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Full text of "Celebration of the semi-centennial anniversary of the Albany Academy. Albany, June 23, 1863"

CELEBRATION 



kSEMI- CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY 



ALBANY ACADEMY 



S 5 1 8 » } 



CELEBEATION 



SEMI -CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY 



^LBANY ACADEMY, 



ALBANY JUNE 23, 1863. 



ALBANY, N. Y. 

J. MUNSELL, 78 STATE STREET. 

18G3. 



A3 A3 
1863 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 



Fifty years had passed since the Albany Academy received a 
corporate existence. In that half-century, Albany itself had re- 
ceived a new life. It had wakened to commercial strength ; the 
grasp of the canal and the railways had lifted it up to wealth and to 
power, and the jubilee of the great school of the city, even though 
it came in an hour of «^vil, was welcomed by a large circle of the 
J community. 

^ The Albany Academy had been firmly founded. It had received 
^ the attention of the city when that city was yet so small as to con- 
centrate its judgment in public affairs. It had received the care and 
^ good will of the stately old men of the colonial and revolutionary 
'V time, who, many of them, survived till the period when its organiza- 
' tiou was determined. The liberality and good taste of the times, 
- had enshrined it in a noble building. It was in all respects worthy 
I of the great word Learning. The trustees of the Academy, who had 
K watched faithfully over its career, some of them for a long series of 
^ years, were gratified when the proposition was made'to signalize its 
I fiftieth year of life, by calling together its Alumni and its Students . 
J and as the plan for the appropriate celebration of such day developed 
^ it was found that everywhere the love for the Old School, was vivid, 
\3 and that a response in favor of the proposition was in readiness. 
^ Perhaps it was doubted whether the event would find welcome in 
the deep shadows of our great national calamity, but those who thus 






4 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

doubted, did not estimate the genuineness of the affection which the 
thousands whose educational home had been the Albany Academy 
bore for the memory of the Teachers who had gone out from the 
presence of those who in all usefulness, were in action in its halls. 

The invitation to the Celebration was given by the following 
circular : 



Albany Academy, "i 



Dear Sir : Alhaiiy, April 4, 1863. 

The Albany Academy during the present year completes half a 
century of its history. The board of trustees have thought that 
perhaps this event might not be without interest to the thousands 
who during that time have been educated within its walls. They 
have therefore resolved that the semi-centennial anniversary of this 
institution shall in some suitable way be celebrated, and for this 
purpose they ask that you, as one of its Alumni, should serve as a 
member of a committee to make arrangements for the occasion. 

This committee is requested to meet for organization and busi- 
ness, on Wednesday evening, April 8th, 1863, at the library of the 
Academy. 

Peter GtAnsevoort, 
President of Board of Trtistccs. 

David Murray, 

Clerk. 

Committee to make Arrangements for Celebrating tlu2 
Semi- Centennial Anniversary of tlie Alhany Academy. 

COMMITTEE OF ALUMNI. 

Hon. John V. L. Pruyn, LL. D., Albany. 

Hon. John Van Buren, New York. 

Joseph Henry, LL. D., Washington. 

Hon. Alexander W. Bradford, LL. D., New York. 

Rev. J. Trumbull Backus, D. D., Schenectady. 

Hon. George W. Clinton, Buffalo. 

Herman Melville, Pittsfield. 

William H. Bogart, Aurora. 



PROCEEDINGS. O 

Prof. Isaac W. Jackson, LL. D., Schenectady. 

Peter Cagger, Albany. 

John Tayler Hall, do. 

Franklin Townsend, do. 

George W. Carpenter, do. 

David I. Boyd, do. 

Robert H. Waterman, do. 

James Cruikshank, LL. D., do. 
William B. Sprague, Jr., do. 

Charles H. Strong, do. 

John T. McKnight, do. 

Abraham Lansing, do. 

Frederic P. Olcott, do. 

committee of trustees. 
Orlando Meads, LL. D., Thomas IIun, M. D., 

Christopher Y. Lansing, Howard Toavnsend, M. D., 

David Murray. 

On tlie evening of the 8th of April, 1863, the committee met at 
the Institute Room of the Academy. 

The Hon John Van Buren was appointed chairman, and 
William H. Bogart, secretary, and the plan for the Celebration 
was matured. The names of the gentlemen who should be requested 
to prepare an Address and an Historical Sketch of the Institution, 
having been selected with unanimity. 

The general features of the Celebration were arranged, and it was 
evident that the proposal would find something better than formal 
cooperation, a very genuine and haarty zeal of execution. 

It was represented to the committee that the subject of the 
erection of a suitable monument to Dr. T. Romeyn Beck, had been 
under the consideration of the former students of the Academy ', 
and, on motion of Mr. Murray, it was unanimously 

" Resolved^ That the purpose of this monument meets the hearty 
approval of this committee, and that we confide to the Alpha Sigma 
Svcittij the execution of the project, and that they be loquestcd to 



6 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

report the progress of their enterprise, and a suitable plan, to the 
meeting of the Alumni at their Semi-Centennial Anniversary." 

The following circular was transmitted by the committee of 
arrangements to as many of the Alumni, as it was found practicable 
to address. In the vicissitudes of fifty years, a community as rest- 
less and as active, as are all in our young nation, obliterates in fre- 
quent instances all traces of individual evidence or fate, and the 
boys of the half-century have found all parts of the world open to 
their enterprise, and to summon the survivors from their homes 
everywhere, would have been to bring hither the far off traveler — 
the weary voyager. 

There were many answers made to the committee, a selection 
from which will be found embodied in the proceedings. The de- 
sire of many to come, prevented by circumstances, will be met by 
this volume, as it portrays the events of a reunion which was in all 
its incidents the joyous gathering of grateful hearts, blending in a 
common and a concentrated kindness. 

Albany Academy, "k 
Dear Sir : June 26th, 1863. / 

The Albany Academy has completed the fiftieth year of its ex- 
istence. It was chartered, by the Regents of the university of the 
state of New York, March 4th, 1813. During this period over five 
thousand students have been received and educated within its walls. 
It has been thought that perhaps such of the former students and 
officers of this institution as still survive, might deem it a privilege 
to unite in celebrating this occasion in some suitable way. 

To this end, the undersigned, who have been appointed by the 
board of trustees as a committee of arrangements, earnestly solicit 
your attendance at Albany, Friday, June 26th, 1863, at the follow- 
ing 

CELEBRATION 

OF THE 

SEMI-CENTENNIAL ANNlVEllSAllY 

OF THE 

ALBANY ACADEMY. 



PROCEEDINGS. 7 

At 3 p. m. a public meeting of the Alumni of tlie Academy will 
be held at Twcddle hall. 

Honorable Alexander W. Bradford, LL. D., of New York, 
will pronounce a Commemorative Oration. 

Orlando Meads, LL. D., will read a History of the Institution. 

At 80 o'clock in the evening a reiinion of the Alumni and Officers 
of the Academy will be held in the chapel and rooms of the Acade- 
my building, llcfreshments will be provided. 

Music has been kindly proflFered by vocalists and artists of the 
Alumni. 

During the evening a meeting will be organized in the chapel, at 
which addresses will be made by various distinguished speakers. 

It is proposed to publish as the result of this celebration a memo- 
rial volume, which shall contain besides proceedings of the meetings, 
a complete catalogue of the students of the Academy from its com- 
mencement. 

From those not residing in the city of Albany, an answer to this 
communication is respectfully solicited, and may be addressed to 
David IMurray, Esq., Principal of Albany Academy. 

The committee have endeavored by every means in their power 
to obtain the addresses of the former students of the Academy, and 
to send invitations to them ; but there is no doubt that with all the 
diligence they have employed that many will have been omitted. 

They will, therefore, be under great obligations if any gentleman 
to whom these invitations may be sent, will extend the same invita- 
tion to others. 

N. B. The Alumni and officers are requested to assemble at the 
Academy building at two o'clock, in order to proceed to the Hall 
in a body. 

COMMITTEE OF ALUMNI. 

Hon. John V. L. Pruyn, LL. D., Albany. 

Hon. John Van Buren, New York. 

Joseph Henry, LL. D., Washington. 

Hon. Alexander W. Bradford, LL. D., New York 

Rev. J. Trumbull Backus, D. D., Schenectady. 

Hon. George "W. Clinton, Buffalo. 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Herman Melville, Pittsfield. 
William H. Bogart, Aurora. 



Prof. Isaac W. Jackson, 


LL. D., Schenectady. 


Peter Cagger, 


Albany. 


John Tayler Hall, 


do. 


Franklin Townsend, 


do. 


George W. Carpenter, 


do. 


David I. Boyd, 


do. 


Egbert H. Waterman, 


do. 


James Cruikshank, LL. 


D., do. 


William B. Sprague, Jr 


., do. 


Charles H. Strong, 


do. 


John T. McKnight, 


do. 


Abraham Lansing, 


do. 


Frederic P. Olcott, 


do. 



committee of trustees : 

Orlando Meads, LL. D., Thomas Hun, M. D., 

Christopher Y. Lansing, Howard Townsend, M. D., 
David Murray. 

The following circular was also prepared by the Alpha Sigma 
Society, and sent to the Alumni, whose residences could be ascer- 
tained. 



Albany, N. Y, | 



Dear Sir: May, 1863. 

There has been a desire very generally manifested among the 
Alumni of the Albany Academy, to have some suitable and lasting 
testimonial erected in memory of the late Dr. T. IIomeyn Beck, 
who, by his zeal and ability, as principal of the Academy for more 
than thirty years, gained for it a rank second to no similar institu- 
tion in the country. 

The eminent propriety of such a tribute to one so distinguished 
for his life-long and efficient labors for the promotion of the cause 
of education and science, will be readily recognized by all. 

But especially will it at once suggest itself to his former pupils, 



PROCEEDINGS. 9 

who are so deeply indebted for their success and usefulness in life, 
to his faithful teachings and wise counsels ; and to whom, his rare 
virtues, his varied acquirements and his energy of purpose have 
been a guiding and inspiring remembrance. To them no argument 
can be necessary to secure their hearty and liberal cooperation in a 
project which has for its end the perpetuation of his memory. 

In calling to mind the zealous instructions and uniform kindness 
of Dr. Beck, that so won the universal respect and affection of his 
pupils, we recall one of the most delightful of the cherished associa- 
tions that cluster around the earlier and happier moments of our 
lives. 

The Alumni, in giving expression to their esteem and reverence 
in the manner proposed, will perform, though a somewhat sad, yet 
a most grateful labor; and the public will take pride in the monu- 
ment erected as a tribute to the worth of one whose great public 
services have rendered him an acknowledged benefactor of mankind. 

The Alpha Sigma Society, the members of which are all former 
pupils of Dr. Beck, have been requested to carry out this project? 
and they have unhesitatingly undertaken this labor of affectionate 
regard. 

Designs for an appropriate testimonial have been promised by 
several distinguished artists. 

To aid in defraying the expenses it has been determined to apply 
to all of the Alumni of the Academy who can be reached, that thus 
the memorial may be from as many pupils as possible. 

It is estimated that at least 83,000 will be necessary to ensure a 
satisfactory result, and contributions of from ^1 to $100 are solicited, 
in order that it shall be within the power of every one to become a 
contributor. 

To you, as one of the Alumni, we look for aid, and solicit your 
contribution. 

As a personal application can not be made to you, please send 
your contribution to the treasurer of the society, " John C. McClure, 
Box 440, P. 0., Albany, N. Y." 

A report of the progress of this enterprise will form a part of the 
exercises upon that occasion, and as it is most earnestly desired that 
we shall be able at that time to report that sufficient funds have 
2 ' 



10 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CEN'TENNIAL. 

been collected to ensure the success of the project, we would respect- 
fully ask as early a response as possible. 
In behalf of the Society, 

KiciiARD M. Strong, John T. McKnight, 

Ernest J. Miller, John E. McElroy, 

Richard V. De Witt, Jr., "William L. M. Phelps, 
William Headlam, Jr., Archibald McClure, Jr., 
John C. McClure, Jacob H. Ten Eyck, Jr., 

Charles H. Strong, J. V. Henry McKown, 

William H. Haskell, J. Wilbur Tillinghast, 

Isaac Annesley, George P. Wilson, 

Resident Members of the A. 2. 

The committee subsequently agreed on the twenty-sixth day of 
June, 1863, as being an appropriate time for the Celebration, and 
the result evidenced that the day was well selected, as at that time 
the foliage was luxuriant which the fifty years has given to a ground 
once the most barren and arid of clay banks, and the great trees 
waved in depth of shadow around the beautiful building, and the 
Alumni were privileged in seeing the Academy with such surround- 
ing of nature, as its founders regarded as an event too distant in 
the future to be regarded as real. 

The Academy was built where literally, a great excavation was 
made not merely for the foundation, but for the basement story, and 
when lawn and walk and grove existed only in the storied Acade- 
mies of the Grecian, whose moral teachings established their order 
of school. 

The day was of the pleasant hours of the beautiful month, and 
was appropriate in all respects for the exercises. Gathering in the 
Hall of the Academy, the Alumni seemed to revive as to the i'ace of 
an old friend, their associations with lecture and study rooms, and 
to recall the memories of the long past hour, when the preparation 
for the realities of life's work was imparted. 

At 10 o'clock the Reunion was duly formed in appropriate order 
under the direction of Col. Frederic Townsend of the United 
States Army, who had so honorably associated his name with the 
scenes of the battlefield. His very capable assistants were Messrs. 



rilOCEEDINGS. 11 

S. AV. Whitney, James McKnown, Robert L. Johnson and Charles 
E. Smith. Trcccdent moved the Trustees, the Faculty, and the 
Guests, while the Alumni and Students with them, formed an im- 
posing army, which led by the music of Screiber's band, retraced 
the streets so familiar in all the incidents of Academical days. It 
was a procession which commanded the attention and the respect 
of the citizens. 

Tweddle Hall was selected as the place for the delivering of the 
Address and of the History, and nothing could have been more ap- 
propriate for its purposes. This hall occupies the lot once owned 
by the only signer of the Declaration of Independence, who was a 
citizen of Albany — the Honorable Philip Livingston, and whose 
biography had been prepared by one of the Alumni of the Academy, 
Theodore Sedgwick, whose loss, literature has long deplored. 

In the Hall, which was crowded with an appropriate audience, 

The meeting was presided over by the Honorable Peter GtANSE- 
VOORT, the President of the Board of Trustees, and by his side 
were his associates and the guests of the festival, among whom was 
warmly welcomed Herman Melville, whose reputation as an 
author has honored the Academy, world-wide. 

Wetron's Grand March was then performed by the band. 

The Reverend Doctor Ferris, now the Chancellor of the New 
York University, who had been of the very early history of the 
Academy as Teacher and Trustee, made prayer to Heaven, the 
source of that knowledge which shall not vanish away. 

The following Historical Discourse was then read by Orlando 
Meads, LL. D., a former student of the Academy. 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 



The founding of the Albany Academy, whether it be regarded in 
the light of the interest which it excited at the time, or of the influ- 
ence which the institution has exerted through the pupils it has sent 
forth, was an event of no small importance in the annals of Albany. 
Our country was at the time involved in its second war with Great 
Britain; but as is the case now, so was it then, that never did our 
people show a stronger instinct of their own national perpetuity 
and greatness, and never did they evince more interest in those 
things which look to their welfare in the remote future, than at the 
very time when they were struggling for the preservation of na- 
tional existence. 

The great and wise men of that day knew well the value of a 
sound education; and no public interest seemed to them more 
important than that of providing adequately for supplying it to 
their children. There was, at that time, hardly a public school or 
academy of a high order in this part of the country. At an early 
day, this deficiency had excited the attention of our leading men ; 
and we find that, in March, 1804, a public meeting was held in this 
city, for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of 
instituting a city academy; and the Lieut. Governor, the Mayor, 
Chancellor Lansing, the Rev. Dr. Nott, the Rev. Dr. De Witt, John 
V. Henry and George D. Beers — all of them zealous and perse- 
vering friends of education — were appointed a committee to report 
the plan of a suitable institution. At a subsequent meeting the 
plan was submitted and approved ; but it does not appear that the 
proposition at that time led to any practical result. It was not, 
however, lost sight of; but in 180G another effort was made by the 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 13 

Rev. Dr. Beaslcy (then the rector of St. Peter's, afterwards pro- 
vost of the University of Pennsylvania), the Rev. Dr. Romeyn, and 
the Rev. Dr. Bradford (then ministers of the Dutch church in this 
city), " to procure the establishment of a grammar school, of such 
a nature that it might afterwards be converted into an academy." 
This attempt also failed ; and we find no record of any renewed 
affort of the kind until November, 1812 : when, probably through 
the quiet influence of that ever earnest and pci'sistent friend of the 
measure, Philip S. Van Rensselaer (then the mayor of the city), 
the project was renewed under favorable auspices. A committee 
was appointed by the common council " to report a plan and the 
expense of establishing a city academy, and also as to the expedi- 
ency of erecting and endowing the same." On the 18th of January 
following, the common council called a general meeting of citizens, 
to be held at the Capitol on the 25th of the same month, to consult 
on the expediency and necessity of instituting an academy in this 
city; and, preparatory to this meeting, they appropriated, in addition 
to certain other appropriations previously made by them for the same 
purpose, the old Jail property and its adjacent grounds, situate on 
the north side of State, near Eagle street; being the gi'ound recently 
known as Van Vechten Hall. This property was then valued at 
about $15,000 ; and, with the other appropriations above referred 
to, amounted to upwards of $20,000. The meeting was held ac- 
cordingly, and Archibald Mclntyre presided. Resolutions were 
adopted approving the measure, and a committee, composed of some 
of the most eminent men of the day, who then resided in this city, 
and whose names have since become historic, was appointed to 
carry it into effect. They were authorized to receive the funds ap- 
propriated by the city, to apply to the Regents of the university 
for a charter of incorporation, and to obtain further subscriptions 
from the citizens in aid of the object. 

These proceedings were reported to, and approved by, the common 
council, who nominated the persons who were to be named in the 
charter as trustees of the institution. Application was thereupon 
made to the regents, who, on the 13th day of March, 1813, in pur- 
suance of the powers vested in them by the laws of this state, 
granted a charter, incorporating Stephen Van Rensselaer, John 
Lansing, jr., Archibald Mclntyre, Smith Thompson, Abraham Van 



14 ALBANY ACADEMT SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Vechten, John V. Henry, Henry Walton, William Niell, John M. 
Bradford, John McDonald, Timothy Clowes, John 31cJinipsey, 
Frederick G. Ma3'er, Samuel Merwin, and the Mayor and Recorder 
of the said city, ex-qfficio, by the name of The Trustees of the 
Albany Academy. 

The first meeting of the trustees, under the charter, was held at 
the Capitol on the 23d day of March, 1813. At that meeting. 
Chancellor Lansing, Judge Thompson, and Abraham Van Vechten 

— all of whom felt a deep interest in the success of the x\cademy — 
tendered their resignations as trustees; their official and professional 
duties, at that time, not permitting them to give to the institution 
the time and attention which it then imperatively required; and 
Theodore Sedgwick, Harmanus Bleecker and John Duer were 
elected in their stead. Before the Academy went into operation, 
however, other resignations occurred ; and Chancellor Lansing, 
having withdrawn from the office of chancellor, was reelected. 
William James and Theodric Romeyn Beck were at the same time 
appointed trustees, and continued, during the residue of their lives, 
among the most faithful, efficient and judicious members of the 
board. 

It would be wearisome, at such a time as this, to recount the 
labors of the trustees during the two years preceding the opening 
of the Academy; but it was those labors that stamped upon the 
institution an impress which it has never lost ; and those of us who 
have enjoyed the benefit of their exertions, owe to those wise and 
faithful men, a debt of gratitude which we can not well over-esti- 
mate. Happily for the institution they were forming — for the great 
interests of education in this the capital of our great state — for us, 
and for those who are to follow us — they were educated men, men 
of wisdom, and of large experience in life, and of elevated and 
comprehensive views as to the requirements of such an institution. 
Let us pause here a moment, and glance at some of the distinguished 
men who, at an early day, sat around that board, and gave impulse 
and direction to the afiairs of the Academy. At its head, giving 
grace and dignity to its deliberations, sat Stephen Van Rensselaer 

— familiarly known as "the old Patroon" — with his tall and grace- 
ful form, his air of high distinction, his benignant yet dignified 
manner — the friend and patron of science and learning, and of 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 15 

every ^ood work, tlian whom, no man among us was more widely 
and deservedly honored. Near him might be seen his brother 
Philip, who for nearly twenty successive years, was mayor of this 
city — a man universally beloved, and never weary of doing good; 
to whose wise counsels, well directed influence, and persevering 
efforts, more than to all else besides, the Academy owes, first its 
establishment, and then the noble edifice given by the city for its 
use. There too, taking a deep interest in all that concerned the 
welfiire of the institution, was the Ex-Chancellor John Lansing, jr., 
with well-powdered head, and garments of antique fashion, grave 
and dignified in mien, and sententious and decisive in his speech ; 
and John V. Henry, the learned jurist and high-toned gentleman. 
And there, too, was the elegant and accomplished Bradford, one of 
the earliest in his efforts to procure the establishment of the Academy, 
and who, for more than ten years, was unwearied in his exertions to 
promote its success Not to speak of all the remarkable men who 
gathered around that board, we may not leave unmentioned the 
clear-headed and sagacious Mclntyre; — the elder Theodore Sedg- 
wick, in whose family intellect and high cultivation were hereditary; 
himself the son of a distinguished father, and the father of a no less 
distinguished sou, a son who was one of the Academy's best scholars ; — 
Harmanus Bleecker, whose virtues and attainments are too fresh in 
our remembrance to need that we should now recall them; — and 
Beck, the youngest of that distinguished body, but second to none of 
them in influence and usefulness. And should we pass on to a 
somewhat later period, we should find there other men not unworthy 
to be associated with those whom we have named. We should meet 
the gentle, kind-hearted, and persuasively eloquent Chester; and 
that thorough-bred gentleman and scholar. Judge William A. Duer, 
trained at Winchester — one of England's best schools — and after- 
wards the president of Columbia college; and John Waters Yates, 
of rare literary and classical attainments, with whom the favorite 
studies of his youth were continued as the recreation and solace of 
his maturer life, and who, up to the time of his death, made the 
Academy and its instructions the object of his vigilant and critical 
oversight. And there, too, should we see Kent, the great chan- 
cellor ; in whom were wonderfully combined the deep and varied 
learning of one of the greatest of ecjuity judges, the elegant tastes 



16 ALBANY ACADEiTT SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

of the man of letters, and an almost youthful gaiety and vivacity of 
character and manner. Long as has been the array of honored 
names thus passed in review, that of James Stevenson may not be 
omitted. He was a trustee for nearly thirty years, and one of the 
most faithful and efficient that the Academy ever had. With the 
gentleness and courtesy of the high-bred gentleman, he united an 
excellent judgment and a thoroughness, exactness and punctuality 
in business not often found. During the long term of his trustee- 
sliip he watched over the interests of the Academy with the most 
careful attention ; and at his death a bequest of five hundred dollars 
for the purchase of philosophical apparatus, evinced his desire still 
to promote its weliare. 

Others might be named, did not their presence here with us forbid. 
Long may it be our privilege thus to pass in silence names that are 
everywhere regarded with honor and reverence. 

To return from this digression to the consideration of the measures 
taken for the organization and opening of the Academy, we find that 
the work was attended with great difficulties, owing to the insuffi- 
ciency of the means provided for the purpose. 

The funds contributed by the city for the endowment consisted, 
1. Of the proceeds of the old Jail property, amounting to about 
$16,900. 2. Of a grant from the city, secured by its bond for 
$5,000. And 3. The ground on the west side of the public square 
intended as a site for the Academy, and on which it was afterwards 
built. To these funds were added subscriptions by individual citi- 
zens, amounting to upwards of $3,000. These provisions were 
obviously inadequate to the establishment of such an institution as 
was desired both by the common council and the trustees. After an 
earnest but unsuccessful ctl'urt by the trustees to procure the requisite 
means by private subscription, they, in December, 1813, applied to the 
common council to erect a suitable building for the Academy at the 
expense of the city. This application was favorably received; and 
and on the Gth of February, 1815, the common council appropriated 
$25,000 for the erection of a building, and soon afterwards they 
modified their resolution so as to appropriate whatever might be 
found iieccssary for the purpose. The trustees had in the mean- 
while procured various plans for the edifice; and after frequent 
conferences between them and the common council, both boards 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 17 

concurred in the adoption of the plan presented by Thomas C. 
Taylor, being the same subf'tantially in accordance with which the 
Academy was afterwards built. At that time the ground now en- 
closed as the Academy park had not been excavated, but was irregular 
and broken ; and for some years after the Academy had been built, 
its basement was much below the surface of the adjoining grounds. 
So doubtful were the common council, at that time, of the suitable- 
ness of this site, that just previous to commencing the work, they 
proposed to the trustees to substitute a block of ground on the 
corner of Eagle and Jay streets; but the trustees, with sound judg- 
ment and far-sightedness, resolved unanimously " that the site for 
the Academy on the Public square was in every point of view the 
most eligible;" and they therefore persevered in their request to 
the corporation " to erect the Academy on said lot." The common 
council, thereupon, ordered the work to proceed. The plan, as ori- 
ginally adopted, contemplated that the building should be of brick, 
and the ornamental work only, of freestone. Soon afterwards it was 
resolved, that the whole front should be of freestone; and at last it 
was determined, to substitute freestone for the whole building. The 
corner stone was laid on the 29th day of July, 1815, with all 
proper ceremonies, in the presence of the common council, of the 
trustees, and of a large assemblage of citizens, by the Hon. Philip 
S. Van Rensselaer — then mayor of the city — who delivered a 
suitable address on the occasion. The building, when ultimately 
finished, cost $90,000. It was a noble and munificent gift, honor- 
able to those who made it, and it may well be doubted, whether one 
wiser, or more lasting in its benefits, was ever made by the city. 
Within its walls, during eight and forty years, five thousand of the 
youth of our city have received those lessons which were to fit them 
for the duties of life. No one can estimate the insensible, and 
withal potent influence upon the minds of all those youths, of its 
beautiful exterior — of its large and lofty school-rooms — of its 
stately chapel — of its ample halls, filled with well arranged libra- 
ries and scientific collections. Time has not rendered it in any degree 
unfitted for its purposes, nor unworthy of its position among the 
public buildings of the city. It seems to have had a power to 
charm down and repress even the proverbial destructiveness of 
youth; and it stands to-day, after the lapse of half a century, 

a 



18 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

unmarred by any spoiling hand, in all its original freshness and 
beauty. 

While the preparations for building were in progress, the trustees 
were engaged in making the arrangements for putting the institu- 
tion into practical operation. They had high views of what was 
desirable, and they sought, by the selection of men of the highest 
qualifications, to place the Academy at once in the first rank of 
similar institutions in this country. After careful consideration, 
Dr. Benjamin Allen, then of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and pre- 
viously of Union college, was appointed principal and professor of 
mathematics, with a salary of §2,500 and a dwelling-house. He 
was a man of commanding presence, of dignified manners, and had 
a high reputation for literary and scientific attainments. 

It may be proper here to state, in order to show the lively interest 
taken by the common council in this work, and the character of the 
instruction which they desired should be furnished, that they at 
this time passed a resolution, that if the trustees would engage a 
competent professor of languages, and their funds at the end of the 
year should be insufiicient to meet the salary, the city would make 
good any deficiency. Notwithstanding the enlightened day in which 
we live, it may be doubted whether it would now be easy to induce 
our common council to proffer such an appropriation for such a pur- 
pose. On the strength of this resolution, the trustees called the 
Rev. Dr. Joseph Shaw to the professorship of the ancient languages, 
with a salary of $2,000 ; and they soon after appointed Moses Cha- 
pin (now Judge Chapin of Canandaigua), English tutor, with a 
salary of $1,000. 

The Academy was opened for the reception of pupils on Monday 
the llth day of September, 1815, in the large old wooden dwelling- 
house, then standing on the southeast corner of State and Lodge 
streets, belonging to the late Killian K. Van Rensselaer. On that 
day, around a desk in a back room, fronting on Lodge street, on 
the ground floor of that building, were assembled Dr. Allen and Dr. 
Shaw, with a committee of the trustees, composed of the Rev. Dr. 
Niell, Dr. Beck and Mr. Sedgwick. As the boys were brought in 
by their parents, their names, ages, parentage, and proposed studies 
were registered, and they were tlien seated on benches which had 
been placed for them around the room. When this was finished, 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 19 

they were, after a few words from Dr. Allen, dismissed until the 
next day, when they were assigned to their proper rooms and classes, 
and the regular work of the school began. Such was the opening 
scene of the Albany Academy. The number of students during 
the first quarter was about 80, and rose in the coui'se of the year to 
about 90 ; of whom 08 were in the classical and 22 in the English 
department. The charge for tuition was at first $8 a quarter; but 
at the end of the first year it was found necessary to raise it to 
$12.50 for the classical, and to $10 for all other students. 

At the close of the first academic year, a public examination of 
the students was held for foui-* successive days, in the old supreme 
court room, now the senate chamber, in the Capitol. It was con- 
ducted with much state and solemnity, and excited great solicitude 
on the part of the boys. In the lofty judges' seat, presiding over 
the whole, appeared the magisterial form of Dr. Allen. Around 
the large oval table within the bar, were seated the trustees ; while 
the students, arranged in their diflPerent classes, occupied the seats 
around the outer circle. An incident which occurred on the first 
day, may serve to illustrate the prompt and vigorous way in which 
authority was enforced by Dr. Allen. A boy, in an algebra class 
then under examination, was observed by the doctor from his ele- 
vated seat, to be secretly referring to a book. The doctor, calling 
the ofiender by name in a stern voice, ordered him to bring him the 
book. The boy hesitated, and at length said that he could not. 
Instantly springing to his feet, and striking his walking cane with 
emphasis across the desk before him, the doctor, in a tone that 
struck terror to the hearts of the other boys, summarily declared 
the recusant suspended from the institution. At a subsequent day, 
the boy appeared before the trustees and stated, by way of apology, 
that he had made a solemn promise to another boy from whom he ob- 
tained the book, that he would not part with it; but this was thought 
by the trustees to be rather an aggravation of the oifence, and he 
was not allowed to return to the Academy. 

At the same examination, three of the oldest students were reported 
to the trustees for habitual idleness and insubordination during the 
previous term. It was resolved that they should be ae'!monished. 
Accordingly, on the morning of the day for the public distribution 
of the premiums, they were brought before the assembled trustees 



20 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

and faculty, and a stern reproof and admonition were delivered to 
them by Chancellor Lansing. It need hardly be said that these 
solemn and awful modes of procedure were reserved for offences of 
a grave character, and did not in the least interfere with the most 
active and liberal administration of current discipline, according to 
the ancient and approved fashion. The views of the trustees on 
this point may be inferred from the fact, that on one occasion, when 
some misconduct on the part of some of the students was brought 
to their attention, they adopted a resolution, inquiring why the 
usual and proper chastisement had been omitted. It is due, how- 
ever, to the professors to say, that they were rarely, if ever, justly 
chargeable with any neglect of duty in this respect. Dr. Shaw was 
a disciple of the old Scottish school, that never spared the rod. 
O'Shaunessy did full justice to his national training; and Dr. Beck, 
although always kind-hearted, and much more considerate and judi- 
cious than some of his associates, distributed his favors with unstinted 
liberality. Happily, this system has in a great measure passed 
away; and with no prejudice, it is believed, either to good conduct 
or good scholarship. 

At the opening of the second academic year in September, 1816, 
it was found necessary to have an assistant teacher in the classical 
department; and the Ilev. Isaac Ferris (now the distinguished 
chancellor of the New York university), was appointed as classical 
tutor, and assistant to Dr. Shaw. 

During the years 1816 and 1817, the prosperity of the Academy 
became much impaired by the financial embarrassment of the 
country, growing out of the termination of the war. The number 
of students fell off, the city became unable to contribute to the 
salary of the classical professor, or even to pay the interest on the 
bond, and this led to the necessity of a reduction of salaries, and 
a genei'al change in the })laii of the whole establishment. Dissatis- 
faction arising from this change led, at the close of the academic 
year in 1817, to the resignation of Dr. Allen, whose place was at 
once filled by the appointment, on the 14th of August, 1817, of 
Dr. Beck, who had then only just coiiipleted his twenty-sixth year. 
The result has shown, that a better appointment could not have been 
made, and has well justified the sagacity and sound judgment of 
the eminent men who then composed the board. lie was already 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 21 

generally regfirded as a young man of unusual attainments, and of 
high mark and promise; and his special qualifications for this place 
had become "well known to the trustees, by the zeal, energy and 
judgment with which he had labored during the previous two years 
in the organization and management of the aifairs of the Academy. 
In September, 1817, the Academy was reopened under his charge, 
in the new building, which had been so far finished as to admit of 
occupation. Dr. Shaw still retained the professorship of languages, 
at a greatly reduced salary; and Prof. O'Shaunessy was also called 
first as tutor, and afterwards as professor of mathematics and natural 
philosophy. From this time, the Academy has ever maintained its 
rank as one of the best classical and mathematical schools in this 
country. Those who have had the advantage of the instructions of 
Dr. Shaw, and his successors in the classical department, need not 
be told that there was a critical accuracy in the elementary teaching 
and drilling rarely found in our American schools. The grammar, 
by constant daily repetition in all classes, from the highest to the 
lowest, was wrought into the very texture of a boy's mind, and 
made as familiar as his alphabet. Few academies or colleges in this 
country afi"orded so extensive a course of reading in the Latin and 
Greek classics, as was regularly pursued by the classes under Dr. 
Shaw. Nothing was neglected which could contribute to give a 
mastery over the language; thorough parsing — scanning — written 
translations from one language into the other — exercises in the 
rules of prosody — all were rigidly exacted. A false quantity struck 
every ear like a discord, and was an offence which was never suf- 
fered to pass unnoticed, and brought down swift vengeance upon 
the offender. Nor was this all. As the student advanced to the 
higher forms, his attention was directed to the noble thoughts and 
the felicities of expression of those grand old writers, whose works 
have become the models on which the intellectual tastes of the young 
have been formed in all succeeding ages. Long may it be so. 
What though it be, that in after years, amid the absorbing duties of 
life, this knowledge, so laboriously acquired, may seem to have 
passed away, or, at all events, to be of little practical use, yet, what- 
ever else maybe lost, the mental discipline thus acquired — the 
subtle power of analysis — the culture of the taste — the breadth 
of intellectual vision and sympathy — the youthful impressions of 



22 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

ancient and heroic times — the music which lingers like an echo 
around some fine old classic phrase — the elevating sense of our 
brotherhood and community with educated men all over the world 
in this our common inheritance — are never lost, but abide with us, 
and impart grace and dignity to the whole intellectual life. 

The death of Dr. Shaw in August, 1824, deprived the Academy 
of a teacher who had established for it a deservedly high character 
for classical instruction. This character was well sustained by his 
successor, the Rev. Dr. Peter Bullions, who, after a short interval, 
during which the place was temporarily supplied by the Rev. Dr. 
Alexander Bullions, was appointed to the vacant classical profes- 
sorship, which he filled with distinguished learning and ability for. 
the next twenty-four years. He brought originally to the place 
excellent qualifications as a classical scholar ; but his knowledge was 
greatly enlarged, and his skill as a teacher improved, by his long 
course of subsequent study and experience. His series of admirable 
grammars and school books, prepared while he held his professorship 
in the Academy, made him, and the institution with which he was 
connected, widely and favorably known, and added much to his 
success and reputation as a teacher. All who ever had the advantage 
of his instructions, will bear witness to the thoroughness, exactness 
and completeness which characterized them. 

Nor were the mathematical and scientific departments of the 
Academy during the same period, less successfully maintained than 
the classical. There was, at the time of the establishment of the 
Academy, a great want in this country of the means of proper scien- 
tific instruction, especially in those branches applicable to the useful 
arts and to the public works and improvements, which were engaging 
the attention of our people. To supply this want, was one of the 
leading objects of the Academy; and it has never failed to have 
men of distinguished ability in charge of this department. The 
names of Beck, O'Shaunessy. Henry, Ten Eyck, and Cook, attest 
the character of its scientific instruction. 

But the influence of the Academy upon the interests of science, 
has by no means been limited to its direct teachings. Placed here, 
at the seat of government of this great state, and in the charge of 
men whose personal and scientific character commanded unusual 
confidence, it has been from the beginning, a centre of wide and 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 23 

salutary influence, giving impulse and direction to almost every 
important scientific enterprise in the state. It is impossible to speak 
of this subject without speaking of Dr. Beck, whose labors and 
influence have become part of the history, both of the Academy and 
of the state. Soon after his appointment, he instituted in the 
Academy, under the sanction of the trustees, an annual course of 
lectures on chemistry, which excited at the time great public interest, 
and were largely attended by our citizens as well as by the students. 
He also established at the Academy a system of regular meteor- 
ological observations, which were regularly published, and which, 
through his eff"orts with the board of Regents, expanded itself into 
a system which now brings its regular annual returns from every 
academy in the state. In the laboratory of the Academy were con- 
ducted the investigations directed by the state, in regard to our salt 
springs and the manufacture of salt, which, at a former day, con- 
tributed so much to the benefit of that branch of our state resources. 
To no one did the great scientific work of the geological survey 
of this state owe more than to Dr. Beck, who in every way, by his 
knowledge, his labors, and his influence with the authorities of the 
state, contributed to its successful accomplishment. Within the 
walls of the Academy, under his watchful eye, the admirable scien- 
tific library and collections of the Albany Institute grew to their 
present magnitude. The State library, now the pride of the state, 
and one of the noblest collections of this country, may be said 
almost to have been the work of his forming hand. It was with 
him ever a most cherished object, and one for which he was pecu- 
liarly qualified, not only by his lifelong devotion to science and 
literature, but by his almost unequalled knowledge of whatever 
pertained to books. But with all this, there was ever the most 
faithful, and vigilant attention to the daily work of the Academy in 
all its departments. No detail of duty was ever neglected. His 
capacity for labor, and his systematic and untiring industry, have 
rarely if ever been surpassed. The written records of the Academy, 
of the Institute, of the board of Regents, and of all the literary 
and scientific bodies with which he was connected, bear witness to 
an amount of patient labor, which would seem to have been beyond 
the power of any man to accomplish. Amid all these multiplied 
labors, he never lost sight of his favorite study of medical jurispru- 



24 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

dence. Commencing his researclies in it at the outset of his profes- 
sional life, he made it for many years the subject of an annual course 
of lectures at the Fairfield medical college ; and at length produced 
his great work on the subject, which has given him a world-wide 
reputation, and has placed him in the first rank of medical writers. 

In 1848, finding that the Academy demanded, on the part of its 
principal, more time and care than his strength and his increasing 
duties, as secretary of the board of Kegents, would enable him to 
give to it, he, to the regret of the trustees, resigned the post which 
he had so honorably and faithfully filled for nearly a third of a 
century. He still, however, retained his seat in the board of trus- 
tees, by whom he was immediately elected their president. Mr. 
Stevenson, who had long held that office, insisting upon resigning it 
in his favor ; and he continued to preside over the board until the 
time of his death, which occurred on the 10th day of November, 1856. 

We need not wonder that such a man should have left the impress 
of his character upon the successive generations of boys, that for 
more than thirty years passed under his charge. The man is 
always far more important than what he teaches. It was not simply 
his well known attainments and his high reputation that gave him 
his influence, although these no doubt served to inspire additional 
respect; but he was a man of high feeling and principle — a gen- 
tleman, not less by his nature, than by descent, by education, and by all 
the associations of his life. Boys are ever keen judges of character ; 
and it was their intuitive recognition of his thorough manliness, his 
kind-heartedness, his love of fun, his scorn of meanness, his quick 
sympathy with whatever was honorable and generous and true, that 
gave him his wonderful power fur good over them. Well and faith- 
fully did he do his part in life ; and his clear and honored name will 
live lung in the record of his varied and useful labors, and in 
the hearts of the thousands who have been trained up under his 
teachings. 

Before leaving the subject of the contributions, whicli the Academy 
and those connected with it have made to the general cause of 
science and the arts, it is especially fitting that we should call to 
mind one, that in its results and practical application has given us 
the most important invention uf the age — the electro-magnetic 
telegra])li. On the resignation uf Ti'dfessur O'Shaunessy in 182G, 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 25 

Professor Joseph Henry (now the distinguished secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution, and who had formerly been a student in 
the Academy), was called to the chair of mathematics and natural 
philosophy. In 1828, in the course of his own studies in connection 
with his duties as professor of natural philosophy, he originated 
and prosecuted in the laboratory of the Academy, a course of original 
investigations and experiments in electro-magnetism, in which he 
was assisted by his friend. Dr. Philip Ten Eyck, afterwards his 
successor in the same professorship. The subject of electro-mag- 
netism had already awakened great interest ; and notwithstanding 
the important discoveries of Oersted, Arago, and Davy, and the still 
more important one of Ampere, the state of the science was such 
previous to Prof. Henry's discoveries, that not only were the means 
of developing magnetism in soft iron imperfectly understood, but 
the electro-magnet, as it then existed, was inapplicable to the trans- 
mission of power to a great distance. The discovery of Professor 
Henry showed how a far greater magnetic power than had previ- 
ously been produced might be developed, and also, how the 
resistance to the transmission of that power, and to its application 
at a great distance, might be successfully overcome. His experi- 
ments first established the facts : that, in order to furnish the 
projectile force necessary to transmit the power through a long 
circuit, so as to produce mechanical effects at a great distance, a gal- 
vanic battery, of many pairs of plates, designated as " an intensity 
battery," should be employed, and that the magnet connected with 
it should be wound with one long wire with many turns ; and that 
a bar of iron might be thus magnetized at a great distance from the 
operator. He also clearly pointed out the application of these facts 
to the transmission of signals. This laid the foundation for the 
practicability of the magnetic telegraph. The older students of the 
Academy in the years 1830, 1831 and 1832, and others who wit- 
nessed his experiments, which at that time excited so much interest 
in this cit}', will remember the long coils of wire which ran, circuit 
upon circuit, for more than a mile in length, around one of the 
upper rooms in the Academy, for the purpose of illustrating the 
fact, that a galvanic current could be transmitted through its whole 
length, so as to excite a magnet at the farther end of the line, and 
thus move a steel bar which struck a bell. This, in a scientific 
4 



26 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

point of view, was the demonstration and accomplishment of all 
that was required for the magnetic telegraph. The science of the 
telegraph was here complete. It needed only the inventive genius 
of Morge to supply the admirable instrument, which was to make 
it available for practical use. It was not for the man of science, to 
leave the path of original scientific investigation, to devise the 
instrument which was to apply his discoveries to the practical pur- 
poses of life. Morse had already been long engaged in his inventive 
work, but had been always baffled by the difficulty which he found 
of transmitting the power to a distance, when the discovery of 
Henry, being communicated to him by his assistant. Dr. Gale, ena- 
bled him at once to perfect his great invention. All honor to the 
inventor ; but let us not forget, that the click of the telegraph, 
which is heard from every joint of those mystic wires which now 
link together every city, and village, and post, and camp, and sta- 
tion, all over this continent, is but the echo of that little bell which 
first sounded in that upper room of the Academy. These facts are 
a part of the history of the Academy ; and it is fitting that, on an 
occasion like this, so important a discovery, made by one of her 
own sons, in her own service, and under her own roof, should not 
be passed over in silence. 

In 1832 Professor Henry, having been called to the chair of 
mathematics and natural philosophy in Princeton college, resigned 
his professorship in the Academy, and was succeeded by Dr. Philip 
Ten Eyck, who brought to the place rare attainments, and a high 
reputation as a mathematician and man of science. He held this 
professorship, fulfilling its duties with ability and faithfulness, until 
the reorganization of the Academy in 1848, when he resigned. 

At this time, an important change took place in the organization 
of the Academy. It was found, that for several years past the 
institution had been falling off in the number of its students, and 
consequently in its income. It had been injuriously affected by the 
establishment throughout our city of district schools, and the im- 
proved character of the instruction afforded by them, as compared 
with the ])ublic schools of an earlier day. This withdrew from the 
Academy many of the pupils who had formerly resorted to it, for 
the purpose of obtaining a good English education. These circum- 
stances induced the trustees, after the retirement of Dr. Beck, Dr. 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 27 

Bullions, and Dr. Ten Eyck, in 1848, to reorganize the whole 
system, with a view to its better adaptation to the changed circum- 
stances and wants of the time. 

The Kev. Dr. VVilliam H. Campbell, now the president of Rutgers 
college, was appointed principal ; and, in connection with that office, 
also discharged the duties of professor of the Greek and Latin 
languages. He was eminently qualified for these duties by his fine 
classical scholarship, and his general literary tastes and acquirements ; 
and the reputation of the Academy was fully sustained during the 
three years that he remained at its head. In 1851, he accepted a 
professorship in the theological seminary at New Brunswick ; and 
Professor George II. Cook, who had filled the chair of mathematics 
and natural philosophy since the resignation of Dr. Ten Eyck in 
1848, was appointed principal in his stead. In addition to his 
duties as" principal, Professor Cook continued to discharge the duties 
of the mathematical professorship ; and the institution was highly 
prosperous under his management. In 1853, he accepted the pro- 
fessorship of chemistry and the natural sciences in Rutgers college ; 
and the Rev. Wm. A. Miller, who had been appointed to the profes- 
sorship of the ancient languages on the resignation of Dr. Campbell, 
was appointed principal, and discharged its duties with ability and 
success until 1856, when he resigned, and Professor David Murray, 
the present principal, was appointed in his stead. In closing this 
review of the distinguished men who have been instructors in the 
Academy, we should not omit to mention the name of Professor 
Julian Molinard, who for twenty years held the professorship of 
modern languages. He had been early in life an officer in the 
French army. He was a man of high and generous spirit, a most 
exact and faithful teacher, critically versed in the structure and 
niceties of his own language, and in the comparative peculiarities of 
our own. He resigned his place in the Academy in 1859, and died 
in the service of the government of the United States in 1862. 

Delicacy forbids that we should speak of those now in charge of 
the institution; but it maybe allowable to say, that its present con- 
dition and prospects are not unworthy of its reputation in the past. 

It remains for us yet to mention those to whom the Academy has 
been indebted for the establishment of scholarships and honorary 
medals. 



28 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

The late Henry W. Dclavuu died in 1836. By his will, he be- 
queathed to the Academy the sum of two thousand dollars, to be 
deposited in the savings bank as a permanent fund, the income of 
which was to be applied to the teaching of such a number of poor 
boys in the Albany Academy, in the useful branches of English 
education, as such income would allow. No boy to enjoy the benefit 
of such fund for more than two years. At all times since the 
foundation of this noble charity, five boys have been educated iu 
the Academy, in accordance with the terms of the bequest, out of 
the income of the fund. 

In 1831, the late Wm. Caldwell, Esq., of this city, gave to the 
Academy the sum of one hundred dollars, the intercs^t of which was 
to be applied to procuring a premium, to be annually bestowed on 
the best scholar in mathematics and natural philosophy in the 
Academy. Such scholar to be of at ler.st four jears standing. A 
gold medal, designated as The Caldwell Mathematical Medal, has 
ever since been annually given as directed by the founder. 

In 1837 the late Stephen Van Rensselaer, Esq., gave to the 
Academy the like sum of one hundred dollars, on condition that the 
income thereof should be annually appropriated to the purchase of 
a gold medal, to be given at every annual examination to the best 
scholar in the Latin and Greek languages. Such scholar to be of 
at least four years' standing in the Academy, and the medal not to be 
twice bestowed on the same individual. This medal has been ever 
since annually given, and is known as The Van liensselaer Classical 
Medal. 

In 1854 Thomas W. Olcott, Esq., gave a fund to provide a gold 
medal, to be designated as The Beck Literary Medal, in honor 
ol Dr. T. Ilomeyn Beck, to be given each year to the student of 
four years' standing in the Academy, and well approved for scholar- 
ship and conduct, who shall present the best English composition. 
The same individual to receive it but once. 

In the same year the late Dr. P. Gannon, of this city, gave by his 
will the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars as a fund for a medal, 
to be given each year to the student of three years' standing in the 
Academy who shall have made the greatest proficiency in mathe- 
matics and natural philosophy. This medal to be given but once 
to the same person. 



HISTORICAL DISCOURSE. 29 

The Principal has also for a number of years past, given two 
prizes for English composition, which are open to competition 
among all the students. 

These medals and prizes have proved powerful and salutary in- 
centives to exertion, and are regarded by the students as badges of 
the highest academical distinction. 

Standing, as we do to-day, at the close of the first half century of 
the Academy's existence, its sons may look back upon its past history 
with pride and with gratitude; with pride, in the great men who 
have presided over it, in the well trained pupils whom it has sent 
forth, in the wide and salutary influence it has exerted j and with 
gratitude, for their share in its inestimable benefits. Sound learning- 
has here ever found a cherished home ; faithful guardians have ever 
watched over it; true-hearted, devoted men, deeply learned, have 
given the best of their lives to its service. Generation after genera- 
tion of the youth and hope of our city have here been trained in 
those habits, and taught those lessons, which have prepared them 
for the duties and responsibilities of life. Well and faithfully has 
the Academy done its part. How well and how nobly some of the 
pupils have done theirs, we all know, though we may not yet say. 
But we may say, that no where, more than in this institution, have the 
interests and dignity of true learning been more carefully preserved 
and respected. No false guides have ever been sufi"ered within its 
honored precincts. Shams and charlatanism, devices for temporary 
efi"ect, schemes to win knowledge without labor, and to give igno- 
rance the semblance of learning, have had no place in its system. 
The men who were in charge of it were too wise, and too learned, 
and too honest, for that. With no blind adherence to the past — 
nay, with a ready and joyful recognition of any new measure which 
commended itself to a sound and enlightened judgment — it has in 
the main, stood " super anfiquas vias ;" it has kept to the well-tried 
ancient ways. It has sought no royal road ; or rather, we should 
say, the only true and royal road, by which any solid and lasting 
attainments are, or ever have been, or ever will be reached — the 
road of patient and well directed labor. 



30 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Ernest J. Miller, Esq., President of tlie Alpha Sigma Society, 
made the following report concerning the monument to Dr. The- 

ODRIC KOMEYN BeCK. 

REPORT. 

The work of erecting a suitable memorial to Dr. T. Romeyn Beck, 
was committed to the Alpha Sigma Society by a resolution passed at 
a meeting of a committee of the Alumni and Trustees of the Albany 
Academy, held April Sth, 18G3. The society willingly undertook 
the work, deeming it an honor to be the instruments of commemo- 
rating the virtues of one so dear to all of us, but with a full know- 
ledge of the labor required at its hands, and in this last respect we 
have not been disappointed. 

The catalogue of the Academy from, the year 1815 down to and 
including the year 1862, contains 4,275 names ; of these we have 
ascertained that 428 are dead, and learned the residences of 1,175. 
All the old students living in Albany, have been notified of the 
project ; and many notices have been sent to those residing abroad ; 
and our labor is not half completed. In consequence of so 'much 
time being consumed in ascertaining the above facts, we were not 
able to commence circulating the subscription books until about 
three weeks since, and the sum of $1,725 has already been sub- 
scribed ; and we shall use every exertion to swell the amount to at 
least ^3,500. We can not at this time report a suitable plan for 
the memorial, because sufficient funds have not yet been raised, to 
warrant our fixing upon any plan ; but we are determined to erect as 
handsome a monument as we can pay for ; and as you no doubt agree 
with us in this, you must see that the beauty of the testimonial 
remains entirely with yourselves. 

Every Alumnus to whom application was made, with one or two 
exceptions — responded nobly and willingly ; and while some paid 
heartfelt tributes to Dr. Beck's many virtues and acquirements, his 
striking peculiarities were remembered by all. 

And now gentlemen of the Alumni, we have reported to you what 
we have done ; and we now ask you what are you going to do ? 

Dr. Beck and the Albany Academy are inseparable and indisso- 
lubly connected. No one can think of that old freestone building. 



PROCEEDINGS. 31 

whither the tribes went up daily, and where the discipline was moral 
suasion and stick united in such excellent proportions, that while all 
we felt at the time was the stick, the moral suasion has governed 
our lives ever since, without also calling to mind the pleasant counte- 
nance of him, who for more than thirty years was its principal. 
The positions of honor which so many of you occupy, are due to his 
teaching and counsel ; the success in life which has attended so 
many of you, is but the building erected by you on the foundations 
he laid ; and while you honor him by this testimonial in the only 
way in your power, you still owe him a greater debt than you can 
pay. This close connexion between the Academy and Dr. Beck, 
leads us too frequently to consider him only as a teacher ; and to 
picture his life as passed in making the hill of science of easy ascent 
to unwilling feet; in answering stupid questions put by stupid boys; 
and in endeavoring to excite the brain to healthy action by pro- 
ducing a counter irritation on some other part of the body ; and 
then at his death to be " wafted to bliss by little cherub boys all 
heads and wings, with no backs to reproach his sublunary infirmi- 
ties." 

But great and useful as the teacher's calling is, Dr. Beck was 
much more than all this. Acknowledged at home as a leader in his 
peculiar branch of science, his fame spread abroad, and the scientific 
men of other countries sought to honor him ; and laurels obtained at 
home were entwined on his brow with laurels obtained abroad. 
Wherever science is known the name of Dr. Beck is known ; and 
gentlemen of the Alumni, this is the man at whose feet you were 
taught. 

You owe it to the city of Albany that the memory of one of its 
citizens so esteemed abroad, should never be forgotten at home, and 
that there should be some lasting tribute to his worth, to keep his 
memory green. 

You owe it to the cause of science throughout the world, that 
one of its most distinguished followers should receive at your hands 
some token of your appreciation of his great genius. 

You owe it to the Albany Academy — who, if she had forgotten 
how old she really was, would be constrained to take her place 
among the educational grandmothers, as she sees how many " old 



32 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

fellows ai*e mixed in with the boys" — you owe it to her, that her 
principal of over thirty years standing, should be substantially re- 
membered, by her four thousand children and grand children. 

You owe it to this society, who acts as your agent, that you should 
assist and aid it by every means in your power ; and not request it 
to work for you, and then withhold the means for making that work 
effective. 

And more than all you owe it to yourselves, that you should fully 
carry out the resolutions you have passed ; that you should erect 
some testimonial worthy of the man, the old Academy and your- 
selves ; and should show that you have a proper appreciation of his 
great talents and genius, of his virtues and wonderful modesty, of 
his useful instructions and wise counsels. Gentlemen, we do not 
stand before you as beggars. This is your own work ; we are only 
endeavoring to persuade you to do it well. We will not make 
bricks without straw : but if you are willing to furnish the straw, 
we will willingly go around and gather it. From what we know of 
our Treasurer, we are ready to affirm that he can not be wearied in 
signing his name to receipts for money to the Beck monument fund; 
and if any of you doubt this statement we wish you would try him. 

Let not this resolution passed by you almost eight years ago re- 
main longer unfulfilled. Do not abandon the position you then 
occupied ; but let this city contain a memorial to show through all 
time the lasting affection of pupils to so beloved a teacher. 

At successive periods the exercises were diversified by the music 
of Home, Siveet Home, of Rest, Sjiirit, Rest, and of other appro- 
priate harmonies. 

The following Commemorative Oration was then pronounced by 
the Honorable Alexander W. Bradford, LL. D., of New York, 
a former student of the Academy. 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 



Mr. President^ Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees, Gentlemen of 
the Faculty, Alumni and Students of the Academy, Ladies and 
Gentlemen of Albany : 

You have called me to my birth-place, the home of my childhood 
and my education, the land where my ancestors lived and died, 
through many generations — and I appear at your summons. It is 
with a heart full to overflowing. 

Breathes there a man with soul so dead 
Who never to himself hath said 

This is my own, my native land ! 

In this presence of the beautiful, the refined and cultivated, the 
learned and renowned, I feel that I have great need for some of 
that inspiration which the ancient poets invoked, at the opening of 
their verse, from the Divine Muse — for, of myself, I am wholly un- 
able to give utterance to the crowding thoughts and emotions, the 
remembrances, the pleasures and pains, the visions of the past, which 
this occasion creates or recalls. 

After revolving years, the time has arrived to note a memorable 
Epoch in the history of this institution — when we can look back 
upon the days which are gone, and forward into the days which are 
to come, and from the survey, gather and apply the maxims and 
wisdom of experience. An Anniversary is a well-spring of joys and 
sorrows, regrets and hopes, gushing all out together over the soul — 
a fountain, now as it were of tears, and again irradiated in the sun- 
shine with all the colors and tints of the rainbow of promise. It 
joins hand to hand, the living and the dead; and tenderly embraces 
5 



34 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

us — with them — in its circle of revolution. Like Janus, with its 
key it unlocks the door of the past, and with its staff it points to 
the journey of the future. JBi/rons, with two visions, it looks both 
ways through all eternity, and thus fills time with its gaze. 

As members of the same family whose youth for fifty years have 
dwelt together in the same mansion of learning, and drank at the 
same springs of knowledge; as fathers and mothers, brothers and 
sisters, we all have the most touching associations clustering around 
the Academy, and imparting a deep interest to the present moment. 
Fifty years cut no deep furrow in the brow of time — a thousand 
years are but as yesterday — as a watch in the night. But the race 
of men is like the race of leaves, says Homer, and fifty years make 
a broad sweep in the ingathering of the harvest of humanity. They 
cover two generations, with the spring of birth, the life of summer, 
the autumn of decline, and the winter of death. Retiring from the 
bustle, noise and din of the active struggles of life, let us quietly 
meditate together, upon the grave themes suggested by this lapse of 
time, and its Commemoration. 

There is no place on the continent, which for so long a period, 
preserved so many features of historic interest, as Albany. Permit 
me to glance briefly at some points of its history. 

Upon the lowlands which skirt the borders of the North sea, and 
on the neck of the Cimbric Chersonesus, there lived in the days of 
Caesar and Tacitus, a race of men called Teots, Teutons, the ancestors 
of the Dutch. The Angles and Saxons, and the Teutons, were of 
the same stock, and spoke the same tongue. The former, about the 
middle of the fifth century, invaded England, and were the progeni- 
tors of that great nation which has given laws, language, civil and 
religious liberty, to a vast portion of the world. The latter remained 
at home, and in process of time vindicated the rights of man, and 
liberty of conscience, in a terrible struggle of arms, and baptism of 
blood. This sturdy race of freemen, thus divided, in England and 
in Holland, became the witness and the keeper of the truth, in regard 
to the rights of man and the principles of civil and constitutional 
freedom ; and at the present day, wherever their descendants can be 
traced, we find prevailing a profound sense of the dignity of humanity, 
the high behests of religion, and the just supremacy of law and 
order. The two branches were united in a remarkable manner, in 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 35 

the discovery and settlement of New York. Hudson was an Eng- 
lishman in the service of the Dutch. The crew of his ship consisted 
of English and Dutch. Soon after the foundation of the colony, 
English traders appeared and established themselves j and ultimately, 
on the conquest of the provincfe by the English in 1664, the basis 
was laid for a more complete mingling of the two races, thus united 
together after a separation of 1200 years. They were both cold and 
reserved ; both hardy, bold and stubborn ; but the outward shell 
covered, as the ice-bound Hecla, hidden fires and energies, which, 
when aroused, led to adventurous voyages, perilous explorations, 
settlements in the remote wilderness, confronting of savages, priva- 
tions, toils and sufferings, exploits and heroic deeds, on land and sea ! 
A great and mighty race, this Teutonic 1 Nothing daunted by 
arctic ice or torrid sun, sandy desert or rugged mountain, it traverses 
the ocean from pole to pole, and girts the earth with its spreading 
power. 

In the year of our Lord 1609, Henry Hudson, in the good yacht 
Half-Moon, of forty lasts or eighty tons burden, with a crew of twenty 
sailors, came groping along our coast, from Hudson's Bay to the 
Chesapeake, in search of a passage to those oriental regions whose 
treasures of costly fabrics, spices, gold and precious stones, dazzled 
the visions of the early mariners, with glittering hopes of fabulous 
riches. In the month of September, he ascended the river which 
bears his name, until ho found it no further navigable. On the 
19th, having sent out a boat to explore the stream, which proceeded 
as far as the town of Half-Moon, named after his ship, he himself 
anchored at Albany. He records that the Indians " came aboard, 
and brought tobacco and beads, and made an oration, and shewed 
him all the country round about.'"' And he found it a goodly country, 
fair and pleasant to the eye. There were, to use his very language, 
" goodly oakes and walnut trees, chestnut trees, yew trees, and trees of 
sweet wood in great abundance, and great store of slate for houses, 
and other good stones." The people were " very loving." They 
flocked around him with friendly gifts of rich furs and robes of 
martin, mink, otter, beaver and sable. Food abounded in plentous- 
ness; fish, oysters, Indian corn, pumpkins, grapes, venison, turkeys, 
partridges — pipes and tobacco, which, I suppose, maybe considered 
food by a Dutchman. Yonder plains and heights, excepting here 



36 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

and there a field, were then covered -with the primitive trees of the 
forest, down to the edge of the gently gliding river, fringed with 
the drooping willow that laved its clear waters. By the little brooks 
we have so often forded in our childhood, nestled Indian huts, with 
wife and child, and modest maiden and lordly hunter. All Nature 
smiled and beamed in loveliness and beauty. It was an exquisite 
scene of Arcadian peace and felicity, inviting with extended arms to 
repose and serene happiness. And here came a little flock, of sim- 
ple liabits, who were minded to get away from the dismal fens and 
crowded cities of Holland. And when their report went home, that 
" our people are in good heart, and live in peace there — the women 
have also borne some children there — they had all their grain 
sowed by the middle of May and reaped by the middle of August," 
the news spread widely, and crowds up&n crowds came to the ships 
eager to find a passage to the Happy Valley. And thus was founded 
Albany, by a peace-loving, liberty-loving, Grod-loving people. They 
built a fort — they traded with the Indians — they breasted, in their 
canoes, the rifts of the Hudson and the Mohawk — they penetrated 
the depths of the forest — they gathered stores of furs, and sent 
deeply laden ships to Holland and to China, returning with double 
value in all manner of wealth. With peculiar faculty for concilia- 
tion, they had lived, with the exception of a brief period in 1641, 
in amity with the neighboring tribes, and they were never disturbed 
by hostile incursions, until the ambition and cupidity of the French 
in Canada broke the repose of nearly a century. From that 
time until the close of the Revolution, Albany was a frontier fortress : 
and its traditions of Indian councils, of wars, ambuscades, massacres, 
the tomahawk and scalping knife, the midnight torch, the going 
into captivity, running the gauntlet, and the burning at the stake, 
the great armies, and their notable generals, exceeded in stirring 
interest and pathos the romance of the artificial tragedy. They 
were in many respects truly Homeric. 

Nor had the city lost traces of its early character, in 1813, when 
the Academy was founded. At that period it retained much 
of its primitive appearance, and the people their ancient manners 
and habits. The quaint old Dutch gables surmounted with weather- 
cocks, had not disappeared. The split doors, over the lower half of 
which the tidy, handsome matron leaned, watching for the return of 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 37 

her husband ; the window seat where the tender-eyed maiden 
glanced out upon the passers-by, expecting by no means to see her 
lover; the stoop with its two benches, where by day the ^)a<er 
smoked his pipe, and where by night the fires of love were kindled, 
with more heat and less smoke — all these yet lingered, in my day. 
Of a warm summer's evening, the whole population swarmed into 
the streets and on the stoops. You could hear the earnest talk — 
the sweet song — the merry laugh. The stars or moon beamed 
down upon the happy scene — while the aged recounted thrilling 
stories of the past, and the young murmured to each other of the 
happy future — until nine o'clock, and suppaan summoned the house- 
hold to more substantial repasts, and to early sleep. 

The manners of the elders were staid and grave, " more decorous 
than enthusiastic." Revolutionary heroes yet mingled among them, 
and even veterans of two wars, who had battled against Montcalm, 
and sat in council with Sir William Johnson and the stout old Indian 
Chief Hendrik at Mohawk Castle. There were narratives of 
breathless interest, of wondrous hair-breadth escapes and ventures, of 
Cherry Valley, Brandt and Butler, of Fort William Henry, of the 
Bloody Pond, of Saratoga, and Stanwis. There were men who had 
fought with Abercrombie and Lord Howe, with Lafayette and 
Schuyler. The speaker himself has sat at the feet of a venerable 
woman, born in 1732, the same year with Washington, and who lived 
until 1832, and listened to traditionary tales of the burning of Schenec- 
tady, and the midnight fugitives escaping from the knife of the savage to 
perish in the deep snows ! These things necessarily impressed upon 
the people a depth and gravity of character for generations, and withal 
made them reserved and cautious. Says a French traveler, Liancourt, 
" 1 almost incline to think that young persons here, arc born old ! " 
He adds, " Hospitality to strangers seems not to be a prominent 
feature. The few with whom we got acquainted looked extremely 
dull and melancholy. They lived retired in their houses with their 
wives, who sometimes are pretty, but rather awkward in their man- 
ners, and with whom their husbands scarcely exchange thirty words 
a day, although they never address them but with the introductory 
appellation of ' my dear ! ' " He winds up, " The Albanians, to 
speak generally, are a set of people remarkable neither for activity 
nor politeness. They are the most disagreeable beings I have 

. 4C4.5GC; 



38 ALB ANT ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

hitherto met with in the United States ! " Maude, another French- 
man, seems to have been impressed in a like manner. He says : 
" The soil of America appears not to have any influence upon the 
character they brought with them from Holland. They arc still, to 
the tenth and twentieth generation, Dutch in person, dress, mind 
and manners." This gentleman had, however, some reason for 
being out of humor, for he relates that on crossing the Hudson at 
Greenbush the Dutch ferryman asked him for his fare as a foot 
passenger. "How so?" "Because you got out of the wagon. 
Had you remained in it, I must have been obliged to consider you 
part of the load ! " 

But what should we expect of these pioneer traders — these 
merchant warriors ? At home they never slept in safety, except in 
their stockade, and under the guns of the fort. At night the rattel- 
watch went their rounds, and cried at each hour whether all was 
well. They carried weapons with them to the house of God, and 
even there they had a care to construct the windows so high as to 
avoid an escalade, or a musket ball. When the father was far away 
among the Indians, the mother conducted his business, and had the 
management of aflFairs. Husband and wife never separated without 
an anxious foreboding. Whether tilling the field, or in his canoe 
or batteau traversing the Mohawk, Oneida lake, the Oswego, Ontario, 
St. Clair and Huron, to trade at Mackinac, it was all the same — 
he carried his life in his hand. He was ever moving among secret 
and treacherous foes, and the constant sense of peril made him 
solemn, taciturn and sententious. And when, after fatigues and 
dangers, he returned to his home, he had a right to sit under his 
own gable, be disagreeable to fussy Frenchmen and inquisitivo 
stranger?, smoke his pipe in peace, clasp his children to his bosom, 
and call his wife " my dear." 

In 1813, Albany was still " a jewel of antiquity; " "all was an- 
tique, clean and quiet." Below the Watering place, and above the 
Patroon's creek, and on the island where we used to bathe, willows 
and elms skirted the margin of the river. A short walk, barely a 
few steps, and you were at Tivoli, or Buttermilk falls. On the 
opposite side, the Giant's grave towered to the skies covered with 
ancient trees. 

The twilight stroll was to the Willow walk, to the Hay scales, or 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 39 

to the North gate — the Fishing ground, at the dam, or the creek 
now spanned by the rail road bridges — the literary culture, at the 
Apprentices' library, the Albany library, or John Cook's reading 
room, a man noted for keeping Congress water, and for loud sneezing. 
The Websters & Skinners, beneath the spot where I am now speak- 
ing, and under the shade of that grand and venerable Elm, were 
diffusing knowledge through the printing press ; and though there 
was no Joel Munsell in that day to honor his profession with beautiful 
typography, and elegant and costly illustrations of his noble art, the 
Websters were faithful in their calling, and in an humble way were 
the Caxtons of Albany. 

In that day, as I suppose in this, the splendid slope of the Capito- 
line hill, in the frosts of winter, afforded a magnificent opportunity 
for what is now vulgarily called coasting — an expression probably 
derived from indulgence in the practice only when the coast is clear 
of constables. Riding down hill as we termed it, was the amuse- 
ment of both sexes — for there was no crinoline; nor were the 
vehicles in the slightest degree aristocratic. A brick, or a board, a 
pair of skates, or a tin pan, went Jiaud inequis passibus, with the 
dignified and luxurious sled. That we all came rightly by this 
sinful practice, appears from the records of the mayor, aldermen and 
commonalty of the city of Albany, in the year 1713, just about one 
hundred and fifty years ago, in cold weather, probably after a snow 
storm, in anticipation of Christmas ; 

" Whereas y^ children in the said city, do very unorderly, to ye 
shame and scandell of their parents, ryde down ye Hilla in ye streets, 
of the said city, with small and great slees, on the Lord-day, and in 
the week, by which many accidents may come — Now for preventing 
y<" same, it is hereby published and declared, that it shall and may 
be lawful for any constable within this city, or any other person or 
persons, to take any slee or slees, from all and every such boys or 
girls, rydeing or offering to ryde down any hill, within ye said city 
and brake such slee or slees, in peeces ! 

" Given under our hands and seals in Albany, the 22d of Decem- 
ber, in ye 12th year of her Majesty's Reign, Anno Domini, 1713." 

Giving due weight to this solemn state paper, I very much doubt 
whether her majesty's subjects received any adequate protection from 
this threatening and formidable ordinance. Certainly in the early 



40 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

days of the Academy, the constable was part and parcel of the per- 
formance, the spice and condiment of the entertainment. The lad 
who was taken up by John Meigs, the high constable, attained the 
pinnacle of glory. 

When the Academy was founded, the city bad ten thousand inha- 
bitants. It had ten clergymen, twenty doctors, and forty lawyers — 
a proportion which might seem to imply that one clergyman in those 
times was fully equal to two doctors and four lawyers. The streets were 
quiet, grave and still — carriages or wagons, by an old ordinance, were 
forbidden to be driven faster than a walk or a step, for fear of accidents, 
I suppose, to stray children, pigs and cows. I thought to-day as I 
was standing in Market street (Broadway), near Maiden lane, I saw 
a great long red box, which seemed to be gliding through the air. 
I rubbed my eyes to look again — it was gone. I turned to inquire 
as to the vision and was told it was a car on a horse rail road. 

Steterunt que comaj 
Vox liEBsit faucibus. 

But what, it may be asked, had been done by this people whose 
history I have briefly traced, in the way of instructing the young ? 
and the answer is ready. In laying the foundations of this new 
commonwealth, Education was not forgotten. It went hand in hand 
with the sacred offices of religion. The West India company at an 
early period adopted the plan of encouraging emigration by granting 
patents of large tracts of land to such persons as would carry out to 
the province fifty souls, and provide for their maintenance and com- 
fort until well established. The patentees were called Patroons, and 
they were vested with feudal rights and powers to an extent that 
made them sovereigns over their domains, within the scope, however, 
of certain just and reasonable rules and restrictions. These colonists 
were required by one of the rules " to find speedy means to maintain 
a clergyman and schoolmaster, in order that Divine service and a 
zeal for religion may be planted in that country : " and every inha- 
bitant was to bear a tax " for the maintenance of clergymen, com- 
forters of the sick, schoolmasters, and such like necessary officers." 
At an early period, lG48,the local authorities cooperated in this wise 
design, and appointed a committee to build a school house, perceiving, 
to use their language, " how necessary the schoolmaster is to the 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 41 

cstablislimeut of a well-constituted republic." Andries Jansz was 
appointed teacher, and on commencing received a present of $20. 
Attention was also paid to the subject of instruction in New York, 
In 1652, the Directors wrote : . " We give our consent that one 
public school may be established, for which one schoolmaster would 
be sufficient." They accordingly appointed Jan de la Montague, 
and recommended that the City Tavern be appropriated for that 
purpose. They conclude, piously, with this prayer: "The Lord 
grant that he may for a good long time exemplify the favorable 
testimony which he carried with him from here, to the edification of 
the youth." 

At this period, probably in consequence of throwing open the fur 
trade, which had previously been monopolized, many English settlers 
had established themselves in the colony, and we find efforts made 
for their instruction. In the same vessel with the schoolmaster 
for New York, came the pulpit of the old Dutch church, which is still 
preserved, the " bell to adorn their new constructed little church," 
and a clergyman for New York who could preach in Dutch and Eng- 
lish — the Rev. Sam' Driess — "able to preach in both languages, 
and, if necessity did require it, in French too " — " so we may 
expect that he shall be a powerful instrument to proclaim the holy 
word of God, to make His glory known, and assist that worthy 
old servant, the Rev. Megapolensis." 

At the time of the surrender of the province to the English in 
1G64, there were schools at Albany and New York, and in the latter 
place a Latin school. 

In October, 1665, Governor Nichols, led by a prudent sagacity, to 
convert Dutchmen into Englishmen, issued an order appointing John 
Shutte " to bee the English schoolmaster at Albany," on condition he 
should not demand "more wages" than were required by the "Dutch 
schoolmasters." 

What the wages were does not appear, but they were probably 
very moderate. I hope they were better than the wages of lawyers, 
for about that time we read that distinguished counsel was retained 
by the corporation to appear for them " against all manner of persons 
whatsoever" — a very general retainer — for S7.50. What would 
the corporation counsel now-a-days say to that! The attorney 
6 



42 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

general was recompensed in a novel manner — lie liad all tlie beer 
which was forfeited by unlicensed dealers. 

About the same time Jan Jurians Beecker received from Grovernor 
Nichols, a " grant to keep y^ Dutch school at Albany for y*^ teaching of 
youth, to read and to write ye same." This was confirmed by Gov- 
enor Lovelace in 1670, with an order that " no other be permitted to 
interrupt him." Beecker is described as being "very capable," and 
the order says, " it being to be presumed y^ said Beecker for ye 
youth, and Jacob Joosten who is allowed for y^ teaching of y*-' younger 
children, are sufficient for that place." So we see that two 
hundi'ed years ago two schoolmasters were the fair complement for 
all the children in Albany, and that care was taken for teaching 
those who were younger than the youth. This was probably a Dutch 
infant school. 

Subsequently the allowance of schoolmasters passed to the juris- 
diction of the common council, for we find in January, 1700, Cor- 
nells Bogardus requesting to be admitted a schoolmaster for the city, 
and his prayer was unanimously granted at a meeting of the mayor, 
aldermen and commonalty. In 1721, Johanuis Glandorf was the 
schoolmaster appointed by the common council for " speliug, read- 
ing, writeing and cyfFering." 

In 1710, the Rev. Thomas Barclay, rector of St. Peter's church, 
writing to the Society for the propagation of the gospel, speaks of 
frequently visiting the schools and encouraging the schoolmasters. 

In 1784, Nicholas Barrington opened a school, " money being 
very scarce," he says : " At the low prices of 10, 12 and 14 shilings 
per quarter, for spellers, writers and scypherers, and three pounds 
for bookeeping and navigation." 

What the currency was, he does not indicate. Continental money 
might be had by the bushel. There were no greenbacks, and judg- 
ing from contemporaneous advertisements in tlic Gazette, the school- 
master was probably satisfied to take boards, plank, staves, peas, flax 
seed, rum, brass kettles, and any sort of grain, in payment. 

The next year, 1785, Elihu Goodrich and John Ely opened a school. 
They taught Greek and Latin for 40s. a quarter ; gi*ammar, arith- 
metic and writing for 30s. ; reading and spelling for 20s. The 
hours of study showed good constitutions both in masters and pupils. 



I 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 43 

They were from six to eight; then came breakfast — nine to twelve ; 
then came dinner — two to five; then came tea — six to eight; then 
came supjiaan. 

Upon the occupation of New York by the British forces during 
the llevolution, the necessity became evident of having some other 
collegiate institution besides King's college, now Columbia. In 
1779, the legislature, sitting at Kingston, were petitioned by the 
inhabitants of Albany, Tryon and Charlotte counties to incorporate 
a college or academy in the town of Schenectady. The necessities 
of the war diverted further attention from the subject. The project 
was again revived in 1791. Meanwhile the citizens of Albany be- 
came alive to the enterprise. In 1792 the corporation resolved to 
convey a part of the public square for the purposes of a college. In 
1794: over six thousand pounds were subscribed for the object. 
Among the subscribers we find Stephen Van Rensselaer, Stephen 
Lush, Samuel Stringer, John Tayler, Abr'm Van Vechten, Dudley 
Walsh, Thomas Hun, David Newland, John V. Henry, Elias 
Kane, Isaac Denuison, John R. Bleecker, Jacob Van Der Heyden, 
Goldsboro' Banyar, and other notable citizens. In 1795, the 
Regents, by a vote of thirteen to three, located Union college at 
Schenectady. Thus that influential city carried ofi'the palm. 

But the Albanians were not to be disappointed. In 1804, a 
meeting of citizens was held at the old City tavern, a building on 
the opposite corner, to take into consideration the expediency of 
establishing an academy. The chancellor, lieutenant governor, 
mayor, the Rev. Eliphalet Nott, and other conspicuous gentlemen 
were present. A plan for the proposed institution was reported, 
but nothing further seems to have been accomplished. In the year 
1806, Frederick Beasly, John B. Romeyn and John Melancthon 
Bradford, my honored and revered father, made proposals to the city 
for the establishment of a grammar school " of such a nature that it 
might be easily converted into an Academy." The first step required 
by the proposers was the raising of a fund of §10,000. 

Finally, in January, 1813, the common council made an appropria- 
tion for the foundation, and a meeting of citizens was held at the 
Capitol to confer upon the subject. Archibald 31clntyre was chair- 
man, and a committee of fourteen was chosen to devise a plan of the 



44 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

institution. It was proposed to raise $30,000 by subscription. 
The corporation offered the lot on the public square as a site for the 
building, and on the 4th of March, fifty years ago, the academy was 
incorporated by the Itegents of the University. The trustees named 
in the charter were the mayor and recorder, ex-officio, Stephen Van 
Rensselaer, John Lansing, Archibald Mclntyrc, Smith Thompson, 
Abraham Van Vechten, John V. Henry, Henry Walton, the llev. 
Messrs. William Neill, John Melancthon Bradford, John McDonald, 
Timothy Clowes, John McJimpsey, Frederick G. Mayer, Samuel 
Mervin — honorable names, associated with all that is good and 
venerable in the history of the period in which they lived. 

Rarely has an institution been founded under such favorable au- 
spices, and so wise a direction. 

The corner stone was laid on the 29th day of July, 1815, by Philip 
S. Van Rensselaer, the mayor, and the Academy was announced to 
open on the second Monday in September, under Benjamin Allen of 
Union college. Messrs. Neill, Beck and Sedgwick were the com- 
mittee to receive applications for admission. Until the building was 
completed, the school was held in a house on the southeast corner of 
State and Lodge streets. 

On the 14th of August, 1817, Dr. Beck was elected Principal and 
professor in mathematics. He was succeeded in mathematics by 
Michael O'Shaunessy, and was associated with Dr. Shaw, professor 
of Latin and Greek. In 1824 Dr. Bullions, and in 1826, Joseph 
Henry, attained these professorships. These three gave the Academy 
great renown. Two of them are still living to enjoy their fame. 
Giving the full meed of admiration and respect for their labors and 
their achievements, I know they will unite with me in honoring the 
memory of that noble hearted man who guided and directed this 
institution so many years. 

Known over the civilized world as the author and founder of 
Medical jurisprudence, a science which he substantially created, he 
ranks, wherever law and justice are administered, with Blackstone 
and Bacon, Grotius and D'Aguessau. 

Theodric Romeyn Beck was a master workman in his profession — 
in moulding the mind and character of the young, unequalled. 
Himself an untiring, indefatigable student, versed alike in solid 
learning and elegant literature, he inspired the pupil with similar 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 45 

tastes, lighted in his bosom the spark of uohle emulation, elevated 
his desires, and purified his ambition. In emotion, tender, delicate 
and sensitive as a woman — in perception of moral rectitude, clear 
and undeviating — he still possessed a wonderful breadth and manli- 
ness of character. His brain was massive, his intellectual faculty 
strong and robust, his temper fearless, his conduct full of gentleness 
and dignity, modesty and courage. Such glorious qualities com- 
manded respect and secured obedience, and withal presented to the 
scholar a model worthy of imitation. He was the Arnold of his 
llugby. Around him clustered a troop of brave boys — Tom Brownes, 
and all — who loved and honored him with full hearts and flowing 
afiections. 

The course of instruction was on the most liberal scale. In 
mathematics it was carried to the differential and integral calculus. 
In Latin and Grreek it embraced a wider scope of the classics' than 
any of the present curricxda of the colleges. It comprised English 
literature, history, philosophy, physical and metaphysical, elocution, 
French, drawing, the science of mechanical arts, and practical chem- 
istry. The student who finished his gradus with fidelity was sure 
to be a good scholar. The ground plan was somewhat extensive. 
There was a vast deal to be learned, but still the result was attained ; 
and the secret of its accomplishment was small classes, frequent recita- 
tions, and small doses. There was a full head of steam, but it was low 
pressure, working by way of condensation, and not puffing and blow- 
ing, fussing and fuming, like a lake boat or a river tug. The scholar 
studied his own lessons without annoying his parents to help him. 

I suppose I shall be considered heretical in making the remark I 
am about to make, in respect to the system of instruction ; for the 
science of pedagogy has attained such a height of vanity and con- 
ceit as to frown down all criticism upon its perfections. The feature 
of academical education in that day was the simplicity of the text 
book. In this respect I am convinced, by much observation and 
experience, modern instruction has not gained, but lost. It is im- 
possible to stuft" and cram all human knowledge into the youthful 
brain, within the scholastic period. The effort leads to confusion 
and to superficial acquirement. The mind and memory are tasked 
beyond their measure. I sincerely pity the school boy of this day. 
Instead of being contented with giving him the principles, rudiments 



46 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

and elements of knowledge, and thus constructing a frame work, the 
outlines of which are clear and well defined, and around which will 
be gathered and arranged the products of his life-long education, the 
teacher places in his hands text books which embrace the entire range 
of their subject, in all its particulars and details, constructed by 
great scholars, into which they have thrown a lavish profusion of 
learning — first books, and second books, and third books, rules 
and exceptions, and exceptions to exceptions, and doubtful solutions 
of doubtful doubts, and the poor boy, lost and bewildered in the in- 
tricacies of this labyrinth, disheartened and discouraged, abandons 
the efibrt to comprehend, and dwai'fs away into a parrot — his last 
resource being the mechanical exercise of memory. Commend me 
to Murray, and Adams, DaboU, Bonuycastle, and Playfair — homely 
and simple food, but sure of good digestion. As to analytical 
mathematics, it is surer to kill than a Minie rifle. 

The system at that time prevailed of taking place in class and re- 
warding by premiums. If still retained — as I believe — it is else- 
where now regarded as immoral, tending to stir up bad passions and 
an unchristian spirit. Those also were days of stern discipline. 
The stupor of the brain, and consequent idleness, were relieved, 
and the mental pulse quickened, by counter-irritation. The rattan 
afforded a convenient means of physical and moral suasion, adminis- 
tered according to the most delicate rules of the science of palmistry. 
If knowledge did not come through the head, it came through the hands 
and knees, and so was drawn upwards. Upon the whole, the boys, I 
think, fully appreciated the real value of the system. It made them 
tough and hardy. It was not only useful as a prophylactic against 
misbehavior, but it added a zest to the transgression when it was 
committed; and they all acknowledged the administration of justice, 
and the principles of compensation upon Avhich it was based. The 
schoolmaster was no meek, complaining creature, pleading with his 
class to be still and not make so much noise, but was the lord and 
master of his subjects, whose rod and sceptre all who met obeyed. 

On great occasions, the Doctor presided alone, with industry and 
dignity. I have seen fifty lads, who had been engaged in a grand 
attack with snowballs upon a Ilelderberg Dutchman who had been 
unmanly enough to refuse them a ride, and who, consequently, 
nearly had his eyes put out, receive their double cut over the be- 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 47 

numbed hands, as they poured through the doorway in close order, and 
feci thankful for the compliment — thankful I mean that it was no worse. 
There was some real, hearty satisfaction in such a little innocent 
frolic, for the offender felt that he paid for it, and he had to pay for 
it ; and, of course, he had his choice. In these times, 1 believe in 
most schools, the matter is settled by a long, dismal note to the 
father, and a plaintive, deprecating intercession, produced by the 
indignation of the mother, all in arms at the imputation that her 
son could be in fault. 

Speaking of discipline, I must not forget that in extreme cases 
the faculty were convened, and then it was a very solemn affair. 
But there was a depth of misery and woe beyond this. There was 
a case, and I believe it is on record, of so heinous a character as to 
call for the interposition of the board of trustees — a body consist- 
ing of the most eminent citizens, lawyers, judges and divines. You 
would hardly conceive what the punishment was. The board 
gravely determined that the unhappy culprit should be called before 
them, and be appropriately admonished by that high and venerable 
dignitary, the chancellor. He was, in fact, put in chancery, and it 
was the wonder of the school how he ever got out — alive. 

My own personal recollections of the Academy are limited to the 
period comprised between the years 1825 and 1832, and they are of 
the most delightful character. Between the pleasures of study and 
the acquisition of knowledge, the sports of out door life, and the 
charms of social intercourse, there was everything to excite and 
animate even a sluggish nature. What shall I say of the domestic 
discords and fights between the Latins and the English, and the 
more fierce and bitter foreign conflicts waged between the Hills and 
the ('reeks, the latter being a pugnacitms tribe of barbarians who 
inhabited the shores of the Fox creek, an ancient stream which our 
ancestors found filled with fish, and which has now disappeared — ■ 
the weekly exhibitions in the gymnasium, graced with the beauty 
of Albany — the lectures and experiments in chemistry, which, be- 
ing in the evening, were favored with the presence of young ladies 
as well as young gentlemen, and where there were quite as many 
experiments of electric afiinity, and electric sparks and shocks 
among the spectators, as the operator below produced — and the only 
jar wa.s that on the operator's table. 



48 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

A most faithful teacher in classic lore Tvas the Rev. Dr. Peter 
Bullions. An admirable scholar, with a mind deeply stored with 
ancient learning, he was peculiarly appreciative of character, and 
readily understood all the difficulties of the student. His system of 
instruction was exact and thorough, and it was very hard, even for 
the dunce, to^^leavc the recitation without learning much. 

And there was another professor whose life has been spared, and 
his fame extended until the respect and applause of the world have 
wreathed his brow with the laurel — who rose with the sun to in- 
struct his pupil, eager after knowledge — who, giving his heart and 
soul to the duties of the school, had yet time for exploring the deep 
paths of science — who, with his wires and silk thread, winding 
miles of insulated copper, in the Commencement hall of the Academy, 
patiently toiled his way, to the demonsti'ation of the magnetic power 
of the galvanic battery, and years before the invention of the tele- 
graph, proclaimed to America and to Europe, the means of commu- 
nication by the electric fluid. I was an eye-witness to those experi- 
ments and to their eventual demonstration and triumph. In this 
Commemorative festival, let us not forget to honor the name of 
Joseph Henry. 

And I would, if I could in the brief space of an address, mention 
many other able and beloved instructors; nor should I forget the 
scholars who gave credit to their tutors, by subsequently rising to 
distinction, or who, without fame, have, in the humbler paths of life, 
adorned society, and diffused around the domestic circle the advan- 
tages and blessings of a good education. The Bleeckers, the Por- 
ters, Lansings, Pruyns, Elmendorfs, Van Vechtens, Elliots, Kanes, 
Sanfords, Walworths, De Witts, Jacksons, Campbells, liussells, 
Kings, Townsends, Ten Eycks. Jameses, Vieles, Van Burens, Cas- 
sidys, Caggers, Huns, Meadses, Fords, Bogarts, Trotters, Hopkinses, 
Duers, Van Cortlands, Backuses, Clintons, Melvilles, Spragues, and 
a thousand other families, and many other men of distinction now 
living. There is certainly no academic institution in the country 
which has equaled this in its intellectual products. 

But I must pause, and turn from this bright retrospective to the 
future. We are met together to day, not merely to commemorate 
the foundation of the Academy, but to honor and encourage the 
cause of education, and to have in view the welfare of the future 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 49 

youtli of our country. Our fathers had large and sagacious views 
jn tliis respect, and we should expand upon them, not only according 
to the necessities of the time, but with the improved means of the 
age. 

What is education? God creates a fair and spotless page, upon 
which is to be written the history of life. It is created without 
blemish or stain, memory or record — a beginning without an end — 
a life continuing forever. Every thought, emotion, feeling and 
sentiment, every passing event, every action, good or bad, low or 
elevated, mean or majestic, there imprints its image and leaves its 
influence. There are wonderful and god-like faculties in this crea- 
ture. He is made in the express image of his Creator, and with the 
breath of life he became a living soul. " In form and moving how 
express and admirable — in action how like an angel — in appre- 
hension how like a god " — the beauty and paragon of the world. 
And yet he comes into being a helpless infant, iincouscious of his 
latent powers, his dormant energies, his slumbering divinity. All 
things arc placed in subjection under him, and still he perishes, but 
for maternal love. Made but little lower than the angels, he dies 
but for a father's care. He is but a worm of the dust, and he is 
to be crowned with glory and honor. 

What an amazing contrast between the babe, hanging on its 
mother's breast, and the matured and ripened man, with mind stored 
with knowledge, abounding in the treasures of science, art and na- 
ture, sublimely spanning in the glorious effulgence of his intellect 
like a grand arch, states and continents, worlds, planets, suns and 
stars, and the depths of illimitable space, time and eternity, and as 
upon eagles' wings, mounting up from this terrestrial sphere, to the 
Divine throne, where, in humble adoration, he finds revealed, the 
length and breadth, and height and depth, of the mysteries of crea- 
tion and the goodness of God. 

And this wonderful transformation is due to a process of education, 
by which the soul is drawn out, developed, instructed, expanded, 
vivified and glorified. We are all pupils in this school of humanity. 
The instruction of youth occupies but its portico. As we cross 
the threshhold, and the columns of the vast pile rise before us, 
crowned with capital and dome, wc have the choice to pass along 
the aisles leading up to the most sacred place; or descend to the 



50 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

caverns and vaults beneath, full of dead men's bones and rotten- 
ness. 

Life is a mighty maze, but not without a plan. The end is in 
the beginning, as the blade and the ear arc in the seed. How care- 
fully then should wc guide the trembling steps of the child. There 
is something inexpressibly beautiful in the beginning of all things 
natural. There is then, more of God's workmanship, and less of 
the devil's interference — more of the first, fresh stamp of the 
divine image, before it is soiled and fretted and marred by the base 
usage of the world, as the clear cut glittering coin from the mint 
can not be recognized in the battered, shapeless metal, worn smooth 
in human commerce. Let us take this young being, and lead him 
with his freshness and innocence, his plastic mind, into the green 
pastures and beside the still waters, and teach him to drink of the 
well of knowledge pure and uudefiled; instill the love of the good, 
acquaint him with the secrets of nature, the history of man, the 
rules of justice, the beauty of holiness, and plant him on the sure 
and everlasting grounds of principle and right action, and then arm 
him with all the powers of science and art — and then education 
will have accomplished her perfect work, in the model of a perfect 
manhood. 

Gentlemen, to attain such an education requires that the pupil 
should be trained upon a systematic plan, in the same institution, 
and under the same auspices, until he has become master of all the 
elements of knowledge. 

And it follows that the standard of instruction should unite 
simplicity, with breadth and extension ; and beginning with what is 
appropriate for tender years, gradually conduct the pupil to the 
summit of knowledge and scholarship. These have been the cha- 
racteristics of the Academy, and I trust they never will be changed. 

And now, my dear friends and townsmen, and you, honored 
guardians of this institution, and you, teachers, and you, pupils, 1 
bid you farewell. 

I thank God that I have lived to see this day, and that it has 
been accorded to me to yield a tribute to the virtues of our fore- 
fathers — to revisit in memory the scenes of childhood, and recall 
the happy former days. 

|]ut in this time of great convulsions and fearful apprehensions, 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 51 

I cannot refrain from a few words in regard to the civil war which 
prevails, believing it of much importance that sound views in this 
respect should be impressed upon the youth of our country and in- 
culculated by the teacher and parent. I am not appalled by the 
terrors and conflicts of the present, nor the gloomy forebodings of 
the future. We have passed through many a fiercer struggle — 
many a deeper furnace of affliction. There are no accidents in 
history. It moves according to certain definite laws. It is orderly, 
methodical, symmetrical. There is nothing fortuitous. Looking 
back since the dawn of Christianity, we find a sure, steady advance; 
and though there be apparently retrocessions and drawbacks, the 
great issues have ultimately always been on the side of humanity ; 
and these issues are not determined without a struggle, without the 
arbitrament of the sword. Look at the religious wars in Germany, 
lasting thirty years; the long and bloody contests for religious 
freedom in Holland ; the English rebellion ; the French revolution ; 
our own Revolution — and nothing can be clearer than that an anta- 
gonism of principles must necessarily occur in the progress of man, 
and the Old will not yield to the New, unless compelled by force to 
succumb. There can, therefore, be no peace unless one or the other 
yields, or there be a concession of principle, by unmanly compromise. 

There are three marked and clearly defined classes of govern- 
ment : the pure despotism, the limited monarchy, and the republic. 
The enlightened and thoughtful man prefers the republic, well 
administered, to no government at all; for anarchy is not only de- 
structive of all regular forms of government, but is directly hostile 
to the peace and order of society, to the enjoyment of life, liberty 
and property, and the welfare and happiness of every member of 
the community. 

Secession is the incarnation of anarchy. Its appropriate emblems 
are the Palmetto flag and the snake, reminding us of the tree, and 
the serpent, that destroyed the felicity of Paradise. Secession 
violates constitutions. It breaks solemn contracts. It bids defiance 
to law. It repudiates pecuniary obligations. It lurks with treason 
in cabinet councils. It carries the pirate's flag upon the hijjh seas. 
It disintegrates, dissolves, and with a centrifugal force breaks into 
fragments. Its life and essence, its very soul and spirit, are rebellion , 
self-will, uncontrol, disorganization, disorder, liberty perverted into 



52 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

licentiousness, and terminating, in its full development, in a dissolu- 
tion of all the bonds of society, and a return to a state of nature, 
where every man asserts his own personal sovereignty. 

The nearest approach to good government consists in unity ) not 
unity without parts, but unity, which recognizes the rights of indi- 
viduals, of communities and of states; which secures them, and 
sanctifies them and ratifies them by inexorable law; and at the same 
time so controls the members as to make them all subservient to 
the good of the whole body, so that all the parts working harmoni- 
ously together, contribute in due proportion to the happiness of 
man, and to the strength, power, dignity and glory of a perfect state. 

This, in my judgment, is the great problem which is now being 
worked out in our beloved country. It underlies even the question 
of slavery — all matters of caste and color, all great and petty dif- 
ferences of politics, domestic or foreign policy. It is a problem 
which belongs to the history of progress and of humanity. In its 
eventuation, the whole world is concerned. It is to be deter- 
mined only by the sword. And nations may well stand aghast at 
the terrors of the conflict, amazed with its gigantic magnitude — and 
await, with suppressed breathing, the momentous issue. 

Truly providence has cast our lot in an age of stupendous actions. 
We can not easily perceive this, with minds contracted to the narrow 
limits of temporary occupations. Intent on the pursuit of the 
hour, the mighty swell and surging of the ocean of humanity, on 
which we are borne, is heaving upward and onward without our 
being conscious of the motion. 

War has its evils ; but wars are the trials and the judgments of 
history. Most justly has said Cousin, one of the most profound of 
modern philosophers : " There is no iniquity in sreat battles. There 
can be none, for in them neither men nor their passions strive together. 
Battles are the encounters of their causes — the clash of the op- 
ponent spirits of an epoch — of the diverse ideas, which in a given 
century animate and agitate humanity." " It is this which has given 
such importance, such interest, such celebrity to battles." Is there 
anything more renowned than Marathon, Platea. Thermopylae, Phar- 
Balia, IMiillipi, Poictiers, Lutzen, Naseby, Saratoga, Bunker hill. 

And which side shall win the victory ? Says the same writer : 
" For my own part, T believe war to be a game, in which there is 



COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS. 53 

little uncertainty — a game of which the issue is infallibly certain; 
for I defy any one to point out a single game lost to humanity. In 
reality, not a single great battle has taken a turn," " detrimental to 
civilization." 

" Civilization may sometimes receive a check ; the success of arms 
may be inconstant; but in the end the advantage, the gain and the 
honor of the campaign must always remain on her side. Nor can it 
be otherwise. 

" Do you admit that an idea to which a certain portion of futurity 
belongs, must needs prevail over an idea in which futurity has no 
interest, and whose whole power is expended ? You must admit it ; 
and then it follows that whensoever the spirit of the past, and the 
spirt of the future, encounter each other, the advantage will always 
remain with the new spirit of the age. History has its laws, and 
war, which acts so great a part in history, and which represents all 
its great movements, must also have its laws ; and as history, with 
its great events, is nothing but the judgment of God on humanity, 
we may say that wars are nothing but the modes of pronouncing 
that judgment, and that battles are its signal promulgations." 

Let us then, men and brethren, all have faith in the issue of this 
combat, which now enlists the armies of the republic. Our country 
has been the chosen spot, reserved until the latter days, for the 
refuge, the expansion and development of civil and religious freedom. 
And here of necessity must be the last great combat of true liberty — 
the liberty of law and order and constitutional government, against 
disorder, confusion, anarchy and unrestrained license. 

With faith and hope, let us abide the awful issue, and in patience 
possess our souls ! 

God of our fathers, we have heard with our ears, and our fathers 
have declared unto us the noble works thou didst in their days, and 
in the old time before them. 

With faith, greater works shall yet be done. Let us then be true to 
our lineage, to our birthright, and transmit to future generations, our 
country, one and undivided, unshattered and unbroken ■ — presenting 
to the nations of the world in supernal majesty a great and glori- 
ous people, animated with the 2>i"in(jiples of liberty and universal 
emancipation, and bound together by the wholesome restraints of 
law, of justice, of constitutional obligations and of national unity. 



54 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Let us teacli these principles to our children. 
Let them be promulgated in our schools, and by our firesides. 
Let us live by them — let us die for them. 

And although the earth be moved, and the people rage and swell, 
and the kings of the earth imagine a vain thing, 

Let us stand by our trust, inflexible, invincible and immoveable. 

But lo I ■where sunk in deep despair — 
Her garments torn, her bosom bare — 

Impatient Fi'eedom lies, 
Her matted tresses madly spread — 
To every sod ■wliicli "wraps the dead 

She turns her joyless eyes : 
Ne'er shall she leave that lowly ground 
Till notes of triumph, bursting round, 

Proclaim her reign restored. 



And receiving the hallowed words of blessing from the ministry 
of the Lord Jesus, the meeting separated in the pleasant recollection 
of an occasion of high moral and intellectual enjoyment. 



REUISriON. 



In the evening at 8 o'clock the Alumni gathered in force at the 
great hall of the Academy — a beautiful room — whose extent and 
proportions were by every one admired. Many of the alumni re- 
membered how long the construction of the room was one of the 
perplexities of the building ; and in what mysteries of scaffolding 
it was for many years encumbered; and to most of those who 
gathered there, this superb hall was never shown in more beauty 
than on this evening, when, in all the brilliancy of a vivid and well 
displayed light, and with tasteful ornament, the crowd of active 
men assembled to give an enthusiastic close to the high literary 
exercises of the day. 

One decoration was seen with significant approbation, and wel- 
comed in its own beauty of fabric and in its association. It was 
the national banner, in silk, exquisitely made by a lady; and which 
had been the distinguishing ornament and symbol at the great 
world's exhibition in London, of the court devoted to American 
product, and which was loaned for the evening by the distinguished 
representative of our country at that fete of industry. Col. B. P. 
Johnson. 

On the motion of John Tayler Hall, Esq., of the Committee of 
Arrangements, William H. Bogart was selected to preside over 
the gathering of the evening. On taking the chair, Mr. Bogart said : 

Fellow Students : — We have met to night to celebrate the golden 
wedding of our literary mother; a wedding rich as that which 
Pluto of old held in Academus. As we gathered this afternoon, 



66 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

the historian and the orator folded our mother in the silk and hro- 
cade of their scholarly research and eloquence, for us, so joyously 
gathered in this beautiful hall, to make, if we can, this evening a 
brilliant one, and to give it as the diamond ring for this renewal of 
the life of fifty years. 

We, who are assembled here, are the representatives of the thou- 
sands — of all who have gone out to fight the battle of life, in the 
long years that have departed since the Academy was made an insti- 
tution of Albany. We call the roll; and ours are all of living 
voice that makes ans-uFer. Can we not say of some of those whom 
the grave claims — as is yet said, in the guard of France, of La Tour 
D'Auvergne, as his name is uttered — died on the field of honor? 

Some of us know the weariness, and waste, and woe, of the 
struggle ; and it is as well that there are some among us in this 
festivity to night who are not yet instructed by reality beyond the 
hope, that what existence seems to be, it is. 

We have come back to our home, and the halls give us welcome. 
They do not change. They are in the life of the physical, and we 
decay beneath the cares that have never ceased to accompany us. 

I am glad to tell you we are not alone to-night. The teachers of 
other days have come up with us, and we shall hear their utterances. 
They shall find we have not forgotten to be attentive. They are 
here to see that they builded well ; that this structure of their 
work has not been the ephemeral and the false, but of the old, and 
sound, and true, of learning. 

We shall have abiding cause to congratulate each other of this 
day and evening. We exult in the memories of the past. We 
look at the present to find that the trust of education is here ful- 
filled to the very honesty of science and progress. In the grand 
old scholars who gave the earnest to the life of letters here, we 
have a common property. We can forgive Michael O'Shaunessy, 
wc can forgive Joseph Shaw, their somewhat heavy discipline ; that 
is long since obliterated. In their depth of science, in their 
strength of mind, they live in our success. While of Dr. Beck, 
there is but one memory — one joyous association — the delight 
that so many of us, of different eras of education, are bound together 
in his administration. The first of the belles-lettres scholars in the 
state, he gave his illustrious mind, which would have dignified the 



REUNION. 57 

proudest college in the Land, to the Albany Academy; and if over 
man was honored by his scholars, it is the man whose name is the 
central thouyht of the ovation of this day. The often quoted words 
by which Johnson expressed to Westminster Abbey the world's 
judgment of Goldsmith, arc again the truth when uttered of our 
teacher : He touched nothing but that he adorned it. The Albany 
Academy might be obliterated from this hour ; but literature could 
not spare its history from its annals, because it was the home of Dr. 
Eeck. 

We clasp hands over his name. Profound, decorative, sagacious, 
facetious ; the ruler and the playmate of the boys of thirty years of 
the school-room. We knew the truth of his will, the delight of his 
wit, the wealth of his learning, the keenness of his common sense. 

My fellow students, I am proud to remember the practical character 
of the studies which have been pui'sued in these halls. Not so much 
the abstrusities of mathematical learning, nor the perplexities of 
Greek and Latin verse. The studies here have been for the life of 
men. 

In the great exhibition at London in 1862, there was the court 
devoted to the products of Russia, in its magnificence of malachite ; 
its profusion of all that art could illustrate of the glories of precious 
stones, of all the devices of luxury. 

By its side was the American court. The Indian corn, the reaper, 
the mower, the cultivator, the steam engine — inventions to make 
greater the amount of food for man ; to make lighter the toil of the 
weary laborer. That was all our department showed to the millions 
who, from all quarters of the earth, came to the crystal palace. 
The one made more beautiful the domain of the illustrious few ; 
the other made glad the homes of the people. 

We resign to the college its intensities of acquisition. We step 
aside to give place to first man and senior wrangler. The few win 
such honor, and fewer wear it, in the long years of real life. It is 
enough for us, to-night, to exult in the fact, that for fifty years the 
Albany Academy has taught so many to make bright the common 
roll of men. 

At the close of his address the President said : I congratulate 
the x\lumni and Students that the Rev. Dr. Isaac Ferris, the chan- 
cellor of the New York university, is with us this evening; but it 
8 



58 ALBANY ACADEMT SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

is not in that dignity we now address liim. A teacher in the 
Academy, in its very earliest years, he has come to join us to-night 
in our festivity. We welcome him enthusiastically ; but I must he 
careful ; yet I think I can venture it. Professor Ferris, will you 
please to speak to the boys ? 

The Reverend Chancellor Ferris then addressed the meeting. 

Mr. President and very respected Friends : — I rise not to make a 
special speech but to talk. I avail myself of the privilege granted 
to my time of life, and leave the special speeches to my young 
friends. 

This is to me a most interesting day, as it carries my mind back 
to the commencement of active life. I supjjose I stand here as the 
oldest living worker in the department of teaching in the Academy 
here present; and but one earlier than myself survives. I was 
Bcai'cely eighteen when I came, in the fall of 1816, to be an assistant 
to Dr. Shaw in the classical department. I had just graduated at 
Columbia college, and was honored with the recommendation of 
President Harris and Dr. Peter Wilson to the trustees. My work 
was begun in the old building, corner of Lodge and State streets, 
and was finished after the removal to this building, then in an 
unfinished state. It was to me an eventful period ; as I then shoved 
my boat off from the parental haven to do as so many American 
lads do — take care of myself. It has been to me a great satisfac- 
tion to shake by the hand to-day two of my pupils ; one of whom I 
see before me, my friend. Dr. Bogart of Staten Island, who was in 
my Sallust class. Alas, where are the rest ? 

• After the lapse of several years, having become the pastor of the 
Second Dutch church, I was introduced into the board of trustees. 
Melancholy thoughts come to my mind when I look back to my 
colaborers in the board. We have heard to-day noble testimonies 
to the distinguished professors who have here spent their strength, 
and secured renown to this Academy; and I maybe permitted to 
speak of the active and influential auxiliaries they had in the board 
of trustees ; of Drs. Ludlow, Chester, Weed ; and Messrs. Webster, 
Kane, and His Honor, Judge Conkling, and Dr. Gideon Hawley, 
and others; men always ready to work — always watching for the 
best interests of the institution. Several of them have gone to 



REUNION. 59 

their reward, and others arc far on their journey. I have been 
connected with various boards of trustees, but with none nioro 
ready to meet the calls of an institution for time and service. This 
must be regarded as most momentous to tlie success of any such 
enterprise. 

My attachment has ever been very strong to the Albany Academy; 
and I have constantly rejoiced in its success. Its position among 
academic institutions is second to none other in our land. Its song 
are found in every profession, and not a few occupying chief places 
in business — in the ministry — in public life — the law — in the 
army and the navy. 

Two chief characteristics have distinguished the course of in- 
struction here. One is its tho7-oughness, which has never been 
excelled elsewhere ; and when I say thoroughness, I mean minute- 
ness in the detail, and that faithful and careful gathering in of 
everything which belongs to the sound scholar in preparation for 
participation in the affairs of life. There has been one tone thus 
in the progress of the Academy ; each succeeding professor carrying 
on the system where his predecessor left it. The other character- 
istic, in which I doubt not my friend, Dr. Campbell, will entirely 
agree with me, as well as in the former, is the harmony of depart- 
ments and instruction ; no one branch prosecuted to the disadvan- 
tage of another; not Latin to the neglect of the Greek; nor both 
these to the neglect of mathematics and natural sciences ; but all in 
such harmony, that when a young man who had applied himself to 
Btudy went before any college faculty for examination, he was 
received without considerations as a whole man, if I may so say — 
soundly educated. 

I see before me a large number of the present students, and I 
would urge them to remember that they have the honor of the 
Academy in their hands. I hope that, taking pattern from those 
who now represent the Academy in active life, they will maintain 
its high character. It is a pleasure to meet some of these repre- 
sentative men here, and among them my own boys, ecclesiastically — 
my honored friend, the chancellor of the board of Regents, and the 
president of this meeting. 

Mr. President, in concluding my talk, let me say, I stand here to 
make confession of my sins. We have heard to day of the plentiful 



60 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

use of the rod in this history of the Academy, and of its value. I 
beg to differ from my excellent friend in his views. When I came 
here to teach, the special matter insisted on was, be not sparing of 
the rod. I followed the counsel, and gave full measure ; but from 
that time to this have been repenting of it. I have found, in my 
large intercourse with youth, that they have hearts and consciences 
as well as physical sensibilities; and that when the former are 
properly addressed much more may be accomplished. I may be 
asked if I would not use the rod at all ? I agree, there are cases 
when the rod is the proper medicine to be administered ; but I 
would use it as a last resort. I like very much the course of a very 
successful teacher in one of the old public schools of New York 
city. Great complaints were made in some neighborhoods of the 
excessive, cruel whipping in the schools.; the people around being 
terrified by the shrieking of the children. A Quaker member of the 
board was for the absolute prohibition of the rod, and strenuously 
argued that there was no need of it ; that other remedies for evils 
could be successfully employed; and the teacher I refer to was 
named as having pei'fect order, and no use of rod. His position 
concerning her was denied, and the parties in the debate referred 
the matter to her. They met in her room, stated the case, when 
she promptly said she did not use it. On this the Quaker member 
was exultant, when she said: Gentlemen, look here; and, lifting 
the lid of the desk, showed the rattan within, and remarked — I 
keep it here. The children know it is here. I reserve to myself 
the liberty to use it. It is in terrorcm. 

Excuse my detaining you so long. My desire for the Albany 
Academy is, that it may ever flourish, and be a blessing to the city 
and the state. 

As there was present some of the very best vocalists, who were 
also of the Alumni, it was with the highest satisfaction that the 
songs which are here given, were heard, as while there was a hearty 
and joyous union in the chorus, there was so much of the beauty of 
music in the voices of Messrs. Whitney, Davis, Thomas, and 
DiCKERMAN, and their skilled associates, that it formed a delightful 
feature of the evening's action. 



REUNION. 61 

It was the contributioa of the Academy to the exquisite art of 
Music, and had the occasion admitted of the offering, there was 
gratulation in the thought that all departments of art, as well of its 
ornamental as of its practical, would have been illustrated by the 
works of those who had found in these halls their academical 
home. Nor thus alone, the Academy had offered to the country its 
life blood — and on the roll of the battlefield, the names of its sons 
are written in the record of carnage and of sacrifice. 

WE HAVE COME AGAIN TOGETHER. 

Air — Cocahelunk. 

We have come again together 

Here to have a jolly row, 
And to make these old walls echo 
With our merry row-de-dow. 
Chorus — Cocachelunk, chelunk, chelaly, 
Cocaclielunk, cheluuk, chela, 
Cocachelunk, chelunk, chelaly, 
Hi ! 0, chickachelunk, chela. 

Ancient feuds are all forgotten, 

Grave Alumni now are we ; 
Little ones who call us "papa," 

Here are taught their ABC. 
Chorus — Cocachelunk, &c. 

Yonder bell no more shall call us 

Latin verbs to conjugate. 
Lines and cosines no more bore us — 
We're not flogged for "coming late." 
Chorus — Cocachelunk, &c. 

Learned " prof's," pedantic tutors, 
No more make us own their might ; 

Birch, rattan, and ferule heavy. 
Fear we not a whit to night. 
Chorus — Cocachelunk, &c. 

With the choicest buds and roses. 

Alma Mater's head array. 
While we loudly sing her praises 
On this anniversary day. 
Chorus — Cocachelunk, &c. 



62 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Loudly, then, upraise the chorus, 
■\Vhilc to-night with memory toys, 

Calling up the hours of pleasure 
When we all were happy boys. 
Chokus — Cocachelunk, &c. 

The President. — And now we turn gratefully to the State. 
It has always cherished the Academies, and our own has never been 
forgotten in its care. But it is with especial pride we turn to the 
State this evening — for of that distinguished body of scholars and 
gentlemen, in whose care are all the Academies — the board of 
Regents of the University, we find in the Chancellor an Albany 
boy — and better stills one of our own Alumni, one who worthily 
and wisely discharges the duty of his high trust. We are honored 
in the attendance of Mr. Pruyn. "^ 

To which Mr. Pruyn said : 

The history of the Academy, Mr. Chairman, and the character 
and services of Dr. Beck as its principal for many years, have been 
so fully placed before us, that I shall not say more in regard to 
either, but will at once pass to some other matters which I hope 
may be considei'ed appropriate to the occasion. 

Your chairman, gentlemen, my fellow student here in my younger 
days, has spoken of the Regents of the university, by whom the 
charter of this institution was granted, and of my connection with 
that board. Having been one of its members for many years while 
Dr. Beck was its secretary, it gives me an opportunity to speak of 
his services in a position quite distinct from his relationship to the 
Academy. Dr. Beck was elected to this office in the year 1841, 
and it has been well said by one of the gentlemen who addressed 
you, that he discharged its duties with faithfulness, ability, and 
success. It is an old remark that an office is often honored by the 
man who fills it. Sir Walter Scott, you will remember, for a long 
while performed the duties of a clerk of the court of session, 
while he was engaged in his most arduous labors as an author : and 
so with Dr. Beck. For years while busy in literary tasks of in- 
terest and importance, he discharged with his own hands an almost 
incredible amount of detail work. Ilis literary and official labors, 



REUNION. 63 

the care of estates held by him as trustee, his common place book, 
his note book of current literature, and of works to be procured for 
the State library, in the affairs of which as secretary of the trustees 
he took the most active interest, all combined, never seemed to leave 
him a moment unoccupied. And although he was fond of social 
life, and was a most attractive and welcome member of every circle 
which he entered, he often yielded its claims, to the constant de- 
mands upon his time of which I have spoken. 

On the death of Dr. Beck, a meeting was held of former students 
of the Academy, at which a committee was appointed to take 
measures to erect a suitable memorial to commemorate his worth 
and services. Some steps were taken in the matter, but several 
causes, among which I may name the death of some of the com- 
mittee, and the absence or removal of others, seemed to interfere 
with its completion. I speak from personal knowledge when I say, 
that it was intended some time ago to undertake the work with a 
determination to carry it through, when the society of whose 
action you have been informed to-day, came forward and assumed 
the duty with a spirit and zeal which calls for the warmest praise. 

The few minutes I may occupy your time are almost gone, but 
I wish to say a word on another subject. The restoration of our 
country and the great struggle now going on to maintain the Con- 
stitution and the Union are present with us on all occasions. The 
distinguished gentleman (Mr. Bradford) who spoke to us this after- 
noon, in the close of his address, urged upon us most strongly, the 
importance of upholding the supremacy of the Constitution and the 
Laws. I can not add to his eloquent words. I can only beg you 
to remember them. The time may soon come when your principles 
may be put to the trial. And should it come, I hope that the 
Alumni of this old, this conservative seat of learning, will be found 
unitedly and boldly standing up for the cause of law and order, for 
the Constitution and the Union founded by our fathers, just as 
they gave them to us, in their original completeness and strength, 
undisturbed and unimpaired. 

The President. — We ask the privilege of hearing one who was at 
the head of this institution — who is now at the head of that old 
and sound school of religious teachiutr — Ilutgers Collesre — who 



64 ALBANT ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

has gracefully blended the devout and deep theologian with the 
severe scholar, who has left in the annals of our institution, a com- 
plete memory of ability — a master of the classics, and not less, of 
his own language, as I am sure we shall realize when he addresses 
\is. I present to you fellow students, the Keverend Doctor Wil- 
liam II. Campbell. 

To which the Rev. Dr. Campbell made the following response. 

Mr. Chairman : You do me too much honor in calling on me to 
speak on this occasion. I regard it as a high honor to be allowed 
to speak at the Semi-Centennial of the Albany Academy, and to such 
an audience as this. I lived long enough in Albany to know it well, 
and to love it greatly for its worth. And on leaving it, I placed in 
my study those mementoes which would serve to keep Albany ever 
in mind. On the mantel is a plaster cast of Adam Clarke, once the 
property of Simeon De Witt, and the gift to me of my friend llichard 
Varick DeWitt, who is with us this evening. There is also sus- 
pended near by, in one frame, the photographs of all the Alpha 
Sigmas, that worthy band. Alumni of the Albany Academy, and 
my own pupils, unto whom has been entrusted' the worthy work of 
rearing some fitting and lasting memorial of Theodric Romeyn Beck. 

But Mr. Chairman, I have in my study, and constantly in my 
sight, another picture. It is of one, who, I am proud to say, was 
my friend. I need not intimate to you, I am speaking of Dr. Beck. 
He was a man, a longer acquaintance with whom, only served to 
deepen my veneration and love for him. I knew him well from 
1841 till the time of his death. And while I gladly affirm that he 
was all that has been said of him to day, I will add further, that he 
was eminently a just, pure and useful man. Every one who hears 
me will bear a willing testimony, that in saying this of Dr. Beck, 
I am adhering strictly to the resolution of President Edwards, 
always in narrations to speak the simple verity. 

I feel, sir, that it is a great honor to be here to night. Albany has 
seen two proud days in the period of my acquaintance with it. The 
first was that of the Dedication of the Dudley Observatory. The 
second is this day, on which we celebrate the Semi-Centennial of the 
Albany Academy. I want to sec the simple story of this Academy, 



REUNION. 66 

as its historian INIr. Meads, and its orator Mr. Bradford have given 
it to us to day, published to the world. And I shall be sur2)rised, 
if, on reading it, one person can be found, who will hesitate to say 
that this Academy has a history superior to that of any similar 
institution in the land. Albanians may well be proud of that 
history. 

I can fully endorse all that has been said about the extent and 
thoroughness of the education, which is here imparted. And there 
is but one period, and that a brief one, in regard to which this high 
commendation may be questionable. I allude to the period in which 
I, myself, was the principal of the Albany Academy. 

The President. — About the day of the Kevolution, there was a 
very serious dispute between New York and Vermont in relation to 
disputed territory. New York stoutly claimed a large area, which 
claim was as stoutly resisted by Vermont. One of our honored 
guests this evening has repented, though born in Vermont, and has- 
tened to New York, to indicate his sense of the justice of our 
claim; and gladly welcomed he is to Albany, which he has chosen 
as his residence. 

Welcomed everywhere ! For his voice of graceful poetic expres- 
sion is of the language of the heart, and has become the lanrruao-e 
of the people. We all welcome to-night the Hon. John Gt. Saxe. 

To which Mr. Saxe made graceful answer as follows : 

Mr. Chairman : — It is true, as you said among the more flattering 
remarks with which you were jileased to introduce me, that I had 
not the honor to be born in Albany, nor indeed in the state of New 
York. But I am sure it will not be imputed to me as a fault, when 
it is considered that I was not consulted as to the place of my birth. 
I have done, however, the best that might be, under the circum- 
stances. After having been fairly born, and carefully reared amono- 
the green mountains of a neighboring state, so soon as I had 
arrived at a suitable age (I will not say " the age of discretion " ) as 
to be in some degree worthy by culture and conduct to become a 
citizen of this good city of Albany, I immediately removed hither • 
and, let me add, have been warmly welcomed and kindly treated. 
During the two years of my residence here, I have seen a good deal 

of your schools, and have marked with pleasure the rather unusual 




66 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

degree of public spirit manifested by the people of Albany in 
respect of their seminaries of learning. I have seen less of tliis 
Academy than of the other high schools ; but I must infer from 
her children, so largely and so handsomely represented here to-night, 
that she must be a very excellent alma mater. 

Orlando Meads, Esq., then read, to the great satisfaction of 
the audience, the following letter from Joseph Henry, the Presi- 
dent of the Smithsonian Institution, and a scholar and teacher in 
the Albany Academy. It was incidentally remarked, that he had 
indicated the claim of the Academy to the production of a name in 
scholarship and scientific acquirement to which was awarded high 
place throughout all the wide world of civilization ; and the interest 
evidenced by him in the proceedings of to-day was very grateful to 
all who had participated in its most interesting incidents. 

Washington, June 23f?, 1863. 

My Dear Mr. Meads : Your letter and the circular of the Com- 
mittee, inviting me to attend the semi-centennial celebration of the 
Albany Academy, were duly received ; and I have endeavored to 
make such an arrangement of my aifairs as would enable me to be 
present; but I am sorry to inform you, that on account of duties 
which have been devolved upon me as a member of a commission, 
appointed by one of the departments of the government, I am 
unexpectedly at this time unable to leave Washington. 

I need not say to you that it would be a source of much enjoy- 
ment to me, though not unmixed with sadness, to be present at the 
celebration of so important an epoch in the history of an institution 
with which the earlier portions of my own life were so intimately 
connected; to turn back, as it were, the pages of the mysterious 
book of latent memory, and to have presented to me the events, the 
objects and the associates of years long gone by. The ])ast and the 
present would, however, be mingled together in a varied picture of 
light and shade — of pleasure in greeting the surviving friends of 
former times, and of melancholy in holding converse in imagination 
with those who have departed — of gratification in beholding the 
improvements which, in time, have been wrought in the city of my 
birth; and of sadness in view of the changes, even for the better, 
which have rendered me a stranger in the homo of my childhood. 



REUNION. 67 

Were I able to be present, I would gladly embrace the opportu- 
nity to say a few words in commendation of the system and method 
of education which were pursued in the Academy during the first 
quarter of a century of its existence, and which I trust still con- 
tinues to be followed. I would also request to be allowed to state 
my own indebtedness to the Academy, and to the great and good 
men connected with it for thoughts, principles and habits, which 
have been of inestimable service in sustaining and guiding me in 
the arduous duties of a responsible position. 

I am glad to learn that measures are in progress to secure the 
means of erecting a monument to the memory of Dr. Beck, who 
has done more than any other individual for the intellectual im- 
provement of the city of Albany. It is true that his fame requires 
no column of parian marble for its perpetuity, since, if at the cele- 
bration a stranger should ask for his monument, the answer given, 
on another occasion would be highly appropriate, namely, " look 
around.'' It is not to him, but to themselves, a simple act of duty, 
that the Alumni should not suffer his grave to be undistinguished 
among those of ordinary men, for want of the appropriate token of 
respect. It will give me pleasure to be permitted to add my mite 
to this tribute of affection and esteem. 

Truly your friend and servant, 

Joseph Henry. 

And now, according to all practice of past and present years, a 
recess was taken, to give opportunity for the enjoyment of the colla- 
tion which the thoughtful liberality of the Committee of Arrange- 
ments had provided. 

The recoi'd of this hour of the evening was one of joyous con- 
verse — of pleasant social reunion — of kind memories awakened — of 
gentle memories of those whose life had found the great end come 
all too soon or sudden — of whatever belongs to a gathering of active, 
vigorous, genial men, finding the door of their old school once more 
open to them, and some rekindling of a picture, whose coloring the 
shadows of years of care in the education of life's realities had 
deepened. 

An Albany boy — a true artist in his profession — Mr. Benjamin 
M. Briare, furnished the delicious materiel of the collation. 



68 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENMAL. 

The following song, written for the occasion by William H. Mc- 
Elroy, an Alumnus of the Academy, was sung during the recess : 



ALMA MATER 0. 

We're gathered now, my schoolmates, to join once more in song. 

To pluck from memory's -wreath the buds which there so sweetly throng : 

To backward gaze on boyhood's days, then on in life to go ; 

But ere we start we'll drink the health of Alma Mater 0. 

CnoKDS — Oh Alma Mater 0, oh Alma Mater 0, 

But ere we start, we'll drink the health of Alma Mater 0. 



No more for us yon tuneful bell shall ring for morning prayers, 
No more to Friday spoutings, shall we mount the well worn stairs ; 
Our recitations are all passed — Alumni all — you know, 
We'll swell the praises long and loud of Alma Mater 0. 

Chorus — Oh Alma Mater 0, &c. 

Hither we come with hearts of joy, with joy we now will part. 
And give to each the parting grasp, which speaks a brother's heart ; 
United firm in pleasing words, which can no breaking know, 
For we're the boys who ne'er forget our Alma Mater 0. 

CnoKus — Oh Alma Mater 0, &c. 

Then brush the tear-drop from your eye, and happy let us be, 
For joy alone shoul fill the hearts of those as blest as we ; 
One cheerfvil chorus, ringing loud, we'll give before we go. 
The mem'ry of our school-boy days and Alma Mater 0. 

CnoBUS — Oh Alma Mater 0, oh Alma Mater 0. 

Hurrah ! hurrah I for school-boy days and Alma Mater 0. 



Returning to the lecture hall, and again in order, the President 

said : 

Fellow Students: You will hear a brief word — for ho too 
modestly denies to mo the privilege of asking him to address us — 



REUNION. 69 

from the honored and capable present head of the Academy, Pro- 
fessor David Murray, who keeps unbroken the golden chain of 
scholarship. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen : I am neither an alumnus, nor 
the son of an alumnus of this institution ; and it would be an im- 
pertinence in me to intrude upon this family gathering. And yet, 
I look upon the Albany Academy with scarcely less of love and 
reverence than its own children who are gathered here to-night. 
And when I look over this hall, and recognize so many who have 
been trained here in my own time, and under my own care, I feel, 
I assure you, more than a stranger's interest and pride in the occa- 
sion we are met to celebrate. It is a noble, an honorable duty that 
we are fulfilling. We are doing honor to an institution which, by 
many years of successful and patient work, has made its impress on 
this city. Human institutions are frail and temporary. Few 
are perpetuated unchanged in their nature for even fifty years. 
Earely is there one whose years can be counted in centuries. 
When, therefore, we find one which is apparently endowed with 
the gift of perpetuity, founded in such wisdom, and hedged round 
with such safeguards, and embodying such a spirit, as have prolonged 
its existence for half a century, and give reasonable promise of a 
still longer continuance, we have a right to congratulate those who 
founded it, and those for whom it was founded. 

In behalf of those, whose duty it is to give instruction in the 
institution at the present day, I can say there is much in this occa- 
sion to encourage us. It is not an easy task to follow worthily in 
the footsteps of the great men who have honored this Academy by 
their learning and ability. And when, to-night, we hear from 
loving and grateful lips concerning their worth and their goodness, 
and their illustrious virtues, we are almost constrained to bow our 
heads in total discouragement, and think how vain it is to lift tho 
sword which they wielded. 

And yet, when I see how tenderly the virtues of those men arc 
remembered by you, how strongly their kindness of heart has im- 
pressed itself upon your memories — how completely all unkind 
feelings, if they ever existed, have faded away — I cannot but look 



70 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

forward, in my niincl, to the next semi-centennial celebration of the 
Albany Academy, when the boys of a century shall be gathered in 
this same hall ; when the future chancellors, and presidents, and 
judges, and poets, and scholars, shall be gathered upon this stage; 
and when, perhaps, some of these lads who are standing before us 
to-night, shall rise in this place, with whitened locks, and trembling- 
limbs, and with a voice cracked with age, shall speak of the teachers 
of his day. And perchance from the withered flowers of his memory 
he shall pluck out some fragrant blossoms, and bind them into 
a wreath, and with trembling hands shall lay them tenderly upon 
our memory. Ah ! I shall not fear to be tried by so kind and partial 
a tribunal. If we are remembered at all, and if our names are 
thought worth mentioning in the annals of the institution, there is 
no fear but we shall be remembered . lovingly and named with 
reverence. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen, by your gathering here to-day, 
by your interest in this celebration, by your kind memories of your 
old instructors, you not only fulfill an act grateful to your own feel- 
ings, but you give aid and encouragement to all who have.the care 
and management of this institution. For myself, I thank you; and 
whether I spend many years or few here, I shall remember with 
delight and gratitude the semi-centennial celebration of the Albany 
Academy in 1863. 

It being ascertained that Mrs. Pierre Van Cortlandt of West- 
chester county, a daughter of Dr. Beck, honored the gathering of 
the evening by her presence, the enthusiastic loyalty to the memo- 
ry of her father, borne by all present, found manly utterance in 
three ringing cheers of homage to his representative. 

There being a very beautiful boquet of flowers on the table of 
the President, he was by the Alumni directed to present it in their 
name to Mrs. Van Cortlandt ; which very acceptable duty he dis- 
charged, saying — for all gathered in the hall — that were every leaf 
in it vocal, it would utter to her the words, Forget Me Not. 



REUNION. 71 

Then with a real grandeur of voice, Auld Lang Sync was 
sung. 

ALPII SIGMA — AULD LANG SYNE. 

Should high old times be e'er forgot, 

Aud never brought to mind, 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And days of Auld Lang Syne. 
Cnonus — For auld lang syne, my boys, 
For auld lang syne ; 
We'll take a cup of kindness yet, 
For auld lang syne. 

Oh could we e'er in any sphere. 

So proudly bend the neck 
As to forget our Schoolboy days. 

The "Den and Dr. Beck. 

Chorus — For auld lang syne, &c. 

The little poodle with the bell, 

The " last day's " bedlam scenes. 
The telegraphs along the desks. 

The Exhibition beans. 

Chorus — For auld lang syne, &c. 

The pieces that we spoke so well, 

The spitballs that we threw, 
The caterpillars that we reared, 

I can't forget — can you ? 

Chorus — For auld lang syne, &c. 

But time would fail to tell of all 

The high old times we had ; 
When each one here with whiskers now 

Was but a hairless lad. 

Chorus — For auld lang syne, &c. 

Yet still we will remember tliem. 

And sing them off in rliyme ; 
Thus old acquaintance's not forgot. 

Nor days of Auld Lang Syne. 

Chorus — For auld lang sync, &c. 



72 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Ou motion of Mr. Murray, an Alumni Association was formed, 
a Constitution adopted, and the following officers elected : 

Orlando Meads, President. 
William II. Bogart, First Vice-President. 
Thomas Hun, Second Vice-President. 
Stephen "W. Whitney, Treasm-er. 
Charles E. Smith, Secretary. 
Directors. — John Tayler Hall, George W. Carpenter, Mau- 
rice E. ViELE, Robert H. Waterman, Ernest J. Miller. 



CONSTITUTION 

OP THE 

ALBANY ACADEMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

Art. I. The Alumni of the Albany Academy assembled on its 
first Semi-Centennial Anniversary, for the purpose of better preserv- 
ing their connection with their Alma Mater, and of more effectually 
cherishing its memories, hereby form themselves into an organiza- 
tion to be known and designated as " The Alumni Association of 
the Albany Academy." Such Association shall be composed of all 
former students of the Academy, of all students who may hereafter 
graduate and of the teachers of the Academy. 

II. The Officers of the Association shall be a President, two Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer, a Secretary, and five Directors, who shall 
constitute the Executive Committee. They shall be elected at the 
Annual Meeting in such manner as the Association shall prescribe. 

III. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the Association on the 
last Friday of the Academic year, and it shall be the duty of the 
Executive Committee to provide for that meeting an oration and 
Buch other exercises as they may deem desirable. 

IV. This Constitution, or any of its articles, may be amended by 
the votes of a majority of the members of the Association present at 
any Annual Meeting. 



REUNION. 73 

This joyous and memorable evening drew to its close. It had 
been the last chapter in a volume of kindly memories. Gathered 
at that Present of fifty years, which had been to the courageous 
founders of the Academy such a far off Future, it was one of the 
gentle but most welcome voices of time; and its philosophy was 
interpreted by all hearts. The hour for the farewell came. 

The Preshlent. — I declare this meeting of the Alumni of the 
Albany Academy adjourned till 8 o'clock of the evening of the 
twenty-sixth day of June, 1913 ; and I must request of you all to 
be punctual. 

And thus this memorable celebration ended j leaving with all the 
most cordial and pleasant memories. 



10 



LETTERS. 



The following letters among many otliers, have been received by 
the Committee of Arrangements. They will commend themselves 
by their genial spirit and delightful reminiscences. 

From John Romeyn Brodhead, LL. D., Author of the 
History of New York. 

New York, 25th June, 1863. 
My Dear Sir, 

On my return home, after seeing you at Albany last week, I 
found the invitation you had sent me to take part in the Celebration 
of the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the Academy to-morrow. 

I have delayed a formal acknowledgment, in the hope that I 
might be able to be with you in person, on this interesting occasion. 
But I am very sorry that this pleasure can not be mine ; and my 
disappointment is the greater, because I had counted much on 
listening to Mr. Bradford's oration, and your own historical sketch 
of our Alma Mater. 

Moreover, I hoped to have met some others of my surviving 
schoolmates, and renewed the memories of the summer of 1823 — 
forty years ago — when we used to make the campus ring with 
our merry noise, after we had escaped the scrutiny of Shaw, and the 
severity of O'Shaunessey. 



LETTERS. 75 

But, more than all, I should have been glad to join in a tribute 
of gratitude and respect to the memory of our venerated principal, 
Doctor Beck. In his death the Academy lost one who did more 
than any other man to give it its present high renown. I trust 
that a prominent result of the commemoration will be a fitting me- 
morial of his rare worth. Those who grew up under his eye ; whose 
progress in life he watched and recorded with such affectionate so- 
licitude ; and who owe so much to his grand and generous teachings, 
will not, I am sure, fail to make true the words of the poet. 

" Quiqiie sui mcmores alios fecerc merendo, 
Omnibus his nived cinguntur tempora vittd." 

I remain, my dear sir. 
With great regard, 
Sincerely yours, 

John Romeyn Brodhead. 
Orlando Meads, Esq., &c., «&c., Albany. 



From the JRev. John Mason Ferris, son of Chancellor Ferris. 

Grand Kapids, Mich., June 17th, 1863. 
David Murray, Esq., 

Dear Sir : The invitation to attend the Semi-Centennial of the 
Academy, has been received. 

It would be an unusual pleasure to participate in exercises so in- 
teresting, but duty here will hold me fast. 

It may be a satisfaction to know, that on the 25th, two of the 
Academy boys will finish chief parts in the examination of the 
Holland Academy, Mich., viz : Rev. Philip Phelps as principal of 
the institution, and myself as orator before the Literary Society and 
member of the council of the Academy. 

I am simply a pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church, doing now, 
and for over 8 years, what I can in helping along the religious and 
intellectual improvement of the West. It is pretty had work now 
and then, but there is always a blessing in it. 

It was not my privilege to graduate at the Academy, but I was 
there long enough to be reading Greek. How can we ever be thank- 



76 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

ful cnougli to Prof. Bullions for liis drill in the Latin and Greek 
grammars. Wasn't it splendid. 

The clear and entertaining talk of Dr. Beck, gave me a taste for 
natural sciences, and what is still better, gave me so correct a basis, 
that from that day to this I have had no difficulty in apprehending 
anything read or heard pertaining to that branch of study. Indeed it 
has been a pleasure to keep tolerably well read up in those matters. 

Well, gray hairs gradually increasing in number, tell me I must 
begin to go down the decline before long, but it is quite invigorat- 
ing to remember again the good times we used to have in the old 
Academy. God bless her more and more. May she stand and 
thrive as long as Dr. Cummings will allow the world to last. 

Yours heartily and respectfully, 

John Mason Fekris. 



From Rev. E. P. Rogers of New York, recently a Trustee of 
the Academij. 

South Dutch Church, Fifth ave., cor. 21st street. "> 

June 23d, 1863. j 
D. Murray, Esq., 

Dear Sir : I have received your polite invitation to be present at 
the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the Albany Academy. It is 
with sincere regret that I am obliged to decline it. My engage- 
ments at that time arc such as to make it impracticable to be with 
you. Allow me, however, to congratulate the trustees, faculty and 
friends of the Academy on the arrival of such an interesting era in 
the history of the Institution. In fifty years how much it has done 
for the promotion of sound learing, and how much it has added to 
the intellectual resources of the state ! Among its five thousand 
pupils, have doubtless, been many who have reflected honor upon 
their Alma Mater, and her fostering care. I sincerely trust that 
the history of the Academy in the next fifty years will be one of in- 
creasing pi'osperity. I shall always remember my connection with it 
as one of its trustees with pleasure, and rejoice to contribute still, 
in any way to its welfare. 



LETTERS. 77 

In tlic hope that the interest of the occasion to which I have had 
the honor of an invitation will be all that it should be, and with my 
best regards to the trustees and faculty, 

I remain, dear sir, 

Your with much esteem, 
E. P. Rogers. 



From Rev. John Toionsend, son of the late Hon. John 
Townsend of Albany. 

TVallingford, June 24, 1863. 
Prof. Murray, 

Dear Sir : I am in receipt of the invitation to be present at the 
Semi-Centennial celebration of the Albany Academy. It would 
afford me very great pleasure to be present on the occasion, were it 
in my power, which, I very much regret to say, it will not be. 

I am very glad indeed that the idea for this celebration has been 
taken up and is being acted upon. It must indirectly tend to the 
advantage of the Academy, and serve to create a unity of interest 
among the Alumni. 

And all this apart from the satisfaction that will be afforded to 
those who may turn from the busy pursuits of life, to renew, in 
what now have become venerable walls, the delightful memories of 
school-boy days. 

Anything that would be suggestive of all this, can not but be of 
value and be worthy of receiving attention. 

Trusting that the former prosperity of the Academy may not only 
be continued, but increased in coming years, and that God's bless- 
ing may ever rest upon all those connected with it. 

I am, with much respect. 
Yours very truly, 

John Townsend. 



78 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



From Bev. Dr. M. Van Rensselaer, President of De Veaux 

College. 

Suspension Bridge, Juno 25th, 1863. 
Dear Sir : 

I have been cherishing the hope up to the last moment, that T 
should be able to join my fellow Alumni of the Albany Academy, 
in celebrating its fiftieth Anniversary. Imperative engagements, 
however, compel me reluctantly to deny myself the anticipated 
pleasure. Most gladly would I have renewed my acquaintance with 
my venerable Alma Mater, on this most interesting occasion, in 
common with my old associates, and the host of noble men she has 
sent forth to the battle of life. Most gladly would I have revived 
the recollections of those faithful instructors who formed my youthful 
mind, and gave me the first taste for learning, and whose eminence 
as scholars and teachers was only equaled by their elevated tone of 
character and the high principles they inculcated on their pupils. 
Beck, Henry, Bullions, Ten Eyck, and others, not one of whom 
that was not thoroughly qualified for his place or failed to fulfill its 
duties with the student conscientiously. Regretting that this poor 
tribute to their worth and to the value of the venerable Institution, 
is all that I can render on this interesting occasion, 

I am very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 
M. Van Rensselaer. 

D. Murray, Esq., Principal, &c., Albany. 



LETTERS. 79 

From Manton 3Iarble, JEsq., Editor of the New York World. 

New York, June 25tli, 1863. 
My Dear Sir : 

I had the pleasure of receiving, a few days ago, the circular letter 
addressed to former students of the Albany Academy, inviting them 
to meet to-morrow and join in the celebration of its Semi-Cen- 
tennial Anniversary. 

Until the present moment I have hoped to be able to be in 
Albany, and to join in the exercises by which you will commemorate 
the day, but now, to my great regret, find myself compelled to re- 
main here. 

The period during which I was a student in the Academy, enjoy- 
ing its manifold advantages, was that in which Prof. Geo. H. Cook, 
and Prof. Wm. A. Miller, your honored predecessors, were at its 
head. Those years I look back upon to day, as among the most 
profitable and happily spent of my life. Their studies anticipated 
in a great degree my college curriculum, and if other academies pre- 
served as high a standard of scholarship as ours, the colleges of the 
United States might, by a proportionate advance of their standards, 
approach more nearly the liberal and comprehensive studies of for- 
eign universities. 

Among the sadder thoughts which crowd upon my mind as it 
reverts to those delightful days, are the memories of well-loved 
fellow-students, who, since we parted in the Academy halls, have 
passed from life. 

There was (to name but two) John Hun Meads, a dear and un- 
forgotten friend, whose ripe, pure, well-balanced character, and 
varied accomplishments, won for him the warmest place in the 
hearts of all of us ; and Richard M. Strong, whose generous nature 
and admirable scholarship, ripening into manhood, had already be- 
gun to show what fruit such seeds may bear, cut ofi" at the threshold 
of life, serving his country with an entire devotion, in the hour of 
her peril. My only brother's name, too, is on your list, he was one 
of your own pupils, sir, and he too is gone. 

Such memories as these, and the gratitude I feel to the institu- 



80 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

tion, and the teachers who did so much for me, are newly awakened 
by the occurrence of this Anniversary, and give keenness to the 
reget that I can not be one of the many who will participate in its 
celebration. 

With the confident belief that the future history of the Albany 
Academy, will justify the promise of its part, and the hope that you 
may long be spared to be its entire principal, 
I remain, dear sir, 

Very respectfully and truly yours, 
Manton Marble. 
David Murray, Esq. 

From Hon. George W. Clinton, son of De Witt Clinton. 

BuFEALO, April 6, 1863. 
Dear Sir : 

I shall, at all times, be happy to show my gratitude to the Albany 
Academy, and my appreciation of the services it has rendered, and 
will, I hope, for centuries, continue to render to the cause of science. 
And I trust that my utter inability to be in Albany on the 8th 
instant, will not deprive me of the honor of being nominally con- 
tinued on the Committee of Arrangments for the Celebration of its 
Semi-Centennial Anniversary. 

Very truly and respectfully, 

Your friend and servant, 
G. W. Clinton. 
Hon. Peter Ganscvoort, President, &c. 



CATALOGUE 



OFFICEES AND FACULTY, 



FROM THE ORGANIZATION TO 18G3. 



TRUSTEES. 



Date of Appointment. Names, Exitus. 

March 4, 1813. Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, LL. D., 1819 

do Hon. John Lansing, Jr., LL. D., 1813 

do Archibald Mclntyre, Esq., 1817 

do Hon. Smith Thompson, LL. D., 1813 

do Hon. Abraham Van Vechten, LL. D., 1813 

do John V. Henry, Esq., 1823 

do Henry Walton, Esq., 1815 

do Rev. William Neill, D. D., ...; 1816 

do Rev. John McDonald, D. D., 1821 

do Rev. John M. Bradford, D. D., 1826 

do Rev. Timothy Clowes, LL. D., 1818 

do Rev. John McJimpsey, 1815 

do Rev. Frederick Gr. Mayer, 1818 

do Rev. Samuel Merwin, 1814 

March23,1813. Theodore Sedgwick, Esq., 1823 

do John Duer, LL. P., 1813 

do Harmanus Bleecker, LL. D., 1822 

Dec. 8,1813. Charles D. Cooper, 1817 

March 8, 1815. Hon. John Lansing, Jr., LL. D., 1817 

do William James, Esq., 1832 

June 23, 1815. T. Romeyn Beck, M. D., 1855 

Dec. 4, 1816. Rev. John Chester, D. D., 1829 

Marchll,1817. John W. Yates, Esq., 1828 

11 



82 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Date of Appointment. Names. Eocitus. 

May 14,1817. Arthur J. Stansbury, 1821 

Nov. 6, 1817. Hon. William A. Duer, LL. D., 1820 

Oct. 27,1818. Gideon Ilawloy, LL. D., 1842 

do John Van Schaiek, Esq., 1818 

July 20,1819. Hon. James Kent, LL. D., 1823 

do Rev. William B. Lacy, D D., 1825 

Feb. 14,1820. Ebenezcr Baldwin, Esq., 1830 

April 10, 1821. Hon. Philip S. Van Rensselaer, 1824 

Oct. 8, 1821. Philip S. Parker, Esq 1831 

Dec. 9, 1822. Rev. Henry R. Weed, D. D., 1831 

March 14,1823. Hon. James Stevenson, 1826 

Dec. 12,1823. Rev. John Ludlow, D. D., 1834 

do Charles R. Webster, Esq., 1834 

July 8, 1825. Rev. Issac Ferris, D. D., 1836 

do Hon. Peter Gansevoort, 

Oct. 13,1826. Hon. Alfred Coukling, LL. D., 1836 

do Isaac Fondey, Esq., 1829 

Sept. 12, 1828. Hon. James Stevenson, 1852 

May 22,1829. John T. Norton, Esq., 1834 

do Nicholas F. Beck, Esq., 1830 

July 9, 1830. Rev. William B. Sprague, D. D., 

Nov. 12,1830. Oliver Kane, Esq., 1834 

June 10, 1831. Richard V. DeWitt, Esq., 1856 

Dec. 9,1831. Archibald Campbell, Esq., 1847 

Marchl5,1833. Philip S. Van Rensselaer, Esq., 1841 

Aug. 5.1834. James Goold, Esq., 1850 

do William C. Miller, Esq., 1857 

Feb. 13, 1835. Rev. John N. Campbell, D. D., 1851 

do Richard Yates, Esq., 1837 

Sept. 9, 1836. Rev. Thomas E. Vermilye, D. D., 1839 

do Thomas W. Olcott, p]sq., 

May 19,1837. Rev. Isaac N. WyckoflF, D. D., 1847 

Jan. 28,1840. Rev. Horatio Potter, D. D., 1856 

Oct. 12,1841. Hon. Teunis Van Vcchten, 1859 

April 12, 1842. Rev. William H. Campbell, D. D., 1851 

Nov. 9, 1847. James P. Boyd, M. D., 

Dec. 14, 1847. Orlando Meads, Esq., 



CATALOGUE OF OFFICERS. 83 

Date of Appointment. Names. Exitus. 

April 9, 1851. Christopher Y. Lansing, Esq., 

May 13, 1851. Henry II. Martin, Esq., 

July 8, 1851. George H. Cook, A. M., 1853 

Oct. 25, 1853. Rev. William A. Miller, A. M., 185G 

Oct. 12, 1852. Thomas IIuu, M. D., 

May 12, 185G. John F. Ilathbone, Esq., 

Sept. 11, 1850. David Murray, A. M., 

Dec. 10, 1856. Rev. Thomas C. Pitkin, D. D., 1863 

Jan. 13, 1857. Rev. William Hague, D. D., 1859 

Feb. 10, 1857. Rev. Ebenezer P. Rogers, D. D., 1863 

June 14, 1859. Howard Towusend, M. D., 

do John W. Ford, Esq., 

June 10, 1863. Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D., 

do Rev. William T. Wilson, 

The Mayor and Recorder of Albany are also ex-officio Trustees. 

PRESIDING OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

1813. Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, LL. D., Senior Trustee, 1819 

1819. Rev. John M. Bradford, D. D., Senior Trustee, 1826 

1826. William James, Esq., Senior Trustee, 18-32 

1834. Hon. Gideon Hawley, LL. D., 1842 

1842. Hon. James Stevenson, President, 1848 

1848. T. Romeyn Beck, M. D., LL. D., Senior Trustee, 1855 

1855. Hon. Peter Gansevoort, Senior Trustee, 

TREASURERS. 

1813. John W. Yates, Esq., 1828 

1828. Richard Yates, Esq., 1836 

1836. James Brown, Esq., 1838 

1838. Aaron D. Patchin, Esq., 1843 

1843. Josiah B. Plumb, Esq., 1850 

1850. Rev. W. H. Campbell, D. D., 1851 

1851. William C. Miller, Esq., 1860 

1860. John W. Ford, 

CLERKS. 

1813. Henry Walton, Esq., 1813 

1813. Rev. Timothy Clowes, LL. D., 1816 

1816. T. Romeyn Beck, M. D., 1848 



84 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNLiL. 

Date of Appointment. Names. Exitus. 

1848. Eev. William II. Campbell, D. D., 1851 

1851. Geo. II. Cook, A. M., 1853 

1853. Rev. AVilliam A. Miller, A. M., 1856 

185G. David Murray, A. M., 1863 

FACULTY. 

PRINCIPALS. 

1815. Benjamin Allen, LL. 1)., 1817 

1817. T. llomcyn ]5eck, M. ])., LL. D., 1848 

1848. llev. William II. Campbell, D. I)., 1851 

1851. George II. Cook, A. M., 1853 

1853. Rev. William A. Miller, A. M., 1856 

1856. David Murray, A. M., 1863 

PROFESSORS AND TUTORS. 

1815. Rev. Joseph Shaw, LL. D., Prof. Latin and Greek, 1824 

1815. Moses Chapin Tutor, 1816 

1816. Rev. Isaac Ferris, Tutor, 1817 

1816. John B Crocker, Tutor, 1817 

1817. Michael O'Shaunessy, A. M., Tutor, 1819 

1819. John Thompson, A. M., Tutor, 1820 

1819. Michael O'Shaunessy, A. M., Professor Mathematics 

and Natural Philosophy, 1826 

1820. William O'Donncll, M. D., A. B., Tutor, 1829 

1824. Rev. Peter Bullions, D. D., Prof. Latin and Greek, 1848 

1826. Joseph Henry, LL. D., Prof. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy, 1832 

1829. William Soul, A. M., Tutor, 1830 

1829. Daniel D. T. Leech, A. B., Tutor, 1831 

1830. George W. Carpenter, Tutor, 1835 

1830. Julian Molinard, Prof. Modern Languages, 1830 

1830. M. Leon Cheronnet, Prof. Modern liunguages, 1831 

1831. Lewis C. Beck, M. D., Lecturer on Chemistry, 1834 

183L IT. Picard, Prof. Modern Languages, 1835 

1831. Rev. Samuel Mc Arthur, Tutor, 1833 

1831. Griffith W. Griffiths, Tutor, 1834 

1831. Benjamin F. Foster, Teacher of Pcumauship, 1833 



CATALOGUE OF OFFICERS. 85 

Date of Appointment. Names. Exitus. 

1832. Philip Ten lOyck, M. 1)., Prof. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy, 1848 

1833. Nathau Ilawley, A. B., Tutor, 1834 

1833. Theodore Foster, Teacher of Penmauship, 1834 

1834. Kev. Samuel McArthur, A. M., Tutor, 1835 

1834. Heury Carpenter, Tutor, 1835 

1834. Joseph Bell, Teacher of Penmanship, 1840 

1835. Charles Clapp, A. M., Prof. English Literature, 1837 

1835. H. V. L. Ducoudray Ilolstein, Prof. Modern Languages, 1839 

1835. Alexander B McDoual, A. M., Tutor, 1841 

1835. Edward P. Edwards, A. M., Tutor, 1840 

1836. David F. Robertson, Tutor, 1838 

1837. Hugh Blair Jolly, A. M., Prof. English Literature, 1841 

1838. Samuel Sidney Smith, Tutor, 1847 

1839. Julian Molinard, Prof. Modern Languages, 1859 

1840. Austin H. Wells, Tutor, 1840 

1840. Austin H. Wells, Teacher of Penmanship, 1849 

1841. Alexander B. McDoual, Prof. English Languages, 1842 

1841. Rev. Andrew Shiland, Tutor, 1844 

1842. Rev. Philander D. Young, Prof. English Literature,.... 1843 

1843. John S. Holmes, Prof. English Literature, 1844 

1844. Rev. Samuel Center, Prof. English Literature, 1848 

1844. Rev. RufusK. Crocker, Tutor, 1847 

1847. James N. Crocker, A. B., Tutor, 1849 

1847. William Wrightson, A. B., Tutor, 1849 

1848. Rev. Wm. H. Campbell, D. D., Prof. Latin and Greek, 1851 
1848. George H. Cook, Prof. Mathematics and Natural Philo- 
sophy, 1853 

1848. Rev. John Sessions, A. M., Prof. English Literature,... 1855 

1849. Andrew R. Wright, Tutor, 1850 

1849. Lemuel M. Wiles, Teacher of Drawing and Penmanship, 1851 

1849. David D. Dewey, Tutor, 1850 

1850. Rev. William A. Miller, A. M., Assistant Prof. Latin 

and Greek, 1851 

1850. James N. Crocker, A. B., Tutor, 1851 

1850. G.W.Taylor, Tutor, 185G 

1851. Rev. Wm. A. Miller, A. M., Prof. Latiu and Greek,... 185G 



86 ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Date of Appointment. Names. Exilxis. 

1851. Arnold Petrie, Tutor, 1851 

1851. David S. Peirce, Teacher of Penmansliip aud Drawing, 1856 

1851. H. Hermon Skinner, Tutor, 1851 

1851. Truman D. Cameron, Superintendent of Preparatory 

Department, 

1851. J. B. Ellis, A. B., Tutor, 1852 

1851. Marcus H. Martin, Tutor, 1852 

1852. David Murray, A. B., Tutor, 1853 

1852. Henry M. Cobb, A. B., Tutor, 1853 

1853. Levi Cass, Tutor, 1856 

1853. Prof. Backhaus, Professor German, 1854 

1853. David Murray, A. B., Prof. Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy, ; 1863 

1853. Albert W. Hale, A. B. Tutor, 1854 

1854. Joseph Warren, A. M., Tutor, 1854 

1854. Henri Kambli, Prof. German, 1859 

1854. Francis K. Dakin, A. M., Tutor, 1855 

1855. Seth B. Cole, A. M., Prof. English Literature, 1856 

1855. Rev. J. W. French, A. M., Assistant Prof. Latin and 

Greek, 1856 

1856. Amos A. Cass, Tutor, 1862 

1856. E. B. Bice, Teacher of Writing and Book-keeping, 1863 

1856. E. P. Waterbury, A. M., Prof. English Literature, 

1856. Bichard W. Swan, A. M., Prof. Latin and Greek, 

1856. M. L. Norton, Tutor, 1857 

1857. D. Penfield Austin, Tutor, 1860 

1858. Adam A. McAlister, Tutor, 1859 

1858. B. L. Cilley, A. B., Tutor, 1859 

1859. George W. Atherton, Tutor, 1860 

1859. Henri Kambli, Prof. French and German, 

1860. Charles A. Nelson, A. B., Tutor, ' 1861 

1860. Horace Loomis, Tutor, 1862 

1861. Thomas H. Pitkin, Tutor, 1863 

1862. Charles E. Smith, A. B., Tutor, 

1862. Joseph M. Cook, A. B., Tutor, 1862 

1862. John T. Saxe, A. B., Tutor, 1863 

1862. Edward H. Griffin, Tutor, 

1863. Jacob S. Mosher, A. M., Tutor, 



MEDALS AND PRIZES AWARDED. 



The following are the names of Students who have received Medals ; 



1831 

1832 



1833 
1834 
1835 
183G 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1850 
1857 
1858 



Caldwell Medal. 

William Austin. 

No public examination in con- 
sequence of the prevalence 
of the cholera. 

Henry Waldron. 

Aurelian Conkling. 

John Newland. 

Henry K. Viele, 

George B. Hoyt. 

Charles N. Waldron. 

Joseph B. Brown. 

William J. Gibson. 

John J. Olcott. 

Philip Phelps. 

William Wrightson. 

Andrew McElroy. 

John K. Croswell. 

Frank B. Hall. 

Frank Jones. 

Jacob C. Koonz. 

George Wrightson. 

William Alvord. 

Richard M. Strong. 

John Bogart. 

Emil Spanicr. 

Robert Strong. 

John Wilson. 

Edward D. Wait. 

Thaddcus R. AVhitc. 

Edward S. Lawson. 



1859 Charles W. Cole. 

1860 Walter K. Vrooman. 

1861 William Henry Fassett. 
18G2 Henry A. Carpenter. 
18C3 Edward Everett Sprague. 

Van Rensselaer Medal. 

1837 Isaac L. K. Miller. 

1838 Henry F. Greene. 

1839 Charles K. McHarg. 

1840 Gilbert L. Wilson. 

1841 Philip Phelps. 

1842 John C. Bullions. 

1843 Oliver Bronson. 

1844 Samuel G. Courtney. 

1845 William Wrightson. 

1846 John K. Croswell. 

1847 Jacob L. Pearse. 

1848 Henry L. Bullions. 

1849 William A. Gott. 

1850 Ernest J. Miller. 

1851 Charles Boyd. 

1852 John Bogart. 

1853 Emil Spanier. 

1854 Oscar H. Young. 

1855 John Wilson. 

1856 Orlando Meads, Jr. 

1857 Thaddeus R. White. 

1858 Thomas S. Wiles. 

1859 Clinton J. Sheldon. 

1860 Edward Be Forest. 

1861 Lorenzo Hale. 



88 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



18fi2 Edward Everett Spraguo. 
1803 John M. Bigelow. 

Gannon Medal. 

1855 Edward D. Wait. 

1856 Joseph M. Cook. 

1857 Thomas S. Wiles. 

1858 Charles E. Smith. 

1859 John IT. Haswell. 

1860 Walter K. Yrooman. 

1861 Alfred B. Huested. 

1862 Patrick H. McQuade. 

1863 Thomas M. Hooker. 

Bbck Medal. 

1855 Thomas S. Wiles. 

1856 William H. McElroy. 

1857 Thaddeus R. White. 

1858 Edward S. Lawson. 



1859 Charles W. Cole. 

1860 George W. Street. 

1861 William J. Gourlay. 

1862 James S. Lynch. 

1803 Edward Everett Spraguo. 

Principal's Phizes. 

1858 1st— Charles E. Smith, 
2d— Thomas M. Gaffney. 

1859 1st— George W. Street. 
2d— William J. Gourlay. 

1860 1st— Francis H. Woods. 
2d— Eben Halley. 

1861 1st— William M. Murray. 
2d — William J. Gourlay. 

1862 1st— Edward E. Sprague. 
2d— John K. Allen, 

1863 1st— Lewis Benedict Hall. 
2d— Chas, W. Carpenter. 



TRUSTEES 

•nnSTE, 1863. 



HON. PETER GANSEVOORT, President. 

REV. WILLIAM B. SPRAGUE, D. D., 

THOMAS W. OLCOTT, 

JAMES P. BOYD, M. D., 

ORLANDO MEADS, 

CHRISTOPHER Y. LANSING, 

HENRY H. MARTIN, 

THOMAS HUN, M. D., 

JOHN F. RATHBONE, 

DAVID MURRAY, 

HOWARD TOWNSEND, M. D., 

JOHN W. FORD, 

REV. RUFUS W. CLARK, D. D., 

REV. WILLIAM T. WILSON, 

HON. ELI PERRY, Mayor of Albany, 

HON. CHAS. L. AUSTIN, Recorder of Albany 



I Ex.offi. 



JOHN W. FORD, Treasurer. 
12 



FACULTY. 

JTHSTE, 1863. 



DAVIT) MURllAY, A. M., Principal, 
Professor of Mathematics and Natural Pldlosophy. 

RICHAKD W. SWAN, A. M., 

Professor of Grech and Latin Lanrjuaijes. 

EDWARD P. WATERBURY, A. M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

HENRI KAMBLI, 

Professor- of the French and German Languages. 

TRUMAN D. CAMERON, 
Superintendent of the Preparatory Department. 

JACOB S. MOSHER, A. M., 

Instructor in Chemistry and Experimental Philosophy. 

CHARLES E. SMITH, A. B., 

Tutor in Mathematics. 

EDWARD H. GRIFFIN, A. B., 

Tutor in Latin and Grech. 

SILAS H. CAMERON, 
WILLIAM L. GREENMAN, 

Tutors in the Preparatory Department. 



Teacher of Writing and Booh-heeping. 



MARK COLE, 

Janitor. 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 

WITH THE 

Dates of Entrance from the Organization to January 1, 1863.* 



1829 Abbot, Caleb. 

1816 Abel, Andrew. 
1852 Abell, John H. 
1851 Abell, Richard P. H. 

1851 AbeU, William. 
1834 Abendroth, August. 
1846 Ableman, Stephen D. 
1838 Ableman, Wellington. 
1861 Abrams, Charles A. 

1817 Ackerman, GaiTit. 

1852 Ackerman, John A. 
1848 Adams, Amos A. 
1850 Adams, Amos, Jr. 
1834 Adams, Charles H, 

1848 Adams, Charles R. 

1849 Adams, George A. 
1838 Adams, George C. 
1852 Adams, George W. 

1838 Adams, Henry P. 
1858 Adams, James Dexter. 
1855 Adams, James H. 
1837 Adams, James N. 

1839 Adams, John. 
1848 Adams, John R. 

1850 Adams, Nelson K. 
1842 Adams, Stephen C. 



1852 Ades, William. 
1830 Adriance, John V. S. 

1850 Aiken, David E. 

1853 Aiken, Jacob D. 

1817 Aikin, George. 

1818 Aikin, John M. 

1846 Ainsworth, Charles F. 
1855 Ainsworth, George E. 

1851 Akin, Jacob. 
1855 Alden, Charles C. 
1860 Alden, Sanford S. 
1855 Aldrich, Theodore. 
1837 Alvord, Charles E. 

1847 Alvord, Henry B. 
1837 Alvord, S. Whitney. 
1839 Alvord, William. 
1844 Allen, Adoniram J. 
1847 AUen, Alexander R. 
1860 Allen, Charles H. 
1815 Allen, Christopher. 
1830 AUen, Henry A. 
1815 AHen, Horatio. 
1835 Allen, James. 

1862 Allen, James H. 
1860 Allen, John K. 
1862 AUen, Walter S. 



* The records of admisaion of Students into the Academy, are deficient between the 
years 1839 and 1847. The names for these years have been obtained by compiling from 
various sources, and can not be as Implicitly relied on as those of the years both preceding 
and succeeding. 



92 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1832 Allen, William. 1850 
1818 Ames, Angelo. 1855 

1833 Ames, John. 1851 
1861 Anable, Frederic G. 1823 

1861 Anable, Henry, B. 1852 
1830 Anable, Henry S. 1880 
1848 Anderson, Andrew, Jr. 1827 
1851 Anderson, EdAvard. 1853 

1855 Anderson, Edward H. 1852 
1841 Anderson, Francis C. 1825 
1854 Anderson, George. 1825 
1853 Anderson, George H. 1838 
1853 Anderson, Hugh. 1830 
1850 Anderson, James W. 1826 
1815 Anderson, Peter. 1862 
1836 Anderson, Philip. 1852 

1862 Anderson, Samuel M. 1849 

1853 Anderson, Thomas W. 1837 
1817 Anderson, William. 1853 
1861 Andrews, Eugene, Jr. 1823 
1838 Andrews, Henry P. 1854 

1856 Andrews, John William. 1828 
1848 Andrews, La Fayette. 1852 
1836 Andrews, Orin. 1856 

1854 Angus, Charles, Jr. 1831 
1848 Anncsley, Isaac. 1829 
1850 Annesley, Richard L. 1832 
1823 Ansart, Edward C. 1852 

1857 Anthony, Charles. 1837 

1860 Appleton, William. 1815 

1861 Arden, Henry. 1818 
1859 Armington, Anthony Rhoades. 1817 

1854 Armington, Hiram T. 1836 

1855 Armour, Charles S. 1845 

1862 Armour, De Witt. 1833 

1848 Armour, Robert H. 1830 
1850 Arms, Charles E. 1833 
1850 Arms, James C. 1820 
1857 Armsby, Gideon H. 1830 
1833 Armstrong, Frederick W. 1859 
1833 Arnold, Dutee. 1862 

1849 Artcher, Austin. 1862 
1859 Aspinwall, L. Augustus. 1861 

1828 Aspinwall, Lewis H. 1860 

1829 Atwood, George P. 1841 



Atwood, Henry B. 
Atwood, Henry C. 
Atwood, William T. 
Austin, Anthony H. 
Austin, Elijah. 
Austin, Emilius. 
Austin, Henry. 
Austin, James A. 
Austin, Jeremiah, 2d. 
Austin, J. J., Jr. 
Austin, John. 
Austin, John T. 
Austin, Richard. 
Austin, AVilliam. 
Averill, Horace P. 
Averill, William H. 
Avery, Thomas Y. 
Ayer, Benjamin F. 
Ayers, Henry H. 
Babbet, Pierre T. 
Babcock, Frederick E. 
Babcock, Harrison, G. 0. 
Babcock, Heman P. 
Babcock, Horace. 
Babcock, John. 
Bachcldor, Edward C. 
Bacheldor, John F. 
Backney, John G. 
Backus, Augustus. 
Backus, Eleazer W. 
Backus, John C. 
Backus, J. Trumbull. 
Backus, William R. 
Bacon, Clarence W. 
Bacon, Edgar J. 
Bacon, John F. 
Bacon, John R. 
Bacon, Marshall J. 
Bacon, William A. 
Badgeley, Charles. 
Bagg, Hiram D. 
Bailey, Forest A. 
Bailey, Henry. 
Bailey, James B. 
Bailey, William. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



93 



1818 Baird, George. 1834 
1848 Baker, Benjamin F. 1828 
183G Baker, David. 1846 
1855 Baker, James A. 1861 

1851 Baker, John A. 1852 
1848 Bakewell, Benjamin. 1846 

1824 Baldwin, . 1840 

183G Baldwin, George C. 1845 

1855 Ballagh, William H. 1861 

1819 Bammann, Henry. 1825 
1855 Bancroft, Jolin D. 1884 
1855 Bancroft, John, Jr. 1835 
1815 Banyar, Goldsbrow L. R. 1859 

1855 Barber, Charles S. 1833 

1852 Barber, Edgar P. 1836 

1856 Barhydt, William F. 1850 

1830 Barker, Lewis. 1855 
1829 Barker, Thomas M. 1827 

1831 Barnard, Samuel W. 1851 

1853 Barnes, Joseph C. 1862 
1852 Barnes, Lucien. 1838 
1839 Barney, Capt. 1860 
1836 Barney, Charles E. 1856 

1829 Barney, Paul C. 1855 

1836 Barney, William. I860 

1857 Barnum, Frank D. 1829 
1833 Barret, George. 1820 

1837 Barret, Rufus. 1835 
1860 Barrett, George W. 1829 
1843 Bartley, John. 1820 
1822 Bassler, Benjamin. 1859 

1858 Batchelder, Franklin Adams. 1829 
1862 Batchelder, Fred. Howard. 1862 
1850 Bathers, Andrew. 1832 
1815 Bay, John W. 1836 
1833 Bay, Richard S. 1832 
1846 Bay, William A. 1832 
1836 Bcal, Stephen T. 18-53 

1859 Beardsley, Charles. 1846 
1821 Beardsley, Crandell E. 1819 

1830 Beardsley, Joseph A. 1841 
1821 Beardsley, Liyingston C. I860 
1830 Beardsley, Samuel R. 1846 
1835 Beck, John Walton R. 1846 
1839 Becker, Albertus. 1858 



Becker, Erwin. 
Becker, Jacob. 
Becker, John H. 
Bedell, Edwin R. 
Beekman, Gerard. 
Beekman, Mancuis. 
Belden, T. 
Belknap, Chaides M. 
Bell, Frederic H. 
Bell, Garrit W. 
Bell, Henry W. 
Bell, James C. 
Bell, James C. 
Bell, John H. 
Bell, John W. 
Bellamy, George E. 
Beman, Franklin S. 
Bement, William. 
Bendall, Henry G. 
Bender, Charles H. 
Bender, Ephraim W. 
Bender, Frank W. 
Bender, Matthew H. 
Bender, William A. 
Bender, William M. 
Benedict, Edmund A. 
Benedict, Henry. 
Benedict, Henry M. 
Benedict, Lewis, Jr. 
Benedict, Spencer S. 
Benjamin, George P. 
Bennet, Amos. 
Bennet, Daniel C. 
Bennet, Francis. 
Bennet, Sanford. 
Bennet, Thomas. 
Bennet, William. 
Bennet, William T. 
Bentley, George T. 
Bentley, James. 
Bentley, Richard C. 
Bentley, Thomas. 
Benton, Daniel S. 
Benton, George. 
Bernhard, Abram. 



94 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1867 Bcrnhard, Lewis G. 1822 

1855 Berrey, Samuel, Jr. 1815 

1848 BertranJ, Joseph. 1838 
1858 Bew, William T. 1839 

1837 Bicknell, Theodore. 1815 
18G0 Bigelow, Charles Gregory. 1820 

1858 Bigelow, John Milton, 1852 

1849 Billings, Stephen A. 1817 
1841 Birch, Joseph. 184G 

1817 Birdsall, Thomas. 1830 
1841 Birmingham, William C. 1815 
1820 Birtch, E. M. 1818 
1855 Bisby, Hilton W. 1832 
1848 Bishop, George S. 1835 

1838 Blackall, Benjamin. 1832 

1838 Blackall, Robert. 1839- 
1831 Blackall, William R. 1831 

1839 Blair, J. C. 1831 
1837 Blanchard, Anthony. 1889 
1848 Blanchard, Edwin. 1855 

1844 Blanchard, Hamilton. 1855 

1837 Blanchard, Robert G. 1855 
1860 Blatner, Joseph H. 1850 
1857 Blatner, Solomon. 1854 

1838 Bleecker, Charles E. 1858 
1820 Bleecker, Charles M. 1854 

1859 Bleecker, Edward. 1853 

1818 Bleecker, George M. 1828 

1815 Bleecker, Henry. 1829 
1829 Bleecker, James. 1844 

1816 Bleecker, John Rutger. 1843 

1815 Bleecker, Rutger. 1821 

1816 Bleecker, Stephen V. R. 1828 
1823 Bleecker, William E. 1825 

1854 Blessing, A. Ten Eyck. 1833 
1838 Bloodgood, Edward. 1845 
1838 Bloodgood, Francis W. 1839 
1838 Bloodgood, George W. 1842 
1823 Bloodgood, James, 1830 
1815 Bloodgood, William. 1839 

1855 Boardman, Albert. 1815 
1855 Boardman, Charles A. 1857 
1848 Boardman, Francis. 1815 

1845 Boardman, George. 1850 
1822 Boardman, John. 1830 



Boardman, Stillman. 
Boardman, William. 
Boardman, William P. 
Bogan, J. A. 
Bogart, Alexander II. 
Bogart, Isaac. 
Bogart, James II. 
Bogart, John II. 
Bogart, John. 
Bogart, P. A. Grandon. 
Bogart, Stephen V. R. 
Bogart, William H. 
Boies, Abraham E. 
Boies, D. Artemas. 
Bonney, Edson. 
Bonney, George W. 
Booth, Dilazon. 
Booth, Dwight. 
Booth, Leander. 
Booth, Oscar H. 
Booth, William A. 
Booth, Wilmot A. 
Bordon, Holland. 
Bortle, John J. 
Bortle, Remington. 
Bortle, Stephen R. 
Bortle, Webster E. 
Bostwick, Oliver M. 
Bosworth, Caleb H. 
Bouck, Charles. 
Bouck, Gabriel. 
Boughton, John, 
Bouvgoin, Alphonse F. 
Bourgoin, Charles A. 
Bowne, John H. 
Boyd, Charles. 
Boyd, David J. 
Boyd, Edward H. 
Royd, Howard. 
Boyd, James. 
Boyd, James P. 
Boyd, James P., Jr. 
Boyd, James R. 
Boyd, James T. 
Boyd, John Scott. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



95 



1845 Boyd, John Campbell. 1817 

1829 Boyd, Thomas, 1818 

1829 Boyd, William. 1815 

1817 Boyd, William Scott. 1843 
1845 Boyd, William T. 1841 
1825 Bradford, Alexander W. 1841 
1825 Bradford, John M. 1859 

1818 Bradford, Stephen L. 1823 

1830 Bradley, George S. 1823 

1832 Bradshaw, Archibald. 1837 

1848 Bradt, Adrian G. 1860 

1838 Bradt, Frederick J. 1853 
1835 Bradt, William H. 1833 
1821 Bradwell, Stephen. 1833 
1841 Brainard, Albert. 1859 

1833 Brainard, William H. 1853 
1847 Brainard, AVilliam H. 1855 

1849 Bramhall, William L. 1859 

1828 Brammal, James. 1860 

1839 Bratt, C. Y. 1860 
1852 Bratt, Edgar D. 1849 

1838 Bratt, Garrit T. 1830 
1845 Bratt, Henry T. 1842 
1830 Bratt, James. 1823 

1829 Bratt, John. 1855 
1855 Brayton, Sanford B. 1818 
1817 Brayton, Thomas A. 1841 
1859 Breen, Edward A. 1816 

1849 Brennan, Edward T. 1819 

1839 Brewerton, George D. 1857 
1858 Brian, George B. Merlieux. 1849 

1830 Briare, Francis D. 1832 
1837 Brice, Alexander L. 18G0 
1815 Bridgen, Abraham T. E. 1815 
1852 Briggs, David C. 1821 

1850 Briggs, George C. 1827 

1851 Briggs, Isaac B. 183G 
1821 Briggs, Jerome. 1860 
1830 Briggs, William W. 1836 
1841 Brigham, Lyman. 1855 
18G2 Brimaghim, Benjamin. 1837 
1862 Brimaghim, Le Roy. 1853 
1815 Brinkerhoff, George. 1855 
1815 Brinkerhoff, Isaac. 1830 
1817 Brinkerhoff, Beekman. 1850 



Brinkerhoff, Cornelius. 
Brinkerhoff, Edward. 
Brinkerhoff, John. 
Brinkerhoff, John. 
Brinkerhoff, T. Van Wyck. 
Britton, Edward. 
Britton, Edward M. 
Brodhead, Alfred. 
Brodhead, John R. 
Brodhead, Thomas. 
Bronck, William. 
Bronk, Stephen. 
Bronson, Henry G. 
Bronson, Oliver. 
Brooks, Howard A. 
Brooks, James. 
Brooks, John R. 
Brooksby, James A. 
Browcr, Charles M. 
Brower, Frederic A. 
Brower, Henry D. 
Brower, John H. 
Brower, Walter Scott. 
Brown, Alexander H. 
Brown, Alfred H. C. 
Brown, Andrew E. 
Brown, Cbauncy. 
Brown, Edward H. 
Brown, Elias. 
Brown, Francis P, 
Brown, Frederic W. 
Brown, George H. 
Brown, Hamilton Bogart. 
Brown, Henry. 
Brown, Jacob S. 
Brown, James. 
Brown, James. 
Brown, James. 
Brown, James A. 
Brown, James M. 
Brown, John. 
Brown, John. 
Brown, John B. 
Brown, Joseph B. 
Brown, Judson B. 



96 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



1848 Brown, Judson D. 

1860 Brown, Lewis G. 
1844 Brown, Matthew. 
1821. Brown, Robert. 

1830 Brown, Robert C. 

1837 Brown, Robert H. 
1821 Brown, Rufus. 

1829 Brown, Stanton. 
1816 Brown, Stanton H. 
1843 Brown, Warren G. 
1834 Brown, AVilliam. 

1838 Brown, William Albert. 
1854 Brown, William C. 
1821 Brown, William E. 

1854 Brown, William T. 

1851 Brush, Thomas H. 

1839 Bryan, A. 
1859 Bryan, David C. 

1838 Bryan, John A. 
1823 Bryce, John. 

1855 Buchanan, Stephen A. 

1832 Buckbee, Edward T. 
1859 Buckbee, AVilliam S. 

1834 Buckrum, Caleb. 

1823 Buel, Charles. 
1827 Buel, Jesse. 

1852 Buel, Jesse Jr. 

1833 Buel, William P. 

1861 Buel, AVilliam P. 

1831 Bugby, Edward. 
1861 Bugden, George T. 

1858 Bulger, AVilliam F. 
1820 Bulkley, Charles D. 
1825 Bulkley, John. 

1824 Bulkley, Silas B. 

1835 Bullen, Lathrop. 

1830 Bullions, Alexander B. 

1831 Bullions, George H. 
1837 Bullions, Henry L. 
183G Bullions, James M. 

1839 Bullions, I. E. 
1833 Bullions, John C. 
1827 Bullions, William J. 

1853 Bullock, Charles C. 

1859 Bullock, Edgar S. 



1857 Bullock, John H. 
1836 Bullock, Matthew T. 
1819 Bullock, Thomas. 
1848 Bullock, William J. 

1838 Bulson, AVilliam. 

1830 Bunker, Edward E. 

1833 Burchan, Peter S. 

1819 Burchard, . 

1845 Burdick, Sullivan R. 

1851 Burgess, Charles E. 

1860 Burgess, Edgar. 

1834 Burgess, George H, 
1834 Burgess, William T. 

1861 Burhans, William AV. 
1827 Burke, Abraham C. 
1819. Burke, AVilliam. 
1856 Burnham, Guy C. J. 

1836 Burns, Cornelius. 

1853 Burns, Edward M. 
1861 Burns, Peter James. 
1818 Burr, George. 
1818 Burr, Henry. 

1841 Burrows, Randall K. 

1839 Burst, I. 

1832 Burt, Charles A. 

1837 Burt, David H. 

1829 Burt, Edward. 

1852 Burt, James A. 

1832 Burt, James D. 

1838 Burt, Silas. 
1855 Burt, William AV, 
1837 Burton, Benjamin. 

1831 Burton, Charles E. 

1833 Burton, Francis C. 
1860 Burton, George T. 

1830 Burton, James. 

1820 Burton, John I. 

1846 Burton, Walter. 
1848 Burton, William H. 
1859 Bush, Arcliibald McC. 
1827 Bush, AValter R. 

1854 Bush, AValter R., Jr. 
1859 Butler, James. 

1832 Butler, William H. A. 
1820 Buttre, AVilliam. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



97 



1831 Cady, Daniel IT. 1831 
1 8.5-4 Cady, Edwiu A. 182G 
185G Cady, William. 1854 

1832 Cafferty, James H. 1859 

1833 Cafferty, William C. 1848 
1827 Cagger, Tetcr. 1823 
1827 Caggev, William. 1853 
1839 Call, J. 1857 

1855 Callaghan, Jeremiah. 1830 

1829 Callaghan, Patrick. 1838 
1847 Callahan, John. 1846 

1856 Callender, David. 1853 

1857 Callender, Thomas Stewart. 1854 

1854 Calverley, John C. 1857 
1862 Cameron, Henry H. 1848 
1857 Cameron, Madison. 1836 

1830 Cameron, Eobert. 1822 

1829 Cammeyer, Charles A. 1834 

1849 Campbell, Alexander. 1855 
1826 Campbell, Alexander S. 1855 
1823 Campbell, Allan. 1846 
1822 Campbell, Archibald. 1834 
1857 Campbell, Archibald. 1850 
1818 Campbell, Daniel. 1850 

1830 Campbell, Duncan. 1857 
1838 Campbell, George L. 1850 
1818 Campbell, James. 1848 
1830 Campbell, John. 1854 

1834 Campbell, John. 1834 

1850 Campbell, Joseph. 1848 
1860 Campbell, Robert James. 1857 

1856 Campbell, Thomas Cooper. 1854 
1817 Campbell, William. 1845 
1847 Campbell, William James. 1856 

1855 Canady, Jeremiah. 1827 
1838 Candce, Joseph II. 1846 
1838 Candee, Lyman P. 1819 

1852 Canedy, AVilliam S. 1827 

1853 Canfield, Charles E. 1846 

1857 Canfield, Henry M. 1830 
1822 Cantine, John. 1817 
1853 Care, William G. 1829 

1832 Carlow, George. 1829 

1833 Carmichael, James. 1838 
1860 Carmichael, .James. 1824 

13 



Carmichael, John. 
Carmichael, Peter. 
Carpenter, Charles W. 
Carpenter, Edward A. 
Carpenter, George. 
Carpenter, George W. 
Carpentei-, George W., Jr. 
Carpenter, Henry Allen. 
Carpenter, James H. 
Carpenter, William M. 
Carr, Benjamin W. 
Carr, William G. 
Carrol, Charles. 
Carroll, Henry. 
Carroll, John N. 
Carson, Robert H. 
Carson, William. 
Carter, Charles W. 
Carter, Edward. 
Carter, Edward. 
Carter, George W. 
Carter, Robert. 
Cary, Albert. 
Cary, Edward. 
Cary, Edward H. 
Cary, Egbert. 
Cary, Julius H. 
Cary, Robert C. 
Cary, Walter. 
Case, Charles J. 
Case, Edward M. 
Case, Franklin. 
Case, Henry S. 
Case, James M. 
Case, Jonathan H. 
Case, Joseph H. 
Case, Sheldon. 
Case William. 
Case, William D. 
Cashman, Thomas H. 
Cassady, James. 
Cassidy, Ambrose S. 
Cassidy, Charles. 
Cassidy, DeWitt C. 
Cassidy, Henry. 



98 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1864 Cassidy, John. 1822 

1817 Cassidy, John P. 1822 

1827 Cassidy, William. 1859 

1847 Cassidy, William. 1829 

1857 Causey, John W. 1836 

1858 Cavut, William. 1861 
1825 Center, Alfred 11. 1829 

1817 Center, Anson II. 1886 

1818 Center, Edward. 1861 
1820 Center, William. 1834 

1847 Chamberlain, Henry W. 1832 
1827 Chapin, Erastus S. 1853 
1827 Chapin, Josiah. 1851 

1859 Chapin, Ogden. 1851 

1848 Chapin, Robert H. 1830 
1827 Chapin, Samuel W, 1835 
1831 Chapman, Alonzo. 1835 

1819 Chapman, Charles. 1834 

1849 Chapman, Charles B. 1843 

1860 Chapman, Clarence C. 1858 

1849 Chapman, George Henry. 1847 

1834 Chapman, Geerge M. 1815 
1846 Chapman, James G. 1831 

1850 Chapman, William. 1848 

1833 Charles, Daniel D. T. 18G2 
1860 Charles, Franklin F. 1850 

1835 Charles, George H. 1839 

1834 Charles, George, Jr. 1861 
1860 Chase, George B. 1855 
1852 Chase, George E. 1815 

1835 Chassel, John. 1843 
1848 Chatfield, Abiram. 1838 

1851 Cheever, Calvin R. 1859 
1830 Cheever, Edwin H. 1851 

1851 Cheever, Henry M. 1834 
1838 Chescbro, Joshua G. I860 

1820 Chichester, Arthur. 1852 
1850 Childs, John H. 1854 

1852 Chittenden, Edwin S. 1852 
1834 Christian, George H. 1852 
1846 Christian, John A. 1852 
1846 Christian, AVilliam D. 1817 

1838 Christie, George. 1823 

1839 Christie, M. 1817 
1838 Christie, William. 1819 



Chrystie, James. 
Chrystie, Thomas W. 
Church, John. 
Churchill, Alansing C. 
Churchill, Charles R. 
Churchill, Emmeth. 
Churchill, Erasmus D. 
Churchill, James E. 
Churchill, John R. 
Churchill, Rensselaer E. 
Churchill, William H. 
Clapp, Augustus A. 
Clapp, Charles M. 
Clapp, Edwin A. 
Clapp, Noah, 
Clapp, Oliver W. 
Clapp, Ruel Shepard. 
Clark, Adrian D. 
Clark, Charles G. 
Clark, Charles Henry. 
Clark, E. Clinton, Jr. 
Clark, Edward. 
Clark, Edward II. 
Clark, Edwin Forrest. 
Clark, Francis. 
Clark, George. 
Clark, H. D. 
Clark, Jesse V. 
Clark, Joseph S. 
Clark, Joseph W. 
Clark, Joseph W. 
Clark, Nathan, Jr. 
Clark, Stephen W. 
Clark, Thomas L., Jr. 
Clarke, George. 
Clarke, John. 
Clay, George. 
Cleaveland, Frederick. 
Cleveland, Charles W 
Cleveland, Frederick. 
Cleveland, George. 
Clinton, DcAVitt, .Ir. 
Clinton, Franklin. 
Clinton, George W. 
Clinton, James. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



99 



1862 Clock, Emory. 


1826 


1841 Clute, William K. 


1821 


1844 Coates, Alfred W. 


1827 


1846 Coates, Charles H. 


1848 


1848 Coates, Edwin M. 


1848 


1848 Coates, Stephen V. 


1857 


1832 Cobb, Elijah. 


1849 


1850 Cobb, AVilliam 11. 


, 1835 


1853 Coburn, Peter, Jr. 


1846 


1823 Cochran, William D. 


1828 


1853 Cochrane, Edward P. 


1856 


1818 Cock, Isaac. 


1851 


1835 Cockburn, Edwin. 


1827 


1827 Cockburn, William. 


1826 


1836 Coffee, Alfred. 


1833 


1836 Coffee, William F. 


1837 


1802 Cogswell, Ledyard. 


1836 


1861 Cogswell, Mason F. 


1854 


1858 Cohn, Gilbert. 


1841 


1800 Cohn, Henry. 


1837 


1853 Cohn, Levi. 


1853 


1830 Coile, John. 


1846 


1849 Coile, Simon V. 


1851 


1835 Colburn L. Wells. 


1852 


1800 Colbut, Michael. 


1843 


1848 Cole, Augustus G. 


1853 


1854 Cole, Charles W. 


1858 


1861 Cole, Frederick W. 


1853 


1854 Cole, Henry Martyn. 


1836 


1822 Cole, James. 


1852 


1832 Cole, John J. 


1840 


1861 Cole, Mark W. 


1853 


1845 Cole, Walter D. 


1836 


1831 Cole, William. 


1821 


1852 Coley, Alfred C. 


1838 


1853 Coley, John AV. 


1845 


1839 Collier, George N. 


1849 


1835 Collier, James H. 


1821 


1834 Collier, John C. 


1822 


1837 Collier, Ozias G. 


1855 


1858 Collin, Norton P. 


1821 


1852 Collins, Charles A. 


1821 


1853 Collins, Peter H. 


1815 


1852 Collins, William D. 


1853 


1846 Colt, Joseph S. 


1851 



Colton, Erastus. 
Colvin, Andrew J. 
Colvin, Henry. 
Colvin, James Ailing. 
Colvin, Norwood Ailing. 
Colvin, Verplank. 
Comstock, Albert. 
Comstock, Alex. Cromwell. 
Condon, Richard J. 
Condie, Daniel T. 
Condon, Thomas Hale. 
Cone, Edward R. 
Conkling, Aurelian. 
Conkling, Frederick A. 
Conkling, Hubbel D. 
Conkling, John P. 
Conkling, Spencer. 
Conley, John. 
Conley, Peter. 
Conners, Elias, 
Conway, Martin D. 
Cook, Asher, .Jr. 
Cook, Charles. 
Cook, Ezra E. 
Cook, Isaac Ives. 
Cook, James Renwick. 
Cook, John. 
Cook, Joseph McK. 
Cook, La Fayette. 
Cook, AV alter. 
Cook, William H. 
Cook, William J., Jr. 
Cooke, Beekman. 
Cooke, John. 
Cooley, Francis B. 
Cooney, John. 
Coonley, George L. 
Cooper, Alfred. 
Cooper, Charles. 
Cooper, Edwin B. 
Cooper, Goldsborough. 
Cooper, Richard. 
Cooper, William. 
Corbett, Thomas. 
Corbiere, George. 



100 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1852 Corbicrc, Thomas H. 1850 

1837 Corbit, Daniel. 1841 

1836 Corbit, Henry. 1851 
1834 Cornell, James. 1846 
1831 Cornell, William W. 1848 

1845 Cosby, James P. 1848 

1846 Costigan, Daniel 0. 1846 

1847 Costigan, William Carton. 1837 

1849 Costigan, William I. 1838 
1888 Cotes, John C. 1862 

1850 Cotrell, Edgar. 1818 

1848 Couch, Charles. 1830 
1861 Coulson, Frederic A. 1829 

1851 Coulson, Henry. 1848 
1861 Coulson, J. Frank. 1810 
1841 Coulson, John B. 1839 
1841 Coulson, Robert B. 1819 

1851 Coulson, Thomas, Jr. 1861 
1850 Coulson, William J. 1838 
1843 Courtney, Joel. 1846 

1848 Courtney, Joseph, Jr. 1846 
1854 Courtney, Robert. 1818 
1839 Courtney, Samuel G. 1849 

1849 Courtright, Edward M. 1823 

1852 Courtright, Horace G. 1851 

1854 Courtright, John H. 1830 
1848 Courtright, Mizeal E. 1848 

1829 Covert, James. 1841 

1830 Covert, Peter H. 1856 
1830 Covert, William C. 1856 
1829 Cowden, David. 1850 
1841 Coyn, John P. 1860 
1861 Craft, Benjamin Franklin. 1846 
1841 Craft, Charles D. 1830 
1841 Craft, Charles G. 1830 
1848 Craft, George F. 1846 
1826 Craig, James R. 1838 
1826 Craig, John. 1853 

1855 Crandell, Frank. 1857 

1853 Crandell, Homer. 1839 

1838 Crane, Hector II. 1838 

1837 Crane, Henry. 1819 
1836 Crane, Henry D. 1845 
1836 Crane, Hiram A. 1849 
1859 Crannell, Delavan. 1854 



Crannell, Edwin. 
Crannell, Francis F. 
Crannell, Monroe. 
Crannell, Robert W. 
Crannell, William Wiuslow. 
Crapo, Angelo. 
Crapo, Charles H. 
Crapo, Edgar. 
Crapo, John M. 
Crawford, Ezekiel McI. 
Crawford, Lemuel. 
Crawford, Stephen G. 
Crew, John L. 
Crippen, Thomas W. 
Cruttendcn, Robert G. 
Cruttenden, Thomas R. 
Cruttenden, Warren. 
Crocker, Frederic W. 
Crofts, Robert T. L. 
Cruikshank, James. 
Cruikshank, Robert. 
Cropsey, Jasper E. 
Crosby, Edward W. 
Crosby, George. 
Crosby, John. 
Croswell, Horace. 
Croswell, John A. 
Croswell, John K. 
Crouch, Charles Philetus. 
Crounse, Edward. 
Crounse, Josiah. 
Ci-ounse, Peter H. 
Crummey, Edward C. 
Cummings, Gilbert. 
Cumming, James. 
Cummings, William. 
Cunliff, Simeon. 
Cunningham, George. 
Cunningham, John II. 
Cunningliam, W. 0. 
Cure, Peter. 
Curreen, John. 
Curtiss, Daniel G. 
Curtiss, Daniel Y. 
Curtiss, J. Henry. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



101 



1841 Curtiss, Joseph S. 


1830 Davis, Nathaniel. 


1850 Curtiss, Norman S. 


1860 Davis, Nicholas H. 


1845 Curtiss, William J. 


1833 Davis, Robert. 


1858 Cushman, Don Alonzo. 


1850 Davis, Robert H. 


1821 Cushman, John W. 


1860 Davis, Robert Johnson 


1832 Cushman, Paul. 


1861 Davis, Rowland A. 


1830 Cushman, Robert S. 


1838 Davis, Thomas B. 


1823 Cushman, William M. 


1825 Davis, William. 


1856 Cutler, James 0. 


1832 Davis, William. 


1815 Cuyler, Augustus. 


1847 Davis, William H. 


1847 Cuyler, Charles Melville. 


1854 Davis, William E. 


1818 Cuyler, Frederick. 


1837 Davison, Joseph A. 


1838 Cuyler, Jacob C. 


1845 Davoth, Michael J. 


1839 Cuyler, Theodore J. 


1841 Dayton, Charles R. 


185G Dalton, William A. 


1859 Dean, Amos Hammond 


1819 Daniels, Henry. 


1860 Dean, Frederic A. 


1825 Daniels, James AV. 


1818 Dean, Henry. 


1849 Daniels, Robert Lincoln. 


1816 Dean, William Eaton. 


1825 Daniels, Warner. 


1855 Decker, Marshall. 


1844 Darling, William R. 


1843 De Forest, Charles A. 


1854 Dash, George J. 


1854 De Forest, Edward. 


1852 Davenport, J. Alfred. 


1850 De Forrest, De Witt. 


1829 Davidson, Alexander. 


1850 De Forrest, Henry A. 


1829 Davidson, Alexander. 


1831 De Freest, Clinton. 


1846 Davidson, Alexander. 


1852 De Freest, John K, 


1836 Davidson, Darius. 


1831 De Freest, Lorenzo D. 


1853 Davidson, George, Jr. 


1852 De Freest, Matthew. 


1828 Davidson, Gilbert C. 


1839 De Groff, A. 


1832 Davidson, John McB. 


1837 De GroflF, Charles E. 


1851 Davidson, AVilliara Humphrey. 


1837 De Groff, Griffin State. 


1846 Davis, Abner Graham. 


1838 De Groff, James E. 


1836 Davis, Abraham S. 


1836 Delahanty, Daniel. 


1859 Davis, Benjamin Brownell. 


1843 Delahanty, Martin. 


1846 Davis, Charles. 


1835 Delahanty, Michael. 


1851 Davis, Charles 0. 


1861 Delamater, Nicholas B. 


1850 Davis, Charles W. 


1854 Delehanty, Daniel M. 


1856 Davis, Edward C. 


1827 Delevan, Edward H. 


1857 Davis, Edward McC. 


1855 Delevan, John S. 


1832 Davis, Francis A. 


1829 Denning, AVilliam W. 


1830 Davis, Henry L. 


1858 Denniston, Garrit D. 


1854 Davis, James, Jr. 


1834 Denniston, Garrit V. 


1824 Davis, John. 


1815 Denniston, Isaac, Jr. 


1838 Davis, James L. G. 


1858 Denniston, Visscher. 


1830 Davis, Joseph. 


1833 Depuy, John J. 


1862 Davis, Joseph S. 


1848 Demarest, James Ji-. 



102 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1856 Deuchar, William. 
1854 Deuel, Eugene A. 
1831 Deuel, John G. W. 
1831 Deuel, Silas W. 
1853 Devol, George E. 
1827 De Witt, Charles E. 
1850 De Witt, Dudley W. 

1836 De Witt, Ephraim. 

1831 De Witt, Ephraim II. 

1817 De Witt, Jacob V. L. 
1819 De Witt, James B, 

1832 De Witt, James R. 
1841 De Witt, Richard V., Jr. 
1839 De Witt, R. Y. 

1818 De Witt, Silas. 
1830 De Witt, William L. 

1857 Dexter, Isaac Newton. 
1856 Dexter, Theodore. 
1832 Deyermand, John. 
1835 Deyermand, William. 

1859 Dibble, Frederic. 

1830 Dibblee, Frederick E. 

1831 Dibblee, James. 

1845 Dickerman, John S. 

1837 Dickinson, Manco Capac. 

1846 Dickson, Walter. 
1852 Dickson, William J. 
1851 Dillingham, William. 

1851 Dillon, Charles. 

1846 Dillon, Horatio P. 

1852 Dillow, Richard, Jr. 

1855 Dinger, Lewis P. 
1854 Disney, John Thomas. 
1839 Dix, Francis P. 

1856 Dobler, Albert Frederic. 

1860 Dodge, Staats. 

1847 Dollar, Conrad T. 

1830 Don, Peter C. 
1860 Donahoe, James. 

1831 Donelan, William. 
1828 Donelly, Peter M. 
1839 Dorman, Jacob. 
1815 Dorr, Alfred. 

1819 Dorsey, Robert R. 

1820 Dougherty, Charles H. 



1833 Douglas, Byron. 

1834 Douglas, Franklin. 

1837 Douglas, George. 

1858 Douglas, George P. 
1836 Douglas, Henry F. 

1859 Douglas, Oscar W. 
1827 Douglas, Robert J. 
1827 Douglas, William A. 
1853 Douglas, Charles H. 
1853 Douglas, George. 

1821 Douw, John De Peyster. 
1849 Douw, J. De Peyster, Jr. 
1852 Douw, Volckert P. 

1846 Dowd, Charles W. 
1833 Downing, George. 
1832 Downing, William W. 

1838 Dox, Alexander H. 
1844 Dox, Dudley W. 

1839 Dox, Hamilton B. 

1847 Dox, Henry B. ' 

1827 Dox, Peter. 

1828 Drake, Garrit. 
1838 Duel, Jeremiah. 
1831 Duel, Thorn. 
1889 Duell, G. 

1821 Duer, Edward A. 

1827 Duer, John K. 

1821 Duer, William Denning. 
1843 Duesler, George L. 
1820 DuflFau, Francis T. 

1828 Duffau, John C. 
1827 Duffy, Edward. 
1818 Duffy, James. 

1861 Dumarry, Richard P. 
1855 Duncan, Eugene. 
1850 Duncan, James, Jr. 

1848 Duncan, James R. 
1824 Duncan, Radcliff H. 
1820 Duncan, Richard. 

1835 Dunham, Warden. 

1836 Dunlop, Alexander. 

1829 Dunlop, Archibald A. 
1838 Dunlop, Edward. 
1824 Dunlop, James. 
1824 Dunlop, Robert. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



103 



1853 Dunn, Charles A. 1820 
1857 Dunn, Charles E. 1839 
1819 Dunn, Edward H. 1852 
1821 Dunn, Henry P. 1818 
1841 Dunn, James O. 1834 

1817 Dunn, John. 1825 
1819 Dunn, Richard F. 1818 
1830 Dunn, William R. 1832 

1854 Durant, Allen B. 1844 
1853 Durant, Thomas F. 1833 

1855 Durant, William. 1843 
1853 Durfce, Cyrus R. 1830 

1830 Durrie, Daniel S. 1827 

1831 Durrie, Horace. 1834 
1830 Dusenbery, Absalom T. 1831 
1829 Dusenbery, Benjamin. 1839 
1829 Dusenbery, Henry. 1831 
1823 Dusenbery, Richard J. 1830 
1826 Dutcher, Augustus H. 1859 
1839 Dutcher, J. 1846 

1818 Dutcher, Salem. 1847 
1826 Dutcher, William C. 1857 
1853 Eagles, John. 1831 
1837 Fames, Marshal H. 1823 
1862 Earl, Waldo. 1817 
1839 Easton, Charles P. 1824 
1818 Easton, John. 1835 
1853 Eaton, Calvin W. 1856 
1849 Eaton, Charles W. 1852 
1802 Eaton, Edward. 1838 
1862 Eaton, Edward C. 1825 
1853 Eaton, Elliot W. 1860 
1802 Eaton, Henry. 1849 
1861 Eaton, John E. 1819 
1828 Eddy, John R. 1837 
1800 Edson, John Tracy. 1836 
1848 Edwards, Alfred. 1838 
1843 Edwards, Carlton. 1849 
1851 Edwards, James. 1823 

1848 Edwards, James, Jr. 1824 

1849 Egleston, George D. 1821 

1828 Eights, Abraham C. W. 1822 
1823 Elliot, Edward. 1840 

1829 Elliot, Hugh D. 1829 
1817 Elliot, Isaac D. 1862 



Elliot, .Tohn. 
Elliot, Robert. 
Ellison, George. 
Elmendorf, John. 
Elmcndorf, Nicholas. 
Elmendorf, Peter E. 
Elmore, David W. 
Enders, Peter. 
Enders, Samuel R. 
Ensign, Martin. 
Ensign, William J. 
Ertsbevger, James. 
Erwin, David W. 
Erwin, George. 
Erwin, Hugh W. 
Erwin, John G. 
Erwin, William. 
Esmay, Isaac. 
Esmay, Isaac. 
Esmay, Peter. 
Estes, David C. 
Evans, Frederic A. 
Evans, Henry. 
Eveleth, John C. 
Evertsen, Bernard. 
Evertsen, Evert. 
Evei'tsen, John B. 
Ewing, Lawson. 
Fabre, Hector. 
Fairchild, David. 
Fairchild, Sidney T. 
Falk, William Christopher. 
Falkey, Charles H. 
Fanning, Dianthus, 
Fanning, Frederick H. 
Fanning, Sidney. 
Farley, George C. 
Farlin, Dudley. 
Farnham, Franklin. 
Farrel, Daniel A. 
Fasset, Amos S. 
Fasset, Charles A. 
Fasset, James A. 
Fasset, William N. 
Fassett, Lawrence T. 



104 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1862 Fassett, Theodore S. 


1850 


1853 Fassett, AVilliam H. 


1857 


1838 Fay, Albert. 


1830 


1830 Fay, Alfred. 


1830 


1828 Fay, De Witt C. 


1841 


1830 Fay, Henry B. 


1855 


1838 Fay, John W. 


1848 


1853 Fearey, Thomas H. 


1841 


1853 Fearey, William 11. 


1832 


1857 Feary, Andrew AV. 


1829 


1860 Feary, George D. 


1859 


1853 Featherly, John Henry. 


1855 


1855 Fellows, Frank H. 


1845 


1852 Fellows, J. Addison. 


1854 


1851 Fellows, J. Harris. 


1824 


1833 Feltman, John C. 


1839 


1835 Feltman, AVilliam P. 


1819 


1817 Fenn, James M. 


1854 


1818 Fenn, T. Jeiferson. 


1832 


1838 Ferguson, Charles. 


1832 


1829 Ferguson, Robert. 


1837 


1856 Ferry, Walter J. 


1826 


1841 Ferris, Charles L. 


1831 


1832 Ferris, John M. 


1828 


1833 Ferris, Richard B. 


1831 


1841 Ferris, AVilliam A. 


1835 


1841 Fetherstone, J. 


1859 


1827 Fiddler, John T. 


1838 


1829 Fiddler, Robert. 


1848 


1834 Fidler, Joseph H. 


1846 


1835 Fields, Joseph. 


1819 


1848 Finch, Charles H. 


1820 


1839 Fink, Edward. 


1848 


1831 Fink, Frederick. 


1816 


1836 Fish, Charles D. 


1853 


1861 Fish, Frederic R. 


1858 


1854 Fish, Henry H. 


1832 


1851 Fish, James L. 


1823 


1854 Fish, Roswell. 


1857 


1856 Fisher, Gotlieb. 


1849 


1855 Fisher, James A. 


1849 


1849 Fisk, Anthony AV. 


1824 


1849 Fisk, Edward S. 


1849 


1824 Fisk, Samuel C. 


1815 


1850 Fitzpatrick, Daniel C. 


1850 



Fitzpatrick, Michael. 
Flacke, Clarke. 
Flagg, Henry F. 
Flag, Thomas B. AV. 
Flagler, Edgar 0. 
Flagler, George AV. 
Flagler, Isaac V. 
Flower, Aaron P. 
Fly, Anson B. 
Fly, Eli J. M. 
Poland, Preston A. 
Poland, Worthington. 
Fonda, Christopher Y. 
Fonda, Cornelius. 
Fonda, John. 
Fonda, IMarcus B. 
Fonda, AVilliam H. 
Fonda, AVilliam J. 
Fondey, Charles T. 
Fondey, Issac. 
Fondey, Theodore. 
Fondey, Townsend S. 
Fondey, AVilliam B. 
Foot, Elisha. 
Foot, George F. 
Foote, Henry. 
Forby, Eli P. 
Ford, Benjamin S. 
Ford, Charles W. 
Ford, David W. 
Ford, Edward. 
Ford, Eliakim. 
Ford, Eliakim AV. 
Ford, John W. 
Ford, Sweton, G. 
Ford, AVilliam R. 
Forsyth, Douglass. 
Forsyth, AVilliam. 
Forsyth, AVilliam D. 
Fossard, George H. 
Fowler, John P. 
Fowler, Philemon H. 
Fowler, Stephen S. 
Fowler, AVilliam. 
Fowler, AVilliam. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



105 



1850 Fowler, Wmiam D. 1835 
1849 Fowler, William P. 1855 
1825 Fox, Albert R. 1857 
1848 Frame, William H. 1832 
1819 Fraser, Alexander. 1832 
18G2 Fraser, Frederic. 1841 
183G Frasier, John T. 1833 
1802 Frazier, Leonard A. 1833 

1852 Frecdlander, William. 1831 

1854 Freeman, Alfred H. 1858 
1838 Freeman, Charles. 1855 

1838 Freeman, Edward. 1832 

1855 Freeman, James. 1832 

1839 Freeman, 0. 184G 
1838 Freeman, Robert G. 1849 
1845 Freeman, Vv'illiam S. 1861 
1825 French, Abel. 1846 
1857 French, Isaac V. 1829 
1819 French, James M. 1851 

1853 Friedlander, AYilliam. 1851 
1860 Friend, Alexander. 1853 
1860 Friend, Joseph R. 1821 
1834 Frisby, Edward. 1815 
1845 Frisby, Eleazer. 1847 
1834 Frisby, John B. 1832 
1834 Frisby, Levi C. 1826 
1838 Frost, Daniel M. 1821 

1830 Frost, James. 1830 
1862 Frost, John H. 1815 
1836 Frost, John S. 1854 
1862 Frost, Lott, Jr. 1857 
1848 Frost, Mark W. 1826 
18G1 Frost, AVilliam B. 1837 
1860 Frost, William R. 1839 
1859 Frothingham, Charles F. 1840 

1831 Frothingham, Thomas. 1837 
1845 Frothingham, Worthington. 1841 
1825 Fry, Charles B. 1853 

1851 Fry, Charles B. 1854 
183G Fry, Joseph. 1815 
1817 Fryer, Aaron. 1854 
1851 Fryer, Alexander S. 1837 
1859 Fryer, Charles L. 1851 
1859 Fryer, Robert L. 1855 
1851 Fryer, William J. 1851 

14 



Fuhr, John. 
FuUei', Augustus 0. 
Fuller, Charles II. 
Fuller, Jacob E. 
FuUei", Joseph W. 
Fuller, Josiah P. 
Fuller, Julius A. 
Fuller, Samuel S. 
Furlong, John. 
Gaffncy, John. 
GaflFney, Thomas M. 
Galligan, William. 
Gallup, Albert S. 
Gallup, Edwin C. 
Gallup, Edwin G. 
Gallup, John E. 
Gallup, Miner. 
Galusha, John J. 
Gambel, Frederick. 
Gambel, John. 
Gamble, Louis M. 
Gansevoort, Guert. 
Gansevoort, Henry. 
Gansevoort, Henry. 
Gansevoort, Hun. 
Gansevoort, Leonard H. 
Gansevoort, Peter L. 
Gansevoort, Stanwix. 
Gansevoort, Ten Eyck. 
Gardner, David D. 
Gardner, Thomas E. 
Gardner, Townsend. 
Garfield, John H. 
Garfield, John N. 
Garfield, L. N. 
Garfield, Nathaniel L. 
Garnsey, Cyrus. 
Garnsey, J. Spencer. 
Garagon, Joseph T. 
Gates Cornelius. 
Gates, George T. 
Gates, Joseph E. 
Gates, Levi S. 
Gates, Philip. 
Gavitt, John C. 



lOG 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1832 


Gaylorc 


, Charles. 


1832 


Gaylorc 


, George D. 


1834 


Geary, 


George. 


1854 


Gebhar( 


i, Edwin. 


1830 


Geer, Darius. 


1818 


Geer, 11 


arold. 


1852 


Gellan, 


James, Jr. 


1887 


Genet, Edmd J. 


1837 


Genet, i 


aeorge C. 


1844 


George, 


James. 


1841 


George, 


AVilliam. 


1848 


Geran, 


Miles. 


1831 


Germon 


d, Morgan. 


185G 


Gervin, 


Joseph H. 


182G 


Gibbons 


, George S. 


1846 


Gibbons 


, George W. 


1841 


Gibbons 


, Henry B. 


1847 


Gibbons 


, Hogan. 


1843 


Gibbons 


, James. 


1830 


Gibbons 


, John B. 


1830 Gibbons 


, Thomas J. 


1828 


Gibbons 


, Washington. 


1857 


Gibbons 


, William Smith. 


1801 


Gibbs, Albert L. 


1834 


Gibson, 


Anthony M. 


1834 


Gibson, 


John, Jr. 


1855 


Gibson, 


Peter M. 


1840 


Gibson, 


Joseph, Jr. 


1846 


Gibson, 


William C. 


1834 Gibson, 


William J. 


1830 


Gibson, 


William L. 


1845 


GiflFord, 


Charles E. 


1801 


Gilbert, 


Frederic L. 


1833 


Gilchris 


t, Ambrose S. 


1818 


Gilchrist, Edward. 


1801 


Gilette, 


Edwin T. 


1831 


Gill, Allen II. 


1818 


Gill, Ch 


arles W. 


1847 


Gill, David Jackson. 


1843 


Gill, George C. 


1824 Gillespie, Charles D. 


1824 


Gillespie, Eugene. 


1800 


Gillespie, William Henry 


1830 


Gillis, Lesler. 


1846 


Gilson, 


Joseph, Jr. 



1850 Gladding, Charles. 
1830 Gladding, Daniel P. 

1830 Gladding, Edward W. 

1829 Gladding, Freeman. 

1831 Gladding, William J. 

1824 Gleason, John. 
1819 Gleason, Michael. 

1825 Glen, Cornelius. 

1839 Godd, J. E. 

1827 Godley, John S. 

1834 Godley, Richard. 

1835 Goeway, Erastus. 
1817 Goeway, Henry. 

1830 Goeway, James M. 
1817 Goeway, Philip. 
1844 Goeway, Henry. 

1853 Goeway, James Nelson. 

1850 Golden, Gilbert AV. 

1853 Golden, Thomas A. 

1840 Gooden, A. 

1851 Goodrich, Edward. 

1831 Goodrich, John M. 

1841 Goodwin, Albert F. 
1850 Goodwin, Benjamin B. 

1854 Goodwin, Seth D. 
1840 Goodwin, Thomas L. 

1854 Goodyear, George G. 

1828 Goold, Henry. 
1831 Goold, Henry H. 
1837 Goold, James E. 

1855 Gordon, George E. 
1830 Goss, Epliraim L. 

1837 Goss, George W. 

1838 Gott, George Pearson. 
1830 Gott, John. 

1838 Gott, William A. 
1834 Gough, Alexander C. 
1833 Gough, Daniel D. 
1819 Gough, James. 
1824 Gough, John T. 
1819 Gough, W^illiam. 
1821 Gough, AVilliam, Jr. 
1802 Gould, Aniliony. 
1815 Gould, BoDJamin. 
1815 Gould, Charles. 



LIST OF SUDENTS. 



107 



1855 Gould, Charles. 1859 

1831 Gould, David. 1818 
184i) Gould, James L., Jr. 1801 
1853 Gould, Jason. 1845 
1839 Gould, J. E. 1850 
1850 Gould, John. 1818 
1826 Gould, Jolm S. 1847 
1845 Gould, Joseph C. 1820 

1836 Gould, William C. 1800 
1853 Gould, William, Jr. 1853 
1817 Gourlay, James, Jr. 1830 
1825 Gourlay, William B. 1852 

1852 Gourlay, AVilliara J. 1844 

1830 Gowie, Charles G. 1835 
1838 Gracie, Edward. 1858 

1832 Graham, Theodore V. 1854 
1815 Graham, Van Wyck. 1858 

1843 Granger, George Gebbi. 1852 

1837 Granger, Rodney. 1841 
1850 Grant, Frederic F. 1852 

1853 Grafwick, William H. 1850 

1854 Graves, Anthony G., Jr, 1831 
1841 Gray, Adam R. 1827 

1855 Gray, Charles M. 1852 
1854 Gray, Daniel Alexander. 1850 
1841 Gray, Israel. 1837 

1850 Gray, James H. 1850 
1854 Gray, Niel. 1822 

1831 Gray, Rufus. 1849 

1830 Gray, William. 1825 
1845 Greaves, Charles G. 1830 

1831 Green, Peckham H. 1830 

1829 Gi'eene, Alfred S. 1831 

1830 Greene, Henry F. 1824 

1832 Greene, James. 1828 

1851 Greene, John C." 1835 

1834 Greene, Joseph H. 1818 

1844 Greene, Lyman R. 1831 

1831 Greene, Rowland. 1824 
1800 Greer, John. 1856 
1849 Greer, Thomas H. 1859 
1848 Gregory, Alexander. 1849 
1822 Gregory, Alexander M. 1859 

1835 Gregory, Benjamin. 1848 
1848 Gregory, David E. 1853 



Gregory, Edgar S. 
Gregory, Edward. 
Gregory, Frank B. 
Gregory, Henry T. 
Gregory, James R. 
Gregory, Sherlock. 
Gregory, Spencer S. 
Gregory, Stephen P. 
Gregory, AVilliam R. 
Gregory, AVorthington. 
Griffin, Christopher C. 
Griffin, Coleman J. 
Griffin, Ezra C. 
Griffin, Jacob. 
Griffin, John L. 
Griffin, Seth E. 
Griffin, Stephen Henry. 
Griffin, Thomas. 
Griffing, Abraham S. 
Griffing, David J. 
Griffing, Seth E. 
Griffiths, Evan T. 
Griffiths, Griffith W. 
Grimwood, Henry W. 
Grindrod, John. 
Grinlinton, Robert. 
Griswold, Henry. 
Groesbeeck, Abraham. 
Groesbeeck, Augustus. 
Groesbeeck, Charles E. 
Groesbeeck, Charles F. 
Groesbeeck, David. 
Groesbeeck, David. 
Groesbeeck, Jacob H. 
Groesbeeck, John D. 
Groesbeeck, Oi'lando. 
Groesbeeck, Stephen. 
Groesbeeck, Sylvester. 
Groesbeeck, William H. 
Grogan, Thomas J. 
Groot, James. 
Groot, Nicholas. 
Gross, Eugene P. 
Gross, James II. 
Gross, Samuel S. 



108 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1854 Grovesteen, Daniel D. 1820 

1862 Hadley, Charles. 1824 

1854 Iladley, Clement L. 18G0 

1835 Iladley, George. 1822 

1851 Hadley, Joshua E. 1857 

1819 Haff, Heeman. 1857 
1854 Hague, Arnold. 1855 

1852 Haight, William I. 1849 
1856 Hale, Lorenzo. 1821 

1854 Hale, William H. 1819 
1838 Hall, Francis B. 1829 

1856 Hall, George. 1835 
1821 Hall, John Tayler. 1817 

1857 Hall, Lewis B. 1848 

1856 Hall, Parker. 1849 
1846 Hall, Richard Henry. 1853 
1846 Hall, Theodore P. 18G1 

1849 Hall, William F. 1861 

1850 Hall, William T. 1858 

1836 Hallenbake, Christopher. 1846 

1829 Hallenbake, Garrit G. 1853 

1825 Hallenbake, Jasper S. 1854 

1850 Hallcnbeck, Edwin I. 1827 

1857 Hallenbeck, John. 1858 

1855 Hallenbeck, M. 0. 1853 

1860 Halley, Austin M. 1841 
1857 Halley, Ebenezer, Jr. 1858 

1861 Halley, William S. 1831 

1851 Halloway, William W. 1836 
1857 Halsted, Mandeville. 1858 

1838 Halsted, Mina B. 1846 

1839 Halstell, jNI. 1854 
1854 Hamburger, Isaac. 1836 
1818 Hamilton, Alfred. 1845 
1834 Hamilton, Fayette. 1827 
1850 Hamilton, William A. 1830 

1852 Hamlin, Samuel J. 1822 
1843 Hammond, Lazarus S. 1858 
1843 Hammond, Reuben II. 1829 

1830 Hammond, Thomas R. 1857 

1826 Hammond, Wells S. 1857 

1820 Hand, Aaron H. 1857 
1815 Hand, Epenetus B. 1829 

1837 Hand, George. 1841 
1815 Hand, Isaac P. 1830 



Hand, Lemuel P. B. 
Hanford, AVilliam L. 
Hans, John. 
Harbeck, John. 
Harcourt, Alfred. 
Harcourt, George. 
Harcourt, John R. 
Hare, Emerson D. 
Hare, Silas. 
Haren, Frederick. 
Haring, Clinton. 
Haring, James D. 
Haring, Samuel K. 
Harman, Charles D. 
Harnard, Samuel W. 
Harned, Charles A. 
Harper, George. 
Harper, John C. 
Harrigan, James. 
Harris, Alfred W. 
Harris, Charles G. 
Harris, Charles L. 
Harris, Daniel. 
Harris, Frederic. 
Han-is, George 0. 
Harris, Henry. 
Harris, John C. 
Harris, Robert W. 
Harris, Rodney. 
Harris, William B. 
Harris, William Hamilton. 
Harris, William W. 
Harrison, William. 
Harrold, George AV. 
narrower, Peter P. 
Hart, Alexander. 
Hart, Enoch L. 
Hart, Eugene R. 
Hart, Hcni'y. 
Hartley, John. 
Hartley, Jonathan. 
Hartley, Joseph. 
Hartness, John. 
Hartness, John W. 
Hartness, Josc))h M. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



109 



1827 Hartness, Thomas L. 1833 

1855 Ilartnctt, Daniel J. 1852 
184G Ilartnett, John B. 1829 

1847 Harvey, Charles S. 1833 

1833 Harvey, Charles W. 1846 

1854 Harvey, Clinton. 1839 

1834 Harvey, Robert. 1823 
1853 Hasbrouck, Francis K. 1853 
1831 Hasbrouck, Robert M. 1846 

1848 Hascy, Alexander G. 1855 
1848 Hascy, Alfred C. 1819 
1848 Hascy, Ambrose R. 1822 
1843 Hascy, Oscar L. 1831 
1848 Hascy, Philip V. R. 1820 
1833 Haskell, Henry C. 1817 

1885 Haskell, Moses. 1843 
1857 Haskell, Sanford R. 1846 
1852 Haskell, Stephen H. 1854 
1848 Haskell, William H. 1838 
1827 Hastings, Frederic B. 1817 
1838 Hastings, Redmond. 1850 

1857 Haswell, Henry V. 1856 
1861 Haswell, Hiram W. 1853 

1856 Haswell, John H, 1855 
1861 Haswell, Robert. 1829 
1819 Hatch, Charles. 1852 
1841 Hatch, George W. 1852 
1841 Hatch, Warner D. 1862 
1833 Hawe, Daniel. 1846 

1835 Hawe, John, 1850 

1826 Hawe, John B. 1815 
1860 Hawe, John L. S. 1819 

1858 Hawe, William. 1815 

1827 Hawkins, Garrit P. 1824 
1860 Hawkins, Horace D. 1833 
1825 Hawley, Charles. 1833 

1857 Hawley, Frederic B. 1825 

1855 Hawley, George H. 1826 

1858 Hawley, Gideon H. 1851 
1825 Hawley, Henry Q. 1855 
1858 Hawley, Henry Q., Jr. 1830 

1886 Hawley, James D. 1854 

1827 Hawley, Nathan. 1832 

1828 Hawley, Roswell. 1831 
1850 Hawley, W. Austin. 1841 



Hawley, William. 
Hawley, William C. 
Hayden, William B. 
Hayes, Duncan. 
Hayes, Timothy. 
Hays, Edmund R. 
Hazard, Edward M. 
Headlam, Robert. 
Headlam, William Jr. 
Healey, Lawrence. 
Heath, David. 
Hector, James. 
Heeley, George. 
Hermans, Halsted, 
Heermans, James B. 
Heermans, Thomas H. 
HeiFernan, James John. 
Heinmiller, Henry. 
Hempstead, Henry N. 
Hempstead, Isaac. 
Hendricks, Francis. 
Hendrickson, Eugene. 
Hendrickson, George R. 
Hendrickson, Jacob E. 
Hendrickson, John, 
Hendrickson, Matthew. 
Hendrickson, AValter. 
Henly, Frank. 
Henry, Dorwin D. 
Henry, John P. 
Henry, John V. 
Henry, Joseph. 
Henry, Peter Seton. 
Henry, William S. 
Hepinstall, Christopher. 
Hepinstall, Richard. 
Hequembourg, Charles L. 
Hequembourg, Theodore. 
Herman, Hymau. 
Hermans Halsted. 
Hermans, John E. 
Hernon, Joseph A. 
Herrick, Edwin H. 
Herrick, John J. 
Herrick, Jonathan W. 



no 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1858 Herrick, Marcus. 


1838 


1854 Herrick, Ricliard P. 


1844 


1855 Herrick, Robert. 


1845 


1835 Herrick, William H. 


1859 


1847 Herring, Edward. 


1858 


1821 Herring, Thomas. 


1818 


18G0 Herschberger, Jacob. 


1836 


1851 Hewett, Henry. 


1849 


1834 Hewfett, Alexander. 


1839 


1850 Hewson, Augustus G. 


1852 


1836 Hewson, Daniel J. 


1862 


1836 Hewson, John E. 


1853 


1859 Heywood, Josephus. 


1854 


1826 Hickcox, Charles S. 


1861 


1835 Hickcox, George A. 


1821 


1832 Hickcox, Hamlet V. 


1817 


1839 Hickcox, H. V. 


1837 


1840 Hickcox, John H. 


1862 


1835 Hickcox, Silas B. 


1855 


1827 Hickcox, William E. 


1850 


1837 Higgins, James. 


1828 


1835 Higgins, Robert. 


1846 


1852 Higham, Alfred G. 


1856 


1829 Higham, Charles. 


1852 


1852 Higham, Charles E. 


1848 


1853 Higham, Edward A. 


1833 


1853 Higham, Francis. 


1839 


1820 Higham, James. 


1829 


1830 Higham, Zury. 


1845 


1832 Hill, Aaron. 


1831, 


1850 Hill, Allen. 


1835 


1848 Hill, Charles A. 


1839 


1850 Hill, Charles Jr. 


1838 


1846 Hill, Edward B. 


1820 


1828 Hill, Samuel W. 


1827 


1848 Hill, Willard L. 


1838 


1847 Hill, William G. 


1830 


1838 Hill, William M. 


1853 


1843 Hillenbrant, John B. 


1862 


1833 Hillhouse, .John. 


1836 


1833 Hillhouse, William. 


1836 


1838 Hillman, Constantine A. 


1821 


1848 Hills, Anthony H. 


1831 


1827 Hills, Augustus. 


1815 


1880 Hills, Charles W. 


1859 



Hills, Henry E. 
Hills, Loran C. 
Hillson, Thomas. 
Hilton, Robert James. 
Hinckley, Charles B. 
Hinckley, Warren. 
Hind, John H. 
Hindman, Edward. 
Hineson, J. 
Hinkley, Warren S. 
Hisgen, Edward. 
Hoag, Abram. 
Hoag, William Henry. 
Hobbs, Henry H. 
Hochstrasser, Charles. 
Hpchstrasscr, Osmond. 
Hodge, William W. 
Hodgkins, George R. 
Hoff, J. S. V. R. 
Hoifman, Charles. 
Hoffman, Henry. 
Hoffman, William. 
Hogan, James L. 
Hogan, Lcverett D. 
Hogan, Peter. 
Hoghtaling, Conrad A. 
Hoghtaling, J. 
Holden, Reuben S. 
Holdridge, Helen D. 
HoUaday, .John. 
Holliday, James. 
Holmes, C. S. 
Holmes, George H. 
Holmes, John. 
Holmes, Richard T. 
Holmes, Sylchester. 
Holmes, William. 
Holmes, William J. 
Holstein, Ernest D. 
Holstein, La Fayette D. 
Holstein, Washington. 
Holt, Herman. 
Homan, John. 
Home, Francis. 
Homes, Henry F. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Ill 



]850 Honeysett, James D. 1853 

18.18 Hook, William. 183G 

1S-2i\ Hopkins, Augustus. 1854 

1838 Hopkins, Francis. 1852 

183G Hopkins, Henry. 1852 

1841 Hopkins, James. 1855 

1822 Hopkins, Samuel. 1845 

1820 Hopkins, William R. 1850 

1827 Hopkins, Wolsey II. 1829 

1841 Horsford, G. W. 1847 

1837 Horth, Francis. 1828 
1841 Horth, James Henry. 1830 
1859 Horton, Cleveland K. 1838 
1833 Hosch, Edward. 1830 
183G Hosch, John F. 1824 

1833 Hosch, Philip H. 1829 
1836 Hosch, William. 1839 
1822 Hosford, Mahlon T. 1838 

1838 Hotaling, Jasper. 1839 
1841 Houghtaling, Alfred. 1834 
1841 Houghtaling, .lasper. 1815 
1855 Hoiil, Henry. 1817 
1852 Howard, Charles N. 1851 

1844 Howard, Henry H. 1851 
1849 Howard, Henry L. 1857 
1830 Howard, Patrick. 1857 
1836 Howe, Benjamin Fowler. 1818 
1818 Howe, Smith. 1861 
1820 Howell, James. 1861 

1845 Howlett, Ezra P. 1837 
1817 Hoxie, Stransbury. 1837 
1862 Hoxsie, Anthon P. 1860 
1835 Hoyt, Albert C. 1850 

1834 Hoyt, Alfred Dudley. 1855 

1839 Hoyt, Charles E. 1853 
1862 Hoyt, Charles R. 1849 
1830 Hoyt, George B. 1848 
1839 Hoyt, George E, 1856 
1822 Hubbel, Almerin. 1862 
1855 Hubbel, Daniel W. 1841 
1830 Hubbel, George. 1862 
1830 Hubbel, James L. 1846 
1830 Huddlestone, John H. ' 1837 
1852 Huested, Alfred B. 1815 
1854 Huested, Emmor. 1815 



Huested, Sylvanus B. 
Hughes, George. 
Hughes, John B. 
Hughes, Richard L. 
Hughes, William H., Jr. 
Humphrey, Barnet V. 
Humphrey, Charles D. 
Humphrey, Correll. 
Humphrey, Daniel W. 
Humphrey, Edward. 
Humphrey, Friend. 
Humphrey, George. 
Humphrey, James H. 
Humphrey, James L. 
Humphrey, John. 
Humphrey, John R. 
Humphrey, L. 
Humphi-ey, Theodore F. 
Humphrey, William J. 
Humphrey, William L. 
Humphries, Correll. 
Humphries, Enoch. 
Hun, Edward K. 
Hun, Edward R. 
Hun, Leonard G. 
Hun, Marcus T. 
Hun, Thomas. 
Hungerford, Clarence C. 
Hungerford, Newman. 
Hunt, Elijah D. 
Hunt, Stephen D. 
Huntington, Chester. 
Hurd, Frederic S. 
Hurd, Joseph M. 
Hurd, Josiah M. 
Hurd, Josiah W. 
Hurdis, John S. 
Hurdis, William Edward. 
Hurst, Frank V. 0. 
Hurst, William. 
Hurst, William. 
Hutchinson, David R. W. 
Hutchinson, Robert. 
Hutton, George. 
Hutton, Thomas L. 



112 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1856 Huyck, Francis C. 1839 

1847 Hyatt, Charles. 182-4 

1846 Hyatt, Chester. 1837 

1851 Hyler, Aaron L. 1819 

1831 Imbrie, George F. 1825 

1853 Isaacs, Isaac M. 1837 

1829 Isham, Alfred H. 18G0 

1831 Isherwood, Benjamin F. 1819 
1839 Jackson, Alonzo C. 1839 
1833 Jackson, Firnin. 1826 

1821 Jackson, Isaac W. 1851 

1855 Jackson, James. 1831 
1861 Jackson, John. 1862 

1828 Jackson, Peter. 1833 
1839 Jaekson, Samuel W. 1830 
1839 Jackson, William J. 1821 

1856 Jacobs, Van Rensselaer. 1833 
1846 Jagger, Eugene. 1838 

1818 James, Augustus. 1846 

1830 James, Edward. 1833 

1819 James, Henry. 1838 
1837 James, Howard B. 1858 
1823 James, John. 1821 
1830 James, Robert W. 1844 

1822 James, Woodbridge. 1854 
1861 Janes, William A. 1832 
1835 Jansen, Egbert H. 1846 

1851 Jarvis, Charles A. 1841 
1835 Jarvis, George. 1819 

1852 Jarvis, John G. I860 

1852 Jarvis, Stephen D. 1851 
1817 Jauncey, James. 1825 

1829 Jenkins, Charlas E. 1852 
1346 Jenkins, Charles E. 1823 
1856 Jenkins, Mulford. 1818 

1837 Jenkins, Robert. 18G2 
1821 Jenkins, Timothy. 1840 
1849 Jenkinson, James T. 1851 
1849 Jenkinson, William J. 1856 
1802 Jermain, Barclay. 1848 

1853 Jerome, Alonzo W. 1849 

1854 Jerome, Rdgar. 1830 

1832 Jervis, Timothy B, 1837 

1838 Jessup, Edwin. 1835 

1839 Jessup, J. B. 1843 



Jewell, J. 
Jewell, Joseph. 
Jewell, William J. 
Jewett, George G. 
Jewett, Grosvenor W. 
Johnson, Benoni C. 
Johnson, Benjamin W. 
Johnson, Daniel. 
Johnson, Edward A. 
Johnson, George N. 
Johnson, James C. 
Johnson, James H. 
Johnson, John. 
Johnson, John S. 
Johnson, Oliver H. 
Johnson, Robert. 
Johnson, Robert F. 
Johnson, Robert L. 
Johnson, Robert T. 
Johnson, William H. 
Johnston, William W. 
Jones, Charles E. 
Jones, Ebenezer. 
Jones, Francis. 
Jones, Gilbert E. 
Jones, Iliram A. 
Jones, Isaac. 
Jones, James. 
Jones, James E, 
Jones, John Stanton Floyd. 
Jones, Livingston L. 
Jones, Llewellyn. 
Jones, Moses G. 
Jones, Richard. 
Jones, Robert. 
Jones, Robert J. 
Jones, Royal Sidney. 
Jones, Samuel E. 
Jones, Sidney. 
Jones, Thomas J. 
Joicc, John T. 
Jordan, Barbazon N. 
Jordan, Charles S. 
Jordan, Christopher. 
Jordan, Edward. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



113 



1831 Jordan, Robert. 1835 

185G Joslin, William L. 1832 

18o2 Joy, EdmimLl L. 1850 

1838 Judd, Joliu C. 1859 
1854 Kaireiiburg, Isaac. 1858 

1854 Kaffcnburg, Philip. 1849 
ISGO Kahn, Adolph. 1849 
18G0 Kahn, Marx. 1818 
1831 Kane, Charles S. 1841 
1820 Kane, David. 1828 
1828 Kane, Oliver De Lancey. 1834 
1827 Kane, John J. C. 1841 
181G Kane, Schelluyne. 18G0 
1816 Kane, Theodore. 1820 

1818 Kearney, Francis. 1846 

1819 Keeler, Charles. 1853 
1830 Keeler, Frederick A. 1851 
1859 Keeler, Harrison H. 1833 
1822 Keeler, Theodore J. 1838 
1859 Keenholtz, Charles. 1821 
1835 Kellogg, Daniel. 1854 
1841 Kelly, George. 1849 

1839 Kelly, John T. 1835 
1833 Kelso, John II. 1834 
1844 Kendrick, Burton. 1840 

1848 Kendrick, Edward E. Jr. 184G 
1847 Kendrick, Fred. M. Hill. 1854 
184G Kendrick, T. W. Fatchin. 1847 

1851 Kendrick, Edward C. 1848 
1850 Kendricks, Francis. 1855 
1833 Kennedy, Francis B. 18G1 

1858 Kennedy, James. 1838 

1859 Kennedy, Robert 0. 1854 
1853 Kennedy, AVilliam Spencer. 1853 

1853 Kenny, James. 1831 
18G1 Kenny, Thomas B. 1849 
1815 Kent, William. 1859 
1843 Kenyon, Ralph W. 1842 
1838 Kerker, Andrew. 1857 

1855 Kerr, Charles. 1850 

1849 Kerr, James. 1851 
1841 Kerr, John. 1850 

1852 Kerr, William Jr. 1837 

1854 Ketcham, George W. 1837 
1854 Ketchum, Edward R. 183G 

15 



Keyser, Charles. 
Keyser, Henry. 
Keyser, James. 
Kidd, Howard. 
Kidd, Robert. 
Kidd, Robert S. 
Kidd, William. 
Kidney, Jonathan. 
Kiernan, Felix A. 
Kiersted, John. 
Kicrsted, Wynkoop. 
Kimball, Richard W. 
King, Allen H. 
King, Andrew. 
King, Andrew. 
King, Andrew T. 
King, Frederic. 
King, Henry L. 
King, J. Howard. 
King, Lewis P. 
King, Ogden. 
King, Rufus H. 
Kingsley, Hale. 
Kingsley, John A. 
Kingsley, Nathan. 
Kinney, William W. 
Kip, Francis M. Jr. 
Kip, AVilliam Henry. 
Kirby, John. 
Kirk, Alfred. 
Kirk, Andrew. 
Kirk, Andrew B. 
Kirk, David N. 
Kirk, Edward. 
Kirk, John. 
Kirk, Joseph W. 
Kirk, Robert AV. 
Kirk, William H. 
Kirk, William H. 
Kirtland, Albert B. 
Kirtland, Dorrance. 
Kirtland, William H. 
Kissam, Thomas M. 
Kittle, Charles E. 
Kittle, John H. 



114 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1817 Kittles, John F. 1815 
1833 Kline, George P. 1818 
1825 Kline, John. 1851 
1841 Klink, Nathaniel. 1843 

1832 Knapp, Samuel. 1851 

1844 Knickerbacker, John H. 1847 

1829 Knight, Calvin S. 1818 
1825 Knower, Benjamin. 18G2 
1846 Knower, Benjamin. 1818 

1825 Knower, Charles. 1840 

1818 Knower, Edmund. 1855 
1818 Knower, Elisha P. 1829 
1827 luiowcr, Henry. 18G2 
1818 Knower, John. 1853 

1833 Knower, Timothy. 1838 

1827 Knowlson, Timothy C. 1833 

1830 Knowlton, Myron. 1847 
1838 Knox, William H. 1849 

1855 Koonz, Edward C. 1844 
1841 Koonz, Jacob C. 1851 

1835 Kossiter, Charles D. 181G 
1849 Kreuder, Augustus. 1834 
1849 Kreuder, Charles. 1839 

1849 Kreuder, Frederic. 1834 

1857 Kreuder, George. 1828 

1836 Kuss, Charles E. 1818 

1828 Lacey, George S. 1848 
1823 Ladd, James. 1818 

1826 La Grange, Stephen. 18G2 

1850 Lain, James. 1839 
1815 Lamb, Anthony. 1859 

1859 Lamb, Desmond. 1853 
1815 Lamb, George C. 1832 
1848 Lamb, George W. 1832 
1840 L'Amoreux, M. Wendell. 1829 
1850 Lamoure, Ten Eyck Jr. 1847 

1850 Lamoure, Uriah. 1840 

1845 Landon, AVilliara A. 18G2 

1860 Langan, John Jr. 1855 
1825 Lansing, Abraham F. 1857 
1823 Lansing, Abraham G. 1815 
181G Lansing, Abraham G. 1855 

1856 Lansing, Alfred D. C. 1854 

1851 Lansing, Andrew A. 183G 

1858 Lansing, Andrew D. Jr. 1839 



Lansing, Barent B. 
Lansing, Charles B. 
Lansing, Charles A. 
Lansing, Edwin B. 
Lansing, Edwin Y. 
Lansing, Egbert W. 
Lansing, Frederick. 
Lansing, Garrit G. 
Lansing, George. 
Lansing, Henry. 
Lansing, Henry K. 
Lansing, Henry Q. 
Lansing, Howard A. A. 
Lansing, James. 
Lansing, Jeremiah Jr. 
Lansing, John A. 
Lansing, John A. 
Lansing, John D. 
Lansing, John Thomas. 
Lansing, John Townsend. 
Lansing, John V. S. 
Lansing, Joseph A. 
Lansing L. 
Lansing, Richard. 
Lansing, Spencer S. 
Lansing, AVilliam. 
Lansing, William B. 
Lansing, Yates. 
Lansingh, Abram. 
Larclier, Edwin B. 
Larose, Peter L. 
Lathrop, Alfred G. 
Lathrop, Daniel S. 
Lathrop, George D. 
Lathrop, George V. N. 
Lawlor, Fenton. 
Lawlor, John. 
Lawlor, William M. 
Lawrence, Atkins S. 
Lawrence, Dwight. 
Lawrence, Thomas. 
Lawrence, Walter 11. 
Lawson, Edward S. 
Lawton, Acton. 
Lawyer, N. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



115 



1816 Lay, James. 


1835 


1818 Lay, Timothy C. 


1833 


1820 Leake, Charles T. 


1844 


1830 Leake, Frederick F. 


1820 


1832 Leake, Horace W. 


1846 


1830 Leake, John S. 


1815 


1830 Leake, Simeon J. 


1855 


1842 Learned, Albert R. 


1852 


1851 Learned, Billings Peck Jr. 


1851 


1858 Leask, William G. 


1841 


1834 Leavitt, Andrew J. 


1847 


1858 Leddy, William G. 


1855 


1858 Ledcrer, Adolph. 


1862 


1859 Lcderer, Jonatz. 


1846 


1835 Lee, George Canning. 


1815 


1833 Lee, James P. 


1837 


1825 Lee, Oliver H. 


1839 


1829 Lee, Theodore. 


1822 


1827 Lee, Thomas E. 


1841 


1829 Lee, Thomas G. 


1837 


1837 Lee, William H. 


1816 


1826 Leech, Daniel D. T. 


1851 


1829 Leech, William. 


1847 


1837 Leete, Thomas. 


1860 


1862 LeGalley, Abram. 


1850 


1839 Legett, W. 


1837 


1818 LeGrange, George. 


1857 


1860 Lehman, Edward J. 


1850 


1831 Leine, Hugh. 


1827 


1838 Leland, George H. 


1861 


1862 Leonard, Alden. 


1862 


1862 Leonard, Edgar. 


1861 


1862 Leonard, Henry W. 


1852 


1862 Leonard, I. I. 


1862 


1802 Leonard, Oscar. 


1861 


1841 Leslie, Edward. 


1854 


1854 Levi, Lewis. 


1862 


1861 Levi, Samuel. 


1851 


1862 Lewi, Isidore G. 


1838 


1854 Lewin, Lewis. 


1836 


1854 Lewin, Moses. 


1859 


1838 Lewis, Andrew McKenna. 


1830 


1830 Leyne, Maurice. 


1825 


1839 Leyne, R. A. 


1849 


1830 Leyne, Richard. 


1846 



Liddlc, William. 
Lightbody, John W. 
Lighthall, John A. 
Linacre, James F. 
Linacre, Thomas B. 
Linn, Henry. 
Linsley, Edwin A. 
Linsley, Joel B. 
Litchfield, Allen. 
Little, Edwin G. 
Little, Jonah. 
Littlefield, Henry C. 
Livingston, Crawford. 
Livingston, Edward P. 
Livingston J. Allen. 
Livingston, John J. 
Livingston, John L. 
Livingston, Livingston. 
Livingston, Matthew H. 
Livingston, Philitj 11. 
Livingston, Theodore. 
Loyd, Edward H. 
Lloyd, Isaac F. 
Lloyd, Lyman J. 
Lochner, John. 
Locke, William R. 
Lockrow, Arthur V. B. 
Lockrow, Thomas. 
Lockwood, Thomas W. 
Lodcwick, Edward. 
Lodcwick, Isaac. 
Lodewick, John H. 
Lodge, Douglas. 
Logan, Theron. 
Long, William James. 
Lord, Charles W. 
Lord, Henry P. 
Lord, Theodore E. 
Losee, Alfred. 
Loucks, Andrew P. 
Loucks, William. 
Loughlin, John. 
Loveridge, Cicero. 
Loveridge, Clinton F. 
Loveridge, Eugene F. 



116 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1831 Lovering, Edmund. I80G 

1830 Lovering, Kichard. 18G2 
1855 Lovett, Frank P. 1854 

1819 Lovett, Hamilton. 1855 
1817 Low, James C. 1858 

1829 Low, Francis S. 1854 

1853 Low, Sidney. 1851 
1855 Low, Warren S. Jr. 1858 
1823 Luce, John B. 1838 

1831 Ludlow, James R. 1833 

1828 Ludlow, John L. 1833 
1846 Lundigan, Francis S. 18G0 

1832 Lush, James K. 1815 
1839 Lush, J. H. 1829 

1830 Lush, Eichard. 1829 
1826 Lush, Stephen. 1829 
1859 Luther, George M. 1834 
1859 Luther, John A. 1834 
1836 Lyman, Charles II. P. 1856 

1829 Lyman, Charles R. 1850 

1829 Lyman, James. 1861 

1832 Lyman, John. 1862 
1834 Lyman, Nathan B. 1849 
1834 Lyman, Stephen. 1856 
1855 Lynch, James S. 1825 
1828 Lyndc, Cliarlcs J. 18G2 
1843 Lyon, Daniel B. 1850 
1843 Lyon, Isaac L. 1841 

1833 Lyons, David H. 1836 

1838 Lyons, Lemuel. 1856 

1820 Mabee, Henry. 1844 
1849 Macdor, Frederic G. 1819 
1849 Maeder, James. 1819 
1817 Mahar, Edward. 1841 
1862 Mahar, James. 1852 

1854 Mahcr, Daniel H. 1843 
1859 Main, Russel. 1819 
1853 Malbone, Henry B. 1858 

1831 Malburn, Francis G. 1860 

1839 MalcQlm, James T. I860 
1838 Malcolm, William. 1839 

1834 Malcomb, James Frazcr. 1819 
183G Manahan, Francis. 1884 
1831 Mancuis, George W. 1829 

1830 Mandcll, Addison. 1833 



Manning, James. 
Many, James M. 
Many, Norton. 
Many, W. Augustus. 
Many, William V., Jr. 
Marble, Eleazer. 
Marble, Manton !\I. 
Marble, Melville F. 
Marcy, Edmund. 
Marcy, Samuel N. 
Marcy, William G. 
Mai"k, Abraham. 
Marselus, John. 
Marsii, Mancius. 
Marsh, Theodore B. 
Marsh, William H. 
Marshall, John. 
Marsliall, AValter. 
Marston, George. 
Martin, Bradley. 
Martin, Frederic T. 
Martin, Graham. 
Martin, Henry. 
Martin, Henry B. 
Martin, Henry H. 
Martin, Howard L, 
Martin, James B. 
Martin, James Jr. 
Martin, James E. 
Martin, Louis. 
Martin, William A. 
Marvin, Benjamin. 
Marvin, Chai-les. 
Marvin, Edward. 
Marvin, George C. 
Marvin, Henry C. 
]\Iarvin, Ricliard H. 
Marx, Albert. 
INIarx, Edward J. 
Marx, Lewis J. 
Mascord, George. 
Mather, Charles. 
Mather, Charles F. 
Mather, James. 
Mather, Joscpli II. 



LIST OF SUDENTS. 



117 



1833 Mather, Lcvcrctt Criittcuclcn. 
1852 Matthews, Charles 11. 

1860 Matthews, James C. 

1849 iNTattimore, Francis. 

1861 Maul, John G. 

1857 IVIaxwell, Jacob. 

1825 Mayell, Alfred. 

1850 Mayell, Henry. 
1859 Mayell, John. 
1850 Mayell, AVilliam. 

1826 Mayer, Frederick J. 
1830 Mayer, Henry. 
182G Mayer, Fhilip A. 

1862 McAlister, Kobert A. 

1858 McAlister, V/illiam H. 

1854 McBaue, Angus M. L. 

1855 McBanc, Joseph W. 
1844 McBride, Edward. 

1844 McBride, Henry, 
1848 McBride, James. 
1841 McBride, Thomas. 
1817 McCabc, Richard. 
1829 McCamman, Alexander. 
1819 McCamman, Charles. 

1834 McCamman, Cyrus. 

1859 McCamman, Cyrus. 
1847 McCamman, Edward. 
1829 McCamman, John. 

1821 McCamman, Washington. 

1823 McCamman, William. 
1836 McCarthy John. 
1829 McCarthy, Isaac. 
1847 McCaskey, William Jr. 

1856 McCasky, Alexander L. 

1843 McCelpic, Charles L. 
1862 McClellan, Samuel. 

1824 McClinton, John. 

1845 McClure, Archibald Jr. 

1857 McClure, James G. K. 

1846 McClure, James H. 

1844 McClure, John C. 
1856 McClure, Thomas. 
1851 McClure, William H. 
1855 McConnell, Joseph. 
1851 McCormick, Charles E. 



1850 McCormick, James. 
1854 McCotter, Francis A. 
1860 IMcCracken, William F. 

1850 McCubbin, John. 

1846 McCuUoch, John C. 
1815 McCulloch, John H. 
1823 McCulloch, William A. . 

1853 McCulloch, AVilliam H. 
1856 McDonald, George. 
1862 McDonald, James. 
1848 McDonald, Noble. 
1862 McDonald, William. 
1858 McDonough, Bernard J. 

1851 McDoual, Alexander B. 

1831 McDougal, James. 

1832 McDowell, Daniel E. 

1854 McDowell, George W. 
1838 McDuffie, Charles. 

1838 McDuffie, Henry. 

1847 McElroy, Alexander. 

1839 McElroy, Andrew. 

1852 McElroy, Charles E. 
1839 McElroy, John E. 
1836 McElroy, Samuel. 

1846 McElroy, Thomas J. 

1847 McElroy, William H. 
1850 McElroy, AVilliam Jr. 
1850 McEntee, Charles S. 
1836 McEowen, Daniel. 

1856 McEwen, John. 
1836 McGibbon, David. 

1836 McGibbon, William. 
1825 McGilchrist, Peter. 
1846 McGuin, Felix. 

1844 McGourkey, George J. 
1844 McGourkey, John. 

1853 McGregor, Beekman. 
1858 McGregor, Donald. 
1860 McIIarg, Albert. 

1855 McIIarg, Alexander Jr. 
1832 McHarg, Charles K. 

1854 McIIarg, G. Van Allen. 

1837 McHarg, Henry B. 
1854 McHarg, John Jr. 

1857 McHarg, John W, 



118 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1829 McHarg, Rufus K. 1858 

1858 McHarg, Theodore. 1842 

1836 McHarg, William C. 1855 

1826 McHarg, "William N. 184G 
1821 McHay, John. 1846 
1835 McHench, David B. 1826 

1825 Mcintosh, William. 1862 
1862 Mclntyre, Alexander. 1824 
1850 Mclntyre, Archibald. 1837 

1821 ISIcIntyre, Daniel J. 1889 

1847 Mclntyre, James. 1821 
1815 Mclntyre, John McD. 1837 

1859 Mclntyre, John V. 1841 

1855 Mclntyre, Thomas A. 1828 
1817 McKay, Michael. 1858 

1834 McKee, Joseph 1849 
1824 McKelvey, Peter B. 18G1 

1835 McKennan, John. 1843 
1841 McKercher, John D. 1837 

1837 McKim, James. 1858 
1839 McKissam, Thomas. 1819 

1852 MKnight, Isaac. 1829 
1841 McKnight, John T. 1828 

1854 McKnight Samuel W. 1846 
1850 McKnight, William G. 1856 
1846 McKown, Henry. 1854 

1839 McKown, Isaac D. 1822 
1841 McKown, Jacob E. 1851 
1832 McKown, James. 1831 

1856 McKown, James F. 1824 

1855 McKown, James H. 1854 

1840 McKown, John V. Henry. 1833 
1854 McKown. William. 1829 

1827 McLachlan, John. 1829 
1837 McLachlan, William M. 1827 

1835 McLaren, Alexander. 184Q 

1848 McLaren, Finlay. 1815 

1836 McLaren, Robert B. 1847 

1828 McLaughlin, William D. 1829 

1853 McMahon, John. 1859 

1827 McMartin, Duncan. 1847 
1820 McMartin, Finlay. 1841 

1822 McMartin, Robert. 1848 

1828 McMickeus, Jacob R. 1848 

1826 McMickeus, John. 1841 



McMillan, John. 
McMillan, Thomas C. 
Mc:\Iillcn, AVilliam J. 
Mc?ilullen, Alonzo T. 
McMuUcn, Edgar. 
McMullen, James. 
McMullen, Joseph G. 
McMullen, Robert. 
McMurdy, Robert. 
McMurdy, Robert S. 
McNab, John F. 
McNab, William A. F. 
McNaughton, Alexander W. 
McNaughton, Duncan R. 
McNaughton, George H. 
McNaughton, Henry G. 
McNaughton, James. 
McNaughton, James A. 
McNeill, .John. 
McNeill, William. 
McPhern, Andrew. 
McPherson, George. 
McPherson, .John F. 
McPherson, AVilliam. 
McQuade, Patrick H. 
McQuade, Peter J. 
McWilliams, George. 
Mcacham, George B. 
Meacham, John. 
Meacham, Roswell S. 
Meacham, William H. 
Meadon, Edward W. 
Meadon, John H. 
Meads, James. 
Meads, John. 
Meads, John H. 
Meads, Orlando. 
Meads, Orlando Jr. 
Means, Thomas.] 
Mears, Elisha Ashley. 

Meech, . 

Meech, George W. 
Meech, Henry L. 
Meech, John H. 
Meech, Robert. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



119 



1849 Meech, Theodore. 1830 

1852 Meech, Theodore H. 1824 
1855 Mecgan, James H. 1828 

1853 Mcegan, Thomas A. 1836 
1887 Meigs, Isaac V. L. 1851 

1830 Meigs, James K. 1850 
18G2 Meigs, John A. 1838 

1833 Meigs, Richard M. 1831 
1823 Meline, James P. 1824 
18G2 Mellick, James R. 1858 

1831 Melville, Allen. 1820 
1830 Melville, Gansevoort. 1835 
1830 Melville, Herman. 1823 
1853 Merchant, Daniel W. 1837 
1818 Merchant, Henry S. 1850 

1840 Merrifield, Charles W. 1889 
1835 Merrifield, George G. 1827 

1844 Merrifield, John. 1847 

1841 Merrifield, Richard. 1831 

1838 Merrifield, AVilliam, 1832 
18G2 Merrill, Charles C. 1846 
184G Merrill, Moses D. 1846 
1855 Merriman, Williston E. 1862 
1851 Mesick, Henry T. Jr. 1839 
1851 Mesick, John W. 1819 
1848 Middour, George. 1858 
18G2 Miggael, Edward. 1854 

1861 Milbank, Elias. 1833 
1857 Milbank, William E. 1833 

1853 Miles, AVilliam H. 1833 

1834 Milholland, Henry. 1822 

1862 Millard, Lqnnox. 1858 

1857 Millbank, "William E. 1831 
1818 Miller, Abraham 0. 1851 

1830 Miller, Andrew, 1851 

1831 Miller, Augustus C. 1833 

1845 Miller, Ernest J. 1836 

1830 Miller, Isaack L. K. 1834 
1834 Miller, James. 1839 

1831 Miller, James A. 1834 

1854 Miller, John Isaac. 1854 
1829 Miller, Peter S. 1841 

1839 Miller, Stephen C. 1853 

1858 Miller, AVesley. 1841 
1839 Miller, AVilliam. 1853 



Miller, William A. 
Miller, William M. 
Milligan, John. 
Miller, Chauncey H. 
Mills, Alexander. 
Mills, Charles. 
Mills, Charles S. 
Mills, Dauiel W. 
Mills, Frederic C. 
Mills, Geox-ge H. 
Mills, John E. • 
Mills, Martin S. 
Mills, Seymour. 
Mills, Theodore G. 
Milwain, William J. 
Mitchell, John D. 
Mitchell, Laban. 
Mix, Benjamin F. 
Mix, Garrit V. 
Mix, James. 
Mix, William Jr. 
Moakler, Francis J. 
Moeller, Charles. 
Molinard, Albert J. 
Monell, John. 
Monly, Charles E. 
Monteath, Edward W. 
Monteath, George H. 
Monteath, John H. 
Monteath, Wm. V. W. 
Monteith, Peter. 
Moon, Robert H. 
Moore, Arthur E. 
Moore, Burritt W. 
Moore, Robert. 
Moore, William R. 
Morange, James P. 
INIorange, James W. 
Morange, W. B. 
Morange, William D. 
More, Francis 0. 
More, H. D. 
More, Irani B. 
More, James Harbrouth. 
Morgan, Charles. 



120 



ALB^VJN-^Y ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1849 Morgan, Fraser. 1833 

184G Morgan, James H. 1851 

1848 Morgan, Samuel H. 182G 

1853 Morgan, "William. 1857 

1836 Morgan, "William J. 1838 

1853 Mork, Moses. 1859 
1841 Morrall, Theodore. 1840 

1848 Morris, Edward. 1839 
1841 Morris, Joseph D. 1853 

1849 Morris, Lewis 0. 1851 
1815 Morris, -Orrin W. 1852 
1841 Morris, Thomas F. 1854 
1856 Morrison, G. Landon. 1850 

1854 Morrison, "William J. 1850 
1838 Morrow, George. 1848 
1836 Morrow, James. 1861 
1862 Morrow, Samuel R. 1860 

1838 Morrow, Thomas B. 1854 

1839 Morrow, Y. 1827 

1845 Morse, Lansing. 1853 
1849 Mory, Wesley S. 1827 

1852 Moseley, Henry L. 1829 

1861 Moseley, "William S. 1853 
1833 Mosher, Cornelius. 1821 
1860 Mosher, Stephen. 1836 
1847 Mott, William H. 1846 

1859 Muir, Charles H. 1850 

1849 Mulford, Augustus T. 1846 
1847 Munsell, William A, 1836 
1818 Munger, Edwin H. 1845 
1843 Murphy, Charles S. 1846 

1853 Murphy, David A. 1846 
1831 Murphy, James. 1833 
1847 Murphy, John. 1838 

1846 Murphy, John W. 1839 

1823 Murray, Alfred H. 1837 
1820 Murray, David. 1839 
1846 Murray, Leverett W, 1853 

1824 Murray, William G. J. 1850 

1860 Murray, William M. 1853 
1830 Myers, Jerome. 1853 

1862 IVIyers, John. 1845 
1835 Myers, John B. 1855 
1833 Mygatt, AVilliam G. I860 

1850 Nulcw, John A. 1857 



Nash, Stephen P. 
Neemes, John. 
Nelliger, John B. 
Nelson, Alexandar C. 
Nelson, Renscelaer V. B. 
Nelson, Robert M. 
Netterville, J. G. 
Nelterville, John T. 
Netterville, William M. 
Netterville, William N. C 
Newberry, Jacob L. 
Newberg, Alexander. 
Newcomb, Charles. 
Newcomb, Edward. 
Newcomb, William W. 
Newitter, Garson. 
Newitter, Jlorris J. 
Newitter, Nathan J. 
Newland, David. 
Newland, Francis F. 
Newland, John. 
Newland, Jolin, Jr. 
Newland, Samuel W. 
Newlands, Robert. 
Newman, Charles. 
Newman, Ebenezer L. 
Newman, Frederic C. 
Newman, George W. 
Newman, Henry A. 
Newman, James. 
Newman, John L. 
Newman, William W. 
Newton, George L. 
Newton, Hoi'ace B. 
Newton M. 
Newton, William II. 
Nicholas, John. 
Nichols, Alphonso. N. 
Nichols, Charles B. 
Nichols, Charles 0. 
Nichols, Charles W. 
Nichols, Francis. 
Nicliols, Henry C. 
Nichols, Morrison C. G. 
Nickerson, Charles. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



121 



1830 Niles, Nathaniel. 

1831 Niver, Conrad. 
1835 Niver, David M. 
1839 Noble, Charley L. 

1820 Nowlton, Farnham. 
1844 Noonan, .James T. 
1862 Norris, Walter H. 
1850 North, Albert M. 
1859 Northrup, Ho-ward N. 

1834 Northrup, Richard H. 

1838 Norton, Edward. 

1848 Norton, Francis Lay. 

1829 Norton, Henry. 

1835 Norton, James A. 
1827 Norton, John P. 
18G2 Norton, John T. 

1839 Norton, P. A. 
1833 Norton, Samuel. 

1830 Norton William. 

1850 Nott, Charles. 
1857 Nott, Howard. 
1859 Noxon, Edward. 
1853 Noyes, Arthur. 
1853 Noyes, Frederic B. 
18G1 Noyes, Matthew M. 
1827 Nugent, Geoi'ge A. 

1821 Nugent, Henry P. 
1319 Nugent, William. 

1840 Nugent, William H. 
1815 Oake, Effingham. 
18G1 Oakley, George C. 

1851 O'Brien, Peter R. 

1849 O'Brien, Thomas C. 
1851 O'Conner, Henry T. 
1837 O'Donnell, Oliver. 
1819 O'Donnell, William. 

1837 O'Hara, Charles E. 

1838 Olcott, Alexander. 
1848 Olcott, Dudley. 
1848 Olcott, Franklin. 
1848 Olcott, Frederic P. 
1836 Olcott, John J. 
1836 Olcott, Robert. 

1839 Olcott, Robert B. 
1842 Olcott, Robert N. 

16 



1819 Olcott, Theodore. 
1838 Olcott, Theodore. 
1836 Olcott, Thomas. 
1846 Olmstead, Charles L. 
1822 Olmstead, George T. 
1817 Olmstead, John J. 

1845 Olmsted, David S. 
1840 Olmsted, Henry S. 
1836 Olney, Charles C. 
1836 O'Neil, James. 

1828 Oathout, Jonas. . 
1859 Oi-r, Alexander. 
1859 Orr, Frederic M. 
1831 Osborn, Charles F. 
1848 Osborn, J. Wesley. 
1824 O'Shaunessy, James. 
1833 Osterhout, William. 
1817 Ostrander, Alexander. 
1817 Ostrander, John C. 

1829 Ostrander, Philip. 
1856 Ostrander, Philip. 
1816 Ostrander, William. 

1822 Otis, Tristram Coffin. 
1848 Ott, Friend James. 
1835 Ott, Hylor. 

1888 Ott, Siberia. 

1846 Outwin, William. 
1833 Overton, Thomas. 
1862 Owen, Francis A. 
1859 Owen, Robert. 

1854 Owens, Charles H. 

1855 Owens, Thomas J. 
1829 Packard, Algernon S. 
1835 Packard, Benjamin F. 

1827 Packard, Charles C. 

1828 Packard, Eugene M. 

1823 Packard, Henry R. 
1845 Packard, James B. 

1829 Packard, Joseph W. 
1841 Packard, Robert J. 
1839 Packer, Thaddeus N. 
1835 Paddock, Stephen. 

1835 Paddock, William H. 
1860 Paddock, William H. 

1836 Paddock, William S. 



122 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1850 Paff, Charles E. 

1850 PaflF, Henry T. 

1851 PafiF, AVilliam P. 
1845 Page, Alanson S. 
1822 Page, Amos C. 

1828 Page, William W. 

1829 Paige, George AV. 

1829 Paige, Joseph C. Y. 
1858 Paige, Joseph Y. 
1858 Paine, Frederic H. 
1855 Palmanteer, AVilliam. 

1830 Palmer, Charles T, 
1858 Palmer, George W. 
1827 Palmer, James E. 
1855 Pardee, Charles P. 
1851 Park, P. Wendell. 

1851 Parker, Amasa J. Jr. 
1824 Parker, Ambrose S. 
1853 Parker, Edmund M. 
1829 Parker, John. 

1860 Parker, John Ten Eyck. 
1833 Parker, Lewis P. 
1824 Parker, Robert M. 
1839 Parkins, R. 
1836 Parks, Nathaniel. 
1829 Parmelee, Francis B. 
1841 Parr, Richard W. 

1857 Parr, William. 

1838 Parry, John. 

1850 Parsons, Charles E. 

1831 Parsons, Harvey K. 

1839 Parsons, Harvey N. 

1858 Parsons, Henry A. 

1840 Parsons, Jacob E. 
1860 Parsons, James W. 

1857 Parsons, Stanley Parmler. 

1852 Passenger, Charles E. 
1829 Patrick, Richard M. 
1860 Patten, William N. 
1840 Patterson, A. L. 
1839 Patterson, F. C. 
1843 Patterson, James. 

1857 Patterson, John S. 
1827 Payn, Charles H. 

1858 Payn, Cornelius N. 



18G2 Payn, Frederic A. 
1852 Pf^yn, George A. 
1849 Payn, John A. Jr. 
1851 Payn, John G. 
1831 Payn, Owen. 
1858 Payn, Samuel G. 
1848 Payne, Edward M. 
1846 Payne, Edward T. 

1854 Payne, George. 
1857 Payne, Warner. 
1848 Peacock, Daniel. 
1834 Peacock, Thomas W. 

1844 Pearse, Jacob L. 
1820 Pearson, John. 

1845 Pearson, Joseph Burr. 
1815 Pearson, Rensselaer. 

1846 Pease, Charles L. 
1848 Pease, Frank. 
1831 Pease, Minot S. 

1855 Pease, R. H. Jr. 

1848 Pease, Thomas II. 

1841 Peck, Edward H. 
1823 Peck, Gad. 
1838 Peck, Henry. 
1855 Peck, Henry C. 

1849 Peck, Spencer S. B. 
1860 Peck, William A. 
1862 Peck, Wooster D. 

1854 Peckham, George T. 
1844 Peckham, Henry M. 

1847 Peckham, Joseph II.' 

1847 Peckham, Rufus W. Jr. 
1844 Peckham, Wheeler H. L- 

1842 Peebles, William M. 

1855 Peets, Cyrus B. 
1838 Pegg, John. 

1818 Pemberton, Henry. 
1854 Pemberton, Howard. 
1829 Pemberton, James S. 
1818 Pemberton, John. 

1848 Pemberton, John Jr. 
1829 Pemberton, Tliomas L. 
1859 Pendleton, William. 
1846 Penfield, Edward C. 
1836 Pepper, William P. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



123 



1835 rercival, George W. 
1848 Pcrcival, Henry. 

1848 Perkins, William A. 
1850 Perry, Eli. 

1846 Perry, Hiram Jr. 
1834 Perry, Oliver H. 
1854 Perry, Thomas R. 

1839 Peters, D. W. 

1853 Pettcngill, Charles. 

1849 Phelps, John F. 
1830 Phelps, Justus M. 

1833 Phelps, Philip Jr. 
1825 Phelps, Philo L. 
1841 Phelps, William L. M. 

1834 Philips, Daniel. 

1847 Philleo, Charles Henry. 
1846 Philleo, Theodore L. 

1854 Phillips, De Witt H. 

1859 Phillips, Frank D. 

1855 Phillips, John D. 
1836 Phillips, Philctus. 

1840 Phipps, Bradford S. 

1850 Pierson, Charles B. 
1839 Pierson, William M. 
1822 Pike, Benjamin. 

1851 Pillsbury, Sherman D. 
1832 Pitcher, Joseph R. 
1830 Pitkin, Thomas C. 

1856 Pitkin, Thomas H. 
1853 Pitman, Frank C. 
1839 Pitts, Horatio W. 

1860 Pladwell, John Edwin. 
1829 Plainer, William. 

1848 Piatt, Charles M. 
1851 Piatt, E. Edward. 

1828 Piatt, Ezra J. 
1816 Piatt, Henry. 
1819 Piatt, Van Zandt. 
1838 Plumb, William H. 
1844 Pohlman, Henry E. 

1859 Pohlman, Oliver S. 

1849 Pohlman, William H. 

1829 Pohlman, William J. 

1860 Pohly, Samuel. 

1 852 Polkcmus, Albert. 



1839 Polkemus, I. 

1861 Pomfrct, William C. 
1819 Porter, Charles A. 
1852 Porter, Charles H. 

1819 Porter, Edmund James. 
1829 Porter, George W. 
1852 Porter, Horatio. 

1821 Porter, Ira. 
1850 Porter, Ira, Jr. 
1829 Porter, James E. 
1823 Porter, James L. 
1852 Porter, Jeremiah. 
1815 Porter, John C. 
1835 Porter, Malcolm. 

1862 Porter, Peter. 
1852 Porter, Robert M. 
1818 Porter, William C. 
1858 Porter, William B. 
1828 Porter, AYilliam V. 
1825 Post, Erasmus D. 

1855 Post, James R. 

1857 Potter, Charles C. 
1846 Potter, David T. 
1852 Potter, Horatio. 

1856 Potter, James. 

1852 Potter, Robert. 

1853 Potter, William B. 

1858 Potts, Jesse W. 

1832 Powers, Charles, 

1859 Powers, Michael J. 
1817 Powers, Titus. 

1822 Pratt, Elisha N. 

1853 Prentice, John. 
1850 Prentice, Sartell. 
1850 Prentice, W. Packer. 

1820 Prescott, Benjamin. 

1854 Preston, Abijah S. 

1833 Prevost, Frederick J 
1828 Priest, Francis W. 
1853 Priest, Henry A. 
1846 Prosser, Henry W. 
1848 Provost, William K. 
1862 Pruyn, Andrew K. 
1852 Pruyn, Charles A. 
1852 Pruyn, Charles E. 



124 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1851 Pruyn, Edward. 184G 

1851 Pruyn, Edward Lansing. 1862 
1837 Pruyn, Edward R. 1823 

1836 Pruyn, Francis. 1851 
1862 Pruyn, Francis. 1850 
1846 Pruyn, Francis S. 1849 

1840 Pruyn, John S. 1853 

1824 Pruyn, John V. L. 1852 
1829 Pruyn, John W. 1836 

1825 Pruyn, Robert H. 1854 
1862 Pruyn, Samuel S. 1831 

1837 Pruyn, "William. 1854 
1850 Pruyn, William H. 1860 

1835 Purdy, George. 1857 

1836 Purdy, Morgan L. ' 1851 
1836 Putnam, Victor A. 1830 
1815 Pugsley, Cornelius. 1830 
1829 Quackenboss, Charles. 1858 
1855 Quackenbush, Albert. 1827 
1855 Quackenbush, Augustus Q. 1827 
1848 Quackenbush, Edwin. 1857 
1861 Quackenbush, Eugene. 1860 
1815 Quackenbush, Gansevoort. 1841 
1846 Quackenbush, John N. 1852 
1858 Quackenbush, John V. P. 1853 
1818 Quackenbush, Nicholas. 1853 
1818 Quackenbush, Smith. 1853 
1834 Quackenbush, Stephen P. 1859 
1832 Quarles, Augustus. 1848 
1832 Quarles, Henry. 1844 
1858 Quinby, Aaron A. 1846 
1839 Quinland, Charles H. 1824 
1855 Quinn, James. 1850 
1848 Quinn, Terrence. 1835 
1857 Quinn, William J. 1835 

1852 Raby, George R. 1835 
1857 Raby, Robert St. George. 1835 
1857 Radclifif, Charles H. Jr. 1831 

1854 Radcliff, Henry G. 1859 
1860 Radcliff, Robert D. 1838 
1827 Radcliff, William J. 1848 
1857 Radcliff, William 0. 1849 

1855 Radley, John J. 1841 

1841 Radley, John P. 1837 
1848 Raffcrty, Terence. 1839 



Raly, James Henry, 
Ramsey, Charles H. 
Ramsey, Henry. 
Randall, Charles H. 
Randall, S. Sidwell. 
Rankin, John N. 
Rankin, Joseph. 
Rankin, Leland. 
Ransom, Albion. 
Ransom, Edward. 
Ransom, Samuel H. 
Rathbone, Albert. 
Rathbone, Charles D. Jr. 
Rathbone, Clarence. 
Rathbone, J. Howard. 
Rathbone, John F. 
Rathbone, Lewis. 
Rattoone, Thomas, 
Rawdon, Charles. 
Rawdon, Leverett. 
Rawson, Byron. 
Rawson, Henry. 
Rawson, James. 
Rawson, Thomas H. 
Ray, John Edward. 
Ray, Levi. 

Raynsford, Edmund W. 
Read, David P. 
Read, Matthew H. Jr. 
Read, Robert. 
Read, William H. 
Rector, William H. 
Redway, .John S. 
Reed, James A. 
Reed, John S. 
Reed, La Fayette. 
Reed, Sylvanus. 
Reed, William H. 
Reid, James R. 
Relyea, Lodewyck. 
Relyea, Peter. 
Relyea, Thomas W. 
Rcmer, Charles T. 
Remer, William T. 
Remis, W. T. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



125 



1859 Reinond, Jules L. 1859 
1849 Reqiia, James B. 1830 
1839 Requa, James E. 1850 
1838 Requa, Joseph. 1860 

1860 Requa, William J. 1853 
1857 Reuter, Andrew. 1833 
1857 Reynolds, Charles C. 1832 

1853 Reynolds, Charles W. 1815 
1843 Reynolds, Dexter. 1861 

1860 Reynolds, George. . 1860 

1830 Reynolds, Henry. 1859 

1861 Reynolds, J. A. 1846 

1861 Reynolds, John H. Jr. 1859 
1851 Reynolds, Robert E. 1859 

1847 Rhoades, Archibald C. 1860 
1851 Rice, Alexander D. 1859 
1835 Rice, DeWitt C. 1841 

1831 Rice, Joseph T. 1858 

1831 Rice, Moses T. 1857 

1829 Rice, Silas C. 1853 
1860 Richards, Peyton. 1853 
1851 Richardson, Warren L. 1825 
1828 Richardson, William J. 1855 
1855 Richmond, James. 1860 
1855 Rider, George. 1318 
1846 Rider, John. 1815 
1826 Rider, John J. 1821 
1859 Ridgeway, Frederic W. 1854 

1849 Ried, William James. 1830 

1848 Riley, John. 1832 

1862 Riley, Patrick. 1857 

1837 Rindge, Joseph F. 1836 

1850 Ring, Clark E. 1838 

1832 Rising, Austin. 1847 

1854 Rising, Austin. 1831 

1830 Rising, William A. 1858 
1835 Risk, William. 1848 
1846 Roak, Hugh B. 1858 

1838 Roberts, Randall. 1824 

1839 Robertson, Gaw. 1852 
1853 Robinson, Albert. 1850 
1853 Robinson, Edward J. 1854 
1830 Robinson, Ephraim D. W. 1851 
1839 Robinson, G. 1838 
1826 Robinson, Hamilton W. 1852 



Robinson, Hugh. 
Robinson, James D. 
Robinson, John D. 
Robinson, Samuel. 
Robinson, Sidney S. 
Robinson, Thomas E. 
Rockwell, Elihu H. 
Rockwell, George AV. 
Rodgers, Clifford B. 
Rodgers, Edward H. 
Rodgers, James. 
Rodgers, John J. 
Rodgers, Prentice. 
Roessle, Henry N. P. 
Roessle, John Jacob. 
Roessle, Richard. 
Roessle, Theophilus< 
Roeter, Henry H. 
Rogers, Edmund D. 
Rogers, Edward K. 
Rogers, Nathaniel Jr. 
Rogers, Thomas. 
Rogers, William G. 
Rooker, Thomas M. 
Roorback, Junius. 
Roorback, Orville A. 
Root, Arthur H. 
Root, Charles F. 
Root, David A. 
Root, Horace. 
Root, Lyman. 
Root, Samuel G. 
Rose, Stewart. 
Rosekrans, Spencer. 
Rosekrants, Henry D. 
Rosendale Samuel. 
Rosendale, Silas. 
Rosengarden, Meyer. 
Roser, William. 
Ross, Edward A. 
Ross, Howard P, 
Rossman, James R. 
Rossman, John V. 
Rossman, Richard. 
Rothmund, Philip. 



126 



ALBAis^Y ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1823 Rowan, . 1858 

1834 Rowe, Sanford. 1835 
1858 Rowland, Charles L. 1862, 

1835 Rowland, John. 1859 

1840 Rowley, Salmon. 1835 
1800 Roy, James Jr. 1835 
183G Rozecrantz, Samuel T. 1852 
1820 Ruby, George W. 1862 
1817 Rudes, Hallenbake. 1838 

1817 Rudes, Jason. 1823 

1838 Rugg, John. 1840 
1858 Ruhl, Frederic. 1823 

1852 Rull, Samuel L. 1833 

1836 Rull, Sylvester. 1851 

1839 Russ, Charles E. 1852 
1836 Russ, Herman H. 1859 
1832 Russel, Abraham A. 1827 
1823 Russel, George. 1836 
1823 Russel, Henry. 1853 
1855 Russel, Hubbard L. Jr. 1837 

1847 Russel, John 11. 1826 
1823 Russel, William. 1859 

1848 Russel, William Jr. 1862 
1862 Russell, Charles E. 1850 
1860 Russell, DeWitt H. 1852 
1862 Ruyter, William C. 1853 
1855 Ryan, Alfred G. 1853 
1848 Ryan, Charles C. 1857 

1853 Ryan, Charles J. 1862 
1839 Ryan, Dennis F. 1834 
1846 Ryan, James. 1841 
1820 Ryan, Stephen V. R. 1821 

1834 Rycliman, Garrit W. 1855 

1835 Rysendorph, Jacob. 1833 

1854 Sackett, Nathaniel 0. 1846 

1851 Sackett, William F. 1861 

1818 Sackridcr, John P. 1829 

1841 Sage, Jasper C. 1832 
1860 Sager, Henry. 1854 

1852 Sager, John W. 1862 

1853 Salisbury, Daniel G. 1841 
1850 Salisbury, Nelson. 1838 
1835 Saltus, Francis H. 1817 
1835 Salvidge, Robert. 1838 
1832 Sanimous, Stephen. 1832 



Sanders, Bareut B. 
Sanders, Barent Bleeckei? 
Sanders, Bleecker. 
Sanders, Jacob G. Jr. 
Sanders, James B. 
Sanders, Robert. 
Sanderson, Richard H; 
Sands, James H. 
Sanford, Caleb W. 
Sanford, Charles. 
Sanford, E. 
Sanford, Henry. 
Sanford, William. 
Sard, George E. 
Sard, Grange Jr. 
Sard, William H. 
Satterlee, Edward. 
Savage, Edmund. 
Savage, Edward. 
Sawyer, Nathaniel; 
Sawyer, Sidney. 
Sayles, Charles. 
Sayles, Edward. 
Sayles, James M. 
Sayles, John W. 
Sayles, William. 
Sayre, Henry. 
Sayres, Thomas Jefferson. 
Scanlan, William F. 
Schenck, Edward T. 
Schermerhorn, Judah P. 
Schermerhorn, Morgan L. 
Schiffer, George W. 
Schiffer, Henry W. 
Schiffer, John H. 
Schliegel, John. 
Schoolcraft, Charles L. 
Schoolcraft, AVilliam C. 
Schoonmakcr, H. Barnard. 
Schricbcr, Andrew. 
Schuyler, Alonzo. 
Schuyler, David C. 
Schuyler, D. Gilbert. 
Schuyler, James L. 
Schuyler, Jeremiah. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



127 



1817 Schuyler, John C. 
1827 Schuyler, Thilip L. 
1862 Schuyler, Kichard T. 

1820 Schuyler, Stephen R. 

1827 Schuyler, William C. 
1860 Schwartz, Edward. 
1860 Schwartz, Gustavus A. 
1835 Schwartzenburgh, William. 
1853 Schwarz, David. 

1853 Schwarz, George. 
1849 Scott, Walter. 

1838 Scovel, Clinton P. 

1840 Scovel, Henry W. 
1848 Scovel, Lewis L. 

1841 Scovel, Nelson R. 

1818 Scovill, Brigham. 
1826 Scovill, Hezekiah G. 
1848 Screver, Richard D. 

1828 Sears, Charles. 

1818 Sedgwick, Theodore. 
1857 Seeley, Harvey. 
1823 Seeley, George. 

1821 Selden, Henry. 
1848 Selkirk, Edwin. 
1820 Selkirk, Francis. 
1848 Sessions, Edward C. 
1859 Sevin, Edward. 

1839 Seward, Augustus H. 
1841 Seward, Clarence H. 

1819 Sexton, Hiram. 
1853 Seymour, Charles Jr. 
1817 Seymour, Edward. 

1820 Seymour, Erastus. 
1853 Seymour, George W. 
1830 Seymour, John. 
1838 Seymour, Truman. 
1828 Seymour, William Jr. 
1835 Shankland, Gilbert. 

1840 Sharp, George Heni-y. 

1838 Sharp, Isaac F. 

1839 Sharp, J. G. 
1861 Sharpe, George. 
1817 Sharpe, Stephen R. 

1822 Sharpe, William A. 

1841 Sharts, Theodore. 



1834 Shaw, Aaron. 
1823 Shaw, Abraham D. 
1822 Shaw, Daniel. 

1830 Shaw, Daniel. 

1840 Shaw, Daniel D. 

1831 Shaw, George. 

1829 Shaw, Henry. 

1818 Shaw, Hiram. 
1822 Shaw, James. 

1852 Sheldon, Alexander E. 
1834 Slieldon, Alexander G. 

1848 Sheldon, Augustus S. 
1857 Sheldon, Clarence, 

1851 Sheldon, Clinton J. 
1837 Sheldon, Henry. 

1849 Sheldon, Isaac E. 
1849 Sheldon, John D. W. 
1828 Sheldon, Smith. 

1852 Shepard, Ashbel K. 

1841 Shepard, Charles T. 
1862 Shepard, Frank D. 
1854 Shepard, George W. 
1860 Shepard, Osgood H. 
1854 Shepard, Sylvester B. 
1824 Shepard, Burrit. 

1830 Shepherd, Oliver L. 
1824 Shepherd, Richard. 
1841 Shepherd, William. 

1827 Shepherd, William G. 
1817 Shepherd, William Stead. 
1830 Sheridan, John Jr. 

1819 Sherman, Charles. 

1828 Sherman, Epaphras S. 
1819 Sherman, Henry. 

1833 Sherman, James A. 
1816 Sherman, Josiah J. 
1819 Sherman, Roger M. 

1829 Sherwood, Isaac. 

1841 Sherwood, James B. W. 

1834 Sherwood, Napoleon B. 
1829 Shilds, Alexander. 
1858 Schloss, Emanuel A. 
1850 Shrisheimer, Charles. 
1860 Shultz, Joseph. 

1838 Sickles, Daniel. 



128 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1827 Sickles, John A. 
1860 Sickles, Robert F. 
1858 Sigsbee, Charles D. 
1837 Sill, John N. 

1828 Sill, Rensselaer N. 
1832 Silliman, Horace B. 
1848 Silliman, James R. 
1858 Silsby, John. 

1830 Sim, William B. 

1853 Simmons, Daniel. 
1834 Simmons, Henry. 
1860 Simmons, Henry L. 

1840 Simpson, Marquis D. L. 

1855 Simpson, Simon M. 

1841 Sims, Francis. 
1862 Sims, William B. L, 

1854 Simson, John G. 

1848 Sing, Edward P. 

1823 Skiff, Seymour. 

1824 Skinner, Charles. 
1815 Skinner, Charles F. 
1823 Skinner, Henry. 
1839 Skinner, John. 
1815 Skinner, John S. 
1832 Skinner, John W. 
1828 Skinner, Joshua K. 

1856 Skinner, Phincas M. 
1817 Skinner, Richard C. 
1838 Slack, Henry. 

1849 Slack, Henry R. 

1847 Slack, John D. 

1827 Slack, William A. 
1849 Slason, Edward P. 
1855 Slater, Henry Jr. 
1821 Slingerland, Augustus. 

1820 Slingerland, Elbert. 
1860 Slingerland, George W. 
1826 Slingerland, John J. 
1859 Slingerland, William. 

1821 Slingerland, William J, 
1832 Sloan, Christian S. 

1828 Small, James. 

1848 Smith, Abraham S. 
1837 Smith, Benjamin F. Jr. 
1855 Smith, Charles E. 



1861 Smith, Charles W. 

1851 Smith, Clark H. 

1857 Smith, Cornal Stevenson Jon. 

1854 Smith, Daniel J. 

1848 Smith, Donald. 
1843 Smith Edward M. 
1850 Smith, Edwin. 

1828 Smith, Elias Willard. 

1855 Smith, Frederic J. 
1831 Smith, Frederick. 

1857 Smith, Franklin Benj. Galutin 

1850 Smith, George. 

1849 Smith, George W. Jr. 

1851 Smith, Heber. 
1837 Smith, Henry L. 
1816 Smith, Horace. 
1851 Smith, Ira St. Clair. 
1836 Smith, Israel. 

1821 Smith, Jacob P. 
1839 Smith, James B. 
1853 Smith, James L. 
1846 Smith, James P. 
1848 Smith, J. N. Wilder. 
1820 Smith, Joel. 
1848 Smith, John, 
1831 Smith, John A. 
1815 Smith, Joseph C. 
1848 Smith, Lewis Beck. 
1838 Smith, Peter. 

1838 Smith, Peter Jr. 

1839 Smith, R. E. 

1837 Smith, Robert C. 
1833 Smith, Samuel. 

1828 Smith, Samuel Sidney. 
1839 Smith, Stephen. 

1855 Smith, Theodore D. 
1850 Smith, Theodore Jr. 

1838 Smith, Thomas A. 
1838 Smith, Thomas W. 
1817 Smith, William. 
1857 Smith, William A. 
1847 Smith, Zachariah Jr. 
1817 Smyth, Charles T. 

1829 Smyth, Henry M. 
1816 Smyth, Isaac Fryer. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



129 



184G Smyth, John K. 1824 

1829 Sinytli, Patrick. 182:5 
1853 Snell, William. 18C2 

1858 Snow, Joseph H. 1853 
1817 Solomons, Adolphus. 1819 
1823 Solomons, Levi. 1848 

1817 Solomons, Lucius Levy. 1830 
1823 Solomons, Samuel D. 1823 

1830 Soulden, William M. 1860 
1828 Southwick, Alfred. 1847 
1815 Southwick, Francis M. 1846 

1856 Southwick, Frank. 1847 

1819 Southwick, Henry C. 1844 

1820 Southwick, Solomon. 1818 

1818 Southwick, Thomas. 1817 
1837 Spofford, Horatio G. 1838 

1847 Spanier, Emil. 1833 
1852 Sparhawk, George K. 1836 

1848 Spaun, .Lacob S. 1830 
1841 Spears, Samuel S. 1844 

1857 Spelman, Benjamin R. Jr. 1862 
1860 Spelman, William. 1862 
1822 Spencer, Alexander A. 1841 

1821 Spencer, John. 1851 
1833 Spencer John C. Jr. 1839 
1848 Spencer, Thomas W. 1857 

1860 Sporborg, Henry. 1817 

1861 Sporborg, Silas. 1817 
1863 Sporborg, William L. 1830 

1839 Sprague, Burton. 1820 

1859 Sprague, Edward Everett. 1816 

1851 Sprague, Frederick H. 1839 

1859 Sprague, Horace T. 1821 
1836 Sprague, James AV. 1836 

1840 Sprague, J. Britton. 1852 
1850 Sprague, John A. J. 1823 
1836 Sprague, William B. Jr. 1851 

1861 Springhart, Edwin. 1826 
1856 Sprinks, James. 1826 

1860 Sprung, Charles H. 1815 
1848 Spurr, Andrew J. 1825 

1852 Staats, Bleecker I. 1837 
1844 Staats, Charles P. 1858 

1862 Staats, Dubois. 1830 
1860 Staats, Edward P. 1834 

17 



Staats, Isaac AY. 
Staats, John C. 
Staats, John Henry. 
Staats, John L. 
Staats, Peter P. 
Staats, Philip. 
Staats, Stephen. 
Staats, AVilliam H. 
Stackpole, Horatio P. 
Stackpole, James. 
Stackpole, Henry. 
Stafford, Arthur G. 
Stafford, James G. 
Stafford, James R. 
Stafford, John. 
Stafford, Michael B. 
Stafford, Robert N. 
Stafford, Samuel S. 
Stafford, Spencer R. 
Stafford, Walter S. E. 
Stahl, John M. 
Staley, Bowen. 
Staley, Daniel G. 
Stanahan, Nicholas. 
Stanford, A. P. 
Stanley, Edward. 
Stansbury, Erskine. 
Stansbury, Howard. 
Stanton, Charles H. 
Stanton, George W. 
Stanton, Martin. 
Stanwix, G. 
Stark, Oliver. 
Starks, Artemas B. 
Starks, George C. 
Starr, Henry. 
Starr, James M. A. 
Starr, Alelancthon. 
Starr, Richard T. 
Stearns, Henry K. 
Steele, Daniel. 
Steele, Henry. 
Steele, Henry Clay. 
Steele, John F. 
Steele, Levi. 



130 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1845 Steele, Oliver. 1846 
1818 Steele, Roswell. 1844 
1830 Steele, William H. 1835 
1858 Steers, Barent B. 18G0 

1853 Stein, Levi S. 1829 

1846 Stembers, William IT. 1829 
1820 Sternberg, Jacob. 1845 
184G Sternberg, William 11. 1846 
1839 Stevens, F. 1849 
1838 Stevens, George M. 1824 
1841 Stevens, James H. 1836 

1832 Stevens, Ward Smith. 1834 

1833 Stevenson, George J. 1830 

1838 Stever, Erastus. 1845 

1839 Stevil, E. 1844 
1824 Stevrart, William. 1815 

1838 Stiles, Henry. 1854 

1817 Stilwell, John W. 1854 
1858 Stimson, Daniel M, 1821 

1839 Stockton, G. 1824 
1837 Stockton, John P. 1853 

1854 Stoffel, William. 1834 

1844 Stokes, Joseph. 1845 

1849 Stone, Charles G. 1853 
1862 Stone, Charles H. 1862 
1861 Stone, Joseph D. 1862 

1834 Stone, William H. 1853 

1852 Storey, AVilliam. 1827 

1850 Storey, James T. 1827 

1835 Story, Joseph. 1856 

1858 Stoughton, Hugh Bernard. 1837 

1859 Stoughton, Norman C. 1851 

1845 Strain, Alexander. 1858 
1835 Strain, David. 1854 
1830 Strain, James. 1860 

1851 Strain, James. 1845 
1851 Strain, John. 1862 

1845 Strain, Robert. 1*44 
1833 Strait, Hiram. 1851 

1818 Strange, James. 1839 

1853 Straiten, Amos-B. 1851 
1857 Street, Alfred, W. 1850 
1856 Street, Gilbert W. 1817 

1846 Street, Richard E. 1837 

1819 Strong, Antliony M. 1822 



Strong, Benjamin. 
Strong, Charles H. 
Strong, John. 
Strong, John. 
Strong, Joseph M. 
Strong, Paschal N. 
Strong, Richard M. 
Strong, Robert. 
Strong, Robert G. 
Strong, Robert M. K. 
Strong, Stephen. 
Strong, Thomas J. 
Strong, William N. 
Strother, William H. 
Strother, William L. 
Stuart, Charles G. 
Stuart, Daniel D. 
Stuart, Thomas. 
Sturtevant, Oscar. 
Sudam, Harrison. 
Snell, William. 
Summers, Henry. 
Sumner, Alanson A. 
Sumner, William A. 
Sutliff, Charles. 
Sutliff, John H 
Swahlen, William F. 
Swain, Robert. 
Swain, Samuel R. 
Swan, Richard H. 
Swart, Cornelius. 
Swarts, Charles. 
Swartz, Nathan. 
Sweet, Edward 11. 
Sweet, John L. 
Swift, Hugh Jr. 
Swinburne, Lewis. 
Sylvester, George W. 
Taber, Oliver A. 
Taber, Paul T. 
Taber, William A. 
Taell, Edward M. 
Talbert, Robert. 
Talcott, Henry W. 
Talcott, John L. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



131 



1839 Tallcott, Daniel W. 
1885 Tallman, Charles. 
1881 Talhuan, Darius. 
1835 Tallman, INIarcius, 
1852 Taylor, Augustus R. 
184G Taylor, Charles H. 
1852 Taylor, Clinton T. 
1889 Taylor, D. 
1852 Taylor, George. 

1830 Taylor, Ira H. 
1839 Taylor, James B. 
1837 Taylor, James Jr. 
1832 Taylor, Joseph B. 
1880 Taylor, J. Richmond. 
1801 Taylor, Robert S. 

1845 Taylor, "William H. 
1857 Taylor, William S. 

1854 Teller, David A. 
1861 Teller, Elisha P. 
1837 Teller, James, 
1851 Teller, William. 
1849 Temple, Robert. 

1849 Temple, William James. 

1818 Ten Broeck, Henry. 
1826 Ten Broeck, Richard. 
1843 Ten Eyck, A. Cuyler. 
1823 Ten Eyck, Andrew J. 

1831 Ten Eyck, Anthony. 

1848 Ten Eyck, Britton. 

1849 Ten Eyck, Clinton. 

1819 Ten Eyck, Ilarman G. 
1826 Ten Eyck, Henry. 
1849 Ten Eyck, Jacob. 
1836 Ten Eyck, Jacob. 

1846 Ten Eyck, Jacob H. Jr. 
1819 Ten Eyck, Jacob L. 
1829 Ten Eyck, John. 

1848 Ten Eyck, Lamoure. 
1831 Ten Eyck, Leonard. 
1815 Ten Eyck, Leonard G. 
1851 Ten Eyck, Leonard G. Jr. 
1848 Ten Eyck, Matthias. 

1855 Ten Eyck, Millard. 
1819 Ten Eyck, Peter G. 
1815 Ten Eyck, Philip. 



1834 Ten Eyck, Philip. 
1883 Ten Eyck, Richard. 

1848 Ten Eyck, William H. 

1835 Ternouth, William. 
1862 Terrell, Holland A. 
1853 Terry, George E. 
1846 Thacher, John F. 
1858 Thatcher, John B. 
1839 Thayer, George H. 
1835 Thomas, Charles. 
1858 Thomas, Charles H. 
1831 Thomas, David W. 

1835 Thomas, Edmund L. 
1846 Thomas, George C. 
1886 Thomas, George F. 
1882 Thomas, James. 

1851 Thomas, James H. 
1830 Thomas, John Jr.. 
1839 Thomas, Warren L. 
1862 Thomas, William C. 
1862 Thomas, W^illiam G. Jr. 
1845 Thomas, William H. 

1844 Thomas, William R. 

1836 Thompson, Charles D. 

1849 Thompson, Charles F. 

1837 Thompson, Edmund. 

1838 Thompson, Michael. 

1850 Thompson, Robert. 
1837 Thompson, AVilliam. 
1857 Thomson, Henry. 

1848 Thorburn, Alexander McA. 
1836 Thorburn, John D. 
1836 Thorburn, Samuel T. 
1848 Thorburn, William G. 

1852 Thorn, Thomas R. 
1841 Thornton, De Witt. 
1841 Thornton, William. 
1862 Thornton, William. 
1833 Thorp, John D. 
1841 Thorp, William H. 
1832 Tibbals, William W. 

1845 Tibbits, Bleecker. 

1846 Tibbits, Clarkson. 
1850 Tibbits, John. 
1848 Tidd, John A. 



132 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1846 Tillinghast, J. Wilbur. 183G 

1846 Tillinghast, William E. 1839 

1833 Tillitson, Echvard R. 1853 

1849 Tittle, David. 1861 

1854 Todd, Charles. 1834 

1856 Todd, Eban. 1838 

1854 Todd, Edmund A. 1848 

1836 Todd, John E. 1835 
1845 Todd, Nathaniel P. 1839 
1849 Todd, Robert F. 1830 
1862 Todd, William A. 1839 

1845 Tomlinson, Victory L. 1822 
1858 Topping, Charles W. 1828 
1848 Tossard, Francis. 1861 
1854 Towner, Egbert. 1836 

1848 Towner, Samuel B. 1831 
1821 Townsend, Ambrose S. 1848 

1849 Townsend, Charles N. 1862 

1817 Townsend, Edward. 1815 

1850 Townsend, Edward. 1827 
1829 Townsend, Franklin. 1862 

1833 Townsend, Frederick. 1857 
1832 Townsend, Howard. 1847 

1821 Townsend, Isaiah. 1853 
1839 Townsend, J. C. 1841 
1849 Townsend, John D. P. 1862 

1818 Townsend, Jolin F. 1858 
1844 Townsend, John Jr. 1843 
1817 Townsend, John R. 1829 
1829 Townsend, Robert. 1849 

1834 Townsend, Theodore. 1854 
1849 Townsend, Volkert D. P. 1838 

1822 Townsend, William H. 1826 

1860 Tracey, Charles. 1825 

1837 Tracey, Edward H. 1853 
1856 Tracy, Osgood V. 1849 

1849 Traver, Alvah. 1837 
1862 Traver, James. 1853 

1861 Treadwell, E. Prentice. 1849 

1850 Treadwell, George II. 1827 

1862 Treadwell, John P. 1829 

1846 Treadwell, Robert B. 1852 
1834 Treat, Nathan P. 1836 
1815 Treat, Richard S. 1841 
1815 Treat, Samuel S. I860 



Treat, Theodore S. 
Tredway, William AV. 
Tremaine, Frederic L. 
Tremaine, Porter Jr. 
Tremper, Cantine. 
Tremper, Julius. 
Trilder, William P. 
Tripp, Ferris. 
Tripp, T. 

Trotter, Edward W. 
Trotter, Elias Willard, 
Trotter, John H. 
Trotter, Matthew. 
Trotter, Van Vcchten. 
Trotter, AVillard. 
Trowbridge, Alexander II. 
Trowbi'idge, Arthur W. 
Trowbridge, John P. 
Truax, John B. 
Trumpbour, AVilliam C. 
Tucker, Charles. 
Tucker, G. M. 
Tucker, Luther II. 
Tucker, Stephen Jr. 
Tucker, Theodore S. 
Tucker, William P. 
Tucker, AVillis Gaylord; 
Tucker, Wilson. 
Tuft's, .Joseph. 
Tuffs, Lucicn .Jr. 
Tuffts, Julian. 
Tulane, Hall N. 
Tullidge, Alfred. 
TuUidge, Henry. 
Turner, Alden. 
Tuttle, Daniel I. 
Tuttle, Merrit. 
Udell, Samuel Howard. 
Valentine, Henry C. 
Van Alen, Ilarman W. 
Van Alen, John G. 
Van Allen, Adam Jr. 
Van Allen, Francis. 
Van Allen, Gai'ret A. 
Van Allen, John B. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



loo 



1854 Van Allen, Jolin S. 1854 

1851 Van Allen, Peter W. 184G 

1851 Van Allen, William II. 1853 
1822 Van Alstine, Christian. 1849 
1824 Van Alstine, Martin. 1853 
1824 Van Alstine, Matthew M. 1854 
1830 Van Alstyne, David P. 1862 
1828 Van Alstyne, J. Fonda. 1856 
18G1 Van Alstyne, AVilliam Charles. 1855 
1822 Van Antwerp, Daniel. 18G0 

1821 Van Antwerp, Isaac V. 1839 
1819 Van Antwerp, Stephen. 1815 

1852 Van Benthuysen, Arthur R. 1829 
1862 Van Benthuysen, Charles H. 1837 
1860 Van Benthuysen, Clarence. 1815 
1841 Van Benthuysen, F. B. 1815 
1860 Van Benthuysen, Frank. 1817 

1819 Van Benthuysen, Henry. 1841 
1836 Van Benthuysen, Henry B. 1830 
1830 Van Benthuysen, Packard. 1830 

1835 Van Bergen, .John P. 1836 
1817 Van Buren, Abraham. 1815 
1817 Van Buren, John. 1830 

1820 Van Buren, Martin. 1818 
1833 Van Buren, Alexander L, 1819 

1836 Van Buren, David H. 1853 

1838 Van Buren, Henry. 1847 

1848 Van Buren, Martin. 1845 

1837 Van Buren, Thomas B. 1817 

1822 Van Cortlandt, Pierre. 1817 
1846 Vandenbergh, John. 1838 

1839 Vandenbergh, K. L. 1838 
1854 Vandenbergh, William. 1820 

1838 Vanderbelt, Henry. 1841 
1838 Vanderbelt, Richard V. 1817 
1838 Vanderbelt, AVilliam H. 1815 
1836 Vanderbergh, Richard L. 1831 
1851 Vanderlip, Charles S. 1841 
1851 Vanderlip, George H. 1858 
1851 Vanderlip, George L. 1848 

1849 Vanderlip, Watkins. 1818 
1841 Vanderlip, AVilliam L. 1818 
1832 Vanderpoel, Isaac. 1841 
1858 Vanderpoel, Isaac. 1854 
1824 Vanderzee, Henry. 1849 



Vanderzee, Jacob. 

Van Deusen, John C. 

Van Dyck, Edward A. 

Van Dyck, Henry II. Jr. 

Van Dyck, Henry L. 

Van Etten, George H. 

Van Gaasbeck, Amos. 

Van Gaasbeck, William A. 

Van Heusen, Alfred T. 

Van Heusen, Theodore V. 

Van Home, Levi. 

Van Ingen, Harmanus. 

Van Ingen, James L. 

Van Ingen, Josiah S. 

Van Ingen, Philip S. 

Van Ingen, Richard. 

Van Ingen, William H. 

Van Ingen, William Henry. 

Van Loon, Charles. 

Van Loon, Edmund. 

Van Loon, George. 

Van Loon, Jacob. 

Van Loon, James S. 

Van Loon, John W. 

Van Loon, Peter. 

Van Namee, James W. 

Van Ness, Augustus. 

Van Ness, Edward. 

Van Ness, James K. 

Van Ness, John B. 

Van Ness, John L. 

Van Ness, William. 

Van Olinda, Douw B. 

Van Olinda, John. 

Van Rensselaer, Abraham L. 

Van Rensselaer, Bernard S. 

Van Rensselaer, Charles W. 

Van Rensselaer, Edward R. 

Van Rensselaer, Eugene. 

Van Rensselaer, Gratz. 

Van Rensselaer, Henry. 

Van Rensselaer, James. 

Van Rensselaer, James C. 

Van Rensselaer, James H. 

Van Rensselaer, John J. 



134 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1829 Van Rensselaer, Mainisell. 
1836 Van Rensselaer, Peter S. 
1815 Van Rensselaer, Rensselaer. 
1853 Van Rensselaer, Robert H. 
1853 Van Rensselaer, Schuyler. 

1818 Van Rensselaer, Stephen H. 

1849 Van Rensselaer, Visscher. 

1850 Van Rensselaer, Walter A. 
1846 Van Schaack, Edwin H. 
1832 Van Schaack, Egbert. 

1845 Van Schaack, Elbridge G. 

1846 Van Schaack, George W. 
1843 Van Schaack, Jenkins. 
1841 Van Schaack, Nicholas. 
1831 Van Schaack, Stephen D. 

1824 Van Schaick, Charles H. 
1834 Van Schaick, Henry D. 

1819 Van Schaick, Isaac. 
1815 Van Schaick, J. Bleccker. 
1819 Van Schaick, John. 

1827 Van Schelluyne, Cornelius. 
1826 Van Schelluyne, Rensselaer. 
1826 Van Schelluyne, Theodore. 

1829 Van Schoonhoven, Cornelius. 
1819 Van Schoonhoven, Derick. 

1831 Van Schoonhoven, EbenezerL. 
1862 Van Sickler, William H. 

1832 Van Slyck, Andrew P. 
1831 Van Slyck, Harman. 

1830 Van Steenbergh, Hugh H. 

1830 Van Tuyl, Otto W. 

1831 Van Valkenburgh, Henry. 
1838 Van Valkenburgh, John L. 
1843 Van Vechten, Cuyler. 
1834 Van Vechten, George. 
1815 Van Vechten, Jacob T. B. 

1833 Van Vechten, James D. 
1819 Van Vechten, Leonard G. 

1825 Van Vechten, Samuel. 

1826 Van Vechten, Tennis. 
1845 Van Voast, Albert A. Jr. 
1841 Van Voast, Benson G. 
1845 Van Voast, Clarence L. 
1853 Van Volkenburgh, Theodore. 
1852 A'an Yvankcii, Adam A. 



1835 Van Vrankcn, Gansevoort. 
1824 Van Vranken, Jacob. 
1820 Van Wagenen, John. 

1836 Van Wie, Garrit P. 

1837 Van Wormer, Francis. 

1838 Van Wyck, Anthony. 

1843 Van Wyck, Richard. 

1844 Van Zandt, Clarence L. 

1845 Van Zandt, John. 
183G Van Zandt, William. 
1820 Vedder, Quincy A. 
1819 Vedder, Richard. 
1837 Vermilye, Ashbel G. 

1836 Vermilye, Thomas E. 
1860 Vernani, Harry. 
1859 Vernam, William S. 
1829 Vernor, Benjamin. 
1848 Vernor, Charles H. 

1848 Vernor, George. 
1835 Vernor, Jeremiah S. 

1835 Vernor, John T. 
1829 Verplanck, Isaac. 
1828 Viele, Augustus. 

1837 Viele, Egbert L. 
1828 Viele, Henry K. 
1837 Viele, Maurice E. 
1824 Visscher, Barcnt. 
1828 Visscher, Edward. 

1815 Visscher, Harmin. 
1844 Visscher, James C. 

1836 Visscher, John B. 

1852 Visscher, John Barrent. 

1816 Visscher, Thomas S. 
1836 Volk, Abram. 

1859 Vosburgh, Theodore. 
1826 Vosburgh, William. 
1851 Vosburgh, William. 
1855 Vrooman, Walter K. 
1851 Waddle, John. 

1849 Wadsworth, Charles. 
1849 Wadsworth, Chester. 
1851 Wait, Edward D. 
1851 Wait, John D. 

1853 Wait, AVilliam B. 
1834 AValdron, Charles N. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



135 



1831 AValdron, George W. 
1827 Waldron, Henry. 
1880 Waklron, William. 
1822 Walker, Calvin. 
1819 Walker, Frederick. 
1826 AValker, George. 

1819 Walker, Henry A. 
1831 Walker, James. 
1854 Walker, Samuel S. 

1820 AValker, Silas. 

1819 Walker, Willard H. 

1843 Wall, Andrew J. 
1846 Wallace, Oliver. 
1857 Wallace, William J. 
1854 Walsh, Alfred. 
1817 Walsh, Charles. 
1850 Walsh, Dudley. 

1861 Walsh, Hugh McK. 

1820 Walsh, James. 

1862 AValter, Joseph B. 

1815 Walton, Henry. 
1822 Walton, James D. 
1822 AValton, William. 
1829 AValworth, Clarence A. 

1846 Wands, Burgess H. 

1847 Wands, Franklin. 
1831 Wands, Isaac H. 

1844 AVands, James. 
1859 Wands, James F. 
1844 Wands, John. 
1859 Wands, John B. 
1861 Ward, Irving. 
1846 Ward, John. 
1861 Ward, Walworth. 

1848 Waring, Richard S. 
1840 Warner, F. 

1849 Warner, John H. 
1859 Warren, Clement H. 
1854 Warren, Edward F. J. 
1837 Warren, George W. 

1816 Warren, James. 
1849 Warren, Theodore. 
1859 Wasserbach, William. 
1839 Wasson, C. E. 

1830 Wasson, Chauncey H. 



1831 Wasson, Christopher C. 
1831 Wasson, George W. 
1849 AVasson, .lames D. Jr. 
1824 AVasson, John B. 

1819 AVasson, AVilHam G. 
1841 AVaterhouse, Richard G. 

1835 AVaterman, Augustus. 

1833 Waterman, Charles G. 
1830 AVaterman, Edgar. 

1829 AVaterman, George. 
1802 AVaterman, Henry AV. 
1845 AVaterman, James. 

1830 AA'aterman, Jeremiah, 
1830 AVaterman, John G. 

1830 AVaterman, Robert. 

1834 AVaterman, Robert H. 
1815 Waters, Andreas. 
1815 Waters, David. 

1815 Waters, Hugh. 
1818 AVatson, Charles. 
1821 AVatson, Ebenezer. 

1856 AVatson, George Harris. 

1857 Watson, George AV. 
1845 AVatson, Howard. 

1820 Watson, Robert. 

1816 AVatson, Theodore. S. 

1815 AA'atson, AVinslow C. 

1836 AVaugh, John S. 
1861 AVayne, Edmund R. 
1854 AVeaver, David S. 
1854 Weaver, Francis N. 
1829 AVeaver, Hamilton B. 

1824 Weaver, Isaiah L. 
1829 AVeaver, Jeremiah J. 
1853 AVeaver, John E. 

1816 AVebb, John. 

1831 AVebster, Charles R. 
1815 AVebster, George. 

1821 AVebster, Horace B. 

1825 AA'ebster, Howard. 

1837 AA''ebster, James H. 

1817 AVebster, John. 
1849 AVebster, Joseph. 
1815 AVebster, M.' Henry. 
1819 AVebster, Richard. 



136 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1815 
1815 
1830 
1860 
1833 
1835 
1858 
1857 
1854 
1827 
1828 
1855 
1822 
1822 
1826 
1842 
1835 
1835 
1834 
1839 
1832 
1849 
1832 
1829 
1833 
1839 
1830 
1827 
1858 
1830 
1856 
1836 
1840 
1820 
1836 
1819 
1846 
1853 
1818 
1831 
1819 
1828 
1827 
1821 
1836 



Webster, Samuel. 1815 

AVebster, William. I860 

Webster, William II. ,1847 

Weed, Frank H. 1821 

Weed, James B. 1850 

Weed, Walter S. 1850 

Weidman, Eugene. 1853 

Weil, Perez. 1845 

Weil, Samuel. 1852 

Welch, Ashbel. 1838 

Weld, Gilbert G. ■ 1851 

Weldon, William H. 1839 

Welles, Augustus L. 1846 

Welles, Edmund W. 1851 

Wells, Charles. 1848 

Wells, Charles H. 1837 

Wells, George A. 1838 

Wells, Henry. 1842 

Wells, Henry J. 1846 

Wells, J. H. 1850 

Wells, Joseph A. 1838 

Wells, Leonard. 1847 

Wells, Minot M. 1846 

Wells, Robert H. 1862 

Wells, Thomas D. 1837 

Wells, Walter M. 1852 

Wells, William D. 1853 

Wells, William H. 1846 

Wells, William S. 1852 

Welsh, George H. 1853 

Welsh, Henry F. 1855 

Welsh, Isaac L. 1839 

Welsh, 0. 1839 

Welsh, Samuel. 1830 

Welsh, William T. 1852 

Wemple, Christopher Y. 1838 

Wemple, Henry De Witt. 1850 

Wemple, Peter II. 1849 

Wendell, Benjamin A. 1831 

Wendell, Benjamin Rush. 1861 

Wendell, Harmanus. 1862 

Wendell, James L. 1847 

Wendell, John. 1853 

Wendell, Oscar. 1853 

Wendell, Peter. 1834 



Wendover, Peter Y. S. 
Werner, Edgar. 
Wesley, John Edward- 
Westerlo, Eilardus. 
Westheimer, Henry. 
Whalen, Daniel. 
Wharton, John S. 
Wheaton, Samuel L. 
Wheeler, Edwin S. 
Wheeler, John M. 
Wheeler, Seth. 
AVheeler, William. 
Whetten, AVilliam. 
Whipple, Henry. 
Whipple, AVilliam W. 
AVhish, AVilliam H. 
AA'hitbeck, John. 
AVhite, Albert A. 
AA'^hit, Andrew Jr. 
AA'hite, Charles R. 
AVhite, James P. 
White, John G. 
White, Matthew. 
AVhite, Ross. 
AVhite, Rufus P. 
AVhite, Silas. 
AVhite, Thaddeus R. 
AVhite, AAllliam James. 
Whitecar, Howard. 
AVhitecar, Newton. 
Whitebouse, Silas S. 
Whiteman, G. 
Whiteman, J. 
Whiting, Daniel P. 
Whitlock, Hamilton L. 
Whitlock, James G. 
Whitney, Alonzo. 
Whitney, Charles. 
Wliitncy, Cliarles E. 
Whitney, Charlel E. 
Whitney, Charles L. 
Whitney, Chuancey Jr. 
Whitney, C. Henry. 
Wliituey, Edward H. 
Whitney, George. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



137 



1853 Whitney, George P. 1855 

1855 Whitney, Henry C. 1829 

1832 Whitney, James. 1861 
1839 Whitney, John R. 1841 
1843 Whitney, John S. 18G1 

1846 Whitney, Richard H. M. 1830 
1835 Whitney, Stephen W. 1818 
1835 Whitney, William H. 1830 
1834 Whitney, AVilliam W. 1830 
1837 Wicks, Silas R. 1840 
1861 Wicks, Thomas T. 1836 
1849 Wilbur, Benjamin H. 1843 

1847 Wilcox, Robert E. 1836 
1852 Wilder, Ephraim. 1837 

1829 Wilder, John N. Jr. 1853 
1852 Wilder, John N. 1829 
1846 Wilder, Waldo. 1846 
1846 Wilder, William. 1835 
1849 Wiles, Thomas S. 1830 

1822 AVilgus, Charles. 1831 
1858 Wilkes, Arthur Augustus. 1857 
1855 Wilkeson, Bayard. 1819 
1855 Wilkeson, Frank. 1837 
1855 Wilkeson, Gansevoort. 1837 
1841 Williamson, Henry. 1839 

1837 Williamson, James. 1829 
1824 Williamson, Mathew. 1857 
1841 Willard, Edward Kirk. 1836 

1823 Willard, Elisha R. 1841 

1838 Willard, Frederick M. 1853 

1824 Willard, John L. 1819 
1861 Willerton, Edmund. 1852 
1824 Willet, Edward. S. 1839 

1830 Williams, Abraham E. 1841 
1846 Williams, Alfred Ridgeway. 1862 
1834 Williams, Arthur. 1833 

1834 Williams, Charles. 1839 
1855 Williams, Frederic S. 1859 

1833 Williams, George H. 1819 
1826 Williams, Henry C 1850 
1849 Williams, Henry R. 1844 

1848 Williams, Henry Seymour. 1839 

1835 Williams, James B. 1824 
1829 Williams, John H. 1841 
1846 Williams, John S. 1856 
1828 Williams, Joseph D. 1822 

18 



Williams, Orion H. 
Williams, Samuel. 
Williamson, Austin. 
Williamson, John D. 
Wilson, Abner A. 
Wilson, Benjamin. 
Wilson, Boyd H. 
Wilson, Charles. 
Wilson, Edward F. 
Wilson, George P. 
Wilson, Gilbert L. 
Wilson, Henry G. F. 
Wilson, Henry L. 
Wilson, James. 
Wilson, James A. 
Wilson, .John. 
AVilson, John L. 
Wilson, John J. 
Wilson, John 0. 
Wilson, Joseph B. 
Wilson, Levi Carter. 
Wilson, Maynard. 
Wilson, Myron W. 
Wilson, Nicholas. 
Wilson, Reuben. 
Wilson, Richard L. 
Wilson, Robert. 
Wilson, Stephen L. 
Wilson, Thomas. 
Wilson, Thomas A. 
Wilson, Timothy. 
Wilson, William P. 
Winant, I. 
Wing, James. 
Wing, James C. 
Wing, Matthew C. 
Winne, Abraham L. 
Winne, Archibald. 
Winne, Charles. 
Winne, Charles K. 
Winne, Charles S. 
Winne, Edmund. 
Winne, Edward. 
Winne, F. D. 
Winne, Franklin. 
Winne, George. 



138 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



1828 Winnc, Jacob. 1838 
1818 Wimie, James. 1855 

1836 Winne, John C. 1854 
1839 Winne, John G. 1840 
1835 Winne, Joseph F. 1853 

1837 Winne, Levinus G. 1846 
1854 Winne, Martin V. B. 1859 

1835 AVinne, Visscher. 1850 
1818 Wiune, William. 1859 

1829 Winslow, Augustus S. 1828 

1817 Winslow, Henry. 1833 
1823 Winslow, John F. 1840 
1829 Winslow, Leonard C. 1845 
1825 Winslow, William. 1839 
1821 Wiswal, Samuel. 1839 
1815 Wiswall, Alfred. 1835 

1818 Wiswall, William. 1835 
1851 Woellmer, Argust. 1850 

1838 Wood, Barnabas. 1836 
1825 Wood, Benjamin. 1836 
1862 Wood, Edward. 1837 
1821 Wood, George. 1838 

1858 Wood, Howard. 1815 
1857 Wood, J. Hampton. 1845 
1849 Wood, Samuel. 1817 

1836 Wood, Theodore. 1817 
1849 Wood, Thomas G. 1848 
1838 Wood, William G. 1851 
1857 Wood, William N. 1823 
1853 Woodhall, AVilliam. 1848 
1846 Woodman, Edward B. 1815 
1862 Woodrutr, William II. D. 1818 

1859 Woods, Francis H. 1815 
1827 Woodward, James L. 1843 
1831 Woodworth, John. 1848 
1821 Woodworth, Robert. 1848 
1820 Woodworth, Westerlo. 1846 
1844 Woolford, Allen. 1838 

1861 Woolverton, Charles B. 1817 

1862 Woolverton, George A. 1838 
1862 Woolverton, Montcath E. 1839 
1862 Wooster, Edward B. 1846 
1849 Worcester, Franklin E. 1857 
1834 Worcester, George P. 1836 
1841 AVormer, F. V. 1855 
1859 Wormer, Wilson. 



Worth, Charles G. 
Worth, William. 
AVorthington, Herman. 
AVorthington, Robert. 
AVright, Augustus R. 
AVright, Calvin M. 
Wright, Edward A. 
Wright, John. 
Wright, John II. 
AVright, Phineas C. 
AVright, William W. 
AVrightman, John. 
AVrightson, George. 
AA^rightson, John. 
AVrightson, AA^illiam. 
Wyatt, George. 
Wyatt, Uriah J. 
WyckoflF, David A. 
Wyckoff, Isaac 0. 
AVyckoff, Theodore F. 
AVyre, Andrew. 
Yates, Alonzo Kingsley. 
Yates, Christopher. 
Yates, David. 
Yates, Edward. 
Yates, Frederick L. 
Yates, George W. M. 
Yates, Hiram .Ir. 
Yates, John C. 
Yates, John Waters. 
Yates, Richard. 
Yates, Robert. 
Yates, Simon Mctcalf. 
Young, Archibald S. 
Young, Campbell. 
Young, Charles L. 
Young, Heurj'^ 0. 
Young, James H. 
Young, Joshua. 
Young, Martin V. 
Young, Merritt. 
Young, Oscar H. 
Zeh, James A. 
Zch, John. 
Zeisei', Joseph. 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 

CHRONOLOGICALLY ARRANGED. 



1815 Allen, Christopher. 
Allen, Horatio. 
Anderson, Peter. 
Backus, Eleazer W. 
Banyar, Goldsborough L. R. 
Bay, John W. 
Bleecker, Henry. 
Bleecker, Rutger. 
Bloodgood, William. 
Boardman, William. 
Bogart, Alexander H. 
Bogart, Stephen V. R. 
Boyd, James P. 
Boyd, James R. 
BrinkerhofF, Isaac. 
BrinkerhofF, John. 
Bridgen, Abraham T. E. 
Brinkerhoff, George. 
Brown, Henry. 
Clark, Edward. 
Clarke, Joseph W. 
Cooper, William. 
Cuyler, Augustus. 
Denniston, Isaac Jr. 
Dorr, Alfred. 
Fowler, William. 
Gansevoort, Henry. 
Gansevoort, Ten Eyck. 
Gates, Cornelius. 
Gould, Benjamin. 



Gould, Charles. 
Graham, Van Wyck. 
Hand, Epenetus B. 
Hand, Isaac P. 
Henry, John V. 
Henry, Peter Seton. 
Howe, Francis. 
Humphries, Correl, 
Hutton, George. 
Hutton, Thomas L. 
Kent, William. 
Lamb, Anthony. 
Lamb, George. 
Lansing, Barent B. 
Lawrence, Thomas. 
Linn, Henry. 
Livingston, J. Allen. 
Marcelus, John. 
M'Culloch, John H. 
Mclntyre, John Mc D. 
Meads, Orlando. 
Morris, Orrin W. 
Oake, Effingham. 
Pearson, Rensselaer. 
Porter, John C. 
Pugsley, Cornelius. 
Quackenbush, Gansevoort. 
Roorback, Orville A, 
Skinner, Charles F. 
Skinner, John S. 



140 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Smith, Joseph C. 
South wick, FraDcis M. 
Stearns, Henry K. 
Stuart, Charles G. 
Teu Eyck, Leonard G. 
Ten Eyck, Philip, 
Treat, Richard S. 
Treat, Samuel S. 
Truas, John B. 
Van Ingen, Harmanus. 
Van Ingen, Philip S. 
Van Ingen, Richard. 
Van Loon, Jacob. 
Van Rensselaer, Bernard S. 
Van Rensselaer, Rensselaer. 
Van Schaick, J. Bleecker. 
Van Vechten, Jacob T. B. 
Visscher, Harmin. 
Walton, Henry. 
Waters, Andreas. 
Waters, David. 
Waters, Hugh. 
Watson, Winslow C. 
Webster, George. 
Webster, M. Henry. 
Webster, Samuel. 
Webster, William. 
Weudover, Peter V. S. 
Wiswall, Alfred. 
Yates, Christopher. 
Yates, Richard. 
Yates, Simon Metcalf. 
1816 Abel, Andrew. 

Bleecker, John Rutger. 
Bleecker, Stephen V. R. 
Brown, Edward H. 
Brown, Stanton H. 
Cruttenden, Robert G. 
Dean, William Eaton. 
Ford, John W. 
Kane, Schelluyne, 
Kane, Theodore. 
Lansing, John V. S. 
Lay, James. 



Livingston, Theodore. 
Ostrander, William. 
Piatt, Henry. 
Sherman, Josiah. 
Smith, Horace. 
Smyth, Isaac Fryer. 
Visscher, Thomas S. 
Warren, James. 
Watson, Theodore S. 
Webb, John. 
1817 Ackerman, Garrit. 
Anderson, William. 
Aikin, George. 
Backus, J. Trumbull. 
Birdsall, Thomas. 
Bogart, John H. 
Boyd, William Scott. 
Brayton, Thomas A. 
Brinkerhotf, Beekman. 
Brinkerhoff, Cornelius. 
Campbell, William. 
Cassady, James. 
Cassidy, John P. 
Center, Aaron H. 
Clinton, De Witt. 
Clinton, George W. 
De Witt, Jacob V. L. 
Dunn, John. 
Elliott, Isaac D. 
Evertsen, Bernard. 
Fenn, James M. 
Fryer, Aaron. 
Goewey Henry. 
Qoewey, Philip. 
Gourlay, James Jr. 
Haring, Samuel K. 
Heermans, James B. 
Hempstead, Lsaac. 
Hochstrasser, Osmond. 
Hoxie, Stansbury. 
Humphries, Enoch. 
Jauncey, James. 
Kittles, John F. 
Low, James C. 



LIST OF SUDENTS. 



141 



Mahar, Edward. 
McCabe, Richard. 
McKay, Michael. 
Olmstead, John J. 
Ostrauder, Alexander. 
Ostrander, John C. 
Powers, Titus W. 
Rudes, Hallenbake. 
Rudes, Jason. 
Schuyler, D. Gilbert. 
Schuyler, John C. 
Seymour, Edward. 
Sharpe, Stephen R. 
Shepherd, William S. 
Skinner, Richard C. 
Smith, William. 
Smyth, Charles T. 
Solomons, Adolphus. 
Solomons, Lucius Levy. 
Stafford, John. 
Stansbury, Erskine. 
Stansbury, Howard. 
Stilwell, John W. 
Talbert, Robert. 
Townsend, Edward. 
Townsend, John R. 
Van Beuren, Abraham. 
Van Beuren, John. 
Van Ingen, William H. 
Van Ness, James K. 
Van Ness, John B. 
Van Rensselaer, Abraham L. 
Walsh, Charles. 
Webster, John. 
Winslow, Henry. 
Yates, Edward. 
Yates, Frederick L. 
Young, Joshua. 
1818 Aikin, John M. 
Ames, Angelo. 
Backus, John C. 
Baird, George. 
Bleecker, George M. 
Bogart, William H. 



Bradford, Stephen L. 
Brinkerhoff, Edward. 
Brown, Andrew. 
Biirr, George. 
Burr, Henry. 
Campbell, Daniel. 
Center, Edward. 
Cock, Isaac. 
Crawford, Lemuel. 
Cropsey, Jasper E. 
Cuyler, Frederick. 
Dean, Henry. 
De Witt, Silas. 
Duffy, James. 
Dutcher, Salem. 
Easton, John. 
Elmendorf, John. 
Elmole, David W. 
Fenn, T. Jefferson. 
Geer, Harold. 
Gilchrist, Edward. 
Gill, Charles W. 
Gregory, Edward. 
Gregory, Sherlock, 
Groesbeeck, Stephen. 
Hamilton, Alfred. 
Hinckley, Warren. 
Howe, Smith. 
Hun, Thomas. 
James, Augustus. 
Jones, Robert. 
Kearney, Francis. 
Kidney, Jonathan. 
Knower, Edmund. 
Knower, Elisha D. 
Knower, John. 
Lansing, Charles. 
Lansing, Frederick. 
Lansing, George, 
Lansing, Yates. 
Lay, Timothy C. 
Legrange , George. 
Merchant, Henry S. 
Miller, Abraham 0. 



142 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Hunger, Edwin H. 
Page, Ames C. 
Pembertou, Henry. 
Pemfcerton, John. 
Porter, William C. 
Quackenbush, Nicliolas. 
Quackenbusli, Smith. 
Rockwell, George W. 
Roorback, Junius. 
Sackrider, John P. 
Scovill, Brigham. 
Sedgewick, Theodore. 
Shaw, Hiram. 
Southwick, Thomas. 
Stafford, James R. 
Steele, Roswell. 
Strange, James. 
Tenbroeck, Henry. 
Townsend, John F. 
Van Loon, John W. 
Van Rensselaer, Henry. 
Van Rensselaer, James. 
Van Rensselaer, Stephen H. 
Watson, Charles. 
Wendell, Benjamin A. 
Wilson, Boyd H. 
Wluue, James. 
Winne, William. 
Wiswall, William. 
Yates, Robert. 
1819 Bamman, Henry. 
Bentley, James. 
Brown, Elias. 
Bullock, Thomas. 

Burchard, 

Burke, William. 
Case, Sheldon. 
Chapman, Charles. 
Clinton, James. 
Cruttenden, Warren. 
Curreen, John. 
Daniels, Henry. 
De Witt, James B. 
Dorsey, Robert R. 



Dunn, Edward H . 
Dunn, Richard F. 
Fanning, Diauthus. 
Fonda, William H. 
Ford, Edward. 
Eraser, Alexander. 
French, James M. 
Gleason, Michael. 
Gough, James. 
Gough, William. 
Haff, Hemau. 
Haren, Frederick. 
Hatch, Charles. 
Heath, David. 
Heniy, Joseph. 
James, Henry. 
Jewett, George G. 
Johnson, Daniel. 
Jones, James E. 
Keeler, Charles. 
Lovett, Hamilton. 
Marvin, Benjamin. 
Marvin, Charles. 
Marvin, Richard H. 
Mather, Charles. 
McCamman, Charles. 
McPhern, Andrew. 
Monell, John, 
Nugent, William. 
O'Donnell, William. 
Olcott, Theodore. 
Piatt, Van Zandt, 
Porter, Charles A. 
Porter, Edward James. 
Sexton, Hiram. 
Sherman, Charles. 
Sherman, Henry. 
Sherman, Roger M. 
Southwick, Henry C. 
Staats, Peter P, 
Strong, Anthony M. 
Ten Eyck, Harman. 
Ten Eyck, Jacob L. 
Ten Eyck, Peter G. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



143 



Van Antwerp, Stephen. 
Van Benthuysen, Henry. 
Van Loon, Peter. 
Vau Schaick, Isaac. 
Van Schaick, .John. 
Van Scboonlioven, Derick. 
Van Vechten, Leonard G. 
Vedder, Richard. 
Walker, Frederick. 
Walker, Henry A. 
Walker, Willard H. 
Wasson, William Gr. 
Webster, Richard. 
Wemple, Christopher. 
Wendell, Harmanus. 
Wilson, Maynard. 
Wilson, Timothy. 
Winne, Charles. 
1820 Bacon, Marshall J. 
Benedict, Henry M. 
Benedict, Spencer S. 
Bleecker, Charles M. 
Birtch, E. M. 
Bogart, Isaac. 
Bulkley, Charles D. 
Burton, John I. 
Buttre, William. 
Center, William. 
Chilchester, Arthur. 
Dougherty, Charles H. 
DnflFan, Francis T. 
Duncan, Richard. 
Ford, Eliakim H. 
Gregory, Stephen P. 
Hand, Aaron H. 
Hand, Lemuel P. B. 
Hermans, Halsted. 
Holmes, John. 
Hopkins, William R. 
Howell, James. 
Kane, David. 
King, Andrew. 
Leake, Charles T. 
Linacre, James F. 



Mabee, Henry. 
McMartin, Finlay. 
Mills, John E. 
Murray, David. 
Nowlten, Farnham. 
Pearson, John. 
Prescott, Benjamin. 
Ryan, Stephen V. R. 
Schuyler, Stephen R. 
Selkirk, Francis. 
Seymour, Erastus. 
Slingerland, Elbert. 
Smith, Joel. 
Southwick, Solomon. 
Stanton, George W. 
Sternbergh, Jacob. 
Van Beuren, Martin. 
Van Olinda, Douw B. 
Van Wagener, John. 
Vedder, Quiucy A. 
Walker, Silas H. 
Walsh, James. 
Watson, Robert. 
Welsh, Samuel. 
Whiting, Daniel P. 
Woodworth, Westerlo. 
1821 Beardsley, Crandell E. 
Beardsley, Livington C. 
Boughton, John. 
Bradwell, Stephen, 
Briggs, Jerome. 
Brown, Joab S. 
Brown, Robert. 
Brown, Rufus. 
Brown, William E. 
Colvin Andrew J. 
Cooke, John. 
Cooper, Alfred. 
Cooper, Goldsborough. 
Cooper, Richard. 
Cushman, John W. 
Douw, De Peyster. 
Duer, Edward A. 
Duer, William D. 



144 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Dunn, Henry P. 

Fassett, Amos S. 
Gansevoort, Guert. 
Gansevoort Peter L. 
Gough, William Jr. 
Hall, John Tayler. 
Hare, Silas. 
Herring, Thomas. 
Hochstrasser, Charles. 
Holt. Herman. 
Jackson, Isaac W. 
Jenkins, Timothy. 
Johnson, Robert. 
Jones, Ebenezer. 
King, Lewis P. 
McCamman, Washington. 
McHay, John. 
Mclntyre, Daniel J. 
McNab, John F. 
Nugent, Henry P. 
Newlands, Robert. 
Porter, Ira. 
Root, Arthur H. 
Schermerhorn, Morgan L. 
Selden, Henry R. 
Slingerland, Augustus. 
Slingerlaud, William J. 
Smith, Jacob S. 
Spencer, John. 
Stark, Oliver. 
Sturtevant, Oscar. 
Townsend, Ambrose S. 
Townsend, Isaiah. 
Van Antwerj), Isaac V. 
Watson, Ebenezer. 
Webster, Horace B. 
Weudell, Oscar. 
Westerlo, Eilardus. 
Wiswall, Samuel. 
Wood, George. 
Woodworth, Robert. 
1822 Bassler, Benjamin. 
Boardman, John. 
Boardman, Still man. 



Campbell, Archibald. 
Cantine, John. 
Carson, William. 
Chrystie, James. 
Chrystie, Thomas W. 
Cole, James. 
Cooper, Charles D. 
Fasset, Charles A. 
Gregory, Alexander M. 
Groesbeck, Abraham. 
Harbeck, John. 
Hart, Enoch L. 
Hector, James. 
Hopkins, Samuel. 
Hostbrd, Mahlon T. 
Hubbel, Almerin. 
James, Woodbridge. 
Keeler, Theodore J. 
Livingston, Livingston. 
McMartin, Robert. 
Mc Williams, George. 
Monteith, Peter. 
Olmstead, George T. 
Otis, Tristram Coffin. 
Pike, Benjamin. 
Pratt, Elisha N. 
Sharpe, William A. 
Shaw, Daniel. 
Shaw, James. 
Spencer, Alexander A. 
Talcott, John L. 
Townsend, William H. 
Trotter, John H. 
Van Alstine, Christen B. 
Van Antwerp, Dauiel. 
Van Cortlandt, Pierre. 
Walker, Calvin. 
Waltou, James D. 
Walton, William. 
Welles, Augustus L. 
Welles, Edmund W. 
Wilgns, Charles. 
Winne, George. 
1823 Ausart, Edward C. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



145 



Austin, Anthony H. 
Babbet, Pierre T. 
Bleecker, William E. 
Bloodgood, James. 
Brodhead, Alfred. 
Brodhead, John R. 
Brown, Alexander H. 
Bryce, John. 
Buel, Charles. 
Campbell, Allan. 
Corpenter, George W. 
Clinton, Franklin. 
Cochran, William D. 
Crosby, George. 
Cushman, William M. 
Dusenbery, Richard J. 
Elliot, Edward. 
Eveleth, John C. 
Faruham, Franklin. 
Forsyth, William W. 
Hazard, Edward M. 
James, John. 
Jones, Richard. 
Ladd, James. 
Lansing, Abraham G. 
Luce, John B. 
McCamman, William. 
McCuUoch, William A. 
Meline, James P. 
Mills, Seymour. 
Murray, Alfred H. 
Packard, Henry R. 
Peck, Gad. 
Porter, James L. 
Ramsey, Henry. 

Rowan, . 

Russell, George. 
Russell, Henry. 
Russell, William. 
Sanford, Charles. 
Sanford, Henry. 
Seely, George. 
Shaw, Abraham D. 
Skiff, Seymour. 

19 



Skinner, Henry. 
Solomons, Levi. 
Solomons, Samuel D. 
Staats, John C. 
Staats, William H. 
Starr, Henry. 
Ten Eyck, Andrew J. 
Willard, Elisha R. 
Winslow, John F. 
Yates, John C. 

1824 Baldwin, . 

Bulkley, Silas B. 
Cassidy, Henry, 
Duncan, Radcliff H. 
Dunlop, James. 
Dunlop, Robert. 
Davis, John. 
Evertsen, Evert. 
Farrel, Daniel A. 
Fisk, Samuel C. 
Fonda, John. 
Fowler, Philemon H. 
Gillespie, Charles D. 
Gillespie, Eugene. 
Gleason, John. 
Gough, John T. 
Groesbeeck, Jacob H. 
Groesbeeck, William H. 
Hanford, William L. 
Henry, William S. 
Humphrey, John. 
Jewell, Joseph. 
McCliuton, John. 
McKelvey, Peter B. 
McMulleu, Peter B. 
Meacham, Roswell S. 
Miller, William M. 
Mills, Frederick C. 
Murray, William G. 
O'Shaunessy, James. 
Parker, Ambrose S. 
Parker, Robert M. 
Pruyn, John V. L. 
Rector, William H. 



146 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Roser, William. 
Shejiherd, Burrit. 
Shepherd, Richard, 
Skinner, Charles. 
Staats, Isaac W. 
Stewart, William. 
Strong, Robert M. K. 
Sudam, Harrison. 
Van Alstine, Martin. 
Van Alstine, Matthew M. 
Van Der Zee, Henry. 
Van Schaick, Charles H. 
Van Vranken, Jacob. 
Visscher, Barent. 
Wasson, John B. 
Weaver, Isaiah L. 
Wilkinson, Matthew. 
Willard, John L. 
Willet, Edward S. 
Winne, Edward. 
1825 Austin, John. 
Bell, Garrit W. 
Bourgoin, Charles A. 
Bradford, Alexander W. 
Bradford, John M. 
Bulkley, John. 
Center, Alfred H. 
Daniels, James W. 
Daniels, Warner. 
Davis, William. 
Elmendorf , Peter E. 
Fairchild, Sidney T. 
Fox, Albert R. 
French, Abel. 
Fry, Charles B. 
Glen, Cornelius. 
Gourlay, William B. 
Groesbeeck, Charles E. 
Hallenbake, Jasper S. 
Ilawley, Henry. 
Hequembourg, Charles L. 
Jewett, GrosvenorW. 
Jones, Llewellyn. 
Kline, John. 



Knower, Benjamin, 
Knower, Charles. 
Lansing, Abraham P. 
Lee, Oliver H. 
Loveridge, Cicero. 
Martin, Henry H. 
Mayell, Alfred. 
McGilchrist, Peter. 
Mcintosh, William. 
Phelps, Philo L. 
Post, Erasmus D. 
Pruyn, Robert H. 
Rogers, Thomas. 
Steele, Henry. 
Tullidge, Henry. 
Van Vechten, Samuel. 
Webster, Howard. 
Winslow, William. 
Wood, Benjamin. 
1826 Austin, William. 

Campbell, Alexander S. 
Carmichael, Peter. 
Colton, Erastus. 
Conkling, Frederick A. 
Craig, James R. 
Craig, John. 
Dutcher, Augustus. 
Dutcher, William C. 
Fonda, Townsend S. 
Gansevoort, Leonard H. 
Gardner, Townsend. 
Gibbons, George S. 
Gould, John S. 
Hammond, Wells S. 
Hawe, John B. 
Hequembourg, Theodore. 
Ilickox, Charles S. 
Hopkins, Augustus. 
Johnson, George N. 
Lagrange, Stephen. 
Leech, Daniel D. T. 
Lusli, Stephen. 
Mayer, Frederick J. 
Mayer, Philip A. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



147 



McHarg, William N. 
McMicken, John. 
McMullen, James. 
Nelliger, John B. 
Pruyn, Francis. 
Rider, John J. 
Robinson, Hamilton W. 
Ruby, George W. 
Sawyer, Sidney. 
Scovill, Hezekiah G. 
Slingerland, John J. 
Starr, Melancton. 
Starr, Richard T. 
Ten Broeck, Richard. 
Ten Eyck, Henry. 
Tullidge, Alfred. 
Van Schelluyne, Rensselaer. 
Van Schelluyne, Theodore. 
Van Vechten, Teunis. 
Vosburgh, William. 
Walker, George. 
Wells, Charles. 
Williams, Henry C. 
1827 Austin, Henry. 
Bement, William. 
Brown, James. 
Buel, Jesse. 
Bullions, William J. 
Burke, Abraham C. 
Bush, Walter R. 
Cagger, Peter. 
Cagger, William. 
Case, Jonathan H. 
Case, William. 
Cassidy, William. 
Chapin, Erastus S. 
Chapin, Josiah. 
Chapin, Samuel W. 
Cockburn, William. 
Colvin, Henry. 
Conkling, Aurelian. 
Delevan, Edward H. 
De Witt, Charles E. 
Douglas, George. 



Douglas, Robert J. 
Douglas, William A. 
Dox, Peter. 
Duel, John R. 
Dufly, Edward. 
Erwin, David W. 
Fiddler, John T. 
Godley, John S. 
Griffiths, Griffith W. 
Harris, Daniel, 
narrower, Peter P. 
Hartness, Thomas L. 
Hastings, Frederick B. 
Hawkins, Garrit P. 
Hawley, Nathan. 
Hickcox, William E. 
Hills, Augustus. 
Holmes, Richard T. 
Hopkins, Wolsey R. 
Kane, John J. C. 
Knower, Henry. 
Knowlson, Timothy C. 
Lee, Thomas E. 
Lockwood, Thomas. 
McLachlan, John. 
McMartin, Duncan. 
Meads, John. 
Mitchell, Laban. 
Newland, David. 
Newland, John. 
Nugent, George A. 
Packard, Charles C. 
Palmer, James E. 
Payn, Charles H. 
Radcliff, William J. 
Rawdon, Charles. 
Satterlee, Edward. 
Schuyler, Philip L. 
Schuyler, William C. 
Shepherd, William G. 
Siokles, John A. 
Slack, William A. 
Swain, Robert. 
Swain, Samuel R. 



148 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Trumpbour, William C. 
Van Alen, Hai-inan W. 
Van Schelluyne, Cornelius. 
Waldron, Henry. 
Wells, William II. 
Welsh, Ashbel. 
Wendell, John. 
Woodward, James L. 
1828 Aspinwall, Lewis H. 

Babcock, Harrison G. 0. 
Becker, Jacob. 
Bostwick, Oliver M. 
Bourgoin, Alphonse F. 
Brammal, James. 
Condie, Daniel T. 
Davidson, Gilbert C. 
Donnelly, Peter M. 
Drake, Garret. 
Duffau, John C. 
Eddy, John R. 
Eights, Abraham C. W. 
Fay, De Witt C. 
Foot, Elisha. 
Gibbons, Washington. 
Goold, Henry. 
Groesbeck, John D. 
Hawley, lloswell. 
Hill, Samuel W. 
Hoffman, Henry. 
Jackson, Peter. 
Kane, Oliver De Lancey, 
Kiersted, .lohn. 
Lacey, George S. 
Lansing, Spencer S. 
Ludlow, John L. 
Lynde, Charles J. 
McLaughlin, William D. 
McMickens, Jacob R. 
McNaughton, Duncan R. 
McPherson, John. 
Milligan, John. 
Oothout, Jonas. 
Packard, Eugene M. 
Page, William W. 
Piatt, Ezra J. 



Porter, William V. 
Priest, Francis W. 
Quackenbush, John V. P. 
Richardson, William J. 
Sears, Charles. 
Seymour, William Jr. 
Sheldon, Smith. 
Sherman, Epaphi-as S. 
Sill, Rensselaer N. 
Skinner, Joshua K. . 
Small, James. 
Smith, Elias Willard. 
Smith, Samuel Sidney. 
Southwick, Alfred. 
Trotter, Matthew. 
Van Alstyne, J. Fonda. 
Viele, Augustus. 
Viele, Henry K. 
Visscher, Edward. 
Weld, Gilbert C. 
Wendell, James L. 
Williams, Josejih D. 
Winne, Jacob. 
Wright, Phineas C. 
1829 Abbott, Caleb. 

Atwood, George P. 
Bacheldor, Edward. 
Barker, Thomas M. 
Barney, Paul C. 
Benedict, Edmund A. 
Benedict, Lewis Jr. 
Bennet, Amos. 
Bleecker, James. 
Bosworth, Caleb H. 
Boyd, Thomas. 
Boyd, William. 
Bratt, Jolin. 
Brown, Stanton. 
Burt, Edward. 
Callaglian, Patrick. 
Cammcyer, Charles A. 
Cassidy, Ambrose S. 
Cassidy, Charles. 
Churchill, Alansing C. 
Churchill, Erasmus D. 



LIST OF SUDENTS. 



149 



Covert, James. 
Cowden, David. 
Crew, John L. 
Davidson, Alexander. 
Davidson, Alexander. 
Deming, William W. 
Dunlop, Archibald. 
Dusenbery, Benjamin. 
Dusenbery, Henry, 
Elliot, Hugh D. 
Elliot, John. 
Fasset, William N. 
Ferguson, Robert. 
Fiddler, Robert. 
Fly, Eli J. M. 
(ialusha, John J. 
Gladding, Freeman. 
Greene, Alfred S. 
Hallenbake, Garrit G. 
Haring, Clinton. 
Hart, Henry. 
Hartness, John. 
Hayden, William B. 
Hendrickson, John. 
Higham, Charles. 
Holden, Reuben S. 
Humphrey, Daniel W. 
Humphrey, Friend. 
Humphrey, John R. 
Isham, Alfred H. 
Jenkins, Charles E. 
Knight, Calvin S. 
Lansing, Henry Q. 
Lathrop, George V. N. 
Lee, Theodore. 
Lee, Thomas G. 
Leech, William. 
Low, Francis S. 
Lyman, Charles R. 
Lyman, James. 
Marsh, Marcius. 
Marsh, Theodore B. 
Marsh, William H. 
Mather, James. 
McCamman, Alexander. 



McCamman, John. 
McCarty, Isaac. 
jMcHarg, Rufus K. 
]\IcPherson, George. 
Meadow, John H. 
Meads, James. 
Means, Thomas. 
Miller, Peter S. 
Newland, John Jr. 
Norton, Henry. 
Norton, John P. 
Ostrander, Phillip. 
Packard, Algernon S. 
Packard, Joseph. 
Paige, George W. 
Paige, Joseph C. Y. 
Parker, John. 
Parmelee, Francis B. 
Patrick, Richard M. 
Pemberton, James S. 
Pemberton, Thomas L. 
Plainer, William. 
Pohlman, William J. 
Porter, George W. 
Porter, James E. 
Pruyn, John W. 
Quackenbush, Charles. 
Rice, Silas C. 
Schoolcraft, Charles L. 
Shaw, Henry. 
Sherwood, Isaac. 
Shilds, Alexander. 
Smyth, Henry M. 
Smyth, Patrick. 
Strong, Joseph M. 
Strong, Paschal N. 
Ten Eyck, John. 
Townsend, Franklin. 
Townsend, Robert. 
Tuffts, Joseph. 
Van Allen, Benjamin. 
Van Ingen, James L. 
Van Rensselaer, Maunsell. 
Van Shoonhoven, Cornelius. 
Vernor, Benjamin. 



150 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Verplanck, Isaac. 
Walworth, Clarence A. 
Waterman, George. 
Weaver, Hamilton B. 
Weaver, Jeremiah J. 
Wells, Robert H. 
Wilder, John N. 
Williams, John 11. 
Williams, Samuel. 
Winslow, Augustus S. 
Winslow, Leonard C. 
Wilson, John L. 
Wilson, Richard L. 
1830 Adriance, John V. S. 
Allen, Henry A. 
Anable, Henry S. 
Austin, Emilius. 
Austin, Richard. 
Bacon, John F. 
Bacon, William A. 
Barker, Lewis. 
Beardsley, Joseph A. 
Beardsley, Samuel R. 
Bogart, P. A. Grandon 
Boyd, Howard. 
Boyd, John. 
Bradley, George S. 
Bratt, James. 
Briggs, AVilliam W. 
Brower, John H. 
Brown, Joseph B. 
Brown, Robert C. 
Bullions, Alexander B. 
Bunker, Edward C. 
Burton, Jarus. 
Cameron, Robert. 
Campbell, Duncan. 
Campbell, John. 
Carpenter, James H. 
- Cheever, Edwin H. 
Clapp, Noah. 
Coile, John. 
Covert, Peter H. 
Covert, William C. 
Crawford, Stephen G. 



Croswell, Horace. 
Cummings, Gilbert. 
Cummings, James. 
Cushman, Robert S. 
Cushman, Thomas H. 
Davis, Henry L. 
Davis, Joseph. 
Davis, Nathaniel. 
De Witt, William L. 
Dibblee, Frederick E. 
Don, Peter C. 
Dunn, William R. 
Durrie, Daniel S. 
Dusenbery, Absalom T. 
Ertsberger, James. 
Esmay, Isaac. 
Fay, Alfred. 
Fay, Henry B. 
Flagg, Henry F. 
Flagg, Thomas B. W. 
Frost, James. 
• Gansevoort, Stanwix. 
Geer, Darius. 
Gibbons, John B. 
Gibbons, Thomas J. 
Gott, John. 
Gowie, Charles G. 
Gray, AVilliam. 
Greene, Henry F. 
Griffin, Christopher C. 
Groesbeeck, Charles F. 
Groesbeeck, David. 
Hammond, Thomas R. 
Hart, Alexander. 
Hartness, Joseph M. 
Hermans, John E. 
Higham, James. 
Higham, Zury. 
Hills, Charles W. 
Holmes, William. 
Howard, Patrick. 
Hoyt, George B. 
Hubbel, George. 
Hubbel, James L. 
Huddlestoue, John II. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



151 



Humphrey, George. 
Humphrey, .James L. 
James, Edward. 
James, Robert W. 
Johnson, Oliver H. 
Jordan, Barbazon N. 
Keeler, Frederick A, 
Knowlton, Myron. 
Leake, Frederick F. 
Leake, John S. 
Leake, Simeon J. 
Leyne, Maurice. 
Loughlin, John. 
Lovering, Richard. 
Lush, Richard. 
Mandell, Addison. 
Meigs, James K. 
Melville, Gansevoort. 
Melville, Herman. 
Miller, Andrew. 
Miller, Isaac L. K. 
Miller, AVilliam A. 
Niles, Nathaniel. 
Norton, William. 
Palmer, Charles T. 
Phelps, Justus M. 
Pitkin, Thomas C. 
Rathbone, John F. 
Rathbone, Lewis. 
Reynolds, Henry. 
Rising, William A. 
Robinson, Ephraim D. W, 
Root, David A. 
Seymour, John. 
Sim, William B. 
Soulden, William M. 
Staats, Stephen. 
Stanton, Charles H. 
Steele, John F. 
Steele, William H. 
Strain, James. 
Strong, William N. 
Taylor, Ira H. 
Taylor, J. Richmond. 
Thomas, John. 



Trotter, Edward W. 
Van Alstine, David D. 
Van Benthuyscn, Packard. 
Van Loon, Charles. 
Van Loon, Edmund. 
Van Loon, James S. 
Van Steenbergh, Hugh H. 
Van Tuyl, Otto W. 
AVasson, Chauncey H. 
Waterman, Edgar. 
Waterman, Jeremiah, 
Waterman, John G. 
Waterman, Robert. 
Webster, William H. 
Wells, William D. 
Welsh, George H. 
Williams, Abraham E. 
Wilson, Benjamin. 
Wilson, Charles. 
Wilson, Edward F. 
Wilson, John 0. 
1831 Babcock, John. 

Barnard, Samuel W. 
Blackall, AVilliam R. 
Booth, Dilazon. 
Booth, Dwight. 
Bugby, Edward. 
Bullions, George H. 
Burton, Charles E. 
Cady, Daniel H. 
Carmichael, John. 
Chapman, Alonzo. 
Clark, Edward H. 
Cole, William. 
Cornell, William W. 
De Freest, Clinton. 
De Freest, Lorenzo D. 
Deuel, John G. W. 
Deuel, Silas W. 
De Witt, Ephraim H. 
Dibblee, James. 
Donellan, William. 
Duel, Thorn. 
Durrie, Horace. 
Erwin, Hugh W. 



152 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Erwin, William. 
Evans, Heurj^. 
Fink, Frederick. 
Fondey, William B. 
Foot, George F. 
Frothingham, Thomas. 
Fui'long, John. 
Germond, Morgan. 
Gill, Allen H. 
Gladding, William J. 
Goodrich, John M. 
Goold, Henry. 
Gould, David. 
Gray, Rufus. 
Green, Peckham H. 
Gi'eene, Rowland. 
Griffiths, Evan T. 
Groesbeeck, David. 
Groesbeeck, Sylvester. 
Harris, Robert W. 
Hasbrouck, Robert M. 
Heely, George 
Herrick, John J. 
Holladay, John. 
Homan, .John. 
Imbrie, Gcoi-ge F. 
Isherwood, Benjamin F. 
Johnson, James H. 
Jordan, Robert. 
Kane Charles S. 
Kirk, John. 
Leine, Hugh. 
Levering, Edmund, 
Ludlow, James R. 
Malburn, Francis G. 
Mancius, George W. 
McDougal, James. 
McHarg, Charles K. 
Meacham, John. 
Melville, Allan. 
Miller, Augustus C. 
Miller, James A. 
Mix, Garret V. 
Moore, Arthur E. 
Morris, Joseph D. 



Murphy, James. 
Niver, Conrad. 
Osborn, Charles F. 
Parsons, Harvey K. 
Payn, Owen. 
Pease, Minot S. 
Ransom, Samuel H. 
Reed, William H. 
Rice, Joseph T. 
Bice, Moses T. 
Rosekrants, Henry D. 
Shaw, George. 
Smith, Frederic. 
Smith, John N. 
Tallman, Darius. 
Ten Eyck, Anthony. 
Ten Eyck, Leonard. 
Thomas, David W. 
Trowbridge, Alexander H. 
Van Rensselaer, Charles W. 
Van Schaack, Stephen D. 
Van Shoonhoven, Ebenezer L. 
Van Slyck, Harman. 
Van Valkenbergh, Henry. 
Waldron, George W. 
Walker, James. 
Walters, Joseph B. 
Wands, Isaac H. 
Wasson, Christopher C. 
Wasson, George W. 
Webster, Charles R. 
Wendell, Benjamin Rush. 
Whitney, Charles E. 
Wilson, Joscjih B. 
Woodworth, John. 
1832 Allen, AVilliam. 

Bacheldor, John F. 
Bennet, Francis. 
Bennet, Thomas. 
Bennet, AVilliam. 
Boies, Abraham E. 
Bonney, Edson, 
Bradshaw, Archibald, 
Brown, George H. 
Buckbee, Edward T. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



153 



Burt, Charles A. 
Burt, James D. 
Butler, William II. A, 
Cafferty, James II. 
Carlo w, George. 
Churchill, William II. 
Cobb, Elijah. 
Cole, John J. 
Cushman, Paul, 
Davidson, John M. 
Davis, Francis A. 
Davis, William. 
De Witt, James R. 
Dey Ermand, John. 
Downing, William W. 
Enders, Peter. 
Ferris, John M. 
Fly, Anson B. 
Fondey, Charles T. 
Fondey, Isaac. 
Forsyth, Douglas. 
Fuller, Jacob E. 
Fuller, Josejih W. 
Galligan, William. 
Gallup, Albert S. 
Gansevoort, Henry. 
Gaylord, Charles. 
Gaylord, George D. 
Graham, Theodore. V. 
Greene, James. 
Herrick, Edwin R. 
Hickcox, Hamlet V. 
Hill, Aaron. 
Jervis, Timothy B. 
Jones, Hiram A. 
Keyser, Henry. 
Knapp, Samuel. 
Lathrop, Daniel S. 
Lathrop, George D. 
Leake, Horace W. 
Lush, James K. 
Lyman, Joiin. 
McDowell, Daniel D. 
McHarg, Charles K. 
McKown, James. 

20 



Meigs, John II. 
Mix, James. 
Pitcher, Joseph R. 
Powers, Charles. 
Quarles, Augustus. 
Quarles, Henry. 
Rising, Austiiji. 
Rockwell, Elisha H. 
Root, Horace. 
Russell, Abraham A. 
Sammons, Stephen. 
Schoolcraft, William C. 
Schuyler, Jeremiah. 
Silliman, Horace B. 
Skinner, John W. 
Sloan, Christian S. 
Taylor, Joseph B. 
Thomas, James. 
Tibbals, William W. 
Townsend, Howard. 
Vanderpool, Isaac. 
Van Shaack, Egbert. 
Van Slyck, Andrew P. 
Walker, Joseph B. 
Wells, Joseph A. ^ 
Wells, Minot M. 
Whitney, James. 
1833 Ames, John. 

Armstrong, Frederick W. 
Arnold, Dutee. 
Bacon, Edgar J. 
Bacon, John R. 
Barret, Rufus. 
Bay, Richard S. 
Bell, John H. 
Bowne, John H. 
Brainard, William H. 
Bronson, Henry G. 
Bronson, Oliver. 
Burton, Francis C. 
Buel, William P. 
Bullions, John C. 
Burchard, Peter S. 
Cafferty, William C. 
Carmichael, James. 



154 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Charles, Daniel D. T. 
Conkling, llubbel D. 
Davis, Robert. 
Depuy, John J. 
Douglas, Byron. 
Downing, George. 
Ensign, Martin. 
Feltman, John C. 
Ferris, Ilicliard B. 
Fuller, James A. 
Fuller, Samuel S. 
Gilchrist, Ambrose S. 
Gough, Daniel D. 
Harvey, Charles W. 
Haskell, Henry C. 
Hawe, Daniel. 
Hawley, William. 
Hayes, Duncan. 
Hepinstall, Christopher. 
Hepinstall, Bichard. 
Hillhouse, John. 
Hillhouse, William. 
Houghtaling, Conrad A. 
Hosch, Edward. 
Hosch, Philip H. 
Jackson, Firnin. 
Johnson, John S. 
Johnson, Robert F. 
Kelso, John H. 
Kennedy, Francis B. 
King, Henry L. 
Kline, George P. 
Knower, Timothy. 
Lansing, John A. 
Lee, James P. 
Lightbody, John W. 
Lyons, David H. 
Marcy, Samuel N. 
Marcy, AVilliam G. 
Mather, Joseph H. 
Mather, Leverett Cruttenden. 
Meadon, Edward W. 
Meigs, Richard M. 
Monteath, George H. 
Monteath, John II. 



Monteath, William Y. W. 
Moore, William R. 
Moshei', Cornelius. 
Mygatt, William G. 
Nash, Stephen. 
Newton, George L. 
Norton, Samuel. 
Osterliout, William. 
Overton, Thomas. 
Parker, Lewis P. 
Phelps, Philip Jr. 
Prevost, Frederick J. 
Robinson, Thomas E. 
Sanford, William. 
Schitfer, Henry W. 
Sherman, James A. 
Smith, Samuel S. 
Spencer, John C. 
Stafford, Robert N. 
Stevenson, George. 
Strait, Hiram. 
Ten Eyck, Richax'd. 
Thorp, John D. 
Tillitson, Edward R. 
Townsend, Frederick. 
Van Buren, Alexander L. 
Van Vechten, James D. 
Waterman, Charles G. 
Weed, James B. 
Wells, Thomas. 
Williams, George H. 
Wing, Matthew G. 
Wright, William W. 
1834 Abendroth, August. 
Adams, Charles H. 
Becker, Erwin. 
Bell, Henry W. 
Brown, William. 
Buckrum, Caleb. 
Burgess, George H. 
Burgess, AVilliam T. 
Campbell, John. 
Carter, Charles W. 
Carter, Robert. 



LIST OP STUDENTS. 



155 



Gary, Walter. 
Chapman, George. 
Charles, George, Jr. 
Christian, George H. 
Churchill, Rensselaer. 
Clark, Adrian D. 
Clark, George. 
Collier, John C. 
Cornell, James. 
Denuiston, Garrit V. 
Elmeudorf, Nicholas. 
Erwiu, George. 
Fidler, Joseph H. 
Frisby, Edward. 
Frisby, John B. 
Frisby, Levi C. 
Geary, George. 
Gibson, Anthony M. 
Gibson, John Jr. 
Gibson, William J. 
Godley, Richard. 
Gough, Alexander C. 
Greene, Joseph H. 
Hamilton, Fayette. 
Harvey, Robert. 
Hewlett, Alexander M. 
Hoyt, Alfred Dudley. 
Humphrey, William L. 
Johnson, William H, 
Kiersted, Wynkoop. 
Kiugsley, John A. 
Lansing, Joseph A. 
Lansing, Richard. 
Leavitt, Andrew J. 
Lyman, Nathan B. 
Lyman, Stephen. 
Malcomb, James Frazer. 
Marshall, John. 
Marshall, Walter. 
Mather, Charles F. 
McCamman, Cyrus. 
McKee, Joseph. 
MilhoUand, Henry. 
Miller, James. 



Morange, James W. 
Morange, William D. 
Northrup, Richard H. 
Peacock, Thomas W. 
Perry, Oliver H. 
Philips, Daniel, 
Quackenbush, Stephen P. 
Rowe, Sanford. 
Rowland, John. 
Ryckman, Garrit W. 
Shaw, Aaron. 
Sheldon, Alexander G. 
Shenck, Edward T. 
Sherwood, Napoleon B. 
Simmons, Henry. 
Steele, Levi. 
Stone, William H. 
Strong, Thomas J. 
Ten Eyck, Philip. 
Townsend, Theodore. 
Treat, Nathan P. 
Tremper, Cantine. 
Van Schaick, Henry D. 
Van Vechten, George. 
Waldron, Charles N. 
Waterman, Robert H. 
Wells, Henry J. 
Whitney, George. 
Whitney, William W. 
Williams, Arthur. 
Williams, Charles. 
Worcester, George P. 
1835 Allen, James. 

Beck, John Walton R. 
Bell, James C. 
Boies, D. Artemas. 
Bradt, William H. 
BuUen, Lathrop. 
Charles, George H. 
Chassel, John. 
Clapp, Oliver W. 
Clapp, Ruel Shepard. 
Cockburn, Edwin. 
Colburn, L. Wells. 



156 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Collier, James H. 

Comstock, Alexander Cromwell. 

Delahanty, Michael. 

De Yermand, William. 

Douglas, Franklin, 

Dunham, Worden. 

Evertsen, John B. 

Feltman, William. 

Fields, Joseph. 

Foote, Henry. 

Fuhr, John. 

Goewey, Erastus. 

Gregory, Benjamin. 

Griffin, Jacob. 

Groesbeeck, Orlando. 

Hadley, George. 

Haring, James D. 

Haskell, Moses. 

Hawe, John. 

Hawley, Charles. 

Herrick, William H. 

Hickcox, George A. 

Hickcox,.Silas B. 

Higgins, Robert. 

HoUiday, James. 

Hoyt, Albert C. 

Jansen, Egbert H. 

Jarvis, George. 

Johnson, William H. 

Jordan, Christopher. 

Kellogg, Daniel. 

Keyser, Charles. 

Kingsley, Hale. 

Kossiter, Charles D. 

Lee, George Canning. 

Liddle, William. 

McHench, David B. 

McKennan, John. 

McLaren, Alexander. 

Merrifield, George G. 

Mills, Martin S. 

Morrow, George. 

Myers, John B. 

Niver, David M. 



Norton, James A. 
Ott, Hylor. 
Packard, Benjamin F. 
Paddock, Stephen. 
Paddock, William H. 
Pepper, William P. 
Percival, George W. 
Porter, Malcolm. 
Purdy, George. 
Reed, James A. 
Reed, John S. 
Reed, La Fayette. 
Reed, Sylvanus. 
Rice, De Witt C. 
Risk, William. 
Rysendorpli, Jacob. 
Saltus, Francis H. 
Salvidge, Robert. 
Sanders, Barent Bleecker. 
Sanders, James B. 
Sanders, Robert. 
Schwartzenburgh, William. 
Shaukland, Gilbert. 
Story, Joseph. 
Strain, David. 
Strong, John. 
Tallman, Charles. 
Tallman, Marcius. 
Ternouth, William. 
Thomas, Cliarles. 
Thomas, Edward L. 
Tripp, Ferris. 
Van Bergen, John P. 
Van Vranken, Gansevoort. 
Vernor, Jeremiah S. 
Vernor, John T. 
Waterman, Augustus. 
Weed, Walter S. 
Wells, George A. 
Wells, Henry. 
Whitney, Stephen W. 
Whitney, William H. 
Williams, James B. 
Wilson, Jolin J. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



157 



Winne, Joseph F. 
Winne, Visscher. 
Wyatt, George. 
Wyatt, Uriah J. 
1836 Anderson, Philip. 
Andrews, Orin, 
Backus, William R. 
Baker, David. 
Baldwin, George C. 
Barney, Charles E. 
Barney, William. 
Beal, Stephen T. 
Bell, John W. 
Bennet, Sanford. 
Briare, Francis D. 
Brown, James A. 
Bullions, James M. 
Bullock, Matthew T. 
Burns, Cornelius. 
Carson, Robert H. 
Churchill, Charles R. 
Churchill, James E. 
Coflfee, Alfred. 
Coffee William F. 
Conkling, Spencer. 
Cook, La Fayette. 
Cooke, Beekman. 
Corbit, Henry. 
Crane, Henry D. 
Crane, Hiram A. 
Davidson, Darius. 
Davis, Abraham S. 
Delahauty, Daniel. 
De Witt, Ephraim, 
Douglas, Henry F. 
Dunlop, Alexander. 
Fanning, Sidney. 
Fish, Charles D. 
Frasier, John T. 
Frost, John S. 
Fry, Joseph. 
Gibson, William L. 
Gillis, Lester. 
Gladding, Daniel P. 



Gladding, Edward W. 
Goeway, James M. 
Goss, Ephraim L. 
Gould, William C. 
Hallenbake, Christopher. 
Harris, Rodney. 
Harrison, William. 
Hawley, James D. 
Hewson, Daniel J. 
Hewson, John E. 
Hind, John H. 
Holstein, La Fayette. 
Holstein, Washington. 
Hopkins, Henry. 
Hosch, John F. 
Hosch, William. 
Hughes, George. 
Kittle, John H. 
Kuss, Charles E. 
Lawton, Acton. 
Leyne, Richard. 
Loucks, Andrew P. 
Lyman, Charles H. P. 
Manahan, Francis. 
Manning, James. 
Martin, James E. 
Mayer, Henry. 
McCarthy, John. 
McElroy, Samuel. 
McEowen, Daniel. 
McGibbon, David. 
McGibbon, William. 
McHarg, William C. 
McLaren, Robert B. 
Millin, Chauncey H. 
Morange, James P. 
Morgan, William J. 
Morrow, James. 
Myers, Jerome. 
Newman, Charles. 
Newman, Henry A. 
Olcott, John J. 
Olcott, Robert. 
Olcott, Thomas. 



158 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Olnej, Charles C. 
O'Neill, James. 
Paddock, William S. 
Parks, Natliauiel. 
Phillips, Philetus. 
Purdy. Morgan L. 
Putnam, Victor A. 
Ransom, Albion. 
Robinson, James D. 
Root, Samuel G. 
Rozecrautz, Samuel T. 
Rull, Sylvester. 
Russ, Herman H. 
Savage, Edmund. 
Shepherd, Oliver L. 
Smith, Israel. 
Sprague, James W. 
Sprague, William B. Jr. 
Stafford, Samuel S. 
Stafford, Spencer. 
Starks, Artemas B. 
Strong, Stephen. 
Ten Ejck, Jacob. 
Thomas, George F. 
Thompson, Charles D. 
Thorburn, John D. 
Thorburn, Samuel T. 
Todd, .John E. 
Treat, Theodore S. 
Trotter, Willard. 
Van Allen, Francis. 
Van Benthuysen, Henry B. 
Van Buren, David H. 
Van Derbergh, Richard L. 
Van Loon, George. 
Van Rensselaer, Peter S. 
Van Wie, Garrit P. 
Van Zandt, William. 
Vermilye, Thomas E. 
Visscher, John B. 
Volk, Abram. 
Waldron, William. 
Waugh, John S. 
Welsh, Isaac L. 



Welsh, William T. 
Wendell, Peter. 
Wilson, Gilbert L. 
Wilson, Henry L. 
Wilson, Stephen L. 
Winne, John C. 
Wood, Theodore. 
Wyckoff, Isaac 0, 
Wyckoff, Theodore F. 
Zeli, John. 
1837 Adams, James N. 
Alvord, Charles E. 
Alvord, S. Whitney, 
Ayer, Benjamin F. 
Backus, Augustus. 
Barret, Rufus. 
Bicknell, Theodore. 
Blanchard, Anthony. 
Blanchard, Robert G. 
Brice, Alexander L. 
Brodhead, Thomas. 
Brown, John. 
Brown, Robert H. 
Bullions, Henry L. 
Burt, David H. 
Burton, Benjamin. 
Collier, Ozias G. 
Conkling, John P. 
Conners, Elias. 
Corbifr, Daniel. 
Crane, Henry. 
Crapo, Edgar. 
Davison, Joseph A. 
DeGrolf, Charles E. 
DeGroff, Griffin State. 
Dickinson, Manco Capac. 
Eames, Marshall H. 
Fanning, Frederick H. 
Fondey, Theodore. 
Garfield, John H. 
Garfield, Nathaniel L. 
Gates, Joseph E, 
Genet, Edme J. 
Gen , George C. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



159 



Goold, James E. 
Goss, George W. 
Granger, Rodney. 
Griulinton, Robert. 
Hand, George. 
Higgins, James. 
Hodge, William W. 
Horth, Francis. 
Hunt, Elijah D. 
Hunt, Stephen D. 
Hutchinson, Robert. 
James, Howard B. 
Jenkins, Robert. 
Jewell, William J. 
Johnson, Benoni C. 
Jordan, Charles S. 
Kissam, Thomas M. 
Kittle, Charles E. 
Lee, AVilliam H. 
Leete, Thomas. 
Livingston, John J. 
Livingston, Philip H. 
Locke, William R. 
McHarg, Henry B. 
McKim, James. 
McLachlan, William M. 
McNab, William A. F. 
McNeill, John. 
Meigs, Isaac V. L. 
Mills, Theodore G. 
Newton, William R. 
O'Donnel, Oliver, 
O'Hara, Charles E. 
Pruyn, Edward R. 
Pruyn, William. 
Eemer, AVilliam T. 
Rindge, Joseph F. 
Sawyer, Nathaniel. 
Sheldon, Henry. 
Sill, John N. 
Smith, Benjamin F. Jr. 
Smith, Heni'y L. 
Smith, Robert C. 
Stafford, Horatio G. 
Steele, Daniel. 



Stockton, John P. 
Swart, Cornelius. 
Talcott, Henry W. 
Taylor, James Jr. 
Teller, James. 
Thompson, Edmund. 
Thompson, William. 
Tracy, Edward H. 
Tattle, Merrit. 
Van Buren, Thomas B. 
Van Ingen, Josiah S. 
Van Wormer, Francis. 
Vermilye, Ashbel G. 
Viele, Egbert L. 
Viele, Maurice E. 
Warren, George W. 
Webster, James H. 
Whish, William H. 
White, Rufus P. 
Wickes, Silas R. 
Wilkinson, James. 
Wilson, James. 
Wilson, Myron W. 
Wilson, Nicholas. 
Winne, Levinus G. 
Wyre, Andrew. 
1838 Ableman, Wellington, 
Adams, George C. 
Adams, Henry P. 
Andrews, Henry P, 
Austin, John T. 
Bender, Ephraim H, 
Blackall, Benjamin. 
Blackall, Robert. 
Bleecker, Charles. 
Bloodgood, Edward. 
Bloodgood, Francis W. 
Bloodgood, George W. 
Boardman, William P. 
Bradt, Frederick J, 
Bratt, Garrit T. 
Brown, William Albert. 
Bryan, John A. 
Bulson, William, 
Burt, Silas. 



160 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Campbell, George L. 
Caudee, Joseph R. 
Candee, Lyman P. 
Carpenter, William M. 
Cassidy, De Witt C. 
Chesebro, Joshua G, 
Christie, George. 
Christie, William. 
Clark, Nathan Jr. 
Cooley, Francis B. . 
Cotes, John C. 
Crane, Hector H. 
Crapo, John M. 
Crofts, Robert T. L. 
Cunliff, Simeon. 
Cure, Peter. 
Cuyler, Jacob. 
Davis, James L. G. 
Davis, Thomas B. 
De Groff, James E. 
Dox, Alexander Ham. 
Duel, Jeremiah. 
Dunlop, Edward. 
Fairchild, David. 
Farley, George C. 
Fay, Albert. 
Fay, John W. 
Ferguson, Charles. 
Ford, Benjamin S. 
Freeman, Charles. 
Freeman, Edward. 
Freeman, Robert G. 
Frost, Daniel M. 
Gott, George Pearson. 
Gott, William A. 
Gracie, Edward. 
Hall, Francis B. 
Halsted, Mina B. 
Hastings, Redmond. 
Hempstead, Henry N. 
Hill, William M. 
Ilillman, Constantino A. 
Hills, Henry E. 
Holmes, George A. 
Holmes, Sylchcster. 



Hook, William. 
Hopkins, Francis. 
Hotaling, Jasper. 
Humphrey, James. 
Humphrey, Theodore F. 
Jessup, Edwin. 
Johnson, Robert L. 
Johnson, William W. 
Judd, John C. 
Kerker, Andrew. 
King, J. Howard. 
Kirk, Andrew B. 
Knox, William H. 
Lansing, Jeremiah. 
Leland, George H. 
Lewis, Andrew McKenna. 
Losee, Alfred. 
Lyons, Lemuel. 
Malcolm, William. 
Marcy, Edmund. 
McDuffie, Charles. 
McDuffie, Henry. 
Merrifield, William. 
Mills, Charles S. 
Morris, Edwai'd. 
Morrow, Thomas B. 
Nelson, Rensselaer V. B. 
Newton, Horace B. 
Norton, Edward. 
Olcott, Alexander. 
Olcott, Theodore. 
Ott, Siberia. 
Parry, John. 
Peck, Henry. 
Pegg, John. 
Plumb, William H. 
Relyea, Lodowyck. 
Requa, Joseph. 
Roberts, Randall. 
Rose, Stewart. 
Rossman, Richard. 
Rugg, John. 
Sanford, Caleb W. 
Sanford, William. 
Schuyler, David C. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



161 



Schuyler, James L. 
Scovel, Clinton P. 
Seymour, Truman. 
Sharp, Isaac F. 
Sickles, Daniel. 
Slack, Henry. 
Smith, Peter. 
Smith, Peter Jr. 
Smith, Thomas A. 
Smith, Thomas W. 
Stafford, Michael B. 
Stevens, George M. 
Stever, Erastus. 
Stiles, Henry. 
Thompson, Michael. 
Tremper, Julius. 
Tulane, Paul N. 
Van Buren, Henry. 
Vanderbelt, Henry. 
Vanderbelt, Richard V. 
Vanderbelt, William H. 
Van Ness, John L. 
Van Ness, AVilliam. 
Van Valkenburg, John L. 
Van Wyck, Anthony. 
Wheeler, John M. 
White, James, 
Whitlock, John. 
Whitlock, James G. 
Willard, Frederick M. 
Wood, Barnabas. 
Wood, William G, 
Worth, Charles G. 
Yates, Alonzo Kingsley. 
Young, James H. 
Young, Martin V. 
1839 Adams, John. 
Alvord, William. 
Barney, Capt. 
Becker, Albertus. 
Blair, J. C. 
Bogan, J. A. 
Bonney, George W. 
Booth, Leander. 
Boyd, David I. 

21 



Boyd, James. 
Bradt, C. Y. 
Brewerton, George D. 
Bryan, A. 
Bullions, J. E. 
Burst, J. 
Call, J. 
Christie, M. 
Clark, H. D. 
Collier, George N. 
Courtney, Samuel G. 
Chittenden, Thomas R. 
Cunningham, W. 0. 
Cuyler, Theodore J. 
De Graff, A. 
De Witt, R. Y. 
Dix, Francis P. 
Dorman, Jacob. 
Dox, Hamilton J. 
Duell, G. 
Dutch er, J. 
Easton, Charles P. 
Elliot, Robert. 
Erwin, John G. 
Fink, Edward. 
Fonda, Marcus B. 
Ford, B. F. 
Freeman, 0. 
Garfield, John N. 
Gott, J. E. 
Gould, J. E. 
Halsted, M. 
Hays, Edmund W. 
Hickcox, H. V. 
Hineson, J. 
Houghtaling, J. 
Holmes, C. S. 
Hoyt, Charles E. 
Hoyt, George E. 
Humphrey, L. 
Humphrey, William J. 
Jackson, Alonzo C. 
Jackson, Samuel W. 
Jackson, William J. 
Jessup, J. B. 



162 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Jewell, J. 

Johnson, Edward A. 
Kelly, John T. 
Lansing, Henry. 
Lansing, L. 
Larcher, Edwin B. 
L'Amoreux, Wendell. 
Lawyer, A. 
Legett, W. 
Leyne, R. A. 
Livingston, John L. 
Lush, J. H. 
Malcolm, James T. 
Mascord, George. 
McElroy, Andrew. 
McElroy, John E. 
McKissam, Thomas. 
McKown, Isaac D. 
McMurdy, Robert S. 
Miller, Stephen C. 
Miller, William. 
Mitchell, John D. 
Molinard, Albert J. 
Morange, W. B. 
Morris, Lewis 0. 
Morrow, Y. 
Netterville, John T. 
Newton, M. 
Nicholas, John. 
Noble, Charles L. 
Norton, P. A. 
O'Cunningham, William. 
Olcott, Robert B. 
Packer, Thaddeus N. 
Parkins, R. 
Parsons, Harvey A. 
Patterson, F. C. 
Peters, D. W. 
Pierson, William M. 
Pitts, Horatio W. 
Polhemus, J. 
Quinland, Charles 11. 
Remis, W. T. 
Requa, James E. 
Robertson, Gaw. 



Robinson, G. 
Russ, Chai'les E. 
Ryan, Dennis F. 
Seward, Augustus H. 
Sharp, J. G 
Shaw, Daniel. 
Skinner, John. 
Smith, James B. 
Smith, R. E. 
Smith, Stephen. 
Sprague, Burton. 
Stanford, A. P. 
Stanwix, G. 
Stevens, F. 
Stevil, E. 
Stockton, G. 
Taber, Paul F. 
Talcott, Daniel W. 
Taylor, D. 
Taylor, James B. 
Thayer, George H. 
Thomas, Warner L. 
Townsend, J. C. 
Tredway, William W. 
Tripp, F. 

Trotter, Elias Willard, 
Vandenberg, K. L. 
Van Horn, Levi. 
Wasson, C. E. 
Wells, J. H. 
Wells, Walter M. 
AVhceler, William. 
Whiteman, G. 
Whiteman, J. 
Whitney, John R. 
Willard, Edward Kirk. 
Wilson, Reuben. 
Winant, J. 
Winne, Abraham L. 
Winnc, Edmund. 
Winnc, John G. 
Wrightson, John. 
Wrightson, William. 
Young, Merritt. 
1840 Belden, T. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



163 



Cook, William II. 
Garfield, L. A. 
Gladding, Charles. 
Gooden, A. 
Kingsley, Nathan. 
L'Amoreux, M. Wendell. 
Lawlor, John. 
McKown, John Henry. 
Merrifield, Charles W. 
Netterville, J. G. 
Nugent, William H. 
Patterson, A. L. 
Phipps, Bradford S. 
Rowley, Salmon. 
Sanford, E. 
Scovel, Henry W. 
Sharp, George Henry. 
Shaw, Daniel D. 
Simpson, Marquis D. L. 
Sprague, J. Britten. 
Warner, F. 
Welsh, 0. 
Wilson, George P. 
Worthington, Robert. 
Wrightman, John. 
1841 Anderson, Francis C. 
Bailey, William. 
Bentley, Richard C. 
Birch, Joseph. 
Birmingham, William C. 
Brainard, Albert. 
Brigham, Lyman. 
Brinkerhoff, T. Van Wyck. 
Britton, Edward. 
Brown, Chauncey. 
Burrows, Randall K. 
Clute, William K. 
Conly, Peter. 
Coulson, John B. 
Coulson, Robert B. 
Coyn, John P. 
Craft, Charles D. 
Craft, Charles G. 
Crannell, Francis F. 
Croswell, John K. 



Curtiss, Joseph S. 
Dayton, Charles R. 
De Witt, Richard V. 
Dunn, James G. 
Ferris, Charles L. 
Ferris, William A. 
Fetherstone, J. 
Flagler, Edgar 0. 
Flower, Aaron P. 
Fuller, Josiah P. 
Garnsey, Cyrus. 
George, William. 
Gibbons, Henry B. 
Goodwin, Albert F. 
Gray, Adam R. 
Gray, Israel. 
Griffin, Abraham S. 
Harris, Henry. 
Hartness, John W. 
Hatch, George W. 
Hatch, Warner D. 
Herrick, Jonathan W. 
Hopkins, James. 
Horsford, G. W. 
Horth, James Henry. 
Houghtaling, Alfred. 
Houghtaling, Jasper. 
Hurst, William. 
Jones, James. 
Kelly, George. 
Kerr, John. 
Kiernan, Felix A. 
Kimball, Richard W. 
Klink, Nathaniel. 
Koonz, Jacob C. 
Leslie, Edward. 
Little, Edwin C. 
Livingston, Matthew H. 
Martin, James B. Jr. 
Marvin, Edward. 
McBride, Thomas. 
McKercher, John D. 
McKnight, John T. 
McKown, Jacob E. 
McNaughton, Alexander W, 



164 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Meech, George W. 
Meech, Robert J. V. D. 
Merriflcld, Richard. 
Mills, Daniel AV. 
More, H. D. 

More, James Harbrouth. 
Morrall, Theodore. 
Morris, Thomas F. 
Packard, Robert J. 
Parr, Richard. 
Parsons, Jacob E. 
Peck, Edward H. 
Phelps, William L. M. 
Radley, John P. 
Rawson, James. 
Remer, Charles T. 
Roessle, Theophilus. 
S?ige, Jasper C. 
Schermerhorn, Judah. 
Schuyler, Alonzo. 
Scovel, Nelson R. 
Seward, Clarence H. 
Sharts, Theodore. 
Shepard, Charles T. 
Shepard, AVilliam. 
Sherwood, James B. W. 
Sims, Francis. 
Spears, Samuel S. 
Staley, Daniel G. 
Stevens, James H. 
Thornton, De Witt. 
Thornton, William. 
Thorp, William H. 
Tucker, Theodore S. 
Van Allen, Garret A. 
Van Benthuyseu, F. B. 
Vanderlip, William L. 
Van Ingen, William Henry. 
Van Olinda, John. 
Van Rensselaer, Edwai-d R. 
Van Rensselaer, James C. 
Van Schaack, Nicholas. 
Van Voast, Benson G. 
Waterhouse, Richard G. 
Wilkinson, Henry. 



Williamson, John D. 
Wilson, Thomas. 
Wing, James. 
Winne, F. D. 
Winne, F. V. 

1842 Adams, Stephen C. 
Boyd, Edward H. 
Brown, Walter Scott. 
Kirk, William 11. 
Learned, Albert R. 
McMillan, Thomas C. 
Olcott, Robert N. 
Peebles, William M. 
Wells, Charles H. 
White, Albert A. 

1843 Bartley, John. 
Bouck, Gabriel. 
BrinkerhoflF, John. 
Brown, Warren G. 
Clark, Charles G. 
Clark, Joseph W. 
Cook, Isaac Iver. 
Courtney, Joel. 

De Forest, Charles A. 
Delehanty, Martin. 
Duesler, George L. 
Edwards, Alfred. 
Edwards, Carlton. 
Ensign, William. 
Gibbons, James. 
Gill, George C. 
Granger, George Gebbi. 
Hammond, Lazarus S. 
Hammond, Reuben H. 
Hascy, Oscar L. 
Hermans, Thomas H. 
Hillenbrant, John B. 
Jordan, Edward. 
Kenyon, Ralpli W. 
Lansing, Edwin B. 
Lyon, Daniel B. 
Lyon, Isaac L. 
Marvin, Henry C. 
McAlpinc, Charles L. 
McNaughton, James A. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



165 



Murphy, Charles S. 
Patterson, James, 
Keynolds, Dexter. 
Smith, Edward M. 
Ten Eyck, A. Cuyler. 
Tucker, Wilson. 
Van Shaack, Jenkins. 
Van Vechten, Cuyler. 
Van Wyck, Richard. 
Wall, Andrew J. 
Whitney, John S. 
Wilson, Henry G. F. 
Young, Archibald S. 
1844 Allen, Adoniram J. 
Blanchard, Hamilton. 
Bouck, Charles. 
Brown, Mathew. 
Coates, Alfred W. 
Darling, William R. 
Dox, Dudley W. 
Enders, Samuel R. 
George, James. 
Goewey, Henry. 
Greene, Lyman R. 
Griffin, Ezra C. 
Hickcox, John H. 
Hills, Loran C. 
Howard, Henry H. 
Jones, Francis. 
Kendrick, Burton. 
Knickerbacker, John H. 
Lansing, John Thomas. 
Lighthall, John A. 
Martin, William A. 
McBride, Edward. 
McBride, Henry. 
McClure, John C. 
McGourkey, George J. 
McGourkey, John. 
Merrifield, John. 
Noonan, James T. 
Pearse, Jacob L. 
Peckham, Henry J. 
Peckham, Wheeler H. L. 
Pohlman, Henry E. 



Read, Robert. 
Staats, Charles P. 
Stafford, James G. 
Stafford, Walter S. E. 
Stokes, Joseph. 
Strong, Charles H. 
Strother, William L. 
Sylvester, George W. 
Thomas, William R. 
Townsend, John Jr. 
Van Zandt, Clarence L. 
Visscher, James D. 
Wands, James. 
Wands, John. 
Winne, Charles S. 
Wolford, Allen. 
1845 Bacon, Clarence W. 
Belknap, Charles M. 
Boar dm an, George. 
Boyd, Charles. 
Boyd, John C. 
Boyd, William T. 
Bratt, Henry T. 
Burdick, Sullivan R. 
Case, Henry S. 
Cole, Walter D. 
Cooney, John. 
Cosby, James P. 
Curtiss, Daniel G. 
Curtiss, William J. 
Davoth, Michael J. 
Dickerman, John S. 
Fonda, Christopher Y. 
Freeman, William S. 
Frisby, Eleazer. 
Frothingham, Worthington. 
Gifford, Charles E. 
Gould, Joseph C. 
Gregory, Henry T. 
Graves, Charles V. 
Harrold, George ^Y. 
Haskell, William H. 
Hillson, Thomas. 
Holdridge, Helim D. 
Hewlett, Ezra P. 



166 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Humphrey, Cbai'les D. 
Landon, William A. 
McClure, Archibald Jr. 
Miller, Ernest J. 
Morse, Lansing. 
Newman, James. 
Nichols, Francis. 
Olmsted, David S. 
Packard, James B. 
Page, Alanson S. 
Pearson, Joseph Burr. 
Steele, Oliver. 
Strain, Alexander. 
Strain, Robert, 
Strong, Richard M. 
Strother, William H. 
Sumner, Alanson. 
Swift, Hugh. 
Taylor, William H. 
Thomas, William H. 
Tibbits, Bleecker. 
Todd, Nathaniel P. 
Tomlinson, Victory L. 
Van Ness, Edward. 
Van Rensselaer, Gratz. 
Vau Schaack, Elbridge G. 
Van Voast, Albert A. 
Van Voast, Clarence L. 
Van Zandt, John. 
Waterman, James. 
Watson, Howard. 
Wheaton, Samuel L. 
Wrightson, George. 
Yates, David. 
1846 Ableman, Stephen D. 
Adams, Samuel W. 
Ainsworth, Chai-les F. 
Bay, William A. 
Becker, John H. 
Beekraan, Manciua. 
Bentley, George T. 
Benton, Daniel S. 
Benton, George. 
Bogart, John Jr. 
Burton, Walter. 



Carr, Benjamin W. 
Carter, George W. 
Case, Joseph H. 
Case, William D. 
Chapman, James G. 
Christian, John A. 
Christian, William D. 
Coates, Charles H. 
Colt, Joseph S. 
Condon, Richard J. 
Cook, Asher Jr. 
Crannell, Robert W. 
Crapo, Charles H. 
Cruikshank, James. 
Cruikshank, Robert. 
Crummey, Edward C. 
Cummings, William. 
Davidson, Alexander. 
Davis, Abner Graham. 
Davis, Charles. 
Davis, William. 
Dickson, Walter. 
Dillon, Horatio P. 
Dowd, Charles W. 
Esmay, Peter. 
Fassett, James A. 
Ford, David W. 
Gallup, Edwin C. 
Gallup, Miner. 
Gibbons, George W. 
Gibson, William H. 
Gibson, Joseph Jr. 
Goodwin, Thomas L. 
Hall, Richard Henry. 
Hall, Theodore P. 
Harris, Alfred, W. 
Harris, William H. 
Hartnett, John B. 
Hays, Timothy. 
Ileadlam, William Jr. 
Heffernan, James John. 
Henry, Darwin D. 
Hill, Edward B. 
Hoifmau, William. 
Howe, Benjamin Fowler. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



167 



Hutchinson, David R. W. 
Hyatt, Chester. 
Jagger, Eugene. 
Jenkins, Charles E. 
Johnson, Kobert T. 
Jones, Isaac. 
Jones, Royal Sidney. 
Kendrick, Thadeus Warsaw P. 
King, Andrew. 
Kinney, William 11. 
Knower, Benjamin. 
Lansing, Abraham 6. 
Linacre, Thomas B. 
Livingston, Edward P. 
Loveridge, Eugene F. 
Lundigan, Francis. 
McClure, James H. 
McCulloch, John C. 
McElroy, Thomas J. 
McGinn, Felix. 
McKown, Henry. 
McMullen, Alonzo T. 
McMuUen, Edgar. 
McPherson, William. 
Meads, John H. 
Mei-rill, Moses D. 
Mix, William Jr. 
Moakler, Francis J. 
Morgan, James H. 
Murphy, John W. 
Murray, Leverett W. 
Newman, Ebenezer L. 
Newman, George W. 
Newman, John L. 
Newman, AVilliam W. 
Olmsted, Charles L. 
Olmsted, Henry S. 
Outwin, William. 
Payn, Edward T. 
Pease, Charles L. 
Penfield, Edward C. 
Perry, Hiram Jr. 
Philleo, Theodore L. 
Potter, David T. 
Prosser, Henry W. 



Pruyn, Fi'ancis S. 
Pruyn, John S. 
Quackenbush, John N. 
Raly, James Henry. 
Read, William H. 
Rider, John. 
Roak, Hugh B. 
Rodgers, John J. 
Ryan, James. 
SchiflFer, John F. 
Smith, James P. 
Smyth, John K. 
Stackpole, Henry. 
Steinberg, William H. 
Stembers, William H. 
Street, Richard E. 
Strong, Benjamin. 
Strong, Robert. 
Taylor, Charles H. 
Ten Eyck, Britton. 
Ten Eyck, Jacob H. 
Thacher, John F. 
Thomas, George C. 
Tibbits, Clarkson. 
Tillinghast, Joseph. 
Tillinghast, William E. 
Treadwell, Robert B. 
Tucker, Luther H. 
Vandenbergh, John. 
Van Deusen, John C. 
Van Shaack, Edwin H. 
Van Shaack, George W. 
Wallace, Oliver. 
Wands, Burgess H. 
Ward, John. 

Wemplc, Henry De Witt. 
Whetten, William. 
White, Andrew Jr. 
White, Mathew. 
White, William James. 
Whitney, Richard H. M. 
Wilder, Waldo. 
Wilder, William. 
Williams, Alfred Ridgeway. 
Williams, John S. 



168 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Woodman, Edward B. 
Wright, Calvin M. 
Young, Henry 0. 
Young, Oscar H. 
1847 Allen, Alexander R. 
Alvord, Henry B. 
Brainard, William H. 
Callahan, John. 
Campbell, William J. 
Cassidy, William. 
Chamberlain, Henry W. 
Clark, Clinton Jr. 
Costigan, William Garton. 
Cuyler, Charles Melville. 
Dollar, Conrad T. 
Dox, Heni'y B. 
Ester, David C. 
Gansevoort, Henry S. 
Gibbons, Hogan. 
Gill, David Jackson. 
Gregory, Spencer S. 
Harris, William Hamilton. 
Harvey, Charles S. 
Herring, Edvrard. 
Hill, William G. 
Humphrey, Edward. 
Hyatt, Charles. 
Kendrick, Fred. Marvin Hill. 
Kip, William Henry. 
Lansing, Egbert 
Lansing, John A. 
Lawlor, Fenton. 
Little, Jonah. 
Lloyd, Isaac F. 
McCamman, Edward. 
McCaskey, William Jr. 
McElroy, Alexander. 
McElroy, William H, 
Mclntyre, James. 
Meads, Orlando Jr. 

Meech, , 

Mix, Benjamin F. 
Mott, William II. 
Munsell, William A. 
Murphy, John. 



Parr, William. 
Peckham, Joseph H. 
Peckham, Rufus W. Jr. 
Philleo, Charles Henry. 
Rhodes, Archibald C. 
Rosekrans, Spencer, 
Russel, John H. 
Slack, John D. 
Smith, Zachariah Jr. 
Spanier, Emil. 
Stacpole, James. 
Stafford, Arthur G. 
Van Ness, Augustus. 
Wands, Franklin. 
Wesley, John Edward. 
White, John G. 
Whitney, Chauncey Jr. 
Wilcox, Robert E. 
1848 Adams, Amos A. 
Adams, Charles R. 
Adams, John R. 
Anderson, Andrew Jr. 
Andrews, La Fayette. 
Annesley, Isaac. 
Armour, Robert H. 
Artcher, Austin. 
Baker, Benjamin F. 
Bakewell, Benjamin. 
Bertrand, Joseph. 
Bishop, George S. 
Blanchard, Edwin. 
Boardman, Francis. 
Bradt, Adrian G. 
Brown Frederic W. 
Brown, Judson D. 
Bullock, William J. 
Burton, William H. 
Campbell, Alexander. 
Carpenter, George. 
Carroll, John. 
Carey, Julius H. 
Cass, Charles J. 
Chapin, Robert H. 
Chatfield, Abiram P. 
Clark, Edwin Forrest. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



169 



Coates, EdTvin M. 
Coates, Stephen P. 
Coil, Simon V. 
Cole, Augustus G. 
Colvin, James Ailing. 
Colvin, Norwood Ailing. 
Couch, Chai-lcs. 
Courtney, Joseph Jr. 
Courtright, Mizeal E. 
Curtiss, AVilliam J. 
Craft, George F. 
Crannell, William W. 
Crapo, Angelo. 
Crippcn, Thomas W. 
Crosby, Edward W. 
Croswell, John A. 
Demarest, James Jr. 
Douw, John D. P. 
Duncan, James R. 
Eaton, Charles W. 
Edwards, James .Jr. 
Egleston, George D. 
Falkey, Charles H. 
Finch, Charles H. 
Fisk, Anthony ^Y. 
risk, Edward S. 
Flagler, Isaac V. 
Ford, Charles W. 
Ford, Eliakim. 
Fossard, George H. 
Frame, William H. 
Frost, Mark W. 
Gerau, Miles. 
Greer, Thomas H. 
Gregory, Alexander. 
Gregory, David E. 
Gross, James H. 
Harman, Charles D. 
Harnard, Samuel AV. 
Hascy, Alexander G. 
Hascy, Alfred C. 
Hascy, Ambrose R. 
Ijascy, Philip V. R. 

Hill, Willard L. 

Hills, Anthony H. 

22 



Hills, Charles A. 
Hindraan, Edward. 
Hogan, Peter. 
Howe, Benjamin F. 
Hurd, Josiah W. 
Hurdis, John S. 
Jones, Thomas J. 
Kendrick, Edward C. 
Keyser, James. 
Kidd, Robert S. 
Kidd, William. 
Kreuder, Augustus. 
Kreuder, Charles. 
Kreuder, Frederic. 
Kirby, John. 
King, Rufus H. 
Lamb, George W. 
Lansing, William. 
Lansing, William B. 
Lighthall, John A. 
Martin, Henry. 
Mattimore, Francis. 
McBride, James. 
McDonald, Noble. 
McLaren, Finlay. 
Meech, Hem-y L. 
Meech, John H. 
Middoure, George. 
Morgan, Eraser. 
Morgan,^amuel H. 
Newcomb, William W, 
Norton, Francis Lay. 
O'Brien, Thomas C. 
Olcott, Dudley. 
Olcott, Franklin. 
Olcott, Frederic P. 
Osborn, J. Wesley. 
Ott, Friend .Tames. 
Payne, Edward M. 
Peacock, Daniel. 
Pease, Frank. 
Pease, Thomas H. 
Pemberton, John Jr. 
Percival, Henry. 
Perkins, AVilliam A. 



170 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Piatt, Charles M. 
Polilman, William H. 
Provoost, William K. 
Quaekenbusli, Edwin. 
Quinn, Tcrrcnce. 
Rafferty, Terrence. 
Read, Matthew H. 
Relyea, Peter. 
Relyea, Thomas W. 
Rhoades, Archibald C. 
Riley, John. 
Rosindale, Silas. 
Russell, William Jr. 
Ryan, Charles C. 
Scovel, Lewis L. 
Screver, Richard D. 
Selkirk, Edwin. 
Sessions, Edward C. 
Sheldon, Augustus S. 
Silliman, James R. 
Sing, Edward P. 
Slason, Edward P. 
Smith, Abraham S. 
Smith, Donald. 
Smith, J. A. Wilder. 
Smith, John, 
Smith, Lewis B. 
Spawn, Jacob S. 
Spencer, Thomas W. 
Spurr, Andrew J. 
Staats, Philip. 
Ten Eyck, Lamoure. 
Ten Eyck, Matthias. 
Ten Eyck, AVilliam H. 
Thomjjson, Charles F. 
Thorburn, Alexander McA. 
Thorburn, William G. 
Tidd, John A. 
Tossard, Francis. 
Towner, Samuel B. 
Townsend, Charles K. 
Townsend, John D. P. 
Townsend, Volkert P. D. 
Traver, Alvah. 
Trilder, William P. 



Trowbridge, Arthur W. 
Valentine, Henry C. 
Van Buren, Martin. 
Vanderlip, Watkins. 
Van Rensselaer, John J. 
Van Rensselaer, Visscher. 
Van Schaack, Edwin H. 
Vernor, Charles H. 
Vernor, George. 
Waring, Richard S. 
Wells, Leonard Jr. 
Whipple, AVilliam W. 
AVilbur, Benjamin H. 
AViles, Thomas S. 
Williams, Henry R. 
Williams, Henry S. 
Yates, George AV. M. 
Yates, John AVaters. 
Young, Campbell. 
Young, Charles L. 
1849 Adams, George A. 
Avery, Thomas Y. 
Billings, Stephen A. 
Bramhall, AA'm. L. 
Brennon, Edward T. 
Brower, Henry D. 
Chapman, Charles B. 
Chapman, George Henry. 
Comstock, Albert. 
Coonly, George L. 
Costigan, AVilliam J. 
Courtright, Edward M. Jr. 
Curtiss, Daniel Y. 
Daniels, Robert Lincoln. 
Farlin, Dudley. 
Fowler, John P. 
Fowler, Stephen S. 
Fowler, AVilliam P. 
Gallup, Edwin G. 
Gould, James L. Jr. 
Groesbeeck, Augustus. 
Groot, Nicholas. 
Hall, AVilliam F. 
Hare, Emerson. 
Howard, Henry L. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



171 



Jcnkinson, Jamos T. 

Jeukinson, William J. 

Joice, John T. 

Kerr, James. 

Kirk, Joseph W. 

Lansing, John D. 

Loveridge, Clinton. 

Maedcr, Frederic G. 

Maeder, James. 

McNaughton, Henry G. 

Meech, Theodore. 

Mory, Wesley S. 
Mulford, Augustus T. 
Payn, John A. Jr. 
Peck, Spencer. 
Phelps, John F. 
Rankin, John M. 
Requa, James. 
Ried, "William James. 
Scott, Walter. 
Sheldon, Isaac E. 
Sheldon, John D. 
Slack, Henry R. 
Smith, George W. Jr. 
Stone, Charles G. 
Strong, Robert G. 
Temple, Robert. 
Temple, William James. 
Ten Eyck, Clinton. 
Ten Eyck, Jacob. 
Tittle, David. 
Todd, Robert F, 
Tuffs, Lucian Jr. 
Tuttle, Daniel J. 
Van Dyck, Henry H. 
Wadsworth, Charles. 
Wadsworth, Chester. 
Warner, John H. 
Warren, Theodore. 
Wasson, James D. Jr. 
Webster, Joseph. 
Whitney, Charles. 
Wood, Samuel. 
Wood, Thomas G. 
Worcester, Franklin E. 



1850 Adams, Amos Jr. 

Adams, Nelson K. 

Akin, David E. 

Anderson, James W. 

Arms, Charles E. 

Arms, James C. 

Artcher, Austin. 

Atwood, Henry B. 

Bathers, Andrew. . 

Bellamy, George E. 

Bordon, Holland. 

Boyd, James T. 

Briggs, George C. 

Brown, Judson D. 

Campbell, Joseph. 

Gary, Edward. 

Gary, Egbert. 

Chapman, William. 

Childs, John H. 
Clark, George. 
Cobb, William H. 
Cochrane, Edward P. 
Coulson, William. 
Crounse, Josiah. 
Curtiss, Norman S. 
Davis, Charles W. 
Davis, Robert N. 
De Forest, De Witt. 
De Forest, Henry. 
Do Witt, Dudley. 
Duncan, James .Jr. 
Fitzpatrick, Daniel C. 
Fitzpatrick, Michael. 
Fowler, William D. 
Goodwin, Benjamin B. 
Gould, John. 
Gray, James H. 
Gregory, James R. 
Griffing, Seth E. 
Griswold, Henry. 
Hall, William T. 
Hallenbeck, Edwin J. 
Hamilton, William A. 
Hawley, W. Austin. 
Hendi'icks, Francis. 



172 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Henry, Jolin T. 
Hewson, Augustus Gr. 
Humphrey, Correll. 
Hurd, Fredei'ic S. 
Hurd, Josiah M. 
Keyser, James. 
Kirtland, Albert B. 
Lain, James. 
Lamoure, Ten Eyck Jr. 
Lamoure, Uriah B. 
Martin, Bradley. 
Martin, James B. 
Mayell, Henry. 
Mayell, William. 
McCormick, James. 
McGubbin, John. 
McKnight, William. 
Meacham, George B. 
Meads, Orlando Jr. 
Mills, Charles. 
Millwain, William J. 
Nafew, John A. 
Newcomb, Charles. 
Newcomb, Edward. 
Newman, Frederic C. 
Nichols, Charles B. 
North, Albert M. 
Nott, Charles. 
PafF, Charles E. 
Paff, Henry T. 
Parsons, Charles E. 
Perry, Eli. 
Pierson, Charles B. 
Porter, Ira Jr. 
Prentice, Sartell. 
Prentice, W. Packer. 
Pruyn, AVilliam H. 
Redway, John S. 
Ring, Clark E. 
Robinson, John D. 
Ross, Howard P. 
Salisbury, Nelson. 
Sayles, James M. 
Sheridan, John Jr. 
Shrisheimer, Charles. 



Smith, Edwin C. 
Smith, George. 
Smith, Theodore Jr. 
Sprague, John A. J. 
Story, James T. 
Taell, Edward M. 
Thompson, Robert. 
Tibbitts, John. 
Tillinghast, J. Wilbur. 
Townsend, Edward. 
Treadwell, George H. 
Tucker, Luther H. 
Van Rensselaer, Walter A. 
Walsh, Dudley. 
Westheimer, Henry. 
Whalen, Daniel. 
White, Charles R. 
Whitney, Alonzo. 
Winne, Charles K. 
Wright, John, 
Wyckoff, David A. 
1851 Abell, Richard P. H. 
Abell, AVilliam. 
Akin, .Jacob. 
Anderson, Edward. 
Atwood, William. 
Austin, Jeremiah Jr. 
Baker, John A. 
Bendall, Henry G. 
Briggs, Isaac B. 
Brush, Thomas H. 
Burgess, Charles E. 
Cheever, Calvin R. 
Cheever, Henry M. 
Clapp, Charles M. 
Clapp, Edwin A. 
Clark, Thomas L, Jr. 
Cone, Edward R. 
Cook, Charles. 
Corbiere, George. 
Coulson, Henry. 
Coulson, Thomas Jr. 
Crannell, Monroe. 
Crosby, John. 
Davidson, William Humphrey. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



173 



Davis, Chai'les L. 
Dillingham, William. 
Dillon, Charles. 
Edwai'ds, James Jr. 
Fellows, J. Harris. 
Fish, James L. 
Fry, Charles 13. 
Fryer, Alexander S. 
Fryer, William J. 
Gambol, Frederic. 
Gambel, John. 
Gates, Levi S. 
Gavitt, John C. 
Goodrich, Edward. 
Greene, John C. 
Hadley, Joshua E. 
Halloway, William W. 
Henry, Darwin D. 
Herman, Hyman. 
Hewett, Henry. 
Hun, Edward. 
Hyler, Aaron L. 
Jarvis, Charles A. 
Johnson, James C. 
Jones, Livingston. 
Jones, Samuel E. 
Kendrick, Edward C. 
King, Fred. 
Kirtland, Dorrance. 
Lansing, Andrew A. 
Lansing, Charles A. 
Lansing, Edwin Y. 
Learned, Billings Peck. 
Litchfield, Allen. 
Lloyd, Edward H. 
Lord, Theodore E. 
Marble, Manton M. 
McClure, William H. 
McCormick, Charles. 
McDowal, Alexander. 
Meacham, George B. 
Mesick, Henry T. Jr. 
Mesick, John W. 
Mills, Alexander. 
Moore, Burrit W. 



Moore, Robert. 
Neemes, John. 
Netterville, William N. C. 
O'Brien, Peter R. 
O'Conner, Henry T. 
Pair, William P. 
Park, P. AVendell. 
Parker, Amasa J. Jr. 
Payn, John G. 
Pilsbury, Sherman D. 
Piatt, E. Edward. 
Pruyn, Edward. 
Randall, Charles H. 
Rathbone, J. Howard. 
Reynolds, Robert E. 
Rice, Alexander D. 
Richardson, Warren L. 
Rossman, John B. 
Sackett, William F. H. 
Sard, George E. 
Sheldon, Clinton J. 
Smith, Clark H. 
Smith, Heber. 
Smith, Ira. 

Sprague, Frederick H. 
Stanahan, Nicholas. 
Star, James M. A. 
Strain, James. 
Strain, John. 
Swarts, Charles. 
Taber, Oliver A. 
Taber, William A. 
Teller, William. 
Ten Eyck, Leonard G. Jr. 
Thomas, James H. 
Van Allen, Peter W. 
Van Allen, William H. 
Vanderlip, Charles S, 
Vanderlip, George H. 
Vosburgh, William. 
Waddle, John. 
Wait, Edward D. 
Wait, John D. 
Wheeler, Seth. 
Whipple, Henry. 



174 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Woellmer, Ai-gust. 
Yates, Hiram. 
1852 Abell, John H. 

Ackerman, John A. 
Adams, George W. 
Ades, William. 
Austin, Elijah. 
Averill, William H. 
Babcock, Heman P. 
Backney, John G. 
Barber, Edgar P. 
Barnes, Lucien. 
Beekman, Gerardi 
Bogart, James H. 
Bratt, Edgar D. 
Briggs, David C. 
Buel, Jesse. 
Burt, James A. 
Canedy, William S. 
Chase, George E. 
Chittenden, Edwin S. 
Clay, George. 
Cleveland, Charles W. 
Cleveland, Frederick. 
Cleveland, George. 
Coley, Alfred C. 
Collins, Charles A. 
Collins, William D. 
Cook, Ezra C. 
Corbiere, Thomas H. 
De Freest, John K, 
De Freest, Matthew. 
Dickson, William J. Jr. 
Dillow, Richard, Jr. 
Douw, Volckert P. 
Ellison, George. 
Fabre, Hector. 
Fellows, J. Addison. 
Frecdlander, William. 
Gellan, James Jr. 
Gourlay, AVilliam J. 
Griffin, Coleman I. 
Griffin, Thomas. 
Grimwood, Henry W. 
Haight, William L 



Hamlin, Samuel J. 
Haskell, Stephen H. 
Hawley, William C. 
Hendrickson, Walter. 
Higham, Alfred G. 
Higham, Charles E. 
Hinkley, Warren S. 
Hogan, Leverett D. 
Howard, Charles N. 
Huested, Alfred. 
Hughes, Richard L. 
Hughes, William H. 
Jarvis, John G. 
Jarvis, Stpehen D. 
Jones, Moses. 
Joy, Edmund L. 
Kerr, William. 
Linsley, Joel. 
Lodge, Douglas. 
Marvin, George C. 
Matthews, Charles H. 
McElroy, Charles E. 
McKnight, Isaac. 
Moseley, Henry. 
Newberi-y, Jacob L. 
Passinger, Charles A. 
Payn, George A. 
Polkamus, Albei't. 
Porter, Charles H. 
Porter, Jeremiah. 
Potter, Horatio. 
Potter, Robert. 
Pruyn, Charles A. 
Rankin, Lelaud. 
Rawson, Thomas H. 
Ross, Edward A. 
Rothmund, Philip. 
Rull, Samuel L. 
Sager, John W. 
Sanderson, Richard 11. 
Sard, Grange Jr. 
Sayles, John AV. 
Sheldon, Alexander E. 
Shepard, Ashbel K. 
Sparhawk, George K. 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 



175 



Staats, Blecckcr J. ' 

Starks, George C. 
Stevens, Ward Smith. 
Storey, AVilliam. 
Taylor, Augustus R. 
Taylor, Clinton T. 
Taylor, George. 
Thorn, Thomas R. 
Van Allen, Adam Jr. 
Van Benthuysen, Arthur R, 
Van Benthuysen, Charles H. 
Van Vranken, Adam A. 
Visscher, John B. 
Wheeler, Edwin S. 
White, Silas A. 
Whitecar, Howard. 
Whitlock, Hamilton L. 
Whitney, Charles L. 
Wilder, Ephraim. 
Wilder, John N. 
Wilson, William P. 
1853 Adams, George W. 
Aiken, Jacob D. 
Anderson, George H. 
Anderson, Hugh. 
Anderson, Thomas W, 
Austin, Elijah. 
Austin, James A. 
Ayres, Henry H. 
Barnes, Joseph C. 
Bennett, William T. 
Bortle, Webster E. 
Bronk, Stephen. 
Brooks, James. 
Bullock, Charles C. 
Burns, Edward M. 
Canedy, William S. 
Canfield, Charles C. 
Care, William G. 
Carpenter, George W. Jr. 
Carr, William G. 
Clapp, Augustus A. 
Coburn, Peter Jr. 
Cohn, Levi. 
Coley, John W. 



Collins, Peter H. 
Conway, Martin D. 
Cook, James R. 
Cook, John. 
Cook, Joseph McK. 
Cook, William J. 
Corbett, Thomas. 
Crandell, Homer. 
Cunningham, George. 
Davidson, George Jr. 
Davis, Charles C. 
Devol, George E. 
Drum, Charles A. 
Durant, Thomas F. 
Durfee, Cyrus R. 
Eagles, John. 
Eaton, Calvin W. 
Eaton, Elliott Walter. 
Fassett, William H. 
Fearey, Thomas H. 
Fearey, William. 
Featherly, John Henry. 
Ford, Sweton G. 
Friedlander, William. 
Gamble, Louis M. 
Garnsey, J. Spencer. 
Goewey, James M. 
Gould, Jason. 
Gould, William Jr. 
Gregory, Worthington. 
Gross, Samuel S. 
Harned, Charles A. 
Harris, Charles G. 
Harris, George 0. 
Hasbrouck, Francis K. 
Headlam, Robert. 
Hcndrickson, George R. 
Higham, Edward A. 
Higham, Frank. 
Hoag, Abraham. 
Holmes, William J. 
Huested, Sylvauns B. 
Isaacs, Isaac M. 
Jerome, Alonzo W. 
Kennedy, William Spencer. 



176 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Kenny, James. 
King, Andrew T. 
Kirk, Edward. 
Lansing, James. 
Lathrop, Alfred Cr. 
Leash, William G. 
Low, Sidney. 
Malbone, Henry B. 
McCulloch, William H. 
McGregor, Beekman. 
McMalion, John. 
Meegan, Thomas A. 
Merchant, Daniel W. 
Miles, William H. 
More, Iram B. 
Morgan, Charles. 
Morgan, William. 
Mork, Moses. 
Neiterville, William M. 
Newland, Frank F. 
Newland, Samuel W. 
Nichols, Alphonso N. 
Nichols, Charles C. 
Nichols, Charles W. 
Noyes, Arthur. 
Noyes, Frederic B. 
Pai'ker, Edmund M. 
Pettingill, Charles. 
Pitman, Frank C. 
Potter, William B. 
Prentice, John. 
Priest, Henry A. 
Eankin, Joseph. 
Ray, John Edward. 
Ray, Levi. 

Raynsford, Edmund W. 
Reynolds, Charles W. 
Robinson, Albert, 
Robinson, Edward J. 
Robinson, Sidney S. 
Rogers, Edward K. 
Rogers, Nathaniel Jr. 
Ryan, Charles J. 
Salisbury, Daniel G. 
Savage, Edward, 



Sayles, William. 
Sayre, Henry. 
Schwarz, George. 
Schwarz, George. 
Seymour, Charles Jr. 
Seymour, George AV. 
Simmons, Daniel. 
Sporborg, William L. 
Staats, John L. 
Stein, Levi S. 
Stratton, Amos B. 
Snell, William. 
Sumner, William A. 
Swahlen, William T. 
Terry, George E. 
Tremain, Frederic L. 
Tucker, Stephen Jr. 
Turner, Alden C. 
Udell, Samuel Howard. 
Van Dyck, Edward A. 
Van Dyck, Heniy L. 
Van Namee, James W. 
Van Rensselaer, Robert II. 
Van Rensselaer, Schuyler Jr. 
Van Volkenburgh, Theodore. 
Wait, William B, 
Weaver, John E. 
Wemple, Peter H. 
Wharton, John S. 
White, Thaddeus R. 
Whitecar, Newton. 
Whitney, C. Henry. 
Whitney, Edward H. 
Whitney, George P. 
Williams, H. Seymour. 
Wilson, James A. 
Wilson, Thomas A. 
Woodhall, William. 
Wright, Augustus R. 
1854 Anderson, George. 
Angus, Chai'les Jr. 
Armington, Hiram T. 
Babcock, Frederic E. 
Blessing, A. Ten Eyck. 
Bortle, John J. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



177 



Bortle, Stephen R. 
Brown, William C. 
Brown, William T. 
Bush, Walter R 
Cady, Edwin A. 
Calverly, John C. 
Carpenter, Charles W. 
Can-oil, Charles. 
€ary, Robert C. 
Case, Fi-anklin, 
Cleaveland, Frederic. 
Cole, Charles ^Y. 
Cole, Henry Martyn. 
Conly, John. 
Courtney, Robert. 
Courtright, John H. 
Curtiss, J. Henry. 
Dash, George J. 
Davis, James. 
Davis, William E. 
De Forest, Edward. 
Delehanty, Daniel M. 
Deuel Eugene A. 
Disney, John Thomas. 
Durant, Allen B. 
Fearey, Andrew William. 
Fish, Henry H. 
Fish, Roswell. 
Fonda, Cornelius. 
Fonda, William J. 
Freeman, Alfi-ed H. 
Gardner, David D. 
Garugen, Joseph T. 
Gates, George T. 
Gebhard, Edwin. 
Genet, George C. 
Goodwin, Scott D. 
Goodyear, George G. 
Graves, Anthony G. Jr. 
Gray, Daniel Alexander. 
Gray, Neil. 
Grifi&ng, David .1. 
Grovesteen, Daniel D. 
Hadley, Clement L. 
Hague, Arnold. 

23 



Hale, William H. 
Hamburger, Isaac. 
Harris, Charles L. 
Harris, William W. 
Harvey, Clinton. 
Heinmuller, Henry. 
Hernon, Joseph A. 
Herrick, Richard P. 
Hoag, William Henry. 
Huested, Emmory. 
Hughes, John B. 
Jerome, Edgar E. 
Jones, Gilbert E, 
Kaifenburg, Isaac. 
Kaffenburg, Philip. 
Ketcham, George W. 
Ketchum, Edward R. 
King, Ogden. 
Kip, Francis M. Jr. 
Kirk, David N. 
Lawson, Edward S. 
Levi, Lewis. 
Lewin, Lewis. 
Lewin, Moses. 
Lord, Charles W. 
Maher, Daniel H. 
Many, Norton. 
Marble, Eleazer. 
McBane, Angus M. L. 
McBane, Joseph W. 
McCotter, Francis A. 
McDowell, George W. 
McHarg, G. Van Allen. 
McHarg, John Jr. 
McKnight, Samuel W. 
McKown, William. 
McQuade, Peter J. 
Meacham, William H. 
Miller, John Isaac. 
Monteath, Edward W. 
Moi'e, Francis C. 
Morrison, William J. 
Murphy, David A. 
Newbergh, Alexander. 
Newitter, Nathan. 



178 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Owenf3, Cliarles H. 
Payne, George. 
Peckliam, George T. 
Pemberton, Howard. 
Perry, Thomas R. 
Phillips, De Witt H. 
Preston, Abijah S. 
Radcliflf, Henry G. 
Randall, S. Sidwell. 
Rathbone, Albert. 
Rawson, Edward. 
Rising, Austin. 
Root, Charles F. 
Roseman, James R. 
Sackett, Nathaniel 0. 
Say re, Henry. 
Shepard, George W. 
Shepard, Sylvester B. 
Simson, John G. 
Smith, Daniel J. 
Stoffel, "William. 
Stuart, Daniel D. 
Stuart, Thomas. 
Sweet, Edward R. 
Teller, David A. 
Todd, Charles. 
Todd, Edmund A. 
Towner, Egbert. 
Tuffts, Julian. 
Van Allen, John S. 
Vandenbergh, William. 
Vanderzee, Jacob, 
Van Etten, George H. 
Van Rensselaer, James H. 
Walker, Samuel S. 
Walsh, Alfred. 
Warren, Edward F. J. 
Weaver, David S. 
Weaver, Francis N. 
Weil, Samuel. 
Winne, Martin V. B. 
Worthingtou, Herman. 
1855 Adams, James H. 
Ainsworth, George E. 



Alden, Charles C. 
Aldrich, Theodore. 
Anderson, Edward H. 
Armour, Charles S. 
Atwood, Henry C. 
Baker, James A. 
Ballagh, William H. 
Bancroft, John D. 
Bancroft, John Jr. 
Barber, Charles S. 
Beman, Franklin S 
Bender, William A. 
Berrey, Samuel Jr. 
Bisby, Hilton W. 
Boardman, Albert. 
Boardman, Charles A. 
Booth, Oscar H. 
Booth, William A. 
Booth, Wilmot A. 
Brooks, John R. 
Brown, Alfred H. C. 
Brown, James M. 
Brown, John B. 
Burt, William W. 
Callaghan, Jeremiah. 
Canady, Jeremiah. 
Carter, Edward. 
Clark, Joseph S. 
Cole, Edward H. 
Cooper, Edwin B. 
Crandall, Frank. 
Decker, Marshall. 
Delavan, John S. 
Dingen, Lewis P. 
Duncan, Eugene. 
Durant, William. 
Fellows, Frank H. 
Fisher, James A. 
Flagler, George W. 
Poland, Worthingtou. 
Freeman, James. 
Fuller, Augustus 0. 
Gaflfuey, Thomas M. 
Gates, Philip. 



LIST OF SUDENTS. 



179 



Gibson, Peter M. 
Gordon, George E. 
Gould, Charles. 
Gray, Charles M. 
Hallenheck, M. 0. 
Harcourt, John R. 
Hartnell, Daniel J. 
Hawley, George H. 
Healey, Lawrence. 
Hendrickson, Jacob E. 
Hermans, Halsted. 
Herrick, Robert. 
Hoflf, J. S. V. R. 
Houll, Henry. 
Hubbel, Daniel W. 
Humphrey, Barnet V. 
Hurd, Joseph M. 
Jackson, James. 
Kerr, Charles. 
Kirk, Alfred. 
Koonz, Edward C. 
Lansing, Henry K. 
Lawrence, Atkins S. 
Lawrence, Walter R. 
Linsley, Edwin A. 
Littlefield, Henry C. 
Lovett, Frank P. 
Low, Warren S. Jr. 
Lynch, James S. 
Many, W. Augustus. 
McConnell, Joseph. 
McHarg, Alexander Jr. 
Mclntyre, Thomas A. 
McKown, James H. 
McMillen, William J. 
Meegan, James H. 
Merriman, Williston E. 
Nichols, Henry C. 
Osborn, Henry. 
Owens, Thomas J. 
Palmanteer, William. 
Pardee, Charles P. 
Pease, R. H. Jr. 
Peck, Henry C. 



Peets, Cyrus B. 
Phillips, John D. 
Post, James R. 
Quackenbush, Albert. 
Quackenbush, Augustus Q. 
Quinn, James. 
Radley, John J. 
Rawson, Byron. 
Richmond, James. 
Rider, George. 
Russell, Hubbard L. Jr. 
Ryan, Alfred G. 
Schiifer George W. 
Simpson, Simon M. 
Slater, Henry J. 
Smith, Charles E. 
Smith, Frederic J. 
Smith, Thomas D. 
Ten Eyck, Millard. 
Van Heusen, Alpha T. 
Vrooman, Walter K. 
Weldon, William H. 
Whitehouse, Silas H. 
Whitney, Henry C. 
Wilkeson, Bayard. 
Wilkeson, Frank. 
Wilkeson, Gansevoort. 
Williams, Frederic S. 
Williams, Orion H. 
Worth, William. 
Zeizer, Joseph. 
1856 Andrews, John William. 
Babcock, Horace. 
Barhydt, William F. 
Bender, Matthew H. 
Brayton, Sanford B. 
Buchanan, Stephen A. 
Burnham, Guy C. J. 
Cady, William. 
Callender, David. 
Campbell, Thomas Cooper. 
Case, James M. 
Condon, Thomas. 
Crouch, Charles Philetus. 



180 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Crounse, Edward. 
Cutler, James G. 
Dalton, William A. 
Davis, Edwai'd C. 
Deucliar, William. 
Dexter, Theodore. 
Dobler, Albert Frederic. 
Ewing, Lawsou. 
Ferrey, Watson J. 
Fisher, Gotlieb. 
Gervin, Joseph H. 
Golden, Gilbert W. 
Grindrod, John. 
Grogan, Thomas J. 
Hale, Lorenzo. 
Hall, George. 
Hall, Parker. 
Haswell, John H. 
Hendrickson, Eugene. 
Hogan, James L. 
Hurdis, William Edward. 
Huyck, Francis C. 
Jacobs, Van Rensselaer. 
Jenkins, Mulford. 
Jones, Sidney. 
Joslin, William L. 
Lansing, Alfred D. C. 
Marston, George. 
Martin, Henry B. 
Martin, Louis. 
McCasky, Alexander L. 
McClure, Thomas. 
McDonald, George, 
McEwan, John. 
McKown, James F. 
McQuade, Patrick H. 
Morrison, G. Landon. 
Ostrander, Philip. 
Pitkin, Thomas H. 
Potter, James. 
Skinner, Phineas M. 
Southwick, Frank. 
Sprague, Edward Everett. 
Sprinks, James. 



Street, Gilbert W. 
Swan, Richard H. 
Todd, Eban. 
Tracy, Osgood V. 
Van Gaasbeeck, William A. 
Watson, George Harris. 
Welch, Henry F. 
Wiuue, Franklin. 
1857 Anthony, Charles. 
Armsby, Gideon H. 
Barnum, Frank D. 
Bernhard, Lewis G. 
Blatner, Solomon. 
Boyd, James P. Jr. 
Brdwn, Francis P. 
Bullock, John H. 
Callender, Thomas Stewart. 
Cameron, Madison. 
Campbell, Archibald. 
Canfield, Henry. 
Carpenter, Henry Allen. 
Carroll, Henry. 
Cary, Edward H. 
Case, Edward M. 
Causey, John W. 
Colvin, Verplank. 
Cunningham, John H. 
Davis, Edward M. 
Dunn, Charles E. 
Dexter, Isaac Newton. 
Evans, Frederic A. 
Fearey, Andrew W. 
Flacke, Charles. 
Forsyth, William D. 
French, Isaac V. 
Fuller, Charles H. 
Gardner, Thomas E. 
Gibbons, Willard Smith. 
Hall, Lewis Benedict. 
Hallenbeck, John. 
Halley, Ebenezer Jr. 
Halsted, Mandeville. 
Harcourt, Alfred. 
Harcourt, George. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



181 



Hartley, Jolin. 

Hartley, Jonathan. 

Hartley, Joseph. 

Haskell, Sanford. 

Hasw'ell, Henry V. 

Hawley, Frederic B. 

Homes, Henry F. 

Hun, Leonard G. 

Hun, Marcus T. 

Kirk, William H. 

Kreuder, George. 

Lawrence, D wight, 

Lockrow, Arthur V. B. 

Maxwell, Jacob. 

McCIure, James G. K, 

McHarg, John W. 

McMurdy, Robert. 

Milbank, William E. 

Nelson, Alexander C. 

Nickerson, Charles. 

Nott, Howard. 

Parsons, Stanley Parmler. 

Patterson, John S. 

Payne, Warren. 

Potter, Charles C. 

Quinn, William J. 

Raby, Robert St. George. 

Radcliff, Charles H. Jr. 

Radcliff, William 0. 

Rathbone, Clarence. 

Renter, Andrew. 

Reynolds, Charles C. 

Rogers, Edmund D. 

Root, Lyman. 

Sayre, Thomas Jefferson. 

Seeley, Henry. 

Sheldon, Clarence. 

Smith, Cornell Stevenson J. 

Smith, Benj. Franklin Galatin. 

Smith, William A. 

Spelman, Benjamin R. Jr. 

Stanley, Edward. 

Street, Alfred W. 

Taylor, Wilham S. 



Thomson, Henry. 
Tucker, G. M. 
Wallace, William J. 
Watson, George W. 
Weil, Perez. 
Wilson, Levi Carter. 
Wilson, Robert. 
Wood, J. Hampton. 
Wood, William N. 
Zeh, James E. 
1858 Adams, James Dexter. 

Batchelder, Franklin Adams. 
Bernhard, Abraham. 
Bew, William T. 
Bigelow, John Milton. 
Bortle, Remington. 
Brian, George P. Merlieux. 
Bulger, William F. 

Cavut, William. 
Clark, Charles Henry. 
Cohn, Gilbert. 

Collin, Norton P. 

Cushman, Don Alonzo. 

Denniston Gerrit V. 
Denniston, Visscher. 
Douglas, George P. 
Ford, William R. 

Gaffuey, John F. 

Griffin, John L. 

Griffin, Stephen Henry. 

Harrigan, James. 

Harris, Frederic. 

Harris, John C. 

Harris, William B. 

Hart, Eugene R. 

Hawe, William. 

Hawley, Gideon H. 

Hawley, Henry 0. 

Herrick, Marcus. 

Hinckley, Charles B. 

Jones, Charles E. 

Kennedy, James. 

Kidd, Robert. 

Lansing, Andrew D. Jr. 



182 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Leddy, William G. 
Lederer, Adolph. 
Many, William V. 
Marble, Melville F. 
Marx, Albert. 
McAlister, William H. 
McDonough, Bernard J. 
McGregor, Donald. 
McHarg, Theodore. 
Mclntyre, Archibald. 
McMillan, John. 
McNaughton, George H. 
McNeill, William. 
Miller, Wesley. 
Mills, George H. 
Monly, Charles E. 
Moon, Robert H. 
Paige, Joseph Y. 
Paine, Frederic H. 
Palmer, George W. 
Parsons, Henry. 
Payn, Cornelius A. 
Payn, Samuel G. 
Potts, Jesse W. 
Quimby, Aaron A. 
Rattone, Thomas. 
Rosendale, Samuel. 
Rosengarden, Meyer. 
Roster, Henry H. 
Rowland, Chai-les L. 
Ruhl, Frederic. 
Sanders, Barent B. 
Shloss, Emanuel E. 
Sigsbee, Charles D. 
Silsby, John. 
Sno-w, Joseph H. 
Steele, Henry Clay. 
Steers, Barent B. 
Stimson, Daniel M. 
Stoughton, Hugh Bernard. 
Swartz, Nathan. 
Thacher, John 15. 
Thomas, Charles H. 
Topping, Charles W, 
Tucker, Willis Gaylord. 



Vanderpoel, Isaac. 
Van Rensselaer, Eugene. 
Weidman, Eugene. 
Wells, William S. 
Wilkes, Arthur Augustus. 
Wood, Howard. 
1859 Armington, Anthony Rhoades. 
Aspinwall, L. Augustus. 
Badgeley, Charles. 
Beardsley, Charles. 
Bell, James C. 
Benjamin, George P. 
Bleecker, Edward. 
Bortle, John J. 
Breen, Edward A. 
Britton, Edward M. 
Brooks, Howard. 
Brooksby, James A. 
Bryan, David C. 
Buckbee, William S. 
Bullock, Edgar S. 
Bush, Archibald McC. . 
Bush, Walter R. 
Butler, James. 
Carpenter, Edward A. 
Chapin, Ogden. 
Charles, George H. 
Church, John B. 
Clark, Stephen W. 
Condon, Thomas Hale. 
Crannell, Delavan. 
Davis, Benjamin Brownell. 
Davis, James Jr. 
Dean, Amos Hammond. 
Dibblee, Frederic. 
Douglas, Oscar W. 
Esmay, Isaac. 
Fearey, Thomas H. 
Poland, Preston A. 
Forby, Eli P. 
Frothingham, Charles F. 
Fryer, Charles L. 
Fryer, Robert L. 
Gregory, Edgar S. 
Groot, James. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



183 



Gross, Eugene P. 
Heywood, Josephus. 
Hilton, Robert James. 
Hoag, William Henry. 
Horton, Clevelnd K. 
Keeler, Harrison H. 
Keenholtz, Charles. 
Kennedy, Robert 0. 
Kidd, Howard. 
Kirk, Robert W. 
Lamb, Desmond. 
Larose, Peter L. 
Lederer, Jonatz. 
Loucks, William. 
Luther, George M. 
Luther, John A. 
Main, Russel. 
Mayell, John. 
McCamman, Cyrus. 
Mclntyre, John V. 
Mears, Elisha Ashley. 
Muir, Charles H. 
Nelson, Robert M. 
Northrup, Howard N. 
Noxon, Edward. 
Orr, Alexander. 
Orr, Frederic M. 
Owen, Robert. 
PaflF, William P. 
Pendleton, William. 
Phillips, Frank D. 
Pohlman, Oliver S. 
Powers, Michael J. 
Read, Daniel P. 
Reid, James R. 
Remond, Jules L. 
Ridgeway, Frederic W. 
Robinson, Hugh. 
Roessle, Henry N. P. 
Roessle, Richard. 
Rogers, James. 
Rogers, Prentice. 
Sanders, Jacob G. N. 
Sard, William H. 
Sayles, Charles. 



Sevin, Edward A. 
Slingerland, John H. 
Slingerland, William. 
Sprague, Horace T. 
Stoughton, Noi'man C. 
Vernam, William S. 
Vosburgh, Theodore. 
Wands, James F. 
Wands, John B. 
Warren, Clement H. 
Wasserbach, AVilliam. 
Winne, Archibald. 
Woods, Francis H. 
Wormer, Wilson. 
Wright, Edward A. 
Wright, John H. 
1860 Alden, Sanford S. 
Allen, Charles H. 
Allen, John K. 
Appleton, William. 
Bailey, James B. 
Barrett, George W. 
Bender, Frank AV. 
Bender, William M. 
Bentley, Thomas. 
Bigelow, Charles Gregory. 
Blatner, Joseph H. 
Bronck, William. 
Brower, Charles M. 
Brower, Frederic A. 
Brown, Hamilton Bogart. 
Brown, James. 
Brown, Lewis G. 
Burgess, Edgar. 
Burton, George D. 
Campbell, Robert James. 
Carmichael, James. 
Chapman, Clarence C. 
Charles, Franklin F. 
Chase, George B. 
Clarke, John. 
Cohn, Henry. 
Colbert, Michael. 
Crounse, Peter H. 
Davis, Nicholas H. 



184 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Davis, Robert Johnson. 
Dean, Fredei-ic A. 
Dodge, Staats. 
Donahoe, James. 
Edson, John Tracy. 
Falk, William Christopher. 
Fearey, George D. 
Friend, Alexander. 
Friend, Joseph R. 
Frost, William K. 
Gillespie, William Henry. 
Greer, John, 
Gregory, William R. 
Halley, Austin M. 
Hans, John. 
Hawe, John L. S. 
Hawkins, Horace D. 
Herschberger, Jacob. 
Huntington, Chester. 
Johnson, Benjamin W. 
Jones, John Stanton Floyd. 
Kahn, Adolph. 
Kahn, Marx. 
King, Allen H. 
Langan, John Jr. 
Lehman, Edwai'd J. 
Lloyd, Lyman J. 
Marx, Edward J. 
Marx, Lewis I. 
Matthews, James C. 
McCraken, William F. 
McHarg, Albert. 
Mork, Abram. 
Mosher, Stephen. 
Newitter, Morris J. 
Nichols, Morrison C. G. 
Paddock, William H, 
Parker, John Ten Eyck. 
Parsons, James W. 
Patten, William N. 
Peck, William A. 
Pladwell, John Edwin. 
Pohly, Samuel. 
Radcliff, Robert D. 
Rathbone, Charles D. Jr. 



Rawson, Henry. 
Requa, William J. 
Reynolds, George. 
Richards, Peyton. 
Robinson, Samuel. 
Roessle, John Jacob. 
Rogers, Edward H. 
Rooker, Thomas M. 
Roy, James Jr. 
Russell, De Witt H. 
Sager, Henry. 
Schwartz, Edward. 
Schwartz, Gustavua A. 
Shepard, Osgood H. 
Shultz, Joseph. 
Sickles, Robert F. 
Simmons, Henry L. 
Slingerland, George W. 
Spelman, William. 
Sporborg, Henry. 
Sprung, Charles H. 
Staats, Edward P. 
Stackpole, Horatio P. 
Strong, John. 
Sweet, John L. 
Tracy, Charles. 
Van Allen, John B. 
Van Benthuysen, Clarence. 
Van Benthuysen, Frank. 
Van Heusen, Theodore V. 
Vernam, Harry. 
Warner, Edgar. 
Weed, Frank H. 
1861 Abrams, Charles W. 
Anable, Frederic G. 
Anable, Henry B. 
Andrews, Eugene Jr. 
Arden, Henry. 
Bailey, Henry. 
Bedell, Edwin R. 
Bell, Frederic H. 
Bigclow, George T. 
Buel, William P. 
Burhans, William W. 
Burns, Peter James. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



185 



Cassidy, Jolin. 
Churchill, Emmeth. 
Churchill, John R. 
Clark, Jesse V. 
Cogswell, Mason F. 
Cole, Frederic AV. 
Cole, Mark W. 
Coulson, Frederic A. 
Coulson, J. Frank. 
Craft, Benjamin Franklin. 
Crocker, Frederic W. 
Davis, Rowland A. 
Delamater, Nicholas B. 
Dumany, Richard P. 
Eaton, John E. Jr. 
Fish, Frederic K. 
Frost, William B. 
Gallup, John E. 
Gibbs, Albert L. 
Gilbert, Frederic L. 
Gillette, Edwin T. 
Gregory, Frank B. 
Halley, William S. 
Harper, George, 
Harper, John C. 
Haswell, Hiram W. 
Haswell, Robert. 
Hobbs, Harry H. 
Hungerford, Clarence C. 
Hungerford, Newman. 
Jackson, John. 
Janes, William A. 
Kenny, Thomas B. 
Kirk, Andrew. 
Levi, Samuel. 
Lodewick, Edward. 
Lodewick, John H. 
Long, William James. 
Martin, Frederic T. 
Maul, John G. 
McNaughton, James. 
Millbank, Elias. 
Moseley, William S. 
Newitter, Oarson. 



24 



Noycs, Mathew M. 
Oakley, George C. 
Fomfret, William C. 
Quackenbush, Eugene. 
Reynolds, J. A. 
Reynolds, JohnH. Jr. 
Rogers, Clifford B. 
Schliegel, John. 
Sharpe, George. 
Smith, Charles W. 
Sporborg, Silas. 
Springhart, Edwin. 
Stanton, Martin. 
Stone, Joseph D. 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Teller, Elisha B. 
Treadwell, E. Prentice. 
Tremaine, Porter Jr. 
Van Alstyne, William Charles. 
Walsh, Hugh Mc K. 
Ward, Irving. 
Ward, Walworth. 
Wayne, Edmund R. 
Whitney, Charles E. 
Wickes, Thomas P. 
Willerton, Edmund. 
Williamson, Austin. 
Wilson, Abner A. 
Wolverton, Charles B. 
1862 Allen, James H. 
Allen, Walter. 
Anderson, Samuel M. 
Armour, De Witt. 
Averill, Horace P. 
Bagg, Homer D. 
Bailey, Forest A. 
Batchelder, Frederic Howard. 
Bender, Charles H. 
Bennet, Daniel C. 
Brumaghim, Benjamin. 
Brumaghim, LeRoy. 
Cameron, Henry H. 
Clai'k, Francis. 
Clock, Emory. 



18G 



ALBANY ACADEMY SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 



Cogswell, Leilyard. 
Crawford, Ezekiel McI. 
Davis, Joseph S. 
Earl, Waldo. 
Easton, Edward. 
Eaton, Edwai'd C. 
Eaton, Henry. 
Fassett, Lawrence T. 
Fassett, Theodore S. 
Eraser, Frederic. 
Frazier, Leonard H. 
Frost, John H. 
Frost, Lott Jr. 
Gould, Anthony. 
Hadley, Charles. 
Henly, Frank. 
Hisgen, Edward. 
Hodgkins, George R. 
Holstein, Ernest D. 
Hoxsie, Anthon P. 
Hoyt, Charles R. 
Hurst, Frank V. 0. 
Hurst, William. 
Jermain, Barclay. 
Johnson, John. 
Jones, Robert J. 
King, Allen H. 
Lansing, Garrit G. 
Lansing, Howard A. A. 
Lansingh, Abram. 
Lawlor, William M. 
Le Galley, Abram. 
Leonard, Alden. 
Leonard, Edgar. 
Leonard, Henry W. 
Leonard, J. J. 
Leonard, Oscar. 
Lewi, Isidor J. 
Livingston, Crawford. 
Lodewick, Isaac. 
Logan, Theron. 
Lord, Henry P. 
Mahar, James. 
Many, James M, 



Martin, Graham. 
Martin, Howard T. 
McAlistcr, Robert A. 
McClellan, Samuel. 
McDonald, James. 
McDonald, William. 
Mclnlyre, Archibald. 
McMullen, Joseph J. 
Mellick, James R. 
Merrill, Charles C. 
Miggael, Edward, 
Millard, Lennox. 
Moeller, Charles. 
Morrow, Samuel R. 
Myers, John. 
Norris, Walter H. 
Norton, John T. 
Owen, Francis A. 
Payn, Frederic A. 
Peck, Wooster D. 
Porter, Peter. 
Pruyn, Andrew K. 
Pruyn, Francis. 
Pruyn, Samuel S. 
Ramsey, Charles H. 
Riley, Patrick. 
Russel, Charles E. 
Ruyter, William C. 
Sanders, Bleecker. 
Sands, James H. 
Saylcs, Edward. 
Scanlau, William F. 
Schrieber, Andrew. 
Schuyler, Richard P. 
Shepard, Frank D. 
Sims, William U. L. 
Staats, Dubois. 
Staats, John Henry. 
Stahl, John M. 
Staley, Bowen. 
Stone, Charles H. 
Sutliff, Charles. 
Sutliff, John H. 
Swinburne, Lewis. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



187 



Terrell, Holland A. 
Thomas, William C. 
Thomas, William 0. Jr. 
Thornton, William. 
Todd, William A. 
Travcr, James. 
Treadwell, John P. 
Trowbridge, John P. 
Tucker, Charles. 
Tucker, William P. 



Van Gaasbeeck, Amos. 
Van Sickler, William H. 
Waterman, Ilcnry W. 
White, Ross. 
Wing, James C. 
Wolverton, Monteath E. 
Wood, Edward. 
AVoodruflf, William U. D. 
Woolverton, George A. 
Wooster, Edward B. 



INDEX. 



Addresses : 

by Rev. Dr. Ferris, 58. 

Hon. John V. L. Pruyn, G2. 
Rev. Dr. W. H. Campbell, 04. 



Hon. J. G. Saxe, C5. 
Prof. David Murray, 69. 



Alumni Association Formed, 72 



Catalogue of Officers and Faculty : 

Trustees, 81, 89. 

Presiding Officers of the Board, 83. 

Treasurers 83, 89. 



Clerks, 83. 
Faculty, 84, 90. 
Professors and Tutors, 84. 



Commemorative Address, by A. W. Bradford, 33 



Committees : 

of Arrangements, 4. 
Alumni, 7. 



Trustees, 5, 8. 



Historical Discourse, by 0. Meads, Esq., 12 



Letters : 

from Joseph Henry, LL. D., 06. 
John Romeyn Brodhead, 

LL. D., 74. 
Rev. John Mason Ferris, 75. 
Rev. E. P. Rogers, 70. 

List of Students: 
Alphabetical, 91, 

Medals and Prizes awarded: 
Caldwell Medal, 87. 
Van Rensselaer Medal, 87. 
Gannon Medal, 88. 



Rev. John Townsend, 77. 
Rev. Dr. M. Van Rensselaer, 78. 
Manton Marble, Esq., 79. 
Hon. George W. Clinton, 80. 



Chronological, 139. 



Beck Medal, 88. 
Principal's Prizes, 



Heunion , 64 



THE CELEBRATION 



SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 



OF THE 



FOUNDING OF THE ALBANY ACADEMY, 



OCTOBER 25th. 1888. 



AtnANv, N. v.: 

CMAi ifci VAN 8ENTHUYSEN i. SijN< 
1889. 



THE CELEBRATION 



Seventy -Fifth Anniversary 



FOUIIDING OF THE AlEAHY AcADEHY, 



OCTOBER 2 5th, ISSS. 



SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. 



The Albany Academy was chartered by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York, by an instrnment bearing 
date March 4, 1818. It was resolved by the Trustees, that at 
some convenient time during the year, the Seventy-Fifth Anni- 
versary of its cor})orate existence should be duly observed ; and 
Mr. Maurice E. Viele, Dr. David Murray, Mr. Archibald Mc- 
Clure, General Frederick Townsend and Mr. Henry P. Warren, 
were ap})ointed a committee of the Board of Trustees, to make 
the arrangements necessary for the celebration ; and they sub- 
sequently reported that Dr. Merrill Edwards Gates, President 
of Rutgers College and a former Principal of .the Academy, 
had been selected to deliver the oration, Mr. Ernest J. 
Miller to prepare an historical sketch, and Mr. William H. 
McElroy to read a {)oem ; and that they had made a special 
request of Mrs. Merrill E. Gates to write an ode to be sung on 
the occasion. The committee also extended this invitation to 
the President of the United States, the Governor of the State, 
the Regents of the University of the State of New York, the 
Judiciary, State officers, the Mayor and Recorder of the city, 
the presidents of colleges and principals of higher academic 
schools : 

The Trustees of the Albany Academy 

KEyUEST YOCR PKESENCE AT THE 

First Congregational Church 
AT 8 o'clock on Thursday eveninu, 25th ok Octobeh instant, 

AT the 

CELEBRATION OF THE SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 

OK THE ORGANIZATION OK THE ACADEMY. 

Maurice E. Viele, 
David Murray, 
Arciiibalo McClure, 
Frederick Townsend, 
Henry P. Warren, 
Albany Academy, Committee of Arrangements. 

October, 1888. 



And from many of These <listin^''uished i)ersonages, letters of 
regret were receiwd, coiiitled with expressions of cheer and 
sym[)athy. We have found space for some of these. 

The exercises at the church were presided over by Mr. 
Maurice E. Viele, chairman of the connnittee of arrangements, 
in the absence of Dr. Thomas Hun, senior Trustee, and pre- 
siding otficer of the Board. The music was furnished by the 
choir of the First Reformed church under the direction of Prof. 
Sanuiel B. Belding, and by (xarthmd's orchestra. 

After an overture by tlie orchestra, the Rev. Dr. William tS. 
Smart, pastor of the cliurcli, offered a i)rayer of thanksgiving 
to the source of all knowledge, for wliat the institution had 
been permitted to do, in the seventy-five years just closing, and 
sought for all the time to c(mie, the guidance of the Heavenly 
han<l that had led us thus far. 

The following ode, written for the occasion by Mrs. Merrill 
E. Gates, was then sung by tlie choir, accompanied by the 
orchestra : 

Air — March from Lohengrin. 

When 'mid the years 

God's hand appears, 
Cvowiiiiig- with glory the work we have wrought, 

Then let us raise 

Hymns to His praise, 
Gladly confessing His love jiasses thought. 
Out of the past, sweet voices, join ye ! 
Echo the (chorus, years yet to be ! 

One note prolong. 

One be our s(nig. 
Hail, our Academy, blessings on thee ! 

Loyal and pure, 

Sti'ong to eiubare, 
Bold for the battles of Right evermore, 

Kagei- for trutli, 

Be every youth 
Leaving thy thi-eshold oi- entei-ing thy door. 
White brows of glory, bending above, 
Challenge thy sons their manhood to prove. 

Make of them, then, 

Helpers of men. 
Conquerors of Wi-ong by the might of their love. 

4 



This is our prayer : 

Shining- and fair 
Still be thy future while glad yeai-s roll on. 

God's smile is thine, 

Thy work divine, 
Boyhood's bright beauty with knowledge to crown. 
Still be the center, noble and sweet. 
Where all our dearest, best hopes shall meet. 

Uxiward thy way. 

Forward, to-day. 
Blessing and blessed, thy future to greet ! 

Mr. Ernest J. Miller then read the following historical 
sketch : 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



Alumni and Stiidents of the Albany Academy, Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen : 

The Trustees of the Albany Academy have iiivited yon this 
evening to celebrate with them the seventy-fifth anniversary 
of the corporate existence of this institution. 

More than three score and ten years ago the Regents of the 
University, under the signature of Daniel D. Tompkins, as 
Chancellor, and under the seal of their honorable body, granted 
the charter to this institution ; and from that day to the pres- 
ent the Academy has been an educational force in your midst. 
Fathers and sons and grandsons have been educated here ; 
for more than two generations of men has its doors been 
open for the instruction of youth ; for more than two genera- 
tions of men have its graduates gone forth to fill places of 
honor and trust, in this City, in this State, in this Nation. It 
is impossible to calculate the amount of good that this single 
institution has accomplished in the seventy-five years of its 
existence, in fitting young men to do with honor a man's work 
in the world. While some generous citizens aided in the erec- 
tion of the building, we are chiefly indebted to the far-seeing 
wisdom of the corporation of the city of Albany, which, by its 
gifts, made the erection of the building a possibility, and by 
its care fostered the institution in its infancy. No higher 
compliment was ever paid to the value of a sound education 
than by this City when it gave of its property to found this 
Academy ; and the greatness of the gift is even now a cause 
for admiration, and a source of unfailing respect for such an 
instance of municipal generosity. To understand what this 
gift was, let us picture to ourselves this old City in 1813 — 
not in miruite particularity, but in its general extent and 
appearance. 



Leaving the bank of the Hudson overshadowed with willows 
and the graceful elm, we will pass up Htate street — which was 
much narrower then, than it is now — to Court street, now 
Broadway, and standing on the corner, we can ahnost see at 
a glance the most important parts of the town. State street 
is in front of us, with its noble proportions of width, and for 
that reason admired by every traveler who visited Albany, 
then, as now, the most beautiful street in the city. The old 
Dutch church that stood in the middle of the street has been 
torn down, and its materials have been used to erect the new 
church edifice in Beaver street ; the most beautiful church edi- 
fice of that day not only, but also receiving from the correct 
architectural taste of the present day, that tribute of praise 
which harmonious proportion and beautiful design always de- 
mand. From the middle of the street further up, St. Peter's 
church had been removed to its present location, so that we 
have an unobstructed view of the new Capitol on Pinckster 
Hill. This was considered a most beautiful building, and had 
just been completed, but not without great objection. Its cost 
of $120,000 was considered as an extreme waste of public 
funds ; it was insisted that the V)uilding was larger than any 
present or future use could possibly retpiire ; while the furni- 
ture and equipments were claimed to be of the highest type 
of foolish extravagance. In fact, it ai>pears that every thing- 
was objected to except the bill providing for its erection ; and 
that would have been, had it been known just what the bill 
meant ; for under the legislative methods that then obtained, 
it was erected under a bill entitled " An. act making provision 
for the improvement of Hudson's river below Albany and for 
other purposes." Southward from our point of view Court 
street extends to the Ferry House, but it was for most of that 
distance simply a roadway without intersecting streets, liouses 
or inhabitants. The only street parallel to State street was 
Hudson avenue, and that extended but a little farther west 
than South Pearl street; beyond that point wa* the country. 
Northward from our point of view, there was a larger popula- 
tion. Steuben street ran west as far as Lodge street, while 
other streets parallel to it extended as far as North Pearl 
street, until we reach Orange street, a little above which was 
the north bounds of the city. 

8 



From this brief description it will be seen, that excepting 
on 8tate street, there was but little of the city west of Pearl 
street, south of Hudson avenue and north of Steuben street ; 
and the only road to the Capitol, whither we shall have to go 
if we want to visit the site set apart for the Albany Academy, 
is up State street hill, that gi'eat developer of the Albanian's 
nuiscle, and the special detestation of all strangers visiting us. 

But we cannot leave our point of view without noticing the 
building right by us, which is a brick edifice of three stories, 
elegantly faced in front with white marble — this is the new 
banking house recently erected by the Bank of Albany, the 
first bank incorporated in the City and the second in the State, 
and their third location since they began business in 1792 ; 
their first banking house being an old-fashioned Dutch house, 
the third north of State on the east side of North Pearl street. 
From there they removed to the building, still standing, north 
of the Merchants' Bank, and in 1809 they occupied this new 
building, which was considered one of the ornaments of the 
city. Directly opposite tlie bank, on tlie south side of State 
street, is the Post-office; and diagonally opposite is the prop- 
erty which, more than two hundred years ago, was owned by 
Volckert Janse Douw, and which has remained in the posses- 
sion of his descendants from that day to the present. 

Let us then walk up the hill to the Capitol, noting a few of 
the most noteworthy buildings as we pass. On the south side 
of the street, we notice that old house with the gable to the 
street — a true Dutch type of architecture, an antiquarian 
curiosity to-day, and the fitting w^orkshop for many years in 
after time of Albany's antiquarian, Joel Munsell. On the 
north side of the street, a little above Middle lane, which we 
now call James street, is the elegant new building of the New 
York State Bank, with the gold eagles on the front — a fitting 
promise, kept for all these years, of the golden returns which 
its successful management would shower upon the fortunate 
stockholders. This bank was the second in the city; and this 
building, especially erected for banking })urposes, has been so 
used by the bank since May 10, 1804, and is the oldest build- 
ing contiiuiously used as a banking house in the United States. 

We will quickly pass by Balthazar Lydius' house on the 'cor- 
ner of State and North Pearl, thankful if the irate and irasci- 

9 



ble old Dutchman don't shoot at us from his second-story 
window, where he usually sat smoking his pipe ; and crossing 
(State street, we notice that Washington, or Houth Pearl street, 
was then but eleven and one-half feet wide — just a passage- 
way between the buildings east and west — and closed with a 
wooden gate, probably to keep out the cattle that might- stray 
from the farms lying to the south. On this side of the street 
the most notable dwellings w^ere the Stevenson House, built 
after a modern model, and the Wendell House, built after the 
Dutch model, witli steps on the roof, going up to fhe peak, 
that the owner could arrange the weather-cock, so that the 
wind might blow" to his liking ; and these buildings are still 
remembered by many of the present generation. 

But the building that most interests us is the large wooden 
house on the corner of Lodge and State streets, built before 
the Revolution, and at one time occupied as a tavern. In this 
building, on the 11th day of September, 1S1!5, Dr. Benjamin 
Allen and Dr. Joseph Shaw% assisted by Dr. William Neill, 
Dr. T. Romeyn Beck and Mr. Theodore Sedgwick, fonnally 
opened the Albany Academy. As a student of that time pic- 
tures it, it was not a very im})ressive scene. No orations were 
delivered, no poems recited, no odes were sung ; and it is 
doubtful if either the committee of the Faculty or of the 
Trustees had the slightest conception of tlie immense influence 
that day's inauguration would exert through all the coming 
years, or the rei)utation and glory that would follow to the 
institution itself. The committee sat around a desk in a back 
room of the building, fronting on Lodge street; the boys were 
brought in by their parents ; names, ages and projjosed studies 
were registered ; and then, seated on the benches which had 
been placed around the room, tliej^ listened to a few remarks 
from the Pi'incii)al, Dr. Allen ; and the iirst day of school at 
the Albany Academy was over. 

As we look across the street we notice the large dwelling on 
the corner of Chapel, now the residence of Mr. Erastus Corning, 
but wliich at that time was occupied by that firm friend of the 
Academy, Philip S, Van Rensselaer; a man whose eftorts w'ere 
untiring in the cause of education, and who by his sound judg- 
ment and well directed influence contributed in a degree sur- 
passed by no other, not only in founding the Academy, but 

10 



also in procuring the beautiful location it has so long occupied. 
It was fitting that as Mayor of the city he should lay the 
corner-stone ; but had he not been Mayor, no truer or more 
constant friend could have been selected to ])erforni so honor- 
able a duty. 

On the block above the Mayor s residence is the old jail, the 
site now occupied by Van Vechten Hall ; but our chief con- 
cern with that building lies in the fact that it is to be sold, 
and its proceeds devoted to the Academy building. 

We are now on the Capitol hill. Elagle street extends south 
only as far as the Lancaster School, — now the Medical College ; 
beyond this was a ravine three hundred and fifty feet broad 
and fifty feet deep, through which flowed the Rutten Kill, the 
l)leasant brook of that generation — alas ! how^ times change — 
and beyond that an unbroken waste. The block now boiuided 
by Eagle and Hawk and State and Lancaster was occupied as 
a cemetery; and this situation for the Capitol, offered by the 
city, was considered as extremely advantageous, and was de- 
scribed in the following style, which is equal to any thing tliat 
could be written by a reporter of to-day : " The prospect from 
this place is extensive and beautiful. It goes to the north, 
the east and the south, till the summits of the distant moun- 
tains terminate it in the horizon. Hence the blue tops of the 
Catskills are seen mingling with the clouds, and the majestic 
Hudson, winding between the islands below% till the lessening 
sails on the surface vanish to the eye, and above till its curv- 
ing margins hide its retreating waves in the neighborhood of 
Troy. The cemetery, immediately to the south, overspread 
with a sheet of verdure, and a wide, opening valley beyond 
it, through which a meandering rivulet runs to refresh the air, 
will forever aflbrd free access to the cooling zephyrs in the 
sultry season." The advantages of a cemetery so near the 
Capitol are not easily com})rehended at present, as we cannot 
learn that there was any ceiling in the building that was in 
danger of falling. 

To the north of the Capitol was the ground given for the 
Academy, not yet excavated, unbroken, irregular in its sur- 
face. The Common Council were doubtful if the site was suit- 
able ; but the Trustees, with a far-sightedness which the pres- 
ent time justifies, resolved that the site was most eligible, and 

11 



tliere the Academy was built. For some years after its erec- 
tion tlie basement story was below the surface of the ground ; 
and in 1821 it was proposed to raise by subscription the sum 
of $1,000 fur the improvement of the Academy Park, and by 
such improvement to render desirable for places of residence 
the lots on the north of the park, which were considered as 
utterly useless ; and the Trustees of the Academy generously 
aided in the scheme by advertising for proposals for remov- 
ing about 10,000 loads of dirt from the Academy Square to 
the cor{)oration lots on Elk and Spencer streets. In later 
days, a resident of Elk street, and a millionaire, became to be 
almost synonymous terms ; and the thought expressed that the 
location if improved as proposed " would command a most 
beautiful prospect, be retired from the ordinary bustle of the 
town, and combine the healthfulness of a country situation," 
received a speedy fulfilment. 

We have now gone around the city in a general way, and 
you have some idea as to its extent ; but its geogra})hical 
lindts do not convey to you any proper conception of the gen- 
erous i)lan proposed in the interests of higher education. 

The city had less than 10,000 inhabitants ; there were but 
1,450 houses in the town, and its municipal expenses were 
about $54,000 per annum. There was not a daily paper 
printed, although from two of tlie five printing offices in the 
city semi-weekly papers were issued. There was not a rail- 
road in the State ; all the traveling was done by stage-coach, 
excepting between Albany and New York during the time of 
navigation, when the steamboats math^ a trip between the two 
cities in a day and a half, with a " security, convenience and 
ease, wliich was unknown to the nations of Europe." 

This, in brief, was the condition of att'airs when tlie city, in 
1813, offered the lot on the public square and the proceeds of 
the sale of the old jail for the purposes of an Academy ; and 
in the person of its Mayor, on the afternoon of Saturday, July 
29, 1815, laid the corner-stone of the building, which to-day 
is universally considered to be one of the most beautiful l)uild- 
ings we have. Dr. Benjamin Sillinian, who visited the city in 
1819, says that Dr. Beck told him that the Academy cost 
$90,000 before the upper rooms were finished ; this, of course, 
must include the value of the ground ; and he suggests that a 

12 



plainer building- would have been equally useful, and thus 
have left more of a fund for its support. No (h)ul)t a plainer 
building- would have answered the purpose ; but the majority 
of the Common Council of that day were Dutchmen, and to 
them the cause of education went hand in hand with the cause 
of religion — both were equally dear — the schoolmaster and 
the minister were among the first settlers in a new colony ; 
and with such inborn and lofty thoughts of the value of a 
high academical education, it is not surprising that they 
erected a building in conformity to their ideas of the great 
and lasting- work that was to be done therein.* 

At the first annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
March 23, 1813, a committee was appointed, consisting of the 
Rev. Mr. Neill, the Rev. Mr. McJimpsey and the Rev. Mr. 
McDonald, who were to report concerning the expediency of 
commencing academic work, and of preparing a plan of the 
line of study to be pursued. They submitted a report propos- 
ing that the Academy should consist of five departments or 
distinct schools, but that for the present two departments, 
the classical and mathematical, would be all that would be 
necessary. The classical list contained more authors than was 
required by the catalogue of Union College for 1812 ; and in 
order that a scholar s time might be fully occupied, pleasant 
little exercises were api)ointed for every (Saturday, either 
speaking selections from English, Latin or Greek authors, or 
recitations in the Evidences of Natural or Revealed Religion. 
The report also recommended that the salaries of the teachers 
should be liberal and promptly paid, and that the rules of 
discipline should be practicable and reasonable, aud whatever 
penalty was attached to their infraction, should be inflexibly 
inflicted without passion and without partiality. 

The hours of attendance in the summer were to be from six 
to eight o'cock, and nine to twelve in the forenoon, and from 
two to five in the afternoon, and in the winter from eight to 
twelve in the forenoon, and from two to five in the afternoon. 
This would not suit the yoiuig men of the present day who 
complain of a session of five hours a day, while they have all 
Saturday for a holiday ; and I think the teachers would also 

* A]>i)ondix A contains the charter of the Academy. Appeniiix 15 contains 
copies of tlie reNoluiions of the Common Council relating to the building. Ajjpen- 
dix C contains an account of tlie sale of the old gaul property. 

13 



complain of siicli lon^'- daily sessions. But when we find that 
the report only reconiniended four weeks' vacation in the sum- 
mer, I am sure that the teachers would complain because of 
the necessity that is laid upon almost every teacher now-a- 
days, to visit Europe during the summer vacation. For all this 
instruction it was recomniende<l that the rate of tuition should 
not be above five dollars a quarter, nor less than four. 

As the Academy did not go into operation until more than 
two years after the date of tliis report, its recommendations 
were not followed, e.vept perhaps on the })oint of liberal 
salaries; for it is worthy of note that the lirst {)rincipal was 
offered a salary of 62, 500 jier year — a very large salary for 
the time, and greater, 1 imagine, than any clergyman in the 
city then received.* 

While the Trustees felt that the corporation had acted in 
the most enlightened and praiseworthy manner in what they 
had done towards the establishment of the institution, yet they 
also felt that it was absolutely essential that funds should be 
secured which would furnish a permanent yearly income for 
the employment of teachers of eminent ability ; that being, in 
their opinion, the only means of rendering the Academy 
superior in its reputation and beneficial effects to ordinary 
schools. To accomplish this end, at the same meeting of the 
Board to which we have referred, a committee of the Trustees, 
consisting of John M. Bradford, Henry Walton, Theodore 
Sedgwick and John V. Henry addressed a circular to the citi- 
zens of Albany and its vicinity, setting forth tlie desire of the 
Trustees as to the character and standing of the school and 
the claims that sound knowledge should have, to the zealous 
and liberal support of parents and guardians, and of all who 
look upon it as one of the great (causes of morality, piety and 
usefulness of cliaracter. But they presented the subject also in 
another view, which is so novel and yet so very true, even at 
this day, that we will present the views of the committee in 
hopes that their arguments being found unanswerable by the 
present generation, may bring forth fruit after these many 
years. We shall take it for granted, the committee say, that 
tlie yearly exyiense of educating a boy from home is at least 
$250, and that not less than four years must be spent abroad 

* Appendix 1> contains this report in lull. 

14 



for that purpose. Suppose a subscriber to the funds of the 
Academy to give $500. The account in favor of education at 
home, for that period, would stand thus : 

Principal sum expended abroad $1,000 00 

Interest on §250 from tlie time of payment, say 

8, 2 and 1 years 105 00 

$1,105 00 

Subscription §500 00 

Interest thereon for 4 years 140 00 

Tuition money to the Academy at $20 a year 80 00 

Interest on $20 from the time of payment, say 8, 

2 and 1 years 8 40 

$728 40 

Making a clear saving of $376 60 



The additional cost of subsistence at home is not taken into 
the account, as it would be more than counterbalanced by 
traveling charges, extraordinary pocket money, more cost in 
dress, etc. 

The sum just stated would be the saving in the education 
of one boy ; but upon every other boy to be educated, it is 
clear that the principal expenditure of $1,000, deducting the 
tuition money, would be saved. 

In the education of three sons, a parent would thus avoid in 
four years an expenditure of $2,199.* 

The conmiittee appointed to solicit subscriptions were era- 
powered by the Board to leave it discretionary with the sub- 
scribers either to }>ay the subscription money, or to give satis- 
factory security for the payment thereof at such time as each 
subscriber shall think proper, with lawful interest, payable 
yearly. And the committee may further leave it discretionary 
with each subscriber, in case the whole amount of subscriptions 
shall not exceed $80,000, to reduce or withdraw his subscription. 

But on the 30th of July, 1813, a report was made to the 
Board that the individual subscriptions amounted to only 
$3,150, and even that amount was considered uncertain, being 
* Appendix E contains this report in full. 

15 



subject to such iilterations as the subscribers nuiy tliink ])r()per 
to make, in case tlie wliole of the subs('riptiollr^ shall not amount 
to $80,()0(). 

There appears to have been made no further effort at that 
time to ol)tain funds ; but at a meeting held July 6, 1814, Messrs. 
Charles D. Cooper and Theodore Sedgwick, of the Board of 
Trustees, were appointed a committee for soliciting further 
subscriptions from the citizens to aid in the erection of an 
Academy, and on the 1st of November, 1814, they reported 
that the amount they had j)rocured to be subscribed was $300, 
and of this sum $85 was paid, wliich was deposited in the 
hands of John W. Yates, the Treasurer of the Board ; and the 
committee suggested that in their opinion it was inexpedient 
at present to attempt to procure any further subscriptions. 

Some further subscriptions must have been obtained within 
the year, for the Treasurer in his communication to tlie Board, 
dated November 7, 1815, reports that the sums in his hands 
subscribed by individuals in cash and notes, amounts to 
$6,089.40, and after that time the work appears to liave been 
continued until 1821, when no further effort was made, and 
the total amount of subscri])tions paid and unpaid amounted to 
$9,665.* 

There are but three institutions in this city that are contem- 
poraneous with the charter granted to the Albany Academy, 
and these are the New York State Bank, the Albany Insur- 
ance Company and the Mechanics and Farmers' Bank: and 
with all of these institutions the Academy has had a vital and 
persoiuil interest. John W. Yates, the first cashier of the New 
York State Bank, was the first Treasurer of the Academy, and 
that bank was the first custodian of the funds of the institu- 
tion. His son, Richard Yates, was, upon the death of his 
father, elected cashier of the bank and Treasurer of the 
Academy, and the ofiiceof the Treasurer has also IxM^n filled by 
Aaron D. Patchin and Josiah B. Pluml), both of them cashiers 
of the bank. 

The Albany Insurance Company issued the policy that was 
first placed on the new Academy building; and to-day it ]»ro- 
tects it with a jiromise to l)ay, that has never beiMi <lishoiioied 
in all the years of its existence. 

• Appendix F contains the list of subscribers to this fund. 

16 



When we speak the name of the Mechanics and Farmers 
Bank, we instinctively associate witli it the name of Thomas' 
W. Olcott, that able financier who was for so many years its 
President, and the founder of its success and fume ; and so we 
become in some measure connected with the l)ank, because he 
was a Trustee of the Academy. He gave to this institution 
the benefit of his large experience, his sound business views 
and his remarkable sagacity. He planned wisely and liber- 
ally for it in all its iiiterests ; he was its unflinching supporter 
in its dark days, and its firm friend at all times. He occupied 
a seat in this Board for forty-four years, and his length of 
service has been exceeded by that of only one other Trustee, 
General Peter Gansevoort, who served this institution with 
whole-hearted, generous zeal for fifty-one years, twenty-one of 
which he was the honored presiding officer of the Board. 

As soon as the Academy had well commenced its sessions, 
the Trustees enacted that there should be tw^o public examina- 
tions every year, and at the close of the examination at the 
end of the year the Trustees would give tokens of approbation 
to those students who had distinguished themselves by scholar- 
ship and good conduct. Under this resolution, the first public 
examination took place on the 29th of July, 1816, attended by 
a committee of the Board of Trustees, composed of the Rev. 
Dr. John McDonald, John V. Henry, Rev. Dr. John M. Brad- 
ford, Harmanus Bleecker and Dr. T. Ronieyn Beck; and on 
the 14th day of August, at nine o'clock in the morning, the first 
public exercises were held in the Senate chamber in the Capi- 
tol. These consisted of an address to the students by the 
Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, and the distribution of certifi- 
cates, in conformity to the report of the commitTee who had 
attended the examination. There was no public sjteaking by 
the students on that occasion, and we do not find that they 
took any part whatever in the proceedings. 

The first printed programme we can find of these closing 
exercises as they were then called — we used to call them exhi- 
bitions — the Academy boys of to-day call them commencement 
exercises — is that of July 27, 1820; and it would seem that 
the boys of the present day have the right name, for the occa- 
sion must have created as much of a gala day for Albany, as 
does the college commencement in a college town. The Trus- 

17 



tees assembled at Skiiiiiei'''s Maussiou House at 9 o'clock in tlie 
luoi'iiiug, at which phice tliev invited to meet tliem the Honor- 
able the ('oi'iKtvatioii, the Rcitents of the University, the 
parents and gar(Jians of students and citizens and strangers 
generally. At the same hour the students were to assemble at 
the Academy, and then march to the Mansion House. On 
arriving tliere, a i»rocession was formed, and headed by a band 
of music, and escorted by the students, the Faculty, Trustees 
and invited guests, marched through Market street and up 
State street to the Capitol. There twenty-one young men 
delivered select pieces of prose and poetry ; Howard Stansbury 
gave the introductory address in Latin; (ieorge W. Clinton, 
afterwards Judge of the tSupreme Court, Regent of the Univer- 
sity, and Vice-Chancellor of the Board of Regents, spoke on 
"(leraldiue ; " Orlando Meads had for his subject "The 
Splendor of War an Obstacle to its Extinction." Stephen 
Crroesbeeck, John McD. M(-lntyre and John V. Henry were 
also among those who appeared before the distinguished audi- 
ence of men seated in the body of the Senate chamber, and 
charmed the ladies who honored the occasion with their })res- 
ence, and for whom, according to the programme, seats in the 
gallery were especially reserved.* 

We can never meet to celebrate an anniversary of the 
Academy without l)ringing to mind those three men, who for 
so nuiny years labored in its behalf that they became almost 
to be considered as the Academy personified — 1 refer to Dr. 
Beck, Dr. Bullions and Dr. Ten Eyck. It is now forty years 
since Dr. Beck resigned the ofiice of Principal ; but notwith- 
standing the lapse of time, his work is still remembered and 
a})i»reciated, and the old boys when they talk together of old 
times have many i>leasant reminiscences to relate concerning 
him. For there was a buoyancy and good nature about him 
that endeared him to all liis scholars; lie enjoyed fun, and 
was always ready to perpetrate a joke ; and even if he did 
punctuate liis joke, after his peculiar fashion, his hearty laugh 
or his quaint remark would so ease the smart that the stroke 
w^as only considered as the pith of the joke and a part of the 
pleasantry. 'He was just, fair and generous ; when occasion 

•Apiieii'lix Ci Cdiitaind two of the oldest iirofrriiimiie.s in existence — lliose ol' lw20 
and 1S->1. 

18 



deniandod it, severe and stern ; but an ordinarily well-Vieliaved 
and studious i)U[)il was always a[)pre('iated, and never had any 
reason to complain of him, and always found him a true friend, 
ready and willin>,'- to assist, even in after years, by his counsel 
and his intluence. His ways were well suited to his times ; 
but were the Trustees to ado})t similar methods to-day, they 
would be overwhelmed by the storm of indi^niation that would 
be i)oured \i\Hm them by the indignant mothers of this city, 
and would soon find themselves in the position of endeavoring 
to carry on a school without any pu})ils ; for the whole system 
of education, both in discipline, method and scope, have 
greatly changed since some of us were Academy boys. The 
coat of arms of tlie former schoolmaster — the crimson shield, 
signifying gore, upon which is emblazoned the figure of a boy 
rampant, with the hand of one unseen holding him in posi- 
tion, while above, as a crest, are two rattans crossed — all this 
has passed into oblivion. No coat of arms is now needed to 
designate the office ; for the intluence of tlie school is but the 
continuation of the influence of the home — the discipline of the 
school is but tlie extension of the government of the home ; 
and parents who desire their sons to be brought u}) to lo\e 
honor, truth and manliood more than any thing else, will iind 
in the Albany Academy of to-day the greatest help to such 
high-moral tone and })ur[)0se. 

But great lustre was reflected on this institution by Dr. 
Beck's reputation as a scientific man ; it was his especial ]:)ride, 
and the time he devoted to its interests can only be a})precia- 
ted by those who have examined the careful, comi)lete and 
painstaking records he has left of his administration. 

Dr. Bullions was a classical scliolar without a peer, and his 
acquaintance with the Latin and Greek languages was thorough, 
comprehensive and exact. His method of teaching would per- 
haps be called old-fashioned in the present day, but the schol- 
ars he turned out were well grounded in the i)rinciples, and 
had a satisfactory knowledge of the structure of the language. 
His system was founded in a comi)lete mastery of the gram- 
mar, and his scholars w^ere daily drilled in rules of syntax and 
construction. So thoroughly were They equipjjed in this 
respect, that I have known young men entering college who 
knew the grammar almost by heart in all its exceptions and 

19 



irregularities. It was mainly due to his thoroughness as a 
teacher, that the Academy, so early in its history, took such a 
high stand as a classical school ; and its position as such was 
increased and sustained by the classical publications he edited, 
which were very generally adopted by the schools through- 
out the country, and were the means of bringing the Academy 
to the notice of professors and teachers, and so showing the ad- 
vantages a scholar would enjoy of having his classical education 
formed and directed by such a renowned aiid competent master. 

Dr. Ten Eyck was a student of the Academy under Dr. 
Beck, and in 18H2 was called to the chair of Mathenuitics and 
Natural Philosophy, made vacant l)y the resignation of Prof. 
Josei)h Henry. To him mathematics was a plain subject, more 
easily com})rehended, perhaps, than ex}»lained ; and so it some- 
times happened that the value of " X " was not ahvays as clear 
to his pupils as it was to him. Nevertheless he w'as a teacher 
possessing great philosophical and scientific attainments, and 
the student who was desirous to learn, found in him a 
thoroughly able and competent instructor. Perhajjs our boy- 
ish feeling towards him was, on the whole, inimical, yet we 
love him now for the enemies he made then, and we tender 
him our heartiest congratulations, that he has been permitted 
to see this anniversary of the institution to which he gave his 
most matured powers, and in whose welfare he always mani- 
fested the deepest interest. 

iSo many years have elapsed since ])r. Beck resigned the 
})rincipalship of the Academy, that we who remember him at 
all, will have to own that more than half a century has passed 
over our heads. Yet there are some still connected with the 
institution who remember him when he first assumed his 
office in 1817, and such an one is Dr. Thomas Hun; and I am 
sure that an occasion like this will be a sufficient justification 
for any personal allusion such a fact might call forth. Dr. 
Hun entered the Academy in 1817, became one of its Trustees 
in 1852, and is now the honored President of the Board. To 
him the office of Trustee has never been simply a position of 
honor. He has given to the interests of the Academy liis best 
thought, his most matured and deliberate conviction, his most 
careful judgment; and while tli(^ institution might well be 
proud to place on its Board of Trustees a name that for so 

20 



many generations has been identitio<l with tlie best interests of 
this city, it is a source of greater congratuhition that tlie honor 
the name has conferred has been supplemented and increased 
by liis most earnest efforts for the well-being and advancement 
of the interests of the Academy. Kind, yet fearless in the 
discharge of his duty, with patience hearing the views of 
otliers, yet with modest gentleness of speech, but with a com- 
prehensive grasp of the subject-matter, sliowing at the close of 
the discussion the true course to be pursued — hating shams of 
of all sorts, both in principles and men, and jMincturing with 
quiet sarcasm every bubble of flimsy and i)retentiou.s excuse — 
this Board of Trustees feel that they ought at this time, to 
acknowledge publicly, the great debt the Academy owes to 
the President of the Board, and how securely they have rested 
on his matured judgment and on his unerring sagacity. 

But time will not permit me to give a further account of the 
interesting matters connected with the early history of the 
Academy ; nor is there any need that I should do so. This has 
been already done, and by one far more competent than I am. 
At the time of the semi-centennial anniversary this task was 
conmiitted to able hands ; and the graceful pen of Orlando 
Meads, guided by his loving heart, depicted this early history 
for us — tlie difficulties that surrounded the beginning of the 
work, and the courage and perseverance by which those dilti- 
culties were overcome. No better selection for historian could 
have been made. His connection with the Academy began 
W'hen, as a boy, he was registered in the first class formed in the 
old wooden building on the corner of State and Lodge streets, to 
which I have referred ; and it closed with his life, after a ser- 
vice in the Board of Trustees of thirty-seven years, the last 
three of which he was presiding officer of the Board. Per- 
haps future investigation may add somettiing to the facts he 
then brought before us ; but no one could have given to those 
early times more carefvil consideration, or devoted to them 
more willingly the study such investigations required. A cul- 
tivated scholar, a courteous gentleman, a consistent Christian, 
in all his walk through life and in his dealings with men, he 
received the respect that such sterling characteristics always 
obtain ; and the Academy considers itself honored that such 
a man was educated witliin its walls. 

21 



My task is to deal with the history of the last twenty-tive 
years ; this begins with the exercises of the senii-ceiiteniiial 
anniversary, which was tlie close of Principal Murray's con- 
nection with the school. The end crowned the work; for the 
years of his administration had been marked with great suc- 
cess, both as regards the inimbers attending the school, and 
as regards the high standard of study pursued ; and under his 
nu\nagement the re])utation of the Academy was not only sus- 
tained, but greatly increased and extended. But Rutgers 
College was as cognizant, as were the Trustees of the Academy, 
of his intellectual qualifications and administrative abilities, 
aiul invited him to the chair of Mathematics, which invitation, 
to the great regret of all connected with the Academy, he 
accepted. The only thing that made our loss easier to bear, — 
for we felt it for some years, — was that the em})ire of Japan 
called him away from the college and placed him at the head 
of their educational system, the old empire thus honoring the 
new republic and the Albany Academy. When his work in 
Japan was finished, by none was he more cordially welcomed 
to his old home than by the Trustees of the Academy, who 
hastened to avail themselves of his judgment and educational 
experience by electing him for a second time to a seat in the 
Board. 

After the resignation of Principal Murray, the affairs of the 
Academy began to decline ; a decline gradual it is true, but 
nevertheless clearly nu^rked. We deal with this simply as a 
fact, without seeking to enquire as to the causes. About the 
year 1870, the attendance at the Academy was smaller than 
ever it had been known to be in all its history. 

Home of the Trustees became greatly discouraged, and con- 
sidered that the days of the Academy were numbered, and 
that no future of usefulness remained for it. It was even i)ro- 
posed that the Academy should be turned over to the city for 
the purposes of a High School, that its history should be ended, 
and that the Trustees should in that way be relieved of their 
onerous duties. But others in the Board thought differently ; 
tViey were likewise disheartened, but not in despair, and with 
a courage founded on a conviction of future success still being 
in store for the old institution, re<piested General John F. 
Hatlibonc; to seek advice and hel}) from that wise and discreet 

22 



man, PresidcTit Anderson, of Rochester University. After a 
cavefiil consideration of the sitnation by him, and on his 
reconinuMuhition, the i)Osition of Principal was offered to 
Merrill Edwards Gates, then just gradnating with high honors 
from the university, Mr. Gates came to look over the field ; 
the Trustees with full frankness, explained the condition of 
affairs just as they were, concealing nothing, but at the same 
time giving full weight to the fact of the high position the 
Academy had once held, and the possibility of regaining this 
position under careful management, and with a high grade of 
scholarship. Mr. Gates, after careful reflection, concluded to 
accept the i)Osition with a clear knowledge of the amount of 
work that would be required to achieve success, and a deter- 
mination to do that work thorouglily, conscientiously, unre- 
mittingly. 

It often seemed to the Trustees that the will power and 
energy that characterized his work would result in physical 
failure ; but his pluck and his grit won the day, and these 
qualities, guided by sound judgement, discriminating discre- 
tion, and a conscientious desire to obtain real results rather 
than showy appearances, rescued the Academy from the hole 
of the })it into which it had fallen, and placed its feet once 
more upon a rock. 

During the twelve years Principal Gates presided over the 
institution, he introduced new features in the course and 
method of instruction which tended to restore the Academy to 
its old prestige and renown. A Primary de])artment for 
younger boys was formed, thus giving under one plan and 
system of instruction the whole educational course pre[)aratory 
to college, so affording an unbroken school life under home 
influence ; while in the later years of the course a system of 
written examinations was introduced that fostered so high a 
grade of scholarshiii, that for many years no student from the 
Academy was conditioned on his entrance into any college. 

A practical Chemical laboratory was fitted uj) with accommo- 
dations for twenty-five boys, where every student with his 
own apparatus, under the direction of the professor in charge, 
performed all the experiments of the course. A library of 
reference books was connnenced, which was always open to all 
the students, and 1lic spirit of investigation and exact infor- 

28 



matioii was thus nurtured and assisted, and by the large col- 
lection of [photographs made by the Principal, the works of 
art and the classical views of the j>ast were made more real to 
the mind than any mere description could possibly do. The 
French language was also made of practical use by teaching 
Physics from French text-books. These were some of the 
reforms instituted, and the ap})reciation of the work done was 
shown by the new incentives offered. William Alvord, of 
San Francisco, an old Academy boy, donated a fund, the 
interest from which furnishes the Alvord Penmanship Medal ; 
Mrs. Howard Townsend gave the Howard Townsend French 
Medal, and Gen. Peter Gransevoort left, by his will, a fund to 
provide for the Gansevoort Essay Medal ; Gen. John F. 
Rathbone gave the Rathbone Military Medal ; Charles Van 
Benthuysen, Maurice E. Viele, Company A, 10th Regiment, 
Erastus Corning and Robert Lenox Banks at various times 
gave the Second Military Medal, and latterly Mrs. Abraham 
Lansing, in memory of her brother, Henry S. Gansevoort, gave 
a medal for the smaller cadets. 

And this leads me to speak of the military drill, which was 
also one of the plans proposed, to add to the number of stu- 
dents, and to increase the interest in the Academy. This sub- 
ject had before been brought to the attention of the Trustees 
by the offer of a Mr. Carter to give instruction in military ex- 
ercises; this was probably between the years 1820 and IblJO; 
but as his offer cannot be found, it is impossible to say just 
when it was made, or the nature of the instruction intended to 
be given ; nor do the minutes disclose that any action of the 
Trustees was taken upon the offer. In a paper on " Military 
Drill in Colleges and Academies," read before the University 
Convocation in 1883 b}- Dr. Edward P. Waterbury, President 
of the State Normal School, it is stated that the earliest ap- 
proach to military drill in the Academy was in 1830, when an 
expatriated Pole acted as drill sergeant. He tauglit the posi- 
tion of the soldier, the facings and marching; the boys were 
neither uniformed or armed, and order w^as maintained by 
Joseph Henry, one of the Faculty, and afterwards the Secre- 
tary of the Smithsonian Institute at Washington. 

It might be supposed that this military organization was the 
result of tlie offer of Mr. Carter, referred to, were it not that 

24 



Mr. Carter could hardly be considered an ex})atriated Pole ; 
while the further difficulty, mentioned in the paper, "that the 
old boys could only remember an occasional syllable of his 
name, but thought that it ended in a sneeze," would hardly be 
applicable to so plain a name as Carter. kSo that it is impossi- 
ble to say whether the offer of Mr. Carter was. an original offer, 
or whether it was made simply as a continuance of the instruc- 
tion already introduced. 

During the time of the late war, when the military spirit 
took possession of every one, the boys of the Academy formed 
a battalion under the command of Charles E. Snuth, as major, 
now the editor of the Philadelphia Press. The battalion wore 
no uniform but a military cap, and had neither equipments, 
guidons or colors. Nevertheless, they attained a good pro- 
ficiency in the manual of arms and in marching, and many a 
member left the ranks of the battalion to join the army, fight- 
ing for the Union. 

But the organization now proposed was of a different nature 
and to be placed on a different basis ; it was to be a part of 
the school life; not elective or discretionary, but just as com- 
pulsory as the educational side of the school ; in fact, it was 
proposed to make it a department of physical education, and 
its claims were to be held as binding as those of the depart- 
ment of mental education. 

The Trustees who were particularly active in proposing this 
plan were Gen. John F. Rathbone, Dr. Edward P. Waterbury 
and Principal Grates ; and they jtresented the subject to the 
other members of the Board with such power of argument, 
cogency of reason and persistency of purpose, that they dis- 
armed all serious opposition, even if they were not successful 
in producing absolute conviction ; and by a unanimous vote of 
the Board, the experiment was entered upon, and in Novem- 
ber, 1870, the battalion of the Albany Academy Cadets was 
formed, with Rufus K. Townsend as its flrst major. 

This was a new departure in the history of the Academy, 
and it certainly has proved to be a most advantageous one. It 
has been the means of increasing the number of students in 
the institution, and its beneficial intiuences were at once seen 
in the manly and self-possessed bearing of the students them- 
selves. And it is in this development of noble qualities that 

25 



the success of the experiment chiefly lies ; for military drill 
cultivates obedience and i)romptness ; produces respect for 
authority, and engenders willingness to yield to it ; teaches 
how to connnand without offensive superiority, and how to be 
commanded without loss of spirit. It creates the feeling that 
the cadet gray nnist not be disgraced by mean or despicable 
actions, and so promotes that best tyjie of school spirit, which 
is the foundation of those gentlemanly qualities we would like 
to have our boys possess. By cai'eful and constant traiiung, 
it also greatly adds to their physical development; makes 
them erect, full-chested and nniscular, and masters of their 
legs and arms; so that a finer body of young men cannot be 
found than the members of the Albany Academy Cadet bat- 
talion. And our citizens take a sincere and hearty interest in 
them — the fathers observing them on parades witii an honest 
and proper pride, and the mothers and sisters encouraging them 
by their gifts of flags and guidons, embroidered mul painted. 
The military organizations watch with a criTical eye the 
manoeuvres of this corps of young soldiers, and greet with 
generous applause their success in the manual of arms, and 
their proflciency in military movements. 

Even the executives of this State have not deemed it beneath 
their dignity as commanders-in-cliief of the National Guard, to 
review them on dress ])ar<ide, or to accept of them as tlieir 
escort when called in a military capacity to other parts of the 
State ; and have shown by their personal gifts their interest in 
the organization, and their appreciation of their services. 
The Albany Academy Cadet battalion is a success from every 
point of view, and the honor of its success belongs to those who 
so patieJitly i)erfected the j»lan of its organization, and who so 
perserveringly carried it out. 

But wliile the Academy was under such satisfactory 
management, Rutgers College once more api)eared ui)on the 
scene, and ort'ered tlie vacant presidency to Princii)al Gates. 
President Campbell, who IkkI just resigned, was a former 
Principal of the Academy, and the successor of Dr. Beck; and 
now the Trustees of the college turn again to the Academy, 
to furnish tliem with another ])resident. 

The Trustees of the Academy fully appreciated the compli- 
ment so delicately paid to their wiscknn and ability in select- 

26 



iiij!^'' coiiipetent men for their iiistituticni ; but at the same time 
they could not help thinking'' tluit such attentions were becom- 
ing a little monotonous, not to say tiresome. However, the 
position offered was one of such honorable dignity that 
Principal Gates concluded to acce])t it, and in accepting his 
resignation, the Trustees recorded their aj^preciation of him 
and of his services in the following grateful words: "And 
the Trustees assure the retiring Principal, that having more 
than justified their expectations when they called him to the 
charge of the Academy, he carries with him their most cordial 
and confident hopes of his usefulness and happiness in the 
high station to which he goes ; and that lie leaves behind the 
memory of twelve years' intercourse, persoiud and official, with 
the members of this Board, of unbroken harmony, of entire 
confidence, and of unmixed pleasure, of which they can truly 
say that its termination furnishes the first and only element of 
pain." 

The Trustees then selected Dr. James M. Cassety as the suc- 
cessor to Principal Gates. He had been very successful in 
Normal School work, and had achieved an honorable reputa- 
tion in this State for the discretion, sound judgment and execu- 
tive ability he had shown under circumstances that called forth 
the fullest exercise of these qualities. His administration of 
the affairs of the Academy was marked by the same character- 
istics, but the conditions of the work w'ere different, an<l were 
not as congenial to his tastes. The teaching of boys who 
require constant supervision and restraint, was totally unlike 
the guiding of those who have chosen the profession of teach- 
ing for their life work ; and his training led him to })refer to be 
a teacher of teachers, rather than a teacher of youth. Accept- 
ing the call he had received to take charge of the Normal 
(School, at Buffalo, he resigned his position as Principal of the 
Academy, followed by the best wishes of the Board of Trus- 
tees for his success in his new field of labor. 

I have now brought this history down to the present time, 
and })erhaps delicacy would advise that I stop right here ; for 
Principal Warren being in the harness, would make no boast 
of his success, as those can do wlio have put it off', nor would 
he be willing that 1 should make any boast for him. So I 
shall say nothing for him, but simply make this statement on 

27 



behalf of the Board of Trustees, that they consider themselves 
extremely fortunate that they were enabled to ])er.suade him 
to take charg'e of the Academy, and that they firmly believe 
that they have not only the right man in the right place, but 
that under his administration the success of the Academy in 
the future Avill be even brighter than it has been in the past. 

When Principal Warren was looking over the ground before 
deciding on the position that had been tendered to him, he 
asked the committee this question : What assurance have you 
that the citizens of Albany will continue to support the 
Academy as they have done all these years ? 

I must confess that that question had never occurred to me. 
I had never for a moment thought that Albanians would sutfer 
to languish an institution that had for so many years occupied 
such a prominent position in their midst, so long as it continued 
to offer the highest educational advantages ; nor did I believe 
that the old Academy had so slight a hold on the afifection and 
consideration of the army of men who once as boys were within 
its walls, that they would permit it to go down while they 
could extend the help that would save it. And now that 
Principal Warren has been here a little more than a year, I do 
not believe he would ask that question, or if he did, he would 
answer it himself, as he recalls the many cordial greetings lie 
has received from the old boys, and the pride they have 
unconsciously shown, as they have told him of the former days 
when they were pupils in this institution. 

I said in the beginning that the Albany Academy was three 
score and ten and more, and still active and able to do good 
work; and the same Scripture that gives me this familiar 
nomenclature, gives also the reason why we are still able to do 
good work — it is by reason of strength. (Strength because of 
the solid, substantial, life enduring work that is done ; 
strength in tlie character of the men, who as boys were edu- 
cated here ; strength in the love and pride that you all feel 
in the old institution in its character, standing and success. 
So the past and the present come in to strengthen for the 
future ; and we upon whose shoulders rests the res})onsibility 
of its present majiagement, have determined to carry out the 
meaning of tlie words of tlie propliet, that "the glory of the 
latter house shall be greater tliaii of the former." 

28 



Tlie riiairinau then iiitroducefl the poet of the evening, Mr. 
William H. McElroy, of New York. 

Before reading his poem, Mr, McElroy said that he felt some 
embarrassment in presenting any poetical thoughts l)efore 
this audience, ])articularly as he noticed among his hearers his 
former teacher and old friend Dr. Murray ; and that this em- 
barrassment arose from the way in which Dr. Murray had 
treated some of his poetical thoughts when he was under him 
in the Academy. 

It was one of the duties of the boys to write compositions at 
regular intervals. It had come in due course to be my turn, and 
I had written an elaborate account of the Duke of Wellington, 
who had died a few years before. I ended up the recital by 
saying that, " the rains of only three summers had fallen on 
his grave." I thought that was a very pretty and striking 
way to put it, and I was rather proud of my performance. 

Mr. Murray, however, had very little mercy for me, for in 
examining the composition he said, " Mr. McElroy, this is all 
wrong; the Duke of Wellington was buried in iSt. Paul's 
Cathedral, out of the rain." 

He then read the followius" : 



OUR MOTHER'S APRON STRINGS. 
I. 

A pilgrim comes, with eyes that flash and till, 
To the fair temple crowning yonder hill, 
"Where Learning's torch, a beatific sight. 
Beams with unwavering and increasing light ; 
With the old love that never faints nor fails. 
The loyal son his mighty mother hails. 
And joys to think that though her boys grow old 
Her age is evermore the age of gold : 
Time conquers us but yields to her, foi'sooth, 
A goddess dowered with immortal youth ! 
With (juickened pulse the pensive pilgrim strays 
'Neath academic shades — the well-worn ways, 
Hither and thither moves with glowing face 
And fondly marks each well-remembered place. 
Here is the room wherein, with many a sigh. 
He looked for Z urged on by X and Y ; 

29 



Here saw great C-Bsar, at amV)ition's call. 

Force frequent wormwood down the throat of (xaul ; 

Across the hall with classic zeal he seeks 

The desk that knew him when he met the Greeks ; 

When peei'less Helen — sweet but not too coy — 

With Paris morals forced the sieg-e of Troy ; 

At yonder portal Science stops the way, 

" Tis consecrated ground," he hears hei' say. 

" Here Henry niiised, and scorned the skeptic's laugh, 

My fa\oi-ite child I christened Telegi-aph" — 

Hail, Joseph Heni-y, with his soul of tire, 

Who scaled Fame's battlements with just a wire ! 

Upstairs the pilgrim lists for echoes shrill. 

Which still must linger o'er that classic hill ; 

Aye, shrill the echoes that we weekly woke 

As prose and vei'se impressively we spoke ; 

The ail- seems vocal with each well-woi-n line, 

Once inoi'e he's born at Bingen on the Rhine ; 

Once more he sup2)licates, 'mid wild applause, 

Heai" me, ye Romans, heai* me for my cause ; 

Once more he sights that most distressing wreck — 

O, broiling boy, that trod the burning deck I 

Once moi-e he revels in that afternoon, 

A jocund day of gay, entrancing June. 

When ail the class — 0, 'twas a halcyon time — 

One after one declaimed the self-same rhyme ; 

At each encore the tutor madder grew. 

But bit his lij) and calmly heard us through ; 

He felt we loved the poem — he told us so. — 

'Twas dear old Linden when the sun was low ! 

So thi'ough the rooms the loving pilgrim strays, 

O'ercome with visions of the vanished days. 

Recalls the comrades of each vivid scene. 

Those still (.n guai-d and those beneath the green ; 

And while the bells of memory softlj' chime 

He sets their music to a bii-thday rhyme ; 

And this the little song he fervent sings, 

Pledged to the toast : Our Mother's Api-on Strings. 



II. 

What's longer than Art when Art's at her longest? 
What's sti-onger than oak when oak's at its strongest? 
What in all the wide world, whale'ei- may l)etide, 
Is longer and stronger than all else beside i 

30 



Pray read nie the riddle, or make you surmise, 
But lo, as I sjieak how you talk with your eyes : 
Naught's longer or stronger, you tell one another, 
Than the strings of the apron that's worn by our mother ! 

They are longer than Art, for knowledge shall fail. 
But Love shall abide, though the planets grow pale ; 
And Love, who us school boys together here brings, 
Is the twister that twisted these wonderful strings ! 

There's a great, flowing girdle which Puck in his mirth 
Lets loose when he'd lasso the swift- bounding Earth, 
But the strings of this apron, which round us entwine. 
Have a length quite eclipsing that much vaunted line. 

For, ! if, perchance, in a furthermost sphere 
Some high-hearted schoolmate looks down on us here, 
His smiles and his teai-s tender blending but teach 
That the wonderful strings have a measureless reach ! 

They are strong as they're long ; lo ! the oak will decay, 
Or the woodman you pray to to spare it says — nay ; 
Other strings will unravel, will break or will fray. 
Will snap, or at best will in time wear away. 

The anchor chain i-usts, the sea cable parts. 
E'en the bond has been burst that encircles twin hearts, 
But the strings of this apron the years have defied. 
They hold us more firmly each day they are tied ! 



IIL 

The song is done, anci with a half-breathed sigh 

The pilgrim lingers for a fond good-bye. 

*' Boys," says our mother, "e'er you go away 

Is there no favor you would ask to-day ? " 

*' Yes," cry we all, " unfohl a priceless truth — 

"Where shall we find the fabled Font of Youth 1 

We who to thee have ever faithful clung 

"Would be like thee — would be foi-ever young." 

And lo ! the mother, having softly smiled, 

"Whisjiers to each " Still, still, you're l)ut a chihi ; 

They are the free whose freedom comes from Truth. 

And they the young whom Learning crowns with Ynuth. 

The fal)led font ? 'Tis like the golden grail. 

Who seek it far and wide shall surely fail : 

Poor Ponce de Leon with his haunting eyes. 

How vain his wanderings 'neath the southern skies ! 

The boon he missed I freely give to you — 

I touch your foreheads with the magic dew." 

31 



IV. 

Farewell, dear mother, niayst thou flourish still 
Till Time's last sunset fades from yonder hill ; 
And let thy quenchless torch, a Heaven-lit ray, 
Shine more and more on to the perfect day ! 

Then followed a serenade by the orchestra, after wliich Dr. 
Merrill Edwards Gates, President of Rutgers College and a 
former Principal of the Academy, delivered the following 
oration : 



82 



ORATION. 



Ladies and Gentlemen, Friends and Students of Uie Academy : 

The finest flavors of life and its most satisfying enjoyments 
we often miss entirely because we do not understand that we 
have them for the taking. The beautiful landscape which you 
long to see as you read of the traveler who found it in a distant 
land, you may have for a walk or drive to the park that just 
below us on its eastern bank overhangs our noble Hudson. 
The hero whose courage fires your heart when yon read of his 
exploits, has his equal among the men you have known who 
once wore the blue ; perhaps in your neighbor and friend, if 
you open your eyes to see what he has Ixirne and overcome. 
The same perfect, self-devoting love which charms us in poetry 
and romance may pour out its whole life npon us, quietly bless- 
ing us without our discerning it, unless our eyes are opened. 
The V)eauty and the poetry of our every-day life may be as rich 
and full as we have heart to make it and eyes to see it. For, 
" the actual well seen is the ideal ;" and the wise and the ha}»py 
are those who see most and enjoy most in their daily surround- 
ings. 

To see clearly the essential nature and the true value of our 
immediate surroundings, to know the possibilities for good of 
our every-day friends and our every-day life, is a great 
gain. 

Anniversaries Rkveal the Ideal in Our Daily Surround- 
ings. 

Anniversaries help to reveal to us the trutli in these matters. 
They reveal to us beauty and power and the finest possibilities 
for good in the persons and the surroundings to whose real 
significance we have been blind. 

33 



What father has not seen a new radiance of spiritual beauty 
in the maidenly face of his daughter, when her birthday re- 
minded him that she was now 

"Htandin<j with reluctant feet 
Whei-e the Ijrook and i-iver meet, 
Womanhood and childhood fleet '. " 

However faithfully a husband rherislies the wife whose 
presence at his side sweetens life and continually strengtliens 
his heart for life's labors, there is a new, an added sense of her 
worth and preciousness, when the anniversary of her we(hling 
day comes round, and all tlieir past love and their united ex- 
perience of life, like an Indian summer haze, lends a calm 
beauty to her face that transligurecj the time-touched features 
and is more calmly satisfying than the remembered beauty of 
her spring-time, as he looks into 

"A beauteous face, in whic^h there meet 
Fair records, pi-omises as sweet." 

And just so the keener sense of hurrying time and rapid 
change which a father's or a mother's birthday will suggest to 
loving children, often flashes into the consciousness a truer 
vision of the pure essential nature of parenthood, a stronger 
emotion of filial love and a truer appreciation of filial duties. 

As time hurries us on in the journey of life, on anniversary 
days such as this, on these lialts and camping-grounds on 
points of vantage where the view over the stages we have 
traveled in the past, is clear, and nuMuory is vivid, tliere come 
to us our truest tluuights of what has been, our clearest visions 
of what ought to be, and our deepest sense of privilego ;nid 
blessing in w/mi is, when we see it in its true relations. 

But when such anniversaries occur in tlie life of a person, 
however pleasant the surroundings, however happy the circum- 
stances, there is always a touch of pnin in the heart. We do 
not speak of it. We put it under; but it is there. After the 
early spring days of perpetual hope and careless joy are passed, 
there is a secret pang for every loving lieart at the anniversary 
of a friend's birth — a pang tliat comes from the ever-i)resent 
knowledge that eacli quick-returning anniversary brings one 
year nearer the time when that life will have ceased among 
us. This is the reason why in some families where love is deep- 

34 



est, the aTiniver.saries bring more of pain tlian ])leasure. The 
mortal life of one friend is so short. The stron>jrest man, the 
dearest, most ufracious woman so soon comes to tlie allotted end 
of life, tliat on such anniversary days, the sweetness of the 
present love is always shadowed by the apprehension of the 
eoming loss. 

But the anniversary of a self-perpetuating institution like the 
school which we honor to-night, has in it no such haunting sug- 
gestion of pain. As we go on in life (you older Academy boys, 
with your wives and friends, to your experience of life I 
appeal ! ) as we go on in life and feel how short is any one man's 
lease of power do we not feel a growing satisfaction in the life 
we have in common, in in^titntiovs which endure from genera- 
tion to generation ? 

LiFK IS Short ; Institutions Endure. 

When a young man first feels the zest of living, he is pro- 
foundly impressed by the im])ortance of a man's life to himself. 
His own needs, his own desires, the development of his own 
} lowers to the full in every direction — these seem to him enough- 

But a few^ j^ears, bringing him on toward middle life, change 
all this. Scarcely has he seen clearly the ends which he wishes 
to attain — scarcely has he nerved his heart and braced his soul 
for the contest — when there falls on him like a shadow the con- 
sciousness of the brevity of life. If he has fixed his eye on 
any thing really worth attaining, when life takes him sternly 
in hand with its interposed obstacles, its checks and counter- 
checks, its absohite denials, and ruthless and wrenching losses, 
he soon comes to feel keenly tlie frailty of his own unaided 
gras}) upon affairs, the slender import of any one man's life, 
lived and regarded as a thing by itself. He feels the need of 
allying his life and its work with the life and work of others 
whose aims and efforts coincide with his own. He feels the 
wish to make his sjtan of life attain a permanence — endure — 
by allying it with the life of an institution that abides, by 
using it to ])erpetuate a w^ork, wliich others, perhaps, have 
begun, and still others will carry on when he shall have passed 
away. Nor is this desire the refuge of weak wills. The strong- 
est souls — wills fullest charged with the impulse to do and to 
control — feel the most imperious denumds for means and men 

35 



and minds to be so used liy tluMn as \o perpetuate in institutions 
their own ideas, that Their life-work may not come to nant^ht. 
Throiig-h an alliance with institutions in one form or another, 
every earnest and aspiring soul seeks to escape its body's doom 
of but a few days' existence liere, and to perpetuate its power 
when the right arm is palsied and the valid eye has lost its 
compelling power. 

Our Academy Binds Together the Old and the Young. 

There is reason, then, in the nature of man, for such love 
of an institution as binds us together to-night. And in an 
anniversary when an entire community is united to honor an 
institution of learning which has lived for three-quarters of a 
century and gives promise of a most vigorous life in the future, 
there is reason for the feeling of pleasure and hopefiilness 
which fills the air ! All ages unite in such a celebration. 
Memory, realization, anticipatioiL, all have their share here, as 
aged men recall the experience of their boyhood, ardent boys 
delight in the evidence of interest in their school, and parents 
and boys alike look to the future. 

But ])erhaps age has more than its due share of this evening's 
pleasures ! For it is a })eculiarity of school life, with its quickly- 
changing succession of students, that all the delightful pre- 
rogatives of respect and adniiration, all the calmly pleasurable 
sensations of the i)atriarcli who has seen successive generations 
pass like the leaves of summer, to be succeeded by later 
growths, may be enjoyed by a young man still in the twenties. 
In school life a lustrum is a generation. Five or six years is a 
lifetime for one set of students in the academy proper. By 
anticii)ation, the boy of twenty wlien he visits the school tastes 
the delight of being looked u}» to as an elder. Perhaps he is 
regarded as one of a nobler race of boys, whose like is not now 
seen ! And my young friend and former pu})il ( Prof. Groold), 
who has hardly turned thirty, I imagine, could not be more 
fitly described than in the plirases which Homer applied to 
that delightful but very aged man, that discursive story-teller, 
old Nestor, " from Pylus' sandy isle : " 

" He liiis seen 
Two genei-atioiis that g-i-ew up ami live<l 
With him on sacred Pyhis, pass away, 
And now he rules the third." 

30 



Beside the intere.st which these fictitiously young patriarclis 
of the school have in to-night's proceedings, there are those with 
us whose presence honors us, and whom we love to honor — true 
*'old Academy boys" who have grown old in the love and 
service of the Academy. Such friends renew their youth, to- 
night, in cordial sympathy with the young : and nothing so 
closely binds together all ages in a connnuidty as does this com- 
mon interest in an institution that trained one's ancestors, 
directed one's own youthful studies, still cares for one's children, 
and in its vigorous, well-cherished life bids fair to train our- 
children's children after us. 

Indeed, our dear old school has so indentitied itself with the 
history of Albany, has so included in itself the springs of life 
here, that I sometimes think we might describe Albany as 
Xenophon describes a city in the Anabasis of the 10,()()() with 
Cyrus. And there was a large and prosperous city "situated 
at the springs of the river Marsyas ; and there is a palace close 
over the sources of the river, and under the Acropolis ; and this 
river flows through the city." So this city might be described 
as noted for the springs of learning which have risen hard 
under its Acropolis, and flowed through the city, watering its 
many homes. 

Nkxt to thk Home the kScHOOL Shapes the Life. 

For it is in school-life next to home-life, and in school-life 
hardly less than in home-life, that ideals of education and 
achievement are formed. The years passed in such a school 
are the formative years for the young life. If the college gives 
the decided form to the man, stamps the die, the image and 
superscription upon him, and gives him currency as he starts in 
life, it is the home and the preparatory school that must furnish 
and purify the gold of initial character and scholarship to be 
thus coined. But this is too mechani(tal a figure of speech to 
express the truth. Above all, it is life and groiolh that mark a 
boy's school years. And as all the science of our time em- 
phasizes the importance, to health and life and full development, 
of the environment of a growing organism — as hygiene bids us 
care especially for the atmosphere, the climate, the light and 
the food of every life which we wish to foster — how profoundly 

S7 



iniiioitiuit to every thoughtful man becomes the choice of a 
school for his children ! 

Here the foundations of character are laid, \ltne are formed 
mental and moral habits of life-long, binding jiower over the 
man. 

"When a man dies," sayf^ Schopeidiauer, "a world perishes 
— the world which he bore in his head." Tliat subjective world 
of ideals and standards and relations which each one of us has 
framed for himself, and in wliich each must live, is so con- 
ditioned and colored by one's sourroundings in tliese early 
formative years of life, tliat we may w^ell say the boy creates 
the social and ideal world in wliich the man nnist live. Recall 
your owni earliest memories. fSee how the wliole world as you 
now know it was held and typified for you in the small circle 
of home and school friends which surrounded you as a child. 
These persons, these relations were around us when there w,as 
in process of creation that little world, that microcosm of con- 
scious existence which each of us carries with him through 
life. The elements of all our subsequent experience were 
there ; and it sometimes seems as if w'e had stood, since those 
early years, within a sphere which has widened and enlarged 
as the walls of the bubble grow away from its center, always 
reflecting the same environment, but in an ever larger sphere, 
on an ever broadening scale. 

It is this permanence of impressions, this lasting and con- 
ditioning power of the infiuences that surround childhood, that 
gives to the work of the teachers of young boys its dower of 
sweet yet grave resjionsibility, to the whole life and work of a 
boys' school its profound importance. 

Thk School Shapes the Boy's Ideas op His Relations 
WITH His Peers for His Whole Life. 
An entire city may well be interested in such an institution, 
because in scliool life is shajjed tliat ideal of his relations -with 
his peers which will color and control the life of tlie future 
citizen. "Outsi(h> of tlu^ home circle, what relations with 
others, my equals, are possible to me ? " This is the question 
which every school boy's daily life among his scliool-mates is 
answering, whether or not he knows how To ]iut the question 
into w^ords. And no thouglitful parent who understands the 

88 



mi^'-lity influence upon the yonn^ of the thonglit and speech of 
thof^e of tlieir own time of life, can for a moment estimate 
slightly the influence of school life upon his children. To me 
it has always been a wonder that so many i)arents are content 
to turn over to teachers whom they allow to remain utter 
strangers, and to the companionship of children of whom they 
know and care to know nothing, for Ave or six hours in the 
day, and for five days in the week, year after year during the 
most impressionable j)eriod of life, those children, who are the 
treasures of their homes, lent them by Grod, to be accounted 
for to Him, 

In his school, the boy's social life, his manner of dealing 
with his e(iuals, is shaped. The conditions are so essentially 
different from those of family life that he virtually hegiiia his 
social life here. And the way in which he carries himself 
among his school-mates, and the standards of honor and 
behavior which he accepts and helps to form, will go with him 
through life. Well may that noble old school at Winchester 
retain as its chosen legend the quaintly-phrased proverb, 
" Manners makyth manne." 'Tis profoundly true. Not the 
mannerisms of the dancing school ; but the answer given in the 
life to the question, " What manner of speaking and working 
and living do you and your friends accept ? " It is thus that 
ideas of morals, (which in almost all languages bear the 
etymology of " customs," " settled habits,") by acceptance and 
imitation come to control the life and work themselves into the 
character. And when Reason, maturing, recognizes the right 
of moral principles to connnand, the growing boy accei)ts the 
sway of conscience and makes his will her loyal servant. 
You can not banish moral training from the school-room and 
the play-ground. It nnist go on. If no pains are taken to 
make it good moral training, it will be bad training in morals; 
but training in morality, yes, in religion, (or in irreligion) will 
go forward in school life for good or for bad, whether you wish 
it or not. 

As his own mother forms the child's ideals of home-life, so 
does the school, the alma mater, the fostering, cherishing 
mother of his growing mind, furnish the moral atmosphere in 
which the boy's social life begins to grow. The early school 
determines to no small degree the lifelong nature of those 

39 



relations witli liis peer.s, relations harmonious or discordant 
which are to make or mar his life as man and citizen. 

What importance this truth gives to those noble friendships, 
generous rivalries and gentlemanly companionshi[)s which are 
open to a boy in a school such as the Academy. If a true view 
of school influence makes the choice of a school so important a 
matter and the maintenance of a noble school so high a work 
in any community, we may well consider to-night those 
features of its history and those distingiushing characteristics 
in its work which make us deservedly proud of our school — 
the Albany Academy. 

I. Home-life and 8(;hool-life go ox Together. 

For the boys of this school, home-life and school-life go for- 
ward together. An essential feature of the school has always 
been its union of home-life and home influence with such hiiih 
standards of scholarship and attainment as it is sometimes 
asserted, can be maintained only by removing boys and young 
men from the influence and the pleasant distractions of home- 
life, and centering all their strength, interest and time in the 
half-monastic routine of boarding-school life. The history of 
this school proves conclusively that boys may retain their 
place in the home-circle, where the God of our family-life 
designs boys to be trained, and while they enjoy the friendship 
and companioushi[» of their sisters, and are under the friendly 
eye of their father, may come daily, with a mother s kiss upon 
brow or lip, to the atmosphere of a school where honor and 
frankness are cultivated in all, and where the standards of 
attainment are such as to call into full play all the intel- 
lectual power the boy has at his conmiand. This accounts for 
much that is good in the history of the school. Character is 
wrought out under home-influence. There is no herding of 
immature boys in dormitories. The refining ert'ect of a 
mother's influence is daily and strongly felt, as the boy begins 
to be a man, at precisely the time when his thouglits and 
ideals of womanhood most need a mother's loving presence. 

We often speak as if the ideal school of our century were 
Rugby, under Thomas Arnold. Certainly he was the ideal 
school-nuister. But no one can read carefully Arnold's letters 
and atricles, and Arnold's sermons bearing on srhool-iife, with- 

40 



out feeling what Arnold always saw clearly and frankly 
admitted — the awful temptations of a great boarding-school for 
hoys — the perilously low moral tone which prevails where 
nothing leavens the low moral standards of unaided boyhood, 
removed from mother-love and sister-influence. To combine 
something of the courteous standards of a pure Christian home 
with the scholarly pursuits of the school, was the great aim of 
Thomas Arnold's admiiristration at Rugby. The effort to do 
this led him to break up as nuich as possible the great school 
boarding-house, w'here the lump of un-moral boyishness was 
too large and heavy for any one man to leaven it and 
counteract its tendencies, and to distribute the boys 
in smaller groups in the houses of the assistant masters, 
where something of family-life should be before them 
in the homes of their teachers. Thus Arnold strove to secure 
something of that home-life with scholarly work which is the 
characteristics of our Academy, All the ideals which are 
precious to us, and were precious to him, are too often violated 
in the overgrown, fashionable boarding-school, where a crude 
mannishness takes the place of a sound boyhood, a true boy's 
tender manliness. High standards of scholarship and broad, 
full courses of study, in some departments reaching the plane 
of good college work, maintained in a school whose scholars 
are daily helped by the life and the standards of home, have 
made this Academy what it has been and is. And in achiev- 
ing its work without support from a boarding department, 
without a city or a State treasury to draw upon, and w-ithout an 
endowment, it stands almost alone among the best preparatory 
schools of this country. 

II. The Academy Fosters Letters — is Pre-emine>tly a 
Classical School. 
The Academy has always been marked, not alone and not 
chiefly for the scientific work done here by Beck, and Joseph 
Henry, and Ten Eyck, brillliant as was that work, but pre- 
eminently as a classical school, where a love of literature and 
the humanities has been cherished. How far-reaching is the 
influence of such a school, in all the w^alks of life ! Let one 
afternoon's experience of a month ago illustrate. Taking the 
train from New York, a very intelligent and public-spirited 

41 



lawyer of tliat city who took a seat beside me, in speaking of 
a clergyman whose death was mentioned in that evenings 
paper, said of him : " He used to teach us. He was not a very 
strong man intellectually, but he drilled into us well our 
'tupto.""' In my own prejiaration for college, I luid studied 
Bullions' Granmiar. "Tui»to" was a shibboleth. "What 
grannnar did you use ? " I asked, " Bullions', of course," was 
the answer. And 1 was reminded of t-he tliousands of school- 
boys of an earlier generation who were trained in the excellent 
grammars w-hich Peter Bullions wrote wliile he was i)rofessor 
of Latin and Greek in the Albany Academy. 

A few moments later, I bought of the train-boy a phamph- 
let containing these charming })apers, "Books that luive 
helped me," written by prominent men of letters, and first 
])ul)lished in the Forum. In turning over its pages, I found 
that Ex-President Hill, of Harvard, in enumerating the books 
that had given him an impulse as he entered on life, makes 
prominent mention of the botany written by Prof. Lewis C. 
Beck, for three years a member of the Faculty of this Academy, 
and afterwards ]^rofessor of chemistry at Rutgers. The arti- 
cle immediately following Professor Hill's was by Moncure 1). 
Conway, and in terms of warm affection lie s})eaks of his debt, 
for " intellectual liberation," to " a beloved law book, Beck's 
'Medical Juris})rudence,' " where he found "the stuff' that 
dreams are made of dealt with in a scientific spirit and with 
exactness." 

These three instances of the far reaching effects of the liter- 
ary work of the Academy were chanced ujton in one afternoon. 
But we know in how many directions the literary skill acquired 
at the Academy is felt in widening circles. When we see an 
editorial in the New York Tribune wdth a })ertinent illustra- 
tion from the characters of Dickens, a dash of Steele's humor, 
or enlivened by an irresistibly comic verse of camjiaign argu- 
ment, we say, "'tis McKlroy's." A party })latf()rni drafted 
with a flavor of literature, a reminiscence of the periods of 
Burke in its well-turned sentences, if Democratic, leads to the 
assertion, " Why, Manton Marble wrote it ; " if Rei)ublican, 
" it is the work of Charles Emory tSmith " — old Academy boys, 
all ! Or such articles as the noble criticisms of Eighteenth 
Century Literature in still recent numbers of tlie Yale Review, 

42 



articles on which I had conmieiited to college classes but a few 
weeks before the death of their author, Louis J. ISwinburne, of 
the Academy class of '74, perhaps the most promising writer 
among our younger men, crowned in his freshmati year at 
Yale, after a competition in which all classes were engaged, 
with tlie highest literary honor of tlie college, and steadily 
developing as a writer since leaving college. 

The "Beck"" and the "Gates"' Literary Hocieties. 

Ho the classical training and the literary culture of the school 
pass into the life of the nation. Well may an Academy boy 
honor the record of those wlio in past years have belonged to 
the Beck Literary Society. May it continue to prosper ! And 
if I might be allowed on an occasion like this to express my 
high appreciation of the compliment paid me in the most un- 
expected choice of a name for the new^ literary society organ- 
ized in the school soon after I had gone to another city to 
reside, I should do so by saying that no memorial of my con- 
nection with the school for a longer time than any other })rin- 
cipal, save Dr. Beck, could have been suggested which would 
have gratified me as did this unexpected action of the boys. 
With perfect loyalty to the older and more famous society, 
whose name so justly entitles it to outrank the otlier, may we 
not heartily wish the truest success to both these societies, in 
which many earnest boys are learning the meaning of Emer- 
son's words : " In tlie highest civilization the book is ever the 
keenest delight."' 

UL A Truly Liberal Course of iStudy. 

A third characteristic of the Academy, as I read its history, 
is a sound conservatism in essentials, with adaptability in 
methods and details. No patent abreviated methods for secur- 
ing the ends of education have ever been tolerated here. One 
distinct part of the mission of this scliool has been to resist the 
too popular tendency to shorten all courses of study and to 
sacrifice the " humanities " to bread-winning quickness of at- 
tainment along lower lines. While I yield to no man in my 
insistance upon the [)ractical vahie of a liberal education, I am 
in favor of taking iirne enough t(» make the course liberal. 

48 



I In matters of education, "he that believeth " in thorough- 
ness "shall not make haste." Of course, the highest class in 
an institution such as this, will not by its fees "pay" for its 
tuition. But the higher education must always be carried for- 
ward by men who are willing to use money which God has 
trusted to them for noble ends. May the Academy always 
maintain courses of study so full that the presidents of our 
leading universities may say, as one of them said to me ten 
years ago : " No freshmen (;ome to us from any other school 
w^ho are on the w^hole so fully and roundly prepared for college 
work ; and members of our Faculty have more than once said 
they wish all our students could come through such a course of 
training as is given in the Albany Academy." I rejoice in 
those evidences of thoroughness and breadth in the present 
management of the school, which lead us to hope that its future 
will outshine even its most glorious early fame. Some years of 
experience in college work have not weakened, but if pos'sible 
have strengthened my convictions, Jexpressed [m past years 
before many of you, that no educational work in our country 
is more important or more needed to-day than that of high- 
grade secondary schools such as the Academy. 

IV. A kSriiouL Kkpt by Gentlemen for the Sons of 
Gentlemen. 

Thackeray said of the Cornhill Magazine, " it is written by 
gentlemen, for gentlemen." So, I would say that another 
marked characteristic of the Academy is, that it is a school 
taught and managed by gentlemen for the training of the 
sons of gentlemen. I trust that I never use that noble word 
gentlemen in a vulgar sense, as if it w^ere the name of a caste 
into whose ranks a favoredj few were born. The word is too 
fine a one to be so narrowed. And when I best knew Academy 
boys, snobbishness, whether based on birth or wealth or on 
arrogated^socialjpositioujgwas [at "a heavy discount with us! 
A genuinejdemocracy of equal rights, and consideration based 
oiilyjou [merit and ^ability, seemed to characterize the boys. 
Butjwe all hold that the Academy has always been km)wn, and 
should always be^kn()wn,fas*a scliool where there is the clear- 
est recognition of gentlemanly standards of behaviour, of the 

44 



value of gentle inanner.s and gentle-manliness, all the stronger 
for its self-repressed power to be gentle. 

V, It is a Christian School. 

And the history of the foundation and management of the 
school leads us to believe that it will always be held, as it was 
founded, a Christian institution, loyal to Christ and lionoring 
Him in the character it forms as well as by the pul)lic worship 
it maintains. 

Marked by tliese strong features, the Academy is a school of 
which we may well be proud. 

But our interest in it is not confined to the past. It is be- 
cause schools deal with the future that they have an unfailing, 
a perennial interest for all. 

Who Can See the (treat Men op the Next Generation 
IN the School-boys op To-day ? 

On the matriculation book of the college where my work now 
lies, in opening its pages for the signatures of the in-coming 
freshman class a week ago, I showed to them a page where 
were written, in boyish hand, the autographs of the class who 
entered Rutgers fifty-six years ago. In the class of tw^enty- 
one, who were graduated in 18H6, we saw the names of Justice 
Joseph Bradley, of the United States Supreme Court ; Fred- 
erick Frelinghuysen, the late United States Senator and Secre- 
tary of State ; Gov. Newell, of New Jersey and Oregon ; Hon. 
Cortlandt Parker, tlie leader of the Newark bar, and Prof. 
Geo. H. Coakley, of the University of the City of New York. 
Who would liave ventured to predict so distinguished a future 
career for one man of each four in that class? 

But anyone can honor great men after they have proved their 
greatness. For a school, the vital cpiestion is. Who can see 
and honor the great men of the next generation in the blush- 
ing, stammering school-boy of to-day ? 

Only lie can do this who respects boyhood for its own sake. 
Do not fancy tliat you can know in advance wlio will be the 
man to fill posts of honor and responsibility ; but try so to 
train the boys whom you teach that each one of them, if jilaced 
under responsibilities, may prove trustworthy. 

45 



You do not need to toacli Ainerican boys tliat any one of 
tlieni may become President of the United States. They know- 
that quite as well as you do! It's in tlie air ! But you rf') 
need to teach them the duties and olilii^ations that rest on 
every citizen of tlie United States, that they may l)e honest, 
true-hearted, public-spirited members of the connnonwealth in 
whatever station they do their life-work. Teach them their 
res]»onsibilities and their oblig-ations ; and their })rivileii"es and 
their ri^^-hts will come out clearly enouu-h, by inqilication ! 

Work faithfully with the commoni)lace, average boy. Said 
Lincoln : " God Almighty must think a great deal of plain, 
connnonplace i)eo[)le, or He never would htive made so many 
of them." No truth is more important to the safe conduct of a 
democratic republic like our own ! And in school manage- 
ment by trustees and teachers, let it always be borne in mind 
that while any one who knows enough can teach the twenty 
linest minds in the school, it takes genius, patience and fine 
enthusiasm, to awaken higher aspirations and inculcate nobler 
habits in the dull boys and commonplace boys of the school. 
Yet most of the teacher's work must be done with and for 
them. " God has made so many of them." 

Memories of the Past; 187() to 1882. 

But I cannot s})eak impersonally of this schoctl, my friends ! 
Twelve years of its history are written in my heart. And I 
see here to-night, not only the familiar faces of very many 
dear friends among tlui men of Albany, grown a little older, 
and the faces of mothers whom I learned to honor and esteem 
for wliat I saw of them in their sons ; but besides tliese friends, 
I have luid a welcome from young men whose faces were 
strange to me in their maturity, yet from whose bearded lips 
the old boyish smile breaking out reveals a former })U}»il. 

The changes are many, since my work began in the 
Academy, eighteen years ago. As we sang of the " wliite 
brows of glory bending above," how our thoughts went back, 
boys of '70 to '82, to those Academy boys who can never i^row 
old! 

Jamie McClure, Fred S ^ inburne, Clarence Hascy, and lat(M', 
(George Dewey, carrying tlie frank warm-heartedness of boy- 
hood into his young manhood, and on through [)ainful suff'er- 

46 



ing" to courageous death ; and Harry Ten Kyck, wlio luul done 
a life-work by liis candid, lionorable manliness, in the few 
years since his college-days, and whom this city, like one great 
family of mourners, so lately followed to an early grave, and 
his class-mate, Louis Swinburne, of whose growing fame we 
have s])oken, and whose chivalric, high-hearted life in the 
school no boy of his time can ever forget. 

" I see them niustei* in a g'leamiiig' row. 

With ever youthful brows that noblei- show. 

We tind in our dull road their shining track, 

They come transfigured back, 

Secure from change in their high-hearted waj's, 

Beautiful evei'more, and with the i-ays 

Of morn on their white shields of expectation." 

Teachers have passed on, too. Mr. Mills and Mr. Tilling- 
hast, self-sacrificing, pure-hearted, loving music, sweet-souled 
men, too early called away ! And of other teachers, Messrs. 
Satterlee and Warner, and Hubbell and Olds, all prospering 
in their professions. Our sister institution, the Higli School, 
owes her eificient principal [Professor 0. D. Robinson] to the 
Academy, who imported him from Yankee-land as a teacher of 
mathematics. And others have come and gone in these 
eighteen years. 

Of the Academy teachers wlio came with me to the Academy 
in 1870, but one is left, the honored professor of mathematics, 
Martin L. Deyo. Look well at his work. For nearly twenty 
years it has been done with unvarying faithfulness. It will 
bear inspection. It is wi-itten with honest accuracy in many 
lives of All)auy men ! You cannot "erase it." Suppose you 
" mark it ten ! " 

Then, for twenty years the school has known that marvel- 
lously insi)iring, wonumly preseiu'e, stinuilatiug ambition, 
awakening heart and conscience in the younger boys — the 
only woman I have ever known in the teacher's work who in- 
variably wore a smile yet was never made weak or silly by it. 
Miss Esther Andrews. Hundreds of Academy boys will never 
forget her! She constantly helped to build up character in 
the boys she taught. 



47 



The Building op Chara(Ter is the Great End. 

And this bnikling of cliiiracter is the irreat thing in educa- 
tion, my friends. Boys may acliieve character much earlier in 
life than many persons tliink. Will-power may be developed, 
will-power guided by conscience and reason. " It is conscience 
that i)reserves the might of the will," says Trendelenburg. 
" Happy is he who walks wath that strong-siding champion, 
Conscience," says Milton. And I have known many a boy 
who, hardly yet in his teens, walked serenely with this strong- 
siding champion, already a "hai)i)y warrior," because he had 
said to duty, " In the light of Truth thy bondsman let me be." 
'Tis well said that "one is already of consequence in the 
world, whatever his age, w^hen men have learned that he can 
be depended on." Judged by this standard, I have known 
many an undergraduate Academy boy who w^as deserving of 
respect as "of consequence in the w^orld." 

I reverence profoundly a pure and manly boy. I have known 
boys at sixteen for whom I have felt a respect as true, as pro- 
found as I ever felt for a man of sixty. For such boys had 
already achieved a noble character. And " character gives 
splendor to youth and awe to wrinkled skin and gray hairs.'' 

It has seemed to me at times, as I recall the faces of the 
Academy boys whom I have known, tluit as our photographers 
now photograph a concejjt, make a composite picture, by tak- 
ing an imi)ression, now of one face now of another, so I could 
well form tlie ideal American V)oy, by blending impressions of 
one and another of the Academy boys whom I have known. 

Let Albanians Idealize this yciiooL — Understanding its 
High Value. 

Let us idealize somewhat our way of looking at the Academy. 
Once in a generation, when these great anniversaries come 
round, let us know how noble are the possibilities, how worthy 
is Yhe actual work of the institution you have among you 
here. ; 

As citizens of Albany you do well to cherish and to develop 
still more fully an institution where your sons may be trained 
to noble living in their earliest social life. " To form the habit 
of doing the thing I know I ouglit to do, at the time when I 
know I ought to do it, wliether I feel like <Ioing it or not," 

48 



Huxley has said is the object of aii^|eduratioTi. This habit 
you want this school to foster. To do hard things heartily and 
with a swing, is a great lesson learned ! In this school let 
Albany boys continue to learn how to act together nobly, for 
worthy ends, as " citizens of no mean city." 

Let the High Hopes of Youth Re-animate Us ! 

And as we think of the hopes of our early youth, to-night, 
my friends, we who are older shall do well to purify our aims 
in life by a clear vision of the high hopes of our youth. As 
we contrast our limited achievements and our lowered stand- 
ards with the purposes of our earlier years, when we look at 
our lives in an hour of vision such as this, let us listen to the 
still, small voice in which Grod says to each one of us, " Look 
that thou make it after the pattern that was shown thee in the 
mount," in thy youth ! 

And for every boy and young man, the question of supreme 
importance, to-night and always, is, How shall I keep my 
ideal, my aim in life, high ; and my power of will to direct 
ray life according to this ideal, strong, unswerving, tri- 
umphantly persistent, and rich in noble achievement ? How 
shall I do this ? 

The True Key-note of Life. 

" Trust yourself," answers one whose followers boast that he 
is a seer. "Trust yourself! Every heart vibrates to that 
iron string ! " 

'Tis a strong key-note ! Every man's heart, in certain 
moods, must answer to it. Yes, trust yourself, as long and as 
far as you can ! Demand much of yourself. 8et it before you 
as an end to be attained that " a simple purpose may be as 
strong for you as iron necessity is to others." Be not content 
to take from yourself the flattering promise, " I will do," but 
sternly demand the assertion of the accomplished fact, " I 
hate done." 

Take out of yourself all you can get ! But, my friend, you 
cainiot get out of yourself what you most need, for it is not in 
you. You cannot get from yourself either heaven or God, 
either forgiveness or peace ; and for these your soul will one 
day know an awful hunger. 

49 



"Trust yourself!" It is indeed an iron string. As life 
goes on, the note which experience by its hard blows draws 
from this string, so changes as to blend sadly with the low- 
throl)l>ing dirge of pain, and sorrow^ and failure, and sin that 
our ears nuist hear, as we learn how utterly unable we are by 
trusting self to secure for ourselves or for those whom we love 
the best results. At last, the fearful, agonizing strain of 
death conies upon this iron string of " trust thyself," and witli 
a startling crash, 'tis broken ! 

If we had no other key-note than that to sound in your ears, 
a minor wail of disapi»ointment would be all we could look for 
to follow it. 

That was an iron string. We want a higher, clearer, more 
joyous key-note for our life. We need a nobler ideal than self 
can give us. There is a truer key-note than " trust yourself ! " 
Trust God, young man ! Trust God ! When self is seen to be 
the source of our w^orst temptations, when we need above all 
else to be saved from self and from the sins of selfishness, 
there comes a Divine answer to our need. Conscience and the 
Bible unite in revealing the ideal we need to keep the will 
steady in its work of self-control and self-direction to the 
noblest ends. 

When the path of virtue, although clearly seen, fails to 
attract us ; when goodness seems irksome to us and we feel the 
need of a power within to quicken ami energize us in our life- 
work, to make duty attractive, how wonderfully this need of 
ours is answered ! Our emotions are quickened by the reve- 
lation of a personal God to meet our personal need, by the 
revelation of a divine Haviour, who became a man and died to 
save us from ourselves and to bring us back to God — a Saviour 
who now calls all men, who will trust in Him, Ilis friends. 

Wrote Emerson, despairingly, to despairing Carlyle, over 
the sea : " A divine })orson is the prophecy of the mind. A 
friend is the hojte of the heart. Our beautitude waits for the 
fulfillment of tlu^ two in one." 

But it waits not, my friends. The Divine Person, the Friend 
of the heart, the fuHilling of the two in one, our Beatitude has 
come. Our deepest needs are met. An infinite fullness sup- 
plies a finite need. God, the Eternal (rod, cares for our 
present life and gives us life eternal. The perfect ideal a 

50 



young man needs to make strong his will and to kindle his 
noblest emotions is set before us in the One Perfect Man. A 
renewed will, trained to holiness, is promised to everyone who 
accepts this Divine Man as his Saviour, his example and his 
Master. 

If you would see your future secure, serve God, 

'' And the i-ewanl, (ir soon oi- late, will come 
Fi-oin Him whom no man serves in vain." 



At the conclusion of the oration, the audience joined in sing- 
ing the familiar hymn, " My Country, 'Tis of Thee," led by 
the choir and the orchestra, and the benediction was then pro- 
nounced by the Rt. Rev. William Croswell Doane, Bishop of 
Albany, one of the Trustees of the Academy. 



51 



LETTERS. 



The following are some of the letters of regret, and also of 
appreciation of the work that the Academy has done, that 
were received by the Committee : 

From the President of the United States. 

Executive Mansion, Washington. 

The President acknowledges the courtesy of the invitation 
of the Trustees of the Albany Academy, and regrets that he 
will be unable to be present at the celebration of the iSeventy- 
fifth Anniversary on Thursday evening, October 25th. 

Friday, Octobe)' 19, 1888. 



From the Rev. TT. H. Campbell, D.D., LL. D., a former Prin- 
cipal of the Academy, and recently President of Rutgers College. 

New Brunswick, October 19, 1888. 
Messrs. Maurice E. Viele, David Murray and others : 

Gentlemen — Accept my thanks for your remembrance of 
me and kind invitation to attend the Seventy-fifth Anniver- 
sary of the organization of the Albany Academy. I regret 
that the infirmities of increasing years will prevent my attend- 
ance. My interest in the welfare of the Academy, its trustees, 
patrons, faculty and friends and pupils does not grow less with 
increasing years. Its good work and growing usefulness fills 
me with joy. 

Your obliged friend, 

Wm. H. Campbell. 
53 



'] 



From the Rev. Anson J. Upson, D.D., LL.D., Regent of the 

University of the State of New York. 

"The Waverly," 
872 Genesee street, Utica, 
October 18, 1888. 
My Dear Mr. Viele — ^I have received an invitation to be 
present at the celebration of the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of 
the Albany Academy, signed by the committee of arrange- 
ments, of which you are the chairman. 

Please thank the Committee for this very pleasant remem- 
brance. It would give me very great pleasure to be present 
on the interesting occasion, and I greatly regret that it will 
not be in my power to do so. 

The Albany Academy holds so high a rank among the insti- 
tutions of the State and has contributed to the thorough educa- 
tion of so many of its best men, that I am glad to be numbered 
among those who are known to be interested in its success. 

Cordially yours, 

Anson J. Upson. 



From the Rev. Henry Darling, D.D., LL. 3., President of Hamil- 
ton College. 

Hamilton College, "i 

Clinton, N. Y., October 28, 1888. | 
My Dear Mr. Viele — I am exceedingly grateful to the 
Committee, of which you are chairman, for the kind invitation 
to attend the Seventy-tifth Anniversary of the organization 
of the Albany Academy ; and though my college duties will 
necessarily prevent its acceptance, 1 am happy for the oppor- 
tunity it affords me of expressing my deep interest in the past 
work of the institution, and in its prospects for future usefulness. 
The Albany Academy, among the older educational institu- 
tions of the State, has been among tlie most successful. It has 
been the source to your community of unspeakable blessing. 
It has contributed very largely to the intellectual culture of 
your city. 

From its graduates the -college with which I am connected 
has from time to time received students, and their preparation 
for the higher education, upon which they have here entered, 

54 



have afforded us the best evidence of the thoroughness of their 

academic education, 

I am happy to be remembered as among the friends of the 

Albany Academy. 

(Sincerely yours, 

Henry Darling. 



From the Rev. E. B. Fairhairn, D. i)., Warden of St. Stephen's 

College. 

8t. Stephen's College, ) 

Annanpale, N. Y., Oct. 22, 1888. \ 
Gentlemen — I beg to thank you for your invitation to the 
75th anniversary of the Albany Academy. I wish it was in 
my power to be with you, but I shall not be able to leave home 
at that time. 

The Albany Academy has acquired a very valuable reputa- 
tion. It may be seen in the Cyclopedia of American Biogra- 
phy. I was surprised in seeing how many distinguished men 
of our country have received part of their education in this 
institution. May it still continue to do the good work, and 
place on its roll the names of others who shall be distinguished 
in all the departments of learning and enterprise. 

Very respectfully yours, 

E. B. Fairbairn. 

Maurice E. Viele, Esq., and others, Committee of Arrangements 
of Albany Academy. 



From Prof A. G. Hopkins of Hamilton College. 

Department of Latin, Hamilton College, ) 
Clinton, N. Y., October 24, 1888. ) 

Messrs. Archibald McClure and others, of the Committee of Ar- 
rangements : 

Gentlemen — Please accept my cordial thanks for your 
invitation to be i)resent at the celebration of the Seventy-fifth 
Anniversary of tlie organization of the Albany Academy. 
Such an event cannot fail to be of great interest to all friends 
of education. The position of the Academy, at the cajjital of 

55 



the State, its long and honorable career, its series of honored 
and able instructors, and its marked influence on the interests 
of education, will all contribute to make the anniversary one 
of unusual dignity and importance. My father attended the 
Academy wlien it was under the charge of that prince of in- 
structors, T. Ronieyn Beck, who might be called without ex- 
travagance the Dr. Arnold of America. I have therefore, in 
a certain sense, inherited a profound respect for the Albany 
Academy. Permit me to send my heartiest good wishes for 
the success of the day and for the future of the Academy. It 
will stand in the future as it has in the past as an exponent of 
sound education. It would give me the greatest pleasure to 
join with you in the anniversary celebration, but my duties 
here compel me to decline. 

With great respect, I am sincerely yours, 

A. G. Hopkins. 
To Messrs. Archibald McClure and others, of the Committee. 



From Prof. Edward H. Griffin of Williams College. 

Williams College, ) 

Willi AMSTOWN, Mass., Oct. 23, 1888. / 

My Dear Sir — I am sorry that 1 cannot be present at the 
celebration of the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the Albany 
Academy. I remember with much pleasure my service of a 
few months as a teacher, when you were at the head of the 
Academy, and have always been grateful for the considerate 
kindness with which you treated me, in my youth and inex- 
perience. We have had, during my connection with this Col- 
lege, quite a number of students from the Albany Academy, 
and they have given abundant evidence of the thorough and 
excellent training which they have received. It has been a 
pleasure to me to know that the standards and traditions of 
the school have been so well maintained. 

With thanks to the ('ommittee for the courtesy of their invi- 
tation, and with much respect and regard to yourself, 1 am. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Enw'ARi) If. Griffin. 
Hon. David Murray, LL. D., Albany. 

m 



From Prof. C. F. P. Bancroft, Principal of Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass. 

Phillips Academy, 1 

Andover, Mass., Oct. 28, 1888. / 

Messrs. Maurice E. Viele, David Murray, Archibald McClure, 
Frederick Townsend, Henry P. Warren, Com,mittee : 
Gentlemen — I have your polite invitation to be present at 
the exercises commemorative of the Seventy-fifth Anniversary 
of the organization of the Albany Academy, and 1 regret very 
much that I cannot join in the celebration — 1 desire to thank 
you for your remembrance and courtesy. The event is a nota- 
ble one and well worthy of a formal and public recognition. 
The Academy has enjoyed so much influence and reputation, 
has called together so many generous and faithful pupils, has 
done so large and so important a part of their education, has 
enlisted and retained the services of so many eminent scholars 
and noble men, has created for itself so many resources, gives 
promise of so much usefulness in the years to come, that all 
that shall be said on Thursday evening in reminiscence, or 
eulogy, or prophecy, will be a just tribute to a genuine insti- 
tution of learning, which has a part in which it may take pride, 
and a present full of promise. My connection with the cause 
of secondary education through my office in this ancient school, 
my acquaintance with you personally, and my familiarity with 
the history of the Albany Academy make it a hardship for me 
to forego the pleasure of attendance at your celebration. 
With great respect I remain, gentlemen. 

Yours faithfully, 

C. F. P. Bancroft. 



From Prof. John E. Bradley, Superintendent of Public Schools, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Minneapolis, Minn., October 27, 1888. 
My dear Mr. Viele — It would have given me great pleas- 
ure, had I been in Albany, to attend the celebration of the 
Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the organization of the Albany 
Academy. So grand a record as this institution has made, 
and such an impress as it has stamped upon the intellectual 
life of Albany, are worthy of a noble commemoration. I take 

57 



pleasure in recalling that, during the sixteen years of my con- 
nection with the Albany High iSchool, such cordial relations 
were constantly maintained between the two institutions. 

With best wishes for the continued success of the Academy, 
1 am, my dear sir, 

Very sincerely yours, 

John E. Bradley. 



Acknowledgments were also received from : 
President Eliot of Harvard. 
President Adams of Cornell. 
President Patton of Princeton. 
President Carter of Williams. 

President Webb of the College of the City of New York. 
President Lamberton of the Lehigh University. 
President Taylor of Vassar. 
Prof. Pickering of Harvard. 
Prof. North of Hamilton. 
Prof. Packard of Princeton. 
Dr. Coit of St. Paul's iSchool. 

Hon. George Wm. Curtis, Regent of the University. 
Hon. Edward A. Maher, Mayor of the city of Albany. 
Prof. James Hall, >State Geologist, 
and many others. 



58 



MEDTILS Am PRIZES /IWARDED. 



The following' are the names of Students who have received Medals 
CALDWELL MATHEMATICAL MEDAL. 



1831 
1832 



1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 



William Austin. 1860 
No public examination in con- 1861 
sequence of the prevalence 1862 

of the cholera. 1863 

Henry Waldron. 1864 

Aurelian Conklin. 1865 

John Newland. 1866 

H. Viele. 1867 

Geo. B. Hoyt. 1868 

Charles N. Waldron. 1869 

Joseph B. Brown. 1870 

William J. Gibson. 1871 

John J. Olcott. 1872 

Philip Phelps. 1873 

William Wrightson. 1874 

Andrew McElroy. 1875 

John K. Croswell. 1876 

Frank B. Hall. 1877 
Frank Jones. • 1878 
Jacob C. Koonz. 

George Wrightson. 1879 

William Alvoi-d. 1880 

Ricthard M. Strong. 1881 

John Bogart. 1882 

Einil Spanier. 1883 

Robei-t Strong. 1884 

John Wilson. 1885 

Edward D. Wait. 1886 

Thaddeus R. White. 1887 

Edward S. Lawson. 1888 
Charles W. Cole. 



Walter K. Vrooman. 
William Henry Fassett. 
Henry A Carpenter. 
Edward Everett Sprague. 
Lewis Benedict Hall. 
Scott D. Goodwin. 
Geo. M. Luther. 
Jas. McNaughton, Jr. 
John Byers. 
Walter S. Allen. 
Henry Hun. 
Rufus K. Townsend. 
William E. Perry. 
William G. Rice. 
Henry J. Ten Eyck. 
Joseph D. Craig. 
John D. Parsons. 
J. Howard Reed. 
Stephen Van Rensselaer Town- 
send. 
Frank DeWitt Ramsey. 
Wilfred J. Woi-cester. 
Gardner C. LeonanL 
William White Capron. 
Harry V. Youngman. 
Edmund N. Huyck. 
Albei't Rathbone. 
James Burton. 
Charles Russell. 
Wallace Greenalch. 



5d 



VAN RENSSELAER CLASSICAL MEDAL. 



1837 Isaac L. K. Miller. 1863 

1838 Henry F. Greene. 1864 

1839 Charles K. McHarg. 1865 

1840 Gilbert L. WiLson. 1866 

1841 Philip Phelps. 1867 

1842 John C. Bullions. 1868 

1843 Oliver Bronson. 1869 

1844 Samuel G. Courtney. 1870 

1845 William Wrig-htson. 1871 

1846 John K. Ci-oswell. 1872 

1847 Jacob L. Pearse. 1873 

1848 Henry L. Bullions. 1874 

1849 William A. Gott. 1875 

1850 Ernest J. Miller. 1876 

1851 Charles Boyd. 1877 

1852 John Bogart. 1878 

1853 Emil Spanier. 1879 

1854 Oscar H. Young. 1880 

1855 John Wilson. 1881 

1856 Orlando Meads, Jr. 1882 

1857 Thaddeus R. White. 1883 

1858 Thomas S. Wiles. 1884 

1859 Clinton J. Sheldon. 1885 

1860 Edward DeForest. 1886 

1861 Loronzo Hale. 1887 

1862 Edwai-d Evei-ett Sprague. 1888 



John M. Bigelow. 
Gilbert M. Tuckei-. 
James G. K. McClure. 
Osgood H. Sheparci. 
James McNaughton. 
Munson Nichols. 
Henry Hun. 

Edwin D. Worcester, Jr. 
Walter Winne, Jr. 
Charles Burton Goold. 
Eugene T. Chamberlain. 
Howard Townsend. 
Heniy Newman. 
Stephen V. R. Townsend. 
Franklin E. Worcester. 
Norton Chjise. 
Edgar C. Leonard. 
Wilfred J. Worcester. 
Frank Davis. 
Gardner C. Leonard. 
William Barnes, Jr. 
E. C. Knickerbocker. 
R. V. De Witt Walsh. 
James Burton. 
Almon H. Millai-d. 
Frederick Townsend, Jr. 



1855 

1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 



GANNON MEDAL ("Natu 

Edward D. Wait. 
Josejih M. Cook. 



Thomas S. Wiles. 
Chai-les E. Smith. 
John H. Haswell. 
Waltei" K. Vrooman. 
Alfr<'d B. Huested. 
Patiick H. McQuade. 
Thomas M. Rooker. 
Gilbei-t M. Tucker. 
Francis A. Owens. 
George M. Luthei-. 
John liyt;rs. 
James J. Kelley. 
George Hagadorn. 
Frank H. Allen. 
Edwin D. Worcester, Jr. 



1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 



RAL Philosophy"). 

George Oliver. 
Charles F. Waterman. 
Henry J. Ten Ejck. 
Clarence H. Hascy. 
John D. Pareons. 
John C. McClure. 
Marvin Olcott. 
Wilfred J. Worcester. 
Frank Davis. 
Willard P. Reid. 
Gai'dner C. Leonai'd. 
Edmund N. Huy<;k. 
Thomas M. St. John. 
Geoi'ge A. Lintncr. 
Frank L. Frost. 
Anson G. Willioi-. 
Wallace Greenalch. 



60 



BECK MEDAL (English 

1855 Thomas S. Wiles. 

1856 Willian H. McElroy. 

1857 Thaddeus R. White. 

1858 Edward S. Lawson. 

1859 Charles W. Cole. 

1860 Geo. W. Street. 

1861 William J. Gourlay, 

1862 James S. Lynch. 

1863 Edwai-d Everett Sprague. 

1864 James C. Matthews. 

1865 Charles W. Abrams. 

1866 Osgood H. Shepard. 

1867 Munson Nichols. 

1868 Jno. B. Stonehonse, Jr. 

1869 S. Chai'les Hunsdon. 

1870 Chas. L. Palmer. 

1871 Edwin D. Worcester, Ji-. 



Essay, Two Uppbr Classes). 

1872 William G. Rice. 

1873 Charles Burton Goold. 

1874 Eugene T. Chamberlain. 

1875 Howard Townsend. 

1876 Edward B. Noble. 

1877 Norton Chase. 

1878 S. Van Rensselaer Townsend. 

1879 Frank DeWitt Ramsey. 

1880 Frank P. Simmons. 

1881 Gardner C. Leonard. 

1882 William W. Capron. 

1883 Harry V. Youngman. 

1884 William Barnes, Jr. 

1885 Cuyler Reynolds. 

1886 Clark T. Durant. 

1887 Irving Boyd Easton. 

1888 Anson G. Wilbor. 



PRINCIPAL'S 

1858 1st— Chai-les E. Smith. 
2d — Thomas M. Gaffney. 

1859 1st— George W. Street. 
2d— William J. Gourlay. 

1860 1st— Francis H. Woods. 
2d— Eben Halley. 

1861 1st— William M. Murray. 
2d — William J. Gourlay. 

1862 1st— Edward E. Sprague. 

2d— John K. Allen. 

1863 1st — Lewis Benedict Hall. 
2d — Chas. W. Carpenter. 

1864 1st— James C. Matthews. 

2d— Willard S. Gibbons. 

1865 1st — Francis A. Owens. 
2d — Charles W. Abrams. 

1866 1st— Martin Bahler. 

2d — Charles W. Abrams. 

1867 Ist- Jas. McNaughton, Jr 

2d— William S. Paddock. 

1868 1st— Thos. L. Greene, Jr. 
2d — Munson Nichols. 

1869 1st— E. D. Worcester, Jr. 
2d — J. B. Stonehouse, Jr. 

1870 1st — Franklin Townsend, 
2(i— T. B. Van Alstyne. 



PRIZES (English Essay). 

1871 1st— Frank B. King. 
2d — Anthony Gould. 

1872 1st — Louis J. Swinburne. 
2d— William G. Rice. 

1873 1st — Henry Newman. 
2d— E. T. Chamberlain. 

1874 1st— E. T. Chamberlain. 
2d — Howard Townsend. 

1875 1st — Benjamin Miles. 
2d — Howard Townsend. 

(Replaced by Gansevoort 
Medal, 1876-1879.) 

1880 1st— Harry V. Youngman. 

2d — J. Montgomery Mosher. 

1881 1st— George Barhydt. 
2d— Wm. White Capron. 

1882 1st— Robert Strain. 
2d— William McElroy. 

1883 1st— Cuyler Reynolds. 

2d — Wm. M. Van Heusen. 

1884 ist- Andrew H. Bayard. 
2d— Thomas M. St. John. 

1885 1st— Albert Rathbone. 
2d — Andrew H. Bayard. 

Jr. 1886 1st— Andi-ew H. Bayard. 
2d— Almon H. Millard. 



61 



RATHBONE MILITARY MEDAL. 

1871 1st Serg-t. Frank H. Allen, A 187tt 1st Serg-t. Robert James Hilton, 

Co. A Co. 

1872 1st Sergt. Fred. E. Strong, B 1880 Sergt. Frank C. Ferguson, C 

Co. Co. 

1873 Corp. Septimus W. Granger, 1881 1st Sergt. Hai'ry V. Youngman, 

A Co. C Co. 

1874 Corp. Hazard P. Bishop, B 1882 1st Sergt. Edmund C. Knicker- 

Co. bockei-. 

1875 Corp. Walter V. Marsh, B 1883 Corp. J. Schuber Peiry. 

Co. 1884 Coi-p. Howai-d B. Mosher. 

1876 Coi'poral William Sage, A "1885 Corp. Richard Irvine. 

Co. 1886 Serg-.- Frank R. Palmer. 

1877 Sergt. C. P. Williams, Color 1887 Serg. Edwin H. Van Worraer. 

Guai'd. 1888 Serg. Geoi-ge H. Wilson. 

1878 Color-Sergt. Robert J. Pratt. 



SECOND MILITARY MEDAL. 

1872 1st Sei-gt. Louis J. Swin- 1880 Serg-t. Henry Z. Pratt. Color 

burne, A Co. Guai-d. 

1873 1st Sergt. Chai-Ies Wile.s, B 1881 Sergt. Eduunxl C. Knic.kei-- 

Co. bocker. C Co. 

1874 Sergt. Major Floyd S. Crego. 1882 1st Sergt. Thomas Van Ant- 

1875 Sergt. Norton Chase, C Co. werp. 

1876 Sergt. Wm. C. Miller, Guide. 18S3 Private Geo. H. Wilson. 

1877 Corp. Robei-t Pratt, Col. Gd. 1884 Serg. William A. Liddle. 

1878 Private Frank C. Ferguson, 1885 Serg. Chai-les M. Page. 

C Co. 1886 Serg. Howard Moshei-. 

1879 Sergt. Charles B. Templeton, 1887 Serg. Harry I. Knickerbocker. 

B Co. 1888 Serg. Joseph B. Tayloi-. 



RATHBONE C CO. MEDAL (For S.mallk.st C.vdet.s). 

1876 John Rathbone. 1879 Private E. C. Knickerbocker, 

1877 Charles B. Templeton. C Co. 

1878 Not awarded. 1880 Corp. Edmund C. Knicker- 

bockei-, C Co. 



GANSEVOORT C CO. MEDAL (Fou Smalle.st Cadkts). • 

1881 Private Edmimd L. Jndscm. 1885 Corp. Joel Rathbone. 

1882 Private Carl Phisterer. 1886 Corp. Harry I. Knickerbocker. 
1888 Private Amasa J. Parker, 3d. 1887 Serg. Jared H. Shepard. 

1884 Corp. James Bui-ton. 1888 Serg. Adrian W. Mather. 

62 



ALVORD PENMANSHIP MEDAL. 



1872 Frank Waterman. 

1873 Fletcher Vosburgh. 

1874 Benjamin F. Miles. 

1875 Charles N. Simons. 

1876 Miles W. Vosburg'h. 

1877 John J. Van Schoonhoven. 

1878 Fred. Lathrop. 

1879 Robert J. Pratt. 

1880 Hari-v Sutlitf. 



1881 Albert L. Judson. 

1882 Charles R. La Rose. 

1883 Edmund L. Judson. 

1884 Thomas M, St. John. 

1885 Fred. Van Wormer. 

1886 Walter E. Rowley. 

1887 Joseph Blackhall Taylor. 

1888 Frederick Cleveland, Jr. 



HOWARD TOWNSEND (Frbxch) MEDAL. 



1873' 

1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 



Howard Townsend. 
S. Van Renss. Townsend. 
I. Chipman Smart. 
John C. McClure. 
Norton Chase. 
Wilfred J. Worcester. 
Edgar C. Leonard. 
Edward Coughtiy. 



1881 William McElroy. 

1882 Harry W. Jessup. 
1883 

1884 William Barnes, Jr. 

1885 Cuyler Reynolds. 

1886 Fred. Townsend, Jr. 

1887 Charles Ti-embly. 

1888 William Widdemer. 



RUFUS KING (German) MEDAL. 

1872 Hugh Dey Ermand. 1878 J. Warner Bott. 

1873 Henry J. Ten Eyck. 1879 Edward C. Sweet. 

1874 George C. Cook. 1880 Louis Di-eyer, Jr. 

1875 C. Fred. Bishop. 1881 Harry V. Youngman. 

1876 Edward C. Cuyler. 1882 John B. Hilton. 

1877 George D. Haskell. 



1876 

1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 

1887 



GANSEVOORT MEDAL (Essay, Open to Entire School). 

1883 William Barnes, Jr. 

1884 Cuyler Reynolds. 

1885 Frank L. Frost. 

1886 Irving B. Easton. 

1887 Frederick W. Loughraa 

1888 Almon H. Millard. 



Robert J. Pratt. 
Joseph P. Davis. 
Norton Chase. 
Lewis E. Gates. 
Jesse H. Leonai-d. 
Harry W. Jessup. 
J. Montgomery Mosher. 

SERGEANT'S MEDAL. 
Serg. George H. Wilson. 1888 Serg. James Fitzsimon.s 

CUE LITERARY MEDAL. 

1888 William S. Corliss. 

DECLAMATION PRIZE. 

1887 Almon H. Millard. 1888 B. Learned Hand. 

READING PRIZE. 

1887 William H. Robinson. 1888 CarioU L. Moshei-. 



63 



MAJORS or THE ALBANY ACADEMY CADET BATTALION. 



1870-71 Rtifiis K. Townseii.l. ISSO- 

1871-72 Frank H. Allen. 1881 

1872-73 Louis J. Swinburne. 1882 

1873-74 Leonard Paige. 1883 

1874-7S Clarence H. Ha.scy, 1884 

1875-76 I. Chipraan Smart. 1885 

1876-77 James Fennimore Cooper. 1886 

1877-78* 1887 

1878-79 Channcey P. Williams, Ji-. 1888 
1879-80 George N. Dewey. 



-81 Frank Davis. 

-82 William W. Capron. 

-83 Harry V. Youngman. 

-84 Edmund C. Knickerbocker. 

-85 Edmund L. Jndson, 2d. 

-86 Clarence T. Wendell. 

-87 Walter E. Rowley. 

-88 Frank R. Palmer. 

-89 Frederick Townsend, Jr. 



'The Majority was lield by the military instructor, Robert J. Hilton. 



•^ 



C/ITALOGUE OF OFFICERS. 



TRUSTEES. 

Date of Appointment 

OR Election. Name.s. Exitus. 

March 4, 1813. Hon. ytephen Van Rensselaer, LL. D... 1819 

do Hon. John Lansing, Jr., LL. D — 1813 

do Archibald Mclntire, Esq 1817 

do Hon. tSmith Thompson, LL. D 1813 

do Hon. Abraham Van Vechten, LL. D 1813 

do John V. Henry, Esq 1823 

do Henry Walton, Esq 1815 

do Rev. William Neill, D. D 1816 

do Rev. John McDonald, D. D 1821 

do Rev. John M. Bradford, D. D 1826 

do Rev. Timothy Clowes, LL. D 1818 

do Rev. John McJimpsey 1815 

do Rev. Fredrick G. Mayer 1818 

do Rev. Samuel Merwin 1814 

March 23, 1813. Theodore Sedgwick, Esq 1823 

do John Duer, LL. D 1813 

do Harmanus Bleecker, LL. D 1822 

Dec. 8, 1813. Charles D. Cooper, Esq 1817 

March 8, 1815. Hon. John Lansing, Jr., LL. D 1817 

do William James, Esq 1832 

June 23, 1815. T. Romeyn Beck, M. D 1855 

Dec. 4,1816. Rev. John Chester, D. D 1822 

March 11, 1817. John W. Yates, Esq 1828 

May 14, 1817. Arthur J. Stansbury 1821 

Nov. 6, 1817. Hon. William A. Duer, LL. D 1820 

Oct. 27,1818. Gideon Hawley, LL. D 1842 

do John Van Schaick, Esq 1818 

65 



1)ATK OF APrOINTMENT 

OK ELECTION Names. Exitis. 

July 20, 1819. HoTi. James Kent, LL. D 1823 

do Rev. William B. Lacy, D. D 1825 

Feb. 14, 1820. Ebenezer Baldwin, Esq 1880 

April 10,1821. Hon. Philip S. Van Rensselaer 1824 

Oct. 8, 1821. Philip iS. Parker, Esq 1831 

Dec. 9, 1822. Rev. Henry R. Weed, D. D 1831 

March 14, 1823. Hon. James Stevenson 182(3 

Dec. 12, 1823. Rev. John Ludlow, D. D 1834 

do Charles R. Webster, Esq 1834 

July 8, 1825. Rev. Isaac Ferris, D. D... 1836 

do Hon. Peter Gansevoort 1876 

Oct. 13, 1826. Hon. Alfred Conklino-, LL. 1) 1836 

do Isaac Fondey, Esq 1829 

Sept. 12,1828. Hon. James Stevenson 1852 

May 22,1829. John T. Norton, Esq 1834 

do Nicholas F. Beck, Esq 1830 

July 9, 1830. Rev. William B. Sprague, D.D 1870 

Nov. 12,1830. Oliver Kane, Esq 1834 

June 10,1831. Richard V. De Witt 1856 

Dec. 9, 1851. Archibald Campbell, Esq 1847 

March 15, 1833. Philip S. Van Rensselaer, Esq 1841 

Aug. 5,1834. James Goold, Esq 1850 

do William C. Miller, Esq 1857 

Feb. 13,1835. Rev. John N. Campbell, U. D 1851 

do Richard Yates, Esq 18;i7 

Sept. 9,1836. Rev. Thomas E. Vermilye, 1). D 1839 

do Thomas W. Olcott, Esq 1880 

May 19,1837. Rev. Isaac N. Wyckoff, D. I) 1848 

Jan. 28,1840. Rev. Horatio Potter, D. D 1856 

Oct. 12, 1841. Hon. Tennis Van Vechten 18.59 

April 12, 1842. Rev. William H. Campbell 1851 

Nov. 9, 1847. James P. Boyd, M. 1) 1881 

Dec. 14,1847. Orlando Meads, Esq 1884 

April 9, 1851. Christopher Y. Lansing, Esq 1873 

May 13,1851. Henry H. Martin, Esq 1886 

July 8,1851. George H. Cook, A. M 18.53 

Oct*. 25,1853. Rev. William A. Miller, A. M 1856 

Oct. 12, 1852. Thomas Hun, M. 1) 



Date of Ai'point.mknt 

OR Election. Nami;s. . Kxriis. 

May 13, 1856. John F. Rathboue, Esq 

Sept. 11, 185H. David Murray, A. M J863 

Dec. 10, 1856. Rev. Thomas C. Pitkin, D. D 18H3 

Jan. 18, 1857. Rev. William Hague, D.D 1859 

Feb. 10, 1857. Rev. Ebenezer P. Rodgers, D. D 1868 

June 14, 1859. Howard Townsend, M.I) 1867 

do John W. Ford, Esq 1869 

June 10, 1868. Rev. RufusW. Clark, D. 1) 1872 

do Rev. William T. Wilson 1867 

Nov. 14,1868. James Weir Mason, A. M 1868 

Sept. 10, 1867. Rt. Rev. William C. Doane, D.D 

Oct. 8, 1867. Paul F. Cooper, Esq 

April 18,1869. Rev. Abel Wood 1870 

Jan. 7, 1870. Hon. William L. Learned 

Sept. 18, 1870. Edward P. Waterbury, A. M 

Dec. 18,1870. Merrill Edwards Gates, A. M 1882 

Nov. 12,1872. Maurice E. Viele, Esq 

do Rev. C. De W. Bridgman, D. D 1879 

March 28, 1876. Abraham Lansing, Esq 

May 9, 1876. Erastus Corning, Esq 1886 

April 12, 1882. David Murray, LL. D 

do Ernest J. Miller, Esq 

1882 James M. Cassety, Ph. D 1886 

1884 Leonard Kip, Esq 

1886 Archibald McClure, Esq 1888 

1886 Henry P. Warren, A. B 

1886 Gen. Frederick Townsend 

The Mayor and Recorder of Albany are also ex-offido mem- 
bers of the Board. 



PRESIDING OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Date ok 
Appointjiknt. Names. Exitis. 

1818 Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, LL. D., Senior Trustee 1819 

1819 Rev. John M. Bradford, D.D., Senior Trustee 1826 

1826 William James, Esq., Senior Trustee 1882 

1882 Hon. Gideon Hawley, LL. D., President 1842 

1842 Hon. James Stevenson, President 1848 

67 



Date of 
Appointment. Names. Exitus 

1848 T. Romeyn Beck, M. L)., LL. D., Senior Trustee.... 1855 

1855 Hon. Peter Gansevoort, Senior Truf^tee 1876 

1876 Thomas W. Olcott, Senior Trustee 1880 

1880 James P. Boyd, M. D., Senior Trustee 1881 

1881 Orlando Meads, Senior Trustee 1884 

1884 Henry H. Martin, Senior Trustee 1886 

1886 Thomas Hun, M. D., President 

TREASURERS. 

1818 John W. Yates, Esq 1828 

1828 Richard Yates, Esq 1836 

1836 James Brown, Esq 1838 

1838 Aaron D. Patohin, Esq 1843 

1843 Josiah B. Plumb, Esq 1850 

1850 Rev. W. H. Campbell, 1) .1) 1851 

1851 William C. Miller, Esq 1860 

1860 John W. Ford, Esq 1869 

1869 James W. Mason, A. M 1869 

1870 Thomas Hun, M. 1) 1877 

1877 Maurice E. Viele, Esq 1884 

1884 Ernest J. Miller, Esq 

CLERKS. 

1813 Henry Walter, Esq 1813 

1813 Rev. Timothy Clowes, LL. 1) 1816 

1816 T. Romeyn Beck, M. D 1848 

1848 Rev. William H. Campbell, D. D 1851 

1851 Geo. H.Cook, A. M 1853 

1853 Rev. William A. Miller, A. M 1856 

1856 David Murray, A. M 1863 

1863 James Weir Mason, A. M 1869 

1869 Abel Wood, A. M 1870 

1870 Merrill Edwards Gates, A. M., Ph. 1) 1882 

1882 James M. Cassety, A.M., l^li. \) 1886 

1886 Henry P. Warren, A. B 



68 



Prin(;ipal8. 
Date of 
Appointment. Names. Exiti s. 

1815 Benjamin Allen, LL. D 1817 

1817 T. Romeyn Beck, M. D., LL. D 1848 

1848 Rev. Wiiliam H. Campbell,- D. D 1851 

1851 George H. Cook, A. M 1853 

1853 Rev. William A. Miller, A. M 1856 

1856 David Murray, A.M., Ph. D 1863 

1863 James Weir Mason, A. M 1868 

1869 Rev. Abel Wood, A. M 1870 

1870 Merrill Edwards Gates, A. M., Ph. D 1882 

1882 James M. Cassety, A. M., Ph. D 1886 

1886 Henry P. Warren, A. B 

Professors and Tutors. 

1815 Rev. Joseph Shaw, LL. D., Prof. Latin and Greek.. 1824 

1815 Moses Chapin, Tutor 1816 

1816 Rev. Isaac Ferris, Tutor 1817 

1816 John B. Crocker, Tutor 1817 

1817 Michael O'Shannessy, A. M., Tutor 1819 

1819 John Thompson, A. M., Tutor 1820 

1819 Michael O'Shannessy, A. M., Prof. Math, and Nat. 

Philosophy 1826 

1820 William O'Donnell, M. D., A. B., Tutor 1829 

1824 Rev. Peter Bullions, D. D., Prof. Latin and Greek.. 1848 
1826 Joseph Henry, LL. D., Prof. Math, and Nat. Phil- 

• osophy 1832 

1829 William Soul, A. M., Tutor 1830 

1829 Daniel D. T. Leech, A. B., Tutor 1831 

1830 George W. Carpenter, Tutor 1835 

1830 Julian Molinard, Prof. Modern Languages 1830 

1830 M. Leon Cheronnet, Prof. Modern Languages 1831 

1831 Lewis C. Beck, M. D., Lecturer on Chemistry 1834 

1831 H. Picard, Prof. Modern Languages 1835 

69 



Date ok 
Ai'foiNTMKNT. Names. Exitus. 

IKU Rev. Samnel McArthnr, Tutor 1833 

1881 Griffith W. GritiiThs, Tutor 1H34 

1831 Benjarain F. Foster, Teacher of Penniauship 1833 

1832 Pliiiip Ten Eyck, M. 1)., Prof. Math, and Nat. Pliil- 

oso})liy 1848 

1833 Nathan Hawley, A. B., Tutor 1834 

1833 Theodore Foster, Teacher of Penmanship 1834 

1834 Rev. Samuel McArthur, A. M., Tutor 1835 

1834 Henry Carpenter, Tutor 1835 

1834 Joseph Bell, Teacher of Peimianship .'... 1840 

1835 Charles Clapp, A M., Prof. Eui^-lish Literature 1837 

1835 IT. L. V. Ducoudray Holstein, Prof. Modern Lan- 

g-uages 1839 

1835 Alexander B. McDoual, A. M., Tutor 1841 

1835 Edward F. Edwards, A. M , Tutor 1840 

1836 David F. Robertson, Tutor 1838 

1837 Hugh Blair Jolly, A. M., Prof. English Literature.. 1841 

1838 Samuel Sidney Smith, Tutor 1847 

1839 Julian Molinard, Prof. Modern Languages 1859 

1840 Austin H. Wells, Tutor 1840 

1840 Austin 11. Wells, Teacher of Penmanshij) 1849 

1841 Alexander B. McDoual, Prof. English Literature... 1842 

1841 Rev. Andrew Shiland, Tutor 1844 

1842 Rev. Philander D. Young, Prof. English Literature. 1843 

1843 John S. Holmes, Prof. English Literature 1844 

1844 Rev. Samuel Center, Prof. English Literature 1848 

1844 Rev. Rufus K. Crocker, Tutor 1847 

1847 James N. Crocker, A. B., Tutor 1849 

1847 William Wrightson, A. B., Tutor 1849 

1848 Rev. William H. Cami)bell, D. D., Prof. Latin and 

Greek 1851 

1848 George H. Cook, Prof. Mathematics and Natural 

Philoso])hy 1853 

1848 Rev. John Sessions, A. M., Prof. English Literature. 1855 

1849 Andrew R. Wright, Tutor 1850 

1849 Lemuel M. Wiles, Teacluu- of Drawing and INui- 

manship 1851 

1849 David D. Dewey, Tutor 1850 



70 



Da IK OK 
Al'lMMNTMENT. NAMKS. EXITILS. 

1850 Rev. Will. A. Miller, A. M., Assistant Prof. Latin 

and Greek 1851 

1850 James N. Crocker, A. B., Tutor 1851 

1850 G. W. Taylor, Tutor 1856 

1851 Rev. Wni. A. Miller, A. M., Prof. Latin and Greek. 1856 

1851 Arnold Petrie, Tutor 1851 

1851 David S. Pierce, Teacher of Penmanship and 

Drawing 1856 

1851 H.Herman kSkinner, Tutor 1851 

1861 Truman D. Cameron, 8u})t. of Prep. Department... 1866 
1851 J. B. Ellis, A. B., Tutor 1852 

1851 Marcus H. Martin, Tutor 1852 

1852 David Murray, A. B., Tutor 1853 

1852 Henry M. Cobb, A. B., Tutor 1853 

1853 Levi Cass, Tutor 1856 

1853 Prof. Backhaus, Prof. German 1854 

1853 David Murray, A. B., Prof. Mathematics and Na- 
tural Philoso})hy 1863 

1853 Albert W. Hale, A. B.,Tutor 1854 

1854 Joseph Warren, A. M., Tutor 1854 

1854 Henri Kambli, Professor German 1859 

1854 Francis R. Dakin, A. M., Tutor 1855 

1855 iSeth B. Cole, A. M., Prof. English Literature 1856 

1855 Rev. J. W. French, A. M., Assist. Prof. Latin and 

Greek 1856 

1856 Amos A. Cass, Tutor 1862 

1856 E. B. Rice, Teacher of Writing and Book-keeping,. 1863 

1856 E. P. Waterbury, A. M., Prof. English Literature... 1868 

1856 Richard W. Swan, A. M., Prof. Latin and Greek... 1868 

1856 M. L. Norton, Tutor 1857 

1857 D. Penfield Austin, Tutor I860 

1858 Adam A. McAllister, Tutor 1859 

1858 B. L. Cilley, A. B., Tutor 1859 

1859 George W. Atherthon, Tutor I860 

1859 Henri Kambli, Prof. French and German 1865 

1860 Charles A. Nelson, A. B., Tutor 1861 

1860 Horace Loomis, A. B., Tutor... 1862 

1861 Thomas H. Pitkin, Tutor 1863 

71 



Datk of 
Appointment. Names. Exitus. 

1862 Charles E. Hmith, A. B., Tutor 1865 

1862 Joseph M. Cook, A. B., Tutor 1862 

1862 John T. 8axe, A. B., Tutor 1863 

1862 Edward H. Griffin, Tutor 1863 

1863 Jacob >S. Mosher, A. M., M. D., Prof. Inst, in Chem. 

and Ex. Phil 1865 

1863 George W. Atherton, A. B., Prof. Latin 1865 

1863 James Weir Mason, A. M., Prof. Math, and Nat. ■ 

Phil 1868 

1863 A. T. Warner, Teacher of Writing and Book-keeping. 1863 
1863 J. E. iSoule, Teacher of Writing and Book-keeping. 1865 
1865 Richard W. Swan, A. M., Professor of Modem Lan- 
guages 1865 

1865 Jacob S. Mosher, A. M., M. D., Prof. Chemistry.... 1870 
1865 Arthur J. Swain, A. M., Professor Latin 1870 

1865 H. E. Gifibrd, Teacher of Writing and Book- 

keeping 1868 

1866 Samuel Morel, Prof. Modern Languages 1869 

1866 Samuel H. Cameron, Tutor 1867 

1866 H. C. Miller, Tutor 1867 

1868 A. H. Van Deusen, Teacher of Writing and Book- 
keeping 1880 

1868 Daniel Waterbury, A.M., Prof. Eng. Lang, and Lit. 1869 

1868 Henry Goold, Tutor 1869 

1869 Oscar D. Robinson, A. "B., Prof. Mathematics 1870 

1869 Charles A. Dickinson, Tutor 1870 

1869 Paul Hubert, Teacher of French 1870 

1870 Merrill Edwards Gates, A. M., Ph. D., Prof. Latin, 

Greek and History 1882 

1870 Eugene H. Satterlee, A. M., LL. B., Prof. Eng. Lit., 

French and German 1874 

1870 Martin L. Deyo, A. M., LL. B., Prof. Mathematics. 

1871 Walter S. Hubbell, A. B., Asst. Prof. English and 

Latin 1873 

1871 Captain John H. Reynolds, Jr., Instructor in Mili- 
tary Tactics 1876 

1873 William T. Mills, A. B., Asst. Prof, of French and 

Latin 1874 



72 



Date of 
Appointment. Names. Exitl.s. 

1873 George D. Olds, A. M., Prof. French, Asst. Prof. 

English and Greek 1879 

1874 Ralph Whelan, A. B., Instructor in English and 

Latin 1876 

1874 H. E. Sadler, A. B., Instructor in Elocution 1875 

1874 Willis G. Tucker, M. D., Instructor in Chemistry... 1875 
1874 John DeWitt Warner, Ph. B., LL. B., Prof, of Ger- 
man and Inst. Latin 1876 

1876 Sergt A. L. Gibbs, Instructor in Military Tactics... 1877 

1876 Charles B. Tillinghast, A. B., Professor of Latin 

and German 1880 

1877 Major Robert J. Hilton, Instructor in Military Tac- 

tics 1879 

1877 F. J. Wilson, Assistant Instructor in English 1878 

1877 Rev. T. D. P. Stone, A. M., Instructor in Elocution. 1879 

1878 Eugene T. Chamberlain, A. B., Instructor Latin and 

Greek 1879 

1879 August M. Magaud, A. B., Instructor in French.... 1882 
1879 Charles B, Goold, A. B., Assist. Prof, of Greek and 

German 1881 

1879 Col. John S. McEwan, Instructor in Military Tac- 

tics 1880 

1880 Eugene Bouton, A. B., Prof, of Eng. Literature and 

Elocution 1883 

1880 James W. Eaton, A. B., Asst. Prof, of Latin, Inst. 

in German 1882 

1880 Col. Frederick Phisterer, Instructor in Military Tac- 
tics 

1880 Edward A. Burt, Inst, in Peimianship and Botany. 1885 

1881 Charles Gardiner, A. B., LL. B., Inst, in Latin, 

Greek and History 1882 

1882 Joshua E. Crane, A. M., Assist. Prof, in Latin 1884 

1882 James M. Cassety, A.M., Ph. D., Prof. Latin,Greek 

and History 1886 

1882 Charles B. Goold, A. M., Prof, of Greek and Modern 

Languages 

1882 Hannibal A. Williams, Instructor in French and 

Elocution 1883 



73 



Date of 
APPOINTMENT. Names. Exitus. 

1882 Joseph S. Sf. John, Instructor in Chemistry 1883 

1883 Heinrich Krumdiek, Instructor in French 1883 

1883 Ralph W. Thomas, A. B., Inst, in Reading and Elo- 
cution 1888 

1883 Chas. O.de la Rochette, Instructor in French 1887 

1884 J. Ernest Wliitney, A. B , Prof, of Eng. Lang, and 

Literature 1884 

1884 Howard J. Rogers, A. B., Prof, of Eng. Lang, and 
Literature 

1884 Irving Bruce, A. B., Professor of Latin 1885 

1885 Jared W. iScudder, A. M., Professor of Latin 

1885 George Babcock, Instructor in Natural Sciences 1887 

1886 Henry P. Warren, A. B., Latin and English 



74 



BOTIRD OF TRUSTEES. 

(1888.) 



THOMAS HUN, M. D., President, 
Gen. JOHN F. RATHBONE, 
Rt. Rev. W. C. DOANE, D.D., 
PAUL F. COOPER, 
W. L. LEARNED, LL.D., 
EDWARD P. WATERBURY, LL.D., 
MAURICE E. VIELE, 
Hon. ABRAHAM LANSING, 
DAVID MURRAY, LL.D., 
ERNEST J. MILLER. 
LEONARD KIP, 
ARCHIBALD McCLURE, 
Gen. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, 
HENRY P. WARREN, A.B., 
The Mayor op Albany, 
" Recorder 



.BANY, I ^^^^^ .^^ 



OKKICERS OK THE BOARD. 

THOMAS HUN, M. D., President. 
ERNEST J. MILLER, Treasurer. 
HENRY P. WARREN, A.B., Clerk. 



75 



FACULTY, 1888. 



HENRY P. WARREN, A.B., 

Latin, Modern History and English. 

MARTIN L. DEYO, A.M., 

Mathematics and Physics. 

CHARLE8 B. GOOLD, A.M., 
Greek, French and Oerman. 

JARED W. SCUDDER, A.M., 

Greek and Latin. 

HOWARD J. ROGERS, A.B., 

English, Mathematics and Chemistry. 

RALPH W. TH0MA8, A.B., 

Instructor First Class and Elocution. 

Col. FREDERICK PHLSTERER, 

A. A. ADJUTANT-GENERAL, S. N. Y., 

Instructor' in Military Tactics. 

Preceptress in Preparatory Department, 
Mlsh JULIA A. EVANS. 
. . , , ( Mlss ANNIE J. McALVIN, 

Assistants. < ^^ *tt/,t> -o n^r^ 

(Mls8 ALICE B. IDE. 



76 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



CHRONOLOGICALLY ARRANGED. 



1815. 

Allen, Christopher. 
Allen, Horatio. 
Anderson, Peter. 
Backus, Eleazer W. 
Banyar, Goldsborough L. R. 
Bay, John W. 
Bleeeker, Henry. 
Bleecker, Rutger. 
Bloodgood, William. 
Boardman, William. 
Bogart, Alexander H. 
Bogart, Stephen V. R. 
Boyd, James P. 
Boyd, James R. 
Bridgen, Abraham T. E. 
Brinkerhoff, Isaac. 
Brinkerhoft", John. 
Brinkerhoff, George. 
Brown, Henry. 
Clark, Edward. 
Clarke, Joseph W. 
Cooper, William. 
Cuylei', Augustus. 
Denniston, Isaac, Jr. 
Dorr, Alfred. 
Fowler, William. 
Gansevoort, Henry. 
Gansevoort, Ten Eyck. 
Gates, Cornelius. 
Gould, Benjamin. 
Gould, Charles. 
Gj-aham, Van Wyck. 
Hand, Epenetus B. 
Hand, Isaac P. 



Henry. John V. 
Henry, Peter Seton. 
Howe, Francis. 
Humphi'ies, Correl. 
Hutton, George. 
Hutton, Thomas L. 
Kent, William. 
Lamb, Anthony. 
Lamb, George. 
Lansing, Barent B. 
Lawrence, Thomas. 
Linn, Henry. 
Livingston, J. Allen. 
Marcelus, John. 
M'Culloch, John H. 
Mclntyi-e, John McD. 
Meads, Orlando. 
Morns, Orrin W. 
Oake, Effingham. 
Pearson, Rensselaer. 
Porter, John C. 
Pugsley, Cornelius. 
Quackenbush, Gansevoort. 
Roorback, Oi-ville A. 
Skinner, Charles F. 
Skinnei", John S. 
Smith, Joseph C. 
Southwick, Francis M. 
Stearns, Henry K. 
Stuart, Chai-les G. 
Ten Eyck, Leonard G. 
Ten Eyck, Philip. 
Treat, Richard S. 
Ti-eat, Samuel S. 
Truax, John B. 



77 



Van Iiig'en, Harmanus. 
Van Iiig'tni, Philip S. 
Van Inyen, Richard. 
Van Loon, Jacol). 
Van Rensselaer, Bernard S. 
Van Rensselaer, Rensselaer. 
Van Sehaick, J. Bleecker. 
Van Vechten, Jacob T. B. 
Visscher, Harniin. 
Walton, Henry. 
Waters, Andi-eas. 
Waters, David. 
Waters, Hng-h. 
Watson, Winslow C. 
Webster, Geoi-ge. 
We])ster, M. Henry. 
Webster, Samuel. 
Webster, William. 
Wendover, Peter V. S. 
Wiswall, Alfred. 
Yates, Christopher. 
Yates, Richard. 
Yates, Simon Metcalf. 

1815-10. 

Abel, Andrew. 
Bleecker, John Rutger. 
Bleecker, Stephen V. R. 
Brown, Edward H. 
Brown, Stanton H. 
Crnttenden, Robert G. 
Dean, William Eaton. 
Ford, John W. 
Kane, Schelluyne. 
Kane, Theodore. 
Lansing, John V. S. 
Lay, James. 
Livingston, Theodore. 
Ostrander, William. 
Piatt, Henry. 
Sherman, Josiah. 
Smith, Horace. 
Smyth, Isaac Fryer. 
Visscher, Thomas S. 
Warren, James. 
Watson, Theodore S. 



Webb, John. 

1810-17. 

Ackerman, (xari-it. 
Anderson, William. 
Aikin, Geoi-ge. 
Backus, J. Trumbull. 
Bii'dsall, Thomas. 
Bogart, John H. 
Boyd, William Scott. 
Brayton. Thomas A. 
Brinkerhoff, Beekman. 
Brinkerhoff, Cornelius. 
Campbell, William. 
Cassady, James. 
Cassidy, John P. 
Center, Aaron H. 
Clinton, DeWitt. 
Clinton, George W. 
De Witt, Jacob V. L. 
Dunn, John. 
Elliott, Isaac D. 
Evertsen, Bei-nard. 
Fenn, James M. 
Fryer, Aai-on. 
Goewey, Henry. 
Goewey, Philip. 
Goui'lay, James, Jr. 
Hai-ing, Samuel K. 
Heermans, James B. 
Hempstead, Isaac. 
Hochstrasser, Osmond. 
Hoxie, Stansbury. 
Humphries, Enoch. 
Jauncey, James. 
Kittles, John F. 
Low, .James C. 
Mahar, I'^dward. 
McCabe, Richard. 
McKay, Michael. 
Olmstead. John J. 
Osti-ander, Alexander. 
Ostrander. John C. 
Powers, Titus W. 
Rudes, Hallenbake. 
Rudes, Jason. 



78 



Schuyler, D. Gilbei-t. 
Schuyler, Joliti C. 
Seymour, Kdwanl. 
Sharpe, Ste{>hen R. 
Shepherd, Williiuu S. 
Skinner, Richard C. 
Smith. William. 
Smyth, Charles T. 
Solomons, Adolphus. 
Solomons, Lucius Levy. 
Stafford, John. 
Stansbury, Erskine. 
Stansbury, Howard. 
Stilwell, John W. 
Talbei't, Robert. 
Townsend, Edward. 
Townsend, John R. 
Van Beui-en, Abi-aham. 
Van Beiiren, John. 
Van Ing-en, William H. 
Van Ness, James K. 
Van Ness, John B. 
Van Rensselaer, Abraham L. 
Walsh, Charles. 
Webster, John. 
Winslow, Henry. 
Yates, Edward. 
Yates, Frederick L. 
Young, Joshua. 

1817-18. 

Aikin, John M. 
Ames, Ang-elo. 
Backus, John C. 
Baird, Georg-e. 
Bleeckei-, George M. 
Bogart, William H. 
Bradford, Stephen L. 
Brinkerhott", Edward. 
Brown, Andi-ew. 
Burr, George. 
Burr, Heniy. 
Campbell, Daniel. 
Center, Edward. 
Cock, Isaac. 
Crawford, Lemuel. 



Cropsey, Jasper E. 
Cuyler, Fi'ederick. 
Dean, Henry. 
De Witt, Silas. 
Duffy, James. 
Dutcher, Salem. 
Easton, John. 
Elmendorf, John. 
Elmole, David W. 
Fenn, T. Jefferson. 
Geer, Harold. 
Gilchrist, Edwai-d. 
Gill, Charles W. 
Gregory, Edward. 
Gregory, Shei'lock. 
Gi-oesl)eeck, Stephen. 
Hamilton, Alfi-ed. 
Hinckley, Wan-en. 
Howe, Smith. 
Hun, Thomas. 
James, Augustus. 
Jones, Robei't. 
Kearney, Francis. 
Kidney, Jonathan. 
Knower, Edmund. 
Knower, Elisha D. 
Knower, John. 
Lansing, Charles. 
Lansing, Frederick . 
Lansing, George. 
Lansing, Yates. 
Lay, Timothy C. 
Legiange, George. 
Merchant, Henry S. 
Miller, Abraham 0. 
Monger, Edwin H 
Page, Ames, C. 
Pemberton, Heni-y. 
Pemberton, John. 
Porter, William C. 
Quackenbush, Nichcl 
Quackenbush, Smith 
Rockwell, George W. 
Roorback, Junius. 
Sackridci-, John P 
Scovill, Bi-ighani 



79 



Sedgewick, Theodoi-e. 
Shaw, Hii-um. 
Sonthwick, Thomas. 
Staffoi-<l, James R. 
Steele, Roswell. 
Sti-ange, James. 
Tenbroeck, IJenry. 
Townsend, John F. 
Van Loon, John W. 
Van Rensselaer, Henry. 
Van Rensselaei", James. 
Van Rensselaer, Stephen H. 
Watson, Charles. 
Wendell, Benjamin A. 
Wilson, Boyd H. 
Winne, James. 
Winne, William. 
Wiswall, William. 
Yates, Robert. 

1818-19. 

Bamman, Henry. 
Bentley, James. 
Brown, Elias. 
Bullock, Thomas. 

Burchard, 

Burke, William. 
Case, Sheldon. 
Chapman, Charles. 
Clinton, James. 
Cruttenden, Warren. 
Curreen, John. 
Daniels, Heiu-y. 
De Witt, James B. 
Doi'sey, Robert R. 
Dunn, Edwai'd H. 
Dunn, Richard V. 
Fanning, Dianthus. 
Fonda, William H. 
Ford, Edwai-d. 
Frasei", Alexander. 
French, James M. 
Gleason, Michael. 
Gough, James. 
Gough, William. 
Haff", Heniiui. 



Haren, Fredei-ick. 
Hatch, Charles. 
Heath, David. 
Henry, Jose{)h. 
James, Henry, 
Jewett, Geoi'ge G. 
Johnson, Daniel. 
Jones, James E. 
Keeler, Charles. 
Lovett, Hamilton. 
Marvin, Benjamin. 
Marvin, Charles. 
Marvin, Richard H. 
Mather, Charles. 
McCamman, Charles. 
McPhern, Andrew. 
Monell, John. 
Nugent, William. 
O'Donnell, William. 
Olcott, Theodore. 
Piatt, Van Zandt. 
Portei", Charles A. 
Porter, Edward James. 
Sexton, Hii'am. 
Sherman, Charles. 
Sherman, Henry. 
Sherman, Roger M. 
Southwick, Henry C. 
Staats, Petei- P. 
Strong, Anthony M. 
Ten Eyck, Harman. 
Ten Eyck, Jacob L. 
Ten Eyck, Beter G. 
Van Antwei'p, Stephen. 
Van Benthuysen, Henry. • 
Van Loon, Peter. 
Van Schaick, Isaac. 
Van Schaick, John. 
Van Schoonhoven. Derick. 
Van Vechten, Leonard G. 
Vedder, Richard. 
Walker, Frederick. 
Walker, Henry A. 
Walker, Willard H. 
Waseon, William G. 
Webster, Richard. 



80 



Wemple, Christopher. 
Wendell, Harraanus. 
Wilson, Maynard. 
Wilson, Timothy. 
Winne, Charles. 

1819-20. 

Bacon, Marshall J. 
Benedict, Henry M. 
Benedict, Spencer S. 
Bleecker, Charles M. 
Birtch, E. M. 
Bogart, Isaac, 
Bulkley, Charles D. 
Burton, John I. 
Buttre, William. 
Center, William. 
Chilchester, Arthur. 
Dougherty, Charles H. 
Duffan, Francis T. 
Duncan, Richard. 
Ford, Eliakim H. 
Gregory, Stej)hen P. 
Hand, Aaron H. 
Hand, Lemuel P. B. 
Hermans, Halsteil. 
Holmes, John. 
Hopkins, William R. 
Howell, James. 
Kane, David. 
King, Andrew. 
Leake, Charles T. 
Linacre, James F. 
Mabee, Henry, 
McMartin, Finlay. 
Mills, John E. 
Murray, David. 
Nowlten, Farnham. 
Pearson, John. 
Prescott, Benjamin. 
Ryan, Stephen V. R. 
Schuyler, Stephen R. 
Selkirk, Francis. 
Seymour, Ei-astus. 
Slingerland, Elbert. 
Smith, Joel. 



Southwick, Solomon. 
Stanton, George W. 
Sternbergh, Jacob. 
Van Beuren, Martin. 
Van Olinda, Douw B. 
Van Wagenei", John. 
Vedder, Quincy A. 
Walker, Silas H. 
Walsh, James. 
Watson. Robert. 
Welsh, Samuel, 
Whiting, Daniel P. 
Woodworth, Westerlo. 

1820-21. 

Beardsley, Crandell E. 
Beardsley. Livingston C. 
Boughton, John. 
Bradwell, Stephen. 
Briggs, Jerome. 
Brown, Joab S. 
Brown, Robert. 
Brown, Rufus. 
Brown, William E. 
Colvin, Andrew J. 
Cooke, John. 
Cooper, Alfred. 
Cooper, Goldsborough. 
Cooper, Richard. 
Cushman, John W. 
Douw, De Peystei-. 
Duer, Edward A. 
Duer, William D. 
Dunn, Henry P. 
Fassett, Amos S. 
Gansevoort, Guert. 
Gansevoort, Peter L. 
Gough, William, Jr. 
Hall, John Tayler. 
Hare, Silas. 
Herring, Thomas. 
HoclTstrasser, Chai-les. 
Holt, Hei'man. 
Jackson, Isaat; W. 
Jenkins, Timothy. 
Johnson, Robert. 



81 



Jones, Ebeiiezer. 
King, Lewis P. 
McCamman, Washington. 
McHay, John. 
Mclntyre, Daniel J. 
McNab, John F. 
Nugent, Henry P. 
Newlands, Robert. 
Porter, Ira. 
Root, Arthur H. 
Schermei'hoi-n, Morgan L. 
Sekien, HtMiry R. 
Slingerland, Augustus. 
Slingerland, William J. 
Smith, Jacob S. 
Spencer, John. 
Stark, Oliver. 
Sturtevant, Oscai'. 
Townsend, Ambrose S. 
Townsend, Isaiah. 
Van Antwerp, Isaac V. 
Watson, Ebenezer. 
Webster, Horace B. 
Wendell, Oscar. 
Westei'lo, Eihirdus. 
Wiswall, Samuel. 
Wood, George. 
Woodwoith, Robert. 

1821-22. 

Bassler, Benjamin. 
Boardman, John. 
Boardman, Stillnian. 
Campbell, Archibald. 
Cantine, John. 
Carson, William. 
Chrystie, James. 
Chrystie, Thomas W. 
Cole, James. 
Cooper, Charles D. 
Fasset, Charles A. 
Gregory, Alexander M. 
Groesbeck, Abraham. 
Harbeck, John. 
Hart. Enoch L. 
Hector, James. 



Hopkins, Samuel. 
Hosfoi-d, Mahlon T. 
HubViel, Almerin. 
James, Woodbridge. 
Keelei', Theodore J. 
Livingston, Livingston. 
McMartin, Robert. 
MeWilliams, George. 
Monteith, Peter. 
Olmstead, George T. 
Oti.s, Tristi'um Coffin. 
Pike, Benjamin. 
Pratt, Elisha N. 
Sharpe, William A. 
Shaw, Daniel. 
Shaw, James. 
Spencer, Alexander A. 
Talcott, John L. 
T()wnsend, William H. 
Ti-otter, John H. 
Van Alstine, Christen B. 
Van Antwerp, Daniel. 
Van Cortlandt, Pierre. 
Walker, Calvin. 
Walton, James D. 
Walton, William. 
Welles, Augustus L. 
Welles, Edmund W. 
Wilgiis, Charles. 
Winne, George. 

1822-23. 

Ansart, Edward C. 
Austin, Anthony H. 
Babbet, Pierre T. 
Bleecker, William E. 
BlOddgood, James. 
Brodhead, Alfred. 
Brodhead, John R. 
Brown, Alexander H. 
Bryce. John. 
Buel, Charles. 
Campbell, Allen. 
Corjjenter, George W. 
Clinton, Franklin. 
Cochran, William D. 



82 



Crosby, George. 
Cushman, William M. 
Dusenbery, Richard J. 
Elliot, Edward. 
Eveleth, John C. 
Farnhani, Franklin. 
Forsyth, William W. 
Hazard, Edwai-d M. 
James, John. 
Jones, Richard. 
Ladd, James. 
Lansing', Abraham G. 
Luce, John B. 
McCamman, William. 
McCulloch, William A. 
Meline, James P. 
Mills. Seymour. 
Mui-ray, Alfred H. 
Packard, Henry R. 
Peck, Gad. 
Poiiei", James L. 
Ramsey, Henry. 

Rowan, . 

Russell, George. 
Russell, Henry. 
Russell, William. 
Sanford, Charles. 
Sanford, Henry. 
Seely, George. 
Shaw, Abraham D. 
Skiff, Seymour. 
Skinner, Henry. 
Solomons, Levi. 
Solomons, Samuel D. 
Staats, John C. 
Staats, William H. 
Starr, Henry. 
Ten Eyck. Andiew J. 
Willard, Elisha R. 
Winslow. John F. 
Yates, John C. 

182.3-114. 

Baldwin, . 

Bnlkley, Silas B. 
Cassidy, Henry. 



Dimcan, Radcliff H. 
Dunlop, James. 
Dunloji, Robert. 
Davis, John. 
Evertsen, Evert. 
Farrel, Daniel A. 
Fisk. Samuel C. 
Fonda, John. 
Fowler. Philemon H. 
Gillespie, Charles D. 
Gillespie, Eugene. 
Gleason, John. 
Gough, John T. 
Groesbeeck, Jacob H. 
Groesbeeck, William H. 
Hanf(u-d, William L. 
Henry, William S. 
Humj)hrey, .John 
Jewell, Joseph. 
McClinton, John. 
McKelvey, Petei- B. 
McMullen, Peter B. 
Meacham, Roswell S. 
Miller, William M. 
Mills, Frederick C. 
Murray, William G. 
O'Shaunessy. James. 
Parker, Ambrose S. 
Parker, Robert M. 
Pruyn, John V. L. 
Rector, William H. 
Roser, William. 
Shepherd, Bni-rit. 
Shepherd, Richard. 
Skinner, Charles. 
Staats, Isaac W. 
Stewart, William. 
Strong, Robei-t M. K. 
Sudam, Harrison. 
Van Alstine, Martin. 
Van Alstine, Matthew M. 
Van Der Zee, Henry. 
Van S(-hai(;k. Charles H. 
Van Vranken, Jacob. 
Visscher, Baj-ent. 
Wasson. John B. 



83 



Weavei', Isaiah L. 
Wilkinson, Matthew. 
Wilhu-d, John L. 
WiUet, Edward S. 
Winne, Edward. 

1824-25. 

Austin, John. 
Bell, Gan-it W. 
Boui-g-oiii, Charles A. 
Bradford, Alexander \V. 
Bradtbi'd, John M. 
Bulkley, John. 
Center, Alfred H. 
Daniels, James W. 
Daniels, Wai-ner. 
Davis, William. 
Elmeniloi-f, Peter E. 
Fail-child, Sidney T. 
Fox, Albert R. 
French, Abel. 
Fry, Charles B. 
Glen, Cornelius. 
Gourlay, William B. 
Gi'oesV)eec,k, Charles E. 
Hallenbake, Jasper S. 
Hawley, Heni-y. 
Hequembour^, Charles L. 
Jewett, Grosvenor W. 
Jones, Llewellyn. 
Kline, John. 
Knower, Benjamin. 
Knower, (/harles. 
LHnsinf,^ Abi-aham F. 
Lee, Oliver H. 
Loveridge, Cicero. 
Maitin, Henry H. 
Mayell, Alfred. 
McGilchrist, Peter. 
M(;Intosh, William. 
Phelps, Philo L. 
Post, Ei-asmvis D. 
Prnyn, Robert H. 
Rogers, Thomas. 
Steele, Henj-y. 
Tnllidge, Henry. 



Van Vechten, Samunl. 
Webster, Howard. 
Winslow, William. 
Wood, Benjamin. 

1825-26. 

Austin, William. 
Campbell, Alexander S. 
Carmichael, Peter. 
Colton, Erastus. 
Conklin, Frederick A. 
Craig, James R. 
Craig, John; 
Dutcher, Augustus. 
Dutcher, William C. 
Fonda. Townsend S. 
Gansevoort, Leonard H. 
Gardner, Townsend. 
Gibbons, George S. 
Goold, John S. 
Hammond, Wells S. 
Hawe, John B. 
Hequembourg, Theodore. 
Hickox, Charles S. 
Hopkins, Augustus. 
Johnson, George N. 
Lagrange, Stephen. 
Leech, Daniel D. T. 
Lush, Stephen. 
Mayer, Fn>derick J. 
Mayer, Philij) A. 
McHarg, William N. 
McMicken, John. 
McMullen, James. 
Nelliger, John B. 
Pruyn, Francis. 
Rider, John J. 
Robinson, Hamilton W. 
Ruby, George W. 
Sawyer, Sidney. 
Scoville, Hezekiah G. 
Slingerland, John J. 
Stan-, Melanc^ton. 
Stan-, Richai-d T. 
Ten Bi-oeck, Richaid. 
Ten Eyck, Henry. 



84 



Tullidge, Alfred. 
Van Schelluyne, Rensselaer. 
Van Schelluyne, Theodore. 
Van Vechten, Tennis. 
Vosburg, William. 
Walker, George. 
Wells, Charles. 
Williams, Henry C. 

1826-37. 

Austin, Henry. 
Bement, William. 
Brown, James. 
Biiel, Jesse. 
Bullions, William J. 
Burke, Abraham C. 
Bush. Walter R. 
Cagger, Peter. 
Cagger, William. 
Case, Jonathan H. 
Case, William. 
Cassidy, William. 
Chapin, Erastus S. 
Chapin, Josiah. 
Chapin, Samuel W. 
Cockhurn, William. 
Colvin, Henry. 
Conkling, Aurelian. 
Delevan, Edward H. 
De Witt, Charles E. 
Douglas, George. 
Douglas, Robert J. 
Douglas, William A. 
Dox, Peter. 
Duel, John R. 
Duflfy, Edward. 
Erwin, David W. 
Fiddler, John T. 
Godley, John S. 
Grifhths, Grilfith W. 
Harris, Daniel. 
Harrower, Peter P. 
Hartness, Thomas L. 
Hastings, Frederick B. 
Hawkins, Garrit P. 
Hawley, Nathan. 



Hickeox, William E. 
Hills, Augustus. 
Holmes, Richai-d T. 
Hopkins, Wolsey R. 
Kane, John J. C. 
Knower, Henj-y. 
Knowlson, Timothy C. 
Lee, Thomas E. 
Lockwood, Thomas. 
McLachlan, John. 
McMartin, Duncan. 
Meads, John. 
Mitchell, Laban. 
Newland, David. 
Newland, John. 
Nugent, George A. 
Packard, Charles C. 
Palmer, James E. 
Payn, Charles H. 
Radcliff, William J. 
Rawdon, Charles. 
Satterlee, Edward. 
Schuylei-, Philip L. 
Schuyler. William C. 
Shepherd. William G. 
Sickles, John A. 
Slack, William A. 
Swain, Robert. 
Swain, Samuel R. 
Trumpbour, William C. 
Van Alen. Harman W. 
Van Shelluyne, Cornelius. 
Waldron, Henry. 
Wells, William H. 
Welsh, Ashbel. 
Wendell, John. 
Woodward, James L. 

1827-28. 

Aspinwall, Lewis H. 
Babcock, Hairison G. 0. 
Becker, Jacob. 
Bostwick, Oliver M. 
Bourgoin, Alphonse F. 
Brammal, James. 
Condie, Daniel T. 



85 



Davi<ls()n, Gilbert C. 
Donnelly, Peter M. 
Drake, Garret. 
Duftaii, John C. 
Eddy, John R. 
Eights, Abraham C. W. 
Fay, De Witt C. 
Foot, Elisha. 
Gibbons, Washington. 
Goold, Henry. 
Groesbcck, John D. 
Hawley, Roswell. 
Hill, Samuel W. 
Hoffman, Henry. 
Jackson, Peter. 
Kane, Oliver De Lancey. 
Kiersted, John. 
Lacey, Ge(>rge S. 
Lansing, S^)encer S. 
Ludlow, John L. 
Lynde, Charles J. 
McLaughlin, William D. 
McMickens, Jacob R. 
McNaughton, Duncan R. 
McPherson, John. 
Milligan John. 
Oolhout, Jonas. 
Packard, Eugene M. 
Page, William W. 
Piatt, Ezra J. 
Porter, William V. 
Priest, Francis W. 
Quackenbush, John V. P. 
Richardson, William J. 
Seai-s, Charles. 
Seymour, William. Ji-. 
Sheldon, Smith. 
Sherman, Epaphras S. 
Sill, Rensselaer N. 
Skinner, Joshua K. 
Small, James. 
Smith, Elias Willard. 
Siiiilh, Sa?iiuel Sidney. 
Southwick, Alfred. 
Trottei-, Matthew. 
Van Alstyne, J. Fonda. 



Viele, Augustus. 
Viele, Henry K. 
Visscher, Edward. 
Weld, Gilbei-t C. 
Wendell, James L. 
Williams. Joseph D. 
Winne, Jacob. 
Wi-ight, Phineas C. 

1828-29. 

Abbott, Calel). 
Atwood, Geoi-ge P. 
Bacheldor, lidward. 
Barker, Thomas M. 
Barney, Paul C. 
Benedict, Edmund A. 
Benedict, Lewis, Jr. 
Bennet, Amos. 
Bleeckei-, James. 
Bosworth, Caleb H. 
Boyd, Thomas. 
Boyd, William. 
Bratt, John. 
Bi'own Stanton. 
Burt, Edward. 
Callaghan, Patrick. 
Cammeyei', Chai-les A. 
Cassidy, Ambrose S. 
Cassidy, Charles. 
Churchill, Alausing C. 
Churchill, Erasmus D. 
Covert, James. 
Cowden, David. 
Crew, John L. 
Davidson, Alexander. 
Davidson, Alexander. 
Deming, William W. 
Dimlop, Archibald. 
Dusenbery, Benjamin. 
Dusenbei-y, Henry. 
Elliot, Hugh I). 
Elliot, John. 
Fasset, William N. 
Ferguson, Robert. 
Fiddler, Robert. 
Fly, Eli J. M. 



S6 



Galusha, John J. 
Gladding, Freeman. 
Greene, Alfred S. 
Hallenbake, Garrit G. 
Haring-, Clinton. 
Hart, Henry. 
Hai'tness, John. 
Hay den, William B. 
Hendri'.'kson, John. 
Higham, Chai'les. 
Holden, Reuben S. 
Humphrey, Daniel W. 
Humphrey, Friend. 
Humphrey, John R. 
Isham, Alfred H. 
Jenkins, Charles E. 
Knight, Calvin S. 
Lansing, Henry Q. 
Lathrop, Geoi-ge V. N. 
Lee, Theodore. 
Lee, Thomas G. 
Leech, William. 
Low, Francis S. 
Lyman, Charles R. 
Lyman, James. 
Marsh, Marcius. 
Marsh, Theodore B. 
Marsh, William H. 
Mather, James. 
McCamman, Alexandei-, 
McCamman, John. 
McCarty, Isaac. 
McHarg, Rufus K. 
McPherson, George. 
Meadow, John H. 
Meads, James. 
Means, Thomas. 
Miller, Peter S. 
Newland, John Jr. 
Norton, Henry. 
Norton, John P. 
"Ostrander, Philip. 
Packai'd, Algernon S. 
Packai'd, Joseph. 
Paige, Geoi-ge W. 
Paige, Joseph C. Y. 



Parker, John. 
Parmelee, Francis B, 
Patrick, Richard M. 
Pemberton, James S. 
Pembei'ton, Thomas L, 
Platner, William. 
Pohlman, William J. 
Porter, George W. 
Porte I', James E. 
Pruyn, John W. 
Quackenbush, Charles. 
Rice, Silas C. 
Schoolci-aft, Charles L. 
Shaw, Henry. 
Sherwooii, Isaac. 
Shilds, Alexander. 
Smyth, Henry M. 
Smyth, Pati'ick. 
Strong, Joseph M. 
Strong, Paschal N. 
Ten Eyck, John. 
Townsend, Franklin. 
Townsend, Robert. 
Tuffts, Joseph. 
Van Allen, Benjamin. 
Van Ingen, James L. 
Van Rensselaer, MaunselL 
Van Schoonhoven, Cornelius. 
Vernor, Benjamin. 
Verplanck, Isaac. 
Walworth, Clarence A. 
Waterman, George. 
Weaver, Hamilton B. 
Weaver, Jeremiah J.| 
Wells, Rol)ei't H. 
Wildei-, John N. 
Williams, John H. 
Williams, Samuel. 
Winslow, Augustus S. 
Winslow, Leonard C. 
Wilson, John L. 
Wilson, Richard L. 

1829-30. 

Adriance, John V^. S. 
Allen, Henry A. 



87 



A.nable, Henry S. 
Austin, Emilius. 
Austin, Richai'd. 
Bacon, John F. 
Bacon, William A. 
Barker, Lewis. 
Beardsley, Joseph A. 
Beardsley, Samuel R. 
Bogart, P. A.Grandon. 
Boyd, Howard. 
Boyd, John. 
Bradley, George S. 
Bratt, James. 
Briggs, William W. 
Brower, John H. 
Brown, Joseph B. 
Brown, Robert C. 
Bullions, Alexander B. 
Bunker, Edward C. 
Burton, Jams. 
Cameron, Robert. 
Campbell, Duncan. 
Campbell, John. 
Carpenter, James H. 
Cheever, Edwin H. 
Clapp, Noah. 
Coile, John. 
Covert, Peter H. 
Covert. William C. 
Crawford, Stephen G. 
Croswell, Horace. 
Cummings, (Gilbert. 
Cummings, James. 
Cushman, Robert S. 
Cushman, Thomas H. 
Davis, Henry L. 
Davis, Joseph. 
Davis, Nathaniel. 
De Witt, William L. 
Dibblee, Frederick E. 
Don, Peter C. 
Dunn, William R. 
Durrie, Daniel S. 
Dusenbery, Absalom T. 
Ertsl)ergei", James. 
Esmay, Isaac. 



Fay, Alfi-ed. 
Fay, Henry B. 
Flagg, Henry F. 
Flagg, Thomas B. W. 
Frost, James. 
Gansevoort, Stanwix. 
Geer, Darius. 
Gibbons, John B. 
Gibbons, Thomas J. 
Gott, John. 
Gowie, Charles G. 
Gray, William. 
Gi'eene, Henry F. 
Gi'iffin, Christopher C. 
Groesbeeck, Charles F. 
Groesbeeck, David. 
Hammond, Thomas R. 
Hart, Alexander. 
Haitness, Joseph M. 
Hermans, John E. 
Higham, James. 
Higham, Zury. 
Hills, Chai-les W. 
Holmes, Willian:. 
Howard, Patrick. 
Hoyt, George B. 
Hubbel, Geoi-ge. 
Hubbel, James L. 
Huddlestone, John H. 
Humphrey, George. 
Humphrey, James L. 
James, Edward. 
James, Robert W. 
Johnson, Oliver H. 
Jordan, Barbazon N. 
Keeler, Frederick A. 
Knowlton, Myron. 
Leake, Frederick F. 
Leake, John S. 
Leake, Simeon J. 
Leyne, Maurice. 
Loughlin, John. 
Lovei'ing, Richard. 
Lush,*Richard. 
Mandell, Addison. 
Meigs, James K, 



88 



Melville, Gansevoort. 
Melville, Herman. 
Miller, Andrew. 
Miller, Isaac L. K. 
Miller. William A. 
Niles, Nathaniel. 
Norton, William. 
Palmer, Charles T. 
Phelps, Justus M. 
Pitkin, Thomas C. 
Rathbone, John F. 
Rathbone, Lewis. 
Reynold^, Henry. 
Rising, William A. 
Robinson, Ephi-aim D. W. 
Root, David A. 
Seymour. John. 
Sim, William B. 
Soulden, William M. 
Staats, Stephen. 
Stanton, Charles H. 
Steele, John F. 
Steele, William H. 
Strain, James. 
Strong, William N. 
Taylor, Ira H. 
Taylor, J. Richmond. 
Thomas, John., 
Trotter, Edward W. 
Van Alstine, David D. 
Van Benthuysen, Packard. 
Van Loon, Charles. 
Van Loon, Edmund. 
Van Loon, James S. 
Van Steenbergh, Hugh H. 
Van Tuyl, Otto W. 
Wasson, Chauncey H. 
Waterman, Edgar. 
Waterman, Jeremiah. 
Waterman, John G. 
Waterman, Robert. 
Webster, William H. 
Wells, William D. 
Welsh, George H. 
Williams, Abraham E. 
Wilson, Benjamin. 



Wilson, Charles. 
Wilson, Edward F. 
Wilson, John 0. 

1830-31. 

Babcock, John. 
Bai-nard, Samuel W. 
Blackall, William R. 
Booth, Dilazon. 
Booth, Dwight. 
Bugby, Edward. 
Bullions, Geoi'ge H. 
Burton, Charles E. 
Cady, Daniel H. 
Carmichael, John. 
Chapman, Alonzo. 
Clark, Edwai-d H. 
Cole, William. 
Cornell, WiUiam W. 
De Freest, Clinton. 
.De Freess, Lorenzo D. 
Deuel, John G. W. 
Deuel, Silas W. 
De Witt, Ephraim H. 
Dil)blee, James. 
Donellan, William. 
Duel, Thorn. 
Durrie, Horace. 
Erwin, Hugh W. 
Erwin, William. 
Evans, Henry.' 
Fink, Frederick. 
Fondey, William B. 
Foot, George F. 
Fi-othingham, Thomas. 
Furlong, John. 
Germond, Morgan. 
Gill, Allen H. 
Gladding, William J, 
Goodrich, John M. 
Goold, Henry. 
Gould, David. 
Gray, Rufus. 
Green, Peckham H. 
Greene, Rowland. 
Griffiths, Evan T. 



89 



Groesbeeck, David. 
Groesbeeck, Sylvester. 
Hai-ri.s Robert \V. 
Hasbiouck. Roheit M. 
Heely, Geor{);'e. 
Heriick, John J. 
Hollailay, John. 
Honian, John. 
Inibrie, George F. 
Isherwood, Benjamin F. 
Johnson, James H. 
Jo]'<lan, Robert. 
Kane, Charles S. 
Kiik, John. 
Leine, Hugh. 
Lovering-, Edmund. 
Ludlow, James R. 
Malburn, Francis G. 
Mancius, George W. 
McDougal, James. 
McHarg, Charles K. 
Meacham, John. 
Melville, Allan 
Miller. Augustus C. 
Miller. James A 
Mix, Gai-ret V. 
Moore, Arthur E. 
Mon-is, Joseph D. 
Murjjhy, James. 
Niver, Coni-ad. 
Osborn, Chai-les F. 
Parsons, Harvey K. 
Payn, Owen. 
Pease, Minot S. 
Ransom, Samuel H. 
Reed, William H. 
Rice, Josei)h T. 
Rice, Moses T. 
Rosekrants, Henry D. 
Shaw, George. 
Smith, Fredei'ic. 
Smith, John N. 
'J'allman, Darius. 
Ten Eyck, Anthony. 
Ten Eyck, Leonard. 
Thomas, David W. 



Ti'owbridge, Alexander H . 
Van Rensselaer, Charles W. 
Van Schaack, Stephen D. 
Van Schoonhoven, Ebenzer L. 
Van Slyck, Harman. 
Van Valkenbei-gh, Heni-y. 
Waldron, George W. 
Walker, James. 
Walters, Joseph B. 
Wands, Isaac H. 
Wasson, Christopher C. 
Wasson, George W. 
Webster, Charles R. 
Wendell, Benjamin Rush. 
Whitney, Chai'les E. 
Wilson, Josejih B. 
Wooilworth, John. 

1831-32. 

Allen, William 
Bacheldor, John F. 
Bennet, Francis. 
Bennet, Thomas. 
Bennet, William. 
Boies, Abi-ahani E. 
Bonney, Edson. 
Bradshaw, Archibald. 
Bi-own, George H. 
Buckbee, Edwai-d T. 
Burt, Charles A. 
Burt, .^ames D. 
Butler, William H. A. 
Cafferty, James H. 
Carlow, (xeorge. 
Churchill, William H. 
Cobb, Elijah. 
Cole, John J. 
Cushman, Paul. 
Davidson, John M. 
Davis, Francis A. 
Davis, William. 
De Witt, James R. 
Dey Ermand, John. 
Dowtiing, William W. 
Enders, Peter. 
Feri'is, John M. 



90 



Fly, Anson B. 
Fondey, Charles T. 
Fondey, Isaac. 
Forsyth, Douglas. 
Fuller, Jacob E. 
Fuller, Josei)h W. 
Galiigan. "William. 
Gallup, Albert 8. 
Gansevoort, Henry. 
Gaylord, Charles. 
Gaylord, George D. 
Graham, Theodore V. 
Greene, James. 
Herrick, Edwin R. 
Hickcox, Hamlet V. 
Hill, Aaron. 
Jarvis, Timothy B. 
Jones, Hiram A. 
Keyser, Henry. 
Knapp. Samuel. 
Lathi'op, Uaniel S. 
Lathi'op, George D. 
Leake, Horace W. 
Lush, James K. 

Lyman, John. 

McDowell, Daniel D. 

McHarg, Charles K. 

McKown, James. 

Meigs, John H. 

Mix, James. 

Pitcher, Joseph R. 

Powers, Charles. 

Quarles, Augvistus. 

Quarles, Henry. 

Rising, Austin. 

Rockwell, Elisha H. 

Root, Horace. 

Russell, Abraham A. 

Sammons, Stephen. 

8chool(;i-aft William C. 

Schuyler, Jeremiah. 

Siiliman, Horace B. 

Skinner, John W. 

Sloan, Chi'istian S. 

Taylor, Joseph B. 

Thomas, James. 



Tibbals. William W 
Townsend, Howard. 
Vanderpool, Isaac. 
Van Shaack, Egbert. 
Van Slyck, Andrew P. 
Walkei', Joseph B. 
Wells, Joseph A. 
Well.«, Minot M. 
Whitney, James. 

1832-33. 

Ames, John. 

Armstrong, Frederick W. 
Arnold, Dutee. 
Bacon, Edgai- J. 
Bacon, John R. 
Bai-iet, Rufus.. 
Bay, Richard S. 
Bell, John H. 
Bowne, John H. 
Bi-ainard, William H. 
Bronson, Henry G. 
Bronson, Oliver. 
Burton, Fi-ancis C. 
Buel, William P. 
Bullions, John C. 
Burchard, Peter S. 
Caffei-ty, William C. 
Carmichael, James. 
Charles, Daniel D. T. 
Conkliiig, Hubbel D. 
Davis, Robert. 
Dejiuy, John J. 
Douglas, Byron. 
Downing, George. 
Ensign, Martin. 
Feltman, John C. 
Ferris, Richard B. 
Fuller, James A. 
Fuliei', Samuel S. 
Gilchiist, Ambrose S. 
(iough, Daniel D. 
Harvey, Charles W. 
Haskell, Henry C. 
Hawe, Daniel. 
Hawley, William. 



yi 



Hayes, Duncan. 
Hepinstall, Chnstopher. 
Hepinstall, Richard. 
Hillhouse, John. 
Hillhou.'^e, William. 
Houghtaling, Conrad A. 
Hosch, Edward. 
Hosch, Philip H. 
Jackson, Firnin. 
Johnson, John S. 
Johnson, Robert F. 
Kelso, John H. 
Kennedy, Francis B. 
KiiifJT, Henry L. 
Kline, George P. 
Knower, Timothy. 
Lansing-, John A. 
Lee, James P. 
LightV)ody, John "W. 
Lyons, David H. 
Marcy, Samuel N. 
Marcy, William G. 
Mather, Joseph H. 
Mather, Levei-ett Cruttenden. 
Meadon, Edward W. 
Meigs, Richard M. 
Monteath, Geoi-ge H. 
Monteath, John H. 
Monteath, William V. W. 
Moore, William R. 
Mosher, Cornelius. 
Mygatt, William G. 
Nash, Stephen. 
Newton, George L. 
Norton, Samuel. 
Osterhout, William. 
Overton, Thomas. 
Parker, Lewis P. 
Phelps, Philip. Jr. 
Prevost, Fi-ederick J. 
Robinson, Thomas E. 
Sanford, William. 
Sehiffer, Henry W, 
Sherman, James A. 
Smith, Samuel S. 
Spencer, John C. 



Stafford, Robert N. 
Stevenson, George. 
Strait, Hiram. 
Ten Eyck, Richard. 
Thorp, John D. 
Tillitson, Edward R. 
Townsend, Frederick. 
Van Buren, Alexander L. 
Van Vechten, James D. 
Waterman, Charles G. 
Weed, James B. 
Wells, Thomas. 
Williams, George H. 
Wing, Matthew G. 
Wright, William W. 

1833-34. 

Abendroth, August. 
Adams, Charles H. 
Becker, Erwin. 
Bell, Henry W. 
Brown, William. 
Buckrum, Caleb. 
Burgess. George H. 
Burgess, William T. 
Campbell, John. 
Carter, Charles W. 
Carter, Robert. 
Cary, Walter. 
Chapman, George. 
Charles, George, Jr. 
Chi-istian, Geoi-ge H. 
Churchill, Rensselaer. 
Clark, Adrian D. 
Clark, George. 
Collier, John C. 
Cornell, James. 
Denniston, Garrit V. 
Elmendorf, Nicholas. 
Erwin, George. 
Fidler, Joseph H. 
Frisby, Edward. 
Frisl)y, John B. 
Frisby, Levi C. 
Geary, George. 
Gibson, Anthony M. 



92 



Gibson, John Jr. 
Gibson, William J. 
Godley, Richard. 
Gough, Alexander C. 
Greene, Joseph H. 
Hamilton, Fayette. 
Harvey, Robei-t. 
Hewlett, Alexander M. 
Hoyt, Alfred Dudley. 
Humphrey, William L. 
Johnson, William H. 
Kiersted, Wynkoop. 
Kingsley, John A. 
Lansing-, Joseph A. 
Lansing, Richard. 
Leavitt, Andrew J. 
Lyman, Nathan B. 
Lyman, Stephen. 
Malcomb, Jam'eo Frazer. 
Marshall, John. 
Marshall, Walter. 
Mather, Charles F. 
McCaniman, Cyrus. 
McKee, Joseph. 
Milholland, Henry. 
Miller, James. 
Morange, James W. 
Morange, William D. 
Northrup, Richard H. 
Peacock, Thomas W. 
Perry, Oliver H. 
Philips, Daniel. 
Quackenbush, Stephen P. 
Rowe, Sanford. 
Rowland, John. 
Ryckman, Garrit W. 
Shaw, Aaron. 
Sheldon, Alexandei- G. 
Shenck, Edward T. 
Sherwood, Napoleon B. 
Simmons, Henry. 
Steele, Levi. 
Stone, William H. 
Strong, Thomas J. 
Ten Eyck, Philip. 
T.nvnsend, Theodore. 



Treat, Nathan P. 
Tremper, Cantine. 
Van Schaick, Henry D. 
Van Vechten, George. 
Waldron, Charles N. 
Waterman, Robert H 
Wells, Henry J. 
Whitney, George. 
Whitney, William W. 
Williams, Arthur 
Williams, Charles, 
Worcester, George P 

1834-35. 

Allen, James. 

Beck, John Walton R. 

Bell, James C. 

Boies, D. Artemas. 

Bradt, William H. 

Bullen. Lathrop. 

Charles, George H. 

Chassel, John. 

Clapp, Oliver W. 

Clapp, Ruel Shepard. 

Cockburn, Edwin. 

Colburn, L. Wells. 

Collier, James H. 

Comstock, Alexander Cromwell. 

Delahanty, Michael. 

De Yermand, William. 

Douglas, Franklin. 

Dunham, Worden. 

Evertsen, John B. 

Feltman, William. 

Fields, Joseph. 

Foote, Henry. 

Fuhr, John. 

Goewey, Erastus. 

Gregory, Benjamin. 

Griffin, Jacob. 

Groesbeeck, Orlando. 

Hadley, George. 

Hai'ing, James D. 

Haskell, Moses. 

Hawe, John. 

Hawley, Charles. 



93 



HeiTiek, William H. 
Hickcox, Geoi-ge A. 
Hickcox, Silas B. 
Hig-i;-ins, Robert. 
Holliday, James. 
Hoyt, Albert C. 
Jansen, Egbert H. 
Jar vis, George. 
Johnson, William H. 
Jordan, Chi-istophei-. 
Kt'llogg, Daniel. 
Keyser, Chai-les. 
Kingsley, Hale. 
Kossiter, Chai-Ies D. 
Lee, George Canning. 
Liddle. William. 
McHench, David B. 
McKennan, John. 
McLai-en, Alexander. 
Merrifield, Geoi-ge G. 
Mills, Martin S. 
Morrow, George. 
Myers, John B. 
Niver, David M. 
Norton, James A. 
Ott, Hyloi-. 

Packard, Benjamin F. 
Paddock, 8teph(in. 
Paddock. William H. 
Pej per, William P. 
Percival, George W. 
Porter, Malcolm. 
Pnrdy, Geoi-ge. 
Reed, James A. 
Reed, John S. 
Reed, La Fayette. 
Reed, Sylvanus. 
Rice, De Witt C. 
Risk, William. 
Rysendoi'ph, Jacol). 
Saltus, Francis H. 
Salvidge, Robert. 
Sanders, Barent Bleecker. 
Sanders, James B. 
Sandei-s, Robert. 
Schwartzenbnrgh, William. 



Shankland, (rilbcrt. 
Story, Joseph. 
Strain, Davi<'i. 
Strong, John. 
Tallman. Chai-les. 
'J'allman, Marcius. 
Ternouth. William. 
Thomas, Charles. 
Thomas, Edward L. 
Tripji, Ferris. 
Van Bergen, John P. 
Van Vranken, Gansevoort . 
Vernor, Jei-emiah .S. 
Vernor, John T. 
Walei-man, Augustus. 
Weed, Walter S. 
Wells, George A. 
Wells, Heniy. 
Whitney. Stephen W. 
Whitney, William H, 
Williams, James B. 
Wilson, John J. 
Winne, Joseph F. 
Winne, Visscher. 
Wyatt, George. 
Wyatt, Uriah J. 

Anderson, Philli]). 
Andrews, Oi'in. 
Backus. William R. 
Bakei', David. 
Baldwin, (reorge C. 
Bai-ney, (IJhai'les E. 
Bai-ney, William. 
Beal, Stephen T. 
Bell, John W. 
Bennet, Sanford. 
Briare, Francis D. 
Brown, James A. 
]5ullions, James M. 
Bullock. Matthew T 
Bui-ns, Cornelius. 
Car.s(;n, Robert H. 
Churchill, Charles R. 
Chui'chill, James E. 



94 



Coffee, Alfred. 
Coffee, William F. 
Conkling-, Spencer. 
Cook, La Fayette. 
Cooke, Beekrnan. 
Corbit, Henry. 
Crane, Henry D. 
Crane, Hiram A. 
Davidson, Darius. 
Davis, Abraham S. 
Delahanty, Daniel. 
De Witt, Ephraim. 
Douglas, Henry F. 
Dunlop, Alexander. 
Fanning-, Sidney. 
Fish, Charles D. 
Frasiei", John T. 
Fi'ost, John S. 
Fry, Joseph. 
Gibson, William L. 
Gillis, Lester. 
Gladding, Daniel P. 
Gladding, Edward W. 
Goeway, James M. 
Goss, Ephraim L 
Gould, William C. 

Hallenbake, Christopher. 

Hai-ris, Rodney. 

Harrison, William. 

Hawley, James D. 

Hewson, Daniel J. 

Hewson, John E. 

Hind, John H. 

Holstein, La Fayette. 

Holstein, Washington. 

Hopkins, Henry. 

Hosch, John F. 

Hosch, William. 

Hughes, George. 

Kittle, John H. 

Kuss, Charles E. 

Lawton, Acton. 

Leyne, Richard. 

Loucks. Andrew P. 

Lyman, Charles H. P. 

Manahan, Francis. 



Manning, James. 
Martin, James E. 
Mayer, Henry. 
McCarthy, John. 
McElroy, Samuel. 
McEowen, Daniel. 
McGibbon, David. 
McGibbon, William. 
McHarg, William C. 
McLaren, Robert B. 
Millin, Chauncey H. 
Morange, James P. 
Morgan, William J. 
Morrow, James. 
Myers, Jerome. 
Newman, Charles. 
Newman, Henry A. 
Olcott, John J. 
Olcott, Roljert. 
Olcott, Thomas. 
Olney, Charles C. 
O'Neil, James. 
Paddock, William S. 

Pai-ks, Nathaniel. 
Phillips, Philetus. 
Purdy, Morgan L. 

Putnam, Victor A. 
Ransom, Albion. 

Robinson, James D. 

Root, Samuel G. 

Rozecrantz, Samuel T. 

RuU, Sylvester. 

Russ, Herman H. 

Savage, Edmund, 

Shepherd, Oliver L. 

Smith, Israel. 

Sprague, James W. 

Sprague, William B. Jr. 

Stafford, Samuel S. 

Stafford, Spencei'. 

Starks, Artemas B. 

Strong, Stephen. 

Ten Fiyck, Jacob. 

Thomas, George F. 

Thompson, Charles D. 

Thorburn, John D. 



95 



Thorbuin, Samuel T. 
Todd, John E. 
Ti-eat, Theodore S. 
Trotter, Willard. 
Van Allen, Fi-ancis. 
Van Benthuysen, Henry B. 
Van Buren, David H. 
Van Derbergh, Richard L. 
Van Loon, George. 
Van Rensselaer, Peter S. 
Van Wie, Gairit P. 
Van Zandt, William. 
Vermilye, Thomas E. 
Visfc^cher, John B. 
V(^lk, Abram, 
Waldron, William. 
Waug-h, John S. 
Welsh, Isaac L, 
Welsh, William T. 
Wendell, Peter. 
Wilson, Gilbert L. 
Wilson, Henry L. 
Wilson, Stephen L. 
Winne, John C. 
Wood, Theodore. 
Wyckoff, Isaac 0. 
Wyckoff, Theodore F. 
Zeh, John. 

1836-37. 

Adams, James N. 
Alvord, Charles E. 
Alvord, S. Whitney. 
Ayer, Benjamin F. 
Backus, Augustus. 
Barret, Rufus. 
Bicknell, Theodore. 
Rlanchard, Antiiony. 
Blanchaj'il, Robert G. 
Bi-ice, Aiexandei' L. 
Brodhead, Thomas. 
Brown, John. 
Brown, Robert H. 
Bullions, Henry L. 
Burt, David H. 
Burton, Heniamin. 



Collier, Ozias G. 
Conkling, John P 
Conners, Elias. 
Corbit, Daniel. 
Crane, Henry. 
Crapo, Edgar. 
Davison, Joseph A. 
DeGrofi; Charles E. 
DeGroif, Griffin State. 
Dickinson, Manco Capac. 
Eames, Marshall H. 
Fanning, Frederick H. 
Fondey, Theodore. 
(4artield, John H. 
Garfield, Nathaniel L. 
Gates, Joseph E. 
Genet, Edme J. 
Genet, George C. 
Goold, James E. 
Goss, Geoi'ge W. 
Gi-anger, Rodney. 
Gi'inlinton, Robert. 
Hand, George. 
Higgins, James. 
Hodge, William W. 
Horth, Francis. 
Hunt, Elijah D. 
Hunt, Stephen D. 
Hutchinson, Robert. 
James, Howard B. 
Jenkins, Robert. 
Jewell, William J. 
Johnson, Benoni C. 
Jordan, Charles S. 
Kissam, Thomas M. 
Kittle, Charles E. 
Lee, William H. 
Leete, Thomas. 
Livingston, John J. 
Livingston, Philip H. 
Locke, William R. 
McHarg, Henry B. 
McKim, James, 
McLachlan, William M. 
McNabb, William A. F. 
McNeill, John. 



96 



Meigs, Isaac V. L. 

Mills, Theodore G. 

Newton, William R. 

O'Donnel, Oliver. 

O'Hara, Chai-les E. 

Pruyn, Edward R. 

Pruyn, William. 

Remei-, William T. 

Rindge, Joseph F. 

Sawyer, Nathaniel. 

Sheldon, Henry. 

Sill, John N. 

Smith, Benjamin F., Jr. 

Smith, Henry L. 
Smith, Robert C. 
Stafford, Horatio G. 
Steele, Daniel. 
Stockton, John P. 
Swart, Cornelius. 
Talcott, Henry W. 
Taylor, James, Jr. 
Teller, James. 
Thompson, Edmund. 
Thompson, William. . 
Tracy, Edward H. 
Tuttle, Merrit. 
Van Buren, Thomas B. 
Van Ingen, Josiah S. 
Van Wormer, Francis. 
Vermilye, Ashbel G. 
Viele, Egbert L. 
Viele, Maurice E. 
Warren, Geoi-ge W. 
Webster, James H. 
Whish, William H. 
White, Rufus P. 
Wickes, Silas R. 
Wilkinson, James. 
Wilson, James. 
Wilson, Myron W. 
Wilson, Nicholas. 
Winne, Levinus G. 
Wyre, Andrew. 

1837-38. 

AV)leman, Wellington. 



Adams, Geoi'ge C. 

Adams, Henry P. 

Andrews, Heni-y P. 

Austin, John T. 

Bender, Ephraim H. 
• Blackall, Benjamin. 

Blackall, Robert. 

Bleecker, Charles. 

Bloodgood, Edward. 

Bloodgood, Fi-ancis W. 

Bloodgood, George W. 

Boardman, William P. 

Bi-adt, Frederick J. 

Bratt, Garrit T. 

Brown, William Alljei-t. 

Bryan, John A. 

Bulson, William. 
Bui't, Silas. 

Campbell, George L. 

Candee, Joseph R. 
Candee, Lyman P. 

Cai'jienter, William M. 

Cassidy, De Witt C. 
Cheseboro, Joshua G. 
Christie, George. 
Christie, William. 
Clark, Nathan, Jr. 
Cooley, Fi-ancis B. 
Cotes, John C. 
Crane, Hector H. 
Crapo, John M. 
Crofts, Robei-t T. L. 
Cunliff, Simeon. 
Cure, Peter. 
Cuyler, Jacob. 
Davis, James L. G. 
Davis, Thomas B. 
De Groff, James E. 
Dox, Alexander Ham. 
Duel, Jeremiah. 
Dinilop, Edward. 
Fairchild, David. 
Fai'ley, George C. 
Fay, Albert. 
Fay, John W. 
Ferguson, Charles. 



97 



Ford. Benjamin S. 
Freeman, Charles. 
Freeman, Edward. 
Freeman, Robei-t G. 
Frost. Daniel M. 
Gott, George Pearson. 
Gott, William A. 
Gracie, Edward. 
Hall, Francis B. 
Halsted, Mina B. 
Hasting-s, Redmond. 
Hempstead, Henry N. 
Hill, William M. 
Hillman, Constantine A. 
Hills, Heni-y E. 
Holmes, Gec^rge A. 
Holmes, Sylchester. 
Hook, William. 
Ho[)kins, Francis. 
Hotaling, Jasper. 
Humjihrey, .James. 
Hnmphi-ey, Theodore F. 
Jessiip, Edwin, 
Johnson, Robert L. 
Johnson, William W. 
Judd, John C. 
Kerker, Andi-ew. 
King, J. Howard. 
Kirk, Andrew B. 
Knox, William H. 
Lansing, Jeremiah. 
Leland, George H. 
Lewis, Andrew McKenna. 
Losee, Alfi-ed. 
Lyons, Lemuel. 
Malcolm, William. 
Marcy, Edmund. 
McDuffie, Chai'les. 
McDnttie, Henry. 
Mcrritield, William. 
Mills, Charles S. 
Moi-ris, Edwai-d. 
Mmrow, 'IMiomas B. 
Nelson, RensselaiM* V. B. 
Newton, Horat'e B. 
Norton, Edward. 



Olcott, Alexander. 
Olcott, Theodore. 
Ott, Siberia. 
Pai-ry, John. 
Peck, Heni-y. 
Pegg, John. 
Plumb, William H. 
Relyea, Lodowyck 
Reipia, Joseph. 
Roberts, Randall. 
Rose, Stewai't. 
Rossman, Richard. 
Rugg, John. 
San ford, Caleb W. 
Sanford, William. 
Schuyler, David C. 
Si;huyler, James L. 
Scovel, Clinton P. 
Seymour, Ti-unian. 
Sharp, Isaac F. 
Sickles, Daniel. 
Slack, Henry. 
Smith, Pejer. 
Smith, Peter, Jr. 
Smith, Thomas A. 
Smith, Thomas W. 
Stafibrd, Michael B. 
Stevens, George M. 
Stever, Erastus. 
Stiles, Henry. 
Thomi)Son, Michael. 
Tremper, Julius. 
Tulane. Paul N. 
Van Bnren, Henry. 
Vandcrbelt, Heiu-y. 
Vanilerbelt, Richai'd V. 
Vandcrbelt, William H. 
Van Ness, John L. 
Van Ness, William. 
Van Valkenburg, John L. 
Van Wyck, Anthony. 
Wheelei-. John M. 
White, James. 
Whitlock, John. 
Whitlock, James G. 
Willard, Fre<lerick M. 



98 



Wood, Barnabas. 
Wood, William G. 
Worth, Charles G. 
Yates, Alonzo King-sley. 
Young, James H. 
Young, Martin V. 

1838-39. 

Adams, John. 
Alvord, William. 
Barney, Capt. 
Beckei", Albertus. 
Blair, J. C. 
Bogan, J. A. 
Bonney, George W. 
Booth, Leandei'. 
Boyd, David I. 
Boyd, James. 
Bradt, C. Y. 
Brewerton, Geoi-ge D. 
Bryan, A. 
Bullions, J. E. 
Burst, J. 
Call, J. 
Christie, M. 
Clark, H. D. 
Collier, George N. 
Courtney, Samuel G. 
Chittenden, Thomas R. 
Cunningham, W. O. 
Cuylei-, Theodore J. 
De Graff, A. 
De Witt, R. Y. 
Dix, Francis P. 
Doi-man. Jacob. 
Dox, Hamiltou'J. 
Duell, G. 
Dutcher, J. 
Easton, Charles P. 
Elliot, Robert. 
Ei'win, John G. 
Fink, Edward. 
Fonda, Marcus B. 
Ford, B. F. 
Freeman, 0. 
Garfield, John N. 



Gott, J. E. 
Gould, J. E. 
Halstead, M. 
Hays. Edmund W 
Hickcox, H. V. 
Hineson, J. 
Hoiightaliug, J. 
Holmes, C. S. 
Hoyt, Charles E. 
Hoyt, George E. 
Humphrey, L. 
Humphrey, William J. 
Jackson, Alonzo C. 
Jackson, Samuel W. 
Jackson, William J. 
Jessup, J. B. 
Jewell, J. 

Johnson, Edwar<i A. 
Kelly, John T. 
Lansing, Heni-y. 
Lansing, L. 
Larchei-, Edwin B. 
L'Amoreux, Wendell. 
Lawyer, A. 
Legett, W. 
Leyne, R. A. 
Livingston, John L. 
Lush, J. H. 
Malcolm, James T. 
Mascord, Geoige. 
McElroy, Andrew. 
McEli-oy, John E. 
McKissam, Thomas. 
McKown, Isaac D. 
McMui-dy, Robert S. 
Millei-, Stephen C. 
Miller, William. 
Mitchell, John D. 
'Molinard, AUtert J. 
Morange, W. B. 
Morris, Lewis 0. 
Morrow, Y. 
Netterville, John T. 
Newton, M. 
Nicholas, John, 
Noble, Charles i.. 



99 



Noi-ton, P. A. 
O'Cnnnin^ham, William. 
Olcott, Robert B. 
Pafker, Thaddeus N. 
Parkins, R. 
Parsons, Harvey A. 
Patterson, F. C. 
Peters, D. W. 
Pierson. William M. 
Pitts, Hoiatio W. 
Polhemus, J. 
Quinland, Charles H. 
Remis, W. T. 
Requa, James E. 
Robertson, Gaw. 
Robinson, G. 
Russ, Charles E. 
Ryan, Dennis F. 
Seward, Augustus H. 
Sharp, J. G. 
Shaw, Daniel. 
Skinner, John. 
Smith, James B. 
Smith, R. E. 
Smith, Stephen. 
Sprague, Burton. 
Stanford, A. P. 
Stanwix, G. 
Stevens, F. 
Stevii, E. 
Stockton, G. 
Tabei-, Paul F. 
Talcott, Daniel W. 
Tayloi-, D. 
Taylor, James B. 
Thayer, Geoi-ge H. 
Thomas, Warner L. 
Townsend, J. C. 
Tiedway, William W. 
Tripp, F. 

Trotter, Klias Wilhii-d. 
Vandeuberg, K. L. 
Van Hoi-n, Levi. 
Wasson, C. E. 
Wells, J. H. 
Wells, Walter M. 



Wheeler, William. 
Whiteman, G. 
Whiteman, J. 
Whitney, John R. 
Willard, Edward Kirk. 
Wilson, Reulien. 
Winant, J. 
Winne, Abraham L. 
Winne, Edmund. 
Winne, John G. 
Wrightson, John. 
Wrightson, William. 
Young, Merritt. 

1839-40. 

Belden, T. 
Cook, William H. 
Garfield, L. A.- 
Gladding, Charles. 
Gooden, A. 
Kingsley, Nathan. 
L'Amoreux, M. Wendell. 
Lawlor, John. 
McKown, John Henry. 
Merritield, Charles W. 
Netterville, J. G. 
Nugent, William H. 
Patterson, A. L. 
Phipps, Bi-adford S. 
Rowley, Salmon. 
Sanford, E. 
Scovel, Henry W. 
Sharp, George Heni-y. 
Shaw, Daniel D. 
Simiison, Mai'quis D. L. 
Sprague, J. Britton. 
Warnei", F. 
Welsh, 0. 
Wilson, George P. 
Worthington, Robert. 
Wiightnum, John. 

1840-41. 

Ando-soji, Francis C. 
Bailey, William. 
Bentley, Ri<hai(l C. 



100 



Birch, Joseph. 
Birming-ham, William C. 
Brainard. Albei't. 
Brighani, Lyman. 
Brinkerhoft", T. Van Wyck. 
Britton, Edward. 
Bi'own, Chauncey. 
Burrows, Randall K. 
Clute, William K. 
Conly, Peter. 
Coulson, John B. 
Coulson, Robert B. 
Coyn, John P. 
Craft, Charles D. 
Craft, Charles G. 
Crannell, Fi-ancis F. 
Croswell, John K. 
Curtiss, Joseph S. 
Dayton, Charles R. 
De Witt, Richard V. 
Dunn, James G. 
Feri'is, Chai-les L. 
Feri'is, William A. 
Fetherstone, J. 
Flagler, Edgar O. 
Flower, Aaron P. 
Fuller, Josiah P. 
Garnsey, Cyrus. 
Geoi'ge, William. 
Gibbons, Henry B. 
Goodwin, Albert F. 
Gray, Adam R. 
Gray, Israel. 
Griffin, Abraham S. 
Harris, Henry. 
Hartness, John W. 
Hatch, George W. 
Hatch, Warner D. 
Herrick, Jonathan W. 
Hopkins, James. 
Horsford, G. W. 
Horth, James Henry. 
Houghtaling, Alfre<l. 
Hough taling, Jasper. 
Hurst, William. 
Jones, James. 



Kelly, George. 
Kerr, John. 
Kievnan, Felix A. 
Kimball, Richard W. 
Klink, Nathaniel. 
Koonz, Jacol> C. 
Leslie, Edward. 
Little, Edwin C. 
Livingston, Matthew H. 
Martin, James B. Jr. 
Marvin, Edward. 
McBride, Thomas. 
McKercher, John D. 
McKnight, John T. 

McKown, Jacob E. 

McNaughton, Alexander W. 

Meech, Geoige W. 

Meech, Robert J. V. D. 

Merritield, Richard. 

Mills, Daniel W. 

More, H. D. 

More, James Harbrouth. 

Moi-rall, Theodore. 

Morris, Thomas F. 

Packard, Robert J. 

Parr, Richard. 

Parsons, Jacob E. 

Peck, Edward H. 

Phelps, William L. M. 

Radley, John P. 

Rawson, James. 

Remer, Charles T. 

Roessle, Theophilus. 

Sage, Jasper C. 

Schermerhorn, Judah. 

Schuyler, Alonzo. 

Scovel, Nelson R. 

Seward, Clarence H. 

Shai'ts, Theodoi-e. 

Shepai'd, Charles T. 

Shepard, William. 
Sherwood, James B. W. 

Sims, Francis. 
Spears, Samuel S. 
Staley, Daniel G. 
Stevens, James H. 



101 



Thornton, De Witt. 
Thornton, William. 
Thoi-ji, William H. 
Tucker, Theodore S. 
Van Allen, Garret A. 
Van Benthiiysen, F. B. 
Vanderlip, William L. 
Van Ingen, William Henry. 
Van Olinda, John. 
Van Rensselaei", Edward R. 
Van Rensselaei-, James C. 
Van Schaack, Nicholas. 
Van Voast, Benson G. 
Waterhonse, Richaj'd G. 
Wilkinson, Henry. 
Williamson, John D. 
Wilson, Thomas. 
Wing, James. 
Winne, F. D. 
Winne, F. V. 

1841-42. 

Ailams. Stephen C. 
Boyd, Edwai-d H. 
Brown, Walter Scott. 
Kirk, William H. 
Learned, Albert R. 
McMillan, Thomas C. 
Olcott, Robert N. 
PeeV)les, William M. 
Wells, Charles H. 
White, Albert A. 

1842-43. 

Bartley, John. 
Bonck, Gabriel. 
Brinkei'hoff, John. 
Bi-own, Wai-ren G. 
Clark, Charles G. 
Clark, Joseph W. 
Cook, Isaac Iver. 
Cdiirtney, Joel. 
I)e Forest, Charles A. 
Dclehanty, Mai-tin. 
Duesler, George L. 
Edwards, Alfred. 



Edwards, Carlton. 
Ensign, William. 
Gibbons, James. 
Gill, George C. 
(xj-anger, Geoi-ge Gebbi. 
Hammond, Lazai'us S. 
Hammond, Reuben H. 
Hascy, Oscar L. 
Hei'mans, Thomas H. 
Hillenbrant, John B. 
Jordan, Edward. 
Konyon, Ralph W. 
Lansing, Edwin B. 
Lyon, Daniel B. 
Lyon, Isaac L. 
Marvin, Henry C. 
McAlpine, Charles L. 
McNaughton, James A. 
Murjihy, Chai'les S. 
Patter.«on, James. 
Reynolds, Dexter. 
Smith, Edward M. 
Ten Kyck, A. Ciiylei". 
Tui;ker, Wilson. 
Van Shaack, Jenkins. 
Van Vechten, Cuyler. 
Van Wyck, Richard. 
Wall, Andrew J. 
Whitney, John S. 
Wilson, Henry G. F. 
Young, Archibald S. 

1 S4;j-44. 

Allen, Adonii-am J. 
Blanchard, Hamilton. 
Bouck, Charles. 
Brown, Mathew. 
Coates. Alfred W. 
Darling, William R. 
Dox. Dudley W. 
Enders, Samuel R. 
George, James. 
Gocnvey, Heni-y. 
Greene, Lynum R. 
Gi'iftin, Ezi-a C. 
Hickcox, John H. 



102 



Hills, Ldran C. 
Howard, Henry H. 

Jones, Frjincis. 
Kendrick, Burton. 
Knickerbacker, John H. 
Lansinjj, John Thomas. 
Lijfhthall, John A. 
Martin, William A. 
McBride, Edward. 
McBride, Henry. 
McClure, John C. 
McGourkey, George J. 
McGourkey, John 
Merritield, John. 
Noonan, James T. 
Peai'se, Jacol) L. 
Peckham, Henry J. 
Peckham, Wheeler H. L. 
Pohlman, Heniy E. 
Read, Robert. 
Statts, Charles P. 
Stafford, James G. 
Stafford, Walter S. E. 
Stokes, Joseph. 
Strong-, Charles H. 
Strother, William L. 
Sylvester, Gporge W. 
Thomas, William R. 
Townsend, John, Jr. 
Van Zandt, Clarence L. 
Visscher, James D. 
^Yands, James. 
Wands, John. 
Wiinie, Charles S. 
Woltbi-d, Allen. 

1844-45. 

Bacon, Clai-ence W. 
Belknap, Charles M. 
Boardman, George. 
Boyd, Charles. 
Boyd, John C. 
Boyd, William T. 
Bratt, Henry T. 
Burdick, Sullivan R. 
Case, Henry S. 



Cole, Walter D. 
Cooney, John. 
Crosby, James P. 
Cui'tiss, Daniel G. 
Curtiss, William J. 
Davoth, Michael J. 
Dickerman, John S. 
Fonda, Christoi)her Y. 
Freeman, William S. 
Fi-isby, Eleazei". 
Fi'othingham, Worthington. 
Giffoi-d, Charles E. 
Gould, Joseph C. 
Gi'egory, Henry T. 
Graves, Charles V. 
Hai'rold, George W. 
Haskell, WiUiam H. 
Hillson, Thomas. 
Holdridge, Helim D. 
Howlett, Ezra P. 
Humphrey, Charles D. 
Landon, William A. 
McClure, Archibald Jr. 
Miller, Ernest J. 
Morse, Lansing. 
Newman, James. 
Nichols, Francis. 
Olmstead, David S. 
Packard, James B. 
Page, Alanson S. 
Pearson, Joseph Bui'i*. 
Steele, Oliver. 
Strain, Alexander. 
Strain, Robert. 
Strong, Richard M. 
Strother, WilHam H. 
Sumner, Alanson. ' 

Swift, Hugh. 
Tayloi', William H. 
Thomas, William H. 
Tibbitts, Bleecker. 
Todd, Nathaniel P. 
Tomlinson, Victory L. 
Van Ness, Edward. 
Van Rensselaer, Gratz. 
Van Schaack, Elbridge G. 



108 



Van Voast, Albert A. 
Van Voast, Clarence L. 
Van Zandt. John. 
Waterman, James. 
Watson. Howard. 
Wheaton, Samuel L. 
Wrightson. George. 
Yates, David. 

1845-46. 

Ableman, Stephen D. 
Adams. Samuel W. 
Ainsworth, Charles F. 
Bay, William A. 
Becker, John H. 
Beekman, Mancius. 
Bently, George T. 
Benton, Daniel S. 
Benton, George. 
Bogart, John Jr. 
Burton, Walter. 
Carr, Benjamin W. 
Cartel-, George W. 
Case, Joseph H. 
Case, William D. 
Chapman, James G. 
Christian, John A. 
Christian, William D. 
Coates, Charles H. 
Colt, Joseph S. 
Condon, Richard J. 
Cook, Asher Jr. 
Ci-annell, Robert W. 
Crapo, Chai-le.^ H. 
Cruikshank, James. 
Cruikshank, Robert. 
Crunmiey, Edward 0. 
Cummings, William. 
Davidson. Alexander. 
Davis, Abiiei- Graham. 
Davis, Charles. 
Davis, William. 
Dickson, Walter. 
Dillon, Horatio P. 
Dowd, Charle.s W. 
Esmay, Peter. 



Fassett, James A. 
Ford, David W. 
Gallup. Edwin C. 
Gallup, Miner. 
Gibbons, George W. 
Gibson, William H. 
Gibson, Joseph. Jr. 
Goodwin, Thomas L. 
Hall, Richard Henry. 
Hall, Theodoie P. 
Harris, Alfred W. 
Harris, William H. 
Hartnett, John B. 
Hays, Timothy. 
Headlam. William Jr. 
Hetlernan, James John. 
Heni-y, Darwin D. 
Hill, Edward B. 
Hoffman, William. 
Howe, Benjamin Fowler. 
Hutchinson, David R. W. 
Hyatt, Chestei-. 
Jagger, Eugene. 
Jenkins, Charles E. 
Johnson, Robert T. 
Jones, Isaac. 
Jones, Royal Sidney. , 
Kendrick, Thadeus Wai"saw P. 
King, Andrew. 
Kinney, William H. 
Knower, Benjamin. 
Lansing, Abraham G. 
Linaci-e, Thonuis B. 
Livingston, Edward P. 
Loveridge, Eugene F 
Lundigan, Fi-ancis. 
McClure, James H. 
McCnlioch. John C. 
McElroy. Thomas J. 
McCximi, Felix. 
McKown, Heiu-y. 
McMuUeii, Alonzo T. 
McMnllen, Edgar. 
McPherson, William. 
Meads, John H. 
Merrill, Moses D. 



104 



Mix, William, Jr. 
Moakler, Francis J. 
Morgan, James H. 
Murphy, John \V. 
Murray, Laverett W. 
Newman, Ebenezer L. 
Newman, George W. 
Newman, John L. 
Newman. William W. 
Olmsted, Chai-les L. 
Olmsted, Henry S. 
Outwin, William. 
Payn, Edward T. 
Pease, Charles L. 
Penfield, Edward C. 
Perry, Hiram, Jr. 
Philleo, Theodore L. 
Potter, David T. 
Prossei", Henry W. 
Pruyn, Francis S. 
Pruyn, John S. 
Quackenbush, John N. 
Raly, James Henry. 
Read, William H. 
Rider, John. 
Roak, Hugh B. 
Rodgers, John J. 
Ryan, James. 
Schiffer, John F. 
Smith, James P. 
Smyth, John K. 
Stackpole, Henry. 
Steinberg, William H. 
Stembers, William H. 
Street, Richard E. 
Strong, Benjamin. 
Strong, Robert. 
Taylor, Charles H. 
Ten Eyck, Britton. 
Ten Eyck, Jacob H. 
Thacher, John F. 
Thomas, Geoi-ge C. 
Tibbits, Clarkson. 
Tillinghast, Joseph. 
Tillinghast, William E. 
Treadwell, Robert B. 



Tucker, Luther H. 
Vandenbergh, John. 
Van Deusen, John C. 
Van Schaack, Edwin H. 
Van Schaack, George W. 
Wallace, Oliver. 
Wands, Bui-gess H. 
Ward, John. 

Wemple, Henry De Witt. 
Whetten, William. 
White, Andrew, Jr. 
White, Matthew. 
White, William James. 
Whitney, Richard H. M. 
Wilder, Waldo. 
Wilder, William. 
Williams, Alfred Ridgeway. 
Williams, John S. 
Woodman, Edward B. 
Wright, Calvin M. 
Young, Henry 0. 
Young, Oscar H. 

1846-47. 

Allen, Alexander R. 
Alvord, Henry B. 
Brainai'd, William H. 
Callahan, John. 
Campbell. William J. 
Cassidy, William. 
Chamberlain, Henry W. 
Clark, Clinton, Jr. 
Costigan, William Garton. 
Cuyler, Charles Melville. 
Dollar, Conrad T. 
Dox, Heni-y B. 
Ester, David C. 
Gansevoort, Henry S. 
Gibbons, Hogan. 
Gill, David Jackson. 
Gregory, Spencer S. 
Harris. William Hamilton. 
Harvey, Charles S. 
Herring, Edward. 
Hill, William G. 
Humi>hi-ey, Edward. 



105 



Hyatt, Charles. 
Keiiiliic.k. Fi-ed. Man'vin Hill. 
Kip. William Ht'iiry. 
Lansiii-r, Ejjhei-t. 
Lansing-, .John A. 
Lawlor, Fenton. 
Little, Jonah. 
Lloyd, Isaac F. 
McCamman, Edward. 
McClaskey, William, -Jr. 
McElroy, Alexander. 
McElroy, WMlliam H. 
Mclntyre, James. 
Meads, Oi-laiulo, Ji-. 

Meech, . 

Mix, Benjamin F. 
Mott, William H 
Munsell, William A. 
Murphy, John. 
Parr, William. 
Peckhani, Joseph H. 
Peckham, Rufus W., Jr. 
Philleo, Charles Henry. 
Rhodes, Archibald C. 
Rosekrans. Spencer. 
Rnssel, John H. 
Slack, John D. 
Smith, Zachariah, Jr. 
Spanier, Emil. 
Stacpole, James 
Stafford, Arthur G. 
Van Ness, Augustus. 
Wands, Franklin. 
Wesley, John Edward. 
White, John G. 
Whitney, Chauncey, Jr. 
Wilcox, Robert E. 

1847-48. 

Adams, Amos A. 
Adams, Charles R. 
Adams, John R. 
Anderson, Andrew, Jr. 
Andrews, La Fayette. 
Atmesley, Isaac. 
Ai-mour, Robert H. 



Artcher, Austin. 
Baker. Benjamin F. 
Bakewell, Benjamin. 
Bertiand. Joseph 
Bishop. George S. 
Blanchard, Edwin. 
Boardman, Francis. 
Bradt, Adrian G. 
Brown, Frederic W. 
Brown, Judson D. 
Bullock, William J 
Burton, William H. 
Campbell, Alexander. 
Carpenter, (xeoi-ge. 
Carroll, John. 
Carey, Julius H. 
Cass, Charles J. 

Chapin, Robert H. 
Chattield, Abiram P. 

Clark, Edwin Foi-i-est. 

Coates, E<hvin M. 

Coates, Stejihen P. 

Coil, Simon V. 

Cole, Augustus G. 

Colvin, James Ailing. 

Colvin, Norwood Ailing. 

Couch, Chai-les. 

Coui'tney, Joseph, Ji-. 

CouT-tiight, Mizael E. 

Curtiss, William J. 

Craft, George F. 

Crannell, William W. 

Crapo, Angelo. 

Crippen, Thomas W. 

Crosby, Edward W. 

Crosswell, John A. 

Demarest, James, Jr. 

Douw, John D. P. 

Duncan, James R. 

Eaton, Charles W. 

Edwards, James, Jr. 

Egleston, George D. 

Falkey, Charles H. 

Finch, Charles H. 

Fisk, Anthony W. 

Fisk, Edwai'd S. 



106 



Flafrlei', Isaac V. 
Ford. Chai-les W. 
Ford, Eliakiin. 
Fossai'd, George H. 
Fi-ame, William H. 
Frost. Mark W. 
Gerau, Miles. 
Greei", Thomas H. 
Gregory, Alexander. 
Gregory, David E. 
Gross, .James H. 
Harman, Charles D. 
Harnard, Samuel W. 
Hascy, Alexander G. 
Hascy, Alfred C. 
Hascy, Ambi'ose R. 
Hascy. Philip V. R. 
Hill, Willard L. 
Hills, Anthony H. 
Hills, Charles A. 
Hindman, Edward. 
Hogan, Peter. 
Howe, Benjamin F. 
Hard, Josiah W. 
Hui'dis, John S. 
Jones, Thomas J. 
Kendrick, Edward C. 
Keyser, James. 
Kidd, Robert S. 
Kidd, William. 
Kreuder, Augustus. 
Kreudei- Charles. 
Kreuder, Fredeiic. 
Kirby, John. 
King, Rufus H. 
Lamb, George W. 
Lansing, William. 
Lansing, William B. 
Lighthall, John A. 
Martin, Henry. 
Mattimore, Francis. 
McBride, James. 
McDonald, Noble. 
McLaren, Finlay. 
Meech, Henry L. 
Meech, John H. 



Middoure, Geoi-ge. 
Moi'gan, Frasei'. 
Morgan, Sanniel H. 
Newcomb, William W. 
Norton, Francis Lay. 
O'Brien, Thomas C. 
Olcott. Dudley. 
Olcott. Fi-auklin. 
Olcott, Fi-ederick P. 
Osborn, J. Wesley. 
Ott, Friend James. 
Payne, Edward M. 
Peacock, Daniel. 
Pease, Fi-ank. 
Pease, Thomas H. 
Pemberton. John, Ji*. 
Pei-cival, Henry. 
Perkins, William A. 
Piatt, Charles M. 
Pohlman, William H. 
Pi'ovoost, William K. 
Quackenbush, Edwin. 
Quinn, Terrence. 
RafFerty, Terrence. • 
Read, Matthew H. 
Relyea, Petei-. 
Relyea, Thomas W. 
Rhoades, Archibald C. 
Riley, John. 
Rosindale, Silas. 
Russell, William, Jr. 
Ryan, Charles C. 
Scovel, Lewis L. 
Screver, Richard D. 
Selkirk, Edwin. 
Sessions, Edward C. 
Sheldon, Augustus S. 
Silliman, James R. 
Sing, Edward P. 
Slason, Edward P. 
Smith, Abraham S. 
Smith, Donalil. 
Smith, J. A. Wildei-. 
Smith, John. 
Smith, Lewis B. 
Spawn, Jacob S.| 



107 



Spencei', Thomas W. 
SpuiT, Andi-ew J. 
Staats. Philip. 
Ten Eyck, Lamoure. 
Ten Eyfk, Matthias. 
Ten Eyck, William H. 
Thompson, Charles F. 
Thoi-bui-n, Alexander McA. 
Thorburn, William G. 
Tidd, John A. 
Tossard, Fi-ancis. 
Towner, Samuel B. 
Townsend, Charles K. 
Townsend, John D. P. 
Townsend, Volkert P. D. 
Traver, Alvah. 
Trilder, William P. 
Trowbridge, Arthur W. 
Valentine, Henry C. 
Van Bui-en, Martin. 
Vanderlip, Watkins. 
Van Rensselaer, John J. 
Van Rensselaer, Visscher. 
Van Schaack, Edwin H. 
Vernor, Charles H. 
Vernor, George. 
Waring, Richard S. 
Wells, Leonard, Jr. 
Whii)ple, William W. 
Wilbur, Benjamin II. 
Wiles, Thomas S. 
Williams, Heni-y R. 
Williams, Henry S. 
Yates, George W. M. 
Yates, John Waters. 
Young, Campbell. 
Young, Charles L. 

1848-49. 

Adams, George A. 
Avery, Thomas Y. 
Billings, Stephen A. 
Biamhall, Wm. L. 
Bi-ennon, Edward T. 
Brower, Henry D. 
Chapman, Charles B. 



Chapman, George Henry. 
Comstock, Albert. 
Coonly, George L. 
Costigan, William J. 
Courtright, Eihvai-d M., Jr. 
Curtiss, Daniel Y. 
Daniels, Robert Lincoln. 
Farlin, Dudley 
Fowler, John P. 
Fowler, Stephen S. 
Fowler, William P. 
Gallup, Edwin G. 
Gould, James L., Jr. 
Groesbeeck, Augustus. 
Groot, Nicholas. 
Hall, William F. 
Hare, Emei*son. 
Howard, Henry L. 
Jenkinson, James T. 
Jenkinson, William J. 
Joice, John T. 
Kerr, James. 
Kirk, Joseph W. 
Lansing, John D. 
Loveridge, Clinton. 
Maeder, Frederic G. 
Maeder, James. 
McNaughton, Henry G. 
Meech, Theodoi-e. 
Mory, Wesley S. 
Mulford, Augustus T. 
Payn, John A., Ji-. 
Peck, Spencer. 
Phelps, John F. 
Rankin, John M. 
Requa, James. 
Reid, William James. 
Scott, Waltei-. 
SheUlon, I.saac E. 
Sheldon, John D. 
Sla(;k, Henry R. 
Smith, George W., Jr. 
Stone, Charles G. 
Sti-ong, Robert G. 
Temple, Roliert. 
Temple, William James. 



108 



Ten Eyck, Clinton. 
Ten Eyck, Jacob. 
Tittle, David. 
Todd, Robert F. 
Tuffs, Lucian, Jr. 
Tuttle, Daniel J. 
Van Dyck, Henry H. 
Wadsworth, Charles. 
Wadsworth, Chester. 
Warner, John H. 
Warren, Theodore. 
Wasson, James D., Jr. 
Webstei", Joseph. 
Whitney, Charles. 
Wood, Samuel. 
Wood, Thomas G. 
Worcester, Franklin E. 

1849-50. 

Adams, Amos, Jr. 
Ailams, Nelson K. 
Akin, David E. 
Andei'son, James W. 
Arms, Charles E. 
Arms, James C. 
Artcher, Austin. 
Atwood, Henry B. 
Bathers, Andrew. 
Bellamy, George E. 
Bordon, Holland. 
Boyd, James T. 
Brigg-s, Georg-e C. 
Brown, Judson D. 
Campbell, Joseph. 
Cai"y, Edward. 
Cary, Egbert. 
Chapman, William. 
ChiMs, John H. 
Clark, George. 
Cobb, William H. 
Cochrane, Edward P. 
Coulson, William. 
Crounse, Josiah. 
Curtiss, Norman S. 
Davis, Charles W. 
Davis, Robert N. 



De Forest, De Witt. 
De Forest, Henry. 
De Witt, Dudley. 
Duncan, James, Jr. 
Fitzpatrick, Daniel C. 
Fitzpatrick, Michael 
Fowler, William D. 
Goodwin, Benjamin B. 
Gould, John. 
Gray, James H. 
Gregoi'y, James R. 
Grifiing, Seth E. 
Griswold, Henry. 
Hall, William T, 
Hallenbeck, Edwin J. 
Hamilton, William A. 
Hawley, W. Austin. 
Hen<lricks, Francis. 
Henry, John P. 
Hewson, Augustus G. 
Humphrey, Correll. 
Hurd, Frederic S. 
Hurd, Josiah M. 
Keyser, James. 
Kirtland, Albert B. 
Lain, James. 
Lamour^, Ten Eyck, Ji*. 
Lamoure, Uriah B. 
Martin, Bradley. 
Martin, James B. 
Mayell, Henry. 
Mayell, William. 
McCormick, James. 
McCubbin, John. 
McKnight, William. 
Meacham, George B. 
Meads, Orlando, Ji*. 
Mills, Chai'les. 
Millwain, William J. 
Nafew, John A. 
Newcomb, Charles. 
Newcomb, Edward. 
Newman, Frederic C. 
Nichols, Charles B. 
North, Albert M. 
Nott, Chai'les. 



109 



Paft; Charles E. 
Paft; Heni-y T. 
Parsons, Charles E. 
Perry. Eli. 
Pierson, Charles B. 
Porter, Ira, Jr. 
Prentice, Sartell. 
•Prentice, \V. Packei-. 
Prnyn, William H. 
Redway, John S. 
Ring-, Clai-k E. 
Robinson, John D. 
Ross, Howard P. 
Salisbuiy, Nelson. 
Sayles, James M. 
Shei-idaii, John, Jr. 
Shrisheimer, Charles. 
Smith, Edwin C. 
•Smith, Georg-e. 
Smith, llieodore, Jr. 
Sprag-ne, John A. J. 
Story, James T. 
Taell, Edward M. 
Thompson, Robert. 
Tibbitts, John. 
Tillinghast, J. Wilbur. 
Townsend, Edward. 
Treadwell, Georg-e H. 
Tnckei', Luther H. 
Van Rensselaer, Walter A. 
Walsh, Dudley. 
Westheimer, Heni-y. 
Whalen, Daniel. 
White, Charles R. 
Whitney, Alonzo. 
Winne, Charles K. 
Wright. John. 
Wyckoli; David A. 

1850-51. 

Abell, Richard P. H. 
AIh'U, William. 
Akin, Jacob. 
Anderson, Edwai'il. 
Atwood, William. 
An.stin, Jeremiah, Jr. 



Baker, John A. 

Bendall, Heni-y G. 

Brig-g-s, Isaac B. 

Brush, Thomas H. 

Burg-ess, Charles E. 

Cheever, Calvin R. 

Cheever, Henry M. 

Clapp, Charles M. 

Clapp, Edwin A. 

Clark. Thomas I>., Ji-. 

Cone, Edward R. 

Cook, Charles. 

Corbiere, Geoi-g-e. 

Coulson, Henry. 

Coulson, Thomas, Jr. 

Crannell. Monroe. 

Crosby, John. 

Davidson. William Humphrey. 

Davis, Charles L. 

Dilling-ham, William. 

Dillon, Charles. 

Edwards, James, Jr. 

Fellows, Han-is J. 

Fish, James L. 

Fry, Charles B. 

Fryer, Alexander S. 

Fryer, William J. 

Gambel, Fredei-ic;. 

Gambel, John. 

Gates, Levi S. 

Gavitt, John C. 

Goodrich, Edward. 

Greene, John C. 

Hadley, Joshua K. 

Halloway, William W. 

Henry, Darwin D. 

Herman, Hyman. 

Hewett, Henry. 

Hun, Edward. 

Hyler, Aaron L. 

Jarvis, Charles A. 

Johnston, James C. 

Jones, Livingston. 

Jones, Sanuiel E. 

Kendi'ick, Edwai'd C. 

King, Fred. 



110 



Kiitland, Dorrance. 
Lansing, Andrew A. 
Lansing, Ciiai-les A. 
Lansing, Edwin Y. 
Leaniiid, Billings Peck. 
Litchfield, Allen. 
Lloyd, Edward H. 
Lord, Theodore E. 
Marble, Man ton M. 
McCkire, William H. 
McConnick, Charles. 
McDowal, Alexander. 
Meachani, Geoi'ge B. 
Mesick, Henry T., Jr. 
Mesick, John W. 
Mills, Alexander. 
Moore, Burrit W. 
Mooi-e, Robert. 
Neenaes, John. 
Netterville, William N. C. 
O'Brien, Peter R. 
O'Conner, Henry T. 
Paff, William P. 
Park, P. Wendell. 
Parker, Amasa J., Ji-. 
Payn, John G. 
Pilsbury, Shei-man D. 
Piatt, Edward E. 
Pruyn, Edwai'd. 
Randall, Charles H. 
Rathbone, J. Howard. 
Reynolds, Robert E. 
Rice, Alexander D. 
Richardson, Wai-ren L. 
Rossman, John B. 
Sackett, William F. H. 
Sard, George E. 
Sheldon, Clinton J. 
Smith, Clark H. 
Smith, Heber. 
Smith, Ira. 

Sprague, Frederick H. 
Stanahan, Nicholas. 
Star, James M. A. 
Strain, James. 
Strain, John. 



Swarts, Chailes. 
Taber, Oliver A. 
Taber, William A. 
Teller, William. 
Ten Eyck, Leonard G., Jr 
Thomas, James H. 
Van Allen, Peter W. 
Van Allen, William H. 
Vanderlip, Charles S. 
Vanderlip, George H. 
Vosbui-gh, William. 
Waddle. John. 
Wait, Edward D. 
Wait, John D. 
Wheeler, Seth. 
Whipple, Henry. 
Woellmer, Argust. 
Yates, Hiram. 

1851-52. 

Abell. John H. 
Ackerman, John A. 
Adams, George W. 
Ades, William. 
Austin, Elijah. 
Averill, William H. 
Babcock, Heman P. 
Backney, John G. 
Barber, Edgai" P. 
Barnes, Lucien. 
Beekman, Gei-ard. 
Bogart, James H. 
Bratt, Edgar D. 
Bi'iggs, David C. 
Buel, Jesse. 
Burt, James A. 
Canedy, William S. 
Chase, George E. 
Chittenden, Edwin S. 
Clay, Geoi'ge. 
Cleveland, Charles W 
Cleveland, Frederick. 
Cleveland, George. 
Coley, Alfred C. 
Collins, Charles A. 
Collins, William D. 



Ill 



Cook, Ezra C. 
Corbiere, Thomas II 
De Freest, John K. 
De Freest, Matthew. 
Dickson, "William J., Jr. 
Dillow, Richard, Jr. 
Douw, Volckert P. 
Ellison, Geoi'ge. 
Fahre, Hectoi'. 
Fellows, Addison J. 
Freedlander, William. 
Gelian, James, Ji'. 
Goui-lay, Wiliiam J. 
Griffin, Coleman I. 
Griffin, Thomas. 
Grimwood, Heni-y W. 
Haight, William I. 
Hamlin, Samuel J. 
Haskell, Stephen H. 
Hawley, William C. 
Hendi-ickson, Walter. 
Hiu-ham, Alfred G. 
Hif»-ham, Charles E. 
Hinkley, Warren S. 
Hogan, Leverett D. 
Howa)-d, Charles N. 
Huested, Alfred. 
Hug-ht's, Richard L. 
Hughes. William H. 
Jarvis, John G. 
Jarvis, Stephen D. 
Jones, Moses. 
Joy, Edmimd L. 
Keri", William. 
Lindsley, Joel. 
Lodge, Douglas. 
Marvin, George C. 
Matthews, Charles H. 
McKlroy, Charles E. 
McKnight, Isaac. 
Moseley, Heni-y. 
Newberi-y, Jacob L. 
Passinger, Charles A. 
Payn, George A. 
Polkamus, Albert. 
Port<^i-, Charles H. 



Portei-, Jeremiah. 
Potter, Horatio. 
Pottei-, Robert. 
Pruyn, Charles A. 
Rankin, Leland. 
Rawson, Thomas H. 
Ross, Edward A. 
Rothmund, Philip. 
Rull, Samuel L. 
Sager, John W. 
Sandereon, Richard, H. 
Sard, Grange, Jr. 
Sayles, John W. 
Sheldon, Alexander E. 
Shepard, Ashbel K. 
S})ai'hawk, George K. 
Staats, Bleecker J. 
Starks, George C. 
Stevens, Ward Smith. 
Storey, William. 
Taylor, Augustus R. 
Taylor, Clinton T. 
Taylor, George. 
Thorn, Thomas R. 
Van Allen, Adam, Jr. 
Van Benthuysen, Arthur R. 
Van Benthuysen, Charles H. 
Van Vranken. Adam A. 
Visschei-, John B. 
Wheeler, Edwin S. 
White, Silas A. 
Whitecar, Howard. 
Whitlock, Hamilton L. 
Whitney, Charles L. 
Wilder, Ephraim. 
Wilder, John N 
Wilson, William P. 

1852-53. 

Adams, George W. 
Aiken, Jacob D. 
Anderson, George H. 
Anderson, Hugh. 
Anderson, Thomas W. 
Austin, Elijah. 
Austin, James A. 



112 



Ay res, Henry H. 
Barnes, Joseph C. 
Bennett, William T. 
Bortle, Webster, E. 
Bronk, Stephen. 
Brooks, James. 
Bullock, Charles C. 
Burns, Edward M. 
Canedy, William S. 
Cantield, Charles C. 
Care. William G. 
Carpenter, Georg-e W., Jr. 
Carr, William G. 
Clapp, Augustus A. 
Coburn, Peter, Jr. 
Cohn, Levi. 
Coley. John W. 
Collins, Peter H. 
Conway, Martin D. 
Cook, James R. 
Cook, John. 
Cook, Joseph McK. 
Cook, William J. 
Corbett, Thomas. 
Crandell, Homer. 
Cunningham, George. 
Davidson, George, Jr. 
Davi.s, Charles C. 
Devol, George E. 
Drum, Charles A. 
Durant, Thomas F. 
Durfee, Cyrus R. 
Eagles, John. 
Eaton, Calvin W. 
Eaton. Elliott Walter. 
Fassett, William H. 
Fearey, Thomas H. 
Fearey, William. 
Featherly. John Henry. 
Ford, Sweton G. 
Friedlander, William. 
Gamble, Louis M. 
Garnsey, J. Spencer. 
Goewey, James M 
Gould, Jason. 
Gould. William. Jr. 



Gregory. Worthington. 
Gross, Samuel S. 
Harned, Charles A. 
Harris, Charles G. 
Harris, George 0. 
Haslirouck. Fi-ancis K. 
Headlam, Robert. 
Hendrickson, George R. 
Higham, Edward A. 
Higham, Frank. 
Hoag, Abraham. 
Holmes, William J. 
H nested, Sylvanus B. 
Isaacs, Isaac M. 
Jerome, Alonzo W. 
Kennedy, William Spencer. 
Kenny, James. 
King, Andrew T. 
Kirk, Edward. 
Lansing, James. 
Lathi'op. Alfred G. 
Leash, William G. 
Low, Sidney. 
Malbone, Henry B. 
McCuUoch, William H. 
McGregor, Beekman. 
McMahon, John. 
Meegan. Thomas A. 
Merchant, Daniel W. 
Miles, William H. 
More, Irani B. 
Morgan, Charles. 
Morgan, William. 
Mork, Moses. 
Nettei-ville. William M. 
Newland, Frank F. 
Newland. Samuel W. 
Nichols, Alphonso N. 
Nichols, Charles C. 
Nichols, Charles W. 
Noyes, Arthur. 
Noyes, Federic B. 
Parker, Edmnntl M. 
Pettingill. Charles. 
Pitman, Frank C 
Potter William B. 



113 



Prentice, John. 
Priest, Henry A. 
Rankin, Joseph. 
Ray, John Edward. 
Ray, Levi. 

Raynsford, Edmund \V. 
Reynolds. Charles W. 
Robinson, Albert. 
Robinson, Edward J. 
Robinson, Sidney S. 
Rogers, Edward K. 
Rogers, Nathaniel, Jr. 
Ryan, Charles J. 
Salisbury, Daniel G. 
Savage, Edward. 
Sayles. William. 
Sayre, Henry. 
Schwarz, George. 
Schwarz, George. 
Seymour, Charles, Jr. 
Seymour, Geoi-ge W. 
Simmons, Daniel. 
Sporborg, William L. 
Staats, John L. 
Stein, Levi S. 
Stratton, Amos B. 
Snell, William. 
Sumner, William A. 
Swahlen, William T. 
Terry, George E. 
Ti-emain. Frcnleric L. 
Tucker, Stephen, Jr. 
Turner, Alden C. 
Udell, Samuel Howard. 
Van Dyck, Edwai-d A. 
Van Dyck, Heni-y L. 
Van Namee, James W. 
Van Rensselaer, Robert H. 
Van Rensselaer, Schuyler, Jr. 
Van Valk»mburgh, Theodoi-e. 
Wait, William B. 
Weaver, John E. 
Wemple, Petei- H. 
Wharton, John S. 
White, Thaddeus R. 
Whitecar, Newton. 



Whitney, C. Henry. 
Whitney, Edward H. 
W^hitney, Geoi-ge P. 
Williams, H. Seymour. 
Wilson, James A. 
Wilson, Thomas A. 
Woodhall. William. 
Wright, Augustus R. 

1853-54. 

Andei'son, Georg(\ 
Angus, Charles, Jr. 
Ai-mington, Hiram T. 
Babcock, Frederic E. 
Blessing, A. Ten Eyck. 
Boi'tle, John J. 
Bortle, Stephen R. 
Bi'own, William C. 
Brown, William T. 
Bush, Walter R. 
Cady, Edwin A. 
Calverly, John C. 
Carpenter, Charles W. 
Carroll, Charles. 
Cary, Robert C. 
Case, Fj'anklin. 
Cleveland, Frederic. 
Cole, Charles W. 
Cole, Henry Martyn. 
Conly, John. 
Courtney, Robert . 
Courtright, John H. 
Cui-tiss, J. Henry. 
Dash, George J. 
Davis, Jam(;s. 
Davis, William E. 
De Forest, Edward. 
Delehanty, Daniel M. 
Deuel, Eugene A. 
Disney, John Thomas. 
Durant, Allen B. 
Feai-ey, Andrew William. 
Fish, Henry H. 
Fish, Roswell. 
Fonda, Cornelius. 
Fonda, William J. 



114 



Freeman, Alfi-ed H. 
Gardner, David D. 
Garu^en, Jos«*i)li T. 
Gates, Georfj-e T. 
Gebliard, Edwin. 
Genet, George C. 
Goodwin, Scott D. 
Goodyear, Geoi-g-e G. 
Gi'aves, Antliony G., Ji-. 
Gray, Daniel Alexander. 
Gray, Neil. 
Griffinii-, David J. 
Gi-ovesteen, Daniel D. 
Hadley, Clement L 
Hague, Arnold. 
Hale, William H. 
Hand)urger, Lsaac. 
Hai-ris. Charles L. 
Harris. William W. 
Harvey, Clinton. 
Heinmullei", Heni'v- 
Hernon, Joseph A. 
Herrick, Richard P. 
Hoag, William Henry. 
Huested, Emmory. 
Hiig-hes, John B. 
Jerome, Edgai- E. 
Jones, Gilhei-t E. 
Kaflenburg, Isaac. 
Kaffenl)urg-, Philiji. 
Ketcham, (xeoi-ge W. 
Ketchum, Edward R. 
King, Ogden. 
Kip, Francis M., Jr. 
Kirk. David N. 
Lawson, Edwai-d S. 
Levi, Lewis. 
Lewin, Lewis. 
Lewin, Moses. 
Lord, Charles W. 
Maher, Daniel H. 
Many, Norton. 
Mai'ble, Eleazei-. 
McBane, Angus M. L. 
McBane. Jo.seph W. 
McCotter, Francis A. 



McDowell. George W. 
McHarg. G. Van Allen. 
McHai-g. John. Ji-. 
McKnight, Samuel W. 
M<-Kown. William. 
McQuade, Peter J. 
Meacham, William H. 
Miller, Jolin Isaac. 
Monteath, Edward W. 
More, Francis C. 
Mori'ison, William J. 
Murphy, David A. 
Newbergh, Alexandei'. 
Newitter, Nathan. 
Owens, Charles H. 
Payne, George. 
Pe(;kham, George T. 
Pembei'ton, Howard. 
Peri-y, Thomas R. 
Phillips, De Witt H. 
Pi-eston, Al)ijah S. 
Radcliff, Heniy G. 
Randall, S. Sidwell. 
Rathbone, Albert. 
Rawson, Edward. 
Rising, Austin. 
Root, Charles F. 
Rose man, James R. 
Sackett, Nathaniel 0. 
Say re, Henry. 
Shepard, George W. 
Shepard, Sylvester B. 
Simpson, John G. 
Smith, Daniel J. 
Stoflel, William. 
Stuart, Daniel D. 
Stuai't, Thomas. 
Sweet, Edward R. . 
Teller, David A. 
Todd, Charles. 
Todd, Edmund A. 
Townei'. Egbert. 
Tufl"t.s, Julian. 
Van Allen. John S. 
Vandenl)ergh, William. 
Vandei'zee. Jacob. 



115 



Vail Etten, George H. 
Van Rensselaer, James H. 
Walker, Samuel S. 
Walsh, Alfred. 
Warren, Edwaid F. J. 
Weaver, David S. 
Weaver, Fi-ancls N. 
Weil, Samuel. 
Winne, Martin V. B. 
Woi'thington, Herman. 

1854-55. 

Adams, James H. 
Ainsworth, George E. 
Alden, Chai-les C. 
Aldrich, Theodore. 
Anderson, Edward H. 
Armour, Charles S. 
Atwood, Henry C. 
Baker, James A. 
Ballagh, William H. 
Bancroft, John I). 
Bancroft, John, Jr. 
Barbel", Charles S. 
Beman, Franklin S. 
Bender, William A. 
Berrey, Samuel, Jr. 
Bisby, Hilton W. 
Boai'dman, Albert. 
Boai'dman, Charles A. 
Booth, Oscar IJ. 
Booth, William A. 
Booth, Wilmot A. 
Brooks, John R. 
Brown, Alfred H. C. 
Brown, James M. 
Brown, John B. 
Burt, William W. 
Callaghan, Jeremiah. 
Canady, Jeremiah. 
Cartel', Edward. 
Clark, Joseph S. 
Cole, Edward H. 
Cooper, Edwin B. 
Crandall, Frank. 
Decker, Mai'shali. 



Delavaii. Ji^hn S. 
Dingen, Lewis P. 
Duncan, Eugene. 
Durant, William. 
Fellows, Frank H. 
Fisher, James A. 
Flaglei", Geoi'ge W. 
Foland, Worthington. 
Freeman, James. 
Fuller, Augustus 0. 
(lafi'ney, Thomas M. 
Gates, Philip. 
Gil)SOTi, Peter ;M. 
Gordon, George E. 
Gould, Charles. 
Gray, Charles M. 
Hallenbeck, M. 0. 
Harcourt, John R. 
Hartnell, Daniel J. 
Hawley, George H. 
Healey, Lawrence. 
Hendrickson, Jacob E. 
Hermans, Halsted. 
Herrick, Robert. 
Hoff, J. S. V. R. 
Houll, Henry. 
Hubbel, Daniel W. 
Huinjihrey, Barnet V. 
Hurd, Joseph M. 
Jackson, James. 
Ken-, Charles. 
Kirk, Alfred. 
Koonz, Edwai-d C. 
Lansing, Henry K. 
Lawi'ence, Atkins S. 
Lawrence, Walter R. 
Linsley, Edwin A. 
Littletield, Henry C. 
Lovi^tt, Fi-ank P. 
Low, Warren S., Ji*. 
Lynch, James S. 
Many, W. Augustus. 
McConnell. Joseph. 
McHarg, Alexander, Jr, 
Mclntyre, Thomas A. 
McKown, James H. 



116 



McMillpii, William J. 
Meeiran. James H. 
Merriman, Willistou K. 
Nichols, Henry C. 
Osborn, Henry. 
Owens, Thomas J. 
Palmanteer, William. 
Pardee, Charles P. 
Pease, R. H., Jr. 
Peck, Henry C. 
Peets, Cyrus B. 
Phillips, John D. 
Post, James R. 
Qiiackenbush, Albert. 
Quackenbush, Augustus Q. 
Quiiui, James. 
Radley, John J. 
Rawson, Byron. 
Richmond, James. 
Rider, George. 
Russell, Hubbard L., Jr. 
Ryan, Alfred G. 
Schiffer, George W. 
Simpson, Simon M. 
Slater, Henry J. 
Smith, Charles E. 
Smith, Frederic J. 
Smith, Thomas D. 
Ten Eyck, Millard. 
Van Heusen, Alpha T. 
Vrooman, Walter K. 
Weldon. William H. 
Whitehouse, Silas H. 
Whitney, Henry C. 
Wilkeson, Bayard. 
Wilkeson, Frank. 
Wilkeson, Gansevoort. 
Williams, Fredei-ic S. 
Williams, Orion H. 
Woi-th, William. 
Zeizer, Joseph. 

1855-56. 

Andrews, John William. 
Babcock, Horace. 
Barhydt, William F. 



Bendei', Matthew H. 
Brayton, Sautbrd B. 
Buchana i, Stephen A. 
Biirnham, Guy, C. J. 
Cady, William. 
Callenilt'r, David. 
Campbell, Thomas Cooper, 
Case, James M. 
Condon, Thomas. 
Crouch, Charles Philetus. 
Crounse, Edwai-d. 
Cutler, James G. 
Dalton, William A. 
Davis, Edward C. 
Deuchar, William. 
Dexter, Theodore. 
Dobler, Albei-t Frederic. 
Ewing, Lawson. 
Ferrey, Watson J. 
Fisher, Gotlieb. 
Gei-vin, Joseph H. 
Golden, Gilbei-t W. 
Grindrod, John. 
Grogan, Thomas J. 
Hale, Lorenzo. 
Hall, George. 
Hall, Parker. 
Haswell, John H. 
Hendrickson, Eugene. 
Hogan, James L. 
Hurdis, William Edward. 
Huyck, Fiancis C. 
Jacobs, Van Rensselaer. 
Jenkins, Mulford. 
Jones, Sidney. 
Joslin, William L. 
Lansing, Alfred D. C. 
Mai'ston, George. 
Martin, Henry B. 
Martin, Louis. 
McCasky, Alexander L. 
McClure, Thomas. 
McDonald, George. 
McEwan, John. 
McKown. James F. 
McQuade, Patrick H. 



117 



Moi-i-ison, G. Landon. 
Osti-ander, Philip. 
Pitkin, Thomas H. 
Potter, James. 
Skinner, Phineas M. 
Southwick, Frank. 
Sprague, Eilward Everett. 
Sprinks, James. 
Street, Gilbert W. 
Swan, Richard H. 
Todd, Eban. 
Tracy, Osgood V. 
Van Gaasbeeck, William A. 
Watson, George Harris. 
Welch. Henry F. 
Winne, Fi-anklin. 

1856-57. 

Anthony, Charles. 
Armsby, Gideon H. 
Barnum, Frank D. 
Bernhai'd, Lewis G. 
Blatner, Solomon. 
Boyd, James P., Jr. 
Brown. Francis P. 
Bullock, John H. 
Callendei', Thomas Stewart. 
Camei'on, Madison. 
Campbell, Archibald. 
Canfield, Heni-y. 
Carpenter, Henry Allen. 
Carroll, Henry. 
Cary, Edwai'd H. 
Case, Edward M. 
Causey, John W. 
Colvin, Verplank. 
Cunningham, John H. 
Davis, Edward M. 
Dunn, Charles E. 
Dextei', Isaac Newton. 
Evans, Fi-ederic A. 
F'earey, Andi-ew W. 
Flacke, Charles. 
Forsyth, William D. 
French, Isaac V. 
Fuller, Charles H. 



Gai-dnei-, Thomas E. 
Gibbons, Willai-d Smith. 
Hall, Lewis Benedict. 
HallenV)eck, John. 
Halley, Ebenezer, Jr. 
Halsted, Mandeville. 
Harcourt, Alfred. 
Harcourt, George. 
Hartley, John. 
Hartley, Jonathan. 
Hartley, Joseph. 
Haskell, Sanford. 
Haswell, Henry V. 
Hawley, Frederic B. 
Homes, Henry F, 
Hun, Leonard G. 
Hun, Marcus T. 
Kii-k, William H. 
Kreuder, George. 
Lawi-ence, Dwight. 
Lockrow, Arthur V. B. 
. Maxwell, Jacob. 
McClure, James G. K. 
McHarg, John W. 
McMurdy, Robei-t. 
Milbank, William E. 
Nelson, Alexander C. 
Nickei'son, Charles. 
Nott, Howard. 
PaT'sons, Stanley Parmlei-. 
Paterson, John S. 
Payne, Wai-ren. 
Potter, Charles C. 
Quinn, William J. 
Ral)y, Robert St. George. 
Rad.-liff, Charles H., Jr. 
Radclitt", William O. 
Rathbone, Clarence. 
Reuter, Andrew. 
Reynolds, Chai-les C. 
Rogers, Edmund D. 
Root, Lyman, 
Say re, Thomas Jefferson. 
Seeley, Henry. 
Sheldon, Clarence. 
Smith, Cornell Stevenson J. 



118 



Smith, Benj. Fi-anklin Galatin. 
Smith, William A. 
Spelman, Benjamin R., Jr. 
Stanley, Edward. 
Street, Alfi-ed W. 
Taylor. William S. 
Thomson, Henry. 
Tucker, Gilbert M. 
Wallace, William J. 
Watson, George W. 
Weil, Perez. 
Wilson, Levi Carter. 
Wilson, Robert. 
Wood, J. Hampton. 
Wood, William N. 
Zeh, James E. 

1857-58. 

Adams, James Dexter. 

Batchelilei", Franklin Adams. 

Bernhard, Abraham. 

Bew, William T. 

Big-elovv, John M. 

Bortle, Reniing'ton. 

Bj'ian, George P Merlieux. 

Bulger, William F. 

Cavut, William. 

Clark, Charles Henry. 

Cohn, Gilbert. 

Collin, Norton P. 

Cushman, Don Alonzo. 

Denniston, Gerrit V. 

Den!iiston, Visschei*. 

Douglas, George P. 

Ford, William R. 

Gaffney, John F. 

Grittin, John L. 

Grifiin, Stephen H. 

Harrig'an, James. 

Harris, Frederic. 

Hari-is, John C. 

Harris, William B. 

Hai-t, Eugene R. 

Hawe, William. 

Hawley, Gideon. 

Hawley, Henry Q. 



Herrick, Marcus. 
Hinckley, Charles B. 
Jones, Charles E. 
Kennedy, James. 
Ki.ld, Robert. 
Lansing, Andrew D., Jr. 
Leddy, William G. 
Lederer, Adolph. 
Many, William V. 
Marble, Melville F. 
Marx, Albert 
McAlister, William H. 
McDonough, Bernard J. 
McGi-egor. Donald. 
McHarg, Theodore. 
Mclntyre, Ai-chibald. 
McMillan, John. 
McNaughton, George H. 
McNeill, William. 
Miller, Wesley. 
Mills, George H. 
Monly, Charles E. 
Moon, Robert H. 
Paige, Joseph Y. 
Paine, Frederic H. 
Palmer, George W. 
Parsons, Henry. 
Payn, Cornelius N. 
Payn, Samuel G. 
Potts, Jesse W. 
Quimby, Aaron A. 
Rattone, Thomas. 
Rosen<lale, Samuel. 
Rosengarden, Meyer. 
Roster, Heniy H. 
Rowlands, Charles L. 
Ruhl, Frederic. 
Sanders, Barent B, 
Shloss, Emanual E. 
Sigsbee. Charles D. 
Silsby, John. 
Snow, Joseph H. 
Steele, Henry Clay. 
Steers, Barent B. 
Stimson, Daniel M. 
Stoughton, Hugh Bernard. 



119 



Swartz, Nathan. 
Thacher, John B. 
Thomas, Charles H. 
Topping-, Charles W. 
Tucker, Willis G. 
Vanderpoel, Isaac. 
Van Rensselaer, Eugene. 
"Weidnian, Eugene. 
Wells, William S. 
Wilkes, Arthur Augustus. 
Wood, Howard. 

1858-59. 

Armitigion, Anthony Rhoades. 

Aspinwall, L. Augustus. 

Badgeley, Charles. 

Beardsley, Chai-les. 

Bell, James C. 

Benjamin, George P. 

Bleecker, Edward. 

Bortle, John J. 

Breen, Edward A. 

Britton, Edward M. 

Brooke, Howard A. 

Brooks Ijy, James A. 

Bryan, David C. 

Buckbee, William S. 

Bullock, Edgar S. 

Bush, Archibald McC. 

Bush, Walter R. 

Butler, James. 

Carpentei-, Edward A. 

Chapin, Ogden. 

Charles, Geoi-ge H. 

Church, John B. 

Clark, Stephen W. 

Condon, Thomas Hale. 

Crannell, Delavan. 

Davis. Benjamin B. 

Davis, James, Jr. 

Dean, Amos Hammond. 

Dibl>le, Frederic. 

Douglas, Oscar W. 

Esmay, Isaac. 

Fearey, Thomas H. 

Foland, Preston A. 



Forby, Eli P. 
Fi'othingham, Charles F. 
Fryer, Charles L. 
Fryer, Robert L. 
Gregory, Edgar S. 
Groot, James. 
Gross, Eugene P. 
Heywood, Josephus. 
Hilton, Robert J. 
Hoag, William Henry. 
Hoi'ton, Cleveland K. 
Keelei-, Harri-son H. 
Keenholtz, Charles. 
Kennedy, Robert 0. 
Kidd, Howard. 
Kii-k, Robei-t W. 
Lamb, Desmond. 
Larose, Peter L. 
Lederer, Jonatz. 
Loucks, William. 
Luther, George M. 
Luther, John A. 
Main, Russel. 
Mayell, John. 
McCamman, Cyrus. 
Mclntyre, John V. 
Mears, Elisha Ashley. 
Muir, Charles H. 
Nelson, Rol)ert M. 
Northi'up, Howard N. 
Noxon, Edwai'd. 
On-, Alexander. 
Orr, Frederic M. 
Owen, Robert. 
Paff, William P. 
Pendleton, William. 
Phillips, Frank D. 
Pohlman, Oliver S. 
Powei's, Michael J. 
Read, Daniel P. 
Reid, James R. 
Remond, Jules L. 
Ri<lgeway, Frederic W. 
Robinson, Hugh. 
Roessle Henry N. P. 
Roe-^sle, Ricliai-d. 



120 



Rogfirp, James. 
Rodg'ers, Pientice. 
Sanders, Jacoli (t. N. 
Sanl, William H. 
Sayles, Charles. 
Sevin, Edward A. 
Slingerland, John H. 
Sling-erlan<l, William. 
Spi-ague, Horace T. 
Stoiighton. Norman C. 
Vernam, William S. 
Vosbiirgh, Theodore. 
Wands, James F. 
Wands, John B. 
Warren, Clement H. 
Wasserbach, William. 
Winne, Archibald. 
Woods, Francis H. 
Wormer, Wilson. 
Wright, Edward A. 
Wright, John H. 

1859-60. 

Alden, Sanford S. 
Allen, Charles H. 
Allen, John K. 
Appleton, William. 
Bailey, James B. 
Barrett, George W. 
Bender, Frank W. 
Bender, William M. 
Bentley, Thomas. 
Bigelow, Charles Gregory. 
Blatner, Joseph H. 
Bronck, William. 
Brower, Charles M. 
Brower, Fredei-ic A. 
Brown, Hamilton Bogart. 
Brown, James. 
Brown, Lewis G. 
Burgess, Edgar. 
Burton, George D. 
Campbell, Robert James. 
Carmichael, James. 
Chapman, Clarence C. 
Charles, Franklin F. 



Chase, George B. 

Clai'ke, John. 

Cohen, Henry. 

Colbei't, Michael J. 

Crounse, Petei- H. 

Davis, Nicholas H. 

Davis, Robei-t Johnson 

Dean, Fredei-ic A. 

Dodge, Staats. 

Donahoe, James. 

Edson, John Ti-acy. 

Falk, William Christopher, 

Feai-ey, George D. 

Friend, Alexander. 

Friend, Joseph R. 

Frost, William K, 

Gillespie, William Henry. 

Greei", John. 
Gregory, William R. 
Halley, Austin M 
Hans, John. 
Hawe, John L. S. 
Hawkins, Horace D. 
Herschbei-gei-, Jacob. 
Huntington, Chester. 
' Johnson, Benjamin W. 
Jones, John Stanton Floyd. 
Kahn, Adolph. 
Kahn, Marx. 
King, Allen H. 
Langan, John. 
Lehman, Edward J. 
Lloyd, Lyman J. 
Marx, Edward J. 
Marx, Lewis I. 
Matthews, James C. 
McCraken, William F. 
McHarg, Albert. 
Mork, Abram. 
Mosher, Stephen. 
Newittei", Morris J. 
Nichols, Morrison C. G. 
Paddock, William H. 
Parker, John 'J'en Eyck. 
Pai'sons, James W. 
Patten, William N. 



121 



Pfck, William A. 
PlHclwell, John Edwin. 
Pohly, Samuel. 
Radcliff, Robei-t D. 
Rathbone, Charles D 
Ra\v«m, Heniy N. 
Re(iua, William J. 
Reynolds, Georg-e. 
Richards, Peyton. 
Robinson, Samnel. 
Roessle, John Jacob. 
Rcxlfj-ers, Edward H. 
Rooker. Thomas M. 
Roy, James. Jr. 
Russell, De Witt H. 
Sagei- Henry. 
Schwartz. Edward. 
Schwartz, Gustavus A. 
Shepard, Osgood H. 
Shultz, Joseph. 
Sickels, Robert F. 
Simmons, Henry L. 
Slingerland, George W. 
Spelman, William. 
Sporborg, Henry J. 
Sprung, Charles H. 
Staats, Edward P. 
Stacpole, Horatio P. 
Strong, John. 
Sweet, John L. 
Tiacey, Charles. 
Van Allen, John E. 
Van Benthuysen, Clarence. 
Van Benthuysen, Frank. 
Van Heusen, Theodoi-e V. 
Vernam, Harry. 
Warner, Edgai". 
Weed, Frank H. 

1800-01. 

Abi'ams, Charles W. 
Anable, Frederic G. 
AnaV)le, Henry B. 
Andrews, Eugene, Jr. 
Arden, Heni'y. 
Bailey, Henry. | 



Bedell, Edwin R. 
Bell, Frederic H. 
Bigelow, George T. 
Buel. William P. 
Burhans. William W. 
Burns, Peter J. 
Cassidy, John. 
Chui'chill, Ennneth. 
Chur(;hill, John R. 
Clark, Jesse V. 
Cogswell, Mas(m F. 
Cole, Fredei-ic W. 
Cole, Mark W. 
Coulson, Fredei'ic A. 
Coulson, J. Fi-ank. 
Craft, Benjamin F. 
Crocker, Fredei-ic W. 
Davis, Rowland A. 
Delamatei', Nicholas B. 
Dumany, Richard P. 
Eaton, John E., Jr. 
Fish, Frederic K. 
Frost, William B. 
Gallup, John E. 
Gil)bs, Albei-t L. 
Gilbert, Fi-ederic L. 
Gillette. Edwin T. 
Gregory. Fi-ank B. 
Halley, William S. 
Hai'per, George. 
Harpei", John C. 
Haswell, Hiram W. 
Haswell, Robert. 
Hobbs, Harry H. 
Hinigertbrd, Clarence. 
Hungerford, Newman. 
Jackson, John. 
Janes, William A. 
Kenny, Thomas B. 
Kirk, Andrew. 
Levi, Samuel. 
Lodcwii'k. Edward^J. 
Lodewick, John H. 
Long, William. 
Maitin, Frederic T. 
Maul. John G. 



122 



McNaiighton, James. 
Millliank, Elias. 
Mosely, W;lliam S. 
Newitter, Garson. 
Noye.s, Mathew M. 
Oakley, George C. 
Pomfi-et, William C. 
Quackenbush, Eugene. 
Reynolds, J. A. 
Reynolds, John H., Jr. 
Rogers, Cliffor.l B. 
Schliegel, John. 
Sharpe, George W. 
Stnith, Chai-les W. 
Sporl)org, Silas. 
Springhart, Edwin. 
Stanton, Martin. 
Stone, Joseph D. 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Teller, Elisha B. 
Ti-eadwell, E. Prentice. 
Tremaine, Porter, Jr. 
Van Alstyne, William C. 
Walsh, Hugh McK. 
Ward, Irving. 
Ward, Walworth. 
Wayne, Edmud R. 
Whitney, Charles E. 
Wickes, Thomas P. 
Willerton, Edmund. 
Williamson, Austin. 
Wilson, Aimer A. 
Wolverton, Charles B. 

1801-02. 

Allen, James H. 
Allen, Walter. 
Andei'son, Samuel_M. 
Armoui-, De Witt. 
Averill, Horace P. 
Bagg, Homer D. 
Bailey, Forest A. 
Batchelder, Fredei-ic Howard. 
Bender, Charles H. 
Bennet, Daniel C. 
Brumaghim, Benjamin. 



Brumaghini, Le Roy. 
Cameron, Heni-y H. 
Clark, Francis. 
Clock, Emoi-y. 
Cogswell, Ledyard. 
Crawford, Ezekiel McI. 
Davis, Joseph S. 
Earl, Waldo. 
Easton, Edward. 
Eaton, Edward C. 
Eaton, Heni-y. 
Fassett, Lawrence T. 
Fassett, Theodore S. 
Eraser, Frederic. 
Frazier, Leonard H. 
Frost, John H. 
Frost, Lott, Jr. 
Gould, Anthony. 
Hadley, Charles. 
Henly, Frank. 
Hisgen, Edward. 
Hodgkins, George R. 
Holstein, Ernest D. 
Hoxsie, Anthon P. 
Hoyt, Charles R. 
Hurst, Frank V. O. 
Hurst, William. 
Jermain, Bai'clay. 
Johnson, John. 
Jones, Robert J. 
King, Allen H. 
Lansing, Garrit G. 
Lansing, Howai-d A. A. 
Lansingh, Abram. 
Lawloi-, William M. 
Le Gallez, Abi-am. 
Leonard, Alden. 
Leonai'd, Edgar. 
Leonard, Heni-y W. 
Leonard, J. J. 
Leonai'd, Oscar. 
Lewi, Isidor J. 
Livingston, Crawford. 
Lodewick, Isaac. 
Logan, Theron. 
Lord, Henry P. 



123 



Mahal-, James. 
Many, .lanie8 M. 
Martin, Graham. 
Maitin, Howard T. 
McAlister. Robei-t A. 
McClellan, Samuel. 
McDonald, James. 
McDonald, William. 
Mclntyre, Archibald. 
McMullen, Joseph J. 
Mellick, James R. 
Merrill, Charles C. 
MifTgael, Edward. 
Millard, Lennox. 
Moellei", Charles. 
Morrow, Samuel R. 
Myers, John. 
Norris. Walter H. 
Norton, John T. 
Owen, Francis A. 
Payn, Frederic A. 
Peck. Wooster D. 
Porter, Peter. 
Pruyn, Andrew K. 
Pi'uyn, Francis. 
Pruyn, Samuel S. 
Ramsey, Charles H. 
Riley, Patrick. 
Russel, Charles E. 
Ruyter, William C. 
Sanders, Bleecker. 
Sands, James H. 
Sayles, Edward. 
Scanlan, William F. 
Schrieber, Andrew. 
Schuyler, Richard P. 
Shepard, Frank D. 
Sims, William B. L. 
Staats, Dul)ois. 
Staats, John Heni-y. 
Stahl, John M. 
Staley, Bowen. 
Stone, Charles H. 
Sntlift", Charles. 
Sutliff, John H. 
Swinburne, Lewis. 



Terrell, Holland A. 
Thomas, William C. 
Thomas, William G., Jr. 
Thornton, William. 
Todd, William A. 
Travers, James, Jr. 
Tread well, John P. 
Trowbridg-e, John P. 
Tucker, Charles. 
Tucker, William P. 
Van Gaasbeeck, Amos. 
Van Sickler, William H. 
Waterman, Henry W. 
White, Ross. 
Wing-, James C. 
Wolverton, Monteath E. 
Wood, Edward. 
Woodruff, William H. D. 
Woolverton, Georg-e A. 
Wooster, Eiiward B. 

1862-63. 

Arden, Richard Bevei'ly. 
Bennett, David C. 
Birch, Sylvan us J. 
Blake, James. 
Briare, Geoi-ge P. M. 
Bug-den, Georg-e T. 
Bui'ton, John I., Jr. 
Carpenter, Charles W. 
Defreest, Kinier V. 
Durant, Edward A., Jr. 
Durant, William. 
Fish, Henry H. 
Gilbert, Stephen. 
Goodwin, Scott D. 
Gould, Charles. 
Hawe, John L. S. 
Hawe, William H. 
Janes, William G. 
Jenkins, Mulford. 
Kirk, Alfred M. 
McCue, John J. 
Mosher, Stephen. 
Rawson, Edward K. 
Rol)bin8, John S. 



124 



Swan, J. Alfred. 
Ten Eyck, Millard. 
Williams, Frederic S. 
Wilson, Georg-e P. 
Wool, John A. 

1863-64. 

Badg-ley, Charles. 
Bell, Frederic H. 
Bender, Charles H. 
Bigelow, Charles G. 
Brayton, Edmund C. 
Brown, Hamilton B. 
Burt, Charles W. 
Burt, James. 
Cameron, Madison. 
Carmichael, James. 
Charles, Frank T. 
Clark, Edward W. 
Cogswell, Mason F. 
Cohn, Louis. 
Cole, Addison D. 
Cooper, George L. 
Coui'tney, Dickinson. 
Davis, Joseph S. 
Dean, Frederic A. 
Draper, Andrew S. 
Fish, Frederic K. 
Fort, Charles N. 
Frost, Lott, Jr. 
Fryer, Charles L. 
Gibbons, Willard S. 
Goo(b'ich, Frank M. 
Gi-egory, Fiancis B. 
Griffith, Leroy S. 
Gi'oss, Eugene P. 
Hadley, Charles S. 
Harper, George. 
Hawkins, Horace D. 
Hill, Edwai-d A. 
Hon; John S. V. R. 
• Howes. Francis H. 
Kirk, Andrew. 
Kirk, Wilson G. H. 
Leonard, Alden. 
Lord, Henry P. 



Luther, George M. 
Many, James M. 
McAlister, Robert A. 
McClellan, SamueL 
Meckel, Henry, Jr. 
Meech, John G. 
Melick, James R. 
Morgan, Jacob. 
Morrow, Samuel R. 
Nevins, B. Chalmers. 
Norton, John T. 
Palmater, Albert. 
Parker, John T. 
Perry, John T. 
Pladwell, John E. 
Quick, Peter. 
Roberts, Frank S. 
Rayter, William C. 
Sage, Albert G. 
Sanders, Bai-ent. 
Saxe, Charles G. 
Sayles, Edward. 
Schuyler, Stephen. 
Shepard, John R. 
Shepard, Osgood H. 
Smith, Charles W. 
Smith, Samuel McC. 
Stevens, DeWitt C. 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Thomas, Charles H. , 
Van Benthuysen, Clarence. 
Van Benthuysen, Frank. 
Vandenburg, George N. 
Van Sickler, William S. 
Walsh, Hugh McK. 
Werner, Charles J. 
Winne, Charles D. 
Woolverton, Charles B. 

1864-65. 

Alden, Sanilfoi-d S. 
Allen, James H. 
Allen, Waltei- S. 
Averill, Horace P. 
Babcock, James H. 
Bahler, Martin. 



125 



Batchelder, T. Howfinl. 
Betkai', John A. 
Blessing, Belmont E. 
Blessing. John. 
Byres. John. 
Bulkley, Alphens T. 
Cobee, Elsbury. 
Cogswell, Leilyani. 
Cuhn, Michael. 
Cornwell, Fi-ank B. 
Davis, Frank E. 
Dalton, Charles E. 
Dey Erniand, Heni-y. 
Duraiif, Edward C. 
Eaton, Heni-y. 
Edson, J. Tracy. 
Fairchild, Albei-t C. 
Frost, John H. 
Gillette, Frank C. 
Gillette, Waltei- C. 
Harcoui-t, Joseph D. 
Hunsdon, S. Charles. 
Hurst, James H. 
James, John H. 
Kite, Thomas. 
Lewi, Edward. 
McBride, George H. 
Mclntyre, Alexander. 
Nichols, Munson. 
Noble, John H. 
Nusbauni, Bernard. 
Peck, Wooster D. 
Potter, Russell 
Pruyn, Charles L. 
Rattoone, Thomas. 
Reynolds, James A. 
Rodgei-s, Frank B. 
Ross, John P. 
Stein, William B. 
Stiles, Charles A. 
Stonehouse, John B., Jr. 
Tiernan, Matthew. 
Tieadwell, Frank A. 
Van Santford, William McC. 
Waggoner, George H. 
Weir, Robert B. 



Werner, Frederick. 
Westheimer, Albert C. 
Wing. James C. 
Wood, Edward. 
Woolverton, Geoi-ge. 

18G5-G6. 

Al)rahanis, P. V. R. 
Ames, Charles W. 
Baker. Edward S. 
Baker, John B. 
Bedell, Edwaid A. 
Bender, Charles H. 
Bi-annan, John T. 
Brown, Willard W. 
Burton. Edward H. 
Cutler, Pemberton. 
Cutler, Walter S. 
De(ierick, Stewart J. 
Dunn, Bernard B. 
Dunscomb, James R. 
Easton, E(iward. 
Fassett, Lawi-eiK^e T. 
Fine, Smith S. 
Gascoigne, Geoi-ge L. 
Gilbert, Frederick L. 
Goold, Henry. 
Hall, C. Edwai-d. 
Hillhouse, Phineas P. 
Holmes, William C. 
Hun, Heni-y. 
Jei'main, Barclay. 
Kelly, James I. 
Kennedy, Thomas. 
Lansing, Howard A. 
Lehrberg, Charles K. 
Leonard, Edgar. 
Lodewick, Eugene, 
Lynch, John. 
Magoon, Frank L. 
Mairs, Frederick T. 
Martin, Howard T. 
McClure, John. 
McCulloch, Waltei-. 
McCulloch, Aikin. 
Mclntyi-e, Howard. 



126 



Moeller, Charles H. 
Mori'is, Lewis H. 
Oliver, Charles J. 
Palmer, Charles L. 
Pomfret, William C. 
Porter, William L. 
RetUleii, John. 
Reiiua, William J. 
Rhein, Benjamin. 
Richards, Peyton. 
Rosboro, William. 
Scott, Franklin W. 
Secor, G. Henry. 
Settle, Charles W. 
Strevel, Frank. 
Strong', John T. 
Sutliff, Charles. 
Talcott, Starke. 
Teller, Elisha P. 
Thanhanser, Benjamin H. 
Treadwell, John P. 
Trowbridg-e, John P. 
Van Allen, Edwin. 
Van Allen, Ira. 
Vanderpoel, Samuel O., Jr, 
Van Wormer, George. 
Van Zandt, Jacob H. 
Wadhams, Frederick. 
Walden, Hiram M. 
Williams, Harvey. 
Woolverton, Thomas D. 
Wood, Halsey L. 

1806-67. 

Aspinwall, Frank A. 
Barnes, Thurlow W. 
Barhydt, John W. 
Blaii', Wallace. 
Brown, Visscher. 
Brumaghim, Leroy. 
Burton, Frank. 
Burton, James. 
Carls, John B. 
Gary, Joseph A. 
Chapin, Campbell. 
Chapman, Clarence T. 



Chase, Nelson, H., Jr. 
Churchill, Roswal J. 
Coburn, Robert M. 
Colborn, Edwai-d. 
Dykenian, James. 
Emery, Charles. 
Emery, George. 
Fei-reil, Charles G. 
Fleischman, Nathan. 
Fondey, William T. 
Fuller, Albert D. 
Gallup, John G. 
Gi'eene, Thomas L., Jr. 
Grismer, John R. 
Hagadorn, George. 
Hartman, Frederick L. 
Hawe, Edmund O'C. 
Hawe, Matthew, Jr. 
Herrick, Edmund P. 
Hibsch, George A. 
Hoagland, Hetn-y. 
Hoffman, Ernest, Jr. 
Hoyt, Charles R. 
Hussey, Edward J. 
Johnson, Fiank. 
Kinnear, Henry C. 
Leai-ned, Leroy M. 
Lloyd, Alexander T., Jr. 
Luce, George W. 
Many, James. 
Mattiraore, Peter. 
Macfarlane, William D. 
McKissick, Edward P. 
Mills, James. 
Mix, WiUiam. 
Midford, James. 
Myers, Max. 
Norton, Harry C. 
Olcott, William L. 
Oliver, Leslie. 
Page, William C. 
Paine, N. Emmons. 
Parnell, John H. 
Pennie, Robert M. 
Ramsay, Charles H. 
Sage, Carroll. 



127 



Samlei-s, Bleeckei-. 
Schaffer, Auf^nst. 
Schiffer, William H. 
Schmidt, Benihanl H. 
Seeley, William. 
Silsbey, Daniel G. 
Simon, Charles. 
Stevens, George H. 
Stone, Charles H. 
Sti'ong, John T. 
Stronge, Joseph, Jr. 
Tracy, James F. 
Valkenburgh, Adolph S. 
Van Antwerp, William H. 
Van Buren, Alexander B. 
Van Vechten, Aln-am, Jr. 
Warren, William, Ji-. 
Wells, Samuel E. 
Wendell, Edward C. 
Winne, Walter, Jr. 
Worcester, Edwin D., Jr. 

1807-68. 

Allen, Fi-ank H. 
Allen, Henry A. 
Amlrews, Daniel B. 
Andrews, John C. 
Andrews, William P. 
Bailey, Forrest A. 
Bender, George C. 
Bii'ch, George A. 
Cameron, Hei-hert H. 
Clark, Fi-ank. 
Cook, William J., Jr. 
Crocker, Winslow M. 
Cutlei", Clarence D. 
Dai'ling, Richard W. 
Dedei-ick, John W. 
D.'lehanty, William E. 
Fisher, Edward G. 
Giff'oi-d, John A. 
Gould, Anthony. 
Gould, Geoi-ge W., Ji-. 
Gi-ay, William J. 
G]-ittin, Albert C. 
Hodgman, Frederick W. 



Hogean, Henry. 
Holmes, John M. 
Horth, Brayton C. 
Hoyt, John K. 
Humphrey, John R., Jr. 
Hurst, Frank V. 0. 
Hurst, William, Jr. 
Kirchner, Charles W. 
Linsley, Fi'anklin. 
Mason, William, Jr. 
McAllister, Alexander G. 
McGarvey, Charles M. 
McKnight, Whitfield. 
Moore, Charles E. 
Moseley, Ira A. 
Moseley, Fi-ank E. 
Moseley, George E. 
Paddock, Howard. 
Paddock, William G. 
Page, William V. G. 
Parks, Charles H. 
Perry, Willai-d E. 
Phelps, William H. 
Pulver, William H. 
Seabury, Melvin. 
Staley, Bo wen. 
Stoneman, George T. 
Templeton, William K. 
Ten Eyck, William C. 
Tolle, John G. 
Van Dei'zee, Fi-anklin. 
White, Merritt. 
Wood, Simeon W. 
Woolvei'ton, Edward R. 
Worcester, George H. 

1808-09. 

Barker, Benjamin. 
Bishop, Charles F. 
Blatner, Isidore. 
Clandenning, George R. 
Clark, Joseph. 
Coleman, Ki-ank. 
Davis, Solomon. 
Dayton, Charles. 
Dewey, George. 



128 



Dey Ermand, Hugh H. 
Ebel, Fi-ederick. 
Edding-er, Samuel. 
Farring-ton, Edward. 
Fleischiiian, Jacob. 
Fowler, Warren H. 
French, Emanuel. 
Gascoig-ne, Mortimer. 
Gascoigne, \V. 
Geoghan, William. 
Goold, Charles B. 
Goold, Fi-ank V. 
Goold, William D. 
Gould, Charles A. 
Granger, Robert. 
Heckman, William C. 
Heinler, Jacob. 
Henley, Frank D. 
Irwin, William. 
King, Frank B. 
Milwain, James, Jr. 
O'Brien, Julian D. V. 
Olcott, Thomas W. 
Palmer, Walter L. 
Papen, George W. 
Park, George. 
Peck Samuel S. 
Pockman, Bayard T. 
Requa, William A. 
Rice, William G.; 
Rossman, Timothy R. 
Rushmore, William. 
Stoneman, William J. 
Sweet, Ernest. 
Thomas, William D. 
Thompson, William. 
Townsend, Franklin, Jr. 
Townsend, Rufus K. 
Van Alstyne, T. B. 
Van Zandt, William A. 
Vint, James. 
Waldman, Louis J. 
Ward, John C. 
Waterman, Charles. 
Waterman, Frank. 
Weller, Louis. 



Wightman, Clarence. 
Williamson, Austin. 
Winne, Lansing G. 
Wright, George L. 

1869-70. 

Bii-ch, John F. 
Colby, David. 
Davis, James W. 
Davis, John. 
De Freest, Peter M. 
Feltman, Thomas. 
Haskell, George D. 
Johnson, Henry N. 
Lansing, Isaac D. F., Jr. 
Latham, James B. 
Martin, Howard T. 
McCammon, Robert. 
Murphy, Joseph. 
Reilly, Hugh. 
Ti'immer, Edwin. 
Woolverton, Edward R. 

1870-71. 

Bender. Edward S. 
Bender, W. H. 
Bingham, Benjamin. 
Chambei'lain, Eugene T. 
Cleminshaw, Nelson H. 
Cook, George C. 
Crego, Floyd S. 
Davidson, Hoffman. 
Dewey, Frederick. 
Ditson, George. 
Dunphy, Thomas J. 
Elmendorf, N. Floyd. 
Fassett, Edgai- S. 
Fuller, Joseph Wiltsie. 
Gould, Anthony. 

Green, 

Greer, Alexander. 
Hartman, Charles F. 
Hascy, Clarence H, 
Heidrick, Charles. 
Hughson, Ward C. 
Kaley, George 0. 



129 



Loi'd, Edmund. 
McClure, James. 
Miles, Benjamin F. 
Munsell, Frank. 
Newman, Henry. 
Noble, Edward B. 
Og^den, Charles G. 
Oliver, George E. 
Paige, Leonard. 
Palmer, Daniel G. 
Palmer, James H. 
Parker, Theodore T. 
Parsons, John D. 
Rooney, Joseph J. 
Sandei's, James B., Jr. 
Simons, Charles N. 
Strong, Frederick E. 
Ten Eyck, Henry J. 
Townsend, John. 
Tremper, Charles B. 
Vanderpoel, John. 
Vanderpoel, Herman W. 
Van Vorst, G. B. 
Wiles, Charles. 
Woolverton, Andrew W. 

1871-72. 

Balicock, John. 
Baker, Peter C. 
Bishop, Hazai'd. 
Cooper, James F. 
Craig, Joseph D. 
De Gi'oot, John. 
Dewey, "William. 
Elmendorf. William B. 
Holmes, Tliomas II. 
Kiei-nan, James T. 
Leach, William. 
Mar.sh, Waltei- V. 
Miller, Andrew. 
Mosely, Charles C. 
Newman, William. 
O'Bi-ien, Charles E. 
Patton, John C. 
Ritchie, George VV. S. 
Sautter, Louis, Ji\ 



Smart, I. Chipman. 
Smith, Philip. 
Stearns, Raymond H. 
Stimson, Edward P., Jr. 
Swinburne, Frederick. 
Talcott, Daniel W. 
Thompson, Thomas. 
Togoora, Masa Hico. 
Vosburgh, Fletchei-. 
Vosburgh, Miles W. 
Watei-man, 'Theodore. 
Wood, Starr K. 

1872-73. 

Blessing, Abraham H. 
Boyce, Ralph. 
Brower, Van Sanvoordt. 
Brumaghim, Albert. 
Bui'ton, Rollin. 
Cassidy, William R. 
Chapman. Isaac. 
Corliss, Edward E. 
Cushman, Paul, Jr. 
Cutler, Edgar A. 
Cuyler, Edward C. 
Davenpoi-t, Frank R. 
Davis, Frank. 
Dwight, Heniy. 
Eaton, James W., Jr. 
Ellis, J. Frank. 
Granger, Septimus W. 

Higgins, 

Holmes, Cooley B. 
Hoyt, Frank. 
Huddleston, Charles F. 

Humphrey, 

Hunt, Charles. 
Jenison, William N. 
Johnson, Frank R. 
Lawson, Joseph A. 
Lundergun, Adrian. 
Mills, Arthur D. 
Munson, James H. 
Pierson, Heni-y H., Jr. 

Pilsbury, 

Reed, Joel Howard. 



130 



Robertson, Alexander. 
Sanford, Waltei-. 

Thauer, 

Townsend, Howai-d. 
Williams, Chauncey P., Jr. 
Wing, Albert J. 
Worcester, Franklin E. 

1873-74. 

Babcock, Robert. 
Bellows, Elmer E. 
Briare, Richard. 
Bi-idgnian, Oliver Benedict. 
Brown, Isaac. 
Brown, Campbell. 
Bruniag-him, William. 
Burton, Samuel Freeman. 
Caniei'on, Herbert Henry. 
Case, Frank Hall. 
Chase, Norton. 
Cooley, Clark. 
Dayton, Charles Sherrill. 
Dewey, Georg-e A. 
Dwight, Richard H. W. 
Evers, Thomas A. 
Farrington, Edward Y. 
Frothinghani, Waltei- D. 
Hawkins, Rouselle Hough. 
Harper, Fi-ank. 
Hourigan, Peter. 
Hurlburt, Gansevoort De W. 
Jackson, Austin C. F. 
Ketchum, Horace. 
Lansing, Edward Y. 
Latham, James Battersby. 
Lathi'op, Frederick. 
Lawyer, Clarence. 
Maiming, Fi-edei-ick C. 
McClure, John Chester. 
McGraw, John. 
Miller, William C. 
Murphy, James. 
Nugent, Edward William. 
Olcott, Howard W. 
Palmer, Horace N. 
Palmer, William M. 



Pratt, Robert James. 
Richmond, W. C, Jr. 
Robinson, Robert. 
Russell, Calvin, Jr. 
Sautter, William. 
Sill, John Targel. 
Tayloi', Eugene R. 
Templeton, John. 
Townsend, S. Van Rensselaer, 
Weibezahl, Herrmann G. 
Wemple, Edward H. 
Whitney, William M., Jr. 
Wood, John. 

Woodward, Walter Mills. 
Woolverton, John. 
Wooster, Benjamin W., Jr. 

1874-75. 

Baldwin, 

Bott, J. Warner. 
Bj'iggs, A. N. 
Carver, Daniel. 
Cassidy, Edward. 
Clark, Frank. 
Cox, James W., Jr. 
Dewey, George N. 
Doncaster, Nelson St. J. 
Fai-rington, John. 
Heidrick, John C. 
Helme, Willard. 
Hiserodt, Theodore H. 
Hoit, Lehmen. 
Lawler, Daniel. 
Leonard, Edgar C. 
Leonard, Jesse Hoyt. 
Lewis, Willai'd. 
Moore, Joseph. 
Morrow, William. 
Simmons, Fi-ank C. 
Sisson, Frank N. 
Sly, Fayette E. 
Spraker, Benjamin F. 
Springsted, William. 
Ten Eyck, James W. 
Van Schoonhoven, John J. 
Van Vorst, Hooper. 



131 



Walter, Alexander. 
Wemple, Frederick. 
White, Frank. 
Worcester, Hariy Augustus. 
Worcester, Wilfi-ed James. 

1875-76. 

Allen, Joseph. 
Allen, William L. 
Bender, Harry H. 
Cameron, Frederick W. 
Cooper, Fredei'ick H. 
Curtis, Lawi'ence C. 
Dai'ling', Heni-y. 
Davis, Joseph. 
De Pfuhl, Bola. 
Edwards, Henry A. 
Farnsworth, John G. 
Fort, William V. 
Gilman, Charles A. 
Goodwin, Albert C. 
Greer, William. 
Harper, Ii-a. 
Hughson, Frank C. 
King, Barrington. 
Lloyd, F. W. 
Lyon, George E. 

Many, 

Mclntyi-e, 



Olcott, Marvin. 
Pratt, Henry Z. 
Pi-entice, Ezra P. 
Ramsey, Frank De Witt. 
Rathbone, John H. 
Rhodes, John Knox. 
Sage, William H. 
Scarborough, John. 

Skinner, 

Smart, F. Wardale. 
Smith, Heni-y, Jr. 
Staats, Henry. 
Stoddard, William E. 
Taylor, Walter. 
Templeton, Charles B. 
Thomson, Isaac. 
Tremper, Fi-ank H. 



Van Antwerp, Elmer H. 
Waterbury, Cyrus, Jr. 
Wilson, John C. 

1876-77, 

Adler, Daniel. 
Andrews, Howard. 
Babcock, Joshua. 
Baker, Edward E. 
Bennett, Harry W. 
Brainard, Alfred V. 
Cleveland, Newcoml). 
Cough try, Edward A. 
Cunningham, William M. 
Denike, Edwai-d M. 
De Voll, Frank M. 
Dreyei", Louis, Jr. 

Flansburg, 

Geer, Frederick L. 
Gregory, Frank A. 
Griffin, Decatur. 
Hill, Frederick W. 
Horst, Rudolph. 
Hutehins, Mason C. 
Judson, Albert L. 
Leonard, Gardner C. 
McCredie, James. 
Meneely, Charles D. 
Noonan, Joseph M. 
Page, John E., Ji-. 
Parmele, Geoi'ge P. 
Rose William C. 
Sutlitt", Henry. 
Sweet, Edwai-d E. 
Sweet William. 
Terrell, Robert H., Jr. 
Waterman, Edward N. 
Wilson, Fi-ankliii J. 
Woodward, James (). 
Younghans, Madison. 
Youngman, Hari-y V. 

1877-78. 

Arnold, Benjamin. 
Ayer, Daniel W. 
Bailey, J. A. 



132 



Babcock, Cornelius V. 
Barnes. Willi.-im, Jr. 
Batch<'Mei-. Albert E. 
Blooiniiiii:(ial(>, Cornelius. 
Bradt, .John H. 
Bull, Stephen C. 
Bnsley, James R. 
Capron, "William White. 
Coan, Charles. 
Cornell, Arthur L. 
Davis, Frank. 
Gardnei-, Edward H. 
Gearon, Edward A. 
Green, Charles G. 
Hamlin, William G. 
Hawkins. Harry C. 
Hendrick, James B., Jr. 
Hepburn, Lewis K. 
Hilton, James. ^ 

Holmes, Samuel V. V. 
Jones, William B. 
Kimball, Edg-ar P. 
Lansing-, Abram W. 
La Rose, Anthime W. 
Martin, Howard. 
McClure, Craigf. 
Morton, Eug-ene. 
Mosher, J. Montgomei-y. 
Murphy, Pete]- R. 
O'Brien. Fiv.nk P. 
Olcott, Robert. 
Perry, Edward R. 
Perry, Frank S. 
Ransom, J. Sanford. 
Reid, Willard P. 
Roseboom, William C. 
Sandei-P, Henry. 
Schoonmaker, C. H. 
Smith, William H. 
Stedman, George W. 
Strain, Robert, Ji-. 
Taylor, William E. 
Tilling-hast, Frederick. 
Van Antwerp, Thomas I. 
Walsh, Henry S. 
Weld, Charles C. 



Wendell. Harry M. 
Wood, Bayard H. 
Wood, Wescot. 

1878-79. 

Atwool, William T. 
Babcock, James L. 
Bacon, Allen H. 
Bacon, George M. 
Beattys, George D. 
Best, John J. 
Brennock, Michael A. 
Bi'idge, Chai-les F. 
Can-, Frederick. 
Coleman, Michael. 
Craig, J. Shei-man. 
Deimon, Sturgis B. 
Dewey, Ned. W. 
Evans, Chai'les. 
Farrington, Albei't. 
Ferguson, Frank C. 
Gates, Lewis E. 
Goodell, Wan-en. 
Griswold, Harry E. 
Harbeck, Marcus. 
Herrick, Frank C. 
Hinds, Herbert C. 
Ingmire, Frederick A. 
Kinney, Chai-les W. 
Knickerbockei", Edmund C. 
Lawler, Thomas C. 
Le Fevi-e, Arthur N. 
Mattimore, Joseph H. 
McArdle, William H. 
McCredie, Donald. 
McElroy, William. 
McHugh, Frank H. 
McKee. Frank. 
Murphy, Charles. 
Newkirk, Jerome E. 
Peri-y, Charles. 
Pratt, John Scott Boyd. 
Ransom, S. Howard. 
Romeyn, Edward K. 
Sheppai'd, Robert. 
Spaulding, N. B. 



133 



Staniiai'd, Han-y H. 

Tobin, John J. 

Townsend, Devereux. 

Van Heusen, William Manning. 

"Wishart, Fi-ederick. 

1879-80. 

Barhydt, George W. 
Battershall, Fletcher W. 
Bedell, William. 
Bradt, Warren L. 
Campbell, Gordon. 
Cassi<ly, John P. 
Charles, Tompkins W. 
Cox. Frederick J. 
Cunningham, Henry. 
Day, Edward F. 
Dayton, Lewis W. 
Defandoi'f, Jason F. 
Du Bois, Pierre Eugene. 
Gould, Albei't L. 
Grant, Ai-thui-. 
Griffith, William H. 
Hackett, James. 
Hamilton, Robert A. 
Hamilton, William J. 
Hilton, John B. 
Jessup, Hariy W. 
Jessup, William. 
Judson, Edmund L. 
Lansing, Henry. 
La Rose, C. E. Rancour. 
Maginnis, Fi-ank E. 
Mix, E(iwar<l D. 
Mullen, James A. 
Rathbone, Albert. 
Reynolds, Cuyler. 
Rol)inson. James A. 
Smart, William S., Jr. 
Stevens, Charles E. 
Stevens, Charles P. 
Tyndall, Charles II. 
Van Benthuysen, Charles F. 
Van Derveei", Charles A. 
Van Heusen, Chai-les. 
Van Wormei', Frederick. 



Waggoner, William G. 
Walsh, R. V. De Witt. 
Wooster, Hai'ry G.' 

1880-81. 

Abell, Frederick W. 
Batchelder, Walter W. 
Brandow, Melvin D. 
Cameron, Edward M. 
Clark, John. 
Clarke, Freeman. 
Collier, Arthur L. 
Cornell, Henry Watson. 
Crounse, Edgar. 
Daly, Andrew. 
Dean, Keble. 
Dean, Philip Sidney. 
Downer, Frank H. 
Edwards, Oliver M. 
Eld ridge, Frank P. 
Emmet, Joseph K., Ji-. 
Fitzgei-ald, Don Felipe. 
Getman, Melanchthon J. 
Gorton, Joseph A. 
Hawley, Charles E., Jr. 
Horner, Ulysses Grant. 
Hungei-foi'd, Isaac J. 
Huntington, Herbert F. 
Huyck, Edmund N. 
Jackson, Albert H. 
Jewett, F. G., Jr. 
Liddle, William A. 
Lintnei", George A. 
Livingston, William A. 
McCormick, Heni-y S. 
McHugh, J. William. 
McKown, .James. 
McKown, S. ('ampbell. 
Newland, David. 
Peri-y, John Schuber. 
Rosenthal, Aaron J. 
Sage, Henry M. 
Shaw, Charles F. 
Smith, George R. 
Smith, Albert T. 
Sti-ong, Selah W., Jr. 



134 



Ten Eyck, William B. 
Van Atten, William A. 
Van Pelt, Arthui- H. 
Warner, James A. 
Weaver, Geoi-g-e S., Jr. 
Wells, Fredei-ick R. 
Wendell, Clarence T. 
Wendell, Nathan H. 
Wilkins, Frank J. 
Williams, Edmund B. 
Young-, Clarence G. 

1881-82. 

Barbel", Morgan. 
Barnard, Arthur. 
Burt, Don H. 
Colbert, Edward V. 
Cox, Edwai'd G. 
De Grafe, William, Jr. 
Donlon, Alphonsus. 
Douglas, Charles H., Jr. 
Dubuque, L. R., Jr. 
Durant, Clai-k. 
Elmoi-e, George W. 
Emerson, James A. 
Gallup, Fritz R. 
Graves, Carleton. 
Harris, John F. 
Helme, Thomas, Jr. 
Higgins, William S. 
Holmes, PMwin. 
Howell, George Seymour. 
Jewett, Edward T. 
Klock, Jay E. 
Lamoreaux, Maus. 
Lansing, Guy. 
Lehman, Rozeli G. 
Markus, Eugene. 
Myers, William S. 
Mills, George S. 
Mills, John G. 
Moi-row, McD. 
Mosher, Howard T. 
Neville, William H. 
Nichols, Andrew E. 
Olcott, Douglas W. 



Page, Charles M. 
Pardee, Arthur. 
Peckham, Hari-y. 
Pemble, Earl B. 
Phisterer, Carl J. 
Rathboiie, Joel. 
Reynolds, Mai-cus T. 
Russell, Charles. 
Sanford, Harry B. 
Saxe, George G., Jr. 
Shattuck, J. M. 
St. John, Thomas M. 
St. John, W. F. 
Strong, William V. D. 
Taylor, Joseph B. 
Tolle, Otto. 
Tyler, Arthur A. 
Van Allen, John H. 
Wade, Edward U., Jr. 
Wagoner, Elmer E. 
Weller, Rheinhardt. 
White, John G. 

1882-83. 

Abbott, Cary F. 

Barker, . 

Beckett, John J. 
Bennett, William. 
Bliss, William T. 
Bontecou, Read B. 
Burton, James. 
Burton, William H. 
Cameron, Le Roy L. 
Cooke, Frank K. 
Delamater, John A. 
Dix, Charles B. 
Downer, Edgar J. 
Du Buque, Paschal S. 
Easton, Irving B. 
Elmore, Edwin W. 
Farrell, James C. 
Feary, Robert H. 
Gaige, Isaac B. 
Graves, Milton S. 
Hagenian. Lowell M. 
Hawkes, Charles F. 



135 



Hays, Alanson, 
Hoag, Fi-ank, Jr. 
Hoit, "William W. 
Irwin, Theodore D. 
Johnston, David S. 
Knickerbockei", Hugh McC. 
Lansing-, Cooper N. 
LaRose, Piei-i-e W. 
Maher, James H. 
March, Alden. 
Marvin, Selden E., Jr. 
Mather, Dan, Jr. 
McLaughlin, Theodore S. 
Millard, A.lmon H. 
Moore, Thomas. 
Murjihy, Waltei- G. 
Murray, Fi-ank N. 
Palmer, Fi-aiik R. 
Pai'ker, Amasa J., 3d. 
Parker, Lewis R. 
Ramsey, Horatio P. 
Rew, Irwin. 
Roberson, Frank R. 
Rowley, Walter E. 
Scott, Robert G. 
Seliger, Joseph. 
Sickles, Hai-ry J. 
Simons, Alfred C. 
Sitterly, Edward. 
Smith, James E. 
Snow, Frank S. 
Stedman, Fi-ank W. 
Strong, Mason R. 
Templeton, Samuel E. 
Todd, Stanley M. 
Tucker, Luther H., Jr. 
Van Heusen, R. Fletcher. 
Van Rensselaer, Cornelius G. 
Visscher, Edward \Y. 
Wendell, Ernest B. 
White, Arthur G. 
\Vill)or, Samuel A. G. 
Wilson, George H. 

188;3-84, 

Antemann, Fredei'ick R. 



Barton, D. Ai-thur. 
Bayard, A. Herbert. 
Benedict, Hii-am A. 
Best, Harvey A. 
Boltwood, Bei-tram B. 
Briggs, Augustus R. 
Dwight, Harvey L. 
Fitzsimons. James. 
Fort, Fi-ank A. 
Frost, Frank L 
Gallup, Hari'is P. 
Garland, William S. 
Gordon, John H., Jr. 
Greenalch, Wallace. 
Hartshorn, Wench^l P. 
Hilton, Fredei'ick L. 
Houck, Clarence A. 
Irvin, Richard. 
Irvin, Thomas S. 
Isham, Edwin S. 
Kenyon, Benjamin B. 
Knickerbocker, Harry I. 
Knight, Charles B. 
Le Gallez, Abram. 
Lockwood, Harry. 
Malcolm, James W. 
Mason, Thomas F. 
Nims, Heni-y Miles. 
Perry, William C. 
Prentice, William K. 
Rancour, La Rose. 
Riley, Joseph H. 
Ronan, Parker C. 
Roraback, Charles P. 
Russell, Howard. 
Shults, William D. 
Smith, Joel D. 
Spitzli, George A. 
Sterry, Frederick. 
Story, Geoi-ge W. 
Turner, John C. 
Van Bui-en, Truman C. 
Van Vi-anken, Clarence V. 
Van Woi'iner, Edwin. 
Vint, James Sanuiel. 
White, Learned. 



VSiJ 



Whitney, Charles L. A. 
Williams, James V. 
Wood, Laiisiiif;;- P. 

1884-85. 

Bailly, Geoi-jre K. 
Barrett, Wiliiai.i C. 
Brown, Roy C. 
Chase, John. 
Cluett, Albert. 
Cluett, Rol)ert, Jr. 
Colvin, Andrew J. 
Corliss, William S. 
Davis, ITari-y S. 
Fish. Wilbur P. 
Freeman, Lewis C. 
Gibson, F<lwin H. 
Hand, B. Learned. 
Hawley, John H. 
Holden, Edg-ar B., Jr. 
Hughson, John C, Jr. 
Huyck, John N. 
Knowles, Charles P. 
Lintnei', Charles H. 
Lochner, Jacob L., Jr. 
Loug'hran, Frederick W. 
Mather, Adrian W. 
McCormick, William. 
McKenzie, John A. 
McKinney, Robert D. 
McLanghlin, Alfred S. 
Niver, Smith. 
Oliver, Jack R. 
Peck, Charles A. 
Ransom, Chai-les S. 
Ransom, Harry N. 
Richards, Frederick H. 
Rosenthal, Lubin L. 
Sanders, Fi-ank N. 
Sanders, John B. 
Shejiard, Jared H. 
Sherman, Hari-y P. 
Shields, Frank A. 
Smith, Han-y E. 
Stedman, John P, 
Stevens, Clarence W. 



Stevens, Frederick B. 
Stewart, William J. 
Thompson, William Lelatid. 
Tilling-hast, Wilbur. 
ToV)in, Thomas H. 
Tolhurst, Frederick A. 
Towiisend. Fi-ederick, Ji-, 
Van Huesen, John M. 
Varick, William R. 
Wasson, James D., Jr. 
Watkins, Jesse M. 

1885-86. 

Bailey, Judson H. 
Ball, Guy S. 
Barnes, Ai'chie S. 
Barnes, Joseph C. 
Blake, Cai-i-oU. 
Beardsley, William K. 
Cai'nell, John R. 
Cassety, Edward P. 
Clark, Charles J. 
Crannell, Clarke W. 
Dunning-, Charles. 
Ensign, William H., Jr. 
Gardenier, Ransen A. 
Gilmour, Allan A. 
Graves, George. 
King, Egbert B. 
King, Robert V. 
Lansing, William, Jr. 
Lynch, Charles P. 
Mack, Russell L. 
Mather, Berthier W. 
McHafiie, Charles E. 
McCormick, Charles. 
Michaelis, Guy. 
Nichols, James H. 
Pruyn, Francis L. 
Schemerhorn, William M. 
Seward, Emory R., Jr. 
Smith, William K. 
Steenbui'gh, Eugene. 
Stone, Stanley M. 
Ten Eyck, Harry. 
Thompson, McNaughton. 



137 



Tolhursl, Burton. 
Van Benthnysen, Boyd. 
Vincent, Robei't H. 
"Walsh, James L. 
Wokott, Frank S. 

1886-87. 

Al)lett, Burton C. 
Brooks, Charles V. 
Chapman, Edgar T. 
Comstock, Edwin S. 
Cornell. Channing B. 
Craft. Franklin. 
Dag-get t, Alexander S. 
Dean, B. Kent. 
Ellis. De Lancey M. 
Gaffer, Homer R. 
Gardenier, William I. 
Hutchins, Walter L. 
La Moure, Charles T. 
Liscomb, Pervy C. 
Martin, E. Throop. 
Miller, Ernest L. 
Miller, MacNaughton. 
Newcomb, Edward T. 
Newman, Clarence E. 
North, Harry B. 
Nuttall, Lyman W. 
Pemberton, Howanl, Jr. 
Phisterer, Frederick W. 
Randel, William H., Jr. 
Rathbone, Gerald L. 
Robinson, John M. 
Robinson, William H. 
Ronan, Walter E. 
Shaw, Percy L. 
Shoemaker, James D. 
Simpson, Emory L. 
Sloan, Clark B. 
Sloan, Han-y. 
•Stedman, Chai-les S. 
Taylor, William H. 
Treinblay, Charles. 
Vander Veer, Edgai- A. 
Van Slyke, Geoi-ge W., Jr 
Van Slyke, William H. 



Walsh, Townsend. 
Willard. James H. 
Woollett, William L. 

1887-88. 

Akin, Roy S. 
Ames, Allan P. 
Andrus, Hugh H. 
Bankei-, Albert B. 
Barr, Edmund L. 
Burton, Rufus. 
Card, John C. H. 
Cavanaugh, William .J. 
Chapman, John K. 
Church, Louis P. 
Cleveland, Frederick J. 
Cluett, Ernest J. 
Collins, Lorenzo D., Jr. 
Cowee, Harvey D. 
Cowlbeck, Hai-ry W. 
Crosby, William M. 
Cross, Hari-y W. 
Dawson, George. 
Dederick, Prescott K. Jr, 
Dubuque, Robei't J. 
Ferguson, Smith F. 
Fitzsimons, Philip. 
Fonda, Douw H., Jr. 
Gaus, Charles H. 
Goddai-d, William M. 
Graham Daniel. 
Griscom, George S. Jr. 
Griswold, Edmund L. 
Hamilton, Alfred S. 
Harder, Harry D. 
Heuser, Frederick C. 
Hilt, Fredei-ick K. 
Hoffman, Karl R. 
Hoffman, Paul W. 
Hoi'ton, James B. 
Johnson, Benjamin R. 
Johnson, Frederick H. 
King, Rufus H., Jr. 
Kirk, William. Jr. 
Knowles, Benjamin. 
Kurtz, Jacob. 



138 



La Moure, Howard A. 
Lemley, Waltei*. 
Liruisey, James. 
Lodewick, James 11. 
Martin, William L. 
McArdlc, James H. 
McCammoii, Edward, Jr. 
McCann, Harry I. 
McClure, Archibald, Jr. 
McDonough, Clarence J. 
McElroy, Charles E. 
McHarg-, Ernest J. 
Mclntyi-e, Ewen. 
McLaug-hlin, William C, Jr. 
Melius. Ludlow. 
Moir, Douglass. 
Mosher, Carroll L. R. 
Mosher, Gouverneur F. 
Newton, Horace B., Jr. 
Newton, Samuel S. 
Nichols, Albert B. 
Oliver, Gibson. 
Ostrander, William A. 



Pi-uyn, Foster. 
Randel, Roy W. 
Russell, Henry, 2nd. 
Russtill, Howard. 
Russell, Piatt. 
Russell, Robert D. 
Sag-e, Dean, Jr. 
Saul. Walter S. 
Schissler, Frank M. 
Sloan, Daniel W. 
Staats, John. 
Stephens, Frederick J. 
Teller, Frank J. 
Titus, Bert E. 
Visscher, William L. 
Vrooman, Isaac H., Jr, 
Wait, Isaac V. A. 
Wagoner, Joel R. 
Whalen, Robert E. 
White, James R., Jr. 
Whitney, David K. 
Widdemer, William. 



139 



APPENDIX A. 



The Charter of the Albany Academy. 

The Regents of the University of the State of New York, to 
all to whom these presents shall or may come, Greeting : 

Whereas, The Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the 
City of Albany, by an instrument in writing, under their seal, 
beariTig date the first day of February, in the year one 
thousand eight luuidred and thirteen, after stating that they 
had contributed in land and money equal to thirty thousand 
dollars, for the use and benefit of an Academy, to be erected 
in the City of Albany, did make application to us, the said 
Regents, that the said Academy might be incorporated and 
become subject to the visitation of us and our successors, and 
that Stephen Van Rensselaer, John Lansing, Junior, Archibald 
Mclntyre, Smith Thompson, Abraham Van Vechten, John V. 
Henry, Henry Walton, AVilliam Neill, John M. Bradford, 
John McDonald, Timothy Clowes, John McJimpsey, Frederick 
G. Mayer, Sanuiel Merwin and the Mayor and Recorder of 
the said City, ex-officio, might be trustees of the said Academy 
by the name of " The Trustees of the Albany Academy ; " 

Now^ KNOW ye. That we, the said Regents, having enquired 
into the allegations contained in the instrument aforesaid, 
and found the same to be true, and conceiving the said 
Academy calculated for the promotion of literature do by these 
presents, pursuant to the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, signify our approbation to the incorporation of the said 
Stephen Van Rensselaer, John Lansing, Junior, Archibald 
Mclntyre, Smith Thompson, Abraham Van Vechten, John V. 
Henry, Henry Walton, William Neill, John M. Bradford, John 
McDonald, Timothy Clowes, John McJimpsey, Frederick G. 
Mayer, Sanniel Merwin, and the Mayor and Recorder of the 
said city, e,r,-offi,cio, by the name of the " Trustees of the 
Albany Academy," being the name mentioned in and by the 
said request in writing; on condition that a part of the i)rin- 
cipal or estate before mentioned, sufficient to i)roduce one 
hundred dollars annual income at least, shall be set a}»art, 
and shall not be diminished or otherwise appropriated, and 

141 



that the said income thereof be applied solely to the mainte- 
nance or salary of the Professors or Tutors of said Academy. 
In testimony whereof we have caused our common 
[l. s.] seal to be hereunto alhxed the fourth day of March 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
and thirteen. 

DANIEL D. TOMPKINS, 



Francis Bloodgood, 

Secretary. 



Chancellor. 



APPENDIX B. 



At a meeting of the Trustees held November 17, 1813, the 
Rev. Messrs. Neill, McJimpsey, Clowes and Bradford, w^ere 
appointed a Committee to prepare a memorial to the Hon- 
orable the Common Council, praying that a suitable build- 
ing for the Academy may be erected at the expense of the 
City ; and at a subsequent meeting held December 8, 1813, the 
Committee reported a draft of a memorial, which was approved 
by the Board, and the President w^as ordered to sign the same 
on the behalf of the Board, and that it be presented at the 
next meeting of the Common Council. 

In reply to the memorial of the Trustees the Common Council 
passed the following resolution : 

" At a Common Council holden at the Capitol, February 28, 
1815. 

^^Resolved, That Messrs. Van Rensselaer, Brinkerhoff, 
Humphrey and Brown, be a Committee to confer wdth a Com- 
mittee of the Trustees of the Albany Academy on the subject 
of a suitable })lan or plans for an Academy in this City ; and 
that the said Connnittee report such plan or })lans together with 
estimates of the expense thereof to this Board, as soon as the 
same may be practicable. 

"A true extract from the minutes, this 28th February, 1815. 

"J. E. LovETT, D'p Clkr 

The same Committee of the Trustees was appointed as the 
Connnittee of ('onfc^rence, and they reported to the Board at a 
meeting held March 9, 1815, that they had ado})ted a plan of 
the building drawn by Thomas C. Taylor, as the most eligible 
of any of those exhibited for the pur})Oses of the institution; 
and thereupon the following resolutions were passed : 

'^Resolved, That this Board adopt the said ])lan, and that the 
Corporation of the City of Albany l)e requested to enter on the 
lot granted by them to this Board, in tlie public scpiare, and 

142 



erect on the east front thereof, a building conformable thereto ; 
or in case the said Cor[)oration shoidd be desirous of omitting 
the wings, they are reijuested to erect the central l)uilding only. 

^^Resolved, That John Lansing, Jr., Chas. D. Cooper, Har- 
manns Bleecker and Henry Walton, be a Committee to confer 
generally with the Cori)oration, or with any Comndttee thereof, 
on the subject of the building for the Academy, and that the 
said Committee report to the Board. 

'■^Resohed, That the Secretary transmit to the Corporation of 
the City of Albany, a co])y of the above proceedings." 

The Common Council thereupon passed the following reso- 
lutions : 

"At a Common Council holden at the Capitol, 13th March, 
1815. 

"Resolved, That the Academy be built of brick with a front 
ornamented by free stone. 

"Resolved, That his Honor, the Mayor, Messrs. Brinkerhoff, 
Humphrey and Stewart, be a Committee to engage the neces- 
sary workmen and materials, and to proceed to build and fiiush 
the said Academy. 

"A true extract from the minutes of the Common Council, 
13th day of March, 1815. 

"J. E. LovETT, D'y Clkr 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held April 25, 1815, 
the following communication was received from the Common 
Council : 

" In Common Council, 25th Ai)ril, 1815. 

"Resolved, That the Academy Committee be authorized and 
are fully empowered, to consult with the Trustees of the 
Academy about the most proper site to build the Academy on ; 
and if the Committee are of opinion that a more proper site 
can be obtained than the one heretofore appropriated for that 
use, that they forthwith make a purchase of as much ground as 
will be sufficient, and this Board will confirm the })urchase, and 
convey the above-mentioned five lots heretofore set apart in 
fee to the Trustees. 

"A copy from the minutes. 

" H. Merchant, Dep. CU:' 

The action of the Board of Trustees on the above resolution 
was as follows : 

At a meeting held April 2(5, 1815 : 

Resolved, That Messrs. Lansing, Bleecker and Sedgwi k be 
a Committee of this Board, to confer with the Academy Com- 
mittee of the Corporation on the sul)ject of changing the site 
of the Academy ; but that they l)e confined merely to that 
subject, this Board not admitting that their title to the lots 
mentioned in the resolution of tlie corporation of this city, is 

143 



ill any way qualified, or tliat the fee of the .•^aid lots is not 
absolutely in this Board ; and that they report the result of 
their conference to this Board. The Committee innnediately 
upon their api)oiutment met with the Academy Committee of 
the Corporation and on their return to the Board made the fol- 
lowiuii- report, which was ordered to be inserted in the minutes : 

" The Committee have met the Committee of tlie Common 
Council on the subject of the site of the Academy. The Com- 
mittee of the Connnon Council ofier to purchase and convey to 
the Trustees of the Academy, five lots on the south side of 
State street and north of Jay street, of the dimensions of 165 
feet front, and 182 feet depth ; that if the Trustees elect to 
have the Academy erected in the square, the building thereof 
suspended until the pitch of the square is ascertained by John 
Randal, Jun'r, who has been engaged to level the streets of 
this city, and to commence his operations in August or Heptem- 
ber next. 

" Thereupon Resolved, unanimously as the ojiinion of the 
Trustees, that the site for the Academy on the public square is 
in every point of view most eligible, and therefore that they 
persevere in their request to the corporation to erect the 
Academy on the said lot." 

On the 28th of February, 1816, the Conunon Council passed 
the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the Trustees of the Albany Academy be 
authorized to solicit a »State loan to the amount of $80, 000 
payable at such time as the Legislature shall direct, to be 
applied to the completion of the Academy, and to profiler the 
responsibility of this Board for such loan, and the payment of 
the interest semi-annually. 

In Connnon Council. A true copy, 

28th February, 1816. (tkorge MERCHAiyT, Clk. 

In coni])liauce witii above request a i)etition to this effect was 
submitted to the Board and signed l)y the several members, 
and ordered to be presented to the Legislature by a committee 
of the Board consisting of Messrs. Lansing and Mclntyre. 

It is not known what was the result of this a])})lication. 

At a meeting of tlio Board of Trustees held January ;Ust, 
1817, the following letter was presented and read : 

" To the Trustees of the Alhcmy Acadeini/ : 

"Gentlemen — We are instructed by the Conmiou Council 
of this city to confer with you (or with a committee to be ap- 
pointed by you) on the propriety of uniting in a petition to the 
llon'ble the Legislature to i)urchase the Academy for the State 
for a Governors" liouse. 

144 



" Be pleased to iiifovni us when and where we shall have the 
honor of discharging the trust reposed in tis by the Common 
Council. " We are, Gentlemen, 

"Respect'}^, your mo: obt. Servts., 
" NicHS. Bleecker, ") 

" Peter 1)\v. Beekman. > Comtnittee.'"' 
"J. V. N. Yates, ) 

Wlierei^MJU, it was 

Resolved, That Messrs, Lansing, Henry and Bleecker be a 
Committee of Conference on the part of this Board, and at a 
meeting of the Board held Feb. 17, 1817, the Committee re 
ported the following resolution of the Common Council : 

In Common Council, Feb'y 10, 1817. 
Resolved, That in case an arrangement can be effected with 
the Legislature, for the sale of the Building lately erected on 
the public square for an Academy, that in such case this Board 
do hereby pledge its faith to the Trustees of the Academy, 
that they will forthwith proceed to build or purchase a suitable 
edifice, as a substitute for the unfinished building now proposed 
to be sold. From the minutes, 

George Merchant, Clh. 

Whereupon, 

^'Resolved, That it will not comport with the interest of the 
Academy to accede to the terms of the above proposition ; but 
that this Board disposed to comply with the wishes of the Hon. 
the Corporation, will not withhold their consent to a sale sup- 
posed to conduce to the ease and comfort of our fellow citizens ; 
and the Committee already appointed are therefore authorized 
to concert with the Committee of the Corporation, the terms of 
such sale — the proportion of the consideration money to be 
retained by the Board, and also concerning a substitute for the 
present Academy, and further that they report the above to 
this Board for their approbation." 

It does not appear that any further report was made on this 
subject. 



APPENDIX C. 



The city was bound under an obligation dated March 15, 
1818, to sell the ground ujion whicli the old gaol stood upon 
such terms and at such times as the Board of Trustees might 
require ; and also to deliver to the Board the material of the 
old gaol as soon as the new one should be finished. To render 

145 



this item of funds available, the committee appointed for that 
imrpose reoommeuded, at a meeting held April 28, 181^, that 
the property be sold at auction ujjon the following terms : 

Three-fourths of the purchase money to be on a credit of fif- 
teen years from the day of sale, at animal interest, to be se- 
cured by bond and mortgage on the premises. 

One-fourth part, with interest, at the choice of the purchaser, 
to be paid in twelve months from tlie sale, and to be secured in 
twenty-four hours after the sale by notes to be approved by a 
Connnittee of the Board ; or in fifteen years from the sale, wdth 
annual interest, secured to the Board by bond mid mortgage 
on other clear and adequate lands to be api)roved by the same 
committee ; the purchaser to make his choice in writing and 
deliver the same to the auctioneer within twenty-four hours 
after the sale. 

The nuiterials of the gaol Avere to be sold on the following 
terms : the price to be paid in four equal yearly instalments, 
with interest secured by personal security ; or at the option of 
the purchaser, to be paid within fifteen years of the sale se- 
cured by bond and mortgage on unincumbered property ; these 
materials to be removed in three months from the sale. 

This re})ort was adopted by the Board, and a copy of a reso- 
lution founded thereon was delivered to the cor})oration. 

Under this resolution the coi-poration ordered the property to 
be sold l)y the Chamberlain on the 22d of June, 1818, and it 
was struck off entire to Benjamin (loodrich for $10,800. Good- 
rich, however, did not fulfil the conditions of the sale, but de- 
livered to the Committee of the Board a relinquishment of all 
his right ; so, according to the resolution of the Board, a re- 
sale was ordered, and the property was struck off to Andrew 
Thompson for $16,900. He elected to secure all the purchase 
by mortgage, and accordingly gave a mortgage on the prem- 
ises for §12,675, and gave a further mortgage on No. 58 Lyon 
street (now Washington avenue) for $4,225. 

During the year 1S16 Mr. Thompson was unable to pay the 
interest on his mortgages, and the ])roperty thereafter came 
into the ]>ossession of the Academy, and was afterwards dis- 
posed of by the trustees. 



APPENDIX D. 



(Conmiittee, Messrs. Neill, Mc.Jimpsev and Donald. Re- 
ported Marcli 81, 1818.) 

146 



DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION. 

This Institution, as soon as the growth of its funds and the 
number ot Scholars shall permit, shall consist of five depart- 
ments, or distinct Schools of literature and science. 

I. Ancient Languages of Greece and Rome, with their Ge- 
ography, &c, 

II. Mathematics, inchiding Algebra, Conic Sections, Flux- 
ions, Geograithy. 

III. Natural Philosophy with its application to Astronomy 
and Mechanics. 

IV. Belles Lettres applied to Criticism, Composition, Oratory. 
V. Natural History, including- Botany, Chemistry, Miner- 
alogy. 

In the present state of the funds, the probable number of 
Scholars and the nature of the studies which they may prose- 
cute, the establishment of the two first departments may be 
deemed sufficient. 

1st DEPARTMENT. 

Ancient Languages of Greece and Rome. 

This School shall consist of four Classes, taught by four ap- 
propriate Teachers in separate apartments. 

Class I. In this shall be taught Elements of Latin and 
English Grammars, Grammatical F2xercises, Penmanship, Latin 
Authors under Caesar and Virii-il — Speaking Select Pieces in 
English, and Catechisms every Saturday. 

Class II. In this Class shall be taught Caesar, Sallust, Virgil, 
Grannnatical Exercises, constant a])plication of the rules of 
Etymology, Syntax and Prosody — Pemnanship, English and 
Latin Grammars — Speaking Pieces in English and Latin, with 
Catechisms every Saturday. 

Clash III. In this Class shall be taught the Odes and Epodes 
of Horace, Virgil's Georgics, Cicero, Livy, Terence, strict at- 
tention shall be paid to the a})])lication of the rules of Syntax, 
Prosody and Scanning Metrical Measures, Versions from Flng- 
lish to Latin and from Latin to F^nglish, Greek Grannuar, 
Greek Testament, Elements of Ancient Geography and Ro- 
man Anti(piities, frequent rejjetition of English and Latin 
Grannnars, Penmanship — Sjjeaking Select English and Latin 
Pieces, in jjrose and verse, with Catechisms every Saturday. 

Class IV. In this class shall be taught the Satires and 
Epistles of Horace, Juvenal, Tacitus, Revisal of Terence, 
Homer, Xenophon, Demosthenes, Longinus, Anacreon, some 
Dramatic Grecian Poets, double Latin Versions aud Transla- 
tions, Greek Grammatical Exercises and Versions from F^nglish 
into Greek, Ancient Geography, Roman and Grecian Antiqui- 

147 



ties, Compositions in Latin, Ciiticisni on Classics — Frequent 
reviews of Latin, Greek and Englisli Grammars — [Speaking 
Pieces, Englisli, Latin and Greek, witli the study of the Evi- 
dences of Natural and Revealed Religion every Saturday.* 

2d department. 

This School (the Mathematical), shall under present circum- 
stances 1)0 connuitted to the direction of one Preceyitor. In it 
shall lie taught Arithmetic, Vulgar, Fractional and Decinuil — 
Euclid's Elements, and Trigonometry with their application to 
Geometry, Astronomy and Navigation, Pennmnship, Geogra- 
phy, English Grannnar and Grammatical Exercises, the pro- 
jection of Maps in connection with practical Land Surveying — 
Catechisms, Speaking Select Pieces in prose and verse, every 
Saturday forenoon. 

Teachers. 

There shall at least be five Teachers at the commencement 
of this institution. The Principal shall have the care of the 
buildings of the Academy, the General Superintendence of the 
behavior of the Scholars, especially of the Classic Schools, and 
he shall teach the fourth or senior Class. He shall preside in 
meetings of the other Teachers for the government and disci- 
pline of the Seminary, shall be the organ of correspondence 
with the Board of Trustees and with the Regents of the Uni- 
versity in anrnial reports. It might be highly conducive to the 
ease of the Trustees and to the iiiterest of the institution that 
he should have a seat, without a vote, in the Board of Trustees. 

The teachers of the three other Classes shall be elected, ex- 
amined and have their Salaries fixed by the Board of Trustees, 
and be independent in their Classes, except in what regards 
harmony of system in education. 

The Mathematical Teacher to be wholly accountable to the 
Trustees and Regents in the management of his School, except 
in what regards the exteriuil government and discipline of the 
Academy. 

Of Salaries. 

These should be so liberal and so punctually paid as to se- 
cure the most respectable talents and their vigorous exertions 
in their res[)ective departments. 

* It is repectfully iiig-ed on the mature deliberation of the Board, to 

considei- whether a ))artial adoption of the Lancastei- i)lan, by Monitors, 
might not with ^Teat advantage both to Teachers and Scholars, find ad- 
mission into ea(;h Class. One of the tii-st Literary .Jonrnals of Enrope, in 
a late nunduM-, has remarked th(^ incr»>dible good etfects that has been 
jiro(bic.ed by its introduction into the M(!tropi>litan Grannnar School of 
their nation. Edinb : Review, No. 40, 1812. 

Pei'haps its etfects might be eipially beneticial, if adopted by theTVIath- 
ematical School. 

148 



The Salary of tlu^ Principal, from his station, from his supe- 
rior labors, and fi'om liis ros})onsil)ilty, as well as to secure re- 
spect, should exceed that of the other Teachers. 

Salaries shall, as far as practicable, be so settled as to stimu- 
late attention and exertion in the Teacher ; a surplus might be 
allowed on the annual increase of Scholars received into his 
Class. This might be aniuially adjusted and modified. This 
method has been represented as carrying some European Sem- 
inaries and especially the Grammar School and University of 
Edinburgh, to their unexampled celebrity during the last lifty 
years. 

Of Government and Discipline. 

This delicate subject may be detailed and adjusted with 
more advantage, by the joint exertions of the Trustees and 
Teachers when the Schools are carried into operation. 

Nothing should be enjoined but what is practicable and ob- 
viously, reasonable. Nothing prohibited that is not injurious. 
Nothing threatened but in mildness, and what is threatened in- 
flexibly inflicted, without passion and without partiality. 

Of Admission into the Schools. 

Any youth of competent age, who can read English toler- 
ably, and of decent deportment, may be admitted without ex- 
amination into the Mathematical School, and into the first Latin 
Class. Those who apply for admission into the higher classes 
must undergo an examination by the Principal and the Teacher 
into whose class he seeks admission, and their decision shall be 
final. No boy shall be expelled till after a fair hearing in the 
presence of the Teachers, and the concurrence of the Trustees 
on reviewing the transaction. 

Hours of Attendance. 

The hours of attendance shall be, during the summer half 
year, from six till eight o'clock, and from nine to twelve, in the 
forenoon, and from two to five, in the afternoon. 

In the winter half year they shall attend from eight till 
twelve, in the forenoon, and from two to five in the afternoon. 

In every School and Class a roll shall be kept, containing the 
name of every Scholar, which shall be called within five min- 
utes after the bell has rung or the clock struck the hour, and 
the name of every absentee and of those who are tardy shall 
be noted, wdiich shall remain for the inspection of Teacher, 
Parents and Trustees, and adjusted every Wednesday, as the 
Teacher shall by a rule prescribe. 

Fees of Tuition. 
These should be so low as to exclude the child of none who 
are not in a state of absolute penury, without being burden- 

149 



some, and to witlilioM the igiioraiit and sordid from enconraiiing 
Private Schools in the hands of unqualified Teacliers. They 
should be so high as to secure respect to the Teachers and to 
the institution. Above five dollars per quarter perhaps, they 
ought not to rise, nor fall under four. Poverty and merit united 
may expect the patronage of the Board. 

Of Vacations axd Examinations. 

There shall be two vacations annually. The first to com- 
mence on the first Monday in August, and expire on tlie first 
Monday of ye})tember. The second to commence on the 24th 
December, and to end on the first Monday of January. 

There shall no other times be admitted as holidays except 
those prescribed by public authority. 

Tliere shall be four Examinations, as nearly (piarterly as 
convenient. Two shall be public and held during the two days 
that precede each vacation. On these the Trustees, the City 
Corporation, the founders of the Academy, the Parents of the 
Pupils, and as many Citizens as can be conveniently accommo- 
dated, shall be expected to attend. The last day's examina- 
tion shall conclude with Orations delivered in }uiblic by the 
Scholars. 

At the end of the intermediate tpiarters an Examination of 
at least one day shall be lield in the presence of the Trustees, 
or a Committee ap})ointed by them, and the Parents and Guar- 
dians of the Scholars. 

The Examination shall bo conducted either by the respective 
Teachers of eacli Class, or by persons whom the Board of Trus- 
tees may previously appoint for that purpose. 

Of£Premiums. 

Premiums shall be conferred at the close of examination on 
one or more boys in each class who shall have distinguished 
themselves for superior })roficiency in their studies, combined 
with correct behavior. 

Tlu; Teachers, in deliberation with the Trustees, shall en- 
deavor to ascertain the victors, and to avoid imputation of par- 
tiality, or individual censure, they shall declare their decision 
by ballot. 

The Premiums shall consist of correct and elegant co])ies of 
such books as they have recently studied, or of such as maybe 
employed in those new Classes into which they are about to 
enter. 

The books shall be inscribed with some* aj)propriate inscrip- 
tion, accom])anied by the namii of the Teacher, and the seal of 
the Board of Trustees, and sli;i II be (h^livered publicly by the 

1.50 



Principal of the Academy, or by the Presichiut of tlie Board of 
Trustees, with a short conijjlinientary address. 

8fei^" It is expected business will conmieuce in tliis Academy 
the first of September next. 



APPENDIX E. 



To the Citizens of Albany and its Vicinity : 

The corporation of tliis city, from most enlightened and 
praise-wortliy views, have })artial]y endo.wed and obtained the 
incorporation of an Academy in tliis place. 

The design of the institution is the solid and deep instruction 
of the youth in all the branches of learning and science usually 
taught in schools and colleges, so as to afford an opportiniity of 
thorough education in all cases, but more especially in those 
where there is either an inability to bear the expense, or a 
disinclination to expose youth to the hazard of education abroad. 
The design merits the zealous and liberal support of parents 
and guardians, and of all who wisely look upon sound knowl- 
edge as one of the great causes of morality, piety and useful- 
ness of character. 

The Trustees are anxious to employ teachers of endnent 
ability as the only means of rendering the Academy superior 
in reputation ancl beneficial effects to ordinary schools. But 
this can not be done without a permanent yearly income, en- 
abling the Trustees to offer and ensure the punctual payment 
of large and adequate salaries. 

The endowment of the Corporation consists of a lot along the 
public square that must be reserved for buildings ; of the sum 
of five thousand dollars, and of the price that may be got for 
the lot and materials of the old gaol, which will probably not 
exceed 12,000 dollars. The greater part of this sum will be 
expended in the execution of suitable edifices, and but little 
will be left as a source of revenue. The money to be derived 
from tuition, the charge for which ought to be low, will not be 
more than enough to pay subordinate instructors and contingent 
expenses. 

It is therefore obvious, although the Corporation have acted 
liberally, and are deserving of the highest commendation, that 
without a sameness of spirit in their fellow citizens, manifested 
not in words, but in generous contributions, the design of the 
founders will not be accomplished. 

The Trustees, consisting of 8tei)hen Van Rensselaer. Archi- 
bald Mclntyre, John V. Henry, Henry Walton, William Neill, 
John M. Bradford, John M'Donald, Timothy Clowes, Jolni 

151 



M'Jinisey, Frederick Gr. Mayer, Samuel Merwin, Theodore 
Sedgwick, Joliu Uuer, Harmaiius Bleecker, the Mayor and 
Recorder of this city, have appointed us a Connuittee to solicit 
subscriptions for establishing a comitetent fund. 

Witliout mentioning the usefulness and the dignity of knowl- 
edge, the policy of spreading it as widely as possible amongst 
all classes of })eople in our republican government, we may be 
permitted to urge, as an excitement to a spirit of liberality the 
necessity of wdping away the deserved reproach ujjon a city so 
old, so populous, and so rich as ours, of being without a public 
seminary for teaching even the rudiments of knowledge. 

There is another view of the suV)ject, ui)on which we address 
you, relating to economy, which ought to be i)resented, as an 
imi)ortant motive to liberal contributions. 

We shall take it for granted, that the yearly expense of 
educating a boy from home is at least 250 dollars, and that no 
less than four years must be spent abroad for that pur})ose. 

Suppose a subscriber to the funds of the Academy to give 
500 dollars. The account in favor of education at home for 
that period, would stand thus : 

Principal sum expended abroad §1 ,000 00 

Interest on 250 dollars from times of payment, say 

3, 2 and 1 years 105 00 

__$1105 00 

Subscription $500 00 

Interest thereon for 4 years ] 40 00 

Tuition money to tlie Academy, at 20 (h)llars a 

year ' 80 00 

Interest on 20 dollars from the time of payment, say 

8, 2 and 1 years 8 40 

$728 40 
Making a clear saving of §376 60 



The additional cost of subsistence at home is not taken into 
the account, as it would be more than counterbalanced by 
travelling charges, extraordinary pocket money, more cost in 
dress, &c. 

The sum just stated, would be the saving in the education of 
one boy. But mark, upon every other boy to be educated, it is 
clear that the princijjal expenditure of 1,000 dollars, deducting 
tlie tuition money, would be saved. In the education of three 
sons, a i)arent would thus avoid in four years an expenditure 
of 2199 dollars. 

Besides economy, and the disinterested pleasure of doing 
good to the present and to future generations, it should be 

152 



remembered that a domestic seminary, whilst it raises emula- 
tion, and affords all the other advantages of a public school, 
leaves the habits, the manners, the morals, and the religion 
of children under the innnediate vigilance and care of ])arents, 
at a time of life when wrong im})ressions are seldom effaced. 

It may he further stated that the Trustees have the power 
and the inclination, should their finids admit of it, to institute 
a school for female education. 

To prevent any inconvenience, it is to be left discretionary 
with each subscriber to ])ay his subscription within sixty days, 
or to secure payment thereof satisfactorily, within sucli times 
as he shall think proper, with lawful interest yearly; and to 
prevent the object of any subscriber's numificence from being 
defeated, he may reduce or strike out his subscription, if the 
whole subscription shall not amount to 30,000 dollars. 

We make this address to ap})rise our fellow citizens of the 
nature of our appointment, and to give time for retiection before 
the subscription lists are presented, under a conviction that 
the more the subject is thought upon, the stronger will be the 
inducement to generous donations. 

John M. Bradford, 
Henry Walton, 
Theodore Sedgwick, 
John V. Henry. 



APPENDIX F. 



Containing List of Subscribers to the Fund for the Sup- 
port OP THE ACADEMY^ 

Whereas, an Academy has been incorporated in this city, in 
which all the branches of science are intended to be taught 
that are usually taught in schools and colleges ; but there are 
not sufficient funds to produce a certain yearly income that 
will eimble the Trustees to employ teachers of the greatest 
eminence, wliich is indispensably necessary to the accomplish- 
ment of the great end of the institution ; We, the subscribers, 
do therefore, in order to establish such fund, hereby severally 
promise to pay to "The Trustees of the Albany Academy " 
the sums annexed to our respective names, leaving it discre- 
tionary with us, either to pay the same within sixty days, or 
satisfactorily to secure the payment thereof, within such times 
as we shall think proper, with lawful interest yearly. 

Albajsty, August, 1813. 

153 



S. Van Rensselaer $1 , 250 

Jolni Lansing, Jun 300 

William James 800 

Dudley Walsh 300 

John C. Cuyler 300 

P. y. Van Rensselaer 250 

Stephen Lush 250 

Abraham Van Vechten 250 

John Van Schaick 200 

Henry Walton 250 

G. W. Van Schaick 300 

Jaraes Warren 100 

Arch. Mclutyre 100 

Geo. Pearson 200 

George Webster 200 

John D. P. Ten Eyck 15 

S. Southwick 200 

Thomas Gould 100 

G. Banyer 250 

William Bay 40 

Charles R. Webster 100 

John W. Yates 100 

J. V. N. Yates 100 

John D. P. Douw 100 

John Boardman 50 

John Ely, Jr 20 

Arch. Campbell 20 

K. K. Van Rensselaer 1 00 

Daniel D. Tompkins 100 

John Tayler 100 

Peter Van Loon 100 

Simeon De Witt 200 

John Woodw orth 100 

L & J. Townsend 250 

G. W. & Ira Porter 125 

Jas. Gourlay 100 

Peter E. Ehnendorf 100 

Andrew Thompson 300 

Daniel Hahi 50 

Lyman Root 50 

Elias Mather 50 

B. V. Clench 50 

S. Allen 50 

J. & n. Meacham 50 

Alexander Vedder .... 75 

Oliver Lathrop 50 

Gideon Hawley 50 

Samuel Wigton 50 

154 



D. Sternberg}!, Juu $30 

Arthur Hotckiss 50 

Chri.stian Miller 50 

William Caldwell 25 

John D. P. Ten Eyck 15 

William Pitkin 25 

Edward Willett 15 

James Stevenson 50 

Henry Bleecker 40 

Henry R. Truax 15 

H. V. Houthwick 25 

H. Lansingh 35 

D. P. Clark 25 

Vinal Luce 50 

James Chestney 10 

J. Vande water 25 

Eben'r Pemberton 25 

Solomon Smith 25 

A. S. Griswold 25 

Nieh's Bleecker, Jnn 25 

James Clark 25 

R. M. Meigs 50 

John S. Beeckman 100 

Jos. Havs Webb 25 

J. H. Ten Eyck. 25 

John Fryer 10 

R. Westerlo 100 

G. La Grange 25 

Sanders Lansing 60 

Sam. A. Foot 20 

John Reid 25 

Sam. Stringer 25 

Tennis Van Vechten 100 

D. B. Slingerland 25 

Ruf us Brown 20 

James Daniel 20 

David Newlands 10 

Rich'd Dodge 10 

Josiah Kerr 10 

H. V. Hart 25 

Benj. Wallace 20 

G. AV. Stanton 20 

John Trotter 20 

Barent Bleecker 75 

Peter Gansevoort 25 

John Willard 30 

Jas. La Grange 40 

Job Van Schaick 25 



155 



John Stafford $25 

Isaac Fonda 25 

Chandler Starr 25 

Walter Clark 25 

Aaron Hand 25 

David Center 25 

John Kirk 20 

Jacol) Best 20 

Jesse Buel 20 

Josiah Sherman 20 

Isaac Hansen 15 

David Schuyler 10 

•Wm. Huni])hrey 10 

Jas. Carniichael 10 

T. Lenington 10 

Cash 10 

Cash 10 

$9,780 

APPENDIX G. 



ALBANY ACADEMY. 

The Trustees will assemble on Thursday the 27th inst., at 
9 A. M., at Skinner's Mansion-house, at which place they re- 
spectfully invite the Hon. the Cor})oration, the Regents of the 
University, Parents and Guardians of Students, together with 
the Citizens and Strangers generally, to join them. The Stu- 
dents will assemble at the same hour in the Academy and 
repair in procession to the above place. On arriving there a 
procession will be formed in the following order : 

Music. 

Students of the Academy. 

Former Students. 

Faculty. 

Trustees. 

The Honourable the Corporation. 

The Governor, Lieut. -Governor and other Regents of the 

University. 

Parents and (ruardians. 

Citizens and Strangers. 

The procession will pass through Market and State streets to 

the Cai>itol. The exercises there will be then as follows : 

s 156 



1. Introductory Prayer by tlio Rev. Mr. tStausbiiry, one of 
the Trustees. 

2. Delivery of Pieces of Prose and Poetry in tlie following 
order : 

1. Howard iStaiisbury — Iiitroduc- 12. Orlando Meads — Tlie splen- 
tory Address in Latin. dour of war a obstacle to its extinc- 

2. Salem Dutcher — Extract from tion, Rev. Di-. Chalmers. 
Phillips's speech before the Glou- K^. William Porter — Speech of 
cestei-shire Missionary Society. Cassius. Shakespeare. 

3. Georg-e W. Clinton— Gei-aldine. U. Willard H. Walker— On Elo- 

4. John ISleecker • — Character of quence, by J. Q. Adams. 

Cicero. 1.5. Stephen Groesljeeck — Lines 

5. Roswell Steele — Andrew Jones, on Sir William Wallace. 

by Wordsworth. 16. Lsaac F.Smyth — Extract from 

6. Douw B. Van Olinda — Charac- Phillips' speech at a dinner in hon- 
ter of Washing-ton, by Phillips. our of Gen. Devei-eux. 

7. John Mcb. Mclntyre— On the 17. John Cassidy — Washington's 
lot of Vii'tue and Vice in this World, monument. 

8. Elbei't Slingerland — Extract 18. Aaron V. Fi-yer — Extract 
from Lord Moira's Spee(;h at the from Cui-raii's speech on the trial of 
College of Calcutta, on the excellence Finerty. 

of the English Language. 19. John V. Henry — Lines on 

9. Henry W. Walkei- — On the George the 3d. 

Dignity of Human Natui-e. 20. Robert Dorsey — On Public 

10. Theodore Sedgwick — Extract Speaking, l)y F. Hopkinson. 

from Gray's Elegy. 21. John C. Porter — Extract from 

11. Robert Cj'uttenden — Exti-act Cui-ran's speech on the trial of 
from Mr. Eivin's speech on amonu- Rowan. 

ment to Washington. 

3. Reports of the different Committees appointed to decide 
on the })remiums for proficiency in the various branches of 
study — in Penmanship and in Oratory. 

4. Presentations of the premiums by the senior Trustee 
present. 

5. Address to the Students, by the Rev. Mr. Lacey, one of 
the Trustees. 

6. Concluding prayer by the Rev. Dr. Bradford, one of the 
Trustees. 

m' u ' C Committee of 

P s"" pTrker \ Arrangement. 

N. B. — The Gallery will be reserved for those Ladies who 
may honour the occasion with their presence. 
July 26, 1820. 

The faculty in compliance with the Statutes, have divided 
the Speakers into three classes, as follows : 

1st Class. 2nd Class. 3r(t Class, 

Robert Cruttenden. George W. Clinton. John Cassidy. 

Salem Dutcher. Rol)ei-t Dorsey. Stephen Gi-oesbeeck. 

Aaron V. Fi-yer. John M. Mclntyre. John V. Henry. 

157 



1st Class. 2n6 Class. 3ril Class. 

John C. Porter. Orlancio Meads. Theodore Sedgwick. 

Elbert Slingerland. William Porter. Roswell Steele. 

Isaac F. Smyth. Howard Stansbury. Henry \V. Walker. 

Douw B. Van Olinda. Jno. Bleecker. ' Willard H. Walker. 

Note. — The Committee awarded the premiums as follows : 

In the 1st Class — 1st Premium to Salem Dutcher ; 2nd to 
Robert Cruttenden. 

In the 2iid Class — 1st Premium to Robert Dorsey ; 2nd to 
Orlando Meads. 

In the 3rd Class — 1st Premium to Theodore Sedgwick ; 2nd 
to Roswell Steele. 

The premium for the best Speaker in the whole number to 
John C Porter. 



ALBANY ACADEMY, 

The Trustees will meet at their rooms in State street, on 
Tuesday, the 31st inst., at half-past 9 a. m. The Students 
wall assemble at 9 o'clock at the Academy, and form a proces- 
sion, accomjianied with the music, which will i)roceed through 
State street to the room where the Trustees are met. They 
will then escort the Trustees to the Mansion House, where the 
Hon. the Corporation, the Regents of the University, Parents 
and Gruardians of Students, the Citizens and Strangers gener- 
ally, are requested to assemble. The ])rocession will move at 
10 o'clock precisely, in the following order, under the superin- 
tendence of C. Van Antwerj), Esq., Sheriff, and Mr. Paul 
Hochstrasser, Marshal of the City, who will act as Marshals 
on this occasion. 

Music. 
Students of the Academy. 
Former Students. 
The Faculty. 
The Trustees. 
The Hon. the Corporation. 
The Grovernor, Lieut. -Governor, and other Regents of the 
University. 
Parents and Guardians of Students. 
Citizens and Strangers. 
The [)rocession will pass through Market and State streets to 
the Cai)itol. On arriving there, the Principal will preside. 
The exercises wilj l)e as follows : 

1. Introductory prayer by the Rev. Mr. Chester, one of the 
Trustees. 

158 



2. Music. 

3. Delivery of pieces of Prose and Poetry in tlie following 
order : 



1. Salem Diitcher — Extract from 
a speech of Mr. T. Knott, before the 
Newcastle (Eiiff.) Bible Society. 

2. Edward H. Brown — Extract 
from Dr. Johnson's " Vanity of Hu- 
man Wishes." 

3. Roberto. Cruttenden ^ — Char- 
acter of William Pitt the Eldei- ; 
Grattan. 

4. Richard Cooper — The Soldiei-'s 
Funei-al— From Blackwood's Mag-a- 
zine. 

5. Elbert Sling-erland and Isaac 
Jackson — Scene between Juba and 
Syphax — Addison's Cato. 

Music. 

6. Robei't R. Dorsey —Will Wad- 
dle — Georg-e Colman. 

7. John I. Bui-ton — Exti-act fi-om 
Fisher Ames' Speech on the British 
Treaty. 

8. Richard Webster— The Philos- 
opher's Scales — Jane Taylor. 

9. John W. Cushman — Extract 
from G. Verplanck's Address before 
the N. y. Historical Society. 

10. George W. Clinton — Lines on 
Pitt and Fox, fi-om the Introduction 
to the tirst Canto of Mai-mion. 

11. Isaac Jackson — Extract from 
Sheridan's speech on the Begum 
Charge. 

12. John Cassidy — Lines on 
America — ^ Anonymous. 

Music. 



18. John V. Heni-y- On the Battle 
on Lake Erie — W. Irving. 

14. Stephen Gi-oesbeeck — Extract 
fi'om Cowper's Task. 

15. John M. D. M'Intyre — The 
Field of Battle — Anonymous. 

16. Elbei-t Slingerland — Extract 
from Di- Nott's Sei'mcm on the 
death of Hamilton. 

17. Willard Walker— Exti-act from 
Akenside's Pleasui-es of the Imagin- 
ation. 

18. John W. Ford— Extract from 
Campbell's Pleasui'es of Hojie. 

19. Jghn C. Backus — Prologue to 
the Rivals — Sheridan. 

Music. 

20. James Cassidy — Extract from 
Burke's Reflections on the French 
Revolution. 

21. Jacol) Sternberg — The Battle 
of Blenheim — Southey. 

22. Theodoi'e Kane — Extract from 
Pope's Essay on Man. 

28, Orlando Meads— On the Im- 
portant Destination of Young Men 
going out to India — Quarterly Re- 
view. 

24. Salem Dutcher and Robert G. 
Cruttenden — ■ Lochiel's Warning — 
Campbell. 

25. John C. Porter — Alexander's 
Feast — Dry den. 

Music. 



4. Reports of the different Committees appointed to decide 
on the premiums for lU'oficiency in the various branches of 
study — in Penmanship and in Oratory. 

5. Presentation of premiums and address to the Students by 
the Principal. 

6. Concluding prayer by the Rev. Mr, Lacey, one of the 

Trustees. 

John Chester, "J >^ .,, n 

u Ti f Cornvuttee of 

liBENEZER Baldwin, Y a , 

rs TT 4 Arrangements. 

UiDEON Hawley, } '^ 

N. B. The Gallery will be reserved for those Ladies who 
may honour the occasion with their presence. 



159 



The faculty, in compliance with the 8tatut.es, have divided 
the Speakers into three classes, as follows : 



1st Class. 
John I. Buiton. 
Robert G. Ciuttenden. 
John W. Cushman. 
Salem Dutcher. 
Isaac Jackson. 
John C. Porter. 
Elbert Slin^ei-land. 



2nd ClasH. 
James Cassidy. 
Geoi'ge W. Clinton. 
Robei't R. Dorsey. 
John W. Ford. 
John V. Henry. 
John M. D. Mlntyre, 
Orhmdo Meads. 
Willard Walker. 



3r(l Class. 
John C. Backns. 
iMlwai-d H. Brown. 
John Cassidy. 
Richard Cooper. 
Stephen Groesbeeck. 
Theodore Kane. 
Jacob Sternbej'g'. 
Richard Wel)stei". 



Premiums are to be given to the first and second best speak- 
ers in each class, and also an honorary premium to the best 
speaker in the whole immber. 

Note. — The Committee awarded the premiums as follows : 

In the 1st Clas.s — l.st Premium to Salem Dutcher ; 2nd to 
Elbert Slingerland. 

In tlte 2d Class— 1st Premium to Orlando Meads ; 2nd to 
Robert R, Dorsey. 

In the 3d Class — 1st Premium to Edward H. Brown ; 2nd to 
John C. Backus. 

The premium for the best Speaker in the whole number to 
John C. Porter. 



160 



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