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Full text of "The centennial celebration of the theological seminary of the Presbyterian church in the United States of America, at Princeton, New Jersey, May fifth, May sixth, May seventh, nineteen hundred and twelve"

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Princeton Theological 

Seminary. 
The centennial celebration 

of the theological seminary 

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THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 

OF THE 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

AT PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 



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( JAN 8 191 
THE CENTENNIAL CELEBEATION ^£iMJ$ 

OF THE 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

AT PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 



MAY FIFTH -MAY SIXTH -MAY SEVENTH 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWELVE 



PRINCETON 

AT THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

1912 



This volume has been printed under the 
supervision of 



Benjamin B. Warfield 
William P. Armstrong 
Harold McA. Robinson 

Committee 



Copyright by the 

Trustees of the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church, 

at Princeton, New Jersey, 1912 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Introductory Note 1 

Responses from the Courts op the Presbyterian Church in the 

United States op America 23 

From the General Assembly 25 

From the Synods (arranged alphabetically) 28 

From the Presbyteries (arranged alphabetically) 48 

From the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York City . . 79 

Responses from the Boards of the General Assembly of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States op America ... 83 

The Board of Home Missions 85 

The Board of Foreign Missions 85 

The Board of Education 86 

The Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work .... 86 

The Board of the Church Erection Fund 87 

The Board of Ministerial Relief 87 

Responses from Other Ecclesiastical Bodies 89 

The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 91 

The General Assembly of the United Free Church of Scotland . 92 

The General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland .... 93 

The Synod of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland ... 95 

The Synod of the Presbyterian Church of England 96 

The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland . 97 
The Synod of Ballymena and Coleraine of the Presbyterian Church 

in Ireland 98 

The Diocese of New Jersey of the Protestant Episcopal Church . 99 

Responses from the Presiding Officers of Churches .... 101 

The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 103 
The Moderator of the General Assembly of the United Free Church 

of Scotland 103 

The Moderator Designate of the General Assembly of the United 

Free Church of Scotland 104 

The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church of 

Scotland 105 

OH 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

The Moderator of the Synod of the Free Presbyterian Church of 
Scotland 105 

The Moderator of the Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church 
of Scotland 106 

The Moderator of the Synod of the United Original Seceders . . 107 

The Moderator of the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in Ireland 107 

The Moderator of the Synod of the Presbyterian Church of Eng- 
land 108 

The Moderator for 1901 of the General Assembly of the Welsh 
Calvinistic Methodist Connection 109 

The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in Canada 109 

The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Reformed Presby- 
terian Church 110 

The President of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in 
the United States Ill 

The President of the Northern Baptist Convention Ill 

The Moderator of the National Council of Congregational Churches 111 

The Presiding Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States 112 

The President of the General Council of the Reformed Episcopal 
Church 112 

The President of the General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church in the United States of America 113 

The President of the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church in North America 113 

The President of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North 
America 114 

The President of the German Evangelical Synod of North Amer- 
ica 114 

The Secretary of the Board of Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church 116 

The Senior Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South . 116 

The Chairman of the Christian Union Commission of the Dis- 
ciples of Christ 117 

The President of the General Conference of the Mennonite Church 
of North America 117 



Responses from Foreign Divinity Faculties 119 

Scotland 

The Faculty of Divinity of the University of Edinburgh . . . 121 

The Faculty of Divinity in the University of Aberdeen . . . 122 

New College, Edinburgh 124 

The United Free Church College, Glasgow 125 

[vi] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Church College at Aberdeen . 
The Free Church College, Edinburgh 127 



PAGE 

The United Free Church College at Aberdeen 126 



Irelakd 

Assembly's College, Belfast 129 

M'Crea-Magee Presbyterian College, Londonderry 130 

The Theological Faculty of Dublin University 130 

ENGLAND 

The Faculty of Theology, University of Oxford 131 

The Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge .... 131 

The Theological Faculty in the University of Durham .... 132 

The Faculty of Theology, University of London, King's College . 132 

The Faculty of Theology, University of London 133 

Westminster College, Cambridge 133 

New College and Hackney College, London 134 

Mansfield College, Oxford 135 

Baptist College, Regent's Park, N. W., London 136 

Manchester College, Oxford 136 

Wales 

St. Davids College, Lampeter 137 

Netherlands (and South Africa) 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Amsterdam . . . 137 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Groningen . . . 138 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Leiden .... 139 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Utrecht .... 140 
The Theological Seminary of the Dutch Reformed Church, Stellen- 

bosch, South Africa 141 

Denmark 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Copenhagen . . 141 

Norway 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Christiania ... 142 

Finland 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Helsingfors ... 143 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Germany 

PAGE 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Berlin . . . 143 

The Catholic Theological Faculty of the University of Bonn . 145 

The Royal Lyceum of Braunsberg 145 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Erlangen . . 146 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Freiburg i. B. . 146 

The Theological Faculty of the Royal Bavarian Lyceum, Freising 147 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Giessen . . . 148 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Gbttingen . . 148 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Halle- Wittenberg 149 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Heidelberg . . 150 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Jena .... 151 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Konigsberg . . 151 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Leipzig . . . 152 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Marburg . . 153 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Munich . . . 154 
The Evangelical Theological Faculty of the University of 

Strassburg i. E 155 

The Catholic Theological Faculty of the University of 

Strassburg i. E 156 

The Evangelical Theological Faculty of the University of 

Tubingen 157 

The CathoUc Theological Faculty of the University of Tubingen 158 



France (and Jerusalem) 

The Catholic University of the West, Angers 158 

The Catholic Faculties of Lyons 159 

The Free Faculty of Protestant Theology, Montauban .... 159 

The Faculty of Protestant Theology of the University of Paris 161 

The BibUcal School of Jerusalem 161 



Belgium 
The Catholic University of Louvain 162 



Switzerland 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Basel 162 

The Catholic Theological Faculty of the University of Bern . . 164 

The Faculty of Theology of the University of Freiburg . . . 164 

The Faculty of Theology of the University of Geneva .... 165 

The Evangelical Theological Faculty of Geneva 166 

C viii 3 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGB 

The Faculty of Theology of the Free Church of the Canton de 

Vaud, Lausanne 168 

The Faculty of Theology of the University of Neuchatel . . . 169 
The Free Faculty of Theology of the Evangelical Church, Neu- 
chatel 170 



Austria 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Innsbruck . . . 171 

The Theological Faculty of Salzburg 171 

The Evangelical Theological Faculty of the University of Vienna 172 



Hungary 

The Faculty of Theology of the Royal Hungarian University, 

Budapest 173 

The Reformed Theological Academy, Budapest 174 

The Theological Faculty of the Reformed College, Debreczen . . 175 

The Unitarian Theological College, Klausenburg 178 

The Reformed Theological Academy, Papa 179 

The Reformed Theological Academy, Sarospatak 179 

The Evangelical Theological Academy, Sopron (Oedenbourg) . 181 



Bohemia 
The Theological Faculty of the Royal Bohemian University, Prague 182 



Canada 

Knox College, Toronto 183 

Queen's University, Kingston 184 

The Presbyterian College, Montreal 185 

Manitoba College, Winnipeg 185 

Westminster Hall, Vancouver 186 

The Faculty of Theology of Trinity College, Toronto .... 186 

Wycliffe College, Toronto 187 

Responses from Theological Schools in this Country (arranged 

according to date of opening) 189 

Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in America, New 

Brunswick, N. J 191 

St. Mary's University and Ecclesiastical Seminary, Baltimore, Md. 191 

The Xenia Theological Seminary, Xenia, Ohio 192 

Hartwick Seminary, Hartwick, N. Y 193 

The Moravian College and Theological Seminary, Bethlehem, Pa. 194 

on 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Andover Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Mass 194 

Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va 195 

Bangor Theological Seminary, Bangor, Me 196 

The General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 

Church, New York City 197 

Auburn Theological Seminary, Auburn, N. Y 197 

Theological Seminary, Colgate University, Hamilton, N. Y. . . 198 

The Divinity School of Yale University, New Haven, Conn. . . 198 

The Allegheny Theological Seminary, North Side, Pittsburgh . . 199 

The Newton Theological Institution, Newton Centre, Mass. . . 200 
The Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in the United 

States, Lancaster, Pa 200 

Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa 201 

The Western Theological Seminary, North Side, Pittsburgh . . 202 

Columbia Theological Seminary, Columbia, S. C 202 

Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio 203 

McCormick Theological Seminary, Chicago 203 

Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn 204 

Oberlin Theological Seminary, Oberlin, Ohio 204 

Union Theological Seminary, New York City 205 

Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa 206 

Wittenberg College, Hamma Divinity School, Springfield, Ohio . 206 

German (Eden) Evangelical Missouri College, St. Louis, Mo. . . 207 

Rochester Theological Seminary, Rochester, N. Y 207 

Dubuque German College and Seminary, Dubuque, la. . . . . 208 

Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn 209 

Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 111 209 

Eureka College, Department of Sacred Literature, Eureka, 111. . 210 

Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pa. . 211 

St. John's University Ecclesiastical Seminary, Collegeville, Minn. 211 

St. Lawrence University, Canton Theological School, Canton, N. Y. 212 

Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago 212 

Niagara University Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, Niagara 

Falls, N. Y 213 

Seabury Divinity School, Faribault, Minn 213 

The Mission House, Plymouth, Wis 214 

The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky. . . 215 

Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, 111. . 216 

Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton, Mo 216 

Lutheran Theological Seminary, Mount Airy, Philadelphia . . 217 

De Lancey Divinity School, Geneva, N. Y 218 

The University of Chicago Divinity School, Chicago .... 218 

Atlanta Baptist College Divinity. School, Atlanta, Ga 219 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J 219 

Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Mass 220 

Crozer Theological Seminary, Chester, Pa 220 

on 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Theological Department, The University of the South, Sewanee, 

Tenn 220 

The German Theological School of Newark, N. J., Bloomfield, N. J. 221 

Pacific Theological Seminary, Berkeley, Cal 221 

Woodstock College, Woodstock, Md 222 

The Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, 

Chicago 223 

Alfred Theological Seminary, Alfred, N. Yv 223 

Howard University, Theological Department, Washington, D. C. 224 

The San Francisco Theological Seminary, San Anselmo, Cal. . . 224 

Talladega College, Theological Department, Talladega, Ala. . . 225 

Theological School and Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Mich. . . 225 

Westminster Theological Seminary, Westminster, Md 226 

The Temple University, Department of Theology, Philadelphia . 227 

Western Theological Seminary, Chicago 227 

University of Southern California, Maclay College of Theology, 

Los Angeles, Cal 228 

The Catholic University of America, School of Sacred Sciences, 

Washington, D. C 228 

Saint Leo Abbey, Saint Leo, Fla 229 

The Seminary of the United Norwegian Lutheran Church, Saint 

Anthony Park, Minn 230 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Omaha, Neb 230 

Houghton Wesleyan Methodist Theological Seminary, Houghton, 

N. Y 231 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, Louisville, Ky. 231 

Western Theological Seminary, Atchison, Kan 234 

Taylor University, Reade Theological Seminary, Upland, Ind. . 234 

Turner Theological Seminary, Morris Brown College, Atlanta, Ga. 235 

Eugene Bible University, Eugene, Ore 235 

Manchester College, Biblical Department, North Manchester, Ind. 236 

School of Theology, Kansas City University, Kansas City, Kan. . 237 

Westminster College, Theological Department, Tehuacana, Texas 238 
Virginia Union University, Theological Department, Richmond, 

Va 238 

Atlanta Theological Seminary, Atlanta, Ga 239 

Meridian Male College, School of Theology and Evangelism, 

Meridian, Miss 240 

Austin Theological Seminary, Austin, Texas 240 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry, Berkeley, Cal. . . . 241 
The Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, 

Texas 242 

Central Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in the 

United States, Dayton, Ohio 242 

Pacific Evangelical Lutheran Seminary, Olympia, Wash. . . . 243 

St. Patrick's Seminary, Menlo Park, Cal 244 

on 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Responses from Missionary Seminaries 245 

Africa 

Albert Academy, Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa . . . 247 

Elat Theological School, Elat, Kamerun, West Africa .... 247 

Union Theological College, Impolweni, near Maritzburg, Natal . 248 
Theological Training School, Ogbomoso, Southern Nigeria, West 

Africa 249 

Brazil 

Seminario Theologico da Egreja Presbyteriana no Brasil, 
Campinas 250 

Bulgaria 
The American Collegiate and Theological Institute, Samokov . . 250 

Burma 
Karen Theological Seminary, Insein 251 

China 

Fati Theological College, Canton 252 

The Graves Theological School, Canton 253 

Union Theological School, Foochow 253 

Nanking Union Theological Seminary, Nanking 254 

Theological School of Shaowu, Foochow 254 

St. John's University, Shanghai 255 

Ashmore Theological Seminary, Swatow 256 

Denmark 
Methodist Theological Seminary, Copenhagen 257 

India 

United Theological College, Bangalore 257 

Bapatla Normal Training School, Bapatla 258 

Bareilly Theological Seminary, Bareilly 259 

American Baptist Telugu Mission, Theological Seminary, Rama- 

patnam 260 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Saharanpur 261 

Italy 

Scvola Teologica Battista, Rome 261 

Cxii^ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Japan 

PAGE 

The Kobe Theological School, Kobe 262 

Theological School of the Kwansei Gakuin, Kobe 263 

The Doshisha Theological School, Kyoto 263 

North Japan College, Sendai 264 

Japan Baptist Theological Seminary, Tokyo 265 

Meiji Gakuin, Tokyo 265 

Mexico 

Colegio Internaeional, Guadalajara 266 

Persia 

Theological Department, Urumia College, Urumia 266 

Philippine Islands 

Iloilo Bible School, Iloilo 267 

Porto Rico 

The Presbyterian Theological Training School, Mayagiiez . . 268 

Syria 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Beirut 268 

TURKEY-IN-ASIA 

Marash Theological Seminary, Marash 269 

Western Turkey Theological Seminary, Marsovan 270 

Responses from Universities and Colleges 271 

The Board of Trustees of Princeton University 273 

Canada 

Dalhousie University, Halifax 273 

The University of Toronto 274 

United States of America (arranged according to date of opening) 

Harvard University 275 

Yale University 275 

University of Pennsylvania 276 

Brown University 276 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Rutgers College 277 

Dartmouth College 277 

Washington and Lee University 278 

Dickinson College 278 

Hampden-Sidney College 279 

University of North Carolina 280 

Williams College 281 

Union University 281 

Middlebury College 282 

Washington and Jefferson College 282 

Miami University 283 

Columbia University 283 

University of Pittsburgh 284 

Amherst College 284 

Franklin and Marshall College 285 

Lafayette College 285 

New York University 286 

Pennsylvania College 287 

Wabash College 288 

Delaware College 288 

Hanover College 289 

Marietta College 289 

Transylvania University 290 

Davidson College 290 

University of Michigan 290 

Westminster College, Pa 291 

The College of the City of New York 292 

Lake Forest College 292 

Macalester College 293 

Lincoln University 293 

Park College 294 

Parsons College 294 

Southwestern Presbyterian University 295 

Bellevue College 295 

Coe College 296 

The College of Emporia 296 

New Windsor College 296 

Alma College 297 

List of Delegates 299 

Programme op Exercises 319 

Sermons and Addresses 337 

Princeton Seminary and the Faith, by Rev. Francis Landey 

Patton, D.D., LL.D 339 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

A Little Book of Love and Life, by Rev. Ethelbert Dudley War- 
field, D.D., LL.D 369 

The Function and the Glory of the Ministry of Grace, by Rev. 
John Fleming Carson, D.D., LL.D 381 

The Making of a Minister, by Rev. Russell Cecil, D.D. . . . 393 

Princeton in the Work of the Pastorate, by Rev. William Leonard 
McEwan, D.D 403 

Princeton on the Mission Field, by Robert Elliott Speer, D.D. . 418 

Princeton in Theological Education and Religious Thought, by 
Rev. William Hallock Johnson, Ph.D 437 

Princeton in its Early Environment and Work, by Charles Beatty 
Alexander, LL.D 455 

On Some Church Problems, by Right Rev. Alexander Stewart, 
M.A., D.D 468 

A Scottish Estimate of Princeton Theology, by Right Rev. James 
Wells, M.A., D.D 484 

Irish and American Presbyterianism, by Right Rev. John Macmil- 
lan, B.A., D.D 499 

Congratulatory Addresses 

From the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 

by Rev. William Henry Roberts, D.D., LL.D 526 

From the Other Presbyterian and Reformed Churches, by Rev. 

John Crawford Scouller, D.D 535 

From Other Churches, by Right Rev. David Hummell Greer, D.D., 

S.T.D., LL.D 539 

From the Seminaries of the Presbyterian Church in the United 

States of America, by Rev. James Gore King McClure, 

D.D., LL.D 542 

From the Seminaries of Other Churches, I, by Rev. Williston 

Walker, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D 549 

From the Seminaries of Other Churches, II, by Rev. Edgar Young 

Mullins, D.D., LL.D 553 

From Princeton University, by Rev. John Grier Hibben, Ph.D., 

LL.D 558 



Response to Congratulatory Addresses 

By Rev. Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D 563 



Cxv] 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Facsimile of the catalogue of Princeton Theological 
Seminary for the year 1821, the earliest catalogue 
extant frontispiece 

Facsimile of the Response from the Faculty of Divin- 
ity in the University of Aberdeen . . . facing p. 119 



C^H 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 



a i 



The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America," located at 
Princeton, New Jersey, was founded in 1812. The story 
of its foundation is embedded in the following extracts 
from the Minutes of the General Assembly. 

The Committee [of Overtures] also laid before the Assembly an 
overture from the Presbytery of Philadelphia, for the establishment 
of a theological school. 

The overture was read, and the Rev. Dr. Dwight, and the Rev. 
Messrs. Irwin, Hosack, Romeyn, Anderson, Lyle, Burch, Lacey, and 
Messrs. Bayard, Slaymaker, and Harrison, elders, were appointed a 
committee to take the overture into consideration, and report upon it. 
(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 23rd, 1809, re- 
print, p. 417.) 

The committee to which was referred the overture in relation to 
the establishment of a Theological School, brought in the following 
report, which being read, was adopted, viz. 

The committee appointed on the subject of a Theological School 
overtured from the Presbytery of Philadelphia, report : 

That three modes of compassing this important object have pre- 
sented themselves to their consideration. 

The first is, to establish one great school in some convenient place, 
near the centre of the bounds of our Church. 

The second is, to establish two schools, in such places as may best 
accommodate the northern and southern divisions of the Church. 

The third is, to establish such a school within the bounds of each 
of the Synods. . . . 

Your committee therefore submit the following resolution, to wit : 

Resolved, That the above plans be submitted to all the Presbyteries 
within the bounds of the General Assembly for their consideration. 

Ill 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

and that they be careful to send up to the next Assembly, at their 
sessions in May 1810, their opinions on the subject. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 27th, 1809, 
reprint, pp. 430, 431.) 

The committee appointed to examine the reports of the several 
Presbyteries on the subject of Theological Schools . . . reported. . . . 

On motion, 

Resolved, That the same committee, with the addition of Messrs. 
Henry A. Rowland, and John M. Wilson, be instructed to consider 
the subject of Theological Schools, and report to the Assembly, 
whether in their opinion any thing, and if any thing, what is proper 
farther to be done. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 21st, 1810, re- 
print, p. 439.) 

The committee appointed to present to the Assembly a plan for 
the establishment of a Theological School, reported, and the report 
was laid on the table. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 29th, 1810, re- 
print, p. 453.) 

The committee appointed farther to consider the subject of Theo- 
logical Schools, reported, and the report being read and amended, 
was adopted, and is as follows, viz. . . . 

Resolved . . . 

2. That the General Assembly will, in the name of the great Head 
of the Church, immediately attempt to establish a seminary for 
securing to candidates for the ministry, more extensive and efficient 
theological instruction than they have heretofore enjoyed. The local 
situation of this seminary is hereafter to be determined. . . . 

5. That the Rev. Drs. Green, Woodhull, Romeyn, and Miller, the 
Rev. Messrs. Archibald Alexander, James Richards, and Amzi Arm- 
strong be a committee to digest and prepare a plan of a Theological 
Seminary. . . . This plan is to be reported to the next General As- 
sembly. . . . 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 30th, 1810, re- 
print, pp. 453, 454.) 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The report of the committee appointed by the last Assembly to 
digest and prepare a plan of a Theological Seminary, was read ; and 
the consideration of it was made the order of the day for tomorrow 
morning. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 17th, 1811, re- 
print, p. 465.) 

An extract from the minutes of the Trustees of the College of 
New Jersey, stating the appointment of a committee of their board, 
to confer with a committee of this Assembly, on the establishment of 
a Theological School, being received, was read, and Drs. Alexander, 
and Nott, the Rev. John P. Campbell, Messrs. Connelly, and Bethune, 
were appointed a committee to confer with the committee of the 
Trustees. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 18th, 1811, re- 
print, p. 466.) 

The order of the day, viz. the consideration of a plan of a Theo- 
logical Seminary, submitted by a committee appointed by the last 
Assembly, was called up, and the discussion of it was postponed to 
hear the report of the committee appointed to confer with a com- 
mittee of the Trustees of New Jersey College. 

This committee reported among other things, that they deem it 
expedient on the part of this Assembly, to appoint a committee with 
ample powers to meet a committee on the part of the Trustees of 
the College of New Jersey, invested with similar powers to frame the 
plan of a constitution for the Theological Seminary, containing the 
fundamental principles of a union with the Trustees of that College, 
and the Seminary already established by them, which shall never be 
changed or altered without the mutual consent of both parties, pro- 
vided that it should be deemed proper to locate the Assembly's 
Seminary at the same place with that of the College. 

Resolved, That a committee for these purposes be appointed 
accordingly; and that said committee be further instructed, and 
invested with powers to receive any propositions which may be made 
to them for locating the said seminary in any other situation if it be 
found expedient; all which shall be fairly and fully reported to 
the next Assembly. 

C 3 ] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

This report was adopted, and a resolution passed to elect said 
committee in the afternoon. 

The subject of locating the Theological Seminary being discussed, 

it was determined by a vote of the Assembly that the rivers Raritan 

and Potomac be the limits, within which the Seminary shall be 

located. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 22nd, 1811, 

reprint, pp. 470, 471.) 

Agreeably to the resolution of the forenoon, an election was held 
for a committee to meet with a committee of the Trustees of New 
Jersey College, and the ballot being taken, Drs. Alexander, Wilson 
and Milledoler, the Rev. Messrs. John McDowell and Janeway, and 
Messrs. Robert Ralston, and Divie Bethune, were declared duly 
elected to compose said committee of the Assembly. 

Resolved, That Dr. Alexander be the chairman of this committee, 

and that he have power to appoint the time and place of the first 

meeting of the committee, and that he give notice accordingly to the 

members. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 22nd, 1811, 

reprint, p. 471.) 

The order of the day was again called up ; and after some progress 
made in reading the report of the committee appointed by last As- 
sembly, to draw up a plan of a Theological School, the farther read- 
ing and consideration of said report was postponed till tomorrow 

morning. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 22nd, 1811, 

reprint, p. 471.) 

The order for the day was again called up ; and after making 
considerable progress in reading the report by paragraphs, and 
making a number of amendments and alterations in it, the Assembly 
adjourned until four o'clock P. M. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 23rd, 1811, 
reprint, p. 472.) 

The order for the day was again resumed, and the reading of 
the report of the committee appointed by last Assembly to draw up 

[43 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

a plan for a Theological School, was finished, except articles 7th and 
9th, which were referred to the consideration of next Assembly. The 
report being thus far corrected and amended, was adopted. 

Resolved, That the committee which reported the plan for a Theo- 
logical School, be continued; that they print for circulation in the 
churches, so much of the plan as has been adopted by the Assembly ; 
and that they digest and prepare such farther provisions and regu- 
lations for said seminary as they may judge to be necessary, and 
report the same to the next Assembly. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 23rd, 1811, re- 
print, p. 472.) 

Resolved, That the committee appointed to confer with a com- 
mittee of the Trustees of the College of New Jersey, be, and they 
hereby are instructed to consider the several articles of the plan of a 
Theological Seminary, so far as the same are adopted by this Assem- 
bly, as their guide in the proposed conference, which they shall in 
no case contravene. 

{Minutes of the General Assembly, May 24th, 1811, re- 
print, p. 479.) 

It being the order of the day, the report of the committee on the 
subject of locating the Theological Seminary was called up. 

A motion was made and seconded, that said seminary be located 
at Princeton. After considerable discussion on the motion, the 
Assembly 

Adjourned till 4 o'clock P. M. 

{Minutes of the General Assembly, May 26th, 1812, re- 
print, p. 496.) 

The discussion of the motion made in the forenoon was resumed, 
and after still farther discussion of the subject, the Assembly 
Adjourned till 9 o'clock tomorrow morning. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 26th, 1812, 
reprint, p. 496.) 

The subject left unfinished yesterday afternoon was again re- 
sumed. 

C5 1 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

A motion was made and seconded, that the subject of locating the 
Theological School be postponed for the present year, and recom- 
mended to the attention of the next Assembly. 

The question being taken was determined in the negative. 

The original motion was then called up, and was amended, and 
with the amendment is as follows : 

Resolved, That Princeton be the site of the Theological Seminary, 
leaving the subject open as to its permanency, agreeably to the stipu- 
lations agreed upon by the joint committee of the last Assembly and 
the Trustees of the College of New Jersey. After some discussion of 
the resolution thus amended, the Assembly adjourned till 4 o'clock, 
P.M. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 27th, 1812, 
reprint, p. 496.) 

The subject of locating the Theological Seminary was again called 
up, and being under discussion, the Assembly adjourned till nine 
o'clock, tomorrow morning. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 27th, 1812, 
reprint, p. 496.) 

The resolution for locating the Theological Seminary was again 
resumed, and after considerable discussion, and special prayer for 
direction on the important subject, was adopted, and is as follows, 
viz. 

Resolved, That Princeton be the site of the Theological Seminary, 
leaving the subject open as to its permanency, agreeably to the stipu- 
lations agreed upon by the joint committees of the last Assembly and 
the Trustees of the College of New Jersey. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 28th, 1812, 
reprint, p. 497.) 

The following plan of an agreement between a committee ap- 
pointed by the last General Assembly, and a committee of the Trus- 
tees of the College of New Jersey, for the location and establishment 
of a Theological Seminary, was submitted to this Assembly, and was 
adopted, and is as follows, viz. 

1. That the Theological Seminary, about to be erected by the 

:6] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

General Assembly, shall have its location in Princeton or its imme- 
diate vicinity, in the state of New Jersey; and in such connexion 
with the College of New Jersey, as is implied in the following 
articles. . . . 

9. . . . And the Trustees engage that, while the Theological Semi- 
nary shall remain at Princeton, no professorship of theology shall 
be established in the College. . . . 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 28th, 1812. 
reprint, pp. 499, 500.) 

Resolved, That an election for Directors of the Theological Semi- 
nary, and for a Professor of Didactic and Polemic Divinity, and 
other Professors, if the Assembly think proper, be held on Saturday 
morning next. . . . 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 28th, 1812. 
reprint, p. 501.) 

Nominations were made for Directors of the Theological Seminary. 
(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 29th, 1812, 
reprint, p. 504.) 

It being the order of the day, the Assembly proceeded to the 
election of Directors of the Theological Seminary. . . . 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 30th, 1812, re- 
print, p. 508; for the names, see p. 509.) 

The order of the day, viz. the election of professor or professors 
in the Theological Seminary, was postponed until Monday morning, 
next. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 30th, 1812, 
reprint, p. 509.) 

The election for a Professor of Didactic and Polemic Divinity, 
was postponed till tomorrow morning. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, June 1st, 1812, 
reprint, p. 510.) 

It being the order of the day for this morning, the Assembly 
proceeded to the election of a Professor of Didactic and Polemic 

C 7 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Divinity in the Theological Seminary. After special prayer for 
direction on the subject, the ballots were taken and read, and the 
Rev. Archibald Alexander, D.D., was declared duly elected. The 
election being closed, a special prayer was made for a divine blessing 
upon the Professor and the Theological Seminary. 

Drs. Green and Hall were appointed a committee to wait on Dr. 
Alexander, and inform him of his appointment. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, June 2nd, 1812, 
reprint, p. 512.) 

Resolved, That the directors of the Theological Seminary be 
directed to meet at Princeton, the last Tuesday in June, at 3 o'clock 
P. M., and afterward on their own adjournments; and Dr. Green 
was directed to write to those directors who were not present and 
give them notice of the meeting. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, June 2nd, 1812, 
reprint, pp. 512, 513.) 

It being the order of the day for this morning, the directors of 
the Theological Seminary reported . . . 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 26th, 1813, 
reprint, p. 526.) 

The subject of locating the Theological Seminary having been 
postponed yesterday, was called up this morning, and after a full 
discussion of the subject, the following resolution was adopted, viz. 

Resolved, That the permanent location of the Theological Semi- 
nary be in the borough of Princeton, New Jersey, in conformity with 
the agreement with the Trustees of the College, signed at Princeton, 
June 26th, 1811, and ratified by the General Assembly at their 
sessions in May, 1812. 

(Minutes of the General Assembly, May 27th, 1813, 
reprint, p. 533.) 

The history of the actual opening of the Seminary is 
recounted in the first report of the Board of Directors, 
made to the General Assembly of 1813. As this docu- 

C 8 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ment is not included in the reprint of the Minutes of the 
General Assembly, it is not generally accessible. It is, 
therefore, reproduced here in full : 

The Board of Directors of the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America, through the good 
hand of their God upon them, are enabled to present this their First 
Report to the General Assembly, under circumstances favourable and 
encouraging. According to appointment, they met on the 30th of 
June, 1812, in Princeton, and chose the Rev. Dr. Ashbel Green their 
President, the Rev. Dr. Philip Milledoler their Vice President, and 
the Rev. John M'Dowell, Secretary. The various and important 
duties committed to their trust, they have endeavoured conscien- 
tiously to fulfil, in humble, but firm confidence in that glorious Re- 
deemer, who hath promised to be with his people to the end of the 
world. The account of their stewardship, they will now give with 
simplicity and fidelity ; and then suggest such measures as they may 
deem worthy of the Assembly's notice. 

For the sake of perspicuity they will arrange the narrative of 
their proceedings under distinct heads. 



I. OF THE PROFESSOR AND HIS INAUGURATION 

At their first meeting, the Directors received information from 
the Rev. Dr. Archibald Alexander of his acceptance of the office 
of Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology in the Seminary. 
They immediately made the necessary arrangements to procure from 
the Presbytery of Philadelphia the dissolution of the pastoral con- 
nexion between him and his congregation, as also to inaugurate him 
into the office of Professor, in the event of such dissolution. On the 
12th of August, the certificate of Dr. Alexander's dismission from 
his charge being presented to the Board, they did solemnly inaugu- 
rate him as Professor. The discourses delivered on that occasion 
have, by their order, been printed, under the impression that these 
discourses would "fully make known to the Christian public the 
views and designs with which the Institution under their care had 
been founded, and was then opened for the reception of pupils." 
The Assembly by noticing this publication will promote the object 

[9] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

of the Board, and the interests of the Infant Seminary, of which 
they are the guardians. 

II. THE STUDENTS 

On the day of the inauguration, William Blair, John Covert, and 
Henry Blatchford, were received by the Board as students in the 
Seminary. Subsequent to that period, Leverett I. F. Huntington, 
William A. M'Dowell, James H. Parmele, Henry R. Weed, Halsey 
Wood, and Benjamin F. Stanton, have been received. One of these, 
viz. William A. M'Dowell, who was far advanced in his Theological 
course before he entered the Seminary, has been licensed to preach 
the gospel by the Presbytery of New Brunswick. The remaining 
eight are still in the Seminary. The term of their probation being 
expired, the Professor, whose duty it is to report any who may be 
unqualified to proceed, has informed the Board that 'the capacity of 
every student in this Seminary, for the acquisition of knowledge, is 
respectable, and most of them may by care and exercise become 
good speakers. Their character, for piety and good conduct, he adds, 
is irreproachable. Their diligence in prosecuting their studies and 
cheerful compliance with the directions of their teacher deserve com- 
mendation. ' 

IU. THE PLAN OF STUDIES 

The Board cannot better exhibit this, than in the words of the 
Professor in his report to them. 'The attention of the students for 
that part of the first year which is past, has been directed, in the 
first place, to the original languages in which the Sacred Scriptures 
were written; and, in the next place, to the English translation of 
the Scriptures, which they have been reading in order. In connexion 
with these studies, they have paid attention to Patriarchal and 
Mosaical rites and institutions; to Jewish antiquities and oriental 
customs ; to Scriptural Chronology and Geography ; and to the con- 
nexion between sacred and profane history, and between the Old 
and New Testaments. They have been required to read composi- 
tions and speak orations of their own composing, agreeably to the 
plan of the Seminary adopted by the General Assembly. The Pro- 
fessor would observe, however, that both himself and students experi- 

Cio] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

enced considerable inconvenience from the want of suitable compends 
on the several branches which they attempted to pursue. The know- 
ledge sought was often contained in massy folios, and mostly in 
foreign languages ; and such books as would have been convenient in 
size and suitable for our purposes, in many instances, were out of 
our reach; or so few copies could be obtained, that the whole class 
could not pursue the studies at once. Your Professor has done 
the best in his power to supply this deficiency by collecting scraps, 
and making translations and abridgments from every work which 
he could find suitable to his purpose. The labour which this re- 
quired he does not regret to have bestowed, as he is convinced that 
the employment has been profitable to himself, as well as useful to 
the students. ' 



IV. ACCOMMODATION OF THE STUDENTS 

The students of the Seminary have been well accommodated, both 
as it relates to boarding and lodging in the College : for the most part 
they have been room mates, and in the refectory have eaten together 
at a separate table. On the subject of the aid expected from the 
charitable funds under the controul of the Trustees of New Jersey 
College, the Directors deem it their duty to state the following facts. 
In November last, at the meeting of a number of the Trustees of the 
College, (a quorum of the Board not being convened,) the President 
was advised to afford to the students of the Seminary such assistance 
as they might need for the winter and spring then ensuing. In 
consequence of this advice, the price of board, to all who chose to 
receive it, has hitherto been reduced to one dollar per week ; and the 
whole expenses of one student in the articles of board and room rent, 
have been defrayed from the funds of the College. At a meeting of 
the Board of the Trustees of the College, on the 13th of the present 
month, they passed the following resolutions : viz. 

1. That on account of the absence of certain members of the Board 
who have heretofore had under their consideration some points per- 
taining to this subject, a final decision thereon be postponed until 
the next meeting. 

2. That, in the mean time, the students in the Theological Semi- 
nary, with respect to pecuniary accommodation, be treated in all 
respects as ordinary students of College. 

mi] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

On these resolutions the Directors remark, that the Theological 
Seminary will be in session less than three months before the next 
meeting of the Board of Trustees of the College— that the deficiency 
in the support of the students of the Seminary, for these three months, 
occasioned by the resolutions recited, has been provided for by a 
private appropriation— that they cherish a sanguine expectation, not 
only from the articles of stipulation between the Assembly and the 
Trustees of the College, but also from the acts of the Trustees them- 
selves, and from information received relative to the prevalent senti- 
ments of the members of the Board of Trustees, that the Board will, 
at their next meeting, give considerable assistance in the support of 
the students of the Seminary — that the better to insure the obtaining 
of this assistance, the Assembly should enjoin on the Board of Direc- 
tors to recommend a specific number of the Theological students as 
candidates for the aid, stipulated in the last article of the agreement 
entered into between them and the Assembly. 

The Professor, in his report to the Board, states, ' that no collision, 
jealousy, or unpleasant feelings of any kind, have arisen between 
the Theological students and those of the College. As far as is 
known to him, they have been uniformly treated with the respect 
due to their station. From the President and faculty of College, 
every accommodation and friendly attention has been afforded which 
it was in their power to bestow; and from the inhabitants of the 
town and vicinity the students have received many civilities. ' 

The Board feel extremely gratified in stating to the Assembly, 
that experience has proved, thus far, that the two institutions have 
had a mutual influence in promoting each other's benefit. The stu- 
dents of the Theological Seminary, by their respectable personal 
characters, as well as their exemplary deportment, have recom- 
mended to the students of the College, with whom they live upon 
terms of the greatest cordiality and friendship, the religion of Jesus 
Christ. In return they have received many advantages, from their 
connexion with and residence in the College. The majority of them 
are members of the literary societies. Of those societies they re- 
ceive the common benefits, and the use of their libraries. Besides 
this, they have the President's promise, that he will give them lec- 
tures and lessons on the composition and structure of sermons, and 
on elocution. They have, moreover, the opportunity of attending the 

[12] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

course of instruction in religion which the President gives to the 
students of the College. 



V. OF THE FUNDS 

The Board have not judged it expedient to publish an address to 
the Christian public, for aiding the funds of the institution as 
directed by the Assembly. They have, however, sent a circular letter 
to the Presbyterian congregations in the cities and towns of Savan- 
nah, Augusta, Charleston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Trenton, Prince- 
ton, New Brunswick, Elizabethtown, Morristown, Orange, Newark, 
New York, Hudson, Albany, Schenectady, Troy, and Lansingburg; 
requesting them to take up a public collection in each of them, to aid 
in defraying the expenses of the Seminary for the present year. 
Nearly $1000 have been reported to the Board as thus collected : viz. 

1st Congregation in Baltimore, $107.56 

2d do. Philadelphia, 146.18 

3d do. do. 54.63 

Elizabethtown, 103.62 

Brick Church, in New York, 204.63 

Wall-street, do. do 180.00 

Rutger's-street, do. do 94.15 

In addition to this the Rev. Mr. M 'Do well reported a 
donation from Mrs. Susan Niemceriez, of Elizabeth- 
town, of 50.00 

Total $940.77 



Of this sum, the collections made in the 2d and 3d congregations 
in Philadelphia are requested by the donors to be appropriated to 
the reduction of the board of the students; and with the consent of 
the Assembly will be thus used by the Directors. 

The Board have directed the Treasurer of the Trustees of the 
Assembly to invest the funds of the Seminary uniformly in the 
public funded debt of the United States. 

They have also adopted the following plan for a permanent and 
contingent fund. 

[13] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

First, Resolved, That all the subscriptions, donations, and legacies 
now in hand, as well as those which shall be hereafter collected, con- 
stitute a permanent fund. The principal or capital of this fund, 
not to be broken upon, except by very urgent circumstances; such 
as the building of houses for the Seminary— the purchase of a library, 
or other indispensable calls, incident to the infant state of the 
Seminary. 

Second, Resolved, That the contingent fund be formed by the 
interest of the permanent fund; by the amount of the collections 
made in the congregations as heretofore recommended; by the 
special draughts on the permanent fund, if they shall be found 
indispensable; and by any donations that may be specially appro- 
priated to this purpose: and that the contingent fund defray the 
expenses of the year ; and that if, in any year, there be a surplusage, 
it be added to the capital of the permanent fund. 

The Directors, finally, on this subject, with pleasure, inform the 
Assembly, that Richard Stockton, esq. of the borough of Princeton, 
has promised to convey to the Rev. John M'Dowell, Samuel Bayard, 
esq. and Dr. John Van Cleeve, as Trustees in behalf of this Board, 
or the survivors, or survivor, and their heirs respectively, a lot of 
four acres of land for the use of the Seminary, provided it be located 
in the said borough. 

VI. EXAMINATION OF THE STUDENTS 

The Directors have, during this month, attended to an examina- 
tion of the students of the Seminary on the Hebrew language, Patri- 
archal and Mosaical Institutions, Jewish Antiquities, Scriptural 
Chronology and Geography, Biblical history, connexion between 
Sacred and Profane history, and between the history of the Old 
and New Testament. The Professor informed the Board, that the 
students were prepared to be examined on the original Greek of the 
gospels, and on a select number of Campbell 's critical disputations ; 
but their examination on these subjects was omitted for want of time. 

The examination afforded the Board much satisfaction in regard 
to the fidelity and diligence of the Professor, and the proficiency of 
the students. They cannot but cherish the hope that these young 
men will fully realize the expectation of the friends of this insti- 
tution. 

[14] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

VII. OF THE LIBRARY 

An appropriation of $100 has been made for the purchase of 
books immediately wanted ; of which sum $77.49 has been expended. 
For the purpose of increasing the library, the Board at an early 
period resolved, that every Director should solicit donations in books. 
The success of different applications in procuring books, has encour- 
aged the Board to continue the resolution. 

VIII. OF RESIGNATIONS 

The Rev. Dr. Milledoler, having left the Presbyterian Church, and 
connected himself with the Reformed Dutch church, has resigned 
his office as Vice President. His place as Director must therefore be 
considered as resigned. The Rev. Dr. Samuel Miller has been elected 
Vice President in his place. 

The Rev. Dr. Alexander has declined taking his seat as a Director, 
in consequence of his acceptance of the office of Professor. 

The Rev. Dr. James P. Wilson has also sent in a letter to the 
Board, resigning his seat as a Director, in consequence of his ill 
health. 

IX. OF EXPENDITURES 

Of the $3000 appropriated by the Assembly to the order of the 
Board, the following sums have been expended : viz. 

To removing Dr. Alexander's effects from Philadelphia 

to Princeton, $22.03 

To do. do. Mr. Haslet, 44.75 

To blank book for Minutes, 7.00 

To two do. for other uses, 475 

To books for the use of the students of the Seminary, . 77.49 
To printing Discourses delivered on the occasion of Dr. 

Alexander's inauguration, 216.10 

To rent of the Professor's house, 125.00 

To stationary, &c, 10.75 

To Professor's salary, three quarters, 1350.00 

To balance unexpended, 1142.13 

$3000.00 
[15: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

In connexion with this report, and as a part of their duty, the 
Directors recommend the three following subjects to the Assembly, 
as demanding their notice. 

1. The immediate appointment of an additional professor. The 
necessity of this measure must be obvious to every reflecting person. 
One man cannot do justice to any number of students in prosecuting 
their theological studies. And it should be recollected, to use the 
language of the Professor in his report to this Board, ' that the whole 
of his time has been occupied in attending to those branches which 
do not properly belong to his department, so that he has had very 
little opportunity of preparing for the duties of his office in that 
branch of Theology which has been assigned him.' In the present 
state of our Seminary, it is of the last importance that we should 
form its character so as to procure the approbation and patronage 
of the Christian public. To secure this, we must place it upon a level 
with other institutions of a similar kind in this country, especially 
in the number of its Professors, and the consequent increase of ad- 
vantages to the students. 

2. Some provision ought to be made by the Assembly to assist in 
defraying the expenses of the students. 

3. The Seminary ought to be permanently located. 

In concluding their report, the Directors congratulate the Assem- 
bly on the present state and future prospects of their infant Semi- 
nary. Considering the difficulties attending such an institution, 
they have every reason to calculate, under the smiles of Divine 
Providence, upon final and complete success. Should they, however, 
fail, (which may God forbid,) they will have the satisfaction of fail- 
ing in a noble cause. 

Signed by order of the Board of Directors, 

Ashbel Green, President, 
Zechariah Lewis, Sec'ry pro tern. 
Extract from the Minutes of the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
A.D. 1813, pp. 73-81.) 



As the completion of the first hundred, years of the 
Seminary's service to the Church approached, prepara- 

C163 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

tions began to be made for an appropriate commemora- 
tion of its century's work. In the autumn of 1908, the 
Faculty presented a memorial to the Board of Directors, 
suggesting the appointment of a joint committee of three 
members each of the Board of Directors, the Board of 
Trustees and the Faculty, to take the matter in hand. A 
committee was accordingly formed, consisting, on the 
part of the Directors, of President E. D. Warfield, the 
Rev. Dr. J. Ross Stevenson, and the Hon. William M. 
Lanning; on the part of the Trustees, of the Rev. Drs. 
John Dixon and David Magie, and William P. Steven- 
son, Esq. ; and on the part of the Faculty, of President 
F. L. Patton and the Rev. Drs. B. B. Warfield and Wil- 
liam Brenton Greene, Jr. Power was given this com- 
mittee to appoint a Secretary and to add to its numbers. 
The enlarged committee ultimately consisted of the 
following gentlemen: President Francis L. Patton, 
Chairman ; Rev. Harold McA. Robinson, Secretary ; Rev. 
Dr. George Alexander, Rev. Dr. Maitland Alexander, 
R. M. Anderson, Esq., Rev. Prof. William P. Arm- 
strong, Rev. Sylvester W. Beach, Silas B. Brownell, 
Esq., Rev. Dr. John Dixon, Rev. J. H. Dulles, Rev. Dr. 
John Fox, Rev. Dr. William Brenton Greene, Jr., 
Rev. Dr. C. Wistar Hodge, E. Francis Hyde, Esq., 
Rev. C. A. R. Janvier, Rev. Dr. John B. Laird, Hon. 
Wm. M. Lanning, Rev. Dr. W. L. McEwan, Prof. Kerr 
D. Macmillan, Prof. Wm. F. Magie, Charles H. Mathews, 
Esq., H. S. Prentiss Nichols, Esq., E. H. Perkins, 
Esq., Rev. Dr. William Henry Roberts, Rev. Dr. J. 
Ross Stevenson, William P. Stevenson, Esq., Rev. Dr. 
B. B. Warfield, and President E. D. Warfield. The work 
of this general Centennial Committee was carried on 
through an Executive Committee of seven members with 

L17J 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

its sub-committee of three, and a number of specific com- 
mittees, as follows : 

Executive Committee: President Francis L. Patton, 
Chairman; Rev. Sylvester W. Beach, Silas B. Brownell, 
Esq., Rev. Dr. John B. Laird, Hon. Wm. M. Lanning, 
Rev. Dr. B. B. Warfield, President E. D. Warfield. 

Sub-Committee of the Executive Committee: Rev. Dr. 

B. B. Warfield, Chairman; Rev. Sylvester W. Beach, 
President Francis L. Patton. 

Committee on Entertainment: Rev. Sylvester W. 
Beach, Chairman; R. M. Anderson, Esq., Rev. Prof. 
William P. Armstrong, Prof. Kerr D. Macmillan, Prof. 
William F. Magie. 

Committee on Invitation: Rev. J. H. Dulles, Chair- 
man; Rev. Dr. William Brenton Greene, Jr., Rev. Dr. 

C. Wistar Hodge, Rev. Dr. W. L. McEwan, Rev. Dr. 
William Henry Roberts. 

Committee on Programme: Rev. Dr. B. B. Warfield, 
Chairman ; Rev. Dr. Maitland Alexander, Rev. Dr. John 
Fox, Charles H. Mathews, Esq., President Francis L. 
Patton. 

Committee on Arrangements: Prof. Kerr D. Mac- 
millan, Chairman; Rev. J. H. Dulles, Prof. William F. 
Magie. 

Committee on Music: Rev. Prof. Wm. P. Armstrong, 
Chairman ; Rev. J. H. Dulles, Prof. Kerr D. Macmillan. 

Committee from the Faculty on the Volume of Bibli- 
cal and Theological Studies: President Francis L. Pat- 
ton, Chairman ; Rev. Dr. B. B. Warfield, Rev. Dr. J. D. 
Davis. 

Committee on Publication of the Commemoration 
Volume: Rev. Dr. B. B. Warfield, Chairman; Rev. Prof. 
William P. Armstrong, Rev. Harold McA. Robinson. 

The Executive Officer of the General Committee and 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of all its subordinate committees was the Rev. Harold 
McA. Robinson, its Secretary. 

This is not the place to give a full account of the work 
undertaken or accomplished by the Centennial Commit- 
tee. Let it only be said in passing that much was done to 
quicken in the Alumni a keener sense of the closeness of 
their relation to their Alma Mater ; that there was given 
to the Alumni and the friends of the Seminary an oppor- 
tunity to contribute to its endowment, which was gener- 
ously embraced by many ; and that a volume of Biblical 
and Theological Studies by the members of the Faculty 
was published as part of the Centennial commemoration. 
The object of the present volume is only to give perma- 
nent record to the details of the celebration itself, with 
its essential accompaniments. 

Due intimation of the desire of the Seminary to cele- 
brate its centennial was made to the General Assembly 
of 1911 {Minutes of the General Assembly for 1911, p. 
186) , and at the opening of the Centennial Session, in the 
autumn of 1911, an announcement was sent to the 
Synods and Presbyteries in the following form : 

1812 [Seal] 1912 

THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

AT PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

ANNOUNCES THE COMPLETION, WITH ITS PRESENT SESSION, 

OF THE FIRST ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SERVICE TO 

THE CHURCH AND ASKS THE GOOD WISHES 

AND PRAYERS OF THE 



[19] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Later an announcement of the proposed celebration 
and an invitation to appoint delegates to it was sent to 
the administrative Boards of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, and to a number of 
institutions of learning in the following form : 



1812 [Seal] 1912 

THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

AT PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

WILL CELEBRATE THE ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS ES- 
TABLISHMENT BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, ON SUNDAY, MON- 
DAY AND TUESDAY, THE FIFTH, SIXTH AND SEVENTH OF MAY, 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWELVE. 
THE DIRECTORS, TRUSTEES AND FACULTY OF THE 
SEMINARY HAVE THE HONOUR TO INVITE 



TO BE REPRESENTED ON THAT OCCASION BY A DELEGATE. THE 
FAVOUR OF AN EARLY REPLY, ADDRESSED TO THE REVEREND 
HAROLD McA. ROBINSON, PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMI- 
NARY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY, IS REQUESTED. 



AT PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY, 
JANUARY, 1912 



[20] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The institutions to which this announcement and invi- 
tation was sent included all theological seminaries in the 
United States serving Churches "who profess and call 
themselves Christian, ' ' all theological schools in mission 
lands in connection with evangelical Churches in the 
United States, a large number of foreign theological 
faculties, and all universities and colleges, ten or more 
of the graduates of which have pursued theological 
courses in Princeton Seminary. 

Still further, there was sent out a personal invitation 
in the following form : 



1812 [Seal] 1912 

THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

AT PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 
HAS THE HONOUR TO INVITE 



TO BE PRESENT AT THE CELEBRATION OF THE 

ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING 

OF THE SEMINARY 

ON SUNDAY, MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

THE FIFTH, SIXTH AND SEVENTH OF MAY 

ONE THOUSAND, NINE HUNDRED AND TWELVE. 

[21] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

This invitation was sent to all the Alumni of the Semi- 
nary, to the presiding officers of all the evangelical 
Churches in the United States, and of the Presbyterian 
Churches in Great Britain, and to a number of distin- 
guished individuals. 

The response to these several announcements and invi- 
tations was very general. 

The present volume contains, in the order in which 
they are here enumerated, the responses of the courts of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica to the announcement of the Seminary's intention to 
celebrate the hundredth anniversary of its foundation, 
together with a number of similar congratulatory ad- 
dresses from other church bodies; the responses of the 
presiding officers of Churches at home and abroad; the 
congratulatory responses to the Seminary's announce- 
ment and invitation of various institutions of learning 
whether theological or general ; the list of delegates sent 
by various ecclesiastical bodies and institutions of learn- 
ing to the celebration ; the programme of the Centennial 
Exercises ; and the text of some of the addresses given at 
the celebration. 



[22] 



RESPONSES FROM THE COURTS OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

The General Assembly, in session at Louisville, Ky., 
May 18th, 1912, took the following action, viz. : 

The General Assembly adopted unanimously the Report of the 
Special Committee on the Centennial of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, as follows :— 

The Committee to bear congratulations to Princeton Theological 
Seminary on its Centennial was appointed by the following action 
of the General Assembly of 1911 : 

"That the congratulations of the Church, through this General 
Assembly, be extended to Princeton Theological Seminary, in view 
of the approaching one hundredth anniversary of the founding of 
that institution, and that, in response to the invitation presented, the 
following Committee be appointed to participate in the coming Cen- 
tennial : Rev. John F. Carson, D.D., Rev. William H. Roberts, D.D., 
the Moderator of ire Synod of New Jersey, the Moderator of the 
Synod of New York, the Moderator of the Synod of Pennsylvania, 
the Hon. Woodrow Wilson, Governor of New Jersey, and the Hon. 
William Jennings Bryan, of Nebraska." (Minutes, 1911, p. 189.) 

The names of the Moderators of the Synods on the Committee are 
as follows : the Rev. William M. Dager, A.B., Moderator of the Synod 
of New Jersey; the Rev. Martin D. Kneeland, D.D., Moderator of 
the Synod of New York; and the Rev. Samuel A. Cornelius, D.D., 
Moderator of the Synod of Pennsylvania. 

The Committee reports the performance of its acceptable duty, 
and acknowledges the hearty welcome with which it was received by 
the authorities of "The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian 
Church in the U. S. A., located at Princeton, New Jersey." The 
Centennial was celebrated on May 5, 6 and 7. The exercises were 
characterized by appropriate dignity, felicitous addresses, and by the 

[25] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

presence of more than 500 alumni, the representatives of Presby- 
terian and other Churches on both sides of the Atlantic, and dele- 
gates from more than one hundred institutions of learning. Specially 
notable was the presence of the Moderators of the General Assem- 
blies of the Church of Scotland, the United Free Church of Scotland, 
the Free Church of Scotland, and the Presbyterian Church in Ire- 
land. There were also present the Moderators or Presidents of eight 
American Churches. The occasion was historic and the Celebration 
worthy of the Seminary and the Church. 

It is recommended that the following minute be approved by the 
Assembly : 

The General Assembly hereby places upon record its congratula- 
tions to "The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A., located at Princeton, N. J.," upon its one hundred 
years of completed service to Christ and to the Church. The plan 
of the Institution, adopted by the General Assembly of 1811, sets 
forth the relation of the General Assembly to the Theological Semi- 
nary as "the patron and fountain of its power," and states the design 
of the Institution in definite terms. It was established— "To form 
men for the Gospel Ministry who shall believe and cordially love, and 
therefore endeavor to protect and defend in its genuineness, sim- 
plicity, and fullness, that system of religious belief and practice 
which is set forth in the Confession of Faith, Catechisms, and Plan 
of Government and Discipline of the Presbyterian Church"; also 
"to provide for the Church men who shall be able to defend her 
faith against infidels and her doctrines against heretics"; and 
further who shall possess "an enlightened attachment not only to 
the same doctrines but to the same plan of government." 

The General Assembly heartily recognizes that the Boards of 
Directors and Trustees, and the Faculty of the Seminary, have 
administered with fidelity the trust committed to them, and in par- 
ticular acknowledges that the educational progress made by the 
Institution has been for the most part due to its able and scholarly 
professors, who through four generations have been largely instru- 
mental in the production of ministers competent by abilities, learning 
and training, for the high and holy office of ambassadors of Jesus 
Christ. 

The General Assembly congratulates itself that forty-three of 

[26] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

its Moderators have received training within the walls of this Insti- 
tution, that many of the leaders in the missionary and benevolent 
work of the Church have had the same privilege, and that out from 
it have gone hundreds of home and foreign missionaries, and above 
all, in the successive generations, a great number of pastors who have 
served faithfully in their respective spheres of labor, and have built 
up Christ's likeness in many human lives, and have laid the founda- 
tion of churches and organizations which have become powers in the 
Church Universal. The Assembly also rejoices in the catholicity of 
the Institution as shown by the fact that students of all evangelical 
churches have been freely admitted to its courses of instruction. In 
this breath of acknowledgment of Christian fellowship, the Semi- 
nary and the Church are one. 

With grateful recognition of the loyalty of the wide-spread con- 
stituency, that from the origin of the Institution has furnished the 
resources and the sympathetic support which have enabled it to 
maintain with some degree of adequacy the purposes for which it 
was established, the Assembly commends the Institution to the 
Church at large, for a continued generous and cordial support, be- 
lieving that there lies before Princeton Theological Seminary along 
the lines of the trust reposed in it, a most useful and great future. 
"Now unto Him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all 
that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us, unto 
Him be glory in the Church by Christ Jesus throughout all ages, 
world without end. Amen. ' ' 

In behalf of the Committee, 

John F. Carson, Chairman, 
Wm. H. Roberts, Secretary. 

Attest: 
Wm. H. Roberts, Stated Clerk. 



C273 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



THE SYNOD OF BALTIMORE 

The following action was taken by the Synod of Balti- 
more in session at Wilmington, Delaware, October 23, 
1911: 

Whereas: The Theological Seminary at Princeton, N. J., does 
this year complete one hundred years of continued usefulness and 
service to the Church ; therefore 

Resolved, That the Synod of Baltimore rejoices with Princeton 
Seminary in the completion of so long a time of service in the cause 
of Christ and His Church, and would give this expression of our 
gratitude and appreciation. 

Resolved, That the Stated Clerk be instructed to send to the Presi- 
dent and Faculty, to the Boards of Directors and Trustees, the con- 
gratulations of this Synod, and to assure them of our prayers to 
Almighty God, that from generation to generation this honored ser- 
vant of the Church, with increasing devotion and success, may send 
forth men of God, knowing the Holy Scriptures, thoroughly fur- 
nished unto all good works. 

Resolved, That the Moderator appoint a Committee of four, con- 
sisting of himself and one minister from each of the three Presby- 
teries, to represent the Synod at the Centennial exercises of Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. 

The Committee : 

Rev. Joseph B. Turner, Dover, Del. 
Rev. James E. Mofpatt, D.D., Cumberland, Md. 
Rev. George P. Wilson, D.D., Washington, D. C. 
Rev. Francis H. Moore, D.D., Middletown, Del. 

Attest: 
N. H. Miller, Stated Clerk. 

McLean, Va. 

[28] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

The Synod authorized its Stated Clerk, in its name, to 
express to the Seminary its warm appreciation of the 
unceasing blessing the Seminary has ever been to all the 
great interests of the Church and the Nation. And the 
Synod prays the Great Head of the Church, that the 
Seminary may ever continue to measure up to the oppor- 
tunity before it in the dear Church to which we belong, 
and that it may have from on high unceasingly the bless- 
ing of Him whose you are and whom you serve. 

On behalf of the Synod of California, 

Wm. Stewart Young, Stated Clerk. 

Los Angeles, Cal., Nov. 15th, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OF CANADIAN 

The Synod of Canadian, being in session at Hot 
Springs, Ark., Oct. 5-7, set apart thirty minutes of the 
evening, Friday, the 6th, 8 P. M. to hold a special service 
of Thanksgiving, Praise and Prayer for the Seminary, 
for the marvelous work God has done and is doing 
through it. The meeting was conducted by Rev. M. L. 
Bethel of the Seminary Alumni. 

Attest: W. H. Carroll, Stated Clerk. 

Valliant, Okla., Nov. 9th, 1911. 

[29 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE SYNOD OF COLORADO 

The Rev. F. E. Smiley, D.D., reported for the Com- 
mittee to which was referred the communication from 
Princeton Seminary. The report was received and the 
recommendation adopted. The report was as follows : 

Whereas, the Synod of Colorado, in session at Greeley, Colo., Oct. 
19th, 1911, has heard with pleasure the announcement of the com- 
pletion, with its present session, of the first one hundred years of 
service to the Church, of the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America, at Princeton, New 
Jersey, 

Resolved, That we place upon our record our gratitude to God for 
putting into the hearts of the fathers, the laying of foundations broad 
and deep for this school of the prophets, where so many of the success- 
ful pastors of our beloved Church have been trained by consecrated 
instructors to ' ' rightly divide the word of truth : ' ' for the long line 
of trustees and teachers who during one hundred years have guarded 
and guided the institution from infancy to its present century 
strength : and for those who have stood as a bulwark against the 
subtle assaults of the enemy, both within and without the Church, 
against the Old Book, our spiritual Magna Charta, and for their 
unswerving devotion to the ' ' faith once delivered to the saints. ' ' 

We congratulate the trustees, faculty, students and the Church 
upon this auspicious occasion, and pray that all may be so endowed 
with the Spirit of Christ that the future, like the past, history of 
the Seminary may redound to the glory of God, the upbuilding of 
the saints and the salvation of sinners. 

Resolved, That this memorial be spread upon our records and a 
copy be sent by the chairman of the committee of the Alumni ap- 
pointed by the Moderator of Synod, to the authorities of Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

. , Francis E. Smiley, Chairman. 

Geo. R. Edmundson, Stated Clerk. 

[30] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SYNOD OF IDAHO 

The Synod of Idaho has received the communication 
from the Princeton Theological Seminary, that it will 
celebrate the Centennial of its life and work, and the 
Synod would congratulate that venerable institution on 
its long career of usefulness, and assure it of our grateful 
appreciation of its work ; of our heartfelt sympathy ; and 
our prayers for its long continued usefulness. 

John Gourley, Stated Clerk. 

Pocatello, Idaho, Oct. 10, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

The committee to which was referred the announce- 
ment of the completion, with the present session, of the 
first one hundred years of service to the Church of the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, at Princeton, N. J., would 
respectfully report, recommending that the following 
resolution be adopted, engrossed upon our record and a 
copy transmitted to the Seminary : 

Resolved, That the Synod of Illinois, in session at Charleston on 
October 19, 1911, expresses to the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America at Princeton, N. J., 
its high appreciation of the eminent services rendered by the Semi- 
nary, within the hundred years now ending, alike to the cause of 
Christian scholarship in the writings of its representative men, to the 
cause of Presbyterianism in its stedfast maintenance of our historic 

C31H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

doctrine and polity and to the practical work of the Church in the 
rich supply of faithful men to preach the Gospel and to minister in 
the name of Christ. Recognizing the great development in our sys- 
tem of theological institutions and the inevitable changes which have 
taken place in our particular relation to it, the Synod prays God's 
blessing upon the Seminary that it may continue through the century 
to come a centre of Christian learning and a source of supply for 
able ministers of the New Testament, men who are both faithful to 
the Word of God and wise to discern the signs of the times. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. S. Plumer Bryan, Committee. 

Done in Synod at Charleston, Oct. 19th, 1911. 

Attest : 

Jas. Franklin Young, Moderator, 
C. Harmon Johnson, Stated Clerk. 



THE SYNOD OF INDIANA 

At its annual meeting, held in Sullivan, Indiana, on 
October 10, 1911, the Synod of Indiana of the Presby- 
terian Church in the U. S. A. unanimously adopted the 
following Preamble and Resolutions, relating to the Cen- 
tennial of Princeton Theological Seminary, and in- 
structed its Stated Clerk to forward a copy of the same 
to the Seminary : 

Whereas, The venerable Theological Seminary at Princeton, New 
Jersey, has announced to the Synod of Indiana the approaching 
completion of the first one hundred years of its service to the Church, 
and has asked the prayers and good wishes of our Synod, and 

Whereas, The Synod of Indiana has been greatly indebted to 

C32] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

the Princeton Seminary for the theological education of many of 
its sons and the supply of many of its workers, having at present on 
our rolls some sixty alumni of the Seminary ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That we extend our cordial congratulations and best 
wishes to the Seminary upon its approaching Centennial, and that 
we pray the blessing of God upon its future work. 

Resolved, That we recognize with gratitude its fidelity to the 
Bible and the standards of our Church, and the efficiency of its 
instruction and preparation for service. 

Resolved, That we commend it as worthy of the prayers and 
liberality of our churches in all its efforts for the enlargement and 
betterment of its facilities for the training and equipment of those 
who shall serve the Church in the ministry of the Gospel of Christ. 

Attest: Leon P. Marshall, Stated Clerk. 



THE SYNOD OF IOWA 

The Synod of Iowa received with great interest and 
sympathy the announcement of the completion of a hun- 
dred years of theological instruction at Princeton, and 
directed the Stated Clerk to convey to the Faculty and 
Directors of the Seminary its greetings and good wishes. 
In the name of the Synod, I congratulate both you and 
the Church on the noble achievements of the past. To 
how large a degree the Presbyterian Church has been 
moulded by the influence of Princeton Seminary can 
never be told. The contributions of the Seminary to 
theological learning through faculty and graduates are 
of inestimable value. The fidelity of its instructors to 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ deserves and receives the 
praise of the Church. We are grateful to Almighty God 
for this glorious history of devotion to the truth. We 

C33H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

congratulate you upon the success of these years, and 
upon your present commanding position. 

Our prayer is that the good work begun may be car- 
ried on and intensified in the years to come, and that 
Princeton may abide in strength as long as the world 
endures. 

In the name of the Synod of Iowa, 

W. O. Ritston, Stated Clerk. 
Dubuque, Iowa, Nov. 17, 1911. 

THE SYNOD OF KENTUCKY 

The Synod of Kentucky heartily unites with the whole 
Presbyterian Church in congratulations to Princeton 
Theological Seminary on the successful completion of 
the first one hundred years of its history. We desire to 
express our appreciation of the great work that the 
Seminary, in the Providence of God, has been enabled to 
do. We gratefully thank God for the men who have been 
trained in its halls and for the light of learning that has 
emanated through the century from its famous faculty. 

We recognize its faithfulness in teaching the Divine 
Oracles and its stedf ast loyalty to the Word of God. 

We remember its ever-growing influence in the devel- 
opment of the Church, and its ever-widening power in 
the evangelization of the world. We invoke the Divine . 
Blessing on the Seminary's future, and pray that the 
same Hand may guide in the days to come that has so 
wondrously prospered it in the days gone by. 

It is peculiarly appropriate that such congratulatory 
expression should be presented formally in a meeting of 
the Synod of Kentucky, held in the Second Presbyterian 

[34: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Church, Lexington, Kentucky. It was in this Church 
and Sunday School that the Rev. Ethelbert D. Warfield, 
D.D., LL.D., the present presiding officer of the Board 
of Directors, and the Rev. Benjamin Breckinridge War- 
field, D.D., LL.D., the present Charles Hodge Professor 
of Didactic and Polemic Theology, were first taught the 
things pertaining to God. 

Mingled with our feelings of debt and gratitude to 
Princeton Theological Seminary for its century of con- 
tribution to the Church and the whole Kingdom of God 
are our feelings of pride and pleasure that the Synod 
has had the privilege and honor to give to the Seminary 
two of its own sons. 

Chaeles Lee Reynolds, Committee. 



THE SYNOD OF MINNESOTA 

This is to certify that the Synod of Minnesota, in ses- 
sion at Minneapolis on the 12th to 16th of October, 1911, 
took the following action : 

Whereas, The Theological Seminary of Princeton, N. J., com- 
pletes this year the first one hundred years of its history, and, 

Whereas, This Synod has felt the impress and value of the Semi- 
nary's work, through the labors of Princeton's students, the past 
fifty years ; therefore, 

Resolved, That the Synod of Minnesota extend to the Board of 
Trustees and Faculty of the Seminary the most cordial congratu- 
lations on the splendid record of the past, and express the prayerful 
hope that, under the divine blessing, the Seminary will advance to 
a yet greater measure of service to the Church and to the Kingdom. 

Maurice D. Edwaeds, Stated Clerk. 

St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 20, 1911. 

[35] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



THE SYNOD OF MISSOURI 

The Synod of Missouri of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America, in session at Springfield, Mo., October 12, 1911, 
acknowledges the receipt of the announcement of the approaching 
celebration of the centennial of Princeton Theological Seminary. We 
congratulate the Seminary upon this coming completion of one hun- 
dred years of service, and desire to express our appreciation of the 
great work accomplished by her. 

Thirty-eight men now connected with this body, besides many 
others whose service has helped to make our history in the past, 
received all, or a part, of their theological training within her halls. 

We gratefully acknowledge the large indebtedness of this Synod, 
and of the whole Church, to Princeton Seminary, for her thorough 
training of the Christian ministry, for her never ceasing champion- 
ship of the truth of God's Word and for her splendid leadership of 
Christian thought. 

We pray the blessing of the Great Head of the Church may con- 
tinue with her in increasing measure through all coming years. We 
further commend to all our churches, and especially to individual 
members of means, the Centennial Fund which is being raised as a 
fitting memorial of her rich past and to equip her still more thor- 
oughly to meet the responsibilities and opportunities of the future. 

I certify that the above is a correct copy of the action 
of the Synod of Missouri. 

John H. Miller, Stated Clerk. 

Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 30, 1911. 



C36] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SYNOD OF MONTANA 

The Synod of Montana offers its most hearty felicita- 
tions to the Princeton Theological Seminary upon the 
completion of its one hundredth year— spent so loyally 
in the service of our beloved Church, and at this time 
sends its best wishes for continued prosperity, enlarged 
usefulness and increased influence in the special sphere 
marked out for her by a kind Providence. 

Eiko J. Groeneveld, 
Chairman of Synod's Committee. 

Butte, Mont., Oct. 26, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

The following resolution was adopted by the Synod of 
Nebraska : 

Inasmuch as Princeton Theological Seminary has about com- 
pleted a century of historic and worthy activity, having served the 
Church with distinguished credit, 

Be it Resolved, That the Synod of Nebraska extend its heartiest 
congratulations to the Seminary on the completion of her first cen- 
tury of service and express its confident hope that the future shall 
be even more glorious. 

Done in Synod at North Platte, Neb., on the 16th day of October, 
A. D. 1911. 

Attest: Julius F. Schwaez, Stated Clerk. 

[37: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY 

Your Committee appointed to prepare resolutions of 
congratulation to Princeton Theological Seminary upon 
the fact of its approaching Centennial Celebration, 
would submit the following for your adoption : 

This year has marked the opening of the one hundredth session 
of Princeton Theological Seminary. At the Commencement in May 
1912 this outstanding event will be fittingly commemorated in 
Princeton by the Directors and Trustees and Faculty and Alumni of 
the Seminary. This is a great record of a great institution for a 
great work. It is cause for congratulation and rejoicing, not only 
for Princeton graduates and those who have her interests at heart 
because of their theological affinity, but for all who believe in the 
doctrines of grace, and especially for the Presbyterian Church in 
America. 

Be it hereby Resolved, therefore, by this Synod of New Jersey, 
the chief recipient of blessing from this century of service in the 
Gospel, 

First, that we render profound gratitude to God for the Divine 
leading in the Church, looking to the higher education of the min- 
istry, and for the action of the General Assembly of 1811 in establish- 
ing a separate institution for theological instruction, which institution 
was the next year opened at Princeton, with the Rev. Archibald 
Alexander, D.D., as Professor. It is interesting to recall that the 
classes were at first held in Dr. Alexander's study, and later for a 
time in the building of the College of New Jersey, itself the out- 
growth of the Log College of Neshaminy, founded for the education 
of ministers. We reverently and thankfully recall to-day the words 
of the Assembly's "Plan of the Seminary," as follows,— "It is to 
form men for the Gospel ministry who shall truly believe, and cor- 
dially love, and therefore endeavor to propagate and defend in its 
genuineness, simplicity and fullness, that system of religious belief 
and practice which is set forth in the Confession of Faith, Cate- 
chisms, and Plan of Government and Discipline of the Presbyterian 
Church ; and thus to perpetuate and extend the influence of true 
evangelical piety and gospel order. ' ' 

We render gratitude for the Divine favor that has enabled the 

C38] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Church to continue this school of Christian theology for a century 
with signal brilliancy of learning, with remarkable power of piety, 
and with steady and delightful growth and development, both of 
equipment and influence. For the glory of God and in honor of 
Princeton we would give praise. We would have thanksgivings rise 
in all our churches that the Spirit of God did thus consecrate and 
has continued to consecrate, as ever in the history of our blessed 
religion, the best scholarship to the cause of Gospel truth and Chris- 
tian life, and especially for the noble men of God who first made 
Princeton great, and whose names are revered and loved to-day 
throughout our Church. 

"We would give praise to God for the fearless, unwavering stand 
Princeton Seminary has held through all these years, not only for the 
Calvinistic Theology as the ripest expression of the Reformed Faith, 
but for the defense and teaching of fundamental Christianity,— the 
supernatural revelation which is in Jesus Christ, the plenary inspira- 
tion and authority of the Scriptures, the precious doctrines of the 
free grace of God and full justification by faith, the saving power 
of the blood of the Lamb, the work of the Holy Spirit and the living 
headship of the Lord of Glory in His Church. 

We thank God for the religious character of this Seminary 
throughout the past, the holy lives of the men who have labored for 
it, its choice spirit of prayer, a valuable memory to all who ever 
shared it, its love for the pure Word of God, its serious understand- 
ing of the vocation of the ministry, as the herald of a God-given 
Gospel, its simplicity of daily life, its supreme desire to exalt Jesus 
Christ, its cordial interest in every effort to extend the Kingdom of 
our Lord through His truth and Church, and especially for its con- 
sistent missionary spirit and record, a spirit that begins with the 
statement in the Assembly's ''Plan" that one object of the Seminary 
is "to found a nursery for missionaries to the heathen," and is able 
to testify that over three hundred and eighty of the graduates have 
entered upon foreign missionary work. We are grateful that through 
these one hundred years, in this land with its marvelously enlarging 
territory, and in the whole world with the rapidly opening doors of 
its vast continents, this Seminary has been as the springs of water 
among the hills,— a source of supply beyond all human power to 
imagine. Surely God has honored His promises and led His people 
graciously. 

C39] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Second, that Synod congratulate the Directors and Trustees and 
Faculty of Princeton Seminary upon the possession of a heritage 
that only time and the blessing of God could produce, and upon the 
accomplishment of a work for the Church that only eternity and the 
presence of God will reveal. Theirs is hallowed soil indeed. Theirs 
are blessed memories indeed. We congratulate them upon the fact 
that Princeton has continued to this day to hold her own in the 
front rank of American institutions of theological learning, and of 
note among those of the world. 

"We congratulate them upon the well known and unwavering and 
hearty stand this Seminary has maintained for the faith once de- 
livered to the saints, and for her loyalty to the Confession of our 
Church, to the Covenant and to Christ. We recognize in her a 
leader in the fight for truth against error for the Church universal, 
to be honored for her work by the whole of evangelical Christendom. 

We congratulate them upon the present vigor and prosperity of 
the Seminary. Beginning with three students, she has given instruc- 
tion to five thousand, seven hundred and forty-two students, and now 
has sixteen instructors with one hundred and eighty-five men under 
their care. 

We congratulate them upon having as President the Rev. Francis 
Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D., whose ripe and commanding powers are 
consecrated to the service of a conservative theology. 

We congratulate them upon having a completed faculty, a soundly 
constructed and steadily enlarging curriculum, with splendid 
grounds and buildings, with the cordial confidence of the Alumni, 
and a secure place in the esteem of the whole Church. 

We look with confidence upon her prospects for the future. We 
regard her as panoplied and prepared to meet the issues of the day 
and of the days to come. We record with pleasure that she is still 
sending forth men well instructed in the truth as it is in Jesus, 
and well fitted to be ambassadors for God and leaders of the people, 
that she might save society through the saving of souls. We rejoice 
that she is touching and tempering with a mighty influence the very 
life of the Church today, not only in this land but wherever the 
Gospel banner has been planted by the sons and daughters of God. 

Third, that we most heartily rejoice in the proposal to signalize 
the completion of these one hundred years, an epoch in the history 

£40 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of Presbyterian theological education, by securing an increased en- 
dowment for the Seminary, and commend this effort to the liberality 
of our pastors and churches, especially to those ministers who are 
Alumni of Princeton, and to those churches whose pastors are Prince- 
ton men. 

Fourth, that the Moderator of this Synod appoint a Committee 
of seven, four ministers and three elders, to represent the Synod 
at the Centennial exercises to be held in Princeton in May, 1912, the 
Moderator himself to be the Chairman, ex-officio, of this Committee. 

Fifth, that the Rev. Francis L. Patton, D.D., LL.D., be invited to 
address the Synod now upon the Seminary's plans for the celebration 
of this important anniversary. 

Adopted by the Synod of New Jersey, in session at 
Atlantic City, Oct. 18, 1911. 
Attest: Walter A. Brooks, Stated Clerk. 



THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK 

The following action was taken by the Synod of New 
York at its recent meeting : 

In view of the approaching 100th Anniversary of the founding 
of the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
U. S. A. at Princeton, the Synod of New York, in session at Auburn, 
October 18th, 191 1, desires to place upon its minutes an expression 
of its sense of the noble service to our Church and to the Christian 
religion throughout the world rendered by this institution; its grati- 
tude to God for the signal manifestations of His favor during the 
whole of the Seminary's history; and its earnest desire and devout 
prayer that the coming years may witness still larger prosperity and 
usefulness for Princeton Seminary. 

A true copy. 

Attest: J. Wilford Jacks, Stated Clerk. 

C4l] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE SYNOD OF NORTH DAKOTA 

A Memorial was received from Princeton Theological 
Seminary with reference to the completion of its first 
one hundred years of service, asking the good wishes and 
prayers of the Synod of North Dakota. To this the fol- 
lowing answer is recommended : 

That this request be remembered in the closing prayer of this 
session, and that the Stated Clerk be instructed to notify the officials 
of the Seminary of that fact, assuring them of the cordial good will 
of the Synod. 

I notice further that the closing item of that forenoon 
session reads : 

Synod took recess until 1:30 o'clock P.M., and was closed with 
prayer by Rev. R. H. Myers, in behalf of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. 

B. A. Fahl, Stated Clerk. 
Devil's Lake, N. D., Nov. 13, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OF OHIO 

The Synod of Ohio held its annual meeting in Mans- 
field, October 10-12, 1911. In response to a request for 
the interest of the Synod, the following recommenda- 
tions were made by the Committee on Bills and Over- 
tures : 

That the Synod of Ohio extend congratulations and good wishes 
to Princeton Theological Seminary upon its One Hundredth Anni- 
versary. 

That the Synod remember Princeton Theological Seminary in 
prayers, and that the Rev. William M. Hindman, D.D., of the Pres- 
bytery of Chillicothe, now lead us in prayer. 

[42^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

That the Stated Clerk of this Synod convey a suitable letter, 
covering the action of the Synod in this matter. 

The foregoing recommendations were unanimously- 
adopted, and the Rev. Dr. Hindman offered a very tender 
and touching prayer for the Seminary, for its present 
student body, and for all living students of former years. 

Attest: Edward T. Swiggett, Stated Clerk. 



THE SYNOD OF OKLAHOMA 

A conimunication from Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary was read, announcing the one hundredth session of 
the Seminary, and soliciting the prayers and good wishes 
of the Synod. 

The Moderator led the Synod in prayer for the Semi- 
nary. 

The Stated Clerk was instructed to convey to the Sec- 
retary of the Seminary information of this action of the 
Synod. 

Lloyd C. Walter, Stated Clerk. 



THE SYNOD OF OREGON 

The Synod of Oregon, assembled in Mt. Tabor Church, 
Portland, adopted the following resolution Oct. 14, 1911 : 

That Synod sends its sincere congratulations to Princeton Semi- 
nary on the completion of 100 years of service in the Presbyterian 
Church and wishes for it even larger and more effective service in 
the future. 

Extracted from minutes, Synod of Oregon, by 

John A. Townsend, Stated Clerk. 

[43] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE SYNOD OF PENNSYLVANIA 

At the meeting of the Synod of Pennsylvania, held in 
Warren, Pa., in the First Presbyterian Church, October 
24th, 1911, after hearing an address by the Rev. Dr. 
Francis L. Patton, President of Princeton Theological 
Seminary, the Synod adopted the following Minute : 

The Synod having received an intimation that the Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., at Princeton, N. J., 
would celebrate the Centennial of its Foundation in May, 1912, 
hereby extends to the Seminary its warmest congratulations and 
rejoices with it in the great work which by the blessing of Almighty 
God it has done for Christ and His Church. 

From the earliest times the ties between the Synod and the Semi- 
nary have been most close and intimate. Many of the most distin- 
guished professors of the Seminary have been drawn from the terri- 
tory, the homes and the churches now covered by this Synod. 
Hundreds of young men have gone from these churches to pursue 
their studies at the Seminary, and have returned confirmed in faith 
and enriched in knowledge to preach the Everlasting Gospel. 

During all this period the Synod and the Seminary have been in 
deep and tender sympathy in reference to the great movements 
which have stirred the Church and advanced the Kingdom of God ; 
and the Synod rejoices in the strength and courage with which the 
Seminary, upon the threshold of a new age, proclaims the faith once 
delivered to the saints. 

May the Great Head of the Church vouchsafe to this beloved and 
honored institution an ever deeper sense of the glorious privilege of 
training men to preach the Everlasting Gospel and an ever greater 
power in inspiring men with the very spirit of His Grace. 

At the request of the President of the Seminary that 
the Synod would appoint a Committee to represent it at 
the Centennial Celebration, the following ministers were 

[44] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

named to convey the greetings of the Synod in connec- 
tion with the Centennial Celebration. 

The Moderator, Rev. Samuel A. Cornelius, D.D., Oil City, Pa. 

The Stated Clerk, Rev. Robert Hunter, D.D., Philadelphia. 

Rev. Wm. L. McEwan, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Ebenezer Flack, D.D., Scranton, Pa. 

Rev. Robert B. Beattie, Franklin, Pa. 

Rev. George S. Chambers, D.D., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Robert Hunter, Stated Clerk. 



THE SYNOD OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Upon receipt of a telegram from Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary in connection with their celebration of the 
One Hundredth Anniversary of the beginning of that 
Institution, Synod joined in thanksgiving for the great 
good that Seminary has already accomplished and in 
prayer for God's continued blessing upon it. 

Harlan P. Carson, Stated Clerk. 

Madison, S. D., Oct. 6, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OF TENNESSEE 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures of the Synod 
of Tennessee reported as follows regarding the Centen- 
nial of Princeton : 

The communication from the Theological Seminary of Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, announcing the completion with its present session 
of the first one hundred years of service to the Church, was before us ; 

C45] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

and we recommend that the Stated Clerk communicate to the Semi- 
nary the congratulations and best wishes of the Synod. 

In compliance with this action of the Synod I take 
pleasure, as Stated Clerk, in assuring you of the hearty 
sympathy, good wishes, and congratulations of the Synod 
upon your one hundred years of great service to the 
Church. 

The Synod of Tennessee in 1819 followed the example 
that Princeton had set seven years before, and organized 
the Southern and Western Theological Seminary, and 
located it at Maryville. This was the second theological 
seminary of our Church. Though for more than half a 
century, the theological seminary features have ceased, 
the institution, now Maryville College, is still under the 
care of the Synod of Tennessee. 

The Synod wishes Princeton a second century of even 
more conspicuous service to the Church than the great 
century which is now closing. 

Samuel T. Wilson, Stated Clerk. 

Maryville, Tenn., Nov. 7, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OP WASHINGTON 

The Synod of Washington, in session in Spokane, 
Wash., October 3-5, 1911, rejoices with you in the com- 
pletion of a century of good service to the churches, for 
our Lord and Master, and assures you of its good wishes 
and prayers for long-continued usefulness and success in 
the yet far away future. 

Eugene A. Walker, Stated Clerk. 

Reardan, Wash., Oct. 30th, 1911. 

[46] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SYNOD OF WEST VIEGINIA 

The Synod, in session at Charleston, W. Va., on Oct. 
21, 1911, took the following action : 

We rejoice that this Seminary has rendered to our beloved 
Church such faithful and efficient service of instruction and inspira- 
tion through this one hundred years. "We rejoice that she has been 
such an able and devoted defender of the faith in all her remarkable 
history. "We rejoice in the noble band of men whose hearts God has 
touched, whom she informed and trained in the things of the King- 
dom. We join with the men all over the world in the best of wishes 
and earnest prayers that in the coming years God may graciously 
bless her even more abundantly both in things temporal, in increas- 
ing her needed endowment, and in things spiritual, to realize her one 
purpose, to raise up, train and inspire men after God's own heart 
to build up the people in our most holy faith. 

Synod also appointed the Rev. Herman G. Stoetzer, 
D.D., an alumnus of the Seminary, its special represen- 
tative at the commemoration services. 

J. P. Leyenberger, Stated Clerk. 
Wheeling, W. Va., Oct. 21, 1911. 



THE SYNOD OF WISCONSIN 

Synod received an invitation to attend the celebration of the 
one hundredth anniversary of the founding of what is commonly 
known as Princeton Theological Seminary. Synod stood in recogni- 
tion of the courtesy and in order to give expressions of good wishes, 
and was led in prayer by the moderator. 

Extracted from the Minutes of Synod, 

C. A. Adams, Stated Clerk. 

Merrill, Wis., Nov. 10, 1911. 

[47] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 
THE PRESBYTERY OF BIRMINGHAM A 

Whereas, The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
at Princeton has announced the completion of 100 years of service 
to the Church, and asks the prayers and good wishes of this Presby- 
tery; therefore, 

Resolved, That the Stated Clerk be instructed to express the con- 
gratulations of this Presbytery to the Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary on the completion of 100 years of such splendid service to the 
Church, and give hearty assurance of the prayers and good wishes of 
this Presbytery. 

Attest: Luther B. Cross, Stated Clerk. 

Gastonbury, Ala., May 2, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF BROOKLYN 

At the November meeting the members of the Presby- 
tery of Brooklyn instructed the undersigned to convey 
to the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America at Princeton, N. J., 
their hearty congratulations on the completion of a cen- 
tury of loyal and effective service for the Kingdom of 
our Lord and to assure the Seminary that she may be 
sure of the best wishes and earnest prayers of Brooklyn 
Presbytery for her continued success and usefulness. 

Joseph Dunn Burrell, Moderator, 
Jos. (J. Snyder, Stated Clerk. 

Nov. 28, 1911. 



[48] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PRESBYTERY OF BUTLER 

The Presbytery of Butler sends heartiest greetings to 
the Princeton Theological Seminary as it closes its first 
century of splendid service for the Presbyterian Church 
and for Protestantism on this continent and beyond the 
seas, and expresses the hope that the institution first 
established to secure a uniform, trained ministry— both 
scholarly and devout— shall increasingly understand the 
world's ills and shall count it all joy to prepare workmen 
who shall minister to these needs and ever seek to remove 
the all embracing cause. 

Rejoicing with you throughout the celebration of this 
notable event, and invoking the divine favor and blessing 
upon all future efforts for the world's redemption, we 
subscribe in behalf of the Presbytery. 

Wm. R. Craig, Moderator, 
Willis S. McNees, Stated Clerk. 

Done in Presbytery, December 12, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF CARLISLE 

At its recent stated meeting, the Presbytery of Car- 
lisle, having received the invitation of the Theological 
Seminary at Princeton to attend its approaching Cen- 
tennial Anniversary Celebration, requested me to thank 
the Seminary for its invitation. 

I desire to add my personal thanks and felicitations 

L49] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

also, having received an individual invitation and re- 
membering with thankfulness and honor the good I 
received from the Institution. 

Rob't F. McClean, Stated Clerk. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa., April 25, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF CAYUGA 

The Presbytery of Cayuga desires to send its greet- 
ings to Princeton Theological Seminary on the comple- 
tion of one hundred years of noble service both to our 
Church and to the Kingdom throughout the world. 

We are grateful to God for his goodness to this insti- 
tution in the past, and pray that God's richest blessing 
may rest abundantly on it during the coming years. 

Attest: E. Lloyd Jones, Stated Clerk. 

Cayuga, N. Y., April 26, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF CENTRAL DAKOTA 

The Presbytery of Central Dakota joins with others 
in offering to Princeton Seminary felicitations on the 
completion of one hundred years of service for Christ 
and the Church. 

May the God, who has so signally blessed her with con- 
secrated, scholarly men in her chairs for one hundred 

[50] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

years, richly endow her with men and money that she 
may render larger service to the cause. 

May those who go forth from her halls be strong in the 
faith, well qualified and adapted to defend the position 
of Evangelical Christianity until the Lord come. 

Wishing the Seminary larger usefulness, in behalf of 
the Presbytery of Central Dakota, 

John C. Linton, Stated Clerk. 

Flandreau, S. D., April 23, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF CHESTER 

The Presbytery of Chester, in session at Paoli, Pennsylvania, 
Tuesday, January 30, 1912, acknowledges with appreciation the 
gratifying announcement that the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the U. S. A. at Princeton, New Jersey, completes, 
with its present session, one hundred years of service to the Church. 
The Presbytery congratulates the Seminary on this event, and assures 
it of its deep appreciation of the splendid work it has accomplished, 
and that its prayers for the future enlarged success of the Seminary 
shall ever ascend to the Great Head of the Church for His continued 
favor and blessing. 

The above action, by resolution, was heartily and 
unanimously adopted by the Presbytery and I was di- 
rected, in my official capacity, as the Stated Clerk, to 
forward the same, duly attested, to the authorities of the 
Seminary, which duty I have great pleasure in herewith 
fulfilling. 

Wm. Tenton Kruse, Stated Clerk. 

Elwyn, Pa., Jan. 31, 1912. 

[513 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE PRESBYTERY OF CHICAGO 

The Presbytery of Chicago gladly avails itself of the 
opportunity of extending to the Boards of Directors and 
Trustees, and to the Faculty and Alumni of Princeton 
Theological Seminary its sincerest and warmest congrat- 
ulations on the occasion of its attaining the 100th anni- 
versary of its establishment. 

The strength and influence of Princeton Theological 
Seminary has rightly been the ground of gratification 
and of legitimate pride to the whole Presbyterian com- 
munity of this land. Its first century of life, coinciding 
as it does with the most intensely active period from the 
intellectual point of view of the world's history, was 
from its nature one that required the work of such an 
institution as Princeton Theological Seminary. The 
Seminary has made its contribution to the whole current 
of intellectual and religious life with marked success. 
Presbyterianism in America, as well as throughout the 
whole world, has reason to rejoice and give thanks to God 
for the life of such an institution. In a time of intensely 
practical tendencies Princeton has insisted on scholarly 
tastes and habits of thought. In a time of questioning, 
with the risk of relaxing convictions, she has stood for 
loyalty to conviction. In a time of diminishing stress on 
educational qualifications for the ministry, she has lifted 
high the cherished ideals distinctive of Presbyterianism 
throughout the centuries, of a thoroughly educated min- 
istry of the Gospel. Much of the success of the Presby- 
terian Church in maintaining its standards and regulat- 
ing its progress is due to the fidelity with which Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary has lived and realized its 
ideals. 

C52: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

,The Presbytery of Chicago offers the prayer, and 
cherishes the hope, that the first century of the life of 
such an institution may be followed by others of still 
greater and more varied usefulness. 

Presented by committee, Rev. Andrew C. Zenos, Chair- 
man. Adopted in Presbytery April 15, 1912. 

Attest: 

James Frothingham, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF CHILLICOTHE 

The Presbytery of Chillicothe joyfully notes the One 
Hundredth Anniversary of the founding of our Theo- 
logical Seminary at Princeton, N. J., and hereby sends 
sincere greeting and assurance of prayer for continued 
good work. 

Attest: Harry B. Vail, Stated Clerk. 

Washington C. H., Ohio, April 16, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF COLUMBIA 

The Presbytery of Columbia begs to acknowledge the 
receipt of the announcement of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New 
Jersey. 

The Presbytery would express its gratification at the 
noble and fruitful history thus accomplished, would con- 

[53] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

gratulate the faculty and officers of the Seminary upon 
the past, and would say that it cherishes the warmest 
appreciation of its present satisfactory status, and in- 
dulges the brightest hopes for its future usefulness and 
prosperity. 

By order of Presbytery, 

Christopher G. Hazard, Stated Clerk. 

Catskill, N. Y., April 23rd, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF COUNCIL BLUFFS 

Council Bluifs Presbytery sends fraternal greetings. 
We are proud of Princeton Seminary; proud of her 
record ; proud of her achievements. We praise Almighty 
God for such institutions as Princeton, and we pray that 
His richest blessing may rest upon good old Princeton. 

We congratulate you on your one hundredth birthday, 
and it is our wish that Princeton may continue to pros- 
per for many, many centuries. God speed your course ; 
God bless your instructors ; God bless your students. 

With my whole heart I join the Presbytery in sending 
you these greetings. 

Theo. J. Asmus, Stated Clerk. 

Carson, Iowa, Oct. 26, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF CRAWFORD SVILLE 

The Presbytery of Crawf ordsville, in session at Frank- 
fort, Ind., sends greetings and rejoices with you in the 

[54] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

completion of your first one hundred years of service to 
the Church. 

We assure you of our prayers for your continued suc- 
cess in training workers who are to go out in the great 
service of the Master. 

Gibson Wilson, 
Hugh N. Ronald, 
Committee. 

Frankfort, Ind., Dec. 11, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF DALLAS 

The Presbytery of Dallas, Synod of Texas, sends 
greeting and congratulations to Princeton Theological 
Seminary on its 100th Anniversary. 

By order of the Presbytery, 

R. W. Benge, Stated Clerk. 
Athens, Texas, Oct. 31, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF DUBUQUE 

The Presbytery of Dubuque has directed me to convey 
to Princeton Theological Seminary its greetings and 
congratulations on the completion of a hundred years of 
distinguished service of God and of the Church, and to 
assure you that earnest and hearty prayers shall continu- 
ally be offered for your abiding prosperity and enlarging 
usefulness. 

W. O. Ruston, Stated Clerk. 

Dubuque, Iowa, April 30, 1912. 

C553 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE PRESBYTERY OF EBENEZER 

The Presbytery of Ebenezer, at its stated meeting in 
Lexington, Ky., in October, 1911, instructed the Stated 
Clerk to acknowledge the receipt of the announcement 
of the Centennial of Princeton Theological Seminary, 
and to convey to you its appreciation of your long and 
honorable service to the Church and your loyalty to your 
historic conditions, as well as its earnest wish and prayer 
that the Seminary may have many centuries of service 
and a constantly increasing service to the Church. 

J. N. Ervin, Stated Clerk. 
Dayton, Ky., Feb. 24, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF IOWA CITY 

The Presbytery of Iowa City joins heartily in the con- 
gratulations that are due the Theological Seminary of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica, at Princeton, New Jersey, on the completion of One 
Hundred Years of service for the Church, and assures 
the President, Faculty and Students that they have our 
prayers and good wishes at this glad time, and we wish 
the Institution many more happy Centennial Celebra- 
tions. May all the future years be as rich in blessing as 
the last. 

On behalf and at the direction of Iowa City Presby- 
tery, 

H. S. Condit, Stated Clerk. 

Iowa City, Iowa, April 29, 1912. 

£56] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PRESBYTERY OF LEHIGH 

A communication having been received from the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, 
announcing the completion with the present session of 
one hundred years of service to the Church, and asking 
for the good wishes and prayers of the Presbytery of 
Lehigh,— 

Your committee recommends that the Presbytery send 
to the Seminary its most hearty congratulations on the 
completion of one hundred years of service in educating 
men for the Gospel Ministry, assuring it of our pray- 
ers for God's richest blessings for the years that are to 
come ; and we further recommend that we here and now, 
as a Presbytery, offer united prayer for the Seminary. 

In behalf of the Committee, 

Samuel C. Hodge, Chairman. 

Hazleton, Pa., Apr. 17, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF MADISON 

The Presbytery of Madison, in session at Richland 
Center, Wisconsin, 16 April, received your announce- 
ment of the near completion of one hundred years of 
service. It directs its stated clerk to send this letter of 
congratulation and best wishes. On taking this action 
the Presbytery was led in prayer by Elder H. B. San- 
ford, of Christ Church, Madison, on behalf of your great 
institution, our Seminary at Princeton. 

Ernest C. Henke, Stated Clerk. 
Baraboo, Wis., 22 April, 1912. 

[57] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE PRESBYTERY OF MATTOON 

The Presbytery of Mattoon, in session at Effingham, 
Illinois, April 10th, 1912, took note of the completion 
of the first hundred years of service of the Princeton 
Seminary. 

By formal action I was instructed to convey to you, 
on behalf of the Presbytery, its congratulations, good 
wishes and prayers. 

We have a pardonable pride in your institution; we 
recognize its signal service in the Kingdom of our Lord ; 
we glory in its loyalty to the faith once given to the 
saints. 

It is in our hearts to add other centuries of like ser- 
vice, and pray that all in connection with Princeton may 
everywhere be marked as men who have been with Jesus, 
conspicuous for energy, effectiveness, consecration. 

With the multitude who so believe, place Mattoon 
Presbytery. 

John A. Tracy, Stated Clerk. 

Shelbyville, 111., April 12, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF MONMOUTH 

Monmouth Presbytery receives with pleasure the an- 
nouncement of the approaching centennial celebration 
of Princeton Seminary's splendid history and service. 

The Presbytery is devoutly grateful to God for an 
institution which has stood for one hundred years a 
staunch defender of the faith of the fathers, as handed 
down in the Word of God, and for the long line of godly 

ess: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

and able ministers of the Word which has gone out from 
its walls to the work of the Church in all the world. 

Old Monmouth Presbytery, which through all these 
years has been in closest touch with Princeton, and 
whose churches have been founded and developed so 
largely by Princeton graduates, would most cordially 
take advantage of this opportunity to express its debt 
to the Seminary and its joy in the Seminary's pros- 
perity. 

The Presbytery hereby sends to the Directors, Trus- 
tees and Faculty of the Seminary the assurance of its 
good wishes and fervent prayers for an enlarged and 
still grander life of usefulness through all the years to 
come. 

Resolved, That the Presbytery recommend to the pastors of the 
churches within its bounds hearty co-operation in the Seminary's 
project to gather a centennial fund to enlarge its efficiency for the 
future. 

Adopted in the Monmouth Presbytery Session of Jan. 
23, 1912, at Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Attest: Fkank R. Symmes, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF NEBRASKA CITY 

The Presbytery of Nebraska City sends greetings to 
the Theological Seminary of Princeton, rejoicing in its 
century of prosperity and praying that our Heavenly 
Father may grant to it a long future of still richer bless- 
ings. 

Done in Presbytery this fourteenth day of November, 
1911. 

Thomas L. Sexton, Stated Clerk. 

[59] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE PRESBYTERY OF NEW BRUNSWICK 

At a meeting of the Presbytery of New Brunswick on 
January 23d, 1912, there was reported to the Presbytery 
the announcement of the Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary of its approaching one hundredth anniversary, to- 
gether with the request of the officers of the Seminary 
for the interest and prayers of the Presbytery of New 
Brunswick. 

In response to this request the Presbytery adopted the 
following resolutions, viz: — 

First, That the members of the Presbytery will suitably remember 
the Seminary in private and public prayer. 

Second, That in response to the request from the Seminary there 
shall be forwarded to its officers a paper prepared by a Committee 
of Presbytery and read before the Presbytery in September, 1911. 

Third, That the Seminary shall be informed that the Presbytery 
has appointed a Committee to attend the commemorative exercises 
of the Seminary. 

The paper referred to in these resolutions, and now 
forwarded to you, the officers of the Seminary, in the 
name of the Presbytery, is as follows :— 

The need which suggested the establishment of a Theological 
Seminary was complex. The first need of the Church of a hundred 
years ago was an increased number of ministers. The nation was in 
the grip of a great missionary movement. William Carey had fanned 
the flickering flame of evangelism to a white heat, which also in- 
flamed the Church on this continent. The Great Revival of 1800 
accentuated the need for the preparation of an ample supply of min- 
isters to safeguard the rapidly spreading cause of Christ. Another 
condition lay in French infidelity, which was rampant and threat- 
ened to invade the Church, as it had already invaded the Colleges 
and clubs of the land. This corrupt philosophy challenged the virile 

[eon 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

intellect of the period and required a commanding response by an 
accredited scholarship. A further need for ministers consisted in 
the unevangelical influences of the theological seminaries and uni- 
versities in the New England States. They were rapidly falling into 
the control of Unitarian disciples. Protestantism needed ardent 
believers and efficient teachers of essential Christianity rightly to 
direct the pulsating yearnings of the large accretions to the Church. 
The able and ardent ministry of the time were very busy men and 
were precluded from sacrificing time and energy on other than their 
specific work. As a matter of fact, unreliable methods of preparation 
existed, under instructors of less ability, and inculcated a sinister 
tendency. "An educated ministry" was the cry. The power and 
purity of the rising clergy called for true and capable experts. This 
was conclusively vindicated by subsequent consequences of ecclesi- 
astical health and influence. 

In recognition, then, of the imminent need of an educated min- 
istry, the Rev. Ashbel Green, D.D., as early as 1805 sent into the 
General Assembly an "admirable paper" which drew the mind of 
the Church to this important subject. Of the particular method for 
raising up an efficient ministry, however, the earliest discoverable 
mention lies in a portion of the Moderator's sermon to the General 
Assembly of 1808, preached by the Rev. Archibald Alexander. ' ' En- 
couraged by this," writes Dr. Green in his autobiography, "I used 
all my influence in favor of this measure ; and in 1809 the Presbytery 
of Philadelphia, to which I belonged, sent into the General Assembly 
of that year an overture distinctly proposing the establishment of 
a theological school." The assembly sent down to the Presbyteries 
for their consideration the following alternatives: First, one great 
school in some convenient place near the center of the Church ; sec- 
ond, two such schools in such places as may best accommodate the 
northern and southern sections of the Church; and, third, such a 
school within the bounds of each of the Synods. The vote of the Pres- 
byteries strongly favored the establishment of an institution of theo- 
logical learning, but left somewhat in doubt the best plan of pro- 
cedure. The first and third plans commanded an equal support. 
The Assembly of 1810 adopted the first plan, and appointed a com- 
mittee, of which Dr. Green was chairman, to draft an outline of the 
proposed Seminary. Dr. Green's committee laid its report in 

[61] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

printed form before the Assembly of 1811, by whom it was adopted 
in toto, proposing that in the Seminary "when completely organized, 
there shall be at least three professors, who shall give a regular 
course of instruction in divinity, in Oriental and Biblical literature 
and in ecclesiastical history and church government, and such other 
subjects as may be deemed necessary." 

The location of the theological seminary at Princeton was largely 
determined by two considerations, to wit, the helpful presence of the 
college and geographical convenience. Princeton was midway be- 
tween the Synods of New York and Philadelphia. The trustees of 
the college proffered sufficient land for a site for the seminary, but 
a similar offer of Richard Stockton, noted patriot and philanthropist, 
was gratefully accepted. 

A yet more sacred and significant necessity remained to be sap- 
plied, namely, the endowment of the embryonic institution with a 
living and life-giving spirit. The selection of a man to pioneer the 
proposed seminary through a "terra incognita" was, perhaps, the 
most solemn duty that ever confronted the General Assembly. In 
the Assembly of 1811, preceded by prayer and prosecuted in the 
hush of sacred awe, and ' ' amid the tears and prayers of the Church, 
Dr. Alexander was elected to the office" of the first and only pro- 
fessor of the seminary-in-sight. On the twelfth day of August in 
the following year he was inducted into his high office at the age 
of forty years. In his characteristic modesty and faith, the newly 
invested professor approached the herculean difficulties of the hour. 
There was nothing tangible before the sight of this pathfinder, but 
a firm faith held him steadfast to his great Guide and Hope. The 
seminary began with three students and a single teacher. In the 
following year these were augmented to twenty-four students and 
two teachers, the Rev. Samuel Miller, D.D., having been added to the 
faculty. 

This infantile institution of sacred learning begins now to develop 
into individuality of character. The personnel of Princeton's insti- 
tutional life, from the pioneer Alexander to the present, has given 
it its individuality among similar institutions. Its founders and 
friends were men of liberal learning and searching thoughtfulness. 
There are in such temperaments balance and proportion, and their 
tendency is toward the conservation of the intellectually accredited. 

[62] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

In addition, the age and place of the early life of Princeton conduced 
markedly to its type of character. She was not buffeted by the rest- 
less flux that surged around other institutions. A stately equanimity 
and a sylvan isolation conduced to a conservative character. The 
location as much as the "Zeitgeist" contributed to its distinct indi- 
viduality. 

Princeton's character answered an existing necessity. The re- 
quirements of the age were for caution and conservatism. The 
natural consequences of a heated revival experience and a rapidly 
spreading Church were mixed accretions of impulse and fervor. The 
influx of French infidelity, made attractive by the charm of a sym- 
pathetic court and nation, called for a confirming conviction of faith 
and stedfastness. The insinuations of an insidious philosophy rap- 
idly infested the churches and universities of New England with 
doubt and danger. In the midst of this instability and uncertainty 
Princeton sounded the clarion note of conviction and courage. The 
Church of to-day is not unmindful of her heroic exploits in these 
crises of thought and morals. She aided many a struggler in the 
gurgling rapids to hold fast to that which was good, and therefore 
enduring. The past century of our Church is secure largely because 
of her services in the apologetics of the Reformed faith. Her cen- 
tenary memorializes her monumental achievements in sacred disci- 
pline to thousands of young men who have themselves rendered 
efficient work in fields at home and abroad. 

What, then, of Princeton's position in the immediate present? 
Is her past, however glorious, the mere reflection of a closed career? 
That there is need in the domain of divinity for thoroughness of 
thought and exemplification of precept is manifest to every sober 
participant in the serious life of the present age. The latter half of 
the nineteenth century developed a spirit audacious and ominous. 
In every realm of thought and action radicalism holds the reins and 
drives the steeds. The danger of to-day is not the failure to discover 
new territories of truth, but the destruction of continents of convic- 
tion as a necessary trail for reaching the new treasures. Radicalism 
is on the road to ruin unless related to a sympathetic yet virile 
conservatism. The past has labored as truly as we do, and the pres- 
ent may enter into its labor with joy and profit. Both the radical 
and the conservative has his legitimate and essential place in the 

[63] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

procession and progression of the race. It is unreasonable and un- 
fortunate to create antipathy and antagonism between correlated 
companions in quest of a common object. 

Without stigmatizing one or despising the other, one may evaluate 
both. There exists at the present an imperative need for a steadying 
conservatism in order to retain to the Church and nation the accred- 
ited and substantial. Princeton with its characteristic type of 
thought and influence, is to-day an indispensable institution of sacred 
learning. Never did a generation need more its temperamental atti- 
tude toward fundamental questions of thought and radical problems 
of action. Without the slightest disparagement to others, Princeton 
is invaluable to the present age and for future generations for the 
training of young men for leadership in the Church. Her centenary 
is her challenge to the twentieth century of cordial interest and cou- 
rageous purpose. Surrounded by a great cloud of witnesses she is 
buckling on her armor for continued and aggressive warfare for 
Christ and His Church. Every lover of the Church will acclaim her 
vision and commend her determination to apprehend that for which 
she was apprehended by her Master and founders. 

In view of the proposed centennial celebration of 
Princeton Theological Seminary, the Presbytery adopts 
the following resolutions : 

1. The Presbytery of New Brunswick hereby expresses its cordial 
appreciation of Princeton's distinguished services to the Church and 
nation during her century of existence. We are proud of her im- 
perishable past. Her eminent men and her efficient achievements 
are illustrious in the records of the Presbyterian Church, and her 
devotion to the nation is the boast of every patriot. 

2. The Presbytery of New Brunswick shares in the confidence of 
sister Presbyteries of Princeton's ability and intention to meet the 
present problems in the Church with sympathy and courage. We 
recognize her as a strong defender of our faith, delivered unto us 
by the great Head of the Church and transmitted to us as a sacred 
legacy. We know her as our chivalric contestant in the maintenance 
of truth and power. 

3. The Presbytery of New Brunswick ardently commends Prince- 

C64] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ton to the affectionate and liberal support of the churches within 
her bounds through moral and financial co-operation. We may move 
her to unparalleled usefulness by our fervent prayers and cordial 
good-will, and in view of her aspiring development of facilities and 
enlargement of faculty, we also earnestly commend Princeton to the 
liberal financial support of individuals and churches in our Presby- 
tery. In her endeavor to increase her endowment with an addi- 
tional million of dollars, greatly needed to meet the large purposes, 
we bespeak for Princeton the most cheerful and lavish support of 
our Presbyterians. We can suggest no better financial investment 
to men of large means than the enlargement and development of this 
institution of genuine culture and strategic influence. 

4. The Presbytery of New Brunswick designates five commission- 
ers as official visitors of the Presbytery to the Centennial celebration 
of the Seminary. 

The commissioners appointed by the Presbytery are 
as follows: Eev. August W. Sonne, Rev. Henry Collin 
Minton, D.D., LL.D., Rev. Walter A. Brooks, D.D., Rev. 
Daniel R. Foster, Rev. Francis Palmer. 

Attest: Walter A. Brooks, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF NEWTON 

At the stated meeting of the Presbytery of Newton, 
held at Newton, N. J., on April 9th, 1912, the following 
was adopted by a hearty and unanimous vote of the Pres- 
bytery, as the report of the Committee to which had 
been referred the communication from Princeton Semi- 
nary, announcing the completion, with this present 
session, of one hundred years of service to the Church. 

Whereas, the Princeton Theological Seminary will observe its Cen- 
tennial at the Commencement season in May ; be it 

Resolved, 1st : That the Presbytery of Newton places on record its 

[65] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

deep thankfulness to Almighty God for the great usefulness of this, 
the oldest Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America. 

Resolved, 2nd : That we recognize, in the present Faculty, men of 
eminent scholarship and spiritual loyalty, fit successors to those who 
have gone before. 

Resolved, 3rd: That we congratulate both the Faculty and the 
Board of Directors upon the bright prospect of future usefulness for 
this Institution, 

Resolved, 4th: That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to 
the Committee having charge of the Centennial Celebration. 

J. A. Armstrong, 
W. C. Peabody, 

Theodore Tinsman, 

Committee. 

Attest: E. Clarke Cline, Stated Clerk. 

Phillipsburg, N. J., April 11th, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF NEW YORK 

The Presbytery of New York acknowledges with plea- 
sure the announcement of your 100th Anniversary at the 
completion of the present session of the Seminary and 
also your request for the good wishes and prayers of this 
Presbytery. 

At our meeting yesterday I was instructed as stated 
clerk of the Presbytery to convey to you our congratula- 
tions upon this long service to the Church and the suc- 
cess which has crowned your efforts to extend the 
Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. We 
assure you of our good wishes and promise to remember 
you in our prayers. 

[66: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

May the Lord grant you His richest blessings and 
increase your labors and the reward which has always 
attended them more and more abundantly. 

In behalf of the Presbytery of New York, 

Jesse F. Forbes, Stated Clerk. 

Nov. 14, 1911. 



THE PEESBYTEEY OF NOETH EIVEE 

The Presbytery of North Eiver extends greeting to 
Princeton Theological Seminary upon the occasion of 
the celebration of her one hundredth anniversary. 

We thank God for the founding of Princeton Semi- 
nary; for the great work He has enabled her to accom- 
plish in the preparation of men for the ministry of 
Christ ; for her noted contributions to Christian Theol- 
ogy ; and for her consistent stand for the Faith. 

With congratulations upon her past and with prayers 
for her future, the Presbytery of North Eiver adds her 
felicitations upon this most happy occasion. 

Attest: John Scott King, Stated Clerk. 

Done in Presbytery, at Newburgh, N. Y., April 16, 1912. 



THE PEESBYTEEY OF NOETHUMBEELAND 

The Presbytery of Northumberland at its two hun- 
dred and fourth stated semi-annual meeting, unani- 
mously voted to send congratulations to Princeton Theo- 

C67I] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

logical Seminary on completing one hundred years of 
splendid service for Christ and the Church. The Pres- 
bytery expresses the earnest and prayerful wish that the 
Seminary may ever continue her painstaking and con- 
secrated work of loyalty to the Holy Scriptures, to the 
Standards of the Church and to Jesus Christ her Foun- 
der and Head. 

James Wollaston Kirk, Moderator, 
Henry Sperbeck, Stated Clerk. 

April 16th, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF OAKLAND 

In view of the splendid record of successful service of 
Princeton Theological Seminary for one hundred years, 
the Presbytery of Oakland hereby acknowledges the an- 
nouncement sent by the said institution and expresses its 
sincere interest and felicitations on the completion of 
Princeton's century; and sends her, through the Stated 
Clerk, hearty good wishes and prayers for God's richest 
blessing upon the Seminary in the coming years. 
In behalf of the Presbytery, 

R. S. Eastman, Stated Clerk. 

Berkeley, Calif., March 1, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF OMAHA 

The Presbytery of Omaha has heard with much inter- 
est that the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, at Princeton, 

1682 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

New Jersey, is approaching the completion of one hun- 
dred years of service to the Church, and recognizes with 
gratitude the great work which this institution, under 
the blessing of God, has been able to accomplish. 

Beginning at a time when the membership of the whole 
Church was but little larger than that of our Synod of 
Nebraska at the present time, it has grown with the 
growth of the Church ; it has sent ministers of the Word, 
numbered by the thousand, into all parts of the world ; 
and at the end of the century it is more adequately 
equipped for service than at any other period in its 
history. 

Remembering the strong and godly men who have been 
connected with this institution in the past, and believing 
that they have been succeeded in the good work by men 
of like faith and spirit, we invoke God's richest blessing 
upon Princeton Seminary and pray that it may still be 
mightily used for the extension of the Kingdom of our 
blessed Lord. 

Attest: Julius F. Schwaez, Stated Clerk. 

Done in Presbytery in session at Fremont, 
Nebraska, April 16th, A. D. 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF PECOS VALLEY 

The Presbytery of Pecos Valley, with pleasure and 
sincere thanks, acknowledges the receipt of your an- 
nouncement concerning the completion of the first one 
hundred years of service to the Church; and we desire 
to express our most hearty congratulations, praying 
God's continued blessings upon the work of this great 
institution. 

[69] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

By order of the Presbytery of Pecos Valley, this 5th 
day of April, A.D. 1912. 

Attest: Ebenezer E. Mathes, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF PHILADELPHIA 

The Presbytery of Philadelphia most heartily and 
cordially congratulates the Seminary on its splendid 
achievement during all these past years, and expresses 
the hope that even greater things may be accomplished 
in the years ahead; also that a committee of three be 
appointed by the Moderator to attend the Anniversary 
services. 

The Moderator appointed Rev. Robert Hunter, D.D., 
Stated Clerk, William P. Fulton, D.D., Permanent 
Clerk, and the Presbytery named Rev. C. A. R. Janvier, 
Moderator, as Chairman. 

Attest: Robert Hunter, Stated Clerk. 

Philadelphia, Pa., April 24, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF PHILADELPHIA 
NORTH 

At a meeting of the Presbytery of Philadelphia North, 
held September 19, 1911, the following resolution was 
unanimously adopted : 

Whereas this Presbytery is informed that a public meeting is to 
be held in Philadelphia on behalf of Princeton Seminary which is 
soon to celebrate its Centennial Anniversary, therefore 

C70] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Resolved 1, That we commend this meeting to the favorable atten- 
tion of our ministers and people. 

2, That we desire to express our grateful sense of the benefits 
which have come to us as a Presbytery, and to the churches under 
our care, from our neighborhood to this venerable Seminary. 

3, That we pray for the continued and increasing prosperity of 
this great School of the Prophets. 

Attest: Richakd Montgomery, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF PHOENIX 

On behalf of the Presbytery of Phoenix, I beg to ex- 
tend to you and to the Seminary, including all the mem- 
bers of the Faculty, our congratulations on the centen- 
nial occasion which the Seminary observes this year, and 
we pray you all possible blessing. 

F. C. Reid, Stated Clerk. 

Phoenix, Ariz., April 17, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF RESERVE 

Reserve Presbytery met April 10th, and requested me 
to convey the hearty good will and appreciation of the 
Brethren to you for reaching the 100th Anniversary of 
your good work; and also the prayers of the Brethren 
for the success of the Institution for many centuries yet 

to come. 

D. S. Brown, Stated Clerk. 

Kadoka, S. D., April 17th, 1912. 

WW 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



THE PRESBYTERY OF ROCHESTER 

Gathered in regular Spring Meeting, the Presbytery 
of Rochester takes great pleasure in extending a unani- 
mous vote of congratulation to the Theological Seminary 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
America at Princeton, New Jersey, on the occasion of the 
celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the 
Founding of the Seminary. 

Our vote is not alone one of congratulation, but also of 
appreciation. We feel that we honor ourselves in hon- 
oring an Institution that has done such great and notable 
work in advancing the Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ in America and throughout the world in all 
these years. 

The Presbytery hereby appoint Reverend George Her- 
man Fickes and Reverend Gerard B. F. Hallock, Stated 
Clerk, to convey our greetings and, if possible, to attend 
the Anniversary Exercises. 

We take pleasure in forwarding the above action, and 
will attend your celebration if possible. 

For the Presbytery of Rochester. 

Geo. Herman Fickes, 

G. B. F. Hallock:, 

Committee. 
Rochester, N. Y., April 22nd, 1912. 



t™l 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PRESBYTERY OF SAINT LAWRENCE 

We, the Presbytery of Saint Lawrence, now in session, 
send greetings to Princeton Theological Seminary and 
hearty congratulations on its completion of one hundred 
years of efficient service to the Church. 

The long roll of noble and distinguished men that this 
Seminary has sent forth to the Church and the world is 
well known to all. Princeton has, for these hundred 
years, stood for a strong and conservative Church, with 
a policy that has been a great source of strength to its 
communion in preventing much loose and unorthodox 
thought from being brought into our Church by the min- 
istry it has sent forth. 

We therefore, with a hope of long continued pros- 
perity, send our prayers and greetings. 

Daniel A. Ferguson, Stated Clerk. 

Canton, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., April 16th, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF SAINT LOUIS 

The Presbytery of Saint Louis has received the an- 
nouncement from the Seminary of the approaching Cen- 
tennial of its organization. 

It has requested me to reply to this, and to say that 
the Presbytery holds your venerable institution in the 
highest esteem, and that it is grateful to God for the 
abundant service it has rendered to the Church in pre- 

[73] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

paring an able, faithful and orthodox ministry during 
the hundred years of its existence. 

It cordially responds to your request and prays for the 
continued peace and prosperity of your great institution. 
Yours in behalf of the Presbytery, 

Sam 'l G. Niccolls. 

St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 24, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF SAINT PAUL 

The Presbytery of Saint Paul extends cordial greet- 
ings and expresses its appreciation of the splendid rec- 
ord in work and influence of this the Mother Seminary 
of American Presbyterianism. 

The attainments of the past have made Princeton a 
household word in the religious world. 

The Presbytery of Saint Paul, while thus rejoicing 
with the whole Church over the past one hundred years, 
is confident that God has great blessings still to diffuse 
through the agency of this, our representative institu- 
tion, in whose ideals and spirit are found devotion and 
loyalty to the great principles and magnificent theology 
of the Reformed Church. 

Attest: J. C. Robinson, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Presbytery of San Francisco, in session this day, 
receives with pleasure from the Theological Seminary 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of 

[74] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

America, at Princeton, New Jersey, the announcement 
of its completion, with the present session, of one hun- 
dred years of service to the Church, expresses to the 
Seminary profound appreciation of its noble work, 
tenders to it hearty congratulations, and pledges pray- 
ers for its ever increasing prosperity and power. 

Rev. E. K. Strong, 
Rev. J. H. Lattghlin, 

Committee. 
Oct. 10th, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF SEDALIA 

Resolved, That the Presbytery of Sedalia extends its 
heartiest congratulations to the Princeton Theological 
Seminary on the completion of its one hundred years of 
faithful and efficient service of the Church, and that we 
pray for continued usefulness, and that our Stated Clerk 
extend our congratulations and good wishes to said 
Seminary. 

Attest: J. W. Mitchell, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF SYRACUSE 

The Presbytery of Syracuse acknowledges the grace- 
ful announcement of the completion of the first one hun- 
dred years of the Seminary's service, and with profound 
gratitude to God desires to assure the Seminary of its 

C75H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

best wishes and continued prayers for increased pros- 
perity and enlarged service in the work of the Kingdom 
of God to the glory of onr Lord Jesus Christ. 
By order of the Presbytery, 

John G. Truair, Stated Clerk. 
Dec. 21, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF TOPEKA 

The Presbytery of Topeka, in session at Lawrence, 
Kansas, on April 10, 1912, recognizes with gratitude to 
the great Head of the Church the century of service 
completed and to be celebrated in May. It acknow- 
ledges the value of the Seminary in contributing to the 
equipment of ministers of the Gospel, sound in faith and 
consecrated to the work of the Kingdom. It congratu- 
lates the management on the hopeful outlook for the 
future. It joins in the petitions to the Sovereign Dis- 
poser of all events for the continuance of His favor as the 
years and even centuries go. 

Attest: A. H. Harshaw, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF UTICA 

The Presbytery of Utica recognizes with profound 
gratitude the completion by Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary of its first one hundred years of magnificent service 
to the Church of our Lord and Redeemer, Jesus Christ. 

H76] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

We extend to the Seminary, in its Centennial celebra- 
tion, our good wishes for continued prosperity and our 
earnest prayer for ever enlarging usefulness. 

Louis G. Colson, Committee. 
Attest: 

Oliver A. Kingsbury, Stated Clerk. 

Clinton, N. Y., April 9th, 1912. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF WESTCHESTER 

At a meeting of the Presbytery of Westchester, held in 
New York, January 16, 1912, the following minute was 
adopted : 

The Presbytery of Westchester notes with gratitude to God the 
completion of one hundred years of service rendered by the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Princeton, N. J., to the cause of Christ in Amer- 
ica, and throughout the world. 

We add to the prayers of the unnumbered friends of Princeton 
our prayers that an ever increasing sphere of usefulness, filled with 
the power of God, may be granted to this venerable institution of 
learning. 

Attest: W. J. Cumming, Stated Clerk. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF WESTERN AFRICA 

The Presbytery of Western Africa acknowledges with 
great pleasure the announcement received from Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary of the completion of its one 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

hundredth anniversary of service to the Church; and 
hereby conveys the expressions of its great appreciation 
for the eminent services rendered by this grand Institu- 
tion, as well as the assurances of its best wishes and fer- 
vent prayers for many more years of usefulness and 
prosperity. 

By the Presbytery, 

William H. Blaine, Stated Clerk. 

Monrovia, Dec. 14, 1911. 



THE PRESBYTERY OF WEST JERSEY 

The Presbytery of West Jersey extends to the Semi- 
nary at Princeton on the occasion of its celebration of its 
first century of service to the Church, its heartiest con- 
gratulations, with gratitude to God for the distinguished 
service to the cause of Christ and to the purity of the 
faith once committed to the Fathers, which has been 
rendered by this institution of our Church, and with 
acknowledgment of the incalculable value of the work 
accomplished in providing for the Church and the mis- 
sion-field a mighty band of ministers and missionaries 
grounded in the truth. 

We express the hope for the continued favor and 
blessing of God, and our prayer that the Seminary in the 
coming years may gain larger opportunities and accom- 
plishments for the Kingdom of our Lord. 

Attest: A. P. Botsfoed, Stated Clerk. 

Salem, N. J., April 16, 1912. 

[78: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PRESBYTERY OF WHITEWATER 

The Presbytery of Whitewater gratefully acknow- 
ledges the receipt of the announcement of the completion 
of the first 100 years of service of the grand, sturdy and 
loyal Seminary at Princeton, and officially assures the 
Trustees and Faculty of the good wishes and prayers of 
this Presbytery. 

Thomas Jackson Graham, Stated Clerk. 

Ordered by motion at meeting of Presbytery- 
April 9, 1912, at Cambridge City, Indiana. 



THE FIFTH AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK 

To the Theological Seminary of Princeton. 

In view of the celebration by the Theological Seminary 
at Princeton of its Centennial Anniversary, the Session 
of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church of the City of 
New York desires to send its salutations and greetings 
to the Seminary. 

We recall the intimate relations between this Church 
and the Theological Seminary of Princeton in its estab- 
lishment, and during the whole century of its existence. 

As early as 1809 the first pastor of this Church, the 
Rev. Dr. John Brodhead Romeyn, was one of a commit- 
tee appointed by the General Assembly, to which was 
referred an overture for the establishment of a Theologi- 
cal School, and which reported three plans, which were 

C793 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

referred to the Presbyteries for their opinion and report 
at the next General Assembly. 

On the replies from the Presbyteries the General As- 
sembly of 1810, of which Dr. Romeyn was Moderator, 
resolved to proceed with the establishment of a Semi- 
nary, and appointed a committee, of which he was one, 
to prepare a plan to be reported to the next General As- 
sembly. He was also appointed to solicit donations for 
the establishment and support of such Theological Semi- 
nary. 

The Committee reported a plan which was adopted by 
the General Assembly of 1811, providing for the choice 
by the General Assembly of a Board of Directors con- 
sisting of twenty-one ministers and nine ruling elders, 
and Divie Bethune, one of the Elders of the Church, was 
appointed upon a Committee to confer with the Trustees 
of the College of New Jersey upon the establishment of 
the Seminary at Princeton. 

When the General Assembly organized the Seminary 
in 1812, it chose Dr. Romeyn and two of our Elders, Divie 
Bethune and Zechariah Lewis, among its first Directors. 

Eight of the nine Pastors of this Church have been 
among the Seminary Directors, and two of our Pastors 
have come to our Church from successful Professorships 
in the Seminary. During the whole century one or more 
of our Elders have been Directors of the Seminary, and 
ever since 1822, when its Trustees were incorporated, 
one or more of the members of our Session have been 
among its Trustees. 

Members of our Church have provided large endow- 
ments for the Seminary, and as early as 1810 a Society 
was formed in our Church to provide aid and comfort for 
its students. 

[son 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Descendants of the Rev. Dr. Archibald Alexander to 
the third and fourth generation have been members of 
our Church and congregation ; of whom two became stu- 
dents of the Seminary and honored and useful ministers 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

These things move us to felicitate the officers and 
Faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary upon the 
first century of its existence and fruitful experience, and 
to hope for it the continuance and increase of the favor 
and blessing of Almighty God, which has always crowned 
its days and made it a faithful minister to the Church of 
Christ in its onward march both at home and abroad. 
By order of Session, 

S. B. Bkownell, Clerk of Session. 
J. H. Jowett, Moderator. 

New York, May 9, 1912. 



[81H 



RESPONSES FROM THE BOARDS OF THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 

STATES OF AMERICA 



THE BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS 

It gives me pleasure to inform you that the Board of 
Home Missions cordially accepts the invitation of 
Princeton Seminary to be represented at the approach- 
ing Centennial, and has appointed its Secretary, Rev. 
Charles L. Thompson, D.D., to that duty. 

John Dixon, Clerk of the Board. 

March 15, 1912. 



THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS 

I acknowledge herewith the receipt of the invitation of 
the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Seminary, to 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the IT. S. A., to be represented on the occasion 
of the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment 
of the Seminary by the General Assembly, on May 5-7, 
1912. 

Our Board has duly appointed its President, the Rev. 
George Alexander, D.D., 47 University Place, N. Y. 
City, to represent them on that occasion. 

Stanley White, Secretary. 

March 7, 1912. 



[85] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The invitation of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
Princeton, N. J., to the Presbyterian Board of Educa- 
tion to be represented by a delegate upon the celebration 
of the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment 
of the Seminary is accepted, and the Board has elected 
the Reverend Charles Wadsworth, Jr., D.D., as such 
representative. 

I write this for the Board, in the absence of the Cor- 
responding Secretary, Dr. Cochran. 

Richard C. Hughes, Sec'y for University Work. 

February 20, 1912. 

THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION AND 
SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK 

At the meeting of the Board of Publication and Sab- 
bath-School Work, held yesterday afternoon, I pre- 
sented the invitation of the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton requesting the Board to appoint a delegate 
who would represent it at the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the Seminary. 

The Board accepted the invitation, and elected the 
Hon. Robert N. Willson, 2226 Spruce Street, President 
of our Board, as its delegate. At the same time, it elected 
the Rev. Louis F. Benson, D.D., 2014 Delancey Street, 
to be the alternative, in case Judge Willson should be 
unable to attend. 

With best wishes for the success of the coming celebra- 

t lon ' Alexander Henry, Secretary. 

February 28th, 1912. 

C86] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE BOARD OF THE CHURCH 
ERECTION FUND 

The communication of the Directors, Trustees and 
Faculty of the Seminary, inviting the Board of Church 
Erection to be represented on the occasion of the Semi- 
nary's One Hundredth Anniversary, was received by the 
Board at its monthly meeting yesterday. 

I am instructed to return the thanks of the Board for 
this invitation, and to inform you that the Hon. Fred- 
erick Gordon Burnham, President of our Board, whose 
address is Morristown, N. J., was elected as the Board's 

representative. 

D. J. McMillan, Cor. Sec'y. 

Feb. 21, 1912. 



THE BOARD OF RELIEF FOR 
DISABLED MINISTERS AND THE WIDOWS 
AND ORPHANS OF DECEASED MINISTERS 

The Presbyterian Board of Relief for Disabled Min- 
isters at its regular meeting May 2nd, 1912, appointed 
the following members of the Board as its representa- 
tives at the Centennial Celebration of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary : 

Rev. S. T. Lowrie, D.D., H. S. P. Nichols, Esq., 
Rev. Marcus A. Brownson, D.D., and Rev. William W. 
Heberton, D.D. 

W. W. Heberton, Rec. Secy. 

May 3rd, 1912. 

L87:i 



RESPONSES FROM OTHER 
ECCLESIASTICAL BODIES 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CHURCH 
OF SCOTLAND 

To the President, Board of Trustees and Faculty of the 
Theological Seminary, Princeton, N. J., U. S. A. 

The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, 
having been informed by Principal Stewart of the com- 
munication which he had received from the Seminary 
intimating that the Seminary was to celebrate the first 
hundredth anniversary of its foundation in the begin- 
ning of the present month, and inviting this Church to be 
represented on the occasion, desires to acknowledge the 
kind intimation and invitation extended to it. Unfortu- 
nately no meeting of the Assembly, or of its Commis- 
sion, took place between the receipt of the intimation, 
and the present meeting of Assembly. The Assembly 
has heard with pleasure the Report of Principal Stewart 
as to his visit to the Celebration at Princeton, and cor- 
dially endorses the kindly greetings which he gave in the 
name of the Church to the Members of the Seminary. 
The Assembly recalls with deep interest the remarkable 
history of Princeton Theological Seminary, and desires 
to express its earnest hope that the work of the Seminary 
may be long continued, that it may have much prosperity 
and that the blessing of God may rest upon it. 

In the name of the General Assembly of the Church of 
Scotland, 

S. Marcus Dill, D.D., Moderator. 

Edinburgh, May 29th, 1912. 

C91H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE UNITED 
FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 

To the Members of the Faculty and Governing Board of 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

We, the Members of the Commission of the General 
Assembly of the United Free Church of Scotland, offer 
you our cordial congratulations upon the centenary of 
your Seminary. 

Your School of Divinity has been greatly esteemed in 
our land, especially in the churches which now form the 
United Free Church of Scotland. In former days, you 
were in fraternal alliance with those who formed the 
United Presbyterian Church, and in 1843 those who 
severed their connection with the State to form the Free 
Church of Scotland found in Princeton generous and 
helpful friends. We are united today in gratefully 
acknowledging our indebtedness to the eminent Prince- 
ton Theologians of last century, and gladly embrace the 
opportunity of joining with you in honouring the men 
who, by their piety and their learning, have made 
Princeton famous throughout Christendom. 

Your Church and ours have the same parentage, they 
have been nourished by the same doctrine, they equally 
prize the Spiritual Independence of Christ's Church, 
they have the same evangelical traditions, and the same 
conceptions of their mission at home and abroad. 

Recognising that you are richly endowed with in- 
spiring associations, we pray God that your School of 
the Prophets may continue to be the Alma Mater to an 
increasing band of consecrated and well instructed stu- 

[92] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

dents, who will prove the devoted heralds of Jesus Christ 
in their native land and throughout the world. 

Signed in name of the Commission of Assembly of the 
United Free Church of Scotland, 

James Wells, D.D., Moderator. 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE FREE 
CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 

[seal] 

The Moderator of the Free Church of Scotland most 
cordially thanks the Faculty of the Princeton Theolog- 
ical Seminary for the honour done to the Free Church in 
sending their kind invitation to take part in the celebra- 
tion of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding 
of their Seminary; herewith most gratefully recalling 
the help and encouragement so generously rendered by 
the Princeton Seminary to our Church in her arduous 
contendings for her spiritual independence during the 
Ten Years ' Conflict. 

The Free Church of Scotland most warmly congratu- 
lates the Presbyterian Church of the United States on 
the possession of its noble Theological Seminary at 
Princeton; venerable even in the earlier stadia of its 
career by association with the memory and achievement 
of such great men as Jonathan Dickinson, Jonathan 
Edwards, Samuel Davies, Gilbert Tennent, John With- 
erspoon, and Ashbel Green ; whilst in these latter days it 
has attained world-wide renown by the massive learning 
of such illustrious divines as Archibald Alexander, 

[93] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Samuel Miller, Charles Hodge, Addison Alexander, 
William Henry Green, and Archibald Alexander Hodge. 
The preservation of this glorious heritage from the past, 
in combination with a singular capacity to meet the ex- 
acting requirements of the present, evokes our liveliest 
admiration. 

The Free Church of Scotland also offers its heartiest 
felicitations to the Princeton Seminary on its most effi- 
cient defence of the Scriptures of the Old and New 
Testament against the attacks of Modern Rationalism; 
meeting rash assertion by reasoned argument, crude 
speculation by exact scholarship, bold sophistry by calm 
demonstration ; thus exhibiting the Higher Criticism as 
essentially a pretentious dogmatism of negation and 
omniscience. The great success which has ever at- 
tended the Princeton Seminary in the rearing of a 
learned and godly Ministry, renowned at home, revered 
abroad, likewise wins our sincerest regard. We earnestly 
pray that the Divine blessing may still rest upon the 
manifold labours of its eminent Professors and the 
varied studies of its numerous Alumni, so that in ever- 
increasing degree, it may be as "a fountain of gardens, 
a well of living waters, and streams from Lebanon." 

Signed in the name of the General Assembly of the 
Free Church of Scotland, 

Wm. Menzies Alexander, Moderator, 
M.A., B.Sc, M.D., B.D. (Glasgow University). 

Assembly Hall, Edinburgh, 
11th March, 1912. 



C94H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SYNOD OF THE FREE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 

The Synod of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scot- 
land beg to thank the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America, at 
Princeton, New Jersey, for their courtesy in inviting 
the Rev. Duncan Mackenzie, Moderator of this Synod, 
to be present at the celebration of the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of the Founding of the Seminary, on the 
fifth, sixth, and seventh days of May of this year. 

The Synod would take this opportunity of congratu- 
lating your Seminary on the completion of one hundred 
years of useful work. They rejoice to think that al- 
though the beginnings of your Institution were small in 
point of numbers, there is, at the present date, scarcely a 
better equipped Theological Faculty in the world than 
Princeton. The Synod bless the name of Christ, the 
adorable Head, that, for the edification of His Church 
at large, He has bestowed upon your Seminary during 
the whole course of its history such remarkable and 
gracious gifts. Your leading men have been examples 
of profound piety as well as indefatigable labours. From 
your Seminary has issued the noblest defence of the 
Calvinistic System of Theology which the world has seen 
within the period of your existence as a Faculty. The 
ablest vindication of the Oracles of God, as against the 
adverse criticism of the so-called Higher Critics, has been 
rendered by Princeton Professors. What noble mem- 
ories cluster around the names of Dr. Archibald Alex- 
ander, Dr. Joseph Addison Alexander, Dr. Charles 
Hodge, Dr. William Henry Green in the several respects 

C95: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

which have been named of gracious character and faith- 
ful work for Christ ! The Synod rejoice to think that the 
existing Faculty of Theological Professors at Princeton 
is true to Princeton's past history, and that, without dis- 
simulation, it may be said in gifts and graces you fall 
little short of your distinguished predecessors. 

The Synod pray that the adorable Head of the Church 
may pour the benign influences of His Spirit more and 
more abundantly upon you, that in the future, as in the 
past, you may witness a good confession for God and 
His Word, and that when, God willing, Princeton shall 
hold its bi-centenary, the men of that future period may 
think as kindly of the men of 1912 as you now think of 
Dr. Archibald Alexander. 

As the Moderator is unavoidably prevented from at- 
tending your celebrations, the Synod send these greet- 
ings by the hand of the Rev. John R. Mackay, M.A., one 
of their members, and a Teacher in Theology. 

Signed in name and on behalf of the Synod of the Free 
Presbyterian Church of Scotland, 

Duncan Mackenzie, Moderator, 
James Steven Sinclair, Clerk. 

April, 1912. 



THE SYNOD OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 

[telegram] 

On motion of Rev. Dr. Thornton, retiring Moderator, 
"The Synod of the Presbyterian Church of England, 
assembled in London, sends hearty greetings and con- 

[96] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

gratulations to Princeton Seminary, on attaining its 
100th Anniversary, and prays that God may make the 
Institution a continued blessing to the Church of Christ 
in America, and throughout the world." 

David Fotheringham, J. P., Moderator, 
Wm. Lewis Robertson, M. A., Clerk. 

May 7th, 1912. 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE PRES- 
BYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRELAND 

[seal] 

The Presbyterian Church in Ireland to the Rev. Francis 
L. Patton, D.D., LL.D., President of the Theological 
Seminary, Princeton, N. J., U. S. A. 

Reverend and Dear Sir, 

On the evening of 3rd June, at the inaugural meeting 
of the General Assembly of 1912, in the Assembly Hall, 
Belfast, the Moderator reported that in accordance with 
an invitation very kindly extended to him by the Faculty 
and Trustees of the Princeton Theological Seminary, he 
had attended and taken part in the Centennial Celebra- 
tions held at Princeton on 5th, 6th, and 7th May. 

"It was unanimously agreed that a message— signed 
by the Moderator and Clerk— be sent to the President of 
the Princeton Theological Seminary, conveying the fe- 
licitations of the General Assembly in connection with 
the Centenary of the famous seat of sacred learning over 
which he presided, and its extreme gratification that the 

[97] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Moderator had been able to attend and take part in the 
most impressive and successful Centennial Celebrations 
of last month. " 

We have therefore unusual pleasure in forwarding to 
you the foregoing minute from the records of the Gen- 
eral Assembly ; and in re-echoing the sentiments already 
expressed in person by the Moderator. 

With best wishes for the continued and growing suc- 
cess of the Theological Seminary, which is so dear to our 
Church ; and for the prosperity of the Church you chiefly 
and so conspicuously serve, 

We remain, Reverend and Dear Sir, 

faithfully and fraternally, 

John Macmellan, Moderator, 

3rd June, 1912. Wm ' JaMES LoWE > Clerk ' 



THE SYNOD OF BALLYMENA AND COLERAINE 

At the annual meeting of the Synod of Ballymena and 
Coleraine, held on the 23rd of April, 1912, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously agreed to, "That the Rev. 
David Russell Mitchell, of Broughshane, be appointed a 
deputy from this Synod, to attend the hundredth anni- 
versary of the Princeton Theological Seminary, and to 
convey the cordial good wishes of the members of this 
Synod for the future prosperity of the Institution. ' ' 

Extracted from the Minutes of the Synod this 23rd day 
of April, 1912, and signed, 

Charles W. Hunter, M.A., Moderator, 
James B. Armour, M.A., Clerk. 

C98H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE DIOCESE OF NEW JERSEY OF THE 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

[telegram] 

The diocese of New Jersey sends its greetings to the 
Princeton Seminary on the celebration of its 100th anni- 
versary with a prayer for God's blessing upon the future 
life and work of the Seminary. 

Howard E. Thompson, Secretary. 

Mt. Holly, N. J., May 7, 1912. 



C993 



RESPONSES FROM THE 
PRESIDING OFFICERS OF CHURCHES 



MODERATOR OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 

Principal Stewart has much pleasure in accepting the 
invitation of the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey, to be present at the Celebration 
of the Hundredth Anniversary of the Foundation of the 
Seminary on 5th to 7th May next. 

St. Mary 's College, St. Andrews, Scotland. 
28th February, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

OF THE UNITED FREE CHURCH 

OF SCOTLAND 

Dr. Wells has special pleasure in accepting the kind 
invitation to the celebration of the One Hundredth An- 
niversary of the founding of the Princeton Seminary on 
the 5th, 6th and 7th of May 1912. 

42 Aytoun Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow, 
February, 26, 1912. 



[103] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

MODERATOR DESIGNATE OF THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE UNITED FREE 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 

Will you please to convey to the Senatus of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Princeton my sincere thanks for 
their kind invitation to the Hundredth Anniversary of 
the Founding of their distinguished Seminary % 

It would have afforded me the greatest pleasure had I 
been able to accept the invitation so generously extended 
to me, as I have for more than half a century been ac- 
quainted with the fame of Princeton ; but my prospective 
election in May to the Moderatorship of the United Free 
Church of Scotland renders it undesirable that I should 
undertake a trip to America so near the day of opening 
the Assembly. 

I recently attended the 50th Anniversary of the 
Founding of St. Andrews University, my Alma Mater, 
which was a splendid success ; and I hope a like success 
will wait on your celebrations. 

During the past century, Princeton has rendered in- 
valuable service to Evangelical Theology; may her fu- 
ture be even more glorious than her past, and may she 
never want gifted sons who will publish and uphold the 
cause of Truth—the Gospel of the Glory of the Blessed 
God. 

With every good wish and earnest prayer for the pros- 
perity of Princeton, 

I am, 

Yours sincerely, 

Thomas Whitelaw. 

Kilmarnock, 1 March, 1912. 

[104] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

MODERATOR OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF THE FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 

Your kind invitation has just reached me this after- 
noon and for it I thank you most warmly. I regret 
exceedingly that duties here in connection with the open- 
ing of our General Assembly on 21st May deprive me of 
the great honour and pleasure of being among your 
guests on this historic occasion. The Address from our 
Church will be presented by Principal M'Culloch who 
represents our College. We pray that every felicity and 
blessing may attend this august Centennial Celebration 
of your world-renowned Seminary. 

I have the honour to be 

Yours most sincerely, 

Wm. Menzies Alexander. 

Free Church College, The Mound, Edinburgh, 27 April, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE SYNOD OF THE 

FREE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

OF SCOTLAND 

I regret that, on account of the state of my health, I 
shall not be able to attend, on the 5th, 6th and 7th May 
next, the 100th anniversary of the Founding of Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. 

I trust you will be favoured with much blessing from 
on high in connection with the services, and that Prince- 

C105 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ton Theological Seminary will always remain faithful in 
all things to the glorious Head of the Church, and that, 
at all times, it will be wealthy in sending forth able men 
endued with power from on high to declare the whole 
counsel of God. 

I shall ask the Canadian or Colonial Committee if 
they will send a representative. 

Again wishing you the blessing of the Most High, I 
remain, Reyd Dear gir ^ 



Strathearn House, Crieff, N. B. 
13 March, 1912. 



Yours sincerely, 

Duncan Mackenzie. 



MODERATOR OF THE SYNOD OF THE 

REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF 

SCOTLAND 

I have to acknowledge with much heartiness and ap- 
preciation the most kind invitation I have received at 
your hands to the Centennial of the Princeton Seminary. 

It would have been to me an unqualified pleasure had 
I been able to accept and be present on such an auspi- 
cious occasion. 

The Princeton Theological Seminary has a name of 
rich savor and high honor in the Church of which I am a 
humble minister, and it would have been not only a great 
pleasure to myself, but an expression of our united 
veneration and esteem, had I been able to be present. 
I am sorry indeed, that I am not able to cross the Atlan- 
tic at this time. 

nioe^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Speaking for myself and my brethren I send you our 
cordial greetings and earnest wishes for abounding use- 
fulness and prosperity. 

Yours very sincerely, 

John McDonald. 

R. P. Manse, Airdrie, 4 March, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE SYNOD OF THE, 
UNITED ORIGINAL SECEDERS 

As I have just returned to India after furlough, I re- 
gret that I cannot accept your kind invitation to be 
present at the celebration of the One Hundredth Anni- 
versary of the founding of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Though unable to be present you may be assured of my 
best wishes for the occasion. 

Very sincerely yours, 

John McNeel. 

Seoni Chhapara, C. P., India, 
21 March, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE REFORMED 
PRESBYTERIAN SYNOD IN IRELAND 

I regret it will not be possible for me to be present at 
the celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the founding 
of the Princeton Theological Seminary. 

It has never been my privilege, either as a student of 

IT1073 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Theology or as a Minister of the Gospel, to visit the Col- 
lege. But for a long time, I have known some of the 
Theological Professors by their writings, which I greatly 
admire, and from the study of which I have, I think, 
derived much profit. 

My prayer is that God may use the Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary even more in the future than in the 
past, for the maintenance and defence of His truth, and 
for the extension of His Kingdom in the world. 

' Sincerely yours, 

_ ... .„ „ T . , S. R. McNeilly. 

Baihesmills Manse, Lis burn, 
30 April, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE SYNOD OF THE 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF ENGLAND 

I greatly appreciate the honor done me in giving me 
an invitation to attend your Centennial Celebration on 
5th, 6th and 7th of May next. 

As our English Presbyterian Synod will be in session 
in London at that time, I cannot, as its retiring Modera- 
tor, be absent. But I would like to propose that the 
Synod send you a cablegram of congratulation. 

I am proud to think that my late father (Rev. R. Hill 
Thornton) , of Oshawa, Ont., Canada, had the honorary 
degree of D.D. from your distinguished seat of learning. 
I also rejoice to think that my old fellow student, Francis 
L. Patton, D.D., is still with you. 

R. M. Thornton. 

18, Hilldrop Road, Camden Road, N., London, 
3 March, 1912. 

C108H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

MODERATOR FOR 1901 OF THE GENERAL 

ASSEMBLY OF THE WELSH 

CALVINISTIC METHODIST 

CONNECTION 

I thank you very much for your kind invitation to be 
present in the Centenary Celebration of the Princeton 
Seminary. But my departure from Liverpool is fixed for 
May 7th, and therefore too late for me to attend any of 
the Centenary meetings. I regret it very much, for noth- 
ing would afford me more genuine pleasure than to see 
and hear your eminent men on so important an occasion. 
The names of your professors, past and present, are well 
known to me, and the Princeton Review comes regularly 
to my home. All this makes me sincerely regret my in- 
ability to accept your kind invitation. 

With fraternal regards, 

Yours faithfully, 

J. Cynddylan Jones. 

Whitechurch, Cardiff, March 21st, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA 

Your kind invitation to be present at the celebration 
of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Theological 
Seminary has been received. It is an invitation of 
peculiar interest and I am hoping to make it possible to 
be with you. The Presbyterian Church in Canada owes 
much to Princeton. Many of our ministers received their 

[109: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

theological training there, and we are now reaping the 
benefits of the type of theology and spiritual inspiration 
received there. I trust that all things will conspire to 
make it an occasion not only of much interest, but of 
special helpfulness as you enter upon a new century of 
your history. 

am ' Yours sincerely, 

E. P. Mackay. 

Toronto, February 27th, 1912. 



MODERATOR OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

An invitation to attend the One Hundredth Anniver- 
sary of the Founding of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church at Princeton, New Jersey, on May 
fifth to the seventh, reached me some time ago. 

I have delayed replying in the hope of arranging my 
work so that I could attend ; but in this my efforts have 
failed. 

I must therefore deny myself a very enjoyable and 
profitable event, and thankfully decline your honoring 
invitation. 

Congratulating you on what the Seminary has done 
during the first century of its existence, and praying that 
it may continue the good work until schools of the proph- 
ets are needed no more, 

I 21 Til 

Yours in sincerity, 

Samuel G. Shaw. 

West Hebron, N. Y., March 29, 1912. 

Clio 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL SYNOD OF 

THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES 

Many thanks for your kind invitation to the Centen- 
nial of Princeton Theological Seminary. I hope to be 
present on Monday and Tuesday. 

Yours ' James I. Good. 

Philadelphia, March 9th, 1912. 



PRESIDENT OF THE 
NORTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

I was very much interested in receiving the announce- 
ment of the Centennial Anniversary of the Princeton 
Seminary. I regret it will not be possible for me to 

attend. ^ T , 1 

Yours very truly, 

Emory W. Hunt. 

April 13, 1912, Granville, Ohio. 



MODERATOR OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 
OF CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHES 

It will be a great pleasure to accept the appreciated 
honor of the invitation to the Centennial Celebration of 
Princeton Seminary, May 5-7th. 

Yours very sincerely, 

Brooklyn, N. Y., March 28, 1912. NEHEMIAH BoYNTON. 

cm: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

PRESIDING BISHOP OF THE PROTESTANT 

EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES 

I beg to return my warm thanks for your courteous 
kindness in sending me an invitation to be present at the 
Centennial Anniversary of the founding of your Semi- 
nary. 

I heartily wish I could come, but engagements of offi- 
cial duty will keep me here. 

May I send to your Seminary my cordial congratula- 
tions upon reaching so great an age of dignity, and my 
earnest good wishes for years yet to come of prosperity 
and usefulness in your great work ? 

Faithfully and gratefully, 

Your brother, 



The Bishop 's House, St. Louis, Mo. 
March 1, 1912. 



Daniel G. Tuttle, 
Bishop of Missouri. 



PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL COUNCIL OF 
THE REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

I greatly appreciate the honor of the invitation to be 
present at the celebration of the One Hundredth Anni- 
versary of the founding of the Seminary at Princeton, 
on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, May 5th, 6th and 7th. 
It would give me very great pleasure indeed, to accept 
the invitation, but unfortunately the pressure of my 
many duties will prevent my attendance. 

C112: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

We all honor Princeton Seminary, and the noble men 
who have been identified with it. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Samuel Fallows. 

Baltimore, Md., March 4, 1912. 



PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL SYNOD OF 

THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

I will, if possible, be present at the Centenary of the 
Theological Seminary at Princeton, May 5-7, to which 
you so kindly invite me. 

Sincerely yours, 

Junius B. Remensnyder. 

New York, N. Y., March 8, 1912. 



PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL COUNCIL OF 

THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

IN NORTH AMERICA 

To my regret, it will not be possible for me to attend 
the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States at Princeton. 

With hearty congratulations on the attainment of your 

centennial, Believe me to be, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Theodore E. Schmauck. 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania, March 5, 1912. 

[IIS] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

PRESIDENT OF THE EVANGELICAL 
LUTHERAN SYNOD OF NORTH AMERICA 

Habe die freundliche Einladung, an der hundertjahri- 
gen Feier des theologischen Seminars Ihrer Kirche im 
Mai d. J. teilnehmen zu wollen, erhalten. Indem ich 
Ilinen fiir diese Einladung meinen herzlichen Dank aus- 
spreche, muss ich Ihnen mitteilen, dass ich dieser Ein- 
ladung nicht Folge leisten kann. Ich stehe jetzt im 88ten 
Lebensjahr und kann eine so weite Reise nach New Jer- 
sey nicht mehr unternehmen. 

Ich wunsche Ihnen aber zu Ihrer Jubelf eier des Herrn 
reichsten Segen. Moge er sich auch in Zukunft zu die- 
ser Ihrer Anstalt mit seiner Gnade bekennen, wie er es 
bisher gethan hat. 

Mit f reundlichem Gruss 

Ihr 

Johannes Bading. 

Milwaukee, Wis., March 11, 1912. 



PRESIDENT OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL 
SYNOD OF NORTH AMERICA 

It is with profound gratitude that I acknowledge your 
kind and considerate invitation, to attend the Centen- 
nial of Theological Seminary, Princeton, N. J. The oc- 
casion truly is one at which representatives of all the 
branches of Christ's Church should gather to enunciate 

CH43 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

their warmest felicitations, to join in the praise of our 
God and Father, who, by His Blessings and Grace, 
has made Princeton historic, and to unite all prayers for 
that one great purpose, that the Kingdom of our Lord 
may be still more intensely furthered as Princeton enters 
upon the threshold of a new era, and that the future re- 
sults of Princeton may be even greater than the past. 

Indeed I am sorry that, when the gates of Princeton 
shall be opened to the festive throngs, I will be at my 
annual tours, visiting the nineteen District Conferences 
of the German Evangelical Synod of North America. 
The attendance upon these Conferences is simply obliga- 
tory. 

But for the reason above stated, I desire the presence 
of a Representative of our Synod at your celebration. 
Therefore, I beg to be permitted to send an able substi- 
tute, namely, Rev. T. F. Bode, of St. Peter's Evangelical 
Church, Buffalo, N. Y., wishing to be shown to him all 
courtesies you would show me. 

May the Triune God enrich you, and the celebrated 
Institution of Spiritual Science, by the manifold mani- 
festation of His Holy Spirit. 

With fraternal greetings in the love of Christ, 

I am, 



Yours, 
Jacob Pister. 



Cincinnati, 0., April 6th, 1912. 



CU5 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF BISHOPS 

OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH 

I am in receipt of your very kind invitation to the 
celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the 
Founding of the Seminary on May fifth, sixth and sev- 
enth, and greatly appreciate your courtesy. It would 
give me great pleasure to be present, but for the fact 
that the General Conference of our Church will, at that 
time, be in session in the City of Minneapolis, and it is 
expected that all our Bishops be in attendance. 

I rejoice in the work which your Theological Seminary 
has accomplished during the past century, and pray that 
during the years to come, it may continue to send forth 
into all the fields, at home and abroad, those who shall 
defend the faith and publish to the world the Gospel of 
our Lord and Master. 

Regretting that I cannot be with you, but trusting that 
the occasion may be one of pleasure and inspiration, 

■*■ am > Very truly yours, 

Philadelphia, Pa., April 10th, 1912. L- B. WlLSON. 

SENIOR BISHOP OF THE 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH 

The Reverend Bishop Alpheus W. Wilson regrets that 
his May engagements prevent his presence at the One 
Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Princeton. 
It would have given him pleasure to attend, if it had been 
possible. 

Baltimore, Md. 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

CHAIRMAN OF THE CHRISTIAN UNION COM- 
MISSION OF THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 

I am honored with an invitation to the one hundredth 
anniversary of the Theological Seminary, at Princeton, 
and if possible, I shall be glad to accept the courtesy of 
your invitation. I have an important engagement at the 
University of Illinois the last of April, and at this writ- 
ing, the exact date has not been settled. I hope if my 
April engagements run over into May, it will not be 
more than a day or two, so that I can be with you cer- 
tainly on Monday or Tuesday, or may be both days. 

I await your further advice. 

Your servant in Jesus Christ, 

Baltimore, Md., March 1, 1912. PETER AlNSLIE. 

PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF THE MENNONITE CHURCH OF 

NORTH AMERICA 

I gratefully acknowledge the receipt of your kind in- 
vitation to the One Hundredth Anniversary of the 
Founding of the Theological Seminary of your Church, 
and it would, indeed, be a great pleasure to me to share 
with you and many others the blessings of this impor- 
tant occasion if circumstances did not prevent me from 
it. With my thoughts and prayers, I shall be one of 
your guests though, and I hope that the school will, under 
God's guidance and protection, prosper in the future as 
in the past. 

With congratulations and best wishes, 
Yours fraternally, 

Hillsboro, Kan., March 25, 1912. H. D. PENNER. 

C 11711 



RESPONSES FROM 
FOREIGN DIVINITY FACULTIES 



THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND 

To the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

The members of the Faculty of Divinity in the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh desire to send their most cordial 
greetings to the Princeton Theological Seminary on the 
celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of its estab- 
lishment by the General Assembly. They rejoice at the 
brilliant services which all during its history it has ren- 
dered in defence of the faith "once for all delivered 
to the saints," at the eminent names with which that his- 
tory has been associated, at the lofty academic ideals 
which it has maintained, at the splendid equipment which 
it possesses for the training of candidates for the min- 
istry in every branch of theological science and every 
department of ministerial work. 

They pray that the blessing of God which has attended 
its work so richly in the past may abide upon it not less 
richly in the years to come, so that, in the new century 
of work on which it is entering, it may contribute in 
ever-increasing measure to the advance of truth and the 
promotion of the Kingdom of God. 

In name and by authority of the Faculty of Divinity, 

John Patrick, D.D., Dean of the Faculty. 

March 1912. 



nm: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY IN THE 
UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN, SCOTLAND 

[seal] 

To the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theo- 
logical Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey. 

We the Dean, Secretary and Members of the Faculty 
of Divinity in the University of Aberdeen, gratefully 
acknowledge your courtesy in inviting us to send a repre- 
sentative of our Faculty to be present at the celebration 
of the Centenary of your far-famed Seminary. We 
deeply regret that no member of the Faculty finds it in 
his power to attend, but we have delegated the Reverend 
Professor John Macnaughton, B.A., of M'Gill Univer- 
sity, Montreal, a distinguished Graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Aberdeen, to represent us and to be the bearer 
of this Address. 

Holding the same Reformed Faith as yourselves, ad- 
hering to the same Theological Standards and maintain- 
ing the same form of Church Government, we avail 
ourselves gladly of this opportunity to congratulate you 
on the noble service you have rendered to the cause of 
Christian Truth during the last hundred years. Whilst 
the distinctive type of theological scholarship which has 
come to be associated with Princeton has been conser- 
vative both in criticism and doctrine, we gratefully rec- 
ognize that your Scholars have been ready to follow the 
guidance of the Spirit of Truth into new fields of Chris- 
tian thought and service. 

We are proud to recall that an illustrious President of 
Princeton College was a Scotsman descended from John 

C1223 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Knox, Dr. John Witherspoon; that Dr. James M'Cosh, 
a Scotsman with special ties to our University, was 
largely instrumental in giving expansion to the old 
Princeton College a generation ago ; and that on the hon- 
oured roll of your past Teachers our Graduates have not 
been unrepresented. 

On this auspicious occasion we are glad to acknow- 
ledge our deep indebtedness to the great Divines and 
Scholars who have rendered your Seminary eminent 
throughout the whole Christian world. The names of 
the Alexanders, the Hodges, of William Henry Green, 
and of Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (still happily 
among you in intellectual vigour), are held in honour 
among us and in all the Churches of our country. Nor 
are we insensible of the impulse which has been given by 
Princeton to the noble cause of world-evangelization, 
and of the splendid labours of such men as Dr. Robert 
Elliott Speer who have carried the influence of Prince- 
ton over the seas to the older lands. 

It is our heartfelt prayer that the usefulness and 
honour which have fallen to you in the century that has 
gone may be increased many fold in the century to 
which you look forward. 

In name of the Faculty and by authority of the Sena- 
tus Academicus. 

(Signed) Thomas Nicol, M.A., D.D., Bean, 
William A. Curtis, B.D., D.Litt., 

Secretary. 
At Aberdeen April, 1912. 



[123] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

NEW COLLEGE, EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND 

To the Principal and Professors of Princeton 
Theological Faculty. 

We greatly regret that it is impossible for us to accept 
your friendly invitation, and to commission one of our 
number to present our congratulations personally at 
your Celebrations. It would have been a privilege to 
visit scenes associated, as the Burgh and College of New 
Jersey are, with the names of George Washington and 
Jonathan Edwards and with the early political and re- 
ligious history of your great Republic, and, especially, to 
join in your devout thanksgivings for the blessings which 
God has vouchsafed to you since the foundation of your 
Seminary in 1812. Both of the Churches which consti- 
tute the United Free Church of Scotland, while profiting 
from their fraternal relation with the Presbyterian 
Churches of America, have learned to hold in special 
honour theologians, pastors, and missionaries trained 
within your walls. At New College we gladly recall the 
fact that when in 1844, after the Disruption, Principal 
William Cunningham was dispatched by our General 
Assembly to investigate the working of the chief theo- 
logical institutions in America, he spent many days as 
the guest of your eminent President, Dr. Charles Hodge, 
and formed intimate relations greatly valued by our 
College. Since that date a sense of brotherhood has been 
maintained by frequent intercourse and occasional inter- 
change of students, which will, we venture to hope, not 
only continue but increase. 

We recognise respectfully the contributions which 
have been made to the cause of sacred learning by the 

[124] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

members of your staff, and the value of the training 
which you give to students not only for the home min- 
istry, but for the service of Christ in the mission field. 

We trust that in the approaching celebrations you will 
be cheered and led forward by the assurance of the good- 
will of other Seminaries, by the increased loyalty of your 
alumni, and by manifest tokens of the favouring pres- 
ence of Almighty God. 

With renewed fraternal greetings and congratula- 
tions, and with high regard, 
We are, 

Yours very faithfully, 

Alexander Whyte, D.D., LL.D., Principal, 
Alexander Martin, D.D., Secretary. 

2nd April, 1912. 



THE UNITED FREE CHURCH COLLEGE, 
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

I am instructed by the Secretary of this College to 
acknowledge gratefully the invitation of the Directors, 
Trustees and Faculty of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary to send a delegate to their Centenary Celebration 
in May. 

The Senatus, though unable to accept this honourable 
invitation, desire to join with the friends of the Chris- 
tian faith and of Christian learning everywhere in offer- 
ing to the representatives of Princeton Seminary their 
cordial and respectful congratulations on so interesting 

C125] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

an occasion. They are well aware of the distinguished 
service Princeton has rendered to the Church in the past, 
and wish for it a no less honourable future. 
I am, 

Ever yours sincerely, 

James Denney, Clerk to Senatus. 
March 6, 1912. 



THE UNITED FREE CHURCH COLLEGE AT 
ABERDEEN, SCOTLAND 

To the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

We, the members of the Senatus Academicus in the 
United Free College at Aberdeen, send hearty congratu- 
lations and brotherly greetings on the occasion of the 
one hundredth anniversary of the Institution. 

In no place outside of America itself is Princeton more 
esteemed and loved than in Scotland. The names of her 
great teachers are household words amongst us, and 
their works are on the shelves of our manses. 

We recall with pride the copious and priceless influ- 
ences contributed for a hundred years to the growing life 
of a great nation by the Seminary, as well as the con- 
stant stream of men sent forth into the Foreign Mis- 
sion field. 

The perfection of the Seminary's equipment, while a 
monument to the Christian liberality of the Presby- 
terian Church, is a model for the schools of the prophets 
in the whole world. 

Finally, it is our hope and prayer, that the benediction 

[126] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of Heaven may rest on the Seminary in the future as it 
has done in the past, and that there may be constant 
expansion, to meet the necessities of the country and the 
opportunities afforded by Providence, while the ideal, 
expressed in the Plan of Foundation, is ever held fast— 
to unite with solid learning the piety of the heart. 

James Iveeach, D.D., Principal, 
Geo. G. Cameron, D.D., Secretary, 
James Stalker, D.D., 
David S. Cairns, D.D. 
28 March, 1912. 



THE FREE CHURCH COLLEGE, EDINBURGH, 

SCOTLAND 

[seal] 

We, the Principal and Professors of the Free Church 
College, Edinburgh, desire very warmly to thank the 
Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary for their 
kind invitation to send a delegate to take part in the 
forthcoming celebration of the Centenary of the Found- 
ing of their Seminary. 

In glad compliance with that invitation, the Senatus 
of this College have appointed the Rev. Principal M'Cul- 
loch as their representative, and herewith recall with 
pleasure and gratitude the fraternal relations existing 
of old between the Princeton Seminary and our Church. 
We recall more specially the congratulations sent by 
the New College, Edinburgh, to Dr. Hodge on the com- 
pletion of his Systematic Theology, and to Dr. Green on 
the attainment of his professorial jubilee. 

[mi 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

We also tender to the Princeton Seminary our 
heartiest felicitations on its long and prosperous career, 
so richly adorned at every stage by the ripe scholarship 
and exalted piety of its renowned divines; whilst the 
Princeton School of today, continuing the early tradition 
of unswerving fidelity to the Word of God and the 
Standards of the Reformed Church, has attained fore- 
most rank by its valiant and victorious defence of the 
Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments against the 
assaults of the Higher Critics, as well as by its profound 
and refreshing exposition of the Calvinistic type of 
Theology in relation to modern thought, aspiration and 
necessity. 

We likewise offer to the Princeton Seminary our sin- 
cerest congratulations on its splendid academic equip- 
ment, its brilliant staff of Professors, the number and 
excellence of its Students, and the sound evangelical 
spirit which pervades all its activities. We earnestly 
pray that the Divine blessing may rest yet more and 
more upon its Professors and Students, so that in ever- 
growing measure it may continue to be a centre of light 
and a tower of strength to all who love the Kingdom of 
our Lord. 

James D. M'Culloch, Principal, 

Wm. Menzies Alexander, M.A., B.Sc, M.D., 

B.D., Professor, 
Colin A. Bannatyne, Professor, 
Robert Moore, B.A., B.D., Professor, 
J. Kennedy Cameron, Professor, 
John MacLeod, M.A., Professor. 

Free Church College, The Mound, 
Edinburgh, 12th March, 1912. 

[128^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



ASSEMBLY'S COLLEGE, BELFAST, IRELAND 

[seal] 

The Faculty of the Assembly's College, Belfast, Ire- 
land, thanks the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of 
Princeton Theological Seminary for the honour of their 
invitation to send a delegate to the celebration of the 
one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of their 
Seminary. 

The Faculty congratulates Princeton Seminary on its 
continued and increasing prosperity, and rejoices in the 
great work which it has done during the last hundred 
years in teaching, maintaining and defending the au- 
thority and inspiration of the Holy Scriptures and the 
pure doctrines of Evangelical Theology, and prays that 
God will continue to bless the Seminary by making it 
still more and more in the centuries yet to come a great 
spiritual and intellectual force in the promotion of the 
truth and righteousness of His everlasting Kingdom. 

The Faculty regret that none of its members is able to 
go to Princeton, but they appoint as their delegate an 
alumnus of their College as well as of Princeton Semi- 
nary, the Rev. John MacMillan, D.D., the Moderator of 
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 
Ireland. 

Matthew Leitch, President of Faculty. 

22d March, 1912. 



C129 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

M'CREA-MAGEE PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE, 
LONDONDERRY, IRELAND 

[seal] 

The Trustees and Faculty of the Magee Presbyterian 
College, Londonderry, beg to thank the Directors, Trus- 
tees and Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary 
for their kind invitation to send a delegate to the Cen- 
tenary Celebration of the Seminary on May fifth, sixth 
and seventh next, and to express their regret that they 
are unable to have the pleasure of accepting this in- 
vitation. 

J. R. Leebody, D.Sc, President of Faculty. 

March 16, 1912. 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY 
OF DUBLIN UNIVERSITY, IRELAND 

I am requested by the Theological Faculty of Dublin 
University to thank cordially the Princeton Theological 
Seminary for their request to send a delegate to repre- 
sent Dublin at the Princeton Centenary Celebration in 
May. 

As that, however, is the busiest time of the year in our 
Divinity School, it will be quite impossible for us to send 
a delegate to Princeton. 

We send fraternal greetings and hope that God's 
blessing may rest upon your proceedings, and prosper 
your subsequent Seminary life. 

I am, Yours very truly, 

Newport J. D. White, 
Deputy Regius Professor of Divinity. 

19 February, 1912. 

Lison 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY, UNIVERSITY 
OF OXFORD, ENGLAND 

I have received your kind invitation addressed to the 
Theological Faculty of the University of Oxford, and 
inviting them to be represented by a Delegate at your 
Meeting in May. I laid it before the Board of the Fac- 
ulty, and they begged me to thank you for the honour of 
the invitation, but unluckily your Meeting comes in the 
middle of our Term, when it is quite impossible for any- 
body really representative of the Cause in Oxford to be 
absent from work. It seemed to them unreal to send 
anybody who did not come out of the heart of the life 
here, and therefore they find themselves forced to de- 
cline. 

With many thanks, Believe me, Yours very truly, 

R. S. Holland, 
March 15th, 1912. Regius Professor of Divinity. 



THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY, UNIVERSITY 
OF CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND 

The Professors of Divinity in the University of Cam- 
bridge beg leave to thank the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton, New Jersey, for the invitation to send a dele- 
gate to be present at the 100th anniversary of the estab- 
lishment of this Seminary. They regret that as the 
anniversary falls in May, when full term is being kept at 
Cambridge, they are unable to avail themselves of this 
kind offer. 

H. B. Swete, Regius Professor of Divinity. 

17 February, 1912. 

C131] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY IN THE 
UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM, ENGLAND 

On behalf of the Theological Faculty in the University 
of Durham, I am desired to express our best wishes to 
the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church, 
Princeton, New Jersey, on the occasion of their one hun- 
dredth anniversary. We had appointed a delegate to 
represent us, the Right Reverend, the Bishop of Mas- 
sachusetts, but he was unfortunately unable to act for us, 
and we had no time out of term to appoint anyone in his 
place. 

With our renewed good wishes for the continuous suc- 
cess of a Seminary to which we owe so much, believe us, 
Yours very truly, 
R. J. Knowling, D.D., Dean of the Faculty, 
Professor of Divinity and Canon of Durham. 

May 2, 1912. 

THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY, UNIVERSITY 
OF LONDON, KING'S COLLEGE 

I beg to inform you that the Council at their meeting 
this week resolved to appoint the Rt. Rev. Bishop 
Courtney, Rector of St. James, New York, as their 
representative at the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

We are writing to the Bishop asking him if he would 
be able to represent the College on the occasion. 
Yours faithfully, 

March 7th, 1912. Walter Smith, Secretary. 

C132H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY, UNIVERSITY 
OF LONDON 

I have to inform you that the Establishment and Gen- 
eral Purposes Committee of the Senate, at their last 
meeting, had under consideration the invitation of the 
Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary to appoint a delegate to represent the 
Faculty of Theology of this University on the occasion 
of the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of 
the establishment of the Seminary, to be held in Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, on May 5th, 6th and 7th, 1912. 

With reference thereto, the Committee have directed 
me to thank you for the invitation and to express their 
regret that it has not been possible to find a delegate able 
to leave this country at the time mentioned. 

I am further to convey to you the warmest wishes of 
the Committee for the continued prosperity of your 
Seminary. I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient Servant, 

March 22nd 1912. Henry A. Miees, Principal. 



WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, 
CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND 

The Senatus of Westminster College, being prevented 
by the exigencies of the present term and the breadth of 
the Atlantic from accepting the invitation to appear by 
delegate at the celebration of the centenary of Princeton 
Theological Seminary, can but send their greetings and 
good wishes by the imperfect medium of writing. Only 

[133] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

one of our number has ever had the honour of being 
within your precincts, but we all know that you are the 
most frequented of Presbyterian Colleges among the 
English-speaking race, that you have had teachers fa- 
mous on both sides the Atlantic, that your alumni have 
taken a large and honourable part in shaping the re- 
ligious life of America, and that your present is worthy 
of your past. We offer you our heartiest congratulations 
on your achievement, and express our hopes of still 
greater things that God may have in store for you in the 
time to come. 

Would that we, the sole Presbyterian Theological Col- 
lege in all England, could anticipate for ourselves a like 
position and influence ; but we trust at least that God has 
still larger truth in store for us both, that our service will 
not fail to meet the perplexities of our time and the vast 
social and religious problems which are much alike in the 
New World and the Old, and that, as God measures our 
real influence for truth and godliness, we shall, through 
His blessing, have good success. 

John Skinner, D.D., Principal, 
John Gibb, D.D., Professor, 
[Seal] John Oman, D.Phil., D.D., Professor, 

April, 1912 C. Anderson Scott, D.D., Professor. 

NEW COLLEGE AND HACKNEY COLLEGE, 

LONDON 

The Joint Theological Faculty of New and Hackney 
Colleges, Hampstead, London, desire to thank the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Princeton, New Jersey, for the 
honour of an invitation to its Centenary festival in May. 

It is a matter of great regret to us that circumstances 

C134] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

do not allow us to send a personal representative to an 
occasion so happy and distinguished. 

But we beg that we may not be denied the privilege of 
being heard among the many congratulations from the 
realms both of sound learning and true piety. 

We remember the high tradition and the famous men 
that have made the name of Princeton familiar to the 
world and precious to the Church as a seat of sacred let- 
ters and Godly discipline. 

We welcome the opportunity of rejoicing in the joy of 
a sister Communion; and of recognising that the 
Churches of the Gospel are members one of another. 

We, further, hail an occasion of expressing the unity 
of two nations which are one in blood and speech, one in 
a long common history, and one in the culture that makes 
the nations members of Humanity. 

And we pray that, as Princeton is beautiful for situa- 
tion, so also it may continue to be rich in Christ's 
Wisdom and Knowledge, and powerful for the world 
purposes of the Eternal Spirit. 

Alfred E. Gaevie, M.A., D.D., 

Principal of New College. 
P. T. Forsyth, M.A., D.D., 

Principal of Hackney College. 
Wm. H. Bennett, D.D., Litt.D. 
Herbert T. Andrews, B.A. 
Herbert Hayes Scttllard, M.A., D.D. 

MANSFIELD COLLEGE, OXFORD, ENGLAND 

I write on behalf of the Professors and Tutors of 
Mansfield College to thank you for the invitation you 
have conveyed to us to be represented at the Centenary 

£1351] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Celebrations of Princeton Seminary. It is a matter of 
great regret to us that as the date falls in our working 
term we are unable to send a delegate. At the same time I 
am instructed to convey to you our warmest congratula- 
tions on the occasion and our good wishes for the future. 

I am, 

Yours faithfully, 

March 19, 1912. W. B. Selbie, Principal. 



BAPTIST COLLEGE, 
REGENT'S PARK, N. W., LONDON 

The members of the Theological Faculty of the Bap- 
tist College, at Regent's Park, London, send cordial 
congratulations to the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Princeton, New Jersey, and express 
their regret that they cannot avail themselves of its 
invitation to send a representative to attend the Cen- 
tenary Celebration to be held in May next. 

February 20, 1912. 

MANCHESTER COLLEGE, OXFORD, ENGLAND 

We are much honoured by the invitation of the Direc- 
tors, Trustees and Faculty of your Seminary to take 
part in the Centenary Celebration of its foundation next 
May. I greatly regret that we can none of us avail our- 
selves of the opportunity to meet the many distinguished 
scholars who will be then assembled, and enjoy the hospi- 
tality of your famous School. Our philosophical lec- 
turer, the Rev. L. P. Jacks, M.A., is to visit your country 
this spring; but he informs me to-day that he cannot 

[136] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

leave here till May 7th, and we must consequently forego 
the pleasure of being represented at your gathering. 

With best wishes for the success of your gathering, 
and the future prosperity of your Seminary, believe me, 
Very faithfully yours, 

J. Estlin Caepentek, Principal. 
February 28th, 1912. 

ST. DAVIDS COLLEGE, LAMPETER, WALES 

I am sorry it is impossible at the date you mention for 
us to send a representative of this College to join in the 
celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of your 
establishment. 

But I am requested to convey to you our congratula- 
tions, and to express the hope that your gathering may 
be in every way successful and that your work may go on 
successfully in the future. 

Yours faithfully, 

March l, 1912. Ll. J. M. Bebb, Principal. 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF AMSTERDAM, 

NETHERLANDS 

De Theologische faculteit der gemeentelijke Universi- 
teit te Amsterdam ontving met groote belangstelling 
Uwe mededeeling betreffende de viering van het honderd- 
jarig bestaan van het Theologisch Seminarie te Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, en is zeer erkentelijk voor de vriende- 
lijke uitnoodiging aan haar gericht om zich daarbij te 
doen vertegenwoordigen. Deze uitnoodiging op hoogen 
prijs stellende, ziet de Theologische faculteit der stede- 

£137 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

lijke Universiteit van Amsterdam zich tot haar leed- 
wezen verplicht U mede te deelen dat zij zich niet zal 
kunne doen vertegenwoordigen bij gelegenheid der 
feestviering van Uw Seminarie. Zij volgt evenwel met 
levendige en begrijpelijke belangstelling deze Uwe feest- 
viering en wenscht U toe dat de tweede nu aanbrekende 
eeuw van het bestaan van Uw Seminarie van niet minder 
activiteit en vrnchtbaarheid op bet terrein der theolo- 
gische studie moge getnigen dan dit in de eerste eeuw 
van bet bestaan van Uw Seminarie het geval heeft mogen 
zijn. Moge Uw Seminarie zich voortdurend verheugen 
in toenemenden bloei en Gods zegen rijkelijk rusten op 
den arbeid van alien die er aan werkzaam zijn. 

De theologische faculteit van de gemeentelijke 
Universiteit van Amsterdam. 

Maart 1912. D. E. J. VoLTER, VOOTZ. Her. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF GRONINGEN, 

NETHERLANDS 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Gronin- 
gen, greatly honoured by your invitation for the hun- 
dredth Anniversary of your establishment, feels obliged 
to answer that it did not succeed in finding a delegate for 
the occasion. Nevertheless the Faculty expresses its best 
wishes for the success of the festival and the future wel- 
fare of the Seminary. 

The Theological Faculty of Groningen, 

C. D. van Rhijn, President. 
H. U. Meyboom, Secretary. 
February 27th, 1912. 

[138] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF LEIDEN, NETHERLANDS 

To the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, at Princeton, New 
Jersey. 

The theological Faculty of the University of Leiden 
regrets that it is impossible for it to accept the invitation 
of the Directors, Trustees and Faculty to send a repre- 
sentative to the celebration of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the foundation of the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America. 

The members of the Faculty and the Ecclesiastical 
Professors associated with them desire to express their 
sincere congratulations on the long and valuable services 
which the Theological Seminary has been enabled to ren- 
der to the education of ministers in the Presbyterian 
Church, to the deepening and broadening of the spiritual 
life of the citizens of the United States, and to the cause 
of learning in all countries of the world. They hope that 
the second century of life on which the Seminary is now 
entering may be as distinguished in enterprise and as 
brilliant in achievement as the hundred years which have 
now been brought to so honourable a close. 

B. D. Eeedmans, President. 
Kiesopp Lake, Secretary. 
Leiden, 27 February, 1912. 

[seal] 



[139] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF UTRECHT, NETHERLANDS 

Seminarii Theologici, quod Ecclesiae Presbyterianae in 
oppido Princetons est, Curatoribus Professoribus 
Doctoribus S. P. D. Facultas Theologica Universi- 
tatis Ultraiectinae. 

Propter Seminarii Vestri dignitatem et doctrinae cele- 
britatem eximiam cum magnopere optaremur ut nobis 
contingeret, Viri Amplissimi Clarissimi Doctissimi, Vos 
praesentes compellare, hanc nobis felicitatem negavit 
adversitas temporis, quoniam causae multae ac variae 
impediebant ne quis nostrum mense Maio legatus ad Vos 
proficisceretur. 

Ergo quod praesentibus non licet, per hasce litteras 
facimus ut Vobis, Viri Amplissimi Clarissimi Doctis- 
simi, centesimum natalem Vestri Seminarii ex animi 
sententia gratulemur. Ut saeculum alteram quod iam 
instat Deus O. M. Vobis fortunet toto pectore nos precari 
scitote. 

Quod nos amicos hospitesque gaudiis Vestris caere- 
moniisque interesse voluistis, Vobis debitas agimus 
gratias. 

Denique ita Deus O. M. Vos omni bonorum fortuna- 
rumque genere cumulet, ut Vos ipsi, quos propter insig- 
nem humanitatem, doctrinam, virtutem magni facimus, 
eximia Vestra benevolentia nos dignari voluistis. 

H. Visscher, Dr. Tlieol. 

ord. h. t. pr. 
J. A. C. van Leeuwen, Dr. Tlieol. 

Dabamus Traiecti ad Rhenum or &' *" t ' ^-actis. 
Id. April, a. MCMXII. 

[140 J 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE 

DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH, STEL- 

LENBOSCH, SOUTH AFRICA 

The Professors of the Theological Seminary of the 
D. R. Church, at Stellenbosch, wish to express their ap- 
preciation of your kind invitation to be represented by a 
delegate at the celebration of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of your Seminary. 

They regret that it will not be possible for them to 
participate in the celebration of an event, which has 
proved such a rich blessing to the Presbyterian Church 
in America and such a power for good in the develop- 
ment of religion and theological thought, and they ear- 
nestly pray that your Seminary may ever by divine grace 
be enabled to uphold the glorious traditions of the past. 

I have the honor to be, 

Yours in our common Lord and Saviour, 

A. Mooreees, 
Scriba of the Faculty. 
March 20, 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF COPENHAGEN, DENMARK 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Copen- 
hagen sends its cordial thanks to the Theological Semi- 
nary of the Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America at Princeton, New Jersey, for the invitation 

P41] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

to be represented by a delegate at the centennial anni- 
versary but regrets being unable to accept the invitation. 
We express our best wishes for the future of the Semi- 
nary. 

J. P. Bang, Decanus. 

April 4. 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF CHRISTIANIA, NORWAY 

[seal] 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Norway 
acknowledges with thanks the invitation to name a dele- 
gate to represent her at the Celebration of the one hun- 
dredth Anniversary of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church, Princeton, New Jersey, on the 5th, 
6th and 7th of May, this year. 

Our Faculty heartily congratulates the Theological 
Seminary upon one hundred years of glorious history, 
but regrets being unable to send a delegate to this impor- 
tant Celebration. 

Andreas Brantrud, Dean. 
S. Sverdrup, Secretary. 

April 4, 1912. 



£14211 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF HELSINGFORS, FINLAND 

On behalf of the Theological Faculty of the University 
of Helsingfors, I beg to acknowledge your kind invita- 
tion to the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, 
and to thank you most cordially for it. 

It is with very great regret that we are compelled to 
refuse the invitation, as we have no opportunity of send- 
ing a delegate to represent us on that occasion. 

Believe me, 

Yours faithfully, 

G. G. Rosenqvist, Dean. 
March 13th, 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF BERLIN, GERMANY 

Dem theologischen Seminar zu Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, entbietet die Theologische Fakultat zu Berlin ihre 
warmsten Griisse. Indem wir fur die so freundliche 
Einladung zu Ihrem Jubelfest unseren ehrerbietigen 
Dank aussprechen, bedauern wir zugleich lebhaft keinen 
Delegirten senden zu konnen, da wir ja Ende April unsere 
Semesterarbeit wieder aufnehmen mlissen. Aber es ist 
uns ein aufrichtigsters Bedurfnis mit unseren aus 

CMS] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

warmen Herzen kommenden Segenswiinschen bei Ihrein 
Fest vertreten zu sein. 

Von Anfang an hat Ihre Kirchengemeinschaft Ge- 
wicht gelegt anf die umf assende wissenschaftliche Aus- 
riistung der Geistlichkeit. Aus dieser Tendenz ist auch 
das Theologische Seminar zu Princeton hervorgegangen 
und es hat ihr gedient nun ein Jahrhundert iiber in 
ernster und hingebender Arbeit. Hundert Jahre sind es 
auch her, dass unsere Berliner Theologische Fakultat zu 
demselben Zweck tatig gewesen ist und schon in unseren 
Anfangen ist einer der Ihrigen Charles Hodge, der fiir 
Ihre Sache dann so grosse Bedeutung gewonnen hat, 
unser Gast gewesen. Aber an einem hohen Fest, wie Sie 
es begehen, denkt man nicht nur der Beziehungen der 
einzelnen Personen, sondern vor allem empfangt man 
das starke Bewusstsein der Zusammengehorigkeit im 
Ruckblick auf die gemeinsamen Aufgaben, die uns zu 
losen libertragen waren. Es gait Ihnen wie uns um die 
Wahrheit ringen und mit ihr die junge Mannschaft aus- 
zuriisten, die in die heiligen Kriege des himmlischen 
Herrn ausziehen sollten. Aus solcher Gemeinschaft der 
kochsten Aufgaben hervor ruf en wir Ihnen von Herzen 
den Wunsch zu, dass Sie das Banner unseres himm- 
lischen Herrn Jesus Christus auch weiterhin in unge- 
schwachter Freudigkeit f esthalten mogen und dass Gott 
in Gnaden die Kirche und ihre kiinftigen Diener auch in 
Ihrer Gemeinschaft um dies Banner sammeln moge ! 

Mit dem nochmaligen Ausdruck der warmsten Segens- 
wiinsche zu Ihrein Jubilaum, 

Die theologische Fakultat zu Berlin 

Dr. Reinhold Seeberg, 
15. April 1912. Dekcm. 

[144^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF BONN, GERMANY 

Dem hochgeekrten Theologischen Seminar zu Prince- 
ton beehrt sich der Dekan der katholisch-theologischen 
Fakultat zu Bonn fur die Einladung zum hundertjahri- 
gen Jubilaeum am 5. bis 7. Mai 1912 den geziemenden 
Dank auszusprechen. Damit verbinde ich meine herz- 
lichste Gratulation zur ehrwiirdigen Gedenkfeier und 
den innigen Wunsch, dass das Theologische Seminar 
auch im zweiten Saeculum seines Bestehens fur Gott, 
Vaterland und Wissenschaf t arbeiten und herrliche Er- 
f olge erzielen moge. 

In ausgezeichneter Hochschatzung 

ergebenst 

Feldmann, Dekan. 

28. April 1912. 



THE ROYAL LYCEUM 
OF BRAUNSBERG, GERMANY 

[telegram] 
Herzlichen Gluckwunsch. 

Theologische Fakultat Braunsberg. 
May 5, 1912. 



[145] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF ERLANGEN, GERMANY 

Fur Hire giitige Einladung zur Jubelf eier sagen wir 
herzlichen Dank. Da diese Feier in den Anfang unserer 
Semesterarbeit fallt, so nmssten wir aus Riicksicht auf 
unsre Berufspflicliten es uns versagen, einen Abgeord- 
neten zu diesem Feste zu entsenden. Gerne aber und von 
Herzen bringen wir Ihnen warme Gliickwiinsche dar. 
Mit Befriedigung blicken Sie auf ein Jahrhundert 
treuer und erspriesslicher Arbeit zurlick. Mochte es 
Ihnen gegonnt sein, im Dienst Ihrer Kirche und des 
gemeinsamen Herrn der Kirche fruehtbar weiterzu- 
wirken f iir den christlichen Glauben und seine Geltung 
innerhalb der weiten Menschheit ! 

Hochachtungsvollst u. ergebenst 
Theologische Fakultat der Universitat Erlangen 

D. Bachmann, 

z. Z. Dekan. 
1. April 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF FREIBURG i. B., GERMANY 

Die theologische Fakultat der Universitat zu Frei- 
burg i. B., Deutsches Reich, ist durch die berufliche 
Tatigkeit verhindert, die Hundertjahrfeier Ihres theo- 
logischen Seminars durch einen Vertreter aus ihrer 
Mitte zu beschicken. 

[146] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Sie dankt verbindlichst fiir die ehrenvolle Einladung 
imd wiinsckt, dass die Feier der Wissenschaf t zum Segen 
gereichen moge. 

Im Geiste, der Zeugnis gibt, dass Christus die Wahr- 
heit ist, [1 Joh. 5, 6] 

Hochachtend 

Dr. Simon Weber, 

d. zt. Dekan. 
8. Marz 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE ROYAL 
BAVARIAN LYCEUM, FREISING, GERMANY 

Wir danken den Rev. Herren Kollegen fiir die giitige 
Einladung zur Sakularfeier Hires Bestehens und Wir- 
kens und indem wir bedauem, dass es uns nicht moglich 
war, einen Vertreter zu delegieren, wiinschen wir den 
Rev. Herren Kollegen noch viele Jahrhunderte erspriess- 
liclien segensreiclien Wirkens. 

Im Auftrag der theologischen Abteilung des Kgl. 
Bayr. Lyzeums Freising : 

D. Dr. Joseph Schlecht, 

p. t. Rektor. 
7. Mai 1912. 

[seal] 



L147] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF GIESSEN, GERMANY 

Im Namen und Auftrag meiner Herren Kollegen 
danke ich verbindlichst fiir die uns freiindlich zuge- 
sandte Einladung zur Jubelfeier des Seminars. Wir 
sind leider verhindert, einen Vertreter zu dieser Feier zu 
senden, gedenken aber des Seminars, dem wir uns auck 
auf dem Gebiet der wissenschaf tlichen Arbeit verbunden 
und verpflichtet fiihlen, mit treuen Segenswlinschen. 

Dr. Gustav Kruger, 
derzeit. Dekan. 
24. 2. 12. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF GOTTINGEN, GERMANY 

Sagen wir fiir die liebenswiirdige Einladung zur Jahr- 
hundertfeier Ihres theologischen Seminars unsern ver- 
bindlichen Dank. Es ist uns leider nicht moglich, einen 
Abgeordneten zu Ihrem Feste zu senden, aber wir geben 
dem Wunsche Ausdruek, dass das Seminar auch im kom- 
menden Jahrhundert sicb als Pflanzstatte charakter- 
voller Frommigkeit, als theologische Bildungsstatte und 
als Bollwerk theologischer wissenscbaftlicher Arbeit be- 
wabren moge. 

Die theologische Fakultat 

Titius. 

15. Marz 1912. 

C148 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF HALLE-WITTENBERG, GERMANY 

Dem Theological Seminary in Princeton N. J. sende 
ich zu seiner Hundertjahrfeier den herzlicken Gliick- 
wunsch unserer Fakultat leider zu spat. Eine schwere 
Erkrankung unseres gegenwartigen Dekans bitte ich als 
Entschuldigung dieser Versaunmis gelten zu lassen. 

Das Princeton-Theological-Seminary kann mit dank- 
barer Freude zuruckblicken auf die 100 Jahre seit 1812. 
Nicht mehr als neun Studenten sammelten sich 1812 um 
den ersten und einzigen Professor, Dr. Archibald Alexan- 
der. Hunderte von Studenten sind seitdem durch das 
Seminar gegangen; und die jetzige Zahl der Studenten 
wird das Zwanzigfache der Anfangzeit sein. Das Semi- 
nar hat in den hundert Jahren, auf die es jetzt zuriick- 
sieht, der presbyterianischen Kirche wertvolle Dienste 
geleistet. Und manche Professoren haben in dem Jahr- 
hundert an dem Seminar gewirkt, deren Gedachtnis noch 
heute in Ehren steht. 

Moge das neue Jahrhundert, das dem Seminar begon- 
nen hat, seine gesegnete Wirksamkeit ihm erhalten und 
sie steigern— zum Besten der presbyterianischen Kirche 
und zur Ehre dessen, dem alle theologische Arbeit dienen 
soil! 

In hochachtungsvoller Begrtissung 



ergebenst 



D. Friedkich Loofs, 
Prodekan. 



29. April 1912. 



[149 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF HEIDELBERG, GERMANY 

Die Theologische Fakultat der Universitat Heidelberg 
spricht ihren ganz ergebenen Dank aus fiir die freund- 
liche und elirenvolle Einladung zum Jubilaum Ihres 
Seminars. Wir bedauern lebhaft, dass die Arbeit des 
Semesters keinem unsrer Prof essoren gestatten wird, an 
Ihrem Feste teilzunehmen. Um so mehr haben wir den 
Wunsch, Ihnen auszusprechen, dass wir an der Freude 
mid dem Ernste, mit denen Sie Ihre Feier begehen wer- 
den, von Herzen teilnehmen. 

Wir wissen uns mit Ihnen einig in der Ueberzeugung, 
dass das Evangelium der Gegenwart ebenso unentbehr- 
lich ist wie der Vergangenheit, dass es aber seine Auf- 
gabe an der heutigen Welt nur erfiillen kann, wenn es 
mit alien edlen Bestrebungen der Wahrheitserkenntnis 
mit verbindet. 

Wir sind mit Ihnen iiberzeugt, dass theologische Ar- 
beit lauterstes Wahrheitsstreben aber anch tiefsten sitt- 
lichen und religiosen Ernst zur Voraussetzung hat. 

Wir glauben und hoffen mit Ihnen, dass es der Theolo- 
gie gelingen moge, immer mehr zu solchen Ergebnissen 
zu gelangen, die ein Gemeingut aller Theologen und, 
wenn Gott will, auch aller Christen werden konnen. 

In diesem Sinne reichen wir Ihnen die Hand mit den 
warmsten Segenswiinschen fiir Ihre Arbeit. 

Im Auftrage der Theologischen Fakultat 

D. Johannes Weiss 

li.t. decanus 

13. April 1912. 

:i5on 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF JENA, GERMANY 

Dem hochwiirdigen Vorstande und Prof essorencolle- 
gium des Theologischen Seminars zu Princeton, New 
Jersey, spricht die Theologische Fakultat zu Jena ver- 
bindlichsten Dank aus fur die Mitteilung iiber die am 
5.-7. Mai 1912 stattfindende Saecularfeier des Seminars 
und f iir die f reundliche Einladung, einen Vertreter zur 
Teilnahme an dieser Feier zu senden. Leider ist es 
wegen der weiten Entf ernung nicht moglich, dieser Ein- 
ladung zu entsprechen. Aber die Theologische Fakultat 
zu Jena sendet dem Theologischen Seminare zu Prince- 
ton ihre herzlichsten Gluck- und Segenswiinsche zu der 
bevorstehenden Saecularfeier. Mogen dem Seminare 
noch viele Jahrhunderte erfolgreichen Wirkens im 
Dienste der christlichen Theologie und Kirche be- 
schieden sein ! 

Die Theologische Fakultat der Universitat Jena. 

D. H. H. Wendt, 

z. Z. Dekan. 

5. Miirz 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF KONIGSBERG, GERMANY 

Dem Theologischen Seminar von Princeton sendet die 
theologische Facultat von Konigsberg zu dem gliick- 
lich vollendeten ersten Jahrhundert ihre herzlichen 
Gliickwiinsche. 

Wie von Konigsberg durch den kategorischen Impera- 
tiv Kants eine Erneuerung des sittlichen Bewusstseins 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

in Deutschland erging, so hat der ernste und tapfere 
Geist des Presbyterianismus in Hirer Facultat eine her- 
vorragende Statte seiner Betatigung gefunden. Manner 
von weithin bekannten Namen haben dem College von 
Princeton angehort und zu der Bllite desselben beige- 
tragen. 

Moge auch in dem neuen Jahrhundert das theologische 
Seminar von Princeton ein weithin leuchtendes Licht 
auf dem Berge sein, moge es den echten Geist theolo- 
gischer Wissenschaft fort und fort pflegen, moge die 
enge Beziehung zwischen deutscher und amerikanischer 
Wissenschaft zum Segen beider Lander auch in dem 
neuen Saeculum, in das Ihr Seminar eintritt, ihre heil- 
samen Friichte zeitigen und der geistige Austausch dies- 
seits und jenseits des Oceans eine stete gegenseitige 
Bereicherung hervorbringen. 

Die theologische Facultat 
der Albertus-Universitat Konigsberg 

D. Dr. Dorner, 

Marz 1912. *' Z ' Dekan ' 

[seal] 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVEESITY OF LEIPZIG, GERMANY 

Fiir die uns zugekommene Einladung zur Feier Hires 
hundertjahrigen Jubilaums sagen wir Ihnen unsern ver- 
bindlichen Dank. 

1st es auch bei der grossen Entfernung zu unserem 
Bedauern nicht moglich, dass eines unserer Mitglieder 

C152] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Ihnen personlich unsere herzlichen Segenswiinsche aus- 
spricht, so nehmen wir doch nicht minder warmen Anteil 
an Ihrer Feier. Moge des Allmachtigen Gnade und 
Segen Sie und Ihre Arbeit ferner begleiten und moge es 
Ihnen auch in der Zukunft wie bisher vergonnt sein, der 
Kirche Christi und der Wissenschaft Manner heranzu- 
bilden, die beiden in gleichem Masse zur Ehre gereichen. 
In amtsbriiderlicher Verbundenheit 

Die theologische Fakultat Leipzig 

D. Rttd. Kittel, z. Z. Dekan. 

3. Marz 1912. 

[seal] 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARBURG, GERMANY 

Dem Theologischen Seminar in Princeton danken wir 
herzlich fur die Einladung zu der Jahrhundertfeier am 
5. 6. und 7. Mai. Zu unserm Bedauern ist es uns aus 
aiissern Griinden nicht moglich gewesen, uns durch einen 
Delegierten vertreten zu lassen. Aber wir nehmen auch 
in der Feme aufrichtigen und herzlichen Anteil an der 
schonen Feier der nachsten Tage. Wir begliickwiinschen 
das Seminar, dass es ihm durch Gottes Gnade vergonnt 
ist, auf diese lange Zeit reicher Arbeit zuriickzublicken, 
und freuen uns des grossen Segens, dessen Quelle es fiir 
die Presbyterian Church gewesen ist. Herzlich wiin- 
schen wir, dass Gottes Gnade ferner liber dem Seminar 
walte, es fiir die heimatliche Kirche zu einer unversieg- 
lichen Quelle cles Segens mache und zu einer bluhenden 

[153;] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Pflegstatte theologischer Wissenschaft, welcher der ge- 
samte Protestantismus sich zu Dank verpflichtet weiss. 

Wir griissen das Seminar im Namen und Geist Jesu 
Christi. 

Die Theologische Fakultat der altesten protestant- 
ischen Universitat. 

Der Dekan: 

DR. THEOL. W. HEITMtJLLER. 
27. April 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH, GERMANY 

Das theologische Seminar der Presbyterian Church in 
den Vereinigten Staaten von America zu Princeton New 
Jersey hat die theologische Fakultat der Universitat 
Munch en zur Teilnahme an der hundertjahrigen Ge- 
dachtniss-Feier ihres Bestehens in edler collegialer Ge- 
sinnung eingeladen. Wir danken auf richtig und herzlich 
fiir diese Aufmerksamkeit. Leider ist es uns nicht mog- 
lich, einen Delegierten dahin abzuordnen. Wir begliick- 
wiinschen das Seminar von ganzem Herzen zu der so 
schonen und erf reulichen und erhabenen Feier und wiin- 
schen zugleich, dass dasselbe fiir alle Zukunft wachse, 
bluhe und gedeihe. 

In aller Verehrung 

Prof. Dr. L. Atzberger, 
z. Z. Dekan der theol. Fakultat. 
26. April 1912. 

[154!] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL FACULTY 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF STRASSBURG 

i. E., GERMANY 

Der freundliche Einladung zu Hirer Jahrhundertfeier 
vermag kein Mitglied unsrer Fakultat zu f olgen. Audi 
abgesehen von der Grosse der Entfernung macht der 
Umstand, dass Ihr Fest in die Zeit des begonnenen Som- 
mer-Semesters f allt, die personliche Teilnahme eines der 
Unsere zu einer Unmoglichkeit. Aber wir diirfen ver- 
sichern, dass wir in den Festtagen Hirer nicht nur in 
Gemeinschaft des Geistes und des Glaubens gedenken 
werden, sondern aucli Ikrer hohen Schule, Lehrenden 
wie Lernenden, zum Heile der theologischen Wissen- 
schaft und zum Segen der evangelischen Kirche in der 
neuen Welt ein f erneres f rohliches Gedeihen von Herzen 
wiinschen. 

Personlich begriisst der Unterzeichnete noch mit be- 
sonderer Freude eine Arbeitsgenossenschaf t, welche, wie 
er der Kirche Calvins zugehorig, auch fiir die Zukunft 
der Sache des Evangeliums die Giiter zu erhalten strebt, 
die der Christenheit und insbesondere der Theologie, ja 
der allgemeinen Wohlf alirt und Weltkultur durch den 
Wahrheitsernst und die sittliche Zucht, durch die Stand- 
liaftigkeit und die Opfermut unsrer ref ormierten Glau- 
bensvater erworben wurden. 

Moge die gesegnete Statte Hirer Wirksamkeit bis in 
die fernsten Zeit en ein Licht bedeuten und weithin das 
stolze und klihne apostolische Bekenntnis verkiindigen : 
"Unser Glaube ist der Sieg, der die Welt iiberwunden 
hat"[Uoh.5,4]. 

C155 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Im Auftrage der evangelisch-theologischen Fakultat 
der Kaiser- Wilhelms-Universitat Strassburg : 

Dr. Julius Smend, D.D., 
ordentlicher Professor der Tlieologie, 

z. Zt. Dekan. 
Am Tage des Edikts von Nantes, 
den 13. April 1912. 

[seal] 



THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF STRASSBURG 

i. E., GERMANY 

Der hohen Fakultat des theologischen Seminars der 
presbyterianischen Kirche d. V. St. spricht die katho- 
lisch-theologische Fakultat der Kaiser- Wilhelms-Uni- 
versitat zu Strassburg ihren ergebensten Dank aus fur 
die giitige Einladung zur hundertjahrigen Gedenkfeier. 
Leider haben die Verhaltnisse unserer Fakultat es uns 
unmoglicli gemacht, einen Abgesandten an der Feier teil- 
nehmen zu lassen. So bitten wir, auf diesem Wege un- 
sere Gltickwunsche clarbringen zu dlirfen. 

Die katholisch-theologische Fakultat 

B6CKENHOFF, 

z. Z. Dekan. 

25. April 1912. 

[seal] 

[156: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL FACULTY 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TUBINGEN, 

GERMANY 

Unsere Fakultat spricht fiir die Einladung zu der 
Hundertjahrfeier Ihres Seminars den verbindlichsten 
Dank aus. Da es keinem nnserer Mitglieder moglich ist 
bei der Feier personlich zu erscheinen, senden wir Ihnen 
die herzlichsten Gliickwiinsche aus der Gemeinschaft des 
evangelischen Glaubens und der Arbeit an der theolo- 
gischen Jugend her aus. 

Unsere Arbeit muss mit jedem Jahrgang Studierender 
neu anfangen, und jedes Geschlecht stellt unserer Wis- 
senschaft neue Aufgaben der Abwehr, Neubegrtindung 
und neuer Begriffsbildung. Was uns die Sicherheit und 
die gewisse Hoffnung gibt bei dieser stets wechselnden 
Aufgabe, das ist die Zuversicht, dass unser Glaube in 
ewigem Grunde wurzelt, ein Gut liber der Zeit, darum 
audi gemeinsames Band von Glaubensgenossen ver- 
schiedener Continente und Volker. In dieser Zuversicht 
griissen wir und wiinschen fiir das zweite Jahrhundert 
die Gnade des ewigen Gottes. 

D. Wurster, 
Dekan der evang. theolog. 
Fakultat Tubingen. 

12. Marz 1912. 



[157] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF TUBINGEN, GERMANY 

Die katholiscli-theologische Fakultat wiinsclit dem 
Theologischen Seminar zu Princeton alles Gute znm hun- 
dertjahrigen Jubilaum, vor allem einen glanzenden Ver- 
lauf der Festesf eier. Hire Mitglieder sind leider verkin- 
dert, daran teilzunehmen. 

Mit vorziiglicher Hochachtung 

RlESSLER, 

Derzeit. Dekan. 
26. Februar 1912. 

[seal] 



THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF THE 
WEST, ANGERS, FRANCE 

Le Doyen et les Prof esseurs de la Faculte de Theologie 
de l'Universite catholique de l'Ouest remercient les 
Directeurs, Administratenrs et Faculte du Seminaire 
theologique de l'Eglise presbyterienne de Princeton de 
la gracieuse invitation qu 'ils leur ont adressee. lis regret- 
tent de ne pouvoir y repondre par 1 'envoi d'un delegue, 
vu la distance qui les separe de l'Amerique. Mais ils 
s 'unissent a eux de cosur pour f eter le centieme anniver- 
saire de leur fondation. Ils sont heureux d'offrir, sur 
le terrain scientifique, un fraternel hommage a des pro- 
fesseurs dont les travaux ont porte au loin la reputation. 

[158] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

lis souhaitent au Seminaire de Princeton, un des plus 
anciens et des plus illustres foyers de la science ameri- 
caine, des succes tou jours nouveaux, dignes de son glo- 
rieux passe. 

Le Doyen, 

A. Legendre. 

le 25 mars 1912. t SEAL] 

[seal] 



THE CATHOLIC FACULTIES OF 
LYONS, FRANCE 

Le Recteur des Facultes catholiques ; le Doyen et les 
Professeurs de la Faculte de Theologie ont l'honneur 
d'exprimer a Messieurs les Directeurs et Adrninistra- 
teurs du Seminaire de Princeton leurs remerciements 
pour leur aimable invitation. La Faculte ne pourra pas 
se faire representer par un delegue; mais elle fait les 
meilleurs voeux pour le succes de la fete du centenaire. 

F. Lavallee, 

le 19 fevrier 1912. recteur. 



THE FREE FACULTY OF PROTESTANT 
THEOLOGY, MONTAUBAN, FRANCE 

La Faculte de Montauban s'est sentie tres honoree par 
1 'invitation que vous lui avez adressee— en meme temps 
que par les invitations speciales f aites a deux de ses mem- 

[159] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

bres, qui ont eu le tres grand regret de ne pouvoir y 
repondre. 

Elle vous remercie. Elle sait qu'il y a entre le Semi- 
naire theologique de Princeton et la Faculte de Montau- 
ban un lieu tout special. Ici et la, on cultive avec un soin 
particulier la memoire du Reformat eur Calvin. Nous 
n'ignorons pas tout ce que vous avez fait par vos ou- 
vrages et par votre Revue pour f aire connaitre et appre- 
cier l'oeuvre et la pensee de celui qui fut un des plus 
grands Frangais de France et un des plus grands Chre- 
tiens de la chretiente. 

Et precisement ces jours-ci, un disciple du Seminaire 
theologique de Princeton, le missionnaire et secretaire 
general du mouvement des etudiants volontaires, Mon- 
sieur Wilder, nous a raconte comment ce fut a Princeton 
que naquit la Federation universelle des etudiants Chre- 
tiens, cette Federation dont le caractere est oecumenique 
et dont la devise est: "faire Christ Roi":— un caractere 
et une devise specialement calvinistes. 

C 'est dans ces sentiments que nous vous envoy ons nos 
vceux les plus sinceres uour votre Seminaire,— et que 
nous demandons a Dieu de faire reposer sa benediction 
sur son activite ulterieure. 

Recevez, Monsieur, 1 'assurance de nos sentiments con- 
fraternels et Chretiens. 

Pour la Faculte 

Le Doyen 

E. DOUMERGUE. 
le ler mars 1912. 



[160 1 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE FACULTY OF PROTESTANT THEOLOGY 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PARIS 

La Faculte libre de theologie protestante de Paris a 
ete tres honoree et touchee de l'invitation que le Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church de Prince- 
ton lui a adressee de se f aire representer aux fetes du 
jubile centenaire de cet' etablissement. 

La Faculte eut ete heureuse de charger un de ses mem- 
bres de vous porter en personne ses salutations et ses 
voeux. Malheureusement les circonstances ne le lui per- 
mettent pas. Aussi doit-elle se contenter de vous envoyer 
par ecrit 1 'expression de sa gratitude en meme temps que 
ses vo3ux pour que votre maison continue d'etre benie. 

Dans le siecle d'activite que vous terminez, il vous a 
ete donne de rendre d'importants services a la science 
chretienne et a l'Eglise pour laquelle vous travaillez. 
Nous demandons a Dieu de feconder votre activite dans 
la periode nouvelle de vie qui s'ouvre pour vous. 

Le Doyen 

le 17 mars 1912. Ed - VauCHER. 



THE BIBLICAL SCHOOL OF JERUSALEM 

[seal] 

Les Professeurs de l'Ecole biblique de Jerusalem sont, 
comme moi, tres honores de votre invitation d'assister 
au centenaire de la f ondation de votre seminaire theolo- 
gique. Nous regrettons que la distance ne nous permette 
pas d 'envoyer du moins un delegue a cette imposante 
ceremonie. 

[161] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Veuillez agreer, tres Reverend Monsieur, l'expression 
de mes sentiments les plus distingues, 

M. J. Lagrange. 

Correspondant de Vlnstitut, 

r „ „ -, Direct eur de I'Ecole ~bi~blique. 

[seal] * 

Couvent des Dominicains 

de St. Btienne 
Jerusalem le 8 mars 1912. 

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF 
LOUVAIN, BELGIUM 

La Faculte de Theologie de l'Universite catholique de 
Louvain remercie le Seminaire Theologique de Prince- 
ton de son invitation aux fetes de son centenaire, et lui 
adresse a cette occasion ses sinceres felicitations. 

Elle regrette vivement que ces fetes etant fixees a 
l'epoque ou les professeurs de l'Universite ne peuvent 
interrompre leurs cours, il lui est impossible de s 'y f aire 
representer par un delegue. 

Au nom de la Faculte 

he Secretaire de VUniversite 

le 23 mars 1912. J. VAN BlERVLIET. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF BASEL, SWITZERLAND 

[arms] 

Empf angen Sie zu Handen der Directors, Trustees und 
Facultat des Theologischen Seminars zu Princeton den 
ergebensten Dank der theologischen Facultat Basel, die 

[162 J 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

es zur Ehre anrechnet, von Ihnen zur Jahrhundertf eier 
Ihres theologischen Seminars eingeladen zu werden. 
Leider ist kein Mitglied unsrer Facultat in der Lage, 
Ihrer ehrenvollen Einladmig Folge leisten zii konnen. 
Die theologische Facultat Basel hat rnir aber als ihrem 
derzeitigen Dekan den Auftrag gegeben, Ihnen mit 
dem Dank und der Entschuldigung fiir nnser Nichter- 
scheinen zugleich den herzlichsten Gluekwunsch der 
Facultat zu Ihrer Feier auszurichten. Sie diirfen auf 
ein Jahrhundert reicher geistiger Arbeit zuriiekblicken, 
auch auf ein Jahrhundert mannigfacher theologiseher 
Kampfe und vielfacher Schwierigkeiten, die jedoch ihr 
theologisches Seminar tapfer und siegreich uberwunden 
hat. Wir wissen uns mit Ihnen einig im strengen wahr- 
haftigen Erforschen der Wahrheit wie im Dienst des 
Evangeliums und im Vertrauen, dass gerade in der f reien 
Wahrheitsf orschung ein besonders wichtiger und unent- 
behrlicher Dienst am Evangelium bestehe und wir wtin- 
schen Ihnen dasselbe, was wir uns wiinschen, dass das 
kommende Jahrhundert ein Jahrhundert reicher geist- 
iger Arbeit und immer tieferen Verstandnisses des 
Evangeliums werden moge. 

Mit den besten Wiinschen zu dem Gedeihen Ihres 
Festes griisst Sie zugleich im Namen meiner Collegen in 
grosster Hochachtung 

Professor D. Paul Wernle, 

Dekan d. theol. Facultat Basel. 

16. Marz 1912. 



[163] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF BERN, SWITZERLAND 

Im Auftrag der kath. theol. Fakultat der Universitat 
Bern libermittelt ihr derzeitiger, unterzeichneter Dekan 
dem Venerable Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Chnrch in the United States of America at Prince- 
ton die herzlichsten Gliickwiinsche zu seinem hundert- 
jahrigen Bestehen, wiinscht ihm fernere gleichsegens- 
reiche Wirksamkeit und bedanert durch die weite Ent- 
fernung gehindert zu sein, der giitigen Einladung znr 
Festf eier zu f olgen. 

Dr. Ph. Woker, 
Professor der allgemeinen Gesckichte 
und der Kirchengeschichte an der 
Universitat Bern. 
12. Marz 1912. 



THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF FREIBURG, SWITZERLAND 

Fur die freundliche Einladung zu der Jahrhundert- 
feier des Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian 
Church at Princeton New Jersey danken wir verbind- 
lichst, bedauern aber dieser giitigen Einladung nicht f ol- 
gen zu konnen. 

Dr. Prummer, 
Dekan d. theol. Facultat. 

Friburgi Helvetiorum, die 26 mensis Martii 1912. 

[164^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 

La Faculte de Theologie de l'Universite de Geneve 
temoigne au Seminaire Theologique de l'Eglise Presby- 
terienne a Princeton sa bien cordiale sympathie a 1 'occa- 
sion du Centenaire qu'il va celebrer. 

Elle regrette qne les circonstances ne permettent pas 
des relations personnelles entre professeurs et etudiants 
des deux pays. 

Elle felicite le Seminaire theologique de Princeton de 
sa prosperite et elle souliaite que les fetes prochaines 
soient pour lui le signal de nouveau progres. 

Nous trouvant dans l'impossibilite de deleguer un de 
nos professeurs aux Fetes du Centenaire a Princeton 
nous avons appris que M. le Professeur Schaffi, Doctor 
honoris causa de notre Faculte, se proposait de se rendre 
a Princeton, et nous 1 'avons prie de representer notre 
Faculte. 

Veuillez avoir la bonte de le recevoir a vos fetes comme 
le temoin de nos sentiments bien cordiaux a votre egard. 

Veuillez agreer l'assurance de nos sentiments bien 
devoues. 

G. Fulliquet, 

Doyen. 

le 20 avril 1912. 



[165] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



THE EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL FACULTY 
OF GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 

^i Messieurs les membres du Board of Directors et a 
Messieurs les Professeurs du Theological Seminary 
de Princeton: 

La Faculte de Tlieologie evangelique de Geneve est 
heureuse, a 1 'occasion du centenaire de la fondation du 
Theological Seminary de Princeton, de vous offrir 1 'hom- 
mage de sa respectueuse sympathie et ses felicitations les 
plus chaleureuses. 

Nous le faisons avec une joie d'autant plus grande que 
nos deux facultes sont unies, depuis de longues annees, 
par les liens d'une profonde estime et d'une parfaite 
confraternite theologique. En 1838, l'un de nos plus 
eminents fondateurs, Merle d'Aubigne, l'liistorien de la 
Reformation, eut l'lionneur de voir ses premiers travaux 
recompenses par la haute distinction que vous lui avez 
accordee alors, en lui conf erant le doctorat en tlieologie ; 
et son successeur dans la chaire d'Histoire de l'Eglise, 
notre collegue M. le professeur Louis Ruffet, eut le 
privilege d'etre en 1874, l'objet de la meme distinction 
de votre part. II nous est particulierement agreable de 
rappeler ces souvenirs, a l'heure ou vous celebrez, avec 
le protestantisme presbyterien tout entier, la date me- 
morable de la fondation de votre Faculte. 

Vos devanciers et vous, Messieurs, leurs dignes et dis- 
tingues successeurs, vous aA r ez accompli une ceuvre 
grande et benie, a la gloire de Jesus- Christ notre com- 

[166 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

mun Seigneur et Sauveur. Vous avez envoye, au service 
des Eglises de votre patrie et dans le vaste champ des 
Missions, des legions de ministres vaillants et solidement 
prepares pour l'ceuvre de l'avancement du regne de 
Dieu dans le monde. Vous avez poursuivi votre noble 
tache dans un esprit de fidelite aux precieuses Verites de 
l'Evangile que nos bienheureux reformateurs ont remises 
en lumiere et proclamees avec l'energie d'une foi puis- 
sante et d'une inebranlable conviction. Nous nous re- 
jouissons, avec l'Eglise entiere, de l'activite si etendue, 
et si feconde que, au cours du siecle qui vient de s'ecouler 
il vous a ete donne de deployer par le moyen de vos pro- 
fesseurs et des pasteurs et missionnaires qui ont ete in- 
struits dans votre f aculte. 

Vos fils spirituels sont devenus, au pres et au loin, les 
temoins vivants de l'Evangile de verite et de salut. En ce 
jour de solennelle commemoration, ils pensent, en tous 
lieux, a leur Alma Mater, et, comme les fils de la Femme 
vaillante du livre des Proverbes, "ils se levent etladisent 
bienheureuse"; ils lui adressent le temoignage de leur 
respectueux attachement et de leur profonde reconnais- 
sance. 

Et nous, enfants comme vous de la Reforme calvini- 
enne, vos freres d 'amies dans le pays de langue fran- 
chise, c'est avec joie que nous nous associons a ces hom- 
mages et que nous y joignons nos vceux les plus sinceres 
et les plus fraternels, en demandant au Souverain Chef 
de l'Eglise de demeurer avec vous dans l'avenir, comme 
II l'a ete dans le passe. 

Veuillez, Messieurs et tres honores Collegues, agreer 
l'assurance de notre haute consideration et de notre 
devouement en Jesus-Christ. 

[167] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Au nom du Comite Directeur de la Faculte de Tkeo- 
logie evangelique : 

Le president : W. N. de St. George, 

Alex. Claparede. Vice-pres t B: Sc: 

Au nom de la Commission des Etudes : 
Le president: 

Ch. Durand-P allot, Antony Krafft, 

B. D. pasteur. B. D. pasteur. 

Le College des Prof esseurs : 

Louis Ruffet, D.D., President. 
Jules Breitenstein, Secretaire. 
Ant. Baumgartner, Ph.D. 
Frank Thomas, M.A., 

pasteur et professeur. 
A. Berthoud, professeur. 
[seal] 



THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OF THE FREE 

CHURCH OF THE CANTON DE VAUD, 

LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 

Veuillez recevoir, au nom de la Faculte que j 'ai 1 'hon- 
neur de representer, nos remerciements les plus sinceres 
pour votre si cordiale et fraternelle invitation a celebrer 
avec vous le Centenaire de la Faculte de theologie de 
l'Eglise Presbyterienne des Etats-Unis d'Amerique. 
C 'est avec le plus grand plaisir que nous aurions repondu 
a 1 'honneur que vous nous f aites en deleguant un de nos 
membres a ces belles Fetes. Malheureusement les circon- 

[168;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

stances presentes de notre Faculte, dont deux profes- 
seurs sont malades, nous rend la chose impossible. C 'est 
avec un tres sincere regret que nous le constatons. Nous 
nous reservons de prendre part, au moment voulu, par 
un message officiel, aux Fetes de votre Centenaire ; pour 
1 'instant nous n 'avons voulu que vous exprimer nos vif s 
remerciements et notre profonde estime. 

Veuillez agreer, Monsieur et tres honore Frere, mes 
respectueux compliments et me croire votre devoue 

Charles O. Mercier, 

professeur. 
le 26 fevrier 1912. 



THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF NEUCHATEL, SWITZERLAND 

[seal] 

A la Direction du Seminaire theologique des Eglises 
presbyteriennes des Etats-Unis d'Amerique, Prince- 
ton. 

Vous avez bien voulu inviter notre Faculte de theo- 
logie de 1 'Universite de Neuchatel a se f aire representer 
au centieme anniversaire de la fondation du Seminaire 
theologique des Eglises presbyteriennes des Etats-Unis 
d'Amerique. Vu la distance qui nous separe de votre 
pays, nous avons le regret de ne pouvoir repondre a votre 
aimable invitation. Mais nous ne sommes pas moins tres 
sensibles a 1 'honneur que vous nous avez fait en nous con- 
viant a votre Jubile, et nous vous en exprimons toute 
notre reconnaissance. 

[169: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Nous sommes heureux de pouvoir saisir cette occasion 
pour vous presenter, avec nos felicitations, tous nos 
voeux pour la prosperite croissante de votre Seminaire 
theologique. Que Dieu benisse de plus en plus votre 
travail, de telle sorte que vous puissiez donner a vos 
figlises, en nombre tou jours plus considerable, des servi- 
teurs eclaires, fideles et devoues ! Qu'il benisse en meme 
temps vos Eglises; qu'il fasse fructifier les semences 
divines de verite, de liberte, de justice et de paix qu'elles 
repandent dans le monde ! 

Veuillez agreer, Monsieur le Directeur et tres honores 
Messieurs, 1 'assurance de notre respectueux devouement. 

Au nom de la Faculte de theologie 

Le Doyen 

E. DlTMONT. 
le 19 avril 1912. 



THE FREE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OF THE 

EVANGELICAL CHURCH, NEUCHATEL, 

SWITZERLAND 

En reponse a 1 'amiable invitation que vous avez bien 
voulu nous adresser et qui nous a vivement touches, nous 
avons le regret de vous informer qu'il ne nous sera pas 
possible de nous f aire representer au centenaire que vous 
vous preparez a celebrer. 

Mais nous nous associerons a votre Jubile par notre 
fraternel interet et notre sympathie chretienne, et nous 
vous prions d 'agreer les voeux tres sinceres que nous 
f ormons pour la prosperite de votre Faculte de theologie 
et de votre Eglise. 

[170] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Veuillez agreer, tres honore Monsieur, avec nos re- 
merciements, l'expression de notre respectueux devoue- 
ment. 

Au nom de la Faculte de tlieologie de 1 'Eglise evange- 
lique neuchateloise independante de l'Etat, 

le president du conseil des prof esseurs, 

Paul Comtesse, fils. 

le 26 fevrier 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA 

Das Prof essorenkollegium der theologiscken Fakultat 
in Innsbruck hat in seiner Sitzung vom 7. Marz d. J. den 
unterzeichneten Dekan beauftragt, dem theologischen 
Seminar der presbyterianischen Kircke in den Vereinig- 
ten Staaten von Nord-Amerika fiir die f reundliche Ein- 
ladung zur Teilnahme an der hundert jahrigen Jubelfeier 
bestens zu danken mid zugleich mitzuteilen, dass die 
Entsendung eines Delegaten unmoglicli ist. 
In ausgezeichneter Hochachtung 

Dr. Johann Stufler, 
d. Z. Dekan der theol. Fakultat. 

8. Marz 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF 
SALZBURG, AUSTRIA 



Faeultas theologica Salisburgensis maxime gaudet de 

lemina 
[171] 



celebritate eenteniaria Seminarii theologici Princeton 



CENTENNIAL CELEBEATION OF 

erecti. Quae gratias agit optimas pro attentione facul- 
tati amice oblata. Dolore afficitur, quod ratio studiorum 
hicce vigens non permittat, delegatum ad festivitatem 
hanc magnam dimittere. Omnes actus festivos eosque 
perficientes votis bonis presequens salutem dicit. 
C. R. Facultas Salisburgensis : 

De. A. Eberhaeter, 

h. t. Decanus. 
Salisburgi, die XXI. Febr. 1912. 



THE EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL FACULTY 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VIENNA, AUSTRIA 

Die k. k. evangelisch-theologische Facultat in Wien 
beehrt sich, mit dem besten Dank fur die uns freund- 
liehst tibermittelte Einladung, Ihnen die ergebensten 
Gliickwunsche zu dem hundertjakrigen Jubilaum der 
tkeologischen Hochschule in Princeton auszusprechen. 
Moge der Segen des Allmachtigen, der bisher so sichtbar 
iiber der Anstalt gewaltet. auch in Zukimf t auf ihr ruhen 
zum Heil f ur die Kirche. 

In grosster Hochachtung 
ergebenst 
die k. k. evang.-theol. Facultat in Wien. 

Prof. D. Wilke, 

d. z. Dekan. 
15. April 1912. 



nm: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OF THE ROYAL 

HUNGARIAN UNIVERSITY, BUDAPEST, 

HUNGARY 

Inclyto Seminario Presbyterianorum in Princeton, Rec- 
tori simulque omnibus Membris Collegii nobis 
Honorandis! 

Nuntium Seminarii Vestri in primo centenario feli- 
citer transacto exsultantis simulque nos ad concelebran- 
dum invitantis grato animo accepimus et familiarem 
Vestram benevolentiam honorantes congratulamur be- 
neficia a D. O. M. in Vos collata. Licet non parem in 
omnibus habeamus ficlei prof essionem, tamen in plurimis 
contra eosdem armemur necesse est inimicos Dei Chris- 
tique ejus. Optamus Vos valere et bonum certamen 
abhinc quoque certare, ut repositam habeatis Vobis coro- 
nam justitiae. Distantia nimia, mare interjectum et cura 
studiorum quotidiana nos a commeatu prohibent. Roga- 
mus ergo, habeatis nos excusatos. De cetero gratia Do- 
mini Nostri Jesu Christi, et charitas Dei et communi- 
catio sancti Spiritus sit cum omnibus Vobis. 

Nomine Facultatis Theologicae Universitatis Buda- 
pestinensis omnia f elicia faustaque Vobis adprecatur. 

Budapestini die 29. Martii anni 1912. 

Dr. Aladarus Zubriczky, 
Decanus h. a. Facultatis Theologicae 
Univ. Budapest. 
[seal] 



[173] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE REFORMED THEOLOGICAL ACADEMY, 
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY 

We beg to acknowledge with hearty thanks the receipt 
of the invitation to the centenary celebrations of our Sis- 
ter Institution. With deep regret, however, we must in- 
timate that we are unable to send a special delegate from 
our College to represent us on the occasion— not only 
because of the great distance, but more because the work 
and arrangements of our institution oblige all of us to 
be in Budapest in the month of May. 

The occasion, however, affords us opportunity of ex- 
pressing our warm brotherly interest in and love toward 
our American brethren. 

We know the great service rendered by the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States in the extension of 
Gospel Light, in bearing faithful and unshaken witness 
to Christ, and in the expansion of the life of the great 
American nation. 

But we know and acknowledge with deep gratitude 
that service also, which the ministers of the American 
Presbyterian Church have, from the very first, rendered 
so unweariedly and with such noble disinterestedness on 
behalf of the evangelisation of our emigrant brethren. 
That Church was the first to interest itself in them. 

And now, when one of the most important and most 
cherished of the institutions of that Church is able, by the 
grace of God, to look back on a past of one hundred years, 
we, the Budapest Theological Academy of the Hungarian 
Reformed Church, pray in the spirit of true Christian 
fellowship and brotherhood, that the blessing of God 
may rest abundantly on our Sister Seminary on the occa- 

[174] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

sion of its celebrations; may it, as it has heretofore, 
still stand for many generations as the pillar and ground 
of the faith and of true Christian doctrine and truth, a 
mighty instrument of all such good work as has its 
source in the command of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

On behalf of the Professoriate of the Budapest Re- 
formed Church Theological College, 

Prof. S. B. Pap, 

Principal. 
[seal] 

4th March 1912. 



THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE 

REFORMED COLLEGE, DEBRECZEN, 

HUNGARY 

A debreceni reformatus kollegium Akademiajanak 
theologiai tanarikara orommel fogadta a princetoni 
theologiai seminarium reszerol a meghivast letezesenek 
szazadik evforduloja unnepelyere. 

Az a teny, hogy a theologiai tudomanyok hatalmas 
vara el 1812— tol fogva az Egyesult allamok szabad 
foldjen,— igaz orommel tolti el sziviinket, hiszen ezen 
mindig erosodo intezmeny az ut, igazsag es elet fejedel- 
menek aldasa. 

A keresztyenseg elso szazadaiban virult regi f oiskolak 
Azsiaban es Afrikaban megsziintek letezni,— es ime ! az 
Ujvilagban tamadnak uj foiskolak azokat helyettesiteni 
es potolni a vesztesegeket. Az onok seminariuma hasonlo 

ens: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

testverintezetek kozt kepviseli a presbyterian vilag egyik 
vilagito tornyat. 

A princetoni seminarium irodalmi munkai es tana- 
rainak erdemei ismeretesek Europaban a tudosok elott s 
mindeniitt koztiszteletet vivtak ki. 

Koszonjiik a megtiszteltetest, bogy meghivtak szazados 
iinnepelyokre, de reszint a nagy tavolsag, reszint iskola 
eviinkben epen azon idoszakra eso legsiirgosebb elfog- 
laltsagunk miatt nem lebetseges kepviselot kiildeni 
korlinkbol, banem meg kell elegeclniink ott lelekben, 
elmenkkel jelen lenni csak. 

Fogadjak azert keresztyeni es testveri iidvozletiinket 
azon f orro kivansagunkkal, bogy a nagy Isten viragoz- 
tassa onok seminariumat es gazdagitsa anyagi es szel- 
lemi segitsegevel a megvalto Jezus Krisztus szolgalata- 
ban a jovendo nehez idokben is szilardan megallani. 

Tbeologiai akademiank tanarainak neveben s megbiza- 
sabol 

Debrecenben, a regi kollegium epiileteben, 1912, marc. 
26. 

tiszteletteljesen 

Dr. Geza Lencz, 
theologiai dekdn. 
[seal] 



[translation] 

The Theological Academy of the Reformed College of 
Debreczen in Hungary has had the pleasure of receiving 
the invitation of Princeton Theological Seminary to the 
celebration of the centennial of its existence. 

[176] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The fact that a powerful seat of theological learning 
has existed since 1812 on the free soil of the United 
States fills our hearts with true joy because this ever- 
growing Institute is a visible blessing granted by the 
Prince of "the Way, the Truth and the Life". 

The ancient schools of the first centuries in Asia and 
Africa ceased to live, but, behold! in the new world— 
never dreamed of by the Apostle Paul— rose new ones 
to replace the losses. Your Seminary among its sister 
establishments represents one lighthouse in the Presby- 
terian world. 

Princeton Seminary's literary works and her profes- 
sors' merits are known in Europe among scholars, and 
have acquired common esteem everywhere. 

We are thankful for the honour of being invited to 
your jubilee festival, but on account of the great distance 
and chiefly because of the busy occupations of our scho- 
lastic year, we cannot send a delegate : we must be satis- 
fied with being present in heart and mind. 

Accept therefore our brotherly salutation and our 
warm wish that the great God may extend and enrich 
your Seminary with both material and spiritual bless- 
ings for the service of the Saviour Jesus Christ in the 
important period to come. 

In the name of the Theological Professors, in the Col- 
lege buildings, Debreczen, Hungary, 26 March 1912. 
Respectfully yours, 

Dr. Geza Lencz, 
Dean of the theol. Academy. 



[177] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



THE UNITARIAN THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE, 
KLAUSENBURG, HUNGARY 

We received with great pleasure your kind invitation 
to the celebration which your Theological Seminary 
holds on the 5th, 6th, and 7th of May on the occasion of 
the hundredth anniversary of its establishment. Up to 
this day we hoped to be able to send a representative of 
ours to you. But to our great regret we have been 
prevented from doing so; therefore, we express our 
heartiest greetings to you in this way, wishing from the 
bottom of our hearts that your College may prosper with 
God's help for hundreds and hundreds of years and may 
do the best of work in the interest of the moral and re- 
ligious advance of mankind. 

May God's blessings be and remain upon your Col- 
lege, your works and you all. 

From the meeting of the directory of the Unitarian 
Theological College at Kolozsvar (Klausenburg) held on 
the 27th of March, with kindest regards, 

We remain, 

Yours faithfully, 

Eitgen Gol, 

President. 

Solomon Csif6, Lawrence Galfi, 

Demi of the College. Notary. 



[its: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE REFORMED THEOLOGICAL ACADEMY, 
PAPA, HUNGARY 

Having received the kind invitation of the Directors, 
Trustees and Faculty of your Seminary to take part in 
the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of it, we are very sorry that we cannot be 
represented on that occasion. Nevertheless the profes- 
sors and trustees of our Theological Academy celebrate 
with you in spirit. We wish most heartily that your 
Theological Seminary vivat, crescat, floreat ad multos 
annos ! May God grant to it a most glorious future, that 
it may bring up many faithful pupils as in the past, who 
will contend bravely for the cause of the Gospel and 
count not their life dear unto themselves, so that they 
may finish their course with joy, that is, may propagate 
the Kingdom of God ! 

Believe me, Honoured Sir, in the name of the Senatus 

of the Reformed Theological Academy. 

Lewis Czizmadia, 

h. t. rector professor. 
[seal] 



THE REFORMED THEOLOGICAL ACADEMY, 
SAROSPATAK, HUNGARY 

Theologiai intezetok jubileumi unnepsegeire szolo 
szives meghivasukat megkaptuk. Fogadjak erte legszi- 
vesebb koszonetiinket. 

£179] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBEATION OF 

Nagyon ohajtanank mi abban szemelyesen is reszt 
vexmi mindannyian, vagy legalabb is kiildottseg utjan; 
de nagyon sajnaljuk, bogy nem tehetjiik, reszint a tavol- 
sag miatt, reszint es kiilonosebben azert, mert mar vege 
fele jarunk iskolai feleviinknek. 

De ba szemelyesen nem lebetiink is ott jelen, lelekben 
Onokkel lesziink. Mi ugy erezziik, bogy a nagy foldrajzi 
tavolsag mellett is kozel vagyunk egymashoz. A koz- 
tiink levo szellemi rokonsag, a kozos protestans erdekek, 
kozos torekveseink az evangeliomi vilagossag terjeszte- 
seben, kivaltkepen az a benso viszony, a melyben Onok 
ama magyar reformatus honfitarsainkkal vannak, akik 
sziilofoldjiiktol tavol az Onok es az Onok presbyteria- 
nus ama mi honfitarsainkrol valo szives gondoskodasa— 
mindez a legszorosabb kapcsolatot kepezi Onok kozott es 
mi kozottiink. 

Fogadjak bat testveri sziviinkbol szarmazo legszi- 
vesebb iidvozletiinket, Princetoni tbeologiai intezetok 
jubileuma alkalmabol. 

Oszinte tisztelettel 

a sarospataki ref. tbeologiai akademia, annak 
tanarai sazok neveben 

Nagy Bela, 

dekdn. 

[translation] 

Your kind invitation to the jubilee-solemnities of your 
theological Seminary reached us duly and we express our 
heartiest thanks for it. 

We all should like to participate in it personally or by 
deputation at least, but we are very sorry that we are 
not able to do so, partly because of the great distance, 

[180 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

partly and especially because we are nearly at the end 
of our second semester. 

Though we cannot be present there personally, we will 
be with all our soul with you. In spite of the great 
geographical distance we feel we are near to each other. 
The spiritual relationship, the common interests of 
Protestantism, our common efforts in spreading the 
evangelical light and especially that intimate relation 
existing between you and our Hungarian Reformed 
fellow-countrymen living in your state, far from their 
native land, and the kindness of your Presbyterian 
Church in taking care of them— these all make the closest 
connection between you and ourselves. 

Receive therefore our kindest greetings coming out of 
our brotherly hearts on the occasion of the jubilee of 
your Theological Seminary of Princeton. Vivat, crescat, 
floreat— ad maiorem Dei gloriam! 

Yours very sincerely, 

The Reformed Theological Academy of Saros- 
patak, its professors, and in their name. 

Bela Nagy, 

Dean. 

20th April, 1912. 

[seal] 



THE EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL ACADEMY, 
SOPRON (OEDENBOURG), HUNGARY 

As it is not in our power to be represented on the sol- 
emn one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of 
your Faculty, we send, with many thanks for your kind 

[181] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

invitation, our heartiest congratulations and our best 
wishes for the new century of your Seminary. 

For the Evangelical Theological Academy: Sopron 
(Oedenbourg), March 30, 1912. 

Ch. Proehle, 
Ant. Bancso, Prof, and Secretary. 

Director. 

[seal] 

THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY OF THE EOYAL 

BOHEMIAN UNIVERSITY, PRAGUE, 

BOHEMIA 

Bohoslovecka fakulta c. k. ceske Karlo-Ferdinandovy 
university v Praze, jsouc si dobfe vedoma zasluh jichz 
"The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America at Princeton, New Jer- 
sey" za sto let sveho trvani o povzneseni kfestanstvi si 
ziskal, vzkazuje temuz slovutnemu Senrinari ke dnum 
5.-7. kvetna t. r., kdy sto let sveho trvani oslavovati bude, 
srdecne blahopf ani, zadajic mu na Bohu, aby i v pf istich 
dobach kvetl a se vzmahal ku blahu vlasti a k prospechu 
kfestanstva a jsa vzdy veren idealum slavnych zaklada- 
telu svych, sir il ideu kf estanskou, kulturu a humanitii. 

Bekujice srdecne za Vase mile a cestne pozvani, 
prosime, aby slovutny bohoslovecky seminar blahoprani 
nase pfivetive pfijati racil. 

V Praze dne 22. budna leta Pane 1912. 

Prof. dv. Al. Soldat, 

8. c. dekan. 
[seal] 

[1821] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

[translation] 

Theologica Facultas c. r. bohemicae Carolo-Ferdi- 
nandea Universitatis Pragae, haud immemor meritorum, 
quae "The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America at Princeton, 
New Jersey" per hos centum annos ad rem christianam 
augendam et amplificandam sibi paravit, eidem celeber- 
rimo Seminario ad dies 5.-7. Maji a. c, quibus centenaria 
sua celebrabit, gratulatur optimisque ominibus prosequi- 
tur, exoptans, ut etiam in posterum floreat et augeatur 
ad salutem patriae, rei christianae incrementum sem- 
perque clarissimorum Fundatorum suorum rationes se- 
cutmn ideam christianam, cultum atque humanitatem 
propaget. 

Pro benevola et honorifica invitatione sinceras gratias 
agentes, rogamus, ut celeberrimum theologicum Semi- 
narium gratulationem nostram humanissime accipiat. 
Pragae Bohemorum a. d. VIII. Kalendas Maji a. D. 1912. 



KNOX COLLEGE, 
TORONTO 

I have presented the gracious invitation from Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary to the Faculty of Knox Col- 
lege. 

Our Faculty is not an official body with power to 
appoint a representative, but we have decided to ask the 
Board of Management of Knox College to appoint Pro- 

[183] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

fessor James Ballantyne, D.D., as our representative at 
the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of 
the Establishment of Princeton Theological Seminary. 
Our Board does not meet until the first week in April, 
but you may be assured that this appointment will be 
made and may place Professor Ballantyne's name upon 
your list as the one who will represent Knox College. 

With congratulations on the great history and the 
great work of Princeton during the past hundred years, 

I am, 

Yours faithfully, 

Alfred Gandier, 

Principal. 

29th February, 1912. 



QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY, 
KINGSTON, ONTARIO 

I beg to advise that at a meeting of the Senate of 
Queen's University held yesterday, the 13th instant, the 
Reverend W. G. Jordan, B.A., D.D., Professor of He- 
brew and Old Testament Criticism, was appointed to 
represent the University at the celebration of the One 
Hundredth Anniversary of the Theological Seminary of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica, at Princeton, New Jersey. 

Yours sincerely, 

George Y. Chown, 

Registrar. 
March 14, 1912. 

[184: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE, 
MONTREAL 

The Faculty of the Presbyterian College, Montreal, 
have much pleasure in accepting the courteous invitation 
of the Princeton Theological Seminary to be represented 
at the celebration of the hundredth anniversary of its 
establishment, and have named the Principal as their 
delegate with the Rev. Prof. R. E. Welsh, D.D., as 
alternate. 

I have the honor to be, 

Yours very sincerely, 

John Scrimgee, 

Principal. 
February 16th, 1912. 



MANITOBA COLLEGE, 
WINNIPEG 

The Senate of Manitoba College, Winnipeg, congratu- 
late the Theological Seminary of Princeton on the at- 
tainment of its centenary, and have appointed the Rev. 
Dr. Baird, Acting-Principal of Manitoba College, as 
delegate to represent it at the coming celebration in May. 

J. Dick Fleming, 
Secretary of Senate. 
15th March, 1912. 

[185 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

WESTMINSTER HALL, 
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Please excuse delay in replying to your very kind invi- 
tation to Westminster Hall to be represented at the one 
hundredth anniversary of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. I had hoped to be in the East about that time, but 
now I find that to be impossible. We have appointed as 
our representative, Rev. A. J. MacGillivray, M.A., D.D., 
Merton, Ont., one of your own graduates and one of the 
first two D.D.'s of our College. 

Thanking you for the invitation and with best wishes 
for the success of your celebration, 

Sincerely yours, 

John Mackay, 

Principal. 
April 20th, 1912. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY OP TRINITY 
COLLEGE, TORONTO 

A few days ago I received from you the very kind invi- 
tation given by the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church of the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey, to the Faculty of Theology of 
the University of Trinity College, Toronto, to be repre- 
sented by a delegate on the occasion of the Celebration 
of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the establishment 
of the said Seminary, such celebration to be held on 5th, 
6th, and 7th May, 1912. 

[186 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

In response to this invitation we have very much plea- 
sure in nominating as our delegate the Reverend E. 
Vicars Stevenson, M.A., graduate of this University, 
whose present address is 130 East Sixth Street, Plain- 
field, N. J. 

With sincere thanks for the courtesy of your invita- 
tion, and with all best wishes for the success of the Cele- 
bration, and for the continued prosperity of your Theo- 
logical Seminary, 

I have the honour to remain, 

Faithfully yours, 

T. C. P. Macklem, 

Provost. 
April 22, 1912. 



WYCLIFFE COLLEGE, 
TORONTO 

The President, Principal and Council of Wycliffe 
College, Toronto, regret that it will not be possible for 
them to accept the kind invitation of the Directors, Trus- 
tees and Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary 
to be represented at the one hundredth anniversary of 
the establishment of that noble institution, owing to the 
absence of the Principal in Europe, and the fact that the 
other officers of the Council and Faculty will be other- 
wise engaged. They desire to express their deep sense 
of appreciation of the kind act of the Authorities of the 
Princeton Seminary in inviting them to take part on 
this most auspicious occasion. They hope and pray that 
the proceedings may be greatly owned and blessed of 

C1873 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

God, and that the noble institution which is celebrating 
its one hundredth birthday may be long favored by God 
with the continuance of ever deepening and most useful 
service in these days of golden opportunity on our North 
American Continent. 
11th April, 1912. 



C188] 



RESPONSES FROM THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 
IN THIS COUNTRY 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OP THE 

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA, 

NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY 

The Faculty of the Theological Seminary of the Re- 
formed Church in America directs me to acknowledge 
with thanks the receipt of an invitation to be repre- 
sented at the one hundredth anniversary of the founding 
of the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States at Princeton, N. J., on the fifth, 
sixth, and seventh of May next. I am also instructed by 
the Faculty to inform you that the undersigned has been 
chosen as their delegate. It will give me great pleasure 
to be present. 

Yours very sincerely, 

J. Preston Searle, 

President of the Faculty. 



ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY AND 

ECCLESIASTICAL SEMINARY, 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

The President and Faculty of St. Mary's University 
and Ecclesiastical Seminary greatly appreciate the 
honor of the invitation to participate in the celebration 
of the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey. 

While for reasons which will he doubtless properly 
appreciated they cannot send a representative on that 
occasion, they wish to extend their hearty congratula- 
tions to the Princeton Theological Seminary on its emi- 
nent services to religion by its high and conservative 
scholarship and particularly by its able and unswerving 
support of the Divinity of Our Lord, and they heartily 
wish it continued and increased influence in this noble 
cause. 

E. R. Dyer, D.D., 

President. 

February 29th, 1912. 



THE XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
XENIA, OHIO 

I am directed by the Faculty of the Xenia Theological 
Seminary to say that Prof. W. G. Moorehead, D.D., 
LL.D., has been appointed to represent this Seminary at 
the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of 
the Princeton Theological Seminary, May 5-7, 1912. 

Thanking you for the honor extended by your invita- 
tion, I am, 

Very truly yours, 

Joseph Kyle, 
Secretary of Faculty. 
April 8, 1912. 

£192 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



HARTWICK SEMINARY, 
HARTWICK, 
NEW YORK 

Thanks for your kind invitation to have Hartwick 
Seminary represented at the coming Centennial of 
Princeton Theological Seminary in May, 1912. It would 
afford us as a Faculty great pleasure to be represented 
personally by one of our number at that interesting anni- 
versary, but inasmuch as that will be impracticable, I, as 
the dean of the Theological Faculty and as the represen- 
tative of the oldest Lutheran Theological School in 
America, hereby extend to the Princeton Theological 
Seminary our cordial greetings and good wishes. We 
celebrated our Centennial in 1897, and like Princeton, 
we represent the old theology of sin and salvation. May 
your Institution, which has already attained such distin- 
guished prominence as a center of Theological learning, 
continue to send forth into the great harvest field an 
increasing number of men richly endowed and fully 
equipped for extending the kingdom of our common 
Lord and Saviour. 

Yours fraternally, 

Alfred Hiller, 

Bean. 
February 23, 1912. 



[193] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE MORAVIAN COLLEGE AND THEOLOGI- 
CAL SEMINARY, BETHLEHEM, 
PENNSYLVANIA 

The announcement of the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the establishment of your institu- 
tion and the courteous invitation extended the above 
named institution to be represented on that auspicious 
occasion came to hand in due time. For various reasons 
a reply could not be sent ere this. At a meeting held this 
morning, the faculty directed that thankful acknowledg- 
ment be made of the courtesy extended and elected the 
undersigned to be its delegate during the festal days. 

With heartiest greetings and hoping that the celebra- 
tion may mean all for Princeton that is expected of so 
interesting an occasion, 

Yours very sincerely, 

W. N. Schwarze, 

The Resident Professor. 
May 1, 1912. 



ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

The Faculty of Andover Theological Seminary have 
the honor to acknowledge the invitation of the Directors, 
Trustees, and Faculty of the Theological Seminary of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica, at Princeton, New Jersey, to be represented by a 

£194] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

delegate at the celebration of the one-hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Seminary by the 
General Assembly, on the fifth, sixth, and seventh of 
May, nineteen hundred and twelve, and to state that the 
Reverend President Albert Parker Fitch, D.D., has been 
appointed as the Andover representative on that occa- 
sion. 

On behalf of the Faculty, 

John Winthrop Platnee, 

Secretary. 



UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

I write in the name of the faculty of Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary in Virginia to express to the directors, 
trustees and faculty of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey, the thanks of our faculty for the 
invitation to have this institution represented by a dele- 
gate at the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the establishment of your venerable school on Sunday, 
Monday and Tuesday, the fifth, sixth and seventh of 
May, nineteen hundred and twelve, and to say that the 
faculty has appointed the Rev. Thos. R. English, D.D., 
Henry Young Professor of Biblical Literature and the 
Interpretation of the New Testament, to represent us on 
this interesting occasion and has appointed the Rev. 
Chas. C. Hersman, D.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of 

[195 1 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Biblical Literature and the Interpretation of the New 
Testament, as his alternate. 

Sincerely yours, 

W. W. Moore, 
March 8, 1912. President. 



BANGOR THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
BANGOR, MAINE 

Will the venerated institution at Princeton pardon the 
President of a sister institution, herself in her ninety- 
sixth year, for this— almost unpardonable— negligence ? 

Our Faculty accepted with appreciation the invitation 
for the Exercises of May 5, 6, 7, and named me to be their 
representative, and, alas ! in extreme pressure of many 
matters, acknowledgment and notification got neglected 
and overlooked. I beg a thousand pardons. 

If I may be forgiven, and my presence after such a 
lapse will be acceptable, please send me, on receipt of 
this, a collect telegram, and I shall plan to be with you. 
I may have to arrive on Monday, but will do my best. 

This Seminary has much in common with Princeton ; 
we are trying to do a reasonably conservative and a dis- 
tinctly constructive work. Also, I grew up in New Jer- 
sey, in one of the Oranges, and in that neighborhood my 
ancestry, from 1685 had its life. 

With sincere contrition, I remain, 

Respectfully and truly yours, 

David N. Beach, 
April 30, 1912. President. 

C196: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 

NEW YORK CITY 

The Faculty of the General Theological Seminary con- 
gratulate the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian 
Church at Princeton, New Jersey, upon the approach of 
its Centennial Celebration and, in response to its gra- 
cious invitation to be represented on that occasion, have 
appointed as delegates the Reverend Arthur Prime 
Hunt, M.A., B.D., Professor of Christian Ethics, and 
the Reverend Dickinson S. Miller, Ph.D., Professor of 
Christian Apologetics, in the General Theological Semi- 
nary. 

Chaeles N. Shepard, 

Secretary. 

February 16, 1912. 



AUBURN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
AUBURN, NEW YORK 

Auburn Theological Seminary salutes the Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America located at Princeton, New Jersey ; and 
presents congratulations upon the completion of one 
hundred years of noble service in the cause of sacred 
learning and of the Christian Religion; and offers best 
wishes for ever-enlarging usefulness. 

[197: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, COLGATE UNI- 
VERSITY, HAMILTON, NEW YORK 

The Faculty of Colgate Theological Seminary accept 
with pleasure the invitation of the Directors, Trustees, 
and Faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary to be 
represented by a delegate at the One-hundredth Anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Seminary on the 
fifth, sixth, and seventh of May. We have appointed 
Prof. David F. Estes, Hamilton, N. Y., as such repre- 
sentative. 

Sincerely yours, 

George R. Berry, 
Secretary of the Seminary Faculty. 
February 21, 1912. 



THE DIVINITY SCHOOL OF YALE UNI- 
VERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 

The Yale University Divinity School has received 
with satisfaction the invitation to be present at the cele- 
bration of the one hundredth anniversary of the estab- 
lishment of the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America to be held 
on the 5th, 6th and 7th of May next. At a meeting of its 
Faculty held on February 15th it voted that Professor 
Williston Walker be the delegate of the Divinity School 
on this occasion. 

Wishing you all success and congratulating you on the 

[198] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

approaching completion of one hundred years of dis- 
tinguished service in the advancement of the Kingdom 
of God, I am, on behalf of the Faculty, 
Yours very truly, 

Williston Walker, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

February 16, 1912. 



THE ALLEGHENY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
NORTH SIDE, PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 

On behalf of the Faculty of the Allegheny Theological 
Seminary (United Presbyterian) I express appreciation 
of the invitation to have our Seminary represented at 
the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of 
Princeton Theological Seminary. Owing to our com- 
mencement week being fixed for the same date, it will 
not be practicable for any member of the Faculty to be 
present at Princeton on this interesting occasion, this 
very much to our regret. With the many friends of 
Princeton Theological Seminary we share heartily in 
devout thanksgiving over the eminently fruitful history 
of the institution and in earnest prayer that the favor of 
the Great Head of the Church may attend its work from 
year to year and give it an increasingly prosperous 

future. 

Fraternally yours, 

John McNaugher, 
President of the Faculty. 
20th March, 1912. 

C199] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE NEWTON THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTION, 
NEWTON CENTRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

The Faculty of the Newton Theological Institution 
have received with pleasure the invitation to be repre- 
sented at the celebration of the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of the establishment of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary on the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen 
hundred and twelve. 

They have requested their President, the Reverend 
Professor George Edwin Horr, D.D., to represent them 
on this occasion and bear their congratulations to the 
Seminary. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE RE- 
FORMED CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES, 
LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA 

In behalf of the Faculty of our Theological Seminary, 
I am pleased to acknowledge the receipt of the invitation 
extended to us to attend the One Hundredth Anniversary 
of your institution. As President of our Theological 
Seminary, I have been chosen by my colleagues to repre- 
sent our Faculty on that occasion. 

I regret very much that the dates which are fixed for 
your Anniversary services are the same as those covered 
by our Seminary Commencement dates. Notwithstand- 
ing the claims of our own Seminary upon my time, I 
hope to be able to arrange to be present at least part of 

H2003 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

the time set apart for your One Hundredth Anniversary 
services. 

Yours very truly, 

John C. Bowman, 

President. 
March 8th, 1912. 



LUTHERAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
GETTYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 

The Faculty of the Evangelical Lutheran Theological 
Seminary at Gettysburg, Pa., beg leave to acknowledge 
the honor of the invitation to be represented on the occa- 
sion of the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the founding of Princeton Seminary. 

They have appointed me as their delegate, and it will 
give me great pleasure to be present. 

Our Seminary (founded in 1826) is under obligations 
to your more venerable institution in that our first Presi- 
dent, Dr. S. S. Schmucker, was educated in Theology at 
Princeton. 

Fraternally yours, 

J. A. SlNGMASTER, 

President. 
March 14, 1912. 



C201H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

NORTH SIDE, PITTSBURGH, 

PENNSYLVANIA 

The Western Theological Seminary accepts with plea- 
sure the invitation of Princeton Theological Seminary 
to be represented at the celebration of the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of the establishment of Princeton Semi- 
nary. The Faculty of Western Seminary has chosen as 
its representative on that occasion the President, Rev. 
James Anderson Kelso, Ph.D., D.D. 

William R. Farmer, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
March 7, 1912. 



COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 

I am directed by the Faculty of the Theological Semi- 
nary of the Synods of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama 
and Florida, usually known as Columbia Theological 
Seminary, to express the Faculty's appreciation of your 
kindness in tendering an invitation to attend the exer- 
cises connected with the one hundredth anniversary of 
the establishment of Princeton Seminary. The Faculty 
of Columbia Seminary accepts the invitation and ap- 
points as delegate to represent this Seminary on the 
occasion named, Henry Alexander White, A.M., Ph.D., 
D.D., LL.D., Professor of New Testament Literature 

t:202: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

and Exegesis in Columbia Theological Seminary, and a 
member of the Class of 1889 of Princeton Seminary. 

Sincerely, 

Henry A. White, 
Secretary of Faculty. 
February 28, 1912. 



LANE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 

The Lane Theological Seminary acknowledges the in- 
vitation to be represented by a delegate at the celebration 
of the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of 
the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, 
May fifth, sixth and seventh, nineteen hundred and 
twelve, and has appointed the Reverend Professor Ed- 
ward Mack, D.D., as its delegate. 



Mccormick theological seminary, 
chicago, illinois 

The Faculty of McCormick Theological Seminary is 
in receipt of the invitation to be present at the celebra- 
tion of the one hundredth anniversary of the establish- 
ment of Princeton Theological Seminary. 

We take pleasure in accepting the invitation and shall 

[203 ] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

be represented by the Reverend Professor Andrew C. 
Zenos, D.D. 

Yours very truly, 

A. S. Carrier, 
February 21, 1912. Secretary of the Faculty. 



HARTFORD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 

The Faculty of the Hartford Theological Seminary 
have received the invitation of the Directors, Trustees 
and Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary, that 
they be represented at the celebration of the One Hun- 
dredth Anniversary of the establishment of Princeton 
Theological Seminary by the General Assembly. 

The Faculty have appointed one who is highly hon- 
ored by both Seminaries, to represent them on this occa- 
sion, namely, the Rev. M. W. Jacobus, D.D., Dean of the 
Hartford Theological Seminary, and an alumnus of 
Princeton Seminary. 

Yours sincerely, 

W. Douglas Mackenzie, 

March 1st, 1912. President. 



OBERLIN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

OBERLIN COLLEGE, OBERLIN, 

OHIO 

Oberlin Theological Seminary, the Theological De- 
partment of Oberlin College, accepts with pleasure the 

[204] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

invitation of the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Chnrch in the United States of America, at 
Princeton, New Jersey, to be represented at its One 
Hundredth Anniversary, the 5th, 6th and 7th of May, 
1912. The delegate representing Oberlin Seminary will 
be Professor Kemper Fullerton, A.M. (Princeton), Pro- 
fessor of Old Testament Language and Literature. 
For the Faculty, 

G. W. Fiske, 

March 16, 1912. Junior Dean. 



UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
NEW YORK CITY 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by the 
Faculty of this Seminary, of the invitation to be repre- 
sented on the occasion of the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the establishment of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, on 
the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen hundred 
and twelve, and to signify the acceptance of the invita- 
tion. 

The Faculty directs me to inform you that they have 
appointed the Reverend Professor Francis Brown, 
Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., D.Litt., President of the Faculty, 
as their representative on this occasion. 
Yours very truly, 

Charles R. Gellett, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
February 22, 1912. 

[205H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBEATION OF 

MEADVILLE THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
MEADVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

At a meeting of the Faculty of the Meadville Theologi- 
cal School held on Tuesday, March 5, 1912, it was voted 
that the President, Franklin C. Southworth, D.D., be 
requested to represent the school as a Delegate at the 
celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the es- 
tablishment of the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey, by the General Assembly, on 
Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the fifth, sixth and sev- 
enth of May, nineteen hundred and twelve. With con- 
gratulations upon the approaching event and wishes for 
a pleasant celebration, 

I remain sincerely yours, 

Waltek C. Green, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
March 6, 1912. 



WITTENBEEG COLLEGE, 

HAMMA DIVINITY SCHOOL, 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 

I am authorized by the Faculty of our Seminary to 
express to you our thanks for the invitation to send a 
representative from our school to attend the celebration 
of the One Hundredth Anniversary of Princeton Semi- 
nary. I would say that I have been appointed to repre- 

[206: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

sent our Seminary at the Princeton Centennial. If I am 
unable to be present, as I now hope to be in attendance, 
I shall endeavor to have some one take my place. 

Sincerely yours, 

D. H. Bauslin, 

March 28, 1912. Dean. 



GERMAN (EDEN) EVANGELICAL MISSOURI 
COLLEGE, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 

Will you, please, excuse me for not answering sooner? 

The members of our faculty have been deliberating on 
the invitation of Princeton Seminary, but as no conclu- 
sion was reached then, the matter was laid aside for some 
time. 

We cannot, however, make arrangements to make it 
possible for any member of our faculty to be absent just 
at that time, and so we are sorry that we cannot send a 
delegate. 

Yours truly, 

W. W. Becker, 
April 6, 1912. President. 



ROCHESTER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

On behalf of the Faculty of this Seminary I beg to ac- 
knowledge your invitation extended to us to send a dele- 

t207n 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

gate to the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary 
of Princeton Theological Seminary. We congratulate 
you upon this event. We regret, however, very much 
that we cannot send a delegate. Our anniversaries come 
on the exact dates of your celebration. 
I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

J. W. A. Stewart, 
Dean of the Faculty. 
March 7, 1912. 



DUBUQUE GERMAN COLLEGE AND SEMI- 
NARY, DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Dubuque German College and Seminary acknowledges 
the kind invitation of Princeton Theological Seminary 
to participate in the celebration of its One Hundredth 
Anniversary. At the annual meeting of the Board of 
Directors, Dr. William Hiram Foulkes, D.D., of the Rut- 
gers Presbyterian Church, New York City, was ap- 
pointed a delegate for this occasion. Dr. Foulkes is the 
President of our Board and, as such, is qualified to rep- 
resent our Institution. 

With warm felicitations and sincere good wishes for 
the continued prosperity of Princeton Seminary, 
Respectfully yours, 

William Graham, 

Secretary of the Board. 
April 25th, 1912. 

[208] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

BERKELEY DIVINITY SCHOOL, 
MIDDLETOWN, 
CONNECTICUT 

We have received the courteous invitation of the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at 
Princeton to be represented at the celebration of the one 
hundredth anniversary of its establishment; and we de- 
sire to express our thanks for the same. And I have the 
honor to say that our President, the Bishop of Connecti- 
cut, and our Faculty desire me, as the Dean of the School, 
to represent this institution on that occasion, and that 
I accept the invitation as desired. 

Very truly yours, 

22 February, 1912. SAMUEL HaKT, 

Bean. 

GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE, 
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 

It is my privilege and honor to bring from the Trus- 
tees and the Faculty of the Garrett Biblical Institute, at 
Evanston, Illinois, our fraternal greeting and most cor- 
dial congratulations to the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
at Princeton, New Jersey. 

We share the pride of all the Churches in the noble 
record of your hundred years. We acknowledge with 
keen appreciation the great work and worth of your 
Faculty whose names are in high esteem in all our theo- 
logical schools, and whose contributions to theological 
literature are prized by all ministers and teachers. The 

£209 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

goodly influences of this Seminary have gone out into all 
the earth and have been a noteworthy power in advanc- 
ing the interests of the Kingdom of God. You have 
kindly welcomed to your halls students from all religious 
denominations, and your genuine courtesy has ever com- 
manded a warm reciprocal affection. Your ample en- 
dowments, your extensive libraries, your learned, able 
and devoted teachers, and the inspirations to high schol- 
arship which suffuse the very air of Princeton have 
brought unspeakable blessing to three generations of the 
American people. Your gospel-trumpet has sent forth 
no uncertain voice. With other Christian schools and 
Churches, we gladly join in devout thanksgiving to the 
Father of mercies for the manifold blessings of the past, 
and in earnest supplication that your prosperity and 
usefulness may increase through all the years to come. 

Milton S. Terry, 
Delegate representing Garrett Biblical Institute. 



EUREKA COLLEGE, DEPARTMENT OF 
SACRED LITERATURE, EUREKA, ILLINOIS 

It is with great regret that we find ourselves unable to 
send a representative to carry personal greetings to 
Princeton Theological Seminary on the occasion of its 
One Hundredth Anniversary. We must, therefore, be 
content to wish for the Theological Seminary the great- 
est prosperity and usefulness. 

Sincerely, 

Charles E. Underwood, 
April 3, 1912. President. 

£210 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY, ALLEGHENY, PENNSYLVANIA 

The invitation to this Seminary to be represented at 
the Centennial of Princeton Theological Seminary has 
been received. Possibly Prof. Richard Cameron Wylie, 
D.D., LL.D., of this Seminary may be present. Any 
further communication you may address to him, West 
Mclntyre Avenue, North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Yours truly, 

D. B. Willson, 



Senior professor. 



February 24, 1912. 



ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY ECCLESIASTICAL 
SEMINARY, COLLEGEVILLE, MINNESOTA 

We have received your kind invitation to attend the 
hundredth anniversary of the establishment of your es- 
teemed Seminary, but regret that it will be impossible 
for us to send a delegate at the time. 

Wishing you continued success in your field of labor, 
I beg to remain, 

Yours truly, 



Alctjin Deutsch, 

Rector. 



February 21, 1912. 



[211] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY, CANTON THEO- 
LOGICAL SCHOOL, CANTON, NEW YORK 

The courteous invitation of Princeton Theological 
Seminary has been received. It gives me pleasure to 
reply that I hope and intend to be present on that occa- 
sion as a representative of the Theological Seminary of 
St. Lawrence University. 

Respectfully yours, 

Henry P. Forbes, 
Dean of Seminary. 
February 27th, 1912. 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

The Faculty of Chicago Theological Seminary accept 
with pleasure the invitation of the Directors, Trustees 
and Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary to 
be represented at the Centennial of the Seminary May 
fifth-seventh, nineteen hundred and twelve, and have 
requested the Rev. George S. Rollins, D.D., Pastor of 
the Hope Congregational Church, Springfield, Mass., to 
represent us on that auspicious occasion. 

On behalf of the Faculty, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Clarence A. Beckwith, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
[212] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY SEMINARY OF OUR 

LADY OF ANGELS, NIAGARA FALLS, 

NEW YORK 

President Edward J. Walsh, of Niagara University 
Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, begs to acknowledge 
the favor of the invitation to attend the Centenary Exer- 
cises of the Princeton Theological Seminary, and to 
render sincere thanks for the courtesy. He will not be 
able to accept, but he wishes a very successful celebration 
on this significant occasion. 

February 29, 1912. 



SEABURY DIVINITY SCHOOL, 
FARIBAULT, MINNESOTA 

At a meeting of the Faculty of Seabury Divinity 
School, March 15, 1912, the Reverend William Austin 
Smith of the class of 1898, now Rector of Christ Church, 
Springfield, Massachusetts, was duly appointed as a 
delegate to represent Seabury Divinity School at the 
Centennial Celebration of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, May fifth, 
sixth and seventh, nineteen hundred and twelve. He has 
been notified of his appointment and we hope that he 
will be able to be present. 

Sincerely yours, 

Elmer E. Lofstrom, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
March 19, 1912. 

C213] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE MISSION HOUSE, 
PLYMOUTH, WISCONSIN 

To the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, at Princeton, New Jer- 
sey:— In Christ Jesus dearly beloved Fathers and 
Brethren: 
We hereby acknowledge the receipt of your invitation 
to the Theological Seminary of the Mission House to be 
represented at the celebration of the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of the establishment of the Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America, at Princeton, New Jersey. 

We regret that causes beyond our control render it 
almost or quite impossible for us to send a delegate to 
take part in the celebration in the first week in May. 

We regret this the more, as we cherish the most kindly 
feelings toward your Seminary, and owe a debt of grati- 
tude to the great teachers of our Reformed faith, the 
Alexanders, the Hodges, Miller, Green and others, whose 
writings have been a source of instruction and encour- 
agement both to our teachers and to our students. 

We, therefore, most gratefully acknowledge these 
benefits derived from your Seminary; and, in so doing, 
we bespeak for you in the new century, upon which, in 
the providence of God, you are now entering, the bless- 
ing, protection and guidance of the triune God ; and we 
trust and pray, that, in this age of apostasy, your Semi- 
nary may continue to be a bulwark against the on- 
slaughts of the enemy that is so violently attacking the 
Church and the Gospel of our blessed Lord and Saviour 

[214] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Jesus Christ ; and that your professors may still, as in 
the past, and even more, if that be possible, prove cham- 
pions of the faith which was once delivered to the saints. 

In the years to come, our eyes shall still be turned 
toward Princeton, and our ears shall hearken for the 
public expression of the sage Christian instructions and 
counsels delivered in your halls. 

That the "Lord may bless you out of Zion, and may 
do to you exceeding abundantly above all that you ask 
or think" is the sincere wish of the Faculty of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Mission House of the Reformed 
Church in the United States. 

E. A. Hofee, President, 
Frank Grether, Secretary. 

February 23rd, 1912. 

[seal] 

THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY, LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

I am due you an apology for a serious oversight. In 
some way the invitation to our Faculty to send a repre- 
sentative to the celebration of the One Hundredth Anni- 
versary of Princeton Seminary was overlooked. At our 
last Faculty meeting, however, action was taken, ap- 
pointing me as our official representative to the celebra- 
tion. Asking your pardon for the delay, I am 
Yours sincerely, 

E. Y. Mullins, 

President. 

April 5, 1912. 

£2151] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

I desire to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation 
from the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary to Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary, to be represented by a delegate 
at the Hundredth Anniversary of the establishment 
of the Seminary by the General Assembly, on Sunday, 
Monday, and Tuesday, the 5th, 6th, and 7th of May next. 
I would say that our General Faculty has appointed 
President Gustav Andreen, Ph.D., to represent our insti- 
tution on that occasion. 

Thanking you for this invitation, and assuring you 
that we highly appreciate the honor you have conferred 
upon us, I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

E. F. Bartholomew, 

Acting President. 
April 1, 1912. 



CENTRAL WESLEYAN COLLEGE, 
WARRENTON, MISSOURI 

In reply to your cordial invitation to send a represen- 
tative of our Theological Seminary to be present at the 
celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the es- 
tablishment of the Princeton Theological Seminary, I 
desire herewith to express our sincere thanks. At the 

C216] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

same time I would express our regrets that it will be 
impossible for any one of our professors or officers to be 
present. However if it is desired, we shall be glad to be 
represented by Rev. F. J. Hubach, Phillipsburg, New 
Jersey. He is an alumnus of our school and has both the 
A.B. and the B.D. 

Thanking you again most sincerely, 

Very truly yours, 

Henry Vosholl, 
Secretary of the Faculty. 
February 26, 1912. 



LUTHERAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
MOUNT AIRY, PHILADELPHIA 

The Faculty of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Philadelphia hereby acknowledges the receipt of an invi- 
tation to be represented at the One Hundredth Anniver- 
sary of the establishment of the Theological Seminary 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States at 
Princeton, N. J., to be celebrated on the fifth, sixth and 
seventh of May, and has instructed me to inform you 
that Rev. Henry Eyster Jacobs, D.D., S.T.D., LL.D., 
Dean of our Seminary and Chairman of its Faculty, will 
be our representative on that interesting occasion. 

Yours truly, 

Jacob Fry, 
Secretary of Faculty. 
February 22, 1912. 

C 21711 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

DE LANCEY DIVINITY SCHOOL, 
GENEVA, NEW YORK 

The Trustees of the De Lancey Divinity School beg to 
acknowledge the courtesy of the most kind invitation of 
the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States at Princeton, N. J., to send a delegate on the occa- 
sion of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the establish- 
ment of the Seminary at Princeton, May 5-7, 1912, and 
hope to be able to send such a delegate, to be appointed 
at a later meeting of the Trustees. 

I am, faithfully yours, 

Thomas B. Berry, 
March 1, 1912. Warden. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO DIVINITY 
SCHOOL, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

The Faculty of the Divinity School of the University 
of Chicago regrets the impossibility of sending a dele- 
gate to participate in the celebration of the One Hun- 
dredth Anniversary of the founding of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary. The Faculty wishes, however, to ex- 
press its hearty felicitations on this occasion, and to 
share in the universal appreciation of the services ren- 
dered by Princeton Theological Seminary to its denomi- 
nation and to the cause of learning. 

Harry Pratt Judson, President, 
April 5, 1912. Shailer Mathews, Dean, 

[218] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ATLANTA BAPTIST COLLEGE DIVINITY 
SCHOOL, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

The invitation of the Theological Seminary to attend 
the Celebration of its One Hundredth Anniversary has 
been received and is deeply appreciated by Atlanta Bap- 
tist College Divinity School. I cannot say just yet 
whether it will be practicable for me to attend and shall 
have to write you later more definitely. 

Sincerely yours, 

John Hope, 

President. 
February 17, 1912. 



DREW THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
MADISON, NEW JERSEY 

The Faculty of Drew Theological Seminary, recogniz- 
ing the honor of invitation to share in the celebration of 
the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Establishment 
of Princeton Theological Seminary on Sunday, Monday 
and Tuesday, the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nine- 
teen hundred and twelve, have designated the Reverend 
President Henry A. Buttz, D.D., LL.D., to represent 
them and to extend their most cordial greetings and 
felicitations. 

By order of the Faculty, 

Chas. F. Sitteely, 

Secretary. 
March 1, 1912. 

[219] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

EPISCOPAL THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

The Faculty of the Episcopal Theological School in 
Cambridge acknowledge with thanks the kind invitation 
of the Princeton Theological Seminary, and will send 
as their delegate to the celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary the Rev. Prof. Henry Sylvester Nash, D.D. 

February 17, 1912. 



CROZER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 

I have the honor to reply to the invitation to send a 
delegate to the One Hundredth Anniversary that our 
Faculty voted to send the President, M. G. Evans, D.D., 
thanking you for the invitation, and directing me to com- 
municate to you their action. 

Alvah S. Hob art, 

Secretary. 
February 22, 1912. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, 
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH, 

SEWANEE, TENNESSEE 

It is with keen regret that I find that it will be impos- 
sible for our Theological Department to be represented 

[220] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

at your anniversary celebration. I had hoped that some 
of us might be able to arrange it. 

With best wishes and heartiest congratulations, I am 
very faithfully yours, 

C. K. Benedict, 
Dean Theological Department. 
March 20th, 1912. 



THE GERMAN THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 
OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY, 
BLOOMFIELD, NEW JERSEY 

Your kind invitation extended to ' ' The German Theo- 
logical School of Newark, N. J." to attend the one hun- 
dredth anniversary celebration of the Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary has been received and was duly sub- 
mitted to the Faculty at their regular meeting on March 
4th, 1912. The Faculty have appointed the Rev. Henry 
J. Weber, Ph.D., D.D., Chairman of the Faculty, to rep- 
resent our School. 

Respectfully yours, 

Charles T. Hock, 

Secretary. 
March 7th, 1912. 



PACIFIC THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Pacific Theological Seminary gratefully acknowledges 
the invitation of Princeton Theological Seminary and 

[221] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

appreciates the honor. It regrets that by reason of dis- 
tance it cannot be represented by a delegate on the occa- 
sion of the one-hundredth anniversary, the fifth, sixth 
and seventh of May, and sends its earnest wishes for the 
success of that event and the long prosperity of Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. 

March 1st, 1912. 



WOODSTOCK COLLEGE, 
WOODSTOCK, MARYLAND 

The President and Faculty of Woodstock College are 
sincerely grateful to the Directors, Trustees and Faculty 
of Princeton Theological Seminary for the honor of 
their kind invitation to be present at the celebration of 
the one hundredth anniversary of Princeton's establish- 
ment, and regret that a partial coincidence with George- 
town's celebration and examination duties at home will 
prevent them from being present. 

Wishing the Princeton Seminary all the blessings of 
heaven needed for a second century of success, I remain, 
Yours sincerely, 

A. J. Maas, S. J., 

President. 
April 15, 1912. 



[222;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

The Faculty of the Theological Seminary of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, at Chicago, 111., acknowledges 
with pleasure the announcement of the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of the Establishment of The Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America at Princeton^ New Jersey, on May 
Fifth, Sixth and Seventh, Nineteen Hundred Twelve. 

The Faculty has designated to represent it on that 
occasion The Reverend Revere Franklin Weidner, D.D., 
LL.D., President. 

By the Faculty, 

Alfred Ramsey, 

March 19, 1912. Secretary. 

ALFRED THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
ALFRED, NEW YORK 

Your invitation to our Seminary to be represented at 
the one hundredth anniversary of Princeton's establish- 
ment is gratefully acknowledged. 

Nothing unforeseen preventing, either President B. C. 
Davis of our University, or myself, will be present. 

Meanwhile accept our congratulations upon Prince- 
ton 's great history, and believe us to be, 
Fraternally yours, 

Arthur E. Main, 

February 18th, 1912. Dean. 

[223] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

HOWARD UNIVERSITY, THEOLOGICAL 

DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

I beg to inform you that the Rev. Dr. Isaac Clark, for 
many years the Dean of the School of Theology of How- 
ard University, has been appointed to represent the 
Board of Trustees and Faculty at the coming Centenary 
of the Theological Seminary of Princeton. 
Very sincerely yours, 

W. P. Thirkield, 

President. 
April 13, 1912. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO THEOLOGICAL SEMI- 
NARY, SAN ANSELMO, CALIFORNIA 

The San Francisco Theological Seminary has received 
with appreciation the invitation to be present at the one 
hundredth anniversary of the founding of Princeton 
Theological Seminary. It will be represented on that 
occasion by its President, the Rev. Warren Hall Landon, 
D.D. 

By order of the Faculty, 

Warren H. Landon, 

President. 
February 23, 1912. 



[224] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

TALLADEGA COLLEGE, THEOLOGICAL 
DEPARTMENT, TALLADEGA, ALABAMA 

The Theological Department of Talladega College re- 
ceived with pleasure the announcement that the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, will 
celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of its establish- 
ment by the General Assembly, on May fifth, sixth and 
seventh, nineteen hundred and twelve, and the invitation 
of the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Seminary 
to be represented on that occasion by a delegate. 

We regret that it will not be practicable for us to send 
a representative to the celebration of this notable anni- 
versary, but extend our congratulations to the Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Princeton upon its long and honored 
service to the Christian Churches of America, and pray 
that for centuries to come it may continue its splendid 
career of training men for the Christian ministry. 

April 1912. 



THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL AND CALVIN 
COLLEGE, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 

Your kind invitation extended to our Faculty to par- 
ticipate in the Centennial Celebration of Princeton 
Theological Seminary was gratefully received and 
brought before our faculty meeting. 

As the secretary of our Faculty, I am instructed to 

[22511 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

thank you for the honor bestowed by your invitation 
upon our young and still small institution ; and to inform 
you that we have appointed as a delegate from our school 
Prof. L. Berkhof . 

He will convey to the Princeton Theological Seminary 
our friendly greetings and heartfelt congratulations. 

May our God bless your honored and worthy Institu- 
tion abundantly in the future for the promotion and 
advancement of His Eternal Kingdom. 

From the Faculty of the Theological School and Cal- 
vin College of the Christian Reformed Church at Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

K. SCHOOLLAND, 

Secretary. 
March 20, 1912. 



WESTMINSTER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND 

In reply to the invitation of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary to send a representative to the one hundredth 
anniversary of that institution, I beg leave to notify you 
that we highly appreciate the honor and have expressed 
it by electing the Secretary of our Faculty, Rev. Claude 
Cicero Douglas, A.M., B.D., to be our representative 
upon that notable occasion. 

Sincerely, 

H. L. Elderdice, 

President. 
February 22nd, 1912. 

C2263 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE TEMPLE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF 
THEOLOGY, PHILADELPHIA 

On behalf of the Faculty of Temple University, 
Department of Theology, I extend to you its felicitations 
upon the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the establishment of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church at Princeton, New Jersey. 

The Faculty also desires me to thank you for inviting 
it to be represented at this centennial by a delegate, and 
has appointed Professor, the Reverend George Handy 
Wailes to be present at the exercises. 
Yours sincerely, 

Walter B. Shumway, 
Dean. 
April 22, 1912. 



WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

The Western Theological Seminary, at Chicago, Illi- 
nois, regrets its inability to accept the kind invitation of 
the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Princeton 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church, to be 
represented on the occasion of its one hundredth anni- 
versary on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the fifth, sixth 
and seventh of May, 1912. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Wm. C. De Witt, 

February 23rd, 1912. Bean. 

C227H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, 

MACLAY COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

I acknowledge with cordial thanks, on behalf of the 
Maclay College of Theology, the invitation to be repre- 
sented by a delegate at the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth annwersary of the establishment of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey. Please convey 
to the directors, trustees and faculty of the Seminary 
our friendly greeting with the earnest wish that your fine 
old Seminary may fill a second century with even more 
good work than has characterized its first. 

We are unable to be represented by a delegate but are 
happy to send this greeting. 

Very sincerely yours, 

E. A. Healy, 

Dean. 

May 3, 1912. 



THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, 

SCHOOL OF SACRED SCIENCES, 

WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Our School of Sacred Sciences acknowledges the re- 
ceipt of the invitation of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary to the celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary 
of its foundation. While it will not be possible for us to 
participate in that event, we extend to all the members of 

[228] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Princeton Theological Seminary our best wishes for 
their personal welfare and we trust that the celebration 
itself will be all that they could desire. 
I remain, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Patrick J. Healy, 
Dean of the Faculty of Theology. 

March 21st, 1912. 



SAINT LEO ABBEY, 
SAINT LEO, FLORIDA 

My dear Mr. Robinson: 

Your Church has done much good in America. Dr. 
Smith, for many years an intimate friend of mine dur- 
ing my missionary experience in Greensboro, N. C, was 
goodness itself. His death was a great loss to Christen- 
dom. 

Will you please act as our delegate during the Cen- 
tenary Celebration? Distance is too great and I have 
not the time to spare. 

I wish you every success. 

Cordially yours, 

Rt. Rev. Abbot Charles. 

17 February, 1912. 



[229] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE SEMINARY OF THE UNITED NORWEGIAN 

LUTHERAN CHURCH, SAINT ANTHONY 

PARK, MINNESOTA 

The Faculty of the Seminary of the United Norwe- 
gian Lutheran Church acknowledge the receipt of an 
invitation to be represented at the celebration of the one 
hundredth anniversary of the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton, N. J. 

We thank you for the invitation and regret that it will 
be impossible for us to send a representative. 

We congratulate the Seminary upon its achievements 
for the Kingdom of Christ and wish it God's richest 
blessings. 

On behalf of the Faculty, 

Carl M. Weswig, 

Secretary. 

April 8, 1912. 

PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
OMAHA, NEBRASKA 

I am writing to acknowledge the receipt of an invita- 
tion from Princeton Seminary to be present, May 5-7, 
1912, at the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniver- 
sary of the founding of the Seminary, and to say that if I 
am unable to be in Princeton at the time it will be a great 
disappointment to me. There are, however, at the pres- 
ent time serious obstacles in the way, principally the 
closing exercises of our Seminary which extend so far 
into the preceding week that it may not be possible to 

£230] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

reach Princeton in time after their conclusion. We hope 
our Seminary may be represented by one of our Profes- 
sors at the Celebration. Four of the members of our 
Faculty are graduates of Princeton Seminary and we 
are very much interested in this great event in the his- 
tory of our Alma Mater. 

Yours cordially, 

A. B. Marshall, 

President. 
February 29, 1912. 



HOUGHTON WESLEYAN METHODIST THEO- 
LOGICAL SEMINARY, HOUGHTON, 

NEW YORK 

The Faculty of the Houghton Wesleyan Methodist 
Seminary accept with pleasure the invitation of the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, N. J., to be rep- 
resented by a delegate at the one hundredth anniversary 
of its establishment by the General Assembly. Prof. H. 
R. Smith has been elected as this delegate. 

March 12, 1912. 



PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF KENTUCKY, LOUISVILLE, 

KENTUCKY 

In response to the invitation extended our Faculty to 
be represented by a Delegate at the celebration of the 

[231] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

one hundredth anniversary of the founding of Princeton 
Theological Seminary, the Faculty appointed some 
weeks ago the Rev. Professor Jesse Lee Cotton, D.D., 
its representative and the bearer of its greetings, of 
which appointment you have, I believe, received infor- 
mation. 

The Faculty desire me, on their behalf, to convey also 
by letter their felicitations on this notable occasion. 

We congratulate your venerable institution on being 
in a sense "the mother of us all," and on your having 
set high standards for all similar institutions that have 
been established within the past hundred years. 

We congratulate you on the illustrious names that 
adorn the roll of your Professors, whose piety, scholar- 
ship, teaching power, and writings have carried the 
name and fame of Princeton throughout the world. 

We congratulate you on the unwavering fidelity of the 
Seminary to the Holy Scriptures, the Reformed Faith, 
and the Presbyterian Church, with which has been 
united a large-hearted devotion to a truly Catholic Chris- 
tianity and the Church Universal, so that the Princeton 
theology and spirit are known and honored in every part 
of Christendom. 

We congratulate you on the hundreds of young men 
who have been trained for the ministry within your 
walls, who have enriched the Church and the world by 
their labors, who have served the Church at home in 
every department of her manifold work, and who have 
preached the Gospel in every continent and in the islands 
of the sea. 

We congratulate you on the present prosperity of the 
Seminary with its splendid equipment and able Faculty, 
and especially on the service it is rendering the whole 

[232] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Church of God in the confirmation and defence of the 
truth. 

For the years to come, we do not know that we can 
offer any better prayer for you than to supplicate the 
grace of God upon your great institution in such measure 
as to make its future worthy of its past. In company 
with a multitude of others in this and every land, we 
pray there may be granted to all connected with the 
Seminary the unfailing presence and power of the Holy 
Spirit. 

On behalf of the Faculty, 

Faithfully yours, 

Charles R. Hemphill, 

President. 
May 2, 1912. 



[telegram] 

The Board of Directors of the Presbyterian Theologi- 
cal Seminary of Kentucky, in session to-day at Louis- 
ville, send greetings and congratulations on Princeton's 
Centennial Anniversary. "Peace be within thy walls 
and prosperity within thy palaces. ' ' 

Peyton H. Hoge, 

President. 
May 7, 1912. 



[233] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
ATCHISON, KANSAS 

I have the honor to inform you that at a meeting of 
the Faculty of the Western Theological Seminary, held 
in Atchison, Kansas, April 21, 1912, the Rev. Frederick 
G. Gotwald, D.D., was chosen to represent the Institu- 
tion at the one hundredth anniversary of the establish- 
ment of the Princeton Theological Seminary, to be held 
at Princeton, New Jersey, May 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1912. 

Sincerely yours, 

Holmes Dysinger, 

Dean. 
April 22, 1912. 



TAYLOR UNIVERSITY, READE THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY, UPLAND, INDIANA 

We have your kind invitation to be represented at 
your Anniversary exercises. Thank you indeed for the 
invitation, but my engagements are such just at this time 
that it will be impossible for me to attend. Trust your 
next hundred years may be greatly blessed of the Lord. 
Most sincerely yours, 

M. Vayhinger, 

President. 
February 26, 1912. 

L234] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

TURNER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, MORRIS 
BROWN COLLEGE, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Having been selected by Turner Theological Seminary, 
Morris Brown College, to represent them at the One 
Hundredth Anniversary of the establishment of your 
Seminary, I had high hopes of the full enjoyment of all 
of the pleasures represented by your very kind invita- 
tion, but at the last moment I find myself unavoidably 
detained and prevented from being present in person. 

Permit me to say that we most sincerely rejoice in 
your remarkable prosperity and successful round out of 
One Hundred Years. 

We view with delight your long and illustrious line 
of representative men as Clergymen, Authors, States- 
men and Scholars, justly the pride of any institution or 
denomination. 

While we pray for all of the anticipated pleasures of 
this, your One Hundredth Anniversary occasion, we also 
trust the coming century may hold in store for you 
larger blessings and greater triumphs. 

Again regretting my inability to be present, I am, 
Very faithfully yours, 

W. G. Alexander, 

May 4, 1912. Bean. 

EUGENE BIBLE UNIVERSITY, 

EUGENE, OREGON 

The announcement of the hundredth anniversary of 
the Princeton Theological Seminary, to be observed 

[235] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

from the fifth to the seventh of May, and your kind invi- 
tation to attend the celebration, received. I am author- 
ized to say for the Trustees and Faculty of the Eugene 
Bible University that we appreciate this invitation and 
kindly notice. We also honor the institution of learning 
from which this invitation comes for its faithfulness to 
the Holy Scriptures and to the Saviour, and for its 
world-wide influence in behalf of evangelical Christian- 
ity. 

We regret that we can not have a representative from 
our school to be with you at the time you suggest. 
Most cordially and faithfully yours, 

Eugene Bible University, 

By E. C. Sanderson, 

President. 
February 21, 1912. 



MANCHESTER COLLEGE, BIBLICAL DEPART- 
MENT, NORTH MANCHESTER, INDIANA 

The Biblical Department of Manchester College, 
North Manchester, Indiana, desires to acknowledge the 
receipt of your invitation to be represented at your one 
hundredth anniversary on the 5th-7th of May next. We 
wish to express our thanks for your kind invitation, but 
do not see our way clear to be represented by a delegate 
on that important occasion. 

May Princeton Theological Seminary have many 

[236;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

more years in the training of men for the most impor- 
tant work in the world. 

Yours very sincerely, 

S. S. Blough, 

Dean. 

March 4, 1912. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, KANSAS CITY UNI- 
VERSITY, KANSAS CITY, KANSAS 

The Kansas City University School of Theology 
acknowledges with pleasure the receipt of the invitation 
from the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary to be represented at the One 
Hundredth Anniversary Celebration of the Seminary on 
the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen hundred 
and twelve. 

We most heartily congratulate you and the Seminary 
on the happy completion of one hundred years of noble 
service to the intellectual and spiritual welfare of man- 
kind. The name and influence of ' ' Princeton ' ' are vitally 
and inspiringly connected with the early history of our 
beloved country and have done a vast deal to shape and 
conserve American ideals, and to give character and 
effectiveness to missionary endeavor in many lands, and 
thus largely to enter into the world's life for its lasting 
betterment. 

If possible, we shall be represented and will ask the 
Reverend D. Baines-Griffith, of Spuyten Duyvil, New 
York City, a former instructor in Kansas City Univer- 
sity, to be present as our representative. 

[237 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

We join in the prayers for multiplied blessing and 
usefulness for your splendid Institution in the years to 
come. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Herbert Taylor Stephens, 

Bean. 
March 23, 1912. 



WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, THEOLOGICAL 
DEPARTMENT, TEHUACANA, TEXAS 

The faculty of Westminster College regrets that it 
will not be able to send a representative to the celebra- 
tion in honor of the one-hundredth anniversary of the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America. We extend to the Seminary 
our heartiest congratulations, and hope that the noble 
work it has done will be increased and multiplied in the 
coming years. 

Very truly yours, 

H. H. Price, 

President. 
March 18, 1912. 



VIRGINIA UNION UNIVERSITY, THEOLOGI- 
CAL DEPARTMENT, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

Permit me to acknowledge the courtesy of an invita- 
tion from you to attend the one hundredth anniversary 

C238 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of the establishment of the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton. I regret that it does not seem possible for 
any official representative of the Theological Depart- 
men of Virginia Union University to be present on that 
occasion. 

We, however, send most cordial congratulations on 
your distinguished work for a century, and the best 
wishes for its continuance and enlargement in the years 
to come. 

Very respectfully yours, 

George Rice Hovey, 

President. 
14 March, 1912. 



ATLANTA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

In the absence of the President, I write to acknow- 
ledge the receipt of your kind favor of March twenty- 
fifth. And I am instructed to report that the Delegate 
appointed to represent the Atlanta Theological Semi- 
nary at the Princeton Centennial in May is the Reverend 
James Wilson Bixler, D.D., Professor Elect, Natural 
Theology, of New London, Connecticut, who plans to be 
with you, bearing the greetings of our Institution on that 
happy occasion. 

Very truly yours, 

Mrs. E. Lyman Hood. 

April 4, 1912. 

[seal] 

[239;] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

MERIDIAN MALE COLLEGE, SCHOOL OF 

THEOLOGY AND EVANGELISM, 

MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI 

In behalf of the President and Faculty of Meridian 
Male College, and as Dean of the School of Theology and 
Evangelism, I take pleasure in acknowledging receipt of 
your invitation to be represented at the " Centennial " of 
good, grand old " Princeton ". 

While distance and date will preclude the probability 
of our being then represented in person, our prayers are 
with you and our love. 

Fraternally yours, 

Joseph H. Smith. 

February 21, 1912. 



AUSTIN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 

Please permit me to convey to you and to the Faculty 
and Directors of Princeton Seminary the thanks of the 
Faculty of the Austin Presbyterian Theological Semi- 
nary for your kind invitation to attend the exercises cele- 
brating the one hundredth anniversary of the founding 
of your great institution. 

It would give us a great deal of pleasure to be able to 
be represented by a delegate on that occasion, but unfor- 
tunately it comes just at the time of the closing of our 
own session and the annual meeting of the Board of 

[240: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Trustees of this Seminary, at which time, owing to 
peculiar circumstances, it is important that every mem- 
ber of our Faculty shall be present here. Personally I 
wish that it were otherwise, for I should count it not 
only an honor but a great privilege to be with you in 
May and nothing short of necessity would prevent my so 
doing. 

Princeton is known and loved all over the South and 
nowhere more than in Texas, and we wish for her many 
centuries of loyal service to our Lord and of steadfast 
adherence to the principles of our common faith. May 
the great Head of the Church crown her efforts with His 
presence and blessing and make her increasingly fruitful 
in the work of the Kingdom. 

Most cordially and sincerely yours, 

Robert E. Vinson, 

President. 
March 8, 1912. 



PACIFIC UNITARIAN SCHOOL FOR THE 
MINISTRY, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry accepts the 
invitation of the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, to 
be represented by a delegate on the occasion of the cele- 
bration of the one hundredth anniversary of the Semi- 
nary's establishment, on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, 
the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen hundred 
and twelve, and has appointed as its delegate the Rev- 

[241] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

erend William Sacheus Morgan, B.D., Ph.D., Professor 
of Systematic Theology. 

February 20th, 1912. 



THE SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGI- 
CAL SEMINARY, FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

The Faculty of the Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary appreciate very highly the invitation of 
Princeton Theological Seminary to send a representa- 
tive to the celebration of the Hundredth Anniversary of 
that honored institution, and I have been honored with 
appointment to represent our Seminary on that occasion. 
I hope to be present to join with many others in recog- 
nizing the great service that Princeton has rendered to 
the cause of evangelical religion. 

Sincerely yours, 

Albert Henry Newman, 
Dean and Professor of Church History. 
February 23, 1912. 



CENTRAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE 

REFORMED CHURCH IN THE UNITED 

STATES, DAYTON, OHIO 

The invitation to send a delegate to the celebration of 
the Centennial of Princeton Seminary was received and 
laid before the faculty of this institution. 

I have been instructed to notify you that we greatly 

[242 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

appreciate the honor of this invitation, and that Rev. 
Prof. J. I. Good, D.D., LL.D., at present residing at 
3262 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa., has been ap- 
pointed to represent our Seminary on the occasion of 
your celebration. 

Fraternally yours, 

Philip Vollmer, 
Secretary of the Faculty. 
February 21, 1912. 



PACIFIC EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SEMI- 
NARY, OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON 

The Pacific Lutheran Seminary wishes to announce 
the receipt of the invitation extended by your Honorable 
Body to attend the celebration, on the 5th, 6th and 7th of 
May, of the one hundredth anniversary of the establish- 
ment by the General Assembly of the Theological Semi- 
nary at Princeton, New Jersey. 

The Faculty, in the name of the Institution, desires 
to extend cordial felicitations and hearty well-wishes, 
and hopes that the future will be as prosperous for the 
Seminary as has been the past. 

The Board, however, regrets exceedingly that adverse 
circumstances will not make it possible to send a repre- 
sentative to attend the festivities. 

Yours fraternally, 

Armin Paul Meyer, 

President. 
April 1, 1912. 

£243] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SAINT PATRICK'S SEMINARY, 
MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA 

The Faculty of the St. Patrick's Seminary are very 
thankful for the honor of your invitation to be repre- 
sented by a Delegate at the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of Princeton Theological Seminary, 
but regret to be unable to send any one to be present on 
the occasion. 



[244] 



RESPONSES FEOM 
MISSIONARY SEMINARIES 



ALBERT ACADEMY, FREETOWN, 
SIERRA LEONE, WEST AFRICA 

I wish to acknowledge with many thanks the invita- 
tion sent to Albert Academy to send a delegate to the 
one hundredth anniversary celebrations of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton, 
New Jersey. 

We have elected as our delegate the Vice-Principal of 
Albert Academy, the Rev. Edwin M. Hursh, A.B., who 
is at present taking special work in Chicago University. 
His address is 332 East 55th Street, Chicago, 111. I have 
written to inform him of his election as delegate and 
trust he will be able to attend. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Raymond P. Dougherty, 

Principal. 
March 9, 1912. 



ELAT THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
ELAT, KAMERUN, WEST AFRICA 

In reply to the kind invitation from Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary to the Theological School at Elat, ask- 
ing representation at the celebration of Princeton's one 
hundredth anniversary, we hasten to say that our Theo- 

[247] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

logical Seminary is a very modest affair. The building 
cost about fifteen dollars; the class now embraces six 
Bulu young men and one Ngumba ; the faculty consists 
of the writer of these lines ; and the subjects being taught 
at present are Church History, Acts of the Apostles, Life 
of Christ, and Theology of the Shorter Catechism. But 
embryonic as we are out here in the bush, we believe that 
our work counts in the redemption of Africa, and we 
are not without aspirations to be useful, if not large. 

We much appreciate the invitation, and would gladly 
accept if distance and limitation of time did not forbid. 
Speaking as a little child to a mighty giant, we beg to 
wish grand old Princeton another hundred years of 
fruit-bearing. And we take this opportunity to raise 
again the Macedonian call for some more of her students 
to come over and help us. 

With fraternal and prayerful thoughts for Princeton 
in anticipation of those glad May days of celebration, 

On behalf of the Theological work at Elat, 

Yours sincerely, 

Melvin Fraser. 

March 25, 1912. 



UNION THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE, 
IMPOLWENI, NEAR MARITZBURG, NATAL 

The Faculty of this Union Theological College feels 
highly honoured by the invitation of the Directors, Trus- 
tees and Faculty of your world-famed Theological Semi- 
nary to be represented at the coming celebration of the 

[2483 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

one hundredth anniversary of its establishment. Not 
having any one in your country at present to represent 
us, we must be satisfied with the expression of our best 
wishes and prayers for the success of your celebration. 
Believe me, 

Yours very sincerely, 

Jas. Luke, 

Principal. 
30th May, 1912. 



THEOLOGICAL TRAINING SCHOOL, 

OGBOMOSO, SOUTHERN NIGERIA, 

WEST AFRICA 

[seal] 

Your kind invitation for the Training School of Ogbo- 
moso to be represented at the celebration of your One 
Hundredth Anniversary was duly received. In the ab- 
sence of any representative from our Theological School, 
I send to you our hearty congratulations and greetings, 
and trust that the years of the second century of your 
noble Institution may be crowned with even greater use- 
fulness and blessing than the first. 

I thank you personally for the thoughtfulness and 
missionary interest that lie behind the invitation, that 
the great and noble Princeton Theological Seminary 
could find a place on its list of invitations for the Theo- 
logical Training School of Ogbomoso, West Africa. 
Yours fraternally, 

(Rev.) George Green, M.D. 

April 27th, 1912. 

[249^ 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

SEMINARIO THEOLOGICO DA EGREJA 

PRESBYTERIANA NO BRASIL, 

CAMPINAS, BRAZIL 

Coming back to the Seminary, I found the beautiful 
invitation which the Theological Seminary at Princeton 
has sent to ours. 

The Faculty of this Seminary has elected the Rev. Dr. 
J. M. Kyle, who for many years has been the Chairman 
of our Board of Trustees and who had given valuable 
help to this institution when he was here in Brazil, to be 
our delegate at the celebration of the Centenary of the 
Princeton Seminary. 

I remain, dear sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Erasmo Braga, 

Bean. 
March 8th, 1912. 



THE AMERICAN COLLEGIATE AND THEO- 
LOGICAL INSTITUTE, SAMOKOV, 
BULGARIA 

The invitation of the Directors, Trustees and Faculty 
of Princeton Seminary to the Collegiate and Theological 
Institute of Samokov, Bulgaria, to be represented by a 
delegate at the approaching celebration of the centenary 
of the Seminary, has been received. The Trustees of the 
Institute deeply appreciate the courtesy and honor thus 
extended, and at a recent meeting voted a hearty expres- 

£250] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

sion of thanks for the invitation. They also desire to 
congratulate the Seminary on the completion of one hun- 
dred years of splendid work for the kingdom of Christ 
at home and abroad, and to extend sincerest wishes for 
its future growth, prosperity and usefulness. It may be 
interesting to state that one of the present Trustees is 
himself a graduate of Princeton Seminary, Rev. D. N. 
Furnajieff, of the class of 1898. 

The Trustees also selected as the representative of the 
Collegiate and Theological Institute at the centennial 
celebration, Rev. Lewis Bond, for many years a mission- 
ary of the American Board in European Turkey. Mr. 
Bond's present address is No. 720 Kensington Ave., 
Plainfield, N. J. It is hoped that he will be able to accept 
this appointment, and he will be requested to inform you 
as to his decision. 

With cordial and fraternal greetings, I remain, 
Very sincerely yours, 

Robt. Thomson, 
13 March, 1912. President of the Trustees. 

[seal] 



KAREN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
INSEIN, BURMA 

To the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, 
Greeting: 

The Karen Theological Seminary regrets that it can- 
not be represented by a delegate on the occasion of the 

C25in 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Hundredth Anniversary of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary, as no member of its Staff will be in America 
at that time. 

March, 1912. 



FATI THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE, 
CANTON, CHINA 

On behalf of the Fati Theological College, I write, at 
this too late date, to express our cordial appreciation of 
your kind invitation sent to us to send a delegate to the 
celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of Princeton Theological Seminary. 

At this distance we were of course unable to send a 
delegate, but we do not forget that our Presbyterian 
Mission in Canton has had worthy representatives from 
Princeton : in the earlier years, Rev. Charles F. Preston, 
easily among the first in ability to speak the Chinese lan- 
guage; Rev. B. C. Henry, well known at Princeton as 
elsewhere; later Rev. C. E. Patton, still with us; then 
our martyred Peale whose short life here left its bless- 
ing ; and last Rev. J. W. Creighton. 

We shall be glad to have more of your men. 
Yours very sincerely, 

Henry V. Noyes. 

June 21st, 1912. 



[252] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE GRAVES THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
CANTON, CHINA 

We send you our sincere and hearty congratulations 
on the 100th celebration of your work for the Master. 
We appreciate very much your kindness in asking us to 
send a representative of our institution on the happy 
occasion, but regret that we cannot be present. 

We pray that God's richest blessing may rest upon 
your efforts to promote the cause of our common Lord 
and Master, Jesus Christ. 

In behalf of the Faculty, 

R. S. Graves. 



UNION THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
FOOCHOW, SOUTH CHINA 

The Baldwin School of Theology and the School of 
the A. B. C. F. M. in Foochow, together with that of the 
English Church Missionary Society, have just estab- 
lished a Union Theological School. At the last meeting 
of the Board of Managers the invitations from the 
Princeton Theological Seminary to the Baldwin School 
and the A. B. C. F. M. School were presented, and I was 
asked to write on behalf of the Board of Managers to 
convey our best thanks to the Directors, Trustees and 
Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary and to 
say that we are asking Dr. W. W. White, of New York, 
to represent this Union Theological School at the cele- 
bration of the Centenary of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary in May next. 

C253] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

With our best wishes for a very successful celebration, 
on behalf of the Board of Managers, Union Theological 
School, Foochow, 

Yours very faithfully, 

H. M. W. Price, 
Bishop of the Church of England in Fuhkien. 

March 25, 1912. 



NANKING UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
NANKING, CHINA 

In response to your kind invitation just received, the 
Faculty of the Nanking Union Theological Seminary is 
asking the Rev. J. E. Williams, of our Board of Direc- 
tors, to act as our delegate on the occasion of the one 
hundredth anniversary of Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. We shall greatly appreciate the opportunity of 
being represented on this auspicious occasion, and join 
in heartiest wishes for the future. 

Believe me, 

Sincerely yours, 

J. C. Gareitt, 
March 22, 1912. President. 



THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL OF SHAOWU, 
FOOCHOW, CHINA 

Your kind invitation to the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of the Princeton Theological Seminary has come to 

C254] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

hand, and I wish to express our appreciation of the high 
honor conferred upon us. 

It has long been the day of beginnings in China, but 
some of our teachings are finding congenial soil. China 
is not like any other non-Christian country. Only one- 
tenth can read, but the reading tenth is so distributed 
that a very large majority of the people have near rela- 
tives who can read; and the future of China is to a 
peculiar degree in the hands of the reading tenth. There 
is opening up a commanding position for an educated 
ministry. 

Rev. C. L. Storrs, of our Station, is now on his way 
home for a well-earned furlough, and I am forwarding 
your invitation to him. He is worthy of double honor 
for thorough work, both educational and evangelistic. 

As Shaowu is out of reach of telegraphic communica- 
tion, we are not permitted to reside there just now, but 
hope to be back there soon. 

Very heartily yours, 

J. E. Walker. 

March 18, 1912. 



ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY, 
SHANGHAI, CHINA 

I am in receipt of your invitation, inviting St. John 's 
University to send a representative to attend the cele- 
bration of the one hundredth anniversar}^ of your Theo- 
logical Seminary, and appreciate the courtesy you have 

L255] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

extended to us. I have asked Dr. William H. Jefferys, 
who is now in the United States, to act as our represen- 
tative and hope he may be able to attend. 

Yours sincerely, 

F. L. Hawks Pott, 

President. 
March 15th, 1912. 



ASHMORE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
SWATOW, CHINA 

The Faculty of Ashmore Theological Seminary beg to 
acknowledge your invitation to send a delegate to the 
celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the 
Princeton Theological Seminary. We appreciate the 
honor you do us, and are asking Rev. A. F. Groesbeck, 
a trustee of our Seminary when on the mission field, and 
just returned to the United States on furlough, to repre- 
sent us, if possible, on that occasion. 

May God continue to richly bless Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary in its work of building up and extending 
His Kingdom in all the earth. 

The Secretary of our Faculty, a Chinese teacher, 
sends acknowledgment in the usual Chinese form. 

In behalf of the Faculty of Ashmore Theological 
Seminary, 

Wm. Ashmore, 

President. 

March 21, 1912. 

[256] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
COPENHAGEN, DENMARK 

Though I would have reckoned it a great honor to have 
been present at your anniversary May 5-7, I must de- 
plore not being able, though I hope to be in the United 
States at that time. The duties of a General Conference 
Delegate constrain me to stay in Minneapolis. And any 
other representation our small school cannot afford to 

send. 

I congratulate your Church on its great school, and 
you on your long and honorable record. 

Yours truly, 

L. C. Laesen, 

President. 
February 20th, 1912. 



UNITED THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE, 
BANGALORE, SOUTH INDIA 

On behalf of the United Theological College of South 
India and Ceylon, I wish to express our appreciation of 
the kind invitation, just received, to be represented at 
the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of the Princeton Theological Seminary, on 
the 5th, 6th and 7th of May. 

Our College regrets its inability to send a representa- 
tive to Princeton. But, rejoicing at the long record of 

H257] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

fruitful service to Christ's Church upon which the 
Princeton Theological Seminary is able to look back, we 
join with its many friends in all good wishes for its 
future. 
I am, 

Yours truly, 

L. P. Larsen, 

Principal. 
March 14th, 1912. 



BAPATLA NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL, 
BAPATLA, SOUTH INDIA 

In the name of the Bapatla Normal Training School, 
I thank you for your courtesy in asking us to send a 
delegate on the occasion of your celebration of the 100th 
anniversary of your great institution. 

It gives me pleasure to inform you that Rev. John 
Newcomb is returning to America and he has kindly con- 
sented to represent us as our delegate. Please receive 
him as a brother beloved. 

We praise God that your noble Seminary has been 
permitted to do such a great work for the Master during 
the past one hundred years. May our Master make you 
more and more to abound in His work, since that work 
has not been, is not and never can be in vain, as your his- 
tory so clearly proves. 

Our work is the same as yours, for we are preparing 
in our humble school, workers for the Master's vineyard. 

[258] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

So we gladly join hands with you on this glorious occa- 
sion, for 

"Ob nah, ob fern, 
Unsere Arbeit macht uns eins in dem Herrn!" 

Your co-worker in the Master's vineyard, 

Geo. N. Thomssen, 

President. 
March 18, 1912. 



BAREILLY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
BAREILLY, INDIA 

I have the pleasure to acknowledge your invitation for 
the Bareilly Theological Seminary to be represented by 
a delegate on the occasion of the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of your Seminary, and to reply that the Trustees 
and Faculty of the Bareilly Theological Seminary have 
asked the Rev. Thomas Jefferson Scott, D.D., of Ocean 
Grove, New Jersey, who was for thirty years the Princi- 
pal of the Seminary, to represent us on that occasion. 
Will you kindly address any necessary correspondence 
to him directly ? 

Wishing you abundant success in the honorable and 
important function for which you are preparing, I am, 

Yours sincerely, 

W. A. Mansell, 

Principal. 
March 14, 1912. 

[259] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

AMERICAN BAPTIST TELUGTJ MISSION, 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

RAMAPATNAM, NELLORE DISTRICT, INDIA 

The communication from the Princeton Theological 
Seminary inviting our Seminary to be represented by a 
delegate on the occasion of the celebration of the one 
hundredth anniversary of its establishment by the Gen- 
eral Assembly, on the 5th, 6th and 7th of May, was duly 
received and appreciated. 

At a meeting of the faculty and students of our Semi- 
nary, held yesterday, it was 

Resolved: (1) To cordially thank the Directors, Trus- 
tees and Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary 
for their remembrance and recognition of our institu- 
tion as well as for the honor of the invitation to be pres- 
ent on this great occasion; (2) To convey our united 
congratulations to your institution on this occasion, 
coupled with the prayer that God, who has so signally 
blessed the Princeton Seminary in the past, may con- 
tinue to do so in the future for His honor and glory and 
the extension of His kingdom in every land; and (3) To 
elect the Rev. W. L. Ferguson, D.D., a former member 
of our faculty, who happens to be home on furlough, to 
represent us on this occasion. 

Yours sincerely, 

J. Heinrichs, 

President. 



[260] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

SAHARANPUR, NORTHWEST 

PROVINCES, INDIA 

In reply to your invitation to the Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary at Saharanpnr, to send a delegate to 
be present at the 100th Anniversary of the establishment 
of Princeton Theological Seminary, to be held on May 
5th, 6th and 7th, 1912, I write to inform you that we 
have requested Rev. Fred J. Newton, an alumnus of 
Princeton Seminary, and a member of the Punjab Mis- 
sion, which maintains the Saharanpur Seminary, to rep- 
resent us on that occasion. 

Regretting very much that I am unable to be present, 
I remain, 

Yours very truly, 

H. C. Velte. 
March 14, 1912. 



SCVOLA TEOLOGICA BATTISTA, 
ROME, ITALY 

Owing to a mistake at the post-office the invitation to 
have our school represented at the great anniversary of 
Princeton only reached me a few days ago, hence the 
delay in replying to an honour so appreciated. It is with 
real regret that I must decline the invitation to be pres- 
ent on an occasion so interesting. I have always had an 
ardent admiration for the Princeton School, and a pe- 
culiar sympathy for the noble Church it represents; if I 

[261] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

were not a Baptist I should have to become a Presby- 
terian on the spot. Fortunately, however, no Church can 
confine our brotherly love which goes out in warm con- 
gratulations from our baby Seminary to your full-grown 
and stalwart one. May God grant Princeton another 
hundred years as fruitful as her last, is the wish of 

Yours fraternally, 

April 25, 1912. D. G. WHITTINGHILL. 



THE KOBE THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
KOBE, JAPAN 

The Kobe Theological School desires to thank you for 
the kind invitation to be represented at the celebration 
of the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment 
of Princeton Seminary. We regret that it will be im- 
possible for us to send a delegate on that occasion. But 
we wish to congratulate you on the splendid history of 
your institution, and to rejoice with you in view of all 
that has been accomplished by her for the advance of 
Christ's Kingdom during the past hundred years. Also 
we pray that under the blessing of God you may have an 
even more successful future— a future in which you may 
continue, as during the past century, to witness with 
power for the ' ' faith once delivered to the saints. ' ' 

Praying God's richest blessing upon your Seminary, 
we are, 

Yours very sincerely, 

Kobe Theological School, 

S. P. Fulton, 
April 4th, 1912. Principal. 

L262] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL OF THE KWANSEI 
GAKUIN, KOBE, JAPAN 

In response to the kind invitation to the Theological 
School of the Kwansei Gakuin to be represented by a 
delegate at your centennial celebration in May, this 
year, I have the honor to inform you that we have re- 
quested the Rev. S. E. Hager, formerly a professor in 
our Theological School and now in America on furlough, 
to represent us on that occasion. 

Thanking you for the invitation and hoping that our 
delegate will attend, I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

Thos. H. Haden, 

Dean. 
March 25, 1912. 



THE DOSHISHA THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL, 
KYOTO, JAPAN 

The Doshisha Theological School at Kyoto, Japan, ac- 
knowledges with appreciation the invitation to attend 
by delegate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the 
establishment of the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey, on Sunday, Monday and Tues- 
day, the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen hun- 
dred and twelve; and hereby introduces the Reverend 
George M. Rowland, D.D., of Sapporo, Japan, now in 

C263 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the United States, as its delegate by vote of the Faculty, 
March fifteenth, nineteen hundred and twelve. 

Tasuku Harada, 

President. 
March 16, 1912. 



NORTH JAPAN COLLEGE, 
SENDAI, JAPAN 

The Board of Directors of North Japan College appre- 
ciates greatly the honor of being invited to be repre- 
sented by a delegate at the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the establishment of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, and in- 
structs me in its name to accept with thanks the invita- 
tion and to say that Professor Teizaburo Demura, A.M., 
Dean of the Higher Department of North Japan Col- 
lege, has been authorized to represent our institution at 
the celebration. His address is No. 12 Divinity Hall, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

With heartfelt wishes for the success of the celebra- 
tion, and for the continued prosperity and usefulness of 
Princeton Theological Seminary, I have the honor to 
subscribe myself, 

Very respectfully yours, 

David B. Schneder, 

President. 
March 21st, 1912. 

[264] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

JAPAN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
TOKYO, JAPAN 

In accordance with your very kind invitation, at a 
faculty meeting held this morning, we elected Prof. 
Chas. B. Tenney, of the New Testament Department, to 
be our representative at the celebration of the 100th 
anniversary of the founding of Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

On behalf of the faculty of the Japan Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary, 

W. B. Parshley, 

March 6th, 1912. President. 

MEIJI GAKUIN, TOKYO, JAPAN 

The Theological Faculty of Meiji Gakuin has ap- 
pointed us to reply to the courteous invitation to Meiji 
Gakuin to appoint a delegate to represent it on the occa- 
sion of the one hundredth anniversary of the establish- 
ment of Princeton Theological Seminary. Were it not 
for the great distance, it would be a great pleasure to 
accept the invitation. 

We congratulate Princeton on the great work which 
it has done for the Kingdom of God in the past, and pray 
that its future may give even greater cause for thanks- 
giving. In particular we desire to express our gratitude 
for what it has contributed through so many of its gradu- 
ates to the Church of Christ in Japan. 

Sincerely yours, 

Kajinostjke Ibtjea, 

March 6th, 1912. WlLLIAM IMBRIE. 

t;265: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

COLEGIO INTERNACIONAL, 
GUADALAJARA, MEXICO 

We feel highly honored by the unexpected invitation 
to send a delegate to the centennial of Princeton Semi- 
nary. Although there has been no personal or official 
connection between this school and the Seminary, edu- 
cators in all parts of the world must have an interest and 
pride in the splendid achievement and priceless service 
rendered to the church and the world by your institu- 
tion. So we gladly accept your gracious invitation and 
name as delegate to represent our humble establishment 
on the memorable occasion the Rev. A. C. Wright, for- 
merly associate principal of the "Colegio Internacional' ' 
of Guadalajara. He is now pursuing especial studies in 
Hartford Theological Seminary. Should he be able to 
attend the celebration he will notify you opportunely. 

Thanking you for the unmerited consideration, I 
remain, 

Yours very truly, 

John Howland. 

February 21, 1912. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, 
URITMIA COLLEGE, URUMIA, PERSIA 

I had the pleasure recently to receive your kind invi- 
tation to be present at the one hundredth Anniversary of 
the founding of Princeton Seminary, next May. 

C266: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

I regret exceedingly my inability to be present with 
you all on such a memorable occasion, and confess it is 
a deep disappointment, especially as my furlough comes 
this year. But our own Theological Department does 
not close until a date too late to admit of any possibility 
of being there. 

I take pleasure, however, in appointing the Rev. 
R. M. Labaree as delegate from the Theological Depart- 
ment of Urumia College, and have advised him of the 
same. He left for the United States nearly a month ago 
and is to be congratulated on the opportunity of being 
there with you at this time. 

I shall think of you all those days and hope they may 
be fraught with great good for the dear old Seminary. 

Sincerely yours, 

Fred'k G. Coan. 

March 29th, 1912. 



ILOILO BIBLE SCHOOL, 
ILOILO, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

The invitation to attend the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of the establishment of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary is at hand today. The Iloilo Bible School ap- 
preciates the honor of being invited, and regrets that cir- 
cumstances make it impossible to accept the invitation. 
Yours very truly, 

Henry Weston Munger, 

Assistant Principal. 
March 25, 1912. 

[2671 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL TRAIN- 
ING SCHOOL, MAYAGUEZ, PORTO RICO 

The Presbyterian Theological Training School, the 
youngest daughter of Princeton Theological Seminary, 
sends greetings on the occasion of the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of the Founding of the Seminary, and re- 
grets that no one can be present at that joyous time to 
represent this school. 

James Alexander McAllister, 

President. 
April, 1912. 



PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
BEIRUT, SYRIA 



j 



We have recently received the invitation to the 100th 
anniversary of the establishment of the Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, and I have the great pleasure of writ- 
ing of the same to all the members of our Mission. 
Seeing that there are two members of our Theological 
Faculty in the United States, we shall have great plea- 
sure in requesting one of them to represent us at this 
great gathering, and just as soon as I can secure answers 
to a circular vote which I am sending round the Mission, 
I will give you the name and address of our delegate. 

It will interest you to know that we are about taking 
a good step forward in the matter of theological training 
here in Syria. We are erecting a new building at a cost 

[268 ^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of $12,000 and, nothing preventing, hope to assemble a 
good class this coming fall. Our present Faculty will 
consist of Rev. O. J. Hardin, Rev. F. W. March, Rev. 
George Ford, D.D., and myself, together with some na- 
tive instructors and lecturers from the Faculty of the 
Syrian Protestant College and neighboring Missions. 
While under the care of the Presbyterian Mission, we 
hope to make the enterprise inter-denominational and 
as far as possible supply the needs of a number of mis- 
sionary enterprises at work in the Levant. 

Very cordially and sincerely yours, 

Fkanklin E. Hoskins, 
Stated Clerk to the Syria Mission. 
March 14, 1912. 



MARASH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
MARASH, TURKEY-IN-ASIA 

Let me acknowledge with gratitude, on behalf of 
Marash Theological Seminary, the invitation of the Di- 
rectors, Trustees and Faculty of Princeton Theological 
Seminary with reference to the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of the latter. It is our hope that Rev. W. N. Cham- 
bers, D.D., of Adana, recently honored with the degree 
of D.D. by Princeton University, will be able to be pres- 
ent as our delegate. 

Yours sincerely, 

Feed Field Goodsell. 

March 11th, 1912. 

C269] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

WESTERN TURKEY THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY, MARSOVAN, TURKEY-IN-ASIA 

Your invitation to the Western Turkey Theological 
Seminary to be represented at the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Theological Semi- 
nary has duly come to hand. We have taken action 
requesting our former associate, Rev. George F. Her- 
rick, D.D., for many years a member of this Mission Sta- 
tion, and one of the faculty of the Theological Seminary, 
but now in America on furlough, to act as our representa- 
tive on your centennial occasion. I am writing him direct 
and we hope very much that he may be able to be pres- 
ent. He certainly will be an able representative of our 
Seminary if he can attend your exercises. 

We congratulate you on the great work done by the 
Seminary. Rev. T. A. Elmer, one of our present teach- 
ers, is a graduate of Princeton College and Seminary, 
and Rev. Edward Riggs, D.D., for many years one of 
our leading instructors in the Seminary, was a graduate 
of Princeton College. 

Sincerely yours, 

G. E. White. 

March 2, 1912. 



C270n 



RESPONSES FROM 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 

Resolved, That the Board of Trustees of the Univer- 
sity tender to the Board of Trustees of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary their cordial appreciation of the invita- 
tion extended to them so courteously through the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees of the Seminary in person, 
to attend the Centennial Exercises of the Seminary, to 
be held on the fifth, sixth and seventh days of May, next, 
and hereby accept the invitation so extended ; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That this Board hereby tender to the Theo- 
logical Seminary for the Centennial Exercises the use of 
Alexander Hall for the Celebration, and be it further 

Resolved, That a delegation be appointed from the 
Trustees to represent this Board at the Celebration. 

In accordance with the third resolution, the President 
of the University, pro tempore, appointed as a delega- 
tion to represent the Board at the Centennial Exercises 
of the Theological Seminary, Hon. William J. Magie, 
Rev. Dr. Simon J. McPherson, Hon. Bayard Henry, 
Mr. James W. Alexander, Mr. Robert Garrett. 

Chas. W. McAlpin, 

Secretary. 



DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, 
HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA 

The Senate of Dalhousie University wish to acknow- 
ledge with many thanks the favour of the invitation 

[273;] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

from the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, to 
take part in the celebration of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Seminary. 

We regret very much that we have not been able at 
an earlier date to name our delegate for that occasion. 
I now have the honour to inform you that the Reverend 
M. J. MacLeod, of the Collegiate Church, New York, has 
found it possible to represent us, and he will convey to 
you the felicitations of this University on this occasion 
of rejoicing. 

I have the honour to be, 

Very faithfully yours, 

A. Stanley Mackenzie, 
May 1, 1912. President. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, 
TORONTO, CANADA 

I have asked the Rev. Professor Kerr D. Macmillan, 
B.A., who is on your staff, to represent the University 
of Toronto at the celebration of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Theological Semi- 
nary of Princeton. Mr. Macmillan is a graduate of the 
University of Toronto and is thus fully competent to 
represent us. 

Yours sincerely, 

Robt. A. Falconer, 

President. 
March 6th, 1912. 

C2743 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, 
CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Harvard University accepts with pleasure the invita- 
tion of the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, to the celebration of the one-hundredth 
anniversary of its establishment, to be held on the fifth, 
sixth and seventh of May, 1912, and has appointed Wil- 
liam Wallace Fenn, Bussey Professor of Theology, and 
Dean of the Faculty of Divinity, as its delegate on that 
occasion. 

[seal] 



YALE UNIVERSITY, 
NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 

I have the honor to inform you that Professor Wil- 
liston Walker has been appointed the delegate of Yale 
University at the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of the Princeton Theological Seminary, 
which is to be celebrated on Sundaj^, Monday and Tues- 
day, the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen hun- 
dred and twelve. 

Very truly yours, 

Edwin Rogers Imbrie, 

Acting for the Absent Secretary. 
March 4, 1912. 

[275] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

It gives me pleasure to advise you that the official rep- 
resentative of the University of Pennsylvania at the one 
hundredth anniversary of the establishment of the Theo- 
logical Seminary to be held on the fifth, sixth and seventh 
of May, nineteen hundred and twelve, will be Professor 
James Alan Montgomery, Ph.D., S.T.D. 

With best wishes for a happy reunion on the part of 
the friends of the Seminary, I am, 

Yours sincerely, 

Edgar F. Smith, 

Provost. 

February 26th, 1912. 



BROWN UNIVERSITY, 
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 

In accordance with your invitation I have appointed 
Professor Henry T. Fowler, Ph.D., Professor of Bibli- 
cal Literature in Brown University, to represent us at 
the One Hundredth Anniversary of Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary on the fifth, sixth and seventh of May. I 
know that he cannot be present all three days, but he will 
endeavor to be present as long as possible, selecting the 
most favorable time after the full program is sent him. 

Brown University joins with all other institutions of 

£27611 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

learning in congratulating the Seminary on its notable 
anniversary. 

Sincerely yours, 

W. H. P. Fattnce, 

President. 

February 29th, 1912. 



RUTGERS COLLEGE, 
NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY 

The Trustees and Faculty of Rutgers College accept 
with appreciation the invitation of the Theological Semi- 
nary at Princeton, New Jersey, to be represented by a 
delegate at the celebrating of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Seminary on the 
fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen hundred and 
twelve. 

February 19th, 1912. 



DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, 
HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Pray allow me, in behalf of Dartmouth College, to 
acknowledge with appreciation the receipt of an invita- 
tion from Princeton Theological Seminary to the Col- 
lege, to send a delegate to the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the Seminary. 

The College has appointed the Reverend Benjamin 

H2773 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Tenney Marshall, pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of New Rochelle, New York, to represent it on 
this occasion. 

Yours with sincere respect, 

Ernest Fox Nichols, 

President. 

3rd April, 1912. 



WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY, 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 

In reply to the invitation of the Directors, Trustees, 
and Faculty of the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America, 
Princeton, N. J., to take part in the celebration of the 
one hundredth anniversary of its establishment by the 
General Assembly, the Faculty of Washington and Lee 
University has appointed as its delegate Rev. Dr. James 
Robert Howerton, Professor of Philosophy, to represent 
Washington and Lee University on that occasion. 

Yours very truly, 

H. D. Campbell, 

February 20, 1912. Dean. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE, 
CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

The President and Faculty of Dickinson College ac- 
knowledge with appreciation the invitation of the Theo- 

C278: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY ♦ 

logical Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, New Jersey, to 
attend the one hundredth anniversary of its establish- 
ment on the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nineteen 
hundred and twelve, and have designated the president 
of the College, Eugene Allen Noble, L.H.D., as its ac- 
credited representative on this occasion, which calls for 
congratulation and thanksgiving. 

February 29th, 1912. 



HAMPDEN-SIDNEY COLLEGE, 

HAMPDEN-SIDNEY, 

VIRGINIA 

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your very cour- 
teous invitation to Hampden- Sidney College to be repre- 
sented at the Centennial Celebration of your venerable 
Seminary. It would afford me personally very especial 
gratification to be present on that happy occasion, inas- 
much as the honored founder of your Seminary, Dr. 
Archibald Alexander, had filled with distinction the 
presidency of this College. I am satisfied that it was the 
ability demonstrated and the reputation achieved as 
President of Hampden-Sidney College that pointed him 
out as the logical man to take charge of the proposed 
Theological School at Princeton, New Jersey. At any 
rate, our institutions are certainly very closely linked in 
this way. 

We have appointed the Rev. W. Creighton Campbell, 
D.D., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Roanoke, 
Virginia, as the representative of Hampden-Sidney Col- 

C279^ 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

lege at your approaching Centennial. Dr. Campbell is 
an alumnus of the College, a member of our Board of 
Trustees, and one of the prominent ministers of our Vir- 
ginia Synod. He will probably be present throughout 
the entire Centennial Exercises. I regret that I cannot 
be present in person and have a share in these impressive 
exercises. 
With very kind regards, I am, 

Cordially yours, 

H. Tucker Graham, 

President. 
February 23, 1912. 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, 
CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

The faculty of the University of North Carolina ap- 
preciate the invitation to send a delegate to the celebra- 
tion of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the establish- 
ment of the Princeton Theological Seminary. 

We regret that it will be impracticable to send a dele- 
gate on that occasion, but wish to tender our congratu- 
lations on the completion of these hundred years of use- 
ful service and to give expression to our best wishes for 
the future welfare and prosperity of the institution. 
Very truly yours, 

Francis P. Venable, 

President. 
February 27, 1912. 

£280 ] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, 
WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS 

On behalf of Williams College, I beg to acknowledge 
receipt of the very courteous invitation of the Directors, 
Trustees and Faculty of the Seminary to send a delegate 
to attend the One Hundredth Anniversary of the estab- 
lishment of Princeton Theological Seminary. I have 
communicated with Dr. William Rankin, our oldest liv- 
ing graduate, now a resident of Princeton, and am in 
receipt of a letter from his son stating that it will give 
his father pleasure to serve as a delegate on that occasion. 
Very sincerely yours, 

H. A. Garfield. 

President. 
April 11, 1912. 



UNION UNIVERSITY, 
SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK 

Union University takes pleasure in appointing the 
Rev. Charles Alexander Richmond, D.D., LL.D., Presi- 
dent of Union College and Chancellor of Union Univer- 
sity, as the official delegate at the celebration of the one 
hundredth anniversary of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary on the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, nine- 
teen hundred and twelve. 

April 4th, 1912. 

L28i: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE, 
MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

I beg to acknowledge the kind invitation of Princeton 
Theological Seminary to the one hundredth anniversary 
of its establishment on May 5th, 6th, and 7th. We ap- 
preciate the courtesy of your invitation and shall wish 
to be represented at the anniversary exercises. 

I am asking Rev. Charles E. Hesselgrave, Ph.D., pas- 
tor of the Stanley Congregational Church, Chatham, 
New Jersey, and a graduate of Middlebury College in 
the class of 1893, to represent Middlebury College at 
your centennial. Faithfully yours, 



John M. Thomas, 

President. 



March 8, 1912. 



WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE, 
WASHINGTON, PENNSYLVANIA 

I have been appointed by the Faculty of Washington 
and Jefferson College to attend the Centennial Celebra- 
tion of Princeton Theological Seminary, May fifth, sixth 
and seventh, and it is my intention to be present. 

Yours truly, 

J. D. Moffat, 

President. 

April 24, 1912. 

[282] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

MIAMI UNIVERSITY, 
OXFORD, OHIO 

Miami University regrets that it will be impossible to 
accept the invitation of the Directors, Trustees and 
Faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary to be 
represented at the one hundredth anniversary of its es- 
tablishment by the General Assembly, on Sunday, Mon- 
day and Tuesday, the fifth, sixth and seventh of May, 
nineteen hundred and twelve. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, 
IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK 

I am directed by the Board of Trustees to say in reply 
to your courteous invitation for Columbia University to 
be represented at the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of the Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America, that 
the invitation is accepted with thanks, and that the Uni- 
versity will be represented by Dickinson S. Miller, Ph.D., 
Professor of Philosophy, and Raymond C. Knox, B.D., 
Chaplain of the University. 

Very truly yours, 

Frank D. Fackenthal, 
Secretary. 
March 21, 1912. 

[283] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 

On behalf of the University of Pittsburgh, I wish to 
acknowledge receipt of the invitation to attend the cele- 
bration of the one hundredth anniversary of the estab- 
lishment of the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America at 
Princeton, New Jersey. The University of Pittsburgh 
extends its hearty congratulations to the Seminary on its 
long and useful career of noble service, and wishes for it 
many more years of enlarged influence and power. 

The representative of the University of Pittsburgh 
will be S. B. Linhart, A.M., D.D., Secretary of the Uni- 
versity. 

Cordially yours, 

S. B. Linhart, 
April 29th, 1912. Secretary. 



AMHERST COLLEGE, 
AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst College accepts with pleasure the very kind 
invitation of the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the 
Princeton Theological Seminary to be represented at the 
one hundredth anniversary of its establishment, May 
5th, 6th, and 7th, 1912. 

President George Harris will represent Amherst 
College. 

March 12th, 1912. 

[2843 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE, 
LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA 

President Henry Harbaugh Apple regrets very much 
that he is unable to accept the kind invitation to attend 
the One Hundredth Anniversary of the establishment of 
the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America on May fifth, sixth and 
seventh. 

He sends most cordial greetings and best wishes from 
Franklin and Marshall College and ardent prayer for 
the work of the Princeton Theological Seminary. 

April 12th, 1912. 



LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, 
EASTON, PENNSYLVANIA 

To the Directors, Trustees and Faculty of the Theologi- 
cal Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America at Princeton, N. J — 
Greeting : 

Lafayette College offers its congratulations to the 
Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at 
Princeton, N. J., upon the completion of one hundred 
years of service in the education of men to preach the 
glorious gospel of the blessed God, and rejoices with it 
in its record as a seminary of learning and as a nursing 
mother of those who, through so long a period, with un- 
faltering loyalty to the truth, have prosecuted their 

£2851 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ministry. Lafayette College has sent many of its sons 
to be trained in the Seminary, foremost among them 
William Henry Green whose memory is dear alike to 
College and Seminary, and marks with satisfaction that 
at the present time no college has so many students on 
the roll of the Seminary. It also acknowledges with 
gratitude its debt to the Seminary for teachers and trus- 
tees who have brought from the Seminary knowledge 
and zeal for the truth. May this celebration redound to 
the glory of God, and introduce with fitting dignity a 
new century of yet more faithful service. 

Lafayette College designates its President, Ethelbert 
D. Warfield, D.D., LL.D., President of the Board of 
Directors of the Seminary, and John Moffat Mecklin, 
Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, a graduate of the Semi- 
nary, to represent it at the Celebration May 5th, 6th and 
7th, 1912. 

Wm. S. Hall, 

Clerk of the Faculty. 

April 29, 1912. 

[seal] 



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, 
NEW YORK CITY 

I beg to acknowledge on behalf of New York Univer- 
sity the invitation of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church at Princeton, N. J., to be repre- 
sented by a delegate at the one hundredth anniversary. 

The University has appointed Prof. Herman H. 

C286] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Home, Ph.D., Professor of the History of Education 
and of the History of Philosophy, as its delegate to rep- 
resent the University at the Centennial, May 5th-7th. 
Very truly yours, 

John H. MacCracken, 
Syndic. 

February 26, 1912. 



PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE, 
GETTYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 

On behalf of the Faculty of Pennsylvania College, 
Gettysburg, I have the honor to acknowledge the invita- 
tion of Princeton Theological Seminary, through its 
Directors, Trustees and Faculty, to be represented by a 
delegate at the celebration of the one-hundredth anniver- 
sary of its establishment, and to reply that we accept 
and have appointed Professor Philip M. Bikle, Ph.D., 
Dean of the College, as our delegate. Should Dean 
Bickle not be able to attend, he is authorized to appoint 
a substitute, of which due notice will be given. 

With best wishes for the Seminary, 
Very truly yours, 

H. A. Rinard, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
February 22, 1912. 



[287] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

WABASH COLLEGE, 
CRAWFORDSVILLE, INDIANA 

Rev. Arthur J. Brown, D.D., 156 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, will represent Wabash College at the forthcoming 
anniversary of Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Trusting that your anticipation of the event may be 
fully realized, I am, 

Very sincerely yours, 

G. L. Mackintosh, 

President. 
March 1, 1912. 



DELAWARE COLLEGE, 

NEWARK, 

DELAWARE 

The Faculty of Delaware College accept with thanks 
the invitation of the Directors, Trustees, and Faculty of 
the Seminary to send a delegate to the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of its establishment by the General Assem- 
bly, on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the 5th, 6th and 
7th of May, 1912. The Rev. Dr. W. J. Rowan of the 
College Faculty has been designated as our delegate to 
the Anniversary and will be in attendance at that time. 
Very truly yours, 

Edw. Laurence Smits, 

Secretary pro tern. 
February 27, 1912. 

[288: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

HANOVER COLLEGE, 
HANOVER, INDIANA 

In response to the invitation received from Princeton 
Theological Seminary requesting Hanover College to be 
represented by a delegate on the occasion of the celebra- 
tion of the 100th anniversary of its establishment, I have 
the honor and pleasure of certifying to the appointment 
of the Reverend John Simonson Howk, D.D., Secretary 
of Hanover College, as her delegate for the occasion, and 
extending to the Seminary the greetings of Hanover 
College. 

Very sincerely yours, 

W. A. Millis, 
February 21, 1912. President. 



MARIETTA COLLEGE, 
MARIETTA, OHIO 

Marietta College desires to be represented at the One 
Hundredth Anniversary of the Seminary and in the 
inability of the President or member of the Faculty to 
attend has designated Rev. William T. Wilcox, D.D., a 
graduate of the College in 1891, of Bloomfield, N. J., to 
represent us on that occasion. 

Very truly yours, 

Alfred T. Perry, 

President. 
April 13, 1912. 

[289] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, 
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 

The President of Transylvania University acknow- 
ledges with pleasure the invitation to attend the Hun- 
dredth Anniversary of the Theological Seminary of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
at Princeton, New Jersey, and regrets exceedingly that 
a delegate cannot be sent to represent us on this occasion. 



DAVIDSON COLLEGE 
DAVIDSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

I have received the invitation of Princeton Seminary, 
and take great pleasure in appointing as the delegate 
from Davidson College on that occasion our Professor of 
Modern Languages, Rev. Thos. W. Lingle, Ph.D., who is 
himself an alumnus of Princeton Seminary. 

Cordially yours, 

Henry Louis Smith, 

President. 
February 23, 1912. 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of the invitation of 
the Princeton Theological Seminary to the University of 

[290] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Michigan to be represented by delegate upon the occa- 
sion of the exercises in celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the establishment of the Seminary, to be 
held Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, the 5th, 6th, and 
7th of May, 1912. This is to notify you that the Rev- 
erend Walter A. Brooks, of Trenton, New Jersey, a 
graduate of the University of Michigan, has been ap- 
pointed to act as our delegate. Mr. Brooks has accepted 
the appointment. 

Very sincerely yours, 

H. B. Hutchins, 

President. 
March 21, 1912. 



WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, 
NEW WILMINGTON, PENNSYLVANIA 

In response to the kind invitation of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary that Westminster College shall be rep- 
resented by a delegate at the 100th anniversary celebra- 
tion May 5, 6, 7, 1912, would say, that it will be my plea- 
sure as President of Westminster College to represent 
the institution on that occasion. 

With much appreciation of the courtesy extended by 
the Theological Seminary of Princeton, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 

R. M. Russell, 

President. 
February 19, 1912. 

[291] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE COLLEGE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 
NEW YORK CITY 

In response to the invitation of the Theological Semi- 
nary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, I am instructed to inform you that the College of the 
City of New York will be represented by President John 
H. Finley at the celebration of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the Seminary on Sunday, 
Monday and Tuesday, the fifth, sixth and seventh of 
May, nineteen hundred and twelve. 

Yours very truly, 

H. L. McCaktie, 
Secretary to the President. 
March 14th, 1912. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, 

LAKE FOREST, 

ILLINOIS 

I wish to acknowledge receipt of the invitation of the 
Directors, Trustees, and Faculty of the Seminary to 
Lake Forest College to be represented at the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the establishment of the Semi- 
nary, on the 5th, 6th and 7th of May. I shall hope to be 
present myself to represent Lake Forest on that occa- 
sion. 

Sincerely yours, 

John S. Nollen, 

President. 
February 21, 1912. 

[292:] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

MACALESTER COLLEGE, 
SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA 

The faculty and trustees of Macalester College request 
me to convey to you and through you to the officers and 
faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary their plea- 
sure over the invitation so kindly extended to send a dele- 
gate to the Hundredth Anniversary of your honorable 
institution. 

They have elected an alumnus of Macalester College 
and an alumnus of Princeton Seminary in the person of 
Eev. W. P. Lee, D.D., of Germantown, Pa. He has been 
notified of this action by the faculty and if he is able to 
be present will doubtless register as the official delegate 
of Macalester College. 

Respectfully, 

T. MOREY HODGMAN, 

February 29, 1912. President. 

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, 
CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Lincoln University appreciates the honor of an invita- 
tion to the One Hundredth Anniversary of Princeton 
Seminary. 

J. B. Rendall, principal, or Rev. Robert L. Stewart, 
D.D., alternate, either the one or the other, will have the 
pleasure of being present as a delegate. 

Very sincerely, 

J. B. Rendall, 
March 5th, 1912. President. 

[293] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

PARK COLLEGE, 
PARKVILLE, MISSOURI 

The Faculty of Park College begs to make apprecia- 
tive acknowledgment of the invitation of Princeton 
Theological Seminary to appoint a representative upon 
the occasion of the celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the establishment of the Seminary. We 
have requested Rev. C. B. McAfee, D.D., Park 1884, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., to serve as our representative. 

With sincere good wishes for the continued prosperity 
and work of the Seminary, I am, 

Very truly, 

Roy V. Magers, 
February 20, 1912. Secretary of the Faculty. 

PARSONS COLLEGE, 
FAIRFIELD, IOWA 

President Parsons wishes me to acknowledge the re- 
ceipt of the invitation to Parsons College to be repre- 
sented on the occasion of the One Hundredth Anniver- 
sary of Princeton. 

He wishes me also to state that he plans to be present 
himself and will represent Parsons College. If Presi- 
dent Parsons finds that he is unable to attend later on, 
you will be duly notified. 

With best wishes 'for the occasion, I am, 
Very truly yours, 

C. E. Downard, 
February 2lst, 1912. Secretary to the President. 

[294] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SOUTHWESTERN PRESBYTERIAN UNIVER- 
SITY, CLARKSVILLE, TENNESSEE 

In behalf of this University and its Theological De- 
partment, I am instructed by our faculty to thank you 
for the invitation to be represented at your centennial 
in May. We regret that we shall be unable to accept. 
With best wishes, 

William Dinwiddie, 

Chancellor. 

February 20, 1912. 



BELLEVUE COLLEGE, 
BELLEVUE, NEBRASKA 

The invitation of Princeton Theological Seminary to 
Bellevue College to be represented on the occasion of the 
one hundredth anniversary of its establishment by the 
General Assembly has been received and is deeply appre- 
ciated. 

We have the honor to appoint Rev. A. J. Dressier to 
represent Bellevue College on that occasion. 

I am sorry that the invitation did not come into my 
hands until recently and, therefore, that notification of 
this appointment has been so much delayed. 
Very sincerely yours, 

S. W. Stookey, 

President. 
April 1, 1912. 

[295: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

COE COLLEGE, 
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA 

Coe College accepts with pleasure the invitation to 
attend the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniver- 
sary of Princeton Theological Seminary, May 5, 6 and 7, 
1912. The College will be represented by the President 
of its Board of Trustees, Rev. Edward R. Burkhalter, 
D.D., LL.D. 

John A. Marquis, 

President. 

February 20, 1912. 



THE COLLEGE OF EMPORIA, 
EMPORIA, KANSAS 

I regret that it is impossible for the College of Em- 
poria to be represented at the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of Princeton Seminary. Let me convey to you our 
congratulations and good wishes upon that occasion. 

Sincerely yours, 

H. C. ClJLBERTSON, 

February 22, 1912. President. 



NEW WINDSOR COLLEGE, 
NEW WINDSOR, MARYLAND 

I have the honor to inform you that the invitation to 
attend the Hundredth Anniversary of Princeton Semi- 
te ] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

nary was received; and it gives me pleasure to state 
(D.V.) that I hope to attend personally, and enjoy the 
great occasion. 

Trusting that your efforts may prove a success, 
I am most respectfully yours, 

James Fraser, 

President. 
February 20, 1912. 



ALMA COLLEGE, 

ALMA, 

MICHIGAN 

The Faculty of Alma College acknowledge the receipt 
of your invitation in behalf of the Directors, Trustees 
and Faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary to be 
present at the Celebration of the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the establishment of the institution ; and send 
greetings, and compliment you upon the work your insti- 
tution has been able to accomplish in the one hundred 
years just closing, but regret to say that Alma College 
will be unable to be represented by a delegate. 
Very truly yours, 

F. E. West, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
February 26, 1912. 



[297 ] 



LIST OF DELEGATES 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

John F. Carson, D.D., LL.D., Moderator 

William H. Roberts, D.D., LL.D., Stated Clerk 

Rev. William M. Dager, A.B., Moderator of the Synod of New Jersey 

Martin D. Kneeland, D.D., Moderator of the Synod of New York 

Samuel A. Cornelius, D.D., Moderator of the Synod of Pennsylvania 

His Excellency Woodrow Wilson, Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D. 

Hon. William Jennings Bryan, LL.D. 



THE TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 

Hon. William J. Magie, LL.D. 

Simon J. McPherson, D.D. 

Hon. Bayard Henry, A.M. 

James W. Alexander, A.M. 

Robert Garrett, B.S. 



COURTS OF SCOTCH, IRISH AND CANADIAN 

CHURCHES 

Alexander Stewart, M.A., D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly 

of the Church of Scotland 
James Wells, M.A., D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly of the 

United Free Church of Scotland 

James D. McCulloch, D.D., representing William Menzies Alexander, 

M.A., B.Sc, M.D., B.D., Moderator of the General Assembly 

of the Free Church of Scotland 

[301] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

John R. Mackay, M.A., representing Duncan Mackenzie, D.D., Mod- 
erator of the Synod of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland 
John Macmillan, B.A., D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly of 

the Presbyterian Church in Ireland 
Robert P. Mackay, D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly of the 

Presbyterian Church in Canada 

Rev. David Russell Mitchell, Delegate of the Synod of Ballymena and 

Coleraine of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland 



THE PRESIDING OFFICERS OF 
AMERICAN CHURCHES 

John F. Carson, D.D., LL.D., Moderator of the General Assembly 

of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 
Russell Cecil, D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States 
John C. Scouller, D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly of the 

United Presbyterian Church of North America 

James I. Good, D.D., LL.D., President of the General Synod of the 

Reformed Church in the United States 

Nehemiah Boynton, D.D., Moderator of the National Council of 

Congregational Churches 

Junius B. Remensnyder, D.D.,LL.D., President of the General Synod 

of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the 

United States of America 

Peter Ainslee, D.D., Chairman of the Christian Union Commission 

of the Disciples of Christ 

T. F. Bode, D.D., representing J. Pister, D.D., President of the 

German Evangelical Synod of North America 

Robert F. Rudolph, A.M., D.D., representing Samuel Fallows, D.D., 

LL.D., President of the General Council of the Reformed 

Episcopal Church 



C302] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SUBORDINATE COURTS OF THE PRESBY- 
TERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA 

Synod of New Jersey 

Eben B. Cobb, D.D., Vice-Moderator 

Rev. Frank Lukens, A.M. 

John T. Kerr, D.D. 

Rev. Clarence E. Macartney, A.B. 

Hon. Woodrow Wilson, Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D. 

Robert E. Speer, D.D. 

Edward P. Holden, Esq. 

William H. Vail, Esq. 

Synod of Pennsylvania 

Samuel A. Cornelius, D.D., Moderator 

Robert Hunter, D.D. 

William L. McEwan, D.D. 

Ebenezer Flack, D.D. 

Rev. Samuel Semple, A.M. 

J. Vernon Bell, D.D. 

Synod of Baltimore 

Rev. Joseph Turner, A.B., Moderator 

James E. Moffatt, D.D. 

George P. Wilson, D.D. 

Francis H. Moore, D.D. 

Synod of West Virginia 
Herman G. Stoetzer, D.D. 

Presbytery of New Brunswick 

Rev. August W. Sonne, A.M., Moderator 

Henry C. Minton, D.D., LL.D. 

Walter A. Brooks, D.D. 

Rev. Daniel R. Foster, A.M. 

Rev. Francis Palmer, A.M. 

C303H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Presbytery of Philadelphia 

Rev. C. A. R. Janvier, A.M., Moderator 

Robert Hunter, D.D. 

William P. Fulton, D.D. 

Presbytery of Newton 

Rev. Oscar J. Hardin, A.B., Moderator 

Rev. E. Clarke Cline, A.B. 

Rev. J. Newton Armstrong, A.B. 

Rev. Ward C. Peabody, A.M. 

Theodore Tinsman, Esq. 

Presbytery of Rochester 

G. B. F. Hallock, D.D. 

Rev. George H. Fiekes, A.M. 

Presbytery of New Albany 
John Simonson Howk, D.D. 

Alumni in the Synod of California 
James S. McDonald, D.D. 



THE BOARDS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

The Board of Home Missions 
John Dixon, D.D., an Associate Secretary 

The Board of Foreign Missions 

George Alexander, D.D., President 
£3043 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The Board of Education 
Charles Wadsworth, Jr., D.D., President 

The Board of Publication and Sabbath School Work 
Hon. Robert N. Willson, President 

The Board of the Church Erection Fund 
Hon. Frederick G. Burnham, President 

The Board of Relief 

Samuel T. Lowrie, D.D. 

H. S. P. Nichols, Esq. 

William W. Heberton, D.D. 

Marcus A. Brownson, D.D. 

Members of the Board 

The College Board 

John H. MacCracken, Ph.D., President 

John R. Mackay, Ph.D., Member of the Board 



FOREIGN THEOLOGICAL FACULTIES 

The Faculty of Divinity of the University of Edinburgh 
Alexander Stewart, M.A., D.D., St. Mary's, St. Andrews, Scotland 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Glasgow 

Norman Kemp Smith, D.Phil., Stuart Professor of Psychology, 

Princeton University 

The Faculty of Divinity of the University of Aberdeen 

John Maenaughton, M.A., Professor of Latin in 

McGill University, Montreal 

Free Church College, Edinburgh 

James D. McCulloch, D.D., Principal 

L305 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Assembly's College, Belfast 
John Macmillan, B.A., D.D., Belfast 

The Theological Faculty of King's College, London 
Frederic Courtney, D.D., D.C.L., New York City 

The Theological Faculty of the University of Geneva 
David S. Schaff, D.D., Professor of Ecclesiastical History and His- 
tory of Doctrine, Western Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh 

The Faculty of Evangelical Theology of Geneva 
Alexander Couper Proudfit, A.M., Princeton, N. J. 

The Presbyterian College, Halifax 
J. W. Falconer, D.D., Professor 

Knox College, Toronto 
James Ballantyne, D.D., Professor of Church History 

Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario 

W. G. Jordan, D.D., Professor of Hebrew and 

Old Testament Criticism 

The Presbyterian College, Montreal 
John Scrimger, D.D., Principal 

Manitoba College, Winnipeg 

A. B. Baird, D.D., Acting Principal and Professor of 

Church History 

Westminster Hall, Vancouver, B. C. 
A. J. MacGillivray, D.D., Merton, Ontario 

The Faculty of Theology of Trinity College, Toronto 

Rev. E. Vicars Stevenson, M.A., Plainfield, N. J. 

C 306] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES OF THE PRES- 
BYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA 

Auburn Theological Seminary 
George B. Stewart, D.D., LL.D., President 

The Board of Directors of Auburn Theological Seminary 
Wilton Merle-Smith, D.D., Member of the Board 

Western Theological Seminary 
James Anderson Kelso, Ph.D., D.D., President 

Lane Theological Seminary 
Edward Mack, D.D., Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament 

Literature 

The Theological Seminary of Kentucky 

Jesse Lee Cotton, D.D., Professor in the School of 

Old Testament Exegesis 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Andrew C. Zenos, D.D., Professor of Ecclesiastical History 

San Francisco Theological Seminary 
Warren Hall Landon, D.D., President 

The German Presbyterian Theological School of the Northwest 
William H. Foulkes, D.D., President of the Board of Directors 

The German Theological School of Newark, N. J. 
Arnold W. Fismer, Ph.D., Professor of New Testament Exegesis 

and Ethics 

The Theological Seminary of Lincoln University 

Robert L. Stewart, D.D., Professor of Pastoral Theology, 

Evidences of Christianity and Biblical Archaeology 

Omaha Theological Seminary 
Albert B. Marshall, D.D., LL.D., President 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

OTHER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES 
IN THIS COUNTRY 

Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in America, 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
J. Preston Searle, D.D., President 

Xenia Theological Seminary, Xenia, Ohio 

Joseph Kyle, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Systematic Theology 

and Homiletics 

The Moravian College and Theological Seminary, Bethlehem, Pa. 
"W. N. Schwarze, Ph.D., the Resident Professor 

Andover Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Mass. 
John W. Platner, D.D., Professor of Church History 

Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va. 
Thomas R. English, D.D., Henry Young Professor of Biblical Litera- 
ture and the Interpretation of the New Testament 

Bangor Theological Seminary, Bangor, Me. 
David N. Beach, D.D., President 

General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 

New York City 

Arthur Prime Hunt, M.A., B.D., Professor of Christian Ethics 

Dickinson S. Miller, Ph.D., Professor of Christian Apologetics 

Colgate Theological Seminary, Hamilton, N. Y. 
David F. Estes, D.D., Professor of New Testament Interpretation 

and Librarian 

Yale University Divinity School, Neiv Haven, Conn. 
Williston Walker, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., Titus Street Professor 
of Ecclesiastical History 
. [308] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia, 

Alexandria, Va. 

Angus Crawford, D.D., Dean 

Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in the 

United States, Lancaster, Pa. 

John C. Bowman, D.D., President 

Newton Theological Institution, Newton Centre, Mass. 
George Edwin Horr, D.D., President 

Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa. 
J. A. Singmaster, D.D., President 

Columbia Theological Seminary, Columbia, S. C. 

Henry Alexander White, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., Professor of 

New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn. 

Lewis Bayles Paton, Ph.D., D.D., Nettleton Professor of 

Old Testament Exegesis and Criticism 

Oberlin Theological Seminary, Oberlin, Ohio 

Rev. Kemper Fullerton, A.M., Professor of Old Testament 

Language and Literature 

Union Theological Seminary, New York City 
Francis Brown, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., Litt. D., President 

Boston University School of Theology, Boston, Mass. 

William I. Haven, D.D., a Corresponding Secretary of the 

American Bible Society 

Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa. 

Franklin C. Southworth, D.D., President 

[309;] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

The Hamma Divinity School, Springfield, Ohio 
David H. Bauslin, D.D., Dean 

Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 111. 
Milton S. Terry, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Christian Doctrine 

Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn. 
Samuel Hart, D.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Dean 

Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pa. 

Richard Cameron Wylie, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Church History, 

Homiletics, Systematic and Pastoral Theology 

St. Lawrence University, Canton Theological School, Canton, N. Y. 
Henry P. Forbes, D.D., Professor of Biblical Literature 

Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago, 111. 

G. S. Rollins, D.D., Pastor of the Hope Congregational Church, 

Springfield, Mass. 

Seabury Divinity School, Faribault, Minn. 

Rev. William Austin Smith, Rector of Christ's Church, 

Springfield, Mass. 

Susquehanna University School of Theology, Selinsgrove, Pa. 

Charles T. Aikens, D.D., President 

Frank P. Manhart, D.D., Dean 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky. 
Edgar Y. Mullins, D.D., LL.D., President. 

Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, III. 
Carl A. Blomgren, Ph.D., Professor of Hebrew 

The Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church at 

Philadelphia 
Henry E. Jacobs, D.D., S.T.D., LL.D., Dean. 

H310: 






PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton, Mo. 
F. J. Hubach, B.D., Plainfield, N. J. 

Atlanta Baptist College Divinity School, Atlanta, Ga. 
Rev. John Hope, President 

Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Mass. 
Henry Sylvester Nash, D.D., Professor of New Testament 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J. 

Charles F. Sitterly, Ph.D., S.T.D., Professor of Biblical 

Literature and English Bible 

Crozer Theological Seminary, Chester, Pa. 
Milton G. Evans, D.D., President 

The Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 

at Chicago, III. 

Revere Franklin Weidner, D.D., LL.D., President 

Alfred Theological Seminary, Alfred, N. Y. 
B. C. Davis, D.D., President 

School of Theology, Howard University, Washington, D. C. 
Isaac Clark, D.D., Dean 

Vanderbilt University, Biblical Department, Nashville, Tenn. 
Wilbur F. Tillett, D.D., LL.D., Dean 

The Theological School and Calvin College of the Christian 

Reformed Church at Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Louis Berkhof, B.D., Professor of Exegetical Theology 

Westminster Theological Seminary, Westminster, Md. 

Claude Cicero Douglas, A.M., B.D., Secretary 

[311^ 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Temple University, Department of Theology, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rev. George H. "Wailes, Professor 

St. Leo Abbey, St. Leo, Fla. 
Harold McA. Robinson, B.D., Princeton, N. J. 

Houghton Wesleyan Methodist Seminary, Houghton, N. Y. 
Rev. H. R. Smith, Professor of English 

Western Theological Seminary, Atchison, Kansas 
Frederick G. Gotwald, D.D., York, Pa. 

Turner Theological Seminary, Morris Brown College, 

Atlanta, Ga. 

W. G. Alexander, D.D., Dean 

School of Theology, Kansas City University, Kansas City, Kansas 
Rev. D. Baines-Griffith, A.M., Spuyten Duyvil, N. Y. 

Atlanta Theological Seminary, Atlanta, Ga. 
John Wilson Bixler, D.D., Professor elect of Natural Theology 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry, Berkeley, Cal. 

"William Sacheus Morgan, B.D., Ph.D., Professor of 

Systematic Theology 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas 

Albert Henry Newman, D.D., LL.D., Dean and Professor of 

Church History 

Central Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church 

in the United States, Dayton, Ohio 

James I. Good, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Reformed Church History 

Theological Seminary of the Reformed Episcopal Church, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Robert L. Rudolph, A.M., D.D., Professor of Systematic Theology, 

Biblical Theology and Ethics 

[312H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

MISSIONARY SEMINARIES 

Albert Academy, Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa 
Rev. Edwin M. Hursh, A.B., Vice-Principal 

Seminario Theologico da Edgreja Presbyteriana no Brasil, 

Campinas, Brazil 

John Merrill Kyle, D.D., Lowell, Mass. 

American Collegiate and Theological Institute, Samokov, Bulgaria 
Rev. Lewis Bond, Plainfield, N. J. 

Union Theological School, Foochoiv, China 
Wilbert W. White, Ph.D., D.D., New York City. 

Nanking Union Theological Seminary, Nanking, China 
Rev. J. E. "Williams, Member of the Board of Directors 

Theological School of Shaowu, China 
Rev. C. L. Storrs, Shaowu 

St. John's University, Shanghai, China 
William H. Jefferys, D.D., Shanghai 

Ashmore Theological Seminary, Swatow, China 
Rev. A. F. Groesbeck, Member of the Board of Trustees 

Bapatla Normal Training School, Bapatla, South India 
Rev. John Newcomb, Bapatla 

Bareilly Theological Seminary, Bareilly, India 

Thomas Jefferson Scott, D.D., Ocean Grove, N.J. 

£313] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

American Baptist Theological Seminary, Ramapatnam, India 
W. L. Ferguson, D.D., Newton Centre, Mass. 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Saharanpur, India 
Rev. Fred. J. Newton, A.M., Professor 

The Theological School of the Kwansei Gakuin, Kobe, Japan 
Rev. S. E. Hager 

Doshisha Theological School, Kyoto, Japan 
George M. Rowland, D.D., Sapporo 

North Japan College, Sendai, Japan 
Teizaburo Demura, A.M., Dean of the Higher Department 

Japan Baptist Theological Seminary, Tokyo, Japan 
Rev. Charles B. Tenney, Professor of Greek Language and Exegesis 

Colegio Internacional, Guadalajara, Mexico 
Rev. A. C. Wright, Auburndale, Mass. 

Theological Department of Urumia College, Urumia, Persia 
Rev. Robert M. Labaree, Urumia 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Beirut, Syria 
Rev. Oscar J. Hardin, Professor 

Marash Theological Seminary, Marash, Turkey-in-Asia 
W. N. Chambers, D.D., Adana 

Western Turkey Theological Seminary, Marsovan, Turkey-in-Asia 
George F. Herriek, D.D., New York City 



C3i4 n 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 

Faculty of Princeton University 
Theodore Whitefield Hunt, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of English 

Robert College, Constantinople 
George Washburn, D.D., Boston, Mass. 

Dalhousie University, Halifax 
Malcolm James MacLeod, D.D., Minister of the Collegiate Church, 

New York City 

University of Toronto 

Kerr Duncan Macmillan, B.D., Instructor in Church History, 

Princeton Theological Seminary 

Harvard University 

William Wallace Fenn, D.D., Bussey Professor of Theology and 

Dean of the Faculty of Divinity 

Yale University 

Williston Walker, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., Titus Street Professor 

of Ecclesiastical History 

University of Pennsylvania 
James Alan Montgomery, Ph.D., S.T.D., Assistant Professor 

of Hebrew 

Brown University 
Henry T. Fowler, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature 

Rutgers College 
W. H. S. Demarest, D.D., LL.D., President 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Dartmouth College 

Rev. Benjamin Tenney Marshall, Pastor First Presbyterian Church, 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Washington and Lee University 
James Robert Howerton, D.D., Professor of Philosophy 

Dickinson College 
Eugene Allen Noble, L.H.D., President 

Hampden-Sidney College 
W. Creighton Campbell, D.D., Member of the Board of Trustees 

Williams College 
William Rankin, LL.D., Princeton, N. J. 

Washington College 
James Sylvester Armentrout, B.D., Lancaster, Pa. 

Union University 

Charles Alexander Richmond, D.D., LL.D., President of Union 

College and Chancellor of Union University 

Middlebury College 

Charles E. Hesselgrave, Ph.D., Pastor of the Stanley 

Congregational Church, Chatham, N. J. 

Washington and Jefferson College 
James D. Moffat, D.D., LL.D., President 

Columbia University 

Raymond C. Knox, B.D., Chaplain 

Dickinson S. Miller, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

University of Pittsburgh 

S. B. Linhart, D.D., Secretary 

C316] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Amherst College 
George Harris, D.D., LL.D., President 

Lafayette College 

Ethelbert D. Warfield, D.D., LL.D., President 

John M. Mecklin, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

New York University 

Herman H. Home, Ph.D., Professor of the History of Education 

and the History of Philosophy 

Pennsylvania College 
Philip M. Bikle, Ph.D., Dean 

Wabash College 
Arthur J. Brown, D.D., New York City 

Delaware College 
William James Rowan, Ph.D., Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory 

Marietta College 
William T. Wilcox, D.D., Bloomfield, N. J. 

Hanover College 
John Simonson Howk, D.D., Secretary 

Davidson College 
Thomas W. Lingle, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages 

University of Michigan 
Walter A. Brooks, D.D., Trenton, N. J. 

Westminster College, Pennsylvania 
Robert McWatty Russell, D.D., LL.D., President 

The College of the City of New York 

John H. Finley, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

C317 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Lake Forest College 
John S. Nollexi, Ph.D., President 

Macalester College 

William Porter Lee, D.D., Pastor of the Westside Presbyterian 

Church, Germantown, Pa. 

University of Wooster 
Louis Edward Holden, D.D., LL.D., President 

Park College 
Cleland Boyd McAfee, Ph.D., D.D., Pastor of the Lafayette Avenue 
Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Parsons College 
Willis E. Parsons, D.D., President 

Bellevue College 
Rev. A. J. Dressier, A.B., Princeton, N. J. 

Coe College 

Edward R. Burkhalter, D.D., LL.D., President of the 

Board of Trustees 

New Windsor College 
James Fraser, Ph.D., D.D., President 






[318] 



THE PROGRAMME OF EXERCISES 



THE FIRST DAY 
SUNDAY, MAY FIFTH 

ELEVEN A. M. 

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



Doxology 

Invocation 

The Reverend Sylvester Woodbridge Beach, A.M. 
The Pastor of the Church 

Hymn 

"All people that on earth do dwell" 

Reading of the Scriptures 

Ephesians iv: 1-16 
The Reverend Sylvester Woodbridge Beach, A.M. 

Prayer 

The Right Reverend Robert P. Mackay, D.D. 
Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in Canada 

Hymn 
"The Lord 's my Shepherd, I '11 not want" 

Anthem 

"Teach me, Lord" (Thomas Attwood) 

C321J 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Sermon 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 
Stuart Professor of Ethics, Princeton University- 
President of the Seminary 

Hymn 
"How sweet and awful is the place" 

The Administration of the Lord's Supper 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 

and 
The Reverend Sylvester Woodbridge Beach, A.M. 

Hymn 
"Rock of Ages, cleft for me" 

Benediction 
The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 



FOUR P. M. 

THE MILLER CHAPEL 

Conference for Prayer 

Led by the Reverend John Dixon, D.D. 

An Associate Secretary of the Board of Home Missions 

of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

Hymn 

"I love Thy kingdom, Lord" 
H322;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Prayer 

The Reverend Eiko J. Groeneveld, D.D. 

Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 

Butte, Montana 

Announcement 

"With reference to the tablet 

in memory of 

The Reverend Professor Charles Augustus Aiken, Ph.D., D.D. 

by 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 

President of the Seminary 

Hymn 
"For all the saints who from their labors rest" 

Beading of the Scriptures 

Matthew ix: 35-38 

Acts xiii: 1-3 

The Reverend John Dixon, D.D. 

Address 
The Reverend John Dixon, D.D. 

Hymn 

"The Son of God goes forth to war" 

Prayer 

The Reverend Maitland Alexander, D.D. 

Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Hymn 

"Who is on the Lord's side?" 
C323: 






CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Prayer 

The Reverend James D. Moffat, D.D., LL.D. 

President of Washington and Jefferson College 

and 

The Reverend Samuel McLanahan, A.M. 

Princeton 

Hymn 
"Blest be the tie that binds" 

Benediction 
The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 



SEVEN-FORTY-FIVE P. M. 

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Hymn 

1 ' Sun of my soul, Thou Saviour dear ' ' 

Invocation 

The Reverend Sylvester W oodbridge Beach, A.M. 
The Pastor of the Church 

Hymn 

"Crown Him with many crowns" 

Reading of the Scriptures 
John i: 1-5; 15-20; 29-51 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 

President of Lafayette College 

President of the Board of Directors 

H3243 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Prayer 
The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 

Anthem 
"What are these that are arrayed in white robes" (J. Stainer) 

Hymn 
"My faith looks up to Thee" 

Sermon 
The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 

Hymn 

' ' Jesus, the very thought of Thee ' ' 

Prayer 

The Reverend Robert Mc Watty Russell, D.D., LL.D. 
President of Westminster College, Pennsylvania 

Anthem 

"Nunc Dimittis" (B. Tours) 

Benediction 
The Reverend Robert Mc Watty Russell, D.D., LL.D. 



[325 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

THE SECOND DAY 
MONDAY, MAY SIXTH 

NINE-FIFTEEN A. M. 

The Academic Procession formed in the Faculty Room 
of Princeton University, Nassau Hall 

Kerr Duncan Macmillan, B.D., Marshal 



TEN A. M. 

ALEXANDER HALL 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 

President of Lafayette College 

President of the Board of Directors 

Presiding 

Address of Welcome 

The Reverend John Grier Hibben, Ph.D., LL.D. 
President of Princeton University 

Response 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Board of Directors 



Hymn 

' ' heavenly Fount of light and love ' ' 

Reading of the Scriptures 

II Timothy ii: 1-26 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Board of Directors 

[3263 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Prayer 

The Reverend Henry Eyster Jacobs, D.D., S.T.D., LL.D. 

Dean and Chairman of the Faculty 

The Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 

at Philadelphia 

Address to the Graduating Class 

and 

Distribution of Diplomas 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Board of Directors 

Announcements 

Fellowships and Prizes 

The Reverend Sylvester Woodbridge Beach, A.M. 

Secretary of the Board of Directors 

Conferring the Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Address to the Graduating Class 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 

President of the Seminary 

Singing of the Class Hymn 

"Onward, Christian Soldiers" 

The Graduating Class 

Address 

THE FUNCTION AND THE GLORY OF THE MINISTRY OF GRACE 

The Reverend John Fleming Carson, D.D., LL.D. 

Pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in the United States of America 

C327H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 
Address 

THE MAKING OF A MINISTER 

The Reverend Russell Cecil, D.D. 

Pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, Richmond 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in the United States 

Prayer 

The Reverend John Preston Searle, D.D. 

President of the Faculty of the Theological Seminary of the 

Reformed Church in America at New Brunswick, N. J. 

Hymn 

"0 Spirit of the living God" 

Benediction 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Board of Directors 



THREE P. M. 

ALEXANDER HALL 

Thomas Whitney Synnott, Esquire 

Vice-President of the Board of Trustees 

Presiding 

Hymn 
"Our God, our Help in ages past" 

Reading of the Scriptures 

I Corinthians i: 4-31 

The Reverend Professor Caspar Wistar Hodge, Ph.D. 

Princeton Theological Seminary 

[328] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Prayer 

The Reverend Dickinson Sergeant Miller, Ph.D. 

Professor of Christian Apologetics 
The General Theological Seminary of the Protestant 

Episcopal Church, New York City 

Address 

PRINCETON IN THE "WORK OF THE PASTORATE 

The Reverend William Leonard McEwan, D.D. 
Pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Address 

PRINCETON ON THE MISSION FIELD 

Robert Elliott Speer, D.D. 

A Corresponding Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions 

of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

Hymn 

"Lift up your heads, ye gates of brass" 

Address 

PRINCETON IN THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION AND 

RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

The Reverend William Hallock Johnson, Ph.D. 

Professor of Greek and New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania 

Address 

PRINCETON IN ITS EARLY ENVIRONMENT AND WORK 

Charles Beatty Alexander, LL.D. 

New York City 

Prayer 

The Reverend James Dunlop Paxton, D.D. 

Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Lynchburg, Virginia 

£329 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Hymn 
"Glory to Thee, Lord of Glory, for Thy saints at rest above' 

Benediction 

The Reverend Professor Caspar Wistar Hodge, Ph.D. 
Princeton Theological Seminary 



FIVE-THIRTY TO SIX-THIRTY P. M. 

Informal Reception at Springdale by the President of 
the Seminary and Mrs. Patton 



SEVEN P. M. 

THE CASINO 
Alumni Dinner 

The Reverend Joseph Heatly Dulles, A.M. 

President of the Alumni Association 

Presiding 

Grace 

The Reverend Daniel Neles Freeland, A.M. 

New York City 

Of the Class of 1847 

After-Dinner Speakers 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Seminary 

For the Class of 1862 

The Reverend James Smith McDonald, D.D. 

Corcoran, California 

[330] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

For the Class of 1872 

The Reverend "William Cooper Rommel, A.M. 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

For the Class of 1882 

The Reverend Charles Lee, D.D. 

Carbondale, Pennsylvania 

For the Class of 1892 

The Reverend Maitland Alexander, D.D. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

For the Class of 1902 

The Reverend "Wilson Thomas Moore Beale, A.M. 

Salisbury, Maryland 



THE THIRD DAY 
TUESDAY, MAY SEVENTH 

NINE-FORTY-FIVE A. M. 

The Academic Procession formed in the Faculty Room 
of Princeton University, Nassau Hall 

Kerr Duncan Macmillan, B.D., Marshal 



TEN-THIRTY A. M. 

ALEXANDER HALL 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 

President of the Seminary 

Presiding 

[ 3311] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Hymn 

"A mighty Fortress is our God" 

Reading of the Scriptures 
Ephesians i: 3-23 

The Reverend Henry Alexander White, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 

Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

Columbia Theological Seminary 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Prayer 

The Reverend William Douglas Mackenzie, D.D., LL.D. 

President of Hartford Theological Seminary 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Address 

ON SOME CHUKCH PROBLEMS 

The Right Reverend Alexander Stewart, M.A., D.D. 

Principal of St. Mary's College and 

Primarius Professor of Divinity in the University of St. Andrews 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 

Address 

A SCOTTISH ESTIMATE OF PRINCETON THEOLOGY 

The Right Reverend James Wells, M.A., D.D. 

Minister of the West Church, Pollokshields, Glasgow 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the 

United Free Church of Scotland 

Hymn 

"0 God of Bethel, by whose hand" 
£332] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Address 

IRISH AND AMERICAN PRESBYTERIANISM 

The Right Reverend John Macmillan, B.A., D.D. 

Minister of the Cooke Centenary Church, Belfast 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 

Church in Ireland 

Prayer 

The Reverend Charles Fremont Sitterly, Ph.D., S.T.D. 

Professor of Biblical Literature and Exegesis of the English Bible 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, New Jersey 

Hymn 

' ' Now thank we all our God ' ' 

Benediction 

The Reverend James D. McCulloch, D.D. 

Principal of the Free Church College 

Edinburgh 



ONE-THIRTY P. M. 

THE CASINO 

Commemorative Luncheon 

The Reverend Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. 

President of the Board of Directors 

Presiding 

Grace 

The Reverend Thomas Reese English, D.D. 

Henry Young Professor of Biblical Literature and the 

Interpretation of the New Testament 

Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Virginia 

C333 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Congratulatory Speeches 

From the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 
The Reverend William Henry Roberts, D.D., LL.D. 

Stated Clerk of the General Assembly- 
American Secretary of the World Presbyterian Alliance 

From the Other Presbyterian and Reformed Churches 

The Reverend John Crawford Scouller, D.D. 

Pastor of the Fourth United Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the United 

Presbyterian Church of North America 

From Other Churches 

The Right Reverend David Hummell Greer, D.D., S.T.D., LL.D. 

Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 

Diocese of New York 

From the Seminaries of the Presbyterian Church 

in the United States of America 

The Reverend James Gore King McClure, D.D., LL.D. 

President of McCormick Theological Seminary 

Chicago, Illinois 

From the Seminaries of Other Churches 

The Reverend Williston Walker, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D. 

Titus Street Professor of Ecclesiastical History 

Yale University Divinity School 

New Haven, Connecticut 

and 

The Reverend Edgar Young Mullins, D.D., LL.D. 

President of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Louisville, Kentucky 

From Princeton University 

The Reverend John Grier Hebben, Ph.D., LL.D. 

President of Princeton University 

[3341] 






PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Response 

The Reverend Francis Landey Patton, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Seminary 

Benediction 

The Reverend James Isaac Good, D.D., LL.D. 

Professor of Reformed Church History in the 

Central Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio 

President of the General Synod of the Reformed Church 

in the United States 



[335] 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 



PRINCETON SEMINARY AND THE FAITH 

SERMON 

BY THE REVEEEND FRANCIS LANDEY PATTON, D.D., LL.D. 

Stuart Professor of Ethics, Princeton University 

President of the Seminary 

" Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you 
of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write 
unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly con- 
tend for the faith which was once delivered unto the 
saints. ' ' Jude 3. 

PRINCETON Theological Seminary opened its doors 
a hundred years ago with one professor and three 
students— a ratio of instructor to pupils which ought to 
satisfy the most exacting demands of modern pedagogy. 
Dr. Miller was associated with Dr. Alexander a little later, 
and soon after that Dr. Hodge, then a very young man, 
began his long career as a member of the teaching staff. 
These three men, as Mr. Dulles has well said, determined 
the character of Princeton Seminary. We like to think 
that the institution has not lost the spirit of fervent 
piety into which it was baptized in its infancy, and that 
the stamp of religious character which was impressed 
upon it at the beginning has not been altogether effaced. 
Dr. Alexander was an acute thinker on theological and 
philosophical subjects, a man of great sagacity, keen in 
his analysis of religious states, and very spiritually 
minded. Dr. Miller was a courtly gentleman of elegant 

H339 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

scholarship and wide reading. He was an industrious 
writer and a stalwart defender of the great principles 
of Presbyterian doctrine and polity. Dr. Hodge came to 
his position with special equipment for his work. He 
had enjoyed the advantage of study in Germany, and 
was fully abreast of the theological controversies of his 
day. He won enduring fame as exegete, controversial- 
ist, ecclesiastic and dogmatician ; lived in the service of 
the Seminary to a ripe old age, and garnered the wisdom 
and experience of his life in his " Systematic Theology". 
With these men there was associated later on Dr. Jo- 
seph Addison Alexander, a man of rare literary genius 
and great linguistic attainments, who served the Semi- 
nary with remarkable power and efficiency until the time 
of his death. Dr. John Breckinridge was also a profes- 
sor in the Seminary for a short time during the early 
years of its history, but he left it to enter upon another 
form of ministerial labor ; and the same is to be said of 
Dr. James W. Alexander, whose distinguished career as 
pastor of what is now known as the Fifth Avenue Pres- 
byterian Church is one of the brightest pages in the an- 
nals of the American pulpit. 

Dr. William Henry Green, whom many of us still re- 
member, entered upon the work of instruction in the 
Seminary when he was quite young, and like Dr. Charles 
Hodge filled the full tale of fifty years in the Seminary's 
service. He did conspicuous work in the department of 
Old Testament Literature, achieved a world-wide repu- 
tation as an able supporter of conservative views in re- 
gard to Old Testament criticism, and rendered a lasting 
service to the church by his defence of the Mosaic au- 
thorship of the Pentateuch. Dr. Hodge had as his suc- 
cessors two sons who, during the later years of his life, 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

acted as his colleagues. Dr. Archibald Alexander Hodge, 
a man of less learning than his father, but, as I think, of 
more genius, took the chair of Systematic Theology. He 
was distinguished by keen metaphysical insight and a 
marvelous power of extemporaneous expression. Dr. 
Caspar Wistar Hodge, the distinguished successor of 
Dr. Addison Alexander, added the work of exegetical 
theology to his previous duties as professor of New 
Testament Literature. He was a man of refined scholar- 
ship, of sane and penetrating judgment, and command- 
ing influence. He was an inspiring teacher, and was 
singularly reverent in his attitude toward the Scriptures. 
Following Dr. Hodge in the chair of New Testament 
Literature came Dr. Purves, the pupil succeeding his 
teacher as Dr. Hodge had succeeded his. Dr. Purves, 
after several years of service in the Seminary, resigned 
his position to take the same pulpit in New York which 
Dr. James W. Alexander had taken years before. Dr. 
Purves was one of those rare men who combine in equal 
degree the qualities of an exact scholar and a popular 
preacher. 

Dr. Moffat, a man of fine classical scholarship, suc- 
ceeded Dr. Miller in the department of Church History. 
Coming to his position from the chair of Greek in the 
College of New Jersey, it was not to be expected that he 
would feel a deep interest in the discussion of theological 
subtleties. He preferred to look at church history on its 
literary side ; and he accordingly presented the story of 
the church's life in the form of flowing and interesting 
narrative. Dr. Aiken served the Seminary with unfail- 
ing ability and fidelity during the twenty years of his 
life among us, bringing to the work of his chair the re- 
sources of a broad and exact scholarship and, though la- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

boring under the great disadvantage of growing enfee- 
blement during the later years of his life, is still remem- 
bered as one who with great patience and self-sacrifice 
devoted himself to the defence of the gospel. 

Dr. McGill was a professor in the Seminary as far 
back as when I was a student here : a man of great sub- 
tlety of thought, mighty in the Scriptures, singularly 
copious and felicitous in prayer, an exceptionally fine 
teacher of homiletics and an able defender of the Pres- 
byterian form of church government, though I confess 
that in his zeal for a jure divino polity he sometimes 
seemed to me to put a burden upon certain proof texts 
greater than they were able to bear. Dr. Paxton suc- 
ceeded Dr. McGill, bringing with him the ripe experi- 
ences of large pastorates in Pittsburgh and New York, 
particularly in that historic church in the latter city 
whose members— I refer especially to the Lenox family 
—have done so much for this Seminary and for our 
Church at large. He was no novice in the department of 
Homiletics, for he had lectured on this subject before, 
both in Pittsburgh and New York; and the art of 
preaching had enlisted his deepest interest during his 
entire ministry. 

These men of course were not all alike; but they all 
spoke the same thing and there were no divisions among 
them. There may be some advantage in giving students 
object lessons in independent thinking by allowing them 
to hear the opinions of one professor flatly contradicted 
by the teaching of another professor in an adjoining 
classroom. But this advantage, whatever it be, is in my 
humble judgment more than counterbalanced by the 
advantage of institutional solidarity which has been so 
conspicuously manifested in the history of Princeton 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Theological Seminary. Some of the men to whom I have 
referred brought with them the ripe results of a long ex- 
perience in the pastorate. This is a matter for which we 
should be profoundly grateful. There should always be in 
the Seminary— as there are today, and never in larger 
proportion than today— a number of men who when they 
speak to students in regard to the work upon which they 
are about to enter can speak out of an affluent minis- 
terial experience. But of course it would hardly do to 
say that every professor in a theological seminary 
should first of all go through the apprenticeship of pas- 
toral experience. We should at least find it difficult to 
adjust such a view to the attitude we have taken toward 
some of the most distinguished men who have adorned 
the chairs of this Seminary. Dr. Charles Hodge never 
had a pastorate so far as my knowledge goes. Dr. Addi- 
son Alexander was never a pastor. Dr. Green I believe 
was a pastor for a short time, but I do not suppose that 
his experience in that capacity was of much help to him 
as a student of Old Testament criticism. Dr. Caspar 
Wistar Hodge was a pastor for a few years, but I imag- 
ine that this can be regarded as a negligible element in 
his equipment for the chair of New Testament Litera- 
ture. It is safe to say that a man can no longer enter 
upon a professorship that calls for exact scholarship and 
wide reading after long service in the pastorate and 
hope to render the kind and degree of service that is ex- 
pected of a professor in these days. The reason is obvi- 
ous. The functions of the pastor and of the professor 
have been so differentiated in these latter years that the 
minister of a modern church has no time for the acquisi- 
tion of highly specialized learning, and the work of a 
professorship, at least in some of the departments of the 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

theological curriculum, involves such exact knowledge 
and wide reading that the best results can be hoped for 
only in one who enters early in life upon the duties of his 
chair and gives his undivided interest to them. 

The theological attitude of Princeton Theological 
Seminary is, I think, pretty well understood: but lest 
there should be any misapprehension as to what that at- 
titude is, I wish to say a word, even at the risk of taxing 
your patience somewhat, in regard to our theological 
position. I do not for a moment deny that there may be 
a place in the world for an institution the professors of 
which work in the unhampered exercise of their judg- 
ment in the search for theological truth ; but in the na- 
ture of the case the seminary which is ecclesiastical in 
its origin and relationships and which does its work un- 
der the rubric of confessional obligations cannot have 
that sort of freedom. Princeton Theological Seminary, 
as you all know, is the creature of the Presbyterian Gen- 
eral Assembly, and is committed by the terms of its con- 
stitution to the propagation and defence of the Re- 
formed Theology. Therefore you need not be surprised 
when told that during the hundred years of its history 
it has been a conservative institution. Now, I am not 
ashamed of being conservative on any subject, and least 
of all have I any misgivings in regard to conservatism 
in theology ; but then there are several kinds of conser- 
vatism, and if you will bear with me I will say a word 
or two in regard to some of these forms of conservatism. 

There is, for example, what I may call the conserva- 
tism of ignorance. I do not use the expression in any 
disparaging sense; and, what is more, I have great re- 
spect for conservatism of the kind I have mentioned. 
We cannot well begin our work in any department with- 

[344 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

out some assumptions. Just what these assumptions 
shall be will depend upon circumstances. You do not 
expect a political economist, for example, to preface his 
lectures with a theory of the universe, though some the- 
ory of the universe must underlie what he has to say. 
It may therefore very easily happen that a man who 
starts with the assumption that the Bible is the word of 
God may do very valuable work as an expounder of the 
Bible though he know but little of the arguments where- 
with his assumption is discredited. If in our chairs of 
historical criticism our object is so to discuss the ques- 
tions regarding the authorship of the books of the New 
Testament that our students may thereby be the more 
confident of their position as to the divine authority of 
the New Testament, who shall say that those who with- 
out any minute acquaintance with contrary positions al- 
ready believe in that authority may not do a most impor- 
tant work in the presentation of the truths of Scripture 
to their congregations? If a man should say to me, "I 
take the Bible as the word of God. This is my great as- 
sumption; and with such fluency of speech and power 
of exposition as have been given to me, I preach it to the 
world", I for my part am ready to say that he is fulfill- 
ing a most important function. If our object in our 
chairs of historical criticism is to lead men to a sure 
knowledge that the Bible is God's word, and there are 
men who have already got there without being led there, 
and they with this supreme unchallenged assumption 
are ready to go out and preach the word, then in God's 
name let them go and may God bless them ! I have noth- 
ing to say against this sort of conservatism, but I ought 
to say at the same time that this is not the type of con- 
servatism which we are seeking to illustrate here. 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Then again there is the conservatism of the advocate. 
A man, that is to say, may feel that he holds a brief for 
a certain opinion or set of opinions and that he is called 
upon to defend these opinions with a certain amount of 
enthusiasm. The objection will immediately be made 
that he is not free in his search for truth, that he is 
handicapped by having his conclusions made for him in 
advance, and that he knows when he begins his inquiry 
just what is to be looked for at the end of the road. 
There is a certain amount of force in this criticism 
which I do not overlook, though I think that far too 
much is made of it. But we must be careful, in acknow- 
ledging the element of justice in the criticism, not to fall 
into the very common mistake of supposing that a man's 
position as an advocate operates to the prejudice of his 
full knowledge of the facts. Biassed he may be, but 
ignorant he need not be. When the muniments of title 
are assailed, it is likely that the defendant's counsel 
knows the strength of his opponent's case quite as well 
as he does himself. He is none the less possessed of legal 
knowledge and forensic skill because he has espoused a 
cause and advocates it with the warmth of a partisan. 
He may not be as dispassionate as the judge, but he 
ought to know quite as well as the judge the full value of 
the facts. It is quite possible, however, that an apolo- 
gete may come to feel that he has espoused a cause that 
he cannot honestly defend; and under these circum- 
stances, if he is an honest man, he will throw down his 
brief and retire from the case. I am not ashamed to 
admit that our Princeton theologians have to a great 
extent been advocates. They have felt that their func- 
tion was forensic as well as didactic. They have spoken 
and written in the warm glow of enthusiasm. They have 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

used well the weapons of controversy, and they have 
given expression to their thoughts through the copious 
vocabulary of invective, ridicule and sarcasm, and in the 
use of the hot rhetoric of telling phrase and pungent ar- 
gument. I confess that I miss this in the theological dis- 
cussions of today, and I sometimes think that we lose 
in force what we gain in politeness. 

There is, however, a third type of conservatism ; and 
that is the conservatism of calm scientific conviction. 
Now this scientific attitude toward open questions in 
theology is more suited to the psychological climate in 
which we live today. Men feel that epithets are not ar- 
guments, and that you can get better and more perma- 
nent results through a calm statement of the facts than 
you can through fine writing and florid rhetoric. I sym- 
pathize with this view very heartily. And still I miss 
the enthusiasm of the old controversies too ; and I would 
like to remind the younger theologians of the fact that 
they are defenders as well as investigators. Princeton 
Seminary, it is true, has taken a leading place in theo- 
logical controversy; but she has shown herself capable 
also of placid scientific inquiry, and we have a good il- 
lustration of both the polemic and the scientific conser- 
vatism of the Seminary in the controversial articles of 
Dr. Charles Hodge on the one hand and in his " Sys- 
tematic Theology" on the other. 

Let us remember, then, that Princeton Seminary by 
its constitution is committed to that body of divinity 
known as the Augustinian or Calvinistic Theology. This 
theology presupposes of course the great truths of Natu- 
ral Theology and the divine authority of the Bible. The 
whole area of controversial theology was therefore prop- 
erly within the purview of the Princeton theologians. 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Still the great debates were on grounds which presup- 
posed the theological prolegomena to which I have just 
referred. In the early days of the Seminary's life phil- 
osophy did not enter largely into the reading of a min- 
ister. In fact philosophy was very little read by any- 
body. Mr. Riley, in his book on American Philosophy, 
brings together the evidence of philosophical activity in 
this country during the eighteenth and early part of the 
nineteenth century, but it makes a poor showing. There 
was some idealism in New Haven ; Priestley had a few 
followers in Pennsylvania ; and there was some literary 
and a somewhat amateurish pantheism in New England : 
but philosophy was not a large factor in our theology; 
and in our colleges the Scottish philosophy of common 
sense was what was generally taught. It is likewise true 
that acute interest in the questions of the Higher Criti- 
cism came at a later date. We were slow to recognize 
the immigration of German thought as having any im- 
portant bearing upon our theological life. Accordingly 
theological controversy was largely of an interdenomi- 
national sort. We discussed Presbyterianism versus 
Prelacy ; and infant baptism in opposition to those who 
denied its Scriptural warrant. We had debates on the 
Trinity and the Divinity of Christ. We fought over 
again the battle between Calvinism and Arminianism; 
and against the sects that rose up to contradict it, we 
defended the traditional doctrine of future retribution. 
These discussions for the most part proceeded upon exe- 
getical grounds, each side maintaining that its position 
was the doctrine of the Bible, and neither disputing that 
the Bible was authoritative. In all these discussions 
Princeton Seminary bore an honorable part and ren- 
dered important service. 

[348] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

There was also in the family of Churches holding the 
Reformed Theology an intra- Calvinistic development. 
Under the influence of the New England theologians, 
such as Emmons, Hopkins, Edwards, Taylor and Park, 
there grew up certain modifications of the Calvinistic 
system which constitute a very important chapter in the 
history of opinion in America. I always had great re- 
spect for the New England theologians. I used to read 
them, and have never ceased to admire them, and by that 
I mean that I still cherish the admiring recollection I 
have of them. They were original, they were indepen- 
dent. These discussions were largely ethico-metaphysi- 
cal. They dwelt on the problem of God's relation to the 
world, and of the human will. They entered with great 
minuteness of discrimination into anthropological in- 
quiries respecting original sin and the distinction be- 
tween natural and moral inability. Our friends in New 
England did a great work, and as I have already inti- 
mated opened a splendid chapter in the history of 
opinion. They built their tabernacle with strict regard 
to the plans and specifications of their architects. We 
have nothing but admiration for the fine lines of the 
structure, but we somehow feel that they departed some- 
what from the pattern shown us in the mount. 

• Now Princeton Seminary, it should be said, never con- 
tributed anything to these modifications of the Calvinis- 
tic system. She went on defending the traditions of the 
Reformed Theology. You may say she was not original : 
perhaps so, but then, neither was she provincial. She 
had no oddities of manner, no shibboleths, no pet 
phrases, no theological labels, no trademark. She sim- 
ply taught the old Calvinistic Theology without modifi- 
cation: and she made obstinate resistance to the modi- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

fications proposed elsewhere, as being in their logical 
results subversive of the Reformed faith. There has 
been a New Haven theology and an Andover theology; 
but there never was a distinctively Princeton theology. 
Princeton's boast, if she have reason to boast at all, is 
her unswerving fidelity to the theology of the Reforma- 
tion. Semper eadem is a motto that would well befit her. 
The theological position of Princeton Seminary is ex- 
actly the same today that it was a hundred years ago. 
This may seem like a strange statement to make about a 
living institution in this very progressive age. We have 
of course put a new interpretation on the " days" of 
Genesis ; and in other particulars have used the results 
of science to help us in the interpretation of the Scrip- 
tures. I am speaking now, however, of the distinctive 
dogmatic content of the Reformed Theology. We are in 
possession of new material for studying the historical 
problems connected with the origin and growth of Bibli- 
cal Literature. We have a better text of the New Testa- 
ment and a better understanding of the meaning of the 
New Testament than were possessed by those to whom 
this Seminary owes the beginnings of its life. But have 
any of these improvements made necessary any modifi- 
cation of our belief as to the authority of Scripture or 
as to the dogmatic content of the Scripture ? I am not 
aware of any such necessity. Why then should our doc- 
trinal position undergo a change? -I can think of several 
things that might be said in reply to this question, but I 
do not feel that any of them should influence us very 
materially. "Do you mean to tell us"— I can imagine 
some one saying— "that you still adhere to that old the- 
ology of the Reformers which men in these days have so 
generally abandoned?" I am not aware, to begin with, 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

that it is so generally abandoned. But if it were, that 
would not prove it to be untrue. It would only prove 
that it is not fashionable. Professor James remarks 
somewhere in one of his later books that ' ' souls are not 
fashionable". Some of us nevertheless go on believing 
in " souls", hoping that by and by there will be a reac- 
tion, and that some of our philosophical friends will re- 
consider their hasty attitude toward the spiritual side of 
our nature. This is the way we feel toward the old the- 
ology. It may come into fashion again. 

"Has not modern philosophy made it difficult, if not 
impossible, to maintain the positions of the old theol- 
ogy?" some one else may ask. I am not aware of that 
state of things. I know that certain forms of philosoph- 
ical opinion are incompatible with dogmatic Christian- 
ity, but I do not know of any necessity for adopting 
those forms of philosophical opinion. "Can you con- 
tinue to hold", one may ask, "the numerical distinction 
between God and the world in view of the teaching of 
contemporary metaphysic % ' ' Quite as well, I answer, as 
we could when Spinoza identified natura naturans and 
natura naturata. Not all philosophers are pantheists, and 
if they were, I should not feel under obligation to accept 
their teaching. I know that psychology is invading the 
field of theology, and some of its representatives are try- 
ing to explain "conversion" by expressing the change 
involved in it in the terms of a natural process. My 
judgment is that they have met with very indifferent 
success in their endeavor to desupernaturalize conver- 
sion : but it interests me to notice that just now when the 
ministers seem disposed to stop talking about conversion 
the psychologists are turning their attention to it. 

Still again it may be said that the Christian conscious- 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ness, if it has not changed the meaning of the great doc- 
trines of Christianity, has given us a new scale of values 
in regard to them. But that is only on the assumption 
that the so-called Christian consciousness has a right to 
supplement the Scriptures or contradict their obvious 
meaning. If there is any value at all in the argument 
based on the Christian consciousness, it is to the effect 
that the New Testament is itself only an expression of the 
religious consciousness of the period in which it was writ- 
ten and may therefore be set aside by the Christian con- 
sciousness of today whenever the religious experiences 
of the two periods do not coincide. I should like to know, 
however, by what process we could secure a consensus of 
opinion that might be taken as an expression of the re- 
ligious consciousness of today, and I should like to 
know, moreover, what authority it would possess if we 
had it. What basis should we have for religious certi- 
tude, once we conceded that our only reason for faith is 
found in the religious consciousness, and that as the re- 
ligious consciousness of yesterday is set aside by the re- 
ligious consciousness of today, so also the religious con- 
sciousness of today may be contradicted by the religious 
consciousness of tomorrow ? 

Once more our objector may say that it is not a differ- 
ence in the interpretation of the Scripture but a differ- 
ence of attitude toward the Scripture which makes the 
old theology unpalatable to the modern mind. "Our 
change of belief", he would say, "is not due to exegesis 
or historical criticism. Grammar and logic have had 
little to do with our changed theological position. We 
reverence the writings— say those of Paul— but we do 
not read them literally; we see in their concrete state- 
ments the embodiment of great transcendental ideas." 

[352] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

This is an implied admission that if we do read Paul lit- 
erally it is hard to escape the conclusion that Paul be- 
lieved what the Christian world has always supposed 
that he believed. And the issue I am convinced is really 
whether we shall go on believing in what Paul teaches 
or give him up altogether. I cannot attach much value 
to what I have just referred to as a new attitude toward 
Paul and the other writers of the New Testament. And 
yet I would not be wilfully blind to a certain element of 
truth that may underlie this view of the matter. For I 
am not prepared to say that the language of the New 
Testament, with its imagery borrowed from the world of 
sense, adequately expresses all that it was intended to 
convey. I am not prepared to say that there are not 
some great ideas pertaining to the world of spiritual 
values which Paul's language borrowed from the world 
of fact but imperfectly adumbrated. Be that as it may, 
however, it is still true that when we impute to Paul a 
meaning which in all probability had never entered his 
mind, and deny to his words the meaning that he evi- 
dently meant them to have, we are handling the word of 
God deceitfully : and whether we do so in the icy speech 
of Hegelian philosophy after the style of Edward Caird 
in his Gifford Lectures, or in the fervid words of a vague 
and almost pietistic mysticism after the manner of Fa- 
ther Tyrrell in his "Christianity at the Crossroads" 
matters not. In either case we are reading into the New 
Testament what the writers of the New Testament never 
intended. There is then but one honest course to follow : 
either give up the Scriptures as no longer having au- 
thority, or take them at their face value and in their 
plain and obvious meaning. 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

But while I say that the theological position of 
Princeton Seminary has remained unchanged I am very 
free to admit that the issues of today are different from 
those of a former generation. The Calvinistic theology 
is a view of the world which takes account of the whole 
field of human conduct. All in fact that pertains to be- 
ing, duty and destiny falls within its purview. Believ- 
ing in the existence of a personal God we feel bound to 
interpret all events in the terms and under the great cat- 
egory of the divine purpose. If we believe in the incar- 
nation we must believe that it was included in that pur- 
pose. If we believe that salvation is through faith, it is 
very hard to escape the conviction that both the salva- 
tion and the faith which is instrumental to it are to be 
included in that purpose. 

All problems of ethics, all questions of duty, all phases 
of individual and social morality are therefore legiti- 
mately within the sphere of the Calvinistic theology. All 
the moral sciences and all the speculations of philoso- 
phers in regard to human conduct must come under the 
view of him who looks upon conduct as related to a su- 
preme norm of Right and an ideal conception of the 
Good. In the nature of the case, therefore, we must oc- 
cupy a great deal of territory in common with our breth- 
ren in other communions. With our friends in the Ro- 
man Catholic Church we protest against all forms of 
naturalistic and pantheistic philosophy; and we share 
with them the common heritage of the Christian world 
as it is embodied in the Nicene and Chalcedonian theol- 
ogy. With our brethren in the Lutheran, Anglican and 
Arminian communions we hold to the great principles 
of Protestantism and repudiate the corruptions of doc- 
trine which have crept into the Church of Rome. And 

IT 3543 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

more than that, the things wherein we agree with our 
brethren of other Christian communions are more im- 
portant than those in which we differ. We can therefore 
enter cordially into sympathetic relation with the irenic 
spirit which is so characteristic of our times, and that 
without ignoring or pushing into the background the dis- 
tinguishing features of the Reformed Theology. Those 
distinguishing features I need not say concern the posi- 
tion of the Reformed Theology in regard to the divine 
purpose and the doctrines of grace in relation to that 
purpose. I know you will understand me when I say that 
the points which distinguish our theology are not neces- 
sarily those of greatest controversial importance at the 
present day. Intrinsically they are as important as they 
ever were, but relatively they are of less importance. ' In 
other words, there has been a subsidence of interest in 
regard to some questions due largely to the emergence of 
acute controversial interest in other and more funda- 
mental issues. Men are not discussing the question re- 
garding the subjects or the mode of baptism. The day 
of hot controversy between Calvinists and Arminians 
has passed. Men are not writing treatises on theories of 
inspiration. They are not discussing the question of the 
Adamic relationship or of this, that and the other view 
of the atonement. The reason is not that these questions 
are of no importance or of little importance— and I 
think there is far too much indifference to their signifi- 
cance—but that the thought of the theological world has 
been occupied in recent years and is still occupied with 
questions which bear more radically upon the truth and 
value of historic Christianity. 

Into the discussion of these questions I do not propose 
to enter. But I am safe in saying that the emphasis of 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

contemporary debate is placed upon questions that are in 
their nature philosophical and historical. If the Bible is 
a divine revelation there is practically no difficulty in 
ascertaining the dogmatic content of Christianity. But is 
it % That is the fundamental question with which Christian 
theologians are called to deal. That question involves a 
number of historical inquiries in regard to the origin of 
the books that constitute the Bible. These inquiries 
again are in many cases conditioned by the theory of the 
universe which constitutes the philosophical presuppo- 
sition of those who enter upon historical investigation. 
I am far from saying that all who accept the results of 
negative criticism are advocates of a naturalistic or pan- 
theistic view of the world. But it is quite certain that, 
for the man who holds an antisupernaturalistic philoso- 
phy, a supernaturalistic theology is impossible. Nor is 
it too much to say that antisupernaturalistic bias has 
been the determining influence in much of the historical 
criticism of the last century. It would be idle to say, as 
some perhaps may say, that we can afford to be indiffer- 
ent to the questions mooted in philosophy and history, 
since our religion is one that is rooted in a personal rela- 
tion to Jesus and makes no demand upon us for meta- 
physical subtlety or historical erudition: for the value 
that we attach to our personal relation to Jesus must 
depend upon the place which Jesus occupies in the scale 
of being, and that precisely is the question which is un- 
der discussion at the present day. We are being made 
familiar every day with the effect of a naturalistic con- 
struction of the phenomena of the world upon the atti- 
tude which men assume toward Jesus. There are, for 
example, those who think that Jesus was a normal man, 
pure-minded and the teacher of an exalted type of mo- 

C356n 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

rality, who was cut off in the beginning of His days, but 
not before He became the founder of the Christian re- 
ligion. They look upon the supernatural elements of 
His life as the additions of a later generation of His fol- 
lowers who fitted to Him the prophecies of the Old Tes- 
tament and imputed to Him the supernatural elements 
regarding His birth and resurrection which we find in 
the Gospels. Some of those who take this view of Jesus 
are very much interested in what they call the creed of 
Jesus— that is, in what Jesus believed. I can understand 
that there may be some intellectual interest in discover- 
ing what Jesus believed, just as there is in finding out 
what Confucius or Plato believed. But I cannot attach 
much importance to it. If Jesus was a human being 
like the rest of us and His range of vision was limited to 
His times, I fail to see any great advantage in knowing 
what He believed. He did not know the Copernican the- 
ory of astronomy ; He had no knowledge of the doctrine 
of evolution and therefore had not seen how that doc- 
trine has affected the entire philosophy of conduct. 

This human being, however, men are willing to accept 
as embodying their ethical ideal : and I am safe in saying 
that with some people Christianity consists in regarding 
Jesus as an ethical ideal. Let us give a moment's 
thought to this view of Christianity. It is quite clear 
that if Jesus is simply an ideal man we need no faith in 
God as the presupposition of our attachment to Jesus. 
An atheist may be a good father and a public-spirited 
citizen; he may admire the character of Jesus and be 
willing to join a society membership in which consists 
simply in a promise to live according to the teachings of 
Jesus : atheistic Christianity is therefore quite a possi- 
bility and if by and by we have an organization of athe- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

istic Christians we need not evince any surprise. But 
that is not all ; for if Jesus is simply an exponent of ideal 
morality, there would seem to be no need of the historic 
Jesus. It is not the man Jesus but the ideal embodied in 
Him that is of value ; and all efforts to realize that ideal 
in our own lives will proceed upon the basis that it cor- 
responds to the judgments of moral value of which we 
find ourselves in possession. No great harm would fol- 
low, therefore, if we lost the historic Jesus altogether ; 
as lose Him we are very likely to do if we follow the nat- 
uralistic methods of historical criticism to their logical 
results. 

It is very interesting to watch the efforts of critical 
thinkers to escape from the obvious supernaturalism im- 
puted to Jesus in the Gospels. They fall into hopeless 
difficulties. Those, for example, who regard Jesus as an 
ideal teacher are confronted by the eschatologists who 
say that Jesus was primarily not a teacher at all, but that 
the motive of His ministry was to preach the near ap- 
proach of the end of the present social order and the 
setting up of the Kingdom of God. They hold that He 
shared the eschatological opinions current in later Juda- 
ism, and that He believed Himself to be the Son of Man 
who, in a short time, was to come again in the clouds of 
heaven, in power and great glory. His ethics were no 
ideal scheme of human conduct but were of an interi- 
mistic character, intended to serve the purpose of the 
short interval between His first and His second appear- 
ing, their alleged defects making them inadequate as a 
permanent norm of conduct in the existing socio-political 
order, as obviously also in that condition of things when 
men neither marry nor are given in marriage but are as 
the angels in heaven. 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

If the Bible is to be interpreted on a naturalistic basis, 
and it is merely a human Jesus who is presented to us in 
the Gospels, there is great plausibility in this view. How 
the eschatological and the ethical conceptions of the life 
of Jesus are to be harmonized, it is hard to say. But we 
can hardly be expected to feel much interest in a Jewish 
visionary who succeeded in convincing a few followers 
that He was the Son of Man who was within the space of 
a single generation to bring about the end of the present 
order of things and set up the Kingdom of God. And 
whatever be the genetic relation of present Christianity 
to the eschatological teachings of Jesus, one can not help 
feeling that a great strain is put upon human belief when 
we are taught that the world-conquering religion of 
Christ had its origin in the deluded judgment of a Jewish 
enthusiast respecting the end of the world. If the view 
which we are considering is correct, we are left to wonder 
how Christianity survived the disappointments of the 
primitive believers and how the followers of Jesus main- 
tained their faith in the second coming by successive 
postponements of the event. We wonder that a religion 
can still call itself by the name of Jesus after it has given 
up the idea to which He consecrated His life. Those who 
put a naturalistic interpretation upon the eschatological 
feature in the teaching of Jesus and who, at the same 
time, regard this as the leading feature of His ministry 
are fond of showing that it has undergone changes of 
interpretation until now, in the minds of some, it has 
vanished away. The parousia, looked for as imminent 
at first, has come to be regarded as indefinitely post- 
poned; or it has been exchanged for the problem of post 
mortem destiny ; and this, in turn, is giving way in some 
quarters to a doctrine of the Kingdom of God synony- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

mous with social regeneration and the uplift of society. 
So the eschatological and the ethical conceptions of a 
merely human Jesus meet at last on common ground, 
and Christianity resolves itself into an effort for the 
spread of good-will among men. The success of Jesus, 
in other words, is the victory of a social programme 
against which the life of Jesus was, in a certain sense, 
a protest. 

I can well understand that men will hesitate to think 
that the growth of Christianity has been adequately ex- 
plained by such a view of Jesus. Men may be easily 
forgiven for finding Jesus too uninteresting to be the 
subject of much consideration in these later days. When, 
therefore, still in quest of an adequate cause for the great 
religious phenomenon which we call Christianity, some 
turn to Paul and find in his strong supernaturalism, his 
wide world- view, his faith in the resurrection of Jesus 
and the atonement, his belief in the doctrine of sin, and 
his philosophy of salvation, the real secret of victorious 
Christianity, I do not wonder. It is true that Paul's 
theology was supernatural through and through, but it 
was not the superficial supernaturalism of a visionary 
looking for the speedy end of the world. It was a super- 
naturalism that made its appeal to what Paul believed 
to be accredited facts and, at all events, it did not belie 
its claims by building them upon a confessed historical 
failure. 

But the kaleidoscope of criticism is capable of still 
another twist. Liberal Christians who are satisfied to 
find in a human Jesus, possessed of unusual ethical in- 
sight, a sufficient explanation of Christianity must 
reckon now with a more radical school of thinkers. 

When it was the fashion to reject most of the Pauline 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

writings and put the Gospels down into the second cen- 
tury, it was not difficult to suppose that the supernatural- 
ism which envelopes the life of Jesus was a matter of 
comparatively slow growth. But with Paul's writings 
rehabilitated and the Synoptic Gospels, particularly the 
Gospel of Mark, forced back to a period in all probability 
prior to the capture of Jerusalem, it is not so easy to place 
a mythical interpretation upon the Gospels or to regard 
the miraculous features of the life of Jesus as the harm- 
less exaggerations of admiring disciples or the idealized 
representations of a later generation of Christian be- 
lievers. So deeply embedded is the supernaturalism of 
Jesus in the earliest records of Christianity that we must 
accept this supernaturalism as orthodox Christians have 
always accepted it, or we must construct a pre-Christian 
Jesus out of the eschatological and apocalyptic literature 
of the period covered by a century or more before the 
Christian era. In other words, according to the radical 
school of which I am now speaking the historical Jesus 
never existed. To the liberal Christians, they say, in 
effect, "Give up belief in the historical Jesus altogether, 
or else accept the supernaturalism with which the earliest 
Christian records invest Him." 

I do not mind having these men fall out and quarrel 
among themselves ; I like to read the biting sarcasm with 
which they attack one another, because I feel that when 
they fall out the old faith may come into its own. ■ But 
the position which they have brought us to is this : you 
can not get the supernatural elements out of the earliest 
records of the life of Christ, and you are compelled either 
to seek the origin of the Gospel portraiture of Jesus in a 
pre-Christian myth or to stand by the simple, plain nar- 
rative of the supernatural as it lies on the face of the 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Gospels themselves. Clearly, then, the issue is sharp be- 
tween a natural human Jesus and the ever-living and 
incarnate Jesus, between a Christianity that is super- 
natural in its inception and a Christianity that can be 
explained by a system of natural causation.' 

When, however, you have explained Christianity on 
the basis of natural causation and eliminated the super- 
natural, it is a religion for this world and it has no refer- 
ence to a world to come. You can make Jesus what you 
like, and say, if you please, that He is a prototype of the 
modern socialist; but whatever you say, this remains— 
He and His methods have nothing whatever to do with 
anything outside the boundaries of this earthly life. 
Abolish poverty if you can, but you can not abolish death. 
Give us pure food and better sanitation, equalize the 
luxuries of happiness in as large a measure as you can 
—it makes no difference: it is but a little time until the 
rich man will leave his plenty and the poor man will 
leave his want ; death will come alike to both, and to nei- 
ther has the gospel a word to say with respect to eternal 
life. 

It must be remembered, however, that many who are 
unable to accept the full account of miraculous Chris- 
tianity given us in the Gospels are yet far from denying 
that there are unescapable elements of supernaturalism 
in Jesus. Whatever doubts they may have in regard 
to the Virgin birth or the story of our Lord's resurrec- 
tion, they are impressed with His unique personality; 
they feel that He is the fullest revelation of God; and 
that for the purposes of their religious nature He is to 
them as if He were God. Moreover, they make a great 
deal of the Messianic consciousness of Jesus. I can not 
help feeling, however, that the argument for the super- 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

natural element in Jesus, based upon the reports of His 
subjective states given us by the evangelists, is but a poor 
substitute for the objective supernatural facts which are 
presented to us in the Gospels, and that when faith in 
these objective facts is weakened, men will be disposed to 
account for those subjective states which go by the name 
of the Messianic consciousness by regarding them as the 
offspring of an unbalanced mind. It is so easy appar- 
ently for some men to pay flattering compliments to 
Jesus after they have discredited the facts which justify 
them. The truth is that non-miraculous Christianity is 
not alluring. Men are slow to give up the traditional 
supernaturalism of the gospel story. We honour the 
faith and religious fervour which still retains a mini- 
mum of the traditional doctrine regarding the Divinity 
of Jesus, even though it be at the expense of a rigid logic, 
and though it do more credit to the religious feelings 
than to the intellect. But, nevertheless, we feel prompted 
to say, "You have discarded the great supernatural facts 
of the life of Jesus ; you have stripped Him of the insig- 
nia of divine royalty; what boots it now that you pin 
upon His breast the gaudy decorations of a minimizing 
theology?" It seems impossible to compromise between 
the naturalistic and the supernaturalistic view of Jesus. 
If we give up the account of His divine mission as the 
evangelists present it, then we must conclude that no 
authoritative divine message has ever reached us and we 
are no better off than men were in the days of the Greek 
philosophy. We have had Platonists and Aristotelians, 
Stoics and Epicureans, idealists and materialists; we 
have had agnostics in abundance from Protagoras down 
to our own times. But they brought no message from the 
other world, and none since then has come to us. We 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

are as ignorant as they were in regard to the great prob- 
lem of destiny. The hypothesis of a merely human Jesus 
makes Christianity a moral philosophy and kills its claim 
to be a message from God. Think of what this means 
to us. How we have boasted of Christianity ! How we 
have looked upon it as the only ark of safety! How 
we have urged men the world over to take refuge in 
it and have God shut them- in! This proud ship of 
Christianity ! we have freighted her with all our hopes 
and we have embarked in her the fortunes of our souls. 
She has plowed the ocean this well-nigh two thousand 
years ; she has weathered the storms of persecution ; she 
has sailed through the fogs of superstition ; she has en- 
countered the collisions of philosophy; she has been 
swept from stem to stern by great waves of scepticism ; 
but in spite of it all, we have paced her decks with a sense 
of unwavering security ; we have felt sure that no wind 
could harm her, no sea could swamp her, no obstacle arise 
to check her onward way, until, at last, in an unhappy 
moment she struck the iceberg of historical criticism, 
and down she went to a fathomless grave. 

Are you ready to take that view of Christianity 1 Oh ! 
you who think perhaps that a theological seminary is a 
place where men spin gossamer webs of metaphysical di- 
vinity, get heated in controversy over the dating of a few 
books, and discuss the relative merits of various theories 
of the atonement, I want you to understand what the real 
issue is ; and when Mr. Love joy would have us break the 
entangling alliance of religion and history, I want to 
know whether you are ready to have that alliance broken. 
Do you realize the situation? Do you hear with calm 
complacency and unconcern the order that is given to 
leave the proud ship of Christianity, and lower the boats 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of philosophy % Are you ready to sit in your little dory 
of philosophy and, under an unlighted sky, look out over 
the waste of black water and hope that somehow, some- 
where or somewhen you will drift to some shore of happy 
destiny % Is that your position % You have cut loose from 
history, but you can not cut loose from reason. What 
are your prospects % You are sure of your own selfhood. 
You have satisfied yourself that mechanism can not ex- 
plain the world. Some will tell you of a pluralistic uni- 
verse of separate souls bound together by no common 
tie. Some will tell you that our separate selfhoods are 
only momentary manifestations of an infinite self ; and 
some again will tell you that there is a numerical distinc- 
tion between God and the finite spirits which He has 
created. You will argue, and you will do well to do so, 
that the truths of reason point unmistakably to God. 
You will say that these judgments of worth and value 
need God to give them meaning. Men will tell you that 
the religions of the world— Christianity among them— 
are simply separate modes of God's manifestation of 
Himself. You have ideals that you say ought to be real- 
ized and which are index fingers pointing like prophecies 
to a world to come. You call this man good, and this man 
bad ; this man, you say, is brave and that man a coward. 
What do you mean ? You look forward to the fulfillment 
of your ideals ; but look back, look down : where did you 
get these ideals ? They are but nature 's way in the broad 
process of change which has adjusted you to an environ- 
ment and which makes it possible for you to live. You 
are the victims of a wholesale deception. A gigantic im- 
posture has been practised upon mankind in order that 
nature might secure to herself the perpetuating of the 
life of humanity. What are you going to say % Are you 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

going to say that you have no interest in philosophy and 
that these things do not concern you? You repeat, "I 
don't care what philosophers may say, I believe in his- 
torical Christianity. ' ' If you do, have you no interest in 
other people ? Do you not desire to help them, to prevent 
them from making shipwreck of their own hopes ? Have 
you no interest in showing them that the philosophy 
which robs the world of Christ and religion of God, which 
puts the world of ideals under the imperious sway of 
meaningless fact, which makes the word "is" the be all 
and end all of existence and has no place for ethical norms 
and moral obligation, is only one way of explaining the 
facts of the universe ; and that there is another way, a 
better way, a safer way, a more logical way of construing 
the same facts, which will rehabilitate us in our old faith 
in God and in Jesus Christ whom He has sent; will 
save us from the disappointment that speaks in the bit- 
terness of regret and says, "We hoped that it was he who 
should redeem Israel"; and from the depths of the de- 
spairing pessimism which says, "They have taken away 
my Lord and I know not where they have laid him"? 
Would you not like to help them? My friends, that is 
what this Seminary is for. Will you help us ? Will you 
give us books, will you give us buildings, will you give us 
professors, will you give us men with special learning 
and peculiar aptitude to enlist in the greatest work the 
world can do? Will you do it? Will the great, rich 
Presbyterian Church say "No" to Princeton Seminary 
which is ready to do what needs to be done, and withhold 
from her the sinews of war? I put this upon the con- 
science of the great Church that I am privileged to serve. 
And, my colleagues, my friends, my brothers, what are 
we for ? What can we do in the face of what some regard 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

as an appalling disaster ? I think we can do something. 
I think we can rally the crew and cheer them up ; I think 
we can stop a panic among the passengers and let them 
know that the ship is safe. I think that there are some 
of us— and I speak the more confidently because I am 
not included in the number— there are some of us who 
have a right to speak in the expression of expert opinion 
and declare with the authority of ample knowledge that 
no harm has come to the ship, but that she will go pros- 
perously on. I admit there are two ways of looking at 
theological study. There is a scientific way— and there 
is a large place for it— where we regard men of every 
shade of opinion as with us engaged in the same scien- 
tific pursuit, dispassionately seeking to get the truth, the 
whole truth and nothing but the truth. There is a place 
for philosophic calm and the placidities of scientific 
inquiry. But there is another view. These men who are 
arrayed against us are the King's enemies, and we who 
hold commissions as officers in his army owe it to that 
commission that we draw sword in defence of the King's 
dominions. 

" Soldiers of Christ, arise! 
And gird your armor on, 
Strong in the strength which God supplies 
Through His Eternal Son." 

And you, my friends, who are about to go out after the 
period of training in this Theological Seminary, bear 
with me if I say a single word to you on the nature of 
your calling. If you go out with a feeling that you are 
simply representing the moral aspect of society, that 
your great work is to engage in the development of social 
morality, that your great object is to be considered as au- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

thorities on civic righteousness ; if your rallying cry be 
the uplift of society, which means, in its last analysis, 
simply more luxury for the poor and more self-denial 
for the rich ; then let me tell you that you have misunder- 
stood the real meaning of your work. You are to bring a 
message of hope from another world to dying men. Your 
thought must move in a transcendental sphere of unseen 
realities. You are called to deal with a set of emigrants 
who are setting sail for another shore ; your work is not 
so much to furnish them luxuries on the voyage as to put 
into their hands a passport that will be useful to them 
when they land. Men will deride your message; will 
challenge your credentials; will speak of your work 
in the patronizing tone of worldly disdain. You will 
sometimes be tempted to surrender to the current of anti- 
Christian sentiment. But be strong. Know well the 
strength of the cause which you have espoused and be 
unwavering in your loyalty to it. And remember that no 
small part of your duty is to see to it that you earnestly 
contend for the faith once delivered unto the saints. 



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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



A LITTLE BOOK OF LOVE AND LIFE 

SERMON 

BY THE REVEREND ETHELBERT DUDLEY WARFIELD, D.D., LL.D. 

President of Lafayette College 

President of the Board of Directors 

"These are written, that ye may believe that Jesus is 
the Christ, the Son of God ; and that believing ye may 
have life in his name. ' ' John xx : 31. 

THESE are written, that ye may believe. " This book 
is a book with a purpose. No mere biography, no 
calm and colorless study of the life of a man. It is a great 
plea. A plea made at the judgment bar of every soul to 
which it comes. A plea for the hero to whom the heart of 
the writer was attached by the strongest ties of obliga- 
tion, the tenderest bonds of affection, that He may re- 
ceive the full meed of praise and honor to which He is 
entitled ; but far more a plea for the reader that he may 
share the fealty of the writer and find for himself that 
life in which the author rejoices. 

No mere dry-as-dust zeal has led the writer to seek out, 
after the manner of biographers, every minutest frag- 
ment of information in regard to the subject of his book, 
and record it with pedantic care. Out of the immense 
stores of a memory crowded with knowledge and over- 
flowing with information he selects with thoughtful re- 
serve the matter most significant and germane to his 
purpose and marshals it with the consummate skill, not 
of the literary artist, but of the convinced disciple. 

The whole world might not contain all that could be 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

written of the life of his Lord. A few pages may suffice 
to prove Him to each sincere and sin-sick soul Christ and 
Lord. These are those pages. They belong to the litera- 
ture of power, not of art, nor of criticism. They have 
proved their power in the experience of tens of thou- 
sands of devoted lives. They have been the warm sun- 
shine winning back to loveliness and life frost-bound 
spirits held in the cold indifference of a living death. 
They have been as a rock in a storm, a safe foothold for 
many an imperilled heart. Upon them have critics flung 
themselves through ages upon ages, only to find them- 
selves powerless to break the compelling power in the 
story which they tell. No figure can portray, no tongue 
can tell, all that these precious pages have meant to the 
Church of Christ. There they are a few leaves of a book, 
but here they are in the heart the living testimony of one 
who knew and loved Him who was for the writer and for 
us the resurrection and the life. 

The unvarying tradition of the early church attributes 
this book to John the Apostle, and tells us that the elders 
of the church of Ephesus constantly besought their be- 
loved bishop to write out for those who should come after 
him, and should not hear his living testimony, the story 
that he was accustomed to tell of the living and dying 
and rising again of his divine Master. At last yielding 
to their entreaties he wrote the book that bears his name. 

The story is worthy of the book and the book of the 
story. It is clear that the date is late. John is already 
far on that long way which led him last of all the com- 
panions of the Lord to the grave. Mark and Matthew 
and Luke have written their Gospels. John and the 
church at large have these noble pictures of Jesus' life. 
He does not need to repeat the main features of a history 

H370] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

already so familiar. He rather needs to enrich it with 
special features of Jesus' teaching, to show that from 
the first men were repelled as well as attracted by His 
words of loving appeal as much as by those of high 
authority, and to draw out with power and plainness the 
great meaning of it all— the Messiahship of Jesus, His 
Sonship, and His gift of life through belief in His name. 
In a spirit characteristic of his Lord, John throws 
across the opening passage of his narrative the morning 
beam of divine revelation. Jesus seems never to have 
omitted an opportunity to bring the Old Testament 
teaching into His own. Paul had already in his second 
letter to the Corinthians flashed this same sunbeam into 
his message when he wrote: "God who commanded the 
light to shine out of darkness hath shined in our hearts 
to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in 
the face of Jesus Christ. " John gives it a new and richer 
meaning as he develops in a few words his doctrine of 
the eternal Word. 

Turning then to his story he brings the forerunner, 
whose disciple he was, upon the scene, and in a narrative 
all athrob with life details day by day the opening of 
Christ's ministry as he knew it. The short records of 
each day's incident are like the strong wing-beats of an 
eagle mounting up to its place of more than world-wide 
vision. Yet no simile can equal the simple facts of the 
narrative. 

For John gives us here an old man's memory of a mo- 
mentous day in his youth ; of the day that he first met 
Jesus. The day on which we first met Jesus must be to 
each of us, however unfruitful our lives, a day of deep 
significance and precious memory. But to John with 
his capacity for love, his capacity for being loved, who 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

was the beloved of Jesus, what must that day have been ! 
Yet it came in no blinding splendor, no revelation of 
things unutterable. The simple story, as is generally 
true of the things that mean most to the soul, is a tale of 
every day in its outer features. John the Baptist is 
standing with his disciples and Jesus passes by. John 
points Him out, saying: "Behold the Lamb of God." 
Even the heart of John, the young and eager disciple, 
seems not to have kindled at the words. It is only when 
on the next day the Baptist again makes the same decla- 
ration that John and Andrew are aroused and follow 
Jesus. Already a seeker after God, John speedily comes 
to share with Andrew and Philip the belief that they had 
found Him of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, 
did write, and that He was Messias. 

Thus John makes us see that it is to the heart prepared 
that Jesus comes as the Christ. And even he was not at 
once ready for all that great truth imports. The seeker 
after God became the disciple of Jesus. He went and 
saw where he dwelt. He abode with Him. The old home 
was forsaken. The old life was left behind. The busy 
hands no longer drew the nets. Now it is that he takes 
the open road with Jesus and learns new lessons by the 
way. The old world takes on new meanings. The sower 
as he sows the seed, the digger after hid treasure, the 
thirsty wayfarer as he draws water from the well, even 
the familiar fishermen as they toil at their nets, have a 
new significance, and require fresh interpretations. The 
simplest things seem to have deeper meaning, but the 
greater mysteries of life grow more plain. The long 
sought clue to the deepest mystery of all is at last dis- 
covered. The love of God is manifest in the flesh. He 
beholds in Him who is the Christ the very Son of God. 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Day by day the meaning of it all works itself out. 
Sometimes in His words, His wonderful words of life ; 
sometimes in His silence, the silence of One whose spirit 
walks with God ; sometimes in His deeds, His acts of help 
and healing; sometimes in His inaction, the submission 
of One who knew how both to bear and to forbear ; always 
and forever, the Great Teacher led the responsive pupil 
up along the shining way of life. Now it is a day of 
sunlit glory as when He was transfigured on the mount, 
now of tremendous shadow turned to light as when 
Lazarus is raised up, but often it is half in sunshine, half 
in shade, and, ere the Lord of Glory was perfectly made 
known, a via dolorosa, through Gethsemane and on to 
Calvary. 

While there is a great tenderness in John's picture of 
Him to whom he had listened as his master, and learned 
to acknowledge as his God in the throes of the awful 
agony of His night of humiliation, there is also a noble 
restraint. Over it all rests the assured calm of Him who 
knows the sequel. That the day dies but to return again 
in restored beauty. That the tragedy, awful as it is, is 
not of death unto death, but of death unto life. That the 
crucifixion of love is also love's coronation. And to John 
as he writes, the sorrow of his soul for the sufferings of 
the best beloved is assuaged by the consolation of that 
dear Lord who, though He died, still lives ; though He 
suffered, reigns in glory. 

And so the narrative moves with growing power and 
never wavering confidence to the confession of the re- 
stored faith of Thomas: "My Lord and my God"; and 
Jesus' benediction: "Thomas, because thou hast seen me 
thou hast believed : blessed are they that have not seen, 
and yet have believed." Here he pauses. Surely what 

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has been written must suffice. Surely the object of his 
writing will be attained. And so he says: "Many other 
signs truly did Jesus in the presence of his disciples 
which are not written in this book ; but these are written, 
that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of 
God ; and that believing ye might have life through his 
name. ' ' 

It is the fashion in the critical world to approach 
such a book as this through an introductory study of 
its date and authorship, its authenticity and its rela- 
tion to contemporary thought. A mist is thereby often 
raised that obscures its clearness and dulls its brightness. 
It is its own best answer to such objections as have been 
raised in regard to it. As in a court of justice no ques- 
tions may be raised as to the character and credibility of 
a witness until he has told his story, and as a story told 
with convincing directness, simplicity and evident fa- 
miliarity with the subject testified to, possesses and con- 
trols the minds of judge and jury despite the assaults of 
any cross-examination, so this book justifies itself gener- 
ation after generation to those who approach it with an 
open mind. 

Whoever wrote it knew Jesus and knew Him as Christ 
and God. Who could have known Him so fully and so 
completely as the beloved disciple? Who could have 
written of Him with such a soaring spirit entering into 
the fulness of His love and His purpose to save men 
from sin for eternal life as he to whom has been assigned 
for symbol the eagle rising above the darkness of the 
storm and baring his eye to the full blaze of the flaming 
sun 1 But whoever wrote it, it has fulfilled its purpose 
and will continue to do so through the ages to come in 
giving to many their fullest vision of a divine Saviour 
and their surest grasp upon eternal life. 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

This beautiful book then is the story of a great friend- 
ship. How we delight to talk of such friendships, to call 
friendship the " master-passion," to praise those who 
have shown a great capacity for friendship, to applaud 
the self-sacrifice of the few who have effaced themselves 
for their friends as Jonathan did for David. Friendship 
indeed is marked by some of the finest of human virtues. 
Affection perhaps comes first, then generosity of heart ; 
when testing times come, affection deepens into devo- 
tion, and generosity into capacity for sacrifice ; faith and 
trust and constancy are found in the bright constellation. 
In all these things this book abounds, for Jesus was the 
friend of John and John of Jesus, and no ennobling trait 
of friendship is wanting in the story. 

But who could ever be content to call this merely the 
annals of a great friendship? It defies limitation to 
merely human ties, to a life bounded by the cradle and 
the grave. Perhaps a higher mode is found in the rare 
and beautiful devotion of a disciple to a great teacher. 
Plato has dignified such an association and John surely 
glorifies it. Socrates, too, led Plato to look with longing 
out through the gates of death. Philosophy brings into 
such a relationship the exalting power of intellectual 
aspiration and moral purpose. John found in the fel- 
lowship of Jesus all that philosophy had to offer and 
more than philosophy had to give— the transforming 
power of a great faith. He not only looked out beyond 
the gates of death, he looked forth into the eternal years 
of God and brought heaven down to earth. 

But John had more than this to tell. He had a philo- 
sophical ideal and a practical purpose. He had lived into 
an age when men were seeking to philosophize away the 
facts of his history as they had earlier denied their 
occurrence. He sets himself to testify to his facts, to 

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establish their relation to history and prophecy, and vin- 
dicate for every soul who will accept it the vivifying 
power of faith. And this for no mere academic purpose. 
Philosophy was not self-sufficient for him. It was to 
make men understand the real meaning of life ; of a life 
lived in love for love's own dear sake ; of a love that was 
divine in source as well as in character ; of a life that was 
eternal as well as divine. In short, John set himself to 
make men understand and embrace life and love in the 
assured faith in Him who was Himself Life and Love. 

We are prone to think that our difficulties are peculiar 
to our own age and greater than those of any other time. 
But the very same features of Christ 's gospel are empha- 
sized by John as need emphasis to-day : first, the histori- 
cal connection of Christianity and Judaism, the oneness 
of the revelation of God in the Old and New Testaments, 
that salvation is of the Jews, that Jesus is the Christ; 
second, that the Word was made flesh, that Jesus is the 
very Son of God ; third, that the life which Jesus came to 
proclaim is natural and real, as Tertullian has beauti- 
fully said: "The soul is by nature Christian"; and, 
finally, that entrance into that life is through belief on 
the name of Jesus. 

The position of John gives significance to the purpose 
of his Gospel. He is no longer the young disciple full 
of eager devotion, but of as yet unchastened heart. He 
has not only passed through the tragedy of Jesus' earthly 
career, with its rising hopes and declining fortunes, with 
its blinding lights and its unf athomable darknesses, with 
its poignant sorrows and heavenly joys ; he has not only 
found the clew to its mystery, and the purpose of its 
plan ; but a long life has made him understand the atti- 
tude of men to the gospel he had to preach. He knew 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

how strong are its attractions, how great its repulsions. 
He knew what barriers sin could raise before it, what 
opposition it could arouse in hearts dominated by the 
power of Satan. The minister of the Word speaks in 
him. Nothing is more striking in the arrangement of his 
material than the way in which he shows how throughout 
Jesus' teaching He drew some and repelled others. And 
this is surely the accent that the aged man of long expe- 
rience alone would have been sure to give. Despite the 
warmth and tenderness that singled John out as the 
beloved disciple, and has made all his writings pecu- 
liarly the reflection of the love of God in Christ, this 
characteristic has brought into his Gospel the hot note 
of him who so loved his Lord that his heart flamed out 
against those who despised and rejected Him. Were it 
not for this we should be somewhat at a loss to know why 
he should have been singled out by such a name as a Son 
of Thunder. As it is the Gospel is not only warm with 
a spirit of life sprung from the sources of divine love, 
but it is also palpitant with a sense of the condemnation 
which is due to all rejection of love and mercy, with 
warning to those who choose death rather than life. 

We are apt to select from this book passages of rare 
and exquisite beauty ; the great teachings of Christ as to 
the new-birth, as to Himself as the light of the world, His 
discourse at the Last Supper, and His wonderful prayer, 
that prayer in which John Knox tells us he cast his 
anchor ; and neglect the full current of the book as a plea 
for the entering into eternal life through faith in Christ. 
To do so is to pay less than due regard to John and to his 
Lord. It is in its very power to persuade, to warn, to 
arouse, to convince, to send forth to serve, to create in 
the heart that peace which the world cannot know, that 

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its perennial power resides. This is no doubt partly due 
to the fact that in revealing his Lord, John also writes 
his own spiritual biography. Certainly in so doing he 
does away with the possibility of much honest wavering 
as to the meaning of the life he records. 

John grew up in the hope of Israel, he became the 
disciple of the Baptist whom he accepted as the prom- 
ised forerunner of the Messiah, he was led by the Bap- 
tist's express indication to become the follower of Jesus, 
he learned from Jesus to reconcile His humiliation with 
His mission of redemption and to find in the salvation of 
sinners the coming of the Kingdom, he drew from the 
teaching of the Old Testament as well as from the bitter 
experience of his actual life the meaning of the blood- 
bought pardon, and he looked upon his risen Lord with 
his own eyes and believed. From these things there grew 
up within him a new life which he knew by the evidence 
of daily witnesses to be of the very Spirit of God. In the 
power of that life he lived and labored and wrote. But 
all of this is as it were but the shadow. It is to be read in 
the Gospel. But the substance of that Gospel is the other 
life, as real, as completely the outgrowth of the Old Tes- 
tament, as entirely involved in the story of the redemp- 
tion of men by the sacrifice of Calvary. Yet are the two 
inseparable. As the Word was made flesh and dwelt 
among men, so the Master lived again in the disciple. 

No wonder that John cries: "Now are we the sons of 
God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be. But 
we know that when he shall appear we shall be like him, 
for we shall see him as he is." Already the oneness of 
the life of the disciple and the teacher had been known 
and felt by him. The complete outworking of the power 
of a transforming faith alone remained. It is no wonder 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

that lie who wrote this book should have breathed on 
those for whose spiritual life he was so solicitous the 
benedictions of his letters ; no wonder that to him was 
given the visions of the Apocalypse. The glorious beauty 
of the images in which the brightness of heaven is repre- 
sented for us has never been surpassed by the mind and 
pen of man. Yet it is not in those visions, but in the 
discourses preceding the passion and in the portrayal of 
the suffering Saviour that John has reached most surely 
the ground and anchor of our hopes. 

Let no rude hand rob us of the robust realities of those 
pictures. Through suffering He passed, so must we pass 
to gain the fulness of knowledge of the meaning of life 
and love; through death He passed that we in passing 
through the death of the body may enter into the fulness 
of life with Him ; from death He returned in the triumph 
of Him who Himself is life. In His life is manifested 
for us light and life. 

The world has never been content with itself. In the 
heart of man there has ever been a divine unrest. Not 
always felt, nor by every one. Most notable in the nobler 
few ; in times of special need, it has become more general 
and more poignant. Always upon a quest, it has never 
found its goal. A few have assumed the role of great 
teachers, the many have been content to learn of them, 
or like the blind and insensate mob to drift, or drive 
madly on without an object and without a care. To all 
seekers after truth, truth which to him finds embodiment 
in a life, John offers this little book. He repeats the 
Master's words to those who rejected Him: "Ye search 
the scriptures because ye think that in them ye have eter- 
nal life; and these are they which bear witness of me; 
and ye will not come to me that ye may have life." He 

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clearly understood the blindness of men. But he trusted 
to the Spirit testifying with his words to make men 
accept Jesus as the Christ and the very Son of God. 

Not only have they proved for us the persuasive words 
of a living and abiding faith, but also words of inspira- 
tion and strength and of tender consolation. Let us often 
keep before our minds the words themselves and the 
glorious beauty of the Son of God which they portray, 
and, also, the benign figure of John, the aged, ministering 
to the church at Ephesus, telling over and over again of 
his fellowship with Jesus, drawing about him old and 
young with the sublime story that he tells, illustrating 
it by his own life of love, of heroic constancy, of undi- 
vided loyalty. When we study his book there is room in 
our hearts for one person— Jesus only. But we may 
sometimes withdraw our minds a little from that central 
sun, and thank God for the beauty and the power of the 
love of Christ made manifest in the disciple. 



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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE FUNCTION AND THE GLORY OF THE 
MINISTRY OF GRACE 

ADDRESS 

BY THE EEVEEEND JOHN FLEMING CAESON, D.D., LL.D. 

Pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in the United States of America 

IT is a distinct privilege and honor to have a part in 
such a signal celebration as that of the One Hun- 
dredth Anniversary of Princeton Theological Seminary 
and it is hard to resist the temptation to pause and pay 
tribute to this great institution and to the distinguished 
men, living or departed, who have made it great. But 
justice to the subject assigned compels me to hasten to its 
consideration, waiting only long enough to greet and con- 
gratulate the young men who this day complete their 
seminary training and stand on the threshold of their 
ministerial careers. 

Young gentlemen, you stand in a noble succession and 
in a succession which has always commanded the confi- 
dence, respect and appreciation of men. You are enter- 
ing upon a life-work incomparably more important than 
any other service to which men give themselves ; a work 
that is related to interests more awful and august than 
those with which any other work is related, and a work 
whose achievements and results are more enduring and 
more wonderful than any of the other results and 
achievements of the labors of mankind. 

The subject assigned to me is : "The Function and the 
Glory of the Ministry of Grace." In the statement of 

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this theme there is nothing that requires explanation, no 
hidden thought that waits to be released, no word that 
needs definition. There is one word in the phrasing of 
the theme that was more frequently upon the lips of the 
fathers than it is upon ours and this fact, as well as the 
vital place which the word occupies in the theme, justifies 
us in lingering for a little in the fellowship of that word. 
Grace is a word that the fathers understood, loved and 
accentuated. Grace is that faculty or force or element of 
being that comes unbidden and serves unrequested and 
unrequited. It is the love that pities the sinner, redeems 
from sin, and bends all its energies toward the complete 
and perfect recovery and restoration of man. It is abso- 
lutely free, a priceless gift that can neither be bought nor 
bartered nor sold. Let that radiant word come back in 
all its might and hold dominion in the soul, and then the 
church shall march with triumphant paean to God's high 
goal and guerdon. 

The use of this word " grace" in the subject defines the 
ministry in broad terms. The ministry of grace is a 
service that, however sustained, is unpurchased and un- 
purchasable by man and that does not stand in its suc- 
cessions and orders and institutions as a method of man's 
salvation, but as a medium through which the grace of 
God that bringeth salvation is revealed unto all men. 
Thus the term declares at once the independence and 
exaltation and the subserviency and lowliness of the min- 
istry of grace. 

1. This broad definition intimates that the ministry of 
grace is rooted in the very nature of God, and finds its 
object in the need of man. In this reach from the highest 
to the lowest, its supreme function is declared and its 
surpassing glory is enshrined. In the heart of God is 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

eternal love and in the heart of humanity is the undying 
need of that saving love. The function of the ministry 
of grace is to declare and to interpret the love of God to 
the heart of man. In fulfilling that distinct function the 
glory of the ministry of grace shines forth. 
? 2. In the presence of such a service as this we are 
ready to accept the truth that the ministry of grace is 
an institution of God and that the ministers thereof are 
called of God. However men may debate and differ as 
to its vestments and ceremonials, as to the visible form in 
which it expresses itself, as to the outward ritual through 
which its inward spirit breaks upon the world, all will 
agree that in its essential spirit the ministry of grace has 
come down from heaven, and that it is here because God 

has sent it. 

The evidences of the divine institution of the ministry 
of grace are manifold. The object for which it exists 
attests it. Its persistence through the ages-its refusal 
to be shelved by any studied neglect, or to be crowded 
out of place by any competing aspirants— confirms it. 
And the fact that the outworkings and issues of the min- 
istry of grace are in God's keeping affirms its divine in- 
stitution and sanction. 

This is the vital fact that gives character and power 
and glory to the ministry of grace-the minister is the 
ambassador of God. His ministry is more than his mes- 
sage; his responsibility larger than his utterance. He 
is a God-called, a God-sent man. Conscious of his divine 
call and commission, his ministry rings with a note of 
authority that challenges the world. His voice is oracu- 
lar. His message is a summons. He is bold, with a holy 
boldness, to declare the whole counsel of God, and confi- 
dent, with a holy confidence, to speak God's truth. He 

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works in the spirit of Seneca's pilot, who said to 
Neptune : 

"You may sink me, or you may save me, 
But I will hold my rudder true. ' ' 

He meets any opposition in the spirit of Curran, in his 
defence of Bond, who, when he heard the clatter of the 
arms of his threatening antagonist in court, said: "You 
may assassinate me, but you cannot intimidate me. ' ' 

This is the ministry our age needs— a ministry whose 
manhood stands out in bold and naming relief, whose 
service is impelled by a mighty imperative and con- 
strained by an irresistible necessity and whose message 
does not stammer in fearsome uncertainty, is not stifled 
in mincing ambiguity, or hidden in any conventional 
finesse. 

It ought ever to be an adequate inspiration to the min- 
ister to know that the work is God's and that God has 
called him into the fellowship of His Son under whose 
institution it is carried forward. The work committed 
to the ministry of grace is the same work that summoned 
the Son of God to earth. It is the work in which Paul 
gloried and for which he counted himself unworthy. It 
is the work that challenged the fiery energy of Tertullian, 
that commanded the scholarship of Athanasius, that 
girded the sturdy will of Luther, that kindled the fine 
fervor of St. Francis, saint of purest renown, that in- 
spired the sublime genius of Calvin, that nerved the 
fearless strength of Knox, that evoked the bewitching 
eloquence of Jeremy Taylor, that directed the apostolic 
zeal of Wesley, that buttressed the giant power of Ed- 
wards—the work of reconciling men to God that they 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

may be saved from their sins, comforted in their sorrows 
and glorified in their death. This is the glory of the 
ministry of grace— it is a co-partnership with Christ and 
a fellowship of men of varying abilities through whose 
transparent souls the radiance of heaven has broken over 
earth. 

3. This ministry of grace, ordained by God, is authen- 
ticated by God's people. While certain believers were 
assembled together, an unseen voice was heard saying: 
" Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work where- 
unto I have called them. ' ' That was the divine call and 
the divine authorization. But not immediately did the 
men thus called go forth as fully and sufficiently author- 
ized and empowered. There is in the incident another 
factor that may not be arbitrarily left out. After the 
unseen voice had spoken and after the assembled dis- 
ciples had fasted and prayed "and laid their hands on 
them, they sent them away. So they, being sent forth by 
the Holy Ghost, departed." We may put too much 
emphasis on this laying on of the hands, or on it we may 
put too little; but the fact stands out that the inward 
call was ratified by the outward ordinance, the spiritual 
mission was confirmed by the tactual commission, the 
divine empowerment was certified by the human authen- 
tication. The gifts and powers of the Holy Ghost are 
not tied to the agencies ordained for their transmission. 
The Spirit worketh when and where and how He pleases. 
But still the fact remains that there is a way which is of 
God's appointment— a ministry which He first commis- 
sioned and which they whom He first commissioned 
passed on to others. Call this apostolic succession if you 
please, ridicule its pretensions and deride its efficiency, 
but you cannot dismiss from human history the fact that 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the ministry of grace is not only an ordinance of divine 
appointment, but also of church authentication. Christ 
did not leave His fellowship and truth in the world un- 
organized and disembodied; He built His church and, 
through His church, He sends forth ambassadors. This 
distinguishes the ministry of grace from every other 
vocation— it has back of it the authority of the Church 
of Christ. 

4. The ministry of grace, ordained by God and authen- 
ticated by the church, is in vital and permanent relation 
to the moral order of the world and to the unfolding 
history of humanity. The claim of its divine institution 
can be substantiated only by the eternal necessity and the 
essential rationality of the ministry of grace. In the 
counsels of God are woven the essential and eternal needs 
of human nature and of human history. It cannot be 
assumed that the divine seal rests upon any commission 
that does not convey a message that every man needs to 
hear, and that cannot grow obsolete with any conceivable 
civilization. The herald of God's counsels will be in- 
spired with an unusual and sustained confidence when he 
speaks to his fellows under the profound conviction that 
what he has to say, the whole world, from prince to 
pauper, needs to hear and heed. 

5. The ministry of grace, charged with a message to 
all men, is commissioned to the evangelization of the 
world and to the establishing of believers in the doctrines 
and practices of the Christian faith. For the fulfilment 
of this twofold function the ministry of grace has an 
evangelistic and a teaching mission. The preacher is a 
herald, the substance of his message is the proclamation 
of the free forgiveness of sins and the heritage of eternal 
life through the mediation of Jesus Christ. The passion 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of the ministry of grace is to save men from their sins, 
and, by the sweet and holy, the winsome and wooing note 
of divine persuasion, to lead to Christ. The final reality 
of the religious life is a man's personal relation and alle- 
giance to his God. After much talking about ' ' the enthu- 
siasm of humanity", "the service of man", " social min- 
istry", and other freezing abstractions, we must come 
back to the Master's love of men. " Jesus loved Mary, 
and Martha and Lazarus". "Who loved me and gave 
himself for me ". " That is the superlative wonder in the 
altogether wonderful evangel of grace— the divine love 
can concentrate on everybody, as though each one were 
everybody, and there was only one child in the Father's 
house." This marvel of grace is the substance of the 
evangel that is committed to the ministry of grace. 

The ministry of grace has a teaching mission and its 
message not only voices the evangelistic appeal of the 
Gospels, but also moves in the deep, broad grooves of the 
Pauline Epistles. In fulfilling its teaching function the 
ministry of grace does not come into competition with 
any other teaching agency. Its wide, splendid province 
is the revealing and the interpretation of the eternal 
verities. It may be of service to art, literature and 
philanthropy, but its concern is with the message from 
the very heart of the eternal to the souls of sinful men. 
Its music is set, not to the keynote of moral philosophy, 
or material rewards, or esthetic beauty, but to the ex- 
ceeding abundance of the grace of God, which has in 
store for the human soul a kingdom which eye hath not 
seen. 

As a teacher the minister is a specialist. He deals 
with men, it is true, on every side of their nature— physi- 
cal, intellectual, spiritual ; and with every department of 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

their living— domestic, social, commercial, civic— but 
always and everywhere he deals with them from the reli- 
gious point of view. He is not a teacher of science or 
of philosophy ; he is not an instructor in domestic science, 
or in political economy ; he is not a leader in social func- 
tions or commercial enterprises— he is a teacher of 
religion. Therefore, his specialty is theology. 

It is not uncommon to hear that theology is a declining 
science, that its majesty is waning like the splendor of 
some dying star, and that its voice of power is growing 
faint as the murmur of some distant sea. We are told 
that men are weary of theology and that the church is in 
revolt against it. There never was a more preposterous 
or perverse delusion. Theology is the abiding interest 
of men. It is the theologian who is listened to whether 
he speaks in the literature of history, imagination, 
poetry, science, or religion. So long as men believe in 
God, so long will they fashion for themselves a theology 
of some sort. The preacher announces himself as a 
teacher of God, and men demand of him, and have a right 
to demand, that his teaching concerning God and man's 
relation to God shall be definite, clear and exact. Men 
do not ask from the minister a final statement of truth, 
for they know that no statement of truth can be final, but 
they ask for something that shall be sufficiently near the 
eternal fact for which it stands to serve them. Men 
resent dogmatism. They welcome theology, a clear, 
scientific setting forth, not in technical phrase, but in 
orderly array and system of the great truths of revela- 
tion. 

The ministry of grace is ordained to inspire men to 
noble aspirations, lofty living and consecrated service. 
Its aim is to relieve the fag and strain and stress of life ; 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

to keep faith serene and strong ; to hold before men the 
true values of life ; to cause hope and courage to sing in 
every heart ; to make men feel how near the heavens are 
to earth ; to quicken the soul to divine endeavor and make 
the heart burn with a holy passion for the Lord Jesus— 
this is the high and holy and enviable purpose and privi- 
lege of the ministry of grace. 

The ministry of grace has a prophetic function. It is 
successor not to the priestly order of the Old Testament, 
but to the prophetic office. The prophet was the most 
notable figure in ancient Israel. When he was in the 
ascendant, the nation rose to its best ; but when he was 
ignored, silenced, or banished, the people deteriorated 
and the nation declined. The prophet was the man that 
saw and said. The chief characteristic of the prophet is 
that he sees God, sees Him in the light of all the ages, 
and sees Him in the life of his own day and declares and 
interprets His truth to his day. The function of the 
ministry of grace is to tell forth great truths, dominant 
principles, and so point out the broad highways along 
which all men and all their affairs move to their inevit- 
able destiny. 

All these several phases of the ministry of grace— its 
evangelistic, its teaching, its inspiring and its prophetic 
function— unite in realizing its supreme end, the set- 
ting forth of the tremendous realism of the priesthood 
of Jesus Christ, its profound spiritual and moral neces- 
sity, and its design as an historical fact to produce a 
definite historical and spiritual result— the redemption 
of mankind. Not simply the salvation of men, but a new- 
born humanity, and through that a reconstructed society, 
a redeemed race of mortal men and women on this earth. 
This is the Kingdom of God, which the prophets foretold 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

and for which the apostles longed and labored. This 
Kingdom is the revelation, the keynote of all the dispen- 
sations. For its establishment the ministry of grace is 
to labor by preparing the way for the coming of the 
King and, in its establishment by the enthronement of 
the King, the ministry of grace will realize its eternal 
coronation. 

6. The ministry of grace is equipped with the Word of 
God and endowed by the Spirit of God for the fulfilment 
of its divine mission. As an ambassador of God the min- 
ister does not make his message. He delivers the mes- 
sage that has been entrusted to him. He is not called to 
proclaim his own ideas or speculations, but to preach 
God's Word; not his own guesses at a thousand things, 
but God's revelation of truth and righteousness. The 
preacher has not a roving commission to wander up and 
down the universe of knowledge. As Christ's ambassa- 
dor he must take the latitude from his Master; and 
Christ concerned Himself with the relations of the hu- 
man soul to God, and all which is contained in that fel- 
lowship. The minister will never exhaust that revelation. 
He will never feel equal to the high and holy duty of 
declaring it, but he will declare it and he will declare it 
with the tone of confidence and certainty, for it is God's 
eternal truth. Criticism and investigation have not 
changed the truth of God. The intellectual play on the 
surface has not touched the deep verities. The truth is 
a fixed quantity, and is a firm path through the highway 
of the ages. The great guiding lines have not become 
confused by the march of time; they are as true and 
significant today as on the day when they were first 
penned and they have as clear and confident a message 
for today. Men tell us that the need of the hour is to 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

adjust truth to modern conditions. The need is that we 
adjust modern conditions to truth. I do not see how 
truth can be adjusted to conditions, but I do see how 
conditions can and should be adjusted to truth. You 
cannot adjust the polar star to the ship's compass, but 
you can set the ship 's compass by the polar star. 

In unfolding the Word of God the ministry of grace 
depends upon the guidance of the Holy Spirit, knowing 
full well that He alone can disclose and interpret what 
He has first inspired. Put emphasis upon the person- 
ality, upon the intellectual equipment, upon the all round 
ability of the preacher, but ever remember that the 
power that melts men's wills into God's will is not in 
human genius, but in God's grace. This divine grace is 
not necessarily independent of human genius. On the 
contrary it ordinarily uses that genius as the channel of 
its operation. Hence the insistent and imperious de- 
mand for a ministry that is equipped, efficient, enlight- 
ened and enlightening. No man with any power of vision 
can be blind to this demand, and no man with any in- 
tegrity of mind can ignore it. The rock-bottom need of 
the pulpit is baptized intellect. This is the secret of the 
pulpit's mastery over men and the strength of its posi- 
tion in society. From Paul to Jonathan Edwards, from 
Jonathan Edwards to Archibald Alexander, from Archi- 
bald Alexander to Charles Hodge, from Charles Hodge 
to men whose presence on this occasion alone prohibits 
the mention of their names, the pathway to the throne of 
pulpit power is lined with the monuments of moun- 
tain-minded men. There was spiritual enduement, 
but along with it there was a natural endowment that 
would have given its possessor commanding influence 
anywhere among men. Behind the voices that have 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

stirred the world, the messages that have thrilled and 
enkindled human hearts, were thinking, reasoning men, 
speaking out of the large and the rich manhood in them- 
selves to the manhood of other men. But they were sanc- 
tified, set apart men, men baptized with the Holy Ghost. 
Those last words, " baptized with the Holy Ghost," let 
us into the presence of that unique distinction that for- 
ever differentiates the endowment of the ministers of 
Christ from any mere natural endowment. It is endued 
endowment. It is the permeation of all natural qualities 
and forces with a divine presence and their control by a 
divine power. That which gives the ministry of grace 
its authority and its power, either to evangelize or to 
teach, is not the native gifts of its ministers, however 
great they may be, but the enduement of the life with the 
majesty and glory and grace of the Holy Ghost. 



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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE MAKING OF A MINISTER 

ADDRESS 

BY THE REVEREND RUSSELL CECIL, D.D. 

Pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, Richmond, Va. 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in the United States 

THE word ''minister" in the Scriptures has many 
uses, but for our purpose on this occasion, it means 
"the minister of the Word". He is the chief officer in 
the church of Christ, and his multifarious duties are 
indicated by such scriptural titles as ambassador, bishop, 
evangelist, minister, pastor, preacher, presbyter, teacher, 
and steward. Among these titles, priest does not appear, 
and indeed is made conspicuous by its absence. The sac- 
erdotal function attaches to the whole body of believers, 
and not in any special or exclusive sense to ministers of 
the Word. It is the privilege of any disciple of Christ 
to offer spiritual sacrifice unto the Lord without the 
mediation of an ecclesiastical functionary. We are not, 
therefore, concerned with the question of the making of 
a priest. 

The minister of the Word should be a man. It does 
not appear that women were called to this office in the 
early church. Women were engaged in many Christian 
activities, and their labors were highly blessed of God, 
but they were not designated as ministers of the Word, 
and it can not be shown from the New Testament that 
any woman occupied this office. 

The kind of man needed must be learned from the 
Holy Scriptures. The office is many-sided, and the 
duties of it are grave and responsible. The minister 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

must labor in the spiritual realm, in an atmosphere both 
strange and uncongenial to worldly minds, and into 
which no one should venture rashly without an adequate 
acquaintance with the character of the work required of 
him and some manifest fitness for it. God can without 
doubt use any kind of a man to work His will, and the 
history of the church shows that for the glory of His 
grace He has often "chosen the foolish", "the weak", 
"the base", and "the despised" "to confound the wise" 
and "the mighty" (1 Cor. 1:26-29), and He will pre- 
sumably continue this course as long as His infinite wis- 
dom directs ; yet from our point of view, as enlightened 
by the teachings and example of the apostles and our 
own experience, we believe that the best material out of 
which to construct a minister of the Word is a manly 
man. Whatever the great Head of the Church may do, 
as it pleases Him, in the selection of material, He has not 
authorized those acting in His name to "lay hands sud- 
denly" (1 Tim. 5:22) on any kind of a man who offers 
himself for the ministry. Some men are constitution- 
ally unfitted for the office, and should be firmly rejected, 
as an honest builder rejects an unworthy piece of timber 
in the construction of a handsome edifice. We should 
encourage manly men, of noble minds and honest hearts, 
to undertake this work. 

Of course the minister should be a godly man ; that is, 
a God-like man; one whose knowledge of God is first 
hand ; not a simulator, or an imitator, or even that sort 
of an investigator, who is "ever learning and never able 
to come to the knowledge of the truth" (2 Tim. 3:7); but 
a man of deep spiritual experience, who has heard the 
voice of the Spirit in his own soul and has obeyed it, and 
has become like God in his love of truth, of righteous- 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ness, and of men. It is impossible to make a true min- 
ister of the Word out of an unregenerate and ungodly 
man. 

He must also be a God-called man. There is a differ- 
ence here which some seem willing to obscure. A godly 
man and a God-called man are not necessarily identical. 
Not every godly man is called to preach. The minister 
should be able to say, 

' ' Sunset and evening star 
And one clear call for me!" 

It is just as impossible to make a minister of Christ's 
evangel out of an uncalled man as it is out of an ungodly 
man. "No man taketh this honour to himself", not even 
the devout child of God. It is bestowed from above. God 
chooses those who are to preach the Word, and in some 
way makes clear to them His will. Various elements 
may enter into a call, the man's own convictions, the 
indications of providence, the judgment of the Church, 
the desire of his friends, but a call there must be. 

So much in brief as to the material out of which the 
minister is to be constructed; now as to the method. 
With material of the right kind furnished, what of the 
process through which it should be put in order to make 
a minister? It should be said that entire harmony of 
view does not exist in different branches of the Christian 
church upon this subject, but this is not the time or the 
place to discuss divergencies of opinion. An effort will 
be made simply to suggest in outline certain things which 
are of value in this process; it would be rash to say 
" things which are essential". With the right kind of 
material in hand, who can point out definitely what 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

things are essential to the making of a minister ? Some 
things we know are of value to any minister, but when a 
man is evidently sent of God with a message to the peo- 
ple, it is hazardous for us to prescribe things which we 
believe to be essential to him for the proper delivery of 
it. It cannot be forgotten that some men who have ful- 
filled a fruitful ministry have entered upon their work 
with very little of what is usually regarded as helpful 
preparation. This is not an indication, however, that 
preparation is useless to the man of God. Any able- 
bodied man with an axe in his hand can go into the woods 
and build some sort of a house to shelter himself from 
the weather, but if he were a well trained carpenter with 
a chest of fine tools at his hand, he could build a better 
house. The fact that some men have preached the gospel 
with power without having received any special prepara- 
tion for their work does not argue that they might not 
have done it more effectively had they enjoyed the 
advantages of theological education. 

Early environment is an important factor in the mak- 
ing of a minister. Family life, youthful association, 
school and college experiences contribute not a little to 
the formation of his character and to his usefulness in 
the service. The apostle Paul owed much to the superior 
advantages for mental and moral culture which he en- 
joyed in the plastic period of youth. His life from the 
beginning was evidently projected upon an elevated 
plane by his parents, and he himself had always cher- 
ished high ideals of personal piety and duty ; and to his 
early training no doubt much of his remarkable effi- 
ciency as a minister was due. He appreciated the same 
thing in Timothy, and took occasion to remind his son 
in the faith of the religious atmosphere of his mother's 
home and of his education from childhood in the Holy 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Scriptures. Many of the great preachers have traced the 
elements of their power to these early sources. We can 
hardly overestimate their value in the make-up of the 
minister, and the church will find herself poor in minis- 
ters of the right kind unless the spirit of Christ dwells 
in our homes and schools and colleges. 

But on this occasion we are chiefly interested in the 
work of the theological seminary. Many useful minis- 
ters have never seen the inside of a seminary, but schools 
of the prophets and institutions for the training of men 
in sacred learning have existed in the church throughout 
the most of her history, and the vast majority of those 
who have served in the sacred office have received their 
preparation in such institutions. As we are celebrating 
the one hundredth anniversary of the founding of a 
great theological seminary, the character of work done 
in such an institution demands our attention. 

It may be said at the outset that it should not be me- 
chanical. Students are not to be regarded as empty 
barrels to be filled with theology, headed up with a 
diploma, and thus made ready to be shipped to various 
parts of the world where they can be opened on the Sab- 
bath day for the spiritual nourishment of the people. Nor 
are they thermos bottles to be charged with hot air, or 
only with "milk for babes"; but they are living men to 
be trained for a holy service to living men and women. 
The work done in the seminary therefore should be in- 
stinct with life and in close touch with human interests. 
Human needs and sorrows, human hopes and aspira- 
tions should lie upon the hearts of instructors, and no 
effort on their part should be spared to quicken the sym- 
pathies of their students with the suffering and strug- 
gling masses of mankind. 

Let me mention as the first requisite of a theological 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

seminary a wholesome spiritual atmosphere. It may be 
thought by some that this goes without saying among 
those who have devoted themselves to the sacred calling, 
but that is not true. The student of theology is tempted 
to become spiritually morbid on the one hand, or spiritu- 
ally apathetic on the other. One needs to be encouraged 
in healthy normal development, and another needs in- 
struction in spiritual ideals and the toning up of his 
notions of the kinship of ministerial character and con- 
duct. If the spiritual atmosphere of the seminary is 
either too fetid or too frigid, the best results in the mak- 
ing of ministers can not be secured. One extreme is 
perhaps as dangerous as the other. In the active work 
the course of the true minister lies between religious 
fanaticism on the one side and worldliness on the other, 
and unless therefore he comes from the seminary with a 
robust character, with clear conceptions of gospel truth, 
and with sound views as to the spirituality of the church 
both in its purpose and in its method, he is almost sure to 
be " corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ." 

This is not the time or the place to discuss with any 
fulness matters of curriculum. There are some things, 
however, which I wish to say. The course of study in a 
theological seminary should be comprehensive in its 
scope and scientific in its methods. It should embrace 
everything that can throw light upon the origin and 
history, the significance and worth of Christianity; it 
should honestly face all the difficulties of revelation and 
inspiration; and it should refuse to deal superficially 
with any of the great problems of supernatural religion. 
A theological school above all others should be thorough 
in its investigations of the foundations on which revealed 
truth rests, and should send its students out to their 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

work well established in their faith in the Holy Scrip- 
tures. Men who do not believe the Bible, the source from 
which their message comes, certainly can not preach it to 
others. Preaching to be effective must be positive and 
dogmatic, not negative and apologetic, and what the 
character of it shall be must depend upon the kind of 
instruction the minister receives in his seminary. The 
teachers in our seminaries therefore should be scholars 
second to none in their own departments, but they should 
also be men of faith ; otherwise, the students who sit at 
their feet will have no message worth delivering. Min- 
isters should not be educated to disseminate unbelief, 
but, as Paul says, they should be so "established in the 
faith" (Col. 2:7) as to be guides and helpers of those 
who seek a firm footing in the divine truth. If our semi- 
naries are to turn out men of feeble faith, they had far 
better cease to exist. Unbelievers are plentiful enough 
now without training men to add to their number. 

But while the curriculum of the seminary should be 
broad and thorough, it should not be forgotten that all 
men who are called to preach the gospel are not called to 
become technical scholars. There are different depart- 
ments of church work for which men should be specially 
prepared ; and experience shows that, for the attainment 
of this end, the course of study in the seminary has not 
always been happily arranged. It has been too much of 
a procrustean bed upon which all classes of students, if 
they desire a degree, are compelled to lie. The law of 
adaptation of means to end has not been wisely applied. 
In recent years, this matter has been receiving more 
attention and it should continue to do so. In addition 
to a comprehensive and thorough-going required course, 
why should not the seminary add a large number of 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

electives, adapted to fitting men for the growing needs of 
the church % The complicated religious activities of our 
day demand a variety of ministers, and many think that 
the theological seminary is a failure as a place for pre- 
paring men for meeting the demands of present condi- 
tions. It is charged that the men sent out are not fitted 
to grapple with the task before them, and that they are 
outstripped by others trained in the school of experi- 
ence and in minor institutions, who are laboring in or- 
ganizations of an undenominational character. There is 
enough truth in this charge to awaken the church to the 
importance of equipping her seminaries for dealing 
intelligently with every species of practical church life. 
We can not disguise the fact that many extra-ecclesiasti- 
cal movements owe their origin to a wide-spread feeling 
that the church is not meeting in an adequate manner the 
demands of the age in furnishing men capable of dealing 
with present day practical problems. I do not appear 
as an apologist for movements of this kind, nor do I 
admit that the church is inadequately equipped for 
evangelizing people of all grades of society and for 
taking care of the needy, but I do believe that there is a 
weakness in her system of theological education which if 
corrected would render unnecessary most, if not all, of 
the extra-ecclesiastical movements of the day. I believe 
thoroughly in the doctrine that the church is the divinely 
ordained agency for the evangelization of the world. 
Our seminaries should cultivate more and more the mis- 
sionary spirit, and instruct their students in the vast 
work of modern missions. Every student who leaves the 
halls of a theological school should be a missionary. 
Whether his life work be in a seminary, in a city church, 
in the slums, on the frontier, or in the foreign field is a 

[400] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

matter of secondary importance compared with the in- 
terest he feels in the evangelization of the world and the 
earnestness with which he devotes himself to it. It is an 
open question in which position he can be of greatest use. 
The efficiency of every minister will depend upon his 
personal piety and equipment, but the pastor or the 
theological professor can be as truly missionary in his 
desire to obey the command of the Master as the man who 
labors among the heathen. 

More attention also should be given to the study of 
expression. It is strange that men who have consecrated 
themselves to the gospel ministry should care so little to 
cultivate the art of public speaking ; and yet, nothing is 
truer than that many a good sermon fails to be effective 
because of a poor delivery. Our seminaries should make 
more of this matter, and more emphasis should be laid 
upon the importance of correct composition and impres- 
sive delivery. The forms in which truth is clothed and 
the manner in which it is presented are matters of vital 
moment which many a minister learns, or far more fre- 
quently discovers that he has not learned, long after the 
day of his usefulness has passed. A man charged with a 
great message to the people should certainly study the 
best way to deliver it. Of what use would a magazine 
gun be on the field of battle in the hands of a man who 
did not know how to operate it ? How can a pious and 
learned minister of the Word fulfil the functions of his 
office if he be unable to clothe the truth in living words 
and utter them with a voice and emphasis which will 
claim the attention of the people? I know this subject 
usually receives indifferent attention in the seminary, 
but after more than thirty years 'experience in preaching 
the Word, I am convinced that the process of making 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ministers might be improved if more serious study were 
given to the arts of composition and delivery. 

I close with the remark that Christian people every- 
where feel that humanizing influences should be thrown 
around the young men in our seminaries; that they 
should not be cloistered scholastics, withdrawn from the 
stirring life of the day ; but that they should be men of 
loving hearts, who, when they come forth to their work, 
are able to sympathize with the poor and needy, and 
know how to dispense the gospel of the grace of God to 
our perishing race. 



[402] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PRINCETON IN THE WORK OF THE 
PASTORATE 

ADDRESS 

BY THE REVEREND WILLIAM LEONARD McEWAN, D.D. 
Pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

THE glory of a theological seminary consists in the 
number and character of the men it trains for the 
gospel ministry. However eminent may be the scholars 
produced, as distinguished from preachers, and however 
excellent their services to the church and the world in 
the defense of truth and the refutation of error, it must 
still be true that the chief work of a theological seminary 
is in the preparation of men for the service of preaching. 
Scholars are the by-products of such a school. They are 
vastly needed. They are greatly used. They are to be 
honored and appreciated. We take pride in, and give 
thanks for, the great scholars who have come from this 
institution. A theological seminary exists, primarily, 
for the purpose of training, for pastors and preachers 
to the common people, men who believe they have been 
called of God into the ministry of the gospel. That 
school of the prophets most fully meets its end which 
sends forth in largest numbers men who are qualified 
to "rightly divide the word of truth'', who preach with 
holy confidence "the unsearchable riches of Christ", and 
who have also learned that, with full and accurate schol- 
arship and persuasive eloquence, they cannot do their 
work without the presence and the power of the Holy 
Spirit of God. It is by this standard we measure to-day 
the work of Princeton Theological Seminary for these 
hundred years. 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

This school of the prophets was born in the fulness of 
time. In the early years of the nineteenth century the 
necessity for the establishment of a theological seminary 
by the Presbyterian Church was evident. Theological 
education was in a chaotic state. Colleges such as Yale, 
Harvard, Princeton, Hampden- Sidney, and others were 
preparing men for the ministr}^ and many individual 
pastors had classes of young men under their care. There 
was a growing and wide-spread conviction that the Pres- 
byterian Church ought to establish a school for the one 
purpose of training ministers. 

The Presbytery of Philadelphia, led by Dr. Ashbel 
Green, brought the matter to the attention of the General 
Assembly in 1805. In 1808 Dr. Archibald Alexander of 
Philadelphia, the retiring Moderator, emphasized the 
Church's duty and responsibility for the supply of min- 
isters. The Committee of the General Assembly, ap- 
pointed in 1810 to draft a plan for a Theological 
Seminary to be established at Princeton, presented reso- 
lutions which were adopted, one of which was, 

"That, as filling the Church with a learned and able 
ministry without a corresponding portion of real piety, 
would be a curse to the world and an offense to God and 
His people, so the General Assembly think it their duty 
to state that in establishing a seminary for training up 
ministers, it is their earnest desire to guard, as far as 
possible, against so great an evil. And, they do hereby 
solemnly pledge themselves to the Churches under their 
care, that in forming and carrying into execution the 
plan of the proposed seminary it will be their endeavor 
to make it, under the blessing of God, a nursery of vital 
piety as well as of sound theological learning, and to 
train up persons for the ministry who shall be lovers as 

[404] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

well as defenders of the truth as it is in Jesus, friends 
of revivals of religion, and a blessing to the Church of 
God". 

The Board of Directors held their first meeting in 
Princeton on June 30th, 1812. On the 12th day of 
August the Seminary was formally opened by the in- 
auguration of Dr. Alexander. Three students matricu- 
lated at the opening. The number increased to nine be- 
fore the close of the first year. 

The Assembly of 1813 elected Dr. Samuel Miller of 
New York City as a professor, and in 1820 Dr. Charles 
Hodge was added to the Faculty. These professors, by 
God's grace and under His guidance, laid the founda- 
tions of Princeton Seminary. They planted the seeds 
which through the years have grown, bearing the fruits 
upon which the Church has lived. They started those 
streams that have brought life whithersoever they have 
come, and which have deepened and widened with each 
succeeding generation. 

Princeton Seminary has had illustrious names on the 
roll of its Faculty, and the great men who have been 
among its teachers have been known and honored among 
the lovers of evangelical truth throughout the world, but 
there have not been any who have not delighted to recog- 
nize and rejoice in the leadership of these three great 
heroic scholars and saints. 

Never were men more unlike in temperament and tal- 
ents, and never were men more united in the one supreme 
purpose of teaching and interpreting the Word of God. 
They supplemented each other until the impression made 
upon the students was not confused, but clear, definite, 
distinct and, perhaps, unique. This impression was the 
Princeton stamp upon its students. It was not so much 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the imparting of a particular system of theology, as lead- 
ing men to a love for the truth, an unqualified acceptance 
of the Word of God as the infallible rule of faith and 
practice, and a great sense of responsibility upon every 
teacher of the Word. There was a full appreciation of 
high scholarship, with a devout and humble sense of de- 
pendence and a thorough evangelical spirit. 

Dr. Alexander's distinguishing characteristic was a 
wonderfully clear and penetrating insight into Christian 
experience. He had himself been brought to a know- 
ledge of Christ after much sense of sin and travail of 
soul. Under the trees in the mountains of Virginia he 
had spent hours and days in fasting and prayer and the 
study of the Bible. He had learned to observe closely his 
own mental states and exercises and to weigh carefully 
the experiences of his soul. He was peculiarly qualified 
to deal with young men preparing for the ministry. His 
great ability as a teacher and his broad scholarship were 
united with a child-like simplicity of heart, transparent 
sincerity, and a great loyal, personal love to the Lord 
Jesus Christ. He was also a man of plain common sense, 
and he knew how to deal with men of every class. It is 
not strange that his coming to Princeton, humanly 
speaking, was the means of a revival of religion in the 
College and in the town during the first year of his resi- 
dence. 

Dr. Miller had a comprehensive view of pastoral duty. 
He understood and loved the polity of the Church. He 
was a great authority in the department of history. 
When he was called to undertake the work of a profes- 
sor, coming from the foremost pulpit in the land, he 
wrote in his diary, 

"Resolved, that I will endeavor, by the grace of God, 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

to set such an example for the candidates for the min- 
istry committed to my care as shall convince them that, 
though I esteem theological knowledge and all its auxil- 
iary branches of science very highly, I esteem genuine 
and deep piety as a still more vital and important quali- 
fication. 

Resolved, that, by the grace of God, I will not merge 
my office as a Minister of the Gospel in that of Professor. 
I am persuaded that no Minister of the Gospel, to what- 
ever office he may be called, ought to give up preaching". 

Dr. Hodge's characteristic that marked him from 
others was the emphasis he put on objective faith in 
Christ. Those who heard him speak of the love of Jesus 
Christ for sinful men, the glory of His Person, the great- 
ness of His redeeming grace, never forgot how his whole 
soul seemed to bow in adoring worship and his heart to 
overflow in grateful love as he preached and taught. His 
class-room was a place of worship. When he was con- 
sidering the call given to him to become a teacher in the 
Seminary he wrote, "I believe that I would rather be 
homeless and penniless through life than in any way 
whatever enter such an office unsent of God ". ' ' It seems 
to me that the heart, more than the head, of an instructor 
in a religious seminary qualifies or unfits him for his 
station". The first sentence in his inaugural address was, 
"The moral qualities of an interpreter of the Scriptures 
may all be included in piety, which embraces humility, 
candor and those inward feelings which can only result 
from the operations of the Holy Spirit". 

Dr. Alexander was here thirty-nine years, Dr. Miller 
twenty-six years and Dr. Hodge fifty-two years. Under 
these greatest scholars of their generation and most 
attractive Christian gentlemen there was formed a cer- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

tain type of pastor and preacher. They accepted the 
Bible as the Word of God, and sought intelligently to 
explain it to the people. They understood and received 
the Reformed Theology as the system taught in the 
Bible. They believed in the form of government of the 
Presbyterian Church and the dignity and authority of 
its courts. 

At the time the Seminary was opened this country was 
at war with Great Britain. The fourth President of the 
United States, James Madison— a graduate of Princeton 
College— was closing his first term of service. The popu- 
lation of the country was about seven million. A new 
national spirit was rapidly forming. The tide was mov- 
ing west. New territories were being settled. New com- 
munities were being formed. The Church had need of 
more ministers. Into these fields the Seminary began 
to send its graduates. They worked a quiet but thorough 
revolution in the ideals and accomplishments of the pas- 
torate. They exercised great influence wherever they 
went. The Church and the country felt the reinforce- 
ment of the army of the Lord in the coming of these 
strong, trained preachers and leaders. They set higher 
standards for the ministry. They led the Church to ex- 
pect better service. They influenced whole communities 
by their superior attainments and ability as leaders. 
They became the evangelists under whose preaching 
great revivals swept over the country. 

In the first ten classes graduated there were two hun- 
dred and fifty-six students. From these graduates there 
were six moderators of the General Assembly; two bish- 
ops of the Protestant Episcopal Church ; fifteen college 
presidents, presiding over such colleges as Princeton, 
Tale, Jefferson, Dickinson, Hanover, Centre, Western 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

University of Pennsylvania and others. From these 
classes there went forth missionaries and pioneers to 
every part of the land. Throughout the South, from 
which many of the students came, over the wide, opening 
West to the far Pacific slope, their influence was felt. 

It would not be possible in the limits of this address 
even to mention the names of the Princeton men who 
have done their work for the Church and for God in this 
land, for, with the graduating class of this year, there 
are five thousand nine hundred and forty-seven Alumni. 

It would be interesting to take up one class after an- 
other, and make mention of the services of its members. 

In the first class of the Seminary was William Ander- 
son McDowell. Graduating from Princeton College in 
1809, he had already been pursuing a theological course 
under the president, Dr. Samuel Stanhope Smith. Upon 
his graduation he settled at Bound Brook, N. J., and 
afterwards in the First Church of Morristown. Threat- 
ened with pulmonary trouble he spent the winter of 1823 
in Charleston, S. C, and was pastor of the church there 
for ten years. He was elected moderator of the General 
Assembly in 1832, and, by the Assembly of 1833, was 
appointed Secretary of Domestic Missions. In this office 
he served until his death in 1851, doing an unsurpassed 
work. Of him it was said, "Being dead he yet speaks, and 
will for generations continue to speak, in the Churches 
planted by his instrumentality, the missionaries encour- 
aged by his sympathy, and the souls brought under the 
enlightening influence of the Gospel by his unwearied 
exertions". 

From that same first class was graduated Benjamin 
Franklin Stanton. Remarkable revivals accompanied 
his preaching during his nine years ' pastorate at Hudson, 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

N. Y. He was pastor of the church at Hanover, Va., 
from 1829 to 1842. After the death of Dr. John H. Rice, 
he was lecturer on theology in the Union Theological 
Seminary of Virginia. He died of consumption in 1843. 
Dr. Weed said of him, "For twenty years he was dying 
of consumption, and knew he was dying of consumption, 
still he never ceased to preach while he had strength to 
stand in his pulpit"; and the Honorable Ben Butler 
testified, "In his theological views Mr. Stanton con- 
formed, ex animo, to the standards of the Presbyterian 
Church as expounded at Princeton". 

From the second class there went forth sixteen men. 
John Finley Crowe was pastor in Hanover, Ind., and in 
1824 began the school which grew into Hanover College, 
with which he was connected until his death in 1860. 

From this second class John Todd Edgar went forth 
to labor in Kentucky and Tennessee. He was moderator 
of the General Assembly in 1842. 

Eliphalet Wheeler Gilbert, from the second graduat- 
ing class, labored in Wilmington, Del. twenty years, 
where there is a memorial church bearing his name. He 
was president of Dickinson College, pastor in Philadel- 
phia, and director of this Seminary for six years. 

Elisha Pope Swift was a member of this class. He 
labored in Pittsburgh and Allegheny for forty-one years. 
He was a professor in the Western University of Penn- 
sylvania and instructor in the Western Theological 
Seminary. He exerted as wide an influence, left as deep 
an impression and did as much constructive work as any 
of the great men who have labored in that part of the 
country. He founded the missionary society which after- 
wards became the present Board of Foreign Missions. 

In the third class there were seventeen men. Among 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

these was Jeremiah Chamberlain. He founded three col- 
leges, one of which was Centre College, Kentucky. 

George Washington Gale, a member of this class, led a 
colony, from New York state and settled in Illinois, 
where his name was given to the town of Galesburg. He 
was the founder of Knox College. 

Thomas Charlton Henry, of this class, died in 1827, 
thirty-eight years of age, but not until he had received 
the degree of D.D. from Yale, and had been associated 
with the movement that resulted in the founding of Co- 
lumbia Theological Seminary of South Carolina. 

Sylvester Larned went directly from the Seminary on 
a mission to the Indians of the Southwest, and to investi- 
gate the religious conditions of the city of New Orleans. 
He is described as the most finished orator and the most 
effective preacher in America in his day. Wherever it 
was known that he was to preach crowds thronged the 
churches. People of all classes were attracted by his 
preaching in New Orleans and a splendid church build- 
ing was erected by popular subscription, and he was 
called to be the pastor. He died of yellow fever in New 
Orleans on his twenty-fifth birthday. It would be hard 
to find any other man of whom such estimates of power 
and promise were made. 

Samuel Lyle Graham, of the class of 1818, was a mis- 
sionary and pastor for seventeen years. Extensive re- 
vivals are recorded in the churches in which he preached. 
He was elected to the chair of Ecclesiastical History in 
the Union Seminary of Virginia in 1838. During his 
professorship he continued to preach regularly. When 
he was sick with his last illness in 1851, Dr. Rice came 
into his room and said, "Dr. Alexander has got home 
before you", thus bringing to him the news of the death 

[411 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

of his dearly beloved teacher. The dying man raised 
himself in bed and cried out, " Oh, is it possible % Is it so ? 
I had almost shouted 'glory'. Heaven has seldom re- 
ceived from earth such an inhabitant. His society in 
heaven will be invaluable ' '. 

There is not time to pronounce the names of all the 
eminent graduates of this Seminary, who have been 
known throughout the Church. There have been forty- 
two moderators of our Church, and fourteen moderators 
of other branches of the Presbyterian Church, making 
fifty-six in all. Of the seventy-eight professors in theo- 
logical seminaries connected with the General Assembly 
of our Church at this time, exactly one-third, or twenty- 
six, are graduates of Princeton. There have been one 
hundred and twenty-four chaplains in the Army and 
Navy. There have gone out four hundred and twenty-five 
foreign missionaries who have labored in all the lands 
where the Church has thrown its battle lines. There 
have been one hundred and three secretaries of the 
Boards of our Church and of agencies connected with it. 
There have been one hundred and sixty-one presidents 
of colleges and universities. There have also been six 
hundred and eighty professors and teachers, and sixty- 
six editors. 

By general consent, perhaps the most eminent 
preacher ever sent out from this school was Dr. James 
W. Alexander of New York, of the class of 1824. 

Albert Barnes, of the class of 1823, was for forty years 
the pastor of the First Church of Philadelphia. When 
his name was known throughout the English-speaking 
world, and his books were printed in tens of thousands, 
he died while making a pastoral call on a sick parish- 
ioner. 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Henry A. Boardnian, of the class of 1833, had but one 
charge. He was pastor of the Tenth Presbyterian 
Church of Philadelphia for forty-seven years. He was 
moderator of the General Assembly in 1854, and elected 
to the chair of Pastoral Theology in Princeton Seminary 
in 1853. During his pastorate three thousand four hun- 
dred and fifty persons united with his church, fifteen 
hundred of them on confession of their faith. 

No history of Kentucky could be written without re- 
cognizing the influence and the work of the sons of 
Princeton. Woven into the civil and ecclesiastical his- 
tory of that state are the names of Robert J. Breckin- 
ridge and John Breckinridge, John C. Young and Wil- 
liam C. Matthews, Nathan L. Rice, Stuart Robinson, 
Thomas Cleland, L. W. Green and many others. 

Nor would the history of Western Pennsylvania be 
complete without the names of Elisha P. Swift, Wm. S. 
Plumer, Wm. M. Paxton, M. W. Jacobus and George T. 
Purves. 

Indeed if there were time to revive the memories of 
those who are familiar with the great movements that are 
written in our history, the reading of the names of the 
men whose influence has been great in the time of crisis 
or through long years of service would be sufficient— 
James W. Alexander, John C. Backus, for forty-eight 
years in Baltimore ; J. Trumbull Backus, for forty-one 
years in Schenectady, N. Y. ; George D. Baker, for a 
score of years in Philadelphia; Albert Barnes, forty 
years in Philadelphia ; Charles C. Beatty, for sixty years 
in Steuben ville, Ohio; William Blackburn; Henry A. 
Boardman, for forty-seven years in Philadelphia ; Rob 't 
J. Breckinridge of Kentucky ; James H. Brookes of St. 
Louis; T. W. Chambers, nearly half a century in New 

[413] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

York City ; William C. Cattell, Joseph Christmas, foun- 
der of the American Church in Montreal ; Bishop T. M. 
Clark; Richard F. Cleveland (father of a president of 
the United States) ; Theodore L. Cuyler, for thirty years 
in Brooklyn; Doak of Tennessee; J. T. Duryea, Phile- 
mon H. Fowler, Sam'l W. Fisher, P. D. Gurley of Wash- 
ington, D. C; Leroy J. Halsey, A. A. Hodge, C. W. 
Hodge, E. B. Hodge, F. B. Hodge, William H. Horn- 
blower, William Henry Green, Charles K. Imbrie, pas- 
tor, secretary and editor ; Sheldon Jackson, Bishop John 
Johns, M. W. Jacobus, S. H. Kellogg, John M. Krebs, of 
New York ; John C. Lowrie, Willis Lord, Bishop A. N. 
Littlejohn, J. M. Ludlow, Erskine Mason, Bishop C. B. 
Mcllvaine, David Magie, George W. Musgrave, Thomas 
Murphy, N. G. Parke, R. M. Patterson, W. S. Plumer, 
S. I. Prime, William M. Paxton, George T. Purves, 
Nathan L. Rice, Rendall of Lincoln, David H. Riddle, 
Stuart Robinson, Charles S. Robinson, W. D. Snod- 
grass, William A. Scott, W. B. Sprague, J. G. Symmes, 
E. P. Swift, H. J. Van Dyke, C. Van Rensselaer, Charles 
Wadsworth. 

It was, of course, my purpose to refrain from speak- 
ing of the living men, some of whom have not fallen short 
in reputation and service of the greatest of those who 
have finished their work. They stand today in places of 
importance and usefulness all over the land. I beg to 
make two exceptions to the rule adopted. 

In "The Presbyterian" of this week is the following 
letter from James Park of the class of 1846, the oldest 
living graduate of this Seminary : 

"I matriculated in the Seminary in September, 1843, 
and took the full course, graduating in 1846 ; and, by the 
grace of God, through Jesus Christ, have been permitted 

[414;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

to serve him in the active ministry of the Gospel for 
three score years ; and for the past six years to hold the 
position of Pastor-emeritus in the congregation in which 
I was born, and to which, by its call, I gave the last forty 
years of my active ministry. 

Now, on the verge of the ninetieth year of my life, the 
infirmity of old age denies me the pleasure of being pres- 
ent at Princeton's celebration in May. But as long as 
life and memory last, my heart and soul shall rise in 
praise and gratitude to God for the founding of Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, and, for me, the favor of sit- 
ting at the feet of such men as Dr. Archibald Alexander, 
Dr. Samuel Miller, Dr. Charles Hodge, and Dr. Joseph 
Addison Alexander. 

May the good hand of God always, henceforth as 
hitherto, be upon thee, 'O Princeton, loved of God and 
men' ". 

The other exception is that of a graduate of this Semi- 
nary who for twenty-six consecutive years has been serv- 
ing four country churches in Pennsylvania. His father 
preceded him in a pastorate of thirty years in the same 
field. The people are poor. The churches are small. 
The community is primitive. In these twenty-six years 
he has gathered three hundred souls, mostly on confes- 
sion of their faith. This is not a large number, to be 
sure, but they have been gathered from a scant popula- 
tion. In these years these churches have contributed out 
of their small resources fifteen thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-two dollars for their congregational expenses, 
less than six hundred and fifty dollars per year. In the 
same time they have contributed eight thousand two hun- 
dred and twenty-six dollars through the Boards of the 
Church, of which sum forty-three per cent, has gone to 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the cause of foreign missions. But out of that man's 
ministry the Church received another contribution. One 
son from that charge is a missionary in the home field, 
and one son and two daughters are in the foreign field, 
and two daughters are now in preparation for the for- 
eign field. Strong elders also, serving in prominent 
churches and doing active work, were trained under this 
man's ministry. Neither earthly honors nor pecuniary 
rewards have come to this pastor. He is a representa- 
tive of a great number of faithful men who do their work 
as unto the Lord. 

In all these hundred years Princeton Seminary has 
been true to the ideals and standards of its first great 
organizers, and it has been loyal to the Word of God. 
No student has, by reason of any teaching from any pro- 
fessor, had his reverence for or belief in the Word of 
God, as the only infallible rule of faith and practice, 
weakened or destroyed. No student has here learned to 
question the essential deity of the Lord Jesus Christ, or 
has lost any of the passionate loyalty of his heart for 
Him as Saviour and Lord. No student passes through 
these halls without having it impressed upon his heart 
and mind and conscience that the only salvation for a 
lost world of sinful men is that gospel which is the power 
of God unto salvation to all them that believe. Men who 
have the spirit of this Seminary go forth to their solemn 
calling as preachers of the gospel, caring for the vital 
and essential truths of revelation, and putting these 
things above the temporal and the accidental. 

From this Seminary have been graduated about six 
thousand men, the greater part of whom (a little over 
half) remain until this present day. From more than 
two thousand pulpits every Sabbath day they preach the 

£416] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Gospel of Jesus Christ to multitudes of men and women. 
Year after year they stand in their places, the broken 
ranks being re-filled, proclaiming the everlasting right- 
eousness and the infinite love of God. Who can estimate 
their influence upon the thought and life of this nation? 
Standing this day between the living and the dead, 
representing the army of the sons of Princeton, we know 
that the thoughts and prayers and sympathy of men 
from the East and the West and the North and the South 
are turned toward this place and these services. Yea, 
may we not also believe that we are surrounded by a 
great cloud of witnesses who have finished their labors 
on earth, and that they feel there what we say here, "I 
thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who hath enabled me, for 
that he counted me faithful, putting me into the min- 
istry '"? And we who are here may humbly, reverently 
and sincerely add, "and I thank Him that in His 
good Providence it was given to me to study the mys- 
teries of His grace and the deep things of His Holy 
Word in this School of His Prophets at Princeton". 



C417J 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



PBINCETON ON THE MISSION FIELD 

ADDRESS 

BY EOBEET ELLIOTT SPEEE, D.D. 

A Corresponding Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions of the 

Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

THE first name in the biographical catalogue of 
Princeton Seminary is just what it ought to be, the 
name of a home missionary, John Covert, who entered 
the institution at its beginning, pursued the full course, 
was graduated with the first class, of 1815, and then 
spent the three years of his brief life in the ministry as 
a home missionary in South Carolina and Georgia. In 
that first class of sixteen students, six names are entered 
as names of home missionaries. One of these men, in 
love for the unfortunate, gave the last years of his life as 
chaplain in our most famous prison. A second, as city 
missionary, worked on our most famous city thorough- 
fare of human need. The four others were flung in a 
long line from Georgia to Wisconsin. And that same 
class, as we have already been reminded, gave Dr. Wil- 
liam A. McDowell for seventeen years' service as secre- 
tary to the Assembly's Board of Home Missions. 

There were sixteen men in the second class as well, 
and of these sixteen, six also entered home missionary 
service, and one out of this class had laid upon him the 
work of foreign missions, was ordained in the old Park 
Street Church in Boston for that service under the 
American Board, but was turned aside from this purpose, 
for work first as an agent of the American Board in the 
Middle States and then as pastor in Delaware and Penn- 

[418 ] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

sylvania. He was the man of faith and of will, as we 
shall see, who laid the foundations of the foreign mis- 
sionary organization of our Church. 

In the first five classes that went out from the Semi- 
nary, the first name found on the roll in the biographical 
catalogue in each case is the name of a home missionary. 
The first foreign missionary who went out from the 
Seminary went from the class of 1818, Henry Wood- 
ward, to work for fourteen years under the American 
Board as a missionary in Ceylon, and from that year, 
down to the present, there have been only three classes 
in all the long history of the Seminary which have not 
made their contributions to the foreign field. And those 
three classes, 1820, the class of Bishop Mcllvaine, 1823, 
the class of Albert Barnes, and 1842, gave one-third of 
their entire membership to the varied forms of home 
missionary activity. 

We look back today reverently over the long record of 
the years. Through these sacred walls there have passed 
between five and six thousand men, one-half again as 
many as have gone out from any other theological semi- 
nary in the land ; and one out of every thirteen of these 
men has gone into the foreign field. We may not 
say how many have gone into the home mission field, for 
not one of all the long list who have wrought here in 
America but has woven his life into the character and 
destiny, into the very making of our nation. But more 
than four hundred and ten men, not counting foreign 
students or those who have spent their lives among the 
American Indian tribes, have gone to the distinctively 
foreign fields of the Church; more than half again as 
many as have gone from any other institution in the 
land. Oberlin, I believe, leads our theological seminaries 

C419 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

in the percentage of foreign missionaries, one hundred 
and forty-nine out of seven hundred and seventy-three, 
or one out of every five and a half of its students, have 
gone to the foreign field. As far as I have gathered 
information, Princeton Seminary comes next, with 
Newton, one out of every thirteen of the students of these 
two institutions having gone abroad. In the first quar- 
ter of the century of its history Princeton sent forth 
fifty men; in the second quarter of the century it sent 
seventy-five ; in the third quarter of the century it sent 
one hundred; and in the last quarter of the century it 
sent two hundred. Up to 1875 it sent one out of every 
eighteen of its students abroad ; since 1875 it has sent one 
out of nine. Those who talk of Christianity as a spent 
force, of the decline of the missionary conviction, are 
men who speak in ignorance of the simple facts of this 
institution's life. 

It is impossible here to do much in the way of singling 
out the great missionary classes in the Seminary's his- 
tory. The class of 1902 heads the list with the largest 
percentage of its matriculated students going out to the 
foreign field, thirteen out of fifty-nine,— one out of four 
and a half. The two classes that come next, having 
sent one out of every five, were the class of 1870 and 
the class of 1906. The two classes that come next, hav- 
ing sent one out of every six, were the classes of 1869 
and 1907. 

To man after man here today his own class will come 
back. The memory of faces " loved long since and lost 
awhile" mingles with the recollection of great lives that 
are still being lived. I can only suggest three or four of 
these great classes which stand out in the list of the 
Seminary's achieving men. There was the class of 1853, 

. C4203 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

with Frank F. Ellinwood, pioneer in the field of com- 
parative religion, a scholar who was also a statesman, 
a leader and a little child, and John Livingston Nevius, 
founder of churches, trainer of native leaders, the con- 
structive critic of mission policy and beloved philan- 
thropist, and Charles F. Preston, the man of the magic 
tongue in Southern China, and here at home to ensure 
for us a missionary construction of Christianity, Caspar 
Wistar Hodge. 

There was the class of 1856, which sent out Henry 
Martyn Baird for eleven years of useful service as Sec- 
retary of the American and Foreign Christian Union; 
Samuel R. Gayley to lead a brief and notable life in 
northern China ; Charles R. Mills, to lead a life notable 
and long, thirty-eight years, in the Province of Shan- 
tung, and two saints of God, if any such ever breathed, 
Daniel McGilvary and Jonathan Wilson, who lived for 
fifty-three years in Siam and among the Lao people. In 
the city of Bangkok there came recently to the German 
Club a German naturalist who had been studying trees. 
" Gentlemen", said he, "you think me to be a skeptic, a 
rationalist, but I have read the Bible enough to know 
about the person of Jesus Christ, and I want to tell 
you that the good old missionary with whom I lodged in 
Chieng Mai is more like Jesus Christ than any other 
man that I have seen on earth." He was speaking of 
Jonathan Wilson, who with his classmate and beloved 
brother, Daniel McGilvary, had founded a mission, cre- 
ated a literature and made a people. Sweet and pleasant 
were they in their lives and in their death they were not 
divided. 

The class of 1867 rises before our minds. Out of its 
seventy matriculates it gave Baldwin to Turkey, But- 

C421] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ler to China, Dennis to Syria, Douglas (afterwards 
Member of Parliament and Senator in Canada) and 
Heyl and Wherry to India, Thomson to Mexico and 
Chamberlain to Brazil. It gave Richard C. Morse also 
to be the leader of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions of North America, Dean Griffin to Johns Hopkins 
University, Bloomburgh to Lafayette College, Sparhawk 
Jones and Henry Stebbins to the home ministry and not 
less than eight men to home missionary service. 

I think also of the class of 1870, which sent three-fifths 
of its membership into the home and foreign field, two- 
fifths to be home missionaries and one-fifth foreign. 
Nine of its men were scattered over Asia and South 
America, five of whom are now on the fields to which 
in the first place they went out ; nine men who have spent 
over two and one-half centuries in foreign mission 
work, with an average of nearly thirty years. Let me 
repeat the honorable roll,— MacKay of Formosa, Cham- 
bers and Hubbard of Turkey, Howell of Brazil, Imbrie, 
Miller and Green of Japan, and Lucas and Seeley of 
India. And this class gave us also the present President 
of our Board of Foreign Missions, George Alexander, 
whose reserve prevents our expressing to his face our 
personal affection and for whom accordingly here today 
to the Seminary's praise we dare to speak of the Church's 
gratitude and regard. 

And it is not only the classes that have sent out these 
great groups of strong and influential men to mould the 
nations at home and abroad of which I would speak. I 
recall also the classes which are signalized by the gift of 
only some one or two men,— 1863, with Hunter Corbett, 
patriarch and apostle, as its only and sufficient foreign 
missionary contribution ; the class of 1860, with Charles 

£422] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
M. Hyde, a foundation layer in the Sandwich Islands; 
the class of 1845, with its contribution of John B. French 
to China and David Trumbull to Chile, who buried their 
lives at the foundation of new nations. 

I stood a few years ago with bared head before the 
monument in the English cemetery in the city of Val- 
paraiso, and read upon it the inscription to David Trum- 
bull's memory and career. It was a tribute to the man 
who stamped for generations with his high character the 
mercantile community of a great city; who gave his life 
with great affection to the service of an alien people; 
who brought them the great truths of the gospel and 
two institutes of human liberty, and who, making the 
greatest of all political sacrifices for his adopted coun- 
try, transferred to it his citizenship, and passed away m 
its grateful confidence and love. 

And what David Trumbull and John B. French did 
is only typical. Of the twenty-four foreign missions of 
the Presbyterian Church, nearly two-thirds had their 
foundations laid by men who went out from this Semi- 
nary. In Africa the founders were John B. Pmney, of 
the class of 1832, who began the work in Liberia, and 
Mackey, of the class of 1849, and our honored friend, 
Dr. Nassau, whose presence we recognize here today, of 
the class of 1859, who were the pioneer builders of the 
mission work further south in what is now the German 

Kamerun. 

In India, John C. Lowrie, of the class of 1833; Mor- 
rison, of the class of 1837, "the Lion of the Punjab"; 
Charles W. Forman, of the class of 1847, and Owen and 
Wilson and Janvier and Orbison and Loewenthal, the 
linguistic genius, were the founders. Truer men than 
these never were in these halls, nor wrought for God 

£42311 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

anywhere in the world. Far above the names of states- 
men, the names of these men are written. Many of 
them will be remembered forever in the annals of the 
land that they served. And this is no partial judgment 
uttered in the warmth of this anniversary ; it is the judg- 
ment of a great Indian Governor, W. Mackworth Young, 
uttered when he came home from his service as Lieuten- 
ant Governor of the Punjab. He called attention to the 
great names which the Punjab bore on its roll of honor, 
such statesmen as John and Henry Lawrence, Herbert 
Edwardes, Donald McLeod, who "honored God by their 
lives and endeared themselves to the people by their 
faithful work," but he added, "I venture to say that if 
they could speak to us from the great unseen there is 
not one of them who would not proclaim that the work 
done by men like Clark and French, Newton and For- 
man, who went in and out among the people for a whole 
generation and who preached by their lives the nobility 
of self-sacrifice and the lesson of love to God and man is 
a higher and nobler work and more far reaching in its 
consequences". 

I think of the long list of men who went out from 
Princeton to China from the very beginning, Mitchell, 
'30, Orr, '36, Lowrie, '41, French, '45, and Loomis and 
i^M. S. Culbertson, of the class of 1844. The latter laid 
down his commission in the United States Army, and his 
professorship in West Point Academy, that in answer to 
his mother's prayer and the call of God, he might come 
here to fit himself for missionary service. He was one 
of the great foundation layers in the port cities at the 
mouth of the Yangtse and it was he who did much to 
protect Shanghai in the face of the Taiping Rebels. 
When the American minister said to him, during the 

C424H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Civil War, "Culbertson, you might be a Major-General 
if you were at home now," Culbertson replied, "Doubt- 
less I might; men whom I taught are in that position,' ' 
and he named Newton, Rosecrans, Thomas and Sherman, 
and Tower and Van Vliet, and he might have added 
Lyon and Reynolds and Grant. "But," he added, "I 
would not change places with one of them; I consider 
that there is no post of influence on earth equal to that 
of a man who is permitted to preach the Gospel to four 
hundred millions of his fellow-men". 

We recall Stephen Mattoon, of the class of 1846, and 
Stephen Bush, of the class of 1848, who laid the founda- 
tions of missionary work in Siam, and who began the 
political relations of Siam with the western nations. 
The United States Government's treaty with Siam was 
negotiated in 1856, and Dr. Wood of the embassy wrote 
that "the unselfish kindness of the American mission- 
aries, their patience, sincerity and faithfulness, have won 
the confidence and esteem of the natives and, in some 
degree, transferred those sentiments to the nation repre- 
sented by the missionary and prepared the way for the 
free and national intercourse now commencing. It was 
very evident that much of the apprehension they felt in 
taking upon themselves the responsibilities of a treaty 
with us would be diminished if they could have the Rev. 
Mr. Mattoon as the first United States Consul to set the 
treaty in motion. " In 1871, the Regent of Siam frankly 
told Mr. Seward, the United States Consul-General at 
Shanghai, "Siam has not been disciplined by English 
and French guns, as China has, but the country has been 
opened by missionaries." 

The motion to open our Church 's mission in Japan was 
made by James W. Alexander, in the Board Meeting on 

£425:1 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

January 8th, 1859, and not less than ten graduates of 
the Seminary have labored in this mission. 

We think of the seven men, who, in Mexico and Colom- 
bia and Chile, and the Argentine and Brazil, laid the 
foundations of our modern missionary activities, Parvin, 
'21, in Buenos Ayres ; Trumbull, '45, in Chile ; Fletcher, 
'50, and Simonton, '58, in Brazil; Pratt, '55, in Colom- 
bia ; and Pitkin, '66, and Thomson, '67, in Mexico. And 
I might go on and on, but the roll is too long in glory 
and honor for us to do more than simply glance at its 
lustre today. 

And it is not only on fields far away that the great 
creative work has been done. We have been already 
reminded of the men, who, at home, in the pastorate and 
home mission service, stirred the great moral forces 
which have dominated the life of the nation, and have 
lifted up and taken down again from their pinnacles the 
little statesmen of a day. But we must think also of the 
great mass of men, back of these, whose names are not 
written visibly on the roll, who in quietness and obscur- 
ity, did the great work of God in the dark, and laid the 
foundations for the walls of the nation's temple. But 
here and there stands out the name of some unique char- 
acter among them ; Sheldon Jackson, for example, of the 
class of 1858, who, two generations ago, was agent of the 
American Systematic Beneficence Committee, and in 
three months canvassed the land from New York to 
Leavenworth. On one Saturday, he visited ten pastors, 
and the next day preached to four denominations. We 
think systematic beneficence a discovery of our own time, 
but there are few ideas stirring the church in its organ- 
ized life today which the fathers did not know two or 
three generations since. Jackson came to the Seminary 

C426H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

when there was whispering through all these halls the 
summons of our martyred dead in the Indian mutiny. 
His large heart heard the whispering voice and obeyed. 
There was a real student volunteer band here then, 
which Jackson at once joined. He offered himself to the 
Foreign Board for Syria, Siam or Bogota, but was sent 
to the Choctaws, to pass on from them to the Christian 
Commission in the Civil War, then to work in the western 
states, then to the great northwest, then to Alaska. On 
the frontiers of the nation's life, he wrought his creative 
and enduring work, far away, as Frances Willard wrote 
to him, "on the distant edge of things, where God's most 
friendless children turn towards you their eyes of pathos 
and of hope". 

One after another, we remember men like him today, 
who, taught by their old Mother here that duty is a long 
loyalty, and that there are no short terms in the service 
of the Kingdom of God, have laid out ample lives in the 
age-long work of building the church on earth. I think 
of fourteen men who went out to the mission field, whose 
terms of missionary service aggregate seven hundred 
years. Some of these are living now : J. M. W. Farnham, 
of the class of 1859, the oldest foreign missionary gradu- 
ate of the Seminary, still working after 53 years, in 
Shanghai; John Wherry, of the class of 1861, a pioneer 
of the North China Mission; Andrew Watson, of the 
same class, a father and guide of the remarkable mission 
of the United Presbyterian Church in Egypt. The list 
would include P. J. Gulick, of 1828, for 52 years a mis- 
sionary in Hawaii and Japan, G. W. Wood, of 1837, for 
48 years a missionary in Turkey, W. W. Scudder, of 
1846, for 48 years a missionary in India, and C. C. Bald- 
win, of 1847," for 47 years a missionary in China. I have 

[427;] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

not been curious to make the calculation, but I suppose 
we should find it to be literally true that the years of 
foreign missionary life given by the sons of this institu- 
tion would be equivalent to the time of two men preach- 
ing the gospel from the hour of our Lord's birth down 
to this present day. 

And I can count six home missionary men whose terms 
of service aggregate over three hundred years ; Porter, 
'31, founder of the church at Fort Dearborn, now the 
First Church of Chicago, for 50 years a home missionary 
worker; Lewis Thompson, '40, of Oregon and Califor- 
nia, who gave 57 years of service ; Allen H. Brown, '43, 
of New Jersey, with 67 years ; Thomas Fraser, '45, of the 
Synod of Pacific, with 48 years; David C. Lyon, '45, 
Synodical Missionary in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Da- 
kota, with 48 years ; and H. M. Robertson, '48, of Wis- 
consin, with 41 years. The Seminary has been wont to 
send out from these walls men who believed that the 
work into which they went was not work that called for 
part of life for a little time, but who knew that God asked 
for all that He had given or might give. 

And beyond these men are the many who have had no 
joy of half -century service! How many of them will 
come back to our memories here today! I can think, 
looking down on your faces, of name after name, of year 
after year, coming back to you now. How the dear mem- 
ories glow, of the younger men to whom came no such 
privilege as the joy of the long, long work of which we 
have been thinking; Gerald Dale of Syria, who burned 
his short life out in fourteen years, "the model scholar, 
the model Christian, the model gentleman of Princeton 
Seminary", as Dr. Charles Hodge described him; Albert 
Whiting who laid down his life in China and at whose 

C428I] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

grave the Chinese knelt down to worship; and Edson 
Lowe, of the class of '85, whose memory is cherished wor- 
shipfully still in the capital of Chile, and one I will dare 
to mention, just one, who is living still, quietly, simply, 
doing his work far off in a distant field, John N. Forman 
of India, but for whom some of us would not be here to- 
day but would be doing our work in other places, and 
fulfilling our duty in other callings. It is worth while 
remembering what one life or two can do, when we note 
in the history of this Seminary that prior to the work 
which that little company of men in the modern student 
missionary crusade accomplished, only one out of eigh- 
teen of our students went to the foreign field, while since 
the year 1886, one out of every nine has gone. 

There are more sacred memories even than these that 
throng upon us. I stopped in on my way here to stand 
again before the tablet in Stuart Hall that commemo- 
rates the half dozen sons of this Seminary who met with 
tragic death : Freeman, '38, and McMullin, '54, who laid 
down their lives on the parade grounds at Cawnpore; 
Walter Lowrie, '41, and John Rogers Peale, '05, the first 
and the last, in China; Janvier, '40, andLoewenthal, '54, 
who died in northwestern India ; McChesney, '69, whose 
name is not on the tablet, who died for Christ on the 
waters of southern China. After this, you remember, 
the tablet says, "Of these the world was not worthy." 
And as I stood reading the names once more with the 
brief and simple record, there came flashing through my 
mind what Dr. Mackay will remember, the monument 
that stands in front of the Parliament Buildings in the 
city of Ottawa, the great brown granite boulder, and the 
exquisite figure of Sir Galahad standing upon it, and 
underneath, the bronze tablet that describes the heroic 

[429 J 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

death of Henry Harper, as lie tried to save another's life 
in the waters of the Ottawa in the winter time. Galahad 
is standing with his head thrown back, as though he 
looked far beyond the black swirling waters of the Ot- 
tawa, to the fair hills of Paradise, and the life laid up 
there for those who here their lives laid down for men. 
And below the lovely figure and the lovely face is the 
simple inscription, "And Galahad said, 'If I lose my life, 
I save my life. ' ' ' The old Mother taught many of her 
sons that great fidelity. 

And we turn from the service that the Seminary has 
given in the missionary activities of our own Church for 
just a moment to mark what she has done for other 
Christian bodies. I suppose not less than one quarter 
of the students of the Seminary who have gone out to 
the foreign field, have gone in connection with other 
Christian organizations. Prior to the year 1837, Prince- 
ton gave thirty-nine men to the American Board ; twelve 
of them to the Sandwich Islands alone, among them 
Richard Armstrong, the father of Samuel Chapman 
Armstrong, surely one of the most notable characters of 
the last generation in our land ; not less than twenty or 
thirty to our sister Church of the South; MacKay of 
Formosa to the Church of Canada ; Wood to the Dutch 
Reformed Church of South Africa; Watson and Mc- 
Clenahan to the United Presbyterian Church ; Scudder 
and Miller and Van Ess and others to the Dutch Re- 
formed Church of the United States ; Stevenson to the 
Irish Presbyterian Church, and other men to the New 
Hebrides and Manchuria. The Seminary has not been 
narrow-minded in her ministry to the Church of God 
throughout all the world. 

There is time only to allude to those general gifts which 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

the Seminary has made through her sons to the litera- 
ture of missions. It would not be easy to repeat the long 
list of men who have made these contributions and the 
great books which they have given to the Church. I must 
be content with singling out only five. William M. 
Thompson, '32, author of "The Land and the Book", 
still perhaps the most charming and authoritative book 
on the Holy Land; R. H. Nassau, '59, author of the 
unique and authoritative book on "Fetichism in West 
Africa"; James S. Dennis, '67, who wrote a standard 
apologetic treatise, showing what Christianity is and 
alone can do, demonstrating its divine origin by its actual 
social effects throughout the world ; Samuel H. Kellogg, 
'64, as bright a genius as ever went out from these walls, 
a student of comparative religion and author of what is 
to this day the best statement of our Christian faith as 
contrasted with Buddhism in "The Light of Asia and the 
Light of the World ; ' ' and John Livingston Nevius, '53, 
whose book on "China and the Chinese" was the best 
book of the time on China, and who wrote a little book on 
missionary methods which has made a deeper impression 
than any other book on missionary policy and principle 
throughout the mission field. And if one were to turn 
from all this to the educational foundations laid for the 
good of the whole Christian Church by the men who have 
gone out from this Seminary, he would only pile up the 
debt which the Church of Christ in all the world owes to 
those who have taught in these walls. 

I must speak before closing of what the Seminary has 
given to the work of missionary administration. Seven 
secretaries for the Board of Home Missions have gone 
out from this institution. With two brief intervals, T 
believe that for eighty years the administration of our 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

home missionary work has been in the hands of gradu- 
ates of this institution. And the Congregational Church 
has drawn two of its home missionary administrators 
from our Alumni roll, and the Baptist Publication So- 
ciety one, while many agents have been provided for 
other missionary activities at home. If we turn to our 
own Foreign Missionary Board, every President and 
Chairman of our Executive Committee from the founda- 
tion down to this day, has been either a graduate or a 
director or a teacher in this institution ; Samuel Miller 
was the first President of the Board, and William Phil- 
lips the first Chairman of the Executive Committee and 
these have been followed by James Lenox, William 
Adams, William M. Paxton, John D. Wells and George 
Alexander. Of the ten secretaries of our Board of For- 
eign Missions, five have been students of this institution, 
and two of the other five sent their sons here. There has 
never been a day since our foreign missionary work 
began when a son of this institution has not been carry- 
ing responsibilities for our missionary policies. And 
what the Seminary has done for us in these regards, she 
has done also for other Churches as well. She has given 
two foreign mission secretaries to the American Board 
and five to the American and Foreign Christian Union, 
one to the Irish Presbyterian Church, one to the United 
Presbyterian Church, one to the Southern Presbyterian 
Church, and twenty-three assistant secretaries and 
agents. And last of all, the Seminary gave from its 
second class that one life to which Dr. McEwan re- 
ferred at the beginning, one of the best gifts God ever 
made to our Church, the life of Elisha P. Swift. Swift 
was born in 1792 in Williamstown. He was a lad of 
fifteen at the time of the " Haystack Prayer-meeting". 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

He came here to Princeton, and took his theological 
course, and was then ordained as a foreign missionary 
by the American Board, but was turned away from that 
ambition to serve the Board as an agent at home, and 
then to settle first in the church in Dover, Delaware, 
where Samuel Miller was born, and later in the Second 
Presbyterian Church in the city of Pittsburgh. From 
that pulpit, he blew the trumpet that rallied around him 
and the Synod of Pittsburgh the forces which were to 
bring into being the organized foreign missionary life 
of our Church. 

And what Swift did may suggest best the few things 
I have to say, in closing, of the general convictions, the 
great missionary conceptions for which the Seminary 
has stood. From the beginning she adopted and made 
her own Elisha Swift's principle that the missionary 
enterprise was not an optional thing to be carried on by 
volunteer organizations in which the individual Chris- 
tian man had his choice of participating or not, but that 
the missionary enterprise at home and abroad was the 
Church's first and organic obligation. We have a state- 
ment of Swift's view and a specimen of his logic in a 
paper of his in which he pours scorn on the idea that the 
church courts are for routine business and for litigation, 
but not for the corporate prosecution of the Church's 
chief business which is missions. "On what appoint- 
ment, ' ' says the writer, ' ' do pastors and elders sit in the 
house of God and hold the keys of the Kingdom of 
Heaven, but that which commissions them to go and dis- 
ciple all nations P If, at the bar of such courts, by the 
very fact of their lawful existence, the perishing heathen 
have no right to sue out the payment of a Kedeemer's 
mercy, then the most material object of their sitting is 

[433 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

cancelled; and that neglected, starving portion of man- 
kind, who enter with a specific claim, are turned out to 
find relief by an appeal to the sympathy of particular 
disciples. Will 'the Head of all principality and power' 
stay in judicatories where the laws of His kingdom are 
so expounded? Until something more is done for the 
conversion of the nations, what article on the docket of 
business can be relevant at any meeting, if this is not? 
Shall a worthless, unsound delinquent be told that, ac- 
cording to the Word of God, and the constitution of the 
Church, he has a right to come and consume hours of 
time in trifling litigation ; and shall a world of benighted 
men, who have received as yet no hearing, and no mercy, 
and no information that Jesus has left a deposit for them 
also, be turned over to the slow and uncertain compas- 
sion of individuals 1" 

Dr. Lowrie has told us that Samuel Miller was one of 
the first to make a contribution for the new Western 
Foreign Missionary Society, which embodied Swift's 
principle. And beginning with the year 1837, the whole 
stream of the Seminary's foreign missionaries was 
turned toward the church activity of our own body. The 
theological issue between the Old and the New School 
entered in, I know, but also I know that the Seminary 
believed in Swift's conception. And we owe to these men, 
and most of all to Swift, what is our most priceless pos- 
session to-day, the recognition of the missionary obliga- 
tion as the inalienable duty of the entire Church, the con- 
ception of the whole Church as a missionary society, of 
which every member of the Church is a member by virtue 
of his relationship to the Church herself. 

We owe to these men and to the old institution not only 
this clear perception of the church theory of missions, 

£4341] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

but also a large and courageous faith. Younger men are 
wont to think that the great visions are theirs, but our 
fathers were young men in their day, and what is more, 
they were men of God and seers in the Spirit, and they 
had their great visions too. I have been reading in the 
earliest records of our Board (for this is its seventy-fifth 
anniversary) the purposes cherished in the establish- 
ment of its first missions. Swift planned for stations 
across Africa when the interior of the continent was un- 
known. The missionaries went to Calcutta under in- 
structions that they were not to stay there ; they were to 
go northwest as far as they could go. It was hoped that 
they could plant their stations in the Vale of Kashmir, 
cross the roof of the world and press on to the far shores 
of Lake Baikal; they were not to be content till there 
should be opened a Christian mission station where none 
has been opened to this day, in Kabul of Afghanistan. 
We owe it to the fathers who went before us to stand 
afraid before no opportunity and flinch at no call. 

From the very beginning, they taught us also the glory 
of a great and unswerving fidelity. For twelve years, Ste- 
phen Mattoon and Stephen Bush labored in Siam, before 
they had their first convert. At the end of six years, the 
missionaries numbered sixteen in Ningpo, and they had 
six Chinese converts. The men who have gone out from 
these halls have always known the duty of staying by 
duty until the sun went down. They were taught that 
God was patient, and that His servants need not be 
anxious or afraid. 

And I dare even to say also, that these men learned 
somewhere (maybe the old Mother did not know that she 
was giving it to them, but in the pure milk of the gospel 
which they drew from her breasts, it must have come to 

[435] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

them) that what we hold which is peculiar is less impor- 
tant than what we hold in common with all Christian 
men. From the beginning the sons of the Seminary have 
striven faithfully for what a few minutes ago we were 
praying,— the unity of Christ's Church on earth. Men 
were taught here that there is no chasm between the dif- 
ferent forms of missionary service, that the whole 
Church must some day and everywhere be made one 
mighty army, and they went out to Mexico and Brazil, to 
Japan and China and India, cherishing the dream from 
far across the hills of the day that is waiting, when the 
desire of the Saviour's heart shall be fulfilled, when, 
united to Him, the sin of our schisms shall be over and 
we shall all be gathered together in one, as He and His 
Father are one. 

And lastly, the Seminary has always sought to breed 
in her sons a dauntless and unf earing supernaturalism. 
The missionary enterprise is too vast for a mere human 
will to sustain. Its difficulties, its necessities, its prob- 
lems, its ideals, call for God. Its sufficiency is in Him 
alone. Here men learned that God was "in the begin- 
ning" and that God stands back of the end. With God 
and by God and for God such men have dared all things, 
and have not fainted or grown weary. 

With all this in our past, my friends, what may there 
not be in our future, if we, to whom this past has been 
given, do not lie down to sleep upon our great tradition, 
but answering its summons and its call, rise up to greet 
the new day which is entreating us, in the spirit in 
which James Alexander and Elisha Swift would greet it 
—this new day with its unprecedented world situation 
which confronts us, which is God's gift to us, and not 
God's gift only, but God's test of our worthiness to be 
the heirs and executors of such a past % 

C436 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PBINCETON IN THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION 
AND RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

ADDRESS 

BY THE EEVEEEND WILLIAM HALLOCK JOHNSON, Ph.D. 
Professor of Greek and New Testament Literature and Exegesis 
Lincoln University, Pennsylvania 

Mr. President, Fellow Alumni, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

ONE thought is in every mind today, one sentiment in 
every heart, one word upon every tongue : Prince- 
ton the mother of us all ! 

The history of Princeton Seminary for the past one 
hundred years constitutes an important chapter in the 
history of the Christian Church. That chapter, if fully 
written, would contain many sacred passages from indi- 
vidual biographies. It would tell of the aspirations and 
vows of Christian parents as they dedicated a beloved 
son to the work of the ministry ; it would tell of the devel- 
opment in the growing boy of a holy purpose to serve 
God in the gospel of His Son ; it would tell of the deepen- 
ing of thought and experience and the strengthening of 
purpose and conviction in the three years of the Prince- 
tonian Arabia ; it would tell of the fruitful years of ser- 
vice and sacrifice for church and country in the pulpit at 
home, and in laying the foundations of Christian civili- 
zation abroad, in that work of spiritual imperialism 
which Mr. Winston Churchill of England has spoken of 
as the glory of the Anglo-Saxon race, and which is the 
glory of any race or any institution privileged to have a 
large share in it. 

C437H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Our hearts have been stirred as we have listened to the 
eloquent story of what Princeton men have accomplished 
in the home pulpit and on the mission field. The thought 
has come to me, how abundantly have the wisdom of the 
founders of this Seminary, the devoted labors of its 
Faculty and governing boards, and the generosity of its 
benevolent friends been justified by the result. They 
builded better than they knew. Where, from a business 
standpoint, could one find a better investment of money % 
Where, for every dollar invested, has there been a richer 
return in lasting and far-reaching influence for good ? 

The theme assigned to me this afternoon will, I fear, 
seem rather scholastic after addresses which have car- 
ried us up upon the heights ; but I beg you to remember, 
when thinking of the achievements of Princeton Alumni, 
the good Presbyterian doctrine, "What have I that I 
have not received?" The fond mother feels that she is 
responsible for the successes of her children, and Prince- 
ton may well rejoice today in the service of her sons, and 
may even sympathize a little with the feelings of Nebu- 
chadnezzar, when he said, " Is this not great Babylon that 
I have builded % ' ', without being guilty of the deadly sin of 
pride. You may say that Princeton men were originally 
endowed with those qualities which would ensure minis- 
terial success, even if they had gone to some other semi- 
nary. This is no doubt true, but Princeton is responsible 
for two things : she has attracted to herself men of large 
mental and spiritual calibre, and she has given them a 
training upon which success has in multitudes of cases, 
as we have heard, been built. I believe that there is a 
causal connection between the Princeton training and the 
ministerial success, whether causation be construed in 
terms of uniform sequence with the Humeian philo- 

C438I] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

sophy, or in terms of power or efficiency with Dr. McCosh, 
and with Professor Ormond, who has trained genera- 
tions of theological students in the principles of a sound 
philosophy. 

How shall we estimate the value of Princeton's con- 
tribution to theological education 1 Adopting the quanti- 
tative method, we might speak of Princeton 's age, of the 
number of her graduates and of the number of these 
engaged in theological education. As the oldest semi- 
nary of the Presbyterian Church, Princeton has natu- 
rally exerted a profound influence over theological edu- 
cation. In the South, the Union Seminary of Richmond 
was founded soon after Princeton by men from the Log 
College, and the founders of Columbia Seminary set be- 
fore them the goal of making that institution "the 
Princeton of the South"; while in the North, such insti- 
tutions as McCormick, Western, Lane, Danville, Lincoln 
and San Francisco were founded by Princeton men or 
had Princeton men among their earliest instructors. 
Princeton, it has been said, cannot be jealous of the pros- 
perity of these younger institutions, because they are in 
a large measure her own offspring. As the pioneer 
among the seminaries of the Presbyterian Church she 
has blazed the path which others have followed. 

Princeton is not only the oldest Presbyterian theologi- 
cal school; she is, in the number of her graduates and 
former students, the largest school for theological educa- 
tion, of any name, 1 in America. Some five thousand eight 
hundred men have studied within her walls, her nearest 
competitor being the Southern Baptist Seminary of 
Louisville, Ky., with a total of about four thousand and 

1 "The total number of students up to 1910 was 5,742, of whom 3,076 were liv- 
ing" (J. H. Dulles in New Schaff-Herzog Encyc, Vol. XI., p. 374). 

C439J 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

fifty matriculates. 1 Some one hundred and eight of her 
graduates have been teachers in the Presbyterian schools 
of theology in this country, while others have taught in 
other divinity schools, here and abroad, among them Dr. 
McCurdy, of Toronto, Dr. Jacobus, of Hartford, and one 
who for many years was the only native American to 
occupy a full professorship in a German university— 
Dr. Caspar Rene Gregory, of Leipsic, soon to give to the 
world the fruit of a lifetime of study in a great critical 
edition of the Greek New Testament. Of the theological 
teachers in our Presbyterian seminaries, almost one- 
third are Princeton graduates. Of these, there are two 
in Auburn, one in Western, one in Kentucky, five in Mc- 
Cormick, one in San Francisco, three in Lincoln, one in 
Newark, and four in Omaha. The distinguished presi- 
dents of McCormick and Omaha Seminaries, as well as 
of Princeton Seminary, are Princeton graduates. 

Dr. Patton, I believe, has recently expressed the desire 
that he might be at the head of a school for the training 
of college presidents, but if he would study the statistics, 
he would find that his ambition is already gratified. We 
cannot think of Washington and Jefferson, for example, 
without thinking of Dr. Moff at, nor of Wooster Univer- 
sity without thinking of Dr. Holden, whose energy has 
raised it from its ashes. And what would Lincoln Uni- 
versity be without the forty-six years of splendid service 
and sacrifice of J)r. Isaac N. Rendall % Some of the hon- 
ored guests from abroad may have been accustomed to 
think of Princeton as merely a center of theological 
learning. Now, certainly, they realize that the term 
Princeton has a wider extension ; and those of us who are 

1 This is the estimate of President E. Y. Mullins. Andover reported a total of 
3,538 students up to 1908. 

[440] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Princeton men in a double sense rejoice in the fact that 
a graduate of Princeton Seminary, Dr. John Grier 
Hibben, is, in a few days, to be formally installed as the 
head of the great University whose hospitality we enjoy 
today. 

Beside theological and college teachers, Princeton has 
contributed to the Presbyterian Church fifty-six modera- 
tors of General Assemblies, and five bishops to the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, Bishops Mcllvaine, Johns, 
T. M. Clark, A. N. Little John and J. H. Darlington. She 
has not, as yet, produced a Pope, but has trained three 
stated clerks of the General Assembly. 

The specific quality of Princeton's influence in theo- 
logical education is traceable to two causes : the person- 
ality of Princeton's teachers and the high standard of 
her theological course. 

History, it has been said, is the biography of the 
world's great men. The history of Princeton is the 
record of her great teachers, of the patriarchs and 
prophets who laid the foundations of the Seminary, and 
of those who so skilfully and so devotedly have built 
upon these foundations. The secret of long life and pros- 
perity is said to be found in the choice of a sound an- 
cestry, and no institution has been more fortunate in its 
spiritual progenitors. 

An estimate of the four great men who have left the 
impress of their personality not only upon this Semi- 
nary, but directly or indirectly upon so many in the 
Presbyterian ministry, was given me recently by the 
graduate of the Seminary who is oldest in years, Dr. 
David Tully, of Media, Pa., of the class of 1850. 1 Dr. A. 

1 Eev. James Park, of Knoxville, Tenn., of the class of 1846, is the oldest in 
date of graduation. 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Alexander had "the keenness of a Kentucky rifle-man in 
his insight into spiritual experience"; Dr. Addison 
Alexander was ' ' a whirlwind as a teacher and preacher ' ' ; 
Dr. Samuel Miller was "a prince in church history and 
the Chesterfield of the Presbyterian Church"; and Dr. 
Charles Hodge was "the greatest analytical mind that 
this country has produced, certainly since the days of 
Jonathan Edwards." The same authority says that he 
never knew any group of men who could "state truth 
so clearly and defend it so ably." 

The gifts of God to the theological seminary are first 
teachers, then scholars, then preachers. Often in Prince- 
ton's history these three offices have been happily united 
in the same man, but always she has included within her 
Faculty some of the greatest preachers, the most gifted 
teachers and the prof oundest scholars of the Christian 
Church in America. Her Faculty has often been re- 
cruited from men prominent in the pastorate and pulpit. 
Two, for example, both famous as models of pulpit elo- 
quence, were taken from the pastorate of the First Pres- 
byterian Church, New York. One of these was Dr. 
William M. Paxton, to me a beloved pastor as well as 
teacher ; and in his pulpit in boyhood days I have heard 
the thoughtful and spiritual sermons of Drs. A. A. and 
C. W. Hodge. The other was Dr. Samuel Miller, of 
whom history records that he preached occasionally be- 
fore the Tammany Society, once on the Fourth of July, 
upon the theme, "Christianity, the Grand Source and 
the Surest Basis of Political Liberty." Two Princeton 
professors have been called to the pulpit of the Fifth 
Avenue Church, Dr. J. W. Alexander and Dr. Purves. 
In student days, we regarded Dr. Purves' Sunday night 
sermons as a regular part, and not the least important 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

part, of our theological course, while a sermon by Dr. 
Patton was in student days (and was yesterday) more 
than a sermon— an event in our intellectual and spiritual 
history. 

The two great pillars in the temple of Princeton were 
Drs. Archibald Alexander and Samuel Miller. Prince- 
ton's history is but the lengthening shadow of these two 
great teachers, leaders of the church and devoted ser- 
vants of God. Even to enumerate the distinguished 
teachers who have followed them would be impossible in 
this address. Dr. Addison Alexander, teacher, linguist, 
commentator, preacher, signally gifted in all these roles, 
was an intellectual and spiritual giant, of whom it has 
been said that "to have possessed any one faculty in 
the measure in which he possessed all, would have been 
enough to constitute a man of mark." How shall we do 
justice to the memory of Dr. Charles Hodge in the pres- 
ence of many who have sat under his instruction and 
revere his memory? Even among his colleagues in 
Princeton, Dr. Hodge stands out, like Agamemnon, pre- 
eminent among many and foremost among heroes. 
Measured by the number of students that he taught 
(some three thousand) or by the years of his service, or 
by the depth and permanence of his influence in molding 
conviction and shaping character, or by the affection and 
veneration felt for him by successive classes of students, 
or by the persistence of his influence in the generation 
since his death through the use of his published works 
as text-books in most of the seminaries of the Presby- 
terian faith, Dr. Hodge stands out as easily the foremost 
theological teacher in the Christian churches of America. 

We cannot speak in detail of those contributions to 
theological scholarship which have caused the name of 

IT443: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Princeton to be known and respected in all parts of the 
learned world. The richest contribution which the 
scholar can make to the world of sacred learning is per- 
haps a learned and devout commentary upon some great 
book of the Bible. To unfold the rich treasures of Scrip- 
ture through exegesis is its best defence. Drs. Addison 
Alexander and Charles Hodge did not anticipate all the 
discoveries and discussions of later years, but their com- 
mentaries are still widely studied, and may be studied 
with profit as examples of thorough scholarship, sound 
judgment in exegesis, and spiritual insight. Exposi- 
tion of the Scriptures has in Princeton ever led to theo- 
logical construction : theology without exegesis, to adapt 
Kant's well-known phrase, is empty; exegesis without 
theology is blind. Upon the writings of Princeton men 
in systematic theology a large part of her reputation 
may be said to rest. In other departments, such as phil- 
ology and archaeology, Biblical introduction, apologet- 
ics, church history, church polity, Biblical theology, 
ethics and philosophy of religion, Princeton has kept 
abreast of, and helped to advance, the scholarship of 
her day. The founders of the Seminary and their de- 
scendants by ordinary generation and spiritual inheri- 
tance have exerted a steady stream of influence through 
books, pamphlets, addresses, articles in periodicals and 
Bible dictionaries. "The Princeton Review," insepara- 
bly associated, under its several titles, with the names of 
Alexander, Hodge, Dr. Green and Dr. Warfield, has been 
recognized for three generations as the foremost organ 
of the Reformed faith; it has been an engine of power 
in the church and the country, " spreading the fame of 
Princeton among the nations." To the contributions of 
her own scholars must be added those of her occasional 

[444;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

lecturers upon the ' ' Stone ' ' and other foundations. The 
list includes such names as those of Drs. Storrs, Mark 
Hopkins and Henry J. Van Dyke, of America ; of Drs. 
Flint and Orr, and Sir William M. Ramsay, of Scotland ; 
and Drs. Kuyper and Bavinck, of Holland; together 
with many names notable in the world of missionary 
literature. 

The influence of Princeton's teachers has been felt 
wherever the gospel has been preached by Princeton men. 
The secret of her influence in theological education has 
been the succession of apostolic men who have occupied 
her professorial chairs. These have been men who have 
magnified their office, not content merely to give formal 
instruction in the truths and doctrines of the Word, but 
ambitious to inspire as well as to instruct, to animate 
with zeal for the work of the Kingdom, and to set before 
their students a strong and attractive example of Chris- 
tian and ministerial manhood. 

Another reason for the prestige and influence of 
Princeton as a school of the prophets has been her high 
standard of ministerial training. We have been passing 
through a period of educational transition and perhaps 
of confusion. The wonderful development and ever- 
extending boundaries of the sciences, the obvious utility 
of scientific study as a preparation for many vocations 
in life, the relative depreciation of the classics, the de- 
mands of a not infallible, but very human student body, 
seeking the line of least resistance, the development of 
elective courses, the application of candidates for the 
ministry without classical training, the marked popular 
interest in sociological questions growing out of our in- 
dustrial organization and the progress of democracy, all 
of these causes have had their effect upon the theory and 

£4451 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the actual arrangement of our theological curricula. 
Coupled with these changes in general educational pol- 
icy, have been changes within the theological field itself, 
affecting the traditional views of the Bible and of its 
doctrines, and so of the gospel which ought to be 
preached. We are met with the question : Why not dis- 
pense with the dead languages and the dry bones of scho- 
lastic theology, and study the living problems of the day ? 
Why not take this sorry theological scheme of things— 
this curriculum— entire, and shatter it to bits, and then 
remold it nearer to the heart's desire? 

I know that we are here on controversial ground, and 
that every seminary has its own problems, and must 
decide for itself how it may best serve the church and the 
cause of ministerial education. I congratulate Prince- 
ton Seminary, however, upon reaching her one hun- 
dredth anniversary without finding it necessary to make 
her theological course any easier, or to change the prin- 
ciple upon which that course is organized. In the midst 
of changing conditions and theories, Princeton has stood 
her ground requiring a high standard of admission, 
requiring for graduation a knowledge of Hebrew and of 
Greek, and requiring exegesis in the original tongues. 

Those hours of Hebrew in the junior year are indeed 
for the average student a hill of difficulty, but it is good 
to bear the yoke and to endure a little intellectual hard- 
ship. The mental discipline itself is not to be despised, 
and may help the preacher in later years as he grapples 
with a difficult text, and says, "I will not let thee go, 
except thou bless me." The short cut into the ministry, 
it is well to remember, may lead to the short cut out of 
the ministry, and the road may be made so smooth and 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

easy as to lead readily into the by-paths of a real estate 
and insurance agency. 

In these days of specialized Biblical criticism, it would 
be certainly a misfortune if the decision of Biblical 
questions should be taken out of the hands of the minis- 
try, and relegated to a learned and cloistered caste. Crit- 
ical discussions about the Pentateuch or the Psalms, or 
Isaiah or the Synoptic problem can only be appreciated 
by those who have some knowledge of the ancient lan- 
guages. It is not necessary that the preacher should be 
a specialist in philology, but it is desirable that the min- 
istry, to whom are committed the oracles of God, should 
have in their hands the instruments of scholarship, and 
be able for themselves to " search the scriptures whether 
these things are so." 

In a scientific age, it will be a serious handicap to the 
preacher not to be able to refer to the fundamental docu- 
ments of his faith. The necessity of the ancient lan- 
guages in a theological course stands or falls, indeed, 
in my opinion, with the importance of exegesis, and our 
estimate of the importance of exegesis is bound up with 
our views of the authority and inspiration of the Scrip- 
tures. If there is no water of life, there is no need to 
draw from the fountain of the original text. If the 
preacher is not to preach the Word, his time will be 
wasted in studying the languages in which it was writ- 
ten. But the preacher, who believes that only in the 
Bible can he find his message for the salvation of men 
and the good of society, will wish to know all he can 
about the Bible. He will shrink from no labor which 
may make him a " workman that needeth not to be 
ashamed. " Whatever the changes of the future, I hope. 

£447:1 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

that in these days of higher standards of professional 
preparation, Princeton will not let down the bars in def- 
erence to the clamor for an easier course. 

Our hope and dream for Princeton is that with ex- 
panding resources, she should offer, in some way, as 
extra-curriculum or elective, or fourth year or graduate 
courses, all the subjects which might be taught by the 
theological university. Let her offer courses in all the 
religions, and in all the languages, in all the philosophies, 
in all the Biblical books, in all the doctrines, in all the 
periods of church history, in the philosophy and psy- 
chology of religion, in ethics and economics and sociol- 
ogy. Let her send out Oberlins into the country churches 
who shall improve the roads and the schools and the 
methods of agriculture. Let her send out sociological 
experts, men with the modern outlook upon social prob- 
lems, and able to apply the most exact and scientific 
methods to their study and to their solution. Let there 
be courses that will give to the foreign missionary a 
specialized training for his work. Let elocution be em- 
phasized so that the preacher, on fire with his message, 
may deliver it in a manner commensurate with his theme. 
Let the circumference of the course be as wide as pos- 
sible, but let the center, about which and upon which all 
else shall be built, be the study of the Bible. Thus will 
the Seminary give to the preacher a message large 
enough to fill his heart and mind, and great and impor- 
tant enough to carry to the ends of the earth. 

Courses in psychology of religion, in religious educa- 
tion and in ethics will be attractive and useful to the 
preacher, and other studies, in history, literature, sci- 
ence and philosophy, will be broadening and helpful. 
But in the name of efficiency, let us put the most impor- 

£448 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

tant things first. Let us not crowd in the squash courts 
and Turkish baths and palm gardens, if we have to 
crowd out the life-boats. 

I have seen efficient ministers without scholastic train- 
ing—Paul had more training in the schools than Peter; 
but I never saw an efficient minister without the Bible 
in his hand and in his heart. When we speak of efficiency 
and social service, let us not forget our church history. 
Let us look at Luther and Calvin, and what they accom- 
plished, and how they accomplished it. Luther and Calvin 
might have studied history and psychology and political 
and social science till they were as old as Methusaleh, and 
they would not have produced one tithe of the political 
and social results that they did achieve by studying the 
Bible, by translating the Bible, by expounding the Bible, 
and by building, as they believed, upon the Bible great 
systems of doctrine and of duty. 

Turning, for the few moments which remain, to the 
second part of our topic, we may say that Princeton's 
influence upon religious thought has been constructive, 
conservative and comprehensive, and that it has flowed 
notably in two channels, those of Biblical criticism and 
doctrinal theology. 

Princeton's influence has been constructive. She has 
not been content with a repetition of the old formulas. 
Out of the Scriptures, as she believes, she has reared an 
imposing and positive system of truth, not novel in its 
essential features, but built up in full view of opposing 
systems, and with constant reference to the science and 
philosophy and criticism of the time. The articles of 
Princeton's creed have not been prefaced with a ''per- 
haps" or an "I don't know", yet at times her words 
spoken in moderation and wisdom (for example, upon 

C449 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the principles of subscription to the Confession, or upon 
the atonement as adapted to all, sufficient for all, open 
to all and honestly offered to all) have brought assur- 
ance and relief to the whole Presbyterian world. 

Her influence has been conservative. She has not be- 
lieved with Ibsen that "the life of a normally constituted 
truth is twenty years at the outside". Her appeal has 
been from the fashion of the age ofttimes to the mature 
verdict of the ages. Her faith has been liberal in the 
sense indicated by Bishop Brooks, who said the term 
should be used not of a faith which believes little, but 
of one which believes much. Whether with approval or 
not, we must recognize the notable consistency of her 
position. She has exemplified her favorite doctrine of 
the perseverance of the saints. For one hundred years, 
she has stood like a Gibraltar amid the shifting tides 
and currents of human opinion. 

Princeton's influence has been comprehensive. She 
has expounded and defended both the Old and the New 
Testaments, which the history of criticism has shown to 
be joined together as closely as ever, for better, for worse ; 
for richer, for poorer. She has taught the great central 
doctrines of the Christian faith, human sin, a Divine 
Redeemer, and redemption through the blood of His 
Cross; and she has defended the outposts of the Re- 
formed theology. She has expounded the doctrines of 
revealed religion, and has defended those fundamental 
truths of natural religion which lie at the basis of all 
religion and all ethics. 

In analyzing Princeton's influence upon religious 
thought, we find that two principal streams may be dis- 
tinguished ; her influence in the spheres of Biblical criti- 
cism and of doctrinal theology. In considering ques- 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

tions of Biblical criticism, her attitude has been reverent 
rather than patronizing. She has not sat in the seat of 
the scorner. Her attitude again has been scientific in 
that, whether her conclusions have been correct or not, 
she has, at least, considered the available evidence from 
tradition, from philology, from archaeology, from com- 
parative religion, not omitting the testimony of the Holy 
Spirit, bearing witness by and with the Word in our 
hearts. Her attitude has been courteous, toward criticism 
and toward the critics. Dr. William Henry Green stands 
as Princeton's leading exponent of the higher criticism. 
He has been called "the most influential Hebrew teacher 
of his time among English-speaking men"; he was the 
chairman of the American Old Testament Revision Com- 
mittee; but he will be longest remembered as "the lead- 
ing defender in this country, if not in the world, of the 
authenticity and integrity of the Mosaic books. " It was 
his work in this field which led Dr. Willis J. Beecher to 
say that he had "caused American scholarship to be rec- 
ognized throughout the Western, the Eastern and the 
Australian continents." Dr. Green, as a scholar, a Chris- 
tian and a gentleman, was a model to all those who would 
enter the field of theological discussion. 

While there is a contest between faith and unbelief, 
while men approach historical evidence from different 
philosophical standpoints and hold their philosophy 
dear, the Bible with its revelation of a Divine Christ will 
be the great storm-center, the great battle ground of con- 
troversy. Progress may be made by research, by reflec- 
tion, by calm discussion and the weighing of arguments, 
by proving all things and holding fast that which is good ; 
but perhaps no final agreement will be reached until we 
come to know even as we are known, or until we reach a 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

condition of moral and spiritual indifference, and, like 
Gallio, care for none of these things. 

I am not a prophet to forecast the probable course or 
duration or outcome of the controversy over the author- 
ship and the trustworthiness of the books of the Bible ; 
but I may venture to predict that an institution whose 
delight is in the law of the Lord will continue to enjoy 
the promise of continuous vigor and seasonable f ruitf ul- 
ness. And I may express the conviction that that insti- 
tution which in the coming years of the century does 
most to train men to preach the Bible, and to induce men 
to study the Bible, to believe in and to obey the Bible, as 
the revelation of God's will and God's love for the salva- 
tion of men and society, that institution will not be at 
the end of the procession, but will be marching right in 
front in the vanguard of the world's advance. 

Princeton Seminary has been for a century the con- 
sistent champion of that system of doctrine which has 
been variously called Augustinian, Calvinistic, Re- 
formed, Westminster, or simply Princetonian. Prince- 
ton has produced the greatest textbook, the great monu- 
mental treatise, of this type of theology in the English 
language, its best popular exposition (in Dr. A. A. 
Hodge's " Popular Lectures"), its most genial and per- 
suasive teachers, its keenest polemical defenders. Not 
all of us, as students, were able to bear all that we were 
taught by our theological professors; but I believe I 
speak for the great body of the Alumni when I say that 
we have absorbed a surprisingly large amount of Calvin- 
ism, and in our deepest convictions, as these have been 
deepened by experience, are true to that system of doc- 
trine which places God's will above man's will, God's 
power above human weakness, God's grace above human 

£4521] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

merit, and makes God's glory the supreme end of man's 
existence. 

We live in a time when there is a general desire for a 
fuller outward expression of the essential unity of the 
Christian church. The branches of the church, engaged 
in a common work, animated by a common purpose, are 
longing for some fuller expression of their essential 
unity in Christ, the great Head of the church. The mid- 
dle walls of division, which have stood for centuries with- 
out a breach under the heavy guns of theological contro- 
versy, may at last be melted by the fires of Christian 
love. But whatever the movements and readjustments 
of the future, under the guidance of God's providence 
and of His Spirit, we believe that the essential truths 
which Princeton has taught with such conviction, for 
which she has contended so earnestly, and which she has 
made men see so clearly, whether they accepted her 
teaching or not, that these truths in the church of the 
future, coming down through Augustine and Calvin and 
the Westminster and the Princeton divines, will be a 
possession for all time, and that they will be incorporated 
as a valuable and integral part into the great stream of 
catholic Christianity and catholic Christian thought. 

To these "five points" of Calvinism, may Princeton 
continue to be true. First, a lofty ideal of Christian and 
ministerial character, an ideal which has produced in 
history such men as Coligny, William of Nassau, John 
Knox, Dr. Alexander "the great", and Charles Hodge 
"the gracious". Second, an intelligent faith and a high 
standard of training for the ministry. Third, the au- 
thority of the Bible, given in the lovingkindness of our 
God, as the rule of faith and life. Fourth, the sovereignty 
of God in His grace and in His providence. Fifth, the 

[453] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

doing of the will of God upon the earth; for the Re- 
formed faith is in its very essence a reforming faith. 

As we review the record of one hundred years of the 
Seminary's life, we cannot repress a feeling of profound 
gratitude for the streams of influence which have gone 
out from the Princeton fountain into the pulpits of our 
land, into the mission field and into the deepest thoughts 
and convictions and experiences of men. 

As she faces the new problems of the newer age may 
Princeton go on her way, forgetting the things that are 
behind. May she go forward to a larger usefulness in 
the service of the church and of humanity. May she go 
forward with new hope and courage, with wise leader- 
ship, with holy ambitions, to great constructive achieve- 
ments, and may all of us, her sons, set our faces in hope 
and expectancy to the coming of the better day, when the 
glory of all human achievements and of all human insti- 
tutions and the glory of the ministry and the crown of a 
redeemed humanity shall add lustre only to the Sa- 
viour's brow, and all shall join in the song, "Not unto us, 
not unto us, O Lord, but unto thy name give glory". 



[454^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PRINCETON IN ITS EARLY ENVIRONMENT 
AND WORK 1 

ADDRESS 

BY CHARLES BEATTY ALEXANDEE, LL.D. 
New York City 

HENRI ROCHEFORT has said that after men be- 
come fit for nothing else they write reminiscences. 

When the invitation came to me to deliver one of the 
addresses on this memorable occasion, I, with the sensi- 
tiveness natural to men of my years, was tempted to 
think, from the subject assigned to me, that the commit- 
tee perhaps imagined me a contemporary of the fathers 
of this institution, and hence able to speak from personal 
knowledge of its early days. The committee would not 
have been far wrong, if this had been their impression. 
It so happens that I spent a portion of every year from 
1850 to 1859, in the kindly hospitality of the old Alexan- 
der house, and like most early impressions, the recollec- 
tions of that time are most vivid. 

Dr. Archibald Alexander died in October, 1851, and 
I do not recall him. 

I well remember being taken as a little boy to see Dr. 
Hodge in the house across the campus, and being told not 
to forget that I was to meet one of the great scholars of 
the age. 

At the period I have mentioned, the only buildings on 
the campus were what is now called Alexander Hall, the 
Miller Chapel, and the old Library. It was a great 

1 Owing to the limitations of time, portions of this address were omitted. 

[455] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

source of interest to me to visit a little museum, on the 
first floor of the Seminary. It contained a few shells 
from the South Seas, and copper coins. There were also 
some beads, which I understood were the costume of 
dusky converts before they adopted the traditional garb 
of civilization. There were, moreover, certain idols in the 
cases, which in my early innocence, I supposed might occa- 
sionally, in moments of backsliding, be worshipped by the 
students, but later learned that they had been sent home 
by missionaries, after being discarded by their disciples, 
very much as the Indian braves of the day sent home to 
their lodges the scalps of the conquered. 

Above all, I remember the current of life which flowed 
through the house. The family then consisted of Joseph 
Addison Alexander, and his two brothers, William and 
Archibald, and their sister, Janetta. Hardly a day 
passed without a visit from some returning graduate or 
eminent personage from abroad, and there were frequent 
calls from the other members of the Faculty. I remember 
the intense interest shown in the work of every graduate, 
and the eagerness with which all news of the Alumni was 
sought. The early professors always kept their hands 
on their former students, wherever they might be, the 
hands of sympathy, of imagination, of Christian love. I 
have since thought, that this interest bound the graduates 
very closely to their alma mater. 

Of course, I recall Dr. Addison Alexander and all his 
well known peculiarities. In a few lessons he sought to 
make me a great Oriental scholar, but I clearly proved 
that the mantle of Elijah had not fallen on Elisha. 

Before leaving these personal reminiscences, let me say 
that I have had great pleasure in sending to the Semi- 
nary Library the English Bible which Dr. Archibald 

C456: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Alexander used daily for over thirty years. It contains, 
in his own handwriting, the entry of the births and bap- 
tisms of his children. In the cover, Dr. Alexander pasted 
several verses, which form the best possible clue to his 
character. They are as follows: "To love him with 
all the heart and with all the soul and with all the 
strength is more than all whole burnt offerings and 
sacrifices." "I dwell with him that is of a contrite and 
humble spirit." "But to do good and to communicate 
forget not." "The Lord is nigh unto them which are of 
a broken heart and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit." 
Well may it have been said of him by his biographer 
that at the time of his call to Princeton "no man of emi- 
nence could think more humbly of himself." From the 
worn appearance of portions of the book, it would seem 
that the Psalms and the Major Prophets were the most 
frequently read. I have also sent to the Library an 
ancient Hebrew Old Testament, used daily by Dr. James 
Waddel Alexander, and another read by Joseph Addison 
Alexander from 1828 until his death. 

Let me now turn to the subject assigned to me. Let 
us consider for a moment the condition of the country 
at the time of the foundation of the Seminary. In 1811, 
the people were preparing for the expected war with 
England. The things common to a new country char- 
acterized American life. Traveling facilities were poor. 
There was not a steamboat west of New York City. 
Transportation between Princeton and Philadelphia 
was by coach. In these days of the railway, bicycle, mo- 
tor, telegraph, telephone, photograph, and electricity in 
all its forms, one can hardly imagine the primitive char- 
acter of our national life. 

The educational advantages in the country were far 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

from what they are today. Harvard, Yale, Princeton, 
and some lesser colleges set the standard, bnt the school 
facilities were limited, and the teaching inferior. The 
morality of the people was characterized by the laxness 
of a new land, and strange sects sprang up, "Halcyon," 
i ' New Light, ' ' and the like, due in a large degree to a lack 
of religious training. 

Sharing in the general educational and moral depres- 
sion, theological education was at a low ebb. Ministers 
were being prepared either by private instructors, or by 
what they could pick up in their college courses. This 
condition is indicated in "The Brief Account of the Rise, 
etc. of the Seminary," published in 1822. It states that 
the founders deeply lamented the want of such an insti- 
tution, and saw with much pain the extreme disadvan- 
tage under which their candidates for the ministry 
labored, in pursuing their theological studies. They saw 
yoimg men with very small previous acquirements in 
literature and science, after devoting only twelve or 
eighteen months, and in some instances much less, to the 
study of theology, and even for that short time almost 
wholly without suitable help, taking on themselves the 
most weighty and responsible of all offices. 

But in spite of the gloomy outlook, intellectual, moral, 
and spiritual life was beginning to revive. 

Something vital happens before the green blade ap- 
pears. Although at the beginning of the last century 
there seemed little hope of improvement, the first decade 
of the nineteenth century showed a marvelous renais- 
sance, of which the foundation of the Seminary forms a 
part. / 

There was a reaction proceeding in Europe from eigh- 
teenth century infidelity. W. Gr. Ward in his recently 

C458^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

published "Life of Newman" says that this reaction was 
heralded in 1802 by Chateaubriand's " Genie du Chris- 
tianisme. ' ' 

The great idea of Christian foreign missions was 
born at the Haystack meeting in 1806. The temperance 
movement began in Moreau, New York, in 1808, when a 
society was formed pledging its members to drink rum 
only on special occasions. The first missionary society 
was founded in 1806. Twenty-four benevolent societies, 
the first growth of the immense charities of our own day, 
were incorporated in the first decade. The New Jersey 
Bible Society was founded in 1815, and shortly after- 
wards the American Bible Society. 

The life manifested in these agencies, so new and so 
startling, is also to be remarked in the Government. The 
appearance of Clay, Calhoun, Webster, Cheves and 
Lowndes, at Washington, revealed a determination to 
end the humiliating trade difficulties with France and 
England by an aggressive war. 

With this new spirit so manifest in the political and 
social life of the country, the Church awakened to its 
responsibilities and opportunities as it had not done be- 
fore. The leadership in thought as well as in action fell 
upon men unprepared by education to bear it. As a 
response to the call of the time, loud and insistent, 
Princeton Seminary was born. The men who promoted 
it appreciated that on the one hand an ignorant ministry 
is a national misfortune, and that on the other, a culti- 
vated, educated ministry is a national blessing. There- 
fore, the organization of this Seminary was not only a 
religious, but a patriotic service. 

It is remarkable that the founders of the Seminary 
made it independent of any college already in existence. 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

It would have been easy to graft it upon Nassau Hall. 
Indeed, in 1805, the College of New Jersey showed con- 
siderable uneasiness at the project of a separate semi- 
nary, for the trustees sent a communication to the Assem- 
bly setting forth, that the college was founded with a 
particular view to furnishing men for the ministry, that 
the trustees were devoted to this object, and that an 
opportunity was afforded by the college for the study of 
divinity. This exhibits the change which has taken place 
in public sentiment, when the object of so many universi- 
ties and colleges now is to secularize learning. 

The plan for the Seminary adopted by the Assembly 
of 1811 described the kind of men it was desirous of sup- 
plying to the Church in words which might well have 
been written by John Calvin. The author was Ashbel 
Green. "It is to form men for the Gospel Ministry, who 
shall truly believe and cordially love, and therefore en- 
deavor to propagate and defend that system of religious 
belief and practice which is set forth in the Confession 
of Faith, and thus to extend the influence of true evan- 
gelical piety and gospel order." 

This Seminary has been called "the home of Calvin- 
ism." Today no thinking man should be ashamed of the 
title. Any institution might be proud to furnish to the 
Church men whose ideas of liberty and justice, whose 
zeal and love for men, whose scholarship and power are 
characteristic of the school of Calvin. 

Calvin had died two hundred years before this Semi- 
nary was founded, but just as his theology had persisted, 
so did his views of an educated Protestant clergy con- 
tinue to influence the Presbyterians of the world. He 
had a fine jealousy as to the character and competence of 
his professors. He was himself professor of theology. 

H4603 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

His theological graduates were described by a French 
bishop as " modest, grave, with the name of Jesus Christ 
on their lips. ' ' He made Bossuet and Massillon possible. 
On his return from Geneva, John Knox copied Calvin's 
methods of education, and these ideas were brought here 
by our Scotch and Scotch-Irish and Puritan ancestors. 

Michelet said of Calvin's disciples, "If in any part of 
Europe blood and torture were required, a man to be 
burnt or broken on the wheel, that man was at Geneva 
ready to depart, giving thanks to God and singing 
Psalms to him." If it be thought that this is an exces- 
sive estimate of the character and heroism of the present 
day Presbyterian minister, let me quote from the report 
of the famine and cholera of 1900 in Gujarat made by 
Sir Frederic Lely, one of India's greatest administra- 
tors. He says: " There was Milligan, Presbyterian mis- 
sionary, who, when he heard that the district was in sore 
need of strong men, volunteered to help and was put in 
charge of a thousand persons on whom cholera had al- 
ready taken hold on a relief work. There was Mawhin- 
ney, also a Presbyterian missionary, who also took a 
similar trust in the adjoining native state of Sunth. 
Each of them took up his abode among the people in a 
hut like their own; he restored order and cleanliness; 
he instilled some of his own courage; and then each 
within a month of the other was stricken with the disease 
from which he had saved others, and died the death of 
a Christian." Such men have always been among the 
graduates of this Seminary. 

The early professors here seem to have been imbued 
with Calvin's ideals and with his spirit, in that he is 
described as a man of invincible calm, of balanced speech, 
gentle toward weakness, severe toward vice, severest of 

[46i:] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

all toward himself. Beza in his dedication of Calvin's 
"Petits Traictes" to the Duchess of Ferrara declares 
that Calvin was of such integrity of conscience, that he 
fled from all vain subtle sophistries, and all ambitious 
ostentation, and never sought anything but the pure and 
simple truth. 

It is evident from the writings of the first professors 
that they had Calvin's character and work in mind, as 
they attempted their important task. Dr. Miller in his 
inaugural address pointed out that witnesses for the 
truth in the dark ages were all friends of sound learning, 
and he closed by saying: "Wickliffe, Luther and Calvin 
are all gone, but the Kingdom of Christ did not die with 
them. It still lives and it will live forever. " Dr. Alex- 
ander wrote shortly after to a friend, "We go on here 
upon our old moderate plan, teaching the doctrines of 
Calvinism, but not disposed to consider every man a 
heretic who differs in some few points from us." Ear- 
lier, in the stirring circular issued by the General As- 
sembly in 1816 in aid of the Seminary, reference is made 
to Calvin, as one of those who have done more for the 
illustration and defence of the common salvation, than 
hosts of unlettered, though pious, ministers. Truly, to 
use Comte's aphorism, "The living are dominated by the 
dead." 

Let me now briefly allude to the intellectual life of 
the Seminary during this early period. It is difficult in 
this age of specialization to realize all that the first pro- 
fessors did. By them the plan of the theological curricu- 
lum was developed into substantially what it is today. 
They themselves taught every branch of the theological 
encyclopedia. In the revival of 1815, the professors 
threw themselves into the work with all their heart. 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

They preached frequently in Princeton and in the neigh- 
boring towns. Their sermons might serve as examples 
to those whose ideas of evangelistic preaching do not 
include the fundamental principles of Calvinistic theol- 
ogy. Dr. Alexander was not content to teach simply a 
system of doctrine. He aimed to send out warriors of 
the Cross. To this end, he studied the religions of 
heathenism, and the erroneous faiths of every age, and 
he knew what should be said to refute their doctrines. 
A fresh examination of the literature relating to Dr. 
Alexander, and of the books which he wrote convinces 
me that too much stress has been laid on his sweetness 
of character, great piety and spiritual common sense, 
and too little on his profound and varied learning, mar- 
velous for the place and time. 

It is hardly fitting for me to say too much about my 
grandfather and his sons, but too much cannot be said 
of Dr. Samuel Miller, who united patience, learning and 
eloquence with all the social and courtly graces and the 
most fervent piety. He came to Princeton the year after 
Dr. Archibald Alexander, and found the curriculum 
created and the means for maintaining the religious life 
of the students perfected. He was of inestimable use in 
forming the manners and bearing of future ministers. 
Perhaps his example and precepts extend to the present 
day. I often re-read his book on "Public Prayer", full 
of good sense and of a quiet and appropriate humor. It 
was fortunate for the infant institution that its two 
heads should be so different in type : Dr. Miller, with his 
long training of city life as pastor of the First Presby- 
terian Church in New York, brought to the Seminary 
the experience of the metropolitan pulpit, and Dr. Alex- 
ander, whose great characteristic was a tender regard 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

for the feelings of others, a ripe scholarship and the sim- 
plicity which is characteristic of most profound thinkers. 

Thomas Chalmers said : ' ' The Heraldry of an Institu- 
tion of Learning is its Alumni. ' ' And perhaps Dr. Alex- 
ander 's and Dr. Miller's greatest contribution to the 
Seminary was an early appreciation of Charles Hodge. 
As a student, he developed into a man of massive learn- 
ing, sound exegesis and great skill as a teacher. I am 
glad to allude to the intimate personal friends of my 
father, his sons, Archibald Alexander Hodge, who by the 
flame of his genius made even the darkest theology glow 
with an almost supernatural light, and Caspar Wistar 
Hodge, who with the modesty and reserve of a great 
scholar, made the New Testament new in another sense 
to successive classes of faithful and admiring students. 

Just as a faculty may be judged by the students, the 
product of their training, so the trend of thought in the 
Seminary's life may be judged by the contributions of its 
faculty to the current literature of the day. ' ' The Biblical 
Eepertory," begun in 1828, gives a good idea of Prince- 
ton's thought, as developed during the sixteen preceding 
years, for it is fair to assume that it contained the ripe 
result of the professors' various studies during that 
period. I call your attention to a few subjects on which 
they wrote in the earlier numbers. Dr. Miller wrote a 
review of Cooke, ' ' On the Invalidity of Presbyterian Or- 
dination", and on certain extremes in pursuing the tem- 
perance cause, which recalls the fact, that in one of his 
first letters after arriving in Princeton, he offered to send 
Mrs. Green, through President Ashbel Green, some very 
good claret. Another subject was "Use of Liturgies," 
another "Thoughts on Evangelizing the World," and in 
1821 he published his "Letters on TJnitarianism. " The 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

following were contributed by Dr. Alexander: "The 
Bible a Key to the Phenomena of the Natural World," 
"Priesthood of Christ," " Pelagianism, " "Inability of 
Sinners," "Christian Baptism," "Organization of the 
Presbyterian Church," "Character of the Genuine 
Theologian," "Articles of the Synod of Dort," "The 
Foundation of Opinions and the Pursuit of Truth," 
"Melanchthon on Sin," "Catechism of the Council of 
Trent," "English Dissenters," "Evidences of a New 
Heart," "The Scottish Seceders," "Woods on Deprav- 
ity," "Symington on the Atonement," "Practical View 
of Regeneration. ' ' His books on the Canon, Moral Sci- 
ence and Religious Experience, will not be forgotten. It 
is not necessary in the presence of such an audience to 
comment on the breadth and depth of these topics. 

If there were time here today, we might leave the 
beaten tracks of those days and hear the voices of the 
early professors speaking through their students in quiet 
villages and lonely hamlets, on frontiers and in the wil- 
derness, in foreign lands and at home. The memory of 
these men is not preserved on any stone or monument. 
Nor is it best kept alive even in the Seminary so beloved 
by them, but in the truth which they implanted in min- 
isters ' lives and handed on by them to homes widely 
scattered ; to burdened, toiling, sinning men and women, 
to whom it meant pardon, peace and eternal hope; to 
children whose plastic lives were moulded ; to the heathen 
world, to whom it came as the shining of the Star of 
Bethlehem. In these things are indelibly written the 
testimony of the Church and of the world to the founders 
of this Seminary. 

No one who has studied the history of this great school 
can fail to be impressed by the sincere fidelity to the prin- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ciples of its founders, which has been manifested in 
those who succeeded them. There are many who do not 
agree with these principles, but they must be constrained 
to admire this tenacity and constancy, considering the 
atmosphere of unstable equilibrium in which the theo- 
logical world lives and moves. 

In visiting the graveyard here, I sometimes think that 
even if all other records were to be destroyed, a history 
of Princeton and its institutions, might almost be recon- 
structed from the inscriptions on those venerable tombs 
—the tombs of presidents, professors and other benefac- 
tors who did loyal service to the Seminary and to the 
University. 

There is one group of graves which I cannot look upon 
without personal emotion and unspeakable sorrow at the 
loss of those, all of whom loved Princeton, and of some 
who had for this institution a paternal as well as a filial 
affection. It is a comfort and encouragement to turn to 
this Seminary— a living monument in which I trust my 
family may claim a share. 

One does not have to be a professional theologian to 
be aware that the kind of thought for which Princeton 
Seminary has always stood most firmly is now attacked 
persistently from many quarters. Voices come to us 
from across the sea and are raised here at home telling 
us that the sun is fast setting upon the old faith, and that 
the doctrines taught here will pass away like those of 
the Athenian and Roman schools. It may be said that in 
our own country the Seminary stands in a somewhat iso- 
lated position. Isolation has been the portion of the 
exponents of truth in all ages. Although not an expert 
in these things, I venture to predict that if the sort of 
theology which is taught here should die, and if its en- 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

emies should grant it decent burial, like the Lord of Life 
Himself, it will have a triumphant resurrection. 

Yet even if these sinister prophecies of the foes of 
Princeton theology should be fulfilled to the uttermost, 
if this Seminary should perish amid the ruins of its great 
traditions, I should wish that its remains might be 
marked and made memorable by a Cross. For it is the 
Cross which has been the inspiration of its founders 
and their successors, even as it is the hope and the glory 
of this passing world. For the gospel which it teaches 
is an unconquerable force. The Cross which it uplifts is 
the world's greatest power. And by the gospel of the 
Cross, this Seminary will stand in spite of attack, in 
spite of any storm of criticism or unbelief until its work 
is done, and God comes to take the talent given to our 
fathers, from whom we have received it with its increase, 
to the praise of His eternal glory. 



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ON SOME CHURCH PROBLEMS 

ADDRESS 

BY THE EIGHT EEVEEEND ALEXANDEE STEWART, MA., D.D. 

Principal of St. Mary's College and 

Primarius Professor of Divinity in the University of St. Andrews 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 

Professors and Members of Princeton Theological 
Seminary: 

MANY honours and privileges have fallen to my lot 
since I was called to occupy the chair of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the Church of Scotland in May of last 
year, but few indeed rank as highly in my estimation as 
the honour and privilege you have so graciously con- 
ferred upon me in inviting me to be present at your One- 
hundredth Anniversary Celebration and to represent one 
of the great divisions of our Scottish Christianity on this 
occasion. I beg to offer you most sincere congratulations 
both on my own behalf, on behalf of the Faculty of 
Divinity of St. Andrews, Scotland's most ancient Uni- 
versity, and of the Church of Scotland. 

A hundred years does not seem a long time in the life 
of an institution but there is ample room in the course of 
it for the emergence of great spiritual forces, the attain- 
ment of wide influence and the achievement of much 
practical good. I am sure you feel that you can look 
back upon it with pride and satisfaction and with deep 
thankfulness to God who has guided you so far on your 
way. I do not need to assure you that the name of 
Princeton is well-known and highly honoured far beyond 
the bounds of this country and wherever Protestant 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Christianity is understood and valued. In Britain and 
especially in Scotland the theological teaching of Prince- 
ton is regarded as one of the noblest examples of ad- 
herence to a clear and definite expression of the Christian 
faith. It is not necessary to agree with all its tenets or 
even to occupy the same fundamental position in order to 
appreciate its value. To those of us who hold that truth 
has many sides and that the full-orbed truth can only be 
attained by a combination of these different aspects, it is 
most instructive and helpful to have any of these clearly 
set forth, and embodied in suitable forms. It is refresh- 
ing amidst the jar and conflict of modern thought to find 
one school and succession of teachers who have main- 
tained with practically entire consistency a testimony to 
one system of thought worked out with logical complete- 
ness and forming the inspiration of a very noble type of 
piety. 

Prom the time when it was founded by the General As- 
sembly of the Presbyterian Church in 1812, Princeton 
has stood for a close adherence to the Westminster Con- 
fession of Faith. All its great names have been asso- 
ciated with this fundamental position. From its first 
head, Dr. Archibald Alexander, conspicuously in the 
teaching of Dr. Charles Hodge, and down to the present 
day, its teachers have been faithful to the task originally 
committed to them. This task as I have said, even in 
the view of those who cannot altogether accept the con- 
clusions to which the teaching of these eminent theo- 
logians points, is yet extremely valuable as representing 
one side at least of that all-inclusive truth which all 
theology worthy of the name desires. In many ways we 
in the East may have departed somewhat from the strict- 
est form of Calvinism, but we all honour John Calvin, 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

of keen intellect, logical precision and dauntless courage, 
and while declining to follow them in every jot and tittle, 
we all honour the Westminster Standards as one of the 
most remarkable intellectual structures based upon 
Scripture and making a generous use of reason and 
philosophy that the modern world has seen. It has to be 
remembered that the Westminster Standards had to pre- 
sent a solution of many questions for which it may be 
the material was not yet available. Such solution was 
demanded of them by their age and unless they at- 
tempted to supply it, they would have been regarded as 
altogether defective. It did not follow therefore, that 
the solution supplied to such questions was absolutely 
the best— it was only the best possible at that time. We 
need not be surprised that much material has since accu- 
mulated which the Westminster Divines could not antici- 
pate, and indeed that many questions have emerged 
which then lay wholly below their horizon. That is our 
justification for saying that while we hold the Westmin- 
ster Standards in the highest respect, we can not admit 
that they are the last word in theology, and that theologi- 
cal science has no new treasures as well as old to bring 
forth to the world. 

I trust I may not be misunderstood in making 
these remarks. I am quite sure that you would not 
wish me to pay a compliment to Princeton at the 
expense of the honesty of my own convictions. Fortu- 
nately, I do not need to sacrifice the one to the other as 
I very sincerely respect the Seminary, its founders and 
representatives and believe in the very great value of its 
teaching although unable to rank myself among its clos- 
est disciples. I should like in this connection to make 
special reference to Dr. Charles Hodge whose life-work 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

was an example to all earnest workers in the theological 
field ; his untiring industry, his vast learning and pene- 
trating intellect made him indeed one of the prophets 
of this school and his work has influenced many who 
again have not accepted all his conclusions. His stupen- 
dous work on Systematic Theology with its admirable 
arrangement, its careful array of argument on this side 
and the other and its clear-cut and unambiguous style 
must be at once the admiration and the envy of all who 
are engaged in the same field. His beautiful life at 
Princeton both in public and private and the influence he 
wielded over so many young minds and through them 
over the thought and culture of this whole country are no 
less deserving of attentive and reverential respect. I 
never knew him except through his works, but I had the 
pleasure on my last visit to this country of meeting with 
his nephew who was then a professor at Lincoln Univer- 
sity. On the same occasion I had the pleasure of meeting 
here Dr. W. H. Green, as also your President and another 
who is still spared to be one of the great ornaments of 
your Seminary, Dr. Benjamin B. Warfield whose work 
upon the Westminster Symbols cannot be sufficiently 
valued and admired. 

I have thought that instead of expatiating upon mat- 
ters which are familiar to you all, with which indeed you 
must be better acquainted than I can possibly be, it 
would be of more interest to you were I to touch upon 
one or two of the prominent phases of our Church life 
at home particularly those which are attracting atten- 
tion at the present time. 

In the forefront of these must undoubtedly be placed 
the question of the union of the Church of Scotland and 
the United Free Church. For many years the desire for 

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union has been in the air, and since the accomplishment 
of that between the Free Church of Scotland and the 
United Presbyterian Church the desire has been deep- 
ened and accentuated. On the one hand there has been 
a profound sense of the disadvantage which separation 
entails, the waste of resources, the overlapping of agen- 
cies, often the display of a spirit of emulation and 
rivalry unworthy of great Christian communities,— on 
the other hand the advantages of a strong National 
Church, carefully organized, giving its witness with 
definiteness and firmness, able to make its voice heard in 
all matters of social interest and importance, and to 
exercise a powerful influence in the National Councils 
has moved as an ideal before the minds of many. For 
two years strong Committees of the two Churches have 
been considering together the causes which prevent 
union, and have done a most valuable work in formu- 
lating the position of each Church in regard to those 
questions in which conciliation and compromise are nec- 
essary before any project of union can be entered into. 
Since arriving in this country I have observed from the 
newspapers that communications have been taking place 
between the two Committees embodying a plan by which 
these questions may be dealt with and possibly disposed 
of. So far as I am aware the scheme thus propounded 
leaves many unsettled questions for subsequent discus- 
sion and adjustment. But that such approaches have 
been made and have been most cordially hailed on both 
sides as a step in the right direction is of happy augury 
for the future of the movement. The desire for union 
is a most natural and proper one and in harmony with 
the whole spirit of our religion. Religion is life, and the 
essense of the religious, of the Christian life is love,— 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

and love draws together, makes one. Then a powerful 
motive in the same direction is the need for combination 
for practical work. There is much for the church to do 
and it can best be done by common effort. Union is 
strength, division wastes strength. No wonder that, 
apart from what has been construed as the intention and 
desire of the Saviour himself, the vision of unity has 
been cherished by all good men. It might be questioned 
indeed whether in a condition short of the millennium, 
complete unity of organization would be a good thing for 
the church as a whole. Whether it would not as in the 
past be a temptation rather than an advantage to her 
and lead to countless abuses, to tyrannies, and to the 
re-establishment of such a politico-religious machine as 
we see exemplified in the Church of Rome, where the 
organization is stronger than the men who work it and 
moves on by an inertia of its own, impervious to the 
suggestion of reform and pursuing ends which have been 
found in the past inimical to the liberties and the social 
advancement of men. But we may be quite certain that 
a true union, one beneficial in all respects can only be the 
outcome of a feeling of unity, a sense of oneness in feel- 
ing, in aim, in conviction. Therefore it has always 
seemed to me that the first step should be co-operation 
in all possible directions. We should certainly have for 
example, common action in regard to home and foreign 
missions. This might lead to federation and then when 
the members of the different Churches felt themselves 
so far at one, they might fairly say, Why should we 
remain apart, why should we keep up separate organiza- 
tions? Let us unite and let our outward union be the 
symbol and the consequence of our felt unity of spirit. 
Whether this will be the course actually pursued on the 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

present occasion or not, it seems difficult to see how by 
any other method a healthy union can be brought about, 
—one, that is, which shall be a union of hearts. 

There are obviously one or two dangers to which such 
a movement is exposed and which must be carefully 
guarded against. All human motives are not the highest 
and most human action proceeds from motives in which 
the higher mingle with lower elements. One motive 
which may enter in here is the desire for power— power 
it may be of the individual, it may be of a party or school 
of thought. A united Church can do things on a bigger 
scale, it affords a wider sphere for the energies and am- 
bitions of its ministers and members, an impulse set 
agoing within it affects a wider area, the men who lead 
it bulk more largely in the view of the general commu- 
nity, and it may be that the zeal of men more or less 
consciously influenced by such dreams will urge the 
movement on perhaps faster than it should go. 

Another ground on which union receives support from 
many is probably indifference to the distinctive prin- 
ciples which the Churches represent. It was the zeal of 
our forefathers often manifested no doubt in regard to 
minor points of belief and practice, often expressed far 
too dogmatically and enforced with bitterness that cre- 
ated the lines which divide us : it is an indifference per- 
haps equally excessive and unwise that would altogether 
give them up. The violence of controversy in the older 
days seems often to us in inverse proportion to the im- 
portance of the views and opinions in regard to which it 
concerned itself. We are tempted to go to the opposite 
extreme. There may seem to us nothing worth fighting 
about, wherefore since union would be pleasanter and 
bring with it many contingent advantages, let us all be 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

one, let us sink our differences which have no longer any 
real meaning for us. 

These seem to me to be the dangers to which the move- 
ment towards union is exposed— that its ends may be 
missed and its benefits forfeited when it is sought on any 
other ground than love and confidence and general agree- 
ment. 

But while I point out these dangers I would not forget 
the great company of those who untouched by indiffer- 
ence, or by ambition, desire union for the good of the 
Churches and the advancement of the Kingdom of God 
among men. They find it quite compatible with a sin- 
cere attachment to religion to recognise the distinction 
between the non-essential and the essential and to post- 
pone the former to the latter, the secondary to the pri- 
mary elements of the faith, that which they hold in 
common with others being in their view more important 
than the things which divide brethren in Christ. We feel 
that it is the maintenance of this attitude which really 
makes for the ultimate union of the Churches, and as I 
understand that questions of union or reunion are not 
unknown among those whom I am addressing I trust 
that this brief indication of the position in Scotland may 
not be without interest or profit to you. 

One of the most important developments in the life of 
the Churches in Scotland and especially, I think I may 
say, in that Church which I specially represent, is the in- 
creasing interest in what is known as social work. It has 
indeed in recent years engaged the attention of many 
of the most thoughtful and devoted members of all the 
Churches. It is an earnest and not altogether unsuccess- 
ful attempt to cope with the problems of poverty and 
vice which are so rife in our midst. It was a most happy 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

utterance of one of the most able Scottish preachers of 
the last generation when he said that to the Church mili- 
tant there should be added the Church beneficent, and 
long may it be true of the Church of Christ that its peo- 
ple look not only on their own things but on the things of 
others and continue to provoke one another to love and 
to good works. That such efforts after the amelioration 
of our social system should proceed from the bosom of 
the Churches and be stimulated by the faith and love 
there engendered is only what was to be looked for. It 
must be a question however whether such work can be 
carried out to its full extent by means of the organization 
which the Churches can supply. However successful the 
philanthropic efforts which have already been set on foot 
may have been, I mean our "labour homes" and other 
similar institutions, it is admitted that they only touch 
the fringe of a great difficulty. They have given an 
impulse, they have shown the way, they may serve as 
models for further effort. But it is a question whether 
when the problem comes to be attacked on a commanding 
scale the methods at present in use will prove adequate 
to the strain, whether in fact the church organization is 
the suitable one to undertake it. Two difficulties seem to 
me to emerge here. In the first place while there may be 
found in the Church men of ability, of organizing power, 
of personal devotion, willing to give gratuitous service 
in order to set on foot institutions of the kind here and 
there throughout the country, the work is too great for 
sporadic effort and the peculiarly church organizations 
are not adapted to carry it on. It may be under the 
auspices of a Presbytery and blessed by a General As- 
sembly but it is by a Committee generally consisting of 
laymen and generally self-constituted that the actual 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

work is done. It may be said to be the work of the 
Church in so far as the workers are church members and 
are willing to place that work as it were to the Church's 
credit. 

In the second place similar work may be undertaken 
by different Churches and carried on by them indepen- 
dently of one another. That it should be so is a distinct 
loss. It is a loss to its systematic prosecution and to its 
effectiveness. The divisions of our Churches are here a 
distinct hindrance to good work. It is better that all 
such work of the same kind should be carried on by the 
same organization except in so far as it can be locally 
distributed. The tendency will be for those engaged in 
it to draw nearer to one another notwithstanding the 
separative influence of ecclesiastical connection. One 
remedy is no doubt the union of the Churches, another 
which will probably come first, is the separation of this 
work and its management from official connection with 
any special Church. If we look at the history of the 
church in the past we see how all inclusive the church 
once was. Philosophy, art and such rudimentary science 
as then existed, found in it not only a patron but a home. 
One by one they gradually emancipated themselves from 
her dominance and assumed first semi-independence, 
then altogether independent positions. As with the in- 
tellectual, so it may be with the practical departments 
of human activity. These also may emancipate them- 
selves from the control of the Church, though they have 
been nurtured and grown so far to maturity under her 
care. The great questions of temperance, of peace and 
of social well-being will probably give rise in the future 
to organizations of an extent and complexity not yet 
experienced and so as to be beyond the power of the 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Churches themselves to manage, while when separated 
from the Churches they may be neither altogether for- 
getful of their origin, nor ungrateful for the help which 
when most needed was so willingly given. It is indeed 
an instance of that division of labour, of that specialisa- 
tion, which is the note of the best work in these days. 

What we seem in these respects to be moving towards 
is a Church engaged first and foremost in its purely reli- 
gious work of prayer and exhortation, of caring for the 
souls of men and by its witness to God and salvation 
bringing an ideal element into their lives. So that while 
" knowledge grows from more to more," there may 
"more of reverence in us dwell." The arrangements of 
the Church must have these ends primarily in view. Its 
message should be one of love to man as well as love to 
God, and this would remain the case even though it 
should find it desirable and even necessary to delegate to 
appropriate organizations the carrying out of that prac- 
tical work of which it would remain the preacher and the 
inspirer even as it had been in earlier times the pioneer. 
Its members would join one or other of these organiza- 
tions according as their special sympathies led them. 
In reality, as inspiring and helping on all movements 
towards good ends, the Church would make these but 
branches of its own activity and thus would regain in 
effect its ancient ideal of supremacy over all manifesta- 
tions of human thought and action. But its rule would 
be no longer political or administrative but moral, and 
occupying such a position, ceasing to entangle itself with 
controversies whether on doctrinal or practical points, it 
might readily and safely become one in outward order. 
Within it might be intellectual differences but also an 
assured liberty. It would live for the highest welfare of 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

man, it would seek to consecrate all man's activities to 
the glory of God. 

With regard to the important question of doctrine, I 
do not know that there is anything very new, as there is 
certainly nothing very startling to report. It is quite pos- 
sible that the whole situation would appear to you some- 
what chaotic. The centre of gravity has on the whole 
somewhat shifted from the intellectual cultivation of 
Christianity to the endeavour to realise, on the one side, its 
spiritual life, and on the other, its practical requirements. 
I speak mainly for my own Church, but I think that my 
words are applicable to the entire position of religious 
life in Scotland. We have had of late no heresy hunts ; 
the various doctrinal tendencies at work among us 
have had free scope for their development. We have 
what we may call High Churchmen laying stress upon 
the continuity of the Church 's history and upon the Sac- 
raments as the nourishment of the Church's life. We 
have Broad Churchmen representing a more ethical form 
of Christianity but still recognising as the inspiration of 
Christian life the spirit and example of the Master. We 
have the Evangelical with his more or less spiritual 
forms of preaching and worship bearing his witness to 
some of the central truths of traditional orthodoxy. The 
Church of Scotland two or three years ago altered its 
formula of subscription to the Confession of Faith mak- 
ing it much simpler and especially doing away with the 
somewhat provocative sentence of the older formula 
which required a man to acknowledge the Confession as 
the Confession of "my faith." It is still doubtful what 
the result of this movement may be. At first sight it 
would seem to encourage a freer attitude towards, and 
perhaps a more hostile criticism of, the Confession of 

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Faith. But on the other hand, the slackening of the 
chain may result in greater steadiness of progress since 
there is always an impulse to proceed in the opposite 
direction when it is felt that too great pressure is being 
used to maintain a certain course. It may be that under 
the relaxed formula orthodoxy may regain some of its 
lost influence and attractiveness. It is questionable if 
the legal situation is really changed. The Church under 
the new formula is bound to the Confession of Faith as 
the Confession of its faith and is no doubt morally as 
well as legally required to maintain discipline in this 
respect among its ministers and teachers. Its doctrine 
must remain fairly within the lines of the Confession of 
Faith liberally interpreted and it may be said that any 
other course might not only raise legal difficulties but 
would be at variance with what may be regarded as the 
general standard of opinion and feeling within the 
Church itself. The conviction has no doubt been firmly 
impressed upon many of the most thoughtful among us, 
that as there are many men, many minds, there can never 
be even with the greatest unity of organization complete 
uniformity in thinking. There will always be divergent 
views and opinions, and these will be held with more or 
less tenacity. We would frankly recognise that different 
Churches, different Church systems, different forms of 
worship, are adapted to different peoples and to those 
of varying temperament among the same people. We 
can only approach the gate of God by the pathway which 
leads from our own special nature to Him. We do not 
start from the same point as others, we do not pursue the 
same road, though we may in the end reach the same 
goal. These considerations raise a problem of which it 
may be suggested that the solution will be found not only 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

in the growth of a spirit of toleration so that I will fully 
and frankly recognise that you have as full a right to 
your opinion as I have to mine, that each of us may hold 
firmly to his own view and neither interfere with the 
other, but in an increase of mutual understanding, of 
intellectual sympathy, which will enable me to bear with 
opinions which are at variance with my own because I 
see how they have been arrived at and on what grounds 
it is possible to hold them without their being condemned 
as arbitrary or irrational. Christian knowledge and be- 
lief is like a tree which has mighty limbs, many branches 
and innumerable twigs and stems. Now if the extremity 
of such a twig or stem represents the doctrinal position 
of one man or section of men the other extremities will 
represent the positions of other men or schools of 
thought. It is then possible by tracing the lines of devel- 
opment backward as it were to see clearly the points at 
which divergences which are so apparent first took place 
and how they came to be what they are. First, you have 
the great lines of cleavage, then the adoption of the more 
important principles in the guidance of thought, then 
the preference accorded to the principles of less weight 
and degree of certainty until you come down to the indi- 
vidual position. To understand the genealogy of beliefs 
in this way not only enables us to hold our own position 
more definitely and intelligently, but to understand and 
allow for the positions of others as we see how these have 
been arrived at. When controversy occurs it will also 
be more intelligent for it is useless to contend about 
minor points when the attitudes of the combatants are 
fundamentally opposed. We must first see where the 
root-opposition lies and we may then argue the question 
out more successfully. But in proportion as the distinc- 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

tion is recognised between the primary and secondary in 
doctrine, the more men feel themselves in sympathy on 
the great principles of Christianity, the more will they 
be able to bear with one another however sincerely they 
may hold to the points on which nevertheless they cannot 
help but differ. 

But it is time to draw these somewhat discursive ob- 
servations to a close. In what I have said I must be 
understood as speaking mainly for myself. I would not 
have my Church understood as committed to any of my 
statements as such, though I have endeavoured to inter- 
pret what I understand to be her attitude as nearly and 
clearly as I can. Every Church has its difficulties and 
problems and it is well when we are able to learn some- 
thing from each other's experience. Though separated 
by the ocean I have no doubt that you and we have much 
of that experience in common. In endeavouring to solve 
our own problem we are indirectly at least helping to 
solve those of others. Each of us represents a side of 
truth, each of us has to deal with certain aspects of prac- 
tical life, we each put our trust in the same God who 
rules and guides the world and the hearts of men. We 
each glory in the Christian name, and profess our loyalty 
to the same Lord and Master, we each hold fast the same 
hope of eternal life having our anchor in that which is 
within the veil. The more therefore we can feel our 
oneness in thought and life the better for us all. We 
need not look forward with misgiving, our faith is the 
substance of things hoped for, the proving of things not 
seen. That our aspirations even the highest of them will 
be fulfilled we cannot doubt; the end will be attained 
though as yet we can but guess at the way in which it may 
be brought about. It may often seem as if the founda- 

C4823 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

tions were shaking so that we dread to part with the old 
and fail to bid a welcome to the new, when it is only an 
opening of fresh channels for the same eternal spirit. 
Let us not be wanting in faith and insight. Sursum 
cor da. The future is in the hands of One whose ways 
are higher than our ways and His thoughts than our 
thoughts. To Him be glory in the Churches through 
Christ. 



[483IJ 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



A SCOTTISH ESTIMATE OF 
PRINCETON THEOLOGY 

ADDRESS 

BY THE EIGHT EEVEREND JAMES WELLS, M.A., D.D. 

Minister of the Pollokshields West Church, Glasgow 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the 

United Free Church of Scotland 

President Patton, Fathers and Brethren: 

ON this great day in the history of Princeton I have 
the peculiar honour and happiness of bringing to 
you the warm greetings and congratulations of the 
United Free Church of Scotland. 

During the last hundred years Princeton has been in 
fraternal alliance with the Scottish Presbyterians. Your 
Church and ours are equally free, but you were free born, 
while our fathers, from the days of John Knox, had to 
purchase freedom at a great price. In 1843 the founders 
of the Free Church of Scotland, in their devotion to spir- 
itual independence under the headship of Christ, sev- 
ered their connection with the State. Your fathers were 
then among the most generous allies of the Free Church, 
and the memory of their brotherly kindness is still grate- 
fully cherished among us. Princeton, too, though always 
sparing of such honours, gave the degree of D.D. to 
twenty-one of the leaders of the Free Church when the 
Universities of their native land withheld such honours 
from them. Princeton also conferred the same honour on 
several of the ministers who, in 1847, formed the United 
Presbyterian Church of Scotland. No other Church 

[484] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

in the world can have better reasons than ours for rejoic- 
ing with you today and praying for your prosperity. In 
blood, in tongue, in creed, in aspiration and experience 
we are brothers. It is only the intervening ocean which 
hinders this kinship from becoming identity. 



PRESBYTERIANISM AND LIBERTY 

Presbyterian Princeton is the oldest representative in 
this land of some of the chief forces which have created 
and nourished the greatest republic the world has known. 
Your ninety-two millions are, beyond all comparison, the 
largest community of English-speaking people on the 
face of the earth. Great is one's surprise in discovering 
the perfect unanimity of many famous thinkers regard- 
ing the origin of your republican polity. It seems that 
you owe this boon to Calvinism. 

Bancroft tells us that "the first voice in favour of in- 
dependence came from the Presbyterians". He adds 
that "the revolution of 1776, so far as it was affected by 
religion, was a Presbyterian measure". You will not 
grudge us our satisfaction in knowing on the authority 
of Chief Justice Tilgham that the form of your republic 
is "borrowed from the constitution of the Church of 
Scotland", of which your Church is a genuine daughter. 
Bancroft and d'Aubigne unite in crowning Calvin as the 
father of America. Ranke calls Calvin "the virtual 
founder of America." Taine declares that Calvinism 
has guaranteed constitutional liberty to mankind, and of 
Calvinists he says, "These men founded the United 
States". Thorold "Rogers asserts that "Calvinism was 
the pioneer of religious liberty". Lord Morley assures 

[485] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

us that, "To omit Calvinism from the forces of western 
evolution is to read history with one eye shut". Green 
the historian writes, "It was Calvinism that first re- 
vealed to the modern world the dignity and worth of 
man". Mark Pattison says that Calvinism saved Eu- 
rope. It is thus no wonder that your Declaration of 
Independence was called in England "the Presbyterian 
Rebellion" and that Horace Walpole then intimated in 
the British Parliament that "Cousin America had run 
off with a Presbyterian Parson". 

These impressive testimonials prove that religious and 
civil liberty are twins, and that religious liberty is the 
first born, and the maker of heroic men. 

Your Seminary has always taught that the church of 
the New Testament is a complete spiritual republic, the 
freest society under heaven, the parent and guardian of 
liberty and order. Presbyter ianism is republicanism 
applied to the Church and republicanism is Presby- 
terianism applied to the State. George Buchanan, the 
first moderator of the Church of Scotland, and Samuel 
Rutherford in his "Lex Rex" expounded, almost three 
hundred years ago, the very principles which lie at the 
foundation of our government and yours. These prin- 
ciples teach us "to honour all men", and to foster that 
love of liberty and resistance to oppression which are 
native to all noble hearts. They have given its death- 
blow to mediaeval feudalism. 

Within the last four months one-fourth of mankind 
has avowedly adopted your government as their model. 
This is surely one of the most momentous events of mod- 
ern history. By and by the Chinese may discover how 
much they owe to Princeton and Scotland. 

[486] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE EVOLUTION OF GOVERNMENT 

Surely the most astounding marvel in the evolution of 
government is the fact that in the heart of the cruellest 
military despotism, the apostles planted a common- 
wealth of souls, a perfect republic, which the ingenuity 
of nineteen centuries has not improved. This was done 
on behalf of a society which embraced many slaves, and 
when the greatest sages taught that slaves had neither 
souls nor civic rights. Moreover this new society created, 
even in slaves, the sense of manhood and freedom and the 
virtues without which no republic can truly prosper. 
Here, at least, the church is not behind the age. In this 
region the future can never excel the past. 

These facts are a most impressive illustration of the 
widespread civil and social benefits which accompany 
and flow from a living Christian faith. 



THE SCOTCH AND THE SCOTO-IRISH 

I feel tempted to quote the recent testimony of your 
ambassador to our country, the Honourable Whitelaw 
Reid, in praise of the Scot and the Ulster Scot. He said 
in Edinburgh, "It was the perfervid Scot that sent the 
flame for independence through every colony on the con- 
tinent, never from that hour to die out. ' ' Of the fifty-six 
men who framed the Declaration of Independence eleven 
were of Scottish descent. When they hesitated, Dr. 
Witherspoon, a genuine Scot, persuaded them to sign it. 
Of the college-bred men in the Convention one-half were 
Scots or Scoto-Irish. Alexander Hamilton, your Alex- 

[487;] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ander the Great, the f ramer of your constitution, was the 
son of a Scot. The Scottish race supplied three of the 
four members of Washington's first Cabinet, two-thirds 
of his governors of States, and also eleven of your first 
twenty-five presidents. Their influence was out of all 
proportion to their numbers. These facts justify Dor- 
ner, the German theologian, in saying that Presbyterian- 
ism has been very successful in training men in patriot- 
ism, citizenship and the duties of public life. 

Moreover the church-doctrine of your Princeton 
school is in complete harmony with the teaching of Jesus 
Christ and His apostles. We are thus the real Catholics. 
We do not need Christ 's vicar as Christ Himself is with 
us. The apostolic church had no room for any official 
caste of so-called priests. Our orders are for order only. 
We are persuaded that as there is only one God, so there 
is only one Mediator between God and men. We rejoice in 
the inspiring truth that all the faithful are priests unto 
God. This divine democracy secures the noblest of all 
aristocracies, the aristocracy of Christian character and 
service, and it teaches us not to overvalue the aristocracy 
of birth, of wealth, or of intellect. It reminds us that the 
king and the beggar are made of the same clay and that, 
when under the power of God's grace, they equally bear 
the same divine stamp and superscription, and are all 
united in a sacred brotherhood. 

We may thus congratulate ourselves that our Presby- 
terianism is in thorough accord with the aspirations 
after liberty and unity in all parts of the world, and that 
it can live and thrive amid the most diverse national con- 
ditions. A colonial statesman said lately that it stands 
well the test of pioneering. The secretary of the Pan- 
Presbyterian Alliance reports that Presbyterianism has 

C488: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

about one hundred millions of adherents, and that they 
speak in one hundred and eighty languages. 



CALVINISM 



Princeton has always been one of the chief strong- 
holds of Calvinism. As we call no man master, we may 
justly regret the habitual use of Calvin's name in this 
connection, but it now seems unavoidable. Eef ormation 
divinity is often called Calvinism, but injuriously, for it 
claims to be simply the divinity of the New Testament. 
It professes to explain God's plan so far as He has re- 
vealed it to us. Revelation, however, leaves us with a 
large margin of mystery. It was Calvin 's sole aim fairly 
to interpret at once the Bible and Christian experience. 
He offers us, not a philosophy, but the creed of one who 
looks at all things under the aspect of eternity, who has 
been overmastered quite by Christ as his Teacher, Re- 
deemer and Lord, and who cherishes a noble fear lest he 
should ever think meanly of God. His theology is broad- 
based upon the Scriptures, and its keynote is in these 
words, " Man's chief end is to glorify God and to enjoy 
Him forever". It thus does justice to the nobility of 
man as made by God and for God, and as capable of being 
re-made by the Spirit of God. 

Utterly dependent on God for every breath we draw 
and every morsel of bread we eat, are we to believe that 
we are less dependent on Him for the life of the soul ? The 
sovereignty of God is the sovereignty of a Father, not 
the capriciousness of an eastern despot. It is the love 
that will not let go. Moreover, grace is also sovereign 
because of its exceeding and unsearchable riches. With 
God, the past, present and future are contemporaneous : 

t:489: 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

they are as an ever present now. He "will have all men 
to be saved", and we may be perfectly sure that His eter- 
nal decrees are not at strife with that will. 



OUR INTELLECTUAL DIFFICULTIES 

The greatest of all problems is to explain how the 
divine and human wills can combine and co-operate. But 
this problem does not confront us only or chiefly in the 
domain of theology. Sir William Hamilton, the famous 
professor of Logic in Edinburgh, often told us that no 
difficulty of this sort emerges in theology which had not 
previously emerged in philosophy, and that we could 
apprehend with certainty many things which we could 
not comprehend. Historians of modern thought are tell- 
ing us that idealists, materialists, moral philosophers 
and metaphysicians are now more disposed than for- 
merly to confess their failure to reconcile natural neces- 
sity and moral freedom, though they know both to be 
real. They have here what they call an irreconcilable 
antinomy. A great thinker says, "All theory is against 
the freedom of the will, and all experience is for it". 
Freewill itself is an inexplicable miracle. Freewill and 
predestination form an arc the top of which lies beyond 
our ken. We believe that the two sides meet somewhere, 
and we may also believe that they are wisest who are as 
little anxious to reconcile them as Paul was. Theology 
has neither created nor increased these unescapable diffi- 
culties. They all lead up to the problem of the permis- 
sion of evil in God's world, and its enticing power— a 
stubborn fact over which men have brooded since think- 
ing began, and brooded in vain. 

C490I1 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
DR. CHARLES HODGE 

I mention Dr. Charles Hodge, as in my student days 
he was the best known in Scotland of your professors. 
Forty-five years ago, in company with Dr. Patrick Fair- 
bairn and Dr. John Hall, then of Dublin, I visited 
Princeton and spent a whole day with Dr. Charles 
Hodge. I may almost claim to be an alumnus of Prince- 
ton, for in my youth I read and margin-marked the three 
encyclopaedic volumes of his pellucid * ' Systematic The- 
ology". He has done much to remove objections against 
our creed, and to propitiate the objectors. He loved pa- 
cific more than polemic divinity. The salvation of all 
children dying in infancy was one of his "oft recurring 
fervours". Believing that, in the theology of the heart 
and in their devotions, all sincere Christians are one, it 
was a joy to him to minimise, so far as he could, the dif- 
ferences and to maximise the agreements among them. 
He gladly admits that the evangelical Calvinist and the 
evangelical Arminian are usually one when they pray 
and praise and preach, and two only when they dispute. 
His son, Dr. A. A. Hodge, at the close of his "Evan- 
gelical Theology", maintains that Calvin alone does full 
justice to the godward and the manward sides of the 
truth, but he adds, "The difference between the best of 
Calvinists and Arminians is one of emphasis rather than 
of essential principle. Each is the complement of the 
other. They together give origin to the blended strain 
from which issues the perfect music which utters the 
perfect truth". Your Whittier happily describes such a 
situation when he says, 

"To differ is not crime ; 
The varying bells make up the perfect chime. ' ' 

C491] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

The theological pendulum keeps swinging between 
God's sovereignty and man's responsibility. He who be- 
gins with God will incline to Calvinism, and he who 
begins with man will incline to Arminianism. Armini- 
ans would say that man is saved by the human will and 
the divine : we would say that he is saved by the divine 
will and the human. But we cannot hope to explain 
exactly where and how the spirit of God and man's spirit 
meet. John Newton used to say, "I am considered an 
Arminian among high Calvinists, and a Calvinist among 
strenuous Arminians". He concluded that he must 
therefore be near the centre of revealed truth. 



THE DECLARATORY ACTS 

Your Church and ours have recently made earnest ef- 
forts to remove regrettable impressions concerning the 
implications or supposed implications of our creed, and 
to bring it into greater and more obvious harmony with 
the proportions of truth in the Bible. We both believe 
that no mere human confession can be accepted as final 
and permanent. To your Confession of Faith you have 
accordingly added two chapters and a declaratory state- 
ment. Our Declaratory Acts are in substantial agree- 
ment with yours. They set forth the love of God— Fa- 
ther, Son and Holy Spirit— to all mankind, God's gift 
of His Son to be the propitiation for the sins of the whole 
world, and a salvation sufficient for all, adapted to all, 
and freely offered to all. These explanations exclude 
every view that would hamper any one in urging the 
general offer of the gospel. We rejoice together in the 
revealed things which belong to us and to our children 
for ever, while we pause in reverential silence before the 

[492:] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

secret things which belong to the Lord our God. Assured 
that the veil over the future has been woven by the hand 
of love and leaving all these deep mysteries to the justice 
and mercy of God, we are thankful to have light enough 
to guide our feet, while there is darkness enough to exer- 
cise our faith. We frankly recognise that we must often 
be content with saying, "I do not know; shall not the 
judge of all the earth do right?" These Declaratory 
Acts have added to the many evergrowing streams of 
tendency which are now making for the union of all the 
evangelical Churches. 

If, in some minds, the idea still lingers that our Cal- 
vinistic creed fosters gloom and fetters the evangel, let 
us appeal to the facts. At the close of the eighth chapter 
of his Epistle to the Romans, Paul recites his creed. He 
emphasises God's foreknowledge, predestination, effec- 
tual calling, election, and the final perseverance of the 
saints, and he closes with his most triumphant " Halle- 
lujah Chorus." The explanation is that these high doc- 
trines are our Zion's palaces and bulwarks, that God is 
known in them for a refuge, that they are ever a palisade 
around the fold and never a barricade in front of the 
door, and that, by making grace greater and surer, they 
help to evangelise the heart and life. There must be some 
strange mistake when these themes terrify. 

Need I enumerate the names of some of the evangelists 
who have accepted this side of revealed truth as frankly 
as John Calvin did? Among them are John Bunyan, 
your President Davies, President Jonathan Edwards, 
Brainerd, Elliot, Nettleton, Whitefield, Chalmers, Mc- 
Cheyne, William Burns, Spurgeon and D. L. Moody. 
Did their theology impoverish their evangelism? Has 
not John Owen said, "God doth not take it well to be 

C493H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

limited in anything, least of all in His grace" % Has not 
an old evangelist of this school written, ' ' There is mercy 
enough in God, merit enough in Christ, power enough in 
the Spirit, scope enough in the promises, and room 
enough in heaven for thee"? 

We are often told that ours is a transition period of 
feeble convictions, many concessions, and manifold self- 
indulgences. Writers of many schools of thought— 
Froude, for example— tell us that Calvinism, beyond 
every other creed, has been the mother and nurse of 
heroic men and women. Do we not need to-day a large 
infusion of it to put iron into our blood and to fortify 
ourselves against the subtle influences which threaten to 
rob us of many of the noblest fruits of the Christian 
faith? 

THE STORY OF YOUR SEMINARY 

It has been a veritable benediction to me to read the 
lives of Archibald Alexander, Samuel Miller, and 
Charles Hodge, your three mighties, who were all cast in 
the amplest moulds of nature and grace. Might not one 
of the products of this centenary be a brief popular biog- 
raphy of these three Greathearts % It would surely 
enrich the lives of your students to have their souls and 
imaginations amply furnished with such beautiful and 
inspiring models. My acquaintance with their careers 
lessened my surprise when I read that upwards of one 
half of those whose names are in the American " Who's 
Who?" have been reared in clerical homes. With pe- 
culiar satisfaction I note that several of your leaders 
have been the founders of large Levitical families. Some 
say that their creed was too stern, but it was a life as well 
as a creed, and it blossomed and brought forth fruits. 

[494;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The doctrines of grace created in them the graces of our 
holy religion. The nobleness of their lives has had a 
supreme reward, for it gained the loyalty of their chil- 
dren, their grand-children, and their great-grand-chil- 
dren. The beauty of the Lord our God was upon them ; 
and your programmes, this audience, this palatial Hall 
and the many academic buildings around declare how 
God has established the work of their hands. 

As we were impressively reminded yesterday, Prince- 
ton has also been a nursery of great missionaries. Many 
of your students have had a large share in home mission 
enterprises. Two of them were the founders of the 
"World's Student Christian Federation", while over 
four hundred have devoted themselves to the work of 
Christ in non- Christian lands, and God has granted ex- 
ceptional success to many of them. The genius of this 
place has always fostered missionary and evangelistic 
zeal. 

THE CHIEF NEEDS OF OUR AGE 

We seem to have greater discouragements and greater 
encouragements than ever before. Modern life is grow- 
ing more intense in good and evil. But it is best to go over 
the ridge at once and pitch our tent in the sunshine. May 
we not regard the World Missionary Conference held in 
Edinburgh in June 1910 as at once a most impressive 
exhibition of the triumphs of the gospel beyond any or 
all of the Oecumenical councils of the early church, and 
also as an inspiring summons to the mighty work of 
evangelising the whole world? Great enthusiasm has 
been evoked by the Tercentenary of the authorised Eng- 
lish Bible, and its amazing and evergrowing circulation. 
Then, practical sympathy with the struggling millions is 

£49511 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

one of the most commanding features of the twentieth 
century. May we not hail this as the birth time of a 
marvellous era in which the people of America and Great 
Britain shall for ever renounce war as a means of set- 
tling disputes, and set the whole world a crowning exam- 
ple of peace on earth and goodwill to men ? This sacred 
cause will be greatly promoted by the arrangements al- 
ready made for celebrating, on Christmas Eve 1914, the 
Anglo-American Peace Centenary. No war can be a for- 
eign war to us as all men are our brothers. For all these 
hopeful signs of the times, let us thank God and take 
courage. Ours is a storm-tossed age, but the ever-living 
Master is with His disciples in the ship. What we should 
dread most is not an agitated church, but a becalmed 
church. Some are advising us to throw over a part of 
the cargo, but that would not help us to weather the storm. 
Surely, too, the competition for souls is keener than 
ever, keener even than the competition for gold. Our 
age demands from the preacher an unhesitating and au- 
thoritative message, intense reality, thorough earnest- 
ness and a ceaseless desire to reveal the supreme claims 
of Christ and the manifold winsomeness and gladness of 
Christian service. While, in a largely secular age, so 
many themes are clamouring for recognition in the pul- 
pit, it is not always easy for the preacher to put first 
things first, and rigidly to exclude those alien subjects 
which drain his energies into side channels and weaken 
the sense of what is vital. We must remember that Chris- 
tianity requires perpetual propagation to attest its di- 
vine origin. Unless it conquers the world anew in every 
age, the church must be the affair of one generation only. 
Hence the preacher must be ever doing the work of an 
evangelist and fostering the passion for souls. Let us be 

[496] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

fully assured that deliverance will never come to us by 
putting social gospels and social services in place of the 
evangel of Jesus Christ. Nothing can mend the world 
but what mends the spirits of men. In my youth, I spent 
unforgettable days among the worst of our outcasts. 
I soon discovered that those who expected, attempted 
and achieved great things among them were saturated 
with the apostolic faith, and cherished the sacred mission 
hunger, rescuing zeal and creative spiritual power. Some 
of them had a real genius for winning souls, and refused 
to despair of any. I believe that, under heaven, there are 
no more beautiful and satisfying spectacles than those 
of men, women and children once sunk in vice, but now 
uplifted by the grace of God, clothed and in their 
right mind, and surrounded with all the fruits of pros- 
perous industry. These modern miracles add a new 
charm to life, for by them the greatest Christians are 
made out of what seems the poorest human stuff. They 
assure us that the gospel has lost none of its ancient power 
and that the Acts of the Apostles has not yet been 
rounded with its final Amen. All social reformers should 
study these words of our Lord, ' ' Seek ye first the king- 
dom of God and his righteousness, and all these things 
shall be added unto you"— given into the bargain as sur- 
prising industrial, civil and social by-products, given as 
a generous bonus of earthly goods. Not otherwise can 
the fallen find a place in the sun. 

Many in Scotland deeply feel the need of a great re- 
vival of religion. They are conferring about it in the hope 
of discovering the hindrances and having them removed. 
They are recalling several fruitful revivals in our land, 
and specially the revival which visited many parts of 
your country about fifty years ago, and kindled sacred 

[497] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

fires in Ireland and Scotland. Many among us are 
brooding over the promises concerning the Holy Ghost 
whom God hath given to them that obey Him. God grant 
a fresh baptism of power to your Church and to ours. 

I have attended all the gatherings of this great Fes- 
tival except the first. I was privileged to address the 
students of the University while you were seated at the 
Lord's table. I have been deeply moved by the words 
spoken here, by the sacred songs sung, by the prayers 
offered, by the audiences, and by the spiritual atmo- 
sphere. Such experiences should help to make our ser- 
vice more devoted and more fruitful in the coming days. 

Reverend Fathers and Brethren, with all my heart I 
thank you for your generous kindness to me as the repre- 
sentative of the United Free Church of Scotland. It will 
give me joy to report the inspiring tokens of manifold 
success amid which your venerable Seminary is closing 
its first century of Christian service. It is our heart's 
desire and prayer that your School of the Prophets may 
be the generous mother of a growing band of consecrated 
and gifted men who, by the grace of God, shall do ex- 
ploits in establishing and extending the Kingdom of our 
Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. 

Peace, the very peace of God, be within your walls and 
prosperity within your palaces. For my brethren and 
companions' sakes, I will now say, Peace be within you. 



[498;] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



IRISH AND AMERICAN PRESBYTERIANISM 

ADDRESS 

BY THE EIGHT EEVEREND JOHN MACMILLAN, B.A., D.D. 

Minister of the Cooke Centenary Church, Belfast 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in Ireland 

Mr. President : 

THREE centuries ago, the confiscated lands of Ulster 
presented an opportunity for the peaceable settle- 
ment of that province and opened a door of refuge for 
the people of Scotland who were suffering under the 
intolerance of James I, the chief article of whose new 
creed was, "No Bishop, no King," and whose unkinglike 
declaration was set forth in the solemn vow, "I will make 
them conform or I will harry them out of the land. ' ' 

The settlers brought with them their industry, their 
thrift and their faith ; and they were followed by schol- 
arly and godly ministers like Edward Brice, Robert 
Blair, Robert Cunningham, James Glendinning, John 
Livingston, James Hamilton, John Howe, Josias Welsh, 
George Dunbar, and Andrew Stewart, whose apostolic 
patience and heroism have never been surpassed in the 
history of the Church of Christ. 

Among the settlers were adventurers of various de- 
grees of moral declension, and fugitives from justice as 
well as law ; until it came to be a proverb applied to the 
most graceless and hopeless in the Lowlands, "Ireland 
will be his hinder end." That "end" would have been 
disastrous indeed, had the colonists been left to the 
mercy of the "careless men" who desired only their own 

C499 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

gain, and the conservation of their own power ; but the 
Lord visited them in His "admirable mercy" by giving 
them ministers of their own, "eminent for birth, educa- 
tion and parts," whose labours resulted in revival, 
transformed lives and fruit unto holiness. These min- 
isters have won for themselves the honour of being the 
founders of the Irish Presbyterian Church; and their 
line has gone through all the earth, and their word unto 
the end of the world. 

In the course of one century, there were organised in 
Ulster eleven Presbyteries and one hundred and forty- 
one congregations. The waste places were reclaimed, 
the primeval forests disappeared, the last wolf was put 
out of the way, lint was in the bell, the bleach-greens 
were covered with fair linen clean and white, the whirr 
of the spinning-wheel and the click of the loom sounded 
in almost every dwelling; and the desert rejoiced and 
blossomed as the rose. 

Ballymena, the modern Bangor, Coleraine, Comber, 
the modern Londonderry, Newtownards, Portaferry, 
and many other centres of industry were created; and 
Belfast, which in 1649 was denounced by Milton as "a 
barbarous nook in Ireland", had started on its way to be- 
coming Ireland's commercial capital, with a population 
now approaching half-a-million souls. 

To these men the Bible was statute book and library. 
The Psalter, with the Paraphrases, was their song-book 
at work and worship ; and they found expressed in its 
strong and rugged verse all the growing enrichment of 
their spiritual experience. It was stored in the memory 
against the cloudy and dark day, the lonely vigil, and 
the last scene of all. I could take you to places on their 
farms where they were accustomed to sing and pray, as 

[500] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

they herded their cattle or sought momentary relief 
from their toil. The strains of Martyrdom, and Elgin, 
and Coleshill, and Devizes, linger still among their val- 
leys and hills. 

The Lord's Day was the great day of the week. On it 
"they went out", according to their own phrase, to meet 
their neighbours and the public ; and, above all, to meet 
Him whom their souls loved, and who had given the 
promise of His presence to the two or three gathered to- 
gether in His name— and at times it was long before the 
after-glow on their faces melted into the light of common 
day. 

The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper was the central 
ordinance of their faith, and its observance the chief 
event of the year. It was preceded by two days of fasting 
and prayer, and succeeded by a solemn thanksgiving and 
consecration; whilst the service of the day itself began 
in the early morning, and, with a brief intermission, 
closed at nightfall. There were occasions when scenes 
occurred like those which took place at the Kirk of 
Shotts under the preaching of their own John Living- 
ston in 1630, when five hundred were lifted into a new 
or a higher life ; or like those enacted in the Covenanting 
times, when, on the far-off moor or in some amphitheatre 
among the lonely hills, outed ministers broke the bread of 
life and thousands of communicants lifted to their lips 
the consecrated elements and returned to their home or 
to their hiding, not fearing the wrath of man because 
they had seen the face of God. 

The school, which was regarded as being scarcely less 
important than the church, consisted of four walls, some- 
times of mud and sometimes of masonry, a thatched roof, 
small windows as often as not unglazed, an earthen floor, 

[501] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

logs in the rough from the neighbouring bog to serve 
for seats, and a fire which burned or smoked in the centre 
of the room, the smoke escaping through an opening in 
the roof, or else lingering to create a semi-opaque atmo- 
sphere, not uncongenial to those boys who were bent on 
idleness or full of fun. The master was often arrayed in 
a long black coat, tow-wig, horn-spectacles, and armed 
with a hazel rod. 

"Full well they laughed with counterfeited glee 
At all his jokes, for many a joke had he ; 
Full well the busy whisper circling round 
Conveyed the dismal tidings when he frowned." 

And yet he taught the boys to read and write and cast 
accounts; and introduced the more ambitious among 
them to Cicero and Caesar, to Horace and Homer, and 
prepared them for the university. Where the school- 
mistress reigned, she patiently taught the ABC, pro- 
moted her pupils to the Book of Proverbs, the Gospels, 
and the Shorter Catechism ; and, when the girls had fin- 
ished their samplers, their scholastic education was com- 
pleted. 

The home was humble, consisting of "but and ben" 
and added accommodation to suit growing domestic need. 
The inmates aimed at making it a "little church" and a 
"seminary of piety," instinctively acting on the prin- 
ciple that the domestic hearth-stone was the corner-stone 
of the State. 

Of course, there were other homes of much larger di- 
mensions, equipped with all the comforts procurable at 
that period ; but they were occupied by those persons to 
whom special grants of lands had been made at a merely 
nominal figure, and who "undertook" responsibility for 

L502H 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

the settlement of the surrounding areas. These land- 
owners, however, professed the same faith as did the peo- 
ple whom they subsequently designated their "tenants", 
and ordered their daily lives according to the same reli- 
gious principles. 

Candidates for the ministry were obliged to pursue a 
regular academic and subsequently a regular theological 
course, when such a requirement implied long and per- 
ilous journeys to Glasgow and Edinburgh or Amster- 
dam ; for Trinity College, Dublin, in contravention of the 
purpose of its founder, was closed against them. Stu- 
dents were exhorted to remain at the university for "lau- 
reation" and some were advised to betake themselves to 
"a way of living" other than the ministry on account of 
lack of learning and of natural capacity— and laggards 
profited from such salutary advice. When it became 
impracticable for all candidates to study abroad, a 
"School of Philosophy" was established at home; and 
two pastors were appointed to give instruction, one in 
Hebrew and the other in Greek, each to receive the mod- 
est remuneration of £10 per annum. All ministers were 
exhorted by the Synod to spare no pains in preparing 
for their pulpit prayers and sermons; in acquiring a 
working knowledge of Hebrew and Greek, of the chief 
controversies of Divinity, of the English Bible— so that 
its language might freely flow from their lips ; and of the 
English tongue so that they might speak in a plain un- 
affected style and "accommodate their addresses to the 
understanding of the people. ' ' The Rev. Matthew Clark 
of Kilrea, who acted a soldier's part during the siege of 
Londonderry, and who afterwards became minister of 
the town of that name on this side of the Atlantic, 
preaching from the words of the Apostle— "I can do all 

[5031] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

things", thus began— "Aye, can you, Paul? I'll bet a 
dollar on that!", as he placed a Spanish dollar upon the 
Bible. Then with a look of surprise he continued, "Stop, 
let us see what else Paul says— 'I can do all things 
through Christ who strengtheneth me'. Aye, so can I, 
Paul; I withdraw my bet": and he carefully replaced 
the money in his pocket, after he had succeeded in arrest- 
ing the attention of his audience. 

During my year of office, I have conducted services in 
a church in memory of a dear friend in the ministry 
whose rural parish had been lacking in educational ad- 
vantages, and from whose study there went forth, with- 
out prescribed fee or reward, fifteen young men to the 
university and to professional life. One of my friend's 
predecessors was Dr. Samuel Edgar, who founded the 
"Academy", in which James Thomson, the father of 
Lord Kelvin, was a pupil and afterwards a teacher, and 
from which forty youths proceeded to college and to ordi- 
nation. I have done duty in a church in the city of 
Armagh, the son of whose first minister was Francis 
Hutcheson. As probationer, Francis was persuaded to 
relieve his father on a Sabbath during the temporary in- 
disposition of the latter ; but he broke down so completely 
in the devotional service that the worshippers were dis- 
missed a couple of hours in advance of the accustomed 
time. He, however, was appointed Professor of Moral 
Philosophy in the University of Glasgow, had the cour- 
age to adjudge the English language an adequate vehicle 
for instruction— the first preceptor in that institution to 
do so— and he became the founder of the Scottish School 
of Philosophy, in which Dr. Thomas Reid, Sir William 
Hamilton, and Dr. McCosh were subsequently successive 
master-builders. I do not mean to infer that it is always 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

more easy to become a philosopher than to be an edifying 
preacher ! 

The intercourse between Ulster and the mother-coun- 
try was close and constant. Our people claimed kindred 
with Patrick Hamilton, and George Wishart, and John 
Knox, and Alexander Henderson, and Samuel Ruther- 
ford, and Margaret Wilson, and Andrew Melville, and 
Janet Geddes. Melville once said to the king, "Your 
Majesty, there are two kings and two kingdoms in Scot- 
land: there is king James, the head of the common- 
wealth, and there is Christ Jesus, the King of the 
Church, whose subject James is, and of whose kingdom 
he is not a king, nor a lord, nor a head, but a member. ' T 
Janet Geddes flung her stool at the head of the minister 
who, at the bidding of Laud, proceeded to read from an 
enforced liturgy, with these indignant words, "Fause 
loon, do you say Mass at my lug?" In the county of 
Down, a strong-minded woman was brought before the 
Downpatrick Court of Assize for what was considered a 
most heinous offence— interfering with the official robes 
of the new minister sent by the Bishop to take the place 
of her own, now silenced and forbidden to exercise his 
ministry. She admitted the accuracy of the charge, and 
suiting the action to the word, made confession, ' ' These 
two hands pulled the white shirt over his head." Car- 
lyle declares that the war precipitated by Janet Geddes 
was far more glorious than that precipitated by Helen 
of Troy. Macaulay traces English liberty to Janet's 
action. Henry Grattan describes "the Presbyterian 
religion as the mother of the free constitution of Eng- 
land. ' ' John Richard Green affirms that ' ' it saved Scot- 
land from a civil and religious despotism and in saving- 
Scotland, it saved English liberty as well." It certainly 

[505] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

saved Ulster, and in saving Ulster, it saved more than 
Ulster— as we shall see. 

It may be asked in what way, and to what degree is 
the Ulster Scot superior to the mere Scot? The late 
President McKinley declared that the coming of the Scot 
to Ulster marked an epoch in the world's civilization. 
Last November, Lord Rosebery, on the occasion of his 
presiding at a lecture delivered in Edinburgh by His 
Excellency, the Ambassador of the United States, said 
that he loved Highlanders and he loved Lowlanders, but 
when he came to that branch of the Scottish race which 
had been grafted on to the Ulster stem, he took off his hat 
in veneration and awe ! 

When we came to Ulster, we were returning to our 
own, to the Scotia Major of the ancient world; to the 
land of Cormac, and Patrick, and Columcille, and Colum- 
banus, and Gallus, and Killian, and John Scotus Erigena, 
and Pelagius, and Richard Fitzralph ; we began to think 
with pride of the great schools of Bangor, and Clonard, 
and Clonmacnoise, and Durrow, and Kildare, and Derry, 
and Movilla, and of the achievements of their alumni at 
Iona, Lindisfarne, Burgundy, Bobbio and St. Gall, and 
of all the traditions which clustered round the insula 
sanctorum et doctorum Europae of the early Christian 
centuries. We were brought into contact with a quick- 
witted, warm-hearted people, possessed of the perfer- 
vidum ingenium Scotorwm, which could appreciate a 
joke without the necessity of the proverbial surgical 
operation. 

We had a very long and a very severe struggle for 
toleration— even for existence. A most determined ef- 
fort was put forth to break our fathers' spirit, and to 
quench our fathers' faith. If Scotland had Claverhouse, 

C506] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

and Laud, and Charles, and James, we had Laud and 
Claverhouse in imagination; and we had Charles, and 
James, and Tyrconnell, and Wentworth, and Phelim 
O 'Neill, and Lord Donegal, and the Anglican prelates of 
that time. We became uncompromisingly Protestant 
and as uncompromisingly Presbyterian, which— with its 
franchise and freedom of the Kingdom of God enjoyed 
by women as well as men— is the strongest and most 
democratic form of Protestantism; and we became 
whole-hearted Evangelicals, which are the highest type 
of Presbyterians, and supply the raison d'etre of Pro- 
testantism. Driven back upon the sublime truth that be- 
hind all things we see, changeless amid things which 
change, evolving slowly His own vast designs, making 
all things— the prosperous and the adverse— to work 
together for good to them that love Him, is a living God, 
with all the attributes of a divine personality— a quick 
eye, a warm heart, and a long arm, our people became 
intensely Calvinistic, and strengthened themselves by 
saying or singing such words as these : — 

" Art thou afraid His power shall fail 

When comes thine evil day % 
Or can an all-creating arm 

Grow weary or decay ? 
Supreme in wisdom as in power 

The Rock of Ages stands ; 
Though Him thou canst not see nor trace 

The working of His hands." 

There were three periods of persecution to which our 
people were subjected and which culminated respectively 
in the Black Oath under Charles I, the Act of Unif orm- 

C507] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ity under Charles II, and the Sacramental Test Act 
under Queen Anne. 

Every person over sixteen years of age was com- 
manded to take the Black Oath, by which he renounced 
the Covenants and swore a carte blanche allegiance to the 
king, no matter what the king might enjoin for the fu- 
ture in Church or State. Multitudes of Presbyterians, 
against whom the Oath was chiefly or entirely directed, 
refused to comply, and the most cruel sufferings were 
inflicted upon them. As an instance, we take the case of 
Henry Stewart, who— with his wife, his two daughters 
and his man-servant— was arrested, conveyed to Dublin, 
tried in the Court of Star Chamber, in which the form 
and spirit of justice were alike ignored, fined in the sum 
of £16,000, and cast into prison until the uttermost far- 
thing would be paid— because he had the courage to hon- 
our his conscience as his king. 

At first, the Church, as by law established, was com- 
prehensive enough to admit the ministers from Scot- 
land to her pulpits and in the case of an ordination, the 
Bishop joined with the other presbyters present in 
prayer, and the laying on of hands : but after the Act of 
Uniformity came into force, all ministers in Ulster were 
required to submit to Episcopal ordination or to abandon 
their position in the Church. Of all the ministers in the 
Synod, only seven submitted to such conditions. In a 
single day, Jeremy Taylor, who wrote on the " Liberty 
of Prophesying", silenced thirty-six of the best minis- 
ters of Down, whose ministry had been accompanied by 
revivals and other unmistakable signs that the Lord had 
been working with them, confirming the word by signs 
following. In a single year, sixty-four ministers went 
forth, not knowing whither they went. 

11508^ 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

In 1704, after the siege of Londonderry, defended by 
Presbyterians, who were at the lowest calculation fifteen 
to one of all other Protestants within the walls of the 
city, which was fortified and inspired by Presbyterian 
ministers at a time when Bishops denounced the impiety 
of taking up arms against the " Lord's Anointed", and 
changed their public prayers every week and almost 
every day as the omens seemed to indicate the final issue 
of the struggle ; after the battle of the Boyne, at which 
—according to Hallam— the British constitution was 
saved, and which was rendered possible by the previous 
stand made at Londonderry ; the Sacramental Test Act 
came into operation, according to which it was made nec- 
essary for every person holding office to receive the Sac- 
rament of the Lord's Supper in the Episcopal Church or 
else demit his dignity. Our people had too high an esti- 
mate of the spiritual significance and aim of the Sacra- 
ment to pervert its meaning and to degrade its divine 
institution ; and they were too brave to deny their fathers ' 
faith. Of the twelve aldermen in Londonderry, ten were 
Presbyterian, and of the thirteen burgesses in Belfast, 
nine adhered to the same faith ; and every one of these 
resigned his office rather than be false to his convictions. 
Adam Murray, the hero of the siege, was compelled to 
part company with the horse which had been his faithful 
servant and fellow-soldier during that period of agony. 
Presbyterian churches were closed. Jonathan Swift had 
the bad eminence of nailing up some of them with his 
own hand. Ministers were outlawed and imprisoned, 
prohibited from meeting in Presbytery or conducting a 
service, or performing a marriage ceremony, and were 
fined £100 for administering the Sacrament of the Lord's 
Supper ; bequests were alienated ; the Eighth Command- 

C 50911 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ment was set at nought, the Regium Donum— a Grant 
made by William III in recognition of services rendered 
to his cause by Presbyterian ministers and their people 
—was for the time discontinued; and in the event of a 
place of worship being allowed to exist, it was situated 
remote from town or village or in some position so ob- 
scure and so inaccessible as but too literally to represent 
the ' ' Church invisible. ' ' 

We have an illustration of as pathetic a scene as is 
unfolded in the pages of civic or national history— 
i t There was a little city and few men within it ; and there 
came a great king against it, and besieged it, and built 
bulwarks against it. Now there was found in it a poor 
wise man and he by his wisdom delivered the city. Yet 
no man remembered that same poor man. Then said I, 
Wisdom is better than strength". For though Wisdom 
is despised, her day will come if the God of Wisdom 
reigns. 

Almost two centuries ago, a movement was inaugurated 
as remarkable as any in the history of the human race, as 
divinely directed as the exodus of the children of Israel 
from the house of bondage to a good land and a large, 
where they prepared a faith for mankind and a Saviour 
for the world. In 1636, a small craft, called the " Eagle 
Wing" in anticipation of a swift passage, sailed from 
Groomsport near Belfast with one hundred and fifty 
passengers— the flower of Ulster's enterprise and faith. 
After proceeding twelve hundred miles in the direction 
of New England, she was driven back to Carrickf ergus 
Bay; the distressed sufferers, who, for two months had 
been exposed to most trying and perilous experiences, 
assuredly gathering that the way out of Ireland had not 
yet been made manifest. Ireland still needed them, and 

nsio: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

there they learned to suffer and be strong. When the 
young eagles are ready to fly, the nest will be so stirred up 
that they shall be thrust out of it, and compelled to essay 
the larger world of sun and sky by the use of wings, of 
whose existence they have not dreamed as yet. 

In 1718 five ships left Belfast carrying one thousand 
persons. Sometimes an entire congregation emigrated, 
sometimes as many as seven congregations with their 
ministers. During a lengthened period of the eighteenth 
century an average of twelve thousand a year left the 
land of their fathers for the land of the free. Men sold 
their household goods to realize their passage money, 
and those who had no money mortgaged their freedom 
and their earnings for four years in advance. They 
braved the winds and the waves, carrying with them the 
blood, and brains, and youth, and strength, and skill of 
Ulster to help to make your land what it is today. Their 
church they valued above all earthly things and after 
their church, in point of worth, came their disjunction- 
certificates, which they valued as a traveller values his 
passport or a student his parchment. Last month, I 
conducted the service in a church, the senior minister of 
which had given sixty years of service to one parish. He 
informed me that at the beginning of his ministry seven- 
teen families left in one day; but not until the Com- 
munion season had come round and they had pledged 
themselves anew to their Lord and to one another, and 
had sung the Paraphrase :— 

"I know that safe with Him remains, 
Protected by His power, 
What I've committed to His trust, 
Till the decisive hour. 

csiiii 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Then will He own His servant's name 

Before His Father's face, 
And in the new Jerusalem 

Appoint my soul a place." 

After the benediction, the disjunction-certificates were 
tendered to the brethren and sisters, who had worshipped 
for the last time in the sanctuary which to them had been 
the dearest spot on earth ; and on the following day, they 
were convoyed to the sea by their neighbours and their 
pastor, who commended them to the care of Heaven. 
When men like these went forth, then or in earlier days, 
to New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, 
or the Carolinas, territories unshadowed by the ecclesias- 
tical rule which had embittered their lives on the other 
side of the ocean, they proceeded to build their log- 
dwellings and their log-sanctuaries, and to sing the 
Lord's song in a strange land; and as they sang it, the 
land ceased to be strange, for they recognised it as the 
Lord's land, which they proceeded to claim for Him. 

In 1776, one-third of the population of Pennsylvania 
was Ulster-Scot, and one-third of the people of the Colo- 
nies was of kindred origin. At the Revolution consid- 
erably more than half a million of our people had made 
their home here; their descendants in this country are 
probably ten times more numerous than all the Presby- 
terians in Ireland at the present day, and the tide of emi- 
gration is still flowing. 

In 1683, Francis Makemie, a native of the County of 
Donegal, who at the age of fifteen had been the subject of 
a work of grace, who was a graduate of the University 
of Glasgow and a licentiate of the Old Laggan Presby- 
tery, responded in his twenty-fifth year to a call for help 
addressed to that Presbytery by Judge William Stevens 

ET5123 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of Rehoboth on the banks of the Pocomoke in Maryland. 
Makemie strengthened the scattered community by his 
definite Westminster teaching, organised them into the 
Presbytery of Philadelphia in 1706, prepared for the 
formation of the first Synod ten years later, and in 1789 
for that of the General Assembly, of which John 
Rodgers, his compatriot, was Moderator. Makemie died 
at the age of fifty, exhausted by labours prosecuted with 
the zeal of an apostle and the widened outlook of a states- 
man ; for with patriotic eye he surveyed this land from 
Barbadoes to Boston, declared that it was "a country 
capable of superlative improvement", spent his strength 
to accomplish that end, with the result that he has made 
every subsequent Presbyterian and American his debtor. 
He was not only exhausted on account of his unremitting 
labours, his health suffered not a little from persecution 
and imprisonment. The then Governor of New York 
betrayed his spirit of hostility towards this heroic pio- 
neer, who had dared to proclaim the Evangel within his 
jurisdiction, by describing him to his official correspon- 
dents in London as "a jack-of -all-trades, a preacher, a 
doctor-of-physic, a merchant, a counsellor-at-law, and 
which is worst of all, a disturber of governments." He 
died in 1708 ; and, a century after, a statue of heroic size 
was erected over his last resting place in Virginia by 
the grateful Church which claims him as her earthly 
founder. It is interesting to observe that his daughter 
was spared to see the establishment of that civil and 
religious liberty, for which he suffered and strove. 

When Makemie arrived at Rehoboth— which is, be- 
ing interpreted, " There is room"— he was surprised 
and delighted to discover William Trail, who had for- 
merly been the clerk of the Laggan Presbytery, who was 
pursuing quiet pastoral work in the peninsula between 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, and who subsequently 
became his successor in the ministry of the mother 
church of the United States. As soon as the first Pres- 
bytery was constituted, Makemie ordained John Boyd, 
whose period of earthly service came to a close in the 
same year as his own, and whose weather-beaten monu- 
ment, with its striking inscription, stands over against 
the replica of his own statue in the Witherspoon Build- 
ing, Philadelphia. He also brought from the Old Coun- 
try, on one of his visits thereto, George McNish and John 
Hampton to recruit the slowly growing band of the her- 
alds of the Cross on this side of the ocean. 

In 1716, William Tennent, a native of the county of 
Antrim, a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, a 
minister of the Episcopal Church, and son-in-law of the 
Rev. Gilbert Kennedy, one of our own most distin- 
guished ministers, applied to the Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia for admission as a member, pleading that Ar- 
minian doctrine and ceremonial worship and the gov- 
ernment of the Church in which he had been ordained 
had "affected his conscience so that he could no longer 
abide therein". On being received by the Presby- 
tery, he made grateful reply in a speech in the Latin 
tongue, elegantly composed and earnestly spoken. Like 
his Master, Tennent drew young men unto him ; blessed 
the Church of his adoption with his gifts and his devo- 
tion; founded "Log College" at Neshaminy, which 
Whitefield declared more closely resembled an ancient 
"School of the Prophets" than anything he had ever 
seen, and which constituted its founder "the Father of 
Presbyterian Colleges and Theological Seminaries in 
America." 

Webster, in his "History of the Presbyterian Church 

[5143 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

in America, from its origin till the year 1760," gives the 
biographies of fifty-five ministers of Ulster birth or 
origin, more than one-fourth of the entire number serv- 
ing the Church during that period. It is admitted that 
these men exercised a profound influence, both doctrinal 
and constitutional, on the growth and development of the 
infant Church. The Adopting Act of 1729, by which the 
Westminster Confession of Faith and the Catechisms 
were accepted as a confession of the Synod's faith, 
brought the American Church into line with the Synod 
of Ulster and with the mother Church of Scotland. 
Webster, writing in the middle of the last century, de- 
clares that Ulster has continued for one hundred and fifty 
years to be "the great nursery" of the American Presby- 
terian Church. When I think of John Glendy, who was 
the minister of the church of my boyhood, who fled from 
Ireland in the tragic days of 1798, who became succes- 
sively chaplain of the United States Congress and of the 
United States Senate, and a minister of great eloquence 
and power ; of the incomparable John Hall, who came to 
New York in 1867 and exercised a unique influence over 
the American Continent, of which every Irish Presby- 
terian was so justly proud ; and of the men who in Prince- 
ton have greeted me as a fellow-countryman and who are 
rendering such splendid service in this vast and high 
field, I am convinced that the ministerial succession is 
still being well maintained. 

The people of Ireland did not lose interest in their 
kinsmen across the sea, nor did their kinsmen forget 
their friends in the old home. In 1754, the Rev. Gilbert 
Tennent, son of the founder of "Log College," presented 
to the Synod of Ulster a petition from the Synod of New 
York and the Trustees of the College of New Jersey, 

[515 n 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

appealing for financial help for that recently established 
seat of learning. The Synod of Ulster was unanimous in 
granting a collection, which resulted in £500. In 1760, 
an address from the Corporation of Philadelphia and 
that of New York was presented to the Synod of Ulster, 
making an appeal on behalf of distressed ministers and 
their families, and on behalf of members of the Church, 
held captive by their enemies ; and the sum of £412 was 
contributed. 

The Governor of Pennsylvania was recently walking 
along the banks of the Schuylkill in company with a dis- 
tinguished British visitor, who remarked that, according 
to tradition, George Washington was able to throw half- 
a-crown across the river at its widest point, and who 
referred the question to the gentleman supposed to be 
possessed of the local knowledge. The Governor replied 
that he was not aware of the particular fact, but that he 
was convinced of the truth of the general principle that 
half-a-crown would go farther in George Washington's 
day than in his ! So these two sums, a little less than five 
thousand dollars, would go farther in the middle of the 
eighteenth century than in the first quarter of the twen- 
tieth. America has returned the kindness an hundred 
fold ; for ever since, there has been flowing towards our 
shores a veritable river of gold, which has gilded and 
sweetened the intervening waters, and gladdened many 
an Irish heart and home, north and south and east and 
west. 

We gave one president to the College of New Jersey 
in the person of Dr. Samuel Finley, an alumnus of "Log 
College/' under whose presidency half the students of 
Princeton became subjects of a genuine revival. Dr. 
McCosh was accustomed to say that the human body be- 
ll 516] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

came completely changed in the course of every seven 
years, and, at the end of his first week of years in this 
land, he declared himself a genuine American. That 
being so, and as he laboured with conspicuous success in 
Belfast for seventeen years, I am more than doubly justi- 
fied in affirming that in him Ulster gave another, and one 
of her most distinguished presidents, to Princeton. The 
late President McKinley believed that it would be diffi- 
cult to find a single faculty, academic or theological, in the 
United States, which did not include one or more Ulster 
members. I do not know how many members of the 
Princeton Faculty can trace their birth or descent to 
Erin, but I know that for a very long time one Irishman 
has been a valued member of the Faculty, Dr. George 
Macloskie, beloved by his many friends in Ireland as he 
is beloved by you. 

To Princeton Theological Seminary, we gave the men 
who sat at her cradle and nursed her to strength— the 
Alexanders and the Hodges, whose names are still borne 
by the living and legible in the places of the dead, and 
whose form and features are traceable in those who still 
survive among us ; and if there is one name, which more 
than any other is dear to our ministers and theological 
professors, it is the name of Princeton. If there is one 
Church of the Presbyterian order which more than any 
other loves Princeton theology, it is the Irish Presby- 
terian Church, called to maintain an immovable position 
between ritualism and Romanism on the one hand, and 
rationalism on the other, to uphold the supremacy of 
Scriptural revelation, and to be loyal to the doctrines of 
Grace— the decas et tutamen of the Church of the living 
God— without which we should not feel that we had a 
place in the land or a message for the age. 

C517H 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

I find that upwards of one hundred graduates of Irish 
universities have, for a longer or shorter period, studied 
theology in Princeton ; some of them remaining with you 
and some returning to us. I am acquainted with a dozen 
of our ministers and missionaries, whose memories of 
Princeton are of the most filial and grateful kind, and 
who look upon her as being to them the birthplace of a 
larger and more consecrated life. In 1851, John Byers, 
a son of our Church, graduated from the Seminary, after 
pursuing his full theological course. He sailed as a mis- 
sionary to the Far East accompanied by his wife, a 
daughter of Erin, then in her nineteenth year. After 
less than a twelvemonth's service, a breakdown in health 
suggested his return to America, which he was destined 
never to reach. The extreme kindness received by his 
young widow from the members of the Church in the 
United States was to her an abiding inspiration. She 
returned to her native land with her infant son, now a 
man of title and distinction in the academic and medical 
world, to found Victoria College and to achieve a work 
for the education of women and for the cause of temper- 
ance and philanthropy, the far-reaching results of which 
we can only inadequately and but partially estimate. Our 
most distinguished exponent of Princeton theology was 
Dr. Robert Watts, a graduate of the Seminary, who filled 
the chair of Systematic Theology in the Assembly's Col- 
lege, Belfast, and who revered his preceptors as Saul of 
Tarsus revered Gamaliel or as his own students revered 
himself. 

For myself, I can never speak of Princeton but with 
reverence and affection. When a young man leaves the 
university, filled with a sense of the wonders of ancient 
literature and civilisation, of the discoveries of modern 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

science and the daring speculations of philosophy, he 
may fancy there is no additional knowledge to be ac- 
quired, may become jealous of the suggestion that there is 
a faculty as trustworthy as any of those he has been sedu- 
lously cultivating, and that there are realities in the 
Kingdom which cannot be shaken, more enduring and 
more precious than any of those he has been so anxious 
to contemplate and appraise. The atmosphere of the 
Princeton of my day was a revelation to such a student 
and presented to him theology as the true and undisputed 
"Queen of the Sciences." 

There was Dr. Charles Hodge— clarum et venerabile 
nomen— with his look and his life, the transparency and 
humility of his nature, his consecrated genius, his wide 
and deep learning, his unfailing reverence for the Scrip- 
tures as the Word of God, his prayers which were the 
constant communing of his soul with the Eternal, made 
articulate for the moment and audible in our ears, his 
talks in the Old Oratory, his chivalrous devotion to the 
Saviour, and the marvellous manner in which he brought 
His love and life down into our lives, making us at times 
hold our breath and enabling us always to realize the 
truth of the poet's words :— 

"And warm, sweet, tender, even yet, 
A present help is He ; 
And faith hath still its Olivet, 
And love its Galilee." 

There was Dr. W. H. Green, with his profound schol- 
arship, his keen appreciation of the issues at stake, his 
stern sense of duty and responsibility, his urgency as to 
the use of opportunities which never would return, his 

[519] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

power as a preacher in exposing the sinfulness of sin and 
discovering the grace which saved from its guilt and 
power, and the place freely accorded him by scholars of 
every school of thought, east and west. 

There was the beloved Dr. C. W. Hodge, whose lec- 
tures hushed his class and frequently made it resemble 
more a company of boys gathered round a Communion 
Table than aught else. In addition to these, were the 
gifted and subtle Dr. A. A. Hodge ; the faithful and con- 
scientious Dr. James C. Moffat ; that clear thinker and 
most helpful and practical guide, Dr. A. T. McGill ; and 
the gentle and cultured Dr. Charles A. Aiken. These 
honoured preceptors made upon my classmates and my- 
self an impression which will not be effaced till the last 
syllable of recorded time. I feel certain that I ought to 
submit the tone of high moral and spiritual earnestness 
on the part of my fellow-students— with their devotion to 
study, their brotherly kindness, their regularity at morn- 
ing and evening prayer, their uniform courtesy to the 
members of the Faculty and to one another, and the har- 
mony which characterized the life of our community— 
as being among the most formative and beneficent 
influences of the period, the memory of which is to us 
all as perfume in the garments. 

The prophet in his vision saw a stream issue forth 
from under the threshold of the house of Cod, situated 
on the mountain top. The stream, flowing with deepen- 
ing and widening volume, became a river dispensing 
health and plenty along its course ; trees growing on its 
banks, whose fruit was for food and whose leaves were 
for medicine. It flowed into the Salt Sea, transforming 
the source of death into a place of life, revealing a second 
heaven in its depths, and crowding its shores with un- 

C520n 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

wonted scenes of happy human activity. There was life 
whithersoever the river came. So from this place, there 
has gone forth a river of Truth, which has blessed three 
and thirty generations of students, who in turn have been 
the means of sweetening and sanctifying and comforting 
the lives of succeeding multitudes of the children of men 
in almost every nation under the sun. 

I should like, before I close, to indicate another service 
which our people rendered to this Republic. George 
Canning, one of the most brilliant of British foreign sec- 
retaries, clasped hands with Thomas Jefferson across the 
Atlantic in the bonds of international peace, convinced 
that Britain and America could stand against the pos- 
sible coalitions of the world, and declaring as premier, 
"I called a new world into existence to redress the 
balance of the old". George Canning only recognised 
the existence of the new world and induced George IV to 
do likewise in the King's Speech of 1825 ; but the Ulster 
Presbyterians did their part in calling that new world 
into existence. The National League of Scotland and 
Ulster prepared the way for the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence. A century after the adoption of the Solemn 
League and Covenant by Scotland and Ireland, the Rev. 
Thomas Craighead led in its renewal by his people, who, 
with uplifted hands, declared their separation from the 
Crown which had violated the Covenant. The Mecklen- 
burg Convention, which was the outgrowth and embodi- 
ment of Craighead's spirit, and which consisted of Ulster 
men, announced in 1775 the principles of the Declaration 
of Independence before Jefferson stamped its words with 
the impress of his genius, or Charles Thompson of Bel- 
fast committed it to the handwriting in which it is pre- 
served ; before another Ulster man read it to the people, 

C521U 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

or a third gave to it the wings of the press. In that 
period of a nation's birthpangs, the Ulster Presbyterians 
were American; and in their stand they had the sym- 
pathy and the powerful moral support of that illustrious 
Irish statesman, Edmund Burke. 

The Declaration of Independence gave hope to those 
who struggled for justice in Ireland, and the struggle at 
length was crowned with victory. We have now religious 
equality. Our Church is protected by the law of the 
land. Our General Assembly has been visited by the Lord 
Lieutenant, a ruling elder of the Church of Scotland, 
and by the Countess of Aberdeen. A goodly number of 
our ministers have been appointed to act in turn the part 
of Chaplain to His Excellency. Our Moderator has equal 
precedence with the Archbishops of the other Churches, 
and a place is assigned him at State ceremonies. The 
" barns" in which our fathers worshipped have given 
way to sanctuaries comely and commodious, and in many 
instances, to ecclesiastical edifices which are an ornament 
to the parish and a feature of the landscape. The use of 
hymns and instrumental aid in public worship is now 
permitted and is fast becoming the custom, largely 
through your example. Our Church House, which com- 
prises the various offices of the Church and the Assem- 
bly Hall, was opened a few years ago by the Duke of 
Argyll at a cost of £80,000 ; and it is the finest building of 
its kind in Ireland, and among the finest of its kind in 
the world. 

We have a mission field at our door, and we endeavour 
to approach our fellow-countrymen, not along the lines 
of controversy, but along those on which we agree, em- 
phasizing the love of God, the Saviour's finished work, 
the priesthood of believers, and the supremacy of Scrip- 

[522:j 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ture ; and we have reason to believe that such seed thus 
sown yields fruit— especially when it has the opportunity 
of germinating and fructifying in the freer atmosphere 
of this land. 

We follow our kindred to the British Dominions be- 
yond the seas by means of our Colonial Mission ; we help 
the Reformed Churches on the Continent of Europe ; we 
maintain a successful Jewish Mission at Hamburg and 
Damascus, whilst our foreign missionary operations in 
Kathiawar and Gujarat and especially in Manchuria 
have been crowned with remarkable success. Our tem- 
perance crusade has received unmeasured stimulus from 
the record of your achievements in this momentous re- 
form. Our Theological Seminaries, or ' ' Colleges " as we 
designate them, were never better manned. From one of 
these— that at Belfast, of which Dr. Leitch, one of the 
greatest masters of New Testament Greek in the United 
Kingdom, is the president— I bear hearty felicitations; 
and it is only in a technical sense that I am unable to 
render a similar service on behalf of Magee College, 
Londonderry. 

We have an Orphan Society which provides for the 
Church's fatherless or orphan children, an Old Age 
Fund for the aged, which is available ten years before 
the Government Pension may be obtained, and every 
retired minister is secure for life of his manse and at 
least £100 a year. 

It will be easily understood that we have suffered 
during centuries of persecution through persons and 
families— unable to brave social ostracism, ambitious to 
obtain office or emolument, and not unwilling to sweep 
from their pathway any consideration, however sacred, 
which blocked their material progress— falling away 

C 5231] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

from their ancestral faith and practically confessing the 
quixotic nature of their fathers' resistance unto blood 
by conforming to the State-endowed type of belief and 
worship, under which their fathers' lives were made bit- 
ter. The names of such persons bear witness to the con- 
trast between their fathers' nobler fortitude and their 
own. 

Although year by year, we suffer from emigration, by 
which we are deprived of the enthusiasm and enterprise 
of our youngest and strongest, we do not grudge our 
youth to our Colonies nor to this Republic, which our 
people regard as almost a second home. Notwithstand- 
ing the constant tribute paid by us to the newer countries 
of the world, the income of our Church from all sources 
for the year 1910-1911 was double that of forty years 
ago, and was the largest total ever recorded— amounting 
to one million five hundred and twenty-three thousand 
eight hundred dollars. We have been enriched by gifts 
from our kindred, by bequests for public purposes, by 
memorials of utility in memory of departed friends, and 
by the enlarged sympathies and most salutary example 
of those who return to visit the old land. 

Mr. President, there has, of course, been no meeting of 
our General Assembly since your kind invitation to take 
part in this Centennial Celebration was extended to me ; 
had there been such a meeting, I should have been com- 
missioned to offer you the most fraternal, or, shall I say, 
the most maternal congratulations of our Supreme 
Court. If the Lord spare me to return to the opening of 
the General Assembly on the third day of June, I shall 
have nothing to say which will give me greater pleasure 
in the saying of it than that I witnessed this celebration, 
met the members of your Faculty, saw five hundred 

C524] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Alumni assembled to do honour to their alma mater, and 
looked upon the faces of, and exchanged salutations with, 
as many members of the class of '78 as have found it 
possible to be present. I congratulate you, Sir, whose 
name with that of Professor Warfield, is a household 
word among us, and whom we regard as one of the great- 
est and most brilliant living defenders of "the faith once 
delivered to the saints". I not only congratulate you 
on what you have done, but I pray also that the desire of 
your heart may be abundantly fulfilled as you look to- 
ward the future ; that this day, with all its grateful emo- 
tions and with all its sanguine hopes, may be but the fair 
beginning of a time. 

I have not said what I had hoped to say, and I had not 
even hoped to say all I felt, for— 

"Words are weak, and most to seek 

When wanted fifty-fold ; 
And then if silence will not speak, 
And trembling lip and changing cheek— 

There's nothing told." 



C525U 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 



CONGRATULATORY ADDRESSES 

FROM THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

BY THE EEVEEEND WILLIAM HENRY EOBEETS, D.D., LL.D. 

Stated Clerk of the General Assembly 

American Secretary of the World Presbyterian Alliance 

IN the name of the General Assembly of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America, and 
speaking for the Committee appointed by the Assembly, 
I present congratulations to the oldest and the foremost 
of the American Presbyterian theological seminaries. 
There was a day of small beginnings, both for the Church 
and the institution, but in the kindly providence of God, 
both have been prospered, so that today they are in the 
vanguard of the hosts of religious progress. 

It is to be understood that in congratulating Prince- 
ton, the Assembly is not to be regarded as singling the 
institution out in any specific manner for special lauda- 
tion, but as paying to it a merited tribute of praise and 
high regard as the first in a long line of sister seminaries. 

The General Assembly, also in congratulating Prince- 
ton upon one hundred years of successful service, recog- 
nizes that it speaks to the whole body of officers, teachers 
and Alumni, for whom the word "Princeton" stands, 
and for whom it has a vital and inspiring significance. 
Princeton is not only a faculty, and not only a collection 
of buildings, but further an idea controlling thought and 
act, and set forth not only in documents but also in the 
lives of many persons. 

[526] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The relation of the General Assembly to the Seminary 
is expressed in the Plan of the institution by the state- 
ment: "As this institution derives its origin from the 
General Assembly, that body is to be considered as its 
patron and the fountain of its power." 

The cause of the founding of the Seminary by the 
Assembly was the fact that there was "a demand upon 
the collected wisdom, zeal and piety of the Church to fur- 
nish a large supply of able and faithful ministers." At 
the beginning of the nineteenth century there was no 
sufficient provision for an educated ministry. The As- 
sembly, therefore, acting within its constitutional au- 
thority, determined to establish "a new institution, con- 
secrated solely to the education of men for the Gospel 
ministry." The General Assembly of 1811 adopted the 
plan for the theological seminary, and distinctly stated 
in it the design and purposes in the following terms: 
"And to the intent that the true design of the founders 
of this institution may be known to the public, both now 
and in the time to come, and especially that this design 
may at all times be distinctly viewed and sacredly re- 
garded, both by the teachers and the pupils of the semi- 
nary, it is judged proper to make a summary and explicit 
statement of it. 

"It is to form men for the Gospel ministry who shall 
truly believe and cordially love, and therefore endeavor 
to propagate and defend, in its genuineness, simplicity 
and fullness, that system of religious belief and practice 
which is set forth in the Confession of Faith, Catechisms, 
and Plan of Government and Discipline of the Presby- 
terian Church, and thus to perpetuate and extend the 
influence of true evangelical piety and Gospel order. 

" It is to provide for the Church men who shall be able 

[527] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

to defend her faith against infidels and her doctrines 
against heretics. 

"It is to preserve the nnity of our Church by educat- 
ing her ministers in an enlightened attachment not only 
to the same doctrines but to the same plan of govern- 
ment. ' ' 

The location of the institution, which was named in 
the Plan, "The Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the U. S. A.", at Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, gave to it the name by which today it is known 
throughout the world. 

The congratulations of the Church are tendered in 
view of accomplishment in four lines, the first of which 
is the production of "an educated ministry." It is the 
glory of the Presbyterian Churches in all lands that they 
have always insisted upon an educated ministry. Obedi- 
ent to the command to teach all nations, believing in an 
open Bible, and in the use of the reason which God has 
given man, these Churches have been intolerant chiefly 
of ignorance, have erected schools and colleges rather 
than cathedrals, and have made the centres of their wor- 
ship not altars but pulpits, and exalted their ministers 
not as priests but as teachers. Filled with this spirit the 
Church founded this institution, and rejoices in the 
manner in which the trust reposed in the Seminary has 
been fulfilled. 

Carrying out the trust imposed by the Church, through 
the Assembly, it is recognized that the educational prog- 
ress made by the institution has been for the most part 
due to its able and scholarly faculties, whose abilities and 
wisdom under God have been largely instrumental in the 
production of ministers, competent both by abilities, 
learning and training, for the high and holy office of am- 

C528] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

bassadors for Jesus Christ. Beginning with men such as 
Archibald Alexander, Samuel Miller and Charles Hodge, 
this line of efficient teachers has been distinguished in 
every generation for unstinted and eminent service both 
to students and to the Church. 

The Assembly recognizes also the faithfulness in ser- 
vice of the men who by its appointment have assiduously 
labored as directors and trustees of the seminary, per- 
forming carefully the several duties imposed upon them 
by the Church. The results approve them as workmen 
not needing to be ashamed. 

Another point of congratulation deals with and has to 
do with the system of religious belief named in the Plan 
of the Seminary and set forth in the Westminster Con- 
fession of Faith, whose first and most emphasized doc- 
trine is the inspiration and authority of the Bible. The 
Confession declares that the Holy Scripture is " the Word 
of God written," and all "given by inspiration of God 
to be the rule of faith and life." Loyalty to the Bible 
as the Word of God, the only infallible rule of faith and 
life, has been a chief characteristic of the teaching of this 
Seminary and of the lives of its Alumni. Princeton men 
have not treated the Bible as some others do, dealing 
with it as if it were a mere human book ; and the reason 
therefor is to be found in their recognition of its a priori 
claims to reverence and obedience, and the valid criti- 
cism of the attitude of their antagonists is to be found 
in the belittling by the latter of the controlling super- 
natural element in the Book, an attitude which is of the 
very essence of a proud unbelief. 

Accepting the Bible as the Word of God, Princeton 
holds to the Calvinistic System as a whole. Princeton 
men are not Calvinists because their fathers were, but 

[529] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

because they have thought out and fought out for them- 
selves the way to the greatest of the facts of the universe, 
a sovereign God, an almighty Saviour, and an infallible 
Bible. These three facts are the only sufficient solutions 
of the mental, moral and spiritual problems which con- 
front and trouble mankind. Believing in the universe 
as a product of mind, Calvinists realize first of all that, 
when the Master of the Universe has points to carry in 
His government, He impresses His will in the structure 
of minds. And Calvinists believing thus in divine fore- 
ordination, require answers, not only as to what they 
must believe, but also as to what they ought to do. Once 
having come intelligently to the conception of the sov- 
ereignty of God in His universe, they accept all the 
system of doctrine in Holy Scripture connected with that 
sovereignty, and there remains for them only the duty 
of obedience to God. Calvinists are men of action as 
well as men of faith. And, therefore, Princeton has 
prospered. 

The Plan of the Seminary also requires the Seminary 
to provide for the Church men who shall be able to de- 
fend her faith both against infidels and heretics. De- 
fenders of the faith, not a few in number, have been 
trained in this institution for the service of the Church. 
No statement of the Seminary's history can be complete 
without the acknowledgment of what has been done by 
it in the way of the education of the scholar, not only for 
the professor's chair, but for the aggressive dissemina- 
tion of the Calvinistic and Biblical system of truth. The 
Seminary has sometimes been criticised for endeavoring 
to educate " defenders of the faith," but in so doing it 
has been simply faithful to its trust. And far more 
could have been done, if the Church had provided ade- 

[530] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

quately for the accomplishment of this duty of the insti- 
tution. 

The plan of the Seminary also brings out the idea that 
it is to preserve the unity of the Church through edu- 
cating ministers in an enlightened attachment to the plan 
of government of the Church. To representative eccle- 
siastical republicanism, of which the American Presby- 
terian Church is an example, this institution is devoted. 
It has shown this devotion repeatedly in many ways. 
The greatest danger in recent years to the Church as to 
the State in this land has been found in an excess of in- 
dividuality, but of late there has been a tendency to go to 
the other extreme, in an excess of corporate organization. 
The government of the Presbyterian Church is a reason- 
able compromise between the two extremes just indi- 
cated. We do recognize individuality, but we also accept 
and use those cooperative forces of human society, that 
in this generation are the greatest source of profitable 
service to mankind in general. There is an individuality 
in which self-will is the supreme force, and there is also 
an individuality which, overcoming the limitations of 
self, finds in the use of great cooperative forces its prin- 
cipal source of power, its chief influence, and the high- 
est reward of profitable service. The individuality of 
self accomplishes but little of far-reaching and endur- 
ing value. The individuality which is altruistic makes 
for world-wide good. It has given birth to the nation 
in things political, it is the strength of the Church in all 
its work. The value of this cooperative tendency has 
been made clear in this Church for over two hundred 
years, and the oldest republic on the American continent 
congratulates this institution which today celebrates its 
centennial, upon its loyalty to Presbyterian government, 

[531] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

and in particular to that form of government as it finds 
the greatest expression of its beneficent authority and 
influence in the General Assembly. That authority and 
influence, for instance, has planted and carries on for- 
eign missions in fifteen different countries, and has 
broadcasted the national territory with missions and 
congregations. And this institution has ever been loyal 
to the supreme governing body of the Church, and so has 
been influential in that general administrative system 
which finds, as does the Seminary, the fountain of its 
power in the Assembly. This Seminary's loyalty to the 
Assembly is loyalty to the Church. 

The General Assembly congratulates itself that forty- 
three of its moderators have received training within the 
walls of this institution, that fully one-half of the leaders 
in the missionary and benevolent work of the Church 
have sat at the feet of its professors, that out from the 
institution have gone hundreds of home and foreign mis- 
sionaries, who have carried the gospel to every portion 
of our own country and throughout the world, and above 
all that here have been trained a great number of the 
pastors of the Church through four generations, men 
who have built up, energetically and successfully, the 
foundations of the Kingdom of Christ in this and in 
other lands. No one can estimate the good that has been 
accomplished through the ministers educated within 
these walls, who serving faithfully in their respective 
spheres of labor, have built up Christ-likeness in many 
human lives, and have laid the foundations of churches 
and organizations which have become powers in the 
Church universal. 

The Assembly acknowledges gratefully the loyalty of 
a wide constituency which, from the origin of the institu- 

H532] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

tion, has furnished the resources which have enabled it 
to maintain with some degree of adequacy the principal 
objects for which it was established. It would be invidi- 
ous to name the great ones among these benefactors, for 
many are they who have contributed, from the Female 
Cent Societies of 1815 up to the bequest of nearly two 
millions of dollars by one individual. Back of both the 
cent and the millions is to be found the spirit of loyalty 
to Jesus Christ and His truth. 

The Presbyterian Church has never conceived of the 
Church of Christ as limited within the bounds of any one 
denomination or confined to any one branch of the 
Church. Its standards have always maintained that all 
who profess the true religion together with their chil- 
dren constitute the Church universal. Thus believing it 
has acted upon the great motto, "In essentials, unity; in 
nonessentials, liberty ; in all things, charity". The doors 
of the institution, therefore, have always been open to 
students of all the evangelical Churches, and the influ- 
ence of the Church through the Seminary has gone out 
by many such through the length and breadth of this and 
other lands. The Seminary is to be congratulated upon 
its catholicity of spirit and conduct. 

The Assembly congratulates Princeton and its constitu- 
ency upon the hopeful future. We need not fear as to 
what the character of that future will be. At times, it is 
true, doubts enter into some minds, and pessimistic views 
are taken of the outlook. Time and again, however, the 
providence of God has vindicated the fidelity of this in- 
stitution to the truth in the past, and loyalty to its convic- 
tions of truth has brought it prosperity where adversity 
was dreaded. What is needed is to stand by the truth with 
patient courage and aggressive faith, at no time con- 

£533 3 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

trolled by either fears within or fightings without. It 
has been said for instance that the principal use of a 
conservative was to act as a brakeman. That is not the 
fact, and it has not been the fact in the history of the 
Presbyterian Churches, except as those who are conser- 
vatives have failed "to lift up the hands that hang down 
and the feeble knees. ' ' The place of the conservative is 
that of the conductor, not of the brakeman. The brake 
may need to be applied to a train, but only at the order 
of the conductor. The conservative well grounded in 
doctrine can lead in all progress along practical lines. 
Unhampered by doubts as to what he is to believe, he is 
free to do the things for which God's providence opens 
the way. And within the Presbyterian Church the lead- 
ership belongs to those who are loyal to Presbyterian 
principles. Strength of conviction means loyalty, and it 
also means respect from men of differing views. Pres- 
byterians have always recognized the right of other 
Christians to hold strong convictions, and claimed a 
similar right on their own part. While with strength 
of conviction must always be found that catholicity 
which is true Christian charity, it is also true that 
Christians must be true to themselves. The primacy 
which Princeton has, not only by heredity but also as an 
actuality, can be made, therefore, more sure and more 
manifest as the years roll on, by its firm adherence to 
the fundamentals of the Presbyterian system of doc- 
trine. 

The Princeton of the future we believe, has a greater 
prospect of usefulness before it than has ever been 
known in the past. Relying upon Him who is the al- 
mighty Father, trusting to the care of Him who is the 
divine Saviour, guided by the infallible Word, it will 

C534] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

increase in true service from year to year to that Church 
of Jesus Christ which is the only enduring thing upon 
this earth. Men come and men go, but the Church en- 
dures. Heaven and earth shall pass away but the Church 
shall not pass away. It is deathless with the life of the 
eternal God. Serving the Church with fidelity to Christ, 
and acting in accordance with the divine law, the devo- 
tion of the past and the present will be the inspiration of 
the future, and Princeton will earnestly and effectively 
do its part in the upbuilding of that temple of living 
stones, in the completion of which, the love of God for 
the world shall one day find the consummation of its 
power, its grace, and its glory. 



FROM THE OTHER PRESBYTERIAN 
AND REFORMED CHURCHES 

BY THE EEVEEEND JOHN CEAWFOBD SCOULLER, D.D. 

Pastor of the Fourth United Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia 

Moderator of the General Assembly of the United 

Presbyterian Church of North America 

President Patton and friends of Princeton: 

IT would seem on such an occasion as this, and in such a 
presence, one ought to begin with a quotation from 
the Scriptures, yet to do this, in your presence, I am free 
to acknowledge, I hesitate. There is a vast difference 
between what we say the Scriptures say, and what they 
really do say. We may differ in opinion as to what cer- 
tain of the Scriptures mean, but theological professors 
ought to know at least what they say. 

[535] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

There is a portion of Scripture which comes to me 
from my boyhood that illustrates what I mean. I was 
taught to reverence old age, because "gray hairs are 
honorable." But in later life, I found that there was a 
distinction as I met from time to time some who were 
wearing the crown of glory, yet about whom there was 
nothing that was worthy of honor; and I was glad to 
learn that the quotation was wrong, that the Scriptures 
did not take any such position as that, but that the quo- 
tation was, "The hoary head is a crown of glory, if it be 
found in the way of righteousness. ' ' We are not called 
upon to honor a thing because it is old, but we are called 
upon to honor this institution because it has always been 
in the way of righteousness. We do honor to ourselves 
in honoring it here this afternoon, because behind these 
old institutions lies the whole secret, the forceful and 
faithful teaching of the science of God. 

I have been greatly impressed while walking around 
among the University buildings here, and our hearts are 
with your new president in the work he has before him. 
But when I think of the Theological Seminary with its 
special work, the teaching of the science of God, I am 
profoundly impressed. 

I bring congratulations from our Church, because this 
institution, during all this number of years, has stood 
for the faithful teaching of this science of God, and it 
has, I believe, sought to bring into that teaching all of 
the resources of philosophy, metaphysics and kindred 
sciences on the ground that a man 's faith in the Word of 
God is not shaken on account of this higher learning, but 
that it makes him a better witness and better able to tes- 
tify to that Word; and he goes forth better equipped 
and better prepared for this work. 

[536] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

We rejoice that this Seminary has stood all these years 
for the deity of Christ, for the revealed Word of God, 
for the indwelling Spirit, and stood faithful to them 
all ; and I bring the congratulations of a Church which, 
as you know, believes with you in the higher learning, 
and thinks that it has done the very best it could with 
the material that has been furnished during all these 
years. 

In the early history of our branch of the Church, we 
built the log-cabin school alongside of the log-cabin 
church, and afterwards we built the log-cabin seminary. 

We bring the congratulations of a Church which has 
thoroughly endorsed the work of this Seminary, a Church 
which receives with gratitude everything and everybody 
who bears the Princeton hall-mark. We differ from 
your branch of the Church not so much in character as 
in behavior, and as we read the early history of the 
Church in common with your own, for we were one, we 
see there were troublous times ; there were circumstances 
which called for very wise action on the part of the 
leaders of the Church. While your ancestry did not al- 
ways agree entirely with my ancestry, it is no puzzle to 
those who know these said ancestors. 

Mrs. McFadden had invited some friends to her home 
one afternoon to enjoy the refreshing shade of her front 
lawn. As they were seated together, they heard the 
music of a band, and a troop of soldiers marched by. 
Mrs. McFadden said, ''That is Company L. My boy 
John belongs to that company." As the soldiers came 
along, she pointed him out, the fourth man in the third 
column, and said, " Isn't he noble and manly?" After 
he had gone by, there were a great many complimentary 
things said, perforce, about the soldierly appearance of 

[15373 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

the men. Mrs. McFadden said, "I noticed one thing 
you may have failed to notice ; in all that marching com- 
pany of men, my son was the only man who had the 
step ' \ Now, I presume that my ancestry, while they were 
very few, rejoiced in the fact that they had the step. 

One of the branches of our Church has been called the 
"Seceder Church," and as I came to read the history 
through, I thought the name was somewhat appropriate. 
From time to time, there were a few people who seceded 
—dissented and seceded. I think it might fairly be 
called the " Church of the Apostolic Secession." 

But while we have been such, we were also a Church of 
union, as our name bears witness. It is true that 
after uniting two branches, it nearly always left three 
Churches, each one of which thought it had the step; 
but let us hope they were all in the way of righteousness. 
Whatever we have been as a Church, whatever we are as 
a Church, we owe much to Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, not because she has trained so many of our minis- 
try—though she has trained some, of all of whom we are 
proud— but because she has had much to do with the 
shaping of the course of training in our seminaries. One 
of our seminaries— I don't know whether you know it 
or not, Dr. Patton— is a few years older than yours ; it 
was founded in 1794. But it was not founded with all 
wisdom : the influence of the theological teaching of this 
Seminary has had much to do with the shaping of the 
curriculum in our own Seminary, and we can trace the 
trend in its life to this. 

We rejoice in this, and we are glad to bring you its 
congratulations this afternoon. May the influence of 
Princeton abide and be wide-spread. 

£538] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FROM OTHER CHURCHES 

BY THE EIGHT EEVEEEND DAVID HUMMELL GEEEE, D.D., S.T.D., LL.D. 

Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 

Diocese of New York 

Mr. Chairman ; Gentlemen: 

I AM surprised and pleased to find in this Presbyterian 
assemblage how much at home I am here. You all 
seem just like Episcopalians. Whether it is because I 
am so much like you or you so much like me I am not 
prepared to say. Perhaps because of this somewhat am- 
biguous identity on my part I was called up a few days 
ago by an enterprising journalist who said that impor- 
tant news had just come into that office; the cannibals, 
it had just been learned, had eaten two Presbyterian 
missionaries, and he wanted to know what I was going 
to do about it. There seemed to be nothing to be done, 
though I might have said, "Let the good work go on." 

Dr. Patton said to me a moment ago that if ever the 
Episcopalian Church wanted an archbishop, and he 
thought the signs were pointing in that direction, he 
would nominate for the office our friend Dr. Eoberts. I 
promised him— in fact, I made a sort of contract with 
him on the spot— that if Dr. Roberts would become an 
Episcopalian we would make him an archbishop. We 
don't want an archbishop in the Episcopal Church, but 
I thought I was safe in making the promise. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen : I am glad of the oppor- 
tunity this occasion gives me to acknowledge my per- 
sonal indebtedness to the Presbyterian Church, if not for 
my theological training, at least for some measure of my 

[539] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

intellectual training. In the college at which I was a 
student (not Princeton, but elsewhere), the Exposition 
of the Westminster Confession was a prescribed part, at 
that time, of the established curriculum, and I had to take 
a course in it once every week. Whether my present 
soundness in the faith is due to that fact I do not know, 
but I do know that it was at the time good mental train- 
ing for me. The intellectual discipline which it gave me, 
while it did not have the effect to make me in any sense a 
great metaphysical critic (which I am not), "profoundly 
skilled in analytic," able like Hudibras "to sever and di- 
vide a hair twixt sou ' and sou 'west side " ; it did I am sure 
sharpen somewhat my limited mental faculties and 
give them a finer edge. It taught me how to think. 
Professor Tyndall says in speaking of his indebtedness 
to Hegel, Fichte and others, that while these eminent 
teachers called on him to act he reserved to himself the 
privilege of taking his own line of action and of becom- 
ing not a philosopher but a scientific student. So, while 
that study of the Westminster Confession did teach me 
to think, I did not as the result think myself into the 
Presbyterian Church, but reserved to myself the privi- 
lege of thinking myself more fully into the Church in 
which I was born and of which I am still a member. 

But I am not here to speak personal words or to give 
a personal greeting, but as the topic or toast implies, to 
give you greeting in behalf of my own "and all the other 
Churches. ' ' I appreciate the compliment with its impli- 
cation of a recognition that there is a little marginal 
fringe in Christendom beyond the line and border of the 
Presbyterian Church. And what shall I say for those 
other Churches'? Is there a common bond that binds 
them all together and unites them all with you? Most 

[540] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

assuredly there is. It is the dominion, the personal do- 
minion, not of the dead and absent but of the living 
Christ, which in spite of all the changes so many and so 
great which have taken place in the past has not been 
disturbed, but has strengthened and increased and 
widened more and more with the "process of the suns." 
Whatever their differences may be, it is that personal 
dominion of the living Christ which binds them all to- 
gether. It is also that personal dominion of the living 
Christ which constitutes the distinctive feature of the 
Christian religion and that differentiates it from all 
other religions. Those other religions survived as reli- 
gious codes or systems, but their founders, except as 
more or less influential names, have not survived with 
them. But the Founder of the Christian religion does 
indeed survive, not merely in His teaching, not merely in 
His influence, like that "of the sceptred sovereigns who 
still rule us from their urns," but as a living Person, 
living in His Church, as the power of His Church; its 
power in the past, its power in the present, and the power 
by which it will not only do its work in the world but will 
do the world's work, and which like nothing else will 
help to solve the world's pressing and present problems, 
social and economic, national and international, or what- 
ever they may be. 

While therefore in one sense it would be arrogant and 
presumptuous for me to venture to speak in behalf of 
the Churches of Christendom other than my own, I am 
confident that I may do so in the name of that living 
Christ whom they all acknowledge, and to whom, in spite 
of all their differences, they give their allegiance and 
their faith. Those differences do indeed exist. We are 
not blind to them. Even Dr. Roberts intimates that there 

C54in 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

are some differences in the Presbyterian Church ; and it 
cannot be disputed I think that such differences do exist, 
if not in your theology, at least in your theological em- 
phasis from that of a hundred years ago when your Semi- 
nary was founded. But I am one of those who believe 
that these diversities or differences will in time be healed, 
and that these discords will at last melt and merge some- 
how into a deeper and richer harmony. I certainly do 
not wish to repudiate, nor do you, the theology of the 
past. We are born of that theology ; it is our inheritance. 
We could not repudiate it even if we would. And so with 
the living Christ we shall meet the duties of today and the 
issue of tomorrow, facing the future, yet planted firmly 
on the past ; and so like Dante's pilgrim we shall journey 
on and up the rough and rugged mountain side towards 
the distant mountain top, with the hinder foot still 
firmer. 



FROM THE SEMINARIES OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

BY THE REVEREND JAMES GORE KING McCLURE, D.D., LL.D. 

President of McCormick Theological Seminary 
Chicago, Illinois 

IT is a great privilege before this remarkable audience 
on an occasion of so much significance to attempt to 
express the congratulations and good wishes of the theo- 
logical seminaries of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America. 

There is a sense in which, like Jerusalem which is 
from above, Princeton is the mother of us all. We have 

C542] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

all come to our birth since she entered upon her begin- 
ning. We have all been influenced by her methods, her 
spirit, her teaching and her successes. In a thousand 
ways she has been to us the guide of our youth, the direc- 
tor of our manhood and the companion of our maturity. 
Her existence is the justification of our own existence. 
A new system of training Presbyterian ministers in the 
United States came to its initiation in her. That system 
in due time secured the approval of the Church. Be- 
cause of that approval of the system which Princeton 
represented, we had our birth. 

All these seminaries come, therefore, today to bring 
their greetings to their mother, to lay at her feet their 
tribute of gratitude, to express to her their appreciation 
of all that she has been to them, and to assure her of their 
present and of their abiding affection. Never did chil- 
dren gather about a beloved parent in the hour of that 
parent's honor with more genuine and more profound 
esteem than do the children of Princeton gather about 
their mother at this glad time. 

If it is a great privilege to speak as the representative 
of the theological seminaries in the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, it is likewise a great 
responsibility to attempt in any wise to f orthtell the sen- 
timents of their hearts. These seminaries are twelve in 
number. Their locations are widely scattered. They 
virtually extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast, 
covering the intermediate portions of this good land. 
One by one, according as the Church has felt that there 
was a need, each has arisen to occupy a definite portion 
of our territory and attempt the work that seemed to be 
needed. We minister both to those whose faces are white 
and those whose faces are black, both to those who are 

H543] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

conversant with the English tongue and to those who are 
conversant with the German, Bohemian and other 
tongues. The influence of these seminaries extends far 
beyond the general locality in which they are placed. 
That influence has gone into every portion of the world, 
for there is not a nation upon the earth today without 
representatives from one or more of these seminaries 
who in their places are trying to bring the highest pos- 
sible blessings to those about them. 

Then, too, this should be noted, that Princeton has 
been the one who to so large a degree has contributed her 
graduates to the working faculties of these scattered and 
useful seminaries. When the full record of this Centen- 
nial Celebration shall have been gathered up, it will be 
seen that man after man of those who in the later years 
of their lives became so thoroughly associated with the 
seminaries in which their work was done that men ordi- 
narily think of them only in connection with such semi- 
naries, received their training and were prepared for 
their usefulness in Princeton. 

That there are so many seminaries of such diversified 
types, with such fields of influence and with such a pro- 
duct of helpfulness, is suggestive of the growth that has 
taken place in our country since the action of our Gen- 
eral Assembly whereby Princeton Seminary, one hun- 
dred years ago, became a possibility, and suggestive, too, 
of the growth of our denomination, which has spread far 
and wide until it covers the land ; and suggestive, also, of 
the growth of the system of education itself which first 
came to its expression in the founding of this institution. 
Theological seminaries are today a fixed part of our reli- 
gious life. Toward them the thought and prayer of the 
Church turn with confident expectation that they will 

[544 ] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

furnish the material whereby the work of saving the 
world shall be advanced. 

It is noticeable, too, in this connection how few of all 
the thousands upon thousands who have been connected 
with our seminaries as students have failed to lead help- 
ful lives. They have gone to small and large place alike. 
They have met every kind of difficulty, and even every 
kind of privation. Each one of these seminaries has its 
roll of Christian martyrs. Each of them can tell of num- 
berless instances in which its graduates have opened 
blind eyes, comforted lonely hearts, and led darkened 
souls into the light and life of God. There is no such 
beautiful product anywhere to be found upon the earth 
as the product of theological seminaries. And our hearts 
grow warm and our tones tender as we think of this won- 
derful privilege, granted to our seminaries, in having 
part in the refreshing and saving of humanity. 

But beside the privilege and the responsibility of this 
hour, there is the humor of it. To think that one indi- 
vidual like myself should attempt to speak as the repre- 
sentative of all our seminaries when there is such a va- 
riety of individuality in these seminaries, in the type of 
men constituting their faculties and in the proportions 
and emphases of truth which they express ! 

It is sometimes said of our Presbyterian Church that 
one of its great tendencies is to develop individuality. 
We liken our Church to a splendid piece of solid hickory. 
Hickory is strong, but it splits easily. Our Church, in its 
emphasis upon the fact that each one of us finally stands 
alone before God in his individuality, creates an atmo- 
sphere in which there is danger of great diversity of 
sentiment. Besides, we do attempt to explain much of 
the workings of the Divine mind. We do not hesitate to 

[545] 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

go back even into eternity itself and deal with what we 
call the Eternal Decrees, and that is a long way to go. 
There is ever a possibility that one and another may not 
follow exactly the same track in getting to the original 
sources. And then this, too, is true ; that we attempt to 
define very closely. We hold to the general proposition 
that it is only through definition that there can be close 
and accurate reasoning. But just so soon as we define, 
we separate; and separation is bound to produce vari- 
eties of interpretation. 

Now for me upon this occasion to stand here and at- 
tempt to be the mouthpiece of all these seminaries, in all 
their varieties of expression, in all their different types 
of temperament, in all their definitions, would be a most 
hazardous undertaking. I am afraid that Bedlam would 
be quietness itself compared to the scene which would 
ensue, if I, on my own responsibility, should have the 
audacity to make a brief statement of the faith of all 
these seminaries and of the individual members of their 
faculties and lay it before this audience at this time ! 

And still these varieties of expression are evidences of 
our fidelity to convictions. There could be nothing so 
serious to the welfare of the world as to have all our 
seminaries cut exactly upon the same pattern. Men can- 
not be true to themselves, to their times, to the needs of 
their localities and put into formulated statement with 
the same degree of emphasis and proportion their reli- 
gious beliefs. Ours is a very comprehensive Bible. 
James and Paul are in it, though at first glance to some 
minds they might seem quite apart the one from the 
other. Ours is a comprehensive Confession of Faith. 
The long debates that led up to its acceptance did not 
and could not cause all minds to acquiesce in the ipsis- 

C546] 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

sima verba of one another's views. Ours is a compre- 
hensive Church, and men of different births, of different 
spiritual experiences, of different attitudes toward meth- 
ods of evangelization are bound to arise, and our glory 
is that these seminaries aim to meet all needs and to send 
out men prepared to carry their own special messages 
to the needy hearts of mankind. 

So there is to my own mind great felicity in this op- 
portunity. Variety expresses itself here and now in har- 
mony. We are one in our purpose. There is not a single 
divergence from fidelity to our testimony to the great- 
ness, the goodness, the lovableness of God. Princeton 
has always made God large. So each of us and all of us 
in our special lines intend to lift God before the world in 
such a way that all shall see His matchless majesty and 
goodness, and shall be drawn to adore and serve Him. 
When Dr. Charles Hodge was here, his opening prayer 
in the classroom was again and again offered with a 
tremulous tone, while the tears flowed down his cheeks. 
As he drew near to the God whom he reverenced and 
loved, his heart was submerged with tenderness and de- 
votion. Such a God, sovereign indeed of heaven and 
earth, creator and ruler of all He has made, than whom 
there can be no other, making Himself known in the 
fulness of His benignity in Jesus Christ, is the God that 
each seminary exalts. 

We are one, too, in the fact that we never overlook 
in any wise, the nature, the place, the power and the guilt 
of sin, nor do we ever overlook or in any wise minimize 
the redemptive work of Jesus Christ, God's Son, our 
Lord and Saviour, who came into this world to bear the 
sins of God's people, and to bring us into harmony with 
the Father. Nor do we ever overlook or minimize in any 

£54711 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

wise the convicting, regenerating and sanctifying grace 
of the Holy Spirit. Every one of us holds to the unique 
place of the Bible. It is our authority. Every problem 
of philosophy, every problem of life, is tested by the 
Holy Scriptures. Nor does any one of us fail in loyalty 
to the Presbyterian Church, whose children and servants 
we are. 

As we are one in our purpose, we are all one in our 
gratitude. We thank God that Princeton has always had 
convictions which she has never hesitated to avow. We 
thank God for the scholarly methods which have always 
characterized her teaching. We thank Him too for the 
scholarly requirements which she has demanded of those 
who have been prepared by her for the gospel ministry. 
The mere mention of these causes of gratitude is sug- 
gestive of what uncertain results would have followed to 
the Presbyterian Church and to the Church of God 
throughout the world if Princeton had not been distin- 
guished in these lines. 

Where shall we stop in speaking of our gratitude? 
Who can be so appreciative of the men who have served 
in Princeton's Faculty as ourselves who in our own fac- 
ulties recognize the temptations and the difficulties of 
theological education? We bless God with overflowing 
hearts for the generations of instructors who have suc- 
ceeded one another through these one hundred years, and 
who have left an indelible stamp of goodness and great- 
ness upon our Church and upon the world. Nor can I 
omit to express gratitude for those who in the position 
of directors and of trustees have nourished this institu- 
tion, have strengthened its life and have given it increas- 
ing development for good. And once again my heart 
glows with thankfulness as I think of the multitudes of 

C548 3 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

students who having been made ready in this institution 
have gone like rays of sunlight wherever the darkness of 
sin is, to chase away the shades of night, and bring the 
world into the light of God's eternal day. 

As we are one in our common purpose and in our 
common gratitude, we are also one in our common wish. 
That wish is that God may look with constant and 
abounding favor on this institution as it enters into the 
new century; that Princeton's graduates who are here 
today, and those who are elsewhere throughout the 
world, may always have the seal of God's blessing on 
their hearts, homes and work ; that this institution, with 
each new year of its life, may see more clearly and more 
deeply into the eternal verities, and may be used by God 
increasingly to the bringing in of that time when every 
knee shall bow in the name of Jesus Christ, and the king- 
doms of this world shall become the Kingdom of our God 
and of His Christ. 

And to His name shall be all the praise. 



FROM THE SEMINARIES OF OTHER CHURCHES 

I 

BY THE EEVEKEND WILLISTON WALKER, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D. 
Titus Street Professor of Ecclesiastical History 
Yale University Divinity School 
, New Haven, Connecticut 

WERE this an occasion commemorative of Prince- 
ton University, instead of the Centennial of 
Princeton Theological Seminary, I should be tempted to 
make large assertions of Yale ownership, if not in pres- 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

ent successes, at least in educational origins. I should 
not merely claim its first three presidents, Jonathan 
Dickinson, Aaron Burr and Jonathan Edwards as sons 
of Yale, but I should look upon some portion at least of 
its material structure as belonging to Connecticut as I 
recall that, in 1753, when the legislature of New Jersey 
proved an unsympathetic step-mother, that of Connecti- 
cut granted aid to the then struggling college by a lottery 
"for the encouragement of religion and learning" as the 
act ran. 

Yet even in Princeton Theological Seminary, I would 
claim for Connecticut a certain share, for it was in a Gen- 
eral Assembly in which the Congregational churches of 
Connecticut were then regularly represented that your 
foundations were laid. I remember, also, as a represen- 
tative of Yale, that President Theodore Dwight Wool- 
sey, whose name is venerated among us, had his 
theological training in Princeton Seminary. As a Con- 
gregationalist, moreover, I rejoice to recall that it was 
the example of a Congregational Theological Seminary 
—that of Andover— that in some measure stimulated the 
endeavors, the fruition of which a century ago we now 
commemorate. We have not always looked at Christian 
truth from the same angle of vision. Yale and Princeton 
have had their dissimilarities theologically as in other 
respects. But deeper than any differences of interpre- 
tation has been, I believe, a profound similarity in desire 
to know the truth and to advance the Kingdom of God 
by loyal service to our common Master, the ever-living 
Christ. 

It is not only as an official representative of Yale and 
of its department of theology, but in an unofficial sense 
as a messenger of Congregationalism, and of theological 

C550II 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

training far wider than the Congregational field, that I 
wonld bring you heartiest congratulations. What a 
wealth of hallowed memories a hundred years involves. 
What consecrated service by good men living and dead. 
What hopes and labors and prayers. What a host of 
servants of God have here had their preparation for 
their work and their stimulus to consecrated endeavor. 
Well may you rejoice that the providence of God has led 
you thus onward in ever increasing usefulness these hun- 
dred years. 

Our thoughts on such an anniversary turn naturally to 
the past. It is with the achievements of the century just 
closed that we have chiefly to do. But we should be un- 
worthy sons of those who laid the foundations in their 
poverty, rich only in faith in God, if we in our time 
failed to have something of their breadth of vision and 
willingness to meet enlarging needs. In a real sense they 
were Christian pioneers. They saw that the churches 
needed a better trained ministry. They felt that the pro- 
visions of the past were inadequate to the demands of 
the present. They began their work with courage and 
with determination to equip the servants of the churches 
more perfectly for their tasks. The century that has 
gone has witnessed a constant enlargement in the oppor- 
tunities of Christian service. Once it was sufficient to 
train for the pulpit only. Then came the demand for 
missionary preparation. Now religious education and 
social betterment in the name of Christ are knocking at 
our doors. The conception of the ministry is widening 
as the Church becomes increasingly conscious of the mul- 
tiformity of its mission. It must have its pastors and 
missionaries. It needs its teachers and its social workers 
in town and country no less. 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

If we would have men a hundred years hence look back 
upon us with something of the honor with which we now 
reverence the founders of American theological educa- 
tion, we must have something of their largeness of out- 
look. We must see the needs of our times as clearly as 
they saw the necessities of theirs. We must plan with 
equal courage to meet the demands which are upon us. 
As they enlarged the opportunities for ministerial train- 
ing beyond what had satisfied the age before them, so 
must we go forward. A training for wider service, in 
many differentiated forms, must be our ideal. Theologi- 
cal education cannot rest where it now stands, if we are 
to have the spirit which led them to plan their mighty 
advances. The task before us is to make our schools 
more adequate to meet the needs of the century in which 
we live. 

But on this festal day our chief thoughts are of rejoic- 
ing and of congratulation. As members of a sisterhood 
of schools for ministerial training we bring our heartiest 
greetings to the Theological Seminary of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America. The 
good hand of God has led you through a hundred years 
of service. Loyal devotion and grateful recollection look 
to you this day from all over this land and from coun- 
tries beyond the seas, and joy with you. May He who 
inspired the founders, and has so prospered their work, 
grant you in increasing measure His favor in the years 
to come. May Princeton Theological Seminary have an 
ever larger share in bringing on the glad time when the 
Redeemer's Kingdom " shall have dominion from sea to 
sea, and from the river unto the ends of the earth". 



[552: 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

FROM THE SEMINARIES OF 
OTHER CHURCHES 

II 

BY THE EEVEEEND EDGAE YOUNG MULLINS, D.D., LL.D. 

President of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

I WISH to acknowledge the great honor conferred 
upon me in being asked to represent the theological 
seminaries of the Baptist denominations on this most 
interesting and notable occasion, and I rejoice to bring 
to Princeton the congratulations of the ten or twelve 
Baptist seminaries in the country. 

I must, in a very few minutes, catch a train for an 
engagement very much like this in another theological 
seminary, and really I feel that what I have to say might 
be eliminated from this programme. I feel very much 
like the minister who got a note one Sunday as he was 
about to begin his sermon. His wife had reached the 
church, and had seated herself in a crowded pew, when 
she remembered she had left the roast beef on the gas 
stove, and knew that unless the meat was taken off that 
there would be no roast beef for dinner. But, with the 
usual resourcefulness of the pastor's wife, she wrote a 
note and handed it to her brother, who was an usher, 
and he, with the usual instinct of an usher, took it to the 
pastor, supposing it was a pulpit notice. And just as the 
good man was all athrob with the magnificent message 
that he was to deliver, he opened and read this note, "Go 
home and turn off the gas. ' ' 

C553^ 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

I am not quite sure but that the reverse of that would 
be in order at this time, turn off the gas and go home. I 
have allowed me ten minutes. It is a serious problem 
how I should utilize it. I feel, from the Baptist's point 
of view, I might try to stimulate the Presbyterian con- 
science as to the greatness of the achievements of Pres- 
byterianism during the last one hundred years, but from 
the addresses I have heard, I do not think you need any 
stimulus of that kind. I did think of speaking, how- 
ever, on another line which has been greatly neglected 
during these two days, viz., Calvinism; but that is too 
large a theme for a man to undertake to discuss in ten 
minutes in the absence of previous discussion on the pro- 
gramme. By the way, that is no reflection on Calvinism. 

I learned Calvinism in Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary—I didn't come here as a student, but my teacher 
of theology did. James P. Boyce, founder of the South- 
ern Baptist Theological Seminary, was an alumnus of 
Princeton; he taught me theology. He was one of the 
greatest leaders the South ever had. Basil Manly, a pro- 
fessor of the institution of which I have the honor to be 
president, was an alumnus of Princeton Theological 
Seminary. So Princeton is a household word in the 
circle of the institution with which I am connected. It 
is a special joy, therefore, for me to bring you greetings 
from our Faculty, and representatives of the Baptist in- 
stitutions of the country. I will not attempt, in these 
few minutes, to indicate what we, of the Baptist semi- 
naries, feel by way of appreciation of the work done by 
Princeton. However, if I were to attempt to do this, 
I would sum it up in this : three perils which Princeton 
has avoided, and three conditions which she has fulfilled 
for a triumphant Christianity. 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

In the first place, and briefly, the three perils Prince- 
ton has avoided. First, the peril of reducing Christian- 
ity to the vanishing point in the form of an essence. You 
have taken the thing itself and not the mere essence of 
it. With you, Christianity has been a voice, and not a 
scientific echo of a voice; nor a humanitarian echo of 
an echo of a voice. John the Baptist crying in the 
wilderness was a voice. What we want is a voice and 
what the world must have is a voice if it is to have a feel- 
ing of the power of God in its heart. 

Another peril Princeton has avoided, as we interpret 
it: it has not eliminated the positive note from Chris- 
tianity. We believe, and you believe in the open mind 
and the freedom of investigation, but you have appre- 
ciated the fact that no preaching that has power can be 
without the positive note. You will not do much with 
sinners preaching a gospel to them which says : - ' Except 
ye repent"— as it were— "and believe the gospel"— so 
to speak— "you will be damned"— in a measure. That 
sort of a message does not carry and will not win. Again 
you have avoided the peril of defining Christianity as 
esthetical instead of moral and spiritual. Inclination 
and taste do not determine what the world is. With you, 
religion has been a form of the real, an order of fact ; it 
has been based upon the eternal God and upon the God 
in the human soul. I cannot elaborate this. 

The three conditions which we think this institution 
has fulfilled and which are the essence of this triumphant 
Christianity are these : 

First, with you, Christianity has been a message 
rather than an inquiry. I do not say it may not be both, 
and certainly I am the last man to say inquiry is not in 
order in any sphere, but Christianity, to be a power, 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

must be a message. Your Dr. van Dyke said the coat-of- 
arms of the present age is three bishops prone and above 
them an interrogation point rampant. Princeton has 
not adopted that coat-of-arms. Christianity to be a 
power must be a message. In order to have a fact, there 
must be definiteness. The soul cannot feed on abstrac- 
tions. Just as a bird cannot fly in a vacuum, nor a tree 
root itself in a fog bank, nor a vine climb a moonbeam, 
so the soul cannot subsist upon a mere abstraction about 
God and about religion. 

Christianity and religion are a form of the real, and, 
in a scientific age, the man who says you cannot know, 
the man who puts an interrogation point before the great 
realities of religion, is predestined and foreordained 
from the foundation of the world to be defeated in his 
effort to defend religion at all. 

For an age that has been nurtured at the breast of 
physical science has been taught to love the living and the 
true, and unless religion is brought inside the category 
of reality and truth, religion is doomed. And we and 
you believe religion belongs to an order of fact, co-ordi- 
nate in worth as order of fact, as real, as autonomous, as 
authoritative as physical science in its own sphere, or 
any other department of human investigation. You have 
fulfilled that condition. Christianity with you is, first, a 
message ; second, it is an experience. A message without 
an experience behind it is powerless. It is only the expe- 
rience that can give momentum to the message. It is 
utterly impossible for theology to accomplish anything 
unless behind it is a life ; so I say, as we understand you, 
you have stood for that. 

Imitation Christianity has lost its power ; mere creedal 
Christianity has lost its power— a gold piece is worth 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

more than a brass piece, but an imitation gold piece isn't 
worth any more; Beethoven's compositions have more 
music than ragtime, but the mere notes of the two have 
no difference so far as they are printed on the page; a 
fire has more heat than an iceberg, but the picture of a 
fire has no more heat than the picture of an iceberg. I 
say reality is the key-note, and without it our creeds 
come to naught. 

Princeton has also stood for the conviction that there 
must be messengers who embody the message and the 
experience. I cannot elaborate; that I leave with you. 
These are the three fundamentals of triumphant Chris- 
tianity which we believe you have fulfilled. The trav- 
eller in the Alps, around the valley of Chamonix espe- 
cially, is struck by the fertility of all the region. He does 
not understand the source of all this fertility until he 
discovers the many streams which flow down Mt. Blanc, 
which lifts its head fifteen thousand feet in the air, 
snow-crowned eternally. As Mt. Blanc enriches the 
valleys so Princeton Seminary has stood like Mt. Blanc 
among the seminaries of this country. In a thousand 
ways, you have not known, she has sent down her largess 
of blessing into the valleys, and we rejoice in what she 
has done. And the reason Mt. Blanc can thus bless the 
valleys is because she lifts her head to the very skies 
where, from the inexhaustible heavens themselves, she 
draws her supply, and so Princeton has drawn her sup- 
plies from the eternal sources. 

So we join you today, O Princeton, in doing honor to 
Him whose name is above every name to us, for He is 
the centre of all experience for us. He is the problem 
that is at the core of philosophic thought ; He it is with 
whom men must reckon. 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Majestic sweetness sits enthroned 

Upon the Saviour's brow; 
His head with radiant glories crowned, 

His lips with grace o 'erflow. ' ' 



I join with you in saying— 



No mortal can with Him compare, 
Among the sons of men ; 

Fairer is He than all the fair 
That fill the heavenly train. ' ' 



FROM PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 

BY THE EEVEEEND JOHN GRIER HIBBEN, Ph.D., LL.D. 
President of Princeton University 

Mr. Chairman, President Patton, men of Princeton, both 
of the University and of the Seminary : 

I AM speaking this afternoon not only for the present, 
but also for the past. Many voices come to us today, 
long since stilled, it is true, but eloquent in our memory ; 
I speak not only for Princeton University, but by virtue 
of our historical continuity, also for the College of New 
Jersey, and back of the College of New Jersey, the Log 
College, and back of the Log College, the school house on 
the hills of Scotland and of Ulster in Ireland. 

I am aware of the fact, and, indeed, it is one of our 
most cherished possessions, that the men who founded 
the College of New Jersey were men of the same spirit 
and of the same faith who founded the Princeton 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Theological Seminary one hundred years ago, and the 
names that are conspicuous in the history of this last 
century, intimately associated with the Theological 
Seminary, are names to be found on the roll of the Col- 
lege of New Jersey and Princeton University; the 
Greens, the Alexanders, the Millers, the Hodges and all 
the long roll of honor, which I have not time to repeat 
name by name. There has been a close connection of 
friendly affiliation between our two institutions, but at 
the basis of it all is the foundation of a common faith 
and a common hope. 

With that as our present day inheritance, upon this oc- 
casion, we, who are here representing the present Prince- 
ton University, pledge you that we will endeavor, so far 
as lies within us, to preserve the faith and hope of our 
fathers and to remain true to the gospel which they pro- 
fessed. 

As president of Princeton University, I am not only 
representing today the various branches of the Presby- 
terian Church, but I represent all the denominations, I 
think, which are also represented in your gathering 
here, all the Churches that have come to bring their 
greetings to Princeton Theological Seminary. We, in a 
broad spirit of tolerance, uphold the ideals of the Chris- 
tian faith in Princeton University, not in the name of 
any one denomination, but with a catholicity that ex- 
tends a welcome to all the sects of Christendom. There 
has been a note sounded throughout this celebration of 
Christian unity, and we can, I believe, in Princeton Uni- 
versity, furnish a contribution towards this end ; because 
there we are able to bring together these various faiths of 
Christendom. 

The point of contact between the University and the 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

Theological Seminary today is that of the department of 
philosophy. It is in the department of philosophy that 
most of the Seminary students come to us as graduate 
scholars ; it is in the department of philosophy that the 
questions emerge which are the great central questions, 
not merely of the theology taught by Princeton, but the 
great central questions of life. And I wish to state to you 
who are here today, that as regards the teachings of 
Princeton University, we stand for a spiritualistic phi- 
losophy in an age of materialistic and utilitarian creeds. 
By spiritual philosophy I mean that we would interpret 
the great central humanizing power of the universe not 
merely in terms of Force or of Power— spelling these 
words, if you please, with capital letters— but in the 
name of a person, a person like ourselves. 

I am not afraid, gentlemen, of the charge of anthropo- 
morphism that is so often made. It is urged upon us 
that we should abstractly interpret God, and that we 
should assign to Him only negative attributes. When 
we take the sum total of negative attributes, however 
many there may be, the sum always amounts to zero. In 
the place of that interpretation we would put that of the 
personal significance of God, a spirit whom we can wor- 
ship in spirit and truth. I am not afraid of interpreting 
God according to the highest and best and noblest that 
we find in human nature; man who was made in the 
image of God must be, in the last analysis, the standard 
for the interpretation of God. And that is not humaniz- 
ing the Divine. It is because we recognize in our con- 
sciousness the divine spark, and where we find it aflame 
in the highest and noblest quality of man, we may take 
that as an indication— an intimation, if you please— an 
intimation, if not a definition, of the nature of God. I 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

refer particularly to man as a purposeful being, man as 
you find him today, dominating the whole face of the 
earth. God as a person is a God likewise purposeful in 
the universe. Man is not like the plants and animals, 
incapable of adapting his environment to himself and 
compelling his surroundings. I am not speaking of his 
physical surroundings, but of the moral and mental and 
spiritual surroundings of his life. Is it not the great 
glory of these men who have gone out from this Seminary, 
as they were praised yesterday afternoon, that they have 
not accepted the environment of the world, but have 
gone to the very ends of the earth with the one purpose 
of creating the moral, mental and spiritual environment 
in which the light of reason might shine forth and the 
goodness and glory of God be manifest ? 

The great strife today in philosophy is in reference to 
the doctrine of personality; it is not merely whether 
there is a personal God in the universe, but whether in 
the heart of the human being there is a person or only a 
state of consciousness. 

We stand, in Princeton University, for the central 
doctrine of personality, that the man is a soul, that he is 
a person in a universe of persons. And the one doctrine 
today that grows out of this, which we must insist upon, is 
that the persons of the world are bound together in one 
great family, that we are all one organization. We can- 
not say to man, "Go out into the world and follow the 
law of the animal and plant evolution ; go into the world 
with one creed, one idea, of the survival of the fittest; 
do what you please, do your own work, push forward, 
and let the devil take the hindmost." We insist that 
this is not the doctrine of life. It is not the survival 
of the fittest; it is that other doctrine which has come 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

down to us from the beginning of the Christian centuries, 
that man is in this world, like his Master, "Not to be 
ministered unto, but to minister. ' ' These are some of the 
fundamental doctrines that our philosophy has empha- 
sized, and we believe finally, that all philosophical 
thought culminates in some great system of ethics, the 
philosophy of conduct, and that we cannot have a phi- 
losophy of conduct, as a great German philosopher once 
insisted, without presupposing the fundamental postu- 
lates of God, of freedom and of immortality. 



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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



RESPONSE TO CONGRATULATORY 
ADDRESSES 

BY THE REVEREND FRANCIS LANDEY PATTON, D.D., LL.D. 
President of the Seminary 

MY dear friends, it is the duty of a well instructed 
host to " speed the parting guest", and so I am not 
intending to inflict upon you anything in the way of a 
long speech, but it is my privilege to say a word or two 
before we separate. 

There has been going through my mind, during the 
delivery of these excellent speeches to which we have 
been listening, a verse of the old Scottish version of the 
133rd Psalm: 

"Behold, how good a thing it is, 
And how becoming well ; 
Together such as brethren are, 
In unity to dwell. ' ' 

And amid all the theological diversities and the ecclesias- 
tical differences that have been manifested here, it has 
been delightful to think of the pervasive spirit of unity 
that has characterized our celebration. Not that I, for 
a moment, feel that it is in any sense derogatory to one's 
position or that it interferes at all with the larger charity 
we should have, to feel an interest in a particular form 
of belief, to have theological preferences, or even to par- 
ticipate, for that matter, in theological controversy ; for 

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CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF 

I remember reading, a great many years ago, a very 
interesting book by the Earl of Crawford, the spirit of 
which is very well indicated by its title, "Progress by 
Antagonism". I think the world owes a great deal to 
theological controversy. Creed-statements, it is true, 
have been monuments built upon the battlefields of faith. 
They commemorate victories : but they also serve to pro- 
mote peace ; for they indicate the points in which Chris- 
tians agree as well as the matters in which they differ. 

I think I represent— I am speaking personally now, I 
don't pretend to be official about it— but I think that I 
am the very embodiment of broad church theology in the 
best sense of that phrase when I say that I haven't any 
kind of prejudice against any kind of belief that in any 
kind of way conserves anything that is of intrinsic inter- 
est and permanent value to mankind; and it is one of 
the interesting things connected with this celebration 
that so many men of so many phases of Christian belief 
have come here to join us on this Centennial occasion. 
There are times when it is important for us to emphasize 
points of difference between those who profess and call 
themselves Christians ; times, that is to say, when we feel 
specially called upon, whatever be the denomination to 
which we belong, to protest against what we conceive to 
be error. This, however, is an occasion when it is fitting 
that we should recognize our points of agreement and 
rejoice that we hold so much theological territory in com- 
mon. We have been very much gratified by letters of 
congratulation we have received from our friends in this 
country and our friends across the sea, in fact from all 
parts of the world. Not the least gratifying by any 
means are those that have come to us from Roman Catho- 
lic institutions, regretting that they could not be with us, 
expressing the fact that, of course, they differed with us 

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PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

and we with them, but at the same time recognizing the 
service that Princeton has done in the world in certain 
phases of scientific theology. I wish that representatives 
from some of these institutions had been with us today— 
and there is one such representative— for if they had 
been, I would have said, "Now, my friends, you know I 
differ with you a great deal, but I want to tell you that as 
between the present Pope of Rome and the Modernists, 
I would vote for the Pope of Rome every time. ' ' I will go 
farther and say, that should there ever come a day when 
men use the sacred name of Jesus to disguise sentimental 
atheism, we shall have reason to reckon among the im- 
portant forces in the religious world those organizations 
which lay special emphasis upon the first article of the 
Apostles' Creed, "I believe in God the Father Almighty, 
Maker of heaven and earth". I want to say that so far as 
the theology of Princeton Seminary is concerned— and 
I admit that its peculiarities have not been brought into 
the foreground during this celebration— I think you will 
go away with the conviction that at all events, it is not 
yet actually dead. I do not think that it is even mori- 
bund, but I wish to say that, if it should die and be 
buried, and in the centuries to come, the theological 
palaeontologist should dig it up and pay attention to it, 
he will be constrained to say that it at least belonged to 
the order of vertebrates. 

Oh, gentlemen, you who have come to us over long dis- 
tances by land and sea, you who have come to us from 
other Churches with varying theological convictions, you 
who have come back to sit under the old roof -tree once 
more and to get fresh inspiration from the old Mother, 
we thank you for coming; you have made us glad that 
you have been here, and now, as you go away, God speed 
you on your journey and God bless you in your work. 

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