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Full text of "Census of business: 1935. Retail distribution .."

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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

Danjel C Roper. Setrelary 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

Wilhani L. Austin. Director 



VI 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS: 1935 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION 



VOLUME 1 



UNITED STATES SUMMARY 




JUNE, 1937 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



Daniel C. Roper, Secretary 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 






William L. Austin, Director 
^'.eig'i r?., R';ed.,_ y^ssi.st,^nt Director 



C£:NSU5 of. BUSINESS.' 



Fred A. Gosnell, Chief Statistician 
William A. Ruff, Assistant 



This is one of a series of six volumes, described on pages 3 and 4 
hereof, presenting the results of the 1935 Census of Retail Distribution. 

The facts were collected in 1936 by a complete field canvass of re- 
tail stores in every State, city and county in the United States, and they 
represent the operations of retailers during the year 1935. 

Comparisons with 1933 and 1929 refer to previous business censuses 
conducted by the Bureau of the Census; i.e., the Census of American Business 
of 1933 and the Census of Distribution of 1929. The three enumerations pro- 
vide the first factual appraisal ever available of the effect on retail dis- 
tribution of a serious business depression and the early years of subsequent 
recovery. 

Volume I is primarily a summary for the United States as a whole, by 
kinds of business, by types of operation and by States. Similar data for each 
State, and in many cases by counties and cities within the State, are presented 
in detail in Retail Volumes II to VI inclusive. 

The Census of Business was made possible through an allocation of 
funds to the Bureau of the Census by the Works Progress Administration. 

Retail reports are prepared under the supervision of John Guernsey, Distribution Economist 
for the Census Bureau, by Ira D. Anderson, Retail Assistant, Hugh Dutfey, James O. Reid and Irwin Heine. 



N, v^ . ^ \ r,. .\. ... 



c^^vA 



-Vt-V. 



Vol. I - Page 3 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 



ARRANGEMENT AND CONTENTS OF RETAIL VOLUMES 



Vol ■ I - United States Summary . Contains national summaries, under 
various classifications, of the data presented in other volumes in detail; 
a general description of retail trade in 1935; comparisons with the previous 
Retail Censuses of 1933 and 1929; definitions of terms and classifications; 
and summaries of the Wholesale, Service and other Censuses which contain 
data directly related to retail census data. 

It also contains new matter not treated in greater detail elsewhere, 
including a summary of the number and nature of stores operated by negro 
proprietors, and sample compilations of other data so limited in interest 
or so incomplete as to be excluded from detailed treatment in area volumes. 



Ysi- II " County and City Summaries. Contains (1) a summary of all 
types and kinds of retail business (combined) for each State, county, city 
and place of more than 2,500 population and remainder of each county; (2) 
a series of tables for each city of more than 50,000 population, by 54 kinds 
of business; (3) a series of tables for each city of 10,000 to 50,000 pop- 
ulation, by 11 business groups; (4) analyses by size of city, for each State, 
of all stores and sales arranged in 11 business groups. 



Vol- III - Kinds of Business, by Areas. Contains a series of tables 
showing stores and sales by kinds of business in each State, county, city 
and place of more than 2,500 population, and remainder of each county. For 
this purpose all kinds of business are included in 11 business groups and 
reported uniformly for each area. For greater detail the 11 groups are 
expanded in separate tables, for each State as a whole and for cities of 
more than 500,000 population, into 66 detailed business classifications. 



Yol- lY - IYE§§ of Operation. Contains an analysis of stores, sales, 
personnel, pay rolls and operating expenses, by types of operation (inde- 
pendents, chains and other types), for each State as a whole and for each 
city of more than 500,000 population, for (1) all kinds of business combined 
and (2) 26 principal kinds of business separately. 



Vol. I - - Page 4 



Vol^_V_-_Em2loYment_and_Pay_Roll^ Contains monthly employment data 
by kinds of business, for States and for cities of more than 500,000 pop- 
ulation; also data on rates of pay, sex and full-time versus part-time status, 
by functional classes of employment (executives, office workers, salespeople,, 
etc. ) , 



Vol. VI - Credit Sales, Stocks, Size of Business, apd. Other Data . 
Contains data on credit and instalment sales, value of merchandise stocks on 
hand at the end of the year, analyses by size of business, and analyses by 
sources of sales volume (whether sales of merchandise, meals and fountain, 
or repairs and services). 



Vol. I - Page 5 

RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 

VOLUME 1 

UNITED STATES SUMMARY 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Arrangement and Contents of Retai^l Volumes 3 

Contents ^ 

Chart - Sales of each business group in proportion to total retail 

sales ' 



Comparative Chart of Retail Sales - 1935-1933-1929. 



M§2 of the United States, showing by States the amount of sales in 

1935 and ratio of 1935 and 1933 sales to 1929 sales 9 

Standard Summary of Retail Facts 10 

ComEarison Table of stores, sales, employment and pay roll by States, 

1935 compared with 1933 and 1929 28 

PART I - GENERAL SURVEY OF RETAIL DISTRIBUTION 



Introduction 1-01 

Section 1 - Stores and Sales 1-05 

Section 2 - Employment and Pay Roll 1-09 

Section 3 - Operating Expenses 1-16 

Section 4 - Retail Credit 1-19 

Section 5 - Types of Operation 1-22 

Section 6 - Retail Chains 1-26 

Section 7 - Retail Trade by Size of Business 1-31 

Section 8 - Retail Trade by Size of City 1-35 

Section 9 - Analysis of Sales by Sources of Revenue 1-39 

Section 10- Merchandise Stocks on Hand 1-40 

Section 11- Sales by Retailers versus Other Sales at Retail 1-41 



Vol. I - Page 6 

CONTENTS- - -Continued 

PART I - GENERAL SURVEY OF RETAIL DISTRIBUTION- --Continued 

Page 
Section 12- Retail Stores Operated by Negro-Proprietors 1-42 

Section_13- Ownership Groups and Mail-Order Houses 1-44 

Section_14- Other Fields Covered by the Census of Business 1-46 

PART II - SUMMARY TABLES FOR 1935 

List_of _Tables 2-01 

Es t imat ed_Po2ulat ion_bY_Stat e s , July 1, 1930 to July 1, 1936 2-03 

PART III - REPRINTS FROM PREVIOUS CENSUSES, FOR COMPARISON 

Lili-Of -Tables 3-01 

Map of the United States, showing sales by States for 1933, with 

percent of decrease from 1929 to 1933 3-02 

PART IV - DEFINITION OF TERMS AND CLASSIFICATIONS 

l^inds_of _Business defined 4-03 

Types of Operation defined 4-09 

Def ini t ion_of _Terrns 4-09 

Classi f i cat ions_Com2ar ed , 1935-1933-1929 4-11 

Description of Tables 4-18 



Vol. I - P.J, 7 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 



SALES OF EACH GROUP OF STORES IN PROPORTION TO THE SALES OF ALL STORES IN THE UNITED STATES. 




Total Store* ■ 1,653,961 
Total Sale* - $33,161,276,000 



Vol 1 - Pwe 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 



COMPARATIVE CHART OF RETAIL SALES: 1935 - 1933 AND 1929 



PERCENT OF TOTAL 
10 15 



20 



25 



Food Stores 



General Merchandise Group 



Automotive Group 



Other Retail Stores (includes 
Beer and Liquor and Second 
Hand Stores) 



Apparel Group 



Eating and Drinking Places 



Filling Stations 



Lumber-Building-Hardware Group 



Furniture Household Group 



Drug Stores 



General Stores (with food) 




30 



1935 
1933 
1929 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



Vol. I - Page 9 




Vol. I Page 10 



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Total reported expense (except value of proprietors' 

serrices) - percent to sales 

Pay roll, except proprietors' services - percent to sales. . . . 
Rent per $100 of salea in leased premises 

SALSS RATIOS 




Ho. Of independent stores - percent of total 

Proportion of their salas 

No. of obain stores - percent of total 

Proportion of their sales 

No. of storeB of other types - percent of total. ... 

Proportion of their sales , 

SALES. BT KIND-0r-HaSINK3S GRODPS 












No. of Stores under $10,000 - percent of total 

Proportion of their sales 

No. of stores of $10,000 to $30,000 - percent of total . 

Proportion of their sales 

No. of stores of $30,000 to $100,000 - percent of total. 

Proportion of their sales 

No. of stores of $100,000 to $30fr,000 - percent of total 

Proportion of their sales 

No., of stores of more than $300,000 - percent of total . 

Proportion of their sales 

3AU3 BT TZFES OF OIBB^IOH 














§ 


Food atores 

Eating and drinking places 

Department stores. .••..••....••• 
General merchandise, dry goods, Tariety atores 

Apparel group 

Automotive group ,, 

Fining stations 

Lumher-bullding-hardware groap .•.••••• 
Drug stores 

Liquor stores (packaged bear, wines, liquors). 



Vol. 1 - Page 20 









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Vol. 1 - Page 1-01 



R_E_TAIL_DI_SJ[RI_BU™Nj^ 1935 
VOLUME I - PART I 



Introduction 

This is a summary for the United States presenting the results of the 
third Retail Census. The first such Census was taken as part of the Census of 
Distribution of 1929. A summary for 1929, comparable to this, is contained in 
Distribution Volume I, Part 1, one of the reports of the Fifteenth Census of 
the United States. 

The second Retail Census was taken as part of the Census of American Busi- 
ness of 1933, which included also a census of wholesale establishments and a 
census of service establishments, places of amusement and hotels. A retail 
summary for 1933, comparable to this, is contained in Retail Volume I of the 
1933 Census of American Business. 

This third Retail Census was taken as part of the Census of Business of 
1935. The data, which represent the operations of retailers during the year 
1935, were collected in 1936 by a complete field canvass of retail stores in 
every State, city and county in the United States, by the Bureau of the Census, 
with funds provided by the Works Progress Administration. 

Scoge of the Retail Census 

Retail distribution, as covered in this Census, is the process of purvey- 
ing goods to ultimate consumers for consumption or utilization, together with 
services incidental to the sale of goods. The function of the retailer is 
primarily to anticipate the wants of the consumer and to make available, at 
the right time and at a convenient place, a reasonable selection of goods capa- 
ble of satisfying those wants. The distinguishing characteristic of a retailer 
is that the business is done in a retail manner, in a place of business open to 
the public. 

R§l§ii and Wholesale 

As in the 1933 Census the line of separation between retail and wholesale 
establishments was drawn at 50 percent. Only those stores whose sales at retail 
exceeded 50 percent of total sales were classified with retail establishments. 
The number of cases in which this rule had to be applied was, of course, small 
relative to the total number of establishments covered. Borderline cases of this 
type occur most frequently in the distribution of hardware, farm implements, 
building materials, coal, motor vehicles and gasoline. In the study of retail 
distribution in these several fields it is essential therefore to consider both 
the Wholesale and Retail Censuses. Similarly in comparing the 1935 data with 
1933 it should be noted that for stores in these fields a relatively small change 
in sales at retail may cause a shift in classification from wholesale to retail 
or vice versa. 



Vol. I - Page 1-02 



Tables ?A* and 7B pi'ovide a measure of the volume of wholesale sales made by 
retail stores. Data on the amount of retail sales by wholesale establishments 
are presented in Tables 8A and 8B, which are summaries of more detailed infor- 
mation contained in Volume VII of the Wholesale Distribution reports. 

Because of the nature of the business - distribution to industrial users- 
and regardless of the manner in which the sales are made, most supply houses, 
including barbers' supplies and dental supplies, have been included in the 
Wholesale census rather than in the Retail census. Likewise, most machinery 
dealers (except farm -implement dealers) and dealers in iron and steel products, 
leather and findings and junk are included in the Wholesale census. 

E§i§ii §2^ Se rvice 

As in the case of establishments doing both retailing and wholesaling, the 
line of separation between retail and service establishments was drawn at 50 
percent. Those businesses which reported receipts from services in excess of 
the receipts from the sale of merchandise were classified in their entirety in 
the Service Census; and those showing receipts from services in lesser dollar 
value than sales of merchandise were classified in their entirety in the Retail 
Census. An exception to this rule was made in 1933 for certain kinds of busi- 
ness in which the establishments were classified as Service establishments only 
if the receipts from services exceeded two-thirds of the total receipts. These 
kinds of business were mainly automobile accessories stores, tire and battery 
shops, radio stores, electrical shops, heating and plumbing shops, and some 
small jewelry establishments. It was felt that unless the determining per- 
centage for receipts from merchandise sales was set at a low level during the 
depression there was danger of confusing what were essentially retail stores 
with service establishments. Because of the conditions obtaining in 1933, merchan- 
dise sales dwindled to such an extent that revenue from service, ordinarily a 
subordinate function of a retail business, assumed unusual importance. 

In the 1935 census of retail-service borderline establishments have been 
handled on the 50 percent basis. These borderline establishments occur most fre- 
quently in the following fields: furs and fur repairing and storage ; tailoring 
and cleaning and pressing shops; radio sales and repair work; and electrical 
shops. 

R§l§±i iQd Construction 

A considerable number of heating, plumbing and electrical contractors who 
were included in the 1933 Retail Census have been transferred to the 1935 Con- 
struction Census, leaving in the Retail Census only those dealers whose business 
is primarily the sale of equipment and supplies as such, rather than primarily 
installation and repair work. 



Vol. I - Page 1-03 



Retail and Manufactures 

In general, the principle was followed of classifying all establishments en- 
gaged both in manufacturing and in selling at retail, as manufacturing plants 
when the value of their products exceeded $5,000; as such they are enumerated by 
the Census of Manufactures. The strict application of this principle in 1935 
to the combined manufacturing and retailing bakeries accounts for the marked 
drop in bakery sales shown in the Retail Census for 1935. 

The 1935 Schedules 



Two schedule forms were used for 1935, on which information was collected 
for all retail stores. A short-form schedule (Form 20) was used in the enumera- 
tion of stores with less than $50,000 of sales in 1935. The long-form schedule 
(Form 21) was used in canvassing all stores that had sales of $50,000 or over. 
The forms were identical except for the inquiries on commodity sales. Form 20 
contained a short check list of commodities and a separate inquiry relating 
primarily to the commodity sales of general stores (with food). Form 21 contained 
a detailed commodity inquiry, comparable in general to the commodity inquiry on 
the 1929 schedules. Due to the fact that the commodity data were not furnished 
uniformly by most of the stores, it has been impossible to compile and publish 
detailed information for all kinds of business. An attempt will be made to 
publish, at a later date, commodity information on a small sample basis for a 
number of kinds-of-business classifications. 

The inquiries on employment were expanded, as compared to the previous 
censuses. Employm.ent and pay roll data by occupational classes for a representa- 
tive week were obtained for the first time. The subject is covered in Retail 
Volume V. 

Basic Classifications 



The findings of the 1935 Census are presented in two basic classifications: 
by geographic divisions. States, cities and counties; and by kinds of business, 
based on the usual designation of the establishment and the commodities Sold. 
The first indicates the geographic distribution of retail business in its 
component parts - grocery stores, restaurants, hardware stores, drug stores, etc, 
and permits the presentation of a quantitative description of the retail trade 
for each area. 

The second classification - by kinds of business - is in a sense more fund- 
airental than the first. The student of marketing, whether he be a business man 
or in an academic or other field, will ordinarily find information on retailing 
by kinds of business of greater value than aggregate figures on retail trade. 
A description of the kind-of-business classifications for 1935 and a tabular 
comparison of the 1935. 1933 and 1929 classifications will be found in Part IV 
of this volume. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-04 



Comparisons by kinds of business and by major groups for the three census 
years are subject to some qualification by reason of a num.ber of unavoidable 
shifts between classifications. The principal causes of these shifts were: 
(1) more complete information in 1935 than in 1933, permitting more accurate 
classification of individual stores; and (2) greater emphasis upon commodity sales 
as a basis of classification. 

The commodity information available in 1935 and the greater use of it as a 
basis of classification resulted in unavoidable shifts in classifications of some 
dual-line stores handling substantially equal proportions of such lines as 
furniture and hardware, groceries and feed, clothing and general merchandise, or 
coal and building materials. Because of the marked decrease between 1929 and 1933 
in the sales of apparel, furniture, hardware, building materials and farmers' 
supplies and the pronounced increase from 1933 to 1935, dual-line stores were 
quite likely to have changed the relative proportions of the sales of their two 
main commodities since 1933 and consequently the classification of their stores, 
even resulting in some cases in shifts from one major group to another. The 
effect of such shifts upon kind-of-business comparisons varies in different 
States depending upon the prevalence of such dual-line stores, but in most States 
they account for such a small volume of sales as to have little effect. At- 
tention is called in the text material in Part I to the effect upon certain 
kinds of business of shifts in classification. The definitions in Part IV of 
this volume provide a fairly detailed description of the character of the 1935 
classifications. 



Vol. I - Page 1-05 



SECTION 1 - STORES AND SALES 



Retail sales in the United States in 19.'55 totalled $33,161,276,000, 
as reported by 1,653,961 stores and presented herein. In 1933 retail 
stores numbered 1,526,119 with sales of $25,037,225,000. Thus the num- 
ber of stores was 8.4 percent higher in 1935 than in 1933, with sales 
showing a 32.4 percent increase. 

The sales increase of 32.4 percent over 1933 was in contrast to a 
sharp decrease between 1929 and 1933, which for the United States amount- 
ed to 49 percent of the 1929 volume. Sales in 1935 were nearly one- 
third lower in dollar volume than in 1929, but a substantial part of the 
decrease was caused by the difference in price levels in the two years. 
The number of stores in 1935 was 7.2 percent higher than the total shown 
for 1929. A substantial part of the increase in stores, but an insig- 
nificant proportion of sales, was due to a better coverage in 1935 of 
market and roadside stands, house-to-house selling organizations, and 
certain other types difficult to identify, the enumeration of which is 
apt to vary considerable in different censuses. 

Although sales increased 32.4 percent over 1933, the average sales 
per store increased only 22.2 percent due to the substantial increase in 
number of stores. On the other hand, the 49 percent decline in sales from 
1929 to 1933 resulted in about the same proportionate drop in average 
sales per store because the number of stores was approximately the same in 
both years. 

A comparative summary of the above facts follows: 



Percent Percent 

Change Change 

1935 1933 to 1933 1929 to 1929 

1935 1933 

Number of stores 1,653,961 + 8.4 1,526,119 - 1.1 1,543,158 
Sales $33,161,276,000 +32.4 $25,037,225,000 -49.0 $49,114,653,000 

Avg. sales per store $20,050 +22.2 $16,406 -48.5 $31,827 



Stores and Sales b^r States 

The geographic distribution of retail stores and sales, as shown in 
Table IB, indicates a considerable degree of concentration of retail trade. 
Two geographic divisions - the Middle Atlantic and East North-Central 
account for 45 percent of the number of stores and 47 percent of the amount 
of sales. Five States with the largest volume of sales - New York, 
Pennsylvania, Illinois, California, and Ohio - have about 38 percent of the 



Vol. I - Paee 1-06 



stores and over 41 percent of the sales. New York State alone accounts for 
about one-eighth of the total stores in the United States and one-seventh 
of total sales. 



This concentration of retail trade is related but not proportionate 
to the distribution of population. According to the estimated population 
figures for 1935, as prepared by the Bureau of the Census, (see page 2-03) 
the two geographic divisions with 47 percent of sales had slightly more 
than 41 percent of the population; the five largest States with 41 percent 
of sales had 34 percent of the population. Highest per capita sales are 
found in Nevada with |444, California with $388, and New York with $368; 
these figures contrast with $89 for Mississippi, $119 for Alabama, and 
$120 for Arkansas. Per capita sales, however, must be used with caution 
because of such factors as purchases by mail, trade across State lines, and 
the var-ying complexity of the population. 



The increase in sales from 1933 to 1935, which averaged 32 percent for 
the country as a whole, was unevenly distributed among the States. As 
shown in the table below, the Mountain division had the greatest increase 
(49 percent), followed by the Pacific division with 40 percent. Among the 
Mountain States, the increases varied from a low of 30 percent for Colorado 
to a high of 69 percent for Montana, which had the greatest increase of any 
State. The 1935 figures for Colorado were affected to a considerable degree 
by incomplete coverage, particularly in Denver. The New England States with 
a 26 percent increase showed the smallest relative gain of any geographic 
division. 



Percentage Increase in Sales_^ 1955-1955 , by States 



Division 


Percent 


Division 


Percent 


Division 


Percent 


and State 


increase 


and State 


increase 


and State 


Increase 


United States 


52 


West North Central 


33 


Mississippi 


27 






Iowa 


36 


Tennessee 


46 


New England 


26 


Kansas 


36 






Connecticut 


29 


Minnesota 


40 


West South Central 


32 


Maine 


26 


Missouri 


25 


Arkansas 


34 


Massachusetts 


22 


Nebraska 


31 


Louisiana 


30 


New Hampshire 


36 


North Dakota 


39 


Oklahoma 


27 


Rhode Island 


31 


South Dakota 


39 


Texas 


34 


Vermont 


26 














South Atlantic 


33 


Mountain 


49 


Middle Atlantic 


28 


Delaware 


33 


Arizona 


59 


New Jersey 


20 


Dist. of Columbia 


37 


Colorado 


30 


New York 


27 


Florida 


47 


Idaho 


60 


Pennsylvania 


33 


Georgia 


37 


Montana 


69 






Maryland 


20 


Nevada 


53 


East North Centra 


1 35 


North Carolina 


28 


New Mexico 


65 


Illinois 


26 


South Carolina 


33 


Utah 


44 


Indiana 


37 


Virginia 


32 


Wyoming 


48 


Michigan 


46 


West Virginia 


36 






Ohio 


36 






Pacific 


40 


Wisconsin 


40 


East South Central 


35 


California 


38 






Alabama 


35 


Oregon 


50 






Kentucky 


27 


Washington 


44 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-07 



§ii§§ by Kinds of Business 



Slightly over one fourth of the total volume of retail sales in 1935 
was in food stores. The general merchandise group and the automotive group 
(exclusive of filling stations) accounted for almost exactly the same 
proportions of total sales, each accounting for approximately 14 percent. 
The sales in apparel stores made up about one-twelfth of total retail trade. 
These ratios do not indicate the distribution of the expenditures of the 
American people on food, clothing, automobiles or other commodity lines, 
as the sales by stores in a particular kind of business are not identical 
with sales of the principal commodity which they handle. For example, food 
stores sell more than food, and food also is sold in other kinds of stores 
including variety, general, and department stores. 

,^n examination of the changes from 1929 to 1933, and from 1933 to 1935, 
in the volume of retail sales by business groups shows that of the six 
groups showing increases since 1933 in excess of the 32 percent shown for 
retail trade as a whole, all but one had unusually large decreases between 
1929 and 1933. The exception is the eating and drinking place group which, 
although showing only a 33 percent decrease in the first period, had a 67 
percent increase in 1935 over 1933, due to the unusually large increase in 
drinking places since 1933. The sales of eating places alone show an in- 
crease from 1933 to 1935 of 26 percent. 

The automotive group (exclusive of filling stations) which had a 63 
percent decrease from 1929 to 1933, shows an increase for 1935 over 1933 
of 60 percent. Likewise the lumber-building-hardware group, apparel group, 
and the furniture-household group had large decreases in the first period 
with marked improvement in volume in the period from 1933 to 1935. The 
1935 totals for the lumber-building-hardware group are affected to some 
extent by the transfer to the 1935 Construction Census of a number of 
heating, plumbing and electrical contractors who were included in the 1933 
Retail Census. 

Of the six business groups that show increases smaller than the in- 
crease for retail trade as a whole from 1933 to 1935, only the general- 
store group had a larger than average decrease between 1929 and 1933. The 
small increase shown for this group since 1933 is due to a considerable 
extent to a stricter classification of general stores, made possible large- 
ly by the greater amount of information available on the 1935 schedule 
(see definitions) . 

A summary of stores and sales by business groups for the three census 
years follows: 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-08 



Comparison of Stores by Business Groups, 1935, 1933 and 1929 

























Percent of 




Business Group 


Number 


of Stores 




Total 


Stores 






1935 


1933 


1929 


1935 


1933 


1929 


United States total 


1.653.961 1 


. 526^1 19 1, 


^43^158 


100.00 


lOQ^OO 


100.00 


Food Stores 


532,010 


470,149 


481,861 


32.17 


30.81 


31.23 


Eating and drinking places 


251,473 


200,335 


134,293 


15.20 


13.13 


8.70 


General stores (with food) 


56,701 


85,839 


104,085 


4.03 


5.62 


6.74 


General merchandise 


44,651 


46,712 


54,636 


2.70 


3.25 


3.54 


Apparel 


65,668 


86,548 


114,266 


5.80 


5.57 


7.41 


Automotive 


116,702 


134,666 


135,172 


7.06 


8.84 


8.82 


Filling stations 


197,568 


170,404 


121,513 


11.65 


11.16 


7.87 


Furniture-household 


45,215 


42,676 


58,941 


2.73 


2.82 


3.82 


Lumber-building-hardware 


73,186 


76,098 


90,386 


4.43 


4.99 


5.86 


Drug Stores 


56,697 


58,407 


58,258 


3.43 


3.83 


3.78 


Other retail stores 


151,240 


129,783 


173,618 


9.14 


8.50 


11.25 


Second-hand-stores 


22,550 


20,869 


15,065 


1.36 


1.37 


0.98 



Comparis on of Sales b.v_Bi-isiness Groups, 19 35 , 1933 an d 1 929 



Business Group 



Net Sales 

1935 % of 1933 % of 1929 
(add 000) change (add 000) change (add 000) 



Percent of 
Total Sales 
1935 1933 



1929 



United States total 


i; 


33^161^276 


32 


225^037^225 


-49 


^49^1 14^653 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


Food stores 


8,362. 


,425 


23 


5,776. 


,280 


-37 


10,837,421 


25.22 


27.07 


22.07 


Eating and drinking places 


2,390, 


,850 


57 


1,429, 


,938 


-33 


2,124,890 


7.21 


5.71 


4.33 


General stores (with food) 


1,110, 


,403 


1 


1,097, 


,437 


-57 


2,570,744 


3.35 


4.38 


5.23 


General merchandise 




4,619, 


,751 


19 


3,891, 


,272 


-40 


6,444,101 


13.93 


15.54 


13.12 


Apparel 




2,656, 


,242 


38 


1,923, 


,333 


-55 


4,240,893 


8.01 


7.68 


8.63 


Automotive 




4,606, 


,650 


50 


2,887, 


,525 


-63 


7,828,387 


13.89 


11.53 


15.94 


Filling stations 




1,967, 


,714 


28 


1,531, 


,724 


-14 


1,787,423 


5.93 


6.12 


3.64 


Furniture-household 




1,289, 


,896 


35 


958, 


,780 


-55 


2,754,721 


3.89 


3.83 


5.61 


Lumber-bui Iding-hardware 




1,864, 


,275 


39 


1,342, 


,705 


-65 


3,845,624 


5.62 


5.36 


7.83 


Drug stores 




1,232, 


,593 


16 


1,055, 


,252 


-37 


1,690,399 


3.72 


4.25 


3.44 


Other retail stores 




2,947, 


,127 


45 


2,025, 


,704 


-58 


4,841,982 


8.89 


8.10 


9.86 


Second-hand stores 




113, 


340 


8 


105, 


275 


-29 


148,068 


.34 


.42 


.30 



Note: - A comparison of 1,099,653 of the 1,653,961 stores in 1935, with sales of 
the identical stores in 1934, shows an increase in the one year of 10.6 
percent. For comparisons in detail, by counties, see special 1935 Census 
report entitled "Retail Trade Survey". 



-22.0 


4 


,402,940 


-43.9 


$5,189 


,670,000 


-47.0 


5 , 028 , 


, 282 , 000 


52.4 


161, 


,388,000 


4.2 


1, 


510,607 



Vol. I - Page 109 

SECTION 2 - EMPLOYMENT AhjD PAY ROLL 

There were employed in retail stores throughout 1935 an average of 
3,961,478 paid employees. In addition there were 1,511,734 active pro- 
prietors and firm members devoting the major portion of their time to 
the operation of their stores, resulting in total employment of 5,473,212 
persons in retail stores. 

Total pay roll in retail stores aggregated $3,623,289,000, of which 
$3,388,166,000 was paid to full-time employees and $235,123,000 to part- 
time employees. The compensation of proprietors and firm members of 
unincorporated businesses is not included in these amounts. 

A brief summary of employment and pay roll data for 1935, together 
with 1933 and 1929 comparisons, follows: 



% change % change 

1935 29 3 3j2 9 35___2 9 3 3__2 929^2 9 3 3 2^29_ 

Number of employees 3,961,478 15.4 3,433,652 

Pay Roll - Total $3,623,289,000 24.5 $2,910,445,000 

Full-time 3,388,166,000 27.2 2,664,447,000 

Part-time 235,123,000 -4.4 245,998,000 

Proprietors 1,511,734 -4.0 1,574,341 



Comparisons with 1933 and 1929 

As shown above the number of employees (average for the year) increased 
15.4 percent over 1933 as compared to a 24.5 percent increase in pay roll. 
The 1935 employment total is 90 percent of the 1929 figures , whereas the total 
pay roll for 1935 is approximately 70 percent of the 1929 total. 

A comparison of the number of proprietors for the three years is sub- 
ject to qualification because of differences in the inquiry and enumerators' 
instructions in the different censuses. In 1933 the enumerators were 
instructed to include as proprietors all owners of unincorported estab- 
lishments and adult members of their families who were actively employed 
in, and devoting the major portion of their time to the business . In- 
active proprietors or partners were not included. On the 1935 schedules 
the corresponding inquiry called for the number of proprietors and firm 
members devoting the major portion of their time to the business. Members 
of proprietor's family were not included as proprietors. It is likely 
that these differences in the phrasing and enumeration of the proprietor 
inquiry accounted for part of the higher figure reported for 1933. Table 
lA in this volume shows employment and pay roll by kinds of business; and 
the same information by States. 

Stores Without Paid Employees 

Although no data are available which show the exact number of re- 
tail stores that have no paid employees, it is estimated on the basis of 
a special tabulation that approximately 40 percent of all retail stores 
are operated entirely by proprietors and their families who receive 
no stated compensation. A tabulation of 1,449,378 stores, composed of 



eOVofirr'- Page 1-10 

-il^^ XA3 QMA TM3MY0J3Ma - s MOITOaa 
single-store independents, independent leased departments and concessions 
and certain miscellaneous one-store types, indicated that 654,325 stores, 
or 45.2 percent of the total, had no paid employees. As the difference be- 
tween the stores in this tabulation and the total of all stores (1,653,961) 
is made up largely of chain stores, multi-unit independents and other types 
.which ordinarily have paid employees, it is likely that the 654.325 stores 
represent substantially all of the stores without paid employees. They 
represent about 40 percent of all retail stores. 

In order to complete the picture of total employment in retail 
establishments, definite data on the members of proprietors' families 
working full-time and those working part-time would be highly desirable. 
Although data on this subject were called for on the schedule forms, be- 
cause of frequent misinterpretation of this item with resultant errors in 
reporting, the importance of family members in the operation of retail 
stores cannot be determined from the information obtained in connection 
with the Census. Those members of proprietors' families who are paid a 
stated salary for working regularly, either full-time or part-time, 
are included as paid employees. Unpaid mem.bers as reported totalled 
704,624, of which 648,886 were over 18 years of age and 55,738 were 
reported as under 18 years--full-time and part-time combined. 

Em^loirment b^r Months 

The number of paid employees in retail stores in the United States 
in 1935 increased from a low of 3,721,422 in January to a peak of 4,379,211 
in December, a variation of 16.6 percent. With the exception of July, each 
month showed an increase in employment over the preceding one. However, as 
is shown in the table below, the month-to-month increases varied consid- 
erably. February employment showed a very small increase over that for 
January, and May had only a slightly greater increase over April. The 
employment for the months of August and November in each case was only .4 
percent above that of the preceding month. As contrasted to these changes 
April employment was 3.1 percent above March and that for the month of 
December showed a 5.6 percent gain over November. 

The months of September to December, inclusive, show employment in 
excess of the average for the year. The 4,379,211 employment figure 
for the peak month of December was 10.5 percent higher than the average 
figure of 3,961,478. The total reported for the low month of January 
was 6.1 percent under the average. 

Comparison with 1933 

Each month in 1935 showed more employees than the corresponding 
month in 1933, but the difference varied considerably by months. The 
month of March with the greatest difference showed an increase of 20.8 
percent over 1933, while December with the smallest increase showed 10.9 
percent gain over December of 1933. In 1935, January was the low month of 
employment while in 1933 the low point occured in February. However, in 
each of the two years the difference between the months of January and 
February was small. 



Vol. 1 - Page l-U 



A comparative summary of the number of paid employees by months for 
1935 and 1933 is given below: 



Per- Ratio of 

Number of employees cent monthly em- Percent 

(full-time and increase ployment to change from 

Month part-time ) 1935 average preceding 

1935 1933 over for year month 









1933 


1935 


1933 


1935 


' 1933 


Average for year 1/ 


3^61^478 


3^433^652 


15^4 


iQo^o 


100.0 






January 


3,721,422 


3,118,076 


19.3 


93.9 


90.8 








February 


3,722,161 


3,113,391 


19.6 


94.0 


90.7 





.2 


March 


3,773,721 


3,125,031 


20.8 


95.3 


91.0 


1.4 


.4 


April 


3,891,165 


3,286,347 


18.4 


98.2 


95.7 


3.1 


5.2 


May 


3,896,984 


3,298,135 


18.2 


98.4 


96.1 


.1 


.4 


June 


3,943,583 


3,372,225 


16.9 


99.5 


98.2 


1.2 


2.2 


July 


3,933,143 


3,391,053 


16.0 


99.3 


98.8 


.3 


6 


August 


3,947,742 


3,473,172 


13.7 


99.7 


101.2 


.4 


2.4 


September 


4,048,872 


3,637,628 


11.3 


102.2 


105.9 


2.6 


4.7 


October 


4,131,337 


3,703,621 


11.5 


104.3 


107.9 


2.0 


1.8 


November 


4,148,266 


3,734,842 


11.1 


104.7 


108.8 


.4 


.8 


December 


4,379,211 


3,950,299 


10.9 


110.5 


115.0 


5.6 


5.3 



1/ Represents the average number of employees as shown in Table 2A. 

Variations in Monthly Em2lo;;([ment by Kinds of Business 

In Table 2A the number of employees by months is given for each of 66 
kinds of business. A study of the table shows that with few exceptions the 
low month of employment was January or February, with January the more 
common. December was the most frequent high month, followed by October. 

Both the kind-of-business groups and the individual classification? 
under the various groups show marked differences with regard to the high 
and low months of employment and the changes in employment from month to 
month. In many instances these differences indicate the relative import- 
ance of seasonal variation in the various lines of trade. 



Variati ons in Mont.hly Employ ment by States 

An examination of monthly employmen'u figures by States shows that 
with few exceptions the low month of employment was January or February 
and the peak of employment came in the month of December. January was 
the low month for 23 States and February for 22. The State of New Mexico 
had exactly the same employment for January and February. For New Hampshire 
and Vermont March was the low month of employment, while for Florida the 
low was July. All but four States had their peak employment in December. 
August was the high month for Maine, New Hampshire, and Wyoming and October 
for North Dakota. For details see T&ble on page 2-08. 



Vol. I - Page 1-12 



Eullrtime and Par t-tim e Employment and Pay_Roll 

The analysis of full-time and part-time employment in retail trade is 
based on employment and pay roll reported for the week ending October 26, 
1935 or in a few cases of highly seasonal businesses for a week of normal 
employment during the business season. Each store was requested to report 
for full-time and part-time separately the number of employees and pay roll 
and to classify the employees for the week into occupational classes. The 
information on employment and pay roll for the representative week does not 
include all stores having employment. Some stores failed to answer the 
inquiry and in other cases the information had to be deleted from tabulation 
because of the unsatisfactory character of the information. 

Of the 3,284,723 employees reported for the week, 2,641,041 (80.4%) 
were reported as full-time and the balance (19.6 percent) as part-time 
employees. The pay roll for full-time employees represented 92.1 percent 
of the total pay roll as compared to 7.9 percent for part-time employees. 

The proportion of full-time and part-time employment varies consider- 
ably by kinds of business. The table below presents a summary of full- 
time and part-time comparisons by 11 business groups. Food stores, 
as a group, showed the highest percentage of part-time employees with 24.5 
percent of the total number reported on a part-time basis. The general 
merchandise group (dry goods and general merchandise, department stores, 
and variety stores) showed almost as high a ratio of part-time employment 
to total employment, with 24.2 percent. In contrast to these groups the 
automotive group (not including filling stations) showed the smallest per- 
centage of part-time employment with only 7.4 percent of the employees 
being so reported. Similar information for individual kinds of business 
can be obtained from Table 2C, on page 2-10. 

rOLL-TOa JBUI PABT-TIIg BgLCTIMSlIT ASP PAl HOLL TOR ONS WBg 

























Total 


Tonal 


Full-tlna 


Pull-tiroB 


Part-tlBS 


Part-time 




amployaaa 
report ad 


pay roll 
raportod 


amplojaaa 


pay roll 




employees 


pay roU 






<ot 




*of 




*of 


«of 


Elsd-of -bual na sa 


ft>r 


tor 




total 


total 




total 


total 


group 


waak 


waak 


Number 


em- 


Amount weekly 


Number 


em- 


Amount aeakly 










ploy- 




pay 




ploy- 


pay 










ees 




roll 




ees 


roll 


Onttsd StatM Total! 


S.E84.7ES »S6.1B0.166 2,541,041 
997,973 9,666,414 451,343 


80.4 
79.9 


|51. 660.716 
8,874,340 


98.1 
91.8 


643,682 
146,628 


19.6 
24.5 


♦4.489.490 7.9 


Food Stores 


798.074 8.8 


G«n«ral Stona 
(irtth food) 




















73,887 


1,030,602 


98,736 


78.0 


939,865 


91.8 


16,591 


22.0 


90,737 8.8 


Csmral ttorchandlaa 




















Group 


486,SU 


7.900,849 


368,438 


78.8 


7,809,076 


91.3 


U7,876 


24.8 


691.173 8.7 


Apparol Group 


£78,146 


8,305,994 


214,564 


77.1 


4,819,092 


90.8 


63,982 


22.9 


486,902 9.2 


Automat It* Group 


348,740 


7,955,992 


323,008 


92.6 


7,676,309 


96.5 


28,738 


7.4 


279,687 3.5 


rill Lug Stations 


180,880 


2,749,780 


142,920 


79.0 


2,481,899 


90.3 


37,960 


81.0 


267,925 9,7 


ramltura-Bouaohold 




















Group 


132,016 


3,033,032 


114,009 86.4 


2,837,989 


93.6 


18,007 


13.6 


199,443 6.4 


Lumbor-Bullding- 




















Hardwara Group 


150,920 


3,383,540 


130,072 


83.4 


3,080,042 


91.0 


83,848 


16.6 


X3,«98 9.0 


Bating and Drink- 




















ing Flaoes 


656,682 


7,963,839 


937,823 


82.0 


7,238,090 


90.9 


117,889 


18.0 


727,805 9.1 


Drug Storee 


123,028 


2,060,824 


99,448 


80.8 


1,895,120 


92.0 


23,980 


19.8 


165,704 8.0 


Other Bstall Storaa 


232,788 


4,789,189 


186,891 


80.3 


4,368,488 


91.1 


48,897 


19.7 


486,787 8.9 


Saoond-Hand Storaa 


17,912 


278,699 


13,796 


77.0 


846,924 


88.6 


4,116 


23.0 


31,779 11.4 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-13 



Averag^e Wage of Full-time Emgioyees 



The 2.641,041 full-time employees reported for the week were paid 
a total weekly pay roll of 1161,660,716, or- an average weekly wage of 
$19.56. Ihe average compensation varied considerably by kinds of busi- 
ness. Jewelry stores reported the highest figure, §28.76, followed 
closely by dairy products stores and milk dealers with $28.05. Lunch 
counters and refreshment stands paid the lowest average weekly wage, 
$11.93. The restaurant, cafeteria and lunch room classification showed 
an average figure of $13.06, news dealers $13.20 and variety stores 
$13.53 Gratuities which constitute an additional income of many workers in 
the restaurant group, are not included as pay roll. 

Of the kind-of -business groups, the furniture-household group had 
the nighest weekly wage, with an average of $24.89. The automotive 
group (excluding filling stations) was second with a weekly wage of 
$23.77, followed closely by the lumber-building-hardware group with 
$23.68. The lowest average weekly wage was $13.46 shown for eating and 
drinking places. Food stores with $19.66 and the general merchandise 
group (dry goods, general m.erchandise , department and variety stores) 
with $19.57 had almost exactly the same weekly wage. 

The average weekly wage for full-time employees varied considerably 
by States and geographic divisions. As a group, the Pacific Coast States 
had the highest average with $22.20, followed by the Middle Atlantic with 
$21.42 and New England with $21.04. The lowest average weekly wages were 
in the Southern States, with $15.68 in the East South-Central group, the 
lowest shown for any geographic division. 

In evaluating the average weekly rates of pay, some consideration 
should be given to the differences in conditions in the various States 
that affect the average rates of compensation. For example, it is evident 
that those States or sections of the country that contain large cities tend 
to show considerably higher weekly wage rates, but that is not always the 
case, as shown by Nevada and Montana. 

Among the States, Nevada had the highest wage rate with $24.13, follow 
ed by $22.72 for Montana, $22.49 for California and $22.46 for New York 
State. The lowest weekly wage rate was $14.23 for Mississippi. Louisiana 
was slightly higher with $14.73. 

iSEio^SiSl by Occupational Groups 

Of the 3,284,723 employees reported for the representative week, 
111,991 or 3.4 percent were executive and salaried corporation officers; 
239,843 or 7.3 percent were office and clerical employees; 1,574.265 
or 47.9 percent were selling employees; 375,232 or 11.4 percent were 
waiters and waitresses; and 983,392 or 30 percent were classified as 
"other employees." 



Vol. I - Page 1-14 



The proportion of each occupational group to the total for all 
groups varied somewhat as between full-time and part-time employees. 
Of the 2,641,041 full-time employees reported, 4.1 percent were class- 
ified as executives, whereas part-time executives accounted for only 
.7 percent of the total number of part-time employees. Full-time 
office and clerical workers accounted for 8.2 percent of all full- 
time employees as compared with only 3.4 percent of part-time employ- 
ees. As contrasted to these, selling employees constituted 53.5 per- 
cent of the total number of part-time employees and only 46.6 percent 
of the total of full-time employees. The percentage of waiters and 
waitresses to the total of all employees varied only slightly as be- 
tween full-time and part-time employees. Active proprietors are not 
included in this comparison. 

Of the total pay roll for full-time employees 10.2 percent was 
paid to executives and salaried corporation officers, 8.8 percent to 
office and clerical, 46.8 percent or almost one-half to selling em- 
ployees, 6.7 percent to waiters and waitresses and 27.5 percent to 
"other employees". Executives and salaried corporation officers 
were the highest paid employees at $49.16 per week, followed in 
order by office and clerical employees at $20.76, selling employees 
at $19.65, other employees at $18.10 and waiters and waitresses at 
$11.59. A summary of the information on occupational groups is pre- 
sented in the following table: 

EMPLOYMENT AND PAY ROLL BY OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS 





Total employees 


Full 


-time 


Pay roll for 


Average 


Part-time 




reported 


for W6 


lek 


emgloyees 


one week 


wage 


employe 

I 


ses 


Occupational 


Percent 




Percent 


Percent per- 


'ercent 


Group 


Number of 


Numbei 


r 


of i 


\mount of 


full- 


Number 


of 




Total 




Total 


Total time 




Total 
















employee 






United States, 




















All Groups 


3^284^723 


JOO^O. 


2_^641 


,041 


100.0 


151^660^16 


i00^0_il9^56. 


643^^682 


100.0 


Executives and 










Salaried Corpora- 




















t,' in Officers 


111,991 


3.4 


107 


,342 


4.1 


5,277,424 


10.2 49.16 


4,649 


.7 


Office and Clerical 


239,843 


7.3 


217 


,887 


8.2 


4,522,567 


8.8 20.76 


21,956 


3.4 


Selling 


1,574,265 


47.9 


1,230 


,132 


46.6 


24,169,988 


46.8 19.65 


344,133 


53.5 


Waiters and 




















Waitresses 


375,232 


11.4 


301, 


,106 


11.4 


3,488,788 


6.7 11.59 


74,126 


11.5 


Other Employees 


983,392 


30.0 


784, 


,574 


29.7 


14,201,949 


27.5 18.10 


198,818 


30.9 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-15 



EnjEloYment by Sex 

Each store was asked to repoi-t the number of paid employees for 
the representative week by sex. A summary of this information by kinds 
of business and by States is shown in Table 2D. Of the 3,284,723 em- 
ployees reported for the week, 30.5 percent are women. As all stores 
with employees did not answer the occupational inquiry, the total 
number of women employed in retail trade cannot be stated exactly. 
However, it is likely that the percent of women as shown by the stores 
reporting weekly information is fairly representative of retail trade 
as a whole, which would indicate a total for women of 1,208,250 in addi- 
tion to women proprietors, the proportion of whom is unknown. However, 
the ratio reported in 1929 was 9 percent. 

The ratio of women to the total varies greatly with the kind of 
business from a low of 3.5 percent in garages to a high of 92.9 percent 
in millinery stores. The number of women accounts for more than one- 
third of the total for each of the following kinds of business; candy 
and confectionery stores, other food stores, dry goods and general 
merchandise stores, department stores, variety stores, family clothing 
stores, women's ready-to-wear stores, millinery stores, other apparel 
stores, restaurants and lunch rooms, lunch counters and refreshment 
stands, book stores, and gift, novelty and souvenir shops. 

The ratio of women to the total number of employees shows some 
variation by States (see Table 2D, Page 2-12). Pennsylvania had the" 
highest proportion of women employees, 35.8 percent, followed closely 
by Minnesota with 35 percent. The lowest proportion of women employees 
was in Alabama where they constituted 24.8 percent. 



Detailed EmEloyment and Pay Roll Data 

Because of the importance of employment in retail trade, a separate 
volume (Vol. V) of the Retail series is devoted to this subject. In it 
are presented in greater detail employment and pay roll data by kinds 
of business and by States. 



Vol. 1 - P«ge 1-16 



SECTION 3 - OPERATING EXPENSES 



The average operating expense ratio for 1935 reported by retailers as 
a whole was 22.9 percent of sales, to which must be added certain unreported 
expenses. Items which are charged to the cost of doing business include pay 
roll, rent, advertising, supplies, heat, light, power, communication, travel, 
taxes, insurance, interest on borrowed money, and some repairs and deprecia- 
tion. Compensation for proprietors of unincorporated businesses is not in- 
cluded. Of the total operating expense figure, pay roll accounts for 48 per- 
cent. 

If proprietors' services are computed at clerk value or the average amount 
paid to a full-time employee, the average expense ratio is increased from 22.9 
percent to a total of 23.9 percent of sales. The latter figure in 1933 was 
29.4 percent. 

A special sample tabulation on rental costs, which included 43.8 percent 
of total retail stores and 53.2 percent of total sales, revealed that rental 
costs average 3.91 percent of sales in leased premises and constitute more than 
16 percent of the total reported operating expenses of stores operating in 
leased premises. Although this ratio cannot be applied to all retail stores, 
since a number- of stores are operated in wholly or partially owned premises, 
nevertheless' it gives some measure of the cost of this expense item. Even in 
wholly owned premises, taxes, insurance, depreciation, bond interest and other 
expenses are present in lieu of rent. 

Although the ratios for rent and pay roll are not directly comparable, 
they offer some measure of the ratio which each bears to total reported oper- 
ating costs. 

An analysis of operating expenses from the standpoint of pay roll and 
other expenses, by kinds of business, reveals the importance that pay roll 
bears to total operating expense. The following table shows the ratio of pay 
roll to sales and the ratio of other' operating expenses to sales for selected 
kinds of business. 



Kind of Business 



Total reported Total Other 

operating exp. pay roll expenses 

percent to percent percent 

sales 1/ to sales to sales 



Grocery stores (without meats) 

Combination stores (groceries and meats] 

Department stores 

Variety stores 

Women's specialty shops 

Motor-vehicle dealers (new) 

Filling stations 

Furniture stores 

Household appliance and radio stores 

Lumber-building material dealers 

Drug stores (wi-th and without fountain) 

Jewelry stores 



12.8 


5.7 


7.1 


14.9 


7.3 


7.6 


29.2 


14.2 


15.0 


26.6 


11.7 


14.9 


28.8 


13.0 


15.8 


15.4 


8.4 


7.0 


18.1 


9.0 


9.1 


31.9 


14.7 


17.2 


34.9 


19.7 


15.2 


23.3 


12.6 


10.7 


23.7 


11.6 


12.1 


34.8 


15.1 


19.7 



1/ To which must be added a proper allowance for the services of active pro- 
prietors, whose compensation is not included in pay roll nor in total re- 
ported expense. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-17 



Comparisons with 1929 and 1933 

The operating expense ratios, by kinds of business for 1935, 1933 and 
1929 are based upon total reported operating expenses and do not include any 
wage value for proprietors' services. These comparisons offer a fair measure 
of the changes which have taken place by kinds of business, during the period 
mentioned above. 

In a special report on Retail Operating Expenses, provision is made for 
an imputed compensation for proprietors' services. 

For retail trade as a whole, operating expenses which in 1935 averaged 
22.9 percent of sales compare with 26.0 percent in 1933 and 21.1 percent in 
1929. The table on the following page shows 1935 ratios compared with 1933 
and 1929 ratios by kinds of business, as well as more detailed information 
regarding the ratio of total pay roll to sales for the country as a whole 
and by kinds of business. 

While pay roll in dollars was reduced 42 percent from 1929 to 1933, 
through a decline in both the number of employees and the rates of pay, 
other reported expenses decreased only 31 percent. In 1935 pay roll in- 
creased 24 percent over 1933, while the number of employees (full-time 
and part-time combined) increased 15.4 percent. The average annual wage 
for full-time employees was |1,017 in 1935, based upon a projection of 
the average weekly wage for full-time employees as reported in Retail 
Volume V, on Employment and Pay Roll. 

A comparison of total reported pay roll and other operating expenses for 
1935, 1933 and 1929, per $100 of sales, before making any provision for pro- 
prietors' compensation, is shown below; 



1935 



1933 



1929 



Pay roll, except proprietors 
Other reported expenses 
Total reported expense 



$10.93 

11.97 

$22.90 



$11.62 
$25.96 



$10.57 

10^55 

$21.12 



Vol. 1 - Page 1 18 


















Census of Business REPORTED OPERATING EXPENSES. EXCEPT PROPRIETORS' COMPENSATION 








Retail Distribution: 1935 


















BY KINDS OF BUSINESS (WllH 1933 AND 1929 COMPARISONS) 










UNITED STATES SUMMARY; 1935 


















Total 




Total Reported 


Total Reported 


Kind of Business 


Number 


Sales 


Pay Rol 




Expenses Incl. 


Operating Exp 


• y 


ol 








Pay Roll 1/ 


percent to Sales. | 








Stores 




Amount 


% to 














(add 000) 


I add 000 ) 


Sales 


(add 000) 


1935 


1933 


1929 


UNITED STATES 


1,653,961 


*33,161,276 


S3. 623, 289 


10.9 


tf7,591,912 


22.9 


26.0 


21.1 


Food Stores 

Candy and conlectionery stores 


532.010 


8,362.425 


653.418 


7.9 


1,385,052 


16.6 


19.4 


14.6 


55,197 


314,467 


23,126 


7.4 


76,059 


24.2 


26.8 


22.6 


Dairy products stores & milk dirs. 


16,380 


576,351 


114,994 


20.0 


189,375 


32.9 


36.8 


24.3 


Del icatessen stores 


6,554 


88,708 


5,677 


6.4 


16,271 


18.3 


20.1 


15.7 


Fruit stoies and vegetable markets 


33,632 


216,965 


16,770 


7.8 


39,194 


18.1 


20.0 


16.2 


Grocery stores (without meats) 


188,738 


2,202,607 


125,802 


5.7 


281,962 


12.8 


15.3 


11.8 


Combination stores (groceries & meats) 


166,233 


4,149,813 


304,006 


7.3 


617,799 


14.9 


16.7 


12.6 


Meat markets 


39,474 


612,451 


49,032 


8.0 


107,925 


17.6 


21.0 


14.1 


Other lood stores 


26,802 


202,063 


24,011 


11.9 


56,467 


27.9 


37.6 


31.5 


General Stores (with iood) 


66,701 


1,110,403 


60,735 


5.5 


121,490 


10.9 


12.2 


9.0 


General merchandise group 


44,651 


4,619,751 


608,817 


13.2 


1,283,517 


27.8 


30.3 


26.0 


Dry goods S general metctiandise stores 


28,709 


527,862 


48,612 


9.2 


109,331 


20.7 


23.0 


18.9 


Department stores 


4,201 


3,311,070 


468,910 


14.2 


966.104 


29.2 


32.7 


28.3 


Variety, 5-and-lO, & to-adollar stores 


11,741 


780,819 


91,295 


11.7 


208,082 


26.6 


28.4 


24.4 


Apparel group 


95,968 


2,656,242 


338,300 


12.7 


775,860 


29.2 


31.6 


27.2 


Men's clothing & lurnishings stores 


20,914 


659,617 


74,815 


11.3 


176,574 


26.8 


30.4 


25.2 


Fami ly clothi ng stores 


7,881 


358,849 


47,205 


13.2 


103,173 


28.8 


32.6 


26.0 


Women's ready-to-wear stores 


21,975 


794,992 


103,047 


13.0 


228,873 


28.8 


30.2 


27.2 


IWil linery stores 


9,563 


94,451 


14,865 


15.7 


38,488 


40.7 


41.8 


36.5 


Accessories - other apparel stores 


16,663 


236,934 


41,745 


17.6 


85,868 


36.2 


38.4 


32.6 


Shoe stores 


18,967 


511,399 


56,623 


11.1 


142,884 


27.9 


29.5 


25.9 


Automotive group 


116,702 


4,606,650 


436,993 


9.5 


820,791 


17.8 


23.5 


19.1 


Motor-vehicle dealers ( new) 


30,294 


3,725,438 


314,274 


8.4 


574,832 


15.4 


19.7 


16.7 


Used-car dealers 


4,751 


122,204 


10,769 


8.8 


22,405 


18.3 


18.3 


Accessories, tire and battery dealers 


14,?43 


373,910 


54,557 


14.6 


107,978 


28.9 


30.6 


25.6 


Garages 


66,243 


370,064 


55,122 


14.9 


111,274 


30.1 


35.7 


33.3 


Other automotive 


1,071 


15,034 


2,271 


15.1 


4,302 


28.6 


32.8 


24.8 


Filling stations 


197,568 


1,967,714 


177,128 


9.0 


356,727 


18.1 


22.3 


17.4 


Furniture-household group 


45,215 


1,289,896 


211,188 


16.4 


422,430 


32.7 


38.5 


29.6 


Furniture stores 


17,043 


694,578 


102,065 


14.7 


221,867 


31.9 


37.5 


28.5 


Floor cover 1 ngs draper y stores 


2,611 


61,246 


9,752 


15.9 


19,862 


32.4 


37.4 


28.3 


Household appliance and radio stores 


14,100 


381,171 


75,156 


19.7 


133,070 


34.9 


41.3 


34.2 


Radio dealers 


4,296 


57,152 


7,513 


13.1 


16,442 


28.8 


36.3 


28.9 


Other home furnishings stores 


7,165 


95,749 


16,702 


17.4 


31,189 


32.6 


44.2 


31.4 


Lumber-building hardware group 


73,186 


1,864,275 


221,113 


11.9 


422,441 


22.7 


26.5 


21.5 


Lumber & bui 1 di ng -mater lal dealers 


21,149 


866,865 


108,801 


12.6 


202,074 


23.3 


28.8 


20.2 


Har dwaie stores 


26,996 


467,217 


48,558 


10.4 


100,955 


21.6 


25.7 


20.8 


Hardware & farm implement dealers 


9,637 


291,762 


22,381 


7.7 


45,419 


15.6 


20.1 


13.8 


Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


5,025 


89,477 


20,065 


22.4 


30,986 


34.6 


40.3 


33.8 


Pai nl , glass, wal 1 -paper stores 


8,910 


127,049 


17,250 


13.6 


36,163 


28.5 


32.4 


29.6 


Electrical supply stores 


1,469 


21,905 


4,058 


18.5 


6,844 


31.2 


39.7 


33.0 


Eating and drinking places 


251,473 


2,390,860 


413,720 


17.3 


1,000,041 


41.8 


N.C. 


li.C. 


Restaurants calelerias- lunch rooms 


113,037 


1,453,118 


282,637 


19.5 


677,590 


46.6 


42.1 


3S.0 


Lunch counters refreshment stands 


40,431 


213,781 


29,595 


13.8 


76,498 


35.8 


34.4 


30.3 


Dr 1 nki ng places 


98,005 


723,961 


101,483 


14.0 


240,953 


34.0 


N.C, 


tl.C. 


DruR stores 


56,697 


1,232,593 


143,354 


11.6 


291,770 


23.7 


26.7 


22.8 


Drug stores wi th fountai n 


38,731 


950,328 


112,660 


11.9 


227,071 


23.9 


26.7 


23.5 


Drug stores without fountain 


17,966 


282,265 


30,694 


10.9 


64,699 


22.9 


21.4 


Other retail stores 


151,240 


2,947,127 


331,410 


11.2 


678,205 


23.0 


28.4 


23.3 


Book stores 


2,979 


67,007 


13,474 


20.1 


23,803 


35.5 


(e) 


29.7 


Cigar stores and cigar stands 


15,350 


182,950 


13,820 


7.6 


35,675 


19.5 


23.0 


21.6 


Florists 


11,242 


98,718 


15,964 


16.2 


36,724 


37.2 


47.3 


35.9 


Fuel and ice dealer s 


35,293 


859,018 


106,066 


12.3 


206,521 


24.0 


28.4 


22.4 


Gilt, novel ly, souvenir shops 


5,512 


31,502 


3,366 


10.7 


9,097 


28.9 


(a) 


29.3 


Hay, grai n and teed stores 


11,132 


346,667 


17,681 


5.1 


36,551 


10.5 




8.3 


Farm and garden supply stores 


9,176 


252,471 


18,243 


7.2 


38,169 


15.1 


15.2 


14.7 


Jewel r y stores 

News dealers 

Spor li ng goods stores 


12,447 


234,893 


35,479 


15.1 


81,856 


34.8 


42.0 


29,1 


7,071 


61,655 


6,491 


10.5 


13,992 


22.7 


27.2 


21.8 


1,944 


35,315 


4,252 


12.0 


9,193 


26.0 


la) 


24.4 


Beet & liquor stores (packaged) 
Other classi ( icat ions 


12,105 


328,307 


19,458 


5.9 


41,555 


12.7 


25.1 


(h) 


26,989 


448,624 


77,111 


17.2 


145,069 


32.3 


40.6 


31.2 


Secondhand stores 


22,550 


113,340 


17,113 


15.1 


33,588 


29.6 


37.0 


29.8 



1/ Does not Include compeaoat Ion for 

(a) No conparable data for 1933. 

(b) No comparable data for 1929. 
N.(X Not comparable. 



services of proprietor-omers actively engaged in the operation of their stores. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-19 



Section 4 - Retail Credit 



Because of the importance of retail credit granting, both from the 
standpoint of amount and type of credit, this subject is treated at 
length in Volume VI. 

The analysis presented in Volume VI indicates that in 1935 retailers 
did 67.8 percent of their business on a cash or C.O.D. basis, 21.3 per- 
cent on open account and 10.9 percent on the instalment basis. Thus 
approximately one-third (32.2 percent) of total retail sales were credit 
sales. About two-thirds of the credit business was done on an open- 
account basis and the other third was instalment business. 

Com2arisons_With_1933_and_1929 

Comparisons with 1933 and 1929 must be qualified by reason of certain 
diffei-ences' in the credit inquiry and in the method of presenting the 
material an' previous Censuses. In 1929 a considerable number of stores - 
240,604 with sales aggregating $5,894,681,000 - failed to report clearly 
whether, and how much, they sold on credit and were not included in the 
1929 credit tabulations. The credit analysis for 1929 was carried through 
on the 1,302.554 stores after the 240,604 stores, not sufficiently 
identified, were eliminated. In 1933, with a simpler schedule, coverage 
on the credit inquiry was more complete and the few stores which failed 
to report clearly on credit sales were grouped with cash stores for 
practical purposes. No instalment inquiry v;as included in 1933. Of the 
1,653,961 retail stores in 1935, 1,486,029 or 90 percent are included In 
the cash-credit analysis of sales. Their sales of $27,888,261,000, cash 
and credit (exclusive of receipts from other sources) represent 84.5 per- 
cent of the corresponding sales total for all stores. 

In 1929 data w&re available which made it possible to estimate the 
approximate amount of instalment credit. The credit amount reported in 
1933 covered Only credit extended by retailers; that is, sales for which 
they received no immediate payment in cash. The degree to which the 1933 
amount may have included consumer credit extended through instalment- 
finance companies could not be determined from the data available. In 
1935 the respondent was requested to report instalment sales handled by a 
finance company or other third party as instalment sales and not as cash 
transactions, even though cash proceeds of the sale were received by the 
seller immediately upon consummation of the sale. 

A summary comparison for the three years, subject to the above 
qualifications, is presented below: 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-20 



1935 


1933 


1929 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


67.8 


72.3 


65.7 


32^2 


27.7 


34.3 


21.3 


X 


21.3 


10.9 


X 


13.0* 



Cre dit Sales Ratj.o^_b.v_Years 

Percent of total sales 

Total sales 
Cash and C.O.D. sales 
Credit sales 
Open-account credit 

Instalment credit 

X - No breakdown of credit sales available for 1933. 
* - Approximate proportion, based on limited sample. 

Credit By Kinds of Business 

The largest percent of credit business «as reported by household 
appliance and radio stores with 74.5 percent of the sales on a credit basis. 
Sales on an instalment basis accounted for 54.9 percent of the total sales 
of that kind of business, with open-account credit representing 19.6 percent. 
Furniture stores show almost as high a credit ratio with 48.7 percent instal- 
ment and 23.6 percent open-account, a total of 72.3 percent. Lumber and 
building-material dealers show 70.7 percent credit sales. Motor vehicle 
dealers (new) show 59.9 percent, made up of instalment credit (59.9%) and 
open-account credit (10.0%). 

By groups, the largest percentage of credit is reported by stores in 
the furniture-household, lumber-building-hardware, and automotive groups. 
Under the "Other retail stores" group certain individual kinds of business 
show relatively high credit proportions, such as book stores, fuel and ice 
dealers and jewelry stores. 

The food group as a whole show that slightly over one-fifth of the 
total business is done on a credit basis. Within the group, however, the 
percentage of credit varies from a high of 58.8 percent for dairy products 
stores and milk dealers to a low of 2.2 percent for candy and confectionery 
stores. Grocery stores (without meats) show 15.9 percent, combination 
stores (groceries and meats) 23.2 percent, and meat markets 14.1 percent. 

In the table below are presented relative proportions of open-account, 
instalment, and cash sales for selected kinds of business: 



Vol. I - Page 1-21 



CREDIT AND CASH RATIOS FOR SELECTED KINDS OF BUSINESS 



Kind of business 



Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


open-account 


instalment 


cash and C.O.D 


sales 


sales 


sales_ 


21^3 


10^9 


67^8 


2.2 





97.8 


58.8 





41.2 


15.9 





84.1 


23.2 





76.8 


15.5 





84.5 


26.8 


9.7 


63.5 


.1 





99.9 


23.7 


1.5 


74.8 


23.4 


17.0 


59.6 


24.5 


1.6 


73.8 


7.2 





92.8 


10.0 


59.9 


30.1 


21.8 


.4 


77.8 


23.6 


48.7 


27.7 


19.6 


54.9 


25.5 


68.4 


2.3 


29.3 


34.7 


3.4 


61.9 


34.8 


16.1 


49.1 


7.8 


.1* 


92.1 


52.0 


1.3 


46.7 


22.3 


24.3 


53.4 



All Stores 

Candy and confectionery stores 
Dairy products stores 
and milk dealers 
Grocery stores (without meats) 
Combination stores 

(groceries and meats) 
Meat markets 
Department stores 
Variety stores 
Men's clothing and 

furnishings stores 
Family clothing stores 
Women's ready-to-wear stores 
Shoe stores 

Motor-vehicle dealers (new) 
Filling stations 
Furniture stores 
Household appliance 

and radio stores 
Lumber-building-material dlrs. 
Hardware stores 

Hardware & farm implement dlrs. 
Drug stores 
Fuel and ice dealers 
Jewelry stores 

* - Represents primarily instalment sales of radio sets and household 
appliances. 

Detailed Credit Tables 

Table 5A presents a summary for the United States of open account, 
instalment, and cash and C.O.D. sales for 66 kinds of business. Similar 
tables (Table 5) for each State and each city of more than 500,000 are 
shown in Volume VI. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-22 



SECTI0N_5 - TYPES OF OPERATION 

Of the 1,653,961 retail stores in 1935, 1,474,149 or over 89 per- 
cent were operated as independents, and 127,482 or almost 8 percent as 
chain units. The sales of independents amounted to $24,246,112,000, con- 
stituting 73 percent of total retail sales, while chain store sales 
aggregated $7,550,186,000 or almost 23 percent of the total. Stores 
under other types of operation accounted thus for only 3.2 of the places 
of business and 4.3 percent of the volume of sales. 

Sales of mail-order houses (exclusive of their retail stores) 
constituted about 30 percent of the $1,364,978,000 total for "other 
types." State liquor stores made up an additional 12 percent, their 
$160,665,000 of sales in 1935 representing a considerable part of the in- 
crease over 1933 for "other types of operation." In addition, other 
types of operatibn include stores operated by public utility companies, 
mainly for the sale of electric and gas household appliances; commissary 
stores owned by manufacturing, mining or other companies primarily for 
the sale of goods to their employees; direct selling (house-to-house) 
retailers operating from central points with crews of solicitors; leased 
departments, found most frequently in department stores and operated 
independently of the store; cbnsumer cooperatives; and a miscellany of 
other types, including itinerant vendors, rolling stores, roadside markets 
or stands and the like. Because of the difficulty of canvassing some 
of these "other types" the census enumeration of them is likely to have 
been incomplete, but their sales would have little effect on the results. 

A summary showing the number of retail units and sales by types of 
operation, and comparable 1933 and 1929 figures, follows: 



Comparison of Stores and Sales by Types, by Years 



Types of Operation S tore s Sales (add OOP) 

1935 1933 (a) 1929 1935 1933_iaJ 1929 

Total^_all_tYBes__1^653^9Sl__1^26^119__1^43J^8__533^161^276__S25^037^225_^ 

Independents 1,474,149 1,349,356 1,375,509 24,246,112 17,846,332 38,081,504 

Chains 127,482 141,676 148,037 7,550,186 6,372,554 9,834,846 

Leased Dep'ts 7,181 (b) 4,271 156,111 (b) 154,024 

Utility-operated 3,936 4,127 4,053 123,242 76,079 163,371 

Mail-order 378 311 271 420,027 244,381 515,237 

Direct-selling 6,349 6,934 1,661 125,316 107,813 93,961 
State liquor 2,053 -- -- 160,665 

Other types 32,433 23,715 9,356 379,617 390,066 271,710 

gATIOS_lPercent of Each Type to Total f or all Types) 

Total, all types 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 

Independents 89.1 88.4 89.1 73.1 71.3 77.5 

Chains 7.7 9.3 9.6 22.8 25.4 20.0 

Leased Dep'ts .4 (b) .3 .4 (b) .3 

Utility-operated .3 .3 .3 .4 .3 .3 

Mail-order — -- __ 1.3 1.0 l.o 

Direct Selling ,4 .5 .1 .4 .4 .2 
State liquor .1 -- -- .5 

Other types 2.0 1.5 .6 1.1 1.6 .7 



Vo 



1 - Page 1-23 



Comgarisons_with_1933_and_1929_^ 

Independents increased their stores more than 9 percent and their 
sales 36 percent between 1933 and 1935. Although the number of chain 
stores was 10 percent less in 1935 than in 1933, the sales volume of 
chains was almost 19 percent greater. The chain sales ratio, which was 
20.0 percent of total retail sales in 1929, and rose to 25.4 percent of 
total sales in 1933, returned to a position about halfway between the 
two extremes, or 22.8 percent of total sales in 1935. 

Independents in 1935 did 63.7 percent of their 1929 dollar volume, 
chains did 76.8 percent. Mail-order houses (exclusive of their retail 
stores) did 81.5 percent of their 1929 total. Their 1935 sales of 
$420,027,000 were 72 percent above 1933 as compared to a 32 precent 
increase for all types combined. Utility-operated stores (primarily 
selling household appliances) had sales of $123,242,000 in 1935, which 
represented 75.8 percent of their 1929 volume. 

Bir_States 

In all but four States the chain sales ratio dropped between 1933 and 
1935. The exceptions are Colorado, District of Columbia, Maine and 
Vermont, in each of which States chains now do a greater proportion of 
the business than they did in 1933 or in 1929. In Colorado the relative 
proportion of the business done by chains as compared to independents is 
considerably affected by incomplete coverage in certain parts of the 
State, particularly Denver, because this incomplete coverage affects the 
sales figures for independents to a greater extent than it does the chain 
figures. 

In all but two States the chain sal.es ratio was greater in 1935 than 
it was in 1929. The exceptions are Idaho and Montana. In Idaho the 
1935 ratio was 19.9% vs. 20.7% in 1929. In Montana the 1935 ratio was 
14.8% vs. 15.1% in 1929. 



The chain sales ratio is higher than the national average of 22. 
twelve States, as follows: 



in 



California 

Connecticut 

Dist. of Columbia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Massachusetts 



25 . 7% 
24.5% 
29.7% 
29.3% 
24.3% 
28.9% 



Michigan 25.3% 

New Jersey 25.1% 

New York 25.0% 

Ohio 24.0% 

Pennsylvania 24.9% 

Rhode Island 26.2% 



In all of these States the chain sales ratio was also higher than the 
national average in 1933 and in all except Indiana it was higher than the 
national average of 1929. 

The twelve States with the lowest chain sales ratio in 1935 are: 



Mississippi 


11.1% 


Arkansas 


12.3% 


Wyoming 


14.7% 


Montana 


14.8% 


Minnesota 


15.1% 


Nevada 


15.2% 



North Dakota 


15. 


9% 


New Mexico 


15. 


,9% 


South Carolina 


16. 


.2% 


Nebraska 


16, 


.5% 


Alabama 


16, 


.7% 


Wisconsin 


17, 


.6% 



Vol. I - Page 1-24 



By Kinds of Business 



In the summary below is shown the relative distribution of sales 
among independents, chains and other types in 1935 for 26 kinds of 
business, together with 1933 and 1929 comparisons: 



INDEPENDENTS 



CHAINS 



OTHER TYFES 



1935 1933 1929 1935 1933 1929 1935 1933 1929 



All stores 

Groceiy stores (without meats) 

Combination stores (groc. &, meats) 

Beer and liquor stores (packaped) 

Motor-vehicle dealers 

Accessorles-tlre-battery dealers 

Filling stations 

Department stores 

Variety stores 

Men's clothing & furn'gs stores 

Family clothing stores 

Women's ready-to-wear stores 

Shoe stores 

Furniture stores 

Household appliance-radio stores 

Radio dealers 

Lumber i. bldg. material dealers 

Hardware stores Jc Implement dlrs. 

Restaurants and eating places 

Drinking places 

Cigar stores and cigar stands 

Fuel and ice dealers 

Drug stores with fountain 

Drug stores without fountain 

Hay, grain and feed stores 

Farm and garden supply stores 

Jeweliy stores 

All other stores 



73.1 


71.3 


77,5 


22,8 


25.4 


ao.o 


4.1 


3.3 


2.5 


60.8 


54.3 


53.6 


38.2 


45.0 


45.7 


1.0 


.7 


.7 


60.5 


56.1 


67.6 


39,1 


43.7 


32.2 


,4 


.2 


.2 


48.0 


X 


X 


1.8 


X 


X 


50.2(a) 


X 


X 


95.6 


94.6 


X 


4.4 


5.3 


X 


- 


.1 


T 


50.0 


X 


X 


50.0 


X 


X 


- 


X 


x; 


77.8 


64.3 


66.0 


21.5 


35,5 


33.8 


.7 


,2 


.2 


61.4 


67.3 


72,1, 


26.7 


23,9 


16.7 


11.9(b) 


8.8 


11.2 


-a..?. 


8.8 


9.8 


90.8 


91.2 


90,1 


- 


- 


.1 


78.0 


76.5 


77,9 


21.0 


22.0 


21.2 


1.0 


1.5 


.9 


78:9 


79.2 


71,5 


20.6 


20.3 


27.3 


.5 


.5 


1.2 


72.5 


74.5 


74,3 


25.2 


23.3 


22.7 


2.5 


2.2 


3.0 


43.3 


46.5 


53,5 


50.0 


46.2 


38.0 


6.7(c) 


7,3 


8.5 


86.0 


84.6 


83.9 


13.5 


14.2 


14.2 


.5 


1.2 


1.9 


48.1 


33.2 


I 


12.6 


21.5 


I 


39.3(d)45.3 


X 


75.6 


82.7 


79.0 


23.1 


15.6 


19.1 


1.3 


1.7 


1.9 


75.6 


X 


I 


23.8 


X 


X 


.6 


z 


X 


95.4 


95.6 


X 


4.3 


4.1 


X 


.3 


.3 


X 


84.0 


84.8 


86.1 


14.5 


14.9 


13.6 


1.5 


.3 


.3 


99.2 


X 


X 


.1 


X 


X 


.7 


X 


X 


61,1 


65.1 


73.5 


35.8 


33.9 


25.1 


3.1 


1.0 


1.4 


82.7 


X 


X 


16.5 


X 


X 


.8 


X 


X 


71.1 






20.8 






.1 






84.1 


74.0 


81.2 


15.4 


25.1 


18.5 


.5 


.9 


.3 


71.6 


X 


X 


16.0 


X 


X 


12.4(e) 


X 


X 


75.0 


X 


X 


4.7 


X 


X 


20.3(e) 


X 


X 


90.3 


93.6 


93.0 


8.9 


5.9 


6.4 


.8 


.5 


.6 


78.8 


79.6 


X 


14.3 


15.0 


X 


6.9 


5.4 


X 



(a) Principally State liquor stares, (b) Principally mail-order, (c) Principally leased depart- 
ments, (d) Principally utility-operated stores, (e) Principally consumer cooperatives, 
(x) No true comparisons available. 



In 1935 chains accounted for one-third or' more of total sales in 
only six kinds of business. They did the largest proportion of total 
sales in variety stores, accounting for 90.8 percent. In automobile 
accessories-tire-battery dealers and in shoe store chains did one-half 
of the total business. Of the total sales for cigar- stores and cigar 
stands, chain store sales were 35.8 percent; 39.1 in combination stores 
(groceries and meats), and 38.2 in grocery stores (without meats). 



Vol. 1 Page 1-25 



In contrast to this, independents accounted for more than two-thirds of 
total sales in 17 out of the 26 kinds of business shown above. 

In five kinds of business "other types" accounted for more than 10 
percent of total sales. In beer and liquor stores (packaged), the 50.2 
percent done by "other types" was principally State liquor store sales. 
The 39.3 percent shown for household appliance-radio stores was done 
principally by utility-operated stores, while mail-order sales made up 
most of the sales of "other types" shown by hay, grain and feed stores. 
"Other types" shown for farm and garden supply stores are largely sales 
of consumer cooperatives. 

A comparison of the 1935 ratios with those for 1933 and 1929 indi- 
cate some material changes for certain kinds of business. Although the 
chain ratios for both grocery and combination stores are lower than in 
1933, the chain ratio of 39.1 for combination stores in 1935 is almost 
7 percent higher than 1929, in contrast to a 7.5 percent drop in the 
chain proportion in grocery stores over the same period. 

The marked drop in the chain ratio for filling stations from 1933 
to 1935 is primarily the result of the conversion by many large oil com- 
panies of all or a large part of their company-owned stations to a leased 
station basis, operated by independent lessees. 

Detailed T^pe Data 

Table 3-A analyzes retail trade for the United States as a whole by 
types of operation. Similar tables for each State and each city of more 
than 500,000 population are contained in Volume IV, as well as tables for 
26 selected kinds of business showing type-of-operation information by 
States. 

Reference is made also to a special report of the Retail Census en- 
titled "Retail Chains and Ownership Groups," further analyzing chains and 
showing data on central offices and warehouses as well as store units. 
This special report likewise contains analyses of the operations of owner- 
ship groups of department stores since 1929, and of mail-order houses for 
the same period. 



Vol. I - Page 1-26 



SECTION 6 - RETAIL CHAINS 

Chains operating retail stores in the United States increased nearly 10 
percent in number between 1933 and 1935, while the number of stores decreased 
8.2 percent. Sales increased 25.0 percent. The three Census periods compare 
as follows: 

Percent Percent 

1935__ Change 1933__ Change i929__ 

Number uf chains 6,U79 +9.6 5,545 -21.5 7,061 

Number of store units 139.810 - 8.2 152,308 - 4.6 159.638 

Store sales (add 000) 18^460^611 ±25^0 f6_^767^766 z^l^Q. |10^Z4Q^385 

Sales through central offices, in the nature of wholesale sales and trans- 
fers between chains, added 1281,779,000 to 1935 sales, compared to $215,583,000 
in 1933. These sales constitute the wholesale business of 228 chains operating 
492 warehouses, in addition to their primary function of supplying the chains' 
retail stores with merchandise. The census shows central-office operations of 
1,914 chains which reported central administrative and buying offices apart from 
their retail stores. All of these operations are shown in the comparative sum- 
mary on page 1-30. 

Retail chains are organiza-tions operating more than three centrally mer- 
chandised retail stores in the same general kind of business (such as grocery, 
hardware, women's apparel, drug, etc.). Typically, they sell about the same 
lines of merchandise in all of their stores, and in about the same price range, 
thereby permitting quantity purchases and a degree of standardization in mer- 
chandising and operating methods. Uaually central stocks are maintained; fre- 
quently there ai'e central buying and administrative offices apart fi-om any of 
the retail units; and 228 chains operate separate warehouses. However, it is 
not essential for a chain to have either a sepai-ate buying office or a warehouse; 
it may use stock room in one or more of its stores, or may require delivery di- 
rectly to its stores from wholesalers or manufacturers. 

Chain organizations within the scope of the above definition may include 
multi-unit retailers (with more than three stores each) in such types of opera- 
tion as mail-order, leased-department chains, utility-operated chains, direct- 
selling, or state liquor chains, as well as the usual types of store chains. Of 
the 139,810 chain units enumerated herein, 127,482 are units of store chains 
and 12,328 are of other types described in detail in Retail Volume IV, summar- 
ized herein in Table 3A on page 2-13. 

Chain-Store Warehouses 

There is no relation between total chain sales and the comparatively small 
proportion of the goods which move through chain-store warehouses. Only 492 
warehouses were operated in 1935, by 228 chains out of a total of 6,079 chains. 
The value of merchandise billed through these warehouses totalled $1,864,221,000 
at prices equivalent to what would have been the wholesale price had the goods 
been purchased from wholesalers. About 15 percent ($281,779,000) of this amount 
is accounted for by sales through central offices, in the nature of wholesale 
sales. The primary function of the warehouses, however, is to supply the stores 
of their chains with merchandise which can be warehoused and distributed more 
economically than it can be delivered directly from producers. With the trend 



864,221 


$1,431,563 $1 


,929,581 


$93,471 


$66,204 


$98,640 


25,322 


18, 450(a) 


26,442 


$33^948 


$28^383 


S40^635 


$33,253 


$27,865 


(X) 


S 595 


$ 518 


(X) 


$76,503 


$54,767 


$83,829 


4.1% 


4.5% 


4.3' 



Vol. I - Pag, 1-27 



toward fewer and larger retail units, this economic function of. a warehouse be- 
comes less important, and some chains are actively developing more wholesale 
business with independent stores. 

Chain store warehouse operations in the three Census years compare as 
follows: 

1935_ 1933_ 1929_ 

Number of warehouses 492 462 559 

Wholesale value of goods billed 

through warehouses (add 000) $1 

Stocks end of year, at cost (add 000) 

Number of employees, F.T. and P.T. 

Total pay roll (add 000) 

Full-time 

Part-time 
Total warehouse operating expense 

including pay roll (add 000) 
Ratio of operating expense to 
wholesale value of goods handled 

Chain-store warehouses are located in 43 of the 48 states, and in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. Data on employment, pay roll, expense and the value of goods 
handled are shown by States, so far as the information can be reported without 
revealing the figures of individual chains, in a special report of the Retail 
Census entitled "Retail Chains," (Also shown in Wholesale Vol. I, page 135). 

Central-Office Operations 
A total of 1,914 central offices were operated in 1935 with 73,655 full- 
time and part-time employees and an aggregate pay roll of $153,993,000. Total 
central-office expense, including pay roll, was $288,421,000 of which $94,445,000 
was prorated to the stores and appears in the reported store-operating expense. 
The non-prorated central-office expense is equivalent to 2.29 percent of total 
chain store sales, or 2.22 percent of total chain sales if additional central- 
office sales at wholesale are included. 

Central-office operations in 1935 compare with those in 1933 (no data for 
1929 are available) as follows: 

* __i935__ __1933 

Employees, full-time and part-time 73,655 (b) 

Pay roll, total (add 000) $153,993 $155,249 

Total central-office optg. exp., incl. pay roll (add 000) $2§8^42l $310^.110 

Proportion of above expense prorated to stores (add 000) $ 94,445 $ 93,057 

Remainder not charged to stores $193^.976 $217_^053 

Per $100 of store sales $ 2.29 $ 3.21 

Employment and Pay Roll 
Chains accounted for total employment in 1935, in stores and central off- 
ices and warehouses, of 1,171.671 persons, compared with 1,104,406 in 1933. 
Total Pay roll in all operations was $1,211,066,000 in 1935, and $1,051,990,000 
in 1933. Pay roll was equivalent to $13.85 per $100 of sales in 1935. and 
$15.06 per $100 of sales in 1933. 



(a) Full-time employees only. Number of part-timers in 1933 not available. 

(b) Combined with warehouse in 1933. Not avabilable separately, 
(x) No comparable data available. 



Vol. 



Page 1-28 



It is not possible to compute the average annual earnings of full-time em- 
ployees, because full-time and part-time employees are not reported separately 
for the year. Detailed employment data were requested for one representative 
week, however, for full-time store employees by occupational classifications 
and for part-timers. A 17 percent sample is available, covering 180,886 of the 
1,071,694 store employees. 

Of the total, 137,563 or 76 percent were full-time employees and 43,323 
or 24 percent were part-timers. For the representative week, with a pay roll 
total of $3,545,790, the amount paid to full-time employees was $3,288,477 or 
92.7 percent, and to part-timers $257,313 or 7.3 percent. The average earned 
by full-time employees for the week was $23.91; the part-time average was $5.94 
indicating that part-timers averaged about one-fourth of full-time working 
hours for the week. The week of October 26, 1935 was used as representative. 

Pay Roll Average Pay 

ClassiliciiioS -Number _Qne_Week £or_Week 

Total sample analyzed 277^061 SZiiZi^See l_25^89 

Store managers and executives 2,531 283,818 112.14 

Store office and clerical, full-time 8,556 208,798 24.40 

Store selling employees, full-time 84,983 2,010,042 23.65 

Store waiters, waitresses, full-time 16,090 232,024 14.42 

Other store employees, full-time _25_^403 553_^795 _21^80 

Total store full-time 137^.563 $3^288^477 $23^91 

Store selling employees, part-time 34,122 186,239 5.46 

Store waiters, waitresses, part-time 5,067 27,076 5.34 

Other store employees, part-time 4j_i34 43j_998 _iOj.§4 

Total store, part-time _43^323 $ 257^313 $ 5^94 

Central-office, full-time & part-time 71,908 $2,982,477 $ 41.48(c) 

Warehouse, full-time and part-time _24,267 _644,099 _26^54(d) 

QE§Ii;lin£_i2S£§Iise 
Total operating expenses of retail chains - stores, central offices and 
warehouses - totalled $2,377,250,000 in 1935 and $2,133,675,000 in 1933. This 
includes pay roll as described above. The total expense is equivalent to $27.19 
per $100 of chain sales in 1935, compared with $30.55 per $100 of chain sales in 
1933. The distribution of expense as between stores, offices and warehouses is 
shown in the summary on page 30. It is customary in several kinds of business 
for chains to charge their warehouse expense, and sometimes certain buying ex- 
penses, to cost of goods rather than to consider them a part of operating ex-ense. 
The Census does not differentiate, as it definitely does not report cost-of-goods 
data. 

Stocks on Hand 
Stocks of merchandise for sale at the end of the year totalled $953,597,000 
(at cost) in 1935 and $803,835,000 in 1933. Of this amount in 1935, warehouse 
stocks accounted for $93,471,000 or 9.8 percent. Comparisons are shown on page 30. 



(c) Includes administrative and merchandising executives. 

(d) Includes warehouse executives and some regional merchandisers, 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-29 

Ch§;in_HeadguarjterSj__by_States 
Administrative or home offices of the 6,079 chains operating in 1935 are 
located in every State, but New York leads with 841. It is followed in order 
by Illinois with 493, California with 484, Ohio with 400, Pennsylvania with 
390 and Texas with 302. States which are the home States of more than 100 
chains further include Indiana with 132, Iowa with 137, Kansas with 109, Mass- 
achusetts with 277, Michigan with 241, Minnesota with 155, Missouri with 264, 
New Jersey with 129 and Wisconsin with 149. 

In the first six States mentioned are located the home offices of 48 per- 
cent of all chains, operating in every State a total of 69 percent of all chain 
stores, in which is done 76i- percent of all the chain store business in the 
country. Below is a summary showing the stores and sales of all chains, dis- 
tributed according to the States in which they are domiciled and not according 
to the States in which the retail units are located: 

Number and Size of the Chains Domiciled in Each State 
( not the number of units operated with in the State ) 







No. of 










No. of 




Home Office 


No. of 


Retail 


Total Sales 


Home Office No. of 


■ Retail 


Total Sales 


State 

U. S. Total 
Alabama 


Chains 

6^079 

51 


Units 

139^810 
711 


_iadd_0001_ 

18^460^611 

32,192 


State Chains 

Montana 22 
Nebraska 70 


; Units 
449 
678 


_iadd_000l_ 
16,048 
21,866 


Arizona 


15 


131 




9,966 


Nevada 


3 


13 


308 


Arkansas 


48 


475 




13,260 


New Hampshire 


15 


124 


6,118 


California 


484 


11,037 




600,834 


New Jersey 


129 


2,590 


92,010 


Colorado 


56 


375 




16,048 


New Mexico 


12 


59 


2,869 


Connecticut 


75 


1,000 




52,206 


New York 


841 


46,754 3 


,301,196 


Delaware 


5 


105 




4,371 


North Carolina 


83 


892 


37,122 


Dist. of Columbia 36 


487 




47,650 


North Dakota 


17 


225 


6,C09 


Florida 


70 


639 




32,956 


Ohio 


400 


11,492 


613,950 


Georgia 


97 


1,611 




62,732 


Oklahoma 


99 


1,288 


44,343 


Idaho 


24 


356 




14,871 


Oregon 


60 


794 


33,788 


Illinois 


493 


13,099 


1 


,310,769 


Pennsylvania 


390 


10,266 


506,244 


Indiana 


132 


1,612 




69,262 


Rhode Island 


21 


176 


15,612 


Iowa 


137 


1,553 




56,349 


South Carolina 


39 


377 


12,664 


Kansas 


109 


1,096 




29,828 


South Dakota 


21 


175 


4,546 


Kentucky 


61 


1,050 




28,984 


Tennessee 


98 


1,315 


58,215 


Louisiana 


71 


696 




31,459 


Texas 


302 


3,585 


133,612 


Maine 


32 


261 




12,097 


Utah 


39 


490 


20,959 


Maryland 


65 


983 




38,352 


Vermont 


11 


87 


4,005 


Massachusetts 


277 


6,687 




364,207 


Virginia 


70 


1,004 


49,642 


Michigan 


241 


3,334 




209,461 


Washington 


84 


1,100 


52,674 


Minnesota 


155 


2,536 




106,565 


West Virginia 


66 


589 


26,436 


Mississippi 


29 


228 




6,790 


Wisconsin 


149 


1,383 


58,694 


Missouri 


264 


3,764 




187,109 


Wyoming 


11 


79 


3,363 












Identical Chains 


Compared 



Comparisons have been made between 3,495 identical chains in 1935 and 1933, 
and between 517 identical chains in 1933 and 1929. The number of stores decreased 
slightly from 1929 to 1933, and substantially from 1933 to 1935. Sales decreased 
about 25 percent from 1929 to 1933, and increased about 22 percent from 1933 to 
1935. The chains in 1935 used 8 percent more store employees than in 1929, pay 



1935 




1933 




1929 


6,079 




5,546 




7,061 


139,810 




152,308 




159,638 


1,914 




(X) 




(x) 


492 




462 




559 


$8,460,611 


$6 


,767,766 


$10 


740,385 


281^779 




215,583 




ixl 



Vol. I - Page 1-30 



rolls totalled 1.3 percent more in dollars than in 1929 and sales were 8.3 per- 
cent less in dollar volume than in 1929. Pay roll increased $1.24 per $100 of 
sales between 1929 and 1933, and decreased 23 cents per $100 of sales between 
1933 and 1935. 

A detailed analysis by States of the operations of chains, both identical and 
total, in various kinds of business will be found in a special report of the Retail 
Census entitled "Retail Chains." "R<^]ated to chains, but quite distinct in their 
characteristics, are 13 ownership groups of department stores with sales in 1935 
of more than $700,000,000, and 378 mail-order houses with sales from catalog in 
1935 of more than $420,000,000. Both types are summarized in Section 14 (pages 
44 and 45 herein) . A summary of the ratio of chain store sales in each State 
to independents and other types is included in Section 5 (pages 22 to 25 herein) 
and is covered in detail by 26 kinds of business in Retail Volume IV. 

RETAIL CHAINS - COMPARATIVE SUMMARY FOR 1935, 1933 and 1929 
Inclliding Chain Store Warehouses and Central Offices 

Total number of chains 

Number of retail units (stores) 

Number of central offices 

Number of warehouses (228 chains) 

Sales through stores; all chains (add 000) 

Additional central-office sales (add 000) 

Total value (wholesale) of merchandise han- 
dled through chain-store warehouses enroute 
to stores, including that sold at wholesale 
through the central office (add 000) 

Employees, full-time and part-time 

- stores 

- central offices 

- warehouses 
Pay roll - total (add 000) 

- stores 

- central offices 

- warehouses 
Total pay roll per $100 of total sales 
Operating expense including pay roll - 

- total (add 000) 

- stores (incl. some pro-rate) 

- central offices, total 

Less: prorated to stores 

- warehouses 
Total administrative and operating expense, 

per $100 of total sales 
Stocks on hand, end of year, at cost - 

- total (add 000) 

- in stores 

- in warehouses 

(a) Not the cost of goods sold. Relates only to merchandise billed through ware- 
houses, which is but a small part of the total quantity of goods sold by chain stores. 
This figure is sometimes regarded as a part of the total of wholesale distribution, 
performed by the chains instead of by merchant wholesalers. See text, page 1-26. 

(b) Full-time pay roll; 1935 $962,973,000; 1933 $808,569,000. (c) Full-time pay roll; 
1935, $33,253,000; 1933, $27,865,000. (d) Full-time employees; 1933 only: stores, 
752,623; central offices, 115,078; warehouses, 18,450. (x) No comparable data avail- 
able. 



11^864^221 (a) $1^431^563 


|1^29_^681 


1_J,71^671 


_1^104^406(d) 


(x) 


1,071,694 


985,984 


(X) 


73,655 




(X) 


26,322 


118,422 


26,442 


11^21 1_^066 


$1.L.051^990 


(X) 


1,023, 125(b) 


868,358 


(X) 


153,993 


155,249 


(x) 


33^948(c) 


28 , 383 


40^635 


113.85 


$15. 06 


(X) 


$2^377^250 


$2^133_,.675 


(x) 


2,106,671 


1,851,855 


(x) 


288,421 


310,110 


(X) 


-94,445 


-93,057 


(x) 


76,603 


54,767 


83,829 


$27^19 


230.55 


(X) 


$953^597 


$803,835 


(x) 


860,126 


737,631 


(X) 


93,471 


66,204 


98,840 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-31 



SECTION 7 - RETAIL TRADE BY SIZE OF BUSINESS 



Sixty percent of all stores in 1935 did less than $10,000 of business. 
They accounted in the aggregate for 11 percent of total retail sales. More 
than two-thirds of these small stores showed sales of less than $5,000. In 
contrast, stores with sales of $50,000 or more, although representing only 
7.2 percent of all stores, accounted for 53.3 percent of total sales. A sum- 
mary of the proportions of stores and sales by size groups for 1935, together 
with 1933 and 1929 comparisons, is shown below: 

PERCENTAGES OF STORES AND SALES BY SIZE OF STORE 



1935 1933 1929 



% of % of % of % of % of % of 
stores sales stores sales stores sales 

Total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 



Stores with sales of: 

$1,000,000 or more .06 10.12 .05 9.69 .14 12.34 



500,000 to 999,999 


.15 


5.04 


.09 


3.74 


.29 


6.27 


300,000 to 499,999 


.30 


5.53 


.20 


4.45 


.55 


6.50 


100,000 to 299,999 


2.25 


17.56 


1.62 


15.03 


4.05 


20.06 


50,000 to 99,999 


4.40 


15.07 


3.65 


14.96 


8.35 


17.81 


30,000 to 49,999 


7.31 


13.91 


5.84 


13.35 


11.45 


13.74 


20,000 to 29.999 


7.90 


9.48 


7.12 


10.41 


11.24 


8.55 


10,000 to 19,999 


17.69 


12.31 


17.07 


14.52 


20.27 


9.04 


5,000 to 9,999 


18.47 


6.53) 






(16.48 


3.69 


Less than $5,000 


41.47 


4.45) 


64.36 


13.85 


(27.18 


2.00 



Size by T^ges of Ogeration 

In this Census for the first time size analyses for independent stores 
and for chain units are presented separately. Mail-order units are combined 
with chain stores in order to maintain combinations made in the type-of-oper- 
ation data in Volume IV (Types of Operation) to prevent disclosure of indi- 
vidual operations. 

Only about 5 percent of the independents (and non-chain) had sales of 
$50,000 or more in 1935 as compared to almost 32 percent in the case of chain 
and mail-order units. Approximately 47 percent of the independents' sales 
were accounted for by stores of $50,000 or over, while the corresponding size 
for chain and mail-order units did about 74 percent of the total. 

The lower size group also show clearly the difference in size by type 
of operation, with 64 percent of the independent? (including other types) 
doing less than $10,000 of business in 1935 as compared to only 11 percent 
for chain and mail-order units. The most common size group for independents 
is the "Less than $5,000 sales" group (44.5 percent of all stores), while for 
chain and mail-order units the largest proportion of the stores (23.4 percent) 
is accounted for by the $30,000 to $49,999 group. The following table pre- 
sents a comparison of size of business for the two type groups for all kinds 
of business combined and for four selected kinds of business. Similar com- 
parisons for other kinds of business can be made by using Tables 4A and 4G. 



Vol. I - Page 1-32 



KINDS OF BUSINESS BY SIZE AND TYPE GROUPS 



_Independents_&_other_types Chain_and_mail^rder_units 

% of % of % of % of 

-Stores sales stores sales 



Stores with sales of: IQO^O 

$300,000 or more .4 

100,000 to 299,999 1.6 

50,000 to 99,999 3.1 

30,000 to 49,999 6.0 

20,000 to 29,999 7.2 

10,000 to 19,999 17.7 

5,000 to 9,999 19.5 

Less_tlian_|5^000 44^5 



100^0 
18.5 
15.5 
12.9 
13.7 
10.4 
14.9 
8.3 
5.8 



iQO^O 

2.1 

9.9 

19.8 

23.4 

16.6 

16.9 

6.3 

5.0 



100^0 

27.6 

24.2 

21.8 

14.6 

6.6 

4.2 

.8 

.2 



Grocer.v Stores 
(without meats) 
$50,000 or more 
30,000 to 49,999 
20,000 to 29,999 
10,000 to 19.999 
5,000 to 9,999 
Less_than_S5_^000_ 



100^0 

1.6 

3.4 

4.9 

14.0 

18.2 

57.9 



1Q0_0 
18.0 
15.6 
14.1 
23.4 
15.4 
13.5 



ioo_o 

15.9 
42. 
27. 
10. 

1. 
1 



,7 
.4 
,7 
.9 
.4 



100^ 

32.1 

44.1 

18.6 

4.7 

.4 

.1 



5o5bination_s tores 

(groceries & meats) iQO^O 

$50,000 or more 5.5 

30,000 to 49,999 10.9 

20,000 to 29,999 12.3 

10,000 to 19,999 25.4 

5,000 to 9,999 20.7 

L§ss_than_|5j_000 25^2 



IQO^O 
28.7 
23.0 
16.4 
19.9 
8.3 
3.7 



iQO^o 

51.5 

28.1 

13.1 

5.3 

1. 1 

.9 



EiilinS-Stations 
$50,000 or more 
30,000 to 49,999 
20,000 to 29,999 
10,000 to 19,999 
5,000 to 9,999 
L!§ss_than_S5^000_ 



100^0 

1.2 

3.1 

5.2 

18.4 

24.1 

48.0 



100_^0 
11.3 
13.4 
14.2 
28.9 
19.7 
12.5 



6.0 
13.2 
19.5 
41.3 
12.2 

7.8 



75.6 

17.6 

5.2 

1.4 

.1 

.1 



100^0 
21.3 
22.9 
21.8 
28.7 

4. 

1 



,3 
,0 



Drug_stores 
$50,000 or more 
30,000 to 49,999 
20,000 to 29,999 
10,000 to 19,999 
5,000 to9,999 
t§ss_than_|5_^000 



IQO^O 
3.8 
10.4 
15.4 
32.6 
21.6 
16.2 



iQO^O 
18.3 
22.2 
21.1 
26.6 
9.1 
2.7 



iQO^o 

64.7 
18.0 
7.2 
7.1 
1.5 
1.5 



iQO^O 

87.7 

8.7 

2.1 

1.3 

.1 

.1 



independents by Size by Kinds of Business 

Although 64 percent of the independent stores (all kinds of business com- 
bined) did less than $10,000 business in 1935, there are marked variations in 
size of store among the different kinds of business. For example, as shown in 



Vol. I - Page 1-33 



the table above, 76 percent of the grocery stores had sales in 1935 of less 
than $10,000 as compared to about 38 percent in the case of drug stores. 
Volume VI of the Retail Distribution series presents a detailed analysis 
(Table 4) of the size of business of independents and other types (exclud- 
ing chain and mail-order units) by kinds of business and by States. The 
following discussion of size by kinds of business is a summary of the de- 
tailed data as presented in that volume. 

The food group of stores, averaging in sales $11,451 per store, is pre- 
dominantly a small store group, with 47.8 percent doing less than $5,000 per 
year and only 2.2% doing as much as $50,000 per year. Meat markets and com- 
bination stores show a larger proportion of stores over $5,000 than any other 
kind of business in the food field. Only .7 percent of all food stores had 
sales of $100,000 or over in 1935, but these stores did 12.4 percent of the 
total business. 

All department stores by definition exceed $100,000 of sales per store, 
whereas 56 percent of dry-goods and general-merchandise stores do less than 
$10,000 of business per year. Most of the variety store business (90.8 per- 
cent) is done by chains, but the remaining 9.2 percent is divided among more 
than 6,000 independent variety stores, 58.4 of which had sales of less than 
$10,000 in 1935. 

The great majority of filling stations and garages have sales of less 
than $10,000 a year. Almost one-half (48 percent) of the filling stations 
did less than $5,000 and 69.2 percent of the garages were under that amount. 
As contrasted to these, 35 percent of the motor-vehicle dealers (new) had 
sales of $100,000 or more. 

More than 60 percent of furniture stores do $10,000 or more per year, 
and their sales constitute 95 percent of the total. Almost one-half (46.5 
percent) of the business of furniture stores is done by 7.5 percent of the 
stores, with sales exceeding $100,000 each. About 55 percent of household- 
appliance and radio stores had sales in 1935 of $10,000 or more, and their 
sales represented well over 90 percent of the total. Other classifications 
in the furniture-household group, however, are predominantly small stores 
of less than $10,000 of annual sales. 

One out of every four lumber and building-material dealers did less than 
$5,000, while almost exactly the same proportion (25.7 percent) had sales of 
$50,000 or over. Those under $5,000, however, accounted for only 2.5 percent 
of total sales as contrasted with the two-thirds (66.5 percent) of the total 
for the higher size group. 

Eating and drinking places are essentially small-volume establishments 
with about 75 percent doing less than $10,000 per year and accounting for 31 
percent of the total business. 

Nearly 38 percent of all drug stores do less than $10,000 per year, but 
these small stores account for only 12 percent of drug store sales. Drug 
stores without fountain show 54 percent of all stores doing less than $10,000 
in 1935 as compared to 30 percent for drug stores with fountain. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-34 



Almost 62 percent of the jewelry stores had sales in 1935 of less than 
$10,000, but their sales accounted for only 16 percent of total sales. In 
contrast, 31 percent of the total business was done by the stores with sales 
of $100,000 or more although they made up less than 3 percent of the total 
stores. 

Although 64 percent of all stores (exclusive of chain and mail-order 
units) did less than $10,000 of business in 1935, with their aggregate sales 
amounting to less than one-seventh (14.1 percent) of the total retail sales 
(exclusive of sales of chains and mail-order houses), the instances cited 
above show that there are many kinds of business to which these general con- 
clusions do not apply. 

Tables 4A and 4B provide United States summaries of stores and sales 
by size (exclusive of chain and mail-order units), by kinds of business and 
by States, respectively. Table 4G presents a summary for the United States 
by kinds of business of chain and mail-order units. The totals as shown in 
Table 4G agree with the totals for chains and mail-order houses as published 
in Volume IV. The totals for independents and other types (Table 4A) exceed 
the totals published in Volume IV by 987 stores and $87,777,000 sales because 
of the necessity of including in the independent figures small numbers of chain 
units which were combined with the independent figures for certain States in 
Volume IV to prevent disclosure of the operations of individual establish- 
ments. As these chain stores and sales included with independents are also 
in the chain and mail-order figures, the sum of the totals of Tables 4A and 
4G exceeds the published totals for stores and sales (Table lA) by the 987 
stores and the $87,777,000 sales, and cannot be adjusted without revelation 
of individual operations that were deliberately concealed in the tables in 
Volume IV. 



Vol. 1 - Paee 1-35 



SECTI0N_8_^RETAIL_TRADE_BY_SIZE_0F_CITY 

A significant factor in comparisons between 1933 and 1935 data on re- 
tail trade is the almost unchanging relationship that exists between stores 
and sales for these two census periods, by city-size distribution. The 
accompanying summaries for 1933 and 1935 show this clearly. 

For 1935, 19 percent or 318,176 stores of the 1,653,961 retail stores 
shown for the United States as a whole are located in cities having a popu- 
lation of 500.000 or more; 7 percent, or 117,113 stores are located in cities 
having between 250,000 and 500,000 population; while 7 percent, or 118,079 
stores are located in cities whose population is between 100,000 and 250,000. 
Thus, 33 percent, or 553,368 stores are located in cities having a popula- 
tion of more than 100,000. 

If the city-size groups are combined into three groups - that is, those 
having more than 100,000 population; from 2,500 to 100,000, and places less 
than 2,500, including unincorporated areas - then each city-size group will 
be found to have a third of the total number of retail stores in the country. 
Sales made by the stores in these three city-size groups, however, show ratios 
that vary considerably. The city-size group of more than 100,000 population 
shows 44 percent, or $14,698,561,000 of sales. Stores in the 2,500 to 100,000 
city-size group do 38 percent, or $12,468,850,000, and the group having less 
than 2,500 population does only 18 percent, or $5,993,865,000 in sales. A 
summary of the above data with 1933 comparisons for the various city-size 
groups follows: 

y^_S^_SUMMARY_:^Percent_of_Stores_and_Sales_bY_Size_of_City 



Percent of Percent of 
Percent of Stores Sales 
Cityr:Size_Group Population 1935 1933 1935 1933 



Totals IQO^O 

500,000 or more 17.0 

250,000 to 500,000 6.5 

i0Q^Q00_to_250^000 _6^1^ 

All_cities_^_100^000_or_more 29^6_ 

75,000 to 100,000 1.8~ 

50,000 to 75,000 3.5 

30,000 to 50,000 3.9 

20,000 to 30,000 3.2 

10,000 to 20,000 5.6 

5,000 to 10,000 4.8 

2,500 to 5,000 3.8 



IQQ 100 100 100 

19 19 25 26 

7 7 10 11 

7 7 9 9 



33 



33 



44 



46 



2 
4 
4 
4 
7 
6 



2 
4 
4 
4 

7 
7 



3 
5 
5 
4 



3 
5 
5 
4 
7 
7 



All Cities^ 2,500 to 100.000 26.6 


33 


34 


38 


36 


All other areas 43.8 


34 


33 


__18 


18 



More detailed tables for comparison purposes may be found in Pages 86 and 
87 of the Retail Distribution Volume II. 



A comparison of increases in stores and sales between 1933 and 1935 by 
city-size groups is significant. The city-size groups have been combined into 
three similar groups described above. The table below shows the variations 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-36 



in percenta.ge increases for these three groups. The greatest gains occurred 
in sales in those areas having between 2,500 and 100,000 population. The 
variations, however, between percentage gains for stores and sales in areas 
of less than 2,500, and the group just mentioned above, are very small. The 
least gain shown is for cities having more than 100,000 population. 

Percentage Increase in Stores and Sales 
by City-Size Groups (1933 to 1935) 



% Increase Sales % Increase 

Stores 1933 to iadd_0001 1933 to 

1935 1933 1935 1935 1933 1935__ 

y.:._S^_Total __1^653_^961 1^526^119 8^4 S33_^1§1_^276 S25_^037^225 32^4 
More than 100,000 553,368 508,649 8.8 14,698,561 11,404,138 28.9 
2,500 to 100,000 544,009 510,725 6.5 12.468,850 9,174,489 35.9 
All_Other_Areas 556^584 506^745_9^8 5^993_^865 4,^458^598 34^4 

By Geographic Divisions 

Similar information for each of the nine geographic divisions of the United 
States is revealed in Retail Volume 11, showing number of stores and sales by 
kinds of business, by city-size groups. Variations exist in the different geo- 
graphic divisions in the proportion of stores and sales, by city-size groups, 
and the information provides an unusual measure of the characteristics of each 
area. A comparison with 1933 figures for the geographic divisions shows that 
little change in the ratio of stores and sales, by city-size groups, has taken 
place. 

Differences are evident, however, between geographic divisions, especially 
those which are essentially industrial in character and those which are primarily 
agricultural. For example, a comparison between the Middle Atlantic and the 
South Atlantic divisions is outstanding. In the Middle Atlantic division 48 
percent of the population live ^ n cities of more than 100,000. These cities have 
51 percent of the stores and do almost 59 percent of the sales. The ratio of 
sales in the other city-size groups (except places under 2,500), are fairly 
similar to the ratio of population distribution. An entirely different situa- 
tion occurs in the South Atlantic division. In this area, 15 percent of the 
population live in cities of more than 100,000. These cities have 21 percent 
of the stores and 34 percent of the total sales. More than 60 percent of the 
poT>ulation live in places of less than 2,500, and sales made by stores in these 
places account for only 25 percent of sales. In the Middle Atlantic division, 
this city-size group accounts for 22 percent of the population and only 10 per- 
cent of the sales. For the South Atlantic division, the city-size groups re- 
veal sales ratios larger than the population distribution ratios, which tend 
to show that these cities regardless of size are trading centers drawing their 
customers from surrounding rural areas. This is not as true for the Middle 
Atlantic division where only those cities of more than 100,000 population 
show a definitely higher ratio of sales than population distribution ratios. 



Vol. I - Page 1-37 



By Business Groups 

The following classifications should not be used interchangeably with commodity 
classifications. They represent the major commodities sold by the stores although 
these stores may sell many other items. For example, food stores sell more than food 
while other stores, such as general stores, department stores, and hay, grain and 
feed stores may also sell food. This is just as true for commodities sold by apparel, 
furniture, and drug stores. It should be noted that the range of commodities handled 
by stores in any given kind of business may vary with the size of the community in 
which the store is located. 

City-size tables for 1935 and 1933, shown herein, reveal the importance of 
each business group in the various city-size groups, and the changes in stores 
and sales ratios that have taken place during these two periods. 

Eood_Stores are the most important group in all areas. Cities of more than 
100,000 population account for 39 percent of all food stores and 43 percent of sales. 
Places of less than 2,500 population account for 28 percent of the total food stores 
and 18 percent of sales. For all cities regardless of size, food stores make up 32 
percent of all retail stores and 25 percent of total sales. 

Gene ral merchandise stores are important in cities of 100,000 and over. This 
city-size group accounts for 32 percent of all general merchandise stores and 61 per- 
cent of sales. Although 28 percent of these stores are located in places of less 
than 2,500 population, they account for only 5 percent of the sales. For all cities, 
they constitute 3 percent of total retail stores but are responsible for 14 percent 
of sales, because the classification includes department stores and mail-order houses 
as well as many small stores. 

Like general merchandise stores the apparel group is important in cities of more 
than 100,000 population. This city-size group accounts for 47 percent of all apparel 
stores and 61 percent of sales. In contrast, 10 percent of these stores are located 
in places of less than 2,500 and do only 4 percent of the apparel business. For all 
cities combined regardless of size, they constitute 6 percent of all retail stores 
and 8 percent of sales. 

Among the business groups in which outstanding changes have occurred since 1933 
are the automotive group, general merchandise group, lumber-building-hardware group 
and drug stores. 

In the lumber-building-hardware group, the city-size group for places of less 
than 2,500 shows a gain of 8 percent in dealers and 53 percent in sales. In con- 
trast, the other two city-size groups show losses in the number of dealers but show 
gains in sales ranging from 25 percent to 39 percent. 

Drug stores show losses in all city-size groups ranging from 2 percent in places 
of more than 100,000 to 6 percent in places of less than 2,500 population. Gains in 
sales, however, are shown for these groups amounting to 12 percent for the former and 
16 percent for the latter. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-38 



Retail Characteristics of Cities 

Changes in the proportions which each business group bears to total retail 
stores and sales are evident when 1935 and 1933 data are compared. The following 
table shows kind-of-business group ratios for two city-size divisions (over 500,000 
population and places under 2,500) for 1933 and 1935: 

Tabl e 4 

Proportion of Stores and Sales for City-Size Groups, by Eleven Business Groups 
(Percent of Retail Business Done by Each Business Group in Specified City-Size Groups) 



More than 500,000 All Areas of 

All_Areas Eo£!ii§li02; L§ss_than_2_^00_ 

Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales 
Killdzof-Business_GrouE 1935_1933 1935_1933 1935_1933 1935_1933 1935_1933 1935_1933 
Totals 

Food stores 

Eating and drinking 

places 
General stores 

(with food) 
General mdse. group 
Apparel group 
Automotive group 
Filling stations 
Furniture-household radio 
Lumber-bldg-hardware 
Drug stores 
Other stores 

__lI"^ii_iiS!^£^_£i°£®£l ii ® ? 1 ^^ W 1° 

NC - Not comparable 



100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


32 


31 


25 


27 


40 


41 


25 


28 


27 


23 


25 


23 


15 


NC 


7 


NC 


16 


NC 


10 


NC 


14 


NC 


6 


NC 


4 


NC 


3 


NC 





NC 





NC 


11 


NC 


16 


NC 


3 


3 


14 


15 


3 


3 


20 


21 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


6 


8 


8 


9 


9 


12 


11 


2 


2 


2 


1 


7 


9 


14 


12 


4 


6 


9 


8 


8 


10 


14 


12 


12 


11 


6 


6 


5 


4 


3 


3 


19 


18 


11 


11 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


5 


2 


2 


1 


2 


4 


5 


6 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


6 


10 


9 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-39 



SECTION 9 - ANALYSIS OF SALES BY SOURCES OF REVENUE 



Of the $33,161,276,000 of total sales reported by retail stores for 
the year 1935, 92.5 percent represents sales of merchandise, 5.3 per- 
cent receipts from the sale of meals and from fountain, 1.7 percent re- 
pa:''rs, storage and service receipts, with other sources accounting for 
the remaining 0.5 percent. Thus the great majority of retail receipts 
are derived from the sale of merchandise and meals, and fountain sales, 
whereas repairs, storage, service and "other sources" combined account 
for only 2.2 percent of the total. 



Sales of Meals and From Fountain 

Restaurants and other eating places accounted for 81 percent of the 
$1,762,906,000 of meals and fountain sales. Drug stores (with fountain) 
received $120,582,000 from the sale of meals and from fountain, making 
up an additional 6.8 percent of the total. These receipts represented 
slightly over one-eighth of the total sales of drug stores (with fountain). 

Four other kinds of business accounted for the bulk of the remaining 
sales of meals and from fountain; -drinking places, candy and confectionery 
stores, variety stores, and department stores. These sales represented 
9.0 of the total sales of drinking places, 13.3 percent of total candy and 
confectionery store sales, 4.4 of variety store sales, and only 0.9 per- 
cent of the total department store sales. 

Based on data reported to the Hotels Census, it is estimated that 
meals in hotel dining rooms accounted for an additional $200,000,000 of 
sales, not included in the Retail Census totals. 



R§2i:il§, Storage and Service Receigts 

The automotive group, exclusive of filling stations, accounted for 
70.2 percent of the $571,217,000 of repairs, storage and service receipts 
for all retail stores. Motor-vehicle dealers (new) reported $209,841,000 
of such receipts which represented 36.7 percent of the total service re- 
ceipts for all kinds of business combined and 5.6 percent of the total 
sales of motor-vehicle dealers. The $167,601,000 of repairs, storage and 
service receipts for garages, which make up 45.3 percent of total garage 
sales, represented 29.3 percent of total service sales. 

The $44,160,000 of service sales reported for filling stations ac- 
counted for 7.7 percent of all service sales and represented 2.2 percent 
of the total sales of filling stations. Among the other kinds of business 
with sizable amounts of repairs, storage and service receipts are automobile 
accessories, tire and battery dealers, department stores, jewelry stores, 
household appliance and radio stores, heating and plumbing equipment dealers, 
furriers and fur shops, hardware and farm implement dealers, radio dealers 
and custom tailors. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-40 



Retailers" receipts from repairs, storage and service are offset to 
some extent by the sale of merchandise and meals by service establishments, 
places of amusement and hotels. Tables 9-A and 9-B contain analyses taken 
from the Service Census of 1935 showing the nature of receipts of service 
establishments, places of amusement and hotels. 



Detailed Analysis of Sales Data 

Tables 7A and 7B present United States summaries, by kinds of busi- 
ness and by States, of retail sales analyzed by revenue sources. 
Similar tables (Table 7) for each State and each city of more than 
500,000 population are presented in Volume VI, together with a more de- 
tailed discussion of the data. 



SECTION 10 - MERCHANDISE STOCKS ON HAND 

The ratio of the value of stocks on hand to sales in a retail store 
is an important measure of its merchandising efficiency. The success or 
failure of its buying policies and methods, its sales promotional plans 
and other aspects of merchandising are affected by the speed with 
which its stock of merchandise is sold and replaced. 

Although turnover ratios cannot be computed from end-of-year stocks at 
cost and annual sales at retail, it is possible to show stock-sales ratios on 
that basis (sales divided by stock) which measure variations in investment in 
merchandise stocks in relation to sales, both for different periods and for 
different kinds of business. The total merchandise stock in retail stores at 
cost values as of December 31, 1935 was $4,297,959,000, which compares with 
$3,903,969,000 at the end of 1933 and $7,262,583,000 at the end of 1929. If 
the sales for each year are divided by the end-of-year stocks, comparable 
stock-sales ratios for the three years are shown as follows: 1935, 7.7; 1933, 
6.4; 1929, 6.8. 

Table 7A presents a United States summary of stocks on hand, by 66 kinds 
of business, thus providing for comparison of the relationship of merchandise 
stocks to sales in different kinds of business. Table 7 in Volume VI provides 
similar information for each State and each city of more than 500,000 popu- 
lation. Table 7B contains a summary of stocks by States. 



Vol. I - Page 1-41 



SECTION 11 - SALES BY RETAILERS VERSUS OTHER SALES AT RETAIL 

Wholesale Sales 

Included in total sales of $33,161,276,000 reported by retail stores for 
1935 are sales to other retailers to the extent of $537,749,000. Most of 
this amount may be regarded as "wholesale" business in the sense that it is 
for resale and appears again in other retailers' sales. Of the total sales 
to other retailers, 28.9 percent was accounted for by motor-vehicle dealers 
(new). The $155,255,000 of such sales from one new-car dealer to another 
represented 4.2 percent of "the total sales of the motor-vehicle dealer classi- 
fication. Dairy products stores and milk dealers, with $52,015,000 of sales 
to other retailers, accounted for 9.7 percent of the total of all such sales. 
Among the other kinds of business reporting sizable amounts of sales to other 
retailers are fuel and ice dealers, beer and liquor stores (packaged), 
combination stores (groceries and meats), lumber and building-material dealers, 
hay, grain and feed stores, meat markets, grocery stores, farm and garden 
supply stores, and paint, glass, and wall-paper stores. Table 7 (Volume VI) 
provides data on the amount of sales to other retailers by 66 kinds of busi- 
ness for each State and each city with more than 500,000 population. United 
States summaries of this data by kinds of business and by States are shown in 
Tables 7A and 7B herein. 

Offsetting these sales by retailers to other retailers are sales 
by wholesalers to ultimate consumers which in 1935 amounted to $510,282,000. 
Tables 8A and SB present analyses by kinds of business and by geographic 
divisions, respectively, of these $510,282,000 retail sales made by wholesale 
establishments, as reported in the Wholesale Census. 

Retail Sales by Other Establishments 

As mentioned in Section 9, the $571,217,000 of repairs, storage and 
service receipts reported by retail stores are partially offset by $49,104,000 
of merchandise sales in service establishments. An additional $30,233,000 of 
merchandise sales in 1935 is accounted for by places of amusement, hotels and 
tourist camps. 

The sale of meals by hotels constitutes a retail sale of greater volume 
than the total of merchandise sales by service establishments, places of amuse- 
ment, hotels and tourist camps. On the basis of information obtained by the Hotels 
Census it seems likely that hotel dining rooms in 1935 accounted for approximately 
$200,000,000 of meal sales. These receipts are in addition to sale of meals 
shown in the Retail Census figures. Hotels reported sales of beverages to the 
extent of $72,082,000 in addition to meal sales. Tourist camps account for a 
small additional amount of meal sales, the exact amount of which is not available. 



Vol. 1 - Page 1-42 



SECTION 12 - RETAIL STORES OPERATED BY NEGRO PROPRIETORS 



There were in the United States 23,490 retail stores operated by Negroes, 
with sales in 1935 of $48,987,000. Expressed in ratio to all stores, these 
represent 1.4 percent of all retail stores and .2 percent of total sales. 

The 23,490 stores reported 23,819 proprietors and employed 12,322 full- 
time and part-time employees, (average for the year), paying them $5,021,000. 
in wages. Compensation for the services of proprietor-owners is not included. 

B^ Kinds of Business 

Retail businesses in which Negroes are most active are shown in the follow- 
ing table. The ratios of these kind-of-business classifications to the totals 
for all Negro stores and sales are also included. 

NEGRO PROPRIETORSHIPS 

Kind of Business STORES SALES 

Amount 
Numbe£ PerceQi iadd_000j. Percent 

Total stores operated by Negroes 23,490 100.0 $48,987 LOO-O 
Grocery stores (without meats) 
Restaurants, cafeterias and lunch rooms 
Lunch counters 

Combination stores (groceries and meats) 
Fuel and ice dealers 
Candy and confectionery stores 
Drinking places 
Filling stations 
Garages 
Aii_other_retail_stores 3^902 16^6 llj.Q33 22^5_ 

Grocery stores, combination stores, and restaurants account for 45.5 per- 
cent of the retail stores, and their sales represent 45.5 percent of total sales 
made in stores operated by Negroes. 

By GeograEhic Divisiong 

The greatest concentration of stores operated by Negroes is in the South 
Atlantic States. They account for 36 percent of all Negro stores and 30 percent 
of such sales. Georgia, one of the States in this geographic division with 
2,037 Negro stores, has the largest number of stores, but the 1,140 stores located 
in New York with sales of $4,508,000 account for the greatest amount of bussiness. 

The ratios of stores and sales, by geographic divisions, to the totals for 
the country as a whole are shown in the following table: 



4,553 


19.4 


6,270 


12.8 


4,309 


18.4 


8,638 


17.7 


3,178 


13.5 


2,758 


5.6 


1,811 


7.7 


7,351 


15.0 


1,801 


7.7 


3,188 


5.5 


1,338 


5.7 


1,462 


3.0 


1,081 


4.6 


4,322 


8.8 


783 


3.3 


2,946 


6.0 


734 


3.1 


1,019 


2.1 



Vol. I 



Page 1-43 



Proportion of Negro-o pe rated Stores in each Geographic Division 
to total of gll Negro-operated Stores 













Percent of 


Total 


Percent of Total 


Geographic Division 


Stores Ope 


rated 


Sales in such 




by Negroes 


stores 


Total for United States 
New England 


100.0 
.8 




100.0 
2.6 


Middle Atlantic 


12.0 




17.5 


East North Central 


12.5 




17.6 


West North Central 


4.3 




5.0 


South Atlantic 


36.1 




29.8 


East South Central 


15.0 




10.4 


West South Central 


16.7 




12.6 


Mountain 


.5 




.7 


Pacific 


2.1 




3.8 



The three Southern geographic divisions account for 67.8 percent of the 
stores and 52.8 percent of total sales. By States, however, the two northern 
States of New York and Illinois lead :n sales, while Ohio has almost as large a 
proportion of total Negro sales as Texas: 



State 



Percent of Stores 



Percent of Sales 



United States Total 
New York 
Illinois 
Texas 
Ohio 

Virginia 
Georgia 
Florida 
Pennsylvania 
North Carolina 
Tennessee 
All other States 



100.0 
4.9 
4.0 
7.4 
4.1 
6.4 
8.7 
5.8 
4.5 
5.9 
4.8 
43.5 



100.0 
9.2 
6.7 
5.7 
5.5 
5.3 
5.2 
5.2 
4.7 
4.5 
4.3 
43.7 



Data for stores operated by Negroes, by kinds of business and by geographic 
divisions, will be found in greater detail in Tables 6-A and 6-B of this volume. 



Vol. I - Page 1-44 

SECTION 13 - OWNERSHIP GROUPS and MAIL-ORDER HOUSES 



Related to chains, tut lacking the chain characteristic of central 
merchandising, are thirteen groups of department stores classified as 
Ownership Groups. They are similar in many ways to the holding companies 
typical of the utilities field. 

The stores of an ownership group are not centrally merchandised, but each 
maintains its own staff of merchandisers and buyers. No group operates all 
of its stores under a single name, but usually retains the names under 
which the stores were developed before they were acquired by the holding 
company. There is little uniformity as to operating policies, price range, 
consumer credit practice or even sources of supply of merchandise. There 
is no common denominator except stock ownership, and the stores are generally 
regarded as local enterprises. 

For a more detailed description of ownership groups, the history of 
their development and a discussion of their advantages-, together with a 
record of their performance since 1929, reference is made to a special 
report of the Retail Census which covers chains, ownership groups and 
mail-order houses, entitled "Retail Chains, Ownership Groups and Mail-Order 
Houses. " 

There were 14 ownership groups in 1929; one was dissolved and the 
13 remaining are reported for 1933 and again for 1935, The total number 
of stores owned by these groups in 1933 was 129; in 1935 it was 130. Of 
the 13 groups in 1935, one small group with 5 stores and sales publicly 
reported as $15,000,000 failed to report to the Census and is not included 
in the analysis. 

Sales in 1935 
The remaining 12 groups operated 125 stores with sales in 1935 of 
1717,407,000, which constituted 21.7 percent of the total sales of all 
department stores in 1935. For comparison it may be noted that department- 
store chains accounted for 2,423 stores with total sales of $883,101,000 
in the same year. Mail-order houses in the general merchandise field, 
grouped with department stores in most Census tables, numbered only 33 and 
accounted for total sales (catalog) of $386,200,000, or 11.7 percent of 
total department store and mail-order sales in 1935. (Retail stores of 
mail-order companies are classified as chain stores and not as mail-order 
houses) . 

Employment , Pay Roll 

The 12 ownership groups included in the census employed in 1935 a 
total of 113,473 full-time and part-time employees, of the total of 492,090 
in all department stores. Their pay roll totalled $121,241,000 of the 
total of $468,910,000 for all department stores. 

Total operating expenses in the 125 stores of the ownership groups 
were $243,825,000, of the aggregate of $966,104,000 in all department stores. 
They thus averaged 34.0 percent of sales; and of this 34.0 percent rent 
constituted 2.1 percent and pay roll 16.9 percent of sales. All other 
operating expenses made up the remainder of 15 percent. 



Vol. 1 - Pa«. 1-45 

MAIL::ORDER HOUSES 

There were 378 mail-order houses in 1935, selling exclusively by mail 
from catalog or direct-mail pieces, with total sales during the year of 
S420,027,000. This constitutes 1.3 percent of total retail sales, in com- 
parison with 1.0 percent in 1933 and 1.0 percent in 1929. Neither the 
count of houses nor the sales includes retail stores owned by mail-order 
companies, which are classified in tne census as chain stores and not as 
mail-order houses. 

The number of houses in 1929 was 271, increasing to 311 in 1933 and 
to 378 in 1935. Catalog sales decreased 52.6 percent between 1929 and 
1933. but increased 71.9 percent between 1933 and 1935. Compared with 
the 1935 sales stated above, catalog sales in 1929 totalled $595,237,000 
and in 1933 they totalled $244,381,000. 

5 Companies Do 90 Percent 

Two companies do a majority of the catalog business of the country, 
but their proportion of the whole cannot be stated without revealing con- 
fidential data. However, the five largest companies account in the aggre- 
gate for 89.7 percent of total mail-order sales. In comparison the next 
five largest companies account for only 3.5 percent of the total. The 
remaining companies do 6.8 percent of the total mail-order sales. 

iY iSiQds of Business 

Nearly all of the $420,027,000 of mail-order sales in 1935 was con- 
fined to five kinds of business. General-merchandise houses accounted for 
91.9 percent of the total; women's apparel houses for 1.5 percent; farm and 
garden supply houses for 1.0 percent; men's clothing and furnishings houses 
for 0.7 percent; and mail-order shoe houses for 0.4 percent. The remaining 
4.5 percent is scattered over other kinds of business, of which the prin- 
cipal classifications are radio, drugs, jewelry, family clothing, and 
hardware and farm implement houses. The only classification in which 
the ratio of sales in 1935 was smaller than the ratio in 1933 is the 16 
houses selling men's clothing and furnishings. 

Below is a summary of mail-order houses and their sales in 1935 and 
1933 by kinds of business: 

Mail-order Catalog Sales 

Houses 1935 1933 

Kind of Business Amount % Amount % 

1935 1933_iAdd_000i iAdd_OOOJ. 

Total, all kinds _378 _311 |420^027 100 |244T381 100 

General merchandise (dep't store) 33 35 386,200 91.9 219,978 90.0 

Men's clothing and furnishings 16 6 3,047 .7 2,409 1.0 

Shoes 7 10 1,500 .4 473 .2 

Women's apparel 6 6,346 1.5 

Farm and garden supply 16 4,203 1.0 

Radio 7 628 . 1 

Drug 19 450 .1 

Hardware and farm implements 4 427 .1 

Jewelry 4 331 .1 

Family clothing 4 209 .1 

All others, not classified 262 260 16,686 4.0 21,521 8.8 



Vol. I -Page 1-46 

SECTION 14 - OTHER FIELDS COVERED BY THE CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



In any study of retail distribution it may be valuable to know of the 
material published by the Census of Business covering other business fields. 
Much of it has a direct bearing on distribution; some of it measures markets, 
provides material on employment and pay roll disbursements, or reveals the 
facilities available to improve distribution in a given city or State. 

Wholesale 

Chief among the Business Census reports are 8 volumes on wholesale 
distribution and several special-subject reports. Related to this field 
is a volume entitled "Distribution of Manufacturers' Sales," showing the 
movement of manufactured goods from plants into the various channels of 
primary distribution. 

Service Businesses 

There are three volumes on service establishments in various kinds of 
business, of which the principal classifications are storage garages, auto 
top and body repair shops, barber shops, beauty shops, cleaning and pressing 
shops, laundries, photographic studios, shoe repair and shoe shine shops, 
upholstery shops, watch repair shops and funeral directors. In addition 
there is a volume on hotels, one on theatres and other amusement places, and 
one on tourist camps. 

Construction 

Three volumes are available on contract construction; of these the 
third volume covers value of work performed in 1935, by type of construc- 
tion and the location of the work. Other data on the characteristics of 
construction companies are included. 

Radio Broadcasting 

There is included in the Business Census one volume on radio broad- 
casting, the first ever compiled as a complete coverage, showing number of 
stations, value of time sold, types of rendition and data on employment, 
pay roll and similar information. Another volume of the Census analyzes 
advertising agencies, basic operating data and the nature of the adver- 
tising placed. 

Financial and Insurance 

Volumes are included on banking, on other financial institutions and 
on insurance. 

Transportation, etc. 

Bus Transportation, Motor Trucking for Hire, and Public Warehousing 
are covered in three other volumes of the current Business Census. The series 
also contains a special Retail Trade Survey comparing identical retail stores 
for 1934 and 1935, and a volume on Business Employment and Pay Roll bringing 
together all available data on this subject and showing the totals by counties 
and cities. Copies of Business Census volumes are available for reference in 
most libraries. 



Vol. 1 - Page 2-01 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 
VOLUME I 

Part II - United States Summary Tables for 1935 



Table Page 

^^^^lA - Stores, sales, personnel, pay roll and expenses, by detailed kinds 

of business 2-04 

IB - Stores, sales, personnel, pay roll and expenses, by geographic 

divisions and States 2-05 

2A - Monthly employment, by kinds of business 2-06 

2B - Monthly employment, by geographic division.s and States 2-08 

2B - Relative monthly employment, by geographic divisions and States 2-09 

2C - Employment and pay roll data by occupational groups, by selected 

kinds of business 2-10 

20 - Employment and pay roll data by occupational groups, by States 2-11 

2D - Employment by sex, by kinds of business and by States 2-12 

■"7 3A - Types of operation - twenty-six kinds of business 2-13 

3^ - Types of operation - stores and sales by States 2-15 

^Ca - Stores and sales, by size of store, by kinds of business 2-16 

4B - Stores and sales, by size of store, by geographic divisions and 

States 2-18 

4D - Stores with less than $5,000 annual sales, by kinds of business 2-19 

4E - Stores with less than $5,000 annual sales, by States 2-20 

4F - Stores with sales of $300,000 or more, by kinds of business 2-21 

V^G - Chains and mail-order -- Stores and sales, by size of stores, by 

kinds of business 2-22 

4H - Chains and mail-order -- Stores with less than $5,000 annual sales, 

by kinds of business 2-24 

5A - Open-account, instalment and cash sales, by kinds of business 2-25 

6A - Negro proprietorships, by kinds of business 2-26 

6B - Negro proprietorships, by geographic divisions and States 2-27 

7A - Analysis of sales and value of stocks on hand, by kinds of business. 2-28 
7B - Analysis of sales and value of stocks on hand, by geographic 

divisions and States 2-29 

8A - Retail sales by wholesale establishments, by kinds of business 2-30 

8B - Retail sales by wholesale establishments, by geographic divisions... 2-30 
9A - Analysis of receipts of service establishments, by kinds of business 2-31 
9B - Analysis of receipts of service establishments, by geographic 

divisions 2-32 

-40A - Number of stores and sales, by kinds of business, by geographic 

divisions and States 2-33 

llA - City totals for cities of 10,000 to 50,000 population including 

40 New England Towns, marked 'T) for which 1933 comparable data 

are available - Number of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll... 2-34 
12A - City totals for cities of more than 50,000 population - Number of 

stores, sales, personnel and pay roll, all kinds of business 

combined 2-39 



Vol. 1 - Page 2-02 



Table 

13A - Proportion of stores and sales, for eleven business groups, by 

city-size groups - Percent ratio for each city-size group to the 
United States Totals 2-41 

13B - Proportion of stores and sales, for city-size groups, by eleven 

business groups - Percent of retail business done by each business 
groups in each city-size group 2-41 

13C - Geographic divisions - Percent of stores, sales and population by 

city-size group 2-41 

13D - Number of stores and sales, by kinds of business for the United 

States and geographic divisions, by city-size groups 2-42 

14A - Proportion of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll, by city-size 
groups - Percent ratio of each city-size group to United States 
Totals 2-44 

14B - Number of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll for the United 

States and geographic divisions, by city-size groups 2-44 



Vol. I - Page 2-03 



ESTIMATED POPULATION BY STATES. JULY 1. 1930 TO JULY 1. 1936 



For convenience in making certain computations and comparisons 
by States, there is shown below an estimate prepared by the 
Bureau of the Census as of July 1 of each year 1930-1936, incl. 



DlTlslon 


Census 
population, 
April 1, 
1930 


Satimatad Population 


and 
Stat* 


July 1, 
1930 


July 1, 
1931 


July 1, 

i93e 


July 1, 
1930 


July 1, 
1934 


July 1, 
1930 


July 1, 
1936 


URITSD 3TATB .. 


ltS,77B,04« 


113,091,000 


114,113,000 


124,974,000 


125,770,000 


186,626,000 


127,521,000 


128,429,000 


HSW EXOLAIID 


e.ise.Mi 


6,188,000 


8,882,000 


8,308,000 


8,360,000 


8,414,000 


8,497,000 


8,581,000 


Main* 


797, its 
«M,C99 

359,611 
«, 249, 814 

887,497 
1,606,903 


800,000 
488,000 
361,000 

4,857,000 
687,000 

1,613,000 


810,000 
475,000 
364,000 

4,879,000 
686,000 

1,838,000 


819,000 
482,000 
368,000 

4,295,000 
685,000 

1,659,000 


829,000 
489,000 
371,000 

4,309,000 
683,000 

1,679,000 


837,000 
496,000 
374,000 

4,326,000 
681,000 

1,700,000 


845,000 
502,000 
377,000 

4,375,000 
681,000 

1,717,000 


853,000 


Haw Haapsblra . . 

Temont 

Massaohusatts .. 
Rhode Island ... 
Coanectlcut .... 


508,000 
380,000 

4,425,000 
681,000 

1,734,000 


MIDDLE ATLAHTIC .. 


£6,860,750 


26,334,000 


26,559,000 


88,741,000 


26,911,000 


27,095,000 


27,245,000 


27,399,000 


Hew Tork 

New Jersaj 

PennsylTania . . . 


18,588,066 
4,041,334 
9,651,350 


12,815,000 
4,057,000 
9,668,000 


12,690,000 
4,110,000 
9,759,000 


12,743,000 
4,158,000 
9,840,000 


18,791,000 
4,202,000 
9,918,000 


12,846,000 

4,249,000 

10,000,000 


12,890,000 

4,288,000 

10,067,000 


12,935,000 

4,328,000 

10,136,000 




85,897,185 


25,321,000 


25,377,000 


25,415,000 


25,444,000 


25,479,000 


25,592,000 


25,708,000 


Ohio 


6,646,697 
3,238,503 
7,630,654 
4,842,325 
8,939,006 


6,656,000 
3,251,000 
7,647,000 
4,889,000 
2,938,000 


6,674,000 
3,292,000 
7,693,000 
4,786,000 
2,932,000 


6,685,000 
3,328,000 
7,728,000 
4,750,000 
8,926,000 


6,691,000 
3,364,000 
7,756,000 
4,716,000 
2,917,000 


6,701,000 
3,400,000 
7,790,000 
4,680,000 
2,908,000 


6,707,000 
3,429,000 
7,817,000 
4,731,000 
2,908,000 


6,713,000 


Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 


3,469,000 
7,845,000 
4,783,000 
2,908,000 


W. NOPTB-CHITRAL . 


13,296,915 


13,325,000 


13,416,000 


13,490,000 


13,559,000 


13,635,000 


13,708,000 


13,782,000 


Minnesota 

Iowa 


2,563,953 
8,470,989 
3,629,367 
680,845 
692,849 
1,377,963 
1,880,999 


2,569,000 
2,478,000 
3,648,000 
682,000 
693,000 
1,377,000 
1,880,000 


2,585,000 
2,492,000 
3,707,000 
887,000 
693,000 
1,375,000 
1,877,000 


2,596,000 
2,503,000 
3,762,000 
690,000 
692,000 
1,372,000 
1,875,000 


8,607,000 
2,513,000 
3,814,000 
693,000 
692,000 
1,368,000 
1,872,000 


2,619,000 
2,525,000 
3,868,000 
697,000 
692,000 
1,364,000 
1,870,000 


2,627,000 
2,534,000 
3,913,000 
700,000 
692,000 
1,364,000 
1,878,000 


2,635,000 
2,543,000 


Missouri 

North Dakota ... 
South Dakota . . . 

Nebraska 

Eanaas 


3,959,000 

703,000 

692,000 

1,364,000 

1,886,000 


SOOTH ATLANTIC ... 


15,793,589 


15,859,000 


18,084,000 


16,287,000 


18,480,000 


16,680,000 


16,878,000 


17,072,000 


Delaware 

Maryland 

Dist. Coluabla . 

Virginia 

Weat Virginia .. 
North Carolina . 
South Carolina . 

Oeorgla 

Florida 


238,380 
1,631,526 

486,869 
2,481,851 
1,729,205 
3,170,876 
1,738,765 
8,908,506 
1,468,211 


239,000 
1,635,000 

492,000 
2,434,000 
1,735,000 
3,188,000 
1,745,000 
2,917,000 
1,476,000 


243,000 
1,645,000 

509,000 
2,480,000 
1,754,000 
3,237,000 
1,767,000 
2,944,000 
1,505,000 


247,000 
1,651,000 

526,000 
2,581,000 
1,771,000 
3,284,000 
1,786,000 
2,967,000 
1,534,000 


250,000 
1,857,000 

543,000 
2,562,000 
1,786,000 
3,331,000 
1,803,000 
2,988,000 
1,560,000 


253,000 
1,664,000 

560,000 
2,604,000 
1,802,000 
3,378,000 
1,821,000 
3,011,000 
1,587,000 


256,000 
1,669,000 

594,000 
2,637,000 
1,816,000 
3,417,000 
1,840,000 
3,035,000 
1,614,000 


259,000 
1,674,000 

619,000 
2,671,000 
1,830,000 
3,457,000 
1,860,000 
3,060,000 
1,642,000 




9,887,214 


9,928,000 


10,059,000 


10,176,000 


10,288,000 


10,408,000 


10,512,000 


10,619,000 


Kentucky 

Tannessea 

Alabama 

Mississippi 


2,614,589 
2,618,556 
8,646,848 
8,009,821 


2,828,000 
2,830,000 
8,858,000 
2,010,000 


2,677,000 
2,675,000 
2,698,000 
2,009,000 


2,721,000 
2,712,000 
2,734,000 
2,009,000 


2,765,000 
2,747,000 
2,768,000 
2,008,000 


2,810,000 
2,785,000 
2,805,000 
2,008,000 


2,846,000 
2,824,000 
2,834,000 
2,008,000 


8,883,000 
2,864,000 
2,864,000 
2,008,000 


W. SOUTH-CENTRAL . 


18,178,830 


18,818,000 


18,338,000 


12,432,000 


12,524,000 


12,623,000 


12,705,000 


12,790,000 


Arkanaas 

Louisiana 

Okie bona 

Tezaa 


1,854,488 
2,101,593 
2,396,040 
5,884,713 


1,863,000 
2,104,000 
2,403,000 
5,842,000 


1,894,000 
2,111,000 
8,489,000 
5,898,000 


1,928,000 
2,113,000 
8,450,000 
8,947,000 


1,948,000 
2,115,000 
8,470,000 
5,991,000 


1,976,000 
2,118,000 
2,491,000 
6,038,000 


1,999,000 
2,120,000 
8,509,000 
6,077,000 


2,023,000 
2,128,000 
8,528,000 
6,117,000 


MODBTAIH 


3,701,789 


3,704,000 


3,714,000 


3,721,000 


3,725,000 


3,733,000 


3,748,000 


3,759,000 


Houtana 

Idaho 


537,808 
443,032 
285,565 
1,035,791 
423,317 
433,573 
507,847 
91,058 


537,000 
447,000 
826,000 
1,038,000 
483,000 
433,000 
509,000 
91,000 


536,000 
454,000 
228,000 
1,044,000 
423,000 
426,000 
510,000 
93,000 


535,000 
460,000 
289,000 
1,049,000 
422,000 
419,000 
512,000 
95,000 


533,000 
468,000 
230,000 
1,053,000 
428,000 
418,000 
513,000 
98,000 


531,000 
473,000 
231,000 
1,058,000 
422,000 
406,000 
514,000 
98,000 


531,000 
479,000 
232,000 
1,062,000 
422,000 
406,000 
515,000 
99,000 


531,000 
485,000 


WyoBlng 

Colorado 

Haw Mazloo 

Arizona 

Utah 


833,000 
1,066,000 
488,000 
406,000 
516,000 


NaTada 


100,000 


PACIFIC 


8,194,433 


8,884,000 


8,320,000 


8,404,000 


8,479,000 


8,559,000 


8,638,000 


8,719,000 


Washington 


1,563,398 

953,786 

5,677,251 


1,568,000 

957,000 

5,899,000 


1,584,000 

969,000 

5,767,000 


1,598,000 

980,000 

5,826,000 


1,810,000 

990,000 

5,879,000 


1,623,000 

999,000 

5,937,000 


1,633,000 
1,008,000 
5,997,000 


1,643,000 
1,017,000 


California 


6,059,000 



Vol. I - Page 2 - 04 



Census ot Business 

Retail Oislnbulion: 1935 TAnin ia 

TABLE lA.- 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 










STORES, 


5ALES, PERSONNEL, 


PAY ROLL AND EXPENSES. 








BY DETAILED 


KINDS OF 


BUSINESS 
















Active 
proprietors 

find firm 


Employee* 




Pay Roll* 




Operating 


Kind ol Business 


Number 
ol 


Sale. 


( lull-Ume 
and part- 




(add 000) 




expenses, 
(including 










•tores 


(add 000) 


nl tu 111 III 

members 


time). Avg. 
for year 


Total 


Full-lime 


Part-time 


pay roll) • 
(add 000) 


TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 


1,653,961 


»33,161,276 


1,511,734 


3,961,478 


tS, 623, 289 


$3,388,166 


♦235,123 


»7, 591,912 


Food Stores 

Candy and confectionery stores 


532,010 


8,362.425 


489.966 


745.103 


663,418 


616.695 


46.723 


1.385.052 


56,197 


314,467 


53,973 


37,191 


23,126 


20,266 


2,860 


76,059 


Daity products stores & milk dirs. 


16,380 


576,361 


13,684 


79,964 


114,994 


113,073 


1,921 


189,375 


Egg and poultry dealers 


5,747 


52,404 


6,799 


4,662 


2,951 


2,492 


459 


7,569 


Del icalessen stores 


6,554 


88,708 


6,462 


7,141 


5,677 


6,175 


502 


16,271 


Fruit stores and vegetable markets 


32,632 


215,965 


33,246 


23,217 


16,770 


14,916 


1,864 


39,194 


Grocery stores (without meats) 


188,738 


2,202,607 


170,415 


156,031 


125,802 


114,628 


10,974 


281,962 


Combination stores (groceries & meats) 


166,233 


4,149,813 


148,321 


359,716 


304,006 


281,080 


22,926 


617,799 


Meat markets 


32,666 


565,640 


31,978 


45,258 


44,551 


41,324 


3,227 


97,042 


h ish markets - seafood 


6,919 


46,811 


7,170 


6,220 


4,481 


3.923 


556 


10,883 


Baker les and caterers 


14,150 


99,908 


12,335 


16,604 


12,836 


11,853 


983 


31,840 


Other food stores 


6,906 


49,751 


6,593 


9,099 


8,224 


7,765 


459 


17,056 


General Stores (with food) 

General merchandise group 

Dry goods & general merchandise stores 


66,701 


1,110,403 


66,783 


82,841 


60,736 


56,549 


4,166 


121,490 


44,661 


4,619,751 


32.160 


729,195 


608,817 


566,040 


42,777 


1,263,617 


28,709 


527,862 


25,568 


65,730 


48,612 


43,982 


4,630 


109,331 


Department stores 


4,201 


3,311,070 


766 


492,090 


468,910 


443,870 


25,040 


966,104 


Variety, 5-and-lO, & to-a-dollar stores 


11,741 


780,819 


5,846 


171,375 


91,296 


78,188 


13,107 


208,082 


Apparel group 

IVlen' s f ur r^ishi ngs stores 1/ 


95.968 


2.656.242 


73,414 


327.629 


338,300 


313.714 


24,566 


775,860 


7,716 


143.668 


6,010' 


12.704 


15,110 


14.065 


1,045' 


35,80'S 


Men's clothing - lurmshings stores i^ 


13.198 


515,949 


11,173 


45,579 


59,705 


56 J 803 


2.902 


136,768 


Fami ly clothing stores 


7,881 


358,849 


6,060 


46,777 


47,206 


44,909 


2,296 


153,173 


Women's ready-to-wear stores 


21,975 


794,992 


17,068 


107,469 


103,047 


96,474 


6.573 


228,873 


Furriers and t ur shops 


1,535 


59,897 


1,067 


6,765 


10,461 


9,736 


726 


23,236 


Ml 1 i I nery stores 


9,568 


94,461 


6,773 


18,651 


14,865 


12,806 


2.059 


36,488 


Custom tatlors 


6,559 


67,120 


6,364 


14,820 


17,316 


14, 405 


2,911 


31,110 


Accessories - other apparel stores 


8,569 


109,917 


7,231 


17,733 


13,968 


12,668 


1,300 


31,522 


Shoe stores 


18,967 


511,399 


11,668 


57,131 


56,623 


51,648 


4,775 


142,884 


Automotive group 

Molor-vehiclfr dealers (new 1 


116,702 


4,606,650 


113,220 


378,000 


436,993 


424,352 


12,641 


820.791 


30,294 


3,726,438 


25,484 


257,154 


314,274 


309,210 


5,064 


574,832 


Used car dealers 


4,751 


122,204 


4,736 


9,868 


10,769 


10,126 


644 


22,405 


Accessories, tire and battery dealers 


14,343 


373,910 


10,384 


46,761 


64,557 


52,771 


1,786 


107,978 


Garages 


66,243 


370,064 


71,626 


63,220 


66,122 


50,107 


5,015 


111,274 


Other automotive 


1,071 


16,034 


991 


2,007 


2,271 


2,139 


132 


4,302 


Filling stations 

Furniture-household group 

Fur ni ture stores 


197,568 


1,967,714 


179,870 


203,753 


177,128 


165,726 


11,400 


356,727 


46,215 


1,289,896 


35.864 


173.931 


211.188 


200.651 


10.637 


422,430 


17,043 


694,578 


14.856 


77,905 


102,065 


98,973 


3,092 


221,867 


Floor cover 1 ngs draper y stores 


2,611 


61,246 


2.334 


8,943 


9,752 


9,236 


516 


19,862 


Household appliance and radio stores 


14,100 


381,171 


7,810 


65,636 


76,166 


69,728 


5,426 


133,070 


Radio dealers 


4,296 


57,152 


4,226 


6,135 


7,613 


7,071 


442 


16,442 


Other home furnishings stores 


7,165 


96,749 


6,640 


15, U2 


16,702 


15,643 


1,059 


31,189 


Lumber-building-hardware group 

lumber & bui 1 di ng mater lal dealers 


73,186 


1.864.275 


60,167 


193,672 


221,113 


205,902 


16,211 


422,441 


21,149 


866,865 


10,819 


90,858 


108,801 


101,935 


6,866 


202,074 


Hardware stores 


26,996 


467,217 


26,472 


45,658 


48,558 


45,761 


2,797 


100,955 


Hardware £ fa<m implement dealers 


9,637 


291,762 


9,821 


22,068 


22,361 


20,683 


1,698 


46,419 


Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


5,025 


89,477 


4,316 


16,802 


20,065 


18,061 


2.004 


30,986 


Pflint, glass, wal 1 paper stores 


8,910 


127,049 


7,423 


14,907 


17,250 


15,714 


1.536 


36,163 


flee t r K3i supply stores 


1,469 


21,905 


1,307 


3,389 


4,058 


3,748 


310 


6,844 


Elating and drinking places 
Reslaurants-caleterias-lunch rooms 


251,473 


2,390,860 


257,566 


646,936 


413,720 


383,496 


30,224 


1,000,041 


113,037 


1,453,118 


U6,408 


442,908 


282,637 


266,245 


16,392 


677,590 


Lunch counters, retieshment stands 


40,431 


213,781 


40,174 


62,844 


29,595 


26,550 


3,045 


76,498 


Or inki ng places 


98,005 


723,961 


100,984 


151,183 


101,488 


90,701 


10,787 


245,963 


Drug stores 

Drug sUies wi th tountsi n 


56,697 


1.232.593 


48.363 


159.130 


143,354 


134,319 


9,035 


291,770 


38,731 


950,328 


32,199 


127,830 


112,660 


105,779 


6,881 


227,071 


Drug stores without lountain 


17,966 


282,265 


16,164 


31,300 


30,694 


28.540 


2,154 


64,699 


Other retail stores 

Bicycle shops 


151,240 


2,947,127 


131,822 


300,296 


331,410 


305,376 


26,034 


678,205 


TBI 


6,149 


763 


628 


493 


425 


68 


1,131 


Book stores 


2,979 


67,007 


2,384 


12,UV 


13,474 


12,707 


767 


23,803 


Cigar stores and cigar stands 


15,350 


182,950 


13,717 


15,111 


13,820 


13,027 


793 


35,675 


Florists 


11,242 


98,718 


10,976 


17,320 


15,964 


14,633 


1,331 


36,724 


Fuel and ice dealers 


35,293 


859,018 


31,626 


91,573 


106,066 


92,809 


13,257 


206,521 


Gift, novelty, souvenir shops 


5,512 


31,502 


5,370 


4,286 


3,366 


2,921 


445 


9,097 


Hay, gram, feed stores (without groc.) 


10,350 


317,390 


8,720 


17,418 


16,284 


16,247 


l',037 


33,729 


Hay, grain and feed stores (with groc.) 


782 


29,277 


612 


1,626 


1,397 


1,308 


89 


2,822 


Farm and garden supply stores 


9,176 


252,471 


8,259 


18,732 


18,248 


16,603 


1,545 


38,169 


Jewel r y stores 


12,447 


234,893 


11,096 


25,709 


35,479 


34,176 


1,303 


81,856 


Luggage stores 


829 


16,230 


670 


1,721 


2,124 


2,021 


103 


5,125 


News dealers 


7,071 


61,656 


5,590 


13,843 


6,491 


5,364 


1,127 


13,992 


Spor 1 1 ng goods stores 


1,944 


35,315 


1,741 


3,692 


4,252 


4,063 


199 


9,193 


Beer & liquor stores (packaged) 


12,105 


328,307 


8,922 


16,312 


19,458 


18,461 


1,007 


41,565 


Other classi f icat ions 


25,379 


427,245 


21,376 


60,208 


74,494 


71,631 


2,663 


136,813 


Second-hand stores 

Second-hand stores - clothing & shoe 


22.550 


113.340 


22.549 


20,994 


17,113 


16,344 


1,769 


33,586 


2,862 


6,544 


2,820 


1,192 


631 


564 


67 


1,666 


Second-hand furniture 


6,941 


21,961 


7,032 


3,383 


2,232 


1,929 


303 


5,707 


Second hand tires, accessories & parti 


6,433 


29,988 


6,859 


7,121 


5,392 


4,847 


54S 


9,396 


Pawn shops 


1,142 


20,489 


1,004 


2,258 


3,096 


3,005 


91 


6,150 


Second hand stores other 


5,172 


34,358 


4,'- 34 


7,040 


5,762 


4,999 


763 


10,669 






Pftfle II. Volur 



_\/ Figurai teltecl 



at Iranspoitlion sppaaring in Table 1 A at ptavioualy pul>liatied 

















Vol. 1 - Page 2-05 


C«iuui of BuiincM 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 










Retail Distribulian: 193S 


















TABLE IB 


- STORES, 


AND SALES, PERSONNEL, PAY ROLL AND EXPENSES, 








BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES 










DIVISION AND STATE 


Number 
of 


Sale. 


Active 
proprielon 
and Hrin 
members 


Employees 
(full-time 
and part- 


Pay Roll* 

(add 000) 


Operating 
expenses, 
1 including 










stores 


(add 000) 


time). Avg. 
(or year 


Total 


Full-lime 


Part-time 


pay roll ) • 
(add 000) 


TOTAL FOR UNITED STA1ES 


1.663.961 


♦33.161.E76 


1.511.734 


3.961.478 


♦3.623.289 


t3. 388. 166 


t235.123 


»7. 591. 912 


NX* miLAMD 
Coonectlout 


1U,044 


2,721,911 


95,803 


330,467 


322,456 


300 , 267 


22,199 


653,074 


24,464 


556,722 


20,205 


64,338 


66,968 


62,825 


4,143 


137,191 


Ualna 


12,766 


232,599 


11,384 


24,783 


22,100 


20,631 


1,669 


46,242 


kassach'Aadtts 


55,536 


1,461,180 


45,426 


186,136 


182,065 


169,047 


13,018 


369,408 


Ma« Hampshire 


7,225 


162,583 


6,569 


16,249 


14,881 


13,870 


1,011 


31,065 


Rhode laland 


9,095 


219,706 


7,684 


28,831 


27,671 


25,869 


1,802 


65,453 


Vermont 


4,9Sa 


99,121 


4,545 


10,033 


8,771 


8,115 


656 


18,715 


lODDLS ATLANTIC 
Mew Jersey 


402,028 


8,450,917 


357,70^ 


982,340 


989,038 


929,540 


69,498 


2,167,070 


67,798 


1,220,299 


88,755 


136,907 


140,660 


131,839 


8,821 


305,129 


New Tork 


204,511 


4,749,708 


181,621 


527,564 


568,833 


537,237 


31,596 


1,258,441 


PannBylTanlB 


129,719 


2,490,910 


117,333 


317,869 


279,545 


260,464 


19,081 


603,500 


8AST NORTH CBJTRAL 
lUlDOls 


340,393 


7,170,586 


310,512 


873,807 


800,496 


742,483 


58,013 


1,667,670 


98,538 


2,173,069 


89,533 


272,784 


263,232 


247,287 


15,945 


557,477 


Indiana 


42,471 


780,508 


39,986 


98,062 


81,580 


75,188 


6,392 


166,766 


Ulchlgan 


61,962 


1,388,236 


56,652 


163,278 


162,323 


141,873 


10,450 


308,229 


Ohio 


93,268 


1,956,941 


83,458 


242,003 


219,407 


203,023 


16,364 


442,578 


Wleconaln 


44,154 


871,832 


40,983 


97,390 


83,954 


75,112 


8,842 


182,621 


•BST NORTH CaTTRAI. 

lOWB 


192,570 


3,521,954 


132,871 


413,984 


340,260 


315,321 


24,939 


727,465 


38,979 


650,029 


38,045 


73,273 


55,814 


50,832 


4,982 


122,676 


Kansas 


27,433 


448,261 


26,399 


52,634 


39,863 


36,906 


2,958 


83,199 


Uinneeota 


37,495 


820,010 


36,367 


92,498 


83,029 


77,177 


5,862 


177,612 


Klssourl 


50,927 


946,125 


47,645 


124,849 


104,127 


97,432 


6,695 


218,600 


Nebraska 


19,099 


359,757 


17,979 


40,967 


33,143 


30,587 


2,656 


70,970 


North Dakota 


9,019 


150,208 


8,451 


14,076 


12,132 


11,167 


965 


27,143 


South Dakota 


9,618 


147,564 


8,985 


15,687 


12,152 


11,221 


931 


27,255 


SOUTH ATLaWE 
Delaware 


181,731 


3,296,008 

' 


163,509 


423,911 


344,069 


324,917 


19,152 


684,782 


4,390 


76,877 


3,975 


9,102 


8,364 


7,906 


458 


16,799 


District of Colunbla 


6,472 


330,813 


4,815 


42,069 


43,906 


42,102 


1,803 


87,853 


Florida 


24,330 


425,807 


21,679 


57,255 


46,119 


43,779 


2,340 


92,157 


Georgia 
Maryland 
North Carolina 


31,310 


484,693 


28,625 


66,896 


46,963 


44,473 


2,490 


92,448 


23,349 


462,874 


21,557 


59,681 


51,738 


48,649 


3,089 


109,641 


29,462 


463,219 


27,303 


60,207 


44,233 


41,418 


2,816 


86,285 


South Carolina 


16,686 


248,206 


14,672 


33,327 


22,688 


21,223 


1,465 


42,426 


Virginia 
West Virginia 


26,757 


471,329 


23,901 


58,105 


48,547 


45,943 


2,604 


95,470 


18,975 


332,190 


16,982 


37,269 


31,512 


29,424 


2,088 


61,704 


EAST SXTK OENTRAl 
AlabanB 


94,034 


1,386,429 


89,689 


175,856 


129,778 


122,157 


7,621 


262,777 


22,167 


337,217 


20,740 


42,517 


30,360 


28,669 


1,691 


61,618 


Kentucky 


29,286 


338,278 


28,192 


48,481 


36,931 


34,548 


2,383 


73,831 


UlsslsBlppi 


15,136 


178,348 


14,670 


23,384 


15,703 


14,788 


915 


31,253 


Tennessee 


27,445 


482,586 


26,087 


61,474 


46,784 


44,152 


2,632 


96,075 


lEST SOOTH CENTSAl 
Arkansas 


138,709 


2,309,174 


133,233 


291,496 


224,272 


212,524 


11,748 


452,599 


18,292 


240,724 


18,162 


28,046 


19,427 


18,209 


1,218 


38,793 


Louisiana 


23,189 


344,393 


21,399 


60,271 


36,864 


35,305 


1,569 


76,557 


Oklahons 


26,022 


434,793 


25,275 


53,809 


41,181 


38,684 


2,697 


85,308 


Taias 


71,206 


1,289,664 


68,397 


169,370 


126,800 


120,426 


6,374 


251,941 


yoUNTAd 


49,140 


1,100,728 


44,975 


114,904 


109,178 


101,649 


7,629 


225,858 


Arizona 


5,214 


121,083 


4,904 


13,156 


12,530 


11,744 


786 


26,337 


Colorado 


14,273 


302,559 


13,231 


34,049 


29,971 


28,020 


1,951 


63,748 


Idaho 


5,863 


140,167 


5,347 


13,064 


12,669 


11,791 


868 


26,143 


Montana 


7,944 


189,457 


7,114 


17,751 


18,776 


17,142 


1,633 


37,881 


Nerada 


1,709 


43,932 


1,523 


4,262 


4,937 


4,669 


268 


10 , 109 


New Uazico 


4,812 


88,751 


4,612 


9,396 


8,269 


7,799 


470 


16,488 


Utah 


5,839 


132,098 


5,004 


15,891 


14,611 


13,403 


1,208 


30,081 


WyoDiin^ 


3,486 


82,681 


3,240 


7,338 


7,426 


6,981 


448 


16,104 


PAcinc 

California 

Oregon 

Vashington 


141,312 


3,193.569 


133.433 


355.013 


363.742 


339.418 


24.324 


755.927 


100,874 
15,352 
25,086 


2,329,009 
336,851 
528,709 


95,597 
14,493 
23,343 




262,624 
35,066 
57,423 


273,641 
33,814 
58,287 


255,932 
31,467 
52,019 


17,709 
2,347 
4,268 


868,725 

71,087 

116, 118 



^Includes no comoensation tor proprietors ar.d firm members o( unincorporated busir>e«c« 



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Vol. 


1 -Page 2-09 


CENSUS OF BUSINESS 
RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 

TABLE 28. RELATIVE MONTHLY EMPLOYMENT 

BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES 












Division and Sl«le 


Employees 
(full time 
and part- 
time). 
Average 
for year 


Ratio of Each Month to Average Monthly Employment 


Jan 


Feb. 


Mar 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct 


Nov. 


Dec. 


TOTAL FOB DNlTivD STAISS 

SSI majjno 

Connaotieut 
Ualna 

UaS8aehu3etta 
Naw Hampahire 
Rboda laland 
Tanaont 

MnmiE ATLANTIC 

Naw Jarsey 
Naw York 
PonnaylTanla 

SAST NORTH CSITRAL 

lUlnola 

Indiaia 

Michigan 

Ohio 

WlsoonBin 

*B3t NORTH CaJTBAL 

Iowa 
Kansas 
Uisnasota 
Uiasouri 

Nabraaka 
North Dakota 
South Dakota 

SOOTH ATLANTIC 

Dalawara 

District of Coltmbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Marylani 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Virginia 

Wast Virginia 

BAST SOtrPH CSNTRAL 

Alabama 
Kentucky 
Vlsaissippl 
Tannaasee 

WEST SOOTE CKKTOAL 

Arkansas 
louislana 
Oklahoma 
TezaB 

learrAW 

Arizona 

Colorado 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nerada 

Naw Maxico 

Utah 

WyOTiing 

PACIFIC 

Callfomla 

Oregon 

Washington 


3,961,478 


93.9 


94.0 


95.3 


98.8 


98.4 


99.5 


99. S 


99.7 


108.8 


104.3 


104.7 


110.5 


330,467 


94.5 


94.1 


94.7 


97.8 


99.4 


101.4 


101.2 


101.0 


102.8 


102.7 


108.4 


^07.9 
109.8 


64,338 
24,783 

186,136 
16,249 
28,881 
10,083 

982,340 


93.6 
90.3 
95.3 
94,0 
95,3 
92.7 

94.5 


93.3 
89.6 
95.1 
93.9 
94.3 
91.5 

94.5 


94.4 

90.8 
95.7 
93.2 
95.3 
91.3 

95.5 


97.7 
93.7 
98.6 
95.8 
99.0 
94.9 

99.S 


99.4 
97.7 
99.7 
98.8 
99.3 
98.3 

98.8 


100.7 
103.8 

101.3 
108.0 
100.4 
102.4 

100.1 


100.5 
109.1 
100.0 
104.8 
100.3 
105.0 

98.9 


100.5 
109.5 
99.6 
105.3 
100.1 
105.6 

99.1 


108.8 
108.4 
102.0 
105.0 
101.6 
104.8 

101.9 


103.8 
103.1 
102.2 
102.2 
103.5 
103.8 

103.7 


104.0 
100.4 
102.3 
100.4 
102.8 
108.9 

103.9 


104.4 
U)8.3 


104.8 
108. 1 
106.9 


110.0 

107.6 
110.7 
110.0 

110.5 


136,907 
527,564 
317,869 

873,507 


93.3 
94.4 
95.3 

93.5 


93.0 
94.2 
95.6 

93.5 


94.4 

95.3 
96.5 

95.1 


98.0 

99.4 

100.1 

98.4 


98.3 
98.8 
98.9 

98.9 


101.2 

99.9 

100.0 

100.0 


102.8 
98.3 
98.3 

99.9 


104.2 
98.3 
98.1 

99.7 


102.8 
101.9 
100.3 

102.1 


102.2 
104.2 
103.3 

104.2 


102.8 
104.6 
103.6 

104.6 


272,784 

98,052 

153,278 

242,003 

97,390 

413,984 


94.6 
93.7 
91.9 
93.2 
93.3 

93.2 


94.5 
94.1 
92.7 
93.2 
92.2 

93.3 


95.8 
95.9 
94.4 
95.2 
93.0 

94.7 


98.6 
98.2 
98.2 
98.8 
97.6 

98.0 


99.0 
98.2 
99.0 
99.2 
98.7 

98.3 


99.5 

99.3 

100.5 

100.1 

100.7 

99.8 


98.9 
99.2 
99.6 
99.3 
101.9 

99.9 


99.8 
99.9 
99.7 
99.0 
108.0 

100.8 


102.0 
101.8 
102.5 
101.6 
103.6 

103.5 


104.0 
104.3 
104.4 
103.9 
105.3 

105.3 


104.8 
104.8 
104.8 
104.7 
103.2 

104.4 


109.1 
110.5 
112.8 
111.7 


108.5 
109.4 


73,273 

52,634 

92,498 

124,849 

40,967 
14,076 
15,687 

423, 9U 


92.5 
92.5 
93.4 
94.1 
94.1 
89.5 
91.6 

95.6 


93.1 
93.5 
92.7 
94.3 
93.4 
88.8 
91.9 

95.9 


94.3 
94.8 
93.7 
96.0 
95.8 
90.9 
93.3 

97.1 


98.1 
97.8 
96.9 
99.2 
97.7 
97.2 
96.0 

98.4 


98.6 
98.4 
97.9 
98,6 
98.1 
98.3 
97.6 

97.6 


100.6 

100.1 

99.6 

99.1 

99.2 

101.3 

100.7 

98.0 


101.1 

100.9 

99.6 

98.5 

99.3 

103.0 

103.5 

97.5 


101.1 
101.4 
100.1 
98.5 
99.8 
104.1 
108.6 

98.1 


102.9 
103.6 
104.3 
108.8 
103.3 
106.9 
104.0 

100.6 


105.3 
104.6 
106.8 
104.2 
104.7 
108.9 
106.2 

104.0 


103.9 
103.7 
104.8 
104.7 
104.6 
104.3 
104.6 

105.4 


108.4 
108.4 
110.1 


110.1 


109.9 


106.7 
108.0 


111,7 


9,102 
42,069 
57,255 
66,896 
59,681 
60,207 
53,327 
58,105 
37,269 

175,856 


95.3 
94.2 
103.2 
95.7 
95.6 
93.4 
94.3 
94.5 
92.3 

94.5 


95.8 
93.8 
104.1 
96.0 
95.2 
93.5 
94.9 
94.6 
93.5 

94.8 


96.6 
95.8 
103.7 
97.2 
96.7 
95.1 
96.0 
96.1 
94.7 

96.1 


99.0 
99.2 
99.6 
97.9 
99.1 
97.4 
97.1 
98.3 
98.5 

98.0 


99.0 
98.9 
94.8 

97.4 
99.8 
96.4 
96.7 
98.7 
98.6 

98.4 


100.5 
100. S 
92.4 
97.5 
100.4 
96.7 
97.7 
99.8 
99.5 

98.4 


100.3 
97.0 
91.8 

5577 

99.4 
97.2 
97.8 
99.3 
100.2 

98.5 


100.8 
96.8 
92.8 
99.3 
98.9 
98.8 
99.5 
99.8 

100.8 

99.0 


101.5 
100.5 
94.9 
100.6 
101.3 
102.5 
102.5 
101.3 
108.8 

101.8 


102.2 
104.3 
101.8 
104.3 
102.8 
106.9 
105.8 
103.3 
104.6 

104.8 


102.8 
106.3 
106.3 
106,7 
102.7 
108.7 
106.6 
104.1 
104.5 

105.5 


106.6 


114.0 


115.7 

noTf 

108.6 


114.1 


110.9 


110.1 
111.3 

110.8 


42,517 
48,481 
23,384 
61,474 

291,496 


94.6 
94.5 
93.8 
94.5 

94.1 


94.7 
95.3 
94.0 
94.9 

94.1 


96.5 
96.1 
95.4 
96.2 

95.5 


97.8 
98.8 
96.8 
98.1 

97.2 


97.8 
99.7 
96.7 
98.5 

97.3 


97.3 
99.4 
97.9 
98.4 

97.8 


97.6 
99.3 
97.7 
98.7 

98.6 


98.5 
99.4 

98.4 
99.3 

99.3 


108.0 
101.9 
102.3 
101.4 

108.5 


105.1 
103.3 
106.8 
104.9 

105.8 


106.3 
104.0 
107.9 
105.4 

106.7 


111.9 
108.4 
112.3 
109.7 

111.0 


28,046 

50,271 

53,809 

159,370 

114,904 


92.2 
95.5 
94.1 
94.0 

91.1 


91.9 
96.0 
94.0 
94.0 

90.9 


93.8 
96.9 
95.4 
95.4 

92.4 


96.3 
98.2 
97.5 
97.0 

99.5 


96.6 
97.7 
97.4 
97.3 

97.1 


97.2 

97.7 
98.4 
97.8 

100.3 


98.4 
97.8 
98.8 
98.7 

102.0 


99.2 
99.0 
99.1 
99.5 

103.0 


103.7 
101.7 
102.4 
1C2.5 

104.6 


108.2 
105.2 
105.2 
105.9 

105.2 


109.0 
106.1 
105.9 
106.7 

105,9 


113.7 
108.2 

U1.7 
Ul.l 

U1.8 


13,156 
34,049 

13,064 

17,751 

4,262 

9,396 

15,891 

7,335 

555,013 


94.2 
91.9 

89.1 
90.3 
90.7 
92.3 
90.9 
86.9 

92.4 


94.3 
91.7 
88.5 
89.6 
90.7 
92.3 
X.i 
87.0 

92.3 


95.8 
93.5 
90.4 

91.4 
92.0 
93.1 
92.2 
88.5 

94.2 


97.4 
95.2 
94.2 
95.1 
94.4 
95.8 
97.3 
93.3 

96.5 


97.5 
96.6 
97.6 
97.8 
97.8 
96.9 
96.7 
97.6 

97.2 


97.8 
100.1 
100.9 
100.9 
101.0 

99.1 
100.3 
104.2 

96.7 


97.7 
102.4 
102.7 
103.5 
103.6 
101.2 

99.9 
108.6 

99.9 


98.5 
103.3 
104.2 
104.9 
105.1 
102.2 
100.1 
109.8 


100.9 
104.9 
106.6 
109.8 
104.7 
102.9 
103.5 
108.4 

103.3 


104.7 
104.1 
107.1 
106.1 
106.2 
106.4 
104.6 
105.5 

106 .0 


107.8 
105.1 
106.8 
105.5 
105.9 
107.2 
105.6 
103.9 

106.4 


113.6 
111.5 
111.9 
108.9 
108.0 
110.5 
118.6 
106.1 

113.8 


100.8 


262,524 
■55,066 
57,423 


92.6 
91.5 
91.9 


92.5 
91.4 
92.2 


94.3 

93.1 
94.0 


96.6 
95.1 
96.9 


97.1 
96.6 

97.7 


98.6 
99.9 
98.5 


99.3 

101.3 

99.7 


100.5 
108.8 
100.6 


103.0 
105.0 
103.4 


104.5 
106.4 
106.1 


106.6 
105.4 
105.9 


.U4.3 
ill.S 
113.2 



Vol. I - P»ge 2-10 



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Vol. I - Page 2-12 



UNITED STATES SUMMARY 
TABLE 2 D. - EMPLOYMENT BY SEX, By Kinds of Business and By States 

(Bftsed on number of employees reported by occupational j(roup» for week ending October 26, 1935, or other representative week) 



Kind oi Buaineu 



Number of 
employees 
reported 
for week 



Percent 



Geographic Division and Stale 



Number of 
employees 
reported 
for week 



Percent 
women 



Dilted 3t«f yptal 



rood ator»f 



Candy eod oonfootlmary storaa 

Dairy produoto atorat & milk dsalara 

D«llcBtouoQ atoraa 

Fruit Btoraa 4 ragatabla markats 

Orocvry atoraa (without aaata) 

Co^lnatlon atoraa (grooarlas & maata) 

Uaat nark* t a 

All othar food atoraa 

Pmaral Storaa (with food) 



Baneral Marohandtaa Group 

' Dry gooda k s*nar«l marchandlaa atoraa 

D«par^Dant ator«s 

Varlatj atoraa 



Stg 



Fsillr elotblsg ators* 

Woman *a apaolalty atoraa 

Uillloaiy atoraa 

8ho« atoraa 

All othar apparal atoraa 

AutonotlTa Oroup 
tiotor-Tahiela daalara (naw) 
Uaad-oar daalara 

Aecaaaorlaa, tlra and battary daalara 
GoTogaa 
Othar autoDotlTa 

rming atatlona 



yumltura-Bauaaliold Oroup 



taral Qroup 

len'a clothing & fumlahlnga atoraa 



Furaltura atoraa 

Floor govarlaga-drapary atoi-ee 

Rouaahold appllanca & radio atoraa 

Radio daalara 

Othar homa fumlahlnga atoraa 



Lunbgr-BuUdlng-Hardware Oroup 
Lumbar-bullding-matarial daalara 



Hardwara atoraa 
Hardwara k fam Implament daalara 
Heating h plumbing equipnant daalara 
Paint, glaaa, wall-papar atoraa 
Elaetrioal aupply atoraa 



gating and Prinking Placga 

Raatauranta-eaf atari aa-lunoh rooma 
Lunoh oountara, rafraataoBnt atanda 
Drinking plaoaa 

Drug Storaa 

Drug atoraa (with fountain) 
Drug atoraa (without fountain) 

Othar Rgtail atoraa 



Book atoraa 

Cigar atoraa and otgar atanda 

rioriata 

Pual and ioa daalara 

Gift, nOTalty, aouranir ahopa 

Ray, grain nd faod atoraa 

Farm and gardao aupply atoraa 

Jawalry atoraa 

Nawa daalara 

Sporting gooda atoraa 

Baar and liquor atoraa (paokagad) 

Othar olaaalfioationa 

Saeond-Hand atoraa 



597.973 

32,629 

59,690 

6,846 

22,828 

123,759 

277,967 

42,315 

31,939 

75.327 

466.511 

58,446 

326,429 

101,436 

278.146 
50,270 
38,905 
91,655 
17,308 
43,059 
36,949 

348.740 

235,482 

9,740 

40,384 

61,179 

1,955 

180.880 

132.016 
65,328 

6.285 
44,371 

5,803 
10,229 

155,920 
69.884 
40.143 
18,571 
11,575 
12.936 
2,811 

655,682 

430,541 

55,490 

169,651 

123.028 
95,740 
27.288 

232.788 

7.247 

13,168 

14.352 

61,221 

3,626 

16,341 

14,010 

21,563 

11,813 

3,051 

16,288 

50,108 

17,912 



50.5 

16.8 
49.5 
10.5 
30.8 
12.2 
16.6 
13.5 
10.5 
33,6 

26.9 

66.2 
64.4 
63.3 
66.1 

53.8 
KT? 
56.5 
84.8 
92.9 
20.2 
47.8 

6.3 
7.0 
4.5 
6.8 
3.5 
7.4 

4.7 



nnltad stataa Total 



New Knj^land 
Connecticut 
Uaine 

Maseachusatta 
Naw Harapahire 
Rhode Island 
Vermont 



Middle Atlantic 
New Jeraay 
New York 
Pennaylvania 

Eaat North Central 
Illlnoia 
Indiana 
Uichigan 
Ohio 
Wiaconaln 

West North Central 
Iowa 
Kansas 
t.finnesota 
Miaaouri 
Nabraaka 
riorth Dakota 
South Dakota 

South Atlantic 



Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Maryland 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Bast South Central 
Alabama 
Kentucky 
Miaaiealppl 
Tennessee 

West South Central 



Arkanaaa 
Louiaians 
Oklahoma 
Tezaa 



ttountain 
Arizona 
Colorado 
Idaho 
Montana 
Nevada 
Naw Mexico 
Utah 
Wyoming 

Pacific 



California 

Oregon 

Waahington 



3.284.723 



269,509 


30.4 


52.392 


26. 5 


23.378 


31.9 


148.556 


32.0 


14,701 


28.8 


22,313 


30.5 


6,169 


27.0 


782.610 


31.1 


113:727 


25.6 


416.673 


29.8 


252,010 


35.8 


711,236 


33.2 


262;711 


sn 


63,358 


32.8 


135,882 


32.9 


202,877 


33.9 


86,606 


30.8 


357,108 


31.6 


■ 641374 


31.4 


46,218 


27.6 


83,041 


35.0 


101,865 


32.6 


33.689 


28.3 


13,251 


31.0 


14,670 


32.8 


352.933 


27.1 


7.282 


29.9 


30.159 


34.2 


50,920 


26.7 


59.024 


24.9 


41,090 


32,7 


52,722 


23.5 


31,821 


21.2 


48,297 


25.5 


31,618 


31.1 


158,071 


26.1 


361666 


24.8 


43,672 


28.1 


21.625 


26.4 


55.908 


25.4 


259.024 


27.4 


26,909 


25.4 


44,473 


28.4 


45,246 


30.7 


142,396 


26.4 


100,174 


29.8 


11,854 


27.5 


29,718 


31.5 


11,839 


30.7 


14,698 


28.4 


3,458 


26.6 


8.128 


26.3 


14.123 


33.3 


6,356 


26.7 


294,058 


30.9 


213 ,'759 


29.8 


31,195 


34.6 


49,104 


33.5 























Vol. 1 


- Pa^e 2 - 13 


dT^"* ^."*" .o« UNITED STATES SUMMARY 
Rdul Dwinbution: 1935 

TABLE 3A. - TYPES OF OPERATION - TWENTY-SIX KINDS OF BUSINESS 

STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL, PAY ROLL AND OPERATING EXPENSES 


Type of Operation 


Number 

ol 
stores 


Sales 
(add 000) 


Percent 

oi 

Total Sale. 


Active 
proprietor* 
and firm 
members 


Employeo 
(hdl-time 

and part- 
lime). A>?g. 

(or year 


Pay RoU> 

(•dd 000) 


Operating 
expenses, 
(including 
pay roll 1 • 
(add 000) 


1935 


1933 


1929 


Toul 


Fulltime 


Part-time 


JnltoJ Statoo Total - all typos 


1,653.961 


J33.161.276 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


1.511.734 


3.961.478 


t3.623.£89 


»3. 388. 166 


»235.123 


»7. 591. 912 


Indopoadents 


1.474.149 


24.246.112 


73.1 


t71.3 


77.5 


1.471.938 


2.838.801 


_2j568j^l5 


2,394,166 


164,449 


5,387,686 


Slngl»-9toro 
Two-atoro 
Ilirao-store 
Loeal branch 978t«nis 
Cbaliu 


1,419,855 

40,897 

13,054 

343 

127.482 


21,634,246 

1,749,849 

771,246 

90,771 

7,550.186 


65.2 

5.3 

2.3 

.3 

22. S 


(a) 
(a) 
(a) 
(a) 

t26.4 


(a) 
(a) 
(a) 
(a) 
20.0 


1,447,214 

21,014 

3,645 

66 

2,702 


2,521,921 

209,019 

93,614 

14,247 

963,636 


2,226,042 

219,913 
97,296 
15,364 

910,569 


2,074,975 

210,797 

93,421 

14,973 

849,217 


151,067 

9,116 

3,875 

391 

61,352 


4,736,210 

426,303 

195,871 

29,302 

1,884,980 


Looal 

Sectional and National 
Uanufaoturer-oontrollod 
*ll other tTTjaa 


17,964 

107,593 

1,925 

52.330 


1,021,613 

6,413,596 

114,977 

1,364.978 


3.1 

19.3 

.4 

4.1 


(a) 
(a) 
(a) 
t3.3 


6.7 

12.6 

.7 

2.5 


1,386 

1,310 

6 

37,094 


134,012 

807,808 

21,816 

159.041 


143,752 

739,892 

26,925 

154.105 


138,022 

684,644 

26,551 

144.783 


5,730 

56,248 

374 

9^22 


300,887 

1,538,650 

45,443 

319.246 


Leased departments. Independent 
Leased departments, chain 
Utility-operated stores 
Uall-order houses 
Direct selling (houee-to-houee) 
State liquor stores (b) 
Military poet canteens 
Cooml^sarles or company stores 
Other types 

EDIDS 0? BUSINESS 

QrocBTj stores (without meats) 
Independents 
Chains 

Direct selling (housa-to-house) 
Comaissaries or company stores 
All other typee 

CcBbination stores lexoe.t meats) 


3,517 
3,664 
3,936 

378 
6,349 
2,053 

487 

1,888 

30,058 

188.738 


48,041 
108,070 
123,242 
420,027 
125,316 
160,665 
5,524 
113,126 
260,967 

2,202,607 


.1 
.3 
.4 
1.3 
.4 
,5 

.3 
.S 

100.0 


(a) 
(a) 

3 

1.0 

t ,4 

c 

(a) 

.4 
1.2 

100.0 


} - 

.3 

1.0 

.2 

c 

(a) 

.3 

.4 

100.0 


r 3,408 

I 112 

27 

19 

5,178 

12 
145 
328 

27,489 

170,415 


6,971 
17,071 
20,920 
40,969 
33,570 

4.95* 

728 

9,334 

25,524 

156,031 


4,821 
14.902 
22.929 
39,888 
35,183 

8.196 
557 

9,844 
17,789 

125,802 


4,384 
13,424 
19,614 
39,037 
34,411 

7.938 
524 

9,498 
15.983 

114,828 


467 

1,478 

3,311 

861 

772 

268 

33 

346 

1,806 

10,974 


11,633 
36.864 
43,814 
106,281 
51,997 
13,366 
1,087 
16,269 
37,935 

281,962 


164,404 

22,632 

87 

349 

1,266 

166.233 


1,339,524 

842,075 

3,634 

2,982 

14,392 

4.149.813 


60.8 

38.2 

.2 

.1 

.7 

100.0 


54.3 

45.0 

.1 

.1 

.5 

100.0 


53.6 
45.7 

.7 
100.0 


168,794 

124 

60 

270 

1,177 

148.321 


81,193 

72,698 

790 

183 

1,167 

359.716 


54,566 

69,385 

866 

160 

825 

304.006 


49,455 

63,606 

665 

148 

754 

281.080 


5,111 

5,779 

1 

12 

71 

22.926 


146,709 
131,450 

1,738 
238 

1,827 

617.799 

331,226 

284,275 

411 

1,888 

41,553 


Independents 

Chains 

CooQlssaries or ooapany etores 

All other types 

Beer and liquor stores (packaged) 


139,994 

25,607 

94 

538 

12,105 


2,509,867 

1,624,513 

3,355 

12,078 

328,307 


60.5 

39.1 

.1 

.3 

100.0 


56.1 
43.7 

.2 


67.6 
32.2 

.2 


147,462 

347 

39 

473 

8,922 


206,746 

151,662 

222 

1,086 

16,312 


157,636 

145,130 

260 

981 

19,468 


145,978 

133,931 

260 

921 

18,451 


11,657 

11.199 

10 

60 

1,007 


Independents 

Chains 

State liquor stores (b) 

All other types 

Idotor'Tehlcle dealers 


9,718 
226 

2,053 
108 

35,045 


157,696 
6,020 

160,665 
3,926 

3,847,642 


48.0 

1.8 

49.0 

1.2 

100.0 


100.0 


- 


8,819 
18 
12 
73 

30,219 


10,816 

428 

4,954 

114 

267,022 


10,603 

563 

8,146 

96 

325,043 


9,862 

560 

7,936 

91 

319,335 


741 

3 

258 

5 

5,708 


26,769 

1,215 

13,366 

205 

597,237 


Indei>endants 

Chains 

All other types 

Acceasories-tire-battery dealere 
Independents 
Chains 
All other typee 

rilling^ stations 


34,504 

535 
6 

14,343 

10,885 

3,453 

e 

197^668 


3,678,674 

168,337 

631 

373,910 

186,808 

186,917 

185 

1,967,714 


95.6 
4.4 

100.0 
50.0 
50.0 

100.0 


94.6 

5.3 
.1 

100.0 


100.0 


30,192 

£4 

3 

10,364 

10,325 

55 

4 

179,870 


255,662 

U,247 

113 

45,751 

21,967 

23,757 

27 

203,753 


308,660 

16,422 

61 

54,557 

26,764 

27,762 

31 

177,128 


302,970 

16,304 

61 

52,771 

25,817 

26,924 

30 

166j728 


5,590 
118 

1,786 
947 
838 

1 

11,400 


566,023 

30,956 

258 

107,978 

50,291 

57,621 

66 

356,727 


Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Departinent atoraa \^ 


177,529 

19,575 

464 

4,201 


1,530,994 

423,082 

13,638 

3,3U,070 


77.8 
21.5 

.7 

100.0 


64.3 

35.5 
.2 

100.0 


66.0 

33.8 

.2 

100.0 


179,381 
262 
227 

756 


145,527 

57,130 

1,096 

492,090 


106,904 

69,022 

1,202 

468,910 


96,829 

67,743 
1,156 

443,870 


10,076 

1,279 

46 

25,040 


228,711 

126,097 

1,919 

966,104 

655,671 

217,712 

91,653 

941 

127 

208.082 


Independents 
Chains 

kail-order houses 
Comlssaries or cospany stores 
All other types 

Variety stores 


1,711 
2,423 

33 
30 

4 

U,741 


2,034,945 

883,101 

386,200 

6,130 

694 

780,819 


61.4 

26.7 

11.7 

.2 

100.0 


■67.3 
23.9 

8.7 
.1 

100.0 


72.1 
16.7 

11.2 
100.0 


741 

11 

3 

1. 

S,B46 


337,868 

U6.366 

37,228 

336 

295 

171,375 


334,857 

99,342 

34,053 

697 

61 

»1,295 


322,676 

87,197 

33,395 

548 

65 

78,188 


12,182 

12,145 

658 

49 

6 

13,107 


Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Hen's clothing & fiirn*ga stores 


6,056 
5,658 

27 

20.914 


71,944 

708,651 

224 

659.617 


9.2 

90.8 

100.0 


B.8 
91.2 

100.0 


■ 9.8 

90.1 

.1 

100.0 


5,683 

140 

23 

17,183 


12,532 

158,799 

44 

58,283 


6,715 

84,657 

23 

74,818 


5,822 
72,346 

21 

70.868 


893 

it, 212 

2 

3,947 


15,033 

193,001 

48 

176,574 


Independents 
Chains 

Mail-order houses 
All other types 

Tmily clothing stores 


19,018 

1,592 

16 

288 

7,881 


514,640 

138,528 

3,047 

3,402 

358,849 


78.0 

21.0 

.5 

.5 

100.0 


76.5 

22.0 

.5 

1.0 

100.0 


77.9 
21.2 

.9 

100.0 


16,867 

74 

13 

£29 

6,060 


46,477 

U,381 

190 

235 

46,777 


67,570 

16,678 

267 

310 

47,208 


64,466 

16,899 

208 

295 

44,909 


3,104 

779 

49 

15 

2,296 


131,299 

42 ,876 

1,880 

850 

103,173 


Independente 

Chains 

All other types 

VoBsn's ready-to-wear stores 


6,915 

923 

43 

21,975 


282,956 

74,008 

1,886 

794,992 


78.9 

20.6 

.5 

100.0 


79.8 
20.3 

.5 

100.0 


71.5 

27.3 

1.2 

100.0 


B,998 
33 
29 

17,068 


36,304 

10,312 

161 

107,469 


36;001 

10,989 

S48 

103,04? 


34,205 

10,462 

£42 

98,474 


1,796 

497 

3 

8,673 


78,874 

24,024 

576 

228,873 


Indspendents 

Chains 

Leased departments 

All other types 

(oontljuiAd) 


19,266 
2,407 

225 
7« 


574,900 

200,077 

13,257 

6,758 


72.3 

25.2 

1.7 

.8 


74.5 
23.3 

2.2 


74.3 
22.7 

3.0 


16,838 

122 

46 

63 


79,175 

26,768 

1,708 

318 


77,480 

23,426 

1,372 

799 


72,939 

21,616 

1,143 

776 


4,811 

1,810 

229 

23 


188,680 
87,491 

3,ste 

E,S77 



Vol. I - Page 2-14 



Centut ol BufinaM 
Retail Distribution: 



UNITED STATES SUMMARY 

TABLE 3A. - TYPES OF OPERATION - TWENTY SIX KINDS OF BUSINESS (Continued) 

STORES, SALES, PERSONNEX. PAY ROLL AND OPERATING EXPENSES 



Type o( Operation 



Number 

ol 
•tores 



Shoe stores 



(contlnusd) 



Indepeoiients 

Chains 

Leased departiEents 

UaU-crder bouses 

All other types 

Furniture stores 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Household appllaaoe-radlo Btorea 



Independents 

Chains 

Leased departments 

Utility-operated stores 

Direct selling (house-to-house) 

All other types 

Radio deelers 



Independents 

Chsdns 

All other types 

Lumber fc hldg, material dealers 



18,967 



13,087 

5,006 

89£ 

7 

35 

17.043 



16,466 

561 

li 

14.100 



Stlei 



(idd OOP) 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Hardware stores & Inglement dlrs. 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Restaurants and eating plaoea 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Drinking places 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Fuel and ice dealers 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Dmg stores with fountain 



Independents 

Chains 

All other typee 

Drug stores without fountain 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

Cigar stores and cigar stands 



B,39E 
1,196 

260 
3,936 

306 
10 

4.296 



4,176 

103 

17 

21,149 



15,476 

5,619 

54 

36.633 



35,956 

585 

92 

153.468 



146.747 
3.988 
2,733 

98.005 



97.205 
46 
754 

15,350 



13,462 

1,608 

280 

35,293 



Independents 
Chains 

Uall-order houaea 
All other typee 

Hay, grain and feed «ter»» 



Independents 

Chains 

All other typee 

f arm and garden aupply atoree 
Independents 
Chains 

Uall-order houses 
All other types 

Jewelry stores 



Independents 

Chains 

All other types 

All other kinds of huslneas 



32,720 
1,289 
1,2.84 

38,731 



35,581 

3,107 

43 

17,966 



17,274 

637 

19 

36 

11,132 



9,590 

1,006 

536 

9,176 



8,100 

191 

16 

S69 

12.447 



12,047 
323 
77 



4««,4«1 



♦511.399 



221,712 

255,564 

32,269 

1.500 

354 

694.578 



597.255 

93.aei 

3.502 

381.171 



183,279 

47,987 

5,059 

123,242 

21,403 

201 

57,152 



Percent 

oi 

Total SaJo 



43.3 

50.0 

6.3 

.3 

.1 

100.0 



86.0 

13. S 

.5 

100.0 



43.233 

13,187 

732 

866,865 



655,519 
206,097 
5,249 

758,979 



724,306 

32,911 

1,762 

1,666,899 



1,399,785 

242,354 

24,760 

723,961 



718,215 
813 
4.933 

182. 950 



111.851 

65,525 

5,574 

859,018 



710,707 
141,423 



950,328 



48.1 
12.6 

1.4 
32.3 

5.6 



100.0 



46.5 
46,2 



.1 
7.2 

100.0 



S4.6 

14.2 

1.2 

100.0 



75.6 

23.1 

1.3 

100.0 



75.6 

23.8 

.6 

100.0 



95.4 

4.3 

.3 

100.0 



84.0 

14.6 

1.5 

100.0 



99.2 
.1 



ICO.O 



61.1 
35.8 

3.1 

100.0 



676,10i5 
273,324 
901 

282,265 



237,285 
43.483 

450 
1.047 

346.667 



248.126 
55.443 
43.098 

232.471 



189,294 

u,e«i 

4,203 
47,063 

234,893 



212,002 

20,890 

2,001 

5,616,340 



82.7 

16.5 

.8 

100.0 



33.2 
21.5 

36.8 
6.4 

2.1 

100.0 



53.5 
38,0 



6.6 



100. 



83,9 
14.2 

\,9 



Active 
proprietor! 
and Krm 
membera 



11,668 



11,452 

99 

85 

3 

29 

14,855 



14,819 
26 

10 

7,81C 



100.0 



7».0 
15.6 19.1 
1.7 1.9 



95.6 

4.1 

.3 



84.8 

14.9 

.3 



100.0 



65.1 

33.9 

1.0 



100.0 



86.1 

13.6 

.3 



100.0 



73.5 

25.1 

1.4 



100.0 



71.1 rri. 6 

£8.8 28.4 

.1 



100.0 



84.1 

15.4 

.2 

.3 

100.0 



71.6 
16.0 
12,4 

100.0 



75.0 
4.7 
1.7 

18.6 

100.0 



90.3 
8.9 



(a) Not aeparately reported 

(b) Include! county or municipj liquor itores in !ome States. 

(c) No comparable data. 

• Includes no compensation lor proprietor! ol unincorporated fausini 
NOTE ■ Proprietors shown for chains 
t Revised. 



100.0 



64.4 

15.6 



,748 

11 

14 

27 

5 

5 

4,225 



4,209 
7 
9 

10,819 



10,710 

100 

9 

3 6,293 



Employees 
(hill-time 

and part, 
lime). Ajf 

for year 



67.131 



22.920 

29,416 

4,495 

122 

178 

77,905 



67.570 

9.893 

442 

6 5.836 



24,558 

13,160 

721 

£0,920 

6,466 

11 

6.135 



5,236 
797 
100 

90.658 



36,202 
18 

73 



156,58 2 



154,035 
123 
2,424 

100,984 



100.336 
18 

628 

13,717 

13,487 

17 

213 

31.626 




30.366 

32 

1.228 

^2,^199 

32, U 9 

49 

31 



16,164 



25 

9,332 

9,228 

58 

46 



8.289 

7,930 

7 

10 

312 



70,816 

19,549 

493 

67,716 



64,910 

2,601 

205 

495,752 



Pay RoU> 

(add 000) 



Total 



♦56,623 



24,162 

28,308 

3,906 

172 

75 



102, 065 

87,620 

13,825 

720 



75,156 



28,020 

14,201 

897 

22,925 

9,099 

14 

7.513 



5,337 

2,060 

116 



106,801 

85,640 

22,443 

518 

70,939 



412,640 

76,145 

6,967 

151,183 



149,787 

163 

1,233 

1 5,111 



9,796 

4,987 

328 

91,573 



77,974 

12,731 

868 

127, 830 

92,759 

34,957 

114 

31 ,300 



27,151 

3,964 

94 

91 

1 9,044 



14,4S6 

2,974 
1,614 

18,73 2 



14,375 

1,068 

528 

2,741 

28.709 



23,080 
2,399 
260 

695.084 



67,464 
3,242 

233 

312,252 



Full-time 



♦51.848 



22.431 

26.603 

3,671 

168 

76 

98.973 



84.730 

13,530 

713 

69,788 



26,307 

13,854 

877 

19,614 

9,065 

11 



7.071 



4,947 

2,()10 

114 

101,935 



Part-time 



♦4,775 



1,731 

2,705 

335 

4 



3,092 



2,790 

295 

7 

5,428 



1,713 

347 

20 

3,311 

34 

3 

442 



Operating 
expenses, 

( including 
pay roll ) • 
(add 000) 



♦142.884 

56,951 

76,486 

9,840 

489 

118 

221,867 



186,446 
34,014 
1,407 

133,070 



79,971 
21,455 
509 

6 6,44 4 



252,718 

54,912 

4,602 

101 ,468 

100,621 

136 

731 

13^820 

7,617 

6,824 

379 

10 6,066 



87,010 
16,348 
708 

112,660 



77,527 

35,026 

107 



_3q,694 

25,613 

4,683 

67 

111 

JJ7,681 

12,606 

3,264 

1,811 

16,246 



13,926 
1,189 
542 

2,591 

35,479 



31,291 
3,916 
272 



63,092 

3,126 

226 

29 2,795 



235,674 
52,605 
4,116 

90,701 



69,944 
132 
625 

l:fj027 

' 6,924 

5,743 

360 

92,609 



76,370 

15,670 

569 

105 ,779 

7i;213 

34,460 

106 

28, 840 



23,575 

4,776 

64 

105 

16,555 



11,669 
3,135 
1,751 

16,603 



12,511 

1,165 

498 

2,432 

34,176 



30,086 

3,SS4 

286 

614.680 



390 

50 

2 

6.666 



5,669 

968 

9 

4.495 



4.372 

116 
7 

^9j437 



16,644 

2.107 

486 



10,767 I 245,953 

10,677 
4 
106 



793 

693 

81 

19 



10,640 

2,478 

139 

6,881 



6,314 
566 

1 

2,154 



2,038 

107 

3 

6 



1,126 

937 

129 

60 



1,648 



1,415 

24 

47 

189 

1.308 



1,238 

«2 

6 

47,876 



51,667 
22,074 
2,265 
43,814 
13,033 
17 

16.442 



11.735 

4.42S 

282 

202,074 



157.028 

43,711 

1.335 

146.374 



136,935 

7,ao 

229 
754,068 



610,730 

132,082 

11,276 



243,674 

256 

1,623 



35,675 

20,840 

13,876 

959 

206,521 



168,232 

36,901 

1,386 

227,071 



154,426 

72,429 

214 

64,699 



53,976 

10,303 

176 

243 

36,551 



26,980 
6,823 

3,046 

36,16 9 

29,109 

2,877 

1,519 

4,964 

61 ,656 



70,992 
10,201 
663 



are acti.e owners oi unincorporated chains. -Ow figure does not md.cate the number ol companies. 





















Vo 


. 1 Page 


2 -15 


Census of Busines* 




















Retail Distribution: 1935 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 














TABLE 3B - 


TYPES OF OPERATION STORES AND SALES BY STATES 












(Sales ciptessed in thousands o( dollars) 














Told 


IndepcndenU 


Chains 


All OlSei Typ« 


STATE 


All - 


type. 


Store! 


Sales 


Stores 


Sales 


, 


Sales 1 




Store* 


Salei 




Percent 


Amount ' 


Percent 


Store* 


Amount ' 


Percent 


Total. Onltsd States , 1955 
Total, United States, 1933 


1,653,961 


»S3,161,276 


1,474,149 


124,246,112 


73.1 
71.3 


127,482 

141,676 


»7, 550, 186 
6,372,5M 


22. P 
25.4 


62,330 
35,(87 


♦ 1,364,978 
818,339 


4.1 
3.3 


1,526,119 


25,037,225 


1,349,356 


17346^32 


Total, United States, 1929 


1,543,158 


49,114,653 


1,375,509 


38,081,504 


77.5 


148,037 


9,834,846 


20.0 


I9,6l;d 


1,198,303 


2.5 


States. 1935 


22,167 


337,217 


20,253 


265,534 


78.8 


1,187 


56,365 


16.7 


727 


15,318 


4.5 


Alabama 


Arizona 


5,214 


121,083 


4,766 


91,323 


75.4 


378 


26,915 


22.2 


70 


2,845 


2.4 


Arkansas 


18,292 


240,724 


17,170 


206,287 


85.7 


686 


29,533 


12.3 


436 


4,904 


£.0 


California 


100,874 


2,329,009 


88,487 


1,658,580 


71.2 


9,172 


597,989 


25.7 


3,215 


72,440 


3.1 


Colorado 


14,273 


302,559 


13,169 


227,760 


75.3 


795 


67,391 


22.3 


309 


7,408 


2.4 


Connecticut 


24,464 


556,722 


21,299 


410,045 


73.7 


2,552 


136,453 


24.6 


613 


10,224 


1.8 


Delaware 


4,390 


76,877 


3,659 


60,846 


78.3 


292 


15,271 


19.9 


439 


1,360 


1.6 


District of Columbia 


6,472 


330,813 


5,080 


223,652 


67.6 


1,150 


98,244 


29.7 


242 


8,917 


2.7 


?lorlda 


24,330 


425,807 


22,343 


322 , 682 


75.8 


1,411 


94,593 


22.2 


576 


8,532 


2.0 


Georgia 


31,310 


484,693 


28,444 


366,164 


75.5 


1,946 


90,483 


18.7 


920 


28,046 


5.8 


Idaho 


5,863 


140,167 


5,137 


107,119 


76.4 


407 


27,892 


19.9 


269 


5,156 


3.7 


Illinois 


98,538 


2,173,069 


88,151 


1,342,807 


61.8 


8,873 


636,477 


29.3 


1.514 


193,785 


8.9 


Indiana 


42,471 


780,508 


38,142 


570,271 


73.1 


3.241 


189,890 


24.3 


1,088 


20,347 


8.6 


Iowa 


38,979 


650,029 


35,314 


514,588 


79.2 


2,234 


115,220 


17.7 


1,431 


20,221 


3.1 


Kansas 


27,433 


448,261 


24,867 


360,954 


80.5 


1,930 


79,731 


17.8 


636 


7,576 


1.7 


Ksntuelcy 


29,286 


388,278 


26,826 


296,105 


76.3 


1,529 


75,801 


19.5 


931 


16,372 


4.2 


Louisiana 


23,189 


344,393 


21,569 


273,685 


79.5 


1,052 


61,284 


17.8 


568 


9,424 


2.7 


Ifalne 


12,766 


232,599 


11,451 


178,559 


76.8 


898 


45,681 


19.6 


417 


8,359 


3.6 


Maryland 


23,349 


462,874 


20,773 


342,697 


74.0 


1,656 


88,888 


19.2 


920 


31.289 


e.e 


Uassachusetts 


55,536 


1,461,180 


46,899 


997,754 


68.3 


7,239 


422,379 


28.9 


1,398 


41,047 


8.8 


Michigan 


61,962 


1,388,236 


54,711 


977,268 


70.4 


5,600 


351,754 


25.3 


1.651 


59,214 


4.3 


Minnesota 


37,495 


820,010 


34,153 


644.960 


78.6 


2,463 


123,577 


15.1 


679 


51,473 


6.3 


Mississippi 


15,136 


178,348 


14,195 


154,197 


86.4 


411 


19,754 


11.1 


530 


4,397 


2.5 


Missouri 


50,927 


946,125 


45,895 


687,617 


72.7 


3,595 


193,563 


20.4 


1,437 


64,945 


6.9 


Montana 


7,944 


189,457 


7,175 


153.928 


B1.2 


466 


28,014 


14.8 


303 


7.515 


4.0 


Nebraska 


19,099 


359,757 


17,393 


291.370 


BJ.O 


1,245 


59,405 


16.5 


461 


8.982 


8.5 


NeTada 


1,709 


43,932 


1,594 


36.795 


83.7 


88 


6,660 


15.2 


27 


477 


1.1 


Hew Hemp Shi re 


7,885 


152,583 


6,401 


115.304 


75.6 


593 


31,447 


20.6 


231 


5,832 


3.8 


New Jersey 


67,798 


1,220,299 


59,481 


888,171 


72.8 


6,060 


306,150 


25.1 


2.257 


25,978 


8.1 


New Mexico 


4,812 


88,751 


4,542 


73,211 


32.5 


224 


14,159 


13.9 


46 


1,381 


1.6 


New York 


204,511 


4,749,708 


178,874 


3,449,410 


72.6 


17,050 


1,186,125 


25.0 


8.587 


114,173 


8.4 


North Carolina 


29,462 


463,219 


27,044 


360,305 


77.8 


1,740 


91,556 


19.8 


678 


11,358 


2.4 


North Dakota 


9,019 


150,208 


8,218 


123,197 


82.0 


575 


23,803 


15.9 


226 


3,208 


2.1 


Ohio 


93,268 


1,956,941 


30,446 


1,397,190 


71.4 


8,263 


469,618 


24.0 


4,559 


90A33 


4.6 


Oklahooa 


26,022 


434,793 


23,985 


335,552 


77.2 


1,647 


93,187 


21.4 


390 


6.054 


1.4 


Oregon 


15,352 


335,851 


13,675 


251,884 


75.0 


986 


59,432 


17.7 


691 


24,5X 


7.3 


PennaylToaia 


129,719 


2,490,910 


113,847 


1,717,123 


68.9 


U,208 


618,866 


24.9 


4,664 


154,921 


6.8 


Rhode Island 


9,095 


219,706 


8,003 


157,925 


71.9 


926 


57,521 


26.2 


166 


4,260 


1.9 


South Carolina 


16,686 


248,206 


15,493 


201,046 


81.0 


883 


40,179 


16.2 


310 


6,981 


2.8 


South Dakota [^ 


9,618 


147,564 


8,658 


117,307 


79.5 


637 


26,696 


18.1 


323 


3,561 


2.4 


Tennessee 1/ 


27,445 


482,586 


24.851 


368,929 


76.5 


1.619 


86,568 


17.9 


936 


27,089 


5.6 


Texas 


71,206 


1,289,264 


65,067 


1,012,875 


78.6 


4,334 


232,475 


18.0 


1,805 


43,914 


3.4 


Utah 


5,839 


132,098 


5,126 


97,097 


73.5 


387 


29,328 


22.2 


326 


5,673 


4.3 


Tenaont 


4,958 


99^21 


4,438 


77.889 


78.6 


363 


18,093 


IB. 3 


163 


3,139 


3.1 


Virginia 1/ 


26,757 


471,329 


24,029 


354.478 


75.2 


1,774 


90,701 


19.2 


954 


£6,150 


5.6 


Washington 


25,086 


528,709 


22,563 


397,603 


75.2 


1,622 


98,950 


ie.7 


901 


32,156 


6.1 


West Virginia 


18,975 


332,190 


16,765 


221,625 


66.7 


1,195 


70,795 


21.3 


1,015 


39,770 


12.0 


Wisconsin 


44,154 


871,832 


40,427 


697,640 


80.0 


2,719 


153,169 


17,6 


1,008 


21,023 


8.4 


Wyonlng 


3,486 


82,681 


3,217 


67,404 


81.5 


180 


12,161 


14.7 


69 


3,116 


3.8 


1/ Figures do not reflect slight revisions 1 


etween types a 


jid individual sta 


te tables. 















Vol. 1 




Page 2 


-16 




























1 

m 

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3 




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5,119 
4,593 
3,222 
13,060 
711 
9,594 
8,932 
8,311 
9,093 


3 


1,998 
3,435 
9,852 
90,778 
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S2'°-'SSSa'-5'~ 


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1 


2,043 
1,701 
1,276 
3,894 
273 
4,563 
3,487 
4,179 
3,600 


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602 

1,333 

4,086 

48,797 

479 


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ii 


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1 

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in 


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11,249 

6,084 

18,433 

73,444 

1,388 


to 

s 




C~ iH .H to Q Q * 


SS-S-SS'S 


hi 


s 


in 


s 

8 


11,360 

2,362 

961 

1,468 

4,935 

30,182 

29,098 

6,965 

1,280 

1,443 

893 


g 

to 


s 

to 


rH to 


1 

in 


1,494 

1,810 
1,069 
3,311 
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1,745 
1,451 
1,352 
2,753 




1,519 

861 

2,167 

10,624 

190 


eg 




o 

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o 

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77,384 

29,214 

10,354 

24,740 

47,300 

318,066 

502,124 

118,908 

10,404 

9,415 

8,U7 


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s 
i 






SS8S§SSS8 


s 


53,172 
12,598 
29,246 
86,818 
2,546 


i 




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o 




s 


5,857 

2,082 

772 

1,769 

3,500 

23,238 

35,738 

8,572 

785 

706 

604 


n 

3 


t^ 


«< 1 (T> 

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1,774 
3,029 
1,555 
4,049 

349 
1,124 

887 
1,183 
3,567 


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3,542 

896 

2,106 

6,398 

186 


g 

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ii 
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o 

s § 


in 

CM 


o 


t> 


rHon«a>oKw)rt«o 


i 

i 


3 


3 S 


eg 


18,437 

47,842 

22,637 

49,081 

3,839 

8,825 

7,461 

11,994 

42,553 


8 


69,034 
13,553 
22,182 
44,278 
1,952 


1 




SS'^SSSJS""' 


i_ 8 

E » S 


o 


CM 


3 


1,021 
917 
309 
729 

1,056 

8,070 
17,296 

3,393 
223 
181 
214 


to 


8 

CM 

eo 




m 


772 

1,971 

933 

2,042 

159 

385 

312 

494 

1,775 


eg 
to 


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t 8 
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f-l 

s 

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3 




g 

8 


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192,530 
21,497 
31.266 
43,649 
3,033 


H 

8 




Sf!'-28SSS'°"'" 


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8 


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o» 
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380 
828 
217 
427 
812 

5,669 
15,258 

2,462 

166 

76 

134 


in 


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to 
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786 
670 
753 
677 
377 
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121 
331 
390 
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443,756 
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3 


81 

855 

88 

136 

288 

2,175 

5,989 

1,060 

66 

51 

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1,325,849 

25,808 

34,744 

10,108 

788 


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CMcnincoo'i'CT'tewtO'o 


385S:3"'°''8 




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to 


lO 


m 
to 
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si«: 


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4,019 

83,752 

1,895 

793 

1,058 

25,381 

92,207 

13,818 

375 

706 

3,313 


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to 

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1 


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1,473,718 

12,460 

4,688 

482 

1,655 






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Candy and confectionery stores 

Dairy pioducts stores ft milh dealers 

Egg and poultry dealers 

Delicatessen stores 

Frutt stores and vegetable markets 

Grocery stores (without meals) 

Combination stores (groceries & meats) 

Meat markets 

Fish markets - seafood 

Baketies and caterers 

Other food stores 


1 
1 

1 


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5 2 
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Mens clothing - furnishings stores 

family clothing stores 

Women's ready-to-wear stores 

furriers and fur shops 

Millinery stores 

Castom tai lors 

Accessories - other apparel stores 

Shoe stores 


• 
• 


Motor-vehicle dealers (H«) 

Used car dealers 

Accessories, tire and bltttry tftaltrt 

Garages 

Other automotive 


J 





Vol. 1 - Page 2-17 



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Vol 1 - Paae 21'' 


CeluM of BiuinoH 

STO 




TABLE 4D - UNITED STATES SUMMARY 












RES WITH LESS THAN $5,000 ANNUAL SALES, BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 












^exclusive of chain 


and maiUorder units) * 














Total 


STORES wn H ANNUAL SAI F,S OF | 


$3,000 lo»4,999 


$2,000 to 


S2.999 


$1,000 tr 


$1,99<( 


Less thnr 


$1,000 


























SlOT« 


Sales 
add 0001 


Stores 


Sales 
add 000 1 


Stores 


Sales 
i.,dd 000) 


Stores 


Sales 

„dil (inn 


Stores 


Sales 

ludd nmi 


UNITtD STATES TOTAL 


679,999 


»1, 461, 604 


201,835 


J797,078 


127,293 


J311,749 


173,720 


1252,587 


177,151 


{130.190 


Percent oi tolal store* and ule* '^ 


44.5 


5.8 


13.2 


3.2 


8.3 


1.2 


11.4 


1.0 


11.6 


.4 


Food ^tpies 


227.570 


470^897 


63,708 


252^379 
33,249 


40,350 
5,600 


98.785 
13,811 


57,927 
8,845 


83,472 


65,58r, 


._ .36,861 


Candy and conlec 1 lonety itotes 


35,060 


65,958 


8,414 


12,601 




6,297 


Dairy products stores t milk dltj 


6,60e 


14,087 


1,820 


7,173 


1,262 


3,129 


1,802 


2,605 


1,724 


1,100 


^g and poultry dealers 


3,317 


5,870 


701 


2,739 


516 


1,254 


833 


1,176 




701 


Delicatessen stores 


1,914 


4,553 


680 


2,691 


392 


972 


458 


661 




223 


Fiuit stores and vejetabie mirhcts 


21,718 


38,617 


4,214 


16,259 


3,740 


9,134 


6,299 


9.072 




4,152 


G'ocery stores (without meats) 


96,2X8 


184,638 


23,354 


91,480 


16,484 


40,048 


25,514 


36,289 


30,865 


16,821 


Combination stores (groceries A meals) 


35,473 


93,615 


14,788 


59,518 


7,471 


18,426 


8,245 


12,443 


4,969 


3,223 


Meal markets 


B,092 


20,614 


3,263 


13,104 


1,637 


4,025 


1,754 


2,601 


1,438 


884 


fish markets - seatood 


4,328 


7,941 


970 


3,780 


739 


1,788 


1,160 


1,622 


1,459 


751 


Bakeries and caterers 


10,007 


27,472 


4,684 


19,172 


1,858 


4,611 


1,837 


2,723 


1,628 


961 


Other food stores 


4,835 


7,532 


820 


3,214 


651 


1,587 


1,180 


1,674 


2,184 


1,057 




21,948 


54,025 


8,213 


32,223 


4,698 


U,413 


5,421 


7,948 


3,616 


2,441 




11,761 


26,360 


3^790 


14,942 


2,326 


5,738 


2,914 


4,149 


2,731 


1.531 


Dry loods & general merchandise stores 


9,605 


21,307 


3,028 


11,929 


1,897 


4,688 


2,401 


3,408 


2,279 


1,282 


Depat tment stores 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Variety. 5-and-lO, & to-a-dollar stores 


2,156 


5,053 


762 


3,013 


429 


1,050 


513 


741 


452 


249 


Apparel group 

Men's lur nishmgs stores 


26,986 


62,635 


8,942 
803 


35.254 


5,654 


14,035 


6,648 


10,125 


5,742 


3,220 


2,043 


5,119 


3,179 


418 


1,046 


442 


669 


380 


225 


Men's clottiirig - furnistiings stores 


1,701 


4,593 


732 


2,972 


363 


892 


409 


512 


197 


117 


Family clothing stores 


1,276 


3,222 


466 


1,905 


269 


661 


290 


515 


251 


141 


Women's ready-lo-weai stores 


5,894 


13,060 


1,832 


7,212 


1,201 


3,012 


1,407 


2,056 


1,454 


780 


Furriers and lur shops 


273 


711 


124 


485 


48 


116 


50 


79 


51 


31 


Mill tnery stores 


4,563 


9,594 


1,311 


5,118 


871 


2,156 


1,114 


1,618 


1,267 


702 


Custom tailors 


3,457 


8,932 


1.264 


4,941 


896 


2,207 


935 


1,536 


362 


248 


Accessories - other apparel stores 


4,179 


8,311 


990 


3,864 


826 


2,046 


1,175 


1,807 


1,188 


594 


Shoe stores 


3,600 


9,093 


1,420 


5,578 


762 


1,899 


826 


1,234 


592 




Automotive group 


52,267 


107,133 


13,303 


52,000 


9,816 


23,762 


15,564 


22,766 


13,584 


8,605 


Motor-vehicle dealers ( new) 


602 


1,995 


353 


1,518 


116 


286 


194 


168 


29 


23 


Used car dealers 


1,333 


3,435 


573 


2,206 


235 


572 


338 


529 


187 


128 


Accessories, tire and battery dealers 


4,056 


9,852 


1,469 


5,815 


866 


2,114 


992 


1,462 


729 


441 


Garages 


45,797 


90,778 


10,753 


41 ,857 


8,506 


20,562 


14,016 


20,421 


12,522 


7,938 


Other automotive 


479 


1,073 


155 


604 


93 


228 


114 


166 


117 


75 




85,496 


193,244 


27,995 


110,462 


16,592 


40,443 


21,133 


30,962 


19,776 


11,387 


Fumiture-hoiuehold groiv 


14,424 


32,121 


4,707 


18,379 


2.844 


6,975 


3,339 


4,911 
1,315 


3,534 


1,856 


3;a7i 


9,354 


1,443 


5,612 


793 


1,958 


883 


752 


469 


Floor coverings-drapery stores 


788 


1,862 


279 


1,106 


178 


430 


177 


254 


154 


72 


Household appliance and radio stores 


3,475 


8,711 


1,373 


5,356 


784 


1,942 


762 


1,110 


556 


303 


Radto dealers 


2,222 


4,642 


601 


2,347 


451 


1,109 


590 


869 


580 


317 


Oltier home lucmshings stores 


4,068 


7,552 


1,011 


3,958 


638 


1,536 


927 


l,3o3 


1,452 


695 




17,344 


42.710 


6.528 


25,871 


3,586 


8.853 


4,072 


6.062 


3,158 


1.924 


Lumber & bui tdi ng-mater lal dealers 


2,405 


5,419 


793 


3,161 


452 


1,134 


563 


813 


597 


311 


Haidware stores 


7,542 


19,809 


3,094 


12,379 


1,641 


4,071 


1,695 


2,627 


1,U2 




Hardware & farm implement dealers 


1,551 


4,043 


706 


2,762 


279 


687 


326 


455 


240 


139 


Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


1,598 


4,054 


659 


2,589 


315 


765 


390 


564 


234 






3,586 


7,867 


1,070 


4,156 


745 


1,831 


932 


1,361 


£39 


517 


Electrical supply stores 


662 


1,508 


206 


822 


154 


365 


166 


242 


135 


79 


Eating and drinking pUces 

Restaurants -cafeterias -lunch rooms 


128,725 


280,398 


39,237 


155,586 


24,187 


59,144 


32,828 


47,596 


.12,473 


19,070 


51,549 


115,039 


16,299 


65,678 


9,414 


23,109 


12,988 


18,924 


12,848 


7,328 


Lunch counters, refreshment stands 


27,432 


45,734 


5,432 


a, 096 


4,037 


9,737 


6,927 


9,713 


11,035 


5,188 


Dr 1 nki ng places 


49,744 


U9,625 


17,506 


68,812 


10,736 


26,298 


12,913 


18,961 


8,589 


5,554 


Drug stores 

Drug stores with fountain 


8,608 


24,653 


4,299 


17,543 


1,721 


4,343 


1,532 


2,322 


1,056 


645 


3,583 


11,609 


2,151 


8,851 


711 


1,822 


506 


789 


215 


147 


Drug stores wrthout fountain 


5,025 


13,244 


2,148 


8,692 


1,010 


2,521 


1,026 


1,533 


841 


498 




67,508 


138,632 


18,109 


70,828 


12,811 


31,698 


17,595 


25j496 


18,993 


10,620 




450 


1,060 


141 


551 


U8 


297 


121 


171 


70 


41 


Book stores 


1,136 


2,380 


325 


1,270 


203 


508 


306 


438 


302 


164 


Cigar stores and cigar stands 


7,381 


15,991 


2,175 


8,520 


1,404 


3,432 


2,025 


2,948 


1,777 


1,091 


Florists 


6,208 


12,886 


1,718 


6,731 


1,179 


2,917 


1,575 


2,285 


1,736 


953 


Fuel and ice dealers 


18,264 


31,552 


3,279 


12,671 


3,144 


8,005 


5,101 


7,232 


6,740 


3,644 


Gift, novelty, souvenir shops 


3,774 


6,610 


817 


3,157 


573 


1,382 


971 


1,415 


1,413 


656 


Hay. gram, feed stores (witlfout groc.) 
Hay, grain and teed stores (with groc.) 


2,600 


5,965 


885 


3,467 


521 


1,257 


505 


887 


589 


354 


Farm and garden supply stores 


3,477 


7,760 


1,067 


4,144 


791 


1,908 


866 


1,246 


753 


452 


Jewelry stores 


4,436 


11,789 


1,845 


7,288 


lj05a 


2,640 


1,000 


1,503 


533 


358 


Luggage stores 


244 


583 


86 


338 


51 


124 


65 


92 


42 


29 


News dealers 


3,308 


6,907 


912 


3,574 


614 


1,499 


893 


1,312 


889 


522 


Sporting goods stores 


754 


1,641 


236 


918 


139 


339 


188 


275 


191 


109 


Beer t liquor stores Ipacliagedl 


3,563 


8,403 


1,264 


5,03C 


652 


1,633 


893 


1,331 


754 


409 


Other classifications 


11,913 


25,105 


3,359 


13,169 


2,364 


5,757 


2,986 


4,351 


3,204 




Second-hand ttorca 


17 ,362 


28,596 


3,004 


11, 6U 


2,708 


6,560 


4,747 


6,795 


6,903 


3,530 















I / Peiccsu r«lai« i 



Vol. 1 - Page 2 ■ 20 





Census of Business 
























Retail Distnbulion: 1935 




TABLE 4L - UNITED STATES SUMMARY 














STORES WITH LESS THAN $5,000 ANNUAL SALES. 


BY STATES 














(exclusive of chain and mail- 


order units) 














Division and State 


T 


>tal 




STORES WITH ANNUAL SALES OF | 




$3,000 


$4,999 


$2,000 


o $2,999 


$L000 


o $1,999 


Less than $1,000 




Slores 


Sales 


Stores 


Sales 


Slores 


Sales 


Stores 


Sales 


Slores 


Sales 








(add 000) 




(add 0001 




(add 000) 




(add 000) 




(add 000) 




TOTJU. FOR UNTPED aTATES 
Psrcent of total etoras and aales 1/ 


679,999 


11,461,604 


201,835 


»797,078 


127,293 


»311,749 


173,720 


$252,587 


177,151 


$100,190 




44.5 


5.8 


13.2 


3.2 


8.3 


1.2 


U.4 


1.0 


U.6 


.4 




Conaeetlcut 


37,116 


85,980 


• 12,418 


49,204 


7,464 


18,482 


9,211 


13,536 


8,0ES 


4,7Se 




8,084 


19,782 


3,035 


12,200 


1,581 


3,955 


1,831 


2,650 


1,637 






Maine 


4,840 


10,634 


1,461 


5,705 


1,002 


2,429 


1,273 


1,855 


1,104 






Massachuaetts 


16,788 


38,995 


5,594 


22,149 


3,435 


8,561 


4,162 


6,174 


3,597 






New HampaMre 


2,441 


5,313 


731 


2,818 


476 


1,170 


646 


949 


568 


376 




Rhode Island 


3,265 


7,614 


1,064 


4,344 


651 


1,607 


842 


1,247 


688 


416 




Teimoat 


1,698 


3,642 


513 


1,988 


319 


760 


457 


661 


409 


233 




MIDDLE ATLAOTIO 
New Jersey 


153,342 


338,228 


46,473 


183,301 


30,158 


74,610 


40,482 


58,529 


36,229 


21,768 




26,916 


59,524 


8,195 


32,330 


5,172 


12,809 


7.221 


10,392 


6,328 


3,993 




Ne» yorli 


68,490 


158,532 


22,475 


88,778 


14,022 


34,785 


17,838 


26,187 


14,156 


8,782 




Peaoaylyanla 


57,936 


120,172 


15,603 


62,193 


10,964 


27,016 


15,423 


21,960 


15,746 


9,013 




EJlSr NOKTIi CQfTRAL 
Illlaols 


139,679 


308,422 


42,846 


168,872 


27,270 


67,255 


35,624 


52,413 


33,939 


19,862 




45,284 


99,311 


13,320 


52,653 


9,099 


22,470 


12,109 


17,932 


10,756 


6,256 




Indiana 


16,124 


39,798 


5,513 


21,682 


3,549 


8,749 


4,406 


6,493 


4,654 


2,874 




MieUlgan 


24,565 


55,889 


7,943 


31,374 


4,886 


12,054 


6,090 


9,060 


5,646 


3,401 




Ohio 


36,337 


76,326 


10,423 


40,893 


6,677 


16,453 


9,352 


13,456 


9,885 


5,524 




Wleconaln 


15,369 


37,098 


5,647 


22,270 


3,059 


7,529 


3.665 


5,472 


2,998 


1,827 




WEST meas cehtral 


77,334 


168,508 


24,066 


94,674 


14,266 


34,818 


19,146 


27,968 


19,906 


11,048 




Iowa 


15,548 


32,053 


4,473 


17,491 


2,802 


6,925 


3,670 


5,307 


4,603 


2,330 




Kansas 


11,409 


24,832 


3,683 


14,336 


1,888 


4,552 


2,949 


4,335 


2,889 


1,609 




Minnesota 


12,653 


29,953 


4,425 


17 , 700 


2,492 


6,071 


3,075 


4,545 


2,661 


1,637 




Mlsaourl 


23,639 


49,480 


6,752 


26,469 


4,363 


10,662 


6,076 


6,825 


6,446 


3,624 




Ilebraslca 


7,040 


15,923 


2,324 


9,195 


1,336 


3,236 


1,753 


2,552 


1,627 


940 




North Daicota 


3,415 


7,761 


1,151 


4,514 


638 


1,561 


800 


1,176 


826 


500 




South Dakota 


3,680 


8,516 


1,258 


4,969 


747 


1,811 


823 


1,228 


852 


508 




SOOTH JITLANTIO 
Delaware 


84,906 


168,446 


22,052 


86,220 


14,911 


36,210 


21,850 


31,547 


26,093 


14,469 




2,051 


3,700 


475 


1,854 


293 


727 


502 


684 


781 


435 




District of ColuiDbla 


1,189 


2,889 


444 


1,802 


231 


556 


291 


419 


223 


112 




Florida 


11,565 


23,408 


3,U3 


12,250 


2,029 


4,955 


2,963 


4,300 


3,460 


1,903 




Georgia 


15,873 


28,343 


3,523 


13,800 


2,536 


6,161 


3,973 


5,571 


5,841 


2,811 




Maryland 


10,333 


22,885 


3,157 


12,485 


1,984 


4,854 


2,850 


4,127 


2,342 


1,419 




North Carolina 


14,802 


28,498 


3,739 


14,476 


2,603 


6,233 


3,766 


5,361 


4,694 


2,428 




South Carolina 


7,924 


14,659 


1,817 


7,041 


1,319 


3,230 


2,046 


3,024 


2,742 


1,364 




Tlrglnlo 


12,447 


25,751 


3,347 


13,012 


2,246 


5,438 


3,201 


4,786 


3,651 


2,515 




West Virginia 


8,722 


18,313 


2,437 


9,600 


1,668 


4,056 


2,258 


3,275 


2,359 


1,482 




EAST SOOTH CEHTRAL 
Alabama 


48,024 


91,192 


11,577 


45,367 


8,237 


19,707 


12.706 


17,942 


15,504 


8,176 




11,007 


21,254 


2,677 


10,653 


1,972 


4,741 


2,871 


4,057 


3,487 


l,e03 




Kentucky 


16,119 


29,528 


3,712 


14,356 


2,649 


6,231 


4,273 


6,037 


5,485 


2,904 




lUselsslppi 


8,598 


14,782 


1,779 


6,948 


1,314 


3,139 


2,245 


3,138 


3,260 


1,657 




Tenneesea 


12,300 


25,628 


3,409 


13,410 


2,302 


5,596 


3,317 


4,710 


3,272 


1,912 




WEST SOITTE COrniAL 
ArlEansaa 


67,219 


134,855 


18,473 


73,038 


10,943 


26,375 


16,908 


24,549 


20,895 


10,893 




9,363 


17,125 


2,274 


8,791 


1,468 


3,471 


2,270 


3,283 


3,351 


1,SS0 




Louisiana 


12,468 


26,197 


3,716 


14,840 


2,016 


4,943 


3,054 


4,422 


3,660 


1,992 




Oldahooa 


12,470 


25,389 


3,562 


14,089 


2,017 


4,813 


3,206 


4,592 


3,665 


1,895 




Texas 


32,918 


66,144 


6,921 


35,318 


5,440 


13,148 


6,376 


12,252 


10,179 


5,426 




MOm/TAIM 
Arizona 


18.338 


39,340 


5,553 


22,083 


3,391 


8,215 


4,447 


6,440 


4,947 


2,602 




2,031 


4,178 


567 


2,290 


354 


853 


506 


735 


604 


SCO 




Colorado 


5,642 


12,044 


1,699 


6,713 


1,086 


2,636 


1,307 


1,900 


1,550 


798 




Idaho 


1,842 


4,402 


687 


2,725 


351 


847 


409 


589 


395 


£41 




Montana 


2,466 


5,553 


798 


3,209 


429 


1,071 


659 


958 


580 


315 




Nevada 


600 


1,341 


196 


780 


99 


227 


186 


263 


119 


71 




New Meilco 


2,310 


4,284 


565 


2,199 


398 


964 


546 


751 


601 


370 




Utah 


2,276 


4,868 


667 


2,652 


434 


1,036 


557 


626 


618 


354 




Wyoming 


1,171 


2,670 


374 


1,515 


240 


581 


277 


418 


280 


156 




PAcmo 

California 


53,991 


126,633 


18,377 


74,319 


10,653 


26,077 


13,346 


19,663 


11,615 


6,574 




39,149 


92,479 


13,363 


54,445 


7,7« 


19,003 


9,721 


14,320 


8,321 


4,711 




Oregon 


5,690 


12,658 


1,845 


7,302 


1,037 


2,524 


1,430 


2,065 


1,378 


767 




Weahioeton 


9,162 


21,496 


3,169 


12,572 


1,872 


4,550 


2,195 


3,279 


1,916 


1,096 




1/ PeiMBU ftIsM to lolal Moral and mI«> «• thown on 


Pa«a IS8 



































Vol. 1 - 


Page 2-21 


Cetouj of BwrMM 

Rclul DUtribullon: 193S 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY' 










TABLE 4 F- STORES WITH SAIF.S OF $300,000 OR MORE, BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 










lrulepcncient& 


Chains and Others 












Total 


Stores with annual sales of ] 


ii.smsso 


$500,000 to 


MOO.OOO to 1 


Kind of Bu»ineM 






. u.d 


»ei 


S999.999 


$499 


999 


Number 




Number 




Number 










of 


Sales 


of 


Sales 


ol 


Sales 


ol 


Sales 




iiSISl 


(add 0001 


Horn 


(add 000) 


stores 


(add 000 j 




(add OOOJ 


UNITED STATES TOTAL 


e.M4 


16.879,637 


1.062 


♦3.365.513 


2.604 


tl. 675. 609 


4.878 




Food Stores 


91S 


689,971 


122 


213,321 


271 


182,858 


B20 


193,792 


Candy and confectionery stores 


11 


6,230 


1 


1,576 


3 


1,950 


7 


2,704 


Dairy products stores A mitk (tirs. 


SS6 


306,740 


90 


163,641 


133 


92,262 


133 


50,837 


in and poul try dealers 


5 


1,895 


._ 











9 


1,899 


Delicatessen stores 


2 


793 














e 


798 


Fruit stores and vefetable markets 


* 


1,616 


— 


— 


1 


«08 


3 


1,098 


Grocery stores (without meats) 


90 


43,793 


5 


7,8S1 


21 


12,779 


64 


23,193 


Combination stores (|roceries & meats) 


589 


203,287 


25 


39,119 


100 


66,915 


264 


97,263 


Meat markets 


S7 


15,999 


— 





7 


4,674 


30 


11,326 


Fish markets - seafood 


1 


375 


— 


— 


— 





1 


375 


Bakeries and caterers 


9 


4,788 


1 


1,124 


£ 


1,187 


6 


2,477 


Other food stores 


9 


4,405 


— 


— 


4 


2,485 


9 


1,922 


Cenenl S<ore> I with ioodl 


99 


43,628 


1 


1,815 


21 


13,155 


77 


£6,668 




1,999 


3,143,138 


524 


2,422,942 


540 


365,801 


939 


354,395 


Dry goods & general merchandise stores 


U 


25,775 


4 


6,362 


14 


9,664 


26 


9,759 


Depar tment stores 


1,515 


2,874,740 


488 


2,S72,U1 


375 


259,240 


662 


247,389 


Variety, 5-and-lO. t 10 adollar stores 


440 


242,623 


32 


44,479 


151 


100,897 


257 


97,247 


ApfMrel group 


691 


543,001 


110 


258,887 


207 


142,068 


374 


142,056 


Men's fur nishi ngs stores 


13 


8,107 


— 


— 


8 


6,116 


5 


1,991 


Men's clothing - furnishings stores 


175 


104,028 


19 


28,067 


50 


35,817 


106 


40,194 


Fami ly clothi ng stores 


1S8 


122,007 


24 


70,234 


38 


26,039 


66 


25,734 


Women's ready-to-wear stores 


zee 


255,126 


62 


152,291 


85 


97,011 


121 


45,824 


Furriers and fur shops 


15 


11,548 


8 


5,549 


4 


2,868 


8 


3,131 


Ml III nery stores 


5 


1,913 


— 


_. 








5 


1,913 


Custom tailors 


6 


3,126 


1 


1,330 








5 


1,796 


Accessories - other apparel stores 


4 


2,768 


1 


1,426 


1 


547 


2 


799 


Shoe stores 


77 


34,378 


— 


~ 


21 


13,660 


66 


20,718 




2,956 


1,623,954 


204 


301,865 


969 


645,315 


1,783 


676,774 


Motor-vehidt dealers (new) 


2,883 


1,593,337 


202 


299;468 


959 


639,397 


1,722 


664,472 


Used-car dealers 


29 


14,330 


2 


2,397 


7 


4,352 


20 


7,601 


Accessories, lire and battery dealers 


58 


14,150 








3 


1,586 


39 


12,564 


Garages 


1 


482 


— 


— 


— 





1 


482 


Other automotive 


5 


1,655 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


1,656 


Pilling itatione 


32 


13,708 


~ 


- 


8 


4,749 


24 


8,959 




420 


253,429 


37 


74,482 


114 


77,092 


269 


101,856 


Fur ni lure stores 


E81 


169,420 


24 


48,267 


74 


50,817 


183 


70,336 


Floor coverings-drapery stores 


15 


9,912 


1 


2,977 


5 


3,354 


9 


3,581 


Household appliance and radio stores 


96 


54,623 


8 


14,098 


SO 


19,238 


58 


21,287 


Radio dealers 


10 


3,947 


— 


— 


2 


1,223 


8 


2,724 


Other home furnishings stores 


18 


15,527 


4 


9,140 


S 


2,460 


U 


3,927 


Lumb«r-building-hardw«re group 


275 


124,461 


6 


8,282 


66 


41,125 


203 


79,094 


Lumber & bui 1 di ng -mater lal dealers 


172 


77,754 


4 


5,846 


37 


23,402 


131 


48,506 


Hardware stores 


49 


22,559 


1 


1,220 


13 


8,102 


35 


13,237 


Hardware & farm implement dealers 


41 


17,793 


— 


.- 


12 


7,142 


29 


10,651 


Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


8 


4,659 


1 


1,216 


4 


2,479 


3 


964 


Paint, glass, wall paper stores 


5 


1,696 


.. 


— 








9 


1,696 


Electrical supply stores 


— 


~ 


~ 


— 


— 


— 


~ 




Eating and drinking placet 


207 


94,625 


S 


3,873 


62 


38,396 


142 


52,366 


Restaurants -cafeterias-lunch rooms 


196 


89,448 


3 


3,873 


67 


35,553 


136 


50,022 


Lunch counters, refreshment stands 


4 


1,723 


— 


— 


1 


527 


3 


1,196 


Dr 1 nhi ng places 


7 


3,454 


— 


~ 


4 


2.316 


3 


1,138 


Drug stores 


89 


45,288 


9 


11,401 


16 


U,657 


64 


22,230 


Drug stcjres with fountai n 


75 


40,295 


9 


U,401 


16 


10,971 


51 


17,883 


Drug stores without fountain 


14 


5,033 


— 


— 


1 


686 


13 


4,347 


Other retail ttores 


760 


402,101 


49 


67,007 


230 


153,399 


485 


181,695 


Bicycleshops 


— 


— 


— 


— 


•-- 


— 


— 


— 


Book stores 


21 


11,070 


2 


2,S72 


5 


3,183 


14 


6,519 


Cigar stores and cigar stands 


4 


1,347 


— 


— 


— 




4 


1,847 


Florists 


2 


924 


— 


— 


1 


596 


1 


328 


Fuel and ice dealers 


353 


204,370 


30 


46,136 


120 


81,322 


203 


76,912 


Gift, novelty, souvenir shops 


— 


— 


.. 


— 











__ 


Hay. gram, feed stores (without groc.) 


















Hay. gram and feed stores (with groc.) 


40 


16 , 337 


1 


1,048 


7 


3,857 


32 


11,432 


Farm and garden supply stores 


40 


22,681 


t 


2,585 


20 


13,587 


18 


6,909 


Jewel ry stores 


57 


28,671 


3 


5,195 


11 


6,981 


43 


16,939 


Luggage stores 


3 


1,364 


.- 


^. 


1 


695 


2 


769 


News dealers 


3 


1,157 


_. 


._ 


__ 





3 


1,157 


Spor ti ng goods stores 


4 


1,940 








2 


1,326 


2 


614 


Beer & liquor stores (packaged) 


144 


67,400 


1 


1,118 


45 


29-, 370 


98 


36,912 


Othei c lassi t icat ions 


89 


44,840 


6 


8,693 


18 


12,682 


69 


23,668 


Second-hand etore* 


3 


2,333 


1 


1,638 


„_ 


„ 


2 


695 


Second-hand stores - clothing & shoe 








__ 


__ 


__ 


._ 






Second-hand furniture 


— 


— 

















__ 


Second hand tires, accessories t pads 


— 


— 











__ 


,_ 


__ 


Pawn shops 


1 


379 








__ 


__ 


1 


379 


Second-hand stores other 


2 


1,904 


1 


1,636 


— 


— 


1 


S16 


■ F. cnDplM uU. ,J amwt %n4 ■•W. Vy .a, ^ Mm, m. 


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Vol. 1 - Page 2 - 24 



Census of Buiine» 






















Retail Distnbution: 1935 




TABLE 4 H - UNITED STATES SUMMARY 










CHAINS AND MAIL-ORDER 


- STORES WITH LESS THAN $5,000 ANNUAL SALES 














BY KINDS 


OF BUSINESS 














Tot.1 


STORES WITH ANNUAL SALES OF ] 


• $3,000 to $4,999 


$2,000 to $2,999 


$1,000 to $1,999 


Less than $1,000 1 


Kind o( Business 






















Stores 


5ale> 


Stores 


Sales 


Stores 


Sales 


Stores 


Sales 


Stores 


Sales 






(add 000) 




(add 000) 




(add OOO) 




ladd 000) 




(add 000) 


UNITED STATES TOTAL 


6.385 


♦17.557 


2.824 


J11.524 


1.381 


i3.609 


1.254 


tl.894 


926 


*630 


Percent ol total storet and »ale» 1/ 


5.0 


.2 


















Food Stores 

Caritjy anfl conlechonery stores 


1,745 


6,151 


869 


3.467 


387 


1.063 


311 


512 


188 


119 


169 


460 


75 


307 


34 


84 


40 


62 


10 


7 


Daity products stores & milk d<rs 


661 


1,910 


334 


1,312 


152 


379 


120 


186 


56 


33 


Egg and poul try dealers 


5 


16 


2 


9 


2 


6 


1 


1 






Delicatessen stores 


9 


23 


3 


11 


4 


10 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Fruil stores and vegetable marhets 


28 


65 


9 


36 


5 


12 


6 


10 


8 


7 


Grocery stores [without meats) 


314 


939 


129 


518 


79 


396 


59 


97 


47 


28 


Combination stores (groceries 4 meats) 


229 


642 


101 


415 


44 


U4 


46 


90 


38 


23 


Meat markets 


50 


150 


24 


95 


16 


40 


7 


12 


3 


3 


F ish markets - seafood 


9 


20 


3 


12 


2 


6 


._ 




4 


3 


Baker les and caterers 


251 


865 


172 


726 


46 


100 


17 


28 


16 


11 


Other food stores 


30 


61 


7 


26 


3 


7 


14 


25 


6 


3 


General Stores (with food) 

General merchandise group 

Dry goods & general merchandise stores 


49 


140 


20 


75 


20 


63 


8 


12 


1 


... 


114 


353 


62 


250 


32 


80 


13 


20 


7 


3 


56 


161 


29 


U7 


12 


29 


9 


12 


6 


3 


Department stores 


— 


— 


— 


„ 


.. 





.- 


__ 





.„ 


Variety. 5-and-lO, i to-a-dollar stores 


58 


192 


33 


133 


20 


51 


4 


8 


1 


- 


Apparel Kroup 


604 


1.657 


269 


1,112 


121 


324 


121 


177 


93 


44 


IVIen's lur r.ishi ngs stores 


12 


51 


3 


13 


2 


28 


4 


8 


5 


2 


filen's clothing - furnishings stores 


10 


25 


4 


17 


1 


2 


4 


6 


1 


.» 


Fami ly clothi ng stores 


12 


36 


6 


25 


2 


S 


4 


6 


._ 


_ 


Women's ready-to-wear stores 


U6 


290 


44 


203 


21 


61 


23 


28 


28 


8 


Furriers and fur shops 


-. 


.. 














.. 


.- 








Ml 1 1 inery stores 


288 


829 


146 


583 


53 


135 


59 


93 


31 


18 


Custom tailors 


^^ 





.- 











.- 


.. 


-. 





Accessories - other apparel stores 


42 


121 


21 


86 


10 


25 


4 


6 


7 


4 


Shoe stores 


124 


305 


46 


186 


32 


78 


23 


30 


23 


12 


Automotive group 


171 


596 


95 


446 


32 


88 


44 


62 








Motor-vehicle dealers ( new) 


8 


26 


6 


24 


_« 


«« 


2 


2 


„ 





Used-car dealers 


,_ 








__ 





__ 


,. 


_ 


,_ 


— 


Accessories, tire and battery dealers 


161 


561 


97 


413 


32 


88 


42 


60 


— 


— 


Garages 


2 


9 


2 


9 


-. 


-- 


— 


~~ 


.- 


— 


Other automotive 


~ 


— ' 


~ 


" 


— 


— 


~ 


~ 


- 


— 


Filling stations 

Furniture-household group 

Furniture stores 


1,528 


4.232 


689 


2,866 


327 


81S 


294 


452 


21S 


106 


93 


245 


45 


172 


15 


38 


12 


20 


21 


16 


3 


13 


4 


12 


— 


.- 


— ' 


" 


1 


1 


Flocr cover 1 ngs -draper y stores 


3 


8 


2 


7 





.. 


1 


1 


— 


— 


Household appliance and radio stores 


81 


213 


37 


144 


14 


36 


11 


19 


19 


14 


Radio dealers 








— 





— 


.- 


.- 


— 


-- 


— 


Other home furnishings stores 


4 


11 


2 


9 


1 


2 


— 


- 


1 


— 


Lumber-building hardware group 

Lumber & bu 1 1 dt ng mater ial dealers 


366 


1,142 


203 


863 


66 


161 


58 


89 


39 


29 


210 


748 


140 


613 


39 


97 


17 


28 


14 


10 


Ha'dware stores 


43 


131 


26 


101 


6 


16 


8 


12 


3 


3 


Hardware S. farm implement dealers 





._ 


__ 





— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


37 


88 


10 


41 


9 


22 


12 


22 


6 


3 


Pamt glass, wal 1 -paper stores 


68 


167 


27 


108 


12 


27 


13 


19 


16 


13 


Electt ical supply stores 


8 


8 


— 


~ 


— 


" 


8 


8 


— 


— 


Ealing and dnnlting places 


445 


1,163 


168 


630 


140 


350 


102 


164 


36 


19 


Reslauranls -cafeterias -lunch rooms 


293 


762 


101 


381 


102 


262 


72 


119 


18 


10 


Lunch counters, refreshment stands 


144 


390 


65 


241 


37 


96 


29 


44 


13 


9 


Drinking places 


8 


11 


2 


8 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


— 


Drua stores 

Diug St les wi Ih fountain 


58 


140 


21 


82 


14 


31 


13 


18 


10 


9 


24 


68 


14 


52 


3 


7 


3 


5 


4 


4 


Drug stores wi Ihout tountai n 


34 


72 


7 


30 


11 


24 


10 


13 


6 


6 


Other retail stores 


1,194 


2.695 


388 


1.553 


221 


595 


274 


361 


311 


ISS 


Bicycleshop: 


4 


9 


2 


6 


1 


2 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Book s lore: 


29 


96 


11 


64 


10 


28 


8 


14 


" 


~ 


Cigar stores ^nd cigar stands 


55 


149 


28 


109 


10 


28 


4 


7 


13 


6 


Florists 


12 


49 


8 


40 


3 


8 


1 


1 


— 


— 


Fuel and ice dealers 


297 


524 


66 


218 


41 


109 


91 


117 


110 


80 


Gift, novelty, souvenif shops 


18 


45 


4 


19 


11 


23 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Hay, gram feed stores (without groc.) 


47 


109 


16 


69 


10 


25 


13 


18 


9 


7 


H^y gram and feed stores (with groc ) 


.. 


„ 




.. 


— 


— 


" 


— 


-- 


— 


Fsrm and garden supply stores 


16 


34 


4 


17 


4 


11 


1 


2 


7 


4 


Jewel ry stores 


16 


47 


7 


31 


6 


14 


1 


1 


2 


1 


Luggage stores 


I 


6 


1 


6 


__ 


_. 


— 


.. 


— 


— 


News dealers 


484 


1.066 


161 


631 


92 


234 


98 


123 


133 


68 


Sporting goods stores 





__ 


_- 


— 


— 


-- 


-- 


-- 


— 


" 


Beer f. liQuor stores (packaged) 


35 


101 


19 


79 


4 


10 


6 


9 


6 


3 


Other classi heat ions 


IflO 


471 


73 


286 


29 


104 


49 


67 


29 


15 


Second hand stores 

Second hand stores - clothing & shoe 


18 


43 


5 


18 


6 


17 


4 


7 


3 


1 


4 


10 


3 


10 





_. 


,„ 


.. 


1 





Second hand lumiiure 


4 


12 


._ 




4 


12 


„ 


„ 




__ 


Second hand tires, accessories & parts 


1 


I 





__ 






..^ 





1 


1 


Pawn shops 


__ 




__ 







_. 


__ 


_. 







Second-hand itores jt*>ef 


9 


20 


2 


8 


2 


6 


4 


7 


1 




1/ P«tc«nU lalaK to ioi*l tiorci ■n<t >«lti, by kj. a> » 


*-n on pa(« 


S4 



















Vol. I 



ge 2-25 



Cenius of BusineM 


















R...,l DUiribufor: 1935 TABLE 5A . UNITED SlATES SUMMARY-OPEN ACCOUNT, INSTALMENT, AND CASH SALES. 








B'Y 


KINDS OF BUSINESS 












All 


alorea 


Sloit* reporting cajh-ctcdit analyeia ul kiIc* ] 












Cash and 


1 






Total aatea 1/ 




Open-aecnunt >iilr« 


Instalmenl saira 


C 0. D. lales 


Kind of Buiinesa 


Number 


Total 






total 
■alea 
<\ sit 
•l.re. 




Per- 




Per- 




Per- 




of 


■ain 1/ 


ol 


Amount 


Amount 


cent 
of 


Amount 


cent 
ol 


Amount 


cent 

oi 




•torrj 




itorer 


;.,H r.fi:.. : 


.»d,l O'JC, 


Ml.l 


,fdd 000. , "««' 


\'4A I'^o, 


total 


PROJECTED UNITED STATES TOTALS- 


1.653.961 


Vt33.0il.40l, 




1 


»7. 041. 292 


£1.3 


»3. 598. 954 


10.'.; 


»22,371,lsU 


67.6 


TOTALS _AhALYZED 
Food uotM: 






1,486,029 


♦27,63e.:.'.-. 


M.i 














53E,010 


8,351,892 


490,372 


7,4C3,12£ 


M.9 


1,584,196 


21.1 


„ 


.. 


9,ei^,«34 


78.9 
97.8 


Cindy antJ conlec tionety slo;*s 


55,197 


31£,587 


50.036 


282,34-? 


90.3 


6,188 


2.2 


— 


— 


276,161 


DSFTy products stores & mrik deale'S 


16,580 


573,277 


14,984 


439,666 


75.4 


258,700 


5d.e 


— 


— 


130,966 


41.2 


Egg tnd poultry dealers 


5,7«7 


32,338 


9,228 


49,341 


36.6 


5,199 


U.! 


— 


— 


40,142 


88.0 


Oelicetessen stores 


6,584 


88,548 


5,955 


80,183 


90.6 


3,084 


3.8 


-- 


.- 


77,099 


96.2 


Fruit stores and vegetable markets 


52 , 652 


215,679 


29,880 


193,562 


89.7 


11,471 


5.9 


— 


— 


182,091 


94.1 


Grocery stores Iwilhout meats) 


186,758 


2,199,865 


174,254 


1,932,173 


87.8 


306,800 


15.9 


— 


— 


1,625,573 


84.1 


Combination stores l^ioct;rtes & meats) 


166,233 


4,146,520 


199,024 


3,754,592 


90.5 


870,075 


23.2 


— 


» 


2,684,517 


76.8 


Meat markets 


32,555 


965,096 


30,519 


923,580 


92.7 


80,911 


15.8 


.. 


.. 


442,669 


84.0 


Fish markets - seafood 


6,919 


46,705 


6,293 


41,726 


89.3 


5,899 


14.1 


— 


— 


35,827 


S5.9 


Bakeries and caterers 


14,150 


99,716 


12,135 


87,078 


87.3 


6,677 


7.7 


— 


— 


80,401 


42.3 


Ottier food stores 


6,905 


49,065 


6,256 


42,872 


67.4 


:,3»4 


21.9 


— 


~ 


33,47S 


78.1 


GencTftl atoics (with food 2.: 


66,701 


1.106.506 


63,768 


1,036,620 


93.7 


56);, 133 


34.0 


10,496 


1.0 


674,051 


£5.0 


Geneial merchuidiac group: 

Dry goods A general mercliandise stoies 


44,651 


4.589,487 


41,350 


4,123,750 


89.9 


832.778 


20.2 


290,891 


7.0 


3,000^321 


72,6 


28,709 


516,507 


26,479 


476,475 


90.9 


56,997 


12.0 


9,331 


1.9 


U0,147 


85,1 


Depar Iment stores 


4,201 


3,279,111 


3,679 


2,883,370 


38.1 


774,653 


26.8 


281,320 


9.7 


1,833,387 


63.5 


Variety. S t 10. 1 lo-a-dollar stores 


11,741 


779,859 


11.192 


758,909 


97.3 


1.113 


.1 


"" 


~ 


797,787 


99.9 


App«rd fioup: 

Men's fur nisfii ngs stores 


95,958 


2.645,034 


85,535 


2,378,590 


89.9 


498,227 


15.3 


82,768 


3,6 


1,8!7,59S 


77.2 


7,718 


143,385 


6,938 


128,485 


39.6 


10,872 


8.5 


25 


— 


117,588 


91.51 


Men's clotliini - turnisliingi stores 


13,1*8 


514,630 


12,238 


472,971 


91.9 


111,875 


23.7 


7,237 


1.3 


353,832 


74.8 


Family cictnmg stores 


7,881 


356,256 


7,206 


320,237 


89.9 


79,089 


23.4 


54,430 


17.0 


190,768 


59.8 


tVomen's ready-to-wear stores 


21,975 


789,334 


20,195 


705,063 


89.3 


173,677 


24.6 


11,2S1 


1.6 


OK), 130 


73.8 


Fur r ler s and fur strops 


1,535 


59,749 


1,285 


91,450 


85.1 


17,720 


94.4 


8,473 


16.5 


29,267 


49.1 


Mil linery stores 


9,566 


31,296 


8,788 


37.108 


92.4 


6,282 


7.2 


— 




90,826 


92.8 


Custom tai:ors 


6,559 


66,948 


4,132 


50.517 


73.5 


19,574 


S8,7 


955 


1.9 


29,937 


5'J.<, 


Accessories - other apparel stores 


8,569 


109,695 


7,607 


100.694 


91.8 


9,959 


9.9 


219 


.2 


90,515 


69.9 


Shoe stores . 


18,967 


510,693 


17,288 


461,990 


90.5 


33,179 


7.2 


167 


— 


428,554 


ȣ.8 


Automotive group; 


U6,702 


4,577,855 


70.150 


2,249,030 


49.1 


340,4'.9 


15.1 


1,034,474 


46.0 


974,107 


58.9 


30,294 


3,710,444 


11,194 


1,591,625 


42.9 


159,309 


lo.d 


952,583 


59.9 


47a, 733 


30.1 




4,751 


121,325 


4,009 


96,611 


79.5 


6,880 


6.9 


45,586 


47.2 


44,363 


45.9 


AccessorTes. tire and betlery dealers 


14,343 


371,252 


12,164 


298,968 


80.5 


97,440 


32.6 


51,393 


10.5 


170,135 


56.9 




66.243 


.'.59,637 


41,910 


250,46* 


69.6 


72,913 


29.1 


3,080 


1.2 


174,471 


69.7 


Other automotive 


1,071 


14,397 


873 


U,362 


76.3 


4,127 


38.3 


1,830 


16.1 


6,405 


47.6 


FtUii^g ativtion group: 


197,568 


1,958,255 


131,498 


1,764,802 


90.1 


385,239 


a. 8 


6,898 


.4 


1,373,307 


77.8 


Furniture houAchcId group: 
Furniture stores 


45,213 


1.280,987 


40,199 


1,131.012 


88.3 


253^97 


23.3 


515.709 


49.6 


352, U2 


31.1 


17,043 


689,560 


15,635 


608,953 


88.3 


143,736 


23.6 


296,939 


48.7 


153,682 


87.7 


Floorcoverings-orapery stores 


2,611 


60,851 


2,363 


54,901 


90.2 


15,025 


27,4 


8,787 


15.0 


31,089 


56.6 


ffousehold appliance-radio stores 


14,100 


378,285 


12,303 


338,722 


89.5 


66,407 


19,6 


185,845 


54.9 


86,470 


25.5 




4,296 


56.899 


3,607 


46,578 


81.9 


7,621 


16.4 


15,599 


93.5 


23,998 


50.1 


Other home furnishrngs stores 


7,165 


96.392 


6,291 


81,898 


35.8 


30,408 


37.2 


3,»37 


10.9 


42,513 


91.9 


Lumber building hardware group: 


73,186 


1.859.654 


67,260 


1,692,699 


91.2 


367,996 


Si. 3 


97,2a 


5.7 


727,922 


iS.a 


21,149 


861, 998 


19,471 


732,883 


90,9 


535,528 


68.4 


18,189 


2.3 


229,166 


29.3 




26,99« 


46«,07C 


V 25,000 


426,232 


91.5 


147,379 


54.7 


14,535 


3.4 


263,368 


61. i 


Hardivare £ farr: implement dealers 


9,637 


290,534 


9,009 


263,823 


92.9 


93,647 


34.8 


43,257 


16.1 


131,919 


49.1 


Heating & ptumbing equip, dealers 


5,025 


89,005 


4,592 


30,900 


90.9 


28,915 


35.3 


18,46<, 


22.8 


SS.523 


41.4 


Paint, glass, wall-paper stores 


8,910 


126,717 


7,968 


U9,493 


91.1 


53,489 


46.3 


1,063 


.9 


60,943 


52.9 


Efectiicaf suppfy stores 


1,469 


21,710 


1,220 


18,315 


84.4 


3,500 


46.4 


1,713 


9.4 


8,103 


44.£ 


Eating and drinlung places: 

Restaur a nts-cafeterias-lunch rooms 


251,475 


2,377, «8 


235,945 


2,238,933 


94.2 


57,339 


1.7 


~ 


_ 


2. 200. 9:4 


93.3 


113,037 


1,446,100 


105,764 


1,362,122 


94.2 


£2,443 


1.6 


— 


~ 


l,3.'i9,«79 


98,4 


Lunch counters, refreshment stands 


40,431 


2U.e2S 


38,001 


201,464 


95.1 


5,964 


3.0 


— 


— 


195,500 


97.0 


Drrnking places 


98,005 


719,510 


92,180 


674,947 


93.8 


9,132 


1.4 


— 


~ 


663,815 


98.6 


DnJ8 atorea: 


56,697 


1,230,726 


52,738 


1,147,819 


93.3 


90,263 


".a 


2/ 634 


.1 


l,l»(^»Vr 


■J2.1 


38,781 


948,909 


36,142 


891,409 


93.9 


66,780 


7.5 


f/ 477 


.1 


834,1.4.1 


92.4 


Drug stores without fountain 


17,966 


281,817 


16,596 


296.414 


91.0 


23,483 


9.1 


2/ 137 


.1 


238,771 


90.8 


Other retail tlorea: 

Sicycle shops 


191,240 


2,932,907 


136,630 


2,604,465 


es.s 


656,989 


53.0 


m,s*« 


4.7 


1.624,130 


62.3 


781 


5,143 


681 


4,573 


88.9 


778 


17.0 


SS'S 


6.5 


3,K0 


76..') 


2,979 


66,593 


2,688 


60,041 


90.2 


i''.704 


PM.r, 


12,484 


20.7 


r.?,873 


19.9 


Cigar stores and cigar stands 


15,350 


181,211 


13,829 


169,112 


93.3 


3,888 


2.3 


— 


— 


16^,225 


J7.7 


Florists 


U,242 


98,488 


10,296 


89,529 


90.9 


57,146 


M.5 


— 


— 


S2,3ac 


38.9 


Fuel and ice dealers 


55,295 


355,134 


32,307 


756,934 


88.5 


393,517 


52.0 


9,917 


1.3 


358,500 


'.6.7 


Gift, novelty, souvenir shops 


5,512 


31,407 


5,004 


28,279 


90.0 


3,839 


13.6 


188 


.7 


£4,252 


89.7 


Hay. grain, teed stores fwithout groc.) 


10,350 


315,734 


9.389 


280,983 


88.7 


106,150 1 57.3 


1,600| .8 


173,233 


61.8 


Hay. gram and feed stores (wrth groc.) 


782 


29,196 


698 


25,988 


89.0 


8,386 


31.9 


263 


1.0 


17,439 


67.1 


Farm and garden supply stores 


9.176 


251,541 


3.097 


216,159 


89.9 


80,843 


37.4 


5,079 


2.4 


110,23:: 


60.3 


Jewelry stores 


12,447 


232,689 


10,944 


205,857 


88.5 


45,984 


22.3 


50,009 


24..-. 


! 103,834 


93,4 


Luggage stores 


829 


16,217 


753 


14,144 


87.2 


2,432 


17.2 


48 


,1 


11,664 


82.0 


Hews dealers 


7,071 


61,397 


6,496 


55,844 


91.0 


4,277 


7.7 


— 


— 


51,967 


92.3 


Sportirig goods stores 


1,944 


35,174 


1,788 


51,610 


89.9 


3,277 


25.2 


577 


1.2 


22,995 


72.6 


Beer & liquor stores (packaged) 


12,105 


327,697 


11,291 


313,383 


95.6 


4,107 


1.3 


— 


— 


309,286 


98.7 


Other classifications 


25,579 


424,276 


22,973 


352,019 


83.0 


141,778 


40.3 


41,106 


11.7 


169,135 


48.0 


Second-hand atores: 

Second-hand stores - clothing & shoe 


22,500 


109,164 


20,484 


97,819 


89.6 


10.328 


10.5 


3,484 


3.6 


64,007 


85.9 


2,862 


6,523 


2,601 


9,<S9 


91,0 


94 


1.8 


— 


— 


5,845 


98.4 


Secor'd-iiand stores - furniture 


6,941 


a, 891 


6,437 


19,819 


90.7 


1,595 


8.0 


1,943 


7.8 


16,676 


'H.2 


Second-hand tires, accessories & parts 


6,433 


29,932 


9,783 


27,002 


90.2 


2,934 


9.4 


287 


1.1 


21,131 


89.9 


Pawn shops 

Seccrd-hand stores - other 


1,142 


16,335 


1,019 


14,938 


88.7 


235 


1.6 


m 


1.4 


14,4«7 




5,172 


34,023 


4,844 


30,121 


88.5 


6,870 


19.5 


1,433 


4.8 


22.013 


75,7 



l/ Includx ia(e* al mvichaAdt**. nM*U aiul lovtfttaiN, 
* Fw bMt* of pToioetiOfi, tmm l«U. p««a 10. 



rric* TKwipU, bul nol 



2/ Inalalmcnt ' 



druf HOIK apply 



»nii houaehold appli* 



Vol. 1 - Page 2-26 





Census oi Business 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 












Retail Distribution: 1935 




















TABLE 6-A 


. - NEGRO 


PROPRIETORSHIPS, 


BY KINDS 


OF BUSINESS 










Stores, Sales. Personnel. Pay Roll 


and ^penses 












Kind of Business 


Number 
of 


Sales 


Active 
proprietor! 
Sind firm 


Employees 
(fuU'Ume 
and part- 


Pay RoU- 

(add 000) 


Operating 
expenses, 
(including 














stores 


ladit 000) 


members 


time). Avg. 
(or year 


Total 


FuU-bme 


Part-tillK 


pay roll ) • 
(add 000) 




TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 


e3,490 


#48,987 


23,819 


12,322 


$3,081 


^,405 


♦616 


111,360 




Foo4 St9re» 

Candy and confectionery stores 


9.00S 


17,267 


9.094 


2.229 


761 


638 


123 


2.062 




1,336 


1,462 


l,5Sr 


TS7^ 


£2 


S£ 


10 


'at 




Dairy products stores & rnilk dirs 


35 


93 


35 


21 


6 


5 


1 


28 




Egg and poul try dealers 


59 


189 


64 


31 


U 


8 


3 


SO 




Del icatessen stores 


i7 


162 


47 


20 


9 


s 


1 


30 




Fruit stores and vegetable markets 


«1 


506 


4S4 


94 


27 


22 


6 


71 




Grocery stores (without meats) 


4,553 


6,270 


4,58S 


568 


149 


117 


32 


500 




Combination stores (groceries & meats) 


1,8U 


7,361 


1,847 


1,020 


396 


340 


56 


896 




Meat markeis 


171 


471 


180 


79 


31 


31 




90 




Fish markets - seafood 


303 


380 


310 


116 


32 


26 


6 


70 




Bakeries and caterers 


lis 


278 


115 


65 


SO 


a 


9 


79 




Other lood stores 


US 


105 


126 


18 


8 


8 




27 




General Stores (with food) 


381 


1,081 


328 


83 


82 


SI 


1 


TO 




General merchandise sroup 


68 


316 


65 


46 


29 


28 


2 


58 




Dry goods & general merchandrse stores 


Si 


isr 


51 


26 


U 


U 




31 




Department stores 


— 


— 





.. 


.. 


_« 









Variety, S-and-lO, & toa-dollar stores 


17 


120 


14 


20 


14 


12 


2 


24 




Apparel group 


292 


802 


24S 


110 


SO 


42 


8 


155 




Men's (ur nishi ngs stores 


1£ 


60 


14 


6 


« 


8 


1 


16 




Men's clothing - furnishings stores 


13 


24 


13 


4 


2 


2 




5 




Fami ly cloth! ng stores 


21 


87 


23 


20 


11 


11 


1 


U 




Women's ready-to-wear stores 


64 


98 


71 


IB 


* 


4 


2 


27 




Furriers and fur shops 


4 


18 


4 


4 


t 


1 


1 


7 




Ml 1 1 1 nery stores 


39 


60 


38 


• 


4 


2 


2 


20 




Custom tailors 


41 


96 


44 


37 


IS 


14 


1 


43 




Accessories - other apparel stores 


24 


a 


W 


4 


1 


1 




S 




Shoe stores 


14 


38 


13 


8 


4 


4 


— 


u 




Automotive group 

Motor-vehicif dealers (new) 


779 


1,328 


830 


344 


191 


160 


31 


412 




4 


142 


3 


24 


28 


28 


_ 


44 




Used-car dealers 


6 


20 


8 


6 


8 


2 


1 


6 




Accessories, tire and battery dealers 


S3 


138 


33 


27 


12 


11 


1 


SO 




Garages 


734 


1,019 


788 


286 


147 


118 


29 


SSI 




Other automotive 


2 


9 


3 


1 


1 


1 




1 




Filling stations 

Furniture-household group 
Furniture stores 


788 


2,»46 


776 


483 


217 


191 


26 


471 




74 


472 


70 


105 


30 


48 


10 


123 




34 


263 


32 


48 


84 


34 


_ 


77 




Floor coverings-drapery stores 


_« 


..« 





_« 


_. 


__ 


__ 


_. 




Household appliance and radio stores 


12 


148 


12 


S3 


16 


7 


9 


24 




Radio dealers 


12 


27 


U 


9 


9 


5 





11 




Other home lurmshings stores 


14 


- 34 


14 


15 


3 


2 


1 


U 




Lumber-building-hardware group 


44 


2S4 


46 


3? 


31 


28 


8 


65 




Lumber & building-material dealers 


12 


112 


9 


20 


20 


17 


8 


86 




Hardware stores 


24 


113 


29 


12 


10 


10 





27 




Hardware & farm implement dealers 


1 


1 


1 


1 


__ 


_. 


__ 






Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


1 


2 


1 


1 


__ 


.„ 





1 




Paint, glass, wall paper stores 


6 


6 


6 


3 


1 


1 


__ 


1 




Electrical supply stores 


~ 












— 






EatiHR and drinking places 


8,568 


15,718 


8,799 


6.962 


2,671 


2,406 


26S 


5,920 




Restauranis-caletenas-lunch rooms 


4,309 


8,638 


4,452 


4,181 


1,552 


1,423 


129 


3,368 




Lunch counters, refreshment stands 


3,178 


2,758 


3,217 


1,067 


285 


253 


32 


722 




Dr 1 nki ng places 


1,081 


4,322 


1,130 


1,714 


834 


730 


104 


1,88S 




DruR stores 

Drug stores with f ountai n 


608 


3,760 


596 


862 


431 


377 


54 


853 




298 


2,538 


297 


566 


301 


262 


39 


573 




Drug stores without fountain 


310 


1,222 


299 


296 


130 


115 


IS 


280 




Other retail stores 


2,54« 


4,914 


2,306 


981 


5U 


427 


84 


1,OTO 




Sicycleshops 


3 


3 


3 


_ 


__ 


__ 


__ 


I 




Book stores 


9 


46 


8 


6 


4 


4 




T 




Cigar stores and cigar stands 


306 


483 


300 


94 


82 


27 


5 


89 




Flonits 


96 


1«4 


98 


19 


« 


7 


2 


42 




Fuel and ice dealers 


1,801 


3,188 


1,787 


646 


343 


277 


66 


628 




Gilt, novelty, souvenir shops 


10 


6 


9 


1 


__ 


__ 


._ 


2 




Hay. gram, feed stores (without groc.l 


3 


6 


3 


1 


1 


1 


__ 


1 




Hay, grain and feed stores (with groc.) 
















„_ 






Farm and garden supply stores 


14 


U7 


IS 


18 


9 


• 


1 


IT 




Jewel ry stores 


11 


26 


11 


8 


3 


3 




6 




Luggage stores 


2 


1 


2 








__ 






News dealers 


103 


168 


102 


46 


16 


13 


2 


31 




Sporting goods stores 


5 


20 


4 


2 


2 


1 




6 




Beer & liquor stores (packaged) 


73 


339 


73 


69 


S7 


84 


8 


91 




Other classif icalions 


110 


366 


91 


81 


86 


SI 


6 


153 




Second hand stores 


459 


449 


464 


130 


48 


34 


9 


114 




Second-hand stores - clothing & shoe 


111 


n 


lot 


IS 


I 


1 


_ 


ir 




Second-hand furniture 


178 


165 


182 


3» 


12 


U 


1 


S4 




Second-hand tires, accessories & parts 


67 


82 


70 


M 


U 


8 


4 


29 




Pawn shops 


t 


3 


1 










1 




Secondhand stores other 


103 


126 


101 


49 


is 


9 


4 


SB 



•Includes no comoensalion for proprietors and firm meml>efs ol unincorporated busina 

















Vol. 1 Page 2-27 


Census of Business 
Retail Distnbulion: 1935 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 










TABLE 6-B. - NEGRO PROPRIETORSHIPS, BY GEOGRAPHIC 


DIVISIONS 


AND STATES 






Stores, Sales, Personnel, Pay Roll and Expense* 
















Active 


Employee* 




Pay Roll« 




Operating 


Division and Stale 


Number 
of 


Salea 


proprietora 
and Hrin 
members 


( lullUme 
and part- 




ladd 000) 




expenses, 

(including 










stores 


(aild 000) 


time). Avf. 
ior year 


Total 


Full-time 


Part-lime 


pay roll) • 
(add 000) 




















TOTAL FOR UNITSD STATES 
NSW SNGLUiD 
Cooneaticut 


23,490 


$48,987 


23,819 


12,322 


t8,021 


(4,405 


»616 


»11,360 


177 


1,291 


171 


376 


305 


287 


18 


419 


48 


145 


49 


27 


12 


6 


6 


40 


lialna 


£ 


6 


2 


2 


2 


2 


— 


2 


' ; Uaasachusetts 


107 


1.079 


98 


337 


288 


276 


12 


366 


Now Hampahir* 


2 


5 


2 


1 


— 





— 


1 


Rhode laland 


17 


54 


19 


e 


3 


3 





9 


Tennont 


1 


3 


1 


1 


— 


~ 


— 


1 


lODDLS ATLANTIC 
Hew Jeraoy 


£,82S 


8,569- 


2,908 


1,974 


1,077 


900 


177 


2,709 


620 


1,748 


646 


379 


222 


171 


51 


619 


Naw Yorli 


1,140 


4,508 


1,192 


984 


598 


538 


60 


1,406 


FenneylTania 


1,065 


2,313 


1,070 


611 


257 


191 


66 


664 


BAST NORTH CENTRAL 


2,940 


8,603 


2,997 


2,015 


955 


832 


123 


2,086 


lUlnols 


951 


3,266 


978 


707 


402 


361 


41 


898 


Indiana 


315 


784 


336 


198 


70 


59 


11 


179 


Ulohlgan 


662 


1,589 


688 


439 


188 


169 


19 


374 


Ohio 


953 


2,685 


965 


608 


259 


215 


44 


555 


Wlaoonaln 


59 


279 


65 


63 


36 


28 


8 


80 


■EST NORTH CENTRAL 
Iowa 


1,023 


2,466 


1,049 


724 


284 


254 


30 


706 


62 


156 


62 


26 


8 


7 


1 


29 


Eanaaa 


240 


438 


25S 


116 


38 


35 


3 


96 


Uinneaota 


73 


385 


73 


107 


50 


42 


8 


135 


UlasouTl 


567 


1,278 


576 


410 


164 


137 


17 


373 


Nebraaka' 


63 


193 


64 


58 


30 


29 


1 


64 


North Dakota 


16 


14 


17 


10 


4 


4 


— 


8 


South Dakota 


2 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


1 


SOOTH ATLANTIC 
Dalawara 


8,487 


14,608 


8,499 


3,668 


1,209 


1,065 


144 


2,769 


92 


112 


91 


23 


7 


4 


3 


17 


DUtrlct of Columbia 


279 


1,593 


287 


443 


227 


209 


IS 


570 


Jloriia 


1,369 


2,531 


1,381 


676 


237 


206 


31 


478 


Morgla 


2,037 


2,554 


2,019 


771 


193 


180 


13 


385 


Uaxyland 


587 


1,338 


585 


341 


126 


108 


18 


320 


North Carolina 


1,395 


2,205 


1,403 


527 


150 


130 


20 


361 


South Carolina 


1,008 


1,101 


993 


887 


67 


55 


12 


171 


Virginia 


1,802 


2,881 


1,514 


460 


149 


122 


27 


351 


Waat TlTglnta 


218 


593 


226 


138 


53 


51 


2 


116 


BAST SODTH CENTRAL 
Alabena 


3,528 


5,083 


3,880 


1,412 


393 


349 


44 


896 


980 


1,253 


981 


372 


93 


87 


6 


220 


Kentucky 


568 


856 


893 


231 


71 


63 


8 


154 


Uiaaiaaippl 


863 


849 


868 


232 


49 


42 


7 


125 


Tennaaaaa 


1,117 


2,125 


1,141 


877 


180 


157 


23 


399 


WBST SOOTH CENTHAL 
Arkanaaa 


3,913 


6,171 


4,005 


1,674 


816 


468 


46 


1,151 


673 


800 


690 


188 


44 


39 


5 


96 


Loulalana 


999 


1,597 


1,013 


401 


lis 


108 


10 


308 


Oklahoma 


499 


980 


508 


269 


85 


78 


7 


157 


Tszas 


1,742 


2,794 


1,794 


819 


269 


243 


26 


590 


yOUNTAIN 


108 


335 


Ul 


98 


46 


41 


5 


107 


Arizona 


32 


71 


36 


17 


6 


5 


1 


16 


Colorado 


44 


170 


43 


82 


26 


23 


3 


63 


Idaho 


— 





.. 













Uontana 


6 


34 


7 


17 


9 


8 


1 


20 


NaTada 


6 


■ B 


6 


1 


1 


1 




2 


New Mailco 


11 


U 


U 


2 






__, 




Utah 


4 


s 


S 















Wyoming 


B 


K 


s 


6 


4 


4 


- 


6 


PACUIO 


489 


1,861 


499 


384 


236 


209 


27 


517 


California 


451 


1,581 


447 


330 


193 


172 


21 


416 


Oregon 


15 


36 


10 


12 


7 


7 




14 


Waahlngton 

1 


45 


274 


42 


42 


36 


30 


6 


87 



•Indudo no compensarion (or proprirtori and firm members of unincortwrated busin 



Vol. 1 - Pwe 2-28 



aZ^Dilwb^bir 1935 TABLE 7 A. - UNITED STATES SUMMARY 

ANALYSIS OF SAI.F.S AND VALUE OF STOCKS ON HAND, BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 


Kind of Buaineu 


Total 
•ala 

(add 000) 


RecdpCs from | 


Sale* to 

other 
reuiler* 

(add 000) 


Sloclu 

on hand 

end of year 

(at co*t) 

(add 000) 


•ale* 
(add 000) 


Meal* 

and 

fountain 

tale* 

(add 000) 


Repair*, 
•torage, 

and aervice 
•ale* 

(add 000) 


Other 
•ource* 

(add 000) 


TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 


♦33,161,276 


♦30,677.283 


♦1,762,906 


♦571.217 


♦149.870 


♦937.749 


♦4.297.957 


food Stores 


8,362,425 


8,284,173 


65,123 


2,096 


11,033 


113,224 


502,691 


Candy and conlect lonety stores 

Dairy products stores A milk dealers 

E|g and pool try dealers 

Delicatessen stores 

Fruit stores and vegetable marhetl 

Grocery stores (without meats) 

Combination stores (groceries & meats) 

Meat markets 

Hsh markets - seafood 

Bakeries and caterers 

Other food stores 

General Stores (with food) 


314,467 

576,391 
52,404 
88,706 

215,965 
2,802,607 
4,149,813 

565,640 
46,611 
99,908 
49,751 

1,110,403 


270,101 

970.280 
52,294 
84,725 

219,187 
2,195,850 
4,13J,207 

564,929 
46,981 
97,098 
47,925 

1,103,713 


41,944 

4,915 

8 

3,773 

449 
3,493 
6,781 

124 

120 
2,521 

995 

2,137 


542 
82 
34 

48 

43 
522 
532 

46 
5 

97 
145 

696 


1,860 

1,074 

68 

162 

286 

2,742 

3,293 

545 

105 

192 

666 

3,897 


1,117 

92,019 

1,617 

354 

3,052 

10,378 

29,422 

11,249 

1,083 

1,920 

1,017 

10.378 


19,821 

7,466 

1,035 

6,662 

4,298 

192,099 

258,009 

8,072 

603 

1,315 

3,091 

245,972 


Gcftcral merchandite group 

Dry goods & general merchandise stores 

Department stores 

Variety, S-and-10. t to-adolllr stores 

Appard (roup 


4,619,751 


4,501,013 


64,384 


20,090 


34,264 


13,686 


775.184 


527,862 

3,311,070 

780,819 

2,656,242 


524,298 

3,231,144 

745,571 

2,626,326 


778 
29,438 
34,166 

346 


1,431 

18,529 

130 

16.362 


1,355 

31,959 

950 

11.208 


2,248 

11,134 

304 

5.779 


173,699 
495,361 

106,126 

557.659 


Men's (urnishi ngs s tores 

Men's clothing - furnishings stores 

fami ly clothi ng stores 

Women's ready-to-wear stores 

Furriers and fur shops 

Millinery stores 

Custom tailors 

Accessories - other apparel stores 

Shoe stores 

Automotive group 


143,666 

615,949 

358,849 

794,992 

59,897 

94,451 

67,120 

109,917 

511,399 

4,606,650 


143,024 

513,914 

355,215 

784,302 

53,433 

94,054 

64,546 

109,443 

508,395 

4,175,430 


18 
52 

1 

232 

6 

2 

1 
16 
18 

1,408 


343 

664 
1,040 
4,850 
6,309 

241 
2,401 

234 
2,280 

401,017 


283 

1,319 
?,593 
5,606 
149 
154 
172 
224 
706 

28,795 


289 
1,398 
720 
1,619 
619 
166 
224 
264 
484 

202,401 


40,002 
146,273 

86,096 
108,090 

12,429 
5,050 

11,454 

20,533 
127,736 

486,046 


Motor-vehicle dealers (new) 

Used-car dealers 

Accessories, tire and battery dealers 

Garages 

Other automotive 

Filling lUtiofu 

Fumiture-houaebold group 

Fur ni ture stores 

Floor coverings-drapery stores 

Household appliance and radio stores 

Radio dealers 

Other home furnishings stores 

Lumbcr-buildiiig-hardware (roup 


3,725,438 

122,204 

373,910 

370,064 

15,034 

1,967,714 


3,500,128 

119,291 

351,376 

191,338 

13,297 

1,906,816 


, 475 

50 

179 

695 

9 

7,280 


209,841 

1,984 

19,997 

167,601 

1,594 

44,160 


14,994 

879 

2,398 

10,430 
134 

9,498 


195,255 
3,691 

40,817 

2,149 

489 

15,996 


363,281 

16,404 

56,866 

26,677 

2,620 

73,550 


1,289,896 


1,259,774 


163 


21,050 


8,909 


18,298 


302,508 


694,578 
61,246 

381,171 
57,152 
95,749 

1,864,275 


684,863 
59,652 

366,908 
54,094 
94,257 

1,633,624 


7 
47 
.79 
22 

6 


4,691 
1,151 
11,298 
2,783 
1,127 

22,030 


9,017 
396 

2,886 
253 
357 

8,621 


3,620 
712 

8,721 
749 

4,296 

41,079 


165,534 
16,423 
59,138 
10,066 
91,347 

548,055 


Lumber & building-material dealers 
Hardware stores 

Hardware & (arm implement dealers 
fteating & plumbing equipment dealers 
Paint, glass, wall-paper stores 
Electrical supply stores 

Eating and drinking place* 


666,665 
467,217 
291,762 

89,477 
127,049 

21,905 

2,390,860 


659,742 
461,760 
285,636 

81,369 
125,145 

19,776 

876,891 


1,493,123 


1,656 

4,310 
4,718 
7,640 
1,572 
1,934 

7,424 


5,267 

1,147 

1,208 

472 

332 

195 

13,422 


21,447 

7,457 
3,763 
2,148 
9,679 
585 

1.362 


236,211 

162,419 

79,017 

14,143 

32,062 

4,203 

42.566 


Restaurants -cateterias- lunch rooms 
Lunch counters, refreshment stands 
Drinkini places 

Drug store* 


1,453,118 
213,781 
723,961 

1,232,593 


182,807 

40,576 

653,906 

1,109,401 


1,257,418 

170,526 

69,177 

120,892 


5,875 
724 
825 

473 


7,018 
1,951 
4,453 

1,867 


1,059 

106 
217 

3,179 


22,938 

3,663 

15,965 

272.190 


Drug stores wi th fountain 
Drug stores without fountain 

Otha retail itont 


950,326 
282,265 

2,947,127 


827,681 
281,720 

2,892,514 


120,852 
6,077 


376 
97 

32,316 


1,419 
446 

14,220 


1,847 

1,332 

108,716 


193,966 
78,204 

489.774 


Bicycle ihopt 

Book stores 

Cigar stores and cigir staiids 

Florists 

Fuel and ice dealers 

Gift, novelty, souxnit shops 

Hay, gram, feed stot«s (wi thout grocer las) 

Hay, grain and feed stores (with groceriat) 

Farm and garden supply stores 

lowelry stores 

Luggage stores 

News dealers 

Sporting goods stores 

Beer A liquor stores (packaged) 

Other classif ical ions 

Secand4iand itora* 

Second-hand stores - clothing A shoe 

Secondhand furniture 

Second-hand tires, accessories & parts 

Pawn shops 

Stcondhand stores - other 


9,149 
67,007 

162,950 
98,718 

659,018 
31,902 

317,390 
29,277 

252,471 

234,893 
16,230 
61,659 
39,315 

326,307 

427,248 

113,340 


4,584 
66,193 

174,798 
96,274 

853,240 
31,125 

315,869 
89,150 

249,667 

216,540 
16,004 
60,249 
34,928 

327,666 

41S,4<S 

107,606 


2 
203 
5,952 
16 
63 
69 
40 
30 

6 
96 

899 
119 

960 
13 


556 

197 

461 

198 

1,8U 

213 

663 

28 

1,666 

14,093 

213 

213 

627 

62 

11,266 

1,843 


7 

414 

1,739 

230 

3,684 

95 

618 

69 

930 

2,204 

13 

298 

141 

977 

3,001 

4,176 


118 
1,879 
1,726 
1,443 

35,273 
196 

ig,926 
2,847 
9,278 
1,251 
249 
1,061 
1,196 

32,977 
8,294 

3,631 


1,282 

17,949 
18,930 

7,988 
61, 2M 
U,967 
26,801 

2,614 

51,216 

126,668 

6,130 

4,029 
10,846 
38,047 
96,338 

31,760 


6,944 
21,961 
29,988 
20,489 
34,388 


6,409 
21,649 
29,253 
16,728 
33,873 


1 
1 
9 

6 


117 
201 
674 
107 
444 


21 
110 

96 

3,694 

339 


32 

633 

1,706 

389 

901 


1,462 
4,698 
T,418 
10,S8« 
?,»29 















Vol. I 


- Page 2-29 


Census of Business 
















ReUiJ Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 7B.- 


UNITED STATES SUMMARY 








ANALYSIS OF SAI FS AND VALUE OF STOCKS ON HAND, BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES 






Total 


Receipts (rom - 


Sales to 


Slocks 
on hand 




MeaU 


Repairs, 




Division and Stat^ 


sales 


Merchandise 


and 


storage. 


Other 


other 


end of year 




sala 


fountain 




sources 


retailers 


(at cost) 








sales 


sales 










(.dd 000) 


(add 000) 


(add 000) 


(add 000) 


(add 000) 


(add 000) 


(add 000) 


TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 


♦33.161,876 


»30,677,263 


$1,762,906 


»871,217 


■ 1149,870 


(537,749 


(4,297,957 


NB BOLtND 
Conoaotlout 


8,7S1,9U 


2,613,364 


152,746 


44,806 


10,995 


36,838 


308,741 


556,782 


516,710 


28,175 


6,722 


3,U9 


7,097 


69,788 


Hals* 


838,599 


816,894 


9,855 


4,464 


1,386 


2,^8 


32,639 


llasaachuaatta 


1,*61,180 


1,340,152 


92,787 


83,893 


4.548 


22,645 


180,691 


Mot Banpsbln 


152,563 


139,983 


8,932 


3,098 


570 


1,015 


18,601 


Rhode laland 


219,706 


806,368 


9,617 


2,763 


9SS 


4,286 


25,094 


7armont 


99,121 


93,857 


3,380 


2,066 


418 


1,587 


15,731 


WDOU AXLUmC 
New Jersey 


8,460,917 


7,730,014 


672,283 


122,930 


35,690 


119,842 


1,091,739 


1,880,299 


1,145,858 


52,718 


16,661 


5,668 


13,015 


136,676 


New Tork 


4,749,708 


4,854,129 


413,118 


64,359 


18,102 


61,310 


612,211 


PaanaylTanla 


2,490,910 


2,330,633 


106,447 


41,910 


U,920 


45,517 


342,983 


Uarr NORTH CIMTBAL 
lUlnola 


7,170,566 


6,707,851 


311,576 


120,076 


31,083 


150,150 


856,780 


2,173,069 


8,038,676 


96,248 


35,834 


8,109 


48,293 


273,646 


liidlana 


780,508 


729,994 


34,536 


13,032 


8,946 


12,180 


100,700 


Mlehlgas 


1,388,236 


1,298,282 


57,439 


24,047 


8,468 


34,686 


156,319 


Ohio 


1,956,941 


1,817,173 


100,008 


31,410 


8,360 


43,879 


2U,023 


Vlaoonala 


871,832 


829,524 


23,345 


15,753 


3,210 


11, U2 


112,892 


•Err mns cbrbal 

Iowa 


3,521,954 


3,883,791 


154,496 


69,198 


14,469 


67,452 


517.994 


650,089 


607,473 


26,857 


13,386 


8,973 


15,967 


93,407 


Eanaaa 


448,861 


418,533 


18,770 


9,578 


1,360 


5,404 


67,501 


UUmaaota 


820,010 


768,572 


36,809 


17,200 


3,489 


16,327 


112,322 


Mlsaourl 


946,185 


881, UO 


44.983 


15,939 


4,093 


20,594 


131,967 


Nabraaka 


359,757 


336,860 


14,623 


6,966 


1,318 


3,300 


59,573 


North Dakota 


150.806 


139,988 


6,323 


3,838 


659 


3,184 


25,638 


South Dakota 


147,564 


137,855 


6,731 


8,961 


617 


8,676 


27,586 


30DTB ATLANTIC 
Dalamra 


3,296,006 


3,078,714 


149,460 


52,996 


14,838 


33,245i 


420,333 


76,877 


72,522 


8,714 


1.135 


506 


292 


9,780 


Dlatrtct of Coluabla 


330,613 


898,757 


29,559 


7.129 


1,368 


3,433 


29,099 


norlda 


4£5,607 


393,364 


23,802 


7.242 


1,399 


3,836 


55,927 


Oaorgla 


484,693 


453,522 


80,918 


7,077 


3,176 


4,840 


65,823 


Marrlanl 


462,874 


434,466 


18,705 


7,396 


2,307 


6,047 


52,481 


North Carolina 


463,219 


439,308 


15,085 


6,947 


1,879 


6,156 


66,658 


South Carolina 


248,206 


236,487 


7,478 


3,495 


746 


1,607 


27,202 


Tlrglnia 


471,329 


442,296 


19,163 


7,735 


2,133 


3,357 


68,550 


■•at Virginia 


332,190 


313,990 


18,036 


4,640 


1,324 


4,877 


44,613 


■AST SODIB CBnSAL 
A]abaM 


1,366,429 


1,299,735 


57,886 


24,022 


5,366 


18,916 


197,152 


337,217 


318,236 


12,609 


4.757 


1,715 


3,897 


46,665 


bntuoky 


368,878 


362,744 


16,886 


7.291 


1,357 


6,801 


58,516 


Mlaaiaaippl 


178,348 


169,874 


5,491 


2,979 


604 


2,139 


28,592 


Tannaaa aa 


482,566 


449,481 


22,400 


8,995 


1,710 


7,281 


63,379 


WBT sotrm cnmAL 

ATkanaaa 


2,309,174 


2,154,537 


102,649 


40,865 


10,825 


30,067 


334,504 


240,724 


287,766 


7,361 


4,869 


708 


4,646 


39,750 


louialana 


344,393 


380,922 


16,323 


5,350 


1,796 


3,435 


47,416 


nirlaTw^ 


434,793 


406,759 


17,587 


7.682 


2,765 


9,927 


65,713 


Inaa 


1,889,864 


1,199,190 


61,558 


22.964 


5,552 


18,0^9 


181,625 


HCDRADI 
Arlaoaa 


1,100,728 


1,020,429 


51,763 


23,050 


5,486 


20,789 


169,697 


121,083 


U0,965 


6,895 


2,586 


635 


2,706 


15,536 


ColoiaAo 


302,559 


279,237 


15,068 


6,779 


1,455 


6,361 


40,56* 


X4aho 


140,167 


130,479 


5,726 


3,195 


767 


3,191 


19,479 


Hutaaa 


189,457 


176,375 


6,309 


3,756 


1,017 


1,»M 


29,336 


■arada 


43.9SB 


39,750 


3,203 


724 


2SS 


329 


9,632 


■wManoo 


88,751 


83,564 


3,1B6 


1,679 


302 


1,490 


14,639 


Otah 


132,096 


123,162 


5,563 


2,706 


667 


9,453 


16,038 


■rains 


62,681 


76,677 


3,7»S 


1,623 


366 


1,389 


12,419 


none 

Califorala 


3,193,569 


2,888,748 


210,447 


T3,274 


21,100 


98,448 


417,077 


2,329,009 


2,096,521 


162,004 


54,337 


16,147 


43,486 


2M,648 


OracoB 


SSS.SSl 


30s,oes 


20,445 


7,733 


i.see 


4,91J! 


46,978 


laahiactoa 


928,709 


4S6,14£ 


27,998 


u,a>4 


3,365 


10,090 


70,484 



Vol. I - Page 2-30 



Ceosut of Business 














Retail DMinbution: 1935 jaBLE 8-A - UNITED STATES SUMMARY - RETAIL SAI.F.S BY WHOLESALE ESTABLISHMENTS. 

BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 










(Sales are expressed in thousands oi dollars] 








Kind of Business 
(wholesale classificatioos ) \J 


Sales to 
Household Consumen 2/ 


Kind of Business 
(wholesale classifications) \J 


Sates to 
Household Consumere 2/ 


Total 


Full-service 

and 

limited- 

hinction 

wholesaler! 


All 
other types 

oi 
wholesalers 
2/ 


Total 


Full-service 
and 
limited- 
function 

wholesalers 

17 


All 
other types 

of 
wholesalers 
V 




^o,2a« 


M98,723 


>217,SS9 


Oaneral nereliandlaa 


t<.384 


•2,320 


*4 


iBuanmt ad ajortlae caeta 


3,182 


1,936 


1,244 


Oroearlaa asd fooda (aieaTt tvm. iradssta) 


37,918 


32,114 


6,804 


AateactlT* iroteota 


80,756 


79,006 


1,782 


Bardware 


U,t38 


18,176 


62 


B««r, wlaaa and liquors 


12,197 


U,471 


726 


Jemlrr and optical geoda 


1,877 


1,764 


US 


Chaleals 

eiotliii« aad fnnlahliga 

Coal 


8,329 

3,719 

16,686 


5,S07 

2,945 

15,777 


2,822 

776 

8,909 


laiber end building aatarlala 
(other than aetal) 

Maahlnary, aqoiiMsnt and auppllaa 
(azeapt alaotrioal) 


U,6S4 

U,616 


11,712 
■7,969 


922 
3,647 


Dru^a and drvs avidrlaa 


2,228 


8,U0 


U8 


■iatala (aieapt aerap) 


1,179 


606 


573 


Drreoeda 


3,298 


3,001 


257 


Papar and Ita prodnata 


3,726 


2,975 


751 


Slaotrlsal gseda 


18,479 


15,672 


2,807 


FatrolaiB and It* prediut* 


114,002 


4,183 


109,819 


FaT> prodaota - raw aatariala 


64,684 


5,292 


69,432 


Fliablng and haatiag aqnllBaBt and anppllaa 


5,665 


4,765 


900 


Tan prodaota - oonaawr (ooda 


66,062 


40,676 


15,386 


Tobacco and ita prodiiata [oxBayt laaf) 


4,980 


4,926 


54 


Tarn suppllaa 


16,663 


12,660 


4,015 


Waata matarlala 


1,220 


1,205 


15 


Tomltara aad kosaa fsnlahlaea 


5,620 


4,610 


1,010 


All othar 


6,058 


4,596 


1,663 



See footnote* i 



Mid of Table »-& 



Census of Business 

RetaU Distribution: 1935 TABLE 8-B - UNITED STATES SUMMARY - RETAIL SALES BY WHOLESALE ESTABLISHMENTS, 

BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES 

(Sales are expressed in thousands of dollars) 


Division 


Sales to 
Household Consumers 2/ 


Division 


Sales to 
Household Consumers 2/ 


Total 


FuU-service 
and 
limited- 
function 
wholesalen 
2/ 


All 
other types 

of 
wholesalers 
2/ 


Total 


Full-service 
and 
limited- 
function 
wholesalers 
2/ 


All 

other types 

of 

2/ 


XHIDLX ABAinO 


t610,282 

58,495 

119,487 

113,063 

82,369 


♦292,723 
19,492 
73,923 
67,996 
29,711 


♦217,569 
19,003 
45,664 
45,068 
52,648 


soon ASJUTTIC 
lAST SOOTH OBnSAL 

HOOIRUI 

PAcmo 


»36,972 
17,808 
28,567 
16,483 
57,848 


t23,823 

10,680 

16,879 

9,969 

40,251 


»13,149 
6,528 

11,488 
6,614 

17,8»T 



\J M*i(H groupinsi only are (hown in ihii Iftblc. For d«Uiled kind-of-buiii 
^ For dcllnibon of termi lae Volume I. Wholeialo Cantut, 



(wholMAle) *«« VoJufoe I. Whole 



Vol. I - Page. 2 -31 









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Vol. I - Page 2 34 



Census ol Business 
Retail Distribution: 



TABLE llA - CITY TOTALS, FOR CITIES OF 10.000 TO 50,000 POPULATION 
INCLUDING 40 NEW ENGLAND TOWNS, MARKED Ti. FOR WHICH 1933 COMPARABLE DATA ARE AVAILABLE 
NUMBER OF STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 



CITY 



Number 

ol 

store* 



Aberdeen, S. Da]c. 
Aberdeen, WaBh* 
Abilene, Tex. 
Ada, Okie. 
Adems, Mess. (T) 

Adrian, Mlcb. 
Alainede, Calif. 
Albany, Ga. 
Albert Lea, Miim. 
Albuquerque, N. Uel. 

Alexandria, La* 
Alexandria, Vs. 
ALbambra, Calif. 
Aliquippe, Fa. 
Alliance, Ohio 

Alpena, Mich. 
Alton, 111. 
Amarillo, Tel. 
Ambridge, Pe. 
Aaes , Iowa 

Amesbury, Mass. (T) 
Amsterdem, N, Y. 
Anaconda, Mont. 
Anaheim, Calif. 
Anderson t Ind. 

Anderson, S, C. 
Annarolla, Md. 
Ann Arbor, Mich, 
Annlston, Ala. 
Ansonia, Conn. 

Appleton, Wia. 
Ardmore, Okla. 
Arkansas City, Karis. 
Arlington, Mass. (T) 
Arnold, Pa. 

Aabury Park, N. J. 
Ashland, Ky. . 
Aflbland, Ohio 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula, Ohio 

Astoria, Ore, 
Atchison, Kans. 
Athens, Ga. 
Athol, Mass. (T) 
Attleboro, Mass. 

Auburn, Me. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Augusta, Me. 
Aurore, 111. 
Austin, Uinn* 

BakerBflell, Calif. 
Bangor, Ms. 
Barberton, Ohio 
Barre, Vt. 
BartlesTille, Okla. 

BataTla, [I. Y. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
Bay City, Mich. 
Beacon, N. Y. 

Beatrice, Hebr. 
Beever Falls, ta. 
Bedrord, Ind. 
Bellsire, Ohio 
Belleville, 111. 

BelleTllle, II. J. 
DelleTue, Pa. 
Bellinghan, Wash. 
Beljiunt, Mass. (TJ 
Beloit, Wis. 

Denton Harbor, Mich. 
Berlin, N. H. 
Eervrtck, Pa. 
Berwyn, 111. 
Bessemer, Ala. 

Beverly, Mass. 
Beverly Hills, Cellf. 
Blddeford, Ms. 
Big Spring, Tex. 
Billings, Mont, 



Sala 

ladd 0001 



306 
346 
4ei 
251 
196 

248 
390 
327 
222 
461 

381 
341 

491 
313 
393 

214 
438 
666 
312 

186 

157 
677 
151 
213 
613 

298 
222 
626 
274 

309 

373 
276 
262 
326 
82 

471 
428 
218 
188 
366 

246 
265 
350 
154 
237 

222 
587 
249 
590 
244 

655 
507 
310 
192 
229 

280 
524 
687 
743 
187 

232 

326 
236 
265 
396 

373 
72 
538 
166 
341 

284 

242 
158 
485 
235 

344 

380 
333 
225 
377 



Pro. 

prietors 



\ 8,662 

9,433 

10,173 

5,852 

2,877 

6,612 
8,389 
6,171 
5,824 
15,670 

S,489 

10,535 

14,353 

6,945 

8,771 

4,273 

11,025 

17,811 

5,822 

5,054 

2,592 

12,659 

4,130 

5,118 

14,549 

7,301 
6,210 
17,124 
6,792 
4,900 

12,710 

6,658 

5,121 

7,442 

963 

12,486 
9,610 
5,864 
4,280 
7,876 

5,371 
4,722 
7,466 
4,239 
5,390 

4,717 
15,374 

7,642 
16,444 

6,786 

24,518 

17,679 

6. 337 

5,767 

5,917 

7,868 
16,157 
19,594 
15,129 

3,474 

5,191 
7,662 
3,549 
4,443 
7,891 

4,973 
2,335 
13,187 
4,906 
9,846 

7,579 
5,536 
3,123 
8,066 
3,755 

7,669 

15,875 

7,254 

5,401 

14,876 



263 
336 
431 
245 
193 

224 
365 
286 
206 
417 

318 
292 
422 
291 
351 

212 
396 
610 
260 
176 

135 
551 
135 
207 
607 

350 
203 
556 
237 



Em- 
ployees* 



Total 

P./ Rdi- 
(.dd 000 ) 



1,125 
954 

1,279 
643 
342 

829 
861 
941 
648 
1,867 

1,236 
1,132 
1,407 
813 
1,176 

485 

1,329 

2,196 

709 

621 

282 

1,352 
415 
541 

1,889 

1,132 
776 

2,182 
990 



328 
51 
501 
109 
312 

252 

204 
134 
450 
213 

292 
296 
279 
213 
335 



254 


501 


310 


1,572 


262 


857 


222 


643 


243 


930 


69 


104 


351 


1,693 


386 


1,207 


221 


697 


157 


528 


313 


922 


235 


516 


266 


616 


291 


1,031 


119 


447 


190 


637 


202 


458 


519 


1,736 


201 


933 


505 


2,041 


242 


663 


622 


2,366 


398 


2,022 


276 


767 


144 


701 


219 


693 


231 


955 


412 


2,288 


573 


2,371 


669 


1,947 


161 


343 


215 


567 


281 


991 


229 


469 


266 


496 


368 


912 



457 
341 

1,473 
585 

1,206 

878 
599 
412 
771 
517 

922 

1,774 
830 
587 

1,537 



CITY 



Number 

ol 

stores 



I 932 

881 

1,049 

506 

258 

676 
983 
620 
578 
1,634 



1,029 

1,479 

5ie 

844 

367 

1,301 

2,037 

499 

501 

224 

1,222 

433 

486 

1,634 

764 
671 
1,983 
743 
446 

1,354 

745 

456 

840 

86 

1,699 
989 
576 
423 
791 

606 
466 
782 
419 
574 

441 
1,680 

768 
1,964 

603 

2,733 

2,003 

765 

664 

583 

864 
1,825 
2,189 
1,651 

369 

460 
725 
333 
361 
643 

436 
258 
1,385 
625 
972 

759 
494 

297 
697 
366 

883 

1,998 

706 

483 

1,623 



Biloxi, Miss. 
Blsmarok, N. Dak, 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
BloomlngtoD, 111. 
Blooinington, Ind, 

Bluefield, Va.-W. Va. 
Blue Island, 111. 
Blythevlllo, Ark. 
BogelUBa, La. 
Boise, Ideho 

Boone , Iowa 
Boulder, Colo. 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Braddock, Pa. 
Bradford, Pa. 

Bralnerd, Hinn. 
Breintree, Mass. (T) 
Brawley, Calif. 
Breiosrton, Wash. 
Bridgeton, N. J. 

Bristol, Conn. 
Bristol, Pa. 
Bristol, E. I. (T) 
Bristol, Va.-Tenn. 
Brookflald, ni. 

Brookllne, Mass. (T) 
Brownsville, Tex. 
Brownwood, Tex. 
Brunswick, Ge. 
Eucyrufl, Ohio 

Burbank, Calif. 
Burlingam, Calif. 
Burlloston, Iowa 
Burlington, N. J. 
Burlington, Vt. 

Butler, Pa. 
Butts, Mont. 
Cairo, ni. 
Calumet City, 111. 
Caubridge, Ohio 

Campbell, Ohio 
Cenonsburg, Pa. 
Canton, 111. 
Cape Girardeau, Uo. 
Carbondale, Pa. 

Carlisle, Pa. 
Carnegie, Pa. 
Carteret, N, J. 
Casper, Wyo. 
Central Falls, R. I. 

Centrnlla, 111. 
Charabersburg, Pa. 
Chanipalgn, 111. 
Chanute, Kans. 
Charlerol, Pa. 

Charlottesville, Vu. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Chicego Heights, 111. 
Chlckasha, Okla. 

Chlcopea, Mass. 
Obllllcothe, Ohio 
Cleirton, Pa, 
ClHromont, N. H. (T) 
Clarkabura, W. Va. 

Clarksdale, Mise. 
Cleburne, Tex. 
Cliffslde Park, N. J. 
Clifton, N. J. 
Clinton, Iowa 

Clinton, Mass. (T) 
CoateavillB, Pa. 
CoffoyvUle, Kans. 
Coboes, N. Y. 
Collingawood, N. J. 

Colorado Springe, Colo, 
Columbia, Mo, 
Columbia, Fa. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Columbus, Miss. 



Sales 
ladd 0001 



226 
176 
527 
474 
223 

318 
189 
201 
147 
433 



248 
236 
289 

317 

198 
146 
211 
230 
315 

370 
213 
164 
285 



394 
384 
351 
266 
221 

252 
197 
395 
190 
346 

411 
64E 
23J 
14C 
227 

143 
191 
168 
284 
303 

212 
173 
171 
303 
335 

245 
272 
404 
164 
193 

276 
64! 
280 
306 
254 

522 

378 
162 
163 
494 

192 
231 
180 
630 
551 

200 
277 
29! 
322 
138 

563 
389 

263 
714 

157 



Pro- 
prietors 



; 2,966 

9,573 

11,204 

14,096 

5,574 

8,729 
4,663 
4,510 
3,580 
19,219 

4,817 
6,121 
5,487 
6,736 
9,806 

4,695 
3,227 
4,900 
6,612 
6,432 

7,992 
2,937 
1,798 
8,207 
834 

19,004 
4,017 
5,285 
4,216 
3,941 

4,743 
6,995 
9,480 
3,348 
11,346 

11,568 

21,494 

4,345 

1,113 

5,754 

1,594 
3,904 
4,099 
7,140 
6,220 

6,031 
3,877 
1,944 
10,922 
3,942 

4,526 
6,281 
15,072 
3,077 
4,641 

8,418 

13,661 

11,469 

5,805 

4,894 

6,985 
8,187 
2,313 
4,065 
14,910 

3,664 
4,080 
2,582 
6,991 
9,757 

3,684 
5,446 
5,598 
5,020 
3,500 



Em- 
ployees' 



201 
146 
399 
397 
195 

240 
185 
193 
124 
377 

215 
227 
256 
249 



178 
113 
194 
197 
266 

282 
197 
168 
223 
91 

269 
367 
346 
222 
215 

233 
178 
337 
164 
292 

370 
603 
203 
144 
201 

145 
180 
154 
266 
269 

192 
147 
162 



228 
235 
346 
160 
179 

213 
566 
249 
262 
255 

456 
355 
151 

138 
399 

196 
230 
163 
603 
532 

169 
244 
275 
303 
114 



ToU 
Psy Roll' 

wld 000 ] 



14,944 


.sob 


7,647 


269 


2,522 


239 


17,176 


580 


2,353 


147 



443 

937 
1,172 
1,929 

783 

1,168 
462 
573 
446 

2,089 

549 
67C^ 
705 
764 
1,109 

476 
360 
427 
608 
776 

906 

331 

196 

1,136 

73 

2,357 

757 
697 
668 
502 

449 
641 

1,173 
385 

1,332 

1,411 

2,235 

656 

173 

711 

135 
513 
493 
871 
738 

666 
424 
160 
1,022 
475 

566 
852 
1,976 
387 
550 

1,117 

1,579 

1,126 

728 

667 

742 

1,058 

283 

480 

2,007 

545 
492 
222 

623 
1,300 

461 
704 
738 
560 
336 

2,001 
1,157 

379 
2,642 

355 



t 279 

963 

1,182 

1,636 

673 

972 
541 
413 
374 
2,192 

392 
608 
476 
648 
1,091 

421 
364 
454 
691 
645 

802 
246 
147 
912 
60 

2,266 
460 
507 
476 
326 

463 
731 

1,006 
360 

1,190 

1,145 

2,707 

513 

138 

547 

111 
351 
389 
720 
656 

493 
344 
153 
1,128 
360 

492 

636 

1,778 

275 

452 



1,004 

1,425 

1,16: 

587 

490 

642 

845 

197 

374 

1,714 

393 
335 
234 
843 
1,009 

389 
699 
540 
499 
327 

1,113 
944 
245 

1,974 
236 



*P«y roll includoi 



I eompaniallon lor propriolor. ol unlncorporslad bu.ino.i... Numb.* ol «raploy«a« indud*. lull iim. .od part-llmo (eombio.d). 





















Vol. 


1 - Page 2 - 35 


Ceniiu ol Businesa 
ReUit Dittnbution; 1935 

INCLUDl 




TABLE 


llA - 


CITY TOTALS, FOR CITIES OF 10,000 TO 50.000 POPULATION 








NG 40 NEW ENGLAND TOWNS, 


MARKED (T), FOR WHICH 1933 COMPARABLE DATA ARE AVAILABLE 










NUMBER OF STORES. 


SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 










CITY 


Number 

oi 
•tore* 


Sala 

lailil 0001 


Pro- 
prietor! 


Em- 
ployee*" 


Total 
P.T Roll" 
(m ooo) 


CITY 


Numbel 
ol 

•tor«* 


Sale. 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
pneton 


Em- 
ployee." 


TotJ 

Par Roll" 

(«u ooo) 


CooptoQ, Calif. 


850 


* 4,673 


E35 


405 


t 360 


Fltohburg, Uaas. 


567 


»16,462 


402 


2,010 


»1,885 


CODCord, N. H. 


32* 


11,048 


273 


1,269 


1,239 


Floral Park, N. Y. 


212 


4,605 


188 


391 


406 


Concord, N. C. 


183 


4,372 


171 


646 


426 


Florence, Ala. 


248 


5,709 


235 


695 


559 


ConMllsvllls, P». 


egi 


6,164 


190 


777 


662 


Florence, S. C, 


309 


7,011 


235 


1,064 


749 


ConnorsTllls, Ind* 


n< 


4,593 


176 


576 


499 


Fond du Lac, Wla. 


458 


12,102 


382 


1,464 


1,222 


CODShobocken, Pa. 


19S 


2,097 


195 


222 


160 


Forest Park, 111. 


216 


5,845 


183 


702 


1,063 


Coraopoll3, Pa. 


us 


3,040 


124 


312 


270 


Fort Collins, Colo. 


197 


5,031 


168 


620 


529 


Cornlne, t:. Y. 


292 


6,248 


244 


722 


684 


Fort Dodge, Iowa 


408 


11,783 


367 


1,457 


1,207 


Corpus Cbrlstl, Tex. 


589 


13,878 


556 


1,817 


1,504 


Fort Madison, Iowa 


230 


3,582 


225 


447 


327 


Corcleanfl, Tex. 


299 


6,814 


275 


818 


579 


Fort Scott, Kans. 


214 


4,004 


208 


528 


380 


Cortland, N. Y. 


299 


8,238 


257 


944 


851 


Fort Smith, Ark. 


546 


12,099 


502 


1,602 


1,281 


CosboctoD, Ohio 


2S9 


5,679 


230 


662 


549 


Port Thomaa, Ky. 


73 


939 


70 


108 


82 


Council Bluffs, Iowa 


594 


13,411 


557 


1,672 


1,420 


Fostorla, Ohio 


187 


4,173 


160 


560 


400 


Cranston, R. I. 


3** 


5,380 


281 


577 


523 


Fraffllngbam, Mass. (T) 


325 


8,824 


207 


953 


912 


CranfordSTllle, Ind. 


194 


4,812 


183 


636 


491 


Frankfort, Ind. 


167 


4,285 


157 


531 


416 


Cudahy, Wis. 


177 


2,351 


179 


228 


162 


Frankfort, Ky. 


188 


4,662 


176 


600 


467 


Cumberland, Md. 


604 


16,467 


518 


1,983 


1,712 


Franklin, Po. 


219 


4,797 


199 


591 


495 


Cujnberlond, H. I. (T) 


166 


1,440 


162 


257 


166 


Frederick, Md. 


302 


7,905 


257 


1,063 


900 


Cuyahoga falls, Ohio 


223 


4,873 


167 


546 


482 


Freeport, 111. 


317 


8,917 


298 


1,038 


949 


Danbury, Conn. 


489 


12,823 


376 


1,375 


1,362 


Proeport, N. Y. 


399 


9,505 


321 


940 


1,009 


Danvera, Mass. (T) 


IBO 


3,067 


151 


377 


337 


Fremont, Nobr. 


216 


5,761 


205 


633 


497 


Denvllla, 111. 


601 


15,690 


499 


2,081 


1,770 


Pramont, Ohio 


232 


6,122 


176 


732 


606 


DanYllle, 7a. 


367 


13,365 


326 


1,722 


1,419 


Fullerton, Calif. 


192 


4,251 


176 


389 


419 


Daytona Beach, ?la. 


501 


8,618 


435 


1,257 


978 


Fulton, N. Y. 


199 


4,576 


172 


467 


391 


Decatur, Ala. 


257 


5,448 


242 


651 


457 


Gadsden, Ale. 


350 


8,295 


294 


1,031 


756 


Decatur, Ge. 


124 


3,978 


95 


493 


407 


Gainesville, Fla. 


204 


4,139 


173 


671 


409 


Dedhec, Mass. tT) 


126 


3,341 


86 


409 


405 


Oalaeburg, 111. 


38?, 


11,157 


362 


1,447 


1,275 


Del Rio, Tex. 


171 


3,011 


183 


457 


329 


Gardner, Mass. 


256 


6,520 


!>13 


764 


649 


Denlson, Tex. 


199 


4,132 


194 


578 


423 


Garfield, H. J. 


379 


3,760 


371 


ai 


194 


Derby, Conn, 


240 


3,667 


196 


472 


414 


Garfield Heights, Ohio 


117 


1,438 


110 


126 


109 


Dickson City, ?c. 


133 


1,222 


123 


139 


116 


Gastonla, M. C. 


243 


6,063 


199 


964 


701 


Doico City, Kans. 


219 


5,750 


204 


732 


595 


Geneva, N. Y. 


260 


7,024 


204 


864 


849 


Donora, Pa. 


174 


3,362 


163 


364 


271 


Glen Cove, N. Y. 


246 


5,818 


215 


6a 


6U 


Donnont, Pa, 


100 


3,955 


74 


401 


371 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


336 


11,405 


270 


1,265 


1,234 


Dothan, Ala. 


249 


5,629 


161 


803 


506 


Gloucester, Mass, 


451 


8,491 


362 


1,020 


1,106 


Dover, !!. H. 


213 


f,165 


170 


753 


727 


Gloucester, N. J. 


191 


2,567 


173 


276 


297 


DoTor, 11. J. 


as 


4,978 


178 


584 


571 


Gloversvllle, N. Y. 


342 


11,330 


293 


1,249 


1,233 


Du Bols, Pa. 


214 


5,237 


209 


696 


513 


Goldsboro, N. C. 


269 


5,893 


244 


779 


577 


IXibuque, lova 


665 


16,157 


627 


2,091 


1,743 


Goshen, Ind. 


196 


3,917 


163 


518 


402 


Dunkirk, K. Y. 


270 


8,760 


237 


686 


594 


Grand Forks, N. Dak. 


286 


10,294 


243 


1,172 


1,037 


Dumr.ore, Pa. 


288 


2,714 


281 


293 


236 


Grand Island, Heb. 


318 


9,542 


284 


1,178 


1,072 


IXiquesne, Pq. 


195 


2,830 


182 


321 


222 


Grand Junction, Colo. 


209 


6,581 


199 


717 


614 


East Cleveland, Ohio 


323 


7,044 


282 


757 


792 


Granite City, 111. 


222 


3,935 


204 


493 


465 


£ast Kanpton, ilass. (T) 


153 


2,025 


146 


250 


173 


Great Falls, Mont. 


453 


17,321 


393 


1,723 


2,061 


East Liverpool, Ohio 


469 


10,105 


425 


1,315 


1,142 


Greeley, Colo. 


212 


6,973 


192 


800 


651 


Bast ■■lollna, 111. 


142 


1,809 


147 


179 


144 


Green Bay, Wis. 


703 


20,073 


696 


2,556 


2,317 


Easton, Pa. 


676 


17,761 


565 


2,506 


2,350 


Greenfield, Mass. (T) 


262 


7,549 


221 


891 


610 


East Providence, R. I. (Tl 


270 


5,714 


241 


670 


680 


Greeneburg, Pa. 


308 


10,563 


233 


1,406 


1,180 


Eau Claire, Wis. 


442 


11,508 


365 


1,424 


1,261 


Greenville, Miss. 


257 


5,181 


257 


732 


574 


Scorse, Mich. 


15S 


1,719 


142 


228 


167 


Greenville, S. C. 


562 


19,105 


412 


2,690 


2,257 


El Dorado, Ark. 


313 


6,906 


297 


890 


719 


Greenville, Tex. 


272 


5,167 


253 


719 


490 


El Dorado, Kens. 


175 


5,031 


156 


549 


473 


Greenwood, Miss. 


175 


4,207 


158 


607 


524 


Elgin, 111. 


367 


10,904 


321 


1,285 


1,154 


Greenwood, S. C. 


216 


4,774 


176 


638 


463 


Elizabeth City, H. C. 


175 


3,537 


178 


524 


327 


Griffin, Ga, 


188 


4,992 


149 


768 


536 


Elkhart, Ind. 


463 


10,503 


407 


1,316 


1,088 


Grosae Polnte Park, Mich. 


64 


1,973 


60 


236 


291 


Ell»ood City, Pa. 


XS6 


4,173 


180 


444 


353 


Oulfport, Miss. 


193 


3,479 


176 


483 


340 


Slmhurst, 111. 


157 


3,928 


139 


439 


417 


Hackensack, N, J. 


509 


16,963 


368 


1,851 


2,185 


Elmlra, N. Y. 


777 


21,406 


665 


2,741 


2,524 


Hagerstown, Md. 


513 


13,625 


445 


1,941 


1,509 


Elmwood Park, 111. 


91 


1,246 


77 


169 


123 


Hannibal, Mo. 


358 


6,844 


368 


918 


673 


Elmod, Ind. 


138 


2,648 


128 


376 


269 


Hanover, Pa. 


217 


5,277 


201 


619 


466 


EljTla, Ohio 


365 


9,724 


■ 301 


1,148 


1,016 


Harllngen, Tex. 


235 


5,454 


213 


606 


616 




281 


7,151 


276 


937 


761 


Harrlsburg, 111. 


167 


3,715 


155 


440 


353 


Endtcott, N. Y. 


254 


8,110 


229 


814 


785 


Harrison, N. J. 


255 


3,500 


238 


324 


301 


Englewood, N. J. 


276 


7,898 


183 


789 


975 


Harvey, 111. 


195 


2,961 


184 


317 


265 


Enid, Okla. 


404 


13,021 


371 


1,616 


1,352 


Hasting, Nobr. 


299 


6,594 


279 


851 


604 


Escanaba, Mich. 


210 


5,788 


182 


612 


530 


Hattleeburg, Ulas. 


289 


5,941 


263 


861 


615 


Euclid, Ohio 


139 


2,683 


118 


242 


266 


Haverhill, Mass, 


728 


14,219 


634 


1,939 


1,785 


Eugene, Ore. 


431 


11,459 


398 


1,206 


1,215 


Hawthorne, N. J. 


146 


2,306 


128 


234 


a9 


Eureka, Calif. 


364 


9,290 


380 


914 


996 


liazleton. Pa. 


629 


12,608 


563 


1,658 


1,476 


Everett, Uaas. 


4ex 


9,423 


370 


1,241 


1,038 


Helena, Mont. 


238 


9,589 


a4 


925 


1,133 


Everett, Wash. 


589 


12,690 


564 


1,495 


1,420 


Hempstead, N. Y. 


432 


15,955 


314 


1,683 


2,016 


Fairfield, Ala. 


70 


740 


54 


94 


62 


Henderson, Ey. 


•189 


3,431 


163 


483 


334 


?alrhaven, Mass. (T) 


99 


1,238 


90 


147 


109 


Herkimer, N. Y. 


185 


4,637 


151 


556 


485 


falmiont, W. Va, 


338 


9,774 


294 


1,377 


1,211 


Hlbblng, Minn. 


230 


6,756 


204 


731 


662 


Fargo, N. Dak. 


474 


17,437 


396 


2,202 


1,984 


Highland Park, 111. 


123 


6,833 


106 


598 


739 


Faribault, Minn. 


207 


4,955 


184 


537 


482 


High Point, N. G. 


449 


9,700 


365 


1,306 


1,033 


Farrell, Pa. 


189 


2,539 


180 


325 


241 


Holland, Mich. 


232 


6,284 


228 


654 


500 


Fayettevllie, H. C. 


243 


6,451 


205 


943 


725 


Homestead, Pa. 


321 


6,526 


279 


812 


640 


Ferndale, Mich. 


169 


3,838 


142 


344 


356 


Hopewell, Va. 


118 


1,814 


93 


278 


208 


Flndlay, Ohio 


zii 


7,786 


316 


946 


788 


Hopklnavllle, Ky. 


197 


4,026 


183 


581 


384 



"Pay foil includes im compctHBlion I«t proprialori oi tuUBCOfpgntad buain*MCt Number ol «iBploy*** include* fuH-Iime uid part-lima (combined). 



Vol. 1 Page 2 -36 



Census of BuaincM 

R.t^ D».„buU„„: ,935 INCLUDING 


TABLE llA - CITY TOTALS, FOR 


CITIES OF 10,000 TO 50.000 POPULATION 








40 NEW ENCUJVND TOWNS. MARKED |T>, FOR WHICH 1933 COMPARABLE DATA ARE AVAILABLE 








NUMBER OF STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 












CITY 


Number 
oi 


Sales 


Pro- 


Em- 


Total 
p.r Roll* 


CITY 


Number 
of 


Sales 


Pro- 


Em- 


Total 
P«T Roil" 




■tores 


ladd 0001 


prieton 


ployMt" 


(»ld ooo) 




•tores 


lldd 0001 


prietors 


ployees' 


{•M 000) 


Hoqulem, Kaah. 


188 


t 2,716 


192 


240 


1 203 


Lynbrook, N. Y. 


242 


1 5,946 


194 


604 


t 621 


HomoU, N. T. 


244 


6,837 


220 


763 


698 


Lynchburg, Ta. 


496 


16,511 


380 


2,220 


1,886 


Eot Springs. Ark. 


482 


8,614 


454 


1,310 


875 


Mahanoy City, Pa. 


361 


3,519 


341 


456 


327 


Hudson, N. Y. 


336 


6,449 


290 


690 


656 


Kajnaroneck, N. Y. 


214 


5,291 


173 


489 


600 


HuntlQfiton, Ind, 


215 


5,062 


215 


618 


459 


Manhattan, Kans, 


213 


5,085 


186 


706 


632 


Huntington Park, 0»iir. 


539 


15,727 


495 


1,622 


1,615 


Manitowoc, «la. 


392 


10,153 


357 


1,170 


1,019 


HuntSTllls, Ala. 


251 


6,140 


223 


893 


641 


Mankato, Minn. 


316 


8,992 


288 


977 


852 


Huron, S. Dak, 


191 


4,769 


144 


586 


483 


Uanafleld, Ohio 


610 


15,785 


540 


1,839 


1,723 


Hutchinson, Kana. 


430 


14,671 


387 


1,798 


1,586 


Uaplewood, Mo. 


226 


5,640 


179 


658 


624 


Independence, Kana. 


174 


4,168 


160 


470 


350 


Marietta, Ohio 


317 


6,899 


318 


879 


675 


Independence, Ito. 


266 


6,428 


246 


845 


677 


Marinette, Wia. 


191 


6,537 


184 


857 


664 


Inglewood, Calif. 


414 


8,546 


370 


850 


842 


Marion, Ind. 


436 


9,538 


403 


1,286 


1,078 


Iowa City, Iowa 


260 


9,357 


243 


1,240 


926 


Marion, Ohio 


461 


11,125 


380 


1,402 


1,188 


Iron Mountain, Mich. 


191 


3,674 


182 


401 


293 


Marlborough, Maaa. 


233 


6,007 


200 


584 


541 


Ironton, Ohio 


290 


5,045 


279 


690 


513 


Marquette, Mich. 


156 


4,485 


154 


526 


418 


Ironwood, Mich. 


185 


4,239 


170 


512 


367 


Marshall , Tex. 


274 


5,866 


266 


683 


522 


Ithaca, N. Y. 


364 


14,085 


289 


1,740 


1,779 


Marshal It own, Iowa 


392 


6,911 


388 


846 


599 


Jackson, Ulas. 


536 


18,281 


476 


2,791 


2,281 


Martinsburg, W. Va. 


270 


4,569 


238 


633 


457 


Jackson, Tenn. 


330 


9,189 


300 


1,393 


962 


Martins Ferry, Ohio 


314 


4,436 


309 


466 


353 


Jacksonville, 111. 


259 


7,463 


237 


878 


678 


Mason City, Iowa 


411 


11,625 


370 


1,369 


1,192 


Jamestown, N. Y. 


666 


17,318 


581 


2,320 


1,921 


Massena, N. Y. 


159 


2,926 


142 


337 


250 


Janesvllla. Wis. 


317 


10,036 


262 


1,291 


1,084 


Maasillon, Ohio 


432 


10,299 


382 


1,347 


1,125 


Jeannette, Pa. 


210 


4,422 


175 


529 


442 


Mattoon, 111. 


265 


5,788 


249 


689 


557 


Jefferson City, Uo. 


311 


8,079 


268 


1,025 


859 


Maywood, 111. 


228 


4,339 


174 


484 


455 


JeffereonTiUa, Ind. 


221 


3,229 


211 


386 


294 


UcAlester, Okla. 


221 


4,706 


213 


593 


462 


Johnson City, K. Y. 


168 


5,339 


147 


570 


584 


McComh, Miss. 


203 


2,483 


198 


405 


265 


Johnson City, Tenn. 


339 


8,329 


301 


1,142 


926 


UcKees Rocks, Pa. 


233 


3,478 


210 


374 


281 


Johnstown, H. Y. 


167 


4,057 


155 


416 


417 


IbadTills, Pa. 


327 


8,702 


311 


1,044 


908 


Jollet, 111. 


543 


15,277 


464 


2,070 


1,795 


Medford, Ore. 


236 


7,720 


216 


826 


808 


Joneaboro, Ark. 


£23 


4,572 


200 


611 


603 


Uslrose, Maaa. 


180 


5,313 


134 


592 


623 


Joplln, Mo, 


623 


14,997 


580 


1,975 


1,607 


Melroae Park, 111. 


125 


1,936 


110 


248 


204 


Kankakee, 111. 


374 


10,297 


329 


1,332 


1,124 


Menominee, Mich. 


159 


2,587 


154 


301 


264 


Kearny, H. J. 


450 


7,374 


377 


664 


630 


Merlden, Conn. 


630 


12,975 


527 


1,402 


1,337 


Keens, N. B. 


215 


7,374 


169 


839 


771 


Meridian, Mlse. 


409 


7,090 


371 


1,099 


792 


Kenmore, N. Y. 


U7 


4,793 


107 


507 


441 


Mothuen, Maaa. (T) 


208 


2,719 


193 


348 


289 


Keokuk, Iowa 


292 


6,180 


279 


737 


540 


Michigan City, Ind. 


380 


8,100 


342 


1,025 


823 


Kewanae, 111. 


267 


5,706 


233 


741 


644 


Middleaborough, Ky. 


110 


3,318 


96 


44.7 


316 


Key West, Fla. 


166 


2,207 


163 


345 


189 


Mlddletown, Conn. 


376 


9,601 


305 


1,203 


1,251 


Klngaport, Tenn. 


172 


5,606 


123 


689 


548 


Klddletown, N. Y. 


366 


9,816 


341 


1,100 


1,097 


Kingston, N. Y. 


566 


L2,541 


631 


1,323 


1,263 


Mlddletown, Ohio 


490 


12,090 


435 


1,289 


1,214 


Kingston, Fa. 


255 


5,455 


210 


666 


574 


Milford, Mass. (T) 


201 


4,675 


176 


503 


463 


Klnston, N. C. 


265 


6,683 


258 


729 


623 


MlllTille, N. J. 


259 


3,685 


225 


448 


365 


Klamath Falls, Ol». 


317 


11,672 


291 


1,128 


1,133 


Milton, Maaa. (T| 


89 


3,565 


67 


404 


617 


Xokomo, Ind. 


447 


10,663 


414 


1,330 


1,078 


Minot, N. Dak. 


280 


8,909 


245 


1,020 


931 


Lackawanna, N. Y. 


347 


4,119 


324 


370 


289 


Miabawaka, Ind. 


386 


5,943 


376 


684 


658 


Lacoala, }:. H. 


223 


6,271 


194 


586 


544 


Miasoula, Mont. 


285 


9,321 


259 


940 


1,048 


La Crosse, Wis, 


529 


14,142 


484 


1,718 


1,450 


Mitchell, S. Dak. 


225 


6,246 


193 


712 


581 


Lafayette, Ind. 


441 


13,154 


371 


1,713 


1,474 


Moberly, Mo. 


221 


3,695 


206 


572 


373 


Lafayette, La. 


272 


5,763 


237 


989 


617 


Modeato, Calif. 


427 


15,304 


402 


1,357 


1,520 


La Grange, Ga. 


259 


4,652 


229 


618 


447 


Molina, 111. 


458 


11,712 


424 


1,541 


1,142 


La Orange, 111. 


122 


4,310 


82 


602 


499 


1/onessen, Pa. 


281 


4,201 


253 


633 


377 


Lake CharlBs, La. 


312 


8,267 


256 


1,161 


1,011 


Monroe, La. 


415 


11,273 


323 


1,560 


1,296 


Lakeland, Fla. 


415 


7,286 


375 


969 


712 


Monroe, Mich. 


330 


7,939 


277 


982 


876 


Lancaster, Ohio 


292 


6,895 


258 


822 


670 


Monrovia, Calif. 


203 


3,974 


188 


404 


337 


La Porte, Ind. 


233 


6,086 


192 


721 


636 


Montclair, N. J. 


580 


17,629 


441 


1,818 


2,257 


Laredo, Tex. 


479 


6,514 


450 


946 


587 


Morgantown, W. Va. 


260 


6,750 


236 


892 


690 


U Salle, 111. 


262 


5,146 


245 


645 


523 


Morriatown, N. J. 


340 


10,283 


230 


1,154 


1,218 


Latrobe, Pa. 


181 


3,443 


165 


420 


322 


Moundaville, W. Va. 


196 


3,179 


186 


366 


246 


Leural, Klaa, 


240 


4,570 


200 


676 


497 


Mount Can»l, Pa. 


216 


3,490 


176 


460 


340 


Lawrence, Kans. 


258 


6,751 


253 


841 


660 


Mount Clemens, Mich. 


239 


6,488 


226 


746 


687 


Lawton, Okla. 


263 


5,485 


265 


750 


553 


Mount Vernon, 111, 


211 


3,168 


201 


390 


320 


Leavenworth, Kana. 


341 


6,115 


322 


789 


638 


Ivluncie, Ind. 


673 


16,797 


584 


2,337 


1,948 


Lebanon, Pa. 


489 


9,790 


408 


1,283 


1,006 


Munhsll, Pa. 


63 


1.296 


52 


108 


98 


Leominster, Uaaa. 


285 


6,267 


263 


794 


668 


Muacatine, Iowa 


331 


7,265 


333 


936 


649 


Uwlston, Ma. 


547 


16,483 


486 


2,084 


1,869 


Muskegon, Mich. 


652 


17,583 


570 


2,153 


1,848 


LewlGtown, Pa. 


275 


6,479 


240 


963 


695 


Muakagon Heights, Mich. 


148 


3,487 


141 


293 


260 


Lexington, Ky. 


809 


23,608 


616 


3,464 


2,926 


Muskogee. Okla, 


556 


11,867 


507 


1,687 


1,331 


Llaa, Ohio 


648 


15,770 


543 


2,173 


1.790 


Nanticoke, Pa. 


428 


6,023 


377 


768 


689 


Llr.coln. 111. 


206 


3,817 


192 


507 


354 


Nashua, N. H. 


455 


11,628 


391 


1,326 


1,248 


Lincoln H. I. (T) 


105 


1,201 


103 


189 


135 


Natchez, L'laa, 


219 


2,733 


210 


456 


291 


Lincoln Park, Mich. 


116 


1,796 


119 


200 


165 


Hatick, Maaa. IT) 


LS5 


2,738 


96 


239 


279 


Linden, K. J. 


407 


4,379 


350 


493 


417 


Naugotuck, Conn. 


206 


3,864 


171 


434 


377 


Little Falls, N. Y. 


196 


3,279 


172 


433 


333 


Needhan;, Maao. 


132 


3,645 


75 


408 


414 


Lockport. N. Y. 
Lodl, N. J. 


345 


9,790 


278 


1,093 


1,070 


New Albany, Ind. 


377 


6,616 


341 


774 


636 


121 


1,463 


116 


137 


115 


Newark, Ohio 


544 


12,004 


525 


1,615 


1,295 


Loganaport, Ind. 
LOQR Branch, N. J. 
LongTlew, Kaah. 
Lorain. Ohio 


336 


6,707 


306 


904 


701 


New Bern, M. C. 


247 


4,416 


»19 


746 


tai 


318 


5,720 


263 


648 


612 


How Brunswick, N. J. 


739 


16,027 


605 


1,873 


1,876 


107 


4,417 


92 


481 


479 


Newburgh, N. Y. 


730 


16,411 


650 


1,747 


1,742 


644 


11,976 


556 


1,632 


1,244 


Newburyport, Maaa. 


245 


5,962 


186 


669 


638 


Lubbock, Tax. 


388 


10,589 


388 


1,278 


1,015 


New Caatle, Ind. 


252 


6,217 


227 


747 


689 



'Pay toll tncludti no comparwalion <«■ p(»p>l«lor« ol untncwpoiaiMl buiin«M<i. Numb«r of amploya*! >nclud<i fuJ 





















Vol. 1 - Pa«e 2i-37 


Ceimu of BinineM 
ReUil Distribution: 1935 

INCLUDING 


TABLE UA 


- CITY TOTALS, FOR CITIES OF 10,000 TO 50,000 POPULATION 








40 NEW ENGLAND TOWNS, MARKED (T), FOR WHICH 1933 COMPARABLE DATA ARE AVAILABLE 










NUMBER OF STORES. 


SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 










CITY 


Number 

ol 

•tore* 


Sola 
lidd 0001 


Pto- 

pheton 


Em- 
ployees" 


TotJ 
Pm RoU- 

(^ 000) 


CITY 


Number 

oi 

■torco 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Pio- 

prietOTS 


Em 
ployeos" 


Total 
Psr Roll- 
(.u ooo) 


Now CaMle, Fa. 


978 


»15,617 


757 


2,037 


♦ 1,593 


Ponce City, Okla. 


226 


»6,633 


196 


772 


♦647 


Now Eonaln^ton, Pa. 


35E 


8,800 


309 


1,043 


859 


Port Angeloa, Waah. 


190 


4,802 


170 


457 


481 


Now London, Conn. 


558 


16,248 


410 


1,887 


2,049 


Port Chester, N. Y, 


482 


11,582 


416 


1,131 


1,355 


Now Phlladolplila, Ohio 


£14 


4,889 


201 


620 


509 


Port Huron, Mich. 


S44 


13,603 


476 


1,612 


1,409 


Nowport, Ky. 


550 


9,087 


5C7 


1,056 


978 


Port Jorrlo, N. T. 


251 


4,517 


225 


482 


420 


Nowport, R. I. 


435 


11,314 


379 


1,341 


1,397 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


225 


8,713 


182 


960 


928 


Nowport Now8, Ta. 


S56 


14,524 


449 


2,164 


1,835 


Portsmouth, Ohio 


936 


14,858 


858 


1,998 


1,601 


Nowton, Iowa 


14£ 


4,761 


139 


533 


422 


Portsmouth, Va. 


615 


11,858 


512 


1,704 


1,366 


Mowton, Sana. 


166 


4,466 


147 


623 


459 


Pottstown, Pa. 


398 


8,486 


368 


1,036 


854 


Nllos, Ulols. 


18E 


3,851 


165 


471 


388 


PottBTllle, Pa. 


375 


11,620 


265 


1,594 


1,390 


Nllos, Ohio 


226 


3,490 


212 


379 


326 


Poughkeepsle, N. Y, 


764 


21,777 


685 


2,636 


2,582 


Norfolk, Notr. 


258 


5,457 


254 


673 


521 


PrOTo, Utah 


198 


5,522 


155 


645 


582 


Norrlstown, Pa. 


657 


12,027 


519 


1,430 


1,369 


Qulney, III. 


582 


12,759 


517 


1,874 


1,528 


North Adacio, Mass. 


326 


7,959 


307 


896 


778 


Rahway, N. J. 


327 


4,675 


290 


507 


608 


Northampton, Uaas. 


351 


9,507 


310 


1,058 


1,013 


Raleigh, N. C. 


878 


18,313 


450 


2,586 


2,182 


North Attloboro, Uaaa. (T) 


156 


2,565 


139 


274 


243 


Rapid City, S. Dak. 


228 


8,3«1 


198 


820 


776 


North Braddock, Pa. 


96 


673 


84 


84 


44 


Red Bank, N. 1. 


292 


6,645 


196 


698 


738 


North Llttlo Rock. Ark. 


337 


6,196 


332 


704 


506 


Redlands, Calif. 


231 


5,190 


204 


549 


543 


North Platto, Hobr. 


ae 


7,248 


204 


794 


722 


Reno, Not. 


383 


16,453 


325 


1,760 


2,133 


North ProTldoneo, B. I. 


130 


1,663 


124 


228 


162 


Renaaelaer, N. Y, 


154 


2,776 


124 


253 


252 


North Tonawanda, II. Y. 


329 


4,376 


303 


489 


412 


RoTere, Uaas. 


46S 


6,166 


391 


825 


631 


Norwalk, Conn. 


704 


16,010 


567 


1,627 


1,829 


Richmond, Calif. 


381 


7,182 


401 


668 


608 


Norwich, Conn. 


448 


11,446 


377 


1,395 


1,311 


Richmond, lad. 


546 


13,401 


462 


1,683 


1,450 


Norwood, Uass. (T) 


156 


3,839 


111 


422 


396 


Ridgafield Park, N. T. 


117 


2,488 


101 


225 


225 


Norwood, Ohio 


414 


10,734 


328 


1,234 


1,144 


Ridgewood, N. J. 


124 


4,949 


76 


482 


593 


Nutley, N. J. 


277 


3,889 


£35 


422 


368 


RiTor Rouge, Mich. 


129 


4,400 


106 


445 


481 


Cgden, Utah 


589 


16,850 


506 


2,096 


1,963 


RlTersido, Calif. 


429 


14,212 


408 


1,427 


1,515 


Ogdonoburg, N. Y. 


296 


5,346 


275 


575 


511 


Rochester, Uinn. 


314 


10,769 


283 


1,317 


1,153 


Oil City. Pa. 


276 


8,331 


228 


1,040 


871 


Rochester, N. H. 


178 


4,453 


155 


410 


377 


Okrulgoo, Okla. 


308 


5,669 


304 


779 


590 


Rock Hill, S. 0. 


201 


4,302 


150 


608 


426 


Cld Foigo, Fa. 


198 


1,537 


198 


149 


129 


Rock Island, 111. 


473 


9,708 


448 


1,279 


1,102 


Clean, N. Y. 


349 


9,910 


309 


1,184 


977 


HockTlllo Centre, N. Y. 


255 


9,711 


205 


916 


1,330 


Clycpla, -Hash. 


330 


8,323 


274 


924 


986 


Rocky Mount, N. 0. 


298 


6,945 


256 


1,088 


772 


Olyphant, Pa. 


186 


2,362 


182 


279 


191 


Rome, Ga. 


315 


9,265 


239 


1,211 


990 


Cnoldo, N. T. 


155 


3,290 


132 


357 


328 


Rome, N. Y. 


480 


10,124 


421 


1,105 


957 


Oneonta, N. Y. 


226 


7,121 


188 


839 


796 


ROBolle, N. J. 


138 


2,003 


115 


189 


173 


Ontario, Calif. 


221 


6,061 


204 


551 


615 


Roswoll, N. Hex. 


163 


6,417 


138 


572 


577 


Oranee, N. J. • 


733 


13,071 


639 


1,525 


1,699 


Royal Oak, Kloh. 


334 


10,717 


274 


1,171 


1,101 


Orlando, ?la. 


713 


17,613 


608 


2,582 


2,176 


Rutherford, N. J. 


140 


4,577 


102 


523 


572 


Oohkosh, (is. 


558 


14,246 


443 


1,809 


1,503 


Rutland, Vt. 


294 


9,664 


255 


1,141 


1,092 


Oskaloosa, Iowa 


217 


4,422 


200 


606 


463 


St. Augustine, Fla. 


302 


3,088 


266 


579 


358 


Oaalnlne, N. Y. 


247 


5,420 


209 


556 


618 


St. Charles, Uo. 


169 


3,068 


157 


366 


301 


Cawogo, N. Y. 


415 


7,477 


358 


720 


677 


St. Cloud, Minn. 


421 


9,908 


403 


1,053 


927 


Ottawa, 111. 


268 


4,781 


253 


581 


465 


St. Peteraburg, Fla. 


848 


21,108 


745 


2,888 


2,467 


Ottumwa, Iowa 


485 


9,547 


468 


1,261 


1,009 


Salem, Mass. 


719 


a, 015 


553 


2,742 


2,652 


Owensborc, Ky, 


404 


8,667 


390 


1,142 


927 


Salem, Ohio 


a7 


5,686 


186 


611 


511 


Owosso, Klch. 


231 


6,894 


186 


863 


706 


Salem, Ore. 


414 


14,265 


392 


1,573 


1,550 


Paducah, Ky. 


538 


9,947 


513 


1,509 


1,057 


Salina, Kans. 


334 


10,489 


348 


1,388 


1,111 


PolnosTllle, Ohio 


190 


6,199 


143 


716 


675 


Salinas, Calif. 


283 


8,187 


262 


794 


886 


Palestine, Tex. 


227 


4,611 


220 


642 


482 


Salisbury, Ud. 


219 


5,994 


192 


839 


659 


Palo Alto, Calif. 


246 


8,053 


228 


832 


1,016 


Salisbury, N. C. 


252 


7,824 


197 


1,005 


790 


Paiapa, Tex. 


209 


8,084 


185 


771 


774 


San Angolo, Tex. 


515 


12,689 


492 


1,447 


1,301 


Pari a, Tex. 


235 


5,443 


224 


726 


526 


San Benito, Tex. 


189 


2,016 


172 


270 


184 


Parkereburg, IK. 7a. 


533 


12,713 


466 


1,772 


1,492 


San Bernardino, Calif. 


786 


20,352 


729 


2,209 


2,166 


Park Ridge, 111. 


98 


3,104 


77 


284 


284 


San Buenaventura, Calif. 


312 


8,416 


284 


881 


922 


Parffia, Ohio 


120 


1,731 


109 


147 


143 


Sandusky, Ohio 


482 


9,799 


431 


1,294 


1,048 




292 


5,062 


282 


604 


448 


Sanford, Fla. 


208 


3,645 


177 


527 


361 


Feabody, Uaas. 


250 


4,611 


216 


465 


445 


San Leandro, Calif. 


198 


2,808 


186 


260 


236 


Peeksklll, N. Y. 


391 


8,774 


336 


910 


939 


San Mateo, Calif. 


222 


4,807 


218 


563 


562 


Fokln, 111. 


263 


5,270 


253 


640 


555 


Santa Ana, Calif. 


597 


15,717 


544 


1,665 


1,638 


Pensecola, Fla. 


488 


11,996 


450 


1,714 


1,265 


Senta Barbara, Calif, 


692 


20,194 


624 


2,334 


2,657 


Perth Amboy, N. J. 


944 


15,954 


800 


1,696 


1,694 


Santa Cruz, Calif. 


329 


7,201 


331 


729 


746 


Peru, Ind. 


219 


4,526 


228 


631 


488 


Santa Fe, N. Mei. 


157 


6,025 


135 


853 


876 


Peteraborg, Ta. 


424 


10,216 


338 


1,427 


1,162 


Senta Monica, Calif. 


982 


19,376 


904 


2,194 


2,086 


Fhenlx City, Ala. 


158 


1,536 


157 


177 


106 


Santa Rosa, Calif. . 


364 


10,639 


398 


911 


953 


Phlllipaburg, N. I. 


215 


3,158 


197 


345 


310 


Sapulpa, Okla. 


197 


3,641 


184 


524 


331 


Phoenix, Arix. 


1,033 


35,234 


894 


4,459 


4,509 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 


304 


8,512 


290 


616 


650 


FhoenixTllle, Pa. 


178 


3,038 


169 


315 


262 


Seugus, Mass. (T) 


150 


1,745 


137 


190 


143 


Pino Bluff, Ark. 


355 


7,505 


351 


1,105 


836 


Sault Ste. liarle, Mich. 


174 


5,149 


170 


556 


546 


Piqua, Ohio 


233 


5,645 


204 


761 


608 


Sedalla, Mo. 


324 


6,701 


263 


.919 


746 


Plttaburg, Kana. 


328 


•6,817 


310 


921 


721 


Selma, Ala. 


274 


6,148 


265 


915 


618 


Pittafleld, Uass. 


589 


18,069 


473 


2,174 


2,028 


Seminole, Okla. 


202 


4,690 


167 


614 


543 


Pittatoh, Pa. 


333 


6,593 


297 


957 


786 


Shaker Heights, Ohio 


58 


2,506 


40 


332 


326 


Plalnfiold, N. J. 


704 


20,469 


541 


2,443 


2,754 


Shamokln, Pa. 


349 


6,585 


313 


911 


694 


Plettaburg, N. Y. 


235 


5,891 


213 


670 


605 


Sharon, Pa. 


328 


8,239 


287 


1,004 


839 


FloaaantTlllo, N. J. 


186 


3,531 


154 


395 


397 


Shawnee, Okla. 


347 


8,582 


339 


1,006 


819 


Plymouth, Uaea. (T) 


266 


4,700 


235 


541 


461 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


519 


15,559 


441 


2,020 


1,806 


Plymouth, Pa. 


283 


3,056 


263 


444 


297 


Shelby, N. C. 


155 


4,018 


129 


512 


382 


Focatello, Idaho 


291 


9,606 


247 


1,016 


1,UB 


Shelbyrllle, Ind. 


173 


4,863 


155 


620 


489 


Pooona. Calif. 


406 


9,429 


387 


968 


969 


Sholton, Conn. 


134 


1,918 


110 


172 


153 



hir pt«p*i«lDn «l aaiBcavpomad buno«i 



Namb«r of ^mftaj^ta incliuU* full-tioM and 



Vol. I - Page 2 - 38 



Census of Business 

RetAil Distribution; 1935 „ 




TABLE llA - CITY TOTALS, FOR CITIES OF 10,000 TO 50,000 POPULATION 








INCLUDING 40 NEW ENGLAND TOWNS, 


MARKED (T,, FOR WHICH 1933 COMPARABLE DATA ARE AVAILABLE 








NUMBER OF STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 










ClPi- 


Number 

of 

■tores 


Sales 

(idd 0001 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em- 
ployees- 


Total 
P.r Roll* 

(^ 000) 


CITY 


Number 

ol 

stores 


Sales 

lidd 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees* 


Total 
tn KM' 

(m 000} 


ShenandooLb. Pa. 


428 


t 5,595 


397 


713 


$ 556 


Warren, Ohio 


611 


»16,034 


544 


1.974 


♦1,766 


Shenaan, Tex. 


277 


6,127 


267 


863 


539 


Warren, Pa. 


225 


7.085 


208 


819 


743 


Shor«»Doa, Wla. 


73 


2,297 


59 


252 


236 


Warwick, R. I. (T) 


292 


3,409 


250 


512 


410 


Sloui falls, S. Dak. 


599 


18,240 


506 


2,222 


2,118 


Washington, Pa. 


444 


12,441 


378 


1.677 


1,368 


Southbrldge, Mass. (T) 


235 


5.010 


206 


521 


469 


Waterloo, Iowa 


719 


20,846 


657 


2.629 


2,173 


Soutli Gate, Calif. 


zee 


4,283 


280 


397 


347 


Watortown, Mass. (T) 


302 


9,355 


240 


1.023 


1,137 


South Ullwaukee, Wis. 


165 


2,534 


156 


208 


158 


Watertoim, M. Y. 


576 


14.716 


503 


1,858 


1,611 


South Orange, N. J. 


138 


5,024 


95 


556 


626 


Watertown, S, Dak. 


232 


5.723 


203 


614 


488 


South Paaadena, Calif. 


152 


3,123 


146 


327 


320 


Watertown, Wis. 


210 


6,168 


176 


590 


487 


South Portland, Mo. 


IS2 


2,916 


161 


284 


254 


Waterville. Mo. 


259 


7,177 


233 


826 


719 


South RlTsr, N. J. 


189 


2,446 


171 


247 


197 


Watervliet. N. Y. 


214 


2.610 


211 


251 


176 


South St. Paul, Minn. 


175 


3,992 


172 


374 


346 


Waukeenn, 111. 


349 


12,077 


279 


1,336 


1,362 


Spartanburg, S. C. 


471 


13,074 


361 


1.886 


1,483 


Waukeihii, Wis. 


235 


7,169 


200 


866 


719 


Stamford, Conn. 


844 


21,766 


666 


2,232 


2,666 


Wausau, Vlls. 


367 


11,097 


334 


1,243 


1,114 


StatasTllle, !1. C. 


196 


4,123 


176 


621 


412 


Wauwatosa, Vjis. 


170 


4,506 


160 


463 


513 


Staunton, Va. 


251 


5,536 


207 


769 


698 


Waycross, Ga. 


274 


5,669 


240 


828 


517 


Steel ton. Pa. 


174 


1,769 


162 


236 


181 


Waynesboro, Pa. 


164 


3,886 


149 


520 


353 


Sterling, 111. 


155 


4,489 


129 


521 


466 


Webster, M.a2 = . (T) 


152 


3,966 


121 


421 


366 


Steubenvllle, Ohio 


689 


19,748 


528 


2.434 


2,265 


Webster Groves, Mo. 


172 


5,618 


137 


655 


693 


Stevens Point, Wis. 


245 


5,882 


216 


711 


602 


Wellesley, Mass. (T) 


141 


5,461 


90 


C17 


731 


Stockton, Calif. 


1,112 


33,092 


1,192 


3,262 


3.749 


Wenatchee, Wash. 


266 


10,174 


203 


1,070 


1,104 


Stonehara, Mass, (T} 


103 


1,984 


79 


263 


198 


West Allla, Wis. 


504 


8,935 


452 


876 


786 


Strsator, 111. 


256 


6,472 


244 


712 


553 


Wostbrook, Me. 


164 


2,893 


132 


294 


266 


Struthers, Ohio 


112 


2,172 


91 


230 


194 


West Chaster, Pa. 


249 


6.306 


208 


766 


652 


Suffolk, Va. 


229 


4,352 


211 


673 


459 


Westerly, R. I. 


185 


4.758 


153 


577 


636 


Summit, N. J. 


242 


6,824 


186 


693 


743 


Westfleld, Mass. 


244 


6.238 


202 


723 


666 


Sunter, S. C. 


254 


6,139 


183 


1,009 


645 


Westfield, H. J. 


224 


6,507 


178 


672 


732 


Sunbury, Pa. 


213 


5,196 


156 


748 


575 


West Frinkfort, 111. 


202 


3,237 


163 


398 


317 


Superior, Wis. 


539 


11,909 


481 


1.342 


1.260 


West .»;o« York, H. J. 


828 


11,469 


717 


1,145 


1,211 


Swampacott, Mass. (T) 


72 


2,122 


67 


272 


262 


West Orenee. H. J. 


236 


4,508 


197 


449 


4G2 


Sweetwater, Tex. 


115 


3,550 


101 


332 


343 


West Palm Beach, Fla. 


639 


15,237 


460 


2,040 


1.883 


Swlssvale, Pa. 


93 


1,841 


75 


190 


157 


West Springfield, M.ass. (T) 


^7 


4,467 


195 


525 


473 


Tallahassee, 71a, 


245 


5,241 


227 


704 


525 


West Warwick, P.. I. (T) 


234 


4.716 


220 


536 


445 


TamaqUB, Pa. 


236 


3,829 


209 


476 


412 


Wewoka, Ckla. 


163 


3.140 


134 


382 


304 


Taunton, Mass. 


439 


11,897 


371 


li496 


1,402 


•Aeynouth, Vase. fT) 


249 


5.091 


184 


666 


493 


Taylor, Pa. 


99 


861 


102 


7b 


57 


Whlto Plains, t!. Y. 


828 


30.081 


602 


3.346 


4.010 


Temple, Tex. 


300 


5,603 


235 


710 


520 


Whiting. Ind. 


189 


2.926 


184 


337 


259 


Texarkana, Ark. - Tax. 


505 


10,217 


486 


1,356 


935 


aittler, Calif. 


274 


7,634 


247 


744 


865 


ThoQiasTille, Oa. 


232 


3,533 


208 


574 


370 


iSichltu Falls, Tex. 


565 


16,146 


525 


2.144 


1,891 


Thomasville, il. C. 


104 


2,034 


92 


232 


173 


WllfcinshMrG, Pa. 


279 


8,077 


233 


982 


647 


Tiffin, Ohio 


279 


5.530 


241 


717 


536 


Wlllliuasport, Pa. 


703 


16,610 


686 


2,319 


1,913 


Tonawanda, N'. Y. 


180 


4,824 


166 


569 


479 


lillii. antic. Conn. 


284 


6,061 


241 


663 


637 


Torrlngton, Conn. 


376 


8,349 


297 


968 


918 


i;ilmette. 111. 


112 


2,912 


82 


342 


374 


Travorso City, Mich. 


229 


6,544 


210 


783 


704 


Wilmington, N. C. 


492 


10,386 


451 


1.633 


1,197 


Trinidad, Colo, 


175 


4,835 


171 


570 


434 


Wilson, H. C. 


255 


7.034 


232 


912 


718 


Tucson, Ariz. 


496 


16,896 


451 


1.986 


1,866 


Kinohoster, Mass. (Tl 


100 


2.906 


66 


320 


311 


Turtle Creak, Pa. 


135 


2,671 


109 


284 


232 


■Winchester, Va. 


231 


6.301 


183 


784 


661 


Tuscaloosa, Ala. 


2U4 


7,960 


270 


1,094 


822 


Vi'innotks, 111. 


98 


5,648 


62 


620 


690 


Two SlTers, Wis. 


l.^l 


2,866 


119 


290 


236 


Winonn, Minn. 


387 


10.084 


355 


1,190 


1,09.-, 


Tyler, Tex. 


436 


16,219 


372 


1,632 


1,604 


Wlnthrop. Mass. (T) 


155 


2,921 


127 


390 


307 


Uaiontown, Pa. 


388 


12,898 


333 


1,662 


1,471 


Wobum. Mass. 


276 


5.954 


244 


734 


681 


University City, Mo. 


190 


5,163 


166 


641 


606 


Woonsocket, R. I. 


651 


15,763 


615 


1,985 


1,676 


Urbane, 111. 


179 


3,460 


169 


419 


348 


Woostor, Ohio 


233 


6,681 


211 


756 


673 


Valdosta, Ga. 


278 


5,014 


247 


791 


542 


Wyandotte, Mich. 


326 


7,869 


286 


721 


756 


Vallejo, Calif. 


332 


8,613 


319 


351 


987 


Xenla, Ohio 


201 


4,806 


187 


653 


421 


Valley Stream, N, Y. 


184 


3,612 


156 


332 


306 


Yakima, Wash. 


581 


19,826 


606 


2,058 


2.228 


Vancouver, WasL. 


335 


7,103 


293 


786 


754 


Ypsllnnti, Mich. 


193 


5.327 


174 


6ie 


472 


Vandargrlft, Pa. 


160 


3,149 


149 


326 


234 


ZanosvilJa, Ohio 


681 


15.197 


698 


1,943 


1.660 


Ticksburg, Miss. 


2S4 


4,461 


233 


721 


490 














Vlncennes, Ind. 


306 


6,202 


274 


780 


559 














Virginia, Minn. 


197 


6,201 


169 


669 


62b 














Wakefield, Mass. (rl 


171 


4,230 


128 


489 


392 














•*alla Walla, Wash. 


367 


10,820 


334 


1,163 


1,161 














Walllngford, Conn. 


242 


3,659 


222 


409 


317 














Waltham, M.a8B. 


487 


16,045 


356 


2,021 


1,912 















*Pay fall includ** no eoiBpciual'on ta( piepticlor* of unlncofpofklad bwin«M«t. Number o( •aylvyM* Includti tulf-lfma and p*n-tim« (combln»d). 





















Vo 


. 1 - Pase 2-39 


Ceiuu» of ButincM TABLE 


I2A - CITY TOTALS. FOR CITIES OF MORE THAN 50.000 POPULATION 






Rclul Distribution: 1935 




NUMBER OF STORES, 


SALES, 


PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 












ALL KINOS OF BUSINESS COMBINED 








CITY 


Number 
of 


Sala 


Pro- 


Em- 


Total 
P., Roll' 


CITY 


Number 
of 


Sales 


Pro- 


Em- 


Tol.l 

Pay Roll* 




•lore* 


ladd 0001 


pneton 


ployees' 


{.M 000) 




stores 


(add 0001 


prietors 


ployees' 


(.aa 000) 


Akron,' Ohio 


3,303 


( 95,899 


2,675 


12,721 |12, 725 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


4,757 


t 139,084 


3,912 


20,712 


P8,911 


Albany, N.Y. 


2,256 


79,742 


1,926 


9,620 


9,663 


IrvlQgton, N. J. 


936 


14,348 


822 


1,444 


1,418 


Allantown, Pa. 


1,424 


36,659 


1,226 


5,177 


4,403 


Jackson, Mich. 


746 


19,719 


665 


2,398 


2,104 


Altoona, Pa. 


1,152 


25,545 


954 


3,714 


2,963 














AahOTllle, N. C. 


668 


19,351 


512 


2,806 


2,322 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


1,991 


60,745 


1,634 


8,027 


6,507 


Atlanta, Sa. 


3,833 


136,842 


2,894 


19,570 


16,343 


Jersey City, N. J. 


4,890 


76,954 


4,201 


8,186 


6,651 














Johnstown, Pa, 


705 


20,193 


569 


2,948 


2,490 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


1,734 


37,107 


1,364 


6,526 


5,092 


Kalamazoo, Mich. 


804 


26,880 


701 


3,105 


2,996 


Augusta, Ca. 


971 


20,584 


870 


3,267 


2,463 


Kansas City, Kans. 


1,706 


27,762 


1,694 


3,446 


2,630 


Austin, Tei. 


969 


26,695 


867 


3,695 


3,080 


Kansas City, Mo. 


6,985 


209,399 


5,131 


30,796 


26.165 


BaltlJiore, Ud. 


13,557 


301,137 


12,146 


41,495 


37,587 














BayOQna, N. ~ . 


1,217 


17,129 


1,084 


1,714 


1,591 


Kanosha, Wis. 


673 


15,969 


60S 


1,610 


1,604 


BeaumoQt, Tex. 


886 


23,035 


731 


3,143 


2,753 


Knoxvllle, Tenn. 


1,518 


41,730 


1,302 


6,216 


4,997 














Lakewood , Ohio 


583 


15,717 


434 


1,968 


1,773 


Baritoley, Calif. 


1,155 


25,636 


1,015 


3,041 


3,060 


Lancaster, Pa. 


1,363 


25,117 


1,122 


3,566 


3,024 


Bethlebem, Fa. 


869 


15,507 


763 


1,958 


1,645 


Lansing, Mich, 


1,071 


38,872 


843 


4,735 


4,606 


Blngbamton, N. Y. 


1,070 


38,048 


882 


4,520 


4,491 


Lawrence, Uass. 


1,415 


30,834 


1,244 


3,710 


3,443 


BlmlDeham, Ala. 


2,639 


73,764 


2,013 


11,403 


9,195 














Boston, &:ass. 


10,649 


439,121 


8,136 


60,968 


65,746 


Lincoln, Nebr. 


1,109 


36,426 


934 


5,068 


4,608 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


2,451 


57,030 


1,967 


7,237 


7,506 


Little Rock, Ark. 


1,319 


31,847 


1,162 


4,631 


3,685 














Long Beach, Calif. 


3,054 


63,161 


2,841 


7,163 


7,201 


Brockton, Mass. 


814 


21,977 


667 


3,222 


2,745 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


23,471 


593,902 


21,089 


79,931 


80,965 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


8,097 


205,396 


7,097 


26,652 


25,782 


Louisville, Ky, 


4,488 


100,702 


3,823 


14,907 


13,067 


Cambridge, Uass. 


1,372 


39,111 


1,063 


6,346 


5,036 


Lowell. Mass. 


1,314 


30,962 


1,114 


4,089 


3,639 


Camden, M. J. 


2,089 


38,705 


1,735 


4,665 


4,613 














Canton, Ohio 


1,529 


39,802 


1,304 


5,038 


4,608 


Lyun, Uebs. 


1,412 


34,615 


1,170 


4,666 


4,580 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


1,012 


23,586 


934 


2,865 


2,630 


Macon, Gu. 


912 


20,453 


783 


3,191 


2,435 














Madison, Wis. 


1,033 


36,267 


765 


4,764 


4,698 


Charleston, S. C. 


972 


20,142 


843 


3,184 


2,326 


Maiden, Mass. 


749 


19,775 


618 


2,571 


2,312 


Charleston, W. Va. 


1,020 


33,731 


804 


4,415 


4,402 


Manchester, N. H. 


1,058 


28,637 


948 


3,511 


3,222 


Charlotte, N, C. 


951 


31,690 


702 


4,820 


4,148 


McKeesport, Pa. 


672 


19,297 


649 


2,549 


2,053 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


1,826 


44,065 


1,471 


6,196 


6,296 














Chester, Pa. 


1,018 


17,343 


899 


2,233 


2,127 


Modford, Mass. 


419 


11,017 


313 


1,230 


1,202 


Chicago, 111. 


44,383 


1,216,706 


38,256 


160,917 


166,591 


Memphis, Tenn. 


3,242 


101,916 


2,796 


14,121 


11,632 














Miami, Fla. 


2,641 


76 , 326 


2,230 


10,113 


9,513 


Clcoro, Ul. 


990 


14,268 


961 


1,363 


1,341 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


9,351 


236,941 


8,058 


30,464 


29,214 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


6,948 


196,867 


5,842 


26,517 


24,776 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


6,446 
1,12't 


220,634 


6,776 


30,114 


30,032 


Cleveland, Ohio 


13,924 


355,210 


11,233 


47,601 


48,890 


Mobile, Ala. 


23,457 


962 


3,664 


2,718 


Cleveland Heights, Ohio 


314 


10,408 


224 


1,313 


1,393 














Columbia, S. C. 


840 


22,809 


630 


3,629 


2,809 


Montgomery, Ala. 


1,011 


21,425 


936 


3,361 


2,624 


Columbus, Ohio 


4,070 


118,274 


3,365 


17,007 


16,696 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. 


994 


27,660 


609 


2,705 


3,295 














Nashville, Tenn. 


3,199 


74,561 


2,849 


10,672 


8, '-71 


Covington, Ky. 


1,109 


16,424 


1,008 


2,122 


1,820 


Newark, N. J. 


8,593 


197,627 


7,405 


25,256 


27,980 


Dallas, Tei. 


4,116 


123,550 


3,587 


17,301 


15,967 


New Bedford, Mass. 


1,671 


35,197 


1,395 


4,917 


4,162 


Davenport, Iowa 


961 


26,923 


843 


3,695 


3,147 


New Britain, Conn. 


881 


18,104 


700 


2,012 


2,019 


Dayton, Ohio 


3,332 


80,483 


2,723 


10,626 


10,135 














Dearborn, lach. 


512 


15,060 


437 


1,643 


1,681 


New Haven, Conn. 


2,945 


71,638 


2,379 


8,942 


9,630 


Decatur, 111. 


787 


23,067 


707 


3,002 


2,634 


New Orleans, La. 


6,835 


123,624 


6,132 


20,917 


15,823 














New Rochelle, N. Y. 


825 


25,328 


618 


2,739 


3,340 


Denver, Colo. 


4', 184 


127,497 


3,609 


15,741 


14,873 


IJewton, Mass. 


521 


17,391 


363 


1,999 


2,071 


Des llolnes, Iowa 


2,408 


68,801 


2,161 


9,231 


8,456 


Now York, N. Y. 


U6,667 


2,847,332 


101A33 


323,590 


369,483 


Detroit, Mich. 


19,133 


543,690 


16,332 


68,672 


71,337 


Bronx Borough 


17,492 


311,499 


16,361 


26,236 


30,845 


Duluth, Minn. 


1,420 


41,073 


1,243 


5,687 


6,295 














Durham, N. C. 


577 


17,133 


446 


2,549 


1,994 


Brooklyn Borough 


37,932 


677,258 


34,675 


65,666 


74,072 


East Chicago, Ind. 


753 


9,703 


677 


1,080 


960 


Manhattan Borough 


41,233 


1,462,499 


33,666 


193,796 


!22,023 














queens Borough 


16,278 


361,364 


14,139 


33,805 


38,068 


East Orange, N, J, 


885 


22,724 


671 


2,442 


2,639 


Richmond Borough 


2,632 


44,712 


2,292 


4,085 


4,486 


East St. Louis, 111. 


1,148 


19,661 


1,041 


2,491 


2,246 


Niagara Falls, N. Y. 


1,105 


25,642 


946 


3,176 


2,889 


Elliaboth, N. J. 


2,431 


42,911 


2,149 


4,639 


4,976 


Norfolk, Va. 


2,112 


50,120 


1,729 


7,238 


6,569 


El Paso, Tei. 


1,279 


31,896 


1,190 


4,315 


3,912 














Erie, Pa. 


1,718 


38,051 


1,665 


5,290 


4,668 


Oakland, Calif. 


5,286 


141,781 


4,776 


16,068 


16,903 


Evanston, 111. 


629 


31,067 


437 


3,819 


4,640 


Oak Perk, IIJ . 


562 


23,799 


422 


3,020 


3,191 














Oklahoma City, Oklo. 


2,420 


72,308 


2,110 


9,935 


8,662 


Evansvllle, Ind. 


1,382 


30,510 


1,123 


4,116 


3,748 


Omaha, Nebr. 


3,061 


90,675 


2,545 


12,070 


11,481 


fall River, li:ass. 


1,750 


31,271 


1,526 


4,182 


3,686 


fasadena, Calif. 


1,566 


45,003 


1,243 


5,336 


5,890 


Flint, Klch. 


1,872 


.■^,303 


1,589 


6,675 


6,456 


Passaic, N. J. 


1,303 


26,665 


1,097 


2,981 


3,180 


Port Wayne, Ind. 


1,620 


42,668 


1,418 


6,021 


5,377 














Fort '.forth, Tei. 


2.441 


64,503 


2,271 


8,619 


7,201 


Paterson, N. J. 


2,650 


54,596 


2,262 


6,355 


6,649 


Fresno, Calif. 


1,478 


41,631 


1,314 


4,386 


4,771 


Pawtucket, R. I. 


1,020 


26,224 


853 


3,520 


5,363 














Peoria, 111. 


1,467 


46,816 


1,195 


6,774 


6,261 


Galveston, Tei. 


831 


17,887 


760 


2,641 


2,305 


Phllcdelrhla, Pa. 


29,604 


656,744 


26,054 


90,914 


65,696 


Gary, Ind. 


1,239 


29,277 


1,093 


3,625 


3,378 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


7,400 


266,551 


6,107 


39,617 


38,252 


Glendale, Calif. 


1,148 


28,313 


1,063 


2,950 


2,979 


Pontlac, Mich, 


779 


24,386 


639 


2,776 


2,672 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


2,375 


59,784 


2,082 


7,988 


7,116 














Greensboro, N. C, 


648 


20,875 


486 


3,121 


2,547 


Port Arthur, Tex. 


611 


14,356 


586 


1,862 


1,661 


Hamilton, Ohio 


886 


18,088 


803 


2,068 


1,920 


Portland, Me. 


1,223 


37,122 


895 


4,627 


4,756 














Portland, Ore. 


5,1U9 


147,413 


4,600 


18,079 


18,066 


Hamoond, Ind. 


816 


24,192 


725 


2,811 


2,809 


Providence, R. I. 


3,603 


113,392 


2,852 


15,919 


16,033 


Hamtramck, Kich. 


765 


13,774 


723 


1,637 


1,565 


Pueblo, Colo. 


733 


15,776 


683 


2,136 


1,655 


Harrlsburg, Pa. 


1,235 


37,895 


955 


5,487 


5,069 


^ulncy, Mass. 


827 


24,097 


622 


3,072 


2,832 


Hartford, Conn. 


2,667 


88,639 


2,088 


11,552 


12,704 














Highland Park, Hlch. 


611 


20,293 


513 


2,275 


2,207 


Haclnc, Wis. 


956 


22,217 


849 


2,409 


2,173 


Hoboken. N. J. 


1,289 


16,774 


1,173 


1,827 


1,980 


Reading, Pa. 


2,649 


48,643 


2, -124 


6,353 


5,870 














Richmond, Va. 


2,606 


79,837 


2,120 


11,363 


10,737 


Holyoke, Iilass. 


731 


17,963 


619 


2,310 


2,119 


Roanoke, Va. 


872 


28,801 


619 


3,790 


3,867 


Houston, Tei. 


3,876 


113,716 


3,414 


15,358 


13,705 


Rochester, N. Y. 


4,745 


132,420 


4,100 


16,438 


16,527 


Huntington, X. Va. 


1,078 


24,456 


861 


3,251 


2,806 


Rockford, 111. 


1,212 


31,651 


990 


4,046 


3,782 



*Pa; r«tl inchjdca Bo compouUian fof propriHora a( uaiBCorponttd bui 



Number ol cmploT*** includci tull'iime and pirt-tim* (combined). 



Vol. I - Page 2-40 



Census of Business 
Retail Dislribution: 



TABLE I2A - CITY TOTALS. FOR CITIES OF MORE THAN 50.000 POPULATION 

NUMBER OF STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL 

ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS COMBINED 



CITY 



Number 

of 

store* 



Sales 
(add 000) 



Pro- 
prietors 



Em- 
ployeea" 



Total 

Pay Roll* 



CITY 



Number 

of 

■tores 



S>Je< 

ladd 0001 



Pro- 
prietor* 



Em- 
ployees' 



Total 
P«y Roll* 

[■M ooo) 



Sacramento, Calif. 
S&elnaw, Mich. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
St. Louis, Uo. 
St. Paul, lUrnt. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Antonio, Tex, 
San Diego, Calif, 
San Francisco, Calif, 
San Jose, Calif. 
3a7annaii, Ga. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

Sc rent on. Pa. 
Seattle, Wash. 
ShreTeport, La. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
SoioerYille, Masa. 
South Bend, lad. 

Spokane, Wesh. 
Springfield, 111. 
Springfield, Llaas. 
Springfield, Mo. 
Springfield, Ohio 
Syracuse, N, Y. 



1,868 
1,044 
1,198 
12,790 
3,581 
1,649 

4,107 
3,107 
10,251 
1,066 
1,227 
1,385 

2,126 
6,105 
1,147 
1,232 
1,038 
1,379 

1,953 
937 
2,195 
1,053 
1,083 
2,798 



t 54,815 

28,860 

25,976 

316,398 

137,155 

59,229 

78,744 
75,549 
298,371 
31,049 
24,799 
37,148 

54,993 
163,185 
31,018 
28,330 
22,543 
36,214 

58,403 
28,920 
71,557 
21,406 
25,914 
81,384 



1,852 
925 
1,112 
11,159 
3,188 
1,323 

3,697 
2,965 
10,271 
1,024 
1,149 
1,246 

1,862 
5,462 

950 
1,124 

807 
1,197 

1,794 
776 

1,685 
946 
893 

2,339 



5,901 
3,482 
3,586 
45,519 
16,854 
8,242 

11,688 
8,836 

39,020 
3,279 
4,001 
4,575 

7,418 
21,185 
4,696 
3,658 
2,783 
4,642 

6,683 
3,667 
9,729 
2,819 
3,297 
10,619 



t 6,662 

3,125 

3,012 

42,755 

16,567 

7,907 

9,542 
9,191 
43,541 
3,760 
2,952 
4,224 

7,382 
21,732 
3,907 
3,104 
2,509 
4,369 

6,549 
3,447 
9,639 
2,350 
3,270 
9,875 



Tacona, Wash. 
Tampa , Fla . 
Torre Haute, Ind. 
Toledo, Ohio 
Topeka, Kans, 
Trenton, N. J, 

Troy, N. Y. 
Tulsa, Okla. 
Union City, N. J. 
Utica, N. Y. 
Waco, Tex. 
Washington, D. C. 

Watarbury, Conn, 
Wheeling, W. Ta. 
Wichita, Kans. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Wilmington, Dal. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Worcester, Itoss. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
York, Pa. 
Youngstown, Ohio 



1,774 
1,654 
1,124 
4,037 
1,053 
2,323 

1,293 

1,820 
1,258 
1,644 
898 
6,472 

1,355 
1,074 
1,813 
1,460 
2,290 
935 

2,412 

1,846 

933 

2,379 



» 39,345 
34,764 
26,790 
112,550 
26,366 
48,825 

29,818 
56,019 
24,256 
41,151 
18,586 
330,813 

33,495 
29,169 
49,464 
37,945 
48,609 
23,317 

71,908 
39,865 
25,562 
62,883 



1,610 
1,490 
1,019 
3,342 
987 
1,996 

1,156 
1,540 
1,101 
1,608 
850 
4,815 

1,076 
884 
1,647 
1,189 
1,903 
792 

1,928 

1,555 

760 

1,973 



4,e09|S 4,682 
4.056 
3,269 
14,286 
3,035 
6,867 



4,898 
3,527 
14,672 
3,596 
6,004 



3,619 
7,951 
2,646 
4,927 
2,427 
42,069 

4,233 
4,464 
6,644 
5,601 
6,159 
3,359 

8,786 
3,891 
3,273 
7,C52 



3,682 
7,380 
2,930 
4,733 
1,925 
43,905 

4,232 
3,807 
6,701 
5,209 
6,234 
2,774 

8,892 
4,384 
2,800 
7,471 



'P«y rail Include, na c»inpMMStion Iw praynetot, of uMlncorporaled buMiMMM. Nwmbo ot cnployMs laclud,, lull-iim, ui4 pail-t>in« (combtoarf). 



Vol. I Page 2 1 1 



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Vol. 1 - Page 2-44 



Census of Business TABLE 14 A 
Retail Dislrlbulion: 1935 


-PROPORTION OF STORES, SALES, 


PERSONNEL, 


AND PAY ROLL. 








BY CITY -SIZE GROUPS 










PERCENT RATIO OF EACH CITY-SIZE GROUP TO UNITED STATES TOTALS 






City-Size Group 


Number 


Sale> 


Active 
proprietors 
and firm 


Employees 
(hill-time 

and part- 
time). Avg. 

(or year 


Pay RoUo 

(add 000) 


Percent 

oi 
Division 










stores 




members 


Total 


Full-lime 


Part-time 


Total 






(Idd 000) 












ALL PLACES 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100.0 


Pieces of 


















500,000 or more 


19 


25 


18 


27 


31 


31 


25 


24.9 


250,000 to 500,000 


7 


10 


7 


12 


12 


12 


10 


10.4 


100,000 to 250,000 


7 


9 


7 


10 


10 


10 


9 


9.0 


75,000 to 100,000 


2 


S 


2 


3 


5 


3 


3 


2.6 


50,000 to 75,000 


4 


5 


4 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4.8 


30,000 to 50,000 


4 


5 


4 


6 


6 


6 


6 


5.5 


20,000 to 30,000 


i 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4.4 


10,000 to 20,000 


7 


8 


7 


8 


7 


7 


6 


7.8 


5,000 to 10,000 


6 


7 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7 


6.8 


2,500 to 5,000 


6 


6 


6 


5 


S 


5 


5 


5.7 


All otier areas 


34 


18 


36 


14 


11 


11 


17 


18.1 


TABLE 14B. - UNITED SI 


ATES SUMN 


1ARY-NUMBER OF STORES. SALES, 


PERSONNEL, 


AND PAY ROLL 




FOR THE UNITED STATES AND GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS, BY CITY-SIZE GROUPS 












Active 
proprietors 
and firm 


Employees 




Pay RoU. 




Percent 


Division 
and 


Number 
of 


Sales 


( lull-Ume 
and part- 




(add 000) 




oi 
Division 








City-Size Group 


itores 


(add 000) 


members 


time). Avg. 
tor year 


Total 


Full-time 


Part-lime 


Total 


ALL PLACES 


















UNITED STATES 
Places of 500,000 or more 


1.653.961 


»33,161,276 


1.511.734 


3.951.478 


43.523. 289 


♦3,388,166 


$235,123 


100.0 


318,176 


8,276,499 


277,070 


1,055,360 


1,105,839 


1,045,017 


60,822 


24.9 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


117,113 


3,435,065 


99,699 


461,909 


439,759 


416,541 


23,218 


10.4 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


118,079 


2,987,006 


101,112 


391,766 


368,443 


347,168 


21,275 


9.0 


Places of 75,000 to 100,000 


33,108 


858,787 


28,257 


112,547 


102,832 


96,160 


5,572 


2.5 


Places of 50,000 to 75,000 


54,233 


1,591,245 


54,559 


202,456 


188, US 


176,237 


11,881 


4.8 


Places of 30,000 to 60,000 


73,394 


1,819,790 


63,363 


226,971 


205,963 


191,671 


14,292 


5.6 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


58,646 


1,463,136 


51,513 


176,746 


157,493 


147,115 


10,378 


4,4 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


112,654 


2,597,252 


100,185 


306,938 


265,950 


247,280 


18,670 


7.8 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


104,971 


2,257,677 


96,060 


255,997 


214,194 


198,372 


15,822 


6.8 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000 


95,903 


1,880,961 


90,852 


203,570 


163,825 


161,288 


12,537 


5.7 


All other areas 


566,584 


5,993,865 


548,964 


568,208 


410,873 


371,317 


39,656 


18.1 


mm msLKW 

Places of 500,000 or more 


114,044 


2,721,911 


95,803 


330,467 


322,456 


300,257 


22,139 


100.0 


10,649 


439,121 


8,136 


60,968 


65,746 


62,944 


2,802 


15.1 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


3,603 


113,392 


2,852 


16,919 


16,033 


15,324 


709 


4.3 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


21,227 


554,471 


17,124 


72,429 


71,982 


67,316 


4,665 


20.4 


Places of 75,000 to 100,000 


4,848 


121,090 


4,121 


14,974 


14,260 


13,040 


1,220 


4.4 


Places of 60,000 to 75,000 


6,165 


167,446 


4,787 


21,043 


20,055 


18,479 


1,676 


5.2 


Places of 30,000 to 50,000 


10,874 


268,738 


8,736 


32,312 


30,772 


28,274 


2,498 


9.9 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


8,740 


213,062 


7,141 


24,689 


23,791 


22,072 


1,719 


7.6 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


11,049 


248,854 


9,302 


28,323 


25,537 


23,515 


2,022 


9.1 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


7,013 


144,928 


5,073 


16,771 


14,230 


12,962 


1,268 


5.3 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000 


2,126 


43,341 


1,869 


4,514 


4,278 


3,973 


305 


1.6 


All other areas 


27,750 


407,436 


25,662 


39,525 


36,772 


32,358 


3,414 


15.0 


laWLZ ATLANTIC 
Places of 500,000 or more 


402,028 


8.460,917 


357,709 


982.340 


989.038 


929.540 


69.498 


100.0 


150,668 


3,976,023 


140,391 


480,773 


519,213 


492,140 


27,073 


47.0 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


18,228 


406,901 


15,706 


49,879 


53,158 


50,369 


2,789 


4.8 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


24,429 


569,066 


21,031 


69,781 


68,670 


64,555 


4,015 


6.7 


Places of 75,000 to 100,000 


10,048 


255,011 


8,482 


33,963 


30,829 


28,791 


2,038 


3.0 


Places of 50,000 to 75,000 


16,067 


347,598 


13,493 


42,344 


41,696 


39,208 


2,487 


4.1 


Places of 30,000 to 50,000 


16,962 


400,434 


14,398 


47,384 


46,477 


43,449 


3,028 


4.7 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


12,868 


274,819 


U,1B9 


31,696 


28,618 


25,763 


1,865 


3.3 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


28,936 


624,343 


26,061 


70.752 


66,022 


60,437 


4,586 


7.4 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


21,639 


408,980 


19,308 


44,079 


39,488 


36,518 


2,870 


4.9 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000 


18,187 


332,265 


16,548 


33,527 


30,258 


27,795 


2,463 


3.9 


All other areas 


73,996 


865,377 


72,102 


78,162 


65,610 


59,315 


6,295 


10.2 


EAST NORTH CHJTRAL 
Places of 500,000 or more 


340,393 


7,170,866 


310,612 


873,507 


800,496 


742,463 


68.0i3 


100.0 


86,790 


2,351,547 


73,878 


307,654 


316,032 


297,002 


19,030 


32.8 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


23,115 


662,674 


19,126 


91,529 


86,393 


81,334 


6,059 


9.2 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


18,574 


485,740 


16,697 


63,457 


58,919 


66,013 


3,906 


6.8 


Places of 75,000 to 100,000 


3,327 


99,373 


2,758 


12,262 


11,51^ 


10,750 


765 


1.4 


Places of 50,000 to 75,000 


17,511 


465,149 


16,019 


55,243 


54,483 


60,428 


4,055 


5.5 


Places of 30,000 to 50,000 


20,541 


503,669 


17,931 


53,416 


55,225 


60,766 


4,469 


7.0 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


12,269 


307,771 


10,840 


37,403 


32,725 


30,027 


2,698 


4.3 


Placea of 10,000 to 20,000 


20,957 


469,162 


19,058 


56,058 


47,151 


43,300 


3,861 


6.5 


Places of 6,000 to 10,000 


22,341 


464,473 


20,992 


63,911 


43,489 


39,756 


3,733 


6.5 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000 


18,000 


330,540 


17,321 


35,463 


27,990 


25,401 


2,589 


4.6 


All other areas 


95,968 


1,028,468 


97,892 


96,011 


66,564 


58,706 


7,856 


14.4 



•Includes no cumnenMtion lor propnvlon and lirm nrtemberi of unincorporated busina 

















Vol. 1 - 


Page 2- 45 


R^u'oiiiHblJu'^ 1935 TABLE 14B.- UNITED STATES SUMMARY-NUMBF.R OF STORES. SALES, PERSONNEL, AND PAY ROLL 




FOR THE UNITED STATES AND GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS, BY CITY-SIZE GROUPS 












Active 
proprieton 
ai.J finn 
members 


EmployMe 




Pay Roll* 




Percent 


Division 

and 

City-Size Group 


Number 

ol 
stores 


Sales 


(hiU-time 
and part- 
time). Avg. 




(add 000) 




ol 
Division 
Total 


Total 


Full-time 


Part-time 






(add 000) 




for year 




























nar rqhie csmitj. 

Plaaes of 500,000 or more 


192,570 


♦3,521,954 


182,871 


413.984 


$540,260 


t315,321 


♦24,959 


100.0 


12,790 


316,398 


11,159 


45,519 


42,755 


40,115 


2,640 


9.0 


Placsi of 250,000 to 500,000 


16,012 


567,368 


14,095 


77,764 


72,764 


68,586 


4,178 


16.1 


PUces of 100,000 to 250,000 


10,406 


277,795 


9,191 


37,077 


33,765 


31,656 


2,109 


7.9 


Plaoea of 75,000 to 100,000 


3,539 


90,732 


3,170 


12,312 


10,624 


9,868 


769 


2.5 


Flaesa of 50,000 to 75,000 


4,079 


98,281 


3,710 


12,964 


11,162 


10,461 


701 


2.8 


Plaoea of 30,000 to 50,000 


3,200 


83,651 


2.927 


10,589 


9,061 


8,518 


543 


2.4 


Placae of 20,000 to 30,000 


5,851 


152,337 


5.300 


19,011 


16,161 


16,086 


1,076 


4.3 


Plaoea of 10,000 to 20,000 


12,904 


318,784 


11,781 


38,500 


31,541 


29,076 


2,466 


9.1 


?Uoe» of 6,000 to 10,000 


11,076 


260,616 


10.177 


£9,961 


23,966 


22,113 


1,863 


7.4 


PUoes of 2,500 to 5,000 


14,823 


293,411 


14,199 


30,983 


24,018 


22,121 


1,897 


8.3 


All other axoaa 


97,888 


1,062,561 


97,163 


99,304 


64,443 


67,725 


6,718 


30.2 


SOOTH ATLANTIC 
Plaoea of 500,000 or more 


181.731 


3.296.006 


163.509 


423,911 


344.069 


324,917 


19.152 


100.0 


13,557 


301,137 


12,146 


41,495 


37,667 


35,634 


1,953 


9.1 


Plaoea of 250,000 to 500,000 


10,305 


467,655 


7,709 


61,639 


60,248 


57,876 


2,372 


14.2 


Plaoea of 100,000 to 250,000 


13,294 


339,401 


11,106 


47,798 


43,616 


41,700 


1,916 


10.3 


Plaoea of 75,000 to 100,000 


4,291 


104,262 


3,504 


15,431 


12,680 


12,075 


605 


3,2 


Plaoea of 50,000 to 75,000 


8,554 


233,048 


6,677 


34,316 


28,672 


27,211 


1,461 


7.1 


Placea of 30,000 to 50,000 


6,353 


162,183 


5,345 


22,780 


18,426 


17,361 


1,049 


4.9 


PlaooB of 20,000 to 30,000 


5,688 


157,304 


4,660 


21,552 


18,035 


17,178 


857 


4.8 


Plaoea of 10,000 to 20,000 


10,790 


235,650 


9,277 


33,367 


24,677 


23,209 


1,368 


7.1 


Plaoas of 5,000 to 10,000 


U,674 


256,223 


10,063 


33,001 


26,085 


23,610 


1,478 


7.8 


Plaoea of 2,500 to 6,000 


11,441 


223,789 


10,100 


28,658 


20,426 


18,991 


1,434 


6.8 


All other areas 


85,784 


813,356 


82,702 


83,884 


64,718 


50,052 


4,666 


24.7 


EAST SOtJTH CSNTRAL 
Placee of 500,000 or more 


94,034 


1,386,429 


89,689 


175,856 


129,778 


122.167 


7.621 


100.0 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


— 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


10,369 


276,381 


8,632 


40,431 


34,094 


32,404 


1,690 


19.9 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


6,543 


160,356 


5,622 


23,063 


19,264 


18,350 


914 


11.6 


Places of .75, 000 to 100,000 





— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Places of 50,000 to 76,000 


3,247 


61,306 


2,895 


9,037 


7,162 


6,881 


261 


4,4 


Places of 30,000 to 50,000 


2,742 


67,221 


2,270 


9,894 


7,812 


7,434 


378 


4.8 


Placee of 20,000 to 30,000 


3,098 


67,840 


2,837 


9,262 


7,203 


6,740 


463 


4.9 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


4,963 


100,951 


4,618 


14,033 


10,051 


9,549 


508 


7.3 


Placee of 5,000 to 10,000 


6,201 


107,031 


4,893 


13,589 


9,726 


9,056 


670 


7.7 


Placea of 2,500 to 6,000 


7,569 


141,146 


7,357 


17,190 


11,369 


10,585 


784 


10.2 


All other areas 


50,302 


404,197 


60,665 


39,337 


23,097 


21,158 


1,939 


29.2 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 
Places of 500,000 or iKjre 


138,709 


2,309,174 


133,233 


291,496 


224,272 


212,524 


11.746 


100.0 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


14,827 


360,789 


13,133 


53,576 


45,495 


43,664 


1,831 


16.6 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


12,067 


303,470 


10,806 


42,408 


36,697 


36,373 


1,324 


13.1 


Places of 75,000 to 100,000 


2,466 


62,865 


2,112 


9,327 


7,592 


7,267 


335 


2.7 


Places of 50,000 to 76,000 


4,195 


100,548 


3,794 


13,768 


11,724 


11,168 


586 


4.4 


Places of 30,000 to 50,000 


3,336 


80,594 


3,006 


10,862 


8,952 


8,617 


335 


9.9 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


4,721 


108,830 


1,390 


14,411 


11,495 


10,936 


559 


4.7 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


9,153 


203,122 


8,567 


28,630 


20,088 


18,996 


1,092 


8.S 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


11,424 


232,019 


10,811 


29,284 


21,648 


20,318 


1,330 


10.0 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000 


12,724 


233,425 


12,369 


27,438 


19,917 


18,699 


1,218 


10.1 


All other areas 


63,796 


623,512 


64,253 


64,792 


40,664 


37,496 


3,168 


2'/'.l 


UQDIITAJH 
Places of 500,000 or more 


49,140 


1,100,728 


44,976 


U4,904 


109,178 


101,549 


7,629 


100.0 


.- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


4,184 


127,497 


3,609 


15,740 


14,873 


14,012 


861 


11. s 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


1,649 


59,229 


1,323 


8,242 


7,907 


7,318 


589 


8.4 


Placea of 75,000 to 100,000 





.. 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— - 


Places of 50,000 to 75,000 


733 


15,776 


683 


2,136 


1,655 


1,520 


136 


1.4 


Places of 30,000 to 50,000 


3,323 


105,418 


2,959 


12,777 


12,858 


12,019 


839 


9.6 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


1,367 


52,210 


1,187 


5,679 


5,867 


5,515 


372 


4.7 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


3,867 


134,871 


3,429 


14,188 


14,702 


13,729 


973 


12.3 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


5,113 


152,665 


4,631 


15,306 


14,758 


13,775 


983 


13.9 


Placea of 2,600 to 5,000 


4,448 


114,082 


3,986 


11,011 


10,436 


9,726 


710 


10.3 


All other areas 


24,456 


338,980 


23,168 


29,826 


26,102 


23,935 


2,167 


30.8 


PAcmc 

Places of 500,000 or more 


141.312 


3.193,569 


133.433 


356.013 


363.742 


339.418 


24.324 


100.0 


33,722 


892,273 


31,360 


118,961 


124,506 


117,182 


7,324 


27.9 


FUess of 280,000 to 500,000 


16,470 


452,379 


14,837 


55,332 


66,701 


52,972 


3,729 


14.2 


Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


9,888 


236,478 


9,210 


27,491 


27,623 


25,787 


1,836 


7.4 


Flaeea of 75,000 to 100,000 


4,589 


125,464 


4,U0 


14,278 


15,332 


14,362 


960 


3.9 


Places of 60,000 to 75,000 


3,682 


100,993 


3,401 


10,616 


11,510 


10,881 


629 


3.2 


Plaoas of 30,000 to 50,000 


6,063 


147,882 


6,791 


16,957 


16,360 


19,213 


1,167 


4.6 


Places of 20,000 to 30,000 


4,244 


128,945 


3,969 


13,043 


13,578 


12,798 


760 


4.0 


Places of 10,000 to 20,000 


9,935 


261,505 


9,192 


26,097 


27,271 


26,470 


1,801 


8.2 


Plaoas of 6,000 to 10,000 


9,490 


228,742 


9.09? 


21,098 


21,804 


20,164 


1,640 


7.2 


Plaoas of 2,500 to 5,000 


7,585 


168,962 


7,113 


14,786 


15,134 


13,997 


1,137 


8.3 


All othwr areas 


35,644 


449,996 


35,358 


37,368 


33,903 


30,972 


3,331 


14.1 



»la du dei no coaiDcnsation for proprietors and finn members of unmcorporated buwnessss 



Vol. I - Page 3-01 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 
VOLUME I 
Part III - United States Summary Tables for 1933 and 1929 



Table 

A - Comparison of 39 principal kinds of business, 1933 and 1929 3-04 

A - Comparison by geographic divisions and States, 1933 and 1929 3-05 

lA - Number of stores, sales, personnel, pay roll and expenses, by kinds 

of business (1933) 3-06 

IB - Number of stores, sales, personnel, pay roll and expenses, by geo- 
graphic divisions and States (1933) 3-07 

2A - Employment, by kinds of business (1933) 3-08 

2B - Employment, by geographic divisions and States (1933) 3-10 

3A - Eighteen kinds of business by types of operation (1933) 3-12 

4A - Number of stores and sales, by size of store, by kinds of busi- 
ness (1933) 3-14 

4B - Number of stores and sales, by size of store, by geographic divi- 
sions and States (1933) 3-15 

5A - Credit business for selected kinds of business (1933) 3-16 

5B - Credit business by geographic divisions and States (1933) 3-17 

7A - Analysis of sales and value of stocks on hand, by kinds of busi- 
ness (1933) 3-18 

7B - Analysis of sales and value of stocks on hand, by geographic divi- 
sions and States (1933) 3-19 

8A - Retail sales by wholesale establishments, by kinds of business( 1933) 3-20 
8B - Retail sales by wholesale establishments, by geographic divisions 

and States (1933) 3-20 

9A - Analysis of receipts of service establishments, places of amusement 

and hotels . by kinds of business (1933) 3-21 

9B - Analysis of receipts of service establishments, places of amusement 

and hotels, by geographic divisions and States (1933) 3-22 

lOA - Number of stores and sales, by kinds of business, by geographic 

divisions and States (1933) 3-23 

lOB - United States Summary, 1929 - Number of stores and sales, by kinds 

of business, by geographic divisions and States 3-24 

12A - Summary for cities of more than 50,000 population, number of stores, 

sales, employment and pay roll (1933) 3-25 

13A - Proportion of stores and sales, for eleven business groups, by 

city-size groups ( 1933) 3-27 

13B - Proportion of stores and sales, for city-size groups, by eleven 

business groups ( 1933 ) 3-27 

13C - Geographic divisions - Percent of stores, sales and population, 

by city-size groups ( 1933) 3-27 

\Vi - Number of stores and sales, by kinds of business, for the United 

States and geographic divisions, by city-size groups (1933) 5-^S 



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Vd. I Page 3- 06 



i>-n-» 

Census of 
American 
Business 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 

TABLE 1 A . UWITED STATES SUMMARY ■ - NUMBER OF STORES, SALES, PHISONNEL, PAY ROLL, AND E3PEKSES, ,BT KINDS OF BUSINESS 
(Sales, pay roll, arui expenses expressed m thousands of dollars) 



Reproduced irom Retail Volume 1 of 
the 1933 Census o( American Business 





Number 

of 

stores 


Sales 




i 

Number 
of 

proprie- 
tors 


Employment and Pat Roll 


Total 

reported 

expense 

{except 

proprietors' 

compenaa- 

lum) 


Kind of Business 


Amount 


Per- 
cent 
of 
total 


Full-time employees 


Part-time 
employees 


Total 
pay roll 
(fuU-time 

and 
part-time) 


Average 
number 


Payroll 


Average 
per year 
per em- 
ployee 


Average 
number 


PayroU 


UNITED STATES 


1,526,119 


t2S, 037,225 


100.0 


1,574,341 


2,703,325 


t2,6f,.447 


»986 


730,327 


$245,996 


12,910,445 


16,501,060 


Food group - - - - 


473,916 


6,793,010 


27.1 


493,112 


504,530 


641,032 


1,074 


178,455 


51,719 


593,651 


1,319,241 




54,243 

16,092 

10,048 

21,897 

163,538 

140,372 

38,344 

19,380 

3,767 

4,235 

107,483 


271,213 

498,536 

107,685 

170,748 

1,803,242 

3,201,042 

491,866 

188,131 

16,730 

43,817 

1,560,781 


1.1 

2.0 
.4 

.7 
7.2 
12.8 
1.9 
.7 
.1 
.2 

6.2 


60,676 
19,486 
11,648 
25,602 
161,216 
142,881 
42,155 
21,2U 
4,203 
4,034 

125,538 


21,034 

56,664 

6,187 

12,292 

99,016 

221, E25 

35,035 

35,210 

1,238 

6,630 

96,478 


16,725 

93,554 

5,570 

11,334 

100,526 

2:^3,^71 

39,712 

33,<09 

1,218 

6,523 

81,510 


748 

1,478 

900 

922 

1,019 

1,03S 

1,133 

951 

964 

984 

845 


9,527 

6,242 

1,960 

6,525 

45,856 

88,192 

12,617 

7,142 

365 

1,130 

30,115 


2,796 

2,083 

698 

1,637 

12,664 

24,303 

4,441 

2,594 

143 

358 

8,328 


18,523 

100,637 

6,266 

12,971 

U3,690 

£53,174 

44,153 

36,093 

1,361 

6,881 

89,636 


72,776 


Dairy-products stores (including milk dealers) -. 

Delicatessen stores _ 

Fruit stores and vegetable markets— - „.. 


183,303 
21,672 
34,201 

276,240 




636,158 




103,466 


Bakeries— caterers _ 

Pnttle^ hi^r and liqimr idnrm 


73,652 
4,206 




13,545 




204,049 




85,839 
21,644 

49,71£ 


1,097,437 
463,344 

3,891,272 


4.4 

1.8 

15.6 


103,014 
22,524 

43,665 


67,270 
39,203 

526,492 


63,085 
28,475 

492,608 


788 
975 

935 


21,327 
8,786 

160,059 


5,259 
3,069 

42,693 


58,294 
31,644 

535,201 


133,467 




70,582 


(teneral merrhandifw gw»up 


1,177,916 




3,544 
34,122 
12,046 

86,548 


2,544,960 
668,145 
678,167 

1,923,333 


10.2 
2.7 
2.7 

7.7 


783 

35,229 

7,653 

77,790 


365,153 
65,390 
96,949 

201,283 


361,321 
68,293 
72,894 

222,340 


990 
891 
760 

1,105 


71,252 
29,407 

59,400 

62,129 


26,512 
7,190 
8,991 

22,133 


387,833 
65,483 
81,885 

244,473 


831,785 


General merchandise and dl7-goods stores-.„ - 

Variety, 5-and-lO, and to-a-doTlar stores ..„ ...„ 

Apparel group _._ 


153,484 

192,649 

607,333 




19,491 
5,765 

17,759 
1,502 
9,559 
6,986 
6,650 

18,836 

305.403 


489,104 
185,371 
568,392 
41,617 
78,660 
53,4U 
82,186 
424,592 

4,419,249 


2.0 

.7 

2.S 

.2 
.3 
.2 
.3 
1.7 

17.7 


19,055 
5,604 

16,501 
1,3U 
7,682 
7,325 
5,891 

14,406 

309,086 


41,853 
21,544 
66,101 
5,243 

iJv*o* 

8.4a9 
11,990 
34,679 

432,989 


54,016 
24,674 
65,504 

7,217 
10,486 
10,254 

9,079 
41,208 

437.701 


1,291 
1,141 

991 
1,377 

920 
1,211 

757 
1,188 

1,0U 


9,66t 

5,516 
17,100 
869 
5,129 
6,655 
3,088 
14,108 

65.383 


3,840 
1,740 
6,514 

587 
1,736 
3,473 

996 
4,247 

26,645 


57,858 
86,314 
71,018 
7,604 
IS, 222 
13,727 
10,075 
45,466 

464,646 


146,858 




60,352 


Women's ready-to-wear specialty stores— 

Furriers— fur shops — - 

Millinery stores - „ 


171,536 
17,699 
32,909 
25,532 




24,904 




125,543 


Automotive gronp 


1,021,965 


Motor-vehicle dealers (new and used) 

Accessories, tire, and battery dealers 


30,646 

16,027 

170,404 

1,560 

86,454 

312 

42,976 


2,127,720 

225,970 

1,531,724 

9,786 

519,827 

4,222 

958,780 


8.5 
.9 

6.1 
.1 

2.1 

S.8 


33,823 
15,626 
156,451 
1,694 
101,175 
317 

39,623 


190,691 

25,341 

143,391 

1,064 

71,904 

598 

132,071 


196,642 

28,210 

141,903 

1,034 

67,267 

745 

153,123 


1,041 

1,U3 

990 

972 

936 

1,246 

1,159 


12,671 
3,543 

28,421 
279 

20,299 
170 

25,969 


6,276 

1,386 

10,036 

119 

8,949 

80 

11,710 


204,816 

29,696 

161,938 

1,153 

76,216 

826 

164,633 


420,212 

69,189 

342,233 


Motorcycle, bicycle, and supply dealers. 

Garages and repair shops _ 


2,951 

185,732 

1,648 




368.8M 


Furniture stores 

Floor coverings, drapery, and upholstery stores 


17,418 
2,155 
9,750 
5,481 
8,172 

76,098 


553,503 
40,462 

195,531 
52,254 

117,030 

1,342,705 


2.2 
.1 
.6 
.2 
.5 

5.4 


18,825 
2,244 
4,189 
5,713 
8,652 

72,054 


66,238 
6,590 

37,019 
6,800 

15,424 

141,679 


81,005 
7,137 

39,421 
8,478 

17,062 

161,973 


1,223 

1,083 
1,065 
1,247 
1,107 

1,143 


6,356 
1,028 
10,764 
2,423 
3,408 

47,516 


3,799 
672 
4,576 
1,391 
1,572 

25,085 


84,604 
7,709 

43,797 
9,869 

18,654 

187.068 


207,409 
15,123 
80,705 






Radio stores _ 

Lumber, bmlding, and hu-dware group „ 


42.530 
383.070 


Lumber and building-material dealers. . . 

Electrical sbop.'i (without radios) _ 

Heating and plumbing shops 


21,015 
3,257 

U,S07 
7,717 

22,844 
9,958 

200,336 


603,416 
35,357 

123,128 
92,318 

311,321 

177,165 

1,429,938 


2.4 
.1 
.5 
.4 

1.3 
.7 

5.7 


13,286 
3,270 

U,433 
7,298 

25,078 

11,689 

231,968 


64,613 
5,025 

19,015 
9,630 

29,189 

14,207 

356,338 


77,292 
5,820 
21,395 
11,106 
31,941 
14,417 

239,915 


1,196 
1,158 
1,125 
1,103 
1,094 
1,015 

673 


19,569 
2,847 

12,063 
3,441 
6,519 
3,067 

73,092 


9,930 
1,767 
7,321 
1,646 
3,002 
1,220 

21,826 


87,222 
7,587 
26,716 
12,953 
34,943 
16,637 

261,741 


173,856 
14,033 
49,629 
29,917 




60, lU 


Hardware and farm-implement storm ... 
Restaurant and eating group 


36,522 
576,719 




124,090 
46,344 

29,901 

162, 779 


1,089,134 
235,253 
105,651 

2,612,882 


4.4 

.9 
.4 

10.4 


145,231 
52,978 

33,769 

158,437 


297,464 
43,894 
14,990 

296,289 


198,455 
29,752 
11,708 

319,854 


667 

678 
781 

1,080 


63,934 

13,109 
6,049 

80,548 


16,080 
3,747 
1,999 

33,874 


214,535 

33,499 
13,707 

363,728 


458,349 


Lunch counters, refreshment stands. _ 


80,979 




37,391 


Other retail stores _ _ „ 


603,019 


Cigar stores and cigar stand*- . 


20,175 

23,876 

58,407 

7,728 

14,313 

6,629 

3,854 

27,798 

20,869 


189,756 

623,077 

1,066,252 

66,495 
175,066 

58,071 
111,905 
322,260 

105,275 


.8 

2.5 

4.2 

.3 

.7 

.2 

.4 

1.3 

.4 


20,326 

23,324 

57,749 

8,342 

14,370 

5,749 

2,480 

26,097 

23,068 


14,797 

61,301 

116,^92 

9,777 
20,338 

9,860 
19,422 
43,762 

15,176 


12,989 
69,569 
115,100 
10,285 
27,983 
6,678 
25,647 
61,703 

13,591 


STB 
1,131 

985 
1,062 
1,376 

678 
1,315 
1,182 

896 


4,294 

20,033 
30,699 
3,178 
3,489 
7,241 
1,380 
10,234 

7,061 


1,304 
U,S74 
11,404 
1,308 
1,637 
1,171 
731 
4,950 

1,785 


14,293 
80,943 
126,504 
U,568 
29,620 
7,849 
26,278 
56,653 

15,376 


43,662 
177,121 
265,062 


Florists - 

Jewelry stores - _. . .„ 

News dealers „ 

Office and store supply and equipment dealers 

Other classifications „ _ — .. 

Second-haiid stores „ 


31,427 
73,521 
15,766 
44,890 
131,558 

38,902 



Vol. 1 - Page 3 07 



Census of 
American 
Business 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 

TABLE IB. . . UNITCD STATES SUMMARY • - NUMBER OF STORES. SALES. PERSONNEL PAY ROLL AND EXPENSES. BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES 

„ , . ■ .. J / J „ V Reproduced from Retail Volume 1 of 

iSalM. pay roU. and txpmsea «xpr*s»td %n thmttavds oj doUars) ^^^ ,933 q^^^^^ q, American Business 







Salib 








EaaPLOYMNT AND Pat Rou, 


























Total 
reported 
expense 




Niunber 






Ntimber 

of 
proprie- 


Full-time employeee 


Part-time 
employees 


Total 




of 
8tor«e 


Amount 


Per- 
cent 
of 
total 












pay roll 
{fuU-livK 


{etcctpt 


Dinsicii us aun 






Average 






proprietors' 










Average 
number 


PayroU 


per year 
per em- 


Average 
number 


Pay roU 


and 
part-lime) 


campenm- 
tion) 
















ployee 










UNITED STATES 


i,5t6,U9 


t8S ,037,215 


100.0 


1,574,341 


8,703,385 


42^664,447 


»986 


730,327 


S245.998 


»2, 910,445 


»6. 501.060 


NEW ENGLAND 


10t.6«t 


8.167.760 


6,7 


100.130 


838.747 


847.401 


• 1.063 


87.908 


81.451 


268.852 


586,560 


Conned cut 


■■! ■ 1" 


430,586 


1.7 


20,619 


44,606 


49,288 


1,106 


11,124 


4,257 


63,485 


119,673 


Maine 


ix.tm 


184,386 


0.7 


12,104 


17,755 


17,106 


963 


4,392 


1,609 


18,715 


41,460 


Massachusetts 


SE,«30 


1,195,161 


4.6 


47,538 


133,336 


143,991 


1,080 


33,047 


12,233 


156,224 


337,331 


New ttampshite 


■ 6,368 


111,799 


.5 


6,518 


10,580 


10,338 


982 


2,949 


1,045 


11,377 


24,822 


Rhode Island 


e,4» 


167,868 


.7 


■8,127 


19,080 


19,607 


1,028 


4,397 


1,635 


21,242 


45,384 


Vermont 


4,9S« 


78,600 


.3 


6,224 


7,546 


7,137 


946 


1,994 


672 


7,809 


17,910 


MU5DLE ATLANTIC 


356,489 


6.633.819 


86.5 


355.348 


690.588 


754.048 


1.098 


154.273 


67,661 


811,903 


1,866,114 


New Jersey 


(4,190 


1,016,928 


4.1 


63,410 


95,939 


110,870 


1,156 


23,794 


9,057 


119,927 


282,016 


New York 


lTe,614 


3,739,992 


14.9 


173,771 


377,380 


434,927 


1,153 


71,821 


29,760 


464,707 


1,067,157 


Pennsylvania 


UE.ees 


1,876,899 


7.5 


118,167 


217,328 


208,245 


956 


58,660 


19,084 


227,269 


516,941 


EAST NORTH-CENTRAL 


3£7.771 


5.314.073 


21.2 


338.485 


587.768 


570.733 


971 


181,678 


62.668 


633.401 


1.425.340 


Illinois 


98,870 


1,728,880 


6.9 


99,827 


198,293 


200,168 


1,009 


54,572 


21,155 


221,323 


502, iia 


Indiana 


41,2Se 


569,972 


2.3 


44,006 


63,665 


56,608 


889 


21,642 


6,707 


63,315 


139,746 


Michiian 


57,181 


949,137 


3.8 


59,879 


104,860 


99,084 


945 


29,808 


9,885 


108,969 


244,618 


Ohio 


85,981 


1,442,138 


5.7 


88,196 


169,406 


155,307 


974 


50,735 


16,967 


172,264 


378,403 


Wisconsin 


M,58S 


623,952 


2.5 


46,577 


61,517 


59,566 


968 


24,721 


7,964 


67,530 


160,259 


WEST NORTHCENTRAL 


180.307 


2.641.958 


10.5 


193.758 


283.986 


266.333 


903 


63.201 


25.502 


281.835 


633.191 


Iowa 


34,843 


479,695 


1.9 


37,323 


49,182 


42,190 


658 


16,962 


4,830 


47,020 


108,295 


Kansas 


26,779 


329,178 


1.3 


29,082 


34,724 


29,392 


646 


12,172 


3,421 


32,813 


73,632 


Minnesota 


33,679 


585,102 


2.4 


35,916 


62,196 


59 , 267 


963 


16,126 


5,516 


64,783 


144,800 


Missouri 


49, £47 


759,125 


3.0 


53,410 


89,166 


62,804 


929 


23,431 


7,378 


90,182 


196,527 


Nebraska 


19,318 


274,575 


1.1 


20,629 


29,065 


25,571 


683 


8,967 


2,672 


28,343 


63,901 


North Dakota 


7,981 


108,087 


.4 


8,391 


9,467 


8,478 


694 


2,463 


623 


9,301 


22,521 


South Dakota 


8,568 


106,196 


.4 


8,807 


10,089 


8,531 


846 


3,062 


662 


9,393 23,515 


SOirm ATLANTIC 


168.800 


2.477.026 


9.9 


174.586 


277,815 


247.007 


889 


80,067 


21.951 


268.958 674.496 


Delaware 


3,420 


57,910 


.8 


3,200 


5,673 


5,761 


1,016 


1,890 


570 


6,331 


13,722 


District of Columbia 


6,156 


241,515 


1.0 


5,516 


28,506 


31,918 


1,120 


4,397 


1,763 


33,661 


67,630 


Florida 


£1,697 


288,804 


1.2 


22,383 


33,484 


28,377 


847 


9,453 


2,436 


30,815 


67,727 


Georgia 


£6,661 


352,916 


1.4 


26,179 


42,114 


32,761 


776 


12,312 


2,982 


35,763 


77,666 


Maryland 


23,487 


384,384 


1.5 


24,653 


42,724 


41,335 


967 


12,578 


4,372 


45,707 99,983 


North Carol ma 


27,658 


363, lU 


1.5 


29,252 


39,181 


32,024 


817 


.14,000 


3,141 


35,165 


73,962 


South Carolina 


15,528 


186,215 


.7 


16,097 


20,218 


15,415 


762 


7,444 


1,646 


16,961 


35,107 


Virginia 


26,431 


358,102 


1.4 


27,350 


41,118 


37,034 


901 


10,657 


3,031 


40,065 


85,400 


West Vitginia 


17,188 


244,071 


1.0 


17,956 


24,793 


22,362 


902 


7,137 


2,108 


24,470 


52,899 


EAST SOUTH-CENTRAL 


83.270 


1.085.923 


4.1 


69.645 


116.939 


92.384 


790 


33.662 


8.459 


100.643 


221.560 


Alabama 


20,049 


250,384 


1.0 


21,292 


29,962 


21,760 


727 


6,666 


2,008 


23,786 


51,619 


Kentucky 


25,672 


304,605 


1.2 


27,648 


32,503 


27,470 


845 


9.647 


2,750 


30,220 


66,864 


Mississippi 


14,772 


140,655 


.6 


16,079 


16,906 


12,205 


782 4,831 


1,066 


13,271 


29,097 


Tennessee 


22,777 


330,079 


1.3 


24,626 


37,568 


30,929 


823 10,298 


2,635 


33,564 


73,950 


WEST SOUTH-CENTRAL 


132,505 


1.751.553 


7.0 


142.382 


204.361 


168.837 


826 


50.020 


13.222 


I 

1 182.059 


393.829 


Arkansas 


15,916 


180,095 


.7 


17,965 


18,323 


13,935 


761 


5,594 


1,364 


15,299 


33,533 


Lou isiana 
Oklahoma 
Teias 


22,239 


864,123 


1.0 


22,808 


36,970 


28,666 


775 


6,381 


1,745 


30,411 


66,696 


86,434 


341,774 


1.4 


29,806 


38,006 


31,575 


831 


10,768 


3,054 


34,629 


76,640 


67,914 


965,561 


3.9 


72,403 


1U,080 


94,661 


858 


27,277 


7,059 


101,720 


216,960 


MOUNTAIN 


44.301 


739.614 


3,0 


47.101 


73.150 


72.94A 


997 


21,080 


7.223 


60.163 


177.840 


Ar izona 
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4,749 


76,250 


.3 


5,039 


7,344 


7,542 


1,027 


2,471 


913 


8,455 


19,132 


13,700 


233,014 


.9 


14,563 


25,816 


25,:60 


971 


6,623 


2,114 


27,174 


60,044 


5,139 


87,406 


.4 


5,526 


7,163 


7,119 


991 


2,666 


621 


7,940 


18,401 


Montana 
Nevada 
New Meiico 
Utah 
Wyominj 


6,732 


112,388 


.5 


7,184 


10,147 


10,605 


1,045 


2,958 


1,808 


11.813 


25,877 


1,463 


28,660 


.1 


1,490 


2,438 


3,001 


1,231 


737 


316 


3,317 


7,104 


4,246 


53,944 


.2 


4,613 


5,321 


4,690 


919 


1,504 


461 


5,361 


11,727 


5,103 


91,968 


.4 


5,169 


9,914 


9,422 


950 


2,952 


914 


10,336 


22,963 


3,169 


55,970 


.2 


5,497 


4,986 


5,301 


1,063 


1,169 


476 


1 6,777 


12,592 


PACinc 


125,630 


2,285,497 


9.1 


138.906 


236,017 


254,770 


1,079 


68,444 


27,661 


282.431 


622,120 


California 


89,554 


1,692,879 


6.7 


94,310 


176,198 


! 196,527 


1,U0 


49,380 


20,578 


216,105 


472,032 


Oregon 


13,769 


224,447 


.9 


15,407 


28,335 


21,634 


969 


6,440 


2,430 


24,064 


65,415 


Washington 


22,307 


366,171 

I 


1.5 


83,189 


37,491 


37,609 


1,003 


12,622 


4,653 


42,262 


94,673 



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Vol. I - Page 3-12 

Census of 
American 
Business 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 



TiBLE 3A— UNITED STATES SUMURY 



El^teen Unds of Buaineaa by Typ^a of Operation 



Reproduced from Retail Volume I of 

the 1933 Census of American Busine« 

( See note a i 









Perwat 






PayroU 








Haiber 
of 


Net Sales 
(1933) 


o: 

Total 


Salee 


rull-tlme 
finployeas 


Nmsher ; 
of 


(000 Onitted) 


Arerage Animel 


Total 


Type of Oparatlon 


Total : 


Part- 


attoTfi 




Storaa 










Props. I 


Inoladlngt 


TiBS 


rull-tlae 


Expeneea ^ 






(000 Cttltted) 


1933 


1929 






Part-time: 


Only 


Ssployee 


(000 Ctiltted) 


Total - all tTI»« 


1.526.119 »25.037.225 
1,349,337 17,325,568 


100.0 


100.0 


8.703.385 


1.574.341 


♦2.910.449 


(245.998 


1 986 

947 


»6.a01.090 


Indqxildsnta (a) 


71.2 


77.5 


1,»0«.40I 


1,544,394 


1,987,950 


181,918 


4,5M,890 


Chains (a) 


141,603 6,312,769 


29.2 


80.0 


685,207 


3,870 


795,509 


56,336 


1,079 


1,710,794 


01r«ot Bslllng Ihousa-to-taoufio) (a) 


7,02e 


187,368 


.t 


.2 


36,658 


6,655 


47,247 


1,389 


1,891 


76,606 


bbll-ordsr houses (catalog only) 


3U 244,381 


1.0 


1.0 


27,752 


199 


24,786 


546 


873 


68,446 


Coomlssaries or oonpany atorss 


2,71S 


95,578 


.4 


.3 


6,873 


1,415 


8,020 


631 


1,079 


13,399 


Utllity-opereted stores 

All other types ILaassd dapts.. ooope., etc. )i/ 


4,121 


76,079 


.3 


.3 


10,889 


123 


16,211 


2,865 


1,886 


30,874 


20,996 


294,488 


1.2 


.7 


27,545 


17,685 


30,726 


2,718 


1,017 


78,331 


Department storss 3/ 
Independents 


3.S3E 


2.538.258 


„_ 





364,105 


783 


386,462 


26.489 


980 


8(8.887 


x.iine 


i;706;44S 


67.3 


7271 


279,979 


750 


2i6;^ 


16,946 


i,*b 


iM,M 


Chains 


2,0S1 


605,782 


23.9 


16.7 


59,517 


17 


68,459 


9,246 


995 


166,094 


Uail-ordsr houses (catalog only) 


3J 


219,978 


a.-t 




24,233 


12 


20,670 


258 


B42 


87,339 


CoDmlssarlas or o<npany stores 


1 


3,S»8 


.1 


11.2 


284 


1 


352 


28 


1,141 


979 


All other types 


4 


818 


—i 




92 


3 


97 


7 


978 


181 


Variety. 5-and-lO. and to-a-dollar stores 


12.046 


678.167 








95,949 


7.653 


81,885 


8,991 


760 


198.649 


Independents 


6,572 


59,699 


8.8 


10.7 


6,336 


7,478 


9,129 


912 


SM 


13,861 


Chains 


5,400 


618,333 


91.2 


89.2 


89,609 


102 


76,797 


8,079 


76« 


179,367 


All other types 


74 


135 


— 


.1 


4 


73 


3 


- 


750 


81 


Man's and boys' clothing and fumiahlnAs 


19.491 


489.104 






41.853 


19.055 


97,858 


3,840 


1.291 




Btores 


148.886 


Independents 


17,59! 


374,205 


76.9 


77.9 


31,607 


18,799 


42,817 


2,973 


1,261 


108,916 


Chains 


1,693 


107,553 


22.0 


81.2 


9,543 


96 


14, U5 


814 


1,394 


38,043 


Direct eelllne (house-to-house) 


U 


153 


— ■) 




28 


26 


28 


13 


536 


51 


lkll-ord«r houses (oatalog only) 


1 


2,409 


.5 


.9 


293 


4 


836 


- 


805 


795 


All other types 


16S 


4,784 


i.oj 




382 


130 


662 


40 


1,628 


1,4SS 


Family clothlnx storse (men's. «cmsn'a 






















and ohildren'e) 4/ 


5,76! 


1B5.371 


— 


— 


21.544 


5.604 


26.314 


1,740 


1.141 


60,388 


Independents 


5,177 


146 ,744 


79.2 


71.5 


16,711 


9,536 


20,077 


1,849 


1,127 


48,318 


Chains 


550 


37,588 


20. S 


87.3 


4,667 


37 


6,074 


489 


1,197 


14,647 


Diiect selling (house-to-house) 


2C 


214 


.1 




71 


18 


32 


8 


423 


79 


All other types 


U 


885 


.4 




95 


13 


131 


4 


1,337 


308 


Wonea's ready- to-«ear specialty stores 3/ 


17.768 


575.094 








67.149 


16.501 


78,389 


6,541 


996 
995 


^74,434 


Independents 


15,773 


428,482 


74.5 


T4.3 


51,634 


16,274 


56,044 


4,914 


129, 4«0 


Chains 


1,726 


134,259 


23.4 


U.7 


14,309 


145 


14,965 


833 


988 


41,094 


Direct selUng (house-to-house) 


62 


1,367 


.« 


3.0 


148 


11 


168 


2 


1,122 


432 


All other types 


207 


10,990 


I.9J 


1,058 


71 


1,212 


192 


964 


3,488 


Shoe atoras 


13.836 


424. S92 








34.679 


14.406 


45.455 


4.247 


1,188 


185.943 


IndepenAents 


13,386 


197,345 


46. B 


53.5 


16,015 


14,108 


80,609 


1,841 


1,178 


94,094 


Chelne 


4,442 


196,249 


46.2 


38.0 


15,664 


124 


21,681 


8,016 


1,855 


62,341 


Direct selling (house- to-hcruse) 


1 


602 


.2 




27 


3 


48 


3 


1,444 


184 


Uail-order houses (catalog only) 


10 


473 


.1 


8.5 


27 


8 


85 


- 


986 


133 


All other types 


991 


29,923 


7.0) 




2,946 


163 


3,098 


387 


920 


8,831 


Tumltura storee 


17,4Jt8 
16,728 


5S3.503 
468,338 


8476 


83T9 


66.238 
56,413 


18.825 
18,700 


84,804 
71,284 


3.799 
3,598 


1,823 

1,200 


207.409 


Independents 


171,879 


Chains 


570 


78,418 


14.2 


14.2 


8,965 


26 


12,308 


140 


1,337 


32,883 


Direct selling (houae-to-houae) 


32 


899 


.8 


1.9 


237 


S3 


305 


37 


1,131 


461 


All other types 


88 


5,888 


1.0 


623 


66 


907 


84 


1,382 


2,186 


Household applieaoe storas 9/ 


9.761 


198.662 





_ 


38.010 


4.189 


44.639 


4,388 


1.057 


81.938 


Independents 


3,926 


65,880 


33.2 


— 


8,394 


4,021 


10,796 


1,861 


l!l36 


28,634 


Chains 


1,S6( 


42,669 


21.5 





13,226 


12 


12,291 


398 


900 


80,934 


Direct celling (bouee-to-house) 


290 


18,742 


6.4 


._ 


4,894 


75 


4,879 


19 


992 


6,843 


Utility-operated atores 


3,976 


73,160 


36.8 





19,622 


41 


19,748 


8,673 


1,230 


29,396 


All other typee 


814 


4,211 


2.1 


— 


874 


40 


935 


43 


1,M1 


8,189 


Badio stores 5/ 
Independents 


8.161 
7,846 


U3.899 
94,128 


88'76 


79';o 


14.438 

U,940 


8,652 
8,925 


17.812 
14,563 


1,960 
1^493 


U131 
1,099 


41,303 
3S,«9B 


Chains 


807 


17,793 


19.6 


19.1 


2,239 


19 


2,898 


36 


1,278 


6,476 


Direct selling ( house- to-houee) 


20 


300 


d 


1.9 


40 


25 


42 


9 


923 


S3 


All other types 


88 


1,678 


813 


83 


309 


86 


1,389 


749 



Census of 
American 
Business 



RETAIL DOTRIBUTION: 1933 



Vol. I - Pa«e 3 13 



TABLE Si— QNITSD 3TAIIS GOMkUfiT^Oontliiiwt 



Reproduced from Retail Volume I of 

the 1933 Census of American Business 

(See note a) 





: 




Paraant i 


t 


: 


Parroll t 


: 






1 Kakar i 


lat aalaa 


t of I 


raU-tlMi 


Kamhar i 


[000 Oalttad) :ATara«a Amnialt 


Total 


^p« at Op«xatioa 


1 of I 


(1933) 


iTotel 


Salaa: 


■iVlOTaaai 


of 1 


Total 


Fart-i 


lanlnga Par i 


RaportaA 




t BtaT%» I 




t 


1 


t 


Propa. 1 


Inalndlji^ 


timm I 


raU-tlBa 


Sipnaaa 1/ 




I 1 


(000 OaitttaaliltSS 


1989: 


t 


: 


Part-tlMi 


OalT I 


Bvloraa 


(000 CMlttad) 


aiMUT .toru IwlthOTt »>t<) 


163,838 


»1.803.S4S 


_ 


_ 


99.018 


U1.216 


•1H.?9(? 


♦M.W 


•1.019 


1^76.^ 


Ia«*P«Bda>t« 


137, BU 


978,897 


54.3 


83.6 


44,272 


109,904 


40,948 


4,937 


603 


189,638 


Ckalu 


M,740 


au,9io 


48.0 


48.7 


53,930 


848 


71,808 


7,B97 


1,191 


144,872 


■lr»rt —lllng (fco<u»-to-hauM) 


IM 


1,310 


.l 




833 


186 


889 


7 


983 


40S 


OOBlaaKxl** or ooapuiy atcr** 


ISS 


1,011 


.1 


.7 


64 


151 


89 


8 


781 


99 


HI oth«r tTpM 


M4 


10,114 


.8 




816 


760 


BBS 


UB 


843 


1,328 


OOBblJiaticK Btar*fl (crooarl** and ■•at«) 


140.372 


3.201.042 





_ 


221.225 


142.881 


283.1T4 


84.303 


1.038 


636.188 




11S,UB4 


1,797,021 


56.1 


67.6 


119,852 


142,072 


U9,065 


11,276 


899 


270,854 


Ckalu 


£i,»24 


1,397,090 


43.7 


3S.2 


100,787 


483 


133,424 


18,999 


1,198 


264,628 


DliMt-MUlie (kauM-to-hou*) 


go 


551 


_ 




23 


68 


28 


4 


1,043 


T6 


OiMtrmilo or sojvujr atarM 


3t 


812 


.. 


.2 


48 


37 


46 


3 


896 


70 


HI ottaar trPM 


IBS 


5,868 


.2 




515 


221 


&U 


82 


1,148 


1,233 


BaataozajitB and aatlAK plaoaa 6/ 
Lodepandanta 


170.431 
166, MS 


1.3B4.387 
1,122,882 


84'^ 


86Tl 


SH,348 

280,814 


198.209 
197,684 


248.031 
200,068 


19.827 
17 ; 774 


669 
649 


539.328 

tzitfilf, 


r^KJYim 


3,377 


196,800 


14.9 


13.6 


59,457 


161 


46,943 


1,902 


788 


103,338 


lU otbar typaa 


461 


4,705 


.3 


.3 


1,077 


364 


1,083 


181 


810 


8,U7 


Clnr atoraa ajid eimx atanda 


80.175 


189.756 





__ 


14.797 


20.326 


14.293 


1.304 


878 


43.682 


ladspaodanta 


IS, 278 


123,521 


55.1 


73.8 


9,594 


20,146 


9,463 


1,836 


888 


29,439 


Chalaa 


1,713 


64,396 


33.9 


26.1 


4,990 


50 


4,680 


58 


920 


13,796 


All otbar tTpaa 


1S4 


1,839 


1.0 


1.4 


213 


130 


ISO 


11 


793 


447 


UDtar-rahlala daalara 7/ 


30.646 


2.127.720 


, 


_ 


190.691 


33.823 


204.818 


6.276 


1.041 


480.212 


InSapaodants 


30,219 


2,013,692 


94.6 


— 


180,273 


33,792 


190,660 


6,043 


1,024 


391,036 


Chalu 


40« 


112,703 


5.3 


.. 


10,306 


21 


14,019 


232 


1,338 


28,877 


HI othar tTpaa 


18 


1,325 


.1 


~ 


112 


10 


139 


1 


1,232 


899 


MaUiw atatlona 


170.404 


1.831.724 





__ 


143.395 


186.481 


151.938 


10.03E 


990 


318,233 


Indapeodaata 


134,239 


984,867 


64.3 


66.0 


68,868 


188,734 


65,202 


7.808 


■^s 


16S!6«« 


Ckalna 


36,026 


543,682 


«.5 


33.8 


74,226 


647 


86,382 


2,513 


1,130 


175,906 


HI othar tTpaa 


139 


3,175 


.2 


.2 


301 


70 


3S1 


14 


1,130 


661 


Dnw atorraa 


88.407 


1.066.282 


__ 


_ 


U6.852 


67.749 


186.504 


U.404 


985 


285.062 


IsdapaidanU 


S3,3H 


788,668 


74.0 


81.2 


83,158 


66,433 


91,824 


10,669 


972 


204,765 




3,760 


267,299 


25.1 


1B.8 


31,564 


140 


32,816 


500 


1,024 


74,903 


Dtraet-aallliig (houaa-ta-housa) 


1,111 


6,506 


.6 




1,619 


1,027 


1,493 


96 


663 


2,9S1 


Ifcllrordar hooaas (eatalog oalr) 


51 


2,233 


.2 


.3 


331 


48 


476 


129 


1,048 


1,928 


All othar tTpaa 


144 


1,646 


.1 




ISO 


107 


19S 


10 


1,028 


605 


gufrt—n^ atoraa 8/ 


32.802 


488.486 






43.396 


36.767 


50,880 




A,9«8 

1,059 


H5,633, 
109,496 


ladapanlaDta 


32,234 


467,167 


95.6 


~ 


40,904 


36, 7U 


47,482 


4,l?fl 


Chalna 


536 


19,894 


4,1 





2,399 


46 


3,006 


89 


1,216 


5,902 


All othar typaa 


32 


1,425 


.3 


~ 


93 


10 


122 


5 


1,258 


238 




14.313 


175.066 


— 


_ 


20.338 


14,370 


29_,620 


U637 


1,376 


73.521 


lodapandanta 


14,090 


163,886 


93.6 


93.0 


18,780 


14,289 


27,497 


1,608 


1,379 


67,808 


Chalna 


191 


10,389 


5.9 


6.4 


1,454 


U 


1,975 


26 


1,340 


5,377 


HI othar typaa 


72 


821 


.5 


.6 


104 


70 


148 


6 


1,365 


336 


111 »««■ Hni. -# ^laaaa 


612.247 


7.375.900 


— 


— 


768,309 


686.881 


900.276 


93.738 


1.080 


2.007.634 







(a) Wluetmente »aro made In 1933 figures fbr comparison with 1935; see footnote. Table 3A, pp. 13-14. (Not reflected above) 

i/ Includes no compenoatlon for the sarrloes of proprietors working In their stores, in lieu of employees. 

l/ Includes Isased dapartnsnts, market and roadalde stands. Itinerant Tendore and raLllng stores, cooperatlvea, a few ratal lar-wbolesalars 

(whoea business la eranly divided between the two) and country buyera who aXso operate retail atores. TbA latter ware difficult to Identify 

from .the 1933 achedule, and the comparison latweon 1933 and 1929 poroentages la aubjeot to (juallficatlon In ttiat the entire 1929 percentage 

for retaller-eountiy buyera la Included for comparison purposes in the percautaee alcwn for independents. Further datalla are not available 

from the condensed tabulations used in 1933. 
Sj Totala differ allgitly fron other tables because of an error in California In classifying certain apparel stores aa departmmt stores. The 

eorrootlon la reflected In ttila SnoKry, as wall aa in the California Type Report. 

Ooa large national chain with total sales in 1933 (publlahed in the press) of more than $78,000,000 so changed the character of Its bualneaa 

since 1929 that it now la daaslfied aa a departeBnt-stora chain whereas It was a varlety-otora chain before. If for comparison purposes It 

were eliminated frcn the 1933 figures, the proportion of chain sales would be 21.4 percent against 16.7 percent In 1929— convaraely, tha 

variety-store proportion of chain sales would be 92.1 percent In 1933 against 89.2 percent In 1929. 
4/ A discrepancy of ♦370,000 exists between Uia national totala shown here and the State reporte, caused by an error In classification of certain 

atores In Itontana and lynalng. Die correction la reflected in the State tables, but is not considered of sufficient Importanoe to justify 

changing the national totala. 
^ The totala differ slightly from other tablea baeauae of an error in IllinolB in classifying certain electrical appliance stores aa radio atores. 

^e correction Is raflaotad in this sunmBry, as wall as In ttie Illinois Type Report. 
6/ Restaurants and eating places in the 1933 tabulation include also lunch counters and refreehmsnt stands In addition to restaurants, cafeterlaa 

and lunch roois. Tha 1929 percentages reflect only the latter three kinds of restairants and, therefore, are not strictly compaiable, tut the 

new basis la considered preferable for future comparisons, in order to diatin^iah eating plaoee ae such fron drinking places. 
7/ Thla classification ma not Included in the 1929 Type sumnary (table 6) and, therefore, no percentage figures for eomparlaon with 1929 are 

available. 
Bl Hardware stores in this table include twa business classifications. I.e., hardware atorea, and hardware and farm linjlsmant dealera. Since tha 

1989 ^pa sunmary (table 6) Included only the foxnar, 1929 percentages are not available for comparison. 



Vol. I - Page 3-14 






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Vol. I - Page 3-18 



RETAIL DISlEIBOTTOWt 1933 



• UIOTXD 9CATB SDMABT 



MMMLTBIB OT SALES AFD TILCTX GF STOCHS OS HIRD, BT KZSDS OP HTSIHSE9 
(Aarants •xjnsavd in liioasviAa of doUsrs) 



Reproduced from Retail Volume I of 
the 1933 Census of American Business 



RKXIFTS TBOH — 



Kirn) OP BUSINESS 



Total 










Salea te 


Stocks on 










other 




8al«s 


Hertstaandlae 


Repair* and 


Sala of 


Other 


retillera 


end of 3rear 




saleo 




■cala 


sooxces 






25,037,225 


t22 ,867,406 


♦567,767 


$1,514,424 


$87,628 


$461,659 


$3,903,969 


6,793,010 


6,732,076 


- 


54,108 


6,826 


115,387 


419 ,075 


271,213 


237,342 


_ 


33,080 


791 


1,442 


19,474 


498,536 


497,379 


- 


747 


410 


40,504 


6,680 


107,685 


103,249 


. 


4,357 


79 


464 


9,228 


170,748 


170,326 


- 


244 


178 


3,390 


3.681 


1,803,242 


1,799,314 


. 


2,500 


1,428 


12,381 


151,424 


3,201,042 


3,189,447 


- 


8,792 


2,803 


16,319 


203,132 


491,866 


490,604 


_ 


529 


533 


8,949 


14,471 


188,131 


184,841 


. 


3,015 


275 


28,914 


3,977 


16,730 


15,976 


. 


730 


24 


616 


3,917 


43,817 


43,398 


- 


114 


305 


2,408 


3,091 


1,660,781 


1,552,786 


3,369 


1,572 


3.054 


31,410 


345,830 


1,097,437 


1,093,032 


588 


1,543 


2,274 


10,002 


285,914 


463,344 


459,754 


2,781 


29 


780 


21,408 


59,916 


3,891,272 


3,799,230 


9,122 


53,988 


28,932 


18,633 


807,684 


2,M4,960 


2,491,352 


8,588 


21,536 


23,484 


7,796 


463,610 


668,145 


664,828 


424 


398 


2,495 


10,590 


242,510 


678,167 


643,050 


110 


32,054 


2,953 


247 


101,564 


1,923,333 


1,901,907 


16,599 


- 


6,827 


5,937 


466,470 


489,104 


487,011 


1,158 


_ 


935 


1,072 


167,707 


185,371 


184,232 


492 


. 


647 


491 


49,595 


568,392 


563,083 


2,017 


- 


3,292 


463 


79,825 


41,617 


36,403 


5,030 


- 


184 


701 


10,965 


78,660 


78,248 


337 


_ 


75 


38 


6,887 


53,411 


50,519 


2,8U 


- 


81 


129 


11,159 


82,186 


80,894 


1,191 


_ 


101 


609 


16,541 


424,592 


421,517 


2,563 


- 


512 


2,434 


123,791 


4,419,249 


3,949,625 


453,328 


6,258 


10,038 


179,663 


341,314 


2,127,720 


1,957,845 


166,425 


38 


3,412 


112,105 


198,635 


825,970 


205,399 


20,356 


26 


189 


17,149 


41,289 


1,631,724 


1,479,005 


42,324 


6,008 


4,387 


43,887 


65,016 


9,786 


8,070 


1,691 


1 


24 


366 


2,567 


519,827 


295,682 


221,981 


181 


1,983 


6,897 


37,795 


4,222 


3,624 


551 


4 


43 


259 


1,012 


958,780 


933,460 


23,277 


- 


2,043 


U,S48 


300,447 


553,503 


544,933 


7,326 


_ 


1,244 


2,771 


183,785 


40,462 


39,282 


1,U7 


- 


63 


660 


14,649 


195,531 
52,254 


188,677 
49,668 


6,567 
2,437 


- 


287 
149 


5,2U 
1,279 


36,806 
36,978 




U0,900 


5,830 


- 


300 


2,626 


27,827 


1,342,705 


1,310,266 


27,291 


- 


5,168 


34,054 


531,873 


603,416 

36,357 

123,128 


598,534 

31,009 

109,265 


2,022 

4,081 

13,506 


- 


2,860 
267 
357 


17,941 
1,011 
2,021 


237,976 

9,126 

25,413 


92,318 
311,321 


90,202 
307,168 


1,981 
3,397 


: 


135 
756 


4,667 

5,678 


28,821 
161,546 


177 , 165 


174,078 


2,304 


- 


783 


2,836 


78,989 


1,429,938 


127, ai 


- 


1,291,077 


11,640 


- 


27,937 


1,089,134 


80,363 


_ 


1,003,082 


5,689 






235,253 


32, 6M 


_ 


197,473 


5,131 




4,507 




u,<a» 


- 


90,628 


820 


- 


1,858 


2,612,882 


2.tal,349 


33,483 


107,419 


10,637 


61,099 


627,658 


189,756 


178.168 


662 


5,936 


6,090 


1,776 




628,077 


616,487 


3,649 


63 


see 


31,892 


46,578 


1,066,262 


963,186 


1,010 


100,309 


1,747 


13,289 


281,763 


175,066 


66,151 
161,316 


soe 

13,298 


21 

13 


US 
439 


1,044 
1,242 


5,282 
148,446 


58,071 


66.936 


268 


780 


87 


1,220 


4,646 


1U,905 


103,776 


7,846 


4S 


236 


1,903 


85,990 


322,260 


313,323 


6,643 


2S« 


2,03S 


8,733 


108,006 



miTSD STATES . 



Food group . 



Candy and confectionery stores — _... 

Dairy-products stores (including milk dealers).- 

Delicatessen stores 

Fruit stores and vegetable markets__ _ 

Grocery stores (without meats) 

Combination stores fgroceries and meats) 

Meat markets (including sea foods) 

Bakeries — caterers _ 

Bottled beer and liquor storep 

Other food stores - 



Fanners' supplies and country general stores... 



Country general stores 

Farmers'-supply stores. — 

General merchandise group. 



Department stores 

General merchandise and dry-goods stores.... 
Variety, 5-and-lO, and to-a-dollar stores 



Apparel group 



Men's and boys' stores. 

Family clothing stores 

Women's ready-to-wear specialty stored 

Furriers — fur shops ..._ _ 

Millinery stores.. - 

Custom tailors _ -.- 

Accessories and other apparel stores „ 

Shoe stores - — 



Automotive group... 



Motor-vehicle dealers (new and used) 

Accessories, tire, and battery dealers 

Filling stations -. - 

Motorcycle, bicycle, and supply dealere... 

Garages and repair shops 

Other automotive 



Furniture and household group... 



Furniture stores - - _ 

Floor coverings, drapery, and upholstery stores... 

Household appliance stores — 

Other home furnishings and appliance g 
Radio stores 

Lumber, building, and hardware group.. 



Lumber and building-material dealers.... 

Electrical shops (without radios) 

Heating and plumbing shops 

Paint and glass stores_ 

Hardware stores. 



Hardware and farm-implement stores.-. 
Restaurant and eating group .. „ 



Restaurants, cafeterias, and lunch rooms... 

Lunch counters, refreshment stands 

Drinking places -. 

Other retail stores _ 

Cigar stores and cigar stands... 



C<al and wood yards— ice dealers... 

Drugstores 

Florists - 

Jewelr>' stores 

News dealers 



Ofltce and store supply and equipment dealers.. 
Other classifications -.. 



Second-hand stores 



105,275 



90,!O2 



2,298 



3,473 



2,9 



Vol. 1 - Page 3 - 19 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 



Census OF 
American 
Business 



UUatB 7B — UNITED STATES StJ^WARY — ANALYSIS OF SALES AKD VAIOE OT STOCKS OH HAND, BY aEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AMD STATES 

Reproduced from Retail Volume I of 
the 1933 Census of American Busineu 



(Amounts expressed In thouaandB of dolleuro] 





Total 
8al«e 


RBCBIPTS PROM— 


SalSB to 

othar 
rotallara 


Stoolu oa 

hand at 

and of year 

(at coat) 


DIVTSION AND STATE 


Uerohondiae 

B&lOB 


Hepalro and 
aerrlce 


Sal* of 

OBala 


Otbsr 
eouroea 




$25,037,225 


$22,667,406 


4567,767 


41,514,424 


lB7j628 


4461,^659 


}8, 903, 969 




2.167.760 


1.996.756 


44,896 


119,339 


6,767 


32,621 


295,409 




430,526 

184,366 
l,195,16i 

1U,799 

167,268 

78,600 

6.633,819 


397,693 

172,703 

1,094,390 

103,115 

155,549 

73,308 

5.961,094 


9,194 
4,676 
22,499 
2,899 
3,057 
2,571 

137.691 


21,650 
6,392 

75,071 
6,473 
6,279 
2,474 

492,425 


1,969 
615 

3,201 
312 
403 
247 

22,609 


7,671 

2,695 
16,065 
1,375 
3,324 
1,691 

117,648 


67,833 




32,733 




150,954 




16,602 




21,466 




15,619 


innDLR atlahttc •• 


1.021,867 




1,016,928 
3,739,992 
1,876,899 

5.314,073 


933,454 
3,312,512 
1,735,128 

4,653,829 


19,896 
79,169 
36,627 

124,901 


61,413 

333,724 

97,266 

318,042 


2,165 

14,587 

5,656 

17,301 


12,342 
70,103 
35,203 

139,469 


127,349 




572,938 




321,680 




773,780 




1,728,680 
569,972 
949,137 

1,442,132 
623,952 

2,641,956 


1,659,621 
527,530 

871,303 

1,327,452 

567,923 

2,416,536 


40,669 

11,742 
29,283 
29,998 
13,009 

66,552 


123,343 
29,207 
44.298 
60,547 
40,647 

149,543 


5,047 
1,493 
4,253 
4,135 
2,373 

9,325 


57,419 
10,791 
32,950 
29,641 
8,588 

46,683 


257,293 




69,914 




131,701 




191,882 




102,930 




46S.927 




479,695 
329,176 
565,102 
759,125 
274,575 
106,067 
106,196 

2.477.028 


440,730 
305,333 
529,930 
691,640 
252,061 
99,194 
97,650 

2,307,214 


12,416 
6,480 
14,914 
17,887 
7,739 
2,494 
2,622 

48,847 


24,669 
14,236 
37,795 
47,653 
13,720 
5,615 
5,636 

114,542 


1,660 
1,130 
2,463 
1,945 
1,055 
584 
288 

6,425 


5,934 
5,342 
17,218 
10,636 
4,327 
1,639 
1,365 

31,329 


69,255 


^° * 


63,740 




101,693 


lUssouTl 


123,303 
56,567 




23,975 




25,374 




362,225 




57,910 
241,515 
266,804 
352,916 
364,384 
363, lU 
166,215 
358,102 
244,071 

1,025,923 


54,453 
216,277 
265,563 
332,663 
354,418 
342,340 
176,514 
335,532 
229,254 

960.167 


1,192 
6,062 
6,365 
5,833 
7,737 
6,499 
3,602 
7,191 
4,346 

19.584 


2,055 
16,755 
16,323 
13,374 
20,846 
13,340 

5,767 
14.320 

9,752 

42,654 


200 
401 
553 
646 

1,383 
932 
332 

1,059 
719 

3,298 


740 

2,732 
2,683 
2,766 
4,310 
9,184 
1,923 
3,605 
3,386 

14.501 


8,569 




24,904 




41,744 


\°^ 


55,394 




51,472 




56,347 




22,439 




61,445 




39,911 




175.741 




250,364 

304,605 
140,655 
330,079 

1.751,553 


236,090 
261,726 
133,908 
308,462 

1,619,239 


4,429 
6,722 
2,342 

6,091 

39,490 


8,934 
15,337 

3,952 
14,631 

85,604 


931 
620 
652 
895 

7,220 


3,133 
6,036 
1,695 
3,437 

22,256 


39,777 




55,446 




25,941 




54,577 




295.926 




180,095 
264,123 
341,774 
965,561 

739,614 


169,279 
243,751 
316,584 
689,625 

677.448 


3,553 

5,011 

8,315 

22,611 

19,277 


6,484 
14,580 
15,558 
48,962 

39,709 


779 

761 

1,317 

4,343 

3,160 


1,986 

2,671 

6,897 

10,502 

11,876 


35,008 




38,537 




60,736 




161,647 




132,642 




76,250 
£33,014 
87,406 
112,382 
26,660 
53,944 
91,968 
55,970 

2.285.497 


69,700 
214,645 
80,794 
101,870 
25,169 
50,051 
84,712 
50,507 

2.055.099 


1,765 
5,766 
2,326 
3,275 
653 
1,350 
2,202 
1,738 

66,529 


4.352 
U,e35 
3,910 
6,714 
2.417 
2,271 
4,737 
3,473 

152,366 


433 
766 
376 
523 
241 
272 
317 
252 

U,503 


1,481 
3,615 
1,196 
1,397 

439 
1,100 
2,092 

556 

45,054 


12,690 




41,258 




16,061 




24,045 




4,649 




9,861 




13,106 




10,776 




360.510 




1,692,879 
a24,447 
868,171 


1,515,921 
204,341 
334,637 


50,691 
5,690 
9,948 


117,525 
13,087 
21,754 


6,742 
1,129 
1,632 


36,717 
2,623 
5,514 


261,910 




36,909 




59,691 



Vol. 1 - Page 3- 20 



Census of 
American 
Business 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 



TABLE 6a -- DHITED STATES SO«MAHY — RffTAIL SALES BY WHOLESALE ESTABL ISHMOTTS , 



BT KiHLs or BDsnress 

Reproduced from Retail Volume I of 
the 1933 Census of American Business 



CDID OF BtlSINESS 
(wholesale clasaif Icatlone)^/ 



sals to ultimate 
consumers!/ 



By whole- 
■alara 00172/ 

(thousands) 



B7 all typo 
of ■holeaale 

eatabllah- 
mentaS/ 

(thousands) 



KIND OP BUSINESS 
(wholesale classlf icatloQa) V 



SALS TO TILTBIATK 
CONSUMERS^/ 



By whole- 
salers onlyS/ 

( tLoisande) 



By all type 
of wholesale 

establlab- 
mantaSr 

( thouaanda) 



UNITJSU STATES- 



>379.50a 



Ajniaement and sporting goods.... 

Automot Its products 

Chemicals 

Clothing and furniahlngs 

Coal 

Druga and drug sundries 

Dry goods 

Electrical goods 

Parni products-raw materials 

7artD products-consumer goods.... 

Farm supplies 

Furniture and house furnishings. 



4,963 

56,959 

4,176 

8,461 

16,308 

4,eS2 

3,502 

18,445 

10,693 

59,437 

18,511 

5,776 



t5e5,945 



5,155 
67 , 239 

8,619 

9,028 
19,239 

5,820 
10,707 
20,619 
41.495 
77,527 
22,499 

6,902 



Oeneral merchandise 

Groceries and fooda (except farm products).. 

Hardware 

Jewelry and optical goods...... 

Lumber and bldg. materials (other than metal 
Machinery, equipment, and aup- 

pliea (except electrical).. 

Metals (except scrap) 

Paper and its products 

petroleum and its products 

pl'imbing and heating equipment and euppliea. 

Tobacco and its products (sxcept leaf) 

Waste materials 

All other 



»1,901 
59,520 
20,086 
2,575 
15,260 

9,691 

2,798 

10,141 

13,198 

6,644 

6,637 

2,058 

16,890 



$1,925 
67,505 
20,261 
2,965 
17,431 

23,487 
U,153 
15,333 
88,715 
8,576 
6,715 
2,078 
24,958 



See footnotes at end of Table 



TABLE SB — BUTTED STATES SmUEY — BETAIL SilSS HI HH0IES4LE ESTABUSHMraiTS, B? CTmiRAPRIC DnSTCBS AND 9TATB9 



DIVISION AMD STATE 



SALES TO ULTD'ME 
CONSUlffiBS^ 



By whole- 
Salera only 2/ 



By all type 

of wholesale 

establish- 

menta3/ 

( thousands ) 



DIVISION AND STATE 



SALES TO ULTIMATE 
CONSUMERS V 



By whole- 
salers only V 

(thousands) 



By all type 

of wholesale 

eatataish- 

menta^' 
(th.cur,^.ds) 



UNITED STATSS. 



NEW ENGLAND 

Connecticut.. . 

Maine 

Massac huaetta. 
New HaBg)ahire. 
Rhode laland.. 
Vermont 



MHIDLE ATLANTIC. 
New Jereey. ... 

New Tor]c 

pemisylTaoia. . 



EAST NCRTH CafTRAL.. 

Ullnoi , 

Indiana «.... 

Michigan 

Ohio 

Wiaconaio 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL. 

Iowa 

Kanaaa 

Itlimeeota.. ....... 

Missouri 

Nebraska , 

North Dakota..... 
South Dakota 



SOUTH ATLAOTIC 

Delaware ...1 

District of Columbia.. 
rloTlda 



t379.502 



29,642 
7,713 
3,600 

13,910 

1,674 

1,753 

992 

94,721 
10,491 
54,936 
29,292 

64,905 
27,234 
8,237 
12,530 
25,116 

u,3ee 

32,689 
5,383 
2,858 
8,386 

10,065 

3,980 

667 

1,330 

36,552 

668 

5,741 

3,962 



>585.945 



40,960 
9,130 
4,654 

20,675 
2,904 
2,218 
1,379 

147,621 
17,292 
84,721 
45,606 

131,688 
40,319 
12,608 
19,512 
41,040 
18,209 

68,129 
13,659 
7,798 
15,364 
16,997 
7,514 
2,763 
4,014 

57,848 

1,040 
7,856 
5,060 



SOUTH ATLANTIC— Continued 

Georgia 

Maryland 

North Carolina..... 

south Carolina.. ... .•■■■ 

Virginia. 

West Virginia 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 

Alabama 

Kentucky • 

Mississippi 

Tennessee. 

WEST sOTTH cnmuL 

Arkan eaa. ...... .•••...■• 

Louisiana. ..••••• ••••••• 

OklahouB. ••■....... ..... 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN 

Arizona ...•. 

Colorado ••*.•• 

Idaho 

Montana... .......•••■..• 

Nevada •• 

New Usxieo 

Utah 

iryomln^ 

PAcmc 

California 

Oregon >•.*••■ 

WaahlngtoD 



tS,208 
6,095 
6,360 
2,541 
4,201 
2,776 

13,676 
2,862 
4,773 
2,539 
3,502 

20,004 
2,355 
4,299 
3,567 
9,763 

U,759 

1,976 

3,447 

882 

2,ise 

40s 

763 

1,728 

383 

SS,994 
4T,fM 
3,237 
5,013 



$6,698 
12,048 
7,867 
3,807 
8,853 
4,420 

17,976 
3,311 
6,453 
2,953 
5,259 

32,660 

2,817 

6,077 

7,J17 

16,549 

17,515 
2,592 
5,241 
1,406 
3,641 

49S 
1,076 
2,320 

741 

71,546 
58,661 
4,322 
6,544 



¥^ 



1/ Major grouplngB oaly are ahown in thla table, por detailed klnd-of-buaineaa claaalf loationa (wholeaala) see Volume I of wholesale census reports. 

2/ "Wboleealare otQy" Include thoae wholeaalera and turportera who aell to retallare for resale, although It does not Include manufacturere' sales branchss. 

3/ ?or typea of dlatrlbutora Included In "All types of wholesale eatabllshJi»ntB- aee Voluno I of the wholesale census reporte. 



Vol. I - P««e 3 21 



mcl 
Aamieut 
BttsincH 



ROTAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 

UBU « -.imiTlB 3BH3 30l»»m--«l»LI3I3 or BlOIiCPra Of 3B(VIC« BSEABLIaUKDna, PUCIS OF AKUanOIT, Ua HOTILS, 

BI ONUS or BUSIliSS 



(to««lpta niraaMd *B tboQMBU of dolUn) 



Reproduced from Relait Volume I ol 
the 1933 Ccnsui of American Buaineu 





nabar 

sf 

Uoh- 
aonta 


■ooolpta 






naoolpta 


fnm — 






HXD or BU9I1IE99 


aorrloo 


Itela- 

ilOU 


1/ 


auo of 


aalo of 

wrab- 

•nllBO 


otMr 
Sounaa 


UKIIID SniE TOUl 


30S,tl( 


»2, 760,861 


»1, 680, 717 


»4»9,78« 


W09,497 


1196,423 


#91,601 


»«7,861 


Sorrlo* EatsbllsbBWita — ^Tqtol 


us.eyi 


1,729,114 


1,680,717 




6,3»4 


•14 


ta,«c 


8,767 


PMaoBJkl eerrloci 


















BM4>*r tbopo 


117,632 


204,367 


202,302 






- 


1,810 


889 


Soeu^ p^rloTO 


•l£,073 


116,795 


113,926 






- 


2,801 


•68 


Cl«aaU«, lyalog. pnulag, aitentlon ud 


















npAlr abop^i ood Talat abopo 


&5,4&V 


135,611 


133,484 






- 


1,921 


866 


Cootoo r«Qtal agnolaa 


299 


2,199 


2,142 






. 


54 


3 


rotttr&l dlMOtora and anbaimara 


12,639 


172,438 


172,087 






. 


. 


381 


rar rapalr and atonga abopa 


1,310 


9,069 


4,719 




- 


- 


319 


31 


LAuDdriaa, band (not lBaludiA« aoanorolttl 


















lausdrlaa) 


13,6<1 


35,649 


39,2Se 






- 


la 


237 


Fhotogropblo atudloa 


S,33U 


31,673 


31,073 






. 


727 


73 


Sbo* rapalr ahopa 


90,«£6 


67,193 


63,299 






. 


1,688 


206 


Sboa ablna parlora (iBoluding bat olaanlac) 


7,027 


10,032 


9,67t 


- 




. 


870 


90 


Otbar paraooal aarvloaa 


2,31» 


10,219 


9,940 


- 




- 


159 


U6 


BBOlnaaa aarrlaa; 


















AdJuateKit and orodit buraaua; and oollaatloa 


















a^Qolaa 


l,S2t 


39,199 


34,964 


. 


. 


. 


95 


140 


iAT?r:taloe aganolaa, and bxXlbaexd adTortlaing 


















Ae^noiaa 


1,47« 


169,667 


167,299 


. 


- 


- 


1,699 


909 


BlQaprlntlng and pbotoatat laboratorlaa 


293 


3,879 


3,394 


- 


. 


. 


466 


19 


Carta«a and truoJcin« aaUbllabaanta 


23,102 


174,875 


171,731 


. 


- 


- 


8,197 


947 


DallTa[r7 aarrica 


577 


8,990 


8,916 


. 


. 


. 


3 


31 


Dntal laboratorlaa 


S47 


8,983 


8,870 


. 


_ 


. 


90 


23 


Eupllostlng, addrasalngf mailing; and mailing 


















llBt earrlaa 


672 


5,736 


9,646 


. 


_ 


. 


48 


48 


Llnan supply aarrloa 


461 


17,713 


17,677 


- 


- 


. 


16 


20 


Pboto ;inl«blng laboratorlaa 


780 


9,493 


9,100 


_ 


- 


. 


376 


6 


Slffi painting ahopa 


3,007 


9,438 


9,286 


- 


. 


- 


137 


19 


Storaga aarabouaaa 


2,917 


72,089 


66,448 


- 


. 


. 


1,904 


1,733 


Other bualnaaa earrloaa 


2,302 


127,368 


126,523 


- 


- 


- 


609 


840 


MaohaTilnal npelr aerrloa: 


















lutoDobila broka rapalr, rallnlng and adjuataont 


















ahopa 


241 


1,940 


1,714 


. 


. 


- 


816 


10 


Autaaoblla paint abopa 


1,694 


9,734 


5,994 


- 


. 


. 


99 


41 


Aitaoblla radiator shopa 


1,197 


3,539 


3,393 


. 


. 


„ 


139 


11 


iatOKbUa top and body repair aboifl 


3,636 


17,778 


17,105 


. 


_ 


, 


578 


99 


Hlan'Twnltb abopa 


20,297 


21,963 


20,768 


_ 


. 


_ 


718 


77 


Cablnatnakar and oarpantar rapa.<.r «bope 


2,063 


3,664 


3,511 


_ 


_ 


_ 


124 


It 


Slaotrloal rapalr abopa 


2,391 


11,169 


10,206 


_ 


_ 


_ 


900 


•3 


naTator aarrloa (repair) 


141 


1,946 


1,409 


_ 


_ 


_ 


54 


7 


Hamaae, laatbar, and aboa rapalr abopa 


2,490 


2,680 


2,647 


_ 


_ 


_ 


821 


18 




1,937 


3,272 


3,096 


. 


_ 


_ 


209 


7 


Vattraaa rwjoratlng and rapalr ahopa 


462 


1,284 


1,158 


, 


. 


_ 


121 


S 


Plumbing and boating rapalr ahopa 


6,608 


27,217 


26,161 


_ 


_ 


_ 


973 


•3 


Radio rapalr abopa [not Including daelare In 


















redioa) 


4,501 


6,145 


5,971 


. 


. 


_ 


997 


17 


Saw and tool sharpaning aarrloa 


778 


1,719 


1,996 


_ 


. 


_ 


113 


t 


Tlnnalth, ahaet matal, and roofing rapalr ahopo 


3,191 


11,999 


11,601 


_ 


_ 


_ 


341 


17 


Tlra repair ahopa 


978 


1,174 


1,U9 


_ 


_ 


_ 


94 


1 


Typewriter repair abopa 


298 


746 


670 


_ 


_ 


_ 


74 


8 


Upholatary and furniture repair ahopa 


4,798 


10,990 


10,987 


_ 


, 


_ 


310 


93 


Wetoh, clock, and Jawalrr rapalr abopa 


9,678 


14,707 


13,914 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,083 


110 


Welding abopa 


2,949 


10,476 


10,183 


. 


„ 


_ 


876 


19 


Otbar mechanical repair aarrioaa 


5,962 


17,809 


16,873 


- 


- 


- 


809 


127 


Mlaoeilnnaoua aarrloa; 


















lutcBiobila laundriaa 


733 


2,061 


2,01S 


, 


_ 




44 


9 


intoeoblle rental aarrioe 


361 


5,420 


5,202 


_ 


_ 


_ 


133 


88 


Dlelnfaetant and axtemlDatlng aarrioe 


3a 


3,147 


2,990 


. 


_ 




116 


41 


bplormoit agaacloa 


783 


3,274 


3,242 


_ 


_ 


_ 


86 


6 


Oangea (atomga) 


2,123 


14,197 


12,969 


_ 


, 


. 


976 


298 


Hmsatltohlng, mabroidarlng, and buttonholing 


















ahopa 


965 


1,520 


1,919 


. 


_ 


_ 


86 


19 


Parking lota 


3,152 


12,827 


12,267 


_ 


_ 


_ 


489 


135 


Tourlot campa; and tourlat cospa with filling 


















atatlona 


5,846 


6,483 


_ 


_ 


6,334 


914 


1,012 


888 


Window cleaning Barrioa 


387 


5,106 


9,101 


_ 






4 


3 


Other alacallanaoua aarrioaa 


3,663 


2a. 163 


19,638 


- 


- 


- 


1,884 


841 


iBuoanta— Total 


29,737 


520,216 


_ 


495,788 


. 


3,487 


7,795 


13,194 


BlUJapl and pool parlora and bowling allerw 


u,43e 


31,710 




86,912 




605 


3,524 


669 


Chnca bnUa 


2,933 


10,248 


_ 


8,906 


_ 


663 


427 


280 


Skating rlnka 


264 


1,C05 


_ 


980 




84 


21 


30 


Tboatraa — Total 


10,265 


415,153 


. 


407,953 




992 


1,308 


4,900 


Thaatrwa— lagltlmata atago and opera 


122 


8,611 


_ 


8,906 




U 


16 


77 


Bioatraa— motion picture 


9,499 


356,316 


_ 


349,734 




955 


1,290 


4,337 


Tboatrwa— aotl<ai picture and TaudarlUe 


644 


50,226 


_ 


49,713 




25 


8 


48« 


Otbor aniaaBOQta 


4,637 


62,102 


- 


51,079 




1,603 


8,515 


7,306 


Botala— Total l/ 


29,462 


515,949 


_ 




303,163 


131,088 


15,424 


49,940 


Taai^round— Total 1/ 


27,1S8 


493,341 


- 


- 


289,446 


144,078 


14,905 


«4,SU 


imarioan plan 1/ 


4,044 


34,474 


. 


. 


19,284 


11,099 


2,819 


1,878 


Kiropean plan 

Idxad plan (iaerlcan and Buropaan) l/ 


18,936 


402,102 


_ 


_ 


239,849 


112,607 


10,158 


39,886 


4,148 


56,669 


- 


- 


30,313 


20,166 


8,538 


3,684 


Sooaonal— Total 2/ 


2,334 


82,308 


- 


- 


13,717 


6,990 


519 


1,188 


Amonoan plan l/ 
Boropaon plan ~ 
Uizad plan (.uaarlean and Suropaan) 1/ 


1,263 
604 

467 


12,509 
4,302 
9,497 


\ 


; 


6,191 
8,601 

2,92s 

1 


3,677 
1,306 
1,967 


174 
160 
IBS 


487 
239 
420 



1/ 4iD«^eaa plan ud vii«i piaa (imrieaa wul Bupop«aa) betels » 
T9 tharefow oT«ratat*d, «aid Mle« of a«ali uad«rBt«ted to 



I sot alwayfl able to abov mmml aalaa aeparatalj, 

ne artaat. 



Roun raotala 



Vol. I - Page 3 -22 



Census of 
American 
Business 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 



BLBLX 9B.— OnrSD SOXES SOHiHT. 



r—AHuaais op Bscnna or sehtick vstasllsbussts, pucbs a/ 

BT GSOfSiPEIC DIVIHIQSS ABD SU^S 



(Baeelpts axpreased In thousands of dollBrs) 



SMnSSUWC, AND HOOLS, 

Reproduced horn Retail Volume 1 ol 
the 1933 Census of American Bustneac 





Ntimbar 
of 

Satab- 
11 ah- 


Baoaipta 






Baoaipta 


f rcB — 


^°" 




DIVISKM AHD 3I4IS 


Sarrloa 


ldml»- 


Boob 


Sala at 


Sala of 

■aroh- 

andiaa 


Cthar 




lanta 






alona 


Rantala 
1/ 


U^ 


Sooroaa 


mrrron staies TOTAL 


50Z,*li 


♦2,760,881 


$1,680,717 


$493,782 


$309,497 


$155,423 


$81,601 


♦67,661 


Hsi BaajBH 


36,769 


199,952 


120,910 


41,893 


17,719 


U,917 


S,3ST 


4,ia« 


Caimsetiont 


6,755 


37,130 


22,686 


8,562 


2,742 


2,054 


440 


646 


MalA* 


3,613 


13,576 


6,638 


1,556 


3,606 


1,318 


2S> 


19« 


Mftwimnhnnatta 


19,720 


118,516 


74,330 


25,686 


8,228 


6,260 


2,139 


1,873 


Ha« Eanpshiz« 


2,090 


9,259 


4,354 


1,840 


1,139 


708 


181 


1,037 


Bhnda Island 


2,811 


15,216 


9,546 


3,600 


904 


665 


1S9 


342 


Toznant 


1,750 


6,265 


3,356 


649 


1,100 


912 


U9 


89 


MTriTTit ATUSnC 


122,350 


901,622 


584,181 


162,527 


78,733 


43,182 


13,620 


19,379 


N«» Jttjn«7 


20,012 


103,681 


60,653 


22,162 


11,556 


5,678 


1,853 


1,739 


Nn ToTk 


66,196 


626,893 


419,715 


105,703 


54,145 


25,172 


7,127 


15,031 


PwmaylTanla 


36,142 


171,048 


103,813 


34,662 


13,032 


12,332 


4,600 


2,60( 


EAST HORTH CnTERAL 


108,243 


589,998 


352,893 


109,699 


66,071 


33,089 


12,377 


15,869 


ininola 


34,173 


252,983 


142,237 


51,818 


33,682 


12,934 


4,484 


7,828 


JnAtan^ 


13,029 


47,650 


29,034 


8,452 


5,036 


2,758 


1,462 


908 


Uidhlgaa 


18,580 


93,933 


59,208 


16,423 


8,665 


5,342 


1,878 


2,417 


Ohio 


29,925 


143,248 


89,565 


25,091 


13,155 


8,534 


2,904 


3,999 


Blaeonain 


12,536 


52,184 


32,849 


7,915 


5,533 


3,5a 


1,649 


717 


WlSbT UOBIB CHDCBAL 


61,346 


246,316 


150,447 


40,148 


29,269 


15,632 


5,927 


4,893 


Ia«a 


u,se6 


40,899 


25,200 


6,952 


4,553 


2,180 


1,235 


779 


guTiwaw 


8,617 


25,830 


15,044 


5,273 


2,977 


1,538 


699 


299 


Munaaota 


11,037 


53,213 


30,447 


8,683 


7,049 


4,403 


1,314 


1,312 


UlsacuTi 


17,091 


86,037 


55,965 


12,693 


9,230 


4,868 


1,518 


1,763 


Habraalm 


7,649 


24,907 


15,682 


3,676 


2,979 


1,563 


543 


464 


Horth SaHota 


2,603 


7,665 


4,017 


1,260 


1,231 


664 


3S3 


140 


South DaJcota 


2,783 


7,765 


4,092 


1,606 


1,250 


416 


26S 


136 


SOOTH AHJHTIC 


44,989 


223,876 


125,501 


38,173 


31,482 


16,805 


3,486 


8,429 


OelaasTV 


961 


4,710 


2,803 


1,010 


315 


357 


123 


102 


Uatrlet of Columbia 


2,413 


31,845 


13,240 


5,306 


6,679 


4,402 


606 


1,61P 


Florida 


6,270 


31,215 


14,872 


2,856 


7,763 


2,543 


369 


2,792 


Georgia 


6,389 


26,950 


16,147 


4,737 


3,479 


1,559 


482 


546 


Uai7land 


6,825 


37,161 


22,339 


8,822 


2,318 


1,592 


572 


1,518 


North Carolljia 


6,227 


26,840 


15,931 


4,680 


3,778 


1,689 


270 


492 


Soath Carollaa 


3,854 


14,295 


9,739 


1,975 


1,511 


718 


U7 


£35 


Virginia 


7,405 


33,263 


20,292 


5,192 


3,643 


2,666 


589 


881 


Waat Virginia 


4,645 


17-597 


10,138 


3,595 


1,976 


1,279 


358 


251 


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 


23,849 


82,990 


52.515 


U.891 


10,168 


4,915 


1,173 


2,328 


II flltlllMI 


5,326 


17,556 


11,824 


2,308 


2,008 


859 


246 


3U 


Eantooky 


8,031 


28,471 


17,398 


4,633 


3,115 


1,724 


465 


1,136 


lUaalaalppl 


3,771 


9,143 


5,553 


1,360 


1,301 


573 


98 


258 


Tanneaaea 


6,721 


27,820 


17,740 


3,590 


3,744 


1,759 


364 


623 


nssT soirm coitbal 


39,582 


156,325 


92,045 


26,923 


21,389 


9,126 


2,955 


3,887 


Arkanaaa 


4,245 


12,076 


6,830 


1,715 


1,945 


1,097 


288 


201 


Loulalaaa 


5,653 


25,617 


15,296 


5,089 


2,839 


1,367 


569 


457 


Oklahooa 


8,574 


28,419 


16,436 


5,405 


3,868 


1,694 


486 


530 


Teiaa 


21, UO 


90,213 


53,483 


14,714 


12,737 


4,968 


1,612 


2,699 


UODNTAIN 


16,360 


68,593 


33,980 


11,200 


14,153 


5,213 


2,244 


1,803 


ArlzoQA 


1,546 


7,972 


3,173 


1,284 


1,962 


825 


345 


383 


ColoiaJlo 


5,528 


22,579 


iz.tu 


3,359 


4,098 


1,533 


402 


471 


Idaho 


1,873 


6,985 


3,838 


1,116 


1,239 


426 


210 


156 


Montana 


2,460 


9,807 


4,670 


1,730 


1,994 


730 


416 


268 


Rerada 


541 


3,148 


1,106 


596 


920 


197 


162 


167 


Naa Uailoo 


1,258 


4,813 


2,159 


657 


1,041 


619 


288 


51 


Utah 


1,974 


8,U6 


4,216 


1,479 


1,498 


541 


197 


IBS 


■joBlng 


1,180 


5,171 


2,102 


979 


1,401 


342 


228 


122 


PACinc 


48,928 


291,199 


168,246 


53,328 


40,513 


15, SU 


6,482 


7,067 


California 


35,865 


227,065 


131,619 


42,220 


31,072 


U,49a 


4,926 


6,730 


Oragon 


4,865 


22,546 


13,524 


3,231 


3,370 


1,380 


SOS 


636 


■aahlagton 


8,198 


41,588 


23,102 


7,877 


6,071 


2,666 


1,051 


821 



1/ lffi»nc«uD plooi and Mlzsd plan (Amorloan and B^opean) hotels wars not always able to show msal aidas 
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Vol. 1 - 


P^' 


3- 


24 


























a 

z 

§ 

m 
u. 

O 

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P^ 

1 

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472353 
88,853 
38,834 
265,433 
20,046 
35.450 
21,737 


207.262 
966.299 
384.104 


386,997 
116,642 
189,924 
250,654 
114,464 


99,122 
59,176 
94,686 
161,174 
46,121 
13,026 
14,639 


14,542 
37,171 
46,759 
61,512 
66,067 
54,186 
24.064 
60,204 
26.361 
171249 
37,960 
46.587 
23.126 
61.676 
278978 
35.300 
32.756 
O1.084 
149.839 


14,343 

46,664 

14,446 

19,179 

3,634 

6,443 

16,216 

6,910 

437606 

306,769 

44,110 

86,9(9 


o 

: 

• 


11 

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il 

^1 






1 


2,562 
1,666 
6,802 

784 
1,216 

735 
53786 


7.234 
27,828 
16,724 


13,619 
5,637 
6,383 
10,248 
4,559 


4.465 
2.699 
3.891 
5,645 
2,269 
960 
960 


535 
836 
2,338 
2.512 
2,267 
2,300 
1,196 
2,477 
1,481 


N lO -. Ul CC 
cu >o '^ .O <£ 
in lo o w f 


1,682 
1,791 
2,813 
6,082 
6201 


606 
2.146 
724 
L.043 
169 
377 
741 
397 


S38 


s 

V4 


o 

o 


J5 




eg 

g 

- 


22.816 
10,266 
64,379 

6,617 
11,377 

4,217 
366993 


60,689 
203,103 
113,201 


131.449 
46,627 
78,790 
90,819 
35,975 


33,004 
30,716 
28,028 
59,830 
20,366 
6,162 
6,056 
1 63:176 


2,516 
16,414 
24,603 
27,859 
19,062 
24,977 
11,891 
22,710 
13,345 


23.399 
22.766 
10.344 
26,136 
172791 
17,310 
21,090 
37,307 
97,064 
54093 


7,255 
16,273 
6,649 
7,160 
1,676 
4.293 
6.110 
3,777 


rH O to 


2 

3 

5 


3 


(T 

IT 


1 

to 


774 
378 

1.971 
228 
403 
148 

12514 


1,617 
5,392 
4,406 
12006 


3,809 
1,621 
2,416 
2.868 
1,292 


1,446 

1,134 

1,079 

2,336 

676 

266 

367 

6666 


107 
240 
1,027 
1,132 
654 
926 
536 
771 
475 


ir- IB e- Oi V 


S26 

864 

1,280 

3,618 

1778 


OlENNiOrtC-^O. 


« P> to 

ej rt (D 


a 


Ml 




3 
1 


CM 


61.770 
24,254 
115,096 
12,789 
26,298 
12,788 
823463 


162,966 
117,664 
242,813 
964122 


270,702 
113,374 
210,826 
220,690 
146,530 


133.261 
104,654 
109,503 
99,256 
83,749 
41,867 
45.967 
269361 


9,737 
14,764 
37.663 
31,337 
41.554 
40.950 
16.323 
43,247 
23,796 


28,186 
46,972 
22,956 
42.660 


25,666 
29.490 
81,617 
196.038 
141967 


18,387 
37,377 
16,837 
27,499 
3,906 
10,662 
14,496 
10,604 
312464 
231,614 
32.460 
48,400 


1 




1 




g 




6 ifi CD 03 o to f 
• - o 


3,21! 
9,566 
6.762 
22304 


5,428 
3,003 
3,931 

3,431 


3.854 
2.927 
A360 
3,221 
2.231 
1,401 
1,433 


167 
211 
976 
764 
947 
898 
413 
926 
665 


505 

1,178 

443 

781 


619 

!64 

1.831 

3,699 

3080 




2SS 

rt_ai CM 


9 

a 

s 




= 2.9 
= SI 




CM 
P- 

•; 

P 


a 
p 


49, 4i: 

13,974 
101,117 

8,499 
18,24( 

6,133 
808572 


108.56! 

468,77! 

231.23! 

63550S 


210,817 
68,361 

120,10! 

171,454 
54,77! 


42,302 
34,943 
46,906 
77,377 
26,423 
7,797 
8,133 
2241M1 


6,601 
17.800 
25.492 

32,633 
35,027 
32.722 
16,006 
32,986 
24.971 
108156 


29.14* 
27,437 

16,039 
35,642 


19,229 
23,570 
42,112 
108,633 
74427 


9,043 
22,181 
8,479 
9,562 
2,024 
4,450 
14,372 
4,316 


o ot P- 

O* r^ CO 


rH 

s 




5 

o 
u5 


S 


§ 


953 
420 

2,017 
293 
327 
229 

16232 


2.135 
7.992 
5.106 
12563 


3,920 
1,711 
2,102 
3,188 
1,632 
6950 


1,449 

1,137 

1,201 

1,684 

818 

267 

374 

5394 


136 
229 
695 
782 
645 
852 
467 
824 
562 
2741 


744 
822 
457 

4713 


593 

453 

1.178 

2,489 

1756 


190 
611 
265 
260 
66 
141 
209 
133 
6363 


CD rt c^ 


s 








CD 
P- 


a 


25,387 
5.986 

52,320 
5.316 
6.680 
4.369 

296108 


64.660 
140,987 
102,571 

452524 


110,482 
51,215 
109,069 
132,796 
46,962 
247656 


46,341 
44.346 

46,721 
63,420 
29,414 
10,767 
14,846 
184076 


4,264 

11,366 
29,904 
26,846 
17.081 
37,626 
15,212 
23,611 
17,988 
71074 


18,424 
16,649 
17,115 
18,986 
180916 


17.993 
18.753 
49.752 
94,418 
65491 


6,165 

21,764 

6,268 

10,213 

1,351 

4,813 

8,554 

4,243 

183096 


* e^ rt 

CM rt rH 

p- cn ^ 

sss" 


s 




1 


% 

s 


03 
p. 
P- 


1,695 
571 

3,734 
533 
523 
602 

18841 


3,265 
6,615 
6,761 
24824 


6,008 
3,436 
6,375 
7,230 
2,775 
14660 


2,956 
2,904 
2,273 
3,928 
1,430 
603 
666 
16256 


309 

269 

2,868 

2,618 

939 

4,032 

1,584 

2,116 

1,201 

5757 


1,618 
l.fOl 
1,612 
1,326 

16522 


1,807 
1,856 
4,336 
8,623 
4207 


626 
1,349 
441 
434 
116 
460 
554 
238 
12668 


05* rH cm' 


n 

s 




> 
o °- 


s 

J? 


03 

« 

(O 

p- 
•• 




119,511 
58,393 

291,815 
34,834 
46,968 
32,249 

1604232 


270,596 
806,247 
627,387 
1807978 


510,251 
223.065 
397,604 
476,116 
200,923 
936140 


176,472 

165,611 

167,347 

222,456 

109,278 

51,322 

63,664 

646741 


16,442 

42.607 
87,513 

101,820 
83,691 

104,462 
48,297 
96.069 
67.060 
359200 


85,414 
91,173 
72,741 
109,872 
727319 


71,252 

76,590 

168,912 

411,465 

315783 


41,306 
90,268 
37,068 
50,942 
11,634 
24.166 
37.848 
22,562 
847233 


C- rH rt 

lO rH CD 

P- CO to 

is"; 

to '-t 


t 

is 






CM 
P- 

te 

f 


IT 


1,869 

1,221 

3,721 

726 

762 

634 

26387 


4.376 
12.304 
9.706 
29756 


7,978 
4,560 
6,130 
8,134 
3,954 
20663 


4,231 
3,468 
3,580 
4,516 
2,347 
1.130 
1.292 
12647 


302 
322 
1.999 
1,901 
1,460 
2,087 
1,068 
1,965 
1.453 
5726 


1,526 
2,097 
1,250 
1,754 
12412 


1,300 
1,236 
2,818 
7,066 
6398 


677 
1,681 
653 
933 
172 
470 
515 
397 
13426 


■* o t 

P- .H ^ 

rt p- rt 

oT ^ cm" 


a 





a 
2 


1 


^ 




75,768 
26,631 

194,416 

13,392 

30,108 

8,961 

1458326 


162,480 
940,074 
366,771 
976096 


349,719 
92,119 
191,164 
250.031 
93.062 
353373 


66.698 
39.044 
80.276 
112,660 
34,402 
9,149 
11,342 
313639 


8,712 
42.874 
36,902 
42.019 
45,644 
36,646 
16,111 
47,266 
35,676 
131820 


29.838 
42,833 
14,980 
44,169 
212467 


16,539 
36,922 
46,706 
U2,29e 
64004 


7,740 
29,766 

6,676 
13,210 

2,749 

4,263 
14,241 

5,366 
361591 


Ol eg o 
cn to rt 
o. p- o._ 

rt'p- cn 


3 

10 

S 


1 


s 

o 
(S 


a 

-1 
c 


ot 

c 


2,214 
992 

5,339 
592 
768 
344 

37918 


5,128 
21,659 
11.131 

26762 


9.100 
2.547 
4,646 
6,407 
2,963 
10732 


2.232 
1,422 
2,168 
2,961 
1,053 
381 
495 
9066 


224 

684 
1.381 
1,114 
1,496 
1,269 
646 
1,332 
1,062 
3618 


m Pi %1 Oj CV 


567 

967 

1,136 

2,656 

2656 


«CM^rtC^<CCS«U> 

0jciiu3(0cntf)^^n 


lis 

to' ^ 


If 

rH 


3 

a 

c 
1 


il 
11 


2 
(n 


3 
1 




83,590 
26.468 

303.600 
16,026 
42,361 
11,020 

1641699 


187.699 
844,953 
609,047 
1612344 


640,076 
147,370 
285.203 
400.134 
139.562 
560226 


96,621 

66,273 

166,462 

244,330 

68,614 

17,332 

16,694 

L_552301 


6.735 
53.040 
53,052 
98,949 
100,612 
84,625 
37,523 
67,647 
47,918 
273268 


67,957 
60,353 
45,422 
99,536 
456531 


43,423 
60,602 
85,677 
266,729 
193372 


26,415 
66,732 
21 , 666 
26,756 

4,226 
12.293 
27,027 

7,267 
571116 


rH to Ol 

CM^-* rt 

tf P-' ot" 

S'°2 





3 
J 
( 




S 
2 


* 


666 
453 

1,930 
294 
384 
186 

12790 


2,428 
6,209 
4,153 
10416 


3,220 
1,399 
1,959 
2,753 
1,066 
6358 


920 
902 
664 
1,622 
476 
165 
219 
6700 


163 

161 

848 

1,338 

760 
1,243 
771 
860 
686 
4028 


987 
1,092 

887 
1.062 
6075 


794 

781 

1,199 

3,302 

1587 


W ^ ^ M r-t .H Ul 

rt 


w 


** 


i 


si! 

* O 

|i 




s 
1 


cn 
tO 


7,372 
21,068 
11 , 934 
10,030 

1.994 
15,597 
236064 


13,201 

72,108 

160,766 

316767 


72,292 
47.281 
67 . 293 
62.021 
77,870 
425359 


76,361 
66,473 
61,264 
63,608 
51.869 
38,173 
37,641 
463216 


3,160 
120 
26,914 
72,667 
26,462 
100,971 
50,638 
75,761 
96,613 
385030 


106.886 
89.770 

117.744 
70.631 
422381 


100,084 
78,116 
59,225 

164.955 
143362 


16,101 
23,669 
15,660 
26,254 
7.262 
22,699 
15,609 
16,188 
120671 


o c- ■^ 
rt C- «D 
ot C^ ID 


1 




6 

Z 




in 


ssls"sg 


544 
2,977 
6,200 
12756 


2,967 
2,369 
2,046 
3.074 
2.288 
14;9> 


2,367 
1,780 
2,413 
4,062 
1,406 
1.134 
1,030 
23166 


212 
10 
1,325 
3,617 
1,432 
4,851 
2,161 
6,528 
3,729 


5 g S K S 

^ U3 rt lO ^ 


3..:2e 
3,140 
2,102 
6,390 
3674 


383 
776 
431 
666 
134 
702 
484 
298 
3161 


1,492 

566 

1.001 


1 




li 

II 


J 


c 


to 
in 


28.919 
7,820 

97.745 
5.911 

12,679 
3,267 

652274 


69,816 
448,102 
134,357 

481593 


162,648 
42.882 
94,565 

112,277 
49,331 
193466 


36.425 
25.155 
37.820 
66.866 
19,204 
7,917 
9,069 
132767 


2,714 
18,649 
22,893 
19,663 

16,721 
17,374 

5.783 
15,032 
14,068 

65437 


14,186 
20,076 

9,647 
21,528 

133101 


11,564 

18,770 

72,912 
60634 


9,290 
17,232 
5,541 
9,864 
2,695 
4,818 
6,261 
4,953 
249371 


S3S 


s 




3 


rt 
at 


s 


1,608 
519 

3.904 
414 
673 
287 

29346 


4.328 
15.571 
9,447 
30177 


8,824 
3,866 
4,864 
6.653 
6.981 
i494? 


2,607 
2,336 
2,441 
4,807 
1.513 
567 
574 
13551 


206 

695 

2,464 

2,619 

1.234 

2.206 

911 

1,664 

1,643 

8058 


1,950 
2.266 
1,486 
2,356 
14665 


1,582 
2,697 
2,980 
7,206 
3640 


554 
1,169 
347 
562 
146 
317 
442 
303 
12406 


c~ m p- 

CM CM a> 


1 




S 
1 


S 
3 


i 


s 


204,109 
72.741 

656.921 
50,623 
64,062 
31,614 

3280505 


555,723 

942,703 
2561375 


846.471 
271.426 
491.666 
687,640 
263,968 
915369 


164,639 
126,996 
194,913 
275,344 
87,495 
31.008 
32,994 
661332 


26,208 
81,666 
112,838 
120,335 
167,862 
116,791 
58,362 
117,196 
80,082 
378310 


85,702 
120.824 

57 . 622 
114,162 

616342 


54,330 

80,685 

132,679 

348,648 

285669 


38,566 
93,811 
28,883 
44.200 
9.445 
16.768 
33.736 
16,162 
919349 


p. CD * 

o e- m 

>" cd' rt' 

a rH 


u 

I 

^ 

1 




1 


o 


Ol 
O} 


■* 


8,613 
3.282 

22,176 
1,962 
3,844 
1,201 

149137 


26,644 

70,714 

52,679 

95767 


31,037 
11,450 
17,106 
27,641 
9,634 
36379 


6,196 
4,896 
7.455 
12.037 
3.196 
1.274 
1,326 
54348 


1,214 
2,375 
6,316 
9,770 
9.258 
8.166 
5.293 
7.547 
4.407 
24242 


6,130 
7,156 
4.865 
6,071 
35727 


4,219 
6,947 
6,666 
16,895 
10386 


3,463 
947 

1,460 
242 

1,071 

1,306 
563 

33838 


D CD rH 

o" to* to* 






"3 


: 
^ 




a> 

CD 

i 

rt 


768,510 
307,627 
2,064,976 
164,285 
316,295 
152,176 
12717900 


1,843,545 

7,070,414 

3,803,941 

11262958 


3,7U,903 
1,222,384 
2,226,398 
2,864,831 
1,237,442 
5269563 


972,136 
744,566 
1,051.930 
1,448,220 
662,944 
234,540 
255,197 
4201756 


103,513 
336,262 
604,523 
535,440 
619 , 673 
663,419 
300,220 
500,929 
447,677 
2171995 


527,101 
567,340 
413,737 
643,817 
3727371 


476,643 

796,028 

2,043,020 

1548649 


466,969 
169,067 
243.626 
60.401 
119.768 
196.559 
103.437 
4426602 


rt rH OD 

<o rt Q 
00 (^ « 

3 S3 

CM V P- 

rt' 


XI 

a 

s 

1 

■1 






V) 


In 


3 

O 


22.202 

11,091 

64,183 

6.657 

9.642 

5.189 

385302 


60,010 
190,017 
135,276 

317667 


96,900 
41,618 
55,968 
83,717 
39.474 
170644 


32,715 
26,605 
30,725 
47,039 
17,637 
8,077 
8,646 
169068 


3,668 
6,931 
22,449 

28,667 
21.062 
28,831 
16.036 
26.120 
17.244 
89199 


27,117 
17,266 
23,384 
135462 


23,286 

27 , 339 

65,918 

44561 


13,993 
4.916 
6,951 
1.310 
4.191 
6,249 
2,963 

122371 


rH O O 




S 

1 
° 5 
is 

c c 


1 

a 

o 

> 

a 


S 

S 


1 


% 4 s a s 

-< 3 n, « J 
« e 9 :S • Q 

g d « T3 a w 

3 -• « » O C 1^ 

u at j K S E> g 


»•« York 
PennBylTania 
EAST NOifTH CENTRAL 




Kansas 

Missouri 
Nebraska 
Nortt Dakota 
South Dakota 

aoxrm atlaotic 


s 

1 ... J 

O O o -^ o 

|'o.,?55siE 

»h-'(»)rH«ja-<' a 




ill , 

M :] rH H F- . 

Mi,?!. 


O 


o a 

3 S 

H §1 2 

it i 


1 

m 

E 
i 

6 

U 

s 

3 

S 



Census of 
American 
Business 



AKron. Ohio 
Albany, K. r. 
Allentonn, Pa. 
Altoona, P»* 
AtlMTlllA. N. C. 

AtlADta, Za. 
Atlantic City, It. J . 
Augusta. 3ft. 
Austin, T«x. 
&altliDor«, i:<l. 

ftayonna, K. J. 
BsauiaODt, Tex. 
BertLftle?. C«Ilf. 
Bathlttbem, pa. 
Blpgbsffiton, S. r. 

BlTnlnghao, Alft. 
Boatoo, UasB. 
Bridgeport. Coim. 
BrooktoQ, i:ass. 
Buffalo, S. Y. 

CsR^ridce, 'Jftss. 
Csicdeci, :;. j. 
Canton, Ohio 
Cedar Sarids, Iowa 
CharleBtOD, S. C. 

Charleston. T. 7a, 
Charlotte, s. c. 
Chattanocea , Tenn* 
Chester, Pa. 
Chicago, 111. 

Cloero, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 1/ 
Cleveland Heists, Ohio 
Columbia, s. C* 

Columbus, Ohio 
Covington, Kj« 
I^allas, tax* 
Davenport. Io«ft 
Dayton, Ohio 

Doarbom, Ulah. 
Deoatur, 111. 
Denver, Colo. 
Das Uoines, lova 
Detroit, ::ioh. 

Dolutb, Ulnn. 
Durhan, H. C* 
East Chica^, Ind. 
Sast Oran^, n. j. 
Saat 3t. Louis, 111. 

Slisftbetb, K. J> 
21 Paso, Tex. 
Srle, Pa. 
Svanston, 111, 
Svansville, Ind. 

?»11 Tllver, l-ass. 
?llnt. -^ich. 
Port Tayne. !L.d, 
Port :7orth. Tex. 1/ 
Fresno. Calif. 

Galveston, Tex. 
Gary, Ind. 
Slendale, Calif. 
Grand aapids, :zioh. 
Greensboro, IT, C. 

E&iBiltfa, Ohio 
HatoDond, Ind. 
Eamtraoo^, ifiah. 
Harrlsburg, Pa. 
Hartford, Qosn. 

Hltfiland Park, Uioh. 
Bobok«n, 5. J, 
Bolyoka, uaaa. 
Hoostoh, Tax. 
HuDtiBgtOQ, T. Ta, 

Indian^tolis. Ind. 
Irvlngton, 5. j. 
Jadcaon. uich. 
Jaolcacnville, pla. 
Jersey City, y. J. 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 

TABLE Ui—SOBUBT FOR CITISS OF UuHE THAN 50.000 POroLATICH 
Number of Stores, Sales, Employment, and Pay Roll 
iSaies and pay roll expressed in thousands oj dollars) 



Vol. I - Page 3-25 



Reproduced from Retail Volume I of 
the 1933 Census of American Busineu 

Sunaary — 191 Cltiaa 



Num- 
ber of 

storcii 



3,427 
2.434 

1,285 
SOO 
642 

3,200 

1,705 

913 

S86 

13,499 

1,185 
802 

1.050 
729 
977 

2,742 

10,632 
2,293 
896 
8,215 ' 

1,026 

2.117 

1.493 

929 

: 1,037 

I ^^^ 
946 ' 
i,593 
324 

[44,599 

I 905 
I 6,660 
I 13,413 
313 , 



3,940 
963 

3,694 
830 

2,660 

475 

772 

4,133 

2,157 i 

17,141 ! 

1,285 ' 
611 
694 
821 

1,089 , 

2,359 ' 
1,282 ! 
1,566 

582 I 
1,327 

1,573 , 
1,674 

1,452 
2,300 

1,43^ 

763 
1,027 
1,053 
2,215 

£63 

791 ' 

828 

695 

1,241 

2,192 

691 
1,017 

890 
4,328 

1,124 



Num- 
ber of 



170,445 
60,650 
23,830 
17,048 
15,185 

94,464 
30,423 
14.641 
19,531 
251,461 

13,562 
15,290 
21,009 
11,496 I 
27,499 

55,914 I 
374,805 
44,337 
20,349 , 
162.526 I 

26,135 ; 
32.689 ! 
28,137 
19,918 
16,997 ; 

22,685 : 

28,596 
32,152 
13,821 

990.084 

9,530 
160,459 
275,935 

9.422 
16,056 



31.299 

43,090 ; 
27,879 

15,611 
17,264 
19,773 
45.481 
17.195 

12,393 

18,982 

6.560 
29,629 
68,944 



Full-time 
employees 

{(Utragf 
number) 



Pat Roll 



Total, in- 
cluding 
part^tirap 



Part- 
time 
only 



3,135 

2.409 

1,360 

687 

552 

2,735 

1,584 

892 

946 

13.406 

1,169 

752 I 
1.026 
797 
945 I 
I 
2,370 I 
6,869 
2,064 
864 
7.986 

877 

2,277 

1,438 

867 

980 

910 

702 

1,464 

824 

42,010 

1,166 
6,014 

12,875 
232 
721 



93,263 : 3,704 
13,704 867 

88,512 3,525 



17,843 


766 


67,915 


2,590 


7,500 


646 


16,849 


725 


106,663 


3,996 


55,023 


1.931 


369,936 


16.444 


28,266 


1,193 


14,666 


679 


5,407 


837 


18.354 


702 


14,627 


1,076 j 


35,356 


1,983 


21,346 


1,543 


27,813 


1,554 : 


26,566 


566 


22.669 


1,200 


28.624 


1,607 


37,094 


1,728 



1,461 
2,241 
1,496 

795 
1,039 
1.046 
2,028 

644 

713 

864 

938 

1,124 

1,819 



8,407 
7,023 I 
2,960 
2,279 I 
1.961 I 

13.461 ! 
3,921 
1,906 I 
2,432 

30,164 



(8.989 
8.288 
2,967 
2.140 
1.862 

12,668 
4,038 

1,615 
L,422 
33,482 



899 


1,183 


2,046 


1,877 


1,903 


2.574 


1,324 


1,393 


2,935 


3,324 



8,621 ' 
49.370 
5,106 
2,131 
18.890 
I 
2.930 I 
3,507 
3,297 
2,532 
2.541 

3.019 
4,054 
4,086 
1,452 
122,551 

736 ' 
20.733 
33,658 

952 

2,195 

12,144 
1.322 

12,309 
2,346 
7.100 

734 
2,081 

13.522 
6.755 

46,647 

3.516 
1,796 
616 
1,626 I 
1,609 1 

2.906 i 

3,028 

3,514 

3.014 I 
3.068 , 

3,292 
3.864 
3,661 
5.612 
2.826 

2,134 
1.820 

1,915 
5.953 
2,161 

1,409 
1.949 
683 
4,029 
6,401 



14,486 691 1.662 

15.242 964 1,336 

16,334 924 1,769 

98,392 4.287 12,657 

20,167 1,10S 2,623 



4,494 104.177 3,795 14,341 



7,324 

57,380 
6,021 
2,543 

20,947 

3.484 
4,064 
3,615 
2,533 
2,118 



♦ 755 
484 
244 
244 
124 

eu 

::67 

167 

177 

3,175 

127 
127 

296 
109 
178 

460 

3.250 

637 

270; 

1,6461 

387 I 
3f4 
353 



Johnatown. pa. 
Kalamzoo, vlob. 
Kansae City, Kans. 
Kansas City, Vo. 
Kenosha, ^a, 

Vnorvllle. Tenn. 
LakewDOd, Ohio 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Lansing, b-lob, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Linooln. neb. 
Little Rook, irK, 
Long Beach, Calif. 
Loa Angelea. Calif. 
Louisville. Ky* 

Lowell. Mass. 
Lynn, uass. 
lieKeosport, pa, 
Haoon, Sa. 
Uadison, i7iB. 

UaldsD, uass, 
Usnohester, K. H. 
Uedfort, Uas3. 



162 , Uiaml. pla. 



3,079 159 

3.912 221 

3,811 312 

1,654 111 

141,147 12,384 



676 

23.436 

38.186 

1.207 



12,981 
1,504 

12,004 
2.449 
7,496 

793 
2,097 

14,476 
7,117 

50,329 

3,877 
1,788 
596 
1,993 
1.781 

5,778 I 
2.868 

3,670 
4,057 I 
3.062 j 

3.770 : 
4.165 ' 
4,054 

5,583 
3,687 

2,251 
1,974 
2.267 
6.006 
2.167 

1.529 
2,106 
848 
4,037 
10,241 

1,662 
1,826 
2,104 
12,646 
2,676 



152 

i,eE7 

3.456 
99 
134 

1,004 
162 
537 
279 
647 

80 
202 
896 
606 
3.680 

429 
193 
63 
139 
165 

347 

191 
315 
266 
261 



Vilwauicefl. Vis. 
Minneapolis, t:inn. 
Iioblle, ila, 
Vontgomery, Ala, 
?n, 7emon, II. y. 

nasbville, Tenn. 
Kewark, N. ,1. 
new 3odford. rasa. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Hew Raven, Conn. 

Tiew Orleans, La, 
pew Rochelle. N. V. 
I7ewton, TJass. 
Hew York, R. Y, 

Bronx Borou^ 
Brooklyn Borough 
Manhattan Borough 
Queens Borou^ 
Rlchmood Borough 
Hiagara palls. S. Y. 

SorfoUt, 7a. 
Oakland, Calif. 
Oak Park, 111. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Oneha. nab. 

Pasadena, Calif, 
pasaalc, n. J* 
Peterson, H. j* 
Pewtuoket, R, I, 
Peoria, 111. 



290 Philadelphia, Pa. 
364'' Pittsburg, pa, 1/ 
*30 : pontiac, I'lch. 
358 ■ port Arthur, Tex. 
30* Portland. «alne 

124 ji Portland, Ore. 
211 .1 proTidetkae, R, i. 
196 pueblo. Colo. 
579 I Qulncy. liass. 
152 I Racine. Vis. 

136 Reading, pa. 
1'6 j BichBond, 7a. 

"^f I Roanoke, 7a, 
313 , Rocbeater, B. y, 
566 > Hockford, HI. 

122 I Sacrajnento, Calif. 
157 1 Saginaw, ;:loh, 
193 St. Joseph, ;:o. 1/ 
665 : St. Loula, L'o. 
187 St. Paul. ulnn. 



Num- 
ber of 
stores I 



118,247 
20.215 
19.666 

163,660 
11,269 

27,404 
12.676 
18.318 
23.395 
26.752 

26,054 
22,623 , 
4;. 676 
463,340 I 
81,229 I 

25,621 
31.824 I 
14,398 : 
14.694 j 
23.722 I 
I 
14,668 < 
21,434 
9,611 
69,077 
44.940 

178.740 
166,636 
19,870 
16,020 
22,059 



Num* 

ber of 
propri- 
etore 



50,660 


2,049 


188,167 


8,662 


30,230 


1,660 


13 ,925 


841 


65.467 


2,496 



1,941 ; 39,228 
4.898 ' 105.904 
665 21,029 
2,169 1/ 63,492 
3,152 : 73,903 



1,336 
1,178 
2,677 
897 
1,422 

26.154 
6.942 

I '"'I 

473 

1.149 

4,584 1 

3,223 

674 

747 

1.054 I 

1,889 
2,548 
920 
4,690 
1,126 

1.760 

991 

1,203 

12,527 

3,297 



28,540 
18,621 
48,179 
20,500 
54,699 



716 

687 

1,747 

4,269 



10,474 722 

13,882 666 

37,767 1,632 

61,730 4,176 



731 
1,658 
5,149 
5,328 



106,866 
85,820 
12,866 
19,807 
16,607 

56,741 
66,982 
25,384 

106,321 
23,392 

42,764 
19,066 
22,766 
262.813 
101,323 



899 

838 

1,580 

6,206 

762 

1,121 

639 

862 

1,016 

1,434 



976 
2,177 
19,817 
4,012 

1,365 
1,444 

714 
669 
961 

649 
1,016 

438; 
2,444i 
2,4291 

10,004, 

6,122 

980 



2,206 
8,325 
1,714 
844 
2,691 



7,708 103,386 , 7,687 

660 21,716 517 

464 12,429 , 316 

97.528 2,245.801 92,263 

14,308 243,789 13,605 

33,423 667,619 32,874 

35,089 1,166,806 '31,992 

12,389 243,775 11,596 

2.319 < 54.815 I 2.196 

1,141 19,197 1,126 



862 

811 

1,664 

6,105 

816 

1,058 
614 
869 
980 

1,589 

968 

864 

2,224 

19,917 

5,726 

1,272 

1,352 

668 

664 

854 

64S 

9S2 

384 

2,309 

2,387 

9,223 

5.972 

897 

736 

861 



1,823 
4,910 
464 
^,080 
3,015 

1,246 
1,158 
2,627 
810 
1,242 



514,456 23,657 

195,601 e.soa 

12,439 645 

10,711 616 

51,622 ' 1,056 



4,659 

2,863 

698 

619 

1.118 

1,752 
2,331 
819 
4,409 
1,044 

1,877 
939 
1,189 
12,416 
5,516 



Full-time 
employees 

{m'erage 
number) 



2,313 
2,224 
2,101 
22.921 
1.018 

5.766 

1.200 
2.192 
2.880 
2,650 

3,738 
3,17S 
4,241 
66,608 
10,919 

2,916 
3,655 
1,602 
2,111 
2.803 

1.362 
2.536 
889 
9,163 
5,808 

21,072 
21,997 
2,787 ' 
2,409 
2,055 

6,975 
21,415 
3,284 
1,376 
6,159 

16,946 

2,241 

1,257 

256,334 

18,756 I 
47,954 
146,464 
20,548 
2,633 
2,046 

5,411 
10,846 
2,092 
7,404 
9,78E 

5,020 
1,469 
4,670 
2,244 
4,918 



Pat Roll 



Total, in- Part- 
ctuding time 
part-time only 



t2,330 #236 

2,343 j 20S 

2,088 ' 208 

22,696 1,537 

1,230 195 



3,446 

1,391 
2,363 
2,993 
3,038 

3,967 
2,970 
5,291 
64,619 
10,947 

3,289 
4,566 { 
1,556 
1,846 I 
5,174 , 



250 
156 
206 
273 
345 

362 
254 
689 
4.749 
653 

380 
466 
192 

lec 

3U 



1,678 I 164 

2,497 260 

1,076 , 87 

8,628 694 

5,695 584 



24,718 
23.782 i 
2.300 
1,949 I 

2,676 I 

6,811 
27,030 
3,784 
1,586 
7,497 

14,247 

2,984 

1,560 

299,534 

25,208 
60,943 
182,821 
27,013 
3,649 
2,284 

6,646 
14,242 
2,687 
7,056 
10,180 

5,796 
1,870 
6,909 
2,518 
5,129 



70,736 74,333 

27,327 I 29,866 

1,596 : 1,590 

1,062 i 1,029 

5.975 4.420 



12.717 
10.869 
1,440 
1.844 
1.666 

4,466 
9,011 
3,229 
12,828 
2,739 

4,504 
2,172 

2,866 
32,610 
12,634 



13,564 
12,136 
1,518 
2,226 
1,942 

4,708 
9,623 
3,103 
14,606 
2,763 

6,469 
2,194 
2,980 

37,027 
13,703 



2,703 

1,731 

148 

160 

121 

436 
1,386 
378 
151 
534 

827 

110 

122 

16,568 

1,631 
3,835 
8,910 
1,700 
292 
207 

347 
1,628 
234 
567 
739 

541 
140 
410 



4,562 

2,313 

157 

99 

282 

1,217 
787 
154 
180 
266 

354 

623 

176 

1,207 

237 

364 

194 

241 

2,927 

960 



1/ Correction oaije In flgurea after publication of State total 



14,835 

977 
1,661 
4,777 
6 ,909 


1,221 Salt Lake city, Utah 
94 San Antonio, Tex. 
139 , San Diego, calif. 
292 i San h-anolaoo, Calif. 
569 1 San Joae, Calif. 


1,509 
3,868 
3,025 

10,087 
1,118 


42,109 
60,618 
53,917 
264.075 
26.470 


1.489 
4.037 
3,402 
10,762 
1,134 


5,357 
8,920 
5,837 
30,408 
2,848 


6,588 
7,704 
7,196 
39,327 
3,490 


401 
408 
651 
3,568 
352 



Vol. I - Page 3 26 



C«DBUSOf 

American 
Business 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1933 

TABLt 121— SOaUBT FOR CITIES Of MORE TStM 60.000 POFULinoH 

Number of Stores, Sales, Employment, and Pay Roll 
(Sales and pay roll expressed in thousands of doUars) 



Reproduced Kom Retail Volume I ol 
the 1933 Ceniu* of Amehcaiii Btuinea* 

nuMiiij in citi«»-coBt*A. 



State, CotrNTY, and City 

(Figures ajier cUy represent 1930 
popuiation) 



Num- 
ber of 
fltorea 



191. Cities-continued 

SaTansab, Ga> 
Sohsneetad7, V, Y. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Seattle, Vaab. 
ShreTeport, i<a. 

Sioux City, Iowa 
Somerrllle , Uass. 
Soutb Bend, Tod. 
Spokane, "ash. 
Springfield, 111. 

Springfield, Itosa. 
Springfield, Uo. 
Springfield, Ohio 
Syrecuae, N, ?. 
Tacoma, Waeb. 

Tanroa, Fla, 

Terra Haute, Ind. 
Toledo, Ohio 
Topeka, Kane. 
Trenton, N. J. 



i.eso 

1,461 
1,917 
5,768 
1.064 

1,098 
955 
1.275 
1,807 
1,110 

2,258 
1,057 
947 
2,273 
1,090 

1,643 
1.146 
3,4M 
1,035 
2,297 



Num- 
ber of 
propri- 
etors 



♦19, 9U 
31,365 
41,853 

129,096 
24,269 

26,704 
19.6991 
25,S4g| 

38,375 
24,399 

58 . 010 I 
16,504 1 
16,299 
64,722 
28,950 

26,725 

18,591 
76,595 
22,267 
37,805 



Full-time 
employees 
(averoije 
num6fr) 



1,257 
1,441 
1,811 
5,597 



1,094 

764 

1,140 

1,846; 

1,079 

1,929 

1,123| 

863, 

1,975 

i,7a7| 

l,682l 
1,123 
3,084 
1,060' 
2,213 I 



Pay Roll 



Total, in- 
cluding 
part-time 



Part^ 

time 
only 



2,S40| 
3,456 
5,710, 
16, 229 1 
3, 627 1 

3,507] 
1,989 1 
3,2601 
4,406. 

3,352 I 

7,469! 
2,342 
1,922 
7,531 I 
3,219! 

3.336. 

2,306 

9,713 I 



4S,394| $229 
3,724 349 
5.853 324 

16,58211,805 
3,34« 168 



3,362 
2,715 
3,249 
4,707 
3,343 

8,707 I 
2,219 
1 , 929 
8,151 
3,499 I 

3,122 I 
2,360 
U,373 
3,360 
5,016 



221 
306 
289 
549 
233 

563 
149 

173 
510 
425 

218 
231 
863 



State, County, and City 

(Figures after city represent 1 930 

population) 



Tror, N. Y. 
Tulaa, OUa. 
Onion City. N. J, 
Utlca, N. 7. 
Vaco, Tex. 

Waahlngton, D. C, 
Waterbury, Conn, 
Wheeling, ff. V^, 
■lehlta, Kane. 
Wilicea-Barre, Pe. 

ffllnlnpton, Del, 
■Inaton-Salem. N. C. 
Voreeater, Maai. 
Tonkera. H. Y. 
York. Pa. 
Teun^atan, (9ilo 



Num- 
ber of 
stores 



1,285 
2.027 
1,068 
1,270 
843 

6.156 
1,230 
1,017 
1.844 
1,412 

1,820 
919 

2,024 

1,736 
954 

1,854 



Sales 



$26,115 
44,690 
17,669 
27,667 
15,206 

241,515 
24,293 

22,440 

36,894 
31,049 

37,376 
16,156 
54.597 
3E.057 
18,607 
40,769 



Num- 
ber of 
propri- 
etors 



1,256 
1,964 
1,014 
1,2S£ 
643 

5,516 
1.056 
973 
1,884 
1,282 

1,592 
853 

1.7^ 

1,''25 
886 

1.951 



Full-time 
employees 
(average 
numter) 



Total, in- 
cluding 
part-time 



2,845 
6,189 
1,617 
3,018 I 
1,917 

28,906 ! 
2,703 I 
3,056 i 
4,728 ; 
4,290 I 

4,085 
2,038 
6,492 < 
2,867 ! 
2,312 , 



$3,406 
6.067 
2.206 
3,530 
1.694 

33,681 
3,133 
3.077 
4.714 
4,947 

4,738 
1,961 
7,198 
3,744 
2,409 
5,1?T 



Part- 
time 
only 



$270 
415 
218 
308 
113 



1,76! 



250 
217 
452 



396 

167 
SIS 
255 

soe 

306 



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Vol. I - Page 4-01 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTON: 1935 

PART IV - DEFINITION OF TERMS AND CLASSIFICATIONS 

Part IV is made up of three sections. The first contains a detailed 
definitions of the kind-of business and type-of-operation classifications 
used in the 1935 Census, together with definitions of other terms used in 
the Retail reports, such as stores, sales, employees and the like. 

The second section presents a columnar comparision of the 1935, 1933 
and 1929 kind-of-business and type-of-operation classifications. 

The last section of Part IV is a detailed description of the tables 
presented in the Retail Census. 



Vol. 1 - Page 4-03 

RODS OF BP3IHS33 

Xach retail stor* la clanalfled by kind of bualneaa (grocery atore, hardware atora, cigar atore, etc.), 
according to the principal lines or conmodltles aold, or the uaual trade deaignation. Klnd-of-bua ineaa olas- 
aificatlona are not Interchangeable with conmodlty claaaif Icatlona. Food storea, for Instance, aell more 
than food, and food alao is aold in other kinds of stores, including Tarlety, general and department atore*. 
Likewise, apparel, furniture and drugs are sold in many atorea not elaaslfied as apparel, furniture or drug 
stores. 

Slity-sii kinds of business are shown for States and for cities of more than 500,000 population. Those 
66 are combined into 54 classlf Icatlona for cltlea of 50,000 to 500,000 population. For all areas frcm 2,500 
to 50,000 population, the 66 claaaif Ications are combined into 11 kind-of-buslness groups (except in Table 13 
in which beer and liquor stores are shown as a separate group, thus making 12 groups). 

The 66 kinds of business are defined below, aj>ranged by klnd-of-buslnesa groupa. 

FOOD STORgS 

food stores include 11 classlf Icatlona, defined in the following paragraphs. The classification Bot- 
tled Beer and Liquor Stores, which appeared in this group In the 1933 Census, is now included with "Other 
Retail Stores, 7 when it is not shown separately. 

Candy and confectionery stores — In this combined classification are two distinct kinds of business. The 
first Is the candy store or candy and nut store, confining its business primarily to the sale of boxed or 
bulk candles and nuts or to either of the two conmodltles, and the second is the confectionery store, sell- 
ing also other types of confections and often dispensing fountain drinks and ice cream. Some confectionery 
stores have added lunches aiid prepared foods after the manner of the delicatessen store. 

Dairy products stores and milk dealers — Included in this classification are two related kinds of business; 
first, the dairy products stores, and second, milk dealers. Dairy products storea handle dairy products in- 
cluding milk, butter, eggs and frequently poultry. Milk dealers often handle other dairy products particu- 
larly butter and cheese and sometimes eggs. There is a tendency on the part of milk dealers to Increase the 
number of lines distributed by their salesmen. Faun dairies are not included in 1935; only those with recog- 
nized retail places of business are Included within the scope of the Retail Census. 

Bgg and poultry dealers — These dealers frequently handle dairy products, although they do not usually main- 
tain a complete line. In the 1933 Census this classification was included with dairy products stores and milk 
dealers. 

Delicatessen stores — These stores formerly confined their sales principally to cooked meats, prepared sal- 
ads, cheese and other prepared foods suitable for immediate table use. In recent years many have added a 
limited stock of canned and bottled goods, groceries and frequently beer and wine. Neighborhood delicatessen 
stores often carry fresh fruits and vegetables, some candies, confections, cakes and other bakery products, 
as well as milk and other dairy products. Many serve lunches and sometimes develop a substantial restaurant 
business. With the tendency on the part of delicatessen stores to expand their sale of groceries it has be- 
come exceedingly difficult to distinguish In many cases between delicatessen stores and grocery stores. 
Those stores reporting substantial sales of groceries were included as grocery stores, because in many in- 
stances they had become more nearly like a grocery store than a delicatessen store. Typically delicatessen 
stores operate long hours after other food stores are closed. 

Fruit stores and vegetable markete — While these stores and stands are more often found in public or munici- 
pal markets or operated as roadside stands, many neighborhood stores in large cities confine themselves en- 
tirely to the sale of fruits and vegetables. 

Orocery stores (without meats ) — This is the store popularly known as a grocery store, selling a full line 
of groceries usually with fresh vegetables and fruits in season. They may carry smoked and prepared meats in 
limited quantities without changing the classification, but not fresh meats. Grocery stores which carry 
fresh meats are classified as combination stores. As pointed out above, this classification Includes in many 
instances those delicatessen storea which reported substantial sales of groceries. 

Combination stores (groceries and meats ) — This classification includes those stores primarily engaged In 
the sale of groceries and fresh meats. In some Instances they represent grocery stores which have added 
fresh meats to the grocery line, while others are meat markets which have added staple groceries. Combina- 
tion stores usually carry fruits and vegetables and bakery products and many are conjilete food markets. 

Meat markets — Stores or markets selling principally fresh and smoked meats and usually some fish. They may 
also carry dairy products and eggs. 

Fish markets and sea food — This classification includes those atores or markets selling principally fish, 
oysters or other sea foods. In inland cities and towns fish markets as such are rare but in the seaboard 
cities there are a number of strictly fish and sea food markets. 

Bakeries and caterers — This classification Includes three kinds of stores. The first is the small combined 
manufacturing and retailing bakery whose value of products during 1935 was less than $5,000. This group ac- 
counts for by far the larger number of stores included in the classlf Icat ion. The second kind of store is the 
bakery goods store or dealer priaarily engaged in selling bakery goods purchased from a manufacturing bakery, 
or the retail branch of such bakery. Caterers which constitute the third kind of business Included in this 
classification arrange special menus for l<incheons and dinners to be served elsewhere, prepare and serve the 
foods. This is a specialized business in which service plays an important part, and constitutes but a email 
part of the total for this group. 



Vol. 1 - Page 4-04 

Other food etores — This clasalf Icatlon Includes storas aelllng coffee, tea and spices, and retail distri- 
butors of bottled soft drinks and water. Also included are stores handling farm products which do not come 
within any of the other specified food store classifications, and stores handling special health foods. 

GEKSRAL STOHBS 

These stores are general merchandise stores iriilch also sell a substantial proportion of foods. They 
are located typically but not excluslTely In the smaller commnltles. In rural consunlties this type ordi- 
narily Is known as a Country General Store or siji^ly as a General Store and In urban connunltles ordinarily 
as a General Uerchandlae Store selling foods. 

In 1933, because of the lack of conmodlty Infonnatlon, any store which indicated on the schedule the 
tenn General Store or Country General Store was coded as such. In 1935, however. It was possible to classi- 
fy these stores more strictly because of the greater amount of infonnatlon on the schedule. For exaiqile, 
many stores operating under the name of General Stores indicated on the schedule that they were almost en- 
tirely a food store rather than a store handling a general line of merchandise. Such establishments were 
classified in the food group rather than as general stores. However, a general store selling more than 50 
percent food was not classified as a food store unless the Indications were that the food sales were so 
large that the store had the characteristics of a grocery store or ccmblnation store, rather than those of a 
store handling a nunber of general lines built around food. 

An analysis of the infonnatlon obtained on the short-fonn schedule used in 1935 for stores with sales 
of less than |50,000 Indicates that the sales of general stores of that size are divided approximately as 
follows : 



Groceries and related commodities 

Dry goods and notions 

Apparel and shoes 

Fann Implements and supplies 

(including seed, feed, etc.) 

Gasoline and oil 

Home furnishings 

All other ccnmodities 



Percent of total sales 
55.7 
14.4 

8.8 

6.8 

6.0 

.8 

7.5 



GBNERAL MBRCHAMDISB QROTJP 



Department stores — Department stores are department ized general merchandise stores, usually of the full 
senrioo type, carrying men's, women's and children's apparel and shoes, furnishings and accessories, dry 
goods, homewares and many other lines. Furniture and hardware are often but not necessarily represented, 
although homo furnishings, draperies, curtains, and linens are almost invariably carried. Some department 
stores also have food departments. For purposes of the Census, such department ized stores having annual 
sales of less than $100,000 have been classified as general merchandise stores. 

This classification may include also mall-order houses selling general merchandise by mall. Because 
of the small number of mall-order houses it is iiig;)Osslbl* In most cases to show them separately. They carry 
about the same range of merchandise as do department stores and in addition sell farm implemsnts, fanners' 
supplies, automotive equipment and many other lines. Data on mail-order houses as distinct from department 
stores may be found in Volume IV of the final series of Retail reports for 1935. Department stores owned by 
mail-order companies are classified as department stores and not as mail-order houses. 

Dry goods and general merchandise stores — Dry goods stores sell women's ready-to-wear and accessories, a 
general line of dry goods such as linens, piece goods, domestics, notions, etc., and some homewares. The 
distinction between department stores eoid dry goods stores is that department stores sell a greater variety 
of merchandise than merely dry goods and women's apparel, usually Including furniture and other household 
lines and men's furnishings. A dry goods store beccmes a department store when, and if, it adds furniture, 
household appliances, hardware, and/or men's clothing or shoes, provided the total sales exceed $100,000; if 
its sales are less than $100,000 it becomes a general merchandise store. 

The General Merchandise classification includes, for the purposes of this Census, departmentized 
stores having annual sales of less than $100,000, as well as non-departmsntlzed stores selling somewhat sim- 
ilar lines of general merchandise. In general merchandise stores such lines as dry goods, household fur- 
nishings and appliances, and men's, women's and children's apparel, furnishings and accessories predominate. 
General merchandise stores selling a substantial quantity of food are classified as *Oenaral Stores with 
food", and not in the general merchandise classification, regardless of where located. 

In many instances stores operating under the name 'Dry Goods Store" have expanded their lines of mer- 
chandise so that they have become more nearly general merchandise stores. Because of this confusion in name 
of store, eind the fact that in many Instancee it is difficult to tell from the echedules exactly how wide a 
line of merchandise is carried, dry goods stores and general merchandise stores are combined into one classi- 
fication in presenting data on these stores. 

Variety, 5-and-lO. and to-a-dollar stores — These stores carry a variety of small wares, especially lower- 
priced lines of stationery, gift items, women's scceasories, light hardware, toys, housewares, etc. Sales 
are usually for cash without delivery service. In many variety stores, fountain sales, ice cream and 
lunches constitute appreciable sales items. Uost of the variety stores' volume is done by chains of section- 
al or national scope. Although there la a relatively large number of Independent variety stores their sales 
constitute less than 10$ of the total volume for this classification (see Volume IT of the final Retail Cen- 
sus reports for 1935). 



Vol. I - Page 4-05 

APPARKL GRODP 

Man's fumlBhlma Btores — These stores are primarily haberdashery stores confining their sales to men's 
furnishings and accessories with little or no clothing. Men's hat stores are included in this classifica- 
tion. ?uml8hlngs stores may sell shoes but stores primarily engaged in the sale of men's shoes are not in- 
cluded in this group but rather under the classification "Shoe Stores." 

Man's clothing and fumishingB stores — This classification includes stores selling men's suits and over- 
eoats and other outer clothing, whether or not they also sell furnishings and accessories such as described 
under men's furnishings stores. 

Family clothing stores — These stores carry clothing, furnishings and accessories for men, women and ohll- 
dr«n, usually including shoes. Characteristic of many family clothing stores is their use of instalment 
credit as a sales inducement. Because of the growing inclination of men's stores to add woman's lines, this 
classification now includes many large, high-grade downtown stores fomarly classified as men's stores. 

Women's ready-to-wear stores — Women's apparel and accessories, usually including millinery, shoes, linge- 
rie, hosiery and small wares are sold In these stores. Frequently gloves, handbags and other leather goods 
are carried, as well as toiletries and other lines related to women's apparel. This classification fre- 
quently includes large stores of sales' Importance equal to department stores but limited to women's wear, 
accessories and dry goods. 

Furriers and fur shops — These shops usually sell ready-made fur coats, scarfs and fur-trimmed cloth coats, 
but some shops also do custom work. Repairs and storage constitute a substantial source of income. How- 
orer, when receipts from these sources amount to more than 50^ of the total, the shop is claasified in the 
Service Census and does not appear in the Retail Trade figures, tonufacturing furriers whose value of pro- 
ducts exceeded $5,000 for the year 1935 are included In the Census of Manufactures. 

Millinery stores — These stores sell ready-made and custom millinery and trimmings. They are frequently 
operated as leased departments in women's apparel and departmant stores. 

Custom tallora — These shops sell made-to-order clothing, men's or women's. In some instances they have 
added small amounts of furnishings and accessories. Repairs constitute an item of income, but if receipts 
from repairs and pressing exceed 50% of the total receipts the shops are classified with "Cleaning, dyeing, 
pressing, altering, and repair shops," which are shown in the Service Census. 

Accessories and other apparel stores — This classification includes corset and lingerie shops, hosiery 
shops, knit-goods shops, costume accessories stores (selling bags, jewelry and gloves), umbrella shops, 
children's specialty shops (clothing and accessories), Infants' wear shops and a few mail-order houses en- 
gaged exclusively in the sale of apparel from catalogue. 

Shoe stores — This classification includaa stores selling men's shoes only, or women's shoes only, or 
women's and men's and children's shoes. Men's shoe stores usually sell also hose and gloves, and wcanen's 
shoe stores are rapidly developing the sale of hosiery, bags, gloves and underwear. This classification in- 
cludes leased shoe departments, operated by outside operators in department stores and apparel stores. 

ADTOMOTIVE GROUP 

Motor-vehicle dealers (new) — This group includes dealers specializing in new automobiles and trucks. The 
sales of used cars taken In trade on new cars are Included in the sales of these dealers. These establish- 
ments usually carry stocks of replacement parts and accessories, and maintain repair departments to provide 
free new-oar service, as well as subsequent repairs from which income is derived. Limited quantities of 
tires, batteries and automotive acceaaories are ordinarily carried, the sales of which are Included in the 
total sales reported. Large establishments may add to their Income by utilizing unused floor space for stor- 
age. These sources of additional business make up a relatively small part of the total sales volume in this 
classification, which is predominatly the sale of new motor vehicles. 

Used-car dealers — This classification la used only where the establishment sells used cara or trucks pri- 
marily. As a rule, no stock of parts is carried, for the reason that a variety of makes of automobiles is 
handled. Frequently a limited stock of new tires, tubes and batteries of the cheaper varieties is carried. 
A repair department is usually maintained to place the used cars in salable condition, and service and re- 
pair the cars after sale. Such income has little effect upon the total sales, which are primarily of used 
ears bought from new-car dealers for resale. 

Accessories, tire and battery dealers — This classification includes stores handling all kinds of automo- 
bile accessories, tires and batteries with or without a service department. It also includes tire shops 
selling new and used tires and tubes and maintaining vulcanizing facilities for tire repairs, shops selling 
batteries and doing some battery and ignition service work, and combination tire and battery shops. When 
receipts from service exceed one-half of the total the shops are shown in the Service Census and not in- 
cluded as retail stores. 

Garages — This classification includes repair garages only. Parking and storage garages, body-fender-paint 
shops and radiator repair shops are included in the Service Census. Repair garages sell gasoline, oil and 
accessories in addition to making mechanical repairs and body repairs. Receipts tram storage somotlmes add 
to the income of garages. VJashlng and lubrication service is frequently provided, but most of the income la 
from repairs, new parts and gasoline and oil. 



Vol. 1 - Page 4-06 

Other automotlYe — Under this heading are included shops selling motorcycles, new and used, and incidental 
parts and accessories; dealers selling aircraft and accessories; automobile trailer dealers; and dealers 
selling motor boats, yachts and canoes. All of these kinds of business usually provide repair service. 
Bicycle shops, which were Included under this classification in 1933 are shown in 1935 as a separate kind of 
business under the "Other retail store" group. 

FHXroG STATIONS 

This olasBification includeo retail stations primarily engaged in the sale of gasoline and oil. The 
majority of such places are typical drive-in filling stations along the road or street. Included also are 
cooperative oil companies whose sales in most instances are largely to farmers. This classification also in- 
cludes super-service stations whose principal sales are gasoline and oil, and establishments operating under 
the name "Garage" but which derive the largest part of their receipts frcm gasoline and oil sales. 

All filling stations sell gasoline and oil and usually maintain lubricating facilities; some also sell 
tires and provide emergency tire repair service. Some stations sell in addition other merchandise such as 
lunches and refreshments, candy, tobacco, and groceries. VJhere filling stations are operated in conjunction 
with a tourist camp the establishment is included in the Retail Census provided the income from the rental 
of cabins or other lodging does not exceed one-half of the total receipts. 

FORNTrnRE-HOUSEHOLD gROUP 

Furniture stores — A furniture store carries furniture, floor-coverings, radios, draperies, curtains, house- 
hold appliances and other home furnishings. A large part of the sales of these stores is on the instalment 
plan. In smaller cities, furniture stores often carry hardware. In some instances they are ccmbined with 
undertaking establishments. 

Floor-coverings and drapery stores — Two kinds of stores are included in this classification; floor-cover- 
ings or carpet stores, and drapery stores which also carry curtains and upholstery materials. Part of the 
Income of drapery stores is for service, usually upholstery service and the making of curtains and draperies. 

Household appliance and radio stores — This classification includes (1) stores specializing in the sale of 
electrical and/or gas household appliances, electrical and gas refrigerators and stoves and ranges; and (2) 
stores handling a combined line of household appliances and radios. This second group frequently Includes 
stores which were originally radio dealers but which later added a line of household appliances. 

A considerable part of the stores in this classification are operated by public utility companies sell- 
ing appliances and accessories adaptable to their particular utility, while the Independently operated appli- 
ance stores frequently confine their sales to a limited number of nationally-advertised appliances. The 
larger appliances account for an appreciable proportion of Instalment sales. A large volume of appliance 
sales by furniture, hardware and department stores is not Included, of course, under this heading. 

Radio dealers — This classification includes only stores primarily engaged in the sale of radio sets and 
parts. If any substantial amount of household appliances Is sold, the store is included under the household 
appliance and radio classification described above. Stores operating primarily as music stores with the 
sales of radios of secondary importance are included with other classifications and not in the radio dealer 
classification. In some instances such music stores have branched out into the selling of household appli- 
ances and thus are included in the household appliance and radio classification. Radio dealers usually pro- 
vide repair service. If receipts from such services exceed 5055 of total receipts, the establishment la in- 
cluded in the Service Census and not in the Retail Trade figures. 

Other home furnishings and appliance stores — Under this heading are Included retailers of brushes and 
brooms, stores selling pictures and frames, aluminum-ware retailers (usually house-to-house selling organi- 
zations) , china, glassware, crockery, tinware and enamelware stores. Lamps and shade shops are Included, as 
well as shops selling awnings, baiuiers, flags, window shades and tents. Included also are antique shops 
which sell authentic antique furniture and objects of art at retail and stores selling a mixture of antique 
and used furniture. But used-furniture dealers are included with second-hand stores. 

UMBER BUnJDlG AKD HARDWARE GROUP 

Lumber and building-material dealers — Under this heading are grouped yards selling lumber and other build- 
ing materials, lumber yards also carrying builders' hardware, and retail dealers specializing in building ma- 
terials such as roofing, asbestos products, brick and tile, building stone, cement, granite and marble, lime 
and plaster, nonmetalllc roofing materials, sand, gravel and crushed stone. 

This classification Includes only those dealers whose business is primarily retail. It is emphasized 
that because of the number of dealers who combine retail and wholesale transactions it is essential to con- 
sider also the Wholesale Census in any study of the building material field. 

Hardv;are stores — This classification is confined primarily to stores carrying a lino of hardware and tools 
for general use, builders' hardware and electrical goods, as well as paints and painters' supplies. Dual- 
line hardware and furniture stores are included in this olaesif Ication If hardware lines constitute the ma- 
jority of the sales. 

Hardware and farm Implement dealers — This classification includes retail dealers selling farm implements 
and hardware, those selling primarily farm implements but also some other items such as hay, grain and feed, 

and those selling farm implements only. 



Vol. I - Page 4-07 

Heating and plxmblag aqul;— nt d»«lw« — Thla olaaslf Icatlou la not Idantloal with the "Eaatlsg and plumb- 
ing shops* olaaalfloatlon In tb« 1999 Bavall C«naus. It dlffara hy transfer to the 1995 Conetiuetlon Cen- 
sus of some heating, plumbing, and alr-ocndltionlng oontrbotors who were embraced In the 1993 Retail Ceneua. 
This 1935 ol&sslf loatlon Inoludes oaXf those dealers whose reeelpts are derived primarily from the retail 
■ales of pltaiblnc, halting and alr-eendltlonlag e^ulpMnt aa suoh, rather than froB installation and repair 
work. 

yalnt. glass, wall-paper stores — ma elasaifleation Includes glass and mirror shops and paint, glass and 
wall-paper stores, nie former eell fr«M4 mirrors la addition to glass of all descriptions, and resilTer 
old jnlrrors. Those establlstaoients operating primarily aa contract glaziers are Included In the 1939 Con- 
struction Census. 

llectrical supply stores — This olaaalf leation la not Identical with the "Sleotrieal ahopa" olassifieation 
of 1933. It differs by transfer to the 1935 Coaotruetion Census of a number of elsotrloal contractors who 
were embraced In the 1933 Retail Census ani by the inclusion In the 1935 Serrloe Cenaus of thoae elaotrical 
ahopa whose inccoM from repairs was greater than the aale of merchandise. In 1933, only thoae electrical 
shops reporting reoeipts from repairs la exgest of two>thirdB of total sales were classified as serrice ee- 
tablishments. Although IKlsotrioal nupply stores' as Included in the Retail Census ordinarily make electric- 
al repairs and may also do sods lnst«ll*tlon work, their receipts are derived primarily from the sale of 
lighting fixtures, incandescent leopii, enbia, autleta and boxes and almilar merohandise. 

KATIHG AHD DRUEIMO tUCtS 

Restaurants - cafeterias - lunch roay — Inoludes restaurants having full table service, cafeterias or self- 
serve restaurants, and lunch rocus htTlag lisltcd table service in addition to counter service, ikutomats are 
classified as cafeterias. Some ooaikltiiation restaurant-confectionery and restaurant-bakery establlahiiiBnts 
that derived the majority of their r»e*lpte frcn the aale of meals are included in this classification. In 
many States the receipts of this rastauxwil' elaaalf leatloa inalude some liquor sales. 



clpal highways and adjacent to faotories and office buildings; fountain- lunches, which sell fountain drinks 
and light lunches; lunch counters with aueh variations as the street "diner,' the hole-in-the-wall eating 
place and the modem sandwich shop; and soft-drljik stands, nte eating places in this classification receive 
no subatantlal part of their receipt* trvm %ik* sale of meals at tables. This classification also inoludes a 
growing number of box lunch companies, tboir product consisting of a lunch of sandwiches, fruit and dessert, 
sold ordinarily by street vendors or on regular delivery routes. 

DriTik-ing places — Includes retail estabUsteenta wfaoaa principal business is the sale, for consumption on 
the premises, of beer, ale and wins and/or alcoholic liquors (in most States). Drinking places are variously 
known as bars, beer-gardens, tavema, oafea and otherwise. Although the sales in drinking places frequently 
include meals, such receipts are a relatively small part of the total. (For the United States as a whole, 
meal aad fountain sales represented 9.0 percent of the total receipts of driaklng places in 1935. See Table 
7A. ) Beer, wine and liquor in glasses for eonsuiqjtlon on the premises are often sold in restaurants and other 
eating places as well as in these places elassified ae drinking places. 

DHPO 3T0HBS 

Driig stores with fountaip — These stores nonsally sell. In addition to drugs, prescriptions and fountain 
items, toiletries, cosmstics, patent lOBdicines, magazines and books, tobacco and novelty merchandise. The 
sale of sandwiches and ll^t lunches ia frequently an important source of receipts. In some States bottled 
wines and liquors constitute an In^ortant part of drug store sales. 

Drug stores without fountain — Two distinct kinds of stores oonsxitute the bulk of this classification. 
The most Inqportant is the so-called ethical or old-line professional drug store where the filling of prescrip- 
tions is a principal activity and source of incooe, and i^ere usually the pharmacist is also the proprietor- 
owner. The other is the so-called "piosboard" store selling trade-marked packaged drugs and toiletries at 
cut prices, without service or delivery and without the presence of a pharmacist. A few mail-order drug houses 
are also included in the classification. 

Omm RETAIL STORES 

Bicycle shops — Includes shops prinarily engaged in the retail sale of bicycles, parts and accessories. 
These shops ordinarily do seme repair work; however, if income from repairs exceeds one-half of total receipts, 
the shop is included in the Service Cansus. In 1933 bicycls shops were included with "Ilotorcycle, bicycle and 
supply dealsrs" in the 'Other autonetlv*'* classifleation. They have been separated because of their revived 
Importance. 

Book stores — This classification «eT«ra atorea engaged primarily In the eale of books, with stationery and 
related articles secondary. Included also are subscription book concerns ordinarily selling house-to-house 
or by direct mail with the majority of sales on an instalment credit basis. 

Cigar stores aad cigar stands — Thla group includes cigar stores with fountain (and lunch), cigar stores 
without fountain, and oigex stands In pool rooms, bowling alleys, railway stations and other public places. 
Cigar stores often sell books and magazines and novelty merchandise, cosmetics, and proprietary drug prepara- 
tions in addition to their more usual merchandise. Packaged liquor is a recent addition in some States. The 
cigar stand frequently sells aoft drinks in addition to the sale of cigars, cigarettes, tobacco and smokers' 
supplies. Packaged candies and an isereasing variety of novelty merchandise are now sold in iiany cigar atorea 
and stands. 



Vol. 1 - Page 4 -08 

riorl3t3 — This elaasifloation la confined to flower ehops and does not Include etorea predominantly engaged 
in selling seeds, bulbs and nursery stock. Greenhouses are not included. The florist shop sells cut flowers 
and growing plants, with secondary sale of other merchandise. 

Fuel and ice dealers — This classification includes coal and wood yards, fuel-oil dealers and ice dealers. 
In a large number of States, many coal and wood yards sell substantial quantities of ice during the summer 
months, and ice dealers frequently sell coal, wood and sometimes fuel oil during the winter months. Many 
coal and wood dealers are selling increasing quantities of fuel oil, and some are selling and installing oil- 
burning equipment. Some ice dealers likewise are selling ice boxes. Those dealers primarily engaged in the 
sale of fuel oil frequently sell and Install oil-burning equipment. 

A considerable number of establishments are handling a combination line of coal and lumber and building 
materials. These were included in the "Fuel and ice dealer" classification if the sale of coal exceeded one- 
half of total sales. 

Gift, nov elty, souvenir shops — This classification includes novelty and souvenir stores and art and gift 
shops. Gift shops ordinarily sell a variety of gift articles, small art objects, paper novelties, station- 
ery and related merchandise. 

Hay, grain and feed stores (without groceries ) — This classification is made up of stores primarily engaged 
in selling hay, grain and feed. Frequently fertilizer, seed, flour, and small amounts of other merchandise 
are sold. 

Hay, grai n and feed stores (with groceries ) — This classification differs from the above primarily in that 
staple groceries are sold as a secondary line. 

Farm and garden supp ly stores — Included in this group are stores specializing in seeds and nursery stock, 
fertilizer dealers, harness shops, coal-and-feed stores, and retail dealers In livestock. Dealers in farm 
implements are covered in the classification "Hardware and farm Implement stores" and not in this group. 

Jewelry stores — This group includes stores selling Jewelry primarily, as well as an increasing volume of re- 
lated merchandise. Income is also derived from repair service and sometimes from optical departments. If 
receipts from repairs account for more than one-half of total sales, the establishment is included in Service 
Census. This differs somewhat from the basis of classification used in 1933 when such an establishment was 
considered a retail store providing more than one-third of its total receipts was from the sale of merchandise. 

Luggage stores — These stores sell trunks, hand luggage, gloves, handbags, pocket books, pass cases, leather 
belts, etc. Often saddles and other riding aquipnent are carried, as well as harness. 

News dealers — These stores and stands sell newspapers, current magazines, candy, tobacco, souvenirs and 
novelty merchandise, Including toys. In many instances news dealers sell books and stationery, and often 
operate circulating libraries. Magazine and newspaper subscription sales offices are not included in the 
Census, nor are news stands selling only newspapers. 

Sporting goods stores — This classification includes sporting goods specialty stores handling a full line of 
sporting goods, including gymnasium and playground equipment, sportsmen's equipment, firearms and ammunition; 
and stores carrying a more restricted line of novelty sporting goods with secondary lines such as toys and 
stationery. 

Beer and liquor sto res (packaged ) — These stores specialize in the sale of bottled, or otherwise packaged, 
beer, ale and wine, and/or In the sale of liquors defined in most States as alcoholic or intoxicating bever- 
ages. Some States operate State liquor stores which account for all or a very large part of the sales of this 
classification in those States. In most such States beer and wine up to a specified alcoholic content are sold 
under a licensing system independent of State-operated liquor stores. In many States, bottled beer, wine and 
liquor are sold in quantity in other kinds of stores, including food stores, department stores, cigar and drug 
stores. 

Other cla ssifications — Under this heading are included various kinds of business not elsewhere classified. 
Among the kinds of stores in this group are: monument and tombstone works (cutting stone or marble to individ- 
ual specifications), musical Instruments and music stores, opticians and optometrists (retail sales only), 
stationery stores, office and store supply and equipment dealers, sanitary supplies (Insecticides, disinfect- 
ants, etc.), rubber goods stores, dealers in chemicals (other than drugs) at retail, dealers in cosmetics and 
toilet articles and preparations (including perfumes), fireworks (retail sales only), patent medicine dealers, 
religious goods stores (except book stores) and pet shops. 

SECOND-HAND STORES 

Second-hand stores - clothing and shoes — Stores selling primarily second-hand clothing and shoes. Some new 
merchandise in the lower price lines often is included as well as some small amount of shoe repairing. 

Second-hand store s - furniture — These stores sell second-hand furniture primarily, and occasionally some new 
furniture In the lower price lines. Stores selling antique-and-used furniture are classified under "Other home 
rumishlngs stores'.' 

Second-hand stores - tires, accessories and parts — Under this classification are Included the following 
stores: those selling second-hand automobile parts and accessories, those selling second-hand tires and batter- 
ies, those selling second-hand motorcycles, dealere in used boats and dealers in used aircraft. Sales prin- 
cipally are of second-hand goods, although occasionally new merchandise in the lower price lines is sold. 

Fawn shops -- Includes those pawn shops which sell merchandise at retail. 

Second-hand stores - other — This group includes all other second-hand stores, including second-hand building 
materials and hardware, second-hand office appliances (including typewriters), second-hand musical Instruments, 
radios and phonographs, second-hand book storea, second-hand store fixtures and equipment, and stores selling 
a general li.ia of used merchandise. 



Vol. 1 - Page 4-09 

TYFES OF OP£R.^TION 

Each retail store Is classified as to type of operation, in addition to its kind-of-buslness classifi- 
cation. Definitions of these types of operation are presented below: 

Independents are local, individual enterprises, usually operating a single store but sometimes Including two 
or three similar stores. A few large independents who have developed smaller branches with limited lines, 
supplied from the stocks of the parent store rather than from central warehouses, are classified as local 
branch systems . 

Chains are groups of 4 or more stores in the ssme general kind of business, owned and operated Jointly, with 
central buying, usually supplied from one or more central warehouses. The count of units does not include 
the warehouses nor buying offices maintained apart from the stores. Chains are local if substantially all of 
their stores are located in and around some one city; sectional if in only one part of the country; national 
if in more than one section or geographic division of the country. 

Ownership Groups of department stores are not classed as chains if they are not centrally merchandised. Al- 
though centrally owned, the several stores of most ownership groups are individually operated and their buy- 
ing is done by local buying staffs, almost entirely independent of the central organization. These stores are 
classified as "independents" in the type-of -operation classifications. 

Leased Departments are sections of a store operated by an outside Independent or chain, rather than by the 
store itself. So-called rent, or the compensation to the store, may be a flat amount or a percentage of sales, 
which typically includes many store services in addition to occupancy of lighted, heated and fixtured space. 

Utility-operated stores are sales rooms or separate stores of gas and electric utility companies, primarily 
for the sale of household appliances that increase the power load. 

Mail-order houses are places of business confined to the sale of merchandise by mall, from catalogues. Retail 
stores owned by the same company, whether located in the same building or separately, are properly classified 
as chain units. 

Direct selling (house-to-house ) consists primarily of central offices or multi-unit headquarters of crews of 
canvassers who sell from door to door. 

State liquor stores are State-owned liquor stores, operated as a monopoly by State liquor boards (or sometimes 
by counties or municipalities), 

loilltary post canteens are privately-operated eating places or stores, at army posts and naval stations. Com- 
missaries and post exchanges operated directly by any branch of the Service are excluded. 

Cormissaries or company stores, found principally in lumbering and mining communities, are operated by the 
industrial concerns primarily for the benefit or convenience of their employees. 

Unclassified types include consumer cooperatives, rolling stores, itinerant vendors, market stands and road- 
side stands. 

DEFINITION OF TEHKS 

Stores — Places of business predominatly retail in character, in and from which goods are sold to ultimate 
consur»rs for consumption or utilization. The number includes filling stations, garages, market stands, lum- 
ber and coal yards, eating and drinking places, mail-order houses, district offices of house-to-house can- 
vassers, and leased departments, in addition to retail places of business commonly known as stores. 

Sales — The term sales means total operating receipts of retail stores, after deduction of refunds or allow- 
ances for merchandise returned by customers. Sales taxes are included. 

Each respondent was asked to provide a breakdown of sales into as many of the four follov/lng sources of 
receipts as were applicable to the particular business: (a) merchandise sales, (b) sale of meals, and fountain 
receipts, (c) repairs, storage, and other service sales, and (d) receipts from other sources. 

Receipts from other sources — Incidental income, which in 1935 amounted to 0.5 percent (1/2^) of reported 
sales, is derived from such sources as leased department rental, concessions, cash discounts on equipment pur- 
chases, bank interest and other sources not directly involving the purchase and sale of merchandise. 

Open-account sales — Sales on open-account represent the total sales made on open book, or charge account 
basis. The figure reported does not represent the amount of open-account credit outstanding. 

Instalnent sales — All sales of goods on deferred credit with definite provision for payment of the obliga- 
tion in periodical instalments or portions. This includes so-called budget payment plans. Down-paynents, 
whether in the form of cash or a trade-in-allowance, are included as a part of the total sales on instalment. 
The respondent was requested to report instalment sales financed through finance companies or other third 
parties as instalment sales and not as cash sales, even when cash proceeeds were received by the store imme- 
diately upon consummation of sale. 

Cash and C.O.D. sales — Includes all sales in which the customer paid cash at the time of purchase or upon 
the delivery of the merchandise by the store deliveryman, or coTnnon carrier. C.O.D. .neans cash on delivery. 



Vol. i Pago 4 10 

Active troprlators and firm mccibers — Proprietors or partner-owners of unincorporated businesses devoting 
the major portion of their tijnB to the operation of the business. They are not Included in the count of em- 
ployees, nor is their compensation included in pay roll. Corporate officers and executives of corporations 
are classified as employees, not as proprietors or firm members. 

Employees — The number of full-time and part-time paid employees, including salaried corporation officers 
and executives. Active proprietors and firm members are not included In the count of employees. The average 
number of employees (full-time and part-time) for the year is obtained by totalling the number reported 
monthly (for the pay period ending nearest the 15th of each month) and dividing the sum by 12. 

Full-time and part-time employees — The Census defines a full-time employee as one regularly engaged for work 
for four or more hours per day or for more than three full days per week. Employees working on a full-time 
basis but for only a part of the year were to be reported as full-time employees for the mouths during which 
they worked. All other employees were reported as part-time workers. 

Pay roll — The total compensation (salaries, wages, commissions and bonuses) paid to all employees. This 
item does not include compensation for proprietors and firm members of unincorporated businesses. 

araployment and pay roll by occupational ero^ps — In order to obtain a measure of full-time and part-time em- 
ploj-ment and an analysis of retail employment and pay roll by occupational classes, each respondent having em- 
ployees was asked to classify them by occupational groups, full-time and part-time separately. Data on the 
number of employees and pay roll for one week were obtained for the following groups: executives and salaried 
corporation officers; office and clerical employees; selling employees (other than waiters and waitresses); 
waiters and waitresses; and other employees. '.There an employee performed a variety of functions and thus 
could be classified in more than one group, he was reported on the basis of the function rec^uiring the major 
portion of his time in 1935. 

Executives and salaried corporation officers -- This group includes salaried officers of corporations, such 
as president, vice-president, secretary and treasurer, and non-owner paid employees of single proprietorships 
or partnerships working in the same capacity as corporation officers. In addition, this group Includes other 
hired executives such as merchandise managers, credit managers, controllers, department heads or buyers, and 
others who devote the major portion of their time to responsible administrative and supervisory duties. 

Office and clerical employees — This classification includes bookkeepers, cashiers, accountants, stenograph- 
ers, office secretaries and other so-called "irtiite-collar workers," except salespeople. 

Selling employees — Included under this group are all employees who devote the major portion of their time to 
the actual selling of merchandise or service over the counter, by house-to-house canvass, by telephone, or by 
correspondence. In department Ized stores the respondents were requested to report as selling employees all 
employees carried on the pay roll of the selling departments, except heads of departments and .other persons 
with administrative or supervisory responsibility. IVaiters and waitresses were reported as a separate group, 
not included under selling employees. 

'.Valters and waitresses — This group includes those persons primarily engaged In the serving of food or drinks. 
Generally these employees rely to some extent upon "tips" as compensation in addition to their wages. Foun- 
tain employees are classified in this group. 

Other employees — In general, two types of employees «re included under this group: (a) those whose duties 
or functions are of such a nature that they could not properly be classified in any one of the other groups 
(for example, maintenance employees, elevator operators, delivery-truck drivers, etc.); (b) those performing 
functions falling within two or more of the clasaif icat Ions described above, with no one function dominating. 

Representative week — For the purposes of reporting employees and pay roll by occupational classes, the week 
ending October 25, 1935, was selected as fairly representative for retail trade. In some cases, however, 
where another week was considered more representative, data covering that period were reported. 

Operating expenses — Includes pay roll and other operating expenses such as rent. Interest on current debt, 
traveling expenses, advertising, taxes, insurance, li(^t, heat, po'/ier and all other overhead costs. Compen- 
sation for proprietors and firm members of unincorporated businesses is not included. The cost of the goods 
sold is not included as operating expense, nor Is income tax included. 

Stocks on hand — kepresents the cost value of merchandise stocks on hand as of December 31, 1935, or nearest 
inventory date. 

Ket profit — Business Census reports definitely do not provide data for the determination of net profit. 
In any estimate of profit It Is necessary to take into consideration (1) that the amount reported as sales 
includes sales tax, but operating expenses do not Include such taxes; (2) that Interest on Invested capital 
and at least some deprecletion of plant and equipment are excluded from reported operating expenses; (3) that 
neither the clerk value nor the administrative or managerial value of the services of proprietors and firm 
members of unincorporated businesses are included in the reported pay roll expense, although these owners de- 
vote all or the major portion of their time to the business; (4) State and Federal Income taxes are not In- 
cluded as operating expenses; (5) in the case of chains some of the central office and warehouse expenses are 
not Included in reported store operating expense, but are available in a separate tabulation; (6) both opera- 
ting expense and profit can come only from the margin realized between the net sales price and the cost of re- 
placing the goods sold plus depreciation in the value of goods remaining unsold. The cycle of a continuing 
retail business does not eonclude with the sale of goods, but necessarily continues on to the replacement of 
those goods for the next sale. 



Vol. 1 - Page 4-11 



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Vol. 1 - Page 4-18 '.-,>- 

DESCRIPTION or THE ViSLSS 

Table 1 — Basic statistical data for 1935, concerning the number of stores, enount of sales, number 
of proprietors, average number of employees for the year, amount of full-time and part-time pay roll, and op- 
erating expenses. Table lA presents the infonaation by kinds of business. Similar tables for each State and 
for each city of more than 500,000 population are contained in Volume III. Table IB presents the same infor- 
mation by States. 

Table 2 — Shows employment in retail trade by months. Table 2A ahows this information by kinds of 
business. Two Tables 2B are shown aunmarizlng monthly employment data by geographic divisions and States; 
one shows the actual cumber of eciployees by months and the other presents monthly employment as percentages 
of the average employment for the year. Table 2 for each State and each city of more than 500,000 popxilation 
is contained in Volume V. 

Table 2C contains employment and pay roll data by occupational groups for the week ending October 26, 
1935, or other representative week. It provides a division of retail employees into full-time and part-time, 
and the division of employment by occupational classes. United States summaries of this data by kinds of 
business and by States are shown in tbia volume. A Table 2C for each kind of business group and for selected 
kinds of business is contained in Volume V. 

Table 3 — Analysis of basic data by types of operation, (independents, chains, mail-order, direct- 
selling and other types) showing the number of stores, amount and proportion of sales, number of proprietors, 
number of employees, full-time and part-time pay roll and total operating expenses for 26 kinds of business 
and for all retail business in the United States. Similar tables for each State and each city of more than 
500,000 population are contained in Volume IV, which also contains a separate table for each of the 26 kinds 
of business, showing by States the number of stores and amount of sales for independents, chains, and "all 
other types." 

Table 4 — Analysis of retail trade by size-of-business groups. A separate Table 4 is shown in Vol- 
ume VI for each kind of business and each buainees group, showing number of stores and amount of sales by 
size groups by States. Chain and mail-order units are not included in these tables. Table 4C, also contained 
in Volume VI, presents a further breakdown of the less than ^,000 sales group for selected kinds of business. 

Table 4A shows the number of stores and the amount of their sales (exclusive of chain and mail-oider 
units) by kinds of business, while table 4B presents the same data by States and geographic divisions. 

Table 4D shows number of stores and amount of sales of stores with 1935 sales of less than f5,000 
(exclusive of chain and mail-order units) by kinds of business, while 4K presents the same data by States and 
geographic divisions. 

The stores whose sales volume exceeds $300,000 are further analyzed by size in Table 4T in which in- 
formation is given separately by kinds of business. 

Tables 4C and 4H present United States sutnmaries of chain and mail-order units by kinds of business. 

Table 5 — Presents a credit-cash analysis of retail sales, showing for the stores reporting on this 
inquiry, the emounts of open-account, instalment and cash sales. Table 5A is a United States summary of this 
infonnation by kinds of business. Similar tables for each State are contained in Volume VI. 

Table 6 — Provides basic data for stores operated by Negro proprietors. Table 6A presents the infor- 
mation by kinds of business and Table SB by States. 

Table 7 — Analysis of sjiles to show separately the receipts from sale of merchandise, sale of meals 
and from fountain, repairs, storage and service receipts and other sources. Also includes columns showing 
the amount of sales by retailers to other retailers, and stocks on hand at the end of the year (at cost). 
Table 7A presents this inf ormsitlon by kinds of business and Table 7B by States. Tables similar to 7A for each 
State and each city with more than 600,000 population are contained in Volume VI. 

Table S — Retail sales by idiolesalo establishments. Contains a summary of sales to ultimate con- 
sumers by wholesalers divided into (1) Sales by full-service and limited-function wholesalers, and (2) Sales 
by other types of wholeeale establishments. Table 8A presents this infonnation by kinds of business (whole- 
sale classifications) and Table SB by Geographic Divisions. Tables similar to 8A for each geographic divi- 
sion may be found in more detail in Volume VII of the vnioleaale Census reports. 

Table 9 — Summary of receipts of service establishments as presented in the Service Census reports. 
It shows an analysis of the receipts frcm merchandise sales, service sales, and from other sources. Table 9A 
shows the information by kinds of business (Service Census classifications) and Table 9B by States. 

Table 10 — Retail distribution by areas. Table 10, shown for each State in Volume III, presents the 
number of stores and amount of sales by 11 kind-of-business groups for each county, city and other incorpo- 
rated place of more than 2,500 population, and the remainder of each county. Table lOA summarizes this same 
information by States and geographic divisions. 

Table 11 — This table, shovm for each State in Volume II, presents the number of stores, their sales, 
the number of proprietors, number of employees and their total pay roll for every county, city and other In- 
coiporated place of more than 2,500 population, and the remainder of each county. Table llA gives city to- 
tals for the seme data for cities of 10,000 to 50,000 population including 40 New England "towns," for which 
1933 comparable data are available. 



Vol. I - Page 4-19 

Tabl» 18 — Cltlee of mora than 50,000 population. TTiIb table, ahown for each of thesa cities In 
Volume II, oontalna data on the number of atorea, aalea, proprietnra, employeea and pay roll by 54 kinda of 
bualnesa. Table ISA girea one-line oity totala of the aam infonnation for all kinda of bualnaaa eonblnad. 

Table 13 — Citlee of 10,000 to 50,000 population. Thla table, ahovm for each of theaa cltiea In 
Volume II, presenta the nudber of atorea, their aalea, proprietors , cmployeea and pay roll by 12 kind-of- 
busineae groupa. 

City-aize Tablea — Thia sarlee of tablea numbered from ISA to 14B, Inclualre, preaent retail trade 
data by size of city. T^ble ISA shows the proportion of stores and eales, for eleren buaineas groupa, by 
city-aize groups. Table 13B ahowa the percent of retail bualnosa done by each business group In each city- 
aize group. Table 13C presenta the percent of stores, aalea and population by city-aize groupa. 

Table 13D glTss the number of atorea and amount of aalea, by klnd-of-buaineaa groupa for the Ihiltad 
Stataa and geographic diTisions, by city-aize groups. 

Table 14a shows the proportion of stores, salea, personnel and pay roll (for all kinda of buaineaa 
combined) by city-size groups. Table 14B presents by city-aize groupa the number of stores, salea, personnel 
and pay roll for the United Stataa and geographic dlTiaiona. 



L 



(A 



"a 



V I 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

Daniel C. Roper, Secretary 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

William L. Austin, Director 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS: 1935 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION 



VOLUME II 



COUNTY AND CITY SUMMARIES 




DECEMBER, 1936 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



Daniel C. Roper, Secretary 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

William L. Austin, Director 



''f j/7/J/'J7^^^ 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

Fred A. Gosnell, Chief Statistician 
William A. Ruff, Assistant 



This is a summary of retail distribution by all types and kinds of 
business (combined) for each State, and for each county, city and place of 
more than 2,500 population and remainder of each county. It corresponds to 
Retail Vol. Ill (Table 11) of the 1933 Census of American Business and to 
Retail Vol. I (Table 13) of the 1929 Census of Distribution. 

Included also are two series of City tables, alphabetically arranged, 
one showing the same information by 54 kinds of business for each city of more 
than 50,000 population (Table 12) and one by 11 or 12 business classifications 
for each city of 10,000 to 50,000 population (Table 13). Table 12 corresponds 
to Retail Vol. Ill (Table 12) of the 1933 census. There was no series similar 
to Table 13 in the 1933 census, although the number of stores and sales by 11 
business groups can be found in Vol. VIII (Areas) for each of these cities, 
listed under their respective counties. Separate tables for each city of more 
than 30,000 population were contained in Vol. I (Parts II and III) of the 1929 
Distribution Census under their respective States. 

All areas in each State are also grouped into 11 city-size classifica- 
tions, by 11 business groups, corresponding to similar summary tables in Retail 
Vol. I of the 1933 census, pages 45 to 54. 

For data on the number of stores and sales in each county and city by 
11 business groups, see Retail Vol. Ill of the 1935 Census of Business. 

The facts on which these tables are based were collected in 1936 by 
a complete canvass of retail stores in every State, city and county in the 
United States, by the Bureau of the Census, with funds provided by the Works 
Progress Administration. They represent the operations of retailers during 
the year 1935. They were tabulated, analyzed and published by the Business 
Census division, in the Bureau's branch in Philadelphia. 

Retail reports are prepared under the supervision of John Guernsey, Distribution 
Economist for the Census Bureau, by Ira D. Anderson, Retail Assistant, Hugh Duffey 
James O. Reid and Irwin Heine. r, -, i '\ -'i,-^ Avj.! 

V . I 



Vol. II. Page 2 



RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 



Volume II 



COUNTY AND CITY SUMMARIES 



CONTENTS 



Index 4 



Alphabetical Index of Cities 6 



SECTION ONE 



TEXT 



Description of Tables , and Definition of Terms 9 



TABLES 



United States Summaries, by States and Geographic Divisions 11 

United States Summaries, by Kinds of Business. . 12 

Series of Table s , one for each State and for the District of Columbia, 
summarizing the number of stores, sales, personnel, pay roll and 
expense by counties and cities (Table 11 ) 13 to 84 



SECTION TWO 



City-Size Table I, for the United States - percent ratio of stores and 

sales in each city-size group, for each of 11 kind-of-business groups 87 

City-Size Table II, - percent of retail business done by each kind-of- 
business group, in each city-size group 67 



Vol. II, Page 3 



CONTENTS - TABLES (continued; 



City-Size Table III , percent of stores, sales and population by city- 
size groups, for the United States and separately for each Geographic 
Division 87 



For Comparison , ratios for 1933, comparable to those in city-size tables 

I, II and III, above 86 

City-Size Table IV , analyzing number of stores and sales in 11 kind-of- 

business groups, for the United States and for each Geographic Division, 

by size-of-city groups 86 - 89 



City-Size Table s V , by States, analyzing number of stores and sales in 11 

kind-of -business groups, by size-of-city groups 90 to 97 



City-Size Table VI , for the United States - percent ratio of stores, sales, 
personnel, pay roll and expense, in each city-size group, to United States 
totals 99 



City-Size Tables VII , analyzing the number of stores, sales, personnel, 
pay roll and expense, for the United States and for each Geographic 
Division, by size-of-city groups 99 - 100 



City-Size Table VIII , by States, analyzing the number of stores, sales, 

personnel, pay roll and expense, by size-of-city groups 101 to 106 



City Totals , for 191 cities of more than 50,000 population, summarizing 

number of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll for all kinds of business 
combined 107 - 108 



City Totals , for 763 cities of 10,000 to 50,000 population, summarizing 

number of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll for all kinds of business 
combined 109 to 113 



Series of City Tables , one for each city of more than 50,000 population, 
showing number of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll by 54 kinds of 
business (Table 12) 114 to 179 



Series of City T ablets, one for each city of 10,000 to 50,000 population, 

showing number of stores, sales, personnel and pay roll by 11 or 12 kind- 
of -business groups (Table 13) 180 to 234 



Index Vol. II, Page 4 
County and City Summaries. 



INDEX 



Alabama: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 13 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 90 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups... 101 
Arizona: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 14 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 90 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups... 101 
Arkansas: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 15 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 90 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups... 101 

B 

Business (kind of) Totals - United States Summary 12 

C 

California: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 17 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 90 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 101 

Colorado : - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 19 

' - Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 90 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 101 

Connecticut:- Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 20 

" - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and towns 20A 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 90 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 101 

Cities - Alphabetical index of all cities of more than 10,000 population 6-7-8 

City-size summary tables - stores and sales by business groups 87 - 89 

- stores, sales, personnel, payroll and expense 99 - 100 

City Totals - for each city of more than 50,000 population - stores, sales, 

personnel and payroll, in one-line totals for each city.. 107 - 108 

- for each city of 10,000 to 50,000 population - stores, sales, 

personnel and payroll, in one-line totals for each city.. 109 - 113 
City Tables - for each city of more than 50,000 population - stores, sales, 

personnel and payroll, by 54 Kinds of Business 114 - 179 

- for each city of 10,000 to 50,000 population - stores, sales, 

personnel and payroll, by 12 kind-of-business groups 180 - 243 

Comparison Table - City-size ratios for 1933 86 

D 

Delaware: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 20 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business by city-size groups 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense by - city- 

size groups 101 

Dist. of Columbia: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll 20 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll and expense 101 



Index Vol. II, 

County and City Summaries. 



Page 5 



INDEX 

E 

Florida: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 21 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 101 

G 

Georgia: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 23 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups ...... 102 

I 

Idaho: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 26 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 102 

Illinois: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 27 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 102 

Indiana: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 30 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 91 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 102 

Iowa: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 32 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 92 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 102 

K 

Kansas: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 34 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 92 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 102 

Kentucky: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 36 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 92 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 102 

Kind-of-Business Totals - United States Summary 12 

L 

Louisiana: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 38 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 92 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups .... 103 

M 



Maine: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 39 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 92 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 103 

Maryland: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 39 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 92 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 103 



Index Vol. II Page 5A 
County and City Summaries. 



INDEX 



vlassachusetts: 



ilichigan; 



.'ilinnesota: 



l<!ississippi: 



sJissouri ; 



Montana: 



M (continued) > ■ 

Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by count! 
Stores and sales "by Kinds of Business - by city- 
Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by 
Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counti 
Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city- 
Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by 
Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counti 
Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city- 
Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by 
Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counti 
Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city- 
Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by 
Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counti 
Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city- 
Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by 
Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counti 
Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city- 
Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by 



es and cities. . . 40 

size groups 93 

city-size groups 103 

es and cities. . . 41 

size groups 93 

city-size groups 103 

es and cities. . . 43 

size groups 93 

city-size groups 103 

es and cities. . . 45 

■size groups 93 

city-size groups 103 

es and cities. . . 47 

size groups 93 

city-size groups 103 

es and cities. . . 49 

size groups 93 

city-size groups 104 



.Nebraska: 



JJevada : 



Sfew 


Hampshire: 


1^ 

New 


Jersey: 


tTew 


Mexico: 


New 


York: 


1' 

Nor 


th Carolina: 


Nor 


th Dakota: 



Ohio: 



Oklahoma: 



Oregon: 



Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 



Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 
Stores 



sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.. 50 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups.... 94 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.. 51 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups.... 94 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.. 51 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups.... 94 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 52 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 94 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 53 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 94 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 54 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 94 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 56 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 95 

sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 

sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 58 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 95 

, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 104 



, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 59 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 95 

, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 105 

, sales personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 62 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 95 

, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 105 
, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities .... 64 

and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 95 

, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 105 



Index Vol. II, Page 5B 

County and City Summaries. i.?iQ&^ 

P 

Pennsylvania: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.... 65 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 95 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 105 

R 

Rhode Island: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.... 68 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 96 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups. 105 

S 

South Carolina: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.. 69 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups.... 96 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 105 
South Dakota: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities.. 70 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups.... 96 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 105 
Size-of-city Table - see City-size. 

1 

Tennessee : - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 71 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 96 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups.... 105 
Texas: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 73 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 96 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups.... 106 
Tables - List and description of tables 3 

U 

Utah: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 78 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 96 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 106 

United States S ummaries - City-size ratios (1935) 87 

- City-size ratios (1933) 86 

- Stores and sales by 11 business groups - by city-size groups 88 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll and expense - by city-size groups.... 99 

- by States 11 

- by Kinds of Business... 12 
V 

Vermont: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 78 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 97 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 106 

Virginia: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 79 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 97 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll and expense, by city-size groups... 106 

W 

Washington: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities 81 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 97 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups... 106 
West Virginia: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 82 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 97 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 106 
Wisconsin: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 83 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 97 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 106 
Wyoming: - Stores, sales, personnel and payroll - by counties and cities... 84 

- Stores and sales by Kinds of Business - by city-size groups 97 

- Stores, sales, personnel, payroll, expense - by city-size groups 106 



Vol. n - tv « 



AiHJABgricAL nroEx OF crngs 



of mora than 10,000 population 



A 

Aberdeen, S. Dak 180 

Aberdeen, Wash 180 

Ab llene , Tex 180 

Ada , Okla lao 

AdaiQS , Mass 180 

Adrian, Ulch ISO 

Akron, Ohio 114 

Alameda, Calif 180 

Albany, Oa 180 

Albany, N. T 114 

Albert lea, Uinn 180 

Albuquerque, N. Uez 180 

Alexandria, La IBO 

Alexandria , 7a 180 

Alhambra, Calif 180 

Allqulppa, Pa 180 

Allentown, Pa 114 

Alliance , Ohio 181 

Alpena , Mich 131 

Alton, 111 181 

Altoooa, Pa 115 

Amarillo, Tex 161 

Ambrldge, Pa 181 

Ames , Iowa 181 

Amesbury, Mass 181 

Amsterdam, N. Y 181 

Anaconda, Mont IBl 

Anaheim, Calif 181 

Anderson, Ind 181 

Anderson, S. C 181 

Annapolis, Ud 181 

Ann Arbor, VAch 181 

Annlston, Ala 182 

Ansonia , Conn 182 

Appleton, Wis 182 

Ardmore, Okla 182 

Arkansas City, Kans 132 

Arlington, Mass 182 

Arnold, Pa 182 

Asbury Park, N. J 182 

Asheville, N. C 116 

Ashland, Ky 182 

Ashland, Ohio 182 

Ashland , Wis 182 

Ashtabula, Ohio 182 

Astoria , Ore 132 

Atchison, Kane 182 

Athens, Ga 183 

Athol , Mass 183 

Atlanta, Ga 115 

Atlantic City, N. J 116 

Attleboro, Mass 183 

Auburn, Us 183 

Auburn, N. Y 183 

Au^ste, Ca 116 

Augusta, Me 183 

Aurora, 111 183 

Austin, Minn 183 

Austin, Tex 116 

B 

Bakeraf ield , Calif 133 

Bait imore, Md 117 

Ban£or, Me 133 

Barberton, Ohio 183 

Barre , 7t 183 

BartleSTille, Okla 183 

Batavla, N. Y 1S3 

Baton Rouge , La 184 

Battle creek, Mich 184 

Bay City, Mich 184 

Bayoone, M. J 117 

Beacon, N. Y 134 

Beatrice, Neb 184 

Beaumont, Tex 117 

Beaver Falls, Pa 184 

Bedford, Ind 134 

Bellaire, Ohio 134 

Belleville, 111 134 

BelleTllle, N. J 184 

Bellevue , Pa 184 

Belllngham, Kaeh 184 

Belmont , Mass 164 

Beloit , Wis 184 



Benton Harbor, Mich 185 

Berkeley, Calif 118 

Berlin, H. E 185 

Berwick, Pa 135 

Berwyn, 111 185 

Bessemer, Ala 185 

Bethlehem, Pa 118 

Beverly, Mass 135 

Beverly Hills, Calif 185 

Biddaford, Ma 185 

Big Spring, Tex 135 

Billings , Mont 185 

Blloxi , Miss 185 

Binghamton, N. Y 113 

Birmingham, Ala 119 

Bismarck, N. Dak 185 

Bloorafield, N. J 135 

Bloomington, 111 185 

Bloomlngton, Ind 186 

Bluefield, Va. and W. Va 186 

Blue Island, 111 186 

Blythevilla , Ark 136 

Bogalusa, La 136 

Boise, Idaho 186 

Boone, Iowa 136 

Boston, Mass 119 

Boulder, Colo 186 

Bowling Green, Kv 186 

Braddock, Pa 186 

Bradford, Pa 186 

Bralnerd, Minn 186 

Braintree, Mass 186 

Brawley , Call f 186 

Bremerton , Wash 187 

Bridgeport, Conn 119 

Bridgeton, N, J 187 

Bristol , Conn 137 

Bristol , Pa 187 

Bristol, R. 1 187 

Bristol, Va. and Tonn 187 

Bmcktoiv Mass 120 

uroDtfield, 111 187 

Brookline, Mass 187 

Brownsville , Tex 187 

Brownwood, Tex 187 

Brunswick, Ge 187 

Eucyrus , Ohio 187 

Buffalo, N. Y 120 

Burbank, Calif 137 

Burlingame , Calif 187 

Burlington, Iowa 138 

Burlington, N. J 188 

Burlington, Yt 138 

Butler, Pa 188 

Butte, Mont 188 



Cairo , 111 188 

Calumet City, 111 188 

Cambrldee, Mass 120 

Cambridge , Ohio 188 

Camden, II. J 121 

Campbell , Ohio 188 

Canonsburg , Pa 183 

Canton , 111 188 

Canton, Ohio 121 

Cape Girardeau, Mo 188 

Carbondale, Pa 188 

Carlisle, Pa 188 

Carnegie , Pa 189 

Carteret, N. J 189 

Casper , Wye 189 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 121 

Central Tails, R. I 189 

Centralla , 111 189 

Chambersburg, Fa 169 

Champa Ign , 111 189 

Chanute , Knna 169 

Charlerol , Fa 189 

Charleston, S. C 122 

Charleston, W. Ta 122 

Charlotte, N. C 122 

Charlottesville , Va 189 

Chattanooga, Tenn »1ZZ 



Chelsea , Mass 169 

Chester, Pa 123 

Cheyenne , Wyo 189 

Chicago , 111 123 

Chicago Heights, 111 189 

Chickasha, Okla IBS 

Chlcopee , Mass 190 

Ohlllicothe, Ohio 190 

Cicero, 111 124 

Cincinnati, Ohio 124 

ClalFton, Fa 190 

Claranont, N. H 190 

Clarksburg, IT. Va 190 

Olarkedale , Miss 190 

Cleburne, Tax 190 

Cleveland , Ohio 124 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 125 

Cllffslde Park, N. J 190 

Clifton, N. J 190 

Clinton, Iowa 190 

Clinton, Mass 190 

Coatesville, Pa 190 

Cof f eyvilla, ICans 190 

Cohoes, N. Y 190 

Collingswood, N. J 191 

Colorado Springs, Colo 191 

Columbia, Mo 191 

Columbia, Pa 191 

Columbia, S. C 125 

Columbus , Oa 191 

Columbus , Mies 191 

Columbus , Ohio 125 

Compton, Calif 191 

Concord, N. H 191 

Concord, N. C 191 

ConnellBVille, Pa 191 

Connersvllle, Ind 191 

Conshohocken, Fa 191 

Coraopolls, Pa 191 

Corning, N. Y 191 

Corpus Christl, Tax 192 

Corsicana, Tex 192 

Cortlend, N. Y 192 

Coshocton, Ohio 192 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 192 

Covington , Ky 126 

Cranston, R. 1 192 

Crawf ordsvllle, Ind 192 

Cudahy , Wis 192 

Cumberland , Md 192 

Cumberland, R. 1 192 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 192 

D 

Dallas, Tex 126 

Danbury, Conn .* 192 

Danvers, Mass 192 

Davenport, Icwa 126 

Danville, 111 192 

Danvi 11 e , Va 193 

Dayton, Ohio 127 

Daytona Beach, Fla 193 

Dearborn, Mich 127 

Decatur, Ale 193 

Decatur, Ga 193 

Decatur, 111 127 

Dedham, Mesa •■■•■•••*••. 193 

Del Rio, Tex 193 

Denison, Tex 193 

Denver , Colo 126 

Derby , Conn 193 

Des Moines, Iowa 128 

Detroit , Mich 128 

Dickson City, Pa 193 

Dodge City, Eons 193 

Donora, Fa 193 

Dormont, Pa 193 

Dothan, Ala 193 

Dover, N. H 193 

Dover, N. J 194 

Du Bole, Pa 194 

Dubuque, Iowa •• 194 

Duluth, Minn 129 

Dunkirk, N. Y 194 



Dunmore , Pa 

Duquesne, Fz 

Durham, N. C 



..194 
..194 
..129 



S 



East Chicago, I»l 129 

East Cleveland, Ohio 194 

Easthampton, Masa 194 

East Liverpool, Ohio 194 

East Molina, 111 194 

Easton, Pa 1^4 

Bast Orange, N. J 130 

Baet Providence, R. 1 194 

East St. Louis, 111 130 

Eau Claire, Wis 194 

Ecorae, Mich 194 

El Dorado , Ark 195 

El Dorado, Kans 195 

Elgin, lU 195 

Elizabeth, N. J 130 

EllMbeth City, N. C 195 

Elkhart , Ind 195 

Ellwood City, Pa 195 

Klmhurst , Ell 195 

Elmlra, N. Y 195 

ElMwood Park, 111 195 

El Paso, Tex 131 

Elwood, Ind 195 

Elyria, Ohio 195 

anporla , Kane 195 

Endlcott, N. Y 195 

Englewood, N. J 195 

Enid, Okla 196 

Erie, Pe 131 

Escanaba, Mich 196 

Euclid, Ohio 196 

Eugene , Ore 196 

Eureka, Calif 196 

Evanston, 111 131 

BvansviUe, Ind 132 

Everett, Mass 196 

Everett, Wash 196 

F 

Fairfield, Ala 196 

Fairhaven, Mass 196 

Fairmont, «. Va 196 

Fell River, Mass 132 

Fargo, N. D 196 

Faribault, Minn 196 

Farrell, Pa 196 

Fayetteville, N. C 196 

Femdale, Mich 197 

Flndlay, Ohio 197 

Fitchburg, Mass 197 

Flint, Mich 132 

Floral Park, N. i 197 

Florence, Ala 197 

Florence, S. C 197 

Fond du Lac, Wis 197 

Forest Park, 111 197 

Fort Collins, Colo 197 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 197 

Fort Madison, Iowa 197 

Fort Scott, Kane 197 

Fort anith. Ark 197 

Fort Thomas, Ky 197 

Fort Wayne, Ind 133 

Fort Worth, Tex 133 

Foetorla, Ohio 196 

Framingham, Mass 198 

Frankfort , Ind 198 

Frankfort, 5y 198 

Franklin, Pa 198 

Frederick, Md 198 

Freoport, 111 198 

Frasport, N. Y 198 

Fronont, Neb .• •••166 

Fremont, Ohio 19S 

Fresno, Calif 133 

Fullerton, Calif 198 

FUlton, K. Y 198 

(Continued on Page 7) 



ALPHABITICAI, INnEX OF ClTncs (continued) 



I 



Tol. II - Pag. 7 



Cadaden, Ala 198 

GalnaaTllla, Fla 19n 

Oalaaburg, IH 199 

GalTeatoD, Tax 134 

Gardner, Maaa 199 

Oarfleld, N. J 199 

Carflald Helghta, Ohio 199 

Caiy, Ind 134 

Gaatonia, N. C 199 

GeneTa, K. Y 199 

Clan CoT«, N. Y 199 

Glandala, Calif 134 

Glena Falla, N. Y 199 

Glouceater, Mass 199 

Cloueeater, N. J 199 

GloTersTllle, N. Y 199 

Goldaboro, N. 199 

Goshen, Ind 199 

Grand Forks, N. Dak 199 

Grand Island, Neb 200 

Grand Junction, Colo £00 

Grand Raplda, l-'dch 135 

Granite City, HI 200 

Grant Falla, Mont 200 

Greeley, Colo 200 

Green Bay, Wis 200 

Greenfield, llass 200 

Greensboro, N. C 135 

Greensburc, Pa 200 

Greenville, ftlss 200 

GreenTllle, S. 200 

GreenTllle, Tex ZOO 

Greenwood, IUss 200 

Greenwood, 3. C 200 

Orlf f m, Ga 200 

Grosse Polnte Park, Hich 201 

Gulfport, mss 201 

H 

Backensack, M. J 201 

Hagerstown, ''.d 201 

Hamilton, Ohio 135 

Kajnosnd , Ind 135 

Hamtramck , Ilich 136 

Hannibal, lb 201 

HanoTer, Pa 201 

Harlingen, Tex 201 

Harrlsburg, 111 201 

Harrlsburg, Pa 136 

Harrison, H. J 201 

Hartford, Conn 137 

Harvey, 111 201 

Hastings, Neb 201 

Hattlesburg. Miss 201 

Haverhill, Mass 201 

Hawthorne, H. J 201 

Hazloton, Pa 202 

Helena, rent 202 

Hempstead, H. Y 202 

Henderson, Ky 202 

Herkimer, H. Y 202 

Hibbine, 1'J.nn 202 

Highland Park, 111 20i 

Highland Park, Uieh 137 

High Point, N. C 202 

Hoboken, N. J 137 

HoUand, Mich 202 

Holyoke, Mass 136 

Homestead, Pa 202 

Hopewell, Va 202 

Hopklnaville, Ky 202 

Hoiiuian, Wash 202 

Homell, N. Y 202 

Hot Springa, Ark 203 

Houston, Tex 138 

Hudson, N. Y 203 

Huntington, Ind 203 

Huntington, W. Va 138 

Huntington Park, Calif 203 

HuntsTille, Ala 203 

Huron, S. Dak 203 

Hutchinson, Kans 203 



Independence , Kans 203 

Independence, Mo 203 

Indiannpnlis, Ind 139 

Inglewond . Col 1 f 203 

Iowa City, Iowa 203 

Iron tfeuntnln, tUch 203 

Ironton, Ohio 203 

Ironwood, Mich 203 

Irvington, N. J 139 

Ithaca, N. Y 204 



Tackaon, Mich 139 

Jackaon , Miss 204 

Jackson, Tenn 204 

Jackaonville, Fla 140 

Jacksonville, 111 204 

Jamestown, N. Y 204 

Janesville, Wis 204 

Jeannette, Pa 204 

Jefferson City, Uo 204 

Jefferaonville, Ind 204 

Jersey City, N. J 140 

Johnson City, N. Y 204 

Johnaon City, Tenn 204 

Johnstown, N. Y 204 

Johnstown, Pa 140 

Jollet, 111 204 

Jonesboro , Ark 204 

Joplin, ifo 205 

K 

KalFUnnzoo, K'licb 141 

Kankakee , 111 205 

Kansas City, Kans 141 

Kansas City, LIo 141 

Kearny, I*. J 205 

Keene, N, !1 205 

Kanmoro, II. Y 205 

Kenoaha, Ala 142 

Keokiik, Iowa £05 

Kewonee, 111 205 

Key VIest, Fla 205 

Klnf^sport, Tenn 205 

Kltii5Ston, '•'. ^ 205 

Kingston, Pa 205 

Klnston, K. C £05 

Klamath Falls, Ore 205 

Knorville, Tenn 142 

Kokomo, Ind 205 



Lackawanna, N. Y 206 

Laconia, N. H 206 

La Crosse, V.ia 206 

Lafayette, Ind 206 

Lafayette, La '''06 

La Grange, Ga 206 

La Grange , 111 206 

Lake Charles, La 206 

Lakeland, Fla 206 

Lakewood , Ohio 142 

Lancaster, Ohio 206 

Lancaster, Pa 143 

Lanalng, Mich 143 

La Porte, Ind 206 

Laredo, Tex 206 

La Salle, 111 206 

Latrobe , Pa 206 

Laurel , Miss 207 

Lawrence , Kens £07 

Lawrence , Mess 143 

Lawton, Okla 207 

Leevenworth, Kana 207 

Lebanon, Pa 207 

Leominster, Mass 207 

Lewistnn. Ue £07 

Lewistown, Pa 207 

Lexington, Ky £07 

Lima , Ohio 207 

Lincoln, 111 207 

Lincoln, Neb 144 

Lincoln, R. 1 207 

Lincoln Park, Mich 207 

Linden, N. J £07 

Little Falls, N. Y 206 



Little Rock, Ark 144 

Lockport, N. Y £08 

Lodi, N. J 206 

Loganaport, Ind 20P 

Long Beach, Calif 144 

Long Branch, N. J 208 

Longvlew, Wash 208 

Lorain, Ohio 208 

Los Angeles, Calif 145 

Louisville, Ky 145 

Lowell, Mass 145 

LubbocV, Tex £06 

Lynbrook, N. Y 208 

Lynchburg, Va 208 

Lynn, Masa 146 

M 

Macon, Ge 146 

Itadi ann . Win 146 

Mahanoy City, Pa 208 

Itelden , Mass 147 

Mamaroneck, N. Y 206 

K'-nncheater, N. H 147 

rnnhattnn, Kans 208 

Manitnwnc, Wis £08 

Manknt-i, !hnn 20y 

Mansfield , Ohio 209 

?-toplewood. Mo 209 

Marietta , Ohio 209 

Marinette. V.ls 209 

Ifarion , Ind 209 

Unrlon , Ohio 209 

Mnrlborough, l&ss 209 

r.tar-iuette, rUch 209 

llnrihall , Tei 209 

Itorshalltown . Iowa 209 

I.Inrtinsburp, 'H. Va 209 

WartHa Fnrr>-, Ohio 209 

r.teson City, Iowa 209 

M8S3»nn. :;. Y 210 

Ifaaslllon, Ohio £10 

:.V.ttoon, 111 210 

Liaywood, 111 210 

ItcAlester, Okie 210 

McCorab, )as3 .'10 

McKeeaport, Pa 147 

McKees Rocks, Pa 210 

lleadvllle. Pa 210 

I Bedford , Mass 148 

!.;edford, Ore 210 

Melrose, Mass 210 

relrose Park, 111 £10 

Venphls, Tenn 148 

I,!enominee, Mich 210 

Uerlden, Conn 21C 

Meridian, Miss 210 

Methuen, Mass 211 

:.!lBmi , Fla 148 

laohigan City, Ind 211 

Hlddlesborough, Ky 211 

Middletown, Conn £11 

laddletown, N. Y 211 

!:iddletown, Ohio £11 

talford , Maas itl 

Millvllle, N. J £11 

I'Jlton, Llaas 211 

lalwaukee , Wis 1*9 

h'lnneepolla, Minn 149 

l!inot, tl. Dnk 211 

Mlshownko, Ind 211 

Missoula, Mont 211 

Mitchell, S. Dak 211 

Moberly , Ito 211 

Mobile, Ala 149 

Modesto, Calif 212 

Moline , 111 212 

Monessen, Pa 212 

Monroe , La £12 

Monroe, Mich 212 

Monrovia, Calif £1£ 

Lintolalr, N. J £12 

Montgomery, Ala 150 

Ibrgantown, W. Va 212 

Itorristown, N. J 212 

Moundaville, W. Va £1£ 

Mount Carmel , Pa 212 



Mount Clemens, Mioh 218 

Mount Vernon. Ill 212 

Mount Vernon. N. Y 150 

Munclo. Ind 212 

Munholl , Pa £13 

Muscatine, Iowa 213 

Muskegon, Mich £13 

Muakegon Heichta, Mich 213 

Muskogee , Okie 213 

N 

Nantlcoke, Pa. .T 213 

Nashua, N. H 213 

Nashville, Tenn 150 

Natchez , Ml as 213 

Natick , Moas 213 

Naugntuck, Conn 213 

Needhnm, Mass 213 

New Albany. Ind 213 

Newark, N. J 151 

Newark, Ohio 213 

New Bedford, Mass 151 

New Bern. N. C £13 

New Britain, Conn 151 

New Brunswick. N. J !:14 

Newburgh, N. Y 214 

Newburyport , Mass 214 

New Coftle, Ind 214 

New Cnotle, Pa 214 

New Haven , Conn 152 

Nav; Kenslni^ton, Fa 214 

New London , Conn 214 

New Orleans, la 152 

}lmi Philadelphio, Ohio 214 

Newport , Ky 214 

Newport., K. 1 214 

Newport Newa, Va 214 

N»w !Inrhi.U', N. Y 16£ 

Nawton. lown 214 

Newton, Knrc 214 

iiewton , Muss 153 

New York, N. Y 153 

Bronx Borourh 153 

Bronklvn borourh 154 

"anj'nttnn B^ro'irh .154 

Queens f^orough 154 

Rlctinond lor.-'U'rh 155 

Iliarirn !-'clV3. IJ. Y 155 

::ilea, :.ach 214 

rules, nhio 215 

Norfolk. :ieb 215 

Norfolk. Vo 155 

Norrietown , Pa 215 

North Adams, Mess ...215 

Northampton, Mass £15 

liorth Attleboro, I^asa -.715 

North Braddock, Pa 215 

North Little Rock, Ark 215 

North Platt», Neb 216 

north Providence, R. 1 215 

North Tonav.anda, N. Y 215 

■srwalk, Coaa 215 

Koiwlck, 0«nm 215 

PaTwoM , :.'ase 215 

S9mo4, Ohio 216 

NoUay. K. J £16 



Oakland, Calif 156 

Oak P»rk, 111 156 

OGden. ^'tah 216 

0gden3buri5, N. Y 216 

Oil City, Pa 216 

Oklahoma City, Oklh 156 

Okmulgee, Okla 216 

Old Forge, Pa 216 

Clean, N. Y 216 

Olytnpia, Waah 216 

Olyphant , Pa £16 

Omaha . Neb 157 

Oneide, N. Y 216 

Oneonta, N. Y 216 

Ontario, Calif 216 

Orange, N. J 216 

Orlando, Fla 21' 

Oshkosh, Wis 217 

(Continued on page 8) 



Vol. II - Page 8 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. OF CITIES (continued) 



Oskalooaa, Iowa 217 

Oeolnlng, N. Y 217 

Oswego, N. Y 217 

Ottawa, 111 217 

Ottumwa, Iowa 217 

OweDsboro, Ky 217 

Owosao, Mich 217 

P 

paduceh, Ey 217 

palnesvllle, Ohio 217 

Palestine, Tax 217 

Palo Alto, calif 217 

pampa, Tex 217 

Paris, Tex 218 

Paiiiersburg, W. Va £18 

Park Ridge, 111 218 

Peima, Ohio , 218 

parsons, Kans 218 

Paaedena, Calif 157 

pasaelc, N. J 157 

Paterson, N. J 158 

Pawtucket, H, 1 158 

Peabody, Mass 218 

PeekSKill, N. Y 218 

Pekln, 111 218 

Pensacolfl, Fla 218 

Peoria, 111 158 

Perth Amboy, N, J 218 

Peru, Ind 218 

Petersburg, Va 218 

Phanli City, Ala 218 

Philedelphia, pa 159 

Phillipsburg, N, J 218 

Phoenix, Ariz 219 

PhoenlxvUle, Pa 219 

Pine Bluff, ATk 219 

Pique, Ohio 219 

Pittsburg, Kans 219 

Pittsburgh, Pa 159 

Pittsfield, r.:aas 219 

Plttston, Pa 219 

Plainfleld, N. J 219 

Plattsburg, N. Y 219 

Pleasantville, N. J 219 

Plymouth , Mass 219 

Plymouth, Pa 219 

Pocetello, Idaho 219 

Pomona, Calif 219 

Ponce City, Okie 220 

Pontiac, Mich 159 

Port Angelas, ffash 320 

Port Arth'ir, Tex »220 

Port Chester, N. Y ...220 



Port Huron, Mich, . 
Port Jervls, N, Y. 

Portland, Me 

Portland, Ore 

Portsmouth, N. B. . 



.220 
.220 

.160 
,160 
.220 



portaaouth, Ohio 220 

Portamouth , Va 220 

Pottstowfi, Pb 220 

Pottsvllle, Pa 220 

Poughkaepsla, N, Y 220 

Providence, R, I ,...161 

ProTo, Oteh 220 

Pueblo, Colo 161 



Quincy, 111 220 

iuincy. Mesa 161 



Racine, ffis 

Rahwoy, N. J 

Raleigh, N. C 

Rapid City, S. Dak 
Reading, pa 



Red Bank, N. J.... 
Redlands, Calif.. . 

Reno, Nev 

Rensselaer, TH, Y. . 
Revere, Mass 



. . . 162 
...220 
...221 
...221 
...162 



Rlclmond , Calif 


221 


Richmond, Ind 


221 


Richmond , Va 


162 


Rldgofiold Park, N. J 


221 


Rldgewood, N. J 


221 


HiTer Rouge , Mich 


221 


RlToraide, Calit 


221 


Roanoke , 7b 


163 


Rochaster, Minn 


221 


Rochester, N. H 


222 


Rochester, N. Y 


163 


Rockford, 111 


163 


Rock Hill, 3. C 


222 


Rock Island, 111 


222 


Rockville Centre, N. Y 


222 


Rocky Mount, N. C 


222 


Rome, Ga 


222 


Rome, N. Y 


222 


Rosalie, N. J 


222 


Roswell, N. Mbi 


222 


Royal Oak, ^;lch 


222 


Rutherford, N. J 


222 


Rutland, Tt 


222 



..221 

..221 
..221 
,..221 
-.221 



Sacramento, Calif 164 

Saginaw, Mich 164 

St, Augustine, Fla 222 

St, Charles, Mo 222 

St. Cloud, Minn 223 

St. Joseph, Mo 164 

St. Louie, Mo 165 

St, Paul, Minn 165 

St. Petersburg, Fla 223 

Salem, Mesa , 223 

Selem, Ohio 223 

Selem , Ore , 22^3 

Saline, Rans 223 

Salines, Calif 223 

Salisbury, Md 223 

Salisbury, N, C 223 

Salt Lake City, Utah 165 

Stn Angelo, Tex 223 

Sen Antonio , Tex 166 

Sen Benito, Tex 223 

San Bernardino, Calif 223 

San Buenaventura, Calif 223 

Sen Diego, Celif 166 

Sendusky, Ohio 223 

Sanford, Fla 224 

San Francisco, Calif 166 

San Jose, Calif 167 

San Leendro, Calif 224 

San Mateo, Calif 224 

Sdnte Ana, Celif 224 

Sautu Barbara, Calif 224 

Santa Cruz, Calif 224 

Senta Fe, N. Uex 224 

Santa Monica, Calif 224 

Sante Roee, Calif 224 

Sepulpe, Okie 224 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y 224 

Seugue, Maes 224 

Sault Ste. Uarie. Mich 224 

Savannah, Ga 167 

Schenectedy, N. Y 167 

Scran ton, Pe 168 

Seattle, Weah 166 

SedallQ, Mo 224 

Selma , Ala 225 

Seminole, Okla 225 

Shaker Helots, Ohio 225 

Shamokln, Pe 225 

Sharon, Pe 225 

Shewnee , Okie 225 

Sheboygan , ;ti s 225 

Shelby, N. C 225 

She Ibyvl 1 le, Ind 225 

Shelton, Conn 225 

Shenandoah, Pa 225 

Shennan, Tex 225 



Shorawood, Wis 225 

Shreveport, La 168 

Sloui City, Iowa 169 

Sioux Falla, S. Dak 225 

Somervllle, Mass 169 

South Bend, Ind 169 

Scuthbrldge, Mass 226 

South Gate, Calif 226 

South Milwaukee, Wis 226 

South Orange, N. J 226 

South Pasadena, Calif 226 

South Portland, Me 226 

South River, N. J 226 

South St. Peul, Minn 226 

Spartanburg, S, C 226 

Spokane , ffash 170 

SprlngfleW, 111 170 

Springfield, )/ass 170 

Springfield, Mo 171 

Springfield, Ohio 171 

Stamford, Conn 226 

Statesvllla, N, C 226 

Staunton, Va 226 

Steelton, Pa 226 

Sterling, 111 226 

Steubenvllle, Ohio 227 

Stevens Point, Wis 227 

Stockton, Celif 227 

Stoneham, Mass 227 

Streator , 111 227 

Struthers, Ohio 22*7 

Suffolk, Va 227 

Siiiniit, N. J 227 

Sumter, S, C 227 

Sunbury , Pa 227 

Superior, Wis 227 

Swanpacott, Mess 227 

Sweetwater, Tex 227 

Swiasvale, Pa 227 

Syracuse, N. Y 171 

T 



.172 
.228 
.228 
.172 
.228 



TacomQ, Wash 

Tallahassee, Fie. 

Tama que, pa 

rempa, Fla 

Taunton, Mass. . . . 



Teylor , Pa 228 

Temple, Tei 228 

Terre Haute , Ind 172 

Texarkana, Ark. and Tei 228 

ThCEQaavllle, Ga 228 

Thomasvllle, N. C 228 

Tiffin, Ohio 228 

Toledo, Ohio 173 

Tonawende, N. Y 226 

Topeke , Kane 173 

Torrington, Conn 228 

Treveroe City, Mich 226 

Trenton, N. J 173 

Trinlded, Colo 228 

Troy, N, Y 174 

Tucson , Ariz 228 

Tulsa, Okla 174 

Turtle Creek, Pa 229 

Tuscaloosa , Ala 229 

Two Rivera, Wis 229 



Tyler, Tex. 



.229 



U 

Union City, N. J... 

Uniontown, Pa 

Unlveralty City, Mo 

Urbane, 111 

Utlca, N. Y 



.174 
.229 
.229 
.229 
.175 



Valdosta, Ga 229 

Vallejo, Calif 229 

Valley Stream, N. Y 229 

Vancouver, Wash 229 

Vandergrlft, Pa £29 

Viekeburg , Mlse 229 



Tlncennes, Ind 229 

Virginia, Minn 230 

W 

Waco , Tex 175 

Wakefield, Mass 230 

Walla Walla, Wash 230 

Welllngford, Conn 230 

Welt ham. Mess 230 

Warren, Ohio 230 

Warren, Pe 230 

Werwlck, R. 1 230 

Washington, D. C 175 

Waahington, Pe 230 

Waterbury , Conn 176 

Waterloo, Iowa 230 

Watsrtown, Meas 230 

Watertow n , N. Y 230 

T^atertown, S, Dak 230 

Water town, Wla 230 

Watervllle, Ms 231 

Watervliet, N. Y 231 

Weukegan, 111 231 

Weukeshe, Wis 231 

Weuseu, Wis 231 

Weuwatosa, Wis 231 

Waycross, Ga 231 

Waynesboro, Pa 231 

Webater, Mass 231 

Webster Groves, Wo 231 

Wellealey, lieee 231 

Wenatchee, Wash 231 

^est Allis, Wla 231 

Westbrook, Me 231 

West Chester, Pe 232 

Westerly, H. 1 232 

Westfleld, Mass 232 

Weetfleld. N, J 232 

■■Vest Frenkfort, 111 232 

West New York, N. J 232 

West Orange, N, J' 232 

West Palm Beach, Fie 232 

West Springfield, Mass 232 

West Warwick, R, 1 232 

Wewoka , Okla 232 

Weymouth, Mess 232 

Wheeling, W. Va 176 

White Pleina, N. Y 232 

Whiting, Ind 232 

Whit tier, Calif 233 

Wichita. Kans 176 

Wichita Fella, Tex 233 

Wilkes-Bar re, Pe 177 

Wllklnsburg, Pa 233 

Wllllemsport, Pa 233 

Willlmentlc, Conn 233 

ffllmotte. Ill 233 

Wilmington, Del 177 

Wilmington, N. C 233 

Wileon, N. C 233 

Winchester, Mtiss 233 

Winchester, Va 233 

Winnotka , 111 233 

ffinona, ^inn 233 

Winston-Selem, N, C 177 

Wlntbrop, Mass 233 

Wobxim. Mass 233 

Woonsocket, R. 1 234 

Wooster, Ohio 234 

Worcester, Mess 176 

Wyendotte, Mich 234 

X 

Xento, Ohio 234 

Y 

Yaklme, Wash 234 

Yonkere, N. Y 178 

York, Pe 178 

YoungBtown, Ohio 179 

YpsUentl, Mich 234 

Z 
ZanosTllle, Ohio 234 



Vol. 11, Page 9 

RETAIL DISTRIBUTION: 1935 



VOLUME II - COUNTY AND CITY SUMMARIES 



This volume, which presents summary data by areas showing the number 
of stores, amount of sales, number of proprietors, average number of employees, 
and the amount of total payroll, is in two parts. 

The first consists of Table 11 with the above-described data for each 
State, each county, each city of more than 2,500 population, and the remain- 
der of each county. (Pages 13 to 84). 

The second part consists of Table 12 which presents in alphabetical 
order all cities of more than 50,000 population with the above-described 
data analyzed by 54 kinds of business (pages 114 to 179); and Table 13 which 
presents in alphabetical order all cities of 10,000 to 50,000 population with 
the above-described data analyzed by 11 business groups (pages 180 to end). 

Because of the danger of disclosures it is not possible to present the 
same detail by kinds of business in smaller cities, but a uniform grouping of 
stores for all cities of more than 2,500 population is available in Volume 
III, showing data as to the number of stores and volume of sales only, by 11 
business groups. 

Contained in this volume are two comparison tables of one-line totals 
for each city of more than 50,000 population (pages 107-108) and for each city 
of 10,000 to 50,000 population (pages 109 to 113), in both of which the cities 
are alphabetically listed. 

The population figures, given in Table 11 for each city, are as of 
April 1, 1930. Although the Bureau of the Census has prepared estimates of 
population by States as of July 1, 1936, the figures for 1930 have been used 
throughout because the table includes cities and incorporated places for which 
no population figures later than 1930 are available. 

Stores 



The number of stores used herein is the number of places of business 
predominantly retail in character, in or from which goods are sold to ultimate 
consumers for consumption or utilization. The number includes filling stations, 
garages, market stands, lumber and coal yards, eating and drinking places, mail- 
order houses, district offices of house-to-house canvassers, and leased depart- 
ments, as well as stores. 

Sales 

Sales figures used herein represent total sales of retail stores in each 
designated area during the year 1935. They should not be confused with total 
retail purchases or "buying power" of the population of such areas. Many cities 
attract to their stores a considerable volume of business from residents of 
other communities; likewise the residents of few, if any, communities limit 
their entire purchases to local stores. It is unsound, therefore, to use the 
total sales of the stores of any given area as the basis for computing so-called 
per capita sales of such area. 



Vol. II. Page 10 



Sales include the sale of merchandise and meals (together with incidental 
repairs and services), both on credit and for cash. Sales taxes are included. 
Sales are net, in that returned goods have been deducted. 



Proprietors 



The number of proprietors is the number of owners or partners of unincor- 
porated businesses devoting a major portion of their time to the operation of 
their stores. The number does not include executives of corporations, who are 
classified as employees and whose compensation is included in pay roll. The 
great majority of proprietors are found in the very small stores with less than 
$10,000 of annual sales, and in such stores take the place of salespeople, in 
addition to performing managerial functions. Proprietors should be included 
with employees in any count of persons actively engaged in retailing, and a 
reasonable compensation for their services should be added to reported expense. 



Employees 



The employment figures used herein represent the average number of full- 
time and part-time employees (combined), computed by averaging the twelve 
monthly employment figures reported to the Census. The monthly figures in detail 
may be found in a separate volume of this final series of retail reports, in 
which employment is analyzed in considerable detail. 

Payroll 



Payroll is the total compensation (salaries, wages, bonuses and commis- 
sions) paid to employees during the year. It includes no compensation for 
proprietor-owners. The average annual earnings of full-time employees cannot 
be determined by dividing the total payroll by the average number of employees, 
because it is not possible to determine from the figures how many of the reported 
employees are on a part-time basis. 

For more data on this subject, see separate volume of the Retail series 
on Employment and Pay Rolls. 

Terms and Classifications 



The various terms and classifications used throughout this volume are 
described in the United States Summary, Volume I of this final series. 

















Vol. 1 


- Page 11 


Census of Busmeu 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 










Retail Distribution: 1935 


















TABLE 1-A - STORES. 


AND SALEt 


. PERSONNEL. PAY ROLL AND EXPENSES. 








BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES 
















Active 
proprietors 

nnn firm 


Employees 




Pay Roll. 




Operating 


DIVISION AND STATE 


Number 
of 


Sales 


( full-time 
nnd parl- 




(add 0001 




expenses, 
(including 










storps 




ai.u iiiitt 

members 


tim**). Av(t. 


Tola! 


Fulltime 


Part-time 


pay roll)* 
(add 000) 






(add 000) 




for year 








TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 


1.653.961 


♦33.161.276 


1.511.734 


3.961.478 


t3. 623. 289 


13.388.166 


4235.123 


47. 591. 912 


NISW ENOLAND 
Connecticut 


114,044 


2,72Jj911 


95,803 


330.467 


322,456 


300,257 


22,199 


658,074 


84,464 


556,722 


20,205 


64,335 


66,968 


62,825 


4,143 


137,191 


Maine 


12,766 


232,599 


11,384 


24,783 


22,100 


20,531 


1,669 


46,242 


Uasaachusetts 


55,536 


1,461,180 


45,426 


186,136 


182,065 


169,047 


13,018 


369,408 


New Hampahire 


7,225 


152,583 


6,559 


16,249 


14,881 


13,870 


1,011 


31,065 


Rhode leland 


9,095 


219,706 


7,684 


28,881 


27,671 


25,869 


1,802 


.55,453 


Vermont 


4,958 


99,121 


4,545 


10,083 


8,771 


8,115 


656 


18,715 


MIDDLK ATLANTIC 
New Jersey 


402,028 


8,460,917 


357,709 


982,340 


989,038 


929,540 


59,498 


2,167,070 


67,798 


1,220,299 


58,755 


136,907 


140,660 


131,839 


8,821 


305,129 


New York 


204,511 


4,749,708 


181,621 


527,564 


568,833 


537,237 


31,596 


1,258,441 


Peaneylvanifl 


129,719 


2,490,910 


117,333 


317,869 


279,546 


260,464 


19,081 


603,600 


EAST NORTH CHTCRAI. 
IlllnolB 


340,393 


7,170,686 


310,512 


873,507 


800,496 


742,483 


58,013 


1,657,670 


98,538 


2,173,069 


89,533 


272,784 


263,232 


247,287 


15,945 


567,477 


Indiana 


42,471 


780,508 


39,986 


96,052 


81,580 


75,188 


6,39!t 


166,765 


Michigan 


61,962 


1,388,236 


56,552 


163,278 


162,323 


141,873 


10,450 


308,229 


Ohio 


93,268 


1,956,941 


83,458 


242,003 


219,407 


203,023 


16,384 


442,678 


Wieconsln 


44,154 


871,832 


40,983 


97,390 


83,954 


75,112 


8,842 


182,621 


WEST NORTH CENTRAL 


192,570 


3,521,954 


182,871 


413,984 


340,260 


315,321 


24,939 


727,455 


Iowa 


38,970 


650,029 


38,045 


73,273 


55,814 


50,832 


4,982 


122,076 


Kansas 


27,433 


448,261 


26,399 


52,634 


39,863 


36,905 


2,958 


83,199 


Minnesota 


37,495 


820,010 


35,367 


92,498 


83,029 


77,177 


5,852 


177,612 


Missouri 


50,927 


946,125 


47,645 


124, H49 


104,127 


97,432 


6,696 


218,600 


Nebraska 


19,099 


359,757 


17,979 


40,967 


33,143 


30,587 


2,566 


70,970 


North Dakota 


9,019 


150,208 


3,461 


14,076 


12,132 


11,167 


965 


27,143 


South Dakota 


9,618 


147 , 564 


8,985 


15.687 


12,152 


11,221 


931 


27,265 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 
Delaware 


181,731 


3,296,008 


163,509 


423,911 


344,069 


324,917 


19,152 


684,782 


4,390 


76,877 


3,975 


9,102 


8,364 


7,906 


458 


16,799 


District of Colxjmbla 


6,472 


330,813 


4,815 


42,069 


43,905 


42,102 


1,803 


87,853 


Florida 1 


24,330 


425,807 


21,679 


57,255 


46,119 


43,779 


2,340 


92,157 


Georgia 
Maryland 
North Carolina 


31,310 


434,693 


28,626 


66,896 


46,963 


44,473 


2,490 


92,448 


23,349 


462,874 


21,557 


59,681 


51,738 


48,649 


3,089 


109,641 


29,462 


463,219 


27,303 


60,207 


44.23.'j 


41,418 


2,815 


86,285 


South Carolina 


16,686 


243,205 


14,672 


33,327 


22,688 


21.223 


1,465 


42,425 


Virginia 
West Virginia 


26,757 


471,329 


23,901 


50,106 


48,547 


45,943 


2,604 


96,470 


18,975 


332,190 


16,982 


37,269 


31,512 


29,424 


2,088 


61,704 


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 
Alabama 


94,034 


1,386,429 


89,689 


175,856 


129,778 


122,157 


7,621 


262,777 


22,167 


337,217 


20,740 


42,517 


30,360 


28,669 


1,691 


61,618 


Kentucky 


29,286 


383,278 


28,192 


48,481 


36,931 


34,548 


2,383 


73,831 


Uiseisslppl 


15,136 


178,348 


14,670 


23,384 


15,703 


14,788 


915 


31,253 


Tennessee 


27,445 


482,586 


26,087 


61,474 


46,784 


44,152 


2,632 


96,075 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 
Arkansas 


138,709 


2,309,174 


133,233 


291,496 


224,272 


212j^524 


11,748 


462,599 


18,292 


240,724 


18,162 


28,046 


19,427 


lfl,209 


1,218 


38,793 


Louis iana 


23,189 


344,393 


21,399 


50,271 


36,864 


35,305 


1,559 


76,557 


Oklahoma 


26,022 


434,793 


25,275 


53,809 


41,iai. 


3H , 584 


2,597 


85,308 


Texas 


71,206 


1,289,264 


68,397 


159,370 


126,800 


120,426 


6,374 


251,941 


MOUNTAIN 


49,140 


1,100,728 


44,975 


114,904 


109,178 


101,649 


7,629 


225,558 


Arizona 


5,214 


121,083 


4,904 


13,156 


12,530 


11,V44 


786 


26,337 


Colorado 


14,273 


302,559 


13,231 


34,049 


29,971 


28,020 


1,951 


63,745 


Idaho 
Montana 


5,863 


140,167 


5,347 


13,064 


12,659 


11,791 


868 


26,143 


7,944 


189,457 


7,114 


17,751 


18,776 


17,1.42 


1,633 


37,581 


Nerada 


1,709 


43,932 


1,523 


4,262 


4,937 


4,669 


268 


10 , 109 


New Mexico 


4,812 


88,751 


4,612 


9,396 


8,269 


7,7'.59 


470 


16,488 


Utah 
Wycmlng 


5,839 


132,098 


6,004 


15,891 


14,611 


13,4C13 


1,208 


30,051 


3,486 


82,681 


3,240 


7,335 


7,426 


6,981 


445 


16,104 


PACIFIC 

California 

Oregon 

Vaahln^on 


141,812 


3,193,569 


133.433 


355.013 


363.742 


339.418 


24.324 


755.927 


100,874 
15,352 
25,086 


2,329,009 
335,851 
528,709 


95,597 
14,493 
23,343 


262,524 
35,066 
57,423 


273,641 
33,814 
56,287 


255,932 
31,467 
52,019 


17,709 
2,347 
4,268 


568,725 

71,087 

116,115 



•Includes no comoensation for propnetore and firm members of unincorporated buainesMs 



Vol II - Page 12 


















Census of Business 




UNITED STATES SUMMARY 










Retail Dislribution: 1935 „ 


















TABLE 1-A.- 


STORES. 


SAIFS, PERSONNEL, 


PAY ROLL AND EXPENSES, 








BY DETAILED 


KINDS OF BUSINESS 










Kind of Business 


Number 
oi 


Sales 


Active 
proprietors 
and firm 


Employees 
(hill-time 
and part- 


Pay Roll. 

(add 000) 


Operating 
expenses, 

(inc:-.:cing 










stores 




members 


time). Avg. 
lor year 


Total 


Full-time 


Part-time 


pay roi; i • 
(add 000) 






(add 000) 










TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 


1,653,961 


$33,161,276 


1,511,734 


3,961,478 


^,623,269 


»3, 368,166 


J235,123 


$7,591,912 


Food Stores 

Canoy ant) conlect ionery stores 


532,010 


8,362,425 


489,966 


745,103 


663,418 


616,695 


46,723 


1,385.052 


55.197 


314,467 


53,973 


37,191 


23,126 


20,265 


2,860 


76,059 


Dairy products stores & milk dirs 


16,360 


576,351 


13,684 


79,964 


114,994 


113,073 


1,921 


169,375 


Egg and poul try dealers 


5,747 


52,404 


5.799 


4,662 


2,951 


2,492 


459 


7,569 


Del icatessen stores 


6,554 


88,708 


6.452 


7,141 


5,677 


5,175 


502 


16,271 


Fruit stores and vegetable markets 


32,632 


216,965 


33.246 


23,217 


16,770 


14,916 


1,654 


39,194 


Grocery stores {without meats) 


188,736 


2,202,607 


170,416 


156,031 


125,602 


114,828 


10,974 


261,962 


Combination stores (groceries & meats) 


166,233 


4,149,813 


148,321 


359,716 


304,006 


281,080 


22,926 


617,799 


Meat markeis 


32,555 


565,640 


31,978 


45,258 


44,551 


41,324 


3,227 


97,042 


H isb markets - seafood 


6,919 


46.811 


7,170 


6,220 


4,481 


3,923 


558 


10,883 


Baker les and caterers 


14,150 


99.908 


12,335 


16,604 


12,636 


11,863 


983 


31,640 


Other food stores 


6,905 


49.751 


6,593 


9,099 


8,224 


7,765 


459 


17,068 


General Stores (with food) 

General merchandise group 

Dry goods & general merchandise stores 


66,701 


1.110.403 


66,783 


82,841 


60,736 


66.549 


4,186 


121,490 


44,651 


4,619,751 


32,160 


729,195 


608,817 


566.040 


42,77' 


1,283,517 


28,709 


527,862 


26,558 


65,730 


46,612 


43.982 


4,630 


109,331 


Department stores 


4,201 


3,311,070 


766 


492,090 


468,910 


443,870 


25,040 


966,104 


Variety, 5-and-!0, & to-a-dollar stores 


11,741 


780,819 


5.846 


171,375 


91,296 


76,186 


13,107 


208,082 


Apparel group 

Men's furnish) r.gs stores 


95,968 


2,656,242 


73,414 


327.629 


338.300 


313,714 


24,586 


775,660 


13,198 


615,949 


11.173 


45,579 


59,705 


66,603 


2;902 


136,768 


Men's clothing - furnishings stores 


7,716 


143,668 


6,010 


12,704 


15,110 


14,065 


1,046 


39,806 


Fami ly clothi ng stores 


7,881 


358,849 


6,060 


46,777 


47,206 


44,909 


2,296 


103,173 


Women's ready-to-wear stores 


21,975 


794,992 


17,068 


107,469 


103,047 


96,474 


6,573 


228,873 


Furriers and fur shops 


1,535 


59,897 


1,067 


6,765 


10,461 


9,736 


725 


23,236 


Mi 1 1 i nery stores 


9,568 


94.451 


6,773 


18,661 


14,665 


12,806 


2,059 


38,488 


Custom tailors 


6,559 


67.120 


6,364 


14,820 


17,316 


14,405 


2,911 


31.110 


Accessories - other apparel stores 


8.569 


109,917 


7,231 


17,733 


13,968 


12,668 


1,300 


31.522 


Shoe stores 


18,967 


511 , 399 


U,668 


57,131 


56,623 


61,848 


4,776 


142.884 


Automotive group 

Motor-vehicle dealers (new) 


116,702 


4,606,650 


113,220 


378,000 


436,993 


424,352 


12,641 


820,791 


30,294 


3,725,438 


25,484 


257,154 


314,274 


309.210 


5,064 


574,832 


Used-car dealers 


4,751 


122,204 


4,736 


9,868 


10,769 


10,125 


644 


22,405 


Accessories, tire and battery dealers 


14,343 


373,910 


10,384 


46,751 


54,657 


52,771 


1,786 


107,978 


Garages 


66,243 


370,064 


71,626 


63,220 


55,122 


60,107 


5,015 


111,274 


Otfier automotive 


1,071 


15.034 


991 


2,007 


2,271 


2,139 


132 


4,302 


Filling statioiu 

Furniture-household group 

Furniture stores 


197,568 


1.967.714 


179,870 


203,763 


177,128 


165,726 


11,400 


356.727 


45,215 


1.289,896 


35,864 


173,931 


211,188 


200,651 


10,537 


422.430 


17,043 


694,578 


14,855 


77,905 


102,065 


96,973 


3,092 


021.867 


Floor coverings-drapery stores 


2,611 


61,246 


2,334 


8,943 


9,752 


9,236 


516 


19.862 


Household appliance and radio stores 


14,100 


381,171 


7,810 


65,836 


75,156 


69,728 


6,428 


I3S,070 


Radio dealers 


4,296 


57,152 


4,225 


6,136 


7,513 


7,071 


442 


16,442 


Other home furnishings stores 


7.165 


95,749 


6.640 


16,112 


16,702 


15,643 


1,059 


31.139 


Lumber-building hardware group 

Lumber & bu 1 1 di ng mater lal dealers 


73.186 


1,864,275 


60.157 


193,672 


221,113 


206,902 


15,211 


422,441 


21,148 


866.865 


10,819 


90,868 


106,801 


101,935 


6,866 


202.074 


Hardware stores 


26,996 


467.217 


26,472 


45,658 


46,658 


45,761 


2,797 


100,955 


Hardware & farm implement dealers 


9,637 


291.762 


9,821 


22,058 


22,381 


20,683 


1,698 


46,419 


Heating & plumbing equipment dealers 


5,025 


89,477 


4,315 


16,802 


20,066 


18,061 


2,004 


30,986 


Paint, glass, wall paper stores 


8,910 


127.049 


7,423 


14,907 


17,260 


15,714 


1,536 


36,163 


Electrical supply stores 


1,469 


21,905 


1,307 


3,389 


4,056 


3,746 


310 


6,844 


Eating and drinking places 

Reslaurants-cafeterias-lunch rooms 


251,473 


2,390.860 


257,566 


646,935 


413,720 


383,496 


30,224 


1,000,041 


113,037 


1.453,U8 


116,408 


442,908 


282,637 


266,245 


16,392 


677,590 


lunch counters, refreshment stands 


40,431 


213,781 


40,174 


52,844 


29,596 


26,550 


3,045 


76,498 


Dr 1 nki ng places 


98,005 


723,961 


100,984 


151,183 


101,468 


90,701 


10,787 


245,963 


Drug stores 

Drug stores with fountai n 


56,697 


1,232,593 


48,363 


159,130 


143,354 


134,319 


9,035 


291,770 


38.731 


950,328 


32,199 


127,830 


112,660 


105,779 


6,881 


227,071 


Drug stores without fountai n 


17,966 


282,265 


16,164 


31,300 


30,694 


28,540 


2,154 


64,699 


Other retail stores 
Bicycleshops 


151,240 


2,947.127 


131,822 


300,295 


331.410 


305,376 


26,034 


678,205 


781 


5.149 


763 


628 


493 


425 


68 


1,131 


Book stores 


2,979 


67.007 


2,384 


12, U7 


13,474 


12,707 


767 


23,603 


Cigar stores anri cigar stands 


15,350 


182.950 


13,717 


15,111 


13,820 


13,027 


793 


35,675 


Florists 


11.242 


98.718 


10,976 


17,320 


15,964 


14,633 


1,331 


36,724 


Fuel and ice dealers 


35,293 


859,018 


31,626 


91,573 


106,066 


92,609 


13,257 


206,521 


Gift, novelty, souvenir shops 


5,512 


31,502 


5,370 


4,265 


3,366 


2,921 


445 


9,097 


Hay, gram, feed stores (without groc.) 


10,350 


317 , 390 


8,720 


17,418 


16,284 


16,247 


1,037 


33,729 


Hay, gram and feed stores (with groc.) 


782 


29.277 


612 


1,626 


1,397 


1,308 


89 


2,822 


Farm and garden supply stores 


9,176 


252.471 


8,259 


18,732 


18,248 


16,603 


1,645 


38,169 


Jewel ry stores 


12,447 


234.693 


11,096 


25,709 


35,479 


34,176 


1,303 


61,656 


Luggage stores 


829 


16.230 


670 


1,721 


2,124 


2,021 


103 


5,125 


News dealers 


7.071 


61.655 


6,590 


13,843 


6,491 


5,364 


1,127 


13,992 


Sporting goods stores 


1,944 


35.2115 


1,741 


3,692 


4,252 


4,053 


199 


9,193 


Beer & liquor stores (packaged) 


12,105 


328.307 


8,922 


16,312 


19,498 


16,451 


1,007 


41,555 


Other classi ( icat ions 


25,379 


427.245 


21,376 


60,208 


74,494 


71,631 


2,663 


138,813 


Secondhand stores 

Secondhand stores ■ clothing & shoe 


22.560 


U3.3«0 


22.549 


20,994 


17,113 


15. 3U 


1,769 


33.586 


2,862 


6,544 


2,820 


1,192 


631 


S64 


67 


1.666 


Secondhand furniture 


6,941 


21,961 


7,032 


3,383 


2,232 


1,929 


303 


8,707 


Second-hand tires, accessories & parts 


6,433 


29,9(;8 


6,8S9 


7,121 


6,392 


4,347 


548 


9,396 


Pawn shops 


1.142 


2Q,4<B9 


1,004 


2,258 


3,096 


3,005 


91 


6,160 


Secondhand stores other 


5.172 


34.3S8 


4,834 


7,040 


5,768 


4,999 


763 


10.S69 



•Includes no comoensalion (or proprietors and firm memberi of unincorporated businevaes 





















Vol. 11 - 


Page 13 


Cenius of Business 
Retoil Dislribulion: 1935 


TABLE 


n,-- STORES, SAIF.S, PEI 
STATE < 


RSONNE 
DF ALAE 


L AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 

iAMA 




County and city 


Number 

o( 

stores 


Sales 

(sdd 000) 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em 
ployees" 


Total 
Pty Roll* 
(.dd ooo) 


County and city 


Number 

ol 

stores 


Sales 

(idll 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Km 
pIoyrcB- 


TotsI 
P.r Roll" 

(.dd 000) 


STATS TOTJU. 

Autauga County 

Baldwin County 

Barbour County: 

Bufaula (Pop. 5,808) 
a«mainder of County 

Bibb County 

Blount County 

Bullock County: 

Union SprlD^a {Pop. 2,875) 
Ramalndar of County 

Butler County; 

OroenTllla (Pop. 3,985) 
Remainder of County 

Calhoun County: 

Annlaton (Pop. 22,345) 
Piedmont (Pop. 3,668) 
JaclcsonTllle (Pop. 2,640) 
Remainder of County 

Chambera County: 

Lanatt (Pop. 5,204) 
Remainder of County 

Cberokee County 

Chilton County 

Choctaw County 

Clarke County 

Clay County 

Cleburne County 

Coffee County: 

Snterprlae (Pop. 3,702) 
Elba (Pop. 2,523) 
Remainder of County 

Colbert County: 

Sheffield (Pop. 6,221) 
Tuscumbla (Pop. 4,533) 
Hamainder of County 

Conecuh County 

Coosa County 

CoTin^ton County: 

Andalusia (Pop. 5,154) 
Opp (Pop. 2,918) 
Florala (Pop. 2,580) 
Recalnder of County 

Crenshaw Count}- 

Cullman County: 

Cullman (Pop. 2,786) 
HatLalnder of County 

Dale County: 

Ozark (Pop. 3,103) 
Hanainder of Coimty 

Dallaa County: 

Salma (Pop. 18,012) 
Regaalnder of County 

D« Ealb County: 

Tort Payne (Pop. 3,375) 
HemalniiBr of County 

KlBora County 

KacamblB County: 

Atmore (Pop. 3,035) 
Brewton (Pop. 2,816) 
Remainder of County 

Stowah County: 

Oadsden (Pop. 32,586) 
Attalla (Pop. 4,585) 


22,167 


$337,217 


20,740 


42,517 


»30.360 


Fayette County 

Franklin County: 

RuaaellvUle (Pop. 3,146) 
Remainder of County 

Ganera County 

Greene County 

Rale County 

Henry County 

Houaton County: 

Dothan (Pop. 16,046) 
Remainder of County 

Jackson County 

Jefferson County: 

Birmingham (Pop. 259,678) 
Beaaamor (Pop. 20,721) 
Kalrfleld (Pop. 11,059) 
Tarrant City (Pop. 7,341) 
Homewood (PDp. 6,103) 
Leeda (Pop. 2,529) 
Remainder of County 

Lamar County 

Lauderdale County: 

Florence (Pop. U,729) 
Remainder of County 

Lawrence County 

Lee County: 

Opellka (Pop. 6,166) 
Auburn (Pop. 2,800) 
Remainder of County 

Limestone County: 

Athens (Pop. 4,238) 
Remainder of County 

Lowndes County 

Uacon County: 

Tuakegee (Pop. 3,314) 
Remainder of County 

Madison County: 

HuntsTllle (Pop. 11,554) 
Remainder of County 

Uareogo County: 

Demopolls (Pop. 4,037) 
Remainder of County 

Uarlon County 

Maraball County: 

GuntersTlllo (Pop. 2,826) 
AlbertTllle (Pop. 2,716) 
Ramalnder of County 

Mobile County: 

Mobile (Pop. 68,2021 
Prlcbard (Pop. 4,680) 
Remainder of County 

Monroe Cotinty 

Montponery County: 

ItonteoBsry (Pop. 66,079) 
Ramalnder of County 

Morgan County: 

Decatur (Pop. 15,693) 
Remainder of County 

Perry County 

Pickens County 

Pike County: 

Troy (Pop. 6,814) 
Rsnalnder of County 


123 
199 


$ 2,002 
2,207 


131 
211 


197 1 121 

205 lie 


138 
339 
£49 


1,121 
3,175 
8,843 


131 
345 
240 


112 
277 
352 


54 
177 
174 


67 
132 

269 

94 

129 
128 
449 


1,300 

907 

3,282 
1,214 
1,305 
2,2b5 
6,784 


64 
147 

272 

86 
122 
110 
346 


144 
61 

362 

143 

173 

171 

900 


82 
36 

189 

93 

92 

107 

549 


97 
152 

lU 

198 

168 


1,702 
1,141 

1,369 

1,560 

1,249 


90 
150 

97 

203 

165 


208 
144 

156 

143 

148 


125 
49 

90 

77 

77 


83 
85 

260 


876 
373 

2i_608 


79 
86 

235 


123 
25 

291 


65 
12 

196 


249 

200 

287 
3.729 


5,629 
1,155 

2,425 

68.584 


161 
185 

306 

3,026 


803 
97 

219 

12,908 


506 
43 

136 

10.397 


129 
131 

486 


1,539 
1,069 

8,799 


116 
117 

445 


190 
101 

1,224 


132 
64 

867 


2,639 
236 
70 
70 
37 
31 
647 

129 

446 


73,764 
3,765 
740 
777 
719 
591 
8,238 

1,240 

7,130 


2,013 
213 
64 
71 
35 
28 
612 

136 

431 


11,403 
517 
94 
76 
96 
61 
661 

82 

801 


9,195 
366 
62 
53 
90 
43 
688 

53 

619 


274 
56 
32 

124 

252 


6,792 
825 
402 
780 

2,986 


237 
65 
30 

123 

266 


990 

106 

55 

73 

337 


743 
62 
29 
33 

197 


61 
191 

123 

188 

143 

163 

117 

79 

213 


735 
2,251 

845 
2,502 

860 
2,477 
1,339 

857 
2.932 


61 
204 

127 

184 

114 

176 

132 

64 

210 


96 
241 

60 

291 

103 

226 

99 

72 

296 


50 
147 

36 
178 

36 
144 

60 

38 
180 


248 
198 

212 
283 


6,709 
1,421 

1,470 
4,202 


235 
196 

200 
282 


696 
106 

109 
604 


559 
60 

67 

373 


105 

60 

118 

331 


2,674 
935 
593 

3,239 


100 

64 

118 

327 


357 

200 

47 

331 


261 

101 

21 

191 


74 

48 
91 

247 


1,832 
481 
619 

4,014 


76 
46 
66 

239 


172 
81 
45 

442 


119 
43 
18 

299 


105 
226 

131 

195 


2,194 
1,045 

1,104 

1.962 


94 
233 

132 

192 


257 
74 

94 

295 


169 
32 

51 

156 


82 

49 

116 

208 

99 

312 


1,755 
1,255 
1,004 

2,054 

670 

4,328 


79 
43 

117 

214 
105 
301 


226 

146 
70 

225 

45 
550 


144 
108 
47 

144 

29 

335 


96 
99 

495 


1,418 
544 

6,238 


91 
101 

433 


238 
57 

1.0S9 


135 
21 

743 


251 
244 

239 


6,140 
2,098 

2,284 


223 
210 

232 


693 
196 

278 


641 
102 

160 


100 
59 
52 

101 

213 
415 


2,028 

1,073 

666 

561 

2,391 
5,553 


91 

56 

46 

106 

230 

422 


262 

133 

94 

41 

174 

460 


193 
72 
55 
15 

121 

304 


68 
171 

176 

345 


1,171 
1,113 

1,388 

4,263 


64 
168 

179 

301 


176 
102 

137 

330 


113 
47 

88 

£35 


67 

60 

218 

1,716 


1,201 
1,485 
1,577 

27,566 


70 

61 

170 

1,519 


106 
124 
100 

4,076 


77 
96 
62 

3.019 


145 
270 

174 


4,312 
1,241 

1.652 


145 
277 

162 


366 
74 

140 


270 
34 

70 


1,127 

65 

524 

177 

1,272 


23,457 

780 

3,329 

1,785 

22.373 


952 

64 

603 

172 

1,190 


3,554 

94 

428 

164 

3.473 


2,716 

S3 

246 

115 

2,665 


65 
109 

387 


1,055 
597 

7.058 


65 
117 

382 


118 
22 

976 


61 
9 

650 


274 
113 

239 


6,148 
910 

2.713 


265 
117 

258 


915 
60 

200 


618 
32 

140 


1,011 
261 

600 


21,425 
948 

7.011 


936 
265 

491 


3,361 
112 

610 


2,624 

41 

563 


76 
163 

241 

306 


1,410 
1,303 

2,833 

3.879 


82 
176 

245 

274 


120 
60 

290 

439 


93 
47 

158 

321 


257 
243 

151 

144 

267 


5,448 
1,563 

2,135 

1,815 

3,722 


242 
249 

144 

148 
266 


651 
159 

298 

196 

399 


457 
106 

140 

118 

251 


62 

59 

185 

566 


1,202 
1,669 
1,108 

10,173 


50 

61 

173 

497 


163 

174 
112 

1,216 


106 

150 

66 

859 


112 
155 


2,126 
1,596 


108 
158 


272 
127 


186 
65 


350 

57 

159 


8,295 
975 
903 


294 

46 

158 


1,031 
94 
91 


756 
59 
44 


(he B.r^.^ t Cen.u. ." R<t..l Volume lit. 


of usinc 
enlitred ' 


County and L 


ly Summoj 


rober of wa 


ployMS inci 
ul the Cen, 


ui ol Amci.can Buimeil ol 1933. .vaiUble in m 


Comp.r.kl 
0,1 librxi 


Area ligure. 


fo, 1933 


were publi 


hed by 



Vol. II - Page 14 



Census of Business 
Retail DistribuUon: 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SAl.F.S, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 




















AR120NA 












County and city 


Number 

o( 
•tore. 


Solo 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees" 


It 

Total Ij 
Pw ""'I* ' County and city 

'•" °"' i! 


Number 

oi 

■tores 


Sales 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
prietort 


Em- 
ployee." 


Total 
P» Roll" 

(ad.1 OOO) 


ALABAMA. (continuM) 












Coconinc Comity: 

71as3taff (Pop. 3,891) 


202 


$ 5,698 


168 


573 


t 593 


88 


3.997 


74 


351 


413 


Randolph County: 


208 


IE. 189 


220 


179 


1 124 


Remainder of County 


114 


1.701 


94 


222 


180 


Roanoke (Pop. 4,373) 


93 


1,449 


98 


133 


100 


Remainder of County 


115 


740 


122 


46 


24 


Gila County: 

Miami (Pop. 7,693) 


256 


4,879 


245 


485 


410 


64 


1,155 


56 


141 


106 


RuBBeU County: 

Phenii City (Pop. 13,862) 


274 


2.492 


278 


262 


139 


Olobo (pop. 7,157) 
Remainder c?f County 


101 
91 


2.638 
1.086 


101 
88 


249 
95 


234 
70 


158 


1,536 


157 


177 


106 


Eamainder of County 


US 


956 


121 


85 


33 


























Graham County 


137 


2.478 


138 


241 


ao 


St. Clair County 


210 


2.439 


197 


161 


128 


























Greenlee County 


56 


670 


59 


64 


55 


Shelby County 


224 


2,326 


233 


256 


159 
















145 


1.789 


140 


197 


111 


Uarioope Count;': 

Phoenii (Pop. 48,118) 


1.994 


49.301 


1,839 


5,864 


5,638 


Sumter County 


1,033 


35.234 


894 


4,459 


4,509 














Mean (Pop. 3,711) 


95 


2.619 


93 


278 


242 


TallaJega County: 

Talladesa {Pop. 7,596) 


338 


5.869 


314 


741 


485 


Glandale (Pop. 3,665) 
Remainder of County 


70 
796 


1.655 
9.793 


61 
791 


156 
971 


151 
736 


101 


2,639 


93 


337 


222 


SylQCQUga (Pop. 4,115) 


115 


2,265 


105 


291 


195 














Remainder of County 


122 


965 


116 


113 


68 


I^have Couilty 


121 


2.938 


117 


230 


262 


Tallapoosa County: 

Alexander City (Pop. 4,519) 


271 


3,612 


275 


396 


252 


Navajo County; 

Wlnalow (Pop. 3,917) 


226 


4,948 


211 


388 


406 


89 


1,991 


88 


230 


158 


82 


2,362 


73 


211 


244 


Hemainder of Comity 


132 


1,621 


187 


166 


94 


Remainder of County 


144 


2,586 


138 


177 


162 


TuBcaloosa Coucty: 

'I\iacaloo8a {Pop. 20,659) 


462 


9.332 


451 


1,189 


873 


Pima County: 

Tucoon (Pop. 32.506) 


624 


18,802 


589 


2.159 


2.031 


284 


7,960 


270 


1,094 


822 


496 


16,896 


451 


1,986 


1,866 


Remainder of County 


178 


1,372 


131 


95 


51 


Remainder of County 


128 


1,906 


138 


173 


165 


Walker County: 

Jasper {Pop. 5,313) 


391 


5.948 


373 


575 


472 


Pinal County 


288 


3,205 


297 


Sll 


257 


108 


2,706 


109 


297 


246 


Carbon Hill {Pop. 2,519) 


37 
246 


535 
2,707 


35 
229 


53 
225 


39 
187 


Santa Cruz County: 

Nogaloa (Pop. 6.006) 


132 


2,468 


125 


292 


as 


Remainder of County 


106 


2,205 


97 


272 


196 














Remainder of County 


26 


263 


28 


20 


19 


Waahlngton County 


108 


747 


99 


74 


40 
















163 


1,299 


165 


132 


84 


Yavapai County: 

Prasoott (Pop. 5.517) 


406 


8.903 


404 


913 


922 


Wllcoi County 


150 


5,170 


142 


535 


587 














Jerome (Pop, 4,932) 


50 


829 


56 


75 


65 


Winston County 


103 


1,320 


105 


145 


73 


Remainder of County 


206 


2,904 


206 


303 


270 


ARIZONA 


5,214 


121,083 


4,904 


13,156 


12,530 


Yuma County: 

Yteia (Pop. 4.892) 
Remainder of County 


271 


6,130 


249 


566 


532 


106 
165 


4,518 
1,612 


84 
165 


406 
160 


407 
125 












j^ache County 


97 


1,584 


74 


137 


116 














Cochiae Co'inty: 


404 


9,079 


389 


933 


883 














Douglas (Pop. 9,828) 


134 


3,849 


125 


378 


373 


Bisbee (Pop. 8,023) 


62 


2,432 


57 


218 


220 














Remainder of County 


208 


3,398 


207 


337 


290 
















ol uninc 


orpoi'tcd busin 


e,.ci Nur 


nbci ol employrc, include, iull-lime and parl-lime 1 combined ] NOTE: 


Comparab 


e Aiea (igure 


• lo, 1933 weic pobl.died by ] 


the Buteau oi ihe Cei,*u* ,n Retail Volum* 111, 


eniitlcd 


County and C 


ty Huauna 


im". part of the Ceniua ol American Buuneu ol 1933. available in m 


o*l libraii 





























Vol. U - 


Page .15 


Census of BusineM 
Ri!tail Dislribulion: 1935 


TABLE 


U,-- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF ARKANSAS 


County and city 


Number 

ol 
■tore* 


Sale* 
(add 000) 


Pro. 
prielon 


Em 
ployecs" 


Total 
P.I Roll* 
{^ CK»! 


County and city 


Number 

oi 

■tores 


Sales 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em 
ployccs" 


Total 

P«y Roll' 
(..u ooo) 


atTATK TOTAL 

Arkansaa Coxmty: 

Stuttsart (Pop. 4,9S7) 
Raoalnder of County 

Aahley County: 

CroBBBtt (Pop. 2,811) 
Remainder of County 

Baxter County 

Benton County: 

Rogers (Pop. 3,554) 
RflBnainder -of County 

Boone County: 

Harrlaon (Pop. 3,686) 
Rconalnder of County 

Bradley County: 

Warren (Pop. 2,583) 
Ranainder of County 

Calhoun County 

Carroll County 

Chicot County: 

Delmott (Pop. 2,942) 
Remainder of County 

Clark County: 

Arkadolphla (Pop. 3,380) 
Ramalnder of County 

Clay County 

Cleburne County 

Cleveland County 

Columbia County: 

Magnolia (Pop. 3,008) 
Ronalnder of County 

Conway County: 

Uorrilton (Pop. 4,043) 
Remainder of County 

Craighead County: 

Jonesboro (Pop. 10,3^6) 
Ranainder of County 

Crawford County: 

Tan Buren (Pop. 5,188) 
Reonainder of County 

Crittenden County 

Cross County: 

»ynne (Pop. 3,505) 
Remainder of County 

Dallas County: 

Fordyco (Pop. 3,206) 
Reoiainder of County 

Deehe County: 

UcGehee (Pop. 3,488) 
Rflc^nder of County 

Drew County: 

kontlceUo (Pop. 3,076) 
Honainder of County 

FauUcner County: 

Conway (Pop. 5,534) 
RsDjainder of County 

Franklin County 

Fulton County 

Garland County: 

Hot Springs (Pop. 20,838) 
Remainder of County 

Grant County 

Greene Coxinty: 

Paragould (Pop. 5,966) 
Remainder of County 


IS^ZSi. 


«240.724 


19, m 


%.o«« 


♦19.427 


Hrapetead County: 
Hope (Pop. 6,008) 
Remainder of County 

Hot ?-;':ng County: 

!■■■ urn (Pop. 5,115) 
Kr LfllBd-sr of Co'inty 

'■iOWTird County 

Independence County: 

BatesTille (Pop. 4)484) 
Beraainder of Coiiaty 

Izard County 

Jackson County: 

Newport (Pop. 4,547) 
Remainder of County 

Jefferson County: 

Pine Bluff (Pop. 20,760) 
Remainder of County 

Jotmson County: 

Olarkerille (Pop. 3,031) 
Remainder of County 

lafayette County: 

Stanps (Pop. 8,705) 
Remainder of County 

lawrence Coiinty 

Lee County: 

Marianne (Pop. 4,314) 
Remainder of County 

Lincoln County 

Little RiTer County 

Logan County: 

Paris (Pop. 3,834) 
Remainder of County 

Lonoke County 

UadlBon County 

Marlon County 

Mlller.County: 

Teiarkana (Pop. 10,764)1/ 
Remainder of County 

Uissiaslppi County: 

. BlytherlllB (Pop. 10,098) 
OscBola (Pop. 8,573) 
Remainder of County 

Monroe County: 

Brinkley (Pop. 3,046) 
Remainder of County 

Montgomery County 

Vevada County: 

Prescott (Pop. 3,033) 
Remainder of County 

Hewton County 

Ouachita County: 

Caiaden (Pop. 7,873) 
Remainder of County 

Perry Cotmty 

Phillips- County: 

Helena (Pop. 8,316) 
Wast Helena (Fop. 4,489) 
Remainder of County 

Pike County 

Poinsett County: 

Trumann (Pop. 8,995) 
Remainder of County 

Polk County: 

Mens (Pop. 3,118) 
Remainder of County 


848 


t 3.542 


874 


367 


t263 


271 


4.860 


856 


463 


362 


140 
108 

174 


2,960 
592 

1.536 


157 
117 

183 


324 
43 

176 


845 
18 

97 


107 
164 

171 


8,365 

1,895 

8.648 


100 

156 

168 


259 
204 

839 


£82 

140 

161 


98 
76 

130 

216 


1,217 
319 

1,896 

2.678 


101 
88 

134 

813 


161 
16 

179 

281 


98 
5 

124 

196 


10 
161 

182 

537 


681 
1,967 

693 

4.490 


8 
160 

US 

556 


69 
170 

62 

541 


73 
8B 

31 

288 


106 
110 

116 

822 


1,944 
734 

659 

2.877 


101 
112 

141 

226 


2-V4 
37 

31 

384 


178 
17 

10 

221 


187 
410 

196 


1,366 
3,125 

8,585 


135 
421 

199 


170 
S71 

274 


115 

173 

804 


95 
101 

109 


2,154 
431 

1.971 


100 
99 

114 


260 

14 

225 


197 
7 

162 


99 
183 

598 


1,728 
1,149 

9,221 


105 
123 

599 


283 
101 

1.264 


163 
68 

932 


52 
57 

52 

824 

199 


1,452 

519 

416 
1,555 
2.334 


53 
61 

50 

244 

199 


188 
43 

42 

14G 

325 


137 
85 

25 

71 
176 


356 
243 

203 


7,606 
1.716 

1.918 


351 
248 

822 


1,106 
169 

188 


836 
96 

110 


112 

91 

136 


1,619 
399 

1.347 


122 
100 

136 


164 
24 

163 


101 
9 

83 


48 
151 

843 


574 

1,760 

3.475 


44 

156 

239 


134 

191 

360 


52 
123 

830 


39 

97 

805 
145 


439 
908 

1,692 

8.082 


38 
98 

207 

142 


62 
101 

183 

232 


31 
52 

104 

166 


98 
151 

844 

185 

74 
179 


2,089 
1,366 

2,396 
946 
741 

2.433 


86 
163 

241 

130 

76 

187 


232 

128 

280 
70 
45 

212 


149 
81 

135 
39 
27 

137 


86 
69 

105 

105 

248 


1,692 
490 

1,026 

1,170 

2.526 


77 
65 

109 

109 

244 


206 
26 

67 

121 

294 


149 
17 

45 

63 

165 


86 
93 

806 


1,575 
858 

1.957 


92 

95 

203 


155 
67 

183 


101 
36 

114 


90 
158 

258 

121 

96 

284 


1,336 
1,191 

3,228 
599 
427 

5.357 


86 

158 

250 

138 

96 

267 


178 
116 

341 
39 
32 

665 


109 
56 

192 
17 
13 

503 


U3 
93 

489 


1,606 
351 

6.272 


108 
95 

470 


172 

11 

740 


108 
6 

583 


883 

266 

885 


4,572 

1,700 

2.334 


800 
270 

284 


6U 

189 

255 


503 
80 

156 


213 
71 

598 


6,016 
341 

10.703 


195 
72 

584 


635 

20 

1,179 


496 

8 

813 


100 
125 

339 

215 


1,889 
1,046 

4,756 

8.789 


94 

130 

313 
814 


166 
89 

461 

263 


109 
46 

362 

158 


201 

72 

385 

161 


4,510 

2,101 
4,092 

1,926 


193 

68 

323 

161 


673 
204 
402 

810 


413 
149 
261 

140 


77 
138 

139 


1,595 
1,194 

1.876 


81 
133 

144 


124 
129 

174 


91 

67 

103 


63 
98 

78 

173 


889 
1,037 

613 

1.642 


61 
100 

82 

172 


130 
80 

38 

190 


83 

67 

80 

126 


66 
73 

181 


1,429 
446 

2.856 


67 
77 

172 


139 

35 

299 


89 
14 

818 


80 

93 

98 
295 


1,283 
369 

370 

4.441 


80 
98 

98 

280 


163 
87 

82 

468 


111 
15 

7 

376 


75 
106 

147 


1,707 
1,149 

1.762 


66 

107 

157 


186 
113 

187 


148 

76 

111 


73 
74 

258 


1,234 
528 

3.159 


78 
79 

856 


154 
33 

311 


98 
13 

209 


146 

149 

62 
405 


3,835 
1,206 

346 

5.546 


141 
139 

65 

480 


371 
91 

15 

688 


328 
54 

7 

471 


1S3 
119 

149 

105 

617 


2,554 

505 

1,248 

708 

9.304 


130 
126 

146 

109 

588 


281 
30 

164 

56 

1.389 


195 

14 

68 

30 

926 


157 

63 

186 

107 

257 


3,339 

581 

1,626 

850 

3.588 


154 

71 
195 

108 

230 


517 
56 
116 

72 

362 


366 
37 
78 

34 

255 


482 
135 

71 

858 


8,614 
690 

613 

3.044 


454 
134 

69 

273 


1,310 
79 

52 

378 


875 

50 

30 
243 


36 
221 

179 


538 
3,050 

1.877 


33 
197 

181 


69 
293 

178 


36 
219 

99 


161 
97 


2,500 
544 


171 
108 


319 
59 


214 
29 


90 
89 


1,340 
537 


90 
91 


147 
31 


82 
17 


NOTE: Comp«/.ble Arcs figure, fo: 1933 -e-e 


publiihed 


by the Buiea 


of the C 
iaeotponi* 


eoju. in R 
d bu4in«M« 


etui Volum 
Number 


III. enl.tled "County end City Summer.e,". pari 


of the Ce 
.bined). 


n,u* of Airier 
1/ P«t in T 


cBfl Buiin 


.*■ of 1933 


, svaiUble 



Vol. U - Page 16 



Census of Buaineas 
Retail Distribution: 



TABLE 11,- STORES, SALES. PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF ARKANSAS 



County and city 



Pope County: 

EuasellTllle (Pop. 5,628) 
Remainder of County 

Prairie County 

Pulaski County: 

Little Rock (Pop. 81,679) 
North Little Rock (Rjp. ls,4le) 
ReaalncJer of County 

Randolph County 

St. Francis County: 

Forrest City (Pop. 4,^94) 
Renialnder of County 

Saline County: 

Benton (Pop. 3,445) 
Remainder of County 

Scott County 

Searcy County 

Sebastian County: 

Fort Snlth (Pop. 31,429) 
Remainder of County 

NOTE; Comparable Aiea F,fl,„c. lo, 19 
av-ilable ,n mo.t I,brane» "Pay ,o!l in. 



Number 
ol 



148 
109 



1,994 



1,319 
337 

338 



109 
191 



99 
114 



546 
176 



Sales 

(add 0001 



$ 2.939 



2,235 
704 



38.935 



31,847 
5,196 
1,692 

1,337 

3.53 4 



1,928 
1,606 



1,129 
385 

1.066 

571 

13.651 



12,099 
1,552 



Pro- 

prietore 



139 
120 



1,162 
332 

340 



114 
188 



107 
121 



502 
173 



Em- 
ployees' 



271 
64 



4,631 
704 
191 



245 
183 



120 
29 



1,602 
137 



Total 
Pay Roll* 

( .dd COO ) 



i 216 



183 
35 



3,685 
506 

90 



175 
110 



County and city 



1,281 
70 



published by th> 
) comprnialton for 



propfieiori ot unincorporated busineise*. 



Sevier County: 

De Queen (Pop. 2,938) 
Remainder of County 

Sharp County 

Stone Co'jnty 

Union County : 

a. Dorado (Pop. 16,421) 
SnLackover (Pop. 2,544) 
Remainder of County 

Van Buren County 

Washington County: 

FayetteTille (Pop. 7,394) 
Sprlngdale (Pop. 2,763) 
Remainder of County 

White County: 

Searcy (Pop. 3,387) 
Remainder of County 

V/oodruff County 

Yell County 

III, enlllled "County and C,(y Summar.ei' 
Number of employees inelude, lull-hme ar 



Number 

of 

stores 



72 

70 

107 
49 
618 



313 

58 

247 

111 

494 



176 

86 

232 



363 
81 
302 



Sales 

(add 0001 



tl.229 



794 
435 

716 

283 

9.774 



6,906 

980 

1,888 



6.335 



3,976 
1,153 
1,206 

3,918 



1,645 
2,273 



1,684 



Pro- 
prietor* 



66 

70 

112 

59 

597 



297 

50 

250 



177 
100 
235 



85 
341 



141 
182 



Em 
ployees* 



Total 
Pay Roll' 
(.dd (Mo) 



99 
23 

52 

27 

1.163 



t 72 



60 
12 



25 
10 



690 
120 
163 

33 

746 



919 

719 

97 

103 



516 

133 

97 



480 

360 

76 

44 



176 
218 



213 
169 



241 
139 
102 



ol the Ctriiua ol Americ 
lime (combined/. 



Buiinei* of 1933, 





















Vol. II 


Page 17 


Census or Businew 


TABLE 


11,-- STORES. SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL. BY AREAS 












Retail Distribution: t935 






























STATE OF CALIFORNIA 












County and city 


Nuniber 

ol 

•tore* 


Saia 
(add 0001 


Pro- 
pritton 


Em- 
ployees" 


Total 
P»y Roll* 
(.a. «») 


County and city 


Number 

oi 

•tore* 


Salo 
lldd 000) 


Pro. 
prietors 


Em 
ployee»" 


TotJ 

P«y Roll" 
(•^ ooo) 


JTAIS TUTAf. 


100,874 


»2,329.00< 


95,597 


262,524 


(273.641 


Los Anf^elf^g County: (Continued) 
San F'jrnondo (Pop. 7,567) 


205 


» 4,594 


188 


473 


t 450 












Alameda County: 

Oakland (Pop. SB4,063I 


7,965 


193.690 


7.291 


21.617 


22,43:: 


Lynwood (Pop. 7,323) 
Torrtinco (Fop. 7,271) 


142 
140 


1,637 
2,045 


137 

120 


119 
224 


103 
£04 


5,256 


141,781 


4,775 


16,068 


16,903 


S«rli:elay (Pop. 82,1091 


1,155 


25,636 


1,015 


3,041 


3,080 


San Gabriel (Pop. 7,224) 


138 


1,887 


146 


185 


144 


Alanada (Pop. 35,0331 


390 


8,389 


365 


861 


883 


Maywood (Fop. 6,794) 


135 


1,337 


147 


168 


130 


San Leindrc IPop. 11,455) 


198 


2,808 


186 


260 


236 


Hbwthorne (Pop. 6,596) 


HI 


1,567 


106 


119 


116 


Pladmont (Pop. 9,333) 


7 


332 


4 


39 


58 


l-'ontoTey Park (Fop. 6,406) 


107 


696 


100 


92 


78 


Albany (Pop. 6,569) 


108 


1,488 


107 


112 


112 


Culver City (Pop. 5,669) 


208 


3,647 


199 


444 


457 


Hayvrard (Pop. 5,530) 


192 


5,916 


192 


477 


478 


Kontebello (Pop. 5,498) 


60 


1,128 


71 


103 


92 


LlTanaoro (Pop. 3,119) 


85 


1.531 


80 


123 


135 


ArcadlH (Pop. 6,216) 


70 


1,407 


63 


117 


116 


Ramalndsr of County 


574 


5.809 


567 


636 


547 


Azusu (Pop. 4,808) 


77 


1,174 


52 


105 


116 














Herr-oaa Peach (Pop. 4,796) 


111 


1,549 


102 


145 


138 


Alpine County -=> 


— 


-- 


__ 


— 


-- 


San Liarino (Pop. 3,730) 


30 


756 


26 


59 


pe 














Sierra Ladre (Pop. 3,560) 


43 


616 


43 


61 


57 


Amador County 


137 


2.640 


162 


164 


174 


El Segundo (Pop. 3,503) 


27 


741 


27 


52 


67 














El Koiite (Pop. 3,479) 


112 


2,717 


106 


20B 


210 


Butte County: 

Cliloo (Pop. 7,961) 


580 


13.279 


577 


1,007 


1,082 


Signal Hill (Fop. 2,932) 
La Verne (Pop. 2,860) 


41 
46 


496 
594 


40 
47 


58 
35 


48 
25 


227 


6.943 


217 


559 


614 


OroTllle (Pop. 3,698) 


107 


2,890 


104 


237 


263 


CoTina (Pop. 2,774) 


92 


2,356 


79 


215 


236 


Renal nder of County 


246 


3,446 


256 


211 


205 


Glendore (Pop. 2,761) 


65 


881 


65 


64 


63 














Clarenont (Pop. £,719) 


51 


853 


47 


86 


eo 


CelaToras County 


131 


1.738 


132 


125 


118 


Rer^ainder of County 


4,167 


52,190 


4,138 


5,177 


4,875 


Colusa County 


151 


4.157 


159 


333 


361 


h.ladera County: 

Madera (Pop. 4,665) 


252 


4,329 


262 


369 


376 


148 


3.115 


169 


289 


306 


Contra Costa County: 

Hlehnond (Pop. 20,093) 


1,430 


23.728 


1,477 


2,218 


2,054 


Remainder of County 


104 


1.214 


103 


80 


70 


381 


7.182 


401 


668 


608 


Pittsburg (Pop. 9,610) 
Kartlnez (Pop. 6,569) 


174 
130 


3.351 
3,185 


176 
125 


344 
324 


346 
297 


tiarin County : 

San Rafael (Pop. 8,022) 


598 


11.740 


576 


1,129 


1,226 


222 


6.464 


226 


646 


733 


El Corrlto (Pop. 3,370) 


127 


1.666 


134 


209 


168 


San AnselD.o (Pop. 4,650) 


53 


1.040 


47 


76 


80 


Antloeh (Pop. 3,563) 


73 


1.441 


70 


128 


135 


Kill Volley (Pop. 4,164) 


46 


1,127 


42 


97 


114 


Remainder of County 


545 


6.903 


571 


545 


500 


Sausellto (Pop. 3,667) 


44 


804 


38 


78 


78 














Reneinder of County 


233 


2,315 


223 


233 


221 


Del Norte County 


lie 


1.148 


126 


105 


91 


























V.ariposa County 


56 


1,078 


47 


87 


97 


Eldorado County 


220 


3.428 


201 


286 


315 














yroano County: 

Fresno (Pop. 52,513) 


2,657 


59.049 


2,502 


5,643 


6,105 


i^endocino County: 

Ukiah (Pop. 3,124) 
Fort Bra^e (Pop. 3,022) 


361 


5.675 


371 


469 


442 


96 

57 


2,349 

1,120 


99 
62 


226 

87 


228 

t;9 


1,478 


41.631 


1,314 


4,386 


4,771 


Selma (Pop. 3,0471 


98 


1.969 


99 


124 


132 


Remainder of County 


198 


2,106 


210 


156 


125 


Sanger (Pop. 2,967) 


82 


1.850 


82 


133 


130 














Coallnga (Pop. 2,851) 
Reedley (Pop. 2,589) 


85 
102 


2.509 
1.818 


71 
98 


220 
118 


237 
143 


Merced County: 

hiereed (Pop. 7.066) 


567 


13.873 


572 


1,105 


1,191 


233 


8,125 


234 


699 


779 


Remainder of Co'jnty 


812 


9,272 


636 


662 


592 


Remainder cf County 


334 


5,748 


338 


406 


412 


Ulenn County 


195 


4,094 


185 


313 


314 


Modoc County 


120 


1,910 


112 


139 


149 


Humboldt Count/: 

Eureia (Pop. 15,752) 


749 


14.662 


763 


1.360 


1,450 


Mono County 


47 


318 


51 


33 


£4 


364 


9.290 


380 


914 


995 


Remainder of County 


385 


5.372 


383 


446 


456 


Monterey County: 

Salinas (Pop. 10.263) 


975 


22.184 


941 


2,066 


2.263 


283 


8,187 


262 


794 


686 


Imperial County: 

Brawley Irop. 10,439} 


799 


19.116 


770 


1.723 


1.866 


Konterey (Pop. 9.141) 
Pacific Grove (Pop. 5,558) 


256 
53 


5.953 
1,602 


259 
49 


524 
206 


569 
209 


211 


4,800 


194 


427 


454 


El Centro (Pop. 8,434) 


210 


7,456 


219 


691 


854 


Remainder cf County 


383 


6,442 


371 


533 


679 


Calexlco (Pop. 6,299) 


98 


3.174 


86 


314 


276 














Remainaer of County 


280 


3,686 


271 


291 


282 


Kapa County: 

Napa (Pop. 6,437) 


350 


7.965 


341 


681 


748 


190 


5,797 


177 


506 


566 


Inyo County 


117 


2.128 


112 


159 


153 


Remaliiler of County 


160 


2,168 


164 


176 


180 


Kem County: 

Bakarsfield (Pop. 26,015) 


1.527 


40.698 


1,400 


3,728 


4.166 


Nevada County: 

Grass Valley (Pop. 3,817) 


263 


6.816 


253 


539 


612 


655 


24.518 


622 


2,366 


2.733 


112 


3,991 


108 


293 


345 


Taft (Pop. 3,442) 


125 


4.306 


121 


358 


450 


Remainder of County 


151 


£,827 


145 


246 


257 


Delano (Pop. 2.632) 


81 


2.227 


74 


176 


183 














Remainder of County 


666 


9,647 


583 


828 


600 


Orange County: 

Santa Ana (Pop. 30,322) 


2.124 


38.208 


2,056 


3,920 


3.674 


597 


15,717 


544 


1,6C5 


1.638 


Kings Cour.tj': 

Eanford (Fop. 7,028) 


406 


10.612 


382 


889 


960 


Anaheim (lop. 10,995) 
Fullerton (Pop. 10,860) 


213 
192 


5,118 
4,251 


£07 
175 


541 
389 


486 
419 


183 


6,018 


167 


574 


612 


Remainder of Coiinty 


223 


4,594 


215 


316 


34S 


Orange (Pop. 6,066) 


141 


2.248 


150 


240 


186 














Huntington Beach (Pop. 3,690) 


86 


1,197 


84 


111 


83 


Lake County 


178 


2,236 


182 


207 


177 


Hemfllnder of County 


895 


9,677 


695 


974 


662 


Lassen County 


150 


4.158 


153 


318 


347 


Placer County: 

Hoseville (Pop. 6,425) 


440 


8.462 


441 


701 


724 


115 


2,670 


115 


231 


216 


Loa Angeles County: 

Los Angelee (Pop. 1,240,359/ 


41.C39 


939.409 


37,405 


116,445 


117,346 


Auburn (Pop. 2,661) 
Reraalnder of County 


92 
233 


2,796 
2,996 


83 
243 


238 
232 


276 
232 


23,471 


593.902 


21,089 


79,931 


80,965 


Long &at,ch Uop. 142,032) 


3,054 


63.181 


2,841 


7,163 


7,201 














Pasadena (Pop. 76,086) 


1,566 


45.003 


1,243 


5,336 


5,590 


Plumas County 


151 


2,347 


163 


£23 


238 


Glendale (Pop. 62,736) 


1,148 


28,313 


1,063 


2,950 


2,979 














Santa Moclce (Pop. 37,146) 
BelTeder* (Pop. 33,023) 


982 

377 


19,376 
4,685 


904 
368 


2,194 
464 


2,066 
396 


Riverside County: 

Riverside (Pop. £9,696) 


1.471 


29,948 


1,455 


2,921 


2.906 


429 


14,212 


408 


1,427 


1,516 


AUiaEbra (Pop. 29,472) 


491 


14,353 


422 


1,407 


1,479 


Corona (Pop. 7,018) 


120 


1,990 


125 


171 


167 


Euntlneton Farlt (Pop. 24,591) 


539 


15,727 


495 


1,622 


1,61!S 


Banning (Pop. 2,752) 


83 


1,819 


61 


152 


163 


Pomona (Pop. 20,804) 


406 


9,429 


387 


96S 


969 


Remainder of County 


639 


11.927 


841 


1,161 


1,060 


South Gate (Fop. 19,632) 


286 


4,283 


280 


397 


347 














In^lewood (Pop. 19,480) 
Beverly Hills (Pop. 17,429) 


414 
380 


8,546 
15,675 


370 
298 


860 
1,774 


842 
1,998 


Sacrantnto County: 

SacraEento (Pop. 93,750) 


2.468 


61.752 


2,492 


6.472 


7,178 


1,668 


54.816 


1,852 


5,901 


6,662 


Burbani (Pop. 16,662) 


252 


4.743 


S^ 


449 


463 


Remainder of County 


600 


6,937 


640 


671 


516 


Gerdena (Pop. 15,969) 


139 


1.827 


130 


153 


)27 














iblttier (Fop. 14,822) 
South Fasedena (Pop. 13,730) 


274 
152 


7.534 
3,123 


247 
146 


744 
327 


665 
320 


San Benito County: 

Hollister (Pop. 3,757) 


143 


2.796 


161 


227 


250 


104 


2,556 


110 


218 


242 


Compton (Pop. 12,516) 


250 


4,673 


235 


405 


380 


Remainder of County 


39 


240 


41 


9 


e 


SiinpoTle (Pop. 10,890) 


203 


3,974 


188 


404 


337 














Redondo Beach (Pop. 9,347) 


252 


3.179 


234 


326 


296 














Bell (Pop. 7,884) 


185 


2.616 


184 


242 


209 













*- Pay toll includei no compeiualion Idt pTopnelori of unincorpocaied butincMc* N 
the BuT«au ol Ihe Cenfua in Retail Volume 111. enhiled "County and City Summatie 
(or Amadot County lo avoid diidoiuie. 



ci luM-limr arid parl-li 
Ametiean Buiincts ol 



led), NO I tr Comparable Area liguiei I 
liable in moil librariei, 1/ Data for 2 



1933 were publiihed by 
icluded in ligurci 



Vol. 11 - Page 18 



Cenaus of Business 
Retail Dbtribution; 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SALF.S, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 


















STATE OF CALIFORNL\ 












County and city 


Number 

of 

store* 


S>1« 
(add 000) 


Pro. 
piietois 


EtTt. 

ployees" 


ToU 

Pay RoU* 

(.-J 000) 


Cotmty and city 


Number 
of 

stores 


Sales 
(add 000) 


Pro- 
piietors 


Em- 
ployees' 


Tout 

Pay Roll* 

iM 000) 


San Bernardino County; 

San Bernardino (Pop. 37,4ai) 


2.471 


$ 46.422 


2.344 


4.737 


» 4.639 


Shasta County: 

Redding (Pop. 4,168) 


282 


t 6.482 


272 


545 


t 664 


786 


20,352 


729 


2,209 


2,166 


160 


5,394 


151 


469 


592 


Redlands (Pop. 14,177) 


231 


5,190 


204 


549 


543 


Remainder of Cotmty 


122 


1,088 


121 


76 


72 


Ontario (Pop. 13,583) 


221 


6,061 


204 


551 


616 














Colton (Pop. 8,014) 


107 


1,524 


107 


149 


118 


Sierra Cotinty 


49 


674 


46 


42 


39 


Upland (Pop. 4,713) 


80 


1,647 


73 


164 


148 














Needles (Pop. 3,144) 
CMno (Pop. 3,118) 


49 
49 


1,545 
548 


49 
44 


143 
83 


137 
33 


Slalclyou Cotinty: 

Dtmeanulr (Pop. 2,610) 


380 


7.733 


368 


691 


716 


64 


1,362 


55 


133 


130 


Remainder of County 


948 


9,655 


934 


889 


779 


Remainder of County 


316 


6,381 


313 


558 


586 


San Diego County: 

San Diego (Pop. 147,995) 


4.303 


94.069 


4.104 


10,404 


10,752 


Solano Cotinty: 

Valleio (Pop. 14,476) 


642 


13.389 


629 


1.290 


1.403 


3,107 


75,549 


2,966 


8,836 


9,191 


332 


8,618 


319 


851 


987 


National City (Pop. 7,301) 


112 


2,067 


98 


150 


165 


Benicia (Pop. 2,913) 


35 


398 


36 


32 


27 


Coronado (Pop. 5,4£5) 


77 


1,875 


61 


191 


210 


Remainder of County 


275 


4,373 


274 


407 


389 


Chule Vlste (Pop. 3,869) 


66 


1,681 


67 


121 


142 














Cceanside (Pop. 3,508) 
Escondido (Pop. 3,421) 


120 
121 


1,810 
2,511 


122 
106 


165 
225 


164 
226 


Sonomn County: 

Santa Rose (Pop. 10,636) 


1.298 


26.983 


1.337 


2,171 


2,174 


364 


10,639 


398 


911 


953 


La Mesa (Pop. 2,513) 


60 


1,016 


55 


78 


79 


Petaluma (Pop. 8,246) 


242 


7,008 


£41 


592 


602 


Remainder of County 


640 


7,560 


630 


638 


575 


Remainder of Cotinty 


692 


9,336 


698 


668 


619 


San Frencisco County: 

San Francisco (Pop. 634,394) 


10,251 


298,371 


10,271 


39,020 


43,541 


Stanislaus County: 

Modesto (Pop. 13,842) 


986 


26.317 


910 


2.202 


2,362 












427 


15,304 


402 


1,357 


1,520 


( coextensive with 












Turlock (Pop. 4,276) 


146 


4,183 


127 


310 


332 


San Francisco County) 


10,251 


£98,371 


10,271 


39,020 


43 , 541 


Remainder of County 


413 


6,830 


381 


535 


610 


San Joaquin Comity: 

Stockton (Pop. 47,963} 


1.795 


44,284 


1.882 


4.250 


4,747 


Sutter County: 

Yube City (Pop. 3,606) 


174 


2.531 


160 


180 


164 


1,112 


33,092 


1,192 


3,262 


3,749 


73 


1,448 


59 


118 


126 


Lodi (Pop. 6,788) 


188 


4,626 


196 


372 


400 


Remainder of County 


101 


1,083 


101 


62 


58 


Tracy (Pop. 3,829) 


113 


2,321 


100 


260 


277 














Remainder of County 


382 


4,345 


394 


356 


321 


Tehama County: 

Red Bluff (Pop. 3,517) 


267 


4,639 


266 


411 


437 


102 


2,845 


96 


245 


306 


San Luis Obispo County: 

San Luis Obispo (Pop. 8,276) 


638 


11.335 


559 


1,028 


1.052 


Remainder of County 


165 


1,794 


170 


166 


131 


238 


5,992 


200 


671 


610 


Paso Sobles (Pop. 2,573) 


98 


2,611 


85 


230 


254 


Trinity County 


57 


727 


62 


53 


■ 53 


Remainder of County 


302 


2,732 


274 


227 


188 














San t!ateo County: 

San l^teo (Pop. 13,444) 


1.371 


24,513 


1,369 


2,395 


2,474 


Tulare County: 

Tisalla (Pop. 7,263) 
Tularf (Pop. 6,207) 


1.066 


£4,446 


1,014 


2,102 


£,192 


216 
160 


5,879 
5,220 


206 
145 


520 
520 


560 
630 


222 


4,807 


218 


563 


562 


Burlingame (Pop. 13,270) 


197 


6,995 


178 


641 


731 


PorterviUe (Pop. 5,303) 


138 


4,790 


129 


403 


432 


Redwood City (Pop. 8,962) 


207 


4,420 


200 


443 


449 


Lindsay (Pop. 3,878) 


78 


£,142 


74 


154 


182 


Daly City (Pop. 7,838) 


122 


1,668 


133 


109 


140 


Dinuba (Pop. 2,968) 


86 


1,841 


82 


143 


134 


South San Francisco (Pop. 6,193) 


108 


1,530 


117 


166 


152 


Eieter (Pop. 2,686) 


71 


1,476 


65 


138 


153 


San Bruno (Pop. 3,610) 


45 


738 


43 


81 


81 


Remaiuder of County 


317 


3,098 


313 


224 


£01 


Remainder of County 


470 


4,355 


480 


392 


359 


























Tuolumne County 


191 


3,596 


197 


300 


346 


Santb Barbara County: 

Santa Btrbara (Pop. 33,613) 
Santa Marie (Pop. 7.057) 


1.126 


29.841 


1.034 


3,204 


3,562 


Ventura County: 

San Buenaventura (Pop. 11,603 


937 


19.782 


881 


1.877 


1,999 


692 
139 


20,194 
5,019 


624 

119 


2,334 
473 


2,657 
496 


312 


8,416 


284 


881 


922 


Lonjpoc (Pop. 2,845) 


46 


1,420 


40 


130 


130 


Santa Paula (Pop. 7,452) 


137 


3,179 


126 


286 


333 


Remainder of County 


249 


3,203 


251 


267 


279 


Oxmrd (Pop. 6,285) 


169 


3,941 


158 


337 


404 














Fillmore (Pop. 2,893) 


53 


1,438 


45 


115 


117 


Santa Clara County: 

San Jose (Pop. 57,651) 


2.220 


51.542 


2.169 


5.142 


5,776 


Remelnder of County 


266 


2,808 


268 


259 


223 


1,056 


31,049 


1,024 


3,279 


3,760 


Palo Alto (Pop. 13,652) 
Santa Clara (Pop. 6,302) 


246 

88 


6,053 
1,321 


228 
86 


832 
133 


1,016 
126 


Yolo County: 

Woodland (Pop. 5,542) 


346 


7,613 


370 


600 


634 


124 


4,670 


140 


377 


422 


Willow Glen (Pop. 4,167) 


27 


350 


31 


18 


19 


Renelnder of County 


221 


£,943 


230 


223 


212 


Gilroy (Pop. 3,502) 


92 


2,017 


82 


148 


155 














Mountain View (Pop. 3,308) 
Los Getoe (Pop. 3,168) 


80 
83 


1,773 
1,451 


88 
77 


107 
127 


128 

121 


Yube County; 

Marysville (Pop. 5,763) 


324 


9.047 


331 


766 


899 


230 


8,229 


231 


712 


847 


Sunnyvale (Pop, 3,094) 


65 


902 


66 


55 


66 


Remainder of County 


94 


818 


100 


53 


52 


Remainder of County 


483 


4,626 


487 


443 


384 














Santa Cruz County: 

Santa Cruz (Pop. 14,395) 


767 


15.401 


759 


1.404 


1.489 














329 


7,201 


331 


729 


746 


iKatEonvllle (Pop. 8,344) 


244 


6,482 


235 


575 


644 














Remainder of County 


194 


1,718 


193 


100 


99 














• - P«y roll include* no compentation for prop 


leiori of 


unineorporaied 




Number o 


1 employee 


include, lull-tlma and part-lime 1 combined 1 NO 


rE: Com 


parable Area 


sure, lor 


1933 were 


publiahed 


by the Buteatj of tnc Ceaaut in Retsil Volum 


Iff. enti 


led County an 


d Clly Soi 




art of the 




n moit li 


Ixaiiea- 









Vol. U - Page 19 



Cenaui of ButincH 
Relul Diatributian: 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 




















STATE OF COLORADO 












County and city 


Number 

oi 

■tors 


Sala 

(>(ld 0001 


Pro- 
piieton 


Em- 
ployee*' 


Total 
Pa? Roll* 
(.dd ooo) 


County and city 


Number 

ot 

fttore* 


Salea 
(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietort 


Em- 
ployed* 


Total 

Pay Roll* 
(«u ooo) 


STAK TOUL 


li.t73 


♦302.569 


13,231 


34, 0*9 


$29,971 


Lake County: 

Loadvlllo (Pop. 3,771) 


96 


♦ 1.671 


90 


183 


1 167 












74 


1,413 


71 


165 


140 


Adasm County: 


£E3 


£,718 


E£5 


£16 


21£ 


Remainder of County 


£2 


258 


19 


28 


£7 


Brighton (Pop. 3,394) 


61 


1,£50 


57 


101 


114 














Ramaljider of County 


16£ 


1,468 


168 


115 


98 


La Plata County: 

Durango (Pop. 5,400) 


153 


3,200 


148 


345 


31E 


HE 


2,732 


104 


JoS 


283 


AlaiaosB Coxinty: 

Alamcsa (Jop. 5,107) 


144 


3,356 


136 


396 


29£ 


Remainder of County 


41 


468 


44 


42 


29 


1££ 


3,181 


11£ 


381 


284 


Bamalnder of Cowty 


££ 


175 


£4 


15 


8 


Larimer County: 

Fort Collins (Pop. 11,489) 


496 


9.670 


455 


970 


787 


197 


6,031 


168 


620 


629 


Arapaboe County: 

Inglawood (Fop. 7,980) 


£56 


4,087 


£43 


330 


276 


Loveland (Pop. 5,506) 
Remainder of County 


118 

180 


2,074 
1,565 


115 
172 


210 

140 


160 
98 


llE 


2,270 


104 


187 


158 


Ramalnder of County 


144 


1,817 


139 


143 


118 














Archuleta County 


SS 


529 


25 


48 


40 


Las Animas County: 

Trinidad (Pop. 11,732) 


314 


6,259 


304 


701 


669 


175 


4,836 


171 


570 


484 














Ramalnder of County 


139 


1,4£4 


133 


131 


85 


Baoa County 


1S6 


1,388 


132 


124 


86 


























Lincoln County 


138 


1,418 


141 


117 


9£ 


Bant County: 

Las Animas (?op. £,517) 
Ramaladar of County 


9£ 


1,366 


93 


148 


117 


Logan County; 

Sterling (Pop. 7,195) 


£53 


6,1E5 


2£4 


543 


474 


61 
31 


1,184 
182 


57 
36 


135 
13 


107 
10 


160 


5,150 


134 


469 


4£4 














Remainder of County 


103 


976 


90 


74 


50 


Boulder County: 

Boulder (Pop. 11, ££3) 
Lon^ient (Pop. 6,0£9) 


561 


11.170 


535 


1.179 


1,007 


Mesa County: 

Grand Junction (Pop. 10,247) 


372 


8,201 


373 


842 


704 


£48 

11£ 


6,121 
3,177 


227 

104 


670 
315 


608 

261 


209 


6,581 


199 


717 


614 


Banalndor of County 


201 


1,872 


£04 


194 


138 


Remainder of County 


163 


1,620 


174 


125 


90 


Chaffee County: 

Sallda (Pop. 5,065) 


13£ 


2,458 


130 


273 


220 


Mineral County 


18 


189 


£0 


9 


7 


99 


2,113 


99 


£34 


196 


Remainder of Couaty 


33 


345 


31 


39 


25 


Moffat County 


63 


1,170 


60 


108 


97 


Cheyenne County 


71 


625 


7£ 


59 


32 


Montezuma County 


IOC 


1,593 


96 


143 


105 


Clear Creek County 


54 


1,221 


57 


lie 


93 


Montrose County: 

Kontrose (Pop. 3,566) 


129 


3,371 


107 


319 


308 


86 


2,893 


64 


£81 


278 


Conejos County 


84 


1,046 


85 


76 


62 


Remainder of County 


43 


478 


43 


38 


30 


Costilla County 


59 


453 


62 


22 


18 


Morgan County: 

Port liiorgan (Pop. 4,4£3) 


£39 


4.879 


££0 


462 


408 


80 


£,554 


69 


270 


231 


Crowley County 


75 


935 


65 


63 


68 


Remainder of County 


159 


£,3£5 


151 


212 


177 


Custer County 


£9 


266 


28 


23 


19 


Otero County: 

La Junta (Fop. 7,193) 


317 


6,333 


£73 


666 


547 


131 


3,439 


10£ 


398 


3£5 


Delta County: 

Delta (Pop. E,93e) 


167 


2.753 


156 


248 


206 


Rocky Ford (Pop. 3,4£6) 
Remainder of County 


87 

99 


1,731 
1,163 


79 

9£ 


167 
101 


152 

70 


67 


1,618 


60 


174 


140 


Remainder of County 


100 


1,135 


96 


74 


66 


























Ouray County 


40 


399 


40 


37 


27 


Denver County (coextensive with 
























Denver City) ; 
Denver (Pop. S87,861)i/ 


4,184 


127,497 


3,609 


15,740 


14,873 


Park County 


83 


938 


68 


78 


62 


4,184 


127,497 


3,609 


15,740 


14,873 














Phillips County 


91 


1,410 


86 


106 


82 


Dolores County 


£0 


184 


22 


b 


6 


























Pitkin County 


33 


£87 


31 


30 


21 


Douglas County 


51 


512 


50 


34 


28 














Eagle County 


82 


847 


81 


62 


43 


Prowers County: 

Lemar (Fop. 4,233) 


201 


3.633 


17£ 


403 


315 


107 


£,473 


89 


£80 


237 














Remainder of County 


94 


1,060 


83 


123 


78 


£lbert County 


63 


797 


61 


41 


36 














El Paso County: 

Colorado Springs (Pop. 33, 237)1/ 


839 


16,850 


777 


£.212 


1.958 


Pueblo County : 

Pueblc (Pop. 50,096) 
Remainder of County 


869 


16,607 


813 


2,220 


1,710 


733 
136 


15,776 
731 


683 
130 


2,136 
84 


1,656 
55 


563 


14,944 


506 


2,001 


1,813 


Ramalnder of County 


276 


1,906 


£72 


£11 


145 


























Rio Blanco County 


36 


65£ 


33 


54 


46 


Tranont County: 

Canon City (Pop. 5,938) 
Remainder of County 


274 


4.318 


£63 


471 


417 


Rio Grande County: 

Monte Tista (Pop. £,610) 


140 


£.664 


136 


£67 


235 


122 
152 


2,816 
1,502 


108 
156 


303 
168 


£79 
138 


80 


1,697 


75 


199 


172 














Remainder of County 


60 


957 


61 


88 


63 


Garfield County 


163 


2,565 


155 


£42 


199 


























Routt County 


120 


£,171 


107 


189 


190 


Gilpin CouulQr 


33 


366 


35 


40 


30 


























Saguache County 


86 


769 


9E 


64 


38 


Grand County 


70 


865 


77 


73 


53 


























San Juan County 


£1 


3£3 


£1 


24 


23 


Gunnison County 


88 


1,516 


98 


1£7 


115 


























San Miguel County 


40 


447 


44 


41 


41 


Hinsdale County 


9 


45 


10 





— 


























Sedgwick County 


68 


1,645 


67 


150 


109 


Huerfeno County: 


191 


£.584 


186 


292 


223 


Sunniit County 


£3 


£01 


£4 


15 


11 


lalaenburg (Pop. 5,603) 


135 


1,982 


136 


£27 


17£ 


H«BUilnder of County 


56 


602 


51 


65 


61 


























Teller County 


105 


1,396 


106 


155 


126 


Jackson County 


23 


340 


23 


£9 


28 


























Washington County 


99 


1,131 


115 


91 


63 


Jefferson County 


274 


3,602 


263 


364 


307 














EiowB County 


69 


542 


68 


52 


34 


^7eld Coxinty: 

Greeley (Pop. 1£,203) 


671 


1E.298 


617 


l.EOO 


965 


£1£ 


6,973 


19E 


600 


651 














Remainder of County 


469 


6,325 


4£5 


400 


314 


Kit Carson County 


120 


1,530 


109 


127 


88 


























YuEa County 


179 


2,477 


177 


£16 


155 


NOTE: ComparmbU Axu li<<i,*> ior 1933 ««« 


published 


by Ihe Burea 


ol ihc C 


eniui .i> R 


eta.1 Volum 


t III. enl.tled "County aod Cily Summarie,". pa 


1 o( Ihe 


:eT,.ui ol Ame 


ncan Bui 


ne>. ol 19 


13, 




eoiBp«nM 


tioB for propn 


Mm oJ aa 


incorporalM 




NuoibaT ot ainDloTe«a mclufle* hilLtina and pan 


.Uma {c4> 


^.tead). 1/ 


IHectwi b 


incomptei 





Vol. II - Page 20 



Census of Business 
Retail Distribution: 



TABLE 11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
CONNECTICUT- DELAWARE - DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



County and city 



Number 

of 

stores 



Sales 

ladd 0001 



Pro- 
prietors 



Em- 
ployees" 



__ 



Total 

P«7 Roll' 
(^ 000) 



County and city 



Number 

of 

stores 



Sales 

ladd 0001 



Pro- 
prietors 



Em- 
ployees' 



Total 

P>7 RoU' 
(tM OOO) 



COKKBCTICOT 

Fairfield County: 

Briageport city (Pop. 146,716) 
Stamford city (Pop. 46,346) 
Borwalk city (Pop. 36,019) 
Danbupy city (Pop. 22, £61) 
Shelton city (Pop. 10,113) 
Benainder of County 

Hartford County: 

Hartford city (Pop. 164,072) 
Sair Britain city (Pop. 68,128) 
Bristol city (Pop. 28,451) 
Southlngton borou^ 

(Pop. 5,125) 
ReniaiDdar of County 

Litchfield County: 

Torrlngton city (Pop. 26,040) 
Winatod city (Pop. 7,883) 
Remainder of County 

Ulddlesex County: 

Mlddlotonn city (Pop. 24,554) 
Remainder of County 

New Haven County: 

Now HsTsn city (Pop. 162,655) 
Waterbury city (Pop. 99,902) 
llerlden city (Pop. 38,481) 
Aneonla city (Pop. 19,898) 
Saugatuck borough 

(Pop. 14,315) 
Walllngford borough 

(Pop. 11,170) 
Derby city (Pop. 10,788) 
Remainder of County 



84,464 



>SS6,7a2 



64,335 M6,96e 



6,091 



2,451 
844 

704 

489 

134 

1,469 

5,804 



146,502 



57,030 
21,766 
16,010 
12,823 
1,918 
36,955 

152,352 



4,937 



1,967 

656 
667 
376 
110 
1,261 

4,678 



16,338 



17,722 



7,237 
2,232 
1,627 
1,375 
172 
3,695 

18,085 



7,506 
2,655 
1,829 
1,362 
153 
4,217 

19,296 



2,667 
881 
370 



1,798 
1,053 



376 
131 
546 



88,639 

18,104 

7,882 

1,292 
36,435 

21,823 



2,088 
700 
282 

75 
1,533 



8,349 

2,914 
10,560 

17,009 



297 
113 
473 



11,552 

2,012 

806 

136 
3,577 

2,273 



376 
438 



7,635 



"5794? 

1,355 
630 
309 

206 

242 

240 

1,708 



9,601 
7,408 



156,876 



305 
398 



6,369 



968 

299 

1,006 

1,873 



12,704 

2,019 

802 

132 
3,639 

2,218 



1,203 
670 



19,150 



918 

287 

1,013 

1,926 



71,638 

33,495 

12,975 

4,900 

3,864 

3,659 
3,687 
22,658 



S,379 

1,076 

527 

254 

171 

222 

196 

1,544 



8,94£ 

4,233 

1,402 

501 

434 

409 

472 

2,757 



1,251 
675 



19,334 



5,630 

4,232 

1,337 

446 

377 

317 

414 

2,581 



New London County; 

New London city (Pop. 29,640) 
Norwich city (Pop. 23,021) 
Jowett City (Pop. 4,436) 
Groton borough (Pop. 4,122) 
Renainder of County 

Tolland County; 

RoclcTllle city (Pop. 7,445) 
Stafford Springe borough 

(Pop. 3,492) 
Remainder of County 

Wlndhem County; 

Wllllmantic city (Pop. 12,102) 
Putnam city (Pop. 7,318) 
Danielaon borough (Pop. 4,210} 
Remainder of County 



Kent County: 

Dover (Pop. 4,800) 

JJllford (part) (Pop. l,725)i/ 

Hamalndar of County 

New Castle County: 

Wilmington (Pop. 106,597) 
New Castle (Fop. 4,131) 
Newark (Pop. 3,899) 
Remainder of County 



1,743 



138,989 



4,330 



558 
448 

68 

64 

605 



16,248 

11,446 

1,018 

1,380 

8,897 

6.001 



410 

377 

55 

55 

545 



1,887 

1,395 

94 

148 

806 

510 



► 4,375 



1,311 
82 
180 
763 

489 



83 
190 



907 



1,483 
1,990 



17,170 



73 

199 



284 

183 
112 
328 



4,390 



6,061 
3,661 
2,373 
5,085 



241 

149 



131 
134 



1,776 



424 
262 
422 



149 

118 



1,608 



1557 
373 
241 
357 



8,701 



127 

51 

456 

2,893 



Sussex County: 

Milford (part) (Pop. 
Remainder of County 



,994)1/ 



52 

64 

487 

863 



3,620 

659 

4,522 

56,944 



48,609 

672 

1,691 

5,972 

U,232 



112 

56 

476 

2,463 



1,000 



DISTRICT "T cniniraffl 
(Pop. 486,869) 



53 
810 



6,472 



1,886 
9,346 



330,813 



Tr9i53 

50 

33 

477 

868 



50 
818 



4,815 



~42f 
84 
490 

7,045 



323 

55 

292 

7,002 



6,155 

71 

200 

616 

1,067 
25F 



6,234 

67 

180 

521 

692 
— XIS 



42,069 43,905 



*- Pay roll incluilei no compeMalion lo( proprielor* of unincorporated butincM 
the Bureau ol the Ceniu* in Retail Volume III, entitled "Ci^unty and City Sui 



Number ol employee* include* full-time «nd put-lime (combined) NOTE: Comparable Area liKuie* lot 1933 *r«re pubtiihed b) 
kries", part ol the Centui ol American Bu*ine«* of 1933, availt^le in mo*t hbrarie*. l/ Mitford ii in Kent and SuMCi Coui 





















Vol. II - Pag, 


20 A 


Census oi ButincM 
























Retail DLstfibui.on: 1935 TABLE ll-A—STATE OF CONNECTICUT -STORES. SALES, PERSONNEL. AND 


PAY ROLL. 










FOR COUNTIES AND ALL TOWNS OF MORE THAN 2,500 POPULATION 










County and Town 


Number 

oi 

stores 


Sales 
ladd 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees' 


TotiJ 
p.r Roll- 

(.H 000) 


County and city 


Number 

ol 

stores 


Sale. 

(add 0001 


Pro. 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees' 


ToU 

Pv Roll* 
(.dd ooo) 


STATE T0TAI5 


24.464 


t556.722 


20.205 


64 . 335 


t66.968 


New Haven County: 

AnsoDla tosra (Pop. 19,898) 


7.635 


tl56.e76 


6.369 


19,150 


*19,334 






















Talrfleld County: 

Bethel town {Pop. 3,896) 


6.091 


146,502 


4.937 


16.338 


17.722 


(coextensive wltti 
Ansonla city) 


309 


4,900 


254 


501 


446 


54 


1,399 


48 


182 


180 


Bridgeport town (Pop. 146,716) 












Branford town (Pop. 7,022) 


126 


1.731 


116 


151 


147 


(coextensive with 












Cheahire town (Pop. 3,263) 


43 


852 


37 


98 


104 


Bridgeport city) 


2,451 


67,030 


1,967 


7,237 


7,506 


Darby town (Pop. 10,788) 












Danbury town (Pop. 26,955) 












(coextensive with 












(Includes Danbury city) 


534 


13,082 


423 


1,404 


1,385 


Derby city) 


240 


3,687 


196 


472 


414 


Darien town (Pop, 6,551) 


96 


2,697 


82 


236 


287 


Eaat Haven town (Pop. 7,815) 


91 


1,061 


82 


119 


117 


Fnirfield to-m (Pop. 17,218) 


152 


2,738 


137 


247 


251 


Guilford town (Pop. 3,117) 


100 


927 


101 


116 


98 


Greenwich town (Pop. 33,112) 


405 


14,526 


333 


1,415 


1,707 


Randan town (Pop. 19,020) 


196 


4,271 


169 


525 


655 


New Canaan town (Pop. 5,456) 


85 


3,096 


63 


323 


454 


llarlden town (Pop. 38,461) 












Newtown town {Pop. 2,635) 


45 


756 


40 


85 


65 


(coextensive with 












NorwalK town (Pop. 36,019) 












Meriden city) 


630 


12,975 


527 


1,402 


1,337 


(coextensive with 












Mllford town (Pop. 12,660) 


308 


4,249 


270 


478 


439 


NorwalK city) 


704 


16,010 


567 


1,627 


1,829 


Naugatuck town (Pop. 14,315) 












Sldgefleld town {Pop. 3,580) 


70 


1,264 


62 


142 


136 


(coextensive with 












Shelton town (Pop. 10,113) 












Naugatuck borough) 


206 


3,864 


171 


434 


377 


(coextensive with 












New Haven town (Pop. 162,655) 












Shelton city) 


134 


1,918 


110 


172 


153 


(coextensive with 












Stamford town (Pop. 56,765) 












New Haven city) 


2,945 


71,636 


2,379 


8,942 


9.630 


ilncluaes otami'ord city) 


930 


24,056 


724 


2,448 


2,976 


North Haven town (Pop. 3,730) 


52 


468 


49 


83 


54 


Stratford town {Pop. 19,212) 


198 


3,338 


178 


351 


322 


Seymour town (Pop. 6,890) 


125 


1,711 


105 


196 


168 


'Trumbull town (Pop. 3,624) 


31 


334 


28 


33 


23 


Walllngford town (Pop. 14,278) 












Westport town (Pop. 6,073) 


112 


2,816 


96 


292 


313 


(includes Walllngford 












Remainder of County 


91 


1,442 


79 


144 


130 


borough) 
Waterbury town (Pop. 99,902) 


252 


3,778 


230 


424 


;!34 


Hartford County: 

Berlin town (Pop. 4,875) 


5,804 


162,352 


4,678 


18,085 


19,296 


(coextensive with 
VJaterbury city) 


1,355 


33,495 


1,076 


4,233 


4,232 


64 


930 


61 


95 


85 


Bloomfield town (Pop. 3,247) 


se 


646 


21 


32 


44 


West Haven town (Pop. 25,808) 


323 


4,542 


280 


605 


664 


Bristol town (Pop. 26,451) 












Remainder of Comity 


334 


2,737 


327 


371 


318 


(coextensive with 
























Bristol city) 
Zast Hartford town {Pop. 17,125) 


370 
222 


7,882 
5,866 


282 
179 


806 
516 


802 
617 


New London County: 

East Lyme town (Pop. 2,575) 


1.743 


38,989 


1,442 


4,330 


4,375 


53 


997 


46 


89 


115 


East '.itndsor town (Pop. 3,815) 


37 


572 


34 


43 


46 


Grlswold town (Pop. 6,010) 












Enfield town (Pop. 13,404} 


206 


3,650 


195 


395 


303 


(includes Jewett City) 


75 


1,069 


62 


96 


84 


Parmington town {Pop. 4,543) 


70 


1,019 


63 


91 


98 


Groton town (Pop. 10,770) 












Glastonbury town (Pop. 5,783) 


61 


1,068 


53 


71 


76 


(includes Groton borough) 


112 


2,071 


97 


224 


243 


Hartford to^m (Pop. 164,072) 












Uontville town (Pop. 3,970) 


32 


410 


28 


43 


26 


{coextensive with 












New London toim (Pop. 29,640) 












Hartford city) 


2,667 


86,639 


2,088 


11,552 


12,704 


(coextensive with 












liUmchester •.o'.vn (Pop. 21,973) 


310 


6,596 


267 


739 


658 


New London city) 


558 


16,248 


410 


1,887 


2,049 


New ^rituir. town (Pop. 66,128) 












Norwich town (Pop. 32,438) 












{coextensive with 












(includes Norwich city) 


508 


12,022 


436 


1,441 


1,344 


Mew Britain city) 


881 


18,104 


700 


2,012 


2,019 


Preston town (Pop. 3,928) 


16 


89 


16 


17 


15 


Nexlni»:ton town (Pop. 4,572) 


52 


484 


45 


64 


54 


Sprugue town (Pop. 2,539) 


27 


603 


23 


40 


37 


Plainville town (Top. 5,301} 


81 


1,367 


67 


145 


145 


Stonington town (Pop. 11,025) 


165 


3,212 


142 


281 


273 


Slisbury t.o:-m {Pop. 3,625) 


45 


1,009 


35 


102 


105 


'.Tatarford town (Pop. 4,742) 


56 


528 


55 


48 


39 


So lit inn? tor. town (Pop. 9,237) 












Remainder of County 


141 


1,840 


127 


164 


150 


{inriu::e5 Southington 
























borough) 
South '.■im^or town {Pop. 2,535| 


145 

19 


2,134 

144 


123 
21 


214 
9 


199 
8 


Tolland County: 

I.'.aiisfleld town (Pop. 3,349) 


417 


6.001 


398 


510 


489 


22 


322 


27 


20 


20 


Suffi«3G town (Pop. 4,346) 


42 


683 


38 


64 


67 


Stafford town (Pop. 5,949) 












West Hartford town(Pop. 24,9411 


157 


5,339 


133 


566 


645 


(includes Stafford Springs 












■*'«thersfieid town (Pop. 7,512) 


32 


1,161 


19 


105 


133 


borougli) 


118 


1,726 


106 


151 


165 


Windsor town iPop. 8,29u) 


95 


1,680 


77 


149 


170 


Vernon toiyn (Pop. 8,703) 












Windsor Locks t0¥fr (Pop. 4,073) 


50 


1,009 


33 


119 


128 


(includes Rockville city) 


161 


2,775 


143 


265 


238 


Re.-nalnder of County 


172 


2,370 


154 


196 


190 


Remainder of County 


116 


1,178 


122 


74 


66 


Litcbfiela County: 

Litchfielc toim {Pop. 3,574) 


1,053 


21,823 


883 


2,273 


2,218 


Windliam County: 

Kllllrgly toim (Pop. 8,852) 


907 


17,170 


795 


1.776 


1,608 


45 


1,298 


36 


111 


1.32 












New i:iUord town (Pop. 4,700) 


35 


1,018 


22 


103 


116 


(includes Danielaon borough) 


160 


3,050 


128 


308 


281 


Plymouth town (Pop. 6,070} 


68 


1,202 


58 


99 


90 


Plalnfield town (Pop. 8,027) 


123 


2,481 


114 


238 


206 


Salisbury town (Pop. 2,767) 


21 


554 


16 


60 


55 


Putnam town (Pop. 8,099) 












Thomaston town (Pop. 4,188) 


70 


1,169 


65 


117 


120 


(includOR Putnam city) 


189 


3,764 


154 


440 


386 


Torrington to*-n (Pop. 26,040) 












Thompson town (Pop. 4,999) 


32 


468 


37 


38 


34 


(coertQLS^ve with 












WlndSar. town (Pop. 13,773) 












Torringtcn city) 


376 


8,349 


297 


968 


918 


(Includes •Silllmantlc city) 


301 


6,208 


257 


677 


644 


Watart-own town (Pop: 8,192) 


79 


1,269 


68 


121 


115 


Remainder of County 


102 


1,209 


105 


75 


57 


"Winchester town (Fop. 8,674} 
























(includes Sinsted city) 


139 


2,940 


121 


304 


292 














Remalnaer of County 


220 


4,024 


200 


390 


380 














Uiddlesei County: 

Cromwell town (Pop. 2,814) 


814 


17.009 


703 


1.873 


1,926 














31 


412 


25 


60 


47 


East Hampton town (Pop. 2,616) 


40 


776 


36 


70 


71 














Essex town (Pop. 2,777) 


56 


1,181 


48 


121 


115 














lUddletown town (Pop. 24,554) 
























(coextensive with 
























liiddletown city) 


376 


9,601 


305 


1,203 


1,251 














Portland town (Pop. 3,930) 


54 


1,028 


55 


107 


120 














Eemainder of County 


257 


4,011 


234 


312 


322 
















of uaioc 


OTpentad buain 


.!». N> 


oiber ^ m 


pIoTMa incl 


udea (ull'iime utd pBrt-Um. (combinwl). 

































Voi. II - 


Page 21 


Ceiuut o( Businew 
Retail Diatribution: 1935 


TABLE 


U,-- STORES, SALES. PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF FLORIDA 












County and city 


Number 

oi 
ttore. 


ladd 0001 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em 
ployees" 


ToUl 

P., Ro|]' 
(kdd OOO) 


County and cily 


Number 

o< 

store* 


Sale* 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em 
ployee*" 


Total 
Pm Roll" 
(.dd ooo) 


STATS TOTAL 

Alachua County: 

OalnosTllle (Pop. 10,465) 
Ramainder of County 

Balcsr County 

Bay County : 

Panama City (Pop. 5,402] 
Remainder of County 

Bradford County 

Brovarvi County: 

Melbourne (Pop. 2,677) 
Ramainder of County 

Broward County: 

Port Lauderdale (Pop. B,666) 
Hollywood (Pop. 2,869) 
Pompano (Pop. £,614) 
Ramaiuder of County 

Calhoun County 

Charlotte County 

Citrus County 

Clay County 

Collier County 

Columbia County: 

Lake City (Pop. 4,416) 
Remainder of County 

Dade County: 

lUaml (Pop. 110,637) 
Miami Beach (Pop. 6,494) 
Coral Cables (Pop. 5,697) 
Hialeah (Pop. 2,600) 
Remainder of County 

De Soto County: 

itrcadia (Pop. 4,082) 
Remainder of County 

Dixie County 

Duval County: 

Jacksonville (Pop. 135,146) 
Renalnder of County 

Seeambia County: 

Pensacola (Pop. 31,579) 
Renialader of County 

Flagler County 

Franklin County: 

Apalachicola (Pop. 3,150) 
Renal nder of County 

Gadsden County: 

River Junction (Pop. 5,624) 
^Incy (Pop. 3,788) 

Remainder of County 

Gllchriat County 

jlades County 

Gulf County 

Hamilton County 

Hardee County: 

rfauchula (Pop. 2,574) 
Ramainder of County 

Hendry County 

Hernando County 

Highlands County: 

Avon Park (Pop. 3,355) 
Sebrlne (Pop. 2,912) 
Remainder of County 

HillabOEOugh County: 
Tampa (Pop. 101,161) 
Plant City (Pop. 6,800) 
Remainder of County 


24.330 


J425.807 


21.679 


57,255 


»46.U9 


Holjnaa County 

Indian River County 

Jackson County: 

lilarlanna (Pop. 3,372) 
Remainder of County 

Jefferson County 

Lafayette County 

Lake County: 

Leesburg (Pop. 4,113) 
Euatl3 (Pop. 2,835) 
Remainder of County 

Lee County: 

Fort Klyera (Pop. 9,082) 
Remainder of County 

Leon County: 

Tallahassee (Pop. 10,700) 
Remainder of County 

Levy County 

Liberty County 

lladison County 

Manatee County: 

Bradantown (Pop. 5,986) 
Manatee (Pop. 3,219) 
Palmetto (Pop. 3,043) 
Remainder of County 

Marion County: 

Ocala (Pop. 7,281) 
Remainder of County 

Martin County 

Monroe County: 

Key West (Pop. 12,831) 
Remainder of County 

Nassau County: 

Femandina (Pop. 3,023) 
Remainder of County 

Okaloosa County 

Okeechobee County 

Orange County: 

Orlando (Pop. 27,330) 
ifinter Park (Pop. 3,686) 
Remainder of County 

Osceola County: 

Kissimmee (Pop. 3,163) 
Remainder of County 

Paljn Beach County : 

West Palm Beach (Pop. 26,610) 
Lake Worth (Pop. 5,940) 
Remainder of County 

Pasco County 

Pinellas County: 

St. Petersburg (Pop. 40,425) 
Claai-water (Pop. 7,607) 
Tarpon Springs (Pop. 3,414) 
Reroainder of County 

Polk County: 

Lakeland (Pop. 18,554) 
Winter Haven (Pop. 7,130) 
Bartow (Pop. 5,269) 
Lake ^falos (Pop. 3,401) 
Haines City (Pop. 3.037) 
Remainder of County 

Putnam County: 

Palatka (Pop. 6,500) 
Remainder of County 

St, Johns County: 

St. Augustine (Pop. 12,111) 
Remainder of County 

St. Lucie County: 

Fort Pierce (Pop. 4,803T 
Remainder of County 


106 
126 
307 


t 641 

1,597 
3,635 


101 
110 
286 


89 
226 
341 


t 45 

151 
278 


474 


5.986 


432 


783 


523 


204 
270 

69 

270 


4,139 
1,847 

491 

3.973 


173 
259 

58 

225 


571 
212 

54 

411 


409 

119 

29 

307 


62 
243 

112 

43 

418 


2,090 
1,545 

949 

321 

5,892 


51 
235 

112 

42 

370 


224 
117 

118 

30 

653 


200 
78 

54 

15 

486 


131 
139 

114 

335 


2,983 
990 

1,032 

3.878 


103 
122 

114 

301 


326 
85 

94 

504 


252 
55 

59 

338 


87 
88 
243 

283 


1,752 
1,623 
2,517 

4,487 


69 

68 

233 

250 


233 

167 
253 

576 


167 
152 
167 

430 


82 
253 

415 


1,141 
2,737 

8.177 


74 
227 

374 


155 
349 

1.014 


104 
234 

821 


225 
58 

303 


4,020 
467 

5.448 


191 
59 

283 


533 
43 

722 


395 
35 

531 


173 
77 
45 

120 

79 

79 
79 
89 
65 
212 


4,825 

1,658 

582 

1,112 

592 

895 

816 

658 

678 

2.265 


128 
65 
42 

139 

75 
73 
70 
87 
53 
199 


608 

213 

81 

112 

45 
103 
113 

79 
110 
313 


508 

lai 

51 
81 

32 

84 

69 

43 

83 

190 


245 
58 

160 

48 

138 

339 


5,241 
207 

1,266 

205 

1,794 

5,273 


227 
56 

158 

47 

132 

318 


704 
18 

117 

18 

269 

663 


525 

6 

61 

9 

140 

482 


168 
38 
51 
82 

439 


3,449 
439 
715 
670 

6,701 


144 
40 
52 

as 

400 


468 
43 
91 
61 

813 


357 
30 
62 
33 

561 


141 
71 

3.502 


2,063 
212 

91.400 


129 
70 

2.982 


297 
16 

L2.285 


186 

4 

111491 


204 
235 

94 

178 


5,265 
1,436 

1,296 

2,243 


163 
237 

81 

174 


654 
159 

145 

353 


485 
76 

110 

193 


2,641 

387 

62 

32 

380 

114 


75,326 

8,352 

2,690 

668 

4,364 

1,455 


2,230 

310 

45 

30 

367 

103 


10,113 

1,232 

350 

80 

510 

198 


9,513 
1,193 

306 
71 

408 

137 


166 

12 

143 


2,207 
36 

922 


163 
11 

140 


345 
8 

108 


189 
4 

67 


92 
22 

56 

2.292 


1,297 
158 

954 

52.506 


78 
25 

31 

1.915 


181 
17 

105 

8.236 


128 
9 

66 

6.650 


49 
34 

131 

51 

1,037 


582 
340 

1,085 

495 

20,964 


44 
96 

128 

44 

914 


70 
38 

139 

65 

2.968 


50 
17 

85 

44 

2,469 


1,991 
301 

726 


50,745 
1,761 

13.740 


1,634 
281 

682 


8,027 
209 

1.931 


6,507 
143 

1.405 


488 
238 

48 

109 


11,996 
1,744 

428 

1.086 


450 
232 

43 

88 


1,714 
217 

61 

126 


1,265 
140 

47 

77 


713 

84 

240 

144 


17,613 
1,213 
2,138 

1,396 


608 

66 

240 

144 


2,582 
162 
224 

170 


2,176 
152 
141 

112 


67 
77 

1.201 


801 
595 

24.211 


69 
75 

1.020 


106 
64 

2,965 


70 
42 

2.707 


69 
40 

255 


821 
265 

3.835 


56 
32 

225 


98 
28 

439 


64 

13 

307 


539 
104 
558 

181 

1.350 


15,237 
1,525 
7,449 

1,735 

28.023 


450 
109 
461 

165 

1.231 


2,040 
190 
735 

178 

3.672 


1,883 
149 
675 

113 

3.049 


34 
109 
112 

46 

34 

40 

91 

139 


362 
2,401 
1,072 

415 

450 

201 

806 

1.559 


30 

95 

100 

46 

30 

38 

89 

101 


53 
281 
105 

46 

51 

21 

105 

227 


28 

225 

54 

27 

41 

10 

52 

167 


848 
209 
100 
193 

1.148 


21,108 

4,450 

991 

1,474 

18.090 


745 

201 

90 

195 

1.010 


2,888 
467 
131 
186 

2.343 


2,467 

364 

95 

123 

1.757 


415 
134 
111 
74 
81 
333 

291 


7,286 
2,952 
2,054 
1,641 
1,057 
3,100 

3.255 


375 

109 

90 

61 

70 

305 

261 


969 
368 
247 
234 
149 
376 

388 


712 
305 
190 
197 
105 
248 

296 


81 
58 

70 

76 

159 


1,172 
387 

1,173 

993 

2.221 


48 

53 

59 

71 

142 


185 
42 

119 

122 

254 


143 
24 

115 

73- 

185 


198 
93 

396 


2,517 
748 

3.559 


173 
88 

356 


323 
65 

641 


247 
49 

390 


57 
65 
37 

2.343 


1,128 
926 
167 

41.055 


51 
55 
36 

2.165 


123 

113 

18 

5.705 


82 

95 

8 

4.561 


302 
94 

149 


3,088 
471 

3.357 


266 
90 

110 


579 
62 

391 


358 
32 

317 


1,654 
132 
557 


34,764 
2,675 
3,616 


1,490 
U4 
561 


4,898 
340 
467 


4,056 
251 
254 


134 
15 


3,212 

145 


96 
14 


387 
4 


314 
3 



* P«T roV, include* no compcxMAtioa for proprietor* 
tfa< Bureau of the Ceiuui id Retail Vohime III, 



o^ tuuD£orporkted buwaeite*. Nomber ol 
enlirled "County and Citjr Sununaiiei''. pail 



'•«• inctude* hjll-time and part-lime ( 
the Cenaui of AmencaD Buirnes* of IMS, 



). NOTE: 
oailabl* in 



Comparable Afea (i^ur 
nwMl librarie*. 



> lor 1933 were publithed by 



VoL II - Page 22 



Cenlu* of BuuncM 
Retail Diitiibution: 1935 



TABLE 11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF FLORIDA 



County and city 



Number 

o< 

stores 



Sales 
(add 0001 



Pro. 

prietors 



Em 
ployees' 



Total 
Pm Roll' 

( .da 000 ) 



County and city 



Number 

of 

stores 



Sales 

(add 0001 



Pto- 
pnetors 



Em 
ployees* 



Total 
Piy Roll' 
lud ooo) 



Seata Bosa County 

Saraaota County: 

Saraaota (Pop. 8,398) 
Ramalnder of County 

Seninola County: 

SanfortJ (Pop. 10,100) 
Raoalndar of County 

Suniter County 

Suwannee County: 

Live Oak (Pop. 2,734) 
Renal nd or of County 

Taylor County ; 

Parry (Pop. £.744) 
Remainder of County 



*L,218 



5.037 



i 96 



237 
38 



,848 
189 



213 
60 



626 

37 



521 
14 



208 
116 



178 



3,645 
666 



1,032 



177 
113 



527 
91 



361 
42 



1,394 
417 



195 
40 



115 
16 



Union County 

Voluaia County: 

Daytona Bouch (Pop. 16,598) 
De Land (Pop. 5,246) 
New Snyma (Pop. 4,149) 
Reisalnder of County 

Wakulla County 

.Walton County: 

De Punlak Springs (Pop. £,636 
Remainder of County 

:Weshir^ton County 



14,860 



2,010 



501 
177 
108 
218 



8,618 
3,356 
1,558 
1,328 

275 



435 
148 
105 
222 



1,257 
416 
195 
142 

18 



978 

341 

145 

84 



1,202 
355 



1,016 



180 
42 



110 
21 



1,256 

601 



169 
68 



127 

48 



NOTE: CompusbU A, 
•vkilcbi* in nMfl bbrsrii 



liaufu lor 1933 1 
-Ksy rail includM 



i publithed by lh« Buicau ol tbe 
> comp«asstion lo, propriotori ol v 



; III. enlilled "Count) 
Nuint,«t of omploye* 



■ nd Cily Summaiie," , pail of ihe Cenio* of Al 
include* KilMime and part-lime (combined). 





















Vol. II - 


Page 23 


Census of Business 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 


11, •• STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF GEORGIA 












County and city 


Number 

ol 

•tores 


S«Jes 

(add 0001 


Pro. 
prietora 


Em. 
ployecs* 


Tot.l 
P.r Roll' 

{•d,l 000 ) 


County and city 


Number 

oi 

•tore* 


Salo 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em. 
ployees- 


Total 
Pv Roll* 

(•4d 000) 


3XATB TOTAL 

Appling County 

Atkinson County 

Baoon County 

Baker County 

Baldwin County: 

UlllodgeTiile (Pop. 5,534) 
Remainder of County 

Banks County 

Barrow County: 

Winder {Pop. 3,283) 
Remainder of County 

Bartow County: 

CartersTille {Pop. 5,850) 
Remainder of County 

Ben Hill County: 

Fitzgerald (Pop. 6,418) 
Remainder of County 

Berrien County 

Bibb County; 

Macon (Pop. 53,829) 
Remainder of County 

Bleckley County 

Brantley County 

Brooks County: 

Quitman (Pop. 4.149} 
Remainder of County 

Bryan County 

Bulloch County: 

Statesboro {Pop. 3,996) 
Reinainder of County 

Burke County: 

Waynesboro (Pop. 3,922) 
Remainder of County 

Butts County 

Calhoun County 

Camden County 

Candler County 

Carroll County: 

Carrollton (Pop. 5,052) 
Remainder of County 

Catooaa County 

Charlton County 

Chatham County: 

Savannah (Pop. 85,024) 
Remainder of County 

Chattahoochee County 

Chattooga County: 
Trlon (Pop. 3,289) 
Rensalnder of County 

Cherokee County: 

Canton (Pop. 2,892) 
Remainder of County 

Clarke County: 

Athens (Pop. 18,192) 
Remainder of County 

Clay County 

Clayton County: , 
College Park (yart) (Pop. 283)±^ 
(included la r«aalnder of 
county) 
RamelnQer of County 

Clinch Co'jnty 


3i,310 


♦484.693 


28,626 


66,896 


$46,963 


Cobb County: 

Marietta (Pop. 7.638) 
Remainder of County 

Coffee County: 

Douglas (Pop. 4.206) 
Remainder of County 

Colquitt County: 

Moultrie (Pop. 8.027) 
Remainder of County 

Columbia Cotonty 

Cook County 

Coweta County: 

Newnan (Pop. 6,386) 
Remainder of County 

Crawford County 

Crlap County: 

Cordele (Pop. 6,880) 
Remainder of County 

Dade County 

Dawson County 

Decatur County: 

Balnbrldge (Pop. 6,141) 
Remainder of County 

De Knlb County: g/ 
Atlanta (part) (Pop. 24,743).=' 
Decatur (Pop. 13,276) 
Remainder of County 

Dodge County: 

Eastman (Pop. 3.028) 
Remainder of County 

Dooly Co'anty 

Dougherty County: 

Albany (Pop. 14,507) 
RamaLnder of County 

Dcuglaa County 

Early County 

Echols County 

Effingham County 

Elbert County: 

Elberton (Pop. 4,650) 
Remainder of County 

ananuel County 

Evans County 

Fannin Cotmty 

Fayette Cotmty 

Floyd County: 

Rome (Pop. 21,843) 
Remainder of County 

Forsyth Cotmty 

FrantcUn County 

Fulton County: g/ 
Atlanta (partXPop. 245,623)-^ 
East Point (Pop. 9,512) 
College Park (part) 

(Pop. 6,321) 1/ 
Hapevllle (Pop. 4.284) 
Remainder of County 

Gllmar County 

Glaacock County 

Glynn County: 

Brunswick (Pop. 14.082) 
Remainder of County 

Gordon County 


376 


t 4.605 


367 


587 


^ 363 


187 
64 
80 
S3 

207 


1,487 
413 
768 
187 

2.574 


119 
62 
41 
51 

201 


217 
41 
93 
28 

345 


124 
19 
50 
11 

213 


159 
817 

159 


2.944 
1,661 

2.158 


145 
282 

146 


406 
181 

266 


269 
94 

159 


88 
71 

322 


1,757 
401 

4,430 


75 
71 

289 


209 
57 

591 


138 

21 

332 


192 
130 

77 

136 

373 


3,717 
713 

393 

1,165 

3.646 


158 
131 

79 

134 

385 


495 
96 

49 

133 

529 


297 
35 

80 

71 

269 


127 
80 

64 

154 


2,295 
279 

189 

1,556 


119 
82 

65 

164 


317 
28 

7 

208 


199 
14 

2 

119 


90 
64 

271 


1.243 

313 

3,274 


88 
76 

251 


192 
16 

362 


112 
7 

237 


151 
222 

70 

223 


2,438 
1,208 

266 

2,555 


141 
164 

76 

207 


383 
146 

17 

406 


207 
62 

7 

232 


UE 
159 

198 


2,325 
949 

2,567 


97 
154 

156 


309 

53 

326 


196 
41 

210 


179 
44 

32 

36 
224 


2,412 
143 

289 

114 

2.165 


165 
42 

33 

41 

210 


394 
12 

14 

7 
327 


22S 

4 

7 
3 

164 


164 
34 

121 

1,139 


2,490 
77 

1,492 

21,710 


125 
31 

U2 

1,016 


316 
10 

163 

3,365 


208 
2 

86 

2.526 


912 
227 

94 

52 

115 


20,453 
1,257 

749 

232 

1,297 


783 
233 

89 

50 

87 


3,191 
174 

89 

22 

179 


2,435 
91 

51 

8 

91 


144 
80 

548 


1,755 
410 

8,457 


134 

76 

484 


287 
40 

1.098 


143 
81 

768 


131 
124 
293 

178 


1,771 
3,978 
2,708 

2.134 


120 

95 

269 

169 


281 
493 
324 

836 


163 
407 
188 

160 


67 
48 

52 

235 


1,078 
219 

298 

2,906 


56 
31 

50 

228 


156 
23 

33 

342 


87 
4 

15 

222 


79 
99 

155 

388 


1.550 
584 

1,737 

6.545 


73 

96 

144 
352 


189 

47 

226 
1.012 


131 
29 

105 

651 


116 
119 

313 


2,282 
624 

2,211 


105 
123 

300 


292 
50 

311 


199 
23 

149 


327 
61 

92 

125 

35 

74 

210 


6,171 
374 

966 

1,559 

139 

543 

2.219 


286 
66 

86 

122 

30 

74 

213 


941 
71 

77 

188 

19 

68 

883 


680 

31 

50 

110 

6 

35 
167 


93 
220 

104 

107 

66 

88 

266 


1,076 
1,135 

1,072 
996 
486 
674 

3,419 


80 
220 

103 

108 

48 

79 

273 


167 
144 

127 

116 

71 

101 

392 


82 
67 

78 

67 

30 

51 

224 


106 
104 

306 
80 

135 
78 

523 


1.873 
346 

8,320 

917 

867 

457 

10.678 


99 

114 

305 
71 

137 
75 

445 


259 
24 

245 

101 

91 

37 

1.392 


153 
14 

138 

65 

51 

17 

1.109 


103 
163 

67 

57 

1,559 


2,250 
1,169 

475 

581 

26,434 


97 
176 

72 

51 

1,368 


261 
131 

67 

58 

4,325 


162 
62 

35 

28 

3.132 


1,327 
232 

22 

90 


24,799 
1,635 

256 

2.115 


1,149 
219 

20 

91 


4,001 
324 

30 

206 


2.952 
180 

19 

163 


315 
208 

85 

172 

4,606 


9.865 

1,413 

635 

1,392 

145,379 


239 
206 

81 

169 

3,660 


1.211 
181 

61 

133 

80,645 


990 
119 

37 

69 

17,107 


3 
87 

169 


650 
1,^65 

1.976 


91 

175 


59 
147 

249 


65 
98 

186 


3.708 
187 

74 

54 

649 

66 

74 

388 


135,071 
2,767 

993 

568 

5,980 

414 

443 

4.768 


2.774 
113 

75 

52 

646 

74 

83 

281 


19,889 
388 

149 

93 

792 

28 

28 

754 


16,180 
860 

110 

68 

499 

16 

15 

537 


40 
129 

396 


1.212 
764 

7.757 


38 

137 

338 


183 
66 

1.066 


149 
37 

801 


350 
46 

58 

85 


7.456 
301 

490 

618 


291 
47 

56 

78 


1.031 
35 

63 

76 


782 
19 

37 

43 


85 
71 


618 
639 


78 
69 


76 
57 


43 
32 


266 
62 

171 


4,218 
550 

1,934 


282 

59 

178 


658 
96 

179 


476 
61 

118 


NOTE: Comparable Area figurei loi 1933 wete 
ID moat librartu- * - Pay roll include* no coinpc 


publithcd 
Motion lo 


by the Bureau 
proprietori o 


ol the C 
unincofpc 


etuu. ,„ R< 
r»led bu,in 


ta.1 Vo)ume 
■ue.. Nun. 


III. en'.tled "County and C.ly Summer.e." pott 
bet ol employee* indudei (oil-time «itd' pert.time 


ot the Ce 
combined 




can Buiine 


41 ot 1933 


•veiUbie 



\/ College Paik i> in Cloytop and Fulton Couniie*. 2/ 



in Fulton and Dc Kalb Countic 



Vol. 11 - Page 24 



1 Censui ol Businesj 
Retaa DistnbuUon; 1935 


TABLE 11,-. STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL. BY AREAS 




















STATE OF GEORGIA 












County and city 


Numbe 

of 

•tore* 


' Salei 

(add 000 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em 
ployees" 


Toul 

P.y Roll" 

(.dd 000) 


County and city 


Number - , 
of SiJ™ 

•tore* (add 000 1 


Pto- 

prieton 


Em 
ployees" 


TolJ 
Par Roll" 
(«id ooo) 


Grady County: 

Cairo (Pop. 3,169) 
Remainder of County 


137 


$1,753 


133 


223 


J133 




66 
114 


t 600 

1,370 


56 
106 


102 
146 


* 42 

IDS 


75 
62 


1,474 
279 


68 
65 


196 
27 


126 
8 


Morgan County 


Greene County 


88 


1.033 


90 


127 


76 


Murray County 


65 


512 


70 


26 


13 


Gwinnett County: 

Buford (Pop. 3,357) 
Remainder of County 


286 


2.952 


296 


303 


168 


Muscogee County: 


844 


17,897 


710 


2.733 


2.013 


64 
222 


1,028 
1,924 


66 
230 


133 
170 


85 

83 


Columbus (Pop. 43,131) 
Remainder of County 


714 
130 


17,176 
721 


seo 

130 


2,642 

91 


1,974 
39 


Habersham County 

Hall County: 

Gainesville (Pop. 6,624] 
Remainder of County 


173 
388 


1,816 
5,379 


161 
350 


154 
671 


92 
486 


Newton County: 

Covington [Pop. 3,203) 
Porterdale (Pop. 3 002) 


170 


2.668 


167 


296 


186 


91 

3 

76 


2,082 
167 
419 


86 
I 

79 


257 
14 
25 


162 
12 
12 


226 

162 


4,300 
1,079 


204 
146 


593 
78 


433 

53 


Remainder of County 


Hancock County 


143 


608 


145 


118 


46 


Oconee County 


61 


231 


59 


11 


4 


Haralson County 


118 


1,451 


117 


116 


73 


Oglethorpe County 


85 


627 


77 


50 


£6 


Harris County 


85 


651 


86 


78 


32 


Paulding County 


79 


729 


82 


44 


24 


Hart County 
Heard County 


102 
49 


1,274 
425 


101 
54 


127 
18 


84 
11 


Peech County : 

Fort Valley (Pop. 4,560) 
Remainder of County 


87 


1,313 


82 


198 


ICO 


71 
16 


1,202 
111 


67 
15 


184 
14 


95 

5 


Henry County 


147 


1,333 


138 


136 


73 


Pickens County 


82 


742 


81 


58 


41 


HouBton County 


87 


1,297 


86 


166 


90 


Pierce County 


88 


1,119 


96 


133 


70 


Irwin County 


77 


767 


73 


83 


50 


Pike County 


77 


672 


72 


66 


43 


Jackson County: 

Commerce (Pop. 3,002) 
Remaloder of County 


190 


2,045 


193 


259 


137 


Polk County; 

Cedartown (Pop, 8,124) 
Roclonbrt (Pop. 3,264) 
Remelnder of County 


207 


3,222 


187 


425 


272 


103 

49 

- 55 


1,884 
881 
457 


90 
46 
51 


281 

108 

36 


184 
65 
23 


78 

112 


1,079 
964 


72 
121 


148 

111 


81 
56 


Jasper County 


88 


980 


83 


133 


92 


Pulbskl County 


122 


1,154 


110 


174 


113 


Jeff Davie County 


70 


789 


62 


126 


59 


Putnam County 


66 


654 


51 


141 


87 


Jefferson County 


201 


1,556 


195 


265 


108 


Qultmen County 


27 


146 


28 


21 


8 


Jenkins County: 

Mlllen (Pop. 2,527) 
Remainder of County 

Johnson County 


106 


1.249 


98 


168 


80 


Rabun County 

Randolph County; 

Cutbbert ':Pop. 3,235) 
Remainder of Cotuity 


96 
181 


834 
1,549 


106 
162 


76 
236 


49 
115 


69 

37 

114 


1,106 
143 

1,037 


60 
38 

109 


150 

18 

83 


74 
6 

63 


63 
98 


1,026 
523 


69 
93 


161 
85 


84 
31 


.Tones County 

Lamar County: 

Bamesville {Pop. 3,235) 
Remainder of County 


44 

91 


355 
1.123 


44 
92 


37 
133 


17 
75 


Richmond County: 

Augusta (Pop. 60,342) 
Reinalnder of County 

Rockdale County 


1.172 


21,278 


1,077 


3,376 


2.511 


971 
201 

76 


20,584 
694 

756 


870 
207 

72 


3,267 
108 

89 


2,463 
48 

47 


63 
28 


924 

199 


64 
28 


117 
16 


66 
9 


Lanier County 


41 


388 


39 


43 


20 


Schley County 


38 


337 


45 


24 


13 


Laurons County: 

Dublin (Pop. 6,681) 
Remainder of County 


337 


3.062 


336 


430 


239 


Screven >ounty 
Seminole County 


167 

69 


1,463 
839 


159 
68 


146 
100 


86 

50 


190 
147 


2,417 
645 


187 
149 


369 
61 


211 
28 


Lee County 
Liberty County 


4S 

117 


450 
507 


40 
116 


44 

93 


21 
32 


Spaulding County: 

"^rill'in (Pop. 10,321) 
Remainder of County 


297 


5.662 


254 


840 


568 


188 
109 


4,992 
670 


149 
1.06 


768 
72 


636 
32 


Lincoln County 
Long County 


71 
30 


531 
176 


73 
25 


47 

28 


19 
18 


Stephens County: 

Toccoh [Pop. 4,602) 
Remaindor of County 


125 


1.706 


116 


161 


108 


95 
30 


1,600 
106 


88 
26 


154 
7 


106 
2 


Lowndes County: 

Valdosta (Pop. 13,482) 
Henalnder of County 

Lumpi'-^o County 


392 


5.486 


349 


856 


570 


Stewort County 

Sumter County: 

Amerleus (Pop. 8,760) 
Senalnder of County 


109 
254 


802 
3,641 


106 
241 


135 
561 


54 

320 


278 
114 

66 


5,014 
472 

298 


247 
102 

72 


781 
75 

29 


542 
28 

13 


161 
103 


3,060 
561 


142 

99 


467 
94 


283 
37 


McDuffle County 
\iclnt08b County 
t^aeon County 


118 

74 

122 


1,099 

598 

1,367 


114 
67 
119 


193 

91 

185 


78 
42 

90 


Talbot County: _/ 
Manr-hepter (part) (Pop. 29)-^ 
'Included In remainder of 
county) 
Remainder of County 


85 


480 


86 


58 


£6 


65 


480 


65 


58 


26 


uladison County 


103 


828 


112 


64 


41 


Taliaferro County 


49 


418 


42 


67 


£3 


Merlon County 


57 


464 


57 


68 


26 


Tattnall County 


136 


1,120 


119 


160 


79 


Meriwether County: „/ 


203 


1.755 


207 


230 


141 


Taylor County 
Telfair County 


69 
199 


836 
1,593 


87 
190 


116 
201 


5S 

106 


Manchester (part) (Pop. 3,716)-' 
Remainder of County 


47 
156 


856 
899 


39 
168 


123 

107 


87 
54 


Miller County 
Mitchell County; 


78 
1B7 


587 
2.553 


76 
181 


65 
360 


37 
218 




181 


2,191 


156 


368 


159 


Dawaon (Pop. 3,827) 
Remaindor of County 


110 
71 

437 


1,755 
436 

4.579 


97 
69 

402 


290 
78 

780 


137 
2£ 

444 


Pelham (Pop. 2,762) 
Remelotler of County 

Uooroe County 


51 
136 

112 


1,329 
1,224 

1,140 


49 
132 

103 


192 
168 

153 


137 
81 

89 


Thomasvllle (Pop. 11,733) 
Remaindor of County 


232 
206 


3,532 
1,047 


208 
194| 


574 
146 


370 
74 


NOTE Comp*>.bl< Arc. I.guxi (or 1933 were p 
in mofl lib(f>r>«i 


ubhihed t 


y (he Buic.u 


or lh« Ce 


„,,., , ». 


■ II Volume III. coKlIdH "Counly and Cily Sutnm.ne," pari 


>( Ih* Ce 


• u* of Amaric 


an Buaine 


* of 1933. 


■ vailrbla 



*Pay roll includea no conip«Ti*Btion tot pfopnatort of unincorporslad bu«in«»««t. Numb«r at anploj*** includci full-li 



and parl-lima (combinad), 3/ Mar 



Talbul and Manwclhai Count 



Vol. II - Page 25 



Ccn»u» of BusincM 
Retail Distribution: 



TABLE 11,- STORES, SALES. PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF GEORGIA 



County and city 



Number 

oi 

•torn 



(add 0001 



Pro. 
prielon 



Em 
ployees" 



Tola! 
Pw Roll' 
(.Jd ooo) 



County and city 



Number 

of 

ttore* 



Sale> 
(add 0001 



Pro. 
prietors 



Em 
ployec»" 



Total 

P.T Roll' 
[mM ooo] 



Tift (^unty: 

Tlfton (Pop. 3,390) 
Romainder of County 

ToCDba County: 

Vldolla (Pop. 3,585} 
Ronalndor of (bounty 

Towns County 

Treutlen County 

Troup County: 

La Grange (Pop. 20,131) 
Remfti':ier of County 

Turner County 

Twlgge County 

Union County 

Upson Cou::ity: 

Thomaston (Pop. 4,982) 
East r^nomaaton (Pop, 3,061) 
Remainder of County 

Valker County: 

Rosarllle (Pop. 3,230) 
Lafayette (Pop. 2,811) 
Remainder of County 

Walton County: 

Monroe (Pop. 3,706) 
Remainder of County 



♦ 2,829 



♦ 226 



115 
90 



62 
73 



43 
30 



2,408 
421 

1,805 



95 
83 



207 
19 



259 
£04 



112 
60 



1,070 
735 



8,090 



48 
65 



4,652 
3,438 



3.374 



229 
198 



54 
156 



145 
98 



1.039 



98 
55 



618 
421 



447 
287 



14 
3 



2,688 
242 
444 

2,760 



80 
20 
56 



349 
25 
34 



244 
12 
24 



45 

68 

106 



729 
1,007 
1,024 

2,200 



36 

67 
104 



110 
122 
102 



67 
76 
72 



1,610 
590 



62 
101 



205 
91 



141 
38 



Ware County: 

Wayoroaa (Pop. 15,510) 
Remainder of County 

Warren County 

Washington County; 

SandersTillo (Pop. 3,011) 
Remainder of County 

Wayne County 

Webster County 

Wheeler County 

White County 

Whitfield County: 

Dalton (Pop. 8,160) 
Remainder of County 

Wilcox County 

Wilkes County: 

Washington (Pop. 3,158) 
Remainder of County 

V/ilkinson County 

Worth County 



274 
113 



74 
240 



♦6.968 



5,669 
299 



678 
1.936 



240 
109 



73 
235 



828 

41 



82 

251 



♦530 



78 

162 

137 
28 
45 
58 

236 



1,215 
723 

1,492 

87 

313 

166 

5,678 



71 
164 



43 

59 
242 



156 
95 



57 

11 

442 



517 
13 



121 



87 
34 

90 

1 

26 

6 

294 



140 
96 



3,341 
337 



808 
1,355 



141 
101 



117 
163 



426 
16 



134 
194 



286 
8 



57 
103 



998 
357 



476 
862 



91 
138 



168 

26 



65 
138 



*P«y nil indudw no compcmabon lor piopHoton al iialo«avpotatod busiocu««. 
he BurMU oi the CcoM, m Retail Voiumc III. entitled "County end City Su 



Number of amployeee indudei full-time end peit-time (combined). 
perl ol the Ccntu, ol Amciicen Bunnell ol 1933. iveilel 



Campaieblc Area ligurei tor 1933 were publiihed by 



Vol II - Page 26 



Census of Business 
Retail Dislnbulion. 1935 


TABLE 


ll," STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 




















STATE OF IDAHO 












County and city 


Number 

of 

stores 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Pro. 
prietors 


Em- 
pioyees" 


Total 
Psy Roll" 
(.Sd 000) 


County and city 


Number 

ol 

•totes 


Sales 
(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietois 


Em. 
pioyees" 


Total 
Pay Roll" 

(ua 000) 


STATE TOTAL 


5.863 


#140,167 


5,347 


13,064 


J12,659 


Gem County: 

amett (Pop. 2,763) 


76 


$1 , 829 


74 


157 


J155 












62 


1,701 


62 


147 


147 


Ada County: 

Boise (Pop. 21, 544) 


558 


20,692 


514 


2,231 


2,306 


Remainder of County 


14 


128 


12 


10 


8 


433 


19,219 


377 


2,089 


2,192 


Remainder of County 


125 


1,473 


137 


142 


114 


Gooding County 


103 


2,276 


94 


175 


162 


Adams County 


48 


507 


47 


27 


23 


Idaho County 


152 


2,443 


138 


190 


180 


Bannock County: 

PocataUo (Pop. 16,471) 


444 


11,658 


388 


1,204 


1,254 


Jefferson County 


113 


1,480 


94 


133 


121 


291 


9,606 


247 


1,016 


1,118 


Remainder of County 


153 


2,052 


141 


188 


136 


Jerome County 


100 


2,100 


90 


183 


163 


Bear Lake County 


95 


1,916 


103 


140 


129 


Kootenai County: 

Coour d' Alene (Pop. 8,297) 


261 


4,400 


262 


358 


327 


137 


3,391 


137 


305 


290 


Benewah County 


80 


1,038 


75 


87 


80 


Remainder of County 


124 


1,009 


125 


53 


37 


Bingham County: 

Blactroot (Pop. 3,199) 


188 


3,945 


170 


359 


348 


Latah County: 

Moscow (Pop. 4,476) 


213 


5,181 


196 


434 


42S 


100 


2,653 


101 


246 


260 


103 


3; 507 


95 


304 


315 


Remainder of County 


88 


1,292 


69 


113 


88 


Remainder of County 


110 


1,674 


101 


130 


110 


Blaine County 


84 


922 


82 


81 


80 


Lemhi County 


76 


1,489 


72 


99 


102 


Boise County 


36 


291 


33 


34 


25 


Lewis County 


75 


1,064 


68 


72 


58 


Bonner County: 

Sandpolnt (Pop. 3,290) 


169 


2,923 


164 


242 


227 


Lincoln County 


55 


993 


56 


73 


60 


82 


1,888 


72 


167 


165 


Remainder of County 


87 


1,035 


82 


75 


62 


Madison County: 

Reiburg (Pop. 3,048) 


78 


2,010 


58 


160 


166 


59 


1,817 


41 


170 


157 


Bonne'llle County: 

Idaho Falls (Pop. 9,429) 


236 


9.396 


184 


961 


999 


Remainder of County 


19 


193 


17 


10 


9 


189 


9,022 


138 


933 


984 


Remainder of County 


47 


374 


46 


28 


15 


Klnldoka County 


97 


2,085 


86 


164 


160 


Boundary County 


56 


1,078 


59 


85 


70 


Nez Perce County: 

Lewlston (Pop. 9,403) 


266 


7,890 


247 


684 


696 


205 


7,527 


190 


663 


685 


Butte County 


30 


387 


28 


30 


23 


Remainder of County 


61 


363 


57 


21 


11 


Camas County 


22 


273 


21 


30 


23 


Oneida County: 

Malad (Pop. 2,535) 


57 


1,100 


53 


115 


85 


49 


1,068 


44 


114 


85 


Canyon County: 

Nampa (Pop, 8,206) 


361 


10,395 


320 


960 


950 


Remainder of County 


a 


32 


9 


1 


— 


155 


5,421 


139 


512 


513 


Caidwell (Pop. 4,974) 


106 


3,862 


92 


■ 368 


381 


Owyhee County 


53 


617 


48 


52 


35 


Remainder of County 


100 


1,112 


89 


80 


56 














Caribou County 


36 


628 


33 


43 


49 


Payette County: 

Payette (Pop. 2,618) 


105 


2,082 


96 


187 


170 


64 


i;490 


59 


138 


134 














Remainder of County 


41 


592 


37 


49 


36 


Cassia County: 

Burlay (Pop. 3,826) 


163 


3,214 


158 


316 


262 


Power County 


52 


963 


49 


72 


62 


105 


2,748 


95 


287 


247 


Remainder of County 


58 


466 


63 


29 


15 














Clark County 


21 


187 


20 


19 


12 


Shoshone County: 

Kellogg (Pop. 4,124) 


245 


6,341 


222 


587 


572 


80 


2,656 


72 


216 


219 














Wallace (Pop. 3,634) 


71 


2,370 


65 


249 


254 


Clearwater County 


80 


1,581 


70 


136 


134 


Remainder of County 


94 


1,315 


85 


122 


99 


Custer County 


64 


671 


74 


58 


4S 


Teton County 


44 


428 


45 


38 


31 


Slmore County 


86 


1,503 


82 


156 


125 


Twin Falls County: 

Twin Falls (Pop. 8,787) 


401 


12,813 


347 


1,250 


1,173 


227 


9,710 


190 


996 


933 


Franklin County: 

Preston (Pop. 3,381) 


97 


1,794 


92 


187 


147 


Remainder of County 


174 


3,103 


157 


254 


240 


15 


1,63S 


66 


174 


139 


Remainder of County 


22 


159 


26 


13 


8 


Valley County 


65 


993 


60 


77 


74 


Fremont County: 

St. Anthony (Pop. 2,778) 


116 


2,040 


99 


167 


137 


Washington County: 
Welser (Pop. 2,724) 


106 


2,551 


86 


231 


234 


46 


1,190 


41 


102 


83 


75 


2,175 


61 


205 


213 


Remainder of County 


70 


850 


58 


65 


54 


Remainder of County 


31 


376 


25 


26 


21 


*Pay roll includei no compcnaalion m, propriolort 


ol mine. 


rporaled buiin 


BMCt Nu 


nbot ol om 


ployeM inek 




Compar. 


ble Area Irgur 


, lor 193 


3 were pu 


llithed bv 


lh« Buie.u ol Ihe Lon.u, .0 RoUll Volume III. 


entilied ' 


County and C 






ol the Cen 


u, ol American tlu..ne., ol 1933. .variable in m 

a 


o,l Irbrar. 































^ol. II - 


Page 27 


Census of Busines* 
Retail Distribution; 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 




















STATE OF ILLINOIS 












County and city 


Number 

oi 

store* 


Sales 
(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees" 


TotiJ 

Pit Roll- 

(.dd ooo) 


County and city 


Number 

ol 

stores 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees" 


Total 

Psy Roll" 
{.<u ooo) 


3I4TE TOTAL 


93.636 


(2^73.069 


89.533 


272.784 


1263.232 


Cook County (continued): 


6 


% 77 


7 


7 


% 4 












La Grange Park (Pop, 2,939) 


Adana County; 

4ulncy (Pop. 39,S'll) 


785 


14,465 


729 


2,020 


1,610 


Bolton (Pop. 2,923) 

Steger (part) (Pop. 1,296) 5/ 


39 
12 


239 
166 


42 

10 


22 
25 


17 
14 


582 


12,759 


517 


1,874 


1,528 


Ramaladar of County 


203 


1,706 


212 


146 


82 


River Grove (Pop. 2,741) 


49 


341 


44 


49 


30 














Lenont (Pop. 2,582) 


54 


729 


56 


73 


73 


AlaiBDdor County: 

Cairo (Pop. 13,532) 


314 


4,963 


266 


704 


541 


Rlverdale (Pop. 2,504) 
Kenllworth (Pop. 2,501) 


24 
8 


186 
204 


23 
6 


19 
23 


14 
16 


232 


4,345 


203 


656 


51S 


Ranaladar of County 


82 


618 


83 


48 


23 


Remainder of County 


1,112 


11,400 


1,098 


1,321 


1,219 


Bond County; 

araenTllle (Fop. 3,233) 


200 


2,231 


202 


210 


164 


Crawford County: 

Robinson (Pop. 3,668) 


257 


2,994 


258 


353 


230 


76 


1,383 


72 


159 


132 


71 


1,652 


64 


192 


139 


Ramalndar of County 


124 


848 


130 


51 


32 


Remalndor of County 


186 


1,342 


194 


161 


91 


Boone County: 

BolTldare (Pop. 8,123) 


194 


3,709 


161 


420 


339 


Cumberlend County 


122 


925 


130 


86 


43 


132 


3,034 


120 


353 


285 


Rfloaalnder of County 


62 


675 


61 


67 


54 De Ealb County: 

De Kalb (Pop. 8,545) 


513 


8,772 


521 


1,008 


784 


165 


3,964 


168 


513 


417 


Broim County 


102 


1,233 


105 


157 


68 


Sycamore (Pop. 4,021) 


91 


1,898 


91 


202 


170 














Sandwich (Pop. 2,611) 


66 


799 


65 


101 


56 


Bureau County: 

Spring VaUey (Pop. 5,270) 


585 


6.687 


586 


672 


480 


Renxilnder of County 


191 


2,111 


197 


192 


141 


109 


933 


108 


81 


61 


Princeton (Pop. 4,7621 
Raoalnder of County 


120 
356 


2,496 

3,208 


126 
352 


272 
319 


212 

207 


De Witt County; 

Clinton (Pop. 5,920) 


266 


4.217 


266 


424 


305 


142 


2,918 


142 


316 


240 














Remainder of County 


124 


1,299 


124 


108 


65 


Calhoun County 


76 


625 


78 


53 


31 














Carroll County: 

SaTanna (Pop. 5,086) 


309 


4.054 


307 


426 


298 


Douglas County: 

Tuscola (Pop. 2,569) 
RecBlnder of County 


285 


4,044 


278 


393 


281 


68 
217 


1,377 
2,667 


65 
213 


137 
256 


103 

178 


97 


1,429 


98 


224 


146 


Reimlndar of County 


212 


2,625 


209 


202 


152 














Caes County: 

Baardstown (Fop. 6,344) 


248 


3,288 


255 


422 


280 


Du Page County; 

nitihurst (Pop. 14,055) 
Downers Grove (Pop. 8,977) 


972 


19.076 


893 


2,126 


1.936 


157 
83 


3,928 
2,400 


139 
75 


439 
287 


417 
238 


119 


1,952 


119 


272 


183 


Raoalnder of County 


129 


1,336 


136 


150 


97 


Glen Ellyn (Pop. 7,680) 


70 


1,955 


53 


222 


200 














Kheaton (Pop. 7,258) 


66 


1,921 


50 


21b 


210 


Chaspalgn County; 

Chaiqialgn (Pop. 20,348) 


93S 


22.504 


857 


2.759 


2,401 


Hinsdale (part) (Pop. 6,487)3/ 
Villa Park (Pop. 6,220) 


55 
70 


1,75£ 
1,008 


52 
56 


156 
114 


158 

96 


404 


15,072 


346 


1,978 


1,778 


Urlana (Pop. 13,060) 


179 


3,460 


169 


419 


348 


Lombard (Pop. 6,197) 


64 


1,251 


54 


168 


192 


Remainder of County 


352 


3,972 


342 


362 


275 


Naperrllle (Pop. 5,118) 


78 


1,430 


77 


159 


129 














West Chicago (Fop. 3,477) 


45 


688 


47 


92 


69 


Christian County: 

Taylorrllla (Pop. 7,316) 


544 


8.218 


527 


819 


635 


Westmont (Pop. 2,733) 
Remainder of County 


17 
£67 


226 
2,517 


15 
275 


15 
259 


10 
217 


158 


3,919 


145 


397 


339 


Pana (Pop. 5,835) 


127 


2,197 


124 


223 


170 














Remainder of County 


259 


2,102 


258 


199 


126 


Edgar County; 

Paris (Pop. 8,781) 


331 


5.706 


322 


631 


451 


170 


4,187 


159 


465 


353 


ClarlE County 


286 


3,101 


300 


367 


226 


Renainder of County 


161 


1,519 


163 


166 


98 


Clay County; 

Flora (Pop. 4,393) 


174 


2.230 


172 


244 


162 


Edwards County 


108 


1,008 


107 


134 


90 


75 


1,363 


68 


149 


113 


Razfiilnder of County 


99 


867 


104 


95 


49 


Effingtiam County: 

Effingham (Pop. 4,978) 


289 


3.946 


294 


392 


302 


108 


2,312 


115 


258 


221 


Clinton County: 

Cantrslia (part) (Pop. 515) i/ 


320 


2.705 


329 


267 


171 


Remainder of County 


181 


1,634 


179 


134 


81 


3 


20 


3 


1 


1 


ReoBlnder of County 


317 


2,685 


326 


266 


170 


Fayette County; 

Vandal la (Pop. 4,342) 


224 


2,691 


230 


286 


192 


63 


1,300 


62 


149 


122 


Colas County; 

Uattoon (Pop. 14,631) 


493 


8,778 


483 


1.023 


811 


Remainder of County 


161 


1,391 


168 


137 


70 


265 


5,788 


249 


689 


557 


Charleston (Pop. 8,012} 
BeoBBinder of County 


133 

95 


2,187 
803 


135 
99 


254 

80 


208 
46 


Ford County; 

Paiton (Pop. 2,692) 


218 


3.437 


213 


330 


233 


53 


1,110 


49 


133 


91 














BecBlnder of County 


165 


2,327 


164 


197 


14£ 


Cook County: 

Chicago (Pop. 3,376,438) 
Cicero (Pop. 66,602) 


51,152 


1,366,325 


44,252 


177,996 


184,931 


Franklin County: 

Vfest Frankfort (Pop. 14,683) 


706 


8,107 


654 


864 


658 


44,332 

990 


1,215,706 
14,268 


38,255 
961 


160,917 
1,363 


166,591 
1,341 


202 


3,287 


163 


398 


317 


Oak Park (Pop. 63,982) 


582 


23,799 


422 


3,020 


3,191 


Benton (Pop. 8,219) 


151 


1,962 


130 


228 


162 


Eranston (Pop. 63,338) 


629 


31,067 


437 


3,819 


4,640 


Christopher (Pop. 4,244) 


76 


1,053 


79 


100 


79 


Berwyn (Pop. 47,027] 


485 


8,066 


450 


771 


697 


Zelgler (Pop. 3,816) 


58 


586 


66 


54 


46 


Elgin (part) (Pop. 431) U 


14 


217 


11 


28 


17 


Remainder of County 


£19 


1,219 


216 


84 


54 


Haywood (Pop. 25,829) 


228 


4,339 


174 


484 


455 














Chicago Heights (Pop. 22,321) 
Blue Island (Pop. 16,534) 


306 
189 


5,805 
4,65S 


282 

185 


728 
462 


587 
541 


Fulton County: 

Canton (Pop. 11,718) 


479 


7.360 


484 


830 


615 


168 


4,089 


154 


493 


389 


Barrey (Pop. 16,374) 


195 


2,961 


184 


317 


285 


Remainder of County 


311 


3,271 


330 


337 


226 


lilinette (Fop. 15,233) 


112 


2,912 


82 


342 


374 














Forest Park (Pop. 14,555) 


216 


5,849 


183 


702 


1,083 


Gallatin County 


112 


1,067 


99 


111 


75 


Calumet City (Pop. 12,298) 


148 


1,113 


144 


173 


138 














Wlnnetke (Pop. 12,166) 
KlnsiDod Park (Pop. 11,270) 


98 
81 


5,648 
1,246 


62 
77 


520 
169 


690 
123 


Greene County: 

White Ball (Pop. 2,928) 


237 


2.663 


238 


306 


224 


49 


560 


45 


55 


47 


KelToaa Park (Pop. 10,741) 


125 


1,936 


UO 


243 


204 


Roodbouse (Fop, 2,621) 


49 


618 


50 


91 


65 


Park Ridge (Pop. 10,417) 


98 


3,104 


77 


284 


284 


Remainder of County 


139 


1,485 


143 


160 


112 


La Grange (Pop. 10,103) 


122 


4,310 


82 


502 


499 














Brookfield (Pop. 10,035) 
RlTer Forest (Pop. 8,829) 


98 
33 


834 
2,313 


91 
28 


73 
290 


60 
548 


Grundy County; 

ktorrle (Pop. 5,568) 


298 


3.212 


302 


302 


235 


138 


2,021 


137 


224 


179 


Des Flalnes (Pop. 8,798) 


101 


2,502 


84 


254 


232 


Remainder of County 


160 


1,191 


165 


78 


56 


Hinsdale (part) (Pop. 436) 3/ 


5 


412 





36 


41 














Riferside (Pop. 6,770) 


64 


1,391 


53 


137 


156 


Hamilton County 


125 


1,214 


124 


124 


71 


Sumnlt (Pop. 6,548) 


62 


869 


60 


60 


68 














Olencoe (Pop. 6,295) 


26 


1,296 


21 


161 


163 


Hancock County 


358 


3,946 


340 


392 


277 


Kiles Center (Pop. 5,007) 


90 


1,646 


98 


159 


162 














Arlington Heights (Pop. 4,997) 


67 


1,227 


60 


98 


94 


Hardin County 


75 


636 


75 


55 


32 


Bellwood (Pop. 4,991) 


36 


418 


42 


42 


30 














Lyons (Fop. 4,787) 


104 


702 


101 


50 


45 


Henderson County 


67 


762 


62 


75 


57 


Weetem Springe (Pop. 3,894) 


23 


SOI 


20 


63 


46 














Lansing (Pop. 3,378) 
EomeiTOOd (Pop. 3,287) 


39 
3« 


411 
496 


43 

32 


43 
50 


30 
46 


Henry County; 

Kewanee (Pop. 17,093) 


608 


11.038 


574 


1,206 


914 


267 


5,706 


233 


741 


544 


Barrlngton (part) (Pop. 1,990) 4/ 


30 


914 


36 


89 


83 


Geneaeo (Pop. 3,406) 


87 


1,955 


95 


200 


143 


Phoenli (Pop. 3,033) 


32 


62 


30 


1 


~ 


GalvB (Pop. 2,875) 
Remainder of County 


66 
168 


749 
2,628 


68 

178 


72 
193 


58 
169 



*P«y rail iBchide* 

^e Bureau ol the Ceiuua in RcUil Volume 111, < 

Counhei. 2/ Elgin >t in Cook and Kane Counlie*. 



d — twc otpoimfd btuiacMw. Numbvr 
Dtillcd "County and City Summano" . 
3/ Hiiudftle i« in Cook and Ou P*ce 



Couniici 4. 



M iDcIode* full-time kad pa/t-timc ( 

Cen«u* o( American Buiineit o( 1933. 
/ BftTTinglon ■• in Cook and Lake Coi 



. NOTE: 


Comparable 


Ai 


c« 


(igure. 


lor 1933 


■ere 


publuhed 


by 


able in mMl IJbr«r>«« 


1/ 


C 


nha 


a 


» in Clinlon a 


nd Manon 




5/ Steger 


I* >n Cook 


ar 


d 


Will 


Countrc*. 









Vol. II - Page 28 



Census of Business 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES. SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 












County and city 


Number 

of 

stores 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prieton 


Em- 
ployees* 


TotJ 
rv Roll" 

(wU ooo] 


County and dty 


Number 

ot 

stores 


Sales 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
piietoTS 


Em- 
ployees* 


Total 
P«T ReU* 
(^ 000) 


Iroquois County: 

Wataeka (pop. 3,144) 
Ras^alndar of County 

Jackaon County: 

Murphyaboro (Pop. 8,182) 
Cariondale (Pop. 7,528) 
Renalndar of County 

Jasper County 

JeffarsoQ County: 

Mt. Temon (Pop. 12,375) 
Remainder of County 

Jersey County: 

Jerseyrllle (Pop. 4,309) 
Remainder of County 

Jo Davlesa County: 
Oelena (Pop. 3,878) 
Remainder of County 

Johnaon County 

Kane County: 

Aurora (Pop, 46,589) 
Elgin (part) (Pop. 35,498)2/ 
St. Charles (Pop. 5,377) 
BataTla (Pop. 5,045) 
GeneTa (Pop, 4,607) 
Remainder of County 

Kankakee County: 

Kankakee (Pop. 20,620) 
Bradley (Pop. 3,048) 
Remainder of County 

Kendall County 

Xnox County: 

Oaleaburg (Pop. 28,830) 
Aiingdon (Pop. 2,771) 
Remainder of County 

Lake County: 

Waukegan (Pop. 33,499) 
Highland Park (Pop. 12,803) 
North Chicago (Pop. 8,466) 
Lake Fore at (Pop. 6,654) 
Zlon (pop. 5,991) 
Llbertyrllle (Pop. 3,791) 
Hlghwood (Pop. 3,590) 
Barrington (part) (Top. 1,SS5)1^ 
Remainder of County 

La Salle County: 

Ottaira (Pop. 15,094) 
Streator (Pop. 14,728) 
La Sa11e (Pop. 13,149) 
Peru (Pop. 9,121) 
HaroelUea (Pop. 4,292) 
Ifendota (pop. 4,008) 
Oglasby (Pop, 3,910) 
Remainder of County 

Lawrence County: 

Lain-enceTille (Pop. 6,300) 
Remainder of County 

Lee County; 

Olion (Pop. 9,906) 
Renalader of County 

LiTingaton County: 

Pontlac (Pop. 8,272) 
Dwight (Pop. 2,534) 
Remainder of County 

Logan County: 

Lincoln (Pop. 12,895) 
Remainder of County 

UcDonougb County: 

Macomb (Pop. 8,509) 
Buahnell (Pop. 2,850) 
Remainder of County 

UcHenry County: 

Woodatook (Pop. 5,471) 
Cryatal Lake (pop. 3,732) 
Earrard (pop. 2,988) 
Remainder of County 


477 


* 6,194 


469 


687 


t 493 


MoLaan County: 

Bloortlngton (Pop. 30,930) 
lonaal (Pop. 6,766) 
Reaaindar of Comity 

Uaoon County: 

Deoatup (Pop. 67,510) 
Remainder of County 

lUooupln County: 

Ollleapia (Pop. 5,111) 
8taunt»n (Pop. 4,618) 
OarlinTiUe (Pop. 4,144) 
lit. Oli-e (Pop. 3,07») 
Tirden (Pop. 3,011) 
Benld (Pop. 8,960) 
Remainder of County 

Madieon County: 

Alton (Pop. 30,151) 
Oranlte City (Pop. 25,130) 
OollinsTllle (Pop. 9,835) 
Wood RlTer (Pop. 6,136) 
Hadiaon (Pop. 7,661) 
Kdwardanlla (Pop. 6,835) 
Tenloe (Pop. 5,368) 
Kaat Alton (Pop. 4,608) 
Highland (Pop. 3,319) 
Remainder of County 

Uarion Ccunty: . / 
Cantralia (part ) (Pop. 12,066)-' 
Salem (Pop. 4,420) 
RflBuainder of County 

Uarehall County 

Uason County: 

EaTana (Pop. 3,451) 
Ramainder of County 

Uaasac County; 

IJatropolia (Pop. 5,973) 
Remainder of County 

Itenard County 

Uercer Comity 

Uonroe County 

Montgomery County: 

Litchfield (pop. 6,612) 
Hillaboro (pop. 4,436) 
Renalnder of County 

Morgan County: 

Jkokaonrllle (Pop. 17,747) 
BaaalBdar at County 

Umltrle County 

Ogle County; 

Boehella (Fop. 3,789) 
Remainder of County 

Peoria County: 

Paoria (Pop. 104,969) 
Peoria Helghta (Pop. 3,279) 
Ramainder of County 

Perry County: 

Dmiuoln (Pop. 7,593) 
PinolmeyTllle (Pop. 3,046) 
Remainder of County 

Piatt County 

Pike County 

■ Pope County 

Pulaakl County: 

Hound City (Pop. 2,948) 
Remainder of County 

Putnam County 

Randolph Countyt 

Cheater (Pop. 3,988) 
Sparta (Pop. 3,366) 
Baaainder of County 


949 


tl9.434 


871 


8,618 


tt.MS 


86 
391 

495 


2,176 
4,016 

6.796 


66 
401 

488 


220 
467 

843 


207 
286 

590 


474 

86 
369 

1.012 


14,096 
1,831 
4,107 

84,817 


397 

77 

397 

939 


1,989 

£00 
383 

«,196 


itesT 

135 
878 

8,798 


169 
135 
191 

128 

362 


2,499 
2,950 
1,346 

1,267 

3,894 


179 
U8 
197 

141 

350 


277 
413 
163 

182 

471 


185 

381 

84 

71 

352 


787 
225 

718 


23,067 
1,760 

7.503 


707 
232 

781 


3,008 
194 

730 


8,»4 

184 

691 


80 
87 

114 
45 
56 
66 

870 

1.861 


l,i45 
971 

1,692 
532 
773 
519 

1,871 

89.914 


64 
89 

119 
50 
90 
66 

863 

1,775 


117 
84 

809 
48 

69 

52 

175 

3,588 


97 

66 

168 

36 

47 

36 

106 

3,804 


211 
151 

162 


3,166 
726 

2,125 


201 
149 

164 


390 

81 

207 


320 
32 

181 


103 
59 

322 


1,772 
353 

3,696 


103 
61 

328 


189 
18 

406 


170 
11 

282 


436 

888 

163 

126 

U9 

123 

66 

57 

73 

444 

803 


11,086 

3^935 

2,461 

8,389 

960 

3,836 

418 

803 

1,039 

3,148 

7.567 


396 

804 

191 

109 

113 

114 

64 

55 

68 

461 

486 


1,389 
493 
348 

3oe 

130 
379 
39 
101 
183 
278 

826 


1,301 
463 
898 
311 
113 
344 
48 
92 
106 
170 

698 


86 
236 

103 

1,470 


1,139 
2,557 

804 

34,776 


97 
231 

102 

1,334 


134 
272 

72 

4,053 


102 
180 

40 

3,710 


590 

353 
81 
56 
57 

333 

716 


16,444 

10,687 

1,823 

977 

1,210 

3,635 

13.634 


505 

310 

76 

52 

48 

343 

679 


2,041 
1,857 
168 
113 
110 
344 

1,655 


1,864 
1,137 
205 
105 
107 
292 

1.389 


248 

66 
195 

199 

£44 


4,506 
1,271 
1,610 

2,417 

8.977 


885 

70 
191 

196 

246 


955 
136 
136 

239 

357 


491 

110 

91 

180 

£34 


374 

38 

304 

119 

573 


10,297 

306 

3,031 

1,468 

12.934 


329 

40 

310 

123 

535 


1,332 

32 

291 

146 

1.616 


1,124 

20 

186 

100 

1.398 


92 
152 

196 


1,491 
1,486 

1.775 


87 
159 

193 


164 
173 

198 


136 
98 

180 


382 

40 

151 

1.399 


11,157 

464 

1,323 

32,732 


358 

33 

150 

1.245 


1,447 

36 

131 

3,665 


1,275 
25 
98 

3,725 


124 
78 

144 

£26 
196 
4«4 


1,478 
897 

1,870 

2,948 

2,169 

6.466 


184 

69 

144 
2££ 
164 
476 


166 
30 

183 

895 

198 

638 


106 
14 

114 

£37 

149 

606 


349 

123 

127 

75 

19 

53 

48 

£1 

584 

1,465 


12,077 
5,833 
1,293 
3,189 
1,566 
1,563 
605 
602 
6,004 

22,545 


279 

106 

120 

58 

15 

49 

44 

13 

661 

1.441 


1,336 
598 
133 
388 
311 
151 
68 
50 
690 

2.739 


1,362 
739 
119 
397 
306 
154 
63 
62 
623 

2.122 


112 

81 

291 

420 


1,846 
1,860 
8,770 

6.775 


108 

71 

302 

399 


183 
810 
845 

1.000 


170 
196 
179 

761 


268 

256 

262 

123 

68 

99 

71 

316 

253 


4,781 
5,472 
5,146 
1,620 

758 
2,102 

444 
2,222 

2.974 


EE3 
£44 
245 

117 
65 

103 
70 

344 

244 


681 
712 
646 
204 

87 
249 

47 
214 

370 


466 

553 
623 
164 

63 
191 

34 
129 

251 


299 
161 

176 

379 


7,463 
1,518 

8,064 

6.436 


£37 
168 

179 

STS 


878 

188 

207 
968 


678 
83 

144 

469 


83 
£96 

1,8£1 


8,028 
4,410 

50.057 


76 
£98 

1.939 


199 
373 

7.180 


184 

876 

6.497 


97 
156 

362 


1,574 
1,400 

6.439 


63 
161 

349 


217 
153 

740 


152 
99 

542 


1,467 

23 

331 

308 


46,816 

£48 

8,993 

4.183 


1,195 

81 

319 

308 


6,774 

23 

323 

491 


6,861 

20 
216 

384 


150 
212 

473 


4,164 
2,255 

6,973 


134 

215 

465 


534 
206 

728 


405 
137 

549 


137 

67 

104 

193 

386 

ei 

191 


8,463 

1,183 
517 

8,466 

3,603 

655 

1.664 


141 

66 

lOS 

187 

334 

84 
190 


271 

186 

54 

845 

393 

63 

174 


196 
96 
30 

168 

8S3 

39 

99 


125 

67 

281 

391 


2,812 
1,052 
3,109 

5,663 


HI 

72 

£82 

385 


344 

84 
300 

687 


260 

67 

222 

477 


206 

185 

281 


3,817 

1,846 

5,295 


192 
193 

278 


507 
180 

612 


354 
123 

459 


93 

98 

96 
463 


1,068 
602 

732 

4.T77 


67 
103 

98 

439 


106 
68 

68 

646 


63 
38 

98 

388 


119 

37 

1£S 

613 


3,408 
894 
993 

10.212 


112 
39 

127 

622 


438 

76 

105 

1.014 


326 
70 

63 

840 


lU 
77 
79 

34« 


2,702 
1,614 
1,606 
4,391 


119 
71 
91 

344 


284 
164 
143 
433 


233 
144 
114 
349 


97 

94 

168 


1,614 

899 

t,8«4 


103 

97 

839 


188 
183 
841 


199 

70 

153 



* Pay roll include* no 
the Buramu ol ih« Cenik, 
CounlUi. 2/ Elgin I* in 



lor proDfidoT* ol uriincorpor«tcd buiincMC*. Nurr 
> .n RcUil Volume III. en(lll«d "County ind Ciry 3umm«riei* 
C«ok and Kwm CoubIUi. . 4/ Bwrlnfton I* In Cook and Uka CoiwUi 



employee! include) lull-lime and pBrl-llm* (combined). 
of ihc Cen*u* ol American Butlnee* o( 1933, available 



NOTE: Comparable 
in moel libratje* 



krea lifurM lor 1933 we>. 
1/ CantialU 1* In Clinli 



piiblithed by 

n uwl Merlon 





















V 


ol. II - 


Page 29 


Census of Business 
Ret.iil Dislribulion: 193.S 


TABLE 


U,-- STORES. SALES. PER.SONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 




















STATE OF ILLINOrS 












County and city 


Number 

ol 

•tOTes 


Sales 
Udd 000) 


Pto- 
prielora 


Em 
ployees" 


Total 
Pm Roll" 
(.dd ooo) 


County and city 


Number 

ol 

stores 


Sales 
(add 0001 


Pro. 
pnetors 


F.m. 
ployees- 


Total 

Pa, Roll- 
(.Kd ooo) 


Rlnhland County; 

Olnoy (Ici?. 6,i40l 


197 


t r,569 


193 


rn8 


» 213 
199 


V^rrallinn County: 

DaniUle (Pop. 36,765) 


1.210 


♦ 21_,765 


ljl32 


2,751 


t2.199 


138 


2,224 


131 


259 


601 


15,590 


499 


2,081 


1,770 


Renaioder of County 


59 


345 


62 


29 


14 


Hoopeston (Pop. 5,613) 


103 


1,793 


101 


198 


149 














/lestvllle (Pop. 3,901) 


67 


716 


72 


94 


61 


Rook Island County: 

Rock Island (Pop. 37,953) 


1.256 
473 


25j067 


1,203 


3^a9 


2.548 


Georrt«tovni (Pop. 3,407) 
Rervitndep of County 


55 
384 


550 
3,116 


60 
400 


56 
322 


33 

186 


9,708 


448 


1,279 


1,102 


Molina (Pop. 32,236) 


458 


11,712 


424 


1,541 


1.142 














Sast Molina (Pop. 10, 107) 
SllTls (Poo. 2,650) 


142 
■ 24 


1,809 
422 


147 
24 


179 
67 


144 
40 


V/abash County: 

llouut Cnrmal (Pop. 7, 132) 


178 


2.066 


181 


238 


157 


113 


1,747 


111 


196 


138 


Remainder of County 


159 


1,416 


160 


153 


120 


Remainder of County 


65 


319 


70 


42 


19 


St. Clair County:- 

ilast 3t. Louis (Pop. 74,347) 


2.262 


33,921 


2^2 


4,008 


3,521 


Warren County: 

Monmouth (Pop. 8,666) 


276 


5.200 


291 


543 


404 


1,148 


19,661 


1,041 


2,491 


2,246 


172 


3,914 


176 


448 


334 


BeHaTllle (Pop. 23,425) 


396 


7,891 


368 


912 


843 


Renaindar of County 


104 


1,286 


116 


95 


70 


Washln.:ton lark (Pop. 3,837) 


38 


223 


37 


28 


16 














Heiuainder of County 


680 


6,146 


706 


577 


416 


•Vashinrton County 


231 


1,939 


242 


218 


140 


Saline County; 

Harrisbur^ (lop. 11,625) 


371 


5,904 


359 


701 


536 


V/ayna County: 

Ptiirfield (Pop. 3,280) 


198 


2,181 


185 


217 


140 


167 


3,715 


155 


440 


353 


72 


1,417 


66 


148 


106 


iildorado (Pop. 4,482) 


85 


1,359 


84 


184 


139 


Remainder of County 


126 


764 


119 


69 


34 


Remainder of County 


119 


830 


120 


77 


44 














San-^ainon County ; 

Sprlnrfiald (Pop. 71,864) 


1,344 


32,766 


1,183 


Jj071 


3.741 


VJh* te County; 

Comi (Pop. 2,932) 
Remainder of County 


266 


3.030 


274 


339 


£09 


97 
169 


1,833 
1,197 


100 
174 


225 
114 


141 

68 


937 


28,920 


776 ' 


3,667 


3,447 


Reinainder of County 


407 


3,846 


407 


404 


294 














Schuyler County 


125 


1,556 


132 


169 


114 


VJhitestde County; 

Sterling (Pop. 10,012) 


502 


8.785 


485 


964 


780 


155 


4,489 


129 


521 


465 














Boclt Falls (Pop. 3,893) 


57 


763 


54 


67 


66 


Scott County 


101 


1,119 


105 


100 


68 


N.orrison (Pop. 3,067) 


55 


1,207 


56 


120 


94 














?ulton (Poo. 2,656) 


42 


536 


49 


58 


37 


Shelhy County; 

Shel-iyville (Pop. 3,491) 


312 


3,826 


323 


354 


267 


Remainder of County 


193 


1,790 


198 


198 


128 


90 


1,882 


85 


198 


171 


Renalnder of County 


222 


1,944 


238 


156 


96 


.'/ill County; 

Jollet (Ton. 42,993) 


1.090 


21,811 


1,016 


2,634 


',282 


543 


15,277 


454 


2,070 


1,795 


Stari: County 


120 


1,574 


120 


129 


98 


Lockport (Pop. 3,383) 5/ 
Ste.^^er (part) (Pop. 1,689)^ 


60 


911 


62 


68 


77 














11 


46 


12 


14 


5 


Stephenson County: 

Freeport (Pop. Co, 045) 


522 


11,191 


494 


ljl88 


1,078 


Renalnder of County 


476 


5,677 


487 


482 


405 


317 


8,917 


298 


1,038 


949 


Remainder of County 


205 


2,274 


196 


150 


129 


.Vlllia!nROn County: 
•ierrln (Pop. 9,708) 


612 


8,147 


617 


1,036 


690 


156 


2,984 


149 


360 


£70 


Tazewell County: 

Fekla (Pop. 16,129) 


624 


10,025 


599 


1,089 


901 


Vjirion (Pop. 9,033) 
Johr.-iton City (Pop. 5,965) 


188 
78 


2,914 
892 


206 
65 


406 
99 


266 

67 


263 


5,270 


253 1 


640 


5f.5 


Sast Peoria (Pop. 5,027) 


96 


1,249 


87 


151 


106 


Carterrille (Pop. 2,866) 


48 


623 


48 


89 


48 


ReiLaiuder of County 


265 


3,506 


259 


298 


240 


Renalnder of County 


142 


834 


149 


82 


39 


Union County: 

Anna (Pop. 3,4.56) 


211 


2,680 


205 


361 


235 


AinnebaKO County: 

Rockford (Pon. 05,864) 


1.575 


34.659 


Jj363 


4j364 


4,016 


90 


1,767 


84 


241 


"l7i 


1,212 


31,661 


990 


4,045^ 


3,762 


Renalnder of County 


121 


913 


121 


120 


64 


Rememder of County 


363 


3,008 


.173 


319 


£34 














'.Voodford County 


259 


3,711 


£73 


345 


248 


■ - Poy >"ll inctudri no compenMtion lor propr 


etors ol 


nincoiporBied 


l,U..n...n. 


Niimbi-t >>l ^mployrcK 


include* liiM-lime and pHft-htne (combined) NOT 


F. Comp 


arable Area li 


Buiei lor 


1933 were 


publi.hed 


by Ih* Bure.K nl the Crn.u, .n Relail Volum* 


III. enlili 


d "Cuoly -n 


C.ly Sun 


im.i..^" pur) ..) Ih« C 


eniui. of American Busine.l nl 1933. available i 


moti lib 


rarle. 








5/ Sleia u ,n Cook .n<j W.ll Counl... 























Vol. II - Page 30 



Census o( Business 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 11,- STORES. SALES. PEKSONNEI. AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 

STATE OF INDIANA 












County and city 


Number 

of 

■tores 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Prc^ 
prielors 


Em- 
ployees" 


Tol.l 
P.y Roll" 
(«H oon) 


County and city 


Number 

o< 

stores 


Sde. 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em- 
ployees" 


Total 
Pv Roll" 

(^ m,) 


STATE TOTAL 

Adams County: 

Decatur (Fop. 5,156} 
Renainder of County 

Allen County: 

Fort *ayne (Pop. 114,946) 
Remainder of County 

Bartholomew County: 

Colunbus (Pop. 9,935) 
Renainder of County 

Benton County 

Blac>rford County: 

Hartford City (Pop. 6,613) 
Remainder of County 

Boone County: 

Lebanon (Pop. 6,445) 
Remainder of County 

Brown County 

Carroll County 

Case County: 

Lof^ansport (Pop. 18,508) 
Remainder of County 

Clark County: 

Jeffersonville (Pop. 11,946) 
Remainder of County 

Clay County: 

Brazil (Pop. 8,744) 
Remainder of County 

Clinton County: 

Frankfort (Pop. 12,196) 
Remainder of County 

Crawford County 

DeTie&s County: 

Washington (Pop. 9,070) 
Remainder of County 

Dearborn County : 

Aurora (Pop. 4,386) 
Lawrenceburg (Pop. 4,072) 
Remainder of County 

Decatur County: 

Greenaburg (Pop. 5,702) 
Remainder of County 

De Kalb County: 

Auburn (Pop. 5,088) 
Garrett (Pop. 4,428) 
Remainder of County 

Delaware County: 

lluncle (Pop. 46,548) 
Remainder of County 

DubolB County: 

Jeaper (Pop. 3,905) 
Huntingburg (Pop. 3,440) 
Remainder of County 

Zlkhart County: 

Elkhart (Pop. 32,949) 
GoBhen (Pop. 10,397) 
Mappanee (Pop. 2,957) 
Remainder of County 

Fayette Coiinty: 

ConneroTllle (Pop. 12,795) 
Remainder of County 

Floyd Coiinty: 

New Albany (Pop. 25,819) 
Remainder of County 

Fountain County: 

Attica (Pop. 3,700) 
Remainder of County 

Franklin County 

Fulton County: 

Rocheater (Pop. 3,518) 
Remainder (t County 


42.471 


$780,506 


39 . 986 


98.052 


181.580 


Gibson County: 

Princeton (Pop. 7,505) 
Oakland City (Pop. 2,842) 
Remainder of County 

Grant County: 

Marion (Pop. 24,496) 
Cae City (Pop. 3,087) 
Remainder of County 

Greene County: 

Linton (Pop. 5,085) 
Jasonvllle (Pop. 3,536) 
Remainder of County 

Hamilton County: 

Nobleaville (Pop. 4,811) 
Remainder of County 

Hancock Coiinty: 

Greenfield (Pop. 4,188) 
Remainder of County 

Harrison County 

Hendricks County 

Henry County: 

New Cn.-^tle (Pop. 14,027) 
Remainder of County 

Howard County: 

Kokono (Pop. 32,843) 
Remainder of County 

Huntington County: 

Huntington (Pop. 13,420) 
Remainder of County 

Jackson County: 

Seymour (Pop. 7,508) 
Remainder of County 

Jasper County: 

Rensselaer (Pop. 2,798) 
Remainder of County 

Jay County: 

Portland (Pop. 5,276) 
Dunkirk (Pop. 2,583) 
Remainder of County 

Jefferson County: 

Madison (Pop. 6,530) 
Remainder of County 

Jennings County: 

North Vernon (Pop. 2,989) 
Remainder of County 

Johnson County: 

Franklin (Pop. 6,682) 
Remainder of County 

Knoi County: 

Tineennes (Pop. 17,564) 
Blcknell (Pop. 5,212) 
Remainder of County 

Kosciusko County: 

■/farsow (Pop. 5,730) 
Remoinder of County 

Lagrange County 

Lake Coiinty: 

Gary (Pop. 100,426) 
Hammond (Pop. 64,560) 
East Chicago (Pop. 54,784) 
Whiting (Pop. 10,880) 
Hobart (Pop. 5,787) 
Crown Point (Pop. 4,046) 
Remainder of County 

La Porte County: 

Michigan City (Pop. 26,735) 
La Porte (Pop. 15,755) 
Remainder of Cotmty 

Laitfrence County: 

Bedford (Pop. 13,208) 
Mitchell (Pop. 3,226) 
Remainder of County 


372 


% 4.594 


373 


647 


% 399 


235 


4.334 


223 


485 


362 


151 

68 

153 

723 


2,801 

635 

1,158 

12.279 


145 

66 

160 

697 


369 

62 

116 

1,551 


286 
4£ 

71 

1,259 


111 
124 

1,914 

1,620 

294 

367 


2,456 
1,878 

45^852 

42,668 

3,184 

6.990 


102 
121 

lj723 

1,418 

305 

349 


302 
183 

6,270 

6,021 

£49 

813 


228 
134 

5,547 

5,377 

170 

612 


435 
49 
£39 

372 


9,538 

667 

2,074 

4.216 


403 

45 

24? 

374 


1,286 

77 

188 

489 


1,078 

66 

115 

334 


226 

141 

165 
170 


5,870 
1,120 

2,549 

2.847 


204 
145 

161 

173 


737 
76 

247 

36£ 


565 
47 

185 

245 


107 
59 
206 

326 


1,712 

786 

1,718 

4.596 


108 

56 

£10 

326 


212 

77 

200 

522 


156 

61 

117 

352 


121 
205 

239 


2,473 
2,123 

3.399 


117 
209 

240 


306 
216 

389 


207 
145 

266 


113 
57 

295 


2,317 
530 

5.007 


115 
58 

287 


300 
62 

550 


210 
35 

400 


100 
139 

179 

262 

465 


1,984 
1,415 

1,833 

2,924 

8.173 


95 
145 

193 

£83 

436 


241 
148 

185 

298 

899 


172 
94 

108 

192 

701 


155 
140 

63 

200 

469 


3,485 
1,522 

367 

2,938 

7,882 


146 
141 

60 

206 

449 


413 
137 

30 

£59 

1.022 


318 
82 

16 

180 

767 


252 
213 

553 


6,217 
1,956 

11.775 


227 
208 

519 


747 
152 

lj427 


589 
112 

1,153 

1,078 

75 

543 


336 
133 

417 


6,707 
1,175 

4,507 


306 
143 

403 


904 
118 

516 


701 
66 

365 


447 
106 

368 


10,663 
1,112 

6.605 


414 
105 

386 


1,330 
97 

769 


221 
196 

285 


3,229 
1,278 

4,362 


211 
192 

292 


386 
130 

494 


294 

71 

344 


215 
153 

4E3 


6,052 
1,553 

5.081 


£15 
171 

434 


618 
151 

607 


459 
84 

453 


160 
125 

305 


3,067 
1,295 

5,535 


158 
134 

307 


395 
99 

630 


284 
60 

477 


171 
£52 

193 


3,352 
1,729 

2,595 


160 
£74 

187 


415 
192 

275 


327 
126 

190 


167 
138 

127 

299 


4,285 
1,250 

856 

3,394 


157 
150 

137 

331 


531 
' 99 

73 

420 


41B 
59 

41 

266 


88 

105 

287 


1,680 
916 

4,026 


89 
98 

304 


187 
88 

495 


138 
52 

334 


194 
105 

325 
105 
100 
120 

237 


2,659 
735 

4,944 


217 
114 

316 


339 

81 

423 


£24 
42 

364 


141 
48 
98 

267 


2,650 
761 
615 

3,053 


147 
48 
109 

£56 


362 
70 
63 

402 


249 

30 

£89 


2,273 
1,604 
1,067 

3,890 


106 
84 
126 

235 


153 

179 

91 

472 


130 

163 
71 

357 


173 
94 

128 


£,573 
480 

1,756 


157 
99 

128 


363 

39 

167 


£73 
16 

107 


130 
107 

289 


3,243 
647 

4,704 


127 
108 

291 


417 
55 

540 


324 
33 

410 


79 
49 

260 


1,422 
334 

4,098 


79 
49 

254 


150 
17 

448 


100 
7 

322 


96 

47 

146 

861 


2,218 

814 

1,672 

18,534 


82 
48 
161 

778 


262 
132 
146 

2,508 


£17 

85 

108 

2,042 


106 
154 

583 


£,£47 
1,851 

7.579 


101 
153 

570 


£59 

189 

1.035 


185 
137 

72E 


673 
188 

258 


16,797 
1,737 

3.259 


684 
194 

268 


2,337 
171 

374 


1,948 
94 

255 


306 
105 
172 

415 


5,202 

954 

1,423 

5,504 


£74 
107 
189 

423 


780 
121 
134 

574 


559 
87 
76 

406 


67 

65 

126 

882 


1,555 
999 
705 

17^440 


68 

60 

140 

810 


182 

110 

82 

2,158 


140 
82 
33 

1,706 


135 
280 

180 

3^486 

1,239 

816 

753 

189 

81 

90 

318 

802 


2,624 
2,880 

2,330 

72^^380 
29,277 
24,192 
9,703 
2,926 
1,152 
2,020 
3,110 

15,865 


127 
296 

182 

3^174 


316 

£i>'J 

£12 
8,548 


£40 
166 

144 

7 , 929 

3,378 

2,809 

960 

259 

95 

227 

201 

1,566 
823 
636 
107 

424 


463 

195 

58 

166 

260 


10,503 
3,917 
1,214 
1,806 

4,838 


407 

163 

58 

182 

E2E 


1,316 
518 
141 
183 

589 


1,088 

402 

92 

124 

507 


1,093 
725 
677 
184 
76 
91 
329 

732 


3,625 

2, all 

1,080 
337 
1-13 
246 
306 

1,907 


214 
46 

456 


4,593 
245 

6,958 


176 
46 

427 


575 
14 

796 


499 
8 

650 


377 
79 

249 


6,616 
342 

3.274 


341 
86 

£50 


774 
22 

351 


636 

14 

£31 


380 
233 
189 

416 


8,100 
6,086 
1,679 

4,891 


342 
192 
198 

410 


1,025 
721 
161 

695 


76 
173 

204 

244 


1,407 
1,867 

1,835 

3,110 


68 
182 

210 

260 


156 
195 

200 

348 


105 
126 

120 

218 


236 
63 
117 


3,549 
784 

658 


229 

58 

123 


459 

86 
50 


333 
67 
24 


98 

14f 


1,986 
1,124 


109 

11.1 


231 

117 


152 
66 



*Pay raU IndudM i 
th« BurcMi of tha 



< compwiUBlion lot proprivtoii 
•niu« in lUtall Vohima \\\. 



6t unlncovporalad buainaMaa. Numbar «l aaployaaa Incluila* full-llma and pan-lima (e*fnblB«d). NOTE: 
tniillad "County and Ciry Summarisi" . pari a\ ihe C«n«u* of Amarlcan Bu*lna«* ol 1933, availabla in m 



Comparabla Aiaa lifura 



1933 waf* publiahad by 





















Vol. 11 - 


Page 31 


Census of Business 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SALES. PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AB-'AS 
STATE OF INDIANA 












County and city 


Number 
•tore. 


S.Ia 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em- 
ployees* 


Total 
Pay Rail* 
(,dd oflo) 


County end city 


Number 

of 

•tore. 


Sala 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees' 


TotiJ 

Pay Rnlio 
(«id two) 


Madicoo County: 

Acderaon I Pop. 39,804) 
iawood (Pop. 10,685) 
Alezandrla (Pop. 4,408) 
Ranalcder of County 

UarioD County: 

Inditinapolls (Pop. 364,161) 
Beech Grove (Pop. 3,552) 
Rantinder of County 

tlarshall County: 

Plymouth (Pop. 5,290) 
Remainder of County 

Martin County 

Miami County: 

Peru (Pop. 12,730) 
Remainder of County 

Monroe County: 

Bloomlngton (Pop. 18,227) 
Remainder of County 

Montgomery County: 

Crewfordsvllle {Pop. 10,355) 
Rflmfllnder of County 

itoreen County: 

Martinsville (Fop. 4,962) 
Reaainder of County 

Newton County 

Moble County: 

Kendallville (Pop. 5,439) 
Henainder of County 

Ohio County 

Orange County 

Owen County 

Parke County 

Perry County: 

Tell City (Pop. 4.873) 
Remainder of County 

PllEe County: 

Petersburg (Pop. 2,609) 
Remainder of County 

Porter County: 

Valparaiso (Pop. 8,079) 
Remainder of County 

Posey County: 

Kt. Vernon (Pop. 5,035) 
Remainder of County 

Pulaeki County 

Putnam Coiinty: 

Greencestle (Pop. 4,613) 
Remainder of County 

Randolph County: 

Winchester (Pop. 4,487). , 
Union City (Pop. 3,084)-' 
Remainder of County 

Ripley County: 

BatesTllle (Pop. 2,838) 
Remainder of County 

Rush County: 

RuahTille (Pop. 5,709) 
Remainder of County 


1.083 


t 21.036 


977 


2.710 


? 2.226 


St. Joaeph Couoty: 

South Bond (Pop. 104,193) 
MlshBtvoko (Pop. 28,630) 
Renuilndor of County 

Scott County 

Shelby County: 

Shelbyville (Pop. 10,616) 
Renfilnder of County 

Spencer County 

Starke County 

Steuben County; 

Angola (Pop. 2,665) 
Remainder of County 

Sullivan Cnunty: 

Sullivan (Pop. 6,306) 
Remainder of County 

Switzerland County 

Tippecanoe County: 

Lafayette (Pop. 26,240) 
Hest Lafayette (Pop. 5,095) 
Remainder of County 

Tipton County: 

Tipton (Pop. 4,861) 
Remainder of County 

Union County 

Vanderhurg County: 

Evansville (Pop. 102,249) 
Remainder of County 

Vermillion County: 

Clinton (Pop. 7,936) 
Remainder of County 

Vigo County: 

Terre Haute (Pop. 62,810) 
most Terre Haute (Pop. 3,588) 
Remainder of County 

Wabash Coiinty: 

.Vabash (Pop. 8,840) 

North luancheater Cftrp. 2,765) 

Remaitder of County 

Warren County 

Warrlclc County: 

Boonvllle (Pop. 4,206) 
Remainder of County 

Washington County: 
Salem (Pop. 3,194) 
Remainder of County 

Wayne County: 

Richmond (Pop. 32,493) 
Remainder of County 

Wells County: 

Bluffton (Pop. 5,074) 
Remainder of County 

White County 

Whitley County: 

Columbia City (Pop. 3,805) 
Remainder of County 


2,036 


t 44,786 


1,856 


5,569 


»6.140 


613 
135 
105 
£30 

5. 244 


14,549 
2,648 
1,532 
2,307 

145,044 


507 
128 
113 
229 

4,366 


1,689 
376 
189 
266 

21,324 


1,634 
269 
149 
176 

19,509 


1,379 
385 
272 

117 

298 


36,214 
5,943 
2,629 

1,452 

5,773 


1,197 
376 
283 

119 

267 


4,642 
684 
243 

144 

690 


4,369 
668 
213 

110 

541 


4,757 

42 

445 

313 


139,084 

544 

5,416 

4,884 


3,912 
41 

413 

302 


20,712 

49 

563 

562 


16,911 
49 
549 

421 


173 
125 

228 

184 

237 


4,863 
910 

1,692 

2,116 

3.302 


156 
112 

222 

199 
241 


620 

70 

203 
172 
397 


489 
62 

113 

129 

249 


94 
£19 

113 

381 


2,489 
2,395 

1,166 

6,080 


76 
226 

118 

392 


329 
233 

139 

757 


266 

155 

81 
571 


88 
149 

325 


1,665 
1,637 

3,737 


95 
146 

342 


187 
210 

417 


132 
117 

£93 


219 
162 

327 


4,526 
1,554 

6,052 


228 
164 

305 


631 
126 

823 


486 
83 

595 


121 
204 

155 

616 


2,063 
1,654 

779 

15.167 


119 
£23 

163 

532 


269 
148 

67 

1,942 


202 
91 

38 

1,656 


223 
104 

387 


5,574 
478 

6.669 


195 
110 

400 


783 
40 

811 


573 
22 

569 


194 
193 

220 


4,812 
1,867 

3.171 


183 
217 

221 


638 
173 

351 


491 
98 

242 


441 
54 

121 

169 


13,164 

1,096 

935 

2,584 


371 
43 
118 

177 


1,713 

147 

82 

306 


1,474 

125 

69 

206 


96 
124 

163 

311 


2,003 
1,168 

2,094 

4,583 


86 
135 

170 

301 


244 

107 

235 
477 


179 
63 

164 

357 


91 
78 

79 

1.597 


1,922 
562 

1,218 

31,664 


91 
86 

81 

1,343 


245 
61 

131 

4,239 


175 
33 

85 

3,832 


118 
193 

58 

219 

127 

as 

2U 


2,056 
2,527 

441 

2,492 

1,666 

2,269 

2,077 


111 
190 

67 

223 

138 

£25 

223 


242 
235 

44 

264 

173 

248 

227 


168 
169 

26 

164 

120 

167 

149 


1,382 
215 

326 


30,610 
1,174 

3j488 


1,123 
220 

325 


4,116 
123 

382 


3,748 
84 

225 


156 
170 

1,447 


1,945 
1,543 

26,797 


155 
170 

1,367 


226 

126 

3,704 


151 
74 

3,369 


1,124 

52 

271 

370 


26,790 

691 

1,316 

5,619 


1,019 

49 

299 

368 


3.527 

67 

110 

689 


3,259 
57 
53 

493 

298 

149 

46 

42 

175 


100 
111 

187 


1,354 
723 

1,722 


108 
115 

189 


163 
64 

174 


41 
99 


173 

73 

124 

100 

207 


3,299 

1,586 

732 

607 

2,266 


166 

76 

136 

106 

202 


420 

190 

79 

68 

251 


57 
130 

3?fl 


733 

989 

5.512 


53 
136 

323 


89 
85 

694 


54 
45 

526 


132 
196 

234 


3,938 
1,574 

2,821 


128 

195 

243 


536 
158 

372 


426 

100 

242 


95 

112 

213 


1,643 

643 

1,962 


88 

114 

216 


199 
52 

208 


145 
30 

120 


104 
130 

141 

260 


1,800 
1,021 

1,934 

3,271 


104 
139 

151 

254 


276 
96 

179 

343 


184 
58 

119 

243 


99 
114 

828 


1,303 
659 

16,041 


98 
117 

694 


153 
55 

2,004 


99 
21 

1,633 


546 
282 

213 


13,401 
2,640 

4,428 


462 
232 

209 


1,683 
321 

381 


1,450 
183 

293 


102 
158 

382 


1,959 
1,312 

5,319 


84 
170 

366 


230 
113 

565 


179 

64 

398 


116 
97 

222 

239 


3,006 
1,422 

2,636 

3,383 


115 

94 

228 
266 


301 
80 

276 

402 


236 
57 

188 

256 


90 
90 
202 

260 


1,689 
1,501 
2,129 

3,362 


87 

85 

194 

247 


205 
178 
182 

285 


156 
123 
119 

197 


67 
193 

229 


1,043 
2,319 

3,306 


61 
186 

216 


114 
171 

412 


88 
109 

323 


107 
132 


2,123 
1,260 


120 
146 


276 
124 


174 
82 


125 

104 


2,468 
838 


110 

106 


344 

68 


274 

49! 


•Pay fjll loclude* no cotnpeoMtiOB for proprirton 
the Bureau o\ the Cerwu* >n Rclail Volume III, 
Kandolph Coonty. IndiM- and Union City, l>a»lie 


U unJBO 

cniilled " 

County, 


afpoTstcd bu«in 
County «nd Ci 
Ohio: 4.389. 


«••««. Nu 

ly Summtr 


illb«r of M. 


p1o7«M incl 
) the Cen. 


idci full-time ond iwrt-tim« (cMnbrnod). NOTE; 
. ol Amencan Buiinc* ol 1933, svail.ble in m 


Comp.. 

,1 llbKIIO 


ble Area Imu 
l/ Combin 


e» for 19 

ed populo 


33 i*«re pu 
on of Uni 


n Cily, 



Vol. II - Page 32 



Census oi Business 
Retai] Distribution: 



TABLE n,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF IOWA 



County and city 



Number 

of 

■tores 



T" 



Salu 
ladd 000) 



Pro- 
prietora 



Em- 
ployees" 



Total 
Pm Roll* 

(hU OOo) 



County and city 



Number 

ol 

itorei 



Sales 

(add 0001 



Pro- 

prielon 



Em 
ployees' 



Total 

P«7 Roll* 
(•dJ OOo) 



Adair County 
AdeaoB County 

Al 1 »lnalr fln CoUDty : 

Waukon (Pop. £.526) 
Remainder ot County 

Appanoose County: 

Oontervllle (Pop. 8,147) 
Remainder of Cotxnty 

Audubon County 

Benton County: 

Vinton (Pop. 3,372) 
Belle Plalne (Pop. 3,239) 
Rentalnder of County 

Black Hawk County: 

Waterloo (Pop. 46,191) 
Cedar Falls (Pop. 7,362) 
Remainder of County 

Boone County: 

Boone (Pop. 11,886) 
Remainder of County 

Bremer County: 

WaTerly (Pop. 3,652) 
Remainder of County 

Bucllanan County: 

Independence (Pop. 3,691) 
Remainder of County 

Buena ViBta County: 

Storm Lake (Pop. 4,157) 
Remainder of County 

Butler County 

Callioun County 

Carroll County: 

Carroll (Pop. 4,691) 
Remainder of County 

Cass County: 

Atlantic (Pop. 5,585) 
Remainder of County 

Cedar County 

Cerro Gordo County: 

liason City (Pop. 23,304) 
Clear Lake (Pop. 3,066) 
Remainder of County 

Cherokee County: 

Cherokee (Pop. 6,443) 
Remainder of Cotinty 

Cbickeeaw County 

Clarke County: 

Oeoeola (Pop. 2,871) 
Remainder of County 

Clay County: 

Spencer (Pop. 5,019) 
Remainder of County 

Clayton County 

Clinton County: 

Clinton (Pop. 25,726) 
Remainder of County 

Crewford County: 

Denison (Pop. 3,905) 
Remainder of County 

DalleB County: 

Perry (Pop. 5,881) 
Remainder of County 

Davis County 

Decatur County 

Delaware County: 

Uancbester (Pop. 3,41S) 
Remainder of County 



1650,029 



73,273 



(55,814 



90 
186 



149 
194 



107 

90 

206 



719 
152 
145 



228 
192 



114 
166 



110 
176 



123 
267 



123 
257 



167 
204 



274 
611 



411 

84 

116 



134 
162 



250 
145 



_£ai 



140 
119 



_SS1 



551 
343 



_2ia 



127 
221 



_igi 



137 
267 

145 

209 



121 
183 



8,187 



1,739 
2,012 



93 

201 



168 
165 



2,739 
1,208 



5,198 



135 
202 



379 
124 



2,029 
1,191 
1,978 

25,455 



108 
80 
198 



20,846 
2,852 
1,757 

6,596 



657 
148 
163 



173 
167 
141 

3,207 



2,629 
404 
174 



4,817 
1,779 



215 
193 



549 
177 



£,325 
2,593 



102 
176 



239 
204 



2,138 
1,436 

5.422 



95 
179 



209 
130 



2,753 
2,669 

3,673 

4,003 

6.485 



110 
256 



297 
277 



3,187 
3,298 



5.045 



125 
270 



333 

375 



3,359 
1,686 



3,630 
13.883 



156 
203 



11,625 

983 

1,275 



370 

81 

113 



396 
155 



1,564 



1,369 
117 
78 



3,103 
1,968 



3,260 
1,560 



126 
174 



252 

148 



324 
152 



1,237 
323 



6.444 



29 



5,075 
1,369 



4,467 



124 

108 



411 
866 



495 

119 



9,757 
4,083 



4.239 



532 
334 



1,300 
353 



2,121 
2,118 



123 
220 



248 
181 



3,ose 

2,731 
1,641 
2.135 
?.?66 



2,138 
1,428 



1^9 
2E9 



127 
199 



385 
250 



124 

177 



241 
138 



114 



117 
96 



223 
52 



141 

319 



127 
96 
96 



2,173 
247 
103 



392 
101 



186 
123 



177 
76 



209 
154 



178 
235 



293 
210 



293 
85 



238 
1,315 



,192 
80 
43 



"5!r 
113 



107 

""ST 

16 



464 
74 



1,008 
236 



177 
111 



134 



161 
79 



Des Moines County: 

Burlington (Pop. 26,755) 
Remainder of County 

Dickinson County 

Dubuque County; 

Dubuque (Pop. 41,679) 
Remainder of County 

Ennnet County: 

Esthervllle (Pop. 4,940) 
Remainder of County 

Fayette County: 

Oelwein (Pop. 7,794) 
Remainder of County 

Floyd County: 

Charles City (Pop. 8,039) 
Remainder of County 

Franklin County: 

Hampton (Pop. 3,473) 
Remainder of County 

Fremont County 

Greene County: 

Jefferson (Pop. 3,431) 
Remainder of County 

Grundy County 

Guthrie County 

Hamilton County: 

Webster City (Pop. 7,024) 
Remainder of County 

Hancock County 

Hardin County: 

Iowa Falls (Pop. 4,112) 
Eldora (Pop, 3,200) 
Remainder of County 

Harrison County: 

KisBOuri Valley (Pop. 4,230) 
Remainder of County 

Henry County: 

Mount Pleasant (Pop. 3,743) 
Remainder of County 

Howard Coimty: 

Cresco (Pop. 3,069) 
Remainder of County 

Humboldt County 

Ida County 

Iowa County 

Jackson County: 

Maquoketa (Pop. 3,595) 
Remainder of County 

Jasper County: 

Newton (Pop. 11,560) 
RenBlnder of County 

Jefferson County: 

Fairfield (Pop. 6,619) 
Remainder of County 

Johnson County: 

Iowa City (Pop. 15,340) 
Remainder of County 

Jonea County: 

Anamoaa (Pop. 3,579) 
Remainder of County 

Keokuk County 

Koasutb County: 

Algona (Pop. 3,985) 
Remainder of County 

Lee County: 

Keokuk (Pop. 15,106) 

Fart Madison (Pop. 13,779) 

Bemalnier of County 



395 
121 



»10,82a 



665 
325 



133 
101 



147 
329 



154 
US 



76 
106 



88 
146 

181 

315 

324 



159 
165 



127 
84 
222 



97 
265 



122 
168 



87 
HI 



a5 

213 



117 
213 



142 
230 



_227 



182 
95 



jsai 



260 
136 



_S£i 



60 
206 



395 



110 
285 



_i42 



292 

230 

118 



9,480 
1,348 



337 

U5 



1,274 



»1,087 



1,173 
101 



16,157 
3,251 



627 
334 



2,091 
281 



2,481 
1,131 



123 
111 



253 
83 



3,364 
3,501 



4.041 



139 
341 



410 
320 



,788 
1,253 



149 
113 



293 
98 



1,573 
1,036 



64 
109 



133 
64 



1,825 
1,670 

2,598 

2,688 
5,109 



90 
144 

186 

323 

322 



192 
179 

213 

298 
572 



3,446 
1,663 



147 
175 



~4Cr 
171 



264 
640 



Z,fl2 
1,458 
2,274 



117 

76 

£18 



182 
198 



1,660 
2,861 



100 
264 



187 
322 



2,089 
1,461 



132 
160 



253 
139 



1,942 
1,156 



2,931 
2,694 



79 
104 

223 

£12 
243 
334 



210 
94 



446 

449 



2,398 
2,090 

6.902 



106 
229 



,761 
2,141 



139 
235 



2S4 

185 



722 



2,454 

516 



181 
104 



303 
34 



9,357 
1,517 



243 

143 



1,240 
113 



1,352 
3,079 



3,087 



52 
211 



£79 



3,093 
3,578 



109 
£76 



290 



5,180 
3,562 
1,033 



279 
225 
US 



737 

447 

95 



•Poy (oil includw no componMlton for proprlotoi* ol onineo/potWod buainsa*** Nu 
lb* Bureau ol Uio Comus in RoUil Voluma III, ontitlcd "Count)' and City Summ 



ol amployaat includci lull-tima and part-ilma I eombinad ) . NOTE 
pan ol (tie Ccniut ol Amadcan Buiineaa o) 1933, available in 



lo( 1H33 wa(a publithad by 





















Vol. 11 - 


Page 33 


Census of Business 
Retail DistribuUon: 1935 


TABLE 


1 1,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 

STATE OF IOWA 


County and city 


Number 

of 
•tores 


Sidet 

ladd 0001 


Pro- 
prietoi* 


Em. 
ployees" 


Tol.1 

Par Roll' 
(■dd 000) 


County and city 


Number 

o( 

•tores 


SiUo 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees" 


Total 
Par Roll' 

(.« 000) 


Linn Coimty: 

Cedar Rapids (Pop. 56,097)2/ 
llarlOQ [Pop. 4,34S) 
Remainder of County 

Louisa County 

Lucas County: 

Charlton (Pop. 5,365) 
Remainder of County 

Lyon County 

Madison County: 

Winterset (Pop. 2,921) 
Remainder of County 

Mahaska County: 

Oskaloosa (Pop. 10,183) 
Remainder of County 

Marlon County: 

KhoxTllle (Pen. 4,697) 
Pella (Pop. 3,326) 
Remainder of County 

Marshall County: 

Marshalltown {Pop. 17,373) 
Remainder of County 

Mills County: 

Glenwood {Pop. 4,269) 
Remainder of County 

Mitchell County: 

Osage (Pop. 2,964) 
Reoainder of County 

Monona County: 

Onawa (Pop. 2,538) 
Remainder of County 

Monroe County: 

Albla (Pop. 4,425] 
Remainder of County 

Montgomery County: 

Red Oak (Pop. 5,778) 
Remainder of County 

liiscatine County: 

Muscatine (Pop. 16,778) 
Remainder of County 

O'Brien County: 

Sheldon (Fop. 3,320) 
Remainder of County 

Osceola County 

Page County: 

Shenandoah (Pop. 6,502) 
Clarlnda (Pop. 4,962) 

Remainder of County 

Palo Alto County: 

Qnnetsburg (Pop. 2,865) 
Remainder of County 

Plymouth County: 

Le Mars (Fop. 4,786) 
Ranalnder of County 

Pocahontas County 

PoUc County: 

Dee Molnee (Pop. 142,559) 
Valley Junction {Pop. '4,280) 
Remainder of County 


1,389 


♦27,621 


1,321 


3,197 


»2.851 


Pottairattuiuie Coimty: 


910 


17.054 


661 


2,012 


1.643 


85 
292 

189 

226 


1,2£1 
2,814 

2,116 

3,402 


82 
305 

182 

224 


2 855 
128 
214 

191 

352 


2,630 

98 

123 

109 

245 


Council Bluffs (Pop. 42,048) 
Reiaaintaer of County 

Poweshiek County: 

Orlnnell (Pop. 4,949) 
Repielnder of County 

Ringgold County 

Sac County; 

Sac City (Pop. 2,854) 
Remainder of County 

Scott County: 

Davenport (Pop. 60,751) 
Bettendorf (Pop. 2,768) 
Renainder of County 

Shelby County: 

Harlan (Pop, 3,145) 
Remainder of County 

Sioui County 

Story Countj': 

toes (Pop. 10,261) 
Nevada (Pop. 3,133) 
Remainder of County 

Tama County: 

Tama (Pop. 2,626) 
Remainder of County 

Taylor County 

Union County: 

Creston (Pop. 8,615) 
Remainder of County 

Van Buren County 

V/apello County: 

Ottumvia (Pop. 28,075) 
Remainder of County 

V/arren County: 

Indianole (Pop. 3,488) 
Remainder of County 

Viashington County: 

Washington (Pop. 4,814) 
Remainder of County 

Wayne County 

Webster County; 

Fort Dodge (Pop. 21,895) 
Remainder of County 

Winnebago County 

Winneshiek County; 

Decorah (Pop. 4,581) 
Remainder of County 

Woodburj' County: 

Sioui City (Pop. 79,183)1/ 
Remainder of County 

Worth County 

Vtright County; 

Eagle Orovo (Pop. 4,071) 
Clarion (Pop. 2,678) 
Remainder of County 


594 
316 

268 


13,411 
3,64:i 

3,982 


557 
304 

261 


1,672 
340 

389 


1,420 
223 

280 


94 
174 

141 

276 


2,143 
1,839 

1,309 

3.527 


87 
174 

141 

292 


241 
148 

161 

329 


leo 

100 

85 

217 


143 

83 

249 
210 


2,893 
509 

2,856 

2,700 


138 
86 

244 

217 


307 
45 

294 

262 


220 
25 

189 

175 


68 
208 

1.193 


1,385 
2,142 

29.436 


76 
217 

1.073 


128 
201 

3.936 


94 
123 

3.34C 


112 

98 

343 


1,976 
725 

5,321 


114 
103 

333 


198 
64 

675 


143 
32 

610 


961 

37 

196 

280 


26,923 

547 

1,965 

3,503 


843 
42 
188 

267 


3,695 

40 

203 

3C7 


3,147 
4] 
162 

219 


217 
126 

347 


4,432 
899 

4.219 


200 
133 

370 


606 
69 

436 


463 
47 

275 


115 
165 

385 

569 


2,048 

1,455 

5,274 
9.246 


118 
169 

398 

526 


195 
112 

516 

963 


165 
64 

336 

745 


106 

96 

145 

608 


1,826 
1,257 
1,136 

8.518 


108 
107 
155 

609 


184 
147 
105 

967 


132 
78 
65 

666 


188 

96 

285 

381 


5,054 
1,501 
2,691 

3,964 


175 

88 

265 

406 


621 

. 135 

207 

396 


501 
101 
143 

247 


392 
216 

217 


6,911 
1,607 

2,773 


388 
221 

217 


846 
121 

293 


599 
67 

197 


73 
144 

206 


1,222 
1,551 

3,339 


72 
145 

210 


137 
166 

238 


90 
107 

227 


85 
296 

251 

310 


1,034 
2,920 

2,170 

3,851 


94 
312 

238 

307 


113 
283 

247 

500 


72 
175 

134 

324 


71 
135 

247 


1,931 
1,408 

3.433 


72 

138 

260 


157 
81 

323 


■ 162 
65 

209 


188 
122 

200 

610 


3,064 

787 

1,681 
10,509 


186 
121 

204 

607 


436 
65 

166 

1,351 


266 

38 

67 
1,064 


68 
179 

213 


1,312 
2,121 

2.248 


69 
191 

200 


126 
197 

294 


89 
120 

168 


128 

85 

316 


1,697 
551 

4,251 


118 
82 

314 


237 
57 

471 


139 
29 

316 


485 
125 

334 


9,547 
962 

2.919 


468 
139 

353 


1,261 
90 

296 


1,009 

45 

167 


164 
152 

493 


2,998 
1,P.53 

9.024 


159 
155 

500 


;is 

155 
1,070 


233 

83 

743 


123 

211 

301 


1,650 
1,269 

4,763 


123 

230 

310 


191 
105 

491 


110 
67 

342 


331 

162 

343 


7,265 
1,759 

4.916 


333 
167 

342 


936 
154 

473 


649 
94 

318 


114 
187 

214 

612 


2,737 
2,026 

2,334 

14.050 


109 
201 

210 

581 


317 
174 

196 

1.644 


247 
95 

ino 

1,328 


91 
252 

155 

398 


1,935 
2,981 

2,277 

9,265 


87 
255 

155 

414 


211 
262 

193 

1,087 


154 
169 

146 

768 


408 
204 

238 

319 


11,783 
2,267 

3,821 

4.111 


367 
214 

233 

327 


1,457 
1B7 

353 

436 


1,207 
121 

236 

294 


146 
125 
127 

271 


4,987 

3,492 

786 

3.843 


144 
127 
143 

268 


690 
319 

78 

353 


480 

263 

35 

266 


134 
185 

1.549 


2,566 
1,543 

31.863 


135 
192 

1,432 


301 
135 

3.953 


222 
72 

3,303 


92 
179 

35* 


1,864 
1,979 

5.571 


78 
190 

357 


187 
166 

564 


156 
101 

423 


1,232 
317 

171 

362 


28,330 
3,533 

2,219 

4,421 


1,124 
308 

168 

354 


3,658 
296 

211 

443 


3,104 
199 

■ 126 

301 


123 
234 

261 

2.730 


2.541 
3,030 

3,397 

72.337 


117 
240 

260 

2.461 


286 
279 

363 

9,540 


239 
184 

207 

8,706 


118 
90 
154 


1,292 
1,383 

1,746 


110 
93 

151 


168 
122 

163 


11! 
83 
106 


2,408 

61 

261 


68,801 

1,385 

• 2,151 


2,161 

SO 

270 


9; 231 
123 
186 


8,458 
121 

127 


'.■^r Bureau of ih« Ceiwua m Ret«il Volume III. 


entitled "( 


orpoisled buiir 
ounly and Cii 


e«ei Ha 

f Summan 


into ,1 a, 
ce", pan 


the Leniui of American Buiineaa ol 1933, available in mo 

1 


Compaia 
•t libtane 


ble Area ligu 
, 1/ rifotea 


et for 19 
•ifeclad b 


33 »er, po 
incomplete 


bl»hed by 
coverage. 



Vol II - Page 34 



Census of Business 
Retail Dislribulipn: 1935 


TABLE 11,- STORES. SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL. BY AREAS 
STATE OF KANSAS 












County and city 


Number 
of 

stores 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em. 
ployaes* 


Total 
Pw Roll' 
(^ ooo) 


Cotmty and city 


Number 

ot 

stores 


Sales 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
prietors 


Em- 
ployees' 


TotJ 

(>dd ooo) 


STATg TOTitL 

Allen County; 

lola (Pop. 7,160) 
Humboldt (Pop. 2.568) 
Remainder of County 

Anderson County: 

Gamott (Pop. 2,768) 
Remainder of County 

Atchison County: 

Atchison (Pop. 13,024) 
Ramalnder of County 

Barber County 

Barton County: 

Great Band (Pop. 5,548) 
Holslngton (Pop. 3,001) 
Remainder of County 

Bourbon County: 

Fort Scott (Pop. 10,763) 
Remainder of County 

Brown County: 

Horton (Pop. 4,049) 
Hiawatha (Pop. 3,302) 
Remainder of County 

Butler County: 

11 Dorado (Pop. 10,311) 
Augusta (Pop. 4,033) 
Remainder of County 

Chase County 

Cbautautlua County 

Cherokee County: 

Galena (Pop. 4,736) 
Baxter Springs (4,541) 
Columbus (Pop, 3,235) 
Remainder of County 

Cheyenne County 

Clark County 

Clay County: 

Clay Cantor (Pop. 4,386) 
Remainder of County 

Cloud County: 

Concordia (Pop. 6,792) 
Remainder of County 

Coffey County 

Comanche County 

Cowley County: 

Arkanaao City (Pop. 13,946) 
Wlnfleld (Pop. 9,398) 
Remainder of County 

Crawford County: 

Pittsburg (Pop. 18,145) 
Remainder of County 

Decatur County 

Dickinson County: 

Abilene (Pop. 5,658) 
Herlngton (Pop. 4,519) 
Remainder of County 

Doniphan County 

Douglas Coxinty: 

Lswrence (Pop. 13,726) 
Remainder of County 

Edwards County 

21k County 

Ellis County: 

Hays (Pop. 4,618) 
Remainder of County 

Ellsworth County 

Finney County: 

Garden City (Pop. 6,121) 
Renalailer of County 


27,433 


♦448.261 


26.399 


52,634 


»?9,86? 


Ford County: 

Dodge City (Pop. 10,059) 
Remainder of County 

Franklin County: 

Ottawa (Pop. 9,563) 
Remainder of County 

Geary County: 

Junction City (Pop. 7,407) 
Remainder of County 

GoTe County 

Graham County 

Grant County 

Gray Coiinty 

Greeley County 

Greenwood County: 

Eureka (Pop. 3,698) 
Remainder of County 

Harper County: 

Anthony (Pop. 2,947) 
Remainder of County 

Harvey County: 

Newton (Pop. 11,034) 
Remainder of County 

Haskell County 

Hodgeman County 

Jackson County: 

Holton (Pop. 2,705) 
Remainder of County 

Jefferson County 

Jewell County 

Johnson County: 

Olatha (Pop. 3,666) 
Remainder of County 

Kaamy County 

Kingman County: 

Klngnan (Pop. 2,762) 
Remainder of County 

Kiowa County 

Labette County: 

Parsons (Pop. 14,903) 
Remainder of County 

Lane County 

LeaTenworth County: 

LeaTenworth (Pop. 17,466) 
Remainder of County 

Lincoln County 

Linn County 

Logan County 

Lyon County: 

Emporia (Pop. 14,067) 
Remainder of County 

UcPhareon County: 

UcPheroon (Pop. 6,147) 
Remainder of County 

Marion County 

Marshall County: 

karysilllo (Pop. 4,013) 
Remainder of County 


334 


♦6.852 


305 


855 


♦682 


358 


4.472 


354 


533 


350 


219 
115 

303 


6.750 
1.102 

5.322 


204 

101 

282 


732 
123 

597 


595 

87 

466 


196 

55 

107 

185 


3,225 
512 
735 

2,398 


180 

63 

111 

150 


404 
62 
67 

246 


288 
33 
29 

169 


171 
132 

176 


3.957 
1,365 

2.897 


165 
127 

172 


487 

110 

355 


393 
73 

250 


82 
103 

361 


1,577 
821 

5.370 


60 
90 

359 


139 
87 

666 


119 
50 

496 


155 
21 

91 

96 

30 

84 

31 

244 


2.801 
96 

865 

1.061 

683 

882 

325 

3,846 


152 

20 

87 
91 
22 
76 
21 
234 


342 

13 

68 
123 
57 
89 
38 
387 


242 

8 

52 

65 
35 
66 
28 
278 


265 
96 

161 

359 


4,722 
648 

2,490 

7,471 


266 
93 

154 

344 


616 
49 

246 

849 


466 

29 

176 
686 


137 

66 

156 

357 


4,479 
1,160 
1,832 

4,973 


115 

70 

169 

346 


502 
154 
193 

581 


436 

119 
131 

406 


214 
143 

232 


4.004 
969 

3.413 


208 
138 

232 


528 
53 

362 


3S0 
26 

256 


79 
165 

73 

223 


1,916 
1,930 

876 

3.502 


69 
166 

70 

211 


222 

166 

132 
332 


173 
105 

82 

264 


63 
75 
94 

454 


903 

1.710 

800 

8.417 


62 
72 
98 

439 


116 

191 

55 

853 


79 

144 

33 

703 


65 
158 

306 


2,021 
1,481 

6.628 


68 
153 

292 


181 
161 

812 


167 
97 

596 


175 

79 

200 

117 

129 

384 


5.031 
1.699 
1,687 

1,241 

1,919 

4.561 


156 

79 

204 

114 

125 

390 


649 
154 
140 

116 

207 

459 


473 

136 

95 

72 

146 

298 


166 
140 

30 

33 

183 


4,466 
2,162 

363 

512 

1,938 


147 

145 

23 

34 

174 


623 
189 

34 

43 

187 


459 
137 

24 

31 

104 


72 

81 

74 

157 

82 

93 

216 


632 
1,038 
1,883 

998 

1.413 
1.090 
3.433 


77 

85 

68 

160 

85 

94 

217 


' 84 

106 

197 

72 

160 

107 

390 


46 

72 

133 

47 

96 

71 

265 


79 

104 

205 
164 
437 


1,246 
692 

1,818 

2,007 

4,850 


80 
94 

211 

164 

427 


129 
68 

121 

210 

566 


76 
28 

81 

137 

387 


90 
347 

46 

183 


1,697 
3,153 

546 

3,088 


89 

338 

40 
178 


186 
370 

53 

266 


130 
257 

41 

202 


107 
109 

261 


2,346 
1,087 

4,364 


104 
113 

254 


283 
107 

635 


210 
55 

380 


102 
159 

223 

86 

586 


2,715 
1,649 

2,851 

1,437 

10,700 


97 
157 

186 

76 

526 


344 
191 

309 

139 

1.J44 


270 
110 

182 

114 

1,003 


74 
109 

93 

531 


1,938 
1,160 

1,328 

7.275 


71 
107 

100 

543 


178 
78 

119 

830 


139 
63 

86 

584 


292 
239 

56 

U7 


5,062 
2,213 

810 

7,139 


282 
261 

47 

432 


604 
226 

77 

882 


448 
136 

66 

701 


262 
212 
112 

724 


5,121 

4,963 

616 

10.267 


222 
192 
112 

691 


643 

644 

57 

1.264 


456 

518 

29 

928 


341 
106 

125 

217 

89 
442 


1,024 
1,313 
2,462 
992 
8.154 


322 
110 

128 

221 

79 

442 


789 
93 

151 

231 

119 

1,046 


636 
63 

84 
134 

91 
810 


328 
396 

115 

401 


6,817 
3,450 

1,645 

6.566 


310 
381 

109 

403 


921 
343 

156 

620 


721 
207 

103 

440 


114 
93 
194 

179 


2,661 
1.334 
1,571 

1,842 


112 

92 

199 

180 

399 


298 
168 
154 

213 

993 


230 

no 

100 
136 
739 


281 
161 

341 


7.161 
1.0O3 

6.709 


276 
166 

328 


937 
109 

723 


761 
49 

600 


2S8 
146 

108 

121 

177 


6,751 
1,216 

1,691 

1,142 

4.156 


253 
146 

106 

134 

159 


841 
152 

195 

110 

469 


660 
79 

138 

62 

381 


140 

201 

280 
372 


3.901 
2.808 

4.523 

5,067 


123 
205 

267 

381 


459 
264 

426 

483 


193 
282 
337 


66 

284 

80 
233 


2,013 
3,064 

1,201 

3,384 


91 
290 

79 

233 


213 

270 

115 
380 


172 
165 

91 

258 


90 
87 

177 

185 


2,928 
1,228 

2,4*9 

3.576 


82 

77 

168 
140 


346 
123 

273 

428 


286 

95 

197 

3K> 


Miami County: 

Oeawatomla (Fop. 4,440) 
Paola (Pop. 3.762) 
Remainder of County 

Mitchell County: 

Beloit (Pop. 3.602) 
RsBialnder of County 


83 
79 
71 

203 


1,381 

1,440 

663 

3.142 


79 
81 
73 

201 


175 

169 

36 

375 


115 

121 

22 

233 


130 
25 


3,447 
129 


114 
26 


404 
24 


309 
11 


106 
102 


2,163 
979 


106 

95 


257 
118 


171 
62 



"Pay roll IndudM no coaipMwatlon fof pf«pri«lo«i oJ unlncMpontMl btidn*** 
iKp Bu(*»u of iha Ceniu* >n Rauil Volume III, enotlcd 'Counly ani) Cily : 



NuiBb*r 4l ■■piny lnelti<iai hill-itm* uid part-llma (combiaad), NOTE: 
maiiei", pari ot tha Ciniu* ot Ani«rlc«n Buonaa* o( 1933, awulabia in meal 



CompBiabla Aiva liguia* lor 1933 wara publithad by 





















Vol. II - 


Page 35 


Census of Business 
Retail Dtstribulion: 1935 


TABLE 


II.-- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 




















STATE OF KANSAS 












County and city 


Number 

of 

•tores 


Sele. 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietore 


Em. 
ployees* 


Tol.1 

Pty Roll* 

(^ 000) 


County and city 


Number 

of 

■tore* 


SaJei 

(add 000) 


Pro- 

ptietora 


Em- 
ployee*" 


Total 
Par Roll- 

(.dd 000) 


Uootgomsry County: 

Coffoyrllle (Pop. 16.193) 


682 


♦11,586 


658 


1,431 


H.024 


Russell County 


202 


t 2,905 


207 


263 


$ 194 


292 


5,588 


275 


738 


540 


Independence {Fop. 12.782) 
Cherryrale (Pop, 4,251) 


174 
73 


4.168 
702 


160 
78 


470 
103 


350 
50 


Saline County: 

Sallna (Pop. 20,155) 


486 


11.184 


464 


1.458 


1,147 


384 


10,489 


348 


1,388 


1,111 


Canay (Pop. 2,794} 


35 


669 


30 


73 


62 


Remainder of County 


102 


696 


106 


70 


36 


Rwnainder of County 


108 


4S9 


115 


47 


22 


























Scott County 


63 


917 


62 


98 


81 


Uorrla County: 

Council Orove {Pop. 2,898) 
RamQlnder of County 


186 


2.135 


179 


219 


152 


Sedgwick County: 

Wichita (Pop. 111,110) 


2,146 


52,792 


1.996 


6.975 


5.928 


89 
97 


1,286 
849 


82 
97 


156 
54 


114 
38 


1,813 


49,464 


1,647 


6,644 


6,701 














Remainder of County 


333 


3,328 


349 


331 


227 


Morton County 


58 


585 


47 


70 


52 














Nanaha County 


251 


3,270 


258 


337 


208 


Seward County: 

Liberal (Pop. 6,294) 


123 


3.015 


114 


363 


284 


111 


2,941 


104 


367 


280 














Remainder of County 


12 


74 


10 


6 


4 


Neoaho County: 

Chonute (Pop. 10,277) 
Remainder of County 


273 


3,899 


277 


479 


338 


Shawnee County : 

Topeka (Pop. 64,120) 


1,280 


27.761 


1.227 


3.707 


3.092 


164 
109 


3,077 
822 


160 
117 


337 
92 


275 
63 


1,053 


26,366 


987 


3,596 


3,035 














Remainder of County 


227 


1,395 


240 


112 


57 


Ness County 


112 


1,368 


110 


131 


90 


























Sheridan County 


60 


870 


58 


74 


61 


Norton County: 

Norton (Pop. 2,767) 
Romfiinder of Cotinty 


174 


2.396 


167 


301 


202 


Sherman County: 

Goodland (Pop. 3,626) 


102 


1,954 


99 


203 


163 


80 
94 


1,486 
910 


78 
89 


217 
84 


165 
47 


77 


1,715 


76 


177 


134 














Remainder of County 


26 


239 


23 


26 


29 


Osage County 


265 


2,682 


264 


250 


160 


























Smith County 


166 


1,980 


161 


246 


139 


Oaborne County 


175 


1,952 


175 


227 


147 


























Stafford County 


129 


2,610 


130 


257 


195 


Ottawa County 


189 


1,852 


191 


239 


131 


























Stanton County 


33 


426 


28 


47 


35 


Pawnee County: 

Lamed (Fop. 3,532) 


108 


2,379 


96 


286 


240 


Stevens County 


68 


817 


50 


98 


66 


62 


1,693 


51 


236 


204 


Rerrialnder of County 


46 


686 


44 


49 


36 














Phillips County 


179 


2,130 


178 


260 


136 


Sumner County: 

Wellington (Pop. 7,406) 


422 


6,132 


398 


657 


495 


111 


2,628 


98 


320 


268 














Remainder of County 


311 


3,504 


300 


337 


237 


Pottawatomie County 


222 


2,195 


226 


274 


177 


























Thomas County 


130 


2,045 


125 


220 


165 


Pratt County: 

Pratt (Pop. 6.322) 


176 


3,955 


168 


433 


388 


Trego County 


84 


1,165 


80 


123 


86 


112 


3,350 


100 


372 


342 


Renainder of County 


63 


606 


58 


61 


46 


Wabaxinsee County 


148 


1,368 


160 


136 


84 


Rawlins County 


108 


1,463 


98 


124 


82 


Wallace County 


38 


506 


39 


47 


29 


Reno County: 

Hutchinson (Pop. 27,085) 


740 


17.075 


720 


2.061 


1,759 


Washington County 


260 


2,667 


265 


272 


161 


430 


14,671 


387 


1,798 


1,586 


Remainder of County 


310 


2,404 


333 


263 


153 












41 














Wichita County 


32 


479 


29 


54 


Republic County 


222 


2,304 


221 


290 


172 


Ult 1 ertn Crtiintv 


242 


2,846 


249 


300 


198 


Rice County: 

Lyons (Pop. 2,939) 


262 


5.116 


328 


551 


399 


Fredonia (Pop. 3,446) 
Neodesha (Pop. 3,381) 


77 
67 


1,111 
1,140 


77 
68 


132 

127 


93 
85 
20 


88 


2,141 


89 


240 


183 


Remainder of County 


174 


2,975 


139 


311 


216 


Remainder of County 


98 


696 


104 


41 


Riley County: 

Manhattan (Pop. 10,136) 
Rertlnder of County 


318 


6,404 


300 


808 


679 


Woodson County 

Wyandotte County: 

Kansas City (Pop. 121,857) 


130 
2.122 


1,218 
29.331 


129 
2.000 


164 
3.604 


80 
2,931 


213 
105 


5,085 
1,319 


186 
114 


706 
102 


632 
47 


1,706 


27,782 


1,694 


3,446 


2,830 


Rooks County 


162 


1,892 


148 


219 


138 


Remainder of County 


416 


1,649 


406 


169 


101 


Rush County 


140 


1,932 


132 


205 


144 














'Pay roll includes no coinpciualion (or propricion 


ot uninco 


rporaled buiioc 


Mb*. Nur 


nber of erap 


loyeu .nclude* full-time and part-time (combined). NOTE: C 


emparable 


Area figure* 


or 1933 


were publii 


.ed b. 


the Bureau at ihc Csniui in Reuil Vatuinc HI. 


enrilled "C 


ounly and Ciij 




j" p«t of 


the CeniUi ol AmericaA Buiinei* ot 1933, available in moi 


1 librariea 











Vol. II - Page 36 



Census of Business 
Retail Distribution; 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF KENTUCKY 












County and city 


Number 

of 
stares 


Sales 

(add 000) 


Pro- 
prietois 


Em 
ployeei' 


ToU 

P.7 RoD" 
(^ ooo) 


County and city 


Number 

of 

stores 


Sales 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
piieton 


Em 
ployees" 


Total 
Psj KM' 

(Ud tXio) 


Adair County 

Allan County 

AndereOD County 

Ballard County 

Barren County: 

Glasgow (Pop. 5,042) 
BaoBinder of County 

Bath County 

Ball County: 

Middleeborough (Fop. 10,350) 
PlnoTllle (Pop. 3,567) 
RasBlnder of County 

Boone County 

Bourbon County: 

Paris (Pop. 6,204) 
Remainder of Coimty 

Boyd County: 

Ashlejid (Pop. 89,074) 
Catlettsburg (Pop. 5,025) 
Remainder of County 

Boyle County: 

DanTille (Pop. 6,729) 
RenBlnder of County 

Braclcen County 

Breathitt County 

Braekinridge County 

Bullitt County 

Butler County 

Caldwell County: 

Princeton (Pop. 4,764) 
Remainder of County 

Calloway County: 

Murray (Pop. 2,891) 
Raoainder of County 

Ca]q)bell County: 

Newport (pop. 29,744) 
yort Thomaa (Pop. 10,008) 
Dayton (Pop. 9,071) 
BelleTue (Pop. 8,497) 
Clifton (Pop. 3V080) 
Remainder of County 

Carl 1 ale County 

Carroll County 

Carter Cotinty 

Casey County 

Chrlatian County: 

HopkinaTllle (Pop. 10,74«) 
Reninder of County 

Clark County: 

Wlnobaster (Pop. 8,232) 
Romindar of County 

Clay County 

Clinton County 

Crittenden County 

CuBbarland County 

DaTlesB County: 

Owens boro (Pop. 2£,76&) 
Remainder of County 

Idmonson County 

niiott County 


29.286 


t388.278 


28.192 


48.481 


136.931 


Bstill County: 

Irrlns (Pop. 3,640) 
Remainder of County 

Payette County: 

Lexington (Pop. 45,736) 
Ranalnder of County 

Flaming County 

Floyd County 

Franklin County: 

Frank-Tort (Pop. 11,626) 
Remainder of County 

Fulton County: 

Fulton (Pop. 3,502) 
Remainder of Co\inty 

Gallatin County 

Garrard County 

Grant County 

Graveo County: 

Mayfleia (Pop. 8,177) 
Remainder of County 

Grayson County 

Green County 

Greenup County 

Hancock County 

Hardin County: 

Illzabetbtown (Fop. 2,590) 
RenBlnder of County 

Barlan County: 

Harlan (Pop. 4,327) 
Cumberland (Pop. 2,639) 
Remainder of County 

Harrison County: 

Cyntbiana (Pop. 4,386) 
Remainder of County 

Hart County 

Henderson County: 

Hendoreon (Pop. 11,668) 
Remainder of County 

Henry County 

Hickman County 

Hopkins County: 

Madlsonyllle (Pop. 6,908) 
Earlington (Pop. 3,309) 
RenBlnder of County 

Jackson County 

Jefferson County: 

LouiOTllle (Pop. 307,746) 
Remainder of County 

Jeesanlno County: 

JIlcboloSTllle (Pop. 3,128) 
Remainder of County 

Jobnaon County 

Eenton County: 

Covington (Pop. 65,252) 
Ludlow (Pop. 6,486) 
KlsDore (Pop. 2,917) 
ReeielDdar Of County 

Ettott County 

Knox County; 

Corbln (Pop. 1,736) 

(part in Whitley County) 
ReaBinder of County 

Larue County 

Laurel Ceunty 


148 


t I.EIS 


141 


108 


1 72 


217 

13S 

89 

110 

33« 


1,015 
1,199 
1,187 
715 
3,052 


243 
129 
86 
122 
342 


94 
123 
107 

51 
378 


41 
59 
76 
25 
235 


53 
96 

922 


769 
446 

24.192 


44 

97 

726 


87 
21 

3,508 


59 

13 

2,948 


809 
113 

157 

378 

260 


23,608 
584 

1,282 

3,365 

6.016 


616 
109 

162 

378 

252 


5,464 
44 

141 

218 

641 


2,926 
22 

70 

177 
490 


121 
215 

296 


2,110 
942 

641 

5.433 


107 
235 

110 

261 


287 
91 

75 

681 


200 
35 

37 

497 


188 
72 

219 


4,652 
364 

2.683 


176 
76 

218 


600 
41 

353 


467 
23 

211 


no 

76 
110 

130 

195 


3,518 
1,242 

873 

982 
2,845 


96 

65 

100 

114 

196 


447 

176 

58 

82 

353 


316 

129 

52 

65 

240 


124 

95 

59 
121 
137 
356 


1,917 
766 

477 

1,205 

1,310 

4.431 


125 
93 

61 

120 

135 

362 


284 
69 

76 

145 

161 

524 


165 
46 

38 

74 

96 

379 


123 
72 

587 


2,336 
509 

10.734 


121 

75 

543 


310 
43 

1.328 


218 
22 

1.067 


164 
191 

161 

154 

208 

59 

312 


3,804 
627 

1,082 
957 

1,681 
446 

3.901 


152 
210 

180 

187 

220 

64 

325 


496 

28 

99 
63 

165 
39 

446 


366 
13 

68 

36 

122 
26 

298 


428 

57 
102 

218 


9,610 
620 
504 

3.262 


386 

56 

101 

218 


1,207 
74 
47 

477 


989 
50 
28 

370 


129 

89 

137 
190 
199 
83 
123 
143 


2,669 
583 

1,118 
800 

1,067 
807 
373 

1.741 


121 
97 

139 

187 

202 

95 

125 

144 


411 
66 

128 
62 

142 
67 
25 

254 


336 
34 

52 

33 

64 

40 

9 

141 


73 
239 

409 


2,238 
1,663 

10.239 


71 
264 

348 


267 
179 

954 


180 

lie 

839 


100 

70 

239 

162 


3,250 

909 

6,080 

2,516 


81 

67 

200 

160 


404 
123 
427 

305 


324 

80 
435 

204 


95 
48 

202 


1,439 
302 

2.041 


89 
55 

212 


218 
36 

209 


128 
13 

140 


100 
52 

199 

269 


2,217 
299 

1,239 

3,816 


94 

56 

209 
245 


280 
26 

96 

510 


193 

11 

55 
348 


127 
75 

1.052 


1,682 
359 

13,766 


126 
86 

979 


201 
8 

1,534 


137 
3 

1,367 


189 
80 

144 

74 

337 


3,431 
385 

1,291 

622 

5.292 


163 
82 

149 

77 

341 


483 
27 

132 

85 

605 


334 

14 

68 

37 
417 


550 
73 

146 
99 
30 

155 

81 
134 
199 
142 
348 


9,087 
939 

1,278 

1,178 
203 

1,083 

483 
1,584 
1,684 

612 
4.732 


507 
70 

134 
87 
27 

154 

88 
118 
196 
148 
343 


1,066 
108 
122 
117 
31 
100 

83 
248 
110 

61 
639 


978 

82 

107 

113 

17 

70 

33 

144 

66 

24 

414 


138 

26 

173 

85 

4,915 


3,211 

606 

1,476 

284 

104,852 


134 
20 

187 

85 
4,242 


392 

72 

141 

18 

15,436 


283 
44 

90 

9 

13,424 


4,488 
427 

146 


100,702 
4,160 

1,466 


3,823 
419 

148 


14,907 
629 

160 


13,067 
357 

102 


197 
151 

220 


4,026 
706 

3.271 


183 

160 

234 


581 
58 

382 


384 
30 

265 


72 
76 

231 

1.431 


1,084 
372 

£.254 

19,7£0 


69 
79 

234 

1,303 


130 
30 

217 

2,649 


87 
15 

155 

2.154 


168 
52 

226 

101 

108 

97 

554 


3,060 
211 

693 

315 

960 

532 

9.332 


177 
57 

238 

107 
113 
104 
550 


375 
7 

125 
40 

102 

42 

1.192 


£62 
3 

37 

16 

50 

22 

949 


1,109 

92 

19 

211 

107 

£34 


16,424 

821 

183 

2,292 

609 

1,686 


1,008 

82 

18 

195 

98 

231 


2,122 
85 

£1 
321 

£9 

141 


1,S£C 

74 

15 

£45 

£1 

91 


404 

150 

101 
64 


8,667 
665 

394 

243 


390 
160 

112 

62 


1,142 
50 

59 

9 


927 
22 

24 

3 


18 
216 

12£ 


169 
1,416 

933 

1.427 


18 
£13 

12£ 

226 


11 

130 

116 


7 
84 

64 

89 


NOT^: CompaobI* Ar«« Uguiu h, 1933 ««. 


publiihed 


by th* Bur«B 


u of ih« 


C«n.ui in R 


• Uil Volum* III, anlill«d "Couoly Mid City Summ«i«." , p> 


.1 of th* 
■*tm* (c« 


C«n*ui of Am 
■nblnvd). 


ticu. But 


ne., «! IS 


33. 





















Vol. 11 - 


Page 37 


Census of Businest 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 11,- STORES, SALES. PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL. BY AREAS 




















STATE OF KENTUCKY 












County and city 


Number 
■tores 


(add OOO; 


Pro. 

piieton 


Em- 
ployee** 


Toul 

P«T Roll' 


County and city 


Number 

oi 

■toree 


Salo 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em- 
ployee** 


Tolel 
Pny Roll* 

(.dd 000) 


La«r«DCQ County 


17£ 


t 856 


176 


73 


* 44 


OldhjBjn County 


98 


» 796 


98 


97 


»58 


L»6 County 


ISO 


533 


99 


33 


22 


Oiwn County 


93 


951 


98 


86 


49 


Leslla County 


79 


278 


80 


19 


6 


Oweloy Coiuity 


58 


223 


66 


7 


3 


Latchor County: 

Jenkins (Fop. 6,465) 


S77 


4.100 


338 


405 


316 


Pendleton County 


14S 


1,039 


130 


84 


57 


M 


94S 


44 


97 


85 


Renfilnder of County 


S£3 


3,155 


294 


308 


231 


Perry County: 

Hazard (Pop. 7,021) 


343 


5,189 


323 


448 


402 


94 


2,119 


81 


265 


219 


Lowls County 


136 


1,063 


139 


79 


42 


Renfilnder of County 


249 


3,070 


242 


183 


183 


Lincoln County 


235 


1,491 


232 


106 


58 


Pike County: 

PlkeTllle (Pop. 3,376) 


498 


5,617 


489 


424 


379 


96 


2,020 


89 


206 


193 


LlTlugston County 


91 


441 


95 


45 


20 


Reminder of County 


402 


3,597 


400 


218 


166 


Logan County: 

RusseUville (Pop. 3,297) 


180 


2.616 


181 


291 


204 


Powell County 


65 


280 


70 


14 


8 


69 


1,793 


66 


207 


156 


Renalnder of County 


111 


823 


115 


84 


48 


Pulaakl County: 

SomerBot (Pop. 5,506) 


435 


3.243 


423 


424 


247 


U9 


2,334 


114 


352 


219 


Lyon County 


58 


468 


52 


58 


32 


RenBinder of County 


316 


909 


309 


72 


28 


UcCracken County: 

Paduca^ (Pop. 33. Ml) 


618 


10,253 


596 


1.535 


1,068 


Robertson County 


32 


204 


34 


26 


9 


536 


9,947 


513 


1,509 


1,057 


Ramalndsr of County 


80 


306 


83 


26 


11 


Rockcastle County 


171 


821 


174 


93 


34 


McCreary County 


145 


1,U6 


142 


100 


74 


Rowan County 


116 


1,079 


120 


86 


57 


McLean County 


98 


753 


106 


95 


44 


RuBsell County 


144 


568 


150 


56 


17 


Uadiaon County: 

RlchMond (Pop. 6,496) 


282 


4.177 


281 


555 


362 


Scott County: 

Georgetown (Pop. 4,229) 


164 


2.339 


166 


289 


170 


131 


3,091 


127 


416 


292 


84 


1,870 


83 


235 


150 


Ramalndor of County 


151 


1,086 


154 


139 


70 


Remainder of County 


80 


469 


83 


54 


20 


Magoffin County 


151 


343 


158 


23 


8 


Shelby County: 

Shelbyrllle (Pop. 4,033) 


177 


2.782 


189 


320 


192 


88 


2,198 


86 


261 


166 


Marion County: 

Lebanon (Fop. 3,248) 


128 


1,823 


132 


192 


117 


Remainder of County 


89 


584 


103 


59 


26 


63 


1,445 


65 


162 


103 


Remainder of Coujtty 


60 


378 


67 


SO 


14 


Sijnpson Co\mty: 

Franklin (Pop. 3,056) 


U8 


1.540 


123 


193 


112 


83 


1,423 


86 


190 


111 


Marshall County 


135 


852 


90 


88 


59 


Reinalnder of County 


35 


117 


37 


3 


1 


Martin County 


52 


289 


54 


16 


8 


Spencer County 


50 


645 


49 


48 


35 


Mason County: 

MaysTllle (Fop. 6,557) 


249 


3.406 


248 


453 


306 


Taylor County 


131 


1,524 


135 


133 


70 


150 


2.806 


139 


400 


285 


Remainder of County 


99 


600 


109 


53 


21 


Todd County 


131 


1,166 


154 


143 


70 


Meade County 


85 


512 


87 


41 


la 


Trigg County 


110 


954 


115 


110 


48 


Menifee County 


55 


2B4 


55 


20 


5 


Triable Coiinty 


64 


338 


68 


46 


22 


Mercer County: 

Harrodeburg (Pop. 4,029) 


170 


1.749 


168 


210 


132 


Union County: 

Morganfleld (Pop. 2,551) 


167 


2,625 


168 


290 


177 


104 


1,460 


98 


195 


128 


54 


1,383 


51 


163 


107 


Remainder of County 


66 


289 


70 


15 


4 


Remainder of County 


U3 


1,242 


117 


127 


70 


Metcalfe County 


75 


338 


79 


21 


a 


Warren County: 

Bowling Green (Pop. 12,348) 


423 


6,058 


449 


780 


502 


236 


5,487 


266 


705 


478 


Monroe County 


«02 


915 


216 


85 


44 


RenHinder of Cotmty 


187 


571 


193 


75 


24 


Montgomery County: 

Mount Sterling (Pop. 4,350) 


140 


2,135 


139 


241 


167 


Washington County 


94 


1,357 


111 


127 


84 


112 


1,985 


109 


235 


164 


Reimlnder of County 


£8 


150 


30 


6 


3 


Wayne County 


148 


930 


157 


113 


S8 


Morgan County 


171 


529 


182 


30 


10 


Webster County: 

Providence (Pop. 4,742) 


207 


2.153 


207 


259 


132 


70 


887 


69 


118 


66 


Central City (pop. 4,321) 


253 


3,553 


248 


355 


240 


Renfiinder of County 


137 


1,266 


138 


141 


66 


80 


l,4«e 


77 


156 


103 


Renelnder of County 


173 


2,061 


171 


199 


137 


Whitley County: 

Corbln (Pop. 6,301) 


323 


3,393 


311 


414 


269 












Nelaon County 


158 


2,191 


157 


275 


153 


(part in Knoi County) 


129 


2,135 


120 


283 


194 














ResBlnder of Coxinty 


194 


1,258 


191 


131 


75 


Nicholas County 


81 


995 


82 


114 


92 


























Wolfe County 


68 


254 


80 


17 


4 


Ohio County 


229 


1,449 


223 


142 


80 


























Woodford County 


163 


1,749 


US 


206 


142 


NOTE; Compukble Aiem ligurM tat 1933 war 


publ >*!,«< 


by the Bur« 


.u or iho 


Conn* in 


%cl»l Voliin 


e III. entitled "County and City Sumjnorio." . p 


■ft of the 


Cenau* ol An 


ericiu, Bu 


• meii of 1 


»3, 


■vulaiile >n rmmi Ubrviea *'- Pay roll include* 


no compe 


fU«Uon (or pro 


pnelori of 


unincorpori 


led buiineu 


>e*. Number al employee* include, full-bme and p 


iH-time [ 


ombined ) 









VoL 11 - Page 38 
























Census of B-jsine&s 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


fABLE 


n,- STOBF.S SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF LOUISIANA 










County and city 


Number 

ol 
stores 


Sales 

(add 000) 


Pro- 

prieten 


Em. 
ployeeso 


Total 
rn Kril* 


County and dty 


Number 

o< 

•tores 


Sales 

(sdd 0001 


Pro- 
prietot* 


Em. 
ployees* 


Total 

(-M 000) 


SIATB TOIM. 

Acadia Parish: 

Crowley (Pop. 7,656) 
Rayua (Pop. 3,710) 
Remainder of Pariah 

Ailen Pariah: 

OoJtaale (Pop. 3,188) 
Remainder of Parish 

AacenBlon Parish; 

Donaldsonvllle (Pop, 3,788) 
Remainder of Parish 

As sumption Parish 

Avoyelles Parish 

Beauregard Pariah: 

De Riddar (Pop. 3,747) 
Merryrille (Pop. 2,626) 
Remainder of Parish 

BienTille Parish 

Bossier Parish: 

Bossier City (Pop. 4,003) 
Remainder of Parish 

Caddo Parish: 

Shreveport (Pop. 76,655) 
Remainder of Parish 

Calcasieu Parish: 

taKe Charles (Pop. 15,791) 
De ^ulncy (Pop. 3,589) 
Remainder of Pariah 

Caldwell Parish 

Cameron Parish 

Catahoula Parish 

Claiborne Parish: 

Homer (Pop. 2,909) 
HaynesTlllo (Pop. 2,541) 
ReiDainder of Parish 

Concordia Parish: 

Ferrlday (Pop. 2,502) 
Remainder of Pariah 

De Soto Parish: 

Mnnsfleld (Pop. 3,837) 
Remainder of Parish 

East Baton Rouge Parish: 
Baton Rouge (Pop. 30,729) 
Remainder of Parish 

East Carroll Parish: 

Lake'ProTldence (Pop. 2,867) 
Remainder of Perish 

East Feliciana Parish: 
Jaclceon (Pop. 3,966) 
Remainder of Parish 

Evangeline Parish 

Grant Parish 

Iberia Perish: 

New Iberia (Pop. 8,003) 
Remainder of Parish 

Iberville Parish: 

Plaquemlne (Pop. 6,124) 
Remainder of Parish 

Jackson Parish 

Jefferson Parish: 

Gretna (Pop. 9,584) 
Weatwego (Pop. 3,987) 
Remainder of Pariah 

Jefferson Davie Parish: 
Jennings (Pop. 4,036) 
Remainder of Pariah 


23,189 


J344.393 


21.399 


50.871 


t36.e64 


Lafayette Pariah: 

Lafayette (Pop. 14,635) 
Eaaalnder of Parish 

Lafourche Parish: 

Thlbodaui (Pop. 4,442) 
Rsmalnder of Pariah 

La Salle Parish 

Lincoln Parish: 

Ruaton (Pop. 4,400) 
Remainder of Parish 

Livingston Pariah 

lladisun Pariah: 

Tallulah (Pop. 3,332) 
Benainder of Parish 

Ubrehouse Parish: 

Bastrop (Pop. 5,121) 
Remainder of Pariah 

Natchitoches Parish: 

Natchitoches (Pop. 4,547) 
Remainder of Pariah 

Orleans Pariah: 

(Coextensive with 
New Orleaiia)(Pop. 458,762) 

Ouachita Parish! 

Monroe (Pop. 26,026) 
West Monroe (Pop. 6,566) 
Bamainder of Parish 

Plaquemines Perish 

Point* Coupee Perleh 

Rapides Parish! 

Alexandria (Pop. 23,085) 
Plnevllle (Pop. 3,612) 
Remainder of Parish 

Bed River Parish 

Richland Parish 

Sabine Parish 

St. Bernard Parish 

St. Charles Parish 

St. Helena Parish 

St. James Parish 

St. John the Beptlet Parish 

St. Landry Parish: 

Opeloueaa (Pop. 6,299) 
amloo (Pop. 3,597) 
Remainder of Parish 

St. Martin Parish 

St. Mary Parish: 

Morgan City (Pop. 5,985) 
Franklin (Pop. 3,271) 
Remainder of Parish 

St. Tanmiany Parish; 

Covington (Pop. 3,208) 
Slldell (Pop. 2,807) 
Remainder of Pariah 

Tangipahoa Parish: 

Baimond (Pop. 6,078) 
Ponohatoula (Pop. 2,898) 
Aalts (Pop. 2,536) 
Reneinder of Pariah 

Tensas Parish 

Terrebonne Parish: 
Bouma (Pop. 6,531) 
Remainder of Parish 

Onion Parish 


465 


t 6.691 


486 


1.099 


• 671 


406 


5,415 


374 


737 


571 


272 
19S 

366 


6,763 
988 

4,764 


237 
189 

348 


98* 
UO 

665 


617 
64 

S66 


169 

65 

172 

157 


2,579 
1,463 
1,37S 

1.646 


151 

60 

163 

155 


SS9 

187 
161 

213 


SOS 

178 
90 

194 


104 
862 

104 

178 


1,929 

2,836 

1,202 
2,731 


101 
241 

93 

157 


251 
304 

128 

891 


ITS 
193 

94 

886 


77 
80 

222 


917 
729 

1,505 


74 

81 

219 


119 

94 

844 


88 

66 

135 


85 

93 

126 
81 


2,060 

671 

762 
1.663 


67 
90 

180 

69 


839 
58 

77 

198 


196 
SO 

47 

14S 


68 
154 

132 

351 

133 


788 
717 

1,347 

2,41S 

1,317 


67 
152 

125 

329 

127 


141 
103 

167 

334 

153 


90 
45 

104 

223 

106 


55 
26 

197 


1,288 
875 

3,133 


44 

26 

174 


170 
82 

393 


134 

11 

269 


85 
17 
31 

183 

176 


1,056 

9g 

171 

2,305 

2.519 


81 
16 

30 

180 
192 


131 

8 

14 

224 

280 


94 

5 
7 

156 

807 


102 
95 

272 


1,998 

1,141 

2.830 


66 
69 

270 


241 
152 

339 


187 
88 

851 


107 
165 

6,836 


1,869 
961 

123,524 


100 
170 

6,132 


241 
98 

20,917 


191 
60 

15,823 


60 
U6 

1,465 


1,413 
1,106 

34,765 


61 
131 

1,276 


139 
111 

5.139 


145 
62 

4,806 


593 


13,597 


488 


1,870 


1,614 


1,147 
318 

653 


31,018 
3,747 

11,757 


950 
S26 

563 


4,696 
443 

1,599 


3,907 
299 

1,299 


416 
92 
86 

118 

812 

675 


11,273 

1,656 

669 

573 

1,476 

11,034 


323 
61 
84 

126 

800 

603 


1,560 

211 

99 

48 

165 

1,500 


1,896 

166 

58 

86 

101 

1,133 


312 

63 

278 

72 

58 

95 

177 


8,267 

887 

2,603 

1,100 
210 
982 

3.096 


256 

57 

250 

69 

58 

85 

180 


1,161 

99 

339 

96 

25 

94 

307 


1,011 

63 

225 

78 

12 

60 

262 


381 
54 
240 

98 
180 
171 

84 
134 

39 
144 
131 
567 


6,489 

806 

1,739 

1,112 

2,219 

2,009 

493 

929 

226 

1,161 

1,110 

6.483 


318 

62 

233 

102 

158 

160 

81 
134 

41 
130 
130 
644 


1,236 

96 

168 

91 
283 
198 

78 
128 

20 
168 
187 
664 


988 
57 
88 

69 
177 
154 

53 

70 
6 

78 
lOS 
577 


68 
51 
58 

117 


1,682 

1,178 

402 

1.214 


65 
54 

61 

120 


160 

120 

2? 

167 


133 

115 

14 

105 


52 
65 

217 


686 
528 

2,609 


51 
69 

199 


111 
56 

284 


73 
32 

216 


79 
138 

889 


1,382 
1,227 

19,632 


73 
126 

772 


173 
111 

2,793 


132 
84 

2.080 


524 
365 

99 


16,157 
3,475 

1,565 


412 
360 

S9 


2,868 
505 

206 


1,825 
2S6 

143 


60 
39 

145 


1,103 
462 

986 


54 

55 

145 


144 
62 

149 


118 
25 

60 


147 
102 

308 

291 
389 


3,486 

1,350 
1,648 

1,872 

3.226 


138 

93 

313 

303 

310 


198 
176 

178 

486 


136 
91 

105 

863 


16 
129 

264 

186 

132 

364 


281 

705 

1,357 
2,431 
1,384 
4,047 


14 
131 

271 

163 

127 

357 


29 
120 

223 

889 

146 

£11 


17 
43 

119 

807 

94 

363 


91 
82 

156 

861 


908 
1,252 
1,066 

2,616 


96 

76 

140 

848 


161 
164 
103 

388 


87 

U7 

59 

833 


83 

51 
117 

441 


1,170 
738 
706 

6,307 


84 

41 

U7 

403 


167 

143 
66 

693 


101 
83 
49 

435 


169 
195 

241 


2,437 
1,610 

2,663 


163 
194 

231 


368 
843 

321 


240 
183 

800 


118 

S3 

66 

214 

111 


2,118 

1,063 

653 

1,283 

1,186 

4 066 


99 
43 
48 

213 

112 
301 


863 
126 
100 

188 

146 
617 


184 
87 
79 
65 

93 

388 


61 
160 

107 

808 


1,126 
1,537 

1,960 

4.856 


78 

153 

91 
828 


187 
134 

190 

668 


113 
87 

173 

344 


194 

68 

546 

246 


1,236 

359 

3,261 

3.376 


194 

70 
564 

226 


144 
SI 

469 

457 


30 
239 

899 


166 
156 

140 


2,726 
1,340 

1,866 


160 
141 

143 


465 
168 

166 


287 
95 

87 


91 

155 


1,962 

1,414 


73 
163 


269 

188 


1»0 
109 


tiia Buretu of tho Caniu, m Rotail Voluma 111. 


K ol OIlllX 

emitted ' 


wfporstod bvM 

County and C 


IV Summ* 


nisltor «< a 
■ Of", pari 


•■lorMS loo 

^ Iho Co. 


u« ol Atn«..can Buiina., ol 1933. available in m 


Cotopaia 
Ml llbrarl. 


la Ajoa llfur* 
• 


a lor 193 


3 v.o»e pob 


Ithed by 





















Vol. 11 


Page 39 


Census of Business 
Retail Distribution: 1935 


TABLE 


11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
MAINE MARYLAND 












County and city 


Number 

oi 

•tore* 


S.le> 

ladd 0001 


Pro- 
prietore 


Em- 
ployee** 


ToU 

P«7 Roll* 

(••Id 000 ) 


County and city 


Number 

of 

■tore* 


SiJe* 

(add 0001 


Pro- 
prietor* 


Em- 
ployee*" 


TotJ 

P.y Roll- 
(.dd ooo) 


UKflSlAHA. (oontlntwd) 

Vemlllon Pariah: 

AbboTllIe (Pop. 4»356) 
R«Dalader of Parish 

Vemoa Pariah: 

LaesTlUe {Pop. 3,291) 
Roiaalndor of Pariah 

Washington Parish: 

Bogftluaa (Pop. 14,0£9l 
Ramalnder of Pariah 

Wabatar Pariah: 

Uladen (Pop. 5.683) 
Ramalnder of Pariah 

Weat Baton Rouge Pariah 

West Carroll Pariah 

ITeet Feliciana Parish 

Winn Pariah: 

Wlnnfiold (Pop. 3.721) 
Remainder of Parish 

MUNE 

Lewlston (Pop. 34,948) 
Auburn (Pop. 18,5?1) 
Renalnder of County 

Aroostoolc County: 

Prasque Isle (Pop. 4»662) 
Remainder of County 

Cumberland County: 

Portland (Pop, 70,810) 
South Portland (Pop. 13,840) 
Weatbrook (Pop. 10,807) 
Brunswick (Pop, 6,144) 
Hamaiader of County 

nrenklln County 

Hancock County: 

niflworth (Pop. 3,557) 
Remainder of County 

Kennebec County: 

Augusta (Pop. 17,198) 
Waterrllle (Pop. 15,454) 
Gardiner (Pop. 5,609} 
Eallowell (Pop. 2,675) 
Remainder of County 

Knoi County: 

Rockland (Pop. 9,075) 
Remainder of County 

Lincoln County 

Oxford County: 

Rumford Palle {Pop. 8,726) 
Remainder of County 

Penobscot County: 

Bangor (Pop. 28,749} 
Old Town (Pop, 7,266) 
Brewer (Pop. 6,329) 
Renalodar of County 

PlscataqulB County 

Sagadahoc County: 
Bath (Pop. 9,1101 
Remainder of Coanty 

Scoarset County: 

Uadiaon {Pop, 3,036) 
Ramalnder of County 

Waldo County: 

Belfast (Pop. 4,993) 
Remainder of County 

Washington County: 

Calais (Pop. 5,470) 
laatport (Pop. 3,466) 
Ramalnder of Coiinty 

Tork County: 

Blddaford (Pop. 17.633) 
aaeo (Pop. 7.233) 
Risalader of County 


451 


» 3,853 


436 


516 


t 273 


Allegany County; 

Cumberland (Pop. 37,747) 
FroBtburg {Pop. 5,588) 
Westemport (Pop. 3,440) 
Remainder of County 

Anne Arundel County: 

Annapoll, (Pop. 12,631) 
Remainder of County 

Baltimore County 

Baltimore (city) (Pop. 804,87.1) 

CalTert County 

Caroline County 

Carroll County: 

Westminster (Pop. 4,463) 
Remainder of County 

Cecil County: 

Klkton (Pop. 3,331) 
Remainder of County 

Charles County 

Dorchester County: 

Cambridge (Pop. 8,544) 
Reioalnder of County 

Frederlcli County: 

Frederick (Pop. 14,434) 
Brunswick (Pop. 3,671) 
i^emalnder of County 

Garrett County 

Harford County: 

Hayre de Grace (Pop. 3,985) 
Remainder of County 

Howard County 

Kent County: 

Cheatertown (Pop. 2,809) 
Remainder of County 

Montgomery County: ^ , 
Takoma Park (part)(Pop.5,437)= 
Remainder of County 

Prince Georges County: , / 
Takoma Park (part) (Pop. 978)-' 
HyattSTlllo (Pop. 4,264) 
Mount Rainier (Pop. 3,832) 
Laurel (Fop. 2,532) 
Remainder of County 

Queen Annes County 

St. Marys County 

Somerset County: 

Crlsfleld (Pop. 3,850) 
Remainder of County 

Talbot County: 

laaton (Pop. 4,092) 
Remainder of County 

Washington County: 

Hagerstown (Pop. 30,861) 
Ramalnder of County 

Wlccmloo County: 

Salisbury (Pop. 10,997) 
Ramalnder of County 

Worcester County: 

PoooBoke City (Pop. 2,609) 
Remainder of County 


23,349 


»462,874 


21,557 


59,681 


(51,738 


1,097 


22,036 


1,019 


2,600 


2,170 


142 

309 

169 


2,002 
1,851 

1,601 


131 
305 

149 


287 
229 

202 


163 
110 

128 


604 

123 

32 

338 

731 


16,487 

2,009 

541 

2,999 

10,133 


518 

126 

29 

346 

682 


1,983 

256 

67 

294 

1,147 


1,712 

199 

44 

215 

934 


8Z 

87 

244 


936 

665 

4,807 


70 
79 

208 


155 

47 

566 


100 
28 

456 


222 
509 

1,103 

13,557 

148 

269 

402 


6,210 
3,923 

17,030 

301,137 

1,201 

3,700 

6,630 


203 
479 

1,041 

12,146 

152 

271 

409 


776 
371 

1,743 

41,495 

113 

340 

734 


671 
263 

1,463 

37,687 

76 

240 

496 


147 
97 

213 


3,580 
1,227 

2.465 


124 
84 

202 


446 

119 

300 


374 

82 

192 


96 
117 

86 
101 

63 
123 


1,635 
830 

825 
1,034 

630 
1,655 


86 

116 

77 
108 

67 
107 


209 
91 

126 

124 

52 

185 


146 
46 

72 

73 

27 

118 


98 
304 

390 


2,895 
3,735 

4,687 


94 
315 

385 


382 
352 

548 


276 
220 

370 


70 
53 

12,766 


1,292 
363 

232,599 


56 
51 

U.384 


166 
19 

24.783 


108 
10 

22,099 


74 
316 

166 

327 


1,327 
3,360 

2,155 

4,327 


63 
322 

175 

334 


171 
377 

198 

503 


139 
231 

137 

325 


1.021 


24,495 


930 


2.815 


2,517 


547 
222 
252 

1.028 


16,483 

4,717 
3,295 

16.141 


485 
202 
243 

927 


2,084 
458 
273 

1,590 


1,859 
441 
217 

1,257 


168 
159 

688 

302 

53 

333 

159 

341 


3,088 
1,239 

12,431 


171 
163 

647 


416 

87 

1,617 


268 

57 

1,163 


7,905 
1,001 
3,525 

2,397 
5,746 


257 1,063 

52 121 

338 333 

158 193 

355 604 


900 
81 
182 

160 

442 


125 
903 

2.322 


2,589 
13,552 

52.835 


109 
818 

1.909 


290 
1,300 

6.256 


243 

1,014 

6.074 


1,223 
182 
154 
152 
611 

294 

748 


37,122 
2,916 
2,893 
3,480 
6,424 

4,944 

9.601 


895 
151 
132 
127 
604 

277 

709 


4,627 
284 
294 

416 
635 

411 

892 


4,755 
254 
258 
320 
487 

343 

800 


92 

249 

207 
219 


1,472 
4,274 

2,302 

2,840 


91 
264 

193 

213 


174 
430 

245 

329 


118 
324 

188 

200 


60 
159 

434 


1,444 
1,396 

13,173 


54 
159 

380 


176 
154 

1,253 


122 

78 

1,188 


89 
659 

989 


2,329 
7,272 

22,008 


86 
623 

890 


221 
671 

2,347 


191 
609 

2.060 


19 
415 

543 


806 
12,367 

11,334 


12 
368 

491 


72 

1,181 

1.110 


69 
1,119 

1.021 


249 

259 

97 

49 

335 

515 


7,642 

7,177 

2,515 

663 

4,011 

8.215 


201 

233 

83 

45 

328 

463 


833 
826 
271 
71 
346 

977 


768 
719 
233 
55 
285 

857 


57 
37 
50 
399 

189 

232 

303 


2,163 

836 

1,327 

7,018 

2,340 

1,600 

2,379 


46 

27 

40 

378 

203 

239 

303 


190 
104 
139 
677 

229 

166 

323 


210 

90 

120 

601 

143 

99 

176 


204 
311 

368 

546 


4,769 
3,446 

4,466 

9.893 


168 
295 

343 

502 


605 
372 

424 

849 


546 
311 

351 

753 


132 
414 

1.367 


3,622 

6,271 

29.663 


107 
395 

1,157 


355 
494 

3.062 


339 
414 

2,855 


92 
211 

244 


1,081 
1,298 

4,365 


90 
213 

237 


198 
125 

481 


104 
72 

360 


507 

105 

73 

682 

285 

3S1 


17,678 

1,808 

935 

9,242 

4,089 
4.9S6 


398 

84 

73 

602 

241 

270 


2,022 

172 

91 

777 

382 

581 


2,003 

134 

70 

648 

318 

545 


94 

150 

880 


3,095 
1,270 

17.032 


82 
155 

817 


356 
125 

2.284 


293 
67 

1,694 


513 
367 

414 


13,625 
3,407 

7,232 


445 
372 

399 


1,941 
343 

946 


1,509 
185 

719 


190 
141 

520 


3,908 
1,018 

7.697 


155 

115 

498 


481 

100 

668 


47! 
72 

501 


219 

195 

306 


6,994 
1,238 

4.667 


192 
207 

308 


839 
107 

680 


659 
60 

387 


78 
442 

377 


989 
6,708 

4.259 


72 
426 

364 


110 
558 

399 


75 
428 

313 


68 
238 


2,047 
2,620 


67 
241 


282 

298 


194 
193 


115 
262 

570 


2,377 
1,882 

7.941 


102 
262 

559 


2S6 
143 

787 


2Z1 
92 

891 


84 

91 

39B 

1,485 


2,291 
1,687 
3,963 

21. 426 


73 

93 

393 

1.345 


287 
190 

310 

2,343 


197 
171 
223 

1,964 


333 

9« 
1,05« 


7,eS4 

1,420 

12,782 


279 

87 

979 


890 

161 

1,352 


706 

141 

1.U7 



include* hill-iimc >ad parl-tima ( eantbiBad ) , 
Ceiuui of Aincncan Buiinu* at 1933. avail*! 



NOTX: Comparable Area tigurci 
le in dimI librarici. ]/ Data fof 



1933 were publiahcd by 
•toret in Prince George* 



Vol. 11 - Page 40 



Ceiuiu of BuBuiess 
Retail Distribution: 



193S 



TABLE H,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS 



County and city 



Number 

oi 

stores 



STATE TOTAL 

BamBtable County: 

Barnstable (Pop. 7,271) 
Provlncetoim (Pop. 3,808) 
Remainder of County 

Berkablre County: 

Plttafleie (Pop. 49,677) 

Nortb AdalLB (Pop. 21,621) 

Adams (Pop. 12,697) 

Great Barrington (Pop. 5, 934 J 

Dalton (Pop. 4,220) 

Lee (Pop. 4,061) 

Remainder of County 

Bristol County: 

Fall River (Pop. 115,274) 
New Bedford (Pop. 112,597) 
Taunton (Pop. 37,355) 
Attleboro (Pop. 21,769) 
Falrhaven (Pop. 10,951) 
North Attleboro (Pop. 10,197) 
Dartmouth (Pop. 8,778) 
l..ansfield (Pop. 6,364) 
Somerset (Pop. 5,3S8) 
Remainder of County 

Dukes County 

Ssaez Cotinty: 

Lynn (Pop. 102,320) 
Lawrence (Pop. 85,068) 
Haverhill (Pop. 48,710) 
Salem (Pop. 43,353) 
Beverly (Pop. 25,086) 
aioucestor (Pop. 24,204) 
Paabody (Pop. 21,345) 
Methuen (Pop. 21,069) 
Newburyport (Pop. 15,084) 
Saugus (Pop. 14,700) 
Danvers (Pop. 12,957) 
Amesbury (Pop. 11,899) 
Sxampscott (Pop. 10,346) 
Andover (Pop. 9,969) 
!.,arblshead (Pop. 8,668) 
North Andover (Pop. 6,961) 
Ipswich (Pop. 5,599) 
Rockport (Pop. 3,630) 
Remainder of County 

Franklin County; 

Greenfield (Pop. 15,500) 
kontague (Pop. 8,081) 
Orange (Pop. 5,365) 
Remainder of County 

Hampden County: 

Sprir.gfleld (Pop. 149,900) 
Holyoke (Pop. 56,537) 
Chlcopee (Pop. 43,930) 
Westfield (Pop. 19,775) 
Xest Springfield (Pop. 16,684) 
Palmer (Pop. 9,677) 
Ludlow (Pop. 8,876) 
Lon^eodow (Pop. 4,437) 
Remainder of County 

Hampshire County: 

Northampton (Pop. 24,381) 
Basthampton (Pop. 11,323) 
Ware (Pop. 7,385) 
South Hadley (Pop. 6,773) 
Amherst (Pop. 5,888) 
Remainder of County 

Middlesex County: 

Cambridge (Pop. 113,643) 
Somerville (Pop. 103,908) 
Lowell (Pop. 100,234) 
Newton (Pop. 66,276) 
liodford (Pop. 59,714) 
tolden (Pop. 58,036) 



55.536 



tL.46I.180 



589 
326 

196 

109 

40 

66 

412 

5,107 



1,750 
1,671 

489 

237 
99 

156 
97 
83 
63 

462 

124 
7,513 



Sales 

(add DOO; 



1,412 

1,411 

728 

719 

344 

451 

250 

208 

245 

150 

180 

157 

72 

97 

152 

82 

92 

161 

598 

733 



262 

110 

79 

282 

4,438 



2,195 
731 
522 
244 
217 
102 
102 
19 
306 

1,112 



351 
153 
133 
130 
107 
238 

10,189 



1,372 

1,038 

1,314 

521 

419 
749 



15.224 



4,217 
1,396 
9,611 

38,532 



18,069 
7,959 
2,877 
2,813 
848 
1,167 
4,809 

96,148 



31,271 

35,197 

11,897 

6,390 

1,236 

2,565 

1,559 

1,596 

557 

4,878 

2,832 

156,611 



Pro- 
prietors 



60 
430 



1,571 



473 

307 

193 

95 

39 

61 

403 

4,383 



1,528 

1,395 

371 

190 

90 

139 

92 

70 

67 

451 

99 

6,412 



Em- 
ployees" 



1182.066 



454 
151 
945 

4,419 



2,174 
896 
342 
306 
76 
132 
494 

12.564 



34,615 
30,834 
14,219 
21,015 
7,669 
8,491 
4,611 
2,719 
5,962 
1,746 
3,067 
2,692 
2,122 
2,157 
3,199 
1,344 
1,953 
1,147 
7,050 

14.862 



7,549 
1,708 
1,531 
4,074 

114,540 



71,567 
17,963 
6,985 
6,238 
4,467 
1,924 
1,374 
448 
3,584 

19.881 



9,507 
2,026 
2,523 
1,153 
2,309 
2,364 

251,613 



39,111 
22,543 
30,962 
17,391 
11,017 
19,775 



1,170 

1,244 

634 

553 

292 

362 

216 

193 

186 

137 

151' 

136 

57 

76 

129 

75 

89 

156 

657 

669 



221 

103 

72 

S73 

3.656 



1,685 

619 

456 

202 

195 

91 

98 

16 

295 



310 
146 
119 
123 
79 
224 

6,040 



4,182 

4,917 

1,496 

637 

147 

274 

187 

145 

56 

523 

299 

19,903 



Total 
Pay Roll* 
(«u ooo) 



1,589 



493 
141 
965 

3,957 



2,028 
778 
258 
277 
70 
109 
437 

10,991 



3,686 

4,162 

1,402 

574 

109 

243 

173 

153 

51 

438 

336 

18,549 



4,866 

3,710 

1,939 

2,742 

922 

1,020 

465 

348 

669 

190 

377 

282 

272 

289 

418 

191 

201 

112 

890 

1.612 



891 
186 
166 
370 



1.001 I 2,154 



1,063 
807 

1,114 
363 
313 
618 



1,058 
250 
278 
126 
245 
198 

30,875 



4,580 

3,443 

1,786 

2,652 

883 

1,106 

465 

289 

538 

143 

337 

224 

252 

266 

399 

147 

190 

110 

650 

1,431 



810 
159 
137 
325 

14.174 



9,639 
2,119 
642 
666 
473 
175 
109 
58 
293 

1.937 



County and city 



Number 

ol 

stores 



6,346 
2,783 
4,089 
1,999 
1,230 
2,671 



1,013 
173 
202 
125 
266 
169 

28.644 



5,035 
2,609 
3,639 
2,071 
1,202 
2,312 



Uiddlesez County (Continued): 
Everett (Pop. 48,424) 
Waltham (Pop. 39,247) 
Arlington (Pop. 36,094) 
Watertown (Pop. 34,913) 
Melrose (Pop. 23,170) 
IYamln£ham (Pop. 22,210) 
Belmont (Pop. 21,740) 
Wobum (Pop. 19,434) 
Wakefield (Pop. 16,318) 
llarlborough (Pop. 15,587) 
Natick (Pop. 13,589) 
Winchester (Pop. 12,719) 
Stoneham (Pop. 10,060) 
Reading (Pop. 9,767) 
Lexington (Pop. 9,467) 
Hudson (Pop. 8,469) 
Concord (Pop. 7,477) 
Kaynard (Pop. 7,166) 
Dracut (Pop. 6,912) 
Ayer (Pop. 3,060) 
Remainder of County 

Nantucket County: 

Nantucket (Pop. 3,578) 

Norfolk County: 

liulncy (Pop. 71,983) 
Brookllne (Pop. 47,490) 
Weymouth (Pop. 20,882) 
Lllton (Pop. 16,434) 
Braintree (Pop. 15,712) 
Dedham (Pop. 15,136) 
Norwood (Pop. 15,049) 
Wellesloy (Pop. 11,439) 
Needham (Pop. 10,846) 
Stoughton (Pop. 8,204) 
Walpole (Pop. 7,273) 
Franklin (Pop. 7,028) 
Randolph (Pop. 6,553) 
Canton (Pop. 5,816) 
Remainder of County 

Plymouth County: 

Brockton (Pop. 63,797) 
Plymouth (Pop. 13,042) 
Brldgewater (Pop. 9,056) 
Uiddleborough (Pop. 8,603) 
Whitman (Pop. '',638) 
Rockland (Pop. 7,624) 
Hlngham (Pop. 6,657) 
Abington (Pop. 5,872) 
RemalQdor of County 

Suffolk County: 

Boston (Pop. 781,188) 
Chelsea (Pop. 45,816) 
Revere (Pop. 35,680) 
Wmthrop (Pop. 16,852) 

Worcester County: 

Worcester (Pop. 195,311) 
Fltchburg (Pop. 40,692) 
LeoD'.lnster (Pop. 21,810) 
Gardner (Pop. 19,399) 
lillford (Pop. 14,741) 
Southbridge (Pop. 14,264) 
Webster (Pop. 12,992) 
Clinton (Pop. 12,817) 
Athol (Pop. 10,677) 
Nortbbrldgo (Poo. 9,713) 
lillbury (Pop. 6,957) 
Uibridge (Pop. 6,285) 
Spencer (Pop. 6,272) 
Winchendon (Pop. 6,202) 
Auburn (Pop. 6,147} 
Blackstone (^op. 4,674) 
Dudley (Pop. 4,265) 
Hopedale (Pop. 2,973) 
Remainder of County 



481 

467 

326 

302 

180 

325 

166 

276 

171 

233 

125 

100 

103 

93 

99 

122 

89 

112 

36 

64 

886 

73 



Sda 

(add 0001 



827 

394 

249 

89 

146 

126 

156 

141 

132 

85 

86 

109 

76 

70 

402 



814 
2^6 

87 
171 
123 

99 
106 

87 
844 

11,909 



10,649 
642 

463 

155 

6,212 



2,412 

667 

285 

256 

201 

235 

152 

200 

154 

100 

00 

116 

99 

91 

73 

41 

30 

9 

1,11; 



9,423 
16,045 
7,442 
9,356 
5,313 
8,824 
4,906 
6,954 
4,230 
5,007 
2,738 
2,906 
1,984 
1,875 
2,751 
2,689 
2,820 
2,408 
341 
1,569 
12,344 

1.975 



Pro- 
prietors 



370 

356 

243 

240 

134 

207 

109 

244 

128 

200 

96 

66 

79 

68 

73 

102 

71 

98 

34 

51 

793 

59 



87.203 



24,097 
19,004 
5,091 
3,565 
3,227 
3,341 
3,839 
6,461 
3,646 
1,909 
1,909 
2,436 
1,341 
1,611 
6,837 

51,608 



21,977 
4,700 
1,795 
3,037 
2,185 
2,906 
1,877 
1,468 

11,864 

461,869 



439,121 

13,661 

6,166 

2,921 

148.082 



71,908 

15,462 

6,267 

6,520 

4,675 

5,010 

3,956 

3,684 

4,239 

2,424 

1,466 

1,225 

1,873 

1,923 

1,000 

408 

716 

390 

14,934 



622 

259 

184 

67 

113 

86 

111 

90 

76 

72 

67 

95 

70 

59 

346 

2.240 



Em- 
ployees* 



Total 

Pay Rail' 
(«u ooo) 



1,241 

2,021 
930 

1,023 
592 
963 
686 
734 
489 
684 
289 
320 
263 
271 
304 
309 
273 
263 
44 
148 

1,221 

172 



10.162 



657 

236 

70 

158 

105 

79 

92 

78 

766 



,136 
665 
391 
127 



5,180 

1,928 

402 

253 

213 

176 

206 

121 

169 

119 

88 

75 

109 

85 

78 

67 

43 

31 



1,010 



3,072 
2,357 
565 
404 
360 
409 
422 
617 
408 
179 
202 
217 
148 
153 
649 

6.391 



% 1,038 
1,912 
840 
1,137 
523 
912 
625 
581 
392 
541 
279 
311 
198 
2S2 
334 
256 
275 
226 
27 
154 
1,093 



3,222 
541 

179 
362 
236 
309 
174 
149 
1,219 

63,762 



60,968 

1,679 

825 

390 

17,461 



8,786 

2,010 

794 

764 

503 

521 

421 

461 

447 

226 

136 

120 

201 

211 

112 

64 

64 

46 

1,586 



*Pay toll includo* 



' companaalioo lot praprtalor* ol oDlncorporatad buiinaaiaa. Numb«r of amployaaa incli 
eniui in Relail Volume 111. entillad "Counly and Cily Suinma/ie.", pail ol the Cenau 



and part-Una (cotnbinad). NOTE: Coi 
an Buainet* ol 1933, available tn moat 



la, 1933 were pubhahad by 



Vol. II Page 41 



Census of Business 
Retail Distribution: 



TABLE 11,- STORES, SALES, PERSONNEL AND PAY ROLL, BY AREAS 
STATE OF MICHIGAN 



County and cily 



Number 

of 

■tore! 



S&les 

(add 0001 



Pro- 
prielon 



Em- 
ployees* 



Totnl 
P.y Roll" 



County and city 



Number 

of 

•tores 



Sales 

(add 0001 



Pro- 
prietors 



Em- 
ployees* 



Total 
Pay Roll" 
(■<jd ao«) 



dTAIE TOTAL 

AloODA County 

Alger County: 

Uunlslng (Fop. 3,956} 
Remainder of County 

Allegan County: 

Ailegan (Pop. 3,941) 
Otoego (Pop. 3,245) 
Remainder of County 

Alpena County: 

Alpena (Pop. 12,166) 
Remainder of County 

Antrim County 

Arenac County 

Baraga County 

Barry County: 

Eastlnga {Pop. 5,227) 
Remainder of County 

Bay County: 

Bay City (Pop. 47,355) 
Remainder of County