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Full text of "CENSUS OF POPULATION 1960"

The Eighteenth Decennial Census of the United States 

Census of Population: 1960 

Volume I 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION 

Number of Inhabitants, General Population Characteristics, 

General Social and Economic Characteristics, 

and Detailed Characteristics 



SOUTH CAROLINA 




Prepared under the supervision of 

HOWARD G. BRUNSMAN 
Chief, Population Division 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
LUTHER EL HODGES, Secretary 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

RICHARD M. SCAMMON, Director (from May 1, 1961) 

ROBERT W. BURGESS, Director (to March 3, -Wl) 




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

RICHARD M. SCAMMON, Director 

A. Ross ECKZJER, Deputy Director 
HOWARD C. G3BOEVES, Assistant Director 
CONJULD TAEUBER, Assistant Director 

MORRIS H. HASTSEN, Assistant Director for Research and Development 
CBCARXBS B. LAWRENCE, JR., Assistant Director for Operations 
WALTER L. KEHRES, Assistant Director for Administration 
CALVERT L. DERRICK, Chief, International Statistical Programs Office 
SHAMEL, Acting Public Information Officer 



Population Division 

HOWARD G. BB.UKSMAN, Chief 

HENRT S. SHRYOCK, JR., Assistant Chief (Program Development) 

DAVID L. KAPLAIST, Assistant Chief (Mtthods Development) 

PAUL C. GLICJC, Assistant Cbitf (Demographic and Social Statistics Programs') 

MURKAT S. WBTTZKCAN-, Assistant Chief (Economic Statistics Programs) 

Demographic Operations Division MORTON A- MEYER, Chief 
Field Division JBCTBRSON D. McPiKB, Chief 
Geography Division WTLIJAM T. FAY, Chief 
Statistical Methods Division JOSBPH STBLNTBERO, Cittf 



Library of Congress Card Number: A61-9570 



The four chapters of tables in this report were originally published in 
the PCOO-A, B, C, and D final reports for this State. 



SUGGESTED CITATION 

U.S. Bureau of the Census. U.S. Census of Population: I960. 
Vol. I, Characteristics of tbe Population. 

Part 42, South Carolina. 
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1963- 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 
or any of the Field Offices of the Department of Commerce Price $4. 00 . 



PREFACE 

This report presents statistics from the 1960 Census of Population on the number of inhabitants and the characteristics of the popu- 
lation of the State and of its constituent areas. Legal provision for this census, which was conducted as of April 1, 1960, was made in the 
Act of Congress of August 31, 1954 (amended August 1957) which codified Title 13, United States Code. Comparable statistics from earlier 
censuses are also presented in this report. 

The major portion of the information compiled from the 1960 Census of Population is contained in Volume I, Characteristics of the 
Population. A description of the other final reports of the 1960 Population Census appears on page IV. Volume I, of which this report 
is a part, consists of Part A and the 57 numbered parts listed on page IV. The parts for the United States, each of the 50 States, the 
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are bound in 53 individual books; the 4 parts for Guam, the Virgin Islands of the United States, 
American Samoa, and the Canal Zone are bound in a single book. 

The detailed tables presented in each numbered part of Volume I were originally published in four separate reports. Those reports 
(which correspond to chapters A, B, C, and D in this book) were identified by the following series designations and titles: PC(1)-A, Number 
of Inhabitants,' PC(1)~B, General Population Characteristics; PC(1)-C, General Social and Economic Characteristics; and PC(1)-D, Detailed 
Characteristics. (For Guam, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Canal Zone, the material normally contained in the PC(1)-B, C, and 
D reports was included in PC(1)-B.) 

Part A of Volume I is a compendium of the 57 series PC(1)-A reports. It presents in a single book, for library and other reference 
use, the 1960 Census population counts for States and their component areas. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

A large number of persons participated in the various activities of the 1960 Census of Population. Primary responsibilities were 
exercised by many of the persons listed on the preceding page. Within the Population, Demographic Operations, Field, Geography, and 
Statistical Methods Divisions, most of the staff members worked on the program. 

This report was prepared under the supervision 9f Howard G. Brunsman, Chief, Population Division, and Henry S. Shiyock, Jr., 
David L. Kaplan, and Paul C. Glick, Assistant Chiefs, with the assistance of Sigmund Schor (Systems Coordinator to January 1962). 
The following members of the Population Division also had a major role in planning the content of this report: Henry D. Sheldon, Chief, 
Tobia Bressler, Charles P. Brinkman, Elizabeth A. Larmon, Gordon F. Sutton, Melvin Zelnik, and Denis F. Johnston of the Demographic 
Statistics Branch; Charles B. Nam, Chief, Education and Social Stratification Statistics Branch; Wilson H. Grabill, Chief, John C. Beres- 
ford, David M. Heer, and Robert Parke, Jr., of the Family and Fertility Statistics Branch; Stanley Greene, Chief, Stuart H. Garfinkle 
(Chief to October 1961), William J. Milligan, Miles A. Abelson, Arthur Podolsky, and G. Marie Dodd of the Economic Statistics Branch; 
and James C. Byrnes, Chief, Selma F. Goldsmith (Chief to April 1962), and Arno I. Winard of the Consumer Income and Expenditures 
Statistics Branch. Technical editorial work was performed by Mildred M. Russell, Chief, Publications Branch, assisted by Leah S. 
Anderson. 

Important contributions were made by Morton A. Meyer, Chief, Glen S. Taylor (Chief to June 1961), E. Richard Bourdon, Richard A. 
Hornseth, Morris Gorinson, Willard P. Hess, Patience Lauriat, Betty Mitchell, Catherine Neafsey, Richard J. Rice, Leo Solomon, 
and Florence Wright of the Demographic Operations Division in the processing and compilation of the statistics; Jefferson D. McPike, 
Chief, Robert B. Voight (Chief to July I960), Ivan Munro, Paul R. Squires, and George K. Klink of the Field Division in the coUection 
of the information; William T. Fay, Chief, Robert CL Klove, and Robert L. Hagan of the Geography Division in the delineation of special 
types of urban territory and other geographic work; Joseph Steinberg, Chief, Robert Hanson, and Herman Fasteau of the Statistica 1 
Methods Division in the planning of sampling and quality control procedures; and by William N. Hurwitz, Chief, Statistical Research 
Division, and Harold Nisselson, Jack Silver, Leon Gilford, and William H. Cook in the formulation of enumeration procedures. 

Important contributions were also made by Lowell T. Gait and Herman P. Miller of the Office of the Director, by A. W. von Struve, 
Public Information Officer until his death in October 1962, and by the staffs of the Administrative Service Division, Everett H. Burke, 
Chief; Budget and Management Division, Charles H. Alexander, Chief ; Jeffersonville Census Operations Office, Robert D. Zrook, Chief; 
Data Processing Systems Division, Robert F. Drury, Chief; and Personnel Division, James P. Taff, Chief. Robert H. Brooks of the 
Administrative Service Division, assisted by John F. Lanham, was responsible for the 1960 Census printing arrangements. 

To help carry out the 1960 Census most efficiently and effectively as well as to help maximize the usefulness of the results, a number 
of special advisory groups were organized in 1956 when the planning work was begun. One group established by the Census Bureau 
was the Technical Advisory Committee for the I960 Population Census, which consisted of 19 experts in various phases of demography 
selected in their individual capacities. For their long and careful work on the program, special acknowledgment is made to the mem- 
bers of this Committee: Philip M. Hauser (chairman), Donald J. Bogue, Dorothy S. Brady, John D. Durand, John K. Folger, Maurice I. 
Gershenson, Harold Goldstein, Robert D. Grove, Margaret Jarman Hagood, Peter Henle, William Hodgkinson, Jr., Stanley Lebergott, 
Frank W. Notestein, Gladys L. Palmer, Charles B. Reeder, Calvin F. Schmid, Mortimer Spiegelman, Dorothy Swaine Thomas, and P. K. 
Whelpton. To supplement the views of this Committee with those of a less technically oriented but more broadly based group, the Census 
Bureau established the Council of Population and Housing Census Users (with Ralph J. Watkins, then of the Brookings Institution, as 
chairman), consisting of representatives of approximately 70 professional and public organizations whose memberships include many 
users of decennial census statistics. The U.S. Bureau of the Budget established the Federal Agency Population and Housing Census 
Council (with Peyton Stapp and Margaret E. Martin as successive chairmen) to coordinate the interests of the more than 30 Federal 
agencies which make substantial use of the decennial census material. In addition, the Population Association of America established a 
number of work groups to explore in detail the data needs for specific subjects; and the Census Advisory Committee of the American 
Statistical Association participated in certain phases of the 1960 Census as part of its continuing review of all Bureau programs. The 
guidance and counsel provided by all these groups, as well as by many other organizations and individuals, were invaluable in developing 
and carrying through the program. 

April 1963. in 



FINAL REPORTS OF THE I960 CENSUS OF POPULATION 

The final reports of the 1960 Population Census are arranged in four volumes and a joint Population-Housing series of census tract 
reports. For Volumes II, III, and IV, which remain to be published as of this date, the scheduled content is subject to change. The 1960 
Population Census publication program also includes preliminary, advance, and supplementary reports, certain evaluation, procedural, 
and administrative reports, and graphic summaries. After publication, copies of all reports are available for examination or purchase at 
any U.S. Department of Commerce Field Office. For reports not yet issued, more detailed descriptions of content than those given below 
can be obtained from the Chief, Population Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D.C. 

Certain types of unpublished statistics are available for the cost of preparing a copy of the data. Also, under certain conditions, 
special tabulations of the 1960 Census data can be prepared on a reimbursable basis. In addition, there are available for purchase magnetic 
tapes and punchcards containing 1960 Census information on the characteristics of a one-in-a-thousand and a one-in-ten-thousand sample 
of the population of the United States. Confidentiality of the information, as required by law, has been maintained by the omission ol 
certain identification items. Further information about any of these materials can be obtained by writing to the Chief, Population Division 
Bureau of the Census. 

Volume I. Characteristics of the Population. See description on page III. 

Volume II (Series PC(#) reports). Subject Reports. Each report in this volume will concentrate on a particular subject. Detailec 
information and cross-relationships will generally be provided on a national and regional level; in a few reports data for States or standarc 
metropolitan statistical areas will also be shown. Among the characteristics to be covered are national origin and race, fertility, families 
marital status, migration, education, employment, unemployment, occupation, industry, and income. There will also be a report on tto 
geographic distribution and characteristics of the institutional population. 

Volume III (Series PC(S) reports). Selected Area Reports. This volume will contain three reports presenting, respectively, selecte* 
characteristics of the population (1) for State economic areas, and (2) according to the size of place where the individual resided, an< 
(3) social and economic characteristics of Americans overseas. 

Volume IV. Summary and Analytical Report. This report will present an analytical review of the results of the 1960 Census c 
Population for each major field. 

Series PHC(1). Census Tract Reports. These reports present information on both population and housing subjects. There is on 
report for each of 180 tracted areas in the United States and Puerto Rico. The population subjects include age, race, marital status, countr 
of origin of the foreign stock, relationship to head of household, school enrollment, years of school completed, place of residence in 195<' 
employment status, occupation group, industry group, place of work, means of transportation to work, and income of families, as we 
as certain characteristics of the nonwhite population in selected tracts. The housing subjects include tenure, color of head of householt 
vacancy status, condition and plumbing facilities, number of rooms, number of bathrooms, number of housing units in structure, ye* 
structure built, basement, heating equipment, number of persons in unit, persons per room, year household head moved into unit, aut< 
mobiles available, value of property, and gross and contract rent, as well as certain characteristics of housing units with nonwhite househo] 
head for selected tracts. In addition, for selected tracts these reports contain data on certain population and housing subjects for persoi 
of Puerto Bican birth or parentage and for white persons with Spanish surname. (This series is the same as the tract reports included i 
the publication program for the 1960 Census of Housing.) 



VOLUME I 

This volume consists of the parts listed below : 

A. Number of Inhabitants 14. Idaho 30. Nevada 46. Utah 

(all areas) 15. Illinois 31, New Hampshire 47. Vermont 

1. U.S. Summary 16. Indiana 32, New Jersey 48. Virginia 

2. Alabama 17 - J owa 33. New Mexico 49. Washington 

3. Alaska 18 - Kansas 34, New York 50. West Virginia 

4. Arizona 19 - Kentucky 35. North Carolina 51. Wisconsin 

5. Arkansas 2 - Louisiana 36. North Dakota 52. Wyoming 

6. California a - Maine 37. Ohio 53. Puerto Rico 

7. Colorado ^ Maryland 38. Oklahoma 54-57. Outlying areas 

8. Connecticut S* Massachusetts 39, Oregon (bound together) 
9 DAiflwarA ?* MMrisa* 1 40. Pennsylvania 54. Guam 



27. Missouri 43. South Dakota 56. American Samoa 

12. Georgia 28. Montana 44. Tennessee 57. Canal Zone 

13. Hawaii 29. Nebraska 45. Texas 



-IV 



CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 



Page 

Subject guide Subjects included in this report, by type 

of area and table number _ vi 

Graphic summary _ vin 

General .. _ xi 

Collection and processing procedures xii 

Current population survey xii 

Comparability of complete-count and sample data xii 

Sources of historical data xii 

Changes in definitions xiv 

Area classifications xiv 

Usual place of residence xiv 

Urban-rural residence xiv 

Farm-nonfarm residence xv 

Counties.-. xvi 

County subdivisions xvi 

Places __ xvi 

Incorporated places _. xvi 

Unincorporated places xvii 

Urban places 1 xvii 

Annexations _ xvii 

Urbanized areas > xvii 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas xvin 

Standard consolidated areas- _ xix 

Social characteristics _ xix 

Age xix 

Race and color xx 

Nativity, place of birth, and parentage xx 

Mother tongue of the foreign born. _ xxi 



Page 

Social characteristics Continued 

Year moved into present house __ xxn 

Residence in 1955__ -^ _._ *rn 

School enrollment and year of school in which enrolled- - xxra 

Years of school completed . xxiv 

Veteran status _^ xxv 

Marital status xxv 

Household and group quarters membership, and rela- 
tionship to head of household xxvi 

Married couple, family, subfamily, child, and unrelated 

individual xxvrn 

Children ever born_____ xxvni 

Economic characteristics xxix 

Employment status ^ xxix 

Hours worked xxx 

Weeks worked in 1959-_ __ __ ____ xxxi 

Year last worked __ xxxi 

Occupation, industry, and class of worker __ xxxi 

Place of work and means of transportation to work... _. xxxvi 
Income in 1959 xxxvi 

Collection and processing of data xxxvni 

Collection of data -. xxxvm 

Sample design xxxix 

Manual editing and coding of schedules XL 

Electronic processing _ _ XL 

Accuracy of the data _ XL 

Sources of error _ __ _ XL 

Editing of unacceptable data XLI 

Ratio estimation _ _ XLIH 

Sampling variability XLIH 



TABLES AND MAPS 

[See list preceding each chapter] 

Chapter A. Number of inhabitants (Tables 1 to 12). 

Chapter B. General population characteristics (Tables 13 to 31, B~l and B-2), 

Chapter C. General social and economic characteristics (Tables 32 to 93 and C-l to O3). 

Chapter D. Detailed characteristics (Tables 94 to 146 and D-l). 



Corrections of errors discovered after the individual chapters 
were originally published are listed on page XLVH. 



SUBJECTS INCLUDED IN THIS PUBLICATION, BY TYPE OF AREA AND TABLE NUMBER 



[In order to L_ _ 

appears in virtually ev 



^MMSfflf i 3^^ 

]nfora!atton oTthe^ntent of other 1960 1 Population Census publications appears on page IV] 



Subject 


Type of area (see Note, below) 




The State 


Standard metro- 
politan statistical 
areas, urbanized 
areas, and urban 
places of 10,000 
or more 


Standard 
metropolitan 
statistical areas of 
260,000 or more 1 


Counties 


Total 


Urban, rural non- 
farm, and -rural 
farm 


Total 


Population of 
260,000 or 
more 3 




Table, 
14,16 

94, *101, *102 
16,17,37,94,^97 

*100 
*101 
*102,*103 
*105 
*105 

*106 
*107 
*113 

*114 
54, *116 
*115, *117 
*119 


Table 
*14, 16 

95.*101,*102 
16,37,96,96 


Table 
21 


Table 


Table 
28 


Table 


Color or race -cr-i 

By other subjectssee specific subject. 

Age: 
By single years 
By color or race* 
By place of birth. 






20 


196 


27 


96 


By residence in 1956 

By year of school in which enrolled 

TD-T -TTna-ro nf ep"h/v>l OOTttOlfitfid 


*101 
*102, *103 
*106 
*106 
"106 
*107 
*113 

*114 
64,*116 
*116,*117 
*119 





*103 
*105 
*106 
*106 
*107 
*113 

*114 
116 
*115, *117 
i*119 
131 

196 
196,99 
99 


;~~~;i 


nos 
no5 

*106 


By whether married more than once 
By household relationship 


I::::::-:::-:::::: 


For persons in group quarters 
For women, by children ever born-.-. -- 

For women, by number of own children under o 

By labor force status 








_ 


73 


83 


.__- 
nw 


By hours worked 
By year last worked 








By place of work . 

By other subjects see specific subject. 

Nativity or parentage: 


94,96,97 
38,94,96,97,99 
99 

39,*98 
40,99 
41 
*42,*100 
43 

44,46 i *101 
4*101 

*102 
<47,*103,*138 

48,104 

18 
*105 
*106 
*106 
*116 

450 
*105 
*106 
*19, *49,*106 
^ 19, 49, *107 

109, *110, *111, *112 
*108,109 
60, *110, 111, *112 
*111 
*110 

*no 
*in 

60,109 
*108 
109. *110. *111. *112 
*111 
*112 

*19 


96 
38,96 






96 
96 


By age 


72 


82 


By country of origin of the foreign stock 


*39 
40 
41 
442 
43 

44,*101 

. 

*102 
*47,*103,*138 

48,104 

18 
*106 
*106 
*106 
*116 

60 
*105 
*105 
-*19, *49,*106 
*>*19 f *49,*107 

109, *110, *lli, *112 
*108,109 
eO^llO,*!!!,*!^ 
*111 
*110 
*110 
Mil 
60,109 
*108 
109,*110,*111,*112 
*111 
*112 

* 19 

*108 
109 


72, 77 
*79 
80 
72, 77 
72 

73, 77 
73, 77 

*77 


82, 87 
89 
<90 
82, 87 
82 

83, 87 
83, 87 
87 




Place (or State) of birth 
Country of origin of the foreign stock - , 

Mother tongue of the foreign, "horn-. , ^ -, . 


99 




..: 


Residence in 1966 








School enrollment: 

"Bv &fffi * 


By levefand type of school.' 


. 


* 


Tears of school completed: 
For persons 14 to 24 years old not enrolled in school. 
For all persons of specified age 


73, 77 

72 

21 


*103 


83, 87 
82 

28 


nos 


Marital status: 
By color* -- --" 


. 

*105 
*106 
*116 


*I6B 
no6 
no5 


By presence of spouse 

By whether married more than once 








By labor force status. . 


72, 77 

*21 
*21 

72, "77 


82, 87 

28 
428 

82, 87 




Presence of spouse.*..!. . >- - 


*106 
*105 
*106 
*107 

109, *110, *111, *112 
*108,109 
*110, *111, *112 
*111 
*110 
*110 

mi 

109 

*108 

109, *no, nil, ni2 
nn 
ni2 

nos 


noe 
no5 


Whether married *nore tbarx oncft^ ... - -. - 


Tjv.oftK/t'I/q T*&1a-M/vnQ"Mrt 


Group quarters, persons in 

Families: 
By type of famfly ____^_. - - 


no 


"Rv TnTmbftT of own children 


By presence of own children 


72, 77 


82, *87 


.By jlUuLDor OI reisre c 








Bv number of members 18 years ol,d and ovor 


















77 


*87 




*PTT mflriffll ^tfttnfl rtf TtAftrf 


nos 








Bv education of head - 














' 


For additional items, see "Income in 1959 of fami- 
lies." 


*21 


*28 


nos 


PnTfrfftTTtjifoy^ *. - . 


*108 
109 


Secondary fanuTtMi .---*.. 


Unrelated individuals: 
Nmntxjr of (only) >. ~ *- 


72 

577 




82 
87 




By color* 


60 
*106,*108 

*ioe 

*108 

<19 

*61,*113 
*114 


60 
*106,*108 
*106 
*108 

MIQ 

*51,*113 
*114 






"Bv tvnft - ...M..,.. _ 


' no6,no8 
noe 
nos 


nos 
""""""noi 


By age ~_ -~ ^.^ -.^^1^ -,<- 





. 


By TrTaritftl status -- - -- 


For additional items, see "Income in 1959 of unre- 
lated individuals." 

PriinwTy iti^viduals ^ -r - 


*21 
72, *77 


*28 

82, 87 


Fertility: 
ChfldTerv ever !xmi. r .., -. , ,^ -, 


nis 
nw 


,, ... . ... 


Own children under 5 years old..^...^ _.. 



See footnotes on next page. 
VI 



SUBJECTS INCLUDED IN THIS PUBLICATION, BY TYPE OF AREA AND TABLE NUMBER Con. 



Subject 


Type of area (see Note, below) 


The State 


Standard metro- 
politan statistical 
areas, urbanized 
areas, and urban 
places of 10,000 
or more 


Standard 
metropolitan 
statistical areas of 
250,000 or more * 


Counties 


Total 


Urban, rural non- 
farm, and rural 
farm 


Total 


Population of 
250.000 or 
more* 


Employment status: 
T?y employment stetfls group (only)^ 


Table 


Table 


Table 
73 
577 


Table 


Table 
83 

87 


Table 


By color* ^ 


52,53 
*115,*117,*119 
*117 
137 

54,*H6 
*115,*117 

55 
*118 
136,143 
*119,122 

120,121 
67,68,59,60 
58,60,122 
122 
122 
122 
*123 
68,*124 
125 


52 

*115,*117,*119 
*117 
137 

54,*116 
*115 r *117 

65 
*118 
136,143 
*119 

121 
57,68,60 
68,60 







By age - - - 


*115,*117, i*119 
*117 
137 

*116 
*115,*117 


*115,*119 


By school enrollment ^ ^ ^ 






By income in 1959 of persons 








Labor force status - 


73 


83 




"HOWS worked . _ 


*115 


Weeks worked In 1959: 
By weetg worked gronp (only) 


76 


86 


By age . 


1*118 
136,143 
1*119,122 

1 121 


*118 


By rncflnj^ In 1959 






Year last work6d 






*119 
121 


Occupation: 
By detailed category (only) 






By major or conctanlsefi group (oniy)^, - ^., L 


74,75 
78 


84,85 
<88 


By color or race*, I I_J JJ ; 
By class of worker 


122 
122 
122 
122 
*123 
*124 
126 
1131 
*145 

1127 





For persons not in the labor force 










By year last worked __ 










By age - - - 










By earnings In 1959 of persons 

By industry ... 





76 


86 





By place of" wort 










By income IP iQfiQ of families ,-, -,- 


*145 

126,127 
.61,62 
125 
128 
61, 129 
129 
*130 










Industry: 
By detailed category (only) 








127 


By major or condensed group (only) 


61 


75 


85 


By occupation 


125 
128 
129 
129 
*130 
1131 
146 

122 
129 




By age 










By color or race* * 


61 


578 


388 





By class of worker 


By earnings in 1959 of persons 










By place of work. 











By vn<wrnA itt 1959 of families 


146 

122 
56,129 
132 
132 
463,132 
64 










Class Of worker: 
By occupation 










By Industry >- . 


66 


74 


84 





Bv ulace of" work 


By 6ar n i n gs in 1959 of persons 












Place of work *. 


<63 
64 


72,77 
72 

76 

78 


1131 
H31 


82,187 
82 

86 
588 




iWftnng of transDortation to work 




Income in 1959 of persons: 
By income group (only) 




By color or race 


67,133 
*134,135 
135 
136 
137 
*138 
69 

66 
65 
*139, *140 
*139 
141 
*142 
143 
*144 
*145 
146 

66 
65 
135 
*139 
*142 
143 

68,*124 
*130 
132 


67,133 
*134,135 
136 
136 
137 
*138 
69 

66 
66 
*139,*140 
*139 
141 
*142 
143 
*144 


133 
*134,136 
135 
136 
137 




By family status 


"134 


By weeks worked in 1959 
















Bv years of school completed. 








By tvDe" of income 


76 

76 
78 




86 

86 

88 




Income in 1959 of families: 
By income group (only) 




__-_, 


By color of head* 

By type of family and presence of children 

By size of family . 
By number of earners - 


*139, *140 
*139 
141 
*142 
143 
*144 
*145 
146 


*139 
*139 


_ .. 


By weeks worked in 1959 by head.., 

By work experience in 1959 of head and wife 


_.. 














.. _ _____ 


Income in 1959 of unrelated individuals: 


66 
65 
135 
*139 
*142 
143 


76 
.?78 


86 
.788 




By color* 







By type of individual __ 




135 
*139 
*142 
143 

*124 
*130 




*139 


By earner status in 1959 








By weeks worked in 1959 

Earnings in 1959 of persons: 
By occupation 
By industry 
By place of work 


76 


86 




By class of worker 


132 













: and for minor civil divisions (or census county divisions) in tables . 

ld population are presented for* selected urban places and counties in table 31. 



are presented for mbn places of 2,600 to 10,000 In taWe 22; for places otl.OX. 
and 26. 



to 2 500 to tables 23 and 

c. Data on age and race of the ous . _-. ,nnAf+vi 

d Data on nativity and parentage, years of school completed, employment status, occupation, Industry, and family income are presented for places of 2,600 to 10,000 in table 81. 

e. Data on age by nativity and race are presented for cities of 100,000 or more in table 96. , * K1 - rt1 

f. DataonsiWeyeftreofageforpersoiis6to24yearsoldarepre^ ^ ,._,*,. x . ,, , 4 ,a*n/ 

g. Data on pffi ofbirtti. residence in 1955, year r of school in which enroUed, and years of school completed (each cross-classified by age) are presented for cities of 250,000 or 

^^ are presented for counties in tables 29, 30, and 91; and of the rural-farm population for selected counties in tables 92 

___________ _____ politan-nonmetropolitan residence In table 71. 

ited for selected areas of the State in tables 13 and 32 to 36. 
3 in chapters B, C, and D. 



1. Data on selected characteristics ^ , , 

j. Summary statistics on characteristics of the ] 
E Data on nonresponse rates are presented in t 

*Separate data for nonwhites in those areas with 25,000 or more nokwhites appear in tables marked with an asterisk. For the urban, rural-nonferm, and rural-farm parts of States, such 
data are shown only for the South. v 

* Includes data by color. 

Data for nonwhites in areas with 1,000 or more nonwhite persons. 

For areas with 1,000 or more persons of specified type. 
" * " "* '" " ' lividualsc 



i Data in tables 96, 118, 119, 121, 127, an<ll31 are lor SMSA's oflOOjfOOO ormore. 
* Outside New England States, and excluding counties which are coextensive with an 
' 



. 
* Urban by size of place; niral not by fann-nonfarm residence. 



? Median income of Jbmilies and unrelflteoT individuals combined. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

1960 Census of Population Graphic Summary 



V OVER THE LAST CENTURY SOUTH CAROLINA 
HAS GROWN AT A SLOWER RATE THAN THE U.S. 

200,000,000 
100,000,000 

50,000,000 



20,000,000 
10,000,000 
5,000,000 

2,000,000 

1,000,000 

500,000 

200,000 
100,000 
50,000 





1860 

(Ratio eol) 




1880 



1900 1920 

YEAR 



1940 



1960 



THE PROPORTION NONWHITE FOR THE STATE 
HAS DECREASED SINCE 1940 




I960 1940 
UNITED 
STATES 



1960 1940 
SOUTH 



1960 1940 

SOUTH 
ATLANTIC 



1960 1940 

SOUTH 
CAROLINA 



ABOUT THREE-FIFTHS OF THE STATE'S 
POPULATION IS RURAL 



UNITED STATES 

1960 
1950 



SOUTH 



1960 
1950 



SOUTH 

ATLANTIC 1960 

1950 



SOUTH 
CAROLINA 1960 

1950 



URBANIZED AREAS 

>^ 

** * OTHER 

CENTRAL CITIES FRINGE URBAN RURAL 







20 



40 60 

PERCENT 



80 100 



THE STATE HAS PROPORTIONATELY MORE 
PEOPLE UNDER 20 THAN THE U.S. 



MALE 



FEMALE 




8 6 



, PERCENT OF TOTAL POPULATION _ 
I STATE MORE THAN U.S. STATE LESS THAN U.S. I?'*.?: 



Note: The 1960 Census geographic classification divides the country into four regions and nine divisions, as follows: Northeast region - New England division (Maine, N. H., Vt., 
Mass., R. I., and Conn.) and Middle Atlantic (N. Y. , N. J. f and Pa.); North Central - East North Central (Ohio, Ind., III., Mich., and Wis.) and West North Central (Minn., Iowa, Mo,, 
N. Dak., S. Dak., Nebr., and Kans.); South - South Atlantic (Del., Md. f D. C,, Va., W. Va., N. C, S. C, Ga v and Fla.), East South Central (Ky., Tenn v Ala., and Miss.) and West 
South Central (Ark. f La., Okla., and Tex.); and West - Mountain (Mont., Idaho, Wyo., Colo., N. Mex., Ariz., Utah, andNev.) and Pacific (Wash., Oreg., Calif., Alaska, ana 1 Hawaii). 
In figures 1, 2, 3, and 5, the pre-1960 data refer, insofar as possible, to the present area of the United States, region, division, and State. In figure 5, fertility rate is the number of 
children ever bom per 1,000 women in the specified age group; in States with fewer than 25,000 nonwhite women 15 to 49 years old in 1940, the 1940 rates refer to white women only. 
In figure 6, the data refer to persons five years old and over reporting this item; the category "Different State" includes persons living abroad five years prior to the census date. In 
figure 9, the base for the percent excludes employed persons with occupation not reported. White collar workers include the professional, managerial (nonfarm), clerical, and sales 
major occupation groups; blue collar workers include the craftsman, operative, private household, service, and nonfarm laborer groups; and farm workers include the farmer and farm 
laborer groups. 



THI 
HA* 

150 
T 

uT 100 

K 

fc 

-J 


: FERTILITY RATE FOR YOUNGER WOMEN 
> INCREASED GREATLY SINCE 1940 






11 
|| 

il 






U_ 

2 

g 

1 

IU 

0. 

-so 


t:?:iS :;^i;i;> 




III 
:::: 






sss 




Hi 


^ 
1 




? ? ? e^a -i 






AGE OF 
WOMAN 


!! SOUTH SOUTH SOUTH 
STATES ATLANTIC CAROLINA 



(D ABOUT 43 PERCENT OF THE STATE'S WOMEN 
AGED 18 TO 24 ARE IN THE LABOR FORCE 



Sfefc&S&X^ Tjil:SvJL : Ji 




ONE-TENTH OF SOUTH CAROLINA'S 1960 POPU- 
LATION LIVED OUTSIDE THE STATE IN 1955 



UNITED STATES 



SOUTH 



SOUTH 
ATLANTIC 



SOUTH 
CAROLINA 




20 40 60 80 100 
PERCENT OF POPULATION 5 YEARS OLD AND OVER 



MORE THAN HALF OF THE STATE'S EMPLOYED 
WORKERS ARE IN BLUE-COLLAR OCCUPATIONS 



WHITE 

COLLAR 

WORKERS 




THE STATE'S PROPORTION OF ADULTS WHO 
COMPLETED ONE OR MORE YEARS OF COLLEGE 
IS LOWER THAN THE U.S. AVERAGE 



25 




UNITED 
STATES 



SOUTH 



SOUTH 
ATLANTIC 



SOUTH 
CAROLINA 



TWO OUT OF FIVE FAMILIES IN SOUTH CARO- 
LINA HAVE INCOMES UNDER $3,000 



UNITED STATES 



SOUTH 



SOUTH 
ATLANTIC 



SOUTH 
CAROLINA 



UNDER $3,00070 

$3,000 $5,999 



$6,000 TO $10,000 

$9,999 &OVER 




20 40 60 80 

PERCENT OF FAMILIES 



100 



Characteristics of the Population 



GENERAL 



This report presents the major portion of the information 
compiled from the 1960 Census of Population for this State. It 
contains the four chapters, A, B, C, and D, previously published 
as paper-bound reports in the PC(1)-A, PC(1)-B, PC(1)-C, 
and PC(1)-D series of the 1960 Census of Population. The 
statistics in chapters A and B are from the complete count 
whereas those in chapters C -and D are from the 25-percent 
sample of the population. 

Chapter A, "Number of Inhabitants," comprises tables 1 to 
12 and furnishes statistics on the number of persons in the 
State and its counties, or comparable areas. In addition, data 
are presented for minor civil divisions (townships, New England 
towns, etc.), or census county divisions, urban places, incorpo- 
rated places (cities, boroughs, villages, etc.), urbanized areas, 
standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSA's) and for the 
population of the State and its counties or comparable areas 
classified by urban-rural residence. 

Chapter B, "General Population Characteristics," comprises 
tables 13 to 31 and presents the basic demographic statistics on 
age, sex, race, relationship to head of household, and marital 
status. The amount of detail presented is generally greater for 
larger places than for smaller ones, and data from earlier censuses 
are usually only included for larger areas. Maximum detail 
is shown for the State and its urban and rural parts and for 
SMSA's, urbanized areas, urban places of 10,000 or more, and 
counties. Somewhat less detail is shown for urban places of 2,500 
to 10,000, for rural parts of counties, and for the rural popula- 
tion of counties outside places of 1,000 to 2,500. The least amount 
of detail is shown for places of 1,000 to 2,500 and for minor civil 
divisions or census county divisions. 

Chapter C, "General Social and Economic Characteristics," 
comprises tables 32 to 93 and presents inventory statistics on 
social and economic characteristics. The characteristics shown 
are farm-nonfarm residence, nativity and parentage, State of 
birth of the native population, country of origin of the foreign 
stock, mother tongue of the foreign born, residence in 1955, year 
moved into present house, school enrollment, year and type of 
school (public or private) in which enrolled, years of school 
completed, veteran status of civilian males, married couples and 
families, number of children ever born, employment status, weeks 
worked in 1959, class of worker, occupation group, industry group, 
place of work, means of transportation to work, income in 1959 
of persons and of families and unrelated individuals, earnings 
in 1959, and type of income in 1959. 

Most of the 1960 statistics shown in chapter C for the total 
population in the State -and its urban and rural parts are also 
shown separately for the white and nonwhite population in those 
areas. Moreover, statistics on most of the subjects are shown 
for the nonwhite population in each SMSA, urbanized area, urban 
place of 10,000 or more, -and county with 1,000 or more nonwhite 
persons. In addition, statistics on age, sex, and household re- 
lationship are shown for counties with a rural-farm nonwhite 



population of 400 or more persons. Statistics on country of 
origin of the foreign stock in areas within the State -are shown 
only where there were 1,000 persons or more in this category- 
Likewise, statistics on mother tongue of foreign-born persons in 
areas below the State level are shown only where there were 
1,000 or more persons in this category. As in chapter B, the 
amount of detail presented is greater for the areas with a larger 
population than areas with a smaller population. 

Chapter D, "Detailed Characteristics," comprises tables 94 
to 146, and completes the presentation of information for this 
State in Volume I. It shows detailed categories and cross-classifi- 
catio.ns (generally by age) on the social and economic characteris- 
tics of the inhabitants of this State. This chapter contains data 
on all the subjects treated in chapter C, except mother tongue 
of the foreign born and year moved into present house. It also 
includes data on whether married more than once, hours worked, 
and year last worked. 

Although information on the five population items age, sex, 
race, relationship to head of household, and marital status 
was collected on a complete-count basis, the data on these items 
shown in chapters C and D are based only on persons in the 
sample. 

Because of the amount of detail and cross-classification in the 
tables, the presentation in chapter D is restricted to the larger 
areas, namely, States, the urban and rural parts of States, the 
larger counties, SMSA's, and cities. Most of the data for coun- 
ties, SMSA's, and cities in this chapter are for areas of 250,000 
or more although a few tabulations are presented for SMSA's 
and cities of 100,000 or more. In general, data for the nonwhite 
population are shown separately for any of these areas contain- 
ing 25,000 nonwhite persons or more. Historical comparisons are 
limited to 1950 data and are presented only for the State as ft 
whole. 

More detailed cross-classifications of many of these character- 
istics will be presented in the subject reports of Volume II. In 
some cases, a few tables for States and other large areas will also 
be included. 

A list of the subjects included in this report, showing the type 
of area and the tables in which they appear, is presented on 
pages VI and VII. 

Maps of this -State, showing the composition of urbanized areas 
and county subdivisions, are presented in chapter A. Also, a 
map of the State indicating counties, places of 25,000 or more, 
and SMSA's is presented in chapters A, B, and C. 

In general, medians -are computed from the class intervals 
shown in -the tables in which they appear. Hence, medians 
shown in one table may differ from the corresponding medians 
in other tables where a different number of class intervals is 
shown. The medians shown with the distributions by single years 
of age which appear in tables 94 and 95, however, -are based on 
5-year age groups. 



XI 



Introduction 



COLLECTION AND PROCESSING PROCEDURES 

Sampling was used in the 1960 Census, as well as in the 1950 
and 1940 Censuses, to supplement the information obtained from 
the enumeration of the total population. The population in the 
sample in 1960 comprised the members of every fourth house- 
hold and every fourth person who was not a member of a house- 
hold, i.e., who was living in "group quarters." Later sections 
discuss the sample design, the methods used to inflate the sample 
figures, and the accuracy of the sample data. Text tables give 
estimates of sampling variability. 

The 1960 Census was the first in which self-enumeration was 
used on a nationwide scale. A questionnaire, entitled "Advance 
Census Report," was mailed to every household in the country. 
The instructions on the ACR requested that one or more of the 
members enter on the form the answers to all the questions for 
each person in the household. The enumerator was instructed to 
correct omissions and obviously wrong entries by asking the neces- 
sary questions. In the sparsely populated areas (with 65 percent 
of the land area and 18 percent of the population) , the enumerator 
collected the complete-count information and also asked the sam- 
ple questions at the time of his visit; these are referred to below 
as the "single stage" enumeration areas. In the rest of the United 
States, where most of the population lives, the enumerator col- 
lected the complete-count information and also left with each 
sample household, for mailing to the local census office, a House- 
hold Questionnaire containing the sample questions to be an- 
swered; these areas are referred to below as the "two stage" 
areas. The partial substitution of self -enumeration for the tra- 
ditional direct interview has probably affected the nature and 
extent of errors in the 1960 statistics relative to those in the 
statistics of earlier censuses. More comprehensive and definitive 
accounts of the nature and effects of this and other innovations in 
the 1960 Census procedures will be given in later reports. 

The enumerators inspected and copied the answers from the 
Advance Census Reports and Household Questionnaires to spe- 
cially designed complete-count and sample forms, respectively, 
especially designed for electronic processing. Later, at the cen- 
tral processing office in Jeffersonville, Ind., selected items were 
coded and all of the information was microfilmed. The micro- 
film was then sent to Washington, where the information was 
transformed by FOSDIC (Film Optical Sensing Device for Input 
to Computer) into coded signals on magnetic tape. This tape, 
in turn, was processed by an electronic computer and related 
equipment to produce the tables. 

The definitions of terms which are given below are consistent 
with the instructions given to the enumerators and to the field 
office personnel who reviewed the questionnaires. As in all cen- 
suses and surveys, however, there were some failures to execute 
these instructions exactly. The partial use of self -enumeration 
made it feasible to call the attention of respondents more uni- 
formly in the 1960 Census than in prior censuses to some of the 
important inclusions and exclusions in the definitions. However, 
it was not feasible to give detailed instructions to the respond- 
ents, and some of their errors of understanding and reporting 
have undoubtedly gone undetected. A few types of known or 
suspected inaccuracies in the data arising from failure to apply 
the definitions correctly are noted in this text. 

The processing of census returns regularly involves the coding 
of numerous items such as detailed relationship to head of house- 
hold, State of birth, and occupation and the editing of schedules 
for omissions and inconsistencies. In the 1960 Census, much 
of the editing was done by the electronic computer, whereas in 
prior censuses this work had been done largely as a clerical 
operation. It is believed that this heavy reliance on electronic 
equipment has improved the quality of the editing but at the 
same time, has introduced an element of difference between the 
1960 statistics and those of earlier years. 



CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY 



Data on many of the subjects covered in this report are col- 
lected monthly or annually for the United States as a whole by 
the Bureau of the Census through its Current Population Survey 
(CPS). This nationwide survey, covering a sample of about 
35,000 interviewed households, provides monthly data on em- 
ployment which are published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
The CPS also provides data on income which are published an- 
nually by the Bureau of the Census (in Series P-60 reports) and 
data on migration, education, families, fertility, and other sub- 
jects issued annually or less frequently (in Series P-20 reports). 
This survey provides more limited statistics for regions, but 
statistics for the State or smaller areas, which are featured in 
the present report, have not been tabulated from the CPS. 

Certain differences exist between the levels of the national 
data from the CPS and from the 1960 and 1950 Censuses. The 
reasons for the differences Include the more extensive training, 
control, and experience of the CPS enumerators than of the census 
enumerators; the use of hourly rate payments in the CPS and 
of piece-rate payments in the census ; differences in the extent to 
which self -enumeration is used ; differences in the question word- 
ing on some of the items, in the time of year to which the data 
apply (as for the annual school enrollment figures collected in the 
October CPS), and in coverage (the CPS covering only the civil- 
ian noninstitutional population in months other than March) ; 
enumeration of unmarried college students in the CPS at their 
parental home but in the census at their residence while attend- 
ing college ; differences in the methods used to process the orig- 
inal data into statistical tables; differences in the weighting 
procedure and in noninterview rates; and differences between 
the sampling variability in the CPS and in the 25-percent sample 
in the census. The differences for some of the specific population 
characteristics are discussed below. 

COMPARABILITY OF COMPLETE-COUNT 
AND SAMPLE DATA 

For the characteristics covered on a complete-count basis in 
chapter B (i.e., sex, race, age, marital status, household relation- 
ship, and related items), chapters C and D present comparable 
25-percent sample statistics. A comparison of selected complete- 
count and sample statistics is given in table A. The reasons for 
the differences (which result from processing differences and 
sampling) are discussed in Part 1 of this volume. 

SOURCES OF HISTORICAL DATA 

Most of the statistics for 1950 shown in chapters C and D are 
based on a 20-percent sample. The following are exceptions. 
The figures for foreign-born persons, in the distribution of the 
foreign white stock by country of origin, are based on a complete 
count (whereas the figures on native persons of foreign or mixed 
parentage are based on the 20-percent sample). Statistics for 
families and those for married couples without their own house- 
holds living with nonrelatives are based on Sample F. (Income 
data for families, however, are based on the 20-percent sample.) 
Fertility statistics for women ever married 15 to 44 years old are 
based on Sample C. Nationally, Samples F and C covered about 
2.4 percent of the families and women 15 years old and over, 
respectively. Statistics for 1950 on unrelated individuals in 
table 106 are partially based on Sample F ; statistics on employ- 
ment status (except labor force status by age), occupation, in- 
dustry, and class of worker are from complete counts. For 
Alaska, all 1950 figures are based on a complete count. For 
Hawaii, 1950 figures on the following subjects are also based on 
a complete count: State of birth of the native population, ' race 
and nativity, marital status, presence of spouse and whether 
married more than once, and relationship to head of household. 

Statistics for 1940 are based on complete counts with the fol- 
lowing exceptions. Those on the native population of foreign 



Characteristics of the Population 

Table A. COMPARISON OF COMPLETE-COUNT AND SAMPLE DATA FOR SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 

[Selected characteristics are those for which complete-count and sample data are available. Minus sign (-) indicates sample lower than complete count. 

Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200] 



XIII 







The Stat 


e 






Urban 








Rural 






Subject 


Complete 




Differ 


ence 


C enrol ete 




Differ 


ance 






Differ* 


ance 




count 


Sample 


Number 


Per- 
cent 


count 


Sample 


Number 


Per- 


count 


Sample 


Number 


Per- 
cent 


SEX. 


2,382,594 


2, 382, 594 






981,386 


981,386 






1,401,208 


1,401 3 208 






Male 


1,175,818 
1,206 776 


1,175,672 
1 206 922 


-146 

"\Lt\ 


... 


467,211 


467,149 


-62 


... 


708,607 


708,523 


-84 


... 


COLOR AND AGE 
Toti, <n ngpR... ....,, 


2,382,594 


2,382,594 






981,386 


514,237 
981,386 


62 




692, 601 
1,401,208 


692,685 
1,401,208 


84 






294,913 
286 285 


294,890 
284 221 


-23 
2 064 


... 


118,362 


118, 356 


-6 


... 


176,551 


176,534 


-17 


... 




268,930 


270 751 


1 821 


Orj 






-809 


-0.7 


177,093 


175,838 


-1,255 


-0.7 


15 to 19 years . 


228 819 


228 511 


an** 








629 


0.6 


170, 329 


171, 521 


1,192 


0.7 


20 to 24 years 


166 802 


168 314 


1 512 


9 










146, 655 


146, 088 


-567 


-0.4 


25 to 29 years 


147 357 


148 035 


678 


Oc 












96,798 


1,018 


1.1 


30 to 34 years 


149 510 


149 278 


232 


n 9 












81,914 


189 


0.2 




157 596 


157 514 


-82 


1 










82,097 


82,063 


-34 


... 


40 to 44 years 


142 422 


141 662 
















86, 733 


123 


0.1 


45 to 49 years 


1^9 jQy 


130 594 














78,980 


78,468 


-512 


-0.6 




105 885 


106 653 


rjfift 


017 










72,276 


72,863 


587 


0.8 


55 to 59 years 


86 583 


88 026 


1J 11 












58, 906 


59,437 


531 


0.9 


$0 to 64 years 


67 386 


66 966 


,443 
420 


6 








-0.3 


48,563 


50,137 


1,574 


3.2 


65 to 74 years 


103 429 


101 681 














38,129 


37,794 


-335 


-0.9 




47 170 


45 498 


1 672 








-415 


-1.0 


60,110 


5tJ,777 


-1,333 


-2.2 


Median age. years. . 
White, nil age* 


23.4 
1,551,022 


23.4 
1, 550, 632 


-390 




25.9 
700,497 


25.8 
700, 539 


42 




21.6 
850, 525 


21.6 
850,093 


-1,161 
-432 


-4.2 
-0.1 




169, 661 
163 141 


170,143 
162 002 


432 


0.3 


78,305 


78,629 


324 


0.4 


91,356 


91,514 


158 


0.2 




156 530 


157 841 










-770 


-1.1 


91, 890 


91,521 


-369 


0.4 


15 to 19 years 


141 067 


140 746 


1,311 
321 


2 










90,507 


91,552 


1,045 


1.2 


20 to 24 years 


116 141 


117 794 


















-901 


-1.1 


25 to 29 years .. 


105 273 


105 858 


585 








568 


1.1 


62,597 


63,632 


1,085 


1.7 


30 to 34 years 


107 203 


TfY7 ft*7O 


Jen 
















282 


0.5 


35 to 39 years 


m 057 


113 238 


1 ft! 










0.4 


56, 549 


56,316 


267 


0.5 


40 to 44 years 


100 615 


100 006 


AHQ 














59, 649 


253 


0.4 


45 to 49 years .. 


90 484 


90 740 


9 








-268 


-0.6 


53,484 

J* ,4n 


53, 143 


-341 


-0.6 


50 to 54 years 


76 129 


76 216 


O-rj 






41, 930 


-117 


-0.3 


48,437 


48,810 


373 


0.8 




61 137 


61 240 












0.2 


40,648 


40,667 


19 


... 


60 to 64 years 


47 816 


47 123 


e.Q-> 






27, 788 


-365 


-1.3 


32, 984 


33,452 


468 


1.4 


65 to 74 years 


69 588 


68 259 


1 329 


1 9 


M -a-a/i 






-0.9 


25,863 


25,364 


-499 


-1.9 




33 180 


31 756 


1 Z3Z 


i -a 












37,088 


-1,164 


-3.0 


Median age . years. . 


26.4 
831, 572 


26.3 
831,962 


-1,424 

390 




27.5 
230,889 


27.4 
280,847 


-316 
-42 


-2.1 


18,246 
25.4 

550,683 


17,138 
25.3 

551,115 


-1,108 
432 


-6.1 
0.1 




125,252 
123 144 


124,747 
122 219 


-505 
925 


-0.4 
n ft 


40,057 

V7 Q/.1 


39,727 


-330 


-0.8 


85,195 


85,020 


-175 


-0.2 


10 to 14 years 


112,400 


112 910 


510 


5 


32 578 


<ao Q/T 








84, 317 


-886 


-1.0 


15 to 19 years 


87 752 


87 765 


13 




Off 3Q"3 














0.2 




50 661 


50 520 


-141 


-0 3 


17 478 










62, 693 


334 


0.5 


25 to 29 years 


42 084 


42 177 


93 


2 


16 379 


16 565 


irtfi 








-67 


-0.2 


30 to 34 years 


42,307 


41 608 


-699 


-1 7 


16 759 


16 361 


398 


2 4 


5= KJft 






-0.4 


35 to 39 years 


44 539 


44 276 


-263 


-0 6 


17 325 


17 192 


1 "Yl 


_n A 










40 to 44 years 


41, 807 


41 656 


-151 


-0 4 


16 311 


16 331 


20 


On 


55 JQ 






-0.5 


45 to 49 years 


39,023 


39,854 


831 


2 1 


15 184 


15 801 
















29 756 


30 437 


681 


2 3 


11 498 












214 


0.9 




25,446 


26 786 


1 340 


5 3 


9 867 


i n i m 


5O> 






18,770 


512 


2.8 




19 570 


19 843 


273 


1 4 


7-apy 










16,685 


1,106 


7.1 




33, 841 


33 422 


-419 


-1 2 


11 983 


U 174-9 








.12, 430 


164 


1.3 




13 990 


13 742 


-248 


1 8 


41* 05 












-169 


-0.8 


Median age years. . 

MARITAL STATUS 
Total, 14 and over 


18.1 
1,579,279 


18.2 
1, 579, 356 


77 




21.3 
671,402 


21.4 
671,409 


7 




9,158 
17.0 

907,877 


9,105 
17.1 

907, 947 


-53 
70 


-0.6 


Married 


411,475 
1, 021, 734 


409,550 
1, 025, 409 


-1,925 
3,675 


-0.5 
0.4 


154,102 
445 887 


153,741 
446,836 


-361 
949 


-0.2 
2 


257,373 
575 847 


255, 809 
578 573 


-1, 564 
2 726 


-0.6 
5 


Separated 


41,400 


40,794 


-606 


-1.5 


21,179 


21, 152 


-27 


-0 1 


20 221 


19 642 


-579 


-2 9 


Widowed 


127 425 


125 893 


-1 532 


-1 2 


60 280 


59 719 


-561 


9 


67 145 


66 174 


971 


1 4 




18 645 


18 504 


-141 


-0 8 


13 133 


11 113 


-20 


-0 2 


7 512 


7 391 


121 


i fi 


RELATIONSHIP 

Population in households 
Head of household 


2,299,793 
603,551 


2,301,096 
603,551 


1,303 


0.1 


947,893 
275 032 


948, 421 
275 032 


528 


0.1 


1,351,900 
328 519 


1,352,675 
328 519 


775 


0.1 


Head of primary family.... 


536, 516 
67, 035 


540, 301 
63, 250 


3,785 
-3,785 


0.7 
-5.6 


236, 550 
38,482 


237, 746 
37, 236 


1,196 
-1,196 


0.5 
-3.1 


299,966 
28, 553 


302, 555 

25 964 


2,589 
-2 589 


0.9 
-9 1 


Wife of head 


451,146 


453, 439 


2,293 


0.5 


196, 134 


196, 866 


732 


0.4 


255 012 


256 573 


1 561 


6 


Child under IS of head .. 
Other relative of head 


847, 692 
370,736 
26 668 


851,684 
369, 664 
22, 758 


3,992 
-1,072 
-3, 910 


0.5 
-0.3 
-14.7 


330,396 
131,038 
15, 293 


331,874 
130,643 
14, 006 


1,478 
-395 
-1 287 


0.4 
-0.3 
-8 4 


517,296 
239,698 
11 375 


519, 810 
239,021 
8 752 


2,514 
-677 
2 623 


0.5 

-0.3 
23 1 


Population in group quarters.. 


82,801 


81,498 


-1,303 


-1.6 


33,493 


32,965 


-528 


-1.6 


49,308 


48,533 


-775 


-1.6 



XIV 



Introduction 



or mixed parentage in the distribution of the foreign white stock 
by country of origin, and those on mother tongue of the foreign- 
born white, are based on a 5-percent sample. Fertility statistics 
for women 15 to 44 years old are based on Sample O ; nationally, 
this sample covered about 3.3 percent of the women. 

Statistics for census dates before 1940 are from complete 
counts, except that fertility statistics for women 15 to 44 years 
old for 1910 are based on an 8.9-percent sample. (For further 
explanations of sample historical data, see publications of the 
1950 and 1940 Censuses, especially U.8. Census of Population: 
1950, Yol. IV, Special Reports, Part 2, chapter A, General 
Characteristics of Families, and Part 5C, Fertility.) 



CHANGES IN DEFINITIONS 

The definitions of the major concepts used in the 1960 Census 
of Population are given below. A few of the definitions used in 
1960 differ from those used in 1950. These changes were made 
after consultation with users of census data and were made in 
order to improve the statistics, even though it was recognized that 
comparability would be affected. In some cases the new defini- 
tions were tested by the Bureau of the Census in connection with 
its Current Population Survey and census pretests, and, where 
feasible, measures of the impact of the change on the statistics 
were developed. 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



USUAL PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

In accordance with census practice dating back to 1790, each 
person enumerated in the 1960 Census taken as of April 1, 1960, 
was counted as an inhabitant of his usual place of abode, which 
is generally construed to mean the place where he lives and sleeps 
most of the time. This place is not necessarily the same as his 
legal residence, voting residence, or domicile. Although there 
may be appreciable differences for a few areas, in the vast major- 
ity of cases the use of these different bases of classification would 
produce substantially the same statistics. 

In the application of this rule, persons were not always counted 
as residents of the places in which they happened to be found 
by the census enumerators. Persons in the larger hotels, motels, 
and similar places were enumerated on the night of March 31, 
and those whose usual place of residence was elsewhere were 
allocated to their Jtiomes. In addition, information on persons 
away from their usual place of residence was obtained from 
other members of their families, landladies, etc. If an entire 
family was expected to be away during the whole period of the 
enumeration, information on the family was obtained from neigh- 
bors. A matching process was used to eliminate duplicate reports 
for a person who reported for himself while away from his usual 
residence and who was also reported at his usual residence by 
someone else. 

Persons in the Armed Forces quartered on military installa- 
tions were enumerated as residents of the States, counties, and 
county subdivisions in which their installations were located. 
i Members of their families were enumerated where they actually 
resided. As in 1950, college students were considered residents 
of the communities in which they were residing while attending 
college. The crews of vessels of the U.S. Navy and of the U.S. 
merchant marine in harbors of the United States were counted 
as part of the population of the ports in which their vessels were 
berthed on April 1, 1960. Inmates of institutions, who ordinarily 
live there for long periods of time, were counted as inhabitants 
of the place in which the institution was located, whereas patients 
in general hospitals, who ordinarily remain for short periods of 
time, were counted at, or allocated to, their homes. Persons 
without a usual place of residence were counted where they were 
enumerated. 

Persons staying overnight at a mission, flophouse, jail, detention 
center, reception and diagnostic center, or other similar place on 
a specified night (for example, April 8 in some areas) were enu- 
merated on that night as residents of that place. 

Americans who were overseas for an extended period (in the 
Armed Forces, working at civilian jobs, studying in foreign 
universities, etc.) are not included in the population of any of 
the States or the District of Columbia. On the other hand, per- 
sons temporarily abroad on vacations, business trips, and the 
like were enumerated at their usual residence on the basis of 
information received from members of their families or from 
neighbors. 



URBAN-RURAL RESIDENCE 



The population of the State by urban-rural residence is shown 
in table 1 and for counties, or comparable areas, in table 6. 

In general, the urban population comprises all persons living in 
urbanized areas and in places of 2,500 inhabitants or more out- 
side urbanized areas. More specifically, according to the defini- 
tion adopted for use in the 1960 Census, the urban population 
comprises all persons living in (a) places of 2,500 inhabitants or 
more incorporated as cities, boroughs, villages, and towns (ex- 
cept towns in New England, New York, and Wisconsin) ; (6) the 
densely settled urban fringe, whether incorporated or unincor- 
porated, of urbanized areas (see section below) ; (c) towns in 
New England and townships in New Jersey and Pennsylvania 
which contain no incorporated municipalities as subdivisions and 
have either 25,000 inhabitants or more or a population of 2,500 
to 25,000 and a density of 1,500 persons or more per square mile ; 
(d) counties in States other than the New England States, New 
Jersey, and Pennsylvania that have no incorporated municipali- 
ties within their boundaries and have a density of 1,500 persons 
or more per square mile; and (e) unincorporated places of 2,500 
inhabitants or more (see section on "Places") . 

This definition of urban is substantially the same as that used 
in 1950; the major difference between 1950 and 1960 is the 
designation in 1960 of urban towns in New England and of urban 
townships in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The effect on popula- 
tion classification arising from this change was actually small 
because, in 1950, most of the population living in such places was 
classified as urban by virtue of residence in an urbanized area 
or in an unincorporated urban place. (See sections below.) In 
the definition used prior to 1950, the urban population comprised 
all persons living in incorporated places of 2,500 inhabitants or 
more and areas (usually minor civil divisions) classified as urban 
under somewhat different special rules relating to population 
size and density. In all definitions, the population not classified 
as urban constitutes the rural population. In the tables present- 
ing the population by urban-rural residence, the "current" urban 
definition refers to the population classified in accordance with the 
definitions used in 1950 and 1960. The "previous" urban definition 
refers to the definition used prior to 1950. 

The most important component of the urban territory in both 
definitions is the group of incorporated places having 2,500 inhab- 
itants or more. A definition of urban territory restricted to such 
places, however, excludes a number of equally large and densely 
settled places merely because they are not incorporated places. 
Under the definition used previous to 1950, an effort was made to 
avoid some of the more obvious omissions by the inclusion of 
selected places which were classified as urban under special rules. 
Even with these rules, however, many large and closely built-up 
places were excluded from the urban territory. 

To improve its measure of urban population, the Bureau of 
the Census adopted, in 1950, the concept of the urbanized area 



Characteristics of the Population 



and defined the larger unincorporated places as urban. All the 
population residing in the urban-fringe areas and in unincor- 
porated places of 2,500 or more is classified as urban, according 
to the current definition. The urban towns, townships, and 
counties, as defined for the 1960 Census, are somewhat similar 
in concept to the minor civil divisions classified as urban under 
special rules in 1940 and 1930. 

For the convenience of those interested in the historical trend 
of the urban and rural population, the 1950 and I960 population 
figures are shown on the basis of both the "current" definition 
and the "previous" definition. Although the Bureau of the Cen- 
sus had employed other definitions of "urban" in prior years, 
the urban and rural population figures published here as accord- 
ing to the "previous" definition have been revised to present a 
substantially consistent series. 

FARM-NONTARM RESIDENCE 
Definitions 

The rural population is subdivided into the rural-farm popula- 
tion, which comprises all rural residents living on farms, and the 
rural-nonfarm population, which comprises the remaining rural 
population. In the 1960 Census, the farm population includes 
persons living in rural territory on places of 10 or more acres 
from which sales of farm products amounted to $50 or more in 
1959 or on places of less than 10 acres from which sales of farm 
products amounted to $250 or more in 1959. Through an error 
in computer programing, the small number (29,873 for the United 
States) of farm residents in workers' camps (including quarters 
for migratory agricultural workers) were erroneously classified 
as nonf arm in the chapter C tables but were correctly classified as 
farm residents in chapter D. Persons in all other types of group 
quarters were properly classified as nonf arm. 

Farm residence in accordance with this definition was deter- 
mined from answers to the following questions on the Household 
Questionnaire : 



H17cmdH18. Is this house: 

On a city lot 

(or Is this on a port - 

ment building)? 



OR 

On a place of 

less than 10 acres? . 



-Last yoar (1959), did salo 
of crops, Uvostock, end 
othor farm products from 
this placo amount to $250 
or moro? 



$250 or more 



a 



OR 

On a placo of 

1 or more acres? . 



Less than r i 
$250 or none I I 



Last yoar (1959), did sales 
of crops, livestock, and 
other farm products from 
this place amount to $50 or 
more? 



$50 or more . 



a 



Less than 

$50 or none 



If the reported value of sales was at least the amount specified 
for that size of place, the household was classified as living on a 
farm. Other persons in rural territory, including those living 
on "city lota" were classified as nonfarm residents. Persons 



were also classified as nonfarm if their household paid rent for 
the house but their rent did not include any land used for 
farming. 

Sales of farm, products refer to the gross receipts from the sale 
of field crops, vegetables, fruits, nuts, livestock and livestock 
products (milk, wool, etc.), poultry and poultry products, and 
nursery and forest products produced on the place and sold at 
any time during 1959. 

Comparability 

Earlier censuses of population. Farm-nonfarm residence in 
1950 was determined by respondents' answers to the question, 
"Is this house on a farm (or ranch) ?" The instructions to the 
enumerators specified that "persons on farms who paid cash 
rent for this house and yard only are to be classified as nonfarm." 
In 1950 and 1960, persons living in group quarters on institutional 
grounds or in summer camps or motels were classified as nonfarm 
residents. The definition adopted for 1960 employs more restric- 
tive criteria than the 1950 definition. One reason for the change 
was to make the definition of farm residence essentially con* 
sistent with the definition of a farm used in the agricultural 
census beginning with the 1959 Census of Agriculture. The net 
effect of the 1960 definition is to exclude fr6m the farm popula- 
tion persons living on places considered farms by the occupants 
but from which agricultural products are not sold or from which 
sales are below the specified minimum. In previous censuses, 
f arm-nonf arm residence was determined in cities and other terri- 
tory classified as urban, but in 1960 no effort was made to identify 
farm population in urban areas. In 1950, tills urban-farm popu- 
lation amounted to only about 300,000 persons in the country 
as a whole. 

1959 Census of Agriculture. According- to the 1960 Census of 
Population, the rural-farm population numbered 13.4 million and 
rural-farm households numbered 3.6 million. According to the 
1959 Census of Agriculture, there were 3.7 million farms and an 
estimated 3.4 million farm operators living on the farms they 
operated. The number of rural-farm households was 3.9 per- 
cent below the number of farms but 4.0 percent above the esti- 
mated number of farmers living on the farms they operated. 
Even if there had been no errors of enumeration, the number of 
farm households from the Census of Population would not equal 
exactly either the number of farms or the number of opera-tors 
living on farms operated. The Census of Agriculture, for ex- 
ample, includes farms in urban territory. Moreover, there are 
two or more households on some farms and no resident house- 
holds on other farms. In addition, the absence of a resident 
operator does not preclude the presence of a, household, for ex- 
ample, that of a farm hand. Finally, the Census of Agriculture 
was taken in the fall of 1959, and evidence from other sources 
suggests that there was a decline in the number of farm resi- 
dents between the time of this enumeration and that of the 
Census of Population. 

Current Population Survey. A test conducted in the CPS of 
April 1960 indicated th'at at that time the change in the defini- 
tion of the farm population resulted in -a net reduction of 4.2 
minion persons on farms, representing about 21 percent of the 
farm population under the old definition. The farm population 
of 15.7 million under the new definition indicated by the GPS, 
however, was 2.3 million greater than the 1960 Census count, 
13.4 million. This discrepancy between the census and the OPS 
figures may be the result of the effect of several factors. 

Although there is no conclusive evidence on the relative validity 
of the f arm-nonf arm classification in the CPS as compared with 
that in the census, the difference between the CPS and census 
procedures already noted (see "Current Population Survey," 
above) must be taken into consideration in evaluating the figure, 
2.3 million. There is also a difference between the definition of 
urban territory in the census and in the OPS. In the OPS of 



XVI 



Introduction 



1960, the boundaries of urban areas used were still -those of the 
1950 Census and did not include the annexations and other sub- 
stantial expansions of urban territory th-at were incorporated in 
the 1960 Census. In the. 1960 Census, the determination of farm 
residence was limited to rural territory as defined in 1960. The 
effect of this difference was to classify an unknown number of 
persons as rural farm in the OPS who are treated as urban in the 
reports of the 1960 Census. 

COUNTIES 

Except as noted below, the primary divisions of the States are 
called counties. In Louisiana these divisions are known as 
parishes, and in Alaska where there are no counties data are 
shown for election districts, which are the nearest equivalents 
of counties. In Maryland, Missouri, and Virginia, there are a 
number of cities which are independent of any county organiza- 
tion and thus constitute primary divisions of their States. 

COUNTY SUBDIVISIONS 

Minor civil divisions. The minor civil divisions which have 
been used traditionally for the presentation of statistics for the 
component parts of counties represent political or administra- 
tive subdivisions set up by the States. In addition to the county 
divisions shown by the Bureau, there are thousands of school, 
taxation, election, and other units for which separate census 
figures are not published. Where more than one type of primary 
division exists in a county, the Bureau of the Census uses the 
more stable divisions, so as to provide comparable statistics from 
decade to decade, insofar as possible. 

Among the States where minor civil divisions are still recog- 
nized, there is a considerable variety of -types. Although civil 
and judicial townships are the most frequent type of minor civil 
division, there are also beats, election districts, magisterial dis- 
tricts, towns, and gores. In some instances, as is discussed more 
fully below, none of the systems of subdivisions is adequate, and 
census county divisions have been substituted for them. 

Census county divisions. 1 For purposes of presenting census 
statistics, counties in 18 States have been subdivided into statis- 
tical areas, which are called "census county divisions" (CCD's). 
These divisions are used instead of the minor civil divisions for 
which population statistics were previously reported. These 
changes were made because the boundaries of the minor civil 
divisions observed in previous censuses changed frequently or 
were indefinite. Where the boundaries changed frequently, com- 
parison of the data from one census to another was impeded and 
the statistics for the areas were of limited value. Enumerators 
had difficulty in locating boundaries and in obtaining an ac- 
curate count of the population where the boundaries were in- 
definite, did not follow physical features, or were not well known 
by many of the inhabitants because the areas had lost most, if 
not all, of their local functions. 

Census county divisions were established in the State of Wash- 
ington for use in the 1950 Census. Between 1950 and 1060, they 
were established in 17 additional States, including 10 States in 
the West 'Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Mon- 
tana, New (Mexico, Oregon, Utah, -and Wyoming and 7 States 
in the 'South Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, South Caro- 
lina, Tennessee, and Texas. 

The census county divisions were defined with boundaries that 
seldom require change and that can be easily located. The 
boundaries normally follow physical features, such as roads, 
highways, trails, railroads, power lines, streams, and ridges. The 
use of survey lines was limited. The larger incorporated places 
are recognized as separate divisions, even though their boundaries 
may change as the result of annexations. Cities with 10,000 
inhabitants or more generally are separate divisions. In addi- 
tion, some incorporated places with as few as 2,500 inhabitants 



may be separate divisions. Where an unincorporated enclave 
exists within a city, it is included in the same census county 
division as the city. In establishing census county divisions, 
consideration was given to the trade or service areas of principal 
settlements and in some cases to major land use or physiographic 
differences. 

Each census county division has a name which is ordinarily 
the name of the principal place located within it, except in the 
State of Washington where most county divisions are numbered 
rather than named. The boundaries of census county divisions 
were reviewed with the officials in each county and various State 
agencies and were approved by the governors of the States or 
their representatives. Descriptions of these boundaries are 
given in a set of reports entitled United, States Censuses of Popu- 
lation and Housing, 1960: Census County Division Boundary De- 
scriptions, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, B.C., 1961. 

In the State of Washington, some revisions in the census county 
divisions recognized in 1950 were made in the metropolitan 
counties in order to coordinate the divisions with the expanded 
system of census tracts. 

The population count for each county or comparable area by 
county subdivisions (minor civil divisions or census county divi- 
sions) appears in table 7. Incorporated places which are not 
themselves county subdivisions and unincorporated places are 
shown indented under the county subdivisions in which they 
are located. When an incorporated or unincorporated place lies 
in more than one county subdivision, the population of the sev- 
eral parts is shown in table 7 under the appropriate county sub- 
division, and each part is designated as "part." The total 
population of such places appears in table 8. Changes in the 
boundaries of minor civil divisions and of census county divisions 
between 1950 and 1960 are shown in the notes at the end of 
table 7. Minor civil division boundary changes occurring be- 
tween 1940 and 1950 are given in table 6 of the State reports of 
the 1950 Census of Population. Selected characteristics of the 
1960 population of county subdivisions are shown in tables 25 
and 26. 

PLACES 

The term "place" as used in census reports refers to a concen- 
tration of population, regardless of the existence of legally pre- 
scribed limits, powers, or functions. Most of the places listed are 
incorporated as cities, towns, villages, or boroughs. In addition, 
the large unincorporated places outside the urbanized areas were 
delineated ; and, those places with a population of 1,000 or more 
are presented in the same manner as incorporated places of equal 
size. Each unincorporated place possesses a definite nucleus of 
residences and has its boundaries drawn so as to include, if fea- 
sible, all the surrounding closely settled area. Unincorporated 
places are shown within urbanized areas if they have 10,000 
inhabitants or more and if there was an expression of local inter- 
est in their recognition. The towns in New England, townships in 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and counties recognized as urban 
are also counted as- places. 

INCORPORATED PLACES 

Political units recognized as incorporated places in the reports 
of the decennial censuses are those which are incorporated as 
cities, boroughs, towns, and villages with the exception that 
towns are not recognized as incorporated places in the New Eng- 
land States, New York, and Wisconsin. The towns in these 
States are minor civil divisions similar to the townships found in 
other States and not necessarily thickly settled centers of popula- 
tion such as the cities, boroughs, towns, and villages in other 
States. Similarly, in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, where some 
townships possess powers and functions similar to those of in- 
corporated places, the townships are not classified as "incor- 
porated places." Thus, some minor civil divisions which are 



Characteristics of the Population 



xvn 



"incorporated" in one legal sense of the word are not regarded 
by the Census Bureau as "incorporated places." 

Without this restriction on "incorporated places," all of the 
towns in the New England States, New York, and Wisconsin 
and the townships in New Jersey and Pennsylvania would be 
counted as incorporated places without any consideration of the 
nature of population settlement. A number of towns and town- 
ships in these States do qualify, however, as urban towns or town- 
ships and in other towns and townships the densely settled 
portions are recognized as unincorporated places or as parts of 
an urban fringe. 

UNINCORPORATED PLACES 

As it did for the 1950 Census, the Bureau delineated, in ad- 
vance of enumeration, boundaries for densely settled population 
centers without corporate limits to be covered in the 1960 Census. 
( See the section above on "Places." ) 

URBAN PLACES 

The count of urban places in 1960 includes all incorporated 
and unincorporated places of 2,500 inhabitants or more, and the 
towns, townships, and counties classified as urban. Unincor- 
porated places are designated by "U" and urban towns and town- 
ships by "UT." Under the urban definition used previous to 
1950, places of 2,500 or more and the areas urban under special 
rules were urban places. 

ANNEXATIONS 

The population figure for an incorporated place in earlier 
censuses applies to the area of the place at the time of the given 
census. Hence, the indicated change in population over the 
decade reflects the effect of any annexations or detachments. In 
order to permit an analysis of the relative importance of popu- 
lation growth within the old boundaries and of population added 
in annexed territory, table 9 for incorporated places of 2,500 
or more has been included here. There were a great many an- 
nexations in cities in the decade of the 1950's, and some of these 
annexations involved large areas. 

URBANIZED AREAS 

The major objective of the Bureau of the Census in delineating 
urbanized areas was to provide a better separation of urban and 
rural population in the vicinity of the larger cities. In addition 
to serving this purpose, however, individual urbanized areas have 
proved to be useful statistical areas. They correspond to what 
are called "conurbations" in some other countries. An urbanized 
area contains at least one city which had 50,000 inhabitants or 
more in I960, 1 as well as the surrounding closely settled incorpo- 
rated places and unincorporated areas that meet the criteria 
listed below. An urbanized area may be thought of as divided 
into the central city, or cities, and the remainder of the area, or 
the urban fringe. All persons residing in an urbanized area are 
included in the urban population. 

It appeared desirable to delineate the urbanized areas in terms 
of the 1960 Census results rather than on the basis of informa- 
tion available prior to the census, as was done in 1950. For this 
purpose a peripheral zone was recognized around each 1950 
urbanized area and around cities that were presumably approach- 
ing a population of 50,000 in 1960. Within the unincorporated 
parts of this zone, small enumeration districts (ED's) were estab- 



1 There are a few urbanized areas where there are "twin central 
cities," neither having a population of 50,000 or more but which have a 
combined population! of at least 50,000. See the section below on 
"Standard metropolitan statistical areas" for further discussion of twin 
central cities. 



lished, usually including no more than one square mile of land 
area and no more than 75 housing units. 2 

Arrangements were made to include within the urbanized area 
those enumeration districts meeting specified criteria of popula- 
tion density as well as adjacent incorporated places. Since the 
urbanized area outside incorporated places was defined in terms 
of ED's, the boundaries of the urbanized area for the most part 
follow such features as roads, streets, railroads, streams, and 
other clearly defined lines which may be easily identified by 
census enumerators in the field and often do not conform to the 
boundaries of political units. 

In addition to its central city or cities, an urbanized area also 
contains the following types of contiguous areas, which together 
constitute its urban fringe : 

1. Incorporated places with 2,500 inhabitants or more. 

2. Incorporated places with less than 2,500 inhabitants, pro- 
vided each has a closely settled area of 100 housing units or 
more. 

3. Towns in the New England States, townships in New Jersey 
and Pennsylvania and counties elsewhere which are classified as 
urban. 

4. Enumeration districts in unincorporated territory with a 
population density of 1,000 inhabitants or more per square mile. 
(The areas of large nonresidential tracts devoted to such urban 
land uses as railroad yards, factories, and cemeteries, were ex- 
cluded in computing the population density of an ED. ) 

5. Other ED's provided that they served one of the following 
purposes : 

a. To eliminate enclaves, 

b. To close indentations in the urbanized areas of one mile 
or less across the open end, 

c. To link outlying ED's of qualifying density that were no 
more than 1% miles from the main body of the urbanized area. 

A single urbanized area was established for cities in the same 
SMSA if their fringes adjoin. Urbanized areas with central 
cities in different SMSA's are not combined, except that a single 
urbanized area was established in the New York-Northeastern 
New Jersey Standard Consolidated Area and in the Chicago- 
Northwestern Indiana Standard Consolidated Area. 

Urbanized areas were first delineated for the 1050 Census. In 
1950, urbanized areas were established in connection with cities 
having 50,000 inhabitants or more according to the 1940 Census 
or a later special census prior to 1950; in I960, urbanized areas 
were established in connection with cities having 50,000 in- 
habitants or more according to the 1960 Census. 

The boundaries of the urbanized areas for 1960 will not con- 
form to those for 1950, partly because of actual changes in land 
use and density of settlement, and partly because of relatively 
minor changes in the rules used to define the boundaries. The 
changes in the rules were made in order to simplify the process 
of defining the boundaries, and, as a result of these changes, the 
area classified as urbanized tends to be somewhat larger than 
it would have been under the 1950 rules. The changes include 
the f ollowing : 

1. The use of ED's to construct the urbanized areas in 1960 
resulted in a less precise definition than in 1950 when the limits 
were selected in the field using individual blocks as the "unit of 
area added. On the other hand, the 1960 procedures produced an 
urbanized area based on the census results rather than an area 
defined about a year before the census, as in 1950. 

2. Unincorporated territory was included in the 1950 urbanized 
area if it contained at least 500 dwelling units per square mile, 
which is a somewhat different criterion than the 1,000 persons 
or more per square mile of the included 1960 unincorporated 
areas. 

3. The 1960 areas include those entire towns in New England, 
townships in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and counties that are 
classified as urban in accordance with the criteria listed in the 
section on urban-rural residence. The 1950 criteria permitted 
the exclusion of portions of these particular minor civil divisions. 



2 An enumeration district is a small area assigned to one enumerator 
to toe canvassed and reported separately. The average ED contained ap- 
proximately 200 housing units. 



AYJJJL 



Introduction 



In general, however, the urbanized areas of 1950 and 1960 are 
based on essentially the same concept, and the figures for a given 
urbanized area may be used to measure the population growth of 
that area. 

Any city in an urbanized area which is a central city of an 
SMSA (see following section) is also a central city of an urban- 
ized area. With but two exceptions, the names of the central 
cities appear in the titles of the areas. The central cities of the 
New York-Northeastern New Jersey Area are the central cities 
of the New York, Newark, Jersey City, and Paterson-Clifton- 
Passaic SMSA's. Likewise, the central cities of the Chicago- 
Northwestern Indiana Area are the central cities of the Chicago 
and Gary-Hammond-East Chicago SMSA's. 

In this report, data are shown for each urbanized area with 
a central city located in this State. In chapter A the population 
for each component of the urbanized area is shown; and, in 
chapters B and C, general characteristics are presented for the 
central city and the total urbanized area. 

STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 

It has long been recognized that for many types of analysis 
it is necessary to consider as a unit the entire population in and 
around a city, the activities of which form an integrated economic 
and social system. Prior to the 1950 Census, areas of this type 
had been defined in somewhat different ways for different purposes 
and by various agencies. Leading examples were the metropolitan 
districts of the Census of Population, the industrial areas of the 
Census of Manufactures, and the labor market areas of the 
Bureau of Employment Security. To permit all Federal statistical 
agencies to utilize the same areas for the publication of general- 
purpose statistics, the Bureau of the Budget has established 
"standard metropolitan statistical areas" (SMSA's). (In the 
1950 Census, these areas were referred to as "standard metro- 
politan areas.") Every city of 50,000 inhabitants or more accord- 
ing to the 1960 Census is included in an SMSA. 

The definitions and titles of SMSA's are established by the 
Bureau of the Budget with the advice of the Federal Committee 
on Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas. This committee is 
composed of representatives of the major statistical agencies of 
the Federal Government. The criteria used by the Bureau of 
the Budget in establishing the SMSA's are presented below. ( See 
the Bureau of the Budget publication Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Areas, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 
25, D.C., 1961.) 

The definition of an individual SMSA involves two considera- 
tions : First, a city or cities of specified population to constitute 
the central city and to identify the county in which it is located 
as the central county ; and, second, economic and social relation- 
ships with contiguous counties which are metropolitan in charac- 
ter, so that the periphery of the specific metropolitan area may 
be determined.* SMSA's may cross State lines. 

Population criteria. The criteria for population relate to a 
city or cities of specified size according to the 1960 Census. 

1. Each SMSA must include at least : 

a. One city with 50,000 inhabitants or more, or 

b. Two cities having contiguous boundaries and constituting, 
for general economic and social purposes, a single community 
with a combined population of at least 50,000, the smaller of 
which must have a population of at least 15,000. 

2. If each of two or more adjacent counties has a city of 50,000 
inhabitants or more (or twin cities under Ib) and the cities are 
within 20 miles of each other (city limits to city limits), they 
will be included in the same area unless there is definite evidence 
that the two cities are not economically and socially integrated. 

8 Central cities are those appearing in the SMSA title. A "contiguous" 
county either adjoins the county or counties containing the largest city 
In the area, or adjoins an intermediate county integrated -with the central 
county. There is no limit to the number of tiers of outlying metropolitan 
counties so long as all other criteria are met. 



Criteria of metropolitan character. The criteria of metropoli- 
tan character relate primarily to the attributes of the contiguous 
county as a place of work or as a home for a concentration of 
nonagricultural workers. 

3. At least 75 percent of the labor force of the county must be 
in the nonagricultural labor force. 4 

4. In addition to criterion 3, the county must meet at least one 
of the following conditions : 

a. It must have 50 percent or more of its population living 
in contiguous minor civil divisions B with a density of at least 
150 persons per square mile, in an unbroken chain of minor 
civil divisions with such density radiating from a central city 
in the area. 

b. The number of nonagricultural workers employed in the 
county must equal at least 10 percent of the number of non- 
agricultural workers employed in the county containing the 
largest city in the area, or the county must be the place of 
employment of 10,000 nonagricultural workers. 

c. The nonagricultural labor force living in the county must 
equal at least 10 percent of the number of the nonagricultural 
labor force living in the county containing the largest city in 
the area, or the county must be the place of residence of a 
nonagricultural labor force of 10,000. 

5. In New England, the city and town are administratively 
more important than the county, and data are compiled locally 
for these minor civil divisions. Here, towns and cities are the 
units used in defining SMSA's. In New England, because smaller 
units are used and more restricted areas result, a population 
density criterion of at least 100 persons per square mile is used 
as the measure of metropolitan character. 

Criteria of integration. The criteria of integration relate pri- 
marily to the extent of economic and social communication be- 
tween the outlying counties and central county. 

6. A county is regarded as integrated with the county or coun- 
ties containing the central cities of the area if either of the follow- 
ing criteria is met : 

a. 15 percent of the workers living in the county work in 
the county or counties containing central cities of the area, or 

b. 25 percent of those working in the county live in the 
county or counties containing central cities of the area. 

Only where data for criteria 6a and 6b are not conclusive are 
other related types of information used as necessary. This in- 
formation includes such items as the average number of telephone 
calls per subscriber per month from the county to the county 
containing central cities of the area ; percent of the population 
in the county located in the central city telephone exchange area ; 
newspaper circulation reports prepared by the Audit Bureau of 
Circulation ; analysis of charge accounts in retail stores of central 
cities to determine the extent of their use by residents of the 
contiguous county ; delivery service practices of retail stores in 
central cities ; ofilcial traffic counts ; the extent of public trans- 
portation facilities in operation between central cities and com- 
munities in the contiguous county ; and the extent to which local 
planning groups and other civic organizations operate jointly. 

Criteria for titles. The criteria for titles relate primarily to 
the size and number of central cities. 

7. The complete title of an SMSA identifies the central city 
or cities and the 'State or States in which the SMSA is located : 

a. The name of the SMSA includes that of the largest city. 

b. The addition of up to two city names may be made in the 
area title, on the basis and in the order of the following 
criteria: 

(1) The additional city has at least 250,000 inhabitants. 

(2) The additional city has a population of one-third or 
more of that of the largest city and a minimum population 
of 25,000 except that both city names are used in those in- 
stances where cities qualify under criterion Ib. (A city 



* Nonagricultural labor force is defined as those employed in non- 
agricultural occupations, those experienced unemployed whose last oc- 
cupation was a nonagricultural occupation, members of the Armed Forces 
and new workers. 

B A contiguous minor ciyil division either adjoins a central city in an 
SMSA or adjoins an intermediate minor civil division of qualifying popu- 
lation density. There is no limit to the number of tiers of contiguous 
minor civil divisions so long as the minimum density requirement is met 
in each tier. 



Characteristics of die Population 



XIX 



which qualified as a secondary central city in 1950 but which 
does not qualify in 1960 has been temporarily retained as a 
central city.) 

c. In addition to city name, the area titles contain the name 
of the State or States in which the area is located. 

Data on the number of inhabitants for SMSA's which cross 
State lines -are shown in full in table 11 for each State in which 
a central city is located. If that part of an SMSA that extends 
into another State does not include a central city, data are shown 
only for the part within the State. In table 12 only that part 
of the SMSA which is within the State is shown. Data on gen- 
eral characteristics in chapters B and are shown for each 
SMSA with a central city located in this State. 

Data on detailed characteristics in chapter D for SMSA's 
which cross State lines are shown for the State containing the 
largest central city, and, in addition, for any -State not containing 
the largest central city tout containing 50 percent or more of the 
total population of the SMSA. 

In the 1950 Census reports, data were presented for standard 
metropolitan areas (SMA's) and in several earlier censuses a 



somewhat similar type of area called -the "metropolitan district" 
was used. In 1959, the criteria for delineating metropolitan 
areas were revised by the Bureau of the Budget, and, at the same 
time, the areas were designated as standard metropolitan statis- 
tical areas. The comparative SMSA figures shown here for 
1950 apply to the SMSA as defined in 1960. 

STANDARD CONSOLIDATED AREAS 

In view of the special importance of the metropolitan complexes 
around New York and Chicago, the Nation's largest cities, sev- 
eral contiguous SMSA's and additional counties that do not ap- 
pear to meet formal ^integration criteria but do h-ave strong 
interrelationships of other kinds, have been combined into the 
New York-Northeastern New Jersey and the Chicago-North- 
western Indiana Standard Consolidated Areas, respectively. The 
former is identical with the New York-Northeastern New Jersey 
SMA of 1950, and the latter corresponds roughly to the Chicago 
SMA of 1950 (two more counties 'having been added) . 



SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS 



AGE 

Definitions 

The data on age were derived from answers to question P6 
on the Advance Census Report. These answers were copied to 
the complete-count and sample FOSDIC forms, as explained in 
the section below on "Collection of data." 



When was this 
person bom ? 

(P6) 

Month j Year 



The age classification is based o'n -the age of the person in com- 
pleted years -as of April 1, 1960. For the first time since 1900, 
the Bureau of the Census obtained data on the age of the popu- 
lation by asking for date of birth. The respondent was requested 
to give the month and year of birth ; for simplicity in the process- 
ing, however, only the quarter of year of birth was used in 
determining age. The comparable question in previous censuses 
was designed to obtain the age in completed years. It was be- 
lieved that the use of self -enumeration coupled with the wording 
of the question in terms of date of birth would result in fewer 
errors in age reporting. On the other hand, there was a sub- 
stantial rise in the proportion of persons reporting no informa- 
tion relating to age. 

Assignment of Unknown Ages 

In each census since 1940, the Bureau of the Census has esti- 
mated the age of a person when it was not reported. In censuses 
prior to 1940, with the exception of 1880, persons of unknown 
age were shown as -a separate category. The summary totals 
for "14 years and over" and "21 years and over" for earlier 
censuses included all persons of "unknown age" since there is 
evidence that most of the persons for whom age was not reported 
were in the age classes above these limits. Both in 1940 -and 
1950, estimates for unknown ages were made for less than 0.20 
percent of the population of the United States using basically 



similar techniques of inferring age from related information for 
the person and other members of the family and household. In 
1960, birth date was estimated for JL7 percent of the enumerated 
population on the basis of other information regarding the per- 
son reported on the census questionnaire. Also, birth date was 
allocated for an additional 0.5 percent of the population as a part 
of the process of substituting persons with reported characteris- 
tics for persons not tallied because of the enumerator's failure 
to interview households or because of mechanical failure in proc- 
essing. This makes a total of about 2.2 percent of the population 
for whom age was estimated. For a discussion of the procedure 
followed in 1960 to estimate values for unknown items, including 
age, see the section below on "Editing of unacceptable data." 

Errors in Age Statistics 

Studies of age data collected in previous censuses have shown 
that age has been occasionally misreported in several character- 
istic ways. The numbers in some age groups have been under- 
stated, whereas others have been overstated, as the combined 
result of net underenumeration and of misstatements of age. 
One of the presumed advantages of self -enumeration was an ex- 
pected reduction in such misreporting. The respondent was 
given an opportunity to consult records and discuss his reply be- 
fore responding. Also, the wording of the question in terms of 
date of birth rather than age in number of years has changed 
the way in which age statistics tend to heap on certain terminal 
digits (e.g., and 5) and may have reduced the overall extent 
of such heaping. As data become available from the 1960 tabula- 
tions, a more definitive analysis of the effect of the new enumera- 
tion techniques will be made. 

Age estimates for selected SMSA's. The 1950 data shown here 
for SMSA's apply to the area as defined in 1960. Estimates of 
some of the age categories were prepared for the relatively few 
areas in which 1950 data were not available in the detail needed 
for the 1960 area. The estimation was based on the assumption 
that the distribution of ages for the area to be estimated was the 
same as that of the area as defined in 1950. 

Median Age 

The median, a type of average, is presented in connection TWth 
the data on age which appear in this report The median is the 
value which divides the distribution into two equal parts one- 
half of the cases falling below this value and one-half of the 
cases exceeding this value. The medians shown in tables 94 and 
95 (giving age by single years to 84) were computed on the basis 
of 5-year groupings. 



XX 



Introduction 



Fertility Ratios 

The "fertility ratio," as the term is used in this report, is the 
nnmber of children under 5 years- old per 1,000 women 15 to 49 
years old. It is a rough index of the natural growth tendencies 
of various areas and population groups. The ratio is a measure 
of effective fertility. 

The fertility ratios shown in table 13 were computed from the 
distribution of the population in each area by age and sex and, 
therefore, included all persons under 5 years old. The data are 
not comparable with those in table 114, which show women by 
number of own children under 5 years old. (See section below 
on "Child.") 

RACE AND COLOR 

Definitions 

The data on race were derived from answers to the following 
question on the Advance Census Report : 



ft this person - 
White 



American Indian 

Japanese 

Chinese 

Filipino 

Hawaiian 

Part Hawaiian 

Aleut 

Eskimo 

<.) 7 

(P5) _ 



Bace. The concept of race, as it has been used by the Bureau 
of the Census, is derived from that which is commonly accepted 
by the general public. It does not reflect clear-cut definitions of 
biological stock, and several categories obviously refer to na- 
tional origin. The use of self -enumeration in the 1960 Census 
may have affected the data on race as compared with those of 
earlier censuses. Whereas formerly the classification was ob- 
tained in most cases by the enumerator's observation, in 1960 it 
was possible for members of the household to classify themselves. 
Some of their entries were ambiguous ; but, where the enumera- 
tor failed to classify these into the prescribed census racial 
categories, the classification was made in the editing process. 
Nonetheless, in many areas the proportion of persons classified 
as of "other races" may be somewhat higher than it would have 
been had the 1950 procedures been followed. 

Color. The term "color" refers to the division of the popula- 
tion into two groups, white and nonwhite. The color group desig- 
nated as "nonwhite" includes persons of Negro, American Indian, 
Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Malayan 
races. Persons of Mexican birth or ancestry who are not defi- 
nitely of Indian or other nonwhite race are classified as white. 
In the 1930 publications, Mexicans were included in the group 
"other races," but the 1930 data published in this report have 
been revised to include Mexicans in the white population. 

Negroes, Indians, Japanese, etc., are quite different with re- 
spect to some demographic and economic characteristics; but, 
since Negroes constitute 92 percent of all nonwhites, many of the 
data presented are shown for all the nonwhite races combined, in 
order to effect savings in tabulation and publication. Statistics 
for specific nonwhite races may be found in chapter B. 



Nonwhite Races 

Negro. In addition to person^ of Negro and of mixed Negro 
and white descent, this classification includes persons of mixed 
Indian and Negro descent, unless the Indian ancestry very 
definitely predominates or unless the individual is regarded as 
an Indian in the community. 

American Indian. In addition to fullblooded Indians, persons 
of mixed white and Indian blood are included in this category 
if they are enrolled on an Indian tribal or agency roll. A com- 
mon requirement for such enrollment at present is that the pro- 
portion of Indian blood should be at least one-fourth. Indians 
living in Indian territory or on reservations were not included 
in the official population count of the United States until 1890. 

Other races. The category "other races" is used variously in 
different tables of this report to include all racial stocks not 
shown separately. The greatest detail on racial stock of the 
population is presented in chapter B, in which separate statistics 
for persons of the white, Negro, American Indian, Japanese, 
Chinese, Filipino, and all other racial stocks are shown for each 
SMS A, urbanized area, urban place of 10,000 or more, and 
county. In tables of chapter B in which detailed racial stock 
is presented, "other races" thus includes only the relatively small 
numbers of Koreans, Hawaiians, Asian Indians, Malayans, 
Eskimos, Aleuts, etc. Elsewhere, "other races" includes all non- 
white races other than Negro. 

Mixed parentage. Persons of mixed racial parentage are clas- 
sified according to the race of the nonwhite parent, and mixtures 
of nonwhite races are classified according to the race of the 
father, with the special exceptions noted above. 

In 1950, an attempt was made to classify as separate groups 
persons of mixed white, Negro, and Indian ancestry living in 
specified communities. These persons were included in the "other 
races" category. Because of problems of identification of these 
groups encountered in 1950 and the difficulty of distinguishing 
these groups by self-enumeration, the practice was dropped in 
1960, except for the classification of a very few small mixed 
groups. 

NATIVITY, PLACE OF BIRTH, AND PARENTAGE 

The data on nativity, place of birth, and parentage were derived 
from answers to the following questions on the Household 
Questionnaire : 



P8. Where was this person born? 

(If born in hospital, give residence of mother, not location of 
hospital) 

If born in the United States, write name of State. 
If born outside the United States, write name of country, U.S. 
possession, etc. Use international boundaries as now recog- 
nized by the U.S. Distinguish Northern Ireland from Ireland 
(Eire). 

(State, foreign country, U.S. possession, etc.) 



P10. What country was his father born in? 



United , 
States. I 



OR. 



(Nome of foreign country; or Puerto Rico, Guam, tc 



PIK What country was his mother bbrn in? 
OR 



United i 
States.! 



(Name of foreign country; or Puerto Rico, Guam, etc.) 



Characteristics of the Population 



XXI 



Nativity 

In this report, information on place of birth is used to classify 
the population of the United States into two major categories, 
native and foreign born. The "native" category comprises per- 
sons born in the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
or a possession of the United States. Also included in this cate- 
gory is the small number of persons who, although they were born 
in a foreign country or at sea, have at least one native American 
parent. Persons whose place of birth was not reported are as- 
sumed to be native unless their census report contains contra- 
dictory information, such as an entry of a language spoken prior 
to coming to the United States. Persons not classified as "native" 
in accordance with these qualifications were considered 'foreign 
born." 

The total and white populations of the United States have 
been classified as native or foreign born in every census since 
1850. Beginning with the Census of 1900, the Negro population 
and the population of other races were similarly classified. 

Place of Birth 

native. Data on the State of birth of the native population 
have been collected at each census beginning with that of 1850. 
In the Censuses of 1850 and 1860, State of birth was presented 
for whites and for free Negroes only. In this report, as in those 
for some of the more recent censuses, State of birth has been 
shown for the native population of the urban, rural-notnfarm, 
and rural-farm parts of States, and of individual cities above 
a specified minimum size. 

In chapter C of this report, the native population is further 
classified into the following groups : Persons born in the State in 
which they were residing at the time of the census, persons born 
in a different State, persons born in an outlying area of the 
United States or at sea of American parents, and persons whose 
State of birth was not reported. In addition, chapter D presents 
the region of birth of persons born in a different State and sep- 
arate categories are shown for persons born in an outlying area 
of the United States and for persons born abroad or at sea of 
American parents. The enumerators in 1960 were instructed to 
report place of birth in terms of the mother's usual State of 
residence at the time of birth rather than in terms of the location 
of the hospital if the birth occurred in a hospital. This instruc- 
tion also appeared on the Household Questionnaire. 

The statistics on State of birth are of value mainly for the 
information they provide on the historical movements of the 
native population from one State to another within the United 
States from the time of birth to the date of the census. These 
statistics indicate migration only in terms of the number of per- 
sons who had moved from the State of their birth and were 
still living in another State on the date of the census. The 
statistics therefore afford no indication of the amount of migra- 
tion within a given State from rural to urban communities or 
from one locality to another; nor do they take any account of 
intermediate moves between the time of a person's birth and 
the time of the census. 

The statistics thus do not indicate the total number of persons 
who have moved from the State in which they were 'born to other 
States, or to any specific State, during any given period of time. 
Some of those who had gone from one State to another have since 
died, others have returned to the State in which they were born, 
and others have gone to still other States, or places outside the 
United States. 

Foreign born. Foreign-born persons were asked to report their 
country of birth according to international boundaries as recog- 
nized by the United States on April 1, 1960. Similarly, in editing 
and coding the data on country of birth of the foreign born, the 
list of countries used was composed of those officially recognized 
by the United States at the time of the census. There may have 



been considerable deviation from the rules specified in the instruc- 
tions, in view of numerous changes in boundaries that have oc- 
curred. Moreover, many foreign-born persons are likely to report 
their country of birth in terms of boundaries that existed at the 
time of their birth or emigration, or in accordance with their 
own national preference; such variations in reporting may have 
been intentional or the result of ignorance of the boundaries 
recognized by the United States. 

Parentage and Birthplace of Parents 

Information on birthplace of parents is used to classify the 
native population of the United States into two categories: 
Native of native parentage and native of foreign or mixed parent- 
age. The category "native of native parentage" comprises native 
persons, both of whose parents are also natives of the United 
States. The category "native of foreign or mixed parentage" 
comprises native persons, one or both of whose parents are for- 
eign born. The rules for determining the nativity and country 
of birth of parents are substantially the same as those used for 
the persons enumerated. Where the data on parents' birthplace 
were incomplete, the editing procedure made use of other related 
information on the census schedule in order to determine an 
acceptable entry where possible. 

Foreign Stock 

The foreign-born population is combined with the native popu- 
lation of foreign or mixed parentage in a single category termed 
"foreign stock." This category comprises all first- and second- 
generation Americans. Third and subsequent generations in the 
United States are described as "native of native parentage." 

In this report, persons of foreign stock are classified according 
to their country of origin with separate distributions shown for 
the foreign born and the native of foreign or mixed parentage. 
In this classification, native persons of foreign parentage whose 
parents were born in different countries are classified according 
to the country of birth of the father. 

MOTHER TONGUE OF THE FOREIGN BORN 

Definitions 

The data on mother tongue of the foreign born were derived 
from answers to the following question on the Household 
Questionnaire : 



P9. If this person wos bom oufsfde ff>* U.S. 

What language wa$ spoken in his home before he came to the 
United States? 



In the 1960 Census, mother tongue is defined as the principal 
language spoken in the person's home before he came to the 
United States. If a person reported more than one language, 
the code assigned was the mother tongue reported by the largest 
number of immigrants from that country in the 1940 Census. 
Data are shown in chapter O for all the more common European 
languages, as well as Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic. 

Data on mother tongue were collected in the interest of de- 
termining nationality or ethnic or linguistic origin of the fo.reign 
born, especially of those persons born in certain Eastern Euro- 
pean areas which have experienced changes in national sover- 
eignty. The data on mother tongue of the foreign born do not 
necessarily reflect a person's current language skills or an in- 
ability to speak English. The vast majority of persons reporting 
a mother tongue other than English have learned to speak 
English since entering -this country. It is likely, furthermore, 



X70T 



Introduction 



that many of -these persons have forgotten the mother tongue they 
reported, and some have acquired skills in other foreign languages. 
Nonresponse to the question on mother tongue was relatively 
frequent in some areas. Failure to report a language may have 
resulted from a number of causes. For example, in some situa- 
tions, the respondent and the enumerator may have thought the 
mother tongue was obvious from the country of birth. Further- 
more, since the mother-tongue question was asked only of foreign- 
born persons, it was asked relatively rarely in some areas and 
may have 'been overlooked by the enumerator in direct interview 
situations. It is apparent that in areas where there are large 
concentrations of foreign-born persons, nonresponse rates are 
substantially lower than in areas where there are relatively few 
such persons* No assignments to replace nonresponses were 
made for missing entries on mother tongue for this report. 

Comparability 

A question on mother tongue was asked in the Censuses of 1910, 
1920, 1930, and 1940. The comparability of these data is limited 
to some extent by changes in the wording of the question, in the 
categories of the population to which the question was addressed, 
and in the detail that was published. In 1940, the question asked 
for the language spoken in earliest childhood and included a 
caution to enumerators that, when obtaining this information 
from foreign-born persons, they should record the language 
spoken in the home before the person came to the United States. 
In 1960, if both English and another mother tongue were reported, 
preference was always given to the non-English language. This 
procedure may reduce somewhat the proportion of the foreign- 
born population classified as having English as their mother 
tongue. 

In the 1910 and 1920 Censuses, statistics on mother tongue were 
published for the foreign white stock; in 1930, they were pub- 
lished for the foreign-born white population ; and in 1940 they 
were published for the native white of native parentage as well 
as the foreign white stock. In the present census, they are 
shown for the foreign-born population of all races combined. 

YEAR MOVED INTO PRESENT HOUSE 

The data on year moved into present residence were derived 
from -the answers to the following question on the Household 
Questionnaire : 



PI 2. When did this person movt into this house (or apartment)? 
(Check date of fast move) 



In 1959 or 1960...O 

In 1958 ...D 

In 1957 D 



April 1955 
to Dec. 1956. 



.a 



Jan. 1954 _. 

to Mdrch 1955. ..LI 

1950 to 1953-.. D 

1940 to 1949 IH 

1939 or earlier... D 
Always lived here. ll 



Respondents were asked to answer in terms of the most recent 
move they had made. The intent was to obtain the year when 
the person established his usual residence in the housing unit. 
Thus, a person who had moved back into the same house (or 
apartment) in which he had previously lived was asked to give 
the date at which he began the present occupancy. If a person 
had moved from one apartment to another in the same building, 
he was expected to give the year when he moved into the present 
apartment. In reports of the 1960 Census, the category "always 
lived here" includes persons who reported that their residence 
on April 1, 1960, was the same as their residence at birth and 
who had never had any other place of residence. In reports of 
the 1960 Census of Housing, however, "year moved into present 
house" is shown for heads of households, but the category "al- 
ways lived here" is not used; heads of households who had 



always lived in the present house were distributed among the 
time periods on the basis of the head's age. 

RESIDENCE IN 1955 
Definitions 

The data on residence in 1955 were derived from the answers 
to the following questions on the Household Questionnaire : 



PIS. Did he live in this house on April 1, 1955? 
(Answer 7, 2, or 3) 



O* 



OR 



1 . Born April 1 955 or later 
* 

2. Yes, this house 



LJ 



3. No, different house --- 

* 

Where did he live on April 1, 1955? 



B. City or town . 



ff cify or town Did he live inside 
the city limits?-- 




c. County 

AND 

State, foreign 
country, U.S. 
possession, etc. . 



Besidence on April 1, 1955, is the usual place of residence 5 
years prior to enumeration. Residence in 1955 was used in con- 
junction with residence in 1960 to determine the extent of mo- 
bility of the population. 

The category "same house as in 1960" includes all persons 5 
years old and over who were reported -as living in the same 
house on the date of enumeration in 1960 and 5 years prior 
to enumeration. Included in the group are persons who had 
never moved during the 5 years as well as those who had moved 
but by 1960 had returned to their 1955 residence. Persons who 
had changed residence from 1955 to 1960 were classified -accord- 
ing to type of move. 

The category "different house in the U.S." includes persons 
who, on April 1, 1955, lived in the United States in a different 
house from the one they occupied on April 1, 1960, and for whom 
sufficient information concerning the 1955 residence was col- 
lected. These persons were subdivided into three groups ac- 
cording to their 1955 residence, viz., "different house, same 
county," "different county, same State," and "different State/' 
The last category was further subdivided by region of 1955 
residence. 

The category "abroad" includes those with residence in a 
foreign country or an outlying area of the United States in 1955. 
(In the coding of this item, persons who lived in Alaska or 
Hawaii in 1955 but in other States in 1960 were classified as liv- 
ing in a different State in 1955. ) 

Persons 5 years old and over who had indicated they had moved 
into their present residence after April 1, 1955, but, for whom, 
or for members of their families, sufficiently complete and con- 
sistent information regarding residence on April 1, 1955, was not 
collected, are included in the group "moved, place of residence in 
1955 not reported." (Missing information was supplied if data 
were available for other members of the family. ) Also included in 
the category "moved, place of residence in 1955 not reported" are 
persons who gave no indication as to their movement since April 1, 



Characteristics of the Population 



X X J_ I { 



1955, but who, on the basis of the final edited entry for year 
moved (for which all nonresponses were replaced by assigned 
entries), were classified as having moved into their present house 
since April 1, 1955. 

The number of persons who were living in different houses in 
1960 and 1955 is somewhat less than the total number of moves 
during the 5 years. Some persons in the same house at the two 
dates had moved during the 5-year period but by the time of 
enumeration had returned to their 1955 residence. Other persons 
made two or more moves. Persons in a different house in the 
same county may actually have moved between counties during 
the 5-year period but by 1960 had returned to the same county 
of residence as that in 1955. Finally, some movers during the 
5-year period had died or gone abroad. 

Comparability 

Similar questions on mobility were asked in the 1950 and 1940 
Censuses. However, the questions in the 1950 Census, as well as 
in annual supplements to the Current Population Survey, applied 
to residence 1 year earlier rather than 5 years earlier. In 
the 1950 reports, migrants reporting the State but not the county 
of residence in 1949 were included in the known categories of mi- 
gration status and State of origin, whereas in this report such 
persons were all assigned to the category "moved, place of res- 
idence in 1955 not reported." This partial nonresponse group 
comprised 411,590 migrants in 1950 ; the corresponding figure for 
1960 is not known. 

Although the questions in the 1940 Census covered a 5-year 
period, comparability with that census is reduced somewhat be- 
cause of different definitions and categories of tabulation. In 
1940, the population was classified in terms of four categories : 
Migrants, nonmigrants, immigrants, and migration status not 
reported. The first group, "migrants," included those persons who 
in 1935 lived in a county (or quasi-county) different from the one 
in which -they were living in 1940. A quasi-county was defined as 
a city which had a population of 100,000 or more in 1930 or the 
balance of the county within which such a city was located. The 
second group, "nonmigrants," comprised those persons living in 
the same house in 1935 as in 1940 as well as persons living in a 
different house in the same county or quasi-county. The group 
classified as "immigrant" in 1940 is comparable to the group 
classified in 1960 as "abroad." The 1940 classification, "migration 
status not reported," included persons for whom information was 
not reported in addition to those for whom the information 
supplied was not. sufficient. 

In the Series PHC(l), Census Tract Reports, for Denver, 
Colo.; Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va. ; New Orleans, La.; Baltimore, 
Md. ; St. Louis, Mo.-Ill. ; Philadelphia, Pa.-N. J. ; and Richmond, 
Va., the number of persons shown as having moved within the 
central city of the SMSA is slightly too low and the number shown 
as having moved from the ring to the central city is correspond- 
ingly too high. The cities in question are either coterminous with 
counties or are independent of any county. The error occurred in 
the tabulation where codes of "this county" without a code for the 
city were tallied as "other part of this SMSA," In those SMSA's 
with only one central city, the correct figures are available from 
the line for "same county" in table 82 of this report. If there are 
two or more central cities, however, the correct figures are not 
available for the category "central city of this SMSA." The 
SMSA's concerned are Newport News-Hampton and Norfolk- 
Portsmouth in Virginia and San Francisco-Oakland in California. 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND YEAR OF SCHOOL 
IN WHICH ENROLLED 

Definitions 

The data on school enrollment were derived from answers to 
the following questions on the Household Questionnaire : 



PI 6. Has he attended regular school or college at any time since 
February 1, 1960? 

If he has attended only nursery school, business or trade 
school, or adult education classes, check "No" 

Yes.. .D 



No 



....a 



P17. Is it a public school or a private school? 



Public school. 



...a 

Private or * 

parochial school LJ 



The answers to these questions were recorded for persons 5 to 
34 years of age. The data on year of school in which enrolled 
were obtained by tabulating, for those who were enrolled, the 
responses to the question on highest grade attended (see section 
below on "Years of school completed") . 

Schooling included. Persons were included as enrolled in 
school if they reported attending or being enrolled in a "regular" 
school or college at any time between February 1, 1960, and the 
time of enumeration. According to the census definition, "regu- 
lar" schooling refers to formal education obtained in public and 
private (denominational or nondenominational) kindergartens, 
graded schools, colleges, universities, or professional schools, 
whether day or night school, and whether attendance was full 
time or part time. That is, "regular" schooling is that which 
may advance a person toward an elementary school certificate 
or high school diploma, or a college, university, or professional 
degree. Schooling that was not obtained in a regular school and 
schooling from a tutor or through correspondence courses were 
counted only if the credits obtained were regarded as transferable 
to a school in the regular school system. Persons who had been 
enrolled in a regular school since February 1, 1960, but who had 
not actually attended, for example, because of illness, were 
counted as enrolled in school. 

Schooling excluded. Persons were excluded from the enroll- 
ment figures if the only schools they had been attending at any 
time since February 1, 1960, were not "regular" (unless courses 
taken at such schools could have been counted for credit at a 
regular school). Schooling which is generally regarded as not 
"regular" includes that which is given in nursery schools, in 
specialized vocational, trade, or business schools, in on-the-job 
training, and through correspondence courses. 

Level and year of school in which enrolled. Persons who were 
enrolled in school were classified according to the level and year 
of school in which they were enrolled. The levels which are 
separately identified in this report are kindergarten, elementary 
school, high school, and college. Table 101 in chapter D presents 
data for single years within each level. Elementary school, as 
defined here, includes grades 1 to 8 and high school includes 
grades 9 to 12. If a person was attending a junior high school, 
the equivalent in terms of 8 years of elementary school and 4 
years of high school was obtained. ( See the section on "Tears of 
school completed" for a discussion of variations in school organi- 
zation.) The term "college" includes junior or community col- 
. leges, regular 4-year colleges, and graduate or professional schools. 

Public or private school. Persons who were enrolled in school 
were also classified as attending a public or private school. In 
general, a "public" school is defined as any school which is con- 
trolled and supported primarily by a local, State, or Federal 
government agency, whereas "private" schools are defined as 
schools which are controlled and supported mainly by a religious 
organization or by private persons or organizations. 

Enumeration, of college students. College students were enu- 
merated in 1950 and 1960 where they lived while attending college, 
whereas in most earlier censuses they generally were enumerated 



XXIV 



Introduction 



at their parental home. A study conducted in the Current Popu- 
lation Survey showed, however, that residence while attending 
college is the same under both the current and the previous 
procedures for roughly one-half of the college students ; further- 
more, only part of the one-half who would be classified at differ- 
ent residences would be counted in different counties and still 
fewer in different States. 

Comparability 

Earlier census data. The corresponding question on schooling 
in the 1930 Census applied to a somewhat longer period, the 
period since the preceding September 1. Furthermore, in that 
census the question was not restricted as to the kind of school 
the person was attending. In 1940, the question referred to the 
period since the preceding March 1. There were indications, 
following that census, that in some areas the schools closed early 
(i.e., before March 1) for such reasons as lack of funds, flood 
conditions, or crop sowing. For such areas, the enrollment rates 
would, therefore, have been relatively low. In order to insure 
more complete comparability among areas, it was considered 
advisable in 1950 to change the reference period to that between 
February 1 (the usual date for beginning the second semester) 
and the time of enumeration. The corresponding reference period 
was used in 1960. 

In 1950, for the first time in a decennial census, kindergarten 
enrollment was separately identified, but the number of children 
enrolled in kindergarten was not included with the 1950 statistics 
on enrollment in regular schools. In 1960, kindergarten enroll- 
ment was separately identified and included with the regular 
enrollment figures. In this report, the statistics for 1950 have 
been adjusted to include enrollment in kindergarten with the 
regular enrollment figures. 

The age range for which enrollment data have been obtained 
has varied for the several censuses. Information on enrollment 
was recorded for persons of all ages in 1930 and 1940, for persons 
5 to 29 years old in 1950, and for those 5 to 34 years old in 1960. 
Most of the published enrollment figures relate, however, to ages 
5 to 20 in 1930, 5 to 24 in 1940, 5 to 29 in 1950, and 5 to 34 in 1960. 
The enrollment statistics at the older ages reported In 1930 and 
1940 were regarded as of poor quality and as relating mostly to 
enrollment in other than regular schools. The extended age 
coverage for the published enrollment data in the recent censuses 
reflects the increasing -number of persons in their late twenties 
and early thirties who are attending regular colleges and 
universities. 

In 1960, as in prior censuses, persons for whom there was no 
report on school enrollment were allocated as either enrolled or 
not enrolled. In both 1940 and 1950, the editing rules were de- 
termined largely on the basis of information on ages of compul- 
sory attendance as compiled by the U.S. Office of Education. 
Additional information used in editing included other items on 
the schedule and results of Current Population Surveys showing 
the percent enrolled for various age groups. In general, in 1940 
and 1950, persons 5 through IT years of age not reporting on 
school enrollment were treated as enrolled, whereas those over 
17 years old were considered -not enrolled. The general scheme 
used in eliminating nonresponses in 1960 is discussed in the 
section below on "Editing of unacceptable data." 

Data from other sources, Data on school enrollment are also 
collected and published by other Federal, State, and local govern- 
mental agencies. This information is generally obtained from 
reports of school systems and institutions of higher learning and 
from other surveys and censuses. These data are only roughly 
comparable with data collected by the Bureau of the Census by 
household canvassing, however, because of differences in defini- 
tions, subject matter covered, time references, and enumeration 
methods. 



YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED 

Definitions 

The data on years of school completed were derived from 
answers to the following questions on the Household 
Questionnaire : 



PI 4. Whot is the highest grade (or year) of regular school this person 
has ever attended? (Check one box) 

If 'now attending a regular school or college, check the grade 
(or year) he is in. If it is in junior high school, check the 
box that stands for that grade (or year). 



Never attended school.. LJ 
Kindergarten LJ 



12345678 

nananaan 

1234 
High school (Year) O D Q D 

1 2 3 4 5 6 or more 
College (Year) 



PI 5. Did he finish the highest grade (or year) he attended? 
Finished Did not Never 

this p- - finish . . attended , , 

grade . . . LJ this grade. . . LJ school . . . LJ 



These questions on educational attainment applied only to 
progress in "regular" schools, as defined above. Both ques- 
tions were asked of all persons 5 years of age and over. In the 
present report, these data are shown for persons 14 to 24 years 
old not enrolled in school and for all persons 14 years old and 
over. 

Highest grade of school attended. The first question called for 
the highest grade attended, regardless of "skipped" or "repeated" 
grades, rather than the number of full school years which the 
person had spent in school. If the highest grade of school at- 
tended was in a junior high school, the instructions to enumera- 
tors were to determine the equivalent in elementary grades 1 to 
8 or high school grades 1 to 4. 

In some areas in the United States, the school system has, or 
formerly had, 11 years of school (7 years of elementary school 
and 4 years of high school) rather than the more conventional 
12 years (8 years of elementary school and 4 years of high school, 
or equivalent years in the elementary-junior high-senior high 
school system). Persons who had progressed beyond the 7th 
grade in this type of school system were treated as though they 
had progressed beyond the 8th grade of elementary school. 

Enumerators were instructed to obtain the approximate equiv- 
alent grade in the American school system for persons whose 
highest grade of attendance was in a foreign school system, 
whose highest level of attendance was in an ungraded school, 
whose highest level of schooling was measured by "readers," or 
whose training by a tutor was regarded as qualifying under the 
"regular" school definition. 

Completion of grade. The second question on educational at- 
tainment asked whether or not the highest grade attended had 
been finished. It was to be answered "Yes" if the person had 
successfully completed the entire grade or year indicated in 
response to the previous question on the highest grade ever at- 
tended. If the person was still attending school in that grade, 
had completed only a half grade or semester, or had dropped out 
of or failed to pass the last grade attended, the question was to 
be answered "No." 



Characteristics of the Population 



XXV 



Comparability 

Question wording and editing. In 1940, a single question was 
asked on highest grade of school completed. Analysis of the 
1940 returns and those of other surveys conducted by the Census 
Bureau using wording similar to that used in 1940 indicated that 
respondents frequently reported the grade or year in which they 
were enrolled, or had last been enrolled, instead of the one com- 
pleted. The two-question approach used in 1950 and 1960 was 
designed to reduce this kind of error. 

In 1950, persons for whom highest grade attended was re- 
ported but for whom no report was made on finishing the grade 
were assumed not to have finished the grade if they were at the 
compulsory school ages but to have finished the grade if they 
were not at those* ages. In 1960, nonresponses on both highest 
grade attended an;d completion of grade were eliminated by the 
procedure described below, in the section on "Editing of un- 
acceptable data." 

The number in each category of highest grade of school com- 
pleted for 1950 and 1960 represents the combination of (a) per- 
sons who reported that they had attended the indicated grade 
and finished it, and (&) those who had attended the next higher 
grade but had not finished it 

Median School Years Completed 

The median number of school years completed is defined as the 
value which divides the population group into two equal parts 
one-half having completed more schooling and one-half having 
completed less schooling than the median. This median was 
computed after the statistics on years of school completed had 
been converted to a continuous series of numbers (e.g., comple- 
tion of the 1st year of high school was treated as completion of 
the 9th year and completion of the 1st year of college as comple- 
tion of the 13th year). The persons completing a given school 
year were assumed to be distributed evenly within the interval 
from .0 to .9 of the year. In fact, at the time of census enumera- 
tion (generally April or May), most of the enrolled persons had 
completed at least three-fourths of a school year beyond the 
highest grade completed, whereas a large majority of persons 
who were not enrolled had not attended any part of a grade be- 
yond the highest one completed. The effect of the assumption is 
to place the median for younger persons slightly below, and for 
older persons slightly above, the true median. 

The same procedure for computing this median has been used 
in the 1940, 1950, and 1960 Censuses. Because of the inexact 
assumption as to the distribution within an interval, this median 
is more appropriately used for comparing groups and the same 
group at different dates than as an absolute measure of educa- 
tional attainment. 

VETERAN STATUS 

The data on veteran status were derived from answers to the 
following question on the Household Questionnaire : 



P35. If this is a man 

Has he ever served in the Army, Navy, or other Armed Forces of 



the United States? 
Yes ... 



No ... 



I 



(Check one box 
oh each line) 



. 
Koreah War (June 1 950 to Jon. 1 955 ) ...... LJ LJ 

World War II (Sept. 1940 to July 1947) ..... LJ LJ 

World War! (April 1917 to Nov. 1918) ..... LJ LJ 

Any other time, including present service --- -I I _ LJ 



Data on veteran status are being published in detail for the 
first time in this census. In the Census of 1840, a special volume 
was issued giving the names, ages, and places of residence of 



pensioners of the Revolutionary War or other U.S. military 
service, but other veterans were not identified. An inquiry on 
veteran status was undertaken in the Census of 1890, and sum- 
mary statistics on surviving veterans of the Union and Con- 
federate Armies were published. A question on veteran status 
was also included in the Censuses of 1910, 1930, 1940, and 1950, 
but the results of these inquiries were not published because of 
the high rate of nonresponse and other reasons. 

A "veteran" as defined here is a civilian male 14 years old 
and over, who has served but is not now serving in the Armed 
Forces of the United States. All other civilian males 14 years 
old and over are classified as nonveterans. Because relatively 
few females have served in the Armed Forces of this country, 
questions on veteran status were asked only of males. 

The veteran population is classified according to period of 
service. Among veterans with more than one period of service, 
those who served in both the Korean War and World War II 
are presented as a separate group. All other persons with more 
than one period of service reported are shown according to the 
most recent wartime period of service reported. All data for 
veterans were edited to eliminate reported periods of service 
which were inconsistent with reported ages. 

Comparability 

The figures in this report on the number of veterans cover all 
civilian males 14 years old and over in the United States who 
have served in the Armed Forces, regardless of whether their 
service was in war or during peacetime. The Veterans Ad- 
ministration's estimates include civilian veterans living outside 
as well as in the United States and, generally speaking, cover 
only persons with war service. Thus, the count of veterans 
from the 1960 Census is not directly comparable in all particulars 
with estimates of the total number of veterans published by the 
Veterans Administration. 

Within these limitations, however, it appears that the 1960 
Census figure for veterans of World War II and/or the Korean 
War is about 7 percent less than the Veterans Administration's 
estimate, and that the census count and the Veterans Adminis- 
tration's estimate for veterans of World War I are in substantial 
agreement. The difference in .definition of the "other service" 
category precludes any useful comparison of the figures for this 
group. It is possible that the census figure, which presumably 
reflects in large part persons who served between World War II 
and the Korean War and after the Korean War, is overstated. 
Additional tabulations of the characteristics of veterans from the 
1960 Census, and further study of the figures from both the Census 
Bureau and Veterans Administration, are being planned in an 
effort to determine the sources of these differences. 

MARITAL STATUS 

The data on marital status were derived from answers to the 
following question on the Advance Census Beport : 



1$ this person 
Married 
Widowed 
Divorced 
Separated 
Single (never married) ? 

(Leave blank for children 
born after March 31, 1946) 



(P7) 



XXVI 



Introduction 



The classification refers to the marital status of the person 
at the time of enumeration. Persons classified as "married" com- 
prise, therefore, both those who have heen married only once 
and those who remarried after having been widowed or divorced. 

Persons reported as separated (either legally separated or 
otherwise absent from the spouse because of marital discord) are 
classified as a subcategory of married persons. The enumerators 
were instructed to report persons in common-law marriages as 
married and persons whose only marriage had been annulled as 
single. Persons "ever married" are those in the categories 
married (including separated), widowed, and divorced. 

Differences between the number of married men and the num- 
ber of married women are due partly to the absence of husbands 
or wives from the country at the time of enumeration. Examples 
are women whose husbands were in the Armed Forces overseas 
and immigrants whose husbands or wives were still abroad. 
Differences may also arise because the husband and wife have 
different places of residence, because of differences in the com- 
pleteness and accuracy of reporting on marital status for men 
and women, and because of the methods used to inflate the sample 
cases as explained in the second paragraph below. 

Married persons with "spouse present" are persons whose 
spouse was enumerated as a member of the same household 
even though he or she may have been temporarily absent on 
business or vacation, visiting, in a hospital, etc. The small num- 
ber of persons living with their spouse in group quarters are 
classified as married, spouse absent ; if a married person in group 
quarters was in the sample, his spouse was unlikely to be in the 
sample, because in group quarters the sample consisted of every 
fourth person in order of enumeration. 

The number of married men with wife present, shown in this 
report, is identical with the number of married couples. (See 
discussion of "Married couple" below. ) By definition, these num- 
bers should also be identical with the number of married women 
with husband present. However, the figures may not be exactly 
the same because, in the weighting of the sample, husbands and 
their wives were sometimes given different weights. Married 
persons with "spouse absent other" comprise married persons 
employed and living away from their homes, those whose spouse 
was absent in the Armed Forces, in-migrants whose spouse re- 
mained in other areas, husbands or wives of inmates of institu- 
tions, married persons (other than separated) who were living 
in group quarters, and all other married persons whose place of 
residence was not the same as that of their spouse. 

Comparability 

The 1960 marital status categories are the same as those of the 
1950 Census, except for the exclusion of all persons in group 
quarters from the category "married, spouse present." It is pos- 
sible, however, that the use of self -enumeration in 1960 rather 
than direct enumeration, as in 1950, has produced some degree 
of incomparability between the two sets of data. 

Whether Married More Than Once 

The data on whether married more than once were derived 
from answers to the following question on the Household 
Questionnaire : 



PI 8. If this person has ever been married 

Has this person been married more than once? 

More than 
Once once 



a 



a 



In 1950, the corresponding question was "Has this person been 
married more than once?" 



HOUSEHOLD AND GROUP QUARTERS MEMBERSHIP, AND 
RELATIONSHIP TO HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 

Definitions 

The data on households, group quarters, and relationship to 
head of household were derived in part from the following 
question on -the Advance Census Report : 



Who! i* the relationship of each person 
to the head of thft household? 

(For example, wife, son, daughter, 

grandson, mother-in-law, lodger, 

lodger's wife) 



(P3) 

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 



Greater detail on persons classified as "other relative" or 
"nonrelative," which was used in determining family member- 
ship, was obtained from the following question on -the Household 
Questionnaire : 



P3. What is the relationship of this person to the head of this house- 
hold? 

Head d 

Wife of head CD 

Son or daughter of head LJ 



Other Wnfe in: 

(For example: Son-in-law, mother, uncle, cousin, etc.) 



Household. A household consists of all the persons who occupy 
a housing unit A house, an apartment or other group of rooms, 
or a single room, is regarded as a housing unit when it is oc- 
cupied or intended for occupancy as separate living quarters. 
Separate living quarters -are those in which the occupants do 
not live -and eat with any other persons in the structure and in 
which there is either (1) direct access from the outside or 
through a common hall, or (2) a kitchen or cooking equipment 
for the exclusive use of the occupants. 

The average population per household is obtained by dividing 
the population in households by the number of households. The 
number of households is equal to the number of household heads. 

Group quarters. All persons who are not members of house- 
holds are regarded as living in group quarters. Group quarters 
are living arrangements for institutional inmates or for other 
groups containing five or more persons unrelated to the person 
in charge. Group quarters are located most frequently in institu- 
tions, lodging and boarding houses, military and other -types of 
barracks, college dormitories, fraternity and sorority houses, hos- 
pitals, homes for nurses, convents, monasteries, and ships. Group 
quarters are also located in a house or an apartment in which 
the living quarters are shared by the person in charge and five 
or more persons unrelated to him. 

Five categories of group quarters are shown here : 

1. Rooming or "boar&wg house. In addition to rooming and 
boarding houses, this category includes group quarters in ordi- 
nary homes, tourist homes, hotels, motels, residential clubs, Y's, 
and dormitories for students below the college level. Not all of 
the persons in -these types of quarters are classified as living in 
group quarters ; some are classified as living in housing units. 



Characteristics of the Population 



xxvn 



2. Military barracks. These are quarters which are occu- 
pied by military personnel and which are not divided into sep- 
arate housing units. Data on persons in such quarters are shown 
separately in this report only for men. 

3. College dormitory. As used here, this term also refers to 
a fraternity or sorority house. 

4. Institution. Institutions include the following types: 
Correctional institution, hospital for mental disease, residential 
treatment center, tuberculosis hospital, other hospital for chronic 
disease, home for the aged and dependent (with or without nurs- 
ing care) , home or school for the mentally or physically handi- 
capped, home for unwed mothers, or a home for dependent and 
neglected children ; or a place providing custody for juveniles, 
such as a training school for juvenile delinquents, detention home, 
or diagnostic and reception center. Inmates of institutions are 
persons for whom care or custody is being provided. "Resident 
staff members" are persons residing in group quarters on institu- 
tional grounds who provide care or custody for the inmates. 

5. Other group quarters. These quarters include the fol- 
lowing types : General hospital (including quarters for nurses and 
other staff members), mission or flophouse, ship, religious group 
quarters (largely quarters for nuns teaching in parochial schools 
and for priests living in rectories ; also other convents and mona- 
steries except those associated with a general hospital or an 
institution), and dormitory for workers (including bunkhouse 
in migratory workers' camp, logging camp, or other labor camp). 
In addition, military barracks occupied toy women -are classified 
in this report as "other" group quarters. 

All rural-farm persons in group quarters are persons in dormi- 
tories for workers located on a farm. (See chapter D, table 
107.) In chapter C, these persons were erroneously classified 
as rural nonf arm because of a processing error. 

BelationsMp to head of household. The following categories 
of relationship are recognized in this report : 

1. The "head of household" is the member reported as the 
head by the household respondent. The instructions to enumera- 
tors defined the head as the person considered to be the head by 
the household members. However, if a married woman living 
with her husband was reported as the head, her husband was 
classified as the head for the purpose of these tabulations. 

Household heads are either heads of primary families or 
primary individuals. The head of -a primary family is a house- 
hold head living with one or more persons related to him by blood, 
marriage, or adoption. A primary individual is a household 
head living alone or with nonrelatives only. 

2. The "wife of head" is a woman married to, -and living 
with, a household head. This category includes women in com- 
mon-law marriages as well as women in formal marriages. This 
category is somewhat less inclusive than the category of married 
women, husband present, because it excludes those married women 
whose husband is not head of the household. By definition, the 
number of wives of household heads should be identical with the 
number of heads of households who are married males, wife 
present, but in practice the two numbers may differ because, in 
the weighting of -the sample, husbands and wives were sometimes 
given different weights. 

3. A "child of head," as shown in tables on relationship in 
chapters B and D, is -a son, daughter, stepchild, or adopted child 
of the head of the household (regardless of the child's marital 
status or age). The term excludes all other children, sons-in- 
law, and daughters-in-law in the household. "Child of head" 
is a more inclusive category than "own child of head." (See sec- 
tion on "child" below. ) 

4. An "other relative of head" is a household member re- 
lated to the head by blood, marriage, or adoption tout not included 
specifically in another category. In table 106 this category in- 
cludes only such relatives of the head as nephews, aunts, cousins, 
and grandparents ; however, in table 135 the category comprises 
all relatives of the head other than his wife. 

5. A "nonrelative of head" is any person in the household 
not related .to the head toy blood, marriage, or adoption. Nonrela- 
tives consist of lodgers -and resident employees, as defined below. 

A "lodger" is any household member not related to the head 
except a resident employee. The category "lodger" includes 
roomers, boarders, partners, and relatives of such persons, and 
also foster children and wards. A resident employee is an em- 
ployee of the head of the household who usually resides in the 
housing unit with his employer; the term also includes the em- 
ployee's relatives living in the same housing unit Among the 
main tygpes of resident employees are maids, hired farm hands, 
cooks, nurses, and companions. 



Comparability 



1960 and 1950 household definition. The 1960 definition 
of a household differs slightly from that used in the 1950 Census, 
The change arises as a result of the shift from a dwelling unit 
to a housing unit as the basic unit of enumeration in the Census 
of Housing. According to the 1960 definition, a household consists 
of all the persons who occupy a housing unit, whereas according 
to the 1950 definition, a household consisted of all the persons 
who occupied a dwelling unit. 

In 1950, a dwelling unit was defined as: (1) A group of 
rooms occupied or intended for occupancy as separate quarters 
and having either separate cooking equipment or a separate en- 
trance ; or (2) a single room (a) if it had separate cooking equip- 
ment, (&) if it was located in a regular apartment house, or (c) 
if it constituted the only living quarters in the structure. 

Housing units differ from dwelling units mainly in that separate 
living quarters consisting of one room with direct access but with- 
out cooking equipment always qualify as a housing unit in 1960 
but qualified as a dwelling unit in 1950 only when located in a 
regular apartment house or when the room was the only living 
quarters in the structure. 

The evidence so far available suggests that using the housing 
unit concept in 1960 instead of the dwelling unit concept as in 
1950 had relatively little effect on the comparability of the statis- 
tics for the two dates on the number of households for large areas 
and for the Nation. Any effect which the change in concept may 
have on comparability can be expected to be greatest in statistics 
shown in other reports for some small areas, such as city blocks 
and census tracts. Living quarters classified as housing units in 
1960 but which would not have been classified as dwelling units 
in 1950 tend to be clustered in neighborhoods where many per- 
sons live alone in single rooms in hotels, rooming houses, and other 
light housekeeping quarters. In such areas, the number of house- 
holds in 1960 may be higher than in 1950 even though no housing 
units were added by construction or conversion. 

The count of households in 1950 excluded groups of persons 
living as members of quasi-households. A quasi-household was 
defined as the occupants of a rooming house containing five or 
more persons not related to the head, or the occupants of certain 
other types of living quarters, such as dormitories, military bar- 
racks, and institutions. The concept of quasi-household used in 
1950 is thus similar to the concept of group quarters used in 
1960. Moreover, except for the household concept, the 1960 def- 
initions with respect to relationship to head of household are 
essentially the same as those used in 1950. However, the national 
statistics for certain relatively small categories by relationship 
and family status may have been significantly affected through 
the change in the household definition. The effects of this change 
were still tinder investigation when the present report was pre- 
pared. The change from dwelling unit to housing unit (and, 
therefore, by implication, the change in household definition) is 
discussed in 1960 Census of Sousing, Vol. IV, Components of 
Inventory Change, Part 1A. This report contains statistics on 
dwelling units based on the December 1959 Components of In- 
ventory Change Survey which was part of the 1960 Census of 
Housing. 

Complete-count versus sample figures on members of group 
quarters. The number of inmates of institutions shown in the 
complete-count data for some small areas may differ from the 
corresponding number shown in the sample data because of errors 
in the classification of living quarters as an institution or other 
group quarters. Thus, secondary individuals in a few group quar- 
ters were misclassified as Inmates in one of these two sources and 
correctly classified in the other. The opposite error, misclas- 
sification of inmates as secondary individuals, also occurred, but 
in fewer cases. Differences arising from these errors were usually 
caused by erroneous classification in the complete-count data 
rather than in the sample data. Revised figures for these areas 



xxvni 

on the numbers of inmates and secondary individuals in group 
quarters have been prepared, where feasible, and are shown in the 
List of Corrections which begins on page XLVH. 

MARRIED COUPLE, FAMILY, SUBFAMILY, CHILD, AND 
UNRELATED INDIVIDUAL 

Married Couple 

In the 1960 Census, a married couple is denned as a husband 
and his wife enumerated as members of the same household. 
Statistics on married couples were compiled in 1960 for persons 
in sample housing units only ; data are not available for the very 
small number of married couples in group quarters. Married 
persons living with their spouse in group quarters were classified 
as "married, spouse absent" In 1950, the figures on married 
couples in quasi-households are available. For further discussion 
of this point, see section below on "Sample design." 

The number of married couples, as shown in this report, is 
identical with the number of married men with wife present. By 
definition, the number of married couples in any area should also 
be identical with the number of married women with husband 
present; however, the two figures may not be exactly the same 
because of the method used in the weighting of the sample, as 
noted above in the section on "Marital status." 

A "married couple .with own household" is a married couple 
in which the husband is the household head; the number of 
such married couples is the same as the number of "husband-wife 
families with own household." In the tables in chapter B of this 
report, figures based on complete-count data are shown for women 
classified as wife of head of household. 

Family 

A family consists of two or more persons living in the same 
household who are related to each other by blood, marriage, or 
adoption ; all persons living in one household who are related to 
each other are regarded as one family. Thus, if the son of the 
head of the household and the son's wife are members of the 
household, they are treated as part of the head's family. Not 
all households contain families, because a household may be com- 
posed of a group of unrelated persons or one person living alone. 
A few households contain more than one family, that is, two 
family groups in the same household in which none of the mem- 
bers of one family is related to any of the members of the other 
family. A "husband-wife family," as the term is used in the 
1960 Census, is a family in which the head and his wife are 
enumerated as members of the same household. 

Statistics on the total number of families were compiled in 1960 
only for persons in the households that were in the sample. The 
1950 Census data on families included those in quasi-households 
as well as those in households. 

Statistics on the number of heads of "primary families" (that is, 
heads of households with relatives in the household) are shown 
on a complete-count basis in chapter B of thisi report. The num- 
ber of husband-wife "secondary families" is the number of hus- 
band-wife families without their own household; these are 
families in which the members (lodgers or resident employees) 
are household members not related to the head of the household. 
Table 109 shows figures on the total number of "secondary 
families." 

Subfamily 

A subfamily is a married couple with or without own children, 
or one parent with one or more own children under 18 years old, 
living in, a housing unit and related to the head of the household 
or his wife. The number of subfamilies is not included in the 
count of families. The number of husband-wife "subfamilies'* 
(that is, the number of married couples without their own house- 
hold who are living with relatives) may be obtained by subtract- 
ing the number of husband-wife families from the total number 
of married couples. Table 108 shows figures on the total number 
of subfamilies. 



Introduction 



Child 



Statistics on the presence of "own" children are shown here 
for married couples, families, subfamilies, and women 15 to 49 
years old. An own child is defined, in this report, as a person 
under 18 years of age who is a single (never-married) son, 
daughter, stepchild, or adopted child of a family head or sub- 
family head. The number of "persons under 18 living with both 
parents" includes single stepchildren and adopted children as 
well as single sons and daughters born to the couple. 

Data on women by age, classified by number of own children 
under 5 years old, provide a rough indication of how recent 
fertility has varied with age of woman. The age of the mother is 
known from information on the schedule for only those children 
who were living with their mother. Because the sample data on 
own children under 5 (in table 114) are inflated by the sample 
inflation weight of the mother rather than the sample inflation 
weight of the child, the results are not strictly comparable with 
the data on the total number of children under 5 years old shown 
in other tables in this report. Thus, the count of own children 
under 5 years old (living with their mother) exceeds the count 
of total population under 5 years old in some States, whereas it 
logically should be smaller by 1 to 3 percent for white children 
(because some children do not live with their mother) and much 
smaller for nonwhite children. (See also the section above on 
"Fertility ratios.") 

Comparisons of figures on children under 18 years old of the 
household or family head with the total population in the same 
age group may also be affected by the fact that the parent's 
sample inflation weight was used in some tables (such as table 
108), whereas the child's own sample inflation weight was used 
in others (such as table 106) . 

Tables 111, 112, and 140 show the number of "related children" 
under 18. years old in the family. These persons include not only 
"own" children, as defined above, but also all other family mem- 
bers under 18 (regardless of marital status) who are related to 
, the head or wife by blood, marriage, or adoption. 

After most of the State PC(1)-D final reports were published, 
a tabulation error was discovered in the number of children 
under 5 years old shown in table 114. If this State was affected 
by this error, corrected figures are presented in the List of Cor- 
rections which begins on page XLVII. 

Unrelated Individual 

As the term is used in the 1960 Census, an unrelated individual 
is either (1) a member of a household who is living entirely 
alone or with one or more persons all of whom are not related 
to him, or (2) a person living in group quarters who is not an 
inmate of an institution. Unrelated individuals who are house- 
hold heads are called "primary individuals." Those who are not 
heads of households are called "secondary individuals." Statis- 
tics on primary individuals are presented in chapter B on the 
basis of complete-count data. Secondary individuals in house- 
holds are shown in table 106 of chapter D ; secondary individuals 
in group quarters constitute all persons in group quarters except 
inmates of institutions (table 107). Data for unrelated individ- 
uals by marital status and income are limited to persons 14 years 
old and over. 

CHILDREN EVER BORN 

The data on children ever born were derived from answers to 
the following question on the Household Questionnaire : 



P20. If this Is a woman who has ever been married 

How many babies has she ever hod, not counting stillbirths? 
Do not count her stepchildren or adopted children. 

OR None__D 



(Ngmbtr) 



Characteristics of the Population 



XXTX 



Although the question on children ever born was asked only 
of women reported as having been married, the number of chil- 
dren reported undoubtedly includes some illegitimate births. It 
is likely that many of the unwed mothers living with an illegiti- 
mate child reported themselves as having been married and there- 
fore were among the women who were expected to report the 
number of children ever born, and that many of the mothers 
who married after the birth of an illegitimate child counted 
that child (as they were expected to do).. On the other hand, 
the data are, no doubt, less complete for illegitimate than for 
legitimate births. Consequently, the rates of children ever born 
per 1,000 total women may be too low. The enumerator was 
instructed to include children born to the woman before her 
present marriage, children no longer living, and children away 



from home, as well as children borne by the woman who were 
still living in the home. 

The FOSDIC form for the sample data contained a terminal 
category of "12 or more" children ever born. For purposes of 
computing the total number of children ever born, the terminal 
category was given a mean value of 13. 

Comparability 

The wording of the question used in the 1960 Census differs 
slightly from that used in 1950. In that census, the question 
was, "How many children has she ever borne, not counting still- 
births?" The intent of the change was to make the question 
more understandable to respondents and to obtain a better count 
from the few women who might misinterpret the word "children" 
to mean only those who survived early infancy. 



ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 



EMPLOYMENT STATUS 

Definitions 

The data on employment status were derived from answers to 
the following questions on the Household Questionnaire : 



P22. Did this person work at any time last week? 

Include part-time work such as a Saturday job, delivering papers, 
or helping without pay in a family business or farm. Do not 
count own housework. 



Yes 



No. 



.D 



P23. How many hours did he work lost week (at all jobs)? 

(If exact figure not known, give besf estimate) 

1 to 14 hours .LJ 40 hours LJ 

15 to 29 hours d 41 to 48 hours.. Q 

30 to 34 hours C] 49 to 59 hours EH 

35 to 39 hours I I 60 hours or more LJ 



P24. Was this person looking for work, or on layoff from a job? 
Yes D No D 



P25. Does he have a. job or business from which he was temporarily 
absent all last week because of illness, vacation, or other reasons? 



Yes I 



No 



....a 



The series of questions on employment status are designed to 
identify, in this sequence: (a) Persons who worked at all 
during the reference week ; ( & ) those who did not work but were 
looking for work or were on layoff; and (c) those who neither 
worked nor looked for work but had jobs or businesses from 
which they were temporarily absent. For those who worked 
during the reference week, a question was asked on hours of 
work. 

Reference week. In the 1960 Census, the data on employment 
refer to the calendar week prior to the date on which the respond- 
ents filled their Household Questionnaires or were interviewed 
by enumerators. This week is not the same for all respondents 
because not all persons were enumerated during the same week. 
The majority of the population was enumerated during the first 
half of April. The employment status data for the 1950 Census 
refer to the approximately corresponding period in 1950. The 
1940 data, however, refer to a fixed week, March 24 to 30, 1940, 
regardless of the date of enumeration. 

Employed. Employed persons comprise all civilians 14 years 
old and over who were either (a) "at work" those who did any 
work for pay or profit, or worked without pay for 15 hours or 



more on a family farm or in a family business ; or (&) were "with 
a job but not at work" those who did not work and were not 
looking for work but had a job or business from which they were 
temporarily absent because of bad weather, industrial dispute, 
vacation, illness, or other personal reasons. There appears to 
have been a tendency for seasonal workers, particularly nonwhite 
women in the rural South, to report themselves as "with a job 
but not at work" during the off-season, 

Unemployed. Persons are classified as unemployed if they 
were civilians 14 years old and over and not "at work" but look- 
ing for work. A person is considered as looking for work not only 
if he actually tried to find work during the reference week but 
also if he had made such efforts recently (i.e., within the past 
60 days) and was awaiting the results of these efforts. Examples 
of looking for work are : 

1. Registration at a public or private employment office. 

2. Meeting with or telephoning prospective employers. 

3. Being on call at a personnel office, at a union hall, or from 
a nurses' register or other similar professional register. 

4. Placing or answering advertisements. 

5. Writing letters of application. 

Persons waiting to be called back to a job from which they had 
been laid off or furloughed were also counted as unemployed. 
Unemployed persons who have worked at any time in the past 
are classified as the "experienced unemployed." 

Labor force. The labor force includes all persons classified as 
employed or unemployed, as described above > and also members 
of the Armed Forces (persons on active duty with the U.S. Army, 
Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard). The "civilian 
labor force" comprises only the employed and unemployed com- 
ponents of the labor force. The "experienced civilian labor force" 
comprises the employed a-nd the experienced unemployed. 

Hot in labor force. This category consists of all persons 14 
years old and over who are not classified as members of the labor 
force and includes persons doing only incidental unpaid work in 
a family farm or business (less than 15 hours during the week). 
Most of the persons in this category are students, iiousewives, 
retired workers, seasonal workers enumerated in an "off" season 
who were not looking for work, inmates of institutions* or persons 
who cannot work because of long-term physical or mental illness 
or disability. Of these groups not in the labor force, only inmates 
of institutions are shown separately. 

Problems in Classification 

Although the classification of the population by employment 
status is correct for most regular full-time workers, it is subject 
to error in marginal cases. Some of the concepts are difficult to 
apply ; more important, for certain groups, the complete inf orma- 



Introduction 



tion needed is not always obtained. For example, students or 
housewives may not consider themselves as working if their job 
required only a few hours of work a week. 

Comparability 

Statistics on gainful workers* The data on the labor force for 
1940, 1950, and 1960 are not entirely comparable with the statistics 
for gainful workers for years prior to 1940 because of differences 
in definition. "Gainful workers" were persons reported as having 
a gainful occupation, that is, an occupation in which they earned 
money or a money equivalent, or in which they assisted in the 
production of marketable goods, regardless of whether they were 
working or seeking work at the time of the census. A person 
was not considered to have had a gainful occupation if his 
activity was of limited extent. 

The labor force is defined on the basis of activity during the 
reference week only and includes all persons who were employed, 
unemployed, or in the Armed Forces during that week. Certain 
classes of persons, such as retired workers, some inmates of in- 
stitutions, recently incapacitated workers, and seasonal workers 
neither working nor seeking work at the time of the census, were 
frequently included among gainful workers j but in general, such 
persons are not included in the labor force. On the other hand, 
the census included in the labor force for 1940, 1950, and 1960 
persons without previous work experience who were seeking 
work, that is, new workers ; such new workers were probably not 
reported as gainful workers in the Censuses of 1920 and 1930. 

1940 and 1950 Censuses. The 1940 and 1950 Census question- 
naires, interviewing techniques, and tabulation procedures dif- 
fered somewhat from each other and from those used in the 1960 
Census. In addition, modification in wording and some simplifi- 
cation in concepts were introduced in 1960, instead of using the 
Current Population Survey questions and concepts almost un- 
changed as was done in the 1950 Census. This was in recogni- 
tion of the different tasks, motivation, and training of the 
enumerators in the CPS and the Census. 

The so-called "main activity" question of 1950 "What was 
this person doing most of last week working, keeping house, or 
something else?" was omitted from the 1960 schedule on the as- 
sumption that the information obtained in that item (e.g., the 
knowledge that a person was primarily a housewife or a student) 
might induce enumerators, in direct interview situations, to omit 
the follow-up questions on work activity, job seeking, etc. It 
was felt that the loss of the classification of nonworkers (keep- 
ing house, in school, unable to work, and "other") shown in 1950 
would not be serious. Actually the only group that cannot be ap- 
proximated by means of data on marital status and school en- 
rollment is the "unable to work" category. 

The question on unemployment was revised in conformity with 
the classification under the 1957 CPS revision of the definition 
of persons on temporary (less than 30-day) layoff as unemployed, 
as well as with the previous implicit inclusion with the unem- 
ployed of those on "indefinite" layoff. Formerly, such persons 
were included among the employed. However, no mention was 
made either on the schedule or in instructions to enumerators 
of the other small categories of "inactive" unemployed covered 
under CPS concepts and in the 1950 and 1940 Censuses, that is, 
those who would have been looking for work except for tem- 
porary illness or belief that no suitable work was available in 
their community. The definition of "unpaid family work" was 
simplified to include any work done without pay in an enterprise 
operated by a relative, without further specifying (as in CPS 
and in the 1950 Census) that this relative had to be a member 
of the same household. In 1940, this relative had to be a member 
of the same family. 

The 1940 data for the employed and unemployed in this report 
differ in some cases from the figures published for that census. 
Members of the Armed Forces living in the State in 1940 were 



originally included among employed persons. In this report, 
the figures for 1940 on employed persons have been adjusted to 
exclude the estimated number of men in the Armed Forces. 
Similarly, statistics for persons on public emergency work in 
1940 were originally published separately, but in this report they 
have been combined with those for persons classified as 
unemployed. 

Other data. Because the 1960 Census employment data were 
obtained from respondents in households, they differ from sta- 
tistics based on reports from individual business establishments, 
farm, enterprises, and certain government programs. The data 
obtained from households provide information about the work 
status of the whole population without duplication. Persons em- 
ployed at more than one job are counted only once in the census 
and are classified according to the job at which they worked 
the greatest number of hours during the reference week. In sta- 
tistics based on reports from business and farm establishments, 
on the other hand, persons who work for more than one estab- 
lishment may be counted more than once. Moreover, other series, 
unlike those presented here, may exclude private household 
workers, unpaid family workers, and self-employed persons, but 
may include workers less than 14 years of age. 

An additional difference between the two kinds of data arises 
from the fact that persons who had a job but were not at work 
are included with the employed in the statistics shown here, 
whereas many of these persons are likely to be excluded from 
employment figures based on establishment payroll reports. 
Furthermore, the household reports include persons on the basis 
of their place of residence regardless of where they work, whereas 
establishment data report persons at their place of work regard- 
less of where they live. This latter consideration is particularly 
significant when data are being compared for areas where a num- 
ber of workers commute to or from other areas. 

For a number of reasons, the unemployment figures of the 
Bureau of the Census are not comparable with published figures 
on unemployment compensation claims. Generally, persons such 
as private household workers, agricultural workers, State and 
local government workers, the self-employed, new workers, and 
workers whose rights to unemployment benefits have expired, 
are not eligible for unemployment compensation. Further, many 
employees of small firms are not covered by unemployment insur- 
ance. In addition, the qualifications for drawing unemployment 
compensation differ from the definition of unemployment used 
by the Bureau of the Census. Persons working only a few hours 
during the week and persons classified as "with a job but not at 
work" are sometimes eligible for unemployment compensation 
but are classified as "employed" in the census reports. Differ- 
ences in the geographical distribution of unemployment data 
arise because the place where claims are filed may not necessarily 
be the same as place of residence of the unemployed worker. 

HOURS WORKED 

The statistics on hours worked pertain to the number of hours 
actually worked, and not necessarily to the number usually 
worked or the scheduled number of hours. For persons working 
at more than one job, the figures reflect the combined number 
of hours worked at all jobs during the week. The data on hours 
worked presented here provide a broad classification of persons 
at work into full-time and part-time workers. Persons are con- 
sidered to be working full time if they worked 35 hours or more 
during the reference week and part time if they worked less than 
35 hours. The proportion of persons who worked only a small 
number of hours is probably understated because such persons 
were omitted from the labor force count more frequently than 
were full-time workers. The comparability of data for 1960 and 
1950 on hours worked may be affected by the fact that in 1950 
a precise answer on number of hours was requested, whereas 
in 1960 check boxes were provided as shown in item P23. 



Characteristics of the Population 



XXXT 



WEEKS WORKED IN 1959 
Definitions 

The data on weeks worked in 1959 were derived from answers 
to the following two questions on the Household Questionnaire: 



P30. Lost year (1959), did this person work at all, even for a few days? 



Yes.. I 



No.-l 



P31. How many weeks did he work in 1959, either full-time or 
part-time? Count paid vacation, -paid sick leave, and mili- 
tary service as weeks worked. 
(If exact figure not known,, give besf estimate) 

1 3 weeks or less _ LJ 40 to 47 weeks . . . CH 

14 to 26 weeks.. Q 48 to 49 weeks.,. CJ 
27 to 39 weeks.. Q 50 to 52 weeks... Q 



The data pertain to the numher of different weeks during 1959 
in which a person did any work for pay or profit (including paid 
vacation and sick leave) or worked without pay on a family farm 
or in a family business. Weeks of active service in the Armed 
Forces are also included. It is probable that the number of 
persons who worked in 1959 and the number of weeks they 
worked are understated, because there is some tendency for re- 
spondents to forget intermittent or short periods of employment, 
or they may have a tendency not to report weeks worked without 
pay. 

Comparability 

The comparability of data on weeks worked collected in the 
1940 and 1950 Censuses with data collected in the 1960 Census 
may be affected by certain changes in the Questionnaires, in 
the 1960 Questionnaire, two separate questions were used to obtain 
this information. The first was used to identify persons with 
any work experience in 1959 and thus to indicate those for whom 
the questions on number of weeks worked and earned income 
were applicable. This procedure differs from that used in 1940 
and 1950, when the schedules contained a single question regard- 
ing the number of weeks worked. 

In 1940, the enumerator was instructed to convert part-time 
work to equivalent full-time weeks, whereas in 1950 and 1960 
no distinction was made between a part-time and a full-time 
work week. The 1940 procedure was to define as a full-time 
week the number of hours locally regarded as full time for the 
given occupation and industry. Furthermore, in the 1940 re- 
ports, the data were shown for wage and salary workers only 
and were published in terms of months rather than weeks. 

YEAR LAST WORKED 

The data on year last worked were obtained for the first time 
in the 1960 Census. They were derived from answers to the 
following question on the Household Questionnaire : 



P26. When did he lost work at all, even for a few days? 
(Check one box) 

Working now. _LJ 1949 or earlier LJ 

In 1960 CD 

In 1959 d Never worked CD 

1955 to 1958.. D 
1950 to 1954.. EH 



The "year last worked" pertains to the most recent year in 
which a person did any work for pay or profit, or worked without 



pay on a family farm or in a family business. Active service 
in the Armed Forces is also included. Data derived from this 
item were tabulated for persons classified as not in the labor 
force and for persons classified as unemployed. 

There are several reasons for introducing this item into the 
census. The data provide a means of evaluating the current 
applicability and signficance of the Inventory of the occupational 
skills for those persons not in the labor force, and the tabulations 
resulting from the cross-classifications of this information pro- 
vide data on the demographic characteristics of the labor reserve. 
Also, the data give some indication of the duration of unemploy- 
ment for persons seeking jobs. 

OCCUPATION, INDUSTRY, AND CLASS OF WORKER 

The data on occupation, industry, and class of worker were 
derived from answers to the following question on the House- 
hold Questionnaire : 



P27. Occupation (Answer 7, 2, or 3) 

1. This person last worked in 1 949 or earlier I P"! 

This person has never worked 



OR 



2* On active duty in the Armed Forces now. 



D 



OR 



3. Worked in 1 950 or later . . | _ | Answer a to e, below. 



m 
ter . . | _ | 

Describe this person's job or business last week, 
if any, and write in name of employer. If this 
person had no job or business last week, give 
information for last job or business since 1950. 

a. For whom did he work? 



(Name of company, business, organization, or other employer) 

b. What kind of business or industry was this? 
Describe activity at location where employed. 

(For example: County junior high school, auto assembly plant, TV 
and radio service, retail supermarket, road construction, farm] 

c. Is this primarily: fC hec* one boxj 

Manufacturing ' ' 

Wholesale trade.. ... C] 

Retail trade ---CD 

Other (services, agriculture, . . 

government, construction, etc.) LJ 

d. What kind of work was he doing? 

(For example: 8th grade English teacher, paint sprayer, repairs 
TV sets, grocery checker, civil engineer, farmer, farm hand) 

e. Was this person: (Check one box) 
Employee of private company, business, or indi- p-i 

vidual, for wages, salary, or commissions ... LJ 

Government employee (Federal, State, r i 

county, or local) - , LJ 

Self-employed in own business, r i 

professional practice, or farm LJ 

Working without pay in a family . i 

business or farm . . I 1 



In the 1960 Census, information on occupation, Industry, and 
class of worker was collected for persons in the experienced 
civilian labor force as well as for persons not in the current 
labor force but who had worked sometime during the period 1950 
to April 1960. All three items related to one specific job held by 
the person. For an employed person, the information referred 



Introduction 



3 the job lie held during the reference week. If he was employed 
,t two or more jobs, the job at which he worked the greatest 
.umber of hours during the reference week was reported. For 
xperienced unemployed persons, i.e., unemployed persons who 
iave had previous job experience, and for those not in the labor 
orce, the information referred to the last job that had been 
leld. 

The classification systems used for the occupation and industry 
iata in the 1960 Census described below were developed in con- 
sultation with many individuals, private organizations, govern- 
ment agencies, and, in particular, the Interagency Occupational 
Classification Committee of the U.S. Bureau of the Budget. 

Occupation 

Classification system. The occupational classification system 
is organized into 12 major groups. It consists of 494 items, 297 of 
which are specific occupation categories and the remainder are 
subgroupings (mainly on the basis of industry) of 13 of the occu- 
pation categories. The composition of the 297 categories is shown 
in the publication, U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1960 Census of 
Population, Classified Index of Occupations and Industries, 
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1960. 

For the presentation of occupation data in chapter C, a con- 
densed set of categories is used for employed persons in certain 
tables and the 12 major groups for employed persons in other 
tables as well as for experienced unemployed persons. The con- 
densed set consists of SI categories for males and 23 categories 
for females (including the subdivisions by industry and class of 
worker). The composition of most of these categories in terms 
of specific occupation categories can be readily determined by 
reference to detailed occupation table 120 in chapter D. The 
following list shows the components of the condensed categories 
whose composition may not be readily determined : 

Construction craftsmen. Includes brickmasons, carpenters, 
cement and concrete finishers, electricians, excavating, grading, 
and road machinery operators, painters (construction and main- 
tenance) , paperhangers, pipefitters, plasterers, plumbers, roofers 
and slaters, stone masons, structural metal workers, tile setters. 

Drivers and deliverymen. Includes bus drivers, chauffeurs, 
deliverymen, routemen, taxicab drivers, truck and tractor drivers. 

Medical and other health workers. Includes chiropractors, 
dentists, dietitians, healers, medical and dental technicians, nu- 
tritionists, optometrists, osteopaths, pharmacists, physicians and 
surgeons, professional nurses, student professional nurses, psy- 
chologists, therapists, veterinarians. 

Metal craftsmen, except mechanics. Includes blacksmiths, 
boilermakers, coppersmiths, die makers and setters, f orgemen and 
hammermen, heat treaters, annealers and temperers, machinists, 
metal jobsetters and molders, metal rollers and roll hands, mill- 
wrights, pattern and model makers (except paper), sheet metal 
workers, tinsmiths, toolmakers. 

In chapter I>, several levels of classification are used. The 
most detailed list appears in tables 120 and 121 ; for the purposes 
of these tables, certain categories were combined and the list 
consists of 479 items (rather than 494). For the cross-tabula- 
tions by race, class of worker, year last worked for experienced 
workers not in the current labor force, age, earnings, and indus- 
try, use has been made of intermediate occupational classifica- 
tions with 161 categories for males and 70 for females (tables 
122 to 124). The occupation stub for table 125 consists of 57 
categories for males and 30 for females. Both of these levels 
represent selections and combinations of the items in the detailed 
system. A listing of the relationships between the levels of 
classification can be obtained by writing to the Chief, Population 
Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D.C. This list- 
ing will also appear in Part 1 (U.S. Summary) of this volume. 

In the separation of "Managers, officials, and proprietors 
(n.e.c.)" by class of worker into salaried and self-employed 
components, the small number of unpaid family workers in this 
occupation is included in the self-employed component. Since the 
data presented in the occupation tables refer only to civilians, 



the category "former members of the Armed Forces" shown in 
table 120 is limited to experienced unemployed persons whose 
last job was as a member of thr Armed Forces. 

Belation to DOT classification. The occupational classification 
of the Population Census is generally comparable with the sys- 
tem used in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT).* The 
two systems, however, are designed to meet different needs and 
to be used under different circumstances. The DOT system is 
designed primarily for employment service needs, such as place- 
ment and counseling, and is ordinarily used to classify very de- 
tailed occupational information obtained in an interview with 
the worker himself. The census system, on the other hand, is 
designed for statistical purposes and is ordinarily used in the 
classification of limited occupational descriptions obtained in a 
self-enumeration questionnaire or in an interview with a mem- 
ber of the worker's family. As a result, the DOT system is 
much more detailed than the census system ; and it also calls for 
many types of distinctions which cannot be made from census 
information. 

Industry 

Classification system. The industrial classification -system de- 
veloped for the 1960 Census is organized into 13 major industry 
groups and consists of 151 items (two of which are the govern- 
ment and private subgroupings of the category * 'Educational 
services"). The composition of each specific category is shown 
in the above-mentioned Classified Infle of Occupations and 
Industries. 

Several different levels of classification are used in this volume. 
The most detailed industry list appears in chapter D, tables 126 
and 127 ; two combinations were made for the puri>oses of these 
tables and thus the list consists of 149 categories. In chapter 
C, a 40-item condensed grouping is used. In chapter D, for cross- 
tabulations by age, race, class of worker, and earnings, an in- 
termediate industrial classification of 71 categories has been 
used (tables 128 to 130). The industry list for table 125 con- 
sists of 43 categories. The industry list for nonwhite workers 
in table 130 consists of 42 categories for male and 28 for female. 
These intermediate classifications represent selections and com- 
binations of the categories in the detailed system. The re- 
lationships among the 40-, 71-, and 149-category levels of classi- 
fication are shown in List A. Further information on the inter- 
mediate classifications can be obtained by writing to the Chief, 
Population Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D.C. 

Relation to Standard Industrial Classification. List A shows 
for each Population Census category .the code designation of the 
similar category or categories in the Standard Industrial Classi- 
fication (SIC). 7 This relationship is presented here for general 
information purposes only and does not imply complete compara- 
bility. The SIC, which was developed under the sponsorship of 
the U.S. Bureau of the Budget, is designed for the classification 
of industry reports from establishments. These reports, by their 
nature and degree of detail, produce considerably different data 
on industry from those obtained from household enumeration 
such as the Census of Population. As a result, some of the dis- 
tinctions called for in the SIC cannot be made in the 1960 Census. 
Furthermore, the data from the Census of Population are 
designed to meet different needs from those met by the establish- 
ment data. The allocation of government workers represents 
perhaps the most basic difference between the two systems. The 
SIC classifies all government agencies in a single major group. 
In the Population Census system, however, the category "public 
administration" includes only those activities which are uniquely 

8 See U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Employment Security, 
Dictionary of Occupational Titles, Second Edition, Vols. I and H, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1949. 

* See Executive Office of the President, Bureau of the Budget, Standard 
Industrial Classification. Manual (1957). For sale by the Superintendent 
of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. 



Characteristics of the Population 



governmental functions, such as legislative and judicial activi- 
ties and most of the activities in the executive agencies. Gov- 
ernment agencies engaged in educational and medical services 
and in activities commonly carried on also by private enter- 
prises, such as transportation and manufacturing, are classified 
in -the appropriate industrial category. For example, persons 
employed by a hospital are classified in the "hospitals" group, 
regardless of whether they are paid from private or public 
funds. Information on the total number of government workers 
appears in the tables on class of worker. 

Relation to certain occupation groups. In the Population Cen- 
sus classification systems, the industry category "agriculture" 
is somewhat more inclusive than the total of the two major oc- 
cupation groups, "farmers and farm managers" and "farm la- 
borers and foremen." The industry category also includes (a) 
persons employed on farms in occupations such as truck driver, 
mechanic, and bookkeeper, and (&) persons engaged in agri- 
cultural activities other than strictly farm operation, such as crop 
dusting or spraying, cotton ginning, and landscape gardening. 
Similarly, the industry category "private households" is some- 
what more inclusive than the major occupation group "private 
household workers." In addition to the baby sitters, house- 
keepers, laundresses, and miscellaneous types of domestic workers 
covered by the major occupation group, the industry category 
includes persons in occupations such as chauffeur, gardener, and 
secretary, if they are employed by private families. 

Class of Worker 

The class-of -worker information refers to the same job as the 
occupation and industry information. The assignment of a per- 
son to a particular class-of -worker category is basically independ- 
ent, however, of the occupation or industry in which he worked. 
The classification by class of worker consists of four categories 
which are defined as follows : 

1. Priv&te wage and salary workers. Persons who worked 
for a private employer for wages, salary, commission, tips, pay- 
in-kind, or at piece rates. 

2. Government workers. Persons who worked for any gov- 
ernmental unit (Federal, State, local, or international), regardless 
of the activity which the particular agency carried on. 

3. Self-employed workers. Persons who worked for profit or 
fees in their own business, profession, or trade, or who operated 
a farm either as an owner or tenant. Included here are the 
owner-operators of large stores and manufacturing establish- 
ments as well as small merchants, independent craftsmen and 
professional men, farmers, peddlers, and other persons who con- 
ducted enterprises of their own. Persons paid to manage busi- 
nesses owned by other persons or by corporations, on the other 
hand, are classified as private wage and salary workers (or, in 
some few cases, as government workers) . 

4. Unpaid family workers. Persons who worked without pay 
on a farm or in a business operated by a person to whom they 
are related by blood or marriage. The great majority of unpaid 
family workers are farm laborers. 

The relatively small number of employed persons for whom 
class of worker was not reported have been included among 
private wage and salary workers unless there was evidence on 
the census schedule that they should have been classified in one 
of the other class-of-worker categories. 

Special Editing Procedures 

A factor to be considered in the interpretation of these data is 
that respondents sometimes returned occupation and industry 
designations which were not sufficiently specific for precise classi- 
fication. Indefinite occupation and industry returns were fre- 
quently assigned, however, to the appropriate category through 
the use of supplementary information. For example, the name 
of the employer or the industry return on the census schedule was 
often of great assistance in determining occupation. The name 
of the employer (company name) was used extensively to assign 
the proper industrial classification using lists of employers show- 



ing their industrial classification in the 1958 Economic Censuses. 
In the coding of indefinite industry returns, helpful information 
was frequently obtained from other sources regarding the types 
of industrial activity in the given area or of the given company. 

Comparability 

Earlier censuses. The changes in schedule design and inter- 
viewing techniques for the labor force questions, described in the 
section on "Employment status," have little effect on the com- 
parability between 1340, 1950, and 1960 for most of the occupa- 
tion, industry, and class-of-worker categories. For experienced 
unemployed persons, however, the 1950 and I960 occupation data 
are not comparable with the data for the United States shown in 
Volume III of the 1940 reports on population, The Labor Force. 
The occupation data for public emergency workers (one of the 
two component groups of the unemployed in 1940) referred to 
"current job," whereas the "last job" of the unemployed was 
reported in 1950 and 1960. 

The occupational and industrial classification systems used 
in 1940 and 1950 are basically the same as those of 1960. There 
are a number of differences, however, in the title and content for 
certain items, as well as in the degree of detail shown for the 
various major groups. For 1930 and earlier censuses, the occupa- 
tional and industrial classification systems were markedly dif- 
ferent from the 1960 systems. The 1940 and 1950 classification by 
class of worker is comparable with the 1960 categories. The 
following publications contain much helpful information on the 
various factors of comparability and are particularly useful for 
understanding differences in the occupation and industry informa- 
tion from earlier censuses : U.S. Bureau of the Census, Sixteenth 
Census Beports, Population, Comparative Occupation Statistics 
for the United States, 1810 to 1940* and Bureau of the Census 
Working Paper No. 5, Occupational Trends in the United States, 
1900 to 1950 t 1958. 

The 1940 and 1950 occupation and industry data shown in this 
report include adjustments which take account of the differences 
between the 1940, 1950, and 1960 classification systems. In order 
to make available as much comparable data as possible, it was 
sometimes necessary to estimate the adjustments from informa- 
tion which was incomplete or not entirely satisfactory for the 
purpose. Furthermore, there were certain differences among the 
1940, 1950, and 1960 coding and editing procedures which could 
not be measured statistically. Caution should, therefore, be ex- 
ercised in interpreting small numerical changes. 

The 1940 data on occupation, industry, and class of worker 
shown in this report have been revised to eliminate members of 
the Armed Forces in order to achieve comparability with the 1950 
and 1960 figures for the employed, which are limited to civilians. 
In the occupation tables of the 1940 reports, the Armed Forces 
were mainly included in the major group "protective service 
workers." In the industry tables, the Armed Forces were all in- 
cluded in the major group "government." In the class-of-worker 
tables, the Armed Forces were all included in the category "gov- 
ernment workers" and in the total "wage or salary workers." 

Other data. Comparability between the statistics presented in 
this volume and statistics from other sources is frequently af- 
fected by the use of different classification systems, as well as by 
many of the factors described in the paragraphs on comparability 
with other data in the section on "Employment status." Occupa- 
tion figures from the Population Census are not always directly 
comparable with data from government licensing agencies, profes- 
sional associations, trade unions, etc. Among the sources of dif- 
ference may be the inclusion in the organizational listing of 
retired persons or persons devoting all or most of their time to 
another occupation, the inclusion of the same person in two or 
more different listings, and the fact that relatively few organiza- 
tions attain complete coverage of membership in an occupation 
field. 



xxx fV 



Introduction 

List A.-RELATIONSHIPS AMONG INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS USED IN THE 

1960 CENSUS OF POPULATION 

[Figures In parentheses In the third column are code designations in the Standard Industrial Classification; see text for explanation] 



Condensed classification 40 items 



Agriculture 

Forestry and fisheries- 



Mining 

Construction.. 



Furniture and lumber and wood products.. 



Primary metal industries.. 



> products. 
Furniture and fixtures 

[Primary iron and steel Industries 
[Primary nonferrous industries 



Fabricated metal industries (incl. not specified 
metal). 



Machinery, except electrical.. 



Electrical machinery, equipment, and supplies 

Motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment 

Transportation equipment, except motor vehicles. 



f Aircraft and parts 

1 Other transportation equipment. 



Other durabb goods- 



Food and kindred products- 



Textile mill products; 



Apparel and other fabricated textile products. 
Printing, publishing, and allied products 



Chemicals and allied products. 



Other nondurable goods (incl. not specified 
manufacturing industries) . 



Trucking service and warehousing 

Railroads and railway express service.. 



Other transportation 



See footnotes at end of list. 



Intermediate classification 71 items 



Agriculture . 

Forestry and fisheries. 



Mining 

Construction- 



j mllVworfc'ftnd miscellaneous WOOd 



Fabricated metal Industries (incl. not specified metal) 



Machinery, except electrical- 



Electrical machinery, equipment, and supplies- 
Motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment 



Stone, clay, and glass products- 



All other durable goods., 



Meat products 

Bakery products.. 



Other food industries. 



Knitting mills 

Yarn, thread, and fabric mills.., 

.Other textile mill products , 



Apparel and other fabricated textile products- 
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.... . 



Chemicals and allied products... 



Paper and allied products 

Petroleum and coal products 

Rubber and miscellaneous plastic products... 
Footwear, except rubber 

All other nondurable goods , 

Not specified manufacturing Industries 



Trucking service and warehousing. 



Railroads and railway express service. 

! Street railways and bus lines. 
Water transportation 
Air transportation 



[All other transportation., 



Detailed classification 149 Items 



Agriculture (01, 02, 07 except 0713). 

'Forestry (08). 
iFisherles (09). 

.Metal mining (10). 

| Coal mining (11, 12). 

I Crude petroleum and natural gas extraction (13). 

[Nonmetallic mining and quarrying, except fuel (14). 

Construction (15-17). 



/Sawmills, planing mills and mlllwork (242, 243). 
IMiscellaneous wood products (244, 249). 
Furniture and fixtures (25). 



[Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling and finishing mills (3312, 3313). 
I Other primary iron and steel industries (3315-3317, 332, 3391, 3399 i). 
Primary nonferrous industries (333-336, 3392, 3399 i). 

'Cutlery, hand tools and other hardware (342). 

Fabricated structural metal products (344). 

Miscellaneous fabricated metal products (341, 343, 345-349, 19 except 

194). 
.Not specified metal industries.* 

(Farm machinery and equipment (352). 
Office, computing, and accounting machines (357). 
IMiscellaneous machinery (351, 353-356, 358, 359). 

Electrical machinery, equipment, and supplies (36). 
Motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment (371). 

Aircraft and parts 072). 
fShip and boat building and repairing (373). 
L Railroad and miscellaneous transportation equipment (374, 375, 379). 

Glass and glass products (321-323). 

Cement, and concrete, gypsum, and plaster products (324, 327). 

Structural clay products (325). 

Pottery and related products (326). 

Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral and stone products (328, 329). 

Professional equipment and supplies (381-385, 194). 

Photographic equipment and supplies (386). 

Watches, clocks, and clockwork-operated devices (387). 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries (39). 

Meat products 

Bakery products I 

Dairy products (2_, . 

Canning and preserving fruits, vegetables, and sea foods (203). 

Grain-null products (204, 0713). 

Confectionery and related products (207). 

Beverage industries (208). 

Miscellaneous food preparations and kindred products (206, 209). 

.Not specified food industries. 3 

^ mills (225). 
Yarn, thread, and fabric mills (221-224, 228). 
[Dyeing and finishing textiles, except wool and knit goods (226). 
Floor coverings, except hard surface (227). 
1 ..... textile mill products (229) . 

/Apparel and accessories (231-238). 
\Miscellaneous fabricated textile products (239). 

minting (271). 

" industries, except newspapers (272- 

f Synthetic fibers (2823, 2824). 
Drugs and medicines (283). 
{Paints, varnishes, and related products (285). 
Miscellaneous chemicals and allied products (281, 282 except 2823 and 
I 2824,284,286-289). 

V and paperboard mills (261-263, 266). 
containers and boxes (265). 
____ us paper and pulp products (264) . 
'etroleum refining (291). 

tiscellaneous petroleum and coal products (295, 299). 
.ubber products (301-303. 306). 
Miscellaneous plastic products (307). 
Footwear, except rubber (313, 314). 
(Tobacco manufactures (21). 

{Leather products, except footwear (312, 315-317, 319). 
(Leather: tanned, curried, and finished (311). 
Not specified manufacturing industries.* 

/Trucking service (421, 423). 
^Warehousing and storage (422). 

Railroads and railway express service (40). 

Street railways and bus lines (411, 413-415, 417). 

Water transportation (44). 

Air transportation (45). 

[Taxicab service (412). 

-{Petroleum and gasoline pipe lines (46). 

transportation (47). 



[Services incidental to 



Characteristics of the Population 

List A. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS USED IN THE 

1960 CENSUS OF POPULATION Continued 



XXXV 



Condensed classification 40 items 



Intermediate classification 71 items 



Detailed classification 149 items 



Communications- - 



Utilities and sanitary services 



Wholesale trade 



Food and dairy products stores-... 
Eating and drinking places 



Other retail trade.. 



Finance, insurance and real estate. 



Business services- 



Repair services. 
Private households.. 



Other personal services. 



Entertainment and recreation services.. 
Hospitals.. 



Educational services, government. 
Educational services, private 



Welfare, religious and nonprofit membership or- 
ganizations. 



Other professional and related services. 



Public administration.. 
Industry not reported. _ 



Communications _ 

fElectric and gas utilities 

(.Water supply, sanitary services, and other utilities- 



Wholesale trade.. 



[Radio broadcasting and television (483). 
{Telephone (wire and radio) (481). 
[Telegraph (wire and radio) (482, 489). 

fElectric light and power, and electric-gas utilities (491, 493).* 
Gas and steam supply systems (492, 496). 
Water supply (494). 
Sanitary services (496). 
Other and not specified utilities (497). 

Motor vehicles and equipment (501). 

Drugs, chemicals, and allied products (502). 

Dry goods and apparel (503). 

Food and related products (504). 

Farm products raw materials (505). 

Electrical goods, hardware, and plumbing equipment (506, 507). 

Machinery, equipment, and supplies (508). 

Petroleum products (5092). 

Miscellaneous wholesale trade (5091, 5093-5099). 



Food and dairy products stores and milk retailing . 

Eating and drinking places _,__ 

General merchandise and limited price variety stores 

Apparel and accessories stores 

Furniture, home furnishings, and equipment stores 

Motor vehicles and accessories retelling.. 

Gasoline service stations _ _ 



Hardware, farm implement, and building material re- 
tailing. 

All other retail trade _ 



Not specified wholesale trade.' 
Food and dairy products stores (54),* 
Eating and drinking places (58). 

I General merchandise retailing (53 except 533) . 

iLimited price variety stores (533). 

/Apparel and accessories stores, except shoe stores (56 except 566). 

s Shoe stores (566). 

'Furniture and housetarnishings stores (571). 

.Household appliance, TV, and radio stores (572, 573). 

Motor vehicles and accessories retailing (55 except 554). 

Gasoline service stations (554). 

Drugstores (591). 

"Hardware and form equipment stores (525). 

.Lumber and building material retailing (521-524). 



U^rstoresCSB), 



Banking and other finance.. 
Insurance and real estate... 



Business services.. 



/Automobile repair services and garages., 
(.Miscellaneous repair services 

Private households 



Hotels and lodging places 

Laundering, cleaning, and dyeing services. 



All other personal services... 



Entertainment and recreation services., 



09 

Educational services, government- 
Educational services, private 



Welfare, religious, and membezship organizations 

'Legal, engineering, and miscellaneous professional services. 
iMedical and other health services' 



fioiists (5992), 
Jewelry stores (597). 
Fuel and ice dealers (598). 

Miscellaneous retail stores (593-596, 599 except 5992). 
Not specified retail trade.' 

[Banking and credit agencies (60, 61). 

Security and commodity brokerage and investment companies 

[ (62, 67). 

Insurance (63, 64). 

[Real estate (incl. real estate-insurance-law offices) (65, 66). 

/Advertising (731). 

\Miscellaneous business services (732-736, 739). 

Automobile repair services and garages (75). 
Miscellaneous repair services (76) . 

Private households (88). 

Hotels and lodging places (70) . 

Laundering, cleaning, and dyeing services (721, 727). 

'Dressmaking shops (729).* 

Shoe repair shops (725). 

Barber and beauty shops (723, 724). 

"' --------- personal services (722, 726, 729). 

[Theaters and motion pictures (78, 792). 

< Bowling alleys and billiard and pool parlors (793) . 

(Miscellaneous entertainment and recreation services (791, 794). 



Educational services, government! tgf> ^ 
Educational services, private / (82 84) - 

/Nonprofit membership organizations (861-865, 869). 
\Welfere and religious services (866, 867). 

Legal services (81). 

Engineering and architectural services (891). 

Accounting, auditing, and bookkeeping services (893). 



f Postal service 

I Federal public administration 

[State and local public administration.. 
Industry not reported 



Miscellaneous professional and related services (892, 899). 
Medical and other health services, except hospitals (80 except 806). 
Hospitals (806). 

Postal service 

Federal public administration 
/State puolic administration 
\Local public administration 

Industry not reported (99). 




NOTE: See Executive Office of the President. Bureau of the Budget, Standard In- 
dustrial Classification Manual, 1957 edition. 

1 The components of SIC category 3399 .are allocated between ''Other primary iron 
and steel industries" and "Primary nonferrous industries 1 ' on a ferrous-nonferrous basis. 

' In the Population Census system, "not specified" categories were set up within 
certain groups to take care of schedule returns which were not sufficiently precise for 
allocation to a specific category within the group. 

* This item represents a combination of two categories in the 1960 Census industrial 
classification system "Electric light and power" and "Electric-gas utilities." 



* This item represents a combination of two categories in the 1960 Census industrial 
classification system "Food stores, except dairy products" and "Dairy products stores 
and milk retailing." 

< Dressmaking shops are separated from the rest of the SIC category 729 which is 
included in "Miscellaneous personal services." 

The category "Hospitals," which appears as a separate item in the condensed clas- 
sification, is included in "Medical and other health services" in the intermediate 
classification. 

? See text for explanation of basic difference between SIC and Population Census in 
classification of government workers. 



XXXVI 



Introduction 



PLACE OF WORK AND MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION 
TO WORK 

Data on place of work and means of transportation to work 
were obtained, for the first time in the 1960 Census. They were 
derived from answers to the following questions on the House- 
hold Questionnaire : 



If this person worked last week, answer questions P28 and P29. 



P28, What city and county did he work in last week? 

If he worked in more than one city or county/ give place 
where he worked most last week. 

a* City or town 

b. If city or town Did he work inside r Y . Fl 

the city limit*? I Te p; 

\No-.U 



f 



c. County State . 



P29. How did he get to work last week? 

(Check one box for principal means used last week) 

Railroad C3 Taxicab d Walk only O 

Subway or , , Private auto .. Worked at r j 
elevated LJ or car pool,. I I home LJ 

Bus or p I Other means Wir/fe inr 

streetcar 1 I 



Place of Work 

Place of work refers to the geographic location in which civil- 
ians at work during the reference week and Armed Forces person- 
nel not on leave, sick, etc., carried out their occupational or job 
activities. In chapter C, place of work is classified simply as to 
whether it was in the same county (or equivalent area) as the 
worker's county of residence or in a different county. 

These work locations were classified in two ways in chapter D. 
For the standard metropolitan statistical areas in table 131, the 
locations are: (1) Central city (or cities) of the SMSA, (2) ring 
(or outlying parts) of the SMSA, and (3) the area outside the 
SMSA. For the State statistics in table 132, the areas are : (1) 
State of residence, (2) specified States contiguous to the State 
of residence, and (3) noncontiguous States. 

Persons working at more than one job were asked to report on 
the job at which they worked the greatest number of hours during 
the census week. Salesmen, deliverymen, and others who work 
in several places each week were requested to -name the place in 
which they began work each day, if they reported to a central 
headquarters. In cases in which work was not begun at a central 
place each day, the person was asked to report the county in 
which he had worked the greatest number of hours during the 
previous week. 

During the tabulation of statistics on place of work, it was 
discovered that some enumerators working in counties containing 
central cities of SMSA's, but outside the cities themselves, had 
failed to identify correctly these central cities as places of work. 
For the convenience of the enumerator and the coder, the FOSDIC 
document contained a circle for "this city" for indicating that 
the place of work was in the respondent's city or town of resi- 
dence. Some enumerators understood this category to refer to 
a nearby large city and filled the circle when they should have 
written in the name of that city in P28a. Since the city that 
actually contained the place of work was frequently a central 
city of an SMSA, the statistics in table 131 were impaired. 

After a limited study of the relevant materials, including some 
of the Household Questionnaires (which gave the respondent's 



own written reply), it was decided that a simple mechanical edit 
would tend to improve the statistics. This mechanical edit applies 
to entries for workers living in unincorporated parts of counties 
containing the central city of an SMSA (or other city with a 
population of 50,000 or more). For these workers, a workplace 
code of "this city" was tabulated as the largest city in the county. 
This edit was not used in New England, New Jersey, or the urban 
townships of Pennsylvania since it was considered likely that 
the category "this city" was used to refer to the town or township 
rather than to the large city. For the same reason, in all States, 
entries for workers living in incorporated places were not edited. 
Finally, codes of "this city" for workers living in unincorporated 
areas outside counties containing central cities of SMSA's (or 
other city of 50,000 or more) were tabulated as "balance of 
county" since it was not clear what city, if any, was intended. 

Later, a national sample of reports of place of work was as- 
sembled for the purposes of estimating the magnitude of the error 
before and after the corrective edit. On a national basis, ex- 
cluding from consideration New England States and New Jersey, 
it appears that the published statistics are substantially better 
than would have been the case had the corrective edit been 
omitted. The number of workers residing outside central cities in 
the balances of central counties and working in the central cities 
appeared to be considerably understated before the correction and 
only slightly overstated, in net effect, after the correction. For 
the workers who were residing in parts of central counties located 
in incorporated places and in urban townships in Pennsylvania, 
there still remains a small understatement of reports of place of 
work in central cities. Moreover, it is probable that there is also 
some understatement of commuting to central cities from outside 
the central counties. It was not feasible to estimate the error or 
take corrective action for these more distant areas. Therefore, 
it cannot be readily determined whether the total number of com- 
muters to central cities of SMSA's is overstated or understated 
in the published statistics. This edit was further refined for th 
tabulations in chapter D ; therefore, some minor inconsistencies 
in the data on both place of work and means of transportatiot 
are apparent between chapter D and chapter C, especially foi 
areas containing military installations. Both before and after th< 
corrective edit, there was considerable variation in the error rat< 
from one SMSA to another. Hence, caution should be exercise* 
in using the statistics for particular areas (especially in tabl< 
131). 

Means of Transportation to Work 

Means of transportation to work refers to the principal mod 
of travel or type of conveyance used in traveling to and fror 
work by civilians at work during the reference week and Arme 
Forces personnel not on leave, sick, etc. In this report, th 
categories "railroad" and "subway or elevated" were combinec 
and "taxicab" was- included in "other means." The enumers 
tor was instructed that "principal means" referred to the mean 
of transportation covering the greatest distance, if more tha 
one means was: used in daily travel, or to the means of trail* 
portation used most frequently, if different means were use 
on different days. "Bus or streetcar" was defined as referring 1 
vehicles operating within or between cities on public streets < 
highways. The facts that the items on place of work and meat 
of transportation refer to the job held "last week" (see sectio 
OIL "Employment status") and that the worker may have subs 
quently changed his- usual place of residence may explain sou 
impossible or unlikely commuting patterns for particular area 

INCOME IN 1959 
Definitions 

The data on income were derived from answers to the follow 
ing questions on the Household Questionnaire : 



Characteristics of the Population 



xxxvu 



P32. How much did this person tarn in 1959 in wages, salary, com- 
missions, or tips from all fobs? 

Before deductions for taxes, bonds, dues, or other items. 
(nfer amounf or check "None," If exocf figure not 
give besf esf/mofe.) 

$ 00 OR None..D 

(Dollars only) 



P33, How much did he earn in 1959 in profits or fees from working in 
his own business, professional practice, partnership, or farm? 

Net income after business expenses, (fnfer amounf or check 
"None." If exacf figure not known, give best esf/mofe. If 
business or form lost money, write "toss" after amounf.} 



$ 00 

(Dollars only) 



OR None 



..a 



P34. Last year (1959), did this person receive any income from: 
Social security 
Pensions 

Veteran's payments 
Rent (minus expenses) 
Interest or dividends 
Unemployment insurance 
Welfare payments 
Any other source not already entered 

NO..D 



s..n 

Tu 



What is the amount he received from these sources 

in 1959? (If exact figure not known, gi'v b**f *s*imofe) 

..00 



(Dollars only) 



Information on income for the calendar year 1959 was re- 
quested from all persons 14 years old and over in the sample. 
"Total income" is the sum of the amounts reported in P32 (wage 
or salary income), P33 (self -employment income), and P34 
(other income). Earnings were obtained by summing wage or 
salary and self -employment income. The figures represent the 
amount of income received before deductions for personal income 
taxes, Social Security, bond purchases, union dues, etc. 

Receipts from the following sources were not included as in- 
come : Money received from the sale of property, unless the 
recipient was engaged in the business of selling such property ; 
the value of income "in kind," such as food produced and con- 
sumed in the home or free living quarters ; withdrawals of bank 
deposits ; money borrowed ; tax refunds ; gifts and lump-sum in- 
heritances or insurance benefits. 

Wage or salary income. This is defined as the total money 
earnings received for work performed as an employee. It in- 
cludes wages, salary, pay from Armed Forces, commissions, tips, 
piece-rate payments, and cash bonuses earned. 

Self-employment income. This is defined as net money in- 
come (gross receipts minus operating expenses) from a business, 
farm, or professional enterprise in which the person was engaged 
on his own account. Gross receipts include the value of all 
goods sold and services rendered. Expenses include the costs of 
goods purchased, rent, heat, light, power, depreciation charges, 
wages and salaries paid, business taxes, etc. 

Income other than earnings. This includes money income re- 
ceived from sources other than wages or salary and self-employ- 
ment, suclras net income (or loss) from rents or receipts from 
roomers or boarders ; royalties ; interest, dividends, and periodic 
income from estates and trust funds; Social Security benefits; 
pensions ; veterans' payments, military allotments for dependents, 
unemployment insurance, and public assistance or other govern- 
mental payments; and periodic contributions for support from 
persons who are not members of the household, alimony, and 
periodic receipts from insurance policies or annuities. 



This report presents information on income for families and 
unrelated individuals and for persons 14 years old and over by 
detailed characteristics. Data are also presented for 4-person 
husband-wife families with two (own) children under 18 in 
which the head was an earner, including families in which there 
were one or more additional earners. 8 

In the statistics on family income, the combined incomes of all 
members of each family are treated as a single amount ; whereas 
in the statistics on the income of unrelated individuals and in 
those on the income of persons 14 years old and over the classi- 
fication is by the amount of their own income. Although the 
time period covered by the income statistics is the calendar year 
1959, the characteristics of persons and the composition of fami- 
lies refer to the time of enumeration. Thus, the income of the 
family does not include amounts received by persons who were 
members of the family during all or part of the calendar year 
1959 if these persons no longer resided with the family at the 
time of the interview. On the other hand, family income in- 
cludes amounts reported by related persons who did not reside 
with the family during 1959 but who were members of the family 
at the time of enumeration. For most of the families, however, 
the income reported was received by persons who were members 
of the family -throughout 1959. 

Median and Mean Income 

The median income is the amount which divides the distribu- 
tion into two equal groups, one having incomes above the median, 
and the other having incomes below the median. For families 
and unrelated individuals, the median income is based on the 
total number of families and unrelated individuals; whereas 
for persons the medians are based on -the distributions of persons 
14 years old and over with income. 

The mean income is the amount obtained by dividing the total 
income of a group by the number of income recipients in that 
group. For wage or salary income and self -employment income, 
the means are based on persons having those types of income. 
In the derivation of aggregate amounts, persons in the open-end 
interval "$25,000 -and over" were assigned an estimated mean of 
$50,000. 

Limitations of the Data 

The schedule entries for income are frequently based not on 
records but on memory, and this factor probably produces under- 
estimates, because the tendency of respondents is to forget minor 
or irregular sources of income. Other errors of reporting are 
due to misunderstanding, of the income questions or to mis- 
representation. 

A possible source of understatement in -the income figures was 
the failure, on occasion, to obtain from the respondent any re- 
port on "other money income." For these cases, the assumption 
was made in the editing process that no income other than earn- 
ings was received by a person who reported the receipts of either 
wage or salary income or self-employment income. Where no 
income information for a person 14 years old -and over was re- 
ported, a more elaborate editing procedure was used, as described 
below in the section on "Editing of unacceptable data." Appendix 
tables C-2 and O3 indicate the extent to which income in 1959 
was allocated for families and persons 14 years old and over. 
Because of -an error in programing the tabulations, however, the 
nonresponse 'rates for families shown in these tables are some- 
what overstated. This error is described in more detail in the 
section below on "Extent and implications of editing." 

The income tables for families and unrelated individuals in- 
clude in the lowest income group (under $1,000) those that were 



8 Because of a processing error, the data on this subject shown in 
tables 65, 76, and 86 were mislabeled in a number of States. To deter- 
mine whether this State is one of those affected, see "List of Corrections" 
on page XLVII. 



xxxvm 



Introduction 



classified as having no 1959 income, as defined in the census. 
Many of these were living on income "in kind," savings, or gifts, 
were newly constituted families, or were unrelated individuals 
who recently left families, or were families in which the sole 
breadwinner had recently died or had left the household. How- 
ever, many of the families and unrelated individuals who re- 
ported no income probably had some money income which was not 
recorded in the census. 

The income data in this report cover money income only. The 
fact -that many farm families receive an important part of their 
income in the form of rent-free housing and of goods produced 
and consumed on the farm rather than in money should be taken 
into consideration in comparing the income of farm and nonf arm 
residents. In comparing income data for 1959 with earlier years, 
it should be noted that an increase or decrease in money income 
between 1949 and 1959 does not necessarily represent a com- 
parable change in real income, because adjustments for, changes 
in prices have not been made in this report. 

Comparability 

1940 and 1950 Censuses. In 1950, information on income simi- 
lar to that requested in 1960 was obtained from a 20-percent 
sample of persons 14 years old and over. If the sample person 
was the head of a family, the income questions were repeated 
for the other family members as a group in order to obtain the 
income of the whole family. In 1960, however, separate income 
data were requested for each person 14 years old and over in the 
sample household. 

In tabulating family income for the 1950 Census, if only the 
head's income was reported, the assumption was made that there 
was no other income in -the family. In the 1960 Census, all non- 
respondents on income (whether heads of families or other per- 
sons) were assigned the reported income of persons with similar 
demographic characteristics. 

In 1940, all persons 14 years old and over were asked to report 
(a) the amount of money wages or salary received in 1939 and 
(6) whether income -amounting to $50 or more received in 1939 
was from sources other than money wages or salaries. Income 
distributions for 1959 and 1949 shown in the present report relate 
to total money income or to earnings ; comparable statistics from 
the 1940 -Census are not available. 

Income tax data. For several reasons, the income data shown 
in this report -are not directly comparable with those which may 
be obtained from statistical summaries of income tax returns. 
Income, as defined for tax purposes, differs somewhat from the 



concept used by the Bureau of the Census. Moreover, the cover- 
age of income tax statistics is less inclusive because of the ex- 
emptions of persons having small amounts of income. Further- 
more, some income tax returns are filed as separate returns and 
others as joint returns ; and, consequently, the income reporting 
unit is not consistently either a family or a person. 

Bureau of Old-Age and Survivors Insurance earnings record 
data. The earnings data shown here are not directly comparable 
with those which may be obtained from the earnings records of 
the Bureau of Old-Age and Survivors Insurance for several rea- 
sons. The coverage of the earnings record data for 1959 is less 
inclusive than that of the 1960 Census data because of the exclu- 
sion of the earnings of self-employed physicians, many civilian 
government employees, some employees of nonprofit organiza- 
tions, workers covered by the Railroad Retirement Act, and 
persons who are 'not covered by the program because of insuffi- 
cient earnings, including some self-employed persons, some farm 
workers, and domestic servants. Furthermore, earnings received 
from any one employer in excess of $4,800 in 1959 are not covered 
by the earnings record data. Finally, -as the Bureau of the 
Census data are obtained by household interviews, they will 
differ from the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance earnings rec- 
ord data, which are based upon employers' reports and the 
Federal income tax returns of self-employed persona. 

Office of Business Economics State income series. The Office of 
Business Economics of the Department of Commerce publishes 
data on aggregate and per capita personal income received by the 
population in each State. If the aggregate total income were 
estimated from the income statistics shown in this report, it 
would be lower than that shown in the State income series 
for several reasons. The income statistics published by the 
Bureau of the Census are obtained from households, whereas the 
State income series published by the Oflice of Business Economics 
is estimated largely on the basis of data derived from business 
and governmental sources. Moreover, the definitions of income 
are different. The Office of Business Economics income series in- 
cludes some items not included in the income statistics shown 
in this report, such as income in kind, the value of the services 
of banks and other financial intermediaries rendered to persons 
without the assessment of specific charges, and the income of 
persons who died or emigrated prior to the time of enumeration. 
On the other hand, income statistics in publications of the Bureau 
of the Census include contributions for support received from 
persons not residing in the same household, and employee con- 
tributions for social insurance. 



COLLECTION AND PROCESSING OF DATA 



The steps taken in the collection and processing of data in the 
1960 Census differed in several important respects from those 
in the 1950 Census. In 1960, all the complete-count data and 
the sample data for about four-fifths of the population were 
obtained in the field by self -enumeration supplemented, if neces- 
sary, by a visit or telephone call by an enumerator, whereas in 
1950, nearly all the data were collected by direct interview. 

In 1960, enumerators recorded all the complete-count items and 
many of the sample items in the form of codes by marking appro- 
priate circles on the schedule, but those in 1950 recorded most 
answers in terms of written entries on the population census 
schedule which were later coded by clerks. In both censuses, 
some of the sample items were edited by clerks and some by 
machine; however, machine procedures were used much more 
extensively for this operation in 1960 than in 1950. For complete- 
count data, the 1960 Census used machine editing almost exclu- 
sively as contrasted to the reliance in 1950 on both mechanical 
and clerical means. 



More detailed descriptions of the 1960 Census practices in the 
collection and processing of data are given, respectively, in the 
reports entitled United States Censuses of Population and Hous- 
ing, 1960: Principal Data-Collection Form* <ind Procedures, 
1961, and Processing the Data, 1962, U.S. Government Printing 
Office, Washington, D.C. 

COLLECTION OF DATA 
Single- and Two-Stage Areas 

In all parts of the United States, a few days before the census 
date (April 1), all households received by mail an Advance 
Census Report (ACR) containing the complete-count questions, 
that is, the questions which were to be answered for all persons. 
Household members were requested to fill these forms before the 
enumerator called. 

In some areas, a "single stage" enumeration procedure was 
used, as discussed in the "General" section above. When the 



Characteristics of the Population 



XXXIX 



enumerator in a "single stage" area made his visit, he collected 
all the complete-count and sample information at that time. 9 
This information included answers to the questions on the ACR 
and to the additional (sample) questions which were to be 
answered for one-fourth of the households and one-fourth of the 
persons in group quarters. 

In the other areas, a "two stage" enumeration procedure was 
used. When the "Stage I" enumerator called to collect the ACR, 
he left at every fourth household a Household Questionnaire 
containing the sample questions and asked that the questionnaire 
be filled and mailed promptly to the local census office. (Special 
procedures were used for sample persons in group quarters.) 
If the "Stage II" enumerator found that the questionnaire was 
incompletely filled or was not mailed, or if he detected answers 
that contained obvious inconsistencies, he was instructed to make 
calls by telephone or personal visit to obtain the missing informa- 
tion or to correct errors. 

Advance Census Report, Household Questionnaire, and 
FOSDIC Forms 

When an enumerator visited a household in a single-stage area, 
he obtained and recorded the complete-count information required 
for each person and for each living quarters on a special form de- 
signed for electronic processing on FOSDIC (Film Optical Sens- 
ing Device for Input to Computer) . In doing so, he made use of 
the information which the household had entered on the ACR. 
Also, in each sample household, he completed the sample FOSDIC 
form. In addition, he transferred the complete-count information 
for the sample household to the sample FOSDIC form. 

When a Stage I enumerator visited a household in a two-stage 
area, he followed the procedure described above for recording 
the complete-count information. Later, the Stage I enumerator 
transferred the complete-count information for each sample 
household to its sample FOSDIC form. When the sample house- 
hold mailed its Household Questionnaire to the local census office, 
the Stage II enumerator transferred the sample information 
from the Household Questionnaire to the sample FOSDIC form. 
If the sample household had failed to mail a completed Household 
Questionnaire, the Stage II enumerator usually recorded the sam- 
ple information directly on the sample FOSDIC form when he 
called for the information by telephone or by personal visit. 

Thus, the enumerator's duty was to deliver completed FOSDIC 
schedules to the local census office. To do so, he made use of 
completed ACR's and Household Questionnaires where they were 
available and conducted direct interviews as needed. 

Most of the questions on the ACR and Household Question- 
naire were virtually identical with the corresponding ones on 
the FOSDIC forms. Those on the FOSDIC forms were somewhat 
briefer and more compact, contained more boxes for preceding, 
and omitted many of the brief instructions which are given on 
the self-enumeration forms to explain the meaning of certain 
questions. The differences between the two types of forms, how- 
ever, are regarded as minor and probably did not contribute in 
any important way to a lack of comparability of the sample data ; 
the less detailed wording on the FOSDIC forms was reinforced 
by the training on detailed instructions that was given to enu- 
merators who used these forms. The respondent was probably not 
ordinarily aw,are, however, of the special cases discussed in the 
instructions unless he asked the enumerator for clarification of 
a particular point. 



9 States enumerated completely on a single-stage basis were : Alaska, 
Arkansas, Hawaii, Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming. States enumerated partly, 
but not completely, on a single-stage basis were : Alabama, Arizona, Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mtfmj, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utan, Wasn- 
ington, and Wisconsin. 



Field Review 

In the 1960 Census, one of the more important innovations was 
a series of regularly scheduled field reviews of the enumerator's 
work by his crew leader or field reviewer. This operation was 
designed to assure at an early stage of the work that the enumer- 
ator was performing his duties properly and had corrected the 
errors he had made. Moreover, the completeness of coverage of 
the enumeration was checked in various ways, including, for the 
first time, an advance partial listing by one of the supervisors of 
addresses throughout the enumerator's district, and the checking 
of this list of addresses against that reported by the enumerator. 

SAMPLE DESIGN 

For persons in housing units at the time of the 1960 Census, the 
sampling unit was the housing unit and all its occupants ; for per- 
sons in group quarters, it was the person. On the first visit to an 
address, the enumerator assigned a sample key letter (A, B, C, 
or D) to each housing unit sequentially in the order in which he 
first visited the units, whether or not he completed an interview. 
Each enumerator was given a random key letter to start his as- 
signment, and the order of canvassing was indicated in advance, 
although these instructions allowed some latitude in the order of 
visiting addresses. Each housing unit assigned the key letter 
"A" was designated as a sample unit, and all persons enumerated 
in the unit were included in the sample. In every group quarters, 
the sample consisted of every fourth person in the order listed. 
In 1950, the sample was designed to include every fifth person, 
regardless of his living arrangements. Thus, if a household head 
was in the sample, his wife, if any, and most or all of his chil- 
dren, if any, were not in the sample ; likewise, if the wife or a 
child was in the sample, the head generally was not. This 
handicap to the analysis of household and family statistics was 
overcome by the use of the housing unit (hence, the household) 
as the basic sampling unit in 1960. But the effect of "clustering" 
persons by sampling whole households increased the sampling 
variability of the data for some items and is one of the factors 
that led to the enlargement of the sampling fraction from 20 per- 
cent to 25 percent. (See discussion of "Sampling variability" be- 
low.) Moreover, in the 1950 Census, the last few sample ques- 
tions were to be asked only of every sixth sample person and may, 
therefore, have been regarded by the enumerator as less im- 
portant, hence, could be given more casual treatment than the 
other sample questions. In the 1960 Census, if a person, was 
in the sample, he was asked to answer all of the sample questions 
that were applicable. 

Although the 1960 sampling procedure did not automatically in- 
sure an exact 25-percent sample of persons or housing units in 
each locality, the sample design was unbiased if carried through 
according to instructions. Generally, for large areas the deviation 
from 25 percent was found to be small. Biases may have arisen, 
however, if the enumerator failed to follow his listing and sam- 
pling instructions exactly. 

Table C-l shows the percentage of persons and households, re- 
spectively, that were in the unweighted sample. For the United 
States, as a whole, the published figures are 24.7 and 24.5, respec- 
tively. The sample as finally processed, taking account of all 
replications, represented somewhat higher percentages, namely, 
24.94 for persons and 24.82 for households. Available records 
indicate that the sample of persons as designated in the .field 
was very slightly larger than this, since the number of persons 
canceled because of bias in size of household was only slightly 
larger than the 85,255 persons replicated to replace them. Esti- 
mates of the total number and percent of persons with specified 
characteristics based on sample data for 1960 were obtained by 
a ratio estimation procedure that is described in the section 
below on "Katio estimation." 



Introduction 



MANUAL EDITING AND CODING OF SCHEDULES 

After the sample FOSDIC forms had been assembled L and 
checked for completeness in the field, they were sent to a central 
processing office in Jeffersonville, Ind., for ^^^f^J^ 
ing The FOSDIC forms for the complete-count data had not been 
coded manually (except where some special problems arose) be- 
fore they were microfilmed. 

The clerical editing and coding operation of the sample sched- 
ules provided an opportunity to correct obvious errors and to as- 
sign numerical codes to written entries before the data were 
processed by the electronic equipment. As a rule, editing or cod- 
ing was performed by hand only when it could not be done effec- 
tively by machine. Thus, the manual operation was essentially 
limited to the minority of items where editing and coding re- 
quired the reading of written entries rather than the reading 
of marked circles. 

One of the coding problems that required the manual processing 
of every sample FOSDIC form was the coding of the item on re- 
lationship to the head of the household. The main purposes of 
this operation were to assign codes for relationship in detailed 
categories and to assign a family number to every member of a 
family group that was sharing the living quarters of the house- 
hold head as a secondary family or a subfamily. A special group 
of coders assigned a code for type of institution or type of other 
group quarters to the first person in each of these types of living 
accommodations, and then the computer assigned the same code 
to all other persons in the group quarters. 

Clerks also assigned codes for mother tongue of the foreign 
born State of birth of the native population, country of origin of 
the foreign stock, residence five years prior to the census date, 
place of work, and income. The items related to geographic 
location created special problems because many respondents were 
unfamiliar with the names of counties and other political sub- 
divisions required and, in many instances, provided incomplete 
or inaccurate information, or information not called for by the 
questions. 

A special group of clerks coded the entries for occupation and 
industry. The clerks were provided with lists of names of large 
companies and their industrial classifications, as well as the 1960 
Census of Population, Alphabetical Index of Occupations and In- 
dustries. The class-of-worker entry was edited for consistency 
with occupation and industry. 

The principles of quality control were applied in the manual 
editing and coding operation, just as they were used in the 
review of enumeration work and in certain other operations. 
Thus, in the first stage of the coding operation, one-fifth of the 
work of each occupation and industry coder, and one-tenth 
of the work of other coders, was verified by an examination of 
the work of the coders during the first few weeks of their assign- 
ment, that is, before they were eligible to be rated as "qualified." 
In the second stage, one-fortieth of the work of the occupation and 
industry coders, and one-eightieth of that of the other coders, was 
checked by two verifiers, each of whom did the work independ- 
ently and did not see the work of the coder or of the other verifier. 
If the work done by a coder in the early phase was rejected on 
the basis of either or both of these checks, his work was verified 
completely. If the coder's work failed to qualify after a reason- 
able period of time he was dismissed from coding work. 



After the coder qualified, control of his work was based on the 



. _/ high weekly error rates. Information on error rates 
given in later publications. 

ELECTRONIC PROCESSING 

The steps after the clerical processing of the sample data for 
werTquite different from those performed in connection 
the 1950 Census. In 1960, the procedure was as follows: 
(1) The schedules, which contained both population and housing 
information in the form of shaded code circles, were rtcrofihoftl ; 
(?) the microfilm was read by FOSDIC, which converted the 
shaded circles to coded signals on magnetic tape ; (3) WB 
was read by an electronic computer, which edited, coded (that 
JS of coding sometimes referred to as decoding"), and tabu- 
lated the data; (4) a high-speed electronic printer printed the 
numbers and captions on sheets to which Preprinted itles were 
added by hand; (5) the tables were reviewed; and 6 the ^high- 
speed printer output was used as copy for offset printing of the 
publication. 

In 1950 the steps were as follows : (1) Clerks edited and coded 
both complete-count and sample entries; (2) clerks punched a 
card for each person containing the codes for population (but not 
housing) characteristics; (3) the punchcards were edited the 
sample punchcards were weighted, and all cards were tabulated 
by conventional tabulators ; (4) the tables were typed manually 
from the tabulation sheets ; (5) the typed tables required proof- 
reading -and verification in addition to review ; and (6) the tables 
were reproduced by offset printing for publication. 

The extensive use of electronic equipment in the 1960 Census 
insured more uniform editing of the data than could have been 
accomplished by clerical work. On the other hand, the inability 
of the electronic equipment to read names and to perform some 
other operations that can be readily done by clerks introduced 
a measure of inflexibility at certain points in the processing 
operations. In the editing operation, substitutions were made 
for some of the nonresponses and inconsistencies, in order to 
simplify later tabulations and to make the published tables more 
usable. Moreover, the use of FOSDIC completely eliminated 
the cardpunching operation and thereby eliminated one important 
source of error. The types of error introduced by the use of 
FOSDIC were probably minor by comparison. 

The enormous capacity of the electronic computer made it 
possible to do much more complex editing and coding than in 
earlier censuses and to insure consistency among a larger num- 
ber of interrelated items. For example, the computer assigned 
a code to each person 14 years old and over for one of the five 
categories of employment status. In some instances, the deter- 
mination of this code required the scanning of entries in as many 
as 9 items, where a full cross-classification of the 9 items 
would involve approximately 7,500 combinations of categories. 
At the same time, the greater capacity of the computer permitted 
the keeping of a detailed record of the extent of computer editing 
of census entries. ( See section below on "Editing of unacceptable 
data.") 



ACCURACY OF THE DATA 



SOURCES OF ERROR 



Human and mechanical errors occur in any mass statistical 
operation such as a decennial census. Such errors include fail- 
ure to obtain required information from respondents, obtaining 



inconsistent information, recording information in the wrong 
place or incorrectly, and otherwise producing inconsistencies be- 
tween entries on interrelated items on the field documents. 
Sampling biases occur because some of the enumerators fail to 
follow the sampling instructions. Clerical coding and editing 



Characteristics of the Population. 



sue 



errors occur, and errors occur in the electronic processing opera- 
tion for reasons discussed in the next section. 

Careful efforts are made in every census to keep the errors 
In each step at an acceptably low level. Review of the enumera- 
tor's work, verification of manual coding and editing, checking 
of tabulated figures, -and ratio estimation of sample data to con- 
trol totals from the complete count (as discussed in a later sec- 
tion) reduce the effects of the errors in the census data. 
According to present plans, one or more reports evaluating the 
statistics of the 1960 Census will be published later. A report 
published by the Bureau of the Census and entitled The Post- 
Enumeration Survey: 1950, Technical Paper No. 4, presents evalu- 
ative material on the 1950 Census. 

EDITING OF UNACCEPTABLE DATA 
Assignments for Nonresp^nse or Inconsistency 

Regardless of the operating procedure that is used, the de- 
sired end is to produce a set of statistical tables that describes 
the population as accurately and clearly as possible. In keeping 
with this objective, certain unacceptable entries on the 1960 
Census questionnaires were edited. 

As one of the first steps in editing, the computer scanned the 
configuration of marks from a given section of the sample 
FOSDIC schedule to determine whether it contained information 
for a person, or merely a spurious mark or two. If -the section 
contained marks for at least two of the general characteristics 
relationship, sex, color, age, marital status and at least one 
of the entries was a relationship, sex, or color, the inference was 
made that the section contained entries for a person. Names 
were not used as a criterion of the presence of a person because 
the electronic computer was unable to distinguish between a name 
and any other entry in the name space. If the entries indicated 
that the line contained data for a person, the computer supplied 
information by assignment (as explained below) for more than 
half of the sample characteristics, where such information was 
missing, and for -all of the missing complete-count characteris- 
tics. However, if sample information was entirely missing for 
more than a tolerable proportion of sample households in an area, 
special remedial action was taken, as explained in the section 
below on "Editing for other reasons." 

Allocations, or assignments of acceptable codes in place of un- 
acceptable entries, were needed most often where an entry for a 
given item was lacking or where the information reported for a 
person on that item was inconsistent with other information for 
the person. (See section below on "Editing for other reasons" 
for examples of other situations requiring allocations.) As in 
earlier censuses, the general procedure for changing unacceptable 
entries was to assign an entry for a person that was consistent 
with entries for other persons with similar characteristics. Thus, 
a person who was reported as a 20-year-old son of the household 
head, but for whom marital status was not reported, was assigned 
a marital status from a marital status distribution for other sons 
in the same age group. Through the assignment of acceptable 
codes in place of blanks or unacceptable entries, it is believed that 
the usefulness of the data is enhanced. 

In earlier censuses, the distributions from which assignments 
were made were derived from previous censuses or surveys. The 
use of the electronic computer improved upon this procedure by 
making feasible the use of distributions implicit in the 1960 data 
being tabulated. In addition, the superior flexibility of the com- 
puter permitted the use of a greater number of homogeneous sub- 
groups and thus increased the probability that assignments would 
be accurate and consistent with entries on other items for the 
person. 

The technique in the 1960 Census may be illustrated by the 
procedure used in the assignment of wage or salary income. The 
allocation of this item was carried out in the following steps: 



1. The computer stored reported wage or salary income, by 
sex, age, color, major occupation group, and number of weeks 
worked in 1959, for persons 14 years old and over who worfcea 
in 1959. 

2. Each stored wage or salary income was retained in the 
computer only until a succeeding person having the same charac- 
teristics and having wage or salary income reported was proc- 
essed through the computer during the mechanical edit operation. 
Then, the reported wage or salary income of the succeeding per- 
son was stored in place of the one previously stored. 

3. When the wage or salary income of a person 14 years old 
or over who worked in 1959 was not reported or the entry was 
unacceptable, the wage or salary income assigned to this person 
was that stored for the last person who otherwise had the same 
characteristics. 

The above procedure insured that the distribution of wage or 
salary income assigned by the computer for persons of a given 
set of characteristics would correspond closely to the reported 
wage or salary income distribution of such persons in the current 
census. 

In general, the procedure for making assignments of complete- 
count items shown in chapters C and D was more complex than 
that used for making assignments of complete-count items shown 
in chapter B. The assignment procedure used for chapters C and 
D often took account of additional information not available on 
the complete-count schedules about the sample person, and, when 
feasible, about other members of the household to determine the 
most appropriate value to assign. 

For persons in large group quarters in which the enumerator 
had not been able to obtain the required sample information, a 
manual editing operation was used. For some of these places, 
entries for sample items were assigned by clerks from distribu- 
tions of acceptable values for each item. These distributions 
of acceptable values were compiled through inspection of data 
for other group quarters of similar type for which adequate 
entries had been obtained. 

Editing for Other Reasons 

Editing was performed not only when there were nonresponses 
and inconsistencies but was also performed when the proportion 
of sample households in a "work unit" (group of enumeration 
districts) with little or no sample information exceeded certain 
tolerance limits. When this situation was discovered, households 
with inadequate sample information were canceled, and house- 
holds of the same size in the same general area that did have the 
sample information were replicated to replace the ones that were 
canceled. As shown in table C-l for the United States, this proce- 
dure involved 315,069 persons and 127,257 households. Also, ad- 
justments were made in the work done by a small proportion of 
the enumerators, for biases in the size distribution of sample 
households as compared to that of all households. Thus, if there 
were too many large sample households, the proper number of 
large households was canceled and the same number of small 
households was substituted. For the United States as a whole, 
this adjustment involved 85,255 persons in 26,307 replicated 
households. The number of persons in the canceled households 
has not yet been firmly established, but it is estimated at about 
110,000. 

Editing was necessary, in addition, because of occasional fail- 
ures in the microfilming process that caused an entire page of a 
schedule to be unreadable by FOSDIC. When this occurred, all 
information for at least one household was canceled. (Each 
sample FOSDIC page was designed to contain information for, one 
housing unit and for one person or two persons.) If the unread- 
able page contained entry spaces for both housing and population 
information, two households may have been canceled because the 
computer was not always able to determine in this situation 
whether the page represented the beginning of a new household 
or the continuation of the previous household. 



"XT/IT 



Introduction 



Specific tolerances were established for the number of com- 
puter allocations, substitutions, and cancellations that would be 
permitted for an enumeration district. If the number of correc- 
tions was beyond tolerance, the schedule books in which the errors 
occurred were clerically reviewed. If it was found that the errors 
resulted from damaged schedules, from improper microfilming, 
from faulty reading by FOSDIC of undamaged schedules, or from 
other types of machine failure, the schedules were manually re- 
paired and reprocessed. Sometimes this repair work consisted 
simply of remicrofilming or of making darker shadings in the 
code circles. If a large number of allocations resulted from faulty 
entries on the schedules, the appropriateness of the computer 
allocations was considered and, in some instances, a manual al- 
location based on special sources of information was substituted. 

As noted, inconsistencies in the reported data were resolved 
primarily by machine editing but occasionally by clerical editing. 
However, because of limitations of computer capacity and other 
resources, a number of complicated editing steps were not intro- 
duced when the effect upon the final data was considered to be 
small. Thus, for some characteristics, there may be a small 
number of cases in an unlikely age group. Illustrations include 
women under 18 years old with 5 or more children, members of 
the Armed Forces under 17, and parents under 30 years old of 
household heads or wives. 

Very minor differences between tables result from imperfections 
in the electronic equipment. For example, in table 82 for the 
United States, Male, Employed is 43,466,951, whereas in table 86 
for the United States, the same universe is reported as 43,466,946. 
No attempt has been made to reconcile these insignificant 
discrepancies. 

Extent and Implications of Editing 

In order to measure the effects of the various editing proce- 
dures, a number of appendix tables is presented. Appendix 
tables show the extent and implications of census editing. Tables 
B-l -and B-2 follow the chapter B tables, ta'bles C-l, -2, and 
0-3 follow the chapter C tables, -and table D-l follows -the chap- 
ter D tables. Specifically, tables B-l and B-2 show the extent of 
the allocations for nonresponse or for inconsistency. In these 
tables "substituted persons" and "persons with allocations" are 
stated as percentages of the population subject to the risk of 
such substitutions or allocations. 

Persons substituted for "omissions due to noninterview" rep- 
resent persons from previous occupied housing units substituted 
to take the place of the group of persons in a housing unit 
enumerated as occupied but for which the computer could find 
no persons. Persons substituted for "omissions due to mechani- 
cal failure" represent persons on preceding schedule pages who 
were substituted to account for persons on pages which could 
not be read by FOSDIC. 

. The count of "persons with one or more allocations" -and the 
count of persons with allocations of various characteristics gen- 
erally exclude "persons substituted." However, persons who 
served as substitutes for other persons, and who also had miss- 
ing or inconsistent entries in one or more population characteris- 
tics, were included In the count of persons with one or more 
allocations for themselves and -also for the person (or persons) 
for whom they were substituted. The sum of the percentages of 
persons having assignments in each population characteristic 
is greater than the number of persons with one or more alloca- 
tions because some persons had allocations on more than one 
characteristic. 

The size of the sample and the extent of replication are shown 
in -appendix table C-l. The extent of the allocations for nonre- 
sponse or for inconsistency is shown in tables C-2 and C-3. In 
these tables, the percentages of persons for whom nonresponses 
were -allocated are essentially exclusive of those persons with all 
sample characteristics not reported. 



In table .C-l, "persons in sample" and "households in sample" 
represent unweighted counts of distinct sample persons and dis- 
tinct sample households, as determined after the computer had 
completed the various processing steps. These totals do not in- 
clude the figures for "replicated because of bias in size of house- 
hold" -and "replicated because of absence of sample information** 
that appear on the following lines in table C-l. In tables C-2 
and C-3, replicated persons were tallied as many times as they 
were replicated; and, therefore, the percent of "persons iii 
sample" in table C-3 may be larger than the corresponding per- 
cent in table C-l. All data shown in tables C-2 and C-3 are 
weighted so as to be consistent with corresponding complete- 
count data, except "persons in sample" in table C-3, which rep- 
resents the ratio of the unweighted sample count plus replica- 
tions to the total population. 

In table C-2, "persons with two or more sample characteristics 
reported" are persons with acceptable entries in two or more 
relevant sample characteristics (for ex-ample, entries in employ- 
ment status are only relevant to persons 14 years old and over) . 
The characteristics listed in table C-2 cover all the items that 
are published in chapter C and are classified into three major 
groups: Those subjects for which all nonresponses were -allo- 
cated, -those for which some but not all nonresponses were al- 
located, and those for which no nonresponses were allocated. 
For each subject, the universe applicable to the characteristic is 
indicated, along with the percent of persons in the relevant 
universe for whom nonresponses were allocated. 

For each subject, the number of assignments shown in table 
C-2 for nonresponse or inconsistency includes only those made 
by the computer. This number excludes any assignments that 
were made in the field review of the census schedules, in the 
manual editing and coding operation, or in the manual repair 
of schedules for areas where the computer had made more than 
the -tolerable number of -assignments on the subject. 

In table C-3, the percent of nonresponses shown in the column 
"nativity and nativity of parents" is overstated because, if both 
items were not reported, the person was incorrectly cotinted twice 
in the numerator. 

The allocation rates for family income shown in tables C-2 and 
C-3 are somewhat overstated. The number of primary individ- 
uals for whom income items were allocated was inadvertently 
included in the numerator of the rates. The numerator should 
have included only families for which any member 14 years old 
and over had a nonresponse on income. This error was discovered 
too late for correction. For most areas, a fairly adequate cor- 
rection may be obtained by assuming that the allocation rate for 
primary individuals is the same as that shown for persons 14 
years old and over. This adjustment, -though reducing the rates 
for families shown in tables C-2 -and C-3, would nevertheless 
tend to result in an overstatement of the true rate because allo- 
cation rates for primary individuals are generally higher than 
those for all persons 14 years old and over. The application of 
this procedure reduces the family-income -allocation rate for the 
United States from 11.7 to 10.6 percent. 

Appendix table D-OL presents distributions of selected subjects, 
essentially as they appeared prior to allocation of nonresponses. 
These distributions may 'be compared with -the corresponding 
statistics in the regular tables, category by category, in order 
to measure the net effects of allocation. 

The figures shown are based on the final weighted sample 
figures, and the -total number of persons in each distribution 
should agree with corresponding totals in the report. The data 
shown include persons in households which were replicated, and 
the characteristics tabulated for these persons are those of the 
members of the replicated household. In other words, the "not 
reported" categories in table D-l include allocations but not 
replications (unless the person in the replicated household him- 
self happened to hare a nonresponse on the given characteristic). 



Characteristics of the Population 



For each subject, the number of allocations shown in table 
D-l for "not reported" includes only those made by the computer ; 
the exclusions are the same as those noted above for table G-2. 

For items with all nonresponses allocated in 1960 but not in 
1950 such as income and years of school completed the 1960 
percent distributions are based on the total number of persons 
in the given area or group; whereas the corresponding percent 
distributions for earlier censuses, as shown in this report, are 
based on the number reporting. If the nonresponses had been 
distributed for the earlier censuses in the more complicated ways 
that were used for the 1960 Census, the results obviously would 
have been a little different. 

Certain types of response assignment (or allocation) are not 
included in the appendix tables. Among these, the following 
are the chief examples : Allocations of color were made for house- 
hold members by substituting the color of the household head; 
allocations of marital status and sex were automatically made 
for persons identified as wives of household heads or as heads 
of households with wife present; and allocations were made at 
random for missing information on quarter of year of birth. 
Allocations of color made by substituting that of the household 
head were made only when the person was related to the head. 
The possibility of error in these cases was considered so low 
that the inclusion of such allocations in the tables was felt to 
be unjustified. All persons coded as wives were automatically 
classified as female and married, and -all heads with wife present 
as male and married. These automatic classifications occurred 
regardless of the original entries in sex or marital status, and 
assignments in sex or marital status resulting from these alloca- 
tions were not recorded. Also, clerical corrections, such as mak- 
ing darker shadings in the code circles, were not tallied and are 
not reflected in the counts of allocations. 

Assignments for nonresponse or inconsistency, substitutions of 
persons and households, and other aspects of editing by the 
electronic computer will be discussed more f tlly as part of a more 
detailed report to be published at a later date under the title 
Eighteenth Decennial Census: Procedural History. 

RATIO ESTIMATION 

The statistics based on the sample of the 1960 Census returns 
are estimates that have been developed through the use of a ratio 
estimation procedure. This procedure was carried out for each 
of the following 44 groups of persons in each of the smallest 
areas for which sample data are published. 10 



Relationship and tenure 



Head of owner household 

Head of renter household 

Not head of household 

Same groups as age group 14 to 24 

Same groups as age group 14 to 24 

Male nonwhite: 
12-22 Same groups as male white 

Female white : 
23-33 Same groups as male white 

Female nonwhite : 
31 11 Same groups as male white 

For each of the 44 groups, the ratio of the complete count 
to the sample count of the population in the group was deter- 
mined. Each specific sample person in the group was assigned 
an integral weight so that the sum of the weights would equal the 
complete count for the group. For example, if the ratto for 
a group was 4.2, one-fifth of the persons (selected at random) 





fifea?, color, 


Group 


and age 




Male white: 


1 


Under 5 


2 


5 to 13 


3 


14 to 24 


4 


14 to 24 


5 


14to24 


6-8 


25 to 44 


9-11 


45 and over 



within the group were assigned a weight of 5, and the remaining 
four-fifths, a weight of 4. The use of such a combination of in- 
tegral weights rather than a single fractional weight was adopted 
to avoid the complications involved in rounding in the final 
tables. In order to increase the reliability, where there were 
fewer than 50 persons in the complete count in a group, or where 
the resulting weight was over 16, groups were combined in. a 
specific order to satisfy both of these two conditions. 

These ratio estimates, reduce the component of sampling error 
arising from the variation in the size of household and achieve 
some of the gains of stratification in the selection of the sample, 
with the strata being the groups for which separate ratio esti- 
mates are computed. The net effect is a reduction in the sam- 
pling error and bias of most statistics below what would be 
obtained by weighting the results of the 25-percent sample by a 
uniform factor of four. The reduction in sampling error will 
be trivial for some items and substantial for others. A by- 
product of this estimation procedure is> that estimates for this 
sample are generally consistent with the complete count with 
respect to the total population and for the subdivisions used as 
groups in the estimation procedure. A mo-re complete discussion, 
of the technical aspects of these ratio estimates will be presented 
in another report 

SAMPLING VARIABILITY 

The figures from the 25-percent sample tabulations axe subject 
to sampling variability, which can be estimated roughly from 
the standard errors shown in tables B and C below. Somewhat 
more precise estimates of sampling error may be obtained by 
using the factors shown in table D in conjunction with table C 
for percentages and table B for absolute numbers. These tables 11 
do not reflect the effect of response variance, processing vari- 
ance, or bias arising in the collection, processing, and esti- 
mation steps. Estimates of the magnitude of some of these 
factors in the total error are being evaluated and will be published 
at a later date. The chances are about 2 out of 3 that the differ- 
ence due to sampling variability between an estimate and the 
figure that would have been obtained from a complete count of 
the population, is less than the standard error. The chances; are 
about 19 out of 20 that the difference is less than 1 twice the 
standard error and about 99 out of 100 that it is less than 2% 
times the standard error. The amount by which the estimated 
standard error must be multiplied to obtain other odds deemed 
more appropriate can be found in most statistical textbooks. 

Table B shows rough standard errors of estimated numbers. 
In determining the figures for this table, some aspects of the 
sample design, the estimation process, and the population of the 
area over which the data have been compiled are ignored. Table C 
shows rough standard errors of data in the form of percentages). 
Linear interpolation in tables B and C will provide approximate 
results that are satisfactory for most purposes. The standard 
errors estimated from tables B and C are not directly applicable 



10 Estimates of characteristics from the sample for a given area are 
produced using the formula : 



where x' Is the estimate of the characteristic for the area obtained through 

the use of the ratio estimation procedure* 
zi Is the count of sample persons with the characteristic for the 

area in one (1) of the 44 groups, 
yi is the count of all sample persons for the area In the same one 

of the 44 groups, and 
Yt Is the count of persons in the complete count for the area In 

the same one of the 44 groups, 

11 The estimates of sampling variability are based on calculations from 
a preliminary sample of the 1960 Census results. Further estimates are 
being calculated and will be available at a later date. 



xuv 

TABLE B. ROUGH APPROXIMATION TO STANDARD ERROR OF 
ESTIMATED NUMBER 
[Range of 2 chances out of 3] 



Estimated number 1 


Standard 
error 


Estimated number 1 


Standard 
error 


60 
100 


16 
20 


5,000 
10,000 


110 
160 
190 


250 . . 
600 _ 

1000 


30 
40 
50 


25000 
50,000 


250 
350 


2JXX) 


80 















i For estimated numbers larger than 60,000, the relative errors are somewhat smaller 
than for 50,000. 

TABLE C. ROUGH APPROXIMATION TO STANDARD ERROR OF 
ESTIMATED PERCENTAGE 

[Range of 2 chances out of 3] 



Estimated percentage 




] 


Base of p 


ercentagt 


5 






600 


1,000 


2,500 


10,000 


25,000 


100,000 


2 or 98 - 


1.3 


0.9 


0.5 


0.3 


0.1 


0.1 


6 or 95 - -.- 


2.0 


1.4 


0.9 


0.4 


0.2 


0.1 


10 or 90 


2.8 


2.0 


1.2 


0.6 


0.3 


0.2 


25 or 75 - 


3.8 


2.7 


1.5 


0.7 


0.4 


0.2 


60 


4.4 


3.1 


1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


0.3 

















to differences between two sample estimates. These tables are 
to be applied in the three following situations as indicated : 

1. For a difference between the sample figure and one based 
on a comiplete count (e.g. f arising from comparisons between 1960 
sample statistics and complete-count statistics for 1950 or 1940), 
the standard error is. identical with the standard error of the 
1960 estimate alone. 

2. For a difference between two sample figures (that is, one 
from 1960 and the other from 1950, or both from the same 
census year), the standard error is approximately the square 
root of the sum of the squares of the standard error of each 
estimate considered separately. Thisi formula will represent the 
actual standard error quite accurately for the difference between 
estimates of the same characteristics in two different areas, 
or for the difference between separate and uncorrelated char- 
acteristics in the same area. If, however, there is a high posi- 
tive correlation between the two characteristics, the formula 
will overestimate the true standard error. The approximate 
standard error for the 1960 sample figure is derived directly from 
table B or C. The standard error of a 20-percent 1950 sample 
figure may be obtained from the relevant 1950 Census report, 
or an approximate value may be obtained by multiplying by 1.2 
the appropriate value in table B or C. 

3. For a difference between two sample estimates, one of 
which represents a subclass of the other, table B or O (which- 
ever is appropriate) can be used directly, with the difference con- 
sidered as the sample estimate. 

The sampling variability of the medians presented in certain 
tables (median age, median years of school completed, and median 
income) depends on the size of the base and on the distribution 
on, which the median is basied. An approximate method for 
measuring the reliability of an estimated median is to determine 
an interval about the estimated median, such that there is a 
stated degree of confidence that the true median lies within 
the interval. As the first step in estimating the upper and lower 
limits of the interval (that is, the confidence limits) about the 
median, compute one-half the number reporting (designated 

N 

TT ) on the characteristic on which the median is based. By the 

methods outlined in other parts of this section, compute the 

standard error of iJ. Subtract this standard error from??. Cu- 

2 2 

mulate the frequencies (in the table on which the median is 



based) 

and its standard error, and by linear interpolation obtain a value 



up to the interval containing the difference between 

2 



Introduction 

corresponding to this number. In a corresponding manner, add 

the standard error to -5 > cumulate the frequencies in the table, 

N 
and obtain a value corresponding to the sum of -g and its standard 

error. The chances are about 2 out of 3 that the median would lie 
between these two values. The range for 19 chances out of 20 
and for 99 in 100 can be computed in a similar manner by mul- 
tiplying the standard error by the appropriate factors before sub- 
tracting from and adding to one-half the number reporting the 
characteristic. Interpolation to obtain the values corresponding 
to these numbers gives the confidence limits for the median. 

The sampling variability of a mean, such as the number of 
children ever born per 1,000 women, or mean income, presented 
in certain tables, depends on the variability of the distribution 
on which the mean is based, the size of the sample, the sample 
design (for example, the use of households as the sampling 
unit) , and the use of ratio estimates. Formulas for computing the 
variability of a mean in simple random sampling can be found 
in textbooks on statistics. Although the estimated distribution 
on which a given mean is based may not be published in the 
detailed tables which follow, an approximation to the variability 
of the mean may be obtained by using a comparable distribution 
for a larger area or for a similar population group. A rough 
estimate of the sampling variability of means in this report may 
then be obtained by multiplying the figure thus derived by the 
factor corresponding to it in table D. 

For most characteristics, the use of the household as a sampling 
unit increases the standard error above what would be ex- 
pected for a simple random sample of persons taken with the 
same sampling fraction. In particular, sample items which tend 
to have the same value for all members of a household (e.g., 
race or residence in 1955) may have a considerably higher vari- 
ance than if a sample of persons had been used. However, for 
many characteristics, the standard error is reduced below what 
would be expected for a simple random sample of persons be- 
cause of geographic stratification in the selection of the sample 
and the use of ratio estimation. 

Table E shows standard errors for estimated numbers of per- 
sons depending on the population of the place (city, county, 
State) , unlike table B, and the magnitude of the estimate but, 
similar to table B, ignoring some aspects of the sample design 
and the estimation process. Table D provides a factor by which 
the standard errors shown in table E should be multiplied to 
adjust for the combined effect of the sample design, the estima- 
tion procedure, and the population of the area over which the 
estimate is calculated. 

To estimate a somewhat more precise standard error for a 
given characteristic, locate in table D the factor applying to the 
characteristic. Where data are shown as cross-classifications 
of two characteristics, locate each characteristic in table D. The 
factor to be used for any cross-classification will usually lie 
between the values of the factors. When a given characteristic 
is cross-classified in extensive detail (i.e., by single years of age), 
the factor to be used is the smaller one sihown in table J>. Where 
a characteristic is cross-classified in broad groups (or used in 
broad groups), the factor to be used in table D should be closer 
to the larger one. Multiply the standard error given for the 
size of estimate and the population of the area as shown in table B 
by this factor from table D. The result of this multiplication 
is the approximate standard error. Similarly, to obtain; a some- 
what more precise estimate of the standard error of a percentage, 
multiply the standard error as shown in table C by the factor 
from table D. For most estimates, linear interpolation in tables 
C and E will provide reasonably accurate results. 



Characteristics of Ae Population 



TABLE D.-FACTOR TO BE APPLIED TO STANDARD ERRORS 






!** 



Children ever bom..., 



1.4 
L8 
1,8 
L2 
L4 
L4 
L8 
L8 



1.0 
LO 

LO 
1,0 
LO 
1,0 
LO 
LO 
1.0 
1,0 
LO 
LO 
LO 
LO 

1.0 
LO 
Lfl 
LO 
LO 
LO 
LO 



Let us assume that, for a city with a population 
of 250,000, table 101 shows that there are an estimated 1,500 



tary school Table D shows that, for data on school enrollment, 



the appropriate standard error in table E should be multiplied 
by a factor of 0,8, Table 1 shows that the standard error for 
an estimate of 1,500 in areas of 250,000 inhabitants is about 60. 
The factor of 0,8 times 60 is 48, which means that the chances 
are approximately 2 out of 3 that the results of a complete census 
will not differ by more than 48 from this estimated 1,500, It also 
follows that there is only about 1 chance in 100 M a complete 



times the number estimated from tables D and E, 
TABLE E.-STANDARD ERROR OF ESTIMATED NUMBER 



so..... 

E... 



1,000.. 



1,000 



15 



IS 



70 
100 
120 
120 



IS 



D 



110 
ISO 



IS 



110 



310 



IS 



no 

ISO 
190 



15 



110 
160 
190 



15 



110 



i An area is the smallest complete geographic area to which the estimate under 
consideration pertains. Thus, the area may be the State, city, county, standard 
metropolitan statistical area, urbanized area, or the urban or rural portion of the State 
or county, The rural-farm or roral-nonfarm population of the State or county, the 



LIST OF CORRECTIONS 



This publication has been prepared primarily by assembling and 
binding the maps and tabular materials originally issued in the 
separate PC(1)-A, B, C, and D final reports for the State. This 
plan was adopted in order to conserve public funds. The corrections 
listed below represent changes which would ordinarily have been made 
if this publication had been prepared by reprinting these maps and 
tabular materials. Those items with an asterisk (*) consist of 



errors which affect not only the specific figure(s) mentioned but 
also affect other data in this publication. Among the other data 
which might be involved are the statistics for a larger area of which 
the particular area is part and the statistics by such classifi- 
cations as urban-rural residence and size of place. The user can, 
of course, carry through these types of changes if he thinks ttiem 
worthwhile. 



Lexington, Newberry, and Saluda County boundaries incorrectly shown. See page 3 for 
correct boundaries. 



Calhoun" 



"County, map location E-8: St. Matthews division shown as St. Mathews. 

Page 6, table 1 

Previous urban definition: 1960 (Apr. 1) From To 
The State: 

Population 2, 117, 027 2, 382, 594 

Increase over preceding census: Number 217, 223 265,567 

Percent 10.3 12.5 

Rural territory: 

Population 1,299,352 1,564,919 

Increase over preceding census: Number -164,636 100,931 

Percent -11.2 6.9 

Percent of total: 

Urban 38.6 34.3 

Rural 61.4 65.7 

Page 7, table 3 

1960, previous urban definition: From To 
Population: 

Rural territory 1,299,352 1,564,919 

Other rural territory 1,148,613 1,414,180 



Percent of total population: 

Rural territory 

Places of 1,000 to 2,500. 

Places under 1,000 

Other rural territory.... 



54.5 



65.7 
4.2 

2.1 
59.4 



Page 13, table 8 

Change 1950 population of Pelzer from 2, 692 to ... . 

Pages 31, 38, 39, and 72, tables 19, 21, and 28* 

The number of inmates shown in table 21 for Greenville city, for Greenville Urbanized 
Area, and for Greenville Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area includes approximately 
240 persons who should have been classified as "other" persons in group quarters. This 
misclassif ication also affects the corresponding number for Greenville County and the 
State, shown in tables 28 and 19, respectively. 



Pages 112, 113, 134, 135, and 162-165, tables 65, 76, and 86 

The alnih lln "T^jg'hanri- iff ?& fafrrfM^p rvnf> oflT*npT fom fVM 1 riTwn lyiHjai* lg years n 

read "Husband-wife families, head an earner, two children under 18." 



should 



Page 187, table C-2 

The nonresponse rates for "Birth date, decade unknown" erroneously exclude nonresponses 
for group quarters members other than inmates. 



Pages 
Add f i 



T202 and 203, table 99 
ootnote symbol 3 to~the line for "Other West Indies." 



Pages 291, 297, and 303, tables 120 and 121 

Under "Laborers (n.e.c.)" the 15 lines from "Machinery, exc. electrical" 
cellaneous mrf* a rtfon^ TIP indus"b?ies " are indented two spaces too many. 



through ''Mis- 



Pages 304-325, tables 122 to 124 

On each page showing Male, Operatives and kindred workers, the line reading "Furnacemen, 
smeltermen, and heaters" should be changed to "Furnacemen, smeltermen, and pourers." 



Pages 304-337, tables 122 to 125 ' 

On each page showing Male, Graf tsmen, foremen, and kindred workers, the line reading 

"Granemen, hoiatmen, Q n^ const, mach. operators 11 should be changed to "Cranemen, der- 

ricknien. ftTM H hois*tinen. " 

Page 385, table D-l 

The following explanatory footnote should Toe keyed to the line for "Not reported" in the 
section on "Relationship": 

Limited to persons who were allocated to the categories "Wife of head," "Other 
relative of head, " or THonrelative of head. " 

Page 385, table D-l 

The category "Not reported in decade or year" under "Age" erroneously excludes non- 
responses on decade of "birth for group quarters members other than inmates. 



Table 114.-- REVISED FIGURES FOR LAST THREE COLUMNS 





rth-n rtTQn \, 


aider 5 ye 


ars old 




Children u 


mder 5 ye 


ars old 




Children i 


nader 5 ye 


jars old 


Area, age, and color 
of woman 


Number 


Per 
1,000 
total 
women 


Per 
1,000 
women 
ever 
married 


Area, age, and color 
of woman 


Number 


Per 
1,000 
total 
women 


Per 
1,000 
women 
ever 
married 


Area, age, and color 
of woman 


Number 


Per 
1,000 
total 
women 


Per 
1,000 

ever 

married 


THE STATE TOTAL 


264 895 


470 


621 


URBAN NONWHITE 
Total 15 to 49 years 


32,419 


472 


663 


RURAL FARM TOTAL Con. 
30 to 34 years 


6,951 


858 


948 


15 to 19 years 


12,249 


114 


624 


15 to 19 years 


1,437 


109 


812 


35 to 39 years 


6,530 


666 


709 


15 to 17 years 


2 728 


40 


447 


20 to 24 years 


7,648 


808 


1,320 


40 to 44 years. 


3,116 


307 


327 




9 521 


244 


705 


25 to 29 years 


9,152 


976 


1,165 


45 to 49 years 


1,262 


122 


129 


9O + 2A * * - * * 


67,448 


845 


1,179 


30 to 34 years 


7,008 


742 


829 










90 and 91 VAfl-nfl 


20 878 


617 


1,020 


35 to 39 years 


4,504 


468 


515 


RURAL FARM NONWHITE 








?? to 24 yenrs 


46,570 


1,012 


1,267 




2,054 


227 


247 










25 to 29 years 


76, 208 


997 


1,114 


45 to 49 years 


616 


. 71 


77 


Total, 15 to 49 years... 


22,018 


584 


954 


30 to 34 years 


53,895 


695 


743 










15 to 19 years 


939 


82 


841 


35 to 39 years 
40 to 44 years 


35,697 
15,080 


436 
208 


462 
221 


RURAL' NONFARM-- TOTAL 








20 to 24 years 
25 to 29 years 


4,310 
4,570 


854 
1,205 
11 y$ 


1,553 
1,547 

1O/.4 


45 to 49 years 


4,318 


64 


68 


Total, 15 to 49 years... 
15 to 19 years 


121,065 
5,557 
31,614 


506 
122 
935 


659 
643 
1,242 


35 to 39 years 
40 to 44 years 


4,630 
2,119 


964 
495 


1,036 
530 


THE STAIB- -NONW.tLLXE 








25 to 29 years . . 


35,868 


1,031 


1,136 




846 


197 


207 


Total, 15 to 49 years... 
15 to 17 years 


98,430 
4,348 
1,189 


540 
102 
42 


805 
861 
710 


30 to 34 years 
35 to 39 years 
40 to 44 years 


24,128 
15,358 


708 
441 
227 


749 
467 
239 


COLOMBIA TOTAL 








20 to 24 years 


3,159 
21,977 
6,956 


221 
859 
639 


935 

1,449 
1,352 


45 to 49 years 

MTPAT. NONFARM NONWHITE 


1,874 


70 


74 


Total, 15 to 49 years... 
15 to 19 years 
20 to 24 years . .... 


27,390 
1,041 
6,875 


437 
96 
709 


585 
562 

1,068 


22 to 24 years 


15,021 


1,022 


1,499 










25 to 29 years 


7,982 


943 


1,070 


25 to 29 years 


25,286 


1,102 


1,351 




43 993 


580 


874 


30 to 34 years 


5,971 


671 


730 


30 to 34 years 
35 to 39 years 


20,875 
15,774 


900 
647 


1,006 
708 


15 to 19 years 
20 to 24 years 


1,972 
10 019 


108 
905 


910 
1 520 


35 to 39 years 
40 to 44 years 


3,640 
1,588 


386 
194 


414 

210 


40 to 44 years 
45 to 49 years 


7,473 
2,697 


336 
127 


364 

136 


25 to 29 years 
30 to 34 years 


11,564 
9 263 


1,184 
961 


1,463 
1 077 




293 


41 


45 










35 to 39 years 


6,640 


667 


732 


COLUMBIA NONWHITE 








URBAN TOTAL 








40 to 44 years 


3,3M 


372 


402 










Total 15 to 49 year's 


109 951 


438 


569 


45 to 49 years 


1,235 


149 


159 


Total, 15 to 49 years... 


8,822 


490 


725 


15 to 19 years 
25 to 29 years 


5,133 
28,855 
32,858 
22,816 
13,809 

5 nQO 


119 
771 
952 
646 
371 


586 

1,085 
1,059 
692 
394 


RURAL FARMTOTAL 

Total, 15 to 49 years... 
15 to 19 years 


33,879 
1,559 
6 979 


463 
82 
810 


690 
703 
1.348 


15 to 19 years 
20 to 24 years 
25 to 29 years 
30 to 34 years 
35 to 39 years 
40 to 44 years 


416 
2,303 
2,190 
1,935 
1,164 
646 


118 
779 
908 
822 
457 
290 


852 
1,386 
1,115 
950 
510 
330 




1,182 


39 


42 




7,482 


1,049 


1,283 


45 to 49 years 


168 


84 


94 



Number of Inhabitants 



i 



NUMBER OF INHABITANTS 

South Carolina 



LIST OF TABLES 



ixnum 



for each page. The prefix for this State is 42] 

Table 

l.-Population of the State, urban and rural: 1790 to 1960 . 5 

2, Population in groups of places according to size: 1960 and 1950. . 5 

3 Population in groups of places according to size: 1900 to 1960 7 

4. Population in incorporated and unincorporated places according to size: 1960 g 

5. Population of incorporated places of 10,000 or more from earliest census to I960.... g 

6. Area and population of wunties, urban and rural: 1960 and 1950 9 

7. Population of counties, by census county divisions: 1960.......... 10 

8. Population 'of all incorporated places and of unincorporated places of 1,000 or more: 1940 to 1960 12 

9.-1960 population of areas annexed between 1950 and 1960 by incorporated places having 2,500 inhabitants 

or more in 1950_ .. .. 14. 

10, Population of urbanized areas: 1960 and 1950 ; 15 

11. Population of standard metropolitan statistical areas: 1960 and 1950 15 

* ^ P- **. ,ffmmmmmmm^mmmm *. .*(, JL< 

12. Population of the State and of standard metropolitan statistical areas, by iype of residence: 1960 15 



LIST OF MAPS 

The State, showing counties, places of 25,000 or more, and standard metropolitan statistical areas 2 

The State, showing census county divisions 3 

Urbanized areas (separate map for each area) 16 

42-1 



42-2 



"5 'S "2 _ 

<ri 




42-3 





HH 

U 
w 






o 




i 



I 



Ji 
I 

"I 



42-4 




42-5 




42-6 



Current urban definition: 
1960 (Apr. 1L 
1950 ( Apr. 1). 

Previous urban definition: 

1960 (Apr. 1) 

1950 (Apr. 1) 

1940 (Apr. 1)-.- 

1930 (Apr. 1) 

1920 (Jan. 1) 



1910 (Apr. 15). 
1900 (June 1).. 
1890 (June 1).. 
1880 ( June 1).. 
1870 (June 1).. 

1860 (Junel).. 
1850 (Junel).. 
1840 (Junel)., 
1830 (June 1). 
1820 (Aug. 7).. 
1810 (Aug. 6).. 
1800 (Aug. 4).. 



South Carolina 

Table 1 -POPULATION OF THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1790 TO I960 
[For description of curent and previous urban definitions, see text. Minus si 8 n (-) denote, decrease] 

! -mr - - =g=^c^^^^* c '" a ^^ B 




2,117,027 
2,117,027 
1,899,804 
1,738,765 
1,683,724 

1,515,400 

1,340,316 

1,151,149 

995,577 

705,606 

703,708 
668,507 
594,398 
581,185 
502, 741 
415,115 
345,591 
249.073 



217,223 
217,223 
161,039 
55,041 
168,324 

175,084 
189,167 
155,572 
289,971 
1,898 

35,201 
74,109 
13,213 
78,444 
87,626 
69,524 
96,518 



10.3 
11.4 
9.3 
3.3 
11.1 

13.1 
16.4 
15.6 
41.1 
0.3 

5.3 

12.5 

2.3 

15.6 
21.1 
20.1 
38.8 



817,675 
*653,039 
466,111 
371,080 
293,987 

224,832 

171,256 

116,183 

74,539 

61,011 

43,574 
49,045 
33,601 
33,599 
24,780 
24,711 
18,824 
16,359 



164,636 
186,928 
95,031 
77,093 
69,155 

53,576 
55,073 
41,644 
13,528 
12,437 

-471 
15,444 

8,819 
69 

5,887 
2,465 



25.2 
40.1 
25.6 
26.2 
30.8 

31.3 
47.4 
55.9 
22.2 
25.6 

-1.0 
46.0 



0.3 
31.3 
15.1 



1,299,352 
*1. 463, 988 
1,433,693 
1,367,685 
1,389,737 

1,290,568 

1,169,060 

1.034,966 

921,038 

644,595 

655,134 
619,462 
560,797 
547,586 
477,961 
390,404 
326,767 
232,714 



-164,636 
30,295 
66,008 
-22,052 
99,169 

121,508 
134,094 
113,928 
276,443 
-10,539 

35,672 
58,665 
13,211 
69,625 
87,557 
63,637 
94,053 



-11.2 
2.1 
4.8 

-1.6 
7.7 

10.4 
13.0 
12.4 
42.9 
-1.6 

5.8 
10.5 

2.4 
14.6 
22.4 
19.5 
40.4 



38.6 
*30.8 
24.5 
21.3 
17.5 

14.8 

12.8 

10.1 

7.5 

8.6 

6.9 
7.3 

5.7 
5.8 
4.9 
6.0 
5.4 
6.6 



61.4 
*69.2 
75.5 
78.7 
82.5 

85.2 
87.2 
89.9 
92.5 
91.4 

93.1 
92.7 
94.3 
94.2 
95.1 
94.0 
94.6 
93.4 



1 Barnvell Island, Beaufort County, S.C., ceded to Chatham County, Qa., by Federal action in 1958. 

2 Includes 203,766 persons in urban territory outside urban places. 

3 Includes 68,237 persons in urban territory outside urban places. 
* Revised since publication of 1950 reports. 



Table 2.-POPULATION IN GROUPS OF PLACES ACCORDING TO SIZE: I960 AND 1950 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1] 



Type of area and size of place 



1960 



Number of 
places 



Population 



Percent of 

total 
population 



Percent of 
total 



1950 



Number of 
places 



Population 



1'wt'iH of 

total 
population 



Percent of 
total 



The State 

URBAN 
Total -. . .' 

Within urbanized areas. ... ...... 

Central cities, total 

Cities of 1,000,000 or more 

Cities of 500,000 to 1,000.000 

Cities of 250,000 to 500,000 

Cities of 100,000 to 250,000 

Cities of 50,000 to 100,000. 

Cities under 50,000 

Urban fringes, total 

Places of 2,500 or more 

Places of 100,000 or more 

Places of 50,000 to 100,000 

Places of 25,000 to 50,000. 

Places of 10,000 to 25,000 

Places of 5,000 to 10,000 

Places of 2,500 to 5,000 

Places under 2,500 

Places of 2,000 to 2,500 

Places of 1,500 to 2,000 

Places of 1,000 to 1,500 

Places under 1,000 

Other urban territory 

Outside urbanized areas _ 

Places of 25,000 or more 

Places of 10,000 to 25,000 

Places of 5,000 to 10,000 

Places of 2,500 to 5,000 

RURAL 

Total 

Places of 1,000 to 2,500 

Places of 2,000 to 2,500. , 

Places of 1,500 to 2,000 

Places of 1,000 to 1,500..... 

Other rural territory 

URBANIZED AREAS 

Total.. 

Areas of 1 ,000,000 or more 

Areas of 500,000 to 1,000,000 

Areas of 250,000 to 500,000 

Areas of 100,000 to 250,000 

Areas under 100,000. 

1 There were 76 places of 2,500 or more. 

2 There were 83 places of 2,500 or more. 



C 1 ) 



2,382,594 



981,386 



462,429 
229,546 



229,546 

232,883 
29,117 



10,348 

14,927 

3,842 

6,264 

2,475 

1,544 

1,002 

1,243 

197,502 

518,957 
115,072 
122,410 
171,672 
109,803 



151,858 

49,614 

44,150 

58,094 

1 .249.350 



100.0 



2,117,027 



462,429 



100.0 



777,921 



19.4 
9.6 



9.6 



9.8 
1.2 



0.4 
0.6 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 

oil 

8.3 

21.fi 
4.8 
5.1 
7.2 
4.6 



47.1 
23.4 



23.4 



23.7 
3.0 



1.1 
1.5 
0.4 
0.6 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 
20.1 

52.9 
11.7 
12.5 
17.5 
11.2 



100.0 



244,736 
157,088 



157,088 

87,668 

19,431 



9,238 
10.103 



1,543 



60,604 

533,165 
94.956 
127,106 
171,918 



1^339,106 



6.4 
2.1 
1.9 
2.4 



10. a 

3.5 
3.2 
4.1 
89." 



128,874 

30,975 

54,263 

43,636 

1,210,232 



19.4 



244,756 



19.4 



100.0 



241,097 
3,659 



100.0 



36.7 



11.6 
7.4 



4.1 
0.9 



0.4 
0.5 
0.1 



4.4 

6.0 
8.1 



63.3 



6.S 
1.5 
2.6 
2.1 
57.1 



11.6 



11.4 
0.2 



100.0 



31.5 
20.2 



20.2 



11.3 
2.5 



1.2 
1.3 
0.2 

6*. 2 



8.6 

68.5 

12.2 
16.3 
22.1 
17.9 



100.0 



9.7 
2.3 
4.1 
3.3 
90.4 



100.0 



98.5 
1.5 



Number of Inhabitants 
Table 3.-POPULATION IN GROUPS OF PLACES ACCORDING TO SIZE: 1900 TO 1960 



42-7 





19 


60 


19 


50 












Subject and size of place 


Current 
urban 
definition 


Previous 
urban 
definition 


Current 
urban 
definition 


Previous 
urban 
definition 1 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


NUMBER OF PLACES 
Urban territory 


82 


69 


84 


62 


50 


40 


32 


25 


20 


Places of 2,500 or more 


76 


69 


83 


62 


50 


40 


32 


25 


20 


Places of 1,000,000 or more 




















Places of 500,000 to 1,000,000 _ 





. 




... 


... 


.. * 


... 


"** 


... 


Places of 250,000 to 500,000. 









.* . 


... 


* 


"** 






Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


* " * 


. * 


... 


. 


... 


... 


... 


... 





Places of 50,000 to 100,000 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Places of 25,000 to 50,000 . 


3 


4 


j_ 


2 


2 


2 


^ 


1 




Places of 10,000 to 25,000 


9 


12 


7 


7 


6 


5 


4 


2 


3 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


27 


26 


27 


22 


14 


12 


8 


9 


4 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000. 


34 


24 


45 


28 


26 


19 


18 


12 


12 


Places under 2,500 


6 




1 














Rural territory 


226 


195 


213 


179 


198 


225 


227 


223 


180 


Places of 1 000 to 2 500 


94. 


60 


81 


47 


53 


54 


50 


43 


25 


Places under 1,000 ..... 


132 


135 


132 


132 


145 


171 


177 


180 


155 


Cumulative summary: 
Places of 1,000,000 or more. 




















Places of 500,000 or more 


... 














... 







Places of 250,000 or more _. .. . 


" * * 


... 






* 








* 


Places of 100,000 or more . . 
















* 


. 


Places of 50,000 or more 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Places of 25,000 or more 


6 


7 


4 


5 


4 


4 


2 


2 


1 


Places of 10,000 or more __ 


15 


19 


11 


12 


10 


9 


6 


4 


4 


Places of 5 000 or more . 


42 


45 


38 


34 


24 


21 


14 


13 


8 


Places of 2 500 or more 


76 


69 


83 


62 


50 


40 


32 


25 


20 


POPULATION 
Urban territory _ 


981,386 


817,675 


777,921 


653,039 


466,111 


371,080 


293,987 


224,832 


171,256 


Places of 2,500 or more 


777,620 


817,675 


709,684 


653,039 


466,111 


371,080 


293,987 


224,832 


171,256 


Places of 1 000 000 or more 




















Places of 500,000 to 1,000,000 





















Places of 250,000 to 500,000 


















.. 


Places of 100 000 to 250,000 




















Places of 50,000 to 100,000 _ 


229, 546 


229,546 


215,249 


215,249 


133,671 


113,846 


67,957 


58,833 


55,807 


Places of 25,000 to 50 000 


115,072 


140,959 


36 795 


67,238 


66,983 


57,877 


37,524 


26,319 




Places of 10,000 to 25,000 


132,758 


185,246 


127,106 


129,469 


89,902 


63,279 


67,303 


33,258 


44,363 


Places of 5,000 to 10,000 


186,599 


179,535 


181,156 


147,037 


87,718 


73,855 


56,967 


60,737 


22,056 


Places of 2,500 to 5,000 


113,645 


82,389 


149,378 


94,046 


87,837 


62,223 


64,236 


45,685 


49,030 


Places under 2,500 


6,264 




1,543 














Other urban territory 


197, 502 




66 694 














Rural territory. . _ _ 


1,401,208 


1,299,352 


1,339,106 


1,463,988 


1,433,693 


1,367,685 


1,389,737 


1,290,568 


1,169,060 


Places of 1,000 to 2,500 . . 


151,858 


100,435 


128,874 


75,024 


83,013 


88,114 


84,504 


68,483 


38,355 


Places under 1,000. _ 


49,061 


50,304 


52,163 


52,163 


53,955 


62,129 


63,799 


60,877 


51,427 


Other rural territory ._. 


1,200,289 


1,148,613 


1,158,069 


1,336,801 


1,296,725 


1,217,442 


1,241,434 


1,161,208 


1,079,278 


Cumulative summary: 
Places of 1 000,000 or more . . 




















Places of 500,000 or more 












... 




... 


... 


Places of 250,000 or more 

















... 


... 


Places of 100 000 or more 












... 






... 


Places of 50,000 or more . . 


229,546 


229,546 


215,249 


215,249 


133,671 


113,846 


67,957 


58,633 


55,807 


Places of 25 000 or more 


344,618 


370,505 


252,044 


282,487 


200,654 


171,723 


105,481 


85,152 


55,807 


Places of 10 000 or more 


477 376 


555,751 


379,150 


411,956 


290,556 


235,002 


172,784 


118,410 


100,170 


Places of 5 000 or more 


663 975 


735, 286 


560,306 


558,993 


378,274 


308,857 


229,751 


179,147 


122,226 


Places of 2,500 or more 


777 620 


817 675 


709,684 


653,039 


466,111 


371,080 


293,987 


224,832 


171,256 


PERCENT OF TOTAL POPULATION 
Urban territory 


41.2 


34.3 


36.7 


30.8 


24.5 


21.3 


17.5 


14.8 


12,8 


Places of 2 500 or more 


32.6 


34.3 


33.5 


30.8 


24.5 


21.3 


17.5 


14.8 


12.8 


Places of 1,000,000 or more 




















Places of 500,000 to 1 000,000 




















Places of 250 000 to 500 000 




















Places of 100,000 to 250,000 


. . 


















Places of 50 000 to 100 000 


9 6 


9 6 


10.2 


10.2 


7.0 


6.5 


4.0 


3.9 


4.2 


Places of 25,000 to 50,000 .... 


4 8 


5 9 


1.7 


3.2 


3.5 


3.3 


2.2 


1.7 




Places of 10 000 to 25 000 


5.6 


7.8 


6.0 


6.1 


4.7 


3.6 


4.0 


2.2 


3.3 


Places of 5 000 to 10 000 


7.8 


7.5 


8.6 


6.9 


4.6 


4.2 


3.4 


4.0 


1.6 


Places of 2 500 to 5 000 


4 8 


3 5 


7.1 


4.4 


4.6 


3.6 


3.8 


3.0 


3.7 


Places under 2 500 


3 




1 














Other urban territory 


8 3 


* . . 


3.2 














Rural territory 


58.8 


54.5 


63.3 


69.2 


75.5 


78.7 


82.5 


85.2 


87.2 


Places of 1,000 to 2,500 


6.4 




6.1 


3.5 


4.4 


5.1 


5.0 


4.5 


2.9 


Places under 1 ,000 


2.1 




2.5 


2.5 


2.8 


3.6 


3.8 


4.0 


3.8 


Other rural territory . 


50.4 




54.7 


63.1 


68.3 


70.0 


73.7 


76.6 


80.5 


Cumulative summary; 
Places of 1 000 000 or more 




















Places of 500 000 or more 

















... 


. . . 


Places of 250 000 or more .. 





















Places of 100 000 or more 












. * * 


. 


. 


* . 


Places of 50 000 or more 


9.6 


9.6 


10.2 


10.2 


7.0 


6.5 


4.0 


3.9 


4.2 


Places of 25 000 or more 


14.5 


15 6 


11.9 


13.3 


10.6 


9.9 


6.3 


5.6 


4.2 


Places of 10,000 or more. . 


20.0 


23.3 


17.9 


19.5 


15.3 


13.5 


10.3 


7.8 


7.5 


Places of 5 000 or more - - 


27 9 


30 9 


26.5 


26.4 


19.9 


17.8 


13.6 


11.8 


9.1 


Places of 2 500 or more 


32 6 


34 3 


33.5 


30.8 


24.5 


21.3 


17.5 


14.8 


12.8 























1 Revised since publication of 1950 reports. 



42-8 



South Carolina 








Size of place and urban-rural 
classification 




500,000 or more 
250,000 to 500,000 
100,000 to 250,000 
50,000 to 100,000 
25,000 to 50,000 
20,000 to 25,000 
10,000 to 20,000 

5,000 to 10,000 
2,500 to 5,000 
2,000 to 2,500..,. 
1,500 to 2,000 
1,000 to 1,500 
500 to 1,000 
200 to 500 
Under 200.. 



In urbanized areas. 

500,000 or more 

250,000 to 500,000.. 
100,000 to 250,000. . 
50.000 to 100,000... 

25,000 to 50,000 

20,000 to 25,000 

10,000 to 20,000. 



All places 



229,546 

115,072 

47,784 

84,974 

186,599 

113,645 

52,089 

45,694 

59,096 

24,740 

20,389 

5,175 

264,927 



229,546 



10,348 



Incorporated 
places 



229,546 

115,072 

47,784 

84,974 

179,535 
82,389 
38,466 
29,730 
32,239 
24,740 
20,389 
5,175 

264,927 



229,546 
10,348 



Unincorporated 
places 



7,064 
31,256 
13,623 
15,964 
26,857 



Size of place and urban-rural 
classification 



In urbanized areas-Con. 

5,000 to 10,000 

2,500 to 5,000 

2,000 to 2,500 

1,500 to 2,000 : 

1,000 to 1,500 

500 to 1,000 

200 to 500 

Under 200 



Other urban territory-. 



25,000 to 50,000. 
20,000 to 25,000. 
10,000 to 20,000. 
5,000 to 10,000. . 
2,500105,000... 



Rural territory. 



2,000 to 2,500 

1,500 to 2,000 .- 

1,000 to 1,500 

500 to 1,000 

200 to 500 

Under 200 



ACCORDING TO SIZE: I960 

s= 

All places 



14,927 
3,842 
2,475 
1,544 
1,002 
729 
514 



518,957 



115,072 
47,784 
74,626 
171,672 
109,803 



200,919 



49,614 
44,150 
58,094 
24,011 
19,875 
5,175 



Incorporated 
places 



^urn- 



189 



14,927 
3,842 
2,475 
1,544 
1,002 
729 
514 



480,637 



115,072 
47,784 
74,626 

164,608 
78,547 



144,475 



35,991 
28,186 
31,237 
24,011 
19,875 
5,175 



Jnincorporated 
places 



Num- 



11 



37 



opulation 



38.320 



7,064 
31,256 



56,444 



13,623 
15,964 
26,857 



Tab lc 5.-POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE FROM EARLIEST CENSUS TO 1*0 

riuimiQ aim i-\ denotes decrease] 



. 1 

Incorporated place 
and census year 



AIKEN: 
1960 
1950 
1940 ... 
1930 
1920 
1910 
1900 


B^E3 


' T 

Increase over pre- 
ceding C6 nslia 




1 [I 
Increase over pre- 
1 ceding census 


1 

Incorporated place 
and census year 


GREENVILLE Con. 


"" 1 

Population 


Increase over pre- 
ceding census 


Incorporated place 
and census year 


Population 

" 

11,243 
7,083 
6,168 
6,033 
4,103. 
3,911 
3,414 
2,362 
1,817 

41,316 
19,770 
19,424 
14,383 
10,570 
9,654 
5,498 
3,018 
1,850 
1,432 
625 

65,925 
70,174 
71,275 
62,265 
67,957 


Number 

.I ' 

4,160 
915 
135 
1,930 
192 
497 
1,052 
545 

21,546 
346 
5,041 
3,813 
916 
4,156 
2,480 
1,168 
418 
807 

-4,249 

-1,101 
9,010 
-5,692 
9,124 
3,026 
852 
4,971 
1,028 
8,434 
-2,463 
13,724 
-1,02 
5,509 
6 
5,887 
2,46 

10,51 
24,51 
10,81 
14,05 
11,20 
5,211 


ercent 




Number 

" 

5,755 
5,317 
738 
1,246 
1,992 
1,720 
1,030 

2,209 
6,459 
1,280 
3,806 
3,911 
2,410 
1,252 
1,481 

2,312 
487 
809 
1,762 
298 
830 
2,306 
1,231 

6,257 
445 
477 
503 
-951 
1,39 
1,24 
33 
477 
360 
9 

8,027 
23,427 
5,58 
6,027 


'ercent 

37.5 
53.0 
7.9 
15.5 
32.9 
39.6 
31.1 

9.8 
40.2 
8.7 
34.7 
55,4 
51.9 
36.9 
77.4 

28.5 
6.4 
11.9 
34.8 
6.3 
21.1 
141.4 
307.8 

104.2 
8.0 
9.4 
11.0 
-17.2 
33.6 
42.9 
13.2 
22.9 
20.9 
5.7 

13.8 
67.4 
19.1 
26.1 


_ ^ ^ 

23,127 
15,741 
11,860 
8,607 
6,160 
2,757 
1,518 
1,305 

16,644 
13,806 
13,020 
11,020 
8,703 
6,614 
4,824 
1,326 
745 
700 

10,348 
3,659 
2,629 

2,003 
1,742 
1,136 

13,852 
15,322 
10,521 
8,776 
7,290 
5,906 
4,455 
2,964 
2,140 
246 
997 

29,404 
24,502 
15,009 
11,322 
8,809 
7,216 
5,485 
2,744 
809 


Number 
_J^_L 

7,386 
3,881 
3,253 

2,447 
3,403 
1,239 
213 

2,338 
786 
2,000 
2,317 
2,089 
1,790 
3,498 
581 
45 

6,689 

1,030 
626 
261 
606 

-1,470 
4,801 
1,745 
1,486 
1,384 
1,451 
1,491 
824 
1,894 
-751 

4,902 
9,493 
3,687 
2,513 
1,593 
1,731 
2,741 
1,935 


r ercent 

46.9 
32,7 
37.8 
39.7 
123.4 
81.6 
16.3 

20.6 
6.0 
18.1 
26.6 
31,6 
37.1 
263.8 
78.0 
6.4 

182.8 
39.2 

31.3 
15,0 
53.3 

-9.6 
45,6 
19.9 
20.4 
23.4 
32.6 
50.3 
38.5 
769.9 
-75.3 

20.0 
63.2 
32.6 
2S.5 
22.1 
31.6 
99.9 
239.2 


58.7 
14.8 
2.2 
47.0 
4.9 
14,6 
44.5 
30.0 

109.0 
1.8 
35.0 
36.1 
9.5 
75.6 
82.2 
63.1 
29.2 
129.1 

-6.1 
-1.5 
14.5 
-8.4 
15.5 
5.4 
1.6 
9.9 
2.1 
20.8 
-5.7 
46.9 
-3.4 
22.2 
0.3 
31.3 
15.1 

12.1 
39.3 
21.0 
37.5 
42.6 
24.7 


COLUMBLA--COQ. 

1900 
1890 
1880 
1870 
1860 
1850 
1840 
1830 

FLORENCE: 
1960 


21,108 
15,353 
10,036 
9,298 
8,052 
6,060 
4,340 
3,310 

24,722 
22,513 
16,054 
14,774 
10,968 
7,057 
4,647 
3,395 
1,914 

10,435 
8,123 
7,636 
6,827 
5,065 
4,767 
3,937 
1,631 
400 

12,261 
6,004 
5,559 
5,082 
4,579 
5,530 
. 4,138 
2,895 
2,557 
2,080 
1,720 
1,628 

66,188 
58,161 
34,734 
29,154 


1910 
1900 
1890 
1880 
1870 
1860. 
1850 

GREENWOOD: 


1880 


ANEERSQN: 
1960... 
1950 
1940 




1950 ,. 




1940 
1930 
1920 
1910 


1930 , 
1920 
1910 * 
1900 , 


1920 
1910 ..... 
1900... 


1900 
1890 
1880 

'GAFFNEY: 
1960 
1950 
1940 


1890 
1880 
1870 

NORTH AUGUSTA: 
1960 
1950 
1940 




1870 
1860 

CHARLESTON: 

T QAfi 


1920 
1910 
1900 
1890 
1880 


1920 


1950 
1940 
1930 


ORANOEBURG: 
1960 


1910 
1900 
1890 
1880 
1870 


58,833 
55,807 
54,955 
49,984 
48,956 
40,52 
42,98 
29,261 
30,289 
24,780 
24,711 
18,824 


GEORGETOWN: 
1960 
1950 
1940 


1950 
1940 
1930 
1920 
1910 
1900 


1850 
1840 
1830.. 
1820 
1810 
1800 


1930 
1920 
1910 
1900 
1390 
1880 


1890 
1880 
1870 
1860 

RflPJf HTT T 


1790... 

COLOMBIA.: 


16,35 
97,43 


1870 
1860 
1850 

GREENVILLE: 
1960 
1950 
1940 
1930 


1960 
1950 
1940 


1920 


1950. 
1940 
1930 
1920 
1910 


86,914 
62,39 
51, 581 
37,524 
26,31 


1910 
1900 , 
1890 
1880 



Number of Inhabitants 



42-9 



Table 5.-POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE FROM EARLIEST CENSUS TO 1960-Con. 

[Minus sign (-) denotes decrease] 



Incorporated place 
and census year 


Population 


Increase over pre- 
ceding census 


Incorporated place 
and census year 


Population 


Increase over pre- 
ceding census 


Incorporated place 
and census year 


Population 


Increase over pre- 
ceding census 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


SPARTANBURG: 


44,352 
36,795 
32,249 
28,723 
22,638 
17,517 
11,395 
5,544 
3,253 
1,080 
1,216 
1,176 


7,557 
4,546 
3,526 
6,085 
5,121 
6,122 
5,851 
2,291 
2,173 
-136 
40 


20.5 
14.1 
12.3 
26.9 
29.2 
53.7 
105.5 
70.4 
201.2 
-11.2 
3.4 


STMTER: 
I960 


23,062 
20,185 
15,874 
11,780 
9,508 
8,109 
5,673 
3,865 
2,011 
1,807 
1,119 
1,356 


2,877 
4,311 
4,094 
2,272 
1,399 
2,436 
1,808 
1,854 
204 
688 
-237 


14.3 
27.2 
34.8 
23.9 
17.3 
42.9 
46.8 
92.2 

n.3 

61.5 
-17.5 


UNION: 
I960 


10,191 
9,730 
8,478 
7,419 
6,141 
5,623 
5,400 
1,609 
1,267 


461 
1,252 
1,059 
1,278 
518 
223 
3,791 
342 


4.7 
14.8 
14.3 
20.8 
9.2 
4.1 
235.6 
27.0 


1950 


1950 . 


1950. , 


1940.... 


1940 


1940 




1930 


1930 


1920 


1920 . . 


1920 




1910 


1910 


1900 


1900 


1900 


1890 


1890 


1890 , 


1880 


1880 . .. 


1880 .... 


1870 


1870 






I860 


1850 


1850... . 







Table 6,- AREA AND POPULATION OF COUNTIES, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 AND 1950 

[Minus sign (-) denotes decrease. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 1 



County 


Map 
refer- 
ence 




1960 population 


1950 population 


Percent increase, 
1950 to 1960 


Land 


Total 


Urban 


Rural 


Total 


Urban 


Rural 


Total 


Urban 


Rural 


in 
square 
miles, 
1960 


Number 


Per 
square 
mile 


Total 


Per- 
cent 
of 
total 
popu- 
lation 


Urban- 
ized 
areas 


Other 
urban 
terri- 
tory 


Total 


Places 
of 
1,000 
to 
2,500 


Other 
rural 
terri- 
tory 






30,272 


2,382,594 


78.7 


981,386 


41.2 


462,429 


518,957 


1,401,208 


151,858 


1,249,350 


2,117,027 




1,339,106 




26 r 2 


4.6 




D-3 
E-5 
G-6 
B-3 
F-7 

G-6 

H-8 
P-9 
E-8 
H-9 

A-5 
Br6 
B-9 
E-9 
0-7 

C-10 

c-n 

F-8 
D-5 
C-7 

D-10 
F-ll 
A-4 
C-4 
H-6 

C-12 
H-7 
C-8 
B-8 
B-4 

. D-9 
D-6 
D-4 
C-ll 
B-10 

C-5 
B-2 
E-7 
A-3 
D-7 

D-5 
A-5 
D-8 
B-6 
E-10 
A-7 


507 
1,097 
418 
775 
395 

553 
588 
1,100 
377 
945 

394 
585 
793 
598 

1,048 

545 
407 
569 
481 
699 

805 
813 
789 
447 
562 

1,152 
662 
786 
504 
701 

409 
708 
370 
480 
482 

636 
670 
1,105 
501 
748 

442 
830 
665 
515 
931 
685 


21,417 
a, 038 
11,362 
98,478 
16,274 

17,659 
44,187 
38,196 
12,256 
216,382 

35,205 
30,888 
33,717 
29,490 
27,816 

52,928 
30,584 
24,383 
15,735 
20,713 

84,438 
34,798 
209,776 
.44,346 
17,425 

68,247 
12,237 
33,585 
39,352 
' 47,609 

21,832 
. 60,726 
8,629 
32,014 
.28,529 

29,416 
40,204 
68,559 
46,030 
200,102 

14,554 
156,830 
74,941 
30,015 
40,932 
78,760 


42.2 
73.9 
27.2 
127.1 
41.2 

31.9 
75.1 
34.7 
32.5 
229.0 

89.4 
52.8 
42.5 
49.3 
26.5 

1 97.1 
75.1 
42.9 
32.7 
29.6 

104.9 
42.8 
265.9 
99.2 

31.0 

59.2 

18.5 
42.7 
78.1 
67.9 

53.4 
85.8 
23.3 
66.7 
59.2 

46.3 
60.0 
62.0 
91.9 
267.5 

32.9 
189.0 
112.7 
58.3 
44.0 
115.0 


7,983 
29,653 

3,114 
53,574 
6,302 

7,290 
6,298 

6,111 

159,118 

15, 214 
9,936 
5,171 
3,917 
5,417 

13,102 
6,173 
3,633 
2,876 
3,479 

30,781 
15,201 
133,638 
21,835 

16,397 

6,842 
14,254 
17,535 

3,586 
27,187 

13,403 
6,963 

10,871 
8,658 
13,852 
10,940 
138,931 

289 
56,666 
30,126 
10,191 
3,902 
40,977 


37.3 
36.6 
27.4 
54.4 
38.7 

41.3 
14.3 
16.0 

73!5 

43.2 
32.2 
15.3 
13.3 
19.5 

24.8 

20.2 
14.9 
18.3 
16.8 

36.5 
43.7 
63.7 
49.2 

24.0 

26!4 
36.2 

36.8 

16.4 
44.8 

4JU9 
24.4 

37.0 
21.5 
20.2 
23.8 
69.4 

2.0 
36.1 
40.2 
34.0 
9.5 
52.0 


12,828 

6,111 
154,002 

126,887 

23,670 

138,931 
... 


7,983 
16,825 
3,114 
53,574 
6,302 

7,290 
6,298 

5,116 

15,214 
9,936 
5,171 
3,917 
5,417 

13,102 
6,173 
3,633 
2,876 
3,479 

30,781 
15,201 
6,751 
21,835 

16,397 

6,842 
14,254 
17,535 

3,586 
3,517 

13,403 
6,963 

10,871 
8,658 
13,852 
10,940 

289 
56,666 
30,126 
10,191 
3,902 
40,977 


13,434 
51,385 
8,248 
44,904 
9,972 

10,369 
37,889 
32,085 
12,256 
57,264 

19,991 
20,952 
28,546 
25,573 
22,399 

39,826 
24,411 
20,750 
12,859 
17,234 

53,657 
19,597 
76,138 
22,511 
17,425 

51,850 
12,237 
26,743 
25,098 
30,074 

18,246 
33,539 
8,629 
18,611 
a, 566 

18,545 
31,546 
54,707 
35,090 

a, 171 

14,265 
100,164 

44, as 

19,824 
37,030 
37,783 


1,166 
13,740 
1,785 
6,006 

1,901 

3,492 
2,433 

3,ea' 

2,174 
2,624 
3,552 

1,504 

7,820 
1,901 
3,541 
2,119 
2,411 

4,379 

10,079 
1,435 
5,841 

1,702 
1,192 
553 
3,196 
4,757 

2,746 
1,998 

4,526 

3,707 
5,601 
5,258 

2,089 
24,655 

4,638 
-1,656 


12,268 
37,645 
6,463 
38,898 
9,972 

8,468 
37,889 
28,593 
9,823 
53,583 

17,a? 
18,328 
24,994 
24,069 
22,399 

32,006 
22,510 
17,209 
10,740 
14,823 

49,278 
19,597 
66,059 
21,076 
11,584 

50,148 
11,045 
26,190 
21,902 
25,317 

18,246 
30,793 
6,631 
18,611 
17,040 

18,545 
27,839 
49,106 
29,832 
61,171 

12,176 
75,509 
44,815 
15,186 
37,030 
36,127 


22,456 
53,137 
11,773 
90,664 
17,533 

17,266 
26,993 
30,251 
1A,753 
164,856 

34,992 
32,597 
36,236 
32,215 
28,242 

50,016 
30,930 
22,601 
16,591 
21,780 

79,710 
31,762 
168,152 
41,628 
18,027 

59,820 
10,995 
32,287 
37,071 
46,974 

23,173 
44,279 
9,577 
33,110 
31,766 

31,771 
39,050 
68,726 
40,058 
142,565 

15,924 
150,349 
57,634 
31,334 
43,807 
71,596 


5,424 
17,800 

40,521 
5,768 

5,081 

120,289 

12,412 
10,426 
4,836 
2,775 
4,616 

12,277 
5,171 
3,312 
2,518 
6,203 

27,625 
13,733 
100,699 
20,550 

9,418 

6,986 
11,472 
15,826 

3,076 
13,063 

11,750 
7,828 

10,552 
6,753 
15,322 
6,316 
no, 688 

226 
52,039 
26,013 
9,730 
3,664 
35,163 


17,032 
35,337 
11,773 
50,143 
11,765 

17,266 
21,912 
30,251 
14,753 
44,567 

22,580 
22,171 
31,400 
29,440 
23,626 

37,739 
25,759 
19,289 
14,073 
15,577 

52,085 
18,029 
67,453 
a, 078 
18,027 

50,402 
10,995 
25,301 
25,599 
31,148 

20,097 

31, ae 

?,577 
a,360 
23,938 

21, a9 
32,297 
53,404 
33,742 
31,877 

15,698 
98,310 
31, 621 
a, 604 
40,143 
36,433 


-4.6 
52.5 

-3.5 
8.6 
-7.2 

2.3 

63.7 
26.3 

-16.9 
31.3 

0.6 
-5.2 
-7.0 
-8.5 
-1.5 

5.8 
-1.1 
7.9 
-5.2 
-4.9 

5.9 
9.6 
24.8 
6.5 
-3.3 

14.1 
11.3 
4.0 
6.2 
1.4 

-5.8 
37.1 
-9.9 
-3.3 

-10.2 

-7.4 
3.0 
-0.2 
14.9 
40.4 

-8.6 
4.3 
30.0 
-4.2 
-6.6 
10.0 


47.2 
66.6 

32! 2 
9.3 

24^6 

323 

22.6 
-4.7 
6.9 
41.2 
17.4 

6.7 
19.4 
9.7 
14.2 
-43.9 

11.4 
10.7 
32.7 
6.3 

74.1 

-2.i 
24.3 
10.8 

16.6 
108.1 

u!i 

-11.1 

3.0 
28.2 
-9.6 
73.2 
25.5 

27.9 
8.9 
15.8 
4.7 
6.5 
16.5 


-a.i 

45.4 
-29.9 
-10.4 
-15.2 

-39.9 
72.9 
6.1 
-16.9 
28.5 

-11.5 
-5.5 

-9.1 
-13.1 
-5.2 

5.5 
-5.2 
7.6 
-8.6 

10.6 

3.0 
8.7 
12.9 
6.8 
-3.3 

2.9 

11.3 
5.7 
-2.0 
-3.4 

-9.2 
7.4 
-9.9 
-12.9 
-9.9 

-12.6 
-2.3 
2.4 
4.0 
91.9 

-9.1 
1.9 
41.7 
-8.2 
-7.8 
3.7 




Aalendale............. 








Beaufort 1 


Berkeley 






Cherokee 


Chester . 




Clarendon . . . . . * 


Colleton 




Dillon 




Edgef ield. . . . ........ 


Fairfleld 














Jasper 1 








Lee 


Lexington 2 , 


MeCormiek. 


Marion 


Marlboro 


Nevterry 2 




Orangfttmrg , , .,..,...,. 


Pickens . 


Richland 


Saluda 






Union . . . , . 


villlamHTTurg:. . ........ 


York... 



1 Part of Beaufort County annexed to Jasper County. Barxwell Island, Beaufort County, ceded to Chatham County, Ga., "by Federal action in 1958. 

2 Part of Lexington County annexed to Netfberry County. 



42-10 



South Carolina 
Table 7.-POPULATION OF COUNTIES, BY CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: I960 

[" U" denotes an unincorporated place. Total population of a place located in 2 or more census county divisions appears in table 8] 



County and census county 


Copulation 


County and census county 
division 


Population 


County and census county 
division 


Population 


division 


Population 


ABBEVILLE COUNTY 

Abbeville div 

Abbeville city > 


21,417 

9,357 
5,436 


BARNWELL COUNTY 5 
Barnwell div 


17,659 

6,962 
4,568 


CHESTERFIELD COUNTY 


33,717 

5,171 
5,171 


EDGEFIELD COUNTY 
Edgef ield town 


15,735^ 

2,876 
2,876 


Antreville-Lowndesville div.. . 

Calhoun Falls div 

CaUioun Falls town 


2,467 
274 
3,638 
2,525 


Hilda town 
Blackville div 
Blackville town 5 
KLine-Snelling div 


259 
3,753 
1,901 
1,992, 
213 


Chesterfield town 


2,771 
2,943 
3,207 
1,532 
3,276 


Edgef ield South div 
Johnston div 

Meriwether div 


1,672 
1,676 
5,252 
2,119 
1,196 


Donalds div 
Donalds town 


416 


Snelliag town 


100 


Jefferson div 


3,029 
493 


Pleasant Lane div 


1,330 
1,733 


Honea Path town (pt.) .... 


22 


Williston div 




McBee div . . 


2,044 




314 


Due West div 


3,229 
1 166 


Elko town 

Williston town > 


2,722 


McBee town 


512 
















2,445 


FAIRFIELD COUNTY. f 


20.713 


AIKEN COUNTY 1 


81,038 


BEAUFORT COUNTY 6 


44,187 




145 
284 


Monticello-Salem div 


2,730 


Aiken div 
Aiken. city 1 
Alton North div 
Aiken West (U) 
Graniteville (U) 
Madison (U) 
Aiken South div 
Aiken South (U) 
Beech Island div 
Edisto-Shaws div 

Bath (U) 

Gloverville (U) 

Langiey (u).... 


11,243 
11,243 
9,935 
2,602 
1,017 
1,904 
8,316 
2,980 
3,095 
2,287 

3,248 
1,746 
9,846 
1,419 
510 
1,551 
1,216 


Beaufort div 
Beaufort city 
Bluff ton div 
Bluff ton town 
Port Royal div 

BERKELEY COUNTY 

Jamestown town 7 
Huger-Wando div 


16,686 
6,298 
3,135 
356 
15,025 
686 
6,048 
3,293 
18 

38,196 

4,308 
402 
3,083 
184 
3,902 
1,881 
6,688 


Fageland div 
Pageland town 
Patrick div 

CLARENDON COUNTY 

Manning West div 
Paxville div 
Faacville town 


5,380 
2,020 
3,451 
393 

29,490 

3,032 
3,917 
3,917 
2,188 
4,636 
2,214 
216 
2,602 
3,963 
1,504 

4 151 


Ridgeway town 

Winnsboro North div 

Winnsboro Mills (U) 

FLORENCE COUNTY.. 

Cowards div , . 
Ef f ingham div 

Windy Hill (U) 
Lake City div 


3,371 
417 
3,268 
11,344 
3,479 
2,411 

84,43j[ 

2,785 
4,513 
24,722 
24,722 
6,375 
2,201 
8,154 
4,970 
882 
7,938 


Warrenvine (U) 
Monetta div 

New Ellenton div 
North Augusta div 

Salley div.... 

Wagener town 
Windsor div 

AIIENDALE COUNTY 
Allendale div 


1,128 
2,770 

4,513 
2,309 
18,452 
1,450 
10,348 
2,408 
196 
403 
3,194 
614 
1,731 

11,362 

5,013 
3,114 


Mount Holly div 

CALHOUN COUNTY 
Cameron div 

Fort Motte-Lone Star div....... 
St. Matthews div 
St. Matthews town 
Sandy Run-Center Hill div 

CHARLESTON COUNTY 


2,030 
11,573 
6,761 
1,462 

12,256 

3,221 
607 
1,711 
5,155 
2,433 
2,169 

216,382 

65,925 
65,925 
11,735 

1COQ 


Turbeville div 

COLLETON COUNTY 

Walterboro div...,, 

Walterboro North div 

Walterboro South div 


2,787 
355 

27,816 

2,145 
181 
3,027 
520 
2,042 
4,022 
2,015 
145 
194 

5,417 
5,417 
5,017 

4 131 


Lake City town 

Olanta div 
Olanta town 

Pantplico Northwest div 
Sardis div 
Timmonsville div 

Andrews div 

Georgetown city 


6,059 
4,349 
568 
2,042 
3,912 
4,203 
988 
3,009 
3,778 
613 
3,688 
2,178 

34,798 

5,482 
2,940 
12,261 
12,261 


Fairfax div 

Fairfax town (pt.) 2 
Martin-Millett div 


3,369 
1,785 
791 
2,189 
401 


Folly Beach town 8 


12,515 
420 
13,872 
1,137 
6 252 


DARLINGTON COUNTY 

Darlington div. 

Darlington town 


52,928 

6,710 
6 710 


Pleasant Hill-Folly Grove div, . 
Sampit-Santee div f 

Waccmimw div 


4,424 
3,102 
3,339 
3,576 
2,614 




168 


MeClellanville div 

McClellanville town 


4,478 
354 


Darlington North div 
Doneraile (U) 


3,949 
1,043 


GREENVILLE COUNTY 


209,776 


ANDERSON COUNTY 

Belton div 
Belton town 3 

Belton West div 
Piedmont (U) (pt.) 


98,478 

41,316 
41,316 
4,001 
4,002 
5,144 
5,106 
991 
3,446 
4,978 
891 


Isle of Palms city 8 

Sullivans Island town 8 
Noisette Creek div 

St. Pauls div ,. 


13,838 
1,186 
5,116 
1,358 
9,876 
22,339 
9,323 
25,887 

8,960 
334 
188 
527 


Hartsville div , 
Hartsville town 13 
Hartsville North div 
North Hartsville (U) 

College Heights (U) 
Hartsville Southwest div 
West Hartsville (U) 

Lamar city 13 

Society Hill div 


6,229 
6,392 
6,392 
6,683 
1,899 

3,863 
1,330 
7,673 
2,427 
3,554 
3,945 
1,121 
3,930 


Mauldln town" 

Fountain Inn town (pt.) .... 

Groar town (pt.) 18 
Highland div 


3,483 
1,462 
3,676 
2,074 
66,188 
66,188 
10,549 
18,414 
36,018 
10,590 
6,751 

4,889 


Honea Path div 
Honea Path town (pt. )....... 
Iva div 
Iva town 3 
Pelzer div 
Pelzer town 3 . 
Pelzer North (U) 

Sandy Springs town 3 .... 
Pendleton West div 


1,648 
6,609 
3,431 
4,449 
1,357 
4,245 
106 
1,400 
687 

4,327 
174 
3,584 


Wadmalaw Island div... 
Waylyn div 

CHEROKEE COUNTY 

Gaffney city 9 
Gaf f ney North div 
East Gaffney (U) 
Gaffney South div 

Southside div 


2,326 
7,467 

35,205 

6,373 
2,174 
10,435 
10,435 
8,365 
4,779 
4,540 
3,344 
2,148 


Society Hill town 

DILLON COUNTY 
Dillon div 

Dillon East div 
Dillon West div 
Lakeview div. 

Latta town 1 * 


677 

30,584 

6,173 
6,173 
4,569 
3,327 
5,807 
865 
4,586 
1,901 


Piedmont div 

Piedmont (U) (pt.)... 

City View town 1 " , 

Simpaonvillc town 
Slater Uiv , 

Taylor (U) 

Tigervllle div 

Travelerc Rein div............. 
Travelers Re-tit city ........ 


7,310 
6,360 
1,217 
a 14, 394 
2,475 
5,701 
2,282 
3,119 
5,148 
1,071 

3,086 
6,840 
1,973 




3,277 

243 




30,888 


Latta West div 


3,017 
95 
94 


Woodvillo aiv 


4,011 

LL r >iL(\ 


Williamston div 
Williamston town. . . .' 
Williamston Rural div 


3,721 
3,721 
2,740 


Chester div 
Chester city 

Chester East div . 


6,906 
6,906 
2 793 


Little Rock div 


3,105 


Greenwood Uiv. 

Greenwood city 


16,644 
16,644 






Eureka (U) 


1,423 


DORCHESTER COUNTY 


24,383 




5,643 


RAKBERG COUNTY 


16 274 


Chester North div . 


2,800 


Harleyville div 


4,297 




2,520 

3f,"\L 




6,a9 

3,081 
5,816 
3,221 
1,981 


Chester West div 

Baldwln-Aragon Mills (u) 

Great Falls div 

Great Falls (u) 


3,432 
4,693 
1,201 

5,864 
3 030 


Harleyville town 
Reevesville div 
Reevesville town 
Ridgeville div 
Ridgeville town 


561 
2,350 
268 
2,674 
611 
4 298 


Hodtfus div 

Ware Shoalu (U).. 

Kirk'"OY div 


4,026 
6,308 
209 
2,671 

1 777 


Olar div 


4S2 
2,258 
138 
467 


Richburg div 
Richburg town 


2,297 
192 
2,103 
235 


St. George town 15 
Summerville div 

Pinehurst-Sheppard Park (U) . 
Summerville town 


1,833 
10,764 
1,708 
3,633 


Ninety-Six div. 
Ninety-Six town 19 
Troy div , 


4,217 
1,435 
2,117 
260 



a Includes 
See other 



1(196) of Woodside town identified too late to be included in the detailed distributions 
at end of table, p. 12. 



Number of Inhabitants 



42-11 



Table 7.-POPULATION OF COUNTIES, BY CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 1960-Con. 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Total population of a place located in 2 or more census county divisions appears in table 8] 



County and census county 
division 


Population 


County and census county 
division 


Population 


County and census county 
division 


Copulation 


County and census county 
division 


'opulation 


HAMPTON COUNTY 


17, 425 


LEE COUNTY 


21,332 


OCONEE COUNTY 


40,204 


SALUDA COUNTY 


14,554 




1,233 




4,041 




1 444 




2,694 


Branson town 


603 


Bishopville div 


3,586 


Mou t in 1? -t di 


934 




289 


Fairfax town (pt.) 20 


29 


Bishopville town 


3,586 


Oakway div, .. 


3,758 




3,523 




4,819 


Bishopville North div.......... 


2,811 




1,842 




649 




1,865 


Bishopville South div 


3,531 


Salem town 30 * . 


206 


Wards town . **. ***. 


162 




102 


Lynchburg div. ................. 


3,064 




5 227 


River div . 


2,026 




2,390 


Lynchburg town. ... >...*. 


544 


Seneca town 30 ... 


5,227 


Saluda North div . . 


4,269 




244 




2,298 


Seneca North div ..... 


6,991 




2,089 




102 


Stokes Bridge-Cypress div...... 


2,501 


Seises Soutii div . . .**. 


4,238 


Saluda South dlv ,..,., , rm 


2,042 




4 167 






Utica (U) 


1,294 






Varnville div 


2,486 
2,760 
1,461 
2,056 


LEXINGTON COUNTY 26 


60,726 

7,955 
3,517 


Walhalla div 

Walhalla town 30 
Walhalla North div 

Walhalla Souf 1 d^v . .. .. T 


3,431 
3,431 
3,433 
2,691 


SPARTANBIffiG COUNTY 
Arkwright (U) 


156,830 

6,875 
1,656 


HORRY COUNTY 
Aynor North div 


455 

68,247 
2,749 


Leesville town 
Cayce div 
Cayce city 26 

Pineridge town 26 ......-. 
South Gongaree town '*<* 


1,619 
17,570 
3,517 
329 
650 


Westminster town 30 


443 

6,215 
2,413 


Arcadia-Saxon div 
Arcadia (U) 


9,483 
2,458 
3,917 
5,047 
4,099 




3,688 




1,002 




68,559 




1,045 




635 
3,122 




1,696 
358 




3,960 




6,525 
1,249 




8,563 








1,106 




2,038 




8,563 


Gilbert div 


4,337 




2,280 


cwpe 






3,785 


Gilbert town. 


171 




1,182 




3,408 


Conway South div. ... .... 


4,701 


Summit town . ...* 


208 




2,177 




2,073 


Conway Vest div..,.,. ......... 


2,337 


Irno div. ... . ................ 


1,177 




227 




2,391 




4 324 




359 




4,289 




2,931 


oy .... 






7,884 


___ totm 


1,031 




7,415 


Little River div 


3,809 




1,127 




3,520 


T> - [im ^ Vi + fKjn 


1,714 


Cherry Grove Beach town 21 .... 
Crescent Beach town 2 ^........ 


208 
MO 


Pelion div 


2,268 




468 


Inman Mills (U) 


1,769 




313 
3,139 
3,752 
1 702 




233 

4,046 
776 


Holly Hill div 
Holly Hill town 31 


5,179 
1,235 
2,337 


Canrpobello town 


5,265 
420 
1,930 


Loris South div 

Myrtle Beach div..... 
Myrtle Beach town 21 


3,061 
3,598 
17,619 
7,834 

1 O 9*V7 


Vest Columbia div 
McCORMICK COUNTY 


13,793 
6,410 

8,629 
5,050 


North div 
North town 


208 
347 

3,561 
1,047 
172 
2,479 
525 


Mayo div 

Central Pacolet town 3 * 
Pacolet town 3 * 
Pacolet Mills town 3 * 
Pacolet Park town 3 * 

Peni'l'Trno <Hv 


2,270 
4,627 
333 
1,252 
1,476 
117 
3 816 


Hardeevllle div 

Hardeeville town 22 


3,903 
3,177 
700 
5,157 


Farksville div 


1,998 
1, 679 
109 
1,900 
164 




13,852 
13,852 

7,922 
1a/o 


Reidville div 
Reidville town 


2,410 
242 

7,968 

1/ 




1,192 




339 




4,287 
398 




,435 

44,352 
44,352 


KERSHAW COUNTY 


33,585 

2,320 
579 
6,144. 


MARION COUNTY 
Brittons Neck div 


32, 014 

1,813 
2,186 

7"\rjJ 


Springfield div 


4,275 
209 
2,515 
787 


Wellford div 
Vellford town 


9,455 
1,186 
1,261 
1,040 
6 128 


DeKalb div 


329 
2,227 
6,842 
6,842 
4,235 


Marion East div 
Marion West div 


7,174 
5,458 
2,411 
337 
6229 




4,078 
105 
85 


Whitney (U) 

Woodburn Hills div 
Woodruff rtiv .. . ........ 


1,128 
2,502 

3,941 
7,787 


Mount Pisgah div 

Kershaw town (pt.) 23 ., 
Mount Zion div 


3,040 
553 
5 959 


Mullins town 27 
Mullins North div 


6,229 
3,951 


PICKENS COUNTY 


46,030 
4,654 


Woodruff town 34 
Woods Chapel div 


3,679 
8,564 


Thorn Hill div 
LANCASTER COUNTY 


2,818 

39,352 

4,388 
832 

L 7ft7 


Nichols town 27 
Mullins South div 

MARLBORO COUNTY 

Bennettsville div... 

Bennettsville city 


617 
2,792 

28,529 

6,963 
6 963 


Norris town 32 


1,473 
594 
4,421 
1,587 
8,283 
8,283 
4,932 


Victor Mills (U) 
Mayesville div 


2,018 

74,941 

6,028 
2,214 


Spring Mills (U) 


1,014 
1,069 
7,999 
7,999 
7,435 

10,056 


Bennettsville North div 
Bennetteville South div 
Bennettsville Southwest (U). 
South Bennettsville (U) 
Blenheim div 


2,344 
3,274 
1,022 
1,025 
2,732 
185 


Easley West div 

Liberty div.......... 

Liberty town 32 
Pickens East div 


4,619 
1,275 

4,902 
2,657 
3,153 
5 474 


Mayesville town 
Pinewood div 

Renibert div 
Shiloh div 


750 
2,265 
570 
3,032 
2,683 
2,588 
23 062 


Irwin (U) 

Lancaster Mills (U) 


1,113 
3,274 
2,981 


Clio town 


847 
6,482 


Six Mile div 
Six Mile town 


2,198 
4,317 
218 




23,062 
3,994 




2,093 
2,594 




2,479 
132 








10,882 
12,281 








3,057 


HIGHLAND COUNTY 


200,102 




7,064 


LAUKENS COUNTY 
Clinton div 

Lydia Mills (U) 

Fountain Inn town (pt.) 25 ... 


47,609 

15,401 
7,937 
1,177 
2,774 
441 
148 
5,759 
311 


NEWBERRY COUNTY 29 

Newberry town 29 
Newberry North div 
Newberry South div 


29,416 

1,221 
128 
8,208 
8,208 
4,312 
2,886 
181 


Blythewood div 

Columbia North div 

Ardincaple town 33 
Bendale town 33 
Boyden Arbor town 33 


2,575 

2,013 
97,433 
97,433 
44,548 
316 
729 
1,544 
271 
3,842 


| Sumter West div 

UNION COUNTY., 
Carlisle div 

Jonesville div 
Lockhart div 


5,912 

30,015 

2,031 
390 
1,378 
3,152 
1,439 
3,469 


Joanna (U)... 

Laurens Rural div. . ......... 

Vatts Mills div 
Watts Mills (U) 


3,135 
1,831 
9,598 
9,598 
3,366 
3,888 
3,688 
1,438 


Peak town 

Prosperity town 29 
Whitmire div 
Whitmire town 29 


2,684 
230 

5,206 
238 
86 
757 
4,899 
2,663 


Forest Lake town 33 .. 

Dutch Fork div 
Eastover div 

Hopkins div 
Horrell Hill div 
Pontiae div 


243 

14,924 

6,940 
4,730 
713 
4,225 
2,183 
20,531 


Union city 36 

Union Northwest div 
Buffalo (U).. 

Monarch Mills (U) 
West Springs div 


128 
10,191 
10,191 

3,792 
1,209 
4,717 
1,990 
1,285 



See footnotes at end of table. P. 12. 



42-12 



South Carolina 

,-PO^ OP ooom. w ONSUS 

['IT denotes an unincorporated place. Total population of a place located m 2 



County and census county 
division 


Population 




40,932 




3,590 


Greeleyville div 


4,357 
504 


Hemingway div.... 
Hemingway town. 
Stuckey town 37 . 
Indian div....... 
Kingatree div.... 


5,548 
951 
199 
2,616 
3,847 
3,847 







County and census count 
division 



WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY-- 
Kingstree Northeast div 
Kings-tree Northwest div 
Kings-tree Southeast div 


y 



Con. 


Population 

.^_-_ ^ 

2,884 
3,751 
2,262 
3,375 
497 
1,852 
2,415 
1,914 
2,521 
55 


Lane town. 
Lane Vest div 
Nesnith div 
Turkey div 

Williamaburg div... 


:::': 







County and census county 
division 




i^ ^ 
Population 

- 

78,760 




4,001 




3,500 


Clover town 


3,500 
3,112 


Clover Vest div 
Fort Mill div...., 
Fort Mill town 38 
Hickory Grove div 
Hickory Grove town 


2,121 
8,080 
3,315 
3,170 
287 
280 




52 



County and census county 
division 



Population 



YORK COUNTYCon. 
MoConnells div 

McDonnells town 

Rock Hill div..... 

Rock Hill city 38 

Rock Hill North div 

Industrial-Aragon Mills (U) . 

Red River town 

Rock Hill South div 

Rook Hill West div 

York div...,. 

York town 38 



1,353 
266 

29,404 

29,404 

5,660 

1,656 

255 

6,437 

2,213 

9,709 

4,758 



ac C-tyon* in 1950. 

ANDSoN.-Pelzer and Sandy Springs towns incorporated since 1950. 
to BeltonTlva, and Pendleton towns and to Anderson city. 



Annexations 



2SSw-2SSS:SaKSW=!aK 

3d Isle of Palms city incorporated since 1950. 
AnnexaSo^T^Mo^rSLeas^ town. Sullivans Island town not returned separately in 

1950 

9 "CHEROKEE. -^Annexations to Gaffney city. 

10 CHESTERFIELD. Annexations to Cheraw town. 

11 CLARENDON. Annexation to Manning town. 

OOEIBV.r4nn.tUD.* ""g-J*^ n^me *. ln> *m ch^ed 

* TTTT.TJIN _ dmnaxKCLuiid to Lakeview and Latta towns. 

15 DORCHESTER. Annexation to St. George town. 

16 EDGEFIELD Annexation to Johnston town. 

ac 



__ nwnni _ Grove Beach and Crescent Beach towns incorporated since 1950. 

Annexations to Conway and Myrtle Beach towns. 



22 JASPER. Part of 
County since 1950. 

23 KEHSHAW. Detachment 



Beaufort County including Hardeeville town annexed to Jasper 
from Bethune town. Annexations to Camden city and Kershav 



^'LANCASTER. Annexations to Lancaster and Kershaw towns. 






to BemettsvilU city d MsColl town. Bermettsvllle town 
Counv anrt tD Mbnqr OauBtr. tovxatlcn. t, 






^tt^~&&^*?i^&? 

^ssfe-rsffst^T^ 1 ?^^^^^^ 

corporated since 1950. 

S S^^SSS^^dS^ and Union city. Lockhart town incorporated 
[.-Annexation to Kingstree town. Stuckey town incorporated since 

to Fort Mill and York towns 



ci-ty. 



Table 8.-POPULATION OF Att INCORPORATED PLACES AND OF UNINCORPORATED PLACES OF 1*00 OR MORE: 19 40 TO 1960 





L 


















Place 


County 


1960 


1950 


1940 


Place 


County 


1960 


1990 


1940 


Attoevill 
Aiken 


Abbeville 

Aiken 


5,436 
n,243 
2,980 


5,395 
7,083 


4,930 
6,168 


C entr el 

Central Pacolet 




8,517 
1,473 
333 
358 


3,294 

1,263 

327 


1,476 
1,496 

311 


Aiken Vest (U) 
Allendal 

Anderson 


Anderson 
ieorgetoun 


2,602 
3,114 

41,316 
2,995 


2,474 
19,770 
2,702 


2,217 

19,424 
2,008 


Chapln 
Charleston 


Chesterfield 
Horry 


128 

65,925 
5,171 
208 
1,045 


199 

70,174 
4,836 

1,051 


195 

71,275 
4,497 

827 


Arcadia (U) 
Aroadla Lakes... 
Ardineaple* 


Rlchland 


2,458 
316 
729 


2,554 


... 


Chesterfield 


Chester 

Greenville ......... 


6,906 

1,532 
2,475 


6,893 
1,530 


6,392 
1,263 


Arkvright (U) 
Aynor ........*....**** 
Baldwin-Aragon MiUs (U) 
Baniberg 


Horry 
Chester 
Bamberg 


1,656 
635 
1,201 
3,081 
4 568 


1,266 
551 
1,440 
2,954 
2 005 


537 

3,000 
1,922 


Clearvater (U) 
Cleroson 
Clifton (U) 


Aiken 
Fiotena 

Spartanburg 


1,450 
1,587 
1,249 

7,937 


1,204 
1,707 

7,168 


761 
5,704 


Barawell 


Lexington 


\ 3,806 


3,169 


2,933 


Clio 


Marlboro 
York 


847 
3,500 


837 
3,276 


821 
3,067 


Bath (U) 


\Saluda 
Aiken 


1,419 
6,298 
5,106 


5,081 
3,371 


3,185 
2,119 


College Heights (U) 
Columbia 


Darlington 


1,330 
97,433 
8,563 


1,381 
86,014 

6,073 


62,396 
5,066 
280 


Bendale^ 

Bennettsville 

Bennettsvine Southwest (U) . . . 

Blackvill 


Richland 

Marlboro ..*..* 
Marlboro 
Kershaw 

Lee 
Barnwell 


1,544 
6,963 

l ' 

95 
3,586 

2,174 
1,901 

-30Q 


5,L40 

639 
169 
3,076 

2,056 
1,294 
183 


4,895 

620 
101 
2,995 

1,917 
1,456 
1A6 


Cope 
Cordova - 
Cottageville 
Cowpens. 

Cross Hill 
Dillon 


Orangeburg 
Colleton 
Spartanburg 

Lawrens 

Bamberg 
Dillon 


227 
209 
520 
2,038 

440 
441 
6,710 
3,221 
6,173 


175 
553 
1879 

543 

6,619 
2,814 
5,171 


139 
544 
1,343 

52J 

6,236 
2,05 
3,86" 


Blaney 
Bluffton 

Boyden Artor* 
Branohville 


Beaufort 

Berkeley.... 
Orangeburg 
Riohland. 


185 
356 

402 
1,106 
271 
1,182 


153 
474 

408 
857 

1,353 

fLfff 


237 
459 

493 
799 

1,351 
542 


Doneraile (U) 
Drayton (U) 
Due West 

Easley 


Abbeville...., 
Darlington 
Spartanburg 
Abbeville 

Pickene 


416 
1,043 
1,128 
1,166 
1,186 

8,283 

/ rjrjQ 


332 
1,086 
1,228 
1,033 
599 

6,316 

4 289 


271 

59: 

63] 

5,18 


Buffalo (TT) 


Union 


1,209 
510 


1,580 
578 




East Gaffney (U) 
Eastover 
Edgef ield 


Richland 
Edgef ield 


713 
2,876 


564 

2,518 


47 

2,11 
40" 


Cameron 


Abbeville 
Calhovm . ....... 


2,525 
6,842 
607 


2,396 
6,986 
630 


1,832 
5,747 
624 

n jJQ 


Eifco 




482 

194 
1,031 


510 

142 
1,127 


20 

X 'S 


Carlisle 


Union,. . ...4. _. 


420 
390 


'405 


30 


Estill 




1,865 


1,659 


1,2* 



Number of Inhabitants 42-13 

Table 8.-POPULATION OF ALL INCORPORATED PLACES AND OF UNINCORPORATED PLACES OF 1,000 OR MORE: 1940 TO 1960-Con. 
["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Asterisk (*) denotes an incorporated place under 2,500 located in an urbanized area] 



Place 


County 


1960 


1950 


1940 


Place 


County 


1960 


1950 


1940 


.,_V_ /Tt\ 


Chester 


1,423 
468 

1,814 

24,722 

1,137 

3,842 
243 
192 
3,315 

2,385 

244 
10,435 
12,261 
171 
1,551 

138 
1,017 
473 
3,030 
504 

66,188 
16,644 

8,967 

2,486 

700 

561 
6,392 
832 
951 
287 

259 

209 
1,235 
334 

- 3,453 

1,656 
1,714 
1,769 
359 
1,113 

1,186 
1,357 
1,746 
184 
493 

1,831 
882 
2,119 
1,439 

|- 1,567 

3,847 
213 
6,059 
865 
1,121 

7,999 
3,274 
1,930 
497 
1,216 

1,901 
9,593 
1,619 
1,127 
2,657 

420 
238 
203 
128 
181 

1,435 
1,702 
274 
298 
102 

1,177 
1,261 
544 
512 
354 

2,479 
266 
1,998 
1,904 
3,917 

7,174 
1,462 
750 
183 


1,990 
478 

1,567 
22,513 

3,240 

216 
3,204 

1,325 

293 
8,123 
6,004 
172 

109 
3,362 
479 
3,533 
600 

58,161 
13,806 

5,050 
2,007 

483 
5,658 
694 
821 
275 

304 
275 
1,116 
246 

2,840 

1,868 
1,514 
1,776 

2a 

1,164 

556 

616 
1,426 
1,345 

1,376 

3,621 
230 
5,112 
653 
958 

7,159 

1,333 
580 

1,602 
8,653 
1,453 
1,081 
2,291 

278 
213 
210 

316 

1,614 
252 
368 
102 

1,212 

506 
420 
417 

2,688 
255 
1,744 

2,775 
6,834 

706 
224 


496 
1,379 
16,054 

323 

168 
2,919 

1,346 

380 
7,636 
5,559 
153 

113 
401 

633 

34,734 
13,020 

2,940 
997 

381 
5,399 
570 
536 
272 

246 
303 
1,062 

2,765 

1,115 
230 

1,285 

547 

464 

1,100 
1,132 

1,264 

3,182 
282 
2,522 
532 
921 

4,430 

1,289 
297 

1,334 
6,894 
1,217 
1,033 
2,240 

261 
251 
178 

242 

1,238 
201 
315 
162 

382 

587 
431 

2,391 
263 
1,456 

2,381 
5,746 


Monarch Mills (U) 




1,990 
2,030 
109 
145 
5,116 

6,229 
7,834 
347 

8,208 
2,309 

617 

1,435 
594 
1,047 
10,348, 

1,399 

525 
313 
568 
467 

13,852 
1,252 

1,476 
117 
2,020 

988 
164 
393 
216 
86 

233 
106 
1,400 
2,358 
196 

2,198 
' 2,108 

1,708 
329 
570 

139 
230 
686 
757 
527 

255 

268 
242 
235 

1,192 

649 
611 
417 
29,404 
398 

284 
1,833 
2,433 
1,462 
206 

403 
2,039 
174 
105 
3,917 

102 
613 

} 

5,227 
7,064 

280 
181 
2,282 
218 
145 

52 

100 
677 
1,025 
650 

2,520 
44,352 
2,981 
1,002 
787 

1,069 
243 
199 
1,353 
1,504 
3,633 
103 


2,158 
1,818 
84 

209 
1,857 

4,916 
3,345 
328 
7,546 

380 
1,556 
325 
954 
3,659 

1,743 
476 
255 
586 

414 

15,322 
455 

1,925 
728 
198 

310 
208 
134 

196 
2,692 

1,432 

133 

1,961 
2,673 
1,419 

578 

153 
251 
793 
699 
337 

346 
285 
236 
238 
1,078 

598 
507 
414 
24,502 
363 

315 
1,938 
2,351 
1,341 

407 
1,594 

167 

3,088 

226 

.602 

530 

3,649 
5,828 

365 
201 
1,529 
157 
130 

105 
34 
645 

3,712 
36,795 

782 

1,210 
282 

1,419 
3,312 
105 


1,165 
114 
209 
1,698 

4,392 

1,597 
364 
7,510 

292 

1,453 
177 
733 
2,629 

488 

515 
523 
10,521 
352 

989 

555 
168 
270 
194 
147 

212 

1,278 
141 

1,637 

456 

142 
263 
342 
719 

324 
217 
214 
183 
1,021 

661 
593 
408 
15,009 
402 

337 
1,908 

2,137 
1,185 

443 
1,516 

225 
438 

681 

2,15J 

38E 
146 
1,291 

is; 

165 

13: 

12 

68" 

32,245 

78< 

345 

951 
3,02: 
7: 


Eutavrville 

Va-f -rfov 


Jrangeburg 
Anendale 


Moncks Corner . . 










Florence 


Mount Croghan 




Folly Beach 


Charlestown 


Mullins 


Marion 




Richland . . 






Forest Laics* 


Richland 








Chester 






Fort Mill 


York 




Aifcen 




Greenville 


Nichols 


Marion 




Hainpton . 


Ninety-six 






Cherokee..... 


North 




Gilbert 


Jeorgetown 


North Augusta 

North Hartsville (TI) 

Mrvruw 


)arlington 




Mken 




Bainberg 






G^pnltevlllP (Tl) t 


Aiken. ............. 








Laurens 


Olar 


Bamberg 


Great Falls (U) 






Orangeburg 


Greenville .. . 




Pacolet 
Pacolet Mills 


Spartanburg 
Spartanburg . . . . . 
Spartanburg 


Hampton 


lainpton . .... ... 


Pageland 

Fanplico 
Parkeville 


Shesterfield ... 
i'lorence ............ 


Harleyville 




Patrick 
Paxville '... 


Jhesterfield 


Hartavine 


LwKsas ter ........... 


Pelion 


Tifixinsrton 


Hemingway 


Winiflmshirrg 


Pelzer 




Hilda 


Barnwell..... 


Pelzer North (U) 


Anderson 


Hodges 
Holly Hill . . . 






Pickens 


Hollywood 


/Abbeville 


Piedmont (U) 


preenville 




York 


Pinehurst-Sheppard Park (Uj... 
Pineridge 

Pinewood 


tiexington. .......... 
Sumtftr . . 


Inman Mills (U) 






McConnick 










Irwin (U) 

Isle of Palms 






Newberry 


Iva 


Aiken 




York. 




Berkeley 


Reevesvllle 


Dorchester .......... 




Chesterfield........ 


Reidville 










Chester 




Edgefield ... 


Hidge Spring 


Saluda 






TM rigfc-u-t 11 ft 


Dorchester . 






Ridgevay 


Fairfield 


TMnerp+TOB 


W1 113 *Tns1jurff 


Rock Hill 
Rowesville 


York 


Kline 


Barnwen 


Ruby 


Chesterfield 


Lake City 






Dorchester . .... 


1>V9Ylu . ... TT T 


Dillon 


St Matthews 


Calhoun . . 








Berkeley 








Oconee 


Lancaster Mills (U) 




Sall^y ....... 


Alton 






Saluda 


Saluda 


Lane 




Sandy Springs 


Anderson 




Dillon 






La"**ens .......... 




Scotia . . ...... 


Hampton 


Leesville 


Lexington . . ... 


Scran. ton ............... 








Sellers *-- *---- 


(Dillon 


Liberty 




Seneca 


Sinn ter 


Little Mountain 






York 


LoeWiart ......... t - 




Silverstreet 


Newberry. 


Lodffe . . 




PiwpsQnville . . . 




Lone Oak (U) 


Spartanburg 


Six Mile 




Lorls 

Lowndesvl lift 






York 




Chester..... 


flnelling . . * . . * 


Baruwell 


owrys.. .,..,.......* * 




Society Hill 


Darlington 


Lyman 


Spartanburg 
Lee 


South Bennetteville ( TJ) 
South Congaree 


Marlboro 
Lexington 


McBe 

McClellanville 

McColl 

McConnells.. 

McCornick 


Chesterfield 

Marlboro 
York. t ... 


Springdale (U) 

Sprfngf^XcU ., ,,. ....... ,..T 


TjticasteT . 
Lexington ... ...... 


Spring Mills (IT) ............. 




Madison (ll) . . . 


Aiken ....... * T 


Starr . 










Will 1 rniWhiFg 


Marion 




SuUivans Island 




Mauldin 
Mayesville 


Greenville.. 


Summerville 


Dorcnester 


Meggett 




. . . 


. 



42-14 South Carolina 

Table 8.-POPULATION OF ALL INCORPORATED PLACES AND OF UNINCORPORATED PLACES OF 1,000 OR MORE: 1940 TO 1960-Con. 
["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Asterisk (') denotes an incorporated place under 2,500 located in an urbanized area] 



Place 


County 


1960 


1960 


1940 


Place 


County 


1960 


1960 


1940 






23,062 


20,185 


15,874 


Waterloo 


Laurens 

T AHVIAVIQ 


148 

1 A^tf 


162 
i (j& 


150 


Tfl+llffl 


Allendale 

MfirThnrn 


776 
401 
132 


762 
383 

119 


950 
324 
181 


Vatts Mills (U) 
Vellford 


Spartanburg,,f..,M. 


1,040 
6,410 


L)Wy 
721 

1,543 


454 
1,744 


Taylor (U) 
Tisnonsrill 




1,071 

2,178 


1,518 
2,001 


* 

1,979 


West HartsviUe (U) 

Uflfl+Tfrlnfl'hA'P 




2,427 
2,413 


2,287 
2,219 


2 on 






1,973 






UO.P+ Polp^r 




687 


578 


ut 




Edgefield , 


314 


296 


408 


Tj-qi nHnn 




443 


429 


UA 






260 


242 


224 


UM+flrfttA 


Newberry 


2,663 


3,006 


3yj* 


Turteville 


Clarendon. , ,,,,,j.., 


355 


271 


234 


uM+nev (ri\ 


Spartariburg t * , * 


2,502 


1.611 


)(t 




Allendale,. ,. 


168 


139 


169 










* i 




Union 


10*191 


9,730 


8,478 






194 


254 


as 


Utica (U) 


fieOHftP 


1 294 










3,721 


2,782 


2,509 


Vance 


QrfinwlwJfl 


85 


106 


125 


Villiston 




2,722 


896 


1,107 


Vamville 




1 461 


1 180 


917 






2,201 


1,710 
















Fairfield 


3,479 


3,267 


3,181 


Victor Mills (U) 


STMLrtsiibuw . . 


2,018 


2,654 














Vainer . ^ . . * . . 


Aikea 


614 


584 


588 


Winnaboro Mille (u) 


Fairfield 


2,411 


2,936 




VaJialla ... . 


QcQOee ( 


3,431 


3,104 


2,820 






172 


179 


211 


Valterboro 


Collftton 


5,417 


4,616 


3,373 




Spartanburg 


3,679 


3,831 


3,508 


Vards, 


Saluda 


162 


f,UXU 

122 


204 






\ 473 


712 


684 


Vare Shoals (U) 
Varrenville (II) 


Alton . 


2,671 
1,128 


3,032 
1,604 


< (i 


York 


York 


4,758 


4,181 


3,495 



Table 9.-1960 POPULATION OF AREAS ANNEXED BETWEEN 1950 AND I960 BY INCORPORATED PLACES 

HAVING 2,500 INHABITANTS OR MORE IN 1950 

[Minus sign (-) denotes decrease] 



Incorporated place 


1960 population 


1950 
popula- 
tion, 
total 


Increase, 
1950 to 
1960, in 
1950 area 


Incorporated place 


19(j() population 


1950 
popula- 
tion, 
total 


Increase, 
1950 to 
1960, in 
1950am 


Total 


In 1950 
area 


In 
annexed 
area 


Total 


In 1960 
area 


In 
annexed 
urea 


Ai&n 


11,243 
41,316 
3,081 
5,106 
6,963 

6,842 
8,517 
5,171 
97,433 
8,563 

6,710 
3,221 
3,315 
10,435 
12,261 

66,188 
16,644 
8,967 
6,392 
3,847 


8,603 
18,711 
3,018 
4,145 
5,396 

6,838 
3,924 
4,722 
83,249 
6,643 

6,537 
2,514 
3,152 
10,272 
5,105 

64,813 
14,112 
5,695 
6,210 
3,750 


2,640 
22,605 
63 
961 
1,567 

4 

4,593 
449 
14,184 
1,920 

173 
707 
163 
163 
7,156 

1,375 
2,532 
3,272 
182 
97 


7,083 
. 19,770 
2,954 
3,371 
5,140 

6,986 
3,294 
4,836 
86,914 
6,073 

6,619 
2,814 
3,204 
8,123 
6,004 

58,161 
13,806 
5,050 
5,658 
3,621 


1,520 
-1,059 
64 
774 
256 

-148 
630 
-114 
0,665 
570 

-82 
-300 
-52 
2,149 
-899 

6,652 
306 
645 
552 
129 


Lancaster * , , . , . 


7,999 
9,598 
2,479 
3,917 
6,229 

7,834 
8,208 
10,348 
13,852 
29,404 

5,227 
44,352 
23,062 
10,191 
3,431 

5,417 
2,663 

3,679 
4,758 


7,821 
9,422 
2,391 
3,219 
5,118 

7,640 
7,500 
4,7M 
13,339 
26,582 

4,330 
35,262 

22,770 

VIM 

3,244 

4,935 

2,0) 
2,774 
4,W? 


178 
176 
88 
(M 
1,111 

194 
708 
5,566 
%3 
2,M2 

877 
9,090 

m 

539 

1H7 

M 

m 

m 

171 


7,159 
8,658 
2,688 
2,775 
4,916 

3,345 
7,546 

3,639 
15,322 

,5Q3 

3,ft49 
3t),795 
20,185 
9,730 
3,104 

4,fcl6 
3,006 

3,831 
4,181 


662 
764 
-297 

444 
202 

4,295 

-46 
1,123 
-1,983 
2,080 

701 
-1,533 
2,585 
-78 
140 

339 
-476 
-1,057 
406 


Anderson 


Laurens ,. , .. , 




McColl 


Belton,..,, 


Manning , ,,, 


Bermettsville 


Mullins 




Nevlserry 


Conw&y 




Darlington 


Rock Hill 


Seneca,. .,,.. , ,. 




Fort Mill , 


Suartanburc.. . 




Sinter 




Union . . 


Greenville , 


Valhalla 


Walterboro 


Greenwood 




Whi trains 


Hartsville 


Woodruff 




York 



Number of Inhabitants 
Table 10.-POPULATION OF URBANIZED AREAS: I960 AND 1950 



42-15 



Area 


1960 


1950 


Area 


1960 


1950 


Area 


1960 


1950 


.AUGUSTA (GA.-S.C.) URBANIZED 
AREA 

That part of the area in 


12,828 


3,659 


COLUMBIA (S.C.) URBANIZED 
AREA 

The area 


162,601 


120,808 


GREENVILLE (S.C.) URBANIZED 
AREA 


126,887 


( 5 ) 


The area includes the following 






Columbia city . 

Outside central city . 


97,433 
65 168 


86,914 
33 894 


Greenville city 


66,188 
60 699 


... 


census county divisions and parts 
of census county divisions: 


12,828 


2 3,659 


The area includes the following 
census county divisions ffiry ^ "Darts 






The area includes the following 








12,828 
















North Augusta city 


10,348 


3,659 


Census county divisions. 


















Lexington County (pt.) 


23,670 


2 10,120 


GTe^tiviUL County (pt ) 


126 3 887 




CHARLESTON (S C ) URBANIZED 








12,905 




Greenville fliv 


66,188 




AREA 








8,517 


3 294 


GrsCTi'iHe city 


66,188 










Springdale town 


1,002 


'( 3 ) 


Greenville East div (pt ) 


2,737 






160,113 


120,289 


West Columbia div. (pt . ) 


10,765 




Greenville North div. (pt.) 


14,580 




Charleston city 


65,925 
QJ 1 rtrt 


70,174 


West Columbia city 


6,410 


1,543 


Greenville Southwest div. (pt.) 
Paris div. (pt.) 


28,808 
4,241 










Richland County (pt.) 
Columbia div 


138,931 
97,433 


*110,688 


Riverside div. (pt.) 
City View town 


10,333 
2,475 










Columbia city 


97,433 


86 914 














Columbia North div 


30,847 










Berkeley County (pt. ) 


6,111 




Ardincaple town 
Bendale town. ...... 


729 

1,544 


( 3 ) 
( 3 ) 








Mount Holly div. (pt.) 


6,111 
154,002 


2 120,289 


Boyden Arbor town 
Forest Acres town 


271 
3,842 


H 

3,240 
O\ 








Charleston div 
Charleston city 


65,925 
65,925 


70,i?4 


Columbia South div. (pt. ) 
Pontiac div (pt ) 


8,900 

T 7*51 


( ) 








Chic or & div, . . .>.. * . . . 


11,735 
1,680 


... 






'" 








James Island div. (pt.) 


6,565 
















Noisette Creek div 


9,876 
















North Charleston div. (pt.) 


22,280 
9,323 


... 














St. Andrews div. (pt.) 


19,921 
















Waylyn div. (pt . ) 


6,697 



































1 For the map and population of the entire Augusta (Ga.-5.C.) Urbanized Area, see the corresponding report for Georgia. 

2 County returned in 1950 by townships; data by census county divisions not available. 

3 Incorporated since 1950. 

4 County returned in 1950 by school districts; data by census county divisions not available. 

5 There was no urbanized area delineated for Greenville in the 1950 Census. 



Table 11.- POPULATION OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS: I960 AND 1950 

[Data relate to areas as denned for 1960. Minus sign (-) denotes decrease] 



Standard metropolitan statistical 
area, central city, and other 
component areas 


1960 


1950 


Increase 


Standard metropolitan statistical 
area, central city, and other 
component areas 


1960 


1950 


Increase 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


AUGUSTA, GA.-S.C. (PART) 
Total 


81,038 


53,137 


27,901 


52.5 


COLUMBIA, S.C. 
Total 


260,828 


186,844 


73,984 


39.6 


Aiken County, S.C 


81,038 
216,382 


53,137 
164,856 


27,901 
51,526 


52.5 
31.3 


Columbia city 


97,433 
163,395 

60,726 
200,102 

209,776 


86,914 
99,930 

44,279 
142,565 

168,152 


10,519 
63,465 

16,447 
57,537 

41^624 


12.1 
63.5 

37.1 
40.4 

2-4.8 


CHARLESTON, S.C. 
(Charleston County) 

Total 




Richland County , , 


GREENVILLE, S.C. 
(Greenville County) 

Total 




65,925 
150,457 


70,174 
94,682 


-4,249 
55,775 


-6.1 
58.9 






66,188 
143,588 


58,161 
109,991 


8,027 
33,597 


13.8 
30.5 





Table 12.-POPULATION OF THE STATE AND OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, BY TYPE OF RESIDENCE: 1960 









Urban 






Rural 




Metro politan-nonmetropolitan 
residence 


Total 


Total 


Central city 
or cities 


Other urban 
territory 


Total 


Places of 1,000 
to 2,500 


Other rural 
territory 


The State 


2,382,594 


981,386 


229,546 


751,840 


1,401,208 


151,858 


1,249,350 




768,024 


488,527 


229,546 


258,981 


279,497 


30,246 


249,251 




^OSS 


29,653 




29,653 


51,365 


13,740 


37,645 




216,382 


159,118 


65,925 


93,193 


57,264 


3,681 


53,583 


Columbia, S C . 


260,828 


166,118 


97,433 


68,685 


94,710 


2,746 


91,964 




209,776 


133,638 


66,188 


67,450 


76,138 


10,079 


66,059 


Not in standard metropolitan statistical areas 


1,614,570 


492,859, 


... 


492,859 


1,121,711 


121,612 


1,000,099 



Part in State only; for entire area see corresponding report for Georgia or table 31 of the U.S. Summary. 



42-16 



South Carolina 




U. S. OOVERNMENT RRINTINC3 OFf^ICE: 1S6O 3OS787/31 



General Population Characteristics 





GENERAL POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS 

South Carolina 



LIST OP TABLES 

[Page numbers listed here omit the State prefix number which appears as part of the page number for each page, 

The prefix for this State is 42] 

THE STATE 

Table ' Page 
13. Summary of population characteristics, for the State, by size of place, and for standard metropolitan statistical areas, 

urbanized areas, urban places, and counties: 1960 - 19 

14 Color by sex, for the State, by size of place, 1960, and urban and rural residence, 1950 21 

15. Rase by sex, for the State, by size of place, 1960, and for the State, 1890 to 1950 22 

16. Age by color and sex, for the State, by size of place, 1960, and urban and rural residence, 1950 23 

17. Age by color and sex, for the State: 1890 to 1960 - - 28 

18* Marital status, by color and sex, for the State, by size of place, 1960, and for the State, 1950 and 1940, 30 

19. Household relationship, by color, for the State, by size of place, 1960, and for the State, 1950 and 1940 31 

STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, 
AM) URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE 

20. Age by color and sex, for standard metropolitan statistical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places of 10,000 or more: 1960. 32 
21. Characteristics of the population, for standard metropolitan statistical areas, urbanmd areas, and urban places of 10,000 or 

more: 1960 - - 38 

COUNTIES, CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS, AND PLACES OF LESS THAN 10,000 

22. Characteristics of the population, for urban places of 2,500 to 1960 - 40 

23. Characteristics of the population, for places of 1,000 to 2,500: 1960 - 45 

24.-Age by sex, for places of 1,000 to 2,500: 1960 .. - - 46 

25. Characteristics of the population, for census county divisions: 1960 _ 47 

26. Age by sex, for census county divisions: 1960 -.. - 53 

27, Age by color and sex, for counties: 1960 5S 

28. Characteristics of the population, for counties: 1960 70 

29. Characteristics of the rural population, for counties: 1960 74 

30 Characteristics of the rural population outside places of 1,000 to 2,500, for counties: 1960 78 

31. Household population, by age and sex, for selected urban places and counties: 1960 . - 82 

APPENDIX 

Table . Pa f 

B-i .-Percent of allocation for nonresponse, for the State, by size of place: 1960 - 83 

B-2 -Percent of allocation for nonresponse, for urban places of 10,000 or more and counties: 1960 - 83 

42-17 



2-18 



C3 



?5 



[ *| 

"^ 
(J 



co 



32 

H O 



oo 



u 



CM 




CD 



O 



LU 



General Population Characteristics 



42-19 



Table 13. SUMMARY OF POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, AND FOR STANDARD 
METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, URBAN PLACES, AND COUNTIES: 1960 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Minus sign r -> denotes decrease. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 100; fertility ratio not shown where base is less than 100; 

population per household not shown where less than 100 persons in households] 



AREA 


POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


POPULATION IN 
GROUP QUARTERS 






ALL PERSONS 


14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


18 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 

PER- 
CENT 
MALE 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
IN- 
CREASEt 
1950 TO 
I960 


PER- 
CENT 
NON- 
WHITE 


PER- 
CENT 
UNDER 
18 
YEARS 
OLD 


PER- 
CENT 
18 TO 
64 
YEARS 
OLD 


PER- 
CENT 
65 
YEARS 
AND 
OVER 


FER- 
TIL- 
ITY 
RATIO 1 


MALE 

PER^- 
CENT 
MAR- 
RIED 


FEMALE 

PER- 
CENT 
MAR- 
RIED 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
IN- 
CREASE i 
1950 TO 
I960 8 


POPU- 
LATION 
PER 
HOUSE- 
HOLD 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
OF 
TOTAL 




2 382 594 
981 386 
462 429 
229 546 
232 883 
518 957 
237 482 
281 475 
1 401 208 
151 858 
1 249 350 

216 382 
260 828 
209 776 

160 113 
162 601 
126 887 

5 436 
11 243 
2 980 
2 602 
3 114 
41 316 
2 995 
3 081 
4 568 
3 806 

6 298 
5 106 
6 963 
3 586 
2 525 
6 842 
8 517 
65 925 
5 171 
6 906 

7 937 
3 500 
97 433 
8 563 
6 710 
3 221 
6 173 
8 283 
4 779 
2 876 

24 722 
3 842 
3 315 
10 435 
12 261 
3 030 
66 188 
16 644 
8 967 
6 392 

3 453 
3 847 
6 059 
7 999 
3 274 
9 598 
2 657 
3 917 
7 174 
5 116 

6 229 

7 834 
8 208 
10 348 
13 852 
29 404 


12.5 
26.2 
88.9 
46.1 
165.6 
-2.7 
6.9 
-9.5 
4,6 
17.8 
3.2 

31.3 

39.6 
24.8 

33.1 
34.6 
C 3 > 

0.8 
58,7 
< 3 > 
() 
25.9 
109.0 
10.8 
4.3 
127.8 
20.1 

24.0 
51.5 
35.5 
16.6 
5.4 
-2.1 
158.6 
-6,1 
6.9 
0.2 

10.7 
6.8 
12.1 
41.0 
1.4 
14,5 
19.4 
31.1 
11.4 
14.2 

9.8 
18.6 
3.5 

28.5 
104.2 
-14.2 
13.8 
20.6 
77.6 
13.0 

21.6 
6.2 
18.5 
11.7 
(3) 
10.9 
16.0 
41.2 
5.0 
175,5 

26,7 
134.2 
8.8 
182.8 
-9,6 
20,0 


34.9 
28.6 
26,1 
36.1 
16.3 
30.8 
31.0 
30.7 
39.3 
23.5 
41.2 

36.5 
29.0 
17.6 

31.4 
27.0 
20.0 

33.0 
39.4 
8.3 
0*5 
58.1 
20.1 
42.5 
29.3 
29.0 
35.9 

32.5 

15.2 
42.7 
47.4 
24.0 
39.1 
15.9 
51.0 
43.6 
37.8 

22.4 
17.1 
30.4 
34.4 
49.6 
60*5 
33.7 
16.6 
16.2 
48.0 

37.6 
0.9 
6.2 
25.2 
43*9 
8.5 
29.8 
34.4 
11*2 
40.5 

11.6 
41.0 
47.9 
39.9 
2.8 
36.1 
15.4 
48.0 
46.6 
15.9 

46,8 
9.3 
28*1 
10.0 
39.7 
24.5 


41.7 
38.3 
38.0 
34.1 
41.9 
38.5 
37.7 
39.2 
44*0 
39.1 
44.6 

42.0 
37.0 
37.6 

39.7 
36.5 
37.5 

37.0 
40.1 
46.7 
43.0 
40.6 
36.2 
45.9 
38.3 
42.9 
36.3 

40.0 
36.4 
38.9 
42.7 
41.7 
38.9 
42.0 
34.9 
39.0 
37.1 

37.6 
38.3 

32.4 
42.1 
38.9 
45.2 
41.1 
36.6 
39.3 
39.8 

38.8 
41t6 
36.0 
37.1 
44.9 
36.0 
35.8 
35.2 
34.8 
37.2 

33,7 
39.4 
43.6 
40.0 
42.5 
37.9 
36.2 
43.2 
41.2 
44.0 

41,7 
35.4 
29.8 
40.5 
36.1 
38*1 


52,0 
55.3 
56.4 
58.4 
54.4 
54.4 
55.3 
53.6 
49,7 
53.8 
49.2 

53.2 

57.0 
56,2 

55.4 
57.5 
56.3 

53.5 
52.7 
51.1 
54.6 
49.5 
57.1 
48.3 
52.0 
50.7 
53.3 

53,3 

56.4 
52.8 
48.4 
51.1 
50.8 
54,1 
57,6 
52.9 
52.2 

55.3 

54.5 
59.9 
52.3 
52.4 
46.3 
51.9 
56.1 
54.2 
50.3 

54.0 
55,7 
56.3 

55.1 
49.1 
56.7 
56*9 
56.6 
58.2 
55.2 

58.3 
53.1 
51.0 
53.2 

53.5 

54.2 
56.0 
50.2 
51.4 
51.6 

50.9 
59,1 
59.2 
55.2 
57,0 
56.0 


6.3 

6.4 
5.6 
7.6 
3.7 
7.2 
7.0 
7.3 
6.2 
7,1 
6.1 

4.8 
5.9 
6.2 

4.8 
6.0 
6.2 

9.5 
7.2 
2.1 
2.4 
9.9 
6.6 
5.7 
9.7 
6.4 
8.5 

6.7 
7.2 
8.3 
9.0 
7.1 
10.3 
3.9 
7.5 
8.0 
10.7 

7.1 
7.2 
7.7 
5.6 
8.7 
8.5 
7.1 
7.2 
6,4 
9.8 

7.2 
2.7 
5.7 
7.8 
5.9 
5.3 
7.3 
8.2 
7.0 
7.6 

8.1 
7.5 
5.5 
6.8 
4.0 
8.0 
7.8 
6.6 
7.4 
4,4 

7.4 
5.5 
11.1 
4.2 
7.0 
5.9 


524 
473 
492 
418 
564 
455 
442 
467 
565 
467 
579 

581 
479 
471 

552 
447 
475 

451 
533 
621 
529 
406 
444 
552 
442 
554 
463 

511 
416 
485 
558 
475 
449 
531 
469 
454 
466 

428 
440 
381 
489 
432 
573 
536 
432 
475 
494 

448 
492 
416 
429 
523 
406 
430 
375 
384 
407 

397 
436 
522 
476 
478 
478 
366 
535 
513 
609 

450 
485 
329 
513 
370 
408 


65.7 
70-3 
69.3 
62.8 
76.3 
71.2 
71.0 
71.3 
62*6 
71.7 
61.5 

65.1 
58.8 
72-3 

66.2 
68.3 
73-9 

70,1 
72.4 
83.6 
. 83.1 
69.5 
73.7 
68.2 
69.5 
74.8 
72.6 

72.7 
75-7 
68.9 
68.3 
71*9 
69.3 
75.6 
56.2 
68.9 
69.7 

62.3 

68.7 
63-0 
72.1 
71-2 
64.5 
69.3 
75.0 
67.9 
68.7 

71.4 
80*4 
73.3 
72.5 
67.3 
73.4 
70.2 
71.8 
73.9 
73.8 

77.0 
73.6 
69.9 
69.6 
71.4 
71.3 
73.8 
66.7 
70-9 
75.7 

70.9 
78.4 
64.6 
79.2 
61.5 
72-2 


63.7 
63.1 
64.2 
56.0 
73.5 
62.1 
61.0 
63*1 
64.3 
65.3 
64.1 

64.6 
62.6 
67.2 

65.2 
61.8 
65.4 

60.4 
63.2 
81.1 
78.3 
56.4 
65.6 
59.7 
62.9 
67.4 
65.5 

63.1 
67.5 
59.6 
59.1 
62.5 
58.1 
71.5 
53.4 
60.8 
58.2 

61.9 
60.5 
55.2 
64.5 
58.3 
58.6 
60,2 
67.4 
64.6 
60.0 

60.6 
76.3 
67.2 
59.4 
60.2 
68.6 
.59.7 
59.5 
66.6 
55.1 

66.1 
60.3 
61.8 
61.0 
70.2 
61.9 
65.1 
60.1 
59.8 
70.3 

57.6 
73.1 
58.5 
71.1 
54.1 
57.6 


48.3 
45.9 
47.2 
46,6 
47.9 
44.8 
44.5 
45.1 
50-0 
46*0 
50.6 

49.6 
51.6 
47.4 

49.5 
46. U 
45.6 

43.9 
45.7 
48.9 
47.4 
42.8 
45.5 
45.0 
44.8 
45.8 
46.2 

44.8 
45.1 
44.7 
43.1 
44.6 
43.1 
47.7 
50.1 
45.3 
43,5 

48.1 
45.3 
45.8 
44.9 
42.9 
44,8 
43*9 
45.8 
46.3 
45.6 

44*3 
47.5 
45.8 
42.9 
44.4 
47.2 
44.2 
43,4 
46,0 
41.2 

45.2 
42.6 
43.9 
44.4 
48.2 
45.1 
45.4 
45.7 
43.5 
46,0 

42.6 
47.2 
46.4 
46.2 
45.1 
43.0 


603 551 
275 032 
127 115 
64 277 
62 838 
147 917 
67 803 
80 114 
328 519 
43 015 
285 504 

55 337 
62 466 
58 916 

43 119 
43 730 
36 660 

1 646 
3 254 
755 
715 
908 
12 193 
760 
937 
1 279 
1 087 

1 810 
1 512 
2 040 
1 016 
690 
2 009 
2 251 
18 306 
1 502 
2 089 

2 142 
975 
26 407 
2 305 
2 012 
854 
1 726 
2 430 
1 294 
834 

7 044 
1 086 
944 
3 047 
3 215 
832 
19 564 
5 007 
2 719 
1 745 

1 074 
1 149 
1 628 
2 279 
805 
2 808 
792 
1 034 
2 015 
1 329 

1 747 
2 452 

2 584 
2 934 
3 746 
7 784 


17.3 
29.8 
96.0 
52.8 
175.8 
0.6 
9.4 
-5.7 
8.5 
23.7 
6.5 

29.0 
34.2 
30.7 

32.3 

40.4 
( 3 ) 

3.5 
52.4 
< 3 > 
( a ) 
25.6 
108.3 
10.9 
10.8 
111,4 
17.1 

23.5 

58.7 
38.2 
14.7 
11.8 
2.7 
168.6 
-8.8 
12.9 
2.2 

19.7 
17,8 
20.9 
42.6 
6.9 
10.3 
24.3 
36.5 
15.7 
10.9 

10.3 
24.0 
9.5 
32.4 
95.1 
-5.3 
17.2 
24.1 
77.8 
15.9 

29.2 
7.5 
17.4 
14.1 
<3> 
14.9 
24.3 
39.9 
7.3 
157.1 

29.8 
162.0 
17.4 
167.2 
-6.5 
26.0 


3.81 
3.45 
3.45 
3.24 
3-66 
3.44 
3.41 
3.48 
4.12 
3-51 
4.21 

3.71 
3.63 

3.46 

3.51 
3.45 
3-37 

3.29 

3.40 
3.95 

3.64 
3.40 
3.36 

3.92 
3.27 
3.55 
3.49 

3.41 
3.37 
3.40 
3.52 
3.66 
3.35 
3.77 
3.23 
3.43 
3.29 

3.37 
3.59 
3.26 
3.69 
3.30 
3.77 
3.55 
3.39 
3.69 
3.42 

3.45 
3.49 
3.48 
3.34 
3.80 
3.64 
3.23 
3.19 
3.29 
3.46 

3.21 
3.33 

3.72 
3.49 
4.07 
3.41 
3.35 
3.75 
3.56 
3.84 

3.56 

3.18 
3.01 
3.53 
3.34 
3.59 


82 801 
33 493 
24 095 
21 301 
2 794 
9 398 
6 458 
2 940 
49 308 
815 
48 493 

10 806 
34 022 
5 971 

8 793 
11 853 

3 449 

23 

182 
... 
... 
28 
333 
15 
18 
30 
7 

133 

15 
26 

5 

102 
40 
6 878 
13 
32 

725 
... 

11 477 
51 
63 
5 
44 
53 
10 
21 

418 
50 
30 
272 
4,0 

2 946 
664 
15 
353 

8 
22 

a 

47 
... 

28 

44 
6 

11 

a 

39 

439 

1 346 
1 475 


3.5 
3.4 
5.2 
9.3 
1.2 
1.8 
2.7 
1*0 
3.5 
0.5 
3.9 

5.0 
13.0 
2.8 

5.5 
7.3 
2.7 

O.4 
1.6 

... 

0^9 
0.8 
0,5 
0.6 
0.7 
0.2 

2.1 
0.3 
0.4 
0.1 
... 
1.5 
0,5 
10.4 
0.3 
0.5 

9*1 
. . 
11.8 
0,6 
0.9 
0.2 
0.7 
0.6 
0*2 
0.7 

1.7 
1*3 
' 0*9 
2.6 

0.3 
... 
4.5 
4.0 
0.2 
5.5 

0.2 
0.6 
O.I 
O.6 

. . 
0.3 
. . 
1.1 
0.1 
0.2 

0.1 
0.5 
5.3 

9,7 

5.0 












PLACES OF lOtOOO OR MORE. 
PLACES OF 2 1 500 TO W000 


PLACES OF It 000 TO 2i500. , 


STANDARD METROPOLITAN 
STATISTICAL AREAS 






URBANIZED AREAS 






URBAN PLACES 












































COLUMBIA. ,. * 





































































1 CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS OLD PER If 000 WOMEN 15 TO 49 YEARS OLD. 
8 SEE TEXT FOR CHANGES IN HOUSEHOLD DEFINITION. 
a 1950 DATA NOT AVAILABLE. 



42-20 

Table 13.--SUMMARY OF POPULATION " nAMr7Cn 

METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Minus sign I'-) 



South Carolina 



^t^^ 






1 


~ 
POPULATION 


===== 


. 


= 
HOUSEHOLDS 


-. 

POPULATION IN 
GROUP QUARTERS 




ALL PERSONS 


14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


18 
YEARS 
OLD 


AREA 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
IN- 
REASEt 
950 TO 
I960 

26.8 
43,2 
21.2 
-32,1 
20.5 
< 3 > 
9,7 
14.3 
4.7 
10*5 

17,4 
-11.9 
315.4 
-11,4 
55.3 
33.8 
203,8 
6.5 
-4.0 
13,3 

-4.6 
52.5 
-3.5 
8.6 
-7,2 
2.3 
63,7 
26.3 
-16.9 
31.3 

0,6 
-5.2 
-7,0 
-8,5 
-1,5 
5.8 
-1.1 
7.9 
-5,2 
-4.9 

5.9 
9.6 
24,8 
6,5 
-3.3 
14.1 
11,3 
4.0 
6.2 
1.4 

-5.8 
37.1 
-9,9 
-3.3 

-10.2 
-7.4 
3.0 
-0.2 
14.9 
40*4 

-8.6 
4,3 
30*0 
-4.2 
-6. 
10. 


PER- 
CENT 
NON- 
AHITE 

U4.8 
24.8 
79.4 
1.8 
31.8 
5.3 
32.1 
34.9 
28.2 
8.6 

41.8 
5.7 
5.7 
14.3 
0.2 
22.9 
33.3 
53.8 
21.3 
32.0 

32.0 
26.3 
63.2 
19.5 
55.8 
43.3 
38.7 
49,6 
66,9 
36.5 

21.2 
39,9 

37,1 
68,3 
51*1 
44*4 
46*5 
48.8 
58,2 
59.5 

43*2 
52*1 
17.6 
29.6 
53.9 
26.7 
62*3 
39.8 
27.0 
29,6 

65.8 
17.2 
61.6 
55.0 
48.8 
35.5 
10.7 
60.1 
10. 1 


PER- 
CENT 
UNDER 
18 
YEARS 
OLD 

35.8 
35.9 
48.0 
37,6 
36.1 
41.3 
39,1 
39,7 
37,3 
37.7 

40*4 
35.3 

36.7 
35.3 
34.3 
38.8 
43,7 
42.1 
35,4 
41.3 

39,0 
42,6 
45,1 
37.4 
44.0 
45.2 
43.5 
49.5 
47.2 
42.0 

40.0 
41.2 
44.2 
51,4 
44,3 
45.1 
48.9 
44.4 
45.6 
45,0 

44,8 
49.5 
37.6 
37.1 
46.0 
44.2 
46.4 
44,7 
42.3 
39,3 

50.0 

40.5 
47.2 
46,5 
46.0 
36.4 
36.4 
, 45.4 
38.0 
36.0 

41.4 
37.8 
45. 
39.2 
51.2 


PER- 
CENT 
18 TO 
64 
YEARS 
OLD 

57.8 
56.4 
46.9 
60.1 
56.3 
55.2 
51.8 
53.7 
54.4 
54.7 

52.0 
59.9 
57,6 
57.9 
59.5 
54.6 
49.4 
49*0 
57.2 
50.2 

52.3 
51,9 
47.0 
55.5 
47,7 
47.4 
52.3 
45.8 
44.8 
53.2 

52.6 
50.7 
48.8 
42.3 
48,2 
49,0 
45.4 
49,0 
46,4 
47.2 

49.4 
45.0 
56.2 
55.4 
46.8 
50*9 
46,1 
48.0 
51.5 
53.4 

43.5 
53.0 
44.0 
47.2 
47,3 
53.7 
56.7 
47.8 
54.8 
58.3 

48,9 


PER- 
CENT 
65 
YEARS 
AND 
OVER 

6.3 
7,7 
5,1 
2,3 

7,7 
3.5 
9.1 
6*6 
8.3 
7.5 

7.6 
4.8 
5.7 
6.9 
6.2 
6.6 
6.9 
8.9 
7.4 
8.4 

8.7 
5.5 
7.9 
7.0 
8.3 
7.4 
4.2 
4.7 
7.9 
4.8 

7.4 
8.1 
7.0 
6.2 
7.5 
5.9 
5-7 
6.6 
8.0 
7.8 

. 5.9 
5.5 
6.2 
7.5 
7.2 
4.9 
7.5 
7.2 
6.2 
7,3 

6.4 
6.5 
8.8 
6.3 
6.8 
9.9 
6.9 
6.8 
7.2 
5.8 

9.7 
7.0 
5. 
8. 
5. 
6. 


FER- 
TIL- 
ITY 
ATIO 1 

385 
436 
649 
447 
418 
473 
478 
538 
447 
448 

451 
340 
443 
372 
427 
451 
550 
561 
404 
508 

454 
546 
554 
446 
573 
576 
753 
686 
632 
581 

459 
506 
522 
679 
544 
543 
649 
535 
607 
612 

529 
626 
471 
424 
598 
562 
569 
568 
507 
434 

635 
509 
598 
565 


MALE 

P~ER"- 

CENT 
MAR- 
RIED 

64.1 
74.9 
67,6 
78*6 
69.5 
74,1 
70.1 
72.6 
71*4 
72.5 

70,7 

73.4 
76.1 
71.3 
78-1 
73.6 
73.8 
70*8 
72*8 
68*6 

65-9 
72-9 
63-8 
71.7 
60*8 
67-1 
43*2 
66.6 
62*7 
65*1 

67*9 
66.8 
64*5 
60*6 
64.7 
68*0 
63*7 
65*9 
64,3 
63,4 

66,8 
64.7 
72-3 
72.1 
64*8 
66,9 
62*6 
66.7 
70,1 
64*8 

62*2 
71.6 
61.7 
65,0 
63* 
65*7 
58. 
62-7 
71*8 
55,5 

65*7 
70* 
65*2 
69* 
62* 
69* 


EMALE 

PER^ 
CENT 
MAR- 
RIED 


AND 
OVER 

PER- 
CENT 
MALE 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
IN- 
REASEt 
950 TO 
I960 3 


OPU- 
ATION 
PER 
OUSE- 
HOLD 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
OF 
TOTAL 


64.9 
64,6 
60,6 
76,0 
60*4 
74,2 
62,1 
63.7 
61.7 
61.7 

61.7 
68*6 
68.9 
63*6 
71.9 
68.9 
63*5 
58.1 
65*6 
58.5 

60*8 
68.5 
57,6 
66.6 
59*7 
62*7 
67*1 
64.9 
57.2 
64,6 

62*9 
61.5 
61.8 
57.0 
61.7 
61.4 
59*5 
63,7 
61.1 
60,4 

62.1 
60,2 
67.2 
65*0 
60*6 
67.0 
59*5 
62.7 
66.5 
62.0 

59, 
68.9 
58,4 
58. 
58* 
62* 
67. 
58. 
69. 
60* 

63* 
65* 
64 i 
64* 
59. 
62. 


48.3 
45.4 
44.0 
49.1 
44*5 
48.2 
45*5 
45*0 
44*6 
43.4 

44.0 
46.8 
46*2 
45*2 
46.7 
46.5 
44,6 
43.8 
46.1 
44.4 

46*8 
47*6 
45.7 
47*0 
47.9 
46.3 
58.8 
48.7 
46.2 
49.6 

46.5 
46,6 
48*2 
47*2 
47*6 
46*2 
46*4 
48.1 
47.6 
47*7 

46*7 
46*5 
47.4 
46, 
47*2 
49.5 
47.7 
47.6 
47,4 
47t7 

47*0 
46* 
47. 
45* 
46. 
47* 
53. 
46, 
43* 
52* 

43, 
47, 
49. 
46* 
46* 
46* 


1 048 
1 619 
1 666 
702 
13 012 
792 
1 031 
6 584 

^ 917 

1 021 

1 552 
774 
1 896 
772 
736 
1 072 
754 
932 
1 101 
1 279 

5 753 

21 649 
2 857 
27 855 
4 006 
4 522 

a 973 

a 679 
2 926 
55 337 

9 290 

7 975 

a 333 

6 193 
7 084 
12 803 
6 84b 
6 003 
3 641 
4 907 

20 613 
7 931 
58 916 
12 619 
4 34b 
16 602 
2 957 
8 344 
10 143 
12 343 

4 70V 
16 17 
1 9U 
7 61 
6 90 

a 16 

10 44 
16 43 
12 85 
46 28 

3 74 
43 31 
17 79 
7 92 
8 64 
19 89 


32.2 

44.3 
20.4 
-25*9 
24,7 
(') 
9*3 
18.3 
13.4 
18.3 

18.2 
1.8 
362.4 
4.9 
67.7 
41.4 
< 3 > 
2.3 
7.9 
16.1 

1*2 
54.9 
2*2 

a. 9 

-2,3 

7.4 
44,8 
30*8 
-14,0 
29.0 

10.1 
0.3 
1.8 
-5.1 
2.8 
9*3 
l*b 
11,1 
-2.6 
-2*1 

10*6 
10. b 
30.7 
14*7 
-0.3 
25*4 
15*6 
11*0 
13*6 
8.6 

-4.0 
44.2 
-6.0 
0* 
-6. 
1.0 
U* 
4.V 
27, 
31*0 

-1* 
13* 
34. 
b. 
-4. 
17. 


3*58 
3*22 
4*24 
3*57 
3*31 
3*76 
3*50 
3*43 
3*49 
3.36 

3.47 
3.41 
3.38 
3.44 
3-39 
3.47 
3.61 
3.72 
3.31 
3*63 

3*65 
3.72 
3.96 
3. SI 
3,95 
3.89 
3-95 
4*39 
4.18 
3*71 

3*75 
3*86 
4.04 
4*74 
3.92 
4.09 
4*4b 
4*05 
4*08 
4,20 

4.0U 
a, 28 
3*46 
3*45 
U.OO 
4*03 

a. 13 

3*97 
3*87 
3*6 

4,62 
3.72 
4,20 
4,20 
4.1 
3*54 
3*60 
4.07 
3.56 
3*60 

3*tt 
3.5 
4*0 
3*7 
4,7 
3*8 


168 
9 
. 

12 
1 225 

*26 
490 
13 

5 

33 
28 
, , , 

8 
10 

*15 

39 

110 

400 
464 
35 

624 
466 
69 
8 735 
112 
34 
10 806 

400 
121 
60 
113 
63 
564 
90 
96 
68 
108 

1 070 
91 
5 971 
756 
5 
1 270 
30 
478 
135 
3 010 

99 
62 
27 
6 
13 
51 
2 55 
I 60 
30 
33 40 

4 
2 28 
2 65 
12 
9 
1 73 


4.3 
0.2 

0.5 
2.8 
* , * 

9-7 
, 2,1 
0*1 
0,1 

0.6 
1.0 

o!3 
0.4 
, , * 
, 

0.4 
1.1 
2,3 

1,9 
0,6 
0*3 
0.6 
2,9 
0.4 
19.8 
0.3 
0.3 
5*0 

1,1 
0.4 
0.2 
0.4 
0.2 
1.1 
0.3 
0.4 
0.4 
0*5 

1*3 
0*3 
2*8 
1.7 
0.3 
1*9 
0.2 
1.4 
0.3 
6*3 

0.5 
1*0 
3.2 

0*2 
0*5 
1*8 
6*4 
2*7 
0*7 
16*7 

0.3 
1.5 
3*5 

0.4 
0.2 
2.2 


URBAN PLACESCON. 


3 917 
5 227 
7 064 
2 520 
44 352 
2 981 
3 633 
23 062 
10 191 
3 431 

5 417 
2 671 
6 410 
2 663 
2 502 
3 721 
2 722 
3 479 
3 679 
4 758 

21 417 
81 038 
U 362 
98 478 
16 274 
17 659 
44 187 
38 196 
12 256 
216 382 

35 205 
30 888 
33 717 
29 490 
27 816 
52 928 
30 584 
24 383 
15 735 
20 713 

84 438 
34 798 
209 776 
44 346 
17 425 
68 247 
12 237 
33 585 
39 352 
47 609 

21 832 
60 726 
8 629 
32 014 
28 529 
29 416 
40 204 
68 559 
46 030 
200 102 

14 554 
156 830 
74 94 
30 015 
40 932 
78 760 




SHANNONTOWN (U) 


























WILLISTON 
WINNSBORO 




COUNTIES 

ABBEVILLE . 
A I KEN ... 

ALLENDALE . 
ANDERSON. . 
BAMBERG * 
BARNWELL. . 
BEAUFORT, . 
BERKELEY. , 
CALMOUN * . 


CHEROKEE. 
CHESTER , , 
CHESTERFIELD 
CLARENDON . 
COLLETON. . 
DARLINGTON. 
DILLON. * . 
DORCHESTER. 
EDGEFIELD . 
FAIRFIELD . 

FLORENCE. . 
GEORGETOWN. 
GREENVILLE. 
GREENWOOD . 
HAMPTON . . 
HORRY . 


















59 

425 






464 
552 
436 
469 

52 

42 
65 
48 
66 
48 








32.6 

36.6 
22*1 
46.8 
29.6 
66.5 
28*7 






55.3 

49.9 
52,8 
43,3 
52*5 








YORK. 


41.3 



1 CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS OLD PER ItOOO WOMEN 15 TO 49 YEARS OLD. 

2 SEE TEXT FOR CHANGES IN HOUSEHOLD DEFINITION. 
8 1950 DATA NOT; AVAILABLE. 



General Population Characteristics ^2-21 

Table 14-GOLQR BY SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, 1960, AND URBAN AND RURAL RESIDENCE, 1950 



AREA AND CENSUS YEAR 




ALL CLASSES 






WHITE 






NONWHITE 






TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


1960 


,- 
2 382 5911 


1 17R fllft 


1 30A 77A 


1 R(*1 A50 


77C 7Kii 


775 968 


fltl CT5 


nArt r\tt\ 


fill ertfi 




00 i 7CU 


1 1(7 010 
1147 rtt i 


1 WO f/0 

(ill fTC 


1 731 vtc 
7ftrt JI07 


(13 f3*r 

777 t**\ 


JA9 a7c 


o31 ill 

IQfl QOO 


mju uo+ 

1 ^0 AOfl 


HJ1 3VQ 
i C t 700 




'01 JOO 
U65 J190 


H&7 211 

937 710 


Dl4 1/5 

^70 AQl 


TOO 497 

T/l I Z ft 1 


337 622 

1 A7 70/i 


JVC. GO 
m907 


280 So? 

i 5A 0150 


129 7o9 

HA lllil 


l7l JUU 
A/l liAil 




tO Hfc7 

350 e/u 


tCJ fTO 

1ftQ 7KA 


2 JO 0?1 
i 9rt ion 


Jt*! OU1 

i/i* C7T 


iOf J7*t 
71 not 


fivf 

75 flQn 


ItU 0a 
01 07H 


70 JHH 

TO 577 


04 HOH 
/in 700 




23; R83 


109 370 

m7flO 


120 1VO 
t 1 fl 5A 1 


146 57J 

ific rtjB 


71 Uo y 

QA T1 1 


/3 H7y 
98 717 


82 973 
^7 A55 


Jo crJ 
18 071 


tt fUv 
10 784 




5ifl 957 


JOfi 
5/17 /n't 


110 3U1 
37C ilflll 


17D UtO 

TCO flfti 


70 Jll 
1 7A 90ft 


iflo A6A 


jl 097 
160 QA1 


10 Ur 1 

73 2U5 


OA 816 


PLACES OF 10 i 000 OR MORE* * , 
PLACES OF 2t500 TO 10,000 . . 


237 482 
281 475 
1 40 1 208 


47J Hf J 

110 903 
132 570 

7QQ 4Q7 


2f5 404 

126 579 
148 905 

&Q3 601 


^70 070 

163 971 
194 925 

850 525 


IfU 6& 

77 256 
92 972 
U3S 132 


100 000 

86 715 
101 953 
412 393 


iou yoi 
73511 
86 550 
550 683 


33 647 
39 598 
270 475 


39 864 
46 952 

280 208 


PLACES OF 1000 TO 2500 


151 858 
1 249 350 


72673 

A?C QTJI 


0?i OU1 

79 185 

AM U1A 


03U J&J 

116 219 
7t/i -inA 


56 222 

381 910 


59 997 
352 396 


35 639 

515 01U1 


16 451 . 
254 024 


19 188 
261 020 


1950 


5 117 Q27 


QJ7 7JH 
1 OILO 5UO 


D1J *+10 
1 076 il87 


12* JUQ 
1 293 il05 


J01 7lW 

643 573 


649 832 


823 622 


396 967 


426 655 




777 09 i 


170 577 


/1A7 AM 


E/IIJ ^ij 


OA1 Qflll 


ofln 97fl 


JTC iCQ 


108 293 


127 366 


URBANIZED AREAS 


244 756 
157 08A 


JfU fiff 

119 214 

711 flQA 


rvf W'T'T 

125 542 

fl5 1Q5 


742 

165 017 

Qfl QCQ 


01 70*+ 

82 186 

iiA 368 


tU (0 

82 831 

48 590 


fcJ3 D?7 

79739 

6P no 


1UO 7J 

37 028 
28 5?fl 


42711 

37 AQ2 




87 668 


f*T 07Q 

jia 310 


Oi 176 

a 350 


7H 730 

70 059 


HO JOO 

35 818 


34 241 


Qc 1JU 
n609 


8 500 


109 




533 165 


tH J10 

951 OAT 


3fl9 109 


377 ?U5 


170 7flg 


197 U47 


ICC QOO 


71 265 


Qfl 55 




1 339 106 


71 UDv 

670 363 


&0 iwfc 

668 843 


^ff tHP 

751 1U3 


if7 /70 

381 589 


369 554 


177 7tV 

587 963 


r 1 07 

?88 674 


299 289 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 
i960 
THE STATE 


100.0 
UU2 


100.0 
-10.7 


100.0 
Jl2t6 


100.0 

115.5 


100*0 
113.5 


100.0 
^618 


100,0 
33.8 


100,0 
32 14 


100,0 
35,1 


URBANIZED AREAS 


*Tl, 

19.4 
Q.& 


^7. ' 

19.0 
9.3 


19.8 
10,0 


13 it 

22.0 

0.5 


*tJ.3 

21*6 
0,2 


22.5 
0.7 


14.5 
10,0 


14,1 
9,6 


14,9 
10*4 




9*8 


9i7 


9,5 


7.3 

12i6 


I2i4 


12.7 


4,6 


4,5 


4,6 


OTHER URBAN 

PLACES OF lOiOOO OR MORE. 
PLACES OF 2t50Q TO 10,000 . 


21.8 
10.0 
11.8 
' 58.8 


20.7 

9.4 
11.3 
60.3 


22t8 
10.5 
12.3 
57.4 


23.1 
10i6 
126 
54,3 


21.9 
10.0 
12.0 
56.5 


24,3 
11.2 
13.2 

53.2 


19,2 
8,8 
10,4 
66 1 2 


18,3 
8,4 
9,9 
67,6 


20,1 
9,2 
10,9 
64,9 


PLACES OF ItOOO TO 2t500, . . 


6.'4 
52,u 


6.2 
5/1.1 


616 
50i8 


7.5 
U7.3 


7.2 

[10,5 


7,7 

45,5 


4,3 
61,9 


4,1 
63,5 


4,4 
60,5 


1950 


100.0 


100,0 


i 

100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100,0 


100,0 


100,0 


100,0 




36.7 


35i6 


37i9 


41.9 


40.7 


43.1 


28.6 


27,3 


29,9 




11.6 


11.5 


11,7 


12.8 


12.8 


12.7 


9,7 


9,3 


10*0 




7.4 


7.2 


7t6 


7.3 


7.2 


7,5 


7,5 


7,2 


7,9 






4i3 


4iO 


5.4 


5.6 


5,3 


2,1 


2,1 


2,1 




25,2 


24.1 


26.2 


29 .'2 


27.9 


30,4 


18,9 


18,0 


19.8 




63.3 


64.4 


62il 


58il 


59.3 


56,9 


71,4 


72,7 


70,1 




























u 















42-22 



South Carolina 



T SHX, ^ TH* 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 100. 







i 


,. 






NONWHITE 














WHITE 










OTHER RAC 


,ES 






AREA* CENSUS YEAR t AND SEX 


CLASSES 




TOTAL 


NEGRO 


TOTAL II 


INDIAN 


JAPA- 
NESE 


CHINESE 


FILI- 
PINO 


ALL 

OTHER 








_ 





1 


- 










TOTAL 


2 382 594 
981 386 


1 551 022 
700 497 


831 572 
280 889 


829 291 
279 935 


2 281 
954 

79 1 


1 098 
277 
157 


460 
215 
166 


158 
92 
75 


328 
248 
233 


237 
122 
90 




462 429 
229 546 
232 883 


341 601 
146 573 
195 028 


120 828 
82 973 
37 855 


120 107 
82 676 

37 431 
159 828 


297 
424 
233 


68 
89 
120 


53 
113 

49 


54 
21 
17 


58 
175 
15 


64 
26 
32 


PLACES OF 10 t 000 OR MORE 
PLACES OF 2i500 TO IO000. . 


518 957 
237 482 
281 475 
1 401 208 


358 896 
163 971 
194 925 
850 525 


73 511 
86 550 
550 683 


73 385 
86 443 
549 356 
we. i^a** 


126 
107 
1 327 
56 


68 
52 
821 
23 


29 
20 
245 
11 


10 
7 
66 
6 


6 
9 
80 
1 


13 
19 
115 
15 


PLACES OF It 000 TO 2?500 


151 858 
1 249 350 


116 219 
734 306 


35 639 

515 044 


513 773 


1 271 


798 


234 


60 


79 


100 




2 117 027 
1 899 604 
1 738 765 
1 683 724 


1 293 405 

1 084 308 
944 049 
818 538 


823 622 

815 496 
794 716 
865 186 


822 077 
814 164 
793 681 
864 719 


1 545 
1 332 
1 035 
467 
396 


554 
1 234 
959 
304 
331 


34 
33 

15 
15 

a 


101 
27 
41 
93 

57 


(*> 
(*) 
18 

( a ) 

... 


856 
38 
2 
55 
... 


MALE 


1 515 400 
1 340 316 
1 151 149 

1 175 818 
467 211 


679 161 
557 807 
462 008 

775 754 
337 622 


836 239 
782 509 
689 141 

400 064 
129 589 


782 321 
688 934 

398 931 
129 102 


188 
207 

1 133 
487 


121 
173 

560 

141 


... 
... 

136 
57 
45 


67 

34 

91 
48 
40 


(1) 
(1) 

215 
164 
159 


... 

131 
77 
67 




223 738 

1O9 356 


167 394 
71 083 


56 344 
38 273 


55 953 
38 081 


192 


41 
39 


23 
22 


33 

7 


44 
1 15 


51 
16 




114 382 


96 311 
170 228 


18 071 
73 245 


17 872 
73 149 


96 


61 


12 


8 


5 


10 


PLACES OF lOfOOO OR MORE 
PLACES OF 2i500 TO lOtOOO- 


110 903 
132 570 
708 607 


77 256 
92 972 
438 132 


33 647 
39 598 
270 475 


33 596 

39 553 
269 829 


51 

45 
646 


31 
30 
419 
12 


9 
3 
79 

n 


c 

43 
u 


2 

51 


5 
5 

54 
9 


PLACES OF IfOOO TO 25QO . . . 


72 673 
635 934 


56 222 
381 910 


16 451 

254 024 


16 421 
253 408 


616 


407 


75 


38 


51 


45 




1 040 540 
935 239 


643 573 
540 597 


396 967 

394 642 
379 842 


396 112 
393 958 
379 300 


855 
684 
542 


302 
616 

474 


19 
23 

11 


56 
17 
38 


<*) 
<*> 
17 


478 
28 
2 




853 158 
838 293 
751 842 
664 B95 


415 823 
343 544 
281 147 


422 470 
408 298 
383 748 


422 185 
408 078 
383 626 


285 
220 
122 


145 
165 
57 
tiy 


11 
4 


76 
51 
65 
29 


<*> 

< 

t ) 


53 

... 

... 


FEMALE 


572 337 
1 206 776 


230 405 
775 268 


341 932 

431 508 
1 5 1 ""5 on 


341 82: 

430 360 
150 83' 


111 

1 148 
467 


538 
136 


324 
158 


67 

44 


113 
84 


106 

45 




514 175 
238 691 


362 875 
174 207 


64 484 
44 700 


64 154 
44 595 


330 
105 


77 
27 


121 
30 


35 

21 


74 
14 


23 

13 




120 190 
118 501 


98 717 


19 784 


19 559 


225 


50 


91 


14 


60 


10 




275 484 


188 668 


86 816 


86 679 


137 


59 


37 


9 


10 




PLACES OF 10 f 000 OR MORE 
PLACES OF 2*500 TO lOiOOO* . 


126 579 
148 905 
692 601 


86 715 
101 953 
412 393 


39 864 
46 952 
280 208 


39 789 
46 890 
279 527 


75 
62 
681 


37 
22 

402 


20 
17 
166 


23 


29 


m 

61 


PLACES OF liOOO TO 2i500 . . 


79 185 
613 416 


59 997 
352 396 


19 188 
261 020 


19 162 
260 36 


26 
655 


11 
391 


7 
159 


2; 


2B 


55 




1 076 487 


649 832 


426 655 

ii?n nmi 


425 96 
420 20 


690 

648 


252 

618 


lb 
10 


4 
1 


!i 


378 
10 




964 56! 
885 607 


470 733 


414 874 


414 38 


493 


485 


4 










845 431 


402 715 


442 716 


442 53 


182 


159 


4 


1 


('4 


2 




763 558 
675 421 


335 617 
276 660 


427 941 
398 761 


427 76 
398 69 


176 
66 


166 
64 


4 




(1 


... 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


578 81? 
100.0 


231 603 
65.1 


347 20 
34. 


347 11 
34. 


96 

0.1 


9 


... 




(X 






100.0 


71.4 


28. 


28. 


0.1 


. 


... 


. 










100.0 


73.9 


26* 


26. 


0.2 





. . 


* * 


0. 


... 




100.0 


63.9 


36. 


36. 


0.1 





. * 


* 


* 







100.0 


83.7 


16. 


16. 


0.2 





. . 


. . 


0. 


. 




100. 


69.2 


30. 


30. 


... 





... 


, * 


* 


. . 


PLACES OF lOiOOO OR MORE . 
PLACES OF 2f500 TO 10000. . 


100. 
100. 
100. 


69.0 
69.3 
60.7 


31. 
30. 
39. 


30. 
30. 
39. 


0.1 
0.1 





... 
... 


II 


* 


. 


PLACES OF 1?000 TO 2500 . 


100. 
100. 


76.5 
58. 


23. 

41. 


23. 

41. 


oil 





... 


* * 


. 


, , 




100. 


61. 


38. 


38. 


0.1 










(1 


... 




100. 


57. 


42. 


42. 


0*1 







. 


. * 


... 




100. 


54.3 


45. 


45. 


0.1 





* . * 


* * 


. 


... 




100. 


48.6 


51. 


51. 


. 





t 


, 


. . 


... 




100. 


44. 


55. 


55. 


... 


. 


* 


^ i 


* * 


... 




100. 


41. 


58. 


58. 


* 


. 


* . 


* * 


<1 


... 




100. 


40. 


59. 


59. 




. 




m m 


<1 


... 


MALES PER 100 FEMALES 


97. 


100. 


92. 


92. 


98.7 


104* 


42*C 


* 


wo* 


123.6 




96. 


99* 


93. 


93. 


123.9 


119. 






jl 


126.5 




97. 


99. 


93. 


93. 


105*6 


99* 









... 




96* 


100. 


91. 


91. 


109.9 


97. 


. * . 




^ 


.* 




99 i 


103 


95. 


95. 


156*6 


91. 













98* 


102 


95. 


95. 


125.0 


99* 






. 


** 




93. 


101 * 


96. 


96. 










(1 


* 




98. 


99. 


98. 


98, 


... 


1 


... 




(I 


... 



NOT AVAILABLE. 
INCLUDED WITH 



"ALL OTHER." THE TOTAL NUMBERS OF FILIPINOS WERE AS FOLLOWS: 19^0, 36; 1920, f> . 



General Population Characteristics 42-23 

Table 16. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, I960, AND URBAN AND RURAL RESIDENCE, 

1950 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is less than 100, Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 100] 



AGEt COLOR. AND SEX 


1960 


1950 






URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 


TOTAL 


PLACES 
OF 
liOOO 
TO 
2.500 


OTHER 

RURAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES OF 
10 i 000 
OR MORE 


PLACES OF 
2t500 TO 
10 t 000 


ALL CLASSES 
TOTAL? ALL AGES . 


2 382 594 
59 658 
58 918 
58 935 
58 988 
58 414 
59 789 
58 254 
57 708 
55 733 
54 801 
55 2SO 
54 944 
56 466 
55 427 
46 813 
46 863 
45 785 
49 700 
45 652 
40 819 
37 396 
1 266 251 

294 913 
236 285 
268 930 
228 819 
166 802 
147 357 
149 510 
157 596 
142 422 
129 507 
105 885 
86 583 
67 386 
60 661 
42 768 
26 785 
12 942 
7 443 

992 476 

150 599 
23.4 

1 175 818 
30 239 
29 859 
29 907 
29 888 
29 592 
30 332 
29 566 
29 205 
28 084 
27 753 
27 898 
28 141 
28 706 
27 995 
23 668 
23 791 
23 193 
27 106 
25 154 
22 010 
19 802 
603 929 

149 485 
144 940 
136 408 
121 254 
86 495 
71 450 
71 947 
75 549 
69 619 
63 019 
50 751 
40 433 
30 292 
26 903 
18 401 
11 115 
5 018 
2 739 

504 923 
64 176 
22.1 


981 386 
24 525 
24 092 
23 650 
23 210 
22 885 
23 280 
22 250 
21 928 
21 260 
20 474 
20 661 
20 278 
20 937 
20 554 
16 171 
16 423 
16 523 
16 442 
16 665 
16 111 
15 674 
557 393 

118 362 
109 192 
98 601 
82 164 
71 022 
65 632 
67 413 
70 986 
63 442 
57 231 
46 979 
38 020 
29 257 
25 260 
18 059 
11 176 
5 413 
3 177 

375 543 
63 085 
25.9 

467 211 
12 487 
12 160 
12 034 
11 708 
11 599 
11 720 
11 326 
11 076 
10 766 
10 232 
10 225 
10 267 
10 468 
10 293 
8 126 
8 246 
8 181 
7 922 
7 602 
7 274 
7 272 
256 227 

59 988 
55 120 

49 379 
39 225 
33 565 
31 619 
32 062 
33 631 
30 357 
27 101 
21 732 
17 002 
12 459 
10 151 
6 997 
4 049 
1 813 
961 

188 836 
23 971 

24.5 


229 546 
5 253 
4 931 
4 883 
4 743 
4 739 
4 649 
4 493 
4 624 
4 367 
4 237 
4 309 
4 255 
4 314 
4 233 
3 451 
3 552 
3 512 
3 699 
4 885 
5 316 
5 254 
135 847 

24 549 
22 370 
20 562 
20 964 
21 002 
14 618 
14 415 
15 505 
14 561 
13 914 
11 788 
10 006 
7 955 
6 856 
4 983 
3 087 
1 505 
906 

78 244 
17 337 
26.8 

109 356 
2 608 
2 473 
2 418 
2 331 
2 391 
2 382 
2 281 
2 289 
2 220 
2 086 
2 086 
2 171 
2 140 
2 099 
1 702 
1 702 
1 749 
1 743 
2 366 
2 691 
2 723 
62 705 

12 221 
11 258 
10 198 
10 251 
11 032 
7 527 
6 964 
7 342 
6 752 
6 444 
5 299 
4 338 
3 339 
2 731 
1 889 
1 085 
465 
221 

38 871 
6 391 
24.9 


232 883 
7 060 
7 068 
6 823 
6 645 
6 397 
6 399 
6 112 
5 725 
5 479 
5 130 
5 008 
4 974 
5 039 
5 036 
3 632 
3 625 
3 784 
3 651 
3 228 
2 963 
3 102 
126 003 

33 993 

28 845 
23 689 
17 251 
16 538 
18 560 
18 513 
18 858 
15 315 
12 025 
9 136 
6 800 
4 727 
3 726 
2 404 
1 453 
668 
382 

97 587 
8 633 
23.8 

114 382 
3 630 
3 573 
3 516 
3 417 
3 279 
3 165 
3 142 
2 918 
2 755 
2 608 
2 514 
2 534 
2 543 
2 610 
1 814 
1 842 
1 910 
1 780 
1 491 
1 349 
1 415 
60 577 

17 415 
14 588 
12 015 
8 372 
7 469 
8 965 
9 013 
9 153 
7 868 
5 952 
4 503 
3 319 
2 169 
1. 632 
1 002 
555 
254 
138 

49 550 
3 581 
23.2 


237 482 
5 576 
5 519 
5 443 
5 326 
5 383 
5 573 
5 239 
5 248 
5 117 
4 912 
5 057 
4 806 
5 131 
4 969 
3 942 
4 111 
4 063 
4 051 
4 345 
4 045 
3 679 
135 947 

27 247 
26 089 
23 905 
20 615 
16 261 
14 972 
15 769 
16 915 
15 553 
14 289 
11 874 
9 686 
7 603 
6 591 
4 860 
2 961 
1 455 
837 

89 466 
16 704 
26*5 

110 903 
2 831 
2 783 
2 812 
2 736 
2 721 
2 835 
2 668 
2 695 
2 618 
2 428 
2 529 
2 395 
2 567 
2 500 
1 992 
2 074 
1 974 
1 926 
1 757 
1 500 
1 462 
61 100 

13 883 
13 244 
11 983 
9 231 
7 135 
6 998 
7 395 
7 857 
7 325 
6 726 
5 406 
4 259 
3 206 
2 593 
1 847 
1 066 
475 
274 

45 084 
6 255 
25.0 


281 475 
6 636 
6 574 
6 5O1 
6 496 
6 366 
6 659 
6 406 
6 331 
6 297 
6 195 
6 287 
6 243 
6 453 
6 316 
5 146 
5 135 
5 164 
5 041 
4 207 
3 787 
3 639 
159 596 

32 573 

31 888 
30 445 
23 334 
17 221 
17 482 
18 716 
.19 70S 
18 013 
17 003 
14 181 
11 528 
8 972 
8 087 
5 812 
3 675 
1 785 
1 052 

110 246 
20 411 
26.5 

132 57O 
3 418 
3 331 
3 288 
3 224 
3 208 
3 338 
3 235 
3 174 
3 173 
3 110 
3 096 
3 167 
3 218 
3 084 
2 618 
2 628 
2 548 


1 401 208 
35 133 
34 826 
35 285 
35 778 
35 529 
36 509 
36 004 
35 780 
34 473 
34 327 
34 619 
34 666 
35 529 
34 873 
30 642 
30 440 
29 262 
33 258 
28 987 
24 708 
21 722 
708 858 

176 551 
177 093 
170 329 
146 655 
95 780 
81 725 
82 097 
86 610 
78 980 
72 276 
58 906 
48 563 
38 129 
35 4O1 
24 709 
15 609 
7 529 
4 266 

616 933 

87 514 
21.6 

708 607 
17 752 
17 699 
17 873 
18 180 
17 993 
18 612 
18 240 
18 129 
17 318 
17 521 
17 673 
17 874 
18 238 
17 702 
15 542 
15 545 
15 012 
19 184 
17 552 
14 736 
12 530 
347 702 

89 497 
89 820 
87 029 
82 029 
52 930 
39 831 
39 885 
41 918 
39 262 
35 918 
29 019 
23 431 
17 633 
16 752 
11 404 
7 066 
3 205 
1 778 

316 087 
40 205 
20.6 


151 858 
3 544 
3 401 
3 453 
3 572 
3 430 
3 527 
3 475 
3 478 
3 443 
3 279 
3 288 
3 243 
3 432 
3 505 
2 750 
2 861 
2 845 
2 834 
2 271 
2 086 
1 892 
86 244 

17 405 
17 202 
16 218 
12 897 
9 340 
9 776 
9 874 
10 456 
9 882 
9 067 
7 814 
6 320 
4 782 
4 263 
3 153 
1 933 
955 
521 

59 365 

10 825 
26.5 

72 673 
1 836 
1 670 
1 744 
1 828 
1 707 
1 800 
1 802 
1 771 
1 723 
1 712 
1 698 
1 644 
1 713 
1 763 
1 384 
1 462 
1 416 
1 411 
1 086 
981 
887 
39 635 

8 785 
8 808 
8 202 
6 356 
4 318 
4 60S 
4 753 
4 998 
4 652 
4 314 
3 644 
2 843 
2 064 
1 770 
1 296 
737 
333 
192 

30 084 

4 328 
24.8 


1 249 350 
31 589 
31 425 
31 827 
32 206 
32 099 
32 982 
32 529 
32 302 
31 030 
31 048 
31 331 
31 423 
32 097 
31 368 
27 892 
27 579 
26 417 
30 424 
26 716 
22 622 
19 830 
622 614 

159 146 
159 891 
154 111 
133 758 
86 440 
71 949 
72 223 
76 154 
69 098 
63 209 
51 092 
42 243 
33 347 
31 138 
21 556 
13 676 
6 574 
3 745 

557 568 
76 689 
21.0 

635 934 
15 916 
16 029 
16 129 
16 352 
16 286 
16 812 
16 438 
16 358 
15 595 
15 809 
15 975 
16 230 
16 525 
15 939 
14 158 
14 083 
13 596 
17 773 
16 466 
13 755 
11 643 
308 067 

80 712 
81 012 
78 827 
75 673 
48 612 
35 223 
35 132 
36 920 
34 610 
31 604 
25 375 
20 588 
15 769 
14 982 
10 108 
6 329 
2 872 
1 586 

286 003 
35 877 
20.2 


2 117 027 
53 402 


777 921 
18 663 

38 446 

35 606 

15 262 

15 679 

42 815 
48 276 

11 352 
11 574 
25 148 

27 295 

14 537 
475 268 

92 715 
73 756 
59 628 
62 017 
73 610 
74 617 
64 203 
61 618 
50 877 
41 356 
33 774 
26 727 
21 342 
19 02O 
11 556 
9 566 

1 539 

260 821 
41 681 
26.8 

370 277 
9 472 
19 556 

18 218 

7 718 
7 976 

21 397 

24 118 

5 693 

5 587 
10 770 

12 069 

6 524 
221 179 

47 246 
37 091 
29 811 
28 426 
34 369 
35 865 
30 885 
29 226 
24 063 
19 256 
15 728 
12 408 
9 456 
7 743 
4 640 
3 589 

475 

130 505 
16 447 
26.1 


1 339 106 

34 739 
76 357 

75 792 

35 256 
35 416 

99 616 

123 638 

29 034 
28 O36 
55 545 

48 677 

21 401 
675 599 

186 888 
170 288 
152 672 
132 258 
103 404 
97 816 
85 124 
84 875 
70 050 
58 612 
49 657 
40 925 
33 213 
33 107 
20 505 
17 058 

2 654 

593 429 
73 324 
21*3 

670 263 
17 413 

39 021 

38 155 

17 840 
17 888 

50 460 
63 O91 

14 807 
14 241 
28 602 

25 505 

10 334 
332 906 

94 589 
86 188 
77 898 
68 348 
51 279 
47 815 
41 955 
41 714 
34 849 
28 591 
24 291 
20 515 
16 559 
15 991 
10 215 
8 407 

1 059 

301 518 
35 672 
20.8 






111 398 

50 518 
51 095 

142 431 
I 171 914 

40 386 
39 610 

i. 78 693 

L 75 972 

35 938 
1 150 867 

279 603 
244 044 
212 300 
194 275 
177 014 
172 433 
149 327 
146 493 
120 927 
99 968 
83 431 
67 652 
54 555 
52 127 
32 061 
L 26 624 

4 193 

854 250 
115 005 
23.6 

1 040 540 
. 26 885 
L 58 577 

\ 56 373 

25 558 
25 864 

j- 71 857 
L 87 209 

20 500 
. 19 828 
I 39 372 

\ 37 574 

16 858 
554 085 

141 835 
123 279 
107 709 
96 774 
85 648 
83 680 
72 840 
70 940 
58 912 
47 847 
40 019 
32 923 
26 015 
23 734 
14 855 
1 11 996 

1 534 

432 023 
52 119 
23.0 






































21 YEARS AND OVER . . . 


































85. YEARS AND OVER .... 


65 YEARS AND OVER .... 


MALE, ALL AGES. . . . 




































2 473 
1 988 
1 734 
1 672 
71 845 

16 469 
16 030 
15 183 
11 371 
7 929 
8 129 
8 690 
9 279 

a 412 

7 979 
6 524 
5 086 
3 745 
3 195 
2 259 






21 YEARS AND OVER . . . 
































1 343 
619 
328 

55 33 

7 744 
24*6 




65 YEARS AND OVER 


65 YEARS AND OVER . . . . 



42-24 



South Carolina 



Table 16.-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, I960, AND URBAN AND RURAL RESIDENCE, 

1950 Con. 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1; percent and median not shown where base is less than 100. Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 100] 



AGEi COLOR? AND SEX 


1960 




1950 




TOTAL 


URBAN 




RURAL 




TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER 


URBAN 


TOTAL 


PLACES 
OF 
ItOOO 
TO 
2500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES OF 
lOtOOO 
OR ' MORE 


PLACES OF 
2i500 TO 
lOfOOO 


ALL CLASSES CON. 
FEMALE? ALL AGES. 


1 206 776 
29 419 
29 059 
29 028 
29 100 
28 822 
29 457 
28 688 
28 503 
27 649 
27 048 
27 382 
26 803 
27 760 
27 432 
23 145 
23 072 
22 592 
22 594 
20 498 
18 809 
17 594 
662 322 

145 428 
141 345 
132 522 
107 565 
80 307 
75 907 
77 563 
82 047 
72 803 
66 488 
55 134 
46 150 
37 094 
33 758 
24 367 
15 670 
7 924 
4 704 

487 553 
86 423 
24.8 

100.0 
12.4 
12.0 
11.3 
9.6 
7.0 
6.2 
6.3 
6.6 
6.0 
5.4 
4.4 
3.6 
2.8 
2.5 
1.8 
1.1 
0.5 
0.3 

97.4 
102.8 
102.5 
102.9 
112.7 
107.7 
94.1 
92.8 
92.1 
95.6 
94*8 
92.1 
87,6 
81.7 
79.7 
75.5 
70.9 
63.3 
58.2 


514 175 
12 038 
11 932 
11 616 
11 502 
11 286 
11 560 
10 924 
10 852 
10 494 
10 242 
10 436 
10 Oil 
10 469 
10 261 
8 045 
8 177 
8 342 
8 520 
9 063 
8 837 
8 402 
301 166 

58 374 
54 072 
49 222 
42 939 
37 457 
34 013 
35 351 
i 37 355 
1 33 085 
30 130 
25 247 
21 018 
16 798 
15 109 
11 062 
7 127 
3 600 
2 216 

186 707 
39 114 
27.2 

100.0 
12.1 
11.1 
10.0 
8.4 
7.2 
6.7 
6.9 
7.2 
6.5 
5.8 
4.8 
3.9 
3.0 
2.6 
1.8 
1.1 
0.6 
0.3 

90.9 
102.8 
101.9 
100.3 
91.4 
89.6 
93.0 
90.7 
90.0 
91.8 
89.9 
86.1 
80.9 
74.2 
67*2 
63.3 
56.8 
50*4 
43.4 


120 190 
2 645 
2 458 
2 465 
2 412 
2 348 
2 267 
2 212 
2 335 
2 147 
2 151 
2 223 
2 084 
2 174 
2 134 
1 749 
1 850 
1 763 
1 956 
2 519 
2 625 
2 531 
73 142 

12 328 
11 112 
10 364 
10 713 
9 970 
7 091 
7 451 
8 163 
7 809 
7 470 
6 489 
5 668 
4 616 
4 125 
3 094 
2 002 
1 040 
685 

39 373 
10 946 
29.0 

100.0 
10.7 
9.7 
9.0 
9.1 
9.1 
6.4 
6.3 
6.8 
6.3 
6.1 
5.1 
4.4 
3.5 
3.0 
2.2 
1.3 
0.7 
0*4 

91.0 
99.1 
101.3 
98.4 
95.7 
110.7 
106.1 
93.5 
89.9 
66.5 
86.3 
81.7 
76.5 
72.3 
66.2 
61.1 
54.2 
44.7 
32.3 


118 501 
3 430 
3 495 
3 307 
3 228 

3 ue 

3 234 

2 970 
2 807 
2 724 
2 522 
2 494 
2 440 
2 496 
2 426 
1 818 
1 783 
1 874 
1 871 
1 737 
1 614 
1 687 
65 426 

16 578 
14 257 
11 674 
8 879 
9 069 
9 595 
9 500 
9 705 
7 447 
6 073 
4 633 
3 481 
2 558 
2 094 
1 402 
898 
414 
244 

48 037 
5 052 
24.3 

100.0 
14.6 
12.4 
10.2 
7.4 
7.1 
8.0 
7.9 
8.1 
6.6 
5.2 
3.9 
2.9 
2.0 
1*6 
1.0 
0.6 
0.3 
0.2 

96.5 
105.0 
102.3 
102.9 
94.3 
82*4 
93.4 
94.9 
94.3 
105.7 
98.0 
97.2 
95.3 
84.8 
77.9 
71.5 
61.8 
61-4 
56.6 


126 579 
2 745 
2 736 
2 631 
2 590 
2 662 
2 738 
2 571 
2 553 
2 499 
2 484 
2 528 
2 411 
2 564 
2 469 
1 950 
2 037 
2 089 
2 125 
2 588 
2 545 
2 217 
74 847 

13 364 
12 845 
11 922 
11 384 
9 126 
7 974 
8 374 
9 058 
8 228 
7 563 
6 468 
5 427 
4 397 
3 998 
3 013 
1 895 
980 
563 

44 382 
10 449 
27.9 

100.0 
11.5 
11.0 
10.1 
8.7 
6.8 
6.3 
6.6 
7.1 
6.5 
6.0 
5.0 
4.1 
3.2 
2.8 
2.0 
1.2 
0.6 
0.4 

87.6 
103.9 
103.1 
100.5 
81,1 
78.2 
87.8 
88.3 
86.7 
89.0 
88.9 
83.6 
78.5 
72.9 
64.9 
61.3 
56.3 
48.5 
48.7 


148 905 
3 218 
3 243 
3 213 
3 272 
3 158 
3 321 
3 171 
3 157 
3 124 
3 085 
3 191 
3 076 
3 235 
3 232 
2 528 
2 507 
2 616 
2 568 
2 219 
2 053 
1 967 
87 751 

16 104 
15 858 
15 262 
11 963 
9 292 
9 353 
10 026 
10 429 
9 601 
9 024 
7 657 
6 442 
5 227 
4 892 
3 553 
2 332 
1 166 
724 

54 915 
12 667 
28.2 

100.0 
11.6 
11.3 
10.8 
8.3 
6.1 
6.2 
6.6 
7.0 
6.4 
6.0 
5.0 
4.1 
3.2 
2.9 
2.1 
1.3 
0.6 
0.4 

89.0 
102.3 
101.1 
99.5 
95.1 
85.3 
86.9 
86.7 
89.0 
87.6 
88.4 
85.2 
79.0 
71.6 
65.3 
63.6 
57.6 
53.1 
45.3 


692 601 
17 381 
17 127 
17 412 
17 598 
17 536 
17 897 
17 764 
17 651 
17 155 
16 806 
16 946 
16 792 
17 291 
17 171 
15 100 
14 895 
14 250 
14 074 
11 435 
9 972 
9 192 
361 156 

87 054 
87 273 
83 300 
64 626 
42 850 
41 894 
42 212 
44 692 
39 718 
36 358 
29 887 
25 132 
20 296 
18 649 
13 305 
8 543 
4 324 
2 488 

300 846 
47 309 
22.8 

100.0 
12.6 
12.6 
12.2 
10*5 
6.8 
5.8 
5.9 
6.2 
5*6 
5.2 
4.2 
3.5 
2.7 
2.5 
1.8 
1.1 
0.5 
0.3 

102.3 
102.8 
102*9 
104.5 
126.9 
123.5 
95.1 
94.5 
93,8 
98.9 
98.8 
97.1 
93.2 
87.9 
89.8 
85,7 
82.7 
74.1 
71.5 


79 185 
1 708 
1 731 
1 714 
1 744 
1 723 
1 727 
1 673 
1 707 
1 720 
I 567 
1 590 
1 599 
1 719 
1 742 
1 366 
1 399 
1 429 
1 423 
1 185 
1 105 
1 005 
46 609 

8 620 
8 394 
8 016 
6 541 
5 022 
5 168 
5 121 
5 458 
5 230 
4 753 
4 170 
3 477 
2 718 
2 493 
1 857 
1 196 
622 
329 

29 281 
6 497 
27.9 

100.0 
11.5 
11.3 
10.7 
8.5 
6.2 
6.4 
6.5 
6.9 
6.5 
6.0 
5.1 
4.2 
3*1 
2.8 
2.1 
1.3 
0.6 
0.3 

91.8 
101.9 
104.9 
102.3 
97.2 
86.0 
89.2 
92.8 
91.6 
88.9 
90.8 
87.4 
81.6 
75.9 
71.0 
69*8 
61.6 
53.5 
58.4 


613 416 
15 673 
15 396 
15 698 
15 854 
15 813 
16 170 
16 091 
15 944 
15 435 
15 239 
15 356 
15 193 
15 572 
15 429 
13 734 
13 496 
12 821 
12 651 
10 250 
8 867 
8 187 
314 547 

78 434 
78 879 
75 284 
58 085 
37 828 
36 726 
37 091 
39 234 
34 488 
31 605 
25 717 
21 655 
17 578 
16 156 
11 448 
7 347 
3 702 
2 159 

271 565 

40 812 
22.1 

100.0 
12.7 
12.8 
12.3 
10.7 
6.9 
5.8 
5.8 
6.1 
5.5 
5.1 
4.1 
3.4 
2.7 
2.5 
1.7 
1.1 
0.5 
0-3 

103.7 
102.9 
102.7 
104.7 
130.3 
128.5 
95.9 
94.7 
94.1 
100.4 
100.0 
98.7 
95.1 
89.7 
92.7 
88.3 
86.1 
77.6 
73.5 


1 076 487 
N 26 517 
J. 56 226 

X 55 025 

24 960 
25 231 

| 70 574 
L 84 705 

19 886 
19 782 
I 39 321 

\ 38 398 

19 080 
596 782 

137 768 
120 765 
104 591 
97 501 
91 366 
88 753 
76 487 
75 553 
62 015 
52 121 
43 412 
34 729 
28 540 
28 393 
17 206 
\ 14 628 

2 659 

422 227 

62 886 

24.2 

100.0 
13.2 
11.5 
10.0 
9.2 
8.4 
8.1 
7.1 
6*9 
5.7 
4.7 
3.9 
3.2 
2.6 
2.5 

} 

0.2 

96.7 
103.0 
102.1 
103.0 
99.3 
93.7 
94.3 
95.2 
93.9 
95.0 
91.8 
92.2 
94.8 
91.2 
83.6 
86.3 
\ 82.0 

57.7 


407 644 
9 191 
18 890 

17 388 

7 544 
7 703 

21 418 
24 158 

5 659 
5 987 
12 378 

15 226 

8 013 
254 089 

45 469 
36 665 
29 817 
33 591 
39 241 
38 752 
33 318 
32 392 
26 814 
22 100 
18 046 
14 319 
11 886 
U 277 
6 916 
5 977 

1 064 

130 316 
25 234 
27*5 

100.0 
11.9 
9.5 
7.7 
8*0 
9.5 
9.6 
8.3 
7.9 
6.5 
5.3 
4.3 
3.4 
2.7 
2.4 
1.5 
1.2 

0.2 

90.8 
103.9 
101.2 
100.0 
84.6 
87.6 
92.6 
92.7 
90*2 
89.7 
87.1 
87.2 
86.7 
79.6 
68.7 
67.1 
60.0 

44.6 


668 843 
17 326 
37 336 

37 637 

17 416 
17 528 

49 156 

60 547 

14 227 
13 795 
26 943 

23 172 

11 067 
342 693 

92 299 

84 100 
74 774 
63 910 
52 125 
50 001 
43 169 
43 161 
35 201 
30 021 
25 366 
20 410 
16 654 
17 116 
10 290 
8 651 

1 595 

291 911 
37 652 
21.9 

100.0 
14.0 
12.7 
11.4 
9.9 
7.7 
7.3 
6.4 
6.3 
5.2 
4.4 
3.7 
3*1 
2*5 
2.5 
1-5 
1.3 

0.2 

100.2 
102*5 
102.5 
104.2 
106.9 
98.4 
95.6 
97.2 
96.6 
99.0 
95-2 
95.8 
100.5 
99.4 
93.4 
99.3 
97.2 

66.4 










































21 YEARS AND OVER .... 


































85 YEARS AND OVER .... 


65 YEARS AND OVER .... 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 
TOTAL i ALL AGES 


































85 YEARS AND OVER .... 

MALES PER 100 FEMALES 
TOTAL i ALL AGES . 


































85 YEARS AND OVER .... 



General Population Characteristics 42-25 

Table 16. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, I960, AND URBAN AND RURAL RESIDENCE, 

1950 Con. 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is less than 100. Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 100] 





1960 


1950 


AGE? COLOR? AND SEX 


TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 


TOTAL 


PLACES 
OF 
liOOO 
TO 
2 1500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES OF 
10 i 000 
OR MORE 


PLACES OF 
2i500 TO 
10 f 000 


WHITE 
TOTAL i ALL AGES 


1 551 022 
34 248 
33 988 
33 970 
34 062 
33 393 
34 346 
33 112 
32 734 
32 244 
30 705 
31 512 
31 603 
33 400 
33 675 
26 340 
26 773 
27 245 
30 848 
29 206 
26 995 
25 476 
895 147 

169 661 
163 141 
156 530 
141 067 
116 141 
105 273 
107 203 
113 057 
100 615 
90 484 
76 129 
61 137 
47 816 
40 352 
29 236 
18 898 
9 403 
4 879 

574 198 
102 768 
26.4 

775 754 
17 578 
17 455 
17 336 
17 460 
16 953 
17 572 
17 031 
16 717 
16 348 
15 691 
16 070 
16 272 
17 134 
17 070 
13 594 
13 764 
13 891 
17 472 
16 546 
14 934 
13 893 
434 973 

86 782 
83 359 
80 140 
76 607 
61 922 
52 329 
53 245 
55 414 
50 067 
44 770 
37 043 
28 895 
21 959 
17 983 
12 418 
7 626 
3 518 
1 677 

295 408 

43 222 
24.9 


700 497 
16 328 
16 026 
15 604 
15 357 
14 990 
15 323 
14 462 
14 325 
13 943 
13 198 
13 457 
13 399 
14 220 
14 316 
10 631 
10 800 
11 152 
11 191 
11 819 
11 809 
11 795 
416 352 

78 305 
71 251 
66 023 
56 771 
53 544 
49 253 
50 654 
53 661 
47 131 
42 047 
35 481 
28 153 
21 953 
18 081 
13 255 
8 416 
4 201 
2 317 

248 722 
46 270 
27.5 

337 622 
8 399 
8 178 
8 041 
7 787 
7 631 
7 759 
7 380 
7 290 
7 140 
6 704 
6 755 
6 815 
'7 180 
7 234 
5 431 
5 491 
5 545 
5 416 
5 291 
5 303 
5 516 
195 336 

40 036 
36 273 
33 415 
27 046 
25 758 
24 477 
24 938 
25 972 
23 150 
20 273 
16 696 
12 760 
9 492 
7 313 
5 065 
2 949 
1 359 
650 

126 176 
17 336 
26.3 


146 573 
2 737 
2 503 
2 467 
2 422 
2 375 
2 360 
2 296 
2 445 
2 30O 
2 223 
2 2S8 
2 337 
2 452 
2 454 
1 916 
1 936 
1 989 
2 209 
3 531 
4 045 
4 012 
93 276 

12 504 
11 624 
11 447 
13 710 
15 431 
9 434 
9 200 
10 138 
9 568 
9 273 
8 305 
7 025 
5 856 
4 922 
3 727 
2 426 
1 215 
718 

41 709 
13 008 
29*5 

71 083 
1 370 
1 261 
1 234 
1 231 
1 196 
1 181 
1 145 
1 212 
1 187 
1 100 
1 123 
1 187 
1 245 
1 246 
954 
959 
1 013 
1 042 
1 746 
2 123 
2 179 
44 149 

6 292 
5 825 
5 755 
6 883 
8 570 
5 222 
4 703 
4 949 
4 565 
4 328 
3 760 
3 041 
2 480 
1 948 
1 388 
840 
371 


195 028 
5 819 
5 841 
5 613 
5 374 
5 206 
5 173 
4 889 
4 623 
4 371 
4 075 
3 985 
3 983 
4 057 
4 160 
2 894 
2 880 
3 024 
2 938 
2 576 
2 457 
2 652 
108 438 

27 853 
23 131 
19 079 
13 875 
14 274 
16 132 
16 152 
16 390 
13 220 
10 200 
7 846 
5 714 
4 009 
3 092 
1 978 
1 204 
569 
310 

78 905 
7 153 
24.8 

96 311 
3 001 
2 979 
2 931 
2 763 
2 657 
2 554 
2 518 
2 349 
2 205 
2 080 
2 029 
2 038 
2 053 
2 181 
1 469 
1 484 
1 544 
1 433 
1 193 
1 110 
1 194 
52 546 

14 331 
11 706 
9 770 
6 764 
6 449 
7 883 
8 006 
8 000 
6 844 
5 094 
3 856 
2 790 
1 855 
1 353 
824 
463 
211 
. 112 

40 268 
2 963 
24.3 


163 971 
3 556 
3 545 
3 414 
3 437 
3 397 
3 550 
3 270 
3 285 
3 230 
3 074 
3 161 
3 091 
3 423 
3 436 
2 521 
2 651 
2 697 
2 699 
2 883 
2 715 
2 535 
98 401 

17 349 
16 409 
15 632 
13 645 
11 300 
10 826 
11 493 
12 520 
11 183 
10 215 
8 738 
7 125 
5 580 
4 621 
3 502 
2 154 
1 108 
571 

57 437 
11 956 
28*5 

77 256 
1 844 
1 826 
1 786 
1 770 
1 728 
1 869 
1 657 
1 707 
1 673 
1 550 
1 593 
1 550 
1 734 
1 741 
1 284 
1 334 
1 318 
1 295 
1 032 
900 
942 
45 123 

8 954 
8 456 
7 902 
5 879 
4 881 
5 200 
5 630 
5 956 
5 428 
4 927 
4 056 
3 172 
2 402 
1*838 
1 335 
731 
342 
167 

29 259 

4 413 
27.5 


194 925 
4 216 
4 137 
4 110 
4 124 
4 012 
4 240 
4 007 
3 972 
4 042 
3 826 
4 023 
3 988 
4 288 
4 266 
3 300 
3 333 
3 442 
3 345 
2 829 
2 592 
2 596 
116 237 

20 599 

20 087 
19 865 
15 541 
12 539 
12 811 
13 809 
14 613 
13 160 
12 359 
10 592 
8 289 
6 SOB 
5 446 
4 048 
2 632 
1 309 
718 

70 671 
14 153 
28.4 

92 972 

2 184 
2 112 
2 090 
2 023 
2 050 
2 155 
2 060 
2 022 
2 075 
1 974 
2 010 
2 040 
2 148 
2 066 
1 724 
1 714 
1 670 
1 646 
1 320 
1 170 
1 201 
53 518 

10 459 
10 286 
9 988 
7 520 
5 858 
6 172 
6 599 
7 067 
6 313 
5 924 
5 024 
3 757 
2 755 
2 174 
1 518 
915 
435 
208 

35 763 
5 250 
26.9 


850 525 
17 920 
17 962 
18 366 
18 705 
18 403 
19 023 
18 650 
18 409 
18 301 
17 507 
18 055 
18 204 
19 180 
19 359 
15 709 
15 973 
16 093 
19 657 
17 387 
15 186 
13 681 
478 795 

91 356 
91 890 
90 507 
84 296 
62 597 
56 020 
56 549 
59 396 
53 484 
48 437 
40 648 
32 984 
25 S63 
22 271 
15 981 
10 482 
5 202 
2 562 

325 476 
56 498 
25.4 

438 132 
9 179 
9 277 
9 295 
9 673 
9 322 
9 813 
9 651 
9 427 
9 208 
8 987 
9 315 
9 457 
9 954 
9 836 
8 163 
8 273 
8 346 
12 056 
11 255 
9 631 
8 377 
239 637 

46 746 
47 086 
46 725 
49 561 
36 164 
27 852 
28 307 
29 442 
26 917 
24 497 
20 347 
16 135 
12 467 
10 670 
7 353 
4 677 
2 159 
1 027 

169 232 
25 886 

24.0 


116 219 
2 464 
2 383 
2 445 
2 496 
2 419 
2 455 
2 473 
2 463 
2 470 
2 264 
2 350 
2 316 
2 531 
2 652 
1 967 
2 044 
2 125 
2 081 
1 65], 
1 596 
1 466 
69 108 

12 207 
12 125 
11 816 
9 497 
7 403 
7 961 
8 059 
8 528 
7 940 
7 264 
6 321 
5 082 
3 805 
3 215 
2 378 
1 486 
766 
366 

42 398 
8 211 
28.2 

56 222 
1 290 
1 191 
1 235 
1 301 
1 221 
1 290 
1 294 
1 252 
1 246 
1 199 
1 231 
1 162 
1 271 
1 325 
1 004 
1 064 
1 077 
1 035 
756 
745 
671 
32 362 

6 238 
6 281 
5 993 
4 677 
3 451 
3 841 
3 966 
4 152 
3 805 
3 533 
2 983 
2 330 
1 694 
1 339 
979 
570 
260 
130 

21 688 
3 278 
26.9 


734 306 
15 456 
15 579 
15 921 
16 209 
15 984 
16 568 
16 177 
15 946 
15 831 
15 243 
15 705 
15 888 
16 649 
16 707 
13 742 
13 929 
13 968 
17 576 
15 736 
13 590 
12 215 
409 687 

79 149 
79 765 
78 691 
74 799 
55 194 
48 059 
48 490 
50 868 
45 544 
41 173 
34 327 
27 902 
22 058 
19 056 
13 603 
8 996 
4 436 
2 196 

283 078 
48 287 
25.0 

381 910 
7 889 
8 036 
8 060 
8 372 
8 101 
8 523 
8 357 
8 175 
7 962 
7 788 
8 084 
8 295 
8 683 
8 511 
7 159 
7 209 
7 269 
11 021 
10 499 
8 886 
7 706 
207 275 

40 508 
40 805 
40 732 
44 884 
32 713 
24 Oil 
24 341 
25 290 
23 112 
20 964 
17 364 
13 805 
10 773 
9 331 
6 374 
4 107 
1 899 
897 

147 544 
22 608 
23.7 


1 293 405 
29 353 

63 322 

62 021 

27 067 
27 652 

77 514 
I 91 428 

22 047 
. 22 082 
. 44 012 

\, 44 658 

21 406 
760 843 

154 696 
132 233 
113 475 
110 752 
109 921 
113 869 
101 212 
95 554 
81 964 
66 177 
55 730 
46 943 
37 648 
32 151 
. 21 233 
L 17 572 

2 275 

466 498 
73 231 
26.1 

643 573 
15 036 
L 32 537 

L 31 702 

13 913 
14 119 

f 39 564 
L 46 363 

11 276 
N 11 213 
|r 22 295 

\ 22 690 

10 652 
372 213 

79 275 
67 596 
57 639 
56 198 
55 137 
56 284 
50 151 
47 327 
40 617 
32 471 
27 292 
22 816 
17 854 
14 802 
9 634 
\ 7 632 

848 

238 018 
32 916 
25.5 


542 262 
12 389 
25 688 

23 952 

10 019 
10 183 

28 085 
30 891 

7 407 
7 643 
14 906 

18 907 

10 251 

341 941 

62 029 
48 287 
38 298 
41 456 
52 560 
53 983 
46 607 
43 068 
36 826 
29 343 
24 308 
20 114 
15 921 
13 004 
8 493 
6 985 

980 

171 163 
29 462 
27.6 

261 984 
6 394 
13 103 

12 361 

5 155 
5 200 

14 164 
15 528 

3 753 
3 775 
6 977 

8 512 

4 825 
162 237 

31 858 
24 519 
19 281 
19 264 
25 433 
26 519 
22 872 
20 990 
17 799 
14 028 
11 538 
9 319 
7 056 
5 373 
3 342 
2 492 

301 

86 410 
11 508 
27.0 


751 143 
16 964 
37 634 

38 069 

17 048 
17 469 

49 429 
60 537 

14 640 
14 439 
29 106 

25 751 

11 155 
418 902 

92 667 
83 946 
75 177 
69 296 
57 361 
59 886 
54 605 
52 486 
45 138 
36 834 
31 422 
26 829 
21 727 
19 147 
12 740 
10 587 

1 295 

295 335 

43 769 

24.7 

381 589 
8 642 

19 434 

19 341 

8 758 
8 919 

25 4OO 
30 835 

7 523 

7 438 
15 318 

14 178 

5 827 
209 976 

47 417 
43 077 
38 358 
36 934 
29 704 
29 765 
27 279 
26 337 
22 818 
18 443 
15 754 
13 497 
10 798 
9 429 
6 292 
5 140 

547 

151 608 
21 408 
24*2 










































21 YEARS AND OVER .... 


































85 YEARS AND OVER .... 


65 YEARS AND OVER .... 


MALEf ALL AGES* * . 










































21 YEARS AND OVER . . . . 


































85 YEARS AND OVER . . . . 


163 

20 886 
4 710 
27.1 


65 YEARS AND OVER * . * . 



42-26 



South Carolina 



Table 16. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, 1960, AND URBAN AND RURAL RESIDENCE, 

195O Con. 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1; percent and median not shown where base is less than 100. Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 100] 



AGE i COLOR r AND SEX 


1960 




1950 


TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 






URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 




PLACES 
OF 
It 000 
TO 
2t500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


TOTAL 


CENTRA 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRING 


PLACES 
lOiOOO 
OR MORE 


PLACES 
2i500 TO 
10*000 


TOTAL 


WHITECON. 
FEMALE i ALL AGES. 


775 261 
16 67( 
16 53: 

16 631 
16 60; 
16 44C 
16 774 
16 08J 
16 Oil 
15 89 
15 01H 
15 442 
15 331 
16 266 
16 605 
12 746 
13 009 
13 354 
13 376 
12 660 
12 061 
11 583 
460 174 

82 879 
79 782 
76 390 
64 460 
54 219 
52 944 
53 958 
57 643 
50 548 
45 714 
39 086 
32 242 
25 857 
22 369 
16 818 
11 272 
5 885 
3 202 

278 790 

59 546 
27.8 

831 572 
25 410 
24 930 
24 965 
24 926 
25 021 
25 443 
25 142 
24 974 
23 489 
24 096 
23 768 
23 341 
23 066 
21 752 
20 473 
20 090 
18 540 
18 852 
16 446 
13 824 
11 920 
371 104 

125 252 
123 144 
112 400 
87 752 
50 661 
42 084 
42 307 
44 539 
41 807 
39 023 
29 756 
25 446 
19 570 
20 309 
13 532 
7 887 
3 539 
2 564 

418 278 
*7 831 
18.1 


362 87 
7 925 
7 846 
7 563 
7 570 
7 359 
7 564 
7 082 
7 035 
6 803 
6 494 
6 702 
6 584 
7 040 
7 082 
5 200 
5 309 
5 607 
5 775 
6 528 
6 506 
6 279 
221 016 

38 269 
34 978 
32 608 
29 725 
27 786 
24 776 
25 716 
27 689 
23 981 
21 774 
18 785 
15 393 
12 461 
10 768 
8 190 
5 467 
2 842 
1 667 

122 546 
28 934 
28.6 

280 889 
8 197 
8 066 
8 046 
7 853 
7 895 
7 957 
7 788 
7 603 
7 317 
7 276 
7 204 
6 879 
6 717 
6 238 
5 540 
5 623 
5 371 
5 251 
4 846 
4 302 
3 879 
141 041 

40 057 
37 941 
32 578 
25 393 

17 478 
16 379 
16 759 
17 325 
16 311 
15 184 
11 498 
9 867 
7 304 
7 179 
4 804 
2 760 
1 212 
860 

126 821 
16 815 
21.3 


75 49 
1 36 
1 24 
1 23 
1 19 
1 17 
1 17 
1 15 
1 23 
1 11 
1 12 
1 16 
1 15 
1 20 
1 20 
96 
97 
97 
1 16 
1 78 
1 92 
1 83 
49 12 

6 21 
5 79 
5 69 
6 82 
6 86 
4 26 
4 49 
5. 18 
5 00 
4 94 
4 54 
3 98 
3 376 
2 974 
2 339 
1 586 
' 844 
555 

20 823 
8 298 
32.3 

82 973 
2 516 
2 428 
2 416 
2 321 
2 364 
2 289 
. 2 197 
2 179 
2 067 
2 014 
2 021 
1 918 
1 862 
1 779 
1 535 
1 616 
1 523 
1 490 
1 354 
1 271 
1 242 
42 571 

12 045 
10 746 
9 115 
7 254 
5 571 
5 134 
5 215 
5 367 
4 993 
4 641 
3 483 
2 981 
2 099 
1 934 
1 256 
661 
290 
188 

36 535 
4 329 

22.1 


98 7 
2 81 
2 86 
2 68 
2 61 
2 54 
2 61 
2 37 
2 27 
2 16 
1 99 
1 95 
1 94 
2 00 
1 97 
1 42 
1 39 
1 48 
1 50 
1 38 
1 34 
1 45 
55 89 

13 52 
11 42 
9 30 
7 11 
7 82 
8 24 
8 14 
8 39 
6 37 
5 10 
3 99 
2 92 
2 15 
1 73 
1 15 
74 
35 
19 

38 637 
4 190 
25.1 

37 855 
1 241 


86 71 
1 71 
1 71 
1 62 
1 66 
1 66 
1 68 
1 61 
1 57 
1 55 
1 52 
1 56 
1 54 
1 68 
1 69 
1 23 
1 31 
1 37 
1 40 
1 85 
1 81 
1 59 
53 27 

8 39 
7 95 
7 73 
7 76 
6 41 
5 62 
5 863 
6 564 
5 755 
5 288 
4 682 
3 953 
3 178 
2 783 
2 167 
1 423 
766 
404 

28 178 
7 543 
29.5 

73 511 
2 020 
1 974 
2 029 
1 889 
1 986 
2 023 
1 969 
1 963 
1 887 
1 838 
1 896 
1 715 
1 708 
1 533 
1 421 
1 460 
1 366 
1 352 
1 462 
1 330 
1 144 
37 546 

9 898 
9 680 
8 273 
6 970 
4 961 
4 146 
4 276 
4 395 
4 370 
4 074 
3 136 
2 561 
2 023 
1 970 
1 358 
807 
347 
266 

32 029 
4 748 
21.9 


101 95 
2 03 
2 02 
2 02 
2 10 
1 96 
2 08 
1 94 
1 95 
1 96 
1 85 
2 01 
1 94 
2 14 
2 20 
1 57 
1 61 
1 77 
1 69 
1 50 
1 42 
1 39 
62 71 

10 14 
9 80 
9 87 
8 02 
6 68 
6 63 
7 210 
7 546 
6 847 
6 435 
5 568 
4 532 
3 753 


412 39 
8 74 
8 68 
9 07 
9 03 
9 08 
9 21 
8 99 
8 98 
9 09 
8 52 
8 74 
8 74 
9 22 
9 52 
7 54 
7 70 
7 74 
7 60 
6 13 
5 55 
5 30 
239 15 

44 610 
44 80 
43 782 
34 735 
26 433 
28 168 
28 242 
29 954 
26 567 
23 940 
20 301 
16 849 
13 396 
11 601 
8 628 
5 805 
3 043 
1 535 

156 244 
30 612 
27.1 

550 663 
17 213 
16 864 
16 919 
17 073 
17 126 
17 486 
17 354 
17 371 
16 172 
16 820 
16 564 
16 462 
16 349 
15 514 
14 933 
14 467 
13 169 
13 601 
11 600 
9 522 
8 041 
230 063 

85 195 
85 203 
79 822 
62 359 
33 183 
25 705 
25 548 
27 214 
25 496 
23 839 
18 258 
15 579 
12 266 
13 130 
8 728 
5 127 
2 327 
1 704 

291 457 
31 016 
17.0 


59 99 
1 17 
1 19 
1 21 
1 19 
1 19 
1 16 
1 17 
1 21 
1 22 
1 06 
1 11 
1 15 
1 26 
1 32 
96 
98 
1 04 
1 046 
895 
85 


352 39 
7 56 
7 49 
7 86 
7 83 
7 88 
8 04 
7 82 
7 77 
7 86 
7 45 
7 62 
7 59 
7 96 
8 19 
6 58 
6 72 
6 69 
6 55 
5 23 
4 70 
4 509 
202 41 

38 64 
38 960 
37 959 
29 915 
22 48 
24 048 
24 149 
25 578 


649 83 
_ 14 31 
| 30 78 

| 30 31 
13 15 

1353 

J 37 95 
I 45 06 

10 77 
N 10 86 

|- 21 71 

L 21 96 

10 75 

388 63 

75 42 
64 637 
55 836 

54 554 
54 784 
57 585 


280 27 
5 99 
12 58 

11 59 

4 86 
4 98 

13 92 
15 36 

3 65 
3 86 
7 92 

10 395 

5 426 
179 704 

30 171 
23 768 
19 017 
22 192 
27 127 
27 464 
23 735 
22 078 
19 027 
15 315 
12 770 
10 795 
8 865 
7 631 
5 151 
4 493 

679 

84 753 
17 954 
28.3 

235 659 

6 274 
12 756 

11 654 

5 243 
5 496 

14 730 
17 365 

3 945 
3 931 
8 242 

8 388 

4 266 
133 327 

30 686 
25 469 
21 330 
20 561 
21 050 
20 634 
17 596 
16 550 
14 051 
12 013 
9 466 
6 613 
5 421 
6 016 
3 063 
2 561 

559 

89 656 

12 219 
24.7 


369 554 
8 322 

18 200 

18 728 

8 290 
8 550 

24 029 
29 702 

7 117 
7 001 
13 788 

11 573 

5 328 
208 926 

45 250 
40 869 
36 819 
32 362 
27 657 
30 121 
27 326 
26 149 
22 320 
18 391 
15 668 
13 332 
10 929 
9 718 
6 448 
5 447 

748 

143 727 
22 361 
25.3 

587 963 
17 775 
38 723 

37 723 

18 206 
17 947 

50 187 
63 101 

14 394 
13 597 
26 439 

22 926 

10 246 
256 697 

94 221 
86 342 
77 495 
62 962 
46 043 
37 930 
30 519 
32 389 
24 912 
21 778 
18 235 
14 096 
11 486 
13 960 
7 765 
6 471 

1 359 

298 094 
29 555 
17.9 








































21 YEARS AND OVER . . 


79: 

36 746 

5 969 
5 844 
5 823 
4 820 
3 952 
4 120 
4 093 
4 376 
4 135 
3 731 
3 338 
2 752 
2 111 
1 876 
1 399 
916 
506 
236 

20 710 
4 933 
29.4 

35 639 
1 080 
1 016 
1 013 
1 076 
1 Oil 
1 072 
1 002 
1 015 
973 
1 015 
938 
927 
901 
853 
783 
817 
720 
753 
620 
490 
426 
17 136 

5 198 
5 077 
4 402 
3 400 
1 937 
1 815 
1 815 
1 928 
1 942 
1 803 
1 493 
1 238 
977 
1 048 
775 
447 
189 
155 

16 967 
2 614 
19.6 
















51 061 
48 227 
41 347 
33 706 
28 438 
24 127 
19 794 
17 349 
. 11 599 
9 940 

1 427 

228 480 
40 315 
26*7 

623 622 

24 049 
51 481 

49 377 

23 451 
23 443 

64 917 
> 80 486 

18 339 
17 528 
34 681 

31 314 

14 532 
390 024 

124 907 
111 811 
98 825 
83 523 
67 093 
58 564 
48 115 
50 939 
38 963 
33 791 
27 701 
20 709 
16 907 
19 976 
10 828 
9 052 

1 918 

387 752 

41 774 
19.6 






22 432 

20 209 






16 963 
14 097 
11 285 
9 725 
7 229 
4 889 
2 537 
1 299 

135 534 
25 679 
26.7 

515 044 
16 133 

15 846 
15 906 
15 997 
16 115 
16 414 
16 352 
16 356 
15 199 
15 805 
15 626 
15 535 
15 448 
14 661 
14 150 
13 650 
12 449 
12 848 
10 980 
9 032 
7 615 
212 927 

79 997 
80 126 
75 420 
58 959 
31 246 
23 890 
23 733 
25 286 
23 554 
22 036 
16 765 
14 341 
11 289 
12 082 
7 953 
4 680 
2 138 
1 549 

274 490 
28 402 
16.9 








3 272 
2 530 
1 717 
874 
510 

34 908 
8 903 
29.9 

86 550 
2 420 
2 437 
2 391 
2 372 
2 354 
2 419 
2 399 
2 359 
2 255 
2 369 
2 264 
2 255 
2 165 
2 050 
1 846 
1 802 
1 722 
1 696 
1 378 
1 195 
1 043 
43 359 

11 974 
11 801 
10 580 
7 793 
4 682 
4 671 
4 907 
5 095 
4 853 
4 644 
3 589 
3 239 
2 464 
2 641 
1 764 
1 043 
476 
334 

39 575 
6 258 
21.2 






85 YEARS AND OVER . . . 

UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 YEARS AND OVER .... 


NONWHITE 
TOTAL? ALL AGES . 




1 227 
1 210 
1 271 
1 191 
1 226 
1 223 
1 102 
1 108 
1 055 
1 023 
991 
982 
876 
738 
745 
760 
713 
652 
506 
450 
17 565 

6 140 
5 714 
4 610 
3 376 
2 264 
2 428 
2 361 
2 468 
2 095 
1 825 
1 290 
1 086 
718 
634 
426 
249 
99 
72 

18 682 
1 480 
18.6 






































21 YEARS AND OVER .... 
UNDER 5 YEARS ...... 












30 TO 34 YEARS. ..... 














65 TO 69 YEARS. ..... 








85 YEARS AND OVER .... 


65 YEARS AND OVER .... 





General Population Characteristics 42-27 

Table 16. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, 1960, AND URBAN AND RURAL RESIDENCE, 

1950 Con. 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is less than 100. Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 100] 



AGE i COLOR f AND SEX 




1960 


1950 


TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 


TOTAL 


PLACES 
OF 

nooo 

TO 
2.500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES OF 
lOrOOO 
OR MORE 


PLACES OF 
2i500 TO 
10 t 000 


NONWHITE CON. 
MALEi ALL AGES* 


4OO 064 
12 661 
12 404 
12 571 
12 428 
12 639 
12 760 
12 535 
12 488 
11 736 
12 062 
11 828 
11 869 
11 572 
10 925 
10 074 
10 027 
9 302 
9 634 
8 608 
7 076 
5 909 
168 956 

62 703 
61 581 
56 268 
44 647 
24 573 
19 121 
18 702 
20 135 
19 552 
18 249 
13 708 
11 538 

a 333 

1 8 920 
5 983 

3 489 
1 500 
1 062 

209 515 
20 954 

17.2 

431 508 
12 749 
12 526 
12 394 
12 498 
12 382 
12 683 
12 607 
12 486 
11 753 
12 034 
11 940 
U 472 
11 494 
10 827 
10 399 
10 063 
9 238 
9 218 
7 838 
6 748 
6 Oil 
202 148 

62 549 
61 563 
56 132 
43 105 
26 088 
22 963 
23 605 
24 404 
22 255 
20 774 
16 048 
13 90S 
11 237 
11 389 
7 549 
4 398 
2 039 
1 502 

208 763 
26 877 
19.1 


129 589 
4 088 
3 982 
3 993 
3 921 
3 968 
3 961 
3 946 
3 786 
3 626 
3 528 
3 470 
3 452 
3 288 
3 059 
2 695 
2 755 
2 636 
2 506 
2 311 
1 971 
1 756 
60 891 

19 952 
18 847 
15 964 
12 179 
7 807 
7 142 
7 124 
7 659 
7 207 
6 828 
5 036 
4 242 
2 967 
2 838 
1 932 
1 100 
454 
311 

62 660 
6 635 

19.1 

151 300 
4 109 
4 084 
4 053 
3 932 
3 927 
3 996 
3 842 
3 817 
3 691 
3 748 
3 734 
3 427 
3 429 
3 179 
2 845 
2 868 
2 735 
2 745 
2 535 
2 331 
2 123 
80 150 

20 105 
19 094 
16 614 
13 214 
9 671 
9 237 
9 635 
9 666 
9 104 
8 356 
6 462 
5 625 
4 337 
4 341 
2 872 
1 660 
758 
549 

64 161 
10 180 
23.4 


38 273 
1 238 
1 212 
184 
100 
195 
201 
136 
077 
033 
986 
963 
984 
895 
853 
748 
743 
736 
701 
620 
568 
544 
18 556 

5 929 
5 433 
4 443 
3 368 
2 462 
2 305 
2 261 
2 393 
2 187 
2 116 
1 539 
1 297 
859 
783 
501 
245 
94 
58 

17 985 
1 681 
19.9 

44 700 
1 278 
1 216 
1 232 
1 221 
1 169 
1 088 
1 061 
1 102 
1 034 
1 028 
1 058 
934 
967 
926 
787 
873 
787 
789 
734 
703 
698 
24 015 

6 116 
5 313 

4 672 
3 886 
3 109 
2 829 
2 954 
2 974 
2 806 
2 525 
1 944 
1 684 
1 240 
1 151 
755 
416 
196 
130 

18 550 
2 648 
23.8 


18 071 
629 
594 
585 
654 
622 
611 
624 
569 
550 
528 
485 
496 
490 
429 
345 
358 
366 
347 
298 
239 
221 
8 031 

3 084 
2 882 
2 245 
1 608 
1 020 
1 082 
1 007 
1 153 
1 024 
858 
647 
529 
314 
279 
178 
92 
43 
26 

9 282 
618 
17.6 

19 784 
612 
633 
625 
617 
569 
615 
599 
533 
558 
527 
538 
495 
492 
447 
393 
387 
394 
366 
354 
267 
229 
9 534 

3 056 
2 832 
2 365 
1 768 
1 244 
1 346 
1 354 
1 315 
1 071 
967 
643 
557 
404 
355 
248 
157 
56 
46 

9 400 
862 
19.6 


33 647 

987 
957 
1 026 
966 
993 
966 
1 Oil 
988 
945 
878 
936 
845 
833 
759 
708 
740 
656 
631 
725 
600 
520 
15 977 

4 929 

4 788 
4 O81 
3 352 

2 254 
1 798 
1 765 
1 901 
1 897 
1 799 
1 350 
1 O87 
804 
755 
512 
335 
133 
107 

15 825 
1 842 
19.5 

39 864 
1 033 
1 017 
1 003 
923 
993 
1 O57 
958 
975 
942 
960 
960 
870 
875 
774 
713 
720 
710 
721 
737 
730 
624 
21 569 

4 969 
4 892 
4 192 
3 618 
2 707 
2 348 
2 511 
2 494 
2 473 
2 275 
1 786 
1 474 
1 219 
1 215 
846 
472 
214 
159 

16 204 
2 906 
24.2 


39 598 
1 234 
1 219 
1 198 
1 201 
1 158 
1 183 
1 175 
1 152 
1 098 
I 136 
1 086 
1 127 
1 070 
1 O18 
894 
914 
878 
827 
668 
564 
471 
18 327 

6 010 
5 744 
5 195 
3 851 
2 071 
1 957 
2 091 
2 212 
2 099 
2 055 
1 500 
1 329 
990 
1 021 
741 
428 
184 
120 

19 568 
2 494 
18.7 

46 952 
1 186 
1 218 
193 
171 
196 
236 
224 
207 
157 
233 
178 
128 
095 
032 
952 
888 
844 
869 
710 
631 
572 
25 032 

5 964 
6 057 
5 385 

3 942 
2 611 
2 714 
2 816 
2 883 
2 754 
2 589 
2 089 
1 910 
1 474 
1 620 
1 023 
615 
292 
214 

20 007 

3 764 
24.1 


270 475 
8 573 
8 422 
8 578 
8 507 
8 671 
8 799 
8 589 
8 702 
8 110 
8 534 
8 358 
8 417 
8 284 
7 866 
7 379 
7 272 
6 666 
7 128 
6 297 
5 105 
4 153 
108 065 

42 751 
42 734 
40 304 
32 468 
16 766 
11 979 
11 578 
12 476 
12 345 
11 421 
8 672 
7 296 
5 366 
6 082 
4 051 
2 389 
1 046 
751 

146 855 
14 319 
16.5 

280 208 
8 640 
8 442 
8 341 
8 566 
8 455 
8 687 
8 765 
8 669 
8 062 
8 266 
8 206 
8 045 
8 065 
7 648 
7 554 
7 195 
6 503 
6 473 
5 303 
4 417 
3 888 
121 998 

42 444 
42 469 
39 518 
29 891 
16 417 
13" 726 
13 970 
14 738 
13 151 
12 418 
9 586 
8 283 
6 900 
7 048 
4 677 
2 738 
1 281 
953 

144 602 
16 697 
17.6 


16 451 
546 
479 
509 
527 
486 
510 
508 
519 
477 
513 
467 
482 
442 
438 
380 
398 
339 
376 
330 
236 
216 
7 273 

2 547 
2 527 
2 209 
1 679 
867 
767 
787 
846 
847 
781 
661 
513 
370 
431 
317 
167 
73 
62 

8 396 
1 050 
17.8 

19 188 
534 
539 
504 
549 
525 
562 
494 
496 
496 
502 
471 
445 
459 
415 
403 
419 
381 
377 
290 
254 
210 
9 863 

2 651 
2 550 
2 193 
721 
070 
048 
028 
082 
095 
022 
832 
725 
607 
617 
458 
280 
116 
93 

8 571 
1 564 
22*2 


254 024 
8 027 
7 943 
8 069 
7 980 
8 185 
8 289 
8 081 
8 183 
7 633 
8 021 
7 891 
7 935 
7 842 
7 428 
6 999 
6 874 
6 327 
6 752 
5 967 
4 869 
3 937 
100 792 

40 204 
40 207 
38 095 
30 789 
15 899 
11 212 
10 791 
11 630 
11 498 
10 640 
8 Oil 
6 783 
4 996 
5 651 
3 734 
2 222 
973 
689 

138 459 
13 269 

16.4 

261 020 
8 106 
7 903 
7 837 
8 017 
7 930 
8 125 
8 271 
8 173 
. 7 566 
7 784 
7 735 
7 600 
7 606 
7 233 
7 151 
6 776 
6 122 
6 096 
5 013 
4 163 
3 678 
112 135 

39 793 
39 919 
37 325 
28 170 
15 347 
12 678 
12 942 
13 656 
12 056 
11 396 
8 754 
7 558 
6 293 
6 431 
4 219 
2 458 
1 165 
860 

136 031 
15 133 
17.4 


396 967 

11 849 
J. 26 040 

\ 24 671 

11 645 
11 745 

|- 32 293 

L 40 846 

9 224 
. 8 615 
J. 17 077 

\ 14 884 

6 206 
181 872 

62 560 
55 683 
50 070 
40 576 
30 511 
27 396 
22 689 
23 613 
18 295 
15 376 
12 727 
10 107 
8 161 
8 932 
. 5 221 
J. 4 364 

686 

194 005 
19 203 
18.7 

426 655 
,. 12 200 
J. 25 4-41 

1 24 706 

11 806 
11 698 

j- 32 624 

L 39 640 

9 115 
,. 8 913 
\ 17 604 

\ 16 430 

8 326 
208 152 

62 347 

56 128 
48 755 
42 947 
36 582 
31 168 
25 426 
27 326 
20 668 
18 415 
14 974 
10 602 
8 746 
11 044 
N 5 607 
j. 4 688 

1 232 

193 747 
22 571 
20.4 


108 293 

3 078 
6 453 

5 857 

2 563 

2 776 

7 233 

8 590 

1 940 
1 812 
3 793 

3 557 

1 699 
58 942 

15 388 
12 572 
10 530 
9 162 
8 936 
9 346 
8 013 
8 236 
6 264 
5 228 
4 190 
3 089 
2 400 
2 370 
1 298 
1 097 

174 

44 095 
4 939 
23.6 

127 366 
3 196 
6 305 

5 797 

2 680 
2 720 

7 497 
8 795 

2 005 
2 119 
4 449 

4 831 

2 587 
74 385 

15 298 
12 897 
10 800 
11 399 
12 114 
11 288 
9 583 
10 314 
7 787 
6 785 
5 276 
3 524 
3 021 
3 646 
1 765 
1 484 

385 

45 563 
"7 280 
25.5 


288 674 
B 771 
19 587 

18 814 

9 082 
8 969 

25 060 
32 256 

7 284 
6 803 
13 284 

11 327 

4 507 

122 930 

47 172 
43 111 
39 540 
31 414 
21 575 
18 050 
14 676 
15 377 
12 031 
10 148 
8 537 
7 018 
5 761 
6 562 
3 923 
3 267 

512 

149 910 
14 264 
17.3 

299 289 
9 004 
19 136 

18 909 

9 126 
8 978 

25 127 
30 845 

7 110 
6 794 
13 155 

11 599 

5 739 

133 767 

47 049 
43 231 
37 955 
31 548 
24 468 
19 880 
15 843 
17 012 
12 881 
11 630 
9 698 
7 078 
5 725 
7 398 
3 842 
3 204 

847 

148 184 
15 291 
18.4 






































21 YEARS AND OVER . . . . 


































85 YEARS AND OVER .... 


65 YEARS AND OVER .... 


FEMALE! ALL AGES* 










































21 YEARS AND OVER . . . . 


































85 YEARS AND OVER . 


65 YEARS AND OVER .... 



42-28 



South Carolina 
Table 17.-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE: 1890 TO I960 

[Percent not shown where leas than 0.1] 



j=== 
AGE COLOR 


POPULATION 





AND SEX 


1960 


1950 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 


ALL CLASSES 














TOTAL .... 
UNDER 5 YEARS . . 
5 TO 9 YEARS. 
10 TO 14 YEARS. . 
15 TO 19 YEARS. 
20 TO 24 YEARS. . 
25 TO 29 YEARS. 
30 TO 34 YEARS. * 
35 TO 39 YEARS. * 
40 TO 44 YEARS. * 


2 382 594 
294 913 
286 285 
268 930 
228 819 
166 802 
147 357 
149 510 
157 596 
142 422 


2 117 027 
279 603 
244 044 
212 300 
194 275 
177 014 
172 433 
149 327 
146 493 
120 927 


1 899 804 
210 660 
214 036 
215 989 
224 090 
193 891 
160 513 
128 812 
115 046 
95 827 


1 738 765 
205 076 
240 750 
222 80S 
211 345 
166 354 
120 468 
98 859 
104 760 
86 589 


683 724 
228 581 
235 827 
223 040 
182 761 
160 204 
126 448 
98 891 
104 386 
79 488 


515 400 
226 459 
208 780 
192 406 
172 674 
151 470 
118 317 
91 750 
83 534 
61 468 


45 TO 49 YEARS. 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 
55 TO 59 YEARS. 
60 TO 64 YEARS* * 
65 TO 69 YEARS. 
70 TO 74 YEARS. 
75 AND OVER . 


129 507 
105 885 
86 583 
67 386 
60 661 
42 768 
47 170 


99 968 
83 431 
67 652 
54 555 

52 127 
32 061 

30 817 


85 689 
72 885 
56 021 
45 031 
40 419 
21 573 
19 322 


78 138 
65 371 
44 318 
36 173 
23 596 
16 845 
16 723 
592 


71 490 
50 909 
32 763 

34 225 
23 639 
15 525 
14 211 
1 336 


48 096 
47 161 
32 295 
32 527 
19 979 
12 283 
11 830 
2 371 


NOT REPORTED. . . 
MEDIAN AGE. ..* 


23! 4 


... 

23.6 


22*2 


19.7 


19.2 


18.7 




1 175 818 
149 485 
144 940 
136 408 
121 254 
86 495 
71 450 
71 947 
75 549 
69 619 


1 040 540 
141 835 
123 279 
107 709 
96 774 
85 648 
83 680 
72 840 
70 940 
58 912 


935 239 
105 918 
107 496 
109 379 
110 830 
93 495 
77 719 
62 733 
54 177 
46 290 


853 158 
103 100 
120 871 
112 421 
103 771 
77 567 
54 845 
46 149 
49 227 
41 683 


838 293 

115 501 
118 568 
111 996 
88 816 
74 678 
59 445 
47 179 
51 046 
39 603 


751 842 
115 296 
104 854 
97 224 
84 448 
70 463 
55 843 
45 086 
41 596 
30 934 


UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS. 
10 TO 14 YEARS. 
15 TO 19 YEARS. 
20 TO 24 YEARS- 
25 TO 29 YEARS. 
30 TO 34 YEARS. 
35 TO 39 YEARS- . 
40 TO 44 YEARS. 


45 TO 49 YEARS. 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 
55 TO 59 YEARS. 
60 TO 64 YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS. 
70 TO 74 YEARS. * 
75 AND OVER . 
NOT 'REPORTED. . . 
MEDIAN AGE. * . * 


63 019 
50 751 
40 433 
30 292 
26 -903 
18 401 
18 872 
. . . 
22.1 


47 847 
40 019 
32 923 
26 015 
23 734 
14 855 
13 530 

23^0 


41 662 
35 944 
27 792 
22 635 
20 040 
10 616 
8 513- 

21 '.8 


38 051 
33 620 
23 349 
19 761 
12 186 
3 570 
7 730 
257 
19.3 


39 783 

27 506 
17 151 
19 169 
12 928 
7 962 
6 236 
726 
19.1 


23 097 
24 890 
17 099 
18 040 
10 531 
5 833 
5 285 
1 323 
18.4 


FEMALE. . . 
UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS* 
10 TO 14 YEARS. 
15 TO 19 YEARS. * 
20 TO 24 YEARS. 
25 TO 29 YEARS. . 
30 TO 34 YEARS* * 
35 TO 39 YEARS. 
40 TO 44 YEARS. . 


1 206 776 
145 428 
141 345 
132 522 
107 565 
80 307 
75 907 
77 563 
82 047 
72 803 


1 076 487 
137 768 
120 765 
104 591 
97 501 
91 366 
85 753 
76 487 
75 553 
62 015 


964 565 
104 742 
106 540 
106 610 
113 260 
100 396 
82 794 
66 079 
60 869 
49 537 


885 607 
101 976 
119 879 
110 387 
107 574 
88 787 
65 623 
52 710 
55 533 
44 906 


845 431 
113 080 
117 259 
111 044 
93 945 
85 526 
67 003 
51 712 
53 340 
39 885 


763 558 
113 163 
103 926 
95 182 
88 226 
81 007 
62 474 
46 664 
41 938 
30 534 


45 TO 49 YEARS. 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 


66 488 
55 134 


52 121 

43 412 


4:4 027 
36 941 


40 087 
31 751 


31 707 
23 403 


24 999 
22 271 


55 TO 59 YEARS. . 


46 150 


34 729 


28 229 


20 969 


15 612 


15 196 


60 TO 64 YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS* 


37 094 
33 758 


28 540 
28 393 


22 396 

20 379 


16 412 
11 410 


15 056 
10 711 


14 487 
9 448 


70 TO 74 YEARS. 
75 AND OVER 


24 367 
28 298 


17 206 
17 287 


10 957 
10 809 


8 275 
8 993 


7 563 
7 975 


6 450 
6 545 


NOT REPORTED. . . 


... 


. * 


. 


335 


610 


1 048 


MEDIAN AGE. * 


24.6 


24.2 


22.5 


20.2 


19.3 


18*9 


WHITE 














TOTAL . . . . 


1 551 022 


1 293 405 


1 084 308 


944 049 


818 538 


679 161 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


169 661 


154 696 


107 740 


108 643 


110 992 


99 685 


5 TO 9 YEARS. 


163 141 


132 233 


110 360 


124 289 


107 510 


85 656 


10 TO 14 YEARS. 


156 530 


113 475 


114 219 


111 560 


99 498 


78 024 


15 TO 19 YEARS. 


141 067 


110 752 


121 655 


104 801 


83 045 


73 519 


20 TO 24 YEARS* 


116 141 


109 921 


106 877 


89 597 


74 794 


66 133 


25 TO 29 YEARS. 


105 273 


113 869 


95 578 


69 106 


64 593 


55 039 


30 TO 34 YEARS* 


107 203 


101 212 


83 452 


59 832 


53 190 


45 529 


35 TO 39 YEARS. 


113 057 


95 554 


70 615 


59 68 


53 018 


39 645 


40 TO 44 YEARS. 


100 615 


81 964 


59 438 


49 542 


42 056 


29 508 


45 TO 49 YEARS. 


90 484 


66 177 


53 943 


45 059 


35 407 


23 956 


50 TO 54 YEARS. 


76 129 


55 730 


45 827 


38 393 


26 210 


25 048 


55 TO 59 YEARS. 


61 137 


46 943 


37 419 


27 888 


18 749 


16 178 


60 TO 64 YEARS. 


47 816 


37 648 


29 615 


20 596 


18 947 


16 350 


65 TO 69 YEARS* 


40 352 


32 151 


23 018 


13 960 


13 604 


10 069 


70 TO 74 YEARS. 


29 236 


21 233 


12 877 


10 710 


8 839 


6 298 


75 AND OVER * 


33 180 


19 847 


11 675 


10 174 


7 578 


5 888 


NOT REPORTED. . . 


. . 


... 


. 


218 


508 


636 


MEDIAN AGE. 


26.4 


26.1 


24*1 


21.3 


20*5 


20*2 


MALE 


775 754 


643 573 


540 597 


473 316 


415 823 


343 544 


UNDER 5 YEARS . 


86 782 


79 275 


54 574 


55 38 


56 717 


50 799 


5 TO 9 YEAKS. * 


83 359 


67 596 


55 909 


62 976 


54 604 


43 521 


10 TO 14 YEARS. 


80 140 


57 639 


56 296 


56 889 


50 415 


39 918 


1 15 TO 19 YEARS. 


76 607 


56 198 


61 152 


52 91 


41 488 


36 990 


20 TO 24 YEARS. 


61 922 


55 137 


52 524 


43 34 


37 209 


32 437 


25 TO 29 YEARS. 


52 329 


56 284 


46 985 


32 947 


32 09 


27 093 


30 TO 34 YEARS. 


53 245 


50 151 


41 271 


29 14 


26 570 


23 276 


35 TO 39 YEARS. 


55 414 


47 327 


34 603 


29 70 


27 078 


20 376 


40 TO 44 YEARS. 


50 067 


40 617 


29 569 


24 81 


21 734 


15 232 



1900 


1890 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


1960 


1950 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


1890 

-. 

OOiO 
14.8 
15.5 

lT.4 
9.0 
6.6 
5.6 


340 316 
203 651 
194 263 
174 363 
157 420 
138 747 
96 614 
71 455 
63 515 
56 482 

45 709 
42 718 
27 427 
26 525 
16 790 
11 327 
11 506 
1 804 
18.1 

664 895 
102 024 
97 849 
88 697 
76 992 
66 311 
46 137 
35 046 
31 104 
28 261 

22 535 
22 104 
13 575 
13 916 
8 638 
5 378 
5 372 
956 
17.8 

675 421 
101 627 
96 414 
85 666 
80 428 
72 436 
50 477 
36 409 
32 411 
28 221 

23 174 

20 614 
13 652 
12 609 
8 152 
5 949 
6 134 
848 
16.3 

557 807 
78 373 
74 574 
67 369 
63 873 
56 652 
42 195 
32 393 
27 622 
27 527 

22 814 
20 716 
13 549 
11 67 
7 870 
5 144 
4 823 
642 
19.6 

281 147 
39 997 
38 38 
34 50 
31 757 
28 308 
21 224 
16 454 
13 99 
14 192 


151 149 
169 941 
178 802 
166 082 
131 499 
104 099 
75 439 
64 327 
62 383 
47 780 

37 728 
34 426 
21 471 
20 781 
13 903 
9 751 
10 628 
2 109 
17.3 

572 337 
86 664 
90 207 
85 255 
64 049 
49 935 
35 767 
32 098 
31 456 
23 091 

17 171 
17 145 


100.0 
12.4 
12.0 
11.3 
9.6 
7.0 
6.2 
6.3 


oo.o 

13*2 

11.5 
10.0 
9.2 
8.4 
8-1 
7.1 


ooo 

11.1 
110 
11.4 
11.8 
10*2 
8.4 
6.8 


00.0 
11.8 
13.8 
12.8 
12.2 
9.6 
6.9 
5.7 


00.0 
13.6 
14.0 
13.2 
10.9 
9.5 
7.5 
5.9 


00.0 

15.1 
13.6 
12.7 
11.4 
10.0 
7.8 
6.1 


00.0 
15.2 
14.5 
13.0 
11.7 
10.4 
7.2 
5.3 


6.0 

5.4 
4.4 


5.7 

4-7 
3-9 


5.0 

4*5 
3*8 


5.0 

4.5 
3.8 


4.7 

4.2 
3.0 


4.1 

3-2 

3.1 


4.2 

3*4 
3-2 


4.2 

3.3 

3.0 


2.8 
2.5 

1.8 
2.0 


2-6 
2.5 

1*5 
1.5 


2-4 
2*1 
1*1 
1*0 


2.1 
1*4 
1.0 
1.0 


2.0 
1.4 
0.9 
0.8 
0.1 


2.1 
1*3 
0.8 
0.6 
0.2 


2*0 
10 
0.8 
0,9 
0,1 


1.8 
1.2 
0.8 - 
0.9 
0.2 










100.0 
12.7 
12.3 
11.6 
10.3 
7.4 


100.0 
13*6 
11*8 
10*4 
9. 3 
8*2 


100.0 
110 
11.5 
11*7 
11- V 

10.0 


00.0 
12.1 
14.2 
13.2 
12*2 
9.1 


100*0 
13.6 
14.1 
13.4 
10.6 
8.9 


100.0 
15,3 
13,9 
12,9 
11.2 
9.4 
7,4 
6.0 

4,1 
3.1 


100.0 
15.3 
14.7 
130 
11.6 
10.0 
6.9 
5. 3 
4*7 
40 

3.4 


00.0 
15.1 
15.8 
14.9 
11.2 
8.7 
6*2 
5.6 
5*5 
4.0 

3.0 
3.0 


6.1 
6.4 
5.9 

5.4 


7*0 
6*8 
5*7 

4.6 


6.7 

5.8 

4.9 

4*5 


*>!a 

4.9 
4.5 


6^1 
4.7 

4.7 


10 432 
7 184 
4 852 
5 063 
1 015 
16.8 

578 812 
83 277 
88 595 
80 827 
67 450 
54 164 


2.6 


2.5 


2-4 


2*3 


20 


2*4 


2*1 


1.8 


1.6 
1.6 


1.4 
1O 


1*1 

o*v 


1*0 
0.9 


0.9 
0,7 


0,8 
0*7 


0.8 
0.8 
0.1 


0.8 
0.9 
0.2 














100.0 
12.1 
11.7 
11.0 


100*0 
12*6 
11.2 
9*7 


100.0 
10-9 
11.0 

11*1 


100*0 
11*5 
13.5 

12,5 


100.0 
13.4 
13*9 
12.1 


100*0 

13,6 
12*5 


100*0 
15.0 
14.3 
12.7 


100*0 
14,4 
15.3 
14.0 


6,7 


8*5 


10-4 


10*0 


10*1 


10*6 


10.7 


9.4 


32 229 

30 927 
24 669 

20 557 
17 281 
10 518 
10 349 


6*8 
6,0 


7*0 
5*6 


5.1 




4,7 


u.O 
3*3 


4.2 
3-4 


5*3 
4.3 

3*6 


4.6 
3,6 




20 


2*4 


l.tt 


2*0 


2.1 


3.0 
1.8 


6 719 
4 899 
5 565 

1 094 


2.6 
2.0 
20 


2.6 
1*6 


2*1 
1*1 
1*1 


1-0 


1O 

o.v 

O.S) 


1*2 
0*8 


1.2 
0-9 
0*9 


1.2 
0.8 
1.0 
0.2 
















462 00 
63 64 
66 169 
61 840 
50 890 
41 472 
29 80 
30 44 
27 25 
22 32 

17 19 
15 22 
10 38 
9 33 
6 34 
4 56 
4 52 
55 
18. 

230 40 
32 74 
33 84 
31 84 
25 30 
20 28 
14 44 
15 51 
14 08 
11 08 


100.0 


100.0 


100*0 


100*0 


100.0 


100.0 


100*0 


100.0 


10. & 
10.1 
9.1 


10*2 
8-8 
8*6 
8.5 


11*2 


13*2 

11.8 

11.1 


1<U2 
10*1 
V.I 


12.6 
11-5 
10.8 


13*4 
12.1 
11.5 
10*2 


14.3 
13.4 
11.0 
9.0 


6*8 
6.9 


8.8 
7.8 


7.7 


vo 




8*1 
6,7 


5.6 
5-0 
4.9 


6.6 

5.9 
4.8 

3.7 


6.5 

5.6 
4.9 
3.9 
3.1 

2*6 
U9 


6* 

4* 
3*6 

2* 
1*6 


4. a 

2*7 
2* 

1.2 


$'( 

I- ! 




UO 


20 

2O 
1,7 
1.1 


?*' 

0*9 


3.7 

2-4 
2*1 
1*4 
0*9 


3.3 

2.2 

2*0 
1.4 
1.0 












0*1 


0*1 


o.i 


100.0 
11-2 
10.7 
10*3 
9.9 
8.0 
6,7 
6.9 
7. 
6, 


100. 

12* 
10- 
9* 
8* 
8* 
6* 
7. 
7. 
6* 


100*0 
10* 
10*3 
10*8 

no 

9*7 
8*7 
7.6 
6*4 
5. 


100*0 
11*7 
13O 

12*0 
11*2 

7.0 
6.2 
6O 
5*2 


100*0 
13.6 

13*1 
12.1 
10.0 
8.9 
7.7 
b.U 
6.5 


100. ( 

11*6 
10.8 

9.4 
7.9 
6,8 


100-0 
14.2 
13*7 
12*3 

11*3 
10-1 
7*5 
5*9 
5*0 
5,0 


100*0 

14*2 
14.7 
13.8 
11.0 
8.8 
6*3 
6.7 
6*1 
4.8 



General Population Chara 



cteristics 



42-29 



Table 17. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE: 1890 TO I960 Con. 

[Percent not ahown where teas than 0.1] 



AGE i COLORi 

AMD ^EX 






POPULATION 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 




1960 


1950 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


1890 


1960 


1950 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


1890 


WHITE CON. 

MALE CON. 
45 TO 49 YEARS. 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 
55 TO 59 YEARS. 
60 TO 64 YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS. 
70 TO 74 YEARS. 
75 AND OVER . 
NOT REPORTED. . 
MEDIAN AGE. . . 

FEMALE. . . 
UNDER -5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS. . 
10 TO 14 YEARS. 
15 TO 19 YEARS. 
20 TO 24 YEARS. 
25 TO 29 YEARS. 
30 TO 34 YEARS. 
35 TO 39 YEARS. 
40 TO 44 YEARS. 

-45 TO 49 YEARS- 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 
55 TO 59 YEARS. 
60 TO 64 YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS. 
70 TO 74 YEARS- 
75 AND OVER 
NOT REPORTED. . 
MEDIAN AGE. . . 

NONWHITE 

TOTAL . 
UNDER 5 YEARS . . 
5 TO 9 YEAKS. 
10 TO 14 YEARS. . 
15 TO 19 YEARS. 
20 TO 24 YEARS. 
25 TO 29 YEARS. . 
30 TO 34 YEARS.- 
35 TO 39 YEARS. 
40 TO 44 YEARS. 

45 TO 49 YEARS. 
50 TO 54 YEARS. . 
55 TO 59 YEARS. . 
60 TO 64 YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS. 
70 TO 74 YEARS. 
75 AND OVER 
NOT REPORTED. . . 
MEDIAN AGE. . . 


44- 770 
37 043 
28 895 
21 959 
17 983 
12 418 
12 821 

24*9 

775 268 
82 879 
79 782 
76 390 
64 460 
54 219 
52 944 
53 958 
57 643 
50 548 

45 714 
39 086 
32 242 
25 857 
22 369 
16 818 
20 359 

27**B 

831 572 
125. 252 
123 1-44 
112 400 
87 752 
50 661 
42 084 
42 307 
44 539 
41 807 

39 023 
29 756 
25 446 
19 570 
20 309 
13 532 
13 990 

is!! 

400 064 
62 703 
61 581 
56 268 
44 647 
24 573 
19 121 
18 702 
20 135 
19 552 

18 249 
13 708 
11 538 
8 333 
8 920 
5 983 
6 051 

17.2 

431 508 
62 549 
61 563 
56 132 
43 105 
26 088 
22 963 
23 605 
24 404 
22 255 

20 774 
16 048 
13 908 
11 237 
11 389 
7 549 
7 939 
... 
19.1 


32 471 
27 292 
22 816 
17 854 
14 802 
9 634 
8 480 
... 
25.5 

649 832 
75 421 
64 637 
55 836 
54 554 
54 784 
57 585 
51 061 
48 227 
41 347 

33 706 

28 438 
24 127 
19 794 
17 349 
< 11 599 
11 367 
. . 
26.7 

823 622 
124 907 
I'll 811 
98 825 
83 523 
67 093 
58 564 
48 115 
50 939 
38 963 

33 791 

27 701 
20 709 
16 907 
19 976 
10 828 
10 970 
. . 
19.6 

396 967 
62 560 
55 683 
50 070 
40 576 
30 511 
27 396 
22 689 
23 613 
18 295 

15 376 
12 727 
10 107 
8 161 
8 932 
5 221 
5 050 

18- 1 7 

426 655 
62 347 
56 128 
48 755 
42 947 
36 582 
31 168 
25 426 
27 326 
20 668 

18 415 
14 974 
10 602 
8 746 
11 044 
5 607 
5 920 

20.4 


26 946 
22 901 
18 566 
14 617 
11 306 
6 206 
5 172 
... 
23.8 

543 711 
53 166 
54 451 
55 923 
60 503 
54 353 
48 593 
42 181 
36 012 
29 869 

26 997 
22 926 
18 853 
14 998 
11 712 
6 671 
6 503 

24.4 

815 496 
102 920 
103 676 
101 770 
102 435 
87 014 
64 935 
45 360 
44 431 
36 389 

31 746 
27 058 
18 602 

15 416 
17 401 
8 696 
7 647 

... 
19,9 

394 642 
51 344 
51 587 
51 083 
49 678 
. 40 971 
30 734 
21 462 
19 574 
16 721 

14 716 
13 043 
9 226 
8 018 
8 734 
4 410 
3 '341 

19.i 

420 854 
51 576 
52 089 
50 687 
52 757 
46 043 
34 201 
23 898 
24 857 
19 668 

17 030 
14 015 
9 376 
7 398 
8 667 
4 286 
4 306 

2o!i 


22 811 

19 825 
14 584 
10 806 
7 003 
5 380 
4 685 
111 
21.0 

470 733 
53 262 

61 313 
54 671 
51 890 
46 255 
36 159 
30 690 
29 974 
24 726 

22 248 
18 568 
13 304 
9 790 
6 957 
5 330 
5 489 
107 
21.5 

794 716 
96 433 
116 461 
111 248 
106 544 
76 757 
51 362 
39 027 
45 079 
37 047 

33 079 
26 978 
16 430 
15 577 
9 636 
6 135 
6 549 
374 
18.4 

379 842 
47 719 
57 895 
55 532 

50 860 
34 225 
21 898 
17 007 
19 520 
16 867 

15 240 
13 795 
8 765 
8 955 
5 183 
3 190 
3 045 
146 
17.8 

414 874 
48 714 
58 566 
55 716 
55 684 
42 532 
29 464 
22 020 
25 559 
20 180 

17 839 
13 183 
7 665 
6 622 
4 453 
2 945 
3- 504 
228 
19.0 


19 150 
13 948 
9 709 
10 137 
7 139 
4 370 
3 177 
287 
20.6 

402 715 
54 275 
52 906 
49 083 
41 557 
37 585 
32 502 
26 620 
25 940 
20 322 

16 257 
12 262 
9 040 
8 810 
6 465 
4 469 
4 401 
221 
20.5 

865 186 
117 589 
128 317 
123 542 
99 716 
85 410 
61 855 
45 701 
51 368 
37 432 

36 083 
24 699 
14 014 
15 278 
10 035 
6 686 
6 633 
828 
18.1 

422 470 
58 784 
63 964 
61 581 
47 328 
37 469 
27 354 
20 609 
23 968 
17 869 

20 633 
13 558 
7 442 
9 032 
5 789 
3 592 
3 059 
439 
17.8 

442 716 
58 805 
64 353 
61 961 
52 388 
47 941 
34 501 
25 092 
27 400 
19 563 

15 450 
11 141 
6 572 
6 246 
4 246 
3 094 
3 574 
389 
.18.4 


12 052 
13 318 
9 754 
8 536 
4 800 
2 703 
2 381 
358 
20*1 

335 617 
48 886 
42 135 
38 106 
36 529 
33 696 
27 946 
22 253 
19 269 
14 276 

11 904 
11 730 
8 424 
7 814 
5 269 
3 595 
3 507 
278 
20.3 

836 239 

128 774 
123 124 
114 382 
99 155 
85 337 
63 278 
46 221 
43 889 
31 960 

24 140 
22 113 
14 1.17 
16 177 
9 910 
5 985 
5 942 
1 735 
17.6 

408 298 
64 497 
61 333 
57 306 
47 458 
38 026 
28 750 
21 810 
21 220 
15 702 

11 045 
11 572 
7 345 
9 504 
5 731 
3 130 
2 904 
965 
17.2 

427 941 
64 277 
6L 791 
57 076 
51 697 
47 311 
34 528 
24 411 
22 669 
16 258 

13 095 
10 541 
6 772 
6 673 
4 .179 
2 855 
3 038 
770 
17.9 


11 742 
10 786 
6 268 
5 265 
3 578 
2 207 
2 138 
358 
19.3 

276 660 
38 376 
36 193 
32 868 
32 116 
28 344 
20 971 
15 939 
13 631 
13 335 

11 072 
9 930 
7 281 
6 406 
4 292 
2 937 
2 685 
284 
19.8 

782 509 
125 278 
119 689 
106 994 
93 547 
82 095 
54 419 
39 062 
35 893 
28 955 

22 895 
22 002 
13 878 
14 854 
8 920 
6 183 
6 683 
1 162 
17.1 

383 748 
62 027 
59 468 
54 19,6 
45 235 
38 003 
24 913 
18 592 
17 113 
14 069 

10 793 
11 318 
7 307 
8 651 
5 060 
3 171 
3 234 
598 
16.8 

398 761 
63 251 
60 221 
52 798 
48 312 
44 092 
29 506 
20 470 
18 780 
14 886 

12 102 
10 684 
6 57 
6 203 
3 860 
3 012 
3 449 
56 
17. 


7 631 
6 995 
4 824 
4 182 
3 003 
2 209 
2 148 
267 
18.3 

231 603 
30 900 
32 346 
29 996 
25 582 
21 192 
15 364 
14 932 
13 179 
11 233 

9 565 
8 225 
5 558 
5 157 
3 346 
2 357 
2 379 
292 
19.4 

689 141 
106 296 
112 613 
104 242 
80 609 
62 627 
45 634 
33 879 
35 124 
25 458 

19 206 


5.8 
4.8 


5.0 

4.2 


5.0 

4.2 


4.8 
4.2 


4.6 

3.4 


3.5 
3.9 
2.8 
2.5 

1.4 
0.8 
0.7 
0,1 


4*2 
3.8 
2.2 
1-9 
1.3 
0.8 
0.8 
0*1 


3.3 

3.0 
2.1 
1.8 
1.3 
1.0 
0.9 
0.1 


2.8 
2.3 

1.6 
1.7 


2.8 
2.3 
1.5 
1-3 


2.7 
2.1 
1.1 
1.0 


2.3 

1.5 
1.1 
1.0 


2.4 
1.7 
1*1 
0.8 
0.1 










100.0 
10,7 
10.3 
9.9 
8.3 
7.0 
6.8 


100.0 
11.6 
9.9 
8.6 
8.4 
8.4 


100.0 
9.8 
10*0 
10.3 
11.1 
10.0 


100.0 
11*3 
13.0 
11.6 
11.0 
9.8 


100.0 
13.5 
13.1 
12.2 
10.3 
9.3 


100.0 
14.6 
12.6 
11.4 
10.9 
10.0 


100.0 
13.9 
13.1 
11.9 
11.6 
10.2 


100.0 
13.3 
14.0 
13-0 
11.0 
9.2 

6 .4 


6.5 

5.9 
5.0 
4.2 
3.3 
2.9 
2.2 
2.6 


6.4 

5.2 
4.4 
3.7 
3.0 
2.7 


5.5 

5.0 
4.2 
3.5 
2.8 
2.2 


5.3 

4.7 
3.9 

2.8 
2.1 
1.5 


5.0 

4.0 
3.0 
2.2 
2.2 

1.6 


4.3 

3.5 
3.5 
2.5 
2.3 

1.6 


4.8 

4.0 
3.6 
2.6 
2.3 

1.6 


4-9 

4.1 
3.6 
2.4 
2.2 

1.4 


1.7 


1.2 


1.2 


1.1 
0.1 


1.0 
0.1 


1.0 
0.1 


1.0 
0*1 










100.0 
15.1 
14.8 
13.5 
10.6 
6.1 
5.1 
5.1 
5.4 
5*0 


100. 
15.2 
13.6 
12.0 
10.1 
8.1 
7.1 
5.8 
6.2 
4.7 


100.0 
12.6 
12.7 
12-5 
12.6 
10.7 
8.0 
5.6 
5-4 
4.5 


100.0 
t2.1 
14.7 
14.0 
13.4 
9,7 
6.5 
4.9 
5.7 
4.7 


100.0 
13.6 
14.8 
14.3 
11.5 
9,9 
7.1 
5.3 
5.9 
4.3 


100.0 
15.4 
14.7 
13.7 
11.9 
10.2 
7.6 
5*5 
5.2 
3.8 


100.0 
16.0 
15.3 
13-7 
12-0 
10-5 
7.0 
5-0 
4.6 
3-7 

2-9 

2.8 


100.0 
15.4 
16.3 
15,1 
11.7 
9.1 
6.6 
4*9 
5.1 
3.7 

2*8 


11 089 
11 442 
7 554 
5 185> 
6 101 
1 550 


2.4 
1.6 
1.7 


2.4 
I. 3 
1.3 


2.1 
1.1 
0.9 


1.2 
0.8 
0.8 


1.2 
0.8 
0.8 
O.L 


1.2 
0.7 
0.7 
0.2 


1-1 
0.8 
0.9 
0*1 


1.1 
0.8 
0.9 
0.2 


341 932 
53 919 
56 364 
53 411 
38 741 
29 655 


100.0 
15.7 
15.4 
14.1 
11.2 


100.0 
15.8 
14.0 
12.6 
10.2 


100.0 
13-0 
13*1 
12.9 
12.6 


100.0 
12.6 
15.2 
14.6 
13.4 


100.0 
13.9 
15.1 
14.6 
11.2 


100.0 
15.8 
15.0 
14.0 
11.6 


100.0 
16.2 
15.5 
14*1 
11.8 


100.0 
15.8 
16.5 
15.6 
11.3 


UNDER 5 YEARS . . 
5 TO 9 YEARS. 
10 TO 14 YEARS. . 
15 TO 19 YEARS. . 
20 TO 24 YEARS. . 
25 TO 29 YEARS. 
30 TO 34 YEARS. 
35 TO 39 YEARS. . 
40 TO 44' YEARS. 

45 TO 49 YEARS. . 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 
55 TO 59 YEARS. 
60 TO 64 YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS. . 
70 TO 74 YEARS. 
75 AND OVER 
NOT REPORTED. . . 
MEDIAN AGE. . . 

FEMALE. 
UNDER 5 YEARS . . 
5 TO 9 YEARS. . 
10 TO 14 YEARS. . 
15 TO 19 YEARS. 
20 TO 24 YEARS. 
25 TO 29 YEARS. 
30 TO 34 YEARS. 
35 TO 39 YEARS. 
40 TO 44 YEARS. 

45 TO 49 YEARS. 
50 TO 54 YEARS. 
55 TO 59 YEARS. 
60 TO 64 'YEARS. 
65 TO 69 YEARS. 
70 TO 74 YEARS. * 
75 AND OVER . . 
NOT REPORTED. . . 
MEDIAN AGE. . 


21 326 
16 562 
17 376 
12 002 

9 540 
10 150 
6 129 
6 250 
4 181 
2 643 
2 915 
74B 
15.9 

347 209 
52 377 
56 249 
50 831 
41 868 
32 972 
24 308 
17 297 
17 748 
13 456 

10 992 
9 056 
4 960 

5 192 
3 373 
2 542 
3 18 
80 
16* 


4.7 
5.0 
4.9 

4.6 
3.4 
2.9 
2.1 
2.2 
1.5 
1.5 
* 


5.7 

5.9 
4.6 

3.9 
3.2 
2.5 
2.1 
2.3 
1.3 
1.3 


7.8 
5.4 
5-0 
4.2 

3.7 
3-3 
2.3 

2.0 
2.2 

1.1 
0.8 


4.5 

5.1 
4.4 

4.0 
3.6 
2.3 

2.4 
1.4 
0.8 
0.8 

... 


4.9 
5.7 
4.2 

4.9 
3.2 

1.8 
2.1 
1.4 
0.9 
0.7 
0*1 


5.3 
5.2 

3.8 

2.7 
2,8 
1.8 
2.3 

1.4 
0.8 
0.7 
0.2 


4.8 
4.5 
3.7 

2.8 
2.9 
1.9 
2.3 

1*3 
0.8 
0*8 
0.2 


6*2 
4.8 
5*1 
3.5 

2.8 

3.0 
1.8 
1.8 
1.2 
0.8 
0.9 
0.2 


100.0 
14.5 
14.3 
13.0 
10.0 
6.0 
5.3 
5.5 
5.7 
5. 

4. 
3. 
3. 
2. 
2. 
1. 
1. 
. 


100.0 
14.6 
13.2 

11.4 
10.1 
8.6 
7.3 
6.0 
6.4 
4*8 

4.3 
3.5 
2*5 
2.0 
2*6 
1.3 
1-4 
. 


100.0 
12.3 
12.4 
12.0 
12*5 
10.9 
8.1 
5.7 
5.9 
4.7 

4.0 
3.3 
2*2 

1.8 
2*1 
1.0 
l.O 
. 


100 ..Q 
11.7 
14.1 
13.4 
13.4 
10.3 
7. 
5.3 
6.2 
4.9 

4.3 
3.2 

1.8 
1.6 
1. 
0.7 
0* 
0. 


100.0 
13.3 

14.5 
14.0 
11.8 
10. S 
7.8 
5.7 
6.2 
4.4 

3.5 
2.5 

1.5 
1.4 
1.0 
0.7 
0.8 
0.1 


100.0 
15.0 
14.4 
13.3 
12.1 
11.1 
8.1 
5.7 
5.3 
3.8 

3.1 
2.5 
1.6 
1.6 
1.0 
0.7 
0.7 
0.2 


100*0 
15.9 
15.1 
13*2 
12.1 
11*1 
7.4 
5*1 
4*7 
3.7 

3.0 
2.7 
1*6 
1-6 
1.0 
0*8 
0.9 
0.1 


100.0 
15.1 

: 16.2 

14.6 
12.1 
9.5 
7.0 
5.0 
5.1 
3.9 

3.2 

2.6 

1.4 
1.5 
1.0 
0.7 
0.9 
0.2 



42-30 



South Carolina 



Table 18.-MARITAL STATUS, BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, I960, AND FOR THE STATE, 

1950 AND 1940 

[1950 data based on sample. Percent not shown where Jess than 0.1 or where base is less than 100 in 1960 or 1940, or less than 500 in 1950] 



MARITAL STATUS t COLOR* 
AND SEX 


1960 






1940i 
TOTAL 


TOTAL 


URBAN 




RURAL 




1950 1 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 




PLACES OF 
1*000 TO 
2*500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


TOTAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES 
LOiOOO 
OR MORE 


PLACES OF 
2 1 500 TO 
10*000 


TOTAL 


ALL CLASSES 
MALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. , 


768 653 

233 698 
505 15 
15 737 
21 99 
7 813 

810 626 
177 777 
516 583 
25 663 
105 434 
10 832 

539 067 
148 608 
371 560 
6 144 
11 936 
6 963 

548 963 
102 114 
373 368 
8 416 
63 971 
9 510 

229 586 
85 090 
133 591 
9 593 
10 055 
850 

261 663 
75 663 
143 215 
17 247 
41 463 
1 322 

100.0 
30.4 
65.7 
2.0 
2.9 
1.0 

100.0 
21.9 
63.7 
3.2 

13.0 
1.3 

100.0 
27.6 
68.9 
3.5 

100.0 
18.6 
68.0 
13.4 

100.0 
37.1 
58.2 
4.8 

100.0 
28.9 
54.7 
16.3 


310 650 
79 622 
218 498 
7 148 
8 768 
3 962 

360 552 
74 480 
227 389 

14 031 
51 512 
7 171 

233 329 

54 839 


77 381 
25 0,34 
48 623 
2 302 
2 431 
1 293 

88 135 
22 316 
49 354 

4 411 
14 124 
2 341 

54 165 
17 625 
34 165 
774 
1 282 
1 093 

58 749 
14 856 
33 104 
1 193 
8 796 
1 993 

23 216 

7 409 
14 458 
1 528 
1 149 
200 

29 386 
7 460 
16 250 
3 218 
5 328 
348 

100.0 
32.4 
62.8 
3.0 

3.1 
1.7 

100.0 
25.3 

56.0 
5.0 
16.0 
2.7 

100.0 
32.5 
63.1 

4.4 

100.0 
25.3 

56.3 

16.4 

100.0 
31.9 
62.3 

5.8 

100.0 
25.4 
55.3 
19.3 


72 178 
14 865 
55 087 

968 
1 350 
876 

77 810 
11 946 
57 193 
1 824 
7 237 
1 434 

61 973 
11 820 
48 400 
529 
913 
840 

65 886 
9 126 
49 903 
993 
5 517 
1 340 

10 205 
3 045 
6 687 
439 
437 
36 

11 924 
2 820 
7 290 
831 
1 720 
94 

100.0 
20.6 
76.3 
1.3 
1*9 
12 

100.0 
15.4 
73.5 
2.3 
9.3 
1.8 

100.0 
19.1 
78.1 
2.9 

100.0 
13.9 
75.7 
10.4 

100.0 
29.8 
65.5 
4,7 

100.0 
23,6 
61.1 
15.2 


73 785 
18 170 
52 367 
1 936 
2 325 
923 

90 398 
19 829 
55 109 
3 825 
13 709 
1 751 

53 228 
11 331 
39 887 
684 
1 205 
805 

63 874 
12 876 
40 861 
1 227 
8 599 
1 538 

20 557 
6 839 
12 480 
1 252 
1 120 
118 

26 524 
6 953 

14 248 
2 598 
5 110 
213 

100.0 
24.6 
71.0 
2.6 
3.2 
1.3 

100.0 
21.9 
61.0 
4.2 
15.2 
1.9 

100.0 
21.3 
74,9 
3.8 

100.0 
20.2 
64.0 
15.9 

100*0 
33.3 
60.7 
6.0 

100.0 
26.2 
53.7 
20.1 


87 506 
21 553 
62 421 
1 942 
2 662 
870 

104 209 
20 389 
65 733 
3 971 

16 442 
1 645 

63 963 
14 063 
47 743 
740 
1 400 
757 

73 711 
12 811 
49 052 
1 375 
10 419 
1 429 

23 543 
7 490 
14 678 
1 202 
1 262 
113 

30 498 
7 578 
16 681 
2 596 
6 023 
216 

100,0 
24,6 
71.3 
2.2 

3.0 
1.0 

100.0 
19.6 
63.1 
3.8 
15.8 
1.6 

100.0 
22.0 
74.6 
3.4 

100.0 
17.4 
66.5 
16.0 

100. O 
31.8 
62,3 
5.9 

100.0 
24.8 
54.7 
20.4 


457 803 
154 076 
286 653 
8 589 
13 223 
3 851 

450 074 
103 297 
289 194 
11 632 
53 922 
3 661 

305 738 
93 769 
201 365 
3 417 
7 136 
3 468 

286 743 
52 445 
200 448 
3 628 
30 640 
3 210 

152 065 
60 307 
85 288 
5 172 

6 087 
383 

163 331 
50 852 
88 746 
8 004 
23 282 
451 

100*0 
33.7 
62.6 
1.9 
2.9 
0*8 

100.0 
23*0 
64.3 
2*6 
120 
0*8 

100.0 
30.7 
65*9 
3.4 

100*0 
18*3 
69.9 

11*8 

100* 
39,7 
561 
4,3 

100.0 
31.1 
54*3 
14.6 


48 262 
11 803 
34 587 
912 
1 361 
511 

55 521 
10 354 
36 230 
1 836 
8 133 
804 

38 714 
8 640 
28 710 
410 
889 
475 

43 324 
7 249 
29 572 
769 
5 756 
747 

9 548 
3 163 
5 877 
502 
472 
36 

12 197 
3 105 
6 658 
1 067 
2 377 
57 

100.0 
24.5 
71-7 
1,9 
2.8 
1*1 

100.0 
18,6 
65*3 
3O 

14*6 
1*4 

100.0 
22.3 
74.2 
3.5 

100.0 
16-7 
68*3 
15.0 

100.0 
33*1 
61*6 
5.3 

100*0 
25. Si 
54.6 


409 541 
142 273 
252 066 
7 677 
11 862 
3 340 

394 553 

92 943 
252 964 

9 796 
45 789 
2 857 

267 024 
85 129 
172 655 
3 007 
6 247 
2 993 

243 419 
45 196 
170 876 
2 859 
24 684 
2 463 

142 517 
57 144 
79 nn 
4 670 
5 615 
347 

151 134 
47 747 
62 088 
6 <*37 
20 905 
394 

100. 
34.7 
61* & 
l.V 
2*9 
0*8 

100*0 
23*6 
64.1 
2*5 
11*6 
0,7 

100.0 
31.9 
64,7 
3.4 

100.0 
18*6 
70.2 
IU2 

100.0 
40,1 
5fr*7 
4*1 

100. 
31,6 

54.3 


682 340 
202 380 
454 500 
14 610 
21 600 
3 860 

735 540 
164 975 
471 105 
25 935 
93 385 
6 075 

445 270 
124 520 
305 780 
5 985 

11 445 
3 525 

465 215 
95 185 
311 985 
8 520 
52 475 
5 570 

237 070 
77 860 
148 720 
8 625 
10 155 
335 

270 325 
6V 790 
15V 120 
17 415 
40 910 
505 

100.0 
29.7 
66.6 
2.1 
3*2 
0*6 

100*0 
42.4 
64*0 
3*5 
12.7 
0*8 

100*0 
28.0 
68*7 
3*4 

100*0 
20*5 
67*1 
U5 

100*0 
32.8 
62*7 
*U4 

100*0 
->t>.8 
58.9 
15*3 


634 511 
233 010 

378 740 
(M 
20 913 
1 848 

668 272 
199 454 
384 525 
(M 
80 998 
3 295 

383 794 
137 610 
233 582 

( l ) 
11 131 
1 471 

391 590 
114 226 
234 254 
(1) 
40 686 
2 424 

250 717 
95 400 
145 158 
(M 
9 782 
377 

276 682 
85 228 
150 271 
(1) 
40 312 
871 

100.0 
36.7 
59.7 
(1) 
3.3 
0.3 

100.0 
29.8 
57.5 
(1) 
12*1 
Q.5 

100. 
35.9 
60*9 
3.3 

iOO.O 
29.2 
59.8 
11.0 

100. 
38.1 
57.9 
4.1 

100 
30.8 
54.3 
14.9 










FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. 










WHITE 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 




170 195 
2 727 
4 BOO 
3 495 

262 220 
49 669 
172 920 
4 788 
33 331 
6 300 

77 521 
24 783 
48 303 
4 421 
3 968 
467 

98 332 
24 811 
54 469 
9 243 
18 181 
871 

100.0 
25.6 
70.3 
2.3 

2.8 

1.3 

100.0 
20.7 
63.1 
3.9 

14.3 
2.0 

100.0 
23.5 
72.9 
3.6 

100*0 
18.9 
65.9 

15.1 

100.0 
32.0 
62.3 
5.7 

100.0 
25.2 
55.4 
19.4 








FEMALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. 










NONWHITE 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 










FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 










PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 

ALL CLASSES 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 




SEPARATED 




FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 
SINGLE 
MARRIED 
SEPARATED. . 


DIVORCED . 

WHITE 

MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. 
SINGLE 
MARRIED 
WIDOWED AND DIVORCED 

FEMALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER 
SINGLE 
MARRIED 
WIDOWED AND DIVORCED . 

NONWHITE 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 




WIDOWED AND DIVORCED . . . 
FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER, 




WIDOWED AND DIVORCED . . . 

















General Population Characteristics 



42-31 



Table 19. HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE, 1960, AND FOR THE STATE, 

1950 AND 1940 

[1950 data based partly on sample. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 100 in 1960 or 1940, or less than 500 in 1950; population per house- 
hold not shown where less than 100 persons in households] 



HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
AND COLOR 




1960 




TOTAL 


URBAN 


RURAL 


1950 f 
TOTAL 1 


1940' 
TOTAL 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 


TOTAL 


PLACES OF 
If 000 TO 
2f500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES OF 
10.000 
OR MORE 


PLACES OF 
2i500 TO 
10 t 000 


ALL CLASSES 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 


2 382 594 
2 299 793 
603 551 
536 516 
67 035 
451 146 
847 692 
370 736 
26 668 
82 801 
25 176 
57 625 

3.81 

1 551 022 
1 485 297 
426 930 
384 496 
42 434 
341 022 
527 003 
176 250 
14 092 
65 725 
16 5f6 
^9 179 

3,48 

831 572 
814 496 
176 621 
152 020 
24 601 
110 124 
320 689 
194 486 
12 576 
17 076 
8 6JO 
8 44-6 

4.61 

100.0 
96.5 
25.3 
18.9 
35.6 
15.6 
1.1 
3.5 

100.0 
95.8 
27.5 
22.0 
34.0 
11.4 
0.9 
4.2 

100.0 
97.9 
21*2 
13.2 
38.6 
23.4 
1.5 
2.1 


981 386 
947 893 
275 032 
236 550 
38 482 
196 134 
330 396 
131 038 
15 293 
33 493 
10 522 
22 971 

3*45 

700 497 
672 552 
203 911 
178 918 
24 993 
157 009 
231 643 
71 361 
8 628 
27 945 
8 642 
19 303 

3,30 

280 889 
275 341 
71 121 
57 632 
13 489 
39 125 
98 753 
59 677 
6 665 
5 548 
1 880 
3 668 

3.87 

100.0 
96.6 
28.0 
20.0 
33.7 
13.4 
1.6 
3.4 

100.0 
96,0 
29,1 
22.4 
33.1 
. 10.2 
1.2 
4.0 

100.0 
98.0 
25.3 
13.9 
35.2 
21.2 
2.4 
2.0 


229 546 
208 245 
64 277 
51 463 
12 814 
40 391 
67 629 
30 564 
5 384 
21 301 
7 495 
13 806 

3.24 

146 573 
127 778 
42 612 
34 491 
8 121 
29 128 
38 469 
14 447 
3 122 
18 795 
6 336 
12 459 

3.00 

82 973 
80 467 
21 665 
16 972 
4 693 
11 263 
29 160 
16 117 
2 262 
2 506 
1 159 
1 347 

3.71 

100.0 
90.7 
28.0 
17.6 
29.5 
13*3 
2,3 
9,3 

100,0 
87,2 
29.1 
19.9 
26.2 
9.9 
2.1 
12.8 

100. 
97.0 
26.1 
13.6 
35.1 
19.4 
2.7 
3.0 


232 883 
230 089 
62 838 

58 039 
4 799 
51 602 
90 224 
23 219 
2 206 
2 794 
723 
2 071 

3.66 

195 028 
192 806 
54 327 
50 602 
3 725 
45 937 
74 834 
16 167 
1 541 
2 222 
425 
1 797 

3.55 

37 855 
37 283 
8 511 
7 437 
1 074 
5 665 
15 390 
7 052 
665 
572 
298 
274 

4.38 

100.0 
98.8 
27.0 
22.2 
38,7 
10.0 
0.9 
1.2 

100.0 
98.9 
27.9 
23.6 

38.4 
8.3 
0.8 
1*1 

100.0 
98.5 
22.5 

15.0 
40.7 
18.6 
1*8 
1.5 


237 482 
231 024 
67 803 
57 841 
9 962 
47 304 
77 582 
34 516 
3 819 
6 458 
960 
5 498 

3.41 

163 971 

159 491 
48 912 
42 612 
6 300 
37 239 
53 058 
18 219 
2 063 
4 480 
762 
3 718 

3.26 

73 511 
71 533 
18 891 
15 229 
3 662 
10 065 
24 524 
16 297 
1 756 
i 978 
198 
1 780 

3.79 

100.0 
97.3 
28.6 
19.9 
32.7 
14.5 
1*6 
2.7 

100.0 
97.3 
29.8 
22.7 
32.4 
11.1 
1.3 
2.7 

100.0 
97.3 
25.7 
13.7 
33.4 
22.2 
2.4 
2.7 


281 475 
278 535 
80 114 
69 207 
10 907 
56 837 
94 961 
42 739 
3 884 
2 940 
1 344 
1 596 

3*48 

194 925 
192 477 
58 060 
51 213 
6 847 
44 70S 
65 282 
22 528 
1 902 
2 448 
1 119 
1 329 

3.32 

86 550 
86 058 
22 054 
17 994 
4 060 
12 132 
29 679 
20 211 
1 982 
492 
225 
267 

3.90 

100.0 
99.0 
28.5 
20.2 
33*7 
15.2 
1.4 
1.0 

100.0 
98.7 
29.8 
22.9 
33.5 
11.6 
1.0 
1.3 

100.0 
99.4 
25.5 
14*0 
34.3 
23,4 
2.3 
0.6 


1 401 208 
1 351 900 
328 519 
299 966 
28 553 
255 012 
517 296 
239 698 
11 375 
49 308 
1>t 65M- 
3* 65t 

4.12 

850 525 
812 745 
223 019 
205 578 
17 441 
184 013 
295 360 
104 889 
5 464 
37 780 
7 90H 
29 876 

3.64 

550 683 
539 155 
105 500 
94 388 
11 112 
70 999 
221 936 
134 809 
5 911 
11 528 
6 750 
4 778 

5.11 

100.0 
96.5 
23.4 
18.2 
36.9 
17.1 
0.8 
3.5 

100.0 
95.6 
26.2 
21.6 
34.7 
12.3 
0.6 
4.4 

100.0 
97.9 
19.2 
12.9 
40.3 
24.5 
1.1 
2.1 


151 858 
151 043 
43 015 
37 825 
5 190 
31 736 
51 614 
23 151 
1 527 
815 
153 
662 

3.51 

116 219 
115 570 
34 214 
30 594 
3 620 
26 381 
39 158 
14 433 
884 
649 
84 
565 

3.38 

35 639 
35 473 
8 801 
7 231 
1 570 
4 855 
12 456 
8 718 
643 
166 
69 
97 

4.03 

100.0 
99.5 
28.3 
20.9 
34.0 
15.2 
1.0 
0.5 

100.0 
99.4 
29.4 
23.1 
33.7 
12.4 
0.8 
0.6 

100.0 
99.5 
24.7 
13.6 
35.0 
24.5 
1.8 
0.5 


1 249 350 
1 200 857 
285 504 
262 141 
23 363 
223 276 
465 682 
216 547 
9 848 
48 493 
1f 501 
33 992 

4.21 

734 306 
697 175 
188 805 
174 984 
13 821 
157 132 
256 202 
90 456 
4 580 
37 131 
7 820 
29 311 

3.69 

515 044 
503 682 
96 699 
87 157 
9 542 
66 144 
209 480 
126 09 i 
5 268 
11 362 
6 681 
4 681 

5.21 

.100.0 
96.1 
22.9 
17.9 
37.3 
17.3 
0.8 
3.9 

100.0 
94.9 
25.7 
21.4 
34.9 
12.3 
0.6 
5.1 

100.0 
97.8 
18.8 
12*8 
40.7 
24.5 
1.0 
2.2 


2 114 355 
2 059 010 
511 020 
471 741 
39 279 
400 175 
725 745 
387 765 
34 305 
55 345 
15 154 
40 191 

4.03 

1 289 485 
1 246 550 
331 560 
(2) 
(2) 
277 675 
423 145 
196 540 
17 630 
42 935 
9 181 
33 754 

3.76 

824 870 
812 460 
179 460 
(2) 
(2) 
122 500 
302 600 
191 225 
16 675 
12 410 
5 973 
6 437 

4.53 

100.0 
97.4 
24.2 
18.9 
34.3 
18.3 
1.6 
2.6 

100.0 
96.7 
25.7 
21.5 
32.8 
15.2 
1.4 
3.3 

100.0 
98.5 
21.6 
14.9 
36.7 
23.2 
2.0 
1.5 


1 899 804 
1 870 749 
435 211 
403 131 
32 080 
331 697 
662 380 
387 664 
53 797 
29 055 
13 612 
15 443 

4.30 

1 034 308 
1 062 434 
254 353 
( 2 > 
(*> 
207 267 
366 619 
204 434 
29 761 
21 874 
7 879 
13 995 

4.18 

815 496 
808 315 
180 858 
(2) 
(2) 
124 430 
295 761 
133 230 
24 036 
7 181 
5 733 
1 448 

4.47 

100*0 
98.5 
32*9 
17.5 
34.9 
20.4 
2.8 
1.5 

100.0 
98.0 
23.5 

19.1 
33.8 
18.9 
2.7 
2.0 

100.0 
99.1 
22.2 
15.3 
36.3 
22*5 
2.9 
0.9 


HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD. . . . 
HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. , . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

WHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 


HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD. . . , 
HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD , 
NONRELAI'IVE OF HEAD. . . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . , 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . , . 




HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 

ALL CLASSES 
TOTAL POPULATION . . 






CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . . 
NONRELAVIVE OF HEAD. . . . 


WHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 






CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . , . 


NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 






CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . . 
NONRELAI'IVE OF HEAD. . . . 



SEE TEXT FOR CHANGES IN DEFINITIONS OF HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP CATEGORIES. 
NOT AVAILABLE. 



42-32 



South Carolina 



Table 2CX-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL .AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, AND 

URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: I960 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Median not shown where base is less than 100] 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


POPULA- 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA-!- 
TIONi 
TOTAL 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONV 


/HITE 


TIONi 
TOTAL 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 






CHARLESTON SMSA 


COLUMBIA 


SMSA 








ALL AGES 
UNDER 1 YEAR 
1 YEAR . . . 


216 382 
6 397 
6 185 
5 990 
5 833 
5 701 
5 629 
5 585 
5 286 
5 061 
4 852 
4 789 
4 743 
4 752 
4 779 
3 852 
3 922 
3 717 
3 772 
3 849 
4 033 
4 247 
113 408 


108 318 
3 235 
3 114 
3 116 
2 929 
2 913 
2 884 
2 892 
2 705 
2 574 
2 462 
2 410 
2 396 
2 424 
2 432 
1 903 
1 952 
1 881 
1 859 
2 140 
2 387 
2 576 
55 134 


108 064 
3 162 
3 071 
2 874 
2 904 
2 788 
2 745 
2 693 
2 581 
2 487 
2 390 
2 379 
2 347 
2 328 
2 347 
1 949 
1 970 
1 836 
1 913 
1 709 
1 646 
1 671 
58 274 


70 775 
1 936 
1 851 
1 850 
1 705 
1 685 
1 596 
1 622 
1 470 
1 395 
1 326 
1 309 
1 301 
1 351 
1 393 
1 039 
1 048 
1 071 
1 047 
1 524 
1 836 
2 057 
39 363 


66 674 
1 892 
1 821 
1 661 
1 670 
1 582 
1 590 
1 499 
1 426 
1 404 
1 259 
1 271 
1 252 
1 280 
1 276 
994 
987 
1 012 
1 081 
1 020 
1 020 
1 131 
38 546 


37 543 
1 299 
263 
266 
224 
228 
288 
270 
235 
179 
136 
101 
095 
073 
039 
864 
904 
810 
812 
616 
551 
519 
15 771 


41 390 
1 270 
1 250 
1 213 
1 234 
1 206 
1 155 
1 194 
1 155 
1 083 
1 131 
1 108 
1 095 
1 048 
1 071 
955 
983 
824 
832 
689 
626 
540 
19 728 


164 856 
4 283 
1 8 894 

1 8 727 

3 841 
3 885 

I 10 231 
I 11 371 

2 582 
2 405 
\ 4 956 

\ 6 606 

3 583 
93 492 


260 828 
6 020 
5 936 
5 982 
5 996 
5 840 
5 914 
5 671 
5 586 
5 350 
5 093 
5 126 
5 094 
5 170 
5 096 
4 075 
4 043 
4 152 
6 402 
6 990 
6 438 
5 578 
145 276 


134 524 
3 060 
3 040 
2 944 
3 064 
2 989 
3 023 
2 889 
2 783 
2 686 
2 543 
2 507 
2 618 
2 558 
2 609 
2 062 
2 062 
2 136 
4 233 
4 674 
4 085 
3 361 
72 598 


126 304 
2 960 
2 896 
3 038 
2 932 
2 851 
2 891 
2 782 
2 803. 
2 664 
2 550 
2 619 
2 476 
2 612 
2 487 
2 013 
1 981 
2 016 
2 169 
2 316 
2 353 
2 217 
72 678 


97 387 
1 942 
1 963 
1 920 
2 041 
1 953 
1 983 
1 866 
1 802 
1 776 
1 600 
1 627 
1 664 
1 705 
1 752 
1 283 
1 281 
1 407 
3 371 
3 801 
3 264 
2 678 
54 708 


87 803 
1 859 
1 803 
1 953 
1 863 
1 807 
1 847 
1 749 
1 795 
1 698 
1 571 
1 661 
1 622 
1 723 
1 708 
1 270 
1 236 
1 297 
1 406 
1 577 
1 677 
1 565 
53 116 


37 137 
113 
077 
024 
023 
036 
040 
023 
931 
910 
943 
880 
954 
853 
857 
779 
781 
729 
862 
873 
821 
683 
17 890 


38 501 
1 101 
1 093 
1 085 
1 069 
1 044 
1 044 
1 033 
1 008 
966 
979 
958 
854 
389 
779 
743 
745 
719 
763 
739 
676 
652 
19 562 


186 844 
4 479 
I 9 322 

\ 8 673 

3 724 
3 838 

r 10 691 
111 408 

2 549 
. 2 547 
\ 5 406 

| 6 382 

3 382 

114 443 


3 YEARS. 
4 YEARS. 
5 YEARS. 
6 YEARS. 
7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. 
9 YEARS. 
10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 


UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 


30 106 
26 413 
22 915 
19 293 
18 128 
14 630 
14 779 
15 219 
12 817 


15 307 
13 517 
11 565 
10 219 
10 247 
7 386 
7 236 
7 387 
6 334 


14 799 
12 896 
11 350 
9 074 
7 881 
7 244 
7 543 
7 832 
6 483 


9 027 
7 409 
6 393 
6 526 
8 039 
5 543 
5 451 
5 231 
4 388 


8 626 
7 178 
6 073 
5 120 
5 450 
4 981 
5 009 
5 231 
4 160 


6 280 
6 108 
5 172 
3 693 
2 208 
843 
785 
2 156 
946 


6 173 
5 718 
5 277 
3 954 
2 431 
2 263 
2 534 
2 601 
2 323 


21 904 
17 957 
13 953 
13 967 
16 184 
15 419 
12 972 
12 137 
9 710 


29 774 
27 614 
24 561 
28 025 
25 092 
17 351 
17 466 
18 212 
16 129 


15 097 
13 924 
12 354 
17 190 
15 459 
8 856 
8 525 
8 962' 
8 206 


14 677 
13 690 
12 207 
10 835 
9 633 
8 495 
8 941 
9 250 
7 923 


9 819 
9 027 

8 031 
13 124 
12 493 
6 458 
6 385. 
6 687 
6 153 


9 285 
8 660 
7 984 
7 193 
6 798 
6 071 
6 469 
6 771 
5 813 


5 278 
4 897 
4 323 

4 066 
2 966 
2 398 
2 140 
2 275 
2 053 


5 392 
5 030 
4 223 

3 642 
2 835 
2 424 
2 472 
2 479 
2 110 


22 474 
18 253 
13 957 
14 335 
17 868 
18 222 
15 502 
14 326 
11 488 


45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 


11 034 
8 730 


5 276 

4 184 


5 758 
4 546 


3 394 

2 837 


3 610 
2 982 


882 
347 


2 148 
1 564 


7 919 
6 211 


14 025 
10 963 


6 918 
5 257 


7 107 
5 706 


5 138 
3 981 


5 177 
4 344 


1 780 
1 276 


1 930 
1 362 


9 600 
8 237 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


6 999 


3 320 


3 679 


2 222 


2 385 


098 


1 294 


4 988 


8 914 


4 115 


4 799 


3 061 


3 546 


1 054 


1 253 


6 578 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


4 929 


2 253 


2 676 


1 591 


1 760 


662 


916 


3 914 


7 185 


3 251 


3 934 


2 434 


2 927 


817 


1 007 


5 369 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


4 315 


1 840 


2 475 


1 217 


1 516 


623 


959 


3 425 


6 255 


2 754 


3 501 


1 932 


2 562 


822 


939 


4 801 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


2 985 


1 189 


1 796 


765 


1 183 


424 


613 


2 064 


4 321 


1 776 


2 545 


1 276 


1 841 


500 


704 


2 963 


75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 


1 706 
850 


631 
268 


1 075 
582 


441 
192 


741 

416 


190 
76 


334 
166 


\ 1 808 


2 779 
1 345 


1 134 
507 


1 645 
838 


846 
373 


1 262 
647 


238 
134 


383 

191 


I 2 465 


85 AND OVER. * 


534 


159 


375 


109 


253 


50 


122 


324 


817 


239 


578 


169 


453 


70 


125 


406 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


9O 845 


46 081 


44 76*4 


25 995 : 


24 957 


20 086 


19 807 


61 175 


96 .546 


49 806 


46 740 


32 936 


29 868 


16 870 


16 872 


62 637 


65 AND OVER, . 


10 390 


4 087 


6 303 


2 724 


4 109 


1 363 


2 194 


7 621 


15 517 


6 410 


9 107 


4 596 


6 765 


1 814 


2 342 


10 635 


MEDIAN AGE . . 


22.6 


21.7 


23.8 


23.8 


25.9 


16.6 


19.5 


24.5 


24.1 


22.8 


26.2 


23.5 


28.3 


20.0 


21.7 


26.8 




GREENVILLE SMSA 


CHARLESTON URBANIZED AREA 




ALL AGES . 


209 776 


101 890 


107 886 


84 367 


88 456 


17 523 


19 430 


168 152 


160 113 


79 845 


80 268 


56 216 


53 578 


23 629 


26 690 


120 289 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


5 073 


2 588 


2 485 


2 087 


1 906 


501 


579 


. 3 940 


4 720 


2 411 


2 309 


1 600 


1 540 


811 


769 


3 039 


1 YEAR . 


5 086 


2 576 


2 510 


2 058 


1 995 


518 


515 


\ 8 303 


4 566 


2 299 


2 267 


1 501 


478 


798 


739 


1 6 262 


2 YEARS. 


5 018 


2 568 


2 450 


2 036 


1 928 


532 


522 


/ 


4 349 


2 249 


2 100 


1 472 


303 


777 


797 


; 


3 YEARS, 


4 952 


2 523 


2 429 


1 973 


1 894 


550 


535 


\ 7 718 


4 154 


2 039 


2 115 


1 285 


323 


754 


792 


X 5 949 


4 YEARS. 


4 925 


2 470 


2 455 


1 926 


1 920 


544 


535 


; 


4 051 


2 074 


1 977 


1 311 


252 


763 


725 


/ 


5 YEARS. 


4 970 


2 494 


2 476 


1 945 


1 932 


549 


544 


3 329 


3 846 


1 946 


900 


1 174 


211 


772 


689 


2 618 


6 YEARS. . 


4 623 


2 347 


2 276 


1 827 


1 786 


520 


490 


3 420 


3 881 


2 016 


865 


1 229 


157 


7U7 


708 


2 647 




4 656 


2 293 


2 363 


1 826 


1 868 


467 


495 




3 575 


832 


743 


1 1 08 


059 


724 


684 


"] 




4 494 


2 286 


2 208 


1 821 


1 712 


465 


496 


9 503 


3 431 


743 


68B 


1 041 


049 


702 


639 


> 6 752 


9 YEARS. 


4 299 


2 194 


2 105 


1 747 


1 650 


447 


455 




3 316 


678 


638 


984 


972 


694 


666 


/ 


10 YEARS 


4 171 


2 110 


2 061 


654 


1 581 


456 


480 


^ 


3 291 


647 


1 644 


1 005 


965 


642 


679 


1 


11 YEARS . 
12 YEARS 


4 222 
4 400 


Z 203 

2 266 


2 019 
2 134 


766 

842 


1 600 
1 674 


437 
424 


419 
460 


111 104 


3 250 
3 278 


644 
631 


1 606 
1 647 


985 
1 012 


954 
1 032 


659 

619 


652 
615 


I 7 322 


13 YEARS 


4 286 


2 179 


2 107 


808 


1 689 


371 


418 


J 


3 251 


659 


1 592 


1 068 


964 


591 


628 


J 


14 YEARS 


3 330 


644 


1 686 


314 


318 


330 


368 


2 756 


2 642 


303 


1 339 


812 


776 


491 


561 


1 647 


15 YEARS 


3 329 


642 


1 687 


292 


281 


350 


406 


2 806 


2 688 


322 


366 


806. 


782 


516 


584 


N 1 601 


16 YEARS 


3 477 


752 


1 725 


375 


343 


377 


382 


\ 5 322 


2 626 


324 


302 


839 


790 


435 


512 


\ 3 360 


17 YEARS 


3 473 


710 


1 763 


382 


399 


328 


364 


/ 


2 711 


309 


402 


850 


907 


459 


495 


J 


18 YEARS 


3 486 


621 


1 365 


280 


519 


341 


346 


\ 5 853 


2 956 


663 


293 


1 306 


879 


357 


414 


\ 4 958 


19 YEARS 


3 341 


601 


1 740 


298 


507 


303 


233 


J 


3 146 


865 


281 


1 564 


896 


301 


335 


/ 


20 YEARS 


3 195 


511 


1 684 


268 


431 


243 


253 


3 025 


3 416 


2 069 


1 347 


1 776 


1 024 


293 


323 


2 789 


21 AND OVER . 


120 970 


57 312 


63 658 


48 842 


53 523 


8 470 


10 135 


101 073 


86 969 


42 122 


44 847 


31 488 


31 263 


10 634 


13 534 


71 345 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


25 054 


12 725 


12 329 


10 080 


9 643 


2 645 


2 686 


19 961 


21 840 


11 072 


10 768 


7 169 


6 896 


3 903 


3 872 


15 250 


5 TO 9 YEARS . 


23 042 


11 614 


11 428 


9 166 


8 948 


2 448 


2 480 


16 252 


18 049 


9 215 


8 834 


5 536 


5 448 


3 679 


3 386 


12 017 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


20 409 


10 402 


10 007 


8 384 


7 862 


2 018 


2 145 


13 860 


15 712 


7 884 


7 828 


4 382 


4 693 


3 002 


3 135 


8 969 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


17 106 


8 326 


8 780 


6 627 


7 049 


1 699 


1 731 


13 981 


14 127 


7 483 


6 644 


5 365 


4 254 


2 1 18 


2 390 


9 919 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


15 313 


7 267 


8 046 


6 057 


6 783 


1 210 


1 263 


15 376 


14 443 


8 120 


6 323 


6 805 


4 764 


315 


1 559 


12 812 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


14 861 


7 335 


7 526 


6 31 1 


6 247 


1 024 


1 279 


15 991 


11 452 


5 853 


5 599 


4 613 


4 030 


240 


569 


12 244 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


14 863 


7 271 


7 592 


6 265 


6 396 


1 006 


1 196 


13 727 


11 126 


5 503 


5 623 


4 247 


3 817 


256 


806 


10 013 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


15 709 


7 571 


8 138 


6 568 


6 932 


1 003 


1 206 


.12 895 


11 381 


5 475 


5 906 


3 990 


4 074 


4U5 


832 


9 202 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


13 664 


6 653 


7 Oil 


5 681 


5 854 


972 


1 157 


11 111 


9 699 


4 734 


4 965 


3 436 


3 317 


298 


648 


7 392 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


12 066 


5 924 


6 142 


4 989 


5 135 


935 


1 007 


8 794 


8 525 


4 025 


4 500 


2 715 


2 980 


310 


520 


6 016 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


10 252 


4 865 


5 387 


4 163 


4 506 


702 


881 


7 302 


6 753 


3 208 


3 545 


2 253 


2 443 


955 


1 102 


4 668 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


8 147 


3 775 


4 372 


3 177 


3 656 


598 


716 


5 827 


5 435 


2 561 


2 874 


1 770 


1 953 


791 


921 


3 688 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


6 181 


2 695 


3 486 


2 300 


2 935 


395 


55,1 


4 446 


3 821 


1 763 


2 058 


1 296 


1 454 


467 


604 


2 876 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


5 258 


2 285 


2 973 


1 695 


2 481 


390 


492 


3 959 


3 199 


1 335 


1 864 


958 


1 280 


377 


534 


2 296 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


3 671 


1 548 


2 123 


1 311 


1 822 


237 


301 


2 420 


2 244 


873 


1 371 


607 


982 


266 


339 


1 405 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


2 455 


996 


1 459 


854 


1 262 


142 


197 


\ 1 943 


1 270 


435 


835 


328 


625 


107 


210 


\ 1 285 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


1 117 


424 


695 


371 


621 


53 


72 


/ 


650 


196 


454 


158 


359 


38 


95 


; 


85 AND OVER. 


608 


214 


394 


168 


324 


46 


70 


307 


387 


110 


277 


88 


209 


22 


68 


237 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


78 784 


39 845 


38 939 


31 679 


30 476 


8 166 


8 463 


58 201 


63 626 


32 126 


31 500 


20 082 


19 516 


12 044 


11 934 


41 197 


65 AND OVER. . 


13 109 


5 467 


7 642 


4 599 


6 510 


868 


1 132 


8 629 


7 750 


2 949 


4 801 


2 139 


3 455 


810 


1 346 


5 223 


MEDIAN AGE . 


26,3 


25.4 


27.2 


26.5 


28*2 


19.9 


22.7 


26.5 


23.6 


22.6 


24.8 


23.8 


25.9 


17.9 


21.8 


25.5 



General Population Characteristics 42-33 

Table 20. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, AND 

URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960 Con. 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Median not shown where base is less than 100] 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 

POPULA- 
TIONf 
TOTAL 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TIONi 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 




TOTAL I) MALE 


FEMAuE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


^EMALE 




COLUMBIA URBANIZED AREA 


GREENVILLE URBANIZED AREA 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 


162 601 
3 993 
3 870 
3 893 
3 809 
3 661 
3 773 
3 593 
3 572 
3 397 
3 215 
3 237 
3 211 
3 215 
3 163 
2 341 
2 396 
2 493 
2 559 
2 938 
3 112 
2 967 
94 193 

19 226 
17 550 
15 167 
13 498 
13 188 
11 598 
11 639 
12 303 
10 945 
9 444 
7 422 
6 064 
4 780 
3 971 
2 769 
1 743 
812 
482 

59 391 
9 777 
26.2 


77 591 
1 998 
957 
911 
944 
874 
919 
826 
776 
693 
583 
559 
637 
559 
596 
160 
189 
258 
223 
1 278 
1 356 
1 267 
44 028 

9 684 
8 797 
7 511 
6 304 
6- 041 
5 758 
5 576 
5 962 
5 440 
4 553 
3 474 
2 713 
2 040 
1 625 
1 076 
637 
289 

m 

29 662 
3 738 

25.4 


85 010 
995 
913 
982 
865 
787 
854 
767 
796 
704 
632 
678 
574 
656 
567 
181 
207 
235 
336 
660 
756 
700 
50 165 

9 542 
' 8 753 
7 656 
7 194 
7 147 
5 840 
6 063 
6 341 
5 505 
4 891 
3 948 
3 351 
2 740 
2 346 
1 693 
1 106 
523 
371 

29 729 
6 039 
26,9 


57 176 
1 327 
328 
301 
344 
225 
286 
219 
186 
1 142 
1 054 
1 059 
1 119 
1 083 
1 158 
7S7 
829 
895 
845 
939 
1 026 
951 
34 073 

6 525 
5 887 
5 206 
4 534 
4 656 
4 343 
4 273 
4 607 
4 251 
3 561 
2 752 
2 119 
1 616 
1 221 
820 
503 
220 
82 

20 187 
2 846 
27.0 


61 593 
1 295 
1 246 
1 310 
1 207 
1 167 
1 229 
1 170 
1 198 
1 105 
1 059 
1 103 
1 092 
1 138 
1 114 
800 
793 
832 
911 
1 217 
1 334 
1 261 
38 012 

6 225 
5 761 
5 247 
5 087 
5 255 
4 205 
4 470 
4 810 
4 180 
3 716 
, 3 145 
2 589 
2 131 
1 811 
1 320 
901 
427 
313 

19 769 
4 772 
28.8 


20 415 
671 
629 
610 
600 
649 
633 
607 
590 
551 
529 
500 
518 
476 
438 
373 
360 
363 
378 
339 
330 
316 
9 955 

3 159 
2 910 
2 305 
1 770 
1 385 
1 415 
1 303 
1 355 
1 189 
992 
722 
594 
424 
404 
256 
134 
69 
29 

9 475 
892 
20*2 


23 417 
700 
667 
672 
658 
620 
625 
597 
598 
599 
573 
575 
482 
518 
453 
381 
414 
403 
425 
443 
422 
439 
12 153 

3 317 
2 992 
2 409 
2 107 
892 
635 
593 
531 
325 
1 175 
803 
762 
609 
535 
373 
205 
96 
58 

9 960 
1 267 
22.3 


120 808 
2 807 
. 5 738 

5 171 

2 078 
2 217 

" 6 130 
I 6 238 

1 380 
1 373 

L 2 911 

L 4 083 

2 343 
78 339 

13 716 
10 425 
7 618 
8 367 
12 511 
12 717 
10 858 
9 920 
7 988 
6 681 
5 607 
4 340 
3 537 
3 026 
1 85'1 
1 1 416 

230 

36 043 
6 523 

28.1 


126 B87 
3 262 
3 198 
3 127 
3 061 
3 055 
3 048 
2 793 
2 860 
2 738 
2 575 
2 492 
2 506 
2 582 
2 585 
1 906 
1 901 
1 968 
1 907 
2 066 
1 926 
1 866 
73 465 

15 703 
14 014 
12 071 
9 768 
9 269 
9 061 
8 952 
9 648 
8 309 
7 258 
6 194 
4 917 
3 824 
3 177 
2 227 
1 446 
653 
396 

47 564 
7 899 
26.4 


60 016 
1 665 
1 588 
1 608 
1 565 
1 537 
1 495 
1 397 
1 414 
1 401 
1 297 
1 236 
1 278 
1 334 
1 307 
946 
930 
981 
899 
838 
780 
755 
33 765 

7 963 

7 004 
6 101 
4 428 
4 096 
4 397 
4 295 
4 571 
3 968 
3 460 
2 843 
2 201 
1 593 
1 308 
897 
544 
215 
132 

23 878 
3 096 
25.5 


66 871 
1 597 
1 610 
1 519 
1 496 
1 518 
1 553 
1 396 
1 446 
1 337 
1 278 
1 256 
1 228 
1 248 
1 278 
960 
971 
987 
1 008 
1 228 
1 146 
1 111 
39 700 

7 740 
7 010 
5 970 
5 340 
5 173 
4 664 
4 657 
5 077 
4 341 
3 798 
3 351 
2 716 
2 231 
1 869 
1 330 
902 
438 
264 

23 686 

4 803 
27.4 


48 324 
1 295 
1 232 
1 241 
1 184 
1 145 
1 104 
1 048 
1 101 
1 094 
1 020 
952 
990 
1 064 
1 O63 
728 
719 
740 
698 
630 
615 
607 
28 054 

6 097 
5 367 
4 797 
3 402 
3 352 
3 700 
3 610 
3 892 
3 288 
2 821 
2 367 
1 779 
1 319 
1 045 
746 
454 
188 
100 

18 418 
2 533 
26.6 


53 180 
1 197 
1 237 
1 145 
1 126 
1 145 
1 183 
1 055 
1 108 
994 
972 
926 
942 
935 
999 
735 
720 
738 
788 
1 Oil 
994 
954 
32 276 

5 850 

5 312 
4 537 
4 251 
4 307 
3 731 
3 792 
4 203 
3 476 
3 045 
2 697 
2 180 
1 827 
1 508 
1 108 
756 
383 
217 

17 945 
3 972 
28.1 


11 692 
370 
356 
367 
381 
392 
391 
349 
313 
307 
277 
284 
288 
270 
244 
218 
211 
241 
201 
208 
165 
148 
5 711 

1 866 
1 637 
1 304 
1 026 
744 
697 
685 
679 
680 
639 
476 
422 
274 
263 
151 
90 
27 
32 

5 460 
563 
20.1 


13 691 
400 
373 
374 
370 
373 
370 
341 
338 
343 
306 
330 
286 
313 
279 
225 
251 
249 
220 
217 
152 
157 
7 424 

1 890 
1 698 
1 433 
1 O89 
866 
933 
865 
874 
865 
753 
654 
536 
U04 
361 
222 
146 
55 
47 

5 741 
831 
24.2 


(1) 


t 


* . 

* 

* 
* . 
. * 
. . 
. . t 
. . 

... 
... 
... 

... 
... 
. 
*. 
... 

... 
... 
... 

... 

... 
... 
... 
t . 
... 
... 
... 
... 
... 

* 
... 


... 
... 


















10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS . 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS . 
17 YEARS . . 
18 YEARS . . 
19 YEARS . 
20 YEARS . 
21 AND OVER . 

UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 YEARS . . 
10 TO 14 YEARS . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS . 
35 TO 39 YEARS . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS . 
55 TO 59 YEARS . 
60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS * 
75 TO 79 YEARS . 
80 TO 84 YEARS . 
85 AND OVER. 

UNDER 18 YEARS . 
65 AND OVER. 
MEDIAN AGE 

ALL AGES 
UNDER 1 YEAR 








AIKEN 


ANDERSON 


11 243 
312 
281 
297 
278 
298 
284 
290 
279 
250 
238 
256 
241 
227 
234 
185 
206 
189 
160 
117 
102 
114 
6 405 

1 466 
1 341 
1 143 
774 
592 
715 
816 
878 
792 
669 
508 
418 
319 
309 
237 
147 
64 
55 

4 505 
812 


5 324 
144 
143 
146 
151 
159 
149 
133 
147 
120 
120 
129 
117 
116 
109 
94 
107 
86 
76 
53 
45 
55 
! 2 925 

743 
669 
565 
367 

250 
343 
400 
419 
386 
322 
233 
200 
106 
125 
98 
63 
15 

ie 

2 24< 
3T3 


5 919 
168. 
138 
151 
127 
139 
135 
157 
132 
130 
118 
127 
124 
111 
125 
91 
99 
103 
84 
64 
57 
59 
3 480 

723 
672 
578 
, 407 
342 
372 
416 
459 
406 
347 
273 
218 
213 
184 
139 
84 
49 
37 

2 259 
493 
28.2 


3 296 
81 
86 
78 
94 
95 
94 
79 
83 
68 
62 
72 
72 
66 
76 
58 
63 
50 
46 
22 
24 
27 
1 902 

434 
386 
344 
205 
152 
224 
28G 

: 297 

267 
214 
146 
122 
69 
61 
55 
25 


1 322 
15' 
27 ^ 


3 520 
96 
81 
88 
66 
79 
76 
93 
73 
77 
59 
80 
77 
60 
78 
48 
55 
61 
56 
28 
39 
29 
2 121 

410 
378 
343 
239 
183 
233 
276 
315 
249 
20C 
156 
131 
135 
IOC 
7M 
45 
31 
22 

1 302 
272 
29. H 


2 026 
63 
57 
68 
57 
64 
55 
54 
64 
52 
58 
57 
45 
50 
33 
36 
44 
36 
30 
31 
21 
28 
1 023 

309 
283 
221 
162 
98 
119 
120 
122 
119 
108 
89 
77 
37 
58 
43 
38 
12 
11 

922 

162 

21 .? 


2 399 
72 
57 
63 
61 
60 
59 
64 
59 
53 
59 
47 
47 
51 
47 
43 
44 
42 
28 
36 
18 
30 
1 359 

313 
294 
235 
168 
159 
139 
140 
144 
157 
147 
117 
87 
76 
84 
65 
3? 
1 
IS 

95* 

221 
26.1 


7 083 
157 
321 

279 

137 
140 

>- 405 

} " 

10 
10 

} ls 
} ' 

. 4 54 

75 
68 
53 
48 
54 
64 
53 
54 
44 
39 
35 
30 
26 
26 
15 

> 15 2 

2 25 

59 
29. 


41 316 
998 
988 
921 
920 
907 
937 
846 
901 
802 
743 
845 
732 
877 
866 
655 
635 
717 
687 
712 
645 
556 
24 426 

4 734 
4 229 
3 975 
3 396 
2 745 
2 915 
2 846 
3 008 
2 726 
2 590 
2 268 
1 767 
1 382 
1 072 
811 
490 
243 
119 

14 977 
2 735 
27.7 


19 524 
491 
493 
479 
445 
446 
474 
423 
454 
415 
366 
462 
367 
442 
424 
320 
320 
368 
345 
316 
254 
236 
11 184 

2 354 
2 132 
2 015 
1 603 
1 257 
1 387 
1 371 
1 398 
1 29*3 
1 24 
1 052 
78; 
56<5 
43? 
311 
18C 
81 
4C 

7 53i 
1 051 
26.' 


21 792 
507 
495 
442 
475 
461 
463 
423 
447 
387 
377 
383 
365 
435 
442 
335 
315 
349 
342 
396 
391 
320 
13 242 

2 380 
2 097 
1 960 
1 793 
1 488 
1 528 
1 475 
1 610 
1 427 
1 344 
1 215 
978 
813 
633 
500 
310 
162 
79 

7 443 
1 684 
28.9 


15 719 
381 
377 
372 
345 
353 
367 
309 
343 
318 
285 
352 
286 
370 
345 
248 
244 
280 
281 
238 
190 
191 
9 244 

1 828 
1 622 
1 601 
1 233 
1 009 
1 166 
1 144 
1 165 
1 055 
1 038 
895 
656 
45<3 
362 
251 
138 
66 
2fi 

5 856 
846 
27. H 


17 289 
374 
374 
335 
361 
338 
344 
328 
309 
285 
286 
280 
283 
327 
345 
262 
243 
295 
276 
330 
324 
273 
10 717 

1 782 
1 552 
1 497 
1 468 
1 205 
1 215 
1 179 
1 316 
1 136 
1 102 
1 005 
800 
658 
514 
404 
254 
138 
64 

5 645 
1 374 
29.1 


3 805 
110 
116 
107 
100 
93 
107 
114 
111 
97 
81 

no 

81 
72 
79 
72 
76 
38 
64 
78 
64 
45 
1 940 

526 
510 
414 
370 
248 
221 
227 
233 
244 
203 
158 
131 
IK 
7 
6C 
42 
15 
12 

1 67E 
20 
21.- 


4 503 
133 
121 
107 
114 
123 
119 
95 
138 
102 
91 
103 
82 
108 
97 
73 
72 
54 
66 
66 
67 
47 
2 525 

598 
545 
463 
325 
263 
313 
296 
294 
291 
242 
210 
178 
155 
119 
96 
56 
24 
15 

1 798 
31C 
25. 6 


19 770 
443 
835 

788 

341 
383 

t- 1 018 
1.1 133 

274 
301 
585 

I 64-9 

r 

320 
12 700 

2 066 
1 74-2 
1 407 
1 535 
1 731 
1 766 
1 605 
1 672 
. 1 425 
1 191 
1 018 
758 
633 
546 
324 

} 3 7 

44 

6 101 
1 221 
29.0 


2 YEARS. 
3 YEARS. . 
4 YEARS. 
5 YEARS. 
6 YEARS. 
7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. . 
9 YEARS. . 
10 YEARS . 
11 YEARS . 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS . 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 

UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29. YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. 

UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. 
MEDIAN AGE . 



1 NOT AVAILABLE. 



42-34 



South Carolina 



Table 20.-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, AND 

URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960 Con. 
["IT denotes an unincorporated place. Median not shown where base is less than 100] 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA- 
TIONt 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH ITE 


POPULA- 

TIONi 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


. TOTAL || MALE | FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 








CHARLESTON 


COLUMBIA 


ALL AGES * 


65 925 


33 Oil 


32 914 


17 503 


14 810 


15 508 


18 104 


70 174 


97 433 


45 796 


51 637 


32 119 


35 670 


13 677 


15 967 


86 914 


UNDER 1 YEAR 
1 YEAR 


518 
452 


763 
737 


755 
715 


247 

224 


257 
202 


516 
513 


498 
513 


1 645 
\ 3 110 


2 141 
998 


1 072 
1 001 


1 069 
997 


627 

592 


599 
S65 


445 
409 


470 
432 


N 1 816 
j 3 776 


2 YEARS. 
3 YEARS. 
4 YEARS. 


428 
388 
368 


705 
659 
703 


723 
729 

665 


202 
209 
211 


204 
215 

197 


503 
450 
492 


519 
514 
468 


\ 3 062 


984 
888 
861 


978 
943 
923 


1 006 
945 
938 


580 
583 

510 


577 
525 
527 


398 
360 
413 


429 
420 
411 


\ 3 296 


5 YEARS. 


309 


685 


624 


196 


202 


489 


422 


1 385 


874 


955 


919 


556 


523 


399 


391 


1 421 


6 YEARS. 


311 


691 


620 


204 


173 


487 


447 


1 408 


813 


913 


900 


528 


535 


385 


365 


1 436 




285 


648 


637 


186 


193 


462 


444 


"1 


1 868 


904 


964 


522 


582 


382 


382 


^ 




229 


637 


592 


188 


187 


449 


405 


}- 3 646 


1 757 


886 


871 


535 


501 


331 


370 


} 4 059 


9 YEARS. 


207 


608 


599 


177 


181 


431 


418 


/ 


1 723 


821 


902 


477 


515 


344 


387 


J 


10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 


234 
270 
249 
258 


617 
642 
618 
609 


617 
628 
631 
649 


196 
225 
234 
227 


184 
211 
. 243 
230 


421 
417 
384 
382 


433 
417 
388 
419 


1 4 193 


1 758 
729 
749 
722 


832 
906 
862 
853 


926 
823 
887 
869 


520 
565 
568 
570 


54B 
519 
554 
570 


312 
337 
2V4 
283 


378 
304 
333 

299 


I 4 272 


14 YEARS 


109 


536 


573 


210 


204 


326 


369 


953 


343 


667 


676 


421 


432 


246 


244 


945 


15 YEARS 


146 


544 


602 


199 


213 


345 


389 


946 


409 


677 


732 


448 


441 


229 


291 


939 


16 YEARS 


085 


547 


538 


228 


208 


319 


330 


\ 2 066 


414 


695 


719 


473 


453 


222 


266 


I 2 047 


17 YEARS 


142 


540 


602 


253 


267 


287 


335 


J 


544 


733 


811 


479 


520 


254 


291 


J 


18 YEARS 


508 


968 


540 


745 


276 


223 


264 


\ 2 795 


2 089 


890 


1 199 


658 


896 


232 


303 


i 3 no 


19 YEARS 


732 


1 188 


544 


996 


289 


192 


255 


/ 


2 406 


1 060 


1 346 


812 


1 023 


248 


323 


; 


20 YEARS 


829 


1 307 


522 


1 120 


309 


187 


213 


1 534 


2 273 


972 


1 301 


730 


947 


242 


354 


1 848 


21 AND OVER 


37 868 


18 059 


19 809 


10 826 


10 165 


7 233 


9 644 


43 431 


59 090 


27 253 


31 837 


20 361 


23 313 


6 892 


8 524 


57 949 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


7 154 


3 567 


3 587 


1 093 


1 075 


2 474 


2 512 


7 817 


9 872 


4 917 


4 955 


2 892 


2 793 


2 025 


2 162 


8 868 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


6 341 


3 269 


3 072 


951 


936 


2 318 


2 136 


6 439 


9 035 


4 479 


4 556 


2 618 


2 661 


1 861 


895 


6 916 


10 'TO 14 YEARS 


6 120 


3 022 


3 098 


1 092 


1 072 


1 930 


2 026 


5 146 


8 301 


4 120 


4 181 


2 648 


2 623 


1 472 


558 


5 217 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


6 613 


3 787 


2 826 


2 421 


1 253 


1 366 


573 


' 5 807 


8 862 


4 055 


4 807 


2 870 


3 333 


1 185 


474 


6 096 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


6 669 


4 392 


2 277 


3 537 


1 238 


855 


039 


7 205 


9 185 


4 363 


4 822 


3 337 


3 419 


1 026 


403 


9 407 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


3 967 


2 130 


1 837 


1 299 


767 


831 


070 


6 397 


6 367 


3 334 


3 033 


2 389 


1 991 


945 


042 


8 910 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


3 911 


2 000 


1 911 


1 122 


710 


878 


201 


5 301 


6 171 


2 945 


3 226 


2 078 


2 170 


867 


056 


7 634 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


4 093 


1 949 


2 144 


995 


882 


954 


262 


5 390 


6 608 


3 178 


3 430 


2 281 


2 416 


897 


014 


7 196 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


3 859 


1 713 


2 146 


845 


964 


868 


182 


4 539 


6 387 


3 067 


3 320 


2 267 


2 390 


800 


930 


6 03B 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


3 867 


1 747 


2 120 


653 


1 024 


894 


096 


3 945 


6 127 


2 842 


3 285 


2 137 


2 424 


705 


861 


5 114 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


3 303 


1 465 


1 838 


803 


1 024 


662 


814 


3 221 


5 109 


2 333 


2 776 


1 818 


2 164 


515 


612 


4 359 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


2 905 


1 278 


1 627 


713 


945 


565 


682 


2 638 


4 344 


1 899 


2 445 


1 483 


1 885 


416 


560 


3 328 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


2 154 


943 


1 211 


599 


742 


344 


469 


2 156 


3 561 


1 476 


2 085 


1 171 


1 625 


305 


460 


2 770 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


1 919 


719 


1 200 


461 


734 


258 


466 


1 781 


3 021 


1 221 


1 800 


914 


1 403 


307 


397 


2 353 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


1 453 


544 


909 


350 


621 


194 


288 


1 138 


2 124 


803 


1 321 


615 


1 034 


188 


287 


1 409 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


850 


287 


563 


215 


411 


72 


152 


\ 1 058 


1 327 


463 


864 


364 


716 


99 


148 


\ ] 093 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


463 


131 


332 


103 


253 


28 


79 


/ 


648 


220 


428 


173 


356 


47 


72 


; 


85 AND OVER. . 


284 


68 


216 


51 


159 


17 


57 


196 


384 


81 


303 


64 


267 


17 


36 


186 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


22 988 


11 489 


11 499 


3 816 


3 771 


7 673 


7 728 


22 414 


31 575 


15 621 


15 954 


9 558 


9 491 


6 063 


6 463 


24 007 


65 AND OVER. . 


4 969 


1 749 


3 220 


1 180 


2 178 


569 


1 042 


4 173 


7 504 


2 788 


4 716 


2 130 


3 776 


658 


940 


5 041 


MEDIAN AGE . 


25.1 


23.3 


29.3 


24.5 


37.0 


18.8 


23.9 


27.1 


27.7 


26.4 


29,1 


28.5 


32.3 


21.4 


23.2 


28.9 




FLORENCE 


GAFFNEY 


ALL AGES . 


24 722 


11 498 


13 224 


7 280 


8 138 


4 218 


5 086 


22 513 


10 435 


4 776 


5 659 


3 577 


4 231 


1 199 


1 426 


8 123 


UNDER 1 YEAR . 


518 

570 


269 
286 


249 
284 


153 
1 71 


139 
1 63 


116 
1 1 


110 

121 


545 

1 11 9A 


257 


121 


136 


83 


87 


36 


49 


1*5 

V *(.. 




614 


323 


291 


1 88 


1 9 


1 35 


1 & \ 
199 


L I 1 Q 


222 


1 17 


105 


61 


72 


36 


33 


I 366 




565 


301 


264 


1 AR 


1 ^9 


1 ^X 


1 .. 


J 
i 1 rt^n 


247 


1 36 


1 1 1 


81 


74 


55 


37 


J 


4 YEARS. 


553 


273 


280 


1 Q3 

147 


1 Dfi 
154 


1 .?o 

126 


126 


1 1 UTv 


232 

216 


1 19 
115 


1 13 
101 


B2 
76 


77 
60 


37 
39 


36 

41 


} 3W 


5 YEARS* . 


610 


318 


292 


190 


164 


128 


128 


445 


230 


124 


106 


83 


54 


41 


52 


' 156 


6 YEARS. . 


606 
564 


315 
287 


291 
277 


165 
1 73 


167 
1 50 


150 
114 


124 

1 97 


482 
\ 


218 


100 


ne 


68 


76 


32 


42 


137 




599 
543 
582 
502 
546 
517 


292 
263 

288 
245 
278 
242 


307 
280 
294 
257 
268 
275 


156 
152 
161 
138 
185 
160 


162 
152 
161 
148 
158 
157 


136 
111 
127 
107 
93 
82 


1 * f 

145 
128 
133 
109 

no 
ne 


t 1 281 
I 1 414 


229 
198 
225 
209 
215 
232 
206 


129 
113 
105 
92 
117 
112 
95 


1 00 
85 
120 
117 
98 
120 


88 
71 
72 
60 
77 
88 
68 


64 
53 

93 
79 
57 
87 
75 


41 
42 
33 

32 
40 
24 
27 


36 
32 

25 
38 
41 
33 
36 


\ 432 
I M-97 


9 YEARS. 
10 YEARS . 
11 YEARS . 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS . 


14 YEARS . 


410 


196 


214 


103 


118 


93 


96 


304 


188 


98 


90 


66 


71 


32 


19 


^ 122 


15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS . 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER . 


434 
466 
391 
319 
339 
257 
14 217 


196 
224 
195 
146 
148 
100 
6 313 


238 
242 
196 
173 
191 
157 
7 904 


118 
124 
122 
86 
69 
61 
4 293 


132 
139 
119 
109 
116 
97 
5 112 


78 
100 
73 
60 
79 
39 
2 020 


106 
103 
77 
64 
75 
60 
2 792 


310 
\ 624 

L 602 

329 

13 978 


189 
164 
190 
222 
185 
208 
5 953 


102 
71 
90 
77 
52 
62 
2 629 


87 
93 
100 
145 
133 
146 
3 324 


86 
53 
69 
52 
33 
47 
2 093 


51 
66 
7V 
129 
114 
125 
2 586 


16 
18 
21 
45 
19 
IS 
536 


36 

27 
21 
16 
19 
21 
738 


129 
\ 236 

\ 330 

183 
M- 996 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 
5 TO 9 YEARS . 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO. 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. . 


2 820 
2 922 
2 557 
949 
449 
442 
664 
849 
735 
525 
196 
006 
826 
704 
558 
300 
139 
81 


1 452 

1 475 
1 249 
909 
587 
641 
759 
860 
827 
741 
524 
453 
350 
267 
218 
111 
44 
31 


1 368 
1 447 
1 308 
1 040 
862 
801 
905 
989 
90S 
784 
672 
553 
476 
437 
340 
189 
95 
50 


824 
836 
747 
519 
367 
448 
513 
601 
567 
501 
359 
311 
247 
169 
156 
76 
23 
16 


777 
795 
742 
615 
546 
505 
537 
670 
554 
506 
454 
367 
328 
279 
230 
134 
68 
31 


628 
639 
502 
390 
220 
193 
246 
259 
260 
240 
165 
142 
103 
98 
62 
35 
21 
15 


591 
652 
566 
425 
316 
296 
368 
319 
354 
278 
218 
186 
148 
158 

no 

55 
27 

19 


2 744 
2 208 
718 
536 
879 
2 243 
982 
863 
459 
202 
006 
804 
689 
584 
297 

} * 66 

33 


1 174 
1 100 
1 050 
950 
711 
631 
654 
740 
651 
602 
532 
468 
356 
291 
241 
153 
75 
56 


608 
571 
514 
392 
281 
297 
304 
350 
304 
275 
223 
195 
161 
107 
88 
53 
34 
19 


566 
529 
536 
558 
430 
334 
350 
390 
347 
327 
309 
273 
195 
184 
153 
100 
41 
37 


403 
382 
359 
293 
221 
236 
246 
296 
248 
211 
173 
160 
122 
80 
67 
39 
25 
16 


370 
342 
369 
439 
351 
262 
263 
313 
270 
238 
236 
220 
162 
135 
116 
66 
30 
27 


205 
169 
155 
V9 
60 
61 
58 
54 
56 
64 
t0 
35 
39 
27 
21 
14 
9 
3 


196 
187 
167 
119 
79 
72 
87 
77 
77 
89 
73 
53 
33 
49 
37 
12 
1 1 
10 


905 
725 
619 
695 
7*3 
722 
621 
627 
509 
462 
368 
289 
265 
237 
163 

} '*" 

' 15 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


9 590 
1 782 
27.3 


4 791 
671 
25.6 


4 799 

1 111 
28.7 


2 771 
440 
28.9 


2 704 
742 
30.8 


2 020 
231 
19.4 


2 095 
369 
24.9 


7 604 
1 180 
27.6 


3 867 

816 
26.8 


1 956 
301 
25.4 


1 911 
515 
28.2 


1 352 

227 
27.8 


1 277 
396 
29.7 


604 
74 
17*6 


634 
119 
22.8 


2 61* 
553 
27.6 



General Population Characteristics 



42-35 



Table 20. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, AND 

URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960 Con. 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place. Median not shown where base is less than 100] 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 

POPULA"* 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


PQPULA- 
TIONi 

TflTAI 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TIONf 
TOTAL 




TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


1 U 1 Ml_ 


TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 








GEORGETOWN 


GREENVILLE 


ALL AGES 


12 261 


5 819 


6 442 


3 354 


3 526 


2 465 


2 916 


6 COM- 


66 188 


30 549 


35 639 


21 461 


25 010 


9 088 


10 629 


58 161 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


293 


148 


145 


79 


68 


69 


77 


13* 


1 594 


773 


821 


496 


511 


277 


310 


1 435 


1 YEAR . 


298 


150 


148 


74 


68 


76 


80 


1 316 


1 481 


735 


746 


445 


475 


290 


271 


L 2 671 


2 YEARS. 


310 


169 


141 


87 


66 


82 


75 


i 


471 


, 735 


736 


452 


452 


283 


284 


1 




314 


184 


130 


97 


66 


87 


64 


\ 280 


467 


729 


738 


439 


451 


290 


287 


2 400 


4 YEARS. 


334 


170 


164 


80 


86 


90 


78 




510 


765 


745 


475 


455 


290 


290 




5 YEARS. 


361 


175 


186 


91 


93 


84 


93 


128 


466 


742 


724 


429 


449 


313 


275 


973 




31 2 


163 


149 


79 


73 


84 


76 


125 


' 369 


677 


692 


413 


443 


264 


249 


1 013 


7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. 


342 
310 


172 
159 


170 
151 


91 
86 


78 
92 


81 
73 


92 
59 


f 370 


471 
1 381 


737 
697 


734 
684 


504 

464 


458 
425 


233 
233 


276 
259 


\ 2 617 


9 YEARS. 


284 


152 


132 


77 


61 


75 


71 


J 


1 307 


657 


650 


446 


427 


211 


223 


) 


10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 


335 
309 
350 


170 
152 
160 


165 
157 
190 


95 
74 
83 


87 
72 
M2 


75 
78 
77 


78 
85 
78 


I M-27 


1 317 
1 256 

1 316 


637 
623 
660 


680 
633 

656 


407 
393 

443 


433 
420 
410 


230 
230 
217 


247 
213 
246 


I 2 915 


13 YEARS 


291 


151 


140 


78 


75 


73 


65 


J 


1 253 


637 


616 


449 


408 


188 


208 


J 


14 YEARS 


287 


153 


134 


81 


65 


72 


69 


105 


999 


499 


500 


323 


326 


176 


174 


749 


15 YEARS 


265 


136 


129 


71 


58 


65 


71 


106 


997 


481 


516 


312 


323 


169 


193 


729 


16 YEARS 


251 


124 


127 


68 


64 


56 


63 


\ 187 


1 013 


507 


506 


312 


315 


195 


191 


}1 533 


17 YEARS 


263 


131 


132 


57 


72 


74 


60 


; 


1 013 


470 


543 


310 


380 


160 


163 


r 


18 YEARS 


210 


102! 108 


50 


61 


52 


47 


X 182 


1 288 


508 


780 


343 


613 


165 


167 


}2 379 


19 YEARS 


135 


59 


76 


30 


44 


29 


32 


j 


1 178 


443 


735 


315 


610 


128 


125 


, 


20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 


127 
6 280 


51 
2 788 


76 
3 492 


31 
1 795 


40 
2 025 


20 
993 


36 
1 467 


81 

3 563 


1 152 
38 889 


444 
17 393 


708 
21 496 


329 

12 962 


577 
15 649 


115 
4 431 


131 
5 847 


1 303 
37 444 


UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEAhS 


1 549 
1 609 


821 
821 


728 
788 


417 
424 


354 
397 


404 
397 


374 
391 


730 


7 523 
6 994 


3 737 
3 510 


3 786 
3 484 


2 307 
2 256 


2 344 
2 202 


1 430 
1 254 


1 442 
1 282 


6 506 
4 603 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


1 572 


786 


786 


411 


411 


375 


375 


532 


6 141 


3 056 


3 085 


2 015 


1 997 


1 041 


1 088 


3 664 


15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 


1 124 
611 


552 
271 


572 

340 


276 
168 


299 
195 


276 

103 


273 

145 


488 


5 489 

5 148 


2 409 
2 277 


3 080 
2 871 


592 
696 


2 241 
2 204 


817 
581 


839 
667 


4 641 
6 256 


25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 


653 
753 
842 
818 
732 
563 
382 
326 
281 
223 
138 


276 
345 
380 
386 
361 
254 
177 
130 
103 
74 
54 


377 
408 
462 
432 
371 
309 
205 
196 
178 
149 
84 


187 
238 
263 
251 
231 
161 

no 

82 
55 
36 
32 


234 
248 
290 
238 
224 
172 
107 
115 
82 
77 
48 


89 
107 
117 
135 
130 
93 
67 
48 
48 
38 
22 


143 
160 
172 
194 
147 
137 
98 
81 
96 
72 
36 


508 
516 

467 
429 
313 
220 
211 
159 
172 
67 


4 284 
4 333 

4 804 
4 315 
3 920 
3 376 
2 757 
2 240 
1 916 
1 406 
910 


2 063 

2 019 
2 215 
1 972 
1 855 
1 501 
1 161 
920 
791 
542 
335 


2 221 
2 314 
2 589 
2 343 
2 065 
1 875 
1 596 
1 320 
1 125 
864 
575 


534 
503 
673 
453 
338 
139 
845 
710 
573 
423 
261 


1 504 
1 617 
1 891 
1 649 
1 497 
1 357 
1 154 
1 009 
837 
684 
459 


529 

516 
542 
519 
517 
362 
316 
210 
218 
119 
74 


717 
697 
698 
694 
568 
518 
442 
311 
288 
180 
116 


6 098 
4 995 
4 662 
3 927 
3 232 
2 805 
2 084 
1 626 
1 424 
809 
\ 689 


80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. 


53 

32 


15 
13 


38 
19 


8 
4 


26 

9 


7 
9 


12 
10 


/ 
12 


394 
238 


114 
72 


280 
166 


95 

48 


235 

129 


19 
24 


45 
37 


140 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


5 509 
727 
22.3 


2 819 
259 
19.4 


2 690 
468 
25.1 


1 448 
135 
24.4 


1 356 
242 
27.3 


1 371 
124 
16.0 


1 334 
226 
21.6 


2 178 
333 
26.5 


23 681 

4 864 
27.1 


11 761 
1 854 
25.7 


11 920 
3 010 
28.4 


7 512 
1 400 
27.8 


7 561 
2 344 
30.0 


4 249 
454 
20.0 


4 359 
666 
25.0 


17 035 
3 062 
27.8 




GREENWOOD 


NORTH AUGUSTA 


ALL AGES . 


16 644 


7 625 


9 019 


5 050 


- 5 863 


2 575 


3 156 


13 806 


10 348 


5 039 


5 309 


4 555 


4 755 


484 


554 


3 659 


UNDER 1 YEAR . . 


337 
336 


159 
165 


178 
171 


94 
100 


92 

89 


65 
65 


86 
82 


278 
\ 572 


275 

286 


141 
158 


134 
128 


131 

141 


117 
117 


10 
17 


17 
11 


. 100 
j. 180 


2 YEARS. .... 


331 


164 


167 


98 


83 


66 


84 


J 


266 


135 


131 


121 


123 


14 


8 


J 


3 YEARS. * . 


328 


166 


162 


95 


104 


71 


58 


L 532 


376 


147 


129 


134 


115 


13 


14 


\ 1 89 


4 YEARS. . . 


315 
331 
338 
353 
341 
334 
342 
360 
328 
363 
244 
277 
304 
295 
301 


169 
169 
176 
183 
179 
160 
182 
190 
157 
184 
127 
152 
138 
127 
125 


146 
162 
162 
170 
162 
174 
160 
170 

171 
179 
117 
125 
166 
168 
176 


96 

104 
98 
101 
116 
97 
114 
119 
109 
129 
83 
98 
99 
83 
74 


93 
83 
80 
99 
95 
97 
98 
107 
112 
118 
75 
76 
115 
114 
123 


73 
65 
78 
82 
63 
63 
68 
71 
48 
55 
44 
54 
39 
44 
51 


53 
79 
82 
71 
67 
77 
62 
63 
59 
61 
42 
49 
51 
54 
53 


224 
259 

\ 844 

197 
224 


288 
287 
263 
270 
218 
204 
241 
210 
232 
222 
166 
166 
178 
144 
122 


145 
140 
138 
146 
111 
105 
120 
116 
135 
117 
91 
89 
86 
73 
60 


143 
147 
125 
124 
107 
99 
121 
94 
97 
105 
75 
77 
92 
71 
62 


136 
133 
125 
130 
93 
92 
102 
102 
117 
110 
83 
77 
74 
66 
51 


129 
130 
116 
111 
97 
93 
110 
85 
86 
93 
63 
67 
76 
58 
50 


9 

7 
13 
16 
18 
13 
18 
14 
18 
7 
8 
12 
12 
7 
9 


14 
17 
9 
13 
10 
6 
11 
9 
11 
12 
12 
10 
16 
13 
12 


72 
76 

I 205 
I 189 

46 
45 


6 YEARS. . 


8 YEARS. . . 
9 YEARS. . . 
1 YEARS . . 
1 1 YEARS . . 
12 YEARS . . 
13 YEARS . . 
14 YEARS . . 
15 YEARS . . 
16 YEARS . 
17 YEARS . . 
18 YEARS . 


19 YEARS . . 
20 YEARS . . 
21 AND OVER . . 


289 
228 
9 969 


94 
74 
4 385 


195 
154 
5 584 


57 

42 
3 044 


147 
123 
3 740 


37 
32 

1 341 


48 
31 
1 844 


243 
8 933 


75 
85 
5 874 


. 29 
37 
2 720 


46 
48 
3 154 


20 
30 

2 487 


. 37 

41 
2 841 


9 

7 
233 


9 

7 
313 


36 
2 363 


UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 YEARS . . 
10 TO 14 YEARS . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS . 
35 TO 39 YEARS . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS . 
50 TO 54 YEARS . 
55 TO 59 YEARS . 
60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 TO 79 YEARS . 
80 TO 84 YEARS . 


1 647 
1 697 
1 637 
1 466 
1 023 
1 003 
i 101 
1 183 
1 121 
1 099 
875 
780 
647 
542 
356 
254 
147 


823 
867 
840 
636 
421 
470 
492 
546 
510 
527 
376 
337 
272 
201 
140 
89 
58 


824 
830 
797 
830 
602 
533 
609 
637 
611 
572 
499 
443 
375 
341 
216 
165 
89 


483 
516 
554 
411 
260 
305 
345 
369 
348 
367 
279 
240 
212 
137 
106 
64 
41 


461 
454 
510 
575 
396 
333 
383 
411 
411 
356 
368 
315 
272 
237 
156 
128 
65 


340 
351 
286 
225 
161 
165 
147 
177 
162 
160 
97 
97 
60 
64 
34 
25 
17 


363 
376 
287 
- 255 
206 
200 
226 
226 
200 
216 
131 
128 
103 
104 
60 
37 
2U 


1 382 
1 116 
1 041 
1 091 
1 257 
1 310 
1 110 
1 152 
949 
785 
675 
568 
449 
415 
275 
\ 203 


1 391 
1 242 
1 071 
685 
540 
828 
913 
819 
757 
619 
485 
342 
217 
185 
125 
66 
45 


726 
640 
579 
337 
206 
383 
456 
370 
389 
309 
244 
158 
95 
74 
38 
17 
15 


665 
602 

492 
348 
334 
445 
457 
449 
368 
310 
241 
184 
122 
111 
87 
49 
30 

1 e 


663 
573 
514 
288 
176 
358 
434 
348 
353 
282 
213 
143 
88 
59 
34 
14 
12 

1 


601 
547 
437 
288 
309 
415 
421 
409 
338 
270 
1 217 
165 
101 
89 
71 
37 
26 
14 


63 
67 
65 
49 
30 
25 
22 
22 
36 
27 
31 
15 
7 
15 
4 
3 
3 


64 
55 
55 
60 
25 
30 
36 
40 
30 
40 
24 
19 
21 
22 
16 
12 
4 
1 


469 
353 
235 
203 
269 
325 
359 
342 
280 
223 
159 
148 
113 
81 
47 
Y 45 


85 AND OVER. * . 


66 


20 


46 


13 


32 


7 


1 ^ 


2 


18 


3 


\ 3 






... 






UNDER 18 YEARS . 
65 AND OVER. * 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


5 857 
1 365 
29.2 


2 947 
508 
27.4 


2 910 
857 
30.8 


1 833 
361 
29.9 


1 730 
618 
32.6 


1 114 
147 
22.7 


1 18C 
239 
27.3 


4 18 
92 
28.9 


4 192 
439 
26.5 


2 193 
147 
25.4 


1 999 
292 

: 27.4 


1 967 

122 
25.9 


1 786 
237 
27.4 


226 

25 
19.8 


213 
55 
28.0 


1 187 
181 
29.6 



South Carolina 



CCU, 



I-D" denotes an unincorporated place. Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



=====r 


1" 
1960 POPULATION 


- 
1950 
POPULA- 
TION? 


~ 
I960 POPULATION 

ALL CLASSES || WH 1 TE 


NONWH TE 


1950 
POPULA- 
TIONi 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 
TOTAL II MALE 1 FEMALE 


WM 1 

MALE 


FEMALE MALE 


EMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL II 

29 404 
679 
655 
722 
680 
663 
676 
650 
637 
640 
659 
677 
579 
712 
648 
462 
501 
469 
507 
742 
704 
646 
16 096 

3 399 
3 262 

3 078 
2 923 

2 274 
1 903 
1 965 
2 079 
1 852 
1 725 
1 372 
1 093 
751 
714 
506 
285 
144 
79 

11 216 
1 728 
24.5 


MALE | FEMALE [[ MALE | FEMALE 
ROCK HILL 


MALE F 


EMALE 




' u ' 
ORANGEBURG 

, 1 ' 1 1 


13 475 
354 
325 
374 
341 
350 
347 
329 
330 
317 
348 
325 
287 
370 
341 
232 
244 
210 
238 
188 
157 
179 
7 289 

1 744 
1 671 
1 555 
1 037 
813 
899 
929 
985 
908 
828 
666 
478 
324 
283 
189 
92 
48 
26 

5 662 
638 

24.5 


15 929 
325 
330 
348 
339 
313 
329 
321 
307 
323 
311 
352 
292 
342 
307 
230 
257 
259 
269 
554 
547 
467 
8 807 

1 655 
1 591 
1 523 
1 886 
1 461 
1 004 
1 036 
1 094 
944 
897 
706 
615 
427 
431 
317 
193 
96 
53 

5 554 
1 090 
24.5 


10 131 
237 
240 
271 
244 
255 
253 
223 
226 
215 
246 
220 
202 
257 
260 
157 
170 
165 
175 
122 
97 
106 
5 790 

1 247 
1 163 
1 096 
729 
5B5 
702 
754 
783 
735 
678 
522 
391 
253 
227 
157 
59 
35 
15 

4 016 
493 
26.7 


12 074 
218 
226 
232 
240 
214 
218 
210 
222 
204 
203 
232 
208 
243 
245 
159 
194 
176 
187 
476 
490 
388 
6 887 

1 130 
1 057 
1 087 
1 525 
1 202 
776 
812 
848 
733 
697 
561 
463 
328 
338 
242 
159 
78 
38 

3 833 

6b5 
25.2 


3 344 
117 
85 
103 
97 
95 
94 
106 
104 
102 
102 
105 
85 
113 
81 
75 
74 
45 
63 
66 
60 
73 
1 499 

497 
508 
459 
308 
228 
197 
175 
202 
173 
150 
144 
87 
71 
56 
32 
33 
13 
11 

1 646 
145 
18*4 


3 855 
107 
104 
116 
99 
99 
111 
111 
85 
119 
108 
120 
84 
99 
62 
71 
63 
81 
82 
78 
57 
79 
1 920 

525 
534 
436 
361 
259 
228 
224 
246 
211 
200 
145 
152 
99 
93 
75 
34 
18 
15 

1 721 
235 
21.4 


24 502 
613 
1 252 

1 139 

473 
425 

1 1 336 

I 1 484 
| 
346 
378 
721 

1 399 

621 
14 315 

3 004 

2 234 
1 830 
2 498 
2 531 
2 323 
1 978 
1 982 
1 538 
1 206 
949 
789 
583 
489 
325 
\ 208 

35 

8 167 
1 057 
25.3 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . * 


13 852 
290 
272 
247 
290 
301 
297 
307 
288 
306 
254 
263 
271 
291 
258 
224 
292 
248 
297 
445 
427 
335 
7 649 

1 400 
. 1 452 
1 307 
1 709 
1 253 
827 
791 
934 
870 
783 
625 
528 
410 
380 
252 
177 
87 
67 

4 996 
963 
24.2 


6 468 
168 
140 
119 
148 
125 
151 
161 
140 
148 
127 
132 
125 
148 
128 
100 
168 
112 
132 
188 
182 
170 
3 456 

700 
727 
633 
782 
639 
391 
364 
444 
398 
366 
287 
223 
184 
141 
76 
70 
22 
21 

2 472 

330 
23.1 


7 384 
122 
132 

128 
142 
176 
146 
146 
148 
158 
127 
131 
146 
143 
130 
124 
124 
136 
165 
257 
245 
165 
4 193 

700 
725 
674 
927 
614 
436 
427 
490 
472 
417 
338 
305 
226 
239 
176 
107 
65 
46 

2 524 
633 
25.6 


3 939 
94 
88 
71 
93 
77 
101 
97 
90 
82 
71 
78 
79 
95 
78 
66 
90 
70 
74 
43 
32 
41 
2 329 

423 
441 
396 
309 
226 
244 
269 
340 
287 
262 
207 
181 
135 
95 
51 
42 
17 
14 

1 494 
219 
28.6 


4 413 
70 
77 
75 
92 
104 
90 
84 
92 
97 
75 
78 
91 
94 
77 
82 
83 
82 
81 
73 
50 
41 
2 725 

418 
438 
422 
369 
233 
272 
290 
345 
323 
280 
230 
218 
146 
152 
113 
82 
50 
32 

1 524 
429 
30.9 


2 529 
74 
52 
48 
55 
48 
50 
64 
50 
66 
56 
54 
46 
53 
50 
34 
78 
42 
58 
145 
150 
129 
1 127 

277 
286 
237 
473 
413 
147 
95 
104 
111 
104 
SO 
42 
49 
46 
25 
28 

978 
111 
19.9 


2 971 
52 
55 
53 
50 
72 
56 
62 
56 
61 
52 
53 
55 
49 
53 
42 
41 
54 
84 
184 
195 
124 
1 468 

282 
287 
252 
558 
381 
164 
137 
145 
149 
137 
108 
87 
80 
87 
63 
25 
15 
14 

1 000 
204 
21.4 


15 322 
362 
748 

716 

358 
348 

916 

} ~ 

213 
227 

j, 500 

776 

371 
8 851 

1 826 
1 622 
1 149 
1 503 
1 685 
1 427 
1 159 
1 091 
872 
750 
601 
458 
357 
378 
225 

} "' 

28 

5 324 
822 
24.6 


2 YEARS* 
3 YEARS* 
4 YEARS* 
5 YEARS* 




8 YEARS* 
9 YEARS* 
10 YEARS 
1! YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 

UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 -YEARS . 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. . 

UNDER 18 YEARS . 
65 AND OVER. . * 
MEDIAN AGE * . 

ALL AGES . * 
UNDEK 1 YEAR . 


SPARTANBURG 


SUMTER 


44 352 
959 
989 
925 
900 
966 
1 030 
917 
935 
990 
941 
894 
920 
876 
895 
743 
728 
700 
692 
780 
736 
698 
26 138 

4 739 
4 813 
4 328 
3 636 
2 982 
2 581 
3 007 
3 198 
2 953 
2 741 
2 392 
1 991 
1 590 
1 366 
982 
58S 
292 
176 

16 OOC 
3 401 
28.2 


20 730 
488 
517 
457 
465 
512 
508 
471 
482 
521 
454 
431 
451 
439 
461 
390 
374 
364 
322 
350 
309 
328 
11 636 

2 439 
2 436 
2 172 
1 719 
1 408 
1 175 
1 371 
1 453 
1 374 
1 25C 
1 086 
873 
694 
54*7 
394 
20S 

QL 

52 

8 10' 
1 28C 
25. 


23 622 

471 
472 
468 
435 
454 
522 
446 
453 
469 
487 
463 
469 
437 
434 
353 
354 
336 
370 
430 
427 
370 
14 502 

2 300 
2 377 
2 156 
1 917 
1 574 
1 406 
1 636 
1 745 
1 579 
1 491 
1 306 
1 118 
896 
819 
588 
383 
208 
123 

7 893 
2 121 
30.2 


14 202 
302 
317 
262 
293 
307 
312 
303 
293 
327 
284 
252 
303 
271 
300 
250 
233 
227 
215 
219 
235 
246 
8 451 

1 481 
1 519 
1 376 
1 129 
1 020 
846 
1 030 
1 076 
1 005 
882 
792 
636 
514 
36- 
27 e 
14<= 
6< 

3: 

5 05 
89^ 
28.' 


16 043 
290 
274 
275 
270 
266 
298 
261 
274 
301 
287 
282 
285 
276 
307 
213 
231 
214 
236 
350 
327 
274 
10 252 

1 375 
1 421 
1 363 
1 358 
1 132 
939 
1 109 
1 255 
1 121 
1 036 
901 
824 
644 
575 
436 
28' 

17: 

9* 

4 84< 
1 56J 
32. ( 


6 528 
186 
200 
195 
172 
205 
196 
168 
189 
194 
170 
179 
148 
168 
161 
140 
141 
137 
107 
131 
74 
82 
3 185 

958 
917 
796 
59C 
38E 
321 
341 
37" 
36S 
366 
29t 
23' 
18C 
18C 
llf 
SI 
1 
2( 

3 05 
38 
20. 


7 579 
181 
198 
193 
165 
188 
224 
185 
179 
168 
200 
181 
184 
161 
127 
140 
123 
122 
134 
80 
100 
96 
4 250 

925 
956 
793 
559 
442 
467 
527 
490 
458 
455 
405 
294 
252 
244 
152 
96 
35 
2<= 

3 05: 
55< 
26.2 


36 795 
853 
1 690 

1 59 

65 
67 

" 1 77 
I 2 06 

49 
51 

} " 

} 123 
72 
23 52 

4 13 
3 10 
2 56 
2 74 
3 54 
3 41 
3 07 
3 00 
2 57 
2 19 
1 80 
1 38 
1 08 
58 
58 

} so 

11 3 
2 14 
28 


23 062 
666 
706 
5*5 
602 
602 
580 
549 
501 
483 
488 
454 
454 
469 
464 
379 
380 
378 
379 
337 
352 
384 
12 840 

3 191 
2 601 
2 220 
1 826 
1 996 
1 700 
1 483 
1 501 
1 390 
1 209 
981 
799 
634 
591 
458 
274 
132 
76 

9 145 
1 531 
24.2 


10 911 
351 
351 
328 
302 
304 
299 
290 
260 
254 
241 
219 
223 
232 
250 
197 
180 
195 
172 
125 
139 
145 
5 854 

1 636 
1 344 
1 121 
811 
910 
854 
717 
682 
657 
54C 
441 
358 
25 
25C 
171 
8- 
51 
2i 

4 64{ 
58 
23. ( 


12 151 
335 
355 
267 
300 
298 
281 
259 
241 
229 
247 
235 
231 
237 
214 
182 
200 
183 
207 
212 
213 
239 
6 986 

1 555 
1 257 
1 099 
1 015 
1 086 
846 
766 
819 
733 
669 
S40 
U41 
379 
341 
287 
187 
81 
5C 

4 501 
941 
25.* 


7 239 
241 
221 
201 
190 
17H 
182 
171 
148 
168 
144 
127 
124 
139 
161 
10V 
101 
131 
107 
75 
85 
W 
4 137 

1 031 
813 
660 
4VS 
644 
63 
22 
&01 
46! 
34* 
31? 
221= 
18<3 
171 
lOf 
5* 
4C 
1< 

2 84 
39( 
24. 


7 764 
203 
233 
156 
182 
184 
182 
168 
146 
129 
140 
131 
143 
145 
146 
95 
11V 
103 
124 
126 
117 
158 
4 634 

9&ti 
765 
661 
58S 
735 
S8S 
4VS 
S2t 
46 
4U 
35' 
29! 
241; 
221 
211 
12i 
6< 
3i 

2 72< 
66 
<26 


3 672 

no 

UO 
U7 
1 12 
126 
117 

iw 

112 
86 
97 
VX 
99 
93 
89 
88 
79 
64 
65 
50 
$4 
46 
1 717 

60S 
531 
401 
31Ji 
264 
22t 
W* 
1*1 

ws 

193 
U< 
13C 
6< 
7 e 

6: 

3. 

1 
1< 

1 80 
19 
18. 


4 387 
132 
122 
111 
118 
1 14 
99 
91 
95 
100 
107 
104 
88 
92 
68 
87 
81 
80 
83 
86 
96 
81 
2 352 

597 
492 
43S 
426 
351 
25' 
26' 
291 
26^ 

25: 

18< 
1*M 
13 
11< 
7 ( 
5* 

r 
1, 

1 77 
28 
23. 


20 185 
523 
. 1 070 

1 029 

415 
434 

- 1 185 
1 1 279 

299 
274 
554 

667 

^ 344 
12 112 

2 622 

2 034 
1 578 
1 495 
1 856 
2 037 
1 763 
1 587 
1 141 
942 
792 
662 
562 
499 
332 
^ 237 

; ,6 

7 062 
1 114 
26.2 


2 YEARS. . 
3 YEARS. . 
4 YEARS. . 


6 YEARS. 


3 YEARS. . 
9 YEARS.. 
10 YEARS * 
1 v YEARS . 
12 YEARS . . 
13 YEARS . * * 
14 YEARS . 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS . * 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS . . 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS * . 
21 AND OVER . 

UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 YEARS . 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. 

UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . . 



General Population Characteristics ^2-3 7 

Table 20.-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED AREAS, AND 

URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960-Con. 

["II" denotes an uniuearjorated place. Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



AGE 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 
POPULATION! 
TOTAL 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONVIHITE 


TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 




UNION 


10 191 
247 
202 
234 
217 
228 
237 
206 
219 
198 
203 
200 
223 
223 
227 
165 
204 
177 
190 
160 
131 
126 
5 974 

1 128 
1 063 
1 038 
862 
625 
602 
689 
703 
645 
614 
562 
454 
362 
341 
236 
158 
79 
30 

3 800 

844 
28,2 


4 753 
138 
96 
117 
114 
98 
121 
107 
111 
100 
92 
99 
121 
113 
115 
85 
95 
82 
98 
87 
61 
62 
2 641 

563 
531 
533 
423 
298 
265 
343 
340 
276 
270 
261 
176 
161 
130 
88 
65 
23 
7 

1 902 
313 
25,5 


5 438 

109 
106 
117 
103 
130 
116 
99 
108 
98 
111 
101 
102 
110 
112 
80 
109 
95 
92 
73 
70 
64 
3 333 

565 
532 
505 
439 
327 
337 
346 
363 
369 
344 
301 
278 
201 
211 
148 
93 
56 
23 

1 898 
531 
30.2 


3 467 
99 

71 
77 
72 
64 
92 
65 
71 
66 
60 
62 
76 
71 
86 
63 
60 
51 
66 
51 
48 
51 
2 045 

383 
354 
358 
276 
229 
206 
289 
265 
200 
195 
207 
134 
120 
107 
69 
52 
18 
5 

1 272 
251 
28.2 


3 854 
75 
62 
75 
57 
91 
79 
73 
71 
62 
69 
60 
70 
75 
72 
49 
75 
62 
60 
46 
47 
45 
2 479 

360 
354 
326 
290 
241 
268 
267 
273 
256 
233 
245 
213 
142 
149 
107 
70 
43 
17 

1 237 
386 
31,6 


1 286 
39 
25 
40 
42 
34 
29 
42 
40 
34 
32 
37 
45 
42 
29 
22 
35 
31 
32 
36 
13 
11 
596 

180 
177 
175 
147 
69 
59 
54 
75 
76 
75 
54 
42 
41 
23 
19 
13 
5 
2 

630 
62 
18.8 


1 584 
34 
44 
42 
46 
39 
37 
26 
37 
36 
42 
41 
32 
35 
40 
31 
34 
33 
32 
27 
23 
19 
854 

205 
178 
179 
149 
86 
69 
79 
90 
113 
111 
56 
65 
59 
62 
41 
23 
13 
6 

661 
145 
24.7 


9 730 
'240 
| 488 

\ 448 

192 

210 

1 547 
1 693 

170 
176 

} 
} 

147 
5 812 

1 176 
949 
863 
783 
788 
880 
725 
728 
661 
501 
428 
369 
296 
266 
162 
\ 128 

27 

3 496 
583 
26.7 


















































10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 











42-38 
Table 



South Carolina 
THE POPULATION, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED 



["TJ" denotes an u n ">rP< M< *l*<l place. Percent not sntrw** * * - - ~ " ~ , r-r - *- ___... f ^,^, w uvueenoiosj 


SUBJECT 


SMSA'S 




URBANIZED AREAS 




URBAN 


PLACES 




CHARLESTON 


COLUMBIA 


GREENVILLE 


CHARLESTON 


COLUMBIA 


GREENVILLE 


AIKEN 


ANDERSON 


CHARLESTON 


COLUMBIA 


TOTAL POPULATION . . . 
RACE 


216 382 

108 318 
70 775 
37 284 
49 
24 
13 
139 
34 

108 064 
66 674 
41 204 
44 
57 
11 
60 
14 

69 832 
21 708 
45 485 
65.1 
1 538 
1 700 
939 

70 968 
14 892 
45 836 
64.6 
2 641 
8 984 
1 256 

20 847 
7 343 
12 558 
60.2 
1 058 
855 
91 

25 177 
7 004 
13 713 
54.5 
2 023 
4 293 
167 

216 382 

205 576 
55 337 
47 824 
7 513 
39 528 
79 012 
28 915 
2 784 
10 B06 
570 
10 236 

3.71 

78 933 
77 777 
18 063 
14 755 
3 308 
10 29J 
31 023 
17 262 
1 138 
1 156 
293 
863 

4.31 


260 82 

134 524 
97 387 
36 959 
46 
38 
26 
4 
27 

126 304 


209 776 

101 890 
84 367 
17 445 
39 
11 
16 

10 

107 886 
88 456 
19 341 
30 
36 
14 

9 

68 793 
16 402 
49 767 
72.3 
1 333 
1 765 
859 

75 808 
14 506 
50 967 
67.2 
2 280 
8 959 
1 376 

10 742 
3 412 
6 738 
62.7 
635 
520 
72 

12 487 
3 102 
7 275 
58.3 
1 174 
1 999 
111 

209 776 
203 805 
58 916 
52 450 
6 466 
45 564 
71 209 
25 652 
2 464 
5 971 
1 609 
4 362 

3.46 

36 953 
36 263 
9 038 
7 470 
1 568 
5 392 
13 196 
7 748 
889 
690 
437 
253 

4.01 


160 113 

79 845 
56 216 
23 413 
39 
4 
8 
131 
34 

80 268 
53 578 
26 559 
27 
34 

a 

57 

e 

52 977 
15 850 
35 092 
66.2 
1 168 
1 287 
748 

54 177 
10 795 
35 330 
65.2 
2 171 
6 932 
1 120 

13 536 

4 309 
8 547 
63.1 
791 
609 
71 

16 858 
4 262 
9 523 
56.5 
1 636 
2 921 
152 

160 113 
151 320 
43 119 
36 771 
6 348 
30 339 
56 663 
18 891 
2 308 
8 793 
418 
8 375 

3,51 

50 319 
49 554 
12 745 
10 099 
2 646 
6 968 
19 443 
9 522 
876 
765 
162 
603 

3.89 


162 601 

77 591 
57 176 
20 292 
23 
30 
21 
26 
23 

85 010 
61 593 
23 290 
29 
52 
17 
17 
12 

52 759 
14 497 
36 017 
68.3 
1 131 
1 390 
855 

60 240 
13 635 
37 220 
61.8 

2 217 
7 888 

1 497 

12 414 
3 961 
7 767 
62.6 
637 
574 
112 

15 080 
3 920 
8 537 
56.6 

1 381 
2 431 
192 

162 601 
150 748 
43 730 
37 565 
6 165 
31 535 
53 343 
18 871 
3 269 
11 853 
6 958 
4 895 

3.45 

43 832 
41 770 
10 369 
8 665 
1 704 
6 036 
15 724 
8 345 
1 296 
2 062 
1 199 
863 

4.03 


126 887 

60 016 
48 324 
11 642 
18 
10 

i: 

10 

66 871 
53 180 
13 621 
19 
35 
10 

6 

39 894 
8 834 
29 477 
73.9 
928 
1 060 
523 

47 111 
9 175 
30 802 
65.4 
1 778 
6 064 
1 070 

7 103 
2 068 
4 595 
64.7 
510 
388 
52 

8 895 
1 986 
5 235 

58.9 
1 002 
1 583 
91 

126 887 
123 438 
36 660 
31 853 
1 4 807 
27 134 
42 868 
14 901 
1 875 
3 449 
842 
2 607 

3-37 

25 383 
25 132 
6 727 
5 376 
I 351 
3 742 
8 948 
4 984 
731 
251 
96 
155 

3.74 


11 243 

5 324 

3 298 
2 024 
1 

1 

5 919 

3 520 
2 394 

4 
1 

3 441 
763 

2 490 
72.4 
109 
143 
45 

4 037 
727 
2 551 
63.2 
164 
699 
60 

1 249 
329 
813 
65.1 
84 
100 
7 

1 600 
330 
886 
55.4 
136 
373 
11 

11 243 
11 061 
3 254 
2 687 
567 
2 202 
4 022 
1 327 
256 
182 
71 
111 

3.40 

4 425 
4 357 
1 229 
967 
262 
638 
1 500 
874 
116 
68 
44 
24 

3.55 


41 316 

19 524 
15 719 
3 800 

* * 

t 

21 792 
17 289 
4 500 

1 

2 

13 343 
2 990 
9 834 
73.7 
341 
372 
147 

15 690 
2 917 
10 290 
65.6 
616 
2 183 
300 

2 427 

754 
1 534 
63.2 
155 
126 
JL3 

2 970 
706 
1 712 
57.6 
292 
536 
16 

41 316 
40 983 
12 193 
10 629 
1 564 
9 005 
13 450 
5 891 
444 
333 
2 
331 

3.36 

8 308 
8 308 
2 275 
1 835 
440 
1 269 
2 809 
1 807 
148 

3.65 


65 925 

33 Oil 
17 503 
15 426 
20 

L 

31 

27 

32 914 

14 810 
18 096 

t 

L 

23 689 

9 204 
13 311 
56.2 
795 
785 
389 

23 730 
6 086 
12 662 

53.4 
1 537 
4 378 
604 

9 112 
2 902 
5 730 
62.9 
602 
420 
60 

11 799 
3 015 
6 470 
54.8 
1 290 
2 198 
116 

65 925 
59 047 
18 306 
13 838 
4 468 
10 049 
19 228 
10 173 
1 291 
6 878 
326 
6 5&2 

3.23 

33 612 
33 092 

9 113 
6 954 
2 159 
4 569 
12 371 
6 473 
566 
520 
127 
393 

3.63 


97 433 

45 796 
32 119 
13 591 
16 
20 
20 
12 
18 

51 637 
35 670 

15 897 
23 
17 
11 
10 
9 

32 947 
10 587 
20 750 
63.0 
908 
983 
627 

38 621 
10 238 
21 307 
55.2 
1 688 
5 941 
1 135 

8 565 
2 871 
5 183 
60.5 
526 
418 
93 

10 596 
2 900 
5 672 
53.5 
1 090 
1 866 
158 

97 433 
85 956 
26 407 
21 475 
4 932 
17 160 
27 411 
12 286 
2 692 
11 477 
6 653 
4 824 

3.26 

29 644 
27 809 
7 225 
5 809 
1 416 
3 802 
9 852 
5 841 
1 089 
1 835 
991 
844 

3.85 


















87 803 
38 346 
31 






68 
18 
23 
15 

95 211 
35 462 

56 027 
58.8 
2 001 
2 334 
1 388 

87 743 
19 994 
54 968 
62*6 
3 055 
11 022 
1 759 

23 418 
9 160 
13 086 
55.9 
1 243 
979 
193 

24 599 
6 982 
13 658 
55.5 

2 044 
3 719 
240 

260 828 
226 806 
62 466 
54 757 
7 709 
46 459 
82 783 
31 149 
3 949 
34 022 
12 461 
21 561 

3.63 

75 638 
66 948 
15 292 
13 084 
2 208 
9 392 
25 967 
14 711 
1 586 
6 690 
5 934 
2 756 

4.38 








MARITAL STATUS 

TOTAL 
MALEt 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 






FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . * 






NONWHITE 
MALEt 14 YEARS AND OVER. . * 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 






FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 


HOUSEHOLDS 

TOTAL 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 


HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD. . . . 
HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION , . 




HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . , 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 



General Population Characteristics 



42-39 



Table 21. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR STANDABD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED 

AREAS, AND URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: I960 Con. 

["TJ" denotes an unincorporated place. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 100; population per household not shown where less than 100 persons in households] 



SUBJECT 


URBAN PLACES CON. 


FLORENCE 


GAFFNEY 


GEORGETOWN 


GREENVILLE 


GREENWOOD 


NORTH 
AUGUSTA 


ORANGEBURG 


ROCK HILL 


SPARTAN- 
BURG 


SUMTER 


UNION 


TOTAL POPULATION * . 
RACE 


24 722 

11 498 
7 280 
4 216 

1 

1 

13 224 
8 138 
5 085 


... 
.... 

1 

7 518 
1 783 
5 366 
71.4 
253 
269 
100 

9 315 
1 877 
5 647 
60*6 
478 
1 583 
208 

2 542 
773 
1 595 
62.7 
191 
154 
20 

3 373 
795 
1 833 
54.3 
364 
716 
29 

24 722 
24 304 
7 044 
5 952 
1 092 
4 750 
8 192 
3 748 
570 
418 
82 
336 

3.45 

9 304 
9 246 
2 420 
1 956 
464 
1 265 
3 063 
2 173 
325 
58 
24 
34 

3.82 


10 435 

4 776 
3 577 
1 197 
1 

. 
. 
1 

5 659 
4 231 
1 426 

2 

. 
. 
. . 
. 

3 181 
725 
2 305 
72.5 
70 
111 
40 

4 118 
997 
2 446 
59.4 
156 
598 
77 

682 
200 
439 
64.4 
27 
41 
2 

897 
225 
512 
57.1 
78 
153 
7 

10 435 
10 163 
3 047 
2 610 
437 
2 113 
3 326 
1 546 
131 
272 
28 
244 

3.34 

2 627 

2 619 
672 
549 
123 
380 
958 
560 
49 
8 
2 
6 

3.90 


12 261 

5 819 
3 354 
2 464 

... 
... 
. . 
... 
1 

6 442 
3 526 
2 915 

1 

3 544 
1 029 
2 385 
67.3 
57 
94 
36 

4 274 
939 
2 572 
60.2 
183 
703 
60 

1 361 
486 
801 
58.9 

45 
69 

5 

1 845 
491 
937 
50.8 
147 
406 
11 

12 261 
12 221 
3 215 
2 747 
468 
2 214 
4 820 
1 825 
147 
40 
2 
38 

3.80 

5 381 

5 367 
1 313 
1 042 
271 
691 
2 151 
1 140 
72 
14 
2 
12 

4.09 


66 188 

30 549 
21 461 
9 064 

5 
3 
9 
1 
6 

35 639 

25 010 
10 602 

2 
13 
8 

4 

20 745 
5 243 
14 562 
70.2 
599 
663 
277 

25 784 
5 992 
15 385 
59.7 
1 186 
3 805 
602 

5 539 

1 636 
3 545 
64.0 
400 
311 
47 

6 991 
1 545 
4 108 
58.8 
838 
1 264 
74 

66 188 
63 242 
19 564 
16 150 
3 414 
13 182 
20 990 
8 105 
1 401 
2 946 
516 
2 430 

3.23 

19 717 
19 566 
5 327 
4 209 
1 118 
2 892 
6 937 
3 803 
607 
151 
41 
110 

3.67 


16 644 

7 625 
5 050 
2 575 

9 019 
5 863 

3 147 
9 

... 

... 
... 

5 222 
1 243 
3 752 
71.8 
170 
161 
66 

6 685 
1 451 
3 975 
59.5 
351 
1 137 
122 

1 642 
479 
1 069 
65.1 
126 
86 
8 

2 172 
481 
1 236 
56.9 
260 
440 
15 

16 644 
15 980 
5 007 
4 203 
804 
3 397 
4 771 
2 571 
234 
664 
446 
218 

3.19 

5 731 
5 698 
1 622 
1 317 
305 
879 
1 679 
1 397 
121 
33 
19 
14 

3.51 


10 348 

5 039 
4 555 
482 

1 

1 

... 

5 309 
4 755 
552 

2 

. . 

3 185 
597 
2 522 
79.2 
35 
35 
31 

3 625 
576 
2 578 
71.1 
54 
398 
73 

297 
95 
188 
63.3 
23 
13 
1 

392 
102 
191 
48.7 
23 
92 
7 

10 348 
10 348 
2 934 
2 685 
249 
2 408 
3 978 
- 899 
129 
... 

... 
3.53 

1 038 
1 038 
268 
214 
54 
144 
347 
257 
22 

3.87 


13 852 

6 468 
3 939 

2 526 

1 

2 

7 384 
4 413 
2 967 
... 

4 

... 
. * 

4 508 
1 563 
2 774 
61.5 
108 
127 
44 

5 409 
1 571 
2 927 
54.1 
231 
830 
81 

1 763 
962 
731 
41.5 
70 
66 
4 

2 192 
963 
848 
38.7 
170 
367 
14 

13 852 
12 506 
3 746 
3 079 
667 
2 488 
4 357 
1 665 
250 
1 346 
57 
1 289 

3*34 

5 500 
4 321 
1 214 
906 
308 
565 
1 509 
896 
137 
.. 1 179 
23 
1 156 

3.56 


29 404 

13 475 
10 131 
3 320 
22 

1 
1 

15 929 
12 074 
3 823 
21 

6 

2 

* . 
3 

8 737 
2 062 
6 308 
72.2 
164 
221 
146 

11 390 
3 239 
6 564 
57.6 
312 
1 374 
213 

1 955 
690 
1 153 
59*0 
98 
96 
16 

2 431 
711 
1 286 
52.9 
196 
414 
20 

29 404 
27 929 
7 784 
6 897 
887 
5 770 
9 729 
4 248 
398 
1 475 
15 
1 460 

3.59 

7 199 
7 045 
1 681 
1 402 
279 
952 
2 451 
1 802 
159 
154 
... 
154 

4.19 


44 352 

20 730 
14 202 
6 523 

2 
2 

1 

23 622 

16 043 
7 572 
2 
3 

1 
1 

14 073 
3 606 
9 774 
69.5 
437 
504 
189 

17 142 
3 722 
10 358 
60.4 
864 
2 637 
425 

3 997 
1 261 
2 485 
62.2 
294 
222 
29 

5 045 
1 200 
2 883 
57.1 
613 
909 
53 

44 352 
43 127 
13 012 
10 939 
2 073 
8 718 
13 765 
6 893 
739 
1 225 
158 
1 067 

3.31 

14 107 
13 966 
3 652 
3 008 
644 
1 938 
4 666 
3 351 
359 
141 
54 
87 

3.82 


23 062 

10 911 
7 239 
3 665 

... 
6 

... 
1 

12 151 

7 764 
4 376 

2 
7 

... 
2 
* . . 

7 007 
1 616 
5 087 
72.6 
157 
227 
77 

8 422 
1 629 
5 364 
63.7 
330 
1 291 
138 

2 163 

645 
1 386 

64.1 
119 
122 
10 

2 946 
751 
1 594 
54.1 
267 
56B 
33 

23 062 
22 572 
6 584 
5 575 
1 009 
4 600 
7 937 
2 965 
486 
490 
96 
394 

3.43 

8 059 
7 738 
2 072 
1 649 
423 
1 100 
2 745 
1 615 
206 
321 
28 
293 

3.73 


10 191 

4 753 
3 467 
1 286 

5 438 

3 854 
1 584 

3 211 
790 
2 292 
71.4 
70 
96 
33 

3 916 
760 
2 415 
61.7 
140 
674 
67 

776 
260 
474 
61.1 
43 
38 
4 

1 053 
300 
521 
49.5 
75 
228 
4 

10 191 
10 178 
2 917 
2 523 

394 
2 047 
3 213 
1 837 
164 
13 
3 
10 

3.49 

2 870 
2 868 
741 
598 
143 
388 
993 
682 
64 
2 
2 
... 

3.87 
































MARITAL STATUS 

TOTAL 
MALE? 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 






FEMALE? 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 






NONWHITE 
MALE 14 YEARS AND OVER. . .. 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . 






FEMALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 




PERCENT MARRIED* . . 






HOUSEHOLDS 

TOTAL 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 




HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


CHILD UNDER is OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 




HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


CHILD UNDER is OF HEAD . 

OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 



42-40 South Carolina 

Table 22. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 TO 10,000: 1960 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



SUBJECT 


A8BEVILL 


' AIKEN 
SOUTH (U 


AIKEN 
WEST (U 


ALLENDALE 


ANDREWS 


BAMBERG 


BARNWELL 


BATESBURG 


BEAUFORT 


BELTON 


BENNETTS- 
VILLE 


BISHOP- 
VILLE 


TOTAL POPULATION* * . 


5 43 
3 64 


2 980 
2 733 


2 602 
2 588 


3 114 
1 3O6 


2 995 

1 721 


3 081 
2 178 


4 568 
3 243 


3 806 

2 440 


6 298 
4 249 


5 106 
4 330 


6 963 
3 991 


3 586 
1 888 




1 79 


247 


12 


1 807 


1 272 


9O2 


1 320 


1 366 


2 040 


775 


2 971 


1 698 














1 






9 


1 


1 




AGE 
TOTAL MALE? ALL AGES. . . 


2 50 
288 


1 482 
241 


1 258 
182 


1 416 
147 


1 417 
193 


1 456 
153 


2 164 
293 


1 814 
206 


2 965 
419 


2 394 
280 


3 221 
390 


1 667 
235 




280 


241 


177 


185 


185 


182 


312 


225 


380 


262 


346 


230 




286 


156 


129 


208 


215 


162 


252 


187 


308 


261 


389 


205 




235 


83 


81 


124 


135 


137 


172 


157 


238 


184 


283 


151 




1 18 


41 


39 


73 


86 


69 


113 


103 


194 


153 


161 


64 




135 


119 


84 


56 


77 


75 


147 


103 


179 


165 


174 


83 




164 


178 


144 


74 


71 


68 


161 


120 


173 


168 


225 


105 




183 


164 


109 


100 


85 


94 


141 


128 


196 


189 


227 


99 




166 


100 


97 


98 


84 


100 


136 


121 


211 


153 


222 


1 10 




147 


61 


91 


95 


76 


90 


118 


115 


193 


148 


181 






138 


43 


66 


57 


55 


84 


68 


94 


132 


133 


167 


76 




97 


15 


21 


47 


57 


72 


82 


79 


92 


93 


134 


59 




79 


18 


19 


31 


30 


51 


49 


49 


84 


72 


116 


35 




78 




10 


55 


31 


50 


52 


44 


82 


53 


82 


42 




55 


Q 




39 


14 


42 


39 


36 


44 


43 


64 


35 




60 


4 


4 


27 


23 


27 


29 


47 


40 


37 


60 


37 


TOTAL FEMALE* ALL AGEs 


2 927 

296 


1 498 
235 


1 344 
190 


1 698 

153 


1 578 
193 


1 625 
161 


2 404 
327 


1 992 
215 


3 333 

412 


2 712 
266 


3 742 
413 


1 919 
213 




283 


229 


181 


187 


199 


145 


290 


209 


342 


28O 


370 


229 




295 


156 


138 


199 


197 


176 


248 


198 


322 


251 


397 


207 




207 


83 


81 


153 


153 


136 


194 


167 


274 


199 


293 


143 




156 


70 


79 


80 


104 


76 


146 


93 


246 


190 


198 


85 




167 


185 


123 


80 


76 


74 


185 


134 


214 


190 


212 






190 


154 


134 


86 


85 


92 


173 


118 


218 


201 


241 






192 


135 


107 


128 


105 


123 


162 


143 


264 


186 


281 


119 




197 
185 


73 
66 


104 
75 


95 
117 


103 
73 


101 
109 


134 
125 


127 

1 97 


223 

187 


193 
154 


209 

95/\ 


125 




157 


40 


44 


79 


82 


88 


90 


95 


137 


154 


205 






151 


14 


22 


75 


48 


97 


QfL 


100 


1 24 


1 1 A 








128 


17 


22 


79 


57 


67 


79 


70 


1 16 










109 


18 


lg 


74 


39 


84 


67 


"7 1 


94 


79 








96 


1 1 


14 


56 


33 


51 


44 


e/i 


75 


fm 








118 


12 


15 


57 


21 


45 






QC 








NONWHITE MALE* ALL AGES . 


796 
130 


97 
21 


6 


817 
85 


595 
101 


396 


569 


651 


928 


368 


1 369 


811 




112 




* 




93 


MO 












145 




87 


TT 




135 


109 












158 


139 




97 


_ 


t 


87 


65 














110 




41 







42 


27 


27 
















30 






22 


26 


















40 


^ 




33 


1 8 














36 




40 


g 





49 


in 


i 
















38 







e i 


9Q 












86 


42 




53 


5 


* * T 


45 












14 


83 


34 




33 




















63 


38 




23 




. 














10 


65 


27 




18 


7 











24 


23 


24 


7 


47 


23 




22 












19 


12 


20 


9 


38 


12 




14 


7 




1 8 






19 


16 


28 


7 


25 


21 




18 







1 A 








17 


13 


10 


30 


17 


NONWHITE FEMALEt ALL AGES . 


999 
119 


150 
17 


8 


991 


679 


507 


10 
756 


18 
715 


14 
1 121 


7 

408 


33 

1 603 


15 
887 




119 













103 


88 


152 


43 


197 


111 




106 










50 


106 


87 


132 


59 


189 


116 




87 


10 








64 


80 


75 


114 


34 


185 


117 




59 


g 


i 








69 


71 


85 


42 


153 


79 




51 




* 


B 




19 


30 


35 


55 


30 


80 


40 




50 


i 2 








22 


42 


43 


73 


27 


92 


49 




49 











22 


46 


28 


63 


30 


89 


55 




69 










41 


45 


49 


94 


29 


115 


48 




56 










22 


36 


40 


85 


22 


77 


53 




39 


Q 






34 


27 


42 


49 


54 


15 


86 


48 




59 




. * 






25 


22 


32 


52 


17 


77 


44 




39 









20 


31 


36 


32 


40 


17 


65 


28 




TjJ 









18 


21 


20 


23 


36 


13 


60 


30 













16 


28 


35 


19 


27 


12 


66 


36 




40 


2 


. 


33 


12 


14 


21 


19 


28 


7 


43 


13 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


1 706 


867 


794 


911 


859 


17 
984 


23 
1 348 


25 
1 234 


31 
1 917 


11 
1 641 


29 
2 165 


20 
1 030 










242 


241 


248 


282 


297 


454 


349 


555 


278 




P = 




660 


633 


586 


684 


1 006 


896 


1 394 


1 243 


1 491 


703 












10 


37 


33 


26 


38 


23 


50 


35 










31 


25 


43 


43 


33 


55 


40 


89 


43 


FEMALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


2 102 


894 


853 


5 
1 188 


7 
1 022 


9 
1 164 


15 
1 576 


8 
1 402 


14 
2 314 


9 
1 951 


30 
2 636 


6 
1 302 




1 269 




118 


253 


229 


197 


274 


253 


487 


340 


541 


247 










670 


610 


732 


1 062 


918 


1 461 


1 317 


1 571 


769 








5 


79 


32 


68 


76 


35 


78 


66 


102 


78 








56 


257 


169 


219 


215 


216 


333 


268 


481 


268 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . . 


5 413 
1 646 


2 980 


11 
2 602 


8 
3 086 


14 
2 980 


16 
3 063 


25 
4 538 


15 
3 799 


33 

6 165 


26 

5 091 


43 
6 937 


18 
3 581 










908 


760 


937 


1 279 


1 087 


1 810 


1 512 


2 040 


1 016 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 


2 560 
108 


1 515 


649 
1 223 


546 
1 586 


547 
1 641 


611 
1 475 


923 
2 284 


800 
1 872 


1 254 
2 951 


1 163 
2 375 


1 348 
3 457 


634 
1 865 


NONWHITE i IN HOUSEHOLDS * . * . 


1 790 
493 


247 
48 


14 

2 


46 

1 780 
476 


32 

1 265 
286 


40 

900 
272 


52 

1 311 
355 


40 

1 366 
344 


150 
1 973 


41 

776 
195 


92 

2 962 

779 


66 

1 695 
422 



General Population Characteristics 

Table 22. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 TO 10,000: I960 Con. 

["IT 1 denotes an unincorporated place] 



42-41 



SUBJECT 


CALHOUN 
FALLS 


CAMDEN 


CAYCE 


CHERAW 


CHESTER 


CLINTON 


CLOVER 


CONWAY 


DARLING- 
TON 


DENMARK 


DILLON 


EASLEY 




2 525 


6 842 


8c i"7 














399 1 


^ 173 


8 283 




ig i Q 






















6Qfia 




607 


2 678 








6 159 


2 90O 


5 620 


3v | a 


1 QLQ 


2 080 


1 369 


























5 


AGE 
TOTAL MALE? ALL AGES. . . . 


1 145 
141 


3 117 

TQft 


4 119 


2 462 



3 165 


3 865 


1 658 


4 055 


3 040 

a/LE 


1 524 

1 Q*5 


2 873 
378 


3 928 
454 




140 


364 


CEQ 


9Q"7 


-x*f 1 








363 


223 


367 


468 




148 


368 


-ZQC 






11 El 


t AC* 




386 


191 


359 


400 




94 


9QA 


vne 












3 mi 


1 61 


240 


306 




69 


1 *3Q 








ii n i 


99 


995 


160 


74 


161 


264 




63 


14O 


9QO 


i y^ 


1 R9 


227 




254 


177 


79 


171 


280 




00 


16& 


^AI 




1 QA 


217 


119 


295 


184 


85 


170 


283 




74 


200 


T86 


184 


212 


228 


125 


283 


188 


87 


182 


288 




70 


208 


-*(Y7 


i f>^ 


5O5 


9O1 


QA 


97 1 


202 


81 


165 


227 




68 


196 


213 


151 


t Til 


216 


93 


225 


194 


70 


177 


238 




45 


1 fl"7 


1 A1 


i *^*s 


1 SO 


1 S6 


58 


196 


150 


62 


158 


190 




45 


149 


1 If) 




1 9J1 


1 "58 


ft9 


tOA 


116 


63 


104 


181 




30 


92 


80 


69 


118 


108 


52 


92 


87 


44 


84 


117 




21 


106 


62 


59 


38 


81 


38 


76 


87 


45 


75 


97 




29 


74 


34 


41 


86 


5-7 


24 


54 


76 


36 


45 


63 




19 


82 


39 


50 


84 


67 


35 


57 


61 


25 


37 


72 


TOTAL FEMALE? ALL AGES* . 


1 380 
155 


3 725 

348 


4 398 
589 


2 709 

245 


3 741 
373 


4 072 
411 


1 842 
168 


4 508 
523 


3 670 

346 


1 697 
208 


3 3OO 
410 


4 355 
451 




164 


421 


529 


300 


402 


442 


172 


497 


412 


226 


350 


435 




160 


360 


465 


292 


336 


440 


215 


530 


380 


199 


332 


420 




126 


312 


365 


203 


264 


357 


i ee 


318 


279 


141 


259 


333 




81 


207 


28O 


149 


217 


260 


102 


300 


209 


77 


211 


311 




79 


178 


381 


140 


196 


247 


122 


313 


209 


97 


193 


285 




83 


198 


355 


202 


213 


246 


131 


352 


225 


92 


202 


309 




91 


26O 


350 


172 


261 


255 


128 


306 


239 


112 


216 


297 




85 


227 


300 


176 


225 


249 


106 


317 


257 


90 


198 


295 




78 


262 


199 


175 


235 


256 


113 


251 


228 


94 


191 


267 




56 


191 


172 


142 


222 


237 


111 


205 


192 


77 


208 


220 




65 


170 


116 


129 


169 


178 


98 


156 


174 


70 


131 


206 




46 


146 


99 


118 


150 


139 


67 


144 


157 


47 


120 


158 




48 


156 


83 


95 


165 


132 


68 


105 


133 


78 


102 


146 




27 


131 


47 


82 


143 


97 


35 


90 


102 


43 


84 


87 




36 


158 


68 


89 


170 


126 


51 


101 


128 


46 


93 


135 


NONWHITE MALEt ALL AGES . . 


257 

41 


1 222 
194 


624 
111 


1 035 
149 


1 167 
165 


777 

107 


279 

47 


1 396 
226 


1 472 
201 


919 

139 


951 
157 


654 
101 




41 


154 


106 


134 


164 


101 


36 


214 


229 


161 


134 


109 




46 


150 


73 


122 


146 


85 


37 


181 


210 


128 


154 


78 




23 


147 


54 


107 


95 


63 


24 


137 


108 


114 


80 


58 




11 


50 


37 


48 


70 


35 


15 


77 


60 


46 


53 


32 




8 


47 


31 


45 


67 


44 


13 


75 


73 


48 


41 


35 




16 


49 


25 


55 


52 


52 


23 


77 


81 


37 


48 


38 




^ j_ 


58 


36 


63 


63 


48 


12 


70 


80 


44 


55 


41 




7 


73 


37 


63 


49 


41 


14 


79 


88 


44 


39 


24 




10 


62 


26 


58 


56 


48 


15 


78 


87 


30 


47 


40 




4 


45 


18 


40 


45 


38 


9 


64 


51 


24 


49 


16 




8 


52 


29 


41 


44 


28 


9 


38 


54 


25 


22 


31 




9 


35 


18 


24 


41 


25 




34 


46 


21 


24 


11 




5 


51 


12 


35 


35 


29 


5 


24 


43 


25 


25 


18 




8 


28 


5 


24 


37 


19 


e 


9 


37 


18 


13 


12 




9 


27 


6 


27 


38 


14 


10 


13 


24 


15 


10 


10 


NONWHITE FEMALEi ALL AGES 


350 

54 


1 456 
151 


734 
121 


1 222 
137 


1 446 
188 


1 001 

124 


321 

41 


1 547 
202 


1 853 
197 


1 030 
149 


1 130 
170 


720 
83 




63 


189 


112 


162 


194 


130 


34 


206 


249 


171 


144 


91 




44 


149 


90 


136 


141 


84 


40 


204 


215 


140 


136 


87 




28 


134 


70 


95 


83 


64 


24 


112 


157 


103 


92 


46 




19 


85 


43 


58 


92 


61 


16 


97 


85 


45 


65 


46 




20 


68 


43 


67 


63 


77 


18 


95 


105 


57 


53 


50 




14 


58 


38 


77 


73 


66 


21 


100 


115 


49 


58 


46 




10 


82 


43 


70 


92 


57 


23 


101 


103 


66 


70 


45 




15 


85 


40 


70 


84 


65 


10 


123 


126 


46 


71 


48 




9 


94 


25 


59 


82 


59 


18 


75 


118 


49 


52 


47 




10 


63 


28 


60 


83 


51 


18 


75 


89 


30 


63 


15 




15 


68 


25 


57 


57 


35 


13 


44 


81 


33 


39 


27 




13 


53 


14 


48 


46 


45 


11 


38 


64 


19 


31 


25 




16 


74 


18 


49 


61 


36 


20 


26 


64 


40 


36 


23 




10 


53 


10 


41 


58 


22 


2 


19 


42 


13 


28 


16 




10 


50 


14 


36 


49 


25 


11 


30 


43 


20 


22 


25 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALE? 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


745 
175 


2 076 

541 


2 634 
553 


1 645 

431 


2 112 
515 


2 647 

894 


1 123 
306 


2 548 
613 


1 990 

474 


947 
290 


1 833 
475 


2 660 
561 




536 


1 439 


1 991 


i 134 


1 472 


1 650 


772 


1 837 


1 417 


611 


1 270 


1 994 




9 


53 


30 


60 


60 


47 


19 


64 


89 


19 


47 


51 




23 


72 


60 


55 


99 


79 


34 


84 


76 


41 


68 


71 




11 


24 


30 


25 


26 


24 


11 


14 


23 




20 


34 


FEMALE? 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


929 
188 


2 663 
591 


2 884 
503 


1 920 
352 


2 698 
577 


2 854 
606 


1 325 

319 


3 028 

551 


2 598 
527 


1 098 

220 


2 273 
464 


3 118 
543 




581 


1 546 


2 063 


1 168 


1 570 


1 766 


801 


1 954 


1 514 


643 


1 368 


2 100 




35 


110 


81 


91 


120 


115 


37 


135 


172 


27 


110 


113 




140 


481 


283 


361 


509 


435 


190 


477 


526 


232 


392 


422 




20 


45 


35 


39 


42 


47 


15 


46 


31 


3 


49 


53 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . . 


2 525 
690 


6 740 
2 009 


8 477 

2 251 


5 158 

1 502 


6 874 
2 089 


7 212 
2 142 


3 500 

975 


8 512 
2 305 


6 647 
2 012 


3 216 
854 


6 129 
1 726 


8 230 
2 430 




497 


1 309 


1 847 


988 


1 306 


1 511 


701 


1 672 


1 226 


564 


1 129 


1 860 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 


1 325 
13 


3 317 

105 


4 282 
97 


2 585 
83 


3 376 

103 


3 486 
73 


1 796 
28 


4 361 
174 


3 292 

117 


1 772 

26 


3 169 
105 


3 869 
71 


NONWHITEi IN HOUSEHOLDS . . * 


607 

141 


2 654 
704 


1 348 
290 


2 256 
600 


2 591 
713 


1 775 
514 


600 
154 


2 932 

716 


3 300 

927 


1 944 
428 


2 056 
491 


1 357 
337 



42-42 South Carolina 

Table 22. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 TO 10,000: 1960-Con. 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



SUBJECT 


EAST 
GAFFNEY 
(U) 


EDGEFIELD 


FOREST 
ACRES 


FORT MILL 


GREAT 
FALLS (U) 


GREER 


HARTS- 
VILLE 


HONEA 
PATH 


KINGSTREE 


LAKE CITY 


LANCASTER 


LANCAS- 
TER 
MILLS 
(U) 




4 779 


2 876 


3 842 


3 315 


3 030 


8 967 


6 392 


3 453 


3 847 


6 059 


7 999 


3 274 




4 005 


1 496 


3 807 


3 110 


2 771 


7 967 


3 804 


3 054 


2 269 


3 158 


4 808 


3 183 




773 


1 380 


24 


205 


259 


999 


2 586 


397 


1 578 


2 895 


3 191 


91 




jL 




n 






1 


2 


2 





6 








AGE 
TOTAL MALEi ALL AGES- . 


2 330 
303 


1 351 
172 


1 874 
265 


1 588 

182 


1 456 
154 


4 252 
458 


2 825 
348 


1 637 
186 


1 761 
232 


2 631 
381 


3 718 

474 


1 615 
203 




276 


156 


240 


185 


177 


395 


364 


185 


198 


411 


464 


199 




248 


155 


216 


174 


160 


478 


317 


152 


228 


357 


441 


200 




231 


116 


123 


139 


123 


365 


189 


119 


143 


249 


319 


15B 




148 


66 


75 


87 


76 


264 


149 


105 


86 


170 


188 


140 




163 


92 


114 


91 


92 


245 


159 


123 


94 


166 


217 


114 




145 


76 


136 


111 


87 


300 


196 


102 


120 


161 


246 


103 




149 


102 


178 


109 


124 


317 


197 


148 


122 


177 


274 


110 




134 
125 


72 
80 


174 

147 


132 
96 


95 

104 


305 
301 


173 
164 


94 


112 


165 


232 


99 
85 




131 


65 


79 


90 


98 


247 


177 


79 


92 


137 


184 


81 




88 


53 


50 


68 


55 


190 


126 


91 


62 


85 


129 


38 




69 


38 


37 


48 


43 


128 


79 


43 


58 


78 


107 


29 




50 


38 


19 


32 


30 


113 


82 


31 


40 


54 


70 


27 




29 


29 


7 


21 


20 


53 


53 


29 


22 


38 


54 


13 




41 


41 


14 


23 


18 


73 


52 


38 


36 


32 


66 


16 


TOTAL FEMALE* ALL AGES- t . 


2 449 
255 


1 525 

156 


1 968 

241 


1 727 
171 


1 574 
156 


4 715 
433 


3 567 
364 


1 816 
174 


2 086 
195 


3 228 
393 


4 281 
476 


1 659 
196 




266 


189 


231 


169 


163 


438 


367 


161 


221 


384 


452 


196 




253 


153 


233 


176 


168 


462 


323 


141 


223 


363 


462 


201 




191 


119 


115 


153 


128 


345 


379 


128 


158 


263 


329 


154 




177 


88 


119 


110 


87 


314 


290 


117 


100 


183 


259 


121 




183 


80 


129 


97 


91 


258 


214 


129 


120 


190 


268 


115 




169 


81 


165 


128 


108 


333 


228 


155 


153 


199 


294 


103 




142 


112 


199 


132 


122 


364 


207 


144 


152 


237 


290 


125 




156 


92 


181 


123 


111 


372 


206 


116 


157 


211 


294 


110 




157 


92 


121 


106 


116 


335 


227 


118 


139 


201 


263 


106 




129 


75 


76 


108 


101 


271 


203 


100 


108 


166 


215 


67 




101 


60 


59 


91 


81 


216 


132 


98 


96 


131 


182 


51 




82 


54 


35 


50 


49 


187 


129 


55 


73 


100 


146 


39 




74 


66 


25 


45 


39 


153 


131 


67 


67 


81 


142 


32 




52 


56 


17 


30 


29 


108 


82 


48 


60 


55 


95 


28 




62 


52 


22 


38 


25 


126 


85 


65 


64 


71 


1 14 


15 


NON WHITE MALEi ALL AGES . . 


365 

64 


662 

107 


11 


92 

7 


113 
j[7 


447 
69 


1 143 
185 


191 

42 


695 
107 


1 337 
212 


1 460 
237 


38 
i 




61 


87 


2 


17 


24 


51 


184 


23 


79 


227 


196 


5 




41 


76 


2 


3 


14 


52 


i 419 




i t 3 


1 7*4 




e 




37 


67 


]_ 


14 


7 


38 


84 


id 


65 


123 


136 


4 




14 


44 


^ 


I 


3 


32 


48 


15 


27 


76 


85 


7 




22 


41 




2 





26 


49 


o 


33 


67 


69 


5 




21 


30 


i 


g 


H, 


25 


Q < 




44 


AJL 


01 






22 


33 


2 


3 


^ 


22 


69 


g 


43 


67 


90 


2 




^ j_ 


32 


j_ 


jL j_ 


g 


27 


6? 


1 <! 


M 


7U 


Oil 


2 




13 


26 


^ 


^ 


n 


30 






<t 1 


fft 








25 


27 




^ 


^ 


18 


= 




Vf 


KB 


An 


Q 




7 


21 




c 


e 


yt 
















g 


12 




g 


i^ 


Q 


\ o 




O 


* 









9 


21 






* 


12 












1 1 




j 


20 




3 
















* * t 




7 


18 








o 














NONWHITE FEMALE t ALL AGES . 


409 
66 


718 
93 


24 
2 


113 

g 


146 
P* 


553 


1 445 


208 


883 


1 564 


1 731 


53 




56 


106 












22 


81 


230 


244 






46 


84 












23 


89 


224 


204 






30 


64 


2 


g 


o 




167 


20 


116 


192 


188 






26 


46 


2 


n 






101 


14 


78 


130 


142 






33 


38 


2 


f. 






68 


15 


37 


75 


116 






32 


35 










99 


17 


52 


96 


116 






24 


39 


2 








96 


19 


68 


90 


113 







18 


40 










86 


14 


66 


101 


103 






21 


34 


2 


o 




37 


70 


9 


65 


99 


109 


5 




i i 


3 i 






4 




94 


12 


51 


87 


91 






13 


26 


f 






23 


69 


5 


51 


82 


77 


2 




g 


35 










48 


14 


34 


53 


71 






7 


26 




a 




17 


45 


2 


24 


35 


44 


ll 




g 


18 


* 








59 


9 


26 


35 


53 






Q 











13 


27 


5 


21 


18 


27 


2 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEi 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


1 544 
435 


890 
229 


1 190 
214 


1 076 
237 


991 
228 


13 

3 004 
674 


' 22 

1 850 

412 


8 
1 138 

?"51 


24 

1 142 

PA7 


17 
1 757 

II Q-l 


33 

2 421 

A 1 ft 


1 051 
278 




1 049 
41 


611 


957 


789 


727 


2 221 


1 366 


876 


841 


1 228 


1 685 


750 




40 


*i * 




15 




44 


60 


10 


33 


48 


69 


21 




20 










68 


57 


25 


29 


40 


92 


17 


FEMALE i 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


1 718 

TQC 


1 054 


1 289 


1 232 


12 
1 106 


41 
3 466 


15 
2 565 


6 
1 361 


5 
1 487 


6 
2 155 


26 

2 964 


6 

1 099 








189 


228 


183 


612 


683 


242 


234 


438 


615 


209 




78 






828 


759 


2 310 


1 413 


899 


897 


1 332 


1 807 


772 




9U7 








23 


103 


119 


19 


64 


123 


143 


37 




tf. 






148 


149 


479 


428 


198 


282 


357 


500 


96 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . . 


4 769 

1 294 


2 855 

Q-TII 


3 792 


28 
3 285 


15 
3 030 


65 
8 952 


41 
6 039 


22 

3 445 


24 
3 825 


28 
6 051 


42 
7 952 


22 

3 274 




QCO 








832 


2 719 


1 745 


1 074 


1 149 


1 628 


2 279 


605 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD 

NONWHITEi IN HOUSEHOLDS .... 


2 492 
31 

773 
175 


1 418 
17 

1 365 
352 


1 733 
34 

35 

7 


741 
1 562 
38 

205 
63 


665 

1 508 
25 

259 
62 


2 071 

4 109 
53 

991 
266 


1 173 
2 917 
204 

2 584 
672 


821 
1 525 
25 

399 


766 

1 843 
67 

1 573 
442 


i 097 
3 259 
67 

2 901 
716 


1 552 
3 998 

123 

3 187 

802 


685 
1 757 
27 

91 

19 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 22. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 TO 10,000: 1960--Con. 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



42-43 



SUBJECT 


LAURENS 


LIBERTY 


MANNING 


MARION 


MOUNT 
PLEASANT 


MULLINS 


MYRTLE 
BEACH 


NEWBERRY 


SAXON (U) 


SENECA 


SHANNON- 
TOWN (U) 


SOUTH 
GREEN- 
WOOD (U) 




9 598 


2JLC*7 
























6 130 


2 247 


2 036 


3 834 


5 116 
4 303 


6 229 

3 316 


7 834 
7 103 


8 208 
5 902 


3 917 
3 337 


3 930 


1 453 


2 475 




3 465 

3 


410 


1 881 


3 336 


813 


2 908 


727 


2 306 


579 


1 295 

2 


5 607 

^ 


45 


AGE 
TOTAL MALEi ALL AGES- . . . 


4 530 
559 


1 271 
i /i ii 


1 838 


3 317 


2 490 


2 864 


3 795 


3 876 


1 923 


2 419 

573 


3 303 

c=73 


1 233 

1 U7 




527 


132 


5511 


U3R 










9 1 fi 


97 'A 


445 


122 




502 


144 


5p- 


U. 1 O 


27 1 


X7 1 






3O3 


5511 


437 


122 




354 


1 19 














5/1 j 


1 flA 


327 


103 




299 


flit 








1 9Q 




Till | 


1 37 


175 


181 


86 




319 


93 


101 


187 


168 


137 


332 


175 


94 


181 


187 


116 




303 


81 


1 13 


3n<5 


yyn 


145 


25O 


197 


114 


171 


196 


106 




325 


97 


1 OA 




1 Oft 


1 QQ 


oai 


239 


136 


167 


208 


87 




285 


ac 






1 5"7 


1 78 


99O 


O = f\ 


108 


154 


168 


96 




277 


86 


122 


180 


129 


204 


203 


267 


104 


154 


151 


89 




208 


51 


94 


1 LQ 


Q | 


1 U6 


1 **9 


?&9 


lOil 


122 


98 


67 




176 


U5 


59 


1 3U 


4LE 


99 


tun 


2P2 


118 


88 


93 


47 




1 16 


25 


50 


1 O3 


^7 


89 


1 95 


i ft 


66 


84 


81 


23 




123 


29 


cv 


oo 


50 


ft A 




1 TO 


44 


69 


75 


14 




81 


33 


29 


78 


30 


55 


58 


102 


35 


44 


44 


4 




76 


26 


27 


55 


26 


55 


52 


109 


30 


49 


39 


4 


TOTAL FEMALE t ALL AGES. . . 


5 068 
575 


1 386 
115 


2 079 
253 


3 857 
431 


2 626 
367 


3 365 

351 


4 039 
495 


4 332 

318 


1 994 
198 


2 808 
309 


3 761 
515 


1 287 
169 




513 


116 


232 


446 


340 


372 


349 


345 


179 


287 


522 


120 




465 


150 


259 


392 


264 


362 


325 


348 


214 


246 


462 


131 




360 


124 


1 02 


SAO 


1 7tt 


OBA 


TllLA 


11 1 O 


184 


213 


323 


113 




322 


105 


117 


186 


167 


189 


438 


238 


121 


210 


233 


97 




336 


81 


138 


239 


210 


183 


322 


196 


114 


198 


254 


113 




368 


92 


110 


262 


256 


199 


287 


228 


122 


205 


250 


96 




372 


106 


133 


270 


195 


258 


304 


286 


154 


185 


233 


111 




335 


95 


121 


228 


163 


214 


252 


290 


132 


171 


194 


84 




279 


105 


116 


206 


120 


226 


217 


3O6 


128 


154 


189 


93 




273 


65 


96 


218 


92 


162 


177 


298 


132 


162 


142 


62 




202 


64 


97 


204 


81 


155 


152 


284 


90 


121 


145 


51 




183 


49 


67 


150 


57 


121 


14O 


220 


87 


106 


97 


12 




184 


51 


68 


121 


45 


109 


104 


207 


62 


85 


94 


17 




136 


34 


36 


103 


37 


92 


55 


143 


39 


62 


45 


6 




165 


34 


44 


92 


58 


86 


76 


215 


38 


94 


63 


12 


NONWHITE MALE? ALL AGES . . 


1 627 
250 


198 
36 


886 
140 


1 500 
232 


381 
64 


1 303 
183 


355 
74 


1 023 
124 


283 
32 


566 

58 


2 585 

485 


18 

3 




218 


27 


131 


207 


58 


232 


36 


117 


41 


69 


357 


3 




199 


18 


113 


199 


57 


177 


31 


129 


29 


53 


339 


1 




148 


24 


101 


131 


41 


126 


34 


103 


27 


67 


252 


. . 




112 


8 


56 


70 


29 


53 


34 


54 


26 


44 


126 






103 


10 


44 


72 


19 


45 


40 


38 


13 


31 


144 


2 




106 


15 


50 


73 


16 


53 


30 


49 


11 


22 


161 


1 




94 


7 


49 


90 


16 


66 


13 


53 


21 


32 


150 


2 




77 


8 


34 


80 


23 


62 


27 


63 


9 


32 


128 


1 




86 


11 


52 


77 


13 


83 


13 


68 


14 


30 


106 


2 




55 


5 


38 


57 


10 


53 


7 


45 


16 


36 


65 






60 


4 


18 


64 


17 


52 


5 


41 


19 


14 


73 


3 




35 


5 


16 


55 


5 


38 


3 


29 


6 


26 


64 






40 


6 


20 


36 


5 


29 


3 


37 


7 


20 


68 


... 




20 


6 


14 


36 


4 


3O 


2 


33 




17 


37 


. *' 




24 


8 


10 


21 


4 


21 


3 


40 


9 


15 


30 


... 


NONWHITE FEMALE? ALL AGES 


1 841 
252 


212 

15 


995 
145 


1 840 
244 


432 
51 


1 610 
206 


376 
52 


1 283 

120 


297 
29 


731 

82 


3 026 
418 


27 

7 




235 


24 


124 


235 


51 


212 


34 


135 


37 


82 


429 


2 




213 


21 


148 


194 


41 


183 


28 


122 


45 


81 


360 


1 




137 


19 


100 


147 


44 


144 


38 


121 


26 


57 


261 


6 




118 


15 


59 


91 


34 


85 


56 


57 


9 


53 


182 


1 




120 


11 


65 


105 


28 


74 


37 


52 


18 


33 


209 


2 




130 


15 


56 


119 


28 


98 


36 


65 


19 


45 


204 


1 




110 


13 


55 


114 


24 


102 


29 


81 


26 


37 


169 


4 




102 


10 


42 


110 


28 


99 


26 


93 


11 


50 


147 


1 




92 


16 


44 


94 


17 


111 


16 


86 


19 


47 


154 


1 




67 


7 


39 


97 


22 


71 


13 


51 


21 


51 


113 






72 


15 


41 


93 


17 


77 


5 


75 


10 


26 


126 


. . * 




60 


9 


19 


71 


15 


51 


3 


57 


5 


28 


81 


... 




68 


10 


36 


52 


8 


42 


2 


73 


9 


27 


79 







32 


8 


10 


47 


7 


22 


. 


39 


7 


8 


42 


1 




33 


4 


12 


27 


17 


33 


1 


56 


6 


24 


52 


t 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


3 023 
729 


875 
193 


1 181 
347 


2 089 

516 


1 486 
316 


1 782 

428 


2 602 
475 


2 926 
888 


1 371 

439 


1 674 
346 


1 926 

542 


858 

167 




2 155 


646 


788 


1 482 


1 125 


1 263 


2 039 


1 889 


879 


1 254 


1 302 


674 




74 


17 


27 


81 


13 


45 


31 


69 


35 


23 


67 


10 




101 


30 


35 


74 


33 


74 


43 


118 


35 


54 


70 


12 




38 


6 


11 


17 


12 


17 


45 


31 


18 


20 


12 


5 


FEMALE 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


3 601 
712 


1 024 
191 


1 384 
320 


2 645 
537 


1 692 
290 


2 342 
505 


2 923 

418 


3 382 
753 


1 431 
279 


2 009 
367 


2 338 
485 


899 
139 




2 228 


667 


832 


. 1 583 


1 190 


1 348 


2 138 


1 978 


929 


1 298 


1 417 


683 




118 


34 


70 


136 


39 


111 


66 


102 


54 


58 


122 


11 




589 


153 


215 


485 


185 


454 


285 


602 


190 


315 


413 


60 




72 


13 


17 


40 


27 


35 


82 


49 


33 


29 


23 


17 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . * . 


9 570 
2 808 


2 657 
792 


3 873 
1 034 


7 168 
2 015 


5 105 
1 329 


6 221 
1 747 


7 795 
2 452 


7 769 
2 584 


3 749 

1 048 


5 218 
1 619 


7 064 
1 666 


2 508 
702 




1 959 


599 


709 


1 323 


1 074 


1 120 


1 909 


1 682 


777 


1 174 


1 120 


636 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 

NONRELATIVE OF HEAD ...... 
NONWHITE* IN HOUSEHOLDS . . 


4 701 
102 

3 460 
873 


1 255 
11 

410 
106 


2 046 
84 

1 848 
425 


3 735 
95 

3 334 
890 


2 638 
64 

813 
190 


3 239 
115 

2 905 
744 


3 268 
166 

717 

184 


3 258 

245 

2 293 
679 


1 883 
41 

580 
137 


2 383 

42 

1 289 
373 


4 172 
106 

5 611 
1 305 


1 163 

' 7 

45 
9 



2-44 South Carolina 

Table 22. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 TO 10,000: I960 Con. 

["XT' denotes an unincorporated place] 



SUBJECT 


SPRING- 
DALE (U 


SUMMER- 
VILLE 


WALHALLA 


WALTER- 
BORO 


WARE 
SHOALS 
(U) 


WEST CO- 
LUMBIA 


WHITMIRE 


WHITNEY 
(U) 


WIL- 
LIAMSTON 


WILLIS- 
TON 


WINNS- 
BORO 


WOODRUFF 


YORK 


TOTAL POPULATION. . 


2 981 
2 823 


3 633 

2 466 


3 431 
3 135 


5 417 
3 150 


2 671 
2 518 


6 410 
6 043 


2 663 
I 282 


2 502 
2 498 


3 721 
2 870 


2 732 
1 816 


3 479 
1 609 


3 679 

2 897 


4 758 
3 236 




158 


1 161 


295 


2 267 


153 


366 


381 


4 


851 


906 


1 870 


777 


1 514 


AGE 
TOTAL MALEi ALL AGES' . . 


1 500 
197 


6 

1 729 

193 


1 593 

218 


2 518 
304 


1 290 
130 


3 030 

372 


1 258 
134 


1 211 
152 


1 817 
222 


1 267 
168 


1 577 
203 


1 774 
207 


8 

2 218 
290 




176 


224 


181 


321 


120 


325 


128 


140 


218 


200 


201 


180 


286 




182 


207 


182 


313 


153 


305 


146 


102 


223 


147 


202 


188 


250 




146 


137 


142 


208 


111 


238 


111 


71 


148 


103 


113 


161 


208 




119 


87 


113 


106 


72 


200 


103 


66 


100 


57 


70 


120 


87 




103 


127 


110 


138 


84 


201 


60 


111 


127 


74 


103 


111 


131 




114 


95 


109 


175 


74 


234 


74 


100 


138 


106 


87 


121 


141 




101 
104 


126 
97 


100 

94 


156 
154 


99 

113 


234 
244 


91 
88 


100 
98 


137 
99 


105 
74 


127 
110 


126 
95 


141 
139 




89 


122 


73 


170 


95 


206 


105 


67 


127 


60 


75 


110 


144 




69 


86 


80 


125 


95 


143 


68 


59 


81 


53 


64 


113 


107 




32 


75 


53 


106 


59 


110 


46 


49 


71 


31 


70 


74 


92 




26 


41 


40 


89 


29 


79 


39 


39 


32 


31 


48 


65 


61 




18 


44 


48 


57 


20 


62 


35 


32 


37 


20 


39 


54 


62 




15 


28 


22 


44 


19 


41 


15 


11 


27 


17 


36 


25 


36 




9 


40 


28 


52 


17 


36 


15 


14 


30 


21 


29 


24 


43 


TOTAL FEMALE? ALL AGES. . 


1 481 
177 


1 904 
222 


1 838 
186 


2 899 
295 


1 381 
119 


3 380 
378 


1 405 
123 


1 291 
133 


1 904 
194 


1 455 
189 


1 902 
247 


1 905 
172 


2 540 
270 




153 


198 


170 


313 


134 


317 


116 


113 


174 


194 


223 


169 


309 




174 


192 


173 


320 


127 


342 


148 


119 


230 


143 


200 


184 


261 




1 17 


143 


160 


222 


125 


275 


114 


92 


141 


112 


135 


171 


220 




156 


131 


136 


163 


73 


232 


83 


77 


130 


80 


95 


128 


124 




101 


111 


126 


170 


88 


229 


80 


112 


136 


113 


117 


128 


141 




126 


112 


133 


195 


94 


224 


85 


116 


144 


116 


121 


129 


161 




102 


135 


136 


178 


124 


283 


105 


107 


137 


97 


119 


121 


152 




109 


115 


105 


197 


121 


255 


117 


97 


121 


69 


117 


139 


158 




80 


121 


106 


203 


107 


196 


107 


66 


113 


62 


98 


122 


146 




58 


94 


98 


171 


88 


176 


83 


60 


94 


47 


77 


114 


123 




45 


68 


78 


133 


59 


145 


80 


48 


75 


46 


79 


84 


118 




22 


44 


71 


83 


50 


102 


46 


54 


63 


57 


69 


76 


96 




27 


79 


55 


99 


29 


82 


52 


41 


54 


45 


78 


69 


96 




18 


54 


48 


65 


18 


78 


28 


26 


50 


36 


62 


49 






16 


85 


57 


92 


25 


(Lf. 


38 


30 


48 


49 


65 


en 




NONWHITE MALE ALL AGES . . 


66 
H 


527 
71 


130 
20 


1 062 
160 


67 
1 


175 
24 


181 
25 


1 


428 
53 


395 

64 


859 

130 


374 
60 


708 
97 




g 


83 


18 


165 


5 


36 


16 


. 


52 


80 


130 


46 


1 1 Q 




g 


75 


24 


150 


E 


22 


22 


... 


7R 


50 




45 






9 


51 


^ ^ 


107 


9 


15 


20 





36 


43 


63 


40 


75 




3 


20 


9 


46 


^ 


9 


18 


. 


9ft 


pe 


e i 




ne 




^ 


29 


5 


58 


i 


Q 


Q 


. . 


o* 


15 


57 








e 


29 


5 


58 


^ 


13 


9 


... 


25 


^3 


42 


1 Q 


^fl 




3 


36 


g 


59 


^ 


g 


g 


... 


9 i 


19 


f.0 


1 Q 


no 




g 


23 


9 


51 


8 


Q 


12 


... 




20 












37 


5 


65 


(| 


7 


12 


... 


BfN 


14 


Tfi 











9O 


2 


33 




^ 


7 






1 9 












19 


1 


36 




3 


a 


















g 


ij, 


30 


4 


^ 




... 




i /s 










3 


j_3 


7 


21 




2 


7 


. . 














^ 


7 


2 


9 


2 


7 




. 














J_ 


g 


2 


14 




2 




... 












NONWHITE FEMALE? ALL AGES 


92 
16 


640 
96 


166 
21 


1 205 
157 


86 
7 


192 


200 


3 


423 


511 


1 Oil 


408 


814 




15 


83 


19 


147 


13 


57 




... 








38 






14 


67 


19 


158 








* * 














g 


e-z 






^ 1 






* 






114 


48 






3 


29 


g 


76 




18 


17 





29 


57 


81 


37 


63 




3 


31 


7 


76 


3 








30 


27 


56 


22 


34 




10 


46 


g 


82 











24 


32 


69 


25 






2 


45 


19 


7 1 


.1 






... 






65 


26 






5 


39 




78 











23 


25 


55 


20 


55 




3 


37 


* 










. 


21 


15 


51 


30 


50 




3 


26 


g 


48 








2 


24 


22 


54 


19 


46 






16 


6 


39 


6 


8 


11 





21 
16 


18 


27 

41 


18 
18 


35 




2 

c 


8 

OQ 


9 


27 


6 


7 


5 


... 


19 


23 


23 


15 


20 




n 


12 


3 


1 7 








... 


21 


17 


36 


13 


31 




2 


23 


g 













17 


11 


27 


10 


24 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


977 

P*5U 


1 143 


1 045 


1 630 


912 


2 067 


877 


. 
832 


15 
1 193 


21 
779 


23 
1 003 


12 
1 243 


27 

1 433 




724 


801 








422 


226 


150 


276 


185 


243 


301 


389 




j 










1 573 


625 


650 


878 


575 


710 


905 


983 




i 










25 


18 


5 


17 


11 


51 


34 


33 




i 








22 


42 


18 


21 


30 


15 


43 


29 


40 


FEMALE i 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


1 003 
149 


1 327 

oca 


1 343 


2 038 


1 024 


30 
2 396 


8 
1 040 


11 
942 


9 

1 341 


4 
946 


7 
1 266 


8 
1 409 


21 

1 745 




744 


824 


090 






365 


188 


131 


214 


181 


273 


261 


403 




15 


Q 








1 652 


661 


677 


924 


601 


736 


925 


1 020 




93 


59"* 








61 


28 


23 


43 


27 


68 


62 


59 




17 


09 








314 


168 


112 


190 


153 


247 


205 


289 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . . 


2 981 
792 


3 607 

10^1 


3 426 


5 384 


2 643 


65 

6 410 


23 
2 655 


22 

2 492 


13 
3 721 


11 
2 722 


10 
3 464 


18 
3 640 


33 

4 648 




684 


MB 










772 


736 


1 072 


754 


932 


1 101 


1 279 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . , . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD 

NONWHITE! IN HOUSEHOLDS .... 


1 479 
26 

158 
29 


1 803 
38 

1 165 
295 


1 676 
25 

296 
75 


2 640 
136 

2 250 
552 


1 229 
16 

153 
49 


1 475 
2 982 
57 

367 
87 


560 
1 301 
22 

381 
98 


612 
1 131 

13 

4 
1 


818 
1 813 
IB 

851 
237 


545 
1 398 
25 

906 
208 


591 
1 819 
122 

1 855 
428 


803 
1 704 
32 

749 
191 


878 
2 426 
65 

i 506 
373 



General Population Characteristics 

Table 23. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500: 1960 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



42-45 





POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


AREA 


TftTAI 


BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


IDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
ORCED 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


DOWED 
AND 
DI- 
ORCED 




MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 




2 458 
1 656 

1 201 

1 419 
1 544 

1 022 
2 174 
1 901 
1 106 
1 182 

1 209 
1 473 
1 045 
1 532 
2 475 
1 450 
1 587 
1 249 
1 330 
2 038 

1 043 
1 128 
1 166 
1 186 
1 031 
1 865 
1 423 
1 814 
1 137 
2 385 

1 551 
1 017 
2 486 
1 235 

1 656 
1 714 
1 769 
1 113 
1 186 
1 357 

1 746 
1 831 
2 119 
1 439 
1 567 
1 121 


1 174 
813 

587 
692 
755 

473 
1 002 
885 
529 
519 

591 
710 
517 
708 
1 161 
715 
815 
617 
644 
972 

490 
549 
556 
600 
479 
863 
700 
856 
592 
1 097 

'753 
490 
1 170 
544 

838 
815 
872 
558 
599 
665 

869 
889 
987 
678 
689 
507 
932 
584 
884 
745 

528 
701 
809 
589 
606 
1 17 
942 
912 


1 284 
843 

614 
727 
789 

549 
1 172 
1 016 
577 
663 

618 
763 
528 
824 
1 314 
735 
772 
632 
686 
1 066 

553 

579 
610 
586 
552 
1 002 
723 
958 
545 
1 288 

798 
527 
1 316 
691 

818 
899 
897 
555 
587 
692 

877 
942 
1 132 
761 
878 
614 
998 


2 369 
1 297 

1 172 
1 274 
389 

75 
1 629 
950 
381 
607 

1 209 
1 253 
891 
1 136 
1 955 
1 277 
1 579 
1 152 
1 330 
1 656 

840 
1 128 
914 
1 034 
643 
717 
1 214 
987 
1 135 
1 869 

1 551 
1 016 
1 861 
781 

1 542 
1 411 
1 567 
1 030 
1 180 
1 320 

1 563 

1 712 
1 237 
1 074 
1 182 
749 
1 718 
1*216 
1 060 
1 032 

989 
1 367 
1 139 
1 143 
1 136 
2 332 
1 137 
1 24 
1 39 
1 92 

1 55 
1 64 
1 23 
67 
1 45 
94 
1 30 
1 52 
1 40 
1 51 

1 82 
2 10 

41 
1 17 
1 14 
1 03 
78 
1 48 
2 13 

59 

99 
91 
1 28 
69 
85 
97 
1 63 
1 26 
87 


89 
358 

29 
145 
1 155 

947 
545 
946 
725 
575 

217 
154 
396 
519 
173 
2 
97 
* . 
381 

203 

252 

152 
387 
1 145 
208 
827 

516 


625 

454 

108 
303 
202 
81 

37 

183 
119 
882 
365 
385 
372 
212 

84. 
587 

138 
68 
563 


* 
1 

... 

. 
5 
. 


. 

3 
. 

* 
1 

6 
. 

* 
1 

... 

... 

1 

1 

1 


. 

6 



L 

. 




. 

. 


. 


. 




* 


. 

. 

. 


. 
. 


698 
450 

311 
397 
365 

274 
622 
527 
269 
365 

336 

409 
314 
481 
722 
413 
491 
359 
373 
582 

268 
335 
258 
380 
307 
520 
383 
532 
339 
742 

434 
308 
715 
351 

396 
512 
504 
273 
332 
412 

443 


20 

86 

7 
29 
265 

253 

145 
231 
149 
156 

. 
54 
40 
105 
141 
40 
5 

26 

t 
97 

40 


67 
52 
95 
289 
57 
218 
1 
126 



149 
122 

20 
63 

49 
19 

i: 

47 
32 

225 
96 
95 
97 
44 

202 
165 

32 

1 
12 
1 
3 
4 
18 
19 
1 
1 

.12 
14 
5 

9 
10 
6* 

11 


22 

10 

30 

20 
35 
16 
14 
4 

10 

r 
3: 

13 


2 458 
1 656 

1 201 
1 419 
1 544 

1 022 
2 172 
1 875 
1 106 
1 182 

1 199 

1 473 
1 045 
1 523 
2 475 
1 450 
1 567 
1 249 
1 330 
2 031 

1 043 
1 128 
830 
1 186 
1 031 
1 862 
1 423 
1 814 
1 137 
2 385 

1 542 
1 017 
2 474 
1 235 

1 656 
1 713 
1 769 
1 113 
1 186 
1 345 

1 723 
1 831 
2 119 
1 439 
1 567 
1 121 
1 914 
1 216 
1 898 
1 619 

1 101 
1 435 
1 694 
1 177 
1 261 
2 479 
1 991 
1 876 
1 462 
1 990 

2 016 
2 289 
1 427 
1 047 
1 899 
1 204 
1 476 
2 020 
1 400 
2 358 

2 182 
2 096 

1 708 
1 177 
1 817 
2 423 
1 462 
2 075 
2 267 

1 025 

1 002 
1 065 
1 349 
1 49 
1 071 
2 17 
1 96* 
1 294 
1 432 


180 

145 

10O 
112 
87 

116 
161 
172 
92 
83 

111 
99 
82 
127 
178 
104 
196 
114 
93 
182 

93 

65 
239 

79 
100 

131 
121 
151 
82 
151 

119 
59 
170 
60 

162 
132 
128 
73 
54 
98 

90 
129 
147 
120 
93 
70 
127 
112 
14 
117 

8 
9 
13 
9 
8 
22 
16 
17 
5 
17 

15 
13 
9 
8 
16 
9 
12 
16 
11 
18 

13 
18 

15 
8 
14 
15 
14 
16 
14 

8 

1 
13 
10 

17 
> 12 

1- 9 
1 


622 
385 

271 
338 
314 

172 
490 
350 
199 
233 

303 
357 
250 
356 
556 
354 
405 
323 
328 
466 

224 
283 
179 
320 
195 
364 
332 
370 
264 
566 

333 

256 
573 
278 

371 


25 
23 

12 
20 

13 

10 
22 

29 

14 
12 

17 

10 
25 
16 
39 
17 
15 
10 
10 
26 

10 
8 
14 
14 
17 
24 
25 
23 
28 
38 

33 

32 

10 

20 
17 
20 

11 
14 

10 
15 
29 
19 
24 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
2 

2 
2' 

1 

i 
1 

2 

't 


161 

94 

63 

85 
82 

91 
156 
158 
73 
86 

74 
97 
63 

133 
146 
66 
104 
105 
75 
184 

71 
59 
238 
67 
85 
152 
91 
97 
52 
179 

86 
73 

149 
89 

104 
106 


646 
401 

291 
353 
342 

, 205 
500 
401 
207 
259 

316 
369 
261 
374 
576 
376 
398 
335 
336 
497 

234 
300 
182 
327 
209 
393 
361 
404 
277 
589 

362 

263 
595 
325 

384 
426 
457 
277 
298 
348 

413 
48 
47 
35 
36 
25 
48 
27 
36 
39 

27 
39 
39 
28 

37 
56 
43 
44 
36 
49 

48 
51 
38 
22 

41 
28 
39 

47 
34 
57 

56 
56 

35 
28 
44 
52 
32 
49 
59 

2 

26 
27 
30 
28 
28 
46 
49 
34 
30 


112 
78 

64 
78 
36 

82 
153 

161 
74 
118 

59 
57 
62 
124 
183 
60 
68 
54 
82 
121 

66 

54 
64 
58 
103 
139 
66 
152 
42 
168 

82 
60 
131 
73 

63 

113 
71 
26 
27 
78 

45 
76 
142 
105 
119 
96 
96 
64 
156 
114 

78 

71 
103 
51 
47 
183 
134 
157 
46 
110 

101 
66 
97 
87 
116 
87 
65 
118 
77 
128 

143 
136 

73 
87 
151 
187 
60 
151 
139 

78 

29 
35 

73 
108 
49 
188 
73 
67 
92 




BALDWIN-ARAGON MILLS 
(U) 




BENNETTS V I LLE 
SOUTHWEST (U) . . . . 


















CLEARWATER (U) . . 




COLLEGE HEIGHTS (U). . 






















GLOVER VI LLE (U). 
GRANITEVILLE (U) . . . 




INDUSTRIAL-ARAGON 




41: 


INMAN MILLS (U). . 


439 
269 

288 
341 

399 
462 
43 
34 
35 
24 
46 
27 
35 
36 

27 
38 
37 
27 
36 
52 
40 
43 
36 
46 

48 
51 
35 
21 
40 
28 
37 
46 
33 
54 

55 

54 

33 
27 

42 
49 
31 
47 
57 

20 

26 

26 
29 
26 
26 

42 
48 
31 
30 


127 
53 
50 
94 

7 
11 
14 
11 
11 
8 
13 
8 
14 
11 

9 

7 
12 
6 
8 
16 
13 
12 
6 
12 

13 
8 
12 

13 
8 
10 
14 
10 
14 

14 
11 

13 
6 
12 
18 
9 

16 
14 

6 

4 
6 
8 
14 
6 
17 
12 


ISLE OF PALMS 






537 

624 
429 




KERSHAW 


482 
328 
551 
306 
528 
483 

337 

439 
485 
300 
407 
698 
555 
57 
38 
53 

57 
58 
45 
31 
48 
32 
40 
57 
37 
68 

69 
63 

42 
35 

56 
69 
37 
62 
68 

27 

27 
28 
36 
37 
31 
62 
54 
38 
38 




1 930 
1 216 
1 901 




632 

1 017 




1 619 

1 127 
1 435 
1 702 


874 

59 
734 
893 
58 
65 
1 30 
1 05 
99 
75 
1 04 

1 04 
1 16 
78 
55 

96 
66 
74 
1 03 
73 
1 23 

1 17 
1 08 

86 
60 
97 
1 33 

70 
1 10 
1 IB 

53 

49 
53 
68 
84 


LONE OAK (U) * . . 


LYDIA MILLS <U). . 


1 177 
1 261 
2 479 
1 998 
1 904 
1 46 
1 990 

2 03 
2 30 
1 43 
1 04 
1 89 
1 25 
1 47 
2 02 
1 40 
2 35 

2 19 
2 10 

1 70 
1 19 
1 83 
2 43 
1 46 
2 08 
2 28 

1 02 

1 00 
1 06 
1 35 
1 50 
1 07 
2 17 
1 97 
1 29 
1 46 


3 
125 
147 
86 
65 
6 
6 

46 
66 
20 
37 
44 
31 
17 
49 
. 
84 

37 

* 

1 28 
1 
68 
1 40 
67 
60 
15 

43 

15< 
7 
81 
22 
1 20 
33 

T 

58 










70 
944 

982 
1 14 
647 
49 
93 
58 
73 
98 
67 
1 12 

1 02 
1 02 

84 
58 
85 
1 09 
75 
98 
1 09 

49 

50 
53 
67 
65 
53 
97 
95 
62 
70 


MONARCH MILLS (U). 

MONCKS CORNER* * . 
NEW ELLENTON .... 




NORTH HARTSVILLE (U) 


PACOLET MILLS. . 


PELZER NOKTH (Uy . . 




PIEDMONT (U) . . . 
PINEHURST-SHEPPARD 












SIMP50NVILLE .... 
SOUTH BENNETTSVILLE 
(U) . 




SPRING MILLS (U) . 
SULLIVANS ISLAND . 




53 
1 20 
1 01 
66 
75 


' 


4 


TIMMONSVILLE .... 
TRAVELERS REST . . 









42-46 



South Carolina 
Table 23.-CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500: 1960-Con. 

["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



AREA 



POPULATION 


1 

HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


TOTAL 


BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


WIDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
VORCED 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


WIDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
VORCED 


MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 


VICTOR MILLS <U) . 
WARRENVILLE (U). . . 
WATTS MILLS (U) . . 


2 018 
1 128 
1 438 
1 040 
2 427 
2 413 
2 201 
2 411 


971 
538 
700 
505 
1 154 
1 157 
1 043 
1 168 


1 047 
590 
738 
535 
1 273 
1 256 
1 158 
1 243 


935 
1 126 
1 425 
484 
1 326 
2 112 
664 
2 381 


1 083 
2 
13 
556 
1 101 
301 
1 537 
30 




540 
335 
459 
284 
670 
724 
543 
676 


265 
1 
7 
138 
275 
81 
362 
6 


2 018 
1 128 
1 438 
1 040 
2 412 
2 409 
2 201 
2 411 


172 
83 
119 
82 
166 
189 
175 
234 


417 
286 
405 
226 
529 
552 
404 
558 


25 
13 
14 
19 
28 
36 
32 
25 


160 
69 
84 
78 
155 
169 
171 
167 


435 
300 
411 
233 

575 
587 
428 
588 


123 
64 
65 
56 
127 
155 
147 
132 


WEST HARTSV1LLE (U). 


WINDY HILL CD) . . 
WINNSBORO MILLS (U) 



Table 24. AGE BY SEX, FOR PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500: 1960 
["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



AREA 


MALE 


FEMALE 


UNDER 
5 
YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 

44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 
64 
YEARS 


65 

AND 
OVER 


UNDER 
5 

YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 
44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 

64 
YEARS 


65 
AND 
OVER 




118 
99 

64 
69 
167 

63 
113 
115 
74 
69 

59 

98 
46 
77 
156 
92 
63 
47 
76 
117 

54 
57 
57 
70 
56 
122 
86 
106 
84 
146 

91 
60 
151 
79 

96 
86 
87 
70 
107 
84 

135 
99 

132 

64 
85 
52 

111 
54 
131 
108 

67 
85 
98 
67 
44 
123 
113 
106 
123 
108 

123 
187 
55 

66 

123 
76 
70 


251 
185 

153 
164 
181 

129 
229 
240 
164 
129 

114 
159 
125 
145 
252 
154 
148 
137 
154 
205 

120 
143 
70 
122 
122 
244 
148 
227 
145 
218 

191 
112 
272 

127 

211 
188 
212 
160 
151 
135 

243 
195 
257 
139 
148 
136 
218 
148 
251 
157 

93 

138 
200 
156 
100 
279 
253 
188 
171 
186 

221 
300 
122 
121 
243 
119 
159 


170 
116 

88 

111 
125 

85 
162 
138 
75 
62 

101 
125 
70 
103 
175 
106 
184 
104 
88 
162 

88 
64 
230 
87 
57 
113 
129 
120 
75 
156 

119 
67 
141 
55 

160 
107 
118 
77 
52 
113 

81 
123 
130 

94 
86 
57 
110 
96 
104 
105 

81 
105 
107 
91 
66 
197 
132 
154 
75 
177 

122 
116 
87 
67 
162 
83 
113 


172 
105 

84 
88 
131 

37 
117 
91 
46 
41 

81 
94 
60 
98 
153 
114 
85 
61 
107 
126 

68 
61 
59 
90 
51 
69 
97 
101 
73 
154 

98 
79 
173 
58 

80 
96 

122 
88 
108 

94 

158 
135 
129 
98 
86 
63 
136 
87 
92 
80 

68 
107 
101 
90 
65 
131 
99 
102 
133 
128 

129 
231 
82 
54 
103 
79 
103 


147 
95 

78 
88 
90 

49 
125 
91 
65 
65 

85 
ff4 
71 
86 
137 
91 
117 
90 
82 
119 

60 
75 
44 
90 
67 
106 
84 
114 
74 
123 

113 
68 
175 
69 

94 
115 
124 
104 
88 
78 

128 
133 
130 
86 
96 
60 
130 
72 
106 
92 

79 
103 
110 
69 
87 
138 
123 
116 
105 
117 

164 
162 
101 
72 
122 
84 
95 


143 
115 

68 
87 
33 

48 
103 
73 
41 
54 

80 
67 
66 
87 
122 
84 
105 
93 
60 
105 

55 

74 
33 

69 
50 
93 
85 
79 
57 
120 

71 
53 
122 
51 

87 
94 
110 
33 
51 
63 

69 
132 
87 
90 
81 
63 
103 
69 
78 
75 

69 
70 
81 
65 
137 
141 
84 
128 
50 
93 

104 
83 
104 
53 
93 
48 
93 


92 
57 

35 

55 
16 

31 
65 
67 
36 
37 

46 
46 
37 
59 
99 
44 
59 
59 
51 
68 

23 

42 
28 
29 
35 

62 

37 
51 
50 
88 

34 
23 
68 
58 

77 
62 
57 
15 
25 
44 

39 

50 
52 
46 
55 
42 
54 
35 
75 
58 

35 
51 

56 
40 
64 
88 
51 
64 
28 
77 

73 
41 
55 
32 

45 
45 
66 


81 
41 

17 
30 

12 

31 
88 
70 
28 
62 

25 
37 
42 
53 
67 
30 
54 
26 
26 
70 

22 
33 

35 

43 
41 
54 
34 
58 
34 
92 

36 
28 
68 

47 

33 

67 
42 
11 
17 
54 

16 
22 

70 

61 
52 
34 
70 
23 
47 
70 

36 

42 
56 
11 
43 
74 
87 
54 
24 
58 

46 
26 
41 
28 
43 
52 
31 


122 
93 

64 
84 
154 

70 
131 
97 
89 
62 

61 
96 

47 
70 
173 
97 
58 
49 
83 
82 

69 
61 
34 
54 
61 
113 
75 
111 
77 
134 

79 
47 
156 
92 

93 
104 
111 
72 
08 
70 

132 
87 
141 
55 

103 
65 
87 
63 
117 
101 

58 
76 

95 
68 
38 
127 
122 
106 
123 
108 

112 

210 
64 
64 
118 
69 

KK 


270 
188 

139 
146 
185 

114 
257 
229 
143 
153 

115 
154 
101 
138 
258 
146 
157 
102 
122 
204 

124 
109 
98 
88 
106 
232 
139 
203 
99 
232 

199 
95 
316 
127 

188 
160 
147 
131 
132 
110 

231 

207 
243 
145 
184 
124 
211 
156 
238 
170 

98 
129 
188 
124 
120 
298 
240 
185 
166 
218 

242 
299 
138 
108 
206 
147 

1 IIT 


179 

124 

87 
109 
167 

68 
157 
140 
86 
74 

93 
138 
72 
112 
201 
106 
122 
99 
120 
173 

95 
60 
236 
83 
69 
146 
134 
112 
86 
177 

135 
84 
171 
89 

136 
134 
143 
97 
67 
124 

101 
137 
142 
103 
106 
78 
159 
102 
110 
104 

84 
117 
128 
94 
76 
179 
140 
150 
113 
150 

147 
130 
115 
88 
176 
82 

1 1 A. 


186 
102 

89 
85 

144 

59 
134 
112 
50 
72 

89 
104 
58 
104 
138 
103 
59 
76 
103 
138 

75 
84 
55 
93 

55 
98 
93 
109 
75 
186 

107 
88 
185 
80 

90 
93 

128 
110 
111 
82 

171 
143 
162 
103 
109 
74 
121 
82 
110 
101 

64 
117 
125 
93 
79 
128 
140 
107 
133 
137 

138 
243 
99 
56 
120 
89 


175 
111 

87 
114 
71 

61 
143 
113 
73 
72 

88 
89 
71 
107 
166 
110 
131 
109 
82 
155 

59 
98 
49 
98 
68 
108 
114 
126 
84 
155 

107 
69 
195 
75 

106 
119 
141 
67 
102 
85 

121 
138 
140 
93 
108 
65 
151 
90 
125 
102 

101 
104 
122 
86 
102 
179 
123 
146 
91 
160 

167 
137 
111 
69 

113 
94 

a* 


163 
98 

83 
77 
30 

66 
136 
98 
51 
63 

97 
82 
74 
105 
157 
87 
105 
99 
89 
120 

65 
79 
42 
69 
66 
116 
90 
123 
59 
139 

65 
69 

uo 

78 

108 
102 
91 
35 

44 
82 

60 
143 
99 
89 
110 
77 
96 
67 
118 
92 

71 
75 
107 
68 
136 
171 
87 
126 
54 
107 

123 
65 
108 
63 
106 
56 

i no 


101 
70 

33 
60 
19 

56 
96 
95 
38 
71 

46 
57 
58 
98 
125 
53 
63 
55 
48 
93 

30 

51 
40 
47 
52 
101 
41 
76 
37 
125 

54 
32 

86 
87 

65 
94 
71 
24 
23 
53 

33 

50 
90 
67 
71 
59 
73 
34 
71 
84 

54 
64 
76 
37 
63 
113 
87 
78 
36 
85 

63 
47 
75 
47 
63 
57 

AiL 


88 

57 

32 
52 

19 

55 

118 
132 
47 
96 

29 
43 
47 
90 
96 
33 
77 
43 
39 
101 

36 
37 
56 
54 
75 
88 
37 
98 
28 
140 

52 
43 
87 
63 

32 

93 
65 
19 
20 
86 

28 
37 
115 
106 
87 
72 
100 
38 
128 
120 

69 
52 

52 
18 

41 
113 
117 
94 
37 
81 

56 
32 

78 
59 

63 
72 
45 


ARK WRIGHT (U) 
BALDWIN-ARAGON MILLS 






BENNETTSVILLE 
SOUTHWEST (U) . . . * 














CHESTERFIELD . . . . 


CLEARWATER (U) . . . 




COLLEGE HEIGHTS (U). . 


DON ERA I LE <U) 


















GLOVERVILLE (U) 
GRANITEVILLE (U) . . 




INDUSTRIAL-ARAGON 
MILLS (U) * 




INMAN MILLS (U). . * 
































LYDIA MILLS (U). . . . 








MONARCH MILLS (U). . . 








NORTH HARTSVILLE (U) . 





General Population Characteristics 

Table 24. AGE BY SEX, FOR PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500: 1960 Con. 
["U" denotes an unincorporated place] 



42-47 



AREA 






MALE 


FEMALE 


UNDER 
5 
YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 
44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 

64 
YEARS 


65 
AND 
OVER 


UNDER 
5 
YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 

44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 
64 
YEARS 


65 
AND 
OVER 




120 
62 
136 
127 
89 

121 
61 
77 
140 
97 

130 
140 

70 
93 
74 
93 
113 
74 
112 
107 

84 
103 
130 
41 
43 
72 
141 
149 
156 
110 


229 
153 
253 
198 
204 

212 
151 
208 
299 
190 

210 
229 

129 
99 
124 
154 
189 
114 
235 
238 

126 
183 
240 
120 
129 
111 
314 
257 
296 
271 


150 
118 
179 
143 
160 

141 
77 
123 
149 
121 

148 
154 

80 
61 
73 
87 
68 
76 
135 
125 

96 
81 
168 
83 
119 
62 
143 
170 
157 
189 


131 
96 
180 
144 
141 

76 
66 
95 
107 
73 

116 
157 

66 
120 
78 
90 
69 
64 
91 
128 

114 
113 
110 
74 
71 
80 
144 
130 
119 
143 


135 
105 
134 
144 
160 

102 
86 
126 
115 
78 

145 
159 

52 
63 
64 
87 
82 
65 
140 
134 

72 
97 
133 

88 
116 
63 
167 
155 
129 
144 


97 
71 
109 
110 
133 

81 
78 
111 
118 
82 

98 
110 

44 
46 
64 
76 
69 
84 
105 
109 

72 
6O 
8O 
65 
90 
49 
127 
131 
95 
168 


62 
39 
57 
76 
76 

48 
35 
60 
89 
68 

67 
69 

23 

16 
34 
48 
32 
50 
72 
58 

41 
36 
53 
35 
77 
37 
69 
77 
49 
101 


61 
26 

74 
81 
64 

63 

34 
55 
80 
45 

74 
77 

28 
8 
21 
35 
36 
9 
81 
56 

20 
35 

57 
32 

55 
31 
49 
88 
42 
42 


120 
65 
154 
115 
90 

112 
60 
81 
177 
78 

113 

110 

64 
64 
48 
102 
109 
43 
142 
127 

54 
103 
140 
43 
53 
67 
145 
124 
161 
100 


204 
152 
260 
216 
182 

205 
114 
196 
277 
160 

206 
215 

119 
103 
124 
130 
219 
102 
256 
224 

122 
187 
203 
123 
140 
111 
291 
243 
277 
277 


164 
128 
190 
172 

151 

133 
84 
131 
171 
116 

160 
183 

95 
83 
73 
77 
120 
82 
144 
154 

125 
92 
183 
90 
97 
70 
164 
183 
186 
181 


128 
104 
178 
169 
128 

86 
74 
102 
133 
86 

124 
191 

67 
105 
96 
81 
100 
65 
131 
130 

108 
100 
148 
77 
91 
74 
193 
150 
145 
148 


136 
115 
153 
150 
186 

-124 
'95 
150 
169 
87 

158 
147 

53 

61 
76 
101 
82 
88 
155 
150 

94 
84 
135 
93 
129 
76 
179 
153 
149 
174 


111 
79 
115 
133 

151 

87 
74 
126 
147 
89 

125 
124 

56 
45 
61 
88 
89 
89 
138 
89 

83 
68 
103 
71 
90 
61 
135 
126 
101 
197 


78 
55 

83 
95 
92 

57 

48 
93 
121 
38 

85 
97 

42 
20 
39 
62 
49 
33 
101 
70 

45 
60 
68 
51 
88 
36 
99 
122 
73 
94 


94 
32 

103 
125 
101 

60 
55 

99 

141 
54 

130 
120 

37 
15 
20 
47 
78 
33 
140 
74 

38 
59 
67 
42 
50 
40 
67 
155 
66 
72 


PELZER NORTH (U) . . 




PIEDMONT (U) 
P INEHURST-SHEPPARD 












SIMPSONVILLE . . , . . 
SOUTH BENNETTSVILLE 

(u) * 




SPRING MILLS (U) . . . 
SULLIVANS ISLAND . . 




TIMMONSVILLE 
TRAVELERS REST .... 




VICTOR MILLS (U> . . 
WARRENVILLE (U). . . 
WATTS MILLS CU) . . . . 


WEST HARTSVILLE <U). . 


WINDY HILL (U) . . . . 
WINNSBORO MILLS (U). , 



Table 25. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: I960 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



AREA 


POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


TOTAL 


BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


WIDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
VORCED 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


WIDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
VORCED 




MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 


ABBEVILLE COUNTY! 
ABBEVILLE DIV. . . . 
ANTREVILLE- 
LOWNDESV 1 LLE DIV. . 
CALHOUN FALLS DIV. 


9 357 

2 467 
3 638 
2 726 
3 229 

11 243 
9 935 
8 316 
3 095 
2 287 
3 248 
9 846 
2 770 
4 513 
18 452 
2 408 
3 194 
1 731 

5 013 
3 369 
791 
2 189 

41 316 
4 001 
4 002 
5 144 
991 
3 446 
4 978 
1 648 
6 609 
4 449 

4 245 
4 327. 
3 584, 
3 277 
3 721 

2 740 


4 413 

1 209 
1 680 
1 329 
1 583 

5 324 
4 853 
4 171 
1 529 
1 152 
1 610 
4 764 
1 385 
2 208 
9 099 
1 205 
1 561 
865 

2 358 
1 617 
394 
1 068 

19 524 
2 068 
1 963 
2 412 
507 
1 708 
2 470 
851 
3 241 
2 218 

2 022 
2 197 
1 730 
1 607 
1 817 

1 349 


4 944 

1 258 
1 958 
1 397 
1 646 

5 919 
5 082 
4 145 
1 566 
1 135 
1 638 
5 082 
. 1 385 
2 305 
9 353 
1 203 
1 633 
866 

2 655 
1 752 
397 
1 121 

21 792 
1 933 
2 039 
2 732 
484 
1 738 
2 508 
797 
3 368 
2 231 

2 223 

2 130 

1 854 
1 670 
1 904 

1 391 


5 994 

1 753 
"2 379 
2' 264 
2 167 

6 818 
7 696 
7 258 
1 590 
1 549 
2 195, 
8 895 
1 775 
2 772 
15 307 
1 195 
1 714 
936 

2 025 

1 164 
131 
858 

33 008 

3 201 
3 141 
4 367 
659 
2 568 
4 394 
1 270 
5 624 
3 538 

4 071 
3 458 
2 435 
2 235 
2 870 

2 394 


3 363 

707 
1 258 
461 
1 062 

4 418 
2 233 

1 055 
1 505 
738 
1 053 
944 
995 
1 740 
3 141 
1 213 
1 480 
795 

2 987 
2 205 
660 

1 331 

8 300 
799 
852 
775 
332 
878 
583 
378 
983 
911 

174 
869 
1 149 
1 038 
851 

346 


. 

7 
1 
1 

7 
6 
3 

. 


7 

1 
4 


... 
. 

1 

. 

B 

1 
9 
2 
. . 
* 
1 
. 
2 
. 


... 
4 

. 


2 616 

659 
964 
724 
790 

3 254 
2 732 
2 058 
769 
528 
844 
2 739 
670 
1 139 
5 054 
617 
822 
423 

1 343 
839 
171 
504 

12 193 
1 010 
1 065 
1 524 
259 
922 
1 348 
392 
1 936 
1 191 

1 196 
1 166 
1 023 
827 
1 072 

731 


805 

147 
271 
104 
241 

1 229 

546 
195 
327 
142 
262 
228 
197 
376 
753 
267 
324 
164 

713 
477 
130 
257 

2 275 
131 
178 
196 
65 
191 
122 
62 
235 
183 

33 
168 
290 
217 
237 

71 


9 294 

2 466 
3 638 
2 726 
2 893 

11 061 
9 907 
8 230 
3 082 
2 204 
3 225 
9 837 
2 762 
4 493 
18 448 
2 408 
3 194 
1 723 

4 985 
3 369 
791 
2 182 

40 983 
3 798 
3 999 

5 129 
991 
3 446 
4 967 
1 648 
6 601 
4 437 

4 235 
4 298 
3 584 
3 277 
3 721 

2 740 


842 

217 
312 
233 
471 

763 
724 
464 
209 
233 
197 
772 
298 
304 
1 161 
251 
316 
159 

426 
329 
95 
203 

2 990 
399 
298 
354 
96 
318 
447 
189 
522 
406 

344 
448 
319 
299 
276 

262 


2 019 

561 
746 
621 
638 

2 490 
2 366 
1 953 
647 
480 
728 
2 276 
565 
978 
4 381 
467 
639 
339 

1 000 
603 
124 
410 

9 834 
988 
969 
1 251 
232 
818 
1 180 
343 
1 641 
1 037 

1 026 
1 018 
837 
706 
878 

649 


131 

32 

50 
38 

49 

188 
97 
63 
38 
32 
28 
162 
44 
41 
155 
43 
43 
31 

65 

46 
12 
34 

519 
81 
58 
50 
10 
52 
75 
15 
71 
50 

57 
64 
46 
37 
39 

31 


727 

208 
291 
208 
414 

727 

588 
348 
201 
155 
154 
612 
229 
246 
975 
179 
283 
140 

411 
268 
68 
187 

2 917 
266 
266 

342 
82 
264 
343 
140 
475 
362 

319 
335 

249 
246 
214 

214 


2 085 

558 
793 
632 
647 

2 551 
2 411 
1 944 
674 
483 
744 
2 356 
580 
990 
4 503 
475 
656 
341 

1 047 
648 
133 
423 

10 290 
906 
980 
1 325. 
233 
837 
1 193 
345 
1 667 
1 040 

1 073 

1 017 
864. 
724 
924 

652 


607 

92 

205 
124 
159 

759 
436 
186 
131 
76 
124 
564 
127 
157 
784 
130 
200 
90 

343 
228 
41 
111 

2 483 
150 
146 
296 
38 
120 
205 
62 
332 
188 

223 
170 
178 
142 
203 

98 


DUE tfEST DIV ..... 
AIKEN COUNTY 1 


AIKEN NORTH DIV. 
AIKEN SOUTH DIV. . . 
BEECH ISLAND DIV " . 
EDISTO-SHAWS DIV . 






NEW ELLENTON DIV . 
NORTH AUGUSTA DIV. . 






ALLENDALE COUNTY I 
ALLENDALE DIV. . . . 
FAIRFAX DIV 


MARTIN-MILLETT DIV . 
SYCAMORE DIV .... 

ANDERSON COUNTY t 
ANDERSON DIV .... 
ANDERSON NORTH DIV . 
ANDERSON SOUTH DIV . 
BEL TON DIV 


BELTON EAST DIV. . 
BEL TON WEST DIV. . 
BRUSHY CREEK DIV . 


HONEA PATH DIV . . 




PENDLETON EAST DIV . 
PENDLETON WEST DIV . 


WILLIAMSTON DIV. . . 
WILLIAMSTON RURAL 



42-48 



South Carolina 
Table 25.-CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 196O-Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



AREA 


POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


TOTAL 


BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


WIDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
VORCED 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


WIDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
VORCED 


MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 


BAMBERS COUNTY x 


6 219 
5 816 
1 981 
2 258 

6 962 
3 753 
1 992 
4 952 

16 686 
3 135 
15 025 
6 048 
3 293 

4 308 
3 083 
3 902 
1 881 
6 688 
11 573 
6 761 

3 221 

1 711 
5 155 

2 169 

65 925 
11 735 
1 589 
12 515 
13 872 
6 252 
4 478 
13 838 
9 876 
22 339 

9 323 
25 887 
8 960 
2 326 
7 467 

6 373 

10 435 
8 365 

4 540 
3 344 
2 148 

6 906 
2 793 
2 800 
3 432 
4 693 
5 864 
2 297 
2 103 

5 171 
2 771 
2 943 

3 207 

3 276 
3 029 
2 044 
2 445 
5 380 
3 451 

3 032 
3 917 
2 188 
4 636 
2 214 
2 602 
3 963 
4 151 
2 787 


3 034 
2 904 
969 
1 122 

3 399 
1 778 
971 
2 382 

8 649 
1 507 
10 851 
2 910 
1 593 

2 121 

1 526 
1 934 
909 
3 307 
5 804 
3 364 

1 592 

837 

2 444 

1 087 

33 Oil 

6 414 
777 
7 030 
6 852 
3 123 
2 192 
6 798 
4 809 
11 033 

4 567 
12 529 
4 303 
1 132 
3 748 

3 093 
4 776 
4 116 
2 309 
1 648 
1 078 

3 165 
1 371 
1 371 
1 655 
2 346 
2 821 
1 126 
1 048 

2 462 
1 338 
1 444 

1 541 

1 646 
1 501 
1 000 
1 210 
2 669 
1 772 

1 490 
1 838 
1 083 
2 291 
1 066 
1 310 
1 855 
2 010 
1 396 


3 185 
2 912 
1 012 
1 136 

3 563 
1 975 
1 021 
2 570 

8 037 
1 628 
4 174 
3 138 
1 700 

2 187 
1 557 
1 968 
972 
3 381 
5 769 
3 397 

1 629 

674 
2 711 

1 082 

32 914 
5 321 
812 
5 485 
7 020 
3 129 
2 286 
7 040 
5 067 
11 306 

4 756 
13 358 
4 657 
1 194 
3 719 

3 280 
5 659 
4 249 
2 231 
1 696 
1 070 

3 741 
1 422 
1 429 
1 777 
2 347 
3 043 
1 171 
1 055 

2 709 
1 433 
1 499 

1 666 

1 630 
1 528 
1 044 
1 235 
2 711 
1 679 

1 542 
2 079 
1 105 
2 345 
1 148 
1 292 
2 108 
2 141 
1 391 


3 166 
1 896 
1 100 
1 025 

5 076 
1 615 
693 
2 620 

11 764 
1 086 
12 697 
1 052 
484 

2 180 
1 326 
1 086 
148 
3 401 
9 441 
1 651 

950 

386 
1 790 

932 

32 313 
6 867 
282 
10 288 
9 702 
2 982 
1 001 
9 129 
9 529 
19 123 

5 143 
22 147 
2 516 
346 
6 081 

5 422 
7 808 
6 347 
3 624 
2 784 
1 750 

4 293 
1 880 
1 111 
1 575 
3 100 
4 411 
964 
1 226 

2 914 
1 326 
1 453 

2 010 

2 066 
2 001 
1 266 
1 807 
3 530 
2 837 

940 
2 036 
580 
987 
663 
1 014 
963 
285 
1 892 


3 052 
3 919 
881 
1 233 

1 881 
2 133 
1 299 
2 326 

4 860 
2 049 
2 257 
4 994 
2 809 

2 128 
1 757 
2 814 
1 733 
.3 261 
' 2 117 
5 110 

2 271 

1 32S 
3 365 

1 236 

33 522 
4 797 
1 306 
2 177 
4 168 
3 260 
3 477 
4 694 
262 
3 168 

4 174 
3 722 
6 425 
1 980 
1 356 

951 
2 623 
2 017 
916 
560 
398 

2 613 
912 
1 689 
1 855 
1 593 
1 453 
1 333 
877 

2 249 
1 445 
1 485 

1 197 

1 207 
1 028 
778 
628 
1 850 
609 

2 091 
1 881 
1 607 
3 646 
1 551 
1 588 
2 997 
3 866 
895 


1 
1 

... 

5 
5 
. 
6 

62 
. 

71 
2 

2 

*26 

15 

... 

... 

1 

90 
71 

1 
50 

2 
10 

*15 
85 
48 

6 
18 
19 

*30 

... 
4 
1 

... 

1 

... 
2 

... 
... 

a 

5 
3 

"10 

"5 

1 

1 
3 

"*3 


1 655 
1 329 

501 
521 

1 884 
892 
489 
1 257 

4 025 
842 
2 026 
1 389 
691 

975 
672 
783 
361 
1 636 
2 795 
1 457 

696 

397 
1 320 

513 

18 306 
2 762 
328 
2 639 
3 335 
1 373 
965 
3 307 
2 837 
6 057 

2 372 
6 883 
1 904 
444 
1 825 

1 664 
3 047 

2 088 
1 132 
835 
524 

2 089 
723 
651 
841 
1 171 
1 492 
530 
478 

1 502 
596 
679 

B49 

750 
734 
489 
632 
1 335 
767 

600 
1 034 
424 
891 
465 
534 
832 
827 
586 


699 
730 
177 
210 

464 
414 
281 
496 

1 048 
476 
372 
1 070 
547 

425 
365 
499 
316 
710 
408 
1 015 

410 

282 
753 

229 

9 113 
1 096 
255 
415 
682 
631 
682 
865 
90 
733 

877 
807 
1 201 
346 
270 

225 
672 

366 
187 
103 
82 

713 
197 
363 
387 
325 
285 
255 
158 

600 
263 
305 

245 

212 
186 
152 
112 
334 
116 

376 
425 
277 
631 
291 
267 
561 
734 
161 


6 177 
5 412 
1 981 
2 238 

6 923 
3 727 
1 992 
4 948 

15 482 
3 128 
7 618 
5 949 
3 275 

4 299 
3 031 
3 902 
1 873 
6 660 
11 573 
6 746 

3 215 

1 711 
5 133 

2 163 

59 047 
10 057 
1 569 
10 804 
13 811 
6 246 
4 448 
13 794 
9 858 
22 243 

9 297 
25 818 
8 946 
2 316 
7 322 

6 371 
10 163 
8 239 
4 540 
3 344 
2 148 

6 874 
2 793 
2 750 
3 400 
4 686 
5 864 
2 297 
2 103 

5 158 
2 763 
2 935 

3 198 

3 254 
3 029 
2 044 
2 445 
5 380 
3 451 

3 016 
3 873 
2 188 
4 636 
2 188 
2 602 
3 957 
4 151 
2 766 


577 
779 
186 
232 

522 
353 
226 
417 

1 681 
294 
7 082 
511 
260 

425 
316 
394 
187 
610 
723 
697 

355 

164 
456 

235 

9 204 
1 845 
155 
1 818 
1 038 
554 
492 
1 059 
434 
1 364 

702 
1 460 
648 
246 
4B9 

5B2 
725 
793 
416 
380 
233 

515 
259 
278 
312 
459 
478 
230 
222 

431 
25B 
337 

294 

359 
327 
IBB 
246 
527 
3B2 

299 
347 
221 
527 
233 
267 
365 
410 
304 


1 275 
1 016 
407 
422 

1 526 
661 
364 
997 

3 607 
605 
2 021 
1 057 
518 

804 
562 
641 
275 
1 362 
2 589 
1 156 

564 

264 
981 

431 

13 311 
2 499 
246 
2 709 
2 937 
1 142 
710 
2 783 
2 322 
5 321 

1 962 
6 041 
1 472 
332 
1 69B 

1 40B 
2 30b 
1 784 
1 012 
735 
451 

1 472 
609 
575? 
670 
1 007 
1 27B 
460 
419 

1 134 
516 
547 

677 

657 
606 
393 
527 

1 115 
693 

526 
78B 
360 
732 
366 
474 
627 
606 
541 


100 
77 
23 
35 

86 
47 
36 

49 

143 
62 
106 
64 
45 

4B 
52 
25 
16 
63 
64 
73 

32 

23 

5V 

21 

1 174 
229 
22 
152 
114 
6S 
bO 
111 
7V 
189 

106 
IBb 
BB 
JO 
4b 

Sti 
li>l 
123 
65 
Jb 
30 

I2b 

43 
43 
60 
bB 
7& 
26 
31 

BO 
22 
37 

3V 

47 
4B 
30 
36 

57 

44 

IB 
40 
27 
42 
22 
2t> 
33 
il 
25 


427 
525 

140 
181 

430 
355 

182 
355 

815 
241 
540 
459 
287 

324 
244 
331 
171 
465 
552 
605 

272 

171 
422 

190 

6 086 
672 
142 
55S 
878 
440 
43b 
9UB 
34i 
1 07B 

667 
1 417 
709 
253 
367 

460 
997 
651 

3*6 
299 
181 

S>77 
227 
240 
232 
352 
392 
212 
171 

3 
213 
227 

->60 

274 
287 
151 
Q4 
443 
24B 

220 
320 
194 
473 
2Q1 
18V 
364 
384 
226 


1 341 
1 043 
417 
437 

1 596 
733 
378 
1 034 

3 574 
627 
1 906 
1 057 
536 

822 
574 
655 
276 
1 407 
2 626 
1 182 

566 

296 
1 030 

432 

12 662 
2 352 
255 
2 518 
3 047 
1 177 
740 
2 917 
2 598 
5 568 

2 080 
6 308 
1 54B 
339 
1 727 

1 447 
2 446 
1 B35 
1 031 
739 
462 

1 570 
650 
568 
711 
1 029 
1 318 
460 
425 

1 168 
536 
570 

702 

646 
621 
404 
539 
1 118 
687 

542 
832 
374 
744 
372 
477 
653 
650 
538 


366 
316 

124 
101 

326 
226 
113 

242 

514 
210 
202 
330 
176 

189 
123 
172 
92 
285 
253 
281 

165 

101 
320 

98 

4 962 
469 
75 
199 
474 
257 
247 
533 
284 
674 

375 
927 
431 
117 
196 

326 
675 
398 
169 
130 
81 

551 
128 
117 
191 
236 
315 
116 
100 

400 
88 
134 

203 

132 

119 
102 
103 
254 
121 

112 
232 
78 
187 
120 
106 
215 
196 
98 




EHRHARDT OIV . 


BARNWELL COUNTY I 
BARN WELL DIV . . 
BLACKVILLE DIV 
KLINE-SNELLING DIV . 
WILLISTON DIV. . . . 

BEAUFORT COUNTY I 
BEAUFORT DIV . , . . 
BLUFFTON DIV .... 
PORT ROYAL DIV , . 
ST HELENA DIV. . . . 


BERKELEY COUNTY! 


CORDESVILLE DIV. . . 


HUGER-WANDO DIV. 
MONCKS CORNER DIV. 
MOUNT HOLLY DIV, . 
ST STEPHENS DIV. . . 

CALHOUN COUNTY I 


FORT MOTTE-LONE STAR 


ST MATTHEWS DIV. 
SANDY RUN-CENTER 


CHARLESTON COUNTY 1 
CHARLESTON DIV , . 


EDISTO ISLAND DIV. 
GOOSE CREEK DIV. . 
JAMES ISLAND DIV 
JOHNS ISLAND DIV 
MC CLELLANVILLE DIV 
MOUNT PLEASANT DlV 
NOISETTE CREEK DIV 
NORTH CHARLESTON DIV 

ROSEMONT DIV - . 
ST ANDREWS DIV . 
ST PAULS DIV . . . 
WADMALAW ISLAND DIV 


CHEROKEE COUNTY 1 
BLACKSBURG DIV . * . 


GAFFNEY NORTH OIV. . 
GAFFNEY SOUTH DIV. . 


SOU1HSIDE DIV. . . . 
CHESTER COUNTY* 


CHESTER EAST DIV 
CHESTER NORTH DIV. 
CHESTER SOUTH DIV. 
CHESTER WEST DIV 
GrtEAT FALLS DIV. 
LANDSFORD DIV. . . 
RICHBURG DIV ... 

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY: 


CHERAW NORTH DIV . . 
CHERAW SOUTH DIV . 
CHESTERFIELD EAST 
DIV ........ 


CHESTERFIELD WEST 


JEFFERSON DIV. . . 


MOUNT CROGHAN DIV. . 
PAGELAND DIV .... 


CLARENDON COUNTY* 




MANNING EAST DIV 
MANNING WEST DIV 
PAXVILLE DIV . . * 
SARDINIA DIV . . . 
SUMMERTON EAST DIV 
SUMMERTON WEST DIV 
TURBEVILLE DIV . . 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 25. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: I960 Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



42-49 





POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 








AND OVER 


AND OVER 


AREA 




BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 









IDOWED 
AND 


SINGLE 


Ui 
MAR- 


IDOWED 
AND 






MALE 


EMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


RIED 


DI- 




RIED 


DI- 


















WHITE 






V 


ORCED 




V 


ORCED 


COLLETON COUNTY* 


2 145 
3 027 
2 042 
4 022 
2 015 
5 417 
5 017 
4 131 


1 087 
1 459 
980 
2 016 
989 
2 518 
2 482 
2 063 


1 058 
1 568 
1 062 
2 006 
1 026 
2 899 
2 535 
2 068 


1 189 
1 073 
382 

1 638 
907 

3 150 
3 104 
2 146 


956 
1 943 
1 659 
2 384 
1 107 
2 267 
1 913 
1 985 


11 
1 

"l 


550 
718 
510 
988 
490 
1 552 
1 305 
971 


203 
391 
391 
503 
214 
552 
403 
401 


2 145 
3 027 
2 036 
4 022 
1 997 
5 384 
5 Oil 
4 131 


226 

317 
159 
460 
199 
415 
449 
421 


446 
569 
358 
744 
435 
1 153 
1 095 
811 


42 
45 
33 

81 
20 
62 
89 

43 


156 
275 
143 
297 

164 
412 
347 
265 


460 
578 
359 
762 
424 
1 257 
1 120 
842 


112 
162 
149 
231 
101 
369 
235 
176 


COTTAGEVILLE DIV . 
GREEN POND DIV . 
HENDERSONVILLE DIV . 


WALTERBORO DIV ... 
WALTERBORO NORTH DIV 
WALTERBORO SOUTH DIV 


DARLINGTON COUNTY 1 
DARLINGTON DIV ... 
DARLINGTON NORTH DIV 
DARLINGTON SOUTH DIV 
HARTSVILLE DIV . 
HARTSVILLE NORTH DIV 


6 710 
3 949 
6 229 
6 392 
6 683 


3 040 
1 93O 
3 083 
2 825 
3 301 


3 670 
2 019 
3 146 
3 567 
3 382 


3 385 
2 284 
2 879 
3 804 
5 303 


3 318 
1 665 
3 349 
2 586 
1 380 


7 

1 

2 


2 012 
920 
1 372 
1 745 
1 606 


927 
307 
621 
672 
275 


6 647 
3 948 
6 130 
6 039 
6 677 


474 
380 
593 

412 
534 


1 417 
796 
1 230 
1 366 
1 411 


99 
38 
75 
72 
72 


527 
331 

414 
683 
426 


1 514 
826 
1 240 
1 413 
1 435 


557 
180 
262 
469 
300 


HARTSVILLE SOUTHEAST 


3 863 


1 884 


1 979 


2 587 


1 276 


... 


900 


203 


3 863 


327 


793 


34 


285 


821 


196 


HARTSVILLE SOUTHWEST 


7 673 
3 554 
3 945 
3 930 


3 807 
1 749 
1 902 
1 959 


3 866 
1 805 
2 043 
1 971 


4 542 
1 408 
1 935 
1 293 


3 131 
2 127 
2 008 
2 635 


2 
2 


1 836 
743 
886 
783 


603 
372 
345 
452 


7 652 
3 535 
3 943 
3 930 


614 
345 
361 
364 


1 584 
671 
749 
636 


82 
38 
40 
52 


520 
298 

343 
323 


1 640 
681 
778 
647 


311 
123 
192 
183 


LAKE SWAMP DIV . 


SOCIETY HILL DIV 


DILLON COUNTY* 


6 173 
4 569 
3 327 
5 807 
4 586 
3 017 
3 105 


2 873 
2 205 
1 629 
2 896 
2 233 
1 557 
1 520 


3 300 
2 364 
1 698 
2 911 
2 353 
1 460 
1 585 


4 092 
1 945 
1 852 
2 825 
2 437 
1 792 
1 412 


2 080 
2 623 
1 464 
2 974 
2 149 
1 224 
1 604 


1 
1 
11 
8 

1 
89 


1 726 
926 
684 
1 206 
1 086 
614 
603 


491 
458 
226 
510 
427 
239 
273 


6 129 
4 553 
3 327 
5 780 
4 583 
3 017 
3 105 


475 
435 
297 
564 
431 
302 
289 


1 270 
777 
570 
1 034 
823 
531 
537 


88 
48 
35 
62 
52 
39 
36 


464 
366 
285 
504 
368 
245 
263 


1 368 

814 
598 
1 076 
869 
536 
556 


441 
203 
128 
213 
255 
90 
136 


DILLON EAST DIV. 
DILLON WEST DIV. 
LAKEVIEW DIV .... 
LATTA EAST DIV . 
LATTA WEST DIV ... 
LITTLE ROCK DIV. . 


DORCHESTER COUNTY I 
HAALEYVILLE DIV. 
REEVESVILLE DIV. 
RIDGEVILLE DIV 
ST GEORGE DIV. . . 
SUMMERVILLE DIV. . 


4 297 
2 350 
2 674 
4 298 
10 764 


2 143 
1 ISO 
1 326 
2 109 
5 266 


2 154 
1 200 
1 348 
2 189 
5 498 


1 860 
1 029 
1 173 
1 833 
6 565 


2 417 
1 321 
1 501 
2 463 
4 190 


2 
9 


984 
561 
597 
1 135 
2 726 


477 
273 
308 
567 
947 


4 297 
2 350 
2 665 
4 282 
10 693 


423 
261 
271 
419 
924 


840 
480 
510 
882 
2 299 


54 
34 
38 
42 
131 


316 
198 
211 
301 
760 


861 
496 
535 
915 
2 356 


171 
114 
104 
269 
496 


EDGEFIELD COUNTY 1 
EDGEFIELD DIV. . . 
EDGEFIELD NORTH DIV. 
EDGEFIELD SOUTH DIV. 
JOHNSTON DIV .... 
MERIWETHER DIV . . . 
PLEASANT LANE DIV. . 
TRENTON DIV 


2 876 
1 672 
1 676 
5 252- 
1 196 
1 330 
1 733 


1 351 
824 
861 
2 527 
590 
669 
871 


1 525 
848 
815 
2 725 
606 
661 
862 


1 496 
572 
780 
2 503 
390 
325 
515 


1 380 
1 100 
896 
2 749 
806 
1 005 
1 217 


1 


834 
392 

385 
1 302 
257 
266 
405 


352 

213 

159 
542 
149 
171 
246 


2 355 
1 637 
1 676 
5 244 
1 196 
1 330 
1 729 


229 
170 
191 
435 
119 
154 
193 


611 
336 
330 
1 020 
234 
225 
312 


50 
19 
21 
63 
13 
17 
27 


228 
158 

124 
384 
89 
122 
127 


632 

327 
341 
1 060 
229 
226 
330 


194 
70 
73 
247 
46 
59 
83 


FAIRFIELD COUNTY: 
MONTICELLO-SALEM DIV 
RIDGEWAY DIV . 
WINNSBORO NORTH DIV 
WINNSBORO SOUTH DIV 


2 730. 
3 371 
3 268 

11 344 


1 382 
1 695 
1 650 
5 433 


1 348 
1 676 
1 618 
5 911 


480 
1 019 
1 256 
5 639 


2 249 
2 352 
2 012 
5 705 


1 


591 
745 
761 
2 810 


445 
481 
399 
1 167 


2 730 
3 322 

3 245 
11 308 


315 
371 
364 
951 


498 
582 
646 
2 285 


51 
67 

44 
153 


221 
287 
276 
839 


507 
588 
656 
2 376 


124 
172 
158 
625 


FLORENCE COUNTY t 

COWARDS DIV. . . 
EFFINGHAM DIV. . . 
FLORENCE DIV . 
FLORENCE EAST DIV. 
FLORENCE WEST DIV. 
JOHNSONVILLE DIV 
LAKE CITY DIV. . . 
OLANTA DIV . . . 


2 785 
4 513 
24 722 
6 375 
8 154 
4 970 
7 938 
4 349 


1 416 
2 238 
11 498 
3 263 
4 097 
2 457 
3 734 
2 157 


1 369 
2 275 
13 224 
3 112 
4 057 
2 513 
4 204 
2 192 


1 999 
1 909 
15 418 
3 371 
5 939 
3 1O5 
3 794 
2 561 


785 
2 601 
9 301 
3 004 
2 212 
1 864 
4 138 
1 788 


1 
3 

3 
. * 
3 
1 
6 


619 
946 
7 044 
1 432 
1 941 
1 083 
2 021 
961 


132 
453 
2 420 
636 
420 
325 
935 
303 


2 774 
4 513 
24 304 
6 077 
8 016 
4 970 
7 930 
4 330 


299 
444 
1 783 
750 
573 
456 
678 
404 


564 
822 
5 366 
1 195 
1 801 
980 
1 558 
831 


39 
41 
369 
80 
86 
42 
60 
42 


226 
403 
1 877 
432 
487 
400 
612 
359 


571 

844 
5 647 
1 240 
1 838 
1 Oil 
1 679 
853 


109 

177 
1 791 
306 
236 
175 
466 
177 


PAMPLICO NOKTHEAST 


2 042 


1 02 


1 014 


515 


1 527 


... 


411 


282 


2 O42 


217 


373 


29 


175 


373 


78 


PAMPLICO NORTHWEST 


3 912 


1 95 


1 953 


1 967 


1 945 


... 


861 


351 


3 863 


377 


769 


47 


308 


774 


143 


PAMPLICO SOUTH DIV 
SARDIS DIV .... 
SCRANTON DIV . . 
TIMMONSVILLE DIV . 


4 203 
3 009 
3 778 
3 688 


2 11 
1 47 
1 87 
1 72 


2 093 
1 539 
1 9O2 
1 966 


2 557 
1 387 
1 926 
1 486 


1 645 
1 622 
1 852 
2 200 


1 
"*2 


920 
656 
798 
925 


316 
280 
307 
479 


4 074 
3 009 
3 778 
3 688 


462 
333 

397 
323 


asu 

571 
685 
70C 


54 
26 
33 

50 


320 
248 
305 
295 


853 
587 
696 
747 


173 

130 
158 

234 


GEORGETOWN COUNTY l 
ANDREWS DIV. . . 
GEORGETOWN DIV . 
GEORGETOWN RURAL DI 
PLANTERSVILLE DIV. 


5 482 
12 261 
4 424 
3 102 


2 66 
5 81 
2 22 
1 47 


2 816 
6 442 
2 195 
1 626 


3 208 
6 880 
2 284 
385 


2 272 
5 379 
2 139 
2 716 


2 
2 
1 
1 


1 299 
3 215 
870 
535 


478 
1 313 
328 
440 


5 467 
12 221 
4 398 
3 102 


463 
1 029 
353 
321 


1 045 
2 385 
82- 
432 


> 52 
13C 

34 
2C 


418 
939 
312 
294 


1 091 
2 572 
82 
444 


274 
763 

93 
116 


PLEASANT HILL-FOLLY 
GROVE DIV . . . . 
SAMPIT-SANTEE DIV. 
WACCAMAW DIV . 


3 339 

3 576 
2 614 


1 67 
1 73 

1 26 


1 663 

1 836 
1 345 


1 835 
1 022 
1 038 


1 502 
2 554 
1 57H 


1 
1- . * * 

l 2 


666 
71fi 
626 


251 
467 
321 


3 339 
3 576 
2 60K 


369 
326 
257 


58* 
58] 
4Bi 


> 27 
38 

1- 42 


284 
282 
222 


602 
60? 
501 


120 

129 
153 


GREENVILLE COUNTY l 














'87* 


> IOC 


) 3 472 


> 24? 


80 


L 3 


> 176 


8l 


> 132 


CONESTEE DIV ... 
FOUNTAIN INN DIV 
GREENVILLE DIV . 
GREENVILLE EAST DIV 
GREENVILLE NORTH DI 


3 483 
3 676 
66 188 
10 549 
18 414 


1 74 
1 75 
30 54 
5 24 
9 14 


1 742 
1 92^ 
35 63 e 
5 30C 
9 27: 


5 2 94" 

\ 2 68= 
? 46 47] 
) 9 34< 
5 16 42< 


53< 
> 98 
19 66< 
) 1 20 ( 
? 1 97' 


3 't 

= 5 
? .. 

7 t 


> 1 06 
L 19 56i 
2 86f 
3 5 171 


, 20- 
\. 5 32' 
5 24< 

; 49J 


' 3 65i 

r 63 24; 

3 10 54f 
5 17 63: 


\. 29? 
> 5 242 
? 60i 
5 1 54E 


> 83- 
5 14 562 
^ 2 67 
J 4 55* 


7 b'< 
> 94C 
L 8C 
3 22( 


> 28 
> 5 992 

) 515 
J 1 05- 


> 86C 
15 38 
> 2 71 
' 4 59E 


) 221 
> 4 407 
264 
3 946 


GREENVILLE SOUTHWES 


36 018 
10 590 
4 889 
7 310 
6 360 


18 13 
5 O6 
2 46 
.3 64 
3 12 


17 87 C 
5 52' 
2 42. 
3 66 
3 23 


? 31 88C 
4. 9 68< 
5 4 72' 
9 668 
5 5 16 


> 4 06< 
3 90 
7 16 
$ 61 
1 1 19 


? 6< 
3 

2 

7 
5 


? 9 62: 

1 3 18 
1 34 
3 2 00 
1 1 71 


5 93 
I 22' 
3 3 

3 12 
S 22 


3 34 64C 
7 10 57< 
^ 4 SO 
> 7 16 
5 6 33 


) 2 691 
= 73' 
4 51 
1 43 
5 48. 


4- 8 87. 
7 2 66 

L 1 21 
1 1 87 
3 1 50 


5 41' 
S 11' 
b 6. 
b 7J 

* 7 


7 1 844 
4 684 
5 37<: 
3 361 
b 39! 


3 8 83 C 
J 2 74< 

9 1 18( 

I 1 882 
1 1 58< 


> 1 272 
i 579 
3 201 
i 236 
3 257 


GREER DIV. .... 
.HIGHLAND DIV . . * 


PIEDMONT DIV . . 



42-50 



South Carolina 
Table 25.-CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 196(^Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 





POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


AREA 




BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


IDOWED 
AND 
01- 
ORCED 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


IDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
ORCED 


TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 


GREENVILLE COUNTY- 
CON. 
RIVERSIDE DIV. . . 
SIMPSONVILLE DIV 


14 394 
5 701 
3 119 
5 148 
3 086 
6 840 
4 Oil 

16 644 
5 643 
3 614 
4 026 
6 308 
1 777 
4 217 
2 117 

1 233 

4 819 
2 390 
4 167 
2 760 
2 056 

2 749 
3 688 
3 122 
8 563 
3 785 
4 701 
2 337 
4 324 
3 809 
3 139 
3 752 
3 061 
3 598 
17 619 

3 903 
3 177 
5 157 

2 320 
6 144 
2 227 
6 842 
4 235 
3 040 
5 959 
2 818 

4 388 
4 787 
7 999 
7 435 
10 056 
2 093 
2 594 

15 401 
2 774 
5 759 
3 135 
9 598 
3 366 
3 888 
3 688 

4 041 
3 586 

2 811 


7 077 
2 850 
1 577 
2 523 
1 585 
3 401 
2 010 

7 625 
2 744 
1 819 
1 965 
3 079 
898 
2 021 
1 001 

583 
2 329 
1 199 
2 003 
1 383 
969 

1 402 
1 801 
1 548 
4 055 
1 913 
2 309 
1 162 
2 151 
1 890 
1 527 
1 801 
1 559 
1 800 
9 098 

1 952 
1 526 
2 504 

1 154 
3 068 
1 235 
3 117 
2 020 
1 476 
2 897 
1 409 

2 094 
2 332 
3 718 
3 729 
4 976 
1 036 
1 286 

7 559 
1 350 
2 810 
1 560 
4 530 
1 696 
1 926 
1 802 

2 028 
1 667 

1 422 

1 733 

1 495 
1 140 

1 225 

3 816 
8 757 
855 


7 317 
2 851 
1 542 
2 625 
1 501 
3 439 
2 001 

9 019 
2 899 
1 795 
2 061 
3 229 
879 
2 196 
1 116 

650 
2 490 
1 191 
2 164 
1 377 
1 087 

1 347 
1 887 
1 574 
4 508 
1 872 
2 392 
1 175 
2 173 
1 919 
1 612 
1 951 
1 502 
1 798 
8 521 

1 951 
1 651 
2 653 

1 166 
3 076 
992 
3 725 
2 215 
1 564 
3 062 
1 409 

2 294 
2 455 
4 281 
3 706 
5 080 
1 057 
1 308 

7 842 
1 424 
2 949 
1 575 
5 068 
1 670 
1 962 
1 886 

2 013 
1 919 

1 389 

1 798 
1 569 

1 158 

1 276 

4 139 
8 813 
841 


13 651 
4 417 
2 920 
3 951 
2 802 
5 861 
3 200 

10 913 
4 892 
2 773 
3 023 
4 910 
952 
2 829 
919 

581 
1 766 
465 
2 911 
1 657 
658 

2 367 
3 180 
1 991 
5 620 
2 850 
2 779 
1 861 
2 742 
2 169 
1 792 
2 690 
2 424 
2 482 
15 058 

1 202 
1 124 
2 293 

1 532 
3 322 

768 
4 164 
2 003 
2 428 
4 719 
1 286 

2 312 
3 668 
4 BOS 
5 622 
9 130 
1 638 
1 557 

12 089 
1 050 
3 383 
2 428 
6 130 
2 280 
3 341 
2 834 

1 502 
1 888 

1 367 

802 
625 
247 

1 028 

5 601 
15 294 
1 376 


735 
1 283 
199 
1 196 
267 
979 
808 

5 722 
751 
841 
1 003 
1 398 
825 
1 387 
1 198 

652 
3 050 
1 924 
1 256 
1 102 
1 398 

381 
508 
1 130 
2 942 
935 
1 919 
476 
1 579 
1 635 
1 347 
1 062 
637 
1 116 
2 532 

2 700 
2 053 
2 863 

787 
2 820 
1 457 
2 678 
2 230 
612 
1 240 
1 531 

2 076 
1 119 
3 191 
1 812 
924 
455 
1 036 

3 308 
1 723 
2 375 
707 
3 465 
1 086 
546 
854 

2 539 
1 698 

1 444 

2 729 
2 439 
2 047 

1 470 
2 354 


8 
1 

1 
17 
... 

3 

9 

* . 
. . . 



... 
1 
. 

*3 

1 

"l 

1 

"l 

1 

3 

3 
5 

*29 

1 
1 

1 
2 
2 

1 

"*J 

] 

4 

] 


4 052 
1 514 
850 
1 432 
767 
1 841 
1 038 

5 007 
1 585 
998 
1 068 
1 797 
435 
1 221 
508 

332 

1 190 
520 
1 113 
695 
495 

639 

854 
642 
2 305 
844 
1 003 
540 
1 010 
958 
651 
949 
715 
850 
4 642 

868 
799 
1 290 

580 
1 379 
405 
2 009 
1 045 
762 
1 495 
669 

1 071 
1 281 
2 279 
1 807 
2 556 
540 
609 

3 495 

675 
1 451 
880 
2 808 
878 
1 120 
1 036 

857 
1 016 

579 

715 
613 
405 

524 

2 189 

4 548 
437 


187 
239 

41 
263 
53 
193 
139 

1 622 

173 
162 
206 
353 
163 
344 
230 

147 
682 
370 
280 
233 
291 

83 
91 
158 
716 
157 
330 
86 
288 
322 
206 
213 
118 
218 
517 

536 

489 
619 

163 
520 
223 

704 
519 
125 
242 
294 

400 
227 
802 
336 
176 
95 
186 

840 
348 
477 
154 
873 
216 
129 
165 

454 
422 

216 
492 


14 327 
5 619 
3 103 
5 148 
2 860 
6 767 
3 914 

15 980 
5 631 
3 594 
4 026 
6 280 
1 777 
4 191 
2 111 

1 233 
4 808 
2 390 
4 155 
2 732 
2 056 

2 749 
3 688 
3 122 
8 512 
3 732 
4 701 
2 337 
4 314 
3 791 
3 13.9 
3 744 
3 061 
3 598 
16 489 

3 903 
3 162 

5 142 

2 320 
6 111 
1 942 
6 740 
4 196 
3 040 
5 948 
2 810 

4 388 
4 787 
7 952 
7 347 
10 056 
2 093 
2 594 

12 459 
2 767 
5 759 
3 135 
9 570 
3 346 
3 880 
3 683 

4 030 
3 581 

2 773 

3 531 
3 034 
2 283 

2 50 
7 880 


1 036 
511 
251 
422 
422 
568 
393 

1 243 
371 
250 
318 
523 
148 
367 
219 

101 
416 
294 
358 
282 
188 

288 
366 
299 
613 
395 
479 
210 
406 
321 
342 
378 
345 
354 
1 681 

449 
271 
480 

203 
572 
340 
541 
368 
284 
393 
336 

404 
373 
618 
638 
783 
212 
240 

2 068 
290 
537 
266 
729 
357 
327 
32 

384 
278 

263 

34 
31 
26 

24 

65 
1 31 
18 


3 545 
1 341 
737 
1 269 
667 
1 659 
983 

3 752 

1 460 
897 
963 

1 515 
398 
1 005 
414 

244 
896 
425 
904 
566 
384 

559 
740 
577 
1 837 
784 
879 
466 
912 
807 
560 
767 
606 
745 
4 272 

725 
618 
988 

488 
1 187 
464 
1 439 
830 
642 
1 291 
543 

860 
1 096 
1 685 
1 665 
2 361 
474 
531 

2 855 


179 
63 
52 
65 
34 
83 
53 

227 
54 
53 

34 
95 
26 
70 

31 

17 
66 
19 
57 
39 
19 

39 
41 
26 
98 
29 
47 
22 
36 
50 
29 
56 
26 
31 
173 

42 
63 
87 

27 
66 
32 

96 


762 
406 
195 
374 
313 
475 
289 

1 451 
322 
212 
236 
441 
125 
324 
166 

104 
369 
214 
286 
179 
172 

215 
293 

207 
551 
280 
398 
158 
314 
284 
296 
280 
222 
290 
767 

372 
226 
419 

161 
417 
153 
591 
296 
252 
369 
253 

373 

341 


3 657 
1 352 
763 
1 309 
678 
1 661 
936 

3 975 
1 490 
914 
992 
1 566 
395 
1 054 
435 

253 
943 
421 
931 
568 
391 

564 
751 
592 
1 954 
791 
902 
480 
920 
820 
575 
802 
616 
752 
4 252 

735 
630 
1 046 

495 
1 181 
334 
1 546 
862 
655 
1 346 
552 

897 

1 125 
1 807 
1 669 
2 442 
479 
535 

3 062 
577 
1 267 
784 
2 228 
758 
972 
915 

760 
769 

495 


728 
257 
115 
175 
126 
269 
150 

1 259 
213 
137 
172 
319 
80 
248 
109 

79 
292 
112 
212 
146 
115 

99 
171 
105 
523 
149 
171 
90 
149 
177 
103 

189 
140 
119 
545 

164 
175 
286 

117 
237 

ac 

526 
209 

12S 
233 
13C 

214 

20? 

542 
272 
33? 
6 
9t 

75; 
13 
24! 
13 
66 
15 
18 

16: 

15 
28< 

12< 

14< 
13. 
5< 

8 

42 
56 

7 




TIGERVILLE DIV . . 
TRAVELERS REST DIV . 
WOODVILLE OIV. 

GREENWOOD COUNTY 1 
GREENWOOD DIV* . 
GREENWOOD EAST DIV . 
GREENWOOD NORTH DIV. 
GREENWOOD WEST DIV . 


NINETY-SIX DIV . 


HAMPTON COUNTY i 




FURMAN-SCOTIA DIV. 


VARNVILLE DIV. . - 
YEMASSEE DIV .... 

HORRY COUNTY I 
AYNOR NORTH DIV. 
AYNOR SOUTH DIV. 
CONWAY EAST DIV. 


CONWAY NORTH DIV 
CONWAY SOUTH DIV 
CONWAY WEST DIV. 
FLOYDS DIV 
LITTLE RIVER DIV . . 


LORIS EAST DIV ... 
LORIS SOUTH DIV. 
LORIS WEST DIV . 
MYRTLE BEACH DIV * 

JASPER COUNTY! 
GRAYS-TILLMAN DIV. . 
HARDEEVILLE DIV. . 
RIDGELAND DIV. . . . 

KERSHAW COUNT Yi 










53 
35 
56 
36 

49 
45 


MOUNT PISGAH DIV . . 
MOUNT ZION DIV , . 
THORN HILL DIV ... 

LANCASTER COUNTY i 
HEATH SPRINGS DIV* . 


LANCASTER DIV. . . 
LANCASTER EAST DIV . 
LANCASTER WEST DIV . 
TRADESVILLE DIV. * . 
VAN WYCK DIV * * * . 

LAURENS COUNTY I 


118 
78 
7 
32 
32 

17 
4 
10 
3 
13 
5 
6 
4 

4 
4 

3 

4 
3 

2 

10 
18 

2 


615 
507 
577 
145 
207 

1 67 
236 
483 
202 


CROSS HILL DIV ... 
GRAY COURT DIV ... 


55 

1 243 
756 
2 155 
765 
977 
909 

736 
703 

503 

57 
51 
357 

45 

1 80 
4 09 
39 


LAURENS RURAL DIV. . 
PRINCETON DIV. . . . 
WATTS MILLS DIV. 

LEE COUNTY I 
ASHWOOD-CENTRAL DIV. 
BISHOPVILLE DIV. . 
BISHOPVILLE NORTH 
DIV *..*.*. 


... 

... 
... 


712 
265 
260 

24 

323 
247 

20 

317 
298 
22 

19 

61 
1 01 
14 


BISHOPVILLE SOUTH 
DIV**>** 


3 531 
3 064 
2 298 

2 501 

7 955 
17 570 
1 696 


608 
540 
377 

473 

1 86 
4 18 
400 


LYNCHBURG DIV. . . . 
ST CHARLES DIV . . . 
STOKES BRIDGE- 
CYPRESS DIV . . . . 

LEXINGTON COUNTY* 
BATESBURG-LEESV I LLE 


430 
33 

240 

579 
47 
54 




2 273 
319 




17 342 
1 690 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 25. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 1960-Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



42-51 





POPULATION 


HOUSEHOLDS 


MALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 
AND OVER 


AREA 




BY SEX 


BY RACE 


NUMBER 


POPU- 
LATION 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


IDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
ORCED 


SINGLE 


MAR- 
RIED 


IDOWED 
AND 
DI- 
ORCED 




MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 


LEXINGTON COUNTY CON. 


4 337 
1 177 
7 884 
2 268 
4 046 
13 793 

5 050 
1 679 
1 900 

1 813 
2 186 
7 174 
5 458 
2 411 
6 229 
3 951 
2 792 

6 963 

2 344 

3 274 
2 732 
3 677 
6 482 
3 057 

1 221 

8 208 
4 312 
2 886 
2 684 
5 206 
4 899 

1 444 
934 
3 758 
1 842 
5 227 
6 991 
4 238 
3 431 
3 433 
2 691 
6 215 

3 960 
2 280 
2 177 
4 289 
3 520 
5 179 
2 337 
3 561 
2 479 
13 852 

7 922 
1 848 
4 287 
4 275 
2 515 
4 078 

4 654 
4 421 


2 182 
555 
3 901 
1 143 
2 009 
6 672 

2 475 
809 
921 

873 
1 055 
3 317 
2 679 
1 140 
2 864 
1 909 
1 413 

3 221 
1 161 

1 565 
1 357 
1 736 
3 167 
1 460 

609 
3 876 
2 155 
1 414 
1 401 
2 618 
2 365 

747 
492 
1 891 
936 
2 419 
4 743 
2 117 
1 593 
1 767 
1 321 
3 039 

1 962 
1 073 
1 107 
2 076 
1 704 
2 521 
1 192 
1 732 
1 249 
6 468 

3 796 
939 
2 061 
2 103 
1 250 
1 957 

2 273 
2 203 
3 928 
2 442 
2 322 
680 
2 401 
1 590 
2 679 
2 132 

1 284 
1 00 
45 796 
22 05 
7 610 
3 444 


2 155 
622 
3 983 
1 125 
2 037 
7 121 

2 575 
870 
979 

940 
1 131 
3 857 
2 779 
1 271 
3 365 
2 042 
1 379 

3 742 

1 183 

1 709 
1 375 
1 941 
3 315 
1 597 

612 
4 332 
2 157 
1 472 
1 283 
2 588 
2 534 

697 
442 
1 867 
906 
2 808 
2 248 
2 121 
1 838 
1 666 
1 370 
3 176 

1 998 
1 207 
1 070 
2 213 
1 816 
2 658 
1 145 
1 829 
1 230 
7 384 

4 126 
909 
2 226 
2 172 
1 265 
2 121 

2 38 
2 218 
4 355 


3 817 
760 
6 628 
1 855 
2 572 
12 357 

2 138 
553 

620 

678 
515 
3 834 
2 491 
807 
3 316 
1 751 
1 023 

3 991 
967 

1 301 
1 205 
1 456 
4 119 
1 569 

529 
5 902 
3 079 

1 175 
1 426 
3 331 
3 540 

1 442 
934 
3 296 
1 823 
3 930 
6 413 
3 507 
3 135 
3 360 
2 532 
5 531 

1 038 
970 
739 
1 429 
522 
1 577 
1 550 
1 652 
1 198 
8 352 

1 229 
763 
1 66 
2 663 
1 349 
675 


520 
417 
1 256 
413 
1 473 
1 435 

2 912 
1 126 
1 280 

1 135 
1 670 
3 336 
2 965 
1 604 
2 908 
2 195 
1 769 

2 971 
1 377 

1 973 
1 527 
2 172 
2 304 
1 488 

690 
2 306 
1 229 
1 710 
1 258 
1 875 
1 359 

... 
... 
461 
19 
1 295 
575 
731 
295 
73 
158 
684 

2 922 
1 310 
1 438 
2 859 
2 998 
3 602 
786 
1 909 
1 281 
5 493 

6 693 

1 085 
2 625 
1 612 
1 166 
3 402 

474 
768 
1 369 
449 
31 
12 
496 
72 
590 
59 

1 37 
1 160 
29 48 
15 36 
3 61 
1 78 


... 

... 
. * 
... 
1 
1 

. * 
. 

. 
1 
4 

2 

... 
5 
5 

... 

1 
. . 
... 

*49 
59 

2 

"*4 
1 

... 

2 
1 

i 
J 

... 
... 
... 


1 119 
321 
2 041 
587 
1 004 
3 932 

1 221 
345 
423 

351 
443 
2 015 
1 118 
523 
1 747 
833 
582 

2 040 
496 

791 
596 
821 
1 535 

626 

312 
2 584 
1 201 
717 
650 
1 360 
1 341 

387 
260 
936 
486 
1 619 
1 313 
1 133 
1 021 
844 
733 
1 713 

848 
631 
493 
1 002 
673 
1 136 
583 
906 
568 
3 746 

1 821 
420 
1 005 
1 116 
642 
842 

1 269 
1 324 
2 430 


98 
101 
273 
84 
272 
335 

561 
241 
223 

198 
307 
890 
537 
333 
744 
388 
323 

779 
249 

457 
298 
410 
442 
255 

149 
679 
274 
375 
247 
351 
313 

1 
*76 

373 
129 
152 
75 
22 
38 
163 

540 
317 
272 
555 
511 
696 
160 
409 
248 
1 214 

1 470 
214 
556 
353 
240 
639 

116 
207 
337 


4 3O5 

1 177 
7 621 
2 259 
4 037 
13 793 

5 037 
1 417 
1 900 

1 813 
2 186 
7 168 
5 412 
2 411 
6 221 
3 942 
2 792 

6 937 

2 299 

3 256 
2 732 
3 650 
6 470 
3 049 

1 205 
7 769 
4 276 
2 886 
2 682 
5 188 
4 891 

1 444 
934 
3 758 
1 826 
5 218 
4 547 
4 212 
3 426 
3 433 
2 637 
6 211 

3 935 
2 280 
2 177 
4 289 
3 520 
5 173 
2 296 
3 56 
2 469 
12 506 

7 854 
1 84 
4 190 
4 27 
2 50 
4 07 

4 58 
4 40 
8 23 
4 93 
4 61 
1 27 
4 90 
3 08 
5 45 
4 24 

2 57 
1 97 
85 95 
40 70 
14 31 
6 03 


391 
77 
707 
224 
406 
876 

459 
221 
192 

196 
225 
516 
547 
272 
428 
383 
306 

555 
263 

324 
316 
371 
631 
249 

129 
888 
384 
322 
313 
529 
450 

167 
97 
439 
192 
346 
2 737 
416 
242 
375 
263 
586 

409 
206 
236 
421 
331 
446 
252 
343 
262 
1 563 

743 
172 
385 
402 
31 
406 

439 
40 
56 
37 
38 
15 
39 
27 
44 
41 

28 
20 
10 58 
3 34 
1 02 
66 


1 028 
268 
1 817 
479 
847 
3 398 

1 004 
242 
362 

308 
372 
1 482 
992 
385 
1 263 
713 
492 

1 491 
416 

579 
471 
626 
1 194 
551 

247 
1 889 
1 025 
566 

604 
1 185 
1 121 

325 

228 
821 
430 
1 254 
1 246 
970 
758 
763 
610 
1 392 

714 
455 
404 
739 
503 
914 
499 
673 


55 
22 

154 
-44 
46 
141 

62 
32 
32 

14 
26 
91 
56 
28 
91 
34 
28 

119 
35 

38 
37 
44 
89 
39 

26 
149 
62 
61 
32 
66 
57 

18 
10 
44 
28 
74 
47 
51 
45 
36 
47 
79 

29 
19 
24 
52 
44 
55 
31 
35 
27 
171 

88 
15 
71 
52 

42 
43 

40 
52 
105 
58 
53 
23 
59 
43 
63 
47 

3 
2 
1 61 
45 
26 
7 


267 

95 
572 
153 
271 
778 

382 
224 

182 

200 
202 
537 
460 
236 
505 
332 
219 

541 
205 

259 
239 
358 
520 

251 

87 
753 
290 
234 
195 
425 
342 

113 
52 

287 
125 
367 
249 
304 
282 
265 
197 
473 

305 
164 
173 
382 
303 
379 
170 
283 
223 
1 571 

690 

128 
354 
307 
220 
368 

376 


1 034 
273 
1 833 
483 
858 
3 508 

1 041 
243 
362 

327 
393 

1 583 
1 008 
408 
1 348 
752 
512 

1 571 

409 

628 

486 
664 
1 277 
546 

248 
1 978 
1 042 
577 
601 
1 204 
1 175 

336 

240 
834 
432 
1 298 
1 216 
1 017 
629 
768 
612 
1 459 

725 

478 
410 
780 
527 
994 
495 
708 
500 
2 927 

1 562 
368 
867 
969 

486 
711 

1 132 
1 105 
Z 100 
1 218 
1 206 
294 
1 195 
763 
1 346 
1 050 

495 
399 
21 307 
10 58 
3 33 
1 54 


140 
67 
408 
116 
200 
608 

225 
93 
68 

59 
89 
525 

207 
119 
489 
141 
116 

524 
121 

214 
128 
201 
352 
117 

63 

651 
223 
175 
116 
218 
290 

50 
38 
134 
71 
344 
123 
165 
232 
90 
134 
307 

181 
165 
98 
249 
165 
222 
105 
226 
94 
911 

393 
73 
256 
155 
132 
186 

169 
162 
475 
197 
ISO 
53 
238 
11C 
250 
162 

83 
91 
7 076 
1 490 
555 
292 




LEXINGTON OIV. . 




WEST COLUMBIA DIV. 

MC CORMICK COUNTY! 
MC CORMICK DIV . 
MOUNT CARMEL DIV 
PARKSVILLE DIV . 

MARION COUNTY I 
BRITTONS NECK DIV. . 
CENTENARY DlV- . 


MARION EAST DIV. 
MARION WEST DIV* 


MULLINS NORTH DIV. . 
MULLINS SOUTH DIV. . 

MARLBORO COUNTY* 
BENNETTSVILLE DIV. . 
BENNETTSVILLE NORTH 


BENNETTSVILLE SOUTH 


BLENHEIM DIV .... 






NEWBERRY COUNTY* 
CHAPPELLS DIV. . 
NEWBERRY DIV .... 
NEWBERRY NORTH DIV . 
NEWBERRY SOUTH DIV . 


PROSPERITY DIV ... 
WHITMIRE DIV .... 

OCONEE COUNTY! 
LONG CREEK DIV * 
MOUNTAIN REST DIV. 






SENECA NORTH DIV . 
SENECA SOUTH DIV . 
WALHALLA DIV . . . . 
WALHALLA NORTH DIV . 
WALHALLA SOUTH DIV . 
WESTMINSTER DIV. . 

ORANGEBURG COUNTY* 


BRANCHVILLE DIV. 




EUTAWVILLE DIV . 
HOLLY HILL DIV . 




... 
. * 

15 
6 


490 
2 774 

1 442 
359 
848 
945 
475 
659 

1 102 
1 095 
1 994 
1 195 
1 17 
28 
1 18 
76 
1 32 
1 03 

48 
41 
20 75 
10 09 
3 60 
1 52 


ORANGEBURG DIV ... 

ORANGEBURG EAST DIV. 
ORANGEBURG NORTH DIV 
ORANGEBURG SOUTH DIV 
ORANGEBURG WEST DIV. 
SPRINGFIELD DIV. 


PICKENS COUNTY! 


4 176 
3 64 
6 909 
4 48 
4 307 
1 263 
4 40 
3 08 
4 87 
4 25 

1 19 
85 
67 78 
29 12 
11 27 
5 15 




273 




8 283 
4 932 

4 619 
1 275 
4 902 
3 153 
5 474 
4 317 

2 575 
2 013 
97 ,433 
44 548 
14 924 
6 940 


543 
32 
280 
76 
355 
197 
360 
328 

23b 
158 
10 238 
2 614 
789 
580 


EASLEY EAST DIV. . 
EASLEY WEST DIV. 


2 490 
2 297 
595 


1 317 
1 296 
332 
1 373 
85 
1 564 
1 098 

56 
45 
26 40 
10 41 
3 72 
1 59 


87 
6 

13 
1 
15 
10 

23 
21 
7 22 
2 66 

70 

24 




2 50 
1 563 
2 795 
2 185 

. 1 29 
1 012 
51 63 
22 49 
7 31 
3 49 


PICKENS EAST DIV 
PICKENS WEST DIV . 
SIX MILE DIV . . . - 

RICHLAND COUNTY! 
BLYTHEWOOD DIV . 
CAMP GROUND DIV. 
COLUMBIA DIV . . . . 
COLUMBIA NORTH DIV 
COLUMBIA SOUTH DIV 
DUTCH FORK DIV . 



42-52 



South Carolina 
Table ^.-CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 196Q-Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



BAfESBURG DIV. . 
RIDGE SPRING DIV 
RIVER DIV. . 
SALUDA NORTH DIV 
SALUDA SOUTH DIV 



SPARTANBURG COUNTY I 
AIRHORT DIV. . 
ARCADIA-SAXON DIV. . 
BOILING SPRINGS DIV, 

CHESNEE DIV 

COWPENS DIV 

ENOREE DIV 

FAIRMONT MILLS DIV . 
FINGERVILLE DIV. . . 
GRAMLING DIV . . 
INMAN DIV 



LANDRUM DIV. . . 
MAYO DIV 

PACOLET DIV. . . . . 
PAULINE DIV. . 
REIDVILLE DIV. . < 
SOUTHERN DIV ' 
SPARTANBURG DIV, 
WELLFORD DIV ... 
WHITNEY-DRAYTON DIV 
WOODBURN HILLS DIV 
WOODRUFF DIV ... 
WOODS CHAPEL DIV 



SUMTER COUNTYl 
HORATIO DIV. . 
MAYESVILLE DIV 
PINEWOOD DIV . 
PRIVATEER DIV. 
REMBERT DIV. - 
SHILOH DIV . . 

SUMTER DIV 

SUMTER NORTHEAST DIV 
SUMTER NORTHWEST DIV 
SUMTER SOUTHEAST DIV 
SUMTER WEST DIV, * 



UNION COUNTYl 

CARLISLE DIV . . 
CROSS KEYS DIV . . 
JONESVILLE DIV . 
LOCKHART DIV . t 

UNION DIV 

UNION NORTHWEST DIV. 
UNION SOUTHEAST DIV. 
WEST SPRINGS DIV . . 



WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY* 
CADES DIV* . . . - 
GftEELEYVILLE DIV . 
HEMINGWAY DIV. . . < 
INDIAN DIV .... . 
KINGSTREE DIV. . . , 
KINGSTREE NORTHEAST 

DIV 

KINGSTREE NORTHWEST 

DIV ....... 

KINGSTREE SOUTHEAST 



POPULATION 





HOUSEHOLDS 

' T 

NUMBER 


IBY SEX 


BY RACE 


~" r 

MALE 


FEMALE 


WHITE 


NEGRO 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


NON- 
WHITE 


2 183 
20 531 


2 292 
2 057 
1 070 

18 022 


2 438 
2 168 
1 113 
2 509 


937 

413 
1 099 
17 087 


3 793 
3 811 
1 084 
3 371 


"l 

73 


932 
787 

474 
934 


670 
671 
184 
212 


2 694 
3 523 
2 026 
4 269 

2 042 


1 322 
1 728 
1 019 
2 076 
1 066 


1 372 
1 795 
1 007 
2 193 
976 


2 108 
1 904 
1 330 
2 823 
1 057 


586 

1 618 
696 
1 445 
985 


1 
... 

1 


710 
838 
533 

1 204 
461 


111 
314 
151 
339 
173 


6 875 

Q iLA^ 


3 424 

U 641 


3 451 
4 842 


5 405 
8 267 


1 469 
1 214 


1 

2 


1 679 
2 605 


297 
271 

ir\e. 



POPU- 
LATION 



5 047 

4 099 

6 525 

3 408 
2 073 
2 391 
2 931 

7 415 

5 265 

2 270 

4 627 

3 816 

2 410 
7 968 

44 352 
9 455 

6 128 

3 941 

7 787 

8 564 



6 028 
2 214 

2 265 

3 032 
2 683 

2 588 
23 062 

3 994 
10 882 
12 281 

5 912 



2 031 
1 378 

3 152 
3 469 

10 191 

3 792 

4 717 
1 285 



3 590 

4 357 

5 548 

2 616 

3 847 

2 884 

3 751 



2 503 

2 046 

3 166 
1 670 
1 025 
1 166 

1 505 
3 633 

2 575 

1 110 

2 260 
1 923 

1 188 

3 889 
20 730 

4 685 

2 977 
1 909 

3 814 

4 iBO 



3 026 

1 025 
1 122 
1 493 
1 289 
1 271 
10 911 

1 981 
6 367 
5 905 

2 945 



990 
700 
538 
723 



1 889 

2 256 
635 



1 797 

2 132 
2 739 
1 264 
1 761 

1 439 
1 821 



2 544 

2 053 

3 359 
1 738 
1 048 
1 225 

1 426 

3 782 

2 690 

1 160 

2 367 
1 893 

1 222 

4 079 
23 622 

4 770 

3 151 

2 032 

3 973 

4 384 



3 002 
1 189 
1 143 
1 539 
1 394 

1 317 
12 151 

2 013 

4 515 
6 376 
2 967 



1 041 
678 
1 614 
1 746 
5 438 

1 903 

2 461 
650 



1 793 

2 225 
2 809 

1 352 

2 086 

1 445 
1 930 



3 939 
3 509 
5 540 

2 797 
1 539 

1 831 

2 476 



5 661 

4 573 

2 096 

3 666 

2 851 
1 866 

6 640 
30 245 

7 649 

5 560 

3 254 

6 324 
6 457 



4 310 

330 

618 

1 793 

410 

690 

15 003 

1 657 

6 622 

4 475 

3 938 



520 

687 

2 034 

2 507 
7 321 

3 100 

4 032 
922 



1 466 

1 056 

2 895 
533 

2 269 

487 



1 108 
590 
984 
611 
534 
560 
454 

1 753 

692 

174 
960 
965 
543 

1 328 
14 095 

1 806 
568 
687 

1 458 

2 107 



1 677 
1 884 
1 647 

1 239 

2 273 

1 898 
8 041 

2 337 
4 230 
7 802 
1 969 



1 511 
691 

1 118 
962 

2 870 
691 
685 
363 



2 124 

3 266 
2 651 
2 083 

1 578 

2 396 



1 293 2 458 



1 266 
1 087 
1 823 
919 
524 
554 
738 
1 962 

I 398 
584 

1 255 
964 
641 

2 228 
13 012 

2 732 
1 713 

1 112 

2 191 
2 327 



1 442 
454 
503 
620 
534 
492 

6 584 
845 

2 098 
2 814 
1 413 



485 
321 
818 
850 

2 917 
980 

1 235 
321 



686 

959 

1 204 

465 

1 149 

549 



206 
115 
243 
118 
94 
97 
64 
357 

135 
28 
200 
181 
108 
289 
! 652 
413 
115 
159 
320 
480 



349 
361 
330 
212 
400 
328 

2 072 
408 
812 

1 702 
364 



336 

119 
238 
162 
741 
122 
153 
61 



344 
656 
471 
332 

442 

423 
468 



AND OVER 



SINGLE 



4 691 
4 182 
2 176 
4 086 



2 694 

3 517 
2 026 

4 255 

2 020 



6 509 
9 237 

5 039 

4 099 

6 501 

3 408 
2 073 
2 382 
2 848 

7 378 

5 249 

2 270 

4 579 

3 768 

2 410 
7 896 

43 127 
9 447 

6 118 

3 941 

7 745 

8 519 



6 028 
2 214 

2 265 

3 032 
2 673 

2 588 
22 572 

3 879 
8 849 

12 281 
5 909 



MAR- 
RIED 



500 

419 

198 

13 396 



263 
336 
207 
401 
233 



572 
860 
443 
372 
610 
314 
198 
239 
304 
636 

451 
183 
388 
473 
183 
529 
3 606 
762 
416 
288 
670 
767 



310 
255 
211 
261 
267 
288 

1 616 
382 

2 230 
1 047 

316 



EARS OLD 


FEMALES 14 YEARS OLD 


VER 




AND OVER 






WIDOWED 






WIDOWED 


_ 


AND 


SINGLE 


MAR- 


AND 


D 


DI- 




RIED 


DI- 




VORCED 






VORCED 


766 


65 


442 


804 


211 


627 


66 


387 


655 


160 


393 


17 


166 


415 


99 


232 


335 


473 


982 


126 


613 


32 


212 


636 


109 



2 024 

1 378 

3 152 
3 460 
.0 178 

3 700 

4 717 
1 285 



3 546 

4 335 

5 548 

2 616 

3 825 

2 '884 

3 751 



217 
150 
293 
301 
790 
345 
386 
101 



370 
440 
491 
284 
267 

322 
353 



717 
461 
946 
399 



1 531 

2 288 
1 144 

933 

1 539 

789 

463 

501 

713 

1 712 

1 211 
523 

1 098 
833 
581 

2 010 
9 774 
2 404 
1 514 

944 
1 839 
1 976 



1 322 

352 
363 
569 
421 
425 
5 087 
752 

2 144 
2 338 
1 311 



382 
261 
697 
782 

2 292 
912 

1 084 
300 



625 

742 

1 042 

394 

841 

480 
647 



73 
120 
52 
63 
81 
46 
30 
28 
45 
73 

74 
25 
75 
63 
24 
89 
693 
111 
63 
62 
96 
112 



49 
20 
30 
33 

27 

16 
304 

45 
174 
130 

32 



34 
21 
43 
39 
129 
63 
63 
19 



30 

53 
49 

ia 

34 



291 
150 
353 

157 



465 
636 
394 
305 
546 
259 
147 
215 
240 
552 

377 
176 
312 
365 
173 
486 
3 722 
639 
372 
277 
543 
633 



297 
235 
187 
203 
234 
224 
1 629 
312 
534 
869 
292 



181 
106 
271 
253 
760 
236 
306 
97 



310 
359 
420 
289 

284 

248 
309 



717 
467 
975 
395 



1 574 

2 384 
1 158 

952 

1 612 

815 

462 

512 

687 

1 755 

1 244 
539 

1 148 
819 
586 

2 042 
10 358 

2 455 

1 561 

965 

1 889 

2 037 



1 339 
378 
386 
572 
448 
438 

5 364 
738 

1 927 

2 480 
1 347 



382 
263 
711 
805 

2 415 
926 

1 135 
299 



625 
778 
1 099 
407 
897 

498 



170 
87 

249 
64 



242 

467 

164 

173 

319 

154 

85 

92 

96 

319 

230 

92 

250 

160 

92 

317 

3 062 

406 

287 

187 

424 

416 



117 
112 
132 
110 
131 
104 
1 429 
160 
273 
624 
134 



112 
76 
157 
152 
741 
165 
227 
53 



121 
209 
217 
91 
306 

90 
155 
90 





2 262 


1 120 


1 142 


626 


1 636 


... 


451 


276 


2 255 


<L<L( 


385 


14 


ley 
9 on 


571 


151 


LANE EAST DIV. . . 
LANE WEST DIV. ... 
NESMITH DIV 
TURKEY DIV 

WILLIAMSBURG DIV 
YORK COUNTY: 

CATAWBA-LESLIE DIV . 


3 375 
1 852 
2 415 
1 914 
2 521 

4 001 
3 500 


1 638 
943 
1 185 
910 
1 269 

2 029 
1 658 


1 737 
909 
1 230 
1 004 
1 252 

1 972 
1 842 


508 
248 
817 
390 
1 128 

2 665 
2 900 


2 863 
1 603 
'1 598 
1 524 
1 391 

1 105 
596 


4 
1 

"*2 

231 
4 


670 
396 
456 
349 
505 

946 
975 


531 
331 
254 
254 
239 

240 
154 


3 375 

1 852 
2 415 
1 914 
2 521 

4 001 
3 500 


229 
236 
185 
277 

362 
306 


508 
326 
406 
288 
450 

857 
772 


20 
13 
13 
25 

47 
45 


159 
183 
189 
198 

274 
319 


335 

406 
303 
451 

874 
601 


83 
79 
67 

91 

128 
205 
87 


CLOVER EAST DIV, 
CLOVER WEST DIV. 
FORT MILL DIV. , . 
HICKORY GROVE DIV. . 
MC CONNELLS DIV, 
ROCK HILL DIV* , . * 
ROCK HILL NORTH. DIV. 
ROCK HILL SOUTH DIV.. 
ROCK HILL WEST DIV . 
YORK DIV ' 


' 3 112 
2 121 
8 080 
3 170 
1 353 
29 404 
5 660 
6 437 
2 213 
9 709 


1 530 
1 057 
3 940 
1 564 
674 
13 475 
2 825 
3 195 
1 133 
4 736 


1 582 
1 064 
4 140 
1 606 
679 
15 929 
2 835 
3 242 
1 080 
4 973 


1 816 
1 662 
6 663 
2 117 
727 
22 205 
5 202 
2 187 
1 498 
6 553 


1 294 
459 
1 417 
1 052 
616 
7 143 
392 
4 247 
715 
3 145 


2 

1 
10 
56 
66 

3 

11 


686 
512 
2 114 
801 
318 
7 784 
1 441 
1 388 
510 
2 419 


224 
84 
321 
210 
126 
1 681 
97 
826 
128 
661 


3 112 
2 121 
8 050 
3 170 
1 353 
27 929 
5 653 
6 429 
2 213 
9 494 


291 
211 
660 
278 
135 
2 062 
449 
617 
207 
878 


633 

479 
1 822 
672 
280 
6 308 
1 346 
1 152 
465 
2 016 


43 
23 
108 
35 
18 
367 
46 
106 
28 
156 


278 
163 
546 
247 
103 
3 239 
338 
506 
147 
772 


468 
1 897 
673 
279 
6 564 
1 387 
1 213 
479 
2 044 


75 
360 
162 
54 
1 587 
178 
242 
69 
507 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 26. AGE BY SEX, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 1960 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



42-53 



AREA 


MALE 


FEMALE 








UNDER 
5 

YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 
44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 

64 
YEARS 


65 
AND 
OVER 


UNDER 
5 
YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 

44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 
64 
YEARS 


65 
AND 
OVER 


ABBEVILLE COUNTY I 


































ABBEVILLE OIV. . 


496 


1 015 


634 


509 


611 


484 


299 


365 


509 


1 107 


625 


595 


657 


521 


430 


500 


ANTREVILLE- 


































LOWNDESVILLE DlV. . 


151 


280 


160 


148 


131 


109 


95 


135 


138 


287 


164' 


166 


139 


138 


110 


116 


CALHOUN FALLS DIV. 


200 


416 


264 


203 


206 


166 


114 


111 


234 


475 


290 


218 


240 


192 


158 


151 


DONALDS DIV 


144 


332 


201 


159 


159 


169 


80 


85 


145 


310 


212 


178 


185 


159 


97 


111 


DUE WEST DIV * . 


148 


306 


410 


171 


161 


159 


105 


123 


130 


324 


380 


173 


155 


182 


132 


170 


AIKEN COUNTY: 




































743 


1 234 


617 


743 


805 


557 


306 


319 


723 


1 250 


749 


788 


865 


620 


431 


493 


AIKEN NORTH DIV. 


632 


1 146 


656 


692 


688 


567 


263 


209 


621 


1 123 


740 


750 


727 


563 


268 


290 


AIKEN SOUTH DIV. 


675 


1 090 


440 


746 


686 


310 


139 


85 


664 


1 054 


469 


838 


574 


295 


120 


131 


BEECH ISLAND DIV 


229 


435 


165 


195 


175 


150 


105 


75 


197 


391 


222 


213 


183 


149 


103 


108 


EDISTO-SHAWS DIV . 


151 


273 


221 


129 


137 


101 


75 


65 


153 


294 


185 


134 


134 


110 


71 


54 


JACKSON DIV. .... 


246 


432 


168 


260 


212 


135 


79 


78 


237 


404 


212 


277 


193 


143 


83 


89 




514 


1 134 


731 


609 


669 


523 


325 


259 


522 


1 122 


812 


633 


734 


532 


378 


349 


MCNETTA DIV 


192 


320 


222 


141 


148 


152 


99 


111 


158 


327 


226 


141 


138 


149 


135 


111 


NEW ELLENTON DIV . 


330 


602 


252 


376 


279 


185 


105 


79 


358 


589 


303 


402 


260 


171 


130 


92 


NORTH AUGUSTA DIV. . 


1 297 


2 265 


1 031 


1 462 


1 341 


919 


461 


323 


1 220 


2 013 


1 195 


1 603 


1 375 


914 


531 


502 




160 


310 


191 


115 


137 


105 


81 


106 


137 


312 


152 


115 


136 


133 


108 


110 


WAGENER DIV 


205 


414 


250 


129 


170 


172 


105 


116 


168 


367 


276 


154 


200 


176 


136 


156 


WINDSOR DIV 


107 


247 


119 


90 


100 


80 


70 


52 


91 


228 


134 


102 


95 


77 


69 


70 


ALLEN DALE COUNTY* 


































ALLENDALE DIV. . 


295 


633 


343 


236 


295 


246 


137 


173 


269 


636 


393 


274 


341 


284 


208 


25O 


FAIRFAX DIV 


217 


464 


256 


151 


189 


137 


102 


101 


234 


412 


243 


176 


214 


180 


130 


163 


MARTIN-MILLETT DIV . 


52 


123 


72 


24 


33 


44 


18 


28 


46 


121 


61 


29 


43 


37 


28 


32 


SYCAMORE DIV . . 


153 


292 


169 


104 


121 


104 


51 


74 


142 


291 


165 


132 


127 


114 


71 


79 


ANDERSON COUNTY 1 
ANDERSON DIV . . 


2 354 


4 147 


2 860 


2 758 


2 697 


2 299 


1 358 


1 051 


2 380 


4 057 


3 281 


3 003 


3 037 


2 559 


1 791 


1 684 


ANDERSON NORTH DIV . 


193 


450 


338 


271 


'319 


211 


154 


132 


208 


441 


260 


268 


257 


198 


151 


150 


. ANDERSON SOUTH DIV . 


240 


430 


269 


246 


260 


250 


140 


128 


253 


429 


307 


268 


271 


230 


158 


123 




282 


526 


341 


334 


346 


283 


167 


133 


267 


538 


391 


395 


382 


311 


211 


237 


BELTON EAST DIV. 


48 


134 


72 


44 


60 


57 


43 


49 


50 


88 


72 


55 


58 


65 


50 


46 


BEL TON WEST DIV. 


185 


374 


268 


194 


221 


196 


134 


136 


169 


373 


284 


209 


242 


195 


127 


139 


BRUSHY CREEK DIV 


255 


566 


372 


288 


336 


276 


184 


193 


265 


546 


349 


291 


374 


280 


188 


215 




108 


219 


163 


87 


83 


85 


55 


51 


92 


171 


155 


95 


83 


79 


63 


59 


HONEA PATH DIV . 


372 


690 


468 


395 


471 


370 


274 


201 


327 


607 


482 


477 


469 


419 


283 


304 




271 


498 


351 


266 


271 


245 


163 


153 


241 


455 


377 


246 


298 


260 


154 


200 




200 


441 


332 


272 


287 


240 


154 


96 


201 


447 


343 


298 


326 


271 


187 


150 


PENDLETON EAST DIV . 
PENDLETON WEST DIV . 


223 
191 
177 
222 


497 
373 

423 
441 


381 
281 
247 
248 


228 
256 
176 
265 


274 
199 
199 
236 


277 
182 
159 
208 


166 
111 
110 
103 


151 
137 
116 
94 


206 
224 
213 
194 


447 
377 
380 
404 


357 
293 
253 

271 


244 
252 
201 
280 


273 
237 
215 
258 


249 
195 
164 
207 


184 
122 

107 
138 


170 
154 
137 
152 


WILLIAMSTON DIV. . . 


WILLIAMSTON RURAL 


138 


302 


221 


150 


175 


161 


111 


91 


157 


299 


212 


161 


205 


152 


114 


91 


BAMBERG COUNTY I 


371 


768 


471 


277 


351 


323 


231 


242 


364 


745 


438 


322 


387 


341 


290 


298 




350 


750 


672 


280 


280 


228 


168 


176 


366 


730 


505 


296 


320 


283 


166 


246 


EHRHARDT DIV 


129 


247 


132 


93 


118 


100 


65 


85 


110 


235 


143 


104 


110 


107 


75 


128 




156 


305 


178 


92 


122 


111 


77 


8i 


151 


287 


186 


107 


128 


104 


77 


96 


BARN WELL COUNTY* 
BARNWELL DIV 


457 


880 


499 


436 


411 


323 


202 


191 


469 


811 


529 


496 


435 


340 


234 


249 


BLACKVILLE DIV . . 
KLINE-SNELLING DIV . 
WILLISTON DIV. . . . 


241 
119 
322 


523 
257 

655 


307 

146 
. 342 


153 
66 
270 


171 
115 
304 


152 
97 
212 


117 
81 
139 


114 
90 
138 


219 

127 
343 


508 

244 
639 


319 
156 
358 


201 
84 
351 


198 
112 
291 


192 
98 
202 


141 
90 
172 


197 
110 
214 


BEAUFORT COUNTY* 
BEAUFORT DIV . . 
BLUFFTON DIV . , 
PORT ROYAL DIV 
ST HELENA DIV. . . 
SHELDON DIV. . . 


1 516 
207 
820 
469 
286 


1 830 
377 
873 
877 
516 


1 834. 
219 
7 308 
423 
202 


. 1 538 
145 
922 
267 
83 


905 
128 
493 
331 
155 


504 
160 
231 
227 
137 


266 

115 
117 
144 
88 


256 
156 
87 
172 
126 


1 485 
215 
754 
475 
230 


1 766 
373 
839 
888 
521 


1 308 
228 
939 
417 
232 


1 366 
15 
689 
323 

130 


930 
168 
462 
320 
175 


496 
167 
237 
265 
155 


331 
150 
130 
195 
127 


355 

176 
124 
255 
130 


BERKELEY COUNTY* 
BONNEAU DIV. 
CORDESVILLE DIV. 


295 
218 
329 
161 
445 
1 036 
480 


602 
415 
596 
300 
880 
1 459 
1 061 


353 

221 
303 
143 
508 
762 
531 


208 
136 
184 
82 
386 
1 022 
248 


222 
184 
174 
72 
427 
785 
364 


221 
132 
149 
60 
303 
402 
306 


111 
96 
110 
48 
190 
190 
206 


109 
12 
8 

4 
16 
14 
16 


309 
22 
28 

147 
45 
1 00 
43 


617 
423 
579 
320 
858 
1 440 
993 


313 
244 
319 
159 
496 
931 
556 


249 
15 
20 
87 
43 
96 
33 


245 
150 
180 
74 
459 
719 
352 


20 
15 
17 
7 
30 
35 
33 


126 
107 

11 
59 
192 
192 
190 


127 
101 
118 
53 
191 
162 
204 


HUGER-WANDO DIV. 
MONCKS CORNER DIV. 
MOUNT HOLLY DIV. 
ST STEPHENS DIV. 


CALHOUN COUNTY: 
CAMERON DIV* . .. 


235 


. 459 


270 


132 


164 


130 


101 


10 


21 


448 


250 


14 


179 


13 


123 


137 


FORT MOTTE-LONE STA 


119 


268 


127 


53 


8 


66 


57 


6 


10 


23 


132 


6 


96 


9 


63 


87 


ST MATTHEWS DIV. . 


324 


666 


395 


218 


247 


25 


180 


16 


35 


639 


387 


26 


310 


29 


204 


261 


SANDY RUN-CENTER 


14 : 


285 


175 


104 


10 


11 


86 


7 


14 


24 


178 


10 


119 


12 


86 


87 


CHARLESTON COUNTY I 
CHARLESTON DIV . 
CHICORA DIV. . . 
EDISTO ISLAND DIV 
GOOSE CREEK DIV. 
JAMES ISLAND DIV 
JOHNS ISLAND DIV 
MC CLELLANVILLE DIV 
MOUNT PLEASANT DlV 
NOISETTE CREEK DIV 
NORTH CHARLESTON DI 
ROSEMONT DIV ... 


3 567 
777 
127 
95 
1 085 
47 
310 
1 09 
1 04 
1 78 
72 


6 29 
1 140 
249 
1 484 
1 81 
949 
674 
1 877 
97 
2 56 
1 17 


B 179 
2 027 
122 
1 75 
89 
465 
39 
86 
77 
1 64 
66 


4 130 
866 
49 
1 221 
902 
350 
165 
897 
863 
1 746 
577 


3 66 
70 
6 
1 00 
96 
33 
23 
92 
51 
1 60 
59 


3 21 

50 
6 
33 

60 
24 
18 
60 

31 
94 
45 


2 22 

253 
42 
154 
349 
132 
123 
299 
21 
49 
26 


1 74 
15 
6 
11 
24 
16 
11 
23 
10 
24 
12 


3 58 
75 
11 
90 
97 
45 
30 
1 00 
94 
1 73 
70 


6 17 

1 16 
24 
1 40 
1 76 
87 
61 
1 77 
95 
2 44 
1 10 


5 103 
1 124 
114 
844 
1 002 
469 
367 
950 
1 062 
2 045 
783 


3 74 
71 
7 
99 
98 
35 
22 
1 04 
90 
1 79 
63 


4 290 
65 
7 
760 
1 00 
368 
267 
934 
513 
1 563 
649 


3 95 
47 
6 
30 
61 
25 
21 
59 
36 
98 
46 


2 838 
253 

4 
149 
352 
168 
12 
365 
186 
434 
249 


3 220 
169 
75 
129 
321 
183 
164 
365 
142 
304 
159 



42-54 



South Carolina 



Table 26, 



-AGE BY SEX, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 196O-Con. 



[ 


r =^= - ~" 1 
MALE 


FEMALE 




AREA 


UNDER 
5 
YEARS 


5 TO 
14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
YEARS 


25 TO 
34 
YEARS 


35 TO 
44 
YEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 

64 
YEARS 


65 

AND 
OVER 


UNDER 
5 
YEARS 


5 TO 

14 
YEARS 


15 TO 
24 
rEARS 


as TO : 

34 
rEARS 


55 TO 

44 
fEARS 


45 TO 
54 
YEARS 


55 TO 

64 
YEARS 


65 
AND 
OVER 


CHARLESTON COUNTY 
CON. 
ST ANDREWS DIV . 
ST PAULS DIV .... 
WADMALAW ISLAND DIV. 
WAYLYN DIV 


1 830 
707 
191 
627 


3 262 
1 299 
370 
959 


1 341 
688 
177 
488 


1 801 
368 
90 
597 


1 982 
427 
112 
596 


1 235 
387 
74 
292 


633 

214 
66 
121 


445 
213 
52 
68 


1 865 
725 
183 
535 


3 060 
1 374 
335 
960 


1 688 
667 
211 
526 


2 080 
471 
98 
655 


2 069 
472 

124 
569 


1 239 
393 
93 
265 


730 
281 
67 

121 


627 
274 
83 
88 


CHEROKEE COUNTY i 
BLACKSBURS DIV ... 


342 
608 
518 
288 
151 
97 


724 
1 085 
989 
589 
382 
297 


485 
673 
681 
340 
297 
176 


373 

601 
488 
265 
188 
95 


375 
654 
496 
256 
213 
112 


321 
498 
429 
241 
181 
126 


224 
356 
282 
175 
128 
80 


249 
301 
233 
155 
108 
95 


351 
566 
470 
233 

163 
115 


764 
1 065 
982 
519 
399 
255 


474 
988 
640 
351 
270 
157 


391 
684 
570 
285 
195 
132 


411 
737 
522 
291 
229 
130 


363 
636 

453 
229 
180 
109 


263 

468 
323 
160 
128 
83 


263 
515 
289 
163 
132 
89 


GAFFNEY NORTH DIV. . 
GAFFNEY SOUTH DIV. 
MORGAN DIV . 
SOUTHSIDE DIV ... 


CHESTER COUNTY I 
CHESTER DIV. . 
CHESTER EAST DIV . . 
CHESTER NORTH DIV. 
CHESTER SOUTH DIV. . 
CHESTER WEST DIV 
GREAT FALLS DIV. 
LANDSFORD DIV. . 
RICHBURG DIV . . 


377 
151 
169 
227 
268 
366 
154 
141 


725 
338 
330 
433 
592 
683 
288 
261 


438 
239 
246 
232 
353 
397 
158 
175 


378 
140 
145 
161 
265 
337 
121 
105 


414 
176 
150 
189 
288 
381 
124 
118 


333 

158 
134 
146 
260 
330 
117 
100 


242 
92 
85 
119 
165 
192 
75 
72 


258 
77 
112 
148 
155 
135 
89 
76 


373 
141 
201 
202 
256 
342 
134 
117 


738 
297 
334 
430 
520 
722 
272 
263 


481 
249 
227 
253 
343 
439 
183 
162 


409 
160 
147 
182 
292 
369 
120 
126 


486 
221 
164 
220 
303 
397 
134 
115 


457 
178 
148 
171 
301 
356 
118 
105 


319 
82 
95 
140 
161 
226 
78 
83 


478 
94 
113 
179 
171 
192 
132 
84 . 


CHESTERFIELD COUNT Yl 
CHERAW DIV 
CHERAW NORTH DIV 
CHERAW SOUTH DIV . . 


307 
178 
163 


561 
402 
404 


357 
201 
272 


279 
150 
145 


349 
192 
159 


286 
91 
142 


173 
54 
69 


150 
70 
90 


245 
215 
189 


592 

424 
414 


352 

194 
214 


342 
200 
180 


348 
153 
166 


317 
102 
124 


247 
65 
108 


266 
80 
104 


CHESTERFIELD EAST 


172 


399 


239 


179 


182 


153 


109 


108 


170 


364 


252 


195 


209 


174 


157 


145 


CHESTERFIELD WEST 


185 
171 
137 
137 
318 
197 


448 
389 
268 
283 
706 
507 


289 

254 
154 
205 
422 
339 


161 
144 
88 
118 
278 
185 


178 
169 
117 
150 
323 
173 


161 
172 
102 
132 
269 
172 


128 
92 
53 

94 
173 
109 


96 
110 
61 
91 
180 
90 


207 
184 
129 
131 
324 
193 


420 
350 
285 
278 
629 
473 


247 
262 
154 
204 
429 
308 


167 
160 
94 
125 
296 
175 


202 
171 
127 
158 
331 
194 


163 

167 
101 
140 
281 

146 


117 
113 
75 
99 
202 
107 


107 
121 
79 
100 
219 
83 


JEFFERSON DIV. . . 
MC BEE DIV 
MOUNt CROGHAN DIV. . 
PAGELAND DIV .... 
PATRICK DIV. .... 


CLARENDON COUNTY 1 
ALCOLU DIV 


234 
243 
150 
318 
138 
186 
316 
337 
209 


455 
457 
357 
743 
339 
390 
578 
656 
354 


250 
281 
179 
426 
186 
222 
279 
322 
276 


133 

214 
75 
163 
66 
120 
152 
147 
159 


147 
209 
106 
201 
101 
136 
190 
152 
134 


112 
216 

94 
180 
101 
91 
146 
160 
114 


84 
109 
66 
138 
65 
78 
83 
93 
75 


75 
109 
56 
122 
70 
87 
111 
143 
75 


236 
253 

155 
306 

146 
184 
295 
311 
176 


473 
491 
334 
701 
341 
366 
640 
665 
398 


241 
309 
174 
420 
172 
203 
302 
330 
234 


130 
248 
108 
218 
97 
113 
219 
181 
156 


168 
254 
122 
233 
113 
137 
190 
183 
140 


128 
212 
93 
208 
100 
102 
184 
203 
124 


82 
164 
55 
134 
75 
101 
123 
120 
86 


84 
148 
64 
125 
104 
86 
155 
148 
77 


MANNING EAST DIV 
MANNING WEST DIV 
PAXVILLE DIV ..* 
SARDINIA DIV . , 
SUMMERTON EAST DIV . 
SUMMERTON WEST DIV . 
TURBEVILLE DIV . 


COLLETON COUNTY! 
BROXTON DIV 
COTTAGEVILLE DIV . . 
GREEN POND DIV . . 
HENDERSONVILLE DIV . 


129 
195 
137 
248 
113 
304 
278 
278 


269 
380 
313 
532 
253 
634 
626 
553 


167 
232 
125 
342 
141 
314 
368 
365 


94 
135 
66 
181 
113 
313 
267 
210 


125 
152 
91 
215 
109 
310 
310 
211 


124 
154 
103 
185 
109 
295 
280 
206 


86 
123 
68 
156 
75 
195 
187 
132 


93 
88 
77 
157 
76 
153 
166 
108 


100 
183 
145 
250 
120 
295 
265 
290 


249 
418 
299 
517 
249 
633 
616 
545 


164 
240 
121 
304 
167 
365 
377 
320 


112 
146 
90 
190 
104 
365 
312 
220 


Ul 
175 
99 
206 
101 
375 
340 
248 


108 
166 
121 
182 
101 
374 
256 
196 


98 
126 
82 
176 
80 
216 
194 
135 


106 
114 
105 
181 
104 
256 
175 
114 


W ALTERS ORO DIV . . . 
W ALTERS ORO NORTH DIV 
WALTERS ORO SOUTH DIV 


DARLINGTON COUNTY 1 
DARLINGTON DIV . 
DARLINGTON NORTH OIV 
DARLINGTON SOUTH DIV 
HARTSVILLE DIV . 
HARTSVILLE NORTH DIV 


365 

244 
422 
348 
416 


749 
518 
846 
681 
952 


404 
322 
545 
338 

481 


361 
225 
341 
355 
404 


390 
235 
367 
370 

431 


344 
187 
252 
341 
314 


203 
108 
168 
205 

164 


224 
91 
142 
187 
139 


346 

249 
457 
364 
415 


792 
483 
830 
690 
876 


488 
339 
508 
669 
525 


434 
261 
373 
442 
467 


496 
250 
362 

413 
405 


420 
200 
265 
430 
311 


331 
113 
185 
261 
199 


363 

124 
166 

298 

184 


HARTSVILLE SOUTHEAST 


252 


527 


310 


228 


231 


155 


109 


72 


272 


464 


334 


232 


258 


182 


121 


116 


HARTSVILLE SOUTHWEST 


497 
249 
271 
331 


1 112 
483 
533 

618 


538 
324 
309 
315 


454 
139 
183 
181 


479 
188 
207 
195 


369 
179 
181 
139 


201 
98 
117 
77 


157 
89 
101 
103 


490 
238 
264 
295 


993 
521 

525 
579 


548 
282 
330 
322 


512 
197 
202 
210 


529 
193 
233 

1B3 


371 
180 
215 
151 


236 

84 
127 
109 


187 
110 
147 
122 


LAKE SWAMP DIV . 


SOCIETY HILL DIV - . 


DILLON COUNTY! 
DILLON DIV .... 
DILLON EAST DIV. . 
DILLON WEST DIV. 
LAKEVIEW DIV ... 
LATTA EAST DIV . 
LATTA WEST DIV . 
LITTLE ROCK DIV. . 


378 
337 
273 

419 
33C 

231 
. . 245 


726 
684 
492 
895 
67C 

so: 

44E 


401 
361 

25-7 
46 
) 342 
5 24E 
> 26' 


341 
223 
146 
262 
211 
122 
12C 


347 
223 

149 
314 
24 
152 
155 


335 
178 
146 
254 

17] 
14] 
12] 


188 
110 
91 
141 
145 
8C 
88 


157 
89 
73 

142 

in 

7S 
71 


41C 
36S 
245 
401 
31C 
202 
241 


682 
662 
> 48 
794 
> 606 
425 
432 


47C 
366 
27"? 
476 

324 
254 
261 


395 

266 
191 
306 
252 
139 
152 


414 
27J 

is* 

34S 
272 
16* 
16< 


399 
179 

141 
279 

231 
> 134 
> 134 


251 

12' 
9< 
14* 
141 

1. 7: 
t 10J 


279 

^ 125 

> 78 
* 162 
216 
, 67 
L 98 


DORCHESTER COUNTY I 
HARLEYVILLE DIV. . 
KEEVESVILLE DIV. 

RIDGEVILLE DIV . 
ST GEORGE: DIV* 
SUMMERVILLE DIV. * 


291 
. IOC 
182 
24< 
69< 


I 57< 

> 30: 

> 35 
? 56 
S> 1 32 


i 35( 
5 221 
L 23 

3 34 
? 77 


) 2i: 
3 9< 
1 12i 
1 19< 
7 67 


J 23- 

> 15* 
1 15' 
3 27 
D 69 


r 22. 

1 12 
7 12 
3 22 

3 52 


5 122 
I It. 

i a: 

Z 14! 
1 29 


12C 
> 7 

5 7: 

> 12 
L 28 


J 26 

L 14( 
5 14< 
4 23 
9 69 


J 58 
5 27< 
? 39C 
1 52C 
2 1 29' 


J 32< 

) 20; 
) 21< 
) 30 
7 84( 


> 25C 
> 12' 
3 15C 

? 23; 

b 68( 


) 26 

\ 16 

> i7 

i 29( 
J 72 


L 20* 

L 10: 

J 9t 
3 24( 

> 51< 


L 13 
5 8 
3 9 

3 18 
9 30 


L 126 
5 106 

D 80 
& 185 
2 429 


EDGEFIELD COUNTY I 
EDGEFIELD DIV. 
EDGEFIELD NORTH DIV 
EDGEFIELD SOUTH DIV 
JOHNSTON DIV ... 
. MERIWETHER DIV . . 


17 
12 
12 
36 
. 6 


31 

D 20 
4 21 
1 70 
9 17 


1 18 
2 14 
9 15 
1 39 
8 


2 16 
6 6 
3 7 
3 27 
3 6 


3 17 

9 8 
7 B 
4 29 
6 


4 14 
7 8 
3 7 
2 23 

4 5 


5 9 
3 5 
7 6 
9 12 

1 4 


L 10 
7 6 
6 
H 14 
2 5 


B 15 
11 
4 8 
3 37 
1 7 


6 34 
1 20 
9 21 
2 71 
6 17 


2 20 
1 15 
11 
D 38 
B 8 


7 16 
& 8 
& 10 
B 32 
7 


L 20 
3 9 
4 B 
3 32 
3 5 


4 16 
3 6 
2 7 
3 23 
7 6 


7 11 
7 6 
1 7 
7 16 
1 2 


4 174 
4 73 
3 66 
3 209 
7 54 
c 62 


PLEASANT LANE DIV. 


. 9 


6 19 


1 12 


7 5 


5 5 


8 5 


4 3 


5 5 


5 8 


8 18 


1 11 


6 5 


& 6 


6 5 


7 3 


5 o* 
c 76 






B 24 


9 14 


9 8 


3 8 


6 6 


6 


1 6 


5 10 


9 23 


4 12 


6 8 


11 


6 


2 6 


5 70 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 26. AGE BY SEX, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 196O-Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



42-55 



AREA 



MALE 



UNDER 

5 
YEARS 



5 TO 

14 
YEARS 



15 TO 

24 
YEARS 



25 TO 

34 
YEARS 



35 TO 

44 
YEARS 



45 TO 

54 
YEARS 



55 TO 

64 
YEARS 



65 

AND 

OVER 



FEMALE 



UNDER 

5 
YEARS 



5 TO 

14 
YEARS 



15 TO 

24 
YEARS 



25 TO 

34 
YEARS 



35 TO 

44 
YEARS 



45 TO 

54 
YEARS 



55 TO 

64 
YEARS 



65 

AND 
OVER 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY I 

MONTICELLO-SALEM DIV 
RIDGE WAY DIV . . * . 
WINNSBORO NORTH DIV. 
WINNSBORO SOUTH DIV. 



FLORENCE COUNTY I 
COWARDS DIV. . 
EFFINGHAM DIV. 
FLORENCE DIV 
FLORENCE EAST DIV 
FLORENCE WEST DIV 
JOHNSONVILLE DIV 
LAKE CITY DIV. . 
OLANTA DIV . . . 
PAMPLICO NORTHEAST 

DIV 

PAMPLICO NORTHWEST 
DIV 



PAMPLICO SOUTH DIV 
SARDIS DIV .... 
SCRANTON DIV . . . 
TIMMONSVILLE DIV 



GEORGETOWN COUNTY! 
ANDREWS DIV. . 
GEORGETOWN DIV . 
GEORGETOWN RURAL DIV 
PLANTERSVILLE DIV. 
PLEASANT HILL-FOLLY 

GROVE DIV .... 
SAMPIT-SANTEE DIV. 
WACCAMAW DIV . . . 



GREENVILLE COUNTY I 
CONESTEE DIV ... 
FOUNTAIN INN DIV t 
GREENVILLE DIV . 
GREENVILLE EAST DIV 
GREENVILLE NORTH DIV 
GREENVILLE SOUTHWEST 

DIV * . 

GREER DIV. . . . 
HIGHLAND DIV ... 

PARIS DIV 

PIEDMONT DIV . . . 



RIVERSIDE DIV. . . 
SIMPSONVILLE DIV 
SLATER DIV .... 
TAYLOR DIV . . . . 
TIGERVILLE DIV . 
TRAVELERS REST DIV 
WOODVILLE DIV. . . 



GREENWOOD COUNTY I 

GREENWOOD DIV. . . > 
GREENWOOD EAST DIV , 
GREENWOOD NORTH DIV, 
GREENWOOD WEST DIV , 
HODGES DIV .... , 
KIRKSEY DIV. . . . 
NINETY-SIX DIV . , 
TROY DIV . . . . . 



HAMPTON COUNTY: 

BRUNSON DIV. . . . 

ESTILL DIV . . . . 
FURMAN-SCOTIA DIV. 

HAMPTON DIV. . . . 

VARNVILLE DIV. . 

YEMASSEE DIV . . 



HORRY COUNTY I 

AYNOR NORTH DIV. 
AYNOR SOUTH DIV. 
CONWAY EAST DIV. 
CONWAY DIV . . . 
CONWAY NORTH DIV 
CONWAY SOUTH DIV 
CONWAY WEST DIV. 
FLOYDS DIV . . . 
LITTLE RIVER DIV 
LONGS DIV. . . . 



LORIS EAST DIV , 
LORIS SOUTH DIV. 
LORIS WEST DIV . 
MYRTLE BEACH DIV 



JASPER COUNTY t 

GRAYS-TILLMAN DIV. 
HARDEEVILLE DIV. . 
RIDGELAND DIV. . . 



211 
206 
222 
729 



176 
318 
1 452 
408 
575 
312 
514 
300 

110 
258 

241 
178 
231 

231 



384 
821 
373 
220 

240 
284 
178 



245 

229 

3 737 

761 

1 045 

2 616 
566 
234 
474 
385 

884 
351 
198 
270 
161 
379 
190 



823 
318 
223 
227 
351 
109 
190 
124 



85 
327 
171 
233 
172 
126 



158 

217 

226 

53 

215 

283 

181 

270 

258 

206 

201 

181 

248 

1 436 



245 
179 
321 



340 

502 

401 

1 435 



380 

670 
2 724 

933 
1 153 

734 
1 016 

633 

323 
558 

515 
398 
577 
458 



784 

1 607 

690 

530 

516 

554 
341 



440 

355 

6 566 

1 218 

1 872 

3 795 

1 080 

486 

844 

727 

1 554 
635 
376 
535 
329 
773 
431 



1 707 
583 
426 
477 
659 
238 
431 
236 



143 
692 
325 
506 
358 
271 



393 

484 
459 
1 049 
528 
682 
310 
586 
488 
435 

449 
439 

.464 
1 664 



551 
420 
690 



252 

256 
279 

743 



251 
363 

1 496 
646 
517 
423 
596 
358 

195 
303 

390 
293 
311 
258 



405 
823 
301 
262 

288 
267 
212 



252 

288 

4 686 

531 

1 572 

2 858 

716 
417 
469 
468 

976 
502 

240 
403 
360 
512 
343 



057 
367 
222 

270 
435 
122 
298 
167 



87 
328 
221 
295 
206 
130 



249 
317 
257 
565 
315 
408 

17; 

343 
268 
279 

291 

288 

307 

1 955 



364 
220 
369 



122 
138 
191 
623 



160 
212 
1 400 
339 
606 
246 
413 
222 

101 
204 

273 
130 
205 
159 



270 
621 
274 
110 

145 
153 
113 



261 
205 

4 082 
866 

1 274 

3 178 
714 
307 
548 
418 

1 030 
352 

195 
316 
185 
436 
239 



962 

432 
240 
270 
375 
88 
221 
106 



54 
191 

86 
262 
176 

91 



14; 
201 
15' 
549 
240 
236 
154 
225 
209 

14; 

204 
160 

19; 

1 644 



141 
160 
235 



125 
190 
149 
678 



151 
237 
1 687 
370 
585 
270 
443 
227 

112 
213 

218 
154 
196 
205 



299 
766 
285 
128 

158 
183 
132 



235 

222 

4 187 

888 

1 308 

2 608 
732 
349 
560 
383 

973 
374 
190 
331 
153 
452 
279 



056 
411 
258 
276 
421 
106 
288 
104 



7; 

240 

10; 

266 
172 
10. 



140 
188 
168 
554 
225 
243 
138 
273 
225 
152 

221 
175 
21 
1 135 



IB 
I4i 
298 



127 
162 
150 
541 



137 
202 
1 265 
272 
323 
206 
389 
174 

98 
187 

229 
151 
164 
177 



254 
615 
145 
111 

157 

122 
136 



148 
172 
3 356 
491 
997 

1 594 
624 
295 
378 
360 

789 
278 
165 
327 
166 
420 
229 



903 
330 
193 
224 
381 

80 
263 

97 



45 
257 
130 
206 
143 

96 



145 
185 
120 
421 
'S6 
205 
98 
235 
213 
148 

189 
14, 
184 
600 



193 
16' 
261 



88 
100 

113 
382 



85 
121 
803 
159 
180 
144 
205 
143 

43 
109 

132 

91 

106 

122 



136 

307 

79 

53 

88 
88 
75 



93 

122 

2 081 

268 

581 

892 
357 
188 
216 
196 

512 

181 
103 
195 
116 
216 
153 



609 
176 
12' 
109 
254 

77 
163 

80 



51 

14; 

83 

128 

85 

70 



90 
112 

78 
198 
104 
13' 

60 
125 
12 

79 

134 

99 

110 

375 



13! 
116 
161 



117 

139 
145 
302 



76 

115 
671 
136 
158 
122 
158 
100 

46 
127 

112 
75 
86 

112 



134 

259 

82 

62 

84 
87 
82 



66 

159 

1 854 

226 

492 

598 
277 
190 
152 
187 

359 
177 
110 
146 
115 
213 
146 



508 
127 
130 
112 
203 

78 
167 

87 



46 
152 

81 
107 

71 

81 



85 

97 

83 

187 

100 

113 

49 

94 

108 

86 

11 

75 

8 
28' 



142 
118 
165 



211 
233 

173 
758 



155 
275 
1 368 
419 
554 
344 
522 
286 

131 
252 

239 
197 
241 
251 



356 
728 
347 
275 

220 
284 
194 



237 

203 

3 786 

698 

1 003 

2 491 
554 
221 
482 
380 

828 
291 
173 
277 
137 
353 
215 



824 
335 
194 
242 
320 

10; 

189 
151 



80 
325 

169 
244 
171 

161 



135 
20' 
256 
523 
20, 
306 
172 
264 
238 
21 

214 
153 
210 
1 38 



235 

234 
31 



317 

440 

392 

1 429 



355 

655 
2 755 

786 
1 023 

638 
1 019 

582 

292 

525 

565 
420 
542 
479 



741 
574 
671 
544 

483 
588 
306 



407 

387 

6 569 

1 201 

1 807 

3 688 

1 049 

491 

756 

676 

1 450 
599 
331 
534 
279 
762 
449 



627 

596 
366 
458 
641 
186 
430 
278 



146 
628 
313 
54' 
345 
276 



378 

509 

451 

1 02' 

495 

68; 
30; 

574 
443 
466 

506 

410 

480 

1 686 



494 
422 
654 



234 
248 
259 
819 



245 
361 
1 902 
482 
613 
431 
627 
366 

162 
295 

348 
246 
310 
271 



469 
912 
370 
254 

292 
273 
213 



265 

270 

5 951 

591 

1 378 

2 794 
782 
421 
557 
521 

1 019 
426 
265 
428 
328 
543 
287 



43; 

413 
216 
274 
429 
125 
324 
150 



10' 
355 
185 
310 
200 
148 



235 
318 
246 
618 
304 
425 
185 
350 
283 
275 

280 

24; 

291 
1 565 



38< 
24' 
396 



124 
166 
166 
706 



143 
246 
1 706 
394 
678 
277 
485 
257 

118 
232 

213 

133 
226 
222 



311 
785 
291 
133 

150 
197 
142 



262 

251 

4 535 

969 

1 323 

2 910 
765 
291 
556 
407 

1 070 
423 
187 
341 
170 
438 
220 



14; 

464 
284 
277 
41 

99 
254 
110 



54 
251 

95 
284 
159 
104 



135 

228 

16' 

665 

244 

248 

168 

26 

25; 

165 

236 

17; 

216 
1 466 



149 
155 
293 



132 

176 
184 
698 



183 
251 
1 897 
397 
577 
306 
558 
231 

117 
215 

240 
188 
205 
221 



337 
894 
257 
175 

189 
180 
154 



219 

247 

4 932 

860 

1 353 

2 454 
816 
339 
534 
456 

1 050 
368 
213 
367 
177 
488 
276 



1 248 
411 
268 
310 
475 
114 
323 
112 



75 
286 
130 
300 
15' 
113 



166 
206 
174 
623 
222 
262 
134 
270 
24; 
175 

244 

186 

223 

1 040 



215 
186 
317 



121 
129 
170 
622 



117 
211 
1 456 
288 
300 
234 
459 
209 

94 
175 

217 
162 
148 
213 



265 
680 

115 
96 

137 
127 

135 



164 
194 

3 940 
461 

1 030 

1 675 
679 

254 
381 
347 

861 
296 
171 
323 
158 
375 
220 



1 071 
344 
195 
22; 

436 

95 

264 

114 



55 
250 
11' 
19' 

141 
104 



14' 
172 
111 
456 
170 
212 
92 
234 
193 
138 

208 
146 
174 
613 



168 
265 



94 
114 
117 

407 



98 
145 
1 029 
186 
156 
136 
278 
139 

44 
140 

137 
90 
123 
136 



164 

401 

75 

64 

92 
86 
84 



99 

170 

2 916 

276 

704 

994 
442 
188 
238 
232 

560 

224 
108 
179 
117 
234 
177 



818 
173 
152 
127 
277 

78 
206 

94 



6; 

193 
86 
141 
101 
75 



88 
124 

95 
300 
110 
124 

66 
11 
143 

95 

144 
107 
118 
423 



133 

118 
196 



115 
170 
157 
472 



73 
131 

1 111 
160 
156 
147 
256 
122 

56 
119 

134 
103 
107 
173 



173 

468 

69 

85 

100 
103 
117 



90 

202 

3 010 

244 

675 

873 
437 
218 
165 
217 

479 
224 
94 
176 
135 
246 
157 



857 
163 
120 
151 
232 
80 
206 
107 



71 
202 

94 

. 141 

103 

106 



61 
123 

74 
296 
125 
133 

56 
102 
125 

86 

117 
86 
86 

339 



162 
119 
213 



42-56 



South Carolina 
Table 26. AGE BY SEX, FOR CENSUS COUNTY DIVISIONS: 196Q-Con. 

[Characteristics not shown where fewer than five persons in the area] 



UNDER 

5 
YEARS 



5 TO 

14 
YEARS 



15 TO 

24 
YEARS 



25 TO 

34 
YEARS 



35 TO 

44 
YEARS 



45 TO 

54 
YEARS 



55 TO 

64 
YEARS 



65 

AND 

OVER 



FEMALE 



UNDER 

5 
YEARS 



5 TO 

14 
YEARS 



15 TO 

24 
YEARS 



25 TO 

34 
YEARS 



35 TO 

44 
YEARS 



45 TO 

54 
YEARS 



55 TO 

64 
YEARS 



65 

AND 
OVER 



KERSHAW COUNTY 
BETHUNE DIV, . . 
BLANEY DIV * . 
BOYKIN DIV . . 
CAMDEN DIV . . 
DEKALB DIV ... 
MOUNT P1SGAH DIV 
MOUNT ZION DIV . 
THORN HILL DIV , 



LANCASTER COUNTY! 
HEATH SPRINGS QIV- 
KERSHAW DIV. . . t 
LANCASTER DIV. , . 
LANCASTER EAST DIV 
LANCASTER WEST DIV 
TRADESVILLE DIV, . 
VAN WYCK DIV . 



LAURENS COUNTY: 
CLINTON DIV. . . 
CROSS HILL DIV . 
GRAY COURT DIV . 
JOANNA DIV . . . 
LAURENS DIV. . 
LAURENS RURAL DIV 
PRINCETON DIV. 
WATTS MILLS DIV 



LEE COUNTY l 

ASHWOOD-CENTRAL DIV 
BISHOPVILLE DIV. . 
BISHOPVILLE NORTH 
DIV ....... 

BISHOPVILLE SOUTH 



LYNCHBURG DIV. 

ST CHARLES DIV 

STOKES BRIDGE- 

CYPRESS DIV . 



LEXINGTON COUNTY! 

BATESBURG-LEESV ILLE 

DIV 

CAYCE DIV 

CHAPIN DIV .... 
GILBERT DIV. . . . 
IRMO DIV ..... 
LEXINGTON DIV. . 
PEL I ON DIV .... 
SWANSEA DIV. . . . 
WEST COLUMBIA DIV. 



MC CORMICK COUNTY! 
MC CORMICK DIV . 
MOUNT CARMEL DIV 
PARKSVILLE DIV . 



MARION COUNTY! 

BRITTONS NECK DIV. 
CENTENARY DIV. * . 
MARION DIV . . . . 
MARION EAST DIV. 
MARION WEST DIV. . 
MULLINS DIV. . . . 
MULLINS NORTH DIV. 
MULLINS SOUTH DIV. 



MARLBORO COUNTY t 

BENNETTS V ILLE DIV. , 
BENNETTSVILLE NORTH 

DIV , 

BENNETTSVILLE SOUTH 

DIV , 

BLENHEIM DIV - . . < 

CLIO DIV , 

MC COLL DIV. . . . , 
WALLACE DIV. . . . 



NEWBERRY COUNTY I 
CHAPPELLS DIV. . 
NEWBERRY DIV * . . 
NEWBERRY NORTH DIV 
NEWBERRY SOUTH DIV 
POMARIA DIV. . . . 
PROSPERITY DIV . 
WHITMIRE DIV ... 



OCONEE COUNTY! 

LONG CREEK DIV . 
MOUNTAIN REST DIV. 
OAKWAY DIV . . . , 
SALEM DIV. .... 
SENECA DIV . . , . 
SENECA NORTH DIV 
SENECA SOUTH DIV 



155 
466 
143 
390 
267 
178 
406 
171 



273 
309 

474 
452 
649 
111 
189 



723 
153 
331 

178 
559 
162 
162 
166 



301 
235 



285 
240 
190 



468 
1 262 

74 
246 

67 
457 
136 
242 
903 



344 
90 
117 



123 
143 
441 
368 
164 
349 
253 
199 



160 

241 
192 
244 
428 
224 



6; 

324 

234 

158 

159 

27 

275 



75 
49 
187 
105 
273 
319 
242 



311 
852 
288 
732 
551 
371 
811 
372 



548 
542 
905 
960 
1 215 
228 
328 



1 916 
334 
663 
354 

1 029 
406 
435 
397 



614 
435 



524 
439 
357 



867 

2 025 

201 

516 

130 

649 

289 

523 

1 449 



644 
246 
242 



260 
323 

857 
778 

321 
797 
577 
441 



735 
319 

424 
374 
494 
903 
430 



163 
697 
485 
355 
320 
630 
50 1 



183 
113 
448 
202 
500 
435 
484 



160 
467 
247 
435 
269 
239 
363 
235 



328 
361 
507 
593 
849 
189 
196 



1 571 
217 
447 
221 
653 
284 
272 
303 



351 

215 



285 
261 
221 



573 

1 321 

123 

334 
55 
549 
171 
312 
943 



393 
172 

168 



159 
166 
420 
466 
201 
354 
323 
235 



212 

265 
257 
280 
529 
223 



99 
740 
301 
244 
254 
403 
400 



11 
78 

35; 

164 

363 

2 84' 

362 



119 
363 
171 
306 
239 
142 
400 
146 



210 
297 
463 
474 
706 
107 
147 



926 

129 
279 
200 
622 
176 
216 
182 



190 
188 

133 

164 

103 

81 



432 

1 374 

86 

258 

70 

482 

123 

217 

1 043 



259 
44 
73 



72 

90 

392 

255 

89 

282 

191 

137 



109 

166 
129 
147 
290 
155 



38 
37! 
251 
11 
133 
275 
23' 



80 
59 

21! 

104 

35; 

477 
286 



123 
361 
174 
408 
278 
180 
378 
120 



241 
255 
527 
487 
674 
106 
133 



864 
143 
325 
226 
610 
207 
272 
265 



172 
209 



158 
126 
110 

139 



502 

I 302 

96 

243 

86 

531 

128 

243 

1 012 



279 

58 

102 



89 

94 
426 
268 
11 
368 
196 
13; 



143 

163 
120 
186 
324 
166 



72 
489 
31, 
155 
160 
276 
336 



94 
44 

205 

104 

32 

245 

26 



119 
246 
107 
343 
198 
154 
270 
149 



206 
263 
416 
359 
488 
112 
123 



753 
125 
299 
209 
485 
182 
227 
215 



180 
177 



137 
129 
72 



411 
771 
101 
220 
46 
428 
127 
221 
708 



205 
60 
73 



75 
116 
329 
261 
108 
350 
155 
138 



108 

137 
116 
187 
320 

132 



66 
529 
275 
162 
147 
264 
305 



78 
57 
206 
103 
276 
197 
231 



78 

139 
57 

241 

113 
92 

132 
97 



127 

155 

236 

206 

203 

88 

89 



458 
116 
216 
102 
292 
152 
163 
151 



113 
94 



272 

387 

82 

171 

40 
254 

84 
130 
350 



139 
55 
69 



42 

61 
237 
144 

62 
188 
119 

75 



81 
89 
91 
196 
73 



44 

382 

163 

88 

95 

198 

145 



51 
51 

125 
85 

17, 

118 

132 



89 
174 

48 
262 
105 
120 
137 
119 



161 

150 

190 

198 

192 

95 

81 



348 
133 
250 
70 
280 
127 
174 
123 



107 
114 



110 

117 
61 

57 



291 
315 

92 
194 

61 
351 

85 
121 
264 



212 

84 
77 



53 

62 

215 

139 

83 

176 

95 

56 



88 
60 

10' 

177 
5' 



65 
343 
134 
138 
133 
295 
160 



156 
69 
162 
108 
11 



112 
449 
143 
348 
302 
185 
405 
155 



261 
267 
476 
424 
608 
136 
168 



731 
166 
370 
154 
575 
147 
188 
174 



303 

213 



254 
210 
176 



446 

1 146 

72 

253 

68 

414 

136 

237 

912 



337 
90 
U7 



114 
136 
431 
394 
168 
351 
281 
194 



145 

223 
193 
236 
40B 



69 
318 
208 
155 
118 
268 
243 



60 
40 
19' 
95 

309 
324 
238 



306 
B53 
310 
761 
590 
379 
770 
353 



606 
560 
914 
913 
1 197 
253 
324 



1 789 
347 
643 
343 
978 
375 
395 
432 



528 
436 



512 
433 
355 



890 

2 050 

168 

500 

129 

839 

259 

509 

1 433 



640 
250 
263 



27' 
334 
838 

79; 

383 
734 
590 
37 



329 

421 
364 
536 
831 
478 



156 
693 
426 
361 
271 
513 
52 



146 

7 

458 
200 
533 
369 
430 



159 

455 
160 
519 
266 
235 
429 
232 



348 
336 
588 
560 
865 
174 
216 



1 325 
213 
464 
213 
682 
260 
259 
266 



341 
228 



309 

261 
193 



604 

1 381 

134 

301 

77 

551 

173 

318 

1 127 



406 
158 
166 



164 
171 
495 
429 
177 
475 
306 
222 



196 

260 
211 
301 
503 
250 



75 
648 
301 
216 
193 
422 
355 



128 
68 
300 
151 
423 
533 
351 



134 
390 
82 
376 
277 
162 
466 
127 



250 
342 
562 

484 
767 
111 
141 



993 
132 
314 
227 
704 
202 
240 
229 



207 
225 



186 
140 
99 



487 

1 471 

87 

257 

82 

494 

120 

24b 

1 077 



307 

64 
88 



93 
10 
501 

294 
140 
38, 

228 



453 
U' 

191 
14, 
166 
328 
179 



49 
42< 
259 
124 
14' 
271 
288 



75 
51 
191 
10 
403 
354 
293 



134 
317 
117 
487 
279 
210 
402 
141 



249 
292 
584 
514 
678 
107 
165 



1 008 
162 
310 
229 
707 
232 
278 
26b 



244 
149 

194 
160 
114 



1 237 

92 

251 

83 

557 

128 



283 
70 



138 
49tt 

298 
127 

4V, 



490 
lb& 
17' 

21 
U0< 



78 
$76 
34 
191 
149 
29, 



94 
49 
236 
111 
356 
239 
30, 



128 
253 
73 
453 
226 
150 
257 
158 



214 
291 
478 
350 
472 
114 
111 



903 
125 
313 
228 
552 
200 
225 



189 
202 



107 



117 
92 



440 
728 
102 
228 
57 
420 
140 
217 
726 



199 
7b 
80 



86 
118 
4<J4 
267 
100 
5U8 
Itt 
14, 



4<!S 
107 

181 
128 
itib 



btt 
604 
260 
Ibl 
145 
283 
314 



78 
68 

194 
ti6 

316 

229 



86 
169 

45 
316 
126 
125 
168 
103 



154 

193 

328 

237 

259 

76 

86 



546 
128 
258 
97 
385 
125 
192 
169 



128 
164 



95 
107 
73 



334 
427 

95 
169 

50 
290 

86 
135 
432 



184 
63 
79 



44 

51 
354 
156 

87 
276 
120 

73 



329 
67 

123 

104 

129 

233 

77 



49 
504 
179 
116 
110 
229 
196 



54 
46 

133 
8 

22' 

12; 

13: 



107 
190 
62 
445 
149 
118 
165 
140 



212 

174 

351 

224 

234 

86 

97 



547 
151 
272 
84 
485 
129 
185 
135 



105 
207 



106 
141 
56 



406 
373 

91 
195 

76 
418 

83 
149 
368 



219 
100 
66 



47 

79 
316 
149 

89 
287 
100 

73 



374 
65 

131 
96 
177 
250 
76 



78 
565 
177 
158 
149 
310 
218 



62 

42 
156 

74 
241 
120 
146 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 196O-Con. 

[Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



42-59 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


POPULA~ 
TlONt 


ALL CLASSES || WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TlONt 
TOTAL 




TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 












ALLENDALE 








ANDERSON 


ALL AGES 


11 362 


5 437 


5 925 


2 031 


2 147 


3 406 


3 778 


11 773 


98 478 


47 684 


50 794 


38 477 


40 756 


9 207 


10 038 


9O 664 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


253 


141 


112 


44 


30 


97 


82 


256 


2 221 


1 137 


1 084 


663 


801 


274 


283 


2 044 


1 YEAR . 


281 


145 


136 


46 


39 


99 


97 


X 657 


2 238 


1 102 


1 136 


831 


850 


271 


286 


X 4 263 


2 YEARS. 


287 


143 


144 


42 


50 


101 


94 


J 


2 156 


1 110 


1 046 


845 


812 


265 


234 


J 


3 YEARS. 


298 


148 


150 


42 


55 


106 


95 


\ 684 


2 184 


1 058 


1 126 


778 


850 


280 


276 


X 4 294 


4 YEARS. 


289 


140 


149 


42 


42 


98 


107 


/ 


2 107 


1 052 


1 055 


819 


780 


233 


275 


r 


5 YEARS. 


311 
31 9 


155 

1 A9 


156 

1 ^"7 


36 


55 


119 


101 


326 


2 178 


1 116 


1 062 


860 


800 


256 


262, 


1 903 
2m A 


7 YEARS. 


315 


1 Oc 

162 


1 ? I 

153 


45 


45 
36 


112 
117 


1 1 2 
117 


301 
^ 


1 986 
2 163 


1 014 
1 115 


972 
1 048 


762 
856 


746 
765 


252 
259 


226 
283 


U | O 

1 


8 YEARS. 


278 


136 


142 


39 


34 


97 


108 


> 906 


2 039 


1 081 


958 


831 


721 


250 


237 


> 5 754 


9 YEARS. 


286 


150 


136 


53 


38 


97 


98 


J 


1 981 


959 


1 022 


737 


768 


222 


254 


J 


10 YEARS 


283 


154 


129 


45 


32 


109 


97 


S 


2 106 


1 101 


1 005 


828 


744 


273 


261 




11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 


297 
325 


146 
160 


151 
165 


46 
50 


43 
53 


100 
110 


108 
112 


I 1 173 


1 961 

2 186 


1 006 
1 123 


955 

1 063 


783 

908 


736 
823 


223 

215 


219 

240 


6 988 


13 YEARS 


285 


148 


137 


49 


52 


99 


85 


J 


2 205 


1 081 


1 124 


860 


886 


221 


238 




14 YEARS 


273 


139 


134 


41 


27 


98 


107 


220 


1 765 


915 


850 


699 


661 


216 


189 


1 699 


15 YEARS 


257 


123 


134 


39 


34 


84 


100 


237 


1 717 


860 


857 


645 


670 


215 


187 


^ 1 819 


16 YEARS 


245 


108 


137 


33 


36 


75 


101 


1 469 


864 


960 


904 


74S 


718 


212 


186 


X 3) 399 


17 YEARS 


237 


125 


112 


42 


34 


83 


78 




812 


958 


854 


760 


668 


198 


186 


/ 


18 YEARS 


214 


109 


105 


25 


26 


84 


79 


V 398 


673 


788 


885 


572 


702 


216 


183 


X 2 972 


19 YEARS 


150 


88 


62 


21 


15 


67 


47 




425 


652 


773 


499 


620 


153 


153 


f 


20 YEARS 


143 


78 


65 


22 


19 


56 


46 


164 


371 


633 


738 


493 


593 


140 


145 


1 417 


21 AND OVER 


5 736 


2 577 


3 159 


1 179 


1 352 


1 398 


1 807 


5 982 


57 140 


26 863 


30 277 


22 500 


25 042 


4 363 


5 235 


52 096 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


1 408 


717 


691 


216 


216 


5O1 


475 


1 597 


10 906 


5 459 


5 447 


4 136 


4 093 


1 323 


1 354 


1O 601 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


1 509 


765 


744 


223 


208 


542 


536 


1 533 


10 347 


5 285 


5 062 


4 046 


3 800 


1 239 


1 262. 


9 673 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


1 463 


747 


716 


231 


207 


516 


509 


1 393 


10 223 


5 226 


4 997 


4 078 


3 850 


1 148 


1 147 


8 687 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


1 103 


553 


550 


160 


145 


393 


405 


1 104 


8 491 


4 218 


4 273 


3 224 


3 378 


994 


895 


8 190 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


599 


287 


312 


93 


114 


194 


198 


816 


6 408 


2 994 


3 414 


2 389 


2 719 


605 


695 


7 256 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


549 


235 


314 


114 


134 


121 


180 


766 


6 505 


3 155 


3 350 


2 679 


2 737 


476 


613 


7 556 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


577 


280 


297 


140 


129 


140 


168 


645 


6 468 


3 075 


3 393 


2 606 


2 831 


469 


562 


6 771 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


714 


323 


391 


164 


170 


159 


221 


762 


6 964 


3 311 


3 653 


2 843 


3 041 


468 


612 


6 716 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


649 


315 


334 


144 


133 


171 


201 


613 


6 455 


3 123 


3 332 


2 588 


2 752 


535 


580 


5 834 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


639 


295 


344 


139 


164 


156 


180 


556 


5 998 


2 944 


3 054 


2 489 


2 555 


455 


499 


4 707 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


507 


236 


271 


110 


123 


126 


148 


487 


5 335 


2 555 


2 780 


2 167 


2 335 


388 


445 


3 889 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


395 


169 


226 


77 


95 


92 


131 


371 


4 227 


1 982 


2 245 


1 675 


1 876 


307 


369 


3 107 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


350 


139 


211 


62 


81 


77 


130 


326 


3 228 


1 445 


1 783 


1 194 


1 480 


251 


303 


2 538 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


352 


155 


197 


58 


73 


97 


124 


323 


2 675 


1 170 


1 505 


954 


1 241 


216 


264 


2 286 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


283 


122 


161 


52 


65 


70 


96 


228 


2 050 


864 


1 186 


712 


981 


152 


205 


1 507 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


147 


56 


91 


26 


49 


30 


42 


X 219 


1 263 


536 


727 


430 


592 


106 


135 


X 1 183 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


72 


24 


48 


14 


26 


10 


22 


J 


642 


24O 


402 


193 


345 


47 


57 


; 


85 AND OVER. . 


46 


19 


27 


8 


15 


11 


12 


34 


293 


102 


191 


. 74 


150 


28 


41 


163 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


5 119 


2 585 


2 534 


784 


735 


1 801 


1 799 


5 229 


36 869 


18 748 


18 121 


14 413 


13 799 


4 335 


4 322 


34 179 


65 AND OVER. 


900 


376 


524 


158 


228 


218 


296 


804 


6 923 


2 912 


4 Oil 


2 363 


3 309 


549 


702 


5 139 


MEDIAN AGE . . 


21.7 


19.4 


24.2 


29.1 


31.9 


16*8 


19.6 


21.6 


27.2 


26.0 


28.3 


27*5 


29*6 


19.5 


22.6 


25.6 




BAMBERG 








BARNWELL 








ALL AGES 


16 274 


8 029 


8 245 


3 533 


3 654 


4 496 


4 591 


17 533 


17 659 


8 530 


9 129 


4 953 


5 051 


3 577 


4 078 


17 266 


UNDEK 1 YEAR 


410 


212 


198 


67 


63 


145 


135 


408 


447 


230 


217 


125 


m 


105 


106 


411 


1 YEAR . 


388 


202 


186 


77 


63 


125 


123 


X 945 


480 


254 


226 


133 


107 


121 


119 


X 911 


2 YEARS. 


362 


195 


167 


53 


56 


142 


111 


/ 


413 


204 


2O9 


106 


110 


98 


99 


J 


3 YEARS. 


424 


208 


216 


67 


83 


141 


133 


\ 930 


438 


204 


234 


93 


112 


111 


122 


X 992 


4 YEARS. 


413 


189 


224 


77 


74 


112 


150 


J 


519 


247 


272 


126 


145 


121 


127 


f 


5 YEARS. 


446 


213 


233 


86 


87 


127 


146 


466 


479 


253 


226 


122 


122 


131 


104 


489 




405 


218 


187 


84 


60 


134 


127 


480 


488 


257 


231 


150 


112 


107 


119 


463 


7 YEARS. 


416 


222 


194 


76 


69 


146 


125 


"1 


464 


231 


233 


111 


105 


120 


128 


1 




396 


199 


197 


73 


70 


126 


127 


f 1 268 


442 


216 


226 


105 


115 


11 1 


111 


}- 1 320 


9 YEARS. 


423 


215 


208 


73 


70 


142 


138 


J 


440 


231 


209 


112 


107 


119 


102 


J 


10 YEARS 
1 1 YEARS 
12 YEARS 


372 

432 
416 


159 
220 
229 


213 
212 
187 


55 

79 
89 


75 
83 
63 


104 
141 
140 


138 
129 
124 


&1 646 


465 
422 
468 


236 

212 
240 


229 
210 
228 


116 
113 
117 


125 
104 
113 


120 
99 

123 


104 
106 
115 


}1 681 


13 YEARS 


422 


219 


203 


86 


94 


133 


109 




440 


231 


2O9 


129 


95 


102 


114 




14 YEARS 


339 


176 


163 


69 


51 


107 


112 


410 


409 


208 


201 


101 


91 


107 


110 


331 


15 YEARS 


388 


216 


172 


85 


59 


131 


113 


366 


416 


. 217 


199 


119 


83 


58 


116 


347 


1 6 YEARS 


369 


188 


181 


78 


69 


110 


112 


X 755 


373 


180 


193 


78 


97 


102 


96 


X 742 


1 7 YEARS 


346 


188 


158 


64 


52 


124 


106 


J 


378 


195 


183 


98 


91 


97 


92 


j 


18 YEARS 


338 


176 


162 


45 


43 


131 


119 


\ 593 


305 


151 


154 


63 


63 


88 


91 


\ 589 


1 9 YEARS 


306 


164 


142 


39. 


30 


125 


112 


; 


272 


131 


141 


57 


66 


74 


75 


J 


20 YEARS 


285 


155 


130 


39 


41 


116 


89 


290 


207 


97 


110 


51 


53 


46 


57 


251 


21 AND OVER 


8 178 


3 866 


4 312 


2 072 


2 299 


1 794 


2 013 


8 976 


8 894 


4 105 


4 789 


2 728 


2 924 


1 377 


1 865 


8 739 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


1 997 


1 006 


991 


341 


339 


665 


652 


2 283 


2 297 


1 139 


1 158 


583 


585 


556 


573 


2 314 


5 TO 9 YEARS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 


2 086 
1 981 
1 747 


1 067 
1 003 
932 


1 019 
978 
815 


392 

378 

311 


356 
366 
253 


675 
625 

621 


663 
612 
562 


2 214 
2 056 
1 714 


2 313 
2 204 
1 744 


1 168 
1 127 
874 


1 125 
1 077 
870 


600 
576 
415 


561 
528 
400 


588 
551 

459 


564 
549 
470 


2 272 
2 012 
1 678 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


978 


521 


457 


133 


180 


388 


277 


1 356 


912 


420 


492 


254 


291 


166 


201 


1 123 


25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 


780 
791 
935 
881 
842 
755 
662 
487 
565 
383 


382 
360 
445 
426 
401 
361 
314 
227 
245 
176 


398 
431 
490 
455 
441 
394 
348 
260 
320 
207 


183 
190 
249 
248 
237 
231 
201 
131 
129 
101 


176 
218 
257 
246 
243 
218 
204 
159 
170 
125 


199 
170 
196 
178 
164 
130 
113 
96 
116 
75 


222 

213 
233 

209 
198 
176 
144 
101 
150 
82 


1 219 
1 032 
1 081 
882 
881 
671 
581 
482 
473 
321 


970 
1 087 
1 095 
942 
907 
709 
659 
517 
531 
379 


409 
516 
. 524 
477 
451 
333 
311 
228 
211 
175 


561 
571 
571 
465 
456 
376 
348 
289 
320 
204 


318 
382 
367 
321 
296 
224 
181 
137 
112 
93 


375 
386 
350 
304 
263 
243 
185 
173 
156 
112 


91 

134 
157 
156 
155 
109 
130 
91 
99 
82 


186 
' 185 
221 
161 
193 
133 
163 
116 
164 
92 


1 001 
932 
1 065 
956 
830 
753 
576 
496 
539 
357 


75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. . 


216 
127 
61 


95 
55 

13 


121 
72 
48 


50 
22 
6 


72 
45 
27 


45 
33 

7 


49 
27 
21 


\ 246 

41 


216 
108 
69 


86 

41 
20 


130 
67 

49 


54 
28 
12 


74 
41 
24 


32 

13 
8 


56 
26 
25 


56 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . 


7 167 
1 352 
21.7 


3 668 
584 
20.1 


3 499 

768 
23.5 


1 338 
308 
30.8 


1 241 
439 
33.6 


2 330 
276 

17.3 


2 258 
329 
18.3 


7 674 
1 081 
21.8 


7 981 
1 303 
21,5 


4 046 
533 
19.6 


3 935 
770 
23.4 


2 054 
299 
25.8 


1 945 
407 
27.1 


1 992 

234 
16.0 


1 990 
363 

18.8 


7 687 

1 258 
21.6 



42-60 



South Carolina 
Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: I960 Con. 

[Median not shown where base is leas than 100] 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 

PflPULA 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 

POPULA- 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES || WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


puruuM 
TlONt 

TOTAI 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH ITE 


TION! 
TOTAL 




TOTAL MALE 


FEMALE || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


i (j i ML 


TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


FEMALE 






BEAUFORT 


BERKELEY 


ALL AGES 
UNDER 1 YEAR 
1 YEAR . 
2 YEARS. 
3 YEARS. 


44 187 
1 429 
1 341 
1 252 
1 241 
1 194 


25 510 
726 
687 
655 
625 
605 


18 677 

703 
654 
597 
616 
589 


17 050 
455 
414 
383 
354 
309 


10 033 
433 
386 
345 
344 
325 


8 460 
271 
273 
272 
271 
296 


8 644 
270 
268 
252 
272 
264 


26 993 
722 
\ 1 501 

{ 1 396 


38 196 
1 129 
1 150 
1 197 
1 172 
1 171 


18 965 
569 
598 
608 
597 
592 


19 231 
560 
552 
589 
575 
579 


9 765 
280 
289 
306 
312 
274 


9 468 
264 
262 
273 
259 
285 


9 200 
289 
309 
302 
265 
318 


9 763 
296 
290 
316 
316 
294 


30 251 
868 
\ 1 836 

\ 2 009 


5 YEARS. 


1 134 


583 


551 


300 


254 


283 


297 


649 


1 121 


531 


590 


236 


262 


295 


323 


941 


6 YEARS. 


1 086 


541 


545 


266 


257 


275 


288 


624 


1 127 


535 


592 


238 


273 


297 


319 


902 


7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. 
9 YEARS. 
10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 


987 
885 
886 
833 
794 
844 
751 
660 
628 
549 
2 739 
2 457 
1 819 


517 
435 
451 
409 
415 
433 
372 
317 
346 
282 
2 435 
2 083 
1 510 


470 
450 
435 
424 
379 
411 
379 
343 
282 
267 
304 
374 
309 


239 
178 
204 
162 
177 
201 
168 
124 
140 
119 
2 132 
1 753 
1 287 


199 
226 
158 
184 
140 
172 
151 
132 
120 
119 
138 
237 
202 


278 
257 
247 
247 
238 
232 
204 
193 
206 
163 
303 
330 
223 


271 
224 
277 
240 
239 
239 
228 
211 
162 
148 
166 
137 
107 


> 1 685 
1 1 868 

437 
391 
\ 1 867 

\ 1 917 


1 062 
1 041 
1 051 
1 064 
1 031 
1 068 
1 061 
917 
872 
850 
806 
641 
525 


524 
540 
539 
546 
561 
554 
549 
434 
433 
443 
405 
329 
250 


538 
501 
512 
518 
470 
514 
512 
483 
439 
407 
401 
312 
275 


228 
215 
226 
235 
224 
247 
246 
169 
182 
216 
182 
142 
99 


237 
230 
209 
208 
197 
225 
217 
182 
181 
165 
173 
128 
132 


296 
325 
313 
311 
337 
307 
303 
265 
251 
227 
223 
187 
151 


301 
271 
303 
310 
273 
289 
295 
301 
258 
242 
228 
184 
143 


S2 469 
3 035 

680 
656 
\ 1 295 

\ 1 059 


20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 


1 333 

19 345 


1 036 
10 047 


297 
9 298 


683 
6 802 


215 
5 296 


153 
3 245 


82 
4 002 


614 
13 322 


399 
17 741 


178 
8 650 


221 
9 091 


84 
5 135 


119 
4 987 


94 
3 515 


102 
4 104 


413 
14 088 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


6 457 


3 298 


3 159 


1 915 


1 833 


1 383 


1 326 


3 619 


5 819 


2 964 


2 855 


1 461 


1 343 


1 503 


1 512 


4 713 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


4 978 


2 527 


2 451 


1 187 


1 094 


1 340 


1 357 


2 958 


5 402 


2 669 


2 733 


1 143 


1 211 


1 526 


1 522 


4 312 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


3 882 


1 946 


1 936 


832 


779 


1 114 


1 157 


2 305 


5 141 


2 644 


2 497 


1 121 


1 029 


1 523 


1 468 


3 715 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


8 192 


6 656 


1 536 


5 431 


816 


1 225 


720 


4 175 


3 694 


1 860 


1 834 


821 


779 


1 039 


1 055 


3 010 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


4 918 


3 330 


1 588 


2 769 


1 142 


561 


446 


2 418 


2 145 


961 


1 184 


537 


713 


424 


471 


2 160 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


3 109 


1 643 


1 466 


1 351 


1 046 


292 


420 


1 985 


2 332 


1 130 


1 202 


804 


754 


326 


448 


2 067 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


2 505 


1 312 


1 193 


965 


757 


347 


436 


1 707 


2 361 


1 136 


1 225 


724 


732 


412 


493 


1 770 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


2 266 


1 082 


1 184 


709 


716 


373 


468 


1 603 


2 385 


1 146 


1 239 


740 


732 


406 


507 


1 869 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


1 801 


930 


871 


531 


449 


399 


422 


1 230 


2 022 


1 082 


940 


640 


507 


442 


433 


1 506 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


1 450 


717 


733 


377 


363 


340 


370 


1 087 


1 729 


869 


360 


488 


453 


381 


407 


1 300 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


1 129 


542 


587 


277 


258 


265 


329 


949 


1 433 


704 


729 


407 


368 


297 


361 


947 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


923 


410 


513 


204 


208 


206 


305 


782 


1 151 


592 


559 


293 


255 


299 


304 


763 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


740 


320 


420 


172 


190 


143 


230 


621 


777 


359 


418 


203 


184 


156 


234 


642 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


795 


355 


440 


156 


157 


199 


283 


636 


732 


357 


375 


164 


1.57 


193 


218 


718 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


477 


204 


273 


94 


104 


110 


169 


447 


553 


260 


293 


112 


119 


148 


174 


410 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


312 


135 


177 


50 


61 


85 


116 


\ 404 


310 


134 


176 


66 


78 


68 


98 


\ 306 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


155 


62 


93 


20 


39 


42 


54 


/ 


131 


65 


66 


29 


33 


36 


33 


J 


85 AND OVER. . 


98 


41 


57 


10 


21 


31 


36 


67 


79 


33 


46 


12 


21 


21 


25 


43 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


19 233 


10 834 


8 399 


6 325 


4 083 


.4 509 


4 316 


11 140 


18 890 


9 558 


9 332 


4 305 


4 102 


5 253 


5 230 


14 691 


65 AND OVER. . 


1 837 


797 


1 040 


330 


382 


467 


658 


1 554 


1 805 


849 


956 


383 


403 


466 


548 


1 477 


MEDIAN AGE . . 


19,1 


18.7 


20,8 


19.2 


22.2 


16.6 


18.3 


20.9 


18.7 


18.2 


19,2 


23.1 


22.6 


15.2 


16.8 


19.0 




CALHOUN 


CHARLESTON 


ALL AGES - 


12 256 


5 960 


6 296 


1 959 


2 099 


4 001 


4 197 


14 753 


216 382 


108 318 


108 064 


70 775 


66 674 


37 543 


41 390 


164 856 


UNDER 1 YEAR . 


319 


167 


152 


33 


23 


134 


129 


391 


6 397 


3 235 


3 162 


1 936 


892 


1 299 


1 270 


4 283 




308 


151 


157 


19 


32 


132 


125 


\ 852 


6 185 


3 114 


3 071 


1 851 


821 


1 263 


1 250 


\ 8 894 


2 YEARS. . 


347 


179 


168 


47 


36 


132 


132 


J 


5 990 


3 116 


2 874 


1 850 


661 


1 266 


1 213 


; 


3 YEARS. 


300 


139 


161 


24 


27 


1 15 


134 


\ 827 


5 833 


2 929 


2 904 


1 705 


670 


1 224 


1 234 


\ 8 727 


4 YEARS. . 


357 


188 


169 


33 


29 


155 


140 


) 


5 701 


2 913 


2 788 


1 685 


582 


1 228 


1 206 


/ 


5 YEARS. 


333 


169 


164 


39 


40 


130 


124 


455 


5 629 


2 884 


2 745 


1 596 


590 


1 288 


155 


3 841 


6 YEARS. 


352 


191 


161 


48 


31 


143 


130 


424 


5 585 


2 892 


2 693 


1 622 


499 


1 270 


194 


3 835 


7 YEARS. 


303 


143 


160 


27 


41 


116 


119 


^ 


5 286 


2 705 


2 581 


1 470 


426 


1 235 


155 


1 


8 YEARS. 


307 


166 


141 


30 


30 


136 


in 


> 1 197 


5 061 


2 574 


2 487 


1 395 


404 


1 179 


083 


J- 10 231 


9 YEARS. 


317 


164 


153 


31 


37 


133 


1 16 


) 


4 852 


2 462 


2 390 


1 326 


259 


1 1 36 


131 


J 


10 YEARS 


318 


157 


161 


42 


41 


115 


120 




4 789 


2 410 


2 379 


1 309 


271 


1 101 


108 


4 


11 YEARS 


330 


163 


167 


31 


36 


132 


131 


}1 496 


4 743 


2 396 


2 347 


1 301 


252 


1 095 


095 


In 371 


12 YEARS . 


336 


179 


157 


48 


36 


131 


121 




4 752 


2 424 


2 328 


1 351 


280 


1 073 


048 


f 


13 YEARS 


361 


199 


162 


50 


45 


149 


117 




4 779 


2 432 


2 347 


1 393 


276 


1 039 


071 


J 


14 YEARS 


285 


147 


138 


37 


32 


no 


106 


312 


3 852 


1 903 


949 


1 039 


994 


864 


955 


2 582 


15 YEARS 


339 


164 


175 


36 


41 


128 


134 


325 


3 922 


1 952 


970 


1 048 


987 


904 


983 


2 405 


16 YEARS . 


276 


147 


.129 


43 


39 


104 


90 


\ 624 


3 717 


1 881 


836 


1 071 


012 


810 


824 


\ 4 956 


17 YEARS 


301 


161 


140 


42 


42 


119 


98 


; 


3 772 


1 859 


913 


1 047 


081 


812 


832 


/ 


18 YEARS 


225 


108 


117 


34 


30 


74 


87 


\ 522 


3 849 


2 140 


709 


1 524 


020 


616 


689 


\ 6 606 


19 YEARS . 


158 


78 


80 


23 


18 


55 


62 


J 


4 033 


2 387 


646 


1 836 


020 


551 


626 


/ 


20 YEARS 


143 


76 


67 


12 


20 


64 


47 


201 


4 247 


2 576 


1 671 


2 057 


131 


519 


540 


3 583 


21 AND OVER . 


5 941 


2 724 


3 217 


1 230 


1 393 


1 494 


1 824 


7 127 


113 408 


55 134 


58 274 


39 363 


38 546 


15 771 


19 728 


93 492 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


1 631 


824 


807 


156 


147 


668 


660 


2 070 


30 106 


15 307 


14 799 


9 027 


8 626 


6 280 


6 173 


21 904 


5 TO 9 YEARS . 


1 612 


833 


779 


175 


179 


658 


600 


2 076 


26 413 


13 517 


12 896 


7 409 


7 178 


6 108 


5 718 


17 957 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


1 630 


845 


785 


208 


190 


637 


595 


1 808 


22 915 


11 565 


11 350 


6 393 


6 073 


5 172 


5 277 


13 953 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


1 299 


658 


641 


178 


170 


480 


471 


1 471 


19 293 


10 219 


9 074 


6 526 


5 120 


3 693 


3 954 


13 967 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


615 


309 


306 


97 


97 


212 


209 


967 


18 128 


10 247 


7 881 


8 039 


5 450 


2 208 


2 431 


16 184 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


537 


250 


287 


91 


93 


159 


194 


951 


14 630 


7 386 


7 244 


5 543 


4 981 


1 843 


2 263 


15 419 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


548 


257 


291 


112 


125 


145 


166 


837 


14 779 


7 236 


7 543 


5 451 


5 009 


1 785 


2 534 


12 972 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


622 


277 


345 


125 


146 


152 


199 


870 


15 219 


7 387 


7 832 


5 231 


5 231 


2 156 


2 601 


12 137 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


679 


320 


359 


135 


147 


185 


212 


677 


12 817 


6 334 


6 483 


4 388 


4 160 


1 946 


2 323 


9 710 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


686 


333 


353 


155 


168 


178 


135 


644 


11 034 


5 276 


5 753 


3 394 


3 610 


1 832 


2 148 


7 919 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


524 


229 


295 


127 


151 


102 


144 


570 


8 730 


4 184 


4 546 


2 837 


2 982 


1 347 


1 564 


6 211 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


516 


251 


265 


127 


135 


124 


130 


485 


6 999 


3 320 


3 679 


2 222 


2 385 


1 098 


1 294 


4 988 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


384 


173 


211 


96 


98 


77 


113 


346 


4 929 


2 253 


2 676 


1 591 


1 760 


662 


916 


3 914 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


364 


147 


217 


64 


83 


83 


. 134 


458 


4 315 


1 840 


2 475 


1 217 


1 516 


623 


959 


3 425 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


271 


111 


160 


49 


83 


62 


77 


261 


2 985 


1 189 


1 796 


765 


1 183 


424 


613 


2 064 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


210 


94 


116 


46 


49 


48 


67 


\ 224 


1 706 


631 


1 075 


441 


741 


190 


334 


\ 1 808 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


87 


32 


55 


14 


28 


18 


27 


J 


850 


268 


582 


192 


416 


76 


166 


/ 


85 AND OVER, . 


41 


17 


24; 


4 


10 


13 


14 


38 


534 


159 


375 


109 


253 


50 


122 


J 324 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


5 789 


2 974 


2 815 


660 


638 


2 314 


2 177 


6 903 


90 845 


46 081 


44 764 


25 995 


24 957 


20 086 


19 807 


61 175 


65 AND OVER. . 


973 


401 


572 


177 


253 


224 


319 


981 


10 390 


4 087 


6 303 


2 724 


4 109 


1 363 


2 194 


7 621 


MEDIAN AGE . . 


19.8 


18.6 


22.2 


33,3 


36.7 


15,4 


17.6 


19.8 


22.6 


21.7 


23.8 


23,8 


25.9 


16.6 


19.5 


24.5 



General Population Characteristics 

Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 196O-Con. 
[Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



42-61 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 
POPULA~ 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA~ 
TlONt 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TlONt 
TOTAL 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL || MALE 


FEMAuE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 










CHEROKEE 


CHESTER 


ALL AGES 


35 205 


17 020 


18 185 


13 538 


14 197 


3 482 


3 988 


34 992 


30 888 


14 903 


15 985 


8 995 


9 565 


5 908 


6 420 


32 597 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


806 


391 


415 


294 


275 


97 


140 


892 


726 


393 


333 


209 


152 


184 


181 


803 


1 YEAR . 


735 


375 


360 


280 


249 


95 


111 


\ 1 825 


664 


338 


326 


152 


152 


186 


174 


I 1 703 


2 YEARS. 


791 


408 


383 


280 


275 


128 


108 


/ 


691 


332 


359 


149 


190 


183 


169 


J 


3 YEARS. 


806 


434 


372 


315 


270 


119 


102 


\ 1 754 


761 


397 


364 


197 


170 


200 


194 


\ 1 575 


4 YEARS. 


764 


396 


368 


293 


247 


103 


121 


/ 


777 


393 


384 


190 


185 


203 


199 


/ 


5 YEARS. 


846 


397 


449 


299 


304 


98 


145 


816 


715 


361 


354 


181 


175 


180 


179 


703 


6 YEARS. 


809 


415 


394 


286 


278 


129 


116 


810 


773 


388 


385 


209 


193 


17? 


192 


699 


7 YEARS. 


846 


462 


384 


342 


262 


120 


122 


^ 


743 


381 


362 


192 


178 


189 


184 


1 


8 YEARS. 


788 


398 


390 


299 


270 


99 


120 


> 2 311 


757 


351 


406 


183 


206 


168 


200 


} 2 205 


9 YEARS. 


799 


401 


398 


301 


301 


100 


97 


J 


702 


357 


345 


185 


177 


172 


168 


J 


10 YEARS 


797 


398 


399 


282 


281 


116 


118 


4 


728 


373 


355 


189 


178 


184 


177 


*| 


1 1 YEARS 


795 


420 


375 


314 


267 


106 


108 


I 2 877 


695 


354 


341 


181 


178 


173 


163 


I 2 726 


12 YEARS 


854 


422 


432 


329 


331 


93 


101 


f 


768 


403 


365 


233 


210 


170 


155 


f 


13 YEARS 


790 


377 


413 


291 


319 


86 


94 


J 


736 


368 


368 


224 


228 


144 


140 


J 


14 YEARS , 


726 


376 


350 


291 


265 


85 


85 


704 


609 


314 


295 


158 


153 


156 


142 


647 


15 YEARS 


754 


396 


358 


316 


265 


80 


93 


732 


622 


296 


324 


158 


197 


140 


127 


634 


16 YEARS 


668 


352 


316 


276 


230 


76 


86 


V 1 352 


614 


311 


303 


134 


173 


127 


130 


\ 1 231 


17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 


723 

628 


381 
291 


342 
337 


303 
202 


277 
276 


78 
89 


65 
61 


I 1 288 


646 
487 


335 
247 


311 
240 


199 
134 


189 
133 


. 136 
113 


122 
107 


V 1 103 


19 YEARS 


548 


228 


320 


176 


260 


52 


60 


/ 


432 


198 


234 


105 


136 


93 


98 


J 


20 YEARS 


535 


238 


297 


187 


240 


51 


57 


635 


406 


215 


191 


112 


111 


103 


80 


5O4 


21 AND OVER 


19 397 


9 064 


10 333 


7 582 


8 455 


1 482 


1 878 


18 996 


16 836 


7 796 


9 040 


5 271 


5 901 


2 525 


3 139 


IS O64 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


3 902 


2 004 


1 898 


1 462 


1 316 


542 


582 


4 471 


3 619 


1 853 


1 766 


897 


849 


956 


917 


4 081 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


4 088 


2 073 


2 015 


1 527 


1 415 


546 


600 


3 937 


3 690 


1 838 


1 852 


950 


929 


888 


923 


3 607 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


3 962 


] 993 


969 


1 507 


1 463 


486 


506 


3 581 


3 536 


1 812 


1 724 


985 


947 


827 


777 


3 373 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


3 321 


1 648 


673 


1 273 


1 308 


375 


365 


3 372 


2 801 


1 389 


1 412 


780 


828 


609 


584 


2 968 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


2 211 


1 004 


207 


822. 


975 


182 


232 


2 902 


1 774 


849 


925 


513 


532 


336 


393 


2 641 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


2 110 


997 


113 


824 


893 


173 


220 


2 756 


1 711 


811 


900 


532 


608 


279 


292 


2 450 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


2 157 


1 013 


144 


861 


914 


152 


230 


2 308 


1 746 


841 


905 


598 


599 


243 


306 


2 218 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


2 354 


1 129 


225 


948 


1 016 


181 


209 


2 329 


1 993 


934 


1 059 


670 


711 


264 


348 


2 198 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


2 072 


977 


095 


831 


914 


146 


181 


1 998 


1 887 


906 


981 


649 


662 


257 


319 


1 871 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


2 023 


972 


051 


812 


847 


160 


204 


1 712 


1 800 


827 


973 


582 


670 


245 


303 


1 575 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


1 743 


824 


919 


683 


758 


141 


161 


1 441 


1 612 


751 


861 


538 


573 


213 


288 


1 315 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


1 517 


695 


822 


594 


680 


101 


142 


1 166 


1 236 


585 


651 


390 


447 


195 


204 


1 133 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


1 153 


550 


603 


457 


509 


93 


94 


985 


990 


457 


533 


317 


335 


140 


198 


1 025 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


972 


427 


545 


351 


442 


76 


103 


911 


903 


393 


510 


233 


307 


160 


203 


9O8 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


754 


322 


432 


259 


354 


63 


78 


595 


754 


322 


432 


190 


250 


132 


182 


636 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


497 


222 


275 


187 


234 


35 


41 


}454 


459 


180 


279 


95 


176 


85 


103 


}5OS 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


239 


112 


127 


89 


102 


23 


25 




233 


99 


134 


50 


96 


49 


38 




85 AND OVER. . 


130 


58 


72 


51 


57 


7 


15 


74 


144 


56 


sa 


26 


46 


30 


42 


on 
90 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


14 097 


7 199 


6 898 


5 391 


4 966 


1 808 


1 932 


14 073 


12 727 


6 447 


6 230 


3 373 


3 284 


3 074 


2 996 


12 926 


65 AND OVER. 


2 592 


1 141 


1 451 


937 


1 189 


204 


262 


2 034 


2 493 


1 050 


1 443 


594 


875 


456 


568 


2 142 


MEDIAN AGE . . 


25.3 


23.9 


26.5 


26.1 


28.5 


17.2 


19.2 


23.7 


25.1 


23.3 


26.7 


28.5 


30.7 


17.3 


20.1 


24.3 




CHESTERF 1 ELD 


CLARENDON 


ALL AGES 


33 717 


16 583 


17 134 


10 540 


10 670 


6 043 


6 464 


36 236 


29 490 


14 339 


15 151 


4 576 


4 784 


9 763 


10 367 


32 215 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


801 


411 


390 


22.7 


194 


184 


196 


970 


831 


406 


425 


91 


92 


315 


333 


976 




799 


376 


423 


194 


227 


182 


196 


\ 2 171 


827 


431 


396 


102 


36 


329 


310 


V 2 161 


2 YEARS. 


755 


380 


375 


204 


198 


176 


177 


) 


891 


460 


431 


101 


98 


359 


333 


J 


3 YEARS. 


841 


429 


412 


260 


210 


169 


202 


\ 2112 


821 


396 


425 


85 


89 


311 


336 


\ 2 069 


4 YEARS. 


756 


369 


387 


200 


217 


169 


170 


; 


823 


438 


385 


98 


89 


340 


296 


J 


5 YEARS. 


809 


416 


393 


239 


197 


177 


196 


973 


887 


426 


461 


94 


106 


332 


355 


1 014 


6 YEARS. 


862 


415 


447 


241 


248 


174 


199 


1 051 


831 


408 


423 


107 


98 


301 


325 


1 007 


7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. 
9 YEARS. 


833 
823 
816 


421 
399 
428 


412 
424 
388 


214 
225 
221 


229 
220 

186 


207 
174 
207 


183 
204 
202 


L 2 716 


879 

859 
832 


431 
426 
441 


448 
433 
391 


101 
106 
97 


117 
122 
96 


330 
320 
344 


331 

311 
295 


| 2 724 


10 YEARS 
1 1 YEARS 
12 YEARS 


864 
916 
930 


433 
502 
475 


431 
414 
455 


254 
273 
274 


236 

214 
254 


179 
229 

201 


195 
200 
201 


1 3 328 


887 
943 
935 


429 
480 
442 


458 
463 
493 


120 
123 
116 


111 
125 
127 


309 
357 
326 


347 
338 
366 


1 3 331 


13 YEARS 


941 


470 


471 


300, 


290 


170 


181 


J 


864 


442 


422 


121 


109 


321 


313 


J 


14' YEARS 


802 


408 


394 


228 


208 


180 


186 


839 


821 


404 


417 


105 


111 


299 


306 


773 


15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 


792 
821 
732 
623 

452 
431 
17 318 


409 
404 
365 
343 
234 
212 
8 284 


383 
417 
367 
280 
218 
219 
9 034 


231 
220 
217 
T95 
'125 
127 
5 871 


224 
250 
210 
. 154 
134 
142 
6 228 


178 
184 
148 
148 
109 
85 
2 413 


159 
167 
157 
126 
84 
77 
2 806 


759 
\ 1 457 

\ 1 237 

552 
18 071 


780 
749 

712 
566 
452 
342 
12 958 


385 
375 

364 
310 
217 
192 
6 036 


395 
374 
348 
256 
235 
150 
6 922 


104 
109 
113 
67 
51 
64 
2 501 


105 
104 
101 
65 
66 
45 
2 722 


281 
266 
251 
243 
166 
128 
3 535 


290 
270 
247 
191 
169 
105 
4 200 


738 
\ 1 379 

\ 1 146 

497 
14 400 


UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEAKS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO .59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. 


3 952 
4 143 
4 453 
3 420 
928 
776 
885 
2 032 
2 019 
890 
505 
295 
049 
946 
706 
414 
,208 
36 


1 965- 

2 079 
2 288 
1 755 
977 
848 
879 
994 
998 
925 
755 
597 
457 
430 
313 
184 
96 
43 


1 987 
2 064- 
2 165 
1 665 
951 
928 
1 006 
1 038 
1 021 
965 
750 
698 
592 
516 
393 
230 
112 
5? 


1 085 
1 140 
1 329 
988 
641 
594 
650 
693 
688 
654 
569 
454 
339 
294 
206 
123 
68 
25 


1 046 
1 080 
1 202 
972 
. 640 
649 
659 
694 
672 
705 
554 
495 
404 
344 
265 
163 
85 
41 


880 
939 
959 
767 
336 
254 
229 
301 
310 
271 
186 
143 
118 
136 
107 
61 
28 
18 


941 
984 
963 
693 
31 T 
279 
347 
344 
349 
260 
196 
203 
188 
172 
128 
67 
27 
12 


5 253 

4 740 
4 167 
3 453 

2 660 
2 541 
2 368 
2 304 
1 864 
1 584 
1 356 
1 108 
927 
887 
500 
\. 475 

49 


4 193 
4 288 
4 450 
3 259 
1 547 
1 289 
1 410 
1 531 
1 385 
1 425 
1' 1 43 
959 
772 
826 
458 
307 
138 
110 


2 131 
2 132 
2 197 
1 651 
770 
582 
647 
701 
675 
648 
566 
436 
355 
387 
230 
128 
58 
45 


2 062 
2 156 
2 253 
1 608 
777 
707 
763 
830 
710 
777 
577 
523 
417 
439 
228 
179 
80 
65 


477 
505 
585 
444 
265 
228 
246 
279 
286 
275 
258 
202 
186 
167 
83 
50 
26 
14 


454 
539 
583 
441 
246 
263 
247 
319 
294 
309 
226 
236 
192 
159 
111 
86 
45 
34 


1 654 
1 627 
1 612 
1 207 
505 
354 
401 
422 
389 
373 
308 
234 
169 
220 
147 
78 
32 
31 


1 608 
1 617 
1 670 
1 167 
531 
444 
516 
511 
416 
468 
351 
287 
225 
280 
T17 
93 
35 
31 


5 206 

4 745 
4 IO4 
3 263 
2 483 
2 156 
1 610 
1 857 
1 417 
1 258 
1 O32 
874 
660 
718 
437 
\ 345 

50 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER* 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


14 893 
2 370 
22.3 


7 510 
1 066 
21.0 


7 383 
1 304 
23.6 


4 222 
716 
25,7 


4 012 
898 
28.0 


3 288 
350 
16.6 


3 371 

406 
17.5 


16 376 
1 911 
2O.9 


15 172 
1 839 
17.8 


7 584 
848 
17.1 


7 588 
991 
18.4 


1 893 
340 
25.3 


T 886 
435 
27.5 


5 691 
508 
15.0 


'5 702 
556 
16.2 


16 172 
1 550 
18.7 



42-62 



South Carolina 



Table 27.-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 1960-Con. 






- 


I960 POPULATION 


1950 




1960 POPULATION 




1950 
POPULA- 


AM r. ASSES I WH ITE 


. NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA- 
TION, 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES || WHITE 


NONWH1TE 


TION* 
TOTAL 


" TOTAL II MALE 1 FEMALE MALE FEMALE 


MALE F 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 




TOTAL || HALE 


FEMALE MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 

- 


rEMALE 


. 












COLLETON 


DARLINGTON 












_ 


- 







e 1 7O 


1 239 


2 269 


50 016 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 
1 YEAR * * . * . 
2 YEARS. * . * . 
3 YEARS. .... 


27 816 
686 
658 
697 
614 
675 
691 
755 
697 
729 
670 
737 
723 
691 
725 
668 
647 
674 
592 
425 
367 
312 
14 383 


13 594 
339 
330 
368 
3O4 
341 
359 
360 
361 
364 
330 
380 
371 
367 
348 
320 
327 
345 
312 
224 
185 
149 
6 8TO 


14 222 
347 
328 
329 
310 
334 
332 
395 
336 
365 
340 
357 
352 
324 
377 
348 
320 
329 
280 
201 
182 
163 
7 573 


6 673 
132 
132 
155 
117 
124 
137 
139 
131 
136 
136 
149 
147 
139 
150 
122 
140 
155 
127 
89 
87 
58 
3 971 


6 916 

131 
131 
123 
128 
121 
136 
155 
137 
135 
141 
140 
158 
130 
165 
126 
137 
144 
122 
83 
73 
68 
4 232 


6 921 
207 
198 
213 
187 
217 
222 
221 
230 
228 
194 
231 
224 
228 
198 
198 
187 
190 
185 
135 
98 
91 
2 839 


7 306 
216 
197 
206 
182 
213 
196 
240 
199 
230 
199 
217 
194 
194 
212 
222 
183 
185 
158 
118 
109 
95 
3 341 


28 242 
643 
1 1 557 

k 1 603 

760 
790 

V 2 135 
I 2 580 

511 
543 

y i 104 

> 

402 
14 710 


52 928 

1 351 
1 326 
1 317 
1 418 
1 373 
1 498 
1 410 
1 417 
1 403 
1 335 
1 401 
1 360 
1 391 
1 351 
1 206 
1 133 
1 127 
1 043 
898 
784 
780 
26 606 


25 480 
676 
660 
664 
695 
700 
775 
746 
692 
705 
678 
715 
680 
740 
695 
593 
574 
553 
521 
439 
335 
316 
12 328 


27 448 
675 
666 
653 
723 
673 
723 
664 
725 
698 
657 
686 
680 
651 
656 
613 
559 
574 
522 
459 
449 
464 
14 278 


14 241 
286 
304 
313 
331 
327 
372 
349 
332 
333 
342 
346 
320 
366 
355 
302 
293 
274 
265 
219 
170 
178 
7 864 


1 3 \ f*f 

292 

306 
303 
333 
289 
333 
305 
328 
322 
313 
315 
334 
325 
341 
273 
264 
304 
249 
271 
257 
280 
8 842 


390 
356 
351 
364 
373 
403 
397 
360 
372 
336 
369 
360 
374 
340 
291 
281 
279 
256 
220 
165 
138 
4 464 


383 
360 
350 
390 
384 
390 
359 
397 
376 
344 
371 
346 
326 
315 
340 
295 
270 
273 
188 
192 
184 
5 436 


1 410 
, 2 898 

2 889 

1 266 
1 302 

3 579 

L 4 363 

1 054 
993 
, 2 054 

1 804 

822 
25 582 


YEARS. ... 


YEARS. . . * 




10 YEARS .... 
11 YEARS .... 
12 YEARS .... 
13 YEARS . . . 
14 YEARS ... 
15 YEARS .... 
16 YEARS .... 
17 YEARS . . . 
18 YEARS .... 
19 YEARS . . . 
20 YEARS .... 
21 AND OVER. . 


UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 YEARS . . 
10 TO 14 YEARS . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS . 
35 TO 39 YEARS . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS . 
55 TO 59 YEARS . 
60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 TO 79 YEARS . 
80 TO 84 YEARS . 
85 AND OVER. . 


3 330 
3 542 
3 544 
2 705 
1 427 
1 417 
501 
667 
521 
630 
330 
208 
921 
855 
566 
391 
156 
105 


1 682 

1 774 
1 786 
1 393 
661 
680 
699 
789 
734 
787 
669 
588 
434 
385 
258 
161 
71 
43 


1 648 
1 768 
1 758 
1 312 
766 
737 
802 
878 
787 
843 
661 
620 
487 
470 
308 
230 
85 
62 


660 
679 
707 
598 
320 
368 
411 
443 
422 
47O 
439 
351 
263 
212 
164 
94 
51 
21 


634 

704 
719 
559 
375 
399 
435 
451 
450 
478 
404 
365 
275 
251 
184 
150 
53 
30 


1 022 
1 095 
1 079 
795 
341 
312 
288 
346 
312 
317 
230 
237 
171 
173 
94 
67 
20 
22 


1 014 
1 064 
1 039 
753 
391 
338 
367 
427 
337 
365 
257 
255 
212 
219 
124 
80 
72 
32 


3 803 
3 685 
3 091 
2 551 
2 060 
1 879 
1 753 
1 840 
1 606 
1 344 
1 171 
951 
804 
792 
483 

> " 


6 785 
7 063 
6 709 
4 985 
3 246 
2 978 
3 223 
3 301 
3 114 
2 841 
2 345 
1 796 
1 420 
1 290 
881 
545 
282 
124 


3 395 
3 596 
3 423 
2 422 
1 464 
1 360 
1 511 
1 552 
1 541 
1 339 
1 122 
819 
631 
571 
363 
216 
114 
41 


3 390 
3 467 
3. 286 
2 563 
1 782 
1 618 
1 712 
1 749 
1 573 
1 502 
1 223 
977 
789 
719 
518 
329 
168 
83 


1 561 
1 728 
1 689 
1 221 
821 
895 
957 
1 049 
969 
848 
764 
518 
415 
343 
225 
145 
69 
24 


1 523 

601 
588 
345 
087 
966 
035 
090 
991 
901 
779 
616 
496 
425 
331 
231 
116 
58 


1 834 
1 868 
1 734 
1 201 
643 
465 
554 
503 
572 
491 
358 
301 
216 
228 
138 
71 
45 
17 


1 867 
1 866 
1 698 
1 218 
695 
652 
677 
659 
582 
601 
444 
361 
293 
294 
187 
98 
52 
25 


7 197 
6 147 
5 417 
4 851 
3 994 
3 921 
3 334 
3 416 
2 774 
2 111 
1 784 ' 
1 496 
1 118 
1 117 
694 

} 551 

' 94 


UNDER 18 YEARS . 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE ... 


12 329 

2 073 
22.8 


6 226 
918 
21.2 


6 103 
1 155 
24.1 


2 468 
542 
30.1 


2 460 
668 
30.8 


3 758 
376 
16.7 


3 643 
487 

18.6 


12 226 
1 704 
22.4 


23 860 
3 122 
21.4 


12 062 
1 305 
19.8 


11 798 
1 817 
22.9 


5 810 

806 
25.6 


5 529 
1 161 
27.3 


6 252 
499 
15.8 


6 269 
656 

17.9 


21 808 

2 456 
21.7 




D 1 LLON 


DORCHESTER 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . 


30 584 
876 
868 
884 
878 
885 
890 
862 
853 
866 
880 


14 913 
441 
439 
459 
440 
434 
467 
443 
430 
428 
458 


15 671 
435 
429 
425 
438 
451 
423 
419 
423 
438 
422 


8 066 

189 
191 
191 
204 
191 
192 
233 
203 
175 
212 


8 269 
190 
176 
180 
186 
194 
176 
174 
200 
200 
197 


6 847 
252 
248 
268 
236 
243 
275 
210 
227 
253 
246 


7 382 
245 
253 
245 
252 
257 
247 
245 
223 
238 
225 


30 930 
887 
. 1 961 

! 1 879 

909 

824 

> 2 415 


24 383 
620 
586 
621 
578 
596 
639 
633 
680 
616 
644 


11 994 
300 
309 
326 
287 
299 
321 
306 
356 
312 
321 


12 389 
320 
277 
295 
291 
297 
318 
327 
324 
304 
323 


6 184 
134 
148 
157 
141 
115 
144 
139 
150 
160 
127 


6 296 

147 
125 
143 
135 
124 
143 
128 
132 
148 
136 


5 810 
166 
161 
169 
146 
184 
177 
167 
206 
152 
194 


6 093 
173 
152 
152 
156 
173 
175 
199 
192 
156 
187 


22 601 
557 
1 272 

1 210 

J 572 
632 

. 1 655 


2 YEARS. . 
3 YEARS. 
4 YEARS. 
5 YEARS. . 


7 YEARS. . 


9 YEARS. . 


10 YEARS . . 
1 1 YEARS . 


845 
88O 


448 
472 


397 
408 


214 
236 


198 
'197 


234 
236 


199 

211 


1 2 928 


608 
583 


319 
301 


289 
282 


142 
139 


131 
133 


177 
162 


158 
149 


I 2 100 


12 YEARS . 


843 


422 


421 


213 


217 


209 


204 


f 


654 


328 


326 


146 


155 


182 


171 


f 


13 YEARS 


801 


437 


364 


226 


175 


211 


189 


J 


614 


301 


313 


151 


163 


ISO 


150 




14 YEARS . 


782 


410 


372 


200 


160 


210 


212 


671 


525 


257 


268 


120 


123 


137 


145 


473 


15 YEARS . 


729 


372 


357 


198 


163 


174 


194 


669 


530 


261 


269 


118 


106 


143 


163 


446 


16 YEARS . 


648 


316 


332 


168 


172 


148 


160 


\ 1 257 


574 


308 


266 


139 


128 


169 


138 


876 


17 YEARS . 


685 


339 


346 


169 


179 


170 


167 


/ 


535 


266 


269 


123 


113 


143 


156 




18 YEARS 


551 


292 


259 


137 


137 


155 


122 


\ 1 064 


422 


220 


202 


81 


92 


139 


110 


\ 761 


19 YEARS . . 


429 


209 


220 


95 


108 


114 


112 


/ 


346 


180 


166 


66 


79 


1 14 


87 


1 


20 YEARS . 


395 


199 


196 


115 


99 


84 


97 


465 


288 


145 


143 


54 


81 


91 


62 


344 


21 AND OVER 


14 254 


6 558 


7 696 


4 114 


4 611 


2 444 


3 085 


15 00 


12 491 


5 971 


6 520 


3 490 


3 631 


2 481 


2 889 


11 703 


UNDER 5 YEARS. . 


4 391 


2 213 


2 178 


966 


926 


1 247 


. 1 252 


4 727 


3 001 


1 521 


1 480 


695 


674 


826 


806 


3 039 


5 TO 9 YEARS . . 


4 351 


2 226 


2 125 


1 015 


947 


1 211 


1 178 


4 148 


3 212 


1 616 


1 596 


720 


687 


896 


909 


2 859 


10 TO 14 YEARS . 


4 151 


2 189 


1 962 


1 089 


947 


1 100 


1 015 


3 599 


2 984 


1 506 


1 478 


698 


705 


808 


773 


2 573 


15 TO 19 YEARS . 


3 042 


1 528 


1 514 


767 


759 


761 


755 


2 990 


2 407 


1 235 


1 172 


527 


518 


708 


654 


2 083 


20 TO 24 YEARS . 


1 733 


817 


916 


453 


487 


364 


429 


2 356 


1 416 


693 


723 


346 


390 


347 


333 


1 642 


25 TO 29 YEARS . 


1 534 


715 


819 


456 


483 


259 


336 


2 279 


1 379 


667 


712 


399 


402 


268 


310 


1 732 


30 TO 34 YEARS . 


1 607 


721 


886 


443 


523 


278 


363 


1 93 


1 358 


626 


732 


378 


415 


248 


317 


1 477 


35 TO 39 YEARS . 


1 770 


799 


971 


504 


563 


295 


403 


1 947 


1 669 


793 


876 


478 


472 


315 


404 


1 579 


40 TO 44 YEARS . 


1 634 


787 


847 


498 


491 


289 


356 


1 543 


1 462 


726 


736 


416 


405 


310 


331 


1 270 


45 TO 49 YEARS . 


1 569 


760 


809 


474 


489 


286 


320 


1 342 


1 330 


673 


657 


408 


352 


265 


305 


1 028 


50 TO 54 YEARS. . 


1 274 


586 


688 


383 


429 


203 


259 


1 04 


1 046 


539 


507 


315 


302 


224 


205 


870 


55 TO 59 YEARS . 


1 015 


499 


516 


321 


317 


178 


199 


82 


860 


410 


450 


242 


249 


168 


201 


660 


60 TO 64 YEARS . 


759 


344 


415 


231 


264 


113 


151 


71 


648 


304 


344 


189 


188 


115 


156 


514 


65 TO 69 YEARS . 


672 


297 


375 


185 


242 


112 


133 


65 


661 


304 


357 


156 


189 


14B 


168 


583 


70 TO 74 YEARS . 


522 


222 


300 


144 


183 


78 


117 


45 


425 


192 


233 


102 


131 


9C 


102 


352 


75 TO 79 YEARS . 


325 


129 


196 


86 


140 


43 


56 


V 32 


276 


102 


174 


63 


1 17 


39 


57 


\ 299 


80 TO 84 YEARS . 


156 


53 


103 


35 


69 


18 


34 


; 


154 


50 


104 


34 


71 


16 


33 


/ 


85 AND OVER. . . 


79 


28 


51 


16 


30 


12 


21 


5 


95 


37 


58 


18 


29 


15 


29 


41 


UNDER 18 YEARS . 


14 955 


7 655 


7 300 


3 605 


3 334 


4 050 


3 966 


14 40 


10 836 


5 478 


5 358 


2 493 


2 413 


2 965 


2 945 


9 793 


65 AND OVER. . . 


1 754 


729 


1 025 


466 


664 


263 


361 


1 48 


1 611 


685 


926 


373 


537 


312 


389 


1 275 


MEDIAN AGE . . * 


18.9 


17.7 


20.3 


22.2 


25.8 


14.4 


16.6 


20. 


22.1 


20,9 


23.2 


26.3 


27*2 


17. 


19.3 


22.3 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 1960-Con. 

[Median not shown where baae is lees than 100] 



42-63 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


PQPULA- 
TION, 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


TIONi 




TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 








EDGEFIELD 


FAIRFIELD 


ALL AGES . 


15 735 


7 693 


8 042 


3 172 


3 409 


4 521 


4 633 


16 591 


20 713 


10 160 


10 553 


4 065 


4 329 


6 095 


6 224 


21 780 


UNDER 1 YEAR . 


442 


210 


232 


65 


56 


145 


176 


462 


551 


268 


283 


69 


78 


199 


205 


586 


1 YEAR .... 


404 


210 


194 


52 


54 


158 


140 




538 


283 


255 


72 


66 


211 


189 


X 1 216 


2 YEARS. ... 
3 YEARS. . . . 


402 
403 
410 


214 
203 
223 


188 
200 
1 87 


62 
52 


60 
58 


152 
151 


128 
142 


( 931 


572 
541 


288 
261 


284 
280 


95 
91 


99 
74 


193 
170 


185 
206 


X 1 178 


5 YEARS. . . . 


423 
441 


200 
202 


223 

239 


74 
52 


57 
73 


1 49 
148 


130 
150 


406 


543 
541 


270 
273 


273 
268 


79 
81 


87 
104 


191 

192 


186 
164 


' 555 


7 YEARS. . . . 


458 
381 


239 

l 03 


219 


79 


67 
72 


1 32 
160 


172 

147 


387 


546 
544 


266 
277 


280 
267 


76 
85 


1 10 
77 


190 
192 


170 
190 


506 
\ 1589 


9 YEARS. ... 


426 


1 O J 

206 


1 98 
220 


62 

60 


66 

65 


1 21 
146 


132 
155 


!1 232 


538 
541 


258 

274 


280 
267 


85 
102 


96 
87 


173 
172 


184 
180 


J ' 


10 YEARS ... 


434 


226 


208 


67 


82 


159 


126 




536 


277 


259 


87 


85 


190 


174 


^ 


11 YEARS . . . 


403 


207 


196 


67 


55 


140 


141 


1 570 


491 


257 


234 


91 


88 


166 


146 


L 2 001 


12 YEARS . . . 


418 


219 


199 


86 


62 


133 


137 




542 


284 


256 


108 


100 


176 


158 


f 


13 YEARS . . . 


372 


182 


190 


75 


71 


107 


119 




533 


297 


236 


114 


85 


183 


151 


J 


14 YEARS . . . 


347 


179 


168 


53 


55 


126 


113 


332 


444 


215 


229 


74 


79 


141 


150 


488 


15 YEARS , * . 


328 


161 


167 


55 


41 


106 


126 


348 


430 


214 


216 


81 


84 


133 


132 


494 


16 YEARS . . . 


334 


176 


158 


62 


59 


114 


99 


X 695 


417 


202 


215 


73 


83 


129 


132 


X 867 


17 YEARS . . . 
18 YEARS . . . 


351 
258 


180 
139 


171 
119 


57 

38 


70 

43 


123 
101 


101 
76 


X 547 


473 
343 


258 
178 


215 
165 


99 

61 


74 
48 


159 
117 


141 
117 


{ 778 


19 YEARS . . . 


229 


116 


113 


29 


34 


87 


79 


/ 


283 


152 


131 


51 


44 


101 


87 


} 


20 YEARS . . . 


204 


116 


88 


32 


29 


84 


59 


263 


255 


111 


144 


36 


61 


75 


83 


384 


21 AND OVER. . 


7 867 


3 702 


4 165 


1 923 


2 180 


1 779 


1 985 


8 502 


10 511 


4 997 


5 514 


2 355 


2 620 


2 642 


2 894 


11 138 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


2 061 


1 060 


1 001 


305 


285 


755 


716 


2 309 


2 745 


1 370 


1 375 


406 


404 


964 


971 


2 980 


5 TO 9 YEARS . 


2 129 


1 030 


1 099 


323 


343 


707 


756 


2 025 


2 710 


1 348 


1 362 


429 


474 


919 


888 


2 650 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


1 974 


1 013 


961 


348 


325 


665 


636 


1 902 


2 546 


1 330 


1 216 


474 


437 


856 


779 


2 489 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


1 500 


772 


728 


241 


247 


531 


481 


1 590 


946 


1 O04 


942 


365 


333 


639 


609 


2 139 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


922 


461 


461 


149 


158 


312 


303 


1 177 


144 


526 


618 


172 


222 


354 


396 


1 698 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


829 


385 


444 


187 


192 


198 


252 


1 119 


099 


530 


569 


217 


233 


313 


336 


1 538 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


837 


401 


436 


213 


235 


188 


201 


976 


137 


544 


593 


236 


274 


308 


319 


1 299 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


912 


428 


484 


, 226 


255 


202 


229 


1 030 


180 


600 


580 


275 


277 


325 


303 


1 301 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


867 


416 


451 


233 


229 


183 


222 


792 


152 


542 


610 


284 


320 


258 


290 


1 105 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


773 


383 


390 


209 


211 


174 


179 


717 


124 


549 


575 


301 


300 


248 


275 


998 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


658 


326 


332 


165 


186 


141 


146 


679 


898 


431 


467 


244 


260 


187 


207 


806 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


539 


245 


294 


137 


178 


108 


116 


586 


799 


398 


401 


211 


195 


187 


206 


700 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


474 


227 


247 


129 


135 


98 


112 


484 


616 


285 


331 


159 


176 


126 


155 


611 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


517 


217 


300 


113 


164 


104 


136 


535 


614 


287 


327 


124 


144 


163 


183 


658 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


368 


170 


198 


86 


131 


84 


67 


339 


446 


184 


262 


80 


128 


104 


134 


385 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


200 


89 


in 


47 


72 


42 


39 


X 289 


313 


131 


182 


60 


80 


71 


102 


X 359 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


111 


47 


64 


30 


44 


17 


20 


/ 


142 


58 


84 


21 


47 


37 


37 


/ 


85 AND OVER. . 


64 


23 


41 


11 


19 


12 


22 


42 


102 


43 


59 


7 


25 


36 


34 


64 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


7 177 


3 620 


3 557 


1 150 


1 123 


2 470 


2 434 


7 279 


9 321 


4 722 


4 599 


1 562 


1 556 


3 160 


3 043 


9 480 


65 AND OVER. , 


1 260 


546 


714 


287 


430 


259 


284 


1 205 


1 617 


703 


914 


292 


424 


411 


490 


1 466 


MEDIAN AGE . . 


21.1 


19.8 


22.5 


30.8 


33.3 


16.3 


17.2 


. 22.0 


21.8 


20.3 


23.1 


29.3 


31.1 


17.4 


18.9 


21.9 




FLORENCE 






GEORGETOWN 








ALL AGES 


84 438 


41 025 


43 413 


23 638 


24 296 


17 387 


19 117 


79 710 


34 798 


16 873 


17 925 


8 275 


8 377 


8 598 


9 548 


31 762 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


2 072 


1 038 


1 034 


508 


505 


530 


529 


2 180 


948 


459 


489 


185 


182 


274 


307 


959 


1 YEAR . 


2 HO 


1 054 


1 056 


525 


495 


529 


561 


X 4 656 


960 


489 


471 


198 


157 


291 


314 


X 2 064 


2 YEARS. 


2 101 


1 033 


1 068 


505 


494 


528 


574 


; 


975 


498 


477 


210 


180 


288 


297 


J 




2 158 


1 125 


1 033 


545 


'500 


580 


533 


}4 482 


1 014 


541 


473 


236 


183 


305 


290 


X 1 973 


4 YEARS. 


2 097 


1 054 


1 043 


474 


487 


580 


556 




1 007 


513 


494 


210 


200 


303 


294 




5 YEARS, 


2 304 


1 207 


1 097 


618 


530 


589 


567 


2 070 


1 086 


543 


543 


236 


211 


307 


332 


946 


6 YEARS. 


2 313 


1 175 


1 138 


572 


561 


603 


577 


2 068 


1 041 


522 


519 


213 


198 


309 


321 


901 


7 YEARS. 


2 136 


1 080 


1 056 


547 


517 


533 


539 


Y 


1 062 


507 


555 


201 


214 


306 


341 


^ 


8 YEARS. 


2 183 


1 116 


1 067 


566 


509 


550 


558 


> 5 650 


965 


481 


484 


198 


222 


283 


262 


L 2 584 


9 YEARS. 1 


2 179 


1 107 


1 072 


556 


505 


551 


567 


J 


943 


491 


452 


193 


182 


298 


270 


J 


10 YEARS 


2 225 


1 150 


1 075 


587 


530 


563 


545 


\ 


999 


522 


477 


237 


199 


285 


278 


1 


1 1 YEARS 


2 111 


1 082 


1 029 


566 


510 


516 


519 


( 6 957 


964 


501 


463 


206 


190 


295 


273 


I 3 088 


12 YEARS 


2 222 


1 1 48 


1 074 


638 


563 


510 


511 


f 


1 056 


531 


525 


241 


243 


290 


282 


[ 


13 YEARS 


2 121 


1 063 


1 058 


615 


545 


448 


513 


J 


929 


474 


455 


216 


196 


258 


259 


J 


14 YEARS 


1 914 


944 


970 


505 


469 


439 


501 


1 717 


884 


450 


434 


188 


174 


262 


260 


714 


15 YEARS 


992 


1 017 


975. 


602 


495 


415 


480 


x 1 663 


853 


434 


419 


194 


153 


240 


266 


640 


16 YEARS 


817 


946 


871 


513 


447 


433 


424 


\ 3 167 


746 


367 


379 


159 


172 


208 


207 


X 1 132 


17 YEARS 


748 


906 


842 


473 


442 


433 


400 


)' 


806 


390 


416 


162 


183 


228 


233 


/ 


18 YEARS 


373 


716 


657 


380 


346 


336 


311 


\ 2 597 


637 


295 


342 


114 


160 


181 


182 


^ 950 


19 YEARS 


219 


577 


642 


263 


331 


314 


311 


J 


448 


210 


238 


84 


107 


126 


131 


; 


20 YEARS 


045 


484 


561 


245 


303 


239 


258 


1 201 


447 


201 


246 


100 


110 


101 


136 


452 


21 AND OVER 


42 998 


20 003 


22 995 


12 835 


14 212 


7 168 


8 783 


41 302 


16 028 


7 454 


8 574 


4 294 


4 561 


3 160 


4 013 


15 359 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


10 538 


5 304 


5 234 


2 557 


2 481 


2 747 


2 753 


11 318 


4 904 


2 500 


2 404 


1 039 


902 


1 461 


1 502 


4 996 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


11 115 


5 685 


5 430 


2 859 


2 622 


2 826 


2 808 


9 788 


5 097 


2 544 


2 553 


1 041 


1 027 


1 503 


1 526 


4 431 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


10 593 


5 387 


5 206 


2 911 


Z 617 


2 476 


2 589 


8 674 


4 832 


2 478 


2 354 


1 088 


1 002 


1 390 


1 352 


3 802 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


8 149 


4 162 


3 987 


2 231 


2 061 


1 931 


1 926 


7 427 


3 490 


1 696 


1 794 


713 


775 


983 


1 019 


2 722 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


4 910 


2 238 


2 672 


1 226 


1 517 


1 012 


1 155 


6 226 


1 851 


862 


989 


452 


495 


410 


494 


2 322 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


4 872 


2 252 


2 620 


1 426 


1 560 


826 


1 060 


6 370 


1 771 


793 


978 


469 


556 


324 


422 


2 485 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


5 128 


2 418 


2 710 


1 589 


589 


829 


1 121 


5 547 


1 924 


893 


1 031 


549 


560 


344 


471 


2 182 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


5 562 


2 624 


2 938 


1 715 


838 


909 


1 100 


5 594 


2 148 


1 005 


1 143 


609 


640 


396 


503 


2 019 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


5 092 


2 444 


2 648 


1 579 


613 


865 


1 035 


4 355 


1 989 


946 


1 043 


554 


541 


392 


502 


1 601 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


4 639 


2 281 


2 358 


1 451 


444 


830 


914 


3 545 


1 770 


909 


861 


517 


445 


392 


416 


1 251 


50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 


3 618 
2 972 
2 308 
2 026 
1 437 


1 693 
1 397 
1 046 
886 

631 


1 925 
1 575 
1 262 
1 140 
806 


1 140 
940 
697 
538 
413 


232 

014 
829 
722 
531 


553 

457 
349 
348 
218 


693 
561 
433 
418 
275 


2 987 
2 295 
1 908 
1 752 

1 019 


1 325 
993 
799 
764 
578 


631 
483 
343 
311 
233 


694 
510 
456 
453 
345 


369 
267 
220 
164 
115 


361 
260 
261 
201 

165 


262 
216 
123 
147 
118 


333 

250 
195 
252 

180 


983 
815 
665 
726 
379 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


836 


340 


496 


222 


353 


118 


143 


X 804 


355 


161 


194 


74 


114 


87 


80 


X 523 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


407 


151 


256 


95 


177 


56 


79 


J* 


128 


49 


79 


24 


51 


25 


28 


) 


85 AND OVER. 


236 


86 


150 


49 


96 


37 


54 


101 


80 


36 


44 


11 


21 


25 


23 


60 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


37 803 
4 942 
21.9 


19 245 
2 094 
20.0 


18 558 
2 848 
23.5 


9 915 
1 317 
25.1 


9 104 
1 879 
27.7 


9 330 
777 
16.7 


9 454 
969 
18.7 


34 610 
3 676 
22.1 


17 238 
1 905 
18.7 


8 713 
790 
17.7 


8 525 
1 115 
19,6 


3 683 
388 
22.8 


3 439 
552 

24.9 


5 030 
402 
14.8 


5 086 
563 
16.9 


15 001 
1 488 
19.9 



42-64 



South Carolina 
Table 27.-AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 1960-Con. 

[Median not shown where base is lets than 100] 











1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 




1950 
POPULA- 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH1TE 


POPULA" 
TIONi 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONV 


IMHITE 


TION* 
TOTAL 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 






GREENV 1 LLE 


GREENWOOD 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 
1 YEAR . . . 


209 776 
5 073 
5 086 
5 018 
4 952 
4 925 
4 97Q 
4 623 
4 656 
4 494 
4 299 
4 171 
4 222 
4 400 
4 286 
3 330 
3 329 
3 477 
3 473 
3 486 
3 341 
3 195 
120 970 


101 890 
2 588 
2 576 
2 568 
2 523 
2 470 
2 494 
2 347 
2 293 
2 286 
2 194 
2 110 
2 203 
2 266 
2 179 
644 
642 
752 
710 
621 
601 
511 
57 312 


107 886 
2 485 
2 510 
2 450 
2 429 
2 455 
2 476 
2 276 
2 363 
2 208 
2 105 
2 061 
2 019 
2 134 
2 107 
1 686 
1 687 
1 725 
1 763 
1 865 
1 740 
1 684 
63 658 


84 367 
2 087 
2 058 
2 036 
1 973 
1 926 
1 945 
1 827 
1 826 
1 821 
1 747 
] 654 
1 766 
1 842 
1 808 
1 314 
1 292 
1 375 
1 382 
1 280 
1 298 
1 268 
48 842 


88 456 

1 906 
1 975 
1 928 
1 894 
1 92O 
1 932 
1 786 
1 868 
1 712 
1 650 
1 581 
1 600 
1 674 
1 689 
1 318 
1 281 
1 343 
1 399 
1 519 
1 507 
1 431 
53 523 


T7 523 
501 
518 
532 
550 
544 
549 
520 
467 
465 
447 
456 
437 
424 
371 
330 
350 
377 
328 
341 
303 
243 
8 470 


19 430 
579 
515 
522 
535 
535 
544 
490 
495 
496 
455 
480 
419 
460 
418 
368 
406 
382 
364 
346 
233 
253 
10 135 


168 152 
3 940 
1 8 303 

\ 7 718 

3 329 

3 420 

!9 503 
11 104 

2 756 
2 806 
X 5 322 

\ 5 853 

3 025 
101 073 


44 346 
933 
928 
992 
943 
926 
966 
949 
976 
952 
' 893 
953 
964 
939 
964 
783 
798 
789 
820 
714 
633 
549 
25 982 


21 152 
458 
440 
496 
495 
476 
487 
494 
489 
498 
431 
503 
489 
473 
490 
403 
422 
363 
396 
332 
261 
232 
12 019 


23 194 
475 
488 
496 
448 
450 
479 
455 
487 
454 
462 
450 
475 
466 
474 
380 
376 
421 
424 
382 
372 
317 
13 963 


,1 4 972 
302 
271 
335 
311 
306 
314 
318 
306 
321 
261 
332 
318 
349 
337 
264 
290 
263 
261 
215 
159 
147 
8 992 


16 239 
277 
297 
289 
298 
294 
291 
279 
302 
299 
290 
287 
293 
299 
341 
256 
252 
305 
284 
265 
274 
241 
10 226 


6 180 
156 
169 
161 
184 
170 
173 
176 
183 
177 
170 
171 
171 
124 
153 
139 
132 
105 
135 
117 
102 
85 
3 027 


6 955 

198 
191 
207 
150 
156 
188 
176 
185 
155 
172 
163 
182 
167 
133 
124 
124 
116 
140 
117 
98 
76 
3 737 


41 628 
910 
X 1 948 

X 1 812 
813 

852 

> 2 443 
I 2 986 

741 
768 
| 1 484 

\ 1 383 

656 
24 832 
















10 YEARS . . . . 
11 YEARS . . 
12 YEARS . . . 
13 YEARS . . * . 
14 YEARS . 
15 YEARS ... 
16 YEARS . . . * 
17 YEARS .... 
18 YEARS . . . . 
19 YEARS , . . 
20 YEARS . . 
21 AND OVER* . 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 
5 TO 9 YEARS . . 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS * 
35 TO 39 YEARS . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS . 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS . 
60 TO 64 YEARS 


25 054 
23 042 
20 409 
17 106 
15 313 
U 861 
14 863 
15 709 
13 664 
12 066 
10 252 

a H7 

6 181 


12 725 
11 614 
10 402 
8 326 
7 267 
7 335 
7 271 
7 571 
6 653 
5 924 
4 865 
3 775 
2 695 


12 329 
1 1 428 
10 007 
8 780 
8 046 
7 526 
7 592 
8 138 
7 Oil 
6 142 
5 387 
4 372 
3 486 


10 080 
9 166 
8 384 
6 627 
6 057 
6 311 
6 265 
6 568 
5 681 
4 989 
4 1.63 
3 177 
2 300 


9 643 
8 948 
7 862 
7 049 
6 783 
6 247 
6 396 
6 932 
5 854 
5 135 ; 
4 506 
3 656 
2 935 


2 645 
2 448 
2 018 
1 699 
1 210 
1 024 
1 006 
1 003 
972 
935 
702 
598 
395 


2 686 
2 480 
2 145 
1 731 
1 263 
1 279 
1 196 
1 206 
1 157 
1 007 
881 
716 
551 


19 961 
16 252 
13 860 
13 981 
15 376 
15 991 
13 727 
12 895 
11 111 
8 794 
7 302 
5 827 
4 446 


4 722 
4 736 
4 603. 
3 754 
2 547 
2 751 
2 992 
3 159 
3 022 
2 881 
2 331 
1 976 
1 544 


2 365 
2 399 
2 358 
779 

159 
287 
407 
476 
1 444 
1 411 
1 060 
924 
671 


2 357 
2 337 

2 245 
1 975 
1 388 
464 
585 
683 
578 
470 
271 
052 
873 


1 525 

1 520 
1 600 
1 188 
761 
929 
1 070 
1 119 
1 101 
1 086 
829 
710 
525 


1 455 
1 461 
1 476 
1 380 
961 
1 027 
1 143 
1 251 
1 170 
1 084 
976 
790 
648 


840 
879 
758 
591 
398 
358 
337 
357 
343 
325 
231 
214 
146 


902 
876 
769 
595 

427 
437 
442 
432 
408 
386 
295 
262 
225 


4 670 
4 108 
3 727 
3 635 
3 442 
3 664 
3 265 
3 273 
2 688 
2 239 
1 858 
1 431 
1 155 


65 TO 69 YEARS . 


5 258 


2 285 


2 973 


1 895 


2 481 


390 


492 


3 959 


1 338 


610 


728 


425 


528 


185 


200 


1 1 19 


70 TO 74 YEARS . 


3 671 


1 548 


2 123 


1 311 


1 822 


237 


301 


2 420 


903 


394 


509 


288 


388 


106 


121 


696 


75 TO 79 YEARS . 


2 455 


996 


1 459 


854 


1 262 


142 


197 


\ 1 943 


613 


237 


376 


178 


279 


59 


97 


| 589 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


1 117 


424 


693 


371 


621 


53 


72 


; 


322 


116 


206 


86 


155 


30 


51 




85 AND OVER. . * 


608 


214 


394 


168 


324 


46 


70 


307 


152 


55 


97 


32 


67 


23 


30 


69 


UNDER 18 YEARS * 


78 784 


39 845 


38 939 


31 679 


30 476 


8 166 


8 463 


58 201 


16 468 


8 308 


8 160 


5 459 


5 233 


2 849 


2 927 


14. 757 


65 AND OVER. . , 


13 109 


5 467 


7 642 


4 599 


6 510 


868 


1 132 


8 629 


3 328: 


1 412 


1 916 


1 009 


1 417 


403 


499 


2 473 


MEDIAN AGE . * * 


26.3 


25.4 


27.2 


26.5 


28.2 


19.9 


22.7 


26.5 


28.3 


27.0 


29.4 


29.8 


31.6 


20.3 


23.9 


26.7 










HAMPTON 




HORRY 




ALL AGES . 


17 425 


8 466 


8 959 


3 945 


4 093 


4 521 


4 866 


18 027 


68 247 


34 016 


34 231 


25 109 


24 896 


8 907 


9 335 


59 820 


UNDER 1 YEAR . 


452 


219 


233 


77 


80 


142 


153 


. 467 


1 857 


927 


930 


621 


632 


306 


298 


x 1 719 


1 YEAR . 


447 


217 


230 


61 


62 


156 


168 


X 1 016 


795 


896 


699 


609 


567 


287 


332 


X 3 697 


2 YEARS. 


445 


201 


244 


77 


ai 


124 


163 


/ 


851 


939 


912 


603 


584 


336 


328 


/ 




458 


235 


223 


95 


63 


140 


140 


X 1 056 


81 9 


952 


867 


650 


566 


302 


301 


X 3 526 


4 YEARS. 


462 


242 


220 


92 


91 


150 


129 




769 


898 


871 


557 


573 


341 


298 




5 YEARS* 


489 


234 


255 


91 


82 


143 


173 


' 496 


819 


921 


898 


609 


577 


312 


321 


1 619 




442 


236 


206 


86 


74 


1 50 


132 


524 ' 


1 725 


904 


821 


609 


537 


295 


284 


q 697 


7 YEARS. . 


491 


246 


245 


98 


89 


148 


156 


^ 


753 


882 


871 


573 


562 


309 


309 


^ 


8 YEARS. 


443 


212 


231 


83 


89 


129 


142 


> 1 349 


656 


808 


848 


543 


572 


265 


276 


I 4 591 


9 YEARS. 


418 


232 


186 


96 


79 


136 


107 


/ 


653 


824 


829 


561 


529 


263 


300 


J 


10 YEARS 


440 


235 


205 


91 


84 


144 


121 




699 


857 


842 


569 


574 


288 


268 


4 


11 YEARS * 


449 


217 


232 


87 


86 


130 


146 


1 1 729 


714 


864 


850 


588 


597 


276 


253 


I 5 917 


12 YEARS . 


465 


246 


219 


80 


83 


166 


136 


f 


678 


822 


856 


577 


577 


245 


279 


f 


13 YEARS 


462 


219 


243 


87 


120 


132 


123 


J 


714 


829 


885 


587 


622 


242 


263 


j 


14 YEARS . 


451 


218 


233 


87 


86 


131 


147 


347 


428 


719 


709 


510 


484 


209 


225 


1 393 


15 YEARS 


417 


215 


202 


91 


78 


124 


124 


311 


439 


718 


721 


502 


503 


216 


218 


1 219 


16 YEARS 


397 


205 


192 


96 


82 


109 


110 


X 693 


1 390 


714 


676 


503 


487 


211 


189 


X 2 521 


17 YEARS . 


381 


196 


185 


76 


94 


120 


91 


t 


1 390 


697 


693 


483 


473 


214 


220 


j 


18 YEARS 


293 


154 


139 


52 


49 


102 


90 


\ 567 


1 100 


568 


532 


392 


360 


176 


172 


X 2 104 


19 YEARS 


186 


84 


102 


32 


50 


52 


52 


J 


1 008 


507 


501 


362 


335 


145 


166 


/ 


20 YEARS . 


174 


88 


86 


38 


32 


50 


54 


248 


1 043 


. 540 


503 


404 


364 


136 


139 


J 918 


21 AND OVER . 


8 763 


4 115 


4 648 


2 272 


2 439 


1 843. 


2 209 


9 224 


34 947 


17 230 


17 717 


13 697 


13 821 


3 533 


3 896 


28 899 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


2 264 


1 114 


1 150 


402 


397 


712 


753 


2 539 


9 091 


4 612 


4 479 


3 040 


2 922 


1 572 


1 557 


8 942 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


2 283 


1 160 


1 123 


454 


413 


706 


710 


2 369 


8 606 


4 339 


4 267 


2 895 


2 777 


1 444 


1 490 


7 907 


10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 


2 267 
1 674 


1 135 
854 


1 132 
820 


432 
347 


459 
353 


703 
507 


673 

467 


2 076 

1 571 


8 233 
6 327 


4 091 
3 204 


4 142 
3 123 


2 831 
2 242 


2 854 
1 2 158 


1 260 
962 


1 288 
965 


7 310 
5 844 


20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. . 


898 
894 
913 
997 
1 020 
929 
814 
679 
538 
531 
341 
225 
97 
61 


413 
422 
438 
491 
465 
453 
424 
325 
234 
240 
149 
88 
43 
18 


485 
472 
475 
506 
555 
476 
390 
354 
304 
291 
192 
137 
54 
43 


1S6 
227 
256 
279 
276 
236 
236 
176 
153 
131 
78 
39 
29 
8 


215 
253 

241 
270 
288 
251 
216 
189 
174 
138 
104 
86 
30 
16 


227 

195 
182 
212 
189 
217 
188 
149 
81 
109 
71 
49 
14 
10 


270 
219 
234 
236 
267 
225 
174 
165 
130 
153 
88 
51 
24 
27 


1 232 

1 217 
1 091 
1 221 
971 
827 
727 
571 
477 
518 
306 
X 284 

30 


5 304 
-4 739 
4 344 
4 374 
3 844 
3 503 
2 636 
2 106 
1 772 
1 451 
923 
595 
263 
136 


2 810 
2 339 
2 116 
2 156 
1 895 
1 745 
1 326 
996 
828 
712 
422 
249 
123 
53 


2 494 
2 400 
2 228 
2 218 
1 949 
1 758 
1 310 
1 1 10 
944 
739 
501 
346 
140 
83 


2 234 
1 865 
1 653 
1 719 
1 442 
1 341 
1 070 
818 
664 
579 
356 
217 
101 
42 


1 887 
1 878 
1 '650 
1 707 
1 487 
1 347 
1 042 
904 
770 
603 
429 
299 
119 
63 


576 
474 
463 
437 
453 
404 
256 
178 
164 
133 
66 
32 
22 
11 


607 
522 
578 
511 
462 
411 
268 
206 
174 
136 
72 
47 
21 
20 


4 648 
4 596 
4 017 
3 875 
3 055 
2 434 
2 030 
1 648 
1 267 
1 074 
610 
X ^97 

66 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER* * 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


8 009 
1 255 
21,3 


4 025 
538: 
19.8 


3 984 

717 
22.6 


1 55} 
285 
28.3 


1 523 
374 
29.1 


2 474 
253 
16.4 


2 461 
343 
18.2 


7 988 

1 138 
21.9 


30 149 
3 368 
21.8 


15 171 
1 559 
21.4 


14 .978 
1 809 
22.2 


10 254 
1 295 
23.5 


10 016 
1 513 
24.6 


4 917 
264 
15.9 


4 962 
296 
16.7 


27 899 
2 247 
19.9 



General Population Characteristics 

Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: I960 Con. 
[Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



42-65 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 

POPULA 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES || WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA 
TlONf 


ALL CLASSES || WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TlONt 
TOTAL 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE II MALE 
It 


FEMALE 


MALE IFEMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL It MALE 


FEMALE || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 






JASPER 


KERSHAW 




ALL AGES 


12 237 


5 982 


6 255 


2 302 


2 317 


3 680 


3 938 


10 995 


33 585 


16 376 


17 209 


9 919 


10 303 


6 457 


6 906 


32 287 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


320 


149 


171 


39 


51 


no 


120 


277 


836 


426 


410 


234 


212 


192 


198 


799 


1 YEAR . 


307 


150 


157 


44 


50 


106 


107 


X 572 


832 


445 


387 


244 


219 


201 


168 


X 1 854 


2 YEARS. 


297 


140 


157 


46 


39 


94 


118 


; 


856 


436 


420 


233 


234 


203 


186 


} 


3 YEARS. 


310 


155 


155 


57 


45 


98 


110 


X 620 


874 


449 


425 


239 


239 


210 


186 


\ 1 741 


4 YEARS. 


299 


151 


148 


45 


49 


106 


99 


/ 


877 


420 


457 


22S 


246 


192 


211 


; 


5 YEARS. 


327 


173 


154 


58 


52 


115 


102 


295 


865 


449 


416 


256 


233 


193 


183 


773 


6 YEARS. 


369 


182 


187 


67 


45 


115 


142 


347 


936 


468 


468 


260 


274 


208 


194 


877 


7 YEARS. 


301 


162 


139 


47 


47 


115 


92 


}~ 


903 


425 


478 


258 


246 


167 


232 


\ 


8 YEARS. 


303 


161 


142 


52 


56 


109 


86 


883 


915 


455 


460 


262 


260 


193 


200 


> 2 505 


9 YEARS. 


334 


172 


162 


54 


35 


118 


127 




851 


422 


429 


235 


216 


189 


213 


^ 


10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 


335 
314 
339 


166 
157 
189 


169 
157 
150 


55 
44 
63 


44 
56 
48 


111 
113 
126 


125 
101 
102 


f 
}1 128 


836 
852 
854 


420 
412 
417 


416 
440 
437 


247 
213 
233 


239 
234 
232 


173 
194 
184 


177 
206 
205 


}2 947 


13 YEARS 


306 


152 


154 


55 


38 


97 


116 




856 


410 


446 


256 


247 


154 


199 


. 


14 YEARS 


303 


147 


156 


40 


43 


107 


113 


239 


762 


410 


352 


206 


158 


204 


194 


712 


15 YEARS 


301 


145 


156 


44 


51 


101 


105 


221 


682 


341 


341 


180 


175 


161 


166 


683 


16 YEARS 


304 


150 


154 


46 


47 


104 


107 


X 459 


708 


363 


345 


193 


190 


170 


155 


}1 268 


17 YEARS 


303 


151 


152 


51 


43 


100 


109 


/ 


729 


369 


360 


194 


194 


175 


166 




18 YEARS 


232 


108 


124 


30 


46 


78 


78 


X 350 


543 


294 


249 


160 


125 


134 


124 


}1 091 


19 YEARS 


165 


78 


87 


24 


29 


54 


58 


; 


445 


222 


223 


112 


123 


110 


100 




20 YEARS 


146 


66 


80 


25 


30 


41 


50 


142 


412 


197 


215 


109 


113 


88 


102 


UU* 

445 


21 AND OVER 


6 022 


2 878 


3 144 


1 316 


1 373 


1 562 


1 771 


5 462 


17 161 


8 126 


9 035 


5 364 


5 894 


2 762 


3 141 


16 592 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


1 533 


745 


788 


231 


234 


514 


554 


1 469 


4 275 


2 176 


2 099 


1 178 


1 150 


998 


949 


4 394 


5 TO 9 YEAKS 


1 634 


850 


784 


278 


235 


572 


549 


1 525 


4 470 


2 219 


2 251 


1 269 


1 229 


950 


1 022 


4 155 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


1 597 


811 


786 


257 


229 


554 


557 


1 367 


4 160 


2 069 


2 091 


1 160 


1 110 


909 


981 


3 659 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


1 305 


632 


673 


195 


216 


437 


457 


1 030 


3 107 


1 589 


1 518 


839 


807 


750 


711 


3 042 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


682 


321 


361 


114 


152 


207 


209 


740 


1 763 


826 


937 


482 


570 


344 


367 


2 288 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


565 


272 


293 


137 


121 


135 


172 


696 


1 878 


870 


1 008 


567 


705 


303 


303 


2 300 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


568 


264 


304 


135 


146 


129 


158 


660 


2 022 


1 016 


1 006 


704 


695 


312 


311 


2 049 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


670 


308 


362 


158 


159 


150 


203 


718 


2 132 


1 031 


1 101 


729 


781 


302 


320 


2 1 14 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


673 


317 


356 


143 


153 


174 


203 


573 


1 977 


991 


986 


672 


652 


319 


334 


1 753 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


687 


340 


347 


157 


151 


183 


196 


518 


1 851 


885 


966 


612 


619 


273 


347 


1 449 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


541 


281 


260 


143 


116 


138 


144 


446 


1 433 


701 


732 


483 


495 


218 


237 


1 226 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


526 


258 


268 


111 


121 


147 


147 


343 


1 167 


560 


607 


360 


369 


200 


238 


1 005 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


337 


158 


179 


70 


82 


88 


97 


256 


920 


389 


531 


251 


341 


138 


190 


850 


65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 


382 
246 
152 


177 
126 
63 


205 
120 
89 


66 

58 
26 


74 
56 
32 


111 
68 
37 


131 
64 
57 


300 
181 
X 149 


963 

712 
446 


428 
303 
194 


535 

409 
252 


241 
175 
121 


281 
225 
168 


187 
128 
73 


254 
184 
84 


9O4 
571 
X 449 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


94 


37 


57 


16 


29 


21 


28 


/ 


196 


86 


110 


57 


67 


29 


43 


/ 


85 AND OVER. 


45 


22 


23 


7 


11 


15 


12 


24 


113 


43 


70 


19 


39 


24 


31 


79 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


5 672 


2 852 


2 820 


907 


839 


1 945 


1 981 


5 041 


15 024 


7 537 


7 487 


4 174 


4 048 


3 363 


3 439 


14 159 


65 AND OVER. 
MEDIAN AGE . . 


919 
20.4 


425 
19.6 


494 
21.3 


173 
27.8 


202 

28.8 


252 

17.3 


292 

18.4 


654 
20.7 


2 430 
22.2 


1 054 
20,8 


1 376 
23.4 


613 
25.3 


780 
27.0 


441 
17.5 


596 
18.5 


2 OO3 
22.0 










LANCASTER 


LAURENS 


ALL AGES 
UNDER 1 YEAR 
1 YEAR . 
2 YEARS. 
3 YEARS. 
4 YEARS. 
5 YEARS. 
6 YEARS. 
7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. 
9 YEARS. 
10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 


39 352 
955 
972 
979 
988 
903 
1 Oil 
994 
913 
936 
929 
984 
992 
961 
1 006 
767 
791 
781 
784 
626 
549 
556 
20 975 


19 171 
512 
496 
483 
484 
482 
485 
494 
457 
476 
458 
514 
508 
478 
475 
381 
432 
421 
376 
314 
285 
258 
9 902 


20 181 
443 
476 
496 
504 
421 
526 
500 
456 
460 
471 
470 
484 
483 
531 
386 
359 
360 
408 
312 
264 
298 
11 073 


14 115 
327 
337 
311 
317 
328 
345 
322 
305 
342 
302 
355 
349 
340 
328 
263 
316 
295 
260 
215 
202 
198 
7 758 


14 620 
292 
299 
340 
325 
277 
348 
322 
300 
300 
324 
313 
324 
342 
388 
264 
237 
251 
295 
233 
183 
208 
8 455 


5 056 
185 
159 
172 
167 
154 
140 
172 
152 
134 
156 
159 
159 
138 
147 
118 
116 
126 
116 
99 
83 
60 
2 144 


5 561 
151 
177 
156 
179 
144 
178 
178 
156 
160 
147 
157 
160 
141 
143 
122 
122 
109 
113 
79 
81 
90 
2 618 


37 071 
1 002 
\ 2 085 

\ 2 055 

910 
918 

i 2 500 
I 3 142 

745 
730 
> 1 447 

"1 1 239 

^ 605 
19 693 


47 609 
993 
992 
961 
986 
1 007 
1 049 
1 065 
1 080 
1 081 
1 064 
1 076 
1 128 
1 167 
1 131 
980 
963 
1 019 
946 
844 
756 
708 
26 593 


23 233 

503 
469 
492 
468 
502 
523 
530 
554 
533 
559 
551 
603 
608 
577 
496 
512 
507 
463 
459 
427 
390 
12 507 


24 376 
490 
523 
469 
518 
505 
526 
535 
526 
548 
505 
525 
525 
579 
554 
484 
451 
512 
483 
385 
329 
318 
14 086 


16 508 
310 
286 
285 
285 
293 
317 
338 
370 
357 
356 
384 
416 
425 
406 
348 
362 
362 
311 
319 
316 
289 
9 373 


17 027 
315 
301 
258 
304 
238 
347 
335 
326 
331 
325 
328 
342 
403 
390 
317 
300 
368 
343 
267 
232 
205 
10 402 


6 725 
193 
183 
207 
183 
209 
206 
192 
184 
176 
203 
167 
187 
183 
171 
148 
150 
145 
152 
140 
111 
101 
3 134 


7 349 
175 
222 
211 
214 
217 
179 
200 
200 
217 
ISO 
197 
183 
176 
164 
167 
151 
144 
140 

lie 

97 

113 
3 684 


46 974 
1 019 
X 2 325 

X 2212 

1 013 

1 084 

j- 3 028 
I 3 878 

908 
. 967 
X 1 802 

X 1 668 

803 
26 267 


UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS . 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. 


4 797 
4 783 
4 710 
3 531 
2 579 
2 491 
2 570 
2 610 
2 402 
2 226 
1 771 
1 355 
1 082 
1 Oil 
711 
399 
205 
119 


2 457 
2 370 
2 356 
828 
195 
189 
215 
284 
139 
091 
876 
624 
480 
434 
315 
175 
89 
54 


2 340 
2 413 
2 354 
1 703 
1 384 
1 302 
1 355 
1 326 
1 263 
1 135 
895 
731 
602 
577 
396 
224 
116 
65 


1 620 
1 616 
1 635 
1 288 
898 
935 
964 
1 031 
905 
880 
705 
483 
381 
330 
216 
131 
59 
38 


1 533 

1 594 
1 631 
1 199 
1 032 
1 010 
1 030 
1 036 
975 
881 
685 
541 
444 
406 
296 

iai 

97 
49 


837 
754 
721 
540 
297 
254 
251 
253 
234 
211 
171 
141 
99 
104 
99 
44 
30 
16 


807 
819 
723 
504 
352 
292 
325 
290 
288 
254 
210 
190 
158 
171 
100 
43 
19 
16 


5 142 
4 328 
3 687 
3 416 
3 107 
3 196 
2 688 
2 499 
1 998 
1 600 
1 389 
1 103 
903 
821 
505 
\ 434 

55 


4 939 
5 339 

5 502 
4 528 
3 122 
2 846 
2 925 
3 167 
2 936 
2 837 
2 420 
2 009 
1 546 
1 343 
1 005 
660 
300 
185 


2 434 
2 699 
2 835 
2 368 
1 600 
1 395 
1 335 
1 508 
1 404 
1 361 
1 134 
942 
713 
613 
420 
278 
116 
78 


2 505 
2 640 
2 667 
2 160 
1 522 
1 451 
1 590 
1 659 
1 532 
1 476 
1 286 
1 067 
833 
730 
585 
382 
184 
107 


1 459 
1 738 
1 979 
1 670 
1 146 
1 021 
991 
1 155 
1 084 
1 034 
880 
730 
542 
428 
303 
209 
89 
50 


1 466 
1 664 
1 780 
1 510 
025 
039 
145 
255 
144 
1 095 
998 
804 
622 
517 
444 
294 
152 
73 


975 
961 
856 
698 
454 
374 
344 
353 
320 
327 
254 
212 
171 
185 
117 
69 
27 
28 


1 039 
976 
887 
650 
497 
412 
445 
404 
388 
381 
288 
263 
211 
213 
141 
88 
32 
34 


5 556 
5 125 
4 786 
4 437 
3 911 
3 784 
3 295 
3 306 
2 796 
2 295 
1 913 
1 598 
1 235 
1 389 
787 
X 658 

103 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. 
MEDIAN AGE . 


16 646 
2 445 
23.6 


8 412 
1 067 

22.4 


8 234 
1 378 
24.6 


5 .742 
774 
25.0 


5 541 
1 029 
26.6 


2 670 
293 

17.0 


2 693 
349 
19.3 


15 534 
1 815 
22.8 


18 708 
3 493 
25.7 


9 450 
1 505 
24.0 


9 258 
1 988 
27.4 


6 211 
1 079 
26.3 


5 921 
1 480 
30.1 


3 239 

426 
19.1 


3 337 
508 

21.2 


18 236 

2 937 

24.6 



42-66 



South Carolina 

Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: I960 Con. 
[Median not shown -where base is less than 100] 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 
POPULA- 
TIONt 
TOTAL 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WH 1 TE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TIONt 


ALL CLASSES 




WHT 


FE 


NONW 


1ITE 




TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 




TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


-EMALE 








LEE 






LEX 1 NGTON 


ALL AGES 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 


21 832 
658 
619 
643 
642 
620 
659 
668 
649 
631 
622 
598 
571 
646 
640 
522 
553 
502 
482 
431 
341 
295 
9 840 

3 182 
3 229 
2 977 
2 309 
157 
015 
093 
176 
128 
041 
838 
671 
610 
606 
366 
251 
124 
59 

10 925 

1 406 
18.3 


10 710 
339 
316 
327 
338 
317 
363 
347 
325 
317 
325 
301 
303 
329 
307 
269 
280 
261 
219 
232 
172 
142 
4 581 

1 637 
1 677 
1 509 
1 164 
564 
454 
510 
537 
535 
508 
425 
302 
246 
259 
ISO 
121 
53 
29 

5 583 
642 
17.3 


11 122 
319 
303 
316 
304 
303 
296 
321 
324 
314 
297 
297 
268 
317 
333 
253 
273 
241 
263 
199 
169 
153 
5 259 

1 545 
1 552 
1 468 
1 145 
593 
561 
583 
639 
593 
533 
413 
369 
364 
347 
186 
130 
71 
30 

5 342 
764 
19.3 


3 596 
71 
68 
70 
82 
75 
83 
80 
82 
89 
72 
78 
74 
80 
98 
65 
77 
81 
65 
59 
35 
36 
2 076 

366 
406 
395 
317 
169 
178 
221 
248 
258 
261 
205 
141 
128 
105 
84 
63 
36 
15 

1 390 

303 
29.1 


3 863 
79 
66 
79 
73 
76 
74 
82 
81 
82 
84 
77 
72 
85 
97 
58 
90 
72 
78 
59 
49 
32 
2 318 

373 

403 
389 
348 
174 
206 
228 
285 
251 
230 
199 
199 
169 
171 
105 
74 
47 
12 

1 405 
409 
30.8 


7 114 
268 
248 
257 
256 
242 
280 
267 
243 
223 
253 
223 
229 
249 
209 
204 
203 
180 
154 
173 
137 
106 
2 505 

1 271 

1 271 
1114 
847 
395 
276 
289 
239 
277 
247 
220 
161 
118 
154 
96 
58 
17 
14 

4 193 
339 

14.6 


7 259 
240 
237 
237 
231 
227 
222 
239 
243 
232 
213 
220 
196 
232 
236 
195 
183 
169 
185 
140 
120 
121 
2 941 

1 172 
1 149 
1 079 
797 
419 
355 
355 
354 
342 
303 
214 
170 
195 
176 
81 
56 
24 
18 

3 937 

355 
16.4 


23 173 
650 
V 1 458 

\ 1 495 

651 
678 

V 1 889 
I 2 314 

489 
519 
\ 988 

\ 860 

366 

10 816 

3 603 
3 218 
2 803 
2 367 
1 727 
1 558 
1 283 
1 387 
1 106 
910 
834 
662 
538 
544 
327 

> 2 " 

43 

11 131 
1 177 
19.1 


60 726 
491 
500 
476 
547 
525 
542 
437 
433 
379 
324 
339 
347 
326 
372 
127 
086 
135 
202 
982 
817 
783 
33 556 

7 539 
7 115 
6 511 
5 222 
3 825 
4 116 
4 289 
4 396 
3 899 
3 358 
2 735 
2 127 
1 661 
1 559 
1 081 
724 
357 
212 

24 588 
3 933 
25.2 


29 890 
751 
779 
750 
796 
779 
810 
722 
709 
721 
675 
649 
650 
651 
708 
554 
548 
598 
581 
460 
368 
381 
16 250 

3 855 
3 637 
3 212 
2 555 

1 826 
1 962 

2 123 
2 183 
1 960 
1 684 
1 349 
1 013 
757 
721 
480 
343 
151 
79 

12 431 
1 774 
24.6 


30 836 
740 
721 
726 
751 
746 
732 
715 
724 
658 
649 
690 
697 
675 
664 
573 
538 
537 
621 
522 
449 
402 
17 306 

3 684 
3 478 
3 299 
2 667 
1 999 
2 154 
2 166 
2 213 
1 939 
1 674 
1 386 
1 114 
904 
838 
601 
381 
206 
133 

12 157 
2 159 
25.7 


24 855 
596 
613 
587 
626 
623 
654 
559 
565 
585 
519 
518 
496 
529 
567 
424 
425 
483 
481 
362 
297 
319 
14 027 

3 045 
2 882 
2 534 
2 048 
1 537 
1 704 
1 885 
1 923 
1 716 
1 444 
1 177 
857 
656 
580 
381 
296 
127 
63 

9 850 
1 447 
26.1 


25 405 
574 
545 
582 
581 
585 
568 
550 
556 
531 
500 
551 
553 
538 
543 
456 
406 
438 
497 
398 
367 
339 
14 747 

2 867 
2 705 
2 641 
2 106 
1 688 
1 850 
1 881 
1 915 
1 655 
1 430 
1 196 
928 
761 
685 
487 
319 
181 
110 

9 554 
1 782 
26.9 


5 035 
155 
166 
163 
17O 
156 
156 
163 
144 
136 
156 
131 
154 
122 
141 
130 
123 
115 
100 
98 
71 
62 
2 223 

810 
755 
678 
507 
289 
258 
238 
260 
244 
240 
172 
156 
101 
141 
99 
47 
24 
16 

2 581 
327 

17.7 


5 431 
166 
176 
144 
170 
161 
164 
165 
168 
127 
149 
139 
144 
137 
121 
117 
132 
99 
124 
124 
82 
63 
2 559 

817 
773 
658 
561 
311 
304 
285 
298 
284 
244 
190 
186 
143 
153 
114 
62 
25 
23 

2 603 
377 
19.2 


44 279 
1 089 
L 2 279 

L 2 258 

994 
1 058 

f 3 OO1 
I 3 320 

756 
700 
\ 1 518 

\ 1 366 

614 
25 326 

5 626 
5 053 
4 076 
3 584 
3 528 
3 761 
3 354 
3 160 
2 555 
2 095 
1 857 
1 572 
1 272 
1 199 
777 
\ 703 

107 

16 973 
2 786 
25.4 






4 YEARS. . . . 








10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER 

UNDER 5 YEARS 
5 TO 9 YEARS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. . 

UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . . 

ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 


MC CORMICK 


MARION 


8 629 
226 

212 
231 
219 
217 
217 
246 
233 
209 
233 
223 
232 
250 
255 
187 
248 
212 
227 
152 
121 
116 
4 163 

1 105 
1 138 
1 147 
960 
505 
417 
418 
462 
438 
371 
321 
297 
292 
286 
224 
111 
78 
59 

4 077 
758 
19.8 


4 205 
114 
110 
118 
99 
110 
103 
127 
114 
106 
116 
133 
113 
110 
126 
84 
128 
96 
117 
79 
68 
63 
1 971 

551 
566 
566 
488 
245 
179 
197 
212 
227 
176 
162 
137 
126 
142 

no 

52 
40 
29 

2 024 
373 
19.3 


4 424 
112 
102 
113 
120 
107 
114 
119 
119 
103 
117 
90 
119 
140 
129 
103 
120 
116 
110 
73 
53 
53 
2 192 

554 
572 
581 
472 
260 
238 
221 
250 
211 
195 
159 
160 
166 
144 
114 
59 
38 
30 

2 053 
385 
20.6 


1 615 
26 
28 
31 
21 
21 
23 
40 
30 
35 
39 
53 
44 
51 
46 
34 
46 
33 
43 
21 
13 
14 
923 

127 
167 
228 
156 
67 
81 
90 
. 101 
112 
84 
83 
72 
70 
69 
49 
25 
18 
16 

644 
177 
28.9 


1 696 
33 
29 
37 
26 
34 
34 
41 
30 
29 
34 
29 
30 
59 
53 
39 
47 
44 
34 
19 
13 
10 
992 

159 
168 
210 
157 
75 
94 
101 
116 
103 
82 
67 
91 
87 
66 
53 
30 
25 
12 

662 

186 
29.2 


2 590 
88 
82 
87 
78 
89 
80 
87 
84 
71 
77 
80 
69 
59 
80 
50 
82 
63 
74 
58 
55 
49 
1 048 

424 
399 
338 
332 
178 
98 
107 
111 
115 
92 
79 
65 
56 
73 
61 
27 
22 
13 

1 380 
196 
17.0 


2 728 
79 
73 
76 
94 
73 
80 
78 
89 
74 
83 
61 
89 
81 
76 
64 
73 
72 
76 
54 
40 
43 
1 200 

395 
404 
371 
315 
185 
144 
120 
134 
108 
113 
92 
69 
79 
78 
61 
29 
13 
18 

1 391 
199 
18.1 


9 577 
255 
\ 548 

\ 491 

255 
255 

} - 

I 982 

248 
239 

} 3 " 
} 31? 

131 
4 702 

1 294 
1 263 
1 230 
957 
640 
606 
571 
500 
425 
384 
371 
334 
257 
303 
196 
\ 206 

40 

4 425 
745 
20.3 


32 014 
799 
808 
802 
867 
833 
908 
894 
881 
852 
895 
864 
880 
889 
827 
784 
722 
721 
671 
540 
436 
354 
15 787 

4 109 
4 430 
4 244 
3 090 
1 673 
1 646 
1 755 
1 951 
1 763 
1 774 
1 471 
1 198 
891 
816 
631 
331 
143 
98 

14 897 
2 019 
20.4 


15 250 
403 
405 
407 
400 
425 
463 
449 
430 
424 
462 
425 
.446 
462 
401 
392 
340 
361 
350 
278 
205 
187 
7 135 

2 040 
2 228 
2 126 
1 534 
790 
733 
775 
866 
819 
864 
668 
530 
398 
358 
285 
157 
49 
30 

7 445 
879 
19.0 


16 764 
396 
403 
395 
467 
408 
445 
445 
451 
428 
433 
439 
434 
427 
426 
392 
382 
360 
321 
262 
231 
167 
8 652 

2 069 
2 202 
2 1 18 
1 556 
883 
913 
980 
1 085 
944 
910 
803 
668 
493 
458 
346 
174 
94 
68 

7 452 
1 140 
22.5 


7 007 
137 
149 
143 
159 
155 
160 
156 
170 
167 
182 
182 
203 
172 
175 
175 
132 
152 
158 
116 
80 
85 
3 799 

743 
835 
907 
638 
379 
397 
401 
484 
420 
455 
375 
277 
211 
204 
145 
86 
28 
22 

2 927 
485 
25.0 


7 408 
138 
140 
142 
166 
140 
162 
162 
151 
164 
164 
156 
174 
172 
181 
161 
154 
151 
145 
113 
104 
64 
4 304 

726 
803 
844 
667 
363 
465 
457 
528 
444 
450 
418 
349 
256 
244 
194 
105 
57 
38 

2 823 
638 
28.2 


8 243 
266 
256 
264 
241 
270 
303 
293 
260 
257 
280 
243 
243 
290 
226 
217 
208 
209 
192 
162 
125 
102 
3 336 

1 297 
1 393 
1 219 
896 
411 
336 
374 
382 
399 
409 
293 
253 
187 
154 
140 
71 
21 
8 

4 518 
394 
16.2 


9 356 
258 
263 
253 
301 
268 
283 
283 
300 
264 
269 
283 
260 
255 
245 
231 
228 
209 
176 
149 
127 
103 
4 348 

1 343 
1 399 
1 274 
889 
520 
448 
523 
557 
500 
460 
385 
319 
237 
214 
152 
69 
37 
30 

4 629 
502 
18.7 


33 1 10 
. 953 

|. 1 986 

L 1 870 

866 
823 

I 2 '335 
I 3 045 

704 
705 
\ 1 393 

\ 1 131 

512 

16 787 

4 809 
4 024 
3 749 
3 229 
2 637 
2 483 
2 138 
2 279 
1 798 
1 517 
1 193 
940 
776 
707 
447 
\ 336 

^ 48 

14 680 
1 538 
21.4 


2 YEARS 
3 YEARS 










10 YEARS . . . . 
1.1 YEARS .... 
12 YEARS . . . 
13 YEARS . . . . 
14 YEARS . . 
15 YEARS . . . 
16 YEARS . . * . 
17 YEARS . . . 
18 YEARS . . . . 
19 YEARS . 
20 YEARS ... 
21 AND OVER. * . 

UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 YEARS . 
10 TO 14 YEARS . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS . 
35 TO 39 YEARS . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS . 
50 TO 54 YEARS . 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 TO 79 YEARS . 
SO TO 84 YEARS . 
85 AND OVER. . 

UNDER 18 YEARS . 
65 AND OVER. . . 
MEDIAN AGE * . 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 1960 Con. 

[Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



42-67 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 

POPULA- 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WH 1 TE 


NONWHITE 


TlONi 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TION! 
TOTAL 




TOTAL MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 




TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 






MARLBORO 


NEWBERRY 


ALL AGES 


28 529 


13 667 


14 862 


7 009 


7 599 


6 658 


7 263 


31 766 


29 416 


14 438 


14 978 


9 377 


9 605 


5 061 


5 373 


31 771 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


763 


393 


370 


160 


146 


233 


224 


897 


575 


299 


276 


160 


148 


139 


128 


680 


1 YEAR . 


773 


383 


390 


164 


175 


219 


215 


L 1 902 


598 


307 


291 


181 


139 


126 


152 


}1 492 


2 YEARS. 


768 


391 


377 


169 


174 


222 


203 


r 


566 


297 


269 


158 


142 


139 


127 




3 YEARS, 


703 


352 


351 


141 


139 


211 


212 


L 1 823 


540 


279 


261 


134 


126 


145 


135 


}1 424 


4 YEARS. 


743 


360 


383 


159 


186 


201 


197 




589 


307 


282 


162 


145 


145 


137 




5 YEARS. 


767 


377 


390 


167 


155 


210 


235 


838 


609 


295 


314 


160 


150 


135 


164 


657 


6 YEARS. 


714 


367 


347 


180 


146 


187 


201 


843 


537 


270 


267 


145 


125 


125 


142 


693 


7 YEARS. 


737 


390 


347 


158 


153 


232 


194 


}" 


604 


317 


287 


171 


149 


146 


138 


'S 


8 YEARS. 


689 


317 


372 


151 


167 


166 


205 


2 396 


594 


291 


303 


157 


163 


134 


140 


> 1 935 


9 YEARS. 


702 


345 


357 


152 


147 


193 


210 




630 


319 


311 


181 


157 


138 


154 


J 


10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
12 YEARS 


773 
811 
775 


386 
408 
370 


387 
403 
405 


165 
176 
171 


177 
181 
197 


221 
232 
199 


210 
222 
208 


}2 886 


594 
646 
692 


303 
346 
363 


291 
300 
329 


164 
187 
215 


161 
156 
199 


139 
159 
148 


130 
144 
130 


I 2 504 


13 YEARS 


762 


390 


372 


182 


184 


208 


188 




650 


340 


310 


197 


186 


143 


124 


J 


14 YEARS 


675 


329 


346 


145 


172 


184 


174 


679 


549 


313 


236 


170 


123 


143 


1 13 


606 


15 YEARS 


695 


366 


329 


162 


128 


204 


201 


664 


588 


301 


287 


162 


154 


139 


133 


593 


16 YEARS 


639 


329 


310 


159 


138 


170 


172 


X 1 268 


584 


293 


291 


176 


176 


117 


1 15 


}1 158 


17 YEARS 


624 


310 


314 


139 


148 


171 


166 


f 


559 


280 


279 


149 


160 


131 


1 19 




18 YEARS 


489 


245 


244 


101 


103 


144 


141 


X 1 058 


539 


291 


248 


184 


158 


107 


90 


}1 079 


19 YEARS 


421 


210 


211 


90 


93 


120 


118 


J" 


561 


296 


265 


183 


172 


1 13 


93 




20 YEARS 


344 


175 


169 


92 


86 


83 


83 


485 


454 


254 


200 


164 


129 


90 


71 


Slll 
514 


21 AND OVER 


14 162 


6 474 


7 686 


3 826 


4 404 


2 648 


3 284 


16 027 


17 158 


8 077 


9 081 


5 817 


6 387 


2 260 


2 694 


18 436 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


3 750 


1 879 


1 871 


793 


820 


1 086 


1 051 


4 622 


2 868 


1 489 


1 379 


795 


700 


694 


679 


3 596 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


3 609 


1 796 


1 813 


808 


768 


988 


1 045 


4 077 


2 974 


1 492 


1 482 


814 


744 


678 


738 


3 265 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


3 796 


1 883 


1 913 


839 


911 


1 044 


1 002 


3 565 


3 131 


1 665 


1 466 


933 


625 


732 


641 


3110 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


2 868 


1 460 


1 408 


651 


610 


809 


798 


2 990 


2 831 


1 461 


1 370 


854 


820 


607 


550 


2 830 


20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 


1 554 
1 421 


750 
673 


804 
748 


396 
398 


419 
410 


354 
275 


385 
338 


2 398 
2 328 


1 820 

1 424 


980 
663 


840 
761 


652 

464 


55O 

521 


328 

199 


290 
240 


2 497 
2 268 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


1 552 


722 


830 


447 


466 


275 


364 


1 982 


1 558 


757 


801 


537 


546 


220 


253 


2 140 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


1 699 


789 


910 


. 465 


519 


324 


391 


2 062 


1 890 


898 


992 


647 


690 


251 


302 


2 244 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


1 581 


762 


819 


440 


466 


322 


333 


1 682 


1 936 


902 


1 034 


668 


732 


234 


302 


2 028 


45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 


1 590 
1 273 
1 058 
847 
806 
533 


759 
589 
472 

371 
331 
211 


831 
684 
586 
476 
475 
322 


468 
348 
286 
230 
192 
123 


469 
408 
345 
274 
246 
201 


291 

241 
186 
141 
139 
88 


362 
276 
241 
202 
229 
121 


1 404 
1 166 
987 
793 
323 
455 


1 907 
1 656 
1 352 
1 146 
1 141 
776 


951 
797 
605 
510 
514 
348 


956 
859 
747 
636 
627 
428 


708 
584 
461 
379 
359 
244 


68O 
655 
536 
453 
420 
303 


243 

213 
144 
131 
155 
104 


276 
204 
211 
183 
207 
125 


1 586 
1 410 
1 321 
1 007 
1 037 
689 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


359 


149 


210 


77 


139 


72 


71 


X 378 


535 


228 


307 


160 


216 


68 


91 


L .622 


80 TO 84 YEARS 
85 AND OVER. 


159 
74 


45 
26 


114 

48 


31 
17 


79 
29 


14 
9 


35 

19 


/ 

54 


286 
185 


115 
63 


171 
122 


81 
37 


127 
85 


34 
26 


44 
37 


101 


UNDER 18 YEARS 
65 AND OVER* . 
MEDIAN AGE * . 


13 113 
1 931 
20.8 


6 563 
762 
19.4 


6 550 

1 169 
22.6 


2 900 
440 
25.2 


2 913 
694 
28.3 


3 663 
322 

16.3 


3 637 
475 
18,3 


14 196 
1 710 
21.3 


10 704 
2 923 
28.8 


5 520 
1 268 
26.0 


5 184 
1 655 
31.2 


3 029 
881 
31,6 


2 759 
1 151 
35,7 


2 491 
387 
18.5 


2 425 

504 
21.4 


11 742 
2 449 
26.3 




OCONEE 


ORANGEBURG 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 


40 204 
891 
831 
850 
869 
806 
880 
786 
800 
800 
778 
802 
853 
836 
843 
749 
774 
779 
722 
1 142 
1 297 
1 124 
21 992 


21 065 
451 
434 
423 
421 
414 
450 
404 
421 
399 
389 
413 
444 
428 
438 
386 
400 
403 
400 
801 
973 
826 
10 947 


19 139 
440 
397 
427 
448 
392 
430 
382 
379 
401 
389 
389 
409 
406 
405 
363 
374 
376 
322 
341 
324 
298 
11 045 


18 978 
387 
396 
382 
372 
367 
396 
357 
359 
345 
337 
360 
382 
381 
378 
336 
349 
358 
342 
753 
939 
784 
9 918 


16 925 
374 
344 
369 
387 
340 
381 
325 
333 
351 
343 
321 
372 
362 
361 
313 
335 
332 
283 
296 
290 
269 
9 844 


2 087 
64 
38 
41 
49 
47 
54 
47 
62 
54 
52 
53 
62 
47 
60 
50 
51 
45 
58 
48 
34 
42 
1 029 


2 214 

66 
53 
58 
61 
52 
49 
57 
46 
50 
46 
68 
37 
46 
44 
50 
39 
44 
39 
45 
34 
29 
1 201 


39 050 

861 
. 1 947 

1 852 

841 
901 

L 2 444 
1 3 095 

808 
811 

L 1 536 

\ 1 996 

940 
21 018 


68 559 

1 749 
1 667 
1 668 
1 777 
1 806 
1 867 
1 869 
1 869 
1 712 
1 809 
1 780 
1 733 
1 771 
1 765 
1 598 
1 625 
1 496 
1 590 
1 432 
1 215 
1 025 
33 736 


33 190 
882 
852 
852 
924 
881 
934 
942 
916 
896 
936 
909 
881 
892 
914 
796 
834 
742 
815 
656 
576 
507 
15 653 


35 369 

867 
815 
816 
853 
925 
933 
927 
953 
816 
873 
871 
852 
879 
851 
802 
791 
754 
775 
776 
639 
518 
18 083 


13 378 
280 
272 
247 
301 
267 
312 
315 
292 
308 
281 
312 
283 
308 
319 
268 
297 
262 
269 
167 
126 
126 
7 766 


13 969 
237 
239 
251 
251 
306 
281 
269 
320 
289 
257 
272 
281 
300 
282 
249 
269 
250 
272 
210 
154 
135 
8 615 


9 812 
602 
580 
605 
623 
614 
622 
627 
624 
588 
655 
597 
598 
584 
595 
528 
537 
480 
546 
489 
450 
381 
7 887 


21 380 
630 
576 
565 
602 
619 
652 
658 
633 
527 
616 
599 
571 
579 
569 
553 
522 
504 
503 
566 
485 
383 
9 468 


68 726 
v 1 771 
X 3 933 

\ 3 979 

1 916 
1 894 

i 5 178 
1 6 328 

1 399 

1 289 
\ 2 724 

\ Z 636 

1 .182 
34 497 






4 YEARS. 
5 YEARS* . . 


7 YEARS. . . 
8 YEARS. . 
9 YEARS. . 
10 YEARS . . 
11 YEARS . . 
12 YEARS . . 
13 YEARS . . 
14 YEARS . . 
15 YEARS . . 
16 YEARS . . 
17 YEARS . . 
.18 YEARS 
19 YEARS . . 
20 YEARS . . 
21 AND OVER . . 


UNDER 5 YEARS. . 
5 TO 9 YEARS . . 
10 TO 14 YEARS . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS . 
35 TO 39 YEARS . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS . 
50 TO 54 YEARS . 
55 TO 59 YEARS . 
60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 TO 79 YEARS . 
80 TO 84 YEARS . 


4 247 
4 044 
4 083 
4 714 
4 129 
2 691 
2 228 
2 333 
2 225 
2 136 
1 860 
1 469 
1 274 
1 043 
781 
521 
289 


2 143 
2 063 
2 109 
2 977 
2 617 
1 375 
1 081 
1 103 
1 067 
1 088 
905 
692 
582 
511 
345 
229 
124 


2 104 
1 981 
1 974 
1 737 
1 512 
1 316 
1 147 
1 230 
1 158 
1 048 
955 
777 
692 
532 
436 
292 
165 


1 904 
1 794 
1 837 
2 741 
2 446 
1 280 
988 
1 005 
952 
970 
810 
639 
507 
453 
293 
202 
109 


1 814 
1 733 
1 729 
1 536 
1 368 
1 199 
1 021 
1 093 
1 Oil 
930 
838 
706 
615 
472 
388 
254 
146 


239 

269 
272 
236 
171 
95 
93 
96 
115 
118 
95 
53 
75 
58 
52 
27 
15 


290 
248 
245 
201 
144 
1 17 
126 
137 
147 
1 18 
1 17 
71 
77 
60 
48 
38 
19 


4 660 
4 186 
3 903 
4 343 
4 201 
3 014 
2 597 
2 387 
2 116 
1 689 
1 453 
1 212 
1 044 
947 
639 

y 


8 667 
9 126 
8 647 
7 358 
4 240 
3 506 
3 612 
4 141 
3 845 
3 526 
2 819 
2 518 
1 905 
1 848 
1 303 
843 
386 


4 391 
4 624 
4 392 
3 623 
2 049 
1 641 
1 677 
1 980 
1 859 
1 704 
1 309 
1 160 
840 
823 
537 
368 
124 
89 


4 276 
4 502 
4 255 
3 735 
2 191 
1 865 
1 935 
2 161 
1 986 
1 822 
1 510 
1 358 
1 065 
1 025 
766 
475 
262 
180 


1 367 

1 508 
1 490 
1 121 
665 
725 
866 
1 033 
935 
893 
738 
647 
453 
391 
250 
183 
75 
38 


1 284 
1 416 
1 384 
1 155 
750 
783 
906 
1 004 
972 
869 
788 
706 
552 
476 
393 
273 
167 
111 


3 024 
3 116 
2 902 
2 502 
1 384 
916 
811 
947 
924 
811 
571 
513 
387 
432 
287 
185 
49 
51 


2 992 
3 O86 
2 871 
2 580 
1 441 
1 082 
1 029 
1 157 
1 O14 
953 
722 
652 
513 
549 
373 
202 
95 
69 


9 683 
8 988 
7 727 
6 649 
5 670 
5 088 
4 202 
4 327 
3 479 
3 016 
Z 484 
2 032 
1 657 
1 752 
1 038 

141 


85 AND OVER. . . 


137 


54 


83 


48 


72 


6 


1 1 




















UNDER IB YEARS . 
65 AND OVER. . 
MEDIAN AGE . . . 


14 649 
2 771 
23.6 


7 518 
1 263 

22,4 


7 131 
1 508 
26.0 


6 584 
1 105 
22.5 


6 226 
1 332 
26.2 


934 
158 
20.8 


905 
176 
24.3 


15 09 
2 24 
22. 


31 151 
4 649 
20.6 


15 798 
1 941 
19.4 


15 353 

2 708 
22.1 


5 193 
937 
26.7 


. 4 875 
1 420 
31*2 


10 605 
1 004 
16.7 


10 478 
1 288 
18.4 


30 411 
3 724 
21.2 



42-68 



South Carolina 
Tablc 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 1960-Con. 

[Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



, 1 


1960 POPULATION 


- 
1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 
POPULA- 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA-^ 
TIONt 

TflTAl 


ALL CLASSES 


WHI 


TE 


NONWH 1 TE 


TION* 
TOTAL 




TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 1 FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


1 U 1 Al_ 


TOTAL 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 












PlCKENS 








HIGHLAND 


ALL AGES . 
UNDER 1 YEAR 
1 YEAR . 
2 YEARS. 
3 YEARS* 
4 YEARS. * 
5 YEARS. * 


46 030 
1 009 
1 002 
977 
998 
964 
993 
957 
1 002 
990 
1 000 
966 
966 
1 054 
1 117 
831 
873 
919 
859 
760 
727 
'695 
26 371 


22 650 
500 
516 
493 
508 
479 
503 
490 
513 
511 
498 
497 
509 
541 
541 
446 
447 
471 
429 
382 
350 
320 
12 706 


23 380 

509 
466 
484 
490 
485 
490 
467 
489 
479 
502 
469 
457 
513 
576 
385 
426 
448 
430 
378 
377 
375 
13 665 


20 431 
439 
455 
436 
437 
418 
433 
426 
435 
453 
443 
440 
462 
491 
492 
408 
391 
411 
382 
338 
321 
287 
11 633 


20 969 
442 
437 
417 
414 
436 
427 
405 
421 
439 
438 
410 
397 
452 
510 
348 
378 
408 
389 
343 
331 
345 
12 382 


2 219 
6V 
61 
57 
71 
61 
70 
64 
78 
58 
55 
57 
47 
50 
49 
38 
56 
60 
47 
44 
29 
33 
1 073 


2 411 
67 
49 
67 
76 
49 
63 
62 
68 
40 
64 
59 
60 
61 
66 
37 
48 
40 
41 
35 
46 
30 
1 283 


40 058 
914 
\ 1 998 

1 1 949 

873 
909 

I 2 590 
I 3 248 

810 
877 
\ 1 606 

\ 1 360 

625 
22 299 


200 102 
4 529 
4 436 
4 506 
4 449 
4 315 
4 372 
4 234 
4 153 
3 971 
3 769 
3 787 
3 747 
3 844 
3 724 
2 948 
2 957 
3 017 
5 200 
6 008 
5 621 
4 795 
111 720 


104 634 
2 309 
2 261 
2 194 
2 268 
2 210 
2 213 
2 167 
2 074 
1 965 
1 868 
1 858 
1 968 
1 907 
1 901 
1 508 
1 514 
1 538 
3 652 
4 214 
3 717 
2 980 
56 348 


95 468 
2 220 
2 175 
2 312 
2 181 
2 105 
2 159 
2 067 
2 079 
2 006 
1 901 
929 
779 
937 
823 
440 
443 
479 
548 
794 
1 904 
1 815 
55 372 


72 532 
1 346 
1 350 
1 333 
1 415 
1 330 
1 329 
1 307 
1 237 
1 191 
1 081 
1 109 
1 168 
1 176 
1 185 
859 
856 
924 
2 890 
3 439 
2 967 
2 359 
40 681 


62 398 
285 
258 
371 
282 
222 
279 
199 
239 
167 
1 071 
1 110 
1 069 
1 185 
1 165 
814 
830 
859 
909 
1 179 
1 310 
1 226 
38 369 


32 102 
963 
911 
861 
853 
880 
884 
860 
837 
774 
787 
749 
800 
731 
716 
649 
658 
614 
762 
775 
750 
621 
15 667 


33 070 
935 

917 
941 
899 
883 
880 
868 
840 
839 
830 
819 
710 
752 
658. 
626 
613 
620 
639 
615 
594 
589 
17 003 


142 565 
3 390 
\ 7 043 

1 6 415 

2 730 
2 780 

!7 690 
8 088 

1 793 
1 847 
"I 3 888 

\ 5 016 

2 768 
89 117 


7 YEARS. 
8 YEARS. 


10 YEARS 
11 YEARS 
\2 YEARS * 
13 YEARS 
14 YEARS 
15 YEARS 
16 YEARS 
17 YEARS . 
18 YEARS 
19 YEARS 
20 YEARS 
21 AND OVER. . 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 
5 TO 9 YEARS 
10 TO 14 YEARS 
15 TO 19 YEARS 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS 
40 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
5O TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS 
60 TO 64 YEARS 
65 TO 69 YEARS 
70 TO 74 YEARS 
75 TO 79 YEARS 
80 TO 84 YEARS 


4 950 
4 942 
4 934 
4 138 
3 309 
3 076 
3 068 
3 101 
2 920 
2 763 
2 271 
1 794 
1 429 
1 301 
927 
602 
311 


2 496 
2 515 
2 534 
2 079 
1 601 
1 540 
1 531 
1 507 
1 413 
1 562 
1 079 
843 
650 
583 
424 
272 
133 


2 454 
2 427 
2 400 
2 059 
1 708 
1 536 
1 537 
1 594 
1 507 
1 401 
1 192 
951 
779 
718 
503 
330 
178 


2 185. 
2 190 
2 293 
1 843 
1 463 
1 418 
1 396 
1 402 
1 310 
1 234 
985 
772 
600 
527 
377 
240 
119 


2 146 
2 130 
2 117 
849 
540 
386 
394 
470 
377 
259 
092 
861 
696 
647 
455 
298 
161 


311 
325 
241 
236 
138 
122 
135 
105 
103 
128 
94 
71 
50 
56 
47 
32 
14 


308 
297 
283 
210 
168 
150 
143 
124 
130 
142 
100 
50 
83 
71 
48 
32 
17 


4 861 
4 372 
4 058 
3 843 
3 415 
3 154 
2 884 
2 790 
2 407 
1 868 
1 567 
1 407 
1 077 
979 
697 

} 59a 


22 235 
20 499 
18 050 
22 803 
21 267 
13 235 
13 177 
13 816 
12 230 
10 667 
8 228 
6 787 
5 524 
4 696 
3 240 
2 055 
988 


11 242 
10 287 
9 142 
14 635 
13 633 
6 894 
6 402 
6 779 
6 246 
5 234 
3 908 
3 102 
2 494 
2 033 
1 296 
791 
356 


10 993 

10 212 
8 908 
8 168 
7 634 
6 341 
6 775 
7 037 
5 984 
5 433 
4 320 
3 685 
3 030 
2 663 
1 944 
1 264 
632 


6 774 
6 145 
5 497 
11 076 
10 956 
4 754 
4 500 
4 764 
4 437 
3 694 
2 804 
2 204 
1 778 
1 352 
895 
550 
246 


6 418 
5 955 
5 343 
5 087 
5 110 
4 221 
4 588 
4 856 
4 158 
3 747 
3 148 
2 618 
2 166 
1 877 
1 354 
943 
466 


4 468 
4 142 
3 645 
3 559 
2 677 
2 140 
1 902 
2 015 
1 809 
1 540 
1 104 
898 
716 
681 
401 
241 
110 


4 575 
4 257 
3 565 
3 081 
2 524 
2 120 
2 187 
2 181 
1 826 
1 686 
1 172 
1 067 
864 
786 
590 
321 
166 


16 848 
13 200 
9 881 
10 751 
14 340 
14 461 
12 148 
11 166 
8 933 
7 505 
6 380 
5 006 
4 097 
3 602 
2 186 
"I 1 762 


85 AND OVER. . 


194 


88 


106 


77 


91 


11 


15 


87 


605 


160 


445 


106 


343 


54 


102 


299 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


17 477 


8 892 


8 585 


7 852 


7 568 


1 040 


1 017 


15 774 


71 958 


37 375 


34 583 


23 086 


20 314 


14 289 


14 269 


45 664 


65 AND OVER. . 


3 335 


1 500 


1 835 


1 340 


1 652 


160 


183 


2 355 


11 584 


4 636 


6 948 


3 149 


4 983 


1 487 


1 965 


7 849 


MEDIAN AGE . 


26.2 


25.3 


27.1 


25.9 


27.5 


19,9 


23.2 


24.2 


23.9 


22.6 


26.4 


23.1 


28.9 


20.4 


22.1 


27.2 




SALUDA 


SPARTANBURG 


ALL AGES . 


14 554 


7 211 


7 343 


4 553 


4 669 


2 658 


2 674 


15 924 


156 830 


76 019 


80 811 


59 493 


62 652 


16 526 


18 159 


150 349 


UNDER 1 YEAR . 


308 


167 


141 


76 


63 


91 


73 


361 


3 364 


1 748 


616 


1 235 


154 


513 


462 


3 554 


1 YEAR .... 


334 


182 


152 


99 


72 


83 


80 


\ 797 


3 322 


1 720 


602 


227 


128 


493 


474 


\ 7 541 


2 YEARS. . . . 


340 


170 


170 


88 


87 


82 


83 


J 


3 300 


1 634 


666 


162 


171 


472 


495 


J 


3 YEARS* * * 


324 


175 


149 


92 


82 


83 


67 


\ 809 


3 325 


1 689 


636 


235 


162 


454 


474 


\ 7 435 


4 YEARS. . * 


373 


178 


195 


102 


105 


76 


90 


/ 


3 304 


1 714 


590 


236 


no 


478 


480 


J 




374 


201 


173 


108 


98 


93 


75 


392 


3 529 


1 798 


731 


306 


198 


492 


533 


3 249 


6 YEARSt * . 


348 


187 


161 


100 


85 


87 


76 


379 


3 369 


1 756 


613 


294 


136 


462 


477 


3 154 


7 YEARS. . . * 


345 


174 


171 


94 


97 


80 


74 


^ 


3 502 


1 852 


650 


353 


183 


499 


467 


^ 




292 


146 


146 


90 


83 


56 


63 


> 1 101 


3 584 


1 831 


753 


363 


295 


468 


458 


f 9310 




373 


207 


166 


1 13 


88 


94 


78 




3 275 


1 645 


630 


202 


154 


443 


476 




10 YEARS . . . 


335 


161 


174 


80 


89 


81 


85 


}" 


3 408 


1 691 


717 


246 


241 


445 


476 


\ 


11 YEARS . . 


326 


162 


164 


91 


92 


71 


72 


1 402 


3 477 


1 702 


775 


269 


277 


433 


498 


111 153 


12 YEARS . . . 


327 


156 


171 


87 


107 


69 


64 




3 490 


1 759 


731 


330 


272 


429 


459 


f 


13 YEARS . . . 


351 


173 


178 


104 


109 


69 


69 




3 477 


798 


679 


348 


313 


450 


366 


J 


14 YEARS . . 


313 


155 


158 


88 


91 


67 


67 


373 


2 947 


513 


434 


137 


039 


376 


395 


2 699 


15 YEARS . . . 


316 


166 


150 


96 


85 


70 


65 


338 


2 943 


528 


415 


133 


070 


395 


345 


2 781 


16 YEARS . . . 


340 


161 


179 


99 


98 


62 


81 


\ 670 


2 754 


418 


336 


067 


014 


351 


322 


\ 5 291 


17 YEARS . . . 


307 


162 


145 


77 


82 


85 


63 


/ 


2 851 


394 


457 


063 


093 


331 


364 


J 


18 YEARS . . . 


254 


136 


118 


73 


70 


63 


48 


\ 560 


2 658 


316 


342 


970 


076 


346 


266 


\ 5 135 


19 YEARS . . 


194 


105 


89 


54 


49 


51 


40 


; 


2 379 


128 


251 


885 


970 


243 


281 


/ 


20 YEARS . , . 


180 


82 


98 


43 


58 


39 


40 


254 


2 208 


1 049 


1 159 


812 


899 


237 


260 


2 488 


21 AND OVER. . 


7 900 


3 805 


4 095 


2 699 


2 874 


1 106 


1 221 


8 488 


90 364 


42 336 


48 028 


34 620 


38 697 


7 716 


9 331 


86 559 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


1 679 


872 


807 


457 


414 


415 


393 


1 967 


16 615 


8 505 


8 110 


6 095 


5 725 


2 410 


2 385 


18 530 


5 TO 9 YEARS . 


1 732 


915 


817 


505 


451 


410 


366 


1 872 


17 259 


8 882 


8 377 


6 518 


5 966 


2 364 


2 41 1 


15 713 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


1 652 


807 


845 


450. 


488 


357 


357 


1 775 


16 799 


8 463. 


8 336 


6 330 


6 142 


2 133 


2 194 


13 852 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


1 411 


730 


681 


399 


384 


331 


297 


1 568 


13 585 


6 784 


6 801 


5 118 


5 223 


1 666 


1 578 


13 207 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


796 


395 


401 


231 


250 


164 


151 


1 168 


10 021 


4 785 


5 236 


3 697 


4 113 


1 088 


1 123 


12 526 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


766 


352 


414 


237 


264 


115 


150 


1 046 


9 961 


4 716 


5 245 


3 838 


4 175 


878 


1 070 


13 021 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


800 


395 


405 


294 


279 


101 


126 


987 


10 344 


4 887 


5 457 


4 108 


4 360 


779 


1 097 


11 636 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


867 


413 


454 


290 


331 


123 


123 


927 


11 203 


5 314 


5 889 


4 441 


4 804 


873 


1 085 


11 071 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


860 


432 


428 


316 


311 


116 


117 


825 


10 347 


4 870 


5 477 


4 005 


4 418 


865 


1 059 


9 635 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


774 


357 


417 


262 


284 


95 


133 


750 


9 514 


4 563 


4 951 


3 718 


3 975 


845 


976 


7 788 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


680 


352 


328 


265 


237 


87 


91 


678 


8 338 


4 018 


4 320 


3 330 


3 490 


688 


830 


6 353 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


592 


279 


313 


202 


235 


77 


78 


639 


6 752 


3 216 


3 536 


2 655 


2 916 


561 


620 


5 099 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


539 


256 


283 


184 


207 


72 


76 


451 


5 167 


2 344 


2 823 


1 930 


2 276 


414 


547 


4 040 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


536 


256 


280 


193 


207 


63 


73 


620 


4 410 


1 940 


2 470 


1 521 


1 961 


419 


509 


3 645 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


365 


167 


198 


108 


129 


59 


69 


320 


3 209 


1 382 


1 827 


1 103 


1 482 


279 


345 


2 151 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


304 


143 


161 


98 


115 


45 


46 


\ 275 


1 899 


800 


1 099 


651 


912 


149 


187 


\ 1 793 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


129 


56 


73 


41 


57 


15 


16 


; 


909 


343 


566 


285 


476 


58 


90 


/ 


85 AND OVER. . 


72 


34 


38 


21 


26 


13 


12 


56 


498 


207 


291 


150 


238 


57 


53 


289 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


6 026 


3 083 


2 943 


1 684 


1 613 


1 399 


1 325 


6 622 


59 221 


30 190 


29 031 


22 206 


21 010 


7 984 


8 021 


56 167 


65 AND OVER. . 


1 406 


656 


750 


461 


534 


195 


216 


1 271 


' 10 925 


4 672 


6 253 


3 710 


5 069 


962 


1 1 84 


7 878 


MEDIAN AGE 


25.0 


23.6 


26.5 


29.9 


31.5 


17.2 


18.7 


23,3 


27.1 


25.6 


28.4 


27.6 


30.0 


19.1 


22.3 


25.5 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 27. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR COUNTIES: 1960--Coii. 

[Median not shown where base is less than 100] 



42-69 





1960 POPULATION 


1950 


1960 POPULATION 


1950 


AGE 


ALL CLASSES 


WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA- 
TION, 


ALL CLASSES j| WHITE 


NONWH 1 TE 


POPULA- 
TION! 




TOTAL || MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 


TOTAL II MALE 


FEMALE MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


TOTAL 










SUMTER 








UNION 


ALL AGES . . 
UNDER 1 YEAR . . 


74 941 
2 341 
2iiKi 


37 335 

194 

9UA 


37 606 

147 


20 572 
641 


19 274 
585 


16 763 
553 


18 332 
562 


57 634 
1 601 


30 015 
691 


14 484 
361 


15 531 

330 


10 233 
239 


10 890 
205 


4 251 
122 


4 641 
125 


31 334 
N 731 


2 YEARS* . . 
3 YEARS* . . 
4 YEARS* . . 


*+3 | 

2 204 
2 251 
2 107 


*+Q 

133 
153 
084 


205 
071 
098 
023 


652" 
583 
602 
522 


624 
539 
567 
521 


594 
550 
551 
562 


581 
532 
531 
502 


\ 3 357 
\ 3 418 


683 
716 
648 
696 


328 
370 
326 

339 


355 
346 
322 
357 


211 
252 
204 
214 


211 
216 
208 
238 


117 
118 
122 
125 


144 
130 
114 
119 


\ 1 677 
1 1 534 


5 YEARS* 


2 058 


034 


024 


529 


522 


505 


502 


1 541 


670 


340 


330 


235 


222 


105 


108 


693 


6 YEARS* 


2 068 


021 


047 


504 


504 


517 


543 


1 545 


660 


340 


320 


199 


205 


141 


115 


701 


7 YEARS. . * 


1 958 
1 796 


991 

BQE 


967 

Qf\ 1 


464 


427 


527 


540 


i" 


685 


363 


322 


218 


201 


145 


121 






1 827 


973 

902 


7U | 

925 


433 


402 


462 


499 


4 216 


652 


331 


321 


203 


184 


128 


137 


f 1 970 


10 YEARS 


1 800 


918 


382 


418 
410 


41 1 

366 


484 
508 


51 4 
516 




627 
657 


31 1 
311 


316 
346 


186 
174 


188 
206 


125 
137 


128 
140 


4 


11 YEARS * 


1 725 


877 


848 


385 


382 


492 


466 


5 023 


680 


342 


338 


217 


213 


125 


125 


I 2 522 


12 YEARS 


1 764 


883 


861 


394 


413 


489 


468 




710 


354 


356 


219 


228 


135 


128 


[ 


13 YEARS * . 


1 705 


877 


828 


412 


378 


465 


450 




707 


364 


343 


247 


231 


117 


112 


J 


14 YEARS . . 


1 470 


730 


740 


297 


283 


433 


457 


1 183 


546 


275 


271 


192 


154 


83 


117 


627 


15 YEARS 


1 478 


749 


729 


294 


298 


455 


431 


1 093 


591 


299 


292 


193 


188 


106 


104 


668 


16 YEARS * . 


1 404 


743 


661 


303 


274 


440 


387 


\ 2 171 


571 


288 


283 


187 


185 


101 


98 


\ 1 280 


17 YEARS . . 


1 366 


669 


697 


290 


272 


379 


425 


J 


575 


291 


234 


178 


183 


113 


101 


; 


18 YEARS . . 


1 221 


621 


600 


281 


267 


340 


333 


\ 2 166 


487 


261 


226 


166 


140 


95 


86 


\ 1 057 


19 YEARS 


1 249 


656 


593 


345 


272 


311 


321 


; 


415 


202 


213 


130 


149 


72 


64 


J 


20 YEARS . . 


1 314 


687 


627 


444 


332 


243 


295 


1 060 


397 


205 


192 


138 


140 


67 


52 


494 


21 AND OVER * * 


37 384 


18 272 


19 112 


11 369 


10 635 


6 903 


8 477 


29 260 


16 951 


7 883 


9 068 


6 031 


6 795 


1 852 


2 273 


17 380 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


11 354 


5 810 


5 544 


3 000 


2 836 


2 810 


2 708 


8 376 


3 434 


1 724 


1 710 


1 120 


1 078 


604 


632 


3 942 


5 TO 9 YEARS . . 


9 707 


4 843 


4 864 


2 348 


2 266 


2 495 


2 598 


7 302 


3 294 


1 685 


1 609 


1 041 


1 000 


644 


609 


3 364 


10 TO 14 YEARS . 


8 464 


4 285 


4 179 


1 898 


.1 822 


2 387 


2 357 


6 206 


3 300 


1 646 


1 654 


1 049 


1 032 


597 


622 


3 149 


15 TO 19 YEARS . 


6 718 


3 438 


3 280 


1 513 


1 383 


1 925 


1 897 


5 430 


2 639 


1 341 


1 298 


854 


845 


487 


453 


3 005 


20 TO 24 YEARS * 


6 584 


3 613 


2 971 


2 469 


1 734 


1 144 


1 237 


5 053 


850 


921 


929 


657 


704 


264 


225 


2 515 


25 TO 29 YEARS . 


5 420 


2 784 


2 636 


1 899 


1 606 


885 


1 030 


4 673 


838. 


856 


982 


674 


756 


182 


226 


2 4-44 


30 TO 34 YEARS . 


4 808 


2 363 


2 445 


1 559 


1 443 


804 


1 002 


3 869 


905 


941 


964 


767 


741 


174 


223 


2 117 


35 TO 39 YEARS . 


4 786 


2 321 


2 465 


1 532 


1 468 


789 


997 


3 690 


914 


899 


1 015 


710 


786 


189 


229 


2 119 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


3 941 


2 015 


1 926 


1 304 


1 087 


711 


839 


2 819 


851 


851 


1 000 


642 


734 


209 


266 


1 839 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


3 210 


1 499 


1 711 


816 


841 


683 


870 


2 469 


714 


797 


917 


590 


671 


207 


246 


1 534 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


2 431 


1 116 


1 315 


628 


669 


488 


646 


2 050 


1 515 


717 


798 


565 


633 


152 


165 


1 341 


55 TO 59 YEARS . 


2 084 


936 


1 148 


484 


558 


452 


590 


1 583 


1 274 


560 


714 


430 


547 


130 


167 


1 097 


60 TO 64 YEARS . 


1 696 


7.16 


980 


388 


449 


328 


531 


1 323 


1 090 


518 


572 


400 


404 


118 


168 


944 


65 TO 69 YEARS . 


1 549 


715 


834 


327 


391 


388 


443 


1 281 


932 


403 


529 


293 


365 


110 


164 


851 


70 TO 74 YEARS . 


1 025 


437 


588 


200 


316 


237 


272 


. 768 


705 


309 


396 


223 


264 


86 


132 


527 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


635 


236 


399 


112 


231 


124 


168 


J. 609 


451 


191 


260 


130 


193 


61 


67 


\ 448 


80 TO 84 YEARS . 


326 


130 


196 


64 


108 


66 


88 


J 


203 


84 


119 


64 


93 


20 


26 


/ 


85 AND OVER. . * 


203 


78 


125 


31 


66 


47 


59 


113 


106 


41 


65 


24 


44 


17 


21 


98 


UNDER 18 YEARS ., 


33 773 


17 099 


16 674 


8 133 


7 768 


8 966 


8 906 


25 148 


11 765 


5 933 


5 832 


3 768 


3 666 


2 165 


2 166 


12 403 


65 AND OVER. . . 


3 738 


1 596 


2 142 


734 


1 112 


862 


1 030 


2 771 


2 397 


1 028 


1 369 


734 


959 


294 


410 


1 924 


MEDIAN AGE . . * 


20.9 


20.4 


21.6 


23.1 


23.8 


16.8 


19.0 


21.5 


26.3 


24.6 


27.9 


27.9 


30.2 


17.9 


20.1 


24.4 




WILLIAMSBURG 






YORK 


ALL AGES 


40 932 


20 018 


20 914 


6 312 


6 904 


13 206 


14 010 


43 807 


78 760 


37 816 


40 944 


26 941 


29 254 


10 875 


11 690 


71 596 


UNDER 1 YEAR 


1 137 


565 


572 


144 


142 


421 


430 


^ 1 195 


1 856 


951 


905 


601 


.552 


350 


353 


. 1 897 


1 YEAR . 


1 126 


561 


565 


159 


148 


402 


417 


\ 3 026 


1 876 


982 


894 


648 


576 


334 


318 


\ 3 897 


2 YEARS. 


1 206 


623 


583 


167 


131 


456 


452 


/ 


1 948 


1 Oil 


937 


638 


592 


373 


345 


/ 


3 YEARS. 


1 174 


612 


562 


154 


148 


458 


414 


\ 2 899 


1 964 


996 


968 


669 


624 


327 


344 


\ 3 680 


4 YEARS. 


1 241 


612 


629 


165 


172 


447 


457 


J 


1 909 


978 


931 


651 


599 


327 


332 


/ 


5 YEARS. 


1 163 


607 


556 


168 


134 


439 


422 


1 331 


1 945 


1 020 


925 


657 


595 


363 


330 


1 657 




1 180 


577 


603 


149 


1 49 


428 


454 


1 309 


1 937 


966 


971 


613 


611 


353 


360 


1 554 


7 YEARS. 


1 222 


603. 


619 


162 


186 


441 


433 


T 


1 850 


957 


893 


630 


570 


327 


323 




8 YEARS. 


1 184 


613 


571 


160 


155 


453 


416 


> 3 604 


1 821 


908 


913 


594 


573 


314 


340 


4 688 


9 YEARS. 


1 228 


636 


592 


171 


157 


465 


435 


J 


1 889 


964 


925 


619 


598 


345 


327 




10 YEARS 


1 188 


599 


589 


151 


170 


448 


419 


1 


1 969 


970 


999 


662 


636 


308 


363 




11 YEARS 


1 258 


647 


611 


182 


163 


465 


448 


I 4 452 


1 823 


908 


915 


596 


601 


312 


314 


5 668 


12 YEARS 


1 276 


652 


624 


187 


158 


465 


466 


f 


1 911 


992 


919 


659 


614 


333 


305 




13 YEARS 


1 211 


617 


594 


176 


176 


441 


418 


J 


1 871 


933 


938. 


647 


672 


286 


266 




14 YEARS 


1 129 


605 


524- 


170 


119 


435 


405 


1 057 


1 464 


770 


694 


498 


459 


272 


235 


1 352 


15 YEARS 


1 089 


543 


546 


147 


165 


396 


381 


949 


1 569 


780 


789 


511 


522 


269 


267 


1 277 


16 YEARS 


1 008 


497 


511 


157 


135 


340 


376 


\ 1 932 


1 459 


703 


756 


502 


518 


201 


238 


\ 2 575 


17 YEARS 


949 


506 


443 


136 


128 


370 


315 


J 


' 1 477 


765 


712 


520 


471 


245 


241 


J 


18 YEARS 


803 


440 


363 


114 


88 


326 


275 


V 1 636 


1 535 


569 


966 


373 


742 


196 


224 


X 2 990 


19 YEARS 


584 


300 


284 


78 


81 


222 


203 


/ 


1 398 


510 


888 


. 314 


725 


196 


163 


J 


20 YEARS 


481 


240 


241 


79 


75 


161 


166 


J 724 


1 294 


473 


821 


313 


631 


160 


190 


1 357 


21 AND OVER 


18 095 


8 363 


9 732 


3 636 


3 924 


4 727 


5 808 


19 693 


41 995 


19 710 


22 285 


15 026 


16 773 


4 684 


5 512 


39 004 


UNDER 5 YEARS 


5 884 


2 973 


2 911 


789 


741 


2 184 


2 170 


7 120 


9 553 


4 918 


4 635 


3 207 


2 943 


1 711 


1 692 


9 474 


5 TO 9 YEARS 


5 977 


3 036 


2 941 


810 


781 


2 226 


2 160 


6 244 


9 442 


4 815 


4 627 


3 113 


2 947 


1 702 


1 680 


7 899 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


6 062 


3 120 


2 942 


866 


786 


2 254 


2 156 


5 509 


9 038 


4 573 


4 465 


3 062 


2 982 


1 511 


1 483 


7 020 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


' 4 433 


2 2&6 


2 147 


632 


597 


1 654 


1 550 


4 517 


7 438 


3 327 


4 111 


2 220 


2 978 


1 107 


1 133 


6 642 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


2 136 


967 


169 


366 


417 


601 


752 


3 491 


5 220 


2 212 


3 008 


1 548 


2 293 


664 


715 


6 190 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


1 966 


924 


042 


412 


383 


512 


659 


3 117 


4 860 


2 297 


2 563 


1 738 


1 906 


559 


657 


5 878 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


2 062 


953 


109 


420 


431 


533 


678 


2 475 


5 055 


2 417 


2 638 


1 891 


2 014 


526 


624 


5 104 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


2 301 


1 052 


249 


458 


479 


594 


770 


2 532 


5 231 


2 508 


2 723 


1 950 


2 061 


558 


662 


5 041 


40 TO -44 YEARS 


2 112 


1 019 


093 


422 


415 


597 


678 


2 006 


4 755 


2 340 


2 415 


1 830 


1 845 


510 


570 


4 218 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


1 920 


905 


015 


397 


422 


508 


593 


1 722 


4 450 


2 192 


2 258 


1 697 


1 712 


495 


546 


3 453 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


1 448 


701 


747 


313 


31.8 


388 


429 


1 420 


3 630, 


1 736 


1 894 


1 350 


1 435 


386 


459 


2 798 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


1 327 


592 


735 


256 


326 


336 


409 


996 


3 036 


1 421 


1 615 


1 085 


1 191 


336 


424 


2 253 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


1 052 


490 


562 


233 


253 


257 


309 


872 


2 187 


1 Oil 


1 176 


786 


885 


225 


291 


1 763 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


953 


448 


505 


191 


205 


257 


300 


824 


2 002 


882 


1 120 


639 


799 


243 


321 


1 634 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


653 


278 


375 


123 


169 


155 


206 


512 


1 387 


603 


784 


461 


564 


142 


220 


1 054 


75 TO 79 YEARS 


396 


171 


225 


71 


' 105 


100 


120 


\ 403 


835 


325 


510 


202 


394 


123 


116 


\ 838 


80 TO 84 YEARS 


156 


66 


90 


40 


48 


26 


42 


/ 


395 


148 


247 


102 


196 


46 


51 


/ 


85 AND OVER. 


94 


37 


57 


13 


28 


24 


29 


47 


246 


91 


155 


60 


109 


31 


46 


1.37 


UNDER 18 YEARS 


20 969 


10 675 


10 294 


2 905 


2 736 


7 770 


7 558 


21 754 


32 538 


16 554 


15 984 


10 915 


10 383 


5 639 


5 601 


28 245 


65 AND OVER. 


2 252 


1 000 


1 252 


438 


555 


562 


697 


1 786 


4 865 


2 049 


2 816 


1 464 


2 062 


585 


754 


3 663 


MEDIAN AGE * > 


17.9 


16.9 


18.9 


24.2 


26.7 


14.9 


16.7 


18,4 


23.7 


22.9 


24.4 


25.9 


26,3 


17.3 


19.4 


23.7 



42-70 



South Carolina 



Table 28. CHAEACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES: 1960 

[Percent not shown where less than J or where base is less than 100; population per household not shown where less than 100 persons in households] 



SUBJECT 


ABBEVILLE 


A I KEN 


ALLENDAL 


ANDERSON 


6AMBERG 


BARNWELL 


BEAUFORT 


BERKELEY 


CALHOUN 


CHARLESTO 


CHEROKEE 


TOTAL POPULATION . 
RACE 


21 41 
10 21 


81 03 
39 726 


11 36 

5 43 


98 47 
47 68 


16 27 
8 02 


17 65 
8 530 


44 18 
25 51 


38 19 
18 965 


12 25 
5 96 


216 38 
108 31 


35 205 
17 020 




7 05 


29 575 


2 03 


38 47 


3 53 


4 953 


17 05 


9 765 


1 95 


70 77 


13 538 




3 15 


10 139 


3 40 


9 19 


4 49 


3 569 


8 40 


9 175 


4 00 


37 28 


3 480 
















2 


* . 




4 


1 















t t 




1 




24 
























13 




















13 




139 






"* 












2 






34 


1 




11 20 


41 312 


5 925 


50 794 


8 245 


9 129 


18 67 


19 23 


6 29 


108 064 


18 185 




7 50 
3 69 


30 125 
11 171 


2 147 
3 777 


40 756 
10 024 


3 654 
4 58 


5 051 
4 070 


10 03 
8 56 


9 468 
9 745 


2 099 
4 196 


66 674 

41 204 


14 197 
3 985 






j 


. . 






3 


47 


10 





44 
57 


2 

1 






_ 
















^j 






* * 




* * 




*" 


_ 


** 


* * 


* * 


60 


... 






2 




y 




2 


22 




* * 


14 


... 


MARITAL STATUS 

TOTAL 
MALEf 14 YEARS AND OVERt . 


6 960 
2 075 


25 125 
5 851 


3 347 
1 053 


32 629 
7 967 


5 129 
1 774 


5 284 
1 518 


18 056 
9 828 


11 122 
3 352 


3 60S 
19 1 n 


69 832 

y 1 7Ofl 


11 326 




4 585 


18 309 


2 137 


23 407 


3 120 


3 548 


7 808 


7 409 


29AO 


45 485 




PERCENT MARRIED. . . 


65.9 
101 


72.9 

481 


63.8 

113 


71.7 
647 


60.8 
119 


67.1 

131 


43.2 


66.6 

1 flO 


62.7 


65,: 


67.9 




247 


692 


135 


947 


195 


179 


9 A^ 


9Q/1 


199 




228 




53 


273 


29 


1OS 


Iff) 


^o 










377 


FEMALE t 14 YEARS AND OVER. 


7 750 
1 648 


27 309 
4 837 


3 908 
934 


36 138 
7 034 


5 420 
Iyrit 


5 970 

1192 


11 474 


11 629 


4 063 


70 968 


125 
12 653 




4 715 


18 708 


2pc < 


511 O7Q 


39TA 










14 892 


2 914 


PERCENT MARRIED* . . 


6o.a 

1 77 


68.5 

79 ft 


57.6 

9OQ 


66.6 


59.7 


62.7 


67.1 


64.9 


2 324 
57.2 


45 836 
64.6 


7 960 
62.9 




1 114 


3 375 


7fl 1 


4 519 


flTfl 




335 


244 


160 


2 641 


380 




73 


389 


Op 


= i e 






1 330 


1 328 


664 


8 984 


1 596 


NONWHITE 
MALE! 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 


1 924 
732 


5 871 
10 an 


1 945 


5 713 


2 638 


1- 989 


102 
4 816 


67 
4 913 


20 
2 148 


1 256 
20 847 


183 
1 993 




1 086 


3<*a 






1 156 


777 


2 080 


1 849 


834 


7 343 


684 


PERCENT MARRIED. * . . 


56.4 
61 


62.0 
278 


57.9 

Qjt 


60.0 


51.3 


1 102 
55.4 


2 526 
52.5 


2 890 
58.8 


1 222 
56.9 


12 558 
60.2 


1 209 
60.7 




i D5 


fjQ 








81 


166 


136 


93 


1 058 


74 




^ 


24 








105 


197 


166 


88 


855 


94 


FEMALE t 14 YEARS AND OVER. , 


2 279 

708 


6 992 

1-7110 


2 365 


6 464 


2 776 


5 
2 502 


13 
5 015 


8 
5 562 


4 
2 448 


91 
25 177 


6 
2 385 




1 172 


3OQJI 






883 


771 


1 369 


1 728 


752 


7 004 


731 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . 


51.4 
114 


55.7 
UBI 


52.2 


56.7 


1 440 
51.9 


1 272 
50.8 


2 688 
53.6 


2 980 
53.6 


1 284 
52.5 


13 713 
54.5 


1 314 
55.1 




tqii 








138 


201 


289 


192 


150 


2 023 


154 




C 




433 


1 016 


449 


450 


938 


844 


407 


4 293 


324 


HOUSEHOLDS 

TOTAL 
TOTAL POPULATION . . , 


21 417 


81 038 


5 
11 362 


28 
: 98 478 


4 
16 274 


9 
17 659 


20 
44 187 


10 

38 196 


e 

12 256 


167 
216 382 


16 
35 205 




575T 




11 327 


97 854 


15 808 


17 590 


35 452 


38 084 


12 222 


205 576 


34 805 


HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


5 055 
698 


19 318 
2 331 


2 857 

2 450 
407 


27 855 
24 881 
2 974 


4 006 
3 449 
557 


4 522 
3 931 
591 


8 973 
7 983 
990 


8 679 
7 967 
712 


2 926 
2 565 
361 


55 337 

47 824 

7 513 


9 290 
8 351 
939 


CHILD UNDER is OF HEAD . 

OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


7 136 
3 764 
204 


30 932 
10 213 
891 


1 908 

4 016 
2 439 
107 


21 492 
32 970 
14 753. 
784 


2 793 

5 948 
2 907 

154 


3 241 

6 819 
2 850 
158 


6 833 
14 077 
5 014 
555 


6 756 

15 712 
6 587 
350 


1 990 
4 410 
2 798 
98 


39 528 
79 012 
28 915 
2 784 


6 977 
12 177 
6 024 
337 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


27 

T7T 


148 


3 5 




624 
207 


466 
11 


69 

13 


8 735 
28 


112 

14 


34 
12 


10 806 
570 


400 
63 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . , 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION , . 


3.65 

6 860 


3.72 
21 338 


35 
3.96 

7 184 


417 
3.51 

19 245 


455 
3.95 

9 087 


56 
3.89 

7 655 


8 707 
3.95 

17 104 


98 

4.39 

18 963 


22 

4,18 

8 198 


10 236 
3.71 

7A Q"* 1 ^ 


337 
3.75 




1C /TO 


21 177 


7 149 


19 166 


8 643 


7 615 


16 135 


18 911 


8 164 


77 777 




HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


1 299 
269 
onn 


5 010 

* 145 
865 


1 577 
1 352 
225 


4 654 
3 916 
738 


1 816 
1 573 
243 


1 655 
1 366 
289 


3 513 
2 916 
597 


3 738 
3 314 
424 


1 674 
1 459 
215 


18 063 
14 755 


1 635 
1 410 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD , 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


2 476 
1 793 
84 


8 085 
4 666 
378 


949 
2 596 
1 951 
76 


2 895 
6 872 

4 463 
282 


1 138 
3 599 
1 991 
99 


944 
3 010 
1 908 
98 


2 116 
6 051 
4 081 
374 


2 483 
7 792 
4 680 
218 


1 026 
3 200 

2 191 
73 


10 291. 
31 023 
17 262 


1 035 
2 935 
1 713 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION, . . 


20 


161 
94 


35 


79 
67 


444 
8 


40 
8 


969 

17 


52 
g 


34 

1 9 


1 156 


1O9 
4-3 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 


4.35 


67 
4.23 


35 
4.53 


12 
4.12 


436 
4.76 


32 

4.60 


952 
4.59 


44 
5,06 


22 
4.88 


863 

4-31 


2 
41 

4,54 



Genoal Population Characteristics 
Table 28.-CHAJIACIERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES- 196O-Con 

[Percent not shown where less than Ol or when base i, less than 100; potion per hoMehold a* +** whe fe than 100 peraoa, in 



42-71 





y==== 


:?=== 





j 


i 


,- -- 












SUBJECT 


CHESTER 


CHESTER- 
FIELD 


CLARENDON 


COLLETON 


DARLINGTON 


DILLON 


DORCHESTER 


EDGEFIELD 


FA I RF I ELD 


FLORENCE 


GEORGETOWN 


TOTAL POPULATION . . 
RACE 


30 888 


33 717 


29 490 


27 816 


52 928 


30 584 


24 383 


15 735 


20 713 


84 438 


34 798 






16 583 


14 339 


13 594 


25 480 


14 913 


11 994 


7 693 


10 160 


41 025 


16 873 




5 907 


10 540 
6 031 


4 576 
9 758 


6 673 
6 915 


14 241 

U22A 


8 066 


6 184 


3 172 


4 065 


23 638 


8 275 


JAPANESE 
CHINESE 

FILIPINO . 





6 
4 

1 


i 
... 


6 

. * . 
. . 
... 


13 
... 


... 


46 
. 

... 
1 


5 804 
5 
... 
1 



4 521 


6 094 
1 

... 
... 
. 


17 379 

3 
1 

... 
2 


8 593 

3 


... 





i *5 QA 




2 


... 


. 


1 


... 




... 


2 


2 




9Cfi 




15 151 


14 222 


27 448 


15 671 


12 389 


8 042 


10 553 


43 413 


17 925 








4 784 


6 916 


15 179 


8 289 


6 296 


3 409 


4 329 


24 296 


8 377 








10 364 


7 299 


12 249 


7 319 


6 088 


4 632 


6 224 


19 105 


9 544 


JAPANESE 
CHINESE . 


.. 


4 


... 


7 

... 


17 
... 


63 




5 
... 


... 

... 




2 
4 


... 
1 


FILIPINO 
OTHER RACES 

MARITAL STATUS 

TOTAL 
MALEt 14 YEARS AND OVER. . , 


9 714 
2751 


TJ 

4 
10 659 




8 283 


... 
8 672 


... 

1 
2 

15 659 


. 
... 
... 

8 695 


... 
... 

7 608 


1 
... 
... 

4 769 


6 327 


... 
3 

3 

25 593 




2 
1 

9 801 




6IIQO 


6A7O 






4 404 


2 793 


2 298 


1 491 


2 001 


7 496 


3 118 


PERCENT .MARRIED. . . . 


66*6 

9O7 


64.5 


60.6 


64.7 


10 653 
68.0 


5 542 
63.7 


5 Oil 
65.9 


3 068 
64.3 


4 Oil 
63.4 


17 099 
66.8 


6 340 
64.7 




*~7tt 








388 


231 


131 


69 


198 


600 


127 




96 


7Q 






485 


286 


250 


188 


263 


770 


272 


FEMALE? 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 


10 936 

Z/lC-t 


11 312 

2f.f.C 


9 097 


9 396 


117 
17 918 


74 
9 778 


49 
8 103 


22 
5 149 


52 
6 829 


228 

28 513 


71 

11 048 




67T 1 


6QQ1 






4 150 


2 495 


1 786 


1 232 


1 623 


6 447 


2 752 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 


61.5 
327 


61.8 

3O^ 


57.0 


61.7 


10 995 
61.4 


5 817 
59.5 


5 163 
63.7 


3 145 
61.1 


4 127 
60.4 


17 713 
62.1 


6 648 
60.2 




1 6O8 


1 5X11 




ill fn 


656 


394 


204 


122 


250 


1 O50 


321 




146 


1*C 


~tii 








1 105 


736 


1 022 


4 001 


1 549 


NONWHITE 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 


3 393 

:y i e 


3 445 

1-xc 


5 169 

2f\O*B 


3 923 


6 094 


3 499 


49 
3 417 


36 
2 520 


57 
3 497 


352 

9 777 


99 
4 506 




1 964 


1 <3S*3 


2Qnn 


29R1 






1 254 


969 


1 275 


3 512 


1 734 


PERCENT MARK I ED. . . . 


57.9 

133 


55.9 
132 


56.2 

137 


58.1 

IDS 


60.1 
o/in 


57.4 


2 024 
59.2 


1 423 
56.5 


2 028 
58,0 


5 814 
59.5 


2 593 
57.5 




209 


1 &5> 


1 7*? 


1 RA 






100 




152 


432 


90 




^ 


7 


7 


T> 






133 


122 


182 


403 


171 


FEMALEi 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 


3 945 
1 158 


3 762 

1 143 


5 778 

1 858 


4 411 
1 209 


7 178 

2 nil * 


4 149 


6 
3 750 


6 
2 638 


12 
3 736 


48 
11 468 


8 
5 428 




2 076 


2 032 


3 070 


2 438 


3QRC 




1 022 


767 


1 025 


3 311 


1 662 


PERCENT MARRIED* . . . 


52.6 
209 


54.0 
200 


53.1 
257 


55.3 

217 


55.5 
496 


53.0 

OQQ 


2 151 
57.4 


1 496 
56.7 


2 115 
56.6 


6 313 

55.0 


2 836 

52.2 




693 


CAT 


845 


754 


1111 


A1 A 








823 


260 




18 


on 




10 


mn 












909 


HOUSEHOLDS 

TOTAL 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 


30 888 
30 767 


33 717 

33 657 


29 490 
29 377 


27 816 
27 753 


52 928 
52 364 


30 584 
30 494 


24 383 

nil 307 


15 735 

1 ^ f\f*7 


20 713 

yf) tfte 


84 438 


21 
34 798 




7 975 


8 333 


6 193 


7 084 


1 2 flO^ 


6 845 


6nm 










HEAD OF 'PR I MARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


7 098 
877 
5 787 


7 508 
825 
6 152 


5 648 
545 
4 501 


6 184 
900 
5 031 


11 447 
1 356 
9 456 


6 14O 
705 
4 9 13 


5 396 
607 
4 509 


3 413 
428 
2 820 


4 331 

576 
3 423 


18 418 
2 200 

1 5 PUS 


7 059 
872 

5O'> C 5 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD , 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


10 404 
6 276 
325 
121 


12 591 
6 268 
313 
60 


12 469 
5 919 
295 
113 


10 259 
4 989 
390 
63 


20 033 
9 434 
638 
564 


12 259 
6 083 
394 
90 


9 326 
4 272 
177 

QfL 


6 039 
2 868 
99 

fiR 


7 640 
4 376 
259 

1 Oft 


31 795 
14 557 
1 150 


14 895 
5 704 
352 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


78 
43 


30 
30 


59 

54 


18 

45 


84 
480 


19 
71 


59 
37 


: 37 

J 1 


32 

76 


658 

it | 5 


28 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . . 


3.86 

12 328 
12 257 


4.04 

12 507 
12 464 


4.74 

20 130 
20 081 


3.92 

14 227 
14 186 


4.09 

23 508 
23 364 


4.45 

14 229 

14 185 


4.05 

11 903 
11 890 


4.08 

9 154 
9 104 


4.20 

12 319 
12 241 


4.Q4 

36 504 
36 228 


4.38 

18 146 
18 095 


HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD. . . . 
HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . 


2 683 
2 280 
403 
1 628 


2 525 
2 234 
291 
1 592 


3 723 
3 409 
314 
2 553 


3 058 
2 638 
420 
1 952 


4 777 
4 193 
584 
3 076 


2 624 
2 352 
272 
1 681 


2 572 
2 262 
310 
1 696 


1 832 
1 628 
204 
1 268 


2 492 
2 216 
276 
1 623 


7 639 
6 685 

954 
4 851 


3 598 

3 115 
483 

2982 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


4 407 
3 373 
166 
71 


5 077 
3 119 
151 
43 


8 991 
4 617 
197 
49 


5 767 
3 200 

209 

41 


9 666 

5 518 
327 
144 


5 978 
3 667 

235 

44 


4 706 
2 793 
123 

13 


3 900 
2 039 
65 
50 


4 777 
3 160 
189 
78 


14 566 
8 560 
612 
276 


8 177 
3 853 
185 
51 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


48 
23 


26 

17 


33 

16 


12 
29 


56 

88 


14 
30 


11 
2 


27 
23 


27 

51 


199 
77 


24 
27 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 


4.57 


4.94 


5.39 


4.64 


4.89 


5.41 


4.62 


4.97 


4.91 


4.74 


5.03 



42-72 



South Carolina 



Table 28, CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES: 1960 Con. 

[Percent not shown where leas than 0*1 or where base ia less than 100; population per household not shown where less than 100 persons in households] 



SUBJECT 


GREENVILL 


GREENWOO 


HAMPTON 


HORRY 


JASPER 


KERSHAW 


LANCASTE 


LAURENS 


LEE 


LEXINGTO 


CORMICK 


MARION 


TOTAL POPULATION * . 
RACE 


209 77 

101 890 


44 34 
21 15 


17 42 
8 46 


68 24 
34 01 


12 23 
5 98 


33 58 

16 37 


39 35 

19 17 


47 60 
23 23 


21 83 
10 710 


60 72 

29 89 


8 629 
4 205 


32 014 

15 250 




4 36 


14 97 


3 94 


25 10 


2 30 


9 91 


14 11 


16 50 


3 596 


24 85 


1 615 


7 007 




17 44 


6 18 


4 51 


8 89 


3 68 


6 45 


5 05 


6 72 


7 no 


5 03 


2 590 


8 233 




3 






















a 




1 


























16 




















































10 










* * 












2 


FEMALE > 


107 886 


23 194 


8 95 


34 23 


6 25 


17 20 


20 18 


24 37 


11 122 


30 83 


4 424 


16 764 




88 456 


16 23 


4 09 


24 89 


2 31 


10 30 


14 62 


17 02 


3 863 


25 40 


1 696 


7 408 




19 34 


6 94 


4 86 


9 30 


3 93 


6 90 


5 55 


7 34 


7 256 


5 425 


2 728 


9 349 




30 
36 






1 
1 


* 









3 






3 
2 




14 
































* 




* * 


* 


* * 








... 




g 










* * 


* * 










2 


MARITAL STATUS 

TOTAL 
MALEt 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 


68 793 
16 402 


14 433 
3 439 


5 275 


21 69 

6U.T7 


3 723 
Ionft 


10 322 


12 369 


15 76 


6 156 


19 740 


2 606 


9 248 




49 767 


10 404 






2-r-f 


6OQ/1 














PERCENT MARRIED* . , 


72.3 

I"*"*"* 


72.1 
"*/m 


64*8 


66.9 

tee 


62.6 

85 


66.7 


70.1 


64.8 


62.2 


71.6 


61.7 


65.0 




1 765 


434 


1 flii 


47 


1 *57 


""4""5rt 




^O"4 


163 




71 


232 




859 


156 


33 


234 


35 


yi 


87 


1 <?3 


PJ- 






310 


FEMALE t 14 YEARS AND OVER. 


75 808 
14 506 


16 635 
3 277 


5 787 
1*53(1 


22 052 
4 555 


4 053 
In 1 7 


11 120 


13 460 


17 048 


6 810 


20 948 


2 820 


10 767 




50 967 


10 821 


3 507 


14 771 


2 411 


6Q7 i 












2 691 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . 


67.2 

2 280 


65.0 
600 


60*6 

915 


67.0 
50 1 


59.5 

1 99 


62.7 


66.5 


62.0 


59.1 


68.9 


58.4 


6 331 
58.8 




8 959 


2""4QI1. 


QftA 














414 


88 


436 




1 376 


233 


50 


268 


43 


1 558 


1 602 


2 206 


940 


2 354 


367 


1 650 


NONWHITE 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 


10 742 
3 412 


3 842 
1 207 


2 531 
Q*fn 


4 840 

1R55 


2 147 


3 804 


2 862 


4 081 


3 662 


244 
2 922 


19 
1 479 


95 

4 551 




6 738 


2 404 


isnft 








1 040 


1 417 


1 456 


1 044 


567 


1 628 


PERCENT MARRIED. . , . 


62.7 
635 


62.6 
231 


59.3 


58.7 

1 RC"> 


56.8 


2 118 
55.7 


1 702 
59.5 


2 428 
59.5 


2 065 
56.4 


1 727 
59.1 


837 
56.6 


2 737 
60*1 




520 


214 


Oft 












120 


106 


58 


188 




72 


17 










116 


222 


.137 


149 


72 


176 


FEMALE * 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 


12 4B7 
3 102 


4 532 

1 079 


2 877 


5 225 


2 391 


4 148 


3 334 


14 
4 614 


4 
4 054 


2 
3 300 


3 

1 622 


10 
5 571 




7 275 


2 616 


1CV""i 






1 242 


960 


1 316 


1 290 


935 


534 


1 630 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 


58.3 

1 174 


57.7 

"fQlt 


54.7 


57.1 


53.5 


2 175 

52.4 


1 875 
56.2 


2 585 
56.0 


2 239 
55.2 


1 856 
56.2 


874 
53.9 


3 009 

54.0 




1 999 


813 


I1QC 




106 


186 


208 


291 


255 


194 


73 


357 




111 


pc 








717 


486 


688 


517 


503 


211 


909 


HOUSEHOLDS 

TOTAL 
TOTAL POPULATION . . . 


209 776 
yr\* AOS 


44 346 


17 425 


68 247 


12 237 


14 
33 585 


13 
39 352 


25 
47 609 


8 
21 832 


6 
60 726 


3 
8 629 


23 

32 014 




58 916 


IP A i O 




66 977 


12. 207 


33 107 


39 217 


44 599 


21 733 


60 104 


8 354 


31 945 


HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


52 450 
6 466 
45 564 


11 183 
1 436 
9 Klin 


3 792 
553 


16 602 
15 226 
1 376 


2 957 
2 580 
377 


8 344 
7 368 
976 


10 143" 
9 282 
861 


12 343 
10 922 
1 421 


4 709 
4 269 

440 


16 178 
14 770: 
1 408 


1 989 
1 726 
26J 


7 612 
6 718 
394 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. * . . 


71 209 
25 652 
2 464 
507 1 


14 071 
6 958 
398 


6 795 

3 025 
179 


26 560 
9 962 
738 


2 085 
4 471 
2 589 
105 


6 178 
12 923 
5 393 
269 


8 023 
14 662 
6 034 
355 


9 194 
14 946 
7 670 
446 


3 409 
8 938 
4 456 
221 


13 023 
22 101 
8 246 
556 


1 434 
3 119 
1 719 
93 


5 328 
12 225 
6 407 
373 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


1 609 


466 


51 
29 


1 270 
74 


30 

7 


478 
377 


135 
93 


3 010 
2 577 


99 
71 


622 

331 


275 

249 


69 

60 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION * . . 


3*46 
36 953 


3.45 
13 135 


22 

4,00 

9 387 


1 196 
4.03 

18 242 


23 

4.13 

7 618 


10-1 
3.97 

13 363 


42 
3.87 

10 617 


433 
3.61 

14 074 


28 
4.62 

14 373 


291 
3.72 

10 466 


26 
4.20 

5 318 


9 

4.20 

17 599 


HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD. . . . 
HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL , 


9 038 
7 470 
1 568 

5-IQ5 


3 273 
2 775 

498 


9 347 
2 003 
1 736 
267 


18 039 
3 505 
3 110 
395 


7 606 

1 644 
1 401 
243 


13 093 
2 790 
2 377 
413 


10 586 
2 222 
1 993 
229 


14 028 
3 202 
2 764 
438 


14 313 
2 586 
2 381 
205 


10 401 
2, 267 
1 972 
295 


5 298 
1 025 
911 


17 544 
3 720 
3 235 


CHILD UNDEK 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


13 196 
7 748 
. 889 
AOD 


1 992 

4 359 
3 210 
216 


1 232 
3 922 
2 090 
100 


2 393 

7 788 
4 Oil 
342 


1 050 
2 869 
1 976 

67 


1 743 
5 173 
3 244 
143 


1 491 
4 111 
2 635 
127 


2 021 
4 967 
3 632 
20.6 


1 781 
6 346 
3 455 
145 


1 445 
4 039 
2 504 
146 


707 
2 109 

1 384 

7"5 


2 312 
6 976 
4 297 

n-ZQ 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION* . . 


437 

pCT 


39 


40 
26 


203 
56 


12 
3 


270 
229 


31 
31 


46 
33 


60 
38 


65 

58 


20 


55 

Mi 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 


4.01 


3.99 


14 
4.67 


147 
5.15 


'9 

4.63 


41 
4.69 


4.76 


13 
4.38 


22 
5.53 


7 
4.59 


15 
5.17 


9 
4.72 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 28. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES: I960 Con. 

[Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is lew than 100; population per household not shown where Jese than 100 pewons in households! 

=^=^= =^^- ^ 



42-73 





. 


: 






















SUBJECT 


MARLBORO 


NEWBERRY 


OCONEE 


ORANGE- 
BURG 


PICKENS 


RICHLAND 


SALUDA 


SPARTAN- 
BURG 


SUMTER 


UNION 


WILLIAMS- 
BURG 


YORK 


TOTAL POPULATION . . . 
RACE 


28 529 


29 416 


40 204 


68 559 


46 030 


200 102 


14 554 


156 830 


74 941 


30 015 


40 932 


78 760 






14 438 


21 065 


33 190 


22 650 


104 634+ 


7 211 


76 019 


37 335 


14 484 


20 018 


37 816 




6CQ7 




18 978 


13 378 


20 431 


72 532 


4 553 


59 493 


20 572 


10 233 


6 812 


26 941 








2 083 


19 808 


2 202 


31 924 


2 658 


16 516 


16 715 


4 251 


13 179 


10 691 






1 





1 


7 


46 




3 


6 




27 


176 






1 


1 


1 


... 


38 




2 


25 




. 


1 




* * * 







2 


1 


26 




4 


10 




... 


1 






... 


1 





. . 


41 




1 


4 




... 


2 




1 II Q-cp 


2 


2 





9 


.27 




... 


3 




. 


4 




7CQQ 




19 139 


35 369 


23 380 


95 468 


7 343 


80 811 


37 606 


15 531 


20 914 


40 944 




73 i e 




16 925 


13 989 


20 969 


62 398 


4 669 


62 652 


19 274 


10 89O 


6 904 


29 254 




/ID 




2 208 


21 373 


2 398 


32 921 


2 672 


IB 144 


18 282 


4 640 


13 992 


11 49O 








1 


2 


6 


29 





5 


4 


... 


18 


186 







... 




1 


2 


64 


1 


6 


35 


1 


... 


7 






... 


1 


4 


1 


13 





1 


4 


... 


... 


2 









... 





... 


23 


1 


2 


4 


... 





* . 


MARITAL STATUS 

TOTAL 
MALE i 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 


8 438 
2 709 


10 105 


15 136 


* 
20 579 


4 
15 551 


15 
75 471 



4 772 


1 
51 682 


3 
23 127 


... 
9 704 


... 

11 494 


5 
24 280 




5*30 






6 888 


3 849 


30 631 


1 440 


13 264 


7 183 


2 583 


4 Oil 


6 456 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 


63.1 
236 


65.7 


58,1 


12 893 
62.7 


11 159 
71.8 


41 891 
55.5 


3 136 

65.7 


36 320 
70.3 


15 084 
65*2 


6 71O 

69.1 


7 134 
62-1 


16 802 
69.2 




323 


384 






215 


1 735 


69 


1 051 


438 


207 


199 


463 




78 








429 


1 752 


167 


1 574 


606 


314 


290 


724 


FEMALE f 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 


9 611 
2 373 


10 887 

2-iyf. 


123 
13 443 


124 
23 138 


114 
16 484 


1 197 
66 795 


29 

5 032 


524 
57 422 


254 
23 759 


97 
10 829 


59 

12 644 


298 
27 911 




5 581 


6 825 








16 082 


1 163 


11 834 


5 016 


2 21O 


3 427 


6 932 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 


58.1 
393 


62.7 
278 


67.3 

^on 


58.4 


69.2 


40 530 
60.7 


3 190 
63.4 


37 554 
654 


15 417 

64.9 


6 936 
64.1 


7 467 
59.1 


17 325 
62.1 




1 540 


1 630 










107 


1 801 


738 


299 


367 


802 




117 


106 


i AO 








653 


7 128 


3 095 


1 538 


1 696 


3 246 


NONWHITE 
MALE* 14 YEARS AND OVER. . . 


3 724 
1 426 


3 100 

1 189 


1 357 
499 


11 298 

4 A 1 1 


1 380 


1 5l5 
20 496 


1 543 


906 
9 995 


231 

9 504 


145 
2 489 


54 
6 977 


408 
6 223 




2 114 


1 738 


7Ail 


63^7 








3 501 




932 


2 773 


2 300 


PERCENT MARRIED. . , . 


56.8 

151 


56.1 
154 


57.8 
41 


55.2 

UP? 


60.3 

6O 


55.4 

11 T7 


56.3 


59.3 


5 641 
59.4 


1 421 
57.1 


4 O15 
57.5 


3 566 
57.3 




168 


170 


71 


429 


93 










106 


154 


253 




16 


2 


2 


p t 












128 


183 


322 


FEMALEt 14 YEARS AND OVER. . 


4 339 
1 321 


3 428 

959 


1 481 
nyQ 


12 984 

45^i 


1 560 

VJ*J 


21 299 


1 625 


50 

11 564 


33 

11 126 


8 
2 895 


6 
7 929 


35 

7 070 




2 272 


1 834 


0-JJ3 


6 759 


Q/\e 




506 


3 239 


3 154 


876 


2 533 


2 142 


PERCENT MARRIED. . . . 


52*4 
281 


53.5 

202 


56.2 
62 


52.1 
777 


58.0 
i fifl 


55.4 


55.3 


55.9 


54.6 


1 497 
51.7 


4 325 

54.5 


3 843 
54.4 




721 


626 


225 


1 954 


268 










154 


321 


500 




25 


9 


^ 


35 


1 C\ 










514 


1 053 


1 042 


HOUSEHOLDS 

TOTAL 
TOTAL POPULATION . , . 


28 529 
28 393 


29 416 
28 897 


40 204 
37 646 


68 559 
66 959 


46 030 
45 728 


200 102 
166 702 


14 554 
14 512 


156 830 


74 941 

75 3 Oft 


30 015 


18 
40 932 


43 
78 760 




6 905 


8 165 


10 445 


16 432 


12 854 


46 288 


3 746 




1 7 7QO 






77 025 


HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . . 


6 017 
888 
4 683 


7 114 
1 051 
5 911 


9 441 
1 004 
8 150 


14 281 
2 151 
11 428 


11 682 
I 172 
10 406 


39 987 

6 301 
33 ' 436 


3 378 

368 

2R7U 


38 811 
4 503 

z^ f\eii 


16 041 
1 758 


7 107 
820 


7 920 
725 


19 894 
18 035 
1 859 


CHILD UNDER is OF HEAD . 

OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


10 474 
6 Oil 
320 
136 


8 797 
5 588 
436 
519 


13 301 
5 486 
264 
2 558 


25 459 
12 773 
867 
1 600 


15 917 
6 153 
398 
302 


60 682 
22 903 
3 393 
33 400 


5 042 
2 667 
183 
42 


51 543 
25 133 
1 499 

2OH7 


28 593 
11 612 
822 

24LC | 


9 667 

6 031 
341 


17 346 
8 148 
303 


15 258 
27 932 
13 110 
831 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


67 
69 


432 
87 


2 516 
42 


209 
1 391 


162 
140 


12 130 

? 1 97O 


13 
29 


992 

1SQR 


177 


71 


59 


1 735 
210 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 

NONWHITE 
TOTAL POPULATION . . 


4.11 

13 921 
13 856 


3.54 

10 434 
10 359 


3.60 

4 301 
4 276 


4.07 

41 192 
39 865 


3.56 

4 630 
4 601 


3.60 

65 172 
56 547 


3.87 

5 332 
5 307 


3.57 

34 685 
34 224 


4.O6 

35 095 
34 460 


3.77 

8 892 
8 859 


4.72 

27 216 
27 158 


1 525 

3.87 

22 565 

po "*TA 




2 890 


2 388 


1 032 


8 394 


1 118 


13 025 


1 088 


7 942 


7 338 


1 932 


5 02l 


4-7=5 


HEAD OF PRIMARY FAMILY 
PRIMARY INDIVIDUAL . 


2 531 
359 
1 747 


1 981 
407 
1 391 


895 
137 
663 


7 234 
1 160 
5 215 


960 
158 
700 


11 112 
1 913 
7 947 


971 
117 
754 


6 798 
1 144 
4 782 


6 455 
883 
4 697 


1 666 
266 

1 148 


4 621 
4OO 
3 525 


4 154 
598 
2070 


CHILD UNDER 18 OF HEAD . 
OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 


5 283 

3 763 
173 
65 


3 573 

2 761 
246 
75 


1 433 
1 091 
57 
25 


16 118 
9 525 
613 
1 327 


1 515 
1 174 
94 
29 


21 928 
12 207 
1 440 
8 625 


2 022 

1 345 
98 

25 


12 051 
8 833 
616 
U6l 


13 611 
8 385 
429 
635 


3 121 
2 499 
159 

TT-I 


12 143 
6 239 

230 


8 385 
5 880 
340 


INMATE OF INSTITUTION. . . 


38 
27 


40 
35 


17 
g 


88 
1 239 


27 
2 


5 876 
2 749 


11 
14 


301 
160 


93 

542 


26 

7' 


39 


67 


POPULATION PER HOUSEHOLD . . 


4.79 


4.34 


4.14 


4.75 


4.12 


4.34 


4.88 


4.31 


4.70 


4.59 


5.41 


4.70 



42-74 



South Carolina 
Table 29.-CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES: I960 



SUBJECT 


ABBEVILLE 


A I KEN 


ALLENDALE 


ANDERSON 


BAMBERG 


BARNWELL 


BEAUFORT 


BERKELEY 


CALHOUN 


CHARLES- 
TON 


CHEROKEE 




13 434 


51 385 


8 248 


44 904 


9 972 


10 369 


37 889 


32 085 


12 256 


57 264 


19 991 




8 976 


36 027 


2 872 


35 993 


3 737 


4 945 


22 834 


13 124 


4 058 




15 922 




4 449 


15 343 


5 376 


8 B95 


6 234 


5 413 


14 929 


18 920 


8 197 


27 703 


4 069 




9 


15 




16 


1 


11 


126 


41 


1 


100 





AGE 
TOTAL MALE* ALL AGES- t . 


6 549 

710 


25 376 
3 398 


4 021 
570 


22 323 

2 417 


5 049 
658 


5 099 
678 


22 545 

2 879 


15 931 
2 376 


5 960 
824 


29 017 
4 407 


9 914 
1 093 




733 


3 365 


580 


2 490 


662 


676 


2 147 


2 296 


833 


4 316 


1 226 




758 


3 053 


539 


2 577 


650 


728 


1 638 


2 368 


845 


3 686 


1 231 




675 


2 224 


429 


2 164 


631 


599 


6 418 


1 685 


658 


2 739 


1 025 




478 


1 326 


214 


1 379 


378 


250 


3 136 


744 


309 


2 225 


575 




364 


1 496 


179 


1 353 


228 


188 


1 464 


760 


250 


1 735 


537 




375 


1 836 


206 


1 296 


207 


249 


1 139 


846 


257 








355 


1 726 


223 


1 442 


264 


278 


886 


889 


277 


1 971 


630 




416 


1 581 


217 


1 461 


245 


267 


719 


906 


320 








392 


I 388 


200 


1 329 


241 


273 


524 


759 


333 


1 232 


572 




296 


1 115 


179 


1 210 


215 


212 


410 


627 


229 


962 


470 




230 


878 


122 


938 


179 


198 


318 


542 


251 


744 


412 




211 


662 


108 


730 


132 


148 


236 


324 


173 


488 


320 




226 


546 


100 


610 


150 


139 


273 


336 


147 


498 


270 




161 


389 


83 


454 


98 


119 


160 


249 


111 


297 


205 




169 


393 


72 


473 


111 


97 


198 


224 


143 


299 


245 


TOTAL FEMALE ALL. AGES- 


6 885 
705 


26 009 
3 245 


4 227 
538 


22 581 
2 433 


4 923 
622 


5 270 

642 


15 344 
2 747 


16 154 
2 283 


6 296 
807 


28 247 
4 236 


10 077 
1 077 




841 


3 207 


557 


2 351 


648 


641 


2 109 


2 332 


779 


4 123 


1 220 




757 


2 957 


517 


2 417 


603 


686 


1 614 


2 199 


785 


3 556 


1 180 




651 


2 245 


397 


2 013 


538 


564 


1 262 


1 631 


641 


2 459 


924 




449 


1 558 


232 


1 489 


304 


266 


1 342 


872 


306 


1 703 


600 




412 


1 788 


234 


1 367 


227 


263 


1 252 


867 


287 


1 770 


596 




397 


1 787 


211 


1 420 


247 


282 


975 


961 


291 


1 928 


625 




426 


1 716 


263 


1 578 


255 


. 312 


920 


989 


345 


1 981 


693 




382 


1 625 


239 


1 476 


264 


262 


648 


794 


359 


1 501 


592 




420 


1 361 


227 


1 325 


238 


269 


546 


765 


353 


1 233 


567 




295 


1 194 


192 


1 218 


229 


239 


450 


659 


295 


979 


481 




274 


941 


151 


976 


181 


216 


389 


506 


265 


777 


448 




263 


763 


132 


759 


146 


160 


304 


392 


211 


587 


326 




228 


672 


123 


673 


158 


208 


346 


357 


217 


584 


287 




175 


419 


105 


515 


113 


124 


198 


278 


160 


403 


227 




210 


531 


109 


571 


150 


136 


242 


269 


195 


427 


234 


NONWHITE MALE* ALL AGES 


2 107 
290 


7 414 
1 2O7 


2 589 
416 


4 415 
651 


3 181 
478 


2 613 
403 


7 532 

l" 263 


9 200 
1 503 


4 001 
668 


13 533 

2 313 


1 918 
273 




286 


1 161 


420 


602 


465 


415 


1 173 


1 526 


658 


2 371 


296 




292 


1 053 


381 


590 


454 


425 


1 007 


1 523 


637 


2 113 


290 




250 


750 


306 


534 


460 


359 


1 138 


1 039 


480 


1 534 


239 




129 


386 


152 


301 


315 


120 


520 


424 


212 


864 


108 




106 


326 


88 


198 


135 


64 


255 


326 


159 


584 


90 




97 


352 


107 


183 


116 


87 


298 


412 


145 


513 


73 




80 


345 


110 


182 


131 


111 


315 


406 


152 


655 


105 




107 


386 


120 


245 


115 


104 


324 


442 


185 


625 


79 




104 


345 


111 


191 


116 


113 


282 


381 


178 


559 


83 




75 


270 


95 


200 


87 


85 


235 


297 


102 


382 


66 




75 


210 


74 


146 


71 


96 


182 


299 


124 


290 


59 




58 


155 


58 


117 


59 


62 


128 


156 


77 


190 


46 




67 


181 


64 


115 


74 


74 


171 


193 


83 


241 


40 




38 


146 


52 


70 


45 


60 


97 


148 


62 


154 


39 




53 


141 


35 


90 


60 


35 


144 


125 


79 


145 


32 


NONWHITE FEMALE? ALL AGES 


2 351 

310 


7 944 
1 140 


2 787 
385 


4 496 
648 


3 054 
454 


2 811 
388 


7 523 

1 174 


9 761 
1 512 


4 197 
660 


14 270 
2 250 


2 151 
320 




364 


1 141 


405 


591 


442 


388 


1 225 


1 522 


600 


2 281 


357 




338 


1 031 


384 


580 


408 


413 


1 043 


1 468 


595 


2 -101 


293 




218 


800 


305 


485 


404 


344 


635 


1 055 


471 


1 520 


216 




146 


487 


154 


337 


213 


144 


391 


470 


209 


839 


127 




120 


396 


145 


232 


143 


112 


347 


448 


194 


666 


115 




120 


408 


114 


191 


142 


115 


373 


492 


166 


701 


111 




117 


417 


151 


252 


126 


151 


374 


507 


199 


745 


108 




85 


404 


145 


237 


141 


110 


337 


433 


212 


647 


86 




119 


372 


122 


206 


122 


129 


316 


407 


185 


611 


94 




82 


335 


106 


192 


121 


100 


277 


361 


144 


440 


77 




90 


256 


91 


144 


80 


109 


265 


304 


130 


356 


76 




64 


222 


82 


114 


61 


73 


194 


234 


113 


297 


52 




65 


219 


85 


103 


82 


112 


256 


218 


134 


367 


47 




53 


147 


63 


80 


55 


60 


141 


174 


77 


217 


32 




60 


169 


50 


104 


60 


63 


175 


156 


108 


232 


40 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALE* 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


4 501 

1 467 


16 094 
4 112 


2 436 
811 


15 322 

4 122 


3 198 
1 236 


3 157 
1 051 


16 139 
9 374 


9 287 
3 061 


3 605 
1 210 


17 204 
5 833 


6 601 
1 969 




2 846 


11 310 


1 504 


10 583 


1 825 


1 965 


6 414 


5 901 


2 260 


10 776 


4 341 




67 


323 


69 


256 


63 


87 


196 


178 


104 


368 


117 




164 


494 


104 


480 


111 


121 


228 


266 


122 


398 


226 




24 


178 


17 


137 


26 


20 


123 


59 


13 


197 


65 


FEMALE i 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


. 4 711 
1 244 


17 108 
3 219 


2 720 
681 


15 803 
3 322 


3 158 
856 


3 448 
867 


9 160 
1 855 


9 771 
2 465 


4 063 
1 055 


16 957 

4 034 


6 817 
1 592 




2 858 
82 


11 569 

477 


1 581 
130 


10 647 
268 


1 863 
87 


2 078 
146 


6 239 
257 


6 012 
230 


2 324 
160 


10 846 
445 


4 404 
146 




584 


2 095 


444 


1 680 


427 


477 


997 


1 246 


664 


1 949 


751 




25 


225 


14 


154 


12 


26 


69 


48 


20 


128 


7O 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS- 


13 057 
3 410 


51 103 
13 319 


8 241 
1 949 


44 636 
12 Oil 


9 529 
2 215 


10 330 
2 489 


29 287 
7 163 


31 973 
7 081 


12 222 

2 926 


55 262 
12 487 


19 873 
4 949 




2 557 


10 354 


1 362 


9 692 


1 618 


1 773 


5 579 


5 291 


1 990 


9 580 


3 912 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD . . . , 

NONWHITE* IN HOUSEHOLDS * t 


7 007 
83 

4 424 
934 


26 959 
471 

15 265 
3 396 


4 869 
61 

5 369 
1 101 


22 677 
256 

8 832 
1 836 


5 608 
88 

5 799 

1 116 


5 987 
81 

5 398 
1 092 


16 140 
405 

14 162 
2 987 


19 285 
316 

18 909 
3 738 


7 208 
98 

8 164 
1 674 


32 749 

446 

27 412 
5 128 


10 837 
175 

4 035 
788 



























General Population Characteristics 
Table 29.CHAJRACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION. FOR COUNTIES: I960 Con. 



42-75 



SUBJECT 


CHESTER 


CHESTER- 
FIELD 


CLARENDON 


COLLETON 


DARLINGTON 


DILLON 


ORCHESTER 


EDGEFIELO 


FAIRFIELD 


FLORENCE 


GEORGE- 
TOWN 


TOTAL POPULATION. .... 


20 952 

1 1 496 


28 546 


25 573 


22 399 


39 826 


24 411 


20 750 


12 859 


17 234 


53 657 


19 597 




9 453 






10 439 


22 231 


12 263 


10 014 


5 085 


6 785 


29 358 


8 064 












17 571 


12 038 


10 731 


7 773 


10 448 


24 288 


11 528 


AGE 
TOTAL MALE? ALL AGES. . . , 


10 282 
1 322 


14 121 

1ASR 


8 
12 501 


13 
11 076 


24 
19 615 


110 
12 040 


5 
10 265 


1 
6 342 


1 
8 583 


11 
26 696 


5 
9 666 




15QO 








2 682 




1 328 




1 167 








1 298 


2O?iL 






2 869 


1 859 


1 392 


874 


1 147 


3 799 


1 542 




1 019 


IE 1 Q 








1 830 


1 299 




1 128 




1 482 




582 


ASA 




cec 






1 098 


656 










537 










656 


606 


395 


456 








558 


"75^ 




e-3/i 


1 024 






293 






iiTO 




598 


R1 O 






1 131 




531 












609 


833 


e*7> 


ecs A 




AO9 


667 








477 




549 


774 


526 


617 


981 


583 


551 


303 


474 


1 375 


472 




494 
406 


620 

|Q<* 


472 
377 


544 

li oy 


795 

7*7 


428 


453 


261 


367 


1 032 

peg 


324 

pIQ 




OQA 


QO 




fie 


















275 


^"71 




"SDfl 




260 


263 


189 


237 








216 


272 


9O1 


01/1 


gii 




260 




1 HR 


e*7C 


1 U6 




233 


273 




33^ 


OKB 










WCQ 


1 tt3 


TOTAL FEMALEi ALL AGES* 


10 670 
1 237 


14 425 
1 742 


13 072 
1 809 


11 323 

1 353 


20 211 
2 680 


12 371 

1ff.a 


149 
10 485 

i9CB 


6 517 
845 


8 651 

11 OB 


26 961 

3 473 


9 931 

i 486 




1 287 


1 764 


1 924 


1 455 


2 ABB 


1 775 


ivQQ 


91 


113Q 


3 599 


1 571 




1 220 


1 873 


1 994 


1 438 


2 583 


1 63O 


1 286 


808 


1 016 


3 535 


1 375 




1 020 


1 462 


1 416' 


1 090 


1 905 


1 255 


1 O29 


609 


807 


2 684 


1 072 




621 


802 


660 


603 


1 283 


705 


592 


373 


523 


1 627 


547 




6l3 


788 


569 


567 


1 195 


626 


ftOl 


364 


452 


1 629 


525 




584 


804 


653 


607 


1 259 


684 


A2Q 


355 


472 


1 606 


538 




676 


866 


697 


700 


1 303 


755 


741 


372 


461 


1 712 


580 




645 


845 


589 


590 


1 110 


649 


621 


359 


493 


1 529 


5O8 




622 


790 


661 


640 


1 047 


618 


536 


298 


477 


1 373 


419 




538 


608 


481 


490 


828 


48O 


413 


257 


390 


1 O87 


304 




4O1 


569 


426 


487 


671 


385 


382 


234 


322 


891 


257 




334 


474 


350 


404 


503 


295 


300 


193 


262 


686 


203 




3Q6 


421 


371 


371 


455 


273 


27 8 


234 


249 


622 


236 




260 


311 


192 


243 


334 


2l6 


179 


142 


200 


411 


165 




306 


306 


280 


285 


367 


257 


251 


164 


260 


497 


145 


NONWHITE MALE* ALL AGES . 


4 628 
774 


5 008 
731 


8 877 
1 514 


5 859 
862 


8 624 
1 448 


5 896 
1 090 


5 283 
755 


3 859 
648 


5 236 

834 


11 832 
1 907 


5 560 

961 




700 


805 


1 496 


930 


1 455 


1 077 


813 


620 


789 


1 960 


1 017 




667 


837 


1 499 


929 


1 382 


946 


733 


589 


738 


1 799 


911 




507 


660 


1 106 


688 


1 009 


681 


657 


464 


576 


1 418 


643 




263 


288 


449 


295 


535 


311 


327 


268 


303 


716 


281 




206 


209 


310 


254 


343 


218 


239 


157 


256 


566 


209 




187 


174 


351 


230 


392 


230 


219 


158 


266 


517 


221 




197 


238 


373 


287 


354 


240 


279 


169 


257 


583 


249 




200 


247 


355 


261 


422 


250 


287 


151 


209 


531 


228 




185 


213 


321 


252 


358 


239 


228 


148 


218 


514 


244 




164 


146 


270 


197 


254 


154 


204 


114 


161 


333 


150 




146 


102 


216 


201 


201 


156 


149 


87 


158 


286 


124 




95 


94 


153 


141 


151 


89 


109 


86 


109 


215 


70 




122 


101 


200 


152 


151 


87 


135 


83 


143 


- 229 


87 




92 


83 


133 


85 


81 


65 


83 


64 


91 


137 


76 




123 


80 


131 


95 


88 


63 


66 


53 


12B 


121 


89 


NONWHITE FEMALEi ALL AGES 


4 828 
706 


5 242 
804 


9 372 
1 463 


6 101 
857 


8 971 
1 469 


6 252 
1 082 


5 453 
710 


3 915 
623 


5 213 

817 


12 467 
1 932 


5 973 

1 028 




70S 


822 


1 493 


917 


1 424 


1 034 


826 


650 


753 


1 932 


1 043 




621 


827 


1 522 


881 


1 316 


879 


706 


552 


665 


1 831 


894 




492 


598 


1 067 


653 


960 


663 


601 


417 


528 


1 371 


682 




295 


253 


472 


315 


542 


364 


304 


257 


340 


764 


303 




222 


212 


379 


262 


448 


283 


279 


214 


267 


668 


253 




227 


270 


460 


285 


466 


305 


271 


166 


254 


663 


278 




248 


274 


456 


356 


470 


338 


359 


190 


248 


680 


296 




226 


279 


374 


259 


386 


285 


292 


182 


239 


582 


273 




217 


201 


424 


286 


389 


268 


268 


145 


221 


549 


236 




198 


136 


312 


209 


286 


196 


179 


115 


130 


393 


157 




139 


146 


246 


216 


232 


160 


185 


90 


165 


322 


132 




144 


140 


206 


185 


184 


120 


148 


9C 


132 


250 


96 




139 


123 


244 


186 


171 


97 


139 


110 


147 


225 


140 




119 


87 


107 


107 


118 


89 


90 


49 


107 


147 


97 




130 


70 


147 


127 


110 


89 


96 


65 


150 


158 


65 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


6 611 
2 010 


9 014 
2 918 


7 102 
2 626 


7 042 
2 231 


11 819 
3 518 


6 662 
2 318 


6 465 
2 002 


3 879 
1 262 


5 324 
1 758 


16 31S 
5 230 


5 413 

1 852 




4 291 


5 736 


4 232 


4 458 


7 870 


4 272 


4 210 


2 457 


3 301 


10 505 


3 379 




138 


179 


139 


136 


239 


184 


12< 


63 


147 


299 


60 




252 


306 


225 


286 


352 


218 


216 


147 


220 


461 


154 




58 


54 


19 


67 


79 


54 


37 


13 


45 


122 


28 


FEMALEi 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


7 134 
1 693 


9 392 
2 313 


7 713 
2 251 


7 358 

1 647 


12 755 
2 940 


7 505 
2 031 


6 776 
1 528 


4 095 
1 004 


5 563 

1 350 


17 043 
4 132 


5 766 

1 587 




4 402 


5 823 


4 350 


4 545 


8 068 


4 449 


4 339 


2 513 


3 391 


10 734 


3 476 




184 


202 


218 


184 


365 


284 


174 


99 


182 


449 


106 




950 


1 180 


1 095 


1 126 


1 609 


958 


882 


547 


775 


2 061 


678 




89 


76 


17 


40 


138 


67 


27 


31 


47 


116 


25 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . . 


20 863 
5 054 


28 499 
6 831 


25 504 
5 159 


22 369 
5 532 

3QfC 


39 678 

9 046 

70*57 


24 365 

5 119 
3 784 


20 680 
4 972 
3 774 


12 812 
3 007 
2 234 


17 141 
3 975 
2 832 


53 013 
11 946 
9 401 


19 561 
3 968 
3 074 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 


3 8 16 
11 796 

197 


5 164 
16 274 
230 


3 792 

16 342 
211 


12 608 
254 


23 258 
317 


15 173 
289 


11 795 

139 


7 489 
82 


10 197 
137 


31 153 
513 


12 346 
173 


NONWHITE! IN HOUSEHOLDS . . 


9 407 
1 908 


10 208 
1 925 


18 233 

3 298 


11 936 

2 506 


17 480 
3 178 


12 129 
2 133 


10 725 
2 277 


7 739 

1 48 


10 386 
2 064 


24 081 
4 503 


11 505 
2 006 



42-76 



South Carolina 
Table 29 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES: I960 Con. 



SUBJECT 


GREEN- 
VILLE 


GREENWOOD 


HAMPTON 


HORRY 


JASPER 


KERSHAW 


LANCASTER 


LAURENS 


LEE 


LEXINGTON 


MC- 
CORMICK 


MARION 


TOTAL POPULATION. . 


76 138 
65 234 


22 511 
15 305 


17 425 
8 038 


51 850 
37 232 


12 237 
4 619 


26 743 
16 058 


25 098 
17 921 


30 074 
21 246 


18 246 
5 571 


33 539 
26 991 


8 629 

3 311 


18 611 
7 265 




10 858 


7 205 


9 382 


14 530 


7 616 


10 677 


7 173 


8 825 


12 668 


6 546 


5 318 


11 338 




46 


^ 




38 




8 


4 










8 


AGE 
TOTAL MALEt ALL AGES- . . 


38 697 
4 408 


11 004 
1 265 


8 466 

1 114 


26 166 
3 525 


5 982 
745 


13 259 
1 786 


12 338 
1 583 


14 838 
1 486 


9 043 
1 402 


16 733 
2 023 


4 205 

551 


9 069 
1 250 




4311 


1 290 


1 160 


3 422 


850 


1 855 


1 531 


1 722 


1 447 


1 984 


566 


1 364 




3 950 


1 243 


1 135 


3 260 


811 


1 701 


1 533 


1 882 


1 304 


1 942 


566 


1 336 




3 641 


929 


854 


2 629 


632 


1 293 


1 205 


1 566 


1 013 


1 533 


488 


1 052 




2 973 


580 


413 


2 187 


321 


687 


748 


900 


500 


1 020 


245 


498 




2 757 


617 


422 


753 


272 


730 


755 


849 


371 


974 


179 


409 




2 740 


735 


438 


571 


264 


850 


752 


815 


405 


1 034 


197 


425 




2 762 


744 


491 


592 


308 


831 


799 


955 


438 


1 094 


212 


435 




2 456 


725 


/iA<5 


395 


317 


783 


683 


918 


425 


1 018 


227 


456 




23-10 


7nn 


iie 


TS1 7 


340 


689 


685 


868 


407 


950 


176 


480 




1 840 


522 


424 


978 


28 1 


554 


542 


740 


349 


791 


162 


373 




1 432 


481 


325 


750 


258 


411 


425 


628 


243 


623 


137 


297 




1 004 


347 


234 


611 


158 


297 


318 


489 


211 


494 


126 


206 




894 


375 


240 


550 


177 


322 


319 


409 


217 


503 


142 


210 




604 


231 


149 


310 


126 


229 


233 


282 


145 


325 


110 


152 




687 


220 


149 


316 


122 


241 


227 


329 


166 


425 


121 


126 


TOTAL FEMALE ALL AGES. . 


37 441 

4 244 


11 507 

1 245 


8 959 

1 150 


25 664 
3 461 


6 255 
788 


13 484 
1 751 


12 760 
1 491 


15 236 
1 519 


9 203 
1 332 


16 806 
1 914 


4 424 
554 


9 542 
1 287 




4 081 


1 253 


1 123 


3 421 


784 


1 830 


1 612 


1 685 


1 323 


1 918 


572 


1 384 




3 717 

3 196 


1 190 
907 


1 132 
820 


3 287 

2 459 


786 
673 


1 73; 

1 206 


1 517 
1 103 


1 762 

1 443 


1 261 
1 002 


1 888 
1 505 


581 
472 


1 364 
961 




2 635 


6 1 A 


485 


1756 


36 1 


730 


848 


940 


508 


1 000 


260 


508 




2 672 


730 


472 


1 765 


293 


830 


A 1 A 


AAA 


459 


993 


238 


II Q 1 




2 677 


786 


475 


1 589 


304 


808 


QTO 


Q7A 


460 


1 107 


221 


C 1 Q 




2 782 


811 


506 


1 608 


362 


841 


809 


Imp 


520 


1 109 


250 


557 




2 392 


762 


555 


1 380 


356 


759 


7=rt 


QUA 


468 


IftftQ 


O 1 1 


en 3 




2 099 


698 


476 


1 290 


347 


704 


AAA 


Oil i 


427 


951 


195 


478 




1 827 


622 


390 


928 


260 


en i 


ecc 


7"7A 


i i 7 


7 Oil 


1 f\Q 


it 3^ 




1 482 


499 


354 


802 


268 


U37 


II E 1 * 


AA7 


9 AA 


iC-I 


160 


-t(\Q 




1 117 


436 


Oil 


660 


1 7Q 


age 


TQC 


e i i 


5A3 


= (=3. 








977 


341 


291 


530 


205 


379 


376 


414 


256 


542 


144 


228 




709 


269 


192 


356 


120 


278 


255 


555 


135 


389 


Ul 


1 5 i 




834 


342 


234 


392 


169 


274 


260 


382 


166 


482 


127 


1 5fi 


NONWHITE MALE' ALL AGES . 


5 530 

730 


3 520 

490 


4 521 
712 


7 156 
1 272 


3 680 
514 


5 235 
804 


3 492 

KB a 


4 321 

A 1 A 


6 303 

il26 


3 202 

COK 


2 590 

u 311 


5 440 

AA2 




776 


519 


706 


1 194 


572 


796 


545 


642 


1 1 52 


II7-I 


TQQ 






681 


466 


703 


1 048 


554 


759 


5ft/L 


=73 


Iftnu 


1117 


TT^Q 






646 


357 


507 


791 


437 


603 


Q 1 




7AQ 










450 


232 


227 


465 


207 


294 


202 


307 


363 


179 


178 


288 




313 
304 


190 
188 


195 
1 B2 


359 

35A 


135 

1 5Q 


256 

3A"? 


178 


227 


240 


167 


98 


219 




309 


172 


5 1 9 


TEli 


i 5n 


311 II 
















272 


172 


1 RQ 


"?JL7 


1 7IL 


















276 


159 


317 


f 1 -X 


I A^ 












115 


257 




210 


132 


1 Aft 


1 QC 


1 *3ft 












92 


249 




160 


111 




1 T5 








161 




106 


79 


183 




1 14 


82 


81 


127 


Aft 






124 


138 


85 


65 


137 




120 


118 


109 


106 








111 


106 


58 


56 


94 




82 


70 


7 1 


ec 








116 


133 


105 


73 


89 




87 


A9 


7T 


11Q 








78 




63 


61 


74 


NONWHITE FEMALE* ALL AGES . 


5 374 
750 


3 686 

= 3 = 


4 866 

75S 


7 412 


3 938 


5 450 


68 
3 685 


86 
4 507 


74 
6 372 


63 
3 346 


62 
2 728 


58 
5 906 




747 


485 


7 1 ft 


19 eft 






541 


663 


1 061 


502 


395 


893 




677 


470 


A7^ 


IflCA 






595 


611 


1 033 


487 


404 


952 




608 


330 




A 1 (? 








590 




426 


371 


897 




368 


2l7 


37/\ 


n eii 






352 


449 


718 


357 


315 


598 




329 


3^9 


A 1 Q 










318 


379 


193 


185 


344 




306 


208 


3/i 








169 


215 


306 


161 


144 


269 




"107 


1 O^ 












249 


300 


184 


120 


306 




267 


pA 1 


5A7 






238 


183 


237 


306 


168 


134 


341 




231 


166 


525 


T5ft 


1 QA 




169 


221 


289 


173 


108 


291 




213 


1 5Q 










154 


230 


255 


143 


113 


255 




i A "3 


1 5A 










128 


170 


170 


116 


92 


217 




136 


1 1 A 








170 


114 


156 


142 


104 


69 


149 




1 16 


96 


1 R^ 






137 


112 


106 


165 


87 


79 


115 




72 


59 


QO 








112 


109 


140 


105 


78 


120 




84 


101 


1 O5 






131 


67 


87 


68 


76 


61 


83 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALE? 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


26 667 
7 096 


7 441 

1 A39 


5 275 


16 543 


3 723 


8 246 


43 
7 920 


96 
10 091 


78 
5 126 


64 
11 156 


60 
2 606 


76 
5 377 




18 610 


5 309 






1 200 


2 496 


2 138 


3 272 


1 811 


3 075 


872 


1 929 




378 


148 






2 331 




5 513 


6 406 


3 129 


7 594 


1 608 


3 262 




AKO 










157 


95 


255 


128 


159 


71 


106 




311 








157 


258 


220 


323 


166 


397 


106 


162 


FEMALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


26 070 
4 880 


8 027 

Ien | 


5 787 


16 101 


35 
4 053 


47 
8 457 


49 
8 394 


90 
10 593 


20 
5 508 


90 
11 437 


20 
2 820 


24 
5 780 




18 426 


5 461 






1 017 


1 901 


1 792 


2 752 


1 551 


2 356 


788 


1 649 




il^^ 












5 631 


6 569 


3 253 


7 667 


. 1 646 


3 400 




2S 1 O 


QflQ 




300 


122 


178 


150 


322 


224 


191 


88 


189 




5K/1 








582 


1 077 


913 


1 182 


672 


1 329 


367 


711 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . . 


73 622 
20 171 


22 459 
6 136 


17 374 


140 
50 670 


43 
12 207 


54 
26 367 


58 
25 010 


90 

27 817 


32 

18 152 


85 
32 964 


19 
8 354 


20 
18 556 




16 850 


/i Aa*7 








6 335 


6 267 


7 393 


3 693 


8 633 


1 989 


3 850 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD ..... 

NONWHITEr IN HOUSEHOLDS .... 
HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD ...... 


36 055 
546 

10 465 

21 "152 


11 295 
141 

7 154 

1 5Q** 


9 820 
179 

9 347 


28 893 
398 

14 390 


2 085 
7 060 
105 

7 606 


4 869 
14 999 
164 

10 439 


5 102 
13 462 
179 

7 150 


5 724 
14 429 
271 

8 793 


2 775 
11 529 
155 

12 618 


6 920 
17 108 
303 

6 493 


1 434 
4 838 
93 

5 298 


2 885 
11 658 
163 

11 305 












1 644 


2 086 


1 372 


1 815 


2 164 


1 353 


1 025 


2 086 



General Population Characteristics 
Table 29. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION, FOR COUNTIES: 1960-Con. 



42-77 



SUBJECT 


MARLBORO 


EWBERRY 


OCONEE 


ORANGE- 
BURG 


PICKENS 


RICHLAND 


SALUDA 


SPARTAN- 
BURG 


SUMTER 


UNION 


ILLIAMS- 
BURG 


YORK 


TOTAL POPULATION. .... 


21 566 
10 617 


18 545 
10 798 


31 546 
28 838 


54 707 
19 015 


35 090 

32 244 


61 171 
37 100 


14 265 
9 112 


100 164 
81 286 


44 815 
23 39O 


19 824 
13 802 


37 030 
11 434 


37 783 
24 744 




10 841 


7 740 


2 701 


35 688 


2 821 


23 990 


5 151 


18 871 


21 349 


6 O21 


25 551 


12 723 




108 


7 


7 


n 


25 


&1 


2 


7 


76 


1 


45 


316 


AGE 
TOTAL MALE? ALL AGES. . . 


10 446 
1 489 


9 304 
1 031 


17 053 
1 652 


26 722 
3 691 


17 451 
1 898 


38 521 

3 206 


7 076 

850 


49 306 
5 433 


23 121 

3 601 


9 731 
1 161 


18 228 
2 735 


18 877 

2 493 




1 450 


1 034 


1 606 


3 897 


1 915 


2 937 


896 


5 812 


3 054 


1 154 


2 834 


2 500 




1 494 


1 152 


1 703 


3 759 


1 990 


2 726 


795 


5 671 


2 727 


1 113 


2 887 


2 409 




1 177 


951 


2 647 


2 841 


1 654 


9 211 


715 


4 483 


2 30O 


918 


2 142 


1 779 




589 


536 


2 329 


1 410 


1 253 


8 301 


389 


2 968 


2 522 


623 


879 


1 126 




499 


428 


1 084 


1 25O 


1 167 


2 027 


346 


3 161 


1 743 


591 


830 


1 065 




497 


486 


801 


1 313 


1 167 


1 799 


391 


3 117 


1 450 


598 


831 


1 124 




562 


568 


836 


1 536 


1 122 


1 783 


408 


3 420 


1 431 


559 


928 


1 148 




540 


564 


819 


1 461 


1 101 


1 640 


419 


3 119 


1 190 


575 


902 


1 063 




578 


579 


861 


1 338 


1 O38 


1 310 


347 


2 957 


808 


527 


793 


1 031 




422 


467 


703 


1 022 


838 


903 


347 


2 591 


577 


456 


607 


815 




338 


337 


551 


937 


620 


704 


275 


2 054 


485 


384 


530 


701 




255 


311 


458 


656 


508 


671 


253 


1 450 


380 


357 


431 


526 




249 


347 


394 


682 


457 


585 


253 


1 233 


390 


273 


4O8 


467 




147 


231 


279 


461 


328 


340 


166 


911 


222 


221 


255 


333 




160 


282 


330 


468 


395 


378 


226 


926 


241 


221 


236 


297 


TOTAL FEMALEt ALL AGES. 


11 120 
1 458 


9 241 
938 


14 493 
1 609 


27 985 
3 576 


17 639 
1 888 


22 650 
3 023 


7 189 
790 


50 858 
5 219 


21 694 
3 474 


10 093 

1 145 


18 802 
2 713 


18 906 
2 371 




1 443 


1 021 


1 524 


3 777 


1 876 


2 834 


793 


5 438 


3 085 


1 077 


2 715 


2 386 




1 516 


970 


1 555 


3 581 


1 830 


2 477 


833 


5 521 


2 618 


1 149 


2 715 






1 115 


846 


1 364 


2 808 


1 602 


1 982 


668 


4 336 


1 942 


859! 


1 986 


1 697 




606 


519 


1 166 


1 577 


1 292 


1 397 


397 


3 260 


1 652 


602 


1 067 


1 211 




536 


485 


992 


1 429 


1 170 


1 540 


402 


3 417 


1 536 


645 


922 


1 199 




589 


488 


809 


1 508 


1 136 


1 660 


398 


3 379 


1 429 


618 








629 


601 


909 


1 671 


1 191 


1 668 


443 


3 677 


1 413 


652 


1 093 


1 217 




610 


627 


882 


1 514 


1 117 


1 291 


419 


3 436 


999 


631 








611 


543 


788 


1 405 


1 029 


1 146 


409 


3 054 


853 


573 








479 


478 


695 


1 172 


907 


876 


321 


2 646 


633 


497 








406 


383 


578 


1 053 


681 


701 


307 


2 154 


562 


436 


639 






327 


370 


515 


839 


572 


580 


275 


1 661 


504 


371 


489 


536 




320 


368 


392 


786 


521 


547 


275 


1 453 


399 


318 


438 


323 




212 


257 


326 


590 


382 


414 


193 


1 101 


256 










263 


347 


389 


699 


445 


514 


266 


1 106 


339 


272 






NON WHITE MALEi ALL AGES 


5 289 
897 


3 857 
545 


1 391 
161 


17 283 
2 747 


1 367 
174 


12 953 
1 535 


2 574 
399 


9 194 
1 340 


10 506 
1 720 


2 965 
424 


12 489 
2 072 


6 452 
1 063 




830 


545 


182 


2 830 


189 


1 436 


395 


1 344 


1 607 


467 


2 144 


922 




845 


581 


195 


2 665 


145 


1 494 


353 


1 244 


1 587 






X.Q/L 




656 


484 


158 


2 029 


154 


1 908 


320 


998 


1 361 


340 




^QC 




291 


256 


118 


971 


98 


1 361 


160 


637 


752 






317 




207 


153 


59 


769 


77 


785 


111 


503 


521 




nfl'7 


290 




206 


162 


66 


716 


82 


661 


99 


400 






549 


293 




238 


190 


60 


843 


57 


734 


120 


449 


458 


i "5^ 


563 


272 




239 


159 


74 


813 


71 


689 


109 


460 






477 


273 




228 


163 


83 


707 


77 


599 


91 


429 




98 


350 


203 




176 


161 


57 


491 


73 


423 


86 


364 




QQ 


313 


204 




139 


95 


38 


471 


36 


354 


75 


289 






231 


127 




103 


96 


45 


338 


34 


323 


72 


216 


198 




246 


168 




114 


111 


31 


386 


32 


300 


60 


215 




67 


146 


96 




58 


70 


33 


262 


29 


165 


58 






78 


134 


121 


f- ft AMf\ At/CD 


62 


86 


31 


245 


39 


186 


66 


154 










NONWHITE FEMALE f ALL AGES 


5 660 
854 


3 890 
540 


1 317 
187 


18 409 
2 710 


1 479 
210 


11 118 
1 497 


2 579 

381 


9 684 
1 373 


10 919 
1 693 

1A.7"? 


3 057 
427 

431 


13 107 
2 086 
2 066 


6 587 

1 016 
988 


UNDER 5 Yt. 


856 


581 


147 


2 799 


182 


1 480 


350 






443 


2 038 


9O2 




817 


500 


145 


2 619 


175 


1 321 


349 


1 276 




"*OIi 


1 469 


677 




645 


412 


131 


2 022 


145 


1 119 


285 


946 




139 


714 


402 




30 


221 


83 


1 060 


107 


719 


147 






157 


607 


363 




24 


181 


77 


918 


89 


591 


144 


543 






610 


335 




27 


179 


73 


892 


82 


671 


122 


516 






701 


327 




27 


212 


81 


1 012 


66 


736 


118 


542 


nyz 


153 


613 


290 




25 


191 


86 


865 


72 


578 


111 






f -1C 


541 


280 


40 TO 44 " 


27 


175 


64 


816 


79 


566 


130 


465 


fit*} 


109 


377 


253 


e rt EM vC-ADC 


19 


139 


58 


614 


78 


414 


88 






1 OS 


375 


211 




17 


125 


39 


565 


48 


356 


77 


293 


x i g 


109 


285 


155 




14 


121 


40 


433 


49 


294 


70 




one 


102 


274 


168 




16 


120 


30 


462 


38 


283 


70 




155 


91 


184 


114 




7 


84 


37 


310 


24 


239 






175 


72 


167 


106 


AMn (-IVCD 


' 9 


109 


39 


312 


35 


254 














MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


6 27 
2 15 


6 302 
1 901 


12 417 
5 272 


16 071 
5 325 


12 Olfi 
3 09 


30 1^6 
17 617 


4 688 
1 416 


33 391 
8 566 


14 191 
5 025 

8 69 e 


6 49: 
1 792 
4 41E 


10 337 
S 3 74C 
J 6 282 


11 911 
3 462 
7 950 




3 83 


4 122 


6 785 


10 119 


8 51S 


> 11 579 




523 


214 


13" 


r 166 


> 232 




18 


125 


15C 


439 


14" 






)O73 


309 


21J 


J 26C 


) 394 




23 


24fi 


275 


547 


32E 


J 515 




)2fi3 


l6 e 


6* 


I 54 


1- 105 




4 


3C 


85 


80 


7^ 
















FEMALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


6 97 

1 83 


6 46f 
1 3SE 


10 091 
> 2 06= 


17 729 

4 449 


12 342 
2 37f 


i 14 768 
5 3 772 


4 92E 

1 14J 


35 655 

7 28C 


12 999 
2 90S 
1. 9 3 


> 6 9i: 
1 45C 
> 4 52 


s 11 14: 

) 3 14C 
L 6 56C 


S 12 219 
) 2 743 
> 8 112 




4 01 


4 186 


6 914 


10 58C 


8 642 


1 9 22*3 






tOQf 


> 15* 


? 30: 


5 361 




29 


146 


J 213 


69 


I9t 


3 616 






) 1 39 


L 86' 


1 1 41] 


S 1 245 




1 05 


86C 


) 1 ,01< 


, 2 611 


' 1 21< 


> 1 60*. 






57( 


5 7 


3 3C 


) 119 






3i 


I 94 


82 


5 10< 


? 16S 


? 2. 












HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 

POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . 
HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 


21 45 
4 86 
3 33 


18 472 
4 80< 
3 66< 


5 29 OOJ 

? 7 so; 

? 6 27Z 


> 54 45: 
5 12 68< 
> 8 94C 


5 34 84 
, 9 63 
> 7 94 


1 39 58i 
1 9 09< 

7 7 25' 


I 14 22: 
) 3 67, 
7 2 82 

77 ec 


5 99 321 
i 26 781 
L 21 65: 
D 50 22 


3 42 65' 
J 9 54 
5 7 74 
3 25 13 


4 19 71 
? 5 01 

4 3 88 
1 10 64 


5 36 95' 

3 7 48' 
1 5 61< 
8 23 611 


7 37 663 
4 8912 
? 7 168 

3 21 281 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD .... 

NONWHITE, IN HOUSEHOLDS . . 


13 02 
22 

10 89 
2 11 


9 82< 
16< 

7 68J 

1 61 


b 14 72 
3 19' 

y 2 69 
L 58' 


J 32 21C 

r 6i" 

L 35 54* 
I 7 18C 


) 16 94 

r 31 

4 2 83 
) 67 


6 22 89 
6 34< 

M. 17 49 
5 3 26. 


D 18 

3 5 12 
5 1 04 


3 66 

3 18 60 
9 3 87 


4 23 

3 21 11 
4 3 96 


D 17 

1 5 99 
1 1 19 


7 23< 

1 25 54. 
1 4 57 


5 302 

3 12 980 
2 2 481 



42-78 



South Carolina 



Table 30. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION OUTSIDE PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500, FOR COUNTIES: 

1960 



SUBJECT 


ABBEVILLE 


A I KEN 


ALLENDALE 


ANDERSON 


BAMBERG 


BARNWELL 


BEAUFORT 


BERKELEY 


CALHOUN 


CHARLES- 
TON 


CHEROKEE 




12 268 


37 645 


6 463 


38 898 


9 972 


8 468 


. 37 889 


28 593 


9 823 


53 583 


17 817 




8 062 


24 108 


1 885 


3O 864 


3 737 


3 995 


22 834 


10 786 


3 026 


25 866 


14 293 




4 197 


13 524 


4 578 


8 018 


6 234 


4 467 


14 929 


17 775 


6 796 


27 621 


3 524 




9 


13 




16 


1 


6 


126 


32 


1 


96 


. 


AGE 
TOTAL MALEf ALL AGES- . . . 


5 993 

653 


18 677 
2 563 


3 174 
465 


19 424 
2 091 


5 049 
658 


4 214 
563 


22 545 
2 879 


14 195 
2 156 


4 863 
684 


27 156 
4 123 


8 912 

980 




693 


2 481 


459 


2 206 


662 


554 


2 147 


2 086 


667 


4 078 


1 116 




728 


2 317 


437 


2 246 


650 


610 


1 638 


2 167 


712 


3 474 


1 112 




589 


1 638 


350 


1 887 


631 


506 


6 418 


1 520 


560 


2 622 


933 




334 


979 


173 


1 174 


378 


205 


3 136 


666 


258 


2 128 


505 




332 


1 032 


131 


1 137 


228 


150 


1 464 


665 


202 


1 604 


483 




348 


1 269 


154 


1 084 


207 


196 


1 139 


739 


198 


1 659 


501 




333 


1 245 


172 


1 250 


264 


228 


886 


763 


227 


1 849 


557 




394 


1 136 


156 


1 264 


245 


226 


719 


790 


255 


1 492 


487 




375 


1 003 


158 


1 169 


241 


233 


524 


664 


259 


1 131 


513 




280 


791 


142 


1 070 


215 


179 


410 


536 


185 


879 


426 




217 


670 


101 


835 


179 


158 


318 


462 


194 


679 


381 




196 


500 


78 


658 


132 


121 


236 


263 


141 


430 


286 




213 


437 


80 


531 


150 


112 


273 


299 


119 


463 


241 




149 


305 


61 


403 


98 


96 


160 


220 


90 


263 


176 




159 


311 


57 


419 


111 


77 


198 


199 


112 


282 


215 


TOTAL FEMALEt ALL AGES. 


6 275 
671 


18 968 

2 384 


3 289 
431 


19 474 
2 111 


4 923 
622 


4 254 
545 


15 344 
2 747 


14 398 
2 093 


4 960 
630 


26 427 
3 969 


8 9O5 

946 




792 


2 377 


454 


2 064 


648 


528 


2 109 


2 134 


634 


3 919 


1 090 




708 


2 207 


424 


2 117 


603 


570 


1 614 


1 995 


653 


3 399 


1 053 




532 


1 694 


338 


1 735 


538 


468 


1 262 


1 468 


526 


2 336 


842 




332 


1 1O2 


180 


1 265 


304 


222 


1 342 


772 


250 


1 596 


525 




373 


1 226 


175 


1 163 


227 


210 


1 252 


755 


220 


1 644 


523 




381 


1 286 


162 


1 207 


247 


223 


975 


849 


225 


1 787 


564 




399 


1 206 


200 


1 332 


255 


254 


920 


851 


262 


1 819 


626 




360 


1 148 


180 


1 288 


264 


207 


648 


678 


273 


1 376 


516 




396 


991 


154 


1 140 


238 


223 


546 


658 


277 


1 135 


484 




277 


877 


143 


1 058 


229 


187 


450 


554 


224 


886 


428 




255 


685 


112 


843 


181 


158 


389 


448 


196 


705 


392 




242 


577 


96 


662 


146 


123 


304 


349 


159 


537 


286 




208 


496 


94 


562 


158 


152 


346 


313 


173 


546 


241 




162 


309 


75 


431 


113 


93 


198 


243 


114 


373 


190 




187 


403 


71 


496 


150 


91 


242 


238 


144 


400 


199 


NONWHITE MALE' ALL AGES . 


1 993 
269 


6 572 
1 066 


2 231 
356 


4 001 
587 


3 181 
478 


2 190 
343 


7 532 
1 263 


8 620 
1 417 


3 376 
569 


13 486 
2 303 


1 689 
243 




270 


1 041 


359 


551 


465 


342 


1 173 


1 440 


552 


2 360 


265 




282 


939 


337 


536 


454 


361 


1 007 


1 451 


549 


2 108 


264 




244 


661 


270 


497 


460 


307 


1 138 


970 


412 


1 530 


217 




123 


353 


138 


277 


315 


102 


520 


397 


185 


863 


98 




98 


272 


69 


175 


135 


53 


255 


307 


134 


582 


78 




90 


314 


94 


164 


116 


66 


298 


377 


122 


511 


63 




74 


311 


94 


168 


131 


93 


315 


370 


131 


651 


85 




103 


343 


99 


220 


115 


93 


324 


408 


151 


624 


68 




96 


295 


92 


175 


116 


105 


282 


355 


143 


557 


71 




72 


233 


86 


174 


87 


68 


5-aC 


273 


81 


380 


55 




68 


188 


64 


138 


71 


77 


182 


269 


98 


289 


49 




56 


134 


48 


105 


59 


48 


128 


141 


66 


190 


38 




65 


165 


53 


100 


74 


57 


171 


186 


70 


240 


35 




34 


131 


42 


56 


45 


49 


97 


138 


50 


153 


31 




49 


126 


30 


78 


60 


26 


144 


121 


63 


145 


29 


NONWHITE FEMALE* ALL AGES 


2 213 
301 


6 965 

983 


2 347 
328 


4 033 

583 


3 054 
454 


2 283 
330 


7 523 
1 174 


9 187 
1 437 


3 421 
538 


14 231 

2 240 


1 835 
284 




344 


1 014 


347 


532 


442 


319 


1 225 


1 455 


500 


2 279 


311 




318 


927 


331 


530 


408 


349 


1 043 


1 393 


504 


2 101 


260 




207 


720 


279 


453 


404 


292 


635 


993 


399 


1 518 


194 




136 


419 


129 


310 


213 


123 


391 


443 


182 


836 


111 




109 


347 


115 


202 


143 


87 


347 


410 


154 


663 


96 




113 


357 


99 


178 


142 


90 


373 


460 


134 


696 


95 




112 


351 


126 


228 


126 


126 


374 


459 


153 


744 


91 




76 


343 


118 


204 


141 


90 


337 


390 


170 


645 


68 




113 


322 


93 


186 


122 


104 


316 


381 


146 


610 


67 




78 


290 


84 


172 


121 


82 


277 


334 


113 


437 


65 




84 


230 


76 


126 


80 


75 


265 


290 


97 


354 


63 




59 


199 


65 


96 


61 


53 




33^ 


fl7 


5OA 


43 




62 


192 


67 


84 


82 


76 


256 


205 


1 12 


364 


32 




47 


124 


53 


65 


55 


45 


1/11 


1 65 


C, 


216 


24 




54 


147 


37 


84 


60 


42 


1 75 


1 119 


1 76 


2 -39 


31 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


4 069 
1 228 


11 741 
3 129 


1 896 
660 


13 314 
3 647 


3 198 
1 236 


2 606 
879 


16 139 

9T7U 


8 146 
2 764 


2 933 

IflC 1 


16 041 
5 565 


5 928 
1 808 




2 667 


8 114 


1 137 


9 122 


1 825 


1 6 15 


6ii i n 


51 no 


1 7 AA 


9O"?n 


3QC 1 




61 


248 


55 


224 


63 


7 1 




i 50 


AS 


=5 


98 




152 


393 


86 


429 


111 


98 






1 n7 


"^77 


5O7 




22 


105 


1 "5 


116 


56 












A9 


FEMALE 1 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


4 227 
1 006 


12 385 
2 477 


2 076 

585 


13 556 
2 921 


3 158 
856 


2 728 
709 


9 160 

IOCK 


8 576 

2pT^ 


3 165 

Dip 


15 749 
3 nun 


6 006 

1 436 




2 676 


8 264 


1 183 


9 143 


1 Rft"? 


1 677 










-, Qnu 




73 


348 


Op 


214 


87 


96 


5R7 








1 9<5 




521 


1 509 


295 


1 372 


427 


326 


997 


11 rt 1 


117O 


1A*3U 


6O7 




24 


135 


13 


120 


i p 


1 A 












HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS* . . . 


12 227 
3 152 


37 443 
9 518 


6 456 

1 424 


38 642 
10 268 


9 529 

251 = 


8 455 


29 287 


28 495 


9 799 


51 590 


17 701 




2 392 


7 399 


**1 024 


8 336 


1 6 1 R 










11 449 




OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD ..... 

NONWHITEi IN HOUSEHOLDS .... 


6 635 

48 

4 172 
867 


20 172 
354 

13 460 
2 937 


3 963 
45 

4 571 
890 


19 811 
227 

7 955 
1 605 


5 608 
88 

5 799 
11 i A 


4 982 
53 

4 473 

AA1 


16 140 
405 

14 162 


17 532 

264 

17 763 


5 948 
72 

6 773 


30 972 
394 

27 326 


9 739 

156 

3 490 



























General Population Characteristics 42-79 

Table 30. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION OUTSIDE PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500, FOR COUNTIES: 

1960 Con. 



SUBJECT 


CHESTER 


CHESTER- 
FIELD 


CLARENDON 


COLLETON 


ARLINGTON 


DILLON 


ORCHESTER 


EDGEFIELD 


FAIRFIELD 


FLORENCE 


GEORGE- 
TOWN 


TOTAL POPULATION. .... 


18 328 
9 110 


24 994 
15 634 


24 069 
6 633 


22 399 
1O 439 


32 006 

1 6 S97 


22 510 
U2f\-t 


17 209 


10 740 
3 848 


14 823 
4 404 


49 278 
27 722 


19 597 
8 064 




9 216 


9 337 


17 428 


11 947 


15 455 


1 1 197 


8 759 


6 891 


10 418 


21 547 


11 528 




2 


23 




i * 


24 


1 10 


H 


1 


!_ 


9 


5 


AGE 
TOTAL MALE? ALL AGES. . 


8 995 
1 172 


12 428 
1 461 


11 843 
1 775 


11 076 
1 378 


15 886 
2 236 


11 156 
1 704 


8 566 
1 130 


5 355 

756 


7 415 
1 057 


24 682 
3 203 


9 666 

1 492 




1 127 


1 608 


1 808 


1 453 


2 369 


1 736 


1 179 


738 


1 026 


3 497 


1 542 




1 160 


1 824 


1 875 


1 473 


2 253 


1 702 


1 092 


737 


978 


3 552 


1 482 




895 


1 364 


1 421 


1 185 


1 681 


1 207 


923 


571 


755 


2 816 


1 010 




489 


758 


f,S 1 


555 


925 


633 


517 


350 


403 


i 377 


507 




451 


612 


450 


542 


780 


499 


457 


240 


352 


1 350 


440 




463 


607 


496 


524 


890 


504 


443 


249 


389 


1 383 


479 




526 


705 


551 


633 


907 


574 


552 


258 


403 


1 444 


542 




519 


717 


534 


580 


935 


559 


516 


282 


358 


1 321 


477 




484 


672 


492 


617 


763 


545 


436 


267 


371 


1 254 


472 




406 


538 


437 


544 


615 


388 


376 


210 


302 


953 


324 




361 


419 


357 


482 


455 


353 


270 


167 


264 


791 


249 




269 


341 


293 


345 


357 


227 


220 


162 


200 


565 


184 




253 


331 


316 


328 


335 


209 


204 


156 


229 


510 


177 




204 


229 


196 


214 


179 


156 


132 


111 


138 


335 


146 




216 


242 


191 


223 


206 


160 


119 


101 


190 


331 


143 


TOTAL FEMALE? ALL AGES. . . 


9. 333 
1 098 


12 566 
1 552 


12 226 
1 700 


11 323 
1 353 


16 120 
2 200 


11 354 
1 651 


8 643 
1 065 


5 385 
704 


7 408 
1 028 


24 596 
3 170 


9 931 
1 486 




1 137 


1 594 


1 805' 


1 455 


2 259 


1 646 


1 196 


779 


1 004 


3 322 


1 571 




1 092 


1 701 


1 894 


1 438 


2 145 


1 521 


1 087 


696 


874 


3 279 


1 375 




897 


1 297 


1 331 


1 090 


1 567 


1 181 


865 


525 


702 


2 478 


1 072 




523 


691 


625 


603 


988 


669 


492 


315 


447 


1 503 


547 




520 


656 


532 


567 


933 


574 


512 


293 


380 


1 497 


525 




495 


704 


590 


607 


956 


626 


521 


264 


396 


1 462 


538 




576 


744 


652 


700 


1 043 


699 


604 


296 


386 


1 547 


580 




544 


724 


552 


590 


872 


580 


484 


295 


394 


1 390 


508 




536 


684 


615 


640 


797 


565 


418 


248 


377 


1 232 


419 




451 


498 


438 


490 


606 


415 


318 


208 


293 


989 


304 




357 


466 


399 


487 


497 


343 


301 


195 


265 


789 


257 




304 


401 


328 


404 


378 


266 


231 


142 


225 


614 


203 




280 


350 


336 


371 


345 


233 


210 


183 


223 


540 


236 




240 


258 


168 


243 


255 


182 


143 


111 


175 


352 


165 




283 


246 


261 


285 


279 


203 


196 


131 


239 


432 


145 


NONWHITE MALEi ALL AGES . . 


4 524 
757 


4 589 
676 


8 527 

1 439 


5 859 
862 


7 651 
1 311 


5 532 
1 031 


4 330 
631 


3 455 
579 


5 222 
832 


10 585 
1 721 


5 560 
961 




680 


738 


1 437 


930 


1 294 


1 016 


680 


554 


787 


1 760 


1 017 




658 


781 


1 438 


929 


1 244 


881 


611 


532 


734 


1 640 


911 




498 


612 


1 075 


688 


914 


646 


541 


420 


576 


1 289 


643 




259 


267 


441 


295 


482 


303 


273 


249 


301 


649 


281 




204 


185 


291 


254 


302 


204 


201 


139 


255 


504 


209 




180 


155 


336 


230 


346 


216 


180 


136 


265 


454 


221 




195 


219 


353 


287 


299 


226 


22* 


150 


257 


511 


249 




195 


215 


340 


261 


368 


234 


222 


136 


207 


454 


228 




178 


189 


310 


252 


307 


227 


179 


138 


218 


443 


244 




157 


134 


257 


197 


215 


136 


162 


95 


161 


297 


150 




144 


89 


207 


201 


172 


139 


118 


79 


158 


259 


124 




95 


87 


149 


141 


128 


78 


94 


74 


109 


191 


70 




118 


92 


194 


152 


138 


79 


105 


76 


143 


192 






90 


78 


132 


85 


62 


57 


62 


52 


91 


110 


76 




116 


72 


128 


95 


69 


59 


47 


46 


128 


111 


89 


NONWHITE FEMALEi ALL AGES 


4 694 
691 


4 771 
752 


8 909 
1 389 


6 101 
857 


7 828 
1 326 


5 775 
1 004 


4 433 
591 


3 437 
547 


5 197 
816 


10 971 
1 723 


5 973 
1 028 




691 


757 


1 420 


917 


1 269 


962 


696 


587 


747 


1 743 


1 043 




610 


767 


1 459 


881 


1 164 


821 


596 


503 


663 


1 664 


894 




481 


556 


1 017 


653 


853 


619 


497 
5=0 


369 

229 


527 

340 


1 235 
677 


682 
303 




284 
215 


228 
187 


457 
358 


262 


376 


263 


232 


191 


267 


594 


253 




223 


241 


421 


285 


397 


289 


226 


132 


252 


568 


278 




241 


242 


438 


356 


401 


319 


277 


166 


247 


590 


296 




220 


249 


360 


259 


330 


255 


222 


159 


239 


487 


273 




206 


185 


402 


286 


323 


244 


206 


123 


220 








188 


122 


291 


209 


235 


169 


138 


99 


179 


334 


157 




135 


119 


232 


216 


18< 


14 


147 


82 


165 


271 






142 


130 


197 


185 


153 


110 


11 


65 


132 


210 






133 


105 


228 


186 


140 


84 


106 


94 


147 








108 


78 


101 


107 


96 


7 


70 


38 


107 


117 






126 


53 


139 


127 


90 


7 


68 


53 


149 


121 




MARITAL STATUS 
MALE? 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


5 750 
1 789 


7 867 
2 623 


6 720 
2 519 


7 04 
2 23 


9 417 
2 927 

61 42 


6 33 

2 17 
3 92 


5 353 

1 696 
3 447 


3 '265 
1 115 
2 019 


4 507 
1 524 

2 74 


15 065 
4 88 
9 673 


5 413 
1.852 
3 379 




3 688 
121 


4 918 
165 


3 965 

123 


13 


183 


16 


9 


54 


13 


248 


60 




231 


280 


218 


28 


28 


19 


17 


122 






28 




42 


46 


18 


6 


67 


4 


3 










FEMALE* 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER 


6 198 
1 539 


B 028 
2 035 


7 173 
2 103 


7 35 

1 64 


9 92 

2 41 


6 82 
1 88 


5 49 
1 27 


3 33 

85 


4 67 
1 18 


15 467 
3 78 


5 766 
1 587 

3R"7f* 




3 750 


4 979 


4 066 


4 54 


6 25 


4 06 


3 54 


2 04 










142 


182 


192 


18 


24 


24 


12 


6 


15 








847 


955 


994 


1 12 


1 16 


81 


66 


41 


66 


^ 


25 




62 


59 


10 


4 


9 


5 


2 


1 








HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. 


18 239 

4 360 


24 956 
5 776 


24 006 
4 78 


22 36 
5 53 


31 87 
6 91 


22 46 

4 59 


17 15 
3 97 


10 69 
2 38 


14 73 
3 29 


48 63 
10 77 
8 69 


19 561 
3 968 
3 074 




3 271 


4 406 


3 560 


3 97 


5 48 


3 46 


3 10 


1 81 


8 go 


28 69 


12 346 


OTHER KELATIVE OF HEAD. . . 
NQNRELATIVE OF HEAD .... 

NONWHITEi IN HOUSEHOLDS ... 
HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 


10 458 
150 

9 169 

l! 844 


14 583 
19 

9 326 
1 70 


15 47 
18 

17 42 
3 12 


12 60 
25 

11 93 
2 50 


19 23 
23 

15 37 
2 65 


14 14 
26 

11 29 
1 93 


8 

8 76 

1 77 


6 

6 85 
1 25 


12 

10 35 

2 05 


46 

21 33 
3 82 


173 

11 505 
2 006 



42-80 



South Carolina 



Table 30. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION OUTSIDE PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500, FOR COUNTIES: 

I960 Con. 



SUBJECT 


GREEN- 
VILLE 


GREENWOOD 


HAMPTON 


HORRY 


JASPER 


KERSHAW 


LANCASTER 


LAURENS 


LEE 


LEXINGTON 


MC- 
CORMICK 


MARION 




66 059 


21 076 


1 1 584 


50 148 


11 045 


26 19O 


21 902 


25 317 


18 246 


30 793 


6 631 


18 611 




56 381 


14 073 


4 583 


36 143 


3 445 


15 619 


15 238 


16 718 


5 571 


24 970 


2 174 


7 265 




9 633 


7 QQ3 


7 000 


13 967 


7 598 


1O 563 


6 662 


8 596 


12 668 


5 821 


4 457 


11 338 




45 






38 




8 




3 


7 


2 




8 


AGE 
TOTAL MALE* ALL AGES- . . . 


33 865 

3 789 


10 357 
1 210 


5 716 
737 


25 357 
3 427 


5 394 
684 


13 006 
1 757 


10 812 
1 383 


12 515 
1 261 


9 043 
1 402 


15 460 
1 848 


3 263 

438 


9 069 
1 250 




3 730 


1 226 


796 


3 315 


772 


1 825 


1 337 


1 448 


1 447 


1 848 


439 


1 364 




3 464 


1 185 


796 


3 167 


738 


1 674 


1 352 


1 643 


1 304 


1 828 


440 


1 336 




3 280 


878 


A9Q 


2 563 


583 


1 270 


1 097 


1 351 


1 013 


1 432 


410 


1 052 




2 AT 1 ? 


544 




2 146 


293 


675 


655 


767 


5OO 


935 


191 


UQS 




2 387 


580 


260 


1 7O8 


238 


718 


641 


682 


371 


900 


132 


409 




2 409 


690 


244 


1 515 


232 


837 


639 


668 


405 


960 


145 


425 




2 393 


689 


282 


i 532 


264 


811 


675 


773 


438 


1 004 


147 


435 




2 166 


679 


294 


1 345 


275 


760 


586 


767 


425 


937 


169 


456 




1 955 


639 


309 


1 274 


298 


679 


602 


690 


407 


870 


134 


480 




1 593 


479 


293 


940 


245 


538 


473 


612 


349 


727 


120 


373 




1 243 


446 


228 


718 


235 


395 


375 


513 


243 


567 


105 


507 




878 


327 


165 


587 


146 


291 


286 


418 


211 


457 


107 


206 




772 


362 


163 


523 


164 


315 


288 


370 


217 


460 


111 


210 




529 


217 


106 


300 


116 


226 


212 


249 


145 


295 


85 


152 




602 


206 


111 


297 


111 


235 


211 


303 


166 


392 


90 


126 


TOTAL FEMALE* ALL AGES. . 


32 194 
3 666 


10 719 
1 181 


5 868 
774 


24 791 
3 366 


5 651 
728 


13 184 
1 719 


11 090 
1 300 


12 802 
1 295 


9 203 
1 332 


15 333 

1 755 


3 368 

432 


9 542 
1 287 




3 530 


1 191 


744 


3 321 


724 


1 793 


1 408 


1 446 


1 323 


1 787 


445 


I^au 




3 236 


1 1 14 


769 


3 199 


732 


1 701 


1 349 


1 506 


1 261 


1 751 


468 


I^AU 




2 768 


830 


580 


2 380 


629 


1 191 


986 


1 257 


1 002 


1 400 


390 


961 




2 286 


578 


315 


1 707 


321 


711 


723 


775 


508 


917 


202 


508 




2 288 


690 


284 


1 703 


263 


813 


686 


639 


459 


923 


1 7A 






2 306 


727 


279 


1 526 


26O 


792 


682 


803 


460 


1 012 


143 


519 




2 400 


760 


307 


1 540 


308 


822 


712 


843 


520 


1 016 


179 


= (=7 




2 054 


702 


363 


1 326 


315 


737 


637 


768 


468 


899 


159 


c/19 




1 796 


639 


306 


1 231 


306 


679 


596 


77^ 


427 


855 


i lift 






1 574 


573 


255 


880 


227 


524 


481 


620 


317 


727 


119 


423 




1 261 


457 


219 


761 


24O 


425 


392 


568 


286 


575 


123 


309 




945 


403 


191 


625 


159 


375 


344 


434 


283 


492 


" 116 


999 




807 


320 


209 


506 


187 


366 


330 


374 


256 


466 


104 


228 




598 


244 


124 


339 


107 


273 


231 


312 


135 


337 


78 


1=1 




679 


310 


149 


381 


145 


263 


233 


337 


166 


421 


86 


1 Sfl 


NONWHITE MALE* ALL AGES . . 


4 966 
652 


3 432 

478 


3 433 

531 


6 899 
1 221 


3 673 

E 1 -X 


5 184 
791 


3 268 
551 


4 222 

Aft^t 


6 303 

11 9ft 


2 875 

iiA7 


2 194 

ae A 


5 440 




675 


504 


547 


il *?9 


572 


7ftQ 


en-* 














618 


461 


534 


1 O15 




755 


478 














601 


353 


393 


764 


436 


597 


369 


4&n 


769 


^Ofi 


OQ i 






409 


227 


189 


451 


207 


293 


193 


298 


363 


1 Sfl 




ODD 




285 


187 


143 


352 


133 


yc.-*. 
















268 


183 


1 93 


343 


1 9Q 


9fi9 
















281 


164 


156 


333 


15O 


238 


1 4ft 


5O 1 


0117 










250 


165 


139 


333 


174 


3ii5 


i "S^ 














248 


151 


17 1 


302 


182 


















187 


127 


135 


180 


138 




QA 














135 


111 


1 14 


128 


147 


'1 44 


Qi 




1 TR 






183 




100 


78 


66 


123 


88 


1 O2 


i- 














103 


1 16 


8 1 


102 


111 


1 "5A 
















76 


67 


53 


54 


68 


















78 


60 


58 


46 


73 


97 














NONWHITE FEMALE t ALL AGES . 


4 712 
663 


3 571 

5 10 


3 568 

568 


7 106 

1 9 A"? 


3 927 

ee i 


5 387 

7Q9 


3 396 


4 377 


6 372 


2 948 


2 263 


5 906 




657 


471 


507 


1 208 


548 


822 


K/ITt 


CQE 






331 


893 




603 


453 


5 14 


1 17 


557 


09^ 
















541 


316 


355 


787 


USA 


CVii 












897 




330 


212 




It -ffL 












332 


268 


598 




282 


226 


1 5? 


x -7 = 








307 




172 


151 


344 




260 


198 


169 


418 


1 "^"7 


3UQ 




209 


306 


147 


122 


269 




269 


191 


169 


359 


prt-a 


0^11 








156 




306 




241 


193 


1 QQ 


^oft 












154 


105 


341 




196 


161 


1 *57 










211 


289 


148 


95 


291 




180 


153 


1 9Q 










221 


255 


120 


87 


255 




139 


123 


111 


143 


147 




115 


160 


170 


97 


76 


217 




120 


1 15 


88 


1 37 








147 


142 


82 


56 


149 




98 


95 












101 


165 


72 


64 


115 




62 


57 


60 


49 




177 


108 


106 


140 


83 


68 


120 




7]_ 


97 


73 


56 








83 


68 


62 


52 


83 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


23 438 
6 459 


6 961 
1 724 


3 539 

1 99 1 


16 019 


3 333 


8 073 


6 940 


92 

8 473 


78 
5 126 


48 
10 281 


47 
2 013 


76 

5 377 




16 134 


4 951 


21 77 










2 918 


1 811 


2 872 


712 


1 929 




341 


i "?fl 












5 190 


3 129 


6 957 


1 201 


3 262 




560 


219 


1 "S^t 






152 


86 


235 


128 


149 


60 


106 




285 


67 


1 ft 








202 


287 


166 


371 


88 


162 


FEMALEi 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


22 358 
4 268 


7 424 

i-lQ 1 


3 737 


15 479 


3 614 


8 252 


7 266 


78 

8 825 


20 
5 508 


81 
10 371 


12 
2 111 


24 
5 780 




15 854 


5 075 










1 589 


2 462 


1 551 


2 146 


652 


1 649 




346 


1 AO 










4 845 


5 307 


3 253 


7 003 


1 207 


3 400 




2 029 


RQO 






115 


;70 


129 


286 


224 


163 


57 


189 




207 


JLQ 






512 


1 039 


779 


1 000 


672 


1 154 


239 


711 


HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS. . . 


63 577 

17 242 


21 032 

5 680 


11 576 


48 976 


26 
11 030 


51 
25 814 


53 
21 814 


56 
23 060 


32 

18 152 


68 

30 244 


13 
6 363 


20 
18 556 




14 526 


4 549 






2 600 


6 168 


5 394 


6 003 


3 693 


7 813 


1 434 


3 850 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD 

NONWHITE t IN HOUSEHOLDS .... 


31 336 

473 

9 239 

1 839 


10 669 

134 

6 959 

Ie^iO 


6 825 
115 

6 993 


28 051 

381 

13 827 


1 821 
6 517 
92 

7 591 


4 755 
14 737 
154 

10 325 


4 397 
11 875 
148 

6 637 


4 580 
12 239 
238 

8 564 


2 775 
11 529 
155 

12 618 


6 337 

15 829 
265 

5 779 


1 056 
3 807 
66 

4 443 


2 885 
11 658 
163 

11 305 












1 640 


2 058 


1 257 


1 746 


2 164 


1 156 


842 


2 086 



General Population Characteristics 42-81 

Table 30. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RURAL POPULATION OUTSIDE PLACES OF 1,000 TO 2,500, FOR COUNTIES: 

1960 Con. 



SUBJECT 


MARLBORO 


NEWBERRY 


OCONEE 


ORANGE- 
BURG 


PICKENS 


RICHLAND 


SALUDA 


SPARTAN- 
BURG 


SUMTER 


UNION 


WILLIAMS- 
BJRG 


YORK 


TOTAL POPULATION 


17 040 
7 615 


18 545 
10 798 


27 839 


49 106 


29 832 


61 171 


12 176 


75 509 


44 815 


15 186 


37 030 


36 127 




9 317 


7 740 














23 390 










108 


7 


7 










14 610 


21 349 




45 


310 


AGE 
TOTAL MALE? ALL AGES. . . . 


8 310 
1 233 


9 304 
1 031 


15 271 
1 419 


24 158 
3 347 


14 903 


38 521 


6 088 


37 346 


23 121 


7 518 

QTfJ 


18 228 

27^*5 


18 039 
2^97 




1 183 


1 034 


1 414 


3 554 


1f.&y 


20*57 


77R 






935 


2 834 


2 402 




1 224 


1 152 


i =; i ? 


















2OQ6 




937 


QC 1 




















1 679 




467 


536 




* 1 5 




8 -an 1 








467 


879 


1 066 




379 


428 


933 


1 1115 




2r\y"7 


"3 Oil 




17 Q^ 


438 


83O 


1 O27 




383 


486 


7OH 






1-700 






1 Zl^fi 




BY 1 


1 082 




442 


568 


720 


1 360 


959 


1 7B3 


332 


2 584 


1 431 


401 


928 


1 100 




421 
453 


564 
579 


708 

741 


1 299 

1?fiU 


919 
Qon 


1 640 
1 310 


350 


2 334 


1 190 
803 


445 
379 


902 
793 


1 017 
990 




314 


467 


620 


907 


7 14 


903 


poo 


1 909 


577 


341 


6O7 


769 




259 


337 


482 


825 


C 1 5 


704 




IEnQ 


485 


OOA 


530 


658 




192 


311 


409 


57O 


432 


671 


5 i it 




380 


232 


tt3l 


492 




194 


347 


357 


597 


378 


585 


221 


QlU. 


390 


219 


408 


451 




113 


231 


247 


399 


395 


34O 


152 


670 


222 


168 


255 


325 




116 


282 


291 


409 


337 


378 


198 


715 


241 


184 


236 


288 


TOTAL FEMALEi ALL AGES. . . 


8 730 
1 197 


9 241 
938 


12 568 
1 431 


24 948 
3 208 


14 929 
1 619 


22 650 
3 023 


6 088 
677 


38 163 
3 964 


21 694 

3 474 


7 668 
921 


18 802 
2 713 


18 088 
2 278 




1 193 


1 021 


1 327 


3 446 


1 603 


2 834 


680 


4 215 


3 085 


857 


2 715 


2 290 




1 235 


970 


1 387 


3 275 


1 576 


2 477 


740 


4 307 


2 618 


891 


2 715 


2 198 




911 


846 


1 193 


2 553 


1 374 


1 982 


563 


3 317 


1 942 


664 


1 986 


1 631 




468 


519 


1 O24 


1 426 


1 088 


397 


342 


2 409 


1 652 


451 


1 067 


1 141 




407 


485 


846 


1 267 


996 


540 


343 


2 525 


1 536 


483 


922 


1 154 




464 


488 


697 


1 357 


978 


660 


333 


2 567 


1 429 


451 


956 


1 137 




480 


601 


799 


1 491 


1 012 


668 


360 


2 754 


1 413 


482 


1 093 


1 166 




466 


627 


745 


1 337 


926 


291 


344 


2 527 


999 


460 


936 


1 029 




452 


543 


679 


1 247 


870 


146 


342 


2 240 


853 


422 


874 


928 




345 


478 


595 


1 009 


746 


876 


263 


1 930 


633 


355 


638 


806 




290 


383 


481 


905 


563 


701 


263 


1 554 


562 


327 


639 


651 




232 


370 


445 


692 


475 


580 


234 


1 196 


504 


282 


489 


513 




241 


368 


332 


665 


422 


547 


230 


1 059 


399 


240 


438 


466 




158 


257 


260 


489 


322 


414 


159 


795 


256 


184 


313 


319 




191 


347 


322 


581 


359 


514 


215 


804 


339 


198 


3O8 


381 


NONWHITE MALEt ALL AGES 


4 591 
794 


3 857 
545 


1 232 

142 


16 162 
2 556 


1 081 
131 


12 953 

1 535 


2 278 
351 


7 139 
1 044 


10 506 
1 720 


2 757 
399 


12 489 
2 072 


6 385 
1 050 




723 


545 


166 


2 652 


142 


1 436 


354 


1 047 


1 607 


442 


2 144 


1 O14 




750 


581 


172 


2 492 


123 


1 494 


310 


977 


1 587 


393 


2 137 


912 




570 


484 


146 


1 918 


126 


1 908 


283 


812 


1 361 


316 


1 588 


677 




259 


256 


101 


928 


80 


1 361 


138 


486 


752 


182 


573 


388 




173 


153 


49 


738 


53 


785 


99 


393 


521 


113 


479 


315 




172 


162 


63 


664 


68 


661 


89 


298 


448 


112 


487 


286 




208 


190 


53 


782 


44 


734 


101 


343 


458 


101 


549 


292 




205 


159 


63 


759 


60 


689 


100 


354 


391 


122 


563 


269 




194 


163 


74 


668 


62 


599 


82 


328 


385 


114 


477 


271 




143 


161 


53 


462 


63 


423 


76 


266 


297 


90 


350 


201 




121 


95 


29 


434 


26 


354 


71 


226 


249 


87 


313 


202 




85 


96 


40 


301 


26 


323 


62 


172 


198 


74 


231 


125 




97 


111 


24 


353 


23 


300 


51 


155 


241 


78 


246 


168 




46 


70 


28 


237 


24 


165 


55 


120 


137 


62 


146 


95 




51 


86 


29 


218 


30 


186 


56 


118 


154 


72 


134 


120 


NONWHITE FEMALE* ALL AGES 


4 834 
739 


3 890 
540 


1 145 
163 


17 015 
2 499 


1 160 
165 


11 118 
1 497 


2 268 
335 


7 476 
1 064 


10 919 
1 693 


2 834 
405 


13 107 
2 086 


6 540 
1 005 




751 


581 


128 


2 598 


149 


1 480 


317 


1 067 


1 677 


403 


2 066 


983 




740 


500 


134 


2 458 


132 


1 321 


320 


1 034 


1 558 


420 


2 038 


897 




569 


412 


109 


1 886 


122 


1 119 


245 


765 


1 210 


284 


1 469 


672 




265 


221 


74 


986 


88 


719 


136 


474 


704 


129 


714 


397 




197 


181 


66 


846 


68 


591 


127 


415 


564 


146 


607 


359 




230 


179 


65 


841 


64 


671 


109 


396 


531 


134 


610 


334 




235 


212 


72 


941 


53 


736 


97 


419 


537 


127 


701 


327 




216 


191 


71 


795 


59 


578 


94 


393 


423 


137 


613 


284 




222 


175 


58 


757 


63 


566 


111 


344 


463 


129 


541 


279 




156 


139 


51 


556 


56 


414 


73 


. 280 


347 


100 


377 


252 




141 


125 


33 


517 


35 


356 


70 


211 


318 


94 


375 


209 




111 


121 


36 


373 


40 


' 294 


57 


197 


319 


99 


285 


154 




133 


120 


22 


415 


25 


283 


62 


180 


245 


88 


274 


168 




58 


84 


29 


271 


17 


239 


55 


123 


155 


77 


184 


114 




71 


109 


34 


276 


24 


254 


60 


114 


175 


62 


167 


106 


MARITAL STATUS 
MALEi 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . . 


4 879 
1 723 


6 302 
1 901 


11 213 
4 986 


14 463 
4 905 


10 219 
2 665 


30 146 
17 617 


4 026 
1 256 


25 180 
6 684 


14 194 
5 025 


4 908 
1 385 


10 337 
3 740 


11 358 
3 300 




2 940 


4 123 


5 914 


8 998 


7 206 


11 579 


2 606 


17 552 


8 695 


3 301 


6 283 


7 579 




148 


125 


136 


390 


126 


688 


53 


397 


214 


103 


166 


222 




183 


248 


247 


492 


282 


515 


146 


734 


309 


179 


260 


383 




33 


30 


66 


68 


66 


435 


18 


210 


165 


43 


54 


96 


FEMALE t 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER . 


5 324 
1 506 


6 465 
1 385 


8 675 
1 803 


15 641 
4 045 


10 392 
2 028 


14 768 
3 772 


4 123 
978 


26 446 
5 594 


12 999 
2 902 


5 155 
1 136 


11 143 
3 140 


11 668 
2 639 




3 028 


4 186 


5 982 


9 351 


7 307 


9 227 


2 635 


17 835 


8 636 


3 351 


6 560 


7 728 




201 


148 


156 


582 


162 


618 


71 


516 


286 


109 


303 


349 




748 


860 


821 


2 178 


967 


1 604 


496 


2 763 


1 391 


618 


1 413 


1 192 




42 


34 


69 


67 


90 


165 


14 


254 


70 


50 


30 


109 


HOUSEHOLD RELAT IONSH I P 
POPULATION IN HOUSEHOLDS* * . 


16 930 
3 621 


. 18 473 
4 809 


25 299 
6 701 


48 852 
11 O76 


29 619 
8 034 


39 584 
9 090 


12 148 
3 044 


74 745 
19 704 


42 654 
9 549 


15 088 
3 711 


36 957 

7 484 


36 O07 
8 516 




2 540 


3 669 


5 452 


7 936 


6 714 


7 257 


2 386 


16 113 


7 744 


2 887 


5 619 


6 829 


OTHER RELATIVE OF HEAD. . . . 
NONRELATIVE OF HEAD 

NONWHITEf IN HOUSEHOLDS . . . . 


10 576 
193 

9 370 

1 714 


9 826 
169 

7 685 
1 611 


12 977 

169 

2 361 
494 


29 304 
536 

33 029 
6 563 


14 667 
204 

2 229 
509 


22 897 
340 

17 498 
3 265 


6 572 
146 

4 527 
905 


38 419 
509 

14 345 
2 849 


25 131 
230 

21 111 
3 961 


8 323 

167 

5 560 
1 079 


33 618 
236 

25 543 
4 572 


20 396 
266 

12 866 

2 461 



42-82 



South Carolina 



Table 31. HOUSEHOLD POPULATION, BY AGE, RACE, AND SEX, FOR SELECTED URBAN PLACES AND COUNTIES: 

1960 

[Data presented for urban places and counties with a population of 1,000 or more living in group quarters. "IT denotes an unincorporated place] 











URBAN PLACES 








AGE AND SEX 


CHARLESTON 


COLUMBIA 


GREENVILLE 


ORANGEBURG 


ROCK HILL 


SPARTANBURG 


BEAUFORT 


CHARLESTON 


FLORENCE 




59 047 


85 956 


63 242 


12 506 


27 929 


43 127 


35 452 


205 576 


83 368 


AGE 




















MALEt ALL AGES - 
UNDER 5 YEARS. . . 


26 797 
3 540 
3 246 
2 991 
2 244 
1 542 
1 574 
1 503 
637 
584 
662 
421 
236 
907 
707 
535 
468 


39 521 
4 876 
4 421 
4 006 
3 049 
2 933 
2 699 
2 461 
2 699 
2 670 
2 418 
1 998 
1 642 
1 290 
1 077 
684 
598 


29 282 
3 715 
3 483 
3 025 
2 032 
1 796 
1 971 
1 980 
2 190 
1 943 
1 823 
' 1 475 
1 145 
902 
777 
529 
496 


5 805 

698 
727 
626 
536 
340 
338 
349 
433 
396 
359 
280 
221 
179 
139 
74 
110 


13 323 

1 743 
1 669 
1 554 
1 009 
762 
879 
918 
975 
902 
822 
660 
471 
324 
282 
189 
164 


20 148 
2 425 
2 428 
2 164 
1 569 
1 149 
1 154 
1 353 
1 428 
1 357 
1 234 
1 075 
864 
686 
542 
390 
330 


17 222 

3 256 
2 516 
1 935 
1 207 
1 153 
1 345 
1 175 
1 009 
890 
691 
533 
408 
312 
353 
204 
235 


98 643 
15 241 
13 437 
11 471 
7 823 
5 879 
6 420 
6 530 
6 937 
6 122 
5 158 
4 122 
3 265 
2 210 
1 817 
1 177 
1 034, 


40 294 
5 286 
5 669 
5 260 
3 949 
2 207 
2 193 
2 353 
2 585 
2 416 
2 253 
1 677 
1 371 
1 022 
874 
619 
560 


10 TO 14 YEARS . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS . 
25 TO 29 YEARS 
30 TO 34 YEARS . 
35 TO 39 YEARS . . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS 
50 TO 54 YEARS 
55 TO 59 YEARS . 
60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 YEARS AND OVER. 


FEMALE* ALL AGES 
UNDER 5 YEARS. . . 


32 250 

3 565 
3 056 
3 086 
2 651 
2 152 
1 818 
1 388 
2 122 
2 123 
2 092 
.1 813 
1 600 


46 435 
4 926 
4 527 
4 094 
3 588 
3 640 
2 840 
3 040 
3 188 
3 077 
3 031 
2 514 
2 179 


33 960 
3 769 
3 456 
3 044 
2 319 
2 305 
2 165 
2 288 
2 573 
2 327 
2 O50 
1 860 
1 581 


6 701 
700 
725 
672 
560 
369 
432 
426 
487 
467 
413 
333 
298 


14 606 
1 651 
1 587 
1 518 
1 148 
971 
997 
1 033 
1 087 
937 
889 
698 
602 


22 979 

2 296 
2 370 
2 149 
1 618 
1 361 
1 388 
1 631 
1 739 
1 574 
1 483 
1 300 
1 113 


18 230 
3 135 
2 441 
1 930 
1 357 
1 479 
1 429 
1 175 
1 168 
860 
724 
582 
507 


106 933 
14 751 
12 842 
11 296 
8 812 
7 639 
7 192 
7 504 
7 800 
6 455 
5 716 
4 506 
3 647 


43 074 
5 220 
5 411 
5 185 
3 924 
2 618 
2 599 
2 692 
2 923 
2 635 
2 351 
1 919 
1 563 


10 TO 14 YEARS . . 
15 TO 19 YEARS . 
20 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 29 YEARS . 
30 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 39 YEARS . . 
40 TO 44 YEARS . 
45 TO 49 YEARS . 
50 TO 54 YEARS . 
55 TO 59 YEARS 


60 TO 64 YEARS . 
65 TO 69 YEARS . 
70 TO 74 YEARS . 
75 YEARS AND OVER. 


1 194 
1 176 
885 
1 029 


1 828 
1 587 
1 138 
1 238 


1 304 
1 113 
846 
960 


219 
236 
168 
196 


409 
430 
316 
333 


891 
812 
578 
676 


413 
438 
269 
323 


2 652 
2 443 
1 756 
1 922 


1 247 
1 126 
793 
868 


RACE 






















11 718 
15 053 


26 975 
12 479 


20 287 
8 981 


3 869 
1 934 


10 047 
3 252 


13 711 
6 432 


9 622 
7 572 


62 025 
36 463 


23 104 
17 182 




OTHER . 


26 


67 


14 


2 


24 


5 


28 


155 


8 




14 237 
18 005 


31 172 
15 201 


23 389 

10 554 


4 316 
2 381 


10 837 
3 739 


15 450 
7 523 


9 695 
8 458 


65 774 
40 974 


24 036 
19 027 






8 


62 


17 


4 


30 


6 


77 


185 


11 








COUNTIES CON. 








AGE AND SEX 






















GREENVILLE 


HORRY 


LAURENS 


OCONEE 


ORANGEBURG 


RICHLAND 


SPARTANBURG 


SUMTER 


YORK 




203 805 


66 977 


44 599 


37 646 


66 959 


166 702 


154 543 


72 290 


, 77 025 


AGE: 




















MALE? ALL AGES 


98 089 


32 816 


21 513 


18 541 


32 412 


79 189 


74 767 


34 973 


37 484 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


12 667 


4 606 


2 393 


2 140 


4 386 


11 168 


8 476 


5 799 


4 914 




11 569 


4 337 


2 524 


2 063 


4 618 


10 150 


8 807 


4 830 


4 805 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


. 10 335 


4 088 


2 506 


2 105 


4 378 


8 717 


8 376 


4 266 


4 552 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


7 430 


3 049 


1 950 


1 805 


3 371 


6 085 


6 471 


3 096 


3 278 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


5 947 


2 159 


1 281 


1 390 


1 734 


4 855 


4 429 


2 312 


2 141 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


6 968 


2 160 


298 


1 305 


1 574 


5 386 


4 654 


2 463 


2 259 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


7 023 


2 043 


269 


1 073 


1 653 


5 417 


4 838 


2 234 


2 386 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


.7 389 


2 104 


430 


1 097 


1 957 


5 801 


5 250 


2 222 


2 480 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


6 484 


1 862 


330 


1 061 


1 854 


5 415 


4 829 


1 957 


2 321 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


5 804 


1 720 


324 


1 079 


1 686 


4 421 


4 523 


1 463 


2 175 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


4 766 


1 316 


107 


899 


1 300 


3 299 


3 990 


1 110 


1 724 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


3 725 


995 


916 


691 


1 156 


2 652 


3 189 


928 


1 404 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


2 651 


823 


698 


580 


832 


2 066 


2 324 


711 


1 008 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


2 254 


712 


606 


510 


818 


1 680 


1 926 


711 


876 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


1 515 


421 


414 


339 


532 


1 073 


1 366 


433 


603 


75 YEARS AND OVER 


1 562 


421 


467 


404 


563 


1 004 


1 319 


438 


558 


FEMALEi ALL AGES 


105 716 


34 161 


23 086 


19 105 


34 547 


87 513 


79 776 


37 317 


39 541 


UNDER 5 YEARS. 


12 294 


4 473 


2 472 


2 102 


4 270 


10 930 


8 098 


5 536 


4 629 


5 TO 9 YEARS . 


11 384 


4 265 


2 519 


1 978 


4 497 


10 115 


8 323 


4 853 


4 620 


10 TO 14 YEARS 


9 942 


4 136 


2 410 


1 972 


4 252 


8 645 


8 269 


4 162 


4 444 


15 TO 19 YEARS 


7 913 


3 116 


1 897 


1 736 


3 364 


6 691 


6 412 


3 185 


3 358 


20 TO 24 YEARS 


7 367 


2 482 


1 404 


1 511 


1 938 


6 281 


4 996 


2 887 


2 518 


25 TO 29 YEARS 


7 458 


2 397 


1 366 


1 315 


1 849 


6 013 


5 214 


2 618 


2 555 


30 TO 34 YEARS 


7 557 


2 223 


1 532 


1 144 


1 934 


6 369 


5 449 


2 436 


2 634 


35 TO 39 YEARS 


8 113 


2 215 


1 571 


1 228 


2 153 


6 548 


5 876 


2 454 


2 715 


40 TO 44 YEARS 


6 985 


1 946 


1 461 


1 157 


1 981 


5 527 


5 465 


1 922 


2 403 


45 TO 49 YEARS 


6 119 


1 756 


1 414 


1 046 


1 815 


4 941 


4 934 


1 708 


2 245 


50 TO 54 YEARS 


5 349 


1 304 


1 250 


954 


1 501 


3 836 


4 306 


1 314 


1 883 


55 TO 59 YEARS 


4 338 


1 109 


1 029 


776 


1 350 


3 249 


3 517 


1 146 


1 596 


60 TO 64 YEARS 


3 454 


942 


810 


691 


1 052 


2 639 


2 800 


977 


1 156 


65 TO 69 YEARS 


2 941 


737 


716 


532 


1 017 


2 309 


2 446 


829 


1 117 


70 TO 74 YEARS 


2 086 


498 


576 


434 


743 


1 638 


1 799 


586 


780 


75 YEARS AND OVER 


2 416 


562 


659 


529 


831 


1 782 


1 872 


704 


888 


RACE 






















81 140 


24 086 


14 820 


16 473 


13 287 


52 820 


58 560 


18 662 


26 739 


NEGRO. . * . . 


16 891 


8 723 


6 691 


2 067 


19 122 


26 254 


16 197 


16 284 


10 563 


OTHER. . . . . 


58 


7 


. 2 


1 


3 


115 


10 


27 


182 




86 402 


24 852 


15 751 


16 897 


13 807 


57 335 


61 759 


19 168 


27 950 


NEGRO 


19 236 


9 277 


7 327 


2 202 


20 733 


30 039 


18 003 


18 099 


11 393 




78 


32 


8 


6 


7 


139 


14 


50 


198 





APPENDIX 



Table B-l. PERCENT OF ALLOCATION FOR NONRESPONSE, FOR THE STATE, BY SIZE OF PLACE: I960 

[The term "allocation" means that a characteristic was assigned a value during the tabulation because of the absence of an entry on the schedule, or because the entry was poorly marked, 
inconsistent with another entry, or was not readable by the mechanical equipment See text for further explanation. Percent not shown where less than OJ or where base is less than 100] 



SUBJECT 




URBAN 


RURAL 


THE 
STATE 


TOTAL 


URBANIZED AREAS 


OTHER URBAN 


TOTAL 


PLACES OF 
It 000 TO 
2*500 


OTHER 
RURAL 


CENTRAL 
CITIES 


URBAN 
FRINGE 


PLACES OF 
10 t OOO 
OR MORE 


PLACES OF 
2t500 TO 
lOtOOO 




2 382 594 

0.4 
0.1 

2.8 

0.6 
0.5 
0.3 
1.4 
0.9 
0,5 

1 579 279 
0,7 


981 386 

0.5 
0.1 

3.0 

0.6 
0.5 
0.4 
1.6 
1.2 
0.4 

671 402 
0.8 


229 546 

0.8 
0.2 

4.2 

0.7 
0.6 
0.5 
2.6 

1.9 
0.6 

165 516 
1.3 


232 883 

0.4 

2.6 

0.5 
0.4 
0.3 
1.4 
1.1 
0.4 

149 988 
0.6 


237 482 

0.3 
0.1 

2.7 

0.5 
0.4 
0.3 
1.4 
1.1 
0.4 

164 183 
0.7 


281 475 

0.3 
0.1 

2.5 

0.6 
0.5 
0.3 
1.1 
0.7 
0.4 

191 715 
0.5 


1 401 208 

0.3 
0.1 

2.7 

0.6 
0.5 
0.3 
1.2 
0.8 
0.5 

907 877 
0.6 


151 856 

0.3 
0.1 

2.8 

0.6 
0.5 
0.3 
1.4 
1.0 
0.4 

103 783 

0.6 


1 249 350 

0.3 

0.1 

2.7 

0.6 
0*5 
0.3 
1.2 
0.8 
0.5 

804 094 
0.6 


PERSONS SUBSTITUTED J 1 

























1 THIS TYPE OF ALLOCATION* WHICH IS NOT INCLUDED IN THE OTHER PERCENTAGES IN THIS TABLEi CONSISTS OF CASES WHERE PERSONS* AND ALL THEIR CHARACTER- 
ISTICS! WERE SUBSTITUTED FOR AN ESTIMATED NUMBER OF OMITTED PERSONS. OMISSIONS DUE TO NONINTERVIEW CONSISTED OF PERSONS IN HOUSEHOLDS FOR WHICH THE 
ENUMERATOR OBTAINED NO POPULATION DATA. OMISSIONS DUE TO MECHANICAL FAILURE CONSISTED OF FULL SCHEDULE PAGES WHICH WERE NOT PROPERLY RECORDED IN THE 
ELECTRONIC PROCESSING SYSTEM. 



Table B-2. PERCENT OF ALLOCATION FOR NONRESPONSE, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE AND COUNTIES: 

1960 

[The term "allocation" means that a characteristic was assigned a value during the tabulation because of the absence of an entry on the schedule, or because the entry was poorly marked, 
inconsistent with another entry, or was not readable by the mechanical equipment See text for further explanation. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 100] 



AREA 


TOTAL 
PERSONS 

(NUMBER) 


PERSONS SUBSTITUTED 1 


PERSONS 


PERSONS WITH ALLOCATIONS 




PERSONS 
14 YEARS 
OLD AND 
OVER 

MARITAL 
STATUS 


FOR 

OMISSIONS 
DUE TO NON- 
INTERVIEWS 


FOR 
OMISSIONS 
DUE TO 
MECHANICAL 
FAILURE 


WITH 1 
OR MORE 
ALLO- 
CATIONS 


RELATION- 
SHIP 


SEX 


COLOR 


BIRTH 
DATE 


URBAN PLACES OF 10 ? 000 OR MORE 


11 243 
41 316 
65 925 
97 433 
24 722 
10 435 
12 261 
66 188 
16 644 
10 348 

13 852 
29 404 
44 352 
23 062 
10 191 

21 417 
81 038 
11 362 
98 478 
16 274 
17 659 
44 187 
38 196 
12 256 
216 382 

35 205 
30 888 
33 717 

29 490 
27 816 
52 928 
30 584 
24 383 
15 735 
20 713 
84 438 
34 798 
209 776 
44 346 


0.6 
0.4 
1.2 
0.7 
0.4 
0.5 
0.1 
0.5 
0.2 
0.3 

0.7 
0.3 
0.4 
0.2 
. . 

0.4 
0.4 
0.5 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.5 
0.5 
0.4 
0.6 

0.2 
0.3 
0.4 
0.3 
0.4 
0.5 
0.2 
0.4 
0.5 
0.4 
0.3 
0.3 
0.4 
0.1 


0.4 

o!a 

0.2 

oil 

0.1 

. . 

0.2 
, . * 

... 

CU2 

oil 

... 

0.1 
0.2 
0.1 

0.1 
0.2 

0.1 

0.1 
0.1 

o'.i 
... 
, 
* . 
... 


3.4 
2.3 

3.8 
3.8 
2.4 
2.6 
3.1 
5.2 
1.8 
2.1 

3.4 
2.9 

3.2 

2.7 
1.0 

3.4 
2.5 
2.0 
2.0 
1.8 
1.0 
3.6 
3.2 
2.1 
3.1 

2.6 

2.1 
3.1 
3.1 

3.1 
4.0 
2.1 
3*2 
2.3 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.4 
2.0 


0.4 
0.5 
0.7 
0.6 
0.4 
0.5 
0.4 
0.7 
0.3 
0.5 

0.7 
0.7 
0.5 
0.6 
0.2 

0.7 
0.4 
0.5 
0.5 
0.3 
0.3 
0.6 
0.7 
0.3 
0.6 

0.6 
0.7 
0.6 
0.8 
0.7 
0.7 
0.6 
0.4 
0.5 
0.7 
0.6 
0.6 
0.6 
0.3 


0.6 
0.5 
0.7 
0.6 
0.4 
0.4 
0.3 
0.7 
0.2 
0.4 

0.6 
0.6 
0.4 
0.5 
0.2 

0*6 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.3 
0,2 
0.5 
0.8 
0.5 
0.6 

0.4 
0.4 
0.5 
0.7 
0.7 
0.8 
0.7 
0.7 
0.8 
0.6 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0*3 


0.5 
0,3 
0*5 
0.4 
0.3 
0*4 
0*1 
0.5 
0.1 
0.2 

0.1 
0.5 
0.4 
0.4 

0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.3 
0.3 
0.2 
0.3 

0.3 
0.3 
0.4 
0.4 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
0.1 


1.9 
1.1 
2.0 
2.3 

1.2 
1.5 
2.0 
3.6 
1.2 
1.2 

2.0 
1.1 
2.0 
1.3 

0.5 

1.8 
1.3 
0.6 
0.9 
0.9 
0.4 
1.9 
1.6 
0.9 
1.7 

1.4 
0.8 
1.7 
1.2 
1.5 
1.9 
0.5 
1.7 
0.7 
1.2 
1.5 
1.4 
2.0 
1.1 


1.0 
0.5 
1.2 
1.2 
0.7 
0.5 
0.6 
1.7 
0.6 
0.3 

0.9 
0.9 
0.8 
0.8 
0.1 

0.7 
0.5 
0.6 
0.4 
0.5 
0.2 
1.2 
0.9 
0.5 
0.8 

0.4 
0.4 
0.5 
0.6 
0.7 
1.4 
0.5 
1.0 
0.5 
0.7 
0.8 
0.9 
0.9 
0.7 


























COUNTIES 












BEAUFORT ... 

BERKELEY ...... 





























1 THIS TYPE OF ALLOCATION^ WHICH is NOT INCLUDED IN THE OTHER PERCENTAGES IN THIS TABLE. CONSISTS OF CASES 

ISTIC SERE SUBSTITUTED FOR AN ESTIMATED NUMBER OF OMITTED PERSONS. OMISSIONS DUE TO NONINTERVIEW CONSISTED 
ENUMERATOR OBTAINED NO POPULATION DATA 
ELECTRONIC PROCESSING SYSTEM. 



OMISSIONS DUE TO MECHANICAL FAILURE CONSISTED OF FULL SCHEDULE PAGES 



WHERE PERSONS t AND ALL THEIR CHAR ACT ER- 
OF PERSONS IN HOUSEHOLDS FOR WHICH THE 
WHICH WERE NOT PROPERLY RECORDED IN THE 

42-83 



South Carolina 



Table U-PERCENT OF ALLOCATION FOR NONRESPONSE, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE AND COUNTIES: 

1960-Con. 



text 







PERSONS SUBSTITUTED 1 




PERSONS IITH ALLOCATIONS 


PERSONS 








PERSONS 




111 YEARS 




TOTAL 


FOR 


FOR 


IITH1 










it 1 LHIw 

OLD AND 


AREA 


PERSONS 


OMISSIONS 


OMISSIONS 


OR MORE 


RELATION- 






BIRTH 


OVER 




(NUMBER) 


DUE TO NON- 


DUE TO 


ALLO- 


SHIP 


SEX 


COLOR 


DATE 









INTERVIE1S 


MECHANICAL 


CATIONS 










MARITAL 








FAILURE 












STATUS 


COUNTIES-CON. 




















HAMPTON, , 






























17125 


lil 


(1! 


4,0 


0,7 


0,7 


0,2 


2,4 


0,5 


HORRY. . . 






























6824? 


0,4 


Ill 


2,7 


0,3 


0,4 


0,4 


1,0 


0,6 


JASPER . , 






























1223? 


0,4 


IK 


3,8 


1,0 


0,7 


0,3 


1,8 


1,0 


KERSHA1, 






























33585 


0,3 


0,2 


2,0 


0,4 


0,4 


0,1 


1,0 


0,5 


LANCASTER, 






























39352 


0,4 


0,1 


1,9 


0,5 


0,4 


0,4 


0,6 


0,3 


LAURENS, , 






























47609 


0,1 


0,1 


2,1 


0,5 


0,4 


0,2 


1,0 


0,5 


LEE. , , , 


























, 




21 632 


0,2 


0,1 


. 2,8 


0,9 


0,8 


0,2 


1,0 


0,6 


LEXINGTON, 






























60726 


0,3 


III 


W 


0.7 


0,4 


0,3 


1,7 


0,3 


HC CORMICK 






























6629 


0,2 


III 


1.7 


0,5 


0,3 


0,2 


0,7 


0,2 


MARION , , 






























32014 


0,4 


0,2 


2.5 


0,6 


0,8 


0,2 


0,8 


0,6 


MARLBORO , 






























26529 


0,4 


in 


3,5 


0,7 


0,9 


0,3 


1,6 


0,8 


NEHBERRY , 
























' 






29416 


0,2 


in 


1,6 


0,4 


0,2 


0,2 


0,7 


0,4 


OCONEE , , 






























40201 


0,2 


Ml 


1,3 


0,3 


0,1 


0,1 


0,6 


0,3 


ORANGEBURG 






























68559 


0,4 


0,1 


3,4 


0,6 


0,8 


0,3 


1,5 


0,7 


picas. , 






























46030 


0,2 


0.1 


3,2 


0,6 


0,5 


0,4 


1,7 


0,6 


RICHLANO , 































200 102 


0,5 


0,1 


3,1 


0,5 


1 ' 0,5 


0,3 


1,8 


0,9 


SALUDA , , 






, 
























14551 


0,4 


0,1 


3,1 


0,7 


0,8 


0,7 


1,0 


0,6 


SPARTANBURS 






























156 830 


0,3 


0,1 


2,5 


0,5 


0,4 


0,3 


1,3 


0,5 


SUHTER * 






























74941 


0,3 


Ml 


1,9 


0,4 


0,4 


0,3 


0,9 


0,5 


UNION. , 






























30015 


0,1 


0,1 


2,0 


0,5 


0,4 


0,2 


0,6 


0,4 


IILLIAMSBURG 




























40932 


0,4 


0,1 


3,3 


0,7 


' 0,7 


0,2 


1,5 


1,1 


YORK , , 




























76760 


0,4 


I,, 


2,7 


0,7 


0,5 


0,3 


1,1 


0,7 



THIS TYPE OF ALLOCATION! MICH IS NOT INCLUDED IN THE OTHER PERCENTAGES IN THIS TABLE. CONSISTS OF CASES KHERE PERSONSi AND ALL THEIR CHARACTER- 
ISTICS. HERE SUBSTITUTED FOR AN ESTIMATED NUMBER OF OMITTED PERSONS, OMISSIONS DUE TO NONMERVIEf CONSISTED OF PERSONS IN HOUSEHOLDS FOR KHICH THE 
ENUMERATOR OBTAINED NO POPULATION DATA, OMISSIONS DUE TO MECHANICAL FAILURE CONSISTED OF FULL SCHEDULE PAGES KHICH HERE NOT PROPERLY RECORDED IN THE 

ELECTRONIC PROCESSES SYSTEM, 



General kill ami Economic Chinctmstics 



C 







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' '" : <. . , ' : ' ' ! i '' V" 1 ,,' .!'' ." " - 

, i '.:'' 1 ^'' r| i i !,,/' i .'v- ''.'' '"" '''"''' 




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,; :'!;'' ;.;;.,. ;; . \. ( 



GENERAL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 

South Carolina 



LIST OF TABLES 



Table 



[Page numbers listed here omit the State prefix number which appears as part of the page number for each page. The prefix for this State is 42] 



THE STATE 



32. Summary of social characteristics, for standard metropolitan statis- 
tical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places of 10,000 or 
more; 1960 . 

33, Summary of economic characteristics, for standard metropolitan 
statistical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places of 10,000 or 
more: 1960 . . 

34. Summary of social and economic characteristics, for urban places 
of 2,500 to 10,000: 1960_ P 



35. Summary of social characteristics, by counties: 1960 

36. Summary of economic characteristics, by counties: 1960 

37, Age by color and sex, for the State, urban and rural: 1960 ! 



38. Nativity and parentage, by color, for the State, urban and rural: 
1960 

39. State of birth of the native population, by color, for the State, urban 
and rural, 1960, and for the State, 1900 to 1950 

40, Country of origin of the foreign stock, for the State, urban and 
rural, 1960, and of the foreign white stock, for the State, 1950 
and 1940 . 

41. Mother tongue of the foreign born, for the State, urban and rural, 
1960, and of the foreign-born white, for the State, 1910 to 1940 

42. Residence five years prior to census date, by color, for the State, 
urban and rural, 1960, and for the State, 1940__ 

43. Year moved into present house, for the State, urban and rural: 
1960 . . ... 

44. School enrollment, by age, for the State, urban and rural: I960. 

45. School enrollment, by age, for the State: 1930 to I960. 



46. School enrollment, by level and type of school, by color, for the 
State, urban and rural: 1960 . 

47, Years of school completed by persons 25 years old and over, by 
color and sex, for the State, urban and rural, 1960 and 1950, and 
for the State, 1940 . 

48. Veteran status of the civilian male population 14 years old and 
over, for the State, urban and rural: 1960 

49. Household relationship, by color, for the State, urban and rural: 
I960 . 

50. Married couples, families, and unrelated individuals, by color, for 
the State, urban and rural, 1960 and 1950, and for the State, 1940.. 

51. Children ever born to women 15 to 44 years old, by age, color, 
and marital status of woman, for the State, urban and rural, 
1960 and 1950, and for the State, 1940 and 1910 

52. Employment status and selected labor force characteristics, by 

color and sex, for the State, urban and rural: 1960 

53, Employment status, by color and sex, for the State: 1940 to I960 
54. Labor force status, by age and sex, for the State, urban and rural, 

1960, and for the State, 1950 and 1940.. 

55, Weeks worked in 1959, f9r the State, urban and rural: 1960 

56. Persons employed in agriculture and in nonagricultural industries, 

by class of worker and sex, for the State, urban and rural, 

1960, and for the State, 1950 and 1940 . ..____ 

57, Occupation group of employed persons, by sex, for the State, 

urban and rural: I960..... - 

58, Occupation group of employed persons, by color and sex, for the 

State, urban and rural: 1960 . 

59. Occupation group of employed persons, by sex, for the State: 

1940 to 1960 , .. . 

60, Major occupation group of the experienced unemployed, by color 

and sex, for the State, urban and rural: 1960 

61. Industry group of employed persons, by color, for the State, urban 
and rural: 1960 . 

02, Industry group of employed persons, for the State: 1940 to 1960__ 



,^^^JJJ.U.LlDlll J glUUJ UJL GUlplUjr GU pCi-OUAAO, JLVJL UUC kJUOiUC. iiTTU UU JLJ7UW 

3, Place of work of workers during the census week, by color, for 

the State, urban and rural: 1960 .. 

64, Means of transportation to work of workers during the census week, 

for the State, urban and rural: 1960 

65,-^Income in 1959 of families and unrelated individuals, by color, 

for the State, urban and rural: 1960 111 

66, Income in 1959 and 1949 of families and unrelated individuals, 

for the State, urban and rural: 1960 and 1950 



87 



87 

88 
89 
90 
91 

92 
93 



93 
94 
94 

95 

95 
95 

95 



96 
98 
98 
99 



100 

101 
102 

102 
103 

103 
104 
105 
106 
107 

108 
110 

111 
111 



113 



Table 



THE STATE Con. 



67. Income in 1959 and 1949 of persons, by color and sex, for the 
State, urban and rural: 1960 and 1950 

68. Earnings in 1959 of persons in the experienced civilian labor force, 
by selected occupation groups and sex, for the State: 1960 

69. Type of income in 1959 of persons, for the State, urban and rural: 
i y oo_ . 



70. Social and economic characteristics of the population, for the 
State, by size of place: 1960 

71. Social and economic characteristics of the population, by metro- 
politan-nonmetropolitan residence, for the State: 1960 

STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, URBANIZED 
AREAS, AND URBAN PLACES OF X0,000 OR MORE 

72. Social characteristics of the population, for standard metro- 
politan statistical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places 
of 10,000 or more: 1960 

73. Education, employment status, and selected labor force char- 
acteristics of the population, for standard metropolitan statistical 
areas, urbanized areas, and urban places of 10,000 or more: 1960 

74. Occupation group and class of worker of employed persons, by 
sex, for standard metropolitan statistical areas, urbanized 
areas, and urban places of 10,000 or more: 1960 

75. Industry group of employed persons and major occupation 
group of unemployed persons, by sex, for standard metro- 
politan statistical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places 
of 10,000 or more: 1960 

76. Income in 1959 of families and persons, and weeks worked in 1959, 
for standard metropolitan statistical areas, urbanized areas, and 
urban places of 10,000 or more: 1960 

77. Nonwhite population Social characteristics and employment 
status, for selected standard metropolitan statistical areas, urban- 
ized areas, and urban places of 10,000 or more: 1960 

78. Nonwhite population Occupation group, industry group, and in- 
come in 1959, for selected standard metropolitan statistical areas, 
urbanized areas, and urban places of 10,000 or more: 1960 

79. Country of origin of the foreign stock, for selected standard metro- 
politan statistical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places of 1 0,000 
or more: 1 960- . _._. 

80. Mother tongue of the foreign-born population, for selected standard 
metropolitan statistical areas, urbanized areas, and urban places 
of 10,000 or more: 1960 

COUNTIES AND URBAN PLACES OF 2,50O TO 10,000 

81. Social and economic characteristics of the population, for urban 
places of 2,500 to 10,000: 1960 . 

82. Social characteristics of the population, for counties: 1960 

83. Education, employment status, and selected labor force characteris- 
tics of the population, for counties: I960- . . 

84. Occupation group and class of worker of employed persons, by sex, 
for counties: 1960 . . . 

85. Industry group of employed persons and major occupation group of 
unemployed persons, by sex, for counties: 1960. _ 

86. Income in 1959 of families and persons, and weeks worked in 1959, 
for counties: 1960 . . 

87. Nonwhite population Social characteristics and employment status, 
for selected counties: 1960 

88. Nonwhite population Occupation group, industry group, and in- 
come in 1959, for selected counties: 1960 

89. Country of origin of the foreign stock, for selected counties: 1960 

90. Mother tongue of the foreign-born population, for selected coun- 
ties: I960-.. . . 

91. Rural population--Social and economic characteristics, for counties: 
I960 . . . 

92. Rural-farm population Age, sex, and household relationship, for 
selected counties: 1960 . 

93. Rural-farm population Social and economic characteristics, for 
selected counties: 1960 ._: 



Table 



APPENDIX 



C-l. Number of persons and households in sample, for the State, by size of place: 1960. 

C-2. Percent of nonresponse and allocation for selected characteristics, for the State, by size of place: 1960 

C-3. Percent of allocation for nonresponse for selected characteristics, for urban places of 10,000 or more and counties: 1960_ 



Page 

114 
118 
118 
119 
122 



126 
128 
130 

132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
140 



141 
146 

150 



158 
162 
166 

170 
174 

174 
175 
179 
183 



187 
187 

188 



42-85 



42-86 




General Social and Economic Characteristics 

Table 32.-^UMMARY OF SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, 
URBANIZED AREAS, AND URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent, median, and rate not shown where base is less than 200] 



42-87 





TOTAL POPULATION 


FOREIGN 
BORN 


NATIVE 
POPU- 
LATION 

PERCENT 
RESID- 
ING 
IN 
STATE 
OF 

BIRTH 


OTAL 
OPU- 
AT I ON 

ERCENT 
MOVED 
INTO 
HOUSE 
AFTER 
1958 


PER- 
SONS 
YEARS 
LD AND 
OVER 

ERCENT 
MI- . 
SRANT 1 


CHIL- 
DREN 
IN ELE- 
MENTARY 
SCHOOL 

PERCENT 
IN 
PRI- 
VATE 
SCHOOL 


PER- 
SONS 


ERSONS 25 YEARS 
OLD AND OVER 


ARRIED 
OUPLES 

ERCENT 
ITHOUT 
OWN 
HOUSE- 
HOLD 


LIES 


CUMU- 
LATIVE 
FER- 
TILITY 
RATE* 


AREA 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
OREIGN 
BORN 


PERCENT 
NATIVE 
OF 
FOREIGN 
OR 
MIXED 
PARENT- 
AGE 


PERCENT 
WITH 
MOTHER 
TONGUE 
OTHER 
THAN 
ENGLISH 


14 TO 
17 
YEARS 
OLD 

PER- 
CENT 
IN 
CHOOL 


ED I AN 
CHOOL 
EARS 
COM- 
LETED 


ERCENT 
WHO 
COM- 
LETED 
YEARS 
F HIGH 
CHOOL 
R MORE 


ERCENT 
WITH 
OWN 
CHIL- 
DREN 
UNDER 
YEARS 
OLD 


STANDARD METROPOLITAN 
STATISTICAL AREAS 

CHARLESTON- **., 
COLUMBIA 
GREENVILLE. - f 

URBANIZED AREAS 

CHARLESTON- 
CENTRAL CITY. 
URBAN FRINGE. 
COLUMBIA* . * * 
CENTRAL CITY. 
URBAN FRINGE- 
GREENVILLE- 
CENTRAL CITY. 
URBAN FRINGE. 

URBAN PLACES 

AIKEN * * 
ANDERSON, t 
CHARLESTON. 
COLUMBIA* * 
FLORENCE. 
GAFFNEY 
GEORGETOWN* 
GREENVILLE- 
GREENWOOD . 


216 382 
260 828 
209 776 

160 113 
65 925 
94 188 
162 601 
97 433 
65 168 
126 887 
66 188 
60 699 

11 243 
41 316 
65 925 
97 433 
24 722 
10 435 
12 261 
66 188 
16 644 
10 348 

13 852 
29 404 


1.1 
0.9 
0.7 

1.3 
1>4 
1.2 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
0.9 

1.1 
0.3 
1*4 
1. 
0.5 
0.3 
0*5 
1.0 
0.4 
0.4 

0. 
0* 
0. 
1* 
0. 


3*4 
1.8 
1.3 

3.7 
3.8 

3.7 

2*0 
2.1 
1.9 
1.6 
1.9 
1.3 

2.6 
0.8 
3.8 
2.1 
1.3 
0*4 
1.2 
1.9 
0.7 
2.2 

1. 
0.9 
1.3 
1.9 
0. 


60.3 
66.5 
49.2 

62.6 
71.4 
55.3 

66.8 
69.4 
62.7 
51.9 
62.0 
39.7 



... 

71 4 
69 4 


62 




71.5 
74.5 
76.6 

68.4 
76*4 
62.8 
74.9 
76.1 
73.1 
72.5 
71.6 
73.5 

68.7 
81.4 
76.4 
76. 
81.5 
83.9 
88.5 
71. 
85. 
40. 

85. 
80. 
79. 
76. 
87. 


31.6 
33.2 
30.0 

33.9 
31.2 

35*7 
31.6 
32.4 
30,4 
31.2 
29.9 
32.6 

28*2 
30. 
31.2 
32.4 
28.6 
25. 
21. 
29. 
28. 
29. 

30. 
28. 

28. 
33. 
21. 


21.0 
25.6 
16.3 

23.6 

16.3 
29.0 
22.2 
20*6 
24.7 
17.3 
18.1 
16.5 

14.4 
10.0 
16.3 
20. 
13. 
11. 
9. 
18. 
13. 
25. 

18. 
16. 
12. 
21. 
7. 


8.9 
2.7 
3.1 

10,1 
12.5 
8.7 
3*7 
4.1 
3.2 
4.3 
4.5 
4.1 

15.0 
0.2 
12.5 
4* 
0*6 
. 
4.5 
4. 
0. 
7. 

4. 
3. 
3. 
3. 


84.0 
74.7 
76.8 

83.6 
82.6 
84.4 
85.4 
84*5 
86*7 
77.7 
75. 
80.6 

80. 
75. 
82. 
84. 
84. 
79. 
85. 
75. 
80. 
94. 

83. 

83. 
78. 
81. 
78. 


10.1 
10.5 
9.9 

10.4 
9*4 
11*0 
11*4 
11.3 
11.5 
10.4 
11.5 
9.2 

11* 
8. 
9. 
11. 
10. 
9. 
9. 
11. 
9. 
12. 

11. 
9. 

10. 
10. 
8. 


37*7 
40*9 
36.8 

39.3 
35.2 

42.4 
46.3 
46.1 
46.7 
40.4 
47.4 
32.5 

46.5 
28.2 
35. 
46* 
41, 
34. 
33. 
47* 
35. 
59. 

45* 
35. 
40. 
43. 
33. 


2.3 
3.3 

2.8 

2.1 
2.3 
2.0 
2*9 
3.3 
2.4 
2.5 
2.5 
2.4 

3*5 
2.6 
2.3 
3. 
2. 
2. 
3. 
2. 
1. 
1. 

3. 
3. 
3. 
3. 
5. 


38.0 
34.6 
33.2 

37.9 
28.7 
43*5 
34.1 
28.6 
41.6 
33.6 
30.6 
36.7 

35.5 
29.7 
28.7 
28.6 
29*9 
30.6 
32.6 
30* 
25. 
37* 

30. 
33. 

28. 
34. 
25. 


1 950 
1 716 
1 661 

1 833 
1 783 
1 863 
1 588 
1 419 
1 838 
1 626 
1 509 
1 757 

1 824 
1 613 
1 783 
1 419 
1 668 
1 548 
1 975 
1 509 
1 462 
1 700 

1 541 
1 464 
1 626 
1 676 
1 697 






44 352 
23 062 

10 19 


61 7 
48 9 














i tin IQAft. 



PERSONS WHO LIVED IN DIFFERENT COUNTIES IN THE UNITED STATES 
CHILDREN EVER BORN PER liOOO WOMEN 15 TO 44 YEARS OLD OF ALL 



IN 1955 AND 
MARITAL CLASSES. 



Table 33.-SUMMARY OF ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, FOR STAM)ARD METROPOLrrAN STATISTICAL AREAS, 
AUDIC au uyi ^ URBANIZED AREASj AND URBAN PLA CES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960 

[Sea tort for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent, median, and ratio not shown where base is less than 200] 



AREA 


i -.-' r i 


= ====^=====^ == 
PERCENT IN LABOR FORCE 


== 
CIVIL- 


i 
EMPLOYED 
PERSONS 


WORKERS DURING 
CENSUS WEEK 8 


ERSONS 
WHO 
ORKED 


FAMILIES 


NON" 
WORKER- 
WORKER 
RATIO* 


FEMALE? 


MARRIED WOMEN i 
HUSBAND PRESENT 


MALE 


IAN 
LABOR 
FORCE 


PERCENT 
IN 
MANUFAC- 
TURING 
INDUS- 
TRIES 


PERCENT 
IN 
WHITE- 
COLLAR 
OCCUPA- 
TIONS 2 


PER- 
CENT 
WORKING 
OUTSIDE 
COUNTY 
OF 
RESI- 
DENCE 


PER- 
CENT 
USING 
PUBLIC 
TRANS- 
PORTA- 
TION 


IN 
1959 


MEDIAN 


PERCEN 
INCOME 


T WITH 
S OF 


14 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 


TOTAL 


WITH 
OWN 
CHIL- 
DREN 
UNDER 6 


18 TO 
24 
YEARS 
OLD 


65 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 


PERCENT 

UNEM- 
PLOYED 


PERCENT 
FORKED 
50 TO 
52 
WEEKS 


INCOME 
(DOL- 
LARS) 


UNDER 
S3 000 


$10 T 000 
AND 
OVER 


STANDARD METROPOLITAN 
STATISTICAL AREAS 

CHARLESTON* ** 
COLUMBIA- * ' < 

GREENVILLE. * * * t 

URBANIZED AREAS 

CHARLESTON. 
CENTRAL CITY. 
URBAN FRINGE. 
COLUMBIA. . > 
CENTRAL CITY. 
URBAN FRINGE. 
GREENVILLE- f 
CENTRAL CITY* 


1.68 
1.48 
1.41 

1*57 
1*35 
1.74 
1.60 
1*61 
1*60 
1,39 
1.38 
1.40 

N THE LAB 
AL (EXCEP 
E ARMED F 


36.5 
38*6 
42.6 

37.7 
44.8 
32*1 

40*9 
40.9 
41.1 
43.8 
44.1 
43.4 

OR FORCE 
T FARM) i 
ORCES. 


32.4 
39.6 
42.0 

32.3 

37.9 
29.4 
40.5 
40.6 
40.4 
41.8 
41.2 
42*4 

(INCLUD 
CLERIC A 


22.1 
30.6 
32*6 

21.7 
30.8 
18.4 
30.6 
30.7 
30.5 
31.3 
31.0 
31.5 

ING CHIL 
Li AND S 


77.1 
82.8 
78.9 

75.9 
64.5 
91.0 
62.6 
55.8 
81.1 
79.8 
72.3 
89.9 

DREN UND 
ALES. 


35.9 
28.6 
30.3 

37.0 
39.3 
34.1 
29.5 
31.1 
24.5 
33.8 
40.8 
22.9 

ER 14) T 


5.1 
3.5 
2.9 

4.9 
6.0 
4*0 
3*5 

3.8 
3*0 
3.0 
2.5 
3.6 

LABOR 


23*2 
15.8 
38.8 

24.5 
14*1 
33.1 
12.9 
9.9 
17.4 
33.6 
21.2 
47.8 

FORCE. 


39.0 
43,9 
34.5 

41.0 
37.8 
43.8 
50.1 
52.0 
47.3 
38.1 
46.0 
28.9 


2.3 

14.4 
6.2 

4.9 
0.9 
8.1 
14.4 
5.0 
28.2 
4.0 
3.7 
4.3 


10.6 
7*2 
5,6 

11.7 
17.5 
6.9 
11*2 
13.8 
7.4 
8.6 
11*8 
5.0 


59.5 

55.0 
58.8 

62.1 
59.1 
64*6 
58.3 
54.5 
64.4 
59*5 
57.1 
62.2 


4 518 
4 540 
4 754 

4 692 
3 708 
5 263 

4 858 
4 574 
5 197 
4 869 
4 754 
4 955 


32.7 
30.8 
26.4 

29.8 
40.9 
23.1 
27.6 
31.9 
21*8 
25.9 
29.7 
22.0 


9.9 
10.1 
8.9 

10*3 
9.6 

10.7 
12.1 
12.9 
11.0 
10.4 
13.6 
7.2 


1 RATIO OF PERSONS NOT I 
8 PROFESSIONAL! MANAGER I 
8 INCLUDES MEMBERS OF TH 



42-88 South Carolina 

Table 33 -SUMMARY OF ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, FOR STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS, 
URBANIZED AREAS, AND URBAN PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE: 1960-Con. 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent, median, and ratio not shown where base is less than 200] 



AREA 


NON- 
WORKER- 
WORKER 
RATIO 1 


PERCENT IN LABOR FORCE 


CIVIL- 


EMPLOYED 
PERSONS 


CENSUS WEEK 8 


WHO 

WORKED 

IN 
1959 






FEMALE 
14 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 


MARRIED WOMEN i 
HUSBAND PRESENT 


MALE 


IAN 
LABOR 
FORCE 


PERCENT 
IN 
MANUFAC- 
TURING 
INDUS- 
TRIES 


PERCENT 
IN 
WHITE- 
COLLAR 
OCCUPA- 
TIONS 2 


PER- 
CENT 
WORKING 
OUTSIDE 
COUNTY 
OF 
RESI- 
DENCE 


PER- 
CENT 
USING 
PUBLIC 
TRANS- 
PORTA- 
TION 


MEDIAN 
INCOME 
(DOL- 
LARS) 


PERCENT WITH 
INCOMES OF-- 


TOTAL 


WITH 
OWN 
CHIL- 
DREN 
UNDER 6 


18 TO 
24 

YEARS 
OLD 


65 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 


PERCENT 
UNEM- 
PLOYED 


PERCENT 
WORKED 
50 TO 
52 
WEEKS 


UNDER 
$3tOOO 


$10 t 000 

AND 
OVER 


URBAN PLACES 


1.52 
1.22 
1.35 
1.61 
1.45 
1.30 
1.88 
1.38 
1.21 
1.58 

1.47 
1.47 
1.39 
1.52 
1.30 


41.4 
48.1 
44.8 
40.9 
44.4 
48.8 
37.7 
44.1 
49.6 
37.0 

41.8 
42.1 
44.7 
41.2 
47.9 


40.5 
49.2 
37.9 
40.6 
43.1 
54.1 
35.8 
41.2 
52.4 
35,6 

47.2 
47.2 
43.6 
39.0 
48.5 


31.9 

40.6 
30.8 
30.7 
37.6 
47.5 
30.9 
31.0 
47.6 
25.0 

38.0 
38.3 
36.5 
28.8 
41.3 


76.8 
86.0 
64.5 
55.8 
78.6 
85.6 
64.6 
72.3 
86.7 
80.4 

55.0 
62.2 
70.4 
86.2 
84.6 


31.0 
32.1 

39.3 

31.1 
46.8 
30.2 
31.9 
40.8 
35.1 

31.9 
27.4 
31.4 
43.6 
25.3 


3.5 

4.0 
6.0 
3.8 
3.6 
5.5 
5.0 
2.5 
4.8 
2.4 

3.6 
4.2 
5.2 
5.6 
5.7 


24.7 
42.4 
14.1 
9.9 
13.3 
35.8 
32*5 
21.2 
34*1 
26.2 

22.7 
43.5 
26.8 
19.3 
47.0 


43.2 
30.3 
37.8 
52.0 
45.0 
36.2 
36.7 
46.0 
32.3 
57.0 

44.8 
34.1 
41.2 
47.7 
34.0 


5.9 
3.0 
0.9 
5.0 
4.3 
8.7 
2.6 
3.7 
3.0 
51.9 

4.8 
4.7 
3.2 

4.5 
4.5 


2.0 
5.4 
17.5 
13.8 
4.2 
0.2 
0.3 
11.8 
3.2 
2.4 

0.2 
0.5 
8.2 
4.0 
0.1 


59.2 
61.9 
59.1 
54.5 
55.5 
53.3 
52.9 
57.1 
60.2 
64.8 

55.0 
55,6 
56.0 
58.1 
58.6 


4 977 
4 463 
3 708 
4 574 
4 397 
4 183 
4 079 
4 754 
3 974 
6 277 

4 617 
5 010 
4 483 
3 916 
4 384 


33.4 
29.4 
40.9 
31.9 
33.8 
34.3 
38.3 
29.7 
36.3 
13.5 

31.8 
25.6 

33.0 
36.7 
31.5 


17.8 
7.1 
9.6 
12.9 
11.0 
6.9 
7.4 
13.6 
6.6 
15.3 

11.7 
9.1 
11.6 
7.8 
9.7 


ANDERSON. . 
CHARLESTON. 
COLUMBIA. . 
FLORENCE. . 
GAFFNEY . . 
GEORGETOWN. 
GREENVILLE. 
GREENWOOD . 
NORTH AUGUSTA 











1 RATIO OF PERSONS NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE (INCLUDING CHILDREN UNDER 14) TO LABOR FORCE. 
" PROFESSIONAL! MANAGERIAL (EXCEPT FARM) i CLERICAL? AND SALES. 
INCLUDES MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES. 



Table 34. SUMMARY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 

TO 10,000: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent, median, and ratio not shown where base is less than 200] 





TOTAL POPULATION 


PERSONS 25 YEARS 
OLD AND OVER 


NON- 
WORKER- 
WORKER 
RATIO 1 


FEMALE? 
14 YEARS 
OLD AND 
OVER 

PERCENT 
IN 
LABOR 
FORCE 


CIVILIAN 
LABOR 
FORCE 

PERCENT 
UNEM- 
PLOYED 


EMPLOYED 
PERSONS 


FAMILIES 


URBAN PLACE 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
FOREIGN 
BORN 


PERCENT 
NATIVE 
OF 
FOREIGN 
OR MIXED 
PARENT- 
AGE 


MEDIAN 
SCHOOL 
YEARS 
COM- 
PLETED 


PERCENT 
WHO COM- 
PLETED 
4 YEARS 
OF HIGH 
SCHOOL 
OR MORE 


PERCENT 
IN 
MANU- 
FACTURING 
INDUS- 
TRIES 




PERCENT WITH 
INCOMES OF 


INCOME 
(DOLLARS) 


UNDER 
$3iOOO 


SlOtOOO 
AND 
OVER 




5 436 
2 980 
2 602 
3 114 
2 995 
3 081 
4 568 
3 606 
6 298 
5 106 

6 963 
3 586 
2 525 
6 842 
8 517 
5 171 
6 906 
7 937 
3 500 
8 563 

6 710 
3 221 
6 173 
8 263 
4 779 
2 876 
3 842 
3 315 
3 030 
8 967 

6 392 

3 453 
3 847 
6 059 
7 999 
3 274 
9 598 
2 657 
3 917 
7 174 

5 116 
6 229 
7 834 
8 208 
3 917 


0.2 
0.5 
1.1 
0.5 
0.2 
. 
0.4 
0.2 
0.8 
0.4 

0.1 
0.2 

o!e 

0.4 
0.2 
0.3 
0.3 
0.8 
0.3 

0.5 
0.1 
0.7 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
1*4 

6)3 
0.2 

0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
0.1 
0.2 
... 
0.3 
0.5 
0.3 
0.1 

0.8 
0.6 
2.7 
0.5 
0.3 


0.6 
2.4 
5.4 
0.9 
0.8 
0.8 
0.7 
0.2 
3.1 
0.8 

0.5 
0.4 
0.2 
1*8 
0.9 
0.7 
0.9 
0*6 
0.2 
0.6 

0.9 
0.3 
0.8 
0.7 

o!s 

5.2 

o!5 

0.7 

0.5 
0.8 
1.1 
0.4 
0.5 

o!s 

0.4 
0.4 
0.3 

4.7 
0.6 
3.9 
0.9 
0.3 


9.8 
12.5 
12.3 
8.6 
10.4 
8.7 
10.5 
, 9.4 
11.7 
8.8 

9.7 
10.1 
7.2 
10.3 
11.0 
8.8 
9.7 
8.8 
8.2 
10.1 

8.9 
8.7 
9.1 
8,8 
6.8 
9.3 
12.9 
8.7 
8.1 
9.2 

10.0 
9.4 
11.7 
8.4, 
9.0 
6.8 
9.6 
8,7 
9.8 
9.0 

12.2 
9.4 
12.2 
9.7 
7.2 


35.9 

66.8 
59.3 
32.9 
41.4 
30.5 
40.5 
33.6 
48.2 
28.2 

36.9 
40,5 
18.0 
41.2 
42.8 
33.8 
36.7 
31.2 
26.0 
38.7 

33.0 
31.4 
34.4 
30.3 
11*9 
36.8 
75.8 
33.9 
20.3 
32.0 

39.1 
32.2 

48.3 
29.3 
34,7 
12.0 
34.2 
27.0 
36.6 
34.0 

56.6 
36.6 
55.7 
35.5 

15.5 


1.34 
1.98 
1.66 
1.43 
2.12 
1.27 
1.54 
1.3O 
1.54 
1.29 

1.39 
1.68 

1.59 
1.45 
1.47 
1.42 
1.43 
1.38 
1.31 
1.59 

1.4O 
2.32 

1.52 

1.32 
1,35 
1.61 
1.59 

1.20 
1.45 
1.18 

1 .70 
1.15 
1.27 
2.17 
1.27 
1.27 
1.40 
1.29 
1.56 
1.70 

1.91 
1.82 
1.44 
1,23 
1.49 


46.9 
24.3 
33.5 

52.4 
33.1 

49.1 
44.0 
48.0 
40.2 
48.4 

46.1 
42.6 
43.6 
45.3 
43.4 
43.2 
47.0 
51.4 
49.7 
43.4 

48.5 
32.4 
45.1 
48.0 
48.5 
40.0 
37.3 
52.4 
44.2 
47.8 

36.4 
52.6 
47.1 
31,0 
52.0 
53.4 
46.8 
44,5 
48.3 
41.7 

32.5 
38.6 
36.2 
49.0 
38.6 


4.8 
1.9 
0.9 
5.5 
2,0 
3.6 
4.7 
2.7 
2.2 
2.5 

5.9 
3.1 
3.4 
3.0 
2.8 
8.0 
4.1 
6.2 
4.4 
4.3 

3.9 

3.9 
6.0 
4.1 
4.9 
4.6 
2.8 
3.7 
1.5 
3.5 

3.8 
2.8 
3.3 

5.0 
4.9 
4.9 
3.0 
2.7 
8.9 
6.1 

2.3 

8,1 
2.6 
6.0 
7.2 


32.8 
58.9 
38.8 
13.9 
31.8 
23.4 
35.7 
29.8 
3.0 
60.2 

24.3 
19.6 
67.8 
25.8 
18.9 
26.2 
29.8 
42.6 
61.3 
15.0 

26.3 
23.9 
25.1 
51.4 
60.1 
31.3 
7.6 
64.3 
67.7 
48.3 

35.8 
63.9 

11.8 
19.6 
34.6 
80.9 
41.0 
56.0 
11.8 
21.8 

13.2 

18.1 
5.5 

35.4 
51.2 


4 474 
7 735 
6 853 
2 947 
3 800 
3 757 
4 969 
3 631 
4 167 
4 896 

3 596 

3 289 
3 864 
4 244 
5 615 
3 820 
4 204 
4 572 
4 172 
3 922 

3 571 
2 480 
3 675 
4 924 
3 796 
3 234 
7 167 
5 473 
4 471 
4 795 

4 882 
4 650 
4 139 
2 603 
4 622 
5 020 
4 506 
4 976 
3 480 
3 320 

5 986 
3 148 
4 276 
4 210 
3 749 


32.9 
9.3 
8.6 
50.5 
37.7 
40.0 
29.5 
42.3 
34.9 
22.8 

43,7 
46.8 
36.4 
36.0 
18.8 
41.7 
35.6 
28.9 
33.0 
38.5 

42.5 
57.5 
40.7 
24.2 
36.3 
46.9 
9.4 
15.3 
19.0 
21.5 

27.6 
22.9 
37.6 
56.5 
33.7 
14.5 
30.6 
25.3 
43.1 
46.9 

16.3 
48.2 
32.0 
36.0 
36.3 


8.0 
19.6 
18.8 
6*8 
6.6 
7.7 
7.8 
6.5 
9.1 
6.7 

6.0 
5.5 
0.6 
10.2 
11.6 
6*6 
5.4 
7.9 
3.1 
9.3 

6.8 
4.8 
6.5 
7.5 
2.0 
2.8 
23.6 
5.7 
3.1 
9.3 

15.4 
5.6 
5.9 
5,3 

9.0 
7.1 
7.4 
5.9 
6.5 
7.6 

14.8 
79 
12.8 
5.9 
2.5 





















































































RATIO OF PERSONS NOT IN LABOR FORCE (INCLUDING CHILDREN UNDER 14) TO LABOR FORCE. 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 

Table 34. SUMMARY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, FOR URBAN PLACES OF 2,500 

TO 10,000: 196CK-Con. 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent, median, and ratio not shown where base is less than 200] 



42-89 



URBAN PLACE 


TOTAL POPULATION 


PERSONS 25 YEARS 
OLD AND OVER 


NON- 
WORKER- 
WORKER 
RATIO 1 


FEMALE t 
14 YEARS 
OLD AND 
OVER 

PERCENT 
IN 
LABOR 
FORCE 


CIVILIAN 
LABOR 
FORCE 

PERCENT 
UNEM- 
PLOYED 


EMPLOYED 
PERSONS 


FAMILIES 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 
FOREIGN 
BORN 


PERCENT 
NATIVE 
OF 
FOREIGN 
OR MIXED 
PARENT- 
AGE 


MEDIAN 
SCHOOL 
YEARS 
COM- 
PLETED 


PERCENT 
WHO COM- 
PLETED 
4 YEARS 
OF HIGH 
SCHOOL 
OR MORE 


PERCENT 
IN 
MANU- 
FACTURING 
INDUS- 
TRIES 


MEDIAN 
INCOME 
(DOLLARS) 


PERCENT WITH 
INCOMES OF 


UNDER 
S3 i 000 


SlOtOOO 
AND 
OVER 




5 227 

7 064 
2 520 
2 981 
3 633 
3 431 
5 417 
2 671 
6 410 
2 663 

2 502 
3 721 
2 722 
3 479 
3 679 
4 758 


0.3 
0,3 
0.8 
0.3 
0.9 
0..1 
0.5 
0.3 
0.5 
0.2 

* 

. * 

oil 

... 
0.1 


0.9 
0*2 
1.0 
0.1 
2.0 
0.6 
1.5 
0.7 
0*6 
0*8 

1.5 
0.2 
0.7 
0.8 
0.3 
0.3 


9.7 
6.9 
8.2 
8*3 

11*8 
9*1 
11.0 
9.2 
10.3 
7.7 

9.3 

8.9 

11.6 
11.0 
8.4 
8.8 


32.2 

16.0 
19.6 
25.9 
48.9 
33.2 
45.4 
32.3 
38.3 
19.9 

27.7 
26.2 
47.7 
46.0 
27.3 
33.9 


1.22 
2.12 
0.93 
1.37 
1.75 
1.36 
1.54 
1.29 
1.32 
1.19 

1.18 
1.33 

1.73 
1.51 
1.23 
1.47 


47.5 
32.8 
57.6 
48.6 
35.1 
48.9 
44.0 
43.4 
43.8 
50.6 

47.9 
47.9 
40.7 
' 49.1 
49.2 
49.1 


4.5 
8*8 
4.7 
1.1 
3.2 
3.2 
2.5 
4.6 
3.6 
5.4 

4.6 
1.4 
5.3 
4.4 
2.2 
3.8 


36.7 
32.0 
85.6 
77.8 
23.1 
45.3 
16.8 
74.0 
26.8 
65.0 

50.2 
51.7 

36.3 
29.1 
54.2 
37.1 


4 469 
2 668 
5 369 
5 517 
4 394 
3 930 
3 570 
5 204 
5 069 
4 678 

5 263 

4 297 
5 309 
3 726 
4 306 
3 712 


30.0 
58.7 
9.9 
13.3 
35.7 
32.8 
43.5 
17.4 
19.6 
26.0 

15.5 
29.6 

34. O 
41.3 
31.0 
39.7 


8.4 
1.9 
3.5 

6.7 

10.4 
6.9 
6.0 
8.3 
7.6 
5.2 

3.4 
2.9 
8.6 
5.3 

4.4 
5.5 

































1 RATIO OF PERSONS NOT IN LABOR FORCE (INCLUDING CHILDREN UNDER 14) TO LABOR FORCE. 



Table 35. SUMMARY OF SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS, BY COUNTIES: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent, median, and rate not shown where base is less than 2001 



COUNTY 


TOTAL POPULATION 


NATIVE 
POPU- 
LATION 

PER- 
CENT 
RESIDING 
IN 
STATE 
OF 
BIRTH 


TOTAL 
POPU- 
LATION 

PER- 
CENT 

MOVED 
INTO 
HOUSE 
AFTER 
1958 


PERSONS 
5 YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 

PERCENT 
MIGRANT 1 


CHILDREN 
IN ELE- 
MENTARY 
SCHOOL 

PERCENT 
IN 
PRI- 
VATE 
SCHOOL 


PERSONS 
14 TO 
17 
YEARS 
OLD 

PERCENT 
IN 
SCHOOL 


PERSONS 
25 
YEARS 
OLD AND 
OVER 

MEDIAN 
SCHOOL 
YEARS 
COM- 
PLETED 


MARRIED 
COUPLES 

PER- 
CENT 
WITHOUT 
OWN 
HOUSE- 
HOLD 


FAMILIES 

PERCENT 
WITH 
OWN 
CHILDREN 
UNDER 
6 YEARS 
OLD 


CUMU- 
LATIVE 
FER- 
TILITY 
RATE* 


NUMBER 


PERCENT 
RURAL 
NON- 
FARM 


PERCENT 
RURAL 
FARM 


PERCENT 
FOREIGN 
BORN 


PERCENT 
NATIVE 
OF 
FOREIGN 
OR 
MIXED 
PARENT- 
AGE 




2 382 594 


44.1 


14.7 


0.5 


1.1 


82.9 


26.8 


14.6 


2.0 


77.7 


8.7 


3*5 


33.2 


1 910 


ABBEVILLE . 


21 419 
81 038 
11 362 
98 476 
16 274 
17 659 
44 187 
38 196 
12 256 
216 382 

35 205 
30 888 
33 717 
29 490 
27 816 
52 928 
30 584 
24 383 
15 735 
20 713 

84 438 
34 798 
209 776 
44 346 
17 425 
68 247 
12 237 
33 585 
39 352 
47 609 

21 832 
60 726 
8 629 
32 014 

28 529 
29 416 
40 204 
68 559 
46 030 
200 102 

14 554 
156 330 
74 941 
30 015 
40 932 
78 760 


47.5 
54.6 
53. 1 
35.5 

35.6 

38.6 
81.9 
69.9 
57.9 
25.5 

43.7 
51.4 
54.1 
34.7 
61.3 
46.6 
32.8 
68*3 
58.8 
66.8 

30.7 
42.9 
33.0 
45.4 
85.7 
38.4 
86.6 
61.3 
54.1 
51.1 

30.7 
46.3 
82.4 
24.0 
41.3 
45.0 
65.1 
49.3 
68*3 
29.0 

63.9 
57.6 
41.1 
58.2 
35.6 
39.2 


15.2 
8.6 
19.5 
10.1 
25.6 
20.1 
3.8 
14.1 
42.1 
1.0 

13.1 
16.4 
30.6 
52.0 
19.2 
28.6 
47.0 
16.8 
22.9 
16.4 

32.8 
13.4 
3.3 

5.3 

14.3 
37.6 
13.4 
18.3 
9.7 
12.0 

52.8 
8.9 
17-6 
34.1 
34.3 
18.1 
13.3 
30.5 
7.9 
1.6 

34.1 
6.2 
18.7 
7.9 
54.9 
8.8 


0.2 
0.4 
0.2 
0.2 

0.1 
0.2 
0.9 
0.3 

... 
1.1 

0.1 
0.2 

oa 

0.2 
0.1 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 

0.3 
0.2 
0.7 
0.3 
0.2 
0,7 
0.4 
0.4 
0.2 
0.2 

0.1 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.2 
1.1 

. . 
0.2 
1.1 
0.1 
0.1 
0.2 


0.4 
1.4 
0.3 
0.5 
0.3 
0.5 
4.1 
1.2 
0.2 
3.4 

0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
0.2 
0.6 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
0.3 
0.2 

0.6 
0.7 
1.3 
0.6 
0.5 
1.2 
0.7 
0.7 
0.3 
0.4 

0.1 
0.5 
0.1 
0.3 
0.3 
0.5 
0.6 
0.4 
0.6 
2.2 

0.1 
0.6 
1.7 
0.3 
0.2 
0.5 


89.2 
68.4 
90.1 
86.4 
93.0 
87.6 
51.8 
84.0 
95.9 
71.5 

86.3 
89.0 
89.0 
96.3 

92.0 
92.5 
90.0 
88.6 
92.2 
92.7 

90.2 
91.7 
76.6 
87.0 
91.2 
81.3 
88.2 
89.9 
90.3 
89.8 

96.3 
86.7 
91.6 
94.5 
87.7 
92.4 
86.5 
93.2 
86.5 
70.7 

95.9 
84.8 
77.2 
89*2 
96.2 
82.4 


19.6 
25.2 
22.6 

27.0 
21.7 
23.5 
49.3 
22.4 
17.6 
31.6 

24.5 
19.2 
24.6 
21.2 
17.9 
27.4 
28.1 
19.2 
24,1 
16.3 

26.3 

17.5 
30.0 
24.9 
21.8 
30.2 
20.0 
23.3 
22.4 
22.4 

24.9 
22.4 
17,2 
24.8 
23.7 
17,8 
29.1 
21.9 
24.0 
36,5 

16.9 
24.3 
31.2 

21.2 
20.7 
25.2 


11.1 
14.1 
10.5 
9*1 
11.9 
11*0 
47,8 
19.1 
6.8 
21.0 

10.8 
8.5 
7.7 
6.7 
7.9 
8.9 
8.1 
11.2 
8.5 
6.1 

10.1 
8.2 
16.3 
11.0 
7.6 
15.8 
11.4 
9.9 
8.7 
12.4 

8.7 
18.1 
9.3 

9.6 
7.7 
9.1 
16.5 
9.4 
13.8 
27.8 

8.<* 
9.3 

21.6 
7.7 
7.8 
11.6 


0.3 
5.0 

... 
0.2 
0.4 
... 
0.4 
1.4 
... 
8,9 

0.2 
0.1 
0.5 
0.3 
0.9 
0.9 
... 
0.9 
... 
0.1 

1.9 
2.7 
3.1 
0.4 
0.1 
1.0 

6!2 
0.1 
2.7 

0.6 
1.0 
... 
0.2 
0.5 
0.1 
0.3 
1.9 
0,4 
3.3 

0.1 
1.3 

1.6 
0.1 
... 

1.4 


77.2 
82.7 
74.6 
77.2 
81.5 
77.3 
49.2 
82.7 
80.9 
84.0 

71.3 
75.0 
73.8 
73.4 
78.3 
78.3 
76.1 
88.1 
74.2 
80.4 

80.1 
82.1 
76.8 
81.3 
79.1 
77.3 
82*7 
81.8 
80.5 
66.0 

72.5 
83.4 
80.8 
78.4 
77.9 
84.7 
75.6 
82.5 
74.6 
71.9 

83.1 
76.5 
79.0 
77.3 
79.7 
80.3 


8.3 
9.5 
7.4 
8.6 
7.9 
8.5 
9.9 
7.7 
7.7 
10.1 

7.6 
7.8 
7.6 
7.1 
7.8 
8.1 
7.3 
8.3 
8.4 
7.3 

8.5 
7.6 
9.9 
8.7 
7.5 
8.7 
6.7 
8.3 
8.3 
8.1 

7.3 
9.3 
7.6 
7.9 
7.4 
8.6 
8.1 
8.2 
8.4 
10.9 

9.0 
8.5 
9.3 

7.8 
7.4 
8*6 


3.9 

2.7 
3.8 
3.2 
5.3 
2.5 
2.2 
3.0 
3.2 
2.3 

4.0 
5.1 
4.3 
4.1 
4.1 
4.2 
4.6 
5.3 
3.1 
5.5 

3.9 
3.5 

2.8 
2.8 
4.0 
3.2 
5,6 
3.1 
3.8 
3.3 

4.4 
3.7 
5.9 
4.9 
4.1 
4*9 
2.8 
4.1 
3.2 
3.2 

4.4 
3.8 
4.0 
7.3 
4.7 
3.6 


29.3 
36.3 

26.7 
29.5 
30,3 
35.4 
44.0 
40.2 
27.3 
38.0 

29.8 
26.3 
30.3 
36.2 
29.8 
33.5 
35.1 
33.2 
33.1 
30.6 

33.5 

38.6 
33,2 

27,6 
31.6 
37.4 
26.9 
34.1 
33.9 
27.4 

37.7 
34.1 
32.4 
32.4 
29,7 
22.6 
31.3 
31.8 
30.8 
34.8 

28.4 
28.6 
40.0 
26.1 
37,4 
32.8 


1 758 
1 971 
1 939 
1 689 
2 272 
2 097 
2 056 
2 252 
2 169 
1 950 

1 801 
1 967 
2 137 
2 540 
2 201 
2 050 
2 292 
2 006 
2 304 
2 173 

2 077 
2 347 
1 661 
1 661 
2 326 
2 017 
2 078 
2 148 
1 913 
1 713 

2 375 
1 835 
2 139 
2 175 
2 137 
1 689 
1 803 
2 112 
1 719 
1 680 

1 935 
1 706 
2 018 
1 820 
2 422 
1 767 




ALLENDALE ..... 










BERKELEY. . . ... . 






































JASPER 






LAURENS ... 



































1 PERSONS WHO LIVED IN DIFFERENT COUNTIES IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1955 AND 1960. 
CHILDREN EVER BORN PER If 000 WOMEN 15 TO 44 YEARS OLD OF ALL MARITAL CLASSES. 



42-90 



South Carolina 
Table 36.-SUMMARY OF ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, BY COUNTIES: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where leas than 0.1 ; percent, median, and ratio not shown where base is leas than 200] 



COUNTY 


NON- 
WORKER- 
WQRKER 
RATIO 1 


PERCENT IN LABOR FORCE 


CIVIL- 
IAN 
LABOR 
FORCE 


EMPLOYED 
PERSONS 


WORKERS DURING 
CENSUS WEEK 8 


PERSONS 
WHO 
WORKED 
IN 
1959 


FAMILIES 


FEMALE i 
14 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 


MARRIED WOMEN* 
HUSBAND PRESENT 


MALE 


PERCENT 
IN 
MANUFAC- 
TURING 
INDUS- 
TRIES 


PERCENT 
IN 
WHITE- 
COLLAR 
OCCUPA- 
TIONS3 


PER- 
CENT 
WORKING 
OUTSIDE 
COUNTY 
OF 
RESI- 
DENCE 


PER- 
CENT 
USING 
PUBLIC 
TRANS- 
PORTA- 
TION 


MEDIAN 
INCOME 
(DOL- 
LARS) 


PERCENT WITH 
INCOMES QF-- 


TOTAL 


WITH 
OWN 
CHIL- 
DREN 
UNDER 6 


18 TO 
24 
YEARS 
OLD 


65 
YEARS 
OLD 
AND 
OVER 


PERCENT 
UNEM- 
PLOYED 


PERCENT 
WORKED 
50 TO 
52 
WEEKS 


UNDER 
$3*000 


$10 000 
AND 
OVER 




1,66 


38,3 


39,6 


32,1 


79,9 


31,1 


4,1 


32,0 


29,6 


10.5 


3,4 


52,6 


3 821 


39,5 


6,5 




1,64 
1,74 
1,54 
1,36 
1,91 
1.80 
1,21 
2,52 
2,26 
1,68 

1,55 
1,65 
1,83 
2,14 
2,15 
1,89 
1,88 
2,26 
1,76 
2,00 

1,95 
2,41 
1,41 
1,30 
2,09 
1,94 
2,35 
1,93 
1,54 
1,59 

2,42 
1,50 
2,20 
2,08 
1,96 
1,51 
1,55 
1,79 
1,43 
1,47 

1,63 

1,42 
1,82 
1,51 
2,25 
1,56 


39,6 
35,7 
47,0 
44,0 
37,2 
38,6 
35,9 
25,2 
,30,0 
36,5 

42,2 
40,6 
35,3 
35,6 
29,5 
36,9 
40,7 
24,8 
38,0 
34,9 

34,1 
30,1 
42,6 
47,3 
32,0 
30,8 
27,1 
36,0 
44,1 
41,9 

28,1 
41,5 
29.8 
36,1 
36,2 
40,3 
43,3 
39,5 
42,4 
37,7 

38,0 
42,7 
32,9 
42,5 
32,6 
42,0 


43,0 
36,9 
45,9 
46,1 
40,9 
40,1 
29,9 
27,4 
33.8 
32.4 

46.2 
45,3 
38,0 
37,3 
31,9 
38,2 
43,8 
24,9 
39,7 
38,6 

34,5 
30,7 
42.0 
51,5 
35,0 
30,6 
29,5 
37,0 
48,6 
47,9 

28,0 
42,8 
29,0 
38,6 
42,4 
44,3 
46,4 
42,7 
45,1 
38,3 

43,1 
44,7 
31,5 
45,5 
33,9 
46,0 


41,6 
26,9 

38,6 
39,4 
31,6 
36,4 
21,7 
185 
27,8 
22,1 

41,1 
38,7 
30,7 
37,1 
26,1 
35,1 
42,5 
16,5 
32,6 
29,3 

29,3 
26,7 
32,6 
44,7 
33,0 
24,2 
17,9 
32,6 
47,1 
41,2 

24,1 
34,5 
25,3 

35,0 
34,9 
40,6 
45,6 
36,6 
38,1 
29,1 

46,1 
37,3 
23,0 
40,6 
30,6 
39,1 


68,9 
82,6 
85,4 
86,0 
62,1 
83,0 
97,4 
72,5 
69,4 
77,1 

85,1 
81,3 
83,5 
76,1 
76,2 
78,9 
85*0 
77,4 
87,7 
77,1 

78,7 
68,2 
78,9 
87,4 
77,5 
81,7 
80,0 
71.1 
82,6 
70,7 

74,8 
83,3 
84,7 
70,5 
75,2 
67,5 
47,9 
73,7 
81,7 
82,8 

84,2 
80,4 
89,7 
82,3 
76,8 
85,1 


25,8 
30.9 
43,0 
27,3 
48,2 
39*6 
23,6 
26,9 
40.8 
35,9 

26,1 
26,5 
32,4 
48,6 
33,4 
32,6 
41,5 
29,7 
32,5 
25,9 

33,9 
27,4 
30,3 
29,1 
31,6 
32,0 
29,4 
33,6 
24,2 
24,5 

37.3 
31,8 
26,5 
33,3 
35,3 
33,4 
27,6 
37,3 
26,1 
27,5 

41,2 
27,5 
39,4 
23,7 
32,3 
27,6 


4,4 
4,0 
6,3 
3,0 
4,2 
4,0 
5,5 
6,9 
5,6 
5,1 

6,0 
3,7 
5,2 

7,5 
3,1 
3,2 
4,0 
3,4 
2,3 
4,1 

3,9 

6,4 
2,9 
4,5 
4,0 
3,8 
5,9 
3,8 
3,9 
4,0 

2,3 

3,8 
5,3 

5,9 

6,0 
4,5 
3,6 
4,5 
3,2 
3,4 

3,5 

4,4 
4,4 
4,6 
3,7 
- 4,2 


45,4 
38,7 
13,5 
47,4 
20,8 
29,6 
5,3 
32,6 
11,8 
23,2 

46,0 
44,1 
32,4 
10,7 
24,8 
29,9 
16,4 
27,9 
28,7 
43,1 

14,3 
34,0 
38,8 
46,0 
28,0 
10,1 
23,0 
36,3 
55,2 
47,3 

15,0 
26,4 
29,7 
16,3 
25,4 
39,2 
47,2 
20,3 
53,4 
11,7 

37,0 
43,9 
18,8 
53,3 

10,5 
47,2 


21,9 
33,2 

23,8 
24,4 
25,0 
26,0 
30,6 
26,9 
22,1 
39,0 

22,7 
21,5 
22,6 
20,0 
27,1 
24,7 
19,2 
26,4 
22,8 
22,7 

30,9 
28,7 
34,5 
27,0 
26,9 
28,9 
27,1 
27,9 
23,6 
21,6 

19,4 
32,7 
18,9 
26,3 
24,7 
25,3 
24,3 
26,0 
26,5 
48,2 

18,1 
27,5 
30,8 
24,2 
20,3 
26,1 


21,9 
18.4 
13.0 
10.6 
14.5 
13.8 
1.6 
39.6 
20,1 
2.3 

18.6 
13,9 
21,0 
8.2 
17,6 
6,8 
5-9 
26,6 
19.0 
16.5 

4.4 
8,0 
6.2 

4.2 
13,9 
4.2 
27,2 
14.9 
12.8 
15,1 

16.3 
47,2 
28.2 
6.4 
8.2 
13.7 
10.6 
8,6 
24.2 
4.6 

31,6 
7.7 
4.1 
6.3 
9.3 
8.2 


1,1 
1,2 
1,1 
2,6 
0,6 
0,2 
7,2 
3,6 
0,5 
10,6 

0,4 
0,6 
0,6 
0,3 
1,4 
0,1 
0,5 
0,3 
0,4 
0,7 

2,2 

1,5 
5,6 
1,7 
1,3 
,0,8 
2,4 
1,3 
0,5 
0,6 

0,7 
2.6 
0,8 
0.6 
0,3 
0,4 
0,3 
' 0,5 
0,4 
8,5 

0,5 
3,6 

3,1 
0,2 
0,8 
0,6 


53,3 

59,1 
40,6 
59*4 

46,1 
50,1 
46*0 
51,3 
32,7 
59,5 

49,0 
55,8 
41,9 
36*4 
46,2 
48,8 
39,5 
51,5 
47,1 
43,6 

49,5 
44,7 
58.8 
58,9 
44,0 
46,7 
39,1 
49,9 
59*1 
54,9 

38,4 
. 55,6 
43,5 
35,7 
41,7 
53,0 
45,4 
45,3 
55.4 
54,8 

48,3 
55,1 
55,6 
57,7 
39,3 
54,1 


3 641 
4 913 
2 188 
4 191 
2 380 
3 266 
3 597 
3 367 
1 766 
4 518 

3 686 
3 700 

2 811 
1 945 
2 462 
3 231 
2 356 
3 031 
2 595 
2 730 

3 232 

3 160 
4754 
4 175 
2 487 
3 019 
2 401 
3 536 
4 482 
4 145 

1 680 
4 461 
2 639 
2 307 
2 465 
3 341 
3 721 
2 603 
4 503 
4 572 

2 965 
4 228 
3 267 
4 115 
1 631 
4 318 


42,1 
30,7 
60,1 
32,8 

58.5 
47,5 
41,9 
46,0 
66.2 
32.7 

39,9 
39.4 
52.9 
66.7 
57.9 
47.3 
58.6 
49.6 
55.3 
54,2 

47,2 
48,3 
26.4 
34,3 
58.0 
49,7 
60.2 
44.4 
30,6 
35.0 

68.6 
31.3 
56.1 
59.8 
56.3 
45,6 
38.5 
56,0 
28.4 
30.7 

50.6 
32.2 
46.3 
33,4 
68.3 
31,7 


3.9 
9.7 
4,9 
5.6 
3,9 
5.1 
4.7 
5.7 
3.6 
9,9 

3.6 
3.5 
3,1 
2,5 

3,1 
5,6 
3,5 

4,5 
3,0 
3,0 

6,4 
4,8 
8,9 
5,7 
4,3 
5,6 
2,5 
6,4 
5,4 
5,0 

1,9 
6,1 
2,7 
4,6 
3,2 
3,4 
4,3 
5,1 
6,6 
11,5 

2,9 

6,2 
5,6 
5,8 
2,5 
6,6 































































































' RATIO OF PERSONS NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE (INCLUDING CHILDREN UNDER 14) TO LABOR FORCE, 
* PROFESSIONAL? MANAGERIAL (EXCEPT FARM). CLERICAL! AND SALES, 
8 INCLUDES MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES, 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 
Table 37. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where leas than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is less than 200. 
Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 200] 



42-91 



AGE AND SEX 




TOTAL 


1HITE 


NON WHITE 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 

STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


TOTALt ALL AGES .... 


2 382 594 
294 890 
284 221 
270 751 
228 511 
168 314 
148 035 
149 278 
157 514 
141 662 

130 594 
106 653 
88 026 
66 966 
60 044 
41 637 
45 498 

1 266 476 
147 179 
23.4 

1 175 672 
149 321 
144 000 
137 827 
120 933 
88 468 
71 608 
71 742 
75 665 
69 228 

63 116 
51 259 
40 510 
29 856 
26 495 
17 719 
17 923 

603 584 
62 137 
22.0 

1 206 922 
145 569 
140 221 
132 924 
107 578 
79 846 
76 427 
77 536 
81 849 
72 434 

67 476 
55 394 

47 516 
37 110 
33 549 
23 918 
27 575 

662 892 
85 042 
24.8 

100.0 
12.4 
11.9 
11.4 
9.6 
7.1 
6.2 
6.3 
6.6 
5.9 

5.5 
4.5 
3.7 
2.8 
2.5 
1.7 
1.9 

53.2 

6.2 


981 386 
118 356 
108 383 
99 230 
82 423 
71 516 
66 121 
67 215 
70 781 
63 194 

57 731 
47 216 
37 889 
29 172 
25 216 
17 688 
19 255 

557 124 
62 159 
25.8 

467 149 
59 852 
55 120 

49 802 
39 466 
34 082 
31 605 
31 870 
33 552 
30 335 

27 283 
21 948 
16 444 
12 246 
10 069 
6 813 
6 662 

255 564 
23 544 
24.3 

514 237 
58 504 
53 263 

49 428 
42 957 
37 434 
34 516 
35 345 
37 229 
32 859 

30 448 
25 268 
21 445 
16 926 
15 147 
10 875 
12 593 

301 560 
38 615 
27.3 

100.0 

12.1 
11.0 
10.1 
8.4 
7.3 
6.7 
6.8 
7.2 
6.4 

5.9 
4.8 
3.9 
3.0 
2.6 
1.8 
2*0 

56.8 
6.3 


1 050 054 
135 560 
129 992 
122 401 
105 315 
78 184 
67 775 
67 200 
68 355 
59 022 

52 742 
42 116 
34 948 
25 910 
24 423 
17 215 
18 896 

539 614 
60 534 
22.0 

531 478 
68 395 
65 628 
62 555 
59 723 
44 389 
32 995 
33 112 
33 539 
29 601 

26 051 
20 693 
16 537 
11 727 
11 101 
7 556 
7 876 

265 166 
26 533 

21.1 

518 576 
67 165 
64 364 
59 846 
45 592 
33 795 
34 780 
34 088 
34 816 
29 421 

26 691 
21 423 
18 411 
14 183 
13 322 
9 659 
11 020 

274 448 
34 001 
23.3 

100.0 
12,9 
12.4 
11.7 
10.0 
7.4 
6.5 
6.4 
6.5 
5.6 

5.0 
4.0 
3.3 
2.5 
2.3 
1.6 
1.8 

51.4 
5.8 


351 154 
40 974 
45 846 
49 12O 
40 773 
18 614 
14 139 
14 863 
18 378 
19 446 

20 121 
17 321 
15 189 
11 884 
10 405 
6 734 
7 347 

169 738 
24 486 
19,9 

177 045 
21 074 
23 252 
25 470 
21 744 
9 997 
7 008 
6 760 
8 574 
9 292 

9 784 
8 618 
7 529 
5 883 
5 325 
3 350 
3 385 

82 854 
12 060 
19.3 

174 109 
19 900 
22 594 
23 650 
19 029 
8 617 
7 131 
8 103 
9 804 
10 154 

10 337 
8 703 
7 660 
6 001 
5 080 
3 384 
3 962 

86 884 
12 426 
21.1 

100.0 
11.7 
13.1 
14.0 
11,6 
5.3 
4.0 
4.2 
5.2 
5.5 

5,7 
4,9 
4,3 
3.4 
3.0 
1.9 
2.1 

48.3 
7.0 


1 550 632 
170 143 
162 002 
157 841 
140 746 
117 794 
105 858 
107 670 
113 238 
100 006 

90 740 
76 216 
61 240 
47 123 
39 900 
28 359 
31 756 

894 179 
1OO 015 
26.3 

775 070 
86 740 
82 550 
81 097 
75 966 
63 526 
52 370 
53 316 
55 777 
49 789 

44 509 
37 311 
28 651 
21 611 
17 710 
11 959 
12 188 

434 856 
41 857 
24.8 

775 562 
83 403 
79 452 
76 744 
64 780 
54 268 
53 488 
54 354 
57 461 
50 217 

46 231 
38 905 
32 589 
25 512 
22 190 
16 400 
19 568 

459 323 
58 158 
27.7 

100.0 
11.0 
10.4 
10.2 
9.1 
7.6 
6.8 
6.9 
7,3 
6.4 

5,9 
4.9 
3.9 
3.0 
2.6 
1.8 
2.0 

57.7 
6.4 


700 539 
78 629 
70 481 
66 269 
57 351 
54 112 
49 556 
50 854 
53 589 
46 863 

41 930 
35 549 
27 788 
21 759 
18 129 
13 042 
14 618 

415 824 
45 789 
27.4 

337 919 

40 099 
36 091 
33 690 
27 523 
26 143 
24 420 
24 959 
25 982 
23 058 

20 119 
16 840 
12 421 
9 357 
7 275 
4 965 
4 977 

194 975 
17 217 
26.1 

362 620 
38 530 
34 390 
32 599 
29 828 
27 969 
25 136 
25 895 
27 607 
23 805 

21 811 
18 709 
15 367 
12 402 
10 854 
8 077 
9 641 

220 849 
28 572 
28.6 

100.0 
11.2 
10,1 
9.5 
8.2 
7.7 
7.1 
7.3 
7.6 
6.7 

6.0 
5.1 
4,0 
3.1 

2.6 
1.9 

2,1 

59.4 
6,5 


686 267 
79 072 
75 436 
72 337 

66 511 
55 687 
49 522 
49 148 
49 844 
42 017 

36 942 
29 652 
23 838 

17 736 
15 333 

11 035 
12 157 

381 035 
38 525 
24,5 

354 500 
40 320 
38 398 
37 444 
39 191 
32 959 
24 508 
24 701 
24 990 
21 475 

18 559 
14 945 
11 582 
8 391 
7 092 
4 922 
5 023 

191 901 
17 037 
23.3 

331 767 
38 752 
37 038 
34 893 
27 320 
22 728 
25 014 
24 447 
24 854 
20 542 

18 383 
14 707 
12 256 
9 345 
8 241 
6 113 
7 134 

189 134 
21 488 
26.0 

100,0 
11.5 
11.0 
10,5 
9.7 
8.1 
7.2 
7.2 
7.3 
6.1 

5.4 
4.3 
3.5 
2.6 
2.2 
1.6 
1.8 

55.5 
5.6 


163 826 
12 442 
16 085 
19 215 
16 884 
7 995 
6 780 
7 668 
9 805 
11 126 

11 868 
11 015 
9 614 
7 628 
6 438 
4 282 
4 981 

97 320 
15 701 
31.6 

82 651 
6 321 
8 061 
9 963 
9 252 
4 424 
3 442 
3 656 
4 805 
5 256 

5 831 
5 526 
4 648 
3 863 
3 343 
2 072 
2 188 

47 980 
7 603 
29.8 

81 175 
6 121 
8 024 
9 252 
7 632 
3 571 
3 338 
4 012 
5 000 
5 870 

6 037 
5 489 

4 966 
3 765 
3 095 
2 210 
2 793 

49 340 
8 098 
33.3 

100.0 
7.6 
9.8 
11.7 
10.3 
4,9 
4.1 
4.7 
6.0 
6.8 

7.2 
6.7 
5.9 
4.7 
3.9 
2.6 
3.0 

59.4 
9.6 


831 962 
124 747 
122 219 
112 910 
87 765 
50 520 
42 177 
41 608 
44 276 
41 656 

39 854 
30 437 
26 786 
19 843 
20 144 
13 278 
13 742 

372 297 
47 164 
18.2 

400 602 
62 581 

61 450 
56 730 
44 967 
24 942 
19 23B 
18 426 
19 888 
19 439 

18 609 
13 948 
11 859 
8 245 
8 785 
5 760 
5 735 

168 728 
20 280 
17.2 

431 360 
62 166 
60 769 
56 180 
42 798 
25 578 
22 939 
23 182 
24 388 
22 217 

21 245 
16 489 
14 927 
11 598 
11 359 
7 518 
8 007 

203 569 
26 884 
19.3 

100.0 
15.0 
14.7 
13*6 
10.5 
6.1 
5.1 
5.0 
5.3 
5.0 

4.8 
3.7 
3.2 

2,4 
2,4 
1,6 
1.7 

44.7 
5.7 


280 847 
39 727 
37 902 
32 941 
25 072 
17 404 
16 565 
16 361 
17 192 
16 331 

15 $01 
11 667 
10 101 
7 413 
7 087 
4 646 
4 637 

141 300 
16 370 

21,4 

129 230 

19 753 
19 029 
16 112 
11 943 
7 939 
7 185 
6 911 
7 570 
7 277 

7 164 
5 108 
4 023 
2 889 
2 794 
1 848 
1 685 

60 589 
6 327 

19,1 

151 617 
19 974 
18 873 
16 829 
13 129 
9 465 
9 380 
9 450 
9 622 
9 054 

8 637 
6 559 
6 078 
4 524 
4 293 
2 798 
2 952 

80 711 
10 043 
23.7 

100.0 
14.1 
13.5 
11.7 
8.9 
6.2 
5.9 
5.8 
6.1 
5.8 

5.6 
4.2 
3.6 

2.6 

2.5 
1.7 
1.7 

50.3 
5.8 


363 787 
56 488 
54 556 
50 064 
38 804 
22 497 
18 253 
18 052 
18 511 
17 005 

15 800 
12 464 
11 110 
8 174 
9 090 
6 180 
6 739 

158 579 
22 009 
17.7 

176 978 
28 075 
27 230 
25 111 
20 532 
11 430 
8 487 
8 411 
8 549 
8 126 

7 492 
5 748 
4 955 
3 336 
4 009 
2 634 
2 853 

73 265 
9 496 
17.0 

186 809 
28 413 
27 326 
24 953 
18 272 
11 067 
9 766 
9 641 
9 962 
8 879 

8 308 
6 716 
6 155 
4 838 
5 081 
3 546 
3 886 

85 314 
12 513 
18.5 

100.0 
15.5 
15,0 
13.8 
10.7 
6.2 
5.0 
5.0 
5.1 
4.7 

4.3 
3.4 
3.1 
2.2 

2.5 
1.7 
1.9 

43.6 
6.0 


187 328 
28 532 
29 761 
29 905 
23 889 
10 619 
7 359 
7 195 
8 573 
8 320 

8 253 
6 306 
5 575 
4 256 
3 967 
2 452 
2 366 

72 418 
8 785 
16.1 

94 394 
14 753 
15 191 
15 507 
12 492 
5 573 
3 566 
3 104 
3 769 
4 036 

3 953 

3 092 
2 881 
2 020 
1 982 
1 278 
1 197 

34 674 
4 457 
15.7 

92 934 

13 779 
14 570 
14 398 
11 397 
5 046 
3 793 
4 091 
4 804 
4 284 

4 300 

3 214 
2 694 
2 236 
1 985 
1 174 
1 169 

37 544 
4 328 
16.6 

100.0 
15.2 
15.9 
16.0 
12.8 
5.7 
3.9 
3.8 
4.6 
4.4 

4.4 
3.4 
3.0 
2.3 

2.1 

1.3 
1.3 

38.7 
4.7 






























75 YFARS AND OVER ...... 






















35 TO 39 YEARS. 




























































PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 
TOTAL f ALL AGES .... 





































42-92 



South Carolina 



Table 37. AGE BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 Con. 

ISee text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is less than 200. 
Males per 100 females not shown where number of females is less than 200] 







TOTA 








WHITE 








NONWHI1 


PE 






THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 
CON. 


100 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 




12.7 


12.8 


12.9 


11.9 


11.2 


11.9 


11.4 


7.6 


15.6 


15.3 


15.9 


15.6 


5 TO 9 YEARS. 


12.2 


11.8 


12.3 


13.1 


10.7 


10.7 


10.8 


9.8 


15.3 


14.7 


15.4 


16.1 




11.7 


10.7 


11.8 


14*4 


10,5 


10.0 


10.6 


12.1 


14.2 


12.5 


14.2 


16.4 




10.3 


8.4 


11.2 


12.3 


9.8 


8.1 


11.1 


11.2 


11.2 


9*2 


11.6 


13.2 




7.5 


7.3 


8.4 


5.6 


8.2 


7.7 


9.3 


5.4 


6.2 


6.1 


6.5 


5.9 




6.1 


6.8 


6.2 


4.0 


6.8 


7.2 


6.9 


4.2 


4.8 


5.6 


4.8 


3.8 




6.1 


6.8 


6.2 


3*8 


6.9 


7.4 


7.0 


4.4 


4.6 


5.3 


4.8 


3.3 




6.4 


7.2 


6.3 


4.8 


7.2 


7.7 


7.0 


5.8 


5.0 


5.9 


4.8 


4.0 




5.9 


6.5 


5.6 


5.2 


6.4 


6.8 


6. 1 


6.4 


4.9 


5.6 


4.6 


4.3 




5.4 


5.8 


4.9 


5*5 


5.7 


6.0 


5.2 


7.1 


4.6 


5.5 


4.2 


4.2 




4 4 


4.7 


3.9 


4.9 


4.8 


5.0 


4.2 


6.7 


3.5 


4.0 


3.2 


3.3 




3.4 


3.5 


3. 1 


4.3 


3.7 


3.7 


3.3 


5.6 


3*0 


3.1 


2.8 


3.1 




2 5 


2.6 


2.2 


3.3 


2.8 


2.8 


2.4 


4.7 


2,1 


2.2 


1.9 


2.1 




2.3 


2.2 


2.1 


3.0 


2.3 


2.2 


2.0 


4.0 


2.2 


2.2 


2.3 


2.1 




1 5 


1.5 


1.4 


1.9 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


2.5 


1.4 


1.4 


1.5 


1.4 




1.5 


1.4 


1.5 


1.9 


1.6 


1.5 


1.4 


2.6 


1.4 


1.3 


1.6 


1.3 




51 3 


54 7 


49 9 


46.8 


56. 1 


57 7 


54. 1 


58. 1 


42. 1 


46.9 


41.4 


36.9 




5^ 


5 


5 


6*8 


5.4 


5 1 


4.8 


9.2 


5.1 


4.9 


5.4 


4.7 




100*0 


100.0 


100. 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 




12 1 


11.4 


13.0 


11 .4 


10.8 


10.6 


11.7 


7.5 


14*4 


13.2 


15.2 


14.8 




11 6 


10.4 


12.4 


13*0 


10.2 


9.5 


11.2 


9.9 


14. 1 


12.4 


14.6 


15.7 




11 


9.6 


11.5 


13.6 


9.9 


9 


10.5 


11.4 


13.0 


11.1 


13.4 


15.5 




8.9 


8*4 


8.8 


10.9 


8.4 


8.2 


8.2 


9.4 


9*9 


8.7 


9.8 


12.3 




6*6 


7.3 


6.5 


4.9 


7.0 


7,7 


6.9 


4.4 


5.9 


6.2 


5.9 


5.4 




6.3 


6*7 


6.7 


4.1 


6.9 


6.9 


7.5 


4. 1 


5.3 


6.2 


5.2 


4.1 




'6.4 


6.9 


6.6 


4.7 


7.0 


7. 1 


7.4 


4.9 


5.4 


6.2 


5.2 


4.4 






7 2 


6- 


5 6 








69 




6.3 


5 


59 




6.0 


6.4 


5.7 


5.8 


6.5 


6.6 


6.2 


7. 2 


5.2 


6.0 


4.8 


4.6 




5 6 


5*9 


5.1 


5.9 


6.0 


6 


5 5 


7 4 


4.9 


5*7 


4.4 


4.6 




4 6 


4*9 


4.1 


5.0 


5.0 


5 2 


4 4 


6 8 


3.8 


4*3 


3.6 


3.5 




3 9 


4*2 


3 6 


4.4 


42 


40 


3f 


6 1 


3 5 


4.0 


3.3 


20 




2 


3*3 


2 7 


3.4 


3 3 


3n 


2Q 


4 


2f 


3.0 


2 6 


2 4 




2*8 


2*9 


2.6 


2.9 


2.9 


3 


2 5 


3 8 


2.6 


2*8 


2,7 


2.1 




2 


2* 1 


1 9 


1*9 


2 1 


29 




2 




1 ft 


1Q 


Iij 




2.3 


2*4 


2. 1 


2.3 


2.5 


2 7 


2 2 


3 4 


1Q 


1.9 


2.1 


13 




54 9 


58.6 


52.9 


49.9 


59 2 


An o 


57 


60 8 


17 9 


53 .2 


45 7 


40 .4 




7 


7 5 




7 i 


7E 
















MALES PER 100 FEMALES 


97*4 


90*8 


102*5 


101.7 


OO O 


O 








QE ,. 9 








102.6 


102*3 


101.8 


105.9 


104 


lOil 1 




1 Q1 H 




on o 






5 TO 9 YEARS 


102.7 


103*5 


102.0 


102.9 


103 9 


1O4L O 




1 OO S 




i nn a 




m- 




103 7 


100 8 




1 fl7 7 




















112.4 


91*9 


131.0 


114.3 


1 17 3 


O9 *3 




191 9 












110.8 


91*0 


131.3 


1 16 .0 


mi 


Q** 5 
















93 7 


91 *6 


94 9 


98 3 


OT o 


















92.5 


90*2 


97 * 1 


83 4 


OQ i 


OA Jl 
















92 4 


90. 1 


96 3 


87 .5 


Q7 1 


















95.6 


92*3 


100 6 


91 5 


OO 1 


















93.5 


89*6 


97 6 


94 7 


QfL 


















92 5 


86 9 


OA A 


oo n 










87*6 










85 3 


76.7 


89 8 


98 3 










84.6 


77.9 


85.6 




60 TO 64 YEARS. .... 


80 5 


7i2 4 


09 7 


98 


ftll M 


















79.0 


66.5 


83.3 


104.8 


79.8 


67.0 


86.1 


108*0 


71*1 
77.3 


65.1 


69.0 
78.9 


99.8 




74.1 
65 


62.6 
52*9 


78.2 
71 5 


99.0 

QE ii 


72.9 


61.5 


80.5 


93.8 


76.6 


66.0 


74.3 


108.9 




91.1 


84.7 


96 6 


QB n 


Qll 7 








71.6 


57.1 


73.4 






73 1 


61*0 


7A O 


Q7 1 










82.9 


75. 1 


85.9 


















79.3 


93.9 


75.4 


63.0 


75.9 


103.0 



Table 38. NATIVITY AND PARENTAGE, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200] 



NATIVITY! PARENTAGE! 
AND COLOR 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 




2 382 594 
2 371 454 
2 345 025 
26 429 
11 140 

1 550 632 
1 540 289 
1 514 355 
25 934 
10 343 

831 962 
831 165 
830 670 
495 
797 


981 386 
974 176 
957 207 
16 969 
7 210 

700 539 
693 845 
677 079 
16 766 
6 694 

280 847 
280 331 
280 128 
203 
516 


1 050 054 
1 046 306 
1 037 362 
8 944 
3 748 

686 267 
682 779 
674 093 
8 686 
3 488 

363 787 
363 527 
363 269 
258 

260 


351 154 
350 972 
350 456 

, 516 
182 

163 826 
163 665 
163 183 
482 
161 

187 328 
187 307 
187 273 
34 
21 


100.0 
99.5 
98.4 
1.1 
0.5 

100.0 
99.3 
97.7 
1.7 
0.7 

100.0 
99.9 
99.8 
0.1 
0.1 


100.0 
99.3 
97.5 
1.7 
0.7 

100.0 
99.0 
96.7 
2.4 
1.0 

100.0 
99.8 
99.7 
0.1 
0.2 


100.0 
99.6 
98.8 
0.9 
0.4 

100.0 
99.5 
98.2 
1.3 

0.5 

100.0 
99.9 
99.9 
0.1 
0.1 


100.0 
99.9 
99.8 
0.1 
0.1 

100.0 
99.9 
99.6 
0.3 
0.1 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
... 
... 














FOREIGN OR MIXED PARENTAGE. .... 

















General Social and Economic Characteristics 



42-93 



Table 39. STATE OF BIRTH OF THE NATIVE POPULATION, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, 1960, 

AND FOR THE STATE, 1900 TO 1950 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960 or 500 in 1950] 



AREA* CENSUS YEARi 
AND COLOR 




BORN IN THE UNITED STATES 




PERCENT OF TOTAL 




TOTAL 
NATIVE 
POPU- 
LATION 


IN STATE 
OF 
RESIDENCE 


IN 
DIFFERENT 
STATE 


STATE OF 
BIRTH NOT 
REPORTED 


BORN IN 
U.S. 
OUTLYING 
AREA* 
AT SEA. 
ETC.* 




BORN IN THE UNITED STATES 


ORN IN 
U.S. 
OUTLYING 
AREA* 
AT SEAf 
ETC. 


TOTAL 
NATIVE 
POPU- 
LATION 


N STATE 
OF 
ESIDENCE 


IN 
IFFERENT 
STATE 


TATE OF 
IRTH NOT 
EPORTED 


ALL CLASSES 


2 371 454 
974 176 
1 397 278 
1 046 306 
350 972 
2 107 235 
1 894 825 
1 733 407 
1 677 142 
1 509 221 
1 334 788 

1 540 289 
693 845 
846 444 
682 779 
163665 
1 282 720 
1 079 393 

812 137 
673 107 
552 436 

831 165 
280 331 
550 834 
363 527 
187 307 
824 515 
615 432 

865 005 
836 114 
7B2 352 


1 964 914 
755 003 
1 209 911 
876 359 
333 552 
1 852 230 
1 727 268 
1 596 032 
1 565 791 
1 431 028 
1 279 572 

1 178 927 
496 445 
682 482 
530 960 
151 522 
1 058 470 
931 560 

718 524 
609 677 
511 887 

785 987 
258 558 
527 429 
345 399 
182 030 
793 760 
795 708 

847 267 
821 351 
767 685 


362 550 
193 247 
169 303 
154 362 
14 941 
235 990 
165 378 
136 243 
109 369 
76 996 
54 518 

331 510 
179 926 
151 584 
140 730 
10 854 
214 600 
146 162 

92 445 
62 878 
40 219 

31 040 
13 321 

17 719 
13 632 
4 087 
21 390 
19 216 

16 924 
14 118 
14 299 


39 365 
23 593 

15 772 
13 366 
2 406 
18 025 
1 806 
802 
1 707 
1 108 
634 

25 548 
15 311 
10 237 
9 002 
1 235 
8 815 
1 320 

961 

476 
271 

13 817 
8 282 
5 535 
4 364 
1 171 
9 210 
486 
* 
746 
632 
363 


4 625 
2 333 

2 292 
2 219 

73 
990 
373 
330 
275 
89 
64 

4 304 
2 163 
2 141 
2 087 
54 
835 
351 
* * 
207 
76 
59 

321 
170 
151 

132 
19 
155 
22 

*68 
13 

2 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100,0 
100,0 
100.0 
100.0 
10O.O 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
10O.O 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.O 

loolo 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


82.9 
77.5 
86.6 
83.8 
95.0 
87.9 
91.2 
92.1 
93.4 
94.8 
95.9 

76.5 
71.5 
80.6 
77.8 
92.6 
82.5 
86.3 

SB*. 5 
90.6 
92.7 

94.6 
92.2 

95.8 
95.0 
97.2 
96.3 
97.6 

97.9 
98.2 
98.1 


15.3 
19.8 
12.1 
14.8 
4.3 
11.2 
8.7 
7.9 
6*5 
5.1 
4.1 

21.5 
25.9 

17.9 
20.6 
6.6 
16.7 
13.5 
* 
11.4 
9.3 
7.3 

3.7 
4.8 
3.2 

3.7 
2.2 
2.6 
2.4 
. . 
2.0 
1.7 
1.8 


1.7 
2.4 
1.1 
1.3 

0*7 
0.9 
0.1 

... 
0.1 
0.1 

* . 

1.7 
2*2 

1.2 
1.3 
0.8 
0*7 
0.1 
* 
0*1 
0.1 

* . 

1.7 
3.0 
1.0 
1.2 
0.6 
1.1 
0.1 

6.1 
0.1 


0.2 
0*2 
0.2 
0.2 

... 
t 
. * . 

. * . 
. * . 

0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
. 
0.1 

. * 
... 

... 
. 

... 
0.1 

. 

. 
* 




t . 






















WHITE 










1940 
1930*. * 


NONWHITE 






1940 * 
1930 


1 INCLUDES PERSONS BORN ABROAD OF AMERICAN PARENTS. PRIOR TO 1960, INCLUDES PERSONS BORN IN ALASKA AND HAWAII. 
a DATA NOT AVAILABLE. 



Table 40 -COUNTRY OF ORIGIN OF THE FOREIGN STOCK, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, 1960, 
Table ^'^ UmUU FOREIGN WHITE STOCK, FOR THE STATE, 1950 AND 1940 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1] 





FOREIGN STOCK i 1960 


FOREIGN WHITE STOCK 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


COUNTRY OF ORIGIN 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


1950 




FOREIGN STOCK* I960 


WHITE STOCK 


1940 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


1950 


1940 




37 569 
6 178 
1 641 
450 
645 
326 
390 
193 
960 

6 471 
2 038 
614 
946 
474 
199 
1 920 
272 
136 
167 
1 939 
2 274 
146 
683 

2 793 
5 654 
349 
1 056 
509 
146 


24 179 
3 887 
1 047 
276 
340 
169 
216 
124 
580 

4 292 
1 469 
386 
553 
299 
114 
1 528 
169 
70 
116 
1 587 
1 316 
77 
430 

1 794 
2239 
177 
513 

315 
96 


12 692 
2 096 
561 
169 
272 
157 
170 
65 
372 

2 086 
540 
205 
362 
167 
85 
380 
100 
62 
51 
325 
942 
60 
229 

938 
1 368 
172 
518 
194 
46 


698 
195 
33 

5 
33 
... 

4 
4 

8 

93 
29 
23 
31 
8 
... 
12 

n 


27 
16 
9 
24 

61 
47 
. 
25 
. . 
l 


24 148 
3 513 
1 457 
250 
428 
176 
172 
150 
506 

3 666 
1 508 
248 
517 
265 
74 
1 819 
158 
80 
105 
1 827 
1 453 
37 
625 

1 618 
1 747 
103 


15 895 
2 209 
1 032 
97 
302 
185 
24 
23 
347 

2 710 
1 025 
64 
284 
192 
52 
1 316 
122 
40 
47 
1 553 
635 

29; 

1 224 
799 
39 
17 
1 11 
. 


100.0 
16.4 
4.4 
1.2 
1.7 
0.9 
1.0 
0.5 
2.6 

17.2 
5*4 
1.6 
2.5 
1.3 
0.5 
5.1 
0*7 
0.4 
0.4 
5.2 
6.1 
0.4 
1.8 

7.4 
9.7 

0.9 
2.8 
1.4 
0.4 


10O.O 
16.1 
4.3 
1.1 
1.4 
0.7 
0.9 
0.5 
2.4 

17.8 
6.1 
1.6 
2.3 

1.2 
0.5 
6.3 

0.7 
0.3 
0.5 
6.6 
5.4 
0.3 
1.8 

7.4 
9.3 
0.7 
2.1 


100.0 
16.5 
4.4 
1.3 
2.1 
1.2 
1.3 
0.5 
2.9 

16.4 
4.3 
1.6 
2.9 
1.3 
0.7 
3.0 
0.8 
0.5 
0.4 
2.6 
7.4 
0.5 
1.8 

" 7.4 
10.8 
1.4 
4.1 


100.0 
27.9 
4.7 
0.7 
4.7 
* 
0.6 
0.6 
1*1 

13.3 
4.2 
3.3 

4.4 
1.1 
. 

1.7 
0.4 
0.6 

3l9 

2,3 

1*3 
3.4 

8.7 
6.7 

3.6 

0.6 


100.0 
14.5 
6.0 
1.0 
1.8 
0.7 
0.7 
0.6 
2.1 

15.2 
6.2 
1.0 
2.1 
1.1 
0.3 
7.5 
0.7 
0.3 
0.4 
7*6 
6*0 
0.2 
2*6 

6.7 


100.0 
13.9 
6.5 
0.6 
1.9 
1.2 
0.2 
0.1 
2.2 

17.0 
6.4 
0.4 
1*8 
1.2 
0.3 
8.3 
0.8 
0.3 
0.3 
9.8 
4.0 
... 

l.e 

7.7 
5.0 

0.2 
1.1 
7.0 












GERMANY ... 
POLAND. ... 
CZECHOSLOVAKIA 


HUNGARY . . - 
YUGOSLAVIA. 
U.S.S.R.. . * 


FINLAND ... 
RUMANIA ... 
GREECE. ... 
ITALY .... 




7*2 

0.4 
1.5 


CANADA" .....* 


OTHER AMERICA 
ALL OTHER . . . 


1 273 


1.; 


1.5 
0.4 


5.3 

. . 


0.4 













1 INCLUDES TURKEY IN EUROPE. 



8 INCLUDES NEWFOUNDLAND. 



42-94 



South Carolina 



Table 41. MOTHER TONGUE OF THE FOREIGN BORN, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, 1960, 
AND OF THE FOREIGN-BORN WHITE, FOR THE STATE, 1910 TO 1940 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960] 



MOTHER TONGUE 


FOREIGN BORN? 1960 


FOREIGN-BORN WHITE 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 


FOREIGN BORNi 1960 


FOREIGN-BORN WHITE 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NON- 
FARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


1940 


1930 


1920 


1910 




11 140 
3 648 
76 
65 
40 
131 
529 

2 088 
204 
60 
18 
111 
29 
... 
189 
33 
29 
23 
18 
301 

778 
261 
355 

16 

303 
90 
250 
419 
1 076 


7 210 
2 127 
36 
35 
16 
72 
316 

1 340 
149 
33 

11 
76 

25 

145 
29 
17 
15 
14 
279 

693 
167 
202 
8 

129 
51 
212 
321 
692 


3 748 
1 451 
40 
20 
24 
59 
213 

733 
37 
23 
7 
35 
4 
... 
44 
4 
12 

a 

4 
22 

73 

90 
153 
4 

165 
39 
38 
94 
352 


182 
70 
... 

10 
. 
. . 
. . 

15 
18 
4 
. 
. . . 
. . 
. 
. 
. . 

... 
. . 
. . 

12 
4 
... 

4 

9 
... 

... 
4 
32 


4 480 
1 400 

160 
20 
20 
120 

620 
180 
20 

180 
... 

20 

640 

560 
100 
20 

CM 
CM 
260 
20 
140 


5 269 
1 237 
66 
117 
39 
23 
135 

879 
176 
26 
9 
25 
11 
4 
269 
4 
9 
22 
13 
730 

730 
185 
47 
6 

CM 
<M 
407 

51 
49 


6 401 
1 422 
84 
138 
77 
44 
117 

1 235 
315 
57 
12 
38 
13 
10 
518 
CM 
14 
41 
12 
772 

599 

345 
57 

7 

(1) 
<*> 
417 
52 
5 


6 054 
1 666 
81 
96 
51 
30 
122 

1 756 
233 
45 
4 
21 
1 


100,0 
32.7 
0.7 
0.6 
0.4 
1.2 
4.7 

18.7 
1.8 
0.5 
0.2 
1.0 
0.3 


100.0 
29.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.2 
1.0 
4.4 

18.6 
2.1 
0.5 
0.2 
1.1 
0.3 


100.0 
38.7 
1.1 
0.5 
0.6 
1.6 
5.7 

19.6 
1.0 
0.6 
0.2 

0.9 
0.1 


< 

. . 
. 







. 
. 

. . 


100.0 
31.3 

3.'6 

0.4 
0.4 
2.7 

13.8 
4.0 
0.4 

... 


100.0 
23.5 
1.3 
2,2 

0.7 
0.4 
2.6 

16.7 
3.3 

0.5 
0.2 
0.5 
0.2 
0.1 
5.1 


100.0 
22.2 
1.3 

2.2 

1.2 
0.7 
1.8 

19.3 
4.9 
0.9 
0.2 
0.6 
0.2 
0.2 
8.1 


100.0 
27.5 
1*3 
1.6 
0.8 
0.5 
2.0 

29.0 
3.8 
0.7 
0.1 
0.3 
. . 
... 
0.7 










DUTCH, ...... 




GERMAN * 










SERBO-CROATIAN . 




43 


1.7 


2.0 


1.2 


. . 


4.0 


LITHUANIAN .... 


7 
42 
7 
270 

308 
316 
25 
2 

<M 
{*) 
247 
79 
602 


0.3 
0.2 
0.2 
2.7 

7.0 
2.3 
3.2 

0.1 

2.7 
0.8 
2.2 
3.8 
9,7 


0.2 
0*2 
0.2 
3.9 

9.6 
2.3 

2.8 

0.1 

1.8 
0.7 
2.9 
4.5 
9.6 


0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.6 

1.9 
2.4 
4.1 
0.1 

4.4 
1.0 
1.0 
2.5 

9.4 


. 

. . 
. 

. 

. 


0.4 
... 

... 
14.3 

12.5 
2.2 

0.4 

U) 
(1) 
5.8 
0.4 
3.1 


0.2 
0.4 
0.2 
13,9 

13.9 
3.5 

0.9 
0.1 

(1) 
CM 
7.7 
1.0 
0.9 


0.2 
0.6 
0.2 
12.1 

9.4 
5.4 
0.9 
0.1 

(1) 
CM 
6.5 
0.8 
0.1 


0.1 
0.7 
0.1 
4.5 

5.1 
5.2 

0.4 

... 

(1) 
<M 
4.1 
1.3 
9.9 






GREEK. 






PORTUGUESE . . . 




ARABIC 




NOT REPORTED . . . 



NOT AVAILABLE. 



Table 42. RESIDENCE FIVE YEARS PRIOR TO CENSUS DATE, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, 1960 

AND FOR THE STATE, 1940 

, [See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than. 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960] 



RESIDENCE 5 YEARS PRIOR TO 
CENSUS DATE AND COLOR 


1960 


1940 1 
THE 
STATE 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


1960 


1940f 
THE 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


STATE 


TOTAL 
POPULATION 5 YEARS OLD AND OVER. 


2 087 704 
1 060 843 
986 865 
682 335 
304 530 
136 683 
167 847 
17 381 
22 615 

1 380 489 
652 625 
695 930 
429 759 
266 171 
113 144 
153 027 
16 028 
15 906 

707 215 
406 218 
290 935 
252 576 
38 359 
23 539 
14 820 
1 353 
6 709 


863 030 
403 097 
436 910 
289 954 
146 956 
64 538 
82 418 
9 314 
13 709 

621 910 
272 354 
331 238 
197 773 
133 465 
56 815 
76 650 
8 500 
9 818 

241 120 
130 743 
105 672 
92 181 
13 491 
7 723 
5 768 
814 
3 891 


914 494 
453 130 
445 700 
303 696 
142 004 
61 299 
80 705 
7 901 
7 763 

607 195 
271 176 
323 147 
199 157 
123 990 
50 514 
73 476 
7 395 
5 477 

307 299 
181 954 
122 553 
104 539 
18 014 
10 785 
7 229 
506 
2 286 


310 180 
204 616 
104 255 
88 685 
15 570 
10 846 
4 724 
166 
1 143 

151 384 
109 095 
41 545 
32 829 
8 716 
5 815 
2 901 
133 
611 

158 796 
95 521 
62 710 
55 856 
6 854 
5 031 
1 823 
33 
532 


1 689 144 
CM 
CM 

(1) 
a !69 377 

a !03 761 
65 616 
1 058 
12 514 

976 568 
CM 
CM 

(1) 
a !33 281 

277 121 
56 160 
1 044 
7 163 

712 576 
CM 
(i) 

(1) 
a 36 096 
3 26 640 
9 456 
14 
5 351 


100.0 
50.8 
47.3 
32,7 
14.6 
6.5 
8.0 
0.8 
1.1 

100.0 
47.3 
50.4 
31.1 
19.3 
8.2 
11.1 
1.2 
1.2 

100.0 
57.7 
41,1 
35,7 
5.4 
3.3 
2.1 
0.2 
0.9 


100.0 
46.7 
50.6 
33.6 

17.0 
7.5 
9.5 
1*1 
1.6 

100.0 
43.8 
53.3 

31.8 
21.5 
9.1 
12.3 
1.4 
1.6 

100.0 
54.2 
43.8 
38.2 
5.6 
3.2 
2.4 
0.3 
1.6 


100.0 
49.5 
48.7 
33.2 

15.5 
6,7 
8.8 
0.9 
0.8 

100*0 
44.7 
53.2 
32.8 
20.4 
8.3 
12.1 
1.2 
0.9 

100,0 
59.2 
39.9 
34.0 
5.9 
3.5 
2.4 
0.2 
0.7 


100.0 
66.0 
33.6 
28.6 
5.0 
3.5 
1.5 
0.1 
0.4 

100.0 
72.1 
27.4 
21.7 
5.8 
3.8 
1.9 
0.1 
0.4 

100.0 
60.2 
39.5 
35.2 
4.3 
3.2 
1.1 

o!3 


100.0 
CM 
CM 
CM 
310.0 
a 6.1 
3.9 
0.1 
0.7 

100.0 
CD 
(*) 
(1) 
a !3.6 
37.9 
5.8 
0.1 
0.7 

100.0 
<l) 
<U 

a <- 1 - ) 
8 5.1 

a 3.7 
1.3 

6!e 














PLACE OF PRIOR RESIDENCE NOT REPORTED 3 . 
WHITE 
POPULATION 5 YEARS OLD AND OVER* . 








ABROAD 

PLACE OF PRIOR RESIDENCE NOT REPORTED* . 

NONWHITE 
POPULATION 5 YEARS OLD AND OVER, . 














PLACE OF PRIOR RESIDENCE NOT REPORTED 8 



A ND 



INCLUDES MOVERS BETWEEN QUASI-COUNTIES. 
I " ERSONS WHO MOVED BUT 



DIFFERENT HOUSE IN THE SAME COUNTY OR QUASI -COUNTY (CITIES OF 100.000 OR MORE 
FOR WHOM PLACE OF RESIDENCE IN 1955 WAS NOT REPORTED. IN 1940, COMPRISES PERSONS FOR WHOM MIGRATION 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 
Table 43. YEAR MOVED INTO PRESENT HOUSE, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown w!u-n le*. th;m 0.1 



42-95 



YEAR MOVED INTO 
PRESENT HOUSE 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


THE 

STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 




2 382 594 
637 702 
250 491 
186 888 
366 630 
288 017 
303 275 
129 813 
219 778 


981 386 
286 068 
109 632 
80 841 
158 897 
119 076 
119 644 
50 602 
56 626 


1 050 054 
291 424 
111 724 
82 858 
160 646 
125 091 
126 905 
47 690 
103 716 


351 154 
60 210 
29 135 
23 189 
47 087 
43 850 
56 726 
31 521 
59 436 


100.0 
26.8 
10.5 
7.8 
15*4 
12.1 
12.7 
5*4 
9.2 


100*0 
29.1 
11.2 
8.2 
16.2 
12.1 
12.2 
5.2 
5.8 


100.0 
27.8 
10.6 
7.9 
15.3 
11.9 
12.1 
4.5 
9.9 


100.0 
17.1 
8.3 

6.6 

13.4 
12.5 
16.2 
9.0 
16.9 











Table 44. SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, BY AGE, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 2001 



I960 



AGE 


THE STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL NONFARM 


RURAL FARM 


POPU- 
LATION 


ENROLLED IN 
SCHOOL 


POPU- 
LATION 


ENROLLED IN 
SCHOOL 


POPU- 


ENROLLED IN 
SCHOOL 


POPU- 


ENROLLED IN 
SCHOOL 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 


LATION 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 


LATION 


NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 


TOTAL? 5 TO 34 YEARS OLD . 
5 AND 6 YEARS OLD. 


1 249 110 
118 306 
390 042 
93 826 
95 973 
85 336 
72 724 
95 590 
297 313 


625 929 
50 502 
370 981 
81 257 
66 212 
31 029 
12 208 
6 281 
7 459 


50.1 
42.7 
95.1 
86.6 
69.0 
36.4 
16.8 
6,6 
2.5 


494 888 
45 622 
145 999 
32 463 
33 210 
32 742 
30 924 
40 592 
133 336 


245 974 
20 800 
140 457 
28 953 
24 947 
15 069 
7 702 
3 854 
4 192 


49.7 
45*6 
96.2 
89.2 
75.1 
46.0 
24.9 
9.5 
3.1 


570 867 
54 133 
177 202 
41 909 
44 293 
40 171 
33 130 
45 054 
134 975 


274 435 
22 185 
168 315 
35 798 
28 344 
11 590 
3 703 
1 947 
2 553 


48.1 
41.0 
95.0 
85.4 
64*0 
28.9 
11.2 
4.3 
1.9 


183 355 
18 551 
66 841 
19 454 
18 470 
12 423 
8 670 
9 944 
29 002 


105 520 
7 517 
62 209 
16 506 
12 921 
4 370 
803 
480 
714 


57.5 
40.5 
93.1 
84.8 
70.0 
35.2 
9.3 
4.8 
2.5 

















Table 45. SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, BY AGE, FOR THE STATE: 1930 TO I960 

[See text for source of data. Figures for persons enrolled in school include children enrolled in kindergarten. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960, 

500 in 1950, or 100 in earlier years] 







I960 






1950 






1940 






1930 




AGE 


POPU- 

1 ATT ("IN 


ENROLLEC 
SCHOOL 


> IN 


POPU- 


ENROLLEC 
SCHOOL 


3 IN 


POPU- 


ENROLLEC 
SCHOOL 


) IN 


POPU- 


ENROLLEC 
SCHOOL 


> IN 






NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 




NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 




NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 




NUMBER 


PER- 
CENT 


TOTAL t 5 TO 24 YEARS OLD . 


951 797 
118 306 


618 470 
50 502 


65.0 
42.7 


827 595 
100 935 


490 020 
39 380 


59.2 
39 


848 006 
89 047 


452 361 
27 094 


53.3 

30 4 


841 257 
97 063 


434 749 
24 472 


51.7 
25.2 




390 042 


370 981 


95.1 


315 340 


297 230 


94.3 


297 314 


278 613 


93.7 


321 769 


278 155 


86.4 




93 826 


81 257 


86.6 


79 730 


68 400 


85.8 


86 856 


73 117 


84.2 


86 505 


63 859 


73.8 




95 973 


66 212 


69.0 


79 150 


46 420 


KB 


88 880 


47 320 


53 2 


86 710 


40 478 


46.7 




85* 336 


31 029 


36.4 


75 690 


20 455 


27.0 


92 018 


18 472 


20, j. 


82 856 


17 884 


21.6 




72 724 


12 208 


16.8 


70 550 


9 240 


13. 1 


82 280 


5 738 


7.0 


\ 166 354 


9 901 


6.0 




95 590 


6 281 


6.6 


106 200 


8 895 


8.4 


111 611 


2 007 


1.8 









Table 46. SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, BY LEVEL AND TYPE OF SCHOOL, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[Sec text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200] 



LEVEL AND TYPE 
OF SCHOOL 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


TOTAL ENROLLED? 5 TO 
34 YEARS OLD . . . 


625 929 
7 523 
4 343 
57.7 
3 180 
461 497 
452 084 
98.0 
9 413 
128 200 
124 937 
97.5 
3 263 
28 709 


245 974 
4 887 
2 612 
53,4 
2 275 
170 101 
163 438 
96.1 
6 663 
50 415 
48 053 
95.3 
2 362 
20 571 


274 435 
2 412 
1 547 
64.1 
865 
209 984 
207 413 
98.8 
2 571 
54 603 
53 817 
98.6 
786 
7 436 


105 520 
224 
184 
82.1 
40 
81 412 
81 233 
99.8 
179 
23 182 
23 067 
99.5 
115 
702 


375 289 
5 870 
3 135 
53,4 
2 735 
263 809 
255 837 
97.0 
7 972 
81 446 
78 694 
96.6 
2 752 
24 164 


168 662 
3 682 
1 800 
48.9 
1 882 
112 286 
106 589 
94.9 
5 697 
35 604 
33 596 
94.4 
2 008 
17 090 


164 466 
2 054 
1 228 
59.8 
826 
121 598 
119 404 
98.2 
2 194 
34 189 
33 524 
98.1 
665 
6 625 


42 161 
134 
107 

*27 

29 925 
29 844 
99.7 
81 
11 653 
11 574 
99.3 
79 
449 


250 640 
1 653 
1 208 
73.1 
445 
197 688 
196 247 
99.3 
1 441 
46 754 
46 243 
98.9 
511 
4 545 


77 312 

1 205 
812 
67.4 
393 
57 815 
56 849 
98.3 
966 
14 811 
14 457 
97.6 
354 
3 481 


109 969 
358 
319 
89.1 
39 
88 386 
88 009 
99.6 
377 
20 414 
20 293 
99.4 
121 
811 


63 359 
90 

77 

*13 

51 487 
51 389 
99.8 
98 
11 529 
11 493 
99.7 
36 
253 








ELEMENTARY (1 TO 8 YEARS) . . 






HIGH SCHOOL ( 1 TO 4 YEARS). . 









42-96 



South Carolina 



Table 47. YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED BY PERSONS 25 YEARS OLD AND OVER, BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, 

URBAN AND RURAL, I960 AND 1950, AND FOR THE STATE, 1940 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is less than 200 in 1960, 500 in 1950, or 100 in 1940] 



AREA? CENSUS YEAR* 
COLOR* AND SEX 


TOTAUi 
25 YEARS 
OLD AND 
OVER 


YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED 


MEDIAN 
SCHOOL 
YEARS 
COM- 
PLETED 


NONE 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 


HIGH SCHOOL 


COLLEGE 


1 TO 4 


5 AND 6 


7 


8 


1 TO 3 


4 


1 TO 3 


4 OR 
MORE 


1960 


1 135 907 
802 106 
333 801 
535 123 
385 191 
149 932 
600 784 
416 915 
183 869 

501 478 
373 677 
127 801 
228 827 
174 373 
54 454 
272 651 
199 304 
73 347 

634 429 
428 429 
206 000 
306 296 
210 818 
95 478 
328 133 
217 611 
110 522 

478 602 
337 224 
141 378 
230 788 
166 188 
64 600 
247 814 
171 036 
76 778 

155 827 
- 91 205 
64 622 
75 508 
44 630 
30 878 
80 319 
46 575 
33 744 

*1 006 575 
668 085 
338 490 

479 590 
526 985 

413 765 
297 890 
115 875 

189 470 
224 295 

592 810 

370 195 
222 615 

290 120 
302 690 

1 84l"l38 
523 457 
317 681 

408 121 
433 017 


51 584 
17 653 
33 931 

28 357 
9 852 
18 505 
23 227 
7 801 
15 426 

15 577 
5 370 
10 207 
7 812 
2 712 
5 100 
7 765 
2 658 
5 107 

36 007 
12 283 
23 724 
20 545 
7 140 
13 405 
15 462 
5 143 
10 319 

26 310 
9 692 
16 618 
14 613 
5 545 
9 068 
11 697 
4 147 
7 550 

9 697 
2 591 
7 106 
5 932 
1 595 
4 337 
3 765 
996 
2 769 

52 935 
17 315 
35 620 

28 740 
24 195 

14 940 
4 670 
10 270 

7 375 

7 565 

37 995 

12 645 
25 350 

21 365 
16 630 

66 074 
16 407 
49 667 

34 047 
32 027 


179 205 
75 435 
103 770 
96 710 
42 187 
54 523 
82 495 
33 248 
49 247 

58 603 
25 581 
33 022 
29 386 
13 448 
15 938 
29 217 
12 133 
17 084 

120 602 
49 854 
70 748 
67 324 
28 739 
38 585 
53 278 
21 115 
32 163 

86 287 
38 726 
47 561 
47 113 
21 959 
25 154 
39 174 
16 767 
22 407 

34 315 
11 128 
23 187 
20 211 
6 780 
13 431 
14 104 
4 348 
9 756 

222 880 

84 860 
138 020 

117 740 
105 140 

63 750 
25 525 
38 225 

30 955 
32 795 

159 130 
59 335 
99 795 

86 785 
72 345 

225 993 
77 583 
148 410 

118 800 
107 193 


155 784 
90 039 
65 745 
73 671 
45 793 
27 878 
82 113 
44 246 
37 867 

57 046 
33 796 

23 250 
26 308 
16 276 
10 032 
30 738 
17 520 
13 218 

98 738 
56 243 
42 495 
47 363 
29 517 
17 846 
51 375 
26 726 
24 649 

72 519 
44 006 
28 513 
34 627 
22 858 
11 769 
37 892 
21 148 
16 744 

26 219 
12 237 
13 982 
12 736 
6 659 
6 077 
13 483 
5 578 
7 905 

162 645 
91 435 
71 210 

76 355 
86 290 

55 565 

31 810 
23 755 

25 450 
30 115 

107 080 
59 625 
47 455 

50 905 
56 175 

146 746 
83 425 
63 321 

68 805 
77 941 


106 557 
73 051 
33 506 

50 685 
37 306 
13 379 
55 872 
.35 745 
20 127 

40 560 
27 874 
12 686 
19 104 
13 989 
5 115 
21 456 
13 885 
7 571 

65 997 
45 177 
20 820 
31 581 
23 317 
8 264 
34 416 
21 860 
12 556 

49 335 
35 238 
14 097 
23 903 
18 159 
5 744 
25 432 
17 079 
8 353 

16 662 
9 939 
6 723 
7 678 
5 158 
2 520 
8 984 
4 781 
4 203 

98 310 
69 575 
28 735 

46 655 
51 655 

36 440 
25 565 
10 875 

17 055 
19 385 

61 870 
44 010 
17 860 

29 600 
32 270 

87 059 
67 207 
19 852 

42 994 
44 065 


102 034 
74 374 
27 660 
47 298 
36 864 
10 434 
54 736 
37 510 
17 226 

43 427 
31 716 
11 711 
19 658 
15 245 
4 413 
23 769 
16 471 
7 298 

58 607 
42 658 
15 949 
27 640 
21 619 
6 021 
30 967 
21 039 
9 928 

44 099 
33 084 
11 015 
21 038 
16 748 
4 290 
23 061 
16 336 
6 725 

14 508 
9 574 
4 934 
6 602 
4 871 
1 731 
7 906 
4 703 
3 203 

85 735 
66 540 
19 195 

41 520 
44 215 

35 625 
27 050 
8 575 

17 190 
18 435 

50 110 
39 490 
10 620 

24 330 
25 780 

33 600 

27 731 
5 869 

16 777 
16 S23 


195 804 
159 658 
36 146 
86 519 
73 595 
12 924 
109 285 
86 063 
23 222 

90 318 
72 975 
17 343 
39 668 
33 285 
6 383 
50 650 
39 690 
10 960 

105 486 
86 683 
18 803 
46 851 
40 310 
6 541 
58 635 
46 373 
, 12 262 

81 483 
68 100 
13 383 
36 597 
31 807 
4 790 
44 886 
36 293 
8 593 

24 003 
18 583 
5 420 
10 254 
8 503 
1 751 
13 749 
10 080 
3 669 

179 750 
157 870 
21 880 

78 595 
101 155 

81 335 
70 400 
10 935 

35 705 
45 630 

98 415 
87 470 
10 945 

42 890 
55 525 

117 962 
103 650 
14 312 

55 365 

62 5Q7 


193 163 

175 769 
17 394 
80 444 
73 696 
6 748 
112 719 
102 073 
10 646 

100 726 
90 709 
10 017 
41 638 
37 693 
3 945 
59 088 
53 016 
6 072 

92 437 
85 060 
7 377 
38 806 
36 003 
2 803 
53 631 
49 057 
4 574 

74 189 
68 620 
5 569 
31 392 

29 179 
2 213 
42 797 
39 441 
3 356 

18 248 
16 440 
1 808 
7 414 
6 824 
590 
10 834 
9 616 
1 218 

78 130 
72 530 
5 600 

32 150 

45. 980 

48 855 
45 190 
3 665 

20 240 
28 615 

29 275 
27 340 
1 935 

11 910 
17 365 

73 418 
68 509 
4 909 

30 617 
42 aoi 


73 532 
68 014 
5 518 

31 811 
29 584 
2 227 
41 721 
38 430 
3 291 

44 737 
41 449 
3 288 
19 289 
17 918 
1 371 
25 448 
23 531 
1 917 

28 795 
26 565 
2 230 
12 522 
11 666 
856 
16 273 
14 899 
1 374 

22 191 
20 658 
1 533 
9 941 
9 328 
613 
12 250 
11 330 
920 

6 604 
5 907 
697 
2 581 
2 338 
243 
4 023 
3 569 
454 

54 685 
49 035 
5 650 

23 435 

31 250 

33 665 

30 415 
3 250 

14 585 
19 080 

21 020 
18 620 
2 400 

8 850 
12 170 

39 899 
36 625 
3 274 

17 012 
22 flP7 


78 244 
68 113 
10 131 
39 628 
36 314 
3 314 
38 616 
31 799 
6 817 

50 484 
44 207 
6 277 
25 964 
23 807 
2 157 
24 520 
20 400 
4 120 

27 760 
23 906 
3 854 
13 664 
12 507 
1 157 
14 096 
11 399 
2 697 

22 189 
19 100 
3 089 
11 564 
10 605 
959 
10 625 
8 495 
2 130 

5 571 

4 806 
765 
2 100 
1 902 
198 
3 471 
2 904 
567 

54 220 
48 300 
5 920 

24 720 
29 500 

35 640 
31 785 
3 855 

16 660 
18 980 

18 580 
16 515 
2 065 

8 060 
10 520 

39 399 
36 395 
3 004 

17 963 

91 U3A 


8.7 
10.3 
5.9 
8.4 
9.8 
5.1 
9.1 
10.7 
6.4 

10.2 
11.6 
6.8 
9.9 
11.3 
6.2 
10.4 
11.8 
7.2 

7.9 
9.3 

5.4 
7.6 
8.8 
4.6 
8.3 
9.8 
6.0 

8.1 
9.3 
5.5 
7.8 
8.9 
4.7 
8.4 
9.8 
6.0 

7.5 
9.0 
5.3 

6.8 
8.4 
4.3 
8*0 
9.9 
6.1 

7.6 
. 9.0 
4.8 

7.3 
7.9 

8.9 
10.3 
5.7 

8.7 
9.1 

6.8 
8.2 

4.4 

6.3 

7.1 

6.7 
8.5 
3.9 

6.4 

A.O 






























































WHITE* 






flHITE 






















1950 






















WHITE. 








1940 











INCLUDES PERSONS NOT REPORTING ON YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED. 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 



42-97 



Table 47. YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED BY PERSONS 25 YEARS OLD AND OVER, BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, 

URBAN AND RURAL, 1960 AND 1950, AND FOR THE STATE, 1940 Con. 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 ; percent and median not shown where base is teas than 200 in I960, 500 in 1950, or 100 in 1940J 



AREAt CENSUS YEARr 
COLOR t AND SEX 


TOTAL? 
25 YEARS 
OLD AND 
OVER 


YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED 


MEDIAN 
SCHOOL 
YEARS 
COM- 
PLETED 


MONE 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 


HIGH SCHOOL 


COLLEGE 




1 TO H 


5 AND 6 


7 


8 


1 TO 3 


4 


1 TO 3 


4 OR 
MORE 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
10O.O 
10O.O 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
10O.O 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100,0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100,0 
100.0 
100,0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100,0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100,0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 


4.5 
2.2 
10.2 
5.3 
2.6 
12.3 
3.9 
1.9 
8.4 

3.1 
1.4 
8.0 
3.4 
1.6 
9.4 
2.8 
1.3 
7.0 

5.7 
2.9 

11.5 
6.7 
3.4 
14.0 
4.7 
2.4 
9.3 

5.5 
2.9 
11.8 
6.3 
3.3 
14.0 
4.7 
2.4 
9.8 

6.2 
2.8 
11.0 
7.9 
3.6 
14.0 
4.7 
2.1 
8.2 

5.4 
2.6 
10.7 

6.1 

4.7 

3.7 

1.6 
9.1 

4.0 
3.4 

6.5 
3.5 

11.6 

7.5 
5.6 

8.0 
3.2 

15.9 

8.5 
7.5 


15.8 
9.4 
31.1 
18.1 
11.0 
36.4 
13.7 
8.0 
26.8 

11.7 
6.8 
25.8 
12.8 
7.7 
29.3 
10.7 
6.1 
23.3 

19.0 
11.6 
34.3 
22.0 
13.6 
40.4 
16.2 
9.7 
29.1 

18.0 
11.5 
33.6 

20.4 
13.2 
38.9 
15.8 
9.8 
29.2 

22.0 
12.2 
35.9 
26.8 
15.2 
43.5 
17.6 
9.3 
28.9 

22.5 
12.9 
41.6 

25.1 
20.2 

15.7 
8.7 
33.7 

16.7 
14.9 

27.3 
16.3 

45.7 

30.5 
24.2 

27.2 
15.0 
47.5 

29.5 
25.1 


13.7 
11.2 
19.7 
13.8 
11.9 
18.6 
13.7 
10.6 
20.6 

11.4 
9.0 
18.2 
11.5 
9.3 
18.4 
11.3 
8.8 
18. O 

15.6 
13.1 
20.6 
15.5 
14.0 
18,7 
15.7 
12.3 
22.3 

15.2 
13.0 
20.2 
15.0 
13.8 
18.2 
15.3 
12.4 
21.8 

16.8 
13.4 
21.6 
16.9 
14,9 
19.7 
16.6 
12.0 
23.4 

16.4 
13.9 
21.5 

16.2 
16.6 

13.7 
10.9 
20.9 

13.7 
13.7 

18.4 
16.3 
21.7 

17.9 
18.8 

17.7 
16.1 
20.3 

17.1 
18.2 


9.4 
9.1 
10.0 
9.5 
9.7 
6*9 
9.3 
3.6 
10.9 

8.1 
7.5 
9.9 
8.3 
8.0 
9.4 
7.9 
7.0 
10.3 

10.4 
10.5 
10.1 
10.3 
11.1 
8.7 
10.5 
10.0 
11.4 

10.3 
10.4 
10.0 
10.4 
10.9 
8.9 
10.3 
10.0 
1O.9 

10.7 
10.9 
10.4 
10.2 
11.6 
8.2 
11.2 
10.3 
12.5 

9.9 
10.6 
8.7 

9.9 
9.9 

9.0 
8.7 
9.6 

9.2 

8.8 

10.6 
12.1 
8.2 

10.4 
10.8 

10.5 
13.0 
6.4 

10.7 
10.3 


9.0 
9.3 
8.3 
8.8 
9.6 
7.0 
9.1 
9.0 
9.4 

8.7 
8.5 
9*2 
8.6 
8.7 
8.1 
8.7 
8.3 
9,9 

9.2 

10.0 
7.7 
9.0 
10.3 
6.3 
9.4 
9.7 
9*0 

9.2 
9.8 
7.8 
9.1 
10.1 
6.6 
9.3 
9.6 
8.8 

9.3 

10.5 
7.6 
8.7 
10.9 
5.6 
9.8 
10.1 
9.5 

8.7 
10.1 
5.8 

8.8 
8.5 

8.8 
9.3 
7.6 

9.3 

8.4 

8.6 
10.8 
4.9 

8.5 
8.6 

4.0 
5.4 
1.9 

4.2 


17.2 
19.9 
10.8 
16.2 
19.1 
8.6 
lfi.2 
20.6 
12.6 

18.0 
19.5 
13.6 
17.3 
19.1 
11.7 
18.6 
19.9 
14.9 

16*6 
20.2 
9.1 
15.3 
19.1 
6.9 
17.9 
21.3 
11.1 

17.0 
20.2 
9.5 
15.9 
19.1 
7.4 
18.1 
21.2 
11.2 

15.4 
20.4 
8.4 
13.6 
19.1 
5.7 
17.1 
21.6 
1O.9 

18.2 
24.0 
6.6 

16.7 
19.5 

20.0 
24.1 
9.6 

19.3 
20.7 

16.9 
24.0 
5.0 

15.1 
18.6 

14.2 
20.0 
4.6 

13.8 
14.6 


17.0 
21.9 
5.2 
15.0 
19.1 
4.5 
18.8 
24.5 
5.8 

20.1 
24.3 
7.8 
16.2 
21.6 
7.2 
21.7 
26.6 
8.3 

14.6 
19.9 
3.6 
12.7 
17.1 
2.9 
16.3 
22.5 
4.1 

15.5 
20.3 
3.9 
13.6 
17.6 
3.4 
17.3 
23.1 
4.4 

11.7 
18.0 
2.8 
9.8 
15.3 
1.9 
13.5 
20.6 
3.6 

7.9 
11.0 
1.7 

6.8 
8.9 

12.0 
15.5 
3.2 

10.9 
13.0 

5.0 
7.5 
0.9 

4.2 
5.8 

8.8 
13.2 

1.6 

7.6 
10.0 


6.5 
8.5 
1.7 
5.9 
7.7 
1.5 
6.9 
9.2 
1.8 

8.9 
11.1 
2.6 
8.4 
10.3 
2.5 
9.3 
11.8 
2.6 

4,5 
6.2 

1.1 
4.1 
5.5 
0.9 
5.0 
6.8 
1.2 

4.6 
6.1 
1.1 
4.3 
5.6 
0.9 
4.9 
6.6 
1.2 

4.2 
6.5 
1.1 
3.4 
5.2 
0.8 
5.0 
7.7 
1.3 

5.5 

7.5 
1.7 

5.0 
6.0 

8.3 
10.4 
2.9 

7.9 
8.6 

3,6 

5,1 
1.1 

3.1 

4.1 

4.8 
7.1 
1.0 

4.2 
5.4 


6.9 

6.5 
3.0 
7.4 
9.4 
2.2 
6.4 
7.6 
3.7 

10.1 
11.8 
4.9 
11.3 
13.7 
4.0 
9.0 
10.2 
5.6 

4.4 
5.6 
1.9 
4.5 
5.9 
1.2 
4.3 
5.2 
2.4 

4.6 
5.7 
2.2 

5.0 
6.4 
1.5 
4.3 
5.0 
2.8 

3,6 
5.3 

1.2 
2.8 
4.3 
0.6 
4.3 
6.2 
1.7 

5.5 
7.3 
1.8 

5.3 

5.7 

8.8 
10.9 
3.4 

9.0 
8.6 

3.2 

4.5 
0.9 

2.6 
3.5 

4.7 
7.0 
1.0 

4.5 
5.0 


... 
... 
... 

... 
... 

... 
... 

. 

. * 

. . 
. 
. . 

. . 
. 


. . 

.... 
... 
. . 
. . 
. . 
. . 
. . 
.. 
. . 

. . 
. . 
. . 
. . 
* 
* . 
. . 
. 
. . 

... 

... 
... 
... 
... 
... 
... 
... 
... 

... 
' . . 
... 

... 
... 

... 
... 
. * 

... 
. .* 

... 
... 


. . 
... 

. . 
. 
. . * 

... 
. . 


1960 
THE STATE. .... 
























































































NON WHITE .......... 
1950 1 
























NONWHITE 


FEMALE ....... 

1940 1 
THE STATE. 




FEMALE ......* 


3.9 



1 PERCENT BASED ON TOTAL REPORTING. 



42-98 



South Grolina 



Table 48.-VETERAN STATUS OF THE CIVILIAN MALE POPULATION 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER, FOR THE STATE, 

URBAN AND RURAL: I960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1] 



VETERAN STATUS 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARN 


RURAL 
FARM 


MALEt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER * . . 


711 537 
229 341 
41 647 
8 484 
128 744 
22 467 
27 999 
482 196 


292 628 
115 258 
21 465 
5 078 
63 987 
10 438 
14 290 
177 370 


306 677 
94 190 
17 567 
3 059 
53 986 
8 291 
11 287 
212 487 


112 232 
19 893 
2 615 
347 
10 771 
3 738 
2 422 
92 339 


100,0 
32.2 
5,9 
1,2 
18,1 
3.2 
3,9 
67,8 


100,0 
39.4 
7.3 
1,7 
21.9 
3,6 
4,9 
60,6 


100,0 
30.7 
5,7 
. 1,0 
17,6 
2,7 
3,7 
69,3 


100,0 
17.7 
2.3 
0.3 
9.6 
3.3 
2.2 
82.3 




KOREAN WAR AND WORLD WAR II .... 









Table 49.-HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200; population per household not shown where less than 200 persons in households] 



HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIP 
AND COLOR 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


ALL CLASSES 


2 382 594 
2 301 096 
603 551 
453 439 
1 221 348 
22 756 
81 498 

3,81 

1 550 632 
1 485 253 
425 696 
341 796 
705 947 
11 814 
65 379 

3,49 

631 962 
815 843 
177 855 
111 643 
515 401 
10 944 
16 119 

4,59 


981 386 
948 421 
275 032 
196 866 
462 517 
14 006 
32 965 

3.45 

700 539 
672 846 
203 599 
157 270 
304 113 
7 864 
27 693 

3,30 

280 847 
275 575 
71 433 
39 596 
158 404 
6 142 
5 272 

3,86 


1 050 054 
1 001 521 
252 733 
196 065 
546 253 
6 470 
48 533 

3,96 

686 267 
648 581 
178 573 
146 723 
318 277 
3 008 
37 686 

3.63 

JW 787 

352 940 
74 160 
47 342 
227 976 
3 462 
10 847 

4,76 


351 154 
351 154 
75 786 
60 508 
212 578 
2 282 
... 

4.63 

163 826 
163 826 
43 524 
35 803 
83 557 
942 
* , 

3,76 

i87 32$ 
1P7 338 
32 262 
24 705 
129 021 
1 340 
... 

5.81 


100.0 
96.6 
25.3 
19.0 
51.3 
1.0 
3.4 

. 

100,0 
95,8 
27.5 
22.0 
45.5 
0.8 
4.2 

** 

1QO.O 
98,1 
21,4 
13,4 
62,0 
1,3 
1*9 

M 


100,0 
96,6 
28*0 
20,1 
47,1 
1*4 
3,4 

*** 

100,0 
96*0 
29*1 
22,4 
43,4 
1,1 
4,0 

, 

100,0 
98.1 
25.4 
14.1 
56,4 
2.2 
1.9 

... 


100.0 
95.4 
24.1 
18.7 
52,0 
0,6 
4,6 

... 

100,0 
94.5 
26.0 
21.7 
46,4 
0,4 
5,5 

, ,. 

100,0 
97,0 
20,4 
13,0 
62,7 
1.0 
3,0 

, , * 


100,0 
100,0 
21,6 
17,2 
60,5 
0,6 


, 

100*0 
100,0 
26,6 
21,9 
51,0 
0,6 

*f 
M 

10$,0 

100,0 

17,2 
13,2 
68,9 
0,7 
!!! 


















WHITE 
















NONWHITE 



















General Social and Economic Characteristics 

Table 50. MARRIED COUPLES, FAMILIES, AND UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, 
URBAN AND RURAL, I960 AND 1950, AND FOR THE STATE, 1940 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where base is less than 200 in 1960, 500 in 1950, or 100 in 1940] 



42-99 



SUBJECT 



1960 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 



TOTAL 



NONFARM 



1950 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 



1940* 

THE 
STATE 



MARRIED COUPLES* . 

WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD ... 

PERCENT WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD .... 
WITHOUT OWN HOUSEHOLD. 

LIVING WITH RELATIVES. 

LIVING WITH NONRELATIVES ...... 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 ...... 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 6 

WITH OWN CHILDREN 6 TO 17 ONLY . , . 
WITH HUSBAND UNDER 45. . * 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH NO OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18. . . . 
WITH HUSBAND 45 AND OVER 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH NO OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18. * . . 

FAMILIES 

HUSBAND-WIFE FAMILIES. ........ 

WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD 

WITHOUT OWN HOUSEHOLD. ... . . 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 6. . . . . . 

WITH OWN CHILDREN 6 TO 17 ONLY . . t 
UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS. ......... 

PERSONS UNDER 18 YEARS OLD 

LIVING WITH BOTH PARENTS 

PERCENT LIVING WITH BOTH PARENTS . 
OTHER PERSONS UNDER 18 . 

WHITE 

MARRIED COUPLES. 

WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD . . . . 

PERCENT WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD . . * 
WITHOUT OWN HOUSEHOLD 

LIVING WITH RELATIVES 

LIVING WITH NONRELATIVES 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 6. . . . . 

WITH OWN CHILDREN 6 TO 17 ONLY . . * 
WITH HUSBAND UNDER 45 . 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH NO OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18. . . 
WITH HUSBAND 45 AND OVER 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 * . . . 

WITH NO OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18. . 

FAMILIES 

HUSBAND-WIFE FAMILIES 

WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD 

WITHOUT OWN HOUSEHOLD. ....... 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 6 

WITH OWN CHILDREN 6 TO 17 ONLY . . 
UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS. . . 

PERSONS UNDER 18 YEARS OLD ....... 

LIVING WITH BOTH PARENTS 

PERCENT LIVING WITH BOTH PARENTS 
OTHER PERSONS UNDER 18 

NONWHITE 

MARRIED COUPLES 

WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD 

PERCENT WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD . . . 
WITHOUT OWN HOUSEHOLD. . 

LIVING WITH RELATIVES * 

LIVING WITH NONRELATIVES . 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 16 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 6. . . . . 

WITH OWN CHILDREN 6 TO 17 ONLY . . 
WITH HUSBAND UNDER 45 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH NO OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18. . 
WITH HUSBAND 45 AND OVER 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH NO OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18. . . 

FAMILIES .... 

HUSBAND-WIFE FAMILIES 

WITH OWN HOUSEHOLD . 

WITHOUT OWN HOUSEHOLD 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 18 

WITH OWN CHILDREN UNDER 6 

WITH OWN CHILDREN 6 TO 17 ONLY . . . 
UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS* 

PERSONS UNDER 18 YEARS OLD 

LIVING WITH BOTH PARENTS 

PERCENT LIVING WITH BOTH PARENTS 
OTHER PERSONS UNDER 18 



472 440 

455 766 
96*5 

16 674 

16 255 
419 

303 654 
174 088 
129 566 
272 618 
225 617 

47 001 
199 822 

78 037 
121 785 

541 358 

456 185 
455 766 

419 

331 304 
179 754 
151 550 
143 388 

993 037 

777 448 

78.3 

215 589 



354 158 

343 850 
97.1 

10 308 

10 080 

228 

226 332 

124 381 

101 951 
2O8 394 
172 311 

36 083 

145 764 

54 021 

91 743 

386 540 

344 078 
343 850 

228 
238 191 

125 394 
112 797 

102 360 

575 119 
504 685 

87 - 
70 434 



118 282 

111 916 
94.6 

6 366 

6 175 

191 

77 322 
49 707 
27 615 
64 224 

53 306 
10 916 

54 058 
24 016 
30 042 

154 818 

112 107 
111 916 

191 

93 113 
54 360 
38 753 
41 028 

417 918 

272 763 

65.3 

145 155 



203 184 
197 499 

97.2 

5 685 

5 460 

225 

127 466 
73 504 
53 962 
121 981 
98 432 
23 549 
81 203 
29 034 
52 169 

236 315 

197 724 

197 499 

225 

143 059 
78 192 
64 867 
73 434 

375 650 

294 318 

78.3 

81 332 



161 933 

158 141 

97.7 

3 792 

3 661 

131 

102 437 
57 593 
44 844 
98 417 
79 939 
18 478 
63 516 
22 498 
41 018 

179 927 

158 272 

158 141 

131 

109 892 
59 229 
50 663 
50 981 

249 029 

217 880 

87.5 

31 149 



41 251 

39 358 

95.4 

1 893 

1 799 

94 

25 029 
15 911 
9 118 
23 564 
18 493 

5 071 

17 687 

6 536 
11 151 

58 388 
39 452 
39 358 
94 
33 16' 

18 963 
14 204 
22 453 

126 621 
76 438 

60 
50 183 



269 256 
258 267 

95 ..9 

10 989 

10 795 

194 

176 188 

100 584 
75 604 

150 637 

127 185 

23 452 

118 619 

49 003 

69 616 

303 043 
258 461 
258 267 
194 
188 245 

101 562 
86 683 
69 954 

617 387 

483 130 

78.3 

134 257 



192 225 

185 709 

96.6 

6 516 

6 419 

97 

123 895 
66 786 
57 107 
109 977 
92 372 
17 605 
82 246 
31 523 

50 725 

206 613 

185 806 

185 709 

97 

128 299 
66 165 
62 134 

51 379 

326 090 

286 805 

88.0 

39 285 



77 031 
72 558 

94. 
4 473 

4 376 

97 
52 293 

33 796 
18 497 
40 660 

34 813 

5 847 
36 371 

17 480 

18 891 

96 430 
72 655 
72 558 
97 
59 946 

35 39 1 
24 549 
18 575 

291 297 
196 325 

67 
94 972 



204 728 

197 333 

96.4 

7 395 

7 242 

153 

135 725 

79 646 

56 079 

122 888 

103 O72 

19 816 

81 840 

32 653 

49 187 

231 240 
197 486 
197 333 

153 

146 254 
81 344 
64 910 
63 840 

453 097 

354 681 

78.3 

98 416 



154 295 

149 718 

97.0 

4 577 

4 502 

75 

102 190 
57 512 
44 678 
95 137 
79 648 
15 489 
59 158 
22 542 
36 616 

165 666 

149 793 

149 718 

75 

106 584 
57 581 
49 003 
47 898 

266 550 
233 374 

87.6 
33 176 



50 433 

47 615 

94.4 

2 818 

2 740 

78 

33 535 

22 134 

11 401 
27 751 

23 424 
4 327 

22 682 
10 111 

12 571 

65 574 
47 693 
47 615 
78 
39 670 

23 763 
15 907 
15 941 

186 547 

121 307 

65.0 

65 240 



64 528 

60 934 

94.4 

3 594 

3 553 

41 

40 463 
20 938 

19 525 
27 749 
24 113 

3 636 
36 779 
16 350 

20 429 

71 803 

60 975 

60 934 

41 

41 991 

20 218 

21 773 
6 114 

164 290 

128 449 

78.2 

35 841 



37 930 

35 991 
94.9 

1 939 

1 917 

22 

21 705 

9 276 

12 429 

14 840 

12 724 

2 116 
23 090 

8 981 
14 109 

40 947 

36 013 
35 991 

22 

21 715 
8 584 

13 131 

3 481 

59 540 

53 431 

89. 7 

6 109 



26 598 

24 943 

93.8 

1 655 

1 636 

19 

18 758 

11 662 
7 096 

12 909 
11 389 

1 520 

13 689 

7 369 
6 320 

30 856 

24 96: 

24 943 

19 

20 276 
11 634 

8 642 

2 633 

104 750 

75 018 

71.6 

29 732 



427 265 

396 055 

92.7 

31 210 

27 415 

3 795 



(A} 

270 415 
CM 
(i) 

156 850 



482 361 
399 850 
396 055 
3 795 
290 202 
171 567 
118 635 
100 295 

855 355 
(A) 
(A) 



292 440 

273 490 

93.5 

18 950 

(A) 

(1) 

(A) 

(A) 

(A) 

185 140 



107 300 



273 490 

195 322 

(A) 

(A) 

64 93O 

467 660 
(A) 
(A) 
C 1 ) 



134 825 

122 565 

90.9 

12 260 



(A) 



85 275 
t 1 ) 
(A) 

49 550 
CM 
CM 

160 608 
(A) 

122 565 
<M 

94 880 

(A) 

CA) 

35 365 

387 695 
(A) 
CA) 



166 515 

154 875 

93.0 

11 640 

8 868 

2 772 

CA> 

(A) 

CA> 

111 115 



55 400 
(1) 



194 469 

157 647 

154 875 

2 772 

108 537 

62 931 

45 606 

61 615 

261 085 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 



126 500 

119 010 

94*1 

7 490 

(A) 

(A) 

(A) 

<D 

CA) 

84 500 

<M 

CA) 

42 000 



141 541 
(M 

119 010 
(A) 

81 689 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 

171 190 
(A) 
(1) 



40 015 

35 865 

69.6 

4 150 

(A) 

(A) 

(A) 

<A) 

<M 

26 615 
< 
< 

13 400 
(A) 
<M 

52 928 
(A) 

35 865 
CM 

26 848 
(A) 
(A) 
(1) 

89 895 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 



260 750 

241 180 

92.5 

19 570 

18 547 

1 023 

(A) 

CA) 

CA) 

159 300 
d) 
U) 

101 450 
(A) 



287 892 

242 203 

241 180 

1 023 

181 665 

108 636 

73 029 

38 680 

594 270 
CA) 
CA) 
(A) 



165 940 

154 480 

93.1 

11 460 

CA) 
CA) 
CA) 
CA) 
CA) 

100 640 

CA) 

CA) 

65 300 

CA! 
180 212 

154 460 
CA) 

113 633 
CA) 
CA) 
CA) 

296 470 

CM 

CM 



94 810 

86 700 

91.4 

8 110 

CA) 

d) 



C 1 ) 

58 660 
CM 
CA) 

36 150 
CA) 
CM 

107 680 
CA) 

86 700 
CA) 

68 032 
CA) 
CA) 
(1) 

297 800 
CA) 
CA) 
CA) 



358 910 

331 697 

92.4 

27 213 

(A) 

(A) 

(A) 

<A) 

(A) 

226 212 
(A) 
(A) 

132 698 
(A) 
(A) 

(M 
CM 

33 1 f? 7 

<M 
(A) 
(M 
(AJ 

772 757 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 



224 063 

207 267 

92.5 

16 796 

(A) 

(A) 

(A) 

CA) 

(A) 

138 761 
(A) 
<A) 

85 302 
(A) 



(A) 

207 267 
(A) 

(A) 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 

403 645 
(A) 

(A) 
(A) 



134 847 

124- 430 

92.3 

10 417 

(A) 

(A) 
(A) 
(A) 
CM 

87 451 
(A) 
(A) 

47 396 
(A) 
CM 

(A) 
(A) 

12>t- M-30 

(A) 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 

369 112 
(A) 
(A) 
(A) 



NOT AVAILABLE. 



42-100 



South Carolina 



Table 51. CHILDREN EVER BORN TO WOMEN 15 TO 44 YEARS OLD, BY AGE, COLOR, AND MARITAL STATUS OF WOMAN, 
FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, 1960 AND 1950, AND FOR THE STATE, 1940 AND 1910 

[See text for source of data. Data for 1940 and 1910 exclude women ever married with no report on children ever born. Percent and rate not shown where base is less than 200 in I960, 

4,000 in 1950, 3,000 in 1940, or 1,200 in 19101 



SUBJECT 


I960 


1950 


1940t 


1910. 
THE 
STATE 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 


THE 
STATE 


TOTAL 


NONFARM 


FARM 




TOTAL 
WOMEN 15 TO 44 YEARS OLD . * . 


495 670 
363 116 
73.3 
946 629 
1 910 
2 607 

187 424 
76 833 
41.0 
108 185 
577 
1 408 

153 963 
140 967 
91.6 
380 556 
2 472 
2 700 

154 283 
145 316 
94.2 
457 888 
2 968 
3 151 

334 568 
260 607 
77.9 
574 879 
1 718 
2 206 

119 048 
56 617 
47.6 
67 280 
565 
1 188 

107 842 
101 506 
94.1 
233 887 
2 169 
2 304 

107 678 
102 484 
95.2 
273 712 
2 542 
2 671 

161 102 
102 509 
63.6 
371 750 
2 308 
3 627 

68 376 
20 216 
29.6 
40 90S 
598 
2 023 

46 121 
39 461 
85.6 
146 669 
3 180 
3 717 

46 605 
42 832 
91.9 
184 176 
3 952 
4 300 


220 340 
165 189 
75,0 
373 232 
1 694 
2 259 

80 391 
35 346 
44.0 
45 048 
560 
1 274 

69 861 
63 998 
91*6 
155 282 
2 223 
2 426 

70 088 
65 845 
93.9 
172 902 
2 467 
2 626 

160 240 
124 234 
77.5 
252 762 
1 577 
2 035 

57 797 
27 780 
48.1 
30 844 

534 
1 110 

51 031 
47 686 
93.4 
103 705 
2 032 
2 175 

51 412 
48 768 
94.9 
118 213 
2 299 
2 424 

60 100 
40 955 
66.1 
120 470 
2 004 
2 942 

22 594 
7 566 
33.5 

14 204 
629 
1 877 

18 83Q 
16 312 
86.6 
51 577 
2 739 
3 162 

18 676 
17 077 
91.4 
54 689 
2 928 
3 202 


275 330 
197 927 

71.9 
573 397 
2 083 
2 897 

107 033 
41 487 
38.8 
63 137 
590 
1 522 

84 102 
76 969 
91.5 
225 274 
2 679 
2 927 

84 195 
79 471 
94.4 
284 986 
3 385 
3 586 

174 328 
136 373 
78.2 
322 117 
1 848 
2 362 

61 251 
28 837 
47.1 
36 436 
595 
1 264 

56 811 
53 820 

94.7 
130 182 
2 291 
2 419 

56 266 
53 716 

95.5 
155 499 
2 764 
2 895 

101 002 
61 554 
60,9 
251 280 
2 488 
4 082 

45 782 
12 650 
27.6 
26 701 
583 
2 111 

27 291 
23 149 
84.8 
95 092 
3 484 
4 108 

27 929 
25 755 
92.2 
129 487 
4 636 
5 028 


212 492 
158 622 
74.6 
428 299 

2 016 
2 700 

79 387 
34 092 
42.9 
50 500 
636 
1 481 

68 868 
63 802 
92.6 
177 432 
2 576 
2 781 

64 237 
60 728 
94.5 
200 367 
3 119 
3 299 

144 905 
116 067 
80.1 
265 481 
1 832 
2 287 

50 048 
25 334 
50.6 
31 922 
638 
1 260 

49 461 
47 294 
95.6 
112 481 
2 274 
2 378 

45 396 
43 439 
95.7 
121 078 
2 667 
2 787 

67 587 
42 555 
63.0 
162 818 
2 409 
3 826 

29 339 
8 758 
29.9 
18 578 
633 
2 121 

19 407 
16 508 
85.1 
64 951 
3 347 
3 935 

18 841 
17 289 
91.8 
79 289 
4 208 
4 586 


62 838 
39 305 
62.5 
145 098 
2 309 


490 525 
360 690 
73,5 
845 961 
1 725 
2 345 

191 665 
89 640 
46.8 
112 448 
587 
1 254 

163 745 
146 040 
89.2 
342 663 
2 093 
2 346 

135 115 
125 010 
92.5 
390 850 
2 893 
3 127 

306 055 
233 670 

76.3 
477 035 
1 559 
2 041 

113 765 
58 500 
51.4 
60 141 
529 
1 028 

106 790 
96 210 
90.1 
194 542 
1 822 
2 022 

85 500 
78 960 
92.4 
222 352 
2 601 
2 816 

184 470 
127 020 
68.9 
368 926 
2 000 
2 904 

77 900 
31 140 
40.0 
52 307 
671 
1 680 

56 955 

49 830 
87.5 
148 121 
2 601 
2 973. 

49 615 
46 050 
92.8 
168 498 
3 396 
3 659 


204 400 
152 220 
74.5 
279 637 
1 368 
1 837 

75 225 
36 780 
48.9 
38 192 
508 
1 038 

71 185 
62 520 
87,8 
119 195 
1 674 
1 907 

57 990 
52 920 
91.3 
122 250 
2 108 
2 310 

141 395 
106 BOO 
75.5 
182 927 
1 294 
1 713 

52 035 
26 940 
51.8 
24 021 
462 
892 

50 940 
44 970 
88.3 
79 022 
1 551 
1 757 

38 420 
34 890 
90.8 
79 884 
2 079 
2 290 

63 005 
45 420 
72.1 
96 710 
1 535 
2 129 

23 190 

9 840 
42.4 
14 171 
611 
1 440 

20 245 
17 550 
86.7 
40 173 
1 984 
2 289 

19 570 
18 030 
92.1 
42 366 
2 165 
' 2 350 


286 125 
208 470 
72.9 
566 324 
1 979 
2 717 

116 440 
52 860 
45.4 
74 256 
638 
1 405 

92 560 
83 520 
90.2 
223 468 
2 414 
2 676 

77 125 
72 090 
93.5 
268 600 
3 483 
3 726 

164 660 
126 870 
77.0 
294 108 
1 786 
2 318 

61 730 
31 560 
51.1 
36 120 
585 
1 144 

55 850 
51 240 
91.7 
115 520 
2 068 
2 254 

47 080 
44 070 
93.6 
142 468 
3 026 
3 233 

121 465 
81 600 
67.2 
272 216 
2 241 
3 336 

54 710 
21 300 
38. 9 
38 136 
697 
1 790 

36 710 
32 280 

87.9 
107 948 
2 941 
3 344 

30 045 
28 020 
93.3 

126 132 

4 198 
4 501 


414 240 
254 920 
U> 
644 356 
1 556 
2 528 

192 720 
64 760 
CM 
75 820 
393 
1 171 

128 920 
106 040 
(*) 
253 908 
1 970 
2 394 

92 600 

84 120 
(1) 
314 628 
3 398 
3 740 

238 260 
148 940 
(*) 
336 832 
1 414 
2 262 

103 720 
34 200 
< A > 
32 800 
316 
959 

79 460 
65 860 
(M 
141 196 
1 777 
2 144 

55 080 
48 880 
U) 
162 836 
2 956 
3 331 

175 980 
105 980 
t 1 ) 
307 524 
1 747 
2 902 

89 000 
30 560 
(1) 
43 020 
483 
1 408 

49 460 
40 180 
< 4 ) 
112 742 
3 279 
2 805 

37 520 
35 240 
<*) 
151 792 
4 046 
4 307 


326 736 
202 336 
(1) 
. 752 771 
2 304 
3 720 

158 463 
56 251 
(*) 
94 447 
596 
1 679 

100 224 
84 311 
<*) 
302 420 
3 017 
3 587 

68 049 
61 774 
(1) 
355 904 
5 230 
5 761 

144 050 
87 574 
(*) 
304 095 
2 111 
3 472 

65 388 
21 626 
<*) 
33 089 

506 

1 530 

47 QOO 
38 074 
(*) 
121 967 
2 59S 
3 203 

31 662 
27 874 

(M 

149 039 
4 707 
5 347 

182 686 
114 762 
(*) 
448 676 
2 49$ 
3 910 

93 075 
34 625 
{*) 
61 358 
659 
1 77? 

53 224 

46 23.7 
<*) 
180 493 
3 590 
3 90? 

36 397 
33 900 

I 1 ) 
206 865 
5 63> 
6 19? 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER ii 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED , 
WOMEN 15 TO 24 YEARS OLD . . . 


3 692 

27 646 
7 395 
26.7 
12 637 
457 
1 709 

15 234 
13 167 
86.4 
47 842 
3 140 
3 633 

19 958 
18 743 
93.9 
84 619 
4 240 
4 515 

29 423 

20 306 
69.0 
56 636 
1 925 
2 789 

11 203 
3 503 
31.3 

4 514 
403 
1 289 

7 350 
6 526 
88.8 
17 701 
2 408 
2 712 

10 870 
10 277 
94.5" 
34 421 
3 167 
3 349 

33 415 

18 999 
56.9 
88 462 
2 647 
4 656 

16 443 
3 892 
23,7 
8 123 
494 
2 087 

7 884 
6 641 
84.2 
30 141 
3 823 
4 539 

9 088 
8 466 
93.2 
50 198 
5 524 
5 929 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN , , 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 25 TO 34 YEARS OLD . . . . 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 35 TO 44 YEARS OLD . * . . 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 

WHITE 
WOMEN 15 TO 44 YEARS OLD .... 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . , 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . , 


PER If 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 15 TO 24 YEARS OLD .... 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN , . 


PER ItOOO WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 25 TO 34 YEARS OLD .... 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN.. . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 35 TO 44 YEARS OLD .... 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 

NONWHITE 
WOMEN 15 TO 44 YEARS OLD .... 


: PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 15 TO 24 YEARS OLD . . . . 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 25 TO 34 YEARS OLD .... 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED . . . 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN , . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 
WOMEN 35 TO 44 YEARS OLD .... 


PERCENT EVER MARRIED ... 
NUMBER OF CHILDREN EVER BORN . . 


PER It 000 WOMEN EVER MARRIED . 


4 PERCENT NOT SHOWN BECAUSE 19*0 AND 1910 DATA IN THIS TABLE EXCLUDE WOMEN EVER MARRIED WITH NO REPORT ON CHILDREN EVER BORN. 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 42-101 

Table 52. EMPLOYMENT STATUS AND SELECTED LABOR FORCE CHARACTERISTICS, BY COLOR AND SEX, 

FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shorn where leas than 0. 1 or where base is le&s than 200] 



EMPLOYMENT STATUS AND SEX 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 




THE 
STATE. 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


BOTH SEXES 


1 579 356 
696 246 
56.7 
37 945 
838 301 
803 733 
34 568 
4.1 
683 110 
19 375 
158 484 

389 135 
116 116 

768 556 
585 351 
76.2 
57 019 
528 332 
509 156 
19 176 
3.6 
183 205 
12 383 
76 548 

52 778 

41 496 

810 800 
310 895 
38.3 
926 
309 969 
294 577 
15 392 
5.0 
499 905 
6 992 
81 936 

336 357 
125 554 
116 219 
74 620 

810 800 
310 895 
193 434 
66 100 
617 366 
244 795 

469 893 
186 085 
173 107 
55 495 

296 786 
130 590 

340 907 
124 810 
20 327 
10 605 
320 580 
114 205 


671 409 
596 517 
59.1 
18 346 
378 171 
362 568 
15 603 
4.1 
274 892 
8 680 
63 198 

155 193 
47 821 

310 727 
242 233 
78.0 
18 099 
224 134 
215 817 
8 317 
3.7 
68 494 
5 438 
30 450 

17 521 
15 085 

360 682 
154 284 
42.8 
247 
154 037 
146 751 
7 286 
4.7 
206 398 
3 242 
32 748 

137 672 
52 803 
48 786 
32 736 

360 682 
154 284 
83 226 
29 602 
277 456 
124 682 

202 454 
85 669 
73 397 
23 958 

129 057 
61 711 

158 228 
68 615 
9 829 
5 644 
148 399 
62 971 


683 159 
382 658 
56.0 
39 539 
343 119 
327 686 
15 433 
4.5 
300 501 
10 695 
66 960 

172 572 
50 274 

345 545 
260 848 
75.5 
38 868 
221 980 
213 023 
8 957 
4.0 
84 697 
6 945 
32 902 

25 107 
19 743 

337 614 
121 810 
36.1 
671 
121 139 
114 663 
6 476 
5,3 
215 804 
3 750 
34 058 

147 465 
57 396 
53 178 
30 531 

337 614 
121 810 
87 264 
29 147 
250 350 
92 663 

203 360 
79 401 
79 Oil 
25 273 
124 349 
54 128 

134 254 
42 409 
8 253 
3 874 
126 001 
38 535 


224 788 
117 071 
52.1 
60 
117 Oil 
113 479 
3 532 
3.0 
107 717 

28 326 

61 370 
18 021 

112 284 
82 270 
73.3 
52 
82 218 
80 316 
1 902 
2.3 
30 014 

13 196 

10 150 
6 668 

112 504 
34 801 
30.9 
8 
34 793 
33 163 
1 630 
4.7 
77 703 
... 
15 130 

51 220 
15 355 
14 255 
11 353 

112 504 
34 801 
22 944 
7 351 
89 560 
27 450 

64 079 
21 015 
20 699 
6 264 
43 380 
14 751 


495 623 
293 873 
59.3 
17 129 
276 744 
267 367 
9 377 
3.4 
201 750 
7 120 
43 979 

115 438 
35 213 

233 716 

187 291 
80.1 
16 889 
170 402 
165 511 
4 891 
2.9 
46 425 
4 088 
21 667 

9 884 
10 786 

261 907 
106 582 
40.7 
240 
106 342 
101 856 
4 486 
4.2 
155 325 
3 032 
22 312 

105 554 
41 788 
39 671 
24 427 

261 907 
106 582 
61 619 
19 280 
200 288 
87 302 

160 984 
64 646 
57 327 
17 144 
103 657 
47 502 

100 923 

41 936 
4 292 
2 136 
96 631 
39 800 


471 579 
278 273 
59.0 
36 430 
241 843 
233 006 
8 837 
3.7 
193 306 
4 490 
39 941 

116 408 
32 467 

244 563 
194 337 
79.5 
35 801 
158 536 
153 546 
4 990 
3.1 
50 226 
2 682 
20 185 

14 464 
12 895 

227 016 
83 936 
37.0 
629 
83 307 
79 460 
3 847 
4.6 
143 080 
1 808 
19 756 

101 944 
40 169 
38 495 
19 572 

227 016 
83 936 
60 141 
19 606 
166 875 
64 330 

153 259 
60 637 
56 978 
18 156 
96 281 
42 481 

73 757 
23 299 

3 163 
1 450 
70 594 
21 849 


119 802 
63 747 
53.2 
60 
63 687 
62 006 
1 681 
2*6 
56 055 
... 
12 121 

32 086 
11 848 

60 272 
45 150 
74.9 
52 
45 098 
44 136 
962 
2.1 
15 122 
... 
5 826 

5 000 
4 296 

59 530 
18 597 
31.2 
8 
18 589 
17 870 
719 
3.9 
40 933 
. . 
6 295 

27 086 
6 700 
6 431 
7 552 

59 530 
18 597 
9-711 
2 901 
49 819 
15 696 

37 737 

12 447 
9 226 
2 701 
28 511 
9 746 

21 793 
6 150 
485 
200 
21 308 
5 950 


175 786 
102 644 
58.4 
1 217 
101 427 
95 201 
6 226 
6.1 
73 142 
1 560 
19 219 

39 755 
12 608 

77 Oil 
54 942 
71.3 
1 210 
53 732 
50 306 
3 426 
6.4 
22 069 
1 350 
8 783 

7 637 
4 299 

98 775 
47 702 
48,3 
7 
47 695 
44 895 
2 800 
5.9 
51 073 
210 
10 436 

32 118 

11 015 
9 115 
8 309 

98 775 
47 702 
21 607 
10 322 
77 168 
37 380 

41 470 
21 023 
16 070 
6 814 
25 400 
14 209 

57 305 
26 679 
5 S37 
3 508 
51 768 
23 171 


211 580 
104 385 
49.3 
3 109 
101 276 
94 680 
6 596 
6.5 
107 195 
6 205 
27 019 

56 164 
17 807 

100 982 
66 511 
65.9 
3 067 
63 444 
59 477 
3 967 
6.3 
34 471 
4 263 
12 717 

10 643 
6 848 

110 598 
37 874 
34.2 
42 
37 832 
35 203 
2 629 
6.9 
72 724 
1 942 
14 302 

45 521 
17 227 
14 683 
-10 959 

liO 598 
37 874 
27 123 
9 541 
83 475 
28 333 

50 101 
18 764 
22 033 
7 117 
28 068 
11 647 

60 497 
19 110 
5 090 
2 424 
55 407 
16 686 


104 986 
53 324 
50.6 
... 

53 324 
51 473 
1 851 
3.5 

51 662 

16 205 

29 284 
6 173 

52 012 
37 120 
71,4 
... 
37 120 
36 ISO 
940 
2.5 
14 892 
.. 
7 370 

5 150 

2 372 

52 974 
16 204 
30.6 
... 
16 204 
15 293 
911 
5.6 
36 770 
... 
8 835 

24 134 
8 655 
7 824 
3 801 

52 974 
16 204 
13 233 
4 450 
39 741 
11 754 

26 342 
8 568 
11 473 
3 563 
14 869 
5 005 

26 632 

7 636 
1 760 
887 
24 872 
6 749 


TOTAL 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER.-. . . 












PERCENT OF CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE . 






OTHER* 




MALE 
TOTAL* 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER. . . . 












PERCENT OF CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE . 






OTHER! 




FEMALE 

TOTAL 
TOTAL* 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER. . 












PERCENT OF CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE . 






OTHER! 








MARITAL STATUS AND PRESENCE 
OF CHILDREN 












MARRIED WOMEN t HUSBAND PRESENT. . * . 












48 425 
13 786 
2 245 
1 087 
46 180 
12 699 













42-102 



South Carolina 
Table 53.-EMPLOYMENT STATUS, BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE: 1940 TO 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960 or 100 in 1950 and 1940] 







1960 






1950 










EMPLOYMENT STATUS AND SEX 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NON- 
WHITE 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NON- 
WHITE 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NON- 
WHITE 


BOTH SEXES 


2 382 594 


1 550 632 


831 962 


2 117 027 


1 293 405 


823 622 


1 899 804 


1 084 308 


815 496 


TOTALi 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER. . . 


1 579 356 
896 246 


1 087 004 
635 893 


492 352 
260 353 


1 421 466 
798 177 


915 048 
512 557 


506 418 
285 620 


1 302 783 
730 780 


775 384 
415 481 


527 399 
315 299 




57 945 


53 619 


4 326 


16 111 


15 381 


730 


5 500 


5 460 


40 




838 301 


582 274 


256 027 


782 066 


497 176 


284 890 


725 280 


410 021 


315 259 




803 733 


562 379 


241 354 


755 378 


482 876 


272 502 


655 573 


366 842 


288 731 




34 568 


19 895 


14 673 


26 688 


14 300 


12 388 


69 707 


43 179 


26 528 


PERCENT OF CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE . 


4.1 
683 110 


3.4 
451 111 


5.7 
231 999 


3.4 
623 289 


2.9 
402 491 


4.3 
220 798 


9.6 

572 003 


10.5 
359 903 


8.4 
212 100 


MALE 


1 175 672 


775 070 


400 602 


1 040 540 


643 573 


396 967 


935 239 


540 597 


394 642 


TOTAL t 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER. . 


768 556 
585 351 


538 551 
426 778 


230 005 
158 573 


688 217 
552 586 


450 339 

363 591 


237 878 
.188 995 


634 511 
515 979 


383 794 
310 085 


250 717 
205 894 




57 019 


52 742 


4 277 


15 790 


15 104 


686 


5 500 


5 460 


40 




528 332 


374 036 


154 296 


536 796 


348 487 


188 309 


510 479 


304 625 


205 854 




509 156 


363 193 


145 963 


519 764 


338 995 


180 769 


461 273 


275 528 


185 745 




19 176 


10 843 


8 333 


17 032 


9 492 


7 540 


49 206 


29 097 


20 109 


PERCENT OF CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE 


3.6 

183 205 


2.9 

111 773 


5.4 
71 432 


3.2 

135 631 


2.7 
86 748 


4.0 
48 883 


9.6 
118 532 


9.6 
73 709 


9.8 
44 823 


FEMALE 


1 206 922 


775 562 


431 360 


1 076 487 


649 832 


426 655 


964 565 


543 711 


420 854 


TOTAL i 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER. . 


810 800 
310 895 


548 453 
209 115 


262 347 
101 780 


733 249 
245 591 


464 709 
148 966 


268 540 
96 625 


668 272 
214 801 


391 590 
105 396 


276 682 
109 405 




926 


877 


49 


321 


277 


44 


... 


... 


. * 




309 969 


208 238 


101 731 


245 270 


148 689 


96 581 


214 801 


105 396 


109 405 




294 577 


199 186 


95 391 


235 614 


143 881 


91 733 


194 300 


91 314 


102 986 




15 392 


9 052 


6 340 


9 656 


4 808 


4 848 


20 501 


14 082 


6 419 


PERCENT OF CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE . 


5.0 
499 905 


4.3 
339 338 


6.2 

160 567 


3.9 
407 658 


3.2 

315 743 


5.0 

171 915 


9.5 
453 471 


13.4 
286 194 


5.9 

167 277 



Table 54. LABOR FORCE STATUS, BY AGE AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, 1960, 

AND FOR THE STATE, 1950 AND 1940 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960] 



AGE AND LABOR FORCE 
STATUS 


MALE 


FEMALE 






1960 


1950i 
THE 
STATE 


1940 1 
THE 
STATE 


1960 


1950* 
THE 
STATE 


1940 1 
THE 
STATE 


THE 

STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


THE 
STATE 


URBAN 


RURAL 
NONFARM 


RURAL 
FARM 


POPULATION 


























TOTAL 14 AND OVER 
14 TO 17 YEARS 
18 TO 24 YEARS 
25 TO 34 YEARS 
35 TO 44 YEARS 
45 TO 64 YEARS 
65 YEARS AND OVER 


768 556 
98 718 
134 715 
143 350 
144 893 
184 743 
62 137 


310 727 
33 085 
48 815 
63 475 
63 887 
77 921 
23 544 


345 545 
45 741 
69 016 
66 107 
63 140 
75 008 
26 533 


112 284 
19 892 
16 884 
13 768 
17 866 
31 814 
12 060 


682 340 
80 070 
122 610 
154 160 
128 935 
145 130 
51 435 


634 511 
87 790 
138 600 
140 452 
100 467 
128 033 
39 169 


810 800 
91 081 
118 935 
153 963 
154 283 
207 496 
85 042 


360 682 
32 588 
55 443 
69 861 
70 088 
94 087 
38 615 


337 614 
40 461 
49 339 
68 868 
64 237 
80 70S 
34 001 


112 504 
18 032 
14 153 
15 234 
19 958 
32 701 
12 426 


735 540 
78 810 
129 830 
165 420 
136 735 
160 050 
64 695 


668 272 
87 946 
147 309 
148 873 
110 406 
131 593 
42 145 


LABOR FORCE 


























TOTAL f 14 AND OVER 


585 351 


242 233 


260 848 


82 270 


549 805 


515 979 


310 895 


154 284 


121 810 


34 801 


246 505 


214 801 


14 TO 17 YEARS 


30 942 


9 752 


14 788 


6 402 


33 835 


30 587 


11 821 


5 099 


4 469 


2 253 


12 965 


13 368 


18 TO 24 YEARS . 


107 636 


36 701 


57 664 


13 271 


100 035 


119 448 


50 843 


24 603 


20 882 


5 358 


51 750 


60 146 


25 TO 34 YEARS . 


134 094 


59 477 


61 826 


12 791 


142 325 


133 899 


70 685 


34 347 


30 083 


6 255 


65 280 


59 382 




136 044 


60 700 


58 567 


16 777 


121 765 


94 938 


79 136 


38 732 


31 878 


8 526 


59 155 


40 425 


45 TO 64 YEARS * 


157 294 


67 887 


61 770 


27 637 


127 375 


115 462 


90 080 


46 817 


31 927 


11 336 


51 885 


37 221 


65 YEARS AND OVER 


19 341 


7 716 


6 233 


5 392 


24 470 


21 645 


8 330 


4 686 


2 571 


1 073 


5 470 


4 259 


PERCENT OF POPULATION 


























IN LABOR FORCE 


























TOTAL t 14 AND OVER 


76.2 


78.0 


75.5 


73.3 


80.6 


81.3 


38.3 


42.8 


36.1 


30.9 


33.5 


32.1 




31.3 


29 5 


32.3 


32.2 


42.3 


34.8 


13.0 


15.6 


11.0 


12.5 


16.5 


15.2 




79.9 


75,2 


83 .6 


78.6 


81.6 


86.2 


42.7 


44.4 


42.3 


37.9 


39.9 


40.8 




93.5 


93,7 


93.5 


92.9 


92.3 


95.3 


45.9 


49.2 


43.7 


41.1 


39.5 


39.9 




93.9 


95,0 


92,8 


93,9 


94.4 


94.5 


51.3 


55.3 


49*6 


42.7 


43.3 


36.6 




85.1 


87 1 


82.4 


86.9 


87.8 


90.2 


43.4 


49.8 


39*6 


34.7 


32.4 


28.3 


65 YEARS AND OVER. . . , 


31.1 


32.8 


23.5 


44.7 


47.6 


55.3 


9.8 


12.1 


7.6 


8.6 


8.5 


10.1 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 



Table 55.-WEEKS WORKED IN 1959, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[See test for souroc of data. Percent not shorn where lewtkm 0.1 j 



WEEKS WORKED 

, 
TOTALt 14 YEARS OLD AND OVER, , 


" = 

THE 
STATE 


1 579 356 

nnn *tt 



URBAN 

671 409 




999 372 

B4C -ine 


433 503 




3*3 J^J 
At 1 Ai 


253 106 




01 101 
01 filfi 


23 527 




7l 010 
i AB ff7 


34 169 




105 517 

QO 7 1 . 


41 236 




92 316 

1 7t 07C. 


33 471 




14J 47? 
579 984 


47 994 
237 906 



42-103 



" 
RURAL 


RURAL 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 


NONFARM 


FARM 


THE 


URBAN 


RURAL 


RURAL 






STATE 




NONFARM 


FARM 


683 159 


224 788 


100,0 


100.0 


100,0 


100.0 


422 635 


143 234 


63.3 


64,6 


61,9 


63.7 


214 061 


58 178 


33.3 


37,7 


31,3 


25.9 


26 909 


10 665 


3,9 


3.5 


3.9 


4.7 


40 611 


17 038 


5,8 


5.1 


5*9 


7.6 


45 611 


18 670 


6.7 


6.1 


6.7 


8,3 


40 595 


18 250 


5,8 


5.0 


5.9 


8.1 


54 848 


20 433 


7,8 


7.1 


8.0 


9.1 


260 524 


81 554 


36,7 


35.4 


38.1 


36.3 



Table 56.-PERSONS EMPLOYED IN AGRICULTURE AND IN NONAGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES, BY CLASS OF WORKER AND 
SEX, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL, I960, AND FOR THE STATE, 1950 AND 1940 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1, or where base is less than 200 in 1960] 



-- = 


=== 




1960 






1950 i THE 


STATE 


1940i THE 


STATE 


CLASS OF WORKER AND SEX 


THEST 


ATE 




RURAL 


RURAL 












NUMBER 


PERCENT 


URBAN 


NONFARM 


FARM 


NUMBER 


PERCENT 


NUMBER 


PERCENT 


AGRICULTURE 


75 669 


ion. n 


5n 


n i Qflft 


CA Lf\L 










PRIVATE WAGE AND SALARY WORKERS , . 


27 843 

3A7 


368 


1 695 
H 


21 920 

12 729 


50 696 
13 419 


161 546 
32 491 


100.0 
20.1 


208 238 

55515 


100.0 
26.7 




ui ota 


K.* a. 


45 

IOTA 


188 


34 


385 


0.2 


286 


0.1 




5tpc 


Wt*t 
7 11 


270 

at 


8 060 


32 604 


100 501 


62.2 


114 457 


55.0 




IB tA7 


7 i*r 

loo. n 


43 

Ct 1 


943 

6f\tn 


4 639 


28 169 


17.4 


37 980 


18.2 


PRIVATE WAGE AND SALARY WORKERS , , 


8 943 
20 


48.7 

0.1 


3*1 

343 


069 
4 371 

10 


11 787 
4 229 


35 425 

9 707 


100.0 
27.4 


52 818 

15 980 


100.0 
30,3 




ti 010 


vl 
01.0 




12 

OflQ 


... 

3AA1 


56 


0,2 


22 


.** 


UNPAID FAMILY WORKER'S , 
NONAGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES 


5 394 
433 487 


29.4 
100.0 


41 

312 7A11 


888 
798 

mim 


003 
4 555 

OQ A.OH 


4 821 

20 841 

TBO 1 4,0 


13.6 
58.8 


8 570 
28 246 

4CV f\1C 


16.2 
. 53.5 

AM f\ 


PRIVATE WAGE AND SALARY WORKERS . , 


339 983 

48 666 


78.4 
11.2 


163 155 
5A 952 


IV,? 

154 286 
la RYV 


29 O2v 
22 542 
3flfli 


.558 lo 
285 209 

t/l 1 A& 


100.0 
79.6 

9e 


253 035 

199 921 

OT 1 AC 


100*0 

79.0 

9< 




44 123 


10.2 


23 107 


10 3JJ 
n05S 


00 1 

3noi 


51 106 

tfl OU.9 


.3 

i r\ 7 


&3 105 

OA T/ll 


il 
Un 




715 


0*2 


ORO 


TCQ 


U91 

1 Ai 


JO tft 
AR 


1U.7 

On 


9 ^*tj 

Jt/ A 


iO 

Ov 




S7A Sin 


lOfVft 


1 1LA 9U.A 


jyi 

1 AB cftJi 


lUo 

A 1 VP/ 


005 


.2 


066 


i3 


PRIVATE WAGE AND SALARY WORKERS , , 


tfO &lv 

219 423 
42 180 


ivu.o 
79.4 
15.3 


A*fO 2HO 

113 897 

9{1 310 


108 594 
89 137 

IT OR9 


21 376 
16 389 
3oon 


200 100 
162 460 

07 ttA 


100.0 
81.2 

* < 7 


141 482 
108 451 

10 1 Co 


lOOiO 
76.7 

1 M Q 




10 7tt3 


"5*0 


ft 1 It 


U 70fi 
3 flit 


OtjU 
TQ7 


27 33D 

8/|Qt 


13.7 

45 


18 158 

IT /IOC 


12*8 

9c 




t R6il 


1 .11 


11J 
1 019 


O^J 
1A/19 


797 

tin 


*r9i 

1QI 


.2 

A Q 


13 485 

iTOO 


.5 

irt 








1 7 It 


OHfi 


JlU 


61^ 


0.9 


388 


tO 



42-104 South Carolina 

Table 57.-OCCUPATION GROUP OF EMPLOYED PERSONS, BY SEX, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 

rSw text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200] 



OCCUPATION GROUP AND SEX 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 
NONFARM 



RURAL 
FARM 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 
NONFARM 



RURAL 



MALE 



TOTAL EMPLOYED * 

PROFESSIONAL! TECHNICAL! AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

ENGINEERS* TECHNICAL ....... 

MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH WORKERS I 

SALARIED ...,.... 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

TEACHERS ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS . 
OTHER PROFESSIONAL! TECHN'L! & KINDRED WKRS.I 

SALARIED . . 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS. ...... 

MANAGERSt OFFICIALS! AND PROPRIETORS! EXC. FARM. 

SALARIED ..... 

SELF-EMPLOYED! 

RETAIL TRADE ...... 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE. . .......... 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS ... . 

SALES WORKERS. 

RETAIL TRADE . * 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE. . 

CRAFTSMEN! FOREMEN! AND KINDRED WORKERS 

FOREMEN (N.E.C. 1 ) 

MECHANICS AND REPAIRMEN 

METAL CRAFTSMEN? EXCEPT MECHANICS. . 

CONSTRUCTION CRAFTSMEN . . . . 

OTHER CRAFTSMEN. 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS 

DRIVERS AND DELIVERYMEN. ... 

OTHER OPERATIVES! ETC.* 

DURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING 

NONDURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING 

NONMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. . 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS. . 

SERVICE WORKERS! EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD 

PROTECTIVE SERVICE WORKERS 

WAITERS! BARTENDERSf COOKS f AND COUNTER WORKERS. 
OTHER SERVICE WORKERS. . . . . 

FARM LABORERS AND FARM FOREMEN .......... 

LABORERS! EXCEPT FARM AND MINE ...... 

CONSTRUCTION 

MANUFACTURING 

OTHER INDUSTRIES 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED. ............. 

FEMALE 

TOTAL EMPLOYED ... 

PROFESSIONAL! TECHNICAL! AND KINDRED WORKERS . . . 
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH WORKERS t 

SALARIED ....... 

SELF-EMPLOYED. 

TEACHERS! ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS . . . 
OTHER PROFESSIONAL! TECHN'Lf & KINDRED WKRS. 

SALARIED 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS 

MANAGERS* OFFICIALS* AND PROPRIETORS! EXC. FARM. . 

SALARIED . . 

SELF-EMPLOYED I 

RETAIL TRADE . 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE. . . . 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS . 

SECRETARIES! STENOGRAPHERS, AND TYPISTS. . . . , 
OTHER CLERICAL WORKERS ....... < 

SALES WORKERS. .......... < 

RETAIL TRADE < 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE. . 

CRAFTSMEN! FOREMEN! AND KINDRED WORKERS. . . . . 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS . . . 

DURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING < 

NONDURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING 

NONMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. ......... 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS. ... . 

SERVICE WORKERS! EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. ... 
WAITERS! BARTENDERS! COOKS! AND COUNTER WORKERS 
OTHER SERVICE WORKERS . 

FARM LABORERS AND FARM FOREMEN 

LABORERS! EXCEPT FARM AND MINE 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED 



509 156 

31 767 
4 542 

1 431 

2 515 

4 056 

16 599 

2 624 

41 855 

43 940 
24 044 

11 632 
8 264 

22 471 

32 899 

16 410 

16 489 

90 864 

12 714 
22 135 

5 888 
31 610 

18 517 

121 575 
26 831 

15 040 
60 441 

19 263 

1 097 

24 545 

5 858 

3 755 
14 932 

31 714 
48 308 
11 014 
19 863 

17 431 

18 121 



294 577 
32 654 

7 084 

745 

17 672 

6 099 

1 054 

3 983 

7 607 

3 843 

2 851 
913 

48 875 

17 116 
31 759 

18 055 
16 772 

1 283 

2 397 
77 469 

3 502 
66 480 

7 487 

49 017 
27 365 
11 068 
16 297 

13 965 
2 002 

11 188 



215 817 
19 883 

3 064 

1 086 

1 918 

2 188 

9 749 
1 878 

1 082 

26 435 
15 703 

5 949 

4 783 

13 104 
19 610 

8 536 
11 074 

41 975 

6 180 

10 123 

2 918 

13 362 

9 392 

49 480 

11 634 

5 643 
22 362 

9 641 

622 

14 094 

3 106 

2 513 
8 475 

1 219 
18 122 

3 950 
5 633 
8 539 

10 191 



146 751 
20 507 

5 186 

530 

9 837 

4 201 
753 



4 519 
2 551 

1 368 
600 

30 064 
11 158 
18 906 

9 797 

8 903 
894 

1 259 

31 851 
1 405 

26 154 
4 292 

24 465 

16 164 

6 151 

10 013 

290 
826 

6 899 



213 023 

10 449 

1 337 

322 
535 

1 463 

6 127 
665 



15 283 
7 406 

4 902 
2 975 

7 822 

11 400 

6 543 

4 857 

42 995 

5 927 

10 600 
2 694 

15 444 

8 330 

62 988 

12 626 

7 949 
34 184 

8 229 

395 

9 063 
2 264 
1 139 
5 660 

12 896 
25 414 

5 849 

11 766 
7 799 

6 313 



114 663 

9 315 

1 636 

170 

5 674 

1 583 

252 



2 548 

1 034 

1 239 

275 

15 957 

4 994 

10 963 

6 637 
6 326 

311 

967 
39 590 

1 722 
35 178 

2 690 

19 875 
9 485 

4 237 

5 248 

5 019 
1 022 

3 365 



80 316 

1 435 

141 

23 

62 

405 

723 

81 



2 222 

935 

781 
506 

1 545 

1 889 

1 331 

558 

5 894 
607 

1 412 
276 

2 804 
795 

9 107 

2 371 

1 448 

3 895 
1 393 

80 

1 388 
488 
103 
797 

17 599 

4 772 

1 215 

2 464 
1 093 

1 617 



33 163 

2 832 

262 

45 

2 161 

315 
49 

2 990 

540 
258 

244 
38 

2 854 

964 

1 890 

1 621 

1 543 

78 

171 
6 028 

375 
5 148 

505 

4 677 

1 716 

680 

1 036 

8 656 
154 



100.0 
6.2 
0.9 

0.3 
0.5 
0.8 

3.3 

0.5 



8.6 
4.7 

2.3 

1.6 

4.4 
6.5 
3.2 
3.2 

17*8 
2.5 

4.3 
1.2 
6.2 
3.6 

23,9 
5.3 

3.0 
11.9 
3.8 

0.2 
4.8 
1.2 
0.7 
2.9 

6.2 
9.5 
2.2 
3.9 

3.4 

3.6 



100.0 

11.1 

2.4 
0.3 
6.0 

2.1 
0.4 

1.4 

2.6 

1.3 

1.0 

0.3 

16.6 
5.8 
10.8 

6.1 
5,7 
0.4 

0.8 
26.3 

1.2 
22.6 

2.5 

16.6 
9.3 

3.8 
5.5 

4.7 
0.7 

3.6 



100.0 
9.2 

1.4 

0.5 
0.9 
1.0 

4,5 
0.9 

0.5 

12.2 
7.3 

2.8 
2.2 

6.1 

9.1 
4.0 
5.1 

19.4 
2.9 

4.7 
1.4 
6.2 

4.4 

22.9 
5.5 

2.6 

10.4 
4.5 

0.3 
6.5 
1.4 
1.2 
3.9 

0.6 
8.4 
1.8 
2.6 

4.0 

4.7 



100.0 
14.0 

3.5 

0.4 
6,7 

2.9 
0.5 

0.1 

3.1 
1.7 

0.9 

0.4 

20.5 

7.6 

12.9 

6.7 
6*1 
0.6 

0.9 
21.7 

1.0 
17*8 

2.9 

16.7 

11.0 

4.2 

6.6 

0.2 
0.6 

4.7 



100.0 
4.9 
0*6 

0.2 
0.3 
0.7 

2.9 
0.3 

3.8 

7.2 
3*5 

2.3 

1.4 

3.7 
5.4 
3.1 
2.3 

20.2 
2.8 
5.0 
1.3 
7.2 
3.9 

29.6 
5.9 

3.7 

16.0 

3.9 

0.2 
4.3 
1.1 
0.5 
2.7 

6.1 
11.9 
2.7 
5.5 
3.7 

3.0 



100.0 
8.1 

1.4 
0.1 
4.9 

1.4 
0.2 

0.8 

2.2 

0.9 

1.1 
0.2 

13*9 
4.4 
9.6 

5.8 
5.5 

0.3 

0.8 
34.5 

1.5 
30.7 

2.3 

17.3 
8.3 
3.7 

4.6 

4.4 
0.9 

2.9 



100.0 
1.8 
0.2 



0.1 
0.5 

0.9 
0.1 

40.8 

2.8 
1.2 

1.0 
0.6 

1.9 

2.4 
1.7 
0.7 

7.3 
0.8 
1.6 
0.3 
3.5 
1.0 

11*3 
3.0 

1.8 
4.8 
1.7 

0.1 
1.7 
0.6 
0.1 
1.0 

21.9 
5.9 
1.5 
3*1 
1.4 

2.0 



100.0 
8.5 

0.8 
0.1 
6.5 

0.9 
0.1 

9.0 

1.6 
0.8 

0.7 
0.1 

8.6 
2.9 
5.7 

4.9 
4.7 
0.2 

0.5 
18.2 

1.1 
15.5 

1.5 

14.1 
5.2 

2.1 

3.1 

26.1 
0.5 

2.8 



"N.E.C." MEANS NOT ELSEWHERE CLASSIFIED. 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 42-105 

Table 58.-OCCUPATION GROUP OF EMPLOYED PERSONS, BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[See text for source of data] 



OCCUPATION GROUP AND SEX 



WHITE 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 
NONFARH 



RURAL 
FARM 



NON WHITE 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 
NONFARM 



RURAL 
FARM 



MALE 



TOTAL EMPLOYED 

PROFESSIONAL f TECHNICAL* AND KINDRED WORKERS . 

ENGINEERS i TECHNICAL. . * 

MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH WORKERS I 

SALARIED . V ...... 

SELF-EMPLOYED. ...... 

TEACHERS f ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS . 
OTHER PROFESSlONALi TECHNLf & KINDRED WKRS.i 

SALARIED ..,...,,. 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS 

MANAGERS, OFFICIALS, AND PROPRIETORS. EXC, FARM. 

SALARIED ........, 

SELF-EMPLOYED I 

RETAIL TRADE 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE . . . 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS ... 

SALES WORKERS 

RETAIL TRADE . . . . 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE 

CRAFTSMEN? FOREMEN, AND KINDRED WORKERS* . . . . 

FOREMEN (N.E.C. 1 ) . . . . , 

MECHANICS AND REPAIRMEN. ........... 

METAL CRAFTSMEN, EXCEPT MECHANICS. 

CONSTRUCTION CRAFTSMEN 

OTHER CRAFTSMEN . 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS ......... 

DRIVERS AND DELIVERYMEN. . 

OTHER OPERATIVES, ETC.i 

DURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING. . . 

NONDURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING . ...... 

NONMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS. ... . 

SERVICE WORKERS, EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . , 

PROTECTIVE SERVICE WORKERS 

WAITERS, BARTENDERS, COOKS, & COUNTER WORKERS. 
OTHER SERVICE WORKERS. ....... 

FARM LABORERS AND FARM FOREMEN 

LABORERS, EXCEPT FARM AND MINE ... 

CONSTRUCTION .... ....... 

MANUFACTURING. . . . 

OTHER INDUSTRIES ......... 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED. ...... 

FEMALE 

TOTAL EMPLOYED ...... 

PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL* AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH WORKERS I 

SALARIED 

SELF-EMPLOYED. . 

TEACHERS, ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS . . 
OTHER PROFESSIONAL, TECHN'Lf & KINDRED WKRS.I 

SALARIED 

SELF-EMPLOYED. 

FARMFRS AND FARM MANAGERS. ...... . 

MANAGERS, OFFICIALS* AND PROPRIETORS* EXC. FARM* 

SALARIED 

SELF-EMPLOYED I 

RETAIL TRADE 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE. . . . 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS .......... 

SECRETARIES* STENOGRAPHERS, AND TYPISTS. . . . 

OTHER CLERICAL WORKERS . . . . . . ... . 

SALES WORKERS. 

RETAIL TRADE . . 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE. ........... 

CRAFTSMEN* FOREMEN* AND KINDRED WORKERS. . . . . 
OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS 

DURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING . . 

NONDURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING ........ 

NONMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS. ........... 

SERVICE WORKERS* EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . 
WAITERS* BARTENDERS, COOKS* & COUNTER WORKERS. 
OTHER SERVICE WORKERS. ............ 

FARM LABORERS AND FARM FOREMEN ......... 

LABORERS, EXCEPT FARM AND MINE ......... 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED . . . 



363 193 

26 350 

4 491 

1 357 

2 401 
2 356 

15 315 

2 430 

23 278 

42 663 
23 764 

11 054 

7 845 

20 868 
31 850 

15 738 

16 112 

77 736 

12 549 
19 262 

5 480 
23 398 

17 047 

91 710 
14 552 

8 982 
55 384 
12 792 

100 

12 426 
5 600 
1 682 

5 144 

7 823 

14 439 

3 197 

6 506 

4 736 

11 950 



199 186 
25 369 

6 350 

709 

11 885 

5 406 
1 019 

1 581 

6 914 
3 662 

2 429 
823 

47 971 

16 750 
31 221 

17 509 
16 251 

1 258 

2 132 
70 279 

3 207 
63 821 

3 251 

3 264 

13 170 

6 034 

7 136 

2 233 

1 449 

7 315 



165 511 
17 760 
3 O38 

1 044 
1 820 
1 118 

8 989 
1 751 



25 698 
15 527 

5 620 

4 551 

12 071 

18 988 

8 189 

10 799 

35 282 

6 094 

8 745 

2 711 

9 178 
8 554 

36 417 
6 520 

3 471 
20 118 

6 308 

52 

6 444 
2 989 

1 016 

2 439 

294 

5 060 
1 O52 

1 819 

2 189 

6 688 



101 856 
15 934 

4 586 

511 

6 384 

3 727 
726 



4 098 

2 431 

1 125 
542 

29 436 
10 905 
18 531 

9 525 

8 652 

873 

1 095 
27 757 

1 247 
24 722 

1 788 

1 425 
7 503 

3 268 

4 235 

16 
588 

4 390 



153 546 
9 387 

1 316 

290 
519 

981 

5 679 
602 

3 812 

14 803 
7 314 

4 670 

2 819 

7 348 
11 058 

6 284 

4 774 

37 454 

5 869 
9 317 
2 505 

11 987 

7 776 

49 104 

6 888 

4 782 
31 801 

5 633 

37 

5 176 

2 151 

619 

2 406 

2 911 

8 056 

1 809 

3 981 

2 266 

4 400 



79 460 
7 180 

1 527 
153 

3 865 

1 391 
244 



2 304 
981 

1 080 
243 

15 756 

4 916 

10 840 

6 421 

6 114 

307 

884 
36 946 

1 605 
34 147 

1 194 

1 485 
4 836 

2 442 
2 394 

365 
769 

2 291 



44 136 
1 203 

137 

23 
62 

257 

647 
77 



2 162 
923 

764 
475 

1 449 

1 804 

1 265 

539 

5 000 
586 

1 200 
264 

2 233 
717 

6 189 
1 144 

729 

3 465 
851 

11 
806 
460 

47 
299 

4 618 
1 323 

336 
706 
281 

862 



17 870 
2 255 

237 

45 

1 636 

268 
49 

1 269 

512 
250 

224 
38 

2 779 
929 

1 850 



563 

485 

78 



153 
5 576 

355 
4 952 

269 

354 
831 
324 
507 

1 852 
92 



145 963 

3 417 

51 

74 

114 
1 700 

1 284 
194 

18 577 

1 277 
280 

578 

419 

1 603 

1 049 
672 
377 

13 128 
165 

2 873 
408 

8 212 

1 470 

29 865 
12 279 

6 058 

5 057 

6 471 

997 

12 119 
258 

2 073 

9 788 

23 691 

33 869 

7 817 

13 357 
12 695 

6 171 



95 391 
7 285 

734 

36 

5 787 

693 
35 

2 402 

693 

181 

422 
90 

904 
366 
538 

546 

521 

25 

265 

7 190 

295 

2 659 

4 236 

45 753 
14 195 

5 034 

9 161 

11 732 
553 

3 873 



50 306 

2 123 

26 

42 

98 

1 070 

760 
127 

325 

737 
176 

329 
232 

1 033 
622 

347 
275 

6 693 

86 

1 378 
207 

4 184 
838 

13 063 

5 314 

2 172 

2 244 

3 333 

570 

7 650 
117 

1 497 

6 036 

925 

13 062 

2 898 

3 814 
6 350 

3 503 



44 895 
4 573 

600 

19 

3 453 

474 
27 

21 

421 
120 

243 
58 

628 
253 
375 

272 

251 

21 

164 

4 094 
158 

1 432 

2 504 

23 040 
8 661 
2 883 

5 778 

274 
238 

2 509 



59 477 

1 062 
21 

32 

16 
482 

448 
63 

4 193 

480 
92 

232 

156 

474 

342 

259 

83 

5 541 

56 

1 283 
189 

3 457 
554 

13 884 
5 736 

3 167 

2 383 

2 596 

358 

3 887 
113 
520 

3 254 

9 985 
17 358 

4 04Q 
7 785 

5 533 

1 913 



35 203 
2 135 

109 
17 

1 809 

192 
8 

660 

244 
53 

159 
32 

201 

78 

123 

216 

212 

4 

83 

2 644 
117 

1 031 
1 496 

16 390 
4 649 

1 795 

2 854 

4 654 
253 



36 180 

232 

4 



76 
4 

14 059 

60 
12 

17 
31 

96 
85 
66 

19 

894 
21 

212 
12 

571 
78 

2 918 
1 227 

719 
430 
542 

69 

582 

28 

56 

498 

12 981 

3 449 
879 

1 758 
812 

755 



15 293 
577 

25 
... 

525 

27 

1 721 
28 



75 
35 
4O 

58 
58 



18 
452 

20 
196 
236 

4 323 

885 
356 
529 

6 804 
62 

290 



"N.E.C." MEANS NOT ELSEWHERE CLASSIFIED. 



42-106 



South Carolina 



Table 59. OCCUPATION GROUP OF EMPLOYED PERSONS, BY SEX, FOR THE STATE: 1940 TO 1960 

[See text for source of data. Minus sign (-) denotes decrease. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200 in 1960 or 100 in 1950 or 1940] 



OCCUPATION GROUP AND SEX 



NUMBER 



I960 



1940 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 



1960 



1950 



1940 



PERCENT INCREASE 



1950 TO 
1960 



1940 TO 
1960 



MALE 



TOTAL EMPLOYED ......... 

PROFESSIONAL! TECHNICAL. AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

ENGINEERS* TECHNICAL . . . . 

MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH WORKERS I 

SALARIED . . . . 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

TEACHERS* ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS . 
OTHER PROFESSIONAL* TECHN'L* & KINDRED WKRS.t 

SALARIED . ........ 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS 

MANAGERS* OFFICIALS* AND PROPRIETORS. EXC, FARM. 

SALARIED ..... 

SELF-EMPLOYED* 

RETAIL TRADE 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE . . 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS . * . . 

SALES WORKERS "". 

RETAIL TRADE 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE 

CRAFTSMEN* FOREMEN* AND KINDRED WORKERS. . . . * 

FOREMEN (N. E.C.I). . . . . 

MECHANICS AND REPAIRMEN . . . 

METAL CRAFTSMEN* EXCEPT MECHANICS. ...... 

CONSTRUCTION CRAFTSMEN . * . . 

OTHER CRAFTSMEN * . . . . 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS 

DRIVERS AND DELIVERYMEN 

OTHER OPERATIVES* ETC.* 

DURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING 

NONDURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING ....... 

NONMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES . . 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS 

SERVICE WORKERS* EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . . 

PROTECTIVE SERVICE WORKERS . . . . 

WAITERS* BARTENDERS. COOKS t & COUNTER WORKERS. 
OTHER SERVICE WORKERS 

FARM LABORERS AND FARM FOREMEN ......... 

LABORERS* EXCEPT FARM AND MINE .... 

CONSTRUCTION . 

MANUFACTURING. . . * 

OTHER INDUSTRIES ...... 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED. . . . 

FEMALE 

TOTAL EMPLOYED 

PROFESSIONAL* TECHNICAL* AND KINDRED WORKERS . 
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH WQRKERSi 

SALARIED ..... 

SELF-EMPLOYED 

TEACHERS? ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS . 
OTHER PROFESSIONAL* TECHN'L* & KINDRED WKRS.i 

SALARIED . . 

SELF-EMPLOYED . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS 

MANAGERS. OFFICIALS* AND PROPRIETORS* EXC. FARM. 
SALARIED 

SELF-EMPLOYED I 

RETAIL TRADE 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS .... 

SECRETARIES. STENOGRAPHERS, AND TYPISTS. . . . 
OTHER CLERICAL WORKERS ..... 

SALES WORKERS 

RETAIL TRADE . . . 

OTHER THAN RETAIL TRADE 

CRAFTSMEN* FOREMEN* AND KINDRED WORKERS 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS 

DURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING . . . . 

NONDURABLE GOODS MANUFACTURING . . . . * . . . 

NONMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES . . . . 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS . 

SERVICE WORKERS. EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD, . . . 
WAITERS, BARTENDERS, COOKS, & COUNTER WORKERS. 
OTHER SERVICE WORKERS 

FARM LABORERS AND FARM FOREMEN ......... 

LABORERS. EXCEPT FARM AND MINE ......... 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED 



509 156 

31 767 
4 542 

1 431 

2 515 

4 056 

16 599 

2 624 

41 855 

43 940 
24 044 

11 632 

8 264 

22 471 

32 899 
16 410 

16 489 

90 864 

12 714 
22 135 

5 888 
31 610 

18 517 

121 575 
26 831 

15 040 
60 441 

19 263 

1 097 

24 545 

5 858 

3 755 
14 932 

31 714 
48 308 
11 014 
19 863 

17 431 

18 121 



294 577 
32 654 

7 084 

745 

17 672 

6 099 

1 054 

3 983 

7 607 
3 843 

2 851 
913 

48 875 

17 116 
31 759 

18 055 
16 772 

1 283 

2 397 
77 469 

3 502 
66 480 

7 487 

49 017 
27 365 
11 068 
16 297 

13 965 
2 002 

11 188 



519 708 
20 944 

2 346 

3 188 
2 869 

12 541 

100 667 

38 264 

18 768 

19 496 



16 697 
27 959 
16 334 
11 625 

73 105 
8 343 
14 333 

4 703 
29 436 
16 290 

107 000 
21 370 



85 630 



1 347 

19 833 

4 692 

3 072 

12 069 

59 157 
48 688 



(3) 
6 047 



235 525 

23 719 

5 105 
14 299 

4 315 

4 843 

6 058 

2 816 

3 242 



27 353 

9 103 
18 250 

13 366 

12 565 

801 

1 576 
65 448 

1 454 
56 005 

7 989 

38 986 

17 703 

7 039 

10 664 

30 398 

1 924 

4 151 



461 273 
14 537 

1 330 



13 207 



114 871 
25 808 



11 630 
19 519 



41 905 
4 891 
6 946 
3 410 

26 658 



76 856 

15 000 



61 856 



2 800 
15 294 

3 434 
2 360 
9 500 

91 969 

43 915 

(*> 

(3) 

(3) 

2 169 



194 300 
17 476 



(3) 



8 564 



2 873 
(3) 



(8) 



12 237 

5 542 

6 695 

6 177 
<3, 

<*> 

821 

40 080 
( a } 
(8) 
(8) 

49 457 
9 259 
2 735 
6 524 

44 210 
1 238 

1 908 



100.0 
6.2 
0.9 

0.3 
0.5 
0.8 

3.3 

0.5 

8.2 

8.6 
4,7 

2.3 

1.6 

4.4 
6.5 
3.2 
3.2 

17.8 
2.5 
4.3 
1.2 
6.2 
3.6 

23.9 
5.3 

3.0 

11.9 

3.8 

0.2 
4.8 
1.2 
0.7 
2.9 

6.2 
9.5 
2.2 
3.9 

3.4 

3.6 



100.0 

11.1 

2.4 
0.3 
6.0 

2.1 
0.4 

1.4 

2.6 
1.3 

1.0 
0.3 

16.6 

5.8 

10.8 

6.1 
5.7 

0.4 

0.8 
26.3 

1.2 

22.6 

2.5 

16.6 
9.3 
3.8 
5.5 

4.7 
0.7 

3.8 



100.0 
4.0 
0.5 

0.6 
0.6 
2.4 

19.4 

7.4 
3.6 

3.8 



3.2 

5.4 
3.1 
2.2 

14.1 
1.6 
2.8 
0.9 
5,7 
3.1 

20.6 
4.1 



0.3 
3,8 
0.9 
0.6 
2.3 

11.4 
9.4 

<8J 

(> 
(3) 

, 1.2 



100.0 
10.1 

2,2 

6.1 
l.B 

2.1 

2.6 

1.2 

1.4 



11.6 
3.9 
7.7 

5.7 
5.3 
0.3 

0.7 
27.8 

0.6 
23.8 

3.4 

16.6 
7.5 
3.0 
4.5 

12.9 
0.8 



100.0 
3.2 

0.3 



2.9 



24.9 
5.6 

(3) 



2.5 
4.2 
(8) 
(3) 

9.1 
1.1 
1.5 
0.7 
5.8 



16.7 
3.3 



13.4 



0.6 
3.3 

0.7 
0.5 
2*1 

19.9 

9 S 5 
(3) 

<3) 

(8) 

0.5 



100.0 
9.0 

(3) 
(8) 
(8) 



1.5 
(3) 



6.3 
2.9 

3.4 

3.2 

(8) 
(8) 

0.4 
20.6 
(8) 
(ft) 
(8) 

25.5 

4.8 
1.4 
3.4 

22.8 
0.6 

1.0 



-2,0 
51*7 
93.6 

23.8 

41.4 
53.3 

-58.4 

14.8 
28.1 

2.1 



34.6 

17.7 

0.5 

41*8 

24*3 
52.4 
54.4 
25.2 
7*4 
13.7 

13.6 
25.6 



10.6 



-18.6 
23.8 
24.9 
22.2 

23.7 

-46.4 

-0,8 

(8) 

(8) 

(8) 

199.7 



25.1 
37.7 

53-* 
23.6 

65.8 

-17.8 

25.6 
36.5 

16.1 



78.7 
88.0 
74.0 

35.1 
33.5 

60*2 

52.1 
18.4 
140.9 
18.7 
-6.3 

25.7 

54.6 
57.2 
52.8 

-54.1 
4.1 



10.4 
118*5 
241.5 



106.1 



-63.6 
70.3 

(8) 



93.2 

68.5 
<3) 
(8) 

116.8 

159.9 

21S.7 

72.7 

88.0 



58.2 
78.9 



53.2 



-60.8 
60.5 
70.6 
59.1 
57.2 

-65.5 

10.0 

(8) 

(8) 



735.5 



51.6 
86.9 

(8) 
(8) 
(3) 

-53.5 

164.8 
(3) 

(8) 



299.4 
208.8 
374.4 

192.3 
(8) 
(8) 

192.0 
93.3 

(8) 
(8) 
(8) 

-0.9 
195.6 
304.7 
149.8 

-68.4 
61,7 

486.4, 



1 N.E.C." MEANS NOT ELSEWHERE CLASSIFIED. 



2 NOT AVAILABLE. 



General Social and Economic Characteristics 



42-107 



Table 60. MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP OF THE EXPERIENCED UNEMPLOYED, BY COLOR AND SEX, FOR THE STATE, 

URBAN AND RURAL: 1960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is teas than 200] 



MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP t COLOR* AND SEX 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 
NONFARM 



RURAL 
FARM 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 



THE 
STATE 



URBAN 



RURAL 
NONFARM 



RURAL 
FARM 



MALE 



TOTAL * 

PROFESSIONAL? TECHNICAL* AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS . . , . , 

MANAGERS? OFFICIALS? AND PROPRIETORS? EXC. FARM. 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS , 

SALES WORKERS. 

CRAFTSMEN i FOREMEN? AND KINDRED WORKERS. .... 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS 

SERVICE WORKERS? EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . . 

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN. 

LABORERS? EXCEPT FARM AND MINE 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED. ............ 

WHITE 

PROFESSIONAL? TECHNICAL? AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS 

MANAGERS? OFFICIALS? AND PROPRIETORS? EXC. FARM. 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS .... 

SALES WORKERS 

CRAFTSMEN? FOREMEN? AND KINDRED WORKERS 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS 

SERVICE WORKERS? EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . . 

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN 

LABORERS* EXCEPT FARM AND MINE ......... 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED. ...... 

NONWHITE . 

PROFESSIONAL? TECHNICAL? AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS 

MANAGERS? OFFICIALS? AND PROPRIETORS? EXC. FARM. 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS 

SALES WORKERS 

CRAFTSMEN? FOREMEN? AND KINDRED WORKERS. .... 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS. .... 

SERVICE WORKERS? EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . . 

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN. * 

LABORERS? EXCEPT FARM AND MINE 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED 

FEMALE 

TOTAL 

PROFESSIONAL* TECHNICAL? AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS. 

MANAGERS? OFFICIALS? AND PROPRIETORS? EXC. FARM. 
CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS .......... 

SALES WORKERS 

CRAFTSMEN* FOREMEN* AND KINDRED WORKERS 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS ......... 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS 

SERVICE WORKERS* EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . , . 

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN 

LABORERS? EXCEPT FARM AND MINE 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED 

PROFESSIONAL? 'TECHNICAL I AND KINDRED WORKERS . . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS. . . 

MANAGERS? OFFICIALS* AND PROPRIETORS? EXC. FARM. 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS 

SALES WORKERS 

CRAFTSMEN? FOREMEN? AND KINDRED WORKERS. . . . . 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS ... 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS 

SERVICE WORKERS? EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . . 

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN 

LABORERS. EXCEPT FARM AND MINE 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED 

NONWHITE 

PROFESSIONAL* TECHNICAL* AND KINDRED WORKERS . 

FARMERS AND FARM MANAGERS . . . . . 

MANAGERS. OFFICIALS* AND PROPRIETORS. EXC. FARM. 

CLERICAL AND KINDRED WORKERS ... 

SALES WORKERS 

CRAFTSMEN? FOREMEN? AND KINDRED WORKERS 

OPERATIVES AND KINDRED WORKERS . . . 

PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS, ...... 

SERVICE WORKERS? EXCEPT PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD. . . . 

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN. . * 

LABORERS? EXCEPT FARM AND MINE 

OCCUPATION NOT REPORTED * * 



18 356 
246 
455 
376 
570 
613 

3 469 

4 776 

59 

1 076 
1 537 
3 920 
1 259 



10 369 
210 
152 
344 
510 
557 

2 562 

3 298 

19 

461 

413 

1 186 

677 



7 967 
36 

303 
32 
60 
56 

907 

1 478 

40 

615 

1 124 

2 734 
582 



14 354 

271 

102 

70 

1 335 
849 

89 
4 635 

2 683 
1 499 
1 514 

137 
1 170 



8 409 

223 

30 

70 

1 280 

829 

76 

4 117 
188 
722 
108 
74 
692 



5 945 

48 

72 

... 

55 

20 

13 

518 

2 495 

777 

1 406 

63 

478 



7 915 
147 
30 
217 
333 
358 

1 570 

1 998 

39 

664 

171 

1 614 
774 



4 692 

127 

17 

193 

299 

346 

1 110 

1 372 

15 

287 

58 

455 

413 



3 223 

20 

13 

24 

34 

12 

460 

626 

24 

377 

113 

1 159 

361 



6 764 

158 

16 

54 

875 

444 

71 

1 991 

1 408 

920 

147 

59 

621 



4 171 

126 
12 
54 

832 

436 
58 

1 738 
70 

467 

4 

29 

345 



2 593 
32 

4 

*43 

8 

13 

253 

1 338 

453 

143 

30 

276 



8 619 
99 
188 
139 
206 
222 

1 615 

2 388 

20 

380 

974 

1 978 

410 



4 783 
83 
55 

131 

184 

187 

1 228 

1 671 

4 

158 
226 
635 
221 



3 836 

16 

133 

8 

22 

35 

387 

717 

16 

222 

748 

1 343 

189 



6 063 

105 

28 

16 

407 

333 

18 

2 248 

1 078 

511 

805 

54 

460 



3 585 

89 

11 

16 

395 

321 

18 

2 015 

95 

239 

57 

33 

296 



2 478 

16 

17 

... 

12 

12 

... 

233 

983 

272 

748 

21 

164 



1 822 

... 

237 

20 

31 

33 

284 

390 

... 

32 

392 

328 

75 



914 

80 

20 

27 

24 

224 

255 

. 

16 

129 

96 

43 



908 
* . 
157 
... 

4 
9 

60 

135 

... 

16 

263 

232 

32 



527 
8 

58 
... 

53 
72 
. 

396 

197 

68 

562 

24 

89 



653 

8 
7 

... 
53 
72 

364 
23 

16 
47 
12 
51 



51 



32 
174 

52 
515 

12 

38 



100.0 

1.3 

2.5 

2.0 

3.1 

3.3 

18.9 

26.0 

0.3 

5.9 

8.4 

21.4 

6.9 



100.0 
2.0 
1.5 
3.3 

4.9 

5.4 

24.7 

31.7 

0*2 

4.4 

4,0 

11.4 

6.S 



100.0 
0.5 
3.8 
.0.4 
0.8 
0,7 
11*4 
18.6 
0.5 
7.7 
14.1 
34.3 
7.3 



100.0 

1*9 

0.7 

0.5 

9.3 

5.9 

0.6 

32.3 

18.7 

10.4 

10.5 

1.0 

8.2 



100.0 
2.7 
0.4 
0.8 
15,2 
9.9 
0.9 
49.0 
2.2 
8.6 
1.3 
0.9 
8.2 



100.0 
0.8 
1 

0.9 
0.3 

8.7 

42.0 

13 

23.7 
1.1 
8.0 



100.0 

1.9 

0.4 

2.7 

4.2 

4.5 

19.8 

25.2 

0.5 

8.4 

2.2 

20.4 

9.8 



100.0 
2.7 
0.4 
4.1 
6.4 
7.4 
23.7 
29.2 
0.3 
6.1 
1.2 
9.7 
8.8 



100.0 

0.6 

0.4 

0,7 

1.1 

0.4 

14.3 

19.4 

0,7 

11,7 

3.5 

36.0 

11.2 



100.0 
2.3 

0.2 

0.8 

12.9 

6.6 

1.0 

29.4 

20.8 

13.6 

2.2 

0.9 

9.2 



100.0 
3.0 
0.3 
1.3 

19.9 

10.5 
1.4 

41,7 
1.7 

11.2 
0.1 
0.7 
8.3 



100.0 
1.2 

0,2 
, * 

1.7 

0,3 

0,5 

9,8 

51.6 

17.5 

5.5 

1.2 

10.6 



100.0 

1.1 

2.2 

1.6 

2.4 

2.6 

18.7 

27.7 

0.2 

4.4 

11.3 

22*9 

4*8 



100.0 

1.7 

1.1 

2.7 

3.8 

3.9 

25.7 

34.9 

0.1 

3.3 

4.7 

13.3 

4*6 



100.0 
0.4 
3.5 
0*2 
0.6 
0.9 
10*1 
18.7 
0.4 
5.8 
19*5 
35.0 
4.9 



100.0 

1.7 

0.5 

0.3 

6.7 

5.5 

0.3 

37.1 

17.8 

8,4 

13,3 

0,9 

7.6 



100.0 
2.5 
0.3 
0.4 

11.0 
9.0 
0.5 

56 
2.6 
6.7 
1.6 
0.9 



100.0 
0.6 

. i 

0.5 
0.5 
... 
9.4 

39 

11.0 

30 
0.8 
6.6 



100.0 


13.0 
1.1 
1.7 

1.8 
15.6 
21.4 

... 

1.8 
21.5 
18.0 

4.1 



100.0 
... 

8.6 
2.2 

3.0 
2.6 

24.5 
27.9 

... 

1.8 
14.1 
10.5 

4.7 



100.0 

, . . 

17.3 

oli 

1.0 

6.6 
14.9 

. . 

1.8 
29.0 
25.6 

3.5 



100.0 
0.5 
3.8 

3.5 

4.7 



12.9 

4.5 

36.8 

1.6 

5.8 



100.0 
1.2 
1.1 

all 
11.0 

... 

55.7 
3.5 
2.5 
7.2 
1.8 
7.8 



100.0 
... 

5.8 



3*7 
19.9 

5.9 
58.9 

1.4 
4.3 



42-108 South Carolina 

Table 61.-INDUSTRY GROUP OF EMPLOYED PERSONS, BY COLOR, FOR THE STATE, URBAN AND RURAL: I960 

[See text for source of data. Percent not shown where less than 0.1 or where base is less than 200] 



INDUSTRY G