St., Gto. 

Rev., 

A, B., B. D., D. D. {Penmylvanb. 
iQOs). Univeisit}' Scholar in Phi] 
Phfloftophy. Bnflliah; Entyear. 

Gunter, Abram Cyras, Norristown. 

A. B., A. U. (Buckaetl, i«o]. 1904). Philiwophy, Piycholoey. UathcmatJa: 

Harper, Daniel Roberts, 3d, Philadelphia, Rising Sun and Wyo- 

ming Aves. 

B. S. (Peniuylvaiiia, i«os). Instructur in Pbydo, 1904 to date. Physio; 

Hastings, George Tracy. Wenonah, N. J. 

A. B. (Comen, 1S98). Bouny, Pedagjgy; fint year. 

Heckman, Samuel B, Union, Ohio, 1160 N Park Ave. 

Ph. B., A. B,. A. M. (Eaiiham, iSoj; Harvard. iSgj; PennEyWnni.. •n^tt 
Oradiiate student, Harvard. igo;-iSti6. ProfeKorof English Li 



Modem Lanpiagei. Juniata Colleee, i8os-'8o7. Graduate student, Peniuyl- 

' - ' "^Bather of German and French, Cheltenham 

^isUnl CommiBioner of Education for the 

Gen&anic Literature. PcdBROsy. Romanic*. 



— ,_„_. ^ olleee, 180s- - - 

. , iBoT-iSoS, 1809-1000. Teacher of German a 
Military Acsi" " - ' * " ■ - 



Heesler, Lewis Burtron, Philaddphia, 

A. B, (Pennsylranja, i»os). Assistant in Bt 
lish: first year, 

Hiatt, James Smith, George School. 

B. L.. A. n. (Eartham, iflgv: Haverford. 1000). EnsUih. Pedacosy: Kcond 

len Taylor, Philadelphia, 4914 Warrington Ava. 



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Hin, Edwin Rowland, Jr., Philadelphia, 

A. B. (PcnmylvuiB, 1903). English; acconi 

Hinke, William John. Rev., Philadelphia, 3853 Cambridge St. 

A. B, (Calvin CoUege. iS»o). Uniiiul Thoolagical SemiiUkry, iSga-iSu. 

PiiocetuD Theolngi^ Semiiuiry, iSti4-i8«;. Itutnictor in Hebrew in Vt- 

linui School of Theology, 1S95 lo data. Anyriui, Hebnw, Anbic. Abaent 

Hoch, Horace Lind, Lewtstown, 30a S. 37th St. 

A. B., A. H. (Dlcldiuon, tgoi, 1(104). Gennuuci. Ensliih Philfriiisy; lecond 

Hockenben;, John Coulter, Haddon£eld, N. J. 

A. B. (OniYordty of Indiana. .809). Student, Jena, September to M»reh. 
iSa4-i8gs. Beilio. Uarch and April. iSgj. Auditor, Univenity of Pens. 
(ylvania, 1806-1898; Grmduate itudsnt. iSoo-iqdi', Inatnictor in Feda- 
gOKy, Univmity of PennaylvMnia. t«co-i«ai. Inatructor in PaycholocJ' 
and Pedagngy, State Normal School. California, Pa., igoj to dale. Peda«Offy. 
Piycholosy, Sociology. Abaent on leave. 

Holdridge, Newton Clarke, Hammonton, N. J. 

A. B„ M. A. (ColaaU. iBpi, ig«]). Newton <«■».) TheoloeicU loMituta, 
i8«t-igvii Craier Tbe<dogioil Semiouy, lepj-iSffj. Pedagocy, Paychol- 
ogy; fourth yeiu. 

Holdsworth, John Thorn, Philadelphia, Drcwl Institute. 

A. B. (New Yoric, 1^04). Bconomics. Sociolosy: (Kond year, 
Holloway, Harry Vance, New Castle, Del. 

A. B.. A. U. (Waihinston College, iS«i, ig«S). Pedagogy. Paycholovy: 

Holmes, Arthur, Philaddphia, Y. M. C. A., 4iBt and 

WeHttninster Sts. 

A. B. (Hiram College, 1800). Graduate itudent, Pennsylvania, i8«e-data. 
PhnoSDphy, Paychology. Bthica, AbHOt on leave. 

Hunsicker, John Rudolph, Downingtown. 

B, S. (Penniylvsnia. ipoj). Hiitory, Pedagogy: first year. 
Pedagogy; aeeond year. 

Hu4sey, Marj Inda, Philadelphia, 1318 Sprace St, 

Pb. B. (Burlbain, iftgfi). Graduate student. Bnm Ijawr, iS«T-istoi. Uoon 
Fellow in Semitica, looi'igoi; Bennett Fellow, ieo>-i«a). AHynan, 
Hebrew. Arabic. Abient on leave. 

Jackson, Halliday Rogers, West Chester, Friends' Central 

School. 

A. B. (Swarthmore. 1004). Student Summer School, Pcnnaytvaiiia. 1904, 
Pedagogy; lecond year. 

Jacobs, Adeline Hyneman, Philadelphia, 1307 N. Marshall St. 

B. S. (Pennsylvania, ipoj). Botany: firat year. 

Janvier, Caesar Augtistus Philadelphia, 1409 S. Broad St. 

Rodney, Rev., 

A.B.,A.M, (Prineeton,i8So, .88)). Princeton Theological Seminary, 1 881- 
1884. Uiuionuy at Parukhabad and Allalubad, India, i8Sr-i0Oi. AraUe; 

thbrdynr. 



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SBPARTHBNT OF PBILOSOPHT. 



Jennings, Lewia WIseLafay- Culpeper, Va., Navy Ya 

ett«, Island. 

A. B. (Ricliniand Colleae, ipoj). Appointed Bndan. U. S. N.. iv 



Johnson, Amandus, Philadelphia, 3445 Woodland Ave. 

A. B. (Giuteviu Adolplnu CoUegB, 1904). En|di>l>> GetniBiii first yur. 

Johnson, Elizabeth Forrest, Bryn Mawr, Miss Baldwin's Schocd, 

A. B. <VBtiiir, T9o>]. Bconomio: flnC yt»i. 

Kabalgian, Dicran Hadjy, Turkey, 477' Woodland Ave. 

A. B. ( Ana t01i« CoUegB, UanovBQ, Traker, iS«6). OwmiiUT, Phrrict, Uatbe- 
DiatKi: Gnt yaa, 

Philadelphia, no Cliveden Ave., Gtn. 



Kent, Roland Grubb, 

Pb. D. (PenBsylvanift, ir 
of B«rUii uid Uunich 11 — 
vania. Pcbruurr ^ Jung. 



■pooAl work. 

Kerns, Horey Vanzaot, 



Wtlmingfton, Del., 3707 Wcxxjland Ave. 
1). 1809 to Jann»ry. ipoi. (tudent. UnivcnitiM 
1 at Attiens. Gniece. Gniduata itudent. Pcnniyl- 
Pellow in Claisical LAHguago, 
in ClUBMl LBngoaces. i«o)- 
EMK. Hotan to piuiua certain 



1 Fellow for Rw 



Philadelphia, 

A. B. (Tempte CdOege, i«o]). PfailcHophy: thi 

Koch, Louis Henry, Philadelphia, 

B. S. tPenn«ylvania, iSgp). Chemistry; aeemid 
Kolloclc, Margaret Roselyn, Philadelphia, 

A.B. (Woman't ColleseoC Biltimon, igoo). 
History. Bngliih Litenture: fourth year. 

Krause, Jacob Buehrle, 

A. B. (Lehi^. 1808). 

Krautter, Louis, Jr., 

fi. S. in Biology. (Peni 
Kribs, Herbert Guy, Rev. 



154 Richmond St. 
408 Fairmount Ave, 



South Bethlehem, 3531 Locust St. 

Pedagosyi Pfiycho]c«y. Mathematics; first year* 

Philadelphia, 1007 Lehigh Ave. 

lylvnnia. igoi). Botany, Geology ; third year. 

Philadelphia, 



iSgg. 



!,04). Uni. 



300 Highland AvewK 
Chestnut Hill. 

TheologicRl Seminary. ZoMogy; 



Prindpal Perldomen Seia- 



Kriebel, Oscar Schulti, Rev,, Pennsburg. 

A, B.. A. M.. B. D. COberlin, 1889, 180., 1892). PrindDal P 

inary. PemuburB, Pa.. iSgt to date. Graduate student, Univenity of Berlin, 
iSgi-iSgi; Pennaylvania, 1S9T-180S, igoo-igoi, 1901-1004. Pedagogy. 
Philosophy, Psychology; tovonth year. 

Lackey, Alice Halliburton, Philadelphia, 4053 Giratd Ave. 

A, B. (Temple College. 1903). French; fint year. 

Laudenslager, Daniel Klyne, Worcester, Mass, 
Rev., 

A. B., A. If. (Fianldin and Hanball, 189S. 1 



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BTUDBNTS. S97 

Hvxm. Rrndente. City AddieM. 

LefFerta, Walter, Philadelphia, 706 N. 19th St. 

B. S. (Templn Coll«ge, looj). Hiitory: fim ys»r. 

Long, William John, Philadelphia, 9154 N. tSth St. 

B. 8. (Fcniuj'lvBsk, ifos)- Ronunici, G«muilc«; loiaOi ytmi. 

I-ornts, Edmfe Caroline, Philadelphia, 3314 Woodland Ave. 

B. S. <P*iini)4vmiiiii, i»o}). Bugtiih, Ronunk*: fint jreu. 

Lorenz, Uabel Agnes, Philadelphia, 3931 Pine St. 

A. B. (WcDs, i»a4). Enslkh; (econd tmt. 

Lutz, William Filler, Philadelphia, fin N. 43d St. 

A. B., A. 11. (Penna^vanU College, i8g4, 1S97). Chemiitryi fint yau. 

Hanh, Benjamin Clark, PhilicpopoliB, 115 S. aid St. 

Bulgaria, 

A. B. (Ion, Collece, iS«8). Ondtute itudent. Chkwa, iBosi-iiMe. Held 
■ Special Pallowihlp [a Sociology. Pemuylvkiuk, i»oa-i«oj. Sodolosy. 
Booaoniici. Political Science ; third year. 

Martin, Warren Frederic, Philadelphia, 2817 N. Broad St. 

LL. B. (Penoiylvania. looi). Ecoaomio: £nt year. 

Hascar<5, Guillenuo Fer- Santiago de Cuba, 5993 Baldmore Ave. 
nandez, 

Licmciado en Cienciai fideD-qiiinucaa, Lieenciado en Uedlcino y Cinigico 
(Univerajty of Havana, 1805). Profeeeorof Phynci and Cbnnktry. InatittMo 
di Seconda EnsenangB. SanClaffo de Cuba. tS^it to data. Bnten to paimue 
oertajn ipeciBl worV in Cheraiilty. 

Haxfield, Frances Norton, Philadelphia, 164 Ua^and St., Gtn. 

X B. (Havefford. tS^j). Pedagogy, Piycholosy; fint term. 

McAdam, Donlap Jamison, Washington, 906 S. 37th St. 

A. B., A. M. (Waihlngton and Jeffenon, iB«T. iQae). loitructorin Chemlatry 
and Miaenlosy. W«bins:ton and Jcffervon CollEgE, i^gi-i^aj. laitnictor 
in Chemistry. Feonaylvania, igoj-jgofi. nvmiitry; fiirt year. 

McCallie. Joseph Hadison, Trenton, N. J,, [55 Modd Ave.] 

A. B. (Tennenee, 1887). Pedasogy, Paycholojyj first year. 

.UcCleOaiid, George William, Dobbs Ferry, N Y., [College of the City of 
New York.] 

A. B. (Penniylvania, 190]). Engliih Litentiue, Snglieh Philology, Latin; 
third year. 
HcCntcheon, Thomas Potter, Jr. , Philadelphia. 505 Locust Ave., Gtn. 

A. B. (Pcniuylvania, 1903). Chemituy; third year. 

HcElwain, Mary Belle, Philadelphia, 5035 Stmuner St. 

A.B. (WilKmColkse. iSgs). Imtnictor In ereelc. Latin, BoglWi end Math- 
enutin, Wlhon Calege. ilHi6-i90]. Latin: fint jrear. 

McEdden, Alice Madeleine, Washington, D. C, i8« Wvcomba Ave., 

Ph.D. (Pennnylvmnia, 150J). Student, Harvard UnivBrdty,