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Full text of "C. C. Morse"

qc716.^ Morse, G. C. & 00 

M8 [Catalogs of seeds and bulbs J 

OLDER SEP 6 1917 



CALIFORNIA 

State Library 



Call .A'b.a.C.-.7-.L6 J -2.. 
Copy No 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 

SACRAMENTO 



This book if due on the last date stamped heiow, 
A book may be kept (or three weeks and renewed 
for two weeks longer. 

A fine of five cents a day will be charged on over- 
due books. 





ATALOGVE OF 



aaara 



C.C.MORSE g) © 
SAN FRANCISCO 

CALIFORNIA 
V.S.A. 



Our Cover Designs 

FRONT COVER 

The Four Handsomest and Best Market Onions 



Brown Globe 
Ohio Yellow Globe 



Southport White Globe 
Southport R.ed Globe 



We have these varieties almost perfect, and can recommend them for all those who 
Want attractive high-priced market onions with the best keeping qualities. . 
See prices in list, pages 26, 27 

BACK COVER 

Semples Branching Asters 

The best and most popular American Aster. It makes an excellent bedding flower 
on account of its bright colors, and is excellent for bouquets on account of its long stems 
and large double blossoms. 

See list of colors and prices, pages 47-50. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

In ordering seeds in packets you may select as follows: 

amount op to $1.25 For $3.00 select an amount tip to $3.75 

amount np to 2.50 For 4.00 select an amount up to 5.00 

For $5.00 select an amount np to $6.25 

These Rates apply only to Seeds in Packets, but not to Seeds by Weight or Measure. 
Quantities from 1 ounce and up are net— no discount* 

Important Notice 

Unless otherwise stated we will pay postage on all packets, ounces, and one-pound 
packages or less. Larger quantities will be sent by express or freight, the charges to be 
paid by purchaser. 

Cash must accompany all orders. 

Remittances should be made by post-office or express money-order, or by San Fran- 
cisco exchange. Said remittances must include exchange. Personal checks will not be 

Clean, unused stamps will be accepted up to the amount of $1.00. 

Half-pound quantities will be filled at pound rates, but less than one-half pound at 

ounce rates. .. . . ^ , . , . 

Kote. There are so many contingencies to be encountered in growing plants 

from seed that are dependent on the weather and other conditions over which we have 
no control that success in planting is not altogether dependent on the seed. We will 
send out only seed which we believe will grow and which will produce the kind of plant 
and the variety represented. 

But C. C. Morse & Co. give no warranty, express or implied, as to description quality, 
productiveness, or any other matter of any seeds they send out, and they will not be 
responsible in any way for the crop. It the purchaser does not accept the goods on these 
terms, they are at once to be returned. 




THE FARM OFFICE 
Seed-Clearing House and General Farm Headquarters at Carnadero, near Gllroy, Cal. 



40RSB \ CO. SEED GROWERS 



C/ I I VJ- C 



Alfr 



Announcement 




E take great pleasure in presenting to our friends tkis catalogue, wkick is tke 
first we have issued. It appears now as our solicitor for orders for vege- 
table, flower, ana held seeds, and announces to tke public tkat wc kavc 
moved our keadquartcrs from Santa Clara to 815-817 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco, and tkat we arc occupying* tke premises, of tke late E. J. Bowcn, 
seed merckant, we having purckascd tke good will and tke ngkt to succeed 
to tke catalogue and bulk seed business of tkis well-known kousc. 

Vve kave been establisked in Santa Clara for nearly tkirty years as 
wholesale seed groovers, and our seed farms at Gilroy, Newark, and otker 
places-arc well known. We know that we enjoy tke kigkest reputation 
for good seed, and we believe we nave a knowledge of tke business of growing 



seed tkat can come only tkrougk years of experience. We spare no labor nor expense 
in giving our crops proper attention, knowing tkat quality in the ckaracter of seed 
strains is appreciated by every planter of seeds. 

Tke ckief cause tkat now leads us to issue tkis catalogue and to enter tke retail seed 
business is to satisfy a very great demand from a large number of people wko want to 
buy our seeds direct from us, having seen our farms and knowing something ox our 
reputation for kigk standards. 

Tkere are some varieties of seed wkick do not attain tkeir best quality in our Cal- 
ifornia climate, and suck seed we must buy from otker sources in, America and Europe. 
\^Hiere we kuy. we are doing so from tke best and most reliable growers only. Every- 
tking we send out is tested in our extensive Trial Grounds at Carnad^ro, near Gilroy. 
Tkese trial grounds are very instructive to any one interested in plant varieties, and 
our customers are always "welcome to visit us and inspect tkese grounds. 

Remember, tkat we are prepared to nil orders promptly, and any one ordering 
from us can be sure to kave kis seed in kis possession a few days after ordering. 

Hoping to be favored witk your orders, we remain 

Respectfully yours, 

C. C. MORSE & CO. 




Tlie warehouse at Santa Claru, where Wholesale and Contract orders are filled. 



182999 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



ARTICHOKE 



Artichokes are cultivated for the edlWe bud which resembles a S'-tJhisJie T£e 



ilants transpiaiiLeu in ~^» "■ 
. . „uauf bear tor five or six years U is advisable to start new^nesj, 
nallv The suckers from the large plants are also g 



,IS.: 'UIM.1 lUl Liaiia^i.i.... , h 

ith the Jerusalem Artichoke 



Large Creen Clobe. The 

with tint of purple at base. 



nost popular variety. Buds large, globular, deep green 
Pkt., 10c; 01., 35c; % lb., Sl-00; «••> *3.50. 



ASPARAGUS 



It requires three or fV^^S ^nS^'Jfi.^SSoHw^e^-oI'd r?SS 

used, or one ounce for about MlP™ 8 ^ spread from the root, and therefore grow 
they require plenty of room sines ' should be from six to ten feet apart. A loose, 

p^s Toll" ^~yf^iS l Si f^Wr^ .oM ffe-Slcr-^to^fv^ 
S^eef e's^ sti „, must be ma de porous and 

iight^p'S f »^Wi^^nW.t«tt 
shoots must be cut as fast as the y re. icli the S »i shoul(J he cut „ an a 

ourne'd ^"tuTfana IhoroughlyVe^ned up 6 ana a good dressing of manure and wood 

ashes and sand should be spaded into the beds. 

Barr'S Mammoth. A favorite with market gardeners. Shoots very large, tender, 

Bar q r ufck gfoTiTgTd thick to the top. Pkt., 5c; „*, 10c ; V, lb., 25c; lb., ,5c. 

Columbian Mammoth White. 

ground. 



•ge, thick variety; very white, even above 
Pkt., 5c; os., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

ConoVer'S ColOSSal. A standard variety for all purposes, especially for canning. 

^Onuvei » wvmwo^wi* o«„irH« i^ianri and other river points in California, 

It is the popular variety used on Bould.n Island and othe. n P 

where it is canned in immense quantities. Pkt., oc, ox., luc, y 4 id , 

Palmetto This is the most popular variety grown for general garden purposes, 

Pa 'e^cia% L shipping. Shoots are light green -d_ t.nted^iglitl^with pink.^ ^ 

A«snaraeuS RoOtS. Large two-year-old roots of the above (excepting Barr's Mam- 
moth) at 60c per 100 by freight or express, charges not prepaid. 

BEANS 

""S are naturally , divided f^«^^^SS^^^£S"^^rSS£A 

hv a gr'-'cit number hi wiiiur.^. <■ . 

^^-^W^^r^nK^ kept so ' and an pole varlet,es 

Pr °To e r d firm 'crop" P^ about 25 lb, pole beans pe^acre in n^M .»<*« a^art; 
plant bush beans about 35 lbs. Per #" e ' the home gar den there should be a succession 
soils are not suitable^ beans^ For tMmm^ g^^ moalum< and late beans . Use 

on/lb. of seed 'for 100 feet of row. 




■ *»' *•■ I ! " • • * ' T Cnldcn Wax Beans 

GweVdlobfe Jirfi«bb^«-. ••• Palmetto Aanaraems 



MOUSE A CO.— SEED GROWERS 



Pw.nimv ram ui mil >n:ii KARH at ciiimi'i. \r.m liii.ROV. 





Kai-k square represent* n different Vegetable or Flower In vnrinus Stages of prnntli- 

IHtis ripe on the left — t'nrrots just eonilng lip In the foreground — > 

Astern and various Flower seeds at the right. 






The Hotbed** In the foreground — Asters, Verbenas, Radishes, Celery, Beans, and Cucnmne 
lu the distance. 




Showing Radishes, .Sweet Peu», and Hollyhocks In bloom — also Lettuce and Beets. 



4 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

BEAKS — DWARF, BUSH, OR SNAP — UREEN-fODDED. 

In this class are the dwarf beans having green pods. The newest and best varieties 
are now absolutely stringless. 
Early Mohawk- A hardy and early variety, with large, flat, dark-green pods with 

tapering points; seed long, kidney-shaped; drab, purple, and brown. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., #1.00. 
Early Round YellOW Six Weeks. A large, vigorous, productive bean, with long, 

straight, flat, light-green pods; seed light-yellow with marks darker about the eye. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 50c; 10 lbs., 85c. 

Extra Early Red Valentine. A popular variety; erect vine with dark-green leaves; 

Pods of medium length: fleshy, round, and saddle-backed, with only slight strings; 

seed pink, marbled with red. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15e; 5 lbs., 00c; 10 lbs., ¥1.00. 

Extra Early Refugee. A very early, green-podded variety with medium-sized, green. 

fleshy pods; seed drab, freely spotted with dark purple. The vines are smaller and of 

more upright growth, and leaves a little larger than the Late Refugee. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 
Refugee, Or l,OOOtO I. A variety rather later than other green-podded sorts. Vines 

large, spreading, and very hardy; pods long and green, becoming white, streaked 

with purple as they mature; seed drab, freely spotted with purple. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 50c; 10 lbs., 85c. 
StringleSS Creen Pod. A very valuable green-podded variety, absolutely free from 

strings. Is very early; pods are long, rather round, and deeply saddle-backed; .seed 

rich seal brown. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 35c: 5 lbs., 90c; 10 lbs., $1.50. 

BUSH BEANS — VARIETIES FOR SHELLED BEANS 

Dwarf Horticultural. A very vigorous variety with large leaves. Pods are of medium 
length, slightly curved, and when nearly ripe are striped and splashed "With crimson 
on yellowish-brown; seed pale pink, splashed with bright red. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 

English Or Bt03d Windsor. A very well-known and popular variety with certain 
farmers. Familiarly known as the Horse Bean. 

Pkt., 5c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 50c; 10 lbs., 75c' 

White MarrOW. One of the standard varieties for soup beans. The plants are semi- 
running; seed small and white. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 

White Navy. A very prolific variety; vine large and spreading, with occasional run- 
ners; seed small and white. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 
In this class are the dwarf beans having creamy white, yellow, and golden-yellow 

pods. Most of the varieties we list are stringless. 

BEANS — DWARF, BUSH, OR SNAP — WAX-PODDED 

DaviS White Wax. Tne most hardy and productive wax-podded variety. The pods 

are very long and yellow; and while not stringless, it is a remarkably good bean for 

shipping; seed white, and on this account is desirable for a shelled bean in winter. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 35c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 




Stringless Green Port Bean 



KS 6 

in v\»— . aarttaaaMI 
Prolific Black Wax. > old i ick w.it or nmiw n»nn. Very 

Plrt I i n... j... ; i m«| 111 in... »i. .mi. 

Colder) Wax. In cultivation. Pods arc lonpr, 

nd (olden rellov need white, moi lesi 

wiiii : purplish red. Pki.. I(0| i n,.. ::.-,<•: S it,... a«Cj 10 li>».. »i.imi. 

Improved Rust- Proof Colden Wax fOrenooH'*). Rather hardier than Golden 
■re broader and Hatter; omewhal spotted with 

r,-J. Itt, HI--.. I M>.. 25c: ■• ll>» ><1 Ml Mm.. ai.lMI. 

Wardwell's Kidney Wax. a strong Browing vino, fifteen Inches iii hel 

lit 1 lo Inter than Golden Wax; pods long, broad, goldan yellow, brittle, and entlrel 

.1 white with dark markings lAarkel rdi nera I Itl 

[table. Pkl i i II,.. asc| B lam, Me| to lbs., auto. 

it. page n.) 



poi.f: fikw* — GREEN \m> w vv-i'iinnmi 



These beana require 

usually v,ry prolific 



trellis to climb e 
op in i lie open field they n 
and bear longor pods and 



ii bough 

role i,.-.i as 



line variety; pods six t<> 
ee to six pods, which are 
ndltion to use for a long: 
G n.s.. line: in lbs., ai.BO. 

long Ifrom six to eight 
ow. but as they mature 



Cut Short Or Com Hill. A popular variety for plaining among corn, without the 

of poles. Pods short and green; leaves deep green; seed white, spotted Ereels 

with reddish brown. Pkt., Mle: I lli„ 15c; S lbs., <Mlc: 10 lbs., $1.00. 

Early Colden Cluster Wax. a very popular, early, ami 

eight Inches long, borne in clusters, each containing from tin 
yellow. The pods are of fine quality and remain in ci 
time; seed Hat and dull white. Pkl., 10c: 1 11... 26c; 

Colden Carmine. A new variety of merit. The pods are 
Inohesl. stringless. and wlien young are bright golden yel 
bright spots and splashes of carmine appear. Tile beans are valuable for use. either 
r dry shelled. Pkt.. IOC) 1 lb.. 26c: 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., *1.75. 

Indian Chief Or Tall Black WaX. A black-seeded wax variety with thick. 
golden-yellow pods. Very hardy and prolific. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 16c; 6 lbs., «0c; 10 lbs., *1.00. 

Horticultural or Speckled Cranberry. An old favorite. Pods short, paie green. 

becoming splashed with brownish red. Seed blush pink, spotted with red. Valuable for 
either green or dry shelled. Pkt.. 10c; 1 lb.. 15c; 5 lbs,. BOc; 10 lbs., 91.00. 

Kentucky Wonder, or Old Homestead. The most popular of the P oie varie- 
ties. Tods are very long, very fleshy, and deeply .leased or saddle-backed, green in 
color, and stringless; seed light-brown. Pkt.. 10c; i lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., 91.00. 

Lazy Wife. A green-podded, variety bearing good, long pods in clusters; stringless 
and of peculiarly fine flavor; seed rather large, thick, and white. 

Pkt.. 10c: 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs.. OOc; 10 lbs., 91.00. 
The well-known and old-fashioned climber, having bright scarlet, 
seed large, bright scarlet, heavily blotched with purple. 

Pkt.. Mle: 1 II... 20c; 5 Mis., tide; 10 lbs.. 91.00. 

popular, green-podded variety, bearing its pods in clusters: 



Scarlet Runner. 

pea-like flowers; 



Southern Prolific. 



seed light yellowish-brown 



Pkt.. Mle: 1 lb., 2llc; 5 lbs.. 75c; 10 His., 91.00. 




Davis "White WaT Beans 



»ler Pole Beans. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



White Creaseback. 

length, deeply crease 
string-less; seed whiti 



BEANS — Coutiuued 
early, green-podded 



iety. Pods five to six inches in 
saddle-backed, and borne in clusters. Are very fleshy and 
ft can be used as a shelled bean for winter use. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 
White Dutch Case Knife. A climbing- variety with long-, flat, irregular pods, 
which become creamy white as they mature; seed broad, flat, and clear white. 

Pkt.. 10c; 1 11k, 20c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., Spl.OO. 

BEANS — LIMA VARIETIES 

Lima beans are delicious when used as a green shelled bean, and can be grown for 
this purpose in any climate-. The dry ripened bean is now a staple article of food fnr 
winter use. but in California these beans ripen only from San Luis Obispo County and 
south to Pasadena. The best territory for seed beans we believe to be Santa Barbara 
and San Buenaventura Counties, where we grow our stock. 

Burpee's Bush* One of the most popular dwarf or bush varieties, growing eighteen 

to twenty inches high. Very prolific, with large pods and large beans, the latter 

nearly the size of the pole varieties. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., $1.25. 

Dreer'S New Wonder Bush. A new variety with large pods produced well into 

the center of the vine; seed greenish and very thick, almost round. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., $1.25. 

Henderson's Bush. A very productive variety, nearly two weeks earlier than 

Burpee's Bush. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., $1X5. 

Challenger. A popular market-garden variety of the pole or running type. Very 

productive, bearing continuously till late in the season. Beans large and thick. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., $1.25. 
The most popular of all lima beans or the pole or running type, 
es early and continues late; very large, flat seed. 

Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., $1.25. 
variety, pole or running. Is now being largely supplanted by 
Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs., $1.00. 
n improved strain of the large White Pole Lima. Comes into bear- 
very productive. Pkt., 10c; 1 lb., 20c; 5 lbs., 75c; 10 lbs., $1.25. 



King of the Garden. 

Forms large pods, co 

Large White, a late 

Sieberfs. 

Siebert's Early 

ipg earlier and 



practically divided 



tli 



BEETS 

classes: 



stock-feedin 



and 



in California any time after January 1, and a 
shaped roots of good color. The soil must be 
hich is essential to crisp, tender flesh. 



For table 
light, sandy lo 
rich and moist 

BaStian'S BlOOd Turnip- An extra early, deep-red variety. Turnip-shaped, small 

top, green leaf. Crisp, sweet, and of good .quality. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 25c; 1 lb., 60c. 
CrOSby'S Egyptian. More globe-shaped than Ex. Ey. Egyptian. Is very early and of 

fine quality. Bright red with clear vermilion llesh. PkV.,5c; oz.,10c; y± lb., 25c; 1 lb.,75<-. 
Dark StinSOn. A fine variety for summer market. Deep, rich red; medium size; 

small, dark-brown tops. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; 1 lb., 75c. 

Detroit Dark Red. 0ne of tne ^est taDle varieties. Globe-shaped, bright, but rich, 

red flesh. Tops small and green. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c, 

Dewing'S Early BlOOd Turnip. A turnip-shaped variety, with deep red flesh. 

Tops green. Pkt., 5c; o*., 10c; V* lb., 25c; 1 lb., «0c. 




White Creaseback Pole Beans. 



Detroit Dark Red Bee*. 



MORSE A: CO.- SEED GROWERS 



111 11 v — i ,. minuet 
Edmand'S BlOOd Turnip. Roots (lobular nncl tnporlnir. or more eorr- 

showing tlii' zones. I..-af l 

Pkl„ .-M-: ii«.. 111.-: ', II... U.1.-I I II... hoc. 

Eariy Eclipse. hap* or tapering glob. 

■ I with lighter red. Crisp and sweet 

l-kl.. .-..•; ..».. III.-; ', II... v..-..-: I II... 

Extra Early Blood Turnip. A good rarletj r-.r summer and autumn use. [■ i.r- 

■'.: brlshl red flesh ibon Pk«, .-..-: ..«.. ioci '/» n>., 25c: i Mi., 80c. 

Extra Early Egyptian. A turnip-shaped variety with dark • ring aone 

. ....I early variety. 

fkt.. ."..-; ..... III.-: ', II... -J."..- 7."..-. 

Half Long Blood, • deep red, a 

iptly. v.-ry rich, deep red quality. 

rki.. .-.<■: ..«.. in.-: ', ii... ::.-..-; li... 80c. 

Long Smooth Dark Blood. Mc rarletj tor light soIIb, where roots 

y to dig. Skin very .lark brownish-red. Flesh deep blood-red. Very long and 

Blander. Pkt.. Rcj «.».. to.-; ', lb., s.-.t-: i lb., 60c. 

Swiss Chard or Sea Kale. Used tor greens by cutting ii,. stem and leaf, which 
.ire also very ornamental. Ii resembles an ornamental beet top, hut has no edible 
root. I'kt., .-,<•; ..».., 1(1.-: i, Hi.. S.-.i-: I lb., 00c-. 



si<; Alt ni:i:i's ami >ian«;i:i.s 



For main crop, sow about J 
per acre. To £•■! good, large, a 

the fourth leaf to six inches apart in the row. If large lots ar 
prices. 



sing about six pounds 



Champion Yellow Clobe. 

shallow soils. 



large. 



ariety. Good for 
lb., 15c; 1 lb.,. 35c. 

tied variety with 



. orange-yellow 
kt.. 5c; o»„ 10c; > 

Ciant Yellow Intermediate or Cate Post, a yeiiow-ski 

white flesh, zoned with yellow. Large and ovoid shape. 

Pkt., 5c; oji., 10c; % lb., 15c: 1 lb., 35c. 
Colden Tankard YellOW- Fleshed. A very large, yellow-fleshed variety. Giant 

oval shape; small yellow-stemmed top: Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c; 1 lb., 35c. 

MammOth Long Red. The largest of all the mangels and the heaviest cropper. 

Skin is red; " 

Red Clobe. 

Lane's Improved Imperial Sugar. 

almost as much as mangels. Is sweet a 



vhite, zoned wi 
e globe-shaped 



riety 



Klein Wanzleben Sugar. The 

value of the strain and the sugar 
on the part of the seed grower, 
gradually to a long tail. Pkt., 



Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 15c; 1 lb., 35c. 

/lth red skin. Flesh white, zoned with 
Pkt.. 5c; os., 10c; ■ , lb., 15c, 1 lb., 35c. 

large, thick, tapering variety. Yields 
ch and very desirable for stock. 
Pkt., 5c; or,., 10c; ' , lb., 15c; 1 lb., 35c. 
most popular variety for sugar factories. The 
t depends on intelligent care and development 
wedge-shaped, wide at the top and tapering 
10c; Vi Hi.. 15c; 1 lb., 35c. 




Imported Mammoth Long Ited 
Mangel Wurael. 



Golden Tankurd Yellow 
Fleshed Mangel. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



BEETS — Continued 
White Sugar Red Top- A very hardy variety, producing large crops with little 
care. The root is large and very rich in sugar, and while not sufficiently so for 
sugar purposes, it makes a remarkably fine, rich food for stock. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 13c; 1 lb., 35c. 



BROCCOLI 



Should he treated th 
a coarse cauliflower, m. 
and easier to grow. 



divided in 
Purple Cape. Good, large heads 

Early Large White. The best \ 



hers 



which are tinged with purple. 

Pkt., 5e; or.., 45c; '/ 4 lb., $1.00; 1 lb., $3.30. 
riety. Heads white and large. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 15c; % lb., $1.50; 1 lb., ¥5.00. 



BRUSSELS SPROUTS 



The plants are very hardy and grow from two 
mass of leaves at the top. The sides of the main s 
dozen small cabbage heads, which are broken off and 

Plant and cultivate the same as winter cabbage o 

Improved Half Dwarf. The standard 

the stem is well covered with small, fi 



to three feet high, bearing 
;em are covered with three 
cooked the same as cabbag 
• kale. 



r ariety. Grows two 
m, round sprouts. 
Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; 



feet high, and 



% lb., 45c; 1 lb., $1.50. 



CABBAGE 



It is difficult to give definite < 
ve good cabbage at all seasons 
planted almost any time of the 
September 



nd in Jur 
come up very thick 
spindly, and then do 
inches apart, in rows 
field before they are 
root. Cabbages requ 
very readily. 



The 
rly spring cabbages. 



id sprouts quickly, 



:r cabb; 
l the seed bed. It should be 
lot head well. Transplanted to the. field, they : 
eighteen inches apart. To prevent the heads . 
eady to be harvested, the plants should be loc 
re considerable moisture, but too much water 



nee it is possible to 
coast, and seed can 
sons for sowing the 
March for summer and fall 



the plants be 



CABBAGF — EARLIEST 



Extra Early Etampes. 

heads. 

Extra Early Express. 

than "Wakefield, and a 



One 



the earliest vari 

Pkt., 
trly, producing : 
ety for shipping. 
Ptet., 

Early Jersey Wakefield, one of the best and 

round, pointed heads of good size. Is very ha 
unfavorable conditions. Pkt., 



; Yi lb., 40c; 

heads. A 1 



n pointed 
lb., $1.50. 

le earlier 



>c; oz., 35c; Vi lb., 40c; 1 lb., $1.75. 

nost popular early varieties. Forms 
•dy and resists cold and generally 
»c; oz., 15c; % lb., 00c; 1 lb., $2.00. 




Flat Dutch Cabbage, 



Henderson's Early Summer Cabbage* 



1> CKOWKKS 



I Mill M.I — I ..nllnuril 

Early Winnigstadt. - and fine quality. is 

I'kl.. :.. I| ,.,.. I"..: ', 111.. «•■,■; I Hi.. SJ.IK1. 
Early York. Oni orU. Rather small head, bill llrm. 

i-ki.. .-..•: ..... I.-.,; ', ii... aoei I "••. *2.00. 
Large Early Wakefield (Charleston). Vary similar u> Karl 

r and a little rkt.. ...•: ../.. Mc; ', lh., wici i ■•>.. sa.im. 

i \iiii\i.i — BARM imi SKCOld) i:\iii \ 

All Seasons. On the early varieties, i.irtv, round, furnish heads. 

Park .1 summer variety, • •- li withstands heal well. 

I'M.. .I.-; ,„.. I.-.,-: ', 111.. VOC| I III.. *2.II<1. 

Allhead Earlv. Probably the earliest of the large, flai-headlng varieties. 
. and winter crop. Desirable for all sorts ol planting. 

Pkt.. .-..■: or... SOc| ', lb.. 80C| I lh.. V2.00. 
Early Dwarf Flat Dutch, a g I riat-headed variety; desirable for summer. 

I'kl.. .-..•; ../.. l.-.e; ', lb, l.ll.-l 1 III.. *i.7.-.. 

Fottler's Brunswick. One o thi mosl popular of the Sat-headed I especial! 

with the home gardener. aui imn and winter use. 

i'kl., 5c; or... 15c; ' , Hi.. «»<•: l lb., *2.O0. 

Henderson's Early Summer. A desirable medium sized early, flat-headed vari- 
ety. In su and autumn. 

I'kl.. .-..■: o«, 15c; <A »••. «<><•: 1 lb., (2.00. 

Henderson's Succession. Is than Earlj Summer. Is a 

dwarf. Hat head, light green, and very solid. I'kt., 5c; or., !.-.<■; ', lb.. «Oc; l Hi., *2.oo. 

New Early Spring. A verj early Bat-headed variety. Medium sized and good for 
summer use. Pkt, 5c; or... 25c; Vi lb., 76c; 1 lb., *2.;>ii. 

I Villi AGE WINTER VARIETIES 

Autumn King, Or Worldbeater. A fine winter variety of vigorous growth. 
Large, well-formed globular heads of bluish green. 

Pkt, 5c; o*., 20e: '/, lh., 7S.-: 1 lb., *2.50. 

BUrpee'S Surehead. One of the most popular varieties. Large, r,,nn,l, slightly 

flattened head; hard and firm. I'kl.. 5c; or... 2llc; v, lb., 00c; 1 lb., $2.00. 

Danish Ball Head. A very late variety, forming- globular heads; very hard and 

solid. Keeps well and ships well. The color is bluish-green. 

Pkt.. .-e; o»... 2lle; ** lb., 7.-.e; 1 lh., *,2..-.0. 

Premium Flat Dutch. A well-known large, late variety. Flatfish, round heads, 

very solid and firm. Pkt., 3e; or.., 15e; y, lh., «0c: 1 lh„ S.2.00. 

Stone-Mason Marblehead. A medium sized, late, flat-headed variety, forming 

good, solid head. The leaves are bright green with conspicinus veins. 

Pkt., 5c; or.., 15c; </, lb., 60c; 1 lb., $2.00. 
CABBAGE — SAVOY 

Perfection Drumhead Savoy, a variety that is much prized in Europe and 

also by those who are familiar with it in this country. It is very sweet and crisp, and 
always tender. Heads medium sized and fairly compact. 

Pkt., 5e: or... 15c; "i lh., 50c; 1 lb., $1.7.-.. 
CABBAGE — REB 
Mammoth ROCk Red. The best hard-headed, red variety. Large heads, globular, 
and very deep red on top. Outer leaves greenish. Especially used for pickling. 

Pkt., oc; oz., 15c; % lb, 30c; 1 lb., $1.7.-. 




-Allhead Early. 



:irm' Early Wnkeneld. 



10 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

CARROTS 

Good, sandy loam is best adapted fo 
however, can be sown on heavier lands, 
and short varieties any time after January 1. For general crop sow in the open field 
about April 1, using- two or three pounds per acre or rows sixteen to eighteen inches 
apart. While you get a good uniform root by thinning the young plants, it is not 
necessary to do so to get a crop of good, average carrots, 

Chcintenay, Or ModeL A very popular variety for general purposes; five to six 
inches long; very stump-rooted; about three inches thick at shoulder; tapering slightly; 
bright orange-scarlet. (.See cut.) Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; % lb., 35c; 1 lb., 75c. 

CoreleSS Long Rod. A medium long variety of uniform thickness and very stump- 
rooted, with smooth skin, and bright orange-scarlet color. Core large and not very well 
defined. A good variety for table use. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 25c; 1 lb., 90c. 

DanverS Half-Long. The best variety for general purposes and the most largely 
used. The perfect type is about S inches long and about 2^ inches wide at the 
shoulder, tapering to a sort of half-point at the bottom. Color is a bright orange- 
scarlet. It is a very heavy cropper. (See cut.) Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; ^4 lb., 25c; 1 lb., 75c. 

French Hom« A short variety for forcing. Grows about two inches long, and is very 
stump-rooted. Color bright orange-scarlet. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; 3 /i lb., 25c; 1 lb., 90c. 

French Forcing. A very popular variety for forcing. The root is globe shaped, with 
distinct tap root. Color bright orange-scarlet. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; y 4 lb., 25c; lib., $1.00. 

Half-Long Scarlet Stump- Rooted. A variety about as large as Danver's but 
not so thick. It is of uniform thickness and very stump-rooted. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 25c; 1 lb., 75c. 

Improved Short White. The most popular of all white varieties, being a heavy 
cropper and of a desirable shape to allow easy digging in heavy soils. The true type 
is very thick in the middle and should not taper abruptly. 

Pkt., 5c; o«„ 10c; V* lb„ 20c; lb., COc. 

Large White Belgian. The best known and one of the oldest white varieties — is 
a long-pointed root, and should only be planted on light soils where roots are fairly 
easy to dig. The variety we offer does not grow above ground with a green shoulder 
as do some strains. Pkt., 5c; oss., 10c; % lb., 20c; 1 lb., 50c. 

Large White VoSgeS- A medium sized variety with tapering and pointed root. 
A good white variety for heavy soil. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 20c; 1 lb., «0c. 

Long Orange. The best long variety, and a good, heavy cropper for light soils where 
roots can be easily dug. The strain we offer is a bright orange-scarlet, and fairly 
thick, and grows entirely under ground, having no green shoulder. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; V t lb., 25c; 1 lb., 75c. 

Oxheart, Or Clierande. One of the most popular and best croppers among the 
short carrot. The shape is particularly desirable for heavy soils. The true type is 
about 4*£ inches long and 3% inches thick at the shoulder. It tapers slightly to the 
bottom, and is very stump-rooted. (See cut.) Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; y A lb., 25c; 1 lb., 00c. 

Red Saint Vallery, or New Intermediate, a little longer than Danver's, 

tapering abruptly, with pointed root. A very desirable, long variety, and rather pre- 
ferable to Long Orange, being thicker at the shoulder and not so long. Color bright 
orange-scarlet. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 25c; 1 lb., 75c. 

Scarlet Horn, or Early Short Horn, a good, short variety for table use. 

The full grown type is about 3 inches long and 2% inches thick at the shoulder. 
Tapers only slightly and is very stump-rooted. It is very early and forms an edible 
root a short time after planting. (See cut.) Pfct., 5c; ox., 10c; y 4 lb., 25c; l lb., 00c. 

CAULIFLOWER 

The culture of cauliflower is much the same as that of cabbage. It does not make a 
good summer crop, however, as it will not head up well in hot weather. It is especially 
popular as a fall and winter crop, and with market gardeners proves a profitable crop, 
owing to the scarcity of good market vegetables when cauliflower is at its best. It is 
easy to grow in the garden, providing the soil is made rich and porous. Plant the seed 
in beds in June for fall crop, and transplant to the garden or field in August. For spring 
crop plant the seed in protected beds early in January, and the plants will be ready 
to transplant probably early in March. The young plants should be thinned, since they 
become very spindly if allowed to grow too thick. 

Algiers. One of the best late varieties, forming good, large white heads, late in the 

fall. Pkt., 10c; y, oz., 25c; oz., 75c; lb., 82.50. 

Early Favorite. An early, hard-heading variety. Is quite hardy and a good market 

variety. Pkt., 5c; % oz., 35c; oz., $1.00; % lb., $2.50. 

California Wonder. A hardy and popular local variety for shipping. The heads 

are large, and while a trifle coarse are of good flavor and of attractive appearance. 

Is later than Snowball, and especially valuable for main crop. 

Pkt., 10c; % oz., SOc; oz., 75c; % lb., ¥2.50. 



■ skku i.kuw eks 




Oxhrnrt Carrot. 

(Valuable for Table Use or Stock-Feeding.) 




Wardwell's Kidney Wax Beans. — (One ol the Very Best. — See Page 5.) 



\-*M 


WBBBSr 




-'■il'Wm 






*?5 


Fr^lERigMV 


% 




*^ 


V 


t^P jj! 


-A 


v 


\ 


w 






Early Scarlet Horn Carrot. 

(The Best Table Variety.) 



1 iuiDtenay Carrot. 

(Sometimes called the "Model.") 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



Extra Early Dwarf Erfurt. 

heads. 

A hardy 



Extra Early Paris. 



good, early variety, forming good, solid white 
Pkt, 10c; % or.., 75c; or.., $2.30; % lb., $8.00. 
ety quite easy to grow, and forming good heads. 
Pkt., 10c; % oz., 23c; oz., 75c; % 11)., $2.30. 
Early Snowball. The best and most popular early variety grown. There is a vast 
difference in the strains of this variety offered, but what we offer is the best im- 
ported stock. Pkt., 25c; % oz, $1.00; oz„ $3.00; % lb., $9.00. 
VeitCh'S Autumn Ciant. A large, late variety, very hardy but especially desir- 
able for the South. The heads are well protected by the foliage, enabling it to 
resist unfavorable climatic conditions. Pkt., 5c; % or.., I3c; or.., 50c; 14 lb., $1.50. 



CELERY 



arket crop, and is not usually recommended for the home 
tre than usual trouble required to grow it as a vegetable. 
likely to be exaggerated, and the value of having: 



Celery is essentially a 
garden on account of the 
The real trouble and care, 

delicious, fresh celery on one's table compensates in a large measure for all the 
required in growing it. 

Celery requires water, and lots of it, from the time the seed is sown in boxes in 
March, until it is pulled in the autumn or winter. The seed is slow to germinate, and 
the soil where it is planted needs to be kept very wet. As soon as the young plants are 
about one and one-half inches high they should be transplanted to get good, sturdy 
plants before they are finally set in the garden or field. When the plants begin to grow 
vigorously, the soil needs to be drawn up around the plants, first tying them at the 
top or wrapping with a piece of sacking to prevent the earth getting between the stem 
As fast as the plants grow above the soil, the earth wants to be hilled around it agii 
to get a full growth of well-blanched stems. The great celery-growing centers are locate 
in swampy, peat districts. Use one ounce of seed to 15,000 plants, or two ounces per acn 
BOStOtl Market- As the name indicates, this is a popular variety around Boston 
•iety, which blanches very white and crisp. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; V 4 lb., 40c; lb., $1.50, 



A thick, medium-tall 



Crawford's Half- Dwarf 

hardy, blanches -white. 

Dwarf Golden Heart. The mos 

tall, forming a large bunch, and 
shipper. 
Ciant Pascal. The most popular 
with stems nearly round, and wh 
flavor. 

Evan's Triumph, a s 

a large bunch, blanches t 

Ciant Colden Heart. 

large bunch. Blanches < 

Ciant White Solid. 

very hardy and easy to 



•In old favorite for winter use. Medium tall, very 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; % lb., 40c; lb., $1.30. 

nost popular of the old green winter varieties. Rather 

nd blanching white and crisp. Is hardy and a good 

Pkt., 5c; oz, 15c; % lb., 40c; lb., $1.50. 

i newer green winter varieties. Rather tall 

idled is white, brittle, and especially good 

Pkt., 3c; or.., 20c; J/4 lb., 50c; lb., 75c. 

ood. green, winter variety, very popular in the North. Forms 

cell, and is very hardy. Pkt., 5c; or.., 20c; % lb., 50c; lb., $1.75. 

Probably the largest of all celeries: very tall and forms a 

:risp and white. . Pkt., 5c; or.., 15c; *4 lb, 40c; lb., $1.30. 

l very tall variety but does not form a very thick bunch; 

grow. Pkt., 5c; or., 15c; '/, lb, 40c; lb, $1.50. 



©fir 




ETan'N Triumph Celery. 



White PI tunc Celery. 



■ —SEED GROWERS 



II II IH — . ..nllniiril 

Colden Self- Blanching, or Paris Colden. The most pnpuinr mnrJct variety 

In <i*<- especially lor early crop. The plant la naturally golden-yellow (both etem and 

to m.,k.- it brittle and fit tor tabic use. I 
rather email bunch. The eeed <>f this varlet) haa at tunes produced a percentage "■ 
red to offer e carefully selected stooh of our own growing 
the beat Imported seed. We are ais.. pre] 
offer genuli the very best quality for those who desln 

Imported — I'ke., I0e| ../.. (Wot ■, n,.. ai.3oi lb., si.r.n. 
namnatlr — I'kt.. 10c | ■■«.. 36c i ' , I ■>.. gl,00| M>., ati.nu. 
Kalamazoo, A medium short flark-sreen variety! very hardy; Mam 

ships I'ki, .-..•; ..».., use) ', Hi., MJoj Hi.. 01.00. 

Michell'S Far Superior. A rather new winter variety, finite tall and vei I ire 
u are rather licht green, and the pearl] whlten< 

Tk«.. .-.«•: ii/.. ai.-; ', Hi.. 50c; Hi., f.1.75. 
New Rose. The host of the rod celeries. The flavor Is rather strong In • 

but we think la unappreciated by those who like winter ari II Is tall, form 

-i large bunch, and blanches t-> a light-rose pink. 

Pkt, .-.<•: <i/... 16e; ', Ml. IOcj Hi., tl.no. 

Perfection Heartwell. rreen winter variety, rather tall, forming a largi 

bunch. Pkt., 5c; .■*.. IBe; ', lb., 10c; lb, »1.B0. 

Pink Plume. An attractive r lolored variety with white leaves and pink stems. 

Pkt., Be; ii/.., SBc; M lb., 73c: lb.. ¥2.50. 
White Plume. One of the most popular "f the varieties now in use. User! mostly for 

a very early crop. A comparatively easy variety to grow as it is fairly hardy, am! 
being naturally white is easy to blanch. Tile leaves are also white, tinted with green 
at tips. Forms a medium-sized bunch and is fairly tall. 

Pkt., 3c; o«., 25e; V, lb., 60c; lb.. 1*2.00. 
Winter Queen. One of the best winter varieties, and we recommend it especially 
to market gardeners. Is tall and forms a large bunch. The leaves are light green. 

Pkt., 5c; oz, ZOc; V, lb, 50c; lb, $1.75. 

Celery Seed for Flavoring. <sou P ceiery.j 

Oz., 10c; '/, lb, 13c; lb, 25c. 

CELERIAC— Turnip-Rooted Celery 

This plant resembles celery in flavor, but the stems are very strong:, and only the 
root is palatable. It should be treated much as celery, so far as the seed is concerned. 
The plant requires only a little hilling:, however, to get a well-formed, good-sized root. 

Ciatlt SmOOth Prague. The best variety. Forms a good, thick root as much 
as four inches in diameter and nearly globular. Pkt., 5c; ox., 20c; Vi lb., 50c; lb., $1.75. 

CHERVIL 

Can be planted any time in the early spring. The leaves should be Kept cut, and if 
not allowed to run to seed, will keep green for a long time. Is rrore finely curled and 
handsome than parsley, and makes an excellent plant for garnishing. 
Curled. Very finely curled, somewhat resembling parsley and used in same manner. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15e; % n,., 40c; lb., $1.25. 





Sweet Corn — Stowell'M Evergreen. I^argre, Smooth Prague, Celerlnc. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



CHICORY 



Used as substitute for 
spring, thin the young- plai 
the root and is perennial. 

Large Rooted or Coffee. 



larg-est rooted and best variety. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 



COLLARDS 



A plant bearing- a large mass of leaves on the top of a stout stalk. It is a species 
of cabbage, and the flavor is the same. It bears leaves all throug-h the winter, and is used 
especially in the South for cabbage greens. Young plants may be started in boxes in 
early spring, and the young plants transplanted, allowing plenty of room for each plant. 
North Carolina Short Stem. A dwarf or short-stemmed variety. Forms 

medium large, loose head of light-g*reen leaves. Pkt., 5c: ox., 15c; *A 30c; lb., $1.00. 



True Georgia. 

high, and forms 



Tli. 



• well-kno 



iety. 



Grows from four to five feet 
tinged with purple. 
; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 00c. 



CORN SALAD OR FETTICUS 



A salad plant us 
for greens. It does 
and are exceedingly 

Large Leaved. 



ut rapidly aftc 



r being 
lb., 20c; 



CORN 



SWEET OR TABLE VARIETIES 



As corn is very sensitive to frost, it can not be planted with any degre 
until about the middle of April, except in sections that are notably free -from 
Moist, rich soil is best for corn, and frequent hoeing or cultivating improv 
small but rich mountain valleys seem especially favorable to good table corn. 

In cutting corn for the table it is important that it be picked at Just the 
especially when not too old. Frequent small plantings of the several 



keep a good supply available for the table all 
Tiie prices here quoted are for shipment by express or freight, the charges to be 
paid by the purchaser. If wanted by mail add eight cents per pound for postage. 

BEack Mexican. One of the best medium early varieties. Although when ripe the 
seed is bluish or black, when ready for table use it is white. It is of especially fine 
sweet flavor and. very tender. It seems to do well in most parts of California. 

1 lb., 10e: 10 lbs., SOe; 100 lbs.„ $7.00. 

Country Gentleman. One of the best of the late varieties. Has a long, white 
cob, closely filled' with long "shoe peg" kernels. Is remarkably fine flavored and 
sweet. 1 lb.- 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $0.00. 

CrOSby'S Early. A fine, early variety, growing about 4 feet in height. Is twelve- 
rowed, and very popular for canning. 1 lb., 10c; 10 lbs., SOc; 100 lbs,, $7.00. 

Early Red Cob Cory. One of the best extra early varieties. Ears are about six 
inches long, and eight-rowed. 1 lb., IOcj 10 lbs., 80c; 100 lbs., $7.00. 

Early White Cob Cory. An extra early variety with remarkably white grains, 
especially when cooked. Ears are six to seven inches long. Of good quality. 

1 lb., 10c; 10 lbs., SOc; 100 lbs., ¥7.00. 

Early Minnesota. The best early variety for market and private garden. Be- 
tween Crosby's and Cory's in earliness. Stalks about five feet high: ears long, and 
eight-rowed. 1 lb., 10c; 10 lbs., SOc; 100 lbs., $7.0O. 

HickOX Improved. A very popular variety for canning". A little earlier than Sto 
well's Evergreen. Ears are long and well filled. Stalks are about 6% feet high. 

1 lb., 10c; 10 lbs., SOc; 100 lbs., $7.00.. 




Collards — 'iiuc Ueorgin. 



Stowell's Evergr 



MORSE I CO.— SHED GROWERS 



Early Mammoth or Alameda 

r-.rnis rerj 
It «i- man well and I 



Moore's Early Concord. 

well filled Willi 1 I ■ 



onflaurd 

arioty for California and the hup most 
hi. -Ii 
• iinlly •■>■!• .- free from worms and other 

I 111.. lOCj I" II... Ml.-: 100 Ik*, S7.IM1. 

ither short and 



V medium early variety. Bars are i 

"' k ' ' tola, \ g i i hi ii 

'"In* i ih.. in,.; iii ii„„ gooj iimi ih,.. a-.iB>. 

Old Colony. tod, l.iio variety -f rich, sweet flavor. Ears bear 16 to 10 rows ot 

ker,i ">' heavy .111,1 solid. i n,.. iocj i" n.«.. Me; iimi lbs, »t.ih>. 

Perry's Hybrid, A Rood see,,,,,l early variety. Usually produces two g l-alsed 

•ii the stalk, ot fine quality, sweet and 

I Hi.. Ill,-: III Hi,., so,-: 100 Mi,.. S7.IMI. 

Stowell's Evergreen. The moat popular and beal main crop variety, i 

at rods growth, about >; r.-.-i high. Bars keep Ii n toi I 

ably long time. Th,- quality is excellent. i )■>.. loeg to ih,.. sue: iimi ii,,.. *7.o». 

FIELD VARIETIES 

Early Adams. Uthough not a ™« rn, can often I,.- used as such on ad< 

a which are quite sweet and tender. Is -. ,i and oan bi 

er than the eai , n. 

l Hi.. III.-: in Mi,., njilc) lllli Hi,., 06.00. 
Early Eight-Rowed Canada, also known the follow Flint, a rapid grow 
rly yellow variety, and for this reason largely used ror replanting. Very val- 

I Hi.. Ill,': 10 Hi,.. 50c; lull Mi,., s I. ,ii.. 






erj early 

deep, yellow grains. 

io lbs., silo: tun ih,.. *i.imi. 
are long and the variety Is 

to Ih,.. 50c; 100 lb,.. *4.ini. 
,■; stalks are leafy, making 



Early Colden Dent, or Pride of the North 

lars 8 to 1" Inches lmigr. with 10 to 16 rows ol slender 

i Hi.. iu<- 
King Phillip. \r\ old New England favorite. The ears 
very early. Grains, coppery red. l lh., 10c: 

Learning, a very popular tall-growing variety. Is early 
excellent fodder. Kernels are I. ma .'ind deep golden yellow. 

1 lb., 10c; 10 Iiin., Kile; 100 lb».. *4.0<1. 
White Cap YellOW Dent. An early and hardy variety, growing 6 to 7 feet in 
height. Ears ire S to 111 inelies in length. Cob small and IH to IS lowed. The outer 
il the grain is while while the inner portion is char yellow. 

1 Hi.. III.-; Ill Hi,., .-.lie; iimi Hi.,.. (4.00. 

Wisconsin White Dent. A tall-growing variety; large eared; 1 li to IS rowed; 

grains large and white. 1 Hi.. 10c; III His., 50c; 100 11>h., 94.00. 

White Flint. An early, tall variety, bearing large ears which are well rilled with 

long, pure white kernels. The best variety for making hominy. 

1 lb., 10c; 10 lb,., 80c; 100 lbs., V5.00. 
Pop Corn, White Rice. The most popular variety; very prolific; ears short; kernels 
long, resembling riee in shape; color white. 1 lb., 10c; 10 lbs., 75c; 100 lbs., *«.<M). 

KAFFIR CORN. — See Field Seeds. 

CUCUMBER 



ough the summer. Plant in hills four feet each way. and 1 
each hill. The soil should be very rich with well-rotted stable 
Cucumbers are very easy to grow, and a few hills will prod 
average family. 

Arlington Improved White Spine 

when ripened. The fruit 



plants to 
7©, wen spaded in. 
abundance for an 



■ich, dark-green 



igh 



and 



about 7 
shape. 



culture. 



ety turning white 
nches long when in marketable condition and 
ly, and is good for forcing and out of door 
Pkt., 5cj ox. t 10c; y 4 lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 




Enrly Cluster Cucumber. 



Early Mammntb or Alameda Swee( Corn. 



1U 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



CUCUMBER — Contluued 

Chicago Pickling. A medium long deep-green variety, turning yellow at maturity. 
The fruit is finely shaped, being slightly blunt at both ends. It is the popular pickle 
variety in use about Chicago. Pkt., 5c; oz, 10c; % lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 

Cumberland Pickling. This variety is the result of a cross between Paris Pick- 
ling and White Spine and retains the characteristics of the former in being thickly 
covered with small white spines. The vine is hardy and very prolific. The .mature 
fruits are from 9 to 10 inches in length. Pkt., 5c; oz, 10c; "4 lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 

Early Cluster. A very productive variety, bearing its fruit in clusters of two or three. 
The fruit is short and very dark green. A trifle paler at the blossom end. 

Pkt., Sc; oz, 10c; % lb, 30c; lb, ¥1.00. 

Early Short Green, Or Early Frame. A very desirable variety for either pick- 
ling or table use. Fruit straight; small at each end; bright green. 

Pkt, He; oz, 10c; % lb, SOc; lb, $1.00. 

Early RUSSian. A very early and hardy variety; fruit short, thick, and oval. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; 14 lb, 25e; lb, 90c. 

Everbearing. Very early and very prolific. Fruits 4 to 6 inches long; quite thick and 
blunt at the end, of a rich, dark-green color. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; Vi lb, 30c; lb, $1.00. 

Extra Early Creen Prolific, or Boston Pickling, a very prolific variety. 

used principally for pickles. Fruit medium sized; bright green; very even and 

symmetrical. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; % lb, 30c; lb, $1.00. 

Extra Long White Spine. A popular variety having long. rich, dark-green 

fruits with very tender, white, and crisp flesh. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; 'A lb, SOc; lb, $1.00. 
Japanese Climbing. A good variety for training to a trellis. Forms long fruit 

of rich, dark-green color. The flesh is white, crisp, and of good flavor. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; M lb, 30e; lb, $1.00. 
Long Creen. The best known and the most popular variety for general use. Is 

vigorous and productive and forms fruit fit for use almost as early as the shorter 

varieties. The mature fruit is almost 12 inches long. The skin is of a deep green. 

The flesh is .solid, crisp, and of fine quality. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; % lb, 35c; lb, $1.50. 



CRESS 



The 



*,„:■ 



nches apart, 
intervals to 

ng water where there is good soil, and after the seed is up. it needs 
ion since the plants spread over the water and make a mass of fine 



drills about ; 
should be mi 
the banks of 
no further ci 
edible leaves. 

Fine Curled. (Pepper Grass). Leaves finely cut or 
are pungent, and .are used to mix with lettuce. Pkt., 

True Water. Forms a plant, the leaves of which a 
ing. Thrives only when the roots and stems are 

Pkt., 10c 



ted below. The first named should be sowed in 

1 ground, early in the spring. Several sowings 

Watercress should be sowed along 



DANDELION 



An easily grown plant, now much esteemed for gree 
and spinach. Sow the seed in May or June on good, r 
when the leaves will be ready to cut the following spi 



Improved Large Leaved. 



largest leaved ar 
Pkt., JOe; 



urled like parsley. The leaves 
c; ox., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 
used for salad or for garnish - 
submerged. 
vi.., 35c; % lb., $1.00; lb., $3.50. 



est cutting variety. 
50c; % lb., $1.50; lb., $5.00. 



ENDIVE 



s:il:ul 



egetable which 
be sown in June or July in 
well grown, the outer leave 
heart. It is hardly palatable 

Broad-Leaved Batavian, or Escaralle. 

straight at the edges and curved toward the c« 

Pkt 



is becoming very valuable for winter 
rows, and thinned to about six inch 
i should be tied, thus blanching the 
until after frost, being rath 



The 



apart, 
ng the inner le 
bitter if used in 
iety having wide, thick leaves 
Color, dull green. 
>z., 15c; J /i lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 




White Spine Cucumber, 



Water Cress. 



:d growers 



17 



iinllmif-il 

lie mid rlt> holne wide and whitish and 



Ciant Fringed, or Oyster, a large 



I \nnl 

Creen Curled, a very curly 

plani 

Pkt, r.c: ..... I5e| '. Mi.. 40ej lb.. IIXi. 

urled-lenf varlotv niii' of the best mflrkot 

I'kl., .-.<•: ..... l.-.i-: ! , lb., JOe; lb., Il.ii. 

MOSS Curled. * very finely curled. dark-gr.-on variety, 

I'M.. .-.<■: .•».. l.-.i-; ', Hi.. IOC) lb., .1.25. 

StaghOm. .\ '•' type, >-■•■ lobea end divisions of the leaves being wider than In 
ir garden sort In Ban Fran 

Pkt., .-.<■: of.. We| i, Hi.. lOe) lb., ai.25. 

White Curled. A light yellowish-green variety: very eurled and quite ornamental, 

A good variety for general l»kt., Be] o.... IBe| V* lb.. r,Oc: lb., fti.so. 



ECC-PLANT 



The seed germinate? slowly, and should be started 
temperature, about March 1. When about an inch 
garden or field, but not until all danger of frost is 
i 1 nictiis prevail, aa in places where the 



■ glass, w 
transplai 

Eggpla 



moderately high 
carefully to the 
does not do 80 
It needs a warm 
climate to insure qtllek and uninterrupted growth. 
NOW York Improved Large Purple. The principal market variety; plants 
are large and spreading; fruit large and of deep rich purple. 

Pkt., 10c; o»... 40c; Vi lb.. S1.00; lb., *.3.7.->. 

Early Long Purple. An early variety and also a very profitable one. The fruit is 

long and of a dark rich purple. Pkt., 5c; or... 20c; '/, lb.. 60c: lb., $2.00. 

n early, prolific variety, and valuable for market gardeners' use. 

und; skin smooth and black. Pkt., 10c; on.., 30c; M lb., BOc; lb., *2.no. 

smooth-leaved variety with large, egg-shaped, pure white fruit. 

Pkt., 10c; oz., SOc; V* lb„ *1.00; lb., *3.r.o. 



Black Pekin. 

Fruit Is nearl 

White Pearl. 



GOURDS 



Plant late in April after danger from frost is i 
somewhat on whether the plant is allowed to co' 
trellis. The small varieties, however, do best or 
soil well packed, and the plants thi 



shallow, t 

Dipper. 



r. The shape c 
the ground or 
trellis. The s 



f the fruit will depend 
trained to grow on a 
sed should be planted 



eful 



ety 



bearing fruit that can 
Pkt., 
,-ariety. The fruit contai 
ne extent like sponges, 
A small-fruited 



; for household purposes. 

:., 20c; % lb;, 75c; lb., $2.50. 
ins a curious lining which is sponge- 
Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; Vi lb., 85c; lb., 93.00. 



Dish ClOth. A peculiai 
like and can be used to s 

Japanese NeSt Egg. A small-fruited variety bearing a white fruit which re- 
sembles a hen's egg. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20e; % lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

Sllgar TrOUgh. A useful variety, bearing a large, pear-shaped fruit, the top of 
which can be sawed off and the bottom used for a bowl or dish. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 80c; lb., 93.0O. 



KALE OR BORECOLE 



of cabbage forming ; 
ie leaves are cooked 
i will be ready to us. 



A speci 
and curly, 
and the pla 
and anow. 

Dwarf Curled Scotch. 

very curly and very tender. 

Dwarf Purple Cerman. 

purple. 



the 



:,ter 



It 



hardy and will withstand frost 



most popular sort for general use. The leaves are 

tor bright green. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; */ A lb., 25c; lb.. 75c. 

nilar to Dwarf Curled Scotch excepting the leaves are 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; '/i lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 




Rsrsr-Plnnt — New York Purple and Early Lone Purple. 




-Tall Siberian. 



IS 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



KALE) — Continued 
Creen Curled SCOtCh. Tall. A very hardy variety. 
Is yery curly and makes a beautiful plant. Stands the 

Pkt., 5c; 

Siberian* A plain-leaved variety, having very little cu 

although the edges are cut and curled slightly. Pkt., 5c 



wing about 2V4 feet high, 
er well. 

]0c; % lb., 25c; lb., 73c-. 
) the large, green leaves. 
., 10c % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 



KOHL RABI 



bearing short le 
will be ready to 
or fall use. The 
Led to four or sis 



A plant forming a firm bulb above the grou 
like cabbage. If the seed is sown early, the younj 
and a planting in July will secure good veget; 
planted in the open garden, and the young plant 
not transplant well, unless when very small. 
Early White Vienna. The most desirable variety for general use. Is very early 

and has small tops. Color, light silvery green. Pkt., 5c; oz., 23c; % lb., 60c; lb., ¥2.00. 
Early Purple Vienna. An early variety with a bright purple bulb. The leaf and 

stems being green and tinged with purple. Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; Vi lb., 60c; lb., ¥2.00. 

LEEK 

A species of onion which does not form a bulb, but is used for its mild and delicious 
root, stem, or neck. It can be planted in rows, and the young plants thinned to about four 
inches. When well grown, hill up with earth to get a long, white stem. Seed should be 
planted in June for good plants in the fall and winter. 
American Flag. A very good, strong-growing variety, forming large stems of good 

flavor. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; lb.. $1.00. 

Carentan. The largest variety, though the stems 

varieties. L-eaves very broad. Pkt., 5' 



Large ROUen. One of the best known and oldest vari< 

Pkt., 5c; o 
MUSSelburgh. The best variety, having good, thick 

Very vigorous and of sweet, mild flavor. Pkt., 5c; o 
SuttOn'S Prizetaker. A very large variety, with long 

and large leaves. One of the best varieties. Pkt., 5c; i 

LETTUCE 



not so long as some other 
, 10c; Vi lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 
ies. forming good stems. 
-, 30c; Vi lb., 30c; Hi., $1.00. 
terns, which are also long. 
., 10c; % ?b., 30c; i:>., $1.00. 
as well as thick, white neck 
r., 15c; % lb., 50c; lb., $1.50. 



Lettuce is represented by four distinct classe 
edged cabbage, heading type; the curly and th 
curly and thin-leaved, bunching or non-heading 
are early, medium early, and late varieties of 
adapted for greenhouse, hotbed, winter, spring, summer, and 
a difference in localities in regard to the value of lettuce, th 
can not be adopted. For the ordinary house garden, it is 
of each type, and several plantings should be made to secure a 
be planted in rows eighteen inches apart, as early as possible 
.-iibbage varieties should be thi 
may be left quite thick, and whe 
Big BOStOn. A popular market variety, used largely 



types, — by the thick-leaved, smooth- 

ived, tight-heading, crisp type; the 

; and the cos or celery type. There 

type, as well as those especially 

n uses. There is so great 

uniform rule for culture 

able to use one variety 

""he seed should 

nd the young plants of 

ed to four inches apart. Varieties that do not head 

fairly well grown, those thinned out may be used. 

South to grow winter 
Tettuce for northern markets. A light-green cabbage variety, slightly tinged with 
brown in the head. Has a particularly fine golden buttery head. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; ^4 lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 
Black Seeded SimpSOn. A bunching variety, forming no definite head. It has- 
a large mass of fine, brittle leave 



light-green 
Pkt., 5c 

Black Seeded Tennisball. An old weii-known 

bed culture in winter and for withstanding heat in 
sort, forming hard heads. Pkt., ■ 



5c; Vi lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 

Very desirable for hot- 

A light-green cabbage 

15c; V\ lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 




Kobl Rain* — AVhite Vic 



I.cek — Gi:int Musselbiirji;. 



■ C HORSE a CO SEED GROWERS 

I I' I I I I I — c ,.ntluut-<l 

Boston Market. The well-known popular hothouM variety of New Kimland 

-IlKlillv 

■ ittery head. 

I'ki . .-..-. ..... I."..: M II... III.- 11.33. 

California Cream Butter. , very popular variety for autumn and winter use 
Form* a very large head which la rerj buttery, and ■ •! a rich golden-yellow Inaldc 
The la I and of bright green, slightly tinged with brown on lop ol head 

and the outei • brown spot 

■ w and a good ahlpplng variety. Pitt, .*..■: ...., isej '. i ■*.. hi.-; ii... *i.25. 

Deacon. Also called Sun Francisco Market and Golden Qate. \ large cabbage variety 

having thick, bright green leaves; Forma a large, buttery head: very bright golden- 

Inside Pkl.. To-: ..... I.",.-: ', It... III.-! it... ai.s.-.. 

Denver Market. A handsome variety, forming tight, conical bonds. The Ii 

and even the outside leaves are tender and crisp. Color is li^iu 
I'kt., 5c| oi.. 15c; '. III.. 45c; lb., #1.50. 

Drumhead Or Malta. Sometimes called Chinese lettuce. A very large, tight- 
heading variety. Leaves are rather coarse, but very l.rin 
and slightly curled. Pkt., 3c; o«., 16CJ V, lb., 10c; lb.. *1.25. 

Early Curled Simpson. A loose-hunching sore, forming no definite head. 
Is crisp and tender; light green In color. Is very hardy and easy to «row. 

Pkt., 5cj or... 13c: Vi lb., 40c; lb., ¥1-25. 

Crand RapidS* The well-known forcing variety for the middle West where hutter- 
headed "i- cabbage varieties do not grow well under glass. Is a loose-bunching 
variety, forming no definite head. Is extremely curly and its light yellowish-green 
color makes It very attractive. Pkt.. 3c; oi, 13c: '/, lb., 40c; lb., ¥1.23. 

Hanson. A fine, large-heading variety. Leaves curled on the edges: light yellowish- 
green In color. The head is cusp, and brittle, and flavor excellent. Is the very 
best house garden variety in existence, and much the finest variety of its class. 

Pkt.. 5c; »i., 15c; Vi lb., 45c; lb., ¥1-50. 

HOthOUSe. A rather new and very popular variety for growing tinder glass in some 

sections. Is bright green, slightly tinged with brown. Forms a solid, buttery head 

1 ? ize. Fkt, Be; or... 15e; Vi lb., 40c; lb., ¥1.25. 

Hubbard's Market. A large cabbage variety, forming a solid head, buttery, and 
yellow inside and of very tine flavor. Color light green. Is a favorite in some markets. 

Pkt., 5c; or... 15c; Vi lb., 40c; lb., #1.25. 

Iceberg. A large-heading variety: crisp, and brittle, and color bright green, lightly 
tinged with brown on lop of the head; leaves curled on the edges. 

Pkt., 5c; o/., 15c; '/, lb., 40c; lb., gl.25. 

Mammoth Black Seeded Butter. A very large, green cabbage-heading 
variety similar to Salamander, but a third larger. Pkt., 5c; or... 15c; % lb., 45c; lb., ¥1.50. 

New York Or Wonderful. A large, crisp, tight-heading variety. Dark green, 
curly leaves; head large and of fine quality. Pkt., 5c; oz., 13e; % lb., 10c; lb., |l£i. 

Passion. The most popular variety among California and New Orleans market gar- 
deners. A medium size cabbage, butter-heading sort. We have the best and truest 
stock of this variety that can be obtained. Pkt., 5c; or... 15c; Vi lb., 45c; lb., ¥1.30. 

Prize Head. One of the very best loose-bunching or non-heading varieties. Leaves 
brown, very curly, and of remarkable line flavor. Grows quickly and all except the 
outer row of leaves are very brittle. Pkt., 5c; oa, 15c; % lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 

Salamander. One of the most popular summer varieties for withstanding heat. 
Medium size, light green, and forms a hard, buttery head of line quality. 

Pkt., 5c; oie., 15c; Vi lb., 40c; lb., ¥1.23. 

Silver Ball. A good cabbage-heading variety of good size. Forms a very hard head, 
and Is slow to run to seed. Pkt., 5c; ox., 15c; Vi lb., 40c; lb., ¥1.25. 

Th© Morse. A large, loose-bunching or non-heading variety, forming a large bunch 
of leaves which are very crisp and of fine flavor. In color it is a light green and very 
attractive. Pkt., 5c; or.., 15c; V4 lb., 40c; lb., ¥1-25. 

White Seeded Tennisball. This variety is the same as Boston Market, which, see 
for description. Pkt., 5c; or... 15c; Vi lb, 40c; lb., ¥1.25. 

White Summer Cabbage. The oldest and best known cabbage-heading va- 
riety. Forms a medium sized hard head of fine quality. 

Pkt., 5c; or... 15c: U lb.. 40c; lb., ¥1,25. 

YellOW Seeded Butter. A large, cabbage-heading variety. Head very solid and 
buttery inside. Leaves thick and of a light green color. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb.. 40c: lb.. ¥1.25. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



SOME VIEWS FIIOM OUR SEED FARMS AT GILROY. 




Passion Lettuce growing for seed. 

Showing- how each head is perfectly formed. These heads and all other hard-heading 
varieties are cut open by hand with a knife to allow the seed stalk to grow. These rows 
are one-fourth of a mile long. 




The white down-like heads 
to prevent the seed shelling. 



Harvesting Lettuce Seed. 

must be cut very early in the 



while the dew is on 



n GROWERS 








■bbaeea or liu 



r 


*Tr3&S*: '] :; ,^ 


' ^1 


*'i1tiiV"ftf-'\ tkk f \c- rfc^W*~V» 




• 






1 



Drumhead or Malta 




Express Cos. 



Giant "White Cos. 



22 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

LETTUCE — Contliiued 

White Paris COS. The best of the cos or celery varieties. Forms a large, light 
green plant with the head well folded and quite solid. Cos lettuce is also called 
Romaine. Pkt., 5e; o», 15e; Vi lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 

Express COS. The earliest Cos variety. Forms a well-folded, solid head. In color it 
is darker than White Paris. Pkt., 5c; oz., 13c; 14 lb., 45c; lb., *1.50. 

MARTYNIA OR UNICORN PLANT 

The young- pods are much esteemed for pickles, but must be picked young, since they 
become very hard and flinty with age. Sow in hills after all danger of frost is over. 
The plant grows to about five or six feet in diameter, and is very ornamental. 
ProboSCldea. The common variety. Flowers creamy white with dark purple throat. 

Pkt., 10c; oz., 30c; )& lb., 85c; lb., ¥3.00. 



MUSKMELON 



Plant in hills in rich, moist land, using- o.ne ou 
per acre. Sow the seed after all danger of frost is 
melons require plenty of water, and if eonditior 
vigorous growth, and most varieties bear heavily. 



to make the plant 

Delmonico. 



stocky and thick, 
g-e, oval variety, slightly 



to 100 hills, or two or three 
er, and do not cover deeply, 
.re favorable, will make a 
is best to pick off the early 



pounds 
Musk- 
strong, 



•ibbed and netted. Flesh salmon. 
Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; \ t lb., 40; lb., $1.20." 
Emerald C6m> A salmon-fleshed variety of remarkably fine flavor and fine quality. 
Fruit medium sized, globular, slightly flattened at the ends; skin only slightly netted; 
very thick, and well ripened close to the rind. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 35c; lb., $1.25. 
Extra Early Citron. A very early, small-fruited variety. Fruit ball-shaped, skin 
green, and flesh light green. Very productive. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 
Extra Early HackenSack- An early variety with almost globular fruit, which is 
heavily ribbed and heavily netted. Flesh thick, and light green. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. 

Jenny Lind. Very early and very prolific. Fruit is small, somewhat flattened, deeply 

ribbed and netted. Flesh green and very sweet. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. 

MelrOSG. A fine shipping variety owing to the rather tough skin. Fruit is slightly 

oval, very much netted but not ribbed. Flesh light green, shading to salmon at 

seed center, and of very fine flavor. Pkt., 5c; oz., 30c; % lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. 

Montreal Market. A large-fruited variety, nearly globular with flattened ends. 

Skin dark green; heavily netted. Flesh light green. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. 
ROCky Ford Or ■ Netted Gem, The most largely cultivated variety in use. 
Grown in great quantities in Colorado, and shipped East in train loads. Fruit is slightly 
oval, finely netted, and slightly ribbed. Flesh thick, green, very sweet, and of fine 
quality. Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 25c; lb., SOc. 

Nutmeg. A very productive variety of medium size, almost globular, and slightly 
flattened at the ends. Skin well ribbed and heavily netted. Flesh green. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 
Osage. A salmon-fleshed variety, larger than Emerald Gem. Skin dark green, 
slightly netted and ribbed. A favorite variety for the later markets. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; y t lb., 40c; lb., $1.25. 
PetOSkey Or Paul Rose- An excellent market variety with thick, firm, orange- 
colored flesh. Rather larger than Netted Gem: is slightly oval, ribbed, and heavily 
netted. Skin light green, changing- to a faint golden hue when fully ripe. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Ya lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 





MiiNkmelon — Emerald G 



ii i.KuWKKS 



Small Creen Nutmeg. 
White Japan. 

win; .11 Hea 



Ml KKMBI n\_. 
A rn.dllim-.lnd 
■lightly 111.1...1 

limit us. 
-.rl.ty for the hom< 



• nllnuril 

■h (lobular fruit Skin il.irk 
'l**h thick, rreen and rather • 

Pitt, .-„■: ..... I."..-; •, II.. II.,-: lb, »l.2.-.. 

(txden. Fruit medium sited, oval, with 

I'kl.. .-.. ■: ../.. I.-.,; '. II,. in.-: »l..-.o. 



WATERMELON 



Llirht. snndy. -»r Krnvelly soil is n< 

well on I i clay soils, and theac 

'i the soil can be 
well-rotted manu 

Plan) H the first ol 

,i hill, nn.i thin out to two plants i 
d to :>»" hills, "i 
Black Spanish. The well-known and popular varl 
m rule and e> er since. The fruit h 
ol bright yellow where it rea 



watermelons. They seldom do 

tided for watermelons 

Eilll some 



hills ab< 

I shows 
s a farm crop, t wo to 






i-ith a spo 



f used in California in the 
ilmosl globular, very smooth, 
on the ground. Flesh solid, 
bright red, and seeds black. Pkt,, Bcj o*., iocj Vi n>.. 20c; ib.» «oc. 

Chilean* A very brittle, thin-Skinned variety, of the liightest Quality, and especially val- 
uable for the home garden. tl Is slightly oblong; the skin is deep rich green. 
mottled and stripe. 1 with a still deeper green; the flesh is bright red and the Bavoi Is 
remarkably fine and sweet. Pkt., 5c j ok., 10c; Y A lb.. 80c j lb.. SI.0O. 

Citron. A small, globular variety, striped and marbled with light green. Flesh while 
and solid; seeds red. I sed exclusively for pickles and preserves. 

Pkt.. 3c; ok., 10c; V. 11>., 26c; lb.. 75c. 
Cole'S Early. A great favorite for a large area of different climates. Fruit medium 






ihlo 



■Iped 



Cuban Queen. An 

globular to oval shape, 
light and dark green. 



id mottled. Flesh bright red. solid, and of fine, sweet flavor. 
Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 00c. 
excellent shipping variety of medium to large size, and 
Rind quite thin, flesh bright red and firm, Skin striped with 
Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Dark ICing. Fruit large, nearly globular. Skin dark green, sort of mottled* indis- 
tinctly with lighter green. Flesh deep pink, and of fine flavor. 

Pkt., 5c; oz. 

Dixie. A good market variety with large, oblong fruit. Sfe 

green. Rind thin but tough. Flesh bright red. Pkt., 5c; o 

Florida Favorite. A very large variety with large, obi 

skin, mottled with a deeper shade. Rinc 



10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb.. 00c. 

i striped light and dark 



10c; % lb., 20c; lb., «Oc. 

? fruit and dark green 

flesh deep red and of fine quality. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Iceberg. In general appearance this variety resembles Kolb's Gem but the skin. 

which is dark green with markings of a lighter shade, is darker in Iceberg, and shows 

a spot of bright yellow where the fruit rests on the ground. The rind is thin and 

the flesh deep red. It is the best dark-colored shipping variety in use. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; 44 lb.. 20c; lb., 60c. 
Ice Cream. A popular home-market variety. The fruit is oblong, with dark green 
skin. Flesh, deep pink. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Kleckley'S SweetS Or Monte CriStO. A very desirable variety for the home 
garden or hear-by markets. Will not stand shipping as the rind is thin and brittle. 
Fruit medium sized, oval, and skin dark green; flesh bright red and very sweet. It 
is the very sweet, honey-like flavor that makes it especially distinct from all other 
ties. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; J ,± lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 




Watermelon — I>lx 



Watermelon — Kolb's Gem. 



24 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



WATERMELON — Continued 
Kolb'S Gem. The well-known shipping variety. The fruit is large, thick, and oval r 
with flattened ends. Skin striped with light and dark green. Flesh bright red. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; U lb., 20c; lb., 00c. 

Mountain Sweet- A good home-garden variety and an old favorite. Fruit large 

and oval; skin green, and flesh bright red. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y± lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Pride Of Georgia. A well-known southern variety with nearly globular fruit of 

medium size. Skin light and dark green striped. Flesh pink. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Sweet Heart. A very productive and fine shipping variety. Fruit large, oval, with 

thin but firm rind. Flesh bright red, solid, and sweet. Skin light mottled green. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

The Lodi Or San Joaquin. The well-known and popular California variety. 

grown on an immense scale in San Joaquin Valley and shipped to all parts of the 

Pacific Coast. Fruit large, and oblong; skin lighc yellowish-green; rind thin but 

tough; flesh bright red and sweet; seeds white. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V* lb., 15c; lb., 50c. 



MUSTARD 



drills 



the 



spring, and 



as here listed, make excellent greens of 
e as spinage or beet leaves. Sow the seed 
ntervals throughout the summer to secure 
hardy and is easily grown. Om 



will 



constant supply of fresh greens, 
sow fifty feet of row. 

Chinese. A very hardy, broad-leaved variety. Leaves are thick and rough on the 
under sides. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 15c; lb., 40c. 

FordhOOk Fancy. A very handsome variety with dark green foliage. Leaves 
very finely curled on the edges. Plant medium sized. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; \ , lb., 25c; II)., 90. 

Ciant Southern Curled. A large variety, forming a great mass of beautiful 

leaves, which are ruffled and finely curled on the edges. Hardy and vigorous, and 

very highly recommended. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 50c. 

White English. A light-green variety with tender leaves. Seed light yellow. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Yt lb., 15c; lb., 40c. 



NASTURTIUM 



The green s 
excellent condir 
garden. It is • 
tall or climbini 
planted in a ro^ 

Tall Mixed. 



C nasturtium has a sharp, pungent flav 

It is also valuable as a flower a 
sensitive to frost and should not be 
ietv requires a fence or trellis to cl 
ig two ounces to 100 feet. 



and when pickled makes an 
double purpose in the 
ted before April 15. The 
on, and the seed may be 



nost prolific and 



sily grown var 
Pkt., 



ety 



10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 



OKRA OR GUMBO 



The long, tender pods of okra are very delicious when sliced and cooked in soups. 

While this is its chief use, it is also boiled and served like other classes of vegetables. 

The tall sorts should be planted in hills about four feet apart, using about one ounce to 

100 hills. The dwarf sorts may be planted in hills or in rows about three feet apart. 

Plant in any good soil about April 1. The pods should be gathered when very young, 

as they are then very tender. 

Dwarf Green. An early, dwarf, and prolific variety with thick, green pods. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Perkins Mammoth Long Pod. A dwarf-growing, very early and prolific va- 
riety. Pods are long, slender, deep green, and of fine quality. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

White Velvet. A medium-sized variety, bearing long, smooth, white pods, which are 
very tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 





Mustard — Southern Giant Cnrled. 



Okra— Dwarf Green. 



J&£ 








iJSMz- 


u/Br 




^>^* 



Big Boston. — One of the most popular market letti 




MuMkmelon — Rocky Ford or Netted Gem. — The most largely used melon in cultivation. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



ONION 



The best 
Higher lands can ta 
before planting the 



Onions do not follow 
the soil lacks nitrogen and humus. A pi 
be planted to beans : 



On high lands the 



other 

,,, .,.„., ..,.,,. „„„ seed should be sown in December 
low lands any time from February 1 to March 10. will do. dependin 
weather. Sow in rows from twelve to sixteeen inches apart, u; 
of seed. In irrigating cnions, it is important that the land neve 

for a check in the growth will either force the plant to - 

necks. In the house garden plant early in drills, 



hay or grain crop to good advantage, 

>f land contemplated for onions should 

ge'table crop one or two years. 



January, while on 
on the condition of the 
ug four to five pounds 
be allowed to get dry. 



lii ( _ _ f _ _ ounce to 250 feet of row. 

The "seed "crop "is very "short "this year, and prices""rule higher than usual. 

Australian BrOWIl. An early and very hardy variety which does especially well 
in the South. Should be planted early, on low, wet grounds to get large bulbs. The 
skin is thick and the color is a rich brown. Is especially noted as a long keeper, as 
it keeps well into spring, and much longer than other varieties. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 40c; lb., ¥1-35. 

Australian Extra Early YellOW Clobe. An orange-yellow globe variety; very 
early, and a long keeper. Possesses all the good qualities of Australian Brown except 
that it is a little smaller. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; y* lb., 60c; lb., $1.75. 

BrOWn ClObe* An early variety, almost true globe shaped. The color is rich seal 
brown; the skin is thick, and the flesh white, firm, and fine grained. It has all the 
good keeping qualities of the well-known Australian Brown. 
See colored plate on cover. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; y 4 lb., 75c; lb., $2.00. 

California Early Red* A variety much used for very early, onions. If the seed 
is sown in beds in August and set in the field in November or December, good market 
onions can be had in May. It is not a good-keeping variety, but is of very mild flavor 
and of fine quality. Is very much esteemed as a green onion before the bulb is 
formed. Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; y* lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 

Extra Early Red Flat* A very early, flat variety with dark purplish-red skin. 
Forms a hard bulb with good keeping qualities. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15e; % lb., 50c; lb., $1.25. 

Extra Early BaHetta* An extremely early variety. Seed planted in February will 
form ripe onions the last of July. Is a white onion, forming small bulbs about one 
inch in diameter. Valuable for home-made pickles. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; *4 lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

Mammoth Silver King. An early, large, white, flat variety. Is not a keeping sort 
nor a good-shipping variety, but is valuable for home use and near-by markets. Is 
very mild and of fine flavor. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; y± lb., 75c; lb., $2.00. 

OhiO YellOW Clobe* The best of the yellow globe varieties. The skin is bright, 
glossy, orange-yellow, anti the flesh is white, and fine grained. The bulbs are re- 
markably uniform in size and shape, and being firm and hard possess fine keeping and 
shipping qualities. See colored plate on cover. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; y* lb>, 75c; lb., $2.50. 

Pfizetaker* A very large globe-shaped variety with light-yellow skin, and white 
flesh of mild flavor. It is a heavy cropper and a fairly good keeping onion, and is 
very popular as a market variety. Individual bulbs sometimes weigh 4 lbs. and very 
often 2 lbs. or 3 lbs. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; % lb., 60c; lb,. $1.75. 

Red Bermuda. A very early, flat variety, used largely in the South for planting in 
the fall and marketing in the spring. Is of mild flavor and a good shipper but not a 
winter-keeping variety. The color is a pale red. The best stock is imported from 
Teneriffe, Canary Islands, and we offer only this stock. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 





Onion — Red Bermudn 



i' OROWEKS 



ONIONS— < ...ilunr.l 
Red WetherSfleld. The I known and m^i arid.1y.nmd red vart.ty tn .hope 

Is h:ir.l. and „.„,, „ 

bright purplish 

_ m^j «u lk '" '"'• '"" '• '• "'- '"'' ; * ,Jtv 

Southport Red Clobe. » large, globe-shaped, bright purpllah-red variety. Is ■ 

1 1 and of 11 uallty. 

" '' rr '' "" "" •••"• r - i'kl., .-..•; ,.,.. 2". : ■ , II,.. I | II... >M0. 

Southport White Clobe. A pure white globe-shaped variety. Forms handsome 
• -inns with wax-like, pearl-white flesh. I- used .. greal n onions 

white stem, vr colored ml «■ cover. 

Pkl.. .-,.•; ,,»., -(I,.; ., II,.. T.-.,.; II,., fajso. 

Southport Yellow Clobe- A fino. orange-yellow, globe-shaped variety T* a heavy 

ping bard bulb. Pkt, .-..•: ,,,.. 20c; ', n... 7.-,.-; n... njn, 

Yellow Cracker (Early*, a very early, yellow variety. Is very Bat, both on the 

■■•I. linn bulbs with ^ i keeping hub lltle 

I'kl.. .-..■: ,,/., I.-,,-; i, li,.. 50c, n,„ 11.50, 

Yellow DanverS Flat. The best-known nn.l most generally used flat, yellow onion 

most hardy "f all varieties foi Ca ,i yields thi surest mm. I 

Color bright orange-yellow; flesh white an,] firm. \ | 

! si; '•• , • Pkt.. Scj oi, 15c I '■ 11... 400) lb., *1.25. 

YellOW Dutch Or StraSbUrg. The most popular and best variety for set pur- 

Is similar to the fellow Danver's Flat in shape, color and size, bul 
lallty oJ ripening down earlier ami more uniformly. 

Pkt., 5c; ox, I5c; ',, lb., 60c; 11.., Sl.50. 

YellOW Clobe DanverS. The popular yellow globe onion for market and shipping 

purposes. la almost ball-shaped but a trifle flattened at both ends. It is a heavy 

r, and a g 1. firm, hard-fleshed variety. Pkt., 5c; or., no.-! ■/, n,., 60c; lb., SJ1.T5. 

White Bermuda. A very early variety, used largely in the South as an early 

market onion, when the s 1 is sown in the fall and the onions harvested in the 

g. It is mild and "t" particularly fine flavor. The color is a pinkish-white, and the 
The .-■ 1 we offer Is grown in Teneriffe, Canary Islands. 

Pkt, 5c; o«., 25c; V4 lb., 85c; 11... $3.00. 
White Portugal Or SiWerSkin. The best-known and most largely used white 
onion. Is flat on the bottom and thick toward the top. Very hard and firm and an ex- 
cellent keeper. Is largely used for white onion sets as well as for market onions, and 
1; kles - Pkt., .-,<•; ,.»... a.-..-; y, 11).. 75c: lb.. S2.25. 

White Queen. -\ very early white onion. Rather small and does not keep well. Is 
of fine, mild flavor, and largely used fur home-made pickles. 

Pkt, 5c; or... 20c; ', II... 7.-.c: 11... $2..-.0. 
OMOX SETS — Prices on Application. 

PARSLEY 

Used for garnishing, espec.ally dishes of cold meats, or cooked in soups. A few 
plants in the garden will yield sufficiently for a family, providing the leaves are cut often 
and the plant not allowed to seed. Sow the seed in drills earlv in spring, using one- 
fourth of an ounce to 100 feet. 

Champion MOSS Curled. -Y verj finely curled, bright-green and very ornamental 

variety. Pkt, 5c; or,., iocs Vi lb, 20c; lb, 00c. 

Double Curled. A curled variety, very hardy and easy to grow. 

Pkt, 5c; ok., 10c; % lb, 20c; lb, 60c. 
Extra Triple Curled. A very finely curled variety of dark-green color. One of 

the best varieties for all purposes. Pk«, 5c; or.., 10c; y, 111, 20c; lb, 60c. 

Hamburg Or Turnip Rooted. A plain-leaved variety, forming a thick, edible 

root. Pkt, 5c; or.., 10c; 'A lb, 20c; Hi., 50c. 

Plain Or Single. A very hardy variety, resembling a wild plant. The leaves are 

flat and not curled Pkt, 5c; or.., 10c; y, lb, 20c; lb, 50c. 

PARSNIP 

A well-known veq-etable for table use. Tt is also a verv ^onrl sm^k food and quite 
as nutritious as carrots. It prefers very wet soil, and will thrive, where carrots will not 

roots are very long, and are difficult to dig- : 
drills, using one-fourth o 
using three pounds per s 

Early Short Round French, a fiat, turnip-shaped variety 

grain, and not as good quality as the long varieties, but early and easy to dig in 
stiff, hard soil. Tkt.. 5cj ok., 10c; y t lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 



28 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



PARSNIPS — Continued 

Guernsey- ^- ^ on S variety -with a wide or thick shoulder and hollow crowned, 
small top. It tapers gradually, and the largest part of the root is from the 
down to 6 or 7 inches. Pkt., 5c; o«., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 

HollOW CrOWn. A long variety, with a hollow or cup-shaped top, where the 
stems begin. The most popular and best variety for all purposes. Skin smooth, 
white, and flesh tender. Pkt., 5e; ok., 10c; *4 lb., 20c; lb., 

Long Smooth. A very long variety with full crown. Very smooth, white skin 

Pkt., 5c; ok., 10c; ] /i lb., 20c; lb., 



with 
: top 



PEAS 



Peas i 



ted 



hardy, and for very early market can bi 
as can be had in February. They requ 
wet. or they will run too much to vine, and d 

seed needs to be planted thick, using from 150 to 200 pounds per a> 

crop, or one pound for sixty feet 



■ e 1 v 



be planted in rows eighteen inches apart, and the tall 
ol;iss<>s of peas and by making several sowings of each, , 
In the garden the pods should be kept picked as 
bear. 



The dwarf 
three feet. . 

peas can be had for a long 
plants will then continue ti 

The prices quoted for packets are post-paid. For larger quantities from one pound up, 
add eight cents to these prices, if wanted by mail. If ordered by express or freight, 
the charges are to be paid by the purchaser. 

PEAS — EXTRA EARLY VARIETIES 

Alaska Or Earliest Of All, A very early, tall variety with smooth, small peas of 

good quality, and short, well-fined pods. Its fruit ripens practically*all at one time. 

and is very popular with canners, who always desire to make but one cutting. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., $7.00. 
American Wonder, A dwarf or short-vine variety, bearing short, thick, well- . 

Illed pods which are a rich dark green. It bears well, is easily grown, and very 
arly. The peas are of especially fine flavor, and it is the best dwarf variety for all 

purposes. The dried peas are wrinkled. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 Jbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $10.00. 
First and Best. One of the earliest tall varieties, with smooth, round peas, which 

ripen almost at one time. Pods straight, short, and well filled. Of fair quality. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., $7.00. 
CradUS Or Prosperity, One of the very best early varieties. Is a tall variety, 

growing about 3 feet high and bears very long pods which are pointed, and well filled, 

with large, sweet, and very fine, wrinkled peas. The foliage and pods are light green. 

and the plant is not very hardy. Pkt., 10c; lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $2.00; 100 lbs., $15.00. 




Pea — Premium Gem. 



Pea — American Wonder* 



ED CROWEflS 




fi£ l 




■ 




*.« 



Cutting the Onion Tops and hauling to the Drylns Ground*. 

Every head must be cut by hand. The tops require from three to four weeks to dry, 
and are turned every day. and then threshed by machines. 




Threshing Onion* with »peelnllj- hnllt Separator nod mounted gasoline "Union" Engine 
to prevent danger from tire. 



30 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

PEAS — Continued 

McLean's Little Cem. A good, dwarf, wrinkled variety, growing about IS inches 
high. Pods about 3 inches long and well filled with large peas. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $10.00. 
Nott'S Excelsior. The most popular dwarf, wrinkled variety for the home garden 
or market garden. The vines are larger and more productive than American Wonder 
and the peas are of especially fine flavor and good quality. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs.. $10.00. 
Premium Cem. The best and most popular dwarf, wrinkled variety, especially with 
market gardeners. It grows about 15 inches high and bears good-sized pods, which 
are filled with 6 to 8 peas of especially fine, sweet flavor. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $10.00. 

ThOmaS LaXtOII. A fine, early, tall variety similar to Gradus but more hardy ana 

not quite so early. Is also a little darker in color and taller, but lias the same fine, 

large pods and fine quality. Pkt., 10c; lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $1.50; 100 lbs., $12.50. 

PEAS — SECOND EARLY VARIETIES 

Abundance. A tall, branching variety bearing medium-sized pods with large peas 
of good quality. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., $8.00. 

Everbearing, A tall, wrinkled variety bearing broad pods well filled with large peas 
of good quality. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs.. $8.00. 

McLean's Advancer. A good, tall variety with wrinkled peas of very fine quality. 
Is especially productive and very popular with market gardeners. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., $8.00. 

PEAS — LATE VARIETIES 

Champion Of England. One of the most popular, tall, wrinkled varieties. Is very 
prolific and hardy and the peas are of especially fine, rich quality. 

Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs.. $8.00. 

HorSfOrd'S Market Carden. A tall variety of medium height: very prolific; 
peas small and -wrinkled but pods well filled. Dark green and hardy and very popular 
as a canning variety. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., $8.00. 

Stratagem, A semi-dwarf variety with large leaves and large pods. The peas are 
dark green, wrinkled, and of good quality. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $10. 

Telephone. One of the latest varieties. Is tall and vigorous with enormous pods, 
bearing large, wrinkled peas of remarkably fine quality. A popular home-garden 
and market variety. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $10.00. 

Yorkshire Hero. A very hardy and prolific, tall, wrinkled variety. The peas are 
large and of fine quality and the pods which are broad and medium sized, remain in 
condition for a long time. Pkt., 10c; lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 lbs., $10.00. 

Black-Eyed Marrowfat, The best of the marrowfat varieties. Tall, hardy, and 
productive. Lb., 10c; 10 lbs., 80c; 100 lbs., $7.00. 

Large White Marrowfat, A very tall, hardy variety. Very productive but of 
inferior quality. Lb., 10c; 10 lbs., 80c; 100 lbs., $7.00. 

Melting Sugar. A tall variety, bearing long, fiat, brittle pods, which are cut or 
broken and cooked like string beans. Is a delicious vegetable and should be better 
known and more generally used. Pkt., 10c; lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $1.50; 100 lbs., $12.50. 

PEPPER 

" There are varied uses for peppers, and while they are more popular in the South 
among- the Spanish and Mexican people, they are used very largely by all people who 
like strong - , hot condiments. The several varieties are used for stufling' when green, for 
pickles, and for pulverizing- when dry. Our selection of varieties includes all of the 
very best. 

Peppers do best in hot climates, but can be grown quite £ 
They require very rich soil. The seed germinates slowly and 
and the young plants transplanted after all dang-er of frost is oyer. 

Chinese Giant. A very large, deep-red variety, very thick and blunt. It is fully 
twice as large as Large Bell or Bull Nose, being four or five inches thick at the top 
and about six inches long. Pkt., 10c; oz v 50c; % lb-, $1.30. 




Pea — Telepl 



C. C. MORSE .v CO -SEED GROWERS 



..ill inn. . I 



Colden Dawn. 



Bull Xoso In shape. 



•t. thick variety, similar to Tjlrge Bell 
with a mild, sweet flavor. 

Pkt.. .-.,■; ,./... SOe| 'i T.-.i-: II.., *2.25. 

Large Bell Or Bull NOSe. The most popular variety for stuffing. Fruit large, 

round, and hlooky. and aboul 3 Inches lung and '2 Inches thick. Tin- color is dei 

when fruit is young but when fully ripened it Is a rich, glossy i.i t-red. Plant grows 

about two feet high. M, 5c; ox., 9Ke| M >'••• "■"•••: 111., *-'.--.. 

Large Squash. An early variety, bearing large, flat, or tomato-shaped fruit, which 

is blight red when fully ripe. Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; V, 111., 75c; lb., SW.i-.. 

Long Red Cayenne. A strong, pungent variety, having long, pointed fruit which 

is bright scarlet when ripe. A well-known and popular variety. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; y, lb., 75c; lb., *2.25. 

Ruby King. A popular variety of the Bell or Bull Nose type. The fruit is large, bright. 

-red. and tile flavor is mild and swvet. A desirable variety for slicing in salads 

and for stuffing. rkt., 5c; ox., 25c; Vi lb., 75c; lb., !|I2.25. 

Red Cherry. An ornamental as well as useful variety, the plant being tall and bearing 

profusely, small, bright red fruit. The fruit is small, round, and very hot. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; Vi lb., 75c; lb., $2.25. 
Red Chili. A rather small bright red variety about two inches long;, and pointed. 
The pods are used in making chili sauce, and are very pungent and hot. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; V» lb., 75c; lb., *2.50. 

Sweet Mountain or Spanish Mammoth, a very popular variety with some 

market gardeners. It is a late variety, bearing large, thick fruit, which is frequently 
eight inches long and two or three incites in diameter. When mature, it is a deep, 
glossy red, and the flavor is mild and sweet. Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; V4 lb., 75c; lb., $2.25. 
XobaSCO. A very small-fruited variety of a bright scarlet color. It is extremely hot 
and pungent, and is used for making Tobasco Sauce. 

Pkt., 10c; ox., 45c; % lb., $1.25. 

PUMPKIN 

"While pumpkins are of strong growth, thev will not stand frost, and can not be 
planted until about April 15. A moderately rich soil is sufficient for good pumpkins 
Plant in hills about six to eis'M feet apart. Three to four pounds of seed will plant 
an acre, and one ounce will plant 100 hills. Do not plant near squashes or melons as 
they are likely to mix. 

(If large quantities are wanted, write us for special prices.) 
Big Tom. A very large, prolific variety with smooth, reddish-orange skin, slightly- 
ribbed. Flesh rich orange-yellow. Good for either table use or stock feeding. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Connecticut Field. A fine, large orange-colored variety used for field culture and 

stock feeding. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 40c. 

Large Cheese Or Kentucky Field, A very large, flattened variety, averaging 

about two feet through. When ripened the skin is a rich, cream color. Flesh yellow 

and of fine quality. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Mammoth Tours. A well-known and very large variety. Single fruits frequently 

weigh 200 pounds. A fine stock-feeding variety. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 30c; lb., $1.00. 




Spanish Mnmiuoth. 



32 C. G. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

PUMPKIN - — Continued 
Common Field. The well-known, ordinary pumpkins, largely used far stock feeding. 
The fruit is variously colored in yellow, drab, red. and orange, and varies also in size, 
but is usually very large. Is a heavy cropper and very easily grown. 

i'kt., 5c; lb., 30c; 10 lbs., $1.75; 100 lbs., $14.00. 



RADISH 



Being a root crop, good brittle radishes require light, well-worked soil, made very 
rich and mellow to insure quick growth. If permitted to grow slowly, they become 
tough and pithy. They are easy to grow and frequent plantings will insure*a constant 
.supply. Use two-thirds ounce for 100 feet of row, and thin the very young plants some- 
what to prevent crowding. Summer varieties can he sown all spring and well into 
summer. Winter varieties, however, require some time to mature, and the seed should 
be planted in August and September for good radishes in November and December. 
Brightest Long Scarlet. A very showy, long variety. Is thick at the shoulder 

and tapering. Bright rose scarlet with / distinct white tip. 

Pitt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 
Gliartier. A very long variety and larger in diameter and general size than Long Scarlet. 

Keeps hard and crisp longer than most varieties, and is an excellent garden sort. 

Color bright rose with lighter colored tip. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 35c; lb., 75c. 

Cincinnati Market, An early and quick-growing, long variety, which keeps hard 
and crisp for a long time. A favorite market garden variety. Color crimson. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % H»., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Chinese ROSe Winter- A bright scarlet variety. About 4 inches long and stump- 
rooted. Matures two or three weeks earlier than the Chinese White Winter and like it 
is firm and crisp and does not grow pithy until it runs to seed. 

Pkt,, 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 90c. 

Chinese White Winter Or Celestial. The well-known and popular winter va- 
riety. Clear white, about 4 inches long and half stump rooted. Keeps firm and crisp 
until it runs to seed. Is a good cooking variety, and the flavor resembles turnip. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V, lb., 25c; lb., 90c. 
Crimson Ciant Forcing. A new variety which will be a popular market and home 
garden variety, since it matures very early and remains firm and crisp much longt-r 
than other short varieties. Color rose carmine with white tip. It is top-shaped. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Early Scarlet Turnip. A valuable variety for forcing or out-door culture. Is a 
small turnip-shaped, variety, and in color, entirely crimson. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c* 

Early Scarlet ClobC A popular forcing variety owing to its very quick growth 
and fine, bright scarlet color. Shape, a trifle oblong. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y A lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Early White Turnip. A very quick-growing, small, turnip-shaped variety. Color, 
clear white. Valuable for forcing. Very mild flavor. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % i u .. 2 3c . i b ., 85c, 

French Breakfast. A popular variety for market or forcing. It is about two inches 
long and decidedly stump-rooted. Color, bright rose with bottom of root and the tail 
pure white. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c 





Radish — Scarlet Turnip White Tipped. Radish — Early Scarlet Turnip. 



i C MORSE A CO SEED GROWERS 



TWO <;<MI|1 KIM \ I <M v. 




*. riiiisou Cushion. 



Dnnrf i liiimpio 




Pumpkin — Connecticut Field. 

The beautiful bright golden-yellow variety. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



RADISH — Continued 



Golden Clobe. Quite a large top-shaped vi 
flesh. Is not a quick-growing variety but reta 



iety with yellow skin, and solid, white 
is its solidity a long time after maturity. 
Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 23c; lb., 75c. 
Half Long Or Olive"Shaped. The variety most largely used by the gardeners 

in California. It is about 3 inches long with half stump-root and sloping top. Color, 

carmine. Quick growing and hardy. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Half Long Deep Scarlet. A shorter, olive-shaped variety, with half stump-root 

and sloping top. Color, bright scarlet. Valuable for forcing. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ' , lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 
ICICle. A handsome white variety about 5 inches long with sloping top and pointed 

root. Quick growing, brittle, and mild in flavor. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 
Long Black Spanish. A winter varitety with almost black skin and white flesh. 

Roots about six inches long. Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 80c. 

Long Scarlet (short top). The best known and most popular long variety. Color, 

bright carmine, and flesh brittle and Arm. About 6 inches long, the top growing out of 

the ground about one inch. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Long White Japanese. A winter variety, growing frequently 2 feet long and 

about 3 inches in diameter. Skin, white; flesh, solid and tender, and very pungent.. 

A staple article of diet with the Japanese, who use it both green and dried. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 
Round Black Spanish. A winter variety with black skin and white flesh. It is 

top-shaped or almost globular. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Scarlet Turnip White Tipped. One of the most popular and attractive short 

varieties. It is globe-shaped, bright rose carmine with bottom and tip clear white. 

Stems and leaves small. Very valuable for forcing as well as for the house garden 

and market. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ■%, lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Triumph. An attractive, short globe variety. Has white skin, mottled and spotted 

with rose. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 90c. 

White StrasbUrg. A large, white variety for late summer use. Rather thick at 

the shoulder and tapering to about 5 inches in length. Keeps firm and solid a long 

time. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

White Vienna. A very fine, long, white variety, quick growing, and ready for use 

when very young. The flavor is mild and sweet. Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; }4 lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 
WOOd'S Early Frame. A very early, long variety, resembling Long Scarlet, but 

earlier and desirable for forcing. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

RAPE— See Farm Seeds. 

RHUBARB 

A rich, sandy soil, wet but well drained, is best for rhubarb. While it is frequently 
propogated from seed, only a percentage comes true, but it is cheaper to grow from seed 
and discard untrue plants. The popular method, however, is to use young plants propo- 
gated from the crown. Set plants three feet by six. The best stems are produced the 
second year, but it continues to produce for several years. When the blossom stalk 
appears, it should be cut back well into the ground. 

CrimSOn Winter- The new variety, which has become very popular and profitable 
to the grower, is of delicious flavor, extremely hardy, very prolific, and very quick 
growing. Produces good stems all winter and spring. 

Seed — Pkt., 10c; <m., $1.00; V* lb., $3.00; lb., $10.00* 
Roots— 50c each, $5.00 per dozen. 
Wlyatt'S ViCtOria a The variety most generally in use. It comes fairly true from seed. 
.Seeds — Pkt., 5c; oat., 15c; %, lb., 40c; lb., $1.50. 
Roots— 15c each, $1.50 per dozen. 




Squash— Summer Crookneck. 



Rhubarb — 3Iyatt*s "Victoria. 



MORSR • CO SEED OROWER8 



SALSIFY OR VEGETABLE OYSTER 



The salalf) root, which grow 

and I- 

lu stiff BOtl 

la dig fourths ounce f--i i 

ding. 

common variety. Medlui 



IT. IS 

k«d it hu a alstlncl flavor of the oyster, 
light soil, especially sandy loam. 



Usually uneven and hard 

l \Y | i 



Long White. 

Mammoth Sandwich Island. 



sized roots. 

I'M.. T.r; „,.. 10C| ', II... ;|(K-; II)., »I.<KI. 

The Improved, large-rooted variety. 

l"kl„ 5c| .>«.. Moi '. Hi.. SSej Hi.. ai-X".. 
Wisconsin Colden. A new variety with medium sized, fairly smooth root. When 
running to se.-d. the bloasoina are yellow instead of purple as in other varieties. 

Pkt., 3c; o>., 20c) Yt lb., S5c| lit., SUM. 



SORREL 



The large leaves, when 
California it grows luxuriant 

weed unless given attention. 

Large Leaved French 

most desirable. 



cooked like spinach, make a very palatable vegetable. In 

ly, spreads rapidly from the root, and becomes an obnoxious 

A confined location In the garden is therefore recommended. 

The variety having the largest, leaves and therefore the 

Pkt., Bcj o«., 10c; »/i lb., 85c; lb., $1.50. 



SPINACH 



An easily grown plant, the seed of which may be planted in the fall to secure good 
spinach early in the spring or even throughout the winter. The better and richer the 
soil, the larger and more tender the leaves will be. As a field crop for the market garden, 
use 8 pounds of seed per acre. For the home garden use one-half ounce for 1U0 feet of row. 
BlOOmstiaie SaVOy. The variety most generally used in the East, and especially 

throughout the South for shipping. Leaves large, round, and thick, very much savoyed 
and rich deep green. One of the earliest varieties. Seed, round. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., iBc; ll>.. 35c. 
Long Standing. A deep green variety with rather elongated, smooth leaves. Seed, 

round. Stands a long time without running to seed. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; y 4 lb.. 15c; lb., 40c. 
Prickly. The variety commonly used for market in California. Is very hardy and easily 

grown; bears large, smooth leaves which are shaped like an arrow point. Color, bright 

green. Seed, irregular with 3 or 4 sharp points. Pkt., 5c; ok., 10c; V\ lb., 15c; lb., 30c. 

ROLind Thick Leaved. A large-leaved, bright-green variety. Leaves rather smooth 

and rounded at the top. A good variety for late spring and summer. Seed, round. 

Pkt., 5c; ob., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 40c. 
Victoria. A long-standing variety with round, slightly savoyed leaves. Deep green 

and hardy. Forms good, edible leaves early and continues to produce leaves for a 

long period. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ■ , lb., 15c; lb., 40c. 



SQUASH 



The summer varieties come into use early in the summer, but being sensitive to frost 
the seed can not be sown until late in April. The seed should be planted in hills four feet 
apart, using four ounces to 100 hills. The winter varieties are also unable to resist frost. 
and should be planted at the same time. The fruit does not mature until late in the 
fall. and. having a very firm, hard shell, keeps well, and with a little 



be had all winter and until late in the spring. In gath< 
portant to protect the stems, since, if broken off, the fruit v 
hills six to eight feet apart, using two or three seeds to th< 
hills, or two pounds to an acre. Moderately rich soil will gi 



ng 



winter squashes. 


it is im- 


not keep so well. 


plant in 


11. Use eight ouni 


:es to 100 




Spinach— Long Standing. Salsify — Mammoth Sandwich Eslnnd. Squash — Hnhbnrri. 



36 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

SQUASH — SUMMER VARIETIES 

Early White Bush Scallop. A very early variety *ith flat, creamy white, scal- 
loped squashes. The vine is bush in habit and rather dwarf. 

Pkt., 5c; 01., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Mammoth Summer CrOOkheck- A large, golden-yellow variety, thickly 

warted, eighteen inches long, brittle, and tender. Plants are bush and very prolific. 

This is an improved strain of the old variety. Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb, 85c. 

Mammoth White Bush Scallop. A fine, large variety with round, scalloped 

fruit from 12 to 14 inches in diameter. Color, clear wax-white. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; Vi lb, 25c; lb, 85c. 

Vegetable MarrOW. A large, oblong variety, producing fruit which is dark green 

at first, becoming marbled and striped with yellow and lighter green as they mature. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; Vi lb, 30c; lb, $1.00. 
White Summer CrOOkneck. A long, crook-necked variety, similar to Summer 
Crookneck in size and shape, but it is pure white. Is of especially fine quality. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; 'A lb, 25c; lb, 75c. 

YellOW BUSh Scallop. An early variety with flat, round, scalloped fruit. Skin, 

deep yellow; flesh, pale yellow. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; % lb, 25c; lb, 75c. 

YellOW Summer CrOOkneck. The well-known summer variety. Fruit long, 

skin warted, and of a deep yellow. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; *4 lb, 25c; lb, 75c. 

SQUASH — WINTER VARIETIES 

BOStOn MarrOW. A popular variety, with large, oval fruit. Skin bright orange, 
with light cream netting. Flesh, orange. Fine grained, and of excellent quality. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; % lb, 30c; lb, $1.00. 

Golden Hubbard. An exceptionally attractive variety of the true Hubbard type. 
At maturity the color is red, and the flesh bright orange. The vine is productive and 
the fruit is fit for use earlier than the Hubbard. Pkt, 5c; oz, 15c; % lb, 40c; lb, .$1.25. 

Hubbard. The most popular and widely used of the winter squashes. Fruit is oblong 
and pointed, heavily warted, dark green in color, with orange color flesh. Is remark- 
able for its keeping qualities. Pkt, 5c; oz, 15c; % lb, 40c; lb, $1.25. 

Mammoth Chili. A very large variety, with smooth, oblong fruit, flattened at both 
ends. Skin, rich orange yellow; flesh, orange, fine grained, and sweet. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; % lb, 30c; lb, $1.00. 



SUGAR CANE See Field Seeds. 



TOBACCO 



the 
rows four or five feet apart, 
seed is sufficient for an acre. 

Connecticut Seed Leaf. 

the middle and northern sts 

Havanna. An imported vai 
for cigar wrappers. 

White Burley. a popuia, 



id about four feet apart 



the 



About two 



of 



e best known and most widely used variety throughout 
find Canada. Is the hardiest variety in cultivation. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 20c; % ■»■> 00c; lb, $2.00. 
with very thin leaf and delicate flavor. Especially used 

Pkt, 5c; or.., 35c; Vi lb, $1.25; lb, $4.00. 
ety, used extensively for plug tobacco. 

Pkt, 5c; oz, 30e; % lb., $1.00; lb, $3.00. 





Squash — Boston Harrow 



Tnrnip— Seven Top. 



MORSE «. CO.— SEED GROWER8 



TOMATO 





As tomal 










H 


ch 1, A hnr.lv .1 


ml St. 










be pin 


ui.l 




9 


■ .1 


will 


.nt* .■>... 










■ 


ill. In 



I"' l«l 111 II ITT, 

awn In well-protected hotbeds, sow I 
k\ pi mi is IukI by transplanting the -<iii..ii p 
anting to the field. Oi when iboul tour Incfii 
nl Kr-uvs si... K 

. using >ne .1 e to about tl 

In the ii. i.i s.i tall varieties si\ (eel apart mid 

mart, v sliKht trellis la advisable in the gard 

ti esslvel) rich. Too frequent 
nt is Injurious i" tomatoes In the home garden, but 
ue amount oi water sii-.iil.l be applied at the roots at regular lnt< 
Acme. A tall variety, me. Hum early, bearing flallish globe fruit ..f n purpli 
no medium siz. The fruit is emooth and uniform. 

Pkt., .">e: or... 25c: M ">•• 7Bc| M>.. ■MW, 
Beauty. A rniher early, tall variety; very prolific with good aliad. smooth fruit ..f a 
purplish-carmine color. Pkt., Sci ox. Wet 'i !■>., 75c; n>.. X-'.r.n. 

Chalk's Early Jewel. A wonderful new variety, in that n is early and i,. 

tlnuoualy throughout the season. The fruit is large, smooth, uniform, and well -ripened 

clear to the stem. Color, bright scarlet, Is of (In lallty and will und tedl 

a favorite for market and home garden if not tor ail purposes. 

•kt., 10ei OX., .-.lie: ", Hi., XI.25: II,.. s I.IH). 

CrimSOtl Cushion. A tall variety, bearing very large fruit of a bright scarlel color. 
Fruit rather uneven In size and shape, but Is firm and of line flavor though rather 
coarse. I'kt.. 5c; or... 40c; '/, lb, S1.00; lb., «3..-i0. 

Dwarf Champion. A dwarf variety, sometimes called the t 

Its upright growth and Us ability to stand alone without trellislng, Fruit, medium sized, 



ih. 



lif.O 



(See cut.) 

Dwarf Stone, a vi 

a bright scarlet CO 

Earliana (Sparks). 

any other variety. 



tomato on 
to stand alone without trellislng, Fruit, mei 
....I of a purplish-carmine color. 

Pkt.. 5c; oi... 25c: y, lb., 7..e; Hi.. X2.75. 

•nrlcty similar in habit to Dwarf Champion. The fruit is larger ami of 
lloi. Pkt.. Be; or... 25c; V, lb.. 76c| lb.. X2.75. 

The earliest tall variety, forming ripe fruit much earlier than 
The fruit is large, smooth. ..f a bright scarlet color, and of fine 



quality. Very valuable for early market use. Pkt., 10c; 

Favorite. A tall variety, bearing globe-shaped, scarlet fr 

uniform, and well-ripened t.. t lie stem. Pkt.. 5c; oi 

Golden Queen, a large-fruited tall variety, bearin 

fine quality. Pkt., E 



Husk Tomato or Ground Cherry. 

or husk. The true edible variety is ye 



, 40ci Vt lb., ftl.00; ll>.. *.(..-.(>. 
nit. The fruit is smooth, and 
x, 25c; V, ii,., TBc; lb., «2.r.o. 
mooth. bright yellow fruit >.f 
>x, 25c; •/, lli.. TBc; lb.. *2.so. 



variety that is covered by a loose covering 
ami is used for preserves. 

Pkt.. Be; ox.. 25,-t Vi lb, TBc; lb.. *:t.oo. 
MatChleSS. A tall-growing, prolific variety with large fruit which is rather flattened, 
smooth and uniform. Color, bright scarlet. Pkt, 5c; OI, 25c; Vi lb, 75c; lb.. S2.5II. 

MikadO Or Turner's Hybrid. A very large, rather irregular variety of the pur- 
plish-carmine color. Very prolific. The leaf resembles that of the potato. 

Pkt, 5c; ox, 25c; Vi lb, 75c; lb.. S.2.50. 
with medium-sized, globular, uniform fruit, which is smooth 
tern. Color, bright scarlet. 

Pkt, 5c; or... 25c; >/, lb, 75c: lb.. S2.50. 
large, irregular-fruited variety. Vine tall and fruit very 
in color. Rather coarse and of fair Quality only. 

Pkt, 10c; ox.. 40c; % lb, ¥1.00; Hi.. S8.50. 



Perfection, a tail 

and -well-ripened t. 



Ponderosa. An 

solid, and purpli 




Tomato — Perfection. 



Tomato — Beauty. 



:;s 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



TOMATO — Continued 

Red Cherry. The fru!t is small and globe shaped, about 1 to 2 inches in diameter. It 
is bright scarlet in color, and besides being ornamental, is very valuable for preserving. 

Pkt., 5c ox., 25c; % lb., 75e; lb., $2.50. 

Red Pear Shaped. As tne name implies, the fruit is shaped like a pear — small at the 
top and enlarged at the base. It is small, being about 2 or :J inches long. It is bright 
scarlet; is of fine flavor, and makes delicious preserves or salads. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; % lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

Stone. The best main crop variety for all purposes, and largely used for canning. "Vine, 
tall and prolific. Fruit, smooth, large, and uniform, and well ripened to the stem. 
Color, bright scarlet. (See cut.) Pkt. 5c; oi,, 25c; % lb., 75c; lb., $2.75. 

Trophy. An old favorite and much esteemed for its productiveness and hardiness. The 
fruit is somewhat irregular but of fine quality and is valuable, for canning. The true 
stock is scarlet in color, and the fruit shows a distinct navel at the blossom end. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; % lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

YellOW Cherry. A small-fruited, bright golden-yellow variety: very attractive for 
salads or preserves. In all respects like the Red Cherry, except for its golden-yellow 
color. Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; Vi lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

YellOW Pear Shaped. A small-fruited variety, resembling the Red Pear Shaped, 
except in color, -which is golden yellow. It is very useful for salads when the fruit 
is simply cut in two lengthwise. It is also useful for preserves. 

Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c; % lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

TURNIP 

While turnips are a favorite fall and winter vegetable, they may also be had In 
spring by proper sowings. They are of easy culture, but need well-worked, rich soil to 
insure a quick, uninterrupted growth, when they will be tender and free from woodiness. 

For fall and winter use sow the seed in August, using one ounce to 250 feet of 
row, thinning the plants when very young to three or four inches apart. For spring use 
sow in January. 

For field culture sow in rows about two feet apart, using one to three pounds of seed 
per acre. 
Amber Globe. One of the best yellow-fleshed varieties. Skin also clear yellow. Is 

of large size and fine flavor. Pkt., 5c; or... lOe; % lb., 30c; lb., 50c. 

Early White Flat Dutch (Strap Leavedl. A medium-sized flat variety; clear white, 

early, and of fine flavor. A fine table variety. Pkt., 5e; osc., 10c; % lb., 30c; lb., 50c. 
Extra Early White Milan. A very early variety, medium sized, flat, and clear white. 

A fine home-garden variety. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Extra Early Purple Top Milan. A very early variety, medium sized, very flat, and 

white with purple top. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

Orange Jelly Or Purple Globe. A globe-shaped, yellow variety with firm and 

crisp yellow flesh. A very fine table variety. Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Purple Top (Strap Leaf). An early, flat variety. "White with purple top. Probably the 

most popular and generally used garden variety. Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Purple Top White Globe. A valuable sort for either table use or stock feeding. 

Roots, globe-shaped, white, with purple top. Flesh, white, firm, and tender. 

Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 





Turnip — Early Yellow Purple Top, 



Turnip — Early White Flat Dutch. 



MORSE A CO.— SEEK QROWBRS 



"' 



I I II Ml'— I ..,.11,..,. .1 

Purple Top Yellow Aberdeen, a medium-sued variety. Benemiiy and fnr »tnek 

• with purple top, KI.-.-i,. Ilgbl yell..* 

I'kl.. M| •>«., IOci >., lb.. aOoi Ik- Mr. 

Pomeranean White Clobe. a lnrtre. white, vwriety ns<-.i innreiy for *mck fn.-.i 

Inp. I? iclnbe-shnped with Inrsre leaves. Wry hardy. 

I"k«.. .-..-: ..... Ill,-: ', II... WH-; lb.. Mo, 

Seven Top I For Greene) A variety cultivated for Its leaves which are cooked the name 

as spinach and mustard. The root Is smull and not used 

Pkl., 5C| <•«.. me; Vi lb., 20c: lb., 5*e. 
White Egg. A small oval-shaped variety with pure, white skin and white, fine 

grained tlesh. 1-k,., ,-„. ; „«., ioc) V4 lb., 20c; lb., «ec. 

RUTA BACAS OR SWEDES 



These are grown very extensively for stock fet 
uable crup. Treatment same ;?s for winter turnips, 
and the seed should be planted early in July. 1 
one-half feet apart, and the plants thinned to eigiit 
grow to an enormous size. 

American Purple Top or Long Island, one of the best and most popular 

varieties, with yellow flesh. It is yellow below ground with purple top above, and the 



>ut requlr 

e rows si 
twelve ii 



•hos. 



are 



all. 



A good stock-feeding 



L i i . 1 •/ 



iety. 
Pkt., 5c; os., i«e; % lb., 20c; lb., OOc. 

ariety of good quality. Flesh, yellow; skin. 

I'kl.. .V; os., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

hite skin and white flesh, which is tender and 

Pkt., 5c; (./... in.-; V. lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

shape and very large. Flesh, yellow; skin. 

I'kt., 5c; oz., 10c; v, lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

Dne of the hardiest and best varieties for all purposes. Skin is 

nd and purple above ground. Flesh, yellow and of fine flavor. 

Roots are slightly oblong in shape. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

YellOW Purple Top Swede. The well-known and most commonly used variety. 

Roots, globular; skin, yellow under ground and purple above. Flesh of fine flavor. 

Valuable for either table use or stock feeding. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

AROMATIC, MEDICINAL, AND POT HERBS 

Anise. A hardy annual; the seed especially being used for seasoning food, also for 
flavoring liquors and for medicinal purposes. Grows about two feet tall. Sow the 
seed where the plants are to stand. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % lb., 30c; lb., 91.00. 

Balm. A perennial herb used for seasoning, especially in liquors. Has a lemon-like 
flavor. Thrives in any -warm location, and is easy to grow. Plant grows 1 to 2 feet 
high. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; % lb., 75c; lb., $2.50. 

Basil; Sweet. A hardy annual, the leaves of which have a clove-like flavor. Used 
for seasoning soups, meats, and salads. Of the easiest culture; seed can be sown 
as early as the weather permits. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; % !»■* -*0c; lb., $1-50, 



Laing's Purple Top. a globe-shaped 

yellow below ground and purple above. 
Large White. A very large variety with 
sweet. 

Monarch or Tankard. Roots ovoid 

yellow below ground and purple above. 

Purple Top Yellow. 

bright yellow under gi 




3£ 

Rata Bagra— -Purple Top Yellow 



40 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

AROMATIC, MEDICINAL, AND POT HERBS — Continued 

Caraway. A biennial herb grown (or its seeds which are used for flavoring breads, 
cakes, and cheese; also occasionally for the young shoots and leaves, which are eaten. 
Grows 2 feet high. Is of easy culture. Sow the seed in the spring for seed crop the 
following year. Pitt., 5c; ox.., 10c; % lb., 25e; lb., 75c. 

Catnip. Practically a wild plant. Is a hardy perennial, the leaves of which are used for 
medicinal purposes. Pkt., 5e; ox, 30c; % lb., ¥1.00; lb., $3.00. 

Coriander. An easily grown herb, the seeds of which are used for flavoring pastry, 
confectionery, and liquors. Grows 2 to 3 feet high. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Dill. An annual herb, the seeds of which are used for seasoning. The foliage is also 
used for flavoring as well as for medicinal purposes. Grows 2 to 3 feet high. Its 
largest use is pickling cucumbers in what is known as "Dill Pickles." 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; <A lb., 20c; lb., <;<><. 

Fennel, Sweet. A hardy perennial, the leaves of which are used in soups, garnishes, 
and salads. The seed should be sown' early and plants thinned to six or eight plants 
to foot of row. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 30c; lb., ¥1.00. 

Horehound. A hardy perennial shrub, 1 to 3 feet high with whitish, hairy leaves 
which are used in confectionery, and in medicines for coughs and colds. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; <A lb., 00c; lb., ¥2.00. 

HySSOp. A hardy perennial shrub, growing 18 inches high. Used for medicinal purposes, 
both green and dried. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; % lb., 60c; lb., ¥2.00. 

Lavender. A hardy perennial, growing 2 feet high and .forming a bush about 4 feet 
in diameter. Used as a garden plant on account of its fragrant blossoms and foliage. 
Its long, fragrant stems are frequently used for fancy work when dried. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; % lb., 40c; lb., ¥1.25. 

MajOram Sweet. A half-hardy perennial, the leaves of which are used both green 
and dried for flavoring or seasoning. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; % lb., 40c; lb., ¥1-25- 

ROSemary. A hardy perennial shrub, the leaves of which are used for seasoning and 
medicinal purposes. Oil of rosemary is distilled from the leaves. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 35c; % lb., ¥1.00; lb., ¥3.50. 

Rlie. A hardy perennial, thriving on poor soil. Has a peculiar smell; leaves are 
bitter. Is used as a stimulant, but should be used with caution since its use some- 
times results in injury. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; % lb., 40c; lb., ¥1.25. 
A hardy perennial shrub, with whitish-green, oval, and very much wrinkled 
leaves, which have a pleasant smell and which are used for seasoning. It is easily 
grown and the seed can be sown almost any time. Its fragrant, purplish flowers are 
especially attractive to bees, and the finest white honey has its source in sage 
blossoms. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; % lb., 75c; lb., ¥2J25. 

Summer Savory. A hardy annual, the stems and leaves of which are used for flavor- 
ing dressings and Soups. Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; y, lb., 30c; lb., ¥1-00. 

Winter Savory. A hardy perennial, the leaves of which are used for seasoning. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; ■/, lb., 00c; lb., ¥2.00. 

Tansy. A very easily grown perennial plant, growing about 3 feet high. Its leaves 
are used for medicinal purposes, especially for dropsy and kindred disorders. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 30c; y, lb., ¥1.00; lb., ¥3.00. 

Thyme. A low-growing, half-shrubby perennial, with fragrant leaves, having a 
mint-like odor, which are used for seasoning. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; y, lb., 75c; lb., ¥2.50. 

WormWOOd. A hardy perennial, growing about 4 feet high. The leaves, which are 
greatly divided, have a strong, bitter flavor. They .are gathered in the summer 
and dried, and are largely used in medicines for tonics and applications. Also 
used in liquors, especially absinthe. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20e; % lb., tiOe; lb., ¥1.75. 

CLOVERS 

We pay postage on one-pound lots of Grasses and Clovers, but larger quantities are 
sent by express or freight, charges to be paid by purchaser. 

Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa), also known as Lucerne and Chili Clover. One of the most 
valuable forage or pasture grasses, being- very nutritious both as a green feed and as 
hay. It requires very moist land or frequent irrigation, and frequently bears from five 
to six crops of hay a year. It does well in almost any climate, and improves any soil 
that is sown with it. Prepare the land by deep plowing and thorough harrowing, 
and sow 15 to 20 pounds per acre broadcast and harrow it. It is best to sow in the fall 
after the first rains, but it can also be sown in the spring. The best grade of seed is 
that grown in Utah, which we offer here. Other grades will be quoted if asked for. 

Per lb., 30e, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 18c. — Larger quantities on application. 

Alsike, Or Swedish ClOVer. (Trifolium Hybridum), a perennial variety, some- 
times preferred to Red Clover, as it is generally finer and makes better hay for horses. 
The blossoms are also valuable for bees. "When used alone sow 8 to 10 lbs. per acre. 

Per lb., 40c. post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., 22c. — Larger quantities on application. 



ED GROWERS 



11 



CI.OVI II— I ..■•■Inuril 

Bokhara or Sweet Clover. feet ht«b, covered with -.man. white 

wee. Very valuable 

Per lb., toe. p..«i -paid ; 111 to 25 lb... nl 30e. — l.nritrr «|iinnllllrH nn n|i|illeNtlun. 

Burr Clover The native (mw plant of California. Of the earliest 

culture. Browing nil winter mni mil Into nimner, V/e offer only "Hulled seed.'' which 
Is mn. * than In tin- burr. Bow from August to October, using 

pounds of hulled *o.-,i per 

I'rr Hi.. Me, p — t ■ ej d j l» t" -"• Mm., in line. — Larger <i IIIIrM est niMillt'Mlli'n. 

Crimson, Or Italian (Trlfnllum Incarnatum>. An annual variety growing 1 10 

Inches hlph. and having long, crimson blossoms. Dxcellenl for both pasture and hay. 

s..w from II to It lbs per acre, and out for hay when In full bl n. 

IVr ll'.. S6e, |iuMl-pnid| 10 to 25 Ills., nt 20c. — Larger (uaatltleB »■ iiiipllcnllon. 
Mammoth Red (Trlfollum pratense). Similar to Red Clover but coarser, taller, and 
more hardy. Sow from 12 i<> 1"> pounds p- 

Per lb., 35c, peet'paid] to to -."• ib»., nt lOe, — i.nrger qumititii'M t,n application. 
Red Clover (Trlfollum pratense). The standard clover tor all purposea it yields n» 
heaviest crop of any variety except alfalfa, and makes superior hay, especially it mi ced 
with timothy. Sow from 12 to 16 lbs. per acre. 

Per lb., 35c, IIOHl-pnlll; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c*— Lnritrr timintltlen no application. 

White Dutch (Trlfolinm Repensi. A spreading, vine-like variety with white blossoms, 
used largely for bee pasture. Is also an excellent pasture plant for either sheep or 
cattle. 

Per in.. 45c, post-paid: 10 to 25 lbs., nt 80c* — Larger qnantttleM on application. 

GRASSES 

Bermuda CraSS (Cunodon Dactylon). A valuable grass Cor warm climates, such as 
the Southern States, where it withstands the hot, dry summers. Sow 5 to 6 lbs. per 
acre. It Is slow to germinate, requiring at least 30 days under favorable circumstances. 

Per lb., 75e, pout-paid. 

Brome CraSS (Bromus Inermis). A valuable grass for dry, hot, sandy soils, as it with- 
stands drought better than almost any other forage plant. Sow in the fall 20 to 30 
lbs. per acre. 

Per lb., 30c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs.* at ltte. — Larger quantities on application. 

Hard FCSCUe (Festuca Durinsculat. A good grass for resisting heat, and used by some 
for lawns; also valuable for sheep pasture. 

Per lb., 45c, pottt-puld. — Larger quantities on npplifiiiinu. 




Red Clover 



Alslke or Swedish Clover. 



42 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



GRA S SE S — Continued 

Fine Leaved FeSCUe (Festuca Tenuifolia). One of the best of all grasses for sheep, 
and should be used in all mixtures for permanent pastures. Sow 20 lbs. per acre. 

Per ll>., 45c, post-puid-^Larger quantities on application. 
Italian Rye CraSS (Lolium Italicum). An early grown grass, making- excellent hay. 
and good, permanent pasture. Grows taller than Australian Rye. 

Per lb.. 20c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 10c. — Larger quantities on application. 

English Perennial Rye or Australian Rye (Loiium Perenne). a strong- 
growing, hardy, perennial grass, valuable both for grazing and hay. Also makes a 
fine lawn and does not require the close care that Blue Grass does, as it will flourish 
better under trees or in shady locations. For field crop sow 40 to 50 lbs. to the acre, 
and if used for lawns not less than 75 lbs. 

Per lb., 25c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 10c— Larger quantities on application. 

Kentucky Blue CraSS (Poa pratensis). One of the best grasses for permanent 
pasture, and the most popular and useful variety for lawns. For pasture sow 25 to 30 
lbs. per acre. For fine lawn sow much thicker, using fully SO lbs. per acre, or 1%' 
for 20 square feet. Per lb., 35c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 18c. 

Meadow Fescue or English Blue Crass (Festuca pratensis). a perennial 

variety growing 2 to 3 feet high, and valuable for hot, dry climates, since it withstands 
drought. 

Per lb., 30c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 18c. — Larger quantities 
MeSC|Uite (Holcus Lanatus). A fine grass for sowing on new clearings 
tricts. Does well in any good, loose soil. Sow 30 to 40 lbs. per acre. 

Per lb.) 25c, post-paid: 10 to 25 lbs., at 10c— Larger quantities 
Millet ("Hungarian). A better variety for hay than the common c 
heads and bright golden-yellow seed. 

Per lb., 20c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 7c. — Larger quantities on application. 
Millet (Pearl'i. A biennial plant resembling Kale, and valuable for sheep pasture, or for 
plowing under as green manure. Sow in drills or broadcast using 1 to 5 lbs. per acre. 
Per lb., 20c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at Tc. — Larger quantities on application). 
Tall MeadOW Oat CraSS (Avena Elatior). A good grass for mixing with Rye 
or Alfalfa. It makes excellent hay, and by many is preferred to Timothy. If used alone 
sow 30 to 40 lbs. per acre. Per lb., 35c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 20c. 

Orchard CraSS Or COCk'S FOOt (Dactylus Glomerata). A quick-growing per- 
ennial grass, used for pasture or hay. For hay it is advisable to mix with Clover. Sow 
very thick, using 20 to 30 lbs. per acre. 

Per lb., 30c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 10c— I.arfcr quantities on application. 
Red Top (Agrostis Vulgaris), also known as "Herd's Grass," "English Grass," and 
"Rhode Island Bent Grass." A perennial variety, thriving best on wet or marshy land. 
Sow 15 lbs. of well-cleaned seed per acre. 

Per lb., 35c, post-paid; 10 to 25 lbs., at 20c. — Larger quantities on application. 
Lawn CraSS, our Golden Gate Park Mixture. A well-blended and carefully prepared 
mixture of the best lawn grasses. "We can recommend it as the best mixture for all 
purposes where an especially fine lawn is desired. 

1 lb., 45c, post-paid; 10 lbs., at 35c per lb.; 100 lbs., at 25c per lb. 



application. 

lumber dis- 



on application. 

1, having large 




Kentucky Blue Grass. Perennial Rye Grass. Meadow Fescue ot English Bine Grass. 




C C. MORE 9EUDD GROWERS 

i. li \x»i :»_, ■autfcaeed 
Australian Salt Bush, a raloabli plan) Cor peer i 

I in Ih- f.,11 t.. >;• i (i 

Hart ii win grow win, very little ma 

I ..... I."..-: ', Ih.. MM) I II,., Si.ini — .11 ,,„. i. 

Broom Corn (Improred Kvercrcon). Used for making brooma, and extensively used 

■all li Kr>>\\ nigh. 

i Hi., i.-.,-, peal-paldj kmi ih,,.. aN.oe. 

Buckwheat (Silver Bulled). A very cod nn.l popular variety. Grain Is of a H K ht color. 
rounder than the common variety; has . much thinner husk, earlier, and yield 

i ii... me, imm-piihi; too ib»„ ar..oiK 

Buckwheat (Japanese). The best and moat profitable variety, It la earlier than Silver 
i and usuallj more productive, Is also excel! 

i'cr lit.. Me, ,...-, -iu.1.1 ; too U.K.. S.-I.IMI. 

Canary. The seed Is used for bird rood. Is valuable il imental grass and 

has considerable merit as hay ror feeding cattle, i lb., aoc, post-paid] ion lbs., as.oo. 

Flax Seed. Should be sown In the spring on molal land, using 30 lbs. of seed per acre 
If Brown for a seed crop or twice that quantltj If Intended tor b crop of doer. 

t Ih.. 90c, peat-paldj too lbs., tdJfO. 

Hemp (Kentucky Bemp). A staple crop for manufacturing, sown broadcast, using 2& 
lbs. of seed per acre Por a seed crop should he sown In hills tour feel apart. Grows 
I'J t.. it feet high with deep cut, .lark green leaves which are rather fragrant. Makes 
a stately row along a walk and is an interesting garden annual. The seed is used la 
bird-seed mixtures. 1 lb., 23c, imi-.i-ii.iU1; 100 lbs., *7.50. 

Kaffir Corn. Grows from fi to 1 feet high and thrives in hot. dry climates. Makes 
good fodder for cattle, and the seed is used for stock and chicken food. Sow in rows 
3 feet apart, using 5 lbs. per acre. 1 11)., 20c, post-paid; 100 lbs., *B.OO. 

Rape (Dwarf Essex'. A biennial crop used principally for sheep pasture. Is usually 
sown broadcast on ranges, using 2 to 5 lbs. per acre. 1 lb., 26c, post-paid; 10O lbs., $3.00. 

Soja Bean. Valuable as a forage crop or green manure. Also as a green fodder and 
silo plain. S,.w 30 lbs. per acre. 1 lb., 25c, post-paid; 100 lbs., XI. "..on. 

Sugar Cane (Sorghum), Early Amber. A good fodder if cut when 2 feet high. Is 
nutritious and yields a heavy crop. Sow late in April, using 10 lbs. seed per acre 
in drills, or 25 lbs. broadcast. 1 lb., 20c, post-paid; 100 lbs., »5.00. 

Sugar Cane (Sorghum), Early Orange. A strong, productive variety, either for 
fodder or for syrup. 1 lb., 25c, post-paid; 100 lbs., «7.50. 

Sunflower (Russian). A variety bearing large heads, frequently 12 to 20 inches in 
diameter and sometimes yielding 1.000 lbs. of seed per acre. The seed is used for 
feeding chickens. Sow in the open field as soon as danger from frost is over, using 
3 lbs. of seed per acre, sowing in rows 5 feet apart and thinning to one foot. 

1 lb., 20c, post-paid; 10 lbs., 80c; 100 lbs., *7.00. 

Velvet Bean. Used largely as a green manure plant and also for forage. Grows 
taller and larger than any other soil plant, being sometimes 30 feet in length. Sow 
same as cow peas, in rows 5 feet apart and in hills 4 feet apart in the row. 

1 lb., 25c, post-paid; 100 lbs., $15.00. 

Vicia VillOSa (Hairy Vetch). A pea-like plant growing 1 about 4 feet high and doing 
well on dry, sandy soils for forage. Also a valuable green manure plant for sowing in 
the fall. Sow broadcast, 60 to 100 lbs. per acre. 1 lb., 20c, post-paid; 100 lbs., SS.OO. 

Spring Vetches Or Tares (Vicia Sativa). A plant resembling pea vines, and val- 
uable for forage or green manure. It is usually sown with oats or wheat to hold them 
up. Sow 60 bs. per acre with grain, or 80 to 100 lbs. if sown alone. 

Per lb., 20c, post-paid. — Larger quantities ou application. 

COW Peas (Black Eye). Used largely for green manure. It is also valuable if allowed to 
mature the seed, when the dry vines can be plowed under and the seed used to 
grind as feed for stock. If for green manure sow broadcast, using 80 lbs. per acre. 
If for seed or fodder sow in rows 3 feet apart, using 40 lbs. per acre. 

Per lb., 20c, post-paid; 100 lbs., *7.00. 

Canada Field Peas. Used principally for green manure. Is a strong, vigorous 
grower, making long vines and good roots. Sow broadcast, using 80 to 100 lbs. of 
seed per acre. Per lb., 20c, post-paid; 100 IIih.. *5.0O l.nrger quantities on application. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

A New Sweet Pea of Great Merit 




SHASTA 



A errand, new, white Sweet Pea, discovered and developed liy us on our own farms, ami 
now introduced for the first time. 

The standard and win^s are hoth large and vary at the edtses — the texture is firm, 
and the pure -white is very effective. It is one of the hest white sweet peas yet introduced 
and should be a favorite with florists as well as with the public generally. It bears four 
blossoms to the stem, usually facing: one way, and the stems are long; and stout. 

PRICE — SEALED PACKET OP 50 SEEDS — 25 CENTS 



tow I. It.- 

FLOWER SEEDS 



»n» i m him in \ i 

|,.o k. t- 
For »l.00 nted nn nmnnnl up lo HI.2T, For »:1.IH> «rlcol nil nine. mil <■ ,, i„ «3.T."i 

I . r .MH1 ..I,,! „„ milium IM I'l.r I.IHI »,.|,.,l nil IHN.Mii.t lip I.. .-..IMl 

For *5,oo BSlsefl nn niiiouiil up to 9ll.2.~ 
Tkr»r Hnlr« apply only to Sroil« In Packets, lull not to «re.l« liv Weight or Nenanr*. 

\.. iii-i-ouDt t-nn iir allowed oa Plowac ieeda n\ Weight 

more satisfactory flowers In the garden l linn those grown fr - 
the onsll) grown ami lirllllnm lluwvi-cil iinnualti Th 

■ .1 Whirl, 

will furnish a large number ..r plants with usual!} enough for 

It Is Important to study the garden befori flowers th it are sultdbli tot 

ild comprehend the helghi of the plant the tl 
enntal class of the Rower. Usually th.> tall plants go nexl to th. 
the wall, with the shorter kinds in front ami the low-growing varii 
the border. 

While the old-fashioned flowers are still popular, new and Improved varieties have 
developed, with larger and finer blossoms. 

- • ,1 of a large ; i by ourselves 

■ ui ..ur own farms, and is of strong growth, an. I will i In.-., th.- I.esl of 

It Is usually best t.. sow the seed of annuals early In year, and the seed should be 

■>n hand in January. 

Many flowers can be planted in the (all for early blossoms In the spring This Is 
peculiarly so with Sweet Peas. Some biennials ami perennials can be sown in August 
or September, and made to bloom the following summer. This is especially true of sueli 
(lowers as Hollyhocks ami Foxglov, s. 

It is best in practically all Instances i" atari the seed In boxes, preferably a box 

I it lvxJ4 Inches and 4 inches deep, using very sandy soil thai will r.ot bake. It is best 

not to put any fertilizer in the seed-box. since it is imlj necessary to bring the plants 
to the third or fourth leaf, when they should be picked out and reset in another box 
in which the soil should be loam mixed with leaf-mold. It is important that the plant 
be of good size, strong and sturdy, when finally transplanted in tin- garden 

If the seed be sown directly in the garden, il should he sown in the spring after the 
soil is well worked and fertilized. A slight depression should be made with a stick 
the seed sown, and then covered with sharp sand about twi.-e ihe depth of the diameter of 
the seed. The sand will prevent the crusting over of 1 1 1 , soil after watering-. 

When up. the plants must be thinned from two lo twelve inches, depending on the 
variety, otherwise they will lie weak and spindly. Il is a common mistake in the 
garden to leave the plants altogether too thick. Always keep the weeds out 

.count of the long, dry summers in California it is necessary to apnly water 
very often. Most of our gardens suffer for want of snllicient water. Where possible it 
should be applied to the roots only, and after four o'clock in the afternoon. 

With a little study of the garden and the colors and habits of the flowers, a beautiful 
garden can be had from the use of flower seeds, at very little cost. 

innunls. — Bloom first year from seed and plant dies after one season. 
Tlieimials. — Bloom second year from seed and plant dies after second year. 
Perennials. — Bloom second year from seed and plant lives and blooms for several years. 
Tender. — Means plant will not stand the leapt frosl. 

Half Hnrdy. — Means plant will stand a little frost ami needs protection, 
HnnlT. — Means plant will stand considerable frost, or practically all we have on the 
Pa ifie Coast. 

AbrOflia (Sand Verbena). A hardy annual, trailing in habit, about 9 incnes high, bear- 
ing verbena-like clusters of flowers which are very fragrant. A native of California. 
Thrives in dry situations and is valuable for lock work or hanging baskets. 

VMBELLATA. rosy lilac Pk«., .If. 

AbUtilOn (Flowering Maple or Chinese Bell-flower I. A lender perennial shrub, used 
generally in greenhouses, but growing into small trees in California. The flowers 
are beautifully bell-shaped and appear in white, yellow, rose, and orange. 

MIXED COLORS, Pkt., 10c. 

AdoniS (Flos Adonis or Pbaesnnts Eye). A hardy annua! of easy culture, growing about 
one foot high. Leaves fine-cut and feathery; flowers crimson. Seed should be sown in 
the autumn. Pkt., 5c. 

AgeratUITI (Floss Flower). A hardy annual of easy culture, especially valuable for 
bedding as it is literally covered with blossoms all summer. Sow the seed early in the 
spring, either in boxes to transplant, or out of doors, and thin to four or six inches. 

BLUE PERFECTION, deep blue, 1 foot high Pkt., 5e. 

IMPERIAL. DWARF WHITE, 8 inches high, flowers white Pkt., Be. 

IMPERIAL DWARF BLUHt. S inches high, flowers blue Pkt., Be. 

MEXICANUM, light blue, Pkt., Be. 

AgrOStema (Rose of Heaven). A hardy perennial, blooming the first season if seed 
is sown in the autumn. Plant grows 1 to 2 feet high; flowers resemble Dianthus in 
bright colors, and are borne on long, slender stems. Mixed colors, Pkt., 5c. 

Althea ROSea (Sec Hollyhocks). 

AlySSUITl (Maritimum). A fragrant, hardy annual, bearing spikes of small, white 
flowers in great profusion throughout the summer and autumn. Useful for borders or 
early bedding flowers. Sow the seed early in spring. 

COMMON SWEET ALYSSttM, 1 foot high Pkt., 5c; ot.., 25c. 

LITTLE GEM, 3 to 4 inches high Pkt., 5c; ov... 50c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



Our Great Sweet Pea Novelty 




HELEN PIERCE, 

Especially new in color and markings, and briefly described as a gloxinia flowered type. 
The color is very bright blue, mottled on pure white. It does not come striped nor with 
any suggestion of the stripe but uniformly marbled or peppered with the color, and the veins 
show a little deeper. It impresses one as resembling a blue mottled gloxinia. 

The effect is very fine, and it makes a beautiful decoration, especially when bunched 
by itself. 

We discovered it two years ago and it has come perfectly true ever since. It bears 
three and frequently four blossoms to the stem, all of which face one way, a mark of high 
merit in modern Sweet Peas. The stems are usually long, the blossoms are of good size 
and of the perfect shell shape of semi-hooded type. 

Of oil the many Sweet Peas we have discovered and sold for original Introduction, we 
believe this to he the most distinct and one of the prettiest, nnd we recommend it un- 
qualifiedly. 

We have had a great many visitors at our farms the past season and every one who 
saw Helen Pierce was charmed with it, and although we invited criticism freely, no one 
dissented from the opinion that this was one of the prettiest varieties we had. 

PRICE — FOR SEALED PACKET OF 25 SEEDS— 25 CENTS 



MORSE & CO— SEEP GROWERS 



47 



Amaranthus. . for ihalr brilliant foltace. 

CAITDATUS in yellowish t long, 

i.i 4 reel high i'ki.. :..-. 

■ if ■ t a > i ■ ■ 1 1 . .. Plant, ■■• reel nigh. Willi brilliant leavi 

variegated r.-d. jrellow, green, eta Piu., 5v. 

Angel's Trumpet t *«■«• n.tur»>. 
Antirrhinum <>ee su.p.ir.non >. 

ASparagUS PlumOSiS (Nanus). A tender perennial for greenhouse or potted plant 
illmy foliage. The sprays, when cut, retain thel 
t from three to rour weeks. Seeds start slowly. I'M.. 2.-..-: iini seeds, 7r.e. 

Asparagus Sprengeri tEmerald Feather). An early, easily crown. 

leaved variety with drooping branches. Th.- beat variety for hanging baskets 

i'ki., zr.e; iihi seeds, 70c. 



ASTERS 



A popular half hardY annual pr 
less number of colors. The tallest 
dwarfs are not over 3 inches high. 
about January l, and transplant 
ever. In the row where the plants i 
according to the variety. 



>duced In a great variety of classes and an almost end- 
varieties grow about 8 reel high, and Borne varieties ot 
The best ov ture is to sow ih<- seed in boxes 

3 bout April 1 to 15, The seed can be sown, how- 
re to remain, thinning them from t"> to 12 inches apart, 



Comet. A good bedding variety, with large blossoms, the petals 
narrow, and curled backward. These colors are the best: 



w bite 

l.lthl Pink 
Rose ami WhJ 



<~ armine 
Deep Plnl 
Light Blu 



9l.n0; 6 Pkt* 



Lilac, bordered white 

Lilac Red 

Pure Lilac 
sMorted. 40c; 12 Pkts. assorted, 75c. 
: of above colon, Pkt., 10c; ox., $1.25. 



Giant Comet. A taller growing i 
which make it valuable for cutting. 

Grin-eon 

Dork Violet 

Ughl Blue 

Light Blue and White 



ariety of the Comet type. 



While 

The Bride (White 
to Light Rose) 



Pkt., 10c: 6 Pkt». assorted, 40e; 12 Pkts. assorted, 75c; 1 ok. of any color, 91-50. 
Mixture of above colors. Pkt., 10c; <>/.., $1.25. 



Semples or Branching. 



The tallest and best Ho 



nches high 
full petaled 
asters since 
large blossoi 
colors: 
Carmine 
CrfuiKon 
Lavender 
Light Blue 



inches in diameter, 
■ne on long stems or bran 
ot only a showy bedding 
aluable for bouquets. Con 

Pink 

Rose Pink 



iety. The plant grows 18 
mis, which are large and 
t 'satisfactory type of all 
ig to its long stems and 
[ate in the autumn. Best 



White 

Mary Semnle 
(Very light 



Pkt., 10o; 6 Pkts. assorted, 40c; 12 Pkts. assorted, 75c; 
Mixture of above colors, Pkt., 10c; 



z., $1.50. 
/., $1.25. 




Bell Flower. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



ASTERS — Continued 

Upright Branching* Flowers and height of plant same as Semples, but stems grow 
upright and the diameter of the plant is about 8 inches. Colors: White and Pink. 

Pkt., 10c; oz., ¥1*50. 

Truffaut's Paeony Flowered Perfection. This variety has the most bril- 
liant and showy assortment of colors. Flowers, medium sized and almost globular. 
Plant about 16 inches high, of upright growth, and flowers all borne on top. Best colors: 
Crimson Fiery Scarlet Rose and White 

Criinson Rail Li^ht Rlue Scarlet, white edged 

Dark Purple Rose White 

Pkt., 10c; 6 Pkts. assorted, I0e; 12 Pkts. assorted, 75c; oz., $1.50. 

Mixture o£ above colors, Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.25. 

Victoria. One of the best bedding varieties, with medium sized blossoms which are borne 



in great profus 
Best colors: 
Rright Red 
Crimson 
Dark Rlue 
Dark Purple 



from the hot 



to the top of the pla 



Grows 12 to 14 inches high. 



Peach Blossom 

Snow White 
White, changing to 



Fiery Scarlet 
Lavender 
Light Rlue 

Light Rlue and White White, changing to azure blue 

Pkt., 10c; 6 Pkts. assorted, 40c; 12 Pkts. assorted, 75c; oz., $1.50. 

Mixture of above colors, Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.25. 

Triumph (Mixed). A dwarf variety growing about 4 to 5 inches high. Compact habit, 

small globe-shaped blossoms in bright colors. Pkt., 15e; oz., $1.50. 

CocardeaU Or Crown Mixed. A tall variety, growing 14 to 16 inches high. 

Of upright habit, with medium sized blossoms. The center of the blossom is usually 

white with a bright colored outer rim. Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.25. 

Daybreak. A light pink variety of the Victoria type. The blossoms are very double; 

the color a soft shade of pink, and the variety is one of the best for garden or florist's 

use. Pkt., 15c; oz., $3.00. 

Dwarf Chrysanthemum Flowered (Mixed). A semi-dwarf variety with large 

flowers and bright colors. Plants 8 to 10 inches high. Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.25. 

Japanese Or TaSSel (Mixed). A large flowered Variety. The petals are long and 

needle-shaped, and the blossom is very attractive. In various soft and bright colors. 

Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.50. 
HohenZOllem- A new variety of the Comet type with blossoms fully twice as large 
as the old variety. The petals are very long and curved like a flat chrysanthemum. 
Plant of branching habit, and about 16 inches high. Best colors: 
'White Crimson Lilac and White 

Rose Rlue Rose and White 

Pkt., 15c; 1 Pkt. each of above 6 varieties, 75c; oz., $2.50. 
Jewel Or Ball (Mixed). An upright growing plant similar in habit to Truffaut's Per- 
fection. The blossoms are medium sized and the petals curved in toward the center, 
making a ball-shaped flower. Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.25. 

Purity. A pure white variety of the Victoria type. The blossoms are very double and 
clear, pure white. A very desirable variety for florists. Pkt., 15c; oz., $3.50. 

Queen Of the Market. One of the earliest blooming varieties, blossoming frequently 
in July. Of spreading habit, S to 10 inches high. Blossoms medium sized and the petals 
curved outward. Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.00. 




SEED UKOVN 

l-ll Hv_. ..ntlauru 

1TA8HIH n A large flowering variety ■ ■! upright growth. 

- btuli Is ■ vitv brl| 

Pkt | ... . »l.llll. 

i.auv (Mlxi i An upright growing variety with medium siz.-.i bl 

Tin- i i the plant his ., graceful appear- 

l-kt.. t ii.- : ..... »l..v». 
■>- i iii> H PI i MB. .\ medium tall \arlet> ..f the Cornel type, Thi 
are long, narron nnd curly, ah, I the effect <>f h..th Individual bloi 
nnd bunches is beautiful. We offer the following distinct colors: 
While lrare in.,, Dark nine 



ii,. 



i rli 



III:, 



Pkt.. l»e: n Pkta. aaaorted. lOci 12 Pkts. assorted, TISci l <•«.. ,,f nnj e«l„r. »l..-,(l. 
Mixture of the*,- colore besides many uiIhtn, Pkt., l»e; ok., si.25. 

Bachelor's Button (See Centimren rrnnnil. 

Balsamor radl'l Slipper. A I with brittle stems nnd foliage, ttrnws about 

12 inches high. Flowers b nd tl.'ui, I.- in bright c - mm] variations; 

rax-like and very attractive. The individual blossoms Boating in a dish of 
water exhibit their beauty to til ' n;ige. 

i MiEI.lt Fi.owKiir.il. Mix. I. The largest double variety Pkt.. Be; o»„, 75c. 

DARK BLOOD RED, Double i'kt., j«e. 

PEACH BLOSSOM, Double. Shell Pink Pkt., 10c. 

RED AND WH1TK spotted. Double: Pkt., 10e. 

SNOWBALL, Double. Clear pearl white Pkt., JOe. 

MIXED TALL DOIBLES. About 12 inches high Pkt., 5c; oz., 60e. 

BallOOn Vine or Love-in-n-Puff. A climbing annual with small inferior flowers. 
The seed pods are curiously swelled or puffed and are quite attractive. Pkt., ."„•. 

BartOnia. Anrea (Golden Bartonial. A hardy annual growing about 2 feet high and 
bearing golden-yellow flowers, which have a metallic lustre when the sun shines on 
them. Is a native of California. Sow the seed where the plants are to remain since 
it does not transplant easily. Pkt., 5c. 

BelliS PerenniS (Double Daisyl. A hardy perennial, blossoming freely all spring a-nd 
summer. Plant about four inches high and valuable lor borders. 

i. DKMAN DOUBLE MIXED. All colors mixed, blossoms very double Pkt., Be. 

EXTRA DOUBLE WHITE. A clear while variety Pkt., 10c. 

LONGFELLOW. Double dark rose Pkt., 10c. 

SNOWBALL. Large flowers, double pure white with good long stems for 

cutting Pkt., 15c. 

Begonia* Tender perennials usually grown in the greenhouse. Some varieties are 
especially attractive on account of their foliage, but most varieties have exquisitely 
beautiful wax-like flowers, both single and double. The seed is very small and 
rather difficult to germinate. It is also very expensive, some strains being worth far 
more than their weight in gold. 

PEARCEI, a yellow variety with beautiful foliage Pkt., 25c. 

SINGLE VARIETIES, mixed Pkt., 25c. 

INTERNATIONAL PltlZE, mixed, the finest single mixture Pkt., 25c. 

DOUBLE TUBEROUS ROOTED, mixed Pkt., 25c. 




50 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



BrQC&iyCOme (Swan River Daisy). A hardy annual growing from 6 to 10 inches 
high and producing an abundance of pretty blue and white flowers. Pkt., 5e. 

BrOWallia* A half hardy annual, making a fine bedding plant. Blooms profusely. 
The flowers are bright ultramarine blue, and also sky blue with white center. Will 
bloom freely all winter if seed is sown in August. Mixed. Pkt., 5c. 

Calceolaria. A tender perennial used largely in greenhouses and conservatories. Is 
not of easy culture but a very desirable flower. Bears a large profusion of small 
pocket-shaped flowers, many of which are beautifully tigered or spotted. There is a 
great variety of shades and colors in various markings. 

GRANDIFLORA, large flowered, self-colored, profuse flowers, Pkt., 25c. 

TIGERED AND SPOTTED, mixed Pkt., 25c. 

RUGOSA HYBRIDA. A shrubby, profuse bloomer, and best for out-door 

culture Pkt., 25c. 

California Poppy (See Eschschoitzia). 

Calendula (Pot Marigold). Very hardy annual, 1 foot high, blooming freely, practi- 



cally the whole year round. Is 
soils where less sturdy flowers 
made from the flowers 
DOUBLE MIXED. A good l 
some clear colors and sc 
PLUVALIS (Cape Marigold). 



the easiest culture and is desirable for rather inferior 
refuse to thrive. A medicinal extract resembling 
(See Marigold.) 
lixture of S or 10 different shades of yellow, 

me shaded- and striped Pkt., 5c; ox., 25c. 

A white single variety, the under side of the 



petals, lilac, Pkt., 5c. 

CalliopsiS or Coreopsis. A half hardy annual growing about 3 feet high and val- 



Th. 



r for cutting, 
inches in dia: 
largest flowering v 
blossom with brown 



MIXED. All 



Leaves z 
oeter. 

iriety. Clear yellow. Pkt., 5c; < 
ish maroon center, . . . .Pkt., 5c; « 



and stems slender. 



25c. 
, 25c. 
25c. 



3S in good mixture, Pkt., 5c; 

Campanula (Canterbury Bells). A hardy biennial, blooming the second year from 
seed. Of easy culture but preferring rich, moist soil. Grows about 3 feet high 
and bears double and single varieties of blue, white, purple; and red flowers. 

SINGLE MIXED, Pkt., 5c. 

DOUBLE MIXED, Pkt., 5c* 

CUP AND SAUCER TYPE MIXED. In this variety the out petal forms a 

brim like a saucer Pkt., 5c. 

CatChfly (See Sllene). 

Canary Bird FlOWer (Tropaelum Canariense). A tender climbing annual of the 
Nasturtium family. Blossoms have curiously winged petals and are light yellow. 

Pkt., 5c; o/... 25c. 

Candytuft (Iberis). A hardy annual growing about 6 to 18 inches high, according to- 

the variety. The blossoms are borne on variously long spikes and the newer varieties 

are quite large flowering and very fragrant. Of easy culture and valuable for bedding 

or massing. 

COMMON SWEET SCENTED. Small white flowers ..Pkt., 5c; 

CRIMSON, Pkt., 5c; 

PURPLE, Pkt., 5c; 

TOM THUMB, white. Plant very dwarf, Pkt., 5c; 

"WHITE ROCKET. Long spikes and large flowers, Pkt., 5c; 



., 25c. 

, 50c. 

, 50c. 

, 50c. 





Canterbury Bells. 



i <• MORSE fc CO SEED GROWERS 



.it 



I ANU1T11T < ..utinu.'.l 

nn\T nvvrivTii i imvi urn. Very innro heads ami lonir spikes of 

Willi- Bowei I'M.. IOci n... 7.-.O. 

DM \HI lit llll III- Ml\l;ll. Ilw.irf varieties In mix.. I COlOTS, . Pkl.. iocs o... BO.-. 

mimi iif. in in i "I 1 1 ii-. I'ki., .-M-; «■>., am-. 

Carina. i perennial, propagated freely from the roots, but 

tie plan) frown about i to 8 feet high. The mad i 

large and ball-abaped and very hard, and should be Boaked H hours In warm water 

putting in aoll. The planl makes an excellent dump on the lawn, the tall, 

u p rig h t leaves being quite as beautiful aa the large spikes of ■ era Sow 

Hi,. s..,..t early In the year under glass ami transplant to the garden In April or May. 

MIXTURE OF TUP. POPULAR VARIETIES, Pkl.. .-,.-. 

< HOST'S \ \rii:th>. Mixed Pki.. up.-. 

Canterbury Bells (See « .■ . .-... 

Carnation* A half hardy perennial used generally for greenhouse florist's trade in 
winter and for a gei favorite' In summer. i large number of 

.hi the early dowering mixtures are recommended for out-of-door 
culture. Sow the seed early In the year and transplant in March or April. 

GERMAN EXTRA l-'IVF. DOUBLE MIXED Pkt., 10c. 

N tHGl P.HITE. Mixed. The earliest Pkt., 10c. 

picotee. Extra tine double mixed. White edged with colors, or striped 

and splashed Pkt., 25c, 

Castor Oil Bean. <*<■<. Ricinas). 

CelOSia CriStata, Or CockSCOmb* A half hardy annual growing 8 to 8 Inches 
high, bearing a wide, wavy blossom that resembles a cock's comb. In brilliant colors, 
and tine for massing: or border work. 

DWARF MIXED. Several shades of red and yellow mixed Pkl., ISc. 

DWARF NEW GIANT EMPRESS. A rich, crimson variety with dark fo- 

and very wide combs Pkt., Hie. 

PI.UMOSIS OR FEATHERED COCKSCOMB. This species grows 2 to 3 feet 
high and bears long, feathery plumes in brilliant colors. 

MIXTURE OF ALL COLORS, Pkt., 5c. 

CentaUrea* A hardy annual embracing a number of species, some being: grown only 
for their foliage. All varieties grow from 1 l h to 2 feet high. Sow the seed early and 
transplant in March. 

CVANUS, Bachelor's Button, or Bluebottle, or Corn Flower. Mixed colors. 
Of easy culture. Sow the seed where it is to remain and thin to 3 or 4 

inches Pkt., Be; or.., 25c. 

1MPERIAI.IS. A beautiful, large-flowered type resembling Sweet Sultan, 
but with a large petaled margin around the blossom. In white, 

lavender, and purple shades. Mixed Pkt., 10c; oas., 50c. 

MARGUERITE. A large, white variety of the Imperialis class. Fragrant 

and pretty Pkt., iocs oe., Sl.OO. 

MOSCHATA, or Sweet Sultan. A well-known type. In white, yellow, 

lavender and purple. Blossoms very fragrant Pkt., 5c; oz., SSc. 

GYM1VOCARPA, White Leaved or Dusty Miller. Grown for its silvery, flne- 

Pkt., 10c. 





Castor Oil Dean. 



Cockscomb. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



Chrysanthemum. There are many widely different classes of this flower represented 
in the hardy annual or garden varieties, both single and double, and the perennial 
varieties, chief of which is double or florist's varieties, so highly prized in the autumn 
and winter. 

ANNUAL VARIETIES. Growing 1% to 3 feet high. Seeds should be planted 
early and the plants set out in April. Single "Varieties sometimes called 

"Painted Daisies." Very attractive. Mixed, Pkt., 5c; oz., 30c. 

CORONARIUM. Double blossoms. Mixed Pkt., 10c; oz., 50c. 

PERENNIAL VARIETIES. Growing 2% to 3 feet high. Hardy and of easy culture. 
Fruteseens or Marguerite. Also called Paris White Daisy. "White 

petals radiating from a golden-yellow center Pkt., 10c. 

Japanese Hybrids. A mixture of the large flowering florist's varieties. 
These varieties are the large autumn flowers used in exhibitions 
and by florists. They are usually grown from cuttings, and do 

not come absolutely true from seed, Pkt., 25c. 

Cineraria* A tender perennial grown principally in the greenhouse but can be grown 
safely in the garden in summer. Seed should be sown in summer and the greenhouse 
requires only moderate heat. Plants grow from 1 to 2 feet high and bear clusters 
large, single flowered of bright mixed colors. 

HYRRIDA MIXED. The best variety and colors Pkt., 5c. 

MARITIMA, or Dusty Miller. 1 foot high. White leaves Pkt., 5c. 

Clarkia. A hardy annual of easy culture, growing about 18 inches high and bearing- 
bright rose, white, or purple flowers in great profusion. A native of California. 
Seed sown in the fall will give early blossoms in spring. Seed can be sown almost any 
time. Double Mixed, Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

Cieome PlingenS or Giant Solder Plant. A hardy annual growing 4 to 5 feet high and 
bearing in prof u sinn rose-purple blossoms that are shaped something like a 
spider. Pkt., 5c. 

Cobaea ScandenS. A half hardy climbing annual, with large leaves and large 
trumpet-shaped flowers. The blossom is green until nearly grown when it turns bright 
purplish blue. Grows about 30 feet long and is very desirable for covering a large 
lattice. A native of Mexico. Pkt., 10c. 

CockSCOmb, (See Celosla Cristata). 

ColGUS. A tender perennial growing about 10 to 18 inches high, and grown for its 
beautiful bright -colored velvety leaves. Valuable for window garden or pots, and 
can also be grown out of doors if taken up in winter. 

EXTRA LARGE LEAVED MIXED, Pkt., 25c. 

ORNATUS. The best large-leaved variety Pkt., 25c. 

Columbine (Aquilegia). A hardy perennial growing about 2 feet high and bearing 
an immense variety of colors on long, smooth stems. The double flowers are much more 
attractive than the single or wild sorts. 

DOUBLE MIXED, All colors, Pkt., 10c. 

ConVOlVUlUS (See Morning Glory). 

CoSmOS« A tender annual with fine-cut feathery foliage and large, feathery blossoms 
in rose, crimson, pink, and white. The late flowering or giant type grows 5 to 6 feet 
high and its blossoms are larger than the early varieties, or about 4 to 5 inches in 
diameter. They bloom late in the fall or about November 1, and are' rarely in flower 
in the North. The early varieties bloom in July. Sow about March 1 and transplant 
in May. 






II ..l!(.\\ KKS 






. ,.~>|l.»_ „„,„ 

i tini ii"«niiM. DAWK. Whit*, slightly tinted with pink rut.. Met a, »i.oo. 
i mii » i i.nw BUNG iiivi i. | Cosmos colors In mlxttii rti, .-..■: ..,.. 7.-,,.. 
QIAin m < iiiniiiMi. Pink rkt.. hi.-; ,.,., t...... 

Pk«, III.-; ..,.. 7.-..-. 

<-i iin-..n Pkl., Ill,': „».. 7."..-. 

Mixed Pkt.. .I.-; ..,.. .-.«,.. 

Cyclamen. A tender bulbous perennial, used In greenhouses and window-gardens, 
:iv grown from seed Sow In ths f:iii or early spring. 

PKR8II I M. Giants Mixed i-ki.. Me. 

Cypress Vin© (Ipomoea Quamocllt). A tender climbing annual with soft tern-like 

fnll.-iE- and small. Mar-Ilk.- Rowers In red. pink, or White. 

» II UK. Pkt.. tfC| «,.. 15c. 

-. Willi. pkt., BC| or... 2.-.C. 

I BDHOV, Pkt.. .-..-: or... ado. 

M1XTIHF. OK Allot B COLORS Pkt, BO) o».. 10c. 

Dahlia. A well-known and popular late summer and autumn flowering plant. Is 
grown from s.-.-.l or propogated Front the bulbous roots. The seed may be planted earlj 
In the hotbed and the plants set >".t In May after all danger <>t" frost Is oVex. J :> sowing 
the seed early the plants may be made to bloom the tirst year. 

POIBI.E, Mixed Pkt.. Lie. 

SINGLE, Mixed Pkt.. tile. 

CACTI'S, Mixed. Double wiih pointed petals Pkt., ir.c. 

Daisy, Double (See Belli.. IVr.-nul.i. 

DatUra Trumpet Flower or Horn of Plenty. A tender annual growing 3 feet high. 
Flowers large and trumpet-shaped. 

CORNl ICOPIA. Blossoms single, white inside shading to purple Pkt., 5c. 

CHLORANTHA Fl. PI. Double golden-yellow blossoms Pkt., Be. 

Delphinium Or Larkspur. There are two well-known types, one being the single 

and double annual, and the other a very tall, hardy perennial. Both are of easy culture. 

HARDY PERENNIAL LARKSPURS. 4 to 5 feet high with beautiful long spikes. 

Fornioxiiin. The bright blue variety. Pkt., Se. 

FormoHiini CoeleNtlnum. The azure or very light blue variety Pkt., lOe. 

HARDY ANNUAL VARIETIES. Grow about 1 % to 2 feet high. A great variety of 
colors. 

Emperor, Double Mixed Pkt., 5c. 

Dwnrf Rocket, Mixed. Dwarf plant, double flowers Pkt., Se. 

Single, Mixed .Pkt., 3c. 

Dianthus, Barbatus (See sweet h m. 

Dianthus, Caryophyllus <see r.-ir i 




Single Dublin. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



DianthUS Or PinkS. Hardy annuals, about 1 foot high and bearing beautifully 
colored single and double blossoms in profusion all summer. Sow seed early in boxes 
and transplant, or sow in rows where the plants are to remain, and thin. 

CHINENSIS (China Pink). Double, white, Pkt., 5c. 

HEDl)l!«l(ir (Japanese Pink). Finest single mixed Pkt., 5c. 

HEDDEWIGI (Japanese Pink). Finest double mixed Pkt., 5c. 

LACINIATUS. Single fringed varieties Pkt., 5c. 

mixture: op ALL SINGLE VARIETIES, Pkt., 5c; oz, 50c. 

Digitalis Or FOXglOVe. A hardy perennial blooming the second year from seed. 
Grows usually about Zy z feet, although in very rich soil sometimes 6 feet. The bell- 
shaped flowers are borne on long spikes, and come in shades of purple, lavender, rose, 
and white, all spotted lightly inside the blossom. Thrives best in cool, shady locations. 

Pine Mixed Pkt., 5c; oz., 50c. 

DolichOSor Hyacinth Bean. A tender, climbing annual. Grows rapidly and is val- 
uable for covering a trellis. Flowers in purple or white; are borne on long stems, 
the individual blossoms resembling the bean flower, and the ornamental pods resemble 
bean pods. Sow seed in open ground late in April. 

DAYLIGHT. The best white Pkt., 10c. 

DARKNESS. The best purple Pkt., 10c. 

LABLAB. Mixed Pkt., 10c. 

ESChSChOltzia Or California Poppy. A hardy annual with fine-cut, feathery 
foliage and beautiful velvety cup-shaped flowers. Grows from 1 to 1*6 feet high and 
blooms profusely. Seed may be sown in the fall and any time thereafter till April, and 
blossoms may be had from early in January till late in summer. Of the easiest culture. 
Any soil will do, but the better the soil, the larger the plants and blossoms. It is best 
to sow the seed in the garden "where the plants are to remain as they do not trans- 
plant easily. 

CALIFORNICTJS. The bright orange-yellow common variety. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; lb., $2.00. 
GOLDEN "WEST. Very large orange-colored blossom shading to canary 

yellow at the edges Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c. 

MANDARIN. Blossoms are copper colored outside and bright yellow inside 

■the petals Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

DOUBLE ROSE. A semi-double blossom, rose colored outside and "white 

inside the petal Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

"WHITE. Large ivory white Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

MIXED YELLOWS. A mixture of the popular orange and yellow va- 
rieties Pkt., 5o; oz., 15c. 

MIXTURE OF ALL VARIETIES, Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; lb., $2.00. 

ESChSChOltzia, BUSh (See Hunneniannin). 

Euphorbia. A hardy annual growing 4 to 6 feet high and esteemed for its beautiful 
foliage. The blossoms are inconspicuous. 

VARIEGATA, called Snow on the Mountain. Leaves veined and margined 

with white Pkt., 5c; oz., 30c. 

HETEROPHYLLA, called Mexican Fire Plant or Annual Poinsettia. 

Smooth, glossy leaves, turning scarlet late in the summer Pkt., 10c. 

Everlasting Flower (see Heiichrysum). 

Everlasting Pea (See Lathyrm LntifoUu»>. 

Evening Primrose (see Oenothera). 




Canary Bird Flower. 



IRS] II' GROWERS 



Feverfew (PyTOthrunl Parthrnlumi. A hardy perennial with showy yell.m 

plant. Qrowi about s inches high. rki 

FlaX (•*« I Inlumi. 

Flowering Maple (Sm m.uhio.i. 
Flowering Sage <>«-•- lairta). 

Forget-me-not (Myosotls), a hardy perennial growing « to 12 Inches high. Small, 
star-like flowers are bomt In dusten On long stems. The plant Is of easy culture and 
blooms the llrst year if seed Is sown early. Thrives best In a cool, mol 

umrno\ Blue i. k ,., -„.. 

AI.PESTKIS, White ..Pkt., 5c. 

FOUr O'clOCk. A hardy annual about 2 feet high. Of the easiest culture. Seed should 
be sown In the open and thinned to 1 foot. Is free flowering, the blossoms In great 
variety of colors and stripes. 

MIXTIRE OF ALL COLOIIS. pkt., ,-„.. 

VARIEU ATED VXD STRIPED COLORS, Mixed pkt., ,-.e. 

TOM THVMB. Dwarf plant, mixed colors Pkt- Sc, 

FoXglOVe (See Digitalis). 

Caillardia. A very shnwy garden plant with brilliant flowers In scarlet and yellow, 
blended and shaded. Blooms freely from early summer till autumn. Grows 1% to 2 
feet high, and the blossoms are borne on long, slender stems. Both annvial and 
perennial varieties are hardy. 

ANMAL VARIETIES with' slight protection can be carried through the 

winter and made to serve as a perennial. Plctn Mixed. Single varieties. Pkt., 5e. 

PERENNIAL VARIETIES. Urn mil I li.ru Mixed, Pk«., 5c. 

Ger&nium* A half hardy perennial, flowering the first year from seed if sown early. 
A popular flower in brilliant colors and variously fragrant and ornamental foliage. 
Grows easily from seed. 

ZONALE. Various single and double varieties. Pkt., 10c. 

APPLE SCENTED. Very fragrant leaves Pkt., 10c. 

PELARGONIUM or Lady Washington, Mixed Pkt, 25c. 

Cilia* A hardy annual growing 1 foot high with white, lilac, or rose-colored flowers. 
A native of California. Valuable for roekwork or borders. Sow seed in the fall. 

Mixed, Pkt., 5c. 

COUrdS (See Garden Seed List). 
Colden Feather (See Pyrethenm). 
CilliflOWer iSee Ten Weeks Stocks). 

GOmphrena Or Globe Amaranth, A low-growing hardy annual about 8 inches 
high with globe-shaped flowers in red or white. The plant makes a good border and 
the flowers are very pretty, and are attractive, either while growing or dried. 

Mixed, Pkt., 5c. 

Godetia* A hardy annual growing from 6 inches to 10 inches high. Of compact 
growth with a profusion of satiny cup-shaped flowers in deep red. pink, and white, 
shaded and blended. Valuable for bedding or massing. Sow seed early in the year. 
A small-flowered, deep red variety; grows wild in California. 

TALL SORTS, Fine Mixture, Pkt., 6c. 

TOM THUMB or Dwarf Varieties, Mixed, Pkt., 5c. 





Forget-Me-Not. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



CypSOphila (Baby's Breath). A hardy annual of easy culture. Grows 2 to 3 feet high 
and hears a profusion of small star-shaped white and pink flowers. 

PANICULATA. Fine for bouquets; white flowers Pkt., 5c 

MURALIS. An excellent border plant; pink flowers Pkt, 5c. 

Helianthus (see snudouon. 

Heliotrope. A half hardy perennial growing 4 to S feet high. Small flowers borne in 
graceful clusters and very fragrant. Blooms the first season from seed if sown early. 
Forms a large plant and requires a roomy situation. Can also be grown against a "wall 
and made to assume the character of a climber. 

LEMOINE'S GIANT, Blue. A fine strain of the true Heliotrope Pkt, 10c 

LEMOINE'S GIANT, White Pkt., 10c. 

FINEST HI A KD. A mixture of the ordinary true types Pkt., 10c. 

H©liChrySUm« A free-flowering hardy annual growing 4 to 5 feet high and bearing 
beautiful straw-like flowers in a great variety of shades and colors. The stems are 
long and the blossoms large. It is the best and most satisfactory of the everlasting 
flowers, and makes a very handsome dried bouquet. 

Mixed, ! Pkt., 5c j OS, 25c. 

HollyhOCka A hardy perennial of upright, stately growth 5 to S feet high. The very 
double varieties are the most desirable, but the newer, semi-double, fringed types are 
also very popular. Hollyhocks make a fine row in the garden, or a fine background, 
next to a building or high wall or fence. 

DOUBLE VARIETIES. White, Canary. Yellow, Blood Red, Hose. Salmon, 
Dark Maroon. Blush, and Lemon. 

Pkt., 10c; 6 Pfcts. assorted, 40c; ox., $1.50. 
UOliBLK VARIETIES, Mixed. All the above colors and many others in 

addition Pkt., 10c; oz, $1.00. 

ALLEGHENY, Mixed. The semi-double fringed variety. An artistic and 

pretty sort Pkt., 10c; oz., $1.25. 

SINGLES, Mixed. The old-fashioned blossoms in all colors Pkt., 5c; oz, 50c. 

HumlilUS or Japanese Hop. A rapid growing, hardy climbing annual with dense 
leaves. -Will grow 20 to 30 feet in a season, and is very valuable for covering a trellis. 

JAPONICUS. Bright green foliage Pkt., Be. 

JAPONICDS VARIEGATUS. Bright variegated yellow, white, and green 

leaves Pkt, 10c 

Hunnemannia or Bush Eschscholtzia. Known also as the Santa Barbara Poppy. 
An erect growing, tender perennial about 2 feet high. Foliage fine cut and feathery. 
Blossoms are beautifully cup-shaped, bright yellow, and about 3 to 4 feet in diameter. 
Stems, long and smooth. The plant is allied to the Eschscholtzia. There *lre few more 
satisfactory flowers in the garden than the Hunnemannia. 

FTJMARIAEFOLIA, Pkt, 10c; oz, $1.00. 

Hyacinth Bean (see Doiichos). 

IberiS (See Candytuft). 

Ice Plant (Mesembryanthemum Crystallinum). A low-growing and trailing tender an- 
nual. The thick leaves seem to be covered with crystals. Used for edging and box 
work. Pkt, 5c. 




Doable Hollyhock. 




<• 1'. HOB - -KKl> GROW I 

Ipomea. (teni .is including many wall-known garden Dowers Arc tendei 

•-MmtiinK annuals ft 

in.- moon-flo* outer ahell pu 

»n.i then - ->k.-,i in water f"r twelva hour* or mora to terminate It. 

c.u wmi i ..ii \ white blossoms which expand only 

■•11 I Pkt, .-.,-: ..... 7.-..-. 

■■TOSA ..r Braalllaa Merwlag «.i..rj. Beautiful r..« lored blossoms, 

3 Inches In diameter, rut.. .-..-. 

Ill lilt \ > iildll I. \ or llrniriilv lilac. Large. -k> blue blossoms I'kl.. Ml.-. 

nn> \ miv (Evening Glory or ■: I Night). U.rt... fragrant violet bios- 

srniifl, expanding In the nlghl Pkc, .-.<-. 

iihiim:i ..r >mr iiximt-ti. Smtiii scarlet blossoms Pkt., Be, 

ihiiii'.i <n vMdiiii 3 Cypress Vine.) 
i>iri iiivi JAPANESE. iSee list under Morning Glory). 
Japanese Hop (See Bsnwnlw Japoaleaa). 

Kenilworth Ivy (See Uaarui). 

Kochia ScOparia. A beautiful bush plant forming a perfect sphere. The branches 

nn> covered with slender, light green leaves. The plan! Ind I resembles a "bail of 

fire." Pkt., 10*. 

Lantana. A tender perennial, ! i« ! feet high, bearing verbena-like clusters of, 
flowers, in orange, white, rose, and r colors. Blooms constantly all summer. 

FIVE MIXED, Pkt., 10c. 

Larkspur <*<•<• neiphinium). 

LathyrUS LatifOliUS (Perennial or -Everlasting Pea). A hardy perennial climber 

flowering the first year from seed. Leaves and stems smooth. Flowers resemble S\\ t 

Peas but are borne on racemes with 8 to 10 blossoms to the stem. Is not fragrant but 
is hardy, and thrives in any good soil. 

PINK BEAUTY. The ground of t lie petals is white, edged and shaded 

with pink Pkt., 5e; oi., 50c. 

CRIMSON Pkt., So; or.., 40c. 

WHITE. The best variety for cutting, especially for florist's use. Pkt., lOo? ox.. 50c. 

MIXED, Pkt., 5c; ox., 35c. 

SPLENDENS, called the "Pride of California." Not as haj-dy as the 

ordinary class. Flowers bright crimson-scarlet Pkt., loo; ox., *i.0«. 

ODORATA (See Sweet Peas). 
Linurtlor SonrW Flux. A hardy annual about US feet high. Of slender and graceful 
appearance, with smooth stems and bright red flowers, which are borne In great pro- 
fusion. Can be sown early out of doors, and thrives well in good soil. Pkt., 5c. 
Lobelia* A half hardy annual, and hardy perennial. The annual class grows 4 to 6 inches 
high, is of compact growth and literally covered with small, bright flowers. Used 
for ribbon work and borders or hanging baskets. 

CRYSTAL PALACE COMPACT \. Bright blue Pkt., .-..-. 

WHITE GEM (Compactal. White flowers Pkt., lOc. 

PRIMA DONNA. Maroon with white eye Pkt., 10c. 

MIXED Annual Varieties Pkt., 5c. 

PERENNIAL LODELIAS are hardy and 3 feet high. The blossoms are 
produced in spikes. 

Cnrdlnalls or Cardinal Flowers. Brilliant scarlet flowers Pkt., 10c. 

Hybrids, Mixed. Large flowers resembling Cardinalis. In shades of 

rose, red, lilac, purple, etc Pkt., ar,e. 





CyproHs Vine. Heliotrope. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



LophoSpernum ScandenS. A tender climbing perennial growing 10 to 12 feet 
long, with showy purplish-rose blossoms something like Foxgloves. Fkt., 10c. 

LOVe-in -a-MiSt (See Nlgella). 

LOVe LieS Bleeding (See AmanuthnB Cnndutus). 

LllpinUS Or Lupins. Hardy annuals in great variety growing from 1 to 3 feet high 
and bearing spikes of pea-shaped flowers. Of the easiest culture. Sow in the open 
ground and thin to 6 inches apart. 

MIXTURE OF ANNUAL VARIETIES, Pkt., 5c. 

Lychnis. A hardy perennial growing about 3 feet high and bearing bright colored 
flowers in clusters. Of easy culture. 

CHALCEDONICA. Scarlet flowers Pkt., 5c. 

HAAGEANA. Orange, crimson, and scarlet flowers Pkt., 5c. 

Martynia (See Garden Seed List). 

Marigold. A hardy annual shrubby plant in dwarf and tall varieties grow- 
ing from 6 inches to 3 feet high. Foliage, bright green, deeply "cut, and graceful. 
The flowers are various shades of yellow and brown. The tall varieties are very val- 
uable for large bedding or background work and the dwarf varieties for borders. 
ELDORADO (Tagetes). The best tall variety with large double blossoms. 

Called the African Marigold. Mixture,! Pkt., 5c; oi.. 25c. 

DWARF FRENCH MIXTURE (Tagetes). A mixture o£ dwarf double 

colors in yellow, orange, and stripes Pkt., 5c; oz., 50c. 

DOUBLE MIXED (Calendula). A good mixture of 8 or 10 different shades 

of yellow, some clear colors and some shaded and striped. Fkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 
PLUVALIS (Calendula Cape Marigold). A white single variety, the under 

side of the petals, lilac Pkt., 5c. 

Marvel of Peru (see Four o'ciocki. 

Marguerite (See Chrysanthemum Frutescens). 
Matricaria (See Feverfew). 

Mignonette. A hardy annual growing 6 to 12 inches high and bearing pyramidal- 
shaped flower spikes which are made up of thickly-set flowerets, which are exceedingly 
fragrant. Grows easily from seed and can either be transplanted from boxes or sown 
out in the garden and thinned to 4 or 6 inches. Sow in the fall for early blossoms in 
the spring. Valuable for potting, or for bedding, or for border. The flowers are 
not attractive except for their fragrance. 

ALLEN'S DEFIANCE. Long spikes of whitish flowers and compact 

growth Pkt., 5c; oz., 75c. 

GOLDEN MAOHET. A compact growing variety with medium long, thick 

spikes of yellow flowerets Pkt., 5c; oz., 50c. 

PURE MACHET. A compact growing variety with thick spikes and large 

flowerets of a copper color, Pkt., 5e; oz., 50c. 

SWEET SCENTED (Reseda Odorata) : Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

MIXTURE OF THE BEST VARIETIES, Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

MimOSa PudiCa (See Sensitive Plant). 





French Marigold. 



HORSE • CO SEED GROWERS 



Mimulus. 



A hnlf h..r.i> i»T.-nnl»l Browing fr..m s Inches to 1 foot high Rloom* 

for window-gardens end pol 



work 01 
If sown 

■OW Hill.,,, Mii.k Plant 
' lightly with bre 
TK.111M - ,, r Haakci 11..., 
Mina Lobata. \ hall hardy annual 
t In the bud before opening-. Tl 
20 to 30 feet long. 

mm.iimi. A rapid climber 
throat 



I plant with email, yellow hi 



I'M.. .-..-. 



Momordica Balsamina or nniKiim ippi*. a climbing ai 

long. Has graceful and ornamental foliage, yellow Rowers 
fruit with targe carmine-red seeds. 

chakwtii ..r Balaam Pear. Same as the Balsam 



Large flowers of sevi ral colore, and spotted, rki.. .-..-. 
I climber with ..rani;.- colored flowers which are 
he plant blooms Creel) from base to top and grow* 

Pkt., in.-. 

Ilh bl 1 red blossoms, with yellow 

Pkt.. Ilh-. 



nual growing about 10 feet 
and win ted 

Pkt., .-..-. 
Apple but fruit is 



ball-shaped i. k ,., ,-„.. 

MOOnflOWer (See Ipnnirn Graadllen). 

Morning Clory (Convolvulus Majori. A hardy climbing annual growing about 10 feet 
long. Flowers are well known and exist In a great variety of colors, tints, and mark- 
ings. Fully expanded only in the mornings. Of easj culture, quick growth, and 
valuable in every garden. 

TALL or Climbing Varieties, mixed Pkf., .1e; <»*.. 15c, 

IMPERIAL JAPANESE. Taller, larger leaved, and larger flowered With a 

greater variety of blossoms than the older type Pk«.. Be) <>*.. :tlle. 

MlOming' QlOry (Convolvulus Minor). The dwarf or bush varieties. Plants 10 to 12 
Inches high. Hardy annuals. 

Mixed Colors Pkt., 5c. 

MyOSOtiS (See Forgct-Me-Not). 

Mourning Bride !-<•<• scabiosai. 

MUSk Plant (See Mlmuln.i Moschatusi. 

Nasturtium. Tender annua! in two distinct classes — Dwarf and Tall or Climbing. 
NaStUrtiUm (Dwarf Varieties). The plant forms a small, round bush I: in It inches 
high. The foliage is pretty and the flowers very beautiful and contained in a great 
number of colors and tints. Sow the seed where it is to remain late in the spring 
after danger of frost is over. It is seldom necessary to thin the young plants as they 
will bear standing closely. 

AURORA. Yellow, veined with carmine Pkt., 

CHAMELEON, Mixed. A dwarf mixture of blotched and inconstant shades, I'kl., 

CRIMSON, Pkt., Be, 

CRYSTAL PALACE GEM. Suphur yellow, spotted with carmine Pkt., 

GOLDEN KING. Rich golden yellow Pkt., 

KING OF TOM THUMBS. Dark scarlet and dark green leaves Pkt., 

KING THEODORE. Deep crimson and dark foliage Pkt., Be. 

EMPRESS OF INDIA. Intense scarlet and dark brown and green 

foliage Pkt., 




PurlH Dnlsy 



60 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SUED GROWERS 



NASTURTIUM — Continued 

ROSE, Pkt., 3c. 

RUBY KING. Bright red, tinted salmon Pkt., 5c. 

SCARLET Pkt., 5c. 

WHITE PEARL. Very light lemon or primrose Pkt.. 5c. 

YELLOW Pkt., 3c. 

LILLIFUT MIXED. A dwarf and small-leaved type which displays the 

blossoms to good advantage i . . .Pkt., 3c. 

DWARF VARIETIES MIXED. A splendid mixture of all the above besides 

many other varieties Pkt., 3c. 

Nasturtium (Tall or Climbing Varieties). Of quick growth, covering a wall, hedge, 
or trellis in a short time. The brilliant blossoms almost cover the plant from top to 
bottom. 

SCARLET, Pkt.. 3c. 

DARK CRIMSON, Pkt., 3c. 

ROSE, Pkt., 5c. 

YELLOW, Pkt., 3c. 

PEARL or White. Light lemon or primrose Pkt., 3c. 

ORANGE, Pkt., 3c. 

SUNLIGHT. Bright yellow Pkt., 3c. 

MOONLIGHT. Very light yellow Pkt., 5c. 

JUPITER. Large, bright golden-yellow Pkt., 5c. 

TALL VARIETIES MIXED. All the above varieties besides many others 

in a splendid mixture Pkt., 5c. 

Nasturtium Lobbs op Tropaeoltim Lobbiannin. A tall or climbing class. The leaves 
are smaller and the flowers more numerous and prolific than the ordinary tall class. 

ASA GRAY. Light lemon or primrose Pkt., 3c. 

CROWN PRINCE OF PRUSSIA. Blood red Pkt, 5c. 

LUCIFER. Blossoms, deep crimson ; leaves, brownish green Pkt., 5c. 

CRYSTAL PALACE. Orange scarlet Pkt., 5c. 

GIANT OF BATTLES. Sulphur yellow blotched with red Pkt.. 5c. 

CAPRICE. A mixture of light colors, spotted and shaded, with dark 

foliage Pkt.. 5c. 

RED SPURRED. A mixture of light colors, all having a red back or spur. 

Foliage dark Pkt., 10c. 

SPITFIRE. Brilliant scarlet. ' Pkt., 5c. 

KING OF THE BLACKS. Dark red flowers and dark foliage Pkt., 5c. 

REGINA. Salmon red. changing to almost cream color Pkt., 5c. 

HYBRIDS OF MADAM GUNTER, Mixed. A splendid mixture of blotched 

shaded, and variously marked bright tints Pkt., 5c. 

IVY-LEAVED. A mixture of several colors have lobed or scalloped leaves. 
The blossoms have narrow petals scalloped at the edges. Very pretty 

and attractive Pkt., 10c. 

NeiTIOphila or Love Grass. A hardy annual growing about 6 inches high. Has small, 
cup-shaped blossoms about 1 inch in diameter, in white and shades of blue. . . .Pkt., 3c. 
NiCOtiatia AffiniS or Flowerine; Tobacco. A half hardy annual growing 3 feet 
high. Belongs to the tobacco family. Has white blossoms. Requires plenty of room 
in the garden. Pkt., 5c. 

Nigella or Love-in-a-MiNt. A hardy annual 1 foot high with finely cut foliage, oddly 
shaped blossoms in blue and white, and curious seed pods. Of easy culture. 

DA3IASCENA, Pkt., 5c. 





Lily of the Valley. 



61 

Oenothera or Fvrnlna Prlmrnar. A hilf hardy annual and paranatal about P. Inches 
high bearing bright showy flowers tn i> ; 
oallan m ig fully exrnnded ontj late In the afternoon 

»>m M \ nnirrn>. Mixed i. k ,., ,-„. 

PEHE\M\I \ Mill III-. Mixed I'M," 10c. 

OxaliS. A half hardy perennial growing nhout !l Inches high and suitable for 
greenhouse, rock-work or out-door culture. Flowers, bright colored and shovi i 

MXBD, ,. k ,., 5( , 

Pansy (Viola Tricolor). A half hardy perennial growing 4 to K Inches high and prob- 
ably the best know- and among the most popular Rowan in oultlvatlon. It thrives 

l.est In a moist, shady location, and in rich, loamy soil, Seed should be sown lii the 
autumn for early spring blossoms, or can be sown early In thi lod liowers 

later In the spring. The blossoms are usually larger In the spring- and again In the 
fall, and while It blooms freely all summer, the blossoms arc small during the hoi 

months. While the plants carry over well with a mile covering during the winter, 
it Is best to p|ant seed anew each year. 

BTGXOT. Mixed. A circular, ruffled, and five-petaled type with soft. 
blended colors and tints, with a dark blotch at the base of each 
petal. One of the very finest varieties Pkt., 25c; '/i ««., 73c. 

CASSIER'S GIANT MIXED. A splendid mixture of various shades and 
markings. The blossoms are perfectly round and are blotched at the 
base of 3 to 5 of the petals, Pkt., 15c; ;j oz., 50c; oz., ma.oo. 

GIANT TRIMARDEAV. Mixed. The largest flowering type of Pansies, 
called the French strain. The top petals arc larger than the three 
lower ones and are beautifuly marked Pkt., 15c; !j oz., 50c; oz., *:t.0O. 

ODIER, or Prize Blotched Mixed. A large flowered type with round blos- 
soms. The petals :ire all blotched at the base and distinctly margined 
on the edge Pkt., 15c; % oz., 75c; oz., »3.50. 

LARGE FLOWERING MIXED. All varieties and colors in a fine mix- 
ture Pkt., 10c; y, oz., 50c; oz., «3.00. 

EMPEROR WILLIAM. Ultramarine blue Pkt., 10c; Y, oz., 40; oz., $1.25. 

FAIRY QUEEN. Light blue margined with white Pkt., 10c. 

KING OF THE BLACKS. Almost jet black Pkt., 10c. 

LORD BEACONSFIELD. Top petal light blue, lower petals velvety blue. Pkt., 10c. 
PEACOCK. Ultramarine bine, deep claret and white blended very much 

to resemble the feathers of a peacock Pkt., 10c. 

SNOW QUEEN. Pure white Pkt., 10c. 

YELLOW GEM. Pure, clear yellow Pkt., 10c. 

GOLD MARGINED, Pkt., 10c. 

PRINCE BISM ARK. Golden bronze Pkt., 10c. 

QUADRICOLOR, or Phnesant's Eye. Light blue violet and other blues 

shaded prettily Pkt., 10o. 




6* 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



Papaver, or Perennial Poppy. Hardy perennial of easy culture in bright glowing colors. 
Blooms first year from seed. 

ICELAND, Mixed. A graceful, delicate variety, with white, orange, or 
yellow single blossoms, the petals resembling crumpled tissue paper. 
The plant is low-growing but the stems are long and slender. Sow 

in the fall where plants are to remain, and thin Pkt., 10c; oz., 91.00- 

ORIENTALE, (the large Oriental Poppy). A hardy plant bearing large, 
brilliant scarlet flowers with a black blotch on each petal. Very showy 

and attractive Pkt., 10c, 

For other Papavei-N see POPPY. 
P£tSSiflOra, Edalis, or Passion Flower. A hardy perennial climber, shedding its leaves 
in winter. Grows luxuriantly either from cuttings or seed. A very satisfactory 
climber for immense growth as it will cover a porch or small cottage in one summer. 

COERULEA, Crimson Pkt., 10c. 

COERVLEA, Pink, Pkt., 10c- 

PentSteiTIOn. A hardy perennial blooming first year from seed. Grows about 18 
inches high and its bright colored and spotted blossoms are borne in spikes and 
resembles very much the Gloxinia. 

MIXED, Pkt., 10c 

rPeriHst NankinenSIS* A half hardy annual with very dark bronze, almost black 
foliage. Similar to Coleus. Is of easy culture. 

MIXED, Pkt., 5c- 

Perennial Pea (see Lathynis Latifoiius). 

Petunia* A tender perennial of several distinct types, and variously adapted for green- 
house and pot culture, and for open air. The latter grows with little attention or care- 
and in any soil, and blooms profusely all spring and summer. The large, double varieties 
do not produce seed, but the pollen from them is artificially crossed on the large, single, 
and fringed plants, and the seed so produced will make double blossoms. The Giant 
Flowered types are in large, single, plain edged, or fringed edged blossoms, or in very 
thickly double flowers. 
Petunia. Giant Flowered Varieties. 

SINGLE, deep throated, brilliantly blotched, plain edge, mixed Pkt., 58c 

SINGLE, deep throated, brilliantly blotched, fringed, mixed Pkt., 50c 

DOUBLE, white, blotched, and brilliantly colored, mixed Pkt., 75c- 

Petunia. Small Flowered Varieties. 

DWARF INIMITABLE, Mixed. A very free-blooming, dwarf plant Pkt., 18c 

FINE MIXED. Good mixture of all free-blooming colors, Pkt., 18c 

PhlOX DrUITimOndii. A hardy annual growing from G inches to 1 foot high and 
bearing beautiful, soft petaled and brilliantly colored flowers all spring and summer- 
Fine for bedding and mossing. Sow seed in the fall for early flowers. 

PURE "WHITE, Pkt., 10c 

COCCINEA. Brill iant scarlet Pkt., 10c 

FINE MIXTURE, of all colors of the larger type, Pkt., 10c 




Pansy — l.arsi- Flowering. 




Panorama View of Our Seed Farm at Gllroy. 




A Held of Mammoth Mixed Verbena** for seed, growiug on our Seed Farm at 
Cnrnadero, near Gllroy. 



G4 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



PHLOX DRUMMONDII — Continued 

DWARF COMPACT, Mixed. Low growing plants with good sized flowers. Pkt., 10c. 
TARRED AND FRINGED, Mixed. A mixture of star-shaped and pointed 

blossoms Pkt., 10c. 

PERENNIAL PHLOX. A beautiful and easily grown perennial about 3 feet 

high and bearing clusters of bright colored phlox-like blossoms. 

There is no more satisfactory dower for the garden, and should be in 

far more general use than it is now, Pkt., 10c. 

PhySalliS FrariChetti or Chinese Lantern Plant. A showy annual growing 2 feet 
high and esteemed for its seed pods which in the fall change from brilliant yellow 
to scarlet and which are round and pointed and resemble a small lantern. The fruit 
inside the pod sometimes made into preserves. Pkt., lot. 

PinkS (See Dlnnthus). 

PiatyCOdon Cratldiflora or Japanese Bell. A hardy perennial growing 1% feet high 
and bearing double deep blue blossoms in profusion all summer. 

JAPONICUS Fl. PL, Pkt., 10c. 

Poppy (Papaver). A hardy annual 3 to 5 feet high and bearing single and large double 
blossoms in bright colors. Sow seed in open ground where plants are to remain and 
thin to 6 or 12 inches. If left thick the plants will be weak and spindly and the 
blossoms inferior. To avoid getting the seed too thick it can be mixed with dry 
sand before sowing. 

CARDINAL. A bright scarlet, large, fringed, double Pkt., 5c; ok., 50c. 

FAIRY BLUSH. A large, double fringed, white with pink edges. Pkt., 5o; oz., 50c. 

WHITE FRINGED. Large, double fringed Pkt., 5c; oz., 50c. 

DOUBLE WHITE, CARNATION FLOWERED. Straight edges. .Pkt., 5c; oz., 50c. 

SHRIMP PINK. Large, double, straight edges Pkt., 5c: oz., 50c. 

LARGE DOUBLE. Mixed Pkt., 5c; oz., 40c. 

TULIP FLOWERED. Intense scarlet siagle blossoms. Plant, about 2V4 

to 3 feet high. The brightest colored of all poppies Pkt., 10c; oz., 60c. 

SHIRLEY MIXED, or Giant Poppies. The most beautiful type of Poppies, 
having soft, hairy foliage, and an immense variety of single blossoms 
in white, pink, shades of red, and scarlet. Free blooming and fine for 

bedding or tall border Pkt., 5c; oz., SOe. 

ICELAND AND ORIENTALE (See Pnpaver). 
Portlllaca. Low growing or creeping tender annual, G to 8 inches high and bearing 
glossy, cup-shaped bossoms in very brilliant and gorgeous colors. The foliage and 
stems are thick. The seed germinates slowly and should be started under glass. 
The plants require a sunny location, and do best on rather dry ground. 

SINGLE, Large Flowering Mixed Pkt., 5c. 

DOUBLE, Large Flowering Mixed Pkt., 10c. 

Primula Sinensis or Chinese Primrose. Greenhouse or pot plants bearing large 
single or double blossoms of bright colors and soft tints. Sow seed in April or May 



for 



bio 



mg. 



Primula SinenSIS Single Fringed Varieties. 

ALBA MAGND3TCA. Pure white Pkt., 5c. 

BRIGHT ROSE, Pkt., 25c. 




Double Pink. 



MOKSK 



Primula Sinensis, 

»""•'" "III. I'M., i-.c. 

IIU»\ MORN. ,. kI , -„,.. 

IM \m ii. i-k... ■_'.-„.. 

mi\iihi: ..i *i\,.ii PLOWBIU, i'ki.. He, 

mimi Hi: or urn in i: i i n\\ i:ii». rut., j.-..-. 

INK HOI I V ,.r I .m Leaved \ nrlrll.".. Mil 1 1'kl., Me. 

il'or nlhrr pr laro M see Oenothera.) 
Pyrethrum. rdy perennial with bright foliage, much osed for edging and 

. in the full <t spring iuui transplanted, 
r \n i m:\ii i.i ii m \i rem or Qoldea ivihiht. Small cm leaves, bright 

golden yellow i'ki.. ,-„■: ..».., r.v-. 

I'Miiimmim ii. PL, or Krvirffn. The most popular bright yellow- 

Pkt, .-.■■: <>».. BOc. 

POSH! M ,ir Inncc! Powder rlnn« I'ki.. .-„•. 

i.it AMiiii.iiiii H. \ large dowered type with bright irac- 

tive blossoms for cutting. Mixed Pkt., me. 

Red Hot Poker Plant <see Tritoaia). 
Reseda Odorata rse* Mignonette). 

RicinUS »r rnstor Oil Bean. \ tender annua] growing from B to IB feel inuii and 
bearing targe deep purple and brown leaves, and brlghl orang flowers. 

The seed pod resembles a prickly unit, i if the easiest culture. Individual plants witll 
plenty of room look best. 

s\ v-i im:i s. Tricolor. Has blood red stocks and green leaves with 

I'd veins Pitt, Be) ox., 15c. 

ZAJTZTBARENSIS, Mix,, I. A l.i i-«-l,':i ved variety growing 1" to 15 feet 

high Pkt., 5c; on,, J5c. 

MULTURE OF ALL, VARIETIES, Pkt., Be; ox., 10c. 

SalpiglOSSiSa A" half hardy annual growing about 2 feet high and bearing trumpet- 
shaped blossoms of rich shades and colors, all beautifully veined. It is valuable for 
bedding and massing and its long stems make it excellent also for cut flowers. Sow 
seed early in the year and transplant or sow the seed where it is to remain, in April, 
and thin to 6 or S inches. 

EXTRA FINE MIXED, Pkt., Be. 

Salvia or Flowering Sage. A tender perennial blooming the first season from seed and 
growing 2 to 3 feet high. The blossoms are borne on long stems in racemes or spikes. 
and are fragrant. The plant forms a bunch and blooms profusely. 

splesdess. Brlghl Bcarlet Sowers Pkt., 10c. 

PATENS. Bright blue flowers Pkt., 10c. 

Sanvitalia* A hardy trailing annual G inches high and hearing bright yellow blossoms 
resembling a miniature double Zinnia. Of the easiest culture and valuable for rock- 
work or borders. 

PROCUMBENS Fl. PI. Pkt., 5c. 

ScabiOSa or Mourning- Bride. Also called Sweet Scabious, Old Maid's Pincushion, etc. 
A hardy annual growing 8 inches to 2 feet high and bearing heads of bright flowers 
on long, slender stems. The seed pods are thimble shaped and covered with stiff 
stamens. Very effective as a bedding plant or for cut flowers. While an old- 
fasioned flower, it is highly esteemed and very popular. 

DOUBLE TALL VARIETIES, Mixed. About 2 feet tall Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c. 

DOUBLE DWARF VARIETIES, Mixed. About 8 inches tall Pkt., 5c$ ox., 50c. 





Sunflower — Mammoth Russian. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



Scarlet Flax (See unum). 

SilenGor Catchfly. A hardy annual growing about 1 foot high and hearing small, at- 
tractive flowers in various colors. Of easy culture and valuable for bedding. 

MIXED, Pkt., 5e. 

SrnilaXi A climbing perennial with beautiful bright green, glossy leaves, much esteemed 
for its long, delicate sprays of foliage. Largely used for decorating. Start seed under 
glass and transplant 6 inches apart. It requires strings or wires to climb on when very 
young. Pkt., 5cj ox., 50c. 

Snapdragon (Antirrhinum). A half hardy perennial growing from 6 inches to 2 feet 
tall. Flowers are oddly shaped and apparently closed, but by pressing the sides 
together can be made to open like a dog's mouth. The newer strains are large 
flowered and contained in a great number of shades and colors. 

GIANT A r ARIETIES, Mixed Pkt., Be. 

TOM THUMB, Mixed, 6 inches tall Pkt.. 5c. 

Spider Plant (See Cleome Pnngens). 

Stokesia or Cornflower Aster. A hardy perennial 2 feet high and bearing large, blue 
flowers on long stems. Blooms freely all summer and fall and is of easy culture. 

CYANEA, r Pkt., 10c. 

SteVia> A tender perennial 1% feet high and bearing clusters of small, white, fra- 
grant blossoms. Suitable for summer or winter blooming, and for pot- culture or 
open air. 

SERRATA, Pkt., 5c. 

StOClcS or Gilliflowers. Hardy annuals 2 feet high with spikes densely covered with 
beautiful double flowerets. The flowers come in many colors and tints and are fra- 
grant and very valuable for bedding and cut flowers. The flower-seed growers have 
devoted a great deal of attention and care to this flower and have developed a large 
number of varieties, and have so improved the double varieties that they will come 
fully SO per cent double where they formerly would not come 50 per cent so. Of easy 
culture. Sow seed in hotbeds or boxes and transplant. 

GERM AX TEN WEEKS DOUBLE, Mixed Pkt., 5e. 

GERMAN TEN WEEKS DOUBLE, White Pkt., 10c. 

HENDERSON'S COLXOSAU, Double Mixed. Very long spikes Pkt., 10c. 

CUT AND COME AGAIN, Mixed. Best for cutting Pkt., 10c. 

EMPEROR or Perpetual, Mixed. A biennial double variety, sometimes 

lasting many years if protected Pkt., 10c. 




Esehseholtzla— (California Poppy). 



Sweet William — Single Mixed. 



' — SKKH GROWERS 



Straw Flowers (Se* |.l,m,n. llrllrhry.um. x.rnnthemunii. 

SunflOWer lllellanlhnsi Manly annuals growing from 3 to 6 foot high". Of the easiest 
c,,lt ' lately r..w or background, -<r even f..r bedding:, 

< iiu\ •• i \ i in >h m rum r.m :ii. Large, densely double, bright golden 
The plant branohea ami affords One. long, stout stems for 

cutting. This Is the best variety In existence Pkt, Bei o«.. a-.e. 

m -*i w The common, large flowering variety with great brown centers and an 

edge "f yellow petals. The see,) i 3 used far chicken feed l'kl., .-„•; ,,,.. 

- ' ' i-i.A. The shorter, smooth -leaved, small-flowered variety growing 

wild In many states Pkl, 5cj o«., 25e. 

Sweet Alyssum tiy»«„„,,. 

Sweet Rocket (Hesperls). A hardy perennial growing 2 to 3 feet high. An old- 
rashloned. fragrant flower, of the easiest culture, and bearing clusters of white and 
purple blossoms. 

ii i v an Pk ,^ 5c . 

Sweet Sultan (Sec Centanrea Moscbata). 

Sweet William (Diantlms Barbatusl. A hardy perennial blooming the second year 
from seed. Grows 1 to -' feel high and hears its flowers in clusters at the end of a 
stiff stem. The individual flowerets are handsomely colored and marked. It makes 
a beautiful bedding plant and is of easy culture, 

SINGLE VARIETIES, Mixed Pkt., 5c; 07... 28c. 

1 11 II II 1,1: VARIETIES, Mixed P kt . ( Sc| OJi| ;,,-„.. 

SWEET PEAS 

This popular flower, which Is so easily grown anywhere, Is especially adapted to 
California, where most of the seed of the world's supply is grown. It is of the easiest 
culture, its only enemies being cut worms and birds. There is no practical remedy for 
the former, although lime and Paris Green will help somewhat, if sprinkled on the young 
sprouts. 

The seed should be sown in the fall in a row, dropping two or three seeds every 
four inches and covering one or two inches deep. While the growth is very slow in the 
winter, it is very rapid in the spring, and the plants are in full bloom in May, before 
the dry, hot summer sets in. The seed can be planted any time until April 1, especially 
near the sea coast, where the weather is cool and where fog is prevalent. 

Sweet Peas require an abundance of water and an open location. The water, if possible, 
should be applied at the roots, and the vines should not be sprinkled. A trellis of brush 
or strings or chicken wire is necessary. 

The flowers should be kept gathered, since if allowed to go to seed, the plants will 
soon stop growing. 

The Sweet Pea is a climbing annual, and hardy. The early flowering varieties are 
generally used for forcing under glass, but they are very desirable also in the garden, 
and will bloom in February if seed is sown in November. 

There is a very long list of varieties, but as the Sweet Pea has been developed and 
improved, a great many of the older varieties have been discarded. The list we offer 
represents all the desirable varieties, and every color and shade is included. 

If any of our readers are familiar with a name of a variety that does not appear here, 
and will write us for it, we can probably send precisely the same shade or color in an 
improved variety under one of the names we list here. 

The star (*) indicates our choice of the best varieties in each class. 




Cupid Sweet Peas. 



68 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

SWEET PEAS — WHITE 
Blanche Burpee (white seeded). A large, shell-shaped, pure white variety. 

Pkt, Ge; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* Dorothy EckfOrd (white seeded). The new white. Of the largest ana best type, 

with shell-shaped standard and large wings. Of heavy texture, and a very vigorous 
plant. The very best white Sweet Pea in existence. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 60c. 
Emily HenderSOIl (white seeded). A bold open blossom with upright standard and 
heavy texture. It is a very popular variety on account of its large stems and earliness, 
and its hardiness. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ',.j lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Mont BlanC (white seeded). Of the earliest flowering varieties. Vine short, leaves 
small and pointed, blossoms nearly as large as Emily Henderson and of same gen- 
eral appearance. A fine forcing variety for florists. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Mrs. Sankey (black seeded). A white variety which opens with just a trace of pink 
but soon turns clear, snowy white. Standard, shell-shaped or hooded. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Sadie Burpee (black seeded). A large variety with shell-shaped or hooded standard, 
opening "with a faint tint of pink and turning to a pure and clear white. 

Pkt., 5c; oz.. 10c; \ , lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Sadie Burpee (white seeded). A large, clear, white variety with shell-shaped or 
hooded standard with large wings. Similar to Blanche Burpee, but larger. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
*ShaSta a Our new large "white. (See page 44 for cut and description.) 

PALE YELLOW OR PRIMROSE 

* Hon. MrS- E. Kenyon (white seeded). A fine, large, clear primrose or very light 

yellow, with open, wavy standard and large wings. The best variety of this shade. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

MrS, Eckford (white seeded). A clear primrose yellow of good size and with slightly 

hooded standard. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Queen Victoria (black seeded). A large variety with hooded standard. Opens 

■with a faint tint of pink and then turns clear primrose. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
VERY LIGHT PINK, ALMOST WHITE 

* Modesty* A very soft and delicate pale pink, with hooded standard. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

RamOna. A large, shell-shaped or hooded variety, clear white and delicately striped 
with very light pink. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Sensation. A large, shell-shaped standard, opening light pink and buff, with white 
wings. There are usually four blossoms on each stem, the bottom flower turning 
almost white as the blcssoms expand. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y, lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 



VERY LIGHT PINK AND PRIMROSE 

Coquette. Standard light mauve and fawn, blended on primrose. "Wings, clear primrose. 
Large hooded type. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* Golden Rose. One of the largest varieties. Open form with round, wavy standard, 

and large wings. Clear primrose, lightly striped with light, soft pink. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., «0c. 
Lady M. Ormsby Gore. Fawn and primrose in the standard; wings, clear primrose. 

Hooded, good size, and pretty. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Lottie HutchinS. Light primrose, striped with light, delicate pink. Hooded 

standard, and large. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

MarChioneSS Of Cholmondeley. A new variety in buff and light pink, hooded 

and large. Very attractive. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; % lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

* Stella Morse. Buff suffused with tint of pink, and showing a little deeper on the 

edges. Hooded form, good size, and long stems. A graceful and delicate variety. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

LIGHT PINK SHADES 

AgneS JohnSOn. Light pink, buff, and cream, blended and shaded. Standard ex- 
panded and open, and the blossoms of good size. Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 60c. 

COUnteSS Of Latham. A creamy pink, self color. Good size, hooded form. Very 
pretty. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

"Gladys Unwin. A new giant-flowered Sweet Pea from England. A light, delicate 
pink, a little deeper at the edges. Both standard and wings very large and ruffled on the 
edges. Is a light colored companion to Countess Spencer, the grand new giant-flowered 
variety that inaugurated a new era in Sweet Peas. Pkt., 15c; oz., 75c. 



C C M<>!. 3BBS OROM I 

■WW 1 PI \*— I n.ll I 1-IVK SBADBS — loallinri 

Katherine Tracy, a rt pink standards with lighter pink wli I expanded 

Pkt, ."..•; M : ', lb., 30c; lb, .".".. 

•Prima Donna. Tha most popu tor» of all tlio light pink varieties. A 

With shell-shaped Standard, trong and vig- 

orous rlna and long stem? pki.. .-„•: .,».. Me; •, in.. Wo| n>.. .-.n... 

VenUS. utlful buff pink nnd turn* n Utile deeper at full malurit- 

and d,-; torn rki.. .-.. ■: ..».. lOej ', n... l&Cj "••• We. 

mi nit imm\ sii UHBs 

"Countess Spencer. The sensational new type Introdaoad In Bngl 

It Is 1: ,i. ,iud la ol B i. and w . ■ 1 1 ex- 

panded. Its round standard and very largo wings are slightly milled on U\ 
It usu iur blossoma on the stem, and tha stems ara long and stirr. The 

color la a bright rosy pink, a little deeper toward the edge of tha petals than at the 
This variety really marks a new era In Sweet Peaa as it Is of a form and size 
.■I DOt attained heretofore. Pkt., 25e; o«.. si.oo. 

* Janet SCOtt. A beautiful new shell-shaped variety, the standard being elear pink 

at the base and shading to buff al Wings are deeper bright pink. The 

wings Instead of growing at right angles to the standard are upright and almost 
parallel to it. but are so curled that the keel is not conspicuous. 

Pkt., Gcj oz... Hie; '/, lb., 25c; lb., 75c. 

ROSE AM) VERY LIGHT PINK SHADES 

Apple BlOSSOm. one of the older and popular varieties, of very vigorous growth, long 

stems, usually bearing four blossoms. Standard Is shell-shaped, cnlmson-plnk, shading 

deeper at mid rib and lighter at edges. Wings are white, tinted and shaded with pink. 

Pkt., Re; ox., 10c; V. lb.. 20c; lb., 50c. 
CrOWn Jewel. Light magenta lilac shaded on primrose; wings, clear primrose. The 
blossoms sometimes turn to a deep rose color. Large and fine form. 

Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; *4 lb., 20e; lb., 50c. 

* Earliest Of All. The earliest variety grown. Comes into bloom in 8 or 10 weeks 

after sowing the seed, and is largely used by florists for winter greenhouse use. The 
blossom is the same as Blanche Ferry, or bright rose standard with white wings. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb.. 20c: lb., 50c. 

Extra Early Blanche Ferry. An early strain of the well-known and popular 
Blanche Ferry and almost as early as Earliest of All. The blossom which is rose- 
pink and white resembles the old-fashioned Painted Lady or Pink and White but 
is brighter and more pronounced. We recommend this early strain, since coming 
early Into bloom, the flowers are appreciated much more than when the newer and 
more popular varieties are in full bloom. Pkt., 5c; ose., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Lady Skelmersdale. Standard light magenta rose and lilac; wings, clear white. 
Of hooded form and good size. Pkt., 5c: or.., 10c; % lb., 20c: lb., 50c. 

ROSE AND PINK SHADES 

"Jeannie Cordon. Bright rose standard showing veins of deeper rose; wings, 
primrose tinted with light rose. Large size, shell-shaped, and a vigorous vine with 
long stems. Pkt., Sc; o«., 10c; Vt lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Royal ROSe. Crimson-pink standard, shading deeper at the mid rib and lighter at 
edge; wings, pink. Very large and slightly shell-shaped. The largest variety of this 
class. Pkt., 5c; ox., 10c; % "••, 20c; lb., 50c. 

Triumph. Stand rose, heavily veined with scarlet-rose; wings, crimson-pink. Large 
and well expanded; open form. Pkt., 5c; oa., 10c; *A lb., 20e; lb., 50c. 

LIGHT PINK SHADES 

* Dainty. A new variety producing the longest stems of any sort, and bearing nearly 

always four blossoms. Body of flower is clear white, shaded lightly with blush pink 
and having distinct edgings of bright but soft pink. A shell-shaped variety, and one of 
the prettiest. Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; '4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Eliza Eckford. A good sized, hooded variety with white ground, shaded and edged 
with bright pink. Something like Dainty but with much more color. 

Pkt., 5c; oa., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb„ 50c. 
Hon. F. BOUVerie. The petals are deep pink at the base and shade to light pink 
and buff at the edges. The blossoms are large and shell-shaped. 

Pkt., 5c; or.., 10c; '/, lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

LOVely. One of the prettiest and very best Sweet Peas in our list. The blossoms are 

large and shell-shaped and the stems are long and usually bear four blossoms. 

Both standard and wings have a blotch of deep pink at the base, which shades a 

lighter pink and a delicate flesh tint at the edges. 

Pkt., 5c; or... tt!e: >,'l lb., 20c: lb., 50c. 



70 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

SWEET PEAS — Continued — ORANGE PINK SHADES 

* Aurora. White with stripes and flakes of orange pink. A very large variety with 

shell-shaped standard and large wings. The best of the striped varieties. 

Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; H lb., 20c; lb., 30c. 
CorgeOUS* A medium sized open-form variety, highly esteemed for its very bright 
colors. The standard is almost pure orange although shaded somewhat with scarlet. 
The wings are rose shaded and tinged with orange. Needs to be grown with a little 
shade as the standard is soft, and sunburns. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 30c; lb., 50c. 

Lady Mary ClirriC A very brilliantly colored variety of crimson orange, tinted 
at the base of the petals with lilac and crimson. Of the best form. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* MisS WHImOtt. The largest and finest variety of this class of colors. Is a bright 

orange pink showing veins of a deeper tint. It sunburns a little, and the protected 

blossoms are always the best, Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; »4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Oriental. A bright orange-pink showing veins of a deeper shade. Not quite so large 

as Miss Willmott but a little deeper shade. Pkt., 5cj oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

BRIGHT RED SHADES 

America. White with stripes and flakes of brilliant red. The brightest striped variety 

of open form. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; 3 /i lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Firefly, One of the older and best-known bright red varieties of medium size and 

open form. It is superceded in size and form but is still popular on account of its 

peculiarly bright color which is not quite equaled by the newer sorts, 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
George Cordon, A large variety of good form. A pure claret red and a distinct 
shade. The newly opened blossoms are the best. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % ll>., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* King Edward VII. The new red which is taking precedence over all other red 

shades. It is one of the largest varieties; of open "form and well expanded; round 
standard. The stems are long and usually bear four blossoms. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; *4 *».» 25c; lb., 75c. 

* Salopian. A fine, deep rich red variety of the hooded or shell-shaped form. A little 

deeper than King Edward VII, and while not quite so large, is very desirable for its 
fine, rich, velvety effect. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y 4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Scarlet Gem. A new variety and a new shade in Sweet Peas, being almost a true 
scarlet. It is only of medium size and the mature blossoms discolor badly 1 
but the newly opened blossoms are so bright and effective that it is decidedly a 
novelty of merit. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; V± lb., 75c; lb., $2.00. 

ROSE CRIMSON SHADES 

American Queen. A bright rose-crimson self, showing veins of deeper rose. 

Large open form and well expanded. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y 4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Fashion. A rose magenta showing veins of rose. Of good size and hooded form. A 

distinct shade. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V* lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Lord KenyOn. Magenta rose with standard a little deeper shade. Both standard and 

wings show veins of a deeper rose. Of good size and hooded form. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., lOe; *4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* Lord ROSeberry, The best of what we call the rose-veined varieties. Is a bright 

rose suffused with magenta and showing veins of rose. Of good size and shell-shaped, 

and very brilliant. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Majestic. Rose red, self colored. Large and shell-shaped. A bright and attractive 

variety. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y* lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Mrs. Dllgdale. Crimson rose suffused with primrose. Large and slightly shell-shaped 

and very attractive. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ^ lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Mrs. Joseph Chamberlain. A striped variety, white with stripes and flakes of 

rose. Very large and shell-shaped, and a very desirable variety. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* Prince Of Wales. The most popular and also the most satisfactory variety of this 

class. A clear rose-crimson, self color, large, and shell-shaped. Stems are long and 
usually bear four blossoms. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

LAVENDER, MAUVE, AND PURPLE SHADES 

Admiration. Purplish mauve; self colored. Good size and hooded form. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; <i lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

CaptlVatlOn. Almost a pure magenta self colored. Open form, a fair size. A distinct 

shade in Sweet Peas. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 



MOR8B & CO.— SEKH GROWER8 



si. Ml N II \\ s I I CM | HI M.I.M I MIM VI I Ml \ Mil lie I. MM! '. I 1. 1(111 




A Itirce field of Sweet Pen» lt,i» Iiii: for seed. 




Our Swept lVu Experimental Grounds where new varieties arc developed. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



SWEET PEAS — LAVENDER MAUVE AND PURPLE SHADES — Continued 

Dorothy Tennant. Rosy purple; self color. Large and shell-shaped. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Emily Eckford. The newly opened blossoms are rose purple but soon turn to quite 
a bright blue which is very pretty. The flowers are large and shell-shaped. 

■Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ',i lb., 20C; lb., 50c. 

Cray Friar. Heliotrope, marbled or dusted on white, giving a light mauve effect which 

contrasts well with yellowish tints. Large and shell-shaped. A percentage of the 

flowers will always come striped and can not be "fixed" but the true type is very 

attractive. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; VI lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* MrS. Walter Wright. Light rosy purple, turning blue when fully matured. 

Very similar to Emily Eckford but a little larger. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ' , lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

LAVENDER 

Countess Of Radnor or New Countess. Soft lavender tinted with mauve. The 
blossoms open with a little more mauve than when fully expanded. Good sized and 
shell-shaped. Probably the most popular of any one variety of Sweet Peas. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* Flora Norton. A new variety, bright sky blue of rather medium size. Is a new and 

distinct shade and the best color blue we have. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; % lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. 

* Helen Pierce. Our beautiful new. blue mottled. (See page 46 and illustration.) 

* Lady Crisel Hamilton. Soft lavender, tinted with mauve. A little larger than 

Countess of Radnor and is also colored ■with a little more mauve. Is now preferred 
on account of its size and long stems, but is not any improvement in shade. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V* lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 
Lady Nina BalfOUr. Light lavender and mauve with a slight greenish east, or more 
correctly a pearl gray tone. Good size and shell-shaped. 

Pkt/, 5c; oz., 10c; ', , lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* MrS. CeO. HigginSOn, Jr. A new variety of only medium size, but a fine type 

and possessing the most delicate lavender shade we have. Is almost a clear azure 
blue and is destined to be a great favorite "when the seed is more plentiful. 

Pkt., 10c; oz., 20e; % lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. 

LAVENDER AND MAUVE SHADED, PICOTEE OR EDGED 

Maid Of Honor. Clear white with a distinct rim or border of lilac. Good size and 
hooded form. A very delicate and pretty variety, and a great improvement on the 
old-fashioned "Butterfly." Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Lottie Eckford. The largest and best of this class and regarded by some as the 
most desirable of all varieties. The petals are white, shaded with lilac, with a deeper 
border at the edges. The wings are marked with a little lighter shade of lilac. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ', , lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

BLUE AND PURPLE SHADES 

Captain Of the Blues. The standard is almost clear purple; the wings are clear 

blue. Of good size and shell-shaped. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

COUnteSS Of CadOgan, The first opened blossoms have purple standards with 

clear, blue wings, but they soon turn lighter and the whole blossom is quite a clear, 

bright blue. Of good size and shell-shaped. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

* Duke Of Westminister. Almost a clear purple with a tint of violet at the base 

of the wings. Large and shell-shaped. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Y-i lb., 20c; lb., 50c 

Senator. Pure white, striped and flaked with maroon and violet. Large and shell- 
shaped. Pkt., 5c; oz., lOe; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

DEEP MAROON SHADES 

BoreattOn. Clear, dark maroon self color. Of about the same shade as a Black Tar- 
tarian cherry. Of fair size with open or upright standard. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Black Knight. The darkest of all the deep maroon shades. A little darker than 

Boreatton and showing almost black veins.- Except that it is darker, it is the same 

as Boreatton and Stanley. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; *4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

Duke Of Clarence. Dark claret self color. Large size, of perfect shell-shape form, 

and a very desirable dark variety. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 

OthellO. The best of the dark varieties, being very large and of the finest type. It 

is a deep maroon and particularly of rich, velvety effect. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; >4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. 



atORSB • CO.— SEED GROWERS 



-will II »-_, ..„,{„„,,( 
I1MIK Mil \ IMI II vllllll- 

Dllke Of Sutherland. Th« «lnn,lnr,l I | ,.,,r|.le. and the wlnKS. violet 
nnd IndlRo. Large sue and shell Pfcfc, .-..■: | ■, ih., Ktci lb, BOc. 

"Navy Blue. A very popular dark variety of Rood size nn<l open form. The 

standard la Indi,.-.. and violet, and the wings, vi..i.-t and bright I Tha whola effect 

p rich blue, and It contrasts wall with the lavender and mauve il 

1'kl.. :■••: ../.. I0«| ', lli„ *Oc| lb., HOC. 
Shahzada. A very dark variety of pond form nnd lar K o size. The Standard Is deep 
maroon showily veins almoal black, and the wit lolet 

l-kl.. .-..•; ■ »... Illci M ">•> 20c | lb., BOc. 

inj Mi Be, paekata of Sweet i"cn», 25c 



MIXTl IIF.S 



American Seedlings. 

varieties. 



All llcM color 



stly rink shades. About twenty dlstlnei 
I'kt.. Bcj os, 10c) Vi lb., I.'ic; lb., 10c. 

Best Large Flowering Mixture. This is the best mixture that can be made 

from existing varieties. The colors are well proportioned and the amount ol 
determined by a well-studied and carefullj arranged formula whirl, has been tried and 
corrected for many years. All the newer and best varieties are In this mixture. 

I'kl.. Bcj or.., 10c: M "'., 15c; lb., 40c. 

COOd Mixture. A well-proportioned mixture of about fifty varieties, This is a good 
assortment of shades and colors, but does not contain all the new varieties as in our 
Best Large Flowering. Oi.. .1c; V* lb., 10c; lb., 30c. 

Trial CrOUndS Mixture. This mixture Is the product of the Trial Grounds where 
a row of every known variety is grown, and besides are many new selections not yet 
"fixed" and ready for introduction. This mixture actually contains every known sort 
of the Tall varieties but no Cupids or Bush types. 

Pkt., 5c; os., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 40c. 



DOUBLE SWEET PEAS 



These varieties have divided or multiplied standards, sometimes two or three, and 
each as large as the standard in the single flower. Never more than eighty per cent of 
the blossoms will come double, and if the season is unfavorable, and the vines do poorly, 
only a few will double. The real double flower is a pretty thing, and the double varieties 
are worth planting in the hope of getting the true type, while nothing is lost if they should 
come single. 

BRIDE OF NIAGARA. Rose nnd white or double "Blanche Ferry." 

DOUBLE SENATOR. 

WHITE WONDER. A double white, the stems of which frequently double 

when there seems to be 7 to 9 blossoms on one stem, 
DOUBLE BUTTERFLY. DOUBLE BOREATTON. 

DOUBLE SPLENDOR. DOUBLE DUKE OF CLARENCE. 

I'kt., Bcj oz., 10c; <4 lb.. 20c; lb., 50c. 




Jfitinnese Morning Glory. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 



CUPID SWEET PEAS 

These are low-growing or dwarf Sweet Peas, about 1 foot high and spreading to about 
two feet in diameter. The foliage is dark green, and the stems are short, usually from 
three to six inches long. The blossoms, however, are larger than those of the Tall varieties. 
They are recommended for a border, especially along a drive or walk, and while the 
early buds drop off, the whole plant finally comes into bloom nicely, and is a perfect mat 
of bright flowers. While Cupids exist in all the colors and shades found in the Tall va- 
rieties, we have listed only the best ones and those that are freest flowering. The de- 
scriptions are the same as those of the Tall varieties. 

ALICE ECKFORD. LADY MARY CURRIE. 

AMERICA. LOTTIE ECKFORD. 

APPLE BLOSSOM. MAUVE QUEEN or Dark Admiration. 

•BEAUTY or Eliza Eekfonl. NAVY BLUE. 

BOREATTON. OVID. 

BRIDESMAID or Hon. F. Bouverlc. 'PINK. 

CAPTAIN OP THE BLUES. *PRIMA DONNA. 

CHAMBERLAIN or Mrs. Jos. Chain- PRINCE OP WALES, 

herlian. PRIMROSE. 

•COUNTESS OP RADNOR. 'ROYALTY or Dark Royal Rose. 

DUKE OP CLARENCE. RAMONA. 

•ENCHANTRESS or Dark Lovely. SADIE BURPEE (Black Seed). 

EMILY ECKFORD. 'SALOPIAN. 

EXTRA EARLY BLANCHE PERRY. STELLA MORSE. 

FIREFLY. WAVERLY. 

•HER MAJESTY. 'WHITE or Original Cupid. 

LOVELY. 

Each" of the above, Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; *4 lb., 40c; lb., $1.00; any 6 Pkts. 25c; any 12 Pkts. 45e. 

Mixture of all varieties including those listed and many more besides. 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 25c; lb., 7 
TageteS (See Marigold). 
Thlinbergicl or Black Eyed Susan. A hardy annual climber growing about 4 feet long, 
and valuable for low fences or hanging baskets. Prei'ers a sunny situation. Bios 
soms are buff, orange, or white, with dark centers. 

MIXED, Pkt., 5. 

Torenicl. A hardy annual with trumpet-shaped flowers, and growing 4 to 6 inches high 
Good for hanging baskets or borders. 

FOURIERI. Velvety blue with three dark spots of indigo 'and a bright 

yellow throat Pkt., 

WHITE WINGS. Dainty white flowers tinted with rose at throat Pkt., 10c. 

TritOma or Red Hot Poker Plant. Although this flower is usually propagated from 
the root, it does well from seed, and a large number of plants can be had at a small 
cost. Start the seed in boxes under glass. 

UVARIA GRANDIPLORA, Pkt., 25c. 

Tropaeolum (See Nasturtium). 

Trumpet Flower <see Datura). 

Verbena- A half hardy trailing perennial of easy culture. While it grows readily 
■from division of the root or from cuttings, it does best from seed. It is well-known 
as a bedding or border plant, and the improved large flowered and fragrant strains 
make it a handsome cut flower for low vases. 

MAMMOTH FLOWERED, Mixed Pkt., 10c. 

MAYFLOWER. Delicate white, edged with rose Pkt., 10c. 

PINK SHADES. Mammoth strains of rose and pink shades Pkt., 10c. 

PURPLE AND BLUE SHADES, Pkt., 5c. 

SCARLET DEFIANCE. Brilliant scarlet, Pkt., 5c. 

STRIPED VARIETIES, Mixed Pkt., 5c. 

PURE WHITE. Mammoth strains Pkt., 10c. 

MAMMOTH AURICULA FLOWERED. Various colors with large, white 

center, Pkt., 10c. 

Vinca. ^A. tender perennial with ornamental foliage, useful for bedding in summer and 
for the greenhouse in winter. Blooms freely and blooms the first year from seed. 

MIXED. Rose, crimson, white, etc .Pkt., 5c. 

VlOlaS or Tufted Pansies. A hardy perennial blooming freely throughout the summer 
and autumn. Of easy culture, and seed may be sown out of doors where the plants 
are to remain. 

MIXED. All varieties Pkt., 10c. 

ViOlet or Viola Odarata. Although these flowers do best propagated from the cuttings, 
they grow readily from seed, and produce a small, fragrant blossom 

MIXED Pkt., 10-. 



HOR8B & CO.— SEK1> QROWBRS 



Wallflower- A half hardy perennial blooming the first year from seed. Grows 1 to 2 
feet high and bears long stems of fragrant (lowers. It is host to renew the plnnts 
every i or 3 years by rMOWlng the Mad. An old-fashion,-. I Bower which . 
POP" I id transplant. 

I im: i.kikun nilT), Doubles rkt., n>e. 

FISE MM. I I MMXMD, |. kl-> ,-„.. 

TOM Till MB c.ul.DEN. Small compact plant Pkt, loc. 

Xeranthemum. A hardy annual about 1 foot high and benrlng white, purple, or 
yellow blossoms. The leavea are hairy or covered with a. silvery down. 
prMty straw-like everlasting Sowar. 

UOl HLli MI1CU, p kt ., .-„.. 

Zinnia. A half hardy annual growing from 1 to 2 feet high, niossoms are very 
double, and while the stems are stiff they make an excellent bouquet Power. The 
colors are In great variety and very bright. Probabl) no Bower I 
snrtment of shades, tints, and colors, and no bedding plant Is more effective for a 
brilliant show. Sow in box.-s early and transplant. 

DOUBLE MIXED. A tine mixture Pkt., 5c. 

DOUBLE I. II. I. II'! T. A dwarf plant 1 foot high bearing rather small. 

very double flowers. Mixed Pkt.. Be. 

pompoxe mixed. A tin.- mixture of globe-shaped flowers, Pkt., Be. 

t l BLED A.\D CHESTED, Mixed, A line mixture of Colors. The petals are 

curled and the flowers large and attractive Pkt., Be. 

C.lt WDIFLORA nomsrt. Mixed. The largest and finest variety in 
existence. The blossoms are globe-shaped, very large, and in numerous 
colors Pkt., Be. 




A LARGE FIELD PLANTED FOR ONION BULBS 
ON OUR SEED FARM AT CARNADEBO, 



5 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

Planet Jr. Garden Tools 




Xo. 12 — Double Wheel Hoe. No. 17— Single Wheel noe. 

No. 12. — Double Wheel Hoe. This is a very useful tool and the various attachments 
can be adjusted easily and quickly. The two wheels are eleven inches in diameter and 
can be set at four different distances apart. 

Price, ?7.50. 

No. 17.— Single Wheel Hoe, cultivator and plow. This tool is especially useful for working! 
between rows of plants, and, with its various attachments, is a very useful hand cul- 
tivator. Price, $5.50. 

No. 16. — Single Wheel Hoe. Same as No. 17 with additional attachments. 

Price, $6.35. 




No. 4 — Seed Drill and Cultivator Combined. 



No. S— Horse Hoe and Cultivator. 



No. 4.— Hill and Drill Seeder and single-wheel hoe. Holds two quarts of seed, and sows in 
continuous row or drops at five different distances. With the great variety of small 
tools supplied, it is useful almost every day in the year. 

Price, complete, $11.00. 

Price, as drill only, without extra attachments, 0.0O. 



No. 8. — Horse Hoe and Cultivator. A very strong-ly built cultivator 3 
It is especially adjusted with levers, and the side hoes and teeth 
It is the very best cultivator on the market. 

Price, 



-horse work. 
;ily attached. 



D OROWBR9 



Planet Jr. Garden Tools 




No. M — Seed Drill nod Cultivator. No. « — Heavy Seed Drill. 

No. 25. — Seed Drill and Cultivator. A good seed drill for planting- in rows or hills, drop- 
ping accurately at any distance desired. The large number of special attachments 
make it a very valuable garden tool. 

Price, $13.50. 

jio. fl — Hill and Drill Seeder, similar to No. 4. but much heavier and stronger. It is a new 
drill just put on the market by the Planet Jr. Company, and is especially recommended 
where heavy work is required. 

Price, complete with attachments $14.00. 

Price, Seed Drill only, without attachments,.., 11. no. 
No. 11. — Double Wheel Hoe. Same as No. 12, with several additional attachments. 

Price, 9U.no. 




Twelve-Toot li Harrow and Cultivator. 



Twelve-Tooth Harrow and Cultivator. A fine one-horse tool for pulverizing the 
soil. It has adjusting levers and foot-lever pulverizer, and can be used as a harrow or 
cultivator. Price, complete, $10.00. 

(A catalogue ox n lurp' number of other Planet Jr. tooln not listed here will be went on 
application.) 



78 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

HOT-BEDS 

Good hot-beds may be made by digging down about three feet and filling the excavation 
■with rather fresh horse manure in which there is a good deal of bedding straw. About 18 
inches of this manure is sufficient and then fill in on top of it with about one foot of good 
soil mixed with sand. This manure pile will be compressed, and will soon begin to ferment 
and will then keep the top soil warm and cause the seed to sprout quickly, and the young 
plants will grow very fast. It is best to enclose the hot-bed with boards, making what 
is called a cold-frame; this is done by running the length of the bed east and west 
and by making the north side about two feet high and the south side not more than six 
inches. The ends also should be enclosed and a sash of glass should be hung on hinges 
at the highest end. This sash should be raised for ventilation' during most of the day. 
since the bed gets very warm and the atmosphere very close if kept too tightly closed 
for too long a time. As the plants grow, the sash should be left up longer each day to 
harden them and prepare them for final transplanting. 

The hot-bed should have a very sunny location near a hedge or some building, well- 
protected from the prevailing wind. 

The .object of the cold-frame is to make an artificial heat, and to protect the plants 
from frost during winter. Seed may be started any time during the winter and the plants 
can be ready to set out just as soon as danger of frost is over. 

As the sun gets too hot it is necessary to shade the bed, and the glass should be white- 
washed or covered with sacking if necessary. Too much heat is fatal to the tender, young 
plants. 

FOREIGN NAMES OF VEGETABLES 

English. German French. Spanish. Italian. 

Artichoke Artischoke Artichaut Alcachofa Articiocca 

Asparagus Spar gel Asperge Esparrago Sparagio 

Beans Bohnen Haricots Habichuela Pagiuoli. . . .' 

Beet .Rube Betterave Remolacha Barbabietcla 

Broccoli Spargelkohl Chou Broccoli Broculi Brocoli , 

Brussels Sprouts Rosenkohl Chou de Bruxelles. -Bretones de EruselaCavolo di Brusselles 

Cabbage Kopf kohl, Kraut . . Chou pomme Col repello Cavolo cappuccio . . . 

Cabbage Savoy. .Wirsing Chou de Milan ,Col de Milan Cavolo di Milano. . . . 

Carrot Carotteni Mohren. Carotte Zanahoria Carota 

Cauliflower Blumenkohl Chou fleur Colifior Cavolofiore 

Celery Sellerie Celeri Apio Sedano 

Celeriac Knoll-Sellerie Celeri-rave Apio-nabo Sedano-rapa , 

Chervil Kerbel Ceref uil Perifollo Cerf oglio 

Chicory Cichorienwurzel. .Chicoree sauvage. . Achicoria Cicoria selvatica 

Corn Salad Feldsalat Mache Canonigos Valeriana 

Corn Mais Mais Maiz Mais 

Cress Garten -Kresse. . . .Cresson alenois. . . . Mastuerzo Agretto 

Cress, Water. . . .Brunnenkresse. . . Cresson de fontaineBerro Nasturzio aquatico. . 

Cucumber Gurken Concombre Cohombro Cetriolo 

Dandelion Lowenzahn Pissenlit Diente de leon Dente di leone 

Egg-Plant Eierpflanze Aubergine Berengena Petonciano 

Endive Endivien Chicoree Endive. . . Endivia Indivia 

Kale Blatterkohl .Chou vert Breton, Berza Cavolo verde , 

Kohl Rabi Knollkohl Chou-rave Col rabano Cavolo rapa 

Leek Porree, Lauch Poireau Puerro Porro 

Lettuce Lattich, KopfsalatLaitue Lechuga Lattuga 

Melon Melone Melon Melon Popone 

Melon, Water . . . .Wasser-Malone . . . Melon d'eau Sandia Melone d'aqua 

Mushroom Schwamm Champignon Seta Pungo pratajolo. . . . 

Nasturtium Kapuciner Kresse .Capucine Capuchina Nasturzio 

Okra Ocher Gombaud Gombo Ocra 

Onion Zwiebel Ognon Cebolia. .*. Cipollo 

Parsley Petersilie Persil Perejil Prezzemolo 

Parsnip Pastinake Panais .Chirivia Pastinaca 

Peas.. : Erbsen Pois Guisante Pisello 

Pepper Pfeffer Piment Pimiento Peperone 

Pumpkin Melonen-Kurbiss. Potiron Calabaza totanera. . Zucca 

Radish Radies Radis Rabanito Ravanello 

Rhubarb Rhabarber Rhubarbe Ruibarbo Rabarbaro 

Salsify Haferwurzel Salsifis Salsifi bianco Sassefrica 

Spinage Spinat Epinard Espinaca Spinace 

Squash Krubiss Courge Calabaza Zucca 

Tomato Liebesapfel Pomme d'Amour. . . Tomate Porno d'oro 

Turnip Weisse-Rube Navet Nabo Navone 



MOR8H a CO SBBD i;itl)WEKS 



« I. II. II I » 111 \ Alllul » -I I ll» 



Per bush. 

Barlev 

Beans 

Buckwheat 4* lbs. 

Canary 60 lbs. 

Ciuitor Beans 46 lbs, 

60 lbs. 

Held » Shelled 66 lbs. 

: -M . ..ii K.ir. .70 lbs. 

.16 lbs. 

Red Top In chaff.. . n Iba. 



Per bush. 
Red T IS lbs. 

Tnii Meadow u.u 

Grass 10 lbs. 

Orchard Grass 14 lbs. 

Hard Fescue 12 lbs. 

Tall Peniie u lbs. 

English Blue Grass, II n>s. 

Perennial Rye Brass 20 lbs. 

Timnilr If. Iba. 
Kentucky Blu. 



Per hush. 

Hemp 44 lbs. 

Hungarian 48 lbs. 

Millet 60 lbs. 

Peas, smooth 60 lbs. 

Teas, wrinkled 66 lbs. 

R '!'•■ 

■ i 
VetOhea or Tares ...60 lbs. 



QIA.VTITV OP SEED lli:i|l llil'l) TO PRODUCE A GIVEN NUMBER OF PLANTS 
OH TO SOW AN AC11K. 



Per acre. 

Alfalfa 15 to 25 lbs. 

Artichoke. 1 oz. to 500 plants 6 oz. 

Asparagus. 1 oz. to 800 plants 1 lb. 

Asparagus Roots 5000 to 7250 

Barley 100 to 120 lbs. 

Beans, dwarf 1 lb. to 100 ft 15 to 60 lbs. 

Beans. Pole. 1 lb. to 100 ft 25 to 30 lbs. 

Lima. 114 lbs. to 100 ft 40 lbs. 

: irden. 1 oz. to 100 ft 7 lbs. 

Beet, Mangel. 1 oz. t<i 100 ft 5 lbs. 

Beet. Sugar. 1 oz. to 100 ft 10 lbs. 

Brussels Sprouts. 1 oz. to 5000 plants.. 2 oz. 

Buckwheat 25 lbs. 

Cabbage. 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2 oz. 

Carrot. V, oz. to 100 ft 2% lbs. 

Cauliflower. 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2»,£ oz. 

Celery, 1 oz. for 15.000 plants 2 oz. 

Chicory 4 lbs. 

Clover. Alslke. and White Dutch. 8 to 10 lbs. 
Clover, Crimson, Red, and Medium, 

10 to 15 lbs. 

Collards, 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2 oz. 

Corn. Kaffir and Egyptian 6 to 8 lbs. 

Corn. Broom 6 lbs. 

Corn. Sweet. 1% lbs. for 100 hills 15 lbs. 

Corn. Field 15 lbs. 

Cress. y t oz. to 100 ft 12 lbs. 

Cucumber, 1 oz. to 100 hills S lbs. 

Egg-Plant. 1 oz. for 2000 plants 4 oz. 

Endive. U oz. to 100 ft 2 lbs. 

Flax, broadcast : 30 lbs. 

Garlic Bulbs. 1 lb. to 10 ft. 
Gourd, 2 oz. to 100 hills. 

Grass. Kentucky Blue 30 lbs. 

Grass. English Blue 25 lbs. 

Grass, Hungarian Millet 25 lbs. 



Per acre. 

Grass. Mixed Lawn 50 to 75 lbs. 

Grass. Red Top. cleaned 10 lbs. 

Grass. Red Top, in chaff 25 lbs. 

Grass. Timothy 10 lbs. 

Grass. Perennial Rye 40 lbs. 

Grass. Orchard 40 lbs. 

Hemp 20 lbs. 

Kale. 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2 oz. 

Kohl Rabi. 1-3 oz. to 100 ft 4 lbs. 

Leek. 1-3 oz. to 100 ft 4 lbs. 

Lettuce. "4 oz. to 100 ft 2 lbs. 

Martynia. 1 oz. to 100 ft 5 lbs. 

Muskmelon. 1 oz. to 100 hills 3 lbs. 

Melon. Water. 4 oz. to 100 hills.. 3 to 4 lbs. 

Okra. 1 oz. to 100 ft S lbs. 

Onion Seed, 1-3 oz. to 100 ft 4 lbs. 

Onion Seed for Sets 60 to 80 lbs. 

Onion Sets. 1 lb. to 75 ft 250 lbs. 

Parsnip. & oz. to 100 ft 3 lbs. 

Parsley. % oz. to 100 ft 3 lbs. 

Peas. Garden. 1 lb. to 100 ft.. 100 to 200 lbs. 

Peas, Field 150 lbs. 

Pepper, 1 oz. for 1500 plants 3 oz. 

Pumpkins. 4 oz. to 100 hills 3 to 4 lbs. 

Radish, 2-3 oz. to 100 ft 10 lbs. 

Rye 80 lbs. 

Salsify, Yi oz. to 100 ft S lbs. 

Spinach. % oz. to 100 ft 8 lbs. 

Sunflower 8 lbs. 

Squash, Summer. 4 oz. to 100 hills 2 lbs. 

Squash. Winter, S oz. to 100 hills 2 lbs. 

Tomato, 1 oz. for 4500 plants 2 oz. 

Tobacco, 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2 lbs. 

Turnip. 1 oz. to 250 ft 2 to 3 lbs. 

Vetches 100 to 120 lbs. 

Wheat 100 to 120 lbs. 



NUMBER OP PLANTS OR TREES TO THE ACRE AT GIVEN DISTANCES. 



Distance 
apart 



plants. apart 



12x 1 in 522.720 

12x 3 in 174.240 

12x12 in 43,560 

16x 1 in 392.040 

18x 1 in 348,480 

18x 3 in 116,160 

18x12 in 29.040 

18x18 in 19,360 

20x 1 In 313,635 

20x20 In 15.681 

24x 1 in 261.360 

24x18 in 16,520 



24x24 
30x 1 
30x 6 
30x12 
30x16 
30x20 
30x21 
30x30 
36x 3 



plants. 

in 10,890 

in 209.0SS 

in 34,848 

in 17.424 

in 13,068 

in 10,454 

in 8,712 

in 6,970 

in 58,080 

in 14,520 



36x12 
36x18 
36x24 in 7,260 



in. 



apart 
36x36 in 



plants. 



4.840 

42x12 in 12,446 

42x21 in 6,223 

42x36 in 4,148 

48x12 in 10,890 

48x18 in 7,790 

48x24 in 5,445 

48x30 In 4,356 

48x36 in 3,630 

48x48 in 2,723 

60x36 In 2,901 

60x48 in 2.178 



Distance 


No. 


apart 


plants. 


60xfi0 in.. . 


. .. 1.743 


Sx 1 ft. .. 


. .. 5.445 


Sx 3 ft. .. 


. .. 1,815 


Sx 8 ft. .. 


680 


10X 1 ft. .. 


. .. 4,356 




726 


10x10 ft... 


436 


12x 1 ft... 


. .. 3,630 


12x 5 ft... 


736 




302 


16x 1 ft... 


. . . 2,722 


16x16 ft... 


170 



SO C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS 

A FEW SUGGESTIONS ABOUT GROWING 
ONIONS FOR MARKET 

Of all the great variety of seed we grow, none is more important with us than 
Onion Seed. We regard it as our preeminent specialty, and aim to have the best and 
purest strains of all the varieties we offer. 

The onions represented on our front cover are the best of their respective colors 
and make the handsomest, best keeping, and the finest market onions, as well as the best 
for the garden. 

There are also many other varieties of onions which do well in certain localities but 
only in certain places. Other onions besides those we have named which can be recom- 
mended as heavy croppers and adapted practically to all localities are the Australian 
Brown, Yellow Danvers, and Yellow Globe Danvers. 

The Yellow Danvers is frequently called Silverskin on the market, but this is an 
error, for the true Silverskin is a white, flat onion, 

For general crop, the seed must be sown during the month of January or before 
February 1, and, if the location is a fairly dry one, it is best to sow about the middle of 
December. The seed should be sown with a seed drill in rows 14 inches apart, using 4 to 
4% lbs. of seed per acre. In very weedy land the rows may be IS or 20 inches apart 
when less seed is required. 

For planting a single row of onions among strawberry plants about 2 lbs. of seed per 
acre is sufficient. 

The land must be thoroughy worked before planting, and usually two good plowings, 
a good disking, and a harrowing are necessary. 

The crop must always be kept free from weeds, and it is usually necessary to weed 
out in the row by hand once or twice. Hoeing between the rows may be done oftener. 
It is not necessary to thin the plants in the row, since some thinning is naturally done 
during the hand weeding. 

The land chosen for onions should be wet land, preferably loose, sandy loam or peet, 
and should always be kept well drained. Heavy adobe or clay soil is good but needs to be 
irrigated in May, June, and July, and the onions are not so well colored or even in shape in 
heavy, stiff soils. Steady, even growth is necessary to good onions, and a check in the 
growth, whether from disease or drought, causes them to run to seed badly. Onions are 
ready to harvest usually the latter part of August, when, with a good crop, the tops are 
pretty weSl ripened down. If the tops are still standing and green it is well to run a light 
roller or plank over them to press the tops down, and the onions should be pulled in about 
ten days after this is done, whether the tops have dried off or not. It requires not less 
than two full weeks to properly cure onions after they are pulled. In localities where 
fog is prevalent it is best to spread the onions out on the ground, not more than one 
bulb deep. It is usual in other climates to throw into windrows a foot or more deep 
and cover lightly with straw or dried tops. It is best not to top and sack until ready 
to ship to market, and if onions are to be kept for any length of time they should 
not be sacked but should be put under cover on a floor or in a bin with abundant circula- 
tion of air, and be kept absolutely dry. 

The value of an onion crop is naturally dependent on the market and on the char- 
acter of the land planted. Land that is very foul should usually be avoided as too 
expensive. Also avoid land which has just had a hay or grain crop, and if possible use land 
that has been planted to vegetables or some hoed crop, especially peas and beans. An 
onion crop should not be repeated more than three times on the same land, and usually 
twice is best, since onion diseases (of which there are many) appear very plentifully. 
An average crop runs from 150 to 200 centals (100 lbs.) per acre, and the cost represented 
by labor, rent, sacks, and transportation is estimated roughly at $75.00 per acre. 



Another very good system of growing fancy market onions is by transplanting. By 
this method the seed is sown in beds in August and September, and the plants are pulled 
and transplanted about February 15 to March 1. Put the plants G inches apart in lateral 
rows, 14 inches apart when they make a uniform sized bulb and also a hard and firm one. 
This plan is especially recommended for the globe varieties since they do best under this 
treatment. About 2 lbs. of seed will furnish plants enough for an acre by this method. 
The expense is considerably greater than by the ordinary plan, and should be roughly 
estimated at $100.00 per acre. The additional cost is simply in labor in transplanting, 
for there is some saving in hoeing and hand weeding. 

Unless the land is porous and friable and also very moist all through the summer, 
this method is usually unsuccessful and is not recommended. The seed should never be 
sown later than September 15, and the transplanting should never he done later than 
March 15. 

These directions for planting are intended for California and kindred climates only 
and are not the proper directions for Northern Oregon, and "Washington, where the seed 
is sown in the spring and where the seed-beds for transplanted onions must be protected 
by frames. The suggestions as to soil and seed, however, apply to all sections of the 
Pacific Coast. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Pa*e 

Alfalfa 40 

Alslke . 40 

Anise 40 

Artichoke t 

Asparagus 2 

Auatrallan Rye 
Graas (see Eng- 
llah Perennial). 41 
Australian Salt 

Bash 43 

Balm »t 

Basil 39 

Beans 2. 4. 6. 6 

Beets 6. 7, I 

Bermuda Grass. . . 41 

Blue Grass (see 

Kentucky Blue 

Grass) 42 

Bokhara Clover... 41 
Borecole (see Kale)17 

Borccoll 8 

Brome Grass 41 

Broom Corn 43 

Brussels Sprouts. . 8 

Buckwheat 43 

Burr Clover 41 

Cabbage 8, 9 

Canada Field Peas 43 

Canary 43 

Caraway 40 

Carrot 10 

Catnip 40 

Cauliflower ... 10. 12 

Celery 12. 13 

Celerlac 13 

Chervil 13 

Chicory 14 

Page 

Abronla 46 

Abutllon 45 

Adonis 45 

Ageratum 46 

Agrostema 45 

Althea Rosea 45 

Alyssum 45 

Amaranthus 47 

Angel's Trumpet. 47 

Antirrhinum 47 

Asparagus Plum- 

osis 47 

Asparagus Spren- 

gerl 47 

Asters 47. 48. 49 

Bachelor's Button 49 

Balsam 49 

Balsam Apple (see 
Momordlca Bal- 

saminia) 59 

Balloon Vine 49 

Bartonia 49 

Bellis Perennis. . . 49 

Begonia 49 

Black-Eyed Susan 
(see Thunbergia)47 

Brachycome 60 

Browallia 60 

Calceolaria 50 

California Poppy. 50 

Calendula 50 

Calllopsis 50 

Campanula 50 

Canary Bird Flow- 
er 60 

Candytuft 50. 61 

Canna 61 

Canterbury Bells. 61 

Carnation 61 

Caster Oil Beans.. 61 

Catchflv 60 

Celosla Cristata.. 51 

Centaurea 61 

Chinese Lantern 

Plant (see Phy- 

sallisFranchettl)64 

Chinese Primrose 

(see Primula 

Sinensis) 64 

Chrysanthemum . 52 

Cineraria 52 

Clarkia 62 

Cleome Pungens. 62 
Cobaea Scandens. 62 

Cockscomb 62 

Colens 52 

Columbine 62 



Garden 
Page 
Clover Seed . . 40, 41 

Collards 14 

Coriander 40 

Corn 14. 15 

Corn Salad 14 

Cow Peas 42 

Cress 18 

Crimson Clover. . . 41 

Cucumber 15. 18 

Dnndellon 16 

Dill 40 

Egg-Plant 17 

Endive 16. 17 

English Blue Grass 
(see Meadow 

Fescue) 42 

English Perennial 

Rye Grass 42 

Fennel 40 

Fettlcus (see Corn 

Salad) 14 

Fine Leaved Fes- 
cue 42 

Flax Seed 43 

Fiower Seeds (al- 
phabetical) 45 to 75 
Foreign Names of 

Vegetables 78 

Garden Tools.. 76. 77 

Gourds 17 

Grass Seeds 

41. 42. 4S 

Gumbo (see Okra) 24 

Hairy Vetch 43 

Hard Fescue Grass 41 
Hemp 43 



Seeds 

Page 

Horbs 39. 40 

Horehound 40 

Hot-Beds 78 

Hyssop 40 

Italian Rye Grass 42 

K.itlir Corn 43 

Kale 17. is 

Kentucky Blue 

Grass 42 

Kohl Rabl 18 

Lavender 40 

Lawn Grass 42 

Leek 13 

Lettuce. ...18. 19. 22 

Marjoram 40 

Martynia 22 

Millet 42 

Meadow Fescue. . 42 

Mesuulte 4 2 

Muskmelon ... 22. 23 

Mustard 24 

Nasturtium 24 

Number of Plants 

per Acre 79 

Okra 24 

Onion Seeds .. 26. 27 

Onions for Market 80 

Orchard Grass.... 42 

Parsley 27 

Parsnip 27. 28' 

Peas 28. 30 

Pepper 30. 31 

Pumpkin 31, 32 

Quantity of Seed 

per acre 79 

Radish 32, 34 



Flower Seeds 



Page 

Convolvulus 52 

Cornflower Aster. . 

(see Stokesia). 66 
Coreopsis (see Cal- 

iopsls) 60 

Cosmos 52. 63 

Cyclamen 63 

Cypress Vine 53 

Dahlia 63 

Daisy 53 

Datura 63 

Delphinium 63 

Dianthus Barbatus 63 
Dianthus Caryo.. 

phyllus 63 



Dolichos 64 

Edulis (see Passi- 

flora) 62 

Eschscholtzla. ... 64 
Eschscholtzla Bush 54 
Euphorbia 



Everlasting Flow- 



er 



54 



Everlasting Pea.. 64 
Evening Primrose 54 

Feverfew 55 

Flax 66 

Flowering Maple. 65 
Flowering Sage. . 65 
Flowering Tobac- 
co (see Nicotiana 

Afflnis) 60 

Forget-me-not... 65 

Four O'clock 65 

Foxglove 66 

Gaillardia 56 

Geranium 55 

Gilia 66 

Giiliflower 55 

Globe Amaranth 
(see Gomphrena)55 

Gourds 55 

Golden Feather. . 65 

Gomphrena 65 

Godetia 56 

Gyphsophlla 66 

Helianthus 66 

Heliotrope 56 

Helichrysum .... 56 

Hollyhock 56 

Horn of Plenty (see 

Datura) 53 

Humulus 66 

Hunnemannia. ... 56 
Hyancinth Bean.. 66 



Page 

Iberis 66 

Ice Plant 66 

Ipomea 67 

Japanese Bell (see 

Platycondon) .. 61 
Japanese Hop ... 57 
Kenilworth Ivy.. 67 
Kochia Scoparia. 57 
Lady's Slipper (see 

Balsam) 49 

Lantana 67 

Larkspur 67 

Lathyrus Latifolius 57 

Linum 67 

Lobelia 67 

Lophospernum 

Scandens 58 

Love Grass ( se e 

Nemophilla) ... 60 
Love-In-a-Mist ... 68 
Love-in-a-Purf (see 

Balloon Vine).. 49 
Love Lies Bleeding 68 
Lupins (see Lu- 
pins) 68 

Lupinus 58 

Lychnis 68 

Martynia 68 

Marigold 58 

Marvel of Peru . . 68 

Marguerite 58 

Matricaria. 58 

Mignonette 68 

Mim.isn Pucica .. 68 

Mimulus 69 

Mina Lobata 59 

Momordlca Balsa- 

mina 69 

Moonflower 69 

Morning Glory ... 69 

Myosotis 69 

Mourning Bride .. 69 

Musk Plant 59 

Nasturtium ... 59, 60 

Nemophila 60 

Nicotina Afflnis . . 60 

Nigella 60 

Oenothera 61 

Oxalis 61 

Pansy 61 

Papaver 



Passiflora) 

Pentstemon 62 

Perilla Nankinensls 62 
Perennial Pea. ... 62 



Pare 

Rnpe 43 

Red Clover 41 

Red Top 42 

Rhubarb 24 

Rosemary 40 

Rue 40 

Ruta Baga 39 

Sage 40 

Salsify 35 

Sojn Bean 43 

Sorirhum (see 
Sugar Cane)... 43 

Sorrel 85 

Spinach 36 

Spring Vetches... 43 

Squash 35. 36 

Sugar Cane 43 

Summer Savory.. 40 

Sunflower 43 

Tall Meadow Oat 

Grass 42 

Tansy 40 

Thyme 40 

Tobacco 36 

Tomato 37. 38 

Turnip 38. 39 

Vegetable Oyster. 36 

Velvet Bean 4.1 

Vetches 43 

Watermelon.. 23. 24 
Weights o f Var- 
ious Seeds 79 

White Clover 41 

Winter Savory... 40 

Winter Vetch 43 

Wormwood 40 



Page 
Perennial Poppy 

(see Papaver) . . 62 

Petunia 62 

Phlox Drummondti 

62. 64 
Physallis Franchetti64 

Pinks 64 

Platycodon Grandi- 

flora 64 

Poppy 64 

Portulaca 64 

Primula Sinensis 64,65 

Pyrethrum 65 

Red Hot Poker Plant65 
Reseda Odorata . . 66 

Ricinus 66 

Salpiglossis 65 

Salvia 66 

Sanvitalia 66 

Scabiosa 66 

Scarlet Flax 66 

Silene 66 

Smilax 66 

Snapdragon 66 

Spider Plant 66 

Stokesia 66 

Stevia 66 

Stocks 66 

Straw Flowers ... 67 

Sunflower 67 

Sweet Alvssum . . 67 

Sweet Rocket 67 

Sweet Sultan 67 

Sweet William . . 67 

Sweet Peas 

67.68,69.70.71,72.73 
Sweet Peas-Double 73 
Sweet Peas-Cupid 74 

Tagetes 74 

Tunbergia 74 

Torenia 74 

Tritoma 74 

Tropaeolum 74 

Trumpet Flower . . 74 
Tufted Pansies (see 

Violas) 74 

Verbena 74 

Vinca 74 

Viola Odorata (see 

Violet) 74 

Violas 74 

Violet 74 

Wallflower 75 

Xeranthemum ... 75 
Zinnia 75 










A'? 



|| s ■ r 



' 



C.C.MORSE&CO. 
SEED GROWER? 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



. 1907 
C/IT/1LOOUE OF 



GOM0I&SE 6Z CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 




A SAMPLE LIFE-SIZE BULB OF 

THE MORSE BROWN GLOBE ONION 

EARLY, HARD, HEAVY, LONG-KEEPING, HANDSOME. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

In ordering seeds in packets you may select as follows: 
For $1.00 select an amount up to $1.25. 
For $2.00 select an amount up to $2.50. 
For $3.00 select an amount up to $3.75. 
For $4.00 select an amount up to $5.00. 
For $5.00 select an amount up to $6.25. 
These rates apply only to seeds in packets, but not to seeds by weight or 
measure. Quantities from one ounce and up are net; no discount. 

HOW TO ORDER 

Ee sure to write your NAME and ADDRESS plainly. 

Unless otherwise stated, we will pay postage on all packets, ounces, and 
one-pound packages or less. Larger quantities will be sent by express or 
freight, the charges to be paid by purchaser. 

CASH must accompany all orders. 

REMITTANCES should be made by post-office or express money-order, 
or by San Francisco exchange. Said remittances must include exchange. 
Personal checks will not be accepted. 

Clean unusied STAMPS accepted up to amount of $1.00. 

Half-pound quantities will be filled at pound rates, but less than one-half 
pound at ounce rates. 

Note. — There are so many contingencies to be encountered in growing 
plants from seed that are dependent on the weather and other conditions over 
which we have no control, that success in planting is not altogether dependent 
on the seed. We will send out only seed which we believe will grow and 
produce the kind of plant and variety represented; but C. C. Morse & Co. 
give no warranty, express or implied, as to description, quality, productiveness, 
or any other matter of any seeds they send out, and they will not be responsi- 
ble in any way for the crop. If the purchaser does not accept the goods on 
these terms, they are at once to be returned. 



THE MORSE BROWN GLOBE ONION. 

(Our front cover design) 
This is one of the best market onions in existence, and we recommend it 
in the very highest terms. It is early, ripening down as early as August 1st. 
It forms good large bulbs, which are fine grained, solid, heavy and which keep 
in good condition longer than any other onion we have. The color is a deep 
rich seal brown, and the flesh is white, brittle and strongly flavored. The first 
requisite of a market onion is its keeping qualities, and almost as important 
is its size, earliness, and color. 

The Morse Brown Globe has all these admirable characteristics, and it is 
unquestionably the onion for the Pacific Coast. The seed crop is short, but 
we are able to offer it in fair-sized quantities at the following prices: Pkt. 10c; 
oz. 20c; 14 lb. 75c; lb. $2.50, postpaid. By express or freight, 10 lbs., $2.25 a lb. 



NOVELTIES AND SPECIALTIES 

M , , „,, -, ,ffered in the seedsman's catalog are ..... rtovell 

,„,„v ol the novelties which are introduced from year ... year are decidedly good 

"""we are offering several novelties ... sterling merit ourselves this year wh 
will find in these fir-, pages. With them we are also listing some ... th. 
Ihill gs introduced by other high class seedsmen during the pas) ew seasons, and 
IhesTcolored pages might be said to contain the cream of recent introductions. It 
will pay you to try them all. 

A GRAND SUGAR BEET 
lAENSCH'S VICTRIX. This sugar beet is unquestionably the best variety that 
has been offered in this country, and repeated trials by some of the most critical 
factory growers have proved it to be vastly superior to all others in v.tal.ty and vigor 
of growth, and in the amount of sugar in the root. It is a variety that has 
been carefully bred up to its highest state of efficiency by one of the be.t-equ.pped 
seed growers in Germany and has had the benefit of years of careful study and scien- 
tific development. It is wedge-shaped, with distinct longitudinal dent; grows wholly 
underground, and has short, smooth leaves. Pkt. S c; «. ices lb- 35C postpaid. Larger 
quantities quoted on application. 

A NEW POLE BEAN 
Burger's Stringless Pole. This grand new pole bean was introduced two seasons 
ago. and has now been thoroughly tested as a garden, market-garden, and farm-crop 

"'The pod is green in color, is thick, meaty, and entirely stringless. It is earlier 
than Kentucky Wonder or Old Homestead, is just as productive, and more desirable 
in every way. The dried seed is pure white, which means a surplus can always be 
used for a winter cooking bean. 

We offer the best strain on the market. Pkt. ioc; lb. s S c, postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $2.00. 

A SPLENDID GOLDEN BEAN 

Burpee's Brittle Wax. A bean that has been introduced for seve.al seasons and 
has proved itself to be one of the very best early wax beans. It IS very prolific 
and hardy, and bears long, thick, meaty pods, which are a bright golden yellow and 
entirely stringless. A grand garden variety. Pkt. 15c; lb. 40c, postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $3.50. 

A GRAND GARDEN BEAN 
Burpee's White Wax. A hardy white seeded wax bean. It produces long, straight, 
golden-yellow pods, which are entirely stringless at all times. The plant is very 
erect and stands well in wet weather. Its quality is superior to almost any other wax 
bean, and it bears well, producing big crops. Pkt. 15c; lb. 40c, postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $3.50. 

ONE OF THE BEST EARLY CABBAGES 
Burpee's Baseball. This is a dwarf, small beaded cabbage, with ball-shaped 
and very bard heads. It is very early and is ready for use almost as soon as Wake- 
field Of all the cabbages we have grown, we find it one of the best, and can recom- 
mend it as a very desirable early variety for all climates. Pkt. ioc; oz. 30c; % lb. 85c; 
lb. $3.00, postpaid. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



ANOTHER GOOD EARLY CABBAGE 

Early Stonehead, or The Volga. This is a large heading variety; very hardy, and 
especially recommended for a fall crop. It forms a tight, compact head, with large 
outside leaves. The stem is short, so that the heads are close to the ground. Pkt. 
ioc; oz. 30c; J4 lb. 85c; lb. $3.00, postpaid. 

A NEW CAULIFLOWER 

BURPEE'S NEW "DRY WEATHER." At last we think a cauliflower has been 
discovered that is peculiarly adapted to California, and we have persuaded the intro- 
ducers to let us have some of their best stock for our customers. 

It is a little later than Snowball, but forms just as good, firm heads. While 
cauliflower usually thrives best near the seashore, in a cool, moist climate, this variety 
does well in dry, warm climates, both in the South and in California. 

We trust that all of our market-garden friends will try this cauliflower, and report 
to us their results. Pkt. 25c; oz. $3.50, postpaid. 



A GOOD NEW CELERY 

Silver Self-Blanching. A new white self-blanching variety. It grows more uni- 
form than White Plume; is larger and more solid, brittle and sweet. It was intro- 
duced several seasons ago, and has met with unqualified endorsements from the 
largest celery growers, and is to be recommended to all who want an improved 
celery with all the good qualities of White Plume. Pkt. ioc; oz. 50c; J4 lb. $1.50, 
postpaid. 



A NEW CORN FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 

BURPEE'S GOLDEN BANTAM. A good sweet corn is very rare with us on 
the Pacific Coast, and most of us get only the half sweet or semi-field varieties from 
our gardeners. With very little attention, good corn is easily grown in one's own 
garden, and can be served fresh from the garden to the table, providing, of course, 
that the proper varieties are used. 

We have discovered during the first two seasons that Burpee's Golden Bantam 
was proving to be a corn that seemed especially adapted to the Pacific Coast. With 
us in our Trial Grounds, and with some of our friends who tried it in their private 
gardens, we found it a fine sweet corn. It is not a large eared variety, but it is early, 
and the cobs are well filled with sweet juicy kernels, which are bright golden yellow 
when cooked. The stalks grow quickly and vigorously and bear uniformly two good 
ears. Knowing the remarkable qualities of Golden Bantam, we have persuaded 
the introducers to let us have some of their private stock, and we are glad to be 
able to offer a limited supply to our customers. Pkt. 15c; y 2 lb. 20c; lb. 35c, postpaid. 

TWO LONG GREENHOUSE CUCUMBERS FROM ENGLAND 

To satisfy the demands of some of our English friends who have grown the line, 
long, delicious cucumbers under glass in England, we have secured two of the very 
best varieties and the choicest possible strains of them. 

For greenhouse culture these varieties are unsurpassed. They are frequently 
two feet long and almost entirely seedless. The skin is rich deep green, and the flesh 
is clear white and as brittle as ice. The almost seedless nature of these varieties neces- 
sitates rather high prices for the seed. 

Telegraph; the longest variety and a general favorite Pkt. 25c 

Covent Garden Favorite; a new variety and of the best quality. Pkt. 25c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 
AN ORNAMENTAL \S Ul'.l.l \S VERY USEFUL GOURD 



The Chinese Bottle. Man) -i I 

very much in- 
terested in t! h the Chinese 

laborers use for carrying their tea to the 
field. Nearly every man carries his own 
bottle of tea tied to his hack with a strip 
of bamboo, and he seems to think as much 
of his own gourd as if it were a silver 
pitcher. Some of them are ingeniously 
covered with wicker work, as the picture 
indicates, and all of them are pi 
with a wooden cork and a bowl made from 
the top of the gourd, attached with a stout 
cord to t lie neck of the hottle. Rather 
influenced hy the uses the Chines.' make 
of these gourds, all of our men have grown 
to use them, and we find it a cheap as well 
as convenient bottle for carrying water; 
and to meet the request of many of our 
friends, we have decided to offer seed of 
it to our customers this year. Pkt. ioc; 
oz ' 35 c : 54 lh. $i.oo. 




A NEW RED ONION 

Extra Dark Red Wethersfield. We have been several years developing a special 
strain of red onion especially adapted for "market" and "set" purposes, and have at last 
a selection we can recommend as superior to any other strain grown in California. 

It is a deep purplish red, not dull but bright, and is a hard, firm variety and an 
excellent keeping sort. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.25, postpaid. 



A NEW LETTUCE INTRODUCED BY US FROM FRANCE 
STRAWBERRY. This is a new lettuce from France which we tested in our Trial 
Grounds last season and at once discovered so much real merit in it that we decided 
to offer it to our friends this year through our catalog. 

It is a medium-sized, tight-heading va- 
riety, and while very dark brown in gen- 
eral appearance, the interior of the head 
is decidedly pink, and when dressed and 
prepared for the table it resembles a dish 
of crushed strawberries. It is the only 
variety we know which is so colored, and 
while very attractive indeed on this ac- 
count, its chief value is its delicious flavor 
and its buttery but crisp heart. 

There are so many varieties of lettuce 
in the market that it is seldom a really 
new one is offered, but we feel sure that 
the American public has not had so good 
a lettuce novelty as this offered for a long 
time, and we are very anxious that all our 
friends and customers should have it. We 
have only a limited supply and cannot offer 
Strawberry Lettuce '' b y tne P° un d this year. Pkt. ioc; oz. 25c. 




C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



ANOTHER GOOD EARLY CABBAGE 

Early Stonehead, or The Volga. This is a large heading variety; very hardy, and 
especially recommended for a fall crop. It forms a tight, compact head, with large 
outside leaves. The stem is short, so that the heads are close to the ground. Pkt. 
ioc; oz. 30c; Yn lb. 85c; lb. $3.00, postpaid. 

A NEW CAULIFLOWER 

BURPEE'S NEW "DRY WEATHER." At last we think a cauliflower has been 
discovered that is peculiarly adapted to California, and we have persuaded the intro- 
ducers to let us have some of their best stock for our customers. 

It is a little later than Snowball, but forms just as good, firm heads. While 
cauliflower usually thrives best near the seashore, in a cool, moist climate, this variety 
does well in dry, warm climates, both in the South and in California. 

We trust that all of our market-garden friends will try this cauliflower, and report 
to us their results. Pkt. 25c; oz. $3.50, postpaid. 

A GOOD NEW CELERY 

Silver Self-Blanching. A new white self-blanching variety. It grows more uni- 
form than White Plume; is larger and more solid, brittle and sweet. It was intro- 
duced several seasons ago, and has met with unqualified endorsements from the 
largest celery growers, and is to be recommended to all who want an improved 
celery with all the good qualities of White Plume. Pkt. ioc; oz. 50c; % lb. $1.50, 
postpaid. 

A NEW CORN FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 

BURPEE'S GOLDEN BANTAM. A good sweet corn is very rare with us on 
the Pacific Coast, and most of us get only the half sweet or semi-field varieties from 
our gardeners. With very little attention, good corn is easily grown in one's own 
garden, and can be served fresh from the garden to the table, providing, of course, 
that the proper varieties are used. 

We have discovered during the first two seasons that Burpee's Golden Bantam 
was proving to be a corn that seemed especially adapted to the Pacific Coast. With 
us in our Trial Grounds, and with some of our friends who tried it in their private 
gardens, we found it a fine sweet corn. It is not a large eared variety, but it is early, 
and the cobs are well filled with sweet juicy kernels, which are bright golden yellow 
when cooked. The stalks grow quickly and vigorously and bear uniformly two good 
ears. Knowing the remarkable qualities of Golden Bantam, we have persuaded 
the introducers to let us have some of their private stock, and we are glad to be 
able to offer a limited supply to our customers. Pkt. 15c; % lb. 20c; lb. 35c, postpaid. 

TWO LONG GREENHOUSE CUCUMBERS FROM ENGLAND 

To satisfy the demands of some of our English friends who have grown the fine, 
long, delicious cucumbers under glass in England, we have secured two of the very 
best varieties and the choicest possible strains of them. 

For greenhouse culture these varieties are unsurpassed. They are frequently 
two feet long and almost entirely seedless. The skin is rich deep green, and the flesh 
is clear white and as brittle as ice. The almost seedless nature of these varieties neces- 
sitates rather high prices for the seed. 

Telegraph; the longest variety and a general favorite. Pkt. 25c. 

Covent Garden Favorite; a new variety and of the best quality. Pkt. 25c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

AN ORNAMENTAL \S WELL \S \ KK . USEFUL GOURD 



The Chinese Bottle. Many of llic visi- 
iiich in- 
terested in the )j- -nr.N which the Chinese 
laborers use for carrying their tea to ilio 
field. Nearly every man carries his own 
bottle of tea tied to his hack with a strip 
of bamboo, and he seems to think as much 
of his own gourd as if it were a silver 
pitcher. Some of them are ingeniously 
covered with wicker work, as the picture 
indicates, and all of them are pn 
with a wooden cork and a bowl made from 
the top of the gourd, attached with a -lout 
cord to the neck of the bottle. Rather 
intltienced by the uses the Chinese make 
of these gourds, all of our men have grown 
to use them, and we find it a cheap as well 
venient bottle for carrying water; 
and to meet the request of many of our 
friends, we have decided to offer seed of 
it to our customers this year. Pkt. ioc; 
oz - 3S C : 'A lb- $100. 




A NEW RED ONION 

Extra Dark Red Wethersfield. We have been several years developing a special 
strain of red onion especially adapted for "market" and "set" purposes, and have at last 
a selection we can recommend as superior to any other strain grown in California. 

It is a deep purplish red, not dull but bright, and is a hard, firm variety and an 
excellent keeping sort. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; 54 lb. 75c; lb. $2.25, postpaid. 



A NEW LETTUCE INTRODUCED BY US FROM FRANCE 
STRAWBERRY. This is a new lettuce from France which we tested in our Trial 
Grounds last season and at once discovered so much real merit in it that we decided 
to offer it to our friends this year through our catalog. 

It is a medium-sized, tight-heading va- 
riety, and while very dark brown in gen- 
eral appearance, the interior of the head 
is decidedly pink, and when dressed and 
prepared for the table it resembles a dish 
of crushed strawberries. It is the only 
variety we know which is so colored, and 
while very attractive indeed on this ac- 
count, its chief value is its delicious flavor 
and its buttery but crisp heart. 

There are so many varieties of lettuce 
in the market that it is seldom a really 
new one is offered, but we feel sure that 
the American public has not had so good 
a lettuce novelty as this offered for a long 
time, and we are very anxious that all our 
friends and customers should have it. We 
have only a limited supply and cannot offer 
St ran berry Lettuce '' by the pound this year. Pkt. ioc; oz. 25c. 




C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



NEW LETTUCE OF OUR OWN 



Turkey Egg. This is a variety discovered by us and is a selection out of California 
Cream Butter It has excellent keeping qualities and will bear wilting and rather 
rough usage better than any other variety we know. We recommend it especially for 
planting where lettuce is difficult to grow, for it is hardy and vigorous It is 
bright green thickly spotted with dark-brown spots, and so resembles a turkey egg 
that we have been prompted to give it that name. Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c 



A FINE NEW DWARF GARDEN PEA 

BRITISH WONDER. This pea is 
destined to be popular, as its reception 
since its introduction has demonstrated. 
It possesses the remarkable quality of 
being early, and its flavor is unusually 
delicious and sweet. 

The plant grows about eighteen inch- 
es in height, and the foliage and pods 
are very dark green. It is hardy, thrifty, 
and a sure cropper. Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, 
postpaid. By express or freight, lb. 25c; 
10 lbs. $2.00. 

A GRAND NEW PROLIFIC 
TALL GARDEN PEA 
Senator. This is a new English 
variety with long well-filled pods of 
deliciously sweet, wrinkled peas. 

It is a main crop variety, similar ill 
season to McLean's Advancer. It is 
more productive than Advancer, the pods 
are longer, and the flavor very much 
superior. The vines grow about two feet 
long, and each pod frequently contains 
ten peas. 
We have an excellent strain of this new Pea, direct from the American introducer. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, postpaid. By express or freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2.00. 

A NEW EARLY TOMATO 

June Pink. A sterling novelty that was introduced last year and one that has 
proved all that was claimed for it. It is a large, smooth, carmine-pink fruit, coming 
to maturity very early — fully as early as Sparks' Earliana. It is a thrifty grower and 
hears enormously and really has all the money-making characteristics that can he 
desired in a tomato. 

The fruit is unusually smooth and free from cracks and the flavor is remarkably 
sweet and fine. Pkt. ioc; oz. $1.25; % lb. $4.00. 

THE KING OF GARDEN WATERMELONS 

Halbert Honey. This remarkable watermelon has received so much praise from 
those who have used it that we believe our friends and customers must have some - 
of the true stock as sent out by the introducer, and we have arranged for some stock 
of the very finest strain of it, and grown by the originator himself. 

It is an oblong melon, with rich dark-colored skin. The flesh is a rich deep red, 




British AVontlcr 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 




vcrj sweel and crisp There is no melon 
.■I recent introduction that has pie 
public more especial!) those who hav< 
their own garden and who can tak. 

fresh melon directly from i lie garden t" 

the table. It is a good shipping va 

riety, Pkt. ioc; oz. 20c; Y+ lb. 50c; lb. $1.60. 



A GRAND NEW BRANCHING 
ASTER 
VICK'S VIOLET KING. Of all the 
numerous varieties of asters now culti- 
vated, none is more satisfactory than the 
late Branching type, which grows taller 
than other varieties and bears its blossoms 
on long, stout stems. One of the best and 
prettiest we have seen is the new one 
called Violet King. It is a beautiful, purple 
violet, and the blossom is unusually large 
and very double. We have grown our own 
stock and have saved seed from only the 
largest and fully double flowers. Pkt. ioc. 

THE NEW GIANT RUFFLED PANSIES 
Masterpiece. These new pansies have a most beautiful combination of rich velvety 
coloring and attractive wavy or ruffled petals. This wavy effect gives a graceful appear- 
ance rarely seen in pansies, and while they are really very large, they appear larger 
on this account. 

The five large petals are beautifully veined and frequently show a deep red blotch 
at the base of each. It is really one of the best and most distinct pansy novelties 
introduced for many years. Per pkt. 15c. 

A NEW GODETIA FROM ENGLAND 
SUNSET. This beautiful flower is one of the most profuse bloomars we have. It 
is semi-dwarf, growing about one foot 
high, and is literally covered with brilliant, 
crimson, satiny, cup-shaped blossoms. It 
makes a gorgeous bedding flower, and, be- 
ing of the easiest culture, should be in 
every garden. Pkt. ioc. 



A BEAUTIFUL NEW 
ESCHSCHOLTZIA 

Erecta, "Mandarin." A grand new type, 
forming an upright growing bush. The 
blossoms are a rich mahogany brown on the 
outside of petals, and they have a light yel- 
lowish-brown on the inside — a really new 
and distinct shade and very handsome. 
Many of the visitors to our farms choose 
this variety as the prettiest of all, and we 
think ourselves that there is no finer esch- 
scholtzia for a rich bedding effect. Pkt. 15c. 




C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



BURBANK'S NEW ESCHSCHOLTZIA 

Crimson-Flowering. This eschscholtzia is a decidedly new addition to the list, and 
while we have had red and pink varieties, there have been none that were the intense 
brilliant red of this one. It is a grand flower, and a bed of them is a delight in 
any one's garden. Like all of our California Poppies, it is easily grown and blooms 
profusely. Pkt. 15c. 

A GOOD NEW EARLY SWEET PEA 

Burpee's Earliest White. This is, without question, the earliest pea yet introduced. 
Even in the field, planted for seed crop in the ordinary way, it came into bloom eight 
weeks after sowing, and was fully a week ahead of Earliest of AH, and two weeks 
earlier than Mont Blanc and Sunbeams. It is a clear white, with black seed, which 
means the seed is of better germination and hardier than the Mont Blanc, which is 
white seeded. The plant has the usual half dwarf habit, but the stems are of good 
length and the blossoms of good size and substance. 

It has had the benefit of one season's test among the florists, and has proven to 
be an ideal variety for greenhouse purposes. In our climate it will give us blossoms 
easily by February, if the seed is planted early. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c; % lb - $t-5°- 

A NEW SWEET PEA OF OUR OWN 
"FADELESS SCARLET GEM." Discovered by ourselves and introduced for 
the first time. The intense brilliancy of the Scarlet Gem could never be appreciated 
so long as that variety continued to discolor the second or third day after opening. 
In fact, this fault has rendered it almost worthless, and sweet-pea specialists have been 
obliged to discard it altogether, although admitting that it is the truest scarlet we have 
when first open. We are glad to say that we have a strain of it which comes true 
and holds its color without changing in the least, and we can claim for it an absolutely 
sun-proof character. We found it ourselves on our own farms last season, and we 
have only a little seed of it. We offer it for the benefit of our sweet-pea specialist 
friends, in sealed packets at 25c for 10 seeds. 

THE NEW ORANGE PINK SWEET PEA 
Helen Lewis. This is the bright orange pink variety of the Countess Spencer type. 
It is almost as large; has the same wavy, fluffy edge, the same large wings and wide 
standard, and bears uniformly four blossoms to the stem. The color is intensely bril- 
liant, and this variety now supersedes all of this shade, on account of its size and long 
stems. It continues in bloom a long time on account of most of the blossoms not set- 
ting seed pods. Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c; J4 lb- 75c; lb. $2.50. 

THE NEWEST COLOR IN SWEET PEAS 
Henry Eckford. In the introduction of new sweet peas a new color is almost as 
desirable as a new form or one of unusual size. Not that the introducer is content 
perhaps with its size, but he has the foundation in the color, so that by crossing and 
selection, he can ultimately get his enlarged size and improved form. Henry Eckford 
is not a large sweet pea, and it is very tender and burns badly in the sun, so that it 
needs a light cloth protection to get perfect blossoms during the blooming period. 

But it is a new shade and one long sought for by sweet-pea specialists. It is almost 
a true orange self, i. e. the color throughout the standard and wings is the same, and 
while there is a little cast of pink in the color, it is a very near approach to orange, and 
is a color we have never had in sweet peas before. It is an approach toward yellow, 
and it now seems as if a real yellow can be attained with a variety like Henry Eckford 
to work on. This is the only variety Mr. Eckford has introduced that he honored with 
his own name, and he has given us most of the fine new sweet peas during the last decade. 

There was so little seed of it last year that it retailed at sixty cents for ten seeds, and 
there was consequently so little planted that there is very little of it for sale this year. 
We can offer it only in sealed packets at 10c for 10 seeds. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



OUR LAST SE VS< >N'S SENSA NON \1. SWEET PEA NO\ I 
Helen Pierce. Although we hive originated and sold f"r introduction nearly thirty 
peas, in addition to all Cupid or Dwarf varieties, none o! them 
• n us the results c<|ii.il to "Helen Pierce." We introduced it among the sod trade 

last year, and did not have near 
enough seed to go round, but had 
II ill of our orders short We 
grew .1 large crop of it this year, 
and presumed we hail sufficient for 
all requirement s, hut it has proved 
to be so popular with all those who 
have seen it that orders have mul- 
tiplied until we are forced to de- 
cline them. It is really a very fine 
sweet pea and a decided novelty. 
The clear bright blue is dusted and 
marbled on ivory white, and the 
effect in a bunch of blossoms is 
most beautiful. The stems are 'if 
good length, the plant is hardy and 
vigorous, and the shell-like blos- 
soms are almost perfect. Sealed 
packet, ioc; oz. 25c. 



THE NEW ROSE CRIM- 
SON SWEET PEA 
John Ingman. This is the rose 
crimson variety of the Countess 
Spencer type, and while not quite 
so large, it has the wavy edge and 
long stem of the Countess Spencer, 
and also bears uniformly four blos- 
soms to the stem, all facing one 
way. This variety will now super- 
sede Lord Rosebery, American 
arieties of this shade. Pkt. ioc; oz. 25c; 




Helen Pierce 

(Two-thirds natural size) 

Queen, Lord Kenyon, and all other 
14 lb- 75C 



A NEW SCARLET SWEET PEA 

QUEEN ALEXANDRA. A grand new brilliant scarlet sweet pea introduced 
with "Henry Eckford" last season by Mr. Eckford of England, and retailed in this 
country at sixty cents for 10 seeds. It is practically the same shade as Scarlet Gem, 
but is much larger, and has the hooded or shell-shaped standard. There is no red 
sweet pea that approaches it in brilliancy, and it will undoubtedly claim first place for 
florists' use and for cut flowers generally. The size is large, and the stems of good 
length. There will be but little seed of it this year, and we can offer it only in sealed 
packets at ioc for 10 seeds. 

OUR LAST YEAR'S NEW WHITE SWEET PEA 

Shasta. Although there are a great many white varieties of sweet peas varying in 
size, form, and earliness, we offered Shasta last year, knowing it to be different from all 
other whites and superior to the popular and well-known Emily Henderson. It is 
larger, with a round, full, and slightly wavy standard, and comes four to the stem, 
which is always long and stout. It is medium early, a prolific bloomer and very 
hardy. Pkt. ioc; oz. 25c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



A PAGE OF LUTHER BURBANK'S OWN ORIGINAL NOVELTIES 
AND SPECIAL STRAINS 




Mr. Burbank needs no introduction to the 
people of America, and his work needs no ex- 
planation. Nearly every important magazine 
and periodical in the country has published 
illustrated articles on the man and his work, 
and nearly every one has read these accounts. 

This year Mr. Burbank has saved some seed 
of some of the new strains of flowers he has 
been developing, and we have been fortunate 
►me of this seed direct 



We now offer them to our friends and custo- 
mers just as they come from Mr. Burbank, and 
we submit below his names and descriptions 
without comment. The stock of seed is limited 
and we urge those who wish to order some of 
it to do so early. 

HEUCHERA CRIST ATA (Mlcrantha). A 
most surprising and perennial foliage plant. 
Leaves gracefully crimped and crested in won- 
derful manner, something like the Madame Er- 
dody Begonia, but far more beautiful. No plant 
possesses this peculiar cresting of the leaves 
to the same extent. Produced by years of se- 
lection from the ordinary plain leaved 11. ml- 
crantha. Its great panicles, 2 to 3 feet long 
of small white flowers, are nn added charm. 
Conies quite true from seed, but varies slightly 
in the amount of cresting. Per sealed packet 
of 10 seeds, 10c. 



Luther Burbank. 

MECONOPSIS CALIFORNIA, "Wind Poppy." 
A rare, graceful, slender California flower. 
Easily crown from seed. Annual, 2 feet. 
Flowers nn unusual "burnt orange" color. Seed 
from my selected strain. Per sealed packet, 50c. 

SHIRLEY POPPY, "Santa Rosa" strain. Pro- 
duced by years of rigid selection and acknowl- 
edged to be the best and most varied strain 
in existence. Unusually large flowers, remark- 
ably clear colors, including new striped, new 
salmon shades, and new bluish ones, all mixed. 
Per sealed packet, 10c. 

CEPHALIPTERUM DRUM9IONDI. Greatly 
improved "AUSTRALIAN STAR FLOWER." 
New half hardy annual, everlasting. Pale crim- 
son and white, very graceful, abundant bloom- 
er. Culture same as Petunias. Per sealed 
packet, 15c. 





PAPAVER PILOSUM. Pale yellow, wooly 
leaves. Per sealed packet, 25c, 

SCHIZANTHUS WISETONENSIS. Select 
mixed. Blooms a long season, producing 
multitudes of flowers of various pleasing 
shades. Per sealed packet, 25c. 

AGROSTIS FONTANESII. A most grace- 
ful, hardy p.erenninl Algerian grass for 
borders and bouquets. Sealed packet, 25c. 

BRIZA AUSTRALIS. Lately discovered 
in Western Australia, much larger than 
the other brizas. The black spotted shoul- 
ders make it unusually ornamental. Per 
sealed packet, 25c. 

PENTSTEMON GENTIANOIDES. Select 
newest hybrids. Per sealed packet, 10c. 

SHASTA DAISY. 1906 selection from 
named extra. Per sealed packet, 25c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

A BRIEF BUT EVENTFUL BIT OF HISTORY TOLD 
BY ILLUSTRATIONS 

815-817 Sanaome Street. 



- r r F P P~J 

• | Mll , ■ t-' li 




j wiir 


t i r I r I 


iAHSOM[ST.W»SEHOUSE 


BAM - : 


Si 





171-173 Clay Street 



TO OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS 

ALTHOUGH this is only our second annual catalog, it does not mean that the seed 
business is new to C. C. Morse & Co. We have been seed growers for thirty years in 
Santa Clara Valley, and still operate seed farms there to an extent of 2,000 acres, 
devoted entirely to garden and flower seeds, and exclusive of peas and beans, which 
are grown in other parts of the State, where conditions are perfect for them. 

It was to gratify an urgent demand from those who know us and our quality of seed 
that led us to offer our seeds at retail. In the summer of 1905 we purchased the good will, 
store, and office fixtures of the late E. J. Bowen at 815-817 Sansome Street, moved our office 
and headquarters to San Francisco, and consolidated the general seed business of the good 
old house of E. J. Bowen with that of C. C. Morse & Co. 

In the general disaster of last April we were burned out, but have returned to San Fran- 
cisco, and are located at 1 71-173 Clay Street in a very temporary structure, as the views on 
this page indicate. We are well equipped, however, to do business, for we have our brick 
warehouse at Santa Clara and our seed houses at the farms well filled. 

No one section of any country can grow all varieties of seed, and while the largest 
part of our seed is grown by us, we are obliged to buy from other quarters of the world, 
and where necessary import from Europe. O ir long experience in seed growing and the fact 
that our managers are familiar with seed growing establishments in other parts of the 
world gives us the ability to select the very best strains of all varieties. 

We also operate extensive Trial and Experiment Grounds, devoting several acres for 
these purposes alone, and an average of 1,200 to 1,500 samples are tested each season. A 
sample of everything purchased is planted and notes taken. A sample of every variety 
grown by ourselves is also tested, and the results noted to determine whether or not any- 
thing has been labeled incorrectly, or whether there has been any change or reversion in the 
strains. If any unfavorable changes are discovered, plans are inaugurated at once to cor- 
rect them. These Trial Grounds represent a great expense, but they are indispensable to 
the modern and up-to-date seedsman. 

Remember that orders sent to us can reach you quickly, for we are prepared to fill them 
promptly. 

Hoping to receive your valued orders, we remain, 

Respectfully yours, 

C. C. MORSE & CO. 



GROW YOUR OWN VEGETABLES 

Probably most of our readers have a garden, but 
more than likely it is ;i flower garden, and there must be 
many who have never known the pleasure derived from 
planting a vegetable garden. If you have never known 
tlic pure delight of growing your own vegetables and of 

taking them Eresh and >l from the garden to the kitchen, 

yon should begin this year. 

What is more appetizing than a fresh, ripe melon, lifted 
from ti:e vine in the cool of the morning? Whal more de- 
licious than red. juicy tomatoes, picked ripe and spared 
cracking and splitting oi a ride to markel in a box? 
What more wholesome than brittle, golden beans; or sweet, 
mellow peas; or crisp, tender lettuce; or sugary, melting 
corn — when gathered in the pink of condition, ripe and 
ready to eat — fresh — clean — wholesome — delicious I 

Why not have them? A dollar's worth of seed, a square 
red of good soil, a little labor, and a little water will get 
them for you. 

If you have never tried a vegetable garden, try one this 
year. WE have the SEED— YOU get the GARDEN. 

MORSE SEEDS SPROUT 
You and Nature Do the Rest 



:: This star before a variety indicates which, in our opinion, 
is the most popular, as well as the best, sorts, and we recom- 
mend all the varieties so designated. 

Much depends, however, on the location, soil, season, ami 
general conditions, and varieties vary greatly in results. 
It is necessary, therefore, that we have a large assortment 
for our customers to choose from, and we have aimed to 
make our list complete enough to include all the varieties 
that are required for any purpose and for any location. 
Those starred, however, will generally do well and give 
better results than any others. 



12 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



ARTICHOKE 



Artichokes are cultivated for the edible bud, which resembles a giant thistle. The 
plants want a very rich soil and plenty of moisture. In California the seed should be 
planted in boxes in January and the young plants transplanted in March or April. "While 
plants usually bear for five or six years, it is advisable to start new ones from seed occa- 
sionally. The suckers from the large plants are also good for transplanting. The Globe 
varieties here offered must not be confounded with the Jerusalem Artichoke in which the 
tuber is edible. 

st popular variety. Buds large, globular, deep green, with 
Pkt. 10c; oz. 35c; % lb. $1.00; lb. 93.50 



*Large Green Globe. The 

tint of purple at base. 



ASPARAGUS 



It requires three or four years from the time of planting asparagus seed to the time 
that the plant produces shoots suitable for eating, and for this reason, two-year-old roots 
are desirable, as offered below. To raise plants from seed about one pound per acre is 
used, or one ounce for about 800 plants. When set out for crop, in the field or in beds, 
they require plenty of room, since the plants spread from the root, and therefore grow 
larger each year. In the field the rows should be from six to ten feet apart. A loose, 
porous soil is necessary for good asparagus, and the flavor of the young shoots greatly 



depends upon the character of the soil. The light, 
Islands seem especially adapted for perfect Asparagus. 

In the house garden, the soil, if naturally heavy and stif 
light by spading in the proper amount of manure and sand, 
shoots must be cut as fast as they reach the surface. Later 
should be allowed to run to seed, and in the autumn all the 



good dressing 



Is of the Sacramen.to River 

must be made porous and 
During the spring all the 
i the season all the shoots 
tops should be cut off and 



nure, and wood 




H^P" 



BaiT's Mammoth. A favorite with mar- 
ket gardeners. Shoots very large, tender, 
quick growing, and thick to the top. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Columbian Mammoth White, a large, 

thick variety; very white, even above 
ground. Pkt. 5cj oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



*ConOVer's ColOSSal. A standard variety 
for all purposes, especially for canning. 
It is the popular variety used on Bouldin 
Island and other river points in California, 
where it is canned in immense quantities. 
It makes large, thick, white shoots of de- 
licious flavor, and we recommend It as the 
best variety for all purposes. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. 60c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



l:i 



ASPARAGUS Continued. 

Palmetto. This Is the most popular variety Asparagus Roots. Large two-year-old 

grown for general garden purposes, espec- . .. . ._.,... . M t 

i.n. »«. ,ki..i.. c . ■■ ,. roots of the above at »1.00 per 100 by 

lally for shipping. Shoots are light green ' w 

and tinted slightly with pink. (ratfftit or axprua, charges not prepaid. 
Pitt. Sei os. in.-; 14 lb. 20c| lb. 60e 



BEANS 



;ses, and each cla 
i listed here, and 

moisture, and ar 
than April 15th. 
and all pole vat 



i very sensitive 

In the garden 

leties should be 



Beans are naturally divided Into several distinct 
by a great number of varieties. You will find each • 
the best assortment of all varieties. 

Beans require a light friable soil, with plenty 
to frost. In California they should not be sown ear 
the soil should be made mellow and rich, and kept 
provided with poles or a trellis on which to climb. 

For farm crop plant about 25 pounds pole beans per acre, in rows 36 inches apart; plant 
bush beans about 35 pounds per acre, In rows 24 Inches apart. Heavy clay or adobe soils 
are not suitable for beans. For the home garden there should be a succession of five or 
six varieties to provide the table with early, medium, and late beans. Use one pound of 
seed for 100 feet of row. 

Express and freight charges are not prepaid. Write us for special quotations If large 
quantities ar..- wanted. 




DWARF, BUSH, OR SNAP— GREEN PODDED 



The 



st and be 



ieti-- 



Canadian Wonder, a hardy and thrifty 

variety bearing long green pods of fair 
quality. The seed is a rich mahogany red 
and very attractive. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or lb. 15c; 
5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 00c; 100 U»«. $8.50, by 
express or freight, charges to be paid by 
purchaser. 

Early Long Yellow Six Weeks, a long 

podded green variety. Plants strong and 
vigorous and leaves large; of fair quality. 
Seed long, kidney-shaped, light-yellow with 
darker marks about the eyes. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 00c; 
100 lbN. 97.50. 

Extra Early Refugee. A very early, green- 
podded variety, with medium-sized, green, 
fleshy pods; seed drab, freely spotted with 
dark purple. The vines are smaller and of 
more upright growth, and leaves a little 
larger than the Late Refugee. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 00c; 100 
lbs. «7.50. 



Extra Early Red Valentine, a popular 

variety; erect vine with dark-green leaves. 
Pods of medium length; fleshy, round, and 
saddle-backed, with only slight strings. 
Seed pink, marbled with red. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 45c; 10 lbs. 75c; 
100 lbs. $6.50. 

Early Mohawk. A hardy and early va- 
riety, with large, flat, dark-green poda with 
tapering points; seed long, kidney-shaped; 
drab, purple, and brown. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 45c; 10 lbs. 75c; 
100 lbs. $0.50. 

Refuge, Or 1,000 tO 1. A variety rather 
later than other green-podded varieties. 
"Vines large, spreading, and very hardy; 
pods long and green, becoming white, 
streaked with purple as they mature. Seed 
yellowish; heavily splashed with bluish 
black. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 80c; 
100 lbs. $7.50. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



BEAXS— DWARF, BUSH, OR SNAP, GREEX PODDED— Continued 



Dwarf Horticultural. Avery vigorous va- 
riety with large leaves. Pods are of medi- 
um length, slightly curved, and when nearly- 
ripe are striped and splashed with crimson 
on yellowish-brown; seed pale pink, splash- 
ed with bright red. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25o, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. COc; 10 lbs. $1.00; 
100 lbs. $9.00. 

English or Broad Windsor. Averyweii- 

known and popular variety with many 
farmers. Familiarly known as the Horse 
Bean. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 40c; 10 lbs. 70c; 
100 lbs. $6.00. 

'"Stringless Green Pod. a very valuable 

green-podded variety, absolutely free from 
strings. Is very early; pods are long, rather 



round, very fleshy and deeply saddle- 
backed; seed rich seal brown. 

Pkt, 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 00c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 
100 lbs. $9.00. 

Round Yellow Six Weeks, a large, vig- 
orous, productive bean, with long, straight, 
flat, light-green pods; seed light-yellow, 
with marks darker about the eyes. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 90c; 
100 lbs. $S.50. 

Wonder Of France. A hardy green-pod- 
ded variety, with black seed. Is much es- 
teemed by the Italian market-gardeners 
for a very productive string bean and a 
good shipper. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaiil; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 90c; 
100 lbs. $8.50. 



DWARF, BUSH, OR SNAP— WAX PODDED 



In this class are the dwarf beans, having 
Most of the varieties we list are stringless. 

Burpee's Brittle Wax. see page 1. 
Burpee's White Wax. see page 1. 

Davis White Wax. The most hardy and 
productive wax-podded variety. The pods 
are very long and yellow; and while not 
stringless, it is a remarkably good bean for 
shipping; seed white, and on this account 
is desirable for a shelled bean in winter. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 20c; 5 lbs. 75c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 
100 lbs. $10.00. 

*Golden Wax. One of the most popular 
garden varieties in cultivation. Pods are 
long, nearly straight, broad, and flat, and 
golden yellow, seed white, more or less 
covered "with two shades of purplish red. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaifl; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 
100 lbs. $10.75. 

Improved Rust - Proof Golden Wax. 

(Grennell's.) Rather hardier than Golden 
Wax, and the pods are broader and flatter; 
seed white, somewhat spotted with purplish 
red. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25o, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 13c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 
100 lbs. $10.75. 



creamy white, yellow, and golden-yellow pods. 

Pencil Pod Wax. This is the best black 
wax bean in cultivation. The pods are long, 
thick, and meaty, and deeply saddle-backed, 
and entirely stringless. The plant is strict- 
ly a bush, growing about fifteen inches 
high. Seed black. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 20c; 5 lbs. 90c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 
100 lbs. $15.00. 

♦Prolific Black Wax. An improvement on 
the old Black Wax or Butter Bean. Very 
vigorous and prolific; pods fairly long, gold- 
en yellow, very brittle, and stringless; seed 
black. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. G5c; 10 lbs. $1.15; 
100 lbs. $10.00. 

*Wardwell's Kidney Wax. a strong 

growing vine, fifteen inches in height. A 
little later than Golden Wax; pods long, 
broad, golden yellow, brittle, and entirely 
stringless; seed white with dark markings 
about the eye. Market gardeners find this 
bean one of the most profitable. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or by express 
or freight, lb. 20c; 5 lbs. 75c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 
100 lbs. $10.00. 



POLE BEANS- 

require a pole or 



-GREEN AND WAX-PODDED 



ery prolific, and bear longer po 



Burger's Pole, see page 1. 



Cut Short Or Corn Hill. A popular vari- 
ety for planting among corn, since the vines 
climb the corn-stalks without the use of 


Pkt, 10c; lb. 25. 
or freight, lb. 15 


poles. Pods short and green; leaves deep 


100 lbs. $7.50. 



nd a great many more of them than the 
otted freely with red- 



postpaid; or by express 
; r. lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. S5c; 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROV. ERS AND DEALERS 



I. m.i\« i.iii i:\ \\i> \\ \ \-i'"iiin !i i, 



'Early Golden Cluster Wax. \ 

ular. early, and Bl 

••Ik!" I Bat, borne in 

Inlng fr,.m thl I 

hi in condition 
fur a Link- time; s.-.-,l Bat nml dull 
white. 

Part, nit-: Hi. 80c, postpaldj nr !•> express 
or freight, Hi. SOe, r. Hi-. -."..: Ill lli». $1.50. 

Golden Carmine. A new variety of merit 

The i 8 are long (from bIx to .it; ii t Ineh- 

itrlngless, and when young are bright 
golden yellow, but aa the] 
spots and splashes <»f carmine appear. The 
beans arc valuable, either green or dry 
Bhelled. 

I'kt. 10c; Hi. 9Bc, postpaid; by express or 
(relent, li>. IBcj B Hi-. 00e; in lbs. $i.oi>; 
im ii,-. 9n.n0. 

Horticultural or Speckled Cranberry. 

An old favorite. Pods short, pale green, 
becoming splashed with brownish red. Seed 
blush pink, spotted with red. Valuable 
either green or dry shelled. 

Pkl. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. OOe; 100 
lbs. $8.50. 

'"Kentucky Wonder or Old Homestead. 

The most popular of the pole varieties, and 
should be in every garden where beans are 
planted. It grows luxuriantly and bears 
for a long period. Pods are very long, very 
Beshy, and deeply creased or saddle-backed, 
green in color, and stringless. Seed light- 
brown. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. .',0c; 10 lbs. OOe; 100 
lbs. $8.50. 



Kentucky Wonder Wax. An 

variety, and • ■"•■ "f tl 

The puds are long, very thick, meal 

ly eaddled-backed, entirely Btrlngh 

bright yellow In coloi thrifty 

and very prolific. Seed deep brown. 

i'kt. in,*; ii,. SOc, postpaid! by express or 
freight, lb. -•ii,-; .-. lb-. SSc; in lb-. 11,50. 

Lazy Wife, a grei n i , 

Ing good, long puds in clusters; Btrlnglesa 

i" .'iiii.n I] i ii, n mi , seed n n 

1 1 ick white, 

Pkt, lOcj lb. 25c, postpaid) by express or 
freight, lb. I5C| .'■ lbs. 80C I tft lbs. 1(11.1111; IDII 
lb-. $0.00. 

Scarlet Runner. The well-known and old- 
(aehtoned climber, having bright scarlet, 
pea-like Bowers, it not only holds its place 
as a flower, but the pods when young are 
of fine quality Cor cooking. Seed large, 
bright scarlet, heavily blotched with purple. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. l.'e; r> lb-. 00c; 10 lbs. $1.00. 

Southern Prolific. A very popular, green- 
podded variety, bearing its pods in clusters; 
seed light yellowish-brown. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25e, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c| .'• lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 00c; 100 
lbs. ss.r.o. 

White Creaseback. An early, green-pod- 
ded variety. Pods five to six inches in 
length, deeply creased or saddle-backed, 
and borne in clusters. Are very fleshy and 
stringless; seed white and can be used as 
a shelled bean for winter use. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 85c; 100 
lbs. $8.00. 



Indian Chief or Tall Black Wax. a White Dutch Case Knife, a climbing va- 



black-seeded wax variety with thick, gold- 
en-yellow pods. Very hardy and prolific, 
and the most popular of the pole wax beans. 
Pkt. 10c; lb, 25c. postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 50c; 10 lbs. 00c; 100 
lbs. Kts.50. 



riety with long, flat, irregular pods, which 
become creamy white as they mature; seed 
broad, fiat, and clear white. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 60c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 
lbs. $0.00. 



BEANS— LIMA VARIETIES 



deli. 



i I,,- 



ed green shelled, and can be grown for this purpose 
any climate. The dry ripened bean is also a staple article of food for winter use, but 
California these beans ripen only from San Luis Obispo County and south to Pasadena. T 
best territory for s,e.l beans we believe to be Santa Barbara and San Buenaventura countii 



*Burpee's Bush. A most excellent late 
dwarf variety. Plants are IS to 24 inches 
high and are covered with large curved flat 
p. ..Is borne well out from the plant. The 
beans are of the highest duality, of the 
largest size, and are heavily ribbed; the 
flavor is the true rich lima flavor. The 
plant will continue bearing until stopped 
by cold weather. 

i'kt. 10c; lb. 25c, ii. .-I j. :ii, I ; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. (15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 
lbs. $10.00. 



Dreer's New Wonder Bush, very simi- 
lar to Burpee's Bush, which it greatly re- 
sembles in size, shape, and habit of growth. 
The bean, however, is more even and regu- 
lar in shape and the pods are borne well 
toward the center of the plant. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. «5c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 
lbs. $11.00. 

Dreer's Bush or Kumerle. a very pro- 
lific variety, a little later than Burpee's and 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



LIMA BEANS 

having short thick pods, closely filled with 
short, almost round, seed. The plant does 
not grow upright, but spreads or trails over 
the ground about three feet in diameter. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. 91.25; 100 
lbs. 912.00. 

*Early Leviathan, is the best pole lima 

we know of, and we recommend it to every 
one. It grows on a heavy vine some 
six or seven feet In length, and ripens its 
pods fully as early as the earliest of the 
large pod climbing limas. It is a very pro- 
lific and continuous bearer, having clusters 
of large sized pods 5% to 6 inches in length, 
well away from the root. The beans are 
large and white, and will average four to 
a pod, while many contain five perfectly 
developed large-sized beans. The pods re- 
semble "King of the Garden" more than 
any other, but it combines the large size 
of the later varieties with great earliness. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 5 lbs. 90c; 10 lbs. $1.50; 100 
lbs. $12.50. 

Henderson's Bush. This variety is with- 
out doubt the earliest Lima Bean in ex- 
istence, being fully two weeks earlier than 
the tall varieties. A good crop may be 
had with this variety in places where the 
season is too short, or the moisture is in- 
sufficient to produce anything from the 
other varieties. The bean is small and flat 
and is borne in great abundance on plants 
about 16 inches high. Is planted largely for 
canners' use. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 
lbs. $11.00. 



— Continued 

Challenger, or Dreer's Pole, a splen- 
did pole variety, quite early, very pro- 
lific, and of very fine quality. The pods are 
borne in clusters, and the beans are short 
and thick, almost round, and crowded so 
closely in the pod that the ends are flat- 
tened. A very popular variety with market 
gardeners. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. $1.23; 100 
lbs. $10.00. 

King Of the Garden. One of the best and 
most popular main crop varieties. It is me- 
dium early and has very long pods 5% to 
6% inches long, which are well filled with 
4 or 5 good-sized beans. The pods are very 
straight and handsome, and the fine, hardy 
vines bear abundantly. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 
lbs. $10.00. 

Large White. A. good variety of the pole 
or running type. Is very prolific and of 
good quality, but is now being superseded 
by "Siebert's Early." 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 60c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 
lbs. $9.00. 

Siebert'S Early. A fine pole variety grow- 
ing from 5 to S feet long, and coming into 
bearing very early. The pods are from 4 to 
6 inches long, and contain 3 and 4 and 
occasionally 5 beans. The beans are large, 
flat, and white, and the vine is very pro- 
lific. This is an excellent variety both in 
earliness, good quality, and productiveness. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 5 lbs. 70c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 
lbs. $10.00. 



BEETS 



Beets are divided into three classes— Table; Mangels, or Stock-Feeding; and Sugar. 
* or table use the seed can be sown in California any time after January 1st, and a light, 

soil must be rich and 



Bastian's Blood Turnip. An extra early, 

deep-red variety. Turnip-shaped, small top, 
green leaf. Crisp, sweet, and of good quali- 
ty. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

♦Detroit Dark Red. One of the best table 
varieties, and the one we recommend for all 
garden purposes. Globe-shaped; bright, but 
rich red flesh. Tops small and green. 

Pkt. Be; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Early Eclipse. A fine, early table variety, 
top-shape or tapering globe-shape. Flesh, 
deep crimson, zoned with lighter red. Crisp 
and sweet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Y* lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Edmand's Blood Turnip. Roots globular 

and tapering, or more correctly, top-shaped. 



TABLE VARIETIES 



Flesh deep blood-red, scarcely showing the 
zones. Leaf green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Dark SthlSOn. A fine variety for summer 
market. Deep, rich red; medium size; small 
dark-brown tops. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Dewing *s Early Blood Turnip, a tur- 
nip-shaped variety, with deep red flesh. 
Tops green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

Extra Early Egyptian, a turnip-shaped 

variety with dark-red flesh showing zones 
of a lighter shade. Dark leaves; a good 
table variety and very early. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

"II I - I MM i: \ Mill I ll> „ lc ,|. 




Crosby's 
IcypTiAti 

fi£ET 



Crosby's Egyptian. More globe - shaped 
than Extra Early Egyptian, and the best 
known and most popular variety; is very 
early and of fine quality. Bright red with 
clear vermilion flesh. 

I'kl. Sc| oz. 10c; '/, lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Extra Early Blood Turnip, a good va- 
riety for summer and autumn use. Is tur- 
nip-shaped with bright red flesh showing 
zones. Pkt. 5cj oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Half Long Blood. A half - long variety 
about eight inches long and tapering 
abruptly. Very rich, deep red flesh of fine 
quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



*Long Smooth Dark Blood. A very de- 
sirable variety for light soils, where roots 
are easy to dig. Skin very dark brownlsh- 
re.l. Flesh deep blood-red. Very long and 
.slender; very brittle and crisp. 

Pkt. Set os. 10c; V4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



MANGEL WURZEL, OR STOCK- 
FEEDING 



about March 1st In rows 



I for 



For main crop, 
22 inches apart, using 
seed per acre. To get good, large, 
beets, the plants should be thinned when 
the fourth leaf to six inches apart in the r> 

If InrKe lot* of seed are wanted, write 
for special prices. 



Champion Yellow Globe, a large, round, 

orange-yellow variety. Good for shallow 
soils. 

Pkt. 5c; oi. 10c; Va lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

Giant Yellow Intermediate or Gate 

Post. A yellow-skinned variety with white 
flesh, zoned with yellow. Large and ovoid 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 10c; ' ', lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

*Golden Tankard Yellow-Fleshed, very 

large, yellow-fleshed variety. Giant oval 
shape; small yellow-stemmed top. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

*Mammoth Long Red. The largest of ail 

the mangels and the heaviest cropper. Skin 
is red; flesh white, zoned with red. This 
variety produces the largest amount of 
good feed than any other beet, and is 
recommended as superior to all others. 

Pkt. 5c; % lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

Red Globe. A large globe-shaped variety 
with red skin. Flesh white, zoned with 
pink. Pkt. 5c; \ t lb. 15c; lb. 35c. postpaid 

YellOW Leviathan. A large yellow olive- 
shaped variety, with clear white brittle 
flesh. The root grows partly out of ground, 
rendering it easy to dig. 

Pkt. 5c; ' , lb. 15c; lb. 35c. postpaid 



SUGAR BEETS 



Giant Half Sugar. 



A beet which Is su- 
>r stock-feeding pur- 
poses, as it is more nutritious, having a 
large amount of sugar. It is oval in shape 
and grows partly out of ground. Is of large 
size, and yields enormous crops. 

Pkt. 5c; V* lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

Klein Wanzleben Sugar. The most pop- 
ular variety for sugar factories. The value 
of the strain and the sugar content depends 
on Intelligent care and development on the 
part of the seed grower. It is wedge- 



shaped, wide at the top and tapering grad- 
ually to a long tall. 

Pkt. 5c; % lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

Lane 's Improved Imperial Sugar. Large, 

thick, tapering variety. Yields almost as 
much as mangels. Is sweet and rich and 
very desirable for stock. 

Pkt. 5c; \\ lb. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

Vilmorin's Improved Sugar, a little 

smaller than Klein Wanzleben, but even 
richer in sugar and a valuable va- 



18 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



SUGAR BEETS— Continued 



riety for sugar factories. Grows entirely 
under ground, and yields good crops under 
ordinary conditions. 

Pkt. 3c; >4 11>. 15c; lb. 35c, postpaid 

*Jsensch's Vietrix. see page 1. 



*White Sugar Red Top. a very hardy 

variety, producing large crops with little 
care. The root is large and very rich in 
sugar, and while not sufficiently so for 
sugar purposes, it makes a remarkably fine, 
rich food for stock. 

Pkt. 5c; Vi 1». 15c; lb. 33e, postpaid 



SWISS CftARD, OR SEA KALE, BEET. 

Used for greens by cutting the stem and leaf, which are also very ornamental. It resem- 
les an ornamental beet top, but has no edible root. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; a 4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



BROCCOLI 



Should be treated the 
oarse cauliflower, more 
ier to grow. 



Purple Cape. Good, large heads, which are *Early Large White. The best variety, 
tinged with purple. Heads white and larg-e. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c; Vi lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50 Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c; ' , lb. $1.25; lb. $4.00 



BRUSSELS SPROUTS 



The plants are very hardy and grow from two to three feet high, bearing 
of leaves at the top. The sides of the main stem are covered with three o 
small cabbage heads, which are broken off and cooked the same as cabbage- 
Plant and cultivate the same as winter cabbage or kale. 



^Improved Half Dwarf. The standard variety. G 
stem is well covered with small, firm, round sprouts 

CABBAGE 

It is difficult to give definite cultural direct! 
good cabbage at all seasons of the year in some 
ed almost any time of the year. There are three good sea 
ever — in September for early spring cabbages, in March for 
in June or July for winter cabbages. The seed sprouts quickly, 
very thick in the seed bed. It should be thinned early 
then do not head well. Transplanted to the field, they should bi 
in rows eighteen inches apart. To prevent the heads splitting 
they are ready to be harvested, the plants should be loosened 
bages require considerable moisture, but too much water causes the 



hree feet high, and the 
15c; Vi Hi. 45c; lb. $1.50 



it is possible to have 
id seed can be plant- 
wing the seed, how- 
d fall cabbages, and 
3 likely to come up 
plants become spindly, and 
put twelve inches apart, 
open in the field before 
little at the root. Cab- 
a to rot very readily. 



EARLIEST 

Burpee's Baseball, see page 1. 

*Early Jersey Wakefield, one of the best 

and most popular early varieties. Forms 
round, pointed heads of good size. Is very 
hardy and on account of its thick outside 
leaves is able to resist cold and other un- 
favorable conditions to a great extent. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; >/, lb. SOc; lb. $2.00 

Extra Early Etampes. one of the earn- 
est varieties, producing light-green pointed 
heads. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Extra Early Express. Very early, pro- 
ducing firm, round heads. A little earlier 
than "Wakefield, and a good variety for 
shipping. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 



VARIETIES 

*Early WiniligStadt. A decidedly pointed 
head of good size and fine quality— the most 
sharply pointed of all cabbages. Is one of 
the hardiest varieties, and resists cold, wet, 
and insect pests to a degree which makes it 
very desirable, and we recommend it as one 
of the best early varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. «0c; lb. $2.00 



Early Stonehead, or Volga. 



Early Spring, a 

variety. Medium 
mer use. Pkt. 5c; . 



very early flat-headed 
lized and good for sum- 
t. 25c; Vt lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 



Large Early Wakefield (Charleston), is 

very similar to Early Jersey "Wakefield, but 
nearly a third larger and a little later. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; Vi lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 



EARLY AND SECOND EARLY VARIETIES 



All Seasons. One of the best second early 
varieties. Large, round, fiattish heads. 
Dark green. Not only good summer variety, 
as it withstands heat well, but valuable as 
a fall and winter variety, hence its name. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; Vi lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 



*Allliead Early. Probably the earliest of 
the large, flat-headed varieties. Is good for 
summer, autumn, and "winter crop. Desir- 
able for all sorts of planting. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

< Mill M.I I ..nil.. I 



Early Dwarf Flat Dutch. \ cood Bat- 
variety, wmi short stem iin.i hard, 
Mmi head. Forms heads early and la vai- 
f..r summer. 

I'kl. .-..■: ..». Mc| ', Hi. (Ul,-! lh. SI.75. 

Fottler's Brunswick. One ot the moat 
popular of the Bat-headed types, especially 
with the home gardener. Best for autumn 

anil winter us.-. 

I'kl. Be) OS, I'".-: ', II.. 111!.-; Hi. H2.no 



Henderson's Early Summer, a 

medium slsed, earlj u lety. a 

I I keeper, and <io.-s well in 

an.) autumn. 

Pert. .".•: ..».. Mc| ', lb, 80c | lb. W.00 

Henderson's Succession, ts about ten 

days later than Early Summer, is a dwarf, 
Hat head, light green, and very solid. 

Pkl. r.r: os. 20e| </■ lb. 00o| 111. (3.00 



WINTER VARIETIES 



Autumn King, or Worldbeater. a tine 

winter variety of vigorous growth. Large, 
welt-formed globular heads of blulsl 

Pkt. 5c: on. 25c; ■/, lb. 75c; lb. S2..-7II 

Burpee's Surehead. one of the most pop- 
ular varieties. Large, round, slightly Bat- 
tened head; hard and firm. 

I'kl. 5c; ok. 20c; V, lb. GOc: lb. s.-.nu 



Danish Ball Head, a v 

forming globular heads; 



late 



Mammoth Rock Red. 

deep red on top. Outer leav 



y hard and 

RED CABBAGE 

Best hard-headed, red variety 



solid. Keeps well and is a go.,,] shipper, 
The color is bluish-green. 

I'kl. Bej or.. 25c; Vi lb. 75c; lb. 12.50 

--Premium Flat Dutch, a wen - known 

in-', late variety. Flattish, round heads, 
very solid and firm; has rather tall, stout 
stem. I'kt. 5c; o«. 20c; >/i lb. 00c; lb. *2.00 

Stone-Mason Marblehead. Medium-sized, 

late, flat-headed variety, forming a good, 
solid head. The leaves are bright green, 
with conspicuous veins. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 20c; V, lb. GOc; lb. $2.00 



■A-f'-r 



sh. Espe 



Illy 



Large heads, globular, and very 
sed for pickling.^ 
Pkt. 5c; or.. 20c; % lb. GOc; lb. *2.00 



Perfection Drumhead Savoy. 

who are familiar with it in t 
Heads medium sized and fairly - 



CABBAGE— SAVOY 

A variety that 



luch prized in Europe and also by those 
ry sweet and crisp, and always tender. 
Pkt. 5c; ox. 20c; '/, lb. GOc; lb. 1(12.00 



CARROTS 



Good, sandy loam is best adapted for carrots of all varie 
however, can be sown on heavier lands, witli good results, 
and short varieties at any time after January 1st. For geiu-r 
about April 1st, using- two or three pounds per acre for rov 
apart. While you get a good uniform root by thinning the you 
to do so to get a crop of good, average carrots. 



ies. The shorter varieties, 
I^or garden, sow the early 
.1 crop sow in the open field 
s sixteen to eighteen inches 
ig plants, it is not necessary 



Chantenay, or Model, a very popuia 

riety for general purposes; five to six i; 
long; very stump-rooted; about three it 
thick at shoulder; tapering slightly; b 



MgO- 



;arlet. 
Pkt. 



10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 80c 

*DanverS Half-Long. The best variety for 
general purposes and the most largely used, 
not only for stock raising, but for table use 
as well. The perfect type is about S inches 
long and about 2% inches wide at the 
shoulder, tapering to a sort of half-point 
at the bottom. Color is a bright orange- 
scarlet. It is a very heavy cropper. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 80c 

French Horn. A short variety for forcing. 

Grows about 2 inches long, and is very 

stump-rooted. Color bright orange-scarlet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 00c 



Coreless Long Red. * 

riety of uniform thickn 
rooted, with smooth 



and 



a long va- 
ery stump- 
•oth skin, and bright 
ir. Core large and not 
A good variety for table 
z. 10c; M lb. 25c; lb. 80c 



Half-Long Scarlet Stump-Rooted, a va- 
riety about as large as Danver's, but not 
so thick. It is of uniform thickness from 
shoulder to root and very stump-rooted. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; V* lb. 25c; lb. 80c 

"'Improved Short White. The most pop- 
ular of all white varieties, being a heavy 
cropper and of a desirable shape to allow 
easy digging in heavy soils. The true type 
is very thick in the middle and should not 
taper abruptly from the shoulder. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 20c; lb. 00c 



20 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



CARROTS— Continued 




French Forcing. A very popular variety 
for forcing. The root is globe shaped, with 
distinct tap root. Color bright orange- 
scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

Large White VoSgeS. A medium-sized va- 
riety with tapering and pointed root. A 
good white variety for heavy soil. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

Large White Belgian. The best known 

and one of the oldest white varieties — is a 
long-pointed root, and should only be plant- 



ed on light soils where roots are fairly 
easy to dig. The variety we offer does not 
grow above ground with a green shoulder 
as do some strains. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Lt>ng Orange. The best long variety, and 
a good, heavy cropper for light soils where 
roots can be easily dug. The strain we offer 
is a bright orange-scarlet, and fairly thick, 
and grows entirely under ground, having no 
green shoulder. Has the brightest color of 
all the red carrots. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 80c 

*0xheart, or Guerande. one of the most 

popular and best croppers among the short 
carrots. The shape is particularly desir- 
able for heavy soils. The true type is 
about A.y 2 inches long and 3*6 inches thick 
at the shoulder. It tapers slightly to the 
bottom, and is very stump-rooted. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M, lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

Red Saint Valery, or New Intermediate. 

A little longer than Danver's, tapering 
abruptly, with pointed root. A very desir- 
able, long variety, and rather preferable 
to Long Orange, being thicker at the shoul- 
der and not so long. Color bright orange- 
scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. SOc 

Scarlet Horn, or Early Short Horn, a 

good, short variety for table use. The full 
grown type is about 3 inches long and 2% 
inches thick at the shoulder; tapers only 
slightly and is very stump-rooted. It is 
very early and forms an edible root a short 
time after planting. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 90c 



CAULIFLOWER 



The culture of cauliflower is much the same as that of cabbage. It does not make a 
good summer crop, however, as it will not head up well in hot weather. It is especially 
popular as a fall and winter crop, and with market gardeners proves a profitable crop, 
owing to the scarcity of good market vegetables when cauliflower is at its best. It is easy 
to grow in the garden, providing the soil is made rich and porous. Plant the seed in 
beds in June for fall crop, and transplant to the garden or field in August. For spring crop, 
plant the seed in protected beds early in January, and the plants will be ready to trans- 
plant probably early in March. The young plants should be thinned, since they become 
very spindly if allowed to grow too thick. 



Algiers. One of the best late varieties, 
forming good, large white heads, late in 
the fall. 

Pkt. 10c; % oz. 25c; oz. 75c; *4 lb. $2.00 

Burpee's Dry Weather, see page 2. 

Early Favorite. An early, hard-heading 
variety. It is quite hardy and a good 
market variety. 

Pkt. 5c; V4, oz. 35c; oz. $1.00; % lb. $2.50 

*Early Snowball. The best and most pop- 
ular early variety grown. There is a vast 
difference in the strains of this variety 
offered, but what we offer is the best im- 
ported stock. 

Pkt. 25c; Va oz. $1,00; oz. $3.00; y* lb. $9.00 



Extra Early Dwarf Erfurt. An early va- 
riety, forming good, solid white heads. Is 
very early and almost as good as the best 
quality of Snowball. 

Pkt. 20c; % oz. 75c; oz. $2.50; Vi lb. $8.00 

Extra Early Paris. A hardy variety quite 
easy to grow, and forming good heads. 

Pkt. 10c; Vi oz. 25c; oz. 75c; % lb. $2.50 

Veitch's Autumn Giant, a large, late 

variety, very hardy, but especially desirable 
for the South. The heads are well protected 
by the foliage, enabling it to resist unfa- 
vorable climatic conditions to a greater 
degree than other varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; V, oz. 15c; oz. 50c; Va lb. $1.50 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



21 



CELERY 



Celery Is essentially a market crop, and is not usually recommended for the home 
garden on account of the more than usual trouble required to gn>w it U a vefl 
Tho real trouble and care, however, la likely to be exaggerated, ami the value of having 
delicious, fresh celery on one's table compensates In a large measure for all the care 
required In growing It. 

Celery requires water, and lots of It. from the time tho seed Is sown In boxes In 
March, until It Is pulled In the autumn or winter. The seed Is slow to germinate, and 
the soil where It is planted needs to be kept very wet. As soon as the young plants are 
about one and one-half Inches high they should be transplanted to get good, sturdy plants 
before they are finally set in the garden or field. When the plants begin to grow vigor- 
ously, the soil needs to be drawn up around the plants, first tying them at the top or 
wrapping with a piece of sacking to prevent the earth getting between the stems. As 
fast as the plants grow above the soil, the earth wants to be hilled around thorn again 
to get a full growth of well-blanched stems. The great celery-growing centers are located 
In swampy, peat districts. Use one ounce of seed to 15.000 plants, or two ounces per acre. 



Boston Market. As the name Indicates. 
this Is a popular variety around Boston A 
thick, medium-tall variety, which blanches 
very white and crisp. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; Vi lb. 60c; lb. s_-.nn 

Crawford's Half -Dwarf. An old favorite 

for winter use. Medium tall, very hardy, 



Pkt. 5c; 



20c; % lb. 00c; lb. $2.00 



Dwarf Golden Heart. The most popular 

of the old green winter varieties. Rather 
tall, forming a large bunch, and blanch- 
ing white and crisp. Is hardy and a 
good shipper. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Evan's Triumph. A good, green, winter 
variety, very popular in the North. Forms 
a large bunch, blanches well, and is very 
hardy. Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Giant Pascal. The most popular of the 
newer green winter varieties. Rather tall 
with stems nearly round, and when 
blanched is white, brittle, and especially 
good flavor.- 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20et V. lb. GOc; lb. $2.00 

Giant Golden Heart. Probably the larg- 
est of all celeries; very tall, and forms a 
large bunch. Blanches crisp and white. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; vi lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Giant White Solid. A very tall variety, 
but does not form a very thick bunch; very 
hardy and easy to grow. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; Y* lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

KalamaZOO. A medium short dark-green 
variety; very hardy; blanches easily, and 
ships well. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; \\ lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

♦Golden Self-Blanching or Paris Golden. 

The most popular market variety in use, 
especially for early crop. The plant is 
naturally golden-yellow (both stem and 
leaves), but needs to be blanched to make 
it brittle and fit for table use. Forms a 
rather small bunch. The seed of this va- 
riety has at times produced a percentage 
of pithy plants. We are prepared to offer 
a carefully selected stock of our own 



growing, which will give as good results 
as the best Imported seed. We are also 
prepared to offer genuine imported seed of 
the very best quality for those who de- 
sire it. 

Imported— Pkt. 10c; ok. 50c; *4 lb. $1.25; 
lb. s 1.50. 

Domestic — Pkt. 10c; ok. 35c; Vi lb. *..00; 
lb. $3.00. 

*Michell's Far Superior, a rather new 

winter variety, quite tall and very hardy. 
Leaves are rather light green, and the 
stems blanch to a clear, pearly whiteness. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; Y 4 lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

New Rose. The best of the red celeries. 
The flavor is rather strong in red varieties, 
but we think is unappreciated by those 
who like winter varieties. It Is tall, forms 
a large bunch, and blanches to a light- 
rose pink. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; Vi lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Perfection Heartwell. A good, green win- 
ter variety, rather tall, forming a large 
bunch. Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; *A lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Pink Pllime. An attractive rose-colored 
variety with white leaves and pink stems. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 35c; Vi lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

SnOW White. A large, hardy strain of 

White Plume. The stems are thick and 

brittle, and it has a delicious celery flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; Vi lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 



Silver Self-Blanching. 
*White Plume, one of 

of the varieties now In 
for a very early crop, 
easy variety to grow, aj 
and being naturally white 



See page 2. 

the most popular 
use. Used mostly 
A comparatively 
it is fairly hardy, 
easy to blanch. 
The leaves are also white, tinted with 
green at tips. Forms a medium-sized 
bunch and is fairly tall. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 25c; V% lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

*Winter Queen. One of the best winter 
varieties, and we recommend it especially 
to market gardeners. Is tall and forms a 
large bunch. The leaves are light green. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 20c; \\ lb. 60c j lb. $2.00 

Celery Seed for Flavoring. <soup cel- 
ery.) Ok. 10c; % lb. 15c; lb. 25c 



22 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

CELERIAC 

This plant resembles celery in flavor, but the stems are very strong", and only the root 
is palatable. It should be treated much as celery, so far as planting the seed is concerned. 
The plant requires only a little hilling-, however, to get a well-formed, good-sized root. 

Giant Smooth Prague. The best variety. Forms a good, thick root as much as four 
inches in diameter and nearly globular. Pkt. 5e; oz. 20c; j /4 lb. 50c; lb. $1.75 

CHERVIL 



Can be planted any time in the early spri 
allowed to run to seed, will keep green tor 
some than parsley, and makes an excellent pla 

Curled. Very finely curled, somewhi 



z. 10c; V, lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



CHICORY 

i th( 
.ble. 

'he i 

Large Rooted, or Coffee. The largest 



Used as substitute for coffee when the roots are dried and ground. The 
used for cooking and are very palatable. Sow early in the spring, thin the 
to six inches, and keep well hoed. The plant spreads from the root and is p, 



10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



COLLARDS 

A plant bearing a large mass of leaves on the top of a stout stalk. It is a species 
of cabbage, and the flavor is the same. It bears leaves all through the winter, and is 
used especially in the South for cabbage greens. Young plants may be started in boxes in 
early spring, and the young plants transplanted, allowing plenty of room for each plant. 

North Carolina Short Stem. A dwarf or short-stemmed variety. Forms medium large, 

loose heads of light-green leaves. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

*Tme Georgia. The well-known very large variety. Grows from four to five feet high, 
and forms a very large, loose head. Leaves are tinged with purple. 

Flit. 5c; oz. 10c; Vt lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

CORN SALAD, OR FETTICUS 

A salad plant used a; 
for greens. It does well 
are exceedingly tender. 

Large Leaved. Very tender leaves, which grow out rapidly after being cut. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 00c 

CORN 

SWEET OR TABLE VARIETIES 

As corn is very sensitive to frost, it cannot be planted with any degree of safety until 
about the middle of April, except in sections that are notably free from late frost. Moist, 
rich soil is best for corn, and frequent hoeing or cultivating improves it. The small but 
rich mountain valleys seem especially favorable for good table corn. 

In cutting corn for the table it is important that it be picked at Just the right time, 
especially when not too old. Frequent small plantings of the several varieties in succes- 
sion will keep a good supply available for the table all summer. 

Express or freight charges are not prepaid. If large quantities are wanted, "write us for 
special quotations. 

Black Mexican. One of the best medium Crosby's Early. A fine, early variety, 
early varieties. Although when ripe the growing about 4 feet in height. Is twelve- 
seed is dark bluish or black, when ready rowed, and very popular. 

for table use it is white. It is of especially Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 

fine sweet flavor and very tender. It seems freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. SOc; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

to do well in most parts of California. _ , -.,—,;_ 

Early Red Cob Cory, one of the best 

extra early varieties. Ears are about six 
inches long, and eight-rowed. 



Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c. postpaid; by express i 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c; 100 lbs. $7.00. 



ti i n u t» i Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express < 

Burpee s Golden Bantam, see page 2. freight, ib. 10c; 10 lbs. soc; 100 ibs. $7.00. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

( OHM 1 "iillnurd 




^Country Gentleman, one of the best of 

the late varieties. Has a long, white cob, 
closely filled with long "shoe peg" kernels. 
Is remarkably line flavored and sweet, and 
is frequently used by canners. 

Pkt 10c; lb. 25c. postpaid; by express or 
freight, |b, isc; id n,». (LBS; 100 lbs. $10.00. 

Early Minnesota. The hest early variety 
for market and private gardens. Between 
Crosby's and Cory's in earliness. Stalks 
about five feet high; ears long, and eight- 
rowed. 

Pkt. lOe; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 75c; Kill lbs. $0.00. 

HickoX Improved. A very popular variety 
for canning. A little earlier than Stowell's 
Bvergreen. Bare are long and well filled. 
Stalks are about 6 V4 feet high. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c f postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; io lbs. 80c; 100 lbs. $7.00. 



ked. Bars are si\ t<, 
■even Inches long, . >i 

Pkt. 10e| lb. -n... postpaldi by express or 

freight, lb. Illc; 10 lbs, 8001 100 lbs. »7.00. 

'•Early Mammoth, or Alameda. The best 
variety for California and the one moi t gen 
.■rally used here. Forms very large ears, 
which are quite sweet and of fair quality. 
It withstands our dry Bummers well, and is 
usually quite free from worms, and the 



mi 



ell. 



Pkt. loc: Hi. 20c, postpaid; by express or 

freight, lb. 10c: 10 Mis. NOc: 100 lbs. $7.00. 

Holmes' Premo. One of the besl extreme 
early varieties we hai e. Foi me small, well- 
tillcd ears, and is of delicious flavor. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 2.1c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. l.'ic: 10 Ilia. $1.25. 



Late Mammoth. 


A ma 


•nmoth vi 


riety. with 


very 1 


>ng. 


thick 


ears, 


whlc 


h a 


re covered 


with \ 


'IT 


wide, 


thick 


ken 


els. 


Has the 


largest 




3 of ar 


y var 


ety. 


Is \ 


cry late. 


Pkt. 


10c; 


III. 20 


'. post 


paid; 


by 


express or 



freight, lh. III.- 



lli». 80c; too lbs. $7.00. 



Moore's Early Concord, a medium early 

variety. Ears are rather short and well 
filled with It to 16 rows of kernels. A 
good variety for private garden or for can- 
ning. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 Ills. 80c; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

Old Colony. A good, late variety of rich, 
sweet flavor. Ears bear 16 to 20 rows of 
kernels, and are very heavy and solid. 

Pkt. 10c; lh. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. SOc; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

Perry's Hybrid. A good second early va- 
riety. Usually produces two good-sized 
ears, set low on the stalk. Of fine quality. 
sweet, and tender. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. SOc; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

*Stowell's Evergreen. The most popular 

and best main crop variety. Of good, strong 
growth, about 6 feet high. Ears keep in 
condition for boiling for a. remarkably long 
time. The quality is excellent. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. lOe; 10 lbs. 75c; 100 lbs. $0.00. 



White Evergreen. Like stov 



ell'.- 



green. 


t is 


a good ma 


n crop 


variety, but 


has the 




arkable quality of 


being snow- 


white. 


It is 


invaluable 


for car 


ners, market 


gardenr 




nd all who 


desire 


a good ever- 



Early White Cob Cory. An 

variety with remarkably v* 



■xlr 



rly 



Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, III. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 lbs. $10.00. 



24 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



CORN — Continued 



wM 






IMm r LA rrrrtrj m ^ 


m< 111.1 {SUM 




'''.'- 
-,.."**•*' 


90G^ f '©( ; #'i®c 


^H^h-Vj J 
















Field Corn — "Learning" 

FIELD VARIETIES 



Extra Early Adams. The earliest of an 

corn and the first to make ears. Plant 
dwarf and stocky and grains of fair quality. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight. lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

Early Eight-Rowed Canada, also known 

as the Yellow Flint. A rapid growing, early 
variety, and for this reason largely used 
for replanting. Very valuable where the 
seasons are short. 

Lb. 20c. postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 50c; 100 lbs. $4.00. 



golden yellow. It is the 
corn on the market. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express c 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 50c; 100 lbs. $4.00. 



ery best yellow 
freight, 



White Cap Yellow Dent. An early and 

hardy variety, growing 6 to 7 feet in height. 
Bars are 8 to 10 inches in length. Cob 
small and 16 to 18 rowed. The outer end 
of the grain is white, while the inner por- 
tion is clear yellow. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 50c; 100 lbs. $4.00. 



Early AdamS. Although not a sweet corn, 
can often be used as such on account of its 
fine, white kernels, which are quite sweit 
and tender. Is very hardy and can be 
planted earlier than the early varieties of 
sweet corn. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 65c; 100 lbs. $6.00. 

Early Golden Dent, or Pride of the 

North. A very early dent variety, and 
especially valuable on account of its ex- 
treme earliness. Ears 8 to 10 inches long, 
with 10 to 16 rows of slender, deep yellow 
grains. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight. 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 50c; 100 lbs. $4.00. 

King Phillip. An old New England fa- 
vorite. The ears are long, and the variety 
is very early. Grains, coppery red. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 50c; 100 lbs. $4.00. 

^Learning. A very popular, tall-growing va- 
riety. Is early; stalks are leafy, making 
excellent fodder. Kernels are long and deep 



*Sanford White Flint. An early, tall va- 
riety, bearing large ears which are well 
filled with long, pure white kernels. The 
very best white corn on the market. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. $5.00. 

Wisconsin White Dent, a tan - growing 

variety; large eared; 16 to 18 rowed; grains 
large and white. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 50c; 100 lbs. $4.00. 

Sweet Corn for Fodder, as this com is 

always wanted in large quantities, write us 
for special quotations. 

Pop Corn, White Rice. The most popu- 
lar variety; very prolific; ears short; ker- 
nels long, resembling rice in shape; color 
white. 

Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 75c; 100 lbs. $6.00. 



Kaffir Corn 



Egyptian Corn. J 



See Field Seeds. 



C. C. MORSE 4 CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



>:. 



CUCUMBER 



Is sensitive to frost, and cannot be planted until the last of April. It requires a great 
er. andjjnless planted on very wet soil, will require frequent Irrigation through- 
two or throe plants to each 



Plant In hilts four feet each way. and leav 
hould be made very rich with well-rotted stable 
are very easy to grow, and a few hills will produce 



Cucumbers 
average family. 

♦Arlington White Spine. A rich, dark- 
green variety, turning white when ripened. 
The fruit Is about 7 Inches long when In 
marketable condition and very straight and 
even In shape. Is early, and good for forc- 
ing and out-of-door culture. 

Pkt .-.ci os. 10c| Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Chicago Pickling. A medium long deep- 
green variety, turning yellow at maturity. 
The fruit Is finely shaped, being slightly 
blunt at both ends. It is the popular pickle 
variety in use about Chicago. 

Pkt. Sc; os. 10c; y t lb. SOc; lb. $1.00 

Cool and Crisp. A fine garden variety. 

deep green and crisp, and Is of the White 
Spine type, and pure white when ripe. 

Pkt. Sc; ox. 10c; » i lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Cumberland Pickling. This variety is the 

result of a cross between Paris Pickling 
and "White Spine, and retains the character- 
istics of the former in being thickly cov- 
ered with small white spines. The vine is 
hardy and very prolific. The mature fruits 
are from 9 to 10 inches In length. 

Pkt. Be; oz. 10c; Vt lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



Early Cluster, a v< 

bearing its fruit in c 
The fruit is short a 
trifle paler at the bl 



ry productive variety, 
usters of two or three, 
id very dark green; a 
issom end. 



Pkt. Sc; oz. 10c; >„i lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Early Short Green, or Early Frame. 

A very desirable variety for either pickling 
or table use. Fruit straight; small at each 
end; bright green. 

Pkt. Sc; ox. 10c; Vt lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Early Russian. A very early and hardy 
variety; fruit short, thick, and oval. 

Pkt. Sc; oz. 10c; '/i lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

Everbearing. Very early and very prolific. 
Fruits 4 to 6 inches long; quite thick and 
blunt at the end and of a rich, dark-green 
color. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; >,.', lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



Extra Early Green Prolific, or Boston 

Pickling. A very prolific variety, used 
principally for pickles. Fruit medium sized, 
bright green, very even and symmetrical. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V4 lb. 30c; lb. (1.00 

Extra Long White Spine, or Evergreen 

White Spine. A popular variety having 
long, rich dark-green fruits with very ten- 
der, white, and crisp flesh. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



Fordhook Famous 



Fully as long as 
good quality. 

Pkt. Sc; 



A long White Spin. 
; from 10 to 12 inches. 
Long Green and of equally 

oz. 10c; ' , lb. 40c; lb. $1.40 



Gherkin, or West India Gherkin. \n 

extremely small fruited variety, grown ex- 
clusively for pickles. It has no value for 
slicing; is very prickly, but tender and 
crisp if picked when young. Seed ger- 
minates slowly. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V* lb. 25c; lb. 00c 

Japanese Climbing, a good variety for 

training to a trellis. Forms long fruit of 
rich, dark-green color. The flesh is white, 
crisp, and of good flavor. 

Pkt. Sc; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Jersey Pickling. A Black Spine variety, 
not so long as Long Green, but of equally 
good quality and much more prolific. 

Pkt. Sc; oz. 10c; >,4 lb. 25c; lb. 00c 

*Long Green. The best known and the 
most popular variety for general use. Is 
vigorous and productive, and forms fruit lit 
for use almost as early as the shorter va- 
rieties. The mature fruit is almost 12 inches 
long. The skin is of a deep green, and the 
flesh is solid, crisp, and of fine quality. We 
have the very best strains of this variety, 
and recommend it as much the best cucum- 
ber of all, and the variety every one should 
plant. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



CRESS 



There are two species of cress, as noted below. The first named should be sown in 
drills about sixteen Inches apart, in rich ground, early in the spring. Several sowings 
should be made at intervals to secure a succession. "Watercress should be sowed along the 
banks of running water where there is good soil, and after the seed is up it needs no further 
cultivation, since the plants spread over the water and make a mass of fine, edible leaves. 



Fine Curled. (Pepper Grt.sn.) Leaves fine- 
ly cut or curled like parsley. The leaves 
are pungent, and are used to mix with 
lettuce. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; Va lb. 20c* lb. SOc 



True Water. Forms a plant, the leaves of 
which are used for salad or for garnishing. 
Thrives only when the roots and stems are 
submerged In water. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 35c; % lb. 9 1.00; lb. 93.50 



26 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



DANDELION 



An easily grown pi: 
and spinach. Sow the seed 
when the leaves will tr 
row. 



7 much esteemed for greens, which are cooked like mustard 
May or June on good, rich soil, and thoroughly cultivate, 
ady to cut the following spring. An ounce w 



200 feet of 



IrrmrOVed Larffe Leaved. The largest leaved and best cutting variety. 

r D Plct. lOc; oi. 50c: * 



30c; Vt lb. $1-50; lb. $5.00 



ENDIVE 



A salad vegetable which is becomi 


ig very valuable for winter use. The seed sh 


be sown in June or July in rows, and 


thinned to about six inches apart. When quite 


grown, the outer leaves should be tied 
is hardly palatable until after frost, bei 


thus blanching the inner leaves and the heart. 


ng rather bitter if used in summer. 



*Broad-Leaved Batavian, or Escarolle. 

A variety having wide, thick leaves, 
straight at the edges and curved toward the 
center. Color, dull green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. *1.25 

*Green Curled. A very curly variety, the 
mid rib being wide and whitish and the 
outer edges very much indented and curled. 
A very attractive plant, and one of the very 
best varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 



Moss Curled. 

green variety. 
Pkt. 5 



A very finely curled, dark- 



ly lb. 40c; lb. $1.2 



It 



Giant Fringed, or Oyster, a large, curi- 

ed-leaf variety; one of the best market 
garden sorts. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Staghom. A curly type, the lobes and di- 
visions of the leaves being wider than in 
the curled varieties. Is a popular garden 
sort in San Francisco. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

White Curled. A light yellowish-green 
variety; very curly and quite ornamental. 
A good variety for general use. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.50 



EGG-PLANT 



The seed germinates slowly, and should be started under glass 
temperature, about March 1st. "When about an inch high transpU 
den or field, but not until all danger of frost is over. Egg-plai 
ool nights prevail, as in places where the nights are warn 
insure quick and uninterrupted growth. 



mate to 

Black Beauty. A very early 
purple black in color and a 
market variety. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 45o; *4 lb. $1.25; lb. $4.50 

Early Long Purple. An early variety and 
also a very profitable one. The fruit is long 
and of a rich dark purple. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. GOc; lb. $2.00 

*New York Improved Large Purple. 

The principal market variety; plants are 



large and spread: 
deep rich purple. 
Pkt. 10c; oz. 

Black Pekin. An 

and valuable for 



White Pearl. 

with large, egg- 
Pkt. 10c: 



. with moderately high 
nt carefully to the gar- 
it does not do so well 
l. It needs a warm cli- 
ng; fruit large and of 
30c; H lb. $1.00; lb. $3.00 

early, prolific variety, 
market gardeners' use. 
ound; skin smooth and 
I. 30c; '4 lb. 50c; lb. $2.5I> 

smooth - leaved variety 

., pure white fruit. 
30c; Vi lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50 



GOURDS 



after danger from fr 



dl well packed, and the plants thi: 



pe of the fruit will depe 
or trained to grow on 
i seed should be plant 
apart. 



Chinese Bottle, see page 3. 

Dipper. A useful variety, bearing fruit 
that can be used for household purposes. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; *4 lb. GOc; lb. $2.00 



Dish Cloth (Lnffa). 

The fruit contains a > 
sponge-like and can 
tent like sponges. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 2 



peculiar variety, 
ious lining which is 
: used to some ex- 

V* lb. 85c; lb. $3.00 



Japanese Nest Egg. A small-fruited va- 
riety bearing a white fruit which resembles 
a hen's egg. 

Pkt. 5e; oz. 20c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

Sugar TrOUgh. A useful variety, bearing 
a large, pear-shaped fruit, the top of which 
can be sawed off and the bottom used for a 
bowl or dish. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 80c; lb. $3.00 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWFRS AND DEALERS 



KALE OR BORECOLE 



and Cl 

MIL I tl 



plant 



Forming 



m, ■ome varieties being verj 

ti ,i in September, 
It la hardy and will withstand 



-Dwarf Curled Scotch. The mo« 

lar sort c>r general nae. tu.- leaves are 
tender. Color bright 

Pkl. .".<■: >,/. Iilc: ', Mi. met H». "•"'■ 

Green Curled Scotch, Tall, a i 

varlet] out l", teet high. Is 

v.-r> curly anil makes a beautiful plant 
sum. is the winter well. 

rk«. Be] o». 10c: V. lb. 25c: Il». 75c 



Dwarf Purple German, simiiarto 

Ourli d > ptlng the lea 

rkt. .-..■; os. ioci ', Hi. soci u>. »i.ni> 

Jersey Kale. See Farm Sit, Is. 

Siberian. A platn-leaved variety, having 

very little curl to the large, gi n leaves, 

although the edges are cut and curled 

slightly Pkt. .",!•: ra. 10c; Vi ll>. 25c| lb. 75c 



KOHL RABI 



A plant forming a Arm bulb above th< gl 

the edible part, and when cooked tastes vet 

the young bulbs will be ready to us-* in sjn 

les for fall use. Th,- s.-e.i should be 

plants thinned to four or six inches. It doe 

*Early White Vienna. The most desirable 

variety for general use. Is very early and 

has small tops. Color, light silvery green. 

Pkt. Be; o». 20c; Vi lb. 50c; lb. $1.7." 



mnd and bearing short lea 

■ much like turnip. If the s 
HB. and a planting in July 
planted In the open garde 



The bull. 



(ispla 



ell, mil, 



Early Purple Vienna. An early variety 

with a bright purple bulb. The leaf and 

stems being green and tinged with purple. 

Pkt. 3c; or. 2»c; Vi lb. 50c; lb. $1.75 



LEEK 



A species of onion which does not for) 
root. stem, or neck. It can be planted in 

When well grown, hill up with ea 
planted in June for good plants in the fall 
merit, ami is not half appreciate!] by the 
favorite by many of our foreign residents. 



i a bulb, but is used for its mild and delicious 
•ows. and the young plants thinned to about four 
•th to set a long, white stem. Seed should be 
nd winter. Leek is a vegetable of unusual 
.merican people, while it is regarded as a great 




American Flag, a 

growing variety, fo 
good flavor. 



A large Held of Leek** — Seed halls ready 
good, str< 



Large Rouen, om 

oldest varieties, fo; 



10c; Vi lb. SOc; lb. $1.00 

i of the best known and 
ming good stems. 
10c; Vi III. SOc; lb. $1.09 



Carentan. The largest variety, though the 
stems are not so long as some other varie- 
ties. Leaves very broad. 

Pkt. 5c; on. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

*MuSSelburgh. The best variety, having 
good, thick stems, which are also long. 
Very vigorous and of sweet, mild flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; o». 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



28 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



LETTUCE 



Lettuce is represented by four distinct classes or types — by the thick-leaved, smooth- 
edged cabbage-heading type; the curly and thin-leaved, tight-heading, crisp type; the curly 
and thin-leaved bunching or non-heading type; and the Cos or celery type. There are early, 
medium early, and late varieties of each type, as well as those especially adapted for green- 
house, hotbed, winter, spring, summer, and autumn uses. There is so great a difference 
in localities in regard to the value of lettuce, that a uniform rule for culture cannot be 
adopted. For the ordinary house garden, it is desirable to use one variety of each type, 
and several plantings should be made to secure a succession. The seed should be planted 
in rows eighteen inches apart, as early as possible, and the young plants of cabbage 
varieties should be thinned to four inches apart. Varieties that do not head may be left 
quite thick, and when fairly well grown, those thinned out may be used. 




Three average heads of "Hanson" 



Big Boston. A popular market variety, 
used largely in the South to grow winter 
lettuce for northern markets. A light- 
green cabbage variety, slightly tinged with 
brown in the head. Has a particularly fine 
golden buttery head. 

Pkt. Sc; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Black Seeded Simpson, a bunching va- 
riety, forming no definite head. It has a 
large mass of fine, brittle leaves of a light- 
green attractive color. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

California Cream Butter, a very popu- 
lar variety for autumn and winter use. 
Forms a very large head, which la very 
buttery, and of a rich golden-yellow inside. 
The leaves are thick and of bright green, 
slightly tinged with brown on top of head, 
and the outer leaves are slightly spotted 
with inconspicuous brown spots. Easy to 
grow and a good shipping variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Black Seeded Tennisball. An old weii- 

known variety. Very desirable for hot-bed 
culture in winter and for withstanding heat 
in summer. A light-green cabbage sort, 
forming hard heads. 

Pkt. Be; oz. 15c; *4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Deacon. A large cabbage variety having 
thick, bright green leaves; forms a large, 
buttery head; very bright golden-yellow in- 
side. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 



Boston Market. The well-known and pop- 
ular hothouse variety of New England. 
Needs to be quickly grown to be of good 
flavor. Light-green cabbage variety, slightly 
tinged with brown on the head. Forms a 
compact buttery head. 



Pkt. 5c; i 



15c; J 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 



Denver Market. A handsome variety, form- 
ing tight, conical heads. The leaves are 
very deeply savoyed, and even the outside 
leaves are tender and crisp. Color is light 
green. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c; lb. $1.50 

Drumhead Or Malta. Sometimes called 

"Chinese" lettuce. A very large, tight- 
heading variety. Leaves are rather coarse, 
but very brittle and tender. Is dark green 
and slightly curled. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Early Curled Simpson, a loose-bunching 

sort, forming no definite head. Is crisp and 
tender; light green in color. Is very hardy 
and easy to grow. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Express COS. The earliest Cos variety. 
Forms a well-folded, solid head. In color 
it is darker than White Paris. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c; lb. $1.50 

Mammoth Black Seeded Butter. Avery 

large, green cabbage-heading variety sim- 
ilar to Salamander, but a third larger. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c; lb. $1.50 



30 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



LETTUCE— Continued. 



Grand Rapids. The well-known forcing 
variety for the middle "West, where butter- 
headed or cabbage varieties do not grow 
■well under glass. Is a loose-bunching va- 
riety, forming no definite head. Is extreme- 
ly curly, and its light yellowish-green color 
makes it very attractive. 

Pkt. 5e; oz. 15c; M. lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

HothOUSe. A rather new and very popular 
variety for growing under glass in some 
sections. Is bright green, slightly tinged 
with brown. Forms a solid, buttery head 
of good size. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

: '\HailS0Il. A fine, large-heading variety. 
Leaves curled on the edges; light yellow- 
ish-green in color. The head is crisp, and 
brittle, and flavor excellent. Is the very 
best house garden variety in existence, and 
much the finest variety of its class. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; *A lb. 45c; lb. $1.50 

Hubbard's Market. A large cabbage va- 
riety, forming a solid head, buttery, and 
yellow inside and of very fine flavor. Color 
light green. Is a favorite in some markets. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vj lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Iceberg. A large-heading variety; crisp and 
brittle, and color bright " green, lightly 
tinged with brown on top of the head; 
leaves curled on the edges. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

May King. A very early new variety, 
forming fine hard heads within a few weeks 
after planting. It is medium sized, light 
green, with buttery but crisp heads. There 
is just a faint tint of brown on the head. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; '/, lb. 40c; lb. $1.50 

New York, or Wonderful, a large, crisp, 

tight-heading variety. Dark green, curly 
leaves; head large and of fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 15c; y 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

"Prize Head. One of the very best loose- 
bunching or non-heading varieties. Leaves 
brown, very curly, and of remarkable fine 
flavor. Grows quickly and all except the 
outer row of leaves are very brittle. It is 
probably the most easily grown lettuce in 
cultivation. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vt lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 



*PaSSion. The most popular variety among 
California and New Orleans market gar- 
deners. A medium-size cabbage, butter- 
heading sort. We bave tlie best and truest 
.slock of tbis variety tbat can be obtained. 
It is especially recommended as a garden 
lettuce for our climate. It heads well, and 
bears shipping remarkably well, since it 
revives nicely after wetting. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 15c; Vi lb. 45c; lb. $1.50 

Royal Summer Cabbage. Same as Cali- 
fornia Cream Butter, which see for descrip- 
tion. 

Salamander. One of the most popular sum- 
mer varieties for withstanding heat. Me- 
dium size, light green, and forms a hard, 
buttery head of fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Silver Ball. A good cabbage-heading va- 
riety of good size. Forms a very hard head, 
and is slow to run to seed. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. J5c; V* lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

The Morse. A large, loose-bunching or 
non-heading variety, forming a large bunch 
of leaves, which are very crisp and of fine 
flavor. In color it is a light green and very 
attractive. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; 3 A lb, 40c; lb. $1.25 

White Seeded Tennis Ball. This variety 

is the same as Boston Market, which see 
for description. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

White Summer Cabbage. The oldest and 

best known cabbage-heading variety. Forms 
a medium-sized, hard head of fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; ^4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

'"White Paris COS. The best of the Cos or 
celery varieties. Forms a large, light- 
green plant, with the head well folded and 
quite solid. Cos lettuce is also called Pto- 
maine, and is very popular with our for- 
eign population, for it is highly prized in 
England and France, while little known to 
our own people. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; ',.'« lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Yellow Seeded Butter. A large, cabbage- 
heading variety. Head very solid and but- 
tery inside. Leaves thick and of a ligh t 
green color. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 



MARTYNIA, OR UNICORN PLANT 



The young pods are much esteemed for j 
become very hard and flinty with age. Sow 
plant grows to about five or six feet in diamete 

ProboSCidea. The common variety. Flov 



ckles. but must be picked young, 
in hills after all danger of frost is 
, and is very ornamental. 



creamy white with dark-purple throat. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 30c; % lb. S5c; lb. $3.00 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWFRS AND DEALERS 



MUSKMELON. OR CANTALOUPE 

Plant In hills In rich, im.lsi land, using ona out to 1"" hills, or two "i thn 

rter ni i danger ..r frost la over, and do no Musk- 

ona require plenty ..r water, and if conditions are favorable, will mak. 
us growth, and n is best to pick ..IT i, 

. the plant mon stocky and thick. Wherever possible, melons should be 
home garden. f,,r the , '.arm of ; » ^ ...,| melon i.* In petting it fresh from 11 



id dlr 



the table 




Muaknieloi] 



Acme, or Early Baltimore. 



One of the 
ltivation, and 
iform shape and 
lightly pointed at 
end; somewhat ribbed and coarsely 
The flesh is thick, green, and very 
Pkt. 5c; os. 10c; >/, lb. 30c; lb. SI. oil 



recommended for i 
size and fine aualltj 



veet. 



Bay View. An improved "Casaba." Fruit 
large, oblong, heavily ribbed and netted. 
Flesh light green and of good flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; o*. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Casaba. A large, oblong variety, with 
light-green flesh. A strong, thrifty plant, 
and very productive; of good quality and 
very popular in some sections. 

Pkt. Be; oi. 10c; V 4 lb. 25c) lb. 00c 

Delmonico. A large, oval variety, slightly 
ribbed and netted. Flesh salmon. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vt lb. 40c; lb. S1.20 

Extra Early Citron. A very early, medi- 
um-sized variety. Fruit ball-shaped, skin 
green, and flesh light green. Very produc- 
tive; fragrant and of remarkably fine flavor. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; '/, lb. 40c; lb. S1.25 



Emerald Gem. 

of remarkably 



sk 



fleshed variety 
nd fine quality, 
ir, slightly flat- 
slightly netted; 
?11 ripened close to the 
i. 10c; Vi lb. 40c; lb. S1.5D 



rind. Pkt. i 

Extra Early Hackensack. An early va- 
riety with almost globular fruit, which is 
heavily ribbed and heavily netted. Flesh 
thick, and light green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V-l lb. 35c; lb. $1.25 

Hackensack, or Turk's Cap. An excel- 
lent green-flesh variety, with flattened ends, 
thick, irregular ribs, and coarse netting. 
The flavor is sweet and delicious. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Jenny Lind, Very early and very prolific. 
Fruit is small, somewhat flattened, deeply 
ribbed and netted. Flesh green and very 
sweet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 35c; lb. s.1.00 

*Large Yellow Cantaloupe. Although 

there are several varieties frequently sub- 
stituted for this sort, we have a distinct 
type, and find it very popular with all who 



H2 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



MUSKMELON 

have tried it. The fruit is large, oblong, 
slightly ribbed and coarsely netted. The 
flesh is light yellowish green, very sweet, 
crisp and delicious. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V\ lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

MelrOSe. A fine shipping variety owing to 
the rather tough skin. Fruit is slightly 
oval, very much netted but not ribbed. 
Flesh light green, shading to salmon at 
seed center, and of very fine flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; \\ lb. 35c; lb. $1.00 

Montreal Market. A large-fruited varie- 
ty, nearly globular with flattened ends. 
Skin dark green; heavily netted. Flesh 
light green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V% lb. 40c; lb. $1.50 

Nutmeg. A very productive variety of me- 
dium size, almost globular, and slightly 
flattened at the ends. Skin well ribbed and 
heavily netted. Flesh green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V ( lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



A salmon-flesh variety, larger 
than "Emerald Gem." Skin dark green, 
slightly netted and ribbed. A favorite va- 
riety for the later markets. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V, lb. 40c; lb. 91.25 



— Continued 

PetOSkey, Or Paul Rose. Excellent mar- 
ket variety with thick, firm, orange-colored 
flesh. Rather larger than Netted Gem; is 
slightly oval, ribbed, and heavily netted. 
Skin light green, changing to a faint golden 
hue when fully ripe. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. 91.00 

*Rocky Ford, or Netted Gem. The most 

largely cultivated variety in use. Grown in 
great quantities in Colorado, and shipped 
East in trainloads. Fruit is slightly oval, 
finely netted, and slightly ribbed. Flesh 
thick, green, very sweet, and of fine quality. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V, lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Small Green Nutmeg, a medium - sized 

variety with globular fruit. Skin dark 
green, heavily netted, and slightly ribbed. 
Flesh thick, green and rather coarse. A 
desirable variety for hotel and restaurant 
use. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y, lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

White Japan. A good variety for the 
home garden. Fruit medium sized, oval, 
with white skin and green flesh. Very 
early. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y, lb. 40c; lb. $1.50 



WATERMELON 



Light, sandy, or gravelly soil is necessary for the best watermelons. They seldom do 
well on heavy adobe or clay soils, and these lands should be avoided for watermelons as 
a farm crop. In the garden the soil can be made suitable by spading in each hill some 



well-rotted manure and 

Plant the seed about the first of May, in 
seeds to a hill, and thin out to two plants 
Use about four ounces of seed to 100 hills, o 

Black Boulder, or Black Diamond, a 

round, very dark-green melon with bright- 
red flesh and black seeds. It is similar to 
old "Black Spanish," but supersedes it in 
every way. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. COc 

Chilian. A very brittle, thin-skinned vari- 
ety, of the highest quality, and especially 
valuable for the home garden. It is slight- 
ly oblong; the skin is deep rich green, 
mottled and striped with a still deeper 
green; the flesh is bright red and the flavor 
is remarkably fine and sweet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Citron. A small, globular variety, striped 
and marbled with light green. Flesh white 
and solid; seeds red. Used exclusively for 
pickles and preserves. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Cole's Early. A great favorite for a large 
area of different climates. Fruit medium 
sized, oblong, striped and mottled. Flesh 
bright red, solid, and of fine, sweet flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Cuban Queen. An excellent shipping vari- 
ety of medium to large size, and globular 



hills about five feet apart. Use five or six 
as soon as the second or third leaf shows, 
r as a farm crop, two to four pounds per acre. 

to oval shape. Rind quite thin, flesh bright 
red and firm. Skin striped with light and 
dark green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % ii>. 25c; lb. 75c 

Dark Icing 1 . Fruit large, nearly globular. 
Skin dark green, sort of mottled indistinct- 
ly with lighter green. Flesh deep pink, and 
of fine flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Dixie. A good market variety with large, 
oblong fruit. Skin striped light and dark 
green. Rind thin but tough. Flesh bright 
red. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Fordhook Early. The earliest of all mel- 
ons and of the finest quality. Fruit almost 
globular; color deep green with occasional 
faint stripes of lighter green; flesh bright 
red and crisp; rind tough, which makes it 
a good shipping variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

^Florida Favorite. A very large variety 
with large, oblong fruit and dark-green 
skin, mottled with a deeper shade. Rind 
thin, flesh deep red and of fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROV/ERS AND DEALERS 



38 



\\ ITBUnuM 

Georgia Rattlesnake, or Gypsy, a urge 

oblong variety, with decided stripes of light 
and deep green. Rind tough, and It Is one 
of the best shipping melons. Flesh bright 
red and of good quality. 

I'll. ."•■■: ob. 10c; ' , lb. 25c; lb. TSe 

Halbert Honey. Bee page 4. 

Ice Cream. A popular home-market varie- 
ty. The fruit is oblong, with dark green 
skin. Flesh, deep pink. 

Pkt. 5c; or. 10c; >,i lb. 25c; lb. TSe 



Iceberg. In general appearance this va- 
riety resembles Kolb's Gem, but the skin, 
which is dark green with markings of a 
lighter shade, is darker in Iceberg, and 
shows a spot of bright yellow where the 
fruit rests on the ground. The rind is thin 



Continued 

and the flesh deep red 



It is the best dark- 
colored shipping variety in use. 

Pkt. Be; or. 10c; Y* lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

*Kleckley Sweets, or Monte Cristo. 

A very desirable variety for the home 
garden or near-by markets. Will not stand 
shipping, as the rind is thin and brittle. 
Fruit medium sized, oval, and skin dark 
green; flesh bright red and very sweet. 
It is the very sweet, honey-like flavor 
that makes it especially distinct from all 
other varieties. 

Pkt. Be) oz. 10c; Vt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Mdver'S Sugar. One of the best shipping 
melons, similar to Georgia Rattlesnake, be- 
ing conspicuously striped and a good ship- 
per. Flesh is of fine quality, rich and sweet 
in flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y t lb. 25c; lb. 75c 




Kolb'S Gem. The well-known shipping va- 
riety. The fruit is large, thick, and oval, 
with flattened ends. Skin striped with light 
and dark green. Flesh bright red. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25m; lb. 75c 

Mountain Sweet. A good home - garden 

variety and an old favorite. Fruit large 

and oval; skin green, and flesh bright red. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Sweet Heart. A very productive and fine 
shipping variety. Fruit large, oval, with 



thin but firm rind. Flesh bright red, solid, 
and sweet. Skin light mottled green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

The Lodi, or San Joaquin, weii-known 

and popular California variety, grown on 
an immense scale in San Joaquin "Valley 
and shipped to all parts of the Pacific Coast 
Fruit large and oblong; skin green and 
slightly mottled; rind thin but tough; flesh 
bright red and sweet; seeds white. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 76c 



MUSHROOM SPAWN 



By the use of mushroom spawn "bricks," mushrooms are quite easily grown, and with 
little cost. A pamphlet on "How to Grow Mushrooms" will be sent free on application. 

Price of 1-lb. bricks, 35c, postpaid 



,34 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

MUSTARD 

The leaves o£ these varieties of mustard, as here listed, make excellent greens of sharp, 
pungent flavor, and are cooked the same as spinach or beet leaves. Sow the seed in drills 
early in the spring and at frequent intervals throughout the summer to secure a constant 
supply of fresh greens. Mustard is hardy and is easily grown. One ounce will sow fifty 
feet of row. 

Chinese. A very hardy, broad-leaved va- *Giant Southern Curled. A large varie- 

riety. Leaves are thick and deeply savoyed, ty, forming a great mass of beautiful 

with broad white mid-rib. leaves, which are ruffled and finely curled 

Pkt. 3c; on. 10c; '4 lb. 15c; lb. 40c on the edges. Hardy and vigorous, and 

very highly recommended. 

FordhOOk Fancy. A very handsome vari- Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 15c; lb. 50c 

ety with dark green foliage. Leaves very 

finely curled on the edges. Plant medium White English. A light-green variety 

sized. with tender leaves. Seed light yellow. 

Pkt. 5c; or.. 15c; % lb. 25c; lb. 90c Pkt. 5c; % lb. 10c; lb. 25c 

NASTURTIUM 

The green seed of nasturtium has a sharp, pungent flavor, and when pickled makes an 
excellent condiment. It is also valuable as a flower and serves a double purpose in the 
garden. It is very sensitive to frost and should not be planted before April 15th. The tall 
or climbing variety requires a fence or trellis to climb on, and the seed may be planted in 
a row, using two ounces to 100 feet. 

Tall Mixed. The most prolific and easily grown variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oi. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



OKRA, OR GUMBO 



The long, tender pods of okra are very delicious when sliced and cooked in soups. 
While this is its chief use, it is also boiled and served like other classes of vegetables. 
The tall sorts should be planted in hills about a foot apart, using about one ounce to 
100 hills. The dwarf sorts may be planted in hills or in rows about three feet apart. 
Plant in any good soil about April 1st. The pods should be gathered when very young, as 
they are then very tender. 

Dwarf Green. An early, dwarf, and pro- Pods are lon S. slender, deep green, and of 

fine quality. 



lific variety with thick, green pods. 

Pkt. 5c; osk. 10c; H lb. 20c; lb. 



Pkt. 5c; ok. 10c; y± lb. 20c; lb. 60c 



White Velvet. A medium-sized variety, 
hearing long, smooth, white pods, which 
are very tender, 
growing, very early and prolific variety. Pktt 5c . OZi 10o . 1/4 lb> 2 0c; lb. 60c 



i-rk i • i ikir ,i ■■■ n -i hearing long, smooth, white pods, which 

-Perkins Mammoth Long Pod. a dwarf- are very tender , 



ONION 



The best onions are grown on low, sandy, or muckv lands, with natural moisture, and 
plenty of it. Higher lands can be used if irrigated, providing the land is rich and very well 
worked before planting the seed. Onions do not follow a hav or grain crop to good ad- 
vantage. since the soil lacks nitrogen and humus. A piece of land contemplated for onions 
should be planted to beans, peas, or some other vegetable crop one or two years. 

On high lands the seed should be sown in December or early in January, while on low 
lands any time from February 1st to March 10th will do, depending on the condition of 
the weather. Sow in rows from twelve to sixteen inches apart, using four to five pounds 
of seed. In irrigating onions, it is important that the land never be allowed to get drv. 
for a check in the growth will either force the plant to run to seed or will make stiff 
necks. In the house garden plant early in drills, using one ounce to 250 feet of row. 

The onion seed crop this year has been one of the poorest ever known. 

Australian Brown. An early and very an d a 'one keeper. Possesses all the good 

hardy variety which does especially well qualities of Australian Brown, except that 

in the South. Should be planted early, on It is a little smaller. 

low, wet grounds to get large bulbs. The Wrt. 5c; ot. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. *1.75 
skin is thick and the color is a rich brown. 

Is especially noted as a long keeper, as it Extra Early Barletta. Extremely early 

keeps well into spring, and much longer variety. Seed planted in February will 

than other varieties. form ripe onions the last of July. Is a 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. «0c; lb. $1.73 white onion, forming small bulbs about one 

_ , _. „ _ inch in diameter. "Valuable for home-made 

Australian Extra Early Yellow Globe. pickles. 

An orange-yellow globe variety; very early pkt. 5e; oz. 20e; Vi lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 




Jtu.ow(jioM!dnrib 



36 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



ONION- 

California Early Red. a variety much 

used for very early onions. If the seed is 
sown in beds in August and set in the field 
in November or December, good market 
onions can be had in May. It is not a good- 
keeping variety, but. is of very mild flavor 
and of fine quality. Is very much esteemed 
as a green onion before the bulb is formed. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; V, lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

El FaSO. A large white globe Italian va- 
riety. The grain is rather coarse and the 
flavor mild. It Is not a good winter sort, 
but is unsurpassed as a garden variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 40c; lb. 91.50 

Extra Early Pearl. A very early variety, 
with white skin, rather coarse grain and 
mild flavor. In shape it is flat and is un- 
surpassed for early sets or home-made 
pickles. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V, lb. 40c; lb. $1.50 



-Continued 

Extra Early Golden Globe, a handsome 

and valuable yellow globe-shaped variety. 
It is very early and extremely hard and 
firm, and almost as good in long keeping 
qualities as Australian Brown. It runs very 
uniform in shape, is of good average size, 
and perfectly globular. The skin is rich 
orange yellow and the flesh is quite strong 
and fine grained. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; y 4 lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Extra Early Red Flat. A very early, flat 
variety with dark purplish-red skin. Forms 
a hard bulb with good keeping qualities. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.75 

Mammoth Silver King, An early, large, 

white, flat variety. Is not a keeping sort 
nor a good shipping variety, but is valuable 
for home use and near-by markets. Is 
very mild and of fine flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.50 




"Ohio Yellow 

Morse Brown Globe, see cut on front 

cover, also description on second page of 
cover. 

*0hi0 YellOW Globe. The best of the yel- 
low-globe varieties. The skin is bright, 
glossy, orange-yellow, and the flesh is 
white, and fine grained. The bulbs are re- 
markably uniform in size and shape, and 
being firm and hard possess fine keeping 
and shipping qualities. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.25 

PmetakGr. A very large globe-shaped va- 
riety with light-yellow skin and white flesh 
of mild flavor. It is a heavy cropper and 
a fairly good keeping onion, and is very 



Globe" Onions 

popular as a market variety. Individual 
bulbs sometimes weigh 4 pounds and very 
often 2 or 3 pounds. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; *4 lb. 60c; lb. $1.75 

Southport YellOW Globe. A fine, orange- 
yellow, globe-shaped variety. Is a heavy 
cropper, and forms a long-keeping, hard 
bulb. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

*Red Wethersfield. The best-known and 
most widely-used red variety. In shape 
it Is flattish, but thick, with very firm flesh. 
Is hard, and an excellent keeper, as well 
as a heavy cropper. The color is a bright 
purplish-red. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.75 



C. C. MORSE 4 CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



87 



OMON- 

Red Bermuda. A very early, flat variety, 
used largely in the South for planting In 
the fall and marketing In the spring. Is 
of mild flavor and a good shipper, but not 
a winter-keeping variety. The color Is a 
pale red. The best stock Is imported from 
Tenerlffe, Canary Islands, and we offer only 
this stock. 

Pkt. Be; os. 20c> y, lb. 75c| lb. $2.50 

Extra Dark Red Wethersfield. see 

page 3. 

Southport White Globe, a pure white 

globe-shaped variety. Forms handsome 
hard onions with wax-like, pearl-white 
flesh. Is used a great deal for green onions 
owing to the clear, white stem. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; H lb. $1.00; lb. $3.09 

Southport Red Globe, a large, giobe- 

shaped, bright purplish-red variety. Is a 
late sort and an excellent keeper. A very 
handsome variety and of fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c; or. 20c; ', lb. TSc; lb. $2.00 

Yellow Cracker (Early), a very early, 

yellow variety. Is very flat, both on the 
top and bottom. Forms hard, firm bulbs 
with good-keeping qualities. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. «0c; lb. S2.00 

*Yellow Danvers Flat. The best-known 

and most generally used flat, yellow onion. 
Is the most hardy of all varieties for Cali- 
fornia and yields the surest and largest 
crops. Color bright orange-yellow; flesh 
white and firm. A good keeper, fairly 
early, and of good size. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; ■ , lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Yellow Dutch, or Strasburg. The most 

popular and best variety for set purposes. 
Is similar to the Yellow Danvers Flat in 



shape, color and size, but as a set onion It 
has tho quality of ripening down earlier 
and more uniformly. 

Pkl. r.c; os. 20c; ' ■ lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 

Yellow Globe Danvers. The popular yel- 
low globe onion for market and shipping 
purposes. Is almost ball-shaped, but a 
trifle flattened at both ends. It Is a heavy 
cropper, and a good, firm, hard-fleshed va- 
riety. Pkt. 5c; o«. 20c; V* lb. 75c; lb. »2.00 

White Bermuda. A very early variety, 
used largely in the South as an early mar- 
ket onion, when the seed Is sown In the 
fall and the onions harvested In the spring. 
It is mild and of particularly fine flavor. 
The color is a pinkish-straw color, and the 
shape is flat. The seed we offer is growi 
in Teneriffe, Canary Islands, and is a fine 
pure strain. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 85c; lb. »3.00 

*White Portugal, or Silverskin. The 

best-known and most largely used white 
onion. Is flat on the bottom and thick 
toward the top. Very hard and firm and 
an excellent keeper. Is largely used for 
white onion sets as well as for market 
onions, and pickles. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

White Italian Tripoli, a large, giobe- 

shaped variety, with clear, white skin and 
pearl-white flesh. Of mild, sweet flavor. 
Not a good keeping onion, but much es- 
teemed as a garden variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; Vi. lb. 50c; lb. $1.75 

White Queen. A very early white onion. 
Rather small and does not keep well. Is of 
fine, mild flavor, and largely used for home- 
made pickles. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.50 



ONION SETS 



Onion Sets ai 

from seed and 
75 pounds of t 



e miniature onion bulbs grown 
ire so formed by sowing 50 to 
eed per acre. Good sets are 
those of very small size and well ripened. 

The price depends a good deal on the sea- 
son of the year, and we quote only on ap- 
plication. 



PARSLEY 



Used for garnishing dishes of meat, or 
cooked in soups. A few plants in the garden 
will yield sufficient for a family, providing 
the leaves are cut often and the plant not 
allowed to seed. Sow the seed in drills early 
in spring, using one fourth of an ounce to 
100 feet. 

Champion Moss Curled, a very finely 

curled, bright-green and very ornamental 
variety. Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; Yi lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

Hamburg, or Turnip Rooted, a piain- 

leaved variety, forming a long, thick, edible 
root. Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; V'. lb. 20c; lb. GOc 




Mors Curled Parsley 

Double Curled. A curled variety, very 
hardy and easy to grow. Deep, rich green, 
and by many preferred to the extremely 
curly varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 



C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



*Extra Triple Curled. Very finely curled 
variety of dark-green color. One of the 
best varieties for all purposes. 

Pkt. Be; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 



—Continued 

Plain, or Single. 

resembling a will 
flat and not curie 



PARSNIP 



10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



stock food and quite 



stiff 



the field sow 



the 



seed 

s twelve 



the sprin 



apart. 



Early Short Bound French, a fiat, tur- 
nip-shaped variety. Of rather coarse grain, 
and not as good quality as the long va- 
rieties, but early and easy to dig in stiff, 
hard soil. Pkt. 3c; or.. 10c; >/i lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Guernsey, or Thick Shouldered, Hollow 

Crown. A long variety with a wide or 
thick shoulder and hollow crowned, with 
small top. It tapers gradually, and the 
largest part of the root is the upper six or 
seven inches of the root. 

Pkt. 3c; or.. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



ing three pounds per aci 

*Hollow Crown, a 



ety 



ith 



hollo 



or cup-shaped top, where the leaf stem be- 
gins. The most popular and best variety 
for all purposes. Skin smooth, and white, 
and flesh tender, while the root grows IS to 



tained 



st pa 



of it 



nches from the top. 
10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



Long Smooth. A very long variety with 
full crown. "Very smooth, white skin. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 30c 



PEAS 



Peas are quite hardy, and 


for 


very e 


arly market car 


he planted 


in the 


fall 




protected 


places, and ripe 


peas 


can be 


had 


in Feb 


ruary. They re 


quire moderately i 


ich s 


oil 


but not 


excessively rich 


or wet. or th 




ill run 


too much to \ 


ine, and do 


not be 


ar he 




ily. The 


seed needs to b 


e pla 


nted- tin 


ck. i 


sing from 150 to 200 


pounds per 


acre for se 


5d 


or vege- 


table crop, or or 


e pou 


nd for s 


ixty 


feet of 














The dwarf i 


arieti 




:>e p 


anted 


in rows twelve 


to eighteer 


inche 


3 apa 


rt 


and the 


tall ones three 


feet. 


By usi 


g tl 




>us classes of p 


;as and by r 


naking 




■a 


sowings 


of each, good pe 




be had 


for 


i long 


season. In the 


garden th 


s pods 


SllOL 


1.1 


be kept 


picked as the pi 


ints t\ 


ill then 


cont 
















Express or f 
quantities. 


reight 


charges 


are 


not pr 


spaid. Write t 


s for speci 


al quo 


atior 


s 


on large 






PEAS 


—EXTRA 


EARLY VARIETIES 




















and is v 


ery popular 


with c 


anne 


rs 


who al- 




A plant of "An 



Wonder" Peas 



* Alaska, or Earliest cf All. a v 

tall variety with smooth, small peas c 
good quality, and short, well -filled pod 
Its fruit ripens practically all at one tim 



iy, 



ways desire to make but one cutting. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. $7.50. 

^American Wonder, a dwarf or short- 
vine variety, bearing short, thick, well- 
filled pods which are a ricli dark green. 
It bears well, is easily grown, and very 
early. The peas are of especially fine 
flavor, and it is the best dwarf variety for 
all purposes. The dried peas are wrinkled. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 lbs. $10.00. 

First and Best. One of the earliest tall 
varieties, with smooth, round peas, which 
ripen almost at one time. Pods straight, 
short, and well filled. Of fair quality. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15e; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. $7.00. 



Gradus, or Prosperity. 



very 



of the 
tall variety, 
growing about 3 feet high and bears very 
long pods, which are pointed, and well filled 
with large, sweet, and very fine wrinkled 
peas. The foliage and pods are light green, 
and the plant is not very hardy. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; 100 lbs. $15.00. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



Burpee's Best Extra Early. 



w 






In 
icb the 






much swrr 
r. The vim 



ka and all 
quick growth, abo 
length, and t 
time. 
Plot, lOej H>. ante, postpaid. M> express < 
freight, II.. is.-: 10 lbs. xi.oo: ichi lba, 88.00. 



■ emool 

er than Alas- 

lies In 
illy all 



British Wonder, s. 



good, di 

ttl 

>ng and 



McLean's Little Gem. 
wrinkled ^ arlel y, gro^t i 
high. I',« is abi 
tilled with large peas. 

rki. toe) ii>. 8Be; postpaid. By express or 
freight. Hi. Ute; 10 iiik. (1,00; loo lbs. sjo.oo. 

Nott's Excelsior. The most popular dwarf, 
wrinkled variety for tin- hum. garden 0) 
market garden. The vines arc larger and 
more productive than American Wonder 
an.i the peas are of especially line flavor 
and good quality, 

I'kt. 10e; III. 2,%c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb, 13c; 10 lbs. 81-26; 100 lbs. $10.00 

'■'Premium Gem. The best and most popu- 
lar dwarf, wrinkled variety, especially with 
market gardeners. It grows about 15 inches 
high and bears good-sized pods, which are 
filled with 6 to S peas of especially fine, 
sweet flavor. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. sl.uo; 100 lbs. Slum. 



Thomas Laxton. a fin 

similar to Gradus. but l 



ly, tall variety 
hardy and not 

quite so early. Is also a little darker in 

color and taller, but has the same fine. 

large pods and fine quality. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. ::."„'. poNtpnld. By express or 

freight, lb. 25c; 10 Ilia. 81.50; 100 Ilia. 812.50 




■ I'!:, 



PEAS— SECOND EARLY VARIETIES 

Abundance. A tall, branching variety 
bearing medium-sized pods with large peas 
mi good quality. It ripens evenly, ami is 
used largely by canners. 

I'kt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15c; lo ll.a. $1.00; 100 Ilia. $8.01). 



Is especially productive and very popular 
with market gardeners. 

Pkt. 10c; 111. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lli. 15c; 10 Ilia. $1.00; 100 lbs. $8.00. 



McLean's Advancer, a good, ta 

ty with wrinkled peas of very fine 



Everbearing. A tall, wrinkled variety 
bearing broad pods well filled with large 
peas of good quality. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lba. $1.00; 100 lba. $S.OO. 



PEAS— LATE VARIETIES 



Champion of England, one of the most 

popular, tall, wrinkled varieties. Is very 
prolific and hardy, and the peas are of 
especially fine, rich quality. 

Pkt. lOe; lb, 2Se, postpaid. By express or 
freight, 111. 15c; 10 Ilia. $1.00; 100 lba. $8.00. 

Horsford's Market Garden, a tan va- 
riety of medium height; very prolific; peas 
small and wrinkled, but pods well filled. 



ind hardy and 



Pkt. 10c: lb. 2, F ie, poatpnifl. By express « 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lba. $1.00; 100 lba. $8.00. 



Stratagem. a 



dark green 

Pkt. 10c; 

freight, lb. 



inkle, 1. and of good quality. 
15c, postpaid. By express or 
10 lba. $1.2.°;; 100 lba. $11.00. 



40 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



PEAS- Continued 




Black-Eyed Marrowfat. The best of the 

marrowfat varieties. Tall, hardy, and pro- 
ductive. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. .sue; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

Improved Senator, see page 4. 

Large White Marrowfat, a very tan, 

hardy variety. Very productive, but of in- 
ferior quality. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c; 100 lbs. $7.00. 

Melting 1 Sugar. A tall variety, bearing 
long, flat, brittle pods, which are cut or 
broken and cooked like string beans. Is 
a delicious vegetable, and should be better 
known and more generally used. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $1.50. 



^Telephone. One of the latest varieties. Is 
tall and vigorous, with enormous pods, 
bearing large, wrinkled peas of remarkably 
fine quality. A popular home-garden and 
market variety. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $125; 100 lbs. ¥10.00. 

^Yorkshire Hero, or Alameda Sweets. 

A very hardy and prolific, semi-dwarfed, 
wrinkled variety. The peas are large and 
of fine quality and the pods, which are 
broad and medium sized, remain in condi- 
tion for a long time. It bears Immense 
crops, both of pods and dried peas, and is 
the variety most largely planted by gar- 
deners. 

Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c; 100 lbs. $6.50. 



PEPPERS 



There are varied uses for peppers, and while they are more popular in the South among 
the Spanish and Mexican people, they are used very largely by all who like strong, hot 
condiments. The several varieties are used for stuffing when green, for pickles, for pul- 
verizing when dry, and for soups, etc. Our selection of varieties includes all of the very 
best. 

Peppers do best in hot climates, but can be grown quite successfully In most places. 
They require very rich soil. The seed germinates slowlv and should be started in boxes, 
and the young plants transplanted after all danger of frost is over. 

Golden DaWll. A short, thick variety, sim-Large Squash. An early variety, bearing 
liar to Large Bell, or Bull Nose, in shape, large, flat, or tomato-shaped fruit, which 
but a rich golden yellow, with a mild sweet is bright red when fully ripe. 
flavor. Pkt. 5c; n. 25c; Yt lb. 75c; lb. *2.50 Pkt. 5c; oi, 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. *2.50 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



■11 



II PPBIU 

*Chinese Giant. A v«ry largo, deep-red 

wry thick and blunt. It Is fully 
twice as large as Large Bell, or Bull rfMS, 
being four or five Inches thick at the top 
and about six inches long. 

Pki. : .... .mi.-: ', lb. *l.«0: lb. |8JM 

*Large Bell, or Bull Nose. The most pop- 
ular variety for stuffing. Fruit large, round 
and blocky. and about three Inches long and 
two inches thick. The color Is deep green 
when fruit is young, but when fully ripened 
It is a rich, glossy blood-red. Plant grows 
about two feet high. 

Pkt. Se; o«. 2Bc| % lb. 73c; lb. *2.50 

*Long Red Cayenne, a strong, pungent 

variety, having long, pointed fruit which 
Is bright scarlet when ripe. A well-known 
and popular variety. 

Pkt. Be; ox. 25c; ' , lb. 75c 1 lb. $2.50 

Red Cherry. An ornamental as well as 
useful variety, the plant being tall and 
bearing profusely, small, bright red fruit. 



I until I 

The fruit Is small, round, very hot, and is 
largely used for pickles. 

Pkt. Sc; os. 25c; • , lb. 7Bc; lb. *2.50 

Red Chili. A rather small, bright-red va- 
riety about two Inches long, and pointed. 
The pods are used In making chill sauce. 
and are very pungent and hot. 

I'kt. Bcj oi. 2Bct 'A lb. 75c; lb. »2.5<> 

Ruby King. A popular variety of the Bell, 
or Bull Nose type. The fruit is large, 
bright, glossy-red. and the flavor is mild 
and sweet. A desirable variety for slicing 
in salads and for stuffing. 

Pkt. Sc; ox. 25c; Vi lb. 85c; lb. *3.00 

Sweet Mountain, or Spanish Mammoth. 

A very popular variety with some market 
gardeners. It Is a late variety, bearing 
large, thick fruit, which is frequently eight 
inches long and two or three inches in 
diameter. When mature, it Is a deep, glossy 
red, and the flavor is mild and sweet. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 25c; Vi lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 



PUMPKIN 



While pumpkins are of strong growth, they w 
until about April 15th. A moderately rich soil i 
hills about six to eight feet apart. Three to four 
one ounce will plant 100 hills. Do not plant ne 



t stand frost, and cannot be planted 
cient for good pumpkins. Plant in 
ds of seed will plant an acre, and 
uashes or melons, as they are like- 



urge quantities 



for special prlc 




^Connecticut Field. A fine, large orange- 
colored variety used for field culture and 
stock feeding. The skin Is smooth and 
ribbed and the flesh is brittle and sweet. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c, postpaid 

*Common Field. The well-known, ordi- 
nary pumpkins, largely used for stock feed- 
ing. The fruit is variously colored in yel- 
low, drab, red, and orange, and varies also 
in size, but is usually very large. Is a 
heavy cropper and very easily grown. 

Pkt. 5c; lb. 30c, postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. $14.00 



Large Cheese, or Kentucky Field, a very 

large, flattened variety, averaging about 
two feet through. When ripened the skin 
is a rich, cream color. Flesh yellow and of 
fine quality. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. 50c, postpaid 

Mammoth King, or Big Tom. The best 

large pumpkin in use. Forms immense 
globular melons, flattened a little at the 
end. Skin reddish yellow in color and 
flesh rich orange. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; J , lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Mammoth Golden Cushaw. one of the 

best stock-feeding varieties. Is a solid, 
yellow Crooknecked sort, and is nearly all 
flesh, having a very small seed cavity. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. 00c, postpaid 

Pie Pumpkin. A small, round, yellow sort, 
with fine, pinkish netting. Flesh is thick, 
sweet, and of excellent quality. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; ¥* lb. 30c; lb. $1.00, postpaid 

*Small Sugar. A small, round variety of 
excellent quality. The flesh is rich yellow, 
very thick and sweet, and the skin is deep 
orange. We recommend this variety as the 
very best for pies. 
Pkt. 5c; ok. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00, postpaid 



42 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



RADISH 



Being a root crop, good brittle radishes require light, well- worked soil, made very 
•ich and mellow to insure quick growth. If permitted to grow slowly, they become tough 
and pithy. They are easy to grow and frequent plantings will insure a constant supply 
for the table. Use two-thirds ounce for 100 feet of row, and thin the very young plants 



somewhat to prevent crowding. Summer variet 
mer. "Winter varieties, however, require som 
ed in August and September for good radishes 

Brightest Long Scarlet, a very showy, 

long variety. Is thick at the shoulder and 
tapering. Bright rose scarlet with distinct 
white tip. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Chartier. A very long variety and larger 
in diameter and general size than Long 
Scarlet. Keeps hard and crisp longer than 
most varieties, and is an excellent garden 
sort. Color bright rose with lighter colored 
tip. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; \\ lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Cincinnati Market. An early and quick- 
growing, long variety, which keeps hard 
and crisp for a long time. A favorite mar- 
ket garden variety. Color, crimson. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V. lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Chinese Rose Winter, a bright scarlet 

winter variety. About 4 inches long and 
stump-rooted. Matures two or three weeks 
earlier than the Chinese "White "Winter and 
like it is firm and crisp and does not grow 
pithy until it runs to seed. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

*Chinese White Winter, or Celestial. 

The well-known and popular winter va- 
riety. Clear white, about 4 inches long 
and half stump-rooted. Keeps firm and 
crisp until it runs to seed. Is a good cook- 
ing variety, and when cooked the flavor 
resembles turnip. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

Crimson Giant Forcing, a new variety 

which will be a popular market and home 
garden variety, since it matures very early 
and remains firm and crisp much longer 
than other short varieties. Color, rose car- 
mine with white tip. It is top-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Early Round Dark Red, or Prussian 

Globe. A bright scarlet, turnip-shaped 
variety. Early, quick growing, and a hand- 
some radish. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % i„. 25c; lb. 75c 

Early Scarlet Turnip, a valuable vari- 
ety for forcing or outdoor culture. Is a 
small, turnip-shaped variety, and in color 
entirely crimson. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

*Early Scarlet Globe, a popular forcing 

variety owing to its very quick growth 
and fine, bright scarlet color. Shape, a 
trifle oblong. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y* lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



in November and Decembe 

Early White Turnip, a very quick-grow- 
ing, small, turnip-shaped variety. Color, 
clear white; very mild flavor, and valuable 
for forcing. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 85c 

French Breakfast, a popular variety for 

market or forcing. It is about two inches 
long and decidedly stump-rooted. Color, 
bright rose with bottom of root and the 
tail pure white. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y* lb. 25c; lb. 75c 




Early "Scarlet Globe" 

Golden Globe. Quite a large top-shaped 
variety with yellow skin, and solid, white 
flesh. Is not a quick-growing variety, but 
retains its solidity a long time after ma- 
turity. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Half Long, or Olive-Shaped. The varie- 
ty most largely used by gardeners in Cali- 
fornia. It is about 3 inches long with half 
stump-root and sloping top. Color, car- 
mine. Quick growing and hardy. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 



C. C. MORSE ft CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

II UIIMI-- Continued 




"Long Scarlet" 

Half Long Deep Scarlet. a shorter. 

olive-shaped variety, with half stump-root 
and sloping top. Color, bright scarlet. Val- 
uable for forcing. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

*Icicle. A handsome white variety, about 
5 Inches long, with sloping top and pointed 
root. Quick growing, brittle, and mild in 
flavor. Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; "i lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Long Black Spanish. A winter variety 
with almost black skin and white flesh. 
Roots about six inches long. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



*Long Scarlet Otaort top). The best known 
and most popular long variety. Color, 
bright carmine, and flesh brittle and firm. 
About 6 inches long, the top growing out 
of the ground about one inch. 

Pkt. 5c; ok. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. «0c 

Long White Japanese, a winter variety, 

growing frequently 2 feet long and about 
3 Inches in diameter. Skin, white; flesh, 
solid and tender, and very pungent A 
staple article of diet with the Japanese, 
who use it both green and dried. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Round Black Spanish. A winter variety 
with black skin and white flesh. It Is top- 
shaped or almost globular. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

*Scarlet Turnip, White Tipped, one of 

the most popular and attractive short va- 
rieties. It is globe-shaped, bright rose car- 
mine with bottom and tip clear white. 
Stems and leaves small. Very valuable for 
forcing as well as for the house garden 
and market. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

Triumph. An attractive, short globe va- 
riety. Has white skin, mottled and spotted 
with rose. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

White StrasbUTg. A large, white variety 

for late summer use. Rather thick at the 

shoulder and tapering to about 6 inches in 

length. Keeps firm and solid a long time. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 76c 

White Vienna. A very fine, long, white 
variety, quick growing, and ready for use: 
when very young. The flavor Is mild 
and sweet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 76c 

Wood's Early Frame. A very early, long 
variety, resembling Long Scarlet, but 
earlier and desirable for forcing. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



RHUBARB 



A rich, sandy soil, wet but well drained, is 
propagated from seed, only a percentage comes 
and discard untrue plants. The popular method; 
gated from the crown. Set plants three feet by 
ond year, but it continues to produce for several 
it should be cut back well into the ground. 

Myatt's Victoria. The variety most gen- 
erally in use. It comes fairly true from 
seed. 

Seed— Pkt. 5c; ok. 15c; V\ lb. 40c; lb. 91.60 

Root* — 15c each, 91.50 per dozen. 



best for rhubarb. "While It is frequently 
true, but it is cheaper to grow from seed 
however, is to use young plants propa- 
six. The best stems are produced the sec- 
years. When the blossom stalk appears, 



the grower, is of delicious flavor, extremely 
hardy, very prolific, and very quick grow- 
ing. Produces good stems all winter and 
spring. 



Crimson Winter. The : 

has become very populai 



ew variety, which 
and profitable to 



Seed— Pkt. 10c; 
*io.oo. 



91.00; % lb. 98.00; lb. 



Roots — 50c each, 96.00 per dozen. 



44 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



SALSIFY, OR VEGETABLE OYSTER 



isify root, which grows about twelve inehe 
_ _, very popular vegetable. "When cooked it 
and may be served in a great variety of ways. A lc 
is desirable for a long, smooth root. In stiff soils tl 
to dig. Use three-fourths ounce for 100 feet of row, 
vent crowding. 



Long" White. The common and popular va- 
riety, having medium-sized roots of good 
quality. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y 4 lb. 50c; lb. $1.75 



long and one inch in diameter, is 
las a distinct flavor of the oyster, 
se, light soil, especially sandy loam, 
; roots are usually uneven and hard 
nd thin to one or two inches to pre- 



:;: Mammoth Sandwich Island. The im- 
proved, large-rooted variety, growing about 
12 inches long and being from 1 to 2 inches 
thick. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; ' \ lb. 65c; lb. $2.25 



SORREL 



len cooked like spinach, make a 
itly, spreads rapidly from the ro( 
A confined location in the garde 



ery palatable vegetable. In Cali- 
, and becomes an obnoxious weed 
tided. 



Large Leaved French. The 

sirable. 



iety having the largest leaves and therefore the most de- 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

SPINACH 



*Bl00msdale Savoy. The variety most gen- 
erally used in the East, and especially 
throughout the South for shipping. Leaves 
large, round, and thick, very much savoyed 
and rich deep green. One of the earliest 
varieties. Seed, round. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 15c; lb. 35c 

Long Standing. A deep green variety 
with rather elongated, smooth leaves. Seed, 
round. Stands a long time without running 
to seed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 15c; lb. 40c 

Victoria. A long-standing variety with 
round, slightly savoyed leaves. Deep green 
and hardy. Forms good, edible leaves early 
and continues to produce leaves for a 
long period. 

Pkt. 5o; oz. 10c; % lb. 15c; lb. 40c 



AS 



New Zealand. A plant with thick, fleshy 
texture and soft crystalline leaves. Is not 
like the ordinary spinach in appearance, but 
it is used in the same way. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

*Prickly. The variety commonly used for 
market in California. Is very hardy and 
easily grown; bears large, smooth leaves, 
which are shaped like an arrow point. 
Color, bright green. Seed, irregular, with 
3 or 4 sharp points. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 15c; lb. 30c 

Round, Thick Leaved. a large - leaved, 

bright green variety. Leaves rather smooth 
and rounded at the top. A good variety 
for late spring and summer. Seed, round. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yi lb. 15c; lb. 40c 



SQUASH 



The summer varieties come into use early in t 
le seed cannot be sown until late in April. The 
part, using four ounces to 100 hills. The winter v; 
na should be planted at the same time. The fruil 
firm, hard shell, keeps well, and 




Early "White Bush Scallop" 



he summer, but being sensitive to frost 
seed should be planted in hills four feet 
irieties are also unable to resist frost, 
does not mature until late in the fall, 
with a little care squashes can be had 
all winter and until late in the spring. In 
gathering winter squashes, it is important to 
protect the stems, since, if broken off, the 
fruit will not keep so well. Plant in hills 
six to eight feet apart, using two or three 
seeds to the hill. Use eight ounces to 100 
hills, or two pounds to an acre. Moderately 
rich soil will grow good squashes. 



SUMMER VARIETIES 

-Early White Bush Scallop, a very early 

variety with flat, creamy white, scalloped 
squashes 4 to 6 inches in diameter. The 
vine is hush in habit and rather dwarf. 
This variety is the common patty-pan 



Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



I.", 















Yellow ^^B^^^^H 
Cbookneck flH^HBH * ' 

(SOVASH .H^| ■V 





Little Gem. Long-keeping, summer squash, 
4 to 6 inches in diameter; apple shaped; 
distinctly ribbed with smooth, cream-colored 
skin. It is solid and rather hard, but bakes 
to a delicious soft consistency on the inside. 
Pkt. 5c; OS. 10c; '4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



Mammoth Summer Crookneck. a. large, 
golden-yellow variety, thickly we 
eighteen inches long, brlttl,-. and 
Plants are bush and very prolific. This Is 
an Improved Btraln of the old varli 

i'k«. 5«-; am. IOc| 'i lb. Kiel lb. BOe 

Mammoth White Bush Scallop, a One, 

large variety will, round, scalloped fruit 
mm, is to n Inches in diameter. Color, 
White, clear and wax-like. 

Pkt. .->.■: i». ici.-; ', n>. a.-.c: lb. 85c 

Vegetable Marrow, a large, oblong va- 
riety, producing fruit which is dark green 
at first, becoming marbled and sniped with 
yellow and lighter green as they mature. 

Pkt. 5c; om. 10c; Yt lb. 30c; lb. si. on 

White Summer Crookneck. Long, crook- 
necked variety, similar to Summer Crook- 
neck in size and shape, but it is pure white. 
Is of especially fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c: am. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Yellow Bush Scallop, or Custard. An 

early variety with flat, round, scalloped 

fruit. Skin, deep yellow; flesh, pale yellow. 

Pkt. 5c; om. 10c; V, lb. 25c: lb. 75c 

*Yellow Summer Crookneck. The weii- 

known summer variety. Fruit long, skin 
very much warted, and of a bright golden 
yellow. Pkt. 5c; om. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



WINTER VARIETIES 




''Hubbard. The most popular and widely 
used of the winter squashes. Fruit is ob- 
long and pointed, heavily warted. dark 
green in color, with orange-colored flesh. 
Is remarkable for its keeping qualities. 

Pkt. 5c; om. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



Golden Hubbard. An exceptionally at- 
tractive variety of the true Hubbard type. 
At maturity the color is red, and the flesh 
bright orange. The vine is productive and 
the fruit is fit for use earlier than the Hub- 
bard. Pkt. 5c; om. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



4G 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



SQUASH— Continued 



Boston MarrOW. A popular variety, with 
large, oval fruit. Skin bright orange, with 
light cream netting. Flesh, orange. Fine 
grained, and of excellent quality. 

Pkt. 5c; «z. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. OOe 

Fordhook. A good variety for early winter 
or even summer use. The fruit is oblong, 
slightly ridged; is creamy yellow outside 
and the flesh is thick, and when cooked is 



of most delicious flavor. Is solid and hard 
and a splendid keeper. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 90c 

Mammoth Chili. A very large variety, 
with smooth, oblong fruit, flattened at both 
ends. Skin, rich orange yellow; flesh, 
orange, fine grained, and sweet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 



TOBACCO 



Cannot be planted until all danger of frost is over. Tobacco seed should be planted in 
a seed-bed, and when the plants are about six inches high should be transplanted to rows 
four or five feet apart, and about four feet apart in the row. About two ounces of seed is 
sufficient for an acre. 



thin leaf and delicate flavor. Especially 
used for cigar wrappers. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 35c; y lb. $1.25; lb. $4.00 



^Connecticut Seed Leaf. The best known 

and most widely used variety throughout 
the middle and northern States and Canada- 
Is the hardiest variety in cultivation. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 60c; lb. $2.00 White Burley. A popular variety, used 
extensively for plug tobacco. 
Havanna. An imported variety with very Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; % lb. $1.00; lb. $3.00 



TOMATO 



As tomatoes are very sensitive to frost they cannot be set in the open field until about 
May 1st. The seed must be sown in well-protected hotbeds, sowing same about March 
1st. A hardy and stocky. plant is had by transplanting the small plants in the bed a few 
weeks before transplanting to the field. Or when about four inches high, the top may be 
pinched off and the plant grows stockier. 

Sow the seed broadcast, using one ounce to about three square feet of area, which 
will yield plants enough to set an acre. In the field set tall varieties six feet apart and 
dwarf varieties three feet apart. A slight trellis is advisable in the garden. Good soil 
produces the best fruit, but it is not necessary that it be excessively rich. Too frequent 
watering, especially spraying the plant, is injurious to tomatoes in the home garden, but 
a moderate amount of water should be applied at the roots at regular intervals. 



Acme. A tall variety, medium early, 

bearing flatfish, globe fruit of a purplish- 
carmine color, and medium size. The fruit 
is smooth and uniform. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.25 

Beauty. A rather early, tall variety; very 
prolific, with good sized, smooth fruit of a 
purplish-carmine color. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.25 

*Chalk's Early Jewel, a wonderful new 

variety, in that it is early and bears con- 
tinuously throughout the season. The fruit 
is large, smooth, uniform, and well-ripened 
clear to the stem, and the flavor and quality 
are especially fine. Color, bright scarlet. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.75 

Crimson Cushion. A tall variety, bearing 
very large fruit of a bright scarlet color. 
Fruit rather uneven in size and shape, but 
is firm and of fine flavor, though rather 
coarse. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c; *4 lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50 

Dwarf Stone. A variety similar in habit 
to Dwarf Champion. The fruit is larger 
and of a bright scarlet color. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25o; y* lb. 75c; lb. $2.75 



Dwarf Champion. A dwarf variety, some- 
times called the tree tomato on account of 
its upright growth and its ability to stand 
alone without trellising. Fruit, medium 
sized, smooth, uniform, and of a purplish- 
carmine color. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

Earliana (Sparks) . The earliest tall va- 

riety, forming ripe fruit much earlier than 
any other variety. The fruit is large, 
smooth, of a bright scarlet color, and of 
fine quality. Very valuable for early mar- 
ket use. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.75 

Favorite. A tall variety, bearing globe- 
shaped, scarlet fruit. The fruit is smooth, 
and uniform, and well-ripened to the stem. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; Y 4 lb. 75c; lb. $2.25 

Golden Queen. A large-fruited, tall varie- 
ty, bearing smooth, bright yellow fruit of 
fine quality. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

Husk Tomato, or Ground Cherry, a va- 
riety that is covered by a loose covering 
or husk. The true edible variety is yellow 
and is used for preserves. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $3.00 



C. C. MORSE A CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



17 



TOMATO— Continued 



page 4. 



June Pink. 

Matchless. V tall-growing, prolific variety 

with large fruit, which Is rather flattened, 

smooth and uniform. Color, bright scarlet. 

Pkt. Sc( os. 25c| V4 lb. 76c; lb. »2.50 

Mikado, or Turner s Hybrid, very large, 

rather Irregular variety of the purplish- 
carmine color. Very prolific. The leaf re- 
sembles that of the potato. 

Pkt. Sc; os. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. S2.50 

Perfection. A tall variety, with medium- 
sized, globular, uniform fruit, which is 
smooth and well ripened to the stem. Color, 
bright scarlet. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; V4 lb. 75c; lb. »2.25 

PonderOSa. An extremely large, irregular- 
fruited variety. Vine tall, and fruit very 
solid and purplish-carmine in color. Rather 
coarse and of fair quality only. 

Pkt. 10c; in. 40c; ', ■ lb. $1.00; lb. *3.50 

Red Cherry. The fruit Is small and globe 

shaped, about 1 to 2 inches in diameter. It 

is bright scarlet in color, and besides being 

ornamental, is very valuable for preserving. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 25c; M lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 



Red Pear Shaped, as the 

the fruit is shaped like a 
the stem and enlarged at 



npUi 



small, being about 2 or 3 Inches long. It Is 
bright scarlet; is of fine flavor, and makes 
delicious preserves or salads. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; V* lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 

*Stone. The best main-crop variety for 
all purposes, and largely used for canning. 
Vine, tall and prolific. Fruit, smooth, largo, 
and uniform, and well ripened to the stem. 
Color, bright scarlet. 

Pkt. .-..•; os. 25c; ' , lb. 75c; lb. »2.25 

Trophy. An old favorite and much es- 
teemed for its productiveness and hardi- 
ness. The fruit is somewhat irregular, but 
of fine quality, and is valuable for canning. 
The true stock Is scarlet In color, and the 
fruit shows a distinct navel at the blosson. 
end. Pkt. 5c; os. 20c; }4 lb. 00c; lb. »2.00 

Yellow Cherry. A small-fruited, bright, 
golden-yellow variety; very attractive for 
salads or preserves. In all respects like 
the Red Cherry, except for its golden-yel- 
low color. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; '.i lb. 75c; lb. *2.50 

Yellow Pear Shaped. A small-fruited va- 
riety, resembling the Red Pear Shaped, ex- 
cept in color, which is golden yellow. It 
is very useful for salads "when the fruit is 
simply cut in two lengthwise. It Is also 
useful for preserves. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; >.i lb. 75c; lb. $2.50 



TURNIP 



While turnips are a favorite fall and winter vegetable, they may also be had in spring 
by proper sowings. They are of easy culture, but need well-worked, rich soil to insure 
a quick, uninterrupted growth, when they will be tender and free from woodiness. 

For fall and winter use sow the seed in August, using one ounce to 250 feet of row, 
thinning the plants when very young to three or four inches apart. For spring use sow in 
January. 

For field culture sow In rows about two feet apart, using one to three pounds of seed 
per acre. 




Purple Top "White Globe" Turnip 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



TURNIP — Continued 



Amber, or Yellow Globe, one of the best 

yellow-fleshed varieties. Skin also clear 
yellow. Is of large size and fine flavor. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M, lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

COW Horn. A long, pure white variety, re- 
sembling a white carrot more than a tur- 
nip. The flesh is tender and sweet, and it 
is quite popular as a market variety on 



thi! 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Early White Flat Dutch, Strap Leaved. 

A medium-sized, flat variety; clear white, 
early, and of fine flavor. A fine table va- 
riety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Extra Early White Milan, a very early 

variety, medium sized, flat, and clear white. 
A fine home-garden variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Extra Early Purple Top Milan, a very 

early variety, medium sized, very flat, and 
white with purple top. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Orange Jelly, or Golden Globe, a giobe- 

shaped, yellow variety with firm and crisp 
yellow flesh. A very fine table variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Purple Top Flat Dutch (Strap Leaf). 

An early, flat variety. White, with purple 



top. Probably the most popular and gen- 
erally used garden variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Purple Top White Globe, a valuable 

sort for either table use or stock feeding. 
Roots, globe-shaped, white, with purple top. 
Flesh, white, firm, and tender. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Purple Top Yellow Aberdeen, a medi- 
um-sized variety, generally used for stock 
feeding. Is yellow, with purple top. Flesh, 
light yellow. A winter variety, seed of 
which should be sown in the summer. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Pomeranean White Globe, a large, white 

variety, used largely for stock feeding. Is 
globe-shaped, with large leaves. Very 
hardy. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; ^ lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Seven Top (for greens). A variety culti- 
vated for its leaves, which are cooked the 
same as spinach and mustard. The root is 
small and not used. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

White Eg'g'. A small, oval-shaped variety 
with pure, white skin and white, fine- 
grained flesh. A handsome variety and 
very early. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. 60c 



RUTA BAGAS, OR SWEDES 



These are grown very extensively for stock feeding, and makes an excellent and valua- 
ble crop. Treatment same as for winter turnips, but require a longer season to grow, and 
the seed should be planted early in July. The rows should be at least two and one-half 
feet apart, and the plants thinned to eight or twelve inches. The roots frequently grow 
to an enormous size. 

Monarch, or Tankard. Roots ovoid in 

shape and very large. Flesh, yellow; skin, 
yellow below ground and purple above. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; l. t lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Purple Top Yellow. One of the hardiest 
and best varieties for all purposes. Skin 
is bright yellow under ground and purple 
above ground. Flesh, yellow and of fine 
flavor. Roots are slightly oblong in shape. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Yellow Purple Top Swede. The weii- 

known and most commonly used variety. 
Roots, globular; skin, yellow under ground 
and purple above. Flesh of fine flavor. 
Valuable for either table use or stock feed- 
ing. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



* American Purple Top, or Long Island. 

One of the best and most popular varieties, 
with yellow flesh. It is yellow below 
ground, with purple top above, and the 
leaves are small. A good stock-feeding or 
table variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20e; lb. 50c 

Laing's Purple Top. A globe-shaped va- 
riety of good quality. Flesh, yellow; skin, 
yellow below ground and purple above. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

*Large White, or Sweet German. Avery 

large variety, with white skin and white 
flesh, which is tender and sweet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 2©e; lb. 50c 



AROMATIC, MEDICINAL, AND POT HERBS 



Anise. A hardy annual. The seed especial- 
ly being used for seasoning food, also for 
flavoring liquors and for medicinal pur- 
poses. Grows about two feet tall. Sow 
the seed where the plants are to stand. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 30c; lb. 91.00 



Basil, Sweet. A hardy annual, the leaves of 
which have a clove-like flavor. Used for 
seasoning soups, meats, and salads. Of the 
st culture; seed can be sown as early 
the weather permits. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.50 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 
uimi \ I ii . mi'.iiii in vi . \M> POT iii:iiii» , ,i 



Balm. \ perennial herb uaed tor eeasonlne;, 

illy in liquors, lias a lemon-like 

flavor. Thrives In any warm location, and 

la easy to prow. Plant grows l to I feet 

high. l"kt. Keg ..«. 25c: ■, Ih. 75c: Ih. $2.50 

Caraway. A biennial herb, grown for Its 
which are used for flavoring breads, 
cakes, and cheese; also occasionally for 
the young shoots and leaves, which are 
eaten. Grows 2 feet high. Is of easy cul- 
ture. Sow the seed in the spring for seed 
crop the following year. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; Vi lb. 25c: II.. 75c 

Catnip. Practically a wild plant. Is a 
hardy perennial, the leaves of which are 
used for medicinal purposes. 

Pkt. Be; on. SOc; vi lb. $1.00; lb. $3.00 

Coriander. An easily grown herb, the 

seeds of which are used for flavoring 
pastry, confectionery, and liquors. Grows 
: to ! feet high. 

Pkt. 3c; Vi lb. 13c; lb. 30c 

Dill. An annual herb, the seeds of which 
■ 1 for seasoning. The foliage is also 
used for flavoring as well as for medicinal 
purposes. Grows 2 to 3 feet high. Its 
largest use is pickling cucumbers in what 
is known as "Dill Pickles." 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. «0e 

Fennel, Sweet. A hardy perennial, the 

nishes, and salads. The seed should be 
sown early and plants thinned to six or 
eight plants to foot of row. 

Pkt. 3c; ui. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Horehound. A hardy perennial shrub, 1 
to 3 feet high, with whitish, hairy leaves, 
which are used in confectionery, and in 
medicines for coughs and colds. 

Pkt. Sc; oc. 20c; Vi ■■>. «Oc; lb. $2.00 

HySSOp. A hardy perennial shrub, growing 
18 inches high. Used for medicinal pur- 
both green and dried. 
Pkt. 5c j ox. 20c; Vi lb. 00c; lb. $2.00 

Lavender. A hardy perennial, growing 2 
feet high and forming a bush about 4 feet 
in diameter. Used as a garden plant on 
account of its fragrant blossoms and foli- 



age, lis long, fragrant stems are frequent- 
ly used for fancy work when dried. 

Pkl. 5ei „,. 13 CI ., |h. |0ej III. 11.25 

Sweet Marjoram, a half-hardy perennial, 
the leave* of which are used both green 
and dried for flavoring or seasoning. 

Pkt. 5cs ox. lBc; Vi lb. 40c | lb. $1.25 

Rosemary. A hardy perennial shrub, the 
Of Which are used for seasoning and 
Inal purposes. Oil of rosemary is 
distilled from the leaves. 

Pkt. 5c: <i«. 35c; Vi lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50 

Rile. A hardy perennial, thriving on poor 
soil. Has a peculiar smell; leaves are bit- 
ter. Is used as a stimulant, but should be 
used with caution, since its use sometimes 
results in injury. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 15c; Vi lb. 40c; lb. $1.23 

Sage. A hardy perennial shrub, with whit- 
ish-green, oval, and very much wrinkled 
leaves, which have a pleasant smell and 
Which are used for seasoning. It is easily 
grown and the seed can be sown almost any 
time. Its fragrant, purplish flowers are 
especially attractive to bees, and the finest 
white honey has its source in sage blos- 
soms. Pkt. 5c; oz. 23c; Vi lb. 40c; lb. $1.25 

Summer Savoy. A hardy annual, the stems 
and leaves of which are used for flavoring 
dressings and soups. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Winter Savoy. A hardy perennial, tiie 
leaves of which are used for seasoning. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 20c; Vi lb. GOc; lb. $2.00 

Tansy. A very easily grown perennial 

plant, growing about 3 feet high. Its 

leaves are used for medicinal purposes. 

especially for dropsy and kindred disorders. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; Vi lb. $1.00; lb. $3.00 

Thyme. A low-growing, half-shrubby per- 
ennial, with fragrant leaves, having a mint- 
like odor, which are used for seasoning. 

Pkt. 5c; or.. 25c; Vi lb. 73c; lb. $2.50 

Wormwood. A hardy perennial, growing 
about 4 feet high. The leaves, which are 
greatly divided, have a strong, bitter flavor. 
They are gathered in the summer and dried, 
and are largely used in medicines for tonics 
and applications. Also used in liquors, 
especially absinthe. 

Pkt. 5c; or.. 20c; Vi lb. 00c; lb. $1.75 



CLOVERS 



aenl 

Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa), also known as 
Lucerne and Chili Clover. One of the most 
valuable forage or pasture grasses, being 
very nutritious, both as a green feed and 
as hay. It requires very moist land or fre- 



Inrger quantities 



quent irrigation, and frequently bears from 
five to six crops of hay a year. It does 
well in almost any climate, and improves 
any soil that is sown with it. A good 
stand of it will choke out and practically 



50 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



CLOVERS — Continued 



kill "wild morning-glory. Prepare the land 
by deep plowing and thorough harrowing, 
and sow 25 to 30 pounds per acre broad- 
cast and harrow it. It is best to sow in the 
fall after the first rains, but it can also 
be sown in the spring. The best grade of 
seed is that grown in Utah, which we offer 
here. Other grades will be quoted if asked 
for. 

Per lb. 30c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 18c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Alsike, or Swedish Clover (Trifoiium Hy- 

bridum). A perennial variety, sometimes 
preferred to Red Clover, as it is generally 
finer and makes better hay for horses. The 
blossoms are also valuable for bees. When 
used alone sow 8 to 10 lbs. per acre. 

Per lb. 40c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 22c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Bokhara, or Sweet Clover. Grows 3 to 5 

feet high, covered with small, white flowers 
of great fragrance. Very valuable for bee 
pasture. Sow 10 pounds to the acre. 

Per lb. 40c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 30c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Crimson, or Italian (Trifoiium Incarna- 
tum). An annual variety, growing 20 to 
30 inches high, and haying long, crimson 
blossoms. Excellent for both pasture and 
hay. Sow from 12 to 15 pounds per acre, 
and cut for hay when in full bloom. 

Per lb. 35c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c. 
Larger quantities on application. 



Blirr ClOVer (Medicago Sativa). The na- 
tive forage plant of California. Of the 
easiest culture, growing all winter and 
well into summer. We offer only "Hulled 
seed," which is much easier to sow than in 
the burr. Sow from August to October, 
using 15 to 20 pounds of hulled seed per 

Per lb. 35c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Mammoth Red (Trifoiium pratense). Sim- 
ilar to Red Clover, but coarser, taller, and 
more hardy. Sow from 12 to 15 pounds per 

Per lb. 35c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Red ClOVer (Trifoiium pratense). Standard 
clover for all purposes. It yields the heav- 
iest crop of any variety except alfalfa, and 
makes superior hay, especially if mixed 
with Timothy. Sow from 12 to 15 pounds 
per acre. 

Per lb. 35c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

White Dutch (Trifoiium Repens). Spread- 
ing, vine-like variety, with white blossoms; 
used largely for bee pasture. Is also an 
excellent pasture plant for either sheep 
or cattle. 

Per lb. 45c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 30c. 
Larger quantities on application. 



GRASSES 



Bermuda GraSS (Cunodon Dactylon). Val- 
uable grass for warm climates, such as the 
Southern States, where it withstands the 
hot, dry summers. Sow 5 to 6 pounds per 
acre. It is slow to germinate, requiring at 
lease 3 days under favorable circum- 
stances. Per lb. 75c, postpaid 



Brome GraSS (Bromus Inermis). A valua- 
ble grass for dry, hot, sandy soils, as it 
withstands drought better than almost any 
other forage plant. Sow in the fall 20 to 
30 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 30c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs at 16c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Hard FeSCUe (Festuca Durtnscula). Good 

grass for resisting heat, and used by some 

for lawns; also valuable for sheep pasture. 

Per lb. 45c, postpaid. Larger quantities 

on application. 

English Perennial Rye, or Australian 

Rye (Lolium Perenne). A strong-growing, 
hardy, perennial grass, valuable both for 
grazing and hay. Also makes a fine lawn 
and does not require the close care that 
Blue Grass does, as it will flourish better 
under trees or In shady locations. For 
field crop sow 40 to 50 pounds to the acre, 



and if used for lawns not less than 75 
pounds. 

Per lb. 25c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 10c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Fine Leaved Fescue (Festuca Tenuifoiia). 

One of the best of all grasses for sheep, and 
should be used in all mixtures for perman- 
ent pastures. Sow 20 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 45c, postpaid. Larger quantities 
on application. 

Italian Rye Grass (Loiium itaiicum). An 

easily grown grass, making excellent hay, 
and good, permanent pasture. Grows taller 
than Australian Rye. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 10c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Kentucky Blue Grass (Poa pratensis). 

One of the best grasses for permanent pas- 
ture, and the most popular and useful va- 
riety for lawns. For pasture sow 25 to 30 
pounds per acre. For fine lawn sow much 
thicker, using fully 80 pounds per acre, or 
1% pounds for 20 square feet. 

Per lb. 40c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs at 25c 

Meadow Fescue, or English Blue Grass 

(Festuca pratensis). A perennial variety 
growing 2 to 3 feet high, and valuable for 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



51 



(.It LSSBS— < ontlnurd 



hot. dry climates, since It withstands 
drought. 

Per lb. 30c, postpaid; 10 In 25 lhn. nt is c . 
I.nrtrr qua nl 1 1 1 ci on application, 

Mesqilite (Holcus Lanatus). A fine grass 
for sowing on new clearings in lumber 
districts. Does well in any good, loose soil. 
Sow 30 to 40 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 25c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lb*, nt 10c. 
Larsjer quantities on application. 

Millet, Hungarian. A better variety for 
hay than the common or Pearl, having 
large heads and bright, golden-yellow 
seed. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 7c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Millet, Pearl (Penclllaria). A perennial 
plant for fodder. Grows tall and yields an 
enormous amount of corn-like leaves. Sow 
in drills or broadcast, using 1 to 5 pounds 
per acre. 

Per lb. 20e. postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 7c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Orchard Grass, or Cock's Foot (Dactyl - 

us Glomerata). A quick-growing perennial 
grass, used for pasture or hay, and especial- 
ly valuable for sowing on new lumber 
clearings. For hay it is advisable to mix 



with clover. Sow very thick, using 20 to 
30 pounds per acre. 

ivr lb. 3«c. postpaid* 10 to 25 lbs. at 10c. 
Larger quantities on application. 

Red Top (Agrostis Vulgaris), also known 
as "Herd's Grass," "English Grass," and 
"Rhode Island Bent Grass." A perennial 
variety, thriving best on wet or marshy 
land. Sow 15 pounds of well-cleaned seed 
per acre. 

Per lb. 35c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c. 
LnrKer quantities on application. 

Sweet Vernal Grass, a valuable pasture 

grass. Makes good hay, and, as its name 
implies, it has a distinct fragrance when 
dry. Per lb. $1.25, postpaid 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass (AvenaEiatior). 

A good grass for mixing with IJye or Al- 
falfa. It makes excellent hay, and by many 
is preferred to Timothy. If used alone, 
sow 30 to 40 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 35c, postpaid; 10 to 25 lbs. at 20c. 

Lawn GraSS (our Golden Gate Park Mix- 
ture). A well-blended and carefully pre- 
pared mixture of the best lawn grasses. 
We recommend it as the best mixture for 
all purposes where an especially fine lawn 
is desired. 

Per lb. 45c, postpaid; 10 lbs., at 35c per 
lb.; 100 lbs., at 25c per lb. 



FIELD SEEDS 



Australian Salt Bush (Atripiex semi-ba- 

cata). A valuable plant for poor soils, 
especially those containing alkali. Sow 
seed in the fall to get the benefit of early 
rains, using 1 to 2 pounds per acre. After 
the plant gets a good start it will grow 
with very little moisture. 

Oz. 15c; Vi lb. 35c; lb. $1.00, nil postpaid 

Broom Corn (Improved Evergreen). 

Used for making brooms, and extensively 
used on account of its green color and long 
brush. It grows about 7 feet high. 

Per lb. 15c, postpaid; 100 lbs, $8.00 

Buckwheat (Japanese). The best and 

most profitable variety. It is earlier than 
Silver Hulled, and usually more productive. 
Is also excellent for bee pasture. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $5.00 

Buckwheat (Silver Hulled), a very good 

and popular variety. Grain is of a light 
color, rounder than the common variety; 
has a much thinner husk, earlier, and yields 
more. Per lb. 15c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $5.00 

Canary. The seed is used for bird food. 
Is valuable also as an ornamental grass 
and has considerable merit as hay for feed- 
ing cattle. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $8.00 



Canada Field Peas, used principally for 

green manure. Is a strong, vigorous grow- 
er, making long vines and good roots. Sow 
broadcast, using 80 to 100 pounds of seed 
per acre. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $5.00. Larg- 
er quantities on application. 

COW Peas (Black Eye). Used largely for 
green manure. It is also valuable if al- 
lowed to mature the seed, when the dry 
vines can be plowed under and the seed 
used to grind as feed for stock. If for 
green manure, sow broadcast, using 80 
pounds per acre. If for seed or fodder, sow 
In rows 3 feet apart, using 40 pounds per 
acre. Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $7.00 

Flax Seed. Should be sown in the spring 
on moist land, using 30 pounds of seed 
per acre if grown for a seed crop, or twice 
that quantity if Intended for a crop of 
fiber. Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $4.50 

Hairy Vetch (vicia vniosa). a pea-nke 

plant growing about 4 feet high and doing 
well on dry, sandy soils for forage. Also 
a valuable green manure plant for sowing 
in the fall. Sow broadcast, 60 to 100 pounds 
per acre. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $8.00 



52 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FIELD SEEDS— Continued 



Hemp (Kentucky Hemp). A staple crop for 
manufacturing, sown broadcast, using 25 
pounds of seed per acre. For a seed crop, 
should be sown in hills four feet apart. 
Grows 12 to 14 feet high, with deep cut, 
dark green leaves, which are rather frag- 
rant. Makes a stately row along a walk, 
and is an interesting garden annual. The 
seed is used in bird-seed mixtures. 

Per lb. 25e, postpaid; 100 lbs. $7.50 

Kaffir Corn. Grows from 6 to 10 feet high 
and thrives in hot, dry climates. Makes 
good fodder for cattle, and the seed is used 
for stock and chicken food. Sow in rows 
3 feet apart, using 5 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $G.OO 

Rape (Dwarf Essex). A biennial crop, 
used principally for sheep pasture. Is usu- 
ally sown broadcast on ranges, using 2 to 
5 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 25c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $5.00 

Soja Bean. Valuable as a forage crop or 
green manure. Also as a green fodder and 
silo plant. Sow 30 pounds per acre. 

Per lb. 25c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $15.00 

Spring Vetches, or Tares (vicia sativa). 

A plant resembling pea vines, and valuable 
for forage or green manure. It is usually 
sown with oats or wheat to hold them up. 
Sow 60 pounds per acre with grain, or SO 
to 100 pounds if sown alone. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid. Larger quantities 
on application. 

Sugar Cane (Sorghum), Early Amber. 

A good fodder if cut when 2 feet high. 



Is nutritious and yields a heavy crop. Sow 
late in April, using 10 pounds seed per acre 
in drills, or 25 pounds broadcast. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $5.00 

Early Orange. A strong, productive va- 
riety, either for fodder or for syrup. 

Per lb. 25c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $7.50 

Sunflower (Large Russian), a variety 

bearing large heads, frequently 12 to 20 
inches in diameter and sometimes yielding 
1,000 pounds of seed per acre. The seed 
is used for feeding chickens and parrots. 
Sow in the open field as soon as danger 
from frost is over, using 3 pounds of seed 
per acre, sowing in rows 5 feet apart and 
thinning to one foot. 

Per lb. 20c, postpaid; 10 lbs. SOc; 100 lbs. 
$7.00. 

Velvet Bean. Used largely as a green- 
manure plant and also for forage. Grows 
taller and larger than any other soil plant, 
being sometimes 30 feet in length. Sow 
same as cow peas, in rows 5 feet apart and 
in hills 4 feet apart in the row. 

Per lb. 25c, postpaid; 100 lbs. $10.00 

Wild Rice (Zizania Aquatica). A native 
plant, growing in shallow water with mud 
bottom. The seed is difficult to germinate, 
and should be kept moist several days be- 
fore sowing. The plant makes an excellent 
shelter for wild fowl, and is much esteemed 



Per lb. 30c, postpaid, 
u application. 



Larger quantities 



FOUR NEW WHEATS FROM FRANCE 



ng very much interested 
;, we decided to do som 
Out of some twenty-five varieties 
and which proved to have superio 
is that are worth trying and advis> 
"We have but limited quantities — ■ 



the discussion of wheat as manifested by our millers and 

experimenting with a number of varieties on our seed 

have selected four which we imported from 



tha 



nds from any > 



it to all others. We believe them to 

ill who are interested in growing wheat to 

ly enough for trial, and we will not accept 



Odessa. A large-seeded spring variety. 



Bordeaux. A red-seeded winter sort. 

Medeah. A large-leaved variety resem- 
bling corn before it heads. The heads are White Rochelle. A large white seed, 
from 6 to 8 inches long and bearded. The spring variety. 

kernels are very large. The stems are Each variety, 5c per lb., by express 

solid and stout and therefore differ from freight. 
ordinary straw. Not inclined to rust. 



TREE AND SHRUB SEEDS 



Acacia. Melanoxylon 

o£ 80 feet. The woe 
niture, as it takes 
equal to "walnut. 



ows to a height 
valuable for fur- 
e polish, almost 
Oz. 40c; lb. ¥4.00 



Mollossima. A 
with feathery foli; 
flowers. 



rapid-growing variety, 

ge and beautiful yellow 

Or.. 40c; lb. $4.00 



th 



Lopantha (Albizzia Lopantha). One of Douglas Spruce (Abi* 
- most rapid-growing varieties. hardy timber tree, grc 

Or.. 20c; lb. $2.00 tall. 



Douglassii). Fine, 

Ing 200 to 300 feet 

Oz. 30c; lb. $3.00 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

1111)1'. \\1> -11111 II SKEDS -Continued 



58 



Eucalyptus. KIHfnlln. An ornamental va- 
riety, having beautiful crimson flowers. 

I'kt. .Mli- for 2.1 >eril» 

Globulus (Blue C.uml. Th. variety most 
commonly grown in large groves in Cali- 
fornia for Brewood. Oa. Mc| lb. sum 

Raatiata (Red Gum), a rapid-growing 
variety; very hardy. «>». 40e; lb. *4.oo 

\ iminnlix. A variety especially recom- 
mended for Southern California. It Is very 
hardy, and grows to a height ol 
even In poor soil. Ok. 75c. lb. $7.50 

Madrone. A hardwood native tree of Cali- 



Manzanita. 

hearing attr 
beautiful ben 



hrub, 

and 

I'kl. 25c 



Monterey Cypress icupressus Macrocar- 

pa). The sturdy and picturesque evergreen 
trees so famous at Monterey. 

Oi. 10c: lb. $1.0(1 

Palm, Date (Phoenix Canadensis). The 
beautiful, long-leaved variety, growing to 
an immense height. Pkt. of 15 seeds, 25c 



Privet, California. One of th.- moal rapld- 

ii- hedge plants we 

have. Oi, 10c; lb. 11.00 

Pepper rSchlnus Molle). The beautiful and 
well-known pepper tree. Has. handsome, 

ul. fine-cut foliage. Oi. 10c, lb. $1.00 

Pine. Yellow Pine (Pinus Ponderosa). One 

Of the tallest run] finest timber varieties. 
lining yellow bark. Oa. 30c. lb. 1(13.00 

Sugar Pine (Pinus lambertiana). The 
finest timber variety we have. Grows to 
an enormous size and height, and has beau- 
tiful, fine-cut foliage. 0«. 30c, lb. $3.00 

Monterey Pine (Pinus insignis). A rapid- 
growing variety, recommended for parks 
and lawns. Oi, 25c, lb. $2.50 



Sequoia. ciRnutcn 



Big Tree of Cali- 
Oi. (10c, lb. $0.00 
Sempervirens. The common and well- 
known California Redwood. 

Ox. 40c, lb. $4.00 

Wild Cherry. The native California Wild 
Cherry. Resembles holly, and makes a 
beautiful hedge. On. 25e, lb. $2.50 




54 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FLOWER SEEDS 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

In ordering seeds in packets you may select as follows: 

For $1.00 select an amount up to $1.25 For $3.00 select an amount up to $3.75 

For $3.00 select an amount up to $2.50 For $4.00 select an amount up to $5.00 

For $5.00 select an amount up to $0.25 

Those rates apply only to Seeds In Packets, but not to Seeds by Weight or Measure. No dis- 
count can be allowed on Flower Seeds by Weight. 

There are no more satisfactory flowers in the garden than those grown from seed, 
especially the easily grown and brilliant flowered annuals. The beautiful shrubs and lilies, 
of course, have their place, but are far more expensive than a paper of seed which will furnish 
a large number of plants with usually enough for one's garden and some to spare. 

It is important to study the garden before selecting the flowers that are suitable for it, 
and the choice of flowers should comprehend the height of the plant, the time of blooming, 
and the annual or perennial class of the flow r. Usually the tall plants go next to the house 
or the wall, with the shorter kinds in front and the low-growing varieties for the border. 

While the old-fashioned flowers are still popular, new and improved varieties have been 
developed, with larger and finer blossoms. 

The seed of a large part of our list, which we catalogue here, is raised by ourselves on 
our own farms, and is of strong growth, and will produce the best of flowers. 

It is usually best to sow the seed of annuals early in the year, and the seed should be 
on hand in January or earlier. 

Many flowers can be planted in the fall for early blossoms in the spring. This is pecu- 
liarly so with Sweet Peas and Pansies. Some biennials and perennials can be sown in 
August or September, and made to bloom the following summer. This is especially true 
of such flowers as Hollyhocks and Foxgloves. 

It is best in practically all instances to start the seed in boxes, preferably a box about 
18x24 inches and 4 inches deep, using very sandy soil that will not bake. It is best not 
to put any fertilizer in the seed-box, since it is only necessary to bring the plants to the 
third or fourth leaf, when they should be picked out and reset in another box, in which 
the soil should be loam mixed with leaf-mold. It is important that the plant be of good size, 
strong and sturdy, when finally transplanted in the garden. 

If the seed be sown directly in the garden, it should be sown in the spring after the 
soil is well worked and fertilized. A slight depression should be made with a stick, the 
seed sown, and then covered with sharp sand about twice the depth of the diameter of 
the seed. The sand will prevent the crusting over of the soil after watering. 

When up, the plants must be thinned from two to twelve inches, depending on the 
variety, otherwise they will be weak and spindly. It is a common mistake in the garden 
to leave the plants altogether too thick. Always keep the weeds out. 

On account of the long, dry summers in California, it is necessary to apply water very 
often. Most of our gardens suffer for want of sufficient water. Where possible, it should 
be applied to the roots only, and after four o'clock in the afternoon. 

With a little study of the garden and the colors and habits of the flowers, a beautiful 
garden can be had from the use of flower seeds at very little cost, 

Annuals. — Bloom first year from seed and plant dies after one season. 

Biennials. — Bloom second year from seed and plant dies after second year. 

Perennials. — Bloom second year from seed and plant lives and blooms for several years. 

Tender.— Means plant will not stand the least frost. 

Half Hardy. — Means plant will stand a little frost and needs protection. 

Hardy. — Means plants will stand considerable frost, or practically all we have on the 
Pacific Coast. 

AbrOHia (Sand Verbena). A hardy annual, are beautifully bell-shaped and appear in 

trailing In habit, about 9 inches high, bear- white, yellow, rose, and orange. 

ing verbena-like clusters of flowers, which Mixed colors. Pkt. 10c 

are very fragrant. A native of California. 

Thrives in dry situations, and is valuable Adonis (Flos Adonis, or Pheasant's-Eye). 

for rock-work or hanging baskets. A hardy annual of easy culture, growing 

TJmbellata. Rosy lilac. Pkt. 6c about 1 foot high. Leaves fine-cut and 

feathery; flowers crimson. Seed should be 

Abutilon (Flowering Maple, or Chinese sown in the autumn. Pkt. 5c 

Bell-flower). A tender perennial shrub, 

used generally in greenhouses, but growing Ageratum (Floss Flower). A hardy annual 

into small trees in California. The flowers of easy culture, especially valuable for 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



55 



1 I ,<i\\ IK v| | lis ( „„(|„„,.,l 



hrddlng, as It la literally covered with blos- 
soms all summer. Sow the seed early In 
the spring, either In boxes to transplant, 
or out of doors, and thin to 4 or 6 Inches. 

Woe Perfection. Deep blue, 1 foot high. 
Pkt. Sc 

Mexlcnnum. Imperial Dwarf Blue. Eight 
Inches high, flowers blue. Pkt. 5c 

Mexleannm, Imperial Dwarf While. Eight 
inches high, flowers white. Pkt. Be 

Mrxlcanum. Light blue. Pkt. 5c 

Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

AgTOStema (Rose of Heaven). A hardy per- 
ennial, blooming the first season if seed Is 
sown in the autumn. Plant grows 1 to 2 
feet high; flowers resemble Dianthus in 
bright colors, and are borne on long, slen- 
der stems. Mixed colors, pkt. Sc 

AgTOStis. A hardy annual, ornamental 
grass, the seeds of which are beautifully 
arranged on graceful slender stems. Very 
effective In bouquets of everlasting flowers. 
Grows easily in any common garden soil. 

Pkt, 5c 

Australian Star Flower, a very attrac- 
tive, everlasting or straw-flower; intro- 
duced into America by Luther Burbank. It 
is a hardy annual, easily grown, and pro- 
duces beautiful clusters of small, light- 
pink, star-shaped flowers. The dwarf plant 
is literally covered with these flowers and 
is most attractive, but the stems of the 
flower when dried are even more beautiful, 
and really bear out Mr. Burbank's descrip- 
tion of them as a "fadeless flower." Pkt. 10c 



AmaranthllS. Hardy nnnuals, grown espe- 
cially for their brilliant foliage. 

Candntua (Love Lies Bleeding). Light 
yellowish-green foliage; long, drooping, 
crimson flower spikes. Plant, 3 to 4 feet 
high. pkt. 5c 

Tricolor (Joseph's Coat). Plant, 3 feet 
high, with brilliant leaves in variegated, 
red, yellow, green, etc. Pkt. 5c 

Angel's Trumpet. See Datura. 

Asparagus Phimosis (Nanus). A tender 
perennial for greenhouse or potted plant 
use, with long, fine feathery foliage. The 
sprays, when cut, retain their freshness in 
water from three to four weeks. Seeds 
start slowly, and should be soaked in water 
before sowing. Pkt. ISc; 100 seeds 76c 

Sprengerl (Emerald Feather). An early, 
easily grown, feathery-leaved variety, with 
drooping branches. The best variety for 
hanging baskets. Pkt. 10c; 100 seeds 50c 

AlySSUm (Maritimum). A fragrant, hardy 

annual, having the odor of honey, and 

bearing spikes of small, white flowers in 

great profusion throughout the summer 

and autumn. Useful for borders or early 

bedding flowers. Sow the seed early in 

spring. 

Common Sweet Alyssum. One foot high. 

Pkt. 5c; oi. 25c 

Little Gem. Three to 4 inches high; fine 

for borders. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Snxatlle. A yellow perennial variety. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 50c 



ASTERS 



however, in the row w 
apart, according to the 

Boltze's Dwarf Bouquet. An exceedingly 

dwarf variety, growing only 3 to 4 inches 
high, and containing a great variety of 
colors. Pkt. 15c; oz. $1.50 

Cocardeau, or Crown, a tan variety, 

growing 14 to 16 inches high. Of upright 
habit, with medium-sized blossoms. The 
center of the blossom is usually ■white with 
a bright-colored outer rim. 

Mixed, pkt. 10c 

Comet. A good bedding variety, with large 
blossoms, the petals of which are long, 
narrow, and curled backward. These colors 
are the best: 

Light Pink Pore Lilac 

Light Bine Rose and White 

I. line, bordered white Carmine 
Lilac Red Deep Pink 

White 
Pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted 40c; 12 pkts. 
assorted 75c, Mixture of nbove colors, 
pkt. 10c. 



Y annual produced in a great variety of classes and an almost end- 
The tallest varieties grow about 2 feet high, and some varieties 
3 inches high. The best method of culture is to sow the seed in 

, and transplant about April 1st to 15th. The seed can be sown. 

ere the plants are to remain, thinning them from 6 to 12 inches 

variety. 



Giant Comet. A taller growing variety of 
the Comet type, with branching stems, 
which make it valuable for cutting. Best 
colors: 

Crimson Rose 

Dark Violet Salmon 

Light Blue White 

Light Blue and The Bride (White 
White changing to Light 

Rose and 'White Hose) 

Rosy Lilac 

Pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted 40c; 12 pkts. as- 
sorted 75c. Mixture of above colors, pkt. lOe 

Daybreak. A light pink variety of the 
Victoria type. The blossoms are very dou- 
ble; the color a soft shade of pink, and the 
variety is one of the best for garden or 
florist's use. Pkt. 15c 

Giant Emperor. a large-aowering type, 

appearing in a great variety of colors. 

Pkt. 10c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

FLOWER SEEDS — ASTERS — Continued 




Semples, or Branching. The tallest and 

best florist's variety, and we heartily rec- 
ommend it as the very best type of aster 
we have. The plant grows IS inches high 
and about IS inches in diameter, and the 
blossoms, which are large and full petaled, 
are borne on long stems or branches. The 
most satisfactory type of all asters, since 
it is not only a showy bedding flower, but 
owing to its long stems and large blossoms, 
is valuable for bouquets. Comes into flower 



late 



the 



ltur, 



st color 



Carmine 



Purple 

Crimson Rose Pink 

Lavender White 

Light Blue Mary Semple ("Very 

Pink Light Pink) 

Pkt. 10c; G pkts. assorted 40c; 12 pkts. 

assorted 75c; oz. $1.50. Mixture of above 

colors, pkt. 10c; oz. $1.25. 



Truffaut's Pseony Flowered Perfection. 

This variety has the most brilliant and 
showy assortment of colors. Flowers, me- 
dium sized and almost globular. Plant, 
about 16 inches high, of upright growth, 
and flowers all borne on top. Best colors: 



Rose 

Rose and White 

Scarlet (white edged) 

White 



Crimson 

Crimson Ball 

Dark Purple 

Fiery Scnrlet 
Light Blue 

Pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted 40c; 12 pkti 
assorted 75c; oz. $1.50. Mixture of abov 
colon, pkt. 10c; oz. $1.25. 



ud White 



Snow White 
Wlilte t chang 



Dwarf Chrysanthemum Flowered. a 

semi-dwarf variety, with large flowers and 

bright colors. Plants, 8 to 10 inches high. 

Mixed, pkt. 10c 

Victoria. One of the best bedding varie- 
ties, with medium-sized blossoms, which 
are borne in great profusion from the bot- 
tom to the top of the plant. Grows 12 to 
14 inches high. Best colors: 

Bright Red Light Blue 

Crimson Peach Bio 

Dark Purple 

Dark Blue 

Fiery Scarlet 

Lavender Azure Blue 

Light Blue 

Pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted, 40c; 12 pkts. 
assorted. 75c; oz. $1.50. Mixture of above 
colors, pkt. 10c; oz. $1.25. 

HohenZOllem. A new variety of the Comet 
type, with blossoms fully twice as large as 
the old variety. The petals are very long 
and curved like a flat chrysanthemum. 
Plant of branching habit, and about 16 
inches high. Best colors: 
White Blue 

Rose Lilac and White 

Crimson Rose and White 

Pkt. 15c; pkt. each of above G varieties, 
75c. Mixture of above colors, pkt. 15c. 

Japanese, or Tassel. a large - flowered 

variety. The petals are long and needle- 
shaped, and the blossom is very attractive. 
In various soft and bright colors. 

Mixed, pkt. 10c 

Jewel, Or Ball. Upright-growing plant, 
similar in habit to Truffaut's Perfection. 
The blossoms are medium sized, and the 
petals curved in toward the center, making 
a ball-shaped flower. Mixed, pkt. 10c 



Lady. An upright-growl: 

medium-sized blossoms. The foliage is nar- 
row and cut, and the plant has a graceful 
Mixed, pkt. 10c 



iety, with 



Ostrich Plume. A medium tall variety of 
the Comet type. The petals are long, nar- 
row, and curly, and the effect of both indi- 
vidual blossoms and bunches is beautiful. 
We offer the following distinct colors: 

White Crimson 

Rose Dark Blue 

Azure Blue Lilac 

Pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted, 40c; 12 pkts. 
assorted, 75c. Mixture of these colors, be- 
sides many others, pkt. 10c. 

Queen of the Market, one of the earii- 



blo 



•ieti< 



bio 



10 



ly in July. Of spreading habit, 8 to 
ches high. Blossoms medium sized, 
nd the petals curved outward. 

Mixed, pkt. 10c; oz. $1.00 
Pure White, pkt. 10c; oz. $1.50 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



I I i>\\ I u SBED8 

Purity. A pur.- white variety of the Vic- 
toria type. The blossoms are very double 
and clear, purr white. A very desirable 
wirl.-ty fttr florists. I'kl. IBs 

Washington. A large-flowering variety of 
upright growth, about 14 to 16 Inches high. 
Is a very bright-colored and showy bedding 
variety. Mixed, pkt. 10e 



i.H.i 



Triumph, a dwarf 

4 to 5 Inches high 
globe-shaped hi 

n hit.-. 

Mixed, 



arlety. growing about 

Compact habit, small 

in bright colors. 

Pkt. 10e 
•'Ire KIuk. Pkt. 10c 
IUS .1 is Pkt. 10c 



Bachelor's Button. Bee Centaurea Crama, 

Balsam, or Lady's Slipper, a tender an- 
nual, with brittle stems and foliage. Grows 
about 12 inches high. Flowers both single 
and double, in bright colors and variations; 
are wax-like and very attractive. The in- 
dividual blossoms floating in a dish of 
water exhibit their beauty to the best ad- 
vantage. 

Cnmelin Flowered. Mixed; the largest 
double variety. Pkt. 5c: ox. 75c 

Dark Blood Red. Double. Pkt. 10c 

Peach Bloaaoni. Double; shell pink. 

Pkt. 10c 
Red and White Spotted. Double. Pkt. 10c 
Snowball. Double; clear pearl white. 

Pkt. 10c 

>llxed Tall Doubles. About 12 inches 

high. Pkt. 5c; oi. 60c 

Balloon Vine, or Love-in-a-Puff. climb- 
ing annual, with small inferior flowers. The 
seed pods are curiously swelled or puffed, 
and are quite attractive. Pkt. 5c 

Bartonia, Aurea (Golden Bartonia). A 
hardy annual, growing about 2 feet high 
and bearing golden-yellow flowers, which 
have a metallic luster when the sun shines 
on them. Is a native of California. Sow 
the seed where the plants are to remain, 
since it does not transplant easily. Pkt. 5c 



A hardy 



rtiite va- 
Pkt. 10c 
Pkt. 10c 



BelliS Perennis (Double Daisy). 
perennial, blossoming freely all s 
summer. Plant is about 4 inches 
valuable for borders. 

Ultra Double White. A clear 

riety. 

Extra Double. Mixed. 

German Double. Mixed; all colors mixed, 
blossoms very double. Pkt. 5c 

Longfellow. Double dark rose. Pkt. 10c 

Snowball. Large flowers, double pure 
white, with good long stems. Pkt. 10c 

BrachyCOme (Swan River Daisy). A hardy 
annual, growing from 6 to 10 inches high 
and producing an abundance of pretty blue 
and white flowers. Pkt. 5c 

Begonia. Tender perennials, usually grown 
in the greenhouse. Some varieties are 
especially attractive on account of their 
foliage, but most varieties have exquisitely 
beautiful wax-like flowers, both single and 
double. The seed is very small and rather 
difficult to germinate. It is also very ex- 



■ strains being worth far more 
l heir weight in gold. 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED VARIETIES. For 
greenhouse and pot culture, having large, 
waxy flowers in brilliant colors. 

Double varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 35c 

International Priaie. The finest large- 
flowered single mixture. Pkt. 25c 

Single VnrletleH. Mixed. Pkt. 25c 

FIBROUS - ROOTED VARIETIES. For 
outdoor culture, having beautiful leaves, 
and bearing clusters of small, waxy flowers. 

Rex. A beautifully marked, large-leaved 
variety. Pkt. 25c 

Vernon. Deep-red flowers and dark-pur- 
ple foliage. Pkt. 10c 

Browallia. A half hardy annual, making a 
tine bedding plant. Blooms profusely. The 
flowers are bright ultramarine blue, and 
also sky blue with white center. Will 
bloom freely all winter if seed is sown in 
August. Mixed, pkt. 5c 

Calceolaria. A tender perennial, used 
largely in greenhouses and conservatories. 
Is not of easy culture, but a very desirable 
flower. Bears a large profusion of small, 
pocket-shaped flowers, many of which are 
beautifully tigered or spotted. There is a 
great variety of shades and colors in va- 

Grundiflora. Large-flowered, self-colored, 

profuse flowers. Pkt. 25c 

Tigered and Spotted. Mixed. Pkt. 25c 

Rugosa Hybrlda. A shrubby, profuse 

bloomer, and best for outdoor culture. 

Pkt. 25c 

Calendula (Pot Marigold). Very hardy an- 
nual. 1 foot high, blooming freely practical- 
ly the whole year round. Is of the easiest 
culture and is desirable for rather inferior 
soils, where less sturdy flowers do not 
thrive. A medicinal extract resembling 
arnica is made from the flowers. 

Double Mixed. A good mixture of 8 or 
10 different shades of yellow, some clear 
colors and some shaded and striped. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 15c 
Pluvalls (Cape Marigold). A white sin- 
le variety; the under side of the petals, 



111 



Pkt. 



California Poppy, see Eschschoitzin. 



58 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROV/ERS AND DEALERS 

FLOWER SEEDS — Continued 



Calliopsis, or Coreopsis, a half hardy 

annual, growing about 3 feet high, and 
valuable for bright bedding effects or for 
cutting. Leaves are narrow and stems slen- 
der. Blossoms single and about 2 to 4 
inches in diameter. 

Golden Wave. The largest-flowering va- 
riety. Clear yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Drummondi. Mixed. A gorgeous mixture 
of golden yellow, brown, maroon, and other 
shades. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Canterbury BellS (Campanula). A hardy 
biennial, blooming the second year from 
seed. Of easy culture, but preferring rich, 
moist soil. Grows about 3 feet high, and 
bears double and single varieties of blue, 
white, purple, and red flowers. 

Single Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Double Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

CtTP AND SAUCER TYPE. In this variety 

the out petal forms a brim like a saucer. 

Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Pure White. A beautiful flower, and the 

most desirable of all. Pkt. 10c 

Candytuft (Iberis). A hardy annual, grow- 
ing about 6 to 18 inches high, according to 
the variety. The blossoms are borne on 
variously long spikes, and the newer va- 
rieties are quite large flowering and very 
fragrant. Of easy culture and valuable for 
bedding or massing. 

Common Sweet Scented. Small white 
flowers. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c 

Crimson. Pkt. 5c 

Purple. Pkt. 5c 

Tom Thumb. "White. Plant very dwarf. 
Pkt. 5c 

White Rocket. Long spikes and large 
flowers. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c 

Giant Hyacinth Flowered. Very large 
heads and long spikes of white flowers. 
An improved strain of Giant Empress and 
the best sort for cut flowers. 

Pkt. 10c; Va ox. 25c; oz. 75c 

Dwarf Hybrids Mixed. Dwarf varieties 
in mixed colors. Pkt. 10c 

Mixture of all colors. Pkt. 5c 

Canna. A tall, large-leaved, tender peren- 
nial, propagated freely from the roots, but 
also easily raised from the seed. The plant 
grows about 4 to 6 feet high. The seed is 
large and ball-shaped and very hard, and 
should be soaked 24 hours in warm water 
before putting In soil. The plant makes an 
excellent clump on the lawn, the tall, up- 
right leaves being quite as beautiful as 
the large spikes of gorgeous flowers. Sow 
the seed early in the year under glass and 
transplant to the garden in April or May. 
Mixture of the popular varieties. Pkt. 5c 
Crozy's Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 10e 



Canary Bird Flower (Tropeeium canari- 

ense). A tender, climbing annual of the 
Nasturtium family. Blossoms have curious- 
ly winged petals and are light yellow. 

Pkt. 5c 

Carnation. A half hardy perennial, used 
generally for greenhouse florist's trade in 
winter and for a general garden favorite 
in summer. There are a large number of 
varieties and colors, but the early flower- 
ing mixtures are recommended for out-of- 
door culture. Sow the seed early in the 
year and transplant in March or April. 

Choice Double Mixture. A fine mixture 
of various colors and types. Pkt 10c 

German Extra Fine Double Mixed. A 
splendid strain. Pkt. 15c 

Marguerite. Mixed. The earliest, coming 
Into bloom twelve weeks from seed. Pkt. 10c 

Picotee. Extra fine double mixed. White, 

edged with colors, or striped and splashed. 

Pkt. 25c 

Castor Oil Bean (Ricinus). A tender an- 
nual, growing from 6 to 15 feet high and 
bearing large, green, deep purple, and 
brown leaves and bright orange and scarlet 
flowers. The seed pod resembles a prickly 
fruit. Of the easiest culture. Individual 
plants, with plenty of room, look best. 

Sanguineus. Tricolor. Has blood-red 
stocks and green leaves, with red veins. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c 

Zanzibarensis. Mixed. A large-leaved 
variety, deep green and bronze, growing 
10 to 15 feet high. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c 

Mixture of all varieties. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c 

Chrysanthemum. There are many widely 
different classes of this flower represented 
in the hardy annual or garden varieties, 
both single and double, and the perennial 
varieties, chief of which is double or flor- 
ist's varieties, so highly prized in the au- 
tumn and winter. 

ANNUAL VARIETIES. Growing 1^ to 3 
feet high. Seeds should be planted early 
and the plants set out in April. Single va- 
rieties sometimes called "Painted Daisies." 
Very attractive. Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c 
Coronarlum. Double blossoms. 

Mixed. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c 

White. Beautiful for cut flowers. 

Pkt. 10c 
Yellow. Also fine for cut flowers. 

Pkt. 10c 
PERENNIAL VARIETIES. Growing 2% 
to 3 feet high. Hardy and of easy culture. 
Frutescens, or "Marguerite"; also called 
"Paris White Daisy." White petals radi- 
ating from a golden-yellow center. 

Pkt. 10c 
Japanese Hybrids. A mixture of the 
large-flowering, florist's varieties. These 
varieties are the large, autumn flowers 
used in exhibitions and by florists. They 
are usually grown from cuttings, and do 
not come absolutely true from seed. 

Pkt. 25c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



59 



i i o\\ -mi » i in v 1M.11...1 



Cineraria. A tender perennial, grown prin- 
cipally in the greenhouse, but can be grown 
safely in the garden In summer. Seed 
should be sown in summer, and the green- 
house requires only moderate heat. Plants 
grow from 1 to 2 feet high and bear clus- 
ters of large, single flowers of bright 
colors. 

Hybrid* Mixed. The best variety, hav- 
ing large flowers and brilliant colors. 

Pkt. 25c 

Celosia Cristata, or Cockscomb, a half 

hardy annual, growing 6 to 8 inches high, 
bearing a wide, wavy blossom that resem- 



bles a cock's comb. In brilliant colors, and 
fine for massing or border work. 

iivwirf Mixed. Several shades of red and 
yellow mixed. Pkt. 15c 

Dwarf New Giant Empress. A rich, crim- 
son variety, with dark foliage and very 
wide combs. Pkt. 10c 

I'l.i musis. or Feathered Cockscomb. This 
species grows two or three feet high, and 
bears long, feathery plumes In brilliant 
colors. Mixed. Pkt. Be 

Magnificent. A new variety, superior to 
the older sorts. Pkt. 10c 



Catchfly. See Sllene. 




Cosmos — Giant of California 



Clarkia. A hardy annual, of easy culture, 
growing about 18 inches high and bearing 
bright rose, white, or purple flowers in 
great profusion. Native of California. Seed 
sown in the fall will give early blossoms 
in spring. Seed can be sown almost any 
time. Donble Mixed, pkt. Sc; ox. 25c 

Cleome Pungens, or Giant Spider Plant. 

A hardy annual, growing 4 to 5 feet high 
and bearing in profusion rose-purple blos- 
soms that are shaped something like a 
spider. Pkt. 5c 

Cobaea ScandenS. A half hardy, climbing 
annual, with large leaves and large trum- 
pet-shaped flowers. The blossom is green 
until nearly grown, when it turns bright- 



purplish blue. Grows about 30 feet long, 
and is very desirable for covering a large 
lattice. A native of Mexico. Pkt. 10c 

CosmOS. A tender annual, with fine-cut, 
feathery foliage and large, showy blossoms 
in rose, crimson, pink, and white. The 
late-flowering or giant type grows 5 to 6 
feet high and its blossoms are larger than 
the early varieties, or about 4 to 5 inches 
in diameter. They bloom late in the fall 
or about November 1st, and rarely blossom 
very far north. The early varieties bloom 
in July. Sow about March 1st and trans- 
plant In May. 

Early Flowering Dawn. White, slightly 
tinted with pink. Pkt. lOcj ox. $1.00 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

FLOWER SEEDS — Continued 



Early Flowering Mixed. The usual Cc 
nos colors in mixtures. Pkt. 5c; oz. 7 

Giant of California — 

Pink. Pkt. 5c; oz. 7 

"White. Pkt. 5c; ok. 7 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 7 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 5 



Mixed. 



Klondyke. A late-blooming variety, with 
bright-yellow blossoms. Pkt. 10c; oz. ¥1.00 

Centaurea. A hardy annual, embracing a 
number of species, some being grown only 
for their foliage. All varieties grow from 
1% to 2 feet high. Sow the seed early and 
transplant in March. 

cyan us (Bachelor's Button, or Bluebot- 
tle, or Corn Flower). Of easy culture. Sow 
the seed where it is to remain and thin to 
3 or 4 inches. Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Emperior William (Large, the). 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 
Pink. Pkt. 5e 

White. Pkt. 5c 

Imperialis. A beautiful, large-flowered 
type, resembling Sweet Sultan, but with 
a large-petaled margin around the blos- 
som. In white, lavender, and purple shades. 
Mixed, pkt. 10c; oz. 50c 

Pure white, pkt. 10c; oz. 75c 
Marguerite. A large, white variety of 
the Imperialis class. Fragrant and pretty. 
Pkt. 10c 
Moschata, or Street Sultan. A well-known 
type. In white, yellow, lavender, and pur- 
ple. Blossoms very fragrant. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c 
Gymnocnrpa, White Leaved, or Dusty Mil- 
ler. Grown for its silvery, fine-cut leaves. 
Pkt. 10c 

Clematis. A popular hardy perennial climb- 
er. An old favorite and justly so, for there 
are few garden climbers that give more 
satisfaction. 
Large Flowered Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Virginiana (Virgin's Bower). Pkt. 10c 

Paniculata. Beautiful, small-flowered va- 
riety. Pkt. 5c 

ColeUS. A tender perennial, growing about 
10 to 18 inches high, and grown for its 
beautiful, bright-colored, velvety leaves. 
Valuable for window garden or pots, and 
can also be grown out of doors if taken 



up 



rater. 



Extra Large Leaved Mixed. Pkt. 15c 

Ornatus. The best large-leaved variety. 

Pkt. 15c 

Collinsia. A free-flowering and easily 

grown annual, growing from 1 to 2 feet; 
flowers white, crimson, purple, etc. 

Mixed, pkt. 5c 

CypreSS Vine (Ipomcea Quamoclit;). A ten- 
der climbing annual, with soft fern-like 
foliage and small, star-like flowers in red, 
pink, or white. 

Scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

"White. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Mixture of several colors. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c 



Cyclamen. A tender, bulbous perennial, 
used in greenhouses and "window-gardens. 
Is easily grown from seed. Sow in the 
fall or early spring. 

Giganteuni. Very large flowers and very 

free blooming. Pkt. 15c 

Persicum. Splendid mixed. Pkt. 10c 

CockSCOmb. See Cclosia Cristata. 
ConVOlvulllS. See Morning Glory. 




Delphi 



Larkspur — "Emperor" 



Delphinium, or Larkspur. There are two 

well-known types, one being the single 
and double annual, and the other a very 
tall, hardy perennial. Both are of easy 
culture. 

HARDY ANNUAL VARIETIES. Grow 
about 1^ to 2 feet high. A great variety 
of colors. 

Dwarf Rocket. Mixed. Dwarf plant, 
double flowers. Pkt. 5c 

Emperor. Double mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Single. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



I I (i\\ F It SBBD9 < nntlnncd 



iivimv ri:iti.\\i vi. i vuivri u*. 4 to 

• high, with beautiful long spikes. 

rt.rimoiim. The bright-blue variety. 

with white center. Pkt. 5c 

l'>.riii<>«uiit i.rlrwilnum. The azure or 

light-blue variety. I'M. 10c 

Columbine (Aqullegla). A hardy peren- 
nial, growing about 2 feet high and bear- 
ing an Immense variety of colors on long, 
smooth stems. 

Double Mixed. All colors. Pkt. 10c 

Long Spurred Mixed. A large, single va- 
riety, with long spurs or back. A very 
showy and attractive type. Pkt. lOe 

Dahlia. A well-known and popular late 
summer and autumn flowering plant. Is 
grown from seed or propagated from the 
bulbous roots. The seed may be planted 
early In the hotbed and the plants set out 
In May after all danger of frost is over. 
By sowing the seed early the plants may 
be made to bloom the first year. 

Cm-tiiM. Mixed. Double, with pointed 

petals. Pkt. 10c 

Double. Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Single. Mixed. The most easily grown 

and also the most satisfactory from seed. 

Pkt. 10c 

Daisy, Double, see ueiiu Percams. 

Datura (Trumpet Flower, or Horn of Plen- 
lyl. A tender annual, growing 3 feet high. 
Flowers large and trumpet-shaped. 

i hi. , i- : , ml,:. Pi. PI. Double golden-yellow 
blossoms. Pkt. 5c 

Cornucopia. Blossoms single, white in- 
side, shading to purple. Pkt. 5c 

Dianthus, Barbatus. see sweet wiuiam. 
Dianthus, Caryophyllus. see carnation. 

DianthUS, Or Pinks. Hardy annuals, about 
1 foot high, and bearing beautifully colored, 
single and double blossoms in profusion 
all summer. Sow seed early in boxes and 
transplant, or sow in rows where the plants 
are to remain, and thin. 
CliinenslH (China Pink) — 

Double, white. Pkt. 5c 

Double, mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Dlndemutia PI. PI. (Double Diadem Pink). 
Large, double flowers in many colors. 

Pkt. 5c 
Heddewigl (Japanese Pink) — 

Finest single, mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Finest double, mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Lnclnlnliif*. Single, fringed varieties. 

Pkt. 5c 
Mixture of nil single varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Digitalis, Or Foxglove. A hardy peren- 
nial, blooming the second year from seed. 
Grows usually about 3% feet, although in 
very rich soil sometimes 6 feet. The bell- 
shaped flowers are borne on long spikes, 
and come in shades of purple, lavender, 



ul white, all spotted lightly Inside 

ssom. Thrives best in cool. shady 

locations. Fine mixed, pkt. 5c; o*. 50c 

Dolichos, or Hyacinth Bean, a tender, 

climbing annual. Grows rapidly and is val- 
uable for covering a trellis. Flowers in 
purple or white; are borne on long stems, 
the individual blossoms resembling the 
bean flower, and the ornamental pods re- 
semble bean pods. Sow seed in open 
ground late in April. 
Daylight. The best white. Pkt. lOe 

Darkness. The best purple. Pkt. 10c 

l.nhlnli. Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Dusty Miller. See Ceutnurea Kymnocurpu. 

Eschscholtzia, or California Poppy. A 

hardy annual, with fine-cut, feathery foli- 
age and beautiful velvety cup-shaped 
flowers. Grows from 1 to 1>A feet high, 
and blooms profusely. Seed may be sown 
in the fall and any time thereafter till 
April, and blossoms may be had from 
early in January till late in summer. Of 
the easiest culture. Any soil will do, but 
the better the soil, the larger the plants 
and blossoms. It is best to sow the seed 
in the garden, where the plants are to re- 
main, as they do not transplant easily. 

CnllforniciiM. The bright, orange-yellow 

common variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; lb. $2.00 

Itm-hank's Crimson Flowering. See page 6. 

Crocen. Petals rose pink outside, white 
inside. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Double Rose. A semi-double blossom, 
rose colored outside and white inside the 
petal. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Ercctn Mandarin. See page 5. 

Golden "West. Very large, orange-colored 
blossom, shading to canary yellow at the 
edges. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c 

Muuduriu. Blossoms are copper colored 

outside and bright-yellow inside the petals. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Striata. Golden yellow, striped lightly 
with cream. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

White. Large, ivory white. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Mixed Yellows. A mixture of the popular 
orange and yellow varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c 

Mixture of nil varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; lb. $2.00 

Bush Escliscboltzia. See Hunnemannia. 

Euphorbia. A hardy annual, growing 4 to 
6 feet high, and esteemed for its beautiful 
foliage. The blossoms are inconspicuous. 

Hcteropliylla. Called Mexican Fire Plant 

or Annual Poinsettia. Smooth, glossy leaves, 

turning scarlet late in the summer. Pkt. 10c 

Varlegata. Called Snow on the Mountain. 

Leaves veined and margined with white. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c 



Everlasting Flowers, see 

Gomplirene, Australian Star I 



Helicbrysuni, 
lower, Xernn- 



G2 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FLOWER SEEDS— Continued 



Evening Primrose, see Oenothera. 

Everlasting Pea. See Lathyrus Latifolins. 

FlaX. See Lininm. 

Feverfew (Pyrethrum Parthenium). Hardy 
perennial, with showy yellow foliage. Very 
attractive as a border plant. Grows about 
S inches high. Pfct. 5c 

Matricaria Eximia Grandi flora Fl. PI. 
Called Double Feverfew. A plant growing 
8 to 10 inches high and bearing profusely 
pure white, very double flowers. Pkt. 5c 

Flowering Maple, see Abutiion. 
Flowering Sage, see salvia. 

Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis). A hardy per- 
ennial, growing 6 to 12 inches high. Small 
star-like flowers are borne in clusters on 
long stems. The plant is of easy culture 
and blooms the first year if seed is sown 
early. Thrives best in a cool, moist loca- 
tion. 

Alpestris. Blue. Pkt. 5c 

Alpestris. White. Pkt. 5c 

Four O'clock. A hardy annual, about 2 
feet high. Of the easiest culture. Seed 
should be sown in the open and thinned to 
1 foot. Is free flowering, the blossoms in 
great variety of colors and stripes. 

Mixture of all colors. Pkt. 5c 

Tom Thumb. Dwarf plant, mixed colors. 
Pkt. 5c 
Variegated and striped colors. Mixed. 

Pkt. 5c 
FoXglOVe. See Digitalis. 

Gaillardia. A very showy garden plant, 
with brilliant flowers in scarlet and yellow, 
blended and shaded. Blooms freely from 
early summer till autumn. Grows 1% to 2 
feet high, and the blossoms are borne on 
long, slender stems. Both single and dou- 
ble varieties are hardy. 

Fine Single Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Large Doable Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Plcta Lorenzianna. Pkt. 5c 

Geranium. A half hardy perennial, flow- 
ering the first year from seed if sown 
early. A popular flower in brilliant colors 
and variously fragrant and ornamental 
foliage. Grows easily from seed. 

Apple Scented. Very fragrant leaves. 

Pkt. 25c 

Fancy Show, or Lady Washington. One 
of the most beautiful flowers we have; in 
rich, soft colors, with beautiful markings. 
Fancy mixed. Pkt. 25c 

Zonale. Various single and double varie- 
ties. Pfct. 10c 

Gilia. A hardy annual growing 1 foot high, 
with white, lilac, or rose-colored flowers. 
A native of California. Valuable for rock- 
work or borders. Sow seed in the fall. 
Mixed. Pkt, 5c 



GilliflOWer. See Ten Weeks' Stocks. 

Gloxinia. Beautiful hot-house plants, with 
large, bell-shaped blossoms, which come in 
rich, velvety-deep, and bright colors, some 
of which are beautifully marked. 

Hybrids. Mixed. Pkt. 25c 

Godetia. A hardy annual, growing from 6 
inches to 10 inches high. Of compact 
growth, with a profusion of satiny cup- 
shaped flowers in deep red, pink, and white, 
shaded and blended. Valuable for bedding 
or massing. Sow seed early in the year. 
A small-flowered, deep-red variety; grows 
wild in California. 

Tall Sorts. Fine mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Tom Thumb, or Dwarf Varieties. Mixed. 
Pkt. 5c 
Sunset. See page 5. 

Gomphrena, or Globe Amaranth, a iow- 

growing hardy annual, everlasting, or 
straw flower, about 8 inches high, with 
globe-shaped flowers, in red or white. The 
plant makes a good border, and the flowers 
are very pretty, and are attractive, either 
while growing or dried. 

Mixed. Pkt. 5c 
"White. Pkt. 5c 
Crimson. Pkt. 5c 

Gourds. Some varieties, besides being odd, 
are very ornamental. 

Mixed ornamental varieties. Pkt. 5c 

GypSOphila (Baby's Breath). A hardy an- 
nual of easy culture. Grows 2 to 3 feet 
high, and bears a profusion of small star- 
shaped white and pink flowers. 

Mural Is, An excellent border plant; pink 
flowers. Pkt. 5c 

Paniculata. Fine for bouquets ; white 
flowers. Pkt. 5e 

Helianthus. see sunflower. 

HelicnrySUm. A free-flowering, hardy an- 
nual, growing 4 to 5 feet high and bearing 
beautiful, straw-like flowers in a great 
variety of shades and colors. The stems 
are long and the blossoms large. It Is 
the best and most satisfactory of the ever- 
lasting flowers, and makes a very hand- 
some dried bouquet. Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz, 25c 

Heliotrope. A half hardy perennial, 
growing 4 to 8 feet high. Small flowers, 
borne in graceful clusters and very frag- 
rant. Blooms the first season from seed 
if sown early. Forms a large plant, and 
requires a roomy situation. Can also be 
grown against a wall and made to assume 
the character of a climber. 

King of the Blacks. Dark purple, almost 
black. Pkt. 10c 

Queen Marguerite. Purple blue. Pkt. 10c 
White Lady. Pure white. Pkt. 10c 

Finest Mixed. A mixture of the ordinary 
true types. Pkt. 10c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



68 



I l.n \V BIB SEEDS- Continued 




Hollyhock. A hardy perennial of upright, 
stately growth, 5 to 8 feet high. The very 
double varieties are the most desirable, 
but the newer, semi-double, fringed types 
are also very popular. Hollyhocks make a 
fine row in the garden, or a fine background 
next to a building or high wall or fence. 
DOUBLE VARIETIES— 

Mixed. Pkt. Sc 
Black Rose Pink 

Blood Red Snlmon 

Canary Yellow Snow White 

Pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted 40c; oz. 91.50 
Allegheny. Mixed. The semi -double, 
fringed variety. An artistic and pretty 
sort. Pkt. 10c; oz. $1.25 

Henderson's Everbloomlng. An early- 
flowering, gorgeous mixture of" single and 
semi-double blossoms. Pkt. 5c; oz. 75c 

Singles. Mixed. The old-fashioned blos- 
soms in all colors. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Humulus, or Japanese Hop. a rapid- 
growing, hardy, climbing annual, with 
dense leaves. Will grow 20 to 30 feet in 
a season, and is very valuable for covering 
a trellis. 

Jnponlcns. Bright-green foliage. Pkt. 5c 

Jnponlcns Vartegntus. Bright, variegated 

yellow, white, and green leaves. Pkt. 10c 

Hyacinth Bean, see Doiiciio*. 

Ipomea. An extensive genus, including 

many well-known garden flowers. Are ten- 
der climbing annuals, from 5 to 10 feet 
long, and all classes are desirable. The 
seed of several varieties, especially the 
moon-fiower, need have the outer shell 



punctured and then soaked In water for 
twelve hours or more to germinate it. 

Bonn Xox (Evening Glory, or Good 
Night). Large, fragrant violet blossoms, 
expanding in the night. Pkt. Be 

Cocclnen, or Star Ipomea. Small, scarlet 
blossoms. Pkt. 5c 

i. run ill Horn Alba (Moon Flower). Large, 

white blossoms, which expand only on dull 
days or at night. Pkt. 10c 

Imperial Japanese. See list under Morn- 
ing Glory. 

Ipomea Quamoclit. See Cypress Vine. 

Rubra Coerula, or Heavenly Blue. Large, 
sky-blue blossoms, with yellow throat. 

Pkt. 10c 

Setosn, or Brazilian Morning Glory. Beau- 
tiful, rose-colored blossoms, 3 inches in 
diameter. Pkt. 5c 

Ice Plant CMesembryanthemum Crystallin- 
um). A low-growing and trailing tender 
annual. The thick leaves seem to be cov- 
ered with crystals. Used for edging and 
box work. Pkt. 5c 

Japanese Hop. See Humulus Japonlcus. 

Kenilworth Ivy. A hardy perennial, trail- 
ing plant, especially adapted for hanging- 
baskets. Pkt. 10c 

Kochia ScOparia. A beautiful bush plant, 
forming a perfect sphere. The branches 
are covered with slender, light-green 
leaves, and late in the fall the plant is cov- 
ered with small, red blossoms, when it re- 
sembles a "ball of fire." Pkt. 10c 

Lantana. A tender perennial, 2 to 3 feet 

high, bearing verbena-like clusters of 

flowers, in orange, white, rose, and other 

colors. Blooms constantly all summer. 

Fine mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Larkspur. See Delphinium. 

LathyrUS LatifoliUS (Perennial, or Ever- 
lasting Pea). A hardy perennial climber, 
flowering the first year if seed is sown in 
the fall. Leaves and stems smooth. 
Flowers resemble sweet peas, but are borne 
on racemes, with 8 to 10 blossoms to the 
stem. Is not fragrant, but is hardy, and 
thrives in any good soil. 

Pink Beauty. The ground' of the petals 
is white, edged and shaded with pink. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 
Crimson. Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c 

White. The best variety for cutting, 
especially for florist's use. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c 
Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35e 

Splendens. Called the "Pride of Califor- 
nia." Not as hardy as the ordinary class. 
Flowers bright crimson-scarlet. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. $1.00 



64 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

FLOWER SEEDS— Continued 



Lin um, or Scarlet Flax, a hardy an- 
nual, about 1% feet high. Of slender and 
graceful appearance, with smooth stems 
and bright-red flowers, ■which are borne 
in great profusion. Can be sown early out . 
of doors, and thrives well in good soil. 

Pkt. 3c 

LophOSpermum ScanderiS. Tender climb- 
ing perennial, growing 10 to 12 feet long, 
with showy purplish-rose blossoms some- 
thing like Foxgloves. Pkt. lOe 

Love-in-a-MiSt. See Xlgella. 

Love Lies Bleeding. See Amarantlius 

Caudatns. 



LupinUS, Or Lupins. Hardy annuals, in 
great variety, growing from 1 to 3 feet 
high, and bearing spikes of pea-shaped 
flowers. Of the easiest culture. Sow in 
the open ground and thin to 6 inches apart. 

CruikHhankli. Dark blue. Long racemes 
of beautiful, blue flowers. Pkt. 5c 

Mixture of all colors. Pkt. 5c 

Lychnis. Hardy perennial, growing about 
3 feet high and bearing bright-colored 
flowers in clusters. Of easy culture. 

Chalcedonica. Scarlet flowers. Pkt. 5c 

Haageana. Orange, crimson, and scarlet 

flowers. Pkt. 5c 



if 




#^ 



w 



w 







Hnnnemaunia, or 

Hunnemannia, or Bush Eschscholtzia. 

Known also as the Santa Barbara Poppy. 
An erect-gro'wing, tender perennial, about 
2 feet high. Foliage fine cut and feathery. 
Blossoms, beautifully cup -shaped, bright 
yellow, and about 3 to 4 inches across. 
Stems, long and smooth. There are few 
more satisfactory flowers in the garden 
than the Hunnemannia. 

Fumariafolia. Pkt. 5c; oz. $1.00 



Marguerite. See Chrysanthemum Frutesce 
Martyilia. See Garden Seed List. 



Bush Eschscholtzia 

Marvel of Peru, see Four o'clock. 
Momordica. 

Balsumfna, or Balsam Apple. A climbing 
annual, growing about 10 feet long. Has 
graceful and ornamental foliage, yellow 
flowers, and warted golden-yellow fruit, 
with large carmine-red seeds. Pkt. 5c 

Charantia, or Balsam Pear. Same as the 
Balsam Apple, but fruit is ball-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c 

Moonflower. See Ipomea Grandillora Alba. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



66 



ll.oW BR SEEDS i i «i 



Lobelia. A half hardy annual ami hardy 
olal The annual grows 4 to 6 inches 
high; Is of compact growth, and literally 
covered with small, bright Rowers, Deed 
for ribbon work and borders or hanging 
baskets. 

i ryataJ Palace Conipnctn. Bright blue. 

Pkt. 5c 
White Gen (Com pacta). White flowers. 
Pkt. 10c 
Prima Donnn. Maroon, with white eye. 

Pkt. 10c 

Mixed minii:il varieties. Pkt. 5c 

PERENNIAL LOBELIAS are hardy and 

8 feet high. The blossoms are produced in 

spikes. 

Cnrdlnnlls, or Cardinal Flower. Brilliant, 



scarlet flower 
Hybrids. Mi 



■! 



:ed. Large flow* 



bllng Cardlnalls 

purple, etc. Pkt. 10c 

MimulUS. A half hardy perennial, growing 
from G inches to 1 foot high. Blooms free- 
ly and exists In a large variety of colors. 
Useful for window-gardens and pot work 
or for garden in a moist, shady situation. 
Blooms first year from seed if sown early. 
MoMclintuM, or Musk Plant. Fragrant 
plant, with small, yellow blossoms, spotted 
lightly with brown. Pkt. He 

Tigrlnus, or Monkey Flower. Large 
flowers of several colors, and spotted. 

Pkt. 10c 

Mina Lobata. A half hardy, annual climb- 
er, with orange-colored flowers, which are 
scarlet in the bud before opening. The 
plant blooms freely from base to top. and 
grows 20 to 30 feet long. Pkt. 10c 




Marfgolfl — "Eldorado," 



nual, shruDby plant, 
eties, growing from 
Foliage, bright 
graceful. The 
of yellow and 
are very valua- 



Marigold. A hardy 

in dwarf and tall varietie 

6 inches to three feet high 

green, deeply cut, and 

flowers are various shade 

brown. The tall varieties 

ble for large bedding or background work, 

and the dwarf varieties for borders. 

Eldorado. The best tall variety, with 
large double blossoms. Called the African 
Marigold. Hlxed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Dwarf French Mixture. A mixture of 
dwarf double colors in yellow, orange, and 
stripes. Mixed. Pkt. 5c; ok. 50c 

Pot Marigold and Cape Marigold. See 
Calendula. 



Morning Glory (Convolvulus Major). 



hardy cli 



ual, 



Jt 10 



feet long. Flowers are well known and 
exist in a great variety of colors, tints, and 
markings. Fully expanded only in the 
mornings. Of easy culture, quick growth, 
and valuable in every garden. 

Tall, or Climbing Varieties. Mixed. 

Pkt. fie; oz. 15c 

Imperial Japanese. Taller, larger leaved, 
and larger flowered, with a greater variety 
of blossoms than the older type. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c 

Dwarf, or Bush Varieties (Convolvulus 
Minor). Plants grow 10 to 12 inches high, 
and are hardy annuals. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



66 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

F3LOWER SEEDS— Continued 




Mignonette 

Mignonette. A hardy annual, growing 6 
to 12 inches high and bearing pyramidal- 
shaped flower spikes, made up of thickly- 
set flowerets, which are exceedingly frag- 
rant. Grows easily from seed and can 
either be transplanted from boxes or sown 
out in the garden and thinned to 4 or 6 



inches. Sow in the fall for early blossoms 
in the spring. Valuable for potting, or for 
bedding, or for border. The flowers are 
not attractive except for their fragrance. 

Allen's Defiance. Long spikes of whitish 
flowers and compact growth. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Golden Machet. A compact-growing va- 
riety, with medium long, thick spikes of 
yellow flowers. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c 

Parson's White. A tall variety, with 
long spikes with silver-white flowerets. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Pure Machet. A compact- growing va- 
riety, with thick spikes and large flowerets 
of copper color. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c 

Ruby Machet. A dwarf, compact variety, 
with large, stubby spikes covered with 
copper-red flowerets. Pkt. 5c 

Sweet Scented (Reseda Odorata). 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Mixture of the best varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

MUSk Plant. See Mimulus Moschatus. 

Mourning Bride, see scabiosa. 



NASTURTIUM 



Tender aunual, in two distinct classes — Dwarf and Tall, or Climbing 

DWARF VARIETIES 

The plant forms a small, round bush 12 to 16 inches high. The foliage is pretty and 
the flowers very beautiful and contained in a great number of colors and tints. Sow the 
seed where it is to remain late in the spring after danger of frost is over. It is seldom 
necessary to thin the young plants, as they will bear standing close together. 



Aurora. Yellow, veined with carmine. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c 
Chameleon. Mixed. A dwarf mixture of 
blotched and inconstant shades. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 80c 
Crimson. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c 

Crystal Palace Gem. Sulphur yellow, 
spotted with carmine. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 30c 
Empress of India. Intense scarlet and 
dark brown and green foliage. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 45c 
Golden Kins. Rich golden yellow. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c 
King of Tom Thumbs. Dark scarlet and 
dark-green leaves. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V, lb. 30c 



Ruby King. 



Scarlet. 
White Pearl. 



King Theodore. Deep crimson and dark 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 14 lb. 30c 
Bright red, tinted salmon. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c 
Very light lemon or prim- 
rose. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V, lb. 30c 
Yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c 
I.illiput Mixed. A dwarf and small-leaved 
type, which displays the blossoms to good 
advantage. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. S1.40 
Dwarf Varieties Mixed. A splendid mix- 
ture of all the above, besides many other 
varieties. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 85c 



TALL, OR CLIMBING VARIETIES 



a short time. The brilliant blos- 



Butterfly. Light yellow, with blotch of 
deep red on lower petal. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 20e; % lb. 60c 
Chameleon. A mixture of changing or 
inconstant shades. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. S5c; lb. $1.20 



Dark Crimson. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c 
Jupiter. Large, bright, golden yellow. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 60c 
Midnight. Flowers deep brownish red; 
foliage deep green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 60c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

IIDWER SEEDS > L8T1 KIM MS— Continued 



67 



Moonlight. Very light yellow. 

Pkt, .-..-; OS. 1 .'..-: y A lh. IM,- 

Orance. Pk i. 5c; on. ISci ', lb. 40e 

iVarl, or White. Light lemon or prim- 
oae. Pkt. 5c; ob. 15c; Y* lb. 40c 

Ronr. Pkt. Set ob. 15c; V4 lb. 40c 

Sunlight. Bright yellow. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 15c; Y* lb. 40c 



Scarlet. Pkt. Set os. 15c; Ya lb. 40c 

Twilight. Large blossoms of light sal- 
mon, suffused with rosy salmon. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 15c; ' , lb. 40c 
r«ll«W. Pkt. 5c; ob. 15c; ' i lb. 40c 

Tnll Varieties Mixed. All the above va- 
rieties, besides many others, in a splendid 
mixture. Pkt. 5c; ob. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 70c 



TROP-ffiOLUM LOBBIANUM, OR LOBB'S VARIETIES 



the 



are smaller and the flowe 



nore 



l*obb*M Varieties Mixed. 

Pkt. 5c; ob. 10c; 1 i lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 
Asa Gray. Light lemon or primrose. 

Pkt. 5c; oe. 15c; Y* lb. 45c 
Crown Prince of Prussia. Blood red. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 15c; v, lb. 45c 
Crystal Palace. Orange scarlet. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 15c; ] , lb. 45c 
Giant of Battles. Sulphur yellow, blotch- 
ed with red. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Y* lb. 45c 
Kins of the Blacks. Dark-red flowers 
and dark foliage. Pkt. 5c; os. 15c; Y* lb. 45c 
Lucifer. Blossoms, deep crimson; leaves, 
brownish green. Pkt. 5c; os. 15c; % lb. 45c 
Reglnn. Salmon red, changing to almost 
cream color. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Y* lb. 45c 
Spitfire. Brilliant scarlet. 

Pkt. 5c; os. 15c; % lb. 45c 



Caprice. A mixture of light colors, spot- 
ted and shaded, with dark foliage. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V x lb. 45c 

Hybrids of Madam Gunter. Mixed. A 
splendid mixture of blotched, shaded, and 
variously marked petals In bright, glow- 
ing tints. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00 

Ivy-leaved. A mixture of several colors; 
have lobed or scalloped leaves. The blos- 
soms have narrow petals scalloped at the 
edges. Very pretty and attractive. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c 

Red Spurred. A mixture of light colors, 
all having a red back or spur. Foliage 
dark. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.50 



Nemophila, or Love Grass, a hardy an- 
nual, growing about 6 inches high. Has 
small, cup-shaped blossoms about 1 inch 
in diameter, in white and shades of blue. 
Pkt. 5c 

Nigella, Or Love-in-a-Mist. A hardy an- 
nual, 1 foot high, with finely cut foliage, 
oddly shaped blossoms in blue and white, 
and curious seed pods. Of easy culture. 
Damascena. Pkt. 5c 

OxaliS. A half hardy perennial, growing 
about 9 inches high and suitable for green- 
house, rock-work, or out-door culture. 
Flowers, bright colored and showy. Mixed. 
Pkt. 5c 



Nicotiana, or Flowering Tobacco, a 

half hardy annual, growing 3 feet high. 

Belongs to the tobacco family. Has white 

blossoms. Requires plenty of room In the 

garden. 

Afllnls. White. Pkt. 5c 

Sandersea. A new, large, flowering type, 

with various bright-colored blossoms. 

Pkt. 10c 

(Enothera, or Evening Primrose, a half 

hardy annual and perennial, about 6 inches 
high, bearing bright, showy flowers in 
white, pale yellow, rose, etc. Of the easiest 
culture. The blossom is fully expanded 
only late In the afternoon. 

Annual Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



PANSY 



A half hardy perennial, growing 4 to 6 inches high and probably the best known and 
among the most popular flowers in cultivation. It thrives best in a moist, shady location, 
and In rich, loamy soil. Seed should be sown In the autumn for early spring blossoms, or 
can be sown early in the year for good flowers later In the spring. The blossoms are usu- 
ally larger in the spring and again in the fall, and while it blooms freely all summer, the 
blossoms are small during the hot months. While the plants carry over well with a little 
covering during the winter, it is best to plant seed anew each year. We offer only the Im- 
perial German strains. 



Bugnot. Mixed. A circular, ruffled, and 
flve-petaled type, with soft, blended colors 
and tints, with a dark blotch at the base 
of each petal. One of the very finest va- 
rieties. 

Pkt. 25c; % os. 75c; Y* os. $2.75; os. $5.00 

Cassler's Giant. Mixed. A splendid mix- 



ture of various shades and markings. The 
blossoms are perfectly round and are 
blotched at the base of 3 to 5 of the petals. 
Pkt. 15c; Y* oz. 50c; oz. $3.00 
Giant Trlmardean. Mixed. The largest- 
flowering type of pansies, called the French 
strain. The top petals are larger than 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FLOWER SEEDS — PANSY — Continued 



the three lower ones and are beautifully 
marked. Pkt. 15c; Ys oz. 50c; oz. $3.00 

Large-flowering. Mixed. All varieties 
and colors in a fine mixture. 

Pkt. 10c; y s ox, 25c; oz. $1.25 

Odier, or Prized Blotched. Mixed. A 
large- flowered type, with round blossoms. 
The petals are all blotched at the base and 
distinctly margined on the edge. 

Pkt. 10c; % oz. 60c; ox. $3.50 

Perfect Blend. One of the very best 
strains of mammoth pansies obtainable. 
All large blossoms, all perfectly formed, 
circular, and with large, thick petals. 
Colors, deep and rich, and beautifully 
blended. 

Small pkt. 15c; large pkt. 25c; 1/1C oz. 

90c; % oz. $1.50; M. oz. $2.75. 

Masterpiece. See page 5. 

Emperor William. Ultramarine blue, with 
violet eye. Pkt. 10c; y 4 ox. 40c; oz. $1.25 



Fairy Queen. Light blue, margined with 

white. Pkt. 10c 

Gold Margined. Pkt. 10c 

King of the Blacks. Almost jet black. 

Pkt. 10c; V, oz. 40c; oz. $1.25 
Lord Beaconafield. The petal light blue, 
lower petals velvety blue. 

Pkt. 10c; y* ox. 40c; oz. $1.25 

Peacock. Ultramarine blue, deep claret 

and white blended very much to resemble 

the feathers of a peacock. Pkt. 10c 

Prince Bismarck. Golden bronze. 

Pkt. 10c 

Quadricolor, or Pheasant's-Eye. Light 

blue violet and other blues, shaded prettily. 

Pkt. 10c 

Snow Queen. Pure, spotless white. 

Pkt. 10c; % oz. 50c; oz. $1.50 
Yellow Gem. Pure, clear yellow. 

Pkt. 10c; Vi oz. 40c; oz. $1.25 



Papaver, or Perennial Poppy. Hardy 

perennial, of easy culture; in bright, glow- 
ing colors. Blooms first year from seed. 

Iceland. Mixed. A graceful, delicate 
variety, with white, orange, and yellow 
single blossoms, the petals resembling 
crumpled tissue paper. The plant is low- 
growing, but the stems are long and slen- 
der. Sow in the fall, where plants are to 
remain, and thin. Pkt. 5c 

Orientale (the large Oriental Poppy). A 
hardy plant, bearing large, brilliant scarlet 
flowers, with a black blotch on each petal. 
Very showy and attractive. Pkt. 5c 

For other Papavcrs, see Poppy. 

Passion Flower (Passiflora). A hardy per- 
ennial climber, shedding its leaves in win- 
ter. Grows luxuriantly either from cuttings 
or seed. A very satisfactory climber for 
immense growth, as it will cover a porch 
or small cottage in one summer. 

Pink. Pkt. 10c 

Blue and Violet. Pkt. 10c 

Pentstemon. A hardy perennial, bloom- 
ing first year from seed. Grows about 18 
inches high, and its bright-colored and 
spotted blossoms are borne in spikes, some- 
what like the Foxglove, but in a great 
variety of shades and colors. A decidedly 
beautiful and satisfactory flower. 

Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Petlinia. A tender perennial, of several 
distinct types, and variously adapted for 
greenhouse and pot culture, and for open 
air. The latter grows with little attention 
or care, and in any soil, and blooms pro- 
fusely all spring and summer. The large, 
double varieties do not produce seed, but 
the pollen from them is artificially crossed 
on the large, single, and fringed plants, 
and the seed so produced will make double 
blossoms. The Giant Flowered types are 



i edged, or fringed 
very thickly double 

GIANT FLOWERED VARIETIES, all fer- 
tilized by hand — 

Single. Deep throated, brilliantly blotch- 
ed, plain edge, mixed. Pkt. 15c 

Single. Deep throated, brilliantly blotch- 
ed, fringed, mixed. Pkt. 15c 

Double. "White, blotched, and brilliantly 
colored, mixed. Pkt. 25c 

SMALL FLOWERED VARIETIES— 

Dwarf Inimitable. Mixed. A very free- 
blooming, dwarf plant. Pkt. 10c 

Fine Mixed. Good mixture of all free- 
Pkt. 10c 



PhlOX Dnimmondii. A hardy annual, 
growing from 6 inches to 1 foot high and 
bearing beautiful, soft-petaled, and bril- 
liantly colored flowers all spring and sum- 
mer. Fine for bedding and massing. Sow 
seed in the fall for early flowers. 

Carnea. Pink, with chamois-rose center. 

Pkt. 5c 

Coccinea. Brilliant scarlet. Pkt. 5c 

Eclipse. Bright, rosy purple and violet. 

Pkt. 5c 

Large Blood Red. Pkt. 5c 

Pure White. Pkt. 5c 

Splendens. Bright red, with white eye. 

Pkt. 5c 

Yellow. Soft primrose. Pkt. 5c 

Fine Mixture of all colors of the larger 

type. Pkt. 5c; ox. 50c 

Dwarf Compact. Mixed. Low-growing 

plants, with good-sized flowers. Pkt. 10c 

Starred and Fringed. Mixed. A mixture 

of star-shaped and pointed blossoms. 

Pkt. 10c 
PERENNIAL HARDY PHLOX. A beautiful 
and easily grown perennial about 3 feet 
high and bearing clusters of bright-colored, 
phlox-like blossoms. There is no more sat- 
isfactory flower for the garden, and should 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



19 



I l.i>\\ I'll SEEDS l i 



be In far more general use than It is now. 

'Hied. Pkt. 

Purr While. Especially for florists. 

Pkt. 10c 

Perennial Pea. a • i ..n, . ,,,,., LattfoUaa. 
Perilla Nankinensis. a hair hardy an- 

with very dark bronze, almost black 
foliage. Similar to Coleus. Is of easy 
culture. Mixed. Pkt. 3<- 

Periwinkle. See Vlnca. 

Poppy. A hardy annual, 3 to 5 feet high, 
and bearing single and large double blos- 
soms in bright colors. Sow seed in open 
ground where plants are to remain, and 
thin I.. « or 12 Inches. If left thick the 
plants will he »eak and spindly and the 
blossoms Inferior. To avoid getting the 
seed too thick, it can be mixed with dry 
sand before sowing. 

DOUBLE VARIETIES 

Cardinal. A bright scarlet, large, fringed, 
double. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Double White, Preony Flowered. Straight 
edges. Pkt. 5e; n. 50c 

Fairy Blush. A large, double fringed, 
white, with pink euges. Pk*. 5c; oz. 50c 

Shrimp Pink. Large, double, straight 
edges. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

White Fringed, or Carnation Flowered. 
Large, double fringed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 

Large Double. Mixed. All colors. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c 
SINGLE VARIETIES 

Tulip Flowered. Intense scarlet, single 
blossoms. Plant, about 2% to 3 feet high. 
The brightest-colored of all poppies. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 00c 

Shirley. The most beautiful type of 
poppies, having soft, hairy foliage, and an 
immense variety of single blossoms in 
white, pink, lavender, purple, shades 
of red, and scarlet. Free blooming and 
fine for bedding or tall border. Mixed. 

Pkt. 5e; oz. 60c 

Iceland and Oriental. See Papaver. 

Pinks. See Dlanthus. 

Platycodon Grandiflora, or Japanese 

Bell. A hardy perennial, growing 1% 
feet high and bearing double, deep-blue 



Japonicus Fl. PI. Pkt. 10c 

Physallis Franchetti, or Chinese Lan- 
tern Plant. A showy annual, growing 
2 feet high and esteemed for its seed pods, 
which in the fall change from brilliant 
yellow to scarlet and which are round and 
pointed and resemble a small lantern. The 
fruit inside the pod is sometimes made into 
preserves. ' Pkt. 10c 

Portulaca. Low-growing or creeping, ten- 
der annual, 6 to S inches high and bearing 



glossy, cup-shaped blossoms in very bril- 
liant and gorgeous colors. The foliage 
and stems are thick. The seed germinates 
slowly and should bo started under glass. 
The plants require a sunny location, and 
do best on rather dry ground. 

Single. Large flowering, mixed. Pkt. 5c 
Double. Large flowering, mixed. Pkt 10c 

Primrose, Evening, see cEnotaera, 
Primula Sinensis, or Chinese Primrose. 

Greenhouse or pot plants, bearing large 
single or double blossoms in bright colors, 
;is well as soft tints. Sow seed in April 
or May for winter blooming. 

SINGLE FRINGED VARIETIES 
Alba MagnlBca. Pure white. Pkt. 25c 

Bright Blue. Pkt. 25c 

Bright Rose. Pkt. 25c 

Rosy Morn. Blush pink. Pkt. 60c 

Scarlet. Pkt. 25c 

SINGLE FLOWERS. Choice mixed. 

Pkt. 25c 
Single Fringed Varieties. A splendid mix- 
ture. Pkt. 25c 
DOUBLE FLOWERS. Saved from the 
finest blossoms. Pkt. 25c 
FICICIFOLIA, or Fern Leaved Varieties. 
Mixed. Pkt. 25c 
For other Primroses, see Oenothera. 

Pyrethrum. A hardy perennial, with bright 
foliage, much used for edging and borders. 
Seed can be sown in the fall or spring and 
transplanted. 

Parthenifolium Aureum, or Golden Feath- 
er. Small-cut leaves, bright golden yellow. 
Pkt. 5c 

Roseum, or Insect Powder Plant- A 
hardy perennial, with red-petalled flowers 
radiating from a golden-yellow center. Bu- 
hach, or insect powder, is made from the 
dry leaves. Pkt. 5c 

Grnudiflorum. A large-flowered type, 
with bright-colored and attractive blossoms 
for cutting. Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Red-Hot Poker Plant, see Tntoina. 

RicillUS. See Castor OH Bean. 

Salvia, or Flowering Sage, a tender per- 
ennial, blooming the first season from seed 
and growing 2 to 3 feet high. The blos- 
soms are borne on long stems in racemes 
or spikes, and are fragrant. The plant 
forms a bunch and blooms profusely. 

Patens. Bright blue flowers. Pkt. 10c 
Splendens. Bright scarlet flowers. 

Pkt. 10c 

SchizanthllS. Hardy annuals, growing l 1 ^ 
to 2 feet' high and covered with bright, 
showy, butterfly-like blossoms. Large 
flowering. Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

SalpiglOSSis. A half hardy annual, grow- 
ing about 3 feet high and bearing trumpet- 



70 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FLOWER SEEDS— Continued 



shaped blossoms of rich shades and colors, 
all beautifully veined. It is valuable for 
bedding and massing, and its long stems 
make it excellent also for cut flowers. 
Sow seed early in the year and transplant, 
or sow the seed where it is to remain, in 
April, and thin to 6 or 8 inches. 

Extra Fine Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



SmilaX. A climbing perennial, with beau- 
tiful, bright-green, glossy leaves, much es- 
teemed for its long, delicate sprays of foli- 
age. Largely used for decorating. Start 
seed under glass and transplant 6 inches 
apart. It requires strings or wires to 
climb on when very young. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 50e 




"Shirley" Popple 



Sensitive Plant. An ornamental plant, 
with finely cut green foliage. The leaves 
curl up and droop whenever touched. 

Pkt. 10c 

Silene, Or Catchfly. Hardy annual, grow- 
ing about 1 foot high and bearing small, 
attractive flowers in various colors. Of 
easy culture and valuable for bedding. 

Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Sanvitalia. A hardy trailing annual, 6 
inches high and bearing bright-yellow blos- 
soms resembling a miniature double Zinnia. 
Of the easiest culture and valuable for 
rockwork or borders. 

Procumbens FI. Pi. Pkt. 5c 

Snapdragon (Antirrhinum). A half hardy 
perennial, growing from 6 inches to 2 feet 



tall. Flowers are oddly shaped and ap- 
parently closed, but by pressing the sides 
together can be made to open like a dog's 
mouth. The newer strains are large flow- 
ered and contained in a great number of 
shades and colors. 

Fine Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Giant Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Tom Thumb, or D«nrf Varieties. Six 

inches tall. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Scarlet Flax, see tinum. 

Scabiosa, or Mourning Bride. Also called 

Sweet Scabious. Old Maid's Pincushion, etc. 
A hardy annual, growing 8 Inches to 2 
feet high and bearing heads of bright 
flowers on long, slender stems. The seed 
pods are thimble-shaped and covered with 



C. C. MORSE * CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



i inw i it MBBD9 * ..i.iinii.-.i 



stiff stamens. Very effective as a bedding: 
plant or for cut flowers. While an old- 
fashioned flower. It Is highly esteemed and 
very popular. 

Mum moth Flowered. Double or Maxima. 
Mix* il. An Improved strain, with large 
petals and beautiful colors. Pkt. 5c 

Caucasia. A hardy perennial variety, 
with bluish lavender blossoms and long 
stems. Pkt. 10c 

StOCkS i Te c Weeks' Stocks, or Gllllflowers). 

Hardy Tnnuals. 2 feet high, with spikes 
densely covered with beautiful, double 
flowerets. The flowers come in many colors 
and tints and are fragrant and very valu- 
able for bedding and cut flowers. The 
flower-seed growers have devoted a great 
deal of attention and care to this flower, 
and have developed a large number of va- 
rieties, and have so improved the double 
varieties that they will come fully 80 per 
cent double, where they formerly would 
not come 50 per cent so. Of easy culture. 
Sow seed in hotbeds or boxes and trans- 
plant. 

Cut and Come Again. White. Princess 

Alice or White Perpetual. Best for cutting. 

Pkt. 10c 

Emperor, or Perpetual. A biennial dou- 
ble variety, the plants sometimes lasting 
many years if protected. 

White, for florists. Pkt. 10c 
Nixed. Pkt. 10c 

German Doable. A very good double 

strain. White. Pkt. 10c 

Mixed. Pkt. Sc 

Globe Pyramidal. One of the best large, 
double varieties. Pkt. 10c 

Henderson's Colossal Double Mixed. Very 
long spikes, and one of the very finest 
strains. Pkt. 10c 



Spider Plant, seo ra«om« Piumm*.. 

Stevia. A tender perennial, 1M feet high 
and bearing clusters of small, white, frag- 
rant blossoms. Suitable for summer or 
winter blooming, and for pot culture or 
open air. Serrata. Pkt. 10c 

Stokesia, or Cornflower Aster, a hardy 

perennial, 2 feet high, and bearing large, 
blue flowers on long stems. Blooms free- 
ly all summer and fall, and is of easy cul- 
ture. Cyanca. Pkt. 10c 

Straw FloWerS. See Australian Star Flower; 
Gomphrenn; Heliclirysum; Xcranlhentum. 

Sunflower (Helianthus). Hardy annuals, 
growing from 3 to 6 feet high. Of the 
easiest culture and suitable for a stately 
row or background, or even for bedding. 

Chrysanthemum Flowered. Large, dense- 
ly double, bright-golden flowers. The plant 
branches and affords fine, long, stout stems 
for cutting. This is the best variety in 
existence. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Russian. The common, large flowering 
variety, with great brown centers and an 
edge of yellow petals. The seed is used 
for chicken feed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c 

Stella. The shorter, smooth - leaved, 
small- flowered variety, growing wild In 
many States. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c 

Sweet AlySSUm. See Alyssum. 

Sweet Rocket (Hesperis). A hardy per- 
ennial, growing 2 to 3 feet high. An old- 
fashioned, fragrant flower, of the easiest 
culture, and bearing clusters of white and 
purple blossoms. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Sweet Sultan. See Centaurea Moschuta. 



72 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



SWEET PEAS 



This popular flower, which is so easily- grown anywhere, is especially adapted to Cali- 
fornia, and most of the seed of the world's supply is grown here. It is of the easiest 
culture, its only enemies being cut worms and birds, which interfere with the young seed- 
lings. There is no practical remedy for the former, although lime and Paris Green will 
help somewhat, if sprinkled on the young sprouts. 

The seed should be sown in the fall in a row, dropping two 
inches and covering one or two inches deep. While the growth u 
it is very rapid in the spring, and the plants are in full bloom in 
summer sets in. The seed, however, can be planted any time until April 1st, especially 
near the sea coast, where the weather is cool and where fog is prevalent. 

Sweet Peas require an abundance of water and an open location. The water, if pos- 
sible, should be applied at the roots, and the vines should not be sprinkled. A trellis of 
brush or strings or chicken wire is necessary. 



or three seeds every four 
> very slow in the winter, 
May, before the dry, hot 




tf E. J. Castle" 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS ;:; 

ri.uw 1:11 nm ■WKIVl' l'i: \s Continued 

Tae lanrra Mhould be kept Enlbrrril, since If allowed to go to seed, the plants will soon 
■ -wing. 

The OffMl Pi . la a climbing annual, and hardy. The early flowering varieties are gen- 
erally used for forcing under glass, but they are very desirable also In the garden, and 
will bloom In February If sc.,1 is sown In November. 

There Is a very long list of varieties, but as the Sweet Pea has been developed and 
Improved, n (real many of the older varieties have been discarded. The list we offer 
represents nil the ileslrnble varieties, and every color and shade is included. 

>>»««•.— If any of our readers are familiar with a name of a variety that does not ap- 
pear here, and will write us for it. we can probably send precisely the same shade of color 
in an Improved variety under one of the names we list here. 

The star <•) indicates our choice of the best varieties In each class. 



FOUR GRAND NEW SWEET PEAS FROM ENGLAND 



Of the Countess Spencer type 1 
duce 70to 75 per cent of four bloo 
standard and wings, all facing one 



Frank Dolby. 

superb effect. 

Nora Unwin. Pure ws 

true to name, ar.d does 



A fine, light lave 



vy white, 
lot sport. 



All the above at 25c per packet, 



size, form, gracefulness, and beauty. They each pro- 
s to the stem, all large, all having the graceful wavy 
ay on long, stout stems. 

ider of Mrs. Alfred WatkinS. Beautiful, clear, 

deep pink. One of the best for cut 
flowers. 
Comes 

E. J. Castle. A fine, new carmine rose. 

original wrappers, as sent out by the Introducers. 



WHITE 



Burpee's Earliest White, see page i. 

*Dorothy Eckford (white seeded). The 
new white. Of the largest and best type, 
with shell-shaped standard and large wings. 
Of heavy texture, and a very vigorous 
plant. The very best white sweet pea in 
existence. Pkt. Be; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 09c 

Emily Henderson (White seeded), a boia, 

open blossom, with upright standard and 
heavy texture. It is a very popular variety 
on account of its large stems and earliness, 
and its hardiness. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; I, lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Sadie Burpee (black seeded). A large va- 
riety, with shell-shaped or hooded stand- 
ard, opening with a faint tint of pink and 
turning to a pure and clear white. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V* lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



Mont Blanc (white seeded). Of the earli- 
est flowering varieties. Vine short, leaves 
small and pointed, blossoms nearly as large 
as Emily Henderson and of the same gen- 
eral appearance. A fine forcing variety 
for florists. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y 4 lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Sadie Burpee (white seeded). A large, 
clear, white variety, with shell -shaped or 
hooded standard with large wings. Similar 
to Blanche Burpee, but larger. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



*Shasta. ou 



, large white. See page 7. 



White Wonder (white seeded). A double 
variety, having divided or multiplied stand- 
ards, sometimes two or three, and each as 
large as the standard in the single flower. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; ' , lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



PALE YELLOW, OR PRIMROSE 



Earliest Sunbeams, as early as Mont 

Blanc and much the same in every par- 
ticular, excepting the color of the blos- 
soms, which are primrose. A fine florist's 
forcing variety. 

Pbt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Mrs. Eckford (white seeded). A clear prim- 
rose yellow, of good size and with slightly 
hooded standard. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



*Hon. Mrs. E. Kenyon (white seeded), a 

fine, large, clear primrose or very light 
yellow, with open, wavy standard and large 
wings. The best variety of this shade. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Queen Victoria (black seeded). A large 
variety, with hooded standard. Opens with 
a faint tint of pink and then turns clear 
primrose. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V* lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 
FLOWER SEEDS— SWEET PEAS— Continued 

VERY LIGHT PINK, ALMOST WHITE 



75 



*Modesty. A very soft and delicate pale 
pink, with hooded standard. 

Pk«. 5c; ..». 10c| Yt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Nymphsa. A white variety, turning soft 
pink and then rose as the blossoms fully 
mature. There are always four blossoms 
to the stem, and the top blossom usually 
remains white. Large and finely formed 
and a beautiful variety. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; ■ i lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



Ramona. A large, shell-shaped or hooded 
variety, clear white and delicately striped 
with very light pink. 

I'kl. 6c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

SeilSatiOIl. A large, shell-shaped standard, 
opening light pink and buff, with white 
wings. There are usually four blossoms 
on each stem, the bottom flower turning 
almost white as the blossoms expand. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



VERY LIGHT PINK AND PRIMROSE 



Coquette. Standard light mauve and fawn, 
blended on primrose. Wings, clear prim- 
rose. Large hooded type. 

Pkt. 5c; o<. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Golden Rose. One of the largest varie- 
ties. Open form, with round, wavy stand- 
ard, and large wings. Clear primrose, 
lightly striped with light, soft pink. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c) Yt lb. 25c; lb. SOc 

Lady M. Onnsby Gore. Fawn and prim- 
rose In the standard; wings, clear prim- 
rose. Hooded, good size, and pretty. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. SOc 



Lottie Hutchins. Light primrose, striped 
with light, delicate pink. Hooded standard, 
and large. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. SOc 

Marchioness of Cholmondeley. a new 

variety, in buff and light pink, hooded and 
large. Very attractive. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. T5c 

•Stella Morse. Buff suffused with tint of 
pink, and showing a little deeper on the 
edges. Hooded form, good size, and long 
stems. A graceful and delicate variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. SOc 



LIGHT PINK SHADES 



Agnes Johnson. Light pink, buff, and 
cream, blended and shaded. Standard ex- 
panded and open, and the blossoms of good 
size. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

CounteSS Of Lathom. A creamy pink, self 
color. Good size, hooded form. Very pret- 
ty. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*GladyS Unwin. A new giant-flowered 
sweet pea from England. A light, delicate 
pink, a little deeper at the edges. Both 
standard and wings very large and ruffled 
on the edges. Is a light-coloreu companion 
to Countess Spencer, the grand, new, giant- 
flowered variety wh'uh has inaugurated a 
new era in sweet peas. 

Pkt. 15c; oz. 75c 



Katherine Tracy, soft pink standards, 

with lighter pink wings. Open and ex- 
panded type of good size. Vine, a very vig- 
orous grower. 

Pkt. 5c | oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. SOc 

*Prima Donna. The most popular and 
satisfactory of all the light pink varieties. 
A clear, soft pink self color, with shell- 
shaped standard, of good size, strong and 
vigorous vine and long stems. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; ',.', lb. 20c; lb. SOc 

VenUS. Opens a beautiful buff pink and 
turns a little deeper at full maturity. A 
soft and delicate shade. Of good size; 
hooded form. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. SOc 



DEEPER PINK SHADES 



*C0UnteSS Spencer. See page 3 of cover. 

*Janet Scott. A beautiful, new, shell- 
shaped variety, the standard being clear 
pink at the base and shading to buff at 
the edges. Wings are deeper bright pink. 



The wings instead of growing at right 
angles to the standard are upright and 
almost parallel to it, but are so curled 
that the keel is not conspicuous. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



ROSE AND VERY LIGHT PINK SHADES 



Apple Blossom. One of the older and pop- 
ular varieties, of very vigorous growth, 
long stems, usually bearing four blossoms. 
Standard Is shell-shaped, crimson-pink, 



shading deeper at mid rib and lighter at 
edges. Wings are white, tinted and shaded 
with pink. 

Pkt. Be; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 5*c 



76 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FLOWER SEEDS-SWEET PEAS— Continued 



Crown Jewel. Light magenta-lilac shaded 
on primrose; wings, clear primrose. The 
blossoms sometimes turn to a deep rose 
color. Large and fine form. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

♦Earliest Of All. The earliest variety 
grown. Comes into bloom in 8 or 10 weeks 
after sowing the seed, and is largely used 
by florists for winter greenhouse use. The 
blossom is the same as Blanche Ferry, or 
bright rose standard with "white wings. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Extra Early Blanche Ferry. An early 

strain of the well-known and popular 



Blanche Ferry and almost as early as ■ 
Earliest of All. The blossom, which is rose- 
pink and white, resembles the old-fashioned 
Painted Lady or Pink and White, but is 
brighter and more pronounced. We recom- 
mend this early strain, since coming early 
into bloom the flowers are appreciated 
much more than when the newer and more 
popular varieties are in full bloom. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Lady Skelmersdale. Standard light ma- 
genta rose and lilac; wings, clear white. 
Of hooded form and good size. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



ROSE AND FINK SHADES 



*Jeannie Gordon. Bright rose standard, 

showing veins of deeper rose; wings, prim- 
rose tinted with light rose. Large size, 
shell-shaped, and a vigorous vine with long 
stems. Pkt. 5c; 02. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Royal Rose. Crimson-pink standard, shad- 
ing deeper at the mid rib and lighter at 



edge; wings, pink. Very large and slightly 
shell-shaped. The largest variety of this 
class. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Triumph. Standard rose, heavily veined with 
scarlet-rose; wings, crimson-pink. Large 
and well expanded; open form. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



LIGHT PINK SHADES 



*Dainty. A new variety, producing the 
longest stems of any sort, and bearing 
nearly always four blossoms. Body of 
flower is clear white, shaded lightly with 
blush pink and having distinct edgings of 
bright but soft pink. A shell-shaped va- 
riety, and one of the prettiest. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *A lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Lovely. One of the prettiest and very 
best sweet peas in our list. The blossoms 
are large and shell-shaped and the stems 



are long and usually bear four blossoms. 
Both standard and wings have a blotch of 
deep pink at the base, which shades a 
lighter pink and a delicate flesh tint at 
the edges. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Hon. P. Bouverie. The petals are deep 
pink at the base and shade to light pink 
and buff at the edges. The blossoms are 
large and shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



ORANGE PINK SHADES 



*AUT0ra. White, with stripes and flakes 
or orange pink. A very large variety, with 
shell-shaped standard and large wings. The 
best of the striped varieties. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Bolton's Pink. A large, shell-shaped va- 
riety of a brilliant pink, suffused with sal- 
mon. Long stems and fine for cut flowers. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 50c; lb. $1.50 

Evelyn Byatt. The most brilliant and 
gorgeously colored variety we have. Is 
a crimson-orange self. Medium size; petals 
tender, and standard inclined to burn, so 
that the blossoms need protection. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 50c; lb. 91.50 

GorgeOUS. A medium-sized open-form va- 
riety, highly esteemed for its very bright 
colors. The standard is almost pure orange, 
although shaded somewhat with scarlet. 
The wings are rose, shaded and tinged 
with orange. Needs to be grown with a 



little shade, as the standard Is soft and 
sunburns. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Helen Lewis, see page 6. 
Henry Eckford. see page 6. 

Lady Mary Curiie. A very brilliantly 
colored variety of crimson orange, tinted 
at the base of the petals with lilac and 
crimson. Of the best form. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*MiSS Willmott. The largest and finest 
variety of this class of colors. Is a bright, 
orange-pink, showing veins of a deeper 
tint. It sunburns a little, and the protect- 
ed blossoms are always the best. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; l A lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Oriental. A bright, orange-pink, showing 

veins of a deeper shade. Not quite so large 

as Miss Willmott, but a little deeper shade. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 2©e; lb. 50c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

FLOWER SEEDS— >\\ BBT PB \ * — Continued 



BRIGHT RED SHADES 



America. White, with stripes and (lakes 
of brilliant red. The brightest striped va- 
riety of open form. 

Pkt, 5c; ox. 10c; Y* lb, 20c; lb. 50c 

CoCCinea. A beautiful, distinct red shade, 
pure cerise or cherry- red. Medium sized, 
open form. 

Pkt. 6c; ox. 10c; ', lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Killg Edward VLL The new red which 
Is taking precedence over all other red 
shades. It is one of the largest varieties; 
of open form and well expanded: round 
standard. The stems are long, and usually 
bear four blossoms. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 15c; \\ lb. 25c; lb. 75c 

Queen Alexandra, see page 7. 



♦Salopian. A fine, deep rich red variety 
of the hooded or shell-shaped form. A lit- 
tle deeper than King Edward VII, and 
while not quite so large, is very desirable 
for its fine, rich, velvety effect. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; Y* lb. 20c; lb. 50c. 

Scarlet Gem. A new variety and a new 
shade in sweet peas, being almost a true 
scarlet. It is only of medium size, and 
the mature blossoms discolor badly, but the 
newly opened blossoms are so bright and 
effective that it is decidedly a novelty 
of merit. 

Pkt. 10c; ox. 25c; Y* lb. 75c; lb. $2.00 

Fadeless Scarlet Gem. see page e. 



*Jolin In groan, see page 7. 



ROSE CRIMSON SHADES 

Fashion, A rose magenta, showing veins Mrs. Dugdale. Crimson rose suffused 
of rose. Of good size and hooded form. A with primrose. Large and slightly shell- 
distinct shade. shaped and very attractive. 

Pkt. 5c; 01. 10c; V, lb. 20c; lb. 50c Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Mrs. Joseph Chamberlain, a striped va- 
riety, white with stripes and flakes of rose. 
Very large and shell-shaped, and a very 
desirable variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; >i lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Prince Of Wales. The most popular and 
also the most satisfactory variety of this 
class. A clear ro'se-crimson, self color, 
large, and shell-shaped. Stems are long 
and usually bear four blossoms. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



•Lord Rosebery. The best of what we 
call the rose-veined varieties. Is a bright 
rose suffused with magenta and showing 
veins of rose. Of good size and shell- 
shaped, and very brilliant. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

Majestic. Rose red, self colored. Large 
and shell-shaped. A bright and attractive 
variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



LAVENDER, MAUVE, AND PURPLE SHADES 



Admiration. Purplish mauve; self colored. 
Good size and hooded form. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Captivation. Almost a pure magenta, self 
colored. Open form; a fair size. A distinct 
shade in sweet peas. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yi lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Emily Eckford. The newly opened blos- 
soms are rose-purple, but soon turn to 
quite .a bright blue, which is very pretty. 
The flowers are large and shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yi lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



Dorothy Tennant. Rosy purple, self color. 
Large and shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Y*. lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Mrs. Walter Wright. Light rosy pur- 
pie, turning blue when fully matured. 
Very similar to Emily Eckford, but a 
little larger. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Yt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

RomolO Piazanni. One of the newer Eek- 
fords. Large; rosy purple, turning blue 
with age. A fine, large variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; »,., lb. 35c; lb. $1.00 



LAVENDER SHADES 



Countess of Radnor, or New Countess. 

Soft lavender, tinted with mauve. The 
blossoms open with a little more mauve 
than when fully expanded. Good sized 
and shell-shaped. Probably the most popu- 
lar of any one variety of sweet peas. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vt lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



*Flora Norton. A new variety, bright 
sky blue, of rather medium size. Is a new 
and distinct shade and the best color blue 
we have. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 20c; Yi lb. 35c; lb. »1.00 

*Helen Pierce, see page i. 



78 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



FLOWER SEEDS — SWEET PEAS — Continued 



*Lady Grisel Hamilton, soft lavender, 

tinted with mauve. A little larger than 
Countess of Radnor, and is also colored 
with a little more mauve. Is now pre- 
ferred on account of its size and long 
stems, but is not any improvement in shade. 
Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Lady Nina BalfOUr. Light lavender and 
, with a slight greenish cast, or more 



correctly a pearl gray tone. Good size and 
shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Va lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Mrs. Geo. HigginSOn, Jr. A new varie- 
ty of only medium size, but a fine type and 
possessing the most delicate lavender shade 
we have. Is almost a clear azure blue, and 
is destined to be a great favorite when the 
seed is more plentiful. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 20c; *4 lb. 35c; lb. $1.00 



LAVENDER AND MAUVE SHADED, PICOTEE OR EDGED 



Lottie Eckford. The largest and best of 
this class and regarded by some as the most 
desirable of all varieties. The petals are 
white, shaded with lilac, with a deeper 
border at the edges. The wings are marked 
with a little lighter shade of lilac. 

Pkt. 5c; oat. 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Maid Of Honor. Clear white, with a dis- 
tinct rim or border of lilac. Good size and 
hooded form. A very delicate and pretty 



cariety, and a great improvement on the 
old-fashioned "Butterfly." 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*Phenomenal. A selection we called 
"orchid-flowering" before we introduced it 
The petals are very large, soft, and thin 
like tissue-paper. It usually comes double, 
when the flowers seem immensely large. Is 
blue and lavender shaded on white. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Va lb. 25c; lb. 75c 



BLUE AND PURPLE SHADES 



Captain Of the Blues. The standard la 
almost clear purple; the wings are clear 
blue. Of good size and shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

*C01inteSS Of CadOgan. The first opened 
blossoms have purple standards with clear, 
blue wings, but they soon turn lighter and 
the whole blossom is quite a clear, bright 
blue. Of good size and shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



David R. Williamson. A fine, new va- 
riety, with clear, purple standard and blue 
wings. Blossoms large and shell-like. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 35c; lb. $1.00 

*Duke Of Westminster. Almost a clear 
purple, with a tint of violet at the base of 
the wings. Large and shell-shaped. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Ya i D . 20c; lb. 50c 

Senator. Pure white, striped and flaked 
with maroon and violet. Large and shell- 
shaped. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Va lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



DEEP MAROON SHADES 

Black Knight. The darkest of all th« 

deep maroon shades. A little darker than 
Boreatton and showing almost black veins. 
Except that it is darker, it is the same as 
Boreatton and Stanley. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Va lb. 20c; lb. 50c 

Black Michael. One of the new Eckford 
varieties. Deep wine color or light maroon. 
Standard round and large, and wings well 
poised. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Ya lb. 35c; lb. $1.00 

Boreatton. Clear, dark maroon self color. 
Of about the same shade as a black Tar- 



tarian cherry. Of fair size, with open or 
upright standard. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 60c 

Duke Of Clarence. Dark claret self color. 
Large size; of perfect, shell-shape form, 
and a very desirable dark variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



*Othello. The best of the dark varieties, 
being very large and of the finest type. It 
is a deep maroon and particularly of rich, 
velvety effect. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



DARK MAROON AND VIOLET 

Duke Of Sutherland. The standard is dark 
violet and purple, and the wings, violet and 
indigo. Large size and shell-shape. 

Pkt. 5c; oz, 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



SHADES 



rich blue, and it contrasts well with the 
lavender and mauve shades. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 5tc 



*Navy Blue. A very popular dark variety, 
of good size and open form. The standard 
is indigo and violet, and the wings, violet 
and bright blue. The whole effect is deep 



Shahzada. A very dark variety, of good 
form and large size. The standard is deep 
maroon, showing veins almost black, and 
the wings are dark violet. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Ya lb. 20c; lb. 50c 



ANY SIX 5c PACKETS OF SWEET PEAS, 25c 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 
FLOWEll BKBD8 — 8 WflUBT im: as - Cuitlnued 

MIXTURES 



American Seedlings, ah light colon. 

mostly pink shades. About twenty distinct 
varieties. 

I'k(. ."..•: os. 10c| ' , lb. lSe| lb. 40c 

Best Large Flowering Mixture. This 

is the best mixture that can be made from 
existing varieties. The colors are well 
proportioned, and the amount of each is 
determined by a well-studied and care- 
fully arranged formula, which has been 
tried and corrected for many years. All 
the newer and best varieties are in this 
mixture. Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; '. i lb. ISc; lb. 40c 

Good Mixture. A well-proportioned mix- 
ture of about fifty varieties. This is a good 
assortment of shades and colors, but does 



not contain all the new varieties as In our 
Best Large Flowering. 

Ox. Be; • , lb. 10c; lb. 30c 

Striped Varieties, Mixed. a beautiful 

mixture made up exclusively of striped, 
mottled, and flaked varieties. 

Pkt. Sc; ox. JOc; '..', lb. ISc; lb. 40c 

"Trial Grounds" Mixture. This mixture 

is the product of the Trial Grounds, where 
a row of every known variety is grown, 
and besides are many new selections not 
yet "fixed" and ready for introduction. This 
mixture actually contains every known sort 
of the Tall varieties, but no Cupids or 
Bush types. 

Pkt. 6c; oz. 10c; % lb. ISc; lb. 40c 



CUPID SWEET PEAS 



These are low-growing or dwarf sweet peas, about one foot high and spreading to about 
two feet in diameter. The foliage is dark green and the stems are short, usually from 
three to six inches long. The blossoms, however, are larger than those of the Tall varieties. 

They are recommended for a border, especially along a drive or walk, and while the 
early buds drop off, the whole plant finally comes into bloom nicely, and is a perfect mat 
of bright flowers. While Cupids exist in all file colors and shades found in the Tall varieties, 
we have listed only the best ones and those that are freest flowering. The descriptions are 
the same as those of the Tall varieties. 



ALICE ECKFORD. 

AMERICA. 

APPLE BLOSSOM. 

•BEAUTY, or Eliza Eckford. 

BOREATTON. 

BRIDESMAID, or Hon. F. Bonverle. 

CAPTAIN OF THE BLUES. 

CHAMBERLAIN, or Mrs. Jos. Chamberlain. 

•COUNTESS OF RADNOR. 

DUKE OF CLARENCE. 

•ENCHANTRESS, or Dark Lovely. 

EMILY ECKFORD. 

EXTRA EARLY BLANCHE FERRY. 

FIREFLY. 

•HER MAJESTY. 

LADY MARY CURRIE. 



LOTTIE ECKFORD. 

LOVELY. 

MAUVE QUEEN, or Dark Admiration. 

NAVY BLUE. 

OVID. 

•PINK. 

•PRIMA DONNA. 

PRIMROSE. 

PRINCE OF WALES. 

RAMONA. 

•ROYALTY, or Dark Royal Rose. 

SADIE BURPEE (black seed). 

•SALOPIAN. 

STELLA MORSE. 

WAVERLEY. 

•WHITE, or Original Cnpld. 



Each of the above: Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.00; any 8 pkts. 25c; any 12 pkta. 45c. 

Mixture of all varieties, including those listed and many more besides. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; V, lb. 25c; lb. 



.">c 



Sweet William (Dianthus Barbatus). A 
hardy perennial, blooming the second year 
from seed. Grows 1 to 2 feet high and 
bears Its flowers in clusters at the end 
of a stiff stem. The individual flowerets 
are handsomely colored and marked. It 
makes a beautiful bedding plant, and Is 
of easy culture. 

Single varieties. Mixed. More attractive 
than the double. Pkt. 5c 

Double Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Thunbergia, or Black-Eyed Susan, a 

hardy annual climber, growing about 4 
feet long, and valuable for low fences or 
hanging baskets. Prefers a sunny situa- 
tion. Blossoms are buff, orange, or white, 
with dark centers. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



Torenia. A hardy annual, with trumpet- 
shaped flowers, and growing 4 to 6 inches 
high. Good for hanging baskets or borders. 
Fournlerl. Velvety blue, with three dark 
spots of indigo and a bright yellow throat. 
Pkt. 5c 
White Wings. Dainty, white flowers, 
tinted with rose at throat. Pkt. 10c 

Tritoma, or Red-Hot Poker Plant. Al- 
though this flower is usually propagated 
from the root, it does well from seed, and 
a large number of plants can be had at a 
small cost. Start the seed in boxes under 
glass. 

Uvnria Grandiflora. Pkt. 10c 

Trumpet Flower, see Datura. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



PLOW BR 8BBD8- Continued 



Verbena, a half hardy trailing: perennial 
of eaay culture. While it grows readily 
from division of the root or from cuttings, 
it does beat from seed. It is well known 
as a bedding or border plant, and the im- 
proved large flowered and fragrant strains 
make it a handsome cut flower for low 
vases. 

Mammoth Auricula Flowered. Various 
colors, with large, white center. 

Pkt ID.-; ', OK. 50c; ox. K1.50 

Mnmmoth flowered. Mixed. 

Pkt. !(►,-; i 4 ok. 35c; ob. «1.25 

Mayflower. Delicate white, edged with 

rose. Pkt. 1»c; V* oz. 35c: on. K1.25 

Pink S tin des. Mammoth strains of rose 

and pink shades. 

Pkt. 10c; y 4 ox, 35c; oz. $1.25 
Pare White. Mammoth strain. 

rk(. 10c; Y* oz. 35c; oz. $1.25 
Purple and Blue Shade*. Mammoth strains. 

Pkt. 10c; Y* ob. 35c; oz. *1.25 
Scarlet Defiance. Brilliant scarlet. 

Pkt. 10c; Y* oz. 35c; oz. «1.25 
Striped Varieties Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Pine Mixed. Pkt. 5c; Y* oz. 25c; oz. S5c 

VillCa, Or Periwinkle. A tender peren- 
nial, with ornamental foliage, useful for 
bedding in summer and for the greenhouse 
in winter. Blooms freely and blooms the 
first year from seed. 

Mixed. Rose, crimson, white, etc. Pkt. 5c 

Violas, Or Tufted PansieS. A hardy per- 
ennial, blooming freely throughout the 
summer and autumn. Of easy culture, and 
seed may be sown out of doors, where the 
plants are to remain. 

Mixed. All varieties. Pkt. 10c 

Violet, or Viola Odorata. Although 

these flowers do best propagated from the 
cuttings, they grow readily from seed, and 
produce a small, fragrant blossom. 

Single, Sweet-Mcented. Pkt. 10c 

Virginia Stocks. A hardy annual, grow- 
ing about 9 inches high and blooming pro- 
fusely. Of easy culture, and can be had 
in continuous bloom by sowing the seed 
at frequent intervals during spring and 
summer. 

Red and White Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



Wallflower. Half hardy perennial, bloom- 
ing the first year from seed. Orowa 1 to 2 
feet high and bears long stems of frag- 
rant flowers. It is best to renew the plants 
every 2 or 3 years by resowlng the seed. 
An old-fashioned flower, which is always 
popular. Sow early in the year In boxes 
and transplant. 

Fine German. Double; mixed. Pkt. 10c 

Fine Single Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Tom Thumb Golden* Small, compact plant. 

Pkt. 10c 

Whitlavia. An easily grown, hardy an- 
nual, bearing small, violet-blue, cup- 
shaped blossoms. Plants one foot high. 
Sow seed in open ground in spring and 
thin the young plants. Pkt. 5c 

Xeranthemum. A hardy annual, about 1 
foot high, and bearing white, purple, or 
yellow blossoms. The leaves are hairy or 
covered with a silvery down. A very pret- 
ty, straw-like, everlasting flower. 

Double Mixed. Pkt. 5c 



Zinnia 

1 to 2 



are i 
ably 

shad 
planl 
Sow 



A half hardy annual, growing from 

feet high. Blossoms are very double, 

hile the stems are stiff, they make 

cellent bouquet flower. The colors 

great variety and very bright. Prob- 

io flower has such an assortment of 

, tints, and colors, and no bedding 

is more effective for a brilliant show. 

i boxes early and transplant. 

Curled and Crested. A fine mixture of 

colors. The petals are curled and the 

flowers large and attractive. Mixed. 

Pkt. 5c 
Mammoth Double — 

Orange, Magenta, 

Yellow, White, 

Scarlet, Black ■ Purple, 

Deep Red, Dark Crimson. 

Pkt. 5c 
Mammoth Double Mixed. A fine mixture. 
Pkt. 5c 
Double LUllpnt. A dwarf plant, 1 foot 
high, bearing .rather small, very double 
flowers. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 

Gmndiflora Kobusta. The largest and 
finest variety in existence. The blossoms 
are globe-shaped, very large, and in nu- 
merous colors. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 
Pompon Mixed. A fine mixture of globe- 
shaped flowers. Pkt. 5c 



82 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



PLANET JR. TOOLS 

The best garden Implements on the market. 




We offer the following 



New No. 6 Hill and Drill Seeder 

which can be recommended for all who desire good i 



No. 4. Hill and 



Packed 
Weight 

Wheel Hoe 47 lbs. 

seeder only) 38 lbs. 

No. 26. " 59 lbs. 

No. 6. " and Single Wheel Hoe 58 lbs. 

No. 6. ' " plain (as a seeder only) 50 lbs. 

No. 36. Single Wheel Hoe 33 lbs. 

No. 3. Hill and Drill Seeder 46 lbs. 

No. 5. " 51 lbs. 

No. 1. Combined Drill Seeder and Wheel Hoe 44 lbs. 

No. 2. Drill Seeder 38 lbs. 

No. 11. Double Wheel Hoe 37 lbs. 

No. 12. " " •' 32 lbs. 

No. 13. " " '■ 28 lbs. 

No. 16. Single Wheel Hoe 29 lbs. 

No. 17. " " " 26 lbs. 

No. 17%. " " " 22 lbs. 

No. 18. " " " 20 lbs. 

No. 19. " " " 22 lbs. 

Firefly Garden Plow 13 lbs. 

Grass Edger 27 lbs. 

No. 8. Horse Hoe and Cultivator 82 lbs. 

No. 7. " " " " 77 lbs. 

No. 9. " (with wheel) 72 lbs. 

No. 9. " " " " (without wheel) 64 lbs. 

No. 4. " " " " (with wheel) 63 lbs. 

No. 4. " " " " (without wheel) 56 lbs. 

No. 9. Cultivator (with wheel) 64 lbs. 

No. 9. " (without wheel) 57 lbs. 

No. 4. " (with wheel) 57 lbs. 

No. 4. " (without wheel) 49 lbs. 

Double Celery Hiller 88 lbs. 

Single Celery Hiller 68 lbs. 

Twelve-Toothed Harrow (complete) 74 lbs. 

" " " (without pulverizer) 66 lbs. 

" (without pulverizer or wheel) 53 lbs. 

(with No. 9 wheel) 60 lbs. 

" (■without lever expander or wheel)... 46 lbs. 

(without lever expander, with wheel). 53 lbs. 



Price. 


Ill 


00 


9 


511 


14 


00 


14 


00 


11 


50 


6 


75 


11 


00 


13 


50 


10 


00 


8 


00 


9 


60 


7 


50 


5 


25 


B 


35 


5 


50 


5 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


2 


75 


« 


50 


10 


00 


9 


50 


8 


50 


7 


75 


7 


25 


« 


50 


7 


00 


fi 


25 


fi 


25 


6 


50 


IB 


50 


14 


00 


10 


00 


8 


25 


7 


00 


7 


60 


5 


75 


6 


50 



C. C. MORSE 4 CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS X3 

PU\ET JR. I inn - I ..ullmi.'.l 

o. 6S. Two-row Horse Hoe and Beet Cultivator 234 lbs. 30 00 

o. 5J. " " Plain 213 lbs. 27 60 

o. 3. Four-row Sugar Beet Horse Hoe (complete) 679 lbs. 95 00 

White Potato Digger 123 lbs. 18 00 

Sweet Potato Digger 144 lbs. 20 00 

A complete lllimtrnlcil catttloa-ue of Planet Jr. Tools will be mailed free on application. 



BOOKS AND LEAFLETS 

We have chosen the following books as the best that are issued on the topics 
Indicated: 

THE GARDEN CRAFT SERIES 
(The works of Professor L. H. Bailey, of Cornell University) 

The Horticulturist's Rule Book Price JO 75 

The Nursery Book " 1 00 

Plant Breeding " 1 00 

The Forcing Book " 1 00 

The Pruning Book " 1 50 

Garden Making " 100 

The Practical Garden Book " 1 00 

The Principles of Agriculture " 1 26 

The Principles of Vegetable Gardening " 1 26 

(And the following edited by Professor Bailey) 

King's Irrigation and Drainage Price $160 

Lodeman's The Spraying of Plants " 1 00 

Voorhee's Fertilizers " 1 00 

THE FOLLOWING ARE ALSO STANDARD GARDEN BOOKS 

California Vegetables. By Professor E. J. WIckson, of the University of Cal- 
ifornia. A very valuable and interesting book Price $2 00 

A Woman's Hardy Garden. By Mrs. Ely. A very valuable book on the choice 

and arrangement of all kinds of shrubs and flowers for the garden " 1 75 

Wild Flowers of California. By Mary Elizabeth Parsons and Margaret War- 
rlner Buck. One of the very best books published on this topic. Is valu- 
able to any one interested In wild flowers " 2 00 

Alfalfa. By F. D. Coburn " 50 

Asparagus. By F. M. Hexamer " 60 

Mushrooms; How to Grow Them. By William Falconer " 1 00 

The New Rhubarb Culture. By J. E. Morse " 50 

The New Onion Culture. By T. Grelner " 50 



84 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 



HOT-BEDS 

Good hot-beds may be made by digging down about three feet and filling the exca- 
vation with rather fresh horse manure in which there is a good deal of bedding straw. 
About 18 inches of this manure is sufficient and then fill in on top of it with about one foot 
of good soil mixed with sand. This manure pile will be compressed, and will soon begin 
to ferment, and will then keep the top soil warm and cause the seed to sprout quickly, and 
the young plant will grow very fast. It is best to enclose the hot-bed with boards, making 
what is called a cold-frame; this is done by running the length of the bed east and west 
and by making the north side about two feet high and the south side not more than six 
inches. The ends also should be enclosed and a sash of glass should be hung on hinges 
at the highest end. This sash should be raised for ventilation during most of the day, 
since the bed gets very warm and the atmosphere very close if kept too tightly closed 
for too long a time. As the plants grow, the sash should be left up longer each day to 
harden them and prepare them for final transplanting. 

The hot-bed should have a very sunny location near a hedge or some building, well- 
protected from the prevailing wind. 

The object of the cold-frame is to make ah artificial heat, and to protect the plants 
from frost during winter. Seed may be started any time during the winter, and the plants 
can be ready to set out just as soon as danger of frost is over. 

As the sun gets too hot it is necessary to shade the bed, and the glass should be white- 
washed or covered with sacking if necessary. Too much heat is fatal to the tender, young 
plants. 

FOREIGN NAMES OF VEGETABLES 

English. German. French. Spanish. Italian. 

Artichoke Artischoke Artichaut Alcachofa Articiocca 

Asparagus Spargel Asperge Esparrago Sparagio 

Beans Bohnen Haricots Habichuela B'agiuoli 

Beet .Rube Betterave Bemolacha Barbabietola 

Broccoli Spargelkohl Chou Brocoli Broculi Brocoli 

Brussels Sprouts.. Rosenkohl Chou de Bruxelles.Bretones de Bruselas Cavolo tli Brusselles 

Cabbage Kopfkohl, Kraut. .Chou pomme Col repollo Cavolo cappuccio. . 

Cabbage Savoy. . . .M r irsing Chou de Milan Col de Milan Cavolo di Milano. . 

Carrot Carotten, Mohren . .Carotte Zanahoria Carota 

Cauliflower Blumenkohl Cliou-fleur Coliflor Cavolofiore 

Celery Sellerie CSleri Apio Sedano 

Celeriac Knoll-Sellerie .Celeri-rave Apio-nabo Sedano-rapa 

Chervil Kerbel .Cerefeuil Perif olio Cerfoglio 

Chicory Cichorienwurzel . . Chicor§e sauvage . Achicoria Cicoria selvatica . . 

Corn Salad Feldsalat Mache Canonigos "Valeriana 

Corn .Mais ,Mais Maiz Mais 

Cress Garten-Kresse. . . .Cresson alenois. . . Mastuerzo Agretto 

Cress, "Water Brunnenkresse . . . -Cresson de fontaine Berro Nasturzio aquatico 

Cucumber Gurken Concombre Bepino Cetrlolo 

Dandelion Lb'wenzahn Pissenlit Diente de leon. . . . Dente di leone 

Egg-Plant Eierpflanze Aubergine Berengena Petronciano 

Endive Endivien Chicoree Endive. . .Endivia Indivia 

Kale Blatterkohl Chou vert Breton, Berza Cavolo verde 

Kohl Rabi Knollkohl Chou-rave Colinavo Cavolo rapa 

Leek Porree, Lauch Poireau -Puerro Porro 

Lettuce Lattich, KopfsalatLaitue Lechuga Lattuga 

Melon Melone Melon Melon Popone 

Melon, Water Wasser-Melone. . . Melon d'eau Sandia Melone d'aqua 

Mushroom Schwamm Champignon Hongo Fungo pratajolo. .. 

Nasturtium Kapuciner Kresse.Capucine Capuchina Nasturzio 

Okra Ocher Gombaud ..... Gombo Ocra 

Onion Zwiebel Ognon Cebolla Cipollo 

Parsley Petersilie Persil Perejil .Prezzemolo 

Parsnip. Pastinake Panais Chirivia Pastinaca 

Peas Erbsen Pois Chicharos Bisello 

Pepper Pfeffer Piment Pimiento Peperone 

Pumpkin Melonen-Kurbiss . .Potiron Calabaza totanera .Zucca 

Radish Radies Radis Rabanito Ravanello 

Rhubarb JEthabarber Rhubarbe .Ruibarbo Rabarbaro 

Salsify Haferwurzel Salsifis Salsifi bianco Sassefrica 

Spinach Spinat Epinard Espinaca Spinace 

Squash Kurbiss Courge Calabaza Zucca 

Tomato .Liebesapfel Pomme d' Amour. . Tomate Porno d'oro 

Turnip Weisse-Rube Navet Nabo Navone 



C. C. MORSE 4 CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

'WEIGHTS OK VARIOUS SEEDS 



80 



Per buah. 

Barley 48 lbs. 

Beans 60 lbs. 

Buckwheat 48 lbs. 

Canary 60 lbs. 

Castor Beana 46 lbs. 

Clover 60 lbs. 

Corn (flcl.ll. Shelled ..56 lbs. 
Corn (fleldl. on Ear.. 70 lbs. 
Flax 66 lbs. 



Per bush. 

Red Top In chaff 14 lbs. 

Red Top, cleaned 32 lbs. 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass 10 lbs. 

Orchard Grass 14 lbs. 

Hard Fescue 12 lbs. 

Tall Fescue 14 lbs. 

English Blue Grass... 22 lbs. 
Perennial Rye Grass.. 20 lbs. 
Timothy 45 lbs. 



Per bush. 
Kentucky Blue Grass. 20 lbs. 

Hemp 44 lbs. 

Hungarian 48 lbs. 

Millet 60 lbs. 

Peas, smooth 60 lbs. 

Peas, wrinkled 56 lbs. 

Rape 50 lbs. 

Rye 66 lbs. 

Vetches, or Tares 60 lbs. 



(II AXT1TY OF 



Per acre 

Alfalfa 26 to 30 lb 

Artichoke, 1 oz. to 500 plants 6 o 

Asparagus, 1 oz. to 800 plants 1 lb 

Asparagus Roots 5000 to 7250 

Barley 100 to 120 lbs 

Beans, dwarf, 1 lb. to 100 ft. 45 to 60 lbs 

Pole, 1 lb. to 100 ft 25 to 30 lbs 

Lima, IK lbs. to 100 ft 40 lbs 

Beet, Garden, 1 oz. to 100 ft 7 lb: 

Mangel, 1 oz. to 100 ft 5 lbs 

Sugar. 1 oz. to 100 ft 10 lbs. 

Brussels Sprouts, 1 oz. to 5000 plants.... 2 oz 

Buckwheat 26 lbi 

Cabbage, 1 oz. for 6000 plants 2 oz. 

Carrot, 14 oz. to 100 feet 2% lbs 

Cauliflower, 1 oz. for 6000 plants 2% oz 

Celery, 1 oz. for 15,000 plants 2 oz 

Chicory 4 lbs 

Clover, Alsike, and White Dutch.. 8 to 10 lb; 
" Crimson, Red and Medium, 

10 to 15 lbs 

Collards, 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2 oz 

Corn, Kaffir and Egyptian 6 to 8 lbs 

Broom 6 lbs 

Sweet, 1% lbs. for 100 hills 16 lbs 

Field 15 lbs 

Cress, % oz. to 100 feet 12 lb 

Cucumber, 1 oz. to 100 hills 3 lbs, 

Egg- Plant, 1 oz. for 2000 plants 4 oz, 

Endive, % oz. to 100 ft 2 lbs, 

Flax, broadcast 30 lbs. 

Garlic Bulbs, 1 lb. to 10 ft. 
Gourd, 2 oz. to 100 hills. 

Grass, Kentucky Blue 30 lbs, 

English Blue 25 lbs, 

Hungarian Millet 25 lbs. 



Per acre. 
Grass, Mixed, Lawn 50 to 75 lbs. 

Red Top, cleaned 10 lbs. 

Red Top, in chaff 25 lbs. 

Timothy 10 lbs. 

Perennial Rye 40 lbs. 

Orchard 30 to 40 lbs. 

Hemp 20 lbs. 

Kale, 1 oz. for 6000 plants 2 oz. 

Kohl Rabi, % oz. to 100 ft 4 lbs. 

Leek, % oz. to 100 ft 4 lbs. 

Lettuce, 'A oz. to 100 ft 2 lbs. 

Martynia, 1 oz. to 100 ft 6 lbs. 

Muskmelon, 1 oz. to 100 hills 3 lbs. 

Melon, Water, 4 oz. to 100 hills 3 to 4 lbs 

Okra, 1 oz. to 100 ft 8 lbs. 

Onion Seed, % oz. to 100 ft 4 lbs. 

Onion Seed for Sets 60 to 80 lbs. 

Onion Sets, 1 lb. to 76 ft 250 lbs. 

Parsnip, Yi oz. to 100 ft 3 lbs. 

Parsley, % oz. to 100 ft 3 lbs. 

Peas, Garden, 1 lb. to 100 ft 100 to 200 lbs. 

Field 150 lbs. 

Pepper, 1 oz. for 1500 plants 3 oz. 

Pumpkins, 4 oz. to 100 hills 3 to 4 lbs. 

Radish, % oz. to 100 ft 10 lbs. 

Rye 80 lbs. 

Salsify, % oz. to 100 ft 8 lbs. 

Spinach, ȣ oz. to 100 ft 8 lbs. 

Sunflower 8 lbs. 

Squash, Summer, 4 oz. to 100 hills 2 lbs. 

Squash, Winter, 8 oz. to 100 hills 2 lbs. 

Tomato, 1 oz. for 4500 plants 2 oz. 

Tobacco, 1 oz. for 5000 plants 2 lbs. 

Turnip, 1 oz. to 250 ft 2 to 3 lbs. 

Vetches 100 to 120 lbs. 

Wheat 100 to 120 lbs. 



NUMBER OF PLANTS OR TREES TO THE ACRE AT GIVEN DISTANCES 



Distance No. 

apart. plants. 

12x 1 In 522,720 

12x 3 In 174,240 

12x12 in 43,560 

16x 1 In 392,040 

18x 1 in 348,480 

18x 3 In 116,160 

18x12 In 29,040 

18x18 in 19,360 

20x 1 in 313,635 

20x20 in 15,681 

24x 1 in 261,360 

24x18 In 16,520 



Distance No. 
apart. plants. 

24x24 in 10,890 

30x 1 in 209,088 

30x 6 in 34,848 

30x12 In 17,424 

30x16 In 13,068 

30x20 in 10,454 

30x24 in 8,712 

30x30 in 6,970 

36x 3 in 68,080 

36x12 in 14,520 

36x18 In 9,680 

36x24 in 7,260 



Distance No. 
apart. plants. 

36x36 in 4,840 

42x12 in 12,446 

42x24 in 6,223 

42x36 in 4,148 

48x12 in 10,890 

48x18 in 7,790 

48x24 in 5,445 

48x30 in 4,366 

48x36 in 3,630 

48x48 in 2,723 

60x36 in 2,901 

60x48 in 2,178 



Distance No. 
apart. plants. 

60x60 in 1,743 

8x 1 ft 5,445 

8x 3 ft 1,815 

8x 8 ft 680 

10X 1 ft 4,356 

10X 6ft 726 

10x10 ft 435 

12x 1 ft 3,630 

12x 6 ft 736 

12x12 ft 302 

16x 1 ft 2,722 

16x16 ft 170 



86 C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEED GROWERS AND DEALERS 

A FEW SUGGESTIONS ABOUT GROWING 
ONIONS FOR MARKET 

Of all the great variety of seed we grow, none is more Important with us than 
Onion Seed. We regard it as our pre-eminent specialty, and aim to have the best and 
purest strains of all the varieties we offer. 

The onion bulb represented on our front cover is one of the best, and we also recom- 
mend Ohio Yellow Globe, Southport Red Globe, and Southport White Globe as the best, as 
they make the handsomest, best keeping, and the finest market onions, as well as the best 
for the garden. 

There are also many other varieties of onions which do well in certain localities, but 
only in certain places. Other onions besides those we have named which can be recom- 
mended as heavy croppers and adapted practically to all localities are the Australian 
Brown, Yellow Danvers, and Yellow Globe Danvers. 

The Yellow Danvers is frequently called Silverskin on the market, but this is an 
error, for the true Silverskin is a white, flat onion. 

For general crop, the seed must be sown during the month of January or before 
February 1st, and, if the location is a fairly dry one, it is best to sow about the middle of 
December. The seed should be sown with a seed drill in rows 14 Inches apart, using 4 to 
iy z pounds of seed per acre. In very weedy land the rows may be 18 or 20 inches apart 
when less seed is required. 

For planting a single row of onions among strawberry plants about 2 pounds of seed 
per acre is sufficient. 

The land must be thoroughly worked before planting, and usually two good plowings, 
a good disking, and a harrowing are necessary. 

The crop must always be kept free from weeds, and it is usually necessary to weed 
out in the row by hand once or twice. Hoeing between the rows may be done oftener. 
It is not necessary to thin the plants in the row, since some thinning is naturally done 
during the hand weeding. 

The land chosen for onions should be wet land, preferably loose, sandy loam or peat, 
and should always be kept well drained. Heavy adobe or clay soil is good, but needs to be 
irrigated in May, June, and July, and the onions are not so well colored or even in shape in 
heavy, stiff soils. Steady, even growth is necessary to good onions, and a check in the 
growth, whether from disease or drought, causes them to run to seed badly. Onions are 
ready to harvest usually the latter part of August, when, with a good crop, the tops are 
pretty well ripened down. If the tops are still standing and green it is well to run a light 
roller or plank over them to press the tops down, and the onions should be pulled in about 
ten days after this Is done, whether the tops have dried off or not. It requires not less 
than two full weeks to properly cure onions after they are pulled. In localities where 
fog Is prevalent it is best to spread the onions out on the ground, not more than one 
bulb deep. It is usual in other climates to throw into windrows a foot or more deep 
and cover lightly with straw or dried tops. It is best not to top and sack until ready 
to ship to market, and If onions are to be kept for any length of time they should 
not be sacked, but should be put under cover on a floor or in a bin with abundant circula- 
tion of air, and be kept absolutely dry. 

The value of an onion crop is naturally dependent on the market and on the char- 
acter of the land planted. Land that is very foul should usually be avoided as too 
expensive. Also avoid land which has just had a hay or grain crop, and if possible use land 
that has been planted to vegetables or some hoed crop, especially peas and beans. An 
onion crop should not be repeated more than three times on the same land, and usually 
twice is best, since onion diseases (of which there are many) appear very plentifully. 
An average crop runs from 150 to 200 centals (15,000 to 20,000 lbs.) per acre, and the cost 
represented by labor, rent, sacks, and transportation is estimated roughly at $75 per acre. 

Another very good system of growing fancy market onions is by transplanting. By 
this method the seed is sown in beds in August and September, and the plants are pulled 
and transplanted about February 15th to March 1st. Put the plants 6 inches apart in 
lateral rows, 14 inches apart when they make a uniform sized bulb and also a hard and 
Arm one. This plan is especially recommended for the Globe varieties, since they do best 
under this treatment. About 2 pounds of seed will furnish plants enough for an acre by 
this method. The expense is considerably greater than by the ordinary plan, and should 
be roughtly estimated at $100 per acre. The additional cost is simply in labor in trans- 
planting, for there is some saving in hoeing and hand weeding. 

"Unless the land is porous and friable and also very moist all through the summer, 
this method Is usually unsuccessful and is not recommended. The seed should never be 
sown later than September 15th, and the transplanting should never be done later than 
March 15 th. 

These directions for planting are intended for California and kindred climates only, 
and are not the proper directions for Northern Oregon, and Washington, where the seed 
is sown in the spring and where the seed-beds for transplanting onions must be protected 
by frames. The suggestions as to soil and seed, however, apply to all sections of the 
Pacific Coast. 



KEEP THIS CATALOGUE FOR REFERENCE 

You will need it next summer 



Here in California there are many varieties of seed 
that can he planted in our gardens in the summer for 
winter vegetables. 

If this book should be lost or mislaid, we shall be glad 
to send you another if you will write for one. 

Remember to order early, for in AUGUST you may 

sow seed of 

Turnips, 

Spinach, 

Lettuce, 

Bermuda Onions, and 
Winter Cabbages. 
And in SEPTEMBER you can sow seed of 
Winter Radishes, 
Table Beets, and 
Early Peas. 
You will also want some flower seeds, since AUGUST 
is the time to sow Hollyhocks and Foxgloves to make 
them bloom the following summer. It is also the time 
to sow Pansy seed, Calendula, and Eschscholtzia for 
late winter and very early spring blossoms. 

NOVEMBER is the time for Sweet Peas. Remember 
this next summer, and order early. 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO KEEP THIS CATALOGUE 
FOR REFERENCE. 



Alfalfa 49 

Alsike 50 

Anise 48 

Artichoke 12 

Asparagus 12 

Australian Rye 
Grass (see Eng- 
lish Perennial). 50 
Australian Salt 

Bush 51 

Balm ". 49 

Basil 48 

Beans 13 

Beets 16 

Bermuda Grass... 50 
Blue Grass (see 
Kentucky Blue 

Grass) 50 

Bokhara Clover... 50 
Borecole (seeKale)27 

Books and Leaflets 83 

Broccoli 18 

Brome Grass 50 

Broom Corn 51 

Brussels Sprouts.. 18 

Buckwheat 51 

Burr Clover B0 

Cabbage 18 

Canada Field Peas 51 

Canary 51 

Caraway 49 

Carrots 19 

Catnip 49 

Cauliflower 20 

Celeriac 22 

Celery 21 



Page 

Abronia . ., 54 

Abutilon 54 

Adonis 54 

Ageratum 54 

Agrostema 55 

Agrostis 56 

Alyssum 55 

Amaranthus 55 

Asparagus Phim- 
osis 55 

Asparagus Spren- 

geri 55 

Asters 55 

Australian Star 

Flower 55 

Bachelor's Button. 57 

Balloon Vine 57 

Balsam 57 

Bartonia 57 

Begonia 57 

Bellis Perennis... 57 

Brachycome 57 

Browallia 57 

Calceolaria 57 

Calendula 67 

California Poppy.. 57 

Calliopsis 57 

Canary Bird Flow- 
er 58 

Candytuft SS 

Canna 58 

Canterbury Bells.. 58 

Carnation 58 

Castor Oil Beans. 58 

Catchfly 59 

Celosia Cristata. .. 59 

Centaurea 60 

Chinese Lantern 

Plant (see Phy- 

sallis Franchetti) 69 

Chinese Primrose 

(See Primula 

Sinensis) 69 

Chrysanthemum. . 58 

Cineraria 59 

Clarkia 59 

Clematis 60 

Cleome Pungens. 59. 
Cobaea Scandens. . 59 

Cockscomb 60 

Coleus 60 

Collinsla 60 



TABLE OF 

Garden 

Page 

Chervil 22 

Chicory 22 

Clover Seed 49 

Collards 22 

Coriander 49 

Corn 22 

Corn Salad 22 

Cow Peas 51 

Cress 25 

Crimson Clover. . . 50 

Cucumber 25 

Dandelion 26 

Dill 49 

Egg-Plant 26 

Endive 26 

English Blue Grass 
(see Meadow 

Fescue) 50 

English Perennial 

Rye Grass 50 

Fennel 49 

Field Seeds 51 

Fine Leaved Fes- 
cue 50 

Flax Seed 51 

Foreign Names of 

Vegetables 84 

Garden Tools 82 

Gourds 26 

Grass Seeds 50 

Hairy Vetch 51 

Hard Fescue Grass 50 

Hemp 52 

Herbs 48 

Horehound 49 

Hot-Beds 84 

Hyssop 49 

Flower 

Page 

Columbine 61 

Convolvulus 60 

Coreopsis (see Cal- 
liopsis 58 

Cornflower Aster 

(see Stokesia) . . 71 

Cosmos 59 

Cyclamen 60 

Cypress Vine 60 

Dahlia 61 

Daisy 61 

Datura 61 

Delphinium 60 

Dianthus 61 

Dianthus Barbatus 61 
Dianthus Cary- 

ophyllus 61 

Digitalis 61 

Dolichos 61 

Eschscholtzia .... 61 

Euphorbia 61 

Evening Primrose. 62 

EverlastingFlower 61 

Everlasting Pea.. 62 

Feverfew 62 

Flax 62 

Flowering Maple. 62 

Flowering Sage... 62 

Forget-Me-Not ... 62 

Four O'clock 62 

Foxglove 62 

Gaillardia 62 

Geranium 62 

Gilia 62 

Gilliflower 62 

Globe Amaranth 

(see Gomphrena) 62 

Godetia 62 

Gomphrena 62 

Gourds 62 

Gypsophila 62 

Helianthus 62 

Helichrysum 62 

Heliotrope 62 

Hollyhock 63 

Humulus 63 

Hunnemannia .... 64 

Hyanclnth Bean.. 63 

Ice Plant 63 

Ipomea 63 



CONTENTS 
Seeds 

Italian Rye Grass. 50 

Kaffir Corn 52 

Kale 27 

Kentucky Blue 

Grass 50 

Kohl Rabi 27 

Lavender 49 

Lawn Grass 51 

Leek 27 

Lettuce 28 

Marjoram 49 

Martynia 30 

Meadow Fescue. . . 50 

Mesquite 51 

Millet 51 

Mushroom Spawn. 33 

Muskmelon 31 

Mustard 34 

Nasturtium 34. 

Number of Plants 

per Acre 85 

Okra 34 

Onion Seeds 34 

Onion Sets 37 

Onions for Market 86 
Orchard Grass ... 51 

Parsley 37 

Parsnip 38 

Peas 38 

Pepper 40 

Pumpkin 41 

Quantity of Seed 

per Acre 85 

Radish 42 

Rape 52 

Red Clover 50 

Seeds 

Page 
Japanese Bell (see 

Platycodon) ... 69 

Japanese Hop .... 63 

Kenilworth Ivy. . . 63 

Kochia Scoparia. . 63 
Lathyrus Latifoli- 

us 63 

Lantana 63 

Larkspur 63 

Linum 64 

Lobelia 65 

Lophospermum 

Scandens 64 

Love Grass (see 

Nemophila) 67 

Love-in-a-Mist ... 64 
Love-in-a-Puff (see 

Balloon Vine).. . 67 
Love Lies Bleed 

ing 64 

Lupins (see Lu- 

pinus) 64 

Lychnis 64 

Martynia 64 

Marigold 65 

Marvel of Peru. . . 64 

Marguerite 64 

Mignonette 66 

Mimulus 65 

Mina Lobata 65 

Momordica Balsa- 

Moonflower 64 

Morning Glory.... 65 

Mourning Bride.. . 66 

Musk Plant 66 

Nasturtium 66 

Nemophila 67 

Nicotina Affinis. .. 67 

Nigella 67 

Oenothera 67 

Oxalis 67 

Pansy 67 

Papaver 68 

Passion Flower (see 

Passiflora) 68 

Pentstemon 68 

Perennial Pea.... 69 
Perennial Poppy 

(see Papaver) . . 68 
Perilla Nankinen- 



Red Top 51 

Rhubarb 43 

Rosemary 49 

Rue 49 

Ruta Baga 48 

Sage 49 

Salsify 44 

Soja Bean 52 

Sorghum (see Su- 
gar Cane) 52 

Sorrel 44 

Spinach 44 

Spring Vetches... 52 

Squash 44 

Sugar Cane 52 

Summer SaToy ... 49 

Sunflower 52 

Sweet Vernal Grass 51 
Tall Meadow Oat 

Grass 51 

Tansy 49 

Thyme 49 

Tobacco 46 

Tomato 46 

Tree and Shrub 

Seeds 52 

Turnip 47 

Velvet Bean 62 

Vetches 51 

Watermelon 32 

Weights of Vari- 
ous Seeds 85 

Wheats 52 

White Clover 50 

Wild Rice 52 

Winter Savoy. .... 49 
Wormwood 49 



Page 

Periwinkle 69 

Petunia 68 

Phlox Drummondii 68 
Physallis Fran- 
chetti 69 

Pinks 69 

Platycodon Grandi- 

flora 69 

Poppy 69 

Portulaca 69 

Primrose 69 

Primula Sinensis.. 69 

Pyrethrum 69 

Red Hot Poker 
Plant 69 



Ric 



69 



Salpiglossis 

Salvia 69 

Sanvitalia 70 

Scabiosa 70 

Scarlet Flax 70 

Schizanthus 69 

Sensitive Plant. . . 70 

Silene 70 

Smilax 70 

Snapdragon 70 

Spider Plant 71 

Stevla 71 

Stocks 71 

Stokesia 71 

Straw Flowers.... 71 

Sunflower 71 

Sweet Alyssum... 71 

Sweet Peas 72-79 

Sweet Peas, Cupid 79 

Sweet Rocket 71 

Sweet Sultan 71 

Sweet William 79 

Tunbergia 79 



Tor 



nia 



79 



Tritoma 79 

Trumpet Flower. 

Verbena 

Vinca 

Violas 

Violet 

Virginia Stocks. . 

"Wallflower 

Whitlavia 

Xeranthemum ... 
Zinnia 




QUEEN OF SWEET PEAS 

(Our back cover design) 
Countess Spencer. While we 
offered this grand new sweet 
pea in our catalogue last season, 
we feel that the half was not 
told, and that it is entitled to 
all the enthusiastic booming a 
sweet-pea specialist can give 

It combines all the good qual- 
ities of the best sweet pea and 
has so many more that it really 
introduces a new era in sweet 
peas. 

The color is a delightfully 
soft pink, shading a little deeper 
at the edges of the petals. As 
the season progresses it deepens 
,a little, but is always a clear, 
pretty pink. Its size is larger 
than any other variety, and at 
its best the standard is usually 
two inches across, which is 
much wider than any other va- 
riety. Not only its standard, 
but each of the wings is large, 
very much larger in proportion 
to its standard than any other 
variety, which gives the whole 
flower a more commanding 
character than its competitors. 
The edges of all the petals, 
wings, and standard are wavy — 
not too much so, but just enough 
to give it a graceful, fluffy ap- 
pearance. The stems are long, 
and even in the field, where the 
vines are never trellised, it is 
no trouble to find them eighteen 
inches in length. It bears almost 
without exception four blossoms 
to the stem, and they all face one way. Is fragrant, begins to bloom early, and continues 
late in the season. The blossoms usually fall off instead of setting seed, which accounts 
for its long continuation of bloom. It also accounts for the fact that it is a poor 
seeder and that the seed is very scarce this year. We have the truest and best strain of 
Countess Spencer to be had anywhere, and we trust that all of our friends and custo- 
mers will try it. As our stock of seed is limited, we advise ordering early before our 
supply is exhausted. 

Pkt. 15c; oz. 25c; Yt lb. 75c. 






Hffl33£kir» 



>5WEET PEAS 
MAMMOTH FLOWERING 



1(11111)1 



PACKET 15* OUNCE 25* 

POSTPAID 






me* i 
(V« f f ■ ■ i 



4« » * ••» f • * i 






-^"-TrmfT? 



r»jWn»a»'tyv»»»«,l| 





— 



"Sweet Pea Culture 

AND PR.ICE LIST 

1912-1013 





New Dup/ex Sweet Pea W Margaret dt/ee " 






C. C. MORSE 6 CO. 

SEED GROWERS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAUU.S.A 





|HE season of 1912 was, alike for amateur and professional 
growers, a very trying one. It was undoubtedly an "off year." 
We can assure our friends who failed to get good results this season, 
that it was not their fault as like results were obtained by the "old 
hands" and we ourselves have to report a short crop. Next year we 
hope will be more favorable and we urge our friends to try again. 

"Sweet Pea Culture" has supplied a long felt want with American 
Amateurs and the great demand for copies necessitated our issuing a 
second edition. We were much encouraged by this fact and this year 
we have reviewed our booklet and list of varieties. Many of the 
older varieties we have dropped, these now being superseded by more 
beautiful varieties. Our endeavor is to confine our list to the best 
varieties and to keep quite up to date. 

The Novelties we offer this year are of a high order and we have 
every confidence in recommending them. 

"Margaret Atlee" our leading novelty, has met with the greatest 
admiration wherever it has been seen. 

European and American experts who visited our farms have been 
loud in their praises. 

As a result of the bad season and consequent shortage of seed 
there will be a great deal of poor seed on the market. We, however, 
have spared no expense in handpicking our samples so that our 
customers will have first class seeds of dependable vitality. 

We realize fully the disappointment that growers experience from 
poor germination and unfixed stocks and there is no effort which has 
not been put forth by us to eliminate these faults. 

It has been a pleasure to answer our many correspondents seeking 
advice on Sweet Pea matters and we welcome inquiries from any 
of our friends. 

We desire to thank our friends who favored us with their orders 
and assure them of our best attention to their future commands. 

C. C. Morse ®> Co. 

125 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 



=$ 



A GUIDE TO THE 
CULTURE OF THE 

SWEET PEA 



WITH A CATALOGUE OF ALL 
THE BEST VARIETIES 
BOTH NEW AND OLD 




THIS BOOK IS MAILED FREE TO ANY 
ONE 'WHO SENDS US THEIR NAME 
AND ADDRESS C& REQUESTS A COPY 



SHOULD YOU RECEIVE TWO COPIES OF THIS 
BOOKLET WE WILL BE FAVORED IF YOU WILL 
KINDLY HAND ONE TO A FRIEND INTERESTED 
JN THE CULTURE OF THE SWEET PEA 



C. C. MORSE <®, COMPANY 

125 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., U. S. A. 



* 



=$ 



c. c. 

MORSE 
& CO. 

San 
•rancisco, 

Cal. 




H«M»aWBBMMMMMM«BM«BBmfflmffilfflllH!H«mfflaa»lcBS 



The Sweet Pea 




As we anticipated, the publication of this booklet has given a 
great impetus to the Sweet Pea Cultivation in California. Many of 
our friends have written us /tailing of great pleasure gained by the 
results from following our simple Cultural Directions. We have vis- 
ited many gardens where the Sweet Peas were a joy to look at. There 
is yet an endless number of gMQens without Sweet Peas and why? 
Just because the owners failto realize 
the flower when a little dare is given it. 
to invite the neign\ora to Iqfc^fl t their re i 
about the fine blossomsU1>SB v The 
yet gained the place in C 

In San Franckco and 



Beautiful." There is 
good row of bright S; 



exquisite loveliness of 

would ask our friends 

Its and) tell their friends 

een of Annuals" has not 

gardens' we hope^to see it occupy. 

g for the "City 



Peas. 




en more than a 



of grace and beauty of frag- 
f today ? 

In England, in 1902, the 
until at the present time 



For beauty of form.^beauty of color 
ranee, what flower can Ampare to the-'S 

Since the advent ofepir: ^Spencer, 
Sweet Pea has gained ^HHv'V^HPeI 
Sweet Peas are found in\ every garden 

The growing of Sweet Peas 
urable and healthy hobby would 
evening to get an hour orjtw 
he may be found busy watering, 

The Sweet Pea responds to al^the 
rewarded with handsome flowers having 
borne on stems twelve to eighteen Inches 
perfect blossoms. Sweet Peas are too ofte! 
ited on the street vendor's stand. To get 
flower, the amateur must grow the "Spenc' 
vendor. 

In England we find one grower competln 
have the finest blossoms and who has chosei 

The blending of the colors causes endless 1 
visits and comparisons made, make many pl< 
table the housewife discusses with her guests the combination of colors of her 
table decoration*. 

How proud the amateur Is when he walks Into the office In the morning 
with a glorious boutonnlere' of some "Spencer" grown by himself, and Is imme- 
diately accosted and subjected to the inquiries of an. admiring crowd of work- 
mates. 

All over Great Britain, in every town and village, Flower Shows are held 
every year, in which the classes for Sweet Peas take first place. Handsome prizes 
are given and competition is always very keen. On July 28 and 29, 1911, the 
"London Daily Mail" held a Sweet Pea Show at the Crystal Palace In London, 
at which the proprietor offered a prize of $5,000 for the best twelve sprays grown 
by an amateur. Thirty-eight thou land exhibit! were sent in and the prize was 
won by the wife of a minister In Kelso, Scotland. This proves clearly to what 
perfection the humblest amateur can, with a little care, grow Sweet Peas. 



and a more pleas- 
urrles home In the 
rlyjp the morning 
pets. 

e grower Is 

Inches broad 

ometimes five 

tis exhib- 

beauty of the 

which never go to the 

ith his neighbors as to who will 
finest varieties. 

scusslons, and the exchange of 
.nt evenings. Over the dinnei 




d|M|aMg| 



#f2lll$fe 




Tb» Bwt«t Pm finds la California an agreeable aoll and climate, therefore 
wi an confidant tbat battar flowtri can ba produced In California than In any 
oltaar place In the world. 

Tor many years we have been the largest growers of Sweet Peas In the 
world, and in every country "Morss" ts a guarantee of excellence and purity. We 
have raised and Introduced many of the finest varieties In cultivation from our 
"workshop or 8w*6l Pea Kxperimental Grounds at our San Juan Ranch. No ex- 
pense or time Is spared by us to obtain the best results and purest stocks. The 
Sweet Peas are under the supervision of experts and any one purchasing from 
us can depend on getting the finest and purest procurable. 

We want to see the same enthusiasm In California that Is found ever In- 
creasing In Great Britain and to some extent In the Eastern States. 

There Is an American Sweet Pea Society doing good work but mainly In the 
East. A very successful Show was held In Boston this summer. We would like 
to see enough enthusiasm in California to encourage the formation of a Sweet 
Pea Show In ' San Francisco or some large city where amateurs might meet In 
competition. 

Pea is easy and there is no plant that 
play of flowers if the following simple 



The culture of the Sweei 
will give such a continuous 
methods are employed. 

I 
Culture 




Preparation of the 



For the guidance o 

will give a few cul 

First of all to those ^^Hptt^ 1 gr.ojtt large 

would give the following advi 

Select a nice spot f< 



of pjjteet Peas.., 
he I ■ ter. t&vlng 
btoui ; - il 
the ground 
scatter 



time of the day so m 
October, or as soon as 

First of all mark 
wide. Over this portl< 
and a good dressing of bone 
should be trenched about tyro 
are desired. This does not take lo 
at one end of the plot, a foot dee; 
soil and placing It In a heap near t 
at the bottom of the hole to the depth de 
to turn over the next two feet of top soil 
moved. Again stir and break up the subsoi 
so on repeat the process until the .distance 
the hole at the finish which will be filled 
ginning. By this method a good trench ts 

The ground, where turned over, should 
rain and air can operate on it freely. 




ea 



ITION PIOWER3 

grow Sweet Peas, 

exhibition standard, 

If it is partly shaded at some 

he spot, in the month of 

tons should be started. 

not less than two feet 

farmyard manure 

i fcsay the ground 



flowers 

a hole 

irrying the 

up the soil 

Proceed 

that has been 

taken out, and 

rse there will be 

il taken out at the be- 

and the subsoi] is left below. 

ft as rough as possible so that 



Preparation of the Ground FOB OBDINABY GARDEN CULTTJBE 

To those who would have a good show in their garden and who do not wish 
huge flowers, we would recommend the lighter method. 

In October, or when the ground is in condition (I. e., has had some rain to 
moisten It) select the place intended for Sweet Peas. Give a liberal dressing of 
well rotted farmyard manure and bone-meal and dig the ground a foot 4 ee P 
(i. e., depth of a good spade or fork). First of all, take out a hole about a foot 
deep and not less than two feet wide, taking the soil to the other end of the plot, 
then witti the foot push In the spade straight down its full depth, about four Inches 
from the face of the hole, lever It back by the handle and throw the spadeful of 
soil over into the hole taken out and proceed right along. 

If a gardener Is employed see that his digging ts not lazy, but that he pushes 
the spade tn straight and not at an angle of 150 degrees, as Is often done. 



Sowing the Seed 



A few of our customers have asked us why It Is that their Sweet Pea seeds 
will not start as the seed Is apparently quite sound. This Is not an uncommon 
occurrence with some varieties for this reason. Many varieties have a very hard 
seed coat which prevents the moisture getting In to the seed for a long time. The 
moisture must get Into the seed to start the process of growth. To facilitate 
the moisture getting In. a small piece of the seed coat may be clipped off with a 
sharp knife, or file a small notch in the seed-coat on the side opposite the eye 
or sprouting point of the seed. 

Growers can easily recognise hard coated seeds from their bullet like appear- 
ance. 

Sowing the Seed IK TBS OPEN QsOTJHD 

In the open ground, November and December are the best months to sow 
Sweet Peas, but they can be sown at any time as long as the ground remains in 
condition. By the month of November or December the ground will have had con- 
siderable rain and If a nice day Is chosen It will be found that the lumps will 
break down nicely. The trench should then be well Armed down by treading. See 
that the soil is not too moist when Jhls Is done. The Sweet Pea likes a deep soil 
but also a firm one. 

Inch deep and sown thinly. Whenever the 
tilnhed^out to a foot or eighteen Inches apart. 



The seed she- 
plants are welt u 
It Is a great 
to result In 



ild be 



For those who c* 
mend the following 

Procure some th 
Inside; IX not, rub w 
place a piece of broken 
material; old turf with soil 
age. The compost for the 
dusting of lime. A sprinkling 
be well mixed and should be fgj 
gently to within half an ln 5jCU-— 

With a blunt dibble. sVBBsHx|Hh 




rowdlng is sure 



Pots, we recom- 

thoroughly clean 
hole in the bottom 
ne such loose 
Insures good drain- 
little sand and a 
The whole should 
ress down the soil 



three-quarters of an Inch/ 
For the smaller seeds of, 
After sowing, label eac 

The pots should th 
the frame should be 
age. The treat 
get dry, but must never 
frosty nights with a lath 
ing the day. The great secret is 

Sowing In pots may be/ done 

When the plants are large enou 
enable the tendrils to cling. 

Planting out may be done in A 
If the whole potful is to be planted Intact, 
plants, however, may be easily separated 
apart. 

To remove the plants from the pot, pla< 
top of the pot and close on the soil, 
hand on the bottom of the pot and tap the 
solid. If the pot was clean it can be lifted 
will be left In the left hand. If rain does 
watering after a day or so. Plant firmly and 
little soil as possible. 



three holes about 
and cover over with soil, 
or less is sufficient depth. 

ot ,vlth (he .Tune of tha/variety it contains. 



watered. The bottom of 

rial to Insure good draln- 

Quld never be allowed to 

_ered during cold or 

,be taken off dur- 

£coddle" them. 



und Is moist. 
it apart. The 
Mghteen inches 

I^PJft hand over the 

lde down, place the right 

pot sharply on something 

the right hand and the plants 

come soon after planting, see to 

separating plants shake off as 



Caring for the Plants 

As soon as the plants are about three inches high it is time to put some small 
twigs around them to which the young tendrils may cling. When they reach six 
Inches in height, it Is time to give them permanent support. 

The support for the Peas is erected as follows: Along each side of the row 
drive in some stout stakes. These stakes should be at least one foot in the ground 
and at least six. feet out of the ground. Intervals of about eight feet should be 
left between the stakes and sufficient space should be left between the rows of 
stakes to allow the plants to grow up. Ten inches is about the right space to 
leave. 

Wire netting with a coarse mesh, say about four Inches, should be securely 
fastened to each row of posts by means of staples or strong cord. This netting 
should be six feet high and if such a width cannot be procured, two narrow pieces, 
one above the other, will do as well. 



It is very necessary that the stakes are firm in the ground and if this is seen 
to, much trouble will be avoided later. 

Tree boughs with plenty of twigs make the best stakes, but a fair support 
can be made by driving in stout stakes and stretching strong string between them 
as the plants require the support. 

Should it not be convenient to plant the Sweet Peas in rows, a very pretty 
effect can be had along a sidewalk by planting clumps at intervals, following the 
same cultural directions and leaving about three plants to a clump. A circle of 
wire netting can be easily erected, supported by two stakes. 

After the last rains the Sweet Pea ground should be well hoed, and mulched 
with old stable manure, or if this cannot be done, the soil must 'be constantly hoed 
during the summer and kept loose for several inches in depth to prevent crack- 
ing and loss of moisture. 

By the month of May the plants w-ill be ready for some . water, as they will 
have grown several feet high. Watering will be needed every day or so, and it is 
best done in the evening. Examine the row often to see whether or not any shoots 
require training into position. Thts is important not only because the row will 
look better, but because it keeps the growths going straight, therefore straight 
stems will be the result. 



rBBTXMZING 



If extra large flowers are desi: 
the plants to have some feeding'. 

should not be done before th$" pli 

A very good liquid — 
manure and soaking it in a tub 
using and take one quart of the 
the manure, water tns\plants fi 
be often enough to feefi^ 

Another good liquid food 
or barrel and using in a like 
colors. 

We must warn growers against overfeed 
and poor flowers Instead of good ones will be " 

Many growers use Qfl^^ffit manures dt'ssoF 
being Nitrate of Soda, but it has to be used with 1 
manure off the vines anil apply it in jibe, evening. 

Perhaps towards Aj 
getting smaller; do 
the ground, water well 
will shoot out afresh 



Hitherto American growers 1 
now so many beautiful shades in 
that in order to get the full beautfy of 
plant. It takes very little to give sufflcie 
material to use. This should be stretc.hei 
means of light wooden bars, above the va 
little trouble to shade a variety and the 
times over. Examplesof varieties that hav 
Sterling Stent, Melba, Charles Poster and 

INSECT TBO 
We know of no plant that is so free fro 



f ff the sou is light and poor, It will benefit 

plied in liquid form. Feeding 

\have given some flowers. 

pking aT\sack of sheep or cow 

Stir &e liquid well .before 

[vater. Before giving 

Once qr twice a week will 




the growth rank, 



of being spent, the blooms 
n to within three feet of 
of fertilizer. The plants 



>ut there are 

e strong sun 

to shade the 

!hg is the best 

'ire netting by 

.t really is very 

ay the^rower a thousand 

ed are, Thomas Stevenson, 



h e attacks of Insects 
The only insects troubling Sweet Peas are the l\jfe Spider and Green Aphis. These 
are easily disposed of by syringing or spraying with pure water. If the insects 
have gotten very bad, use Whale Oil Soap or Sulpho Tobacco Soap in the water. 

VOTE 

The foregoing directions are generally for California, especially as to time of 
planting. Different climates require a little different procedure, but on the whole 
these cultural directions will be advisable for any location. If you will write and 
let us know .something of your climate, we will try to help you. 

In San Francisco and the Bay Cities, Santa Cruz and Monterey and all loca- 
tions with kindred climatic conditions, providing In warm and protected situations 
and especially If on a sandy land and with sea air, Sweet Peas can be sown as 
late as May 1st with good success. 

We feel sure that, If the gardeners and amateurs give a little care and atten- 
tion to their Sweet Peas next year, they will catch the "fever" which has taken 
hold of the growers in England. They will look with longing eyes for the novelties 
which appear year by year and will be content only with the finest Seeds .procur- 
able, and these can all be had from Morse. 

A little Gypsophtla Pantculata or Elegans used with taste greatly adds to 
the charm of a bunch of Sweet Peas. 



VARIETIES TO PLAIT 

To the amateur the seedsman's list of Sweet Peas la almost bewildering and It 
la difficult to aelect the beat varletlea. 

We would call attention eapeclally to the splendid collections which we offer 
and which are made up with an Idea of assortment of colors and the selection of 
the best and finest varieties. We do not list any worthless varieties, and anything 
we Hat can be depended on. 

To those who ax* going- in for Sweat Peas we would recommend the Spencer 
or Waved type. It Is immensely superior to the grand I flora type, and the grower 
Is not troubled with the constant running to seed, as Is the habit of the grandi- 
flora. 

"MOKSE'S DOLLAB" COLLECTION? Is wonderful value for those who wish a 
grand display. If there are only a few colors you want, name the shades and we 
will send them along. 

BEMSKBEB 

That no flower makes a better table or room decoration than the Sweet Pea. 
That no flower makes] a prettier bontonnlere or vase flower. 
That no flower is more welcona* In the sick room. 
That the Sweet Pea to easily B^HjtfU 
That the shades of color are woflrWful. 
That the pleasure gained 

That the great thing la to getgood seeds fromJan exper^ house, and 
THAT "C. C. Mors\j*: Co." ^0^' largest atadpest 
the world. 



Types 




of Sweet Peas In 



Peas 



Sweet Peas hav 
Early Flowering or 

THE EARLY PLOf 
twelve weeks frt 
of these about Septemt 
early in the year they 
by all who want a successlorf of J 
greenhouse. #;-, 

CTJF1DS — This is the dwarf 
grows about a foot high, and spreaf 
ameter of two feet. The foliage is deep grl 
size, but borne on short stems, usually twl 
are used principally for borders and sidewalf 

THE GBANDITLOBA TYPE is 
not necessarily the old-fashioned small flowed 
shaped types are in this class, as are also all : 
types. There are many new shades and manyl 
the grandifloras, and they will always be popuj 
ways be cheaper than that of the other 
Eckford varieties. 

THE WAVED, or spencer class represents a type of Sweet Pea which was 
discovered In 1903 In England. The original was Countess Spenoer. The advent 
of this variety and the development from it of numerous new varieties, only covers 
a period of about ten years, and the chief interest of all Sweet Pea experts is cen- 
tered on this class. 

All gardeners and florists prefer Waved, or Spencer Sweet Peas when the pop- 
ular colors can be had. They are strong growers, hear long steins, and very large 
blossoms with usually four blossoms to a stem. The standard, is always large, 
round and fluted or wavy on the edges. The wings, top, are always large and 
more or less wavy, but not so much so as the standard. They set very few seed 
pods and for this reason will continue blooming for a long period — vary often from 
Hay" 1st to August 1st. 



five distinct classes — 
or Spencer, 

usually blooms- In about 

;ts usually sow their seed 

stmas flowers. If planted 

should be planted 

forcing in the 

In pots. It 

I root to a di- 

ftways of good 

Je stem. They 

5pt rather dry. 

ordinary Sweet Pea, but 
of the hooded and shell- 
best open form round standard 
, large flowered varieties among 
since the seed of them will al- 
These are frequently called the 



New Sweet Peas and Novelties for 1913 



NEW DUPLEX SWEET PEA "MABQABET ATXEE" — This is a novelty of our 
own raising and which we are justly proud of. This Sweet Pea belongs to the new 
Duplex type and is the most perfect example of that type yet Introduced. It 
differs from those already Introduced on account of its large size, great vigor and 
beautiful coloring. The color is a warm salmon pink, perfectly suffused over a 
cream ground. The cream deepens into bright buff at base of standard and wings 
and this lights up the flower with great effect. The standard and wings are alike 
In color and the general appearance Is a warm self pink. The shade of pink found 
in "Margaret Atlee" is entirely a new shade and commands admiration. The 
flowers are of extraordinary size and we measured many flowers 2% inches across 
the standards. 

The blossoms are borne almost uniformly four on stout stems. The Duplex 
character is carried out in almost e^very case to three flowers and in a large per- 
centage, to the four flowers on eaaafetem. 



rse to duplex Sweet Peas, but Margaret Atlee 



Some growers have.jBaBta 
ipels admiration from the 



compels admiration from the grea : 
quite "fixed" and it is with more th 
novelty. 

Capital illustrations, of tnHk flowet 
and on the back covewbij 
Sweet Pea Society. ^H 



This variety has been proved to be 
dinary pleasure that we offer this sterling 



ront of our Booklet 

of Merit American 

ket of 20 seeds, 25c 

ket of 10 seeds, 15c 



HEW BUFKE3C SWEET P 

from our own workshop wh: 
with the "Duplex" type of 
Duplex Cream, however, oi 
color as other varieties 
beautifully waved. 
A few sprays, when bu 
almost to a soft shade 
variety on the. back 



After Trial on our own Grouni 

the Following British Nov 

We have only a Limited quantity of the* 
NEW SWEET FEA "APTEBOLOW" — T 




the third novelty 

To those familiar 

lmost a description. 

t of the 'double sTindard, iras fully twice as much 

he same shade. The\tandards are large, bold and 

Cream is a 'vigorous gjpwer and produces many fours. 

*~iave a very rich, deejMflkam appearance amounting 

Ve have P'wIH 11 illustrating this grand 

i*, of our Sweet Pea BooI^H ^Ber packet of 30 seeds, 25c 

^H er a9K£*- °' 15 seeds, 15o 



Offering 



among English Sweet Pea growers on accoui 
new break in Sweet Peas and very hard to des- 
effect. The base of standard is bright violet bl 
wings are a peculiar shade of blue best describe? as 



varied created quite a sensation 

of its distinct coloring. It is a 

The flower has quite a pastel 

shading to rosy amethyst. The 

electric blue. When well 



grown this is a beautiful flower; requires shading. 



Per packet, 25c 



NEW SWEET PEA "CHABXES FOSTER"— This variety is a companion 
flower to "Afterglow," both having the pastel effect. It also is peculiarly difficult 
to describe. The general effect is a mauve pink and both standard and wings are 
alike in color. The color deepens towards the centre of the flower and makes It 
most effective, This variety must be well grown and shaded in order to get its 
full beauty. Award of Merit, N. S. P. S. Per packet, 25c 



STEW SWEET FEA "ELFBIDA PEASSOW 
quite 



-This magnificent Pea has caused 



sensation during the last two years in England and we have great pleasure 
in now introducing it to the American Growers. We have grown it on our own 
farms and Trial Grounds and satisfied ourselves that this is a variety of out- 
standing merit It Is a very much glorified "Florence Morse Spencer,'* but that 



comparison by no means describes the Itower. The color Is pale pink on white 
ground, the young Mower*. howe\er. having a decided and distinct tint of buff. 
The plant la exceptionally vigorous and the sterna are very stout on which the 
(lowers are borne In fours. The ilowers can only be described as huge, many 
measuring - 4 Inches across the standard. The placement of the flowers on the 
stem leaves nothing to be das! red. We <-annot too strongly recommend this pea 
and It should undoubtedly be grown by everyone. Besides receiving an award from 
the Royal Horticultural Society of Great Britain, this variety was placed on top 
by the National Sweet Pea Society In the Pink Section. 

Per packet. 25c 



RIW SWEET VEA -Ml 
Sweet Peas that has been sent out for 
own trials and we thought so much of 
of packets from the raisers to offer to 
gained an award from the Nationa lise 
standard beautifully marb led i 
veined with carmine. T-JC^gfc 



HEW SWEET 
gained distinction W ^^^^HH 
flower and is especially^oRtlVj 
unique and bright and is 

The standard 
The growth Is vlgorou 

This variety must 
directions. 



HEW SWEET PEA , 

pleasure that we offer tflH Hy to 

Kaine3 many award? in Bflgland, pari) I; 

tional Horticultural Exhibition in I.. 
"Sweet" Peas that we have ever 
wings are white with faint flush! 
orous and under good cultivation 



' — This Is one of the most distinct 

rs. We have grown this variety In our 
hat we have obtained a limited number 
customers. It Is a British novelty and 
Pea Society. The ground color is cream, 
; wings very slightly 
lety. bearing plenty of fours. 

Per packet, 25c 




variety which has 
t salmon colored 
of salmon is very 



per our cultural 
Per packet, 25c 



with more than ordinary 

omers. This variety has 

sti notion at the Interna- 

pleasing and 

pink and the 

.epticmally vig- 

med sprays. 

r packet, 25c 



galnK a first class 

"Clety of England as 

offering seed for sale. 

ange. The flowers are of 



NEW SWEET PEA "STIBLIHO STEM 
certificate and silver medal from the Natid 
being the best Novelty In 1910. We have jM 
The color is a glorious deep salmon suffusef 
superb Spencer form and well placed on the! 

This Is really a beautiful Sweet Pea antB|y artificial light Is particularly 
effective. We are sure all who grow this Pea wfjp>e amazed at the beautiful color. 
Salmon Peas are inclined to burn in strong sunshine and we recommend growing in 
light shade or using shading material In order to get the full beauty of the color. 

Per packet, 25c 



KTRW SWEET PEA "THOMAS STEVENSON"— To those growers who like 
bright colors "Thomas Stevenson" will prove to be a beauty. The .color Is very 
brilliant orange scarlet. The standard has more orange color than the wings and 
this brightens up the flower. The flowers are of the very finest Spencer form and 
generally come four to each stem. The stems are long and strong and borne on 
very vigorous vines. This variety also comes to us from England, where It has 
proved to be a tremendous favorite, with the "Hawlmark" of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society. 

If this variety can be grown In light shade or shaded, as per note In Cultural 
Directions, the color will be greatly improved. Per packet, 25c 



General List of Sweet Peas 



Grandiflor, 
printed in 



wering. 




AMEBIC A SPENCER — Wh 1 te ground, 
heavily striped and flaked with 
bright crimson scarlet. A large, 
bold flower of splendid iorm. 

Per packet, 10c; *& oz.. 20c 

APPLE BLOSSOM SPENCER — Very 
large, bold flower of best Spencer 
form. Standard very bright rose, 
wings primrose with flush of rose 
tint. A grand robust variety. 

Per packet, 10c; Vz oz.. 30c 

ARTHUR GREEN—A wine color or 

claret self, of immense size and 

nicely waved form. Very strong 

grower and a very attractive color. 

Per packe't*jfi5c 

ASTA OHK — The best lavender' ajftet 
Pea. Is more truly. yfoBpft pftfcisti 
lavender self. Flowers a 
and beautifully wavec 

Per packet, 10c 
AURORA SPENCE: 
mottled and flak 
ange pink. Spl< 
and nicely waved 
flower and one o 
largest Spencers. 

Per packet, 10c 

BEATRICE SPENCER — Buff, pT 

rose, with deeper n ise wj ng 

Per packet, 10c;. J ,2 oz.. 30c 

Black Knight (G.) — The 'popular open 

form, glossy deep A maroon. Thtf 

same shade as a Black Tartarian 

Cherry. 

Per packet. 5c; 1 oz.. 20c; Vi lb., 50c 

BLANCHE PERRY SPENCER— A giant 
type of Spencer form, with rose 
standard and wings white, 
and tinted with light pink. 

Per packet. lOtf; % o 



iety. 
Per packet, 5c; 1 oz., 30c; % lb.. 50c 
Burpee's Earliest White (E.P.) — Very 

early, hooded, black seeded. 
Per packet, 5c; 1 oz., 20c; % lb.. 50c 

CAPTAIN OF THE BLUES, or WAV- 
EBLEY SPENCER — Pure purple. 
The margin of the petals is mar- 
bled. Very large and distinct. 

Per packet, 10c;. % oz., 30c 

CLARA CURTIS — A beautifully waved 
cream, good substance, stems usu- 
ally have four large flowers — a su- 
perior strain of Primrose Spencer. ■ 
Per packet, 15c; % oz., 40c 

CONSTANCE OLIVER— Cream ground, 
beautifully suffused with pale or- 
ange pink. A vigorous grower, flow- 
ers large and wavy. 

Per packet, 15c; % oz., 40c 

COUNTESS SPENCER — The original 
giant flowered Spencer, with finest 
waved standard and wings clear 
pink, deepening somewhat towards 
the edge, but almost self colored. 
Still one of the best Sweet Peas of 
today. 
Per packet, 5c; % oz., 30c; oz., 35c 



DAINTY SPENCER — Very large Spen- 
cer, splendid form, white ground, 
with beautiful picotee edge of rose 
pink. 

Per packet, 10c; % oz., 30c 

Dorothy Eckford (G.) — Best grand- 
iflora white, grand substance. 
Per packet, 5c; 1 oz., 30c; y± lb., 50c 

DUPLEX CRIMSON XING— A rich 
blood red self color in the giant 
double standard type. Very strong 
grower and produces abundant 
"fours." The duplex character is 
well carried out and a few sprays 
make a nice bunch. 

Per packet, 15c; % oz., 40c 

DUPLEX SPENCER— Belongs to the 
new type. It is a handsome flower 
a? and of exceptional merit for cutting 
and decorative work. Color is a 




the 



favc 



ite. 



15c; *£ oz., 50c 
xtra Early Blanche 

'he earliest of all 
;ht rose standard, 
■ pretty. 

z.. 20c; H lb., 50c 
Pine large flower, 
icely edged with 

?t, 15c; % oz„ 40c 

ETHEl"\rOOSEVELT — Cream ground, 

daintily striped and flaked with soft 

Best Spencer form, very 

packet, 10c; Y 2 oz., 30c 
A beautiful white of 

l. Same as Morse's 

Spencer. 

fet^ 15c; % oz., 40c 
and prin 

... 40c 

JCER — Very 

bright 

Ptint of p 

packet,jBoc; Vz oz.. 30c 
BE SPENCER, — Stand- 
shed- with a beautiful 
shade of pink; wings 
oft biffs h pink, giving the flower 
ling appearance; very large 
One of the prettiest of 
Peas. 
Per packet. 10c; ^ oz., 30C 
FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE — A very 
large, finely waved bluish lavender, 
one of the very best new Spencers. 
Per packet, 15c; % oz., 50c 
GAIETY SPENCER— The best bright 
colored stripe in existence. This is 
really a handsome Pea. The color 
is bright rose crimson, striped and 
splashed on ivory white. Very vig- 
orous and four flowers to each stem. 
Per packet,. 15c; % oz., -40c 
GEO. HERBERT — A large Spencer rose 
crimson, suffused with magenta and 
showing veins in wings. 

Per packet. 10c; % oz., 30c 
HELEN LEWIS— A very large and fine 
orange salmon pink, with especially 
bright orange standard. 

Per packet. 10c; Vz oz., 30c 



H«Un Flare* (O.) — Clear 



l.ln 



Ivory 



rhlte 



marbled 



vhlte; ope<< 



Per packet. So; 1 or. 90o; ■, lb.. 50e 

IBISH BELLI or DIUX 1 new simile 
■ nslderable beauty. Rich lilac. 
Hushed with pink, giving the flower 
a distinct and soft tone Oood size 
and torn. Per packet. 15c 

JOHN OIOIUI-A fine rich rose crim- 
son, with veins of deeper shade. 
Very large flower of good substance 
and very bright- Similar to Geo. 
Herbert. 

Per packet. 10c; H oz.. 20c 

King Edward TO (».)— One of the 

very best pure red shades. 

Per packet. 5c; 1 oz.. 20c; ', lb., 50c 

XXNO EDWABD SFEHCEB- The best 

pure red Spencer, very large, witli 

especially Immense wlr 

one should grow tills v; 

strain Is quite sunproof. 

Per packet. lflOj 

Lady Gili.l Hamilton 1<£J— Soft 11 

der. limed with mauve In stem 

Per packet, 5c; 1 oz.. 20c; i , 

Lord Nelson or Brilliant Bin* (Q.) 

darker strain offnavy BTVie. The 
best dark blue. » 
Per packet. 5c; 1 
Lovely (a.) — White 
■hading off tow; 
Per packet, 5c; 1 oz.. 20c; 

LOVELT SFENCEB — Fini 

white ground, with i 

of deep pink at base 

.standard, shading to 

and flesh at edges. 

Per packet. TOc: M Oz., 20c 
MABGABET MADXSotf— A heautlfug 

self-colored azure ■■^LjriiiK was 

has proved to be a^gTOat favorite 
on account of its eximisite color. 

Per packet, 15c; % oz.^.-BOe 
MABIE COBELLI — A bright gl, 
crimson, almost self color, 
large flower, beautifully waved 
Per packet 
MABTHA WASHINGTON — A fine I 
flower, white ground, margined 
bright pink suffusing to cente 
standard and 

Per packet, 10c; % oz., 20c 
MABY GARDEN — Similar to Duplex 
Spencer but a trifle lighter in color. 
Per packet, 15c; Vz oz., 40c 
MASTERPIECE - A splendid lavender 
Spencer, slightly tinted 
Flowers very large and 
Stems nearly always carry 
blossoms. 

Per packet, 15c; ^ o 
MAUD HOLMES — Rich 

cer. tine large flower and quite 
proof. Practically synony 
King Edward Spencer. 

Per packet, 15c; ^ oz.. 40c 

MIRIAM BEAVEB SEEDLINGS Clear 

apricot pink, self color. Unfortu- 
nately, It breaks badly, and while 
we can offer stock that will come 50 
per cent true. we will not guarantee 
it. When once we fix this, it will be 
one of the most beautiful varieties 
in existence. 

Per packet. 15c; % oz.. 50c 

Miss W.'llmott (O.)— Bright orange 

pink, showing veins of a deeper tint. 

"er packet, 5c; 1 oz., 20c; 'A lb.. 60c 




Mont Blanc (>. F.)— Karly 
form. 
Per packet. So; 1 oz.. 25c; V> lb., 75-- 
MBS. A. IRELAND — Standard bright 
roM pink, With creamy base, wings 
blush. A very tine bl-color. 

Per packet. 10c; i-.. oz.. 20c 
MBS. CHAS. POSTER — A very flne lav- 
ender with suggestion of mauve. 
Flowers large and wavy. 

Per packet. 16c; % oz., 40o 
Mrs. C. H. Totty (E. P.)— Very early 
lavender. The best of the shade In 
early types. 
Per packet. 6c; 1 oz.. 26c; % lb., 75c 
MBS. C. W. BBEADMOBE — Creamy buff 
ground, beautifully edged with rose 
pink. One of the best varieties; 
Rowers large and of best Spencer 
form; very vigorous. 

Per packet. lOo; V4 oz., 20c 
George Lewis (E. F.) — The best 
pure early white and very flne form. 
Per packet. 10c; 1 oz„ 25o; y» lb., 760 
Mrs. E. Wilde (E. F.) — Very early, 
hrifrtU 
Per pijket. 10c; 1 oz., 25c; Vi lb.. 760 
Dolanskey (E. F.)- 

lght pink. 

10c;\l oz., 26c; Vi lb., 750 
Hlgginejn, Jr. (Q.) — Clear 
Tgg-olor. 

z.. 20c; >., Hi.. 60o 

DCASVT-fc STKES — Simila 

; i Mew^' Spencer, but in 

the tone of pink 

ket. 10c; V, oz.. 20c 

H DICKSON — The best Cream 

weet Pea. The color is light 

pink on cream ground. This 

i exceptional vigor and 

rge flowers, four on each 

ould 

^r rjack-c, 15c; % oz., 40c 

tA beautiful blend- 

ith blush 




Per packet. 10c; V4 oz.. 20c 
OTHELLO SPENCER — Of immense size, 
with large drooping wings, rich 
maroon, very dark and adapted 
for many attractive combinations. 
One of the best dark Sweet Peas. 

Per packet, 10c; % oz., 20c 

PABADISE IVORY — A good Spencer. 

cream with just a suggestion of 

pink in the newly opened blossoms. 

Per packet, 15c; % oz.. 40c 

PEABL GRAY SPENCEB — Very flne 

lavender on primrose ground; the 

general effect is a pretty bluish 

gray. Splendid form and. size and 

makes an attractive bunch. 

Per packet, 15c; Vz oz., 40c 



PHENOMENAL — A large fluffy type, 
called orchid flowering; white 
ground, with very light shading of 
blue and lavender; blue edge. 

Per packet. 10c; % oz.. 20c 
Prima Donna (G.) — The popular clear 
pink, hooded form. 
Per packet, 5c; 1 oz., 20c; J 4 lb., 50c 
PRIMROSE SPENCER — Morse's Extra 
Selected Strain. The finest of its 
class, clear primrose self of best 
Spencer form, beautifully waved, 
flowers large and mostly four blos- 
soms on each stem. 

Per packet, 10c; % oz., 20c 

PRINCESS VICTORIA — White ground, 

standard flushed with lovely shade 

of pink; wings blush pink. Very 

similar to Florence Morse Spencer. 

Per packet, 15c; l A oz.. 40c 

Queen Alexandra (G.) — Almost a, s true 

scarlet; very brilliant. . "■ 

Per packet, 5c; 1 oz.. 20c; V4 HarfeOc 

QUEEN VICTORIA SPENCER 

large flower, nicely waved, 

with blush tint, then 

primrose; black seeded. 

Per packet, lOc^KV^ oz., 

RAINBOW SPENCER— A porn 
variety. Ground <\ory whit, 
and flaked with soi'- 
and salmon i 

Per packet 
BAflONA SPENCER — Ivory whJFe, wit 
soft blush carmine stri; 
flakes; very pretty. 
Per packi 
St. George (G.) — A brilllan^H 
or more correctly, fl: "" 

Per packet. /: ioc; Vi 
SENATOR SPENCER— 
attractive Spencer 
late and seal brow 
and mottled on i- 
distinct and novel 
very largest 

Per packe 



-Very large open form, very 
20c; % lb., 50c 



Shasta (G.)- 

pure. 
Per packet, 5c; 1 
SUNPROOF CRIMSON— A grand crim- 
son Spencer. Flowers very large 
and nicely waved. Generally car- 
ries four blossoms on each stem. 

Per packet, 15c; % oz., 40c 

TENNANT SPENCER— A giant flower 

of good Spencer form. The color is 

a curious purplish mauve. Very 

distinct and pretty. 

Per packet, 10c; »& oz., 20c 
VERMILION BRILLIANT — A brilliant 
Scarlet Spencer of splendid form. 
The standard is very bold and beau- 
fully waved. On account of its 
brightness this is a very telling 
color and should be in every collec- 
tion. 

Per packet, 15c 
WHITE SPENCER — Morse's re-selected. 
The best Spencer white. Flowers 
very large and of magnificent Spen- 
cer waved form. Stems as a rule 
carry four blossoms. 

packet. 10c; % oz., 30c 

White wAder (G.) — Good sized variety, 

.', givesffnany double flowers, three to 

',,,-, ,• , i,J Ac.™ Viorne near the 

20c; 14 lb., 50o , 
buff primrose 
ng to apricot pink 
"lowers large and 

ariety. 

ket, 10c; Vz oz., 20c 

Pea of peculiar 

are light and 

rather than waved. In early 

color is almost white but 

a delicate pale lavender, 

ch has a very beautiful 



We have done 
in all the shades 1 
since those who p 
White — Pure white. 
Pink — Rose standard, white wing 
ConnteBs of Radnor — Lavender. Crc 
Price of each of the aboi 
Mixture of all varieties, includin 




packet, 15c; *& oz., 40c 
id large silvery blue 
E.best Spencer form 
Spf. ^Per packe* 25c 



cupids c: 
great deal of d 
d colors found 
nt them usually^prefe 




rop failed.| 
Sht red. 

ght pjtfk. Crop failed. 
-1.00; 1-lb., 33.50 
besides. 
c; %-lb., 31.00; 1-lb., $3.50 



Special Collections 



ajority 



ties, and since the 
up collections with vari 
ip with great care and with an eye 
oration has been given to offering a 
We would ask our friends to bear 
and still have an excellent choice, 
will meet the requirements o£ the 



W.e are frequently asked 
of people want only a few colo 
consider the best. These collections are ma 
to the best variety in each class. Great con 
desirable variety of colors in each collectio: 
in mind that it is possible to disagree with 
but our Spencer Collections, we are confide 
keenest growers. 

Morse's $1.00 Spencer Collection is a magnificent set and never before has 
such value been offered. The 15 varieties offered for $1.00 are the "Cream" of our 
list and all packets are regular size. This is the collection for those wishing the 
best selection of Sweet Peas. They are truly a handsome lot. Our regular list price 
for these packets is $1.60, but we offer them "en bloc" for $1.00. We can highly 
recommend this collection as being the finest ever offered for quality and value. 

We have, also, two other Spencer Collections made up to suit the requirements 
of very small and very large growers. Our "Best Seven" for 50c is excellent 
value, and our "Extraordinary Spencer Collection" contains the best 30 varieties 
we have to offer. This collection includes two novelties and purchasers of this 
collection are assured of a grand display. 

On opposite page we give particulars of our Collections: 

(For full descriptions see general list compiled alphabetically.) 



MORSES EXTRAORDINARY SPENCER COLLECTION 

30 (or $'J.iO. Including 3 Nov«ltl»i 
1ME1ICA BPEKCEB — Bright re.l 

whl to strip.-.! 
APPLE BLOSSOM SPENCEB — Rose 

and prlmr..*.- 
CAPTAIN Or THE BLUES SPENCEB 

Purple 

ABTA OE> — Best pinkish lavender 
BLANCHE riEIY SPEHCEB — Rose 

and white bicolor, 
COHSTABCE OLTTEB — Large, deep 

crea m pink. 
COUHTES3 SPEHCEB — Best pure bright 

pink 

daxhty sfenceb - white, wi 



XIRO EDWABD SPEHCEB— Best bright 

re.l. 

maboabet MADISON- Very fine azure 
blue. 

MABTHA WASHINGTON— White, pink- 

•dsed. 
MASTEBFIECE— Pine lavender. 
MBS. HUQH DICXSOH— The best cream 

pink. 
OTHELLO SPENCEB— Best deep ma- 

FEABL OBAT SPEHCEB — Beautiful 



■tg.- 



PXOBA HOBTOH SPEHCEB— Bes 

Mae. 

PXOBEHCE MOBSE SPENCE 

light pink. 
GAIETY SPEHCEB— Beat half ht Ape- 

red. .' 

GEOBOE HEBBEBT— Fi 

carmine. 
HELEH LEWIS — Be! 

"MOR 



SPEHCEB — 

Spencer. 
XING EDWABD SPENCE 

bright red. 
MBS. C. W. BBEADMOBE 

edged rose-pink. 
OTHELLO SPENCE 

rLOBENCE MOBSE SF 




il.it. 



ipi- 



TENNAHT SPEHCEB — Best purplish 

WHITE SPEHCEB — Best white. 
VEBMILIOH BBILLIANT — Best scarlet. 
W. T. HUTCHINS — Fine cream pink. 
MABGABET ATLEE— Our leading nov- 
i/ elty. rose salmon on cream. See 

n ovel ty list for description. 
duflex^cbeam — Giant cream, novelty. 
lty list for description. 



NCER COLLECTION" 

ENCEkS rOB S 100 ; 
HELEN C.EWIS — Best orange pink. 
MBS. HJCGH DICKSON — Best 




COUNT 
cer. 

lavender, f W. T. 
rich rose GAIE 

"BEST 7" 50c SPENCE 

WHITE SPENCEB — Best white Spei 

cer ^T^ 

XING EDWABD SPENCEB—13 

red. '. ■ 

MBS. C. W. BBEADMOBE— <' 

edged rose pink. 

GRANDIFLORA 

OUB INCOMPARABLE 
XING EDWABD VH — Bright red. 
DOEOTHT ECXFOBD — Large white. 
PRIMA DONNA — Fine pink. 
LADY GBISEL HAMILTON — Lavende: 

mixtur: 

To those who are going to make Sweet Pea; 
Ing the flowers for the love of th 
separate varieties For the convenience, howeve: 

ties of bloom, both for cutting and garden effect, we have carefully made up the 
following mixtures: 

MORSE'S STJFERB SFENCER MIXED 

This mixture is made up from our carefully prepared formula. It contains 
practically all .the true Spencer varieties introduced to date. Great attention is 
given to secure a beautiful light mixture and yet include all shades nicely balanced 
and proportioned-. 

To make a better mixture of Sweet Peas than Morse's "Superb" would be im- 
possible. Per packet, 10c; oz., 35c; Vi-lb„ $1.C ); 1-lb., $3.50 
BEST LARGE FLOWERING MIXTURE OF GRANDIFLO^tAS 

This is the best possible mixture that can be made from existing Grandiflora 
or Eckford varieties. It has been our endeavor 'to secure, not only by well studied 
and carefully arranged formula, but by test from time to time, the best balanced 
mixture of colors for the admirers of the Grandiflora type and those in search of a 
good mixture at a low price. Per packet, 5c; oz., 20c; 14 -lb., 50c; 1-lb., $1.35 

EARLY FLOWERING OR CHRISTMAS MIXED 

This is an especially attractive mixture of the Early Flowering varieties made 
up with the same care as the foregoing, and will be valuable to those desiring early 
blooms. Per packet, 10c; oz., 35c 



hobby and who intend grow- 
ongly advise the purchasing of 
f those who wish large quanti- 



CLASSIFICATION BY COLOR 

(See descriptions in general list, which Is compiled alphabetically.) 
G. means Grandiflora or Eckford Type. E. F. means Early Flowering or Christmas Type. 



Waved 



White 

Burpee's Earliest White (E. F.) 

Dorothy Eckford (G.). 

ETTA DYKE. 

Mont Blanc (E. F.) 

MRS. SANKEY SPENCER. 

MRS. GEO. LEWIS (E. F.) 

NORA UNWIN. 

Shasta (G.). 

WHITE SPENCER. 

White Wonder (G.). 

F rim rose 

CLARA CURTIS. 
DUPLEX CREAM. (See Nov- 
elties. ) 
PARADISE IVORY. 
PRIMROSE SPENCER. 
QUEEN VICTORIA SPENCER. 

Light Pink on Primrose 

CONSTANCE OLIVER. 
DUPLEX SPENCER. 
MARGARET ATLEE. (See 

Novelties.) 
MARY GARDEN. 
MRS. HUGH DICKSON. 
MRS. ROUTZAHN. 
Mrs. Win. Sim (E. F.). 
NELL GWYNNE. 
W. T. HUTCHINS. 

Light Pink Shades 

ELFRIDA PEARSON. (See 

Novelties.) 
FLORENCE MORSE SPENCER. 
Lovely (G.h 
LOVELY SPENCER. 
Mrs. F. J. Dolanskey (E. F.). 
MRS. HARDCASTLE SYKES. 
Prima Donna (G.). 
PRINCESS VICTORIA. 

Deeper Pink Shades 

BEATRICE SPENCER 
COUNTESS SPENCER. 



Rose and Very Light 
Pink, Bi-Golors 

APPLE BLOSSOM SPENCER. 
BLANCHE FERRY SPENCER. 
Earliest of All (E. F.). 
MRS. A. IRELAND. 
MRS. CUTHBERTSON. (See 
(Novelties.) 

Orange Pink Shades 

Bolton's Pink (G.). 
HELEN LEWIS. 
MIRIAM BEAVER. 
Miss Willmott (G.). 
St. George (G.). 

Bright Red and Scarlet 

Shades 

DUPLEX CRIMSON KING. 

King Edward VII (G.). 
KING EDWARD SPENCER. 
MAUD HOLMES. 
Mrs. E. Wilde (E. F.). 
Queen Alexandra (G.). 
SUNPROOF CRIMSON. 
THOMAS STEVENSON. (See 

Novelties.) 
VERMILION BRILLIANT. 

Rose Crimson Shades 

GEO. HERBERT. 
JOHN INGMAN. 
MARIE CORELLI. 

Lavender Shades 

ASTA OHN. 

FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE. 

Lady Grisel Hamilton (G.). 

MARGARET MADISON. 

MASTERPIECE. 

MRS. CHAS. FOSTER. 

Mrs. C. H. Totty (E. F.). 

Mrs. Geo. Higginson, Jr. (G.). 

PEARL GRAY SPENCER. 

XENOPHON. 

ZEPHYR. 



Mauve S Purple Shades 

TENNANT SPENCER. 
IRISH BELLE.' 

Bine and Purple Shades 

CAPTAIN OF THE BLUES 

SPENCER. 
FLORA NORTON SPENCER. 

Dark Bine and Violet 
Shades 

Lord Nelson or Brilliant 
Blue (B.J. 

Deep Maroon Shades 

ARTHUR GREEN. 
Black Knight (G.). 
OTHELLO SPENCER. 

Picotee Edged 

DAINTY SPENCER. 
ELSIE HERBERT. 
EVELYN HEMUS. 
MARTHA WASHINGTON. 
MRS. C. W. BREADMORE. 
PHENOMENAL. 

Striped or Flaked 

AMERICA SPENCER. 
AURORA SPENCER. 
ETHEL ROOSEVELT. 
GAIETY SPENCER. 
Helen Pierce (6.). 
MAY CAMPBELL. (See Nov- 
elties.) 
RAINBOW SPENCER. 
RAMONA SPENCER. 
SENATOR SPENCER. 

Salmon Shades 

STIRLING STENT. (See 

Novelties.) 
MELBA. (See Novelties.) 

Fancies 
AFTERGLOW. (See Novelties.) 
CHAS. FOSTER. (See Nov- 
elties.) 





-r 



Morse's Garden Guide for 1913 

is ready December 1st and a copy 

will be sent upon request. 

Morse's Garden Guide is a foremost 
authority on flower and vegetable raising. 
The information and directions contained 
therein are clear and concise, being the 
result of years of study and experiments. 

The 1913 Edition is a veritable store- 
house of new and useful information that 
will be of benefit to both amateur and 
professional. 

Carefully following the advice and sug- 
gestions set forth in this new edition will 
insure the best results in flower and vege- 
table raising. 

Among the new offerings contained in 
the 1913 Guide are our New Yellow Rose, 
Melody, a new bean and cabbage and two 
excellent new peas. 

Don't neglect sending for this new 
edition. It will prove to be a guide well 
worth having. 



C. C. Morse & Co. 

125 Market Street San Francisco 



aj y- -11 




C. C. Mor.se e Co. 

SEEP GROWERS 




-siZftis 



SAN FR J ANCISCO,CAL 
U.S.A. 

-15'?!*- — 



DARWIN TULIP 
CLARA BUTT 



ULDS 




TUL 

MORSE'S special 

LONG STEMMED MIXED 



(•(•Morse && 

BULBS • SEEDS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



BULB NOVELTIES 

Each year we bring for your flower garden some new variety or species of handsome 
flowering plant. Of our last year novelties in Daffodils, the giant trumpet Daffodil 
Olympia was a revelation to all at the Spring Flower Show. This year our novelties 
besides those just below comprise many new Darwin Tulips, five new Daffodils, new 
and finer Spanish Iris offered on the back cover. Wood Hyacinths and True English Blue 
Bells (Scilla Nutans, listed on page 12) are novelties this year and are fine flowers. They 
should find a welcome place in your garden. 

PEACOCK IRIS 

This is a dainty Iris; flat on top like the Japanese Iris, only it is small in size, 2 inches across. The 
petals are of a grayish tone, and at the center of each is a spot with all the colorings and shades 
of a Peacock eye, which it greatly resembles, hence the name. A charming flower with an iridescent 
eye of blue and green, and verv pretty. Plant 2" deep. Per doz., 30 cents; per 100, $1.75. 

AMARYLLIS JOHNSONII 

No flowers are more striking than are the t n ll pink Amaryllis Belladonna (see page 9), 
which are found blooming in all California gardens in August. Here are two new varieties 
of Amaryllis which are equally or more beautiful, and just as easy to raise and as free 
flowering. Let the bulbs remain undisturbed in the flower bed. Amaryllis Johnsonii 
has very large flowers of a rich crimson-scarlet color with a white stripe down the cen- 
ter of each petal. Each, 35 cents; per dozen, $3.50. 

AMARYLLIS VITTATA HYBRIDS 

These Hybrids throw up spikes from 2 to 3 feet high, and bear enormuos trumpet- 
shaped flowers from 8" to 10" across. Some of the flowers are scarlet, veined and feath- 
ered white: others are striped and flaked in all ways. They are strikingly beautiful and 
are grand flowers in every wav. Each, 50 cents; per dozen, $5.00. 

"1913 BEST" BULB COLLECTION 

We again offer an assortment that will meet with great favor. All these bulbs are 
our finest flowering sorts and perfectly hardy. 

Put this Special Collection in with your order for other bulbs and Sweet Peas, and 
have all come by express. 

1 Amaryllis, our selection, 10 Preesias Purity 15 Ranunculus 

probably Belladonna. 6 Gladiolus Blushing- Bride 10 Spring* Star Plower 

10 Anemones Caen, Mixed 8 Hyacinths, all colors 20 Spanish Iris, Mixed 

20 Crocus, Mixed 12 IiOng Stem Tulips, Mixed 8 Trumpet Daffodils 

5 Crown Narcissus 6 Jonquils 2 Peacock Iris — 

6 English Iris 6 Named Hyacinths 

145 Bulbs for $2.25. Postage additional 40c. 



GENERAL CULTURAL DIRECTIONS FOR BULBS 

Outdoor planting should be done early in the (all to secure healthy plants, vigorous foliage and beau- 
tiful flowers. Set the bulbs so that there is earth above them to their own depth. This is a good rule. 
Do not overcrowd; 3 to 4 inches apart for small bulbs such as Crocus, Snowdrops, Ranunculus, etc.; 6-7 
inches for Anemones. Jonquils Tulips, Iris Freesias: 7-9 inches for Hyacinths and Narcissus; 12 inches 
for Crown Imperials, Iris; 18 inches for Lilies. 

Any good garden soil will grow bulbs well if a little time is spent in preparing the beds before- 
hand. 

During August give the ground a liberal coating of well rotted manure and turn over the soil with a 
spade about a foot deep, mixingthe manure with the soil as much as possible and breaking up the lumps 
fine with the spade. 

A dressing of bone meal if given now will prove valuable to the bulbs in the spring. 

The bulbs can be planted as soon as they arrive, usually at the end of September. Make the. hole 
with a trowel, and if the soil is heavy a handful of sand at the base of the bulb will greatly assist the 
roots and prevent the bulb rotting. 

Hyacinths make a lovely and lasting show, and if a little consideration is given to color scheme and 
design the bed will he greatly admired. 

If specially fine color and flowers are desired the beds may he watered twice a week with some weak 
liquid manure' after the buds are well up and the foliage developed. 

Morse's Bulbs are fine and do give satisfaction. 



ind you of the few usual requests which help us so much in our business: 
rly 

soon as this catalogue reaches vou. The bulbs may not have arrived by then 

"but your order will be given immediate attention, and be filled just as soon as the stock arrives. At the 
first of the season there are no sorts sold out, and besides the bulbs flower better when planted early. 
Name and Address 
Please be sure to write plainly your full name and address, when sending us your order and remit- 
tance. Send also the name of the nearest express office, if bulbs are to tome that way, when it differs from 
the postoffice. We send bulbs by express unless postage for the different sorts as shown in the catalogue, 
accompanies the order. 

Non-Warranty 
Most of the failures with seeds, plants and bulbs are due to causes entirely beyond our control, such 
as unfavorable weather, too deep and too shallow plinting. slugs, etc., therefore C. C. Morse & Co. give 
no warranty, exnress or implied, as to description, purity, productiveness, or any other matter of any seeds 
plants, bulbs, etc., they send out. and will be in no wav responsible for the crop; if the purchaser does not 
accept the goods on these terms they are to be returned to us at once. 



C. C. MORSE & CO'S 

New Darwin Tulips 

Photographed on Our Front Cover 
A Wonderful Collection of the Long Stem Tulips. 




AT THE FLOWER SHOW held this Spring at 
the Fairmont Hotel no flowers were more ad- 
mired than the gorgeous Darwin and Late Tu- 
lips, grown and displayed by an ^enthusiastic 
flower lover who has these Tulips for his own pleasure 
around his own home. His experience and the experi- 
ence of others shows that Tulips, that is, "Darwin" and 
"Late" Tulips, which we call Morse's Special Tulips for 
California, may be grown easily and successfully, and 
will give giant flowers on long stems. These two classes 
of Tulips we unhesitatingly recommend — they are easy 
to grow and sure to give fine blooms. This year we 
have made an especial effort to get the very best of 
these Tulips, and we are able to offer many of the finest 
sorts not to be found elsewhere. 

All of the newest and finest varieties are included in 
our superb collection below. Giant flowers and tall 
stems are typical of Darwin Tulips. Not all colors, yel- 
low for instance, come in Darwin Tulips, and for those 
others and for cultural directions, see the list of "Morse's 
Special Tulips for California" on following page, but for 
the deep, rich colors there are no Tulips like the Darwins. 

>c per dozen; 35c per hundred for postage.) Six of a kind at the dozen 



Pr. Dz 

Angelina, light blush pink^ ■ ^ $ 

Ariadne, brilli: 



,, h . ...mson shaded 

scarlet, large flower 1*00 

Ala Gray, deep carmine .... . ■ . . . ...... -I" 

Baronne Tonnaye, rose shaded blush . . .bu 
Bronze Queen, soft golden-yellow-bronze .85 
Clara Butt, a large flower of remarkable 
beautv; an exquisite shade of soft sal- 
mon "pink shaded rose. Award of 

merit ™ 

Bonders, large dark blood red 5U 

Bream, delicate lilac JO 

Electra, a beautiful pale lilac .90 

Europe, a very bright light scarlet, white 



65 $4.50 



blue and 



Flambeau, flame scarlet, bluish center.. 
Gen. rte Cordeus, scarlet, fine for cutting 
George Maw, rosy carmine. 
Glow, brilliant vermilion, 

white center • ■ ■ 

Grand Monarch, plum purple, white 

center 

Kate Greenaway, white and lilac 

King Harold, deep purple red. W. C . 

n), white tinged 



La Candeur (White <„>'! 

blush ™ 

lantern, silvery lilac JO 

Leonardo da Vinci, blackish maroon... .65 

Loveliness, soft light pink carmine 40 

Margaret fCJretehen), lovely blush pink. 

Award of merit 40 

Marianne, violet purple 65 

Massachusetts, vivid pink, W. C 75 



5.00 
3.50 
5.00 



4.00 
3.00 
3.50 
4.00 



3.00 
3.00 
4.00 

4.50 
3.00 
4.50 
3.00 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 

May Queen, soft lilac rose 9 .55 94.00 

Mrs. Farncombe Sanders, scarlet with 

clear white base, beautiful 90 6.50 

Mrs. Krelage, rosy pink, color of Papa 

Oontier rose '. 55 4.00 

Mrs. P. Palmer, rich glowing purple... .90 .... 
Painted Lady, creamy white_, just tinged 

with heliotrope 70 .... 

Ph. de Commines, purplish maroon 90 .... 

Pride of Haarlem, giant flowers of deep 

rose shaded. Award of merit 60 4.50 

Queen of Roses, pink shaded blush 40 .... 

Rev. Ewbank, gray heliotrope 1.00 .... 

Salmon King, fiery salmon .50 3.00 

Suzon, flesh pink, large flower 1.00 .... 

Sieraad van Flora, a magnificent 

bright red of distinct color 75 .... 

The Sultan, the Black Tulip, maroon . . .35 2.50 

Van Poortvliet, glowing deep rosy red . . .60 4.50 
Velvet King, a giant royal purple. 

Each, 30c 3.00 

Wedding Veil, silvery gray 55 4.00 

Whistler, brownish scarlet 1.50 .... 

White Queen, white, tinged blush 65 4.50 

Yellow Perfection, brownish yellow.... 1.20 .... 
Splendid Mixture of Darwin's of finest 

named sorts above 55 3.75 

Darwin Collection No. 1 — 1 each of the 

above sorts, named separately, except 

Velvet King, 42 bulbs, postpaid, for 

82.75 2.60 .... 

Mixed Darwin Tulips 30 2.00 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 




Long Stemmed, 
Giant Flowered, 
Very Satisfactory. 



"Morse's Special Tulips" 
for California 

The varieties directly following and our 
New Darwin Tulips listed and described 
on page 1 cannot be too highly recom- 
mended. They have proved that Tulips can 
be a success in California and have the large 
flowers and long stems so much desired; 
also these Tulips will flower even better the 
second year if they are allowed to dry back 
with their leaves on, and kept dry during 
the summer. If possible leave them in the 
same bed, and be sure to plant a good num- 
ber. 

The secret of Tulip culture is to have rich 
soil well drained ; use rotted manure or bone 
meal to give richness, and set the bulb in 
sand if the ground is heavy and wet. Plant 
the bulbs as early as possible and about 4 
inches deep and 6 inches apart. Water spar- 
ingly during the winter, but give plenty as 
the buds develop, and for several weeks 
after flowering. 

Tulips are so bright and gaudy that they 
are prized by all. Gesneriana Major is a 
dazzling crimson, the brightest red Tulip. 
Parisian Yellow is a fine bright yellow ; Bou- 
ton d'Or is small and good. Fulgens (red) 
and Retroflexa (yellow) have petals bending 
gracefully backward. The salmon and 
orange shaded Tulips in this class are fine 
and distinct. 



Single 



per hundred for postage. ) 



Gesneriana Major: the most brilliant and 
dazzling crimson with black center. 
Has fine large blossoms with long 
stems. Always does well when planted 
utside, and is tremendously hand- 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 



Morse's stock of thij 



best, 
olor chang- 



yellow globe- 



$2.00 
2.75 



.50 3.50 



Ellen Wilmott: undoubtedly one of the 
very finest tulips — very long, perfect 
shape, fragrant; of a soft creamy 
color, a novelty 1.00 

Fawn, The: a perfect gem of a Tulip, 
and of a most unusual and delicate 
rosy fawn shade. A new and dis- 
tinct sort 55 



4.00 
2.50 



Gesneriana Aurantiaca: orange-red tulip 
of the fine Gesneriana form 

Gesneriana £utea: a beautiful golden 
yellow Gesneriana Tulip — large flow- 
ers with long stems ! 



yellow — 

pink 

Isabella or Blushing Bride: creamy white 
and pink, changing darker rose cen- 
ter, marked peacock blue 

La Merveille: a large tulip of a striking 
color, being salmony-rose overlaid 
with orange-red 

La Reeve: flowers of a giant size of an 
old rose color overlaid on buff. A 
most handsome sort and truly giant. 



Pr. 100 
> 2X10 



13.00 
2.15 
1.75 
1.75 

2.2S 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Morse's Special Tulips for California— continued 



Single — Continued 



(If Tulips are wanted by mall, add So per dozen; 35c per hundred t 
Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 
»2.00 



Parisian Whit* (La Candeur): pure 
white changing to silvery-pink: beau- 
tiful goblet form 



.30 3.00 



3.00 
3.00 



Zeflexed White (Elegans Alba): beauti- 
ful large white margined red; a nov- 
elty 



Salmon Queen: a beautiful Mending of 
buIZ and salmon pink; a large hand- 
some tulip $ 

Striped Beauty: (Dutch Zomerschoon) 

color, flaked deep crimson and 

white 

ViteUina: pali 



primrose, tall and hand- 
each of above sorts 



Bizarre Mixed Tulips, a striking and 
showy class of tulips. The ground is 
some shade of yellow — feathered, 
splashed or striped with crimson, pur- 
ple or white 



and splashed in white, lilac, red, etc. 
Much the finest striped tulips. Some- 
thing new. Mixed 

Darwin Tulips, see page 1. Mixed 



Dz. Pr. 100 

.40 $2.75 

.50 4.00 
.50 4.00 
2.75 

.30 2.00 



"MORSE'S SPECIAL MIXED" 

Late Mixed Tulips, made up by ourselves from named varieties, embrace all classes 
and sorts, with all colors; nothing so fine elsewhere; 30c' per doz. ; $2.00 per 100. 

PARROT OR DRAGON TULIPS 

These are in very bright colors, each Tulip having some combination of three colors of red, green, 
black and yellow. The flowers are large and the petals are deeply cut or fringed; stems are short and often 
the flowers droop. They make a very bright border. Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 

Mixture of all colors $ .25 $1.50 



EARLY SINGLE VARIETIES 



For pots, beds and borders. They come 
Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 
Axtus : brigh t red or scarlet, fine bold 

flowers $ .30 $2.00 



bright colors and bloom in March. 



forcer and bedde 



Duchess de Parma: orange scarlet with 
yellow edge, fine and large 

Joost von Vondel: deep cherry red. 
feathered white - 

Kaiser Kroon: crimson scarlet with yel- 
low margin; a fine bold flower 

La Seine (Queen Victoria); white, with 
faint tint of pink, splendid for forc- 
ing and bedding 

Pottebafeker : Scarlet — bright scarlet, 
fine for bedding 

Prince of Austria: sweet scented, bril- 
liant orange scarlet, long stems 

Prince de Ligny: a fine golden yellow, a 
good bedder 



2.00 
4.50 
2.75 



.30 2.00 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 



Prosperlne: glossy carmine rose, silky 
and effective $ .50 

Queen of the Netherlands: exquisite 
shade of soft blush-pink shaded with 
white, large globe-shaped flowers of 
lasting quality 40 

Rosa Mundi: rose with white feather 

centering each petal 30 

Rose Oris de Liu: white edged with 

rose, good for forcing 30 

Snowfiake: purest white, excellent 

shape, fine for bedding 30 

White Swan: large pure white, with 

egg-shaped flowers 30 

Collection' of Early Single Tulips: (2 
each, 32 bulbs) for $1.15 

Splendid Mixture of Single Tulips: good 
portions of various colors, $10.00 per 
1000 20 

Morse's Early Mixture 



-ned sorts 

made up by ourselves of our best 

named tulips, and contains a great 

many varieties 



EARLY DOUBLE TULIPS 



The flowers on these last longer than do the sfcngle blooms; the colors are brilliant and varied. 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 
Couronne D'Or: deep yellow marked, or- 
ange red $ .35 $2.50 

Lady Palmerston: deep pink 35 2.50 

Murillo: a delicate blush-pink 35 2.50 

Rubra Maxima: dazzling scarlet, a fine 

bedding variety 35 2.50 



Titian: scarlet edged yellow 

William III: rich orange scarlet.... 
Morse's Named Double Tulips Mixed 
Splendid Double Mixture: from the Hol- 
land fields 



r. Dz. 


Pr. 100 


$ .35 


$2.50 


.35 


2.50 


.35 


2.50 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Hyacinths 

There is no other flower like 
a Hyacinth, and none can take 
its place ; its clear waxy texture ; 
its varied and beautiful colors 
and soft shades ; and best of all 
its rich, delightful fragrance. To 
many this is the favorite spring 
flower. Give them but half a 
chance and Hyacinths bloom 
surely and well, while with good 
garden treatment they are still 
grander and more delightful. 

Culture. Spade and manure the 
ground a month before planting 
the bulbs, using also a little bone- 
meal well dug in. Set the bulbs 
2^2 inches under ground at the top 
in damp places and 4 inches under 
in dry spots and 7 to 8 inches 
apart. To have all of the bulbs 
flower at one time see that the 
bulbs are set at an even depth. 

After flowering allow the leaves 
to dry up and then lift the bulbs 
in midsummer; store them in dry 
■oil in a cool dry place, and very 
often they can be used again. 

For potting use a mixture of 
river sand, rotted manure and fi- 
brous loam in equal parts. Use a 
5 or 6-inch pot or 3 bulbs to a 
7-inch pot and let a third of the 
bulb be above ground. Bury the 
pot for six weeks to let the bulbs 
root and then bring into the house 
to bring them into flower. 

Our named varieties of Hya- 
cinths are all of first size, and 
are fine, large healthy bulbs, and 
will produce the very finest 
flowers. If ordered by mail, add 
15c per dozen for postage.) 

Named Varieties 
of Hyacinths 



Collection of 12 named varieties, 
$1.35 per doz. Mixture of all varie- 
ties, $1.25 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 



SINGLE BLUE 

Each. Pr. Doz. Pr. 100 

Chaa. Dickenc dark blue $ .15 $1.50 $12.00 

Cxar P»t«r: flne light porcelain 

blue 15 1.75 13.00 

Elactra: very pale blue, large 

flower 18 1.75 

Grand LUm: blue, lilac shaded. .15 1.50 12.00 

Grand Maltr»: deep porcelain blue .12 1.25 10.00 
Johan: pale gray-blue, large 

spikes 15 1.50 12.00 

Xing- of tha BIum: dark blue... .15 1.50 12.00 

Karl*: dark blue, fine spike 15 1.50 12.00 

Qntn of tb> Blnu: azure blue .15 1.50 12.00 

Vonotel: lavender, fine large spike .12 1.25 10.00 




SINGLE WHITE 

Each. Pr. Doz. 
Alba Snperbissima : white, large 

bells $ .15 $1.50 

Baroness Van Thuyll: white 

small bells 12 1.15 

Grande Blanche: blush white 

with large bells 15 1.50 

Grandeur a Merveille: Early 

large, blush white 15 1.50 

La G-randesse, pure white, an 

extra fine sort for exhibition. .20 2.00 
Ii'Innocence: large truss of pure 

white 15 1.50 

Mont Blanc: a splendid pure 

white 15 1.75 



11.00 

i5.oo li 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Hyacinths 



i — Continued 

(Postage 15c per dox. additional.) 

SINGLE RED, ROSE AND PINK DOUBLE YELLOW 



Qartrode: pink. 

popular 

Oljrantaa: fine true pink, many 

flowerets 

Jacquts: enormous spike, tall and 

well Ailed, warm rose pink... 
Xon-1-Woor: brilliant salmon 

pink, Ane spike 

Lady Darby: Ane waxy rose pink 
f Ornament: a Ane pale pink 

with broad spike 

X*a Victoir«: Brilliant scarlet 

red, very Ane spike 

Moreno: Ane waxy, clear pink.. 
Kobert Stettfer: deep crimson.. 
Moi des Beiges: deep crimson 



. Doz. 
91.35 
1.50 

2.00 



2.00 
1.50 
1.15 

1.50 

1.50 



SINGLE YELLOW 



City of Haarlem: the best and 
largest yellow, bright butter- 
cup yellow 9 -20 

Merman, orange yellow 15 

King- of the Tallows: golden 

yellow 18 

■onora: buff color, tinted, large .15 
Yellow Hammer: pure yellow. . .15 

DOUBLE BLUE 

Blockiburg: bright blue 9 -19 

Garrick: deep azure blue 12 

Q.neral Antlnk: light blue, 

forces early 12 

O.n. Xohler; an extra fine bright 



1.7S 
1.50 
1.50 



$10.00 
12.00 



15.00 
12.00 
9.00 

12.00 

12.00 



15.00 
12.00 
12.00 



blue 



Oth.llo: violet black 

Princ. of Baxe Weimar: dark 
blue, large spike 



DOUBLE WHITE 



Bonqnet Koyal: white yellow 

center 9 .12 91.35 

X.a Grandeue: large bells 15 1.50 

L» Tour D'Avergne: very large, 

pure white 15 1.50 

Iia Virginite: blush white, very 



fine 



Von Pins Ultra: blush pink. 



Each. Pr. Dz. Pr. 101. 

Minerva: orange 9-15 91-50 91100 

Jamie Supreme: deep yellow, 

good 15 1.50 13.03 



DOUBLE RED 

deep carmine, 

».12 

Grootvorst: delicate peach blos- 



110.00 
ll.M 



Dutch Roman Hyacinths 

Known also as Miniature Hyacinths. 

(Postage 5c per doz. additional.) 

These are smaller sized bulbs of the well known 

sorts and have the same style of flower. Often 

grown in pots and sold by floriBts when in full 

flower. 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 

White 9 .40* 93.00 

Creamy White 40 3.00 

Dark Red .40 3.00 

Dark Blue .40 3.00 

Light Blue 40 3.00 

Pink .40 3.03 

All above colors mixed 40 3.00 

French Roman Hyacinths 

(Postage Sc per doz. additional.) 
These throw three or four slender spikes from 
which hang the dainty flowerets. They are »x- 
tremely early and are extensively used for forcing 
either indoors or out-of-doors. 

Each. Pr. dz. Pr. 100. 

Pure White 9 -Of » .7S * 5.0D 

Pure White, extra sized 09 .85 (.00 

Blue 05 .50 1.76 

Pink OS .55 4.00 



Bedding Hyacinths 



MIXED COLORS 

(If wanted by mail, add 12c perdoz. for postage.) 

These are good strong bulbs and will form 
■excellent flowers. Each year we import 
thousands of these bulbs for bedding and 
general culture, v 



the ones with the single flowerets are 
they both have fine flower spikes. 

SINGLE VARIETIES 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 
$4.25 
4.25 
4.25 
4.25 
4.25 
4.25 
4.50 
4.00 

?r. 100 
94.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.25 



eight blue .hades mixed $ .55 

Dark bine .bade, mixed 55 

lark red .bad*, mixed 55 

OBe and pink .bade, mix.d 55 



eUow shades mixed 
Lll colors mix.d .... per 1000, 935.00; 

DOUBLE VARIETIES 

high 

Darl 



Light bine shade, mixed 9 .60 

park blue shade, mixed 60 

Ipark red shade, mixed 60 

those and pink shades mixed 60 

White shades mixed 60 

Mush white shades mixed 60 

1111 colors mixed 55 



SEPARATE COLORS AND SORTS'- 

(If wanted by mail, add 12c per doz. for postage.) 

These make the ideal bedding Hyacinths, 
for it is a pleasure to have all of the pinks of 
one shade, and all of the blues to match ex- 
actly. Although these are not so large as our 
first size, still by many they are listed as 
firsts, and they certainly are excellent bed- 
ders. 

IHTEEMEDIATE SIZE — SINOLI 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 

Pink (Gertrude) 9*0 MOO 

Blush Fink (Gigantea) .to 8.00 

Crimson Bad ( Roi des Beiges ) jo 6.00 

White (Alba Superbissima) MO 6.00 

White (La Grandesse) ..o S.00 

Wait. (Mme. Van der Hoop) to 6.00 

Light Porcelain Bin. (Czar Peter) .SO 6.00 

Dark Porcelain Bin. (Grand Maitre) . . . .10 t.Oo 

Axnr. Bin. (Queen of the Blues) JO 6.00 

Dark Bin. (King of the Blues) .10 «.00 

Yellow (King of the Yellows) »5 e.5. 



C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 




DAFFODILS 



A flower so glorious that poets have sung its praises is surely 
one which must have a place in your garden. If your garden is 
small, set out a double row of Trumpet Daffodils, and if your 
estate is large, scatter clumps of Crown Daffodils and Poets' Narcissus in the hardy border, under the trees, 
next to the house, — anywhere and everywhere these hardy flowers grow and bloom profusely. Once 
planted they are always there, ready to flower each year in increasing numbers, 

Do you know that Double Daffodils last longer in bloom than the others ? They are very pretty, 
and we want you to get better acquainted with them. ■ In point of time the Polyanthus Narcissus are 
away the first, coming into bloom by Christmas if planted early; and besides that, they are fragrant, which 
no other Daffodils are. Only the small yellow Single Jonquils are -fragrant besides. Then in April come 
the most of the Trumpet and Crown Daffodils, some early and some late as described, and the latest of 
all is the Poets' Narcissus and its double form, Alba Plena Odorata. By the way. don't forget to waterl 
plentifully these late flowering bulbs before they bloom, if the season is at all dry. Regular watering late ] 
In Spring will make ever so much better flowers. 

"The world do change," and improvement in Daffodils is one^ of the changes which it has seen. Howl 
much admired our novelty Olympia was this Spring at the flower show at the Fairmont Hotel! Truly a 
giant among giants. Here are some improved kinds: Madam de Graaif (Trumpet), Mrs. Thompson 
(Trumpet), Autocrat, Ducifer and Queen Bess (Incomparable), Minnie Hume (Leedsii), which obtained a 
first-class certificate at the Royal Horticultural Society cf "England; Poeticus Almira, a great improvement 
on the Poeticus Ornatus. Some year we will make a specialty of Daffodils, just as this year we are 
offering all of the finest Darwin Tulips. ' 1 

Plant Daffodils in October and November out in the open ground in good soil and let them remain un-I 
disturbed. After flowering let the leaves die back, but do not cut them off or the bulb will not flower nextS 
year. Set five inches deep and 8 inches to 12 inches apart. The bulbous roots wil> multiply and send up 
fine long flower stems every spring. Be sure to keep the ground moist during the growing season if 
season is dry. 

They can also be grown easily in pots, putting 4 or 5 bulbs into a 5-inch pot and keep well watered. 



LARGE TRUMPET DAFFODILS 



If wanted by mail add 1 

Bl-color Grandee: flowers very large with broad pure 

white petal's which overlap each other. The 

trumpet is bright yellow. Rather dwarf and late 

flowering; flowers of great substance and fine for 

cutting 4c each; 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100 

Emperor: one of the grandest Daffodils in cultiva- 
tion; late. The perianth is broad and overlapping 
and the trumpet is very large and finely formed. 
Both perianth and trumpet a bright yellow. The 
stems are long and it is fine for cutting. Emperor 
is the most popular of all the Daffodils, a fine color, 
a strong grower, tall, and hardy. Illustrated 
above. Our stock is of extra large size, all im- 
ported from Holland. We offer you the best and 

only the best. Postage 20c dz. additional 

7c each ; 60c per doz. ; $4.00 per 100. 



!c per doz. for postage. 

Empress fWhite Wings): the perianth is pure white 
and the trumpet bright yellow; fine for cutting. 
6c each; 50c per doz.; $3.50 per 100. 

Golden Spur: a fine fragrant variety with long stems* I 
excellent for cutting. The perianth is yellow and '!( 
the trumpet is bright golden yellow; early.....*, ji 
5c each; 40c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. ! 

Henry Irving - : The perianth has narrow petals of I 
a deep yellow color, the trumpet is of a deep ¥ 

golden yellow and very large; early « If 

6c each ; 50c per doz. ; $3.50 per 100. [< 

Mme. de Graaff : the largest and finest white trumpet ? 
Daffodil, reasonably priced. Perianth is pure 
white, the trumpet is primrose when opening j 
and turns pure white in a day or two. A moat f 
refined and beautiful flower of graceful carriage. | 
15c each; $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. ? 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



DAFFODILS-contd 

LARGE TRUMPET DAFFODILS-Contd 

Mrs. Thompson: a fine pure white vat 

handsome and early, trumpet elegantly frilled. 

Supersedes Albicans 

5c each: 50c per doz. ; $3.50 per 100. 

ObT»llari» (Tenby Daffodil): a fine hardy Bower 

ianth white, trumpet yellow. Not a 

large tlower. but bold and verv attractive. . . . 

5c each. 40c per do/-; $2.75 per 100. 

Olyrapla: the large*! yellow trumpet Daffodil 

there is. Trumpet and perianth of monster 

distinct sort and a grand acquisition 

40c each; $4.00 per doz. 

Princeps Maxima*: very early and popular; peri- 
anth sulphur yellow, drooping, trumpet rich 
yellow 4c each; 30c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. 

Trumpet Major: one of the most popular large, 
clear yellow varieties (both perianth and trum- 
pet same color i ; large and shapely flower. 
Valuable for bedding or cutting or for forcing. 
4c each: 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100. 

Victoria: a new Daffodil with broad white peri- 
anth and large yellow trumpet. The flower has 
great substance and keeping qualities. We 
recommend it as the best yellow and white... 
5c each; 45c per doz.; $3.25 per 100. 

DOUBLE DAFFODILS 

These are all easily grown and are very pretty. 
Double Daffodils, like double Tulips, stay in bloom 
longer than the single ones. The only variety 
which has a trumpet that is doubled is the "Von 
The others are round double flowers; all 
are graceful and pretty. (If wanted by mail add 
10c per doz. for postage.) 

alba Plena Odorata (the double White Poet's Nar- 
isus or Gardenia Daffodil) : A perfect gem, 
re white, very double and fragrant. Blos- 

ms the latest in the season 

3c each; 20c per doz.; .$1.25 per 100. 

Incomparable (Butter and Eggs): rich yellow 

and orange, large size and good shape 

4c each; 35c per doz.; $2.00 per 100. 

Orange Phoenix (Eggs and Bacon): very large, 

double, white and orange, very beautiful, fine 

for pot culture... 5c each; 35c doz.; $3 per 100. 
Sulphur or Silver Phoenix: creamy white with 

sulphur center, very double and beautiful, and 

jonsidered the finest of the double sorts. 

5c each; 45c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. Double Daffodil. Silver Phoenix 

▼on Sion: the largest and finest double yellow trumpet variety. This is the old favorite variety so highly 

prized in the old-fashioned gardens. Excellent for either forcing or cut flowers. If planted out of doors 

ft can remain where planted for a number of years, blossoming freely every year. It is as popular now 

as ever, and every one who loves daffodils should plant it 5c each;; 40c per doz.; $2.50 per 100. 

CROWN DAFFODILS (Chalice Cup or Star) 




(If wanted by mail add 5c per dc 
.utocrat (Incomparabilis) : pure yellow all over; 
.large star-like perianth, large bowl-like crown 

free flowering and vigorous; newly offered 

5c each; 50c per doz.; $3.25 per 100. 

Barrll Conspicuus: broad yellow perianth with a 
short, broad crown edged with orange scarlet; a 
fine bold flower of very large size. Should be 

grown in quantity 

3c each; 25c per doz.; $1.75 per 100. 

ynosure: sulphur yellow perianth; yellow cup, 
stained with orange, scarlet; very showy, fine for 

cutting 3c each; 25c per doz.; $1.50 yer 100. 

Lucifer: Striking Novelty of last year. Lucifer was 
much admired at the flower show for its brilliant 
coloring. The large cup is orange red and is sur- 
rounded by a delicate white perianth 

25c each; $2.50 per doz. 

Minnie Hume: large white perianth, medium sized 
spreading cup passing from fine lemon to white. 

First-class certificate R. H. S 

4c each; 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100. 



, except for Sir Watkin, 10c.) 

Queen Bess: perianth pure white cup light yellow, 

large and well expanded ; early 

4c each; 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100. 

Seagull: This delightful flower cannot be too highly 
praised. Seagull is very large and pure white; cup 
medium sized, fluted and of a soft citron tone. A 
sterling flower 17c each; $1.75 per doz. 

Sir Watkin: The perianth is sulphur yellow; the cup 
deep golden yellow; one of the largest and finest 
Crown Daffodils, often 5*£ inches across. A very 
popular sort.. 5c each; 50c per doz.; $3.25 per 100. 

Stella: star-shaped, one of the first to bloom; flow- 
ers white with yellow cup; large and very free 
blooming. .. .3c each; 25c per doz.; $1.25 per 100. 

Mrs. Langtry: pure white perianth, broad and over- 
lapping; cup white 'edged, bright canary yellow, a 
fine art flower and very prolific. On account of its 

low price is largely used for naturalizing 

3c each; 25c per doz.; $1.50 per 100. 



Polyanthus Narcissus 



A very fragrant sweet-scented type of the easiest 
ulture and very early. Can be grown out doors, in 
or in a dish of water with coarse gravel. The 
terns each bear from 10 to 20 blossoms at the top. 
aper White Grandiflora: beautiful snowy white 
blossoms with large petals deliciously fragrant, 
the earliest to bloom. Will blossom out of doors 

by Christmas if planted in October 

30c per doz.; $1.75 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 



Grand Monarch: broad white perianth with prim- 
rose cup 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100. 

Grand Soleil D'Or: a rich clear yellow with orange 
cup 6c each; 50c per doz..; $3-00 per 100. 

Chinese Sacred Lily < single): perianth white, cup 
vellow, vary free flowering and fragrant. Can 
be had in flower in dishes with water and coarse 
gravel from December to March. We handle the 
finest selected bulbs imported from China. Post- 
paid 13c each 10c each ; 

$1.00 per doz.; $2 25 per basket of 30 bulbs. 
Extra size, 15c each; $1.50 per doz. 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Poeticus Narcissus 



(By mail add 5c per doz. 
These are different from all the foregoing: sorts. 
Poet's Narcissus are pure white round flowers of six 
petals with very small cups hardly more than a cen- 
ter to the flower. One of our novelties last year was 
Elvira, a cross between this class and the polyan- 
thus, having the good features of both. Poet's Nar- 
cissus are great favorites and do especially well un- 
der trees and in grassy places, where they may be 
left undisturbed for years. Largely used for nat- 
uralizing. 

Poeticus (Pheasant's Eye) : the old-time favorite; 

very hardy, late 

20c per doz. ; $1.25 per 100 $10.00 per 1000. 



25c per 100 for postage.) 

Poeticus Almira (King Edward VII): A new and 
magnificent large flowered early variety. Snow 
white petals, broad and round; cup canary bordered 
red 5c each ; 50c per doz. 

Poeticus Ornatus: an early flowering sort with large 
flowers of greater substance; an improvement.... 
20c per doz.; $1.50 per 100. 

Poetaz Elvira: 3 or 4 strong flowers to a stem, pure 
white; cup yellow, fragrant. Very strong grower 
and desirable 5c each; 50c per doz. 

COLLECTIONS — Various Narcissus. (Postage addi- 
tional 12c per doz. ) A splendid mixture of the ' 
best Single Trumpet Daffodils. 40c per doz.; $3.00 
per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

A splendid mixture of the best Double Daffodils. 35c 
per doz.; $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. 

A splendid mixture of all Daffodils and Narcisius. 
35c per doz.; $2.25 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 



Jonquils 



These are much prized for their delicious frag- 
rance, their graceful stems and blossoms, their rich 
golden hue and their fine hardy character. Addi- 
tional postage 5c per doz. Pr Dz pr 10Q 
Single Sweet Scented : very f ra gran t, 
rich golden yellow, cluster of small 
flowers. Postage 15c per 100 addi- 
tional $ .15 $1.00 

Double Jonquil: very sweet scented, 
heads small but very double and rich 
golden yellow. Postage 15c per 100...$ .35 $2.50 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100. 
Camper nelle: yellow flowers resembling 
a small Daffodil, fine for forcing; not 
fragrant. Postage 5c per doz. addi- 
tional 



1.25 



Rugulosus: the largest of the Jonquils, 
rich golden yellow, broad perianth 
with wrinkled cup; not fragrant. 
Postage 5c per doz. additional 



LILIES 



Choose a spot for Lilies which is shaded and drained, but still moist, and you will be successful in 
raising them in your garden. ' Set the bulbs out in November (or as late as Feby. 1st) in a good deep 
soil, planting them 5 inches below the top of the ground into which some leaf mould has been worked. 
Water only lightly until they are well rooted, but liberally when of good size and about to blossom. 
"Watch carefully for plant lice (aphis) and sprinkle with tobacco dust to keep them off. 

See what a choice of Lilies we offer 
r e sorts such as you find 
ins on your vacation, Jap- 
anese sorts to be found in all gardens, 
and Easter Lilies, one variety for in- 
doors (Harrisii) and two for the gar- 
den (Iionginorum). Besides these there 
are the Auratum Lilies, the largest of 
all; the Elegans, which are not large 
and have their brightly colored flowers 
turned upward ; then the Speciosum 
with flowers turned down with recurved 
petals like the Tiger Lilies. What an 
array of flowers they will make! 
TWO LILIES TO BE PLANTED EABLY 
HARDY ST. JOSEPH LILY 
OB CANDIDUM 
Annunciation Lily; Madonna Lily: the 
flowers are pure snow-white and very 
fragrant, borne on long stems. It is 
a valuable variety for forcing; and is 
a fine early hardy lily to plant out of 
doors, never failing to bloom well. 
The flowers do not have quite such 
long trumpets as the Easter lilies... 

15c each; $1.25 per doz. 

(Postage 3c each; 25c per doz. addi- 
tional.) 
We have a limited supply of monster 
bulbs which will give 12 to 18 flowers 
to each bulb, at;.25c each; $2.50 doz. 
(Postage 5c each additional.) 
Harrisii (The Bermuda Easter Lily): 
the flowers are trumpet-shaped, pure 
white, gracefully formed and delight- 
fully fragrant This is the Illy so 
much grown by florists for Easter, on 
account of its very early flowering 
habit and abundance of bloom. On 
account of being liable to injury by 
insects, Harrisii Lilies are better 
grown within doors. At least bring 
them in when they are about to 

flower. 15c each; $1.50 per doz. 

These two lilies must be planted early. 

Order in September. 
Candidum and Harrisii are ready for 
delivery in September and should be 
planted early, and the others in Octo- I 
ber and November. Early orders will 
be kept on file until the varieties ar- 
rive. If wanted by mail add 3c each, 
25c per doz., for postage. 

Auratum Tillies 




C. C. MuRsf & 



BIL1 1 . 



San Francisco. Cal. 



Lilies- 

Amretnm (Gold -banded I '-. .. one of The An 

most popular of the hardy garden lilies. The blos- 
•ome i f six large petals of delicate 

Ivory I with spots with a bright 

golden band running through the center nf each 
petal . expanded are nearly 

are very fragrant and bloom 
from .' 15c and 20c each, and $1.25 

and $3.00 per dozen, accord ii 

Auratnm Pictum: similar in form to the Auratum. 
but tipped with crimson at the ends <.f the yellow 
rays 25c each; $2.50 per doz. 

Auratam Platyphyllum: similar to Auratum, but 

larger and liner in all respects. Especially noted 

for its broad lustrous leaves, which give double 

attraction. The petals are studded with crimson 

Lie spots 25c each; $2.50 per doz. 

Auratum Bubro Vittatum: one of the finest of ail 
lilies. Its crimson band running through the mid- 
dle of the petal is so broad that the petals appear 
to be crimson margined with white; very showy 
and handsome. The flowers are 10 to 12 inches 
across, of bright crimson and white. Illustrated 
In last year's catalogue. .. .50c each; 35.00 per doz. 

Blegane Atrosangninea: a dark blood-red lily of hand- 
some appearance. Elegans lilies are all borne erect 
on a stem about 2u feet.. 20c each; $2.00 per doz. 

Elegant, Incomparable: the richest red known in 
lilies, a deep crimson slightly spotted black. Flow- 
ers large and freely borne. .15c each; $1.50 per doz. 

Sisg&ns, Orange: a very early, flowering lily, doing 
well in any location, about 2 feet high, flowers are 

orange in color 20c each; $1.75 per doz. 

•nryi (The Yellow Speciosum): a rare lily from 
China, hardy and free flowering, often with 17 
blossoms on a stem. Flowers are a rich apricot 

yellow slightly spotted with brown 75c each 

umboldt: native lily with many large flowers, or- 
ange spotted with marooon; as many as 20 flowers 
to a stem 20c each ; $1.75 per doz. 

Erameri: a beautiful large pink lily, distinct from 
all others 20c each ; $2.00 per doz. 

Leopard Idly: the native Tiger Lily found growing 
In the mountains in all parts of California; height 
S to 4 feet. Flowers yellow orange with dark 
spots 10c each ; $1.00 per doz. 



Continued 



type of Japanese 



Longiflorum Oigmnteum: a tin 

Illy; about 8 weeks later than Multlflorun.. 
15c SAOh; $1.50 per doz.; and 25c each; $2.50 per doz. 

Long-iflorum Multiflomm: on early flowering type of 
the Japanese Saster lily. Pure white trumpet- 
Splendid for growing in pots and 
mtdoor planting. 15c each; 31.25 per doz.; 
extra large bulbs, 20c each; $2.00 per doz. 

Bubellum: of dwarf habit, bearing several beautiful 

nk Rowers. Come into flower earl v. It does 

best in sandy loam 20c each; $2.00 per doz. 

Speciosum Album: one of the most beautiful and 

grown lilies we have. The flowers are of 

immense size and pure white. Plants grow from 

I to -1 feet high 20c each; $1.75 per doz. 

Speciosum Bubrum: this is the tall light red lily 
' seen in florists' windows. It is perfectly 
in the open garden and is a strong and 
vigorous grower, Plant in well drained soil in a 
partially shaded place. The lily blooms in July 
and August, having a spike 4 feet tall with bright 
lilies of light crimson and white, the petals re- 
curve 15c each; $1.25 per doz.; $8.50 per 100. 

Speciosum Bubrum Magniflcum: this variety is much 
more crimson in color than the ordinary Rubrum 

and is heavily spotted 

15c each; $1.25 per doz.; $9.00 per 100. 

Tigrinum (Tiger lily): fine showy blossoms, brilliant 
orange spotted with black. The Tiger lily is one 
of the best for out of doors, for it is perfectly 
hardy and will last for years in the garden, each 
year sending up its black and orange flower spike. 
15c each ; $1.25 per doz. 

Tigrinum Flora Plena (Double Tiger Lily): similar 
to Tigrinum but double... 15c each; $1.50 per doz. 

Washington: large native lily, opening white and 
gradually turning purple.. 20c each; $2.00 per doz. 

Whits Calla Lily. According to size 

50c, 75c and $1.00 per doz. 

Yellow Calla Lily (Calla Elliottiana): The foliage 
is dark green with a number of translucent whits 
spots, and the flowers a bright yellow. A very 

jhandsome sort. According to size 

25c to 35c each; $2.50 to $3.50 per doz. 



Miscellaneous Bulbs and Flowering Roots 



.OAPANTHUS UMBELLATUS (Blue African Lily) 

(Too heavy to mail.) 

Flowers bright blue, borne in clusters of 20 to 30. 

'he flower stalks frequently attain a height of 3 

delivery 25c each; $2.50 per doz. 

ALLIUM AUKEUM 
( Postage 5c per doz. ) 
tolly or Golden Allium: A very old favorite, and 
fine for naturalizing in the garden where it forms 
large clumps of golden yellow (lowers in June. 

Height, 1 foot 15c per doz.; $1.00 per 100. 

AHAB7LLI3 
(Postage 10c per bulb.) 
Frequent disturbance of the roots should be avoid- 
l, as this will prevent free flowering. Sends up a 
>wer stalk without leaves in August, to a height of 
'A feet; very fragrant. 

slladonna Major: beautiful soft rose 

1 15c each ; $1.50 per doz. 

thnaoni: Novelty. See inside of front cover. 

Ittata Hybrids: Grand Novelty. See inside of front 

APIOS TUBEROSA 

(December delivery. Prices post-paid.) 
■lis is a climber and is like a miniature Wistaria, 
Igrowing about 10 feet high and bearing clusters 
■of rich, deep . purple flowers, which are sweetly 

Ifccented 50c per doz. 

ANEMONES 

Perhaps you have exclaimed, "Why, I never saw 
be poppies before!" as you stood before a bed of 
kae Anemones in April. They are not related to 
Ippies at all; they belong to the butter-cup family; 
still have a likeness to poppies. The colors 
■ight and the flowers attractive. These and 
cuius, at out the same height, 10 inches, are 
flowers which are becoming more popular each 
Plant 1% inches deep; 5 inches to 6 inches 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 
DOUBLE POPPY ANEMONES 

(Prices per doz are post-paid; on 100, 10c add.) 

Ceres, White delicately tinted blush $ .40 $2.50 

King of the Blues, A fine deep blue 40 2.50 

Peu Superbe, Beautiful Scarlet 45 3.25 

Double Mixed, as it comes from the fields. .25 2.00 

SINGLE POPPY ANEMONES Pr. 500 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100. Pkg. 

Single Blue $ .20 $1.25 $5.50 

Single Scarlet 20 1.25 5.50 

Single White 20 1.00 4.50 

Single Mixed, as it comes 20 1.00 3.75 

Caen Mixed: The giant French 

type of Single Anemone 20 1.25 5.50 

St. Brigid: semi-double Irish Anemone.. 40c per doz. 

ANEMONE JAPONICA OR JAPANESE WIND- 
FLOWER. (December Delivery.) 

These handsome Anemones are fall flowering, 
blooming from August till October. The tall plants, 
2% to 3 feet, make fine cut flowers. They do well in 
a partly shaded position. Japanese Anemones are 
very different from the spring flowering or Poppy 
Anemones. These are truly perennial. 
Queen Charlotte: Japanese semi-double pink; one of 

the most beautiful 15c each; $1.25 per doz. 

Whirlwind: Japanese large semi-double, white 

10c each ; $1.00 per doz. 

BEGONIA (Tuberous-Booted) 
(Prices include postage.) 

For January delivery. Splendid pot plants, equally 
useful for bedding purposes; free flowering, doing 
best with partial shade. No plant has brighter, 
larger flowers than have these tuberous begonias; 
the scarlets are bright scarlet; the yellow, bright 
yellow, and the white and pink, pure and attractive. 

We offer Begonias in the following separate col- 
ors. Dark rose, light pink, salmon, scarlet, whits 
and yellow. 

Double: any color or mixed. .10c each; $1.00 per doz. 
Single: any color or mixed.... 8c each; 75c per doz. 
Begonia Crisps: a new sort with very large single 

flowers, beautifully frilled on edge and crested. 

Try some of these new ones. .20c ea. ; $2.00 per doz. 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Miscellaneous Bulbs and Flowering Roots 



-Continued 



MONTBRETIA 

(Prices are postpaid.) 
A summer flowering bulb, bearing bright colored 
flowers on long, graceful spikes, foliage is long and 
graceful and resembles that of the gladiolus. Valu- 
able for cutting, and makes a beautiful display in a 
clump on the lawn or for borders. Blooms July to 



September. 
Crocosmiaeflora : fine 
BtoiledePeu i Star of Fire 
milion, center of yellow 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 
lden orange. ... $ .20 $1.25 
bright ver- 
utside red . . .25 1.50 

MUSCARI FLUIIOSUS 
Feathered Hyacinths, bears plume-like graceful 
spikes. 9 to 12 inches high, purple in color. 20c per 
doz.; $1.25 per 100. Postage 5c additional. 

OXAT.IS 

(Prices are postpaid.) 
Charming little half-trailing or bushy plants 
adapted for pot culture, hanging baskets and bor- 
ders. The foliage alone is very attractive. They 
flower all spring and summer. „ ■ _ 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100. 
Bermuda Buttercup : pure bright yellow. $ .25 $1.50 

Boweii: bright and rosy crimson 25 1.50 

The Grand Duchess type is a California variety of 
dwarf, sturdy growth, with fine, large flowers, very 
free flowering. _ 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100. 

Grand Duchess : white $ .25 51.50 

Grand Duchess : pink 25 1.50 

Grand Duchess : lavender 25 1.50 

Grand Duchess : mixed 20 1.25 

Mixture of all varieties 15 l.oo 



OKNITHOCJALUM 

(Postage 8c per 100.) 

Star of Bethlehem (Umbellatum) : bears profusely; 

star-shaped flowers, white, outside striped green. 

An old-time favorite of the easiest culture; very 

showv; a good border Mower 

' 15c per doz.; 75c per 100; $6.50 per 1000 

RANUNCULUS 

(Prices are postpaid.) 
These make verv double flowers about 9 inches 
high and go well with Anemones in the garden. Ran- 
unculus come in a wide range of attractive colors; 
bright shades of crimson purple, black, yellow, white. 
The bulbs have curious finger-like projections which 
should be planted pointing down, also soak the bulbs 
in water over night. Plant in a cool, partly shaded 
position. Our collection of named Ranunculus gives 
the very colors you may have wanted for a place in 



garden and 



one 



Pr. Dz. Pr. 100. 



Hercules: giant white $ .35 $2.00 

Jaune Supreme: yellow 35 2.00 

Mont Blanc: white 30 1.75 

Queen of the Netherlands: a dark violet 

-black ...... 30 1.75 

Boraano: bright scarlet 30 1.75 

Souci Dore: brownish orange 30 1.75 

Prench Mixed: fine large, loosely double 
flowers, very vigorous growers, in gor- 



geo 






Persian Mixed: very double rose-shaped 
flowers ■.-■■■; 

Turban Mixed: double, peony-shaped 
flowers in many bright colors 

Morse's Mixed: grow these^ ' 
and : 



how fine they really ; 



Scilla Campanulata 

(Nutaus and Siberica) 

Wood Hyacinths and Blue Bells — Novelties 

(Postage 25c per 100 additional.) 

These are most delightful early spring flow- 
ers, sending up spikes like a Roman Hyacinth 
to a height of 1 to 2 feet. Each flower meas- 
ures nearly 1 inch across and droops gracefully 
on the stem. Scillas are perfectly hardy, doing 
well in even cold and shaded situations. The 
Nutaus has smaller bells and bears them in 
more compact clusters. These are fine new 
flowers and well worth a place in every garden. 
Plant 2" deep and 6" apart. 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100. 
Blue Queen (Campanulata) : beau- 
tiful sky blue $ .20 $1.25 

Pienemann (Campanulata): bright 

blue 20 1.25 

Rose Queen (Campanulata): a 

large clear pink 25 1.50 

Scilla Campanulata: mixed 20 1.25 

Alba Major (Nutaus): white 20 1.25 

Coerulea (Nutaus): the true Eng- 
lish Blue Bell 20 1.25 

Rosea Maxima (Nutaus) : Mauve 

pink 20 1.25 

Scilla Nutaus: mixed 20 1.25 

Scilla Siberica: exquisite blue and 
extremely early; adapted for 
edging and for growing with 
crocus. These look well also as 
a background to a bed of hya- 
cinths or other bulbs 20 1.25 




Scilla Campanulata 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



BULBS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Miscellaneous Bulbs and Flowering Roots-continued 



SNOWDROPS 
(Prices are postpaid.) 
Nothing is more beautiful than these little 
pearing in earliest spring. If 
dotted throughout the lawn, the effect is most 
charming, or grown in a bed where they can be 
left undisturbed from year to year they will 
make a fine showing and may be used as a cut 
flower, especially the giant sort I'r. Hz. Pr. 100. 
California Giants: a vigorous gTOW- 

SPARAXIS 

(Price is postpaid.) 
Beautiful flowers borne on long graceful spikes; 
the colors are of the most telling combinations 
and of the brightest shades. They are tigered, 
blotched, spotted, streaked and flushed in the 
most diverse and pleasing manner. 

SPZREA 

(Postage 10c each bulb. For December delivery.) 
While these can be used for outdoor planting, 

where they will bloom during the summer, their 

great value is as a house plant 

Japonica: produces beautiful sprays of silvery- 
white plumes 25c each; $2.50 per doz. 

Japonica Compact a Multi-flora: dwarf, and a dense 


HljiWl ml h 

gf ^)HE^9HHgL 

m kJBBM 


Gladstone (Hvbrld Astilboides) : the best of all 
the Spireas, bearing snow-white plumes in 
great profusion 35c each; $3.50 per doz. 

Quean Alexandra: a splendid new Splrea of a 
beautiful pink color; a strong grower and free 
flowerer. When grown indoors it should be kept 
cool when flowers are developing; this is nec- 
essary to bring out the delicate coloring 




(Prices are postpaid.) 
Spring Star Flower (Uniflora): a dwarf little 
plant growing only 6" high and very suitable 
for borders and edging. The flowers are a deli- 
cate blue white, about 1 inch across. These do 
not have to be replanted, as they are hardy 
and perennial, lasting for years. A pretty lit- 
tle flower. 15c per doz.; 75c per 100; S5 per 1000 


5nowdrops.M 


TUBEROSES 

(Postage 12c per doz. For February delivery.) 

The flowers grow on stems 18 inches high, each 

stem bearing a dozen or more flowers. They 


are pure white, waxlike, and very fragrant Tuba- 
roses do best in a warm sheltered location. 
Double Dwarf Pearl. . .40c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. 


OUR NURSERIES 

Plants and Trees 



ROSES — the very best and newest sorts, large field grown plants. 

Morse's Rose Book, which is a nice readable book on the Rose and full of useful infor- 
mation, will be sent free on application. 

PALMS, Evergreen and Deciduous Trees and Shrubs, also a full line of Fruit Trees, 
prices of which we will give on application. 

Our nursery stock is all grown near Hayward, without irrigation, and we would invite 
intending planters to pay us a visit and view the stock. 

Nursery Sales Yard and Greenhouses situated at Glen Avenue, near Terminus of Key 
Route Station, Piedmont Ave., Oakland. 



C. C. Morse & Co. FLOWER SEED San Francisco, Cal. 

Morse's Sweet Peas 

The seed should be sown in November and December for early Spring blossoms. 

We issue a Special Catalogue on Sweet Peas and style it "Sweet Pea 
Culture." In it, we give very complete cultural directions, very full 
descriptions of varieties, colors, classifications, and complete price-list. 

It is sent free to any one requesting it. 



Three Grand Sweet Pea Novelties for 1914 




King- White Sweet Pea 



MARGARET ATLEE; this was our leading novelty 
last year and it has proved to be a great favorife. 
We have received numerous expressions of ap- 
preciation from experts all over the world. The 
color is a warm salmon pink, perfectly suffused 
over a cream ground. The cream deepens into 
bright buff at base of standard and wings and 
this lights up the flower with great effect. The 



KING WHITE: undoubtedly the leading nov- 
elty in the Sweet Pea world for 1914. 
Sweet Pea enthusiasts have long been wait- 
ing for a pure white Sweet Pea, but none 
expected such an advance as King White 
marks. Not only because of the glistening; 
immaculate purity of the whiteness, but 
because of the perfect finish of the flower, 
in every detail. King White attains perfec- 
tion in every detail which goes to make up 
a Spencer Sweet Pea. It is the expert's 
ideal for perfect form. Most people would 
.experience difficulty in enlarging on a de- 
scription of a white Sweet Pea, but our 
enthusiasm when beholding King White 
knew no bounds. The improvement in form, 
size, vigor, waviness and purity stands 
eminently out when compared to other 
White Spencers and calls for unstinted ad- 
miration. The number of four-blossomed 
sprays and the great length of stem will 
appeal strongly to those wishing a good 
white for decorative work. 
King White has been awarded the Award 
of Merit of the British National Sweet Pea 
Society and Certificate of Merit from the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 

Per packet 15 seeds 15c 

Per packet 30 seeds 25o 

ILLUMINATOR: a glorious orange salmon 
Sweet Pea. In dull light the color appears 
to be a "fiat orange scarlet," but when in 
brilliant sunshine or under artificial light, 
the color is completely changed. It appears 
to be a bright salmon cerise, sparkling with 
orange. When seen at its best one has to 
cal] it "glorious," fully appreciating the 
meaning of the adjective. 

Illuminator introduces a new shade of 

veet Pea enthusiasts, of rare 

with its additional attributes of 

floriferousness and symmetry, 

to captivate all who give it a 

place in their garden. 

Awarded Certificate of Merit by the Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society. 

Per packet 12 seeds 15c 

Per packet 25 seeds 25a 

shade of pink found in Margaret Atlee is entirely 
a new shade and commands admiration. The 
flowers are of extraordinary size and we meas- 
ured many flowers 2 ^ inches across the stand- 
ard. 

This variety bears a large proportion of du- 
plexed flowers which greatly adds to its effective- 
ness. Per packet 15o 



color 
beauty and 
great vigor, 



NEWER PROFESSIONAL FAVORITES 

The following varieties have been very popular this season and last in the great Sweet Pea Exhibi- 
is in London and all over Great Britain: 



AFTERGLOW: a new break in Sweet Peas and very 
hard to describe. The flower has quite a pastel 
effect. Base of standard bright violet blue, shad- 
ing to rosy amethyst. Wings electric blue. Re- 
quires shading. Per packet 15c 



BERTRAND DEAL IMPROVED: a large rosy lilac 
Sweet Pea of great vigor. The flowers are of 
splendid form and substance. The stems are stout 
and carry uniformly four blossoms. Per pkt ..15o 



C. C. Morse & Co. FLOWER SEED San Francisco, Cal. 



Morse's Sweet Peas- C » ntinued 



CHARLES F08TEB This Is a companion flower to 
Afterglow, both having tho pastel effect. The 
general effect is a mauve pink and both standard 
and wings are alike in color. The color deepens 
towards the center of the flower and makes it 
most effective Requires shading. Per packet.. 15c 

ilfeida PEARSON: this magnificent Tea has 
caused quite a sensation in England during the 
last two years. American amateurs who tried it 
last year were amazed at the size and coloring. 
The color Is pale pink on white ground. The 
plant Is exceptionally vigorous, bearing a large 
number of stout stems carrying four large blos- 
soms. This variety has been placed at the head 
of the Pink Class by the National Sweet Pea So- 
ciety of Great Britain. Per packet 15c 

lOTAlTY: this is the best dark blue stripe on the 
market. The ground color is white, flaked and 
striped with blue. The form and size of the 
flower is all that could be desired. Per packet. 15c 

MRS. CUTHBEETSON: this variety has gained many 
awards in England, particularly gaining distinc- 
tion at the International Horticultural Exhibition 
in London. It is one of the most pleasing and 
"Sweet" Peas that we have ever grown. The 
standard is clear rose pink and the wings are 
white with faint flushing of pale rose. The 
growth is exceptionally vigorous and under good 
cultivation will produce a number of five-bloomed 
sprays. Per packet 15c 



vatching for the best 
i decided that Nubian 
beautiful rich, deep 
vigorous and four 
•ule. "■ 



is what we 

chocolate. The vines a: 

blossomed sprays are the 

placement of the flowers i 

head of Maroon Section by the British National 

Sweet Pea Society. Per packet 15o 

STIRLING STENT: this variety gained a first-class 
certificate and silver medal from the National 
Sweet Pea Society of England as being the best 
Novelty in 1910. The color is a glorious deep sal- 
mon suffused with orange, and with a peculiar 
metallic cast. 

This is really a beautiful Sweet Pea, and by 
artificial light is particularly effective. We are 
sure all who grow this Pea will be amazed at the 
beautiful color. Salmon Peas are inclined to 
burn in strong sunshine, and we recommend grow- 
ing in light shade or using shading material in 

order to get the full beauty of the color 

Per packet 15c 

THOMAS STEVENSON: to those growers who like 
bright colors "Thomas Stevenson" will prove to be 
a beauty. The color is very brilliant orange scarlet, a 

. fire flame shade. The flowers are of the very finest 
Spencer form and generally come four to each 
stem. The stems are long and strong and borne 
on very vigorous vines. This variety also comes 
to us from England, where it has proved to be 
a tremendous favorite, with the "Hawlmark" of 
the Royal Horticultural Society. 



nk at 

edges. 
Miss Willmott: bright orange pink, showing veins. 
Mrs. Geo. Higrglnson, Jr.: clear azure blue. 
Prima Donna: very popular clear pink. 
Queen Alexandra: the new bright scarlet 

Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; % lb., 75o 

Shasta: large fluted, pure white. 



GRAN Dl FLORA TYPE 

Owing to the dry Winter, all Sweet Peas were a very poor crop. 

Following is a list of the best Grandiflora or Eckford Sweet Peas. These are smaller than 
Spencers, and bloom for a shorter period. They are much cheaper, however, and are still wanted 
for long rows or hedges, and for bunching in large quantities. 

Prices of each, are: pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; % lb. 50c; 1 lb. $1.50, except where noted. 
Black Knig-ht: very deep glossy maroon. Lady Qrlsel Hamilton: soft lavender, tinted 

Bolton's Pink: brilliant pink tinted salmon. 
Dorothy Eckford: pure white, large shell shape. 
Earliest of All: the best early flowering or Christmas 

variety, Rose Standard, white wings, similar in 

colors to the old favorite Blanche Ferry. 
Helen Pierce: marbled blue on white. 
Hon. Mrs. E. Kenyon: clear delicate primrose yellow. 
Kins; Edward VII (Improved Firefly): the best 

bright red. Pkt, 5c; oz., 25c; </ t lb., 75c; lb., 92.50 

Best Large Flowering Mixed: The best possible mixture of all the newest and best grandiflora 
and Eckford varieties. Well balanced and complete as to colors and shades. Per pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; 
■4 lb., 60c; 1 lb., $1.25. 

WAVED OR SPENCER TYPE 

Our Choice of the Best Spencers in General Commerce. 
All of the following are of the Spencer type which means the flowers are of immense size 
with wavy edges, and that the stems are long and with usually four blossoms to the stem. 
America Spencer: white ground, heavily striped and 

flaked with bright crimson scarlet 

Per pkt 10c; y 2 oz. 20c 

Apple Blossom Spencer: very large; standard bright 

rose, wings primrose. Per pkt.... 10c; y z oz., 20c 
Asta Olm: soft pinkish lavender 

Per pkt 10c; y 2 oz., 20c; oz., 35c 

; Aurora Spencer: flowers white, flaked with bright 

orange pink. Per pkt 10c; y 2 oz., 20c 

Blanche Perry Spencer: rose standard and wings 

white. Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 

Captain of the Bines, Spencer: pure purple 

Per pkt 10c ; l / 2 oz. 20c 

Clara Curtis: a superior strain of Primrose Spencer 

Per pkt 15c; ]/ 2 oz. 40c 

Constance Oliver: cream ground, beautifully suffused 

with pale orange pink. Per pkt. . . .15c; ^ oz., 40c 
Countess Spencer: the original giant flowered Spen- 
cer, with finest waved standard and wings clear 

pink. Per pkt 5c; y> oz., 20c; oz., 35c 

Dainty Spencer: white ground, beautiful picotee edge 

of rose pink. Per pkt 10c; "% oz., 20c 

Duplex Spencer: belongs to the new type. Color is 
pink. Per pkt 15c; % oz., 50c 



Etta Dyke: a beautiful white of best Spencer form. 

Same as Morse's Strain of White Spencer 

Per pkt 15c; V 2 oz. 40o 

Flora Norton Spencer: the color is bright blue with 

tint of purple. Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 

Florence Morse Spencer: a distinct shade of light 

pink, wings deeper margins. One of the prettiest 

of Sweet Peas. Per pkt 10c; y 2 oz., 20c 

Geo. Herbert: rose crimson, suffused with magenta. 

Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20o 

Helen Lewis: orange salmon pink.... 10c; Vz oz., 20c 
Irish Belle: lilac flushed pink. Pkt., 10c; % oz., 20c 
John Ingriian: a fine rich rose crimson 

Per pkt 10c ; V 2 oz., 20c 

King Edward Spencer: the best pure red Spencer. . . . 

Per pkt '. 10c; % oz., 30c 

Margaret Madison: self-colored azure blue 

Per pkt 15c; % oz., 50c 

Marie Corelli: a bright crimson 10c; V, oz., 20o 

Martha. Washington: white ground, margined with 

bright pink, suffusing to center 

Per pkt 10c ; K oz., 20o 

Masterpiece: a splendid lavender Spencer 

Per pkt v 15c; % oz., 40o 



C. C. Morse & Co. FLOWER SEED San Francisco. Cal. 



Sweet PcaS— WAVED OR SPENCER TYPE— Continued 



Maud Holmes: rich crimson Spencer 

Per pkt 15c; % oz., 40c 

Mrs. C. w. Breadmore: creamy buff ground, beauti- 
fully edged with rose pink. One of tbe best va- 
rieties. Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 

Mrs. Hugh Dickson: the best Cream Pink Sweet Pea. 

Exceptionally vigorous flowers 

Per pkt 15c; % oz., 40c 

Mrs. Routzahn: straw color, tinted blush and shad- 
ing to rose at edges. Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 

Mrs. Sankey Spencer: a large black-seeded white. . . . 
Per pkt. 10c; % oz., 20c 

Othello Spencer; rich maroon, very dark 

Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20o 

Paradise Ivory: cream. .Per pkt 15c; % oz., 40c 

Primrose Spencer: Morse's Strain. The finest clear 
primrose. Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 

Princess Victoria: very similar to Florence Morse 
Spencer. Per pkt 15c; % oz., 40c 

Queen Victoria Spencer: opens with blush tint, turns 
clear primrose. Per pkt 10c; Vz oz., 20c 

Senator Spencer: chocolate and seal brown, striped, 

flaked and mottled; very distinct and novel 

Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 

Tennant Spencer: purplish mauve 

Per pkt 10c; % oz., 20c 



Vermilion Brilliant: a brilliant Scarlet Spencer. On 
account of its brightness this is a very telling 

color and should be in every collection 

Per pkt 15c; % oz., 50o 

White Spencer: Morse's re-selected. Flowers very 

large and of magnificent form 

Per pkt 10c; % oz., 30o 

W. T. Hutchins: buff primrose shading to apricot 
pink at the margin. Per pkt 10c; ^ oz., 20o 

- s-phyr: silvery blue self. Per pkt 25o 

MOBSE'S SUPERB SPENCER MIXED 

This mixture contains practically all the true 
Spencer varieties introduced to date. Great atten- 
tion is given to secure a beautiful light mixture and 
yet include all shades nicely balanced and propor- 
tioned. 

To make a better mixture of Sweet Peas than 
MORSE'S "SUPERB" would be impossible. 

Per pkt 10c; oz., 35c; V*. lb., $1-00; 1 lb., 93-50 

CUPID OB, DWARF SWEET PEAS 



MORSE'S EXTRAORDINARY SPENCER COLLECTION 



Thirty leading varieties for 
America Spencer: bright red and white stripe. 
Apple Blossom Spencer: rose and primrose blcolor. 
Asta Ohn: best pinkish lavender. 
Blanche Perry Spencer: rose and white bicolor. 
Constance Oliver; large deep cream pink. 
Countess Spencer: best pure bright pink. 
Dainty Spencer: white with rose pink edge. 
Duplex Spencer: new Giant Pink. 
Elfrida Pearson: the best blush pink. 
Plora Norton Spencer: best clear blue. 
Gaiety Spencer: best bright stripe red. 
George Herbert: fine rich rose carmine. 
Helen Lewis: large orange pink. 
Illuminator: beautiful salmon orange (see novelty 

list). 
Irish Belle: lilac flushed pink. 



2.50, including two novelties. 
King Edward Spencer: best bright red. 
King White: Giant White (see novelty list). 
Margaret Madison: best azure blue. 
Margaret Atlee: best cream pink. 
Marie Corelli: very fine bright rose. 
Mrs. C. W. Breadmore: cream edged rose pink. 
Mrs. Hugh Dickson: very fine cream pink. 
Othello Spencer: best deep maroon. 
Pearl Gray Spencer: beautiful lavender. 
Primrose Spencer: best primrose. 
Senator Spencer: white with chocolate stripe. 
Stirling Stent: best salmon colored. 
Tennant Spencer: best purplish mauve. 
Thomas Stevenson: best giant orange. 
W. T. Hutching: buff and primrose, shading to apri- 
cot. 



MORSE'S $1.00 SPENCER COLLECTION 



Asta Onn: best pinkish lavender. 
Countess Spencer: best pure bright pink. 
Dainty Spencer: white with rose pink edge. 
Plora Norton Spencer: best clear blue. 
Florence Morse Spencer: best light pink. 
George Herbert: fine, rich rose carmine. 
King Edward Spencer: the best bright red. 
Margaret Madison: best azure i..ua. 



Fifteen of the best Spencers for $1.00. 

Marie Corelli: best bright rose. 

Mrs. C. W. Breadmore: cream edged rose pink. 

Mrs. Hugh Dickson: Giant Cream Pink. 

Othello Spencer: best deep maroon. 

Tennant Spencer: purple mauve. 

Thomas Stevenson: best Giant orange scarlet. 

White Spencer: large white. 



BIG "7" 50c SPENCER COLLECTION 



Asta Ohn: best pinkish lavender. 
Florence Morse Spencer: very fine light pink. 
Thomas Stevenson: best orange scarlet. 
King- Edward Spencer: best bright red. 



Mrs. C. W. Breadmore: cream, edged 
Othello Spencer : best deep maroon. 
White Spencer: best white Spencer. 



INCOMPARABLE 25c COLLECTION 



Seven of the best Grandiflora Sweet Peas. Well known favorites. 
Dorothy Eckford, large white. I Lady Grisel Hamilton: lavender 

Kenyon: primrose. Misa Willmott: orange pink 

I Prima Donna: fine pink. 



Hon. Mrs. 

Janet Scott: pink and buff. 

Zing Edward VII: bright red 



Morse's Bedding Pansies 

SEPARATE COLORS OR NAMED VARIETIES 



Pkt. Oz. 

Atropurpurea: dark blue % .10 $1.25 

Auriculaenora: fine shades 10 1.50 

Azure Blue 10 1.50 

Bronze 10 1.50 

Emperor William: ultramarine blue 10 2.00 

Fairy Queen: blue with azure margin. . . .10 1.50 

Fire Xing: crimson, yellow edge 10 2.00 

Golden Gem: pure yellow 10 2.00 

Gold Margined 10 1.75 

Golden Yellow: with dark eye 10 1.75 

King of the Blacks or Faust: black 10 1.75 

Lord Beaconsneld: lavender heliotrope 



Pkt 

Prince Bismark: golden bronze 10 

Quadricolor: or Pheasant's Eye 10 

Buby Bed: rich color 10 

Silver Edged: extra fine 10 

Snow Queen: pure white 10 

Victoria: nearly scarlet 10 

Violet: fine violet, blue 10 

White: pure white 10 

White: with dark eye 10 

Large Flowering Varieties: all Mixed.. .10 

Striped or Mottled, Mixed 10 

12 packets of any of the above 10c varieties for 
6 for 50c. 



Oz. 
1.75 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.75 
1.25 
• 1.75 
$1-00; 



C. C. Morse & Co. FLOW HUSHED San Francisco, Cal. 




Morse's Prize Strain Pansies about I4 natural size fr 



Morse's Superb Pansies 

Pansies do particularly well in our cool, even climate. If sown where the weather 
is hot, choose a shaded location and give moist, rich, loamy soil. To get the giant 
blossoms which can be had in wonderful variety of colors from Morse's Prize Strain 
Mixture the plants must be transplanted twice, once from the seed box when quite 
small and again when nearly half grown and be sure to manure or fertilize the soil. 
Sow Pansy seed in autumn as the blossoms are the largest in early spring, and be- 
come smaller during the hot months. Morse's Prize Strain Pansies are unequalled. 

SPLENDID MIXTURES 



EXTRA PINE GIANT FLOWERED PANSIES 
We offer in the following colors and varieties, 

these Pansies, which are different from the named 

sorts listed. They are some of the separate sorts 

out of our famous "Prize Strain Mixture," and are 

truly giant in size. 

Giant Adonis: light blue with dark blue face. 

Giant Auricula — flowered: reddish with darker cen- 
ter surrounded by yellow. 

Giant Bridesmaid: pink shaded with dark face. 

Giant Emperor William: fine dark blue. 

Giant Faust: large, pure black. 

Giant Fire Xing': yellow with reddish face and 
orange upper petals. 

Giant Hortense Red: old rose color. 

Giant Indig-o Blue: a deep indigo color with face. 

Giant Lord Beaconsfield: three lower petals purple, 
upper two lavender. 

Giant Madam Perret: wine color and white, fine red. 

Giant Pretiosa: violet on carmine crimson ground, 
with white border. 

Giant Prince Henry: a dark violet. 

Giant Raphael: clear blue on a white ground, lovely 
blue veins, Odier type. 

Giant Solfatara: sulohur yellow or primrose color 
with a deep blue blotch on each petal, Odier type. 

Giant Pure White: fine large size. 

Giant White Three Spotted: three large purple spots. 



Trii 



type 



Giant White Five Snotted: one of the handsomest 

of all Pansies. Odier type. 
Giant Pure Yellow: the largest size of this color. 
Giant Yellow Five Spotted: very large. Odier type. 
All of t^e aboTe Mouse's Giant Pansies, per packet 

20 cents, or 5 packets your selection for 85c 
Collection of the U "' 

sort, for $3.65. 



Pansif 



above, 1 of each 



MORSE'S PRIZE STRAIN. This is a mix- 
ture of all the giant-flowered varieties, all the 
plain colors, faced sorts, ruffled edged, and rare 
sorts; also the varieties exquisitely marbled, 
striped and blotched. The seed is saved from 
Germany's most famous Pansy gardens and 
from EXHIBITION FLOWERS. PRIZE 
STRAIN Pansies are wonderfully beautiful in 
every way, and are the very best there are. 

PIT. OF 500 SEEDS, 50c. 
Morse's Imperial German Strains Mixed: a superfine 
mixture of the choicest German varieties in all 

colors Pkt, 35o 

Bugrnot Mixed: a circular, ruffled and five-petaled 
type, with soft, blended colors and tints, veined 
on the margins and with a dark blotch at the 
base of each petal. One of the finest sorts. Pkt.,35e 
Cassier's Giant, Mixed: a splendid mixture of various 
shades and markings. The blossoms are round 
and are blotched at the base of the petals. Pkt., 25* 
Giant Trimardeau, Mixed: the largest flowering type 
of Pansies, called the French strain. The top petals 
are larger than the three lower ones and are 

beautifulv marked Pkt., 15c; Oz., S3-00 

Giant Odier or Prize Blotched, Mixed. Pkt 15c 

Giant Masterpiece: these new Pansies have a most 
beautiful combination of rich velvety coloring and 
attractive wavy or ruffled petals. This wavy ef- 
fect gives a graceful appearance rarely seen in 
Pansies, and while they are really very large, 

they appear larger on this account Pkt., 30c 

See page 16 for named varieties of bedding Pansies, not 
giant in size but very free flowering and excellent for bed- 
ding where color effect is wanted. 



ORDER "■"mSS" 

11m Tool*, Book*, Spr»y»r», lnaoo1lold« 



SEEDS 



ORDER °"„JS" ROSES AND TREES 

and all Goods from our Nursery Dopartmont 



C. C. MORSE & CO 
SEEDS 



C. C. MORSE & CO. 




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ALFALFA 



■ALFALFA (Medlcag-o Sativa) : also known as Lu- 
cerne and Chili Clover. Our Alfalfa Seed is grown 
out of the State, on high land, and before putting 
it on sale we determine the purity by government 
test, although inspection before purchasing may 
show the seed to be free from dodder. There is 
no other weed that we are so fearful of. "We handle 
several grades of Alfalfa Seed and are in a po- 
sition to supply seed of most any value the cus- 
tomer may want, although it pays to plant only 
the best. 

"We handled twenty-two carloads of alfalfa last 
year, and are always prepared to quote the lowest 
market price for seed. Lb. 35c, postpaid; by 
freight or express, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; larg-er 
quantities at market price; write or wtra. 

"WE ARE HEADQUARTERS IN CALIFORNIA F 



Arabian Alfalfa. Is admirably suited to our Irri- 
gated sections, especially in the San Joaquin Val- 
ley. 50c per lb., postpaid; by freight 40c per lb.; 
10 lbs., $3.60. 

Peruvian Alfalfa. A new long season variety just 
put on the market now. A grand variety for 
Southern California. Lb. 45c, postpaid; by ex- 
press or freight, lb., 35c; 10 lbs., ¥3-00. Please 
write in regard to larger quantities. 

Turkestan or Dry-land Alfalfa. We make direct im- 
portations of this seed. 35c per lb. postpaid; by 
freight or express, lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $2.20. Write 
or wire us on larger quantities. 
OB ALFALFA, CLOVERS AND GRASS SEEDS. 



GRASSES 



Add 10c per pound for all grass seeds ordered by mail; prices below do not include postage. 
The four Grasses most largely planted for pasture and hay are as follows: See page 19 for Lawn 
Grasses. 
AWNLESS BEOME GRASS (Bromns Inermis) 



Will 
stand droughts and produce heavy crops in dry 
sections and on poor soils where other grasses 
perish. It is one of the hardiest grasses and suc- 
ceeds on our dry hillsides. Sow 35 lbs. per acre. 
Lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $2.20; 100 lbs., $20.00. 

Italian Rye Grass (Lolium Italicum). Thrives in 
almost any soil and yields early and abundant 
crops. Sown in the fall, will produce an excellent 
hay crop the following season, but lasts only one 
year. Much sown in Humboldt County for pas- 
ture and hay. Not recommended for lawns. Sow 
50 lbs. per acre. Lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., 
$8.00. 



ORCHARD GRASS, OR COCKSFOOT (Dactylis 

Glomerata). One of the most valuable of all pas- 
ture grasses; produces an immense quantity of 
forage, and hay of best quality. After being 
mown comes up quickly and yields very heavily. 
Suitable for pasture under trees. Sown in the 
ashes on cleared redwood land in Humboldt Coun- 
ty. Not suitable for lawns, as it grows in tus- 
socks. Sow ,35 lbs. per acre. Lb., 25c: 10 lbs., 
$2.00; 100 lbs., $18.00. 
Perennial Rye Grass (Lolium Ferenne). It grows 
rapidly and makes a good showing within month 
from time of sowing; grows very rapidly. The 
great pasture and meadow grass of Great Britain. 
Sow 60 lbs. per acre. Lb., 15c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 100 
lbs. $9.00. 



We carry also all of the standard and special grasses in well cleaned stock. Market prices gladly quoted. 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



CRASS SEED 



San Francisco, Cal. 










II 



Grasses for Lawns 

Grass seed does well planted in the fall. Now the sun is not so hot that it will scorch the 
young shoots, and if not sown just before heavy frosts t'his is probably the best time of the year. 
Don't plant too deep; keep the soil always moist; follow the directions below, and you will get 
a good lawn. The Golden Gate Park in San Francisco uses each year large quantities of our fine 
lawn grasses. You can have a lawn just as good as any of theirs by giving proper care, and sow- 
ing MORSE'S LAWN GRASS, which is of excellent quality. 



PACIFIC RYE GRASS (MORSE'S) 

The best grass for a straight lawn in any sandy 
soil such as is about San Francisco. Pacific 
Rye Grass is like the hardy Australian Rye 
Grass, but is longer lived and of a much finer 
leaf. By express or freight, per lb., 25c; per 
100 lbs., $20.00 Postpaid per lb., 35c. 

KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS 

Makes a lawn of a dark-green color. It forms a 
fine mat with care and plenty of water and is 
the best straight lawn grass for all soils except 
sandy ones. By express or freight per lb., 25c; 
per 100 lb., $20.00 Postpaid per lb., 35c. 

MORSE'S SPECIAL SHADE 
MIXTURE 

Our mixture is made from natural wood grasses 
which grow in shaded places, and for making 
good lawns under trees and in dark corners is 
unequalled. Per lb., 50c. .Postpaid per lb., 60c. 

WHITE CLOVER 

| This is a little dwarf growing lawn clover. The 
color is dark green, and the roots run deeply. 
By express per lb., 50c .. Postpaid per lb., 60c. 



MORSE'S CALIFORNIA LAWN 
MIXTURE 

Contains only the finest leaved grasses in the 
correct proportion to make a good fine turf 
which will look well in summer and winter. 

Per lb., 35c; per 100 lbs., $30.00 

Postpaid per lb., 45c. 

MORSE'S "GOLDEN GATE PARK" 
LAWN MIXTURE 

Contains the more hardy grasses which are used 
to make the sod for the park playgrounds, 
where the grass has to endure much tramping 
over. The mixture also contains a very little 
white clover. By express or freight, per lb., 
25c; per 100 lbs., $20.00 .. Postpaid per lb., 3Sc. 

AUSTRALIAN RYE GRASS 

Makes a very hardy, bright green lawn which 
does well on sandy soil like San Francisco. By 
express or freight, per lb., 15c; per 100 lbs., 
$10.00 Postpaid per lb., 25c. 

PUTTING GREEN MIXTURE 

Especially for golf courses. Makes the very 

finest greens. Per lb., 45c by express 

Postpaid per lb., 55c. 

VELVET LAWN MIXTURE 

A lawn grass for wet places; per lb., 45c postpaid. 



DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING- A LAWN: Prepare 
■ome fertilizer or manure. Let the ground stand a mo 
three months old. Two weeks before planting roll and water the 



his means spade it over and dig Id 
not apply fertilizer until grass la 
ground well and before sowing th» 
seed hoe the soil but do not spade it. This will kill countless thousands of small weeds which ar» 
always in the soil and would otherwise have to be pulled up by hand — a laborious job. 

Sow the seed evenly and roll it in or sprinkle a good cover of sandy loam over it. Where a roller !• 
not available rake the seed in lightly and press down by patting with spade. Water twice a day until 
grass comes up. In stiff, vlayey soils, if planting in summer, use straw or leaves to protect the germinat- 



C. C. Morse & Co. 



VEGETABLES San Francisco, Cal. 



Vegetable Seeds for Fall Planting 




Many good vegetables can be grown 
[or early winter use by sowing seeds 
in the fall. The following varieties are 
hardy and easily grown: 

Price per packet 5c except noted 



BEETS — Table Sorts 



Blood Turnip .... 

$ .15 

Crosby's Egyptian 

20 

Long Blood Red . . 



J* -lb. 
' '$'.45 



Detroit Dark Red . 



Broccoli: large, white 



.15 



.45 



CABBAGE 

Early Jersey Wakefield $ .40 $1.20 $4.00 

Early Winingstadt 30 .90 3.00 

Morse's Early Flat Dutch 45 1.35 4.50 

Surehead 30 .90 3.00 

CARBOT 

Improved Long Orange 10 .25 .75 

Danver's Half Long 10 .25 .90 

Oxheart or Guerande 10 .25 .85 

Earliest French Forcing 10 .30 1.00 

•CAULIFLOWER Pkt. Oz. 

California Wonder $ .10 $ .75 

Extra Early Snowball 25 2.50 

^OLLAKDS Oz. li -lb. Lb. 

True Georgia $ .10 $ .30 $1.00 

I.EEK 

Giant Musselburgh 15 .40 1.25 

1ETTUCE 

Drumhead or Malta 15 .40 1.25 

Iceberg 20 .60 2.00 

Hanson, selected strain 20 .50 1.50 

Big Boston .20 .60 2.00 

New York or Los Angeles... .25 .75 2.50 

"White Paris Cos or Romaine .15 .45 1.50 

ONION 

Australian Brown 15 .40 1.25 

Improved Yellow Flat Danvers .15 .45 1.50 

Prizetaker 20 .60 2.00 

Yellow Globe 20 .60 2.00 

White Portugal 25 .80 2.50 



ONION SETS l Add 10c per lb. for postage.) 

Yellow 

White 

PAESLET Oz. !4-lb. 

Extra Triple or Moss Curled $ .10 $ .20 
PARSNIP 

Hollow Crown 15 .45 

PEAS (Add 10c per lb. for postage.) 



1.50 

Lb. 



American Wonder $ 

Little Gem .20 

Stratagem 25 

Yorkshire Hero , 20 

Telephone 25 

(Special prices quoted on large lots.) 

RADISH Oz. Lb. 

Scarlet Turnip, white tipped $ .10 $ .90 

French Breakfast 10 .75 1 

Long Scarlet 10 .60 ' 

Chinese White Winter 10 .90 

SALSIFY 

Mammoth Sandwich Island 20 1.75 

spinach: Lb. 

Savoy Leaved $ .35 



Prickly 



TURNIP Oz. 

Early Snowball $ .10 

Golden Ball 10 

White Flat Dutch 10 

Purple Top White Globe . 10 

Rutabaga American Purple Top 10 



.30 

Lb. 



Flower Seeds for Fall Planting 



Pans 
Full description 
Asparagus Sprengcri, At 



freely all sumi 
weet Peas, which an 
our Garden Guide: 

. Bellis Perennis, Boston Ivy, Calendula, Candytuft, Canterbury Bells, Cam 
Cobea Scandens, Columbine, Cyclamen, Daisy Shasta, Dianthus, Digitalis or Foxglo 1 



blooming, but by sowing the seed in the fall 
listed separately, the following 



recommended fo 



Clematis, 

photheca, Eschscholtcia, Forgct-Me-Not. Gaillardia Grandiflora, Gladiolus, Godetia, Gysophila Panicuiata, Heliotrope. 
4tock, Larkspur, Lobelia Cardinalis, Mignonette, Nemophila Insignis, Poppy, Primroses, Romneya Coulteri, Salvia, Scabi 



English Iris 



(See Back Cover for Illustration.) 
This beautiful variety grows on tall stout stems and makes a fine florist's flower. The stem is 3 
feet and surmounted by most delicately colored flowers 4 inches across. English Iris is taller thalj 
the Spanish and has larger flowers. Both are needed in all gardens to give a succession of bloorit 
for six weeks. It blooms several weeks later, and care must be used to see that the plants have 
plenty of water when coming into flower, for this is the season of the year when our gardens are 
just beginning to be dry. 

Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 I Pr. Dz. Pr. 100 

Argns: beautiful pink and white $ .40 $2.50 I, 'Unique: bright claret color $ .40 $2.50 

IBieu Celeste: sky blue 40 2.50 Mont Blanc: pure white 35 2.00 

Dak* of Richmond: dark magenta purple .40 2,50 I Mixed colors 25 1.7P 

(Postage 5c perdozen additional.) 






IriS— Fleur-de-Lis 



Illustrated on the back cover. 

Irises, of which there are many sorts, come m I'.oo very distinct classes. One lias 
creep-' Iri and evergreen leaves like the German, Japanese and Susiana Mourning 

Inses and I lags. I'lie other class grows from bulbs and has leaves which wither after 
flowering, such as English and Spanish Iris. .Ill have line handsome flowers, with colorings 
like an orchid, and arc among the best cut flowers. 

The bulbs should be planted 2 or l inches deep and 6 inches apart, and for the best effect 
should be in beds or groups of twenty-five to one hundred or more bulbs. The greater the 
number the finer the effect. 

Set the his with root-stocks at least ? inches apart in 12 inch rows. A mulching of coarse 
manure or strato will facilitate the production of fine long stems and large blossoms. 



Spanish Iris 



ENGLISH IRIS 

Are on opposite pa 



See back cover for illustration.) 

Spanish Iris grow from bulbs and make a stem tzvo feet high, with flowers of exquisite 
shading and texture. Spanish Iris is earlier and shorter than English, and, being so cheap, 
many thousands are planted each year. 'They look best planted in mass. All Spanish Iris have 
v blotch just where the lower petals begin. Our list contains new varieties never of- 
fered before and which are very beautiful. 

After flowering, the bulbs may either be lifted or allowed to remain for another season. 
The varieties contained in our collection are the finest and most distinct in cultivation. 

(Postage 10c per 100 additional. 

Beauty: larye azure blue standard, falls white shad- 
ed bluish 25c per doz.; $1.75 per 100 

Belle Cninoise: very tine yellow. 

Blanche Snperbe: large white flower with a sugges- 
tion of pale porcelain shading; one of the best and 
earliest. 

British Queen: purest white. 

Cajanus: puie yellow; large flower, very tall, fine 

Chrisolvta or Chrysolora: golden yellow, the best of 

its color in cultivation. 
Darling: bright blue. 
Formosa: the finest of .lark blue. 
Gold Cup: darkest bronze, largest variety, very fine 

25c per doz.; $1.75 per 100. 

Hercules : fine bronze and violet 

25c per doz.; $1.75 per 100. 

ting- of the Blies (Count of Nassau l: rich dark 

blue shaded lighter. 
Louise: French gray and white, with golden blotch 
ery beautiful. 

Susiana Mourning: Iris 



Dozen prices are postpaid.) 
1m' Unique: violet blue with white falls; large and 

distinct flower. 
Philomela: tine large pale blue. 

Princess Ida: primrose, orange blotch, white stand- 
ards. 
Queen of tlie Netherlands: a very striking clear 

bright deep blue. 
Reconnaissance: bronze and grange blended. 
Snowball: pure white, shading to sapphire at base, 

with conspicuous gulden blotch. 
Solfaterre: grayish lilac and yellow. 
Sweet 1/ a vender : a large flower of the daintiest, 

sweetest light blue color imaginable 

25c per doz.: $1.75 per 100. 

Thunderbolt: dark bronze. 25c per doz.; $1.75 per 100. 
Walter T. Ware: primrose yellow, finely formed, 

award of merit 25c per doz.; $1.75 per 100. 

Named Varieties: except those priced at 25c per 

dozen All 15c per doz.; $1.00 per 100. 

Splendid Mixture of all Varieties 

2 doz. for 25c; 100 for 75c; 500 for $3.00. 



beau 

and dark chocol 
Inches high and 
which lasts for 
inches apart, 
greatly 



'rices are postpaid.) 
ety different from all others and 



admired. 



Japanese Iris 

(Iris Kaempferi) 

(Postage 30c doz.) 
By universal consent this species of Iris is 
given first place. It is one of the finest flowers 
we have, coming in various tints of blue, laven- 
der, crimson, rose and lilac, as well as the dark 
blues and violets. The bulbs are perfectly hardy 
and the plants are very easily grown in any gar- 
den where there is good soil and plenty of water. 
Plant 4 inches deep and 14 inches apart. The 
blossoms vary from 8 to 10 inches in diameter 
and are borne on long graceful stems, blooming 
profusely in June and July. Bulbs are ready for 
delivery some time in December. We have some 
beautifully colored pictures of these to show at 
our store. 
In separate sorts or mixed 25c each; $3.00 per doz. 



Flag Iris 



(Postage 10c per dozen.) 
those tall large flowered "flags" 
in hardy borders, sending up the 
year, 
illustrated on back cover) ; a very fine 



tall 



White Flag 1 : 






Per doz., 85c 

white, large flag 

Per doz., 85c 



German Iris 

Postage 15c per dozen. 

These also come from creeping root stocks, 
which blossom every year. German Iris are com- 
monly called '"Flags" and are much prized for 
their delicate shadings, fine colors and sure and 
early flowers. Grow 2 to 3 feet tall. Plant 3 
inches deep and 12 inches apart. Like illustration 
of "Blue Flag" on cover. 
All the following- varieties, $1.00 per doz. Bulbs do 

not ripen until November. 
Bouquet Royal: light yellow standards, falls white. 
Darius: standards light yellow, falls purple veined 

vellow and white. 
Gloire do Hillegom: beautiful clear light blue, tall 

and stately. 
Grachus: crimson reticulated white, very fine. 
Innocenza: ivory white. 
Xharput: purple, standards blue, 
Madam Cbereau: white, elegantly frilled azure blue 

at the edges. Tall and fine. 
Maori King-: rich golden yellow standards, falls vel- 

vetv crimson margined gold 
Mixtures of all the above varieties and many others 

not listed separately 85c per doz.; $6.00 




MORSE 5c CO. 
San Francisco, California, U.S.A. 



\aAm 



THE PRICES IN THIS CATALOGUE CANCEL ALL PREVIOUS PRICES 

How to Order by Mail 

YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS. — Be very sure that your name and address are written very 
plainly on each order. We frequently have orders where either name is not given or address 
omitted. Also, give plainly the R. F. D. number and box, or the street address. We acknowl- 
edge all orders above 25 cents by a postcard giving the number oi your particular order. If 
such acknowledgment is not received, or if the order does not follow at once, write us about it. 

YOUR ORDER. — Please keep the Nursery portion of your order separate from the seed 
and insecticide part. Use the separate order sheets if possible. Seeds do not pack well with 
nursery stock, because they are liable to get damp and become spoiled ; it is better to have 
them shipped separately. Correspondence should be on separate sheet, with name and ad- 
dress for prompt reply. Orders for seed can be filled and sent off almost as soon as received, 
but orders for plants and trees must sometimes be delayed on account of wet, stormy weather and 
the rush of orders. 

CASH WITH ORDER. — The proper way is to send remittance in full to cover order and 
postage. We send orders C. O. D. only if 25% of the amount of order is enclosed. Plants we 
never send out C. O. D. 

REMITTANCES should be made by Postoffice Money Order, Express Money Order, or by 
Bank Draft on San Francisco. For amounts up to one dollar, clean unused postage stamps will be 
accepted. Coin should not be sent by mail. Checks on local banks may be sent if 15 cents is added 
to the amount for exchange. We do not accept responsibility for orders which never reach us. 

MARKET GARDENERS. — We number among our customers many market gardeners and 
other users of large quantities of seeds. Those desiring to purchase greater amounts than those 
quoted in our catalogue, will find it to their advantage to send us a complete, itemized list of their 
requirements and we will be pleased to name a special net price on the order. 

SHIPPING. — We will use our best judgment as to the best way of sending orders when 
specific directions are not given. On large "postpaid" orders it is better to have them go by ex- 
press if your town is on a railroad — it is safer. We prepay express charges on prices quoted 
"postpaid." If special directions in shipping are needed, send them explicitly, and where Express 
or Freight Office is different from Postoffice, so state in space on our order sheet. Paris Green, 
Nico Fume and other poisons are not mailable, nor are liquids like Rose Leaf and other insecti- 
cides ; they must go by express or freight. 

SEEDS BY MAIL. — We send by mail or by express prepaid, all orders for flower seeds, and 
for vegetable seeds (except beans, corn and peas). We do not pay postage or express charges 
on onion sets, field seeds, clovers, grasses, bird seeds, beans, corn, peas, tools or plants; but we do 
pay them on other vegetable and flower seeds. Correspondents in foreign countries should add a 
sufficient amount for postage at the rate of 12 cents per pound. Canada postage is 16 cents per 
pound. Seeds sent in sealed tin cans for the tropics cannot be sent by mail unless full letter post- 
age, 50 cents per pound, is paid ; they may, however, be sent by express, if such companies have 
offices there. 

NON-WARRANTY: Note. — There are so many contingencies to be encountered in growing 
plants from seed and in setting out plants that are dependent on the weather and other conditions 
over which we have no control, that success in planting is not altogether dependent on the seed or 
plant. We will send out only seed which we believe will grow and produce the kind of plant and 
variety represented, but : 

C. C. Morse & Co. give no warranty, expressed or implied, as to description, quality, produc- 
tiveness, or any other matter of any seeds, bulbs, plants or trees they send out, and they will not 
be responsible in any way for the crop. If the purchaser does not accept the goods on these 
terms, they are at once to be returned. 

January, 1913. 



Aj2, . Ac2 ~yK~v-^*-*— *"&*-* . 



OUR FALL CATALOGUE OF BULBS.— -At the end of September we issue a complete cat- 
alogue of Bulbs and Sweet Peas. This includes Daffodils, Tulips, Hyacinths and those other gor- 
geous flowering bulbous plants. We plan to send this to all of our mail order customers in the 
Pacific Coast States. A request will bring you a copy gladly. 



C C. MORSE A CO. SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 




CABBAGE— COPENHAGEN MARKET 

No cabbage has been introduced in recent years that has demonstrated greater superiority for all 
climates and all conditions than Copenhagen Market. 

In our trial grounds, every plant we set out produced a perfect and good-sized solid head. 

COPENHAGEN MARKET is an early variety, producing fine heads early in the fall if seed is 
sown in June. It is pure turquoise color with glistening white heart. 

The strain thoroughly "fixed" and all tendency to sport has been entirely eliminated by constant 
selection. 

COPENHAGEN MARKET is pre-eminently a market gardener's cabbage since there is no waste; 
the heads are solid and heavy, the stems short; it matures early and evenly. 

Large cabbage growers, for their own profit, should give the Copenhagen Market a trial. Pkt. 10c; 
Vi oz. 35c; oz. 65c; 2 oz. $1.00; % lb. $1.75; lb. $6.50. 



CABBAGE— DANISH ROUNDHEAD 



-the variety to well 



This is a short stemmed type and a selection out of the famous "Danish Ballhead' 
and favorably known and so highly esteemed throughout the northwest. 

"Soundhead" is a well "fixed" strain and is a sure header, producing medium sized, hard, solid ball-shaped heads. 
It produces a minimum of outer leaves and the plants can be set very closely together in the field. On sandy soils it 
will be found superior to tall stemmed sorts, and large growers should use it in preference to all other varieties. 

"Roundhead" is about two weeks earlier than "Ballhead" but belongs to the main crop type of cabbage. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c; »/ 4 lb. $1.50; lb. $5.00. 

MORSE'S GOLDEN CREAM— SWEET CORN 

ustomers, If we omitted to again give especial prominence to this won- 

- have not been fortunate enough to date to get sufficient 
. »dpply the demand. 

The ears are medium sized; the eob Is slender and the kernels are pointed or shoe-pegged and come In Irregular ar- 
rangement on the cob. When at eating stage they are cream colored but are decidedly yellow when cooked. The flavor la 
delicious. The stalks are rather dwarf and the ears are formed very early. 
Pkt. loo ; postpaid, lb. 35o. By express or freight, lb. 25c: 10 lbs. $2.00. 

1 



It would be neglecting the best Interests of ou 
derful Sweet Corn. 

It has demonstrated beyond all question its superior merit and 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



LAXTONIAN PEA 

A Grand New English Variety. Dwarf Vine, Mammoth Pods, 
Early in Ripening.- 

In spite of the many new Peas being offered every year by the 
leading seedsmen, there is a constant demand for something better. 
Some varieties are best for certain purposes but not for all. The 
canners want certain characteristics in their varieties, the market 
gardeners in theirs and the home gardener in his. 

In LAXTONIAN we have an ideal market and home-garden 
pea. It belongs to the dwarf class in habit of growth and to the 
very large podded types in character of product. 

The pods are very long, averaging easily 5 to 6 inches in length. 
The pods are well filled, and seldom show any blank places, as is 
the case with some large podded varieties. 

The color is a fine deep green in both plant and pods, and the 
peas are a fine deep color as well. 

In every respect the quality is good. 

LAXTONIAN is a prolific Pea. 

LAXTONIAN has a fine flavor. 

LAXTONIAN is the pea for you to plant. 

Our strain is extra fine and we want every pea grower to try it. 

Per packet, 10c; postpaid, lb. 50c. By express or freight, lb. 40c; 
10 lbs. $3.50; 100 lbs. $30.00. 



WATERMELON— ANGELINO 

Angelino is an exclusively home garden creation. It is too delicate to stand 
shipping and should not be used for market. 





The rind is very thin — frequently not 
more than a quarter of an inch of white 
showing — the bright red flesh coming 
almost to the surface. The heart is 
solid and extremely large, in fact is so 
large a proportion of the whole inter- 
ior as to seem nearly all heart. 

The whole melon is so brittle that it 
will split and crack with the least jar 
and should be brought directly from the 
garden to the table. 

High class stock is in short supply. 

Pkt. 10c; oz. 20c; Vi lb. 50c; lb. $1.50. 



C. C. MOIISK * CO.-SKRDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



FLORENCE FENNEL 

This is an old favorite, or rather a favorite in the ol *1 world among French and Italian gardeners. But it is 
little known here and we hope to introduce it among our customers. The growth is similar to common fennel, but only 
the bottom ii saton. When prepared for market it resembles Oelerj, having the rool and the upper part of the 
sterns rut off in the same manner. It is delicious when boiled or when sliced and cooked LH BOUpS. 

Florence Kennel is a really good vegetable and ought to be used more generally. Pkt. 10c; per oz. 25c. 

PERUVIAN ALFALFA 

A new long season vigorous variety, whieh will grow practically all the year round, where mild winters prevail; 
recovers quickly after each cutting an.l on this account, produces one to two additional hay crops each year, and has 
rut as many as II crops in a year, exceeding even the Arabian variety in this regard. It is grown to the best advan- 
tage Under irrigation an.l rather thick seeding is recommended. It is a variety that stands heat as well as cold and tor 
that reason should be a valuable addition to our forage plants, especially of Southern California. 

We have a small amount of selected seed to offer this year and are giving it this prominent position in our cata- 
logue in order better to bring it before the public. 

By the pound, 40c; 10 lbs. $3.00; write for price on larger quantity. 

LETTUCE— LOS ANGELES OR NEW YORK 

Probably no lettuce has ever created a more popular demand for salad than this variety. it is par-excellence in 
flavor, in quality and in general merit of any description. 

Whatever you do with your garden this year, be sure to sow a row of Los Angeles or New fork Lettuce. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; y 4 lb. 60c; lb. $2.00. 



Morse's Seeds 



There is more difference in seeds — good seeds and poor seeds — than in almost any other commodity 
used by mankind. And the planter who sows seed is more hopelessly dependent on his seed dealer 
than on any one else for the success of his garden. 

The planter takes his seed on faith. There is nothing about the looks of the seed that tells him 
what it will do. There are 24 varieties of onions listed in our catalogue, and the seed of all looks ex- 
actly the same. There is also listed a great variety of cabbage and cauliflower, kale and kohl 
rabi, mustard and turnips, and the seed of every one of these vegetables is identical. No living per- 
son can tell them apart, and the planter takes them from us and sows them with confidence that they 
are going to produce what we say they will. And he cannot possibly tell either whether or not the 
seed will grow. No one can tell until the seed is planted. Rut you know when it comes from Morse 
that it will grow and that it will produce what you expect it to. 

Xow, this confidence in us has not come without a lofig season of probation. Seed houses are nut 
born in a night and a successful seed business is the result of years of patient endeavor. 

C. C. MORSE & CO. have been in the seed business since 1877, just 35 years — and their growth, 
though phenomenal, has been slow. The development has been by way of the most natural proc- 
esses — from seed farmer to wholesale seed dealer and then to the consumer direct by retail store 
and catalogue mail business. The industry has been learned thoroughly and has been substantially 
sustained by abundant capital, thorough equipment and an intelligent staff of officers and assistants. 

It is not enough that we have the intent to please and satisfy our customers — we must have the 
system and plan and organization that almost eliminates mistakes and gives to you the Seed of the 
kind you want and of quality which is the best. 

C. C. MORSE & CO. never knowingly send out seeds which will not grow or that are not in 
every way superior. There are many contingencies to meet in getting a crop, and frequently the 
best seed of the strongest vitality will not come up on account of some unknown or unfavorable 
climatic condition. But we always stand ready to replace such seed if the claim is reasonable. We 
want Morse's Seeds to give every satisfaction and will do anything we ought to do to please our 
customers. Letters in praise of Morse's Seeds are received each year in great numbers. We are glad 
to get these and to know that our seeds have given satisfaction to others. 

How seeds are grown and the reasons why some seeds are good and some inferior, would require 
a long chapter and we cannot spare the room here and tell about it. But suffice it now to say that there 
is a wide difference between good and poor seeds and C. C. MORSE & CO. grow and sell seeds only 
of the very best, and this fact is so acknowledged and recognized all over the world. 




PANORAMIC VIEW OF C. C. 

Near San Juan, San Benito County, Looking- West Prom the 
Grounds, Celery Beds, Etc., and Fields 




" 



A View on Our Seed Ranch Near San Juan. Long Scarlet Radish, Ripe and Being 1 Harvested. 




%&&£ &#££ [^^irt^WWJHS 




of Various Seed Crops In the Distance. 



A Partial View of One of Our Seed Ranches, Showing 1 Various Strips of Sweet Peas, Onions and Lettuce, All In Flower 
In the Month of June. Morse's Seed Farms are Over 2,500 Acres in Extent of the Best Land in California, Devoted 
Exclusively to Raising- Morse's Oarden and Flower Seeds, the Beat for Westers Planters. 

5 




We annually gro 



i Our Seed Ranch. Cutting 1 Onion Heads in August. 
seed and ship the product all over the world. Onion seed, true and fresh, 
be had direct from our farms. 




The "Trial Grounds'* on Our New Seed Farm Near San Juan. Here Samples are Grown of Practically Everything 1 
We List, as Well as Samples of Novelties and Strains Purchased From Other Seedsmen. We Test Our Seeds 
in the Most Thoroug-h Manner, and Give You the Benefit of Our Experience. Morse & Go. Keep Only Those 
Sorts Which Ar# the Bast and These They Offer Yon In the Following- Pages. 

i 



■ 1 ^-'^-^-*Y^-*"^** -*—"•" <lwifiMllm'<fnr-*"- J -1-riTnrarf«IMattfiif 




A 



The proper distances to set rows of the different plants in gardens will be given with each sort. Do not overcrowd but leave space for 
good development. Sow small seeds of vegetables not over y 3 inch de9p and keep soil regularly moist by watering. The proper depth 

given in the table on page 40. Remember that no Heed can come up through a crust 
caused, for instance, by a north wind. Replanting in such a case will probably be necessary. 
Plants which require heat will not start in damp, cold ground; wait till conditions are better 
or choose another situation. Firm the soil after planting. Watch for cutworms and slugs. 
Keep the ground cultivated and crops growing fast; this means tender vegetables. 

Well known standard varieties whieb. have been thoroughly 
tried and can be depended on are indicated by larger type. 




ARTICHOKES 



young 



Artichokes are cultivated for the edible bud, which resemble 
thistle. The plants want a very rich Boil and plenty of mois 
California the seed should be planted in boxes in January and the 
transplanted in March or April. While plants usually 
sis years, it iB advisable to start new ones occasionally. They do 
wever, come wholly true from seed, and it is necessary to discard 
good many plants, 



the 



at 2 to 3 
3- to 5- 



Artichokes — Large Green Globe 



feet apart 
foot rows. 

LABGE GKEEN 
GLOBE. The 

most popular variety. Buds large, globular, deep green. Pkt. 10c; oz. 35c; 

1 \ lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50. Strong- roots of this variety, packed, 15c each; $1.25 

per doz. Postage 5c each; best sent by express. 

JERUSALEM, OB TUBEROUS-ROOTED ARTICHOKE. Entirely distinct, 
and grown exclusively for their large potato-like roots, which are valu- 
able for feeding hogs, the yield often exceeding two tons per acre. They 
need not be dug, but the hogs can be turned into the field to root them 
up; one acre will keep twenty head in good condition until Spring. The 
tubers are also edible, and are delicious when well cooked. Can supply 
January to March only. Per lb. 15c; postpaid, 25c per lb. ; 10 lbs. by 
express $1.00; 100 lbs. at market rates. 

ASPARAGUS SEED AND ROOTS 

It requires three or four years from the time of planting asparagus seed to the time 
that the plant produces shoots suitable for eating. To raise plants from seed about 
one pound per acre is required, or one ounce for about 800 plants. Sow early in the 
Spring in drills 12 to 14 inches apart and thin to about 3 inches in the row: Allow 
the plants to grow two full seasons and then transplant to permanent beds. It requires 
about 3000 plants to set an acre. When set out for crop, in the field or in beds, 
they require plenty of room, since the plants spread from the root, and therefore 
grow larger each year. In the field the rows should be from six to ten feet apart. 
A loose, porous soil is necessary for good asparagus, and the flavor of the young 
shoots depends greatly upon the character of the soil. The light, fibrous soils of the 
Sacramento River Islands seem especially adapted for perfect asparagus. 

In the house garden, the soil, if naturally heavy and stiff, must be made porous 
and light by spading in the proper amount of manure and sand. During the Spring 
all the shoots must be cut as fast as they reach the surface. Later in the season 
all the shoots should be allowed to run to seed, and in the Autumn all the tops should 
be cut off and burned and the land thoroughly cleaned up, and a good dressing of 
manure and wood ashes and sand should be spaded in to the beds. 
BARB'S MAMMOTH. A favorite with market gardeners. Shoots very large, 
tender, quick growing, and thick to the top. Pkt. 5c; os. 10c; Y\ lb. 25c; 
lb. «5c. 
COLUMBIA MAMMOTH WHITS. A large, thick variety; very white even 
above ground. Pkt, 5c; ox. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 86c. 

CONOVER'S COLOSSAL or ut™%%:&l e yV £L p zi: 

Di"\I TI rWM 1QI AWri It: Is tne popular variety formerly used on 
DVJKJLiUm lOLtAlW Bouldin Island and other river points in Cal- 
ifornia, where it is canned in immense quantities. It makes large, thick, 
white shoots of delicious flavor, and we recommend It as the best variety 
for all purposes. Pkt. 6c; oi. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 86c 
DAT MCTTn This is the mo3t popular variety grown for general gar- 
* ^V*-""-* 1 lv den purposes, especially for shipping. Shoots are light 
green and tinted slightly with pink (see illustration). Pkt. 6o; oz. 10c; 
V A lb. 85c; lb. 85o. 

ASPARAGUS ROOTS 

100, 1)7 Uprai; (7X10 p«r 1000. 




C. C. MORSK & CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



BEANS 



DWARF OR BUSH— GREEN PODDED 



Xa this elm are the dwarf beans having (preen pods. The n«w eat and best varieties are now absolutely stringless. 

Brans require a light friable soil, with plenty of moisture, and they »re very sensitive to frost. In California they should not be sown 
earlier than April loth. In the garden the soil should be made mellow and rich, and kept so. and all pole varieties should be provided 
with poles or a trellis oo which to climb. For a garden crop plant string besna in succession every four weeks throughout the season. 
Sow in rows 18 Lathe* to M inches apart and cover from one 10 two Inches deep t"it sol more. Keep the pods picked and the vines well 
nat-rrd and the beans will continue bearing much longer than if the vines arc allowed to become dry. Hoe the rows occasionally. 



For farm crop plant about 25 pounds pole bean 
icrt*. in row* 36 inches apart; plant bush beans aho 
pounds per acre in rows 24 inches apart. Heavy 
or adobe soils are not best for beans. For the h 
den there should be a succession of five or six varie 
to provide the table with early, medium and late bei 
T*e one pound of seed for 100 feet of row. 

Express and freight charges are not prepaid. Write 
for special quotations if large quantities are ' 

MORSE'S SELECTED 
STRINGLESS GREEN POD 

We have made a selection of this 
favorite bean which Is absolutely 
stringless. Nor have any of its good 
qualities suffered. The pods are very 
tender and of the best quality — thick 
and meaty and long. The plant bears 
well and is a variety which will more 
than give satisfaction. Seed brown. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, poitpaid; by ex- 
press or freight, lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $1.50. 

CANADIAN WONDEE. A hardy and 
thrifty variety bearing long green 
pods of fair quality. 
rich mahogany red and very attrac- 
tive. Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; or 
lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.35; 100 lbs. $10.00; 
by express or freight, charges to be 
paid by purchaser. 

Harly Long Yellow Six Weeks. A long 
podded green variety. Plants strong 
and vigorous and leaves large; of fair 
quality. Seed long, kidney-shaped, 
light-yellow with darker marks about 
the eyes. Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c. postpaid; 
by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lhs. 
$1.25. 

Extra Early Refugee. A very early, 
green-podded variety, with medium- 
sized, green, fleshy pods; seed drab, 
freely spotted with dark purple. The 
vines are smaller : 
right growth, and leaves a little 
larger than the Late Refugee. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or. 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25. 

EXTRA EARLY RED VAL- 

FNTINF A Popular 

Ull 1 ll^C vino with dark-green 
leaves. Pods of medium length; 
fleshy, round, and saddle-backed, with 
only slight strings. Seed pink, 
marbled with red. Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, 
postpaid; by express or freight, 
15c; 10 lbs. $1.25. 

Early Mohawk. A hardy and early 
with large, flat, dark- 
green pods with tapering 
points; seed long, kidney- 
shaped; drab, purple, and 
brown. Pit. 10c; lb. 25c, 
postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. 
$1.10. 

Dwarf Horticultural. A very 
vigorous variety with 
large leaves, used as 
a shell bean, green or dried. Pod 
are of medium length, slightl: 
curved, and when nearl 
striped and splashed wl 
on yellowish-brown; seed pale pink, 
splashed with bright red. Pkt. 10c; 
lb. 30c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.50. 

Black Valentine. A long-podded green vi 
shipping. Seed black. This variety_ Is 



2,600,000 sacks 



lly from May LOth 




In this state the bean crop is so far lim- 
ited only by the amount that can be profit- 
ably sold — the best bean districts are in San 
Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura 
"fornia bean crop in 1910 



and 

ial pla 



25th. 



being increased 
nade 



ENGLISH OB BROAD WINDSOR This 
is not a string bean of any sort, but 
ell-known popular variety 
with many farmers. Familiarly 
known as the Horse Bean. Pkt. 10c; 
lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15o; 10 lbs. 70c; 100 lbs- 
$6.00. 

French String Bean. A hardy green-pod- 
ded variety, with black seed. Is 
much esteemed by the Italian mar- 
ket-gardeners for a very productive 
string bean and a good shipper. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 25c, uostpald; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. 90c; 100 lbs. 
$8.50. 

Bound Yellow Six Weeks. A large, vig- 
productive bean, with long, 
straight, flat, light-green pods; seed 
light-yellow, with marks darker 
about the eyes. Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, 
postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 
15c; 10 lbs. $1.10. 

MORSE'S SELECTED 
REFUGEE, OR 1,000 TO 1 



any dwarf bean so prolific 
Selection of Refugee we 
heard of it. As many 
150 pods are found on one vine. 
se pods are long and green, be- 
ing lighter in color as they ma- 
e. Not an extra early bean but 
hardy one and an extra heavy 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, poitpaid; 
by freight or expraas, lb. 15c; 10 lba. 



MORSE SEEDS GIVE 
RESULTS 

CHRISTIK & JOHNSON 
30 Peking Road 

Shanghai, 17/11/11. 
Morse & Co., 



pleased to hear 



You will 1 
that I gained 

the Shanghai Horticultural Show 

to-day (the Chrysanthemum 

Show) for Lettuces. The seed 

ght from you and they are 

ne of the finest ever 

Shanghai — Big Bos- 

and Hanson. 

Yours faithfully, 

B. C. WINORORL. 



lb. 30c, postpaid. 
9 



The 


express 


rate 


is no more 




8 cents 




pound any- 




East, and is 


nuch cheaper 


to ne 


r point 


Remember wa 


prepay 


all charges 






i Beans. 




Corn. Ouion 


Sets a 


id Field 


Oral 




Seeds. 









C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BEANS 



DWARF OR BUSH— WAX PODDED 

In this class are the dwarf beans, having 1 creamy white, yellow and golden yellow pods. Most of the varieties we list as 
stringless. The choice of wax or green podded varieties Is pnrely a matter of choice. Both classes are quite hardy and 

very easy to grow. 



MICHIGAN WHITE WAX. 

A hardy white seeded 
wax bean. It produces 
long, straight, golden- 
yellow pods, which are 
entirely stringless at 
all times. The plant 
is very erect and stands 
well in wet weather. 
Its Quality is superior 
to almost any other 
wax bean, and it bears 
well, producing big 
crops. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
35c, postpaid. By ex- 
press or freight, lb. 
25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; 100 
lbs. $15.00. 

CHALLENGE BLACK 

WAX. One of the 
standard wax beans. 
Of excellent quality 
and very prolific. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 30c, postpaid. 
By express or freight, 
lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 
100 lbs. $15.00. 

DETBOIT WAX. One of the 
best of the better 
known and popular 
wax varieties. It is 
quite rust-proof and 
prolific and the quality 
of the stringless gold- 
en-yellow be'ans is ex- 
cellent. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
30c, postpaid. By ex- 
press or freight, lb. 
20c; 10. lbs. $1.75. 

Davis White Wax. The 
most hardy and pro- 
ductive wax-podded va- 
riety. The pods are 
very long and yellow; 
and while not string- 
less, it is a remark- 
ably . good bean for 
shipping; seed white 
and on this account is 
desirable for a shelled 
bean in winter. Pkt. 
10c; per lb. 30c, post- 
paid; by express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. 
$1.75; 100 lbs. $15.00. 

MORSE'S GOLDEN 

WAY ° ne of the 
VY *WV best beans 
in cultivation. Pods are 
long, nearly straight, 
broad, and flat, and 
golden yellow ; seed 
white more or less cov- 
ered with two shades 
of purplish red. All 
gardens should have 
some bush beans in 
them. None will be 
found better in all 
ways than Our Selec- 
tion of Golden Wax. 
Pkt. 10c; per lb. 30c, 
postpaid; by express 
or freight, lb. 20c; 10 
lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. 
$15.00. 




Morse's Golden Wax Bush Beans 



PROLIFIC BLACK WAX 



improvement on 
_ old Black Wax or 
Butter Bean. Very vigorous and prolific; pods fairly 
long, golden-yellow, very brittle, and stringless; seed 
black. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, 1 lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. $15.00. 
WAEDWEIL'S KIDNEY WAX. A strong growing bush, 
fifteen inches in height. A little later than the Golden 
Wax; pods long, broad, golden-yellow, brittle and en- 



tirely stringless. Market gardeners find this bean one 
of the most profitable. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c; postpaid; by 
express or freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. $15.00. 

rust-proof 
and rather hard- 
ier than Golden Wax, and the 
pods are broader and flatter; 
seed white, somewhat spotted with purplish red. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 20c; 
10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. $15.00. 



GOLDEN WAX 



C C MORSE * CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



POLE OR RUNNING BEANS 



GREEN AND WAX PODDED 



Th* 









trellis to climb on, if planted in the 

■tad 'top in the open field they need 

usually very prolific, and bear 



tlltiough when 

longer pod» and a great many more of tliem tbl 

For home garden us.- >»-t tin- pole* well in first, scrape ttie soil away to 
a depth of two inrhes and irrigate well. Then plant five tO nine DORM 
to each hill rovering to a depth of one inch. Save only the best three 
or four plants, role Beans will continue hearing long after the earlier 
bush nrietiea have ceased. Hilts should be 3 to 4 feet apart each way. 
Burger's Pole. A new p.-le variety of great merit. Bears long, 
brittle, stringless pods of excellent flavor. It rivals all oth- 
er pole beans and is destined t-> become the most popular 
of all. Fkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.50; 100 lbs. $13.00. 



Cot Short, or Corn Hill. A popuh 
Corn, Since the vines climb th 
Of poles, PodS short ami g 



ity for planting among 

stalks without the use 

aves deep green ; seed 

Wish brown. Pit. 10c; lb. 25c, 

freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.35; 100 

Horticultural or Speckled Cranberry. An old favorite. Pods 
short, pale green, becoming splashed with brownish red. 
Seed blush, pink, spotted with red. Valuable either green 
or dr v shelled. Fkt. 10c ; lb. 25c postpaid ; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.35; 100 lbs. $12.00. 

Indian Chief or Tall Black Wax. A black-seeded wax variety 
with thick, golden-yellow pods. Very hardy and prolific, and 
the most popular of the pole wax beans. Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, 
postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 
lbs. $11.00 



HOMESTEAD 



most popular 
and should be 
jre beans are 

planted. It grows luxuriantly and bears for a long period. 
Pods are very long, very fleshy, and deeply creased or sad- 
dle-backed, green in color, and stringless. Kentucky Won- 
der is a bean that should be in every garden; for it will 
give satisfaction to all. Seed light brown. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
25c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1,25; 
100 lbs. $10.00. 

Kentucky Wonder Wax. An excellent variety, and one of the 
very best pole beans. The pods are long, very thick, meaty, 
deeply saddle-backed, entirely stringless, and bright yellow 
in color. The vine is thrifty and very prolific. Seed deep 
brown. Fkt. 10c; lb. 30c postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 
20c; 10 lbs. $1.50. 

Lazy Wife. A green-podded variety bearing good, long pods in 
clusters; stringless and of peculiarly fine flavor; seed rather 
large, thick and white. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; by ex- 
press or freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.50; 100 lbs. $14.00. 

Scarlet Runner. The well-known and old-fashioned climber, hav- 
ing bright scarlet, pea-like flowers. It not only holds its 
place as a flower, but the pods when young are of fine qual- 
ity for cooking. Seed large, bright scarlet, heavily blotched 
with purple. Fkt. 10c; lb. 35c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 25c. 

White Creaseback. An early, green-podded variety. Pods five 
to six inches In length, deeply creased or saddle-backed, and 
borne in clusters. Are very fleshy and stringless; seed 
white and can be used as a shelled bean for winter use. 
Can often he grown without poles. Fkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; 
by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 lbs. $11.00. 

imbing variety with long, flat, 
creamy white as they mature; 
seed broad, flat and clear white. Fkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; 
by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.20; 100 lbs. $10.00. 



CALIFORNIA VEGETABLES 

(Mailed postpaid for $2.00) 
JUST PUBLISHED 

For two years this work on gardening and vegetable 
growing in California has been awaited by many planters. 
The book is standard and authentic for California condi- 
tions and is most valuable. By Prof. B. J. WlckBOn, Dean 
in the College of Agriculture of the University of Cali- 
fornia. 



Danish Consulate, Yokohama, Japan. 
I must again tell you that the flower and vegetable seeds 
you sent to me early this spring ha 
factory, and I have had pleasure in 
several friends. 




Kentucky Wonder Bean — Brittle 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



LIMA BEANS 



Lima beans are delicious when used green shelled, and can be grown for this purpose in any climate. The dry ripened bean is 
also a staple article of food for winter use, but in California these beans ripen only from San Luis Obispo County and south to Pasadena. 
The best territory for seed beans we believe to be Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, wliere we grow our stock. Sow bush sorts in 24- 
inch rows and pole varieties in hills 4 ft. each way. Sow late after ground is well warmed in Spring. 



BUSH VARIETIES 



duces magnifi- 
cent crops of pods, which measure from five to six 
inches long by one and one-quarter inches wide. As 
compared with the original Burpee Bush Lima, botli 
pods and beans are very much larger, while the beans, 
either green or dry, are nearly twice as thick. The beans 
have the same luscious flavor as the best flavored 
Ltmas, and are ready to use six to eight days earlier. It 
will outyield the Burpee Bush Lima by fully one-third, 
this greater yield being due to the increased size of 
both pod and beans. The dried beans are very hand- 
some and generally show a greenish-white coloring. 
Pit. 10c; lb. 35c, postpaid; by express or freight, 1 lb. 
25c; 10 lbs. $2.00. 

BUEPEE'S BUSH. The best late dwarf variety. Plant 
eighteen to twenty-four inches high; very prolific. Pods 
large, and the beans are also large and heavily ribbed. 
Will bear until stopped by frost. Pit. 10c; lb. 35c, post- 
paid; by express or freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 
lbs. $15.00. 

Dreer's Bush or Knmerle. A very prolific variety, a little 
later than Burpee's and having short, thick pods, closely 
filled with short, almost round, seed. The plant does 
not grow upright, but spreads or trails over the ground 
about three feet in diameter. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, post- 
paid; by express or freight, lb. 20c; 10 lb. $1.60; 100 
lbs. $15.00. 

This bean is of the type of 
Dreer's Bush Lima, which 
it most nearly resembles. Its height is from twenty- 
two to twenty-four inches and it bears its beans in 
clusters of two to five, well out from the plant on long 
spikes. There are from three to five beans in each pod, 
with an average of four. The beans are round and 
thick, like those of Dreer's Bush, and have the same 
mild, delicious flavor. This delicious bean is far ahead 
of anything which anybody has known in Lima Beans 
up to the present time. Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, postpaid; by 
express or freight, 1 lb. 25c; 10 lbs, $2.00. 
Henderson's Bush. The earliest variety we have, being fully 
two weeks earlier than any other variety. Plant about 
sixteen inches high and very prolific. Beans are small. 
Especially recommended for planting in the North and 
where the season is short. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; 
by express or freight, 1 lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.60; 100 lbs. 
$15.00. 



FORDHOOK BUSH 




POLE VARIETIES 



Challenger, o r Drear's 
Pole. A splendid pole 
variety, quite early, very 
prolific, and of very fine 
quality. The pods are 
borne in clusters, and the 
beans are short and 
thick, almost round, and 
crowded so closely in the 
pod that the ends are 
flattened. A very popular 
variety with market gar- 
deners. Pitt. 10c; lb. 30c, 
postpaid; by. express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. 
$1.60; 100 lbs. $15.00. 

EARLY LEVIATHAN. One 
of the newer varieties 
and the very best pole 
variety in cultivation. 
Vine very tall and strong; 
pods long and borne in 
clusters; beans large and 
white. Is early, strong- 
growing and prolific. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 30c, postpaid; by 
express or freight, lb. 
20c; 10 lbs. $1.60; 100 lbs. 
$15.00. 

KING OF THE 

GARDEN oTst'Vnd 
most popular main crop 
varieties. It is medium 
early and has very long 
pods 5% to 6% inches 
long, which are well 
filled with 4 or 5 good- 
sized beans. The pods 
are very straight and 
handsome, and the fine, 
hardy vines bear abund- 
antly. Pit. 10c; lb. 30c, 
postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. 
$1.60; 100 lbs. $15.00. 

Sieberts Early. A standard 
early variety, with good- 
sized pods and large 
beans. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, 
postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. 
$1.60; 100 lbs. $35.00. 



SUGAR BEETS 



Giant Half-Sugar, Green Top, for feeding Stock. A beet 
which is superior to mangels for stock-feeding pur- 
poses, as it is more nutritious having a large amount 
of sugar. It is oval in shape and grows partly out of 
ground. Is of large size and yields enormous crops. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 55c, postpaid; by freight or express, lb. 
45c; 10 lbs. $4.00. 

Klein Wanzeleben Sugar. The most popular variety for 
sugar factories. The sugar content depends on intelli- 
gent care and development on the part of the seed grow- 
er. It is wedge-shaped, wide at the top and tapering 
gradually to a long tail. This variety is most planted 
by sugar factories as it has a high sugar content; makes 
good food for cattle. Pkt. 10c; lb. 60o, postpaid; by 
freight or express, lb. 50c; 10 lbs. $4.50. 



Lane's Improved Imperial Sugar. Large thick, tapering va- 
riety. Yields almost as much, as mangels. Is sweet 
and rich, and very desirable for stock. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
60c, postpaid; by freight or express, lb. 50c; 10 lbs. 
$4.50. 

Vilmorin's Improved Sugar. A little smaller than Klein 
Wanzeleben but even richer in sugar and a valuable 
variety for sugar factories. Grows entirely under 
ground and yields good crops, under ordinary conditions. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 60c, postpaid; by freight or express, lb. 
50c; 10 lbs. $4.50. 

A very hardy variety, producing 
large crops with little care. The root is large and very 
rich in sugar and while not sufficiently so for sugar, 
purposes, it makes a remarkably fine, rich food for 
stock. Pkt. 10c; lb. 60c, postpaid; by freight or express, 
lb. 50c; 10 lbs. $4.00. 



C. C. MOBSB A: CO. SEEDS SAM FRANCISCO, CAUF, 



BEETS — FOR TABLE AND FARM 



Beets are divided Into U 

Tor iftble ui« the seed can 

ibsped roots of good color. The m 

12 to IS inchee apart and thin by 



TABLE, MANGELS, or STOCK-FEEDING, and SUGAR. 
>wn in California any nine sfter January 1st, and a lighl Randy loom is preferable for good 
is! be noli and molsl lo s;«-t :i quick growth, whirli is essential i<> crisp, lender flesh. Sow in rows 



TABLE VARIETIES 
CROSBY'S EGYPTIAN 

More globe-shaped than Extra Early 

■ in. atiii the best known and 
most ■ is very early 

and of line 'iiiality. Bright red with 
clear vermllon flesh. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
30c; ', lb. 60c; lb. S3 00. 

DETROIT DARK RED 

AD extra tin.* beet, and the one we 
recommend for all garden purposes. 
Globe-shaped; bright, but rich red 
flesh. Tops small and green. Pit. 
5c; os. 20c; V« lb. 60c; lb. $3.00. 

Early Eclipse. A fine, early table beet, 
top-shaped or tapering. globe- 
shaped. Flesh deep crimson, zoned 
with pink. Crisp and sweet. Pkt. 
5c; ox. 15c; % lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 

Extra Early Blood Turnip. A good va- 
riety for Summer and Autumn use. 
Is turnip-Shaped with bright red 
flesh, showing zones. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
15c; H lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 

Half Long Blood. A half-long variety, 
about eight inches long and taper- 
ing abruptly. Very rich, deep red 
flesh of fine quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
15c; y 4 lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 

Extra Early Egyptian. A turnip-shaped 
variety with dark-red flesh showing 
zones of a lighter shade. Dark 
leaves ; a good table beet and very 
earl v. Pit. 5c; oz. 20c; y A lb. 60c; 
lb. $2.00. 

LONG SMOOTH DABK BLOOD. A 
very desirable variety for light soils, 
where roots are easy to dig. Skin 
verv dark brownish 7 red. Flesh deep 
blood-red. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 
45c; lb. $1.50. 

MORSE'S IMPROVED 
BLOOD TURNIP s \ ™„- 

beet with deep red Mesh. Tops green. 
A fine selected strain. The quality of 
Morse's Strain is unusually good; the 



recommend this as most excellent 
sort for either home garden or mar- 
ket planting. The beets are regu- 
ular and of finest appearance. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 25c; y A lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 




Morse's Improved B lood Turnip Beet 



MANGEL WURZEL, OR STOCK BEETS 



In the 



Champion Tallow Globe. A large round, orange-yellow va- 
riety. Good for shallow soils. Pkt. 10c; lb. 55c, post- 
paid; by freight or express, lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $4.00. 

Giant Tellow Intermediate or Gate Post. A yellow-skinned 
variety with white flesh, zoned with yellow. Large and 
ovoid shape. Pkt. 10c; lb. 50c, postpaid; by freight 
or express, lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $4.00. 

Very large 



If large lots of seed are wanted, write us for special prices. 

MAMMOTH LONG RED ? h h e e „*„««,. &&» 

heaviest cropper. Skin is red; flesh white, zoned with red. 
This variety produces a larger amount of good, feed 
than any other beet, and is recommended as superior 
to all others. Pkt. 10c; lb. 55c, postpaid; by freight 
or express, lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $4.00. 



GOLDEN TANKARD YELLOW- 



ii i 



better adapted for heavy soils, because it Is much more 
easily harvested than Mammoth Long Red. The yield 
la enormous. Pkt. lOo; lb. 65o, postpaid: by freight or 
express, lb. 45o; 10 lbs. $4.00, 



Red Globe. A large globe-shaped variety with red skin. 
Flesh white, zoned with pink. Pkt. 10c; lb. 50c, post- 
paid; by freight or express, lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $4.00. 

Yellow Leviathan. A large yellow olive-shaped variety, 
with clear, white, brittle flesh. The root grows partly 
out of the ground, rendering it easv to dig. Pkt. 10c; 
lb. 55o, postpaid; by freight or express, lb. 45c; 10 lbs. 



C. C. MORSE & CO —SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




Brussels Sprouts 



SWISS CHARD or 
SEA KALE BEET 

Sometimes called Spinach Beet. Used 
for greens for chickens by cutting the 
stem and leaf, which are also very 
ornamental. It resembles an orna- 
mental beet top. but has no edible 
root. May be used as a salad. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

BROCCOLI 





Should 


be treated the e 




as cauli 


f 






resembles. 


In 


fact, it i£ 




■;ir|lr;ill 




arse Summer < 


auliflower 




ore di\ 


ided in 


the head, 


grows largei 


a 


nd talle 


r, and 


is hardier 


and 


easier to 




grow. 

Plant and cultivate the same 
EAKLT LARGE WHITE. The best variety. Heads 

white and large. Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c; V, lb. $1.25; 

lb. $4.00. 
Purple Cape. Good, large heads, which are tinged 

with purple. FH. 5c; oi. 35c; Yt lb. $1.00; lb. 

$3.50. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS 

The plants are very hardy and grow from two to three 
feet high, bearing a large mass of leaves at the top. The 
sides of the main stem are covered with three or four doz- 
en small cabbage heads, which are broken off and cooked the same as cabbage. Sow very early. 
IMPROVED HALF DWABF. The standard, variety. Grows two or three feet high, and the 
covered with small, firm, round sprouts. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y* lb. 45c; lb. 



$1.50. 



CABBAGE 



difficult to giv 
art of the coun 
r — in Septembc 



have good cabbage 



definite cultural directions for cabbage, since it is 
ry, and seed can be planted almost any time of the year. There are three good seasons for sowi 
• for late Winter and early Spring cabbages, in March for Summer and Fall cabbages, and in June 
Winter cabbages. The seed sprouts quickly, and "is likely to come up very thick in the seed bed. It should be thinned 
plants become spindling, and then do not head well. Transplanted to the field, they should be put 15 to 18 inches apart, i 
30 inches apart. To prevent the heads splitting open in the field before they are ready to be harvested, the plants should be loos> 
little at the root. Cabbages require considerable 



them to rot very readily. 





Danish Ball Head FYTRA FARI Y VARIFTIF^ Perfection Drumhead Savoy 

COPENHAGEN MARKET. A grand new early cabbage. See Novelties page 1. Pkt. 10c; oz. G5c: % lb. $1.75. 
F API V IFPQFV WAITFFIFI T\ ° ne of tne Dest and rn°st popular early varieties. Forms round, pointed 

H../-YIYL. I JILI\OILI VV/\rvLriLL.Lf heads of good size. Is very hardy and on account of its thick outside 

leaves is able to resist cold and other unfavorable conditions to a great extent. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c; *4 lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50. i 
FARI Y WINNIP^TAHT A decidedly pointed head of good size and fine quality — the most sharply pointed 
A^r*ixjj *■ ▼YllllllViijl A1S1 f a n cabbages. One of the hardiest varieties, resists cold, wet, and insect pesta 

to a degree which makes it very desirable; we recommend it as one of the best early varieties. Pkt. 5c: oz. 35c; V* lb. ■ 

$1.00; lb. $3.50. 
Early Spring. A very early flat-headed variety. Medium sized and good for summer use. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c; Va lb. $1.00; 

lb. $3.50. 

Larg« Early Wakefield (Charleston). Is very similar to Early Jersey Wakefield, but nearly a third larger and a little 
later. Pkt. 6c; oi. 30c; y A lb. 90c; lb. 93.60. 

14 



C. C. HORSE & CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

























1 ^p 




A 












^j^ 




fea 












. ^giPr^r^^^J 


■parr 1 


H^H[ 








**pj 




r;.^'^fi 


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■%-|- s T?^'?atfWlStftilf r^^ 




£j| ; "~"*y™ 


















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Morse's Selected Strain — EAELY DWABF PIAT DUTCH CABBAGE. 



SECOND EARLY VARIETIES 

ALLHEAD EARIT. Probably the earliest of the large, flat- 
headed varieties. Is good for Summer, Autumn, and 
Winter crop. Desirable for all sorts of planting. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 30c; H lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 

DANISH BOUND HEAD. Splendid novelty. See page 1. 

EARLY DRUMHEAD. Second early; round, flat heads. Pkt. 
Sc; oz. 30c; Vi lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 

Early Dwarf Plat Dutch. A good flat-headed variety, with 
short stem and hard, firm head. Forms heads early; 
is valuable for Summer. Pkt. Sc; oi. 30c; Vi lb. 90c; lb. 
$3.00. 

Pottler's Brunswick. One of the most popular of the flat- 
headed tvpes, especially with the home gardener. Best 
for fall and winter. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; Vi lb- 90c; 
lb. $3.00. 

Henderson's Early Summer. A desirable medium sized, 
earlv, fiat-headed variety. A good keeper, and does 
well in summer and autumn. Pkt. Sc; oz. 20c; Vi lb. 
60c; lb. $2.00. 

Henderson's Succession. Is about ten days later than Early 
Summer. Is a dwarf, flat head, light green, and very 
solid. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c; Vi lb. fl.00; lb. $3.50. 

MORSE'S SELECTED EARLY FLAT 

early hard-heading cabbage of bright 



ha 



selected for its sure-heading qualities and for its earli- 
ness. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c; Vi lb. 91.50; lb. $5.00. 
RED CABBAGE 

Mammoth Bock Bed. Best hard-headed, red variety. Large 
heads, globular, and very deep red on top. Outer leaves 
greenish. Especially used for pickling. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c; 
Vi lb. *1.00; lb. 93.50. 

CABBAGE-SAVOY 

Perfection Drumhead Savoy. A variety that is much prized 
in Europe and also by those who are familiar with it in 
this country. It is very sweet and crisp, and always 
tender. Heads medium sized and fairly compact. Pkt. 
6c; oi. 30c; Vi lb. 90o; lb. $3.00. 



WINTER VARIETIES 

Autumn King 1 , or Worldbeater. A beautiful winter variety 
of vigorous growth and extra large. Solid heads of 
bluish green. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; Vi lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 

Burpee's Surehead. One of the best varieties. Large, round, 
slightlv flattened head; hard and firm. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; 
Vi lb. 60c; lb. $2.00. 

DANISH BALL HEAD, OR THE HOL- 

A very late variety, forming globular 
heads ; very hard and solid. Keeps 

well and is a good shipper. The color is bluish-green. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c; Vi lb. $1.20; lb. $4.50. 
Premium Plat Dutch. A well-known, large, late variety. 

Flattish round heads, verv solid and firm; has rather 

tall, stout stem. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; Vi lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 
Stone-Mason Marblehead. Medium-sized, late, flat-headed 

variety, forming a good, solid head. The leaves are 

bright green, with conspicuous veins. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; 

Vi lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 



LANDER 



w, 



A pill 



carry Ca 



Plant, 



See list oh page 39. 



COLLARDS 



iring a large mass of leaves on the top of a stout stalk, 
i of cabbage, and the flavor is the same. It bears leaves 
all through the wniter, and is used especially in the South for cab- 
base greens. Young plants may be started in boxes in early spring, 
and the young plants transplanted, allowing plenty of room for 
each plant. Set 14x18 inches. 

TRUE GEORGIA. Grows from four to five feet high, and 
forms a verv large, loose head. Leaves are tinged with 
purple. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

CORN SALAD OR FETTICUS 

A salad plant used as a substitute for lettuce in salads, or may b* 

cooked like spinach for greens. It does well in winter and spring. 

On rich soil the leaves grow quickly and are exceedingly tender. 

Large Leaved. Verv tender leaves, which grow out rapidly 

after being cut. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Morsel CARROTS 

FOR TABLE AND STOCK 

Good, sandy loam is best adapted for carrots of all varieties. The shorter varie- 
lies, however, can be sown on heavier lands, with good results. For garden, sow 
the early and short varieties at any time after January 1st. For general crop bow 
in the open field about April 1st, using two or three pounds per acre for rows six- 
teen to eighteen inches apart. While you get a good uniform root by thinning the 
young plants, it is not necessary to do so to get a crop of good, average carrots. 
Chantenay, or Modal. A fine, even shaped carrot of a bright orange-scarlet 
color; very popular variety for general purposes, five to six inches 
long; very stump-rooted, about three inches thick at shoulder; tapering 




well 



Carrot — Duvtr'i Half Lonf 



slightly. 
variety i 
called the 

Model Carrot 
for its shape 



planting and 
for every 
home garden. 
Of fine tender 
texture, with- 
out core, and 
excellent flav- 
or. Fkt. 5c; 
os. 15c; y A lb. 
40c; lb. «1.25. 
French Forcing-. 
This is the 
small round 
French carrot 




Carrot — Oxheart (Much reduced) 



uch prized for its sweet flavor and tenderness, it is the 
smallest and earliest carrot there is. A very popular variety 
for forcing and home gardens, because it ripens early and is 
of fine flavor. The root is globe-shaped, with distinct 
tap root. Color bright orange-scarlet. Fkt. 5c; oz. 20c; y+ lb. 
60c; lb. $1.75. 

DANVER S HALF LONG bes^variety "for genera! 
purposes and the most largely used not only for stock rais- 
ing, but for table use as well. The perfect type is about eight 
inches long and about two and a half inches wide at the 
shoulder, tapering to a sort of half-point at the bottom. 
Color is a bright orange-scarlet. It is a very heavy crop- 
per. As grown from Moras'! Seed is an even ripening sort 
with roots of a uniform size. When just undersized this is 
an especially sweet flavored sort on which account it is so 
largely grown. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H Id. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Half -Long Scarlet Stump Booted. A variety about as long as 
Danver's but not so thick. It is of uniform thickness from 
shoulder to root, and very stump-rooted. Flct. 5c; oz. 
10c; H lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

IMPBOVED SHORT WHITE. The most popular of all white 
varieties, being a heavy cropper, and of a desirable shape 
to allow easy digging in heavy soils. The true type is very 
thick in the middle and should not taper abruptly from the 
shoulder. Makes also excellent food for horses. Fkt. 5c; oz. 
10c; H lb. 25c; lb. 85c. 

Large "White Belgian. The best known white variety — is a long- 
pointed root, and should only be planted on light soils where 
roots are fairly easy to dig. The variety we offer does not 
grow above ground with a green shoulder as do some strains. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V A lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Scarlet Horn, or Early Short Horn. No variety is better or 
sweeter for table use than Scarlet Horn. When full grown 
it is 3 inches long and 2% inches thick at the shoulder; 
tapers only slightly. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; *A lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

| (\MC* ORAWrF The best lon £ variety, and a good, 

i-A-JllO VSlXnPIVXE* heavy cropper for light soils where 
roots can be easily dug. The strain we offer is a bright or- 
ange-scarlet, and fairly thick, and grows entirely under 
ground, having no green shoulder. Has the brightest color 
of all the red carrots. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vc lb. 30c; lb. $1,00. 

OXHEART, OR GUERANDE popular and heaviest 
croppers among the short carrots. The shape is particu- 
larly desirable for heavy soils. The true type is about 4H 
inches long and 3% inches thick at the shoulder. It tapers 
slightly to the bottom, and is very stump-rooted. Fkt. 6o; 
oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Bed Saint Valery, or New Intermediate. A little longer than 
Danver's, tapering abruptly, with pointed root. A very desir- 
able, long variety, and rather preferable to Long Orange, be- 
ing thicker at the shoulder and not so long. Color bright 
orange-scarlet Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 



; 



C. C. MORSE & CO.-SEEDS-SAN FHAN'CISCO. CALIF. 



CAULI- 
FLOWER 

The rnltur* of cauliflower is much ilir 
Mint u thai of cabbage. It does not 
make a good summer crop, however, as 
it wilt not head up well in hot weather. 
It 11 especially popular as a fall and 
winter crop, and with market garden*™ 
proves a profitable crop, Owing to the 
scarcity of rood market vegetables when 
cauliflower is at its bet 
(row in the garden, providing the soil is 
made rich and porous. The young plants 
should be thinned, since the] 
very spindling if allowed to grow too 
thick. Set in 24 inch rows 14 inches 
apart. 

Alalsrs. One of the best late varie- 
ties, forming good, large white 
heads, late In the fall. Pkt. 10c; 
i« os. 35o ; os. 75c; y A lb. $2.50. 
Dry Woatbor. A strain of the Early 
Snowball type, which is espe- 
cially adapted to California. Pkt. 
20c; t-i os. 75c; os. $2.50; i£ lb. 
$8.00. 

CALIFORNIA WONDER 

The Cauliflower which does well 
In this climate, always heading 
with large solid heads. Leaves 
large and long and may be tied 
over the head for protection. 
Late and of fine quality. Pkt. 
10c; y t 01. 25c; ox. 75c; Y t lb.. 
$3.60. 
Early Favorite. An early, hard-head- 
ing variety. It is quite hardy 
and a good market varietv. Pkt. 
5c; i. 01. 35c; 01. %\.00;' Yt lb. 
12.50. 




EARLY SNOWBALL 



The best and most popu- 
lar early variety grown. 
There Is a vast difference in the strains of this variety 
offered but what we offer is the best imported stock. 
Those who have had trouble with cauliflower should 
try this Snowball. It will make uniformly fine heads 
even under adverse conditions, Pkt. 25c; V*. oz. 75c: oz. 
$3.50; V4 lb. $9.00. 



Extra Early Dwarf Erfurt. Is very early and almost as 

good as the best qualitv of Snowball. Pkt. 20c; Vk oz. 

65c; oz. $2.25; y 4 lb. $8.00. 
Extra Early Paris. A hardy variety quite easy to grow, and 

forming good heads. Pkt. 10c; Vi oz. 25c; os. 75c; Vi 

lb. $2.50. 
Vsltch's Autumn Giant. A large, late variety, very hardy, 

but especially desirable for the South. Pkt. 5c; V* «■ 

15o ; oz. 500; >/« lb. $1.50. 




CELERY 



WHITE PLUME ^"ST 

being naturally white is easy to blanch. The leaves 
also white, tinted with green at tips. Forms a medium- 
sized bunch and is fairly tall; early. Pkt. 5o; os. 25c; 
H lb. 75c; lb. $3.00. 



Celery is essentially a market crop, and is not usually recommended for the home garden 
on account of the more than usual trouble required to grow it as a vegetable. The real trouble 
and care, however, is likely to be exaggerated, and the value of having delicious, freah celery 
on one's table compensates in a large measure for all the care required in growing it. 

Celery requires water, and lots of it, from the time the seed is sown in boxes in March, until 
it is pulled in the autumn or winter. The seed is slow to germinate, and the soil where it is 
planted needs to be kept very wet. As soon as the young plants are about one and one-half 
inches high they should be transplanted to get good, sturdy plants before they are finally set in 
the garden or field. When the plants begin to grow vigorously, the soil needs to be drawn 
up around the plants, first tying them at the top- or wrapping with a piece of sacking to pre- 
vent the earth getting between the stems. As fast as the plants grow above the soil, the earth 
wants to be hilled around them again to get a full growth of well-blanched stems. The great 
celery growing centers are located in swampy, peat districts. Use one ounce of seed to 15,000 
plants, or two ounces per acre. Set in 24-inch to 30-inch rows. 
Swarf Golden la-art. Rather tall, forming a large bunch, and blanching white and 

crisp. Is hardy and a good shipper. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; y A lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 
Giant Pascal. Rather tall with stems nearly round, and when blanched is white, 

brittle, and especially good flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; y A lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 
Kalamazoo. A medium-short, dark green variety; very hardy; blanches easily, 

and ships well. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; y A lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

GOLDEN SELF-BLANCHING, OR PARIS GOLDEN ™* t ??\ 

variety especially for early crop. The plant Is naturally golden-yellow (both 
stem and leaves) but needs to be blanched to make it brittle and fit for table 
use. Forms a rather small bunch. French grown. Pkt. 10c; oz. $1.50; y A lb. $5.00. 

Calory S««d for Flavoring. (Soup Col try). y a lb. 30c; lb. 50c. 

Parf action Hoartwtll. A good, green winter variety, 
tall, forming a large bunch. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; y A lb. 75o; 



to market gardeners. It Is tall and forms a large bunch. 
The leaves are light green which blanch to a creamy 
whlta. Grows a thick, solid, heavy stalk with a largo 
aoaxt mrt. *•; os. $6o; M **• 75s; lb. $t.60. 



lb. $2.60. 

CELERIAC, 

OR TURNIP ROOTED CELERY 

Grown for the edible root and not for greens. 
Giant Smooth. Pragno. The best variety. Forms a good, 
thick root, as much as four Inches in diameter and 
nsarly (lobular. Vkt 60: os. BOoj H lb. «0«; lb. $1.7*. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CORN 

SWEET OR TABLE VARIETIES 



that are notably fre 
rich mountain valle; 

plantings of the several varieti 

Do not let the plants overcrowd 

Express or freight charges 



e to frost, it cannot be planted with any degree of safety until about the middle of April, except in sections 
late frost. Moist, rich soil is best for corn, and frequent hoeing or cultivating improves it. The small but 
especially favorable for good table corn. 

important that it be picked at just the right time, especially when not too old. Frequent 



ill 



od supply 







#*~~;- 


1 - ■■ 


* 


.■■ISP '^^., 


■• 



If large quantities ar 

Black Mexican. O 
ripe* the seed 
white. It is o 
cially fine sweet flavor 
and very tender. Fkt. 
10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; 
by express or freight, 
lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 
100 lbs. $9.00. 

Golden Bantam. A very 
early variety. The 
ears are but medium 
size, but are thickly 
set with delicious yel- 
low kernels. The 
quality of this varie- 
ty is superb, and it 
has become a general 
favorite early sweet 
corn with all who 
have tried it. Fkt. 
10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; 
by express or freight, 



vilable for the table all 
anted, 



hills 3 feet each way. 



ite us for special quo 

best medium early varieties. Although whe 
dark bluish or black, when ready for table use it i 
espe- 



CROSBY'S 



EARLY 



A fin 



a I.,, 



■iety, 



t 4 feet 
Kernels 
on Red 



in height, 
smaller tha 
Coh Cory 
popular. Fkt. 10c; lb. 
25c, postpaid; by en- 
press or freight, lb. 
15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 
lbs. 89.00. 

MORSE'S GOLD- 
EN CREAM 



othe 



)tt< 



Tt is good enough to 
eat raw. Morse's 
Golden Cream is ear- 
ly, prolific and a fine 
sort; seed yellow. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, post- 
paid; by express or 
freight, lb. 25c; 10 
lbs. 82.00. 

COUNTRY 

GENTLEMAN OR 

SHOE PEG 

One of the best of 
the late varieties. Has 
a long white cob, 
closely filled with 
long small "shoe peg" 
kernels. Is remark- 
ably fine flavored and 
sweet, and is fre- 
quently used by can- 
ners. Fkt. 10c; lb. 25c, 
postpaid; by express 
or freight, lb. 15c; 10 
lbs. $1.25; 100 lbs. 
$10.00. 




Early Bed Cob Cory 
EARLY BED COB COBY. One of the best extra early va- 
rieties. Ears are about six inches long, and eight- 
rowed and well filled. This variety does especially well 
in the Coast counties. We have customers who will not 
plant any other Sweet Corn than Red Cob Cory. Fkt. 
10c; 1 lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 
10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. $9.00. 

EARLY MINNESOTA 

Stalks about five feet high; ears long and eight rowed. 
Fkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 
10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. $9.00. 



Morse's Golden Cream 



Between Crosby's 



Early White Cob Cory. An extra early variety with remark- 
ably white grains, especially when cooked. Ears are six 
to seven inches long. Kernels are large. Of good quali- 
ty. Fkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 
15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. $9.00. 

EARLY MAMMOTH, OR ALAMEDA 

The very best variety for practically all California, and 
the one most generally used here. Forms very large 
ears, which are quite sweet and of fair quality. Fkt. 
10c; lb. 35c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 
lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. (8.00. 



C. C. MOHSF & CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SWEET CORN Continued 



Late Mammoth. A mammoth variety, with 
very long, thick ears, which are covered 
with verv *Ui thick kernels, lias the 
largest ears of any variety. Is very late. 
Pkt. 10c: lb. 35c, postpaid; by express or 
frstght. lb. ISc; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 lba. 
$10.00. 



ioore's Early Concord. 



r-.-l . 



li 

rlth it 



early 

i.l \ 



• •11 



i.»s of kei 
vate garden or for 
eanniiiK Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by 
express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 
100 lba. $9.00. 

Old Colony. A very fine late corn anil worthy 
of a place In the garden; sweet flavor 
ami small kernels: 16 to 20 rows. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. 
$9.00. 



STABLER'S EARLY 



Wi 






I ll ' 



small kernelerl early sweet 
corn. Medium Sized, prolific: white, meaty 
kernels. The kind of sweet corn which 
one most likes An excellent table sort. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. 
$9.00. 

STO WELL'S EVERGREEN 1 ™ os t 

popular and best main crop variety and 
tlie best all-round table variety. Of good, 
strong growth, about 6 feet high. Ears 
keep in condition for boiling for a re- 
markably long time. The quality is ex- 
cellent. Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, postpaid; by 
express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.00; 
100 lbs. 99.00. 

White Evergreen. Like S to well's Evergreen, 
it is a good main crop variety, but has 
the remarkable quality of being snow- 
white. It is invaluable for canners, mar- 
ket gardeners, and all who desire a good 
evergreen corn. Pkt. 10c; lb. 25c, post- 
paid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 10 
lbs. fl.25; 100 lbs. 910.00. 

FIELD CORN 

Extra Early Adams. The earliest of all corn 
and the first to make ears. Plant dwarf 
and stocky and grains of fair quality. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 15c; 10 lbs. 90c; 100 lbs. $8.00. 

Early Adams. Although not a sweet corn, 
con often be used as such on account of 
its fine, white kernels, which are quite 
sweet and tender. Is very hardy and can 
be planted earlier than the earlv varie- 
ties of sweet corn. Pkt 10c; lb. 20c, 
postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 15c; 
10 lbs. 90c; 100 lbs. $8.00. 

Early Eight-Bowed Canada, also known as the Yellow Flint. 
A rapid growing, early variety, and for this reason 
largely used for replanting. Ver; valuable where the 
seasons are short. Isb. 20c. postpaid; by express or 
freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. $5.00. 

King Phillip. An old New England favorite. The ears are 
long, and the variety is very early; copper red in color. 
Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 
eoc; ioo lbs. 95.00. 

Early Golden Dent, or Pride of the North. A very early 
dent variety, and especially valuable on account of its 
extreme earliness. Ears 8 to 10 inches long, with 10 
to 16 rows of slender, deep yellow grains. Lb. 20c post- 
paid; by express or freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. 
$5.00. 

variety. Is 

;ing excellent 

fodder. Kernels are long and deep golden yellow. It is 

the best yellow corn on the market. lib. 20c, postpaid; 

by express or freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. 95.00. 




White Cap Yellow Dent. 

growing 6 to 7 feet i 
in length. Cob small and 16 to 18 rowed. The outer 
end of the grain Is white, while the inner portion is 
clear vellow. Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. 95.00. 

SANFORD WHITE FLINT rteV^ai'inf.ar'le 
ears which are well filled with long, pure white kernels 
The very best white corn on the market. Lb. 20c, post- 
paid; by express or freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. 
$5.00. 

Wisconsin White Dent. A tall-growing variety; large eared; 
16 to 18 rowed; grains large and white. Lb. 20c, post- 
paid; by express or freight, lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; 100 lbs. 
$5.00. 

Sweet Corn for Podder. As this corn is always wanted In 
large quantities, write us for special quotations. 

st popular 
very pro- 
short; kernels long, resembling rice in shape: 
color white. Lb. 20c, postpaid; by express or freight, 
lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c. 

Kaffir Corn Broom Corn 

Egyptian Corn Jerusalem Corn f 



POP CORN, WHITE RICE £ 

liflc; 



See Field Seeds. Page 44. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




CUCUMBER — Arlington "White Spine. 



Norses CUCUMBERS 

Are sensitive to frost, and cannot be planted until the last of April. They require a great deal of water, and unless planted on 
very wet soil, will require frequent irrigation throughout the summer. Plant in hills four feet each way, "dropping about twelve seeds 
in each hill. Later when plants are well started, thin out, leaving only four or five of the strongest plants to each hill. Sow one-half 
inch deep. The soil should be made very rich with well-rotted stable manure, well spaded in. 

Cucumbers are very easy to grow, and a few hills will produce an abundance for an average family. The Cucumbers should be 
gathered when large enough for use, whether required or not; if left to ripen, it destroys their productiveness. For pickles, plant from 
June until the middle of July. 

MORSE'S ARLINGTON WHITE 



When you 
see this 
hav< 
perfect cucumber. 
It is dark green in color, very straight and even in 
shape. Morse's "White Spine is 7 to 8 inched long, is 
early and can be forced, and also is a mpst excellent 
garden cucumber. Pkt. 5c; 02, 15c; y A lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

Chicago Pickling'. Is the most popular pickle variety in use 
about Chicago. Medium sized, dark green. Pkt. 5cj oz. 
lOo; V\ lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Cool and Crisp. A fine garden cucumber, deep green and 
crisp. Is of the White Spine type, pure white when ripe. 
Pkt. 5c; ok. 15c; \ A lb. 45c; lb. $1.25. 

Cumberland Pickling. Is covered all over with the small 
spines so much liked in pickles. . The large, -fruits are 
straight and 9 to 10 inches long with blunt, rounded 
ends and are good for slicing. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 
30c; lb. $1.00. 

Early Cluster. A very productive variety, bearing its fruit 
in clusters of two or three. The fruit is short and very 
dark green. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Early Short Green, or Early Frame. A very desirable varie- 
ty for either pickling or table use. Fruit straight, small 
at each end; bright green. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; 
lb. $1.00. 

Lemon. A prolific little garden cucumber, nearly round, of 
delicious flavor and often eaten as radishes are. Pkt. 
10c; oz. 25c; H lb. 75c; lb. $2.00. 

Everbearing. Very early and very prolific. Fruits 4 to 6 
inches long; quite thick and blunt at the ends and of a 
rich, dark-green color. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; lb. 
$1.00. 

Extra Early Green Prolific, or Boston Pickling. A very pro- 
lific variety, used principally for pickles. Fruit medium 
sized, bright green, very even and symmetrical. Gather 
the fruit when small and it will bear all summer. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Extra Long White Spine, or Evergreen White Spine. A pop- 
ular variety having long, rich dark-green fruits with 
very tender white, and crisp flesh. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A 
lb. 35c; lb. $1.25. 



Pordhook Famous. A long White Spine variety, growing 
from 10 to 12 inches in length. Fully as long as Long 
Green and of equally good quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A 
lb. 40c; lb. $1.50. 

Gherkin, or West India Gherkin. An extremely small fruited 
variety, grown exclusively for pickles. It has no value 
for slicing; is very prickly, but tender and crisp if 
picked when young. Seed germinates slowly. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 20c; y A lb. 60c; lb. $2.00. 

Japanese Climbing. A good variety for training to a trel- 
lis. Forms long fruit of rich, dark-green color. The 
flesh is white, crisp, and of good flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.50. 

:in is of a deep green, and the 
flesh is solid, crisp, and of fine qual- 
ity. We have the very best strains of this variety and 
recommend it as much the best cucumber of all, and the 
variety every one should plant. The best known and 
most popular variety for general use. Is vigorous and 
productive, and forms fruit fit for use almost as early 
as the shorter varieties. The mature fruit is almost 
12 inches long. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 35c; lb. $1.25. 



LONG GREEN 



CHERVIL 



Can be planted any time in the early spring. The leaves should 
be kept cut, and if not allowed to run to seed, will keep green for 
a long time. Is more finely curled and handsome than parsley, 
and makes an excellent plant for garnishing. 

Curled. Very finely curled, somewhat resembling parsley 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; 



CHIVES 



A plant resembling a tuft of grass, but the leaves have 
the flavor of onions: The leaves are used in soups and eal- 
ads giving a mild onion flavor to same, Pkt. 10c; oz. 50o, See 
plants of chives listed under vegetable plants, page 89. 



of your late catalogues ; 



Live Oak, Calif., October 29, 1912. 
praised your plants and seedB highly." 

Mrs. B. M. Sweeney. 



We are praised by thoee who hare trie* Koree'e »•**». 
20 



C C. MORSE ft CO.- SEEDS- SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



CHICORY 



1'ied ai a substitute for coffee whi-n the root* are dne<l ami 
froand. The roots are also used (or rooking and are yery pal 
■table. Sow early in the spring in 18-inch rows, thin the 
plants to six inches, and keep well hoed. The plant spread 



Qg 



and 



CRESS 



There are two species of cress, as noted belOl 
named should bo sown in drills about 16 inches apart in rich 
ground, early in the apring. Several sowings should be made al 
intervals to secure a succession. Watercress should be Bowed 
along the banks of running water whan there is good soil, and 
after the seed is up it needs no further cultivation, since the 
plants spread over the water and make a mass of fine, edible 
leaves. 

Fine Curled (Pepper Grass). Leaves finely cut or curled 
like parslev. The leaves are pungent, and are used 
to mix with lettuce. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; \\ lb. 20c; lb. 
50c. 
True Water. Forms a plant, the leaves of which are used 
for salad or for garnishing. Thrives only when the 
roots and stems are submerged in water. Pkt. 10c; 02. 
35c; \i lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50. 



DANDELION 



lily grown pla 



much esteemed for greens, which 



Jo 



cooked like mustard and spinach. Sow the 
! on good rich soil, and thoroughly cultivate, 

rill be ready to cut the following spring. An 

00 feet of row. 



EGGPLANT 




Black Beauty Egg-plant 



The seed germinates slowly and 
with moderately high temperature, 
3 inches high transplant carefully 
until all danger of frost is over. 
where cool nights prevail, as in pi: 



It : 



should be started under glass, 
il.oiit March 1st. When about 
the garden or field, but not 
Eggplant, does not do so well 
ces where the nights are warm, 
lick and uninterrupted growth. 



BLACK BEAUTY 




Rich purple black in color and 
a remarkable market variety. 
Is early and makes also a fine sort for the home gar- 
den. Fkt. 10c; oz. 50c; % lb. $1.50; lb. $5.00. 
Barly Long- Furple. An early variety and also a very 
profitable one. The fruit is long and thin and of a rich 
dark purple. Fkt.. 5c; oz. 25c; H lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

NEW YORK IMPROVED The principaI mar 



ket 



■iety; plants 
I spreading; 
large and of deep rich 
purple. Fkt. 10c; oz. 30c; y K lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50. 
Black Pakin. An early, prolific variety, and valuable for 
market gardeners" use. Fruit is nearly round; skin 
smooth and black. Fkt. 10c; oz. 35c; \i lb. $1.00; lb. 
$3.50. 
White Pearl. A smooth-leaved variety with large, egg- 
shaped, pure white fruit. Pkt. 10c; or. 35c; V4 lb. $1.00; 
lb. $3.50. 



ENDIVE 



'inter 



nt» very valuable for « 
lie or July in 13-inch rows, 
apart. When quite well grown, 



vhich 
use. The seed should be so 
and thinned to about six in 

the outer leaves should be tied, thus blanching the inner leaves 
and the heart. It is hardly palatable until after frost, being 

BROAD-LEAVED BATAVI AN, OR ES- 



CAROLE 



GREEN CURLED 



Green Curled Endive 



having wide, thick leaves, 
raight at the edges and curved to- 
ward the center. Color dull green, Fkt. 5c; oa. 10c; 
" lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Has very curly leaves, the 
midrib being wide and 
whitish and the outer edges very much indented and 
crested. A very attractive plant, and one of the very 
best varieties. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
Staghorn. A curly type, the lobes and divisions of the 
leaves being wider than in the curled varieties. Is a 
popular garden sort in San Francisco. Pkt. 5c; or. 15c; 
y 4 lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 
White Curled. A light yellowish-green variety; very curly 
and quite ornamental. A good variety for general use. 
Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.50. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



KALE, OR BORECOLE 

A species of cabbage, forming a mass of leaves, some varieties 
eing very beautiful and curly. The leaves are cooked as greens, 
he seed should be planted in September, and the plants will be 
eady to use in the winter. It is hardy and will withstand frost 

)WARF CURLED SCOTCH a £ r e TSi. po ?o u r 

general use. The leaves are very tender. Color bright 
green. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V4 lb. 35c; lb. $1.00. 

ri-een Curled Scotch, Tall. Grows about 2% feet high. Is 
very curly and makes a beautiful plant. Quality is the 
best. Pkt. 5c; 02. 15c; y 4 lb. 35c; lb. $1.00. 

>warf Purple German. Similar to Dwarf Curled Scotch, 
excepting the leaves are purple. Pit. 5c; oz. 10c; X A 
lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

)R THOUSAND r 1 ety 

I4I7Ar»I7r» smooth leaves. Especially used (or 
rlEj/\L/£iL/ feeding chickens. Furnishes lots of 
green feed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

iberiau. A very large plain-leaved variety. Pfct. 5c; oz. 
15c; Vt lb. 35c; lb. $1.00. 





Tall Green Curled Scotch Kale 

KOHL RABI 

A plant forming a firm bulb above the ground and bearing short 
leaves. The bulb is the edible part, and when cooked tastes very much 
like turnip. If the seed is sown early, the young bulbs will be ready 
to use in spring, and a planting in July will secure good vegetables 
for fall use. The seed should be planted in the open garden in 18-inch 
ung plants thinned to four or six inches. It does 



anspla 



veil. 



EARLY WHITE VIENNA 



The most desirable va- 
ety for general use. Is 
very early and has small tops. Color, light silvery green. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 70c; lb. $2.25. 
Early Purple Vienna. Has a bright purple bulb, much liked in 
Germany. The leaf and stems are green and tinged with 
purple. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; H lb. 70c; lb. $2.25. 
Large Green. A popular table variety, having a light green 
bulb. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; V4 lb. 50c; lb. $1.75. 

MORSE'S LEEKS 



A species of 
mild and delic 
rows, and the 
grown, hill up 
planted in .Tun 
vegetable of un 
people, while i 



mion which docs not form a bulb, but is used for its 
js root, stem or neck. It can be planted in 16-inch 
)ung plants thinned to about four inches. When well 
nth earth to get a long white stem. Seed should be 
for good plants in the Fall and Winter. Leek is a 
mnl merit, and is not half appreciated by the American 
s regarded as a great favorite by many of our foreign 



ith long, large 

stems, which are sweet and white when properly blanched; 

vigorous grower. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; *4 lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 
Carentan. The largest variety,, though the stems are not so 

long as some others. Leaves are very broad. Pkt. 5c; oz. 

30c; U lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 
GIANT MUSSELBURGH. Thick, long stems, of sweet, mild 

flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; \i lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 

MARTYNIA, OR UNICORN PLANT 



i for pickles,- but must be 

hard_and flinty with age. Sow 

plant grows to about 



Morse'* American Flag Leek 



The young pods are much e: 
pickled young, since they become 
in hills after all danger of frost 

five or six feet in diameter, and is very ornamental. 

Froboscidea. The common variety. Flowers creamy white wi 

dark purple throat. Fkt. 10c; oz. 30c; H *&• 85c; lb. $3-00. 

22 



C. C. MOHSli A CO. SKKDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 




Market Gardeners find Morse's Lettuce Seed thoroughly reliable and Lettuce a profitable orop. 

Norf&S LETTUCES 

ttuce is represented by four distinct classes or types — by the thick-leaved, smooth-edged cabbage-heading type; the curly ami thin- 

d, ti^M-lieading. crisp type; the curly and thin-leaved bunching or non-heading type, and the Cos or celery type. There tiro early, 

d late varieties of eafch type, as well as those especially adapted for greenhouse, hotbed, Winter, Spring, Summer, and 

great a difference in localities in regard to the value of lettuce, that a uniform rule of culture cannot be adopted. 



leav 

Autumn uses. 
For the ordini 
sion. The set 
be thinned to 



BIG BOSTON 




y of each type, and several plantings should be 
'S eighteen inches apart, as early as possible, and the young plants of cabbage varieties should 
eties that do not head may be left quite thick, and thinned out as used. 

A popular market variety, used 
largely in the South to grow Winter 
lettuce for Northern markets. A light-green cabbage 
variety, slightly tinged with brown in the head. Mas 
a particularly fine golden buttery head. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
15c; y 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
Black Seeded Simpson. A bunching variety, forming nn 
definite head. It has a large mass of line brittle leaves 
of a light-green attractive color. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V4 lb. 
40c; lb. $1.25. 
Black Seeded Tennisball. An old. well-known variety. Very 
desirable for hotbed culture in W inter and for with- 
standing heat in Summer. A light-green cabbage sort, 
forming hard heads. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V4 Id. 40c; lb. 
$1.25. 
Boston Market. The well-known and popular hothouse va- 
riety of New England. Needs to he quickly grown to 
be of good flavor. Light-green cabbage variety, slightly 
tinged with brown on the head. Forms a compact, but- 
tery head. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 



CALIFORNIA CREAM BUTTER 

Cabbage. 

ter 



Royal 



Sui 



l er 



Big Boston Lettuce. 



and of a rich golden-yellow 
thick and bright green, slightly tinged with brown on 
top of head, and the outer leaves are slightly spotted 
with inconspicuous brown spots. Easy to grow and a 
good shipping variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H * b - 40c; l b * 
91.35. 



C. C. MORSE & CO —SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CAXIF. 




Los Angeles Lettuce — Crisp and delicious 

Deacon. A large cabbage variety having thick, bright-green 
leaves; forms a large, buttery head; very bright golden- 
yellow inside. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

Denver Market. A handsome variety, forming tight, conical 
heads. The leaves are very deeply savoyed, and even the 
outside leaves are tender and crisp. Color Is light-green. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; U lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 

Drumhead, or Malta. Sometimes called "Chinese" lettuce. 
A very large, tight-heading variety. Leaves are rather 
coarse, but very brittle and tender. Is dark-green and 
slightly curled. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; *£ lb. 40c; lb. 91.25. 

Early Curled Simpson. A loose-bunching sort, forming no 
definite head. Is crisp and tender; light green in color. 
Is very hardy and easy to grow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 
40c; lb. $1.25. 

Grand Rapids. The well-known forcing variety for the middle 
West, where butter-headed or cabbage varieties do not 
grow well under glass. Is a loose-bunching variety, 
forming no definite head. Is extremely curly, and its 
light yellowish-green color makes it very attractive. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

HANSON A fine ' large-heading variety. Leaves curled 
rirtiiOvH^I on the edges; light yellowish-green in color. 
The head is crisp and brittle, and flavor excellent. Is the 
very best house garden variety in existence, and much 
the finest variety of its class. Hanson is similar to 
the famous Los Angeles lettuce listed below, but is 
larger and lighter green; an extra fine sort. AIL 



Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 45c; 



inches for each head. 

lb. $1.50. 
Hubbard's Market. A large cabbage variety, forming a solid 

head, buttery and yellow inside, and of very fine flavor. 

Color light-green. Is a favorite in some markets. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
Iceberg. A large-heading variety; crisp and brittle, and color 

bright green, lightly tinged with brown on top of the 

head; leaves curled on the edges. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 

40c; lb. $1.25. 

•isp, 
tight-heading lettuce which is a 

great favorite in the markets of Los Angeles and San 

Francisco. This is a lettuce' much raised around New 

York whence its name was taken. The quality is the 

finest, and is an excellent lettuce for the garden. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 20c; y A lb. 60o; lb. $2.00. 

crrv a 

ading 
one of the largest of the cabbage sorts. It is especially 
adapted for planting in the Fall and Winter, and makes 
a fine tender buttery head. A number of our best local 
market gardeners have been growing it and find it un- 
surpassed for a fine heavy shipping variety. 

Prof. R. E. Mansell of the Experiment Station at the 
University of California, who plants a very large num- 



Mammoth Black Seeded Butter. A very large,, green cab- 
bage-heading variety similar to Salamander, but a 
third larger. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 
MAY ION!" 1 A ver y early new variety, forming 
«*/*■ * IVll^lVl fi ne hard heads within a few weeks 
after planting. It is medium-sized, light green, with 
buttery but crisp heads. There is just a faint tint 
of brown on the head. 

We have had no end of praise from our friends and 
customers who have tried this variety. It is essen- 
tially a Spring sort and does well all Summer. Being 
of rapid growth and quick heading it is especially 
recommended for home garden and is universally 
esteemed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; U lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
PRIZE HEAD. One of the very best loose-bunching or 
non-heading varieties. Leaves brown, very curly, and 
of remarkably fine flavor. Grows quickly and all ex- 
cept the outer row of leaves are very brittle. It Is 
probably the most easily grown lettuce in cultiva- 
tion. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
Salamander. One of the most popular varieties for with- 
standing heat. Medium size, light green, and forms a 
hard, buttery head of fine quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15o; 
y 4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

most popular variety among Califor- 
and New Orleans market gardeners. 
A medium-sized cabbage, butter-heading sort. We 
have the best and truest stock of this variety that 
can be obtained. It is especially recommended as a 
garden lettuce for our climate. It heads well, and 
bears shipping remarkablv well, since it revives 
nicely after wilting. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 45c; lb. 
$1.50. 

A large, loose-bunching or non- 
heading variety forming a large 
of leaves which are very crisp and of fine fia-- 
vor. In color it is a light green and very attractive. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
White Seeded Tennis Ball. This variety Is the same as 
Boston Market, which see for description. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
15c; 14 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
White Summer Cabbage. The oldest and best known cab- 
bage-heading variety. Forms a medium-sized, hard head 
of fine quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y± lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
WWITF PARIG CC\** Tne °est of the Cos or cel- 
VV1111J-. r/\l\IO V^V/O ery varieties. Forms a large, 
light-green plant with the head well folded and quite 
solid. Cos lettuce is also called Romaine, and is very 
popular with pur foreign population, for it is highly 
prized in England and France, while little known to 
our own people. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 



PASSION 



THE MORSE 



ber of samples annually, pronounces Maxin. 
titled to lead the list of all lettuces. Pkt. 5c; 
lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 



15c; M 




C. C. MORSE & CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



MUSKMELON OR CANTALOUPE 



Plant hills in rich, raoilt land, umnp one ounce to 100 hills, or two to thn 
the biltl. Sow the teed after all dancer of frost is over, and do not rover 
tiona are favorable, will make a Htrone vigorous growth, and most varieties 
make the plant more stork]- and thirk. Wherever possible, melons should b« 
Is in getting it freah from the garden and dirert to the table. 

ACKZ, OX tABLT BAXTIMOUE One of the best All- 
round melons In cultivation, and recommended for its 
uniform shape end size and fine quality. Is slightly 
pointed at stem end. is long and oval, somewhat i 



Pkt. Sc; ox. 16c; H lb. 40c; lb. Sl.25. 

BURRELL'S GEM OR DEFENDER Tl"*l 

grained, smooth salmon-red fleshed muskmelon. Such 
a one is Defender, the nest of this sort; medium sized 
oval: deeply netted and of an entirely distinct and de- 
licious flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. aoc; y A lb. 60c; lb. |2.oo. 

Extra Early Citron. Fruit ball-shaped, skin green, and flesh 
light green. Very early, medium-sized. Very produc- 
tive; fragrant and of remarkablv fine flavor' slightly 
netted. Pkt. 5c; oi. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. 11.25. 

Emerald Oem. A salmon-fleshed variety of remarkably fine 
flavor and tine quality. Fruit medium sized, globular, 
slightly flattened at the ends; skin only slightly net- 
ted; very thick, and well ripened close to the rind. Pkt. 
5c; oi. 15c; ', lb. 40c; lb. $1.50. 

Extra Early Hacieniack. An early variety with almost 
globular fruit, which is heavily ribbed and netted. 
Flesh thick, and light green, medium size. Pit. 5c; oz. 
15c; % lb. 40c; lb. 11.25. 

FORDHOOK' ° ne of the be3t llome garden melons; 

. .: 7 „ of smi11 slze ' globe-shaped, flattened 

at the ends. Roughly netted while the skin showing 
through the netting is emerald green. The flesh is 
rich salmon In color, very solid and of delicious flavor. 
The rind Is extremely thin and the seed cavity unusu- 
ally smalL Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c; V4 lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

HACXEHSACX, OB TOM'S CAP. The flavor is sweet and 
delicious, and this Is the best of the very large varie- 
ties. Hackensack has green flesh; flattened ends; 
thick irregular ribs and coarse netting. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c: 
V4 lb. 40c; lb. 11.25. 

Jenny I.lnd. Very early and very prolific. Fruit is small, 
somewhat flattened, deeply ribbed and netted. Flesh 

si aV very sweet pkt ' 5c; oz - 15c ' Y* lD - 40 °i "»■ 

I>arffe Yellow Cantaloupe. Although 

there are several varieties fre- 

quently substituted for this sort, we 

have a distinct type, and find it very 

popular with all who have tried it. 

The fruit is large, oblong, slightly 

ribbed and coarsely netted. The 

flesh is light yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 

16c; V4 lb. 35c; lb. $1.10. 
Montreal Market. A large-fruited 

ty slightly oval. Skin dark green 

heavily netted. Flesh light green 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y t lb. 40c; lb. $1.50. 
Osage, or Miller's Cream. A sal 
variety 



pounds por acre. Six feel each way is a 

eeply. Mnekmeli i aty of wa 

ti-mr In-avtly. It in best 10 pick off the 
grown in the home garden, for the charm 



ud if condi 
. runners to 
good melon 




Acme 



Baltimore 



THE HOODOO. The seed cavity is very small; the rind 
very thin indeed; and the edible, fleshy part very thick 
and meaty. Hoodoo is of orange or salmon color, small 
size and of most delicious flavor. Pkt. 10c; oz. 35c; lb. 
$3.50. 
KRIS KRINSLE. The best of the winter casabas. Do 
not pick until the light streaks become quite yellow. 
Stow away in a cool, dark place where the fruits do not 
touch each other. When the rind becomes slightly 
softened and moist they are ready to eat. Some of the 
melons will actually keep till February. Pkt. 10c; oz. 
25c; V, lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 
Petoskey, or Paul Rose. Excellent market variety with 
thick, firm orange-colored flesh. Rather larger than 
Netted Gem; is slightly oval, ribbed, and heavily netted. 
Skin light green, changing to a faint golden hue when 
fully ripe. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 

OB NETTED GEM. The most 
largely cultivated variety In use 
Grown in ereat quantities in Colo- 
rado. Fruit is slightly oval, finely 
netted, and slightly ribbed. Flesh 
thick, green, very sweet, and of 
fine quality and high flavor. It 
Id seem that from the Immense 
areas of land devoted to the Rockv 
Ford or Netted Gem Melon, that 
but one variety in cultiva- 
on. In fact, there is but one for 
ost of the large planters and it Is 
It gives equally 
'.s in the home gar- 
e best all-round va- 
t. Some of the best mel- 
market the past season 
came from 
the Imperial 



ROCKY FORD 




sec- 



elon 

on of Cal- 

fornla and 

best of 



tl 
if 
th 
th 

the Rockv 
Ford varie- 
ty. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 10c; V, 
lb. 30c ; lb. 
$1.00. 

Winter 
Pineapple. A 
globe-shaped 
Winter Ca- 
saba. See 

novel tlee 
Page 1. Pkt. 
10c. 



A Fine Shipping Sort — Rocky Ford — Highly Flavored. 

25 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 







9m^*' 












: #Sj£ 9 


■St 


wJ*- 




Ik '^""■■fr 


I^H 


■■$ 


./-' 




■BH* i£ 




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ft 


m H 








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•. * i 



Our .Seerf w Saved for Us in the True Home of the Watermelon. 

WATERMELON 



the 






the 



ch hill 



Plant the seed about the middle of May. in hills about eight feet apart. Use fi\ 
as soon as the second or third leaf shows. Use about four ounces of seed to 100 hill 
ANGELINO. A new melon of great promise. Fruit round, 
deep green. Rind very thin, flesh bright red and heart 
unusually large and heavy. Ships well and sells read 



narkets. Pkt. 10c; oz. 20c; % lb. 50c; lb. $1.50. 

CHILIAN. A very brittle, thin-skinned melon, of highest 
quality, and especially valuable for home garden. It is 
slightly oblong; the skin is deep rich green, mottled 
and striped with a still deeper green; the flesh is bright 
red and the flavor is remarkably fine and sweet. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Citron, Bed Seeded. A small, globular variety, striped and 
marbled with light green. Flesh white and solid; seeds 
red. Used exclusively for pickles and preserves. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; V4 lb- 25c; lb. 75c. 

Citron, Green Seeded or Colorado Preserving - . For stock feed. 
An oblong dull green variety about eighteen inches long. 
The flesh is green with green seeds and is used largely 
for stock feeding. A common plan is to split them open 
with an axe and feed them to cattle in the field. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; 14 lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Cole's Early. A great favorite for a large area of different 
climates. Fruit medium sized, oblong, striped and mot- 
tled. Flesh bright red, solid, and of fine sweet flavor. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; U lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Cuban Queen. An excellent shipping variety of medium to 
large size and globular to oval shape. Rind quite thin, 
flesh bright red and firm. Skin striped with light and 
dark green. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. 90c. 

Fordhook Early. The earliest of all melons and of the finest 
quality. Fruit almost globular; color deep mottled 
with occasional faint stripes of lighter green; flesh 
bright red and crisp; rind tough, which makes it a 
good shipping variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V4 lb. 25c; 
lb. 75c. 

The Lodi, or San Joaquin. "Well-known and popular Califor- 
nia variety, grown on an immense scale in San Joaquin 
Valley and shipped to all parts of the Pacific Coast. 
Fruit large and oblong, skin green and slightly mot- 
tled; rind thin but tough; flesh bright red and sweet; 
seeds white. Pkt. 5c; 01. lOo; V\ lb. 36o; lb. 75o. 



seeds to a hill, and thin out to two plants 
a farm crop, two to four pounds per acre. 

FLORIDA FAVORITE STne^r^cWii 

please everyone and yet which can be shipped and will 
reach the market in good shape. No wonder it is such 
a favorite with planters, and sells well with commis- 
sion men. A very large variety with large, oblong fruit 
and dark green skin, mottled with a deeper shade. Rind 
thin, flesh deep red and of fine quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
Vi lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 



ened to a very thin rind. Oblong and extra fine quality, 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vi lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Iceberg. In general appearance this variety resembles 
Kolb's Gem, but the skin, which is dark green with 
markings of a lighter shade, is darker in Iceberg and 
shows a spot of bright yellow where the fruit rests on 
the ground. The rind is thin and the flesh deep red. 
It is the best dark-colored shipping variety in use. Pkt. 
z. 10c; y* lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

OB MONTE CRISTO. A 
very desirable variety for 
the home garden or near-by markets. The most exten- 
sively grown shipping variety in California. Fruit me- 
dium sized, oval, and skin dark green; flesh bright red 
and very sweet. It is the very sweet, honey-like flavor 
that makes it especially distinct from all other varieties. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; */£ lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Kolb's Gem. The fruit is large, thick, and oval, with flat- 
tened ends. Skin striped with light and dark green. 
Flesh bright red. The well-known Southern shipping 
variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Tf^M WATQOM The fruk is ver >' lar £ e . many mel- 

1 KJIVI YVI\10\Jiy ns weighing 50 to 60 pounds and 
measuring 18 to 24 inches in length. Its rind is very 
thin but exceedingly tough, and on this account it is 
one of the very best shipping varieties. The skin is a 
dark mottled green, while the flesh is a brilliant scarlet, 
and the heart is very large with a small seed area. The 
flavor is most delicious and refreshing. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
Vi lb. 300; lb. fl.00. 



KLECKLEY SWEETS 



C. C. MORSE & CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



WATEKMELOHS — Contlnn.d. 

GEORGIA 
RATTLESNAKE 

One of the oldest and most popular sorts 
and frequently known as OTPSY. a large 
Lriety with decided stripes of 
light and deep green. Kind la bought but 
flesh Is of good quality and bright red; 
a good shipping and market melon. Is 
quite as generally used by the large 
melon grower* as Ktockley sweets and Is 
perhaps hardier and more profitable, be- 
ing very aeslly grown. Pkt. 5c; os. 10c; 
»« lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

NASTURTIUM 

The green seed of nasturtium haa a 

sharp, pungent flavor, and when pickled 
makes an excellent condiment. It is also 
valuable as a flower and serves a double 
purpose in the garden. Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; 
» 4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 





Georgia Rattlesnake Watermelon 

MUSHROOM SPAWN 

CULTURAL DIRECTIONS 

Ten pounds will spawn about ten feet square. Mush- 
rooms can be grown in any dark room or cellar where the tem- 
perature can bo kept at from 50 to 60 degrees. From some old 
pasture procure good rich soil, and to every bushel of this soil 
add two bushels of fresh horse manure. Of this well-mixed 
compound prepare a bed, say four feet wide. Put down a til ill 
layer and pound it down hard, and go on until voit have a bed 
twelve or eighteen inches thick. If the manure lients too 
much it must be turned over each day until sufficiently 
cool, otherwise it will burn out its vitality. As soon as the 
temperature of the bed falls to 70 degrees, the spawn may l>e 
inserted in pieces about the size of a walnut about one inch 
deep and 10 to 12 inches apart. Cover with loamy soil about 
two inches deep and beat it down evenly and firmly. Finish 
off with a covering of clean hay, about a foot thick, and the 
work is done. If the temperature is right, in six or eight 
weeks you may expect mushrooms. The beds will continue 
bearing from twenty to thirty days. After the first crop is 
gathered spread over the bed an inch of fresh soil, moisten 
ilh hay as before. Keep the bed 



all 



but 



aked. The 



mushroom growing are proper and 
very rich soil. 

English Mushroom Spawn. 1 1 c 
sighing about tw 



iifor 



and 



paid; by express, brick 25c; 10 bricks, $2.00. 



MUSTARD 



English Mushrooms 

or beet leaves. Sow the seed in drills early in the spring and 
secure a constant supply of fresh greens. Mustard is hardy and i 

Chinese. A very hardy, broad-leaved variety. 
Leaves are thick and deeply savoy ed, with 
broad white midrib. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 
15c; lb. 40c. 



mustard. 


as here listed make exce 


lent gree 


ns of sharp, pungent flavo 


and are 


cooked the same as spinas 


frequent intervals 


throughout the summer 1 


sily grown. One c 


unce will sow fifty feet of row 



Fordhook Fancy. The dark-green leaves of this 
variety are more curled on the edges than 
any other sort, making most attractive 
greens. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; ] 4 lb. 30c; lb. 90c. 



GIANT SOUTHERN CURLED 

Large variety, forming a great mass of beau- 
tiful leaves, which are ruffled and finely 
curled on the edges. Hardy, vigorous, highly 
recommended. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 15c; 
lb. 50c. 
White English. Light green variety; tende 
leaves. Seed light yellow and pungent. Th 
commercial mustard seed is this sort. Os 
5c; i., lb. 10c; lb. 30c. 



The long, 



OKRA, OR GUMBO 



delii 



n d served like other classes of vegetables 
foot apart, using about one ounce to 100 hills. The «.l 
feet apart. Plant in any good soil about April 15th. 
are then very tender. 



nd cooked 

The tall sorts should be planted in hills about a 

■ts may be planted in hills or in rows about three 

The pods should be gathered when very young, as they 



PERKINS MAMMOTH 
LONG POD 



£ 



e, 



early and prolific 

Pods are long, 
slender, deep green and of fine quality. Fkt. 
6c; os. 10c; Vi lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 



White Velvet. A medium-sized variety, bearing 
long, smooth, white pods, which are very 
tender. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Va lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

DWARF GREEN. An early, dwarf, and prolific 
Pkt. 5c; os. 




Okra — Iiony Pod 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Morses ONION SEED 

HOW TO GROW ONIONS FOR MARKET 



ally 



planting, 
>eds, and it is usuan; 
; necessary to thin th 



The most essential item in growing Onions for market is good seed — see 
want — cheap seed is very poor economy. 

For general crop the seed must be sown during the month of January 
one it is best to sow about the middle of December. The seed should be so 
pounds of seed per acre. In very weedy land the rows may be 18 

For planting a single row of onions among 

The land must be thoroughly worked befo 

The crop must always be kept free from 
tween the rows may be done oftener. It is n 
hand weeding. , . . , , 

The land chosen for onions should be wet land, preferably Iooe 
adobe or clay soil is good, but needs to be irrigated in May, June, 
heavy, stiff soils. Steady, even growth is necessary to g 
[hem to run to seed badly. Onions are ready to harvest 
well ripened down. If the tops are still standing and gre 
the onions should be pulled in about ten days after this it 
full weeks to properly cure onions after they are pulled 
ground, not more than one bulb deep. It is t 
straw or dried tops. It is best not to top and 
they should not be sacked, but should be put 
or in a bin with abundant circulation of air, 



up and seed that • 



before February 1st, 

with a seed drill in. r 

_ _ i apart when less seed 

plants about 2 pounds of seed per 



I, if the location ie a fairly dry 
i 14 inches apart, using 4 to 4% 
required. 



the 



good disking, and a harrowing are necessary, 
row by hand once or twice. Hoeing be- 
thinning is naturally done during the 



y loam or peat, and should always be kept well drained. Heavy 

ly, and the onions are not so well colored or even in shape in 

a check in the growth, whether from disease or drought, causes 

tually the latter part of August, when with a good crop, the tops are pretty 

it is well to run a light roller or plank over them to press the tops down, and 

one, whether the tops have dried off or not. It requires not less than two 

In localities where fog is prevalent it is best to spread the onions out on the 

■ climates to throw into windrows a foot or more deep and cover lightly with 

sack until ready to ship to market, and if onions are to be kept for any length of time 

nder cover on a floor 

and be kept absolutely 



dry. 



value of 



n crop 
ket and on the character of the 
should usually be avoided as to 
has just had a hay or grain cr( 
been planted to vegetables or i 
beans. An onion crop should n> 
on the same land, and usually 
(of which there are many) app< 
runs from 150 to 200 centi" 
the cost represented by lab 
mated roughly at $75 per 



naturally dependent 
nd planted. Land that 
expensive. Also avoid 

and if po: 

be repeated 



i the mar- 
s very foul 
land which 
id that has 
especially peas and 



best, since onion d 

y plentifully. An averaf 

(15,000 to 20,000 lbs.) per ao 

rent, sacks and transportation 



_other"very good system of growing fancy 
transplanting. By this method the seed is sown in oeas 
and September, and the plants are pulled and transpla 
February 15th to March 1st. Put the plants 6 
inches apart in lateral row! 
when they make a uniform s' 
hard and firm one. This pla 
mended for the Globe 
best under this treatment, 
seed will furnish pla 



ethod. 



The expen 



14 inches apart 
bulb and also a 
is usually recoin- 

s, since they do 

About 2 pounds of 
enough for 




ably 



ransplanting, 



by the ordinary plan, and^should 
be roughly estimated at $100 pe; 
ditional cost is simply in labor : 
for there is some saving in hoeing aim w^u..i 
UnleSB the land is porous and friable and al. 
very moist all through the 
ally unsuccessful and 



The 



jmber l5t 
be done la 



tba 



he transplanting should 
March 15th. 



Ailsa Craig". An immense 

onion; fine grained, cri 

ored and early. The 

measured 18 inches 

weighed 2 pounds. Ailsa G 

largest onion grown. Your 

grow an onion like this one. 

oz. 30c; \i lto. Sl.OO; lb. $3.00. 
Australian Brown. An early and very hardy 

variety which does especially well 

California. Should be planted early, 

low, wet grounds to get large bulbs 



The skii 




ich brown. Is espe- 
cially noted as a long 

keeper, as it keeps 

well into spring, and 

much longer than oth- 
er varieties. Pkt. 5c ; 

oz. 15c; y A lb. 40o ; lb. 

91.25. 
California Early Red. If 

the seed is sown 

beds in August e 

set in the field in 1 

vember or Decc 

ber, good ma 

ket onions can be > 

variety, but is of i 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V A lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 
Crystal Whit* Wax. A pure white variety of the Bermuda 

type; Teneriffe grown. The beautiful clear white onion 

seen in our markets in crates, early in the spring, is 

this variety. Crop short. Pkt. 15c; oz. 50c; x /i lb. $1.50. 
Extra Early Pearl. A very early variety with white skin, 

rather coarse grain and mild flavor. In shape it is flat 

and 1b unsurpassed for early sets or home-made pickles. 

Pkt. Bo; ob. 86o ; Vi Id. *6o; lb. $2.25. 



Giant Onion — Ailsa Craig 1 

Extra Early Barletta. Extremely early variety. Seed planted 
in February will form ripe onions the last of July. Is a 
white onion, forming small bulbs about one inch in dia- 
meter. Valuable for home-made pickles. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; 
1/4 lb. 65c; lb. $2.25. 

Extra Early Golden Globe, or Australian Extra Early 
Yellow Globe. A handsome and valuable yellow globe- 
shaped variety. It is very early and extremely hard 
and Arm. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

Extra Early Bed Plat. A very early, flat variety with dark 
purplish-rod skin. Forms a hard bulb with good keep- 
ing qualities. Pkt. So; oz. SOe; H »■ 90%; lb. $2.00. 






C. C. MOBSK ft CO.-SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO, CAI.IF. 








■H 



YELLOW GLOBE DANVEBS. 
Morse's Onion Seed will produce Onions like the 



OHIO YELLOW GLOBE 



is valuable for home use and near by markets. Is very 
mild and of flue flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; Yk lb. 65c; lb. 

MORSE BROWN GLOBE ^™^oM B l°t be l 

rich, seal-brown color. It ripens uniformly and nearly 
every piant makes a solid, hard bulb. It has all the 
long-keeping characteristics of Australian Brown, and is 
one of the very best varieties for market. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
20c; U lb. 60c; lb. 92.00. 

The best of the yel- 
low Globe varieties. 
The skin is bright, glossy, orange-yellow, and the flesh 
Is white, and fine grained. The bulbs are remarkably 
uniform in size and shape, and being firm and hard pos- 
sess fine keeping and shipping qualities. Pkt. 5o; oz. 
25c; H lb. 75c; lb. $2.25. 

PPI7F TAkTFD A very large globe-shaped variety 

ri\lZ-,E- l/\r*.CI\. with light-yellow skin and white 
flesh of mild flavor. It is a heavy cropper and a fairly 
good keeping onion, and is very popular as a market va- 
riety. Individual bulbs often weigh two or three pounds. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; Y* lb. 60c; lb. 82.00. 

pen U/rTUCPC[7iri W The best-known and 

K.SLU W t- 1 tltKOr 1LLU moat W i d eiy used red 

variety. In shape It is flattish, but thick, with very Arm 
flesh. Is hard, and an excellent keeper, as well as a 
heavy cropper. The color is a bright purplish-red. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 20c; Y* lb. 60c; lb. 92.00. 

Bed Bermuda. A very early, flat variety, used largely In the 
South for planting in the fall and marketing in the 
spring. Is of mild flavor and ships well but will not 
keep for winter. Pkt. 5; oz. 45c; V\ lb. 91.25. 

Southport Ytllow Glob*. A fine, orange-yellow, globe-shaped 
variety. Is a heavy cropper, and forms a long-keeping, 
hard bulb. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; V A lb. 75c; lb. 92.25. 

■onthport Bed Glob*. A large, globe-shaped, bright purplish- 
red variety. Is a late sort and an excellent keeper. A 
very handsome variety and of fine quality. Pkt. So; os. 
25o ; Y* lb. 75o ; lb. 93-50. 



Southport White Globe. A pure white globe-shaped variety. 
Forms handsome hard onions with wax-like, pearl- 
white flesh. Is used a great deal for green onions, ow- 
ing to the clear white stem. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; Y\ lb. 



$1.00; lb. $3.00. 

YELLOW DANVERS FLAT 



rallv 
-iet: 



The beat-known 
and most gen- 
used fiat, yellow onion. Is the most hardy of all 
for California and yields the surest and larg- 



est crops. Color bright orange-yellow; flesh white and 
firm. A good keeper, fairly early, and of good size. It 
is also a good variety for transplanting to get early 
onions. One of the standard varieties on the San Fran- 
cisco market where it is often called "Silverskin," al- 
though of a bright yellow color. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c: Ya lb. 
45c; lb. $1.50. 

Yellow Dutch, or Straataurg. The most popular and best va- 
riety for set purposes. Is similar to the yellow Danvers 
Flat in shape, color and size, but as a set onion It has 
the quality of ripening down earlier and more uni- 
formly. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; Y\ lb. 60c; lb. 91.75. 

Yellow Globe Danveri, Morse's Strain of Globe Danvers is 
specially selected on our farms to give an even ripening 
crop. The bulbs are all of fairly large size, small at the 
neck and perfectly and regularly formed. Morse's Globe 
Danvers is the most popular onion for market and for 
shipping. Is almost ball-shaped, but a trifle flattened 
at both ends. It is a heavy cropper, and a good, firm, 
variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; Yi lb. 75c; lb. 92.25. 

White Bermuda. A very early variety, used largely In the 
South as an early market onion, when the seed is sown 
in the fall and the onions harvested in the spring. It is 
mild and of particularly .fine flavor. The color Is a pink- 
ish-straw color, and the shape is flat The seed we offer 
is grown in Teneriffe, Canary Islands, and Is a flne pure 
strain. This is the principal variety shipped In crates 
from Texas and Imperial Valley early in the spring. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 45c; Y\ lb. 91.25. 

wiiit« Italian Tripoli. A large, globe-shaped onion, with 
clear white skin and pearl-white flesh. Of mild, sweet 
flavor. Not a good keeping onion, but much esteemed 
as a garden sort Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; Y* lb. 65c; lb. $2.25. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




WHITE PORTUGAL, OR 



used white onion. Is flat on the bottom 
and thick toward the top. Very hard 
and firm and an excellent keeper. Is 
largely used for white onion sets as 
well as for market onions and pickles. 
Flit. 5c; oz. 25c; % lb. 80c; lb. $2.50. 
White Queen. A very early white onion. 
Rather small and does not keep well. 
Is of fine, mild flavor, and largely used 
for homemade pickles. Pit. 5c; oz. 25c; 
H lb. 65c; lb. 92.25. 



ONION SETS 



oned. 

the surface in rows 12 inches apart and 2 inches between the sets, us 
250 lbs. of sets per acre. "When raised from sets, the onions can be used in the gr 
state or may be ripened off for large onions, in which case they are fully six week: 
earlier than when raised from seed. Prices are subject to market fluctuations as th. 

Postage on Onion Sets is 10 cents per pound additional. 

Brown or Yellow Onion Sets. Sept. to May. Lb. 20c. 

White Onion Sets. Sept. to Dec. onlv. Lb. 25c. 

Bermuda Sets. July and Aug. Lb. 25c. 
PARI 1C Large quantities are furnished at prevailing market prices. 
\j.rAI\I_H_ to. 15c; it,. 25c postpaid. 



ng 



PARSNIPS 



also a very good stock food and quite as 

1, and will thrive where carrots will not 

roots are very long, and are difficult to .dig 



vegetable for table ub\ 
It prefers very 
preferred since 
n stiff soil. Sow the seed in the Spring in 12 to 18-inch drills, using one-fourth 
to 100 feet. In the field sow in rows twelve inches apart, using three pounds per acre. 
Early Short Bound French. A flat turnip-shaped variety. Of rather coarse 
grain and not as good quality as the long varieties, but early and easy 
to dig in stiff, hard soil. Fkt. 5c; oz. 20c; Y* lb. 60c; lb. $2.00. 

A variety with a hollow or cup-shaped top, 
where the leaf stem begins. The most popular 
and best variety for all purposes. Skin smooth and white, and flesh ten- 
der, while the root grows eighteen to twenty inches long. The best part 
tained in the first eight inches from the top. Our strain of 
Hollow Crown is the thick-shoulrlered type called "Student" by some deal- 
ers. It is particularly fine, smooth, and regular. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; ^ lb. 
45c; lb. $1.50. 
Long- Smooth. A very long variety with full crown. Very smooth, white skin. 
Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Ki lb. 45c; Xb. $1.25. 



dishes of 
: cooked 
in soups. A few 
plants in the gar- 
"■ yield 



nd the plant 

Sow the 
seed in drills early 
in Spring, using 
fourth of an 
to 100 feet. 
Champion Moss 
Curled. A very 
finely curled, 
bright - green 
and very or- 
namental vari- 
ety. Fkt. 5c 
oz. 15c; 1 4 lb 
35c; lb. $1.25. 
a m b u r g, oi 
Turnip Boot- 
ed. A plain- 
leaved variety, 
South port Bed, White and Yellow Globe forming a 

Onions and Yellow Globe Danvers. long, thick, 

True types from Morse's Seed. edible root. 

Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 35c; lb. $1.25. 
Flain or Single. A very hardy variety. The leaves are fiat 
and not curled. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V4 "> : 35c; lb. S 1 '^-^ 

DOUBLE CURLED an a easy to grow. Deep, rich 
green, and by many preferred to the extremely curly va- 
rieties. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Y A lb. 35c; lb. $1.25. 
rVTD A TDIDI 17 CI TD1 VT\ "Very finely curled variety 

LAIKA 1 KlrL.Il. LUKLLU purposes. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; l A lb. 35c: lb. $1.25. 

30 




Double Curled Parsley 
f dark-green color. One of the best varieties for all 



C C. MORSE * CO. BBBDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Morsel peas 



IVu «r« qolte h»rdy and (or T«y early market can bo planted in i 
Tbey r*q,uirr nicdrritteljr rich aoil. but not excessively rich or wet, or i 
• eed needs to be planted thick, using from 80 to 150 pounds per aero for 

The dwarf ranches can be planted in rows twelve to eighteen la 
of peas and lir Kinking several sowings of each, good peas can be had for a' long 
as the plants will then continue to bear longer. All varieties have wrinkled seed 
Sugar. 

Express or freight charges are not prepaid. Write us for special quotati 
1 this year. 

EXTRA EARLY 
VARIETIES 

ALASKA. OK EARLIEST OF 

all. a smooth pea well 

I for extra earls 
planting; vine I! 
high; pods small: will not 

,i cold, wet ground; 
popular with dinners. Pit. 
10c: lb. 30c, postpaid. By 
express or freight, lb. 20c; 
10 lbs. $1.75: 100 lbs. $11.00. 
BRITISH WONDER. We can- 



duced lasi year. Briefly, a 
dwarf pea with extra large 
pods anil peas of linest 
quality; proline. British 
Wonder will soon super- 
sede all other ilwarf peas. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 40c, post- 
paid; or by express or 
freight, per lb. 30c; 10 lbs. 
$2.50. 

FIRST AND BEST, OB EX- 
TRA EARLY. One of the 
earliest tall varieties, with 
smooth, round peas, which 
ripen almost at one time. 
Grows two to two anil one- 
half feet high; seed yel- 
lowish white; pods 
straight, short and well 
tilled. Quality best of 
- tli seeded early varie- 
ties. Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, 
postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. 
$2.00; 100 lbs. $11.00. 

AMERICAN WONDER. A 
ilwarf or short-vine varie- 
ty growing about 12 inches 
tall, bearing short, thick, 
well-fllled pods, which are 
a rich darU-green. It bears 
well, is easily grown, and 
very early. The peas are 
of ilne llavor. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
35c, postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. 
$2.00; 100 lbs. $12.00. 

NOTT'S EXCELSIOR. The 
earliest and best extra 
dwarf pea. Good llavor. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 35c, postpaid. 
By express or freight, lb. 
25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; 100 lbs. 
$12.00. 

HORSE'S PREMIUM GEM, 
sometimes called LITTLE 
GEM. riant our selection 
of this pea for it is extra 
productive, is early; has 
pods long and always filled 
right up; 15 inches tall; fla- 
vor Is sweet. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
35c, postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. 
$2.00; 100 lbs. $12.00. 

ORADUS, OR PROSPERITT. 
Has the finest flavored peas 
of all. Tall light vine; 
matures early; peas and 
pods large size. Pkt. 10c; 
lb. 35c, postpaid. By ex- 
press or freight, lb. 25c; 
100 lbs. (17.00. 




he Fall in protected places, and ripe pern can be had in February. 

ley will run too much lo vine, and do not beat heavily. Tile 

seed or vegetable crop, or on,- pound for sixtv feet of row. 

part, and the tall ones three feet. By using the various classes 

t» n - 'a the garden Ihe pods should be ke] ked, 

cept Alaska. First and Uest. Marrowfat and Melting 

large quantities. Peas are a short 



THOMAS LAXTON. A fine, 
early tall variety, similar 
to Gradus. but more hardy 
and not quite so early. It 
is also a little darker in 
color and has largo blunt 
pods that till well with 
peas of finest quality. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 40c, postpaid. By 
express or freight, lb. 30c ; 
10 lbs. $2.50; 100 lbs. 
$17.00. 



LATER OR 
MMN CROP 
VARIETIES 

ALDERMAN. A new pea like 
Telephone only better. The 
vine is extra vigorous, and 
the pods of Alderman are 
dark green and always 
well filled with fine large 
peas. For a pea which 
should he staked there is 
none quite so good as 
Alderman. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
40c, postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 30c; 10 lbs. 
$2.50. 

ABUNDANCE. A tall, produc- 
tive variety much like Ad- 
vancer. It matures evenly, 
and is used largely by 
canners. Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, 
postpaid. By express or 
freight, lb. 20c; 10 lbs. 
$1.75; 100 lbs. $11.00. 

MCLEAN'S ADVANCER. Ts 
especial ly productive, and 
very popular with market 
gardeners. One of the best 
mid-season peas. Pkt. 10c; 
lb. 30c, postpaid. By ex- 
press or freight, lb. 20c ; 
10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. 
$11.00. 

BLISS'S EVERBEARING. A 
good heavy bearing main 
crop sort; quality good. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid. 
By express or freight, lb. 
20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. 
$11.00. 

CHAMPION OP ENGLAND. 
One of the most popular 
tall late varieties. Is 

very prolific and hardy, 
and the peas are of espe- 
cially fine, rich quality. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, postpaid. 
By express or freight, lb. 
20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. 
$11.00. 

HOESFORDS MARKET GAR- 
DEN. A tall variety of 
medium height; very pro- 
lific; peas small and 
wrinkled, but pods well 
filled. Dark green and 
hardy and very popular as 
a canning variety. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 30c, postpaid. By 
express or freight, lb. 20c; 



Stratagem Peas 

efutly hand selected on their ranches and the produ 



hand picked at their city 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CAIJF. 



PEAS — Continued 



SENATOI, Introduced 

by U3 laat year. Sen- 
ator is literally load- 
ed with large slight- 
ly curved pods, al- 
ways well filled. Peas 
medium sized and of 
splendid quality. This 
pea is a most excel- 
lent one for the home 
garden on account of 
its extra prolificness 
and good quality. Pkt. 
10c; lb. 40c, postpaid, 
or by express or 
freight, lb. 30c; 10 
lbs. $2.50. 

STRATAGEM, MORSE'S 
SELECTED. A semi- 
dwarf variety with 
large leaves and 
largo pods. The 

vines bear well, and 
the pods are long, 
thick and well filled. 



Thi; 



ety 



tendency 


to n 


n out 


or rever 


to a 




podded 


type 


and 




stocks 


of 


Strata 




offered 


contain 


many 


small 


podded 


plants 


We 


offer a: 


especially 


fine se 


ected 


strain 



free from small pods. 
Prices — Beselected 
strain. Pkt. 10c ; lb. 
35c, postpaid. By ex- 
press or freight, lb. 
25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; 100 
lbs. $11.00. 
TELEPHONE. Is tall 

and large; wrinkled 
remarkably 



popu 



fine quality, 
lar home gardei 
market variety; 
pods. We hav 
especially fine 
stock this year. 
10c; lb. 35c, postpaid. 
By express or freight, 
lb. 25c; 10 lbs. 92.00; 
100 lbs. $15.00. 



and 



Pkt. 




YORKSHIRE HHO, OK 
ALAMEDA 8WZETI. 
A very hardy and 
prolific, semi-dwarf, 
wrinkled variety. The 
peas are large and 
of fine quality and 
the pods, which 
are broad and 
medium-sized, remain 
in condition for a 
long time. It bears 

both of pods and 
dried peas, and is the 
variety most largely 
planted by gardeners. 
Pkt. 10c; lb. 30c, 
postpaid. By express 
or freight, lb. 20c; 10 
lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. 
$10.00. 

LARGE WHITE MAR- 
ROWFAT. A very 
tall, hardy variety. 
Very productive, but 
of inferior quality. 
These -peas are not 
wrinkled nor are they 
sweet. Frequently 
when Marrowfat Peas 
are asked for the 
best quality is de- 
sired, and Yorkshire 
Hero is the variety 
desired. Pkt. 10c; lb. 
25c, postpaid. By ex- 
press or freight, lb. 
15c; 10 lb. $1.15; 100 
lbs. $10.00. 

MELTING SUGAR. A 

tall variety bearing 
long, flat, brittle 
pods which are cut 
or broken and cooked 
like string beans. Is 
a delicious vegetable, 
and should be better 
known and more gen- 
erally used. Pkt. 10c; 
lb. 35c, postpaid. By 
express or freight, 
lb. 25c; 10 lbs. 92.00. 



Yorkshire Hero Peas 



PEPPER 



CHINESE GIANT 



There are varied uses lor Peppers, and while they are more 
popular in the South among the Spanish and Mexican people, they 
are used very largely by all who like strong, hot condiments. The 
several varieties are used lor stuffing when green lor pickles, 
for pulverizing when dry, and for soups, etc. Our selection ol 
varieties includes all of the very best. 

A very large, deep-red variety, 
very thick and blunt. It Is 
fully twice as large as Large Bell, or Bull Nose, being 
four or five inches thick at the top and about six inches 
long. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c; y A lb. $1.60; lb. 95.50. 
Golden Dawn. A short, thick variety, similar to Large 
Bell, or Bull Nose, in shape but a rich golden yellow, 
with a mild, sweet flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; y* lb. 75o; 
lb. 92-50. 
Large Squash. An early variety bearing large, flat, tomato- 
shaped fruit, which is bright red when fully ripe. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 25c; \\ lb. 75c; lb. 92.50. 

: BELL OR BULL T 

blocky, and about three Inches long and two inches 
thick. The color Is deep green when fruit Is young, but 
when fully ripened It is a rich, glossy blood-red. Plant 
grows about two feet high. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c: l£ lb. 75o; 
lb. 92.50. 

LONG RED CAYENNE ^^Tn/^TUmea 

fruit, which Is bright scarlet when ripe. A well-known 
and popular variety. Pkt. 5c; ox. 25o; y* lb. 75c; lb. 



seed germinates slowly and should be started in boxes, and the 

young plants transplanted after all danger of frost is over. Set 

in 18-inch rows. 

Bed Cherry. An ornamental as well as useful variety, the 
plant being tall and bearing profusely small, bright, red 
fruit. The fruit is small, round, very hot, and is largely 
used for pickles. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25o; y A lb. 75o; lb. 93.50. 

Bed Chili. A rather small, bright-red variety about two 
inches long, and pointed. The pods are used in making 
Chill sauce, and are very pungent and hot. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
25c; % lb. 75c; lb. 92.50. 

Baby King. A popular variety of the Bell, or Bull Nose 
type. The fruit is large, bright, glossy-red, and the 
flavor is mild and sweet. A desirable variety for slicing 
in salads and for stuffing. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; h\ lb. 85c; 
lb. 93.00. 

SWEET MOUNTAIN, OR SPANISH 

M A MMDTH n is a late variety, bearing large, 

MAIVUVH./ 1 n thlok fruit, which is frequently 
eight inches long and two or three Inches in diameter. 
When mature, it is a deep, glossy-red, and the flavor is 
mild and sweet. Pkt. 5c; oat. 25c; \\ lb. 75c; lb. fa.50. 
SwHt "Upright. A large thick variety, with mild sweet flesh. 
Pkt. 10c; oz. 45c; Vi lb. 91.25; lb. 94.50. 



Daffodils, Tulips, Hyacinths, Iris, are all Spring flowering Bulbs and should be set out in October and November. Our 
Fall Bulb Catalogue lists all these and many others. Upon request we will gladly mail this in September. 

32 . 



C. C. MORSE Jk CO.- SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




I.a.rg-e Bell or Bull Nos» Poppers 



PUMPKIN 



While pumpk 



I are of strong growth, they 
for good pumpkins. Plant i 
11 plant 100 hills. Do not plant near 



special pric 

CONNECTICUT FIELD, OR NEW ENG- 

I ANin PIF A fine - large, orange-colored variety 
I_/A.11L/ riSL, use c| for field culture and stock feeding. 
The skin is smooth and ribbed and the flesh is brittle 
and swtet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Y A lb. 20c; lb. 50c, postpaid. 
By express or freight, lb. 40c; 10 lbs. $3.50. 
Large Cheese, or Kentucky Field. A very large, 
flattened Pumpkin, averaging about two feet 
through. When ripened the skin is a rich 
cream color. Flesh yellow and of fine quality. Sma 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 20c; lb. 60c, postpaid. 

MAMMOTH KING, OR POTIRON 

The best large pumpkin in use. Forms im- 
mense gobular melons, flattened a little at 
the end. Skin reddish yellow in color and 
flesh rich orange. This is unquestionably the 
very best mammoth pumpkin we have. It 
runs very uniform in shape and color and 
all are of immense size. Pkt. 5c; o 



'ill not stand frost, and cannot be planted until about April 15th. A moderately rich 

hills about eight feet apart. Three to four pounds of seed will plant an acre, and 8 

iquashes or melons, they are likely to mix. If large quantities are wanted, write for 



V 4 lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 



15C 



COMMON F1FI D The well-known, ordinary pump- 
V*V-MV11VH-H^ niL.l-Ly k j ns , large'y used for stock feed- 
ing. The fruit is variously colored in yellow, drab, 
red and orange, and varies also in size, but is usually 
very large. Is a heavy cropper and very easily grown. 
Pkt. 5c; lb. 45c, postpaid. By express or freight, lb. 
35c; 10 lbs. $3.00. 

Mammoth Golden Cushaw. One of the best 
stock-feeding pumpkins. Is a solid, yel- 
low crookneckerl sort, and is nearly all 
Sugar flesh having a very small seed cavity. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; \\ lb. 30c; lb. $1.00, post- 
paid. 
Pie Pumpkin. A small, round, yellow sort. 
with fine, pinkish netting. Flesh is thick, 
sweet, and of excellent quality. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 10c; V4 lb. 30c; lb. $1.00, postpaid. 
SMALL SUGAR. A small, round pumpkin 
of excellent quality. The flesh is rich 
yellow, very thick and sweet, and the skin 
is deep orange. We recommend this 
variety as the very best for pies. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00, postpaid. 




Mammoth King 





Connecticut Pield 



Mammoth Golden Cushaw 



Our Nursery Department has a fine assortment of handsome Ornamental Trees and Shrubs. Climbing Vines and Roses. Reached by the 
Key Route System, Piedmont Station, from San Francisco, or by street car from Oakland. The Nursery is located at 41st street attti Glen 
r., Oakland. All goods may be ordered at our store, 125 Market street, San Francisco. 



G. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Mor<?e\? RADISH SEED 



Being a root crop, good brittle radishes require ligl 
mitted to grow slowly, they become tough and pithy, 
for the table. Use two-thirds ounce for 100 feet of ro\ 
varieties can be sown all spring and well into summer, 
be planted in August and September for good radishes 
Brightest Long- Scar- 



t, well-worked soil, made very rich and mellow to insure quick growth. If per* 
They are easy to grow and frequent plantings will insure a constant supply 
, and thin the very young plants somewhat to prevent crowding. Summer 
Winter varieties, however, require some time to mature, and the seed should 
in November and December. 



let. 



r ery 




showy, long 

riety. Is thick at 

the s h oulder 

and tapering. 

Bright rose 

scarlet with dis- 
tinct white tip. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 

14 lb. 30c; lb. 

$1.00. 
Chartier. A very long J 

variety and larg- 
er in diameter ^, L 

and general size Jt*-^ 

than Long Scar- WBk 

let. Keeps hard S^^^H 

and crisp longer M\~ '-;-.■■ . . ■ 

than most varie- ^5=^-.— >- ---- --^-^=5==---^=^==---=^= 

ties, and is an 

excellent garden 

sort. Color bright rose with lighter colored tip. Pit. 

5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 
Cincinnati Market. An early and quick-growing long variety 

which keeps hard and crisp for a long time. A favorite 

market garden variety. Color crimson. Pit. 5c; oz. 10c; 

-4 lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 
Chinese Rose Winter. A bright scarlet winter variety. 

About 4 inches long and sturnp-rooted. Matures two 

or three weeks earlier than the Chinese White Winter 

and like it is firm and crisp and does not grow pithy 

until it runs to seed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y± lb. 40c; lb. 

$1.25. 

CHINESE WHITE WINTER, OR CELES- 

TIAI * or Cal ' Manimotn White Winter). The well- 
I \r\Xu known and popular winter variety. Clear white, 
about 4 inches long and half stump-rooted. Keeps 
firm and crisp until it runs to seed. Is a good cook- 
ing variety, and when cooked the flavor resembles 
turnip. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; -4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 




Long - Scarlet 

Crimson Giant Forcing 1 . A fine solid radish, a little larger 
than Scarlet Globe, very early and crisp; white tip. 
We recommend our selection of this as being an extra 
good radish. It is top-shaped. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H In- 
30c; lb. $1.00. 

Early Bound Dark Bed, or Prussian Globe. A bright scar- 
let, turnip-shaped variety. Early, quick-growing, and 
a very handsome radish. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; ^4 lb. 30c; 
lb. $1.00. 

Early Scarlet Turnip. A valuable variety for forcing or 
outdoor culture. Is a small, turnip-shaped variety, 
and in color entirely crimson. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 
30c; lb. $1.00. 

EARLY SCARLET GLOBE 4 g po v S „: 

ing to its very quick growth and fine, bright scarlet 
color. Shape, a trifle oblong. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y* lb. 
40c; lb. $1.25. 

Early White Turnip. A very quick-growing, small turnip- 
shaped variety. Color, clear white; very mild flavor, 
and valuable for forcing. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y* lb. 40c; 
lb. $1.25. 

French Breakfast. A popular variety for market or forc- 
ing. It is about two inches long and decidedly stump- 
rooted. Color, bright rose with bottom of root and the 
tail pure white. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; V4 lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

Golden Globe. Quite a large top shaped variety with yellow 
skin, and solid white flesh. Is not a quick-growing 
variety, but retains its solidity a long time after 
maturity. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; lb. $1.25. 

Half Long, or Olive-Shaped. The variety most largely used 
by gardeners in California. It is about 3 inches long 
with half stump-root and sloping top. Color, carmine. 
Quick growing and hardv. Remains solid longer than 
any other variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y* lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Half Long Deep Scarlet. A shorter, olive-shaped variety, 
with half stump-root and sloping top. Color, bright 
scarlet. Valuable for forcing. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 
25c; lb. 75c. 

ety, about 5 inches long, 
Quick grow- 
and'mild in flavor. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Vt lb. 
25c; lb. $1.00. 

Long Black Spanish. A winter variety with almost black 
skin and white flesh. Roots about six inches long. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; M lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

(short top). The best known and 
most popular long variety. Color, 
bright carmine, and flesh brittle and firm. About 6 
inches long, the top growing out of the ground about 
one inch. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % 11>- 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Long White Japanese. A winter variety, growing fre- 
quently 2 feet long and about 3 inches in diameter. 
Skin, white; flesh, solid and tender, and very pungent. 
A staple article of diet with the Japanese, who use it 
both green and dried. Our seed is imported from Japan. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; M lb. 40c; lb. $1.50. 

Bound Black Spanish. A winter variety, with black ski] 
and white flesh. It is top-shaped 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y t lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 



LONG SCARLET 



almost globular, 



SCARLET TURNIP WHITE TIPPED 

page 35). Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 40c; 



C. C. MORSE & CO. si-: Kits s.\N FRANCISCO. CALIF. 




RADISH 



SCARLET TURNIP WHITE TIFFED, Or Boey Gem. On the most 

popu] il VI s It I. I. right 

rose-carmine with bottom and tip clear white. Sterna and leaves 
small. Very valual>i< v.,n as for i 1 ard n 

and market PM. Sc; or. 15c; y, lb. 40c; lb. Sl.25. 



White StrnBburff. A large. 



thick 



the ahoulde 



i hite 



and 



lii-iy for late 



$1.00. 
White Vienna ( 
quick growl 



Lady Finger). 
, and ready tor 
■eet Pkt. 5c; o: 



tner uae. Rathei 
i Inches in length, 
time. Fist. 5c; 02. 10c; U lb- 30c; lb. 

ry tine, long, white variety, 

hen verj ■ The Havoi 

'.i lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 



RHUBARB 



Scarlet Turnip White Tipped Radish 



It 



Seed— Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; >i Id. 45c; lb. 

81.50. 

Roots — 15c each, $1.50 per dozen. 

CRIMSON WINTER ™ e rie n t 7 

which has become very popular and 



A rich, sandy soil, wet bul well drained, ie best for rhubarb. While it is 
frequently propagated from seed, oniv a p.'] rnn.-i^,. .-nines true, but h is 
cheaper to grow from seed and discard untrue plaDta, The popular method, 
however, is to use young plant* prop.'iiinu-.i from the crown. Bel plants 
three feet by six. The best stems are produced the second year, but it 
oontinues to produce for several years. When the blossom stalk appears, 
il should be cut bach well into the ground. I-Vt the crowns of the plants so 
thai they are 1 inch under the surface of the soil. Choose a place where the 
soil will be moist at all times. 



profitable to the growers, is of de- 
licious flavor, extremely hardy, very 
prolific, and very quick growing. Pro- 
duces good stems all winter and 
spring. 
Soe d — pkt. 10c; oz. 65c; U lb. $2,00; 

lb. $6.50. 
Large Roots — 25c each, 5 for $1.00. 

Add 15c each for postage. 



SALSIFY, OR VEGETABLE OYSTER 



T« 



fy root, whicfa grows 
popular vegetable. When ■ 
al variety of ways. A Iooe 



about twelve inches 1. 
ooked it has a distinc 
!. light soil. especial!} 
■ usually uneven and hard to dig. Use 
prevent crowding. Plant in 12 inch t 
MAMMOTH SANDWICH ISLAND. The improved, large-rooted 
long and being from 1 to 2 inches thick. PM. 5c; 



one inch in diameter, is becoming a 
of the oyster, and may be served in 
loam, is desirable tor a lon^ smooth 



$1.75. 



SORREL 



SPINACH 



able vec 


■tabli 


T 


l fa 


ifor 


1 ohno^i 




ed a 


nles 


giv 


ded. 











nrly h 

ml mo 



tender the leav 



throughout the 



nay be pla 

inter. Thi 

sld crop for tin 




for 100 feet of 




BLOOMSDALE SAVOY 

st generally used 



th 



t, and 
he South for shippii 
imml, and thick, ve 
nd rich deep green. 
ist varieties. 



ughout 
Leaves large, 
much savoyed 
ie of the earli- 
Pkt. 5c; 



Prickly Spinach 



10c; M lb. 15c; lb. 35c. 

Long- Standing. A deep green variety 
with rather elongated smooth leaves. 
Seed, round. Stands a long time 
without running to seed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
10c; J 4 lb. 20c; lb. 40c. 

Victoria. A long-standing variety with 
round, slightly savoyed leaves. Deep 
green and hardy. Forms good, edible 
leaves early and continues to produce 
leaves for a long period. Pkt. 5c; oz. 
10c; Va lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 



Salsify — Mammoth Sandwich Island 

New Zealand. A plant with thick, fleshy 
texture and soft crystalline leaves, 
is not like the ordinary spinach in 
appearance, but it is used in the same 
way. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c; lb. 
$1.00. 

PPIPLTT V The varietv commonly 

r IN.H-'IVL* I use (3 f or market in Cali- 
fornia. Is very hardy and easily 
grown; bears large, smooth leaves, 
which are shaped like an arrow point. 
Color, bright green. Seed in 
with 3 or 4 sharp points. A fine win- 
ter and spring variety. Pkt. 5c; 02. 
10c; Va lb. 15c; lb. 30c. 

Round, Thick Leaved. A large-leaved. 
bright green variety. Leaves rather 
smooth and rounded at the top. A 
good variety for late spring and sum- 
mer. Seed, round. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
i 4 lb. 20c; lb. 40c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SQUASH 



The summer varieties come into 
April. The seed should be planted 
resist frost, and should be planted a' 
shell, keeps well, and with a little < 
it is important to protect the stems, 
two or three seeds to the hill. Use t 



le early in t 

hills four feet apart, using 
;he same time. The fruit do 
•e squashes can be had all ^ 
ice, if broken off, the fruit \ 
ht ounces to 100 hills, or tw 



tive to frost the seed cannot be 
o 100 hills. The winter varieties 

until late in the fall, and. having 
:il late in the spring. In gatli€ 



until late in 
ilso unable to 
jry firm, hard 




SUMMER VARIETIES 



EARLY WHITE BUSH SCALLOP 

squashes. 4 to 6 inches in diameter. The vine 



sight feet apart, 



rly 



ety. 



ith 



flat, creamy white, scalloped 
The vine is bush in habit and rather 
"patty pan" squash. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
V A lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 
Mammoth Summer Crookneck. A large golden-yellow variety, thickly warted; 
is eighteen inches long, brittle, and tender. Plants are bush and very prolific. 
This is an improved strain nf the old variety and considerably larger. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; y 4 lb. 25c; lb. 80c. 
Mammoth White Bush Scallop. A fine, large variety with round, scalloped fruit 
twelve to fourteen inches in diameter. Color, white, clear and wax-like. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V* lb. 25c; lb. 85c. 

VEGETABLE OR ITALIAN MARROW c ?S^S?Sr»2fS 

all the Squashes. Although usually eaten when quite small still it is good 
for table when nearly full grown; has a distinct flavor. The color is dark 
green at first but changes to a lighter green as it matures. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
M lb. 30c; lb. 91.00. 

White Summer Crookneck. Long, crooknecked variety, similar to Summer Crook- 
neck in size and shape, but it is pure white. Is of especially fine quality. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; *4 lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Yellow Bush Scallop, or Custard. An early variety with flat, round scalloped 
fruit. Skin, deep yellow; flesh, pale yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Y 4 lb. 25c; lb. 
. 75C 



YELLOW SUM- 
MER CROOK- 
NECK 



The 
known 
mer variety, 
long, skin 
much w a i 
bright golde' 



WINTER 
VARIETIES 

BOSTON MAR- 
ROW A var P l Tty' 

with large, oval 
fruit. Skin bright, 
reddish orange, 




orange. 



Fine grained, and of e: 
t popular variety for ci 
rs plant several hundred 
fruit makes a rich orange-red 
dish. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 
Delicious. This is a splendid variety more 
bard than any other, but surpasses it in 
for home use, as it is not quite so large 
not so hard, the meat is thicker, and 
quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c; lb. 81.50. 



cellent 



California 

annually and the 

and delicious flavored 



the Hub- 

resDects 

; shell is 

extra fine 



noked 




Hubbard Squash 



White Bush Scallop Squash 

ex Hybrid, or Hard Shell Turban. An early, quick-grow- 
ing variety, with very hard shell. Is broad, with large 
neck or "Turk's Cap" at blossom end. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
14 lb. 25c ; lb. 75c. 

dhook. A good variety for early "Winter or even Sum- 
mer use. The fruit is oblong, slightly ridged; is 
creamv vellow outside and the flesh is thick, and when 
is of most delicious flavor. Is solid and hard 
snlendid keeper. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y 4 lb. 25c; lb. 
90c. 
Golden Hubbard. An exceptionally attractive variety of the 
true Hubbard type. At maturity the color is red, and 
the flesh bright orange. The vine is productive and the 
fruit is fit for use earlier than the Hubbard. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 10c; H lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

; most popular and widely used of 
Winter squashes. Fruit is oblong 
and pointed, heavily warted, dark green in color, with 
orange-colored flesh. Is remarkable for its keeping 
qualities. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V 4 lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 
Perfect Gem or Cream. Long-keeping Winter squash, 4 to 
6 inches in diameter; apple-shaped, distinctly ribbed 
with smooth, cream colored skin. Is solid and rather 
hard, but bakes to a delicious soft consistency on the 
inside. Although a small variety, 
and is used mostly in the Winter. 
lb. 25c; lb. 85c. 
Mammoth Chili. A very large variety 
fruit, flattened at both ends. Skin 
flesh, orange, fine grained, and sweet. 
y 4 lb. 45c; lb. 81.50. 
36 



HUBBARD 



ith smooth, oblong 

ich orange-yellow; 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; 



C C. MORSE ft CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



TOMATO 



b« 



":' 



lo frost, (h 

out March I 

t field. Or when about fou 



Aa tomatoes ar 
protected hotbeds, 
werki before transplanting to th 

Sow th* ie*d broadcast, tiling one ounce to about thirty square feel ol ar«>a, which 
fleld set tall varieties six feet apart and dwarf varieties four feet apart. A slight troll 
ih<* best fruit, but it is not necessary that it he excessively rich. Too frequent veterl 
tomatoes in the home garden, but a moderate amount of water should be applied 
Acme. A tall variety, medium early. 

bearing Hattlsh globe fruit of 

purplish -carmine Color, an.l i 

ilium size. The fruit Is sum 

and uniform. Fkt. 5c; os. 2 

» 4 lb. 75c; lb. $2.25. 
Beauty. A rather early, tall vario 

very prolific, with good-siz 
i h fruit of a purplish -c 
mine color. Fkt. 5c; os. 25c; 
lb. 75c; lb. $2.25. 



open field until about May 1st. Ths seed must be sown in well- 

A hardy and stock \ plant is had by transplanting the small plants in the bed a few 

high, the top may be pinched off and the plant grows stockier. 

•ill yield plants enough to set an sere. In the 
is advisable in the Harden. Good soil produces 
■ring, especially spraying the plant, is injurious to 
he roots at regular intervals. 



ill 



yhlch has proven ; 



.lays 



the 



ii 1 1 



* 'balk's Early Jewel, which 
it otherwise resembles. It is 
smooth, very even in size, very 
Solid, and also very prolific It 
Is one of the best house-garden, 
canning and shipping Tomatoes 
in existence. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c; 
Va lb. 1.50; lb. $5.00. 

CHALK'S EARLY JEWEL 

A wonderful new variety, in that 
it is early and bears continuously 
throughout the season. The 
fruit is large, smooth, uniform, 
and well-ripened clear to the 
stem, and the flavor and quality 
are especially fine. Color, bright 
scarlet. Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c; V A lb. 
85c; lb. S2.75. 
Dwarf Champion. A dwarf variety, 
sometimes called the tree to- 
mato on account of its upright 
growth and its ability to stand 
alone without trelllslng. Fruit 
medium-sized, smooth, uniform, 
and of a purplish-carmine color. 
Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; y A lb. 75c; lb. 
$2.50. 

nWAPP plAVT Dwarf plant and giant fruit. A 

aVVY.tt.lvr *J***n l selection out of a cross between 
Ponderosa and Dwarf Champion, and it partakes of the 
nature of both parents. The fruit has the mild sweet 
flavor of Ponderosa, is also large and meaty with very 
little core. It is deep purplish-crimson in color and 
belongs to the later-fruiting tvpes. Pkt. 10c; oz. $1. 00; 
Va lb. $3.00; lb. $10.00. 

Barliana (Sparks). The earliest tall variety, forming ripe 
fruit much earlier than any other variety. The fruit 
is large, smooth, of a bright scarlet color, and of fine 
quality. Very valuable for early market use. Pkt. 10c; 
os. 35c; y A lb. $1.00; lb. $3.25. 

Favorite. A tall variety, bearing globe-shaped scarlet fruit. 
The fruit is smooth and uniform, and well ripened to 
the stem. Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; y A lb. 75c; lb. $2.25. 

Golden Queen. A large-fruited, tall variety, bearing smooth, 
bright yellow fruit of fine quality. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; 
y 4 lb. 76c; lb. $2.60. 

Husk Tomato, or Ground Cherry. A small variety that 
is covered by a loose covering or husk. The true edi- 
ble variety is vellow and is used for preserves. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 25c; y A lb. 90c; lb. $3.00. 

MATPI4I P^^ There is no better tomato grown than 

mn 1 ^nL.LJJ Matchless with its large fruit, smooth 
and uniform. Color, bright cardinal red. A heavy crop- 
per and of excellent flavor. Equally good for the home 
garden, for canning and for market. Morse's extra 
selected strain. Fkt. 10c; oz. 40c; Vi lb. $1.10; lb. $4.00. 

Perfection. A tall variety, with medium-sized, globular, 
uniform fruit, which is smooth and well ripened to 
the stem. Color bright scarlet. Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; y A lb. 
75c; lb. $2.25. 

Ponderosa. An extremely large, irregular-fruited variety. 
Vine tall, and fruit very solid and purplish-carmine in 
color. Rather coarse and of fair quality only. Pkt. 
10c; os. 40o ; Vi lb. $1.00; lb. $3.50. 




Tomato Stone 

Bed Cherry. The fruit is small and globe-shaped, about 
one to two inches in diameter. It is very valuable 
for preserving. Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; V4 lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

Bed Pear Shaped. As the name implies, the fruit is shaped 
like a pear — small at the stem and enlarged at the 
top. It is small, being about two or three inches long. 
It is bright scarlet. Pkt. 5c; os. 25c; y A lb. 75c; lb. $$.50. 

CTONF The best main crop tomato for all purposes, 

■^ * vllE* an ,3 largely used for canning. Vine tall and 
prolific. Fruit smooth, large and uniform. Color 
bright scarlet. Fkt. 5c; os. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.25. 

TROPHY An old favorite and much esteemed for its 

* l^vrn 1 productiveness and hardiness. The fruit is 
somewhat irregular, but of fine quality, and is valuable 
for canning. The true stock is scarlet in color, and the 
fruit shows a distinct navel at the blossom end. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 20c; y 4 lb. 60c; lb. $2.00. 

Yellow Cherry. A small-fruited, bright, golden-yellow 
variety ; very attractive for salads or preserves. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 25c; H lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

Yellow Pear Shaped. A small-fruited variety, which is 
golden-yellow. It is very useful for salads when the 
fruit is simply cut in two lengthwise. Fkt. 5c; os. 25c; 
% lb 75c; lb. $2.50. 



We urge you to place your order for Morse's Seeds as 
early as possible. There is a very great rush every Spring 
by necessity, but if you have ordered early you will have 
the seeds to plant the moment they are required. We try 
to get every order off the day follozving its receipt but in 
Spring, on account of the many orders, we sometimes get 
behind. Will you not help us, and save yourself from wor- 
rying, by placing your order early? 



"I put in a lawn a year ago of your Golden Gate Park Mistturt and it has made 

37 



ii in fine condition now." 
Gee. A. Green, Los Goto*, Calif. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



TURNIPS 



For fall and winter use sow the seed in August, in rows 10 to 18 inches apart, 
plants when very young to three or four inches apart. For spring use sow in January. 

For field culture sow in rows about two feet apart, using one to three pounds of seed per 
Aniber or Yellow Globe. Skin is a clear yellow. Is of large 

size and tine flavor. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H 11). 20c; lb. 60c. 
Cow Horn. A long, pure white variety, resembling a white 

carrot more than a turnip. The flesh is tender and 

sweet, and it is quite popular as a market variety on 

this account. Fkt. 5c; 02. 10c; H lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 
Early Snowball. A medium globe-shaped variety of pure 

white. Very solid and of the best quality. Fkt, 5c; oz. 

10c; H lb. 25c; lb. 80c. 

EARLY WHITE FLAT DUTCH (Strap 

I *»^^ jV medium-sized, flat variety; clear white, early, 

LiCai^ and of fine flavor. A fine table variety. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 10c; y A 1». 20c; lb. 60c. 
Extra Early White Milan. A very early variety, medium 

sized, flat and clear white. A fine home-garden va- 
riety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 45c; lb. $1.50. 
Extra Early Purple Top Milan. A very early variety, medium 

sized, very flat, and white with purple top. Pkt. 5c; oz. 

15c; H lb- 45c; lb. $1.40. 
Orange Jelly, or Golden Globe. A globe-shaped, yellow variety 

with firm and crisp yellow flesh. A very fine table variety. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 20c; lb. 65c. 

PURPLE TOP FLAT DUTCH (Strap 

I oaft An earlv fiat variety. White, with purple 
•L'Car^ top. Probably the most popular and generally 
used garden variety. It matures quickly and has fine 
grained flesh of mild flavor. In Colombo Market where 
the vegetables for San Francisco are handled, you will 
see more of Purple Top Flat Dutch than of any other 
sort. It forms early a fine root, even in shape and of 

best quality. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 

20c; lb. 60c. 





White Flat Dutch Turnips 



PURPLE TOP WHITE GLOBE ^^TTooiT^^ iZf B £S e - 

shaped, white with purple top. Flesh, white, firm and tender. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 
Yi lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

Purple Top Yellow Aberdeen. A medium sized variety, generally used for stock feed- 
ing. Is yellow, with purple top. Flesh, light yellow. A winter variety, seed of 
which can be sown in summer. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

Fomeranean White Globe. Large white variety, used largely for stock feeding 
Is globe-shaped, large leaves. Hardy. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V4 !*>• 20c; lb. 60c. 

Seven Top (for greens). Cultivated for its leaves; cooked same as spinach and mus 
tard. The root is small and not used. Pkt. -5c; oz. 10c; y± lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

White Egg. A small, oval-shaped turnip with pure white skin and white, fine-grained 
flesh. A handsome variety and very early. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; \i lb. 25c; lb. 65o. 

RUTA BAGAS, OR SWEDES 



pla 



planted 



■rly 



very extensively for stock feeding, and makt 
for winter turnips, but require a longer seas 
a July. The rows should be at least two a 
light or twelve inches. The roots frequently grow to 



and valuable crop. 



AMERICAN PURPLE TOP, OR LONG ISLAND b e n 8 e t °iSd 

most popular varieties, with yellow flesh. It is yellow below ground, with purple 
top above, and the leaves are small. A good stock feeding or table variety. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 10c; V\ lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

Iiaing-'s Purple Top. A globe-shaped variety of good quality. Flesh yellow; skin, yel- % 
low below ground, and purple above. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 14 lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

LARGE WHITE, or SWEET GERMAN. A very large variety with white skin and 
white flesh, which is tender and sweet. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y<± lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

Monarch, or Tankard. Roots ovoid in shape and very large. Flesh, yellow; skin, yellow 
below ground and purple above. Pkt. 5c; oz, 10c; y& lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 

Yellow Purple Top Swede. The well-known and most commonly used variety. Roota, 
globular; skin, yellow under ground and purple above. Flesh of fine flavor. Val- 
uable for either table use or stock feeding. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y* lb. 20c; lb. 60c. 



Purple Top White Globe Turnip 



TOBACCO 



Sow early in frames or seed beds and transplant when weather ht 

CONNECTICUT SEED LEAF. The best known and most 
widely used variety throughout the middle and northern 
States and Canada, It is the hardiest variety in culti- 
vation. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; V A lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 

Havana (Domestic). Fkt. 10c; oz. 25c; U lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 



become warm and frost has passed. Set in 4-foot rows, 30 

Vuelta da Abajo (Imported Havana). Fkt. 15c; oz. 
White Bur ley. Fkt. 5c; oz. 30c; % lb. $1.00; lb. $3.00. 
Yellow Fryor. Pkt. 10c; oz. 25c; Vi lb. 75c; lb. $2.50. 
Kentucky Yellow. Fkt. 10c; oz. 25c; % lb. 75c; lb. $2.6 



C. C MORSE A CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CAUF. 



AROMATIC, MEDICINAL AND POT HERBS 



ial. Tho seed especially beins used 
J. also for flavoring liquors nnl for 
i. Grows about two feet tall. Sow 
plants are to stand. Pkt. So; ox. 10c; 



Ha 



on, and is easy to now. Plant arrow 

rfa Pkt. 5c; ox. 25c; * 4 lb. 75c. 

BASH., SWEET. A hardy annual, the leaves o 

a ilovt-r-like Mnvor. Used for seasoning i 

i easiest culture 

the weather permits. Pkt. 



can be sown 
5c ; ox. 20c ; 



K lb. 50c. 

Borajre. The leaves are used for flavoring and the flowers 

furnish bee pasture. Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; *i lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 

Caraway. A biennial herb, grown for its seeds, which 

tsed fOr flavoring breads cakes and cheese: also 

occasionally for the young shoots and leaves, which are 
ti. Grows two feet high. Is of easy culture. Sow 

the seed in the Sprint,- for seed crop the following year. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 10c; »i lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 
Catnip. Practically a wild plant. Is a hardy perennial, 

the leaves of which are used for medicinal purposes. 

Pkt. 5c; ox. 40c; »« lb. $125; lb. $4.00. 
Coriander. An easily grown herb, the seeds of which 

are used for flavoring pastry, confectionery and liquors. 

Grows two to three feet high. Pkt. 5c; V4 lb. 15c; lb. 45c. 
Dill. An annual herb, the seeds of which are used for 



seasoning. The foliage 
well as for medicinal purposes, 
feet high. Its largest use is pickling 
"Dill Pickles." Pkt. 5c; 



also used for flavoring 

3 two to three 
umbers in what 
10c; y 4 lb. 20c; 



A hardy perennial, the leaves of which 
soups, garnishes, and salads. The seed 
vn early and plants thinned to six or eight 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y+ lb. 30c; 



lb. 60c. 
Fenuel Sweet, 
are used 
should be s 

plants to foot of row. 
lb. SI .00. 

Horehonnd. A hardy perennial shrub, one to three feet 
high, with whitish, hairy leaves, which are used in con- 
fectionery, and in medicines for coughs and colds. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 20c; V4 lb. 60c. 

Hyssop. A hardy perennial s.irub, growing eighteen inches 



hardy 
Used for 
dried. Pkt. 5c; 02 



high. 



Lavender. A har< 

mill Conning a 1 
as a garden pla 
and I 



Ial, growing two feet high 

eel in diameter. Used 

: on account of its fragrant blossoms 

lone, fragrant stems are frequently 

used for fancy work when dried. Pkt. 5c; ox. 20c; 

M lb. 60c; lb. $2.00. 

Sweet Marjoram. A half-hardy perennial, the leaves 
of which are us.-. I both green and dried for flavoring 
or seasoning. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; V\ lb. 60c; lb. $1.75. 

Rosemary. A hardy perennial shrub, the loaves of which are 
used for seasoning and medicinal purposes. Oil of 
Rosemary is distilled from the leaves. Pkt. 5c; ox. 35c; 
U lb. 31.00. 

Rue. A hardy perennial, thriving on poor soil. Has a 
peculiar smell; leaves are hitter. Is used as a stimulant, 
but should be used with caution, since Its use sometimes 
results in Injury. Pkt. 10c; oz. 30c; 1 4 lb. 90c. 

Sage. A hardy perennial shrub, with whitish-green, oval, 
and very much wrinkled leaves, which have a pleasant 
smell and which are used for seasoning. It is easly 
grown and the seed can be sown almost any time. Its 
fragrant, purplish flowers are specially attractive to 
bees, and the finest white honey lias its source in sage 
blossoms. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; 14 lb. 60c; lb. $1.75. 

Summer Savory. A hardy annual, the stems and leaves 
of which are used for flavoring dressings and soups. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 45c. 

Winter Savory. A hardy perennial, the leaves of which 
are used for seasoning. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; V* lb. 60c. 

Tansy. A very easily grown perennial plant, growing 
about three feet high. Its leaves are used for medicinal 
purposes, especially for dropsy and kindred disorders. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; \\ lb. $1.00. 

Tarragon. The leaves are used for seasoning. The 
plants continue to bear leaves for a long period. Pkt. 
10c; 1 4 oz. $1.00. 

Thyme. A low-growing, half-shrubby perennial, with fra- 
grant leaves, having a mint-like odor, which are used 
for seasoning. Pkt. 10c; oz. 45c; V4 lb. $1.35. 

Wormwood. A hardv perennial, growing about four feet 
high. The leaves, which are greatly divided, have a 
strong, bitter flavor. They are gathered in the Summer 
and dried, and are largely used in medicines for tonics 
and applications. Also used in liquors, especially absin- 
the. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; 14 lb. 60c. 



VEGETABLE PLANTS AND ROOTS 



We carry the following plants in the season shown and pack the 
their wilting or being damaged in transit. 
Artichoke Plants. January to May. Doz. $1.25. Postage and 

packing 50c doz. Really too heavy to mail. 
Asparagus Boots. 2 years old. January to April. 

Doz. 20c (postpaid 25c doz.); 100 $1.00; $7.00 per 1000. 
Cabbage Plants. November to June. Doz. 15c; 100 

85c; doz. 20c, postpaid. 
Cauliflower Plants. November to June. Doz. 20c; 



efully for shipping. The purcha 



takes the risk of 



Doz. 20c; 100 $1.25; 



100 $1.00; doz. 25c, postpaid. 
Celery Plants. March to May. 

doz. 25c, postpaid. 
Egg Plant. March 15th to May 15th. Doz. 25c; doz. 

30c, postpaid. 
Garlic. November to May. 15c per lb.; 10 lbs. $1.00; 



Pepper, Large Bell. March 15th to May. Doz. 25c; 

100 $1.50; doz. 30c, postpaid. 
Pepper, Cayenne. March 15th to May. Doz. 25c; 100 

$1.50; doz. 30c, postpaid. 
Rhubarb Boots. December to May. Each 15c; doz. 

$1.50; doz. $1.75, postpaid. 
Bhubarb Boots, Crimson Winter. Each 25c; 5 for $1.00; 

per 100 $12.00; postage additional 15c each root. 
Sweet Potatoes. April to June. Doz. 20c; 100 $1.00; 

postpaid, $1.25; doz. 25c, postpaid. 
Tomato, Extra Early Plants. March. Doz. 25c. 
Tomato, Stone, Etc. April to June. Doz. 20c; 100 $1.25; 

doz. 25c. postpaid. 
Herbs, Chives, Sweet Marjoram, Sage, Savory, Thyme, 

Tarragon. Two plants of any kind or assorted for 

25c; postpaid, 30c. 



LAWN GRASSES 



On the inside of the back cover you will find listed the various lawn grasses and lawn mixtures, together with direc- 
tions for lawn making. Our lawn mixtures have made many fine lawns under conditions which were unfavorable and 
Seemingly impossible. They are well worth trying. See inside of back cover for prices and descriptions. 



Fertilizer. To insure a rapid growth of grass some kind 
of fertilizer is necessary, especially in lawns where the 
nourishment of the soil has been used up by continuously 
growing on the same place. We have a fertilizer especially 
prepared to invigorate the growth of grass and to keep 
it that dark green color. Use one and one-half pounds to 
one hundred square feet and make two applications each 
year. By express or freight only. Odorless Dawn Dressing-, 
10 lbs. 60c; 25 lbs. $1.25; 50 lbs. $2.00; 100 lbs. $3.50. 

"Lawns and How to Make Them," is an excellent, well 
illustrated book, dealing with lawns and lawn grasses and 
suited where more information is required. 



PACIFIC BYE GRASS (MOBSE'S). Makes a fine bright 
green lawn on sandy soils. Per lb. 25c; 100 lbs. $20.00, 
if by mail, lb. 35c. 

MOBSE'S "GOLDEN GATE PARK" DAWN MIXTURE. A 

verv hardv mixture, containing a little white clover. 
Per lb. 25c; 100 lbs. $20.00; if by mail, lb., 35c. 

Per lb. 15c; 100 lbs. $10.00; 



MOBSE'S CALIFORNIA DAWN mixture. Our best gen- 
eral mixture for fine lawns, contains only the finest 
leaved grasses in the correct proportion to make a 
good fine turf which will wear as no other can and will 
still look well summer and winter. By express or 
freight. Per lb., 35c; per 100 lbe. $30.00. Postpaid per 
lb. 45o. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



PLANTING 
FOR MORSE'S 





Quantity of Seed for 
100 ft. of Row 


Quantity of Seed 


General Time of Sowing 


Time of Sowing about 




Variety 


Needed for 1 Acre. 


where Winters are 


San Francisco and 








Field Culture 


Cold 


Central Cal. 




ARTICHOKE 


hi oz. (3 pkts.) 


6 oz. T. 


Early Spring. 


Sept. to Jan. T. 




Plants (Globe) . . . 


17 plants 


2904 plants 


Spring. 


Jan. to March. 




" (Jerusalem) 


3 lbs. 


5-7 sacks 


Spring. 


February to May. 




ASPARAGUS (Seed) 


1 oz. 


1 Ib.in seed bed. T. 


Early Spring. 


February to April. T. 




(Plants) 


50 


1,800-3.000 


Early Spring. 


December to April. 




BEANS, Bush 


About 1 lb. 


50 lbs. 


Late Spring. 


April to August. S. 




Pole 


8 oz. 


25 lbs. 


Late Spring. 


April 15th to August. S. 




BEETS 


2 oz. 


7 lbs. 


Spring. 


All year round. S. 




BROCCOLI 


X oz. (1 pkt.) 


2-3 oz. T. 


Spring. 


January to Mav. 




BRUSSELS SPROUTS 


Ji oz. (2 pkts.) 


2-3 oz. T. 


Early Spring 


Jan. to March — July to August. 


r 


CABBAGE 


Yl oz. (2 pkts.) 


2-3 oz. T. 


Early Spring. 


Jan. to April— July to October. 


\ 


CARROT 


1 oz. 


2hi lbs. 


Spring. 


All year round. S 




CAULIFLOWER 


Hoz. 


2 oz. T. 


Early Spring. 


June to January. 




CELERY 


Yi oz. (2 pkts.) 


2 oz. T. 


Spring (rather late). 


January to June. T. 




CHERVIL 


1 oz. 




Early Spring. 


February to May. 




CHICORY 


H oz. (1 pkt.) 


4 lbs. 


Early Spring. 


February to April. 




COLLARDS 


hi oz. (1 pkt.) 


2-3 oz. T. 


Early and Late Spring. 


All year round. 




CORN SALAD 


2 oz. 




Early Spring and Late Summer. 


March and April — Sept. to Nnver 


iber 


CORN 


IK lbs. per 100 hin. 


15 lbs. 


Late Spring. 


April 20th to July 15th. 




CUCUMBER 


hi oz. (2 pkts.) 


3 lbs. 


Late Spring, 


April 15th to June 15th. 




DANDELION 


hi oz. (4 pkts.) 




Spring. 


May and June. 




EGG PLANT 


H oz. (1 pkt.) 


4 oz. T. 


Early Spring in Hot-bed. 


February to April. T. 




ENDIVE 


1 oz. 


4 lbs. 




July to October. 




HORSE RADISH 


70 roots 




Spring. 


January to May. 




KALE 


Yi oz. (1 pkt.) 


2 lbs. 


Spring. 


January to April — July to October 




KOHL RABI 


hi oz. (1 pkt.) 


4 lbs. 


Early Spring. 


January to May — July to Octob<- 




LEEK 


hi oz. 


4 lbs. 


Early Spring. 


January to March. 




LETTUCE 


hi oz. (3 pkts.) 


4 lbs. 


Early and Late Spring. 


All year round. S. 




MUSKMELON 


hi oz. (3 pkts.) 


3 lbs. 


Late Spring and Early Summer. 


April 20th to June. 




WATERMELON 


1 oz. 


2-4 lbs. 


Late Spring. 


May to June. 




MUSTARD 


hi oz. (1 pkt.) 


2-3 lbs. 


Spring. 


February to May. 




OKRA 




Slbs. 


Late Spring. 


April 15th to June. 




ONION 


Moz. 


4 lbs. 


Early Spring. • 


November to March. 




PARSLEY 


hi oz. (1 pkt.) 


3 lbs. 


Spring. 


All year round. 




PARSNIP 


hi oz. (2 pkts.) 


3 lbs. 


Early Spring. 


March to June. 




PEAS 


2 lbs. 


60-125 lbs. 


Early and Late Spring. 


All year round. S. 




PEPPER 


Ys oz. (1 pkt.) 


3 oz. T. 


Early Spring in Hot-bed. 


February to March T. 




POTATO, Irish 


5 lbs. 


5-6 sacks 


Late Spring. 


January to May. 




" Sweet 


75 slips 


9,680 plants 


Late Spring. 






PUMPKIN 


hi oz. (2 pkts.) 


3 or 4 lbs. 


Late Spring. 


May to June. 




RADISH 


1 oz. 


10 lbs. 


Spring. S. 


All year round. S. 




RHUBARB 




lib. 


Spring. 


February to May. T 




Roots 


33 plants 


2.420 


Early Spring. 


January to April. 




SALSIFY 


1 oz. 


8 lbs. 


Early Spring. 


February to May. 




SPINACH 


1 oz. 


8 lbs. 


Early Spring and Fall. 


All year round. S. 




SQUASH 


hi oz. (2 pkts.) 


2-3 lbs. 


Late Spring. 

Early Spring in Hot-beds. 






TOMATO 


Ys oz. (1 pkt.) 


2 oz. T. 


February to May. T. 




TURNIP 


Ya oz. (3 pkts.) 


3-4 lbs. 


Spring and Summer. 


August to April. S. 






GI 


iNERAL 


. NOTES 







The information given here is as accurate as can be gathered allowing for the different ways of planting and different 
distances practiced in various parts of the coast. The usual distances are here given and the planter must use his judg- 
ment for his particular case. Where garden cultivation is by wheel hoe, the greater distance is better employed, and 
where it is by hand work, the smaller distance or even less may be better. Jf the patch will be cultivated by horse, I 
the distances in the field culture column should be used. 

The depth at which to plant seed cannot be given more than approximately because it varies so much with the eondi- ^ 
tion of the moisture in the soil and the time of year. All seeds must have air, moisture and heat to germinate. Five! 
times the diameter of the seed is approximately right for good conditions, but for sowing in the rainy season and in ^ 
wet soils that is too deep, and for sowing the same seed in the dry season it is too shallow. For field culture, sow com- \ 
paratively deep late in Spring and when the ground is becoming dry. The Seed Drill must get the seed to moist earth, 
and if rain is not expected it must be rolled or otherwise well firmed to get the soil packed tightly around. This will aid 
germination greatly. Firm only lightly, soils which are heavy or wet. Seed to be sown in dry soil may be soaked for two 
or three hours only in tepid water to hasten it. Such seed will not then go through a drill. 

"S" placed in the column of "Time for Sowing about San Francisco and Central California," means that those sorts 
are sown for succession. Usually the plantings are made two weeks apart. Other sorts are often planted early and again 
late for crops at two different seasons. 

"T," placed iD the same column of "Time for sowing about San Francisco," means that those sorts are always started 
in boxes or beds and later transplanted. 

"T, " placed in the column of "Quantity of Seed needed for 1 Acre," is to mark those sorts which are usually sown 
in beds and later transplanted to the garden, and always transplanted to the field. These are sown without heat or with 
but very little, excepting Egg Plant, Pepper and Tomato, which require heat to do well. 

There is inserted a column of comparative dates for those who live in the mountains and where Winters are cold. 



40 



C. C. MflRSR * CO.- SEKBS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



TABLE 
VEGETABLE SEEDS 



ARTICHOKE 

Plants <ili.hr 
Jerusalem 
ASPARAGUS rSwd 

'Plain. 
BEANS. Buah 
Pol. 
BEETS.. 
BROCCOLI 
BRUSSELS SPROUTS 
CABBAOE 
CARROT 
CAULIFLOWER 
CELERY 
CHERVIL 
CHICORY. 
COLLARDS 
CORN SALAD 
CORN 

CUCUMBER 
DANDELION 
EO.O PLANT 
ENDIVE 

HORSE RADISH 
KALE 



KOHL RABI 

LEEK 

LETTUCE 

MUSKMELON 

WATERMELON 

MUSTARD. 

OKRA 

ONION... 
PARSLEY 
PARSNIP 
PEAS 



Crop Matures 
(In About) 

Srcond Spring 
Next Spring 
I-alc Summer 
Third Spring 
Next Spring 
45-65 days 

. 65 days, up 

■hi uo days 

. 6 mouths 

90-150 days 

Eaily 

110 days 
. 6 months 

Early 

4 months 



100 days 
80-100 davs 
120 days 
<. months 
160 days, up 
100 days 
8 months 
45 days 

4 months 

Late Summer 

65 days, up 

120-140 days 

120-1411 days 

Early 

2.4 months 



135-150 days 
Any time 
4 months 
. 8 to 12 weeks 

PEPPER 130-150 days 

POTATO. Irish July to September 

PUMPKIN 

RADISH 

RHUBARB 



SALSIFY 
SPINACH 
SQUASH 
TOMATO 
TURNIP... 



100-125 days 
30-45 days 
Second Spring 
Next Spring 
5 months 
40 to 45 days 
S. 65 and W. 1 
150 days 
60-75 day-s 



X" 

H" 

H" 



a-i" 

1-2" 
1-2" 



2-4" 

X" 

4-8" 



u- 



5 ft. 

5 ft. 

4 ft. 

1-2 ft. in b 

7 or 8 ft. 

24-30" 

36" 
20-24" 
30-40" 
30-36" 
30-36" 
22-28" 
30-36" 

4 ft. 
30-36" 
30-36" 
30-36" 

30" 



30" 
4-5 ft 
22-28" 
24-36" 
24-30" 
24-36" 
24-36" 
3-34 ft. 



6 ft. 

6 ft. 
24-30" 
24-30" 



3 ft. 
3 ft. 
3 ft. 



18-24" 
8-12" 
16-20" 
18-24" 



6-12" 
. 4 ft. 
to 10 ft. 



3 ft. 

3 or 4 ft. 

3-4" 



"Garden Culture" 
For Maud Cultivation 



3 ft. 

4 ft. 
2 ft. 

1 ft. 

2 ft. 
18-24" 

.< 4 ft. hills 
12-18" 
24-30" 
24-311" 
24-30" 
12-18" 
24-30" 
18-20" 
18-20" 
18-20" 
18-20" 
12-18" 
36" hill. 
4-6 ft. 
18-24" 
24-30" 
18" 



18" 

12-14" 

15-18" 

4 to 6 ft. hills 

8 ft. hills 

12-18" 

3 ft. 

12-14" 

12-18" 

15" 

14 and 36" 



12" 
♦ ft. 
12-15" 
12-18" " 
8 ft. hills 
4-6 ft. hills 
10-18" 



Leave Plants Aparl 
in Rows 
2-3 ft. 
2-3 ft. 
1-2 ft. 

3-S" 
15-20" 

3-4" 
3-4 ft. 

2-4" 
12-18" 
16-24" 
12-18" 



4-6" 

to 5 ft. 
6 ft. 



3-4" 

4 to 6 ft. 
3-6 ft. 
3-8" 



There are three terms used there, which we define as follows: 

"Early Spring," means as soon as the buds in the trees begin to swell, and the ground can be worked into gardening 
condition. This may be in March or April. Frosts have not passed, and such plants, if not too succulent, will stand a 
frost. 

"Spring," refers to those vegetables which are not so hardy as the above and which are usually planted later be- 
cause they do so much better planted later. If, for any reason, early planting is necessary, they can be put in a week 
after the foregoing. 

'Late Spring," is the time of the year when the ground is well warmed and all frosts are passed. This probably will 
be in May. 

"Early Summer," means planting in June and July. 

HOT-BEDS for forcing plants are best made in the following manner: — Dig out a space the size of your frame to a 
depth of two feet. Into this put fresh horse manure mixed with a good deal of bedding straw, to a depth of one foot or 
eighteen inches. Tread this down well and on top spread ten inches of good soil mixed with sand. The frame is just four 
sides of one-inch board and made to slope toward the South from eighteen inches at back, fifteen to twelve inches at 
front. The distance from front to back is three feet and the frame is as long as required. Put over this, glazed sash 
which can be hinged at back. This sash is raised during the day to prevent the bed over-heating and the plants from 
growing tall, spindly and weak. The sash must be white-washed or covered with a sack if the sun gets too hot. Sow the 
seed in rows from front to back, and they will quickly start. Care must be taken to give ventilation each day, or the 
plants will damp off, and when ready to plant out, lift the sash higher each succeeding day, so as to harden the plants. 
Water most carefully. Set the frame in a sunny spot sheltered from the prevailing winds. 

For our California conditions, that is but very slight cold, the bed does not need to be so hot. Mix the fresh horse 
manure with a good amount of chaff or dry leaves so that it will be less hot. Also sow the seed in little boxes, about 
eighteen by fifteen inches, in prepared light soil. These boxes make the plants easy to handle and the boxes can be raised 
and a board put under them if the ground becomes too hot. There is also an advantage in using cloth instead of glass 
to cover the frame as this is less liable to let the plants over-heat. A cold frame is the same as a hot bed placed on the 
even ground and in which no horse manure has been added to give heat. This is good to start early Cabbage and the 
other early vegetable plants, except Egg Plant, Pepper and Tomato. 

41 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




WE ARE HEADQUARTERS IN CALIFORNIA FOR ALFALFA, CLOVERS AND GRASS SEEDS 



ALFALFA 



A | CAI PA (MEDIO&.G-0 SATIVA), and also known as 
*\L*r £\l*r *\ Lucerne and Chili Clover is one of the most 
valuable forage or pasture grasses; it is very nutritious 
both as green feed and as hay. It requires moist land 
or frequent irrigation and bears from four to six crops 
of hay a year. It does well in almost any climate and 
as it draws nitrogen from the air, it naturally improves 
any soil when is sown to it. 

The land should be prepared by deep plowing and 
thorough harrowing and should be well drained, for 
Alfalfa will not stand moisture too close to the surface. 

It can he either drilled or broadcasted in and from 
15 lbs. to 25 lbs. per acre is required. It is best to 
sow in the fall, after the first rain, but can also be 
sown in the spring; but fall sowing is recommended 
whenever possible. 

Alfalfa Seed is graded by the amount of dead matter 
and the percentage of weed seeds it contains. The very 
worst weed is dodder, ( called also Golden Thread and 
Love Vine) which is a yellow parasitic plant with 
abundant stems but no leaves and which gathers its 
nutrition from the Alfalfa plant, killing it quickly and 
spreading to other plants. Isolated spots may be checked 
by hauling straw to the place and burning it. It is 
one of the very worst weeds we have, if not the worst, 
and a little thought will show that Alfalfa which con- 
tains no dodder is worth several cents per pound more 
than Alfalfa which contains this weed. 

Our Alfalfa Seed is grown out of the State, on high 
land and before putting it on sale we determine the 
purity by government test, although inspection before 
purchasing mav show the seed to be free from dodder. 
There is no other weed that we are so fearful of, for 
generally they are either annuals or biennials, which 



seed of most any value the customer may want, although 
it pays to plant only the best. Prospective customers 
can secure samples and have tests made free of charge 
at the Branch Seed Testing Laboratory, University of 
California, Berkeley, Cal. 

We handled twenty-two carloads of alfalfa last year, 
and are always prepared to quote the lowest market 
prices for seed. Lb. 35c, postpaid; by freight or express, 
lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; larger quantities at market price; 

Arabian Alfalfa. Is admirably suited to our irrigated sec- 
tions, especially in the San Joaquin Valley, and has out- 
grown the experimental stage so that we have no hesi- 
tancy in recommending it highly; of rapid and luxuriant 
growth. We have the large seeded type, which was the 
sort originally sent out by the United States Dept. of 
Agriculture. 50c per lb, postpaid; by freight 40c per 
lb.; 10 lbs. $3.50. 

Peruvian Alfalfa. A new long season variety just 
put on the market now. A grand variety for Southern 
California. See Novelty, page 2. Lb. 50c, postpaid; 
by express or freight, lb. 40c; 10 lbs. $3.00. Please 
write in regard to larger quantities. 

Turkestan or Dry-laud Alfalfa. We make direct importa- 
tions of this seed and we can recommend it for 
situations where water is not abundant. We suggest 
that it be seeded a little heavier than the ordinary 
type, as it is inclined to become coarse and woody; and 
thick sowing will produce finer plants. It is proving 
very satisfactory in the San Joaquin and Sacramento 
Valleys, and other parts of the State, where it is not 
possible to irrigate. We can supply this in original 
package, or in smaller quantities. 40c per lb. postpaid; 
hy freight or express, lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $2.50. Write or 
wire us on larger quantities. 



CLOVER SEEDS 



ALSIKE, OR SWEDISH CLOVER 

perennial 



The prices of some varieties of Clover, Grass and Field seeds may change as the season advances. Prices now given are 
those prevailing when this catalog was published. It will be to advantage of intending purchasers to write for samples 
and special prices "before ordering in large quantities. 

Crimson, or Italian (Trifolium Incarnatum). An annual 
variety, growing 20 to 30 inches high, and hav- 
ing long, crimson blossoms. Excellent for both pasture 
and hay. Sow from 12 to 15 pounds per acre, and cut 
for hay when in full bloom. Lb. 35c, postpaid; by 
freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2 20. 
Japan Clover. (Lespedeza Striata). Thrives in any soil 
and in the driest seasons; it makes fair hay and stock 
eat it readily when green. Sow in the spring, 15 lbs. 
per acre. Lb. 50c, postpaid; by frt., lb. 40c; 10 lbs. $3.50. 



(Trifolium Hybridum.) 

preferred to Red Clover, as u is 
makes better hay for horses. Tht 
valuable for bees. Alsike succeed 
stiff soils. When used alone, so"< 
Lb. 40c, postpaid; hy freight 



variety, sometimes 
generally finer and 
blossoms are also 
; on wet, cold and 
' 8 to 10 lbs. per 
express, lb, 30c; 



10 lbs. $2.50; larger quantities on application, 
Bokhara, or Sweet Clover (Melilotus Alba). Grows 3 
to 5 feet high, covered with small white flowers 
of great fragrance. Very valuable for bee pasture. 



Stan- 



l.-nouna.fot h e«re.-*r^i U oi^r^ , S^« RED CLOVER JSFSIE™?™ ^™S: y! 

."£££*■ M^caro^eftfc^ata). The native for- ^heaviest crop o f any vaHety except alMfa makes 

age plant of California. Of the easiest culture, grow- ?^ rl ?J ,' ^I'r SF.fmds net ■ a?re lb 40c Bo^tpaid- bv 

SUed » ^hlc^ls inuVS' t o W s e ow° ff t e h r an° n !n £&* £ &?%"&.%£"■ "' "^ P ° BtPa ' d ' 

the burr. Sow from August to October, using 15 to 20 ,„„.„.,,.,■„.„ „„„,,.„..,. t^ <■ 

pounds of hulled seed per acre. lb. 35c, postpaid; by WHITF DUTCH (TBlrOLITJM REPENS). Dwarf. 

■■- -- «i 75. WnilL l/UIl/n Spreading vine-like variel 



express or freight, lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $1.75. 
mammoth. Bed or Sapling (Trifolium pratense). Similar 
to Red Clover, but coarser, taller and more hardy. 
Sow from 12 to 15 pounds per acre. lib- 40c, postpaid; 
by freight, lb. 30c. 



■iety, 



white blossoms; used largely for bee pastur 
also an excellent pasture plant for either sheep or 
cattle; also makes a beautiful lawn. Sow 10 pounds 
per acre. lib, 70c, postpaid; by freight, lb. 60c. 



C. C. MORSE St CO.-SEFDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GRASSES 



Add 10c par pound for all g-rat> «e«tU ordered by mall; price* below do not Include postage. 



A WW LESS BROME GRASS (Bromm Inermls). Will stand 

- in dry sections and 
■ 
■ eds on our dry hill- 
Lb. 25c; 10 lbs. S3.00; 100 
lb*. $17.00. 
Bermuda, Grass (Cynodon Dactylon). Named after the 
:tm- it Is a dwarf perennial 
plant and spreads by means of Its long and manj 
Jointed rool stalks, and for hard to eradl- 

foothold; thrtves Muring the 
of the year, and win live under water for 



a long tin 



vermis 



Eikes 



durable lawn ami 


is b Iso used 


This grass is m 




o. The seed is 


erv slow to 


ind molstu 


re. Sow 10 



Being of 
te texture this grass is most valuable for lawns 
anil ideal for putting greens. Jt Is of rapid growth 
and spreading hahit and makes a strong, enduring turf. 
Bow 10 lbs. per acre. Lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $3.75; 100 lbs. 
934.00. 

Crested Bog's Tall (CynoBurus Cristatns). Should enter 
In moderate quantity in permanent pasture and 
lawn mixtures. It does well in the shade, roots deeply, 
is stolontferous and perennial. Valuable in mixture for 
lawns, putting gi eens, and for pasture. If sown alone, 
10 lbs. should be used per acre. lib. 60c; 10 lbs. $4.50. 

Hard Fescue (Festuca Buriuscnla). A dwarf-growing 

; . forming a dense, turfted mat. succeeding well 

in dry situations. Valuable as pasture on dry lands 

and sandy soils. Not recommended for lawns. Sow 

30 lbs. per acre. Lb. 35c; 10 lbs. $3.25; 100 lbs. $30.00. 

Hungarian Millet (Fanicum Germanicuni). Is a valua- 
ble quick growing annual forage plant, Seed is good 
for poultry. Cut for fodder just before blooming. Sow 
30 lbs. per acre. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 75c; 100 lbs. $5.50. 

Italian Bye Grass (Lolium Italicum). Thrives in almost 
any soil and yields early and abundant crops. 
Sown in the fall, will produce an excellent hay crop 
the following season, but lasts only one year. Much 
sown in Humboldt County for pasture and hay. Not 
recommended for lawns. Sow 50 lbs. per acre. Lb. 15c; 
10 lbs. $1.00; 100 lbs. $9.00. 

KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS (Foa Pratensis). Fancy or 

double, extra clean. Though offered at the standard 
weight of 14 lbs. per bushel, the natural weight of this 
fancy seed is 20 lbs. per measured bushel. As this 
grass takes some time to become established, it is pref- 
erably sown in mixtures for pasturage. Is truly 
perennial and prefers lime soils. As a lawn grass 
it is the finest there is — spreading habit, even texture, 
permanent, fine leaf and dark color. For pasture sow 
50 lbs. per acre; for lawns 4 or 5 lbs. per 1,000 square 
feet. Lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2.25; 100 lbs. $20.00. 

Meadow Fescue, or English Blue Grass (Festuca Fratensis). 
A valuable grass for permanent pastures, and for 
meadows for cutting which are rather damp. Makes 
a quick second growth, but does not do well on 
dry soils. Often sown in mixtures. Sow 30 lbs. per 
acre. Lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $4.25; 100 lbs. $38.00. 

Meadow Foxtail (Alopecurus Fratensis). One of the 
hest grasses for permanent pasture, early and of rapid 
growth, Is never sown alone, but always in mixtures, 
using about 4 lbs. per acre. Lb. 40c; 10 lbs. $3.50: 100 
lbs. $33.00. 

Mesquite (Holcus lanatus). Valuable on the cleared 
redwood and pine lands of California and Oregon, giving 
large crops of hay and good pasture. Sow 35 lbs. per 
acre. Lb. 25c; 10 lbs. $2.00; 100 lbs. $16.00. 

Millet German (Fanicum Germanicum; Var.). Will grow 
on any good land and yields heavilv when arti- 
ficially watered; yields from 40 to 60 bushels of seed 
per acre, which is excellent food for stock or poultry. A 
good, green fodder plant. Sow 30 lbs. per acre. Lb. 10c; 
10 lbs. 80c; 100 lbs. $6.00. 

ORCHARD GRASS, OB COCKSFOOT (Dactylis Glomerata). 
One of the most valuable of all pasture grasses; pro- 
duces an immense quantity of forage, and hay of best 
quality. After being mown, comes up quickly and 
yields very heavily. Suitable for pasture under trees. 
Sown in the ashes on cleared redwood land in Hum- 
boldt County. Not suitable for lawns as it grows in 
tussocks. Sow 35 lbs. per acre. Lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $2.75; 
100 lbs. $23.00. 



Pearl Millet (Penclllarla). a perennial plain 
der i Iron a tall and j leldi 

:. n drills 
2 to 5 lbs in His, or 25 I 

Lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.75; 100 lbs. $15.00. 

Perennial Bye Grass (Lolium Perenne). It grows rapidly 

and tnai a tvli ith from 

time of sowing; crows very rapidly. The great pasture 
and meuiiow crass oi Great Britain Valuable for plant- 
ing early on dry hillsides, as it grows so vers quickly. 

A gOOd lawn crass, hut 8 lull arse Sow 60 Lbs 

per a.re. Lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 100 lbs. $10.00. 

Australian rye grass. Especially selected and 



•d. lo 



espi 



ill> 



MIS 



Lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; 



Sow 5 Lbs per L.OOQ squ 

100 lbs. $10.00. 

Red, or Creeping Fescue (Festuca Rubra). Forms a 
rb.se, rich sod and is valua.^e in lawns and should be 
in shade mixtures. Makes a close, Lasting turf on dry, 
sandy soils, and can be used to bind dry banks. Also 
an excellent bottom grass for moist mixture. Sow 30 
lbs per acre. Lb. 40c; 10 lbs. $3.75; 100 lbs. $35.00. 

RED TOP (Agrostis Vulgaris). Jhrd's crass. Second only 
to Timothy as hay grass and better If the ground is 
to be pastured afterward for Red Top makes one of 
the best permanent pastures. Succeeds on all soils, 
though doing best on moist anr' even swampy land. 
A permanent grass and valuable as a lawn grass, giving 
quick effect. Sow 40 lbs. per acre. In Chaff, lb. 20c; 
10 lbs. $1.50; 100 lbs. $12.00. Fancy, Free from Chaff. 
Sow 15 lbs. per acre. Lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $2.50; 100 lbs. 
$22.00. 

Rhode Island Bent Grass (Agrostis Canina). Like Red Top, 
this grass accommodates itself to all soils. Especially 
valuable for lawns on sand at the sea coast; from it the 
lawns at Newport are largely made. Is perennial, dwarf, 
and makes a beautiful, tine, close turf. For lawn sow 
50 lbs. per acre. Lb. 45c; 10 lbs. $4.25; 100 lbs. $40.00. 

Rough-Stalk Meadow Grass (Poa Trivialis). Excellent 
for pastures and meadows, particularly on damp 
soils. As a lawn grass it forms a line turf and does 
well in shaded locations. Sow 20 lbs, per acre. Lb. 45c; 
10 lbs. $400; 100 lbs. $35.00. 

Sheep's Fescue (Festnca Ovina). Short and dense in 
growth, excellent for sheep pastures, because it will 
thrive on poor, gravelly, shallow or hilly soils where 
other grasses fail. Not recommended for lawns under 
ordinary conditions because it bunches. Sow 35 lbs. 
per acre. Lb. 30c; 10 lbs. $2.50; 100 lbs. $23.00. 

Sweet Vernal, True Perennial (Antboxanthum Odoratum). 
Emits an agreeable odor, which it imparts to hay 
or to the lawn when being cut. Sqw only in mix- 
tures, using 2 or 3 lbs. per acre. Per lb. 75c. 

Tall Fescue (Festuca Elatior). Early, nutritive and 
productive in permanent pastures on wet or clay soils. 
On moist lands yields a large amount of good hay. 
Height 3 to 4 feet. Not suitable for lawns Sow 40 
lbs. per acre. Lb. eOc; 10 lbs, $5.50; 100 IbB. $50.00. 

Tall Meadow Oat GraBS (Avena Elatior). Of rapid 
luxuriant growth, recommended for soiling and in per- 
manent hay mixtures, also for winter grazing. This 
variety is not a lawn grass. Sow 50 lbs per acre. Lb. 
35c; 10 lbs. $3 00; 100 lbs. $27.00. 

TIMOTHY (Phleum Fratense). The grade we offer is par- 
ticularly "choice," free from weed seeds and of high 
germinating power. Timothy is the great standard hay 
grass of the eastern part of the country. It makes 
hay of the best quality and produces a larger crop 
on good soil than any other grass. Not adapted for 
pasture, as there is little growth after cutting and 
tramping of stock soon destroys it. Not a lawn grass 
and not adapted for dry soils; height 2 to 3 feet. Often 
sown with red top and red clover. Sow 15 to 20 lbs. 
per acre. Price fluctuates. Lb. 20c; 10 lbs. $1.50; 100 
lbs. $12.00. 

Various Leaved Fescue (Festuca Heterophylla). A per- 
ennial grass suitable for cold, moist soils in which 
it will yield heavily. Valuable in permanent meadows, 
either for mowing or grazing. Height 2 to 3 feet. As 
a lawn grass it is" valuable, especially for shaded places. 
Sow 40 lbs. per acre. Lb. 45e; 10 lbs. $4.00. 

Wood Meadow Grass (Poa Nemoralis). Of early growth 
and thriving well under trees where other grasses will 
not grow. Valuable for pasture, hut expensive. As a 
lawn grass its creeping roots soon form a good turf. 
Should be included in putting green mixtures and 
shaded lawn mixtures. Sow 30 lbs. per acre. Lb. 85c; 
10 lbs. $8.25; 100 lbs. $80.00. 



PASTURE MIXTURES 



for fe 



We have two mixtures oi pusses which are excellent for pastures. They contain all of the best grasses 
those highly priced. No effort or expense has been spared to get the best. These will outlast and outyield 
recommend the addition of _' lbs. of Red Clover, and 1 lb. of Burr Clover to the Morse's Dry Pasture Mixture, and" 
Alsyke Clover to the Wet Pasture Mixture. If wanted for hay add to each 50 lbs. 5 lbs. of Timothy. Sow 4o ' 
MORSE'S DRY PASTURE MIXTURE, Per lb. 30c; per 10 MORSE'S WET PASTURE MIXTURE, Per lb 
lbs. $2.75; per 100 lbs. $25.00. lbs. $2.75; per 100 lbs. $25.00. 

For grasses and clovers which have prices that fluctuate, write for sanroles and market quotations. 
If ordered by mail, 10 cents per pound must be added to above prices for postage. 

43 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MISCELLANEOUS FIELD SEEDS 



Alfilaria (Erodium cicutarium). One of the most nutritious 
of fodder plants and well liked by cattle and horses. 
Alfilaria will thrive and make a good pasture on dry 
hillsides. May be found on Mt. Tamalpais as a pas- 
ture. Sow 20 lbs. per acre. Per % lb. 50c; per lb. $1.50, 
postpaid. 

Australian Salt Bush (Atriplex sem.i-baca.ta). A valuable 
forage plant for poor soils, especially those containing 
alkali. Sow seed in the fall to get the benefit of early 
rains, using 1 to 2 pounds per acre. After the plant 
gets a good start; it will grow with very little moisture. 
In cutting fodder be careful not to injure the crown 
of the plants. Oz. 10c; % lb. 30c; lb. $1.00, all postpaid. 

Broom Corn (Improved Evergreen). Used for making 
brooms, and extensively used on account of its green 
color and fine long straight brush. It grows about 
7 feet hisrh. Sow 10 lbs. per acre. Per lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 
60c; 100 lbs. at market prices. lib. 20c, postpaid. 

Buckwheat (Japanese). The best and most profitable 
variety. It is earlier than Silver Hulled and usually 
more productive. Is also excellent for bee pasture. 
Sow 25 lbs. per acre. Lb. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Buckwheat (Silver Hulled). A very good and popular 
variety. Grain is of a light color, rounder than the com- 
mon variety; has a much thinner husk, earlier. Sow 
25 lbs. per acre. Lb. 10c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Canary. The seed is used for bird food. Is valuable also 
as an ornamental grass and has considerable merit as 
hay. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 70c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Canada Pield Feas. A strong, vigorous pea often planted 
for green manure to plow under in the spring. Makes 
an excellent winter growth when sown in fall; very 
useful for fodder. Sow 100 to 150 lbs. per acre broad- 
cast. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 75c; larger quantities on applica- 
tion; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Cow Peas (Black Eye). Used largely for green manure. 
It is also valuable if allowed to mature the seed, when 
the dry vines can be plowed under and the seed used 
to grind as feed for stock. If for green manure, sow 
broadcast, using 80 lbs. per acre. If for seed or fodder, 
sow in rows 3 feet apart, using 40 lbs. per acre. Sow 
late in spring. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Egyptian or Jerusalem Corn, or Dhoura. Belongs to non- 
saccharine sorghums. It is considered a good grain 
for dry sections and seasons. It produces several small 
heads on side shoots, often as many as 8 heads on a 
stalk. The seed makes excellent chicken food. Plant 8 
lbs. per acre. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 60c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Fenugreek. Used in the South for green manure to gather 
nitrogen to he plowed under. Canada Field Peas and 
Vetches are superior in our opinion for this purpose. 
The seed is fed to hogs to aid in fattening them, and 
to horses to ' give temporary fire and vigor. Lb. 35c, 
postpaid. 



Niles Feas. Used principally for green manure. Is a strong, 
vigorous grower, making long vines and good roots. 
Sow broadcast, using 100 to 150 pounds of seed per 
acre. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 75c; lb. 20c, postpaid; Larger 
quantities on application. 

Faspalum Dilitatum, or Dallis Grass. A new grass for 
hot, dry climates. A hardy perennial from Australia, 
growing 5 feet high, without getting tough, and seems 
to be particularly adapted for grazing dairy cattle. It 
stands drought remarkably well, and shoots rapidly 
again with the first shower of rain, and is a splendid 
winter grass. The seed requires about 3 weeks of moist, 
genial weather to germinate it, but once established, it 
seems to stand anything. Sow S or 10 lbs. per acre. Oz. 
10c; lb. 75c, postpaid. 

Rape (Dwarf Essex). A biennial crop, used principally for 
sheep pasture, of which it yields an abundance of 
the best quality. Is usually sown broadcast on ranges, 
using 4 to 5 lbs. per acre. Lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.25; lb. 
25c, postpaid. 

Soja Bean. Valuable as a forage crop or green manure. 
Also as a green fodder and silo plant. Sow 30 pounds 
per acre, after danger from frost is passed. Lb. 10c; 
10 lbs. 80c; lb. 25c, postpaid. 

Spring" Vetches, or Tares (Vicia Sativa). A plant resembling 
pea vines and valuable for forage or green manure. It 
is usuallv sown with oats or wheat to hold them up. 
Sow 60 pounds per acre with grain, or SO to 100 pounds 
if sown alone. Is hardy and makes a fine winter growth. 
Largely planted in the orange groves of the South for 
green manure and plowed under in spring. Lb. 10c; 10 
lbs. 70c; lb. 20c, postpaid. Larger quantities on appli- 
cation. 

Sugar Cane (Sorghum), Early Amber. A good fodder if 
cut when two feet high. Is nutritious and yields a 
heavy crop. Sow late in April, using ten pounds seed 
per acre in drills, or twenty-five pounds broadcast. 
Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 80c; larger quantities on application. 
Early Orange. A strong, productive variety, either for 
fodder or for syrup. Lb. 15c; lb. 25c, postpaid; larger 
quantities on application. 

Sunflower (Large Russian). A variety bearing large heads, 
frequently 12 to 20 inches in diameter and sometimes 
yielding 1000 pounds of seed per ; 



for feeding chickens and parrots, 
field as soon as danger from fro; 
pounds of seed per 



Flax Seed. Should be 

using 30 pounds of seed per 
crop, or twice that quantity 



the sp 



ig on moist land, 
grown for a seed 
tended for a crop of 



and th 
10 lbs. 75c. 
Emmer. A valuable gra 
United States for se 1 
wide range of soil 
ing 
barley. Thi. 



,-k-Mh 



eral 
dim 



ate, and 



of 



tin 



i pern 



open 
ling 3 



pea-like plant growing 
about 4 feet high and doing well on dry, sandy soils 
for forage. Also a valuable green manure plant for 
fall. Sow broadcast 30 to 50 pounds per 



as early as barley, '<. 
the acre, and from 
and hardy, it stands 
grain, making it a s 



Lb. 25c; 



fall this plant may 
is perfectly hardy and grows well in w 
10 lbs. $2.00; lb. 35c, postpaid. 
Hemp (Kentucky Hemp). A staple crop for manufacturing, 
sown broadcast, using 25 pounds of seed per acre. For 
a seed crop, should be sown in hills 4 feet apart. Grows 
12 to 14 feet high, with deep cut, dark-green leaves. 



ly than oats and 
jrows tall, like rye and matures 
,d vields from 40 to 80 bushels to 
to 6 tons of straw hay. Tough 
the drought better than any other 
•e crop. Prepare your land as you 
oats, and sow at the rate of 75 
-e. Sow very early in the Spring 
tand until it gets 



or Fall, and __ 

before cutting as anv grain that yields well, shell 
easily. In the green state it makes an excellent pasture. 
Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 70c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 
Teosinte (Reana Luxurians). This plant grows quickly and 
produces a large quantity of forage in warm locations. 
The seed should not he sown until all danger of frost is 
past. If cut for green forage, which can be done at any 
stage during growth, two or more joints should he left 
at the base of the stalk. These will sprout out quickly 
into fresh growth, making an even larger crop than at 
first cutting. Sow in drills 4 feet apart, using 4 pounds 
of seed to an acre. Oz. 15c; lb. $1.50. 
Velvet Bean. Used largely as a green-manure plant and 
also for forage. Grows taller and larger than any other 
soil plant, being sometimes 30 feet in length. Sow same 
as Cow Peas, in rows 5 feet apart and in hills 4 feet 
apart in the row. Lb. 15c; 10 lbs. $1.20; lb. 25c, postpaid. 
Whippoorwill Peas. This variety is a great favorite in the 
West and South as a green manure and fodder pea. 
Is early and grows upright. Makes a good growth of 
vine, which can be easily cut. Sow same as Cow Peas. 

t _, ...... tj t , lt „,. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. SI. 00; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Owing "to 7requenT market "fluctuations^oV^Clovef "anT*Field Seeds, we will not list the hunred-pound price, but re- 
quest that all who are interested in quantities will write us for samples and quotations. We carry all Field Seeds in 
immense quantities and are able to quote low prices. For shipment by express or freight deduct 10c per pound from 
the above post-paid prices. 



Makes a stately row alon; 
walk, and is an interesting garden annual. The seed 
is used for birdseed. Lb. 10c; 10 lbs. 75c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Jersey or Cow Hale. A tall-growing variety having a large 
bunch of cabbage-like leaves on top of a stout stem. 
Is much grown for chicken and cow feed. The green 
feed from these plants is very great, and is borne 
continuously. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 25c; lb. 75c. 

Kaffir Corn. Grows from 6 to 10 feet high and thrives in 
hot, dry climates. Makes good fodder for cattle, and 
the seed is used for stock and chicken food. Sown in 
rows 3 feet apart, using 6 to S pounds per acre. Lb. 10c; 
10 lbs. 75c; lb. 20c, postpaid. 

Milo Maize. A non-saccharine sorghum, useful for the 
large amount of foliage, green feed or cured fodder that 



BIRD SEEDS 



Prices do not include postage. 

Blue Maw (Blue Poppy). 25c lb. 

Canary Seed. 10c lb.; 3 lbs. 25c; 7 lbs. 50c; 15 lbs. $1.00. 

Corn, Parrot Soft Mexican. Lb. 10c; 4 lbs. 25c. 

Cuttle Pisb Bone. 35c lb. 

Hemp. 10c lb.; 3 lbs. 25c; 6 lbs. 50c. 



Millet, Beclsaned. 10c lb.; 3 lbs. 25c; 8 lbs. 50c; 16 lbs. $1.00. 
Mixed Bird Seed. A large per cent of Canary. 10c lb.; 3 lbs. 

25c; 8 lbs. 50c; 16 lbs. $1.00. 
Rape. 10c lb.; 3 lbs. 25c; 8 lbs. 50c; 16 lbs. $1.00. 
Sunflower. 10c lb.; 3 lbs. 25c; 6 lbs. 50c; 14 lbs. $1.00. 
Mixed Bird Seed. Packed in 1-lb. cartons, including Gravel 

and Cuttlebone, 10c each. 



C. C. mount & CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

CALIFORNIA TREE AND SHRUB SEEDS 

■ilily of tr.e and shrul. ..cds cannot lip tested before the side 
s»li»i»rliun Ni> Enftnnlei mtDatton can be |i?ei 

• tree to the ron.i: 

Price per Packet, 10 cents except where noted 



Ablea Done/lasli (Don^lns Sprnce). A very large and int- 
:it timber tree 100 to 300 feet high; of pvramid 
•hape. Found throughout the Rocky Mountains, from 
•toxica Verj hard] Oz. 30c; lb. $3.00. 
California Fan Palm ( Waahlngrtonia Fillfera). our well- 
known hardy fan i.aim with threads an the leaves, 
ang on after thev have ilrled. Oz. 15c; 
lb. 01.50. 
Christmas Berry (Photlnia Arbntifolia). A California Ever- 
ii shrnli. 10 feel high, bearing clusters of bright 
re.l berries These are gathered for decorations at 
Christmas time and are familiar to nearlv evervone. 
Oz. 30c; lb. 3150. 
Cnpressns Arlzonica (Blue Cypress). A handsome tree with 
horizontal branches and open head. Forty feet high 
and very I. hie in color. Oz. 40c; lb. S4.00. 
" Ooveniana (Ooven's Cypress). 30 to 10 feet high: very 
ornamental: found In the Coast Ranges of Monterey. 
Oz. 40c; lb. S4.0O. 
" Xiawsoniana (Lawson'a Cypress). A handsome tree, with 
white fragrant wood, free from hnots; easily worked 
and very durable Oz. 40c; lb. $4.00. 
" Macrocarpa (Monterey Cypress). A tree 40 to 60 feet 
high rough hark: spreading, horizontal branches, rich 
green foliage, very ornamental for lawns or parks; 
also used extensively for hedges. Oz. 15c; lb. $1.50. 
" Pyramidalis (Italian Cypress). This variety is of up- 
right pyramidal growth, and is much used in cemeteries. 
Oz. 40c; lb. $4.00. 
Grevillea Bobusta (Silk Oak of East Australia). Beautiful 
fern-like foliage; of rapid growth, dowering when about 
L" feet in height: covered with bright orange-scarlet 
flowers. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c; lb. $5.00. 
Iiibocedrus Decurrens (Thuya Craigiana). A fine, lmr.lv 
timber tree: known as White Cedar of California. Oz. 
40c; lb. $4.00. 
Madrone. A beautiful native tree of California. The 
foliage is a deep green and leathery: it attains a 
considerable size; flowers white. Pkt. 25c. 



Plcea Orandla (Western Bnlsam Plr). Grows 200 to 300 

feel high, 4 to 6 feet in din ter: grows rai i in rich. 

moist soil: valuable timber tree. Oz. 40c; lb. $4.00. 
Picea Magnlflca. The Bed Plr ol the sierras, found at an 

altitude of 700n feet; very hardy. Oz. 50c; lb. $5.00. 
Date Palm (Phoenix Canariensis) . A beautiful, hmg-lea veil 

variety growing to an immense height. 100 seeds for 

25c; 1000 seeds for $1.50. 
Dracaena Indivisa (Dragon Palm). A handsome palm-like 

tree used for planting along avenues. The leaves are 

borne in a head at the tup of a branchless stem, eight 

to fifteen feet high. Oz. 30c; lb. $3.00. 
Pepper Tree (Schinus Molle). Well known handsome shade 

trees, with feathery leaves and red berries. Oz. 15c; 

lb. $1.50. 
Finus Insignia (Monterey Pine). A very ornamental tree 

for parks and lawns; grows from GO to 70 feet high: 
: has beautiful green foliage. Oz. 25c; 



lb. $2.50. 
Jeffreyi. 



gnific 



found at an ele- 
vation or 5000 feet: very hardy. Oz. 35c; lb. $3.50. 
Iiamhertiana (Sugar Pine). A hardy tree of gigantic 
dimensions; found on both slopes of the Sierras. The 
finest pine timber tree. Oz. 30c; lb. $3.00. 
Ponderosa (Yellow Fine). i me of the largest pine 
trees known. Found in Coast Range on the highest 



points. Verv hardy. The i 
Oz. 30c; lb. $3.00. 


lost valuable 


timber variety. 


" Sabiniana (Nut Fine). Ab 

hills of the Coast Range. \ 


indai.t over the dr 
ery hardy. Oz. 20c 


' and hot 
lb. $2.00. 


Sequoia Gigantea (Wellington.! 
tree of California. This i 
exist on the American en 
lb. $7.00. 


l Gigantea). 
s the largest 
ntinent. Pkt 


The 

tree 

25c 


mammoth 

cnown to 

oz. 70c; 


" Sempervirens. Usually kn 


own as Califo 




Redwood. 



Oz. 40c; lb. $4.00. 
Wild Cherry. A native Californi; 



iber of the California forests 



hedge plant 



iter. Cannot be 



ACACIA AND EUCALYPTUS TREE SEEDS 

EUCALYPTUS IS THE GREAT COMING SOURCE OF TIMBER FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Price per Packet, 15 cents, except where noted 



ACACIA Bailey ana. A hi 
foliage; in great lieman 
the most beautiful of t 



40c; lb. $4.00. 



Lopantha. One of the rankest growing sorts, makes 
a bush 15 to 20 feet high with spreading leaves. Largely 
used in Golden Gate Tark. Oz. 20c; lb. $2.00. 

Melanoxylon. In irrigated glens of deep soil this tree 
will attain the height of 80 feet with a stem several 
feet in diameter. Oz. 35c; lb. $3.50. 



fine, 
feath 
IS. Oz. 40c; lb. $4.00. 



rapid-growing tie 



EUCALYPTUS Amygdalina (Giant Guin Tree). Is one of 

the best for subduing malarial effluvia in fever regions, 
although it does not grow with quite the same ease as 
the Eucalyptus globulus. Pkt. 15c; oz. 75c; lb. $7.50. 



). This variety will stand 
? other Eucalyptus and will 
iuick growing timber variety. 



Corynocalyx (Sug'ar Gu: 
more frost (22°) than a 
also stand more drought. 
Oz. 75c; lb. $7.50. 

Ficifolia. Very on 
ing; has beautiful 
50 seeds. 

Globulus (Blue Gum). A very rapid-growing tree, mak- 
ing valuable timber. The common variety — the one 
most generally planted. Ox. 40c; lb. $4.00. 



EUCALYPTUS Leucoxylon (Ironbark Tree). The culture 
of this variety is desirable on poor, stony land, where 
other Eucalypti would be unsatisfactory; flowers are 
a beautiful cerise pink. Pkt. 15c; oz. $1.00. 

" Marginata (Jarrah of Western Australia). A very ex- 
cellent timber. Resists teredo, on which account it is 
largely used for piles. Oz. 75c. 

" Robusta (Swamp Mahogany). Thrives best on low 
grounds, especially near the sea coast; makes a good 
tree for street planting. Oz. 50c; lb. $5.00. 

" Rostrata (Red Gum). A rapid-growing tree; stands 
heat and considerable cold without injurv. Imported, 
oz. 75c; lb. $7.50. Domestic, oz. 40c; lb. $4.00. 

" Stua-rtiana (Apple-Scented Gum Tree). Seems to do 
equally well on rather dry and sandy as on humid soils. 
The wood is of a handsome dark color and takes a 
good polish. Pkt. 15c; oz. $1.00. 

" Teretloornis (Gray Gum). A very hardv, quick-grow- 
ing Eucalyptus; largely used for railroad ties. etc. 
One of the sorts most often planted for timber; makes 
a hardwood which is reddish in color and can be stained 
and used as a substitute for mahogany. There is a 
great future for this tree in California. Oz. 40c; lb. 



$4.50. 
Viminalis. In poor 
in rich soil it attain 
import seed of the 
Eucalypti, and offer a 
packet, 75c per ounce: 



E. Cambagei. 
E. Coriacea. 
E. Crebra. 
E. Gonicalyx. 
E. Gunnii. 



E. Hemiphloia. 
E. Melliodora. 
E. Obliqua. 
E. Platyphilla. 
E. Salig-na. 



E. Polyantbema. 

E. Resinifera. 

E. Rudis. A fine street I 

E. Piperita. 

E. Siderophloia. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MORSE'S 
GIANT PANSIES 




MORSE'S PRIZE STRAIN. This is a mixture of all the giant flowered varieties including both 
plain color sorts, faced sorts and the new giant raffled edge and rare varietes. The seed is saved , 
from Germany's most famous pansy gardens from Exhibition Flowers and numbers of gold medals 
have been won in competition by seed which we use in making Prize Strain Mixture. Grow this 
seed with care, following directions given on page 66, and you will have the most gorgeous 
giant pansies imaginable. Our friends tell us these are the finest Pansies they have ever seen. 
Price per packet (about 500 seeds) 50 cents 



Bugnot Mixed. A circular, ruffled, and five-petaled type, 
with soft, blended colors and tints, veined on the mar- 
gins ani with a dark blotch at the base of each petal. 
fine of the finest varieties. Fkt. 25c. 

Cassier's Giant, Mixed. A snlendid mixture of various 
shades and markings. The blossoms are perfectly 
round and are blotched at the base of 3 to 6 of the 
petals. Pkt. 25c. 



Giant Odier or Prize Blotched, Mixed. A large flowered 
type, with round blossoms. The petals are all blotched 
at the base and distinctly margined on the edge. Pfet. 
25c. 

Orchid or Cattleya Plowered Mixed. A mixture of delicate 
shades and pleasing light tones of yellows, lavender, red 
and mauve. Flowers large size, entirely new tones. 
Pkt. 20o. 



C C MORSE A CO.- SKEDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CAME. 



MORSE'S NEW AND GIANT PANSIES— Continued 



'hese new pansies Imvc a most beau- 
iblnatlnn Of rich velvety Coloring an.] attrao- 
y or ruffled petals. This wavy effect glvea a 
appearance rarely seen In pansies, and while 
. ..-ry large, they appear larger on this 
Pkt. 25c. 



Giant Trlmardenn, Mixed. The 


argeat tl->\ 


.ring type of 


lonch st 


•ain. The 


top petals arc 


larger than tho a lower 


lea and a 


re beautifully 


marked. Pxt. 15c; oi. S2.00. 






Morse's Imperial Gerninu strains 


Mixed. A 


superfine mix- 


ture or the choicest ilnnu 


i varieties 


in all colors 


Pkt. 25c. 







Some of the sorts to be found in our Prize Strain Mixture, are offered separately below: 

Giant Raphael, clear blue on a white ground, lovely blue 
\ .■ins, Odier type. 

Giant Solfatara, sulphur yellow or primrose color with a 

deep blue blotch on each petal, Odier type. 
Giant Pure White, lino large size. 
Giant White Three Spotted, three large purple spots, 



Giant Adcnis, light blue with .lark blue face. 

Giant Auricula — flowered, reddish with darker center sur 

rounded by yellow. 
Giant Bridesmaid, pink shaded with .lark face. 
Giant Emperor William, fine dark blue. 
Giant Faust, large, pure black. 
Giant Fire King, yellow with reddish face and orange up- 

etale. 
Giant Hortense Bed. old rose color. 
Giant Indigo Blue, a deep iu.ligo color with face. 
Giant Lord Beaconsfield, three lower petals purple, upper 

two lavender. 
Giant Madam Ferret, wine color and white, fine red shades. 
Giant Pretiosa, violet on carmiue crimson ground, with 

white border. 
Giant Prince Henry, a dark violet. 



typi 
Giant White Five Spotted, one of the handsomest of all 

Pansies, Oilier type. 
Giant Pure Yellow, the largest size of this color. 
Giant Yellow Five Spotted, very large size, black spots, 

Odier type. 
All of the above Morse's Giant tansies, per packet 20 

cents, or 5 packets your selection for 85c. 
Collection of the 19 Giant Pansies above, 1 of each sort, 

for $2.65. 



See In 



general list under FansiaF on page 66 for cultural directions and small flowered sorts. 



PENTSTEMON 

GRANDIFLORUM 

"EXCELSIOR" MIXED 

After several years' constant and 
rigorous selection at one of the fa- 
mous European seed gardens, for 
size and color, we are pleased to 
be able to offer a really grand 
strain of this lovely florists' flower. 
The blooms are of great size, al- 
most as large as a Gloxinia, and 
range in color from white to the 
deepest scarlet. We have every 
confidence in recommending this 
grand strain as something excep- 
tional. Pentstemons are perennial 
and are constantly in flower dur- 
ing the whole summer. 
EXCELSIOR is a finer and 
grander mixture of this lovely 
flower than any before to be had 
and will be a delight in every 
garden. This Pentstemon is a 
sterling novelty. Per pkt. 25c. 

SNAPDRAGON, 

VENUS 

A wonderful new Snapdragon of large 
size, delicate pink in color and with 
wavy edges. This is by far the handsom- 
est Snapdragon we have ever seen. The 
shade of pink is a most pleasing one, 
being light in tone and without any 
trace of magenta. The flowers cover 
the tall spikes with their blossoms. I ~c 
packet 25c. 




GIANT PENTSTEMON, Excelsior Mixed 



G. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAW FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




NEW 

DWARF 

TRITOMA 

HYBRIDA 

MIRA- 

BILIS 

The Trito- 
ma is the old 
fashioned 
"Red Hot 
Poker M or 
"Torch Lil- 
ies, " only 
Hybrida Mi- 
rabilis is new 
fashioned 
and not ex- 
actly red hot. 
The stems of ' ' Hybrida Mirabilis ' ' are slender, erect, 
and graceful — very tall or long and averaging about two 
and one-half feet. The tubular flowerets of the blossoms 
are brilliant scarlet at the tip of the spike and light 
yellow at the base, with varying shades of orange and 
bright yellow and lemon. 

Mirabilis is a first class cut flower for vase decora- 
tions and the Blender stems give it a grace, unknown in 
the older stocky and heavy varieties. But the greatest 
novelty feature of "Hybrida Mirabilis ,} is its earliness, 
although a perennial; it blooms quickly — only a few 
weeks from the sowing of the seed. 

Sow the seed in January and the plants should bloom 
in May and June and will flower during the whole sea- 
son. 

Hybrida Mirabilis is a genuine novelty in blossom, 
stem and general character. Per packet 25c. 



Trltoma Mirabilis 




BELLIS-GIANT DAISY 

RANUNCULUS FLOWERED 

A new and giant flowered daisy and quite distinct from 
the little lawn daisies to which it is closely related. The 
flowers are large and very double, indeed resembling ra- 
nunculus or double asters, 2 to 3 inches across, of a pretty 
red shade. This is a new and distinct flower and makes 
a good cut flower. Per packet 25c. 




GEUM, MRS. BRADSHAW 



The Geum is a splendid perennial plant but little known 
in our ordinary gardens and but little appreciated even 
by those whose home grounds admit of more general plant- 
ing. 

The plants being perennial do not bloom until the sec- 
ond year. 

The older Geums produced very pretty but rather small 
bright scarlet flowers, and while very attractive, do not at 
all compare with Mrs. Bradshaw. 

This is a most striking novelty and is really sensational. 
As in other Geums, the plant is rather dwarf and spreads 
quite flat on the ground. The blossoms are boroe on long 
straight, upright and slender stems. 

The blossom itself resembles to some extent a single 
carnation. The petals are arranged about the rim of a 
semi-double center and in Mrs. Bradshaw they are large, 
wavy and of thick firm texture. 

In color, Mrs. Bradshaw is a rich brilliant scarlet cardi- 
nal — a striking and distinct shade. In size, Mrs. Bradshaw 
is fully double the ordinary Geum and as large as a large 
carnation, and on account of its very wide, graceful petals, 
appeari to be even larger than it is. Per pkt. 25c. 

48 



C C. MORSE & CO. SEEDS-SAN FKANCISCO. CALIF. 



GLADIOLUS 



Th«r« are a number of very fine sorts of Gladioli which are the result of crossing and solecting .lour by horticull 
uriats, both in America and Kurope. Those newer sorts have never been adequately presented to western flower lovers, 
and are therefore comparatively unknown. 

The newer sorts which we offer below, however, are very handsome, and arc away ahead of any of the older types. 
The Childsii and the "hybrids" of Childsii in particular, have very line Sower spikes crowded with bloom; often the 
spikes are four feet and over tall, and the blossoms are always large. 

The culture of the Gladiolus is of the easiest. Set the bull'- about 3 inches deep and 7 or 8 inches apart each way. 
Any good garden soil will make strong plants and good bloom, but for the finest results use manure and plenty of 
water. After the flowers are past, dig the bulbs up and dry them under cover in the open air for a month and then 
store in dry soil till next winter, when they may be reset. From January to April arc the months in which to plant 
Gladioli, but for a succession of flowers they may be started to the middle of June. 

It may be that the comparative high prices of these fine new sorts have kept them from being offered here before, 
but we believe that when the planter realizes that they are worth the price, and comes to l<now what grand flowers 
they are, our stock will soon go. with the result that many gardens will be made beautiful. 

Gladioli do well in San Francisco, standing against the cold Summer winds, and blossoming most freely for weeks. 

(If wanted by mail, add 8c per dozen for postage.) 



GIANT CHILDSII GLADIOLI 



This class is very tall and erect, often 
over two feet long. The flowers are of 
quently seven to nine inches across, and 
Aileen. The finest of all white varieties. 
Unsurpassed for size, substance and 
purity. This is a grand variety and 
quite rare. FJowerB are large, well 
expanded, and pure white with very 
faint markings. Each 30c; doz. 
13.00. 
America. A very popular sort and most 
deservedly so. The flowers are a 
soft lavender pink, or a light flesh 
pink, with a lavender tint; the 
bloBsomB all face one way and are 
very large. Each 10c; aoz. $1.00. 
Attraction. A deep, rich, dark crimson, 
with conspicuous pure white center 
and throat. Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 
Brilliant. Beautiful orange red with 
carmine and white throat. A very 
fine scarlet. Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 
Columbia. Light orange-ecarlet, freely 
blotched and penciled with bluish- 
purple, especially at throat. Each 
10c; doz. $1.00. 
Deborah. Dark red, tinged with ama- 
ranth. Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 



four or five feet high, with spikes of bloom 
great substance and of gigantic size, fre- 
with a great variety of colors. 

Dr. Sellew. Large spike of rich rosy 

crimson, slightly penciled darker; 

center of petals and throat rayed 

white. Each 15c; doz. $1.50. 
Henry Gillman. Deep salmon scarlet, 

with pure white bands through each 

petal. Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 
Nezinscott. Blood-scarlet with deep 

velvety crimson black blotched and 

white mottlings in throat. Each 

20c; doz. $1.75. 
Oddity. Deep amaranth red, throat 

mottled white, and red. Each 15c; 

doz. $1.25. 
Rose Spray. A large and extra fine white 

beautifully sprayed with rose tint. 

Each 20c; doz. $2.00. 
Sunlight. Light crimson with canary- 
yellow throat. Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 
Wm. Falconer. Spike of great length 

and spike of enormous flowers. 

Beautiful clear light pink. Each 15c; 

doz. $1.50. 
Collection of 1 of each of 13 above sorts 

for $1.55; postpaid, $1.70. 



GANDAVENSIS AND HYBRID GLADIOLI 

The following are the 



varieties and are the best sorts. 



Augusta. Lovely pure white, with blue 
anthers. Strong straight spike. 
Each 7c; doz. 75c. 

Blue Jay (Baron Hulot). The finest blue 
gladiolus yet produced. Blue Jay 
is a rich deep indigo color. Each 
20c; doz. $2.00. 

Canary Bird. Fine light yellow, with a 
strong spike. Each 15c; doz. $1.50. 

Klondyke. Clear primrose yellow, with 
a blotch of vivid crimson maroon on 
the lower petals. Strong plants. 
Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 

May. A lovely pure white flower, finely 
flaked with bright rosy crimson. Su- 
perb spike and often forced. Each 
7c; doz. 75c. 



Ceres. Pure white, spotted with purplish 
rose. Each 7c; doz. 75c. 

Mrs. Francis King. A lovely light sear- 
let; the flowers are unusually well 
arranged. A variety much used for 
commercial planting on account of 
its pleasing color. Each 15c; doz. 
$1.50. 

Octoroon. A beautiful salmon pink; dis- 
tinct shade. Each 10c; doz. $1.00. 

Princeps. A large wide-open, very hand- 
some flower like an amaryllis. A 
rich crimson with broad white 
blotches across the lower petal. 
Each 20c; doz. $2.00. 

Sulphur King. Beautiful clear sulphur- 
yellow, the finest yellow ever introduced. Each 30c; doz. $3.00. 

Collection 1 of each of above 10 varieties for $1.15; postpaid $1.30. 

MIXED GLADIOLI 




Gladiolus— "Brilliant" 



These have the various types and colors separated and while not so fine as our named sorts offered above, still they 
have a great variety from seedlings. 
Extra White and Very Light Shades Mixed. Pink and Rose Shades Mixed. Doz. 60c; per 100, $3.50. 

Doz. 75c; per 100, $5.00. 

49 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 



MIXED GLADIOLI -Continued 

Brilliant Scarlet and Red Shades Mixed. Doz. 50c; per 

100, $3.50. 
Orange and Yellow Shades Mxd. Doz. $1.00; per 100, $6.50. 
Striped and Variegated. Doz. 60c; per 100, $4.00. 
Lemoines Extra Fine Mixed. One of the best strains with 

bright colors and odd markings. Doz. 50c; per 100, $3.00. 
Groff's Hybrid Seedlings. Apt to contain some great 

novelty. Doz. 50c; per 100, $3.00. 
Childsii Type Mixed. Large flowers, soft and wavy on the 

edges. Doz. 60c; per 100, $4.00. 
Childsii Lighter Shades. A lighter and better mixture. 

Doz. 75c; per 100, $5.00. 

BEGONIAS (Tuberous-Rooted) 

For January and February delivery; Splendid pot plants 
and equally useful for bedding purposes; very free flower- 
ing-, doing best with partial shade. (Prices include postage.) 

We offer Begonias in the following separate colors: 
Dark Rose, light pink, salmon, scarlet, white and yellow. 
Double: all colors separate or mixed. 15c each; $1.50 per doz. 
Single: all colors separate or mixed. 10c each; $1.00 per doz. 
Begonia Crispa: a new sort with very large single flowers 
beautifully frilled on edge and crested. Try some of 
these new ones. 25c each; $2.50 per doz 



LILIES 




Plant six inches deep in a well-drained soil, preferably 
in a cool spot. For other varieties consult our Fall Cata- 
logue of Bulbs, issued in October. 

The bulbs are ready for delivery in December, January, 
and February, but not later. If wanted by mail, add 3c 
each, 25c per dozen, for postage. 

ATJEATTJM. The grandest of all hardy Lilies, with large, 
graceful flowers of a delicate ivory-white color, thickly 
studded with chocolate crimson spots, and a bright 
golden band through the center of each petal. The 
largest Lily there is, ten inches across, and very fra- 
grant. Each 15c; and 20c; doz. $1.25-$2.00, according 
to size of bulb. 
Easter Lily, or Longiflorum. While if planted as late as 
Jamiary these will not be in bloom for Easter day, 
still they will bloom in the middle of Summer out of 
doors, and are most attractive in a garden. Watch 
for plant-lice on the unexpanded buds and treat with 
tobacco solution or tobacco dust (consult our list of 
insecticides at end of book). 15c and 20c each; $1.50 
and $2.00 per dozen, according to size. 
Speciosum Album. Beautiful pure white flowers of 
large size; petals recurve. Very easily grown and 
very handsome. 20c each; $1.75 per dozen. 
Speciosum Eubrum. This is the tall, light red Lily, 
often seen in florists' windows. It is perfectly 
hardy in the open garden and is a strong and vig- 
orous grower. Plant in well-drained soil in a par- 
tially shaded place. The Lily blooms in July and 
August, having a spike three to four feet tall with 
bright lilies of a light crimson and white color; the 
petals recurve. 15c each; $1.25 per dozen; $8.50 
per 100. 
Speciosum Kubrum Magnificum. This variety is much 
more crimson in color than the ordinary Rubrum 
and is heavily spotted. 15c each; $1.25 per dozen; 
$9.00 per 100. 
Tigrinum (Tiger Lily). Fine showy blossoms, brilliant 
orange-red, spotted with black; three to five feet 
high, and blooms in August. The Tiger Lily is one 
of the best for out of doors, for it is perfectly 
hardy and will last for years in the garden, each 
year sending up its black and orange flower spike. 
15c each; $1.25 per dozen. 

TUBEROSES 

For early flowers they can be started 
in the greenhouse or hot-bed; and for a : 
planted at intervals as late as August. For flowe 
open border plant about the middle of May. 
Excelsior Double Pearl. Extra large bulbs. 3 for 15c; 
doz. 40c; 100, $3.00. If wanted by mail, add 12c per 



doz 



extra. 



America Gladiolus 



THE YELLOW CALLA LILY 

(CALLA ELLIOTTIANAI 

Is the only true yellow flowered calla in existence and 
on account of its marvelous beauty has created a sen- 
sation wherever exhibited. It is a summer flowering va- 
riety, with the same habit of growth as the well-known 
common White Calla, with flowers of the same size and 
shape, but of a clear, rich, golden yellow. The foliage is 
dark green, with a number of white spots, which greatly 
add to the beauty of the plant — so much so that when 
not in flower the plant at once arrests the attention and 
is ever an object of enthusiastic admiration. (Postage 
additional 15c doz.) Crop short; 35c each; $3.50 per dozen. 

BULBS 

Besides the above we have usually in stock during De- 
cember and January bulbs of Caladiums ($1 00 doz.) ; Cy- 
clamen ($2.00 doz.); Scarlet Freesias (25c doz.); Gloxi- 
nias ($1.50 doz.); Iiily of Valley (75c per 25); Montbretia 
(25c per doz.); and Spireas (25c, 35c and 50c each). 

OUR FALL CATALOGUE OF BULBS, issued each 
October fully describes and lists these and many other 
bulbs. Ask to have this catalogue sent to you in the 
Fall. 



C. C. MORSE * CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF, 



FLOWER SEEDS 



California and thr Pacific Coast (except in mountainous parts> b flavored with ft climate that is never severe, and which has an abundance 
of bruchi. warm sunshine. Of the Affect Of this climate OD our gardens we seldom think, unless wh ti sim/ i-.itors about, 

and hearing their wonder expreoed at the roses, and the heliotrope, ami all of the other bright flowers of our California house gardens. 
le may easilv make a select! 
i of the year it may 1m-. If ] 

,ir ■ certain month: and that others. Lobelia. Pansies or Phlox, are in Mower continuonsh for sevenl tmmths. One 
i knowledge of Dowers is to put in a note-book the names and limes of flowering of the different planls which 

greatly help in deciding which 

SELECTION. V perfect garden could not be made from seed alone; the grounds must have some shrubbery for its permanent character. 
We haw a Nursery Department which supplies every need for private grounds of all dimensions; s -e our iist. of trees ami shrubs in the 
weeeedhu paget "f this Guide. On the other hand, no garden would be pretty or satisfactory which did not have a good number uf flowers 
from our flower seed list most carefully chosen and placed in the garden. 

There are no more satisfactory flowers than those grown from seed, especially the easily grown and brilliant flowered annuals. The beau- 
tiful shrubs and lilies, of course, have their place, but are far more expensive than a paper of seed which will furnish a large number of 
plants with usually enough for one's garden and some to spare. 

Aim to have- your garden one artistic unit, with some flowers in bloom at all seasons, with colors which harmonize, and with plants in 
size grading from the dwarf borders, to the bedding annuals, and then to the taller plants which usually should stand next to the house or 
other confines of the garden or lawn. A garden carefully thought out and planned gives very much more pleasure than a haphazard one. 



WHEN TO PLANT FLOWER SEED. There is doubt with many as to the best time to plant the different flower seed. It is to be 
regretted that there is no adequate book for the Pacific Cjast dealing with this subject. One Eastern book will be found very useful, with 
its explicit directions, namely "The Practical Garden Book," by Prof. L. H. Bailey, which we will mail postpaid for SI. 10. There is a Pacific 
Coast book recently published which deals more with landscape work and shrubs, and which is verv good as fur as ir goes, namely "Gardening 
in eXUfornia; Landscape and Flower," ($3.75), by Mr. John McLaren, for many years superintendent of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. 

Perhaps you have noticed that many of the descriptions of flowers contain the words "annual," "hardy annual," "tender 
annual." "perennial." "tender perennial," etc. These may have seemed to you tiresome descriptions, but properly under- 
stood they tell much about planting. The dates in the following brackets will vary with the time that heavy frosts come 
in different places. While they show the best months for San Francisco, planting may be extended much later in all cases. 

TENDER, or Greenhouse, means the plant will not stand the least frost. All such must be planted late in Spring (May) 
or in a greenhouse. 

HALF HARDY means the plant will stand any light frost, but needs protection against very cold weather. These should 
be planted in the spring (March and April), not in the Fall. 



HARDY means the plant will stand considerable frost, or practically all we have on the Pacific Coast. These may be 
planted in the fall or in the spring (October to May). If sown in the fall they will come into bloom earlier than if sown 
in spring, even if the plants do not make much progress during the cold weather. 

ANNUALS are plants that bloom the first year from seed, and the plant dies after one season. Tender annuals must 
be sown in spring (April to June) and hardy annuals may be sown in either spring or fall (October to May). 

BIENNIALS are plants that bloom the second year from seed, and the plant dies after the second year. In California 
many of these will bloom the first year if sown early. Sow under same conditions as perennials. 

PERENNIALS are plants that bloom the second year from seed, and the plant lives and blooms during successive years. 
If sown in early spring (February to April 15) many perennials will bloom the first year from seed. Tender and half-hardy 
perennials are best sown in spring after frost is over (April 15 to June). Hardy perennials are best sown in the late sum- 
mer and early fall (July to October) for next year's flowers. 



HOW TO SOW FLOWER SEED. It is best in practically all instances except hardy annuals to start the seed in boxes, preferably a 
box about 18x24 inches and 4 inches deep, using very sandy soil with leaf mould that will not bake, and provide for drainage by Doring some 
holes in the bottom of the box. It is best not to put any fertilizer in the seed-box, since it. is only necessary to bring the plants to the third 
or fourth leaf, when they should be pricked out and reset in another box, in which the soil should be loam mixed with leaf-mould. It is im- 
portant that the plant be of good size, strong and sturdy, when finally transplanted in the garden. 

If the seed be sown directly in the garden, it should be sown in the spring after the soil is well worked and fertilized. A slight depression 
should be made with a stick, the seed sown, and then covered with sharp sand about twice the depth of the diameter of the seed. The sand 
will prevent the crusting over of the soil after watering. 

It is 

A common mistake in sowing flower, as well as other seeds, is covering too deep. As a general rule, cover only to the 
depth of the thickness of the seeds; or, with medium-sized seeds, like Balsams, Zinnias, etc., half an inch or less is the 
proper depth. Such fine seeds as Portulacas, Nicotiana, etc., need only to be pressed into the soil with a piece of board 
or the palm of the hand. Always press the earth down firmly after sowing all flower seeds, else there is danger of their drying 
up before the roots can get firm hold of the soil. Seeds of the hardier annuals may be sown where they are to grow; but, 
as a rule, it is preferable to transplant, as the plants are generally stronger and stand the drought better. During very dry 
weather, and when the seedlings are first set out, they should be watered frequently. Provide some support for all such 
annuals as require it. 

The weeds should be kept down and the ground loosened often, so that the plants will receive the full benefit of the 
rains and dews, which they will not if the ground is allowed to become hard and baked. 

On account of the long dry summers in California, it is necessary to apply water very often. Most of our gardens suffer 
for want of sufficient water. Where possible, it should be applied to the roots only, and after four o'clock in the afternoon. 

With a little study of the garden and the colors and habits of the flowers, a beautiful garden can be had from the use 
of Morse's Flower Seeds at very little cost. 



A hardy annual, trailing in 
high, bearing- verbena-like 
are very fragrant. A native 



and 



aluable 



ABEONIA (Sana Verbena). 

habit, about nine inch' 
clusters of flowers, whit 
of California. Thrives ii 
for rock-work or hangii 
TJmbellata. Rosy lilac. Fkt. Sc; oz. 50c. 

ABTJTILON" (Flowering* Maple, or Chinese Bell-Flower). A 
half -hardy perennial shrub, used generally in green- 
houses, but growing into small trees in California. The 
flowers are beautifully bell-shaped, and appear in white, 
yellow, rose and orange. Mixed colors, pkt. 10c. 

ACHILLEA Ftarmica, Double, "The Pearl." ( Sneezewort). 
One of the best hardy perennials; bears a profusion of 
small, double, white (lowers during the entire season. 
Fine for cutting and cemeterv decoration. Height 2V> 
feet. Fkt. 15c. 

ACROCLINItJM. Very pretty annual, producing white and 
rose-colored daisy-like flowers in August and Septem- 
ber. These are the "Immortelles," so desirable for 
wreaths and Winter bouquets. One foot. Double mixed, 
pkt. 5c. Single mixed, pkt. 5c. 

ADLUMIA CIBRHOSA (Mountain Fringe, or Allegheny 
Vine). An attractive and beautiful hardy climber, bi- 
ennial, flowering the first season; clusters of small, rosy- 
lilac flowers and pale green feathery foliage. Grows 
fifteen feet tall. Pkt. 10c. . 

ADONIS (Flos Adonis, or Pheasant's Eye) . A hardy an- 
nual of easy culture, growing about one foot high. 
Leaves fine-cut and feathery; flowers crimson. Seed 
should be sown in the Autumn. Fkt. 5c. 

AGEEATUM (Floss Flower). A hardy annual of easy cul- 
especially valuable for bedding, as it is literally 



boxes to transplant, 



covered with blossoms all summer. Sow the seed early 

in the spring, either 

doors, and thin to fou 

Blue Perfection. Deep blue, one foot high. Pkt. 5c. 

Mexicanum, Imperial Dwarf Blue. Eight inches high, 
flowers blue. Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c. 

Mexicanum, Imperial Dwarf White. Eight inches high, 
flowers white. Pkt. 5c; % oz. 30c. 

Little Dorrit. A perfect mass of blue flowers; plant is 
six inches high and a foot through. Pkt. 10c. 

'■Little Bine Star." A very dwarf variety, densely cov- 
ered with small, light-blue flowers, which are pur- 
plish-red at center. Pkt. 15c. 
ARISTOLOCHIA SIFHO (Dutchman's Pipe). Strong-grow- 
ing, hardy climber, with large, thick, shining foliage. 



yellowish-br 



pipe-shaped flowers. 



ALYSSUM (Maritimum) . A fragrant, hardy annual, hav- 
ing the odor of honey, and bearing spikes of small, 
white flowers in great profusion throughout the sum- 
mer and. autumn. Useful for borders or early bedding 
flowers. Sow the seed early in spring. 
Common Sweet Alyssum. One foot high, very sweet 

honey fragrance. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
"Carpet of Snow." Pure white, very dwarf, and sweet 

scented. Pkt. 5c. 
Little Gem. Three to four inches high; fine for bor- 
ders. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 
Sasatile A yellowish sort; perennial. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 

AG-ROSTEMA (Rose of Heaven). A hardy perennial, 
blooming the first season if the seed is sown in the 
Autumn. Plant grows one to two feet high; flowers re- 
semble Dianthus in bright colors, and are borne on 
long, slender stems. Mixed colors, pkt. 5c. 

AMAEANTHUS. Hardy annuals, grown especially for their 
brilliant foliage. 

Caudatus (Love Lies Bleeding-). Light yellowish-green 
foliage; long, drooping crimson flower spikes. Plant 
three to four feet high. Pkt. 5c. 
Cruentus. Tall spikes of red flowers. Three feet. Pkt. 



5c. 



itli 



Tricolor (Joseph's Coat). Plant three feet high, 

brilliant leaves in variegated, red, yellow, green, 
etc. Pkt. 5c. 

Ampelopsis. Quinquefolia. See Virginia Creeper. 

Ampelopsis Veitchi. See Boston Ivy. 

Angel's Trumpet. See Datura. 

Antirrhinum. See Snapdragon. 

Aquilegia. See Columbine. 

ANEMONE, Single Giant ae Caen. The giant French Anem- 
one. Half-hardy perennial. Excellent for cutting. 
Cup-shaped flowers in blue, red, and white. May and 
June. Nine Inches. Pkt. 5c; H oz. 50c. 
St. Brig-id (Irish Anemone). Enormo 
of tulips, with great variety < 
Pkt. 15c; % oz. $1. 

ARCTOTIS GRANDIS (The African lilac Daisy). A re- 
markably handsome annual from Africa, I'mmm.^ 
branched bushes two to two and a half feet in height 
and breadth; are pure white on the upper surface, re- 
verse of petals pale lilac. Pkt. 10c. 



striking color 



ASTERS 



annual produced in a great variety of classes and an air 
gh, and some varieties of dwarfs are not over three inchi 
seed in boxes about .lanuary 1st, and transplant about April 1st to 15th. The t 
plants are to remain thinning them from six to twelve inches apart, according 
EOLTZE'S DWARF BOT7QUET. An exceedingly dwarf va- 
riety growing only three or four inches high, and con- 
taining a great variety of colors. Pkt. 15c. 
COCARDEAU, OB CROWN. A tall variety, growing 14 to 

16 inches high. Of upright habit, with medium-sized 

blossoms. The center of the blossom is usually white 

with a bright-colored outer rim. Mixed, pkt. 10c. 
COMET. A good bedding variety, with large blossoms, the 

petals of which are long, narrow, and curled backward. 

These colors are the best. Any Color. Pkt. 10c. 

Pink Pure Lilac White 

Light Blue Carmine 

Mixture of all, pkt. 10c. Collection five varieties, 40c. 
GIANT COMET. A taller growing variety of the Comet 

type, with branching stems, which make it valuable 

for cutting. Best colors: 

Crimson Dark Violet Light Blue Rose White 

The Bride (white changing to light rose). 

Any of above, pkt. 10c. Collection six varieties, 50c. 

Mixture of mi colon, fkt. 10e. 

52 



•iety. 



own, however, in the row wlmre the 

ew varietv of the Comet type, with 

■ as large as the old variety. The 

and curved like a flat chrysanthe- 

habit, about sixteen inches 



HOEENZOLLEBN. A r 
blossoms fully twici 
petals are very long 
mum. Plant of branchin; 
high. Mixture, pkt. 15c. 

TRUFPAUT'S PAEONY FLOWERED PERFECTION". This 
variety has the most brillant and showy assortment of 
colors. Flowers, medium sized and almost globular. 
Plant about sixteen inches high, of upright growth, and 
flowers all borne on top. Best colors: 
Dark Purple Fiery Scarlet White 

Fkt. 10c. Mixture of all colons, pkt. 10c. 

VICTORIA. One of the best bedding varieties, with me- 
dium-sized blossoms, which are borne in great profu- 
sion from the bottom to the top of the plant. Grows 
12 to 14 inches high. Best colors: 
Bote, pkt. 10c; bow White, pkt. 10c. 
Mixture of mil eolera, pkt. ioo; oi. fa.50. 



C C. MORSE & CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CAMF. 



ASTERS — Continued 



SBKTLBS. OB OIANT BRANCHING. The tallest and best 
florist's variety, and we heartily recommend It as the 
Tery beet type of Aster we have. The plant prows 18 
inches high and about 18 inches In width, and the blos- 
soms, which are large and full-petaled, are borne on 
long stems or branches. The most satisfactory type of 
all Asters, since it is not only a showy bedding flower, 
but owing to its long stems and large blossoms, is valu- 
able for bouquets Comes into flower late in the Au- 
tumn. Best colors, pkt. 10c; os. $1.50: 
Carmine White Light Bine 

Lavender Violet King 1 Purple 

Pink or Bote Crimson 
Btary Semple (very light pink) 
Collection nine varieties, 70c. 
pkt. 10c; os. $1.25. 



Mixture of above colore, 



ASTEB, New England Perennial (Michaelmas Daisies). In 
splendid assortment: four to five feet. Very handsome, 
hardy wild flowers of New England; Fall blooming Blue. 
lilac and pinkish. Mixed, pkt. 15c. 

ABMEBIA MABITIMA (Thrift, Sea Pink). 
Pretty edging plant, bearing tufts of rosy- 
pink flowers; hardy perennial. One foot. 
Pkt. 10c. 

ASPARAGUS FLUMOSUS. A tender peren- 
nial for greenhouse or potted plant use, 
with long, fine feathery foliage. The 
sprays, when cut. retain their freshness 
in water from three to four weeks. Seeds 
start slowly and should be soaked in wa- 
ter before sowing. Pkt. 10c; 100 seeds 75c. 
Pliiniosus Nanus. A dwarf variety and 
sometimes preferred on account of its 
beautiful, dense spravs of feathery green. 

Pkt. 10c; 100 seeds 75c. 
Sprengeri (Emerald Feather). An early, 
easily grown. feathery-leaved variety, 
with drooping branches. The variety for 
hanging baskets. Pkt. 10c; 100 seeds 50c. 

ASPERULA ODOBATA (Sweet Woodruff). An 
old-fashioned favorite, grown for its fra- 
grant leaves and stems, which, when dried, 
have an odor not unlike new-mown hay. 
and are used for putting among clothes, 
etc. Used in Germany to flavor the "Mait- 
rank," or May wine. Best grown in semi- 
shaded positions. Flowers white; peren- 
nial. Pkt. 5c; y A oz. 25c. 

AUBICULA (Primula auricula). A dwarf-grow- 
ing plant, bearing umbels of fragrant 
flowers of many rich and beautiful colors. 
A great favorite in England, where flower 
shows are held of this plant alone. Extra 
choiee mixed from a prize collection. Pkt. 
15c. 

AUSTRALIAN PEA VINE (Dollchos Ligno- 
sus). A rapid-growing evergreen climb- 
ing perennial, flowering freely in large 
clusters of rose flowers. For covering 
arbors, trellises, etc., they have no super- 
ior. Pkt. 10c. 

Bachelor's Button. See Centaurea Cyanus. 

BALLOON VINE, OB LOVE-IN-A-FUPI\ 
Climbing annual, with small inferior flow- 
ers. The seed pods are curiously swelled 
are quite attractive. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c, 

BALSAM OB LADY'S SLIPPER. A tender annual, with 
brittle stems and foliage. Grows about 12 inches high. 
Flowers both single and double, in bright colors and 
variations; are wax-like and very attractive. Th© indi- 
vidual blossoms floating in a dish of water exhibit 
their beauty to the best advantage. 
Camellia Plowered. Mixed; the largest double variety. 

Pkt. 5c; i J, oz. 50c. 
Camellia Flowered. White. Pkt. 10c. 
DOUBLE VARIETIES, AS BELOW, ALL. Pkt. 10c. 
Lavender Dark Blood Bed Bed and White Spotted 
Peach Blossom (Shell Pink). Snowball 
Collection of 6 varieties, 40c. 
Mixed Tall Doubles. Pkt. 5c; oz. 60c. 
Dwarf Double. Pkt. 5c. 

BABTONIA AUBEA (Golden Bartonia). A hardy annual, 
growing about two feet high and bearing golden-yel- 
low flowers, which have a metallic luster when the sun 
shines on them. Is a native of California. Sow the 
seed where the plants are to remain, since it does not 
transplant easily. Pkt. 5c. 

BEGONIA. Tender perennial usually grown In the green- 
house. Some varieties are especially attractive on ac- 
count of their foliage, but most varieties have exquis- 
itely beautiful wax-like flowers, both single and double. 
The seed is very small and rather difficult to germi- 
nate. It is also very expensive, some strains being 
worth far more than their weight in gold. 



QURRN OP TBE MARKET. One of the earliest blooming 
varieties, blossoming frtxiuently In July. Of spreading 
habit, S to 10 Inch*.'?" high. Blossoms medium sized, 
and the petals curve outward 
Mixed, pkt. 10c. Pare white, pkt. 10c. 

OSTRICH plume. A medium tall variety of the Comet 
type. The petals arc long, narrow and curly, and the 
effect of both individual Mnssmns and hunches is beau- 
tiful. Mixture of all colors, pkt. 10c. 

HERCULES ASTEB. One of Benarv's most beautiful 
modern introductions. The Hercules tvpe of Aster is 
one of t lie most beautiful, having long, curly petals, 
which droop and twist gracefully from the center, and 
are so dense and full as to resemble one of the finest 
chrysanthemums; five to six Inches across. It needs, 
however, fine, rich soil to hring out Its greatest beauty. 
Rosy Lilac, pkt. 25c. White, pkt. 25c. 

BEAN, Scarlet Runner. A popular climber; the seed is edi- 
ble and much esteemed, Flowers scarlet : beans black 
and lake splashed. Pkt. 10c. 




ASTER, Semple 



Giant Branching 



puffed, and 



BEGONIA. Pibrous rooted Varieties. For outdoor culture, 

having beautiful leaves and bearing clusters of small, 
waxy flowers. 

Bex. A beautifully marked, large-leaved variety, for 
indoors. Pkt. 25c. 

Vernon. Deep-red flowers and dark-purple foliage often 
used for borders and for bedding; half hard v. Pkt. 
IOC. 

Tuberous-Booted Varieties. For greenhouse and pot 
culture, having large, waxy flowers in brilliant 
colors. Many prefer to start bulbs in December 
and January. 

Double Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 25c. 

International Prize. The finest large flowered single 
mixture. Pkt. 35c. 

Single Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 25c. 
BELLIS PEBENNIS (Double Daisy). A hardy perennial, 

blossoming freely all spring and summer. Plant is 

about four inches high and is valuable for borders. Is 

much sown in lawns. 

Extra Double White, or Snowball. A clear white varie- 
ty. Pkt. 10c; y B oz. 75c. 

Longfellow. Double dark rose. Pkt. 10c; Vg oz- 75c. 

Extra Double. Mixed. Pkt. 10c; y B oz. 65c. 
BIGNONIA (Trumpeta Vine). Magnificent, hardy perennial 

climber, with brilliant scarlet or yellow flowers; a most 

ornamental and effective covering for walls, houses, 

etc. 30 feet. Pkt. 10c 
Border Pinks. See Dianthus Plumarius. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BOSTON IVY OB JAPANESE IVY (Ampelopsis Veitchi). 
The popular Ivy which covers so many buildings. It 
clings to brick and wood without support. The leaves 
are heart shaped and are off the vine for only two 
months in the winter. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c. 

BEACHYCOME (Swan River Daisy). A hardy annual, grow- 
ing from 6 to 10 inches high and producing an abun- 
dance of pretty blue and white flowers. Pkt. 5c. 

BBOWALLIA. A half hardy annual, making a fine bedding 
plant. Blooms profusely. The flowers are bright ultra- 
marine blue, and also sky blue with white center. Will 
bloom freely all Winter if seed is sown in August. 
Mixed, pkt. 5 c. 

CACALIA (Tassel Flower). A beautiful and profuse flow- 
ering plant, with tassel-shaped orange and scarlet flow- 
ers; fine for mixed borders; hardy annual. Pkt. 5c. 

CALAMPELI3 (Bugle Vine). A well known beautiful an- 
nual climber; trained to a trellis or south wall, it is an 
ornamental object throughout the Summer, its bright 
orange tubular flowers contrasting effectively with the 
delicate green of the foliage. Pkt. 10c. 

CALANDRINIA Umbellata. Portulaca-like plants, fond of 
sunshine, well suited for rock- work. Vivid crimson 
violet. Height one-quarter foot; perennial. Pkt. 10c. 

CALCEOLARIA. A tender perennial, used largely in green- 
houses and conservatories. Is not of easy culture, but 
a very desirable flower. Bears a large profusion of 
small, pocket shaped flowers, many of which are beau- 
tifully tigered or spotted. There is a great variety of 
shades and colors in various markings. 
Grandiflora. Large-flowered, self-colored, profuse flow- 
ers. Pkt. 25c. 
Tigered and Spotted. Mixed. Pkt. 25c. 




Calceolaria Bugosa 



Rugosa Hybrid. A shrubby, profuse bloomer, and best 
for out door culture. Pkt. 25c. 
CALENDULA (Pot Marigold). Very hardy annual, one 
foot high, blooming freely practically the whole year 
round. Is of the easiest culture and is desirable for 
rather inferior soils, where less sturdy flowers do not 
thrive. A medicinal extract resembling arnica is made 
from the flowers. 

Double Mixed. A good mixture of 8 or 10 different 
shades of yellow, some clear colors and some 
shaded and striped. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c. 
Lemon Xing'. Pkt. 5c. 



CALENDULA Meteor. Large double yellow flowers 
striped with orange. Pit. 5c. 
Prince of Orange. A fine deep orange. Pkt. 5c. 
California Poppy. See Eschscholtzia. 

CALLIOPSIS. A half hardy annual, growing about three 
feet high, and valuable for bright bedding effects, or 
for cutting. Leaves are narrow and stems slender. 
Blossoms single and about 2 to 4 inches in diameter. 
Atrosanguinea. Velvety dark maroon. Pkt. 5c. 
Golden "Wave. The largest-flowering variety. Clear 

yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 60c. 
DrummondL Mixed. A gorgeous mixture of golden 
yellow, brown, maroon, and other shades. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 60c. 
Bicolor Hybrida Semiplena. Semi-double flowers of 
garnet and yellow. The old-fashioned small Core- 
opsis. Pkt. 5c. 
Lanceolata. See Coreopsis. 
CANARY BIRD FLOWER (Tropaeolum Canariense). A 
tender, climbing annual of the Nasturtium family. 
Blossoms have curiously winged petals and are light 
yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c. 
CANNA. Mixture of the popular varieties. Red and yel- 
low flowers. Plants have large ornamental leaves. Pkt. 
5c. 

Crozy's Varieties. Mixed. New large-flowered and free- 
blooming sorts. Pkt. 10c. 
CANDYTUFT (Iberis). A hardy annual, growing about 6 
to 18 inches high, according to the variety. The blos- 
soms are borne on variously long spikes, and the newer 
varieties are quite large flowering and very fragrant. 
Of easy culture and valuable for bedding or massing. 
Common Sweet Scented- Small white flowers. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 15c. Carmine, branching, pkt. 5c. Purple, 
branching-, pkt. 5c. 
Dwarf or Tom Tnumo. White. Plant very dwarf. Pkt. 

10c; oz. 30c. 
Dwarf, or Tom Thnmb. Hybrids. Mixed colors. Pkt. 

10c; % oz. 25c. 
White Rocket. Long spikes and large flowers. .Pkt. 

5c; oz. 25c. 
Giant Hyacinth Flowered, or Improved Empress. Very 
large heads and long spikes of white flowers. An im- 
proved strain of Giant Empress and the best sort 
for cut flowers. Pkt. 10c; y 4 oz. 25c; oz. 75c. 
Mixture of all colors. Pkt. 5c. 

Gibraltarica, Perennial Lilac. Shading to white. Pkt. 10c. 
Semper virens, Perennial White. Pkt. 10c. 
CANTERBURY BELLS (Campanula Medium) A hardy 
biennial, blooming the second year from seed, or the 
first year, if sown early. Of easy culture, but prefer- 
ring rich, moist soil. Grows about three feet high, 
and bears double and single varieties of blue, white, 
purple and red flowers. Single Mixed, pkt. 5c; oz. 30c; 
Single White, pkt. 5c; oz. 40c; Single Pink, pkt. 5c; oz. 
40c; Single Blue, pkt. 5c; oz. 40c. 
Double Mixed, pkt. 5c. 

Carpatica (Carpathian Harebell), A dwarf perennial; 
9 inches; for rockeries, edges and beds. Blue and 
white. Mixed. Pkt. 5c 
CUP AND SAUCER TYPE. In this variety the outer 

petal forms a brim like a saucer. 
Light Blue. Pkt. 10c. Pink. Pkt. 10c. 
Pure White. Pkt. 10c. Mixed. Pkt. 10c; V 4 oz. 50c. 
Persicifolia. Peach-bell. Perennial; 4 feet; large 
flowered. Mixed, pkt. 10c; Blue, pkt. 10c. 

White, pkt. 10c. 
Pyramidalis. Chimney Bellflower. Large flowers on 
tall (6 foot) spikes; blooms late; perennial. 
Blue, pkt. 10c; White, pkt. 10c. 
CASTOR OIL BEAN (Bicinus). A half-hardy annual 
growing from 6 to 15 feet high and bearing large, 
green, deep purple and brown leaves and bright orange 
and scarlet flowers. The seed pods resemble a prickly 
fruit. Of the easiest, culture. Individual plants, with 
plenty of room look best. 
G-ibson's dark red. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c. 
Sanguineus. Tricolor. Has blood-red stocks and green 

leaves, with red veins. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c. 
Zanzibarensis. Mixed. A large-leaved variety, deep 
green and bronze, growing 10 to 15 feet high. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 15c. 
Mixture of all varieties. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c. 
CENTRANTHUS. The flowers are small pink, salmon color 
or white, borne in clusters on light-green, almost, 
transparent stems. Easy to raise from seed in open 
ground. Mixed, pkt. 5c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO. BBBDS SAN FRANCISCO. CAI.IF. 



CARNATION 



A h»lf hardy pi lly for greenhouse florists' trade in winter and for b garden favorite in summer. 
, large number oi varieties and colors, but the early flowering mixtures are r mmended for out-of-door cul- 
ly in thi- year an.l transplant iu March or April. 



Chabaud's Evcrblooming. Earliest dwarf French type of 
flowering in S to fl months after seed is 
sown. Th.' flowers are double and very freely borne. 
In mixed colors. Pkt. 15c. 

German Extra Fine Double Mixed. A splendid strain, ton 
talning all tho various types and colors mixed of the 
Perpetual or Trot Carnations. Pkt. 15c. 




Picotee Carnation. 

Picotee. Extra fine double mixed. White, edged with 
colors, or striped and splashed. Contains many rare 
sorts never seen at a florists. Pkt. 25c. 

Vienna. Double dwarf mixed, double border carnations; 

early flowering, all colors. Pkt. 10c. 
Choice Double Border. Mixed colors. Pkt. 15c 



MARGUERITE. An extra vi bs] ially adapt- 

ed for out-of-door culture. The plants are trim in 
habit, perpetual, and Bower abundantly in 5 months 
from sowing the seed. Margaret Carnations are 
highly fragrant, and have beautiful double flowers. 

" White Pkt. 10c. 

" Yellow and Yellow Ground. Pkt. 20c. 

" Light Red and Pink. Pkt. 10c. 

" Dark Red. Pkt. 10c. 

" Striped Varieties. Pkt. 10c. 

" Collection. One Pkt. of each of above 5 for 45c. 

" Mixed. Pkt. 10c; oz. $1.00. 

MARGUERITE GIANT, MORSE'S. An improved strain, 
with flowers frequently 2% inches to 3 inches across- 
strong growers, free blooming. 
White Perfection. Pkt. 25c. Scarlet. Pkt. 25c. 

Yellow, pure. Pkt. 25c. Mixed. Pkt. 15c. 



CELOSIA CRISTATA, OR COCKSCOMB. A half hardy 
animal, growiug 6 to 8 inches high, bearing a wide, 
wavy blossom that resembles a cock's comb. In bril- 
liant colors ami fine for massing or border work. 
Dwarf Mixed. Several shades of red and yellow, mixed. 

Pkt. 15c. 
Dwarf New Giant Empress. A rich, crimson variety, 

with dark foliage and very wide combs. Pkt. 10c. 
Glasgow Prize. One of the best strains. Pkt. lOo. 

CELOSIA PLUMOSIS, or Feathered Cockscomb. This 
species grows two or three feet high, and bears long, 
feathery plumes in brilliant colors. Mixed, Pkt. 5c. 

Magnificent (Thompson's). A new variety, superior to 
the older sorts, bearing grand spikes; flowers in 
mid-summer. Mixed. Many colors. Pkt. 100. 

Magnificent Crimson. A bright shade. Pkt. 10c. 

Magnificent Golden Yellow. A fine contrast to the 
crimson. Pkt. 10c. 

Spicata. Ostrich plumes of pink, shading to silver at 
tips. Pkt. 5c. 

CENTBOSEUA, or Butterfly Pea. A hardy perennial vine of 
rare beauty, which blossoms in July from seed sown in 
March, and bears in great profusion pea-shaped flowers 
ranging in color from a rosy violet to a reddish-purple, 
with a feathery white marking through the center. 
Pkt. 10c. 

CLARKIA. A hardy annual of easy culture, growing about 
18 inches high and bearing bright rose, white, or purple 
flowers in great profusion. Native of California. Seed 
sown in the Fall will give early blossoms in the Spring. 
Seed can be sown almost any time. 

Double Mixed, pkt. 5c. Single Mixed, pkt. 5c. 

CI.EOME FUNGENS, or GIANT SPIDER PliNT. A hardy 
annual growing 4 to 5 feet high and bearing in profu- 
sion rose-purple blossoms that are shaped something 
like a spider. Pkt. 5c. 

CLEMATIS. A popular hardy perennial climber. An old 
favorite, and justly so, for there are few garden climb- 
ers that give more satisfaction. 
Large Flowered Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
Virglnlana (Virgin's Bower). Pkt. 10c 
Fanlculata. A very fine hardy climber; leaves bright 
glossy green; flowers small and hawthorn scented, 
and just covering the plant when In bloom. Excel- 
lent for covering trellises, cemeteries, or fences. 
Fkt. 100. 
Flammula. Feathery white. Pkt. 100. 
Cocclnea. Scarlet. Pkt. 10c. 

Jackmanil. Largest flowered hybrids in various colors. 
The blue does not come true from seed. Pkt. 15c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CENTAUREA 



A hardy annual embracing a num- 
ber of species, some being grown 

only for their foliage. Ail va- 
rieties grow from 1% to 2 feet 

high. Sow the seed, early and 

transplant in March. Except 

the white leaved sorts all make 

excellent cut flowers. 
Cyanus (Batchelor's Button, or 

Bluebottle, or Corn Flower). 

Of easy culture. Sow the seed 

where it is to remain and thin 

to three or four inches. 

Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Emperor William (Large Blue). 
Pkt. 10c; oz. 35c. Pink. Pkt. 5c. 

White. Pkt. 5c. 
Imp erialis (Royal Sweet Sultan) . 

The finest of all Sweet Sultans; 

the plants are very strong and 

bear giant flowers on stiff, long 

stems; excellent for cutting and 

lasting, when cut, unusually 

well. Mixed, pkt. 10c; y 2 oz. 

50c. Pure White, pkt. 10c. 

Purple Shades, pkt. 10c 
Marguerite. A large, white variety 

of the Imperialis class. Fra- 
grant and pretty. Pkt. 10c. 
Moschata, or Sweet Sultan. A well 

known type. In white, yellow, 

lavender, and purple. Blossoms 

very fragrant. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Suaveolens. Yellow Sweet Sultan. 

Pkt. 10c. 
Gymnocarpa. Called Dusty Miller; 

leaves Bilvery gray; deeply 

cleft; 1% feet; perennial.Pkt. 5c. 
Oandidissima, White Leaved, or 
Dusty Miller. Grown for its silvery white foliage; leaves 

broader and less cleft; 1 foot; perennial. Pkt. 10c. 
Montana. Large blue perennial Cornflower; for hardy 

border. 2 feet. Pkt. 5c. 
Catchfly. See Silene. 




Centanrea Imperialis 




Cimararia — Hybrida Mixed 



CHRYSANTHEMUM 



There sire many widely different classes 
of tliis (lower represented in the 
hardy annual or garden varieties, 
both single and double, and the per- 
ennial varieties, chief of which is 
the double or florists' varieties, so 
highly prized in the autumn and 
winter. 

ANNUM, VAUII5TII0S. Growing 1% 
to i! feet high. Seeds should be 
planted early and the plants set 
out in April. Single varieties some- 
times called "Painted Daisies." 
Very attractive. Mixed, pkt. 15c. 
Coronariuni Double. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
" White. Beautiful for cut (lowers. 

Pkt. 10c. 
" Yellow. Klowers early and very 
freely. Pkt. 10c. 
Tricolor. Tliese are large, single-flow- 
ered sorts witli color in rings. 
" Biirridgeanuui. Yellow center, crim- 
son maroon band, and white tips. 
Pkt. 5c. 
" Eclipse. Golden yellow with purple 

ring; very striking. Pkt. Sc. 
" White. Pkt. Sc. 
" Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Segetuni, Morning Star. Large light 
yellow; single flowers; shading deep- 
er; fine for cutting. Pkt. 10c. 



C. ( . MOBSK & CO. IBM san PRANCISGO, CALIF. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM-Continued 

s«r«tum. Erenlnr Star. (Htlioi) Pure (olden roll 
single flower, s inches in diameter [excellent I 
ting Pkt. 10c. 

\IAI. VARIETIES. .,, s feet high. 

Hardy and of easy culture 
Prutsscsns, or "Margutrlte"; also called "Paris Whit* 
Daisy ' lis radiatlnK from a golden. 






cent 



Pkt. 10c. 



Japanwa Hybrid!. A mixture of the lark- 
ing, florists' varieties. These mixtures are the 
autumn Nowen Ibltlons end bv 

florists They are usually frown from cuttings, 
me true From seed. Pkt. 25c. 
CINERARIA. A tender perennial, grown principally in 
the greenhouse, liut can be grown safely in the 

should be sown in summer, and the 
greenhouse requires only moderate heat. Plants grow 
from 1 to 2 feet high and bear clusters of large, single 
flowers of bright colors. Will <lo well in a partly 
shaded location. 

Hybrids Mixed. The best variety, having large flow- 
ers and brilliant colors. Pkt. 25c. 
Grandiflora Dwarf. Mixed. Pkt. 25c. 
Grandiflora Stella. With twisted petals. Pkt 25c. 
Maritima Candidissima. Dustv Miller. Silvery fo- 
liage. Hardy border plant. 2% feet. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 40c. 




CLIANTHTJS DIAMPIEKI (Glory Pes of Australia). One 

of the most gorgeous Dowers In i Mowers 

are i- in I soarlel color with intense 

Mask center; requires s dry, warn tie water. 

..Is in hoi water before sowing. Pkt. 15o. 

COBAEA SCANDENS. A half hardy .■limbing annual. 
with large leaves and large bell shaped (lowers. I'.los 
som is green until nearly grown, when it Turns bright- 
purplish blue. Crows about 30 feet long, and it 

desirable i overing a large lattice, A native of 

Mexico. Pkt. 10c. 

COLEUS. A tender perennial, growing aboui 10 to is 
inches high, and grown lor its beautiful, bright col 
ore, I velvety leaves. Valuable for window garden or 
pots, and can also be grown out of doors if taken up 
in winter. 

Extra Large Leaved Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Ornatus. The best large-leaved variety. Pkt. 15c. 



Morse's Exhibition. 
Pkt. 25c. 



A beautiful 



gorgeous str.'ii 



coilinsia A free- fto we 
growing from 1 to 2 feet 
pie, etc. A Callforn 






Mil,, 



asily grown annual, 
white, crimson, pur- 
Mixed, pkt. 5c. 



COREOPSIS. A perennial with light, graceful foliage and 
beautiful golden flowers. Blossoms in midsummer and 
is one of the best yellow cut flowers. 
Lanceolata Grandiflora. Pkt. 10c. 



COLUMBINE (AQUILEGIA) 

A hardy perennial growing about :i feet high and bearing 
an immense variety of colors on long, smooth stems. 
California Hybrida. Large yellow flowers, orange 

spurs; an improvement on our native sort. Pkt. 

15c. 
Chrysantha. Pure golden yellow, single long spurs; 

3 feet. Pkt. 10c. 
Coerulea (Rocky Mountain Blue Columbine). Fine 

deep blue and white; long spurs. Pkt. 10c. 
Rose Queen. A novelty, pink and white long spurs. 

Pkt. 15c. 
Skinneri (Mexican Columbine). Very handsome and 

quite distinct; spurs and sepals long, crimson ami 

light green; 3 feet. Pkt. 25c. 
Truncata. Our native California wild flower found 

everywhere in the woods; flowers scarlet and vel- 

low.' Pkt. 10c; oz. $1.25. 
White, Spurred. Pure white with long spurs. Pkt 10c. 
Collection of the seven fine sorts above for 70c. 
Long Spurred Hybrids Mixed. Showy. Pkt. 10c. 
Single Mixed (A. Vulgaris). Pkt. 5c. 
Double Mixed (A. Vulgaris). Pkt. 5c. 



Oor sepsis — OruoUlora 



Convolvulus. See Morning Glory. 

COSMOS. A tender annual, with fine-cut, feathery foliage 
and large, showy blossoms in rose, crimson, pink, and 
white. The late-flowering or giant type grows 5 to 6 
feet high and its blossoms are larger than the early 
varieties, or about 4 to 5 inches in diameter. They 
bloom late in the Fall, or about November 1st, and 
rarely blossom very far North. The early varieties 
bloom in July. Sow about March 1st and transplant 
in May. 
Early Flowering Dawn. White, slightly tinted with 

pink. Pkt. 10c; oz. 80c. 
Early Flowering Mixed. Pkt. 10c; oz. 60c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



wkiM 




pw 


' y 'f 2J 


HBHGt.' ■** 


Jrv- ^^'- ^^^Bm 








*? Jess 

If /mBI 



Double golden-yellow blossoms. 



Long Spurred Columbine 



Daisy, Double. See Bellis Perennis. 

DAISY, SHASTA DAISY. A fine perennial plant bearing 
large white single blossoms, with yellow centers; an 
excellent cut flower and admired everywhere. Soak 
seed in warm water over night before sowing. Pkt. 15c 
Alaska. One of Burbank's new selections. Pkt. 25c. 

DATURA (Trumpet Plower, or Horn of Plenty). A tender 
annual, growing- three feet high. Flowers large and 
trumpet-shaped. 
Chlorantha F 

Pkt. 5 c. 

Cornucopia. Blossoms single, white inside, shading 

to purple. Pkt. 5c. 
Delphinium. See Larkspur. 
Dian.tb.us, Earbatus. See Sweet. William. 
Diantbus, Caryopbyllus. See Carnation. 
DIANTHUS, OR PINKS. Hardy annuals, about one foot 
high, and bearing beautifully colored, single and 
double blossoms in profusion all Summer. Sow seed 
early in boxes and transplant, or sow in rows where 
the plants are to remain, and thin. 
Chinensis (China or India Pink). 

Double Wbite. Pkt. 5c. Double Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Heddewigi (Japanese Pink). Finest single, mixed. 

Fkt. 5c. Finest double, mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Diadematis Fl. PI. (Double Diadem Pink). Large, 

double flowers in many colors. Pkt. 5c. 
Mourning Pink. Very dark crimson margined pure white. 

Pkt. 5c. 
Laciniatus. Single, fringed varieties. Pkt. 5c. 
Mixture of all single varieties. Fkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 
Imperialis (Dbl. Imperial Pink). "Very large. Pkt. 5c. 
Plumarius (Grass Fink, Pheasant Eye or Scotch Pink). 

A single hardy perennial pink with fringed edge 

light colored flowers, with a darker center, various 

colored. The old-fashioned garden favorite. Pkt. 5c, 
Plumarius Double (Double Clove Pink). A double 

flowered sort, in various colors like the single. 

The foliage makes a pretty border, while the flow 

ers are delightfully fragrant like cloves. Pkt. 10c 



3MOS — C ontinued. 

Giants of California 
Pink. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c. Crimson. Pkt. 10c: oz. 50c. 
White. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c. Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c. 



Klondyke. A late blooming variety, with bright yel- 
low blossoms. Pkt. 10c; oz. $1.00. 

Lady Lennox. A grand new variety which we have grown 
for a large New Tork seedman on our own farms. It is 
without question the finest Cosmos in existence. The 
plants are rather low growing (about 2% feet high) 
and it bears profusely, the whole plant being a mass 
of bloom when in full flower. The blossoms are a 
bright rose pink, and the petals are very large and 
wide, completely overlapping each other. It comes 
into its full perfection of bloom about October 1 to 15. 
Pkt. 10c. 

Cockscomb. See Celosia Cristata. 

CYCLAMEN. A tender, bulbous perennial, used in green- 
houses and window-gardens. It is easily grown from 
seed. Sow in the Fall or early Spring. 
Persicum G-iganteum. Mixed. Very large flowers and 

very free blooming. Pkt. 25c. 
Album. Pure white. Pkt. 25c. 
Rubrum. Red. Pkt. 25c. 
Crimson King. A new variety. Pkt. 25c. 
Papilio. Butterfly type, fringed edges. Pkt. 25c. 

CYPEESS VINE (Ipomoea Quamoclit). A tender, climb- 
ing annual, with soft fern-like foliage and small star- 
like flowers, in red and pink, or white. Scarlet, pkt. 
5c; oz. 30c. White, pkt. 5c; oz. 30c. Mixture of several 
colors, pkt. 5c; oz. 30c. 

DAHLIA. A well-known and popular late summer and 
autumn flowering plant. Is grown from seed or propa- 
gated from the bulbous roots. The seed may be planted 
early in the hotbed and the plants set out in May after 
all danger of frost is over. By sowing the seed early 
the plants may be made to bloom the first year. 
Cactus. Mixed, double, with pointed petals. Pkt. 10c 
Double. Mixed, pkt. 10c. 

Single. Mixed. The most easily grown and also the 
most satisfactory from seed. Pkt. 10c. 




Diantbus Laciniatus 



C C MORSE A CO.- SKKDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CAMF. 



DIGITALIS. OR FOXGLOVE. A hardy paranoial, bloom- 
ing the second year from seed. Grows usually about 
feet) although in very rich soil sometimes 6 feet. 
The bell-shaped (lowers are borne on lonj; spikes, and 
come in shades of purple, lavender, rose and white, 

all spotted lightly inside the blossom. Thrives beat in 
cool, shady locations. Fine mixed, pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 

DIMOBPHOTHECA ATJBANTIACA (African Golden 
Daisy). A plant introduced in the last few years 
which is a great favorite on account of its handsome 
golden orange flowers with black zone at base of 
petals, whi«-h are borne most profusely. 3% inches 
across: plants 12 to 15 in. lies high, and doing well in 
dry situations. Hardy annual. Pkt. 10c. 

Dimorphotheca Aurantiaca Hybrids. Our grand novelty of 
last year. Beautiful shade of purest white, reddish 
and bluish white tints, sulphur, lemon and bright 
golden-yellow, bright orange, reddish yellow changing 
to pale salmon-rose, tender salmon to deep salmony- 
orange. Some, also, have different colored zones, such 
as white with a broad sulphur-yellow zone around a 
black disc, or soft salmon with a deep salmony-red 
inner cinle. 

Fine for borders or bedding. Sow seed in the open 
ground early in the Spring. Per sealed packet, 25c. 

DOLICHOS. OK HYACINTH BEAN. Tender, climbing an- 
nual. Grows rapidly and is valuable for covering a 
trellis. Flowers in purple or white; are borne on long 
stems, the individual blossoms resembling the bean 
Mower, and the ornamental pods resemble bean pods. 
Sow seed in open ground late in April. 
Daylight. The best white. Pkt. 10c. 
Darkness. The best purple. Pkt. 10c. 
Lablab. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 

Dusty Miller. See Centaurea and Cii 



ESCHSCHOLTZIA 

OR CALIFORNIA POPPY 

A hanly annual, with fine-cut, feathery foliage and 
beautiful velvety cup-shaped flowers. Grows from 1 to 1% 





California Poppy — Enchscholtzia California 



Dimorphotheca Aurantiaca. 



feet high, and blooms profusely. Seed may be sown in 
the Fall and any time thereafter till April, and blossoms 
may be had from early in January till late in Summer. 
Of "the easiest culture. Any soil will do, but the better 
the soil, the larger the plants and blossoms. It is best 
to sow the seed in the garden, where the plants are to 
remain, as they do not transplant easily. The beautiful 
State flower of California. 

Californicus. The bright, orange-yellow, com- 
mon variety. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; lb. $2.25. 
Burbank's Crimson Flowering. Pkt. 10c. 
Crocea. Pure deep orange. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Double Rose. A semi-double blossom; rose colored out- 
side and white inside the petal. Pkt. 10c; oz. 
$1.75. 
Erecta Mandarin. Brownish gold, erect growing plant. 

Pkt. 5c. 
Golden West. Very large, orange-colored blossoms, 
shading to canary yellow at the edges. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 25c. 
Mandarin. Blossoms are copper-colored outside and 

bright yellow inside the petals. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Rose Cardinal. White inside, light pink outside. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 40c. 
Striata. Golden yellow, striped lightly with cream. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
White. Large, ivory white. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Mixed Yellows. A mixture of the popular orange and 

yellow varieties. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c. 
Collection one pkt. each of 10 kinds for 45c. 
Mixture of all varieties. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; lb. $2.25. 
Bush Eschacholtzia. See Hunnemannia. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




of the quick- 
height of 30 
orne in great 
nental 



Foxglove, or Digitalis 



ECHINOCYSTIS (Wild Cucumber Vine). C 

est-growing vines we know of, attainir. 
feet in a season; white fragrant flower 
profusion, followed by an abundance 
prickly seed pods; foliage very dense, on which account 
shade is desired. 

EDELWEISS (Leontopodium Alpinum). The true white- 
leaved famous Edelweiss of the Alps; perennial dwarf; 
6 inches. Fkt. 15c. 

EUPHOEBIA. A hardy annual, growing four to six feet 
high, and esteemed for its beautiful foliage. The blos- 

Heterophylla. Called Mexican Tire Plant or Annual 
Poinsettia. Smooth, glossy leaves, turning scarlet late 
in the summer. Pat. 10c. 

Varieg-ata. Called Snow on the Mountain. Leaves 
veined and margined witli white. Pkt. 10c. 

EVERLASTING I'LOWEES. See Acr oclininm, G-omphrena, 
Helichrysum, Honesty, Rhodanthe, Statice, Xeranth- 
emnm, 

Evening- Primrose. See Oenothera. 

Everlasting - Pea. See Lathy r us Latifolius. 

Flax. See Linum. 

FEVERFEW. Matricaria Capensis. Called Double Fever- 
few. A plant growing 18 inches high and bearing pro- 
fusely pure white, very double flowers. Pkt, 5c. 
See also Pyrethrum for edging varieties. 

Flowering Maple. See Abutilon. 

Flowering - Sage. See Salvia. 

FORGET-ME-NOT (Myosotis). A hardy perennial, grow- 
ing 6 to 12 inches high. Small star-like flowers are 
borne in clusters on long stems. The plant is of easy 
culture and blooms the first year if seed is sown early. 
Thrives best in a cool, moist location. 
Alpestris. Blue. Pkt. 5c; oz. 75c. 
Indigo Blue. A new dark indigo color. Pkt. 10c. 
Rosea. Pink-flowering; a pretty contrast for the blue 
and white varieties. Pkt. 5c. 

White. Pkt. 5c. 

Victoria. Large flowers; bright azure blue, with yel- 
low center; plant symmetrical, dwarf and strong 
grower. Pkt. 10c. 



FORGET-ME-NOT— Continued. 

Dissitiflora Perfection. Of dwarf compact habit, flow- 
ering profusely; looks like a sheet of blue. One 
of the best Forget-Me-Nots. Pkt. 15c. 

Perennial Semperflorens. True marsh Forget-Me-Not 
Dwarf, and in flower from early spring till au- 
tumn. Pkt. 10c. 
Collection of seven kinds, 1 pkt of each, 45c. 

FOUR O'CLOCK. A hardy animal, about two feet high, 
of the easiest culture. Seed should be sown in the 
open and thinned to one foot. Is free-flowering, the 
blossoms in great variety of colors and stripes. 
Mixture of all colors. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c. 
Tom Thumb. Dwarf plant, mixed colors. Pkt. 5c. 
Variegated and striped leaved. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 

FOXGLOVE. See Digitalis. 

FUCHSIA. (Ladies' Eardrop). A well-known plant of easy 
culture in pots for the conservatory, parlor decoration, 
or the open ground. Start seed early under glass. 
Double Mixed, pkt. 35c. Single mixed, pkt. 35c. 

GAILLARDIA. A very showy garden plant, with bril- 
liant flowers in scarlet and yellow, blended and 
shaded. Blooms freely from early summer till autumn. 
Grows one and one-half to two feet high, and the 
blossoms are borne on long, slender stems. Both single 
and double varieties are hardy. 
Fine Single Mixed, Annual. Pkt. 5c. 
Double Mixed, Annual. (Picta Lorenziana). Pkt. 5c. 



Grandiflora. Si rigid 
shades of redd is 
GENTIANA Acaulis. 
with yellow spot; 4 ii 

GERANIUM. A half-hardy 
year from seed if sown t 
liant colors and various 

Apple Scented. Very frs 
Fancy Show Felargouiui 
" saiitiful 



perennial variety 
i brown and yellow. 
Gentian. Intense 
. high; hardy perenn 



otol- 



ith 



ul markii 



of varying 
Pkt. 5c. 
blue flowers 
al. Pkt. 10c. 

ing the first 
er in bril- 
nental fo- 



t leaves. Fkt. 25c. 
Lady Washington. One of 
' ve; in rich, soft 



perennial, flov 
arly. A popula 



il<>\ 



rlet shades. Fkt. 10c. 



25c, 
Zonale. Mixed. Beautiful 
Gerhera. See Transvaal Dais; 
GILIA. A hardy annual growing one foot high 



lilac, 
Valuable for r 
Mixed. Fkt. 
Achilleaefolia. 
Francisco 



Dlored flowers. 



nrlc • 



white, 

tive of Cali fornia. 
borders. Sow seed in the fall. 



mm on about San 
ground. Flowers 
and often give a 
Fkt. 



pretty gilia 
hills and sa 
come in clusters 1 y 2 inches ; 
blue look to the fields; 1 foot; hardy 
5c; oz. 20c; lb. $1.25. 
Gilliflower. See Ten Weeks' Stocks. 

GLADIOLUS. Well-known magnificent plants, with sword- 
like leaves and long spikes of flowers of every conceiv- 
able color and shade. Many new and rare varieties are 
produced from seed. Pkt. 10c. 
GLACUM LUTEUM (Horn Poppy). A showy plant, with 
long silvery leaves, gracefully curved and deeply cut 
and curled flowers hell-shaped, orange yellow; peren- 
nial. Fkt. 5c. 
GODETIA. A hardy annual, growing from six inches to ten 
inches high. Of compact growth, with a profusion of 
satiny cup-shaped flowers in deep red, pink and white, 
shaded and blended. Valuable for bedding or massing. 
Sow seed early in the year. Small flowered deep-red 
variety; grows wild in California. Tall Sorts. Fine 
mixed. Pkt. 10c. 

Tom Thumb, or Dwarf Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Amoena. Deep rose-colored flowers; plants twelve to 
thirty inches. Our pretty wild flower known as 
"Farewell to Spring. ' ' Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c; lb. 
$2.50. 
Duchess of Albany. White. Pkt 10c. 
Lary Albemarle. Dark Crimson. Pkt. 10c. 
GOLDEN-ROD (Solidago Canadensis). Well-known golden- 
yellow hardy perennial, flowering late in summer. Three 
feet Pkt. 5o. 









C. C. MORSE * CO.- SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



OOURDS — Continued. 



GOMFKBENA. OB OLOBE AMARANTH 



Dish Cloth, or Luffa. The inside lining resembles a 

■ponge: very useful. Pkt. 5c. 
Dipper or Siphon, ran readily be made into a dipper. 



h Pkt. 5c. 

Turk's Turban. Red, green, striped, <-tc. Pkt. 5c. 
Collection 1 pkt. each of 7 kinds for 25c. 



ORNAMENTAL GRASSES 



-w tbe douMc purpose of rendering the m 

„r panicles in n dried state in winter bouquets. 

AGROSTIS NEBDLOSA. A very graceful and pretty grass 

— charming for borders. Annual, one and one-half 
Pkt. 5c. 
avena sterilis (Animated Oats). Drooping, very grace- 
ful. Annual. Two feet Pkt. Sc. 
BBIZA AUSTRALIS. Lately discovered in Western Aus- 
tralia, mut-li larger than the other brizas. The black 
llders make It unusually ornamental. Pkt. 
15c. 
BBIZA MAXIMA (Quaking Grass). Very pretty. Annual. 

and one-half feet. Pkt. 5c. 
BBIZA GRACILIS (Small Quaking Grass). Very del 

and graceful. Annual. One foot. Pkt. 5c. 
BBOMUS EKIZAEFORMIS. An elegant Briza-like gras; 
Pkt. 5c. 



te 



GLOXINIA. Beautiful hot-house plants, with large, bell- 
shaped blossoms, which come in rich, velvety-deep, and 
bright colors, sonv* of which are beautifully marked. 
Sow In the fall or early spring. Grandinora, Mixed, Pkt. 
25c: tigered and spotted, Mixed, pkt. 25c. 

GYPSOPHILA (Baby's Breath). A hardy annual of easy 
culture. Grows two to three feet high, and hears a pro- 
fusion of small star-shaped white and pinlt flowers. 
Muralis. An excellent border plant; 6 inches; pink 



Pkt. 5c. 



Panicnlata. Fine for bouquets; white flower! 

nial. Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c. 
Elegans. Annual white. Very largely grown 

ists for use in bouquets. Pkt. 5c; oz. 35c. 
Pink (Elegans Bosea). A beautiful soft pinl 



no 



Pkt. 5c. 



HELENIUM Autumnale Superbum. A showy perennial five 
to six feet tall, producing large deep-yellow single flow- 
ers during summer and fall; fine for cutting. Pkt. 10c. 

Helianthns. See Sunflower. 

HELICHRYSTJM (Everlasting Flower). A tree-flowering, 
hardy annual, growing four to five feet high and bear- 
ing beautiful straw-like flowers in a great variety of 
shades and colors. The stems are long and the blos- 
soms large. It is the best and most satisfactory of 
the everlasting flowers, and makes a very handsome 
dried bouquet. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 

HELIOTROPE. A half-hardy perennial, growing four to 
eight feet high. Small flowers, borne in graceful clus- 
ters and very fragrant. Blooms the first season from 
seed if sown early. Forms a large plant, and re- 

quires a roomv situation. Can also be grown against 
a wall and made to assume the character of a climber. 
Xing of the Blacks. Dark purple, almost black. Pkt. 10c. 
Queen Marguerite. Purple Blue. Pkt. 10c. 
White Lady. Pure white. Pkt. 10c. 
Finest Mixed. A mixture of the ordinary true types. 



Hesperis. See Sweet Rocket. 
HIBISCUS. Giant Golden Bowl. 

eight inches, of a deep crearr. 
center. Plants grow from th 
ennial and bear profusely. Pkt. 10c. 
Crimson Eye. The flowers of this perennial are pure 
white with a crimson eye; six inches across; plants 
bloom the first year from seed and often bear fifty 
or more flowers at once; five feet; summer flower- 
ing. Pkt. 10c. 
HUMULUS, OB JAPANESE HOP. A rapid-growing, hardy 
climbing annual with dense leaves. Will grow twenty 
to thirty feet in a season, and is very valuable for cov- 
ering a" trellis. 

Japonicus. Bright-green foliage. Pkt. 10c. 
Japonicus Variegatus. Bright, variegated yellow, white 
and green leaves. Pkt. 10c. 



Very large flowers, 
color with velvety 

to five feet and are per- 



r groups " 

COIX LACRYIHA (Job'! 



GYNERIUM ARGENTEUM (Pampai 

ornamental grass in cultivation. 
Ten feet. Pkt. 10c. 
STIPA PENNATA (Feather Grass). 



two feet high. Pkt. 



most beautiful of the 
Pkt. 10c. 

Grass). The finest 
Half-hardy perennial. 

One of the prettiest 
TWO feet. Pkt. 10c. 
Pkt. 5c. 




Gloxinias 

HONESTY (Satin Plower; Money Plant). The flat silvery- 
seed pods are used for winter decoration. Very hand- 
some, free-flowering; annual. Two feet. Pkt. 5c. 

HOLLYHOCK. A hardy perennial of upright, stately 
growth, Ave to eight feet high. The very double varie- 
ties are the most desirable, but the newer, semi-double, 
fringed types are also very popular. Hollyhocks make 
a fine row in a garden, or a fine- back-ground next to 
a building or high wall or fence. 

DOUBLE VARIETIES. Mixed, pkt. 10c; oz. $1 50. 

Black, Blood Red, Canary Yellow, Rose Pink, Salmon, 
Snow White: Each pkt. 10c; 6 pkts. assorted, 40c. 



SINGLE VARIETIES. Mixed, 
soms in all colors. Pkt. 5c. 
Allegheny. Mixed. The sen; 
An artistic and pretty so 
Henderson's Ever blooming. 



The old-fashioned blos- 



-double, fringed 
t. Pkt. 10c. 
A u earl 



owering gor- 



of single and semi-double blossoms. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




Huxmemannia, 



Bush Eschscholtzia 



HUNNEMANNIA, OR BUSH ESCHSCHOLTZIA. Known 
also as the Santa Barbara Poppy. An erect-growing, 
tender perennial, about two feet high. Foliage fine' 
cut and feathery. Blossoms, beautifully cup-shaped 
bright yellow, and about three to four inches across 
stems, long and smooth. There are few more satisfac 
tory flowers in the garden than the Hunnemannia, 
Fumariafolia. Pkt. 5c. 
Hyacinth Bean. See Dolichos. 

ICE PLANT (Mesenibryanthemum Crystallmum) . A low- 
growing and trailing tender perennial. The thick leaves 
seem to be covered with crystals. Used for edging em- 
bankments and box work; thrives in bright sunlight and 
in dry situations. Pit. 10c. 
IMPATIENS SULTANZ (Zanzibar Balsam). Much prized 
for window culture. The foliage is waxy green, and 
with the semi-transparent branches makes a plant in 
itself attractive. The bright rosy carmine flowers are 
very delicate and pretty. Pkt. 15c. 
IPOMOEA An extensive genus, including many well- 
known garden flowers. Are tender climbing annuals, 
from five to ten feet long, and all classes are desir- 
able. The seed of several varieties, especially the moon 
flower, should have the outer shell punctured and then 
soaked in water for twelve hours or more to germi- 
nate it. 

Bona Nox (Evening Glory, or G-ood Night). Large 
fragrant violet blossoms, expanding in the night. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Coccinea, or Star Ipomoea. Small scarlet blossoms j 

vines about ten feet. Pkt. 5c. 
Grandifiora Alba (Moon Flower). Large white blos- 
soms, five to six inches across, which expand at 
night. The vine grows very rapidly, as much as 
fifty feet in a season, and is covered at night and 
in the early morning with a multitude of fragrant 
white flowers. Pkt. 10c. 



NEW MOON FLOWER. Sky Blue. Of strong, vigorous 
growth, the plants quickly attain a height of twelve 
to fifteen feet. A dense mass of large heart-shaped 
leaves forms a most appropriate setting for the large 
sky-blue flowers, which come in September in great 
profusion. The flowers measure nearly four inches 
aeross, and are surpassingly beautiful — of the softest 
cerulean blue, shading to white at the throat. May 
be grown as a pot plant. Pkt. 10c 
Heavenly Blue. A tall climber with large light-blue 
flowers, yellow throated and measuring four to 
five inches across. Pkt. 10c. 
Setosa, or Brazilian Morning Glory. The vine has large 
overlapping leaves eight to ten inches across, 
which make a dense shade; useful for covering 
porches or garden fences; annual. Beautiful rose- 
colored blossoms three inches across. Pkt. 10c. 
Learil. Large dark-blue flowers, on a quick-growing 

vine. Pkt. 25c. 
IiUtea. Yellow blossoms; vine of medium size. Pkt. 

10c. 
Collection of the eight varieties for 60c. 
Imperial Japanese. See list under Morning Glory. 
Ipomoea Quamoclit. See Cypress Vine. 
Japanese Hop. See Humulus Japonicus. 

KEN II. WORTH IVY. A hardy perennial, trailing plant, espe- 
cially adapted for hanging baskets, window boxes or 
for trailing over walls. Pkt. 10c. 
KENKEDTA (Bimaculata Grandifiora). A half-hardy peren- 
nial climber of much beauty. The flowers are borne in 
clusters of 20 or more; 10 feet; purplish blue. A pretty 
Australian vine. Pkt. lOc. 
KOCHIA TEICOPHYLLA (Summer Cypress). A splendid 
ornamental annual plant, forming dense oval bushes 2 
to 2^ feet high, of small, feathery, light green foliage. 
As summer advances this changes to a carmine hue and 
finally to a fiery red. A very attractive plant at all 
times. Also called "Burning Bush." Pit. 10c. 
KUDZTJ VINE (Fueraria Thunbergiana). A new climber of 
great merit. This vine is one of the most rapid climbers 
there is, growing to 20 feet quickly. Called also Jack- 
and-the-Bean Stalk. Hardy perennial. Pkt. 15c. 
IjANTATTA. A tender perennial often becoming shrub-like, 
two to three feet high, bearing verbena-like clusters of 
flowers, in orange, rose and other colors. Blooms con- 
stantly all summer. Pine mixed, Pkt. 10c. 
LATHTEUS LATIFOLIUS (Perennial or Everlasting Pea). 
A hardy perennial climber flowering the first year if seed 
Is sown in the fall. Leaves and stems smooth. Flowers 
resemble sweet peas, but are borne on strong stems, 
with eight to ten blossoms to the stem. Is not fragrant, 
but is hardy and showy, and thrives in any good soil. 
Pink Beauty. The ground of the petals is white, edged 

and shaded with pink. Pkt. 5c. 
Crimson. Pkt. 5c. 
White. The best variety for cutting, especially for 

florists' use. Pkt. 10c. 
mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
LAVATEEA. (Tree Mallow). A showy hedge plant, grow- 
ing about six feet high and covered with shrimp-pink, 
cup-shaped flowers. Much used for windbreaks about 
San Francisco. Sow in May in the open ground and thin 
young plants to twelve inches apart. Pkt. 5c 
LAVENDER. Chiefly cultivated for the delicious and last- 
ing fragrance of its flowers; succeeds in any common 
garden soil. Perennial. Pkt. 5c. 



LARKSPUR 



OR DELPHINIUM 

There are two classes of the Larkspur which are quite dis- 
tinct — the annual and the perennial. Both are well 
known and are among the finest flowers. 
HARDY ANNUAL VAKIETIES. These Larkspurs grow 
about one and one-half to two feet high. A great 
variety of bright colors; of easiest culture, doing well 
in any soil. 
Dwarf Eocket. Mixed. Dwarf plant, twelve inches 

for bedding; double flowers. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30e. 
Emperor. Branching. The Emperor Larkspurs are 
very bright and showy and send up often forty 
or more erect spikes of double flowers; two feet. 
Rose, pink-flowered. Pkt. 5c. 
White. Pkt. 5c. 
Mixed, fine double flowers. Pkt. 5c. 



C C. MORSE A CO. SEEDS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



HARDY PERENNIAL LARKSPURS (Delphiniums) 
• lUer than the annum] sorts, and theii bril- 
liant tool ion ei ra at a -lis 
tan--- and the plant* 
ami Mat in habit. By keeping the plants well wa- 
' and tho flow- md crop of bloom may 
be had, an-1 from some a third. Tin* seed is a little 
difficult to start, so we advise sowing in a box in pre- 
pared soil mi. I under a glass. 

Cardinale. This is the grand "Southern Scarlet Lark- 
on-' of the brightest anil finest of Cali- 
fornia Wild flowers, and which makes the South 
era mountainsides a blase of glory in mid-June; 
three to five feet Pkt. 20c. 
Chinese Mixed. Large single flowers on spikes: two 
to three feet; the flowers have all the delicate 
shades of blue from white to deep indigo; flowers 
early from see-l sown in the spring. Pkt. 10c. 
Elatum Hybridum. Blue of various shades with black 

center; very handsome; :■ to :> feet. Pkt. 10c. 
Formosum. The variety most often seen. Bright 
blue flowers with white router. Tall spikes, three 
feet. Pkt. 10c. 
Formosum Coelestinum. Like the above, but with 

azure of very light blue flowers. Pkt. 10c. 
Collection of the five Perennial Larkspurs for 45c. 



LEMON VERBENA. The leaves of this fine old favorite 
are delightfully fragrant and refreshing. Grown easily 
from seed. Pkt. 10c. 

LEPTOSYNE MiKITIMA (Sea Dahlia). Along the sea- 
shore of Southern California grows this verv bright 
yellow Wlldflower. The plant is about two feet high 
and has succulent divided foliage. Flowers three to four 
inches across; annual. Pkt. 5c. 

LINUM, OR SCARLET FLAX. A hardy annual, about one 
and one-half feet high. Of slender and graceful appear- 
ance, with smooth stems and bright-red flowers, which 
are borne in great profusion. Can he sown early out of 
doors, and thrives well in good soil. 
Rubrum. Pkt. 5c. 
Perennial Flax. Blue. Pkt. 5c. 

LIPPIA REPENS. A dwarf branching plant which creeps 
over the ground, making a dense mat two inches deep. 
Thrives on very dry places, and after getting started 
needs water only once a month. Resembles white clover 
and is used as a substitute for grass in the lawn. 
Pkt. 10c; oz. S2.50. 



LOBELIA 



A hardy annual and hardy perennial. The annual grows 
four to six inches high; is of compact growth, and 
literally covered with small bright flowers. By cutting 
hack the plants during the summer and giving plenty 
of water, they may be kept in flower all summer. Used 
for ribbon work and borders or hanging baskets. 
Crystal Palace Compacta. The variety most used for 

borders. E>eep blue flowers and dark foliage; six 

inches; a constant bloomer. Pkt. 10c; Vs °z. 00c. 
Emperor William. Sky-blue; compact. Pkt. 10c; Vs oz. 

40c. 
Golden Queen. Dwarf; blue flowers, yellow leaves. 

Pkt. 10c. 
White Gem (Compacta). Snow-white flowers cover the 

plant. Pkt. 10c. 
Gracilis. Light blue, trailing, light green foliage. Ex- 
cellent for hanging baskets. Pkt 5c. 
Prima Donna. Maroon, with white eye. Pkt. 10c. 
Speciosa. Deep blue flowers and dark foliage trailing. 

Pkt 10c. 
Mixed Compact Varieties. Pkt. 5c. 
Perennial Lobelias are hardy and three feet high. The 
blossoms are produced in tall showy spikes. 
Cardinalis, or Cardinal Flower. Brilliant scarlet flower 

spike. Worthy of a more extensive cultivation. 

This plant love's a wet, boggy place, so water extra. 

Pkt. 10c. 



LOBELIA — Cont'd. 

Hybrids. Mixed. 
Large tlowers. 
resembling Car 
dlnalis. In all 
slut iles of rose, 
red, lilac, pur 

pie, etc. in How 
it all summer 
and fall. Pkt. 



der 



ei 



per 



tO tW.'U ,- IV ! 

long, with show) 
purplish - r u s e 
blossoms .some- 
thing like Fox- 

gl..ve.-i. Pkt. IOC 

Love-In-A-Mist. See 
Nigella, 

Love Lies Bleeding*. 
See Amaranth us 
Caudatus. 

LUPINU3, OB LU- 
PINS. Hardv na- 
tive California 
annuals, in great 
variety, growing 
from one to three 
feet high, and 
bearing spikes of 
pea-shaped new- 



est 



Of the 
u It ure. 



Sow 



hlu 



flo 




Pit. 5c 
Pink (Hybridus 
Eoseus).Long 
spikes of 
bright pink 
flowers. Pkt. 
10c. 
Lupinus Polyphyllus. 
Tall handsome 
flowers perennial 
lupins with long 
flower spikes. 
Hardy. Pkt. 5c. 
Mixture of all colors 



Chalceclonica. Scarlet flowers. Pkt. 5c. 

Kaasfeana. Orange, crimson and scarlet. Pkt. 5c. 

MARIGOLD. A hardy annual, shrubby plant, in dwarf 
and tall varieties, growing from six inches to three 
feet high. Foliage, bright green, deeply cut, and 
graceful. The flowers are various shades of yellow 
and brown. The tall varieties are very valuable foT 
large bedding or background work, and the dwarf 
varieties for borders. 
Eldorado. Called "The African Marigold." The best 

tall variety, with large, very double blossoms. 
Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Dwarf French, Legion of Honor. Single brown and 

yellow. Pkt. 5c. 
Dwarf French, Striped. Pkt. 5c. 

" " Mixed. Small flowers. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 

Tall French Mixture. A mixture of tall double, colors 
in yellow, brown and stripes. Small flowered. 
Mixed, pkt. 5c. 
Pot Marigold and Cape Marigold. See Calendula. 

Marg-uerite. See Chrysanthemum Frutescens. 

Marvel of Peru. See Four O'clock. 

Martynia. See Garden Seed List. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MattMola Bicornis. Even- 
ing-Scented Stock. 
The flowers are ex- 
ceedingly f r agrant 
during the evening, 
scenting the sur- 
rounding atmosphere. 
Purple flowers. Not 
the handsome Ten 
Weeks' stock, which 
see. Hardy annual. 
Pkt. 5c. 



MIGNON- 
ETTE 

A hardy annual, growing 
six to twelve inches 
high and bearing 
pyramidal - shaped 
flower spikes, made 
up of thickly-set 
flowerets, which are 
exceedingly fra- 

grant. Grows easily 
from seed and can 
either be transplant- 
ed from boxes or 
sown out in the gar- 
den and thinned to 
four to six inches. 
Sow in the fall for 
early blossoms iu the 
spring. Valuable for 
potting, or for bed- 
ding, or for border. 
The flowers are not 
attractive except for 
their fragrance. 
Allen's Defiance. Long 
spikes of whitish 
flowers and compact 
growth. Pkt. 10c; 
oz. 50c. 

Golden Machet. A 
compact • grow- 
ing variety, with 
medium long, 
thick spikes of 
yellow flowers. 
Pkt. 5c; oz 50c. 
Parson's White. A 
tall variety, with 
long spikes with 
silver flowers. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 
Pure Machet. A compact-growing variety, with thick 

spikes and large size flowerets. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 
Ruby Machet. A dwarf compact variety, with large 
stubby spikes covered with copper flowers. Pkt. 10c. 
Sweet Scented (Reseda Odorata). Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Collection of above six kinds for 25c. 
Mixture of the best compact varieties Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 




MANDE VILLA SUATEOLBNS (Cbili Jasmine). Fine sum- 
mer climber with great clusters of large, waxy, star- 
shaped blossoms, exquisitely fragrant, resembling the 
single tuberose in shape. Pkt. 15c. 
MATRICARIA (Double White Feverfew). Bushy perennial 
garden plant, bearing quantities of white double but- 
ton-like flowers; useful for cutting. Pkt. 5c. 
MAUBANDIA (Giant-PlowerIng). Beautiful climber for 
either garden or greenhouse decoration and for hang- 
ing baskets; gemmed with Gloxinia-shaped flowers of 
rich purple, white, and rose, fully double the size of the 
older, well-known sorts. The plants from seed sown in 
spring will begin flowering by July and continue until 
frost. Mixed colors. Pkt. 10c. 
MINA LOBATA. A fine annual climber which grows very 
rapidly to a height of 20 or 30 feet in a season. Mina 
is one of our best climbers, the leaves are of good size 
and dense, and the flowers are freely borne in clusters; 
orange red. Useful for arbor, trellis, etc. 

Pkt. of 20 seeds, 10c. 
MlMUliUS. A half-hardy perennial, growing from six inches 
to one foot high. Blooms freely and exists in a large 
variety of colors. Useful for window gardens and pot 
work or for garden in a moist, shady situation. Blooms 
first year from seed if sown early. 
Moschatns, or Musk Plant. Fragrant plant, with small, 

yellow blooms, spotted lightly with brown. Pkt. 5c. 
Tigi-inus. or Monkey Flower. Large flowers of several 

colors, and spotted. Pkt. 10c. 
Cardinalls. Scarlet flowered perennial; IS inches high; 

useful for a border; free flowering. Pkt. 10c. 
MOMORCICA. Balsainina, or Balsam Apple. A climbing 
annual, "growing about 10 feet long. Has graceful and 
ornamental foliage, yellow flowers, and warted golden- 
yellow fruit, with large carmine-red seeds. Balsam 
Apple and Balsam Pear are climbers which thrive in 
hot locations and are much planted around Bakersfield. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c. 
Cliarantia, or Balsam Pear. Same as the Balsam Apple. 

but fruit is pear-shaped. Pkt. 5c; oz. 40c. 
Moonflower. See Ipomoea Grandiflora Alba. 

MORNING GLORY (Convolvulus Major. See also Ipomoea). 
No climber is more popular than is the Morning Glory; 
for covering trellises or unsightly back fences they and 
climbing Nasturtiums are most often planted. Morning 
Glories grow quickly to a vine fifteen feet long and 
bear very abundantly brilliant flowers, funnel-shaped, 
of various colors, blue predominating. Soak the seed 
for two hours in warm water to hasten germination; of 
easy culture. See Jpomoeas for Brazilian Morning 
Glory and for sorts not listed here. 
Tall, or Climbing Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c. 
Imperial Japanese. These are much the handsomest 
flowers iu Morning Glories, of gigantic size and in 
colors ranging from snow white to carmine, 
through every shade of blue and purple to nearly 
black, also marbled, striped and slashed sorts. The 
vine is not quite so vigorous a climber as the 
above. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c. 
Dwarf, or Bush Varieties (Convolvulus Minor). Plants 
grow ten to twelve inches high, and are hardy 
annuals. Useful for beds, edges, or hanging 
baskets. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Mourning Bride. See Scabiosa. 
Musk Plant. See Mimulus Moscliatus. 
Myosotis. See Forget-me-not. 



NASTURTIUM 



The foliage of 



the 

they 



•ill be 



Tender annual, in two distinct classes — Dwarf, and Tall or Climbing. 

is pretty aDd the flowers very beautiful and contained in a great number of brightest colors and tints, 
remain late in the spring after danger of frost is over 



do 



gethe 



seldom necessary to thin the young plants, 



Nasturtiu 
profusion t] 

TALL, OR CLIMBING VARIETIES 

Of quick growth, covering a wall, hedge, or trellis in a short 
time. The brilliant blossoms almost cover the plant from top to 
bottom. 

Butterfly. Light yellow, with blotch of deep red on lower 
petal. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; M It). 60c. 



is. Thi; 

Caprice. A mixture of bright colors, spotted and shaded, 
with dark foliage. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y* lb. 45c. 

Chameleon. A mixture of changing and inconstant shades. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; U lb. 35c; lb. $1.20. 

Dark Crimson. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; H lb. 30c. 

Jupiter. Large, bright, golden yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; H 
lb. 60c. 



C C. MORSE A CO.-SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 









IIP 


Mr J 






^73B Iv' 










Hi, ri 


SSHr '' ' 




>'-.■' 




* W^^-i 


Lssssssssm \ 


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fb 





Dwarf Nasturtiums 



tall NASTURTIUMS — Continued. 
Midnight. Flowers deep brownish red; foliage deep green. 

Fkt. 5c; oz. 20c; V4 lb. 60c. 
Moonlight. Immense creamy-yellow flowers. Pit. 5c; oz. 

Orange.' Fkt.' 5c; oz. 15c; y K lb. 40c. 

Pearl, or White. Light lemon or primrose. Fkt. 5c; oz. 15c; 

i 4 lb. 40c. 
Rose. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; Vi lb. 40c. 
Scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 40c. 
Sunlight. Bright yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H lb. 40c. 
Twilight. Large blossoms of light salmon, suffused with 

rosy salmon. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 40c. 
Yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 40c. 
Tall Varieties Mixed. All the above varieties, besides many 

others, in a splendid mixture. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 

25c; lb. 70c. 
Ivy-leaved. A mixture of several colors; have lobed or 

scalloped leaves. The blossoms have scalloped edges. 

Very pretty and attractive. Fkt. 5c; oz. 25o; y A lb. 75c. 

VARIEGATED QUEEN. OK TALL VARIEGATED LEAVED 
MIXED 

Every leaf is variegated with yellow, white and green. Some of 
the leaves are one-half to two-thirds white and yellow while others 
are mostly green, hut beautifully striped and blotched. This gives 
and very handsome appearance to tho plant. 



The (1o 



seed. 



if all 
35c. 



It comes entirely true fro 



Fkt. 10c; 

LOBB'S CLIMBING NASTURTIUMS 

(TROPAEOLUM LOBBIANUM) 

A tall, or climbing class. The leaves ore smaller and the flow- 
ers more numerous and prolific than the ordinary tall class. 

These are very similar to the ordinnry climbing nasturtiums, the 
chief difference being in the bright shades and darker leaves of 
some. The flowers are slightly smaller, hut are borne more freely. 
LoWs Varieties Mixed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V\ lb. 30c; lb. $1.00. 
Asa Gray. Light lemon or primrose. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H N>- 

45c. 
Crown, Prince of Prussia. Blood red. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; H 

lb. 45c. 
Crystal Palace. Orange scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. ISc; Vt lb. 45c. 
Giant of Battles. Sulphur yellow, blotched with red. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 15c; U lb. 45o. 
ting; of the Blacks. Dark-red flowers and dark foliage. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 15c; V\ lb. 45c. 
Lucifer. Blossoms, deep crimson; leaves, brownish green. 

Fkt. 5c; oz. ISc; Vt lb. 45c. 



■Spitfire. Brilliant scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; 14 lb. 45c. 

Hybrids of Madam Gunter. Mixed. A splendid mixture of 
blotched, shaded, and variously marked petals in bright, 
glowing tints. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y* lb. 30c; lb, $1.00. 

DWARF NASTURTIUMS 

The plants form a small, round bush twelve to 16 inches high 

which is a mass of bloom all summer. Do not water too much nor 

sow on rich ground for abundance of bloom. 

Aurora. Yellow, veined carmine. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A !*• 30c. 

Chameleon. Mixed. A dwarf mixture of blotched and incon- 
stant shades on one plant; such as bronze and crimson 
or yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c; *4 lb. 60c. 

Crimson. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; % lb. 45c. 

Crystal Palace Gem. Sulphur yellow, spotted with carmine. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c. 

Empress of India. Intense scarlet 
and green. A splendid variety. 

45C. 

Golden King-. Rich golden yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; y A lb. 
45c. 

"Golden Midnight." The foliage is a light yellowish-green, 
while the flowers are of such a dark maroon as to seem 
almost black. The artistic effect rendered by this con- 
trast between leaves and blossoms is unique and at the 
same time beautiful. Pkt. 15c. 

Xing of Tom Thumbs. Dark scarlet and dark-green leaves. 
Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; % lb. 30c. 

King Theodore. Very deep crimson and dark foliage. The 
darkest of all, nearly black. Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; K lb. 45c. 

Rose or Pink. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V* !*>• 30c. 

Ruby King. Bright red, tinted salmon. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; Y\ 
lb. 30c. 

Queen of Tom Thumbs. Silver variegated foliage, crimson 
flowers; dwarf and compact, and a handsome bedding 
plant. Fkt. 10c. 

Scarlet. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 30c. 

White Pearl. Very light lemon or primrose. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; 

y 4 ib. 30c. 

Yellow. Pkt. 5c; oz. 10c; V* lb. 30c. 

Swarf Varieties Mixed. A splendid mixture of all the above, 

besides many other varieties. Fkt. 5c; oz. 10c; y A lb. 

25c; lb. 85c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



NEMOPEILA, OB. LOVE GRASS. A hardy annual California 
wild-flower, growing about six inches high. Has small, 
cup-shaped blossoms about one inch in diameter, in 
white and shades of blue. Mixed, pkt. 5c. 
Insignia (Baby Blue Byes). Sky blue, with white eyes. 

Pkt. 5c; oz. 15c; lb. 91.00. 
Maculata. White, with each petal spotted violet at tip. 
Pkt. 5c; oz. 20c. 
NICOTIA1TA OB FLOWERING TOBACCO. A half hardy an- 
nual, growing 3 feet high, with slender tubular flower. 
Belongs to the tobacco family. Requires plenty of room 
in the garden. 

Affinis. White, and very fragrant. Pkt. 5c. 

Affinis Hybrids. Splendid new hybrids of the popular 

N. Affinis; they possess the delicious fragrance of 

the parent; colors blue, red, rose, white, etc. Pkt. 

10c. 

Colossea. Giant foliage plant of a dark glossy green 

with reddish ribs. Pkt. 10c. 
Sanderaea. A new, large, flowering type, with vari- 
ous bright-colored blossoms. Pkt. 10c, 
NIGELIA, OB LOVE-IN-A-MIST. A hardy annual, one foot 
high, with finely cut foliage. Oddly shaped blossoms in 
blue and white, and curious seed pods. Of easy culture. 
Damascena. Pkt. 5c. 
OENOTHERA, OB EVENING PRIMROSE. A half hardy 
annual and pererinial, about six inches high, bearing 
bright, showy flowers in white, pale yellow, rose, etc. 
Of the easiest culture. The blossom is fully expanded 
only late in the afternoon. 
Annual Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 

Yellow (Lamarckiana). A bright yellow evening prim- 
rose, three feet high; perennial; of great beauty. The 
yellow evening primrose is found wild in many parts 
of California. Pkt. 5c. 
OXALIS. A half hardy perennial bulbous plant growing 
about nine inches high and suitable for greenhouse, 
rock-work, or edgings. Flowers bright colored and 
showy. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 




ITIOELLA OB LOVE-IN-A-MIST 



MORSE'S SUPERB PANSIES 

See PAGES 46 AND 47 FOE GIANT SOETS 
All our Pansy seerl is obtained from the most noted European specialists. Pansies thrive best in a moist, shady 
location and in rich, loamy soil. Seed should be sown in the autumn for early spring blossoms, or can be sown early in the 
year for good flowers later in the spring. The plants must be transplanted twice in order to get the largest flowers; once 
from the seed box to a chosen bed, and again to the open garden. This is important for large size pansies; use manure 
liberally. The blossoms are usually larger in the spring and again in the fall, and while they bloom freely all summer, 
the blossoms are small during the hot months. While the plants carry over well with a little covering during the 
winter, it is best to plant new seed each year. 

Morse's Prize Strain. The very finest mixtures of truly Giant Sorts. Packet 50c. 
Our Giant Pansies this year are listed and described on our Novelty Pages, 46 and 47. We have 
some new rare sorts. Turn to Novelty page 47, for best Pansies. 



SEPARATE COLORS OR NAMED VARIETIES 



Atropurpurea : dark blue $ .10 $1.75 

Aurlculaeflora : fine shades 10 2.00 

Azure Blue 10 1.75 

Bronze 10 2.25 

Emperor William: Ultramarine blue 10 2.25 

Fairy Queen: blue with azure margin 10 1.75 

Plrs King: crimson, yellow edge 10 2.25 

Golden Gem : pure yellow 10 2.00 

Gold Margined 10 1.76 

Golden Yellow: dark eye 10 8.00 

Xing' of the Blacks or Faust: velvety black 10 2.25 

Lord Xeaconsfleld: lavender, heliotrope and purple. .10 2.00 

Peacock: peacock blue, white edge 10 2.50 



Pkt. Oz. 



Prince Bismarck: golden bronze 10 

Qnadricolor: or Pheasant's Eye 10 

Ruby Bed: rich color 10 

Silver Edged: extra fine 10 

Snow Queen: pure white. . 10 

Victoria: nearlv scarlet 10 

Violet: fine violet, blue 10 

White: pure white, dark eye 10 

Large Flowering Varieties: all mixed 10 

Striped or Mottled, Mixed 10 

12 packets of any of the above 10c varieties for $1.00 
6 for 50c. 



t.oo 

1.75 
3.50 
2.25 
2.00 
2.25 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 



PASSION" FLOWER (Passiflora). A half hardy perennial 
climber, shedding its leaves in winter. Grows lux- 
uriantly either from cuttings or seed. A very satisfac- 
tory climber for immense growth, as it will cover a 
porch or small cottage in one summer. 
Pink, evergreen foliage. Pkt. 10c. 
Purple, pkt. lOo. 

Scarlet, evergreen foliage. Pkt. lOe. 
White, pkt. loo. 

Pelargonium. See Geranium. 



PENTSTEMOIT. One of our beBt flowers for the hardy 
perennial border; grows two feet high; flowers the first 
season from seed, and blossoms freely. Pentstemon 
sends up spikes of bright colored and spotted flowers 
somewhat like the Foxglove, but in a great yariety of 
shades and colors. A decidedly beautiful and satisfac- 
tory flower. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 

Perennial Pea. See Lathyrus Latifollus. 

PE1ILLA NASTKIBZRSIS- Has very dark bronze, almost 
black foliage. Similar to Coleue. Is of easy culture. 
A half hardy annual. Pkt. 5c. 

Periwinkle. See Vlnca. 

66 



C C. MORSK .v CO. SEKltS SAN PHANCISCO, CALIF. 



MORSE'S GIANT PETUNIAS 

A tender perennial, of several distinct type", »nd variously adapted for greenhouse nml pot culture, and for open 
air. The latter grows with little attention or care, and in any soil, and blooms profusely all spring and summer. The 
large, double varieties do not produce seed, but the pollen from them is artificially crossed on the largo, Blngle, and 
I plants, and the seel so produced will make a percentage of double blossoms. The I red types aro in 

large, single, plain edged, or fringed edged blossoms, or in very thickly double flowers. 
Giant Flowered Varieties, all fertilized by hand — 

Single. Deep throated, brilliantly blotched, plain 7 

edge, mixed. Pkt. 25c. \ A town of our 

Single. Peep throated, brilliantly blotched, fringed, . - - ° lant Petnnl <"' 

mixed. Pkt. 25c. A 

Double. White, blotched, and brilliantly colored, l|H 



mixed, plain edged. Pkt. 25c. 

Double. Striped, blotched, mixed, 
fringed. Pkt. 25c. 
Small Flowered Varieties — 

Dwarf Inimitable. Mixed. A very tree- 
blooming, dwarf plant: cherry red 
with white stripes. Pkt. 10c. 

Fine Mixed. Good mixture of small free- 
blooming colors. Pkt. 5c. 



1 \ 



" 



PHYSALIS TRANCHETTI OB CHINESE 
LANTERN PLANT. A showy annual, 
growing two feet high and esteemed for 
its seed pods which in fall change from \ 
brilliant yellow to scarlet and which are \ 
round and pointed and resemble a small V 
lantern. The fruit inside the pod is "-; 

sometimes made into preserves. Pkt. 10c. 

PLATYCODON GRANDITLOR-A, OB JAPA- 
NESE BELL. A giant bell flower grow- V,"' 
ing two feet tall and covered all summer 
with large steel-blue flowers. One of the very best 
perennials and should be more widely planted. Pkt. 10c. 

Fnaseolus Caracalla. See Snail Vine. 

Pinks. See Dianthus. 

Polyanthus. See Primula. 

PERENNIAL HARDY PHLOX. A beautiful and easily 
grown perennial, about three feet high and bearing 
clusters of bright-colored, phlox-like blossoms. There 
is no more satisfactory flower for the garden, and 
should be in far more general use than it is now. 
Decussata Mixed Pkt. 10c. 




Giant Single Petunia 



PHLOX DRUMMONDII. Grandiflora. A hardy annual, 
growing from six inches to one foot high and bearing 
beautiful, soft-petaled, and brilliantly colored flowers 
all spring and summer. Fine for bedding, and mass- 
ing. Sow seed in the fall for early flowers. 
Alba Oculata. White with colored eye. Pkt 10c. 
Atropurpurea. Deep purple. Pkt. 10c 
Carnea. Pink, with chamois-rose center. Pkt. 10c. 
Coccinea. Brilliant scarlet. Pkt. 10c. 
Eclipse. Bright, rosy purple and violet. Pkt. 10c. 
Kermisina. Vivid crimson. Pkt. 10c. 
Large Blood Red. Pkt. 10c. 



PHLOX DRUMMONDII 

Pure White. Pkt. 10c. 
Splendens. Dwarf, bright red, 



th white eye. Pkt. 
10c. 

Yellow (Isabellina) . Soft Primrose. Pkt. 10c. 

Collection, one packet each of above nine sorts for 65c. 

Fine Mixture of all colors of the larger types. Pkt. 
5c; oz. 50c. 

Dwarf Compact. Mixed. Low-growing plants, with 
good-sized flowers. Pkt. 10c. 

Starred and Fringed. Mixed. A mixture of star- 
shaped and pointed blossoms. Pkt. 10c. 



POPPY 

A hardy annual, three to five feet high, and bearing single and large double blossoms in bright colors. Sow 
seed in open ground where plants are to remain, and thin to six or twelve inches. If left thick the plants will be 
weak and spindling and the blossoms inferior. To avoid getting the seed too thick, it can be mixed with dry sand be- 
fore sowing. 

Shrimp Pink. Large double, straight edges. Pkt. 5c; 

oz. 30c. 
White Fringed, or Carnation Flowered. Large, double 

fringed. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c. 
Large Double. Mixed. All colors. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 

SINGLE VARIETIES 
(Annual) — 

Dannebrog. Brilliant scarlet, with white center; four 
" large petals. Pkt. 5c. 



DOUBLE VARIETIES 
(Annual)— 

Cardinal. A bright scarlet, fringed, double. Pkt. 5c; 

oz. 30c. 
Double White, Paeony Flowered. Straight edges. Pkt. 

5c; oz. 30c. 
Fairy Blush. A large, double fringed white, with pink 
edges. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS-SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 



POPPY— Continued 

,, SINGLE VARIETIES 

(Annual) — 

Tulip Flowered. Intense scarlet, single blossoms. 

Plant about two and one-half to three feet high. 

The brightest colored of all poppies. Pkt. 10c; 

oz. 50c. 

Shirley. The most beautiful type of poppies, having 

soft, hairy foliage, and an immense variety of 

single blossoms in white, pink, lavender, purple, 

shades of red, and scarlet. The petals are very 

dainty and look as if made from crepe paper. 

Free blooming and fine for bedding or tall border. 

Mixed. Pkt. 10c; oz. 50c. 

Umbrosum. Vermilion petals, with black spots on 

each, similar to Shirley Poppy. Pkt. 5c; oz. 30c. 

Collection of one packet each of above ten kinds for 

40c. 

PERENNIAL POPPIES 
Hardy perennial, of easy culture; in bright, glowing 
colors. Blooms first year from seed. 

Iceland. Mixed. A graceful, delicate variety, twelve 
inches tall, with white, orange, and yellow single 
blossoms, the petals resembling crumpled tissue 
paper. The plant is low and compact, but the 
flowers on their slender stalks are excellent for 
cutting. Sow in the fall, where plants are to re- 
main, and thin. Pkt. 10c. 
Orientale (The Large Oriental Poppy). A hardy plant, 
bearing large brilliant crimson flowers, with a 
black blotch on each petal. Very showy and at- 
tractive; two and one-half feet tail. Pkt. 10c. 
Bracteatum. Immense orange-scarlet flowers very similar to the Oriental 
Poppy. Pkt. 10c. 
PORTULACA. Low-growing or creeping tender annual, six to eight inches 
high, aud bearing glossy, cup-shaped blossoms in very brilliant and gor- 
geous colors. 
Th 

and stems are 
thick. The 
germi- 
nates slowly 
and should 
be started un- 

vhen the 
weather is hot. 
do best on rathe 





Golden Yellow. Pkt. 5c 
Pink. Pkt. 5c. 
Single. Mixed. 
Double. Mixed 

FOTEKTILLA. Brill 

inches high. Often called Cinquefoil. 
Sing-la Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Primrose, Evening". See Oenothera. 



Scarlet. Pkt. 5c. 
White. Pkt. 5c. 
Large flowering. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 
Large flowering. Pkt. 10c. 
red flowers. Hardy perennk 



PRIMROSES 



Komneya Coulteri, or Matilija Poppy 



PRIMULA SINENSIS, OR CHINESE PRIMROSE. 

Greenhouse or pot plants, bearing trusses of large 
single or double blossoms in bright colors, as well as 
soft tints. Sow seed in April or May for winter! 
blooming'. Our seed is from the very fiuest strains. 
Giant Single Fringed Varieties — 

Alba Magnifica. Pure white. Pkt. 25c. 

Bright Blue. Pkt. 25c. 

Bright Rose. Pkt. 25c. 

Rosy Morn. Blush pink. Pkt. 25c. 

Scarlet. Pkt. 25c. 

Single Fringed Varieties. A splendid mixture. Pkt. 

25c. 
Double Fringed Flowers. Saved from the finest blos- 
soms. Pkt. 50c. 
Single Mixed. Flowers not fringed. Pkt. 25c. 
Filicifolia, or Fern Leaved Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 25c. 



C. < '. MORSB \ ( O. hi ) ox saN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



PUKIOSES — Continued. 
Half Hardy Primulas— 

Auricula. The Primrose of the Alps. Flowers v:iri 
olored, mostly yellow; fragrant. Si 
a. Pkt. 15c. 
Forbesi (Baby Primrose). The Oowors are small (one- 
half ; -i 1 borne most profuselj 

me the plants are a few weeka old; pinch 
off ill orced in conservatory. 

Culture same as 1'. Sinensis. Plowera lilac. 
Pkt. 25c. 
Obconita Grandiflora. A lovely free-flower iug Primula, 
white tinged with lilac; stems nine inches high. 
Pkt. 25c. 
Veris Polyanthus. A hard; sort, blooming early in 
the open gardens. Colors mostly red and yellow, 
colors. Pkt. 10c. 
Vulgaris. The true yellow English Primrose. Pkt. 10c. 



One of the finest and 
ities of everlastings; 
: should be gathered 



PYRETHEUM. Parthenifoliuni Anreum, or Golden Feather. 
ll-CUt leaves of bright golden yellow. A hardy peren- 
nial, with bright foliage, much used for edging and bor- 
ders. Seed can be sown in the fall or spring and trans- 
planted. Pkt. 5c. 

Boseum, or Insect Powder Plant. A hardy perennial. 
with red-petal ed flowers radiating from a golden - 
center. Buhach. or insect powder, is made 
from the dry leaves. A mulching to keep the soil 
moist will greatly aid in producing the handsome 
rs of this variety. Pkt. 5c. 
Grandifiorum (Roseuni Hybridum). A large-flowered 
type, with bright-colored and attractive blossoms 
for cutting. The flowers are often four inches 
across and vary from light pink to deep carmine, 
centers yellow. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
Seleginoides. Kern-leaved edging plant — of great beauty. 
Pkt. 10c. 
Bed-Hot Poker Plant. See Tritoma. 
Bicinus. See Castor Oil Bean. 
BHOOANTHE (Everlasting* Plower) 
most beautiful of the many va 
for winter bouquets, the blosso 
before fully expanded, and if c 
retain their brilliancy for ye; 
mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
BANUNCULUS. Very handsome double flowers, 10 inches 
high, about 2 inrhes across. Blooms the first year from 
seed. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
ROMNEYA COULTERI (California Tree Poppy). Also 
well known as the Matilija Poppy. This tine perennial 
is of a supreme and stately beauty. Jt is of value as 
a cut flower, lasting well in water, and its delicate 
primrose-like perfume is most acceptable. The texture 
of the petals is extremely delicate, indeed, half trans- 
parent. They never lose the crnmpled folds that in the 
case of must poppies betoken newly opened state. 
The flowers are large, four to five inches across, pure 
white with a fine bunch of yellow stamens, resembling 
white, single peonies: The seed takes from three to 
nine months to germinate. Pkt. 15c. 
BUDBECXIA. (Cone Flower). Bicolor Superba. The center 
of this flower Is brown, the petals golden yellow with 
velvety brown spots at the base. A free-flowering an- 
nual: three feet high; very effective as a cut flower. 

Pkt. 5c. 
Laciniata. A single, bright yellow perennial plant, 
blossoming in the late summer. Four to six feet 
tall. The double form known .is Golden Glow is 

propagated by division of the root crown. See 
under plants. Pkt. 10c. 
SALPIGLOSIS. A half-hardy annual, growing about three 
feet high and bearing trumpet shaped blossoms of rich 
shades and colors, ;>ll beautifully veined. It is valu- 
able for bedding and massing, and its long stems make 
it excellent also for cut flowers. Sow seed early in the 
year and transplant, or sow the seed where it is to re- 
main, in April, and thin to six or eight inches, enrich 
the soil. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 

Emperor (Superbissima). A splendid large-flowered 
strain; each stem i:> loaded with these most hand- 
some flowers each one richlv veined with gold. 
Pkt. 10c. 




SUNFLOWER — Chrysanthemum Flowered. 

SALVIA OR FLOWERING SAGE. A tender perennial 
blooming the iirst season from seed and growing two 
to three feet high. The blossoms are borne on long 
stems in racemes or spikes, and are fragrant. The 
plant forms a bunch and blooms profusely during the 
whole summer and fall. 

Patens. Bright blue flowers, 2 feet tall. Pkt. 25c. 
Splendeus. Bright scarlet flowers. Pkt. 10c; y 4 oz. 65c. 
Bonfire. A new dwarf Scarlet Sage, of dense compact 
growth, from 20 to 24 inches high; useful for 
bedding or borders. Flowers dark scarlet on 
spikes which stand clear of the foliage and at- 
tract attention at once. Pkt. 10c; Vs oz. 75c. 
Dark Blood Red. A new tall variety with large flower 
spikes, much darker and richer than other scar- 
lets. Dazzling and beautiful, 3V 2 feet. Pkt. 10c. 
SANVITALIA. A hardy trailing annual, six inches high 
and bearing bright vellow blossoms resembling a mina- 
ture double Zinnia. Of the easiest culture and valuable 
for rockwork or borders. Frocumbens PI. PI. Pkt. 5c. 
SCABIOSA OR MOURNING BRIDE. Also called Sweet 
Scabious, Old Maid's Pincushion, etc. Our mammoth 
flowered strain of this old-fashioned flower is very 
beautiful and worthy of a place in every garden; the 
tall flowers are especially adapted for cutting and 
massing in the garden. Annual (self sown in Cali- 
fornia) 2Vi: to 4 feet high. These new flowers are 
double clear to the center, covering the thimble- 
shaped tone. 

Mammoth Flowered, Double, or Maxima. Mixed. An 
improved strain, with large petals and beautiful 
colors. Pkt. 5c. 
Dwarf Double Mixed Pkt. 5c. 
Tall Double Azure Fairy. Light Blue. Pkt. 10c. 
Tall Double Black Purple. Pkt. 10c. 
Tall Double Rose. Pkt. 10c. 
Tall Purple Edged White. Pkt. 10c. 
Tall Double Snowball. Pkt. 10c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SCABIOSA Caucasica. A hardy perennial variety, with 
pale blue flwers 4 to 5 inches across and long stems. 
One of the handsomest perennial flowers; valuable 
for cutting. Pkt. 10c. 
Scarlet Flax. See Linum. 

SCHIZANTHTJS. Hardy annuals, growing one and one- 
half to two feet high and covered with bright, showy, 
butter-fly-like blossoms. Large flowering. Mixed. 
Pkt. 10c. 

WISETONENSIS. This variety is remarkably free-flow- 
ering, and presents a beautiful appearance with its 
myriads of blooms, the ground color of which is 
white, dotted with delicate rose. A very shy seeder. 
Make several plantings, as the plants come into 
bloom quickly, are a burst of color, and are out 
of bloom. Flit. 25c. 

SEDUM, COEBULEUM. Blue Stone Crop. A little 
annual bedding plant 4 inches high, good in carpet work. 
Fkt. 10c. 
SENECIO (Tall Double Jacobea). A showy, free-flowering 
hardy annual. It produces, in great profusion, branch- 
ing spikes of Cineraria-like double flowers, one and 
one-half inches in diameter, from spring until fall. 
Excellent for bouquets. 
Elegans. Double mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
SILENE, OR CATCEFL7. Hardy annual, growing about one 
foot high and bearing small, attractive flowers in various 
colors. Of easy culture and valuable for bedding. 
Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
SMILAX. A climbing perennial, with beautiful, bright- 
green glossy leaves, much esteemed for its long, deli- 
cate sprays of foliage. Largely used for decorating. 
Start seed under glass and transplant six inches 
apart. It requires strings or wires to climb on when 
very young. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c. 
SNAIL VINE (Fhaseolus Cai-acalla). The flowers of this 
perennial climber are coiled so as to resemble a snail 
shell, whence the name. The flowers are fragrant and 
of a buff yellow and light purple color. Grows to a 
height of twenty feet, and is a good climber. Pkt. 10c. 
STATICE SINUATA (Sea Lavender). A blue everlasting 
flower much used by florists for winter bouquets: An- 
nual, two to three feet. Each floweret is small but the 
plant is very effective. Pkt. 5c. 
SPIDEB PLANT. See Cleome Pungens. 
SNAPDRAGON (Antirrhinum) . A half-hardy perennial, 
growing from 1% to 3 feet tall. Flowers are oddly 
shaped and apparently closed, but by pressing the 
sides together can be made to open like a dog's mouth. 
The newer strains are large flowered and contained 
in a great number of shades and colors. Their rich 
spikes are beautiful for cutting and keep fresh a long 
time. Yery easily raised. 



SNAPDRAGON 

TALL LARGE FLOWERING TYPE 
Crescia. Scarlet. Pkt. 10c. 
Firefly Scarlet and white. Pkt. 10c. 
Pink. Large. Pkt. 10c. 
Queen Victoria. Pure white. Pkt. 10c. 
Venus. This is a delicate shade of pink tint which has 
hitherto been wanting in the fcall large-flowered Snap- 
dragons, and this is just the color most in demand at 
the present time for cutting and making up. 

Venus is admirably fitted to supply this deficiency, 
being a lovely pink shade on white ground, set off 
by a pure white throat. Flowers large and wavy. 

This splendid new Snapdragon will soon become 
one of the most valued sorts. Per sealed packet, 25c. 
Yellow. Large. Pkt. 10c. 
Giant Flowered. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 

SEMI-DWARF TYPE 
8 to 12 inches high for bedding. 
Niobe. Maroon with white throat. Pkt. 10c. 
Picturatum. Blotched varieties mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
Queen of the North. Pure white. Pkt. 10c. 
Tom Thumb, or Dwarf. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Collection of 8 named sorts for 60c. 
SOLANUM CAPSICASTRUM (Jerusalem Cherry). A very 
ornamental plant for house or garden culture, the flow- 
ers being followed by small brightly colored fruit or 
berries, which almost completely cover the plants. 
Flowers and fruits the first season from seed. Pkt. 10c. 
Solarium. Seaforthianum. Only in California In nearly 
frostless places can this handsome vine be found 
as a perennial climber. The flowers are a lovely 
light blue in immense drooping panicles like clusters 
of Wistaria. Scarlet seed-berries follow the flowers. 
Six to twelve feet. May be treated as a tender 
annual. Fkt. 15c. 
STEVIA. A tender perennial, one and one-half feet high 
and bearing clusters of small, white, fragrant blos- 
soms. Suitable for summer or winter blooming, and 
for pot culture or open air. Sorrata. Pkt. 10c. 



STOCKS 




Ten Weeks' Stocks, or Gillif lowers; Levkoje 

Stocks is one of the old time favorites, and no garden 
was considered complete without its row of these beautiful 
flowers. They come in all shades — delicate pink, white, red, 
cream, and purple. Stocks are annual and hardy; they may 
be sown out of doors in spring, or in boxes in winter and 
transplanted. Sow early % inch deep. While all will 
flower the first year, the Dresden, Brompton and 
Winter Stocks will last for two years. 

Stocks have been greatly improved by selection, and 
our strains, which are raised by expert growers, give 
fully eighty per cent, of double flowers, where others 
give only half this percentage. There always will be 
some single plants, as those are the only ones which 
bear seed, and the plants should be set out in the gar- 
den sufficiently close for these single ones to be \ 
pulled up when they show their first flower, and still p 
leave plenty of fine double plants. Stocks are of easy 
culture, are a long time in bloom, are hardy, beautiful, 
and very satisfactory. 

SUMMER STOCKS 
Morse's Dwarf Large Flowering Ten Weeks: Our 
strain of these has great rosettes set closely to- 
gether so that the entire plant is hidden in the 
mass of bloom. Plants 12 to 15 in. tall, and ear- 
ly; the best for bedding effects or edges. Ours is 
a selected strain. 



Blood Red. Pkt. 10c. 
Lavender. Pkt. 10c. 
White. Pkt. 10c 
Canary Yellow. Pkt. 10c. 



Pink. Very dainty. Pkt. 10c. 
Carmine Pink. Pkt. 10c. 
Purple. Pkt. 10c. 
Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 



Smapdraffons — Giant Plow»r*a 



Collection of eight sorts for 60c. 



C. C. MORSE & CO. SBBDS san FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




STOCKS-Cont. 

Giant Perfection. An 
early or Ten 
Weeks' Stock, 
with tall spikes 
of large very 
double flowers. 
This stock 
branches into a 
pyramidal form 
and is two feet 
tall. Mixed. Pkt. 
10c. 

Cut and Come Again, 
or Dresden Per- 
petual. A type of 
early flowering 
Stock with 
large flowers on 
tall spikes. 
These stocks are 
perpetually i n 
bloom and make 
fine cut flowers. 

Princess Alice, or 
Dresden White. 
A pure white 
double Stock, 
very largely used 
by florists. Pkt. 
15c. 
Dresden Mixed. Pkt. 
10c. 

WINTER STOCKS 

This class of later 
flowering Stocks is 
coming into greater 
popularity as more 
varieties are intro- 
duced. Last year we 
had a fine new white 
Stock of this class, 
called White Lady. 
There are now sev- 
eral colors — 1 i g h t 
pink, carmine rose, 
lilac, and our new 
white. These Stocks 
are called by some 
Giant Nice Stocks, 
and by others Beauty 
Stocks. The plants 
are of fine symmet- 
rical habit, bushy 
and from 18 to 24 
inrhes tall. These 
Stocks branch freely 
and the branches are 
well set with double 
flowers. For fall 
blooming sow the 
seed in spring, and for winter flowers sow in summer. The 
plants are in flower about 15 weeks from time of sowing 
seed. All of the following Stocks belong to this class ex- 
cept the Emperor Stocks. 

Emperor Large Flowering. A very fine double biennial 
Stock with finest dowers closely set on spikes, about 
16 in. high. Good for open garden or for pot culture. 
White, Pkt. 20c. Mixed, Pkt. 20c. 

Abundance. The principal quality of Abundance is its 
phenomenal profusion of bloom. It can be used as 
either a summer or winter stock, and by sowing the 
seed early in June it will bloom by ChristmaB. The 
color is beautiful carmine rose. Pkt. S5c. 



B.mutlfol winter Flowerljjj; Stocks 



White Lady Our new puro white winter Stock grows 
about 20 inches high, has largo branches bearing lus 
t rous snowy white, double flowers most freely. Tke 
gran. list white Stock there is. Pkt. 25c. 

Beauty of Nice. A beautiful flesh pink with very large 
spikes. It is of the cut and como again type, bear- 
ing continuously throughout tho season. Very Urge 
handsome spikes. Pkt. 15c; ' 4 oz. $1.00. 

Empress Elizabeth. A splendid Brompton or winter 
Stock, rather dwarf, 18 inches high; covered witk 
large double flowers of bright carmine rose. Pkt. 91c. 

Queen Alexandra. Similar to Beauty of Nice, except in 
color, which is rosy-lilac, a shade that shows beauti- 
fully under artificial light. Pkt. 15c. 

Winter, or Perennial Brompton. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 

STOKE3IA, OS COEKIOWEK ASTER. A hardy p.r.n- 
nial, two feet high, and bearing largo blue flowers on 
long stems. Blooms freelv all Summer and Fall, and 
is of easy culture, but It hard to start from seed. 
Cyanea. Pkt. 10c. 
Stone Crop. See Sedum. 

SIEAWrLOWISS. See Acrolinlum; Gomphrana; Heli- 
chrysum; Honesty; Statlce; Rhedanthe, Xeranthemum. 
SUNFLOWER (Helianthus) . Hardy annuals, growing 
from three to six feet high. Of the easiest culturo 
and suitable for a stately row or background, or 
even for bedding. Plant when the ground is well 
warmed in light or sandy soil. 

Chrysanthemum Flowered. Large, densely double, 
bright golden flowers. The plant branches and 
affords fine, long stout stems for cutting. This is 
the best variety in existence; 6 to 8 feet. Pkt. 5c; 
oz. 25c. 
Russian. The common, large flowering single variety, 
with great brown centers and an edge of yellow 
petals. The seed is used for chicken feed. Pkt. 6c. 
Cucumerifolius Perkeo (Miniature Sunflower). The 
Cucumerifolius sunflowers are small both in flower 
and plant and are often called Cut and Come 
Again Sunflowers. Perkeo is only 2 feet tall but 
is covered with small (three-inch) golden yellow 
flowers with a dark eye. Pkt. 10c. 
Cucumerifolius Stella. Is considerably taller than Per- 
keo and has larger single flowers 6 inches across; 
yellow with black center. Pkt. 5c; oz. 50c 
Cucumerifolius, Double Hybrids. Fine double and 
semi-double miniature sunflowers. Pkt. 10c. 
Sweet Alyssum. See Alyssum. 

SWEET ROCKET (Hesperis). A hardy perennial, grow- 
ing two to three feet high. An old-fashioned, fragrant 
tlower of the easiest culture, and bearing clusters of 
white and purple blossoms. Mixed. Pkt. 5o. 
Sweet Sultan. See Centaurea Moschata. 
SWEET WILLIAM. (Dianthus Barbatus). A hardy per- 
ennial, blooming the second year from seed. Grows 
one to two feet high and bears its flowers in clusters 
at the end of a stiff stem. The individual flowerets 
are handsomely colored and marked. It makes a 
beautiful bedding plant, and is of easy culture. 
Single Varieties. Mixed. More attractive than the 

double. Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 
Double Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
THUNBERGIA, OB BLACK-EYED SUSAN. A hardy an- 
nual climber, growing about four feet long, and valuable 
for low fences or hanging baskets. Prefers a sunny 
situation. Blossoms are buff, orange, or white, with 
dark centers. Mixed, pkt. 5c. 

TORENIA. A hardy annual, with trumpet-shaped flowers 
and growing four to six inches high; in bloom all Bum- 
mer. Good for hanging baskets or borders, or for bed- 
ding. In the hot parts of California where Pansles do 
not do so well Torenia will be found an excellent eub- 
stitute, as It thrives under such conditions. 
Fournierl. Velvety blue, with three dark spots of indigo 

and a bright yellow throat. Pkt. 5c. 
White Wings. Dainty, white flowers, tinted with rose at 

throat. Pkt. 100. 



C. C. MORSE & CO.— SEEDS— SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



TRITOMA, New Hybrids (Red-Hot Poker Plant). The 

plants make a dazzling spot in the garden in summer 
and fall; their tall spikes (4 feet) contain over one 
hundred flowers of bright orange or scarlet or yellow. 
South African perennials well adapted to California. 
Pkt. 15c. 
TRANSVAAL DAISY (Gerbera Jamesoni Gigantea). Is a 
herbaceous perennial and grows in heavy clumps. The 
leaves are about one foot long- and deeply cut. The 
stems are long and stout, growing erect about eighteen 
inches high and bearing a large daisy-like blossom, sim- 
ilar in shape to a Marguerite, but of an intense ver- 
milion color. The blossoms measure from 3 to 4 inches 
in diameter and are beautiful and 
last well when cut. 

The plant is easily grown from 
seed planted in the spring. Sow 
seed in boxes in clear sand mixed 
with leaf mold and cover about 
one-eighth inch deep. Plant with 
the fuzzy end of the seed just 
above the ground, being careful 
not to break it off. Do not over- 
water. They transplant easily to 
the garden and want a well- 
drained soil, as they do best in 
a rather dry situation. 

Be sure to give the plants an 
airy, sunny place in the garden 
and a little protection on frosty 
nights. 

Per packet of IS seeds, 25c 
VALERIAN. Showy plants for mixed 
borders or shrubberies, bearing 
large corymbs of bright flowers; 
bears shade and moisture well. 
Hardy perennial, two and one- 
half feet. Flowers bright red and 
white. Mixed, pkt. 5c. 

VERBENA. A half hardy trailing 
perennial of easy culture. While 
it grows readily from division 
of the root or from cuttings, it 
does best from seed. It is well 
known as a bedding, or border 
plant, and the improved large 
flowered and fragrant strains 
make it a handsome cut flower 
for low vases. 

Mammoth Auricula Flowered Various colors, with 

large white center. Pkt. 10c; y± oz. 50c; oz. $1.50. 
Mammoth Flowered. Mixed. Pkt. 10c; V 4 oz. 50c; oz. 

$1.75. 
Pink Shades. Mammoth strains of rose and pink 

shades. Pkt. 10c; y 4 oz. 75c. 
Pure White. Mammoth strain. Pkt. 10c; y 4 oz. 50c. 
Purple and Blue Shades. Mammoth strains. .Pkt. 10c; 

Vi oz. 50c. 
Scarlet Defiance. Brilliant scarlet. Pkt. 10c; Vi oz. 75c. 
Striped Varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 
Hybrida Grandiflora. New giant flowering Verbena 

in new and beautiful shades. Per pkt. 20c. 
Morse's Extra Selected Mammoth Strain. Mixed. Pkt. 

15c. 
Collection of 6 named varieties 45c. 
VINCA, OB MADAGASCAR PERIWINKLE. A tender per- 
ennial, with ornamental foliage, useful for bedding in 
summer and for the greenhouse in winter. Elooms 
freely the first year from seed. The trailing blue Vi: 
or Myrtle never seeds; see plant list Rose, — 
white, etc. Mixed. Pat. 10c. 
VIOLAS, or TUFTED PANSIES. These dainty violet-like 
flowers make one of the finest bedding plants; their 
colors are so clear and they bloom for such a long 
time during the whole summer j 6-inch perennial, 
blooming quickly from seed, excellent bedding "ef- 
fect. » ' 

Purple Queen (Cornuta). Pkt. 10c. 
Rose Queen. A new, rosy-lilac viola." Pkt. 15c. 
White. Pkt, 10c 
Yellow. Pkt. 10c. 
Mixed, all varieties. Pkt. 10c. 



VIOLET, OB VIOLA ODOBATA. Although these flowers 
do best propagated from cuttings, they grow readily 
from seed, and produce a very fragrant blossom. We 
offer the large flowering favorite blue variety. Single, 
Sweet-scented. Pkt. 10c. 

VIBGINIA CBEEPEK (Ampelopsis Quinquef olia). Perennial 
climber. Large leaves, which color in the fall; also 
bears clusters of dark fruit; flowers inconspicuous. Very 
ornamental and easily raised from seed. Height thirty 
feet- Pkt. 5c; oz. 25c. 

VIBGINIA STOCKS. A hardy annual, growing about nine 
inches high and blooming profusely. Of easy culture, 
and can be had in continuous bloom by sowing the 
seed at frequent intervals during spring and summer. 
Bed and White mixed. Pkt. 5c. 




Mammoth Flowered Verbena 

VISCABIA (Bose of Heaven.). Pretty, profuse flowering 
plants ; adapted for beds, edgings or clumps, growing 
readily in any garden soil; flowers pink and white, 
shaped somewhat like a single pink; annual; twelve 
inches tall. Pkt. 5c. 

WALLFLOWER. Half hardy perennial blooming the first 
year from seed. Grows one to two feet high and bears 
long stems of fragrant flowers. It is best to renew the 
plants every two or three years by resowing the seed. 
An old-fashioned flower, which is always popular. Sow 
early in the year in boxes and transplant. 
Tall German Double. Mixed colors. Pkt. 10c. 
Fine Single. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Tom Thumb Golden. Small, compact plant, single 

blossoms. Pkt. 10c. 
Dwarf German Double. Pkt. 10c. 

WILD GAEDEN FLOWEE SEED. This is a mixture of the i 
easiest growing and surest blooming annual flowers. 
These are not all wild flowers but are good to plant in 
waste places and will give plenty of bloom. Sow early. 
Tall Sorts. Growing from IS inches to 36 inches high. 

Per oz. 15c; V4 lt»- 45c; y 2 lb. 85c; 1 lb. $1.50. 
Dwarf Sorts. Growing from 12 inches to 18 inches high. 
Per oz. 15c; % lb. 45c; y 2 lb. 85c; 1 lb. $1.50. 

WHITLAVIA. An easily grown, hardy annual,, bearing 
small violet-blue, cup-shaped blossoms. Plants one 
foot high. Sow seed in open ground in spring and thin 
the young plants. Pkt. 10c. 

WISTARIA, Chinese Flowering", Tall Blue. One of our most 
popular hardy climbers, growing to a height of fifty 
feet. The flowers are abundantly borne in spring on 
long drooping racemes of light blue before the leaves 
appear. Pkt. 15c. 



C. C. MORSK S cn. BBBDS ^\N FRANCISCO, CAMF. 



IEB1HTHC1CUM (EYsrUating Tlowr). A hardy 

AtMiui (wo fret tnK't. »"■' bearing white, purple, or yel- 
low | U-avcs nre hairy or covered with a 
nitvrry down A very _pretty. straw -like everlasting 
Doable Mixed. 




ZINNIA. A half hardy annual, growing from one to two 
feel high. Blossoms arc very double, and while the 
stems are stiff, they make an excellent bouquet flower. 
Probably no flower has such an assortment of bright 
shades, tints, and colon; no bedding plant is more 
effective for a brilliant show. Sow in boxes early and 
transplant 
Mammoth Double — 

Black Purple. Pfct. 10c. 

Dark Crimson. Pkt. 10c. 

Deep Bed. Pkt. loo. 

Magenta. Pkt. 10c. 

Orange. Pkt. 10c. 

Scarlet. A bright shade. Pkt. lOo. 

White. Pkt. 10c. 

Yellow. Pkt. 10c. 

Mixed, all colors. Pkt. 10c 

Collection of eight colors for 50c 



individual blossoms 
very double and ha 
liarlj free flowering 



;iant flowered zinnias. 
6 inches in diameter, 

nn freely until late in 



In separate colors; Sulphur -yellow, Flesh color, Crimson, 
Violet, Purple. 

Per sealed packet, 20c; 5 packets, 1 of each color, vac. 



Zinnia — Mammoth Double. 



Double Iiilliput. A dwarf plant, one foot high, bearing 
rather small, very double flowers. Mixed. Pkt, 5c. 

Qrandiflora Bohusta. The largest variety In existence 
The blossoms are globe-shaped, very large, and in 
numerous colors. The plants are taller than the 
other varieties. Mixed. Pkt. 10c. 



Eleg-ans. Tall, double. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 
Striped, or Zebra. Mixed. Pkt. 5c. 



MORSE'S COMMISSION SEEDS 



It has become a very common sight to see C. C. Morse 
& Co. 's papers and packages of vegetable and flower seeds 
in most of the stores throughout the Pacific Coast and the 
Middle Southern States. 
Most of the leading 
stores from New Orleans 
to Butte, Montana, carry 
one or more of our Com- 
mission Boxes, in which 
is an assortment of the 
more generally used or 
standard varieties of 
vegetable and flower 
seeds in 5c, 10c and 15c 
papers and packages. 

These goods are our 
best seeds and are put 
up each year with the 
utmost care. No firm in 
the seed business real- 
izes more than we the 
responsibility of selling 
good seeds of the highest 
possible quality. We 

must have the planter's confidence, because if the seeds 
he sows does not give satisfaction, we not only lose him 
but his friends and neighbors. 

Satisfied customers mean a steadily increasing business, 
and as our sales of these Commission Assortments are 
multiplying faster than our most sanguine hopes, we feel 
assured that our efforts in putting up high class seeds 
are being appreciated. 



The more popular and better known varieties are in 
these Commission Boxes, but there is naturally a very long 
list of vegetables and field, farm and flower seeds which 












cannot be sent out on commission, and these we will sup- 
ply promptly by mail. 

Kindly read this catalogue for whatever inter- 
ests you have in garden supplies, and let your or- 
der be for Morse's Seeds either by mail direct or 
through your dealer. In any event use MORSE'S 
SEEDS and have none other. 



'SE'Sf^a 



L$w8et J>eas 



Best In The World 

Sweet Peas may be sown with best results in the Fall, especially for places that are dry and hot in Summer. But seed 
may be sown any time from November first to March first, and by following carefully our cultural directions, anyone 
may have the very finest Sweet Peas in any ordinary season. These cultural directions and general Sweet Pea infor- 
mation are fully covered in our booklet, entitled 




a 



SWEET PEA CULTURE" 



This booklet of 16 pages is well illustrated, very carefully written and is an invaluable guide to any- 
one who is interested in growing Sweet Peas. We will gladly mail it to anyone writing for it, or a 
copy may be secured by simply calling for it at our Seed Store or Nursery. 



It has been our custom to offer several new Sweet Peas every year, chosen from our own Experi- 
mental Grounds, and this year in spite of very unfavorable crops, we are offering two, which we have 
named Margaret Atlee and Duplex Cream. 

In addition to these two sterling novelties, we are offering five of the very finest English novelties 
of the past two seasons and the best of our own splendid novelties of last season, viz., Margaret Madi- 
son. 

These are more particularly described as follows : 

NEW DUPLEX SWEET PEA 

"MARGARET ATLEE" °^ raislng 



NEW SWEET PEA "STIRLING STENT" 



hich 

proud of. This Sweet Pea belongs to the new 
Duplex type and is the most perfect example 
of that type yet introduced. It differs from 
thosa already introduced on account of • its 
large size, great vigor and beautiful coloring. The col- 
or is a warm salmon pink, perfectly suffused over a 
cream ground. The cream deepens into a bright buff 
at base of standard and wings and this lights up the 
flower with great effect. The standard and wings are 
alike in color and the general appearance is a warm 
•elf pink. The shade of pink found in "Margaret At- 
lee" is entirely a new shade and commands admira- 
tion. The flowers are of extraordinary size and we 
measured many flowers 2% inches across the standards. 

The blossoms are borne almost uniformly four on 
stout stems. The Duplex character is carried out In 
almost every case to three flowers and In a large per- 
centage, to the four flowers on each stem. 

Capital illustrations of this flower will be found on 
the front of our Booklet and on the back cover of our 
1913 general catalogue. Certificate of Merit American 



NEW DUPLEX SWEET PEA 
"DUPLEX CREAM" ^h 01 



This Is the 
third novelty 
r own workshop 



introdu 
th the "Duple 
:em almost a d 
t account of t 



ing this year. To those fami 
type of Sweet Pea, the name w 
scrlption. Duplex Cream, howe 

double standard, has fully twice as much color as other 
varieties of the same shade. The standards are large, 
bold and beautifully waved. Duplex Cream is a vigor- 
ous grower and produces many fours. A few sprays, 
when bunched, have a very rich, deep cream appear- 
ance amounting almost to a soft shade of yellow. We 
have pleasure in illustrating this grand variety on the 
back cover of our Sweet Pea Booklet. Per packet of 
30 seeds, 25c. Per packet of 15 seeds, 15c. 



"MARGARET MADISON" 

and is what we call 



The color is a 
clear azure blue, 
f-colored," being of the same 
urface of both standard and 
wings. It is the most delicate and definite light sky- 
blue in existence, and is a color we have long been striv- 
ing for in Spencers. 

This variety was certificated by the National Sweet Pea 
Society of America at the Philadelphia Show, under No. 
8875. It is one of the most distinct varieties on trial 
at Pordhook and is worthy of introduction. Ead noth- 
ing from England that could approach it in color; en- 
tirely distinct. Many visitors picked it out as the "gem" 
of the trials, pkt. 15c; Va oz. son. 



This i 
medal 
land a 
ure in 

ous deep salmt 
of superb Sper 
This Is reall 
light is partic 
grow this Pea 



riety gained a first class certificate and silver 

rom the National Sweet Pea Society of Eng- 

being the best Novelty In 1910. We have pleas- 

eed for sale. The color is a glori- 



n suffused with orange. The flo 
cer form and well placed on the stem. 
r a beautiful Sweet Pea and by artificial 
alarly effective. We are sure all who 
will be amazed at the beautiful color. 
Salmon Peas are inclined to burn in strong sunshine 
and we recommend growing in light shade or using 
shading material in order to get the full beauty of the 
color. Per packet, 25c. 



NEW SWEET PEA "THOMAS 



To 



those 



NEW SWEET PEA "ELFRIDA T £= 
PEARSON" 



beauty. The color Is very brilliant orange scarlet. The 
standard has more orange color than the wings and this 
brightens up the flower. The flowers are of the very 
finest Spencer form and generally come four to each 
stem. The stems are long and strong and borne on very 
vigorous vines. This variety also comes to us from 
England, where it has proved to be a tremendous favor- 
ite, with the "Hawlmark" of the Royal Horticultural 
Society. Should be grown in light shade. Per packet, 25o. 

magni- 
: Pea 
has caused quite a sensation during 
the last two years in England and 
we have great pleasure in now introducing it to the 
American Growers. We have grown it on our own 
farms and Trial Grounds and satisfied ourselves that 
this is a variety of outstanding merit. It is a very much 
glorified "Florence Morse Spencer," but that compari- 
son by no means describes the flower. The color is pale 
pink on white ground, the young flowers, however, hav- 
ing a decided and distinct tint of buff. The plant is ex- 
ceptionally vigorous and the stems are very stout on 
which the flowers are borne in fours. The flowers can 
only be described as huge, many measuring 2 >4 inches 
across the standard. Besides receiving an award from 
the Royal Horticultural Society of Great Britain, this 
variety was placed on top by the National Sweet Pea 
Society in the Pink Section. Per packet, 25c. 

A superior strain 
of apricot pink and 
buff in the most improved giant Spencer type. The col- 
or is soft but bright and most pleasing. The aim of 
Sweet Pea experts is to get greater size in addition to 
waviness and fixity of type. In Mrs. Hugh Dickson, the 
largest size is attained, and with its improved dimen- 
sions it has brought a robust and vigorous disposition. 
The stems are long and bear uniformly four blossoms. 
P»r pkt- 16c; % oe. 40c. 



"MRS. HUGH DICKSON" 



C C MOBSK * CO. BKBDS SAN FBANCI8CO, CALIF. 



A LIST OF MOST OF THE BEST SWEET PEAS 



ETTA DTXE, W. 8. Lur^e wavy, pi 
■OS. SANXEY SPEW CEB. W. or S. 

t ■ i turna clear glistening 

•dad. Per pkt. 10c; > 3 o>. 2( 




o whlta Pkt. 15e; H oa. 40o. 
Opana with a alight tint of pink 
n hlte it is fiTy large and black 



The seed crop of Sweet 
Peas all over the World has 
been the poorest ever known. 
The entire crop has been hut 
little better than a failure and 
stocks of all varieties are 
very low. 

(Price is 5c per pack- 
et, except where noted 
otherwise. If interested 
in larger quantities than 
quoted here, write us.) 

NOTE: Initials E. P. 
means Earlv Flowering 
nr Christmas Type: G. 
means Grandifiora or 
shell shaped standard 
type; W. S. means waved 
or Spencer Giant Flow- 
ered type. 



WHITE 



Burpee's Earliest White. E. f. 

Very early, hooded, black 

seeded. Oz. 20c; % lb. 50c. 
Mont Blanc. E. P. Early, white 

seeded, open form. Oz. 25c; y± 

lb. 75c. 
Mrs. Geo. Lewis. E. P. Ture while seeded, white and shell 

shaped. Per pkt , 10c; oz. 25c; y 4 lb. 75c. 
Dorothy Eckford. G. White seeded, large shell shaped. Oz. 

20c; V\ lb. 50c. 
Shasta, G. Very large open form, white seeded. Oz. 20c; 

lb. 50c. 
White Wonder. G. A large double varie 

U lb. 50c. 
MORSE'S PURE WHITE SPENCEE. W. or S. Re-selected 

strain of the very finest Spencer. Can be used as the 

white no matter under what name. Per pkt. 10c; 



PRIMROSE OR VERY LIGHT YELLOW 

Bod. Mra