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Full text of "The Catholic red book of Western Maryland including Cumberland, Frostburg, Lonaconing, Mt.Savage, Midland, Westernport, Barton, Hagerstown, Hancock, Frederick and Oakland"

CATHOLIC $ED BOOK 



MARYLAN 



St. Charles College 

CATONSVILLE MIX 
ci -ass 1 E35S 



- 




Gc 975. 2 C286 
[Red Book Society 
The Catholic red book of 
Western Maryland 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Alpha Photo. Engraving Co Baltimore, Md 



Blaul's Son. F Cumberland, Md 56 

Bon Ton Millinery Parlors Cumberland. Md 68 

Bowman. George A Cumberland, Mil 8G-98B 

Chicago Dental Parlors Cumberland, M<1 62 

Citizens National Bank Cumberland, Mil 7 1 

Citizens National Bank Frostburg, Md 108 

Citizens National Bank Westernport, Md 148 

Clark. .Maker of Portraits Cumberland, Mil 98-168 

Co-operative Supply Co Cumberland, Md 100 

Cohill. C. P Hancock. Mil 170 

Crystal Laundry Cumberland, Md 50 

Cumberland Meat Supply Co Cumberland, Md 7:' 

Cumberland Steel Co Cumberland. Md 20 

Cumberland Furniture Co Cumberland. Md 44B 

Cumberland Hydraulic Cement and 

Manufacturing Co Cumberland, Md 12 

Cumberland Laundry Co Cumberland, Md 78 

Cumberland Lumber Co Cumberland, Md 58 

Cumberland Savings Bank Cumberland. Mil S 

Davis National Bank Piedmont, W. Va 144 



Fahrney & Son, Drs. D Hagerstown, Md.. 

First National Bank Frostburg. Mil... 

First National Bank Midland. Mil 

First National Bank Mt. Savage, Mil.. 

First National Bank Piedmont. \V. Va. 

First National Bank Hancock. Md 

Footer's Dye Works Cumberland. Md. 

Ford, .lames K Cumberland. Mil . 

Frederick. W. F.. Music Co Cumberland, Md. 



Garrett National Bank Oakland. Md 

German Brewing Co Cumberland, Md. 

German Savings Bank Cumberland, Md . 



Habig & Stegmaier Cumberland, Md Oft 

Hancock Bank. The Hancock, Mil 168 

Holtzman's Pharmacy Cumberland, Md 30 

Holt, Miss Verna Cumberland. Md 9 1 

Hummelshime. Dr. Theodore Cumberland. Md 58 

Kamen & Co Cumberland. Md 68 

Kennedy. Thomas C Baltimore. Md 117 



Lambert, Charles Cumberland, Mil . 

Laing, Frederick L Cumberland, Md. 

Lichtenstein's Pharmacy Cumberland, Md. 

Little S. T.. Jewelry Co Cumberland. Md. 



Malampby Bottling Works Cumberland, Md 50 

Mathews Paint Co Cumberland, Md no 

Morrison Music Co Cumberland, Md 10 

Moller Organ Works Hagerstown, Mil 1G1 



INDEX-CWimW. 



Pearre. William Cumberland, Md. 

Potomac Hardware Co Cumberland, Md. 



Kilter's Sims. Paul Ciiml mtUhk] . Mil . 

Roeder, A. A. Co Cumberland, Md. 

Rosenbaum Bros Cumberland. .Mil. 



Sanner, "The Crab Man." Cumlierland. Md . 

Sansbury, George F Cumberland. Md. 

Schwarzenbach & Sun Cumberland, Md. 

Seaver, P. J. & Co Cumberland. Md. 

Second National Bank Cumlierland. Md. 

Shatter. Harry P Cumberland. Md. 

SI, 11. ■> 's Pharmacy Cumberland, Md. 

Smith, P. J., Co Cumberland, Md. 

Smith, c. c Cumberland, Md. 

Star Dye Works Cumlierland. Md. 

Stark. Charles W Cumberland \M 

Stein. Louis Cumberland, Md . 

Streett, John M Cumlierland, Md. 

Stehley, Dr. F. P Cumberland, Md. 



Thimiel. Theodore Cumlierland. Md. 

Third National Hank Cumberland, Md. 

Tonoloway Orchard Co Hancock, Md 

Tri-State Sanitary Milk Co Cumlierland. .Md. 



Wade Corsets Baltil e. Md 44A 

Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis 

Electric Railway Co Baltimore. Md D 

White & Ankeiie.v Cumberland, Md 52 

Wise s. W Cumberland. Md 20 

Wiesel, .1. P Cumberland, Md SS 

Wright's Central Market Cumberland, Md 5G 



Zil.-h. 



Ceor 



Mi 



INDEX TO PARISHES 



St. Gabriel's Parish Barton, Md... 

St. Joseph's Parish M idland, Md . . 

Si. John's Parish Frederick, Md 

St. Mary's Parish Cumberland, Mc 

St. Mary's of the Assumption Parish. .Lonaeoning, Md 

Si Mary's Parish Hagerstown, W 

St. Michael's Parish Frostburg, Md 

Mission Parish Hoyes, Md 

St. Patrick's Parish Cumberland. Md 

St. Patrick's Parish Ml. Savage, Md 

Si. Peter's Parish Westernport, Md 

Sis. Peter and Paul's Parish Cumlierland. Md 

St. Peter's Parish Oakland. Md.... 

St. Peter's Parish Hancock, Md 



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 

CHURCHES 

Cathedral, The Baltimore, Md 2!i 

Si. John's l.aieino (Interior) Rome -1 

si Joseph' Church Midland. Md 12s 

St. John's Church Frederick. Md 157 



INDEX-CWWe</. 

St. Mary's Church Cumberland. Md 101 

St. Mary's Church Lonaooning, Md 121 

St. Michael's Church Frostburg. Md 107 

St. Patrick's Church ( Front View ).. .Cumberland, Md 47 

St. Patrick's Church) Rectory. Hall 

and Grounds) Cumberland. Md 57 

St. Patrick's Church Mt. Savage. Md 133 

St. Peter's Church ( Interior) Rome 3 

St. Peter's Church (General View) . . .Rome 13 

Sts. Peter and Paul's Church (General 

View ) Cumberland, Md 71 

Sts. Peter and Paul's Church (In- 
terior) Cumberland. Md 75 

Sts. Peter and Paul's Church (Church 

and Rectory ) Cumberland. Md 79 

Sts. Peter and Paul's Church and Pas- 
tor Cumberland, Md 85 

St. Peter's Church Oakland. Md 140 

St. Peter's Church Westernport, Md 147 

St. Peter's Church Hancock, Md 169 



INSTITUTIONS AND SPECIAL VIEWS 

Alpine Hall Cumberland. Md 89 

Apostolic Delegation Home Washington. D. C 19 

Cardinal's Residence Baltimore, Md 27 

House where First Mass was said in Baltimore. Md 31 

Knights of Columbus Building ( In- 
terior) Cumberland. Md 95 

St. Patrick's Convent Mt. Savage, Md ] 36 

Ursuline Convent Frostburg, Md lis 

Vatican, The Rome 11 



PASTORS AND PERSONAGES 

Clarke, Rev. Stephen .1 Frostburg, Md 1 09 

Conway, Rev. John J Lonaconing, Md 119 

Connell, Rev. James E Oakland. Md 139 

Curtis. Rt. Rev. A. A. (Late Vicar General of Baltimore) 32 

Cuddy. Rev. John S Frostburg, Md Ill 

Dowling, Rev. John W Mt. Savage, Md 131 

Falconio, His Excellency Most Rev. 

Diomede Washington, D. C 17 

Gibbons. His Eminence James Cardi- 
nal Baltimore. Md 23 

Gallagher. Rev. Thomas E Westernport, Md 149 

Kane, Rev. William J Frederick. Md 157 

Kemper, Rev. Peter Cumberland. Md 67 

Kemper. Rev. Peter, and Church Cumberland, Md 85 

Mackall. Rev. Francis Pat rick Midland. Md 126 

Xagengast, Rev. H. S Hancock, Md 171 

Petrie, Rev. Thomas Cumberland. Md SI 

Pope Leo XIII ( Died 1903 ) 7 

Pope Pius X. His Holiness Rome 5 

Pope Pius VII ( Died 182:: ) 9 

Rabbia. Rev. Sebastian Hagerstown. Md 165 

Roth, Rev. John R Cumberland, Md 99 

Sullivan. Rev. John L Cumberland, Md 61 

Wunder, Rev. E. ,1 Cumberland, Md 51 



* 



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THE 

CATHOLIC RED BOOK 

OF 

WESTERN MARYLAND 



Cumberland, Frostburg, Lonaconing, Mt. Savage, Midland, 

Westernport, Barton, Hagerstown, Hancock, 

Frederick and Oakland 



A CATHOLIC DIRECTORY ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED 
UNDER PAROCHIAL CLASSIFICATION 



WITH SPECIAL ARTICLE BY 

HIS EMINENCE JAMES CARDINAL GIBBONS 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE RED BOOK SOCIETY 

and Washington 

1909 



Allan County Public J 
900 Webster Street 
P0 Box 2270 *• 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-?jj| 



Copyrighted, 1909. 
The Red Book Soci, 




H 

O 



Est. 1881 Cap. Stock $I.125.i««l Inc. I'"i, 

THE WORLD'S BEST PIANOS 

t£ For nearly 30 years used by the Catholic Clergy Sisters Institu- 
tion and the Catholic People in the Archdiocese of Baltimore, 

especially in Cumberland and Western Maryland. : : : : : : 

FROM THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE DEALERS IN PIANOS IN AMERICA 

THE W. F. FREDERICK 
Piano and Music Company 

Employing Honest Methods A Clean Record Capital Sufficient to Insure Bargains 

the knabe ALL THE LEADING MAKES 

Endorsed by Leo XIII. Now used . 

in the Vatican. 

"The Chickering" Oldest in America 

Exclusive sales for the Strich & Zeidler. 
Estey. Hardman. Kurtzman. Kingsbury 
McPhail. Brewster. Kimball and Hardman 
Autotone. Kingsbury Inner Player. Harrington 
Autotone, Estey. Chicago, Kimball and Stevens 
7 1-3 Octave Organs. 



SACRI PAIA/.ZI APOSTOLIC I 

| \. ... j'. ... Ml . 

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- = J,'..- y, „ ;^./.,. 7 < . ! • . .f 

"o I ........ £ „„ 

0',,U„ cVw.. 

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THE W. F. FREDERICK MUSIC CO. 

WM SHAFENBERG. Manner. 56 Baltimore St., Cumberland, Md. 

STORES: 

Washington, D. C. Johnstown, Pa. Altoona, Pa., 

Cumberland, Md. Pittsburgh, Pa. Charleroi, Pa. 

McKeesport, Pa. Uniontown, Pa. Williamsport, Pa. 




HIS HOLINESS PIUS X. 




! YOU CAN 

'Keep The 

WOLF 

—from the; 
Door when 

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the bank. 



'""miiiiMHOTssw 
That hungry wolf 




«J SICKNESS may come to you. but if you have money in the bank 
you'll be sure to be taken care of because you can then take care 
of yourself. 

(§ We will pay you Three Per Cent, on the money you deposit in our 

(Hhird National lank 



CUMBERLAND, MD. 



Capital and Surplus, $150,000.0 



s, $350." 



officers: 



H. E. WEBER. Pk 



C. CONLEY. Cashi 



directors: 
W. T. COULEHAN. of W. T. Cou'.ehan & Bro. 
J. W. HUM1 

MERWIN M.-KAtC. President Cumberland Steel Co.; McKaig Foundry Co. 
W. WALLACE M.-KAIG. Director Cumberland Steel Co.; McKaig Foundry Co. 
FRED. MERTENS. F. Mertens' Sons; Capitalist and Mine Owner. 
L. D. ROHRER, President L. D. Rohrer M 
R. H. SHEARER. Merchant, Harness and Leather. 
WILL H. SHEPHERD. Insurance and Real Estate. 
H. E. WEBER. Se : '.; Maryland Tin Plate C; V 



Cumberland Mil 



C . 




LEO XIII. 

Elected 1878. Died 1903. 




The Cumberland Savings Bank 



SOUTH CUMBERLAND, MD. 



Receives Accounts of Banks, Bankers, Churches. Co 
porations, Firms and Individuals on most favorable tern 



INTEREST ALLOWED ON TIME DEPOSITS 



Accepts custody of Bonds, Stocks and other Securities 
and collects Coupons and Dividends for credit of 



No amount too small to receive None too large to handle 



LLOYD LOWNDES, CHAS. T. ROGERS. DAVID BRADLEY, 

President Vice-President Cashier 




PIUS VII. 
The Pontiff who crowned Napole 



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PORTLAND 

CEMENT 



Specified bv Leading Architects 

i nparalelled Record of 20 Years 



BEST FOR SIDEWALKS, CURBING, BUILDING BLOCKS 
Uniform in Strength and Color 

Used exclusively in foundations of New Third National Bank. Maryland Theat. 

B. & O. Y. M. C. A., Footer's Dye Works, Maryland Shoe Co. Building, 

and many others. 



WHITE SILICA SAND ^aSI^T^ 

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CRUSHED LIMESTONE For A c ° ncre \l Foundatons 

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PLASTER Ivory Wood Flbre - Granite Hair Fibre. 
A heady sanded, ready for use, if you want il lhal way. 



The Cumberland Hydraulic Cement & Mfg. Co. 

W. I. SPERRY, President. JAS. F. MILLER, Secretary. 

Office: Third National Bank Building 
Warehouse: Cement Mill, Valley Street and Wills Creek 

W. Md. Phone 187 C. & P. Phone 187 



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PAUL RITTER'S SONS 

WHOLESALERS 

CUMBERLAND, MARYLAND 



SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF PIUS X 

Rev. Louis R. Stickney, formerly Secretary to the Apostolic Delegation. 



Pope fins X. Joseph Mehhoir Sarto, the present occupant of the cliair 
of Peter, was born on the 2nd clay of June. 1835, in the small village of 
Riese, diocese of Treviso, Italy. His parents. John Baptist Sarto and Mar- 
garet Sansoni, were of humble origin, and, though not blessed with a great 
plenty of this world's goods, were very religious and highly respecte 1 by 
those about them. 

Joseph Melchoir, the first of eight children, was sent as a small boy to 
the little village school, in which only the rudimentary branches were taught. 
He soon attracted the attention of the parish priest of the village, whose 
Mass he served every morning, and from him he received his first lessons in 
Latin. The archpriest of Riese. noticing in the small boy the incipient signs 
of a vocation to the priesthood, and wishing to direct his steps toward the 
sanctuary, prevailed on Joseph's father to make the necessary sacrifices, and. 
at the age of eleven, he was sent to the college al Castelfranco Veneto, about 
live miles from Riese. 



Having completed, with marked success, his studies at the college of 
Castelfranco, his good father, allowing him to follow his vocation, permitted 
him to enter the seminary at Padua. During the entire course of his eight 
years of study in the seminary, he continued to give evident proofs of the 
pious training he had received from his good parents, and by his conscientious 
application to study, assisted by a natural quickness of mind, he soon rankej 
amongst the first in his class. On the 4th of May. 1852, just as he was about 
to commence his philosophical studies, his father died, and it seemed that he 
would be forced to give up for a while his studies and return to his home in 
Riese to assist his poor mother; however, through the kindness of the arch- 
priest of Riese, and the Patriarch of Venice. Monsignor Monico, he obtained 
a free scholarship and was able to go on with his seminary course. 

On the 18th of September, 1S5S. Joseph was ordained priest in the prin- 
cipal church of Castelfranco by Mgr. Farina. Bishop of Treviso. and was 
immediately appointed curate in the little village of Tombalo. There he 
labored zealously for nine years, until June, 1867, when he was named arch- 
priest of the town of Salzano. 

In 1S75 Mgr. Zinelli. Bishop of Treviso, called him to his episcopal city 
and appointed him canon of the Cathedral and spiritual director of the sem- 
inary. To these duties he soon had to add those of chancellor of the diocese, 
and in all these positions he showed such untiring zeal and faithfulness that 
Mgr Zinelli appointed him as his Vicar-General. This post he filled during 
the administrations of Mgr. Callegari and .Mgr. Apollonio. 

On the null of November, 1884, the See of Mantua became vacant by the 
transfer of its Bishop to CJdine, and Leo XIII. in the consistory of the same 
date, selected him for thai post. He was consecrated in the Cathedral tit 
Mantua on (he 25th of November, L884, by His Eminence Cardinal Paroochi, 
assisted by Mgr. Rota. Titular Archbishop of Thebes, and Mgr Berengo, 
Archbishop of I'd 



Ski ii ii in i in Ln i oi Pn - X— Continued. 

During his administration of the diocese of Mantua Monsignor Sarto 
■ \'{ I such activity and zeal that, on the death of the Patriarch of Venic< 
Cardinal Agostini, Leo XIII chose him as successor, and. in the consistory of 
rune 1 2th, 1893, created him Cardinal Priest, and in the EoHcr ing consistor; 
of June 15th appointed him Patriarch of Venice. 

On the 20th of July, 1903, he received the news of the death of Leo XII 
and left immediately for Rome to assist at the Conclave. He entered tin 
' onclave the evening of the 31st of July with the firm persuasion that he 

would leave it as he was when I ntered; he bought a round-trip ticket fron 

Venice to Rome, and as he left the Lombard College, at which he was a 
guest during his stay in Rome, to inter the Conclave he said jokingly, to thi 
students, "We are going to imprison some one in the Vatican and put him 
under double lock." Little did he imagine that he was the one chosen by 
Divine Providence to be imprisoned. On the Feast of St. Dominic, August 
1th. 1903, His Eminence Cardinal Macchi announced to the people that Car- 
dinal Joseph Mel. hoir Sarto, Patriarch of Venice, had been elected successor 
in I. en XIII. liishop of Rome and Sovereign Pontiff, and that he had chosen 
the name of Pius X. He \\;i> solemnly crowned in St. Peter's on the - ■ 1 1 1 ol 
August. 

In his first encyclical letter. "B supremi apostolatus cathedra," of October 
i ili. 1903, bj which lie made known to the entire world his elevation to the 
Chair of Peter, Pius X gave as the foundation of his pontificate the words of 
the Apostle, "Instamare omnia in Christo" — "to re-establish all things ii 
Christ" (Ephes. I. 10). Since then his most important acts have been hi 
motu proprio on church music November 22nd. 1903; his niotii proprio of 
March l nth, 1904, for the codification of Canon Law: his condemnation of 
sixty-five propositions by a Decree of the Holy Office. July 3rd, 1907; the 
new legislation regarding marriage in the Decree "Ne temere" of the Sai red 
Congregation of Council. Augusl 2nd. and the encyclical letter, Pascend 
dominici gregis." of September 8th, 1907, wherein he condemns the doctrines 
nf tile Modernists. 



-mm- 




HIS EXCELLENCY 

THE MOST REVEREND DIOMEDE FALCOMO, D.D., 

Apostolic Delegate. 



SKETCH OF THE APOSTOLIC DELEGATION 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Bj Rev. Louis R. Stickney, fonimth Seiieiniw in the Delegation. 

The Apostolic Delegation was founded in tin- year 1893 by His Holiness 
Pope Leo XIII, who selected as the first Representative of the Holy £ee in 
the United States Monsignor Francis Satolli, Titular Archbishop of Lepanto. 
With him came as auditor Monsignor Donato Sbarretti, and as 
the Rev. Hector Papi. RIgr. Satolli established the Delegation at Washington, 
and, after a few months as guest of the Catholic University of America, he 
took up his residence at 201 1 Street, one of the famous old mansions of 
Washington, and which was once the home of a Mayor of the District of 
Columbia. 

In 1894 Father Papi resigned his position as secretary, and entered the 
Society of Jesus. He was succeeded by Rev. Frederick Z. Rooker. 

In November, 1895, Pope Leo, desiring to show his appreciation of the 
services rendered to the Church by Mgr Satolli elevated him to the dignity 
of lite Cardinalate, He was succeeded by Mgr. Sebastian Martinelli, O. S. A.. 
Titular Archbishop of Ephesus, in IS9G. In the year 1900 Mgr. Sbarretti, 
the auditor of the Delegation, was appointed Bishop of Havana, and was 
succeeded by .Mgr. Francis Marchetti. Mgr. .Martinelli. created Cardinal 

!i the consistory of April 15th, 1901, was suci led by Mgr. Diomedi 

Falconio, O. F. M., who was transferred from the Delegation at Ottawa. Can- 
ada. VIonsignor Rooker, secretary of the Delegation, was appointed, Janu- 
ary ML, 1903, Bishop of Jaro, Philippine Islands, where he died. September 
1 8th, 1 HOT. and was sui i eeded, January 1st. 1 904, by Rev. Louis R. Sticknej . 
who was secretary at the Apostolic Delegation in Cana la 

Monsignor .Marchetti, the auditor of the Delegation, was recalled to Rome 
in May. 1905, and was succeeded by Mgr. Bonaventure Cerretti, formerly 
secretary of the Delegation in Mexico. 

At a meeting held in 1905, of the Most Reverend Archbishops, it was 
decided to erect a new and modern residence for the Apostolic Delegate 
A building committee, composed of His Eminence Cardinal Gibbons and the 
Most Rev. Archbishops of Philadelphia and New York, was forme 1. A site 
was procured on Biltmore Street, Washington Heights, one of the most beau- 
tiful residential sections of Washington. Mr. A. O. Von Herbulis was chosen 
as architect, and Messrs Newman and smith as builders. Work was com- 
menced in February, 1906, and the Delegate was able to enter his new home 
in i mi ii.< tie same | ea r 

The building is of light brick, with limestone trimmings, three stones 
in height and is designed on the lines of the Italian Renaissance 

The lirst floor contains the reception rooms and pallors, the dining 
and recreation rooms, whilst to the rear are the kit. lien and pantries. A 
broad stairway leads to the second floor, where the Delegate's suite of apart- 
ments and the archives and offices are located. From the hall of this floor 
one enters the beautiful and commodious chapel, which extends the breadth 
hi the building, it is finished in pure white, and contains a beautiful altar 
of Italian marble. 

On the third floor are the apartments of the auditor and secretary, ami 
must rooms. A stairway leads from this floor to the roof, from which may 



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APOSTOLIC DELEGATION HOME, WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Factory Phone, 194a , T ^ Residence Phone. 682. 

***** . . KlX/J * o 

Building 
Material 

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Pays 3 per cent, interest Open Saturday nights 

on time deposits from 7.00 to 9.30 

The 

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of Cumberland, Maryland 



THE STRONGEST AND LARGEST BANK IN WESTERN MARYLAND 



Capital $100,000.00 Surplus $350,000.00 

Assets $2,500,000.00 

Depository of the United States and State of Maryland 
We cordially invite your account 

DANIEL ANNAN, President W. BLADEN LOWNDES. Vice-Preside 

D. F. KUYKENDALL, Cashier 



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HIS EMINENCE JAMES CARDINAL GIBBONS. 



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Phone. C. cv P. 6. 



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ORDERS BY MAIL OR PHONE PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 



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Cumberland, Md. 

trgy. Instttuttons 



i e-e-.-i i~t~i-> 



A SKETCH OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH 
IN MARYLAND 

From Cecilius Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore, to James Gibbons, Ninth 
Archbishop of Baltimore and Cardinal. 

By JAMES CARDINAL GIBBONS. 

I. — From the Establishment of the Colony of Maryland to the 
Rev. John Carroll. 

SIR GEORGE CALVERT, First Lord Bai.timori 

Mm' season when days grow longer, the spring sun warmer. White 
■ is lay like patches of left-over snow in the forest primeval; tender 
gr< a willows were budding f i ■ • ■ ■ ■ 1 > by the brooksides in sheltered meadows: 
swamp maples swelled their red twig-ends almost to bursting. The canvasback 
and redhead duck were dying northward; the deer were mating and all nature 
was beginning to breathe and live again. 

It was Lady Day, March 25th, IC34, when the Indians of what is now St. 

" ships. The Ark and The Dove, drop anchor in the 

water of the Chesapeake. 

The originator of this colony of English emigrants was Sir George Calvert, 

a cultured gentleman, who had taken his degree of .Master of Arts from Oxford. 

was a knight ami a Secretary of State. Strange to 

Sir George Calvert, say, while in the midst of the life of a busy Protestant 

First Lord Baltimore. Court, whose laws proscribed one's being a Catholic. 

Calvert, in 1634, relinquished his seat in Parliament 

received into the Church. He then announced bis change to the King 

and endered bis resignation as Secretary of State. King .lames granted him 

several favors as rewards for his set vice and created him Baron of Baltimore. 

in Ireland. 

Lord Baltimore, in 1 627, established a colon} in Newfoundland, evidently 
as a refuge for persecuted Catholics, but the rocky land and severe climate 
ami Protestant ingratitude destroyed the settlement, where religious liberty 
was granted bj Calvert to those who held and those who rejected the Catholic 
faith. Tims lie was a man far, far ahead of bis intolerant times, a true father 
of religious liberty. 

We have to thank Lady Baltimore, of the Arundell family, for the first 
idea of transferring the settlement to the shores of the Chesapeake. Here the 
Protestants of Virginia opposed the settlement of Catholics in their midst, or 
on their south, or on their north. And. though the royal grant for land south 
of Virginia was recalled, yet King Charles I ordered a patent to be issued to 
Lord Baltimore granting to him the territory north of the Potomac to the 
fortieth degree of latitude, and from the ocean to the westernmost sources of 
the Potomac. This land was named Marx land, in honor of Henrietta Maria. 



V Sketch oi rm Cathi Iiiurch i.v Maryland- Continued. 

laughtei of Henry IV. and the Chesapeake Bay, too, was sometimes called 
St. Mary's Bay. Here was the home of religious liberty, for the Charter oi 
Maryland secured to the immigrants themselves an independent share in the 
legislation of the province. The historian, Bancroft, says tha i a 
the first to seek for religious securitj and peace b: the practice of r 
nut by the exercise of power." But death claimed Sir George Calve] 

However, his brother Cecilius carried on his plans "to convert, no 
pate, the natives, and to send the sober, not the lewd, as settlers, looking not to 

present profit, but future expectation." What a cot 
Cecil Calvert, Second here it) Maryland to the laws and life Catholics had to 
Lord Baltimore. submit to in England. What nobility in Catholics, Hen 

in power, to give in Christian charitj equalitj to the 
very sect that had so tortured them at heme beyond the Atlantic! Hen 
the charity that is "patient— beareth all things . . . and seeketh not her 
own." 

Cecil Calvert left his colonists free to take their own clergyman. 

Among the original pilgrims, beside Leonard Calvert, Lieutenant-Go 
for Cecilius. who remained in England, were twenty other gentlemen, two 
hundred laboring men and two priests. Brave seamen they must have been 
coming across the wide, wild Atlantic in ships so small 

i.« aid Calvert. The Dove a pinnace of 50 ions and The Ark a \ 01 

Lieutenant-Governor. 350 tons burthen, respectively. An account of their voy- 
age of nearlj four months was written by Father White, 
one of the two priests among the colonists. In it we read an account of the 
landing on St. Clement's Island. "On the day of Annunciation of the '. 
Virgin Alary, in the year 1634, after the holy Sacrifice, bearing on our shoulders 
a huge cross, which we had hewn from a tree and erected it as a trophy to 
Christ, our Saviour: then, humbly kneeling, we recited with deep emotioi hi 
Litany of the holy Cross." 

The Governor did not take, but bought land from the Indians, and the 
first town thereon begun, .March 27th, was named St. Mary's, and a bail-, hut 
of the Indians became the first Catholic chapel in Maryland.. 

The land was proportioned out among the gentlemen colonists. 2, acres 

for each five men brought over, and the same amount for each ' 
brought in the two succeeding years. All who bad taken up land were called 
to meet in the legislative colonial assembly, which met first on Januarj 25th 
1G37. 

Mat ■> land i ei eh ed and gave equal libet tu to the Proti 
InRegardto nf vil .g i]llaj ,,,,, p ur itans of Massachusetts, and thi Q 
Religion. of Pennsylvania . 

Peace reigned within the colony, and the teachings of the Prince o 
were carried by the Priests to the Indians 120 miles up the hank-, of the PotO 
mac, and on the shores of the Chesapeake, But the unjust and envious Clay- 
bourne, a Protestant from the Virginia colony, who traded with the Indians 
on Kent Island, excited these simple children of the forest against 
friends, the Catholic Marylanders, and onlj after a naval war was ibis vicious 
man overcome. Scarcelj had the troubles caused bj Claybourne been happily 
concluded and Lord Baltimore's supremacj restored when the Puritans, expelled 
from Virginia, whom Lord Baltimore had welcomed and settle, 1 in \i 

del County, plotted against the authoritj of the Governor, I lard Calvert, and 

sided with the outlaw. Claybourne. These troubles probahlj ha 
ea I [overt .eonard Calvert, which occurred in June, IG47. 



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A Sketch of iiik Catholic Chi bch im Maryland— Continued. 

William. Remember not the days of cruel Cootie, more cruel in that he wan 
an ordained minister of the Church of England, though indicted and convicted 
in 1699 of atheism and blasphemy. E\'en the Puritans, who had intrigued 
with these members of the Church of England to depose the Catholics, were 
now domineered by the latter, and Catholics, Puritans and Friends were taxed 
to support the Church of England in Maryland, and though the colony had 
been estalished by Catholics, yet. in 1702, Catholics alone were disfranchised 
in their own colony, where a majority of the 25,000 inhabitants were then 
Protestants. 

No longer was the seat of government at St. Mary's, but was moved to 

Annapolis, because a less Catholic locality, whence penal laws could l»- mor ■ 

easily enacted and executed, perhaps the most unkindest 

Penal Laws cut of all being the order of Governor Seymour to lock 

\uaiuvt Catholics. up the chapel of St. .Mary's, the first place of Christian 

worship in Maryland. 

To spare the blush of shame on the cheeks of our separated brethren, it 

may be well to omit the details of the penal laws they enacted: suffice it to 

say that the Maryland legislature passed an act. L704, "to prevent the growth 

Of poperj within this province," whereby priests were to be fined fifty pounds 

and imprisoned six months for baptising other than popish children or saying Mass. 

Any Catholic was made incompetent to buy or inherit lands. "Protestant 

children, of popish parents, might not, for want of a suitable maintenance, be 

compelled i < > embrace the Popish religion, contrary to their inclinations." but, 

"it any such person refused a proper support to his Protestant child, then the 

Governor, or Keeper of the Seal, should have power to make such order therein 

as suited the intent of the act." 

Thus by the Protestant regime was a house divided against itself, and no 
wonder it fell. Catholic children were paid to deny their faith; were punished, 
disinherited if they continued faithful. So vile an act 
Queen Anne Amelio- happily elicited the gracious condemnation of the 
rates the Penal Laws good Queen Anne, who allowed Mass "in a private 
Against Catholics. family of the Roman Communion." This necessitated 

and explains those curious house-churches, all under 
one roof, as ai Doughoregan Manor, belonging to ex-Governor Carroll. 

It is interesting to know that out of a population of over 40,1 not 3,000 

were Catholics- 1,2 f these being in St. Mary's County, 700 in Charles, 250 

in Prince George's. 160 in Anne Arundel. .",:, in Baltimore, IS 

Population. in Calvert. 49 in Cecil, 40 in Kent, 179 in Queen Anne, 89 in 

Talbot, 79 in Dorchester, 81 in Somerset. 

Xot only did the ordinary people lose their faith, but, in 171:'., Benedict 

Leonard Calvert, heir to the Barony, renounced his religion, hoping to 

regain his estaies at the price of his faith, but. apparently 

(ahcri Becomes Hie avenging hand of death claimed him before he regained 

a Protestant. .Maryland. His infant son, Charles Calvert, Lord Baltimore, 

was raised a Protestant, and so the house continued. From 

1717 to I7.".l Catholics k>-v undisturbed, and, though deprived of their rights 

and privileges, they enjoyed peace and quiet. 

As early as n;77 the clergy opened a Catholic school in Maryland, where 

the humanites were taught. Again, in 17).".. at Bohemia, in Cecil County, a 

classical school was opened. Those who studied classics were 

Education of to pay forty pounds, others thirty pounds a year. Among 

Catholics, the pupils, win ver exceeded forty, was "Jacky," Hie future 

Archbishop, Carroll. 



A Ski i i im Catholic Church in Maryland — Continued. 

But not only were those who attended their school influenced, but others 
were encouraged to cultivate literature, and the priests had circulating 

libraries for their parishioners, and orders for good books for people were 
sent to England to be filled. 

This wise zeal bore abundant fruit, for, while Catholics were taxed twice 
as much as Protestants to keep up Protestanl Church organization, yet, with 

all the offices, all the legislature executive and judicial 
Catholics Bear power in the hands of Protestants, with a State-church 

Persecution Bravely. supported by taxes levied on Catholics and plate 

bought with money arising from the sale of mulatto 
children anil their mothers; with a virulent newspaper press and vehement 
pulpit orators, the Protestants in Maryland could not hold their own. Catholics 
seem to have continued to be the rich, refined and cultured people of the 
colony. In 17."." Governor Sharpe, of Maryland, wrote to Charles Calvert, "The 
Papists behave themselves peacefully and as good subjects. They are, I imagine, 
about one-twelfth of the population, and many of them are men of pretty con- 
siderable fortunes." About this lime 900 exiled Acadians were landed in Mary- 
land, those sent to Baltimore attending .Mass in a house where the Courthouse 
now stands. Maryland Catholics were thus doubly comforted, both by being 
able to offer a shelter to these homeless exiles and by being reminded that 
others had troubles worse than theirs. 



II.— From Rev. John Carroll to Cardinal Gibbons, 1761 = 1^07. 

MOST REVEREND JOHN CARROLL. 

First Bishop of Baltimore, 1789-1808. 

First Archbishop of Baltimore, i808-1815 

What the Indian guide is to the steamer shooting the Lachine rapids 

running the ship, freighted with a precious burden of life, in danger, past 

nearby threatening rocks and shoals, such was John Carroll to the bark of 

Peter in Maryland. Orthodox, zealous, discreet, a son of Maryland, educated 

in the best that Europe could give him, he was a man of Providence — at the 

same time the Moses and Josue, tie lawgiver and the leader of his people. 

Hi., forbears were Irish, distantly related to the family of Charles Carroll of 

Carrollton on his mother's side, who was a Darnall and who had 1 n beaut 

fully educated in Frame. John was bum, IT::.", at Upper Marlboro, Prince 
George's County. Maryland. When twelve years old he went to the le.-m, 
school in Cecil County, where Charles Carroll of Carrollton also then studied. 
•iter a short w hile there, John went abroad for a thorough course of study at 

St (liners College, ill French Flanders, and had I n there but a short while 

when his father died, L750. During his six years there he won high honors 
In 1753 he became a Jesuit, and was ordained L761, afterward teaching 
Philosophy and Theology at Liege, and later traveled in Europe for some 
months as private tutor to young Lord Stourton. 

In I 77:: I'ope Clement XIV suppressed the Jesuits throughout the world, 
and Father Carroll returned, 177 1, to what is now Forest Glen, Montgomerj 
County, his mother's home, as there was not then a single public Catholic 
Church in Maryland, and took up the work of a missionary. 

Father Carroll writes that because of unjust, discriminating laws Catho- 
lics had become in general poor and dejected. Indeed, some time before, the 



A Sketch of the Catholic Church in Maryland— Continued. 

lather of the signer, Charles Carroll, had made partial arrangements to leave 
Maryland and emigrate to the Arkansas River. Domestic instruction had to 
supplement that of the priests, as .Mass could not be heard even once a month. 
Father Carroll says, however, that "in general Catholics were regular and 
inoffensive in their conduct, such, I mean, as were natives of the country; 
but, when many began to be imported, as servants, from Ireland, great licen- 
tiousness prevailed. . . . Catholics contributed nothing to the support of 
religion or its ministers; the whole . . . maintenance fell on the pii.-sis 
themselves . . . the produce of their lands was sucffiient to answer their 
demands 

In Church authority, Maryland had been subject to the Vicars-Apostolic 
of England and London, successively. In 1763 the Vicar-Apostolic was Bishop 
Challoner, who wrote that there were then twelve missionaries and 16,001) 
Catholics in the colony, and though he thought they should have their own 
bishop, the suppressed Jesuits in Maryland remonstrated against this advance. 
War is an evil, indeed, yet that of 17G3, between England and France, gave 
tin' Catholic colonists a chance to show their patriotism and gain a fairer 
treatment from their fellow-colonists, and their growth became more marked. 
In 1770 t lie first Catholic Church in Baltimore was built on land procured 
from Mr. Carroll, on the corner of Charles and Saratoga Streets, i. e., old St. 
Peter's. 

The first Catholic book printed in America, "A Manual of Catholic 
Prayers," was published openly in Philadelphia, 1771. and "Mr. Welsh, Store- 
keeper in Baltimore Town. Md., took orders for another publication: Bishop 
Challoner's 'Catholic Christian Instructed.' " This incipient fairness toward 
Catholics further increased when the Revolutionary War approached, as is 
seen by the personnel of the Committee sent in L776 by the Continental 
Congress to appeal to Canada to remain neutral during the war; but the 
bigotry of Mr. Jay frustrated the efforts of the Committee and the hopes of 
the Congress. Charles Carroll. Maryland's first citizen, was sent with Benja- 
min Franklin and Samuel Chase, and, though not on the Committee, yet 
Father Carroll was requested by Congress to accompany and aid the Com- 
mittee of three. And the war having begun, Archbishop Carroll later wrote 
of Catholics: "Their blood tlowed as freely (in proportion to their members) 
to cement the fabric of independence as that of any of their fellow-citizens." 
And yet out of the Constitutions adopted by the thirteen original colonies 
only those of Pennsylvania, Delaware. Maryland and Virginia did away with 
the penal laws, and allowed Catholics absolute equality with cither citizens. 

After the war was over, in I7s:. Reverend Leonard Neale returned to 
in.- native Maryland from Europe, and he. with Fathers Carroll, Ashton, 
Sewell, Diderick and Boardman had a meeting at Whitemarsh, where ways 
ami means fur work on the missions were discussed, and a petition was senl 
to Rome for a superior who might have some of the powers of a bishop. And 
in L784 Father Carroll was made superior of the missions in the thirteen 
1'nited States of North America, with power to give confirmation. The 
newly appointed Prefect-Apostolic had much work to do. that very year 
writing "An Address to the Roman Catholics of the United States of North 
America," printed at Annapolis, 1 Hi pages, which was an answer to an attack 
of a Protestant minister named Wharton 

In October, 1784, the priests met in a chapter and adopted nineteen 
rules or regulations fur the conduct of the clergy, each priest's salary being 
set at $17."i a year. They hoped for the restoration of the Jesuit Society, and 
protested against a bishop being appointed. Father Carroll was perplexed; 



A. Sketch 01 the Cat) c Church in Maryland — Contin I 

but In 1 sa« the need of a native American bishop, and. fearing that if lie 
refused, a foreigner might be appointed, he accepted the position. His report 
f Cardinal Antonelli says: "There are in Maryland 15,800 Catholics. Of 

t lii's.'. 9, are freemen over 12 years of age; 3,000 children, and 3,000 

negro slaves of all ages. ... In Maryland a tew of the leading, more 
wealthy families still profess the Catholic faith. . . . The greater part of 
them are planters. ... As for piety, they are for tin- most part sufficiently 
assiduous in the exercises of religion and in frequenting the sacraments, but 
they lack that fervor which frequent appeals to the sentiment of piety usually 
produce, as many congregations hear the word of God only once a month, and 
sometimes only once in two months.' We are reduced to this by want of 
priests. . . . The abuses . . . among Catholics are chiefly . . . more 
frequent intercourse between young people of opposite sexes than is com- 
patible with chastity of mind and body; too great fondness for dances and 
similar amusements, and an incredible eagerness, especially among young 
girls, for reading love stories, which are brought over in great quantities 
from Europe. Then a general lack of care in instructing their children and 
especially the negro slaves in their religion. 

"There are nineteen priests in Maryland . . . we think of establishing 
a seminary in which they can lie trained to the life and learning suited to 
that state 

Dr. Carroll's report pleased the Pope, and tin- American clergy were 
allowed to nominate two or three names from which the Pope would choose 
a bishop for the colonies. 

Baltimore in 1 7 s 7 was such an unpromising mission that Father Sewell 
wished to leave, when Very Rev. Dr. Can nil dei ided to fix his own residence 

there, and "his sermons were so much admired that many Protesl - 

attended them with great satisfaction." Me took active interest in municipal 
movements, especially in a school then starting, but soon saw the need of a 
school tinder distinctively Catholic direction, open to students of every 
religious profession, which the chapter of 1786 agreed to start, with tuition 
at ten pounds a year. This was the first step toward Georgetown College. 

Troubles at this time in New York showed the need of a bishop's 
authority, and, in response to a petition to Rome for the appointment of one. 
word came for a nomination of suitable men. and out of the twenty-six votes 
of the priests in the meeting all but bis own ami one other were for Very 
Rev. Dr. Carroll. Hence, on the 5th of November, 1789, Pope Pius VI in 
a bill ordered: "We being certified of his faith, prudence, piety and zeal, 
. . . do declare, create, appoint and constitute the said John Carroll bishop 
ami pastnr of the said church of Baltimore." 

At the Convention which met at Philadelphia. ITsT. to Irani. ■ the ' 01 
stitution, was Daniel Carroll, of Maryland, brother of the bishop. The sixth 
article of the Constitution provides that "no religious test shall ever be 
required as a qualification te am office of publii trust under the rim..! 
States." . . "The vote of Catholics ... in Maryland was in favor Oi 

the Constitution." Catholics also rejoiced in the election of Washington as 

lirst President, and they presented him a beautiful address, to which he 
replied, March. 1790, saying: I presume that your felhiw -citizens will no; 
forget Hi.' patriotic part which you took in the accomplishment of their 

Revolution, or the estai.lisl -tit el' your Government; or the important 

assistance from a nation in whi.h the Roman Catholic faith is professed 
Bishop Carroll was consecrated in England on the first of the \ 

i \\igust 1.5th, L790. 

36 



A Sketch oi iiik Catholic Chi ri ii in Maryland — Continued. 

The French Revolution, directed against Catholicity in France, help.- 1 to 
scatter the seed of the faith in .Maryland, where the learned and saintly 
Sulpician Fathers established St. Mary's Seminary in 1791, and later their 
associates did parish duty. 

There were now Catholic churches at Baltimore. St. Inigoes, Newtown. 
Newport, Port Tobacco, Rock Creek. Annapolis. Whitemarsh, Bohemia, 
Tuckahoe, Deer Creek, Frederick. Hagerstown, and some other minor places 
in Maryland. 

The first synod in this country was held November 7th, 1791, in old St. 
Peter's Church. Baltimore, where regulations were adopted for the adminis- 
tration of the sacraments, etc.. and in 1791' Bishop Carroll issued his first 
pastoral letter; and in 1793, for the first time, he ordained a priest. Rev. 
Stephen Badin, the first priest ordained in Maryland and in America. In 
1795 Bishop Carroll was at the head of a movement to establish a public 
library in Baltimore, many of whose books are now in the Maryland Historical 
Society. In 1799 Rev. Leonard Neale became president of Georgetown Col- 
lege, and under him, the same year, three ladies started what is now George- 
town Convent of the Visitation. 

This same year saw the death of Washington, on whom Bishop Carroll 
preached a laudatory eulogium. Next year. 1800, Bishop Neale was conse- 
crated by Bishop Carroll as Coadjutor of the See of Baltimore. 

A remarkable marriage occurred in Baltimore. 1S03. Bishop Carroll 
marrying Jerome Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon, to Elizabeth Patterson, 
of Baltimore. 

About this time Bishop Carroll began planning to build a Cathedral, and 
asked each family to give a dollar a year for four years. July 7th. 1800, he 
laid the corner-stone of the Cathedral in Baltimore, the drawing accepted 
and built being the seventh made by Mr. Latrobe, the architect. Twenty 
thousand dollars was the price paid Mr. Howard for the Cathedral site. The 
body of trustees then included Bishop Carroll. Father Beeston, Messrs. Wil- 
liamson, Walsh, Ghequiere, Bennet. Livers, Tiernan and Mitchell. 

Two other corner-stones were laid this same year — that of the Chapel of 
St. Mary's College (now Seminary), on Paca Street, on June 18th, and that 
of St. Patrick's Church, Fells l'ciint mow South Broadway I. on July 10th. 

Baltimore is the Mother See of the whole Tinted States, the other 
dioceses established by the Holy See in 1S0S, each taking a section of the 
diocese of Baltimore, being New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Bardstown. 
while Baltimore became an Archdiocese, and Bishop Carroll an Archbishop. 

Two years later, 1810, these bishops, under Archbishop Carroll, met in 
:i synod and drew up regulations for priests, baptisms, marriages, discour- 
aging theatres, balls and novels, and condemning freemasons. 

A great seat of learning and religion. Mount St. Mary's College, was 
started, 1808, by Fathers Nagot, Du Bois and Du Bourg. In 1810 it bail 
forty scholars, and in 1813 eighty, all Catholics. 

This same year. 1808, Mother Seton, foundress of the Sisters of Charity 
in America, arrived in Baltimore, a recent convert, and in 1809 she, too, set- 
tled at Emmitsburg, with a few other Sisters of Charity. 

During the War of 1812-15 Archbishop Carroll issued a Circular, order- 
ing prayers in lie offered Cor peace and for those in the war. Archbishop 
Carroll's failing health forced him to decline the invitation to lay the corner- 
stone of Washington's Monument, in Baltimore. On November 22d he 
received the last Sacraments, after which He made a beautiful address to the 

priests present. When one of the distinguished Protestant clergymen CI 

lo lake a last farewell, anil said thai his hopes were now fixed on another 



A Sketch oi i i i i. Catholic Chusch in Maryland — Continued. 

world, the dying Archbishop replied: "Sir, my hopes have always been fixed 
on the Cross of Christ." His perfect resignation to the will of God, his calm 
and serene faith and hope were seen when his life was almost at its last ebb. 
The Archbishop died at six A.M., Sunday, December 3d, is I.".; .Masses for 
his happy death being at once followed by Masses for the repose of his soul. 
On Tuesday, the 5th, the "requiem" Mass was said in St. Peter's pro-Cathe- 
dral, and burial made in St. Mary's Seminary Chapel. In 1824 the body was 
transferred to the Cathedral crypt, which still guards its precious deposit. 

Under Archbishop Carroll's wise and brave leadership the diocese of 
Baltimore, from a poor, disorganized flock, had grown until it had theological 
seminaries, colleges, convents, academies, schools, and a free people and 
press. 

MOST REVEREND LEONARD NEALE, 
Second Archbishop. 1815-1817. 

Arshbishop Neale, like Archbishop Carroll, was a native of Maryland. 

More retiring, austere and simple in character, Archbishop Neale had I u 

president of Georgetown College before his consecration. Each morning he 
arose at 4 o'clock, and, after an hour's meditation, said Mass. And if 
"uneasy lies the head that wears the crown." the same is true of the best of 
bishops, for immediately after taking up the burden of the See of Baltimore 
he had to settle a parish schism in Norfolk, the pewholders refusing to allow 
the Church to be governed by the Church authorities. Archbishop Neale 
declared that "the pews belong to the Church, not the Church to the pews." 

These troubles were, however, offset and the good Archbishop consoled 
by the piety and good works of the Sisters of the Visitation Convent at 
Georgetown, in whom the Archbishop showed spec ial interest. Another real 
comfort, again a school, was the establishment of a Catholic free school in 
Baltimore. And a further joy was the ordination of four priests by His 
Grace. 

Archbishop Neale died at the age of 71 on June 1 8th, 1817, and is buried 
in the crypt of Georgetown Convent. 



MOST REVEREND ARCHBISHOP MARECHAL. 
Third Archbishop of Baltimore. 1817-1828 

Archbishop Marechal, though a Frenchman, who came to the S< I 

Baltimore from St. Mary's Seminary, on Paca Street, won great esteem by his 
powers of mind and heart, perfected by education and grace. His love for 
study had been proved, for in 1812 he had refused the mitre of Philadelphia, 
preferring his position of professor of theology in St. Mary's Seminary. 

His first great act as Archbishop was to publish Archbishop Carroll's 
regulations about mixed marriages. Catholics attending Protestant services 
and cemeteries. Next he began the visitation of his diocese, confirming 
2,500 persons, many of whom were converts. The Catholics in Baltimore 
had increased from 800 in 1792 to 10, in L817. 

To complete the Cathedral of Baltimore. Archbishop Marechal strained 
every nerve, raising means not only at home, but also abroad, whence man} 
of tin' handsome appointments came as gifts from persons high in Church 
and State. The high altar of the Cathedral itself is a present from his for- 
mer scholars in Lyons, frame. In 1 S L' 1 Mass was said for the first time in 
the magnificent ami mm venerable Cathedral. 



A Sketch ch iiii Cat] < Chubch in Maryland — Continued. 

The Church militant in Maryland this same year lost a saintly daughter — 
Mother Seton. who died at the Convent in Emmitsburg. And a year before 
had been laid to rest one who had served his God and country well — Hon. 
Thomas Sim Lee. twice Governor of Maryland. In 1S23 occurred the remark- 
able cure of Mrs. Anne Mattingly. sister of the Mayor of Washington, who 
had a disease of the breast which had been pronounced incurable and slip 
was given up by her physicians. I'nder the guidance of Prince Hohenlohe, 
another priest of Washington, and Father Dubuisson. she made a novena, 
and on the ninth day the priests said Mass for her; and, after receiving the 
Holy Communion, March 10th, she was instantly cured. 

Worn by labors and cares, Archbishop Mareehal failed fast, and, on 
December 12th, he received Holy Viaticum, and died January 29th, L828. 
His body was followed to the grave by Charles Carroll as chief mourner, 
interment being made in the Cathedral crypt. 

The report of Archbishop Mareehal showed that the diocese of Balti- 
more then had 62 priests, of whom 25 were Americans. 12 Irish. 11 French, 
5 Belgians. 2 Germans. 2 Italians. 1 English. 1 Pole. 1 Mexican and 1 



MOST REVEREND JAMES WHITFIELD. 
Fourth Archbishop of Baltimore, 1S29-1S34. 

Though a Sulpician like Archbishop Mareehal, his one-time professor in 
Lyons, and predecessor in the See of Baltimore, yet Archbishop Whitfield 
was not French, but English, having been born in Liverpool, 1770. How- 
ever, for ten years before being consecrated, the Archbishop had been a priest 
at the Cathedral in Baltimore. 

A census of that date shows that Maryland in 1829 had 70.000 Catholics 
out of a population of 447.000. Baltimore had five Churches — the Cathedral, 
St. Peter's. St. Patrick's, St. John's and St. Mary's Seminary Chapel. Wash- 
ington had three Churches. 

The first Provincial Council of Baltimore was held this year. 1S2 9, 
attended by Bishops Flaget. of Bardstown. Ky.; Rosati. of St. Louis, Mo.; 
Benedict Fenwick, of Boston; Dominic Fenwick. of Cincinnati; England, of 
Charleston, and Matthews. Vicar-Apostolic of Philadelphia. Bishops Du 
Bois, of New York, and Portier, of Mobile, were absent, being in Europe. Of 
the thirty-eight decrees of the Council: 

1. Required priest to accept any sustaining mission until recalled by 
their bishop. 

2. Required priest to stay in the diocese they belonged to. 

3. Urged bishops not to accept priests from another diocese without 
proper recommendations from their bishops. 

9. Charged bishops to warn their flocks against corrupt translations of 
the Bible, and to urge the use of the Douay Bible. 

10. Set down the qualifications of sponsors in Baptism and Confir- 
mation. 

12. Regarded the giving of profane names in Baptism and urged those 
of Saints to be adopted. 

16. Direct Baptism, where possible, to be given in Church and not in 
private houses. 

20. Enjoined the use of Latin in the administration of the Sacraments. 

23. Forbade Mass in private houses. 



A Sketch o Catiioi.k Chi/rch in Maryi.a.\i>— Continued. 

24. Was on the decency of Churches. 

25. Urges priests to prepare the faithful for the proper reception of 
matrimony. 

27. Was on proper dress for clergymen. 

28. Warned them against games and sports that would give scandal. 

29. Requires every priest having care of souls to preach to his flock on 
Sundaj s and Holy days. 

:.:.. Forbids the use of unlawful prayer books and catechisms, and 
provided for a catechism modeled on that of Cardinal Bellarmine. 

34. Urged, where possible, the erection of Catholic schools to save 
children, especially those of the poor, from perversion. 

35. Regarded the preparation of suitable school books. 

:}<:. Urged the establishment of a society for the diffusion of Catholic 
books. 

This year. 1831, Rev. Charles Constantine Pise, a Baltimore priest, 
wrote a "History of the Catholic Church." the most extended yet written in 
America. It was published in Baltimore, where, too, in 1831, Fielding 
Lucas issued a quarto Bible and a New Testament. 

St Charles College was started on a part of Doughoregan .Manor, given 
by Charles Carroll, himself donating $6,500 and laying the corner-stone, and 
Archbishop Whitfield blessing it. 

This year, also. Bishop Whitfield held a diocesan synod, attended b\ 
thirty-five of his priests. 

When the first siege of the Asiatic cholera appeared in Maryland, while 
many fled, the Archbishop gave his house for a hospital, and the priests and 
Sisters of Charity multiplied their services to attend and nurse the stricken, 
Fathers .Michael Wheeler and William O'Brien, two Sisters of Charity and 
one Oblate sister dying from the plague. 

Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last living man who had signed the 
Declaration of Independence, died November, 1832. 

\ Second Provincial Council was held in Baltimore, is:;::, the Arch- 
bishop of Baltimore as Coadjutor, Bishops David, of Bardstown; England, of 
Charleston; Rosati, of St. Louis; Fenwick. of Boston; Du Bois. of New York; 
Portier. of Mobile; Kenrick, of Philadelphia; Rese. of Detroit, and Purcell, of 
Cincinnati, attending its sessions. 

In 1 s:: 4 St. .lames' Church. Baltimore, was begun. Rev. Samuel Eccles- 
ton. a convert and president of St. Mary's College, was the same year 
appointed coadjutor to Archbishop Whitfield, and. after a brief illness, the 
Archbishop died in October. 



MOST REVEREND SAM TEL ECCLESTON. 
Fifth Archbishop of Baltimore, 1834-1851. 

Vrchbishop Eccleston was born in Kent County. Md.. 1801. Going to 
st. Mary's College when eleven years old, he later became a Catholii a priest 
in 1825, and a Sulpician and Archbishop in 1834. 

In 1837 a Provincial Council met under Archbishop Eccleston, Bishops 

Rosati, of St. Louis; Fenwick. of Boston; Kenrick, of Philadelphia; Purcell 

of Cincinnati: Chabrat, of Bardstown; Clancy, of Charleston; Brute, of Vin- 

and Blanc, of New Orleans, being present. The decrees regarded 

Ordinations, the support of aged and infirm priests, the proper employment 



le 



A Sketch of the Catholic Chi ki ii in Mabylaxd— Continued. 

<it money, etc., given for pious purposes, the bringing of lawsuits against 
clergy and religious, the collection of money by priests from other parishes 
without authority, and ecclesiastical music The use of the Ceremonial of 
the previous Council and of the Roman Ritual was enjoined. 

Archbishop Eccleston estimated the Catholics in Maryland at 70,000, 
and in District of Columbia at 10,000. They had 53 churches. 

This year, 1837, the Sisters of the Visitation started a convent in Bal- 
timore, and the next year the corner-stone of St. Matthew's Church in Wash- 
ington was laid. This year, too, the first seed of the Catholic Tract Society 
of Baltimore was sown, its object being to remove prejudice and spread 
broadcast true Catholic teaching. This was felt necessary, as bigotry had 
brought on an attack on the Carmelite Convent in Baltimore, and Rev. Mr. 
Breckenridge had falsely accused .Mr. McGuire, keeper of the Almshouse, or 
misdemeanors. 

In 18 40 the Fourth Provincial Council met in Baltimore; mixed mar- 
riages, missing Mass and drinking on Sunday were decried. Total abstinence 
societies and Catholic schools were encouraged, and secret societies, whose 
members were burdened by oath, were condemned. 

In 184 1 St. Vincent's Church in Baltimore was dedicated, and St. John's, 
now St. Alphonsus' was begun in 1S42, under the Redemptorists. there being 
then 5,000 German Catholics in Baltimore. The day before the corner- 
stone of Calvert Hall, an academy for young men. was laid on Saratoga Street, 
west of Charles. This year. Catholics, followed by many others from all 
parts of Maryland, made a pilgrimage to the site of the landing of their pil- 
grim forefathers in St. Mary's County, where Archbishop Eccleston said Mass, 
Bishop Fenwick preached and Mr. William 0. Read delivered an appropriate 
historical discourse. 

In 1843 the Fifth Provincial Council met in Baltimore under Archbishop 
Eccleston. the bishops of Boston. Mobile. Philadelphia. Cincinnati. New 
Orleans. Dubuque, New York. Nashville, Vincennes, Natchez. Richmond, 
Louisville. St. Louis and Detroit, and the Administrator of Charleston being 
present. The decrees forbade the use of any Church for discourses by lay- 
men; declared any one divorced by state law, who remarried, excommunicated 
' ipso facto;" forbade the rash incurring of debts for churches; commended 
the recently established Tract Societies, the erection and use of confessionals 
and the prompt and continued attendance on the sick to afford them all the 
consolation of religion. Maryland then had a population of 475.000. and 
the diocese of Baltimore embraced 80,000 faithful, having 58 churches, 39 
priests on the mission. :: 1 engaged in education or special work. 2 theological 
seminaries and their preparatory schools. 2 scholasticates, '; colleges, 2 acad- 
emies for boys, 6 for young ladies. 5 orphan asylums, 1 hospital. 1 house for 
the insane, and last, but not least. in free schools. The gain in Catholic 
population was mainly by natural increase. 

Churches at Pikesville, Georgetown. Rock Creek, Elkton, Westminster, 
C.ovans, Cumberland, Laurel and other places were ere, ted or improved 
about this time. 

The Sixth Provincial Council met in Baltimore, 1846, and petitioned the 
I'm'- io make "Mary Immaculate" the Patroness of the United States 

The Sisters of Charity now carried on work in Baltimore, Wilmington 
Delaware, Albany, Troy. Buffalo, Milwaukee, Natchez, Donaldsonville, Nor- 
folk, Boston and St. Louis. 

Calvert Hall was opened by the Brothers of the Christian Schi ols in 1846. 
The s, hool, Sisters of Notre Dame, also began wort in the diocese this ireai 



Aii interesting ami comforting incident occurred this same year, when 
Rev. .John Hickey. a Baltimore priest, was summoned to court to testify in 
regard to stolen property which had been returned to him by a patient. The 
('.mi i decided that under the Maryland Bill of Rights no further inquiry 
could be pressed upon Mr. Hickey in such a case. 

In 1S-S9 Archbishop Eccleston revived the custom of sending "Peter's 
Pence" to Rome, and sent an invitation to the persecuted Pope to come to 
America and receive the homages of the faithful here. The Seventh Pro- 
vincial Council met in Baltimore. IN 4 9. and was attended by the Archbishops 
of Baltimore and St. Louis, the Bishops of Mobile, Philadelphia, Cincinnati. 
Xew Orleans. Dubuque. New York. Nashville, Natchez. Richmond, Detroit, 
Galveston, Pittsburg, Albany. Hartford, Charleston, Milwaukee, Boston. 
Cleveland, Buffalo, Louisville, Vincennes and Chicago. 

The decrees petitioned the Pope to define the commonly believed doc- 
trine of the Immaculate Conception, i. e.. that Mary was conceived in her 
mother's womb, and born free from original sin. Priests were forbidden to 
marry those who had been, or intended to be, married by a Protestant minister. 

Archbishop Eccleston's health, never robust, declined, and he died April 
22d, is:. 1. His body lies in the crypt of the Cathedral in Baltimore. 

MOST REVEREND FRANCIS PATRICK KENRICK. 
Sixth Archbishop of Baltimore. 1851-1863. 

Vast biblical and theological learning, skill in controversy and advocacy 
of the Primacy of the Pope were characteristics of the newly appointed Arch- 
bishop of Baltimore, who had before been Bishop of Philadelphia. 

The First Plenary Council of Baltimore was held under Archbishop Ken- 
rick, 1S52. five Archbishops and twenty-four Bishops surrounding him. 

The decrees proclaimed the Primacy and Plenary Power of the Pope; 
urged a censor of books in each diocese, the establishment of a Catholic school 
.it every church, the spread of the Association for the Propagation of the 
Faith, and the Association of Prayers for the conversion of our fellow-coun- 
trymen. 

St. Ignatius' Church was begun in is:,::, and Loyola College in is."".. 

The Eighth Provincial Council met at Baltimore. 1S55. attended by 
Bishops Whelan, of Wheeling; O'Connor, of Pittsburg; McGill. of Richmond; 
Neumann, of Philadelphia; Young, of Erie; Very Rev. Barry, of Savannah, 
and Very Rev. Lynch, of Charleston. They warmly urged the opening of a 
college in Rome for young Americans studying for Holy Orders. 

The Archbishop next made a visitation of the diocese, a laborious task. 
as the Catholics in Baltimore alone, in 1856, numbered 80,000, and had 13 
churches. 

In the Ninth Provincial Council a translation of the Bible was dis- 
cussed. The Holy See granted the See of Baltimore precedence in all Coun- 
cils or meetings of any kind held by Archbishops and Bishops of the United 

Sillies 

In 1859 new chinches arose at Locust Point. Hagerstown, and St. Aloy- 
sius in Washington and St. Paul's in Baltimore were begun The Civil War 
was now preparing, though Catholics were neither the originators nor pro- 
longed of it. but they were Christian and patriotic. Archbishop Kenrick 
ordered the "prayer for peace" to be said in all Masses, and the clergj and 
listers hastened to give their services to t\ - sick and wounded soldiers in 
both camps. Thirty-four Sisters of Charity left Baltimore together on 
the 20th of July. 1862, to nurse the sick in Gen. M. Clellan's army, and 
sixty were sent from Baltimore to attend the hospitals around Washington. 
II' 



A Sketch of the Catholic Church i.\ Maryland — Continued. 
Archbishop Kendrick retired on July 7th in apparent good health. 
having said, apropos of the war, "I hope we shall soon nave peace," and was 
found, next morning, dead in his bed. 

Thoroughly versed in Latin, Greek, Hebrew, he spoke French. Italian. Span- 
ish and German fluently, and gave the Church in the United States a new Eng- 
lish version of the Bible, and an excellent Dogmatic and Moral Theology. 
Father Coskery became administrator of the Archdiocese. 

MOST REVEREND MARTIN JOHN SPALDING. 
Seventh Archbishop of Baltimore. 1S64-1872. 

Archbishop Spalding, who had been Bishop of Louisville, had written 
his "Miscellanea" and "History of the Reformation," came of an old Mary- 
land family, and understood our situation well, and. therefore, was a happy 
and welcome appointment. After making his episcopal visitation and issu- 
ing his pastoral, in 1866. he established St. Mary's Industrial School, on 
land given by Mrs. McTavish, and. in a house given by the same lady, the 
House of Good Shepherd for fallen women. 

The Second Plenary Council of Baltimore met in the Cathedral. October 
7th, 1S66, and was attended by Archbishops Spalding of Baltimore as Dele- 
gate Apostolic; Blanchet of Oregon. Kendrick of St. Louis. Purcell of 
Cincinnati, Allemanny of San Francisco. Odin of New Orleans. McCloskey 
of New York, and Bishops Whelan of Wheeling. Lefevre of Detroit. Henni 
of Milwaukee. Blanchet of Nesqually, Rappe of Cleveland. Timon of Buffalo. 
Demers of Vancouver, Saint Palais of Vincennes, McGill of Richmond, Lamy 
of Santa Fe, Laughlin of Brooklyn, Bayley of Newark, de Goesbriand of 
Burlington, Carroll of Covington. Amat of Monterey. Martin of Natchitoches, 
Bacon of Portland, Juncker of Alton. Duggan of Chicago, Elder of Natchez, 
Luers of Fort Wayne. Lynch of Charleston, McFarland of Hartford, Grace 
of St. Paul, Quinlan of Mobile. Wood of Philadelphia, Domenec of Pittsburg, 
Verot of Savannah. Dubuis of Galveston, Lavalle of Louisville, Conroy of 
Albany, Feehan of Nashville, Williams of Boston, Hennessy of Dubuque, 
and Vicars-Apostolic O'Gorman of Nebraska. O'Connell of Marysville. and 
Rosecrans, Auxiliary of Cincinnati; Very Rev. Coady, Administrator of Erie, 
and Rev. Coosmans, Procurator of Bishop Miege. 

The decrees passed treated of Faith. Errors, the Hierarchy and Govern- 
ment of the Church. Ecclesiastical Persons and Property, the Sacraments. 
Worship. Discipline, Religious Communities. Education of Youth. Salvation 
of Souls. Books and Papers, Secret Societies and the Election of New Sees. 

The subject of establishing a Catholic University in the United States 
was discussed. The closing session was attended by the President of the 
United States, in the Cathedral of Baltimore. 

In 1868 Archbishop Spalding consecrated Right Rev. James Gibbons, 
who had been an assistant priest at the Cathedral. Next he visited various 
parts of his diocese. In June, 1869, he ordained at one time 24 priests, 
and the same year established in Baltimore the Little Sisters of the Poor. 
In five years in the See of Baltimore he had confirmed 22,200 persons. 2,750 
or 12 per cent, being converts. In October he left for the Vatican Council 
in Rome. The "Baltimore." on which he sailed from Baltimore, was 
decorated with flowers, and 2.000 faithful went down the harbor with him. 
while cannon boomed from Fort McHenry. Before he returned from the 
Council, which defined the Infallibility of the Pope, he heard hostile cannon 
boom when Rome was taken, and the Pope made a prisoner in the Vatican, 
where he has ever since lived. Archbishop Spalding on his return was 
received in Baltimore by 50,000 people, and by nearly as many in Washington. 
4:; 



ask mii Cmii. .in Church ix Maryland— Continued. 

Five times in liis life His Grace had been brought by sickness to the 
brink of the grave. After six weeks without sleep, choking to death, 
having received the last Sacraments from Father Coskery and having had. 
it was said, a vision of Our Lady and her Divine Son. he sent for "his good 
and devoted priests." as he loved to call them, and died February 7th. and 
was buried in the crypt of the Cathedral. 

MOST REVEREND JAMES ROOSEVELT BAYLEY. 
Eighth Archbishop of Baltimore. L872-1877. 

Archbishop Bayley, the successor of Archbishop Spalding, hai been 
an Episcopal minister, and was converted, he claimed, by the prayers of 
poor Catholics, to whom he had at times given alms. He was the Catholic 
Bishop of Newark when he was transferred to Baltimore, in 1872. He 
established St. Catherine's Normal School and St. James' Home for Boys. 
both in Baltimore. His literary work included a "Life of Bishop Brute." 
and a "History of the Catholic Church on Manhattan Island." 

Though a very handsome man, yet he was most humble, as is instani e I 
by one of his soliloquies, said to have been overheard by a priest: "Arch- 
bishop Bayley! — Bishop Bayley! — Father Bayley! — I prefer Father Bayley." 

The paying off of the debt and the consecration of the Cathedral by 
him in 1876 was the goal he had long struggled to accomplish. 

He died in Newark. October 3rd, J NTT. and his body was buried in 
Emmitsburg by the side of his saintly aunt, Mother Seton. foundress of the 
Sisters of Charity in America. 

MOST REVEREND JAMES GIBBONS 

Ninth Archbishop of Baltimore. 1877-1886. 

His Eminence, rames Cardinal Gibbons, 1886-1909. 

In this section propriety forbids all but bald statements of statistics. 
Of the nine Archbishops of Baltimore, three have been foreign born, two 
from other States than Maryland, four only being Marylanders. Marechal 
was by birth a Frenchman. Whitfield an Englishman, Kenrick an Irishman. 
Spalding a Kentuckian. Bayley a New Yorker. Carroll. Neale and Eccleston, 
Marylanders, and Gibbons, the fourth Marylander and the lirst Baltimorean. 

Born July 23rd, ls:;4, and baptized in the Cathedral, while still young. 
James Gibbons was taken to Ireland, where he made his classical studies 
at a private school. Returning to America, he studied al St. Charles College 
and St. Mary's Seminary, and was ordained 1861. 

He served St. Patrick's and St. Bridget's Churches, and, when scarcelj 
seven years a priest, in 1868, he was consecrated Bishop, with North Carolina 
as his field. After four years of labor there he was made Bishop of Rich- 
mond in 1872, and five years later, in L877, he became Archbishop of 
Baltimore. 

Under him, the Third Plenary Council met in Baltimore, in 1884, and 
was attended by Archbishops Gibbons of Baltimore, Kendrick of St. Louis. 
Ulemany of San Francisco, I. amy of Santa Fe, Williams of Boston, Seghers 
of Oregon. Heiss of Milwaukee. Feehan of Chicago, Elder of Cincinnati. 
Leray of New Orleans. Ryan of Philadelphia, and Coadjutor Archbishops 
■ of N'-u York, Riordan of San Francisco, Salponte of Santa Fe, 
and Bishops Loughlin of Brooklyn, de Goesbriand of Burlington, Hennessj 
of Dubuque, Fitzgerald of Little Rock, McCloskey oi Louisville, o'llara of 
Scranton, O'Reilly of Springfield, Borgess of Detroit, Shanahan of Harris- 




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A Sketch of the Catholic <'m rcu in Maryland — Concluded. 

burg. Hogan of Kansas City, Ryan of Buffalo. McQuaid of Rochester, Mullen 
of Erie, Becker of Wilmington. Fink of Leavenworth, McNierney of Albany, 
Dwenger of Fort Wayne. Gilmour of Cleveland, Wadhams of Ogdensburg, 
Hendricken of Providence, Gross of Savannah, Mora of Monterey. Kain of 
Wheeling, Healy of Portland, Krautbauer of Green Bay, Ireland of St. Paul, 
Spaulding of Peoria, Moore of St. Augustine. Chatard of Vincennes, Keane 
of Richmond, McMahon of Hartford. Vertin of Marquette. Junger of Nesgu- 
alley, Blondell of Helena, Watterson of Columbus, Manogue of Sacramento. 
Janssens of Natchez. Neraz of San Antonio. Flasch of Cross City. Wigger of 
Newark. O'Farrell of Trenton. Northrop of Charleston. Richter of Flumen 
Rapids, Rademocher of Nashville, Bradley of Manchester, Cosgrove of 
Davenport, Maes of Covington, Grace of Minnesota, O'Connell of .loppe; 
Machebeuf, Vicar-Apostolic of Colorado; Seidenbusch. Vicar-Apostolic of 
Minnesota; Manucy. Administrator of Mahile and Brownsville; O'Connor. 
Vicar-Apostolic of Nebraska; Morty, Vicar-Apostolic of Dakota; Gallagher. 
Administrator of Galveston; Glorieux, Vicar-Apostolic of Idaho; Robot. 
Prefect of Indian Territory; Phelan. Procurator of Pittsburg; Zabel. Pro- 
curator of Alton; Lemmers, Procurator-Administrator of Vancouver; Wim- 
mer, Archabbot; Mundeweiler, Abbot; Sorin, Superior-General of the Order of the 
Holy Cross; Edelbrock. Abbot: Wolf, Abbot; Conrad. Abbot; Benedict. Abbot. 

The decrees referred to faith, bishops, diocesan consulators. examina- 
tions for the diocesan clergy, rural deans, irremovable pastors, the concursus, 
the diocese of Ordinandi, the cardination of priests, sick priests, fallen 
priests, tin' life of diocesan priests, religious orders, the power to say two 
Masses on one day. the observance of Sunday, sacred music, the Baptism 
of converts, the Sacrament of Matrimony, the education of clerics, prepara- 
tory seminaries, seminaries proper, examinations for young priests, theologi- 
cal conferences, parochial schools. Catholic high schools, the duty of preach- 
in, catechism, prayer books, books and papers, immigrants, negroes, Indians, 
forbidden societies, temperance societies, rights of the Church as to tempo- 
ralities, the duties of bishops, priests, trustees, councilmen. etc.. forbidden 
ways of raising money, the bishop's court, trials, matrimonial cases, criminal 
cases. Catholic burial, and the promulgation of these decrees. 

Two years later. 1886, Archbishop Gibbons was made a Cardinal. 

In 1SS9 the Catholic University of America was established at Washing- 
ton, of which the Archbishop of Baltimore is "ipso officio." Chancellor. 

This same year the Catholic Congress was held in Baltimore, one 

feature of which was a parade, with 30, Catholic men in line, under 

Mr. James R. Wheeler, as Marshal, 

The Cathedral was much improved under Cardinal Gibbons; not only 
was the new Sacristy built, but the Sanctuary splendidly enlarged. 

The Episcopal Silver Jubilee of His Eminence, in 1893, was attended 
by nearly till the bishops of the United States. 

Eight times His Eminence has journeyed to the Eternal City, the last time, 
in 1908. Nearly thirteen hundred priests have been ordained by him. 

Of his three books. "The Faith of Our Fathers." is the most popular; 
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THE HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN 
WESTERN MARYLAND 



The history of the Catholic Church in Western .Maryland is as rugged 
and as enduring as the noble hills amid which its struggles and its achieve- 
ments have been met and won. 

Back m the days of the French and Indian wars we find recorded the 
Hi ■ Catholic settler — John Mattingly —who had immigrated to what is now 
the mi of Cumberland. Other loyal hearts soon joined him and filed in the 
Orphans' Court of Allegany, on April 26, 1791, is the will of John Arnold, 
whose death is the Qrst "t which we have record in Catholic annals. 

The first priest of whom we have account in Western .Maryland is Dennis 
Cahill, a zealous and fearless Irishman, regarding whom mention is made in 
John O'Kane Murray's "History of the Church," and likewise in Father Hey- 
den's "Life of Rev. Prince Galitzin." A letter written by Father Cahill to 
Rt. Rev. Bishop John Carroll, in 1791, throws a strong light on Catholic 
affairs of that time, viz: "I have been successful since 1 came to these parts 
Tie congregations are growing numerous, and the members of each mostly 
exemplary and pious. 1 attend at Elizabeth Town. Hagerstown, Martinsburg. 
Shepardstown, Winchester. Fort Cumberland and Chambers Town (now 
Chambersburg, Pa. I , the four former more frequently than the latter. * ,: 1 
expect to have four chapels within the next twelve months." From this letter 
may be inferred that about the year 1792 Father Cahill built in Cumberland. 

c.n the site now oc, ui 1 by Carroll Hall, the old log church dedicated to the 

precious name of Mary. With St. Mary's Church, then, begins the history 
of all the churches of Allegany County. From 1795 to 1799 the illustrious 
missionary, Rev. Prince Galitzin, whose parish reached from the Susquehanna 
i'c in.. Potomac, was the only priest that visited Cumberland. 

In the Allegany Court House we find recorded the following licensi ■ 
issued ice Catholics: October 31, ]':<:,, Ralph Logisdon and Margaret Arnold: 
September 11. 1796, John Mattingly and Onea Arnold; May 10, 1 7'.' 7 . John 
Logisdon and Patience Arnold; all of whom were married by I'. A. Galitzin. 
Catholic priest. Demetrius Augustine Galitzin was ln.ni December 22, 177". 

at The Hague. Holland. He was i ived in the Catholii Church in L787, and 

in 1792 came to the United States. Arriving in Baltimore, he decided on a 
missionary lite, and was one of the first students to enter St. Mary's Seminary 
in that city. On March 17. 1795, he was ordained to priesthood. Father 
Galitzin, after a most fruitful life, died May 6, 1840 at the ripe age of 70 

Father Galitzin's work in Western Maryland was taken up by K,\ l-\ 1 s 
Brosius, who came to the country with father Galitzin as a companion, ami 
al ■ at Taneytown, Carroll County. Not until 1819 was Cum- 
berland aide to maintain a pastor ol its own In thai year \ n hhishop Mar- 
echel appointed the Rev. James Redmond to this station. After two 
most successful labor Father Redmond was called to other fields, and was 

-ii. c led by Rev, Michael D Young, a Dominican priest, who remained but 

a lew months Rev. Timothy Ryan had charge of St. Mary's for eight years 
and was in turn succeeded bj Rev. Francis Xavier Marshall, who remained in 

Cumberland for five years in L836 Rev. Henry Myers was appointed to take 



The History of the Catholic Cm urn i\ Western Maryland— Continued. 

charge, and he immediately erected a brick church and a rectory. Father 
Myers was born in 1S06. ordained in 1832. and after leaving Cumberland was 
stationed at Hagerstown. Pikesville and St. Vincent's Church, Baltimore, 
where, in July, he died. 

In 1S41 Rev. Leonard Obermeyer was sent to take charge of the church 
in Cumberland. During the ten years of his pastorate there were many ex- 
traneous developments in Western Maryland, which gave to Father Ober- 
meyer much of opportunity for the development of the church. A resourceful 
man and vigorous in his methods, he was quick to measure up to the demands 
made upon him. The coal treasures of the Cumberland region, the opening to 
the world of Cumberland by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the completion 
of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, brought a tide of population and prosperity 
to Cumberland which made necessary another church. 

Father Obermeyer had plans immediately for what is now the magnifi- 
cent Church of St. Patrick, and the genius and vigor of his mind is shown in 
every line of the magnificent edifice. 

In 1851 Father Obermeyer was transferred to St. Vincent's Church, of 
Baltimore, and died March, 1S6S, at St. Mary's Seminary, where he had been 
professor of chemistry. 

The pastorate of St. Patrick's, after Father Obermeyer. was filled by Rev. 
John Byrne, who remained but a very short time, having been changed to St. 
Matthew's Church, of Washington. 

From 1853 to 1855 we find St. Patrick's in charge of Rev. Peter B. Lena- 
ghan. Many of the older people of Cumberland remember Father Lenaghan, 
and especially the noble work he did during the cholera epidemic in Cumber- 
land, succumbing himself to the dread disease, but after a prolonged struggle 
happily surviving, to continue for thirty-nine years his successful and as- 
siduous missionary and evangelical work. Father Lenaghan died in 1896 at 
Texas, Baltimore County, where he was in charge. 

During" the period of Father Lenaghan's illness St. Patrick's was in charge 
of Fathers Slattery and McNally. For nearly two years afterward Rev. 
Charles W. O'Reilly was in charge at Cumberland. Father O'Reilly was a 
man of intense conviction and fearlessly vigorous in the expression of his 
opinions. Father O'Reilly on being transferred to St. Bridget's Church, Bal- 
timore, was succeeded at St. Patrick's by Rev. George Flaut. Father Flaut, 
who was born in Pennsylvania and had become a carpenter by trade, was, 
through the intercession of the Abbe du Bois, led to abandon his trade and 
enter the Seminary preparatory to ordination to the priesthood. His death 
followed close upon bis leaving Cumberland. 

Father Brennan next took charge of St. Patrick's, and into his work he 
blended the genius of his mind and character. Cumberland had just passed 
its ten thousand mark in population when Archbishop Kendrick appointed 
Father Brennan to his sacred post at Queen City. His enthusiasm and ardor 
became a contagion, and inspired his congregation with kindred zeal. The 
debt of the church — some $4,000 — was quickly cancelled. A spacious rectory 
was erected, a spire put upon the church, a cemetery was established. St. Ed- 
ward's Academy was built, and the Sisters of Mercy and the Brothers of Mary 
were brought to Cumberland to have charge of the schools. Father Brennan 
was born April 19, 1827, in the county of Kildare, Ireland. He studied at St. 
Charles College, and afterward went to St. Mary's Seminary at Baltimore. In 
1858 he was ordained, and a month later made pastor of Cumberland. 

His kind heart endeared him not only to his own flock, but to all the 
people of Western Maryland as well, and his memory will ever be hallowed 
by its association witli St. Patrick's Church. 

19 



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The History hi rHE Catholic Church i\ Western Maryland — Concluded. 

Rev. .lames McDevitt became pastor of St. Patrick's Church in 1884, but 
remained only a short time, when he was transferred to St. John's Church, 
Baltimore. 

His Grace Archbishop Gibbons then appointed Rev. Michael J. Brennan 
to succeed Father McDevitt, and for twelve years he labored in the fold of 
Cumberland and added new lustre to the name of Brennan in Western Mary- 
land church history. Father Brennan was born at Mt. Savage, Md., grew up 
in Frostburg, and early in life was entered at St. Charles College. Later he 
pursued his studies at St. Mary's Seminary, where he was ordained by Rt. Rev. 
Dr. Becker. His first appointment was in Southern Maryland, afterward 
going to St. Patrick's Church in Baltimore as assistant, from whence he was 
promoted to become pastor of St. Peter's Church at Westernport, Md., and 
from thence to Cumberland in October, 18S6. In 18S8 the Brothers of Mary 
and the Sisters of Mercy gave up the charge of the schools, and were suc- 
ceeded by the Sisters of St. Joseph, of Ebensburg, Pa. This move was not a 
popular one, but with a courage born of economic prudence, Father Brennan 
wisely maintained his course, as after events confirmed. In 1S92 Father 
Brennan had the interior of the church decorated and installed a new heating 
plant. In the midst of his busy life Father Brennan died on July 2, 189S, 
leaving the church in excellent financial condition and marked by many 
touches of his masterful administration. 



ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH 

CUMBERLAND, MD. 

Rev. E. J. WUXDER. Pastor. 
Rev. John L. Sullivan. Assistant Pastor. 

After the death of Rev. Charles Brennan in 189S, His Eminence James Cardi- 
nal Gibbons, appointed to the pastorate of St. Patrick's Church, Rev. E. J. 
Wunder. 

Father Wunder was born in Baltimore. January 22. 1852. After completing 
his studies at St. Charles College and St. Mary's Seminary, he was ordained to 
the priesthood on December 23, 1SS2, at the Baltimore Cathedral, and at once 
received his appointment as assistant to the Very Rev. Edward Brenenan, who 
was pastor at that time of St. Patrick's. 

In 1888 Father Wunder was called to Baltimore, and in 1S91 was appointed to 
establish a new parish, and as a result of his successful labor in this direction, 
St. Bernard's Church, of Waverly, Baltimore, today stands conspicuous among 
the sacred edifices of that city. 

When Father Wunder first came to Cumberland his charge included the 
district of South Cumberland. Father Wunder was nut long in perceiving the 
necessity of a separate church for this section of Cumberland. He consequently 
took the initial steps toward the erection of this church, now known as St. 
Mary's, and which when completed continued in his charge until the appoint- 
ment of Rev. John R. Roth as its permanent pastor, March, 1903. 

Fnder the supervision of Father Wunder many essential improvements have 
been added to St. Patrick's parochial property. In addition to the remodeling 
and renovating the interior of the church, three new altars, one new Baptistry 
and a new Sacristy have been added to the church. 

The old school building likewise has received a baptism of improvements, in- 
cluding a new steam heating plant and new desks. 



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St. Patrick's — Continued. 

Under Father Wunder's charge the roster of the school has increased from 225 
to 4uo pupils. The crowning achievement, however, under Father Wunder's pas- 
torate at St. Patrick's is found in the erection of Carroll Hall, which is con- 
sidered by all classes of citizens to be of universal benefit to Cumberland, and 
whilst it is an architectural gem in point of structural beauty, yet above this 
stands the spirit in which it is conducted, a spirit which has given to it a 
character essentially distinguished for its altruistic comprehension. Equipped 
with a gymnasium, bowling alleys, pool-room, reading and reception rooms, it 
may be compared in point of purpose with the Y. M. C. A. buildings throughout 
the country. To its membership are admitted both ladies and gentlemen and 
is strictly non-sectarian, Protestants as well as Roman Catholics being invited 
to and allowed the privilege of membership. The auditorium of Carroll Hall has 
been the scene of entertainment for all classes of people, including men high in 
church and municipal affairs, attracted there by the broad and beneficent spirit 
in which it is conducted. 

The present assistant rector, Father Sullivan, was appointed to aid Father 
Wunder in 1906 — having been transferred from St. Mary's Star of the Sea, Bal- 
timore, Md., and to his efficient and artistic musical talent the choral excellence 
of St. Patrick's musical program is largely due. 

HOURS OF SERVICES. 

Mass Sunday.— Low, 7-9 A. M. ; Children. 9 A. M.; High, 10.30 A. M. 

Rosary Vespers and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, 7.30 P. M. 

Masses. — Week days, 7 A. M. 

Masses during Lent and other Holy Season, 7-8 A. M. 

Confessions.— Saturdays each week and on evenings of Holy Days, 3.30, 6 and 

7 P. M. 
Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary meets every Thursday 7.30 P. M. 
Holy Hours.— Meets every Thursday 7.30 P. M. 
Holy Name Society meets second Sunday of each month 7.30 P. M. 
Promoters of the League of the Sacred Heart meets every third Sunday 7 P. M. 
First Friday of each month Devotion, 7.30 P. M. 
Girls' Sodality meets fourth Sunday of each month 2 P. M. 
Boys' Holy Name Society meets third Sunday of each month 2 P. M. 
Devotion Bono Mors. — Third Sunday 7. 3d P. M. 



B 



PARISHIONERS 

A Bowman. .1. M.. Olympia Hotel. 

Sarah, Cash Valley. Barrett, .lames. Washington Street. 

tan, Mis. B., 1S5 Madison St. Burkey, Augustus, nr. Cornigansville. 

Brooks. J., N. Centre St. 
Bucy, G. R.. Maryland Ave. 
Boylan, W. E.. Bedford Street. Barley. W. F., Elm St. 

Boylan, T., Ridgeley, W. Va. Barnard, Mrs. Bridget E.. 7 Valley St. 

Banks. Mrs. M., 27 S. Centre St. Becker. Casper. Ml Valley St. 

Boyd, W. J., S. Cumberland. Broderick. M., !<s Wineow St. 

Barley, F. H., Lee Street. Bradley, D.. 17S N. Centre St. 

Brown. Mrs. H.. X. Centre Street. Birmingham. R. I.. 66 Union St. 

Brady, Mrs. Rose. Washington Street. Beane. Mrs. Catherine. 4 Polk St. 




its fflmrnm ppgi 



"HOME OF PURITY BUTTERINE" 

WRIGHT & COLGATE, Proprietors. CUMBERLAND, MD. 



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Beef, Mutton, Veal and Pork 

HIGH GRADE SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 

MAIN OFFICE: 

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BRANCHES: 
COR. GREEN AND JOHNSON STREETS 
COR. VALLEY AND MECHANIC STREETS 
COR. DECATUR AND BEDFORD STREETS 
60 BALTIMORE STREET 
26 AND 27 CITY MARKET 

CUMBERLAND, MD. 



OLDEST ESTABLISHED DENTAL OFFICES IN CUMBERLAND 
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4E POTOMAC HARDWARE CO. 

Cumberland, Md. 
EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 




SPECIALTIES 

Awnings, Tents, Etc.— -Careys Roofing. 
Garden Seeds— Yale Locks---Sherwin- 
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34-36 BALTIMORE STREET 



The Cumberland Lumber Co. 

41 WILLIAMS ST., CUMBERLAND. MD. 

LUMBER and 
MILL WORK 

All Kinds of Building Material — Dressed, Undressed and Dimension 
Lumber, Blinds, Sash, Doors, Glass and Plaster 

OUR PLANT IS EQUIPPED WITH THE LATEST WOOD-WORKING MACHINERY 
for Blinds. Moulding.. Brackets and all kinds of Mill Work 

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED 
C. & P. Phone 161- W Call Up W. Md. Phone 25 I -B 



Patrick's — Continued. 



Clark, Mrs. Phillip, Wineow Street. 
Carbine, Mrs. M.. Smallwood Street. 
Coleman, Joseph, Country. 
Coleman, John, Country. 
Condon, Mrs. C. N. Centre Street. 
Connelly, May, 1 12' ; N. Mechanic St. 
Coriigan, Michael. Corrigansville. 
Coffey, Michael, Cumberland. 
( arney, J. J., Centre Street. 
Coulahan, Bernard. Orchard Street. 
Callan, Thomas, Narrows Park. 
Clay, W., Maryland Ave. 
Chambers, Nellie, N. Centre Street. 
Clark. James. 49 Washington St. 
Coyle, Bernard. 6 Polk St. 
Coyle, Richard. 12 Polk St. 
Cavanaugh, Patrick. 2* Baltimore Ave. 
Cunningham, P.. 2 Estella St. 
Cavanaugh, Jno. P.. 154 Baltimore Ave. 
Coulehan. Win. T., 23 X. Allegany St. 
Coulehan, Mrs. R., 1 Cumberland St. 
Coffey, P., lit! Maryland Ave. 
Condon, J., 15 Davidson St. 
Connell, Mrs. T., 122 Wineow St. 
Carney. James I., 54 Fayette St. 
Carney, Thomas E., 48 S. Mechanic St. 
Craddock. J.. 23 Elm St. 
Corrigan, M.. 38 Water St. 
Caton, Robert. 30 Chase St. 
Covenay, Maggie, 72 Baltimore Ave. 
Creamer, Richard. 116 N. Mechanic St. 
Cummiskey, Chas. .1.. 3 I .Maryland Ave. 
Cooney, .Mrs. M., 35 Thomas St. 



Donaboe, Mrs. W., Narrows Park. 
Daugherty, Mrs. J., 17 Maryland Ave. 
Doyle, Mrs. Julia, 31 Maryland Ave. 
Doerner. Dr. John A., 78 Union St. 
Dyche, William B.. 149 Highland Ave. 
Uillon. .Mrs. C. F.. 50 Frederick St. 
Dailey, John H., 267 N. Centre St. 
Dowden. Mrs. M., 44 Baltimore Ave. 



Eagan. Mrs. John, 13 Johnson St. 
Emmert, Mrs. Geo., 143;X Columbia SI. 
Edenhart, Mrs. John, 3rd SI.. Ridgely, 

W. Va. 

F 
Flynn, James, Fayette Street. 
Franklin. Dr. A. Leo. Baltimore Street. 
Frederick, Joseph. Haley Street. 
Finan, James, N. Centre Street. 
Finan. Bartholomew, CO Baltimore St. 
Fahey. B., Centre Street. 
Fogarty, Mrs. James, Williams Road. 
Feely, James, Columbia Street. 
Flannagan, George, 15 Johnson St. 
Fisher, Charles. Mapleside St. 
Fitzgerald, W.. 363 N. Centre St. 
Foreman. James, 2GS N. Centre St. 
Flynn. Michael, 8 Carroll St. 
Finan, Thomas B., Cumberland cor. 

Lee St. 
Finan, John F.. 8 Decatur St. 
Finan, Catherine, 60 Baltimore Ave. 



I) 

Donahue. Mrs. W.. N. Centre Street. 
Dalbaugh, Mrs. E., 183 Bedford St. 
Donahue. Miss Elizabeth, Mechanic St. 
Daugherty, James, Ridgeley, W. Va. 
Daugherty, John. Ridgeley, W. Va. 
Dircks, Mrs. M., Country. 
Dixon. Mrs. M.. Green si reet. 
Doyle, Julia. Maryland Avenue. 
Driscoll, E., Beall Street. 
Delaney, Mrs. E., Cumberland. 
Doll, Bernard, Williams Road. 
Downey. C. 10 S. Lee St. 
Doerner. Mrs. Annie L., 47 N. Lee St. 
Dolan, Timothy, 172; . X. Mechanic St. 
Doyle, Thomas, 3 9 Williams St. 
Dillon. William E., 66 Park St. 
Doerner. Mrs. M.. 03 Payette St. 



Griffin, J.. Oldtown Road. 
Gramlich, Mrs. A., 163 N. Centre St. 
Getty. J. F., 42 Fayette St. 
Griminger, S.. 22 Orchard St. 
Grabenstein, F. J., 5S Arch St. 
Grabenstein, Mrs. Joseph. 115 Colum- 
bia St. 
Gramlich, F„ 163 N. Centre St. 
Griffin, James A., 59 Gay St. 
Griffin, John T., 46 Oldtown Road. 
Gonder, Genevieve, 364 X. Centre Si. 
i louder, Joseph A., is Green St. 
Giles, Mrs. W., 50 Laing Ave. 
Good, Albert B„ 61 Lee St. 
Gooding, G. W., 24 Park Ave. 
Gaffney, James P., S3 Bedford St. 
Geary, Mrs. M. L., 46 Green St. 
Gerdeman, Emma. 28 Pear Si. 



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JAMES K. FORD 

:: BntOOtet :: 



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77 BALTIMORE STREET 

Third National Bank Building 

cumberland, md. 

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Office, 33 N. Centre Street 

Cumberland, Md. 

DR. F. P. STEHLEY. Manager 



Graduate Maryland College of 
Pharmacy 

HARRY P. SHAFFER 

DrUggist and 

Chemist 

A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT 
OF DRUGGISTS' GOODS 

Toilet Articles and Proprietary 
Medicines 



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Prescriptions a Specialty 



43 and 45 N. Centre Street, 
Cumberland, Md. 

A native born Cumberland business 



Patrick's — Continued. 



H 

Hopcraft, W., 1G Elm Street. 
Hogan. John. Cumberland Street. 
Helzel. Mrs., Valley Street. 
Harbaugh, Miss F., Smaliwood Street. 
Higgins, H., Mechanic Street. 
Herpeck, L., Mechanic Street. 
Higgins, M., Ann St. 
Houck, B. P., 22 Emily St. 
Hogan, James, 78 Park Ave. 
Harris, Mrs. Ed.. 22 S. Mechanic St. 
Hodel, Mrs. Barbara. 167 N. Centre St. 
Holzen. Mrs. Anna, 97 N. Centre St. 
Holzen, Mrs. Mary. 17 Pulaski St. 
Hilleary, Mrs. Ella, 53 Green St. 
Hodel. W.. 13 Prospect St. 
Hemming. Mrs. Alice. 67 Bedford St. 
Hoblitzel, Mrs. C, 22 N. Mechanic St. 
Hagerty, Daniel, 334 N. Centre St. 



Annie, 121 Washington St. 



Kirk. James E., 48 Maryland Ave. 
Krigbaum, Mrs. J., Mechanic Street. 
Keely, Mrs. J., Centre Street. 
Kaiser, F., Emily Street. 
Keolker, Henry, N. Centre St. 
Kean, Anthony, Green St. 
Ketzner, John, Williams Road. 
Kelly, Cordelia. 46 Washington St. 
Kelly. Mrs. Thomas, 100 Thames St. 
Kelly. Mrs. M., 53 Union St. 
Keech, William, 20 Charles St. 
Kean, G. A., 72 Green St. 
Kean. D. E., SS Green St. 
Kean, Thomas, 8 S. Smaliwood St. 
Keating, John, 176 Washington St. 
Kelly, Ed„ 193 N. Centre St. 
Kearney, M. J.. 29 Ann St. 
Kaiser, H. C, 2 Emily St. 
Kenney. Patrick, 49 Elm St. 



Little, Mrs. K. L., Park Street. 
Long, Peter H.. Mechanic Street. 
Lippold, Mrs. Joseph, Country. 
Logsdon, H. T., Country. 
Lynch, Miss Kate, S. Centre St. 
Lintner, Mrs. Joseph, Mill St. 



Lehman. Espey. 354 Mechanic St. 
Lavin, P.. 7 Cecilia St. 
Lillis. James H., 122 Bedford St. 
Landwehr. George D.. Green cor. 

Smaliwood St. 
Logsdon. Orman J., 58 Lee St. 



McKnew, Charles, Paca Street. 
McCue. Daisy, Mechanic Street. 
Moore. Mrs. A.. Maryland Ave. 
Miltenberger, John, Paca Street. 
Miltenberger, George. Paca Street. 
McKenzie. Mrs. S., X. Mechanic Street. 
Mason. Joseph, Country. 
McHugh. Gonzaga, Lee Street. 
Mullen. Charles E.. Davidson Street. 
Malloy, Edward, Cumberland. 
Mulligan, Mrs. Ridgeley. W. Va. 
Malone, W. E., Cumberland. 
Mattingly. Mrs. J.. Green St. 
Martin, William, Franklin Street. 
Murphy, E. A., Wineow Street. 
Mills. P.. Mechanic Street. 
Mickell. Robert, Green Street. 
McKenna, Joseph, Fayette and Lee St. 
McCourtney, P. S.. Park Street. 
McEvoy, Mrs. C, Green St. 
McAdams, Mrs. H. C, Bedford St. 
McDermott, Miss M., 355 N. Centre St. 
McLaughlin, Miss M., 2 Fulton St. 
Moore. Mrs. M., 153 Maryland Ave. 
Moran, Frank, 161 Offutt St. 
Martin. H. A., 2SS N. Mechanic St. 
McMullen, Jno. P.. 158 Washington St. 
Miltenberger, H., 45 Williams St. 
Matt, Joseph G., 214 Centre St. 
McKinzie, Nicholas A., 10 Witt Alley. 
Mattingly, H. T., 54 Green St. 
Mullen. W. T., 120 Valley St. 
McMullen. H. A., 160 Washington St. 
McMullen, Dan. F., 156 Washington St. 
Mason, Joseph F., 4 Goethe St. 
Millenberger, John M., 58 Beall St. 
Malamphy, James E.. 15 Woodside St. 
Mullen, J. R., 55 Gay St. 
Mignot, Charles L.. Beall. nr. S. Alle- 
gany St. 
McHenry, J. A., 53 Washington St. 
Millman, F. X., 116 Green St. 
McKnight. Miss Sue, 7 Columbia St. 
Maguire, J. J., 46 Fayette St. 



k's — Coniiiiii.il. 



Madden, Robert, 169 X. Centre St. 
Moran, Mrs. A.. 112 Maryland Ave. 
McKenna, Mrs. Anna. 22 Lee St. 
McKaig, Mrs. Wallace. 193 Washington 

St. 
Murphy, P. J., Windsor Hotel. 
Mullaney, W. J.. Windsor Hotel. 
McEvoy, Charles, 2 4 S. Smallwood St 
Mulligan, Mrs. James. Ridgely, W. Va. 
McCartney, P. S., 7u Park Ave 
May. Aaron. 330 X. Centre St. 
Murphy, J. J.. S7 Green St. 
Martin. P. C. 195 Baltimore Ave. 
Mertens, Mrs. E.. 11 Baltimore Ave. 
Martz, H., 135 Walnut St. 
McDonnell, M., 36 Bedford St. 
Mills. Mrs. Patrick. 350 X. Centre St. 
McCormick, Kate, 205 Columbia St. 
Malamphy, M. J.. 78 Park Ave. 
Martin, Mrs. S. A.. 168 X. Mechanic St. 
Mulvaney, Mrs. Elizabeth, 15S X. Cen 
tre St. 

X 

Xaughton. Frank E., Union Street. 
Xaughton. \V. H.. Decatur Street. 
Xoon, Bridget A., 204 X. Centre Street. 
Xoonan. Mrs. Thomas. 13 Emily St. 
Xiland. Mrs. Thomas, 2(1 Tnomas St. 
Xiland, J., Maryland Ave. 
Xiland. T.. Rldgeley, W. Va. 
Xee, Bartlett, Maryland Ave. 
Xaughton, T. P.. Union St. 
Nicholas, John. Williams St. 
Nearman, M., Smallwood Street. 
Neubeiser, Mrs. \\\, 1 15 X. Mechanic St. 
Xaughton, X., (15 Union St. 
Niland, Martin P.. 20 Thomas St. 
Xiland. IV. 20 Thomas St. 



(> 



O'Neill, B., Ridgeley. W. Va. 
O'Neill, Mrs., Liberty Street. 
O'Neill, Mrs. Thomas, Maryland Ave. 
O'Donnell, Michael J.. 312 X. Centre St. 
O'Donnell. Bridget, 312 X. Centre St. 
O'Donnell. Xorbert. Carpenter Road. 

Ridgely. \V. Va. 
O'Donnell. Patrick, 87 Maryland Ave. 
O'Neill, Patrick, 7 I s. Mechanic St. 



Price, John, Williams Road. 
Porter, Thomas G., 104 Green Street. 
Powers, J. J., Mechanic Street. 
Paisley, William D., SO Green St. 
Piquet, A. C, Xational Pike Road nr. 
Clark's Distillery. 



Quinn, Thomas B., Ann Street 

R 

Rarig, Miss Sue, 14 Hanover Street. 
Reiley, Owen. Crawford Street. 
Rowan. Mrs. M. E., 12 Hanover Street. 
Ryland. Misses. 122 Bedford Street. 
Rowley, Mrs.. Williams Road. 
Rogan. Mrs. John P., Lintherville. 
Ryan. Miss Kate, Washington Street. 
Row... Miss M.. Redford Street. 
Rarig, Matthew. .Madison Street. 
Reinhardt, Mrs. W. A.. Bedford Street. 
Rawley, Mrs. T., Mapleside. 
Reinhart, Genevieve, 69 Paca St. 
Reinhart. Mrs. M. A.. 67 Paca St. 
Reiley. Owens. 7 Crawford St. 
Rari^. Miss Maty. 14 Hanover St. 
Rodney, .lames E., 00 Elm St. 
Ryland. Lloyd, 224 X. Mechanic St. 
Ryland. Mrs. A.. 122 Bedford St. 
Ryland. Mrs. \V.. 114 Bedford S*. 
Ryland, James L, 112 Bedford St. 



Stanton. Mis. May, Williams Road. 
Shellbaus, J. P., Lena Street. 
Sticher. Mrs. (1., X. Centre Street. 
Serimminger, S.. Emily Street 
Schute, Alexander. 28 Elm Street. 
Stechman, Mrs. K C, Emily Street. 
Swayne. Mrs. R., Queea City Hotel. 
Swaine. James F.. Greem Street. 
Sanders, Charles. Centre Street. 
Sanders. Mis. K.. Madison Street. 
Stapleman, John. Green Street. 
Schuck, Mis. K, Ridgeley. W. Va. 
Samons. Thomas, S. Mechanic St. 
Snyder. A. H.. Centre Street. 
Swift. Mrs. J., Ellerslie. 
Speelman, Mrs. Harriet E., s^ Bed- 
ford Street. 



Spiker, R., 35 Paca St. 

Schaffer, Joseph. 52 Independence St. 

Seaver, P. J., 195 Washington St. 

Spiker, James E., 12 S. George St. 

Schaffer, L., 113 Harrison St. 

Sebold, D. M., 2S3 Columbia St. 

Shaffer, F. F.. 161 Highland St. 

Shuck. Mrs. E.. Shuck's Row, Ridg- 
ely, W. Va. 

Sheridan, Mrs. Margaret. 126 Wash- 
ington St. 

Straub. Aloysius, Penn Hotel. 

Snyder. A. H.. 116 N. Centre St. 

Speelman. Gertrude, SS Bedford St. 

Speelman, C. Howard. SS Bedford St. 



Tracy. Mary. Washington Street. 
Thumel, Mrs. E.. 251 X. Centre Street. 
Taylor, Thomas, Cumberland. 
Twigg, Mary, Emily Street. 
Templeton, Mrs. Isabel. 47 Bedford St. 
Twigg, Mary, 42 Valley St. 
Taylor, Thomas, 233 Columbia St. 



Tole, George, 17 Broadway. 
Thompson. Mrs. Catherine M., 17 
Hanover St. 

W 

Wigger. B.. Country. 
Willard. Mrs. K.. Altamont Terrace. 
Wolf, G., Ridgeley, W. Va. 
Wilson. Belle. Linternville. 
Ward. William H., Green Street. 
Wright, Peter E., 5 7 S. Mechanic St. 
Welsh. Mrs. Bridget. 160 Maryland Ave. 
Williams. Bernard. 139 Madison Ave. 
Ward, Mrs. James H., 94 Columbia St. 
Wolf. Henry, Beall and B. & O. R. R. 
Wilson. Mrs. B„ 47 Wilson St. 
Webster. Mrs. James, 24 Frederick St. 
Walsh, W. E., 18S Washington St. 
Webster, Mrs. D., 18 Liberty St. 
Welsh, Charles J., 60 Maryland Ave. 
Weaver. Mrs. M.. 49 Arch St. 
Wood. J. M., 172 Maryland Ave. 
Walsh, Mrs. J. M.. 145 Columbia St. 
Ways, <;. E.. 76 Union St. 
Ways, George P., 47 Fayette St. 



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BRIEF HISTORICAL SKETCH OF 

SAINTS PETER AND PAUL'S CHURCH 

CUMBERLAND, MD. 



The site of SS. Peter and Paul's Church is linked closely with the memory 
of Washington and the French-English War. The hill on which the church 
stands was formerly known as Fort Hill, since historical Fort Cumber- 
land, and the old log cabin in which Washington lived for a time was but 
four or five hundred feet away. Venerable St. Mary's, the old log church, 
which stood on the site of the present Carroll Hall, had been built about 1792, 
and for a half century and over was the only Catholic church in Cumberland. 
The opening of the National Pike and the building of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad as far west as Cumberland soon brought a number of settlers 
to the rich coal and ore fields of Allegany County. Many Catholics, both ot 
Irish and German nationalities, were especially drawn here during the dig- 
ging, and after the completion of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and soon 
quite a large contingent of Germans formed a part of St. Mary's congrega- 
tion. The Rev. Leonard A. Obermeyer. a German by birth, but educated in 
this country, was entirely unable to minister to the Germans of his flock, 
and it became necessary to procure at intervals the services of some German 
priest. In this connection Mr. William Gessner deserves particular mention. 
This gentleman had been a resident of Baltimore when first the Redemptorists 
took charge of St. John's, in that city, and had been a member of that parish. 
Afterward he took up his abode in Cumberland, and at once he experienced 
the sad plight of the Germans, to relieve which he petitioned the Redemp- 
torists at Baltimore to send one of their priests here several times a year. 
The request was granted, and records show that from 1840 on a priest would 
undertake the dangerous trip by the old stage coach and the tedious journey 
by rail every three months in order to preach to and hear the confessions of 
the Germans of old St. Mary's. 

In 1S4 7 Father Obermeyer became convinced that one church would 
be unable to accommodate all the Catholics of Cumberland, and he himself 
pointed out the necessity of a separate congregation for the German Cath- 
olics, Acting on this suggestion, Mr. M. Wiesel, prominent among the Ger- 



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Saints Peter and Paul's— Continued. 

mans, as representative of pastor and people, went before Archbishop Eccles- 
ton to obtain His Grace's sanction of their plans. The committee could not 
agree on the site for the new church, but they would abide by the selection 
which the Redemptorist father, coming to Cumberland at the usual interval, 
should make. Through a most gracious Providence of God, this priest was 
the Venerable Father John N. Neumann. Well might SS. Peter and Pauls 
glory in this exalted distinction, and most confidently look forward to ever 
increasing blessings of God, for even now proceedings tending to the beatifica- 
tion of this blessed servant of God are pending in Rome, and we in joyfulness 
of heart look forward to the happy day when it can be truthfully stated that 
this saint of God selected the site and planned the erection of our church. 

At once the foundation of the church was begun, and on June 4, L848, 
Archbishop Eccleston laid with solemn ceremonies the corner-stone of SS. 
Peter and Paul's Church, which was witnessed by a very large throng of 
people. The building was already well under roof when new difficulties 
arose. Certain members favored " a free church" — that is, without pew rent; 
others opposed it. In a letter to the Very Rev. Bernard Hafkensheid. Pro- 
vincial of the Redemptorists, Archbishop Eccleston forbade the "free church" 
movement. The church was blessed by the Rev. Father Hafkensheid on Sep- 
tember 29, L849. The following is a list of pastors who had charge of the 
church until 1 865 : 

Rev. Anthony Urbanczik, C.SS.R.. from April 23, 1849 to 1851. 

Rev. Louis Dold. C.SS.R.. 1851-1853. 

Rev. Fridolin Luette, C.SS.R., 1853. 

Rev. Adrian Van de Braak, C.SS.R., 1854-1857. 

Rev. Francis Xav. Seelos. C.SS.R.. 1 857-1 S63. 

Rev. Mich. Mueller, C.SS.R., 1S63-1S66. 

Rev. Nicholas Joeckel, C.SS.R., 1S66. 

During the pastorate of Rev. Father Seelos the church was solemnly con- 
secrated by the Most Rev. Archbishop Kenrick, August 1, 1858. 

It will be seen. too. that of the seven Redemptorist pastors of our church 
Rev. Father Seelos was its rector for the longest period, and to this very day 
the memory of this holy and good priest is linked with love, respect and rev- 
erence in the hearts of all parishioners who were so fortunate as to behold 
his blessed countenance. 

Six long years, then, this saintly priest, beloved by God and man. guided 
and governed SS. Peter and Paul's, and when the day of his beatification. 
which is now before the Sacred Congregation in Rome, shall have brought 
happiness to the hearts of many, SS. Peter and Paul's will surely not fail to 
honor him whom they once called their "beloved pastor." 

Father Nicholas Joeckel was the last Redemptorist rector of this church. 
Rumors of the unhealthful climate, as was supposed, of this locality, com- 
bined with the wish of having the Novitiate and House of Studies nearer to 
his residence, induced the Very Rev. Jos. Helmpraecht. Provincial of the 
Redemptorists. to arrange for the withdrawal of the Redemptorists from 
Cumberland. On the morning of October 17. 1866. the work of the Redemp- 
torists, who had labored so faithfully and successfully, was over in Cum- 
berland, and the last Redemptorist was gone. 

In the interest of history it should he recorded that it was in the quiet 
Redemptorist Monastery at Cumberland, where in August of 1857 the Rev. 
Fathers Clarence Walworth, Isaac Hecker, Augustine Hewitt and George 
Ueshon and Father Baker, then young Redemptorists, formed the idea and 
laid the foundation of a movement which was to culminate in the Paulisl 
Congregation of to-day. 



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James A. McHenry Robert MacDonald 

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Saints Peter and Paul's— Continued. 

THE CARMELITE FATHERS AT SAINTS PETER AND PAULS. 

In the year 1S64 a small community of Bavarian Carmelites, with tin- 
Very Rev. Cyril Knoll as their Superior, came to America and took up their 
abode at Leavenworth, Kansas. Two years later they moved to Cumberland, 
and the same Father Cyril became pastor of SS. Peter and Paul's Church, and 
continued as such for nine years. During his term of office the present 
parochial school was built. September 2S, 1S6S, the corner-stone was laid, 
and it was solemnly blessed May 30, 1S69. With untiring zeal and most re- 
markable activity this undaunted priest at once undertook the erection of a 
Sisters' Convent, the corner-stone of which was laid in April of 1S7 0. The 
Very Rev. Edward Brennan, pastor of St. Patrick's Church, blessed the build- 
ing October 23 of the same year. It was Father Cyril, likewise, who brought 
the Ursuline Sisters to Cumberland to take charge of the parochial schools, 
which have witnessed such patient, untiring and faithful labor ever since. 
During Lent of 187 2 Father Cyril proposed to the congregation the enlarge- 
ment of the church. With this purpose in view, the old rectory in the rear 
of the church was torn down, forty-five feet were added to the length of the 
church, and the two present double-story sacristies took the place of the old 
sacristy situate beneath the church. The work of Father Cyril is deserving 
of more than ordinary praise, for it usually does not fall to the lot of one 
priest to successfully complete such substantial and important improve- 
ments in such a short period of time. He is deserving of much lasting grati- 
tude. 

Strange to say, Father Cyril was the first and last Carmelite pastor of 
this church. Owing to the growing missions in the West, the Carmelites 
were desirous of vacating this parish, and on the 17th day of July, 1875, the 
Capuchin Fathers took possession of SS. Peter and Paul's, and have remained 
in charge unto the present time. When the Capuchins were placed at the 
head of this church the parish already possessed the necessary parochial 
buildings and a house of worship sufficiently large for the growing needs 
thereof. Naturally, then, the various pastors vied with one another in im- 
proving the one and beautifying the other as well by new and very beautiful 
altars, imported artistic windows, convenient pews and neat tiling and a pow- 
erful new organ, as also by the installation of modern lighting and heating 
apparatus, so that to-day SS. Peter and Paul's is a most beautiful, worthy 
and devotional house of God, second to none in Allegany County or Western 
Maryland. 

In 1S93 SS. Peter and Paul's School Hall was built, in which provisions 
were made for entertainments, meeting rooms and social gatherings. In 
order to meet the pressing need and urgent demand for more elaborate and 
spacious apartments for the various clubs and societies of the parish, as also 
for larger class rooms for the flourishing Ursuline Academy, Alpine Hall was 
purchased in 1908, and is modern and up to date in all respects, a lasting 
credit to both the present pastor. Father Peter, and the parish itself. 

These are the various pastors who have had charge since the Capuchin 
Fathers have taken possession: 

Rev. Father Anthony M. Schuermann, O.M.Cap., 1875-1877. 

Rev. Father Francis Wolf, O.M.Cap., 1877-1881, 1S84-1SNN. 1894-1897. 

Rev. Father Felix M. Lex, O.M.Cap.. 1881-1884, 1888-1891. 

Rev. Father Hyacinth Epp, O.M.Cap.. L884. 

Rev. Father Herman Jos. Peters. O.M.Cap.. 1891-1894. 

Rev. Father Charles Speckert, O.M.Cap.. 1897-1898. 

Rev. Father Peter Kemper. O.M.Cap.. 1898-1900, 1906-1909. 

Rev. Father Martin Muelders. O.M.Cap.. 1900-1903. 

Rev. Father Constantine Hoefler, O.M.Cap., L903-1906. 
77 



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REV. THOMAS PETRIE 



Saints Peteb ami Paul's — Continued. 

Father Francis, as is seen, was pastor of this church at various times for 
a period of ten years; Father Felix, six years, and the present pastor, Father 
Peter, is just now completing his fifth year as pastor. 

Good Father Francis will always hold the first place in the hearts of 
many of this parish, and his memory will ever be held in the highest esteem. 

We close this brief sketch witli a well-merited allusion to the present 
beloved pastor, Father Peter, under whose able management untold and last- 
ing good has been accomplished, for the younger members of the parish es- 
pecially. In these various undertakings Father Peter is ably prompted and 
aided by his two young and faithful assistants. Father Celestine Oswald, of 
Pittsburg, Pa., and Father Theodosius Mullan, a native of Cumberland, who 
with him are zealously and energetically laboring for the material and spir- 
itual welfare of SS. Peter and Paul's Congregation. 



SAINTS PETER AND PAUL'S CHURCH AND 
MONASTERY 

REV. PETER KEMPER, O.M.Cap., Rector. 

Assistants. 

REV. CELESTINE OSWALD. O.M.Cap. 

REV. THEODOSIl'S MULLAN, O.M.Cap. 

Lectors of the Seminary. 
FATHER BENEDICT WICH. O.M.Cap.. Professor of Moral Theology. 
FATHER ALOYSIl'S KAUSLER, O.M.Cap., Professor of Dogma. 
FATHER KILIAN LUTZ, O.M.Cap.. Professor of Canon Law and Church 

History. 
FATHER THOMAS PETRIE, O.M.Cap., Professor of Scripture and Liturgy. 

HOURS OF SERVICES. 
Sundays and Holidays. — Low Masses, 5.30 and 7; Children's Mass. 9; High 

.Mass. 10 a. m. Sermons in German at High Mass and Evening Services; 

in English at the 7 and 9 o'clock Masses. 
Baptisms at 2 p. m. Sunday-School at 2.30 p. m. 
Vespers and Benediction, :'. p. m During the months of July and August at 

7.30 p. m. 
Rosary, Litany and Benediction every Saturday. 7 p. m. 
Confessions are heard from 2 to 6 and after 7 p. m. on Saturdays, on the days 

before Holidays, on Thursdays before the lirst Friday of each month, and 

Sunday mornings before Mass. 

MEETINGS. 

Archconfraternity of the Holy Family, first Sunday of the month, for the 
young ladies; second Sunday, for the men; third Sunday, for the young 
men; fourth Sunday, for the women. 

Promoters of the Sacred Heart League, fourth Sunday of the month. 

Third Order of St. Francis, third Sunday; English Branch, every liftb Sunday. 

St. Joseph's Club, firs! Sunday of each month. 

Alpine Club, first Sunday of each month. 

ss. Peter and Paul's Beneficial Society, lirst Monday of each month. 

Catholic Knights ni' A rica, third Sunday of each month. 



-•J 



Paul's — Continued. 



PARISHIONERS 



:kerman, Mi 

St. 



A 

Barbara, 



49 Cumberland St. 

eph, Chestnut. Mapleside. 



rge 



:::■ 



Cope. Mrs. Sophia, ISO N. Centre St. 
Clarke. Philip, 90 Wineow St. 
Cook, Mrs. James W.. 140 Bedford St. 
Cah in, II Lee, Cumberland. 



Felix, US Washington St. 
It., 23 Cumberland St. 

es. 197 Washington St. 
Michael, 15 X. Lee St. 
Mrs. Caroline. 15 X. Lee 

nt, Mapleside. 
istnut, Maple- 



Bareis, Mr; 

Bareis. Pet 

Barrett. .la 

Baumhauei 

Baumhauer 
St. 

Bealky. Frank J., 

Bealky, Mrs. Ma 
side. 

Becker. Joseph J.. 14 Chestnut St. 

Becker. William ('.. 20 Chestnut St. 

Beier. Francis Xavier. 1C9 Bedford St 

Bender, Albert R., M Green St. 

Bender. Richard, :: I Cumberland St. 

Bender, Jacob, 34 Cumberland St. 

Berkard, Mrs. J., 23 S. Smallwood St. 

billing. John, lot Walnut St. 

Boch, George, 8 Lena St. 

Boch. Leonard. S Lena St. 

Borgman, George, 7S Wine St. 

Buskey, Anthony C. Coftman nr. Old- 
town Road. 

Bowen. John, 2 Green St. 

Boylan Ja? II. -• H" _. x Mechanic St. 

Brady, Anna. 59 Washington St. 

Braggs, Jos. .ph. i Pulaski St., 

Brinker, Frank, 48 X. I St. 

Blinker, Mrs. Louisa. 48 X. Lee St. 

Brinker, Mrs. Sophia, 18 X. Lee St. 

Brinker, Jno., Oldtown I! I ur. South St. 

Brockey, George. 22 Pulaski St. 

Brockey, Mrs. Margaret, 22 Pulaski St. 

Bro ki y, Mrs C . 22 Pulaski St. 

Brown. II, nn |!., us \. Centre St. 

Buchholtz. William A.. LaVale. Md. 

Brookman. Mrs. B., 194 Green St. 

Brookman. F. J., 150 Green St. 

Brookman. Jos.. 1 W. S. Alleghany St. 

Berkard, Miss Josephine. 23 Smallwood 
St. 

brode, John C. 245 X. Centre St. 

Brode, Gerald, 245 N. Centre St. 

Boeckler. Mrs. Sophia. 42 Dilley St. 

Brooks. Mrs. M., 45 Pear St. 

Brutting, Mrs. Eva, Williams Road. 



i> 

Dahl, Charles. 251 N. Mechanic St. 
Decker, Mrs. F., 121 South St. 
Dehler, Mrs. Mary, 128 Bedford St. 
Dietrich, Chas. 11.. 228 Columbia Ave 
Dilger, Charles E.. 211 Green St. 
Doerner. George. 202 Green St. 
Dcerner, Weyand F.. 226 X. Mechanic 



W 



H. 



220 N. Mechanic St. 
Ham's Road and Ci 



Dorn. George. Wi 

Line. 
Donohoe. Mrs. W.. 42 Beall St. 
Dorn, John R., 37 Hanover St. 
Dressman, John H., 10 Williams St. 
Dressman, J. J.. 10 Williams St. 
Dressman. J. M. J., 10 Williams St. 
Detterman. Barbara, nr. oldtown Road. 
Detterman, Nicholas, nr. Oldtown Road. 
Dummel, Adelaide. Thomas St. 

E 
Ebbert, Mrs. Conrad, 10 Hanover St. 
Edenhait. Charles, Carpenter's Road, 

Ridgely, W. Va. 
Edenhait, Clara B.. Carpenter's Road. 

Ridgely. W. Va. 
Eirick, Martin M.. On Cay St. 
Eirick, Charles L.. 60 Gay St. 
Eirick, Henry J., 9 Pennsylvania Ave. 



Feeny, Bartholomew A.. (15 5th St. 

Fechtig, Dr. Roberl Y.. Washington St. 
Extended. 

Felten, Edward F., HI Valley St. 

Fesenmeier. Mrs. Adelaide. 367 X. Cen- 
tre St. 

Fesenmeier, Andrew J., 367 ^.Centre St. 

Fesen ier, Michael L.. I is Washing- 
ton SI. 

Fesenmeier, Mrs. M . 118 Washington Si. 

Fleckenstein, George J.. 171 Green St 

Fleckenstein, Mrs. Elizabeth, 175 
Green St. 



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Cumberland, Md. 




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DEALER IN 

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255 N. CENTRE STREET, CUMBERLAND, MD. 




REV. PETER KEMPER AND 
SS. PETER AND PAUL'S CHURCH, CUMBERLAND. 




ALLEGANY COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL 
DESIGNED BY 

GEORGE F. SAXSUUHY 

Ardntrrt 



HOOMS NOs. !l-l(> ( ITI/.KNS NATIONAL HANK 1!UILDIX< 

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W M. PHONE 332-A 



Fleckenstein, .Mrs. Rosa A., IS Brown- 
ins St. 
Fogtman, Dr. August. 20 Pulaski St. 
Fogtman, August H.. 20 Pulaski St. 
Forbeck, George J., 39 Pear St. 
Foreman. James. 268 X. Centre St. 
Fradiska, Michael, 79 Valley St. 
Freithof. John. 26 Chestnut St. 
Frey, Conrad. 11 Hanover St. 
Frey, George C, S Harrison St. 
Furlong. Joseph. 95 X. Mechanic St. 
Forheck. Joseph, 33 Wine St. 
Fradiska, George, 77 Valley St. 
Firle. .Mrs. Rose, Xarrows Park. 
Fisher, \V. T., Linternville. 

<; 

Geary, Mrs. M. L., 46 Green St. 

Gerdemann. Bernard J., 351 X. Me- 
chanic St. 

Gerdemann, Henry A.. 362 X. Mechanic 
St. 

Gerdemann, .Norman, 362 X. Mechanic 
St. 

Gerdemann, John. 90 Harrison St. 

Gerdemann, Joseph, 28 Pear St. 

Gessner. George. 8 X. Mechanic St. 

Click. Mrs. F., 141 X. Mechanic St. 

Glick, George. 141 X. Mechanic St. 

Click. Joseph. 192 X. Centre St. 

Glick. John, 192 X. Centre St. 

Glick, J. Henry. Green and Smallwood 
Sts. 

Goellner, Bernard 



101 Fayette St. 



ext. 



Goellner, John M.. 164 Fayette St. ext. 

Goellner. Frank J.. 164 Fayette St. ext. 

Goellner, Jos. P , 164 Fayette St. ext. 

Goetz, Mrs. Bernardina, 174 Fayette 
St. ext. 

Goetz, Caspar F., 157 Fayette St. ext. 

Goetz, Mrs. Catherine. 59 Cumberland 
St. 

Grabenstein. George F.. 5S Arch St. 

Grabenstein, Joseph. 115 Columbia St. 

Grabenstein. William H., 79 Cumber- 
land St. 

Griffin, John T., 46 Oldtown Road. 

Grimm, Mrs. Mary, 2 9 Fairview Aye. 

Grimm, John H., 149 Grand Ave. 

Gunterberg, Mrs. A., 20 Fairview Ave. 

Giles, Floyd \v.. 113 Columbia St. 



Glick, Mary E„ 141 Mechanic St. 
Glick, Lucy M., 141 Mechanic St. 
Gashler, Mrs. Caroline, Smallwood 

and Fayette Sts. 
Gessenhues. Henry, Outskirts. 
Goldsworthy. Paul, Xational Pike. 
Gamlich, Francis, 163 X. Centre St. 
Grabenstein, Adam, Outskirts. 
Grabenstein. Anna, Outskirts. 
Grabenstein. Frank, Outskirts. 
Grabenstein, John, Outskirts. 
Grabenstein. Julius, Country. 
Grabenstein. Justice. Country. 
Grabenstein, Mrs. J. K.. Outskirts. 
Grimm, Mrs. Pauline. 115 Columbia 

St. 
Gutjahr, Frank W.. 53 Spring Vale. 
Gutjahr, John W., 53 Spring Vale. 



II 



Habig. Damian, 230 X. Centre St. 
Hensler, Henry, 125 Walnut St. 
Hensler, Mrs. Mary. 206 Columbia Ave. 
Hammersmith, Frank, Green St. ext. 
Hammersmith, Mrs., Green St. ext. 
Hammersmith. Wolfe. 240 Columbia 

Ave. 
Harmison, Edvv. G.. 1101 Lafayette Ave. 
Hart. Peter, 311 X. Mechanic St. 
Hartmann. George V.. 3 Wallace St. 
Hartman, Joseph H., 37 Beall St. 
Hartung, Mrs. Magd., Allegany Hos- 
pital. 
Haselberger. Andrew, 31S X. Mechanic 

Haselbsrger. Joseph, 31 s X. Mechanic 

St. 
Hauser, August, 99 South St. 
Helker, Mrs. M„ 54 Valley St. 
Helmstetter. Charles, 67 Fayette St. 
Helmstetter, Joseph, Cash Valley. 
Hilleary. Mary M.. 53 Green St. 
Himmler. Mrs. YVilhelmina. 341 X. 

Centre St. 
Hipp. Mrs. Catherine, 7S Fayette St. 
Hoffman, Frederick. 38 Cumberland St. 
Holzen, Anna M., 97 X. Centre St. 
Holzen, Elizabeth F.. 97 X. Centre St. 
Holzen. Mrs. John P., 17 Pulaski St. 
Hopkins. Mrs. P. 
Huebsi bnian. Frank. Bell ext. 



Oldest Music House in Western Maryland. 

J. P. Wiesel's 

33 Baltimore Street Cumberland, Md. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1873. 



PIANOS 



Steinway 
Mason & 

Hamlin 
Behr Bros. 
Ivers & 
Pond 




Wissner 

Packard 

Crown 

Smith & 
Barnes 

Waldorf 



PL/IYER PIANOS 



Angelus, Packard, Ivers & Pond, Smith & Barnes 



i >i j_*;uis of onh standard it- 
Tuning and repairing <if 



si. Patrick and SS. 



is Peteb \m> Paul's — Continued. 



Hammersmith. Fiam.W. Green Si. ext. 
Hein, .Mrs. Matilda. 39 Fayette St. 
Helfrieh, Mary, 28 Green St. 
Helmstetter, George, Cash Valley. 



son, Mis. I... ;,1 Liberty St. 
iinsky. Caisimir, Bedford St. 



Kaiser, Henry ('.. 2 Emily St. 
Kastner, Anthony, 39 Dilley St. 
Kean, Mrs. M.. 27 Beall St. 
Kean, Frank. 45 Green St. 
Kean. Mollie. 45 Green St. 
Keller, Mrs. M.. 13 Browning St. 
Kelly, Christopher, 333 Maryland Ave. 
Kerlier. Mrs. Elizabeth, 79 X. Mechanic 

St. 
Kerber. Mrs. Josephine, 39 Fayette St. 
Kerscher, Csidore, 196 N. Mechanic St. 
Keefer. Dora. 210 Fayette St. 
Keefer, Peter, 210 Fayette St. 
Keefer, W., 114 Fayette St. 
Kienhoefer, Frank. 2 Green St. 
Kienhoefer, Anthony, 2 Green St. 
Klosterman, Thomas. Winsor Hotel. 
Klosterman, Henry B., National Pike 

Road nr. Clark's Distillery. 
Knicricn.Mrs. E.. 212 X. Mechanic St. 
Eobosky, Alois, Oldtown Rd., Mapleside. 
Cobosky, Jno., Oldtown Rd., Mapleside. 
Koelker, Joseph, 27 Hanover St. 
Kornhoff. William, lor. X. Centre St. 
Kotschenreuther, George. 20 Paca St. 
Kotschenreuther, Godfrey. 281 X. Me- 
chanic St. 
Kuhlman, Josephine, 124 Fayette Si 
Kuhlman, Theresa, 124 Fayette St. 
Kean, Thomas, s S. Smallwood St. 
Kegg, Mrs. Josephine. 72 Valley St. 
Kerber, M. Teresa. Cumberlan 1 
Klein. Caroline, Cumberland. 
Krueglein, George. Williams Road. 
Kuhlman, Matilda. 121 Fayette St. 



Laing. John P.. 52 Green St. 
Laing, Fred. L„ 15 X. Smallwood St. 
Laing. Henry. 4th cor. South St. 
Landwehr, George D., Green cor.Smal 

wood St. 



Landwehr, Marj . G Q cor. Small- 
wood St. 
Leo, Mrs. Mar> . 130 Frederick St. 
Lippold, Frank. 12G Bedford St. 
Lippold, John I... 2 I Green St. 
Lippold. Joseph H.. 120 Bedford Si. 
Lippold, William A.. 126 Bedford Si. 
Lippold, Louis W„ 20 Green St. 
Lippold, Mrs. Mathilda. 20 Green St. 
Long, George L. 20 Green St. 
Lippold, Kate M.. 1211 Bedford Si. 
Lippold. Margaret A.. 120 Bedford St. 
Loihel. Joseph. 14 X. Paca St. 
Loibel, Charles, 205 X. Mechanic St. 
Luhrman, Alphonsus. S3 Baltimore Aye. 
Luhrman. Anthony. S2 Baltimore Ave. 
Laing. John, Country. 
Laing, Joseph. Country. 
Ladinger. Nicholas. Country. 
Ladinger. Elizabeth, 171 Bedford St. 
Linder. George. Cumberland. 
Lippold. Peter L.. Cumberland. 
Lueck. Frank J.. Mapleside. 
Lueck, Bernard L., Mapleside. 
Lueck, Lawrence, Mapleside. 

M 

Mackert. Kass. 17 Elm Si. 
Manthei, John L.. Gleason, Mapleside. 
Martin, Peter. 195 Baltimore Ave. 
Matt. Joseph. 214 X. Centre St. 
Matt, Caroline. 214 X. Centre Si 
Matt. George J.. 390 X. Mechanic St. 
McDermott, Bernard, 58 Beall Si. 
McEvoy. Mrs. C. . r i!i Green St. 
McHugh. Gonza, 151 X. Mechanic St. 
McHugh. James. 151 X. Mechanic St. 
McKenzie, Enoch A.. 21 Carroll St. 
McKenzie, Mrs. M.. 157 Thomas St. 
McKenzie. Nicholas A., in Witt Alley. 
McKnight, Mrs. Regina, 131 Highland. 
McMullen, Catki rinc 160 Washington St. 
McMullcn. Hugh A.. Kin Washington St. 
McMullen, John P.. 158 Washington Si. 
Minke. Anthony A.. Beall nr. Lee St. 
Minke, Mrs. Catherine. 13 Beall St. 
Minke. Mrs. John. 59 Beall St. 
Minke. Michael .1.. :'. Paca St. 
Mertens. Emma. 11 Baltimore \v>- 
Mess, nan. \V>ant C, Green St. ext. 
Miller. Peter Joseph, 1.". Henrj Si. 
Miller. Philip. 170 Fayette St 
Miller. Urban Sr., <>:>, Valley St. 



i- I'i il i: 



,'s — Continued. 



Miller, Urban Jr., 63 Valley St. 
Miltenberger, John M., 58 Beall St. 
Mittenberger, Mrs.M. A., 45 William St. 
Mothersole, Mrs. Bertha, 5 Wallace St. 
Mullan, Miss Anna M., 107 Valley Road. 
Mullan, Frederick J., in? Valley Road. 
Mullan, Thomas A., 30 Chestnut St. 
.Mullan. John L„ 4S Cay St. 
Mullen, Joseph, 55 Gay St. 
Mullan. Frank A.. Ill Valley St. 
Mattingly, Henry T.. 54 Green St. 
Metzner. Elizabeth. 17G N. Centre St. 
Miles. Mary, 186 N. Centre St. 
Maerz, Bernard, 338 N. Mechanic St. 
Mearz, Mary, 311 N. Mechanic St. 
Maffley, Fred., 105 Fifth St. 
Meyers, Mrs. Cunig, 331 N. Centre St. 
Meyers, John. Washington St. ext. 
Meyers, Adam, Ridgely, W. Va. 
Meders, Eva, 67 Independence St. 
Meders. Mrs. Caroline. Ridgely, W. Va. 
Meyers. Joseph, 205 Green St. 
Miller. George, 44 Fayette St. 
Miller, J. H., Cumberland. 
Miller, Louis, 16(1 N. Mechanic St. 
Manlove, Elizabeth, Cumberland. 



Nee. John S.. 281 N. Centre St. 
Nehring, William I... 265 N. Centre St. 
Xeiss, Andrew, Green ext. 
Xeiss, Barbara, Green ext. 
Neubauer, Frank, 25 Laing Ave. 
Xeubeiser. Louis Sr.. 30 Polk St. 
Xeubeiser, Louis Jr.. 30 Polk St. 
Newman. Samuel J., 24 Green St. 



i: 

Regal, Jacob, 124 Walnut St. 
Reichert, John M., 246 N. Centre St. 
Reinhard. G. A., 28 Green St. 
Reinhard, Joseph J., 28 Green St. 
Reitmeier, George. IS Necessity St. 
Reynolds, Ellen F., 13^N.Smallwood St. 
Rohman. Caspar. X. Centre cor. X. 

Mechanic Sts. 
Rohman. John. 360 X. Centre St. 
I In], ma n. Mrs. Josephim ,360 N. Centre St. 
Rohman, Martin, 331 X. Centre St. 
Rose. Mrs. John. 218 Bedford St. 
Rossworm, Mrs. M. A., 41 Beall St. 
Rossworm, Vitus. 35 Beall St. 
Rieg, Michael. 375 X. Centre St. 
Ruppert, Fred. W.. 4s Columbia Ave. 
Ruppert, Frank J.. 66 Ann St. 
Ruppert. Jacob P.. 151 Fayette St. 
Ruppert, Joseph H.. 48 Columbia Ave. 
Ruppert, J. Valentine, 106 Fayette St. 
Ruppert, Henry. 21 Decatur St. 
Rush. John. Sr.. 29 Fairview Ave. 
Reinhard, Mrs. Francis, 130 Bedford St. 

Reynolds, Mary, 13)4 N. Smallw 1 St. 

Rider, Joseph S., 34 Flat St. 
Reifmeier, Mrs. B., Cumberland. 
Ruppenkamp, Fred.. Oldtown Road. 
Ruppenkamp, Anthony, Oldtown Road. 
Ruppenkamp, Catharine, ' lldtown Road. 
Ruppenkamp, Mary, oldtown Road. 
Ruppenkamp, Joseph. Oldtown Road. 
Ruppenkamp, Sophia, Oldtown Road, 
Roehrig, Mathew, 163 Madison St. 



Obaker. Henry W.. Xarrows Park. 
O'Donnell. Norbert, Ridgely, W. V; 
O'Neill, Michael F., 35 S. Centre St. 
Ohr, Mrs. Mary, 11 Paca St. 



Paulis. John. Ridgely, W. Va. 
Pfeiffer, Christian, 124 Walnut St. 
Pfopp, Mrs. Magd., Coffman Road nr. 

Williams Road. 
Proctor, Mrs. Maria, 45 Green St. 
Peddicord. F. A.. Is Cumberland St. 
Piquett. Alfred ('.. National Pike Road 

nr. Clark's Distillery, 
Patterson. Mrs., 19 Carroll St. 
Pigman. Mrs. Nora, 12 Fnion St. 



Sanders, Mrs. Mary, 23 Frederick St. 

Shertzer, Mrs. Matilda, 15 Chestnut St. 

Schelhaus, John P., 123 Columbia Ave. 

Schelhaus. Mathias, 123 Columbia Ave. 
Ave. 

Schlunt, John J.. 270 N. Centre St. 

Schmitt, Aloysius, 200 Fayette St. 

Schmutz, Charles A.. 85 Highland Ave. 

Snyder, Andrew H.. 116 N. Centre St. 

Shober, Caspar C. 53 Union St. 

Schultz. Frank F., 41 South St. 

Schwankhaus, Michael, 410 X. Me- 
chanic St. 

Schwankhaus, ('., 410 N. Mechanic St. 

Sell, Charles A., 26 Hanover St. 

Sell, George J.. 176 Green St. 

Fell, James. Fayette St. ext. 



Saixts Pktki 



Paul's — Contii 



Sell, Joseph L., 108 Fayette St. 
Sell. Michael. 174 Green St. 
Sell. Mrs. M.. 174 Green St. 
Siefers, Frank, 41 Harrison St. 
Siefers. Joseph. 214 Bedford St. 
Siefers. Mrs. Mary, 11 Cumberland St. 
Smith. Mrs. Anna. 10 Baker St. 
Soethe. William Louis. Hill St. nr. 

Bedford St. 
Spindler, Louis H., 20 Elm St. 
Startler. Charles. Green St. ext. 
Stegmaier, A. J.. 246 Bedford St. 
Stegmaier. Ignatius B.. 211 X. Centre 

St. 
Stegmaier. Leonard, 24 S Bedford St. 

Steppe, John W., 61 S. Lee St. 

Steppe. John W. Jr.. 04 Paca St. 

Steppe. Louise. 293 Maryland Ave. 

Strohmenger, John T.. 105 Valley St. 

Strohmenger. Henry. 63 Valley St. 

Strohmenger. George. 149 Walnut St. 

Strohmenger. Peter, 149 Walnut St. 

Strohmenger, Frank J.. 149 Walnut 
St. 

Strohmenger, Agnes. 149 Walnut St. 

Strong, George W.. 319 X. Mechanic 
St. 

Stitcher. John. 52 Dilley St. 

Stitcher. William. 3 Lena St. 

Swach, Joseph. 109 Independence St. 

Sanders. .Mrs. Joseph. 120 Green St. 

Schupfer. Joseph. 195 Madison St. 

Schaldt, Mrs. Gertrude, Cumberland. 

Schelhaus. Mathias. 83 Valley St. 

Schosnadel. Charles. Outskirts. 

Sehoenadel. Charles. Jr., Outskirts. 

Schoenadel, Joseph, Outskirts. 

Schonter. Florence, 20 Hanover St. 

Shaver, Anthony, Mrs.. Springvale, 
cor. 3rd St. 

Soethe. Mrs. Bardara, 19:. Madison 
St. 

Soethe, Joseph. L95 Madison St. 

Soethe. John. Bedford Road. 

Stegmaier, John. Country. 

Schrimp, Mrs. Maty. 291 Maryland Ave. 



Taylor, Mrs. A.. :::: Hanover St. 
Taylor, Elmer, 155 Highland Ave. 
Thoma, .Mrs. Theodora. 195 Madii 



Troll, Joseph, 29 S. Smallwood St. 
Trost, John, 194 Baltimore Ave. 
Truog. George, 32 Baltimore Ave. 
Tully. Mrs. Catherine. 13% X. Small- 
wood St. 
Thumel, Theodore. 251 X. Centre St. 
Thumel. Henry E.. 251 X. Centre St. 
Thumel. A. Bernard. 251 X. Centre St. 
Treiber, Mrs. F.. 137 Columbia St. 



\\ 

Wagner, George. 9 Laing Ave. 
Wagner, Mrs. Walburga, 133 Highland 

Ave 
Wahl. Frank ,L. 63 X. Lee St. 
Wallace. Theodore. 128' _. Fayette St. 
Weber. Edward, loin Virginia Ave. 
Weber. Xieholas. Gleason. Mapleside. 
Wegman, Henry. 1 Waverly Terrace. 
Weise, E. J.. 154 Green St. 
Wempe. Frank. Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Wempe. John, Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Wempe. Joseph. Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Wempe, Mary C. Oldtown Road nr. 

South St. 
Wiesel. Joseph P., 29 X. Smallwood St. 
Wiesel. Michael L.. 29 X. Smallwood St. 
Wenner. D. Clarence. Beall St. cor. E. 

Potomac Ave. 
Wieman, John. 88 Fayette St. 
Wiesenmiller. Mrs. A.. 28 Bedford St. 
Wiesenmiller, Anna. 28 Bedford St. 
Wiesenmiller, Mrs. E., 2S Bedford St. 
Wiesenmiller. Mrs. M.. 28 Bedford St. 
Willard, Mrs. Mary. Cumberland. 
Wolf. Joseph, Knobley nr. Valley Road. 
Wolf, George. 15 Independence St. 
Wolf. Marquard. 4S Beall St. 
Wunder, Margaret. 55 Cumberland St. 
Walsh. Edward. Cumberland. 
Webster, James, 24 Frederick St. 
Wigger, Bernard. Country. 
Wild. Mrs. Joanna, 329 Bedford St. 
Wilson. Mrs. Elizabeth, Cumberland. 
Wintermeier, George. Pike. 



Tole, George. 1" 



CUMBERLAND COUNCIL, K. C. 

CUMBERLAND, MD. 



Compiled by J. V. McKenna. 

Cumberland Council No. 5S6, Knights of Columbus, with a Charter 
Membership of sixty members was instituted Sunday. July 14. 1901, and the 
credit for its formation at that time is due to Brother John J. Gibbons of 
East Liverpool, Ohio Council, who spent some time in Cumberland during 
the early Spring, 1901, and by his enthusiasm created an interest in the 
Order. Early in May the matter of organizing a council was taken up 
with the Past State Deputy. Wm. J. O'Brien of Baltimore, Md.. and a meet- 
ing was held in Carroll Hall on Sunday. May 17th. when the principles and 
objects of the Order were explained by Brother O'Brien. At this meeting 
committees were formed and within a week the work of organizing was 
well under way. After Mass at St. Patrick's Church, the institution took 
place at SS. Peter and Paul's Hall. The work was in charge of Past State 
Deputy O'Brien. The First and Second Degrees were conferred by Balti- 
more Councils, and the Third Degree by State Deputy Harry S. Cox and the 
Baltimore Degree Team, assisted by Rev. John J. Dowling and other mem- 
bers of the Johnstown Council. Between the Second and Third Degrees, 
an elaborate banquet was served at the Queen City Hotel, and at night the 
rooms of the Wampus Literary Association were turned over to the local 
knights, who entertained the visitors until the departure of their respective 
trains. 

The officers elected for the first term were: — Grand Knight. .1. V. 
McKenna; Deputy Grand Knight. G. D. Landwehr; Chaplain, Rev. E. J. 
Wunder; Chancellor, Rev. A. F. Marzecki; Financial Secretary, Frank L. 
Geary; Recorder, P. J. Seaver; Treasurer, R. I. Birmingham; Warden, M. 
F. O'Neill; Lecturer. H. J. Glick; Outside Guard. Chas. E. McEvoy; Inside 
Guard. Thos. E. Carney; Physician. R. Y. Fechtig; Trustees. J. P. McMullen, 
W. E. Dillon, E. P. Cohill. M. J. Corrigan and Thos. S. Kean. 

Cumberland Council had the honor of introducing the late Dr. D. J. 
Stafford to this community. He delivered his first lecture at the Academy 
of Music, May, 1902, the subject being "Macbeth." This was followed in 
successive years by lectures, •■Richard III," "King Lear," and "Hamlet." 
His last lecture being delivered in St. Patrick's Hall, May. 1907, and this 
was probably his last appearance on the lecture platform. 

Cumberland Council has given many entertainments for its members 
and friends; it is an active figure in Catholic social circles and is noted for 
its hospitality shown visiting knights. It has twice been honored by having 
a District Deputy appointed from its membership. J. V. McKenna being the 
first appointee, and he was succeeded by Jno. P. McMullen in May. 190S 

Cumberland Council had 120 members on its roll on January I. 1909, 
and since its institution has furnished the nucleus for councils at Piedmont, 
W. Va., .Midland. Mil., and Mount Savage, Md. 

Upon the invitation of Cumberland Council the State Convention of 
tin Knights of Columbus met at Cumberland in .May. L90S. Tnis was the 
first time the State Council had been called together outside of Baltimore. 
At this convention two members of Cumberland Council were honored by 
the State body, viz: — R. I. Birmingham having been elected State Advocate, 
and Jno. P. McMullen Alternate to National Convention at St. Louis, Mo. 

This Council has shown its interest in matters educational by offering 
prizes to the honor pupils at St. Patrick's, SS. Peter and Paul's ami St. 
Mary's Parochial Schools, and La Salle Institute conducted by the Christian 
Brothers. 

93 



P. J. Smith Company 

INCORPORATED 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 




^ 



FOR QUALITY 



China. Silv 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 
EMBLEMS 



\4 



CUMBERLAND 



MARYLAND 











DAINTY CREATIONS MODERATE PRICES 

MISS VERNA HOLT 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER 

Jf me JWtllmerp 




25 N. CENTRE ST. 
CUMBERLAND. MD. 

N. B.--I ENJOY A LARGE PATRONAGE. LOCAL AND UP 
THE CREEK.' GIVE ME YOUR NEXT VISIT. 









Ci \ 1 1 -. i k i \\i> Coi m ii. K. C. — Continued. 



The Roster of the Charter Members is as follows 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



Joseph A. Ahem. 
Patrick Barrett. 
R. I. Birmingham. 
Frank Brinker. 
J as. I. Carney. 
Thos. E. Carney. 

E. P. Cohill. 
W. F. Coleman. 
M. F. Coleman. 
Martin Connelly. 
M. J. Corrigan. 
Jos. C. Corrigan. 
W. E. Dillon. 

R. Y. Fechtig. 
B. J. Finan. 
J. F. Finan. 
Thos. B. Finan. 

F. L. Geary. 
F. W. Getty. 
0. G. Getty. 

Rev. T. E. Gallagher. 
H. J. Glick. 
Jos. A. Gonder. 

E. R. Grant. 

L. F. Harbaugh. 

F. T. Kean. 
Thos. S. Kean. 
M. J. Kearney. 
Rev. G. M. Kelley. 
Thos. P. Kenney. 



\V. F. Kerber. 

H. J. Koelker. 
G. D. Landwehr. 
R. M. Lynch. 
Jos. L. Mansfield. 
W. F. Mansfield. 
Rev. A. F. Marzecki. 
Aaron May. 
Taylor Morrison. 
C. H. McEvoy. 
Jas. A. McHenry. 
J. J. McHugh. 
E. P. McKenna. 
J. V. McKenna. 
J. P. McMullen. 

E. P. O'Neill. 
\V. H. O'Neill. 
J. A. Rinehart. 

F. W. Rowe. 
J. J. Ryland. 
P. J. Seaver. 
Jos. E. Schriver. 
J. E. Spiker. 

J. J. Stapleton. 
H. C. Walker. 
W. E. Walsh. 
W. R. Williams. 
F. A. Wolfhope. 
Rev. E. J. Wnnder. 



CATHOLIC KNIGHTS OF AMERICA 



St. George's Branch No. 33, C. K. of A., was organized January L'lst. 
1879. The Charter was signed by the following members: — Peter Helbig, 
Andrew H. Herbert, Harman M. Steppe. George A. Coleman, Henry Boley, 
Jacob Hammersmith, John H. Borgman, George E. Strong. Edward Manley, 
Alexander Leasure, Peter Hart, George Beckley, Peter Zellers. Arthur 
G reaver. 

Peter Hart and Harman M. Steppe are the only members living who 
signed the Charter. The Catholic Knights of America has paid out through 
Branch No. 33 about $4!i,000.00 to the widows and orphans of its deceased 
members. 

Branch No. 33 has at this time 140 members in good standing, and all 
practical Catholics. Branch No. 33 is also affiliated with the Catholic 
Federation of the United States, and the Allegany County, Maryland, Fed- 
eration. Branch No. 33 meets in SS. Peter and Paul's Hall the third 
Sunday of each month at 7.30 P. M. The officers at the present time are: — 
Spiritual Director, Rev. Father Thomas; President, George I. Stegmaier; 



First Vice-President, Andrew J. Stegmaier; Second Vice-President, Floyd 
W. Giles; Recording Secretary, Peter Bareis; Financial Secretary, George 
.1 Fletchinger; Treasurer, Theodore Thumel; Sergeant-at-Arms, George H. 
Mart/.; Sentinel, John Gellner; Trustees. August H. Fogtman, Henry B. 
Brown, Robert F. McEvoy. 

Compile:! by Theodore Thumel. 



SAINTS PETER AND PAUL'S GERMAN ROMAN CATHOLIC 
BENEFICIAL SOCIETY, CUMBERLAND, MD. 



incorporated January 2d, 1869. 

The following members signed the Charter: — W'eyand Doerner, Richard 
Bender, Caspar Reichert, Henry Hensler. Joseph Wagner. George Pirmer, 
Joseph Ackerman. 

The only living member of the above named is Mr. Henry Hensler, whose 
present age is 7 8 years. He is still very active. 

The officers for the year 1869 were: — Weyand Doerner. President; 
George Roesch. Vice-President; George Pirmer. Secretary; Richard Bender, 
Treasurer; -Michael Fessenmeier, Sr., Adam Wahl, Anthony Gerdeman. Joseph 
Wagner, Joseph Boekler, Michael Kilhepp. John Koch, Committee. 

Mr. Anthony Gerdeman is the only surviving officer of that time. His 
age is about 7 3 years. He is at present messenger for the Society, and is still 
able to perform his duty. 

The members of this Society have, since its organization. 1869, taken 
care of and nursed many sick members. Paid out of its treasury quite a 
sum of money for Sick an i Funeral Benefits. The membership at this time 
is over 20 members in good standing. The monthly meetings are held the 
First Monday of each month at 8 P. M. The present officers are as follows: 
Rev. Father Peter. O. M. Cap., Spiritual Director; Theodore Thumel. Presi- 
dent; Joseph I. Habig, Vice-President; John Wempe. Recording Secretary; 
Godfried Koetchenreuter, Financial Secretary; Martin Rohman, Treasurer; 
Frederick Soethe. Marshal; Anthony Gerdeman, Messenger; William L. 
Nehring, Chairman, Frank Ruppert, Charles Miller. John L. Mullan. M. 
George Miller. Michael Minke, Anthony Minke, Peter Bareis. Committee. 

Compiled by Theodore Thumel. 



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MAKER OF 



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115 BALTIMORE STREET, 



CUMBERLAND, MD. 



The Catholic people know us 
We want all others to know us 



CASH BUYS CHEAPER 
HERE THAN ELSEWHERE 



FURNITURE^ 



Rugs, Mattings, Refrigerators 
Go-Carts, Pictures and Stoves 




EVERYTHING IN THE STORE WILL BE SOLD 
FOR CASH, REGARDLESS OF WHAT IT COST 



COME HERE FOR BARGAINS 



CUMBERLAND FURNITURE CO. 

52 North Centre Street, Cumberland 

N. B. — We make a specialty of completely furnishing Rectories 
and Church Institutions. Special terms to the Catholic Clergy, 
Churches and Institutions. 

5% discount to those who mention the Catholic Red Book 



CLARK maker of PORTRAITS 

Have you any old and highly prized picture you would like a 
large portrait made from ? 

We can do it. Any style, Crayon, 
Watercolor or Pastel. 

Do you want a first-class photo of your 
Father, Mother, Sister, Brother or Baby ? 
Bring them in. We will make a LIKE- 
NESS. 

Do you use a kodak ? We will develop 
your films and print your pictures. In fact 
EVERYTHING in the photo line, we 
make. Our number is 

115 BALTIMORE STREET 
CUMBERLAND, MD. 




Give us a call. Engagements can be made by phone, 
W. M. No. Ill B 



JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 

GEO. A. BOWMAN 

Contractor and Builder 

133 Grand Avenue, Cumberland, Md. 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED 



M. PHONE 332-A 




REV. JOHN R. ROTH 



If it's advertised elsewhere, it's cheaper here 

We want the Catholic people — and all others generalh — to know 
a few of the advantages gained by patronizing "Our Store" the 

"DAYLIGHT STORE" 

THE CO-OPERATIVE SUPPLY CO.'S STORE 

conducted solely on a "modest purse" plan, where all the 
recognized brands of 

GrOCer/eS— Staple and Fancy 

Meats — Smoked, Salt, Fresh 

Vegetables — According to Season 

and, in fact, anything to be had in a well stocked Grocery 
and Provision Store, can be had cheaper than elsewhere. 

The "Daylight Store" has an up-to-date stock of 

Dry Goods, Notions, General Merchandise 
. . . and House Furnishing Goods . . . 

Quality is Supreme Prices are Right 

The Co-Operative Supply Co. 

VIRGINIA and LAING AVENUES 
CUMBERLAND, MD. 

CHAS. A. SMELTZ, Treasurer and General Manager Both Phones 



X. B. — The "Daylight Store" ha- l.een newly renovated ami remodeled to meet 
the requirements of a fast increasing trade. We invite an inspection. If our goods 
please you, tell your friends — if not, iellu.'. 



SKETCH OF ST. MARY'S CHURCH 

CUM e ERLAND, MD. 



Rev. .1. R. ROTH. Pastor. 

The first church edifice, a log structure, erected at Cumberland, probably 
about the year 1792, was dedicated to the Mother of God. and known as St. 
.Mary's Church. This log structure was replaced by a brick building about 
1837. The number of Catholics continued to increase, and a larger church 
became necessary. When this larger edifice was begun, it was considered 
well to change the name of the church, and place it under the patronage of 
St. Patrick. 

As the southern end of the city was being rapidly built up. due. principally 
to the improvements of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, another church became 
imperative. The cornerstone for this, the third Catholic Church in Cumberland, 
was laid September 9th, 1900, and it was placed under the patronage of the 
Blessed Virgin Mary, as had been the first church in Cumberland, and, in all 
probability, in Allegany County, 'litis new St. Mary's Church was dedicated and 
opened for divine service early in 1901. The first regularly appointed pastor, 
took up his residence at St. Mary's on March 4th, 1903. Soon thereafter the 
erection of a school, convent ami pastoral residence was undertaken. The cor- 
nerstone for the school was laid May 24th, 1903. The school opened with 119 
children in attendance December 15th., 1903. This number steadily increased 
so that at the end of the school year in 1904 more than 250 children had been 
enrolled and were in attendance. 



ORDER OF SERVICES. 

Sundays — Low Mass with short instruction at 7.30 a.m. Sunday-School at 
9.15 a.m. High Mass and Sermon at 10 a.m. Baptism at 4 p.m. 
Beads, Vespers and Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at 7.30 
p. m. 

Holy Days of Obligation — Low Mass at 6 a. m. High Mass and Sermon at 
a. m. Vespers and Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at 
7.3 1) p. m. 

Week Days — Mass at 7.30 a. m., attended by the school children. Mass from 
July to September at 7 a. m. 

First Fridays in the Month.— Holy Communion at 6.30 a. m. Mass at 7.30 a. m. 
Sacred Heart Devotions and Benedictions of the Most Blessed Sacrament 
at 7.30 p. m. 

During Lenten Season — On Wednesdays. Beads. Sermon and Benediction of 
the Most Blessed Sacrament at 7.30 p. in. On Fridays, Stations of the 



Sketch of St. Mary's Church— Continued. 

Cross and Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at 7.30 p. m. 
Devotions to Blessed Virgin during May and October at 7.30 p. m. 

Confessions. — Saturdays, from -I to 6 in the afternoon and from 7 in the even- 
ing until all are heard. Eves of Feasts and First Fridays, from 4 to 6 
and 7 to S.30 p. in. Sundays, from 7.10 to 7.30 a. m. Week days, from 
7.10 to 8.30 a. m. (when notified beforehand). Confessions for children, 
who have not made their first Holy Communion, are heard on the Tues- 
days of the four Ember Weeks of the year, from 10 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 
4 p. m. 



SOCIETIES. 

Holy Name Society for men from the age of 17 meets every second Sunday 
in the month at 7.30 p. m. The members receive Holy Communion in a 
body on the second Sunday in January. April. July and October. 

Sodality of the Blessed Virgin meets every first Sunday in the month at 
3 p. m. The members receive Holy Communion every first Sunday in 
the month. 

The Children of Mary receive Holy Communion on the third Sunday of every 
month, and meet for instruction at 3 p. m. The children who have made 
their first Holj Communion are to attend these until the age of 1G, when 
they are to join either the Holy Name Society, or the Sodality of the 
Blessed Virgin. 

The League of the Sacred Heart meets every First Friday at 7.30 p. m. The 
promoters meet every fourth Sunday of the month at 7 p. m. 

The Sanctuary Society meets on the second Sunday of the month at 7 p. m. 
The monthly Mass for the members is offered up on that Sunday. 

The Debt Association meets on the third Sunday of the month at 7 p. m. and 
on that Sunday the Mass is offered for the members. 



PARISHIONERS 

A Bealky. A. W., Chestnut. Mapleside. 

Andrews. J. Chestnut, Mapleside. Birmingham, J. F.. 49 Oldtown Road. 

Albright, Miss C. E., G Laing Avenue. Black. W. M.. 145 Thomas St. 

Artz. Mrs., 3 Lee St. Blaul, Mrs. A. W., 178 Virginia Ave. 

Ashkettle, J. L., Virginia Ave. ext. Borgman, J. H., 7S Wine St. 



B 



Boyd. J. W., 10 Arch St. 
Brady, O. J., 191 Virginia A\ 



A., 1N7 Seymour St. Breighner, C. D.. 215 King St. 



M 



Breighner, J., 903 Virginia Ave. 
Breighner, W. P., 119 Grand Ave. 
Brinker, John. Oldtown Road nr. South 

St 
Brinker. Mrs. M., Oldtown Road nr. 

South St. 
Brookman, F. H., 1101 Lafayette i.ve 
Broskey. S., 162 Homer St. 
Brown. G. L.. 4:1 Wine St. 
Burke, P. W.. 60 Seymour St. 
Burns, John T.. 154 Race St. 
Bums. Michael J., L59 Grand Ave. 
Buskey, A. C, Coffman nr. Oldtown 

Road. 
Buskey, George, Coffman nr. Oldtown 

Road. 
Buskey, Miss Kate, Coffman, nr. Old- 
town Road. 
Bartik, .1. .1.. 167 Homer SI 
Berk, C. .1.. First St. 
Beall, .Mrs. M., Wine St. 
Beck, .Mrs. A.. First St. 
Brinkman, II. C, York Plat e 
Brinker. Mrs. L., Oldtown Road 
Burns, Mrs. Hugh, Grand Ave. 



Donohoe, Coleman, ill Grand Ave. 
Donohoe, H. M., 1 IT Grand Ave. 
Duffy, Mrs. Bridget A.. Oak Cor. 2nd 

St. 
Duffy. Patrick H.. Oak cor. 2nd St. 
I letzek, J., Williams Road. 



II. J.. 9 
Edwards, Mrs. 



K 

Penns 



ania Ave. 

Elder St. 



I 

F::h..>. Frank A., 46 Elder St. 

Fahey, Thomas. 59 Elder St. 

feeney, Bartholomew. 206 Virginia 

Ave. 
Feeney, 1'. L . Mapleside. 

C. R., 62 N I. ie St. 
Fleckenstein, .Mis. A.. IS Browning St. 
Flaming. P.. Wifliams Road. 
Fogarty, .Mrs. M.. Williams Road. 
nberg, Mrs. M.. Lexingto 



Canty, M. J.. In i Cra id St. 
Clark, E. B., 171 Grand St. 
Clancey, Mr. and Mrs. John, 5 Craw- 
ford St. 
Clay. Henry M.. 1003 Lexington Ave. 
Codire, C. J., 7U Seymour St. 
Coniff, J. S., 117 Arch St. 
Connelly. Edward. 113 Arch St. 
c nnellj . Martin, 90 Seymour St. 
Conwa> . Mrs. E . 96 Virginia Ave. 
Conway. H. .!.. 90 Virginia Ave. 
Conway. Mrs. W. G., L64 Virginia Ave. 
Coom s . Mrs. Mai j V. 35 Thomas St. 
Crogan, Mis. James C, 83 5th St. 
Coj le, Pati i k 22 Sej mour St. 
Calvin. II I... Oldtown Road. 
Cherveki, E.. William St. 
Cook, Christopher, Fifth SI 
Crosby, Mrs. A., Wine St. 



Dan w i 

ker, I 

I tonegan, 



P 
Ganley, .Mary. 198 Kirn St. 
Ganlej . Thomas L9S Race St. 
Grabenstein, F. J., 58 Arch St. 
Grady, Miss Estella, Oldtown Road 

opp. Seymour St. 
Gn en, Mrs. J., 1 13 Virginia Ave 
Green, G. J., 163 Thomas St. 
Griffin, Mrs. T. T., 70 Oldtown Roa i. 

Mrs. Charles, 25 5th St. 
Grayson, Lillian E., Mapli 
Grabenstein, Mrs. J. C. Williams 

Road 



II 

Hanifin John L23 Pennsylvania i.ve 
Hanifin, Mi ihael, -I 5tb St. 

Harris. Eliza. 34 Rolling Mill Alley. 
Hansel. Joseph C, 91 South St. 
Hensel, Miss Elizabeth, 154 Thomas St. 
Hession, M. E., 23 1st St, 

HouCk, H. A .. 91 Man Si 



Sketch of 






Hopkins. James, 94 ■, Maryland Ave. 
Huth. Mrs. E., Stewart Ave. nr. Old- 
town Road. 
Hall. P. R„ Offutt St. 
Hogan. R.. Oldtown Road. 
Hopkins. P., Oldtown Road. 



Jones. .1. C, 29 Baker St. 
Jasket. J.. Mapleside. 
Johnson. .Mrs. M. B., Thomas St. 
Joyce. F. J., Arch St. 



Kabosky, A.. 139 Williams Road. 

Kastner. F. M., to Laing Ave. 

Keech, J. E., 181 Virginia Ave. 

Keech, H. I.. 118 Oak St. 

Kelley. C. R., Oldtown Road. 

Keiley, W. M., L25 Grand Ave. 

Kerns, Mrs. A.. Boone St. 

King, Patrick, 11 Race St. 

King, Stephen, 43 Race St. 

King. P. F., 11 Race St. 

Kvacsak, A.. 8 South St. and B. & 0. 

R. R. 
Kyne, Thomas, 112 Oak St. 
Kean, M., Oldtown Road. 
Kelly, P. J.. Oldtown Road. 
King, \\\. Grand Axe. 



Laing, F. X.. Mapleside. 

Laing, Mrs. H.. 1th cor. South St. 

Laing, J., 35 Fayette St. 

Leasure, A.., 13 South St. 

Luke, M., Fairview Ave. Mapleside. 

Luke, Mrs. F. J., Fairview Ave., Maple 

Side. 

M 

McClain, Mrs. J.. 179 Arch St. 
M( Donald. G. \V.. 23 Boone St. 
McDonald. J. '!'.. Maple Ave, Maple 

McDonald, J., Oldtown Road. 
McDonald, W.. 825 Virginia Ave. 

Mi I aid, W. s, 8 Boone St. 

McElfish, Mrs. m. F., 92 Virginia Ave 



McGowan, J.. SI Race St. 
McHugh, .1. M., 142 Virginia Ave. 
McHugh, Miss K., 142 Virginia Ave. 
McHugh. Patrick. 142 Virginia Ave. 
McHugh, Thomas, 142 Virginia Ave. 
McNamee, J., 135 Pennsylvania Ave. 
McNerney, J. C, 21 Grand St. 
Mackert, W. X.. 123 Thomas St. 
Mackin, Patrick J.. 68 Seymour St. 
Maffli y, J. II., 105 5th St. 
Mattingly, W. F.. 146 Thomas St. 
Mattingly, Miss M., 146 Thomas St. 
Matthews. Mrs. Jeanette, Chestnut, 

Mapleside. 
Miller. G., 184 Virginia Ave. 
Moran, M. P.. Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Moore, J. E., 161 Grand Ave. 
Mouse, Mis. M., 58 Virginia Ave. 

Mrs. J., 13 Boone St. 
Murray. J., 156 Pennsylvania Ave. 
McCormick. J., Grand Ave. 
McCulley, E., Virginia Ave. extended. 
vlattingly, J, F., York Place cor. Fort 

St. 



Nee, J. A.. 16S Arch St. 
Xiland, Mrs. S.. 20 Thomas St. 
Nicholson. J., Williams Road. 

O 

O'Neal, J.. 2: Race St. 
O'Leary, E., 200 Grand Ave. 
O'Toole. D.. 79 Taylor St. 
O'Toole. J.. 79 Taylor St. 
O'Leary, Mrs. R.. 4 Lament St. 
O'Leary. Richard, 4 Lamont St. 
Oleweski, P., Mapleside. 



Pendergast, S. 1'.. 143 Grand St. 
Pendergast, T. .1.. 88 Seymour St. 
Price, E. M., 81 Taylor Si. 



It 

Reynolds, W., 277 Columbia Ave. 
Riley, Owen, 7 Crawford St. 
Roonej P i i v.. It Place. 

Roonej . Miss J. V., 11 York Place. 
K.i ill. > . Miss M. A.. 11 York Place. 



Ski.tc ii OF Si. J 

Kwi it. J. P., Williams Road. 

Russler, Mrs. X. \\\. 29 Boone St. 
Ratke. S., 155 South St. 
Repliam. .Mrs. \\\, North Branch. 
Rowley, F.. Williams Road. 



Seaders. J. F., 20 Pennsylvania Ave. 

Sebold, P. F.. 20 Boone St. 

Schultz, F., 41 South St. 

Shaw. Mrs. A.. 89 Williams Road. 

Shields, E.. 49 Elder St. 

Schriver, Mrs. A.. Springvale St. 

Smith, E. B., 132 Arch St. 

Soethe. C. J., Williams Road. 

Spearman. Andrew. 54 Oldtown Road 

Spicer, Miss Catherine. 122 Grand Ave. 

Spicer, L. H., 16S Arch St. 

Spicer. .!. H.. Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Straub, H. A.. 70 Seymour St. 
Suman. L. H.. 9 York Place. 
Snyder, Mrs. Clarence, 16S Grand Ave. 
Schriver, J. S.. Springvale St. 
Schriver, W. M., Springvale St. 



W 

Wat kins. .1. p.. 49 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Weber, J. Y., Chestnut, Mapleside. 
Wempe, F. A.. Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Wempe, Mrs. F.. Oldtown Road nr. 

South St. 
Wempe, .1. !'., Oldtown Road nr. South 

St. 
Wempe, .Miss Agnes. Oldtown Road nr. 

South St. 
Wempe, Martin. Oldtown Road nr. 

South St. 
Wempe. Miss M. C, Oldtown Road nr. 

South St. 
Westbrooke. .Mrs. V, G., v\ Wineow 

St. 
Wheeler. E. L.. 139 Arch St. 
White. .Mrs. C. R„ ., Laing Ave. 
Williams. J. F.. 27 Laing Ave. 
Winfield, .1. .1.. 79 South St. 
Walsh. .1.. 19 South St. 
White. C. J.. 128 Race St. 
Wolf. Max. Grand Ave. 
Wyant. I'.. Oldtown Road. 



Thompson, Miss Elizabeth, 121 Grand 

Ave. 
Thompson. Miss L,., 121 Grand Ave. 

on, O., 121 Grand Ave. 
Troxell. G. W.. Oldtown Road. 



Yost. J. 
Young, 



'.. Lexington Ave. 
Lexington Ave. 



Van Meeter, Mrs Ed\\ m V., 281 Vi 
ginia Ave. 



Zakradka. Frank. 10 Robert St. 
Zakradka, Samuel, 10 Robert St. 
Zarvacki, J.. Wine St. 




ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH 

Frostbui'g, Md. 



kl ANNAN. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



OF FROSTBURG, Ml). 

Capital $50,000 Assets Over $1,000,000 

Surplus $70,000 

DIRECTORS 

ROBERT R. HENDERSON TIMOTHY GRIFFITH 

DUNCAN SINCLAIR DANIEI- ANNAN 

IH >BER DEAD AN N A N 



L'GHIA' EQUIPPED IN A 1 .1 . ITS II Ha: 
ACCOUNTS OF THOSE DESIRING 
It ANKI.N'<; FACILITIES 

ER CENT. INTEREST PAID OX SAVINGS DEP 



THE 



CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK 



FROSTBURG, MD. 

Capital $50,000 Assets $700,000 

Surplus and Profits $72,000 

Th,s Bank solicits your business on the basis of fair treatment, prompt 
and liberal service. 

Our Savings Department is well equipped to handle accounts, both 
large and small. 

$1.00 WILL ST ART AN ACCOUNT 

D. ARMSTRONG. President FRANK WATTS. Cashier. 

DIRECTORS 

DAVISSON ARMSTRONG W ARTHUR HITCHINS 

THOMAS HUMBERTSON HARRY B COLBORN 

J. S BROPHY FRANK WATTS 

HOWARD HITCHINS A J, WILLISON 




REV. STEPHEN J. CLARKE 



ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH 

FROSTBURG, MD. 



At an elevation of over two thousand feet above the level of the sea, 
among the Allegheny Hills, is built the substantial city of Frostburg. 

With ten thousand inhabitants the thriving little municipality is 
one of the garden spots of Western Maryland, and is appropriately known 
as "The City on the Hill." 

In the beginning Frostburg was a mission of Mt. Savage. The first 
priest that celebrated .Mass in what is now Frostburg, was Father John .1. 
Chanche, who visited there in ] S :j » . It is likely that Father Chanche, who 
was president of St .Mary's College at Baltimore, at that time was enjoying 
a month's vacation, because even in the early days the air of the invigorating 
hills of this section had gained an attractive reputation among health 
seekers. Dr. Chanche was born in Baltimore October -1. 1795, where his 
parents had come from San Domingo. He entered the Sulpitian College 
at the age of eleven and had the tonsure bestowed upon him by Archbishop 
Carroll when but fifteen years of age. and was ordained in June 1819 by 
Archbishop Marechal. 

From a professor at St. Mary's College he became vice-president and 
in 1834, president of that college. Proposed for coadjutor at Boston and 
New York he declined. In July. 1837, Dr. Chanche was named to the See 
of Natchez. In 1802. he was one of the foremost organizers of the First 
Plenary Council. Several days after the (lose of this memorial gathering 
he went to Frederick, where he died on July 22, 1S53. 

The first pastor of Frostburg was Rev. .Michael Slatiery in the last of 
the 'til's. Services were first held in the home of John Porter. Later the 
old inn "Highland Hall," was purchased and partially remodeled into a place 
of worship. This was in L852. 

These first years were a period of hardship and courage for Father 
Slattery, but he was a sturdy organizer ami by reading in an 1 reading out 
he gathered together four or five hundred faithful followers. The church 
at Frostburg was given the name of St. Michael's. In I860 Father Slattery 
was removed to St. Joseph's Church, Baltimore, and died in 1866. 

For two years after Father Slatterly's departure, Frostburg became a 
mission to Mt. Savage. 

In 1862 St. Michael's was in charge of Rev. Charles O'Reilly. In 1 S64 
the Redemptorist Fathers of Cumberland took charge and especially remem- 
bered were Fathers Wirth and Gross. After the Reiemptorists came Rev. 
William H. Cross, who afterward became Bishop of Savannah. In October, 
1866, Father Lewis A. Morgan was made resident pastor and remained until 
1868 He was succeeded by Father Valentine Schmitt in February, 1868. 
And with Father Schmitt came the crowning glory of the Church of Frost- 
burg. A Bavarian by birth, Father Schmitt began his studies in his native 
country, and finished at St. Mary's Seminary, having been ordained in L868. 
And though his first charge Father Schmitt's connection \\ ii li St Michael's "ill 
forever last. He built the beautiful Gothic Church which is the glory of 
the mountains. Father Morgan had seen the corner stone laid on August :'. 
1868, but Father Schmitt designed the church as it stands. The old hall 
llo 




FATHER CUDDY, ASSISTANT PASTOR ST. MICHAEL'S. 
Frostburg, Md. 



St. Ai en \el's Chi rch -Continued. 

was demolished and a rectory of the most approved type erected. Likewise 
a cemetery was purchased on McCulloh's Hill. The graves of the founders 
of Frostburg nave a special resting place in front of St. Michael's Church, 
which is marked by a beautiful monument and inscribed: 

THE FOUNDERS OF FROSTBURG, L812 



In .Memory of In .Memory of 

MESHACK FROST, CATHERINE FROST. 

Died, October 9, 1S63. Died July 24, 1876, 

Aged. 76 Years. Aged, 84 Years. 

During Father Sc-hmitt's pastorate, which ende i with his call to St. 
Joseph's Church. Washington, D. C. he made improvements costing sixty 
thousand dollars. 

Father Schmitt was succeeded by Rev. D. C. DeWolf. who remained in 
Frostburg until April. LS90, haying been formerly pastor of Westernport. 
Fathei DeWolf was much beloved by his congregation, but hem- called to 
Europe, he was succeeded by Rev. Stephen J. Clarke. 



Rev. STEPHEN J. CLARKE, Pastor. 
Rev. JOHN S. CUDDY. Assistant. 

The present pastor. Rev. Father Stephen J. Clarke, assumed charge of St. 
Michael's Church, Frostburg, Md., April 10, 1890, having been transferred from 
Barton. Md., and immediately set about to erect a school sufficient to meet the 
regulation of the large palish, with the aid of his able assistant. Father Dennis 
M. McCormick, now pastor of St. Joseph's Church. Baltimore. Md. The work 
progressed and the corner stone was laid June 20, 1891. Rev. John D. Boland. 
then pastor of St. Vincent's Church. Baltimore. Md.. and pastor of St. Pius' 
Church at the time of his death, last autumn (1908), officiating at the cere- 
mony. His Eminence James Cardinal Gibbons dedicated the building in 
October, 1891, and upon that occasion Re\ Thomas J. Broderick delivered a 
masterful sermon. 

Through Father Clarke's aggressive policy of improving the parish property 
came the handsome Ursuline Convent, the Mother House of the Ursuline Sister- 

h 1. in charge of Mother Ignatius and Mother Bernadine. The Mother House 

was dedicated to the Glory of God by Bishop Alfred A. Curtis, of the Cathedral, 
Baltimore. Md.. when again Rev. John D Boland. or "Father" Boland as he was 
known to the people of Frostburg and vicinity, delivered the sermon. 

Father Noland. recently appointed assistant pastor at St. Man's, Lonaconing, 
Md.. was formerly assistant at St. Michael's. Rev. John S. Cuddy now assistant 
pastor of St. Michael's, was transferred from St. Mary's Star of the Sea, Balti- 
more. Md.. in 1905. 

HOURS OF SERVICE. 
Sundays. Masses at 7 and 9 o'clock. High Mass at 10.30 o'clock. Sunday 

School at 3.00 1". M. Vespers at 7 30 P. M. 
Week Days. Masses at Ij.llli and 7. oil A. M . 

Services during Week. First Friday of the Month. -Exposition of Blessed 

Sacrament. Devotions of the Sacred Heart. 
Special. First Sunday of the Month. Meeting of the Holy Name Society, 

with special sermon. 



Mich/ 



i— Li 



Blessed Virgin Mary Sodality every Third Sunday at 3 00 P. M. 

Angels Sodality every Second Sunday at 3.0 P. M. 

Cadets of Temperance every Second Sunday at 2.00 P. M. 

N. B. — Supra Services. 

Lenten Services. — Sermon on Wednesday and Sunday nights at 7.30 P. M. 

Stations of the Cross on Fridays at 3.00 and 7.30 P. M. 
Missions. — Holy Family Church, Grantsville. Mass once a month — Third 

Sunday. 
St. Ann's Church. Avilton.— Mass every Third Sunday. 



PARISHIONERS 



Aedem, Mrs. Frosthurg. 
Adams, Fred., Huffman. 
Atkinson, William. Garrett County. 
Aedem. Mrs., Frostburg. 

15 

Barry, Thomas, Eckhart, 

Bayle, Dennis, Eckhart. 

Brady, Darby, (Sexton) Frostburg. 

Betz, Henry, Eckhart. 

Barry, Edward. Eckhart. 

Byrnes, John, Eckhart. 

Bahen, Mrs, Con., Frostburg. 

Blake. Philip. Eckhart. 

Browne, William, Garrett Co. 

Bryson, John, Blan Avon. 

Barrette, Mrs., Frostburg. 

Brode, Philip. Huffman! 

Bait, Mrs.. Huffman. 

Boyle. Peter, Eckhart. 

Brode. George. Huffman. 

Brady, .lohn. Frostburg. 

Baker. Dennis, Washington Hollow. 

Baxter. Mrs., Frostburg. 

Bennett, Mrs.. Eckhart. 

Brady, Anna, Frostburg. 

Brady. Patrick. Eckhart. 

Brady. Michael, Washington Hollow. 

Broderick, Stephens, Frostburg. 

Brown. Mrs., Eckhart. 

Byrnes, Lawrence, Eckhart. 

Brophy, John, Frostburg. 

Byrnes, Bernard. Frostburg. 

Boyle, Dennis, Eckhart. 

Birmingham, William, Frostburg. 

Brown. Phillip. Frostburg. 

Brady, Thomas, Frosthurg. 

Bahen, Dennis. Frostburg. 

Blake, Oscar, Frostburg. 



Barrett. Esther. Frostburg. 
Bahen, Mrs. Con., Frostburg. 
Bryson, John, Blan Avon. 
Barrette, Mrs., Frostburg. 
Byrnes, Bernard, Frostburg. 
Boyle, Dennis, Eckhart. 



Campbell. Clara. Frostburg. 
Carroll, Peter, Frostburg. 
Cordial, Peter. Eckhart. 
Coleman, Patrick, Midlothian. 
Cain, Henry. Vale Summit. 
Crowe. Rosa, Welsh Hill. 
Carney, James, Allegany. 
Condon. Thomas. Eckhart. 
Cain. Peter, Vale Summit. 
Chambers. John, Frostburg. 
Cosgrove, Mrs. P.. Borden Shaft. 
Condon, Michael, Frostburg. 
Coyne, Mrs. D.. Eckhart. 
Cain, Thomas. Vale Summit. 
Crentzburg, George, Eckhart. 
Counahan, John, Frostburg. 
Cosgrove. Janus. Frostburg. 
Cosgrove, Martin. Frostburg. 
Cronin, William. Frostburg. 
Colgan. Mrs. C. Washington Hollow. 
Cronly, James. Eckhart. 
Conlon. Patrick. Frostburg. 
Conlon, John, Allegany. 
Carney, Kate. Frostburg. 
Conner. John. Frostburg. 
Cunningham, Michael, Garrett Co. 
Cunningham. Michael, Carlos, Garrett 

County. 
Cain, Peter P., Vale Summit. 
Cosgrove, Thomas, Frostburg. 
Chabol, Louis, Eckhai t. 
Conroj Mr Peter, Vale Summit. 



Mi 



- Church— Continue. 



Close, Wallace. Eckliart. 
Canning, .John. Midlothian. 
Counihan, John. Frostburg. 
Cronin, Agnes, Frostburg. 
Cronin, Patrick, Frostburg. 
Conway. Peter. Eekhart. 
Conroy, Dr., Frostburg. 
Conway, .Mrs. Patrick, Frostburg. 
Carey. Daniel. Garrett County. 
Cunningham, William. Frostburg. 
Conlon. Frank. Frostburg. 
Cruise, Marie, Frostburg. 
Creutzburg, George, Frostburg. 
Condon, .1. .1 . Eekhart. 
Counahan. John. Frostburg. 
Cunningham. Michael Carlos, Gar- 
rett Co. 
Chabol, Louis, Eekhart. 
Conroy. Mr. Peter. Vale Summit. 
Canning. John. Midlothian. 
Cronin. Pat.. Frostburg. 
Conroy, Dr.. Frostburg. 

I) 

Davis. Edward. Eekhart. 
Dowling. Mrs. M.. Eekhart. 
Donahue. John. Frostburg. 
Dyer. J.. Frostburg. 
Dundon, Mrs. M.. Eekhart. 
Drum. John. Vale Summit. 
Duffy. James. Eekhart. 
Dillon. Thomas. Frostburg. 
Delaney. W., Vale Summit. 
Delaney. P.. Vale Summit. 
Delaney. Thomas, Frostburg. 
Decker. Edward. Eekhart. 
Hilly, Mr., Vale Summit. 
Doolen. Michael. Frostburg. 
Donahue. Mis. M., Eekhart. 
Donahue. Edward. Frostburg. 
Donahue. William. Frostburg. 
Devine, M. A.. Frostburg 
Dundon, George, Eekhart. 
Dundon. John, Eekhart. 
Drum. James, Vale Summit. 
Dougherty. Max. Welsh Hill. 
Dailey, Mrs. Peter. Vale Summit. 
Dailey. William. Frostburg. 
Dougherty. Mary. Frostburg. 
Dundon, Mis. M., Frostburg. 
Dennison, M. li.. Borden Shalt. 
Drum, Francis, Frostburg. 
DeNauveley, Mrs. Dr.. Frostburg. 



Dress, Jasper. Garrett County. 
Donahue, Patrick. Frost lung. 
Delaney, Louis. Frostburg. 
IUum. James. Vale Summit. 
Dailey, W'm.. Frostburg. 



Eberlein, Mrs. John. Eekhart. 
Entler, Mrs. Andrew. Frostburg. 
Engle, Mrs. Laura, Frostburg. 
Entler. Mrs. Andrew, Frostburg. 



Frey, Mrs. A. E., Frostburg. 
Finzel, Mrs. P.. Eekhart. 
Flanagan, Mrs. Peter. Vale Summit. 
Flanagan. John. Vale Summit. 
Flanagan. Martin. Vale Summit. 
Farley, Ellen, Eekhart. 
Feldman. Peter. Eekhart. 
Fitzgerald. Patrick. Huffman. 
Finn, James. Vale Summit. 
Footen, John. Frost lung. 
Flannigan. Francis. Frostburg. 
Feldman, Thomas. Frostburg. 
Feldman. George. Frostburg. 



Garvey, James. Frostburg. 
Green. John. Frost hum. 
Green. Thomas, Frostburg. 
Gable. James. Eekhart. 
Grablewski, George, bTostburg. 
Grimes. J. W. Carlos. 
Goldsworthy. Paul. Frostburg. 
Goldsworthy, Mrs.. Frostburg. 
Grant, James. Frostburg. 
Garlitz, Enoch Frostburg 
Grant, Mhhael. Frostburg. 
Gallagher, Hugh. Frostburg. 
Grableuski, George. Frostburg. 
Grimes, .1. \\\. Carlos. 
Grunt, .lames. Frostburg. 

H 

Higgins. Michael. Frostburg 
Hoye. Patrick. Eekhart. 
Healey, Jehu. Vale Summit. 
Hinkle, William. Frostburg. 
Hewit. Thomas. Frostburg. 
Harriman. Frank. Frostburg 
llohan. Jehu. Frostburg. 



St. Michael's Church— Continued. 



Hines, William, Frostburg. 
Hogan, Isaac, Frostburg. 
Willis, Augustus, Frostburg. 
Hannan, John, Frostburg. 
Houser, Mrs., Frostburg. 
Higgens. Mrs. P., Vale Summit. 
Haupt, James, Eckhart. 
Harvey, James, Frostburg. 
Heck, Francis, Allegany. 
Hughes, Peter, Frostburg. 
Hewell, Thomas, Frostburg. 
Higgins. Michael. Vale Summit. 
Hamilton, Max, Frostburg. 
Hughes, Peter, Frostburg. 



Jackson. Samuel, Welsh Hill. 
Jack, Mrs. Robert. Frostburg. 
John, Mrs. Mary. Frostburg. 



K 

Kirby, William, Frostburg. 
Kirby, Mrs. John, Vale Summit. 
Kelly, William. Borden Shaft. 
Kelly. .Michael, Eckhart. 
Kirby, John. Jr., Vale Summit. 
Kennj .Mrs. M., Borden Shaft. 
Kelly, Mrs. John. Eckhart. 
Kelly, Frank, Eckhart. 
Kelly, Thomas I.. Frostburg. 
Keating, Thomas, Frostburg. 
Kenny, James, Frostburg. 
Killins, John, Frostburg. 
Keating, John, Frostburg. 
Kerney, Edward. Shaft. 
Kirby, Mrs. John, Vale Summit. 



Lyons, M. E.. Frostburg. 
Lavin, John, Hoffman. 
Lynch. Con., Frostburg. 
Leonard, Mrs., Frostburg. 
Lynch, Patrick, Eckhart. 
La Velle, Martin, Vale Summit. 
Lee, Maurice, Eckhart. 
Lee. William, Eckhart. 
Longhney. Patrick. Frostburg. 
Longhney, Michael, Frostburg. 



LaVelle, Martin, Vale Summit. 
Loughney, Pat., Frostburg. 
Loughney, Michael, Frostburg. 

M 

McCaughan, John, Frostburg. 
McAllister, Mrs., Frostburg. 
Murray, Mrs. Rodger, Vale Summit. 
McAllister, John, Frostburg. 
McGraw, Mrs. Richard, Frostburg. 
McKensie, Urias, Garrett Co. 
McGraw, Patrick, Vale Summit. 
McDonald, John, Frostburg. 
McSorley, John, Frostburg. 
McKinzie, Ambrose. Garrett Co. 
McKenzie, Emma. Frostburg. 
McMahon, Frank. Vale Summit. 
Metzer, Henry, Huffman. 
McGinnis. P. H, Frostburg. 
McGuire. Hugh. Frostburg. 
McGuire, Mary. Frostburg. 
McGuire, John. Frostburg. 
McAllister, James, Frostburg. 
McMahon, Margaret, Eckhart. 
MeAteer, James, Frostburg. 
McGuire, John, Eckhart. 
Marshall. Agnes. Eckhart. 
Mathias, Mrs., Allegany. 
McMillen, James, Eckhart. 
Mullen. Patrick, Glen Avon. 
Maher, William. Vale Summit. 
Murray. Mrs. C, Frostburg. 
Munis. Mrs. Christiana. Eckhart. 
McGuire, James, Allegany. 
McGuire. Peter. Frostburg. 
McGraw, John, Frostburg. 
Monahan, Patrick, Frostburg. 

M ly, Mrs. M. A.. Frostburg. 

Martin, William. Vale Summit. 
McAllister, Mrs. Charles, Frostburg. 
Mallee. Mrs. Peter, Frostburg. 
Moon. Mrs. John. Eckhart. 
McCaffrey, Patrick, Frostburg. 
McCaughan, Mrs., Clarysville. 
Marshall, Agnes, Eckhart. 
Mathias, Mrs. Maxwell, Frostburg. 
McDonald, Ellen, Frostburg. 
McKenzie, Loyla, Frostburg. 
McGann, Patrick, Vale Summit. 
McGann, Patrick. Frostburg. 
Moore, Mis. Mary. Eckhart. 
Meadows, L., Frostburg. 



St. Michael's Church — Continued. 



Monahan, John. Frostburg. 
McDonnell, John, Frostburg. 
Michael, Miss Annie, Frostburg. 
McGuire, Patrick, Frostburg. 
McCready, William, Frostburg. 
McDonnell, Michael, Frostburg. 
McDonnell, Peter, Frostburg. 
McGaw. Joseph, Frostburg. 
McKenna, Henry, Frostburg. 
Metzner, Henry. Frostburg. 
Martin, William, Vale Summit. 
McLane, Dr. 

N 
Nelson, William, Eckhart. 
Miner, Frank, Eckhart. 
Nairn, Jacob, Frostburg. 
Niev, Louis C, Frostburg. 
Nairn, Jacob, Frostburg. 

<> 

O'Connor, Mrs. James, Frostbui 
O'Neil, John, Carlos. 
O'Rouke, M., Eckhart. 
O'Rouke. Patrick, Frostburg. 
O'Rafferty, Patrick. Frostburg. 



Porter, Mrs. John, Frostburg. 
Poisel, James, Eckhart. 
Powers, James, Frostburg. 
Porter, Florence. Frostburg. 
Powers, James, Frostburg. 
Pugh, Mrs., Frostburg. 
Powers. Mrs. John, Frostburg. 
Porter, Thomas G., Frostburg. 
Palmer. Mrs.. Frostburg. 
Poisel, James. Eckhart. 



Shields, Charles. Frostburg. 

Scally, James, Frostburg. 

Scally, Daniel, Frostburg. 

Stapleton, James, Vale Summit. 

Scally, John, Eckhart. 

Shaub, Frank. Frostburg. 

Smith, Mrs. Fannie, Frostburg. 

Sloan, James. Hoffman. 

Spates, F., Frostburg. 

Shea, Michael Jr., Frostburg. 

Shea, James, Alleghany. 

Sullivan. Michael. Frostburg. 

Sellman. Mrs.. Huffman. 

Sullivan, William. Frostburg. 

Smith. Mrs. John, Frostburg. 

Shields, Mrs., Borden Shaft. 

Sullivan, William. Eckhart. 

Stanton, P. J., Frostburg. 

Stapleton. Thomas, Frostburg. 

Sleeman. Mrs. Thomas, Vale Summit. 

Shuck. Robert. Clarysville. 

Smith, Joseph. Frostburg. 

Spater, John, Frostburg. 

Shavinski, Stephen, Frostburg. 

Sloan. James. Hoffman. 

Spates, F., Frostburg. 

Shea, James, Alleghany. 



Thompson. James. Frostburg. 
Tipping. Frank. Frostburg. 
Tipping, John, Frostburg. 
Thompson, Frank, Frostburg. 
Tlghe, Mrs.. Frostburg. 
Trapp, William, Midlothian. 
Thorpe, Lillian, Frostburg. 



i: 

Rafferty, John W., Frostburg. 
Raffert, Michael. Frostburg. 
Rooney, William, Allegany. 
Rooney. Bernard, Frostburg. 
Rafferty. Bernard, Frostburg. 
Rosenberger, A., Jr.. Garrett Co. 
Rairick, Joseph, Frostburg. 
Rafferty, Mary, Frostburg. 
Rooney, Michael. Frostburg. 
Robinson, Samuel. Frostburg. 
Ryan. James, Frostburg. 
Rosenber, Adams, Garrett County 
Rafferty, John W., Frostburg. 
Rainick. Jos., Frostburg. 



W 

Winner, Edward. Frostburg. 
Wolfe, Philip, Frostburg. 
Whitefield, Mrs. C, Midlothian. 
Winner, Mrs., Frostburg. 
Winters, John J., Midlothian. 
Winters, Thomas. Frostburg. 
Winters, James. Frostburg. 
Williams, Edward, Frostburg. 
Winters. John. Midlothian. 
Wiederman, Julia, Frostburg. 
Walsh. James. Frostburg. 
Wills, Joseph. Frostburg. 
Winters, O. Loring, Frostburg. 
Winters, James, Frostburg. 



THOMAS C. KENNEDY. A. 


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LAW BUILDING. BALTIMORE, MD. 

SPECIALTIES: 

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School Sisters Notre Dame 
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Rev. M. F. Foley 
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PLV FA I HER JOHN ]. CCNWAV 



ST. MARY'S OF THE ASSUMPTION 

LONACON1NG, MD. 

Rev. JOHN* .1. CONWAY, Pastor. 

Rev. .JOSEPH NOLAN, Assistant Pastor. 

Masses — Sunday. 8.00 and 10.30 A. M. Holy Days. 7. on and 0.00 A. M. 

Week Days. 7.00 and 7.30 A. M. 
Confessions — Saturdays. 3.00 to 10.00 P. M. Thursday evenings and Friday 

afternoons. 
League of the Sacred Heart — First Friday of each Month. 

Lonaconing, '-The City in the Valley," is situated half the way between 
Frosthurg and Westernport and eighteen miles from the City of Cumberland. 

The heart of the coal fields. Lonaconing, from the Indian word "Lona- 
cona," meaning "where many waters meet." is today a city of eight thousand 
souls, of which nearly one-fifth are Catholics. 

Sometime about 1835, Henry Knapp and another German settler located 
here and were the nucleus of the Catholicity of Lonaconing. In ls4n we 
find missionary priests making occasional calls on the scattered Catholic 
families in this region. To these sturdy Fathers, mostly the sons of St. 
Alphonsus, the organization of the Church from 1840 to 1866 is virtually 
all due. In these early days Rev. John N. Neumann, afterward Bishop Neu- 
mann, was a visitor to the Lonaconing congregation. In 1S43 Mass was said 
in a private house, known even to modern days as the "Stone House." About 
1850 Rev. Thaddeus Anwander. C. SS. R.. began to come to Lonaconing. 
Father Anwander added later glory to his priesthood by his vocations at 
St. James and Sacred Heart Churches of Baltimore. He passed away 
November 1. 1893. The next visitant priest was Father A. Van de Braak, 
C. SS. R. He made a house-to-house visitation, taught the Catechism and 
administered the Sacraments. The zeal awakened brought the desire for 
a church. In is:..". Father Brandstetter took up the work in Lonaconing, 
making regular visits. In 1858 we find baptisms recorded by Father Her- 
genraethe and Joeckel. In 1850 Rev. Michael Slattery. of Frosthurg, began 
to come at intervals to Lonaconing -the thoroughly German aspect of the 
congregation was changing — Irish families were now settling here — attracted 
by the furnaces and mines. Fathers Brown and Carney, of Mt. Savage, 
were occasional visitors. The home of John Ryan became known as the 
stopping place of t he clergy and his parlor became the chapel. In 1859, 
the foundation was laid for St. Mary's Church, the lot being donated by the 
George's Creek Coal Company. The Redemptorist Fathers still held services 
at the "Stone House." 

Rev. J. F. Bradley, during 1S00 and 1861, attended the parish. Father 
Bradley was drowned near Annapolis, July 9, 1866. 

In 1862 Father Bernard Arrant, C. SS. R.. was in charge of the Lona- 
i-iming congregation. The call for the completion of the church became 
urgent, prosperity was at hand, ami Father Eberhardt, who had come to 
Lima. oning late in 1862, unci. •nook tin- work. Everything was full of 
promise and hope, when l lie "war spirit" seized Lonaconing and t he church 
zeal was obscured lor a time The effects of Father Eberhardt's ministrations 
were inseparable warp to the woof of St. Mary's history. This good Father 
died in Philadelphia in June. isss. [Miring these years the home of August 
Kicker was used as a chapel. Willi Father Joeckel, the church began in 
120 



St. Mary's Church— Continued. 

grow into shape; and Father Wrist watched the souls while Father Joeckel 
watched t he walls. And then came Father Cross, who took charge in 

I mber, 1865. He resumed the building of the church. On Christmas, 

L865, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was offered in St. Mary's Church. 
Lonaconing. Md., the Rev. Wm. II. Gross. C. SS. R.. celebrant. 

At the end of six months. Father Gross left for St. Alphonsus' Church, 
New York City, afterward became Superior of the Redemptorist Church of 
Boston, and later was elected to the See of Savannah and consecrated 
Bishop. April 27, 1873. In Inn.".. His Holiness. Leo XIII, elevated Bishop 
Gross to the Archepiscopal See of Oregon. This ended the Redemptorist 
Fathers connection with Lonaconing. 1'ntil 1.868 Father Lewis .Morgan had 
charge of St. .Mary's. After this the Carmelite Fathers took charge and 
of these especially may be noted Father Phillipp and Father Thomas Mahar. 

In 1868 we find the names of many diocesan priests in the Records. 
Among them Very Rev. Edward Brennan and Rev. Valentine F. Schmitt, 
now (1909) at St. Joseph's Church, Washington. D. C. From May to 
August. 1869, Rev. D. C. de Wulf was in charge and was followed by Rev. 
Jeremiah O'Sullivan. who remained until December, 1S70. Father O'Sulll- 
\an became Bishop of .Mobile in 1885, and died. August. Is:";. Following 
Fathei O'Sullivan came the beloved Father James M. O'Brien, who for 
thirteen years served God and his Hock witli a faithfulness that can never 
be lost to the memory of Lonaconing. Father O'Brien graduate! from 
St. Charles College. June 1866, entered St. Mary's Seminary and was ordained 
by Rt. Rev. Dr. Foley in 1 STo. Lonaconing was Father O'Brien's first charge. 
From St. Mary's he went to St. Thomas Aquinas. Baltimore, and now is 
pastor of St. Peter's Church, Washington, D. C. 

Father Peter M. Manning came to Lonaconing early in 1NS4. He was 
full of zeal and progress. In 1885 against great opposition, he opened a 
parochial school in charge of five sisters of St. Joseph's of Chestnut Hill. 
Philadelphia. Pa. Father Manning also bought the cemetery, and during 
ln~. energetic pastorate did many things of permanent good to the Church 
of Lonaconing. Father Manning was transferred to St. Andrew's Church, 
Baltimore, where be lias since died. Father Manning was succeeded by Rev. 
Thomas J. Stanton, who was appointed September 1. 1892, and took charge 
mi the thirteenth day following, and under whose administration many 
important improvements were made. 









A 








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. Joseph 


Bui 


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11. 


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Joseph, 


Big 


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B 



PARISHIONERS 



Cosgo. -Mrs. John. Dudley St. 

Cosgrove. John. Detmold. 

Chambers. Thomas. Mud Row. 

Carey. Mrs. James. Detmold. 

Clark, Robert, Railroad St. 
Brennan, Edward. Douglass Ave. Coleman. William. Up The Road. 

Bowen, George, Jackson St. 

Barry, Patrick. Dudley. " 

Bertenbaugh, Leopold, The island. Douglas, John C, E. Main St. 

Barry, John. Dudley. Duffy, Mrs.. Lonaconing. 

Brady, Mrs. Ellen, Jackson St. nr. Devlin, Mrs. Henry, Big View Hill. 

Main St. Devlin, Terrence, Big View Hill. 

Boyle, Prank, The Island. Donahue, John, Detmold, 



:h— Ci 



Doolan. .Mrs.. Dudley. 
Dormey, George, Church Hill. 



Ellinger, Anthony. .Main St. 
Ennis. Mrs., Railroad St. 



Fitzpatrick, Michael. Big View Hi 
Plynn. James. Dudley Hill. 
Plynn, John, Charlestown. 
Plynn, Patrick, E. Main St. 
Plynn, Robert. Big View Hill. 
Ford, Patrick, Buck Hill. 

(. 

Gill. John, Big View Hill. 
Gill. Peter, Big View Hill. 
Grainey. William. Dudley Hill. 
Geary. Mrs.. Dudley Hill. 



Martin. John A., Jackson St. 
McDonough. Michael. Dudley Hill. 
McConneil. Patrick. The Run. 
Major, Mrs. Mary, Jackson St. 
McCue, Mrs. Michael, Dudley Hill. 
McPartland. Bernard, The Island. 
McCabe. Michael. Pekin. Md. 
.McDonough, John. Buck Hill. 
McGuire. John. Church Hill. 
McPartland. John. Dudley Hill. 
Myers. John. Buck Hill. 
McPartland, Bernard. The Island. 



Nolan, Daniel. Big View Hill. 
Nolan, Peter, Detmold. 
Nichols, George. Lonaconing. 
Nichols, .Airs. James. Buck Hill. 



B 

Howard. James A.. E. Main St. 
Helfner, Katherine, Dinglane A\ 
Hogan, Patrick, Buck Hill. 
Hogan, Patrick, Buck Hill. 
Hogan, Edward, Buck Hill. 
Hubin. Thomas, Lonaconing. 



Jones, W'ihiam D., Water Cliff 

K 

Knapp, William. Railroad St. 
Keating, Thomas. Buck Hill. 
Keating, Mrs. Bernard. Buck H 
Keating, Arthur, Buck Hill. 
Kelley, James, Dudley Hill. 



ueyden, Mrs., Douglass Ave. 

Lawton, Mrs. Abraham, E. Main St. 

Lyden, William. Douglass Ave. 

M 
Myers. Fred.. Water Cliff. 
Murphy, C. S., Church Hill. 
Marley, Thomas, Buck Hill. 
Mi Cowan. .loli 11 . Davis Mountains. 
Murphy, Jere, Buck Hill. 
Mills, James. Big View Hill. 
Morley, Mrs. John, Railroad St. 
McGuire, Mi- Agnes Douglass Ave. 
Moran. John, Water Cliff Hill. 
Morgan, Marselles. Dudley Hill. 
Moran. Mrs. Daniel. Railroad St. 
Miller, Alonzo, Lonaconing. 



O'Rouke, Ellen, Water Cliff. 
O'Connor. Thomas, Up The Road. 
O'Rouke, John, Dudley Hill. 
O'Rouke, Patrick. Dudley Hill. 

Q 

Quinu, James, Dudley Hill. 
Quinn, Frank. Dudley Hill. 



Rowan, Daniel Douglass Ave. 

Rowan, Patri. k, I ? lass V . ■ 

Rickar, Frank. Big View Hill. 
Rh k ir, John. Buck Hill. 
Ruwn, Michael, Lonaconing. 
Rowan, Thomas. Railroad St. 
Rowan. James. Railroad St. 
Rowan, Michael T.. Railroad St. 



Shonski. Michael. Dudley Hill. 
Stakem. James. Buck Hill, 
Sweeney, Daniel, Jackson St. 
Stakem, Patrick. Buck Hill. 



Thomas, M. Hugh. Dudley Hill. 

\V 
Woods, Bernard, Big View Hill. 
Walsh. Bernard, Big View Hill. 
Walsh, John T.. Big View Hill. 
Walsh. Mary, Church Hill. 
Wise, John, Buck Hill. 
Walsh. John T., Big View Hill. 



W; 



Mi 



ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH 

MIDLAND, MD. 



Rev. FRANCIS PATRICK MACKALL, Pastor 

Midland is situated in the same valley with Lonaconing, three miles 
away, on George's Creek. Formerly a mission. Midland, like Barton, was 
nurtured by Lonaconing. Father Manning saw the promise of Midland, 
and invited Architect Stack of Baltimore to draw plans for a local church. 
Messrs. Merten's Sons, of Cumberland, acceptei the contract to build the 
church, and as a consequence on Christmas morning Father Manning recited 
Mass for the first time in Midland's new church. His Eminence, Cardinal 
Gibbons, in the May following, blessed St. Joseph's Church of Midland. Md. 
The new church remained in charge of Father Manning as a mission until 
September. 1892, when he was succeeded by Rev. Thomas J. Stanton, who 
held charge until 1S9S, when Rev. Don Luigi Sartori became the first resident 
pastor. 

Vast improvements followed the administration of Father Sartori. A 
fine pastoral residence was erected, the parochial school opened, the church 
enlarge} and surmounted by a tower, in which have been installed a sweet 
chime of bells. In one year these improvements amounted to $:'" 

The present pastor, the Reverend Francis Patrick Mackall, has during 
the five years of his pastorate paid off all the debt of the parish. 
Masses— Sunday. 8 and 10.30 A. M. Holy days of Obligation, 8 and 10.30 

A. M. Vespers. 7.30 P. M. 
Confessions — Saturdays, 4 to ."■ P. M.; 7 to 10 P. M.; and the evenings of 

Holydays, 4 to P. M. 
Communion — League of the Sacred Heart, First Sunday of every Month. 

Sodality of the Blesse 1 Virgin Mary, Second Sunday of every Month. 
Meetings — Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Second Sunday of every 

Month. 3.00 P. M. Promoters League of the Sacred Heart, last Sunday 

of each Month. 3.00 P. M. Solicitors Sanctuary Society, last Sunday of 

each Month. 3.00 P. M. 



Atkinson, John. Midland. 
Atkinson. William. Midlan 



PARISHIONERS 

Byrne. Mrs. William. Ocean. 

Bushe, Peter. 0:ean. 

Byrnes. Michael, Paradise. 

Byrnes. Walter J.. Paradise. 
i; Byrnes. Mrs. Sarah. Ocean. 

Hums. Garrete, Midland. Broderick, Michael, Ocean. 

Byron, Timothy, Paradise. Broderick. William. Midland. 

Byrnes, William Paul. Upper Ocean. Busn ' Thomas. Ocean 
Blake, Fiank, Upper Ocean. C 

Byrnes, Timothy. Upper Ocean. C gan, Patrick Joseph. Midli 

Blake, Patrick, Ocean. Campbell, James. Midland. 

Bryne, Miles. Midland. Cavanaugh, Isaac, Midland. 

Byrne, .Mrs. Michael, Midland. Creegan, Edward, Tannery. 

Broderick, James. .Midland. Coleman. Mrs. Isaac Tannerj 

Byrnes. Thomas F.. Ocean. Cullen, Richard, Gilmor. 

Burns, Patrick .!.. Midland. Canty. Michael, Paradise. 

Byrnes, Paul. Paradise. Cunningham, James. Ocean. 



t i 

% ASSETS $230,000 £ 

* * 
% CAPITAL $25,000 SURPLUS $20,000 | 

* * 

I t 

| First National Bank ! 

1 I 

f MIDLAND, MD. I 

1 I 



DIRECTORS 



OFFICERS 



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I I 



St. Joseph's Chi 
Cunningham, Patrick I., Paradise. 
Cavanaugh, Isaac, Midland. 
Cluff, Michael, Gilmor. 
Curnniing, Mrs. Thomas. Paradise. 
Cavanaugh, Philip, Paradise. 
Cunningham, James D., Ocean. 
Cain, Peter, Midland. 
Carroll, James P.. Ocean. 
Coulon, James. Midland. 
Cadden, John, Midland. 
Conner, John E., Ocean. 
Cavanaugh, Denis, Paradise. 
Cunningham, Mrs. John, Paradise. 
Cavanaugh, John P., Midland. 
Cavanaugh, Patrick F., Ocean. 
Corrigan, James, Ocean. 
Cunningham. James D., Ocean. 
Coleman, John, Ocean. 
Clark, .Michael. Midland. 



Durkin. James, Midland. 
Devine, John, Tannery. 
Dorsey, Mrs. Michael, Midland. 
Davidson. John, Paradise. 



rch — Continued. 
Duggan, William, Ocean. 
Dorsey, Dennis, Midland. 
Dennis, Lawrence, Paradise. 
Durkin, .Miles. Midland. 
Duffy, Patrick, Ocean. 

E 

Eagan, John, Midland. 
Emply, Michael, Midland. 

P 
Fair, William, Paradise. 
Firley, Peter, Midland. 
Firley, Frank, Paradise. 
Flanagan, Mrs. Lizzie. Midland. 
Flemming. James, Paradise. 



Grant, E. R.. Midland. 
Gaffney, Mrs. Maria, Midland. 
Gunner, John A., Midland. 



Hughes, Patrick. Ocean. 
Hoye, Peter, Midland. 
Henry, Coleman, Midland. 




REV. FRANCIS PATRICK MACKALL 



J iseph's Church— Ci 



Kirby, J. J., Klondyke. 
Kenny. Simon, Midland. 
Kelly. Mrs. Patrick. Paradise. 
Kelly. Mrs. Peter. Paradise. 
Kenny. T. J., .Midland. 
Kenny. .lames, Midland. 
Kilduff, Mrs. .Mary. Ocean. 
Kerney. George, Upper Ocean. 
Kelly. .Mrs. H.. Midland. 
Kane, William. Gilmor. 

L 

Long, Nicholas, Upper Ocean. 
Langham, Mrs. Helen, Midland. 
Lemman. Thomas, Ocean. 

M 

Maney. Martin. Upper Ocean. 
McGoye. Michael. Tannery. 
McGeody. J. J.. Jr., National. 
McGreevy, John, Ocean. 
McVeigh. William. Gilmor. 
Murphy. James, Ocean. 
McConnell, Thomas, Paradise. 
Monahan, Peter. Midland. 
Mahon. James. Ocean. 
Manly. Michael. Paradise. 
Manly. William. Paradise. 
Markin. Michael. Midland. 
McGeody. John P., Jr., National. 
Monahan. Michael. Midland. 
Murphy. Patrick. Paradise. 
McMahon, John, Ocean. 
Murphy, John. Ocean. 
Manley. John, Paradise 
McVeigh. Henry, Paradise. 
McVeigh, Hugh, Paradise. 
Morgan. Robert. Midland. 
McMahon, Philip. Ocean. 
McGinn, Daniel, Midland. 
Mooney, Patrick. Paradise. 
McGuire. James, Midland. 
McGeody. John J.. Jr.. Ocean. 
Melvin. Thomas. Paradise. 
McCann, Edward, Gilmor. 
McCabe, James, Paradise. 
McCahan, Michael, Paradise. 
Morgan. Charles, Ocean. 
McKenna, Peter. Midland. 
Malloy, Patrick, Midland. 

Mills. Oscar, Paradise. 
Mi i tO'si an, John, Paradise. 



Morgan, .lames. Paradise. 
Murphy. Edward. Ocean. 
Manley, John James, Paradi 



Nolan, 
Nolan, 



Patrick, Ocean. 
Michael. Ocean. 



O'Rouke, Mrs. Patrick. Paradise. 
O'Rouke, Hugh, Paradise. 
O'Rouke. Martin T.. Paradise. 
O'Rouke, John T.. Midland. 
O'Mara. William Patrick, Paradise. 
O'Neill. Dr. P., Midland. 
( ('Brian, Michael, Ocean. 

P 

Palmer. William. Ocean. 
Phillips. W. B., .Midland. 

B 

Reilly. Michael. Midland. 
Robinson. Daniel, Paradise. 
Rodger, John. Gilmor. 
Ryan, Michael, Ocean. 



Scally, Peter. Tannery. 
Shields, John. Ocean. 
Staker. Thomas E.. Paradise. 
Staker, James. .Midland. 
Staker, John Joseph. Paradise. 
Staker, John. Ocean. 
Sharp, Anthony. Paradise. 
Staiken. Daniel, Midland. 
Seib, John, Ocean. 



W 



Trappe, Anthony. Ocean. 
Thompson, Milton. Paradise 

\V 

Woods. Bernard, Paradise. 
Wanl, Henry, Midland. 
Winn. William. Tannery. 
White. John, Midland. 
Winter. Robert. Gilmor. 
Winters. William. Gilmor. 
Winter. John. Mi Hand 

Wallace, John, Ocean. 
Woods. Patrick, Paradise. 




Photo bj Clark 



ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH, MIDLAND, MD. 



SKETCH OF ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH 

MT. SAVAGE, MD. 



On the Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad, aboul nine miles from 
Cumberland, is situated the historic town of Mt. Savage. Serenely set in a crown 
of picturesque grandeur, Mt. Savage sparkles with industry. Mere is located 
the immense industry conducted by the Enamel Brick Company, the machine 
shops of the Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad, and many other large 
labor-employing concerns, to whose enterpise and commercial genius Mt. 
Savage owes largely its local prosperity. 

Definite Catholic history begins in Mt. Savage with the first .Mass said 
at Arnold's Settlement (now Mt. Savage) by Rev. Stephen Theodore Bodin 
in 1793. The settlement was named for Archbishop Arnold, whose grands. ,11. 
Rev. John Cronin, afterward became celebrated as a Redemptorist priest. 
Rev. Father Bodin, with whom begins the chureh history of Mt. Savage, was 
the first priest ordained in this country — May 25, 1793. His death occurred 
in is.",::. Like every fruitful seed, the first Mass grew into more frequent 
.Masses. Before the erection of a church services were held in Arnold's Hotel. 

Rev. Nicholas Zocchi, an Italian of profound learning, frequently visited 
our little town, his home station being Taneytown, where he died in ls(.">. 
Afterward (1832) the settlement was visited by Rev. Matthew Ryan, of 
Hagerstown. In 1S19 the mission was in 1 harge of Rev. Timothy Ryan, who 
visited the mission about four times a year for five years. Father Ryan died 
in Hagerstown in is::;. During these visits the first church was built — not 
a large one — scarcely larger than an ordinary room — but still a church. 
About Is:' 4 the settlement was visited during the year by Rev. Francis Roloff, 
who was the eleventh seminarian enrolled at St. Mary's Seminary. 

Rev. Francis Xavier Marshall in 1829 took charge of the. sell lenient 
conjointly with his pastorate at St. Patrick's. Cumberland. During this 
period a new brick church was built, which Father Marshall, an ex-Jesuit, 
named St. Ignatius. The lot on which the church stood is now a part of St. 
Patrick's Cemetery, and was given by Archbishop Arnold. 

At this period tlie congregation was multiplying rapidly, many laborers 
and mechanics being attracted to the town by the works and the mines \u 
addition was built to the church. In is::.". Father Marshall was called to 
other fields. 

For the next Ave years the church was in charge of Fathers Henry 
Meyers and Bertrand S. Peat. At this time in the class as a mission, the Mt. 
Savage Congregation was larger than the one of Cumberland. Father Leonard 
' ibermeyer, of Cumberland, also attended occasionally, and predicted the after 
greatness of Mt. Savage. 

In 1st.", the new railroad was about completed; the furnaces and mills 
were alive with industry, and the population was near the four thousand 
mark. Farmer, merchant and mechanic fell the touch of the healthy prosperity 
that prevailed iboul this time Father- Charles c. Brennan was sent by 
Archbishop Eccleston to assist Father Obermeyer The importance of Mt. 
129 



W. BLADEN LOWNDES. President HENRY SHRIVER. Vice-President H. A. PIHER, Cashier 

A BANK FOR ALL THE PEOPLE 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

MT. SAVAGE, MD. 

All Business Is Kept Strictly Confidential 
Individual Deposits $225,000 Total Assets $300,000 



This Bank has been in business seven year- and ha- had a remarkably rapid 
growth as shown by the above figures. 

Three per cent, interest is paid on Savings Accounts and the interest begins from 
he date of the first deposit. 

Small accounts as well as large one- are welcome here. We open accounts with 

ow as une dollar 



Parent- may open accounts tor their children. 

Husband and wife may open an account subject to the order of either, or at the 
death of either payable to the survivor. 

The directors are large stockholders and recognize their responsibility to the 
depositors. They meet regularly and have an accurate knowledge of the affairs of 
the Bank. All loans are made by a loan committee. The National Banking 
Law- are followed very strictlj . Your business i- solicited. 



DIRECTORS: 

W. BLADEN LOWNDES VAN LEAR BLACK 

C. L. ENGLE H. A. PITZER 

HENRY MULLANEY JOHN BRISCOE 

HENRY SHRIVER 




REV. JOHN W. DOWLING 



Ski i i St. Patrii k'k Chi ki h Continued. 

Savage had been foreseen bj Father Obermeyer; it was realized by Father 
Brennan, and by an arrangement of happy import to both Father Brennan 
became the first residenl pastor of Mt. Savage, with Eckhart, Barreville ana 
Wellersburg as adjacent missions. For nearly ten years Father Brennan 
labored in the pastoral field of Mt. Savage, and in 1856 he was succeeded by 
Rev. James Carney, who was appointed to the charge by Mosi Ke\ .An 
Kendrick. Father Carney was ordained in 1S53, and served as assistant of 
St. Patrick's at Cumberland, Prior to his promotion the church at this time 
was too small and very inconveniently situated. A new location was sought, and 
the selection decided by one-half acre of ground by the Mt. Savage Iron 
Company. About this time Father Carney was called away from Mt. Savage 
but died soon after his departure In the latter part of the year 1862 build- 
ing operations were begun, and the name of the church was i hange l Erom S1 
Ignatius to St. Patrick. Rev. Richard Brown succeeded Father Carney, and 
remained in charge until June. 1868. At the time .Alt. Savage reached the 
zenith of its commercial glorj 

Railroad extension had made Mt. Savage the most important town be- 
tween Cumberland and Piedmont. The work of building was rapidly ad- 
vanced, with Father Brown as architect and superintendent of the building; 
and whilst there was no very great structural beauty to the edifice, its con- 
venience and location were ideal. 

In July. L868, Father Brown was sui i eeded by Rev. Jeremiah Hendricks, 
who had been ordained in 1867 by Rev. Bishop Whelan, of Wheeling, W. Va. 
Of aesthetic temperament. Father Hendricks undertook the improvi 
the architectural outline of the church. In addition to (hanging the slant 
of the roof, he added a tower, which gave a greatly improved tone to the 
structure. In October. 1ST::, the church was dedicated by His Grace Arch- 
bishop Bayley. On July 27, 1875, Father Hendricks died, and his remains lie 
n the i emetery under the shadow of the church wherein he labored so faith- 
fully. Rev. Patrick Francis O'Conner succeeded as pastor in September, 1875 
■. la aed in Louisiana, trained for missionary work, later sent as chaplain in 
the army, from causes of ill health he applied to Archbishop Spaulding for a 
diocesan pastorate, with the result of his appointment to Mt. Savage, after 
a short service as assistant to Monsignor McColgan at St. Peter's Church, of 
Baltimore, and a mission .barge in Harford County. 

During his pastorate Mt. Savage Hall was erected. Father O'Connor's eccen- 
tricities, both conversational and musical, will keep his memory long alive. He 
died \|ii il 30, and to (incite the words of Father Staunton in his work on "The 
History of Western Maryland." "The people whom he had faithfully served laid 
the remains of the lion-like O'Connor beside the lamb-like Hendricks." 

Mt. Savage during the summer months following Father O'Conner's 
de cih was in charge of the Rev. Capuchin Fathers of Cumberland. 

Rev. Edward A. Williams was appointed pastor of Mt. Savage in Sep- 
tember. 1NIU. Born in Ireland. Father Williams received part of his classical 
education before coming to America. lie was ordained by His Eminence 
Cardinal Gibbons in 1886, and became assistant at St. Leo's Church. Balti- 
more, and St. Matthew's. Washington, before coming to Mt. Savage. Under 
Father Williams' charge Si Patrick's oi Mi Savage was improved and advanced 
until it stands today as one of the besl equipped churches in Western Maryland. 

During bis pastorate a new and up-to-date parochial school was built, also 
i ii. -w convent for the Sisters of Notre Dame. 

Manj brillianl churchmen are sons of Mt. Savage, among whom may be 
mentioned such noteworthy names as those of Rt. Rev. Monsignor O'Conner, 

132 




ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH, MT. SAX 'AGE, MD. 



Ski n n of St. P.vi 



- I 'II I Rl 



-Continuec 



hi' Clarksburg, ami Vicar-General of the Wheeling diocese. Rev. Lawrence 
Mattingly was also ordained from Mt. Savage, as were likewise the illustrious 
Father John T. Gaitley, Rev. John .1. VfcDermott, Rev. Michael Brennan, 
Rev. Romanus Mattingly, Rev. Richard ('. Campbell. Rev. Richard O'Neill, 
Rev. John Dowling and 1 1 1 • - genial, warm-hearted and keen writer. Rev. 
l '' Mallon, of Si. Anus Church, Washington, D. C. Rev. Edward Mat- 
tingly, C. SS. R., now at New Orleans; Rev. John Smith. St. Joseph's Baltimore, 
Md.; Rev. John Fannon, at St. .Mary's. Newport. Charles County. Md.. and Rev. 
Edward Malloy. at St. Paul's. Baltimore, Md., all sons of whom Jit. Savage may 
feel royally proud. 

nn September 25, 1904, the present pastor. Rev. John \V. Dowling, was 
transferred to St. Patrick's Church, Mi. Savage, from St. Peter's Church, Wash- 
ington. D. C. 

Father Dowling was born July 8, 1871, in Johnstou n, Pa. After graduating 
from the parochial school he entered St. Charles College, Ellicotl City, Md.. to 
prepare tor his priestly vocation in September, l^v".. After six years of faithful 
study at St. Charles College, and five years at St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, 
Md.. he was ordained by His Eminence James Cardinal Gibbons, in June L9, 1896. 

His first appointment was ai Sykesville, Carroll County, Md.. then at St. 
John's. Baltimore, Md., and St. Peter's. Washington. D. C. 

St. Pattick's palish under his guidance has made much improvement. 



PARISHIONERS 



Arnold. Thorn; 
Aldridge, Mrs. 



Baker, Mrs. Teresa 
Barrett, Catherine 
Barrett, C. J. 
Barrett, Rose 
Beane. Michael 
Birmingham, James 
I Hake, Joseph 
Blank, John 
Blank. Mrs. M. 
Bolden, William 
Boyle. Peter 
Brailer, Augustine 
Brailer. David 
Hi ailer, I 

Brailer, Laurence 
Brailer, Rose 
Brailer. Teresa 
Brannon. J no. W. 
1 1 John 



Campbell, Bernard 
i 'amplieil. John 
Campbell. Mary 
Campbell, Sarah 
Carney, Charles 
Carney. John 
Carabine, Charles 
Carabine. Thomas E. 
Casserly, .lames J. 
Clarke, Mary E. 
Coburn, Benjamin 
Collins, Daniel 
Collins. Patrick 
Conlin, Robert 
Conlin, Thomas 
Conway. Joseph 
Conway. Peter 
\ ndrew 
i 'i -ow ley, Floreni e 
Crow ley, Mrs. Tim. 
Crowley, Thomas 
Cunningham, ('has. P. 
Cunningham, James 
Cunningham, Patrick 



Degnon, Julia 




Dickel. Nicholas 




Doyle, Daniel 




Doyle. James 




Dunne, Judge \Y 


m. M. 




F 


Pannon, Edward, 


Jr. 


Fannon, Edward 


. Sr. 


Pannon, Laurence 


Fannon, .Michael 




Pannon, Joseph 




Pannon, Patrick 


A. 


Farrell, John D. 




Farrell, John F. 




Farrell. John M. 




Farrell, John P. 




Farrell. John V. 




Farrell. Patrick 




Farrell, P. H. 




Farrell. Mrs. P. 


H. 


Farrell, Thomas 




Farrell. William 


E. 


Farrell. William 


M. 


Finzel, Airs. Law 


rence 



Hughes. Frank 
Hughes. John 
Hull. Mrs. Ellen 
Hull, Frank 
Hook. Mary E. 



Hnllngher. All's. Patrick 
Gallagher, Charles 
Gallagher, James 
Gaughan, Harry 
Gihbons, Alary J. 
Graham, John C. 
Graham, Johnson 

H 

Hamilton, William L. 
Hammers. James 
Hammers. Mrs. Wm. 
Haneghan, James 
Haneghan, Francis 
Helbig, John F. 
Helbig Walter 
[em be! i !a1 herine 
Henchel, Lawrence 
Herbert, Fra m i 
Mi'i berl . James 
Herbert, William 
Hergot Lizzie 
Mine. Edward 
Hiner, Roberl 
1 liner. William 



Jeffries 


, Mrs. St( 


Jenkins, Samuel 


Kelly, 


Eliza 


Kenny, 


Edward 


Kenny, 


Tim. 


Kenny, 


Thomas 



Lancaster, G. VV. 
Larkin, Peter. Sr. 
Lai kin. Peter, ,1, 
Lanpert, Marguerite 
Lilly, Airs. John 
Logsdon, Albert 
Logsdon, Bernard 
Logsdon, Edward 
Logsdon. Elizabeth 
Logsdon, John 
Logsdon, Alary 
Logsdon. Meshai k 
Logsdon, Peter 
Logsdon, Richard 
Logsdon, Thomas 
Logsdon, Willi; 
Lynch, George 
Lynch, John 
Lynch, Michael 

M 

Mi Uee, Angus 
\h Den, inn F. B.. Sr. 
Hi Dermott, F. P.., Jr. 
McDermott, Thos. 
McDermott, Airs. K. 
McKenzie, James 
McKenzie, Frank 
McKenzie, Marj 

McKenzie, W. 

McNamee, Catherine 

MeNan , Chas. E. 

McNamee, Chas. P. 
\i. Namee, F., Sr. 
McNamee, F., Jr. 
Malloy, i ieo Jr. 
Malloj Geo. Sr 
Malloy, John L. 




<i"'» ST. PATRICK'S CONVENT. MT. SAVAGE. MD. 



Ski k 






Malloy, .John T. 
M alloy. Laurence 
Malloy, Michael 
.Malloy. .Mrs. Thos. 
.Malloy, Thomas 
Mattingly, Alex. 
Menehan, Mrs. A. 
Michaels, Peter J. 
Miller, Chas. A. 
.Miller, Chas. B. 
Miller, Edmund 
.Miller. Frances Jos. 
.Miller, .lames L. 
.Miller. Joseph 
.Miller. H. T. 
Monahan, A., Jr. 
.Monahan. A., Sr. 
.Monahan. James 
Monahan, John 
Monahan, Patrick 
Morgan, Mrs. Theo. 
Mullaney, Chas. 
Mullaney, Henry 
Mullaney, John 
Mullaney, Mrs. Thos. 
Mullan, William 
Mulligan, James 
Mulligan. John 
Murray. Mrs. Dr. 
Murray, Michael 



Naughton. James J. 
Naughton, Thos. A. 
Xoonan. Charles 
Noonan, Mrs. Ellen 
Noonan, John 
Noonan, Joseph 
Xoonan. William 



Quarles, .Mrs. Ed> 

K 

Rarick, Conrad 
Ratican. Joseph 
Ratican, Mary 
Ratican, Thomas 
Reagan, Edward 
Reagan, Michael 
Reilly, Mary 
Reynolds, Felix 
Reynolds, Fr. P. 
Reynolds, Thomas 
Richards, Mary A. 



Shaffer, Rh. 
Shaffer, Margaret 
Shaffer, Macarious 
Shaffer, Reginal 

Sheridan, John 
Smith, Adam 
Smith, Charles 
Smith, Edward 
Smith, Francis J. 
Smith, John 
Smith. Joseph G. 
Snyder, Joseph 
Snyder, Lawrence 
Stephens, .lames 
Stephens, Thomas 
Stokes, Mrs. Sarah 
Sim l/, Simon 
Sturtz, William 
Stowell. Frank 



Obecker, Ann 
O'Connor, Patrick 
O'Neill, James 
O'Toole. Charles 



Tansey, Nellie 
Tansey, Timothy 
Thompson, James J. 
Thompson, John 

U 



Porter, Mrs. Dinah 
Porter. Mrs. Geo. 
Porter, Harriet 
Porter, Mrs. Jacob 
Porter. John P.. 
Pratt. Richard 



Walker. Frank 
Warner. Susan 



A Meritorious Institution 



Established as a State Bank in 1888 with a capital of 
$25,000; changed to a National Bank in 1903 and 
capital increased to $50,000; Today with a capital 
and surplus of $90,000 and total resources of over 
$500,000 we are 

Better, Bigger and Stronger 

than ever. During the 2 I years of our existence, our 
aim has been to extend to our patrons the best pos- 
sible service. Our steady growth is evidence that the 
banking institution which throws the greatest safe- 
guards around its business in order to protect its de- 
positors merits the confidence of the public. If you 
are not a customer of this Bank let this be your in- 
vitation to become one ; our relations will be mutually 
profitable. 



Garrett National Bank 

OF OAKLAND, MARYLAND 

THE OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK IN GARRETT COUNTY 



DANIEL E. OFFUTT, President SCOTT T. JONES, Cashiei 

GILMOR S. HAMILL. Vice-President G. A. FRALEY, Asst. Cashi 



D. E. Orfutt, G. S. Hamill John M. Da 

George W. Legge John T. Mitchell \V. R. Stul! 

S. T. Jones 




REV. JAMES E. CONNELL 



ST. PETER'S CHURCH 

OAKLAND, MD. 

Rev. JAMES E. CONNELL, Pastor. 

Three thousand feet above the sea. on the summit of ihe Allegheny Moun- 
tain, is built Oakland. 

The lay history, as well as the Catholic history of Oakland, begins with 
I ■:ia. VlcCarty, who owned in 1S4S all the land on which the town now stands. 
The survey of the railroad marked its route through McCarty's land, and a year 
later the town was laid out and a depot built. A young priest came to Oakland 
on a pleasure trip in the summer of LS49, and was a guest of [saac McCarty, and 
having come prepared to say .Mass this priest, by name Rev. Win. D. Parsons, 
had the distinction of ottering up, in the first house built in the town, the first 
Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. in what is now the county seat of Garrett County. 
Father Parson was of English descent and born in Baltimore, where he entered 
St. .Marys Seminary as a student. He was ordained by Archbishop Eccleston 
in August LS45, at which time there were not twenty priests in the whole city. 
His first appointment was assistant at St. Vincent's. He afterward became 
a professor in St. .Mary's Seminary. In 1859 he became Chaplain at Mt. De 
tdemy, w here he died in l 899. 

In the summer of 1850- with the close of the church at Blooming Rose, and 
with the impetus of the building of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad— Oakland 
numbered quite a number of Catholics in its growing population, which attracted 
to its spiritual needs the attention of Rev. Michael Slattery, of Frostburg. Two 
years later a small chapel was erected. Many German families coming to Oak- 
land gave a German phase to the settlement, which brought to the parish the 
religious offices of the good Redemptorist Fathers of Cumberland, as evidenced 
by the names of Fathers Van de Ilraak and Weyrich on the records. 

In L855 the mission was in charge of Rev Richard Brown, of Mt. Savage. 
Father Carney likewise made occasional visits to Oakland. Father O'Reilly 
later took Oakland in his charge and visited it from dine to time until 1863, 
aIi. ii he relinquished the little town to the Redemptorists of Cumberland — 
notably among whom are noted Fathers Eberhardt, Weist and Gerdemann. 

In L865 Archbishop Spalding visited Cumberland and administered the 
Sacrament of Confirmation. Late in 1866, with the purchase of the Redemptorist 
property in Cumberland, the Carmelite Fathers assumed charge of Oakland, 
remembered of whom are Fathers Lewis, Vti Donald and Elias, and so continued 
until 1868 when Oakland became a mission of Westernport. Incorporated in 
L861, the town has continued to grow. As a mission the parish fell to the 
care of Rev. D. C. DeWulf. whose visits were of greater frequency than those 
of bis predecessors. 

In 1869 Father O'Sullivan. then assistant to Father DeWulf, first visited 
Oakland. Popular from the start. Father O'Sullivan soon became a prime 
favorite with the Oakland congregation, and with his promotion to the pas 
torate of Westernport gave particular attention to his Oakland charge, lie built 
the school house and established a school and worked zealously for the 
advancement of the Oakland Church. 

On April 1. 1872, Garrett County was created bj Act of Legislature and 
Oakland became the County Seat. The building of a court house and public 
buildings gave impulse to Oakland's prosperity. During Father O'Sullivan's 
pastorate he purchased a cemeterj and the blessing of the cemetery was his 
last official act. 

in May. 1878, Rev. Joseph v Gall en came m Oakland as the first 
1 M 



Si . i'i 1 1 r's Chi hi h -Conl inued. 
pastor. He was enthusiastically received, but the climate disagreeing with his 
health he was called away January, 1879. On the day of Father (.alien's 
departure. Rev. Joseph M. Frueschler was appointed to Oakland. He developed 
consumption, however, and died a few years later 

For two years after 1880 Rev. Casper Schmitt had charge of St. Peter's 
Church, and was succeeded bj Father Romaine Mattingly on September 10 1882 
who immediately planned and built a pastoral residence. In September. 1897, 
after a most successful administration by Father Mattingly, he was followed 
t>\ Rev. Francis A. Wunnenburg, who made many friends, but was forced by 
the climatic conditions to leave Oakland, being succeeded by Rev. James E. 
Connell. Father Connell was born in Pittsburg, but was reared in Cumberland, 
receiving his early education in St. Patrick's parochial school in that city. His 
classical studies were pursued at St. Charles College, where for deportment 
piety and talent, he was elected prefect of the Blessed Virgin Sodality. From 
there he went in St. .Mary's Seminary, where he made a distinctive record by 
his studies. In 1898 he was ordained bj His Eminence Cardinal Gib 
received bis first appointment as assistant pastor at Newport, Charles Countj 
His brilliant work for the first year won recognition from His Eminence the 
Cardinal, which found expression in his elevation to the pastorate of St. Peter's, 
where his success was immediate and lasting. 

Father James E. Connell assumed charge of St. Peter's Church. Oakland. Md.. 
in 1! having been transferred from Newport. Charles County. Md. 

His first step was to gather funds to wipe out an old debt which hung over 
the parish and develop resources which would yield a handsome church. This 
glorious wish of Father Connell's, aided by zeal and enterprise, bore rich fruit, 
and the magnificent new church was occupied February 15, 1903, and dedi- 
cated to the glory of God and the Catholic faith September 6, 1903, the cere- 
monies being conducted by that grand churchman Bishop Curtis. 

Father Thomas G. Smyth, now assistant at St. Stephen's Church. Washing- 
ton, D. ('.. preached the sermon. The debt of the new church, $22, has been 

wiped out. as also the prior debt at the lime of Father Connell's induction into 
the office of pastor of St. Peter's. 

HOURS OF SERVICE 

Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation.— Masses at 8 and 10.30 A. M. 

Second Sunday of the Month. — April to December (except July and August*. 
Mass at Hoyes at 10.30 A. M. 

July and August. — Every other Sunday Mass in Deer Park Chapel at 7 A. M.: 
everj Sunday in Oakland at 10.30 A. M. 

Sunday School.— 3 P. M. 

Sunday Evening. — Benediction, 7.30; July and August, S P. M. 

Week Day Mass. — June 1 to November 1, 7.30A.M.; November to J un 

Baptisms.— Sundays at 2.30 P. M. 

Confessions.— Saturdays and eve- of Festivals at 7 P. M. 

Communion Days. — First Sunday of the month for children. 

For children who have not made their First Communion. Confess . n> mi Sat- 
urdays of Emher Days at 9.30. 

PARISHIONERS 

A Browning. Mrs. .1. T. 

Archer, Mrs. S. Boj le, Michael 

It Burke, Annie 

Brow inn ■ John s. Browning, E. A. 

Brodley, Ellen Browning, K. T. 

1 12 



St. Peter's Chi ri h -Concluded. 



Broderick, Bridget 
Bartlett. Richard 
Banks, John W. 

C 
Carney. Martin 
( Jarnej . .John 
Chrystal. Mary 
Canty, William 
Carroll. Patrick 
Coglan. William 

E 
Eggers, Margaret 
Eggers. Henry 
Eggers, Charles J. 

1 
Faherty. J. T. 
Faherty. Michael 
Feeney. Peter 
Flanagan. Thomas 
Fleckenstein, A. 
Fay, Joseph 

G 
Gleason, Mrs. Joseph 
Garrett. Michael 
Garrett. Peter 
Garrett, Mary 
Garrett. Patrick J. 
Gonder, A. 11. 
Griffin, Jerome 
Greaser, Simeon 

H 
Hughes. Thomas 
Hail.T. Mrs. Catherine 
Helhig. Joseph P. 
Helbig, Andrew 
Harehe, Julia 
Hughes, John 
Hart, John \V. 
Helbig, John 
Hesen. Alexander 
Hesen. Harrison 
Herr, S. T. 
Helbig, Edward 

Helbig G 

Helbig, Harry 
Heck, Frank 



Jami son, R. S. 



Knox, Patrick 
Kerins, .lanes 



Lowenstein, Harry 
Loraditch, W. A. 
Laraway, Mrs. A. B. 

M 

Mackin, John 
.Murphy, Joseph 
Martin, Mrs. T. E. 
Mattingly, Aunt 
Maroney, Bridget 
Maroney, John 
Maroney, Richard 
Maroney, Michael R. 
Maroney, Peter 
Martin. Teresa 
Maffert, Mrs. William 

N 
Norris, Mrs. J. M. 
Nelson, Thomas 
Nalby, Stephen 

O 
O'Donnell. Edward 

Pendergast, Martin 
Pendergast. M. W. 

S 
Stanton. Lawrence 
Seilxdd. William 
Shafer. Julia 
Shafer, Joseph 
Shafer. Charles 
Shafer. Henry J. 
Shafer. Henry W. 
Stanton. .1. M. 
Ellen 

T 
Treacey, Owens 
Teals. Mrs. A. J. 

W 

While. Mrs. John 

Walsh. Teresa 

Wolf, Julia 

Welling, Nancj 

Wiseman. Man 

Wolf. Fred 

Wolf. Joseph 

Welling 

Wallace. Edward 

Welling. Chai les Et 



MISSION CHURCH 

HOYES, MD. 



HOURS OF SERVICE 

Masses. — Second Sunday each 1 ith, L0.30 A. M., April to December, excepl 

July; Confession before Mass. 

PARISHIONERS 
C R 

l Jlier Anne Friendsville. i: Mary ' Guarc " 



Groar, Joseph, Accident. 

M 

Mattingly, M., Hoyes. 
Mattingly, \V.. Hoyes. 
Vl< ( lei tegan, N . Ai cidenl 
MeGettegan, James. Accident. 



Sebold, G., Hoyes. 
Sebold. J.. Hoyi 3. 
Sebold, A.. Hoyes. 
Schlossnagle, Marj . Cm • ■. 

W 

Weimer, J. T.. Mi 
\\ eimer, Jessie, McHen] j . 
Weimer. John. Jr.. McHenr 
Wass, Kate, Cove. 



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A BANK THAT IS KNOWN THROUGHOUT WESTERN MARYLAND 



ST. PETER'S CHURCH 

WESTERNPORT, MD. 



Rev. THOMAS E. GALLAGHER, Pastor. 

The pioneer days of Westernport date back to before the Revolution. 
To-day it is a prosperous town with three railroads carrying away the output 
of busy coal mines and the products of the extensive pulp paper mills. The 
Catholic history of Westernport begins, however, not till quite late in its 
progress. Sixty years ago the only Catholics were Patrick McGuire and An- 
drew Mullen. Early in 1 S 4 ! t the first Mass was said by Father O'Conner, Re- 
demptorist priest, at the house of Patrick McGuire. Father Cronenberg a few 
months later visited Bloomington and offered up the Holy Sacrifice Ret 
Michael Slattery. of Frostburg, began to visit this neighborhood about the 
year 1850. when the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad completed its extension 
to Bloomington. His visits awakened Catholic enthusiasm, and an old ware- 
house was purchased and remodeled into a chapel, and here Father Slattery 
conducted services once a month. The congregation grew apace, and the 
chapel was soon enlarged. This chapel was known as "Father Slattery's 
Cathedral," and stood on the upper side of the railroad. 

In 1862 Father flattery was transferred to St. Joseph's Church, Balti- 
more, where he died in 1S66. For a time after Father flattery's going there 
was nn regular pries; in attendance. Later came Rev. Charles O'Reilly, who 
was succeeded by the Redemptorist Fathers of Cumberland, among whom 

may 1 specially mentioned Father Eberhardt. Dining his administration a 

parochial school was established. In September of the same year i L864) the 
Redemptorist Fathers Wirth, Heming and Kness preached a mission here 
with much success, following which the parish passed into the charge of 
Rev. William II. Gross, who remained until the Redemptorist Fathers left 
Cumberland. Next came the Carmelite Fathers, who were followed, through 
the decision of Archbishop Spaulding (1868) to place all parishes under 

ii -in i sts, bj Rev. I). ('. DeWulf. a Frenchman of superior attainments. 

whose energy and zeal awakened great activity among the faithful. The 
growing congregation made necessarj Hie appointment of an assistant, the 
Ret Jeremiah O'Sullivan, who later, upon the promotion of Father DeWulf 
to a Washington parish, was made pastor. 

Rev. Jeremiah O'Sullivan was horn in the county of Cork in 18 4 2. In 
1861 he came to America and was ordained by Archbishop Spaulding in 1868. 
A year later his career began at Westernport. By him was erected Hi" present 
church and i (invent and he promoted the parochial schools. Father O'Sullivan's 
crusade against drink will not be forgotten. He was the pioneer of total 
abstinence, and his work was not without profit, not only locally, bin 
nationally. Father O'Sullivan. after nine years' noble work in Westernport. 
w as . ailed in ft. Peter's Church, Wasbinuien. 1 1 C where bis ability gained 
him great repute, and in September, 1885, be was consecrated Bishop of 
Mobile. Bishop O'Sullivan passed to bis great reward August LO, 1896. 

Next came Father George w. Devine, whose ministering care did much 
for Westernport. Beginning bis studies in 1863, Father Devine was ordained 
1ST I by lit. Rev. Bishop Becker, lie came to Westernport from St. .Mary's 

Star of the Sea Church, Baltimore, where In- bad 1 n an assistant, and 

although but a short time in this ticdd. Father Devine reduced the church 
debt and improved the church property as well. From Westernport Father 
Devine went to become Chancellor of the Archdiocese, ami later was made 



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DIRECTORS 








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TIMOTHY KENNY 






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HOWARD C. DIXON. Cashier 



MICHAEL P. GANNON. MICHAEL P FAHEY 

ROBERT H GORDON. SAMUEL 3RADLEY 

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St. Petkk's Church — Continued. 

pastor of St. Peter's Church, Washington, D. C. At present Father Devine 
is the beloved pastor of St. John's Church, Baltimore. 

Rev. John M. Jones followed Father Devine, and his administration is 
pleasantly remembered. The next pastor of St. Peter's Church was Rev. 
.Michael J. Brennan, who paid off the chueh debt in full, and was promoted to 
the pastorate of St. Patrick's Church, Cumberland.. 

Father Peter R. Weider, the next pastor, was ordained December, 1SS1, 
by His Grace Archbishop Gibbons. His first appointment was at Hancock. 
Md., where he ministered for four years. He came to Westernport in Octo- 
ber, 1SS5. For ten years Father Weider was pastor of St. Peter's Church, 
Westernport — ten years of progress, devotion and popularity. Four years 
after leaving Westernport Father Weider died at Baltimore. October, 1S95. 

Rev. Joseph M. Walter was temporary successor to Father Weider. whose 
health was precarious when he came to Westernport. and who never re- 
gained his strength. He died March 20, 1898. 

The end of the century history of Westernport found St. Peter's Church 
in charge of Rev. Thomas E. Lyons. Born in Baltimore. Father Lyons en- 
tered St. Charles Collet;'- September 7. 1876, where he graduated with 
high distinction June. 1883. In 1SS3 he was ordained by His Eminence 
James Cardinal Gibbons and appointed assistant of the Church of St. Mary's 
Star of the Sea. Baltimore. From St. Mary's Star of the Sea. Father Lyons was 
appointed pastor of St. Peter's Church. Hancock. Md.. and from thence he 
came to Westernport. where he has earned a lofty place in the hearts of his con- 
gregation and won distinction for his progressive administration at St. 
Peter's Church. 

The present pastor. Rev. Father T. E. Gallagher, was appointed September 
L'T. L902, to the charge of the spiritual welfare of St. Peter's parish, having been 
transferred from St. Patrick's Church, Cumberland, Md.. where he had been 
stationed for about eight years. 

Father Gallagher, through ability and congeniality, soon won the good will 
of his parishioners and demonstrated that a new school building was a neces- 
sity, and in 1905 the structure was begun and completed in 1906. Father 
Gallagher also set about to gather funds for the erection of the large and 
beautifully equipped hall now known as St. Peter's Hall. 

During his pastorate at St. Peter's Father Gallagher has been ably assisted 
by Rev. Father Martin O'Donohue. formerly of St. John's. Baltimore. Md.. during 
the years of 1902-1904, and by Father Heath, till his appointment to the 
Catholic University, October. 1908. Since that time the mantle of care in hand- 
ling the entire parish has rested on the shoulders of Father Gallagher alone. 

Among the societies connected with St. Peter's is one of the strongest tern 
perance societies in the country. The society was founded by His Grace the late 
Bishop O'Sullivan. and has a membership extending throughout the United 
States; especially is this true of the department of the society attached to 
St. Peter's, on whose records are names of former Westernporters who are 
living in distant lands yet retain their membership in the parish and there pay 
their dues. 

The Cadets of Temperance, a union temperance society, was introduced bj 
Father Gallagher. 

Hoi Its OF SERVICE. 

\[;i i Sunday. 7.30-10.30 A. M : week da\s. 7 A. M. 

Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, first and third Sunday in each month. 

League of the Sa I Heart. Third Sunday in each month. 

Children of Mary. Meets each Sunday morning before the Low Mass. 
150 



i — Continued. 



PARISHIONERS 



Arnold, Frank 
Annan. John 



B 



Boyland, Miss Eliza 
Bell, James 
Burns. William P. 
Brady, Mrs. F. P. 
Brady, J. P. 
Barker, Mrs. Margaret 
Bondreau, Mrs. Hiram 
Brown, William E. 
Broderick. Michael 
Burke, John 
Bissett. Mrs. Bridget 
Bissett. Keyman 
Burke, Thomas 
Boyle. Thomas 



Cunningham, Mrs. Ellen 
Clough, Mrs. Joseph 
Curran, Hugh 
Collins. Mrs. William 
Chaney, Mrs. John 
Collins, Dennis 
Clise, Charles H. 
Collins. Mrs. John 
Curran, Patrick 
Carney, Michael 
Carey, Michael 
Cosgrove. Michael 
Cordire. Patrick 
Cordire, Peter 
Cosgrove. M. P. 
Condry, Mrs. James 
Conroy. Joseph T. 
Cosgrove. Michael 
Casey, John 
Cuff, Patrick 
Coleman, J, O. 
Clearj John 
Connolly, Peter 
Connelly, Matthew 



Deiling, Andrew 
Driscoll, Timothy 
Davitt, Bridget 
Donohue, James 



Eppler. Mrs. Frank 
Hasan, Mrs. Anna 
Eagan, Mrs. Lizzie 



Faherty. Mrs. Catherine 
Faharty. Mrs. Anna 
Fallon. Mrs. Thomas 
Foley, Miss Margaret 
Fallon, Catherine 
Foley, Mrs. Nora 
Fahey, Michael 
Flynn, Bridget 
Fisher. William A. 
Flanagan, Mrs. Sarah 
Foley, William 
Fahey. M. 1'. 
Foley, Martin 
Faherty. Mrs. William 



Getty, M. Alphonse 
Getty, John H. 
Getty, Joseph 
Gleason, Mrs. Virginia 
Gannon, Mrs. 
Gocke, Thomas W. 
Griffin. John 
Gavin. John W. 
Grasit, P. A. 
Gleason, John 
Garmley, Thomas 
Gannon, M. P. 
Gilmore, Mrs. Margaret 
Gamnom, Misses 
Graney, Mrs. Rebecca 



Dugan. Henry 
Detterman. Mrs. Lena 

Daily. Michael 
Doyle. Mrs. Mary A. 



Hoban, John F. 
Hoban, Mrs. Catharine 
Hun's. John 
Higgins, Fannie 
Hose, Mrs. J. 



Hi 



inon, John 

inon, Joseph 
Hines, Miss Maggie 
Hasnill, Mrs. T. A. 
Hogan, Mrs. Bridget 
Henry, Mrs. Thomas A. 
Howard, B. S. 
Hawley, John O. 
Heglman, James 
Hughes, Terrance 
Hughes, John P. 
Healey, Mrs. John 
Hickey, Michael 
Healy, Mrs. Bridget 



Ingols, Jarrett 



Jenkins, Mrs. 
Johnson, Mrs. L. A. 
Johnson. L. V. 
Joseph, Alexander 



Kirk. John 
Kenny. Timothy 
Kenny. Thomas F. 
Kenny, .Mrs. T. A. 
Kelly, Mrs. Kate 
Kelly. James F. 
Kenny. William 
Kenny, Miss Mary 
Kelly, John J. 
Keely. John J. 
Kelly, Miss Mary 
Kelly. Mis. William 
Koberg, Mrs. Anna 
Kearney, Joseph 



Laeey, Mrs. M. 
Laughlin, James O. 
Louth. Mrs. Mary 
Laughlin, Charles 
Laughlin, Joseph P. 
Laughlin, John. Sr. 
Laughlin. P. A. 
Love. Mrs. Richard 
Laughlin. Andrew 
Lynch, John 
Laffey, Michael 



M 

McLane, Mrs. Catherine 
Mitchell. Mrs. C. H. 
Maybury, Henry 
Mansfield. William F. 
Moran, John 
Morrison, Taylor 
McMillan, Mrs. Robert 
McDermott, Mrs. A. 
Mullen. Patrick 
.Moran, Mrs. Mary 
Mackey, Thomas 
McGuire. Mrs. Thomas 
McGuire, Mrs. .Mary 
Moran, Thomas 
Maybury. John B. 
Murphy, Mrs. Catherine 
Murphy. Mrs. Ellen 
M alone. John 
McKane. Miss Emma 
Morgan, Michael 
Morgan. Mrs. Mary E. 
Mertz, John F. 
Mullen. Andrew 
McGuigan, John, Sr. 
McGuigan. John. Jr. 
Mullen. John 
Malloy. William 
Moran. Mrs. Mary 
Morgan, Mrs. Bridget 
McGreevy, Mrs. .Mamie 
.Malloy. Thomas 
McDonald. Bessie 
Murphy. Thomas P. 
McKone. Mrs. J. J. 
McKenzie, Henry 



X 

Noon. E. J. 

Naughton. Mrs. Michael 
Niland, Mrs. Ellen 
Niland. John 
Niland, Mrs. Mary E 
Nan, Henry 

() 

O'Leary. Dennis 
O'Donnell, Michael 
O'Brien, Mrs. Martin F. 
O'Brien, John 
O'Donnell, John 
O'Brien, Edward 
O'Gorman, Edward 
O'Gorman, Mrs. C. 



's Cn I'ui'ii — Concluded 



R 

Ritter, .Mrs. M. 
Rumsey, Mrs. Charles 
Rooney, Michael 
Roach, .Mrs. Anna 
Ricker. Frederick 
Rowan, Thomas 
Reddington, Miss Mar; 
Ryan. John 



Sabadie, Nassif 
Steiley. A. 
Small. Patrick 
Sansfield. Thomas 
Sansfield, Mathew 
Sansfield. Mary 
Spicer, Joshua 
Sloan. .Miss Emma 
Stowell, Joseph 
Starch, Mrs. Willi: 



Turley, Miss Kate 
Tibbitts, Miss Eva 
Thomas. Miss Fannie 
Tierney. Mrs. John 
Tierney, .Messrs. 

V 

Veack. Mrs. Walter 

\V 

Wallace, Mrs. Margan 
Walsh. Patrick 
Welsh. Michael 
White. Patrick 
White, James 
White. Kate 
Welsh, Miss Mary 
Welsh. Bryan 
Welsh, Matthias 
Welsh, James 
Williams. William R. 
Walker. Harvey 
Wilson. Peter 

Z 
Zanutz, Joseph 



ST. GABRIEL'S CHURCH 

BARTON. MD. 



Rev. JAMES QUINN, Pastor. 

On George's Creek, midway between Lonaconing and Westernport, in a deep 
valley, is situated the town of Barton, named after Barton. England, by the 
Shaw family who first settled here. The coming of Patrick Cadden. in 1854, 
was l lie beginning of the church in Barton. In his house was celebrated first 
the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass by visiting priests — Fathers Slattery and O'Reilly. 
Not long after this a small chapel was erected on the ground which is now the 
cemetery of St. Gabriel. 

The Barton parish is the child of St. Mary's Church, of Lonaconing, and 
remained in the charge of the Lonaconing priests, until it became of such 
strength as to sustain a pastor of its own. From 1856 to 1860 the Redemptorist 
Fathers came occasionally to Barton, which visits were renewed from 1S63 to 
1866, in which year the Carmelite Fathers of Cumberland ministered to the 
growing charge, numbering about 600 souls. Father Phillipp had charge, and 
upon him may be placed the responsibility for the situation of the new church, 
which was planned during this period. Barton was attended as a mission of 
Westernport until 1871 by Fathers deWulf and O'Sullivan. In this year Father 
James O'Brien came to Barton and for four years blessed the parish with his 
faithful administration, during which time the property was beautified and the 
bell installed. 

In 1875 Barton had its first resident pastor, Rev. William Mahoney, who 
remained for two years, being succeeded by Rev. M. A. Fennp. late in 1*76. 
Father Fenne after two years of successful labor was followed by Father John 
T. McCall. who remained until August. 1881, when Barton became a mission to 
Westernport, and was attended by Rev. Michael J. Brennan in conjunction with 
the Capuchin Fathers of Cumberland. In 1*S2 Rev. Peter M. Manning took 
permanent charge and remained until 1884. Rev. James P. Carey succeeded 
Father Manning, who was promoted to Lonaconing. Father Carey has won no 
small reputation as a poet of high merit. He was followed at Barton by Rev. 
Stephen .1. Clarke in 1886. In 1890, upon the removal of Father Clarke to 
Frostburg, Father Thomas E. Gallagher became pastor. At the close of the 
century St. Gabriel's Church was in charge of Rev. John .1. Conway. 

The present pastor, Rev. .lames Quinn, came to St. Gabriel's from St. 
Joseph's Church. Baltimore. Md.. September 1. 1908. 



HOURS OF SERVICES. 
Masses.— Sundays. 8 and 10.30 A. M. 
Sundaj Schools.— Sundays, 9.15 A. M. 
Holy Days — Masses 7 and 9 A. M. 
Week Days. Masses s A. M. 
Sailed Heart Devotion. First Friday and First Sunday of each month. 



Arnold, Harmon 
Arnold. Dominick 



PARISHIONERS 



K 

Francis 



Birmingham, Wi 
Bean, John 
Bevans. Miss 
Brennan, Edwar 
Berkenbo. John 
Brehany, James 



Conway, Patrick 
Crawford. .Mrs. 
Cavan, Patrick 
Casey. John 
Coner, Mrs. Bridget 
Clark. Edward 
Clark, Mrs. B. 
Condon. James 



Logsdon Brothers 
Logsdon, William 
Lannon, John 



M 

McKenna, Mary 
McCabe, Michael 
Murray. Mary 
Mai tin. P. H. 
Miller, Mis. B. 
McKenna, James 
M Cormick. Thomas 



O'Toole, John 



Danahey. Matthew 
Bempsey, James 



Footer, Peter 
Footer, Patrick 
Footer, James 
Fitzpatrick, William 
Fitzpatrick Brothers 
Foley. John 



Green, Patrick 

Gallagher. P. H. 
Cannon. Thomas 



V 

Philpot, Mrs. Bertha 

11 

Rodgers, Patrick. 



Thompson, Joseph 
Thompson. Michael 
Thompson. David 
Tansey, Patrick 

Timney, Mrs. 



Ward, Mis. Hugh 
Wallace John 
Welsh. Peter, Sr. 
Welsn, Peter, Jr. 
\\ inkier, George 
Wyland, Mrs. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH 

FREDERICK, MD. 

Rev. WILLIAM .J. KANE, Pastor. 

Frederick, one of the prettiest cities of Maryland, is situated on both sides 
of Carroll Creek, about sixty-one miles from Baltimore. It has a population verg- 
ing on 15,0110. excellent railroad facilities, municipal government, electric light 
plant, waterworks, a telephone system and well-paved streets. 

The main facts of this article are taken from Scharfs "Western Maryland." 

"To write fully the history of St. John's Catholic Church and residence is to 
give the history of Catholicism in Frederick County. All the churches in the 
county have been more or less connected with St. John's. St. Joseph's on the 
Manor, and the churches of Petersville, Liberty and Middletown, are its off- 
shoots. St. John's is also associated with the churches of Mount St. Mary's and 
Emmitsburg, as having had for a number of years the same pastor, the Rev. 
John Du Bois, afterward the Bishop of Xew York. By the middle of the last 
century a number of Catholics had settled in Monocacy Valley. They were prin- 
cipally of English origin, having come directly from England or from the lower 
counties of the State. Many of them were tenants on Carroll's Manor, on the 
Monocacy, and these formed the nucleus of St. Joseph's parish, at present under 
the charge of the Fathers of the Novitiate." 

"In enumerating the Catholic population of Frederick one hundred years ago. 
the German Catholics have also to be taken into the reckoning. Some Hessians 
settled in Frederick Town at the end of the Revolutionary war, but of these very 
few were Catholics. There were also a few Irish Catholics scattered through the 
country." 

"The Fathers of this mission had stations, churches or residences through 
Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and a part of Xew York. Most likely Fred- 
erick Valley was for some time attended directly from St. Thomas'. The Father 
who was appointed for the work used, no doubt, to make long excursions, which 
would take in the Catholics of what is now the District of Columbia, of Mont- 
gomery and Frederick Counties, along the banks of the Potomac River. After 
the mission was begun at Conewago, some German father would perhaps go to 
Frederick Town, a distance of forty miles, to administer the Sacraments to the 
faithful of his nationality. In the course of time the number of Catholics in- 
creased and it became necessary to build a residence and chapel." 

"This residence and chapel were accordingly erected in 1763 by Father John 
Williams, an English Jesuit. There is reason to believe that Father George 
Hunter was the successor of Father Williams. In Campbell's list of ex-Jesuits, 
alluded to before. Father James Framback is set down as the next pastor of 
Frederick Town, in the year 1773. Father James Walton sue, eeded Father Fram- 
back. Father Walton was an Englishman and came to Maryland in the year 
1776, and died at St. Inigoes in 1803." 

"The small chapel of Father Williams was for forty years the only place of 
worship for Catholics of Frederick County." 

"The Rev. John Du Bois is too conspicuous in the history of the Church in the 
United States to need any notice here. He also had under his care the Catholics 

156 




REV. WM. J. KANE AND ST. JOHN'S CHURCH 



St. John's Chi k< ii— Continued. 

about Emmitshurg. and those of Montgomery County, Martinsburg. Western 
Maryland and Virginia, and. in fact, for a long time was the only priest between 
Baltimore and St. Louis. One of the first undertakings of the new pastor was to 
build a church in place of the small upper room in the residence. This work 
began in the year 1800." 

"The church was a brick building eighty-two feet in length and forty-five feet 
wide, and baying been torn down, in part, in 1859, and rebuilt and transformed, 
has since been used by the Junior Fire Company as an infirmary." 

"The Rev. Du Bois remained in Frederick until 1806, when he removed to Em- 
mitsburg, and from this place probably went to Frederick once or twice a 
month. Things continued in this state until Father Francis Malevie, of the 
Society of Jesus, took charge. 'Ibis occurred in 1811. The church continued to 
grow, especially in the more distant stations, and it became necessary a few 
years later to build small churches in several parts of the country. The church 
of St. John's was still unfinished and was even unsafe. Father Malevie had the 
church plastered in 1812, and the roof was secured by means of wooden 
columns. Father .Malevie died October 3, 1822." 

"Several gentlemen, among whom was Mr. Taney, addressed a letter to the 
Father Superior asking him to retain Father McElroy. The request was granted 
and thus was begun a career of usefulness which, if we consider the resources 
at band, has scarcely been equaled in any city in the country." 

"Toward the end of 1823, negotiations were begun with the Superior of the 
Sisters of Charity for the establishment of the community in Frederick." 

"In 1 s ii r> it became necessaiy to build a larger establishment for the Sisters, 
to serve for a school and an orphan asylum. During this year I 1825) Father 
McElroy had as his assistant Father F. \V. Walsh, who was much n teded, as 
the congregation in Frederick alone was enough for one priest." 

"The pastor had done a great deal toward finishing and beautifying the old 
church in Frederick, but on account of the increase in the congregation, it was 
thought advisable to extend the front of the church fifteen or twenty feet and 
erect galleries. The project was abandoned for some time for want of money. 
In 1832 the new plan was put before the congregation and four thousand dollars 
were subscribed. To this amount was added a legacy of another thousand 
dollars. Very Rev. Father Peter Kenney, Superior and Visitor, was consulted 
and after an interchange of opinions, it was finally resolved, in January, 1833, 
that the work should be undertaken and the site changed to the lot on the 
opposite side of the street." 

"The corner-stone was laid in the northeast angle of the nave on St. Joseph's 
Day. in 1S33. On April 26 St. John's was consecrated with the usual impressive 
services of the Church." 

"The school building was burned down in 1845, but was soon replaced by 
another." 

"Father Thomas Lilly succeeded Father McElroy in September, 1845. The 
assistants were Fathers George Villiger. Stonestreet. Meredith. Jenkins. Finotti 
and Bogue." 

"In 1846 the Sisters of Charity withdrew and were replaced by the Nuns of 
the Visitation from Georgetown. In IMS Father Charles H. Stonestreet became 
the successor of Father Lilly. Father Thomas Mullaly was appointed the suc- 
cessor of Father Stonestreet at the end of 1850. The pastors after Father 
Mullaly were Fathers Villiger. Samuel Barber. Hippolyte. De Neckere, Blen- 
kinsop and McAtee. The assistants during this period, from is;,:', to I860, were 
at different times. Fathers liogue. Duddy and Tul'fer." 



St. John's Chubch — Continued. 

"In 1860 the residence on Church street was rented out, and the Fathers and 
Brothers connected with the church and college took up their abode in the Noviti- 
ate, where they have since remained. The pastors who followed Father Sourin. 
who had charge of the church from 1860 to 1S70. were Fathers O'Kane. Smith. 
Jenkins. Ciampi, Fulmer, and lastly, Father Stonestreet, who, after an absence 
of twenty-five years, returned to the church as its parish priest." 

"Recently the parish has been in charge of the following pastors: Fathers 
Cache. Peters. Holland, Brand, Hann and Gaffney, all of whom labored with 
zeal and success to advance the interest of their people." 

"The most renowned pastor of Frederick is unquestionably Father John Mi 
Elroy. He built a magnificent church at Frederick, where the Maryland province 
now has its Novitiate. In 1847. the famous Jesuit was sent to Boston, which for 
seventeen years became the principal scene of his zeal and his labors." 

In the year 1900 Father Coleman was succeeded by Rev. William J. Kane, 
under whose supervision St. John's Church has seen many improvements both in 
the property as well as spiritual welfare. 

REV. WILLIAM J. KANE, Pastor. 



Its ol Si EVII I S. 



Mass I A. M. 



Masses on Sunday — 7 and in 

Vespers— 7.30 P. M. 

Mass Week Days — 7 A. M. 

Holy Name Society — .Meets on the second 

Holy Communion every third month. 
Sacred Heart Sodality — Meets every Friday 
First Friday Devotion — Meets on the first Friday at l.'-jt) o'clock 



ling at 7 o'clock. 



PARISHIONERS 



Albaugh. Mrs.. E. Third St. 
Andrews, Charles. Whisner 



B 



Bachell. Mrs., W. Patrick St. 
Baltzell. Mr. and Mrs.. E. Second St. 
Banghinan, Mr. and Mrs.. E. Church St. 
Baumgardiner, Mrs. Bernard, W. Mar- 
ket St. 
Beckley. Sabina. S. Market St. 
Bennett. Mr. and Mrs., E. Second St. 
Berley. Mrs. Jerome, W. Patrick St. 
Bessant, Mrs.. E. Second St. 
Biser, Mrs.. E. Third St. 
Biser, Mr. and Mrs.. S. Market St. 
Biser, Mr. and Mrs. W. P., Nr. Federal. 
Brenner, Mrs. Charles, E. Second St. 
Brookey. Frank. E. Patrick St. 
Brunier, Mrs. H., Rocky Springs. 
Brookey. Mrs. P.. \V. Sixth St. 
Buckley. Win.. X. Patrick St. 
Burch. O.. E. Second St. 



Burkhardt, James. E. Church St. 
Burch. Mrs. George. E. Patrick St. 
Burch. Mrs. I., E. Patrick St. 
Burch. Dr.. E. Church St. 
Buick, Mrs. Alford, Telegraph St. 
Butts, Mrs. Alma. N. Patrick St. 
Butts, Lottie, N. Patrick St. 
Buick, Joseph. Telegraph St. 



Carroll. Mr. and Mrs. Michael, E. Third 

Street. 
Claybaugh. Mrs. Arthur. E. Fourth St. 
Crimmins, Daniel, W. Market St. 
Crumm, Casper. Alice and George, E. 

Fourth St. 
Crumm, George H.. Carroll St. 

I) 
Davis, Mrs. B. S. Market St. 
Dempsey, William, E. Second St. 
Detrow, Mr. and Mrs. I.. E. Fifth St. 
Detrow, Mrs . Nr, Federal. 
Doll. Mrs.. E. Fifth St. 



Continued. 



Doll, Mr. and Mrs. James. E. Patrick St. 
Doll, Mrs.. E. Church St. 
Dixon. Harold, E. Second St. 
Dyer, Mrs. Mary, \V. Seventh St. 



noffman, Mr. and Mrs.. E. Fourth St. 
Hogan. Mrs.. Fourth St. 
Honanl. Mrs.. E. Second St. 
Hunicker, Dr., \V. Patrick St. 
Hyland. Charles. E. Patrick St. 



Ebberts, .1. Genevieve, E. Second St. 
Eckstein. Mrs.. E. Patrick St. 
Eisenhouser, Mr. and Mrs. John. N. 

Market St. 
Eisenhouser. Mr. and Mrs. J.. X. Pat 

rick St. 
L.kins. Mrs. Joseph, E. Third St. 
Eppley. Mrs., N. Patrick St. 
Erbb, Mary, W. Market St. 
Esworthy, Mrs. J. A.. Rich Mills. 



Flanigan, Margaret, E. Church St. 
Ford, R. G.. E. Church St. 
Forrest. James, W. Patrick St. 
Foster, Bartholomee Catherine. E. 

Fourth St. 
Font, Mrs. K.. S. Market St. 
Fraley. Mrs. Robert, W. Patrick St. 
Frazier, Mrs., S. Market St. 

<; 

Cannon. George, E. Patrick St. 
Gloyd, Mrs.. E. Third St. 
Grailer, Charles and Mary, E. Third St. 
Gresham. Mrs.. E. Patrick St. 
Grove, Mrs. Abe., E. Fourth St. 
Crover. Harry. James. William and 
M. J.. Nr. Fredind. 

H 

Hafer, Mrs.. \V. Patrick St. 
Hahhis. Mrs.. \V. Seventh Si. 
Haley, Mrs. Lewis, X. Patrick SI. 
Haller, Mr. and .Mrs. Wm.. E. Fourth 

SI 1'eet. 

Hamilton. Mr. and Mrs. Calvin. Feaga- 

ville. 
Harman. Allie, Carroll St. 
Hartman, Mrs.. X. Patrick St. 
Haitman. Mrs. John. E. Third St. 
Hauff, Mrs. Joseph, E. Fourth si 

Held. Bettie, E. Second St. 

Hemler, Marj . E. Second St. 
ii. 1 1 ing Edward, E. Second St. 
Hiner. Thomas, Carroll St. 
Hippie, Mrs.. Gas House' Road. 

Hitzelbaugh, Charles. E. Second St. 



Jameson, Mr. and Mrs.. Court Square. 
Jarlioe. Mrs.. E. Second St. 



Kehoe, Mrs. William. Whisner St. 
Kennedy, Mrs. James, E. Third St. 
Kennedy. Mr. and Mrs. J.. S. Market St. 
Kennedy. Mr. and Mrs. T.. S. Markei Si. 
Kennedy, Mr. and .Mrs. M.. X. Patrick 

Street. 
Kline. Mrs.. X. Patrick St. 



Lammen. John. Gas House Road. 

Lanbright, Mrs.. E. Patrick St. 

Larkin. Mrs.. S. .Market St. 

Lepps, Mrs.. E. Third St. 

Libhertz, .Mrs. William. E. Third St. 

Linton. Benj., Carroll St. 

Little, Mrs. T., East St. 

Little. Frank. Fourth St. 

I. 'in-. Mrs.. E. Fourth St. 

Luyder, Mr. and Mis. C. E. Third St. 

M 

McAvoy, Kaie. E. Second St. 
McCaffrey, William, W. Patrick St. 
McEween, Alt'onl. Clifton. 
McDermott, Mrs. C. M.. X. Patrick St. 
McKenzie, Win., Rockj Springs. 
McKenzie, Mrs. T. M.. Rockj Springs. 
McMahon. Mrs.. E. Fourth St. 
M< Sherrj . Mis.. E. Second St. 
McSherry, Mrs. R., Court Square. 

Maroni, Carmel, S. Market SI 
Marino. Salvator, S. Markei Si. 
Marino. Mr. and Mrs. A.. S. Markei St. 
Meyer, Thomas. Telegraph Si. 
Miller. Milton, Gas House Road. 
Morgan, Mrs.. Frederick, Md. 
Morgan, Mr. and Mis. Scott, W. Sixth 
Street. 

Moran, Mr. ami Mrs. Thomas. Conn 

Squat e 
Mulinex. Mrs. M.. S. Market St. 
Murphy, Daniel, w. Patrick si. 
60 



Church — Concluded. 



Xeidhardt, Mrs.. E. Patrick St. 

Neidhardt, Mrs., E. Patrick St. 

New, George C, S. Market St. 

Niles. Mrs.. Burch St. 

Nickless. Mr. and Mrs. Chas., W. Sixth 

Street. 
Nogle, Mrs.. W. Sixth St. 
Nutt, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin. Ruthland 

Hall. 



Payne, Miss Ella. W. Market St. 
Payne, Mrs. E., W. Patrick St. 
Phillipps, Mr. and Mrs. John. W. Sixth 

Street. 
Plun.vard. Mrs. Georg?, X. Patrick St. 
Poole, Mrs. Georgie, E. Third St. 



Smith, Christopher, Fourth St. 
Snyder, Mr. and Mrs., East St. 
Sparrow, Francis, W. Market St. 
Spissard, Mrs., N. Patrick St. 
Starner, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, I 

Street. 
Stevens, Joseph, E.Patrick St. 
Strailman, Ida. E. Patrick St. 
Strip. Elmer. E. Second St. 
Stuab, Blanche. E. Second St. 
Summers, Mr. and Mrs. Elias, E 

Street. 



Topper 
Tyson, 



T 

John, E. Pati 



R 

Remmer. Peter, E. Fifth St. 
Roberts, Mrs., E. Third St. 
Roberts. W., E. Third St. 
Roether, Mrs. V., N. Patrick St. 
Rohrback. Mr. and Mrs. Charles, Lime 

Kilns. 
Rosi, Charles, S. Market St. 
Kowe, August, Fourth St. 
Rowe, Dick, Fourth St. 
Rowe. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph. Fourth St. 



St. Atley. C. B., E. Second St. 
Sappington. Dr., W. Market St. 
Schaffer, Mrs. Rose, N. Patrick St. 
Schenk. Mrs. Mary. S. Market St. 
Schmidt, W. D.. Bennett Bldg. 
Schill. John. X. Patrick St. 
Schwlng, Mrs. Louis, E. Fourth St. 
Seachurst, Mrs., E. Church St. 
Seymour. B., W. Third Si. 
Sharrett, Joseph, W. Patrick St. 
Shill, Mrs., Whisner St. 
Sheffield, John. E. Second St. 
Smallwood, Addie. S. Market St. 
Smith, Mrs. S., Telegraph St. 
Smith, Mrs., E. Patrick St. 
Smith, Mrs. Fannie. Carroll St. 
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. C, E. Third £ 



\V 

Wachter, Lucy. E. Third St. 

Wallace, Mary, E. Church St. 

Walsh, Miss Kate, W. Patrick St. 

Whisner, Philip and Mary, E. Third St. 

Whisser, Mrs., X. Patrick St. 

Wilcom. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, Rich Mills. 

Wilcom, Mr. and Mrs. John. Rich Mills. 

Willis, Mrs., W. Seventh St. 

Wilson. John. W. Third St. 

Wilson, Charles and Virgie. E. Church 

Street. 
Wilson. George, E. Patrick St. 
Wilson. Marion, E. Patrick St. 
Wilson. Mrs. X. J.. E. Patrick Si 
Winkleman, Mrs., Fourth St. 
Wolfe, Mrs., Fourth St. 
Worley, James, Gas House Road. 
Wright. J. H.. X. Market St. 

Street. 

Y 

Yingling, Mr. and Mis. V.. \V. Market 
Young. Mrs.. \V. Sixth St. 
Young, Mr. and Mrs. William G., E. Sec- 
ond St. 
young, Mis. Edith, X. Patrick Si. 



SKETCH OF ST. MARY'S CHURCH 

HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

The city of Hagerstown. the county seat of one of the most fertile counties 
of the Commonwealth of Maryland, was founded by Jonathan Hager, in the year 
1739. Up to the year of Independence. 1770, Washington County did not exist 
as a separate county, but in that memorable year it was formed out of Frederick, 
and since that time has existed and flourished as one of the most beautiful 
counties of the State of Maryland, which to Catholics is of special interest, since 
it was settled and colonized by Lord Baltimore, a Catholic nobleman from Eng- 
land. It was not until ten years after the United States gained its independence 
that from Conewago. near Hanover. Pa., which is yet active as a Catholic mis- 
sion, the Rev. .lames Fremback, one of the early pioneers of the Catholic mission 
at Conewago. was sent to establish the first Catholic mission at Hagerstown. The 
records concerning Father Fremback's first acts are rather meagre, but it is an 
established fact that in the year 17N7 Jonathan Hager, the founder of Hagers- 
town, though not of Catholic faith, donated to him a piece of ground on X. 
Walnut Street for a burying ground, on a corner of which a log house was 
erected as a place of worship for the few scattered Catholics of the mission. It 
is due to that noble Catholic .Missionary to mention that he founded missions in 
a number of places between Hagerstown and Cumberland. He was one of those 
indefatigable priests who nobly devoted their whole lives to the extension of their 
holy Faith. After many years of incessant labors Father Fremback was called 
to enjoy the reward of the good and faithful servant. 

From the following letter dated 1791. addressed to Bishop John Carroll, 
of Baltimore, it would appear thai Father Dennis Cahill was in charge here at 
that time. "I have been successful," he writes, "since I came to these parts 
The congregations are growing numerous and the members of each most ex- 
emplarj and pious. I attended at Elizabeth Town. Hagerstown. Martinsburg, 
Shepherdstown, Winchester, Fort Cumberland and Chambers Town (Chambers- 
burg, Pa. ) the four former more frequently than the latter. Mr. Hager has given 
land for a burying ground." 

On May 24, 179-1. Father Cahill bought from Adam Miller, of Bedford County, 
Pa., the lot on West Washington and Walnut Streets, whereon stands the present 
church. The price paid for the lot was the small sum of five shillings. 

In 1799 Hagerstown was visited by the Rev. Francis Bodkins. After him 
the Prince Priest. Father Gallitzin and the Saintly Father Nicholas Zocci, to- 
gether with the Rev. Father Duhamel, afterward of Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, 
complete the period up to 1848. Then came Father Redmond, who acted as 
pastor here for four years. 

Father Redmond was succeeded bj the Rev. Timothy Ryan in 1822, a young 
priest who vigorously carried on the noble work begun. It nun here i>e incident- 
ally remarked that when in the year ls:il and 1832 an epidemic of cholera pre 
vailed among the operatives in the construction .>t the C. and O. Canal along 
the line at Williamsport, Father Ryan made the most strenuous efforts for the 
relict of the sufferers. This noble pioneer of Hie Holj Catholic church not 
alone caused St. Mary's Church at Hagerstown to he erected, hut he began in 



Sketch <>i St. Mary's Chtjbch — Continued. 

1S35 the building of St. Peter's at Hancock. After working with the most inde- 
fatigable zeal for the improvement of all the Catholic missions he had founded 
in and around Hagerstown, he died on June 2, 1837, in his fifty-third year, and 
lies buried in front of St. Mary's Church on West Washington Street. In his 
last illness he had been assisted by the Rev. Father Michael Guth, who succeeded 
him as chief pastor of the different missions. For seven years he zealously 
discharged his duties, when he was called away in 1845, and temporarily suc- 
ceeded by Rev. Father Joseph Plunkett, from Virginia. In the same year Rev. 
Father Henry Myers, a man of saintly character, and the most serene disposition, 
took charge of all the missions from Hagerstown to Cumberland, holding ser- 
vices in private houses where there were no churches. His kindly nature won 
him friends everywhere not alone among the adherents of his own faith, but 
also among non-Catholics. The Catholic Church at Williamsport owes its 
existence to this noble priest. After twelve years of the most active missionary 
labor he left for Pikesville, near Baltimore, in 1857. being succeeded by the Rev. 
Father George Flautt, who for a while had been with him in his missionary 
field. The following year, 1S5S, there followed Father Myers, who in the mean- 
time had become the pastor of St. Vincent's Church at Baltimore. He died a 
short time before Father Myers, his friend and colaborer. Both these men leave 
the memory of a holy life behind them which will never be forgotten in the 
history of the Catholic mission of this section. 

In 185S Rev. Father Edmund Didier took charge of this mission, a man 
of great enterprising spirit, who made great improvements, materially increas- 
ing the membership of his diverse congregations. He founded a new mission at 
Clearspring, where for years services had been held in private houses. After 
three years of the most active and energetic life, he was followed by the Rev. 
John Gloyd, then pastor of St. Peter's Church, at Hancock. He stayed here, 
however, but a short time. Father Malachy Moran came in 18G2, discharging 
his duties during a portion of the memorable and tumult tempestuous years of 
the Civil War. In these troublesome times Father Moran showed himself a 
fearless and active shepherd. From 1864 to L865 this mission was temporarily 
tilled by the Jesuit Fathers McDonough. Stonestreet and Janelect, until in the 
summer of 1SG5 Father Edmund Didier returned, carrying on his pastorate until 
IMA. when he became pastor of St. Vincent's Church, Baltimore. 

After Father Didier's departure for his new sphere of activity the Rev. 
John M. Jones succeeded as pastor of St. Mary's. He enjoyed the reputation of 
a great scholar and linguist. Among the many improvements owing to him, 
mention must be made of the addition of the brick tower and vestibule to St. 
Mary's Church, finished in 1871. Father Jones also imported from Germany 
the statue of the Crucifixion behind the main altar. Three years after the begin- 
ning of Father Jones' pastorate. Rev. Desiderius DeWulf took charge, but for 
a very short time. He was succeeded by Father Jones, who a second time 
devoted his valuable services to the missions. During Father Jones' second 
pastorate the Sisters of St. Joseph established here a parochial school. This 
school is now conducted by the Sisters of Notre Dame. The school has ever been 
a great success and exercised considerable influence in the community as an 
educational institute. During his second pastorship, Father Jones also caused 
to be erected the present St. Augustine's Church at Williamsport. 

in ins:: Father J. Alphonse Frederick became the next pastor, remaining 
in charge until 18S3. Among the manj good works undertaken during his regime 

was the erection of the Dahlgren Mei ial Chapel on the summit of the South 

Mountain, 1SS1-1SS2. Rev. Henrj Voltz came in 1883 ami serve, I until 1S85. 

When lie was followed by Hi,. Rev. Dominie Maiil,\. 
168 



M. P. MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

More than ILKHl Moller Pipe Organs now in use. We have l.iult 44 pipe organs fur churches 
in Pittsburg: :B ill Ilaltmiore: :U iu Phllailelpllia: 'N j„ Cincinnati; Is in Washington. II. I'. ami 17 in 

Hagerstown, Md. Our organs an- endorsed bj the most eminent organists and clergymen ami fully 
guaranteed. Specifications and estimates free o„ application, roues lence solicited. For cats 

M. P. MOLLER, Hagerstown, Md., U. S. A. 




Dr. Fahrney's Teething Syrup 



AS A RELIEF from 




rHING SYRUP I- til.' -af.-t l.-lll.-lt f.O t llll.lt .-II lean l.e l|se, I to, all eehoial Ull- 

I II..- .IJe Oj tl|| |.o- (., ellll.llioo.l. We ,||e e. ■ II -t.l 1 1 1 I \ leColVIIU.' tesllll Klls flOIII 

.. have u-e.l il with the l.nst result-, an. I ph\ -icians ; ,i.- pi es,-i il.ipe it in then ret/alar 

SOLD bj all druggists at menu live cents pei bottle, or will he mailed direct on 



DRS. D. FAHRNEY & SON 

122-126 W. Washington St. Hagerstown, Md. 




REV. SEBASTIAN RABB1A 



Sketch of St. Maby's Church— Continued. 

Although Father Manley was pastor here for the short space of two years, 
the memory of his saintly soul is still cherished by the members of both parishes. 
Ever and always the priest. Father Manley's whole personality was a sermon; 
his life a treatise on faith. Needless to remark he left a lasting imprint through- 
out this region. Called to devote his life to the work of Negro Missions, he re- 
turned to Baltimore, much to the regret of his many loyal and devoted children. 
Father Manley died in Baltimore, October 30. 1893. 

In October, 1S87, the present pastor, Father Rabbia, assumed charge. Since 
his first arrival by his unwavering activity and zeal, and by his scholarship, he 
has greatly contributed to the growth of Catholicity in this community and the 
embellishment of the Church. Among the many improvements undertaken and 
completed under the pastorate of Father Rabbia. mention must be made of the 
new St. Joseph's School building with large auditorium attached; the Crucifixion 
over the main altar and the improving of both church and rectory at Williams- 
port. He is esteemed not only by the members of his own flock, but by non- 
Catholics as well. On the occasion of his 68th birthday, in November last, the 
esteem and love his parishioners cherish for him was evidenced by the large 
crowd gathered in St. Joseph's Hall. May lie be spared to reach the golden 
jubilee of his priesthood, is the earnest prayer of his many and devoted children. 
He has as his assistant, Rev. Albert E. Smith. 

HOl'RS OF SERVICE. 

Rev. SEBASTIAN RABBIA, Pastor. 

Rev. ALBERT SMITH, Assistant. 

Masses. — Sundays. 7 and 10 a. m.; Holy Day, (I and 9 a. m.: Week Day. C.30 and 

7 a. m.; First Friday, S a. m. 
Afternoon and Evening Service.— Sunday School, :! p. m.; Vespers. 4 p. m.; 

League of the Sacred Heart. First Friday, s p. m . 
Confessions. — Saturday, 4-6, 7-9 p. m. 
Baptism. — Sunday, 2 p. m. Other days by appointment. 
"vVilliamsport, St. Augustine's.— Mass second and fourth Sunday and Holidays of 



Obligati 



PARISHIONERS 



A Cushna, .Mrs. Sallie 

Alexander, Miss B. Cushna. Mr. and .Mrs. Monroe 

Alton, Mrs. Cushna. Mr. and Mrs. Victor 

Clarkson. Miss, s 
U Case, William 

Cowhig, H. G. 

Charfenstein, Mr. and Mrs. 

Clugen. Mrs. 

Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. 

Crossen, Mr. and Mis. 



Banks, Mr. and Mrs. 

Bowers, Mr. and Mis. 

Boyle, Dr. Charles 

Ball, Mrs. 

Barnett. Mrs. 

Burger. Mrs. 

Breen, Mr. and Mrs. 

Baker, Miss 

Bersor, Mrs. Dolan 



Deatrick, Mrs. 

I >e\ inc. Mr. and Mrs. 

I lomenick, Mr. and Mrs. 
Chaney, Mrs. Ruby l>i, in. .ii. Mr. and Mrs. 

Claybom, Mrs. Dillon. Mr. and Mis. 



I' 



Sketch of St. Maby's Cm men— Concluded. 



Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs. Noal 
Laliberte, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lambert, Mr. 



Fugna, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher, Mrs. 
Fechtig, Mrs. 
Futter, Frank 
Fitzpatrick, Mr. and 1 
Full, Miss L. 
Favorite, Mr. 
Ford, Mr. 

G 

Griffy. Miss L. 
Geyger, Patrick 
Grimm, Mrs. 
Gary, Mrs. 
Gunnell, Mr. and Mrs. 



M 

Minna. Mr. and Mrs. _ 
Moore, Thomas 
Moore, Mrs. L. 
Miller. Miss 
Morrison. Mrs. 
Mabley, Mr. and Mrs. 
Malone. Miss Bessie 
Martin, Mr. and Mrs. David 
McArthur, Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin. Miss H. 
Montginey. Xettie 
McMahon. Mr. and Mrs. 
Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. 



H 

Hobbs, Mrs. 

Helenie, Mr. and Mrs. 

Hose, Mrs. 

Halm, Mr. and Mrs. 

Haffel, Mr. 

Hurley, Miss J. 

Hoelle, Mr. and Mrs. 

Hoover, George 

Heil. Mr. and Mrs. John 

Hupp. Mrs. 



.hum-son. T. .1. 



Keedy, Mrs. Julia 
Keelhofer, Mrs. 
Kreigh, Frank 
Kneirman, Mrs. 
Keller. Mrs. 
Knode, Miss M. 
Kircbner. Mrs. 
Kretz, Mr. and Mr 
Kraut. Miss Kate 
Klupper. Mrs. 



Pearl, Mr. and Mi 



Ranth, Mrs. W. 
Ranachotte. Mis. 
Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. 



Sweney, Mr. and Mrs. 
Simms, Mrs. 
Sullivan. J. T. 
Stein, Mrs. 
Sweitzer, Mrs. 
Schmidt, George 
Sherwin, Misses 
Snaney, Mr. and Mrs. 
Shaffer, Miss Agnes 
Shockey, Misses 
Swink, Mrs. 



Tierney, Mr. 
Tierney, Misses 

W 

Wilton, Mr. and Mrs. \V. 
Watzler, Mr. and Mrs. 
Warner. Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
Whalcii. Mrs. 



FIF"I 


'EEN YEARS OF SI 


< (1 


ss 


\V. I>. MYERS, 1 


RESIDENT JOI 


IN STIC 


iERS, Cashier 


THE 


HANCOCK 


BANK 


D, 


>ES GEXF,R,VL BANKING 111' 


MNKS* 




PAYS IXTEK 


5ST ON DEPOSITS 






ACCO! 


NTS IJKSlMXTl'n.I.V SOLIC1 


TED 




VOIR SA1 


E I.N 


MR VAI I.T 



CLARK maker of PORTRAITS 



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you would like a large portrait made from? 

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or Pastel. 

Do you want a first-class photo of your Father, 
Mother, Sister, Brother or Baby? Bring them in. 
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Give us a call. Engagements can be made 
by phone. W. M. No. Ill B. 



115 BALTIMORE STREET, - CUMBERLAND, MD. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF HANCOCK, MD. 
PAID UP CAPITAL $30,000 

GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 

and time certificates of deposit issued. 

THREE PER CENT. INTEREST PAIO ON TIME DEPOSITS 

This bank solicits the accounts of corporations, mercantile firms and individuals ; 
small accounts given the same consideration as large ones. 



U. E. MCANDLISH 
W. M. WIDMEYER 
EDMUND P. COHILL. 



DIRECTORS 

DeWARREN H. REYNOLDS 

B. H. BROSIUS 

C. W. MYERS 



LEANDER H. KUHN 
WILLIAM A MORGART. 
WARFORD N. MANN 



GOVERNMENT AND STATE DEPOSITARY 



E P. COHILL. Pres J G. SCHLOTTER. V Pr. 
L. A. COHILL. Secretary 



700 Acres in Apples 
Tonoloway Orchard 



Hancock, Md. 



Yellow Transparent 

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Wm. Early Red 

Summer Rambo 

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Yellow Belleflower 

Grimes' Golden 

Wine Sap 

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TREES 
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3,000 
1,000 
1,000 
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6,000 
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5,000 
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Edmund P. Cohill 

Hancock, Md. 

SHIPS IN SEASON 

Choice Apples, Peaches 
and Other Fruits 

BUCKWHEAT FLOUR 

Potatoes, Butter and Eggs 




REV. HENRY S. NAGENGAS I 



SKETCH OF ST. PETER'S CHURCH 

HANCOCK, MD. 
Rev. HENRY S. NAGENGAST, Pastor. 



Hancock is situated on the National Pike, one hundred miles from Baltimore. 
It is a very old town, and takes its name from the first settler, a certain Mr. 
Hancock, who seems to have no other title to historical distinction; 

There were Catholics living in Hancock as early as 1S00; they must, however, 
have been very few, because the population of the village at that time did not 
reach a hundred. The few Catholics residing here were attended by the priests 
who journeyed over Braddock's Road to Cumberland, and later, by the priests 
who journeyed over the National Pike on their way to the same missions. 
The See of Richmond was created in 1S20, and a priest shortly afterward was 
stationed at Winchester, Va., and it was from this mission that one began to 
visit Hancock, in Maryland. Fathers Redman and Gildea were the first priests 
that visited regularly the people of Hancock. Father Gildea is still well re- 
membered; he was one of the great builders in his day. His remains rest 
under Old St. Vincent's Church. 

About the year 1S33 the mission assumed some importance on account of the 
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. 

In 1833 Rev. Timothy Ryan was saying Mass regularly at Hancock, and one 
year later he commenced the building of St. Peter's Church, which was completed 
during his administration. The church is brick and is substantially built. 

Father Ryan continued to minister to the spiritual wants of Hancock until his 
death, in 183S. Up to I860 St. Peter's remained a mission of Hagerstown. at- 
tended by Father Guth and Father Myers, who is still kindly remembered by 
the old people. Later Father Gloyd worked with signal success among his scat- 
tered flock until November, 1862, when he was appointed to Taneytown. The 
next pastor to Hancock was the Rev. Michael Dausch. A total abstinence 
society established by him still exists, full of life and youthful vigor. 

In 1 S71 Rev. Stanislaus V. Ryan came to Hancock. Father Darner was assist- 
ant at St. Patrick's Church, Cumberland, and he and Father Ryan exchanged 
places with permission of His Grace the Archbishop of Baltimore. Rev. Charles 
Darner thus began one of the longest and most successful pastorates of St. 
Peter's. 

In 1SS1 Rev. John D. Weider came to Hancock and remained until October, 
1SS5. Father Weider was successful and popular. Rev. John D. Manly was the 
next pastor of Hancock. He took charge toward the end of 1885. Father Manly 
spent three years on this mission. Father Manly is at present pastor of St. 
Anthony's, Emmitshurg. 

November 15, 1890, Thomas E. Lyons became pastor of St. Peter's. Father 
Lyons remained here until promoted to Westernport. Rev. Francis A. Wunnen- 
berg was appointed to succeed Father Lyons. He remained in Hancock until 
promoted to Oakland. The century closed with Rev. Romanus Mattingly in 
charge of St. Peter's ami the outlying missions. St. Peter's is at present in 
charge of Rev. II. S. Nagengast, who was formerly prominently connected with 
St. Anthony's Church, of Anthonyville, near Baltimore city. 
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