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Full text of "Centennial cookery book"

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STANDARD HOUSEHOLD REMEDIES ! 



DR. D. JAYNE'S 

FAMILY MEDICINES 



Are prepared with great care, expressly for Family use, and are so admirably 

calculated to preserve health and remove disease that no 

family should be without them. They consist of 

JAYNE'S EXPECTOEANT, for Colds, Coughs, Asthma, Consump- 
tion, and all Pulmonary and Bronchial Affections. It promotes expec- 
toration and allays inflammation. 

JAYNE'S TONIC VERMIFUGE, for Worms, Dyspepsia, Piles, 
General Debility, &c. An excellent Tonic for Children, and a benefi- 
cial remedy in many of the ailments of the young. 

JAYNE'S CARMINATIVE BALSAM, for Bowel and Summer 
Complaints, Colics, Cramp, Cholera, &c. A certain cure for Diarrhoea, 
Cholera Morbus, and Inflammation of the Bowels. 

JAYNE'S ALTERATIVE, of established efficacy in Purifying the 
Blood, and for curing Scrofula, Goitre Dropsy, Salt Rheum, Epilepsy, 
Cancers, and Disease of the Skin and Bones. 

JAYNE'S LINIMENT OR COUNTER-IRRITANT, for Sprains 
Bruises, Soreness in the Bones and Muscles, Rheumatism, and usefu 
in all cases where an external application is required. 

JAYNE'S SANATIVE PILLS, a valuable Purgative and a certain 
cure for all Bilious Affections, Liver Complaints, Costiveness, Dyspep- 
sia, and Sick Headache. 

JAYNE'S HAIR TONIC, for the Preservation, Beauty, Growth 
and Restoration of the Hair. A pleasant dressing for the hair, and a 
useful toilet article. 

JAYNE'S SPECIFIC FOR TAPE WORM, a certain, safe and 
prompt remedy. 

In settlements and localities wJiere the attendance of a Physician cannot 
be readily obtained, Families will find these Remedies of great service. The 
Directions which accompany them are in plain, unprofessional language, eas- 
ily understood by all and, in addition, Jayne's Medical Almanac and Guide 
to Health, to be had gratis of all Agents, contains, besides a reliable Calendar t 
a Catalogue of Diseases, THE SYMPTOMS BY WHICH THEY MAY 
BE KNO WN, together with advice as to the proper remedies to be used. 



All of 

gists gener 

11 



LIBRARY OF. CONGRESS. 

-^pvA 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



ire sold by Drug- 



IDfym 



Pou are ojfereb a paint, anb informed by a dealer 
that it is just as goob as tfye Longman & 2Har= 
tiuc5 paint, buy it quid 5 ; proptbeb that tfye bealer 
is responsible anb nulling to gire you a signeb 
guarantee, in as strong anb forcible language as 
the one n?I)icl] is attact^eb to er>erv gallon of tfye 
* i. 8c 2tt. pure prepareb paints solb only by ID. 
a Sueli 61- Co., marietta, 0. 



THE MARIETTA BOOK STORE. 

E. R. ALDERMAN & SONS, Proprietors. 

C. E. GLINES, Manager. 

CARRIES THE LARGEST LINE OF 

MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS, TEXT BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S ILLUSTRATED BOOKS, 
FINE STATIONERY, ETC., 

OF ANY HOUSE IN THE CITY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR ARTISTS' GOODS AND ARTISTS' SUPPLIES. 
FINE LINES OF PICTURES AND PICTURE FRAMES. 

A FULL LINE OF SMALL MUSICAL GOODS 

AND PIANOS AND ORGANS. 
AGENTS FOR KNABE, EVERETT, HOWARD AND OTHER PIANOS, 

CLOUGH AND WARREN AND THE CHURCH ORGAN. 
GOOD GOODS, CLOSE MARGINS, CASH PAYMENTS. 

Register Building, Marietta, O. 



# f §$ chards > 









%fit druggist, 

2% (greene Si, 






DKaneffa, 0. 




KINGSFORD'S 

SWEGO 




the best in the w9rlb. 

QaAblTY ALWAYS UNIFORM. 

THE 
NEW WRAPPERS MAKING MOST ATTRACTIVE SHELF GOODS. 

KlNGSFORB'S 

Ggrn Starch 

for The Table, 

IS MOST DGLICIOUS FOR PUDDINGS. 

BLHNC MHNG6, CUSTSRDS. GTC. 

AND IS PERFECTLY P«RE. 

Jo Sccarc tl)e flesl — t1)e UnadalteraLed ^rltcle See lt?at 

T. KINGSF9RD & SON, oswego, n. y. 

Is on everq (Jox and everzj package, 



VALENTINES MEAT-JUICE 

ESTABLISHED 1871 BY 

MANN S. VALENTINE, 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, U.S.A. 



REPORT OF THE JUDGES OF THE CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION. 

" For excellence of the method of its preparation, whereby it more nearly 
represents fresh meat than any other extract of meat, its freedom from dis- 
agreeable taste, its fitness for immediate absorption, and the perfection in 
which it retains its good qualities in warm climates." 



TESTIMONIALS. 

New York — J. Marion Sims, M. D. — I prescribe Valentine's 
Meat-Juice daily, and like it better than any preparation of the 
sort I have ever used. 

Philadelphia — D. Hayes Agnew, M. D. — I have been using for 
some time the M fat- Juice prepared by Mr. Valentine, and I think 
with excellent results. 

Plympton, England, January 25, 1887. 

Valentine's Meat-Juice is excellent ; and, I believe, superior 
to any similar preparations of the kind now in use. It will, when 
administered in cold water, be relished and retained by the most 
irritable stomach, when every other kind of food is loathed. I 
shall not fail to use and recommend it. 

J. M. Mister, M. D., F. R. C. S.; 

[Dr. Minter is Hon. Phys. to H. M. the Queen, and Sur'g. Ext. to 
H. R. H. the Prince of Wales.] 

[Translated from the German] 

Berlin, Germany. December 24. 1878. 
The aqueous solution prepared with Valentine's Meat-Juice 
has an agreeable taste, and it acts both, according to its composi- 
tion and the experiments made by ourselves with convalescents 
and delicate persons, as an easily-digested and life-giving remedy. 

Dr. Oscar Leibreich, 
Ord : Professor of Materia Medica in the University of Berlin, and Director 
of the Pharmacological Institute. 

Dr. Rudolf Virchow, 

Ord : Professor of Pathology, Director of the Pathological Institute in the 
University. 

UHLENTINES MEHT-JUICE 

CHN B6 PURCHHS6D OF DRUGGISTS eM6RY3fliH6RS 



' A cyclone is the nearest approach to Dead Shot in its destruc- 
tive power. It makes a clean sweep. 



WHAT TO EAT? 

And How to Cook it, is Most Fully and Accurately Set 
Forth in This Book. 



WHAT TO WEAR? 

And Where to Get it, and How to Make it, are Ques- 
tions Not Less Important. 



S. R. TURNER & CO. 

The Largest and Leading Dry Goods Firm in Marietta 
Will Help You Answer these Questions, Showing You 
an Exceedingly Large and Yaried Stock of All Kinds 
of Goods Pertaining to the DRY GOODS TRADE, and 
Furnishing the Fashion Sheets and Other Publications 
of the Butterick Publishing Co., as a Help in Choice of 
Styles. The Butterick Patterns, of Which they Keep a 
Full Stock, are generally Conceded to be the Most Re- 
liable and Perfect Patterns Published. 



8^° The invasion of your peaceful couch by a horde of blood- 
thirsty savages, may be easily prevented and the enemy utterly de- 
stroyed by the use of Dutcher's Dead Shot. 



SH0RT HINTS 



0N 

S9GIAL ETIQUETTE. 

Compiled from the Latest and Best Works on 
the Subject by "Aunt Matilda." 

PRICE 40 CENTS. 

THIS book should be in every family desirous 
of knowing "the proper thing to do." We 
all desire to behave properly and to know what is 
the best school of manners. What shall we teach 
our children, that they may go out into the world 
well bred men and women? 

"Short Hints" contains the answer and 
will be mailed to any address, postage prepaid on 
receipt of price. 

SPECIAL 

Until further notice we will mail each of our 
friends a copy of the above valuable book grati ? 
and free of postage, if they will mail us 15 wrapper! 
of Dobbins' Electric Soap. 

By folding up the wrappers as you would a 
newspaper, the postage will only be 2 cts. 

Always put your full name and address on the 
outside of the bundle and write the word 'Etiquette' 
also, and then we will know who sends it. 

I. L. GRAGIN & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



(Cfye £)lbest X)ruos f)ouse 

in tDasfyington do. 

WELL AND FAVORABLY KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE SURROUNDING 
COUNTRY, AS THE MOST RELIABLE PLACE FOR 

pure Drugs, 

$inst Spices anb 23est 23afing porober. 

We manufacture our own Baking Powder of 
only the purest materials. Contains absolutely no 
adulterations, and costs from 10 to 20 cents per 
pound less than other first-class Baking Powders. 

Headquarters for all kinds of Paints and Oils, 
French and American Window Glass, Figured and 
Colored Glass, Wall Paper and Window Curtains. 

Agents for Granite Floor Paint and Neil 's 
Ready -Mixed Carriage Paints. 

We have the best equipped Prescription De- 
partment in this section, and great care is exercised 
in preparing Physicians' Prescriptions. 

ID. fy Smll & £0. 

Wholesale and Retail Druggists, 

Ho. 22 $ront Street, marietta, <D. 

PIONEER DRUG STORE. 



>ealth and ^igop fop tfye ©pair-) arad 



©posb^'s 
¥italized 

pl^os-pfytes 

Composed of the Nerve -giving Principles of the 

Ox-Brain and the Embryo of the Wheat 

and Oat. 

^T^HIS is a standard preparation with all physicians who treat 
Cw) mental or nervous disorders. The formula is on every label. 
Its chemical composition is superintended by a Professor of 
Chemistry. 

As it is identical in its composition with brain- matter, it is 
rapidly absorbed, and quickly relieves the depression from intel- 
lectual efforts, fatigue, loss of memory, or mental irritability. Sleep- 
lessness, irritation, nervous exhaustion, inability to work or study, 
•is but a brain -hunger — in urgent cases, brain - starvation. This 
brain nutriment quickly feeds the hungry nerves and restores brain- 
power. It is a cure for nervous disorders and debility. It aids in 
the growth of the brain, the bones, the teeth, the skin, and nails of 
children. It directly aids a child to learn. 

Brain Workers Need Brain Food. 

F. Crosby & Co. 56 WestKthSt - New York. 

For Sale by Druggists; or by Mail in P. O. Order, Bill or Postage Stamps, $1. 




1 POUND 
CAN 


KENTON | RETA ^ F0R 


1-2 POUND 
CAN 


BHKINC 


RETAILS FOR 
10c. 


1-2 POUND 
CAN 


POWDER 


RETAILS FOR 
10c. 



N. B. In regard to this Powder we have to say, there is no better made. 
It has few equals and no superior. We do not except other brands because they 
may cost more money. While the price of Kenton is much less than some, it is 
equal to the most costly in quality. Buy Kenton Powder and you will not only 
save money, but have light, sweet and wholesome bread. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

P0TT6R, PKRLIN & CO. Cincinnati, o. 



FOR SAifcB BY A,4,£, GROCERS. 



KLKCTRIC BRUSHES ETC. 



IDir. SCOTT'S ^ 

ELECTRIC^ORSETSJ.ND BELTS 

Corsets, I Belts, I x nrs i„g Corset. I Abdominal Corset. 

$1.00, 1.50, 2.00, 3.00. | ( VSo. D I P™« $1.50. Price $3.00. 

Our Corsets Are Double Stitched And Will Not Eip. 

If you have any pain, ache, or ill- 
feeling from any cause, if you seem 
"pretty well," yet lack energy and 
do not " feel up to the mark," if you 
suffer from disease, we beg you to at 
once try these remarkable curatives. 
They cannot and do not injure like 
medicine. 

Always doing good, never harm. 
There is no shock or sensation felt in 
wearing them. There is no waiting a 
long time for results ; electro-magnet- 
ism acts quickly ; generally the first 
week, more frequently the first day, 
and often even during the first hour 
they are worn their wonderful cura- 
tive powers are felt. 

The mind becomes active, the 
nerves and sluggish circulation are 
stimulated, and all the old-time 
health and good feeling come back. 
They are constructed on scientific 
principles imparting an exhilerating, 
health-giving current to the whole 
system. Professional men assert that 
there is hardly a disease which Elec- 
tricity or Magnetism may not benefit 
or cure, and they daily practice the 
same, as your own physician will in- 
form you. 

The prices are as follows ; $1, $1.50, 
82 and S3 for the Corsets and $3 each 
for the Belts. The accompanying cut 
(represents our No. 2 or $1.50 Corset. 
We have also a beautiful French- 
shaped Sateen Corset at $3 : a Sateen 
Abdominal Corset, and a short Sateen 
Corset at $2. The $1 and $1.50 goods 
are made of fine Japan, elegant in 
shape, strong and durable. Nursing 
Corsets, $1.50 ; Misses', 75c. All are double stitched. We have a fine linen netting 
Ventilating Corset at $1.50. We make all the above from 18 to 30 inches. The Ab- 
dominal only are made as large as 38. Gent's and Ladies' Belts $3 each ; Ladies' Ab- 
dominal Supporter, an invaluable article, $12. We make all these Corsets in dove 
and white only. They are sent out in a handsome box, accompanied by a silver- 
plated compass, by which the Electro-Magnetic influence can tie tested. We will 
send either kind to any address, postpaid, on receipt of price, with 20 cents added for 
packing or registration ; and we guarantee safe delivery into vour hands. Remit in 
Pi ist-office Money-order, Draft, Check, or in currency by Registered Letterat our risk. 
In ordering, kindly mention This Book and state exact size of corset usually worn. 
Make all remittances payable to GEO. A. SCOTT, 842 Broadway, New York." 

N. B. — Each Corset is stamped with the English coat-of-arms, and the name of 
the Proprietors, THE PALL MALL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION. 

Send for pamphlet of other appliances adapted to all parts of the body. 

A GREAT SUCCESS. 

8®" A Good, Live Canvassing Agent WANTED in vour town for these splendidly 
advertised and best selling goods in the market. LIBERAL PAY, QUICK SALES. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. Apply at once. GEO. A. SCOTT, 842 Broadway, n. Y. 




t> 



CENTENNIAL 

C°°l^ er y Book: 



SOLD FOR THE BENEFIT OF 

THE WOMAN'S CENTENNIAL ASSOCIATION 

OF MARIETTA, OHIO. 
" Ifcrack my brains to find out tempting sauces." 



is 



"Cook, see all your sauces 
Be sharp and poynant in the palate, that they may 
Commend you ; look to your roast and baked meats handsomely, 
And what new kickshaws and delicate made things." 

Beaumont and Fletcher. 



1788. APRIL 7. 1888. 



DEC 22 18< 

N — ; 



/ 



TIMES PRINT, MARIETTA, O. 

1887. 






^7 



V 



'We may live without poetry, music, and art; 

We may live without conscience, and liye without heart ; 

We may live without friends ; we may live without books ; 

But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 

Lord Lytton. 



"The turnpike road to people's hearts I find 
Lies through their mouths, or I mistake mankind." 

Peter Pindrr 



1 1 own that nothing like good chew succeeds." 



" When dinner has opprest one, 

I think it is perhaps the gloomiest hour 

Which turns up out erf the sad- twenty-four. 

Byron, 



Copyright, 1887, 

By Woman's Centennial Association, 

Marietta, Ohio. 



Preface. 



Of making Cook Books there is no end, a*nd it may be 
granted that they are similar. Yet it is believed this book 
will be valuable to any one, as its contents were gathered 
by competent persons from a large number of most experi- 
enced housewives, and the receipes are such, as have been 
thoroughly tried and approved. 

An effort has been made to preserve some of the 
methods of our grandmothers which have fallen into dis- 
use, under change of circumstances, but which are remem- 
bered to have produced most excellent results for the palate. 

Few persons now care to prepare the Pickled Beef, 
Ham and Pork, the Rye and Indian Bread, the pounded 
Biscuit and Crackers, the Home brewed Beer of the early 
part of the century, but to those who remember these things 
they have never been surpassed for goodness, and there is a 
suspicion that like the great Artist's colors the old recipes 
were " mixed with brains." 

In this day of tracing pedigrees, it may be interesting 
to enquire whence came the traditions of Cookery in this 
vicinity? There can be little doubt they were English, 
and were brought over by our Puritan mothers, in the 
May Flower; they were transmitted from mother to daugh- 
ter almost unchanged for the hundred and fifty years of 
New England housewifery before the Ohio Company brought 
our patient, enduring grandmothers to another wilderness 
of new difficulties. 

As to the cook's materials in the first years. The woods 
supplied game in abundance, but the fruits, vegetables, and 
grains of their old homes were lacking, and ingenuity must 



xvi PREFACE. 



have been sorely taxed to produce a variety. It was at this 

time that one of the first settlers said of his wife : " Mrs. 

can make the best victuals out of nothing of any one I ever 
saw." The French chef can claim no higher praise. While 
in the main our cookery was English, yet some good dishes 
were local and peculiar. 

Succotash, Pumpkin Bread and Baked Squash were no 
doubt inventions of the First Settlers, and long may their 
memory live! 

A gentleman who had traveled far and wide, used to 
say that in Marietta were blended most happily the best of 
Northern and Southern ideas of cookery. There were here 
in early times some Southern families and some famous 
cooks. "Old Gin" and "Daphne" are names which recall 
the good things that make the mouth water. 

Some excellent German dishes have been introduced. 
Especially have they taught us the use of salads, which are 
now indispensable. 

Some change in culinary matters took place, under the 
influence of several Eastern housekeepers who were accus- 
tomed to the more finished habits of Boston and New York, 
and who introduced among us many new dishes of the 
lighter kinds and also some more modern ideas in arrang- 
ing tables and serving food. 

Our housewives have not departed from the teaching 
of their mothers. Order, system and cleanliness are still 
practiced, together with a high regard for the pleasures of 
the palate. 

They have vied with each other in making the table 
attractive, and it is to-day no small epicurean treat to be 
invited to a Ladies' Luncheon, where the hostess, the china, 
linen, flowers and viands all combine to charm the senses. 

M. N. B. 



Breads, Yeast, Hot Cakes, etc. 



" The very staff' of life 
The comfort of the husband, the pride of the wife," 

" And then to breakfast with 
What appetite you have." 



APPLE JOHNNIE CAKE. 

MRS. LAURA CHAMBERLAIN. 

One pint sour milk, 1J pint New Orleans molasses, 1 teaspoonful 
soda, 2 teaspoonsful cream tartar, 1 egg well beaten, 2 tablespoonsful 
melted lard. Peel, core, and chop fine, 3 large Eusset apples, corn meal 
enough to make a stiff batter. Place a paper in the bottom of a well- 
greased pan, bake f of an hour in a moderate oven, as it burns easily. 

MRS. GOVERNOR MEIGS'S BREAD. 1830. 

DAPHNE C. SQUIRES. 

Sift about 4 quarts of flour in a bread-bowl, add 2 teaspoons of 
salt, J pint of (Daphne's) yeast, 1 pint of luke warm milk, stir in just 
enough of the flour to make a thin batter. Do this the night before. 
Set this in the brick oven (in winter) to rise till morning. Then add 
to it $ pint of warm milk, stirring in gradually the moderately warm 
flour, till the batter is nearly thick enough to knead. Put it in a warm 
place for an hour and a half, then knead it a good^while, then put it in 
a warm place to rise again, then bake it. In the^summer use water in- 
stead of milk. A little piece of butter makes bread more tender and 
it is well to add a little saleratus (dissolved in water) just before it is 
set to rise the last time. 

BREAD. 

MISS MARTHA PUTNAM. 

Four quarts flour, 1 quart milk or water, 1 tablespoon lard or 
butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tea cup yeast. Put the flour into a large 
bowl, make a deep hollow and pour in the above, and keep in 
a warm place. When light mix and knead well. In an hour or two 
it should be light- Work into loaves and in another hour it should 
be ready for baking. 
1 



2 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

BREAD. 

MRS. CAROLINE DANA DAWES, LINCOLN, NEB. 

Three tablespoons of flour, scald with boiling water enough to 
make a batter, when milk warm add two or three spoonsful of yeast, a 
teaspoonful of sugar and a teaspoonful of salt; this will rise in 15 or 20 
minutes, then use this for making your sponge, — soak your dried yeast 
with milk instead of water. The more you beat the sponge the better 
it is; when you mold up your bread the first time work it a good deal, 
pull and stretch as well as knead the dough. When you make it out 
the last time only mold enough to shape. When potato is used for 
making sponge use equal quantities of potato and flour. After making 
out light biscuits dip them in melted butter before baking. If you use 
milk in mixing up your bread, you will not need any other shortening. 

BREAD. 

MRS. JOHN L. BLYMYER, MANSFIELD, O. 

Three pints milk, scald it well, 1 tablespoon of lard or butter, 1 
tablespoon of sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 cake of Fleischman's yeast 
dissolved in a half cup of water, when cool add yeast and mix up stiff, 
cover well, let it stand all night in a warm place, then work up twice. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One cup of rye meal, 2 cups of corn meal, 3 cups of sour milk 
(scant), \ cup molasses, 1 tablespoon of soda, 1 teaspoon of salt. Dis- 
solve the soda in the sour milk. Steam four hours and bake twenty 
minutes. 

BOSTON TEA CAKE. 

MRS. NAHUM WARD. 

One and a half pints flour, 3 eggs, f pint of sweet milk, £ tea cup 
of white sugar (or less), 3 teaspoons of baking powder, \ teaspoon of 
. salt. Beat the eggs, melt the butter in the milk, bake quickly, say 25 
minutes. Split and butter, and eat while hot. 

LIGHT BREAD (using potato ball). 

MRS. A. W. KING. 

In the evening take 1 pint warm, mashed potatoes, add a large 
spoonful of white sugar, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 1 small cup of potato 
ball,*if the potatoes are dry add a little water, (you can use potatoes 
left from dinner). Set this in a warm place till morning, then take 1 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 3 

quart of warm water, make a thick batter by adding flour and pota- 
toes, except a cupful which must be saved for the next baking. When 
the sponge rises thicken with flour. Let it rise and mould into loaves. 
This makes two large loaves. If 3 loaves are wanted, add another 
pint of water when making sponge. This is much easier and quicker 
made than yeastbread, and (if kept in a cool place) the potato ball 
need not be renewed. The potato ball is made two or three days be- 
fore baking, in this way: take a pint of mashed potatoes (warm), 1 
teaspoonful of salt, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 1 cake of compressed 
yeast or any good yeast. 

BUNS. 

MISS MARY STONE. 1830. 
Hub 4 ounces of butter into 2 pounds of flour, a little salt and 4 
ounces of sugar, 1 dessertspoonful of caraway seed and 1 teaspoonful 
of ginger. Put some warm milk or cream to 4 tablespoonsful of yeast. 
Mix all together into a paste, but not too stiff. Cover it over and set 
it before the fire an hour. After this has risen make it into buns. 
Put them in bake pans and set them where it is warm for 15 minutes, 
to rise. Then brush them over with very warm milk, and bake them 
in a moderate oven. 

DELICIOUS BROWN BREAD. 

MISS MARY CUTHBERT. 

One quart of sponge (white), f of a cup of molasses. Work it 
stiff with brown flour. This will make two loaves. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. H. D. FEARING, AMHERST, MASS. 

One cup of molasses, 2 cups of water, 3 cups of sour milk, 3 cups 
of rye flour, 4 cups of corn meal, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt. 
Steam 3£ hours and bake one. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. LAUEA CHAMBERLAIN. 

One pint sour milk, £ pint molasses, 1 pint brown flour, 1 teaspoon 
salt and 2 teaspoons soda. 

BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. WM. PITT PUTNAM. 

Two quarts corn meal, 1 quart Graham flour, 1 tea cup Orleans 
molasses, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 pint sponge made as 



4 Centennial Cookery Book. 

for light bread. Scald one-half the corn meal, mix the whole with 
tepid water as stiff as you can stir ; let it rise, dip into pans and let 
rise again, bake two hours. When baked in brick oven this was al- 
lowed to remain all night and was served hot for breakfast. 

BROWN LOAF. 
MRS. SARAH GUITTEAU NYE. 

Three cups brown flour, 3 cups corn meal, 1 cup molasses, 1 quart 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda. Boil 3 hours. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. H. L. HART. 

Two cups corn meal, 1 cup Graham flour, 3 cups sour milk, § cup 
molasses, 1 dessertspoon soda, a little salt. Boil 3 hours. 

BROWN BREAD (Steamed.) 
MRS. SHAW. 

One pint sour milk, § pint bread crumbs, J cup of molasses, 1 tea- 
spoon of salt, 1 pint corn meal (or brown flour,) a heaping teaspoon 
of soda. Steam 2 hours and bake until a crust forms — perhaps half 
an hour. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

MRS. DR. SAMUEL HART. 

Three cups sour milk, 2 cups corn meal, 1 cup Graham flour, § cup 
molasses, 1 dessertspoon soda, a little salt. Steam in a kettle over 
the fire. I use 1 pound baking powder cans with cover, then cover all 
closely. Steam 3^ hours. 

BROWN MUFFINS. 

MRS. ROLSTON. 

One pint of milk, 3 eggs, 1 spoonful of lard, a large spoonful of 
molasses, 3 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 quart of flour. 

MUFFINS. 

MRS. DR. SAMUEL HART. 

One egg, J cup butter and lard mixed, melted and poured into 1 
pint sweet milk, 2 tablespoons baking powder, add flour enough to 
make a batter, not too stiff. These are excellent made of Graham 
flour. 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 5 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

MRS. DR. SAMUEL HART. 

Two eggs, 1 pint sour milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, \ teaspoon soda, 
£ teaspoon salt, 1 dessertspoon lard or butter, 1 cup corn meal, £ cup 
flour. Bake in a quick oven. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS. 

MRS. W, W. MILLS. 

One quart of flour, into which rub thoroughly 2 tablespoonsful of 
lard, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 3 teaspoonsful of baking powder sifted with 
the flour, milk enough to make a very soft dough, roll and cut. \our 
oven should be hot enough for your biscuits to bake in 10 minutes. 

CRUSHED WHEAT. 

Contributed at request of a younj gentleman by 
MRS. W. H. BUELL. 

Get the screened wheat from the mill. Break the grains in coffee 
or spice mill, pick out the black specks which are the hull of another 
seed than the wheat. To a measure of the wheat add 3 measures of 
water, let it soak over night. Unless you have a kettle with water 
bath made for the purpose put the wheat in a tin bucket which allows 
for a'great deal of swelling, put the tin in a kettle of cold or tepid water 
and bring slowly to the boiling poiat, where it should be kept steadily 
from 4 to 6 hours. The wheat will take a surprising amount of w r ater 
and should not be allowed to dry off, but kept fluid by adding hot 
water from the tea kettle. The water bath should be kept as high as 
the wheat in the inner kettle. The quality prized by those who like 
this dish is due to the long, steady, slow cooking of the same. It should 
be poured into small bowls and cups to mould and is better two or 
three days after it is cooked. 

Moses Smith sat by one day when the pot was bubbling and scald- 
ing, and sagely remarked : " It's my opinion that stuff is good to eat, if 
you have plenty of good things to eat with it," which is a fair state- 
ment of the case. 

Thick cream is essential to its goodness. Most people eat it with 
sugar, but to some it is more digestible with cream alone. 

HOME-MADE CRACKERS. 

MRS. WM. PITT PUTNAM. 1830. 

One quart light bread dough, butter or lard, size of an egg, 1 tea- 
spoon of soda, dissolved. Work in all the flour possible and beat on a 



6 Centennial Cookery Book. 

solid table until smooth, then take a piece, size of a walnut and work 
round and smooth with the thumb and finger, roll round, prick deeply, 
and bake at once. After baking keep in a warm 'oven for several 
hours. 

CRACKER TOAST. 

Heat your crackers in the stove oven. Take 1 pint of milk, 1 tea- 
spoon salt, butter the size of a walnut, boil and pour over the crack- 
ers. Cover well and let stand 2 minutes, before serving to the table. 

WAFFLES. 

MRS. DR. SAMUEL HART. 

Three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, 1 large tablespoon 
butter, h teaspoon soda, a pint of salt, 1 quart of flour with milk 
enough to make a batter. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. DR. SAMUEL HART. 

Four pints flour, 2 pints sugar, 4 eggs, butter the size of an egg, 6 
teaspoons bakirjg powder. Beat the eggs in a pint cup then fill it with 
sweet milk. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

MRS. C. S. HALE. 

One pint of sour milk, 2 teaspoon of soda, 1 pint of cornmeal, 1 
egg, a little salt, 1 tablespoon of melted lard. Bake in sheets, or gem 
pans. 

"EVERY DAY CORN BREAD." 

MRS'. GEORGE DANA. 

Two or 3 eggs, 1 quart buttermilk (sour), 2 small teaspoons soda, 
1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon melted butter or lard. Add sifted 
corn meal to make a batter which can be poured (just poured) from 
the jar. Bake quickly in a hot oven. Have your pans hot before 
putting in the bread. 

CORN CAKES. 

DAPHNE. 

Sift meal in a pan. Pour over it some scalding hot water, not 
enough to thoroughly wet the meal. Four or five eggs, whites and 
yellows beaten separately. Milk sufficient to make thin batter. Bake 
on a hot griddle. 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 7 

TIP -TOP CORN BREAD. 

ELIZA. 

PGt some butter in a pan and boil it. Pour \ this on your meal, 
add 1 pint sour milk, 1 teaspoon saleratus, 3 eggs. Bake in shallow 
pans. 

DROP CAKES. 

MRS. RHODES. 

One pint sweet milk, 1 quart flour, a little salt, 2 teaspoonsful 
baking powder, melt lard, the size of a large egg and pour in when all 
is well beaten, drop on an iron pan, rubbed well but not greased, and 
bake quickly. Drop so far apart that they will not run together. 

FRENCH TOAST OR FRENCH BREAD. 

MRS. ISRAEL WATERS. 

Four eggs, 1£ pints milk, 3 tablespoons flour, 1 teaspoon salt. Dip 
the bread in this mixture and fry in a pan with butter and lard. 

Another: One egg, 1 teacup of milk, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
of flour. 

FRITTERS. 

MRS. ISRAEL WATERS. 

One pint milk, 1 quart flour, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Fry in hot lard. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 
A HOUSEKEEPER. 

Into 1 quart of sifted flour: Rub 2 rounded tablespoonsful of 
shortening (1 of butter and 1 of lard), then add 2 well-beaten eggs, 
1 tea cup of yeast, and a little salt and sweet milk enough to make 
a dough. Then set to rise ; let it stand till ready to make into rolls. 

If wanted for tea, make up in the middle of forenoon. If wanted 
for breakfast, make up at 3 P. M. and make into rolls, at bed-time. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 
MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

Two tea cups of Graham flour, 1 tea cup of sweet milk, 1 egg, 1 
spoonful of sugar, salt, 1 spoonful of melted butter, 3 teaspoonsful 
baking powder. Bake in muffin rings. 



8 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

MISS MARTHA PUTNAM. 

One pint and a half of light sponge, scald half a tea cup of sweet 
milk, when cooled, stir into the sponge with a very little soda, and 
two or three tablespoons of sugar (more, if wished sw r eeter), Graham 
flour enough to make stiff enough to pour into the bake pan. Do not 
stir Graham flour more than necessary to mix well, as it makes it 
dry. Let it stand in a warm place till very light. If this quantity is 
made in one loaf it should bake about one hour. 

HARESA. 

MRS. E. W. LABAREE, PERSIA. 

Cut into small pieces a fat chicken, from which the skin, heart, 
liver, etc., have been removed. Put into a large kettle with nearly a 
quart of hulled wheat and three or four quarts of water. Let it boil 
uncovered on the back of the stove six or eight hours, taking care 
that it does not scorch. If it becomes too stiff, add water from the tea- 
kettle. Do not salt it. At night, set aside in the kettle, and when it 
is again put on to the stove in the morning, take out the bones and 
beat until the meat is shredded and smoothly mixed with the wheat. 
Just before serving stir in a handful of salt. When dished, pour over 
the top a little melted butter, and thickly sift over it ground coriander 
seed. It should be of the consistency of mush. Cracked wheat with 
the fine part sifted out will answer in place of the whole grain. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. 

MRS. R03SITER. 

Rather more than 1 cup of sugar, butter the size of an egg, 1 pint 
sweet milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream of tartar, 1 quart of 
berries. Mix to a thick batter, and bake in a quick oven. 

INDI1N BREAD. 

MRS. JOHN EATON. 

Scald with boiling water 1 pint of corn meal. When cool, add to 
this about a cup of molasses, salt, a small piece of butter or lard, or no 
shortening at all and yeast, then enough flour to make a pretty stiff 
dough, work well and set to rise. In the morning make into pans to 
rise again before baking. Do not have the oven too hot at first. 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 9 

LIGHT ROLLS. 

MRS. HARRIET NYE TOWNE. 

One and a half cup milk, 1 beaten egg, 1 cup yeast, 1 tablespoon 
white sugar, butter size of an egg. Make as stiff as can be stirred with 
a spoon. Roll out in the morning by merely flouring the board and 
pressing out with the rolling pin until you can use a cutter. 

LIGHT ROLLS— very nice. 

MRS. MARY MCCLELLAN ADAMS. 

Three or four potatoes boiled and mashed up fine in the water 
they are boiled in. To one pint of this potato water put in half a tea. 
cupful of home made yeast and let this stand until it is very light, all 
frothy on the top. Then make your sponge with the raised potato 
water. Put in two tablespoonsful of white powdered sugar, the 
whites of two eggs beaten stiff, and lard the size of an egg, with a lit- 
tle salt. When this is well raised, work it into a dough, not very stiff 
and let it rise. Then work it again twenty minutes and let it again 
rise. Then work it again twenty minutes, and cut out your rolls not 
making them very stiff. 

LAPLAND, or BREAKFAST CAKES. 

MRS. MCCANDISH. 

One quart of flour, 1 quart of milk, 1 large tablespoonful of butter 
and lard mixed, 4 eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately. Bake, 
in a quick oven. Cut in shapes. — Norfolk. 

LAPLAND CAKES FOR BREAKFAST or TEA. 

MRS. PLUNKETT. 

One pint cream, 1 pint flour, 6 eggs, a little salt. Baked in shallow 
tins, so small as not to have to cut them. 

DAPHNE'S MUFFINS. 

Warm 1 quart of sw'eet milk with a piece of butter 6ize of 2 eggs, 
beat 6 eggs (yolks and whites together), and mix with the milk, a little 
flour and salt, nearly J pint of yeast, thick with flour, as can be stirred. 
Made in the evening before, set to rise (for breakfast) in some w 7 arm 
place, in winter. If necessary, stir in a very little saleratus and water, 
a quarter of an hour before baking. These are stiff enough to bake as 
drop cakes without rings. Make a little thinner batter if you use 
rings. 



10 Centennial Cookery Booh. 



MUFFINS. 

MRS. HENRIETTE DEVOL KNOWLES. 

Either while or Graham flour, 1 egg, J cup of sugar, 1 cup milk 
(sweet), butter size of an egg, 2 teaspoons of baking powder, flour to 
make stiff enough to chop in rings without spreading. Thoroughly 
mix the baking powder with the flour. Melt the butter and mix well 
with sugar and egg. Add the milk gradually, then stir in the flour. 

LENA DE STEIGUER'S FLOUR MUFFINS. 

One quart flour, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
salt; add water to make stiff batter as is usual for muffins. Use as 
cold water as possible and beat well. 

MUFFINS. 

MRS. T. H. HAWKS. 

One tablespoon melted butter, 1 egg, 1J cup of flour) \ cup of 
sweet milk", 2 teaspoons baking powder. Bake quickly in gem pans. 

MUFFINS (raised). 

MRS. LAURA NEAL NYE. 

Two eggs, 2 ounces of butter, 1 quart of flour, a teaspoonful of 
salt, 1 pint of sweet milk, 1 gill of yeast. Mix over night and in the 
morning it will be ready to drop into the muffin pans. Bake quickly. 

MARYLAND BISCUIT. 

MRS. SLACK. 

One quart flour, 2 tablespoonsful lard, a little salt, mix with cold 
water taking care to make it very stiff, pound a half hour (more or 
less) until the dough gets very white and blisters and will snap when 
a piece is broken off, then break off into pieces of even size, work into 
biscuits, pressing in the middle with the thumb and finger, stick twice 
with a fork. Bake quick. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Two quarts of flour, 1 pint sweet milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 
tablespoons butter, \ cup yeast, scald the milk, and after it is cool add 
ingredients. Make a hole in the flour and let it stand till morning. 
Mould it, then let it rise till noon, then make into rolls to rise for 
supper. 



Bread, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 11 



POCKETBOOKS. 

MRS. SLACK. 

Take a piece of bread dough about as large as a pint bowl, 2 eggs, 
1 tablespoonful of lard, add enough flour to make it as stiff as it was 
before. Work well. Let it rise, and if too light work it down. An 
hour or so before baking, spread it out on the bread board and sprinkle 
over it a dessertspoonful of ( sugar, and a quarter of a teaspoonful of 
soda, dissolved in a little water, work well again, roll thin and grease 
the surface with butter, cut out and double the buttered sides together, 
put in baking pans and let rise again. Bake in quick oven. 

PUMPKIN BREAD. 

MRS. STONE. 

Stew pumpkins as for pies, not quite dry, stir into the pot in 
which it was cooked, sugar to sweeten about as for corn bread, a tea- 
spoonful of salt, and corn meal to make it as stiff as you can stir with 
a spoon. Do this at nine o'clock in the morning. Cut a paper to fit 
the bottom of your bread pan, then butter another one to cover the 
bottom and sides, put in the bread mixture and bake two hours in a 
slow oven, when it gets slightly brown cover it, when done keep at 
the back of the oven till tea time. To be eaten hot with butter. Suf- 
ficient pumpkin to fill a six quart kettle would, when stewed make 
about enough, with the meal, to fill a four quart bread pan. 

POPOVERS. 

MRS. FRAZYER. 

Two eggs, 2 cups of milk, butter size of a nutmeg. Fry in hot lard 
and serve with sauce. 

POPOVERS. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

One quart of milk, butter the size of an egg, melt the butter, 2J 
teaspoonsful baking powder, yolks of six eggs well beaten, 1 quart of 
sifted flour, whites of six eggs well beaten. Bake in hot, well greased, 
irons — in a quick oven. 

DAPHNE'S POTATO BISCUITS. 

Boil and mash four potatoes and rub together with 1 quart of 
flour, 1 tablespoonful of butter, add salt, milk enough to mould easily. 
"Warm the milk and stir it with potatoes, flour, etc., add 1 tea cup of 



12 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

yeast. Knead 15 to 20 minutes. Let it rise till light, and then form 
into biscuits, with as little kneading as possible, let them rise 1£ hours 
or longer. Bake quickly. 

EICE CAKE. 

MRS. DR. COTTON. 1859. 

One pint of ground rice, 1 pint of flour, 3 eggs, piece of butter size 
of an egg, 1 tablespoon quick yeast, 1 tablespoon sugar, a little salt, 
and milk enough to make a thick batter. Beat a good while and bake 
30 minutes. Use Durkee's Chemical yeast. 

EOLLS. 

MRS. H. L. HART. 

Two quarts flour, make a hole in the top, put in a piece of butter 
size of an egg, a little salt and a tablespoonf ul of white sugar ; pour 
over this a pint of milk previously boiled and cooled and one-half tea- 
cup of good yeast. When the sponge is light, mould for 15 minutes. 
Let it rise again and cut into round cakes. Butter on one side and 
turn over on itself. Bake in a quick oven. 

STEAMED BREAD. 

MRS. J. H. HOBBS. 

One pint of milk, 2 cups meal, 1 cup brown flour, $ cup molasses, 
1 teaspoon of soda, 1 teaspoon salt. Steam 3 hours. Bake long enough 
to form a crust. Can stand over night to bake in the morning for 
breakfast. Steam this 3^ hours if you do not wish to bake it. Let it 
stand two minutes with a thick cloth over it, after taking it from the 
steamer and it will not stick to the pan. 

SPLIT CAKE. 

MRS. JAMES HOLDEN. 

One pint of sour milk, 1 tablespoonful of lard, melted, 1 table- 
spoonful of butter, melted, a pinch of salt, 1 teaspoonful of soda, flour 
just enough to roll out. Bake thick enough to split, and butter for 
the table. 

NEW ENGLAND SHORT CAKE. 

MRS. HOLDEN. 

One pint of sifted flour, J teaspoonful salt (scant), £ teaspoonful 
soda, one full teaspoonful cream tartar, £ cup of butter, measured after 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 13 

smoothing lump. Mix salt, soda and cream of tartar with the flour 
and sift twice. Rub in the butter until fine like meaL or, if liked very 
short and crisp, melt the butter, and add hot with the milk ; add the 
milk gradually, mixing and cutting with a knife; divide into two 
parts, roll gently until about the size of a pie plate. Bake. Cut round 
the edge. Tear open and spread with softened butter. Fruit may be 
spread on if you like. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

MRS. J. L. RECKARD. 

For each cake allow 1 pint flour, 1 heaping teaspoon baking pow- 
der, shortening the size of an egg. Sift the powder thoroughly into 
the flour ; rub in the lard, salt. Make a soft dough with sweet milk, 
roll and bake on a pie pan. Split and butter well. Have ready a 
quart of strawberries and f cup sugar. Divide the berries between 
the middle and top, sprinkling over the sugar. Serve with sugar and 
cream. 

DAPHNE'S SALLY LUNN. 

One and a half pounds flour, 2 ounces of butter, warmed in 1 pint 
milk, 1 tablespoon salt, 3 well-beaten eggs, 2 tablespoons fresh yeast. 
Set to rise. Eat hot with butter. 

SALLY LUNN. 
MRS. I. H. NYE. 

Seven cups flour, h cup butter, warm, in 1 pint sweet milk, 3 eggs, 
4 tablespoons yeast, salt. Let raise four or five hours. 

SALLY LUNN. 

MRS. ARIUS NYE. 

One cup milk, 1 pint flour, 3 teaspoonsful baking powder, 1 large 
spoonful of sugar, 1 egg, 1 lump of butter size of an egg, 1 salt spoon 
salt. 

SPONGE FOR BREAD. 

Sponge should be mixed in a thick stone or earthen bowl. From 
2^ measures of flour to one of netting. Make your gponge at night, 
cover close and set in a warm place till morning. Pour a coffee cup 
of boiling water into the sponge in the morning, stirring all the time, 
then work in flour, and knead it three or four minutes, make into 
loaves, put in pans, prick it with a fork and set it to rise ; when light, 
it cracks open upon the top, and I put it on the oven to bake. 



14 Centennial Cookery Book. 

TEA CAKES. 
MRS. C. B. WELLS. 

One cup sugar, 1 tablespoonful butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 
3 pints flour, 2 teaspoonsful baking powder. 

VINEYARD CORN BREAD. 

MRS. E. G. BRIGHAM. 

One cup sweet milk, 1 cup corn meal, 1 cup flour, £ cup white sugar, 
1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream of tartar, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 egg. 
Place flour, meal, sugar, cream of tartar in a large dish. Dissolve the 
soda in the milk. After mixing the flour, etc. add »half the milk and 
the egg. Beat thoroughly and add the rest of the milk. Beat thor- 
oughly again and bake as for layer cakes in a quick oven. (This quan- 
tity makes two layers), place one layer on the other, serve hot, cut in 
pie shaped pieces. 

MONTANA WAFFLES. 

MRS. T. A. WICKES, MONTANA. 

Three-fourths cup yeast, 1 quart loppered milk, 3 tablespoonsful 
white sugar, 1 tablespoonful lard, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoonful salt, I teaspoon- 
ful soda, flour to make soft batter. Leaving out soda, mix, to rise over 
night. Dissolve soda in 1 tablespoonful boiling water, and add jyst 
before baking in hot greased irons, beating the batter thoroughly. 

WAFFLES. 

MRS. JOHNSON WELCH, ATHENS. 

One and a half pints of sour milk, 1J pints of flour, 1 teaspoonful 
of salt, 1 large spoonful of butter, 3 eggs, whites well beaten, 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda. Beat together quickly, and cook a nice crispy brown 
over a hot fire. 

WAFERS. 

MRS. WHEELER, KENTUCKY. 

One quart of flour, 1 tablespoonful of butter and lard mixed (or 
3 ounces of butter and lard.) Mix with cold water to a stiff dough. 
Leave one-half of a pint of flour out of the quart of flour to work and 
beat into the dough. Beat and knead until it is smooth and blisters, 
then take a small piece of the dough and roll it as thin as you can and 
prick with a fork all over to keep it from blistering. Bake in a quick 
oven. 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc. 15 

YEAST. 

"Hear ye not the hum of mighty workings." 

MRS. EDGKHTOX. 

Six potatoes, one handful hops, tied in a thin cloth, 1 gallon water. 
Potatoes and hops hoiled separately, same length of time. After boil- 
ing peel and mash potatoes, then strain both potatoes and hops 
through a colander. Afterwards add 1 teacup of salt, 1 teacup sugar, 
and when sufficiently cool, add 1 cup of yeast. Keep in a warm place 
twelve hours. Next morning it will be ready to bottle in glass fruit 
jars with cork stoppers. 

MRS. MEIGS'S YEAST. 

daphne's. 

Boil 1 handful of hops in 1 quart of water for some time. Pour 
this (through a sieve) on to £ pint of sifted flour, (or in winter on to 
mashed potatoes). Stir in more flour and beat out all the lumps. 
Have a sweet, clean crock and put in the yeast with 2 tablespoonsful 

(at least), of the old yeast. In the winter set it near the fire to rise. 

* 

YEAST. 

MRS. GEO. DANA. 

^ Three quarts water, 8 potatoes size of an egg (pared), 1 teacup 
hops in a bag, 1 teacup salt, 1 teacup sugar. Boil the potatoes and 
mash them and when cool add the yeast. Keep in a jug, corked. 

YEAST. 

MISS MARTHA PUTNAM. 

Six good-sized potatoes boiled in 1 quart water, mash through a 
colander. Steep a handful of hops in 1 quart of water, and pour over 
potatoes, 1 teacup of sugar, 1 teacup coarse salt. "When milk warm 
add £ cup yeast. This will not run over when light, only bubble. 
Keep in glass closely covered: no soda is needed with this yeast, 
though the dough may have a sharp odor. 

NANCY'S YEAST. 

MRS. FRAZYER. 

One handful of hops to about 4 quarts of water.' Boil down to 3 
quarts 5 tablespoonsful of sifted flour in a jar. Pour upon it the hop 
water strained through a colander. Boil 4 potatoes, mash and strain 



16 Centennial Cookery Book. 

them and the water they were boiled in ; 1 teaspoon salt, £ cup sugar. 
When cool add 1 teacup of good yeast. Set in a warm place and let 
rise. Then put in a cool place. 1 cup of yeast for two loaves. 

YEAST RECEIPT. 

MRS. D. W. SHARPE. 

Eight good sized potatoes, boil, peel and mash fine, 2 handsful of 
hops, boiled till strength all out, then strain them. 1 cup salt, 1 cup 
sugar, 1 gallon boiling soft water, 1 tablespoonful of ginger. When 
cool put in your starting yeast. Let it stand 24 hours, then put away 
air tight. Use £ pint for 6 large loaves. 



Roasts, Broils, Mealpies and Fish. 17 

Roasts, Broils, Meatpies and Fish. 



" Relations always expect Meat for Breakfast" 



HOW TO BROIL STEAK. 

At the time of placing the steak over the fire, put into the oven a 
dripping pan large enough to hold the steak without folding. As soon 
as the steak is lightly browned on both sides, transfer it to the hot pan 
and hot oven, w T here, if it be thick, it will need to remain from 5 to 10 
minutes. 

Another Way : Let your frying pan get smoking hot, lay your steak 
in smoothly without any grease or butter. It will stick fast at first 
but as soon as it is browned it can be loosened with a knife. When the 
juice begins to appear turn it over, press closely to the pan when 
turned, turn it every quarter of a minute until done, then pepper and 
salt, pressing in the butter upon a hot platter. Some add a tablespoon 
of coffee to make some gravy, pour in the pan and let it boil up. 

" Keep the broiling pan piping hot all the time the meat is cook- 
ing." — Mrs. Ewing. 

TO MOCK BROIL A CHICKEN IN AN OVEN. 

Prepare a chicken as for broiling, by being opened down the back, 
wash in cold water and wipe dry with a soft cloth, flatten the breast 
bone with a mallet, twist the wings back to expose the breast, then 
place the chicken skin up in a dripping pan, press it close to the pan 
to make it lie as flat as possible, then put in a hot oven. In five min- 
utes it will begin to sputter, in 20 or 25 minutes it will be cooked 
ready for seasoning upon a heated platter with pepper, salt and butter. 
— Mrs. E. P. Ewing. 

Have the oven just as hot as the chicken will bear without 
burning. 

ROAST BEEF. 

M. T. PEDDINGHAUS. 

Put beef in a hot oven, do not salt until almost done. A moderate 
oven will make tender beef tough, a quick bake without salt will insure 
a tender juicy roast. 
2 



18 Centennial Cookery Book. 

EECIPE FOR BRINE. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Five pounds salt, 5 pounds sugar, 12 quarts water, 2 ounces salt- 
petre, boil, skim and pour over the meat while hot. 

A GOOD BRINE FOR BEEF. 

MRS. W. H. GURLEY. 

For 100 pounds of beef take 9 pounds of salt, 3 pounds of sugar, 2 
ounces of soda, 2 ounces of saltpetre, put all into six gallons of water 
and boil, place the beef in a clean vessel and pour the mixture over 
hot. 

ACCEPTABLE SUMMER DISHES— (Braised Beef.) 

Take a piece of rump of beef, or the chuck roast, weighing six 
pounds, run several strips of fat pork through the lean part with a 
large larding needle, bind it into shape with tape, put it into a brais- 
ing pan, if you have it, if not, into a pot with a close-fitting lid. 

Put two ounces of butter, half a teaspoonful of pepper and three 
tablespoonsful of salt into the pot, cover it, put it over a slow fire for 
half an hour, stirring it all round twice, then add a quart of water, 
leave it to very slowly cook for an hour and a half longer, then add 
three dozen button onions and two dozen very young carrots or large 
ones cut into several pieces and shaped like young ones, place these 
around the meat, make a bouquet of five branches of parsley, two bay 
leaves and two sprigs of thyme tied together; half an hour later add 
two dozen tiny young turnips or large white ones cut into balls. Let 
it now stew gently an hour and a half longer, making altogether four 
hours. 

Take out the meat, remove tapes and trim it. Take up the vege- 
tables and lay them in neat rows around the meat, the onions first, 
then the carrots, then the turnips. Put them to keep hot. Throw 
half a cup of ice water into the gravy to make it easy to skim, then 
take off all the grease. Stir in a tablespoonful of brown thickening 
(or of butter and flour and color with caramel if you have none ready) 
and a small teaspoonful of sugar. Stir gently, and when just boiling 
pour it round the meat through a strainer. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

MRS. PILLSBURY. 

Soak salt fish in cold water, cut in pieces and put on the stove, 
let them come to a boil. Then drain off the water, draining off water 



Roasts, Broils, Meatpies and Fish. 19 

several times, then pick it up, having potatoes ready. Chop together 
J fish and £ potatoes. Beat one egg and mix in balls and fry in hot 
lard. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

MRS. C. V. CRAM. 

Pick fine 1 quart of codfish, let it simmer on the back of the 
stove 15 minutes, then boil gently fifteen minutes ; also boil 6 
good-sized potatoes, mash fine to mix while hot with the fish, season 
with pepper and salt, add a tablespoon of butter ; lastly beat three 
eggs well and stir through the fish and potato, drop into hot lard from 
a spoon or form into balls ; lay a napkin on a platter to absorb the fat. 

CODFISH AND EGGS. 

Chop the codfish fine, simmer on the stove, changing the water 
once or twice, pour off water, add 1 cup of cream, just before serving, 
stir in 3 or 4 well beaten eggs. 

CODFISH DINNER. 

MRS. A. T. NYE. 

Soak the fish in plenty of water, putting it in early in the morning. 
About an hour before dinner set it on the back of the stove and let it 
cook slowly but never boil it. Use boiled potatoes and boiled beets 
when beets are young and tender. Onions if you prefer them to beets. 
Drawn butter gravy and pork scraps in a separate dish as all do not 
relish pork. Garnish the fish with hard boiled eggs. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

MRS. PILLSBTJRY. 

Fresh cod or haddock should be used, cut fish in convenient 
pieces, 6 slices of salt pork, fry brown in the chowder kettle, then take 
out the pork but leave the fat in kettle. Having some potatoes ready 
peeled and sliced, peel and slice 6 onions. Oyster or Boston crackers. 
Put layer of potatoes, layer of fish, layer of onions, some slices of 
pork, layer of crackers, pepper and salt, then commence over again 
until all is used, having crackers on the top, then put in water until 
you can see it. Boil until potatoes are done, then put in 1 pint of 
milk and boil 10 minutes. 

FAMOUS RECIPE FOR CURING HAMS. 

The following is the famous recipe used by Mrs. Henry Clay for 
curing hams, several hogsheads of which were annually sent to Bos- 



20 Centennial Cookery Boole. 

ton, where, under the name of " Ashland Hanis,"they commanded the 
highest of prices, especially among the wealthy Whigs of that city ; 

For every 10 hams of moderate size she took 3£ pounds of fine 
salt, 1 pound of saltpetre and 2 pounds of brown sugar, and after mix- 
ing these thoroughly together, rubbed the hams therewith on either 
side. They were then packed in a tight box and placed in a cool out- 
house for about three weeks, when the hams were taken out and put 
in a pickling tub or hogshead and covered with brine strong enough 
to swim an egg. 

After remaining in the pickle for about three weeks they were 
taken out, thoroughly rubbed with fresh salt and hung up in a well- 
ventilated house for a few days to dry. Next they were transferred to 
the smoke-house, where they were hung up and smoked with green 
hickory or walnut wood until they acquired the color of bright mahog- 
any. This accomplished, each ham was sewed up in a canvas, the 
coverings whitewashed and hung up to dry, after which they were 
whitewashed again and packed away in hogsheads with hickory ashes, 
until wanted for either home use or sending to Boston. 

CUEING BEEF OK HAMS. 

NEVER KNOWN TO FAIL. 

MRS. ANSELM TUPPER NYE. 

Four gallons of water, 3 pounds of salt, 1£ pounds of sugar, 2 
ounces of saltpetre. Hams should remain in the brine six weeks. 
Rub the hams well with salt before putting them in the brine. Beef 
can be cured in two weeks. 

CALF'S HEAD DINNER. 

MRS. ANSELM TUPPER NYE. 

The Calf's head and feet should be prepared by scalding and 
scraping, and the tongue taken out before the head is split through 
the middle, the brains taken out and after soaking over night put in a 
little bag of muslin to be boiled (15) fifteen minutes. The head, feet 
and harslet having been soaked for some hours in cold salted water, 
should be boiled in water carefully skimmed from 2£ to 3 hours until 
tender. 

DRAWN BUTTER GRAVY FOR CALF'S HEAD. 

Rub 2 ounces of butter into 1 tablespoon of flour, pour upon it 
either milk or water boiling. Stir all the time and let it boil up once 
only or it will be oily. Arrange all the large pieces on a platter. Chop 
a little of the liver with the brains and add to the gravy. Pour on the 



Roasts, Broils, Meatpies and fish. 21 

platter and garnish with parsley and hard boiled eggs. The parts 
around the tongue are very nice. The tongue should be skinned 
when done. This is a very rich dish. 

FRIED CHICKEN WITH MUSH. 

MRS. BETTY WASHINGTON LOVELL. 

To prepare the mush take a pint of Indian meal (for four persons) 
and sift. Have a pint of boiling water on the fire with a teaspoonful 
of salt, stir in the meal a little at a time until it looks thick enough 
not to run. Do this early in the morning and spread to cool on a 
large flat dish. Cut cakes of it square or round using a little flour to 
handle them if necessary. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Get chickens about three months old and be sure they are fat. 
Cut them as for fricassee, in quarters. Dredge them with flour, and 
sprinkle lightly with salt. Put them to fry in a good quantity of boil- 
ing lard. They should be of a fair light brown when done. Fry 
small pieces of mush and lay on the bottom of the dish. Garnish the 
dish with cured parsley. 

GRAVY. 

Boil half a pint of rich milk, add to it a small bit of butter, with 
pepper, salt and chopped parsley. Stew it a little and serve hot with 
the chicken from a gravy boat. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

MRS. N. D. LYON. 

Cut the chicken in small pieces and remove the skin ; put it in 
water enough to boil, to which add a little salt; when it is almost 
done, roll each piece in flour, sprinkle with pepper and salt, lay it in 
a pan, put a small lump of butter on each piece, and sufficient boiling 
water to baste it with. When brown make a gravy of the liquor the 
chicken was boiled in with a little flour and an egg well beaten, pour 
it over the chicken, put it back in the oven a few minutes, then serve. 

STEWED CHICKEN WITH RICE. 

MRS. J. H. CHAMBERLIN. 

Cut up the chicken and stew as usual, boil a cup of rice by itself 
till it is done. Five minutes before the chicken is ready to take up put 
in the rice, with a liberal seasoning of salt, pepper (red if preferred), 



22 Centennial Cookery Book. 

and butter. When done, take out the chicken first upon a platter, 
pour the rice and gravy through a small sieve; what goes through 
with the gravy will thicken it sufficiently. Place the rice remaining 
in the sieve, in large spoonsfull around the edge of the platter. Save 
the gravy by itself in gravy boat. 

CHICKEN PIE. 
MRS. GEO. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

Prepare one chicken. One-half pound or less of fresh pork or 
spare rib. If the chicken is young stew it half an hour, well covered 
with water. Season it to your taste with pepper and salt. Thicken 
the gravy with two teaspoons of flour, wet with milk or water. Have 
a deep pan lined with rather plain pie crust, rolled moderately thin. 
The upper crust should be a rich one, fully half an inch thick with 
openings cut entirely through to the chicken to allow gases to escape. 
Place the poorer parts of the chicken at the bottom of the pan, the 
better on top. Pour over the chicken all the gravy with bits of butter 
laid on the fowl. Add the upper crust, press firmly to prevent gravy 
from escaping and bake an hour in a moderate oven. If a cup is 
placed upside down in the dish before putting in the chicken, the 
gravy will be drawn into it, and not run out while baking. Eemove 
cup before serving. 

FOR CORNING BEEF AS IT BOILS — Very Nice for Tongues. 
MRS. C. B. WELLS. 

For six pounds beef take : 1 gallon water, 1 pint salt, 1 teacup 
sugar, 1 teaspoonful soda, § teaspoon ful saltpetre. Boil three or four 
hours, or till done. Keep filling the kettle with boiling water as it 
boils away. 

DRESSING FOR TURKEY. 
MRS. H. L. HART. 

Two pounds bread, crumbed fine, 6 ounzes butter, 2 tablespoons 
sage, pulverized, 1 small onion, sliced fine, salt and pepper to taste, 
2 teacups cream. 

See " Oysters " for oyster dressing. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Rub 2 teaspoonsful of flour into a quarter of a pound of butter, 
add 5 tablespoonsful of cold water, set it into boiling water and let it 
melt, and heat until it begins to simmer, when it is done. Never sim- 



Roasts, Broils, Meatpies and Fish. 23 

mer it on coals, as it fries the oil and spoils it. If to be'used with fish 
add chopped eggs and nasturtions or capers. If used with boiled 
fowls, put in oysters and let them heat through. 

DRIPPINGS. 

French cooks prefer beef fat to lard for frying. Beef fat does not 
adhere to articles cooked in it and does not impart flavor, and frying 
done in beef fat is more wholesome and digestive than when done in 
lard. A careful cook need never buy fat for the frying kettle, but will 
find herself amply supplied with the drippings from roasts of beef 
and the fat skimmed from the soup kettle. These skimmings and 
remnants should be tried out twice a week by boiling them all to- 
gether in water. When the fat is all melted it should be strained with 
the water and set away to cool. When it has hardened lift the cake 
from the water, scrape off every dark particles adhering at the bottom, 
melt again and strain into a small stone jar, it is now ready for use. 
Miss Corson says after drippings are tried out or cleansed they will 
keep as well as butter or lard. They are cheaper than good butter 
and in general estimation preferable to lard. " Each kind should be 
kept in separate vessels and used with reference to the flavor they 
impart, as they have marked individual flavors." 

A VERY NICE WAY TO COOK A FLANK OF BEEF. 

MRS. M. L. GODDARD. 

After washing and wiping, season the surface with pepper, salt 
and a little sage, roll tight and sew up in a cloth. Put a broken plate 
in the bottom of the kettle and lay the meat on it. Then boil several 
hours till well done. Take out and press before removing the cloth. 
When perfectly cold, the cloth can be taken off and the meat will be 
solid and cut into nice slices. 

TO COOK MACKEREL. 

MRS. M. L. GODDARD. 

Soak, skin Bide up 24 hours changing the water at least once. 
Wipe dry and hang up over night. In the morning fry, putting the 
skin side down first, then turn and fry brown. 

MEAT — FRESH. 

"The economical way of cooking meat is to boil it gently in a 
close pot, where the steam will condense on the inside of the cover 
and fall back upon the meat." " The shoulder piece of beef can be 



24 Centennial Cookery Book. 

made into a tender and delicate dish by letting it cook in its own 
juices in the oven without one particle of water. A stone jar with a 
tight-fitting cover (or a lid of plain dough) will keep in all the flavor 
and the juices. It will require 3 or 4 hours. The heat that comes 
through the stone is very different from that of iron. It is the slow 
action of the steady heat that makes a rich dish out of a cheap joint." 

TO PICKLE TONGUE OR BEEF. 

MRS. S. P. HILDRETH. 

Four gallons of water, 1$ pounds of sugar, 3 ounces of saltpetre, 
8 pounds of salt. Boil, skim when cold, and pour over your meat. 

(This is Mrs. Rhoda Cook's recipe, and is probably nearly 100 
years old.) 

TO PICKLE BEEF AND TONGUE.— (very good.) 

MRS. EMMA CADWALLADER. 

Two gallons water, 3 pounds salt, 1 ounce of saltpetre, 1 pound of 
sugar or 1 pint of molasses. Boil all together, skim and pour over 
the meat when cold. 

PERSIAN STEW. 

MRS. E. W. LABAREE, PERSIA. 

Two pounds of meat, fat and lean together, cut into small bits, 
2 medium sized onions chopped, put all into a kettle with £ cup of 
cold water, set over a hot fire and stir frequently until the meat and 
onions are well browned. If in danger of burning add a spoonful of 
water from time to time. When well browned add J can of tomatoes, 
salt, pepper, (cayenne is best) and 2 quarts or more of hot water. Set 
the kettle back where it will stew slowly but constantly for at least 
two hours. Half an hour before serving pour in $ cup of uncooked 
rice. Should it dry away too much add a little water. Any kind of 
meat can be used, but the best stew is made from mutton or veal. 

PICKLE FOR BEEF OR TONGUE.— (old.) 

MRS. MARTHA BRAINARD WILSON. 

Six pounds of salt, 1£ ounzes of saltpetre, \\ pounds of brown 
sugar, for 100 pounds of meat. Water sufficient to cover. Put the 
meat in weak salt and water over night, drain thoroughly in the 
morning and pack in a tub, or a sugar barrel is better, and cover with 
the prepared brine. Water fresh from the well with the sugar, salt, 
and saltpetre thoroughly stirred in and dissolved, then add as much 
water as necessary to cover. 



Roasts, Broils, Meatpies and Fish. 25 

STEWED CHICKEN. 

MRS. A. G. GARD, VINCENT. 

Take a good sized chicken, cut it up, put it to cook, after skimming 
add pepper and salt to taste, when nearly done add one cup of butter, 
"when done take milk or cream with enough flour to make plenty of 
gravy, have some nice baking powder biscuit hot, break in two or 
three pieces and pour the gravy over — we think it nice. 

SAUSAGE. 

MRS. WM. PITT PUTNAM, BELPRE. 

To 50 pounds of prepared sausage add 1 pound and 2 ounces of 
salt, 5 ounces of pepper, 4 ounces of sage. Season before grinding 
pork. 

SAUSAGE. 
MISS MARY SLACK, KY. 

Twenty pounds of pork before it is prepared, 1 small teacup of 
salt, 5 tablespoonsful of pulverized sugar, 5 tablespoonsful of black 
pepper, 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper. Season after it is ground. 

SAUSAGE — Old. 

MRS. BENJAMIN DANA. 

Twenty pounds of meat, £ pound salt, 2 ounces of sage, 2 ounces 
of pepper. Sprinkle over the meat before grinding. 

EOAST TURKEY — New Style. 

SOUTH CH. COOK BOOK. 

After drawing the turkey rinse with several waters and in next 
to the last mix a teaspoon of soda. Fill the body well with soda 
water, shake well, empty, rinse in fair water. Then prepare a dress- 
ing of bread crumbs mixed with butter, pepper, salt and such sweet 
herbs as you like wet with either milk or water. Add, if you choose, 
the beaten yolks of two eggs. Some like oysters chopped and put in 
the dresssing. Stuff the craw and body and sew up with a strong 
thread ; dredge with flour and rub with salt, and place a buttered 
paper over it to prevent its browning too soon. Baste often and roast 
from four to five hours according to size. The giblets may be cooked 
separately and chopped to be added to the gravy. 



26 Centennial Cookery Booh, 

ROAST TURKEY — Old Style. 

MRS. FAY. 

A large turkey dressed and stuffed with bread crumbs, seasoned 
with salt pork, sage, and whole cloves. This was then hung before an 
open wood fire with a pan under to catch the drip. Cook from three 
to five hours according to the size of the turkey, basting and turning 
every little while. " Never was anything half so nice as turkeys, 
chickens and geese roasted in this way." 



Soups. 27 



SOUPS. 



" Every cook praises his own stew." 



BEZIQUE SOUP. 
MI3S GRACE CRAM. 



One quart can of tomatoes, 3 pints of boiling water, 1 teaspoon of 
soda, boil half an hour, 4 tablespoons of butter, 2 tablespoons of flour, 
1 tablespoon salt, cream together. $ teaspoon celery seed. Heat 1 
quart new milk add and strain. This soup can be made quickly. 

BEEF SOUP. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

Put on early in the morning in about 6 quarts of cold water, a 
good sized shin piece. Boil slowly all the forenoon. If necessary 
replenish with boiling water. At noon add 2 quarts of tomatoes, 4 
potatoes, 3 onions, 2 small turnips, all sliced thin, a little cabbage and 
any other vegetable you may like. Boil 4 hours longer, stirring fre- 
quently the last hour or two. One hour before removing from the 
fire put in a teacupful of rice. Strain through a colander and set 
away to cool. The next morning it will be jellied and you can easily 
remove the cake of fat from the surface. In cold weather this will 
keep for days. To prepare for the table, add a little water, season 
with salt and pepper, boil up once, and serve hot. 

BOUILLON OF BEEF. 

Six pounds of brisket or round of beef all in one piece, 4 turnips, 
3 carrots, 2 Bermuda onions, a good handful of cabbage sprouts, 2 
tablespoonsful of butter, cut up in flour, bunch of sweet herbs, 1 tea- 
spoonful of made mustard, 4 quarts of water. Cover the beef with 
the water, and cook slowly 1 hour. Meanwhile cut the vegetables 
into long strips, not too thin, leaving the sprouts whole. Cook them 
all in boiling salted water 20 minutes. Throw this water away, and at 
the end of the hour skim the soup well, and put in the vegetables. 
Stew all very slowly 2 hours longer. There must never be a fast boil. 
Take out the beef, put into a dripping pan, pour a cup of the soup 
(strained) seasoned well with pepper, salt, and mustard over it, dredge 



28 Centennial Cookery Book. 

thickly with flour, and brown in a good oven, basting every few min- 
utes. Take one-half of the vegetables from the pot, and keep hot. 
Rub the rest through a colander, season the soup and pulp, add the 
herbs and return to the sauce pan, boil sharply for 5 minutes, stir 
in butter and flour, simmer 5 minutes, and your soup is ready for the 
tureen. Season the reserved vegetables, and having dished your beef, 
lay them very hot around it. Serve with each slice. 

BOUILLON. 

One and one-half pounds of beef, 3 quarts of water, 1 ounce of 
salt, 3 leaks, 2 cloves, $ head of celery, £ of a parsnip. Serve, after 
straining clear. 

BOUILLON. 

FOURTH ST. COOKING CLUB. 

Bone of a round of beef, 4 quarts of water (cold). Boil down to 
3 quarts by simmering gently all day, skimming as in other soup. 
Season with salt. Let it stand and cool until the fat can be taken off. 
When heated for use, season to taste with cayenne pepper. This 
makes an amber colored soup. If darker is desired use more mea 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

MRS. DAVID KING, AKRON. 

Put one quart of beans to soak over night, boil five hours with 3 
pounds of beef, 1^ pounds pork, 1 head of celery, 2 grated carrots, 
cloves, allspice, cinnamon, salt, pepper, put in tureen. 2 hard boiled 
eggs sliced, 1 lemon sliced, 1 tablespoon tomato catsup, 2 slices of toast 
cut in squares. Strain the soup on this. 

CHERRY SOUP. 

MRS. JOHN CONLEY, CHICAGO. 

One and a half quarts of cherries, 3 pints of water, boil 1 quart of 
cherries until the cherries are pulpy, sweeten to taste and strain. 
Stone the I quart cherries and with a half teacup of sago put into the 
soup and boil until the sago is clear, not dissolved. Serve cold. 

CONSOMME SOUP. 

MRS. H. WHITNEY. 

Four pounds of shank of beef with sinew, 1 knuckle of veal with- 
out meat, have bones mashed at meat market, 1 small carrot, 1 turnip, 1 
onion, 1 bunch celery, 1 bunch parsley, 12 cloves, 40 black pepper corns. 



Soups. 29 

Put meat on back of stove till it begins to boil, tben boil half an hour 
on front of stove. Next put in vegetables and boil bard one hour, 
then put on back of stove and simmer steadily six hours. Add 2 gal- 
lons of water, and if not enough add 2 quarts more — or if not rich 
enough after it is strained simmer down. Can be used several days. 

CLEAR SOUP. 

MRS. WASHINGTON GLADDEN. 

Five pounds of beef cut from under part of round, 5 quarts of 
cold water, cut beef into small pieces, add water, let it come to a boil 
very gradually, skim and set back where it will keep to boiling point 
(very slight motion,) 8 hours. Then strain through a colander, and 
set away to cool. In the morning skim off all fat, and turn soup into 
a soup kettle, being careful to keep back sediment, add 1 onion, 1 stalk 
of celery, 2 sprigs of parsely, 2 of thyme and savory, 2 leaves of sage, 
2 bay leaves, 12 pepper corns, 5 whole cloves. Boil gently from 10 to 
20 minutes, then strain through an old napkin, and it is ready for use. 

CORN SOUP. 

Boil a small shank of beef in 2 quarts of water for 2 hours. 
After it has boiled an hour and a half, add salt, 4 good sized tomatoes, 
and 8 ears of corn, cut, and scrape from the cob. Fifteen minutes be- 
fore serving add 1 quart of milk and a lump of butter the size of an 
egg, and some pepper, and 4 powdered crackers. Canned corn and 
tomatoes can be used in the winter. 

GREEN PEA SOUP. 

MRS. OSCAR MITCHELL. 

One quart milk, 2 large cupsful peas, 1 tablespoonful butter, 1 
heaping tablespoonful flour. Salt and pepper. Into the boiling milk 
pour mashed peas, butter and flour creamed. Season and strain. 

GUMBO SOUP. 

MRS. M. P. WELLS. 

Put into a skillet one good sized onion and a slice of bam cut 
very fine. Fry them brown with a small piece of butter. When 
brown put in a chicken and a veal cutlet cut into small pieces, and a 
half pound of dried gumbo or one pound of green gumbo. Add a 
s»ltspoonful of cayenne pepper and salt to taste. Let it fry for half 
an hour, then turn it into a pot containing about 4 quarts of boiling 
water. Boil for an hour or more replenishing with boiling water if 
necessary. Serve with boiled rice. 



30 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

JULIENNE SOUP. — With Variations. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

Procure 5 or 6 pounds of lean beef, season with salt only. Put it 
in a soup kettle with 5 quarts of cold water, bring it to a boil, then set 
aside to simmer, closely covered, for 6 or 8 hours, or until the meat 
falls from the bones. Strain it and set aside until next day, when 
carefully remove all the fat from the top. Add a pint of cold water, 1 
carrot cut in small pieces, 1 turnip the same, 1 potato sliced thin, 2 
onions in rings, 5 tomatoes peeled and cut up, and half a cup of bar- 
ley or rice. Bring all to a hard boil, then simmer slowly, closely cov- 
ered for three hours. Season to the taste with pepper and salt. The 
barley or rice can be left out, and 1 root of celery cut up into very 
small pieces substituted. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP — With Variations. 
MRS. EDGERTON. 

Procure a fine large calf's head, cleanse the head thoroughly, tie 
the brains up in a cloth, put all together into a soup kettle, with five 
quarts of cold water, and one tablespoonful salt. Bring to a boil and 
skim well, then set aside to simmer slowly for three hours. The brains 
will be done in one hour and must be taken out and set aside. When 
you can twist out the bones remove the kettle from the fire and strain 
through a colander. Put the broth back in the soup pot, take out all 
the bones from the meat, cut it into small pieces, reserve a cup full of 
it and set it aside, season the remainder with half a teaspoonful of 
black pepper, a teaspoonful of sweet marjoram, the same quantity of 
summer savory, an onion chopped, a teaspoonful of powdered cloves 
and two blades of mace. Stir all well together and put it into the broth, 
add a bunch of parsley and thyme, cover closely and simmer for an 
hour and a half, then strain and set away for the next day. Next 
morning prepare forced meat balls as follows: Chop very fine one 
pound of lean uncooked veal, and a quarter of a pound of fresh beef 
suet, stir them together, add a small teacup of the brains and the same 
of fine bread crumbs, season with half a teaspoonful of salt, a salt- 
spoonful of black pepper, half a saltspoonful of grated nutmeg, a piece 
of onion the size of half a nutmeg, chopped very fine, and a teaspoon- 
ful of chopped parsley, mix all well together. Break up two eggs, stir 
them in. Flour your hands and make into little balls half the size of 
a walnut, brown them in butter and lard, drain them on a sieve or 
cloth and keep them hot until the soup is ready. Take all the fat from 
the top of the soup, put it over the fire and let it come to a boil, put in 
the cup of meat you reserved, thicken with a tablespoonful browned 



Soups. 31 

flour, mixed in cold water, boil five minutes longer. Put the forced 
meat balls into the tureen with several slices of lemon, pour the soup 
over and serve. " Fit for a king." 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

MISS ELIZABETH WOODBRIDGE, CHILLICOTHE. 

Cut a calf's head, dressed from the butchers, in four parts, the 
skull from the lower jaw and again in two, soak in cold water 2 or 3 
hours, put the brains in and tie it together, add salt and boil in a pot 
of water until the meat falls off, skim as soon as it boils, and then 
throw in two potatoes and two onions chopped, a handful of chopped 
parsley and a bunch of thyme twigs, two tablespoons of mixed spices, 
(allspice, cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon and black pepper.) Take 
out the bones and some of the meat, a quarter of a pound of butter 
with two tablespoons of flour mixed together added. Boil hard two 
eggs, chop fine the whites, and just before serving mash the yolks very 
fine and make into little eggs with flour. The breast of veal with 
meat-heads made in the same way is a good substitute. 

MOCK OYSTER SOUP. 

MRS. OSCAR MITCHELL. 

Grate the corn fine. To a dozen ears add 1 quart of water ; boil 
15 minutes, add f of a quart of milk and 1 tablespoonful of corn starch 
or flour, and boil 10 minutes, add J pound butter and season well with 
pepper and salt. 

MOCK BISQUE SOUP. 

GRACE MAY THOMAS. 

One can of tomatoes (strained), 1 quart of sweet milk, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of soda, season with pepper and salt, add 2 teaspoonsful of corn 
starch just as it begins to boil. Pour into the tureen and add butter the 
size of an egg. Twice the above quantity of butter makes it better. 

OYSTER SOUP. 
MRS. MCCANDISH, PARKERSBURG. 

Put one quart of water in a vessel with a slice of bacon, let it boil, 
then add one quart of oysters with one tablespoonful of fine black 
pepper, four ounces of butter, three tablespoonsful of flour, one table- 
spoonful sweet cream, and salt enough to season it. After boiling it 



32 Centennial Cookery Book. 

ten minutes longer add the yolks of two eggs well beaten and let the 
boiling continue about fifteen minutes longer. Take the bacon out 
and the sbup is ready to be served. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

MRS. S. MILLS ELLSTON, CRAWFORDSVILLE. 

One can of oysters, 1 quart of milk, 1 dozen crackers rolled, boil 
oyster liquor and 1 pint of cold water together, when it comes to a boil 
stir in the milk and oysters, butter and crackers, add salt and pepper. 
Serve hot. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

MRS. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, COLUMBUS. 

One quart of oysters, if solid, wash in 1 quart of cold water, if 
liquid, in 1 pint. Drain water through a colander into a kettle, let 
come to a boil, skim carefully. Put 1 quart of milk on to boil, when 
it boils, thicken with two tablespoonsful of corn starch mixed with a 
little cold milk, then add boiling liquor of oysters, £ cup of butter and 
the oysters. Season to taste and serve. 

POTATO SOUP. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Boil in 2 quarts of water (more or less) 6 or 8 large potatoes. Mash 
the potatoes when done, or crush with a spoon, salt and pepper well. 
Then add 2 quarts milk and a large lump of butter, let boil. Less 
milk and some cream is better. When boiling stir in a few cracker 
crumbs, and when ready for table drop in some Boston crackers split 
in two. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

MISS ANDERSON. 

One quart sifted tomato, 1 quart new milk, 1 teaspoon soda, a 
large piece of butter, salt, pepper. Heat the tomato and milk sepa- 
rately. When each has boiled put the soda in the tomato, stir and 
mix with the milk. Pour over broken cracker. 

TAPIOCA SOUP. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

Boil a soup bone very slowly 6 hours, add 1 pint tomatoes boiling 
all together 20 minutes. Then strain and add half a teacupful of 
tapioca, after it has been soaked half an hour, in clear water. Let the 
whole boil half an hour and serve. A little celery (chopped fine) is a 
great addition. 



VEGETABLES. 



" If you confine a man to one article of food he will not take enough to 
keep up natural forces." 



HINTS FOR COOKING VEGETABLES. 
Summer vegetables are best cooked on the same day as gathered. 

Wash and prepare for cooking, and let them lie in cold water 
some time before using them, excepting corn and peas. 

To retain green color keep uncovered whilst cooking. 

Always put vegetables into boiling water and keep boiling gently 
until done. 

The time required varies, according to the age and size, but let 
them cook until tender. 

Asparagus requires from 30 to 60 minutes. The white part of 
Asparagus never boils tender. Throw it away and use only the green. 

Beans-String. — Anywhere from 3 to 4 hours. Some use soda, £ a 
teaspoon is sufficient. 

Beans-Shell. — 1 hour to 1J hour. Boil in as little warm water as 
will keep from burning. 

Beets. — Young beets will boil in J an hour, but as they grow older 
will need from 1 to 3 hours. Leave at least 2 inches of the tops, and 
do not break off the little fibres or the juices will be lost. 

Carrots. — In summer I hour. In winter li hour. 

Corn. — Boil in as little water as possible from 20 minutes to half 
an hour. When you cut off the corn put on the cobs in cold water, 
and when they have boiled take them out and put in the corn and 
boil until tender. 

Cabbage. — In summer from $ an hour to 1 hour. In the winter 
about 2 hours. It is best to soak in salt water, and change the water 
in which it is boiled once or twice. 



34 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Cauliflower. — Plunge the heads in salt water to remove the insects, 
boil from 30 minutes to 1 hour. 

Greens. — Dandelions boil 1 hour. Spinach boil 20 minutes. Al- 
ways put salt in the water. The young tops of mustard, cabbage, 
beets, turnip, narrow dock and sorrel all make good greens and need 
to boil from 30 to 60 minutes. 

Onions. — From 30 to 60 minutes. Change water once. Ochra boil 
20 minutes. 

Potatoes. — Bake potatoes of a medium size about half an hour in 
a steady oven, small potatoes less time, and large ones more. Serve 
in a hot uncovered dish. Baked potatoes should be the last thing to be 
lifted and eaten immediately. If they have to stand stick them with 
a fork to let out the steam. To boil let them remain in from i to | of 
an hour, according to size. 

Stewed Tomatos should be cooked from i to 1 hour. The longer 
the better. Baked tomatos with bread crumbs 1 hour. 

Salsify. — From 40 to 50 minutes, boil until tender. 

Winter Squash. — Steam an hour and a half.. Summer Squash will 
cook in one half an hour.> 



ASPARAGUS. 



Cut the green part of asparagus in inch lengths. Boil from $ to f 
of an hour. Use only water enough to cook it. Dress with a table- 
spoonful of butter worked into a teaspoonful of flour, 1 teaspoonful 
of salt. It is very nice served on toast. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Put 1 quart of small white beans in bean jar. Parboil, and drain 
off the water. Then add £ pound of ham, smoked fat and lean, salt, 
pepper, 1 teaspoonful of ground mustard, and 3 large spoonsful of 
Orleans molasses. Cover all with plenty of water and put them in 
the oven and bake slowly for 24 or 36 hours. If they are placed 
in the oven Friday night they are in nice condition for Sunday morn- 
ing breakfast. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

MRS. PILLSBURY. 

Take 1 quart beans, soak over night. In the morning drain ofl 
the water and replace with fresh. Let boil £ an hour, drain again, 



Vegetables. 35 

then place in an earthern jar smaller at the top than bottom. Add a 
piece of raw salt pork and 2 tablespoonsful of Orleans molasses, salt 
a little, then cover with water and let boil away four times, having the 
beans covered all the time until you put the last water in, then re- 
move the cover and let brown, when done they should be of a light 
brown color. 

BAKED CORN. 

MRS. ISRAEL DEVOL. 

Slice off the tops of kernels and scrape the remainder of the corn 
out. For 1 quart of corn take 1 large teaspoonful of salt, half cup of 
butter, 1 coffee cup of rich milk or cream, bake 1 hour in slow oven. 

ESCALOPED CABBAGE. 

MRS. ISRAEL DEVOL. 

Chop the cabbage as for slaw, then put a layer of it in a bake pan, 
then a layer of stale bread crumbs, sprinkle on salt, pepper, and 
lumps of butter, then another layer of cabbage an inch thick, another 
layer of crackers or bread, salt, pepper and butter, till the pan is full, 
having the crumbs etc. on top. Put in a tea cup of milk and bake one 
hour. 

TO COOK CABBAGE WITHOUT ODOR. 

FROM "TEN DOLLARS ENOUGH." 

Cut the cabbage in quarters, wash and lay in colander to drain, 
have your kettle ready with boiling water, enough to cover the cab- 
bage well, put in the cabbage and add 1 tablespoon of salt and a scant 
half teaspoon of soda. As soon as it comes to the boiling point take 
off the cover, and leave it off all the while, pushing the cabbage under 
the water from time to time. Boil 25 minutes. The whole secret of 
boiling cabbage without filling the house with a bad odor, is— rapid 
boiling, plenty of water, plenty of room, and the cover off. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

MRS. I. H. NYE. 

To a pint of grated corn, young and sweet, add 1 egg well beaten, 
a small teacup of flour, \ gill cream, 1 teaspoonful of salt, mix well 
and fry like oysters, dropping into fat by spoonsful. 



36 Centennial Cookery Book. 



MOCK OYSTERS. 

MRS. FRAZYER. 

One and one half dozen ears sweet corn, grate as fine as possible. 
Mix with the grated corn 3 large tablespoonsful sifted flour, yolks of 6 
eggs well beaten, beat well. Have in frying pan an equal proportion of 
lard and butter. When boiling hot drop in portions of the mixture, 
as nearly as possible the size and shape of oysters. Fry them brown 
and serve hot. They should be nearly an inch thick. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

MRS. I. R. WATERS. 

Grate the corn from 1 dozen ears, mix with the yolks of 6 eggs 
and 3 tablespoons of flour. Season with salt and pepper. Fry in hot 
lard, the cakes the size of oysters. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

One teacupful of sweet corn cut from the cob, 2 tablespoons of 
sweet milk, 1 pinch of salt, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, flour 
(into which has been sifted £ teaspoonful of baking powder) enough 
to make a batter. Drop from a spoon into hot lard. Good for break- 
fast, dinner, or tea. 

CUCUMBERS. 

Pare and cut very thin ; salt them well, pour on enough water 
to cover them ; let them stand five or ten minutes, or until you wish 
to use them ; before serving, pour off all the water, add vinegar and 
pepper. 

EGG PLANT. 

Cut in slices, about half an inch thick, sprinkle with salt, and 
let stand half an hour ; wash in cold water, and wipe dry. Dip in 
a well beaten egg, then in bread or cracker crumbs, and fry in hot 
butter. 

. TO COOK MACCARONI. 

Boil in water with a little salt, a half hour or till tender. Drain. 
Butter a Jpudding dish and put in a layer of maccaroni, add pep 
per and salt, lumps of butter and grated cheese; continue until the 
dish is full. Bake | of an hour. 



Vegetables. 37 

ESCALOPED ONIONS. 

Slice onions as for frying; cook them in water a few minutes; 
turn off water and put in a layer of onions in a pan, add a layer 
of bread crumbs, season as you put them in with salt and pepper, 
butter, cream or milk. Put them in the oven and let brown. Very 
nice. 

PARSNIPS. 

Scrape, and boil in salt and water, till tender. Cut in thick 
slices lengthwise, and fry brown. 

PEAS. 

Always wash them before shelling. Boil the fresh pods fifteen 
minutes in water enough to cover them. Skim out and put in the 
peas, and boil about a half hour. 

FRENCH PEAS. 

MRS. W. S. NEWTON, GALLIPOLIS. 

One tablespoon of butter, put into the kettle, and two small 
onions cooked in this about ten minutes, and then put in water 
enough to boil the peas. When done, season with salt, pepper and 
a little sugar. 

CREOLE PEAS. 

Throw pea-pods into boiling water, cook to a pulp ; mash through 
a colander and serve hot, with butter, pepper and salt. It makes 
a delicious, marrowy dish. 

IRISH WAY OF COOKING POTATOES. 

"If I should cover them with water, they'd be drowned, poor 
things, and would'nt be at all maly ; and if I was to put biling 
water on 'em, they'd be waxy. I stews 'em. — It takes a time to 
understand a petaty : They don't like much water." 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Select fine, large potatoes, and bake until tender. Cut off the 
ends, scoop out the contents with the handle of a spoon and work 
soft with butter, hot milk, pepper, salt and, if desired, a little grated 
cheese. Return the mixture to the skins, mounding it up on the 
open ends, and with these uppermost, set the potatoes in the oven 
five minutes. Eat from the skin. 



38 Centennial Cookery Book. 

ESCALOPED SWEET POTATOES. 

MRS. P. W. SCOTT. 

Parboil the potatoes and slice them lengthwise. Lay in a baking 
dish with a little sugar, nutmeg, and small pieces of butter between 
each layer. Pour a cup of milk over all, and bake a light brown. 
The sugar and nutmeg must be on the top layer, as with the milk, 
they form a brown crust. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

MISS ALICE WATERS. 

Select large potatoes — small ones will do but large slices can be 
handled in less time than small ones. It is not necessary to pare 
the potatoes, though of course they are nicer with the skin removed. 
Slice very thin, from 70 to 90 slices to a large potato, with a bread- 
slicer or slaw-cutter, if you have one, and drop into salt water (about 
a teaspoonful of salt to a quart of water). Let them lie in the water 
for half an hour, longer will not hurt them. Then dry a handful at a 
time in a towel — just rubbing them lightly so as to take off most of 
the water. Have a skillet full of hot lard — so hot that the potato will 
sputter a little when dropped in. Then drop the slices in separately 
and if they fold over, unfold them with a fork, as they will hold 
the lard if folded or laid together. Put in enough to well cover the 
top of the lard, and when the edges of the slices are crisp, turn 
them with a fork and the middle will fry faster. When crisp, remove 
with a wire strainer and let drain for a few minutes, then spread on 
heavy brown paper, which will absorb drops of lard which might not 
have drained off. The lard must be quite hot for frying or the chips 
will not drain well. Before removing from the paper to a dish, 
"sprinkle a little fine salt over them. It takes no longer to drop the 
slices into the lard separately and keep them flat than to put in a 
handful and stir with a fork. They fry faster if kept separate and 
unfolded. 

One pound of potatoes, before being sliced, will make about half 
a pound when fried. 

For an ordinary tea one pound of chips will serve about twenty- 
five persons. New potatoes fry much nicer than old ones. 

The starch which settles in the water that the slices lie in is 
beautiful for laundry purposes if washed and strained. 

STEWED POTATOES. - 

Slice rather thick, cold boiled potatoes, pour in enough milk to 
make them very moist, cover and let it boil until the milk is nearly 



Vegetables. 39 

boiled out. Season with butter, salt and pepper, and with a knife 
chop fine. Serve hot. 

SOUTHERN POTATOES. 

Pare and slice thin the number of potatoes wanted, let them 
stand in cold water } hour, then put them into a pudding dish, season 
with salt and pepper, pour on a cup of milk. Bake an hour. On tak- 
ing them out, add a piece of butter the size of an egg. 

PLAIN PILAV. 

MRS. E. W. LABAREE, PERSIA. 

Soak a pint of rice for an hour. Drain and pour into a kettle con- 
taining 2 or 3 quarts of boiling water and cook until the rice is tender. 
Do not stir or even put a spoon into it. When done turn into a colan- 
der, pour a dipper of cold water over it to wash off the starch and let 
it 6tand until the water has run off, shaking it gently, then return it 
to the hot kettle, in the bottom of which there should be a large spoon- 
ful of melted butter. Pour over the top of the rice through a strainer, 
at least £ cup of melted butter. Cover the kettle closely with a heated 
lid, (a tin plate holding hot ashes is good.) Set it on the back of the 
stove, or on the hearth where it will keep hot, and let it stand fifteen 
minutes. It should be served on a platter, and when successfully 
made, each kernel of rice is unbroken, though thoroughly cooked, 
and no grains adhere together. 

TO BOIL RICE. 

MARTHA J. DANLEY. 

Take f cup of rice, wash the flour out and put water in sufficient 
to start it well to boiling, after which keep filling in with milk until it 
has cooked slowly nearly an hour. Just before taking up add f cup 
of sugar, butter the size of a hulled walnut, and lastly, beat up an egg 
and stir it in. It will be ready to take up as soon as it comes to a boil. 

RIPE TOMATO DOLMA. 

MRS. E. W. LABAREE, PERSIA. 

Cut fair, firm ripe tomatoes in two, without peeling, remove the 
seed and pulp. Fill with forced meal, made of uncooked rice and 
finely chopped bits of cold roast, seasoned with pepper, salt and 
chopped celery and dill or caraway leaves. Replace the tops of the 



40 Centennial Cookery Book. 

tomatos and fasten with splinters. Stew for half or three-quarters 
of an hour in water enough to cover them, and add a bit of butter 
before taking up. 

GREEN TOMATO DOLMA. 

MRS. E. W. LABAREE PERSIA. 

Cut a piece of somewhat fat raw meat into very small bits, add a 
little chopped onion and stir the mixture in a skillet until slightly 
browned. Set aside to cool. Add twice the quantity of uncooked 
rice, season with pepper, salt and a few leaves of celery and dill or 
caraway; cut very fine, mix thoroughly. Cut fair, green tomatoes in 
two and remove the seed and pulp without breaking the form of the 
fruit Fill with the forced meat and replace the top, fastening it on 
with splinters. Lay the tomatoes into a kettle, cover with water and 
stew gently until tender. While cooking add a little acid, either a 
cluster of green grapes, lemon juice or citric acid. 

Green Cucumber Dolma is made in the same way, except that.it 
requires more acid than the tomato. 

STEWED TOMATOS. 

Pour boiling water on the tomatos and remove the skin, cut in 
slices, and stew a half hour or longer, add butter, pepper, salt and 
sugar to taste, crumb up bread and thicken with it. 

GREEN STEWED TOMATOS. 

Pare off the skin, slice and cook with one sliced onion. Season 
same as ripe stewed tomatos. 

ESCALOPED TOMATOS. 

Prepare tomatos same as for stewing. Put a layer of tomatos 
in baking dish and cover with a layer of bread crumbs, some bits of 
butter, salt and pepper, continue this until the dish is full, finishing 
with bread crumbs. Bake 1 hour. Some think it is improved by 
adding a few small slices of onion. 

TURNIPS. 

Peal, cut in slices and boil till tender in salt and water about a 
half hour. When done drain through a colander, mash fine, add but- 
ter, pepper and salt if not already salt enough, add a little white sugar. 



Vegetables. 41 

BAKED TOMATOS. 

A BREAKFAST DISH. 

MRS. DR. SAMUEL HART. 

Cover the bottom of a shallow earthern dish that can be placed 
on the table with ripe tomatos, cut in halts, turning the skin side 
downward, as it forms a cup to hold butter, pepper, and salt, cover with 
fine rolled bread crumbs. Bake one-half hour. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

Boil 1 cup of rice without stirring in 1 quart of milk or water till 
quite dry, add a piece of butter the size of an egg, 2 eggs. Make into 
rolls (or any shape desired), dip into cracker crumbs, fry in lard. 



42 Centennial Cookery Book. 

BEVERAGES. 



And lucent Syrups Unci with Cinnamon. 



'THE CUP WHICH CHEERS. 



FRENCH COFFEE. 

MRS. F. F. OLDHAM. 

One pint of ground coffee, to 2 quarts of boiling water. Put the 
coffee into the uppermost compartment of a French coffee pot and 
pour the water on very slowly. Should it not be strong enough pour 
the water on again. 

CHOCOLATE. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

To 1 quart of milk take 2 squares of Whitman's best chocolate. 
Cut up fine and dissolve with a little warm water. When the milk is 
boiling put in the chocolate and stir almost constantly. It is better to 
use a chocolate-pot, containing a muddler which can be easily twirled 
between the hands, causing it to foam. 

COFFEE. 

MRS. PUTNAM, FROM MRS. BLISS. 

With a little cold water mix one cup of freshly browned ground 
coffee — Java and Mocha mixed in equal parts. Put it into the coffee- 
pot, pour on it seven cupsful of boiling water, close the lid immediately 
and place over a hot fire. As soon as the coffee comes to a boil, pour 
out rapidly one cupful and return it immediately, close the lid and 
wait for the coffee to boil up again, then pour out another cupful and 
return it at once. Repeat the process the third time, then remove to 
a place on the fire sufficiently hot to keep the coffee scalding. It must 
not boil again. In twenty minutes it will be ready to serve. 

MOCK CREAM FOR COFFEE. 

MRS. DOUGLAS PUTNAM. 

Heat a quart of new milk. Work together a dessertspoonful of sweet 
butter, with a teaspoon of flour, thinning it with a little of the hot 



Beverages. 43 

milk. Add the mixture to the milk and beat it constantly for five 
minutes while boiling; then remove it from the fire and continue to 
beat it for five minutes longer. Have ready, well beaten, very light, 
the yolks of two fresh eggs, and add them to 4he cream while hot, 
mix well, strain through a fine sieve, and afterwards beat it until very 
light. 

PROPORTION OF COFFEE TO WATER. 

MRS. G. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

In making only 1 quart of coffee use 4 heaping tablespoonsful of 
ground coffee to 1 quart of water. If making a quantity, take 3 heap- 
ing tablespoonsful to 1 quart of water. 1 quart of coffee will make 6 
ordinary cups as full as necessary. 

CHERRY SHRUB. 

Boil the cherries till tender, strain out the juice and to each quart 
put 1 pint sugar. Cook 15 minutes, bottle and seal the corks with 
wax. Put a tablespoonful of this syrup in a tumbler, fill up with ice 
water, and you have a delicious beverage in hot weather. 

DOMESTIC GINGER BEER. 

Put 2 gallons of cold water on the fire, add to it 2 ounces of ginger 
and 2 pounds of sugar. Let this boil a half hour, skim the liquor and 
pour it into a jar with 1 sliced lemon and £ ounce cream tartar. When 
nearly cold put into it a teacupful of yeast to cause it to work. When 
it has worked 2 days, strain it into bottles and cork tight. Tie the 
corks down firmly. 

LEMONADE. 

MRS. HORACE NORTON. 

Three lemons to a quart of water, 6 tablespoons of sugar. Put 
the sugar in a pitcher, pour the lemon-juice on sugar, cut a part of 
lemons in slices and put with the juice and sugar, stir well and pour 
on water and pounded ice. 

MEAD. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Three pounds brown sugar, 3 pints boiling water, 1 pint molasses, 
J pound tartaric acid, 1 ounce essence wintergreen or sassafras, mix 
the ingredients and pour the boiling water on. Let it stand till cold 
and bottle, cork tight and put in cool place. Put 2 tablespoonsful in a 
tumbler, nearly fill with water, stir in a third of a teaspoonful soda. 
A delicious drink in hot weather. Will keep good a year. 



44 Centennial Cookery Book. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

Put 4 pounds very ripe raspberries into 3 quarts of the best vine- 
gar, and let them stand 3 or 4 days. Strain the vinegar through a 
jelly bag and pour it on the same quantity of fruit. Repeat the pro- 
cess in three days a third time. To each pound of the liquor thus 
obtained add 1 pound of fine sugar. Bottle it, and let stand covered 
but not tightly corked a week. Then cork tight and keep in cellar. 
Add water to it when you drink it. 

TEA. 

Two teaspoons of tea to one coffee cup of boiling water. Scald 
the tea pot well ; put in the tea and covering close, set it on the stove 
one minute to warm. Pour on enough boiling water to cover and let 
it stand ten minutes to draw. Do not let it boil. Fill with as much 
boiling water as you need, and send hot to the table. Boiling after 
the tea is made, injures the flavor, making it rank and "herby." 

BLACK TEA. 
MRS. GEO. DANA. 

An earthen tea pot, that can be easily cleansed, well scalded. 
Boiling water (fresh). A teaspoon of tea to a person. Steep but 
not boil ten minutes. 

EGG LEMONADE. 

PHILADELPHIA PRESS. 

Break an egg into a tumbler. Rub two lumps of sugar on the 
rind of a fine lemon. Put the sugar into the tumbler, squeeze the 
lemon in with the squeezer, half fill the tumbler with fine ice, fill up 
with water and with a shaker, shake the whole vigorously for a few 
seconds, then grate a little nutmeg over the top. If you have no 
shaker beat the egg with a fork. 

SYRUP FOR BEVERAGES. 

Pour a pint of boiling water on a pint of sugar. When dissolved 
bottle for use. The use of syrup prevents the last of a cup being too 
sweet. 



Pickles, Catsups, Etc. 45 



Pickles, Catsups, Etc. 



" Old-fashioned but choicely good." 



Vinegar to keep pickles should be at least two years old. 
BORDEAUX SAUCE. 

MRS. ISRAEL WATERS. 

Two gallons chopped cabbage, 1 gallon chopped green tomatoes 
(drain the juice off), 1 dozen onions chopped, If pound sugar, 1 ounce 
each, celery seed, black pepper, alspice, cloves — whole, $ pound white 
mustard seed, 1 gill salt, 1 gallon vinegar — mix, boil 20 minutes. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

MRS. TUPPER NYE. 

Three dozen white cucumbers, 8 white onions, peel and chop as 
fine as possible, sprinkle over f pint salt and put in a sieve to drain, 
then add 1 teacup ground pepper, mix and put in a jar covering with 
vinegar. After standing 24 hours pour off the vinegar, pour on more 
vinegar and seal closely in quart bottles. 

RIPE TOMATO CATSUP. 

MISS BARBER. 

Three gallons of peeled tomatos, boiled slowly until they will rub 
through a sieve, add 1 quart of vinegar, 6 tablespoons salt, 1 tablespoon 
ground allspice, 6 tablespoons mustard, 2 tablespoons black pepper, 1 
tablespoon cloves, $ tablespoon mace, £ tablespoon red pepper. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

MRS. M. L. GODDARD. 

After boiling and rubbing the tomatos through a sieve — to every 
gallon of the juice thus obtained measure out 4 tablespoonsful of salt, 
4 tablespoonsful ground pepper, 2 tablespoonsful of allspice, 3 table- 
spoonsful of mustard, 4 pods of red pepper. Boil away the tomato 
juice half. When cold add the spices, except the red pepper, which 



46 Centennial Cookery Book. 

boil with the tomatos. Add no more vinegar than necessary to bottle 
it. Fill the neck of the bottle with vinegar, cork and seal. Thin with 
vinegar when put on the table — will keep years. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

MRS. FRAZYER. 

Five quarts of ripe tomatos cooked as for use. Strain through a 
sieve 2 tablespoons of salt, 2 tablespoons of pepper, 1^ tablespoons of 
ground mustard, \ tablespoons allspice, \ tablespoons cloves, 4 ripe 
peppers ground fine, \\ pints of vinegar. Simmer the whole four 
hours, then bottle ready for use and set in a cool place. 

TOMATO CATSUP — Excellent. 

MRS. LUTHER EDGERTON. 

Boil and rub your tomatos through a sieve. To every gallon of 
the juice add 4 tablespoons of salt, 4 tablespoons of ground black pep- 
per, 2 tablespoons of allspice, 3 tablespoons of mustard, 8 pods of red 
pepper. Boil the juice half away. When cold add the spices — except 
the red peppers, which boil with the tomatos. 

GKEEN TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck tomatos chopped fine, drain an hour, then put them in 
a vessel and cover with water and boil tender, then drain half an 
hour, chop 6 green peppers and mix. Take 2 quarts of vinegar and 1 
pound of sugar, 1 teacup of salt, 1 teaspoonful of black pepper, cloves 
and cinnamon. Boil the ingredients in the vinegar and pour on the 
tomatos hot. 

MRS. GEO. DANA'S CURRANT CATSUP. 

Five pounds of fruit, 4 pounds of sugar boiled together about 2 
hours. Then add spices, 1 tablespoon of each, cinnamon, cloves, 
allspice, 1 pint of vinegar. Boil this 15 or 20 minutes longer. Bottle 
it while hot. Do not let it thicken too much, so that it can not be 
poured from the bottle. 

GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. 

Eight quarts gooseberries, 4 pounds sugar, 1 pint vinegar, 2 ounces 
cloves, 2 ounces cinnamon. Boil slowly 4 hours. Tie the spices in a 
bag, and add the last half hour. 



Pickles, Catsups, Etc. 47 

TOMATO CHOW-CHOW. 
MRS. DANIEL TORPY. 

To i bushel green tomatos take 12 onions chopped fine, sprinkle 

1 pint of salt over this and let it stand over night. Then drain well and 
cook this in weak vinegar slowly for 1 hour. Drain off this vinegar, 
and take 2 heads of cabbage chopped fine and stir this in with 1 ounce 
of celery seed, 2 tablespoonsful of cinnamon, 1 of mustard seed and 1 
of allspice, and 1 pint of horseradish chopped fine, and 2 pounds of 
sugar. Mix well together and pack in a jar. Vinegar sufficient to 
make it a little thin and to keep well. Pour this over the tomatos, 
onion, cabbage, spices, etc., in the jar, and it is ready for use. 

OLD VIRGINIA CHOW-CHOW. 

MRS. BETTY WASHINGTON LOVELL. 

One-half peck of green tomatoes, 2 or 3 large heads of cabbage, 
25 large cucumbers, 1 pint of grated horseradish, £ pound of white 
mustard seed, 1 ounce of celery seed, $ teacup tumeric and cinna- 
mon, some small silver onions. Cut the tomatos, cabbage, cucumbers 
and onions fine, and salt them over night. In the morning drain off 
the brine and put them to soak for a day or two in vinegar and water. 
Drain this off. Then mix in the spices. Boil 2 gallons of vinegar 
with 4 pounds of sugar and pour on. Pour this off and heat it up for 
3 mornings. The third morning mix 1 pound of flour of mustard 
with 1 pint salad oil, and mix in with it. 

CHILI SAUCE. 
MRS. DROWN. 

Eighteen ripe tomatoes, 1 onion, 3 green peppers, 1 cup of sugar, 

2 teaspoonsful of salt, 1 teaspoonful of each kind of spice, 1\ cups of 
vinegar. Cook for 3 hours, bottle it like catsup. 

AN OLD RECIPE FOR PICKLES. 

MRS. H. P. WHITNEY. 

Make a brine not too strong and pour scalding hot over the cu- 
cumbers every day for a week taking off the scum which will rise. 
After that put them in a brass kettle with equal parts of water and 
vinegar and a piece of alum as large as a hickory nut pulverized. 
Stir occasionally until scorching hot, then set them off to cool, stirring 
occasionally. Drain off and put in a jar pouring hot vinegar over, 



48 Centennial Cookery Book. 

then adding pepper, mustard seed and horse radish. If cloves are 
used, put them in a muslin bag, ground. 

PICKLED CORN. 

KATY RICE. 

Boil on ear, then cut off. To 3 pints of corn add one of salt, mix 
well, when cold press down in the jar, once in a while wipe off the 
scum from the corn and sides of the jar and the plate. To use it soak 
over night. In the morning change water, set on the stove and heat 
gradually and then change again, then cook adding a spoonful of 
sugar. 

OUDE. 

MRS. GEO. EUSTIS. 

1 peck green tomatos, 8 small green peppers, 1 cup salt, 1 cup 
sugar, 1 cup chopped nasturtions, 1 tablespoon ground cloves, 1 of 
allspice, 1 of cinnamon, 1 of mustard. Sprinkle the salt over the to- 
matos after they are sliced and let stand over night. Pour off water 
in morning, add the other ingredients, put into a kettle and boil 6 or 
8 hours. Some add four onions. 

CABBAGE PICKLE. 

MRS. SLACK. 

Three large cabbage heads, 6 green peppers chopped fine, \ pint 
of mustard seed, 1£ pints of horse radish grated, 1 cup of sugar, J cup 
of salt. Mix well and cover with cold vinegar. It will be ready for 
use in three days. 

CHEERY PICKLE. 

MRS. WHEELER, KENTUCKY. 

Take fresh cherries, (not too ripe) leave the stems on, and place 
them in a glass jar as compact as you can without bruising them. To 
1 quart of cider vinegar, put 1 teacup of sugar and a tablespoonful of 
salt. When it is dissolved pour it over the cherries and fasten them 
up to keep air-tight. Keep them in the dark and cover the jars to 
preserve the color. Grapes can be made the same way. 

PICKLES. 

MRS. CHARLES SHIPMAN. 

One gallon of vinegar, 1 cup of sugar, 3 dozen black peppers, 3 
dozen cloves, 1£ dozen allspice, mace, red pepper, mustard seed. Boil 
5 minutes. 



Pickles, Catsups, Etc. 49 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

MRS. DROWN. 

Wash cucumbers and put in brine 24 hours. Take them out, wipe 
dry and lay in a jar, pour cold vinegar over them and let stand 5 or 6 
weeks; then remove from vinegar and lay in jar, sprinkling some 
mixed spices between the layers of cucumbers, put on top a cup of 
sugar, pour over this hot vinegar in which a little alum has been dis- 
solved. Keep the pickles under the vinegar by pressing a plate over 
them. Tie up the jar and they will keep a year. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
MRS. A. J. WARNER. 

Take small, green cucumbers, cover them with a weak brine, and 
let them stand 24 hours. Then take out the cucumbers, and wipe the 
black specks from them. Put them into a brass kettle, add sufficient 
vinegar to cover them, and a small lump of alum. Heat slowly, 
stirring them from the bottom occasionally. When scalded, turn them 
into a crock and let them stand 24 hours. Add a few green peppers, 
sliced. 

To 600 pickles, take 3 gallons vinegar (if needed to cover them), 
3 pints brown sugar, 3 gills of mustard seed, a large handful of cloves, 
a handful of cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful of celery seed, a few pieces of 
ginger-root, and a lump of alum the size of a walnut. Tie all the 
spices in a muslin bag and scald with the vinegar in a porcelain kettle. 
Drain the first vinegar from the cucumbers, and pour over them the 
spiced vinegar after it has cooled a little. Add some green grapes and 
horse radish, when cold. 

CUCUMBER. 

MRS. HAWKS. 

Wash the cucumbers clean. Make a brine and pour scalding hot 
over them. Let stand 3 hours. To 1 gallon of vinegar add 1 piece of 
alum, size of a hickory nut. Let it get scalding hot. Put your pickles 
in and let them remain 15 minutes. Then take them out, and throw 
the vinegar away. Now take 1 gallon of fresh vinegar and add to it 
1 green pepper cut in two. Cinnamon and cloves, if you like, and a 
little alum. Let this also come to a scald. Put the pickles in and let 
them scald. Seal up in glass jars. Be sure and get good apple vinegar 
and your pickles will keep. 
4 



50 Centennial Cookery Book. 



CHOPPED PICKLE. 

Four heads of cabbage, \ bushel cucumber, \ bushel onions, 1 
ounce each of nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, mace, celery seed, mustard, 
cayenne pepper, tumeric, 2£ pounds white mustard seed. Scald the 
2£ pounds white mustard seed in salt and water and let stand in the 
water over night. In the morning drain and put near the fire to dry. 
Chop the onions, cabbage and cucumbers very fine, sprinkle salt 
through them and put each into a jar by itself and stand till night, 
when put each in a bag by itself to drain till morning. Then mix the 
three together and add the spices and 3 pounds sugar. Cold vinegar 
enough to mix them well. Put into jars and cover with vinegar, let 
stand 24 hours and cover again with vinegar, then tie up for use. 

FRENCH PICKLES. 

MRS. RUTHERFORD B. HAYES. 

One peck of green tomatos sliced, 6 large onions sliced, mix, 
and throw over them a teacup of salt, and let them stand a night. 
Next day drain, and boil in 1 quart vinegar and 2 quarts water for 
15 minutes, then drain. Take 4 quarts vinegar, 2 pounds brown 
sugar, £ pound white mustard seed, 2 tablespoons of ground all- 
spice, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and ground mustard, throw all to- 
gether and boil 15 minutes. 

GREEN TOMATO SOY. 

MRS. NAHUM WARD. 

One peck of green tomatos sliced, add half a pint of salt and let 
it stand 24 hours. Then drain and put in a preserving kettle with 1 
dozen onions sliced, 1 ounce of black pepper, 1 ounce of allspice, i 
pound of ground mustard, \ pint of mustard seed. Cover with vine- 
gar and boil until thick as jam or about 2 hours. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

MRS. NAHUM WARD. 

Slice or chop 1 gallon of green tomatos and salt over night. In 
the morning mix 1 tablespoonful ground black pepper, 1 of mace, 1 of 
cloves, 4 pods red pepper chopped fine, \ pint grated horseradish, mix 
thoroughly, put in a jar and cover with cold vinegar, onions to taste. 



Pickles, Catsups, Etc. 51 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 
MRS. FRANCES NYE STURGES. 

One peck of green tomatos sliced, 1 dozen onions sliced, sprinkle 
with salt and let stand until next day to drain. They may be drained 
by tying in a large cloth and then hung up. The next day add 1 box 
of ground mustard, l\ ounce of black pepper, 1 ounce of mustard 
seed, 1 ounce of allspice, $ ounce of whole cloves. Put in a kettle, 
layer of tomatos and onions alternating. Sprinkle over the spice. 
Put the mustard in the vinegar and put on vinegar enough to cover 
the whole. Let it boil 20 minutes. 

GERMAN PICKLES. 

MRS. D. E. BEACH. 

Two hundred small cucumbers laid in brine for 24 hours. Bay 
leaves, dill seed, mustard seed, grated horse radish. Put the cucum- 
bers in a jar with the leaves, and seeds, and horse radish in alternate 
layers. Boil 1 quart of vinegar, with 1J cups of sugar, and pour on 
hot. Cover the pickles and seal the jars while hot. 

MRS. GEORGE DANA'S GRAPE PICKLE. 

Seven pounds of grapes, 3 pounds of sugar, 1 pint of vinegar. 
Pulp the grapes. Cook the skins in the vinegar and sugar, cook the 
pulps in a little water. Strain them in a sieve, and when the skins 
are cooked, add the strained pulp and let it boil once. Then all is 
done. 

TO PICKLE MARTINOS. 

MRS F. G. SLACfe. 

Gather the martinos while young and tender, put them in a 
strong brine till ready to pickle, changing the brine once during the 
time. Put them in weak vinegar 24 hours ; take them out of the 
vinegar and put them in a jar with a good deal of horse radish, black 
and red pepper, allspice" race ginger, a few cloves, a tablespoonful of 
celery seed and a little garlic if you like. To every gallon of the 
vinegar put f pound of brown sugar, scalding it in the vinegar and 
pour over the martinos while boiling. 

PEPPER PICKLES — Excellent. 

MRS. BLISS. 

Pick the peppers late in the season before they begin to turn red, 
soak them 10 days in a strong brine of salt and water, then if they 



52 Centennial Cookery Book. 

have a good green color, remove them from the brine to clear cold 
water, in which let them stand 24 hours. If they have not a good 
green color, they will get it by scalding in the brine. Drain them, 
remove the seed, scraping them out through a slit cut in the side of 
each pepper. Fill them with red or white cabbage, cut very fine, 
pour boiling vinegar over them, sufficient to cover all, when cool, 
pack in jars. After filling each pepper, the slit should be sewed up. 

PICKLED PLUMS. 

MRS. M. B. HASKELL. 

One peck of plums, 7 pounds of sugar, a pint of good vinegar and 
spices to taste. Boil till well cooked. Nice with meats. 

PEACH MANGOES. 

Wash off the fuzz off the peaches, cut them in half, fill them with 
white mustard, a few cloves, mace and cinnamon. Tie them up and 
put them in a jar, and pour over them three mornings, boiling vine- 
gar sweetened to taste. 

SPICED TOMATOS. 

MRS. M. B. HASKELL. 

Take ripe tomatos, peel and slice them. To 1 quart tomatos 
take 1 pint vinegar and 1 pint sugar, of which make a syrup and pour 
over the fruit. Next morning strain off the syrup, heat, and pour 
over again. The third morning pour all together into a kettle, add 
spices (unground) and boil slowly 1 hour, or till quite thick. 

TO MAKE ANY KIND OF SWEET PICKLE. 

MRS. SLACK. 

Seven pounds fruit, 4 poundB sugar, 1 pint vinegar. Boil sugar 
and vinegar together 7 or 8 mornings and pour over the fruit. Have 
your spices in a lace bag and boil every day in the vinegar. The last 
morning boil the fruit in the vinegar, a good while, until it is clear. 

SWEET TOMaTO PICKLE. 

To 7 pounds of tomatos add 4 pounds of sugar and boil until the 
sugar penetrates the tomatos. Then add 1 pint of vinegar, 1 ounce 
of cloves, 1 ounce of ground cinnamon, and boil a half hour. 



Pickles, Catsups, Etc. 53 

SPANISH PICKLE. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

Cucumbers full grown pared and quartered lengthwise, cut all 
into pieces about half an inch thick. For a layer of the cucumber 
pieces use about as much salt as is used for cucumber catsup. Let it 
stand in the salt 1 night, then drain thoroughly. Vinegar 1 gallon, of 
cloves, race ginger, white mustard seed, celery seed, 2 ounces each, 
mustard 2 large boxes mixed in vinegar, brown sugar 1 pound, tur- 
meric 1 ounce put into the vinegar, horseradish sliced and red pep- 
pers to your taste. Boil this and pour over the cucumbers. 

YELLOW PICKLE. 

MRS. GEO. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

One-half pound ginger sliced, \ pound horseradish scraped, 1 
ounce garlic (or 1 dozen onions) sliced and salted, } pound white 
mustard seed, 1 ounce mace, 1 ounce nutmeg, 1 ounce small long pep- 
pers, 2 ounce of turmeric, 2 pounds of brown sugar, 2 gallons vinegar, 2 
dozen heads early York cabbnge cut in quarters. Scald the vegetables 
in brine strong enough to float an egg. Let them remain 2 days, then 
squeeze them well in a towel and put them in a jar, with cold vinegar 
sufficient to cover them, well colored with perhaps an ounce of tur- 
meric, let them remain 2 weeks. Then place them with the 2 gallons 
of vinegar, the spices and sugar named, in a bright kettle over a clear 
fire. Boil 15 or 20 minutes. Pour into a jar and tie up immediately 
with leather or enameled cloth. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

(to be eaten with meats.) 

MRS. DOUGLAS PUTNAM. 

Five pounds currants, 4 pounds of brown sugar, 1 pint of vinegar, 
1 tablespoonful of ground cloves, 1 tablespoonful of cinnamon, 1 
tablespoonful allspice (all tied up in a thin bag). Boil 50 minutes. 
Dissolve sugar in vinegar, heat, then add fruit. 



54 Centennial Cookery Book. 



Salads, Salad Dressings, Oysters, Etc. 



TO MAKE IT ONE MUST HAVE A SPARK OF GENIUS. 



" My salad days, 
When I was green in judgment." 

— Shakespeare. 



BAKED SALMON. 

MRS. DIMMICK, SCRANTON, PA. 

Boil 6 pounds of lake salmon. Boil it, in the cans, 20 minutes, 
then open the can, and pour off the oil. When cold, pick it to pieces. 
Make a sauce of 1 quart of rich milk in which boil 1 onion, cut up and 
tied in a bag. Rub 5 tablespoons of flour in 1 cup of butter. Stir into 
the milk when it boils. Season with red pepper, salt, and chopped pars- 
ley. When cold put the fish and the sauce in layers in baking dish. 
Sprinkle the top with bread or cracker crumbs. Bake until a light 
brown. 

MRS. A. B. WATERS'S BEEF LOAF. 

Three and one-half pounds of chopped beef, 3 eggs, butter size 
of an egg, | tablespoon pepper, 1 tablespoon salt, % nutmeg, 4 table- 
spoons cream (in winter), 6 or 8 soda crackers. 

CHICKENf SALAD. 

MRS. H. TOWNE, PORTSMOUTH. 

Four chickens, 8 bunches celery, 8 eggs (yolks only) well beaten, 
1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon salt, 2 tablespoonsful prepared mus- 
tard, a little cayenne pepper, i cup sweet cream, 1 pint of vinegar, 1 
cup of butter or olive oil. Boil together, stirring constantly, and 
pour over chicken and celery. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

MRS. MELLISSA S. NORTHROP, BELPRE. 

Four eggs, 1 chicken, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon of common pep- 
per, \\ gills of table mustard, 1£ wine glass of vinegar, 2 wine glasses 
of sweet oil, 2 heads of celery. 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 55 



CHICKEN SALAD. 

MRS. ARIUS NYE, BROOKLYN. 

The white meat and second joints of three boiled chickens cut 
moderately fine, 3 large heads of celery, 12 hard-boiled eggs. Bruise 
the yolks to a paste with 9 tablespoons of salad oil, 3 ounces of melted 
butter, 9 teaspoons of salt, a pint and a half of sharp vinegar, 9 tea- 
spoons of mixed mustard. Chop the whites of the eggs and cut the 
celery. Set all the ingredients in a cool place and mix thoroughly 
just before serving. Chopped cabbage may be substituted for the 
celery. If used, flavor with celery salt. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

MRS. WM. NYE. 

Take 2 large fowls, cold, the yolks of 9 eggs, hard-boiled, h pint of 
butter, £ pint of vinegar, 2 large heads of celery, chop and mix well. 
Season with Durkie's salad dressing. It is improved by adding some 
chopped cucumber pickles. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

MRS. WOODRUFF. 

Chop the meat of one chicken fine, also add % of a middling sized 
onion, fry the onion with 1 ounce of butter, add 1 teaspoonful of 
flour, stir half a minute, then add the chopped meat and a little over 
a gill of the broth, salt, pepper and a pinch of nutmeg, stir for about 
2 minutes, take from the fire, mix the yolks of 2 eggs with it, put it 
back on the fire for 1 minute, stirring the while, turn into a dish to 
cool, when perfectly cold mix well, roll into the shape you want, 
then roll in bread or cracker crumbs, then in egg and again in cracker 
crumbs. Fry in hot lard — use veal if you prefer. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

MRS. PARLOA. 

One solid pint of finely chopped cooked chicken, 1 tablespoon of 
salt, \ teaspoon of pepper, 1 teacup of cream or chicken stock, 1 table- 
spoon of flour, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoon of chopped parsley, 1 teaspoon of 
onion juice, 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, 1 pint of bread crumbs, 3 
tablespoons of butter. Put the cream or stock on to boil, mix flour 
and butter and stir in, add chicken and seasoning. Boil two minutes 
and add two of the eggs well beaten and set away to cool. When cold 
shape and fry. 



56 Centennial Cookery Book. 

CABBAGE DRESSING. 

For one head of cabbage take one coffee cup of cream, sweet or 
sour, one tea cup of vinegar, a large spoonful of sugar, a large spoon- 
ful of butter, teaspoon of salt, 5 teaspoon mustard, 5 teaspoon corn 
starch, pepper to taste. Heat until it boils, then pour over chopped 
cabbage, stirring all the time. 

CABBAGE DRESSING. 

MRS. S. MILLS ELLSTON. 

One heaping teaspoon of mustard, 1 heaping teaspoon of salt, 2 
heaping teaspoons of cream, 1 heaping teaspoon of butter, 3 heap- 
ing teaspoons of sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, f of a cup of vinegar. 

CABBAGE DRESSING. 

MRS. BEMAN GATES. 

One teacup of vinegar, made hot, (not boiling) the yolks of 2 
eggs, beaten and stirred in after it is taken off from the fire, add 2 
tablespoons of sugar, 1 teaspoon of mustard and butter the size of 
a hickory nut, and half a cup of cream. 

CREAM FISH. 

FOURTH STREET COOKING CLUB. 

* Pick in pieces 2 pounds of canned salmon. For sauce: J quart 
of milk in which boil a little onion cut up and tied in a bag. Rub 
2 tablespoons of flour in 2 cup of butter, stir into milk, when it 
boils season with salt, black pepper, parsley. Put fish and sauce 
into a baking dish in alternate layers. Cover the top with bread 
crumbs and bake brown. 

CELERY SALAD. 

BREVOORT HOUSE. 

Cut up celery into small pieces and pour over it mayonnaise 
dressing. 

ESCALOPED SALMON. 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON. 

Pick the bones from canned salmon. Place in a buttered bak- 
ing dish a layer of bread crumbs, a layer of salmon with butter, 
pepper and salt, finishing with crumbs, on which lay bits of butter. 
Add the liquor from the salmon and milk, or milk and water— half 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 57 

as much more as would be required for the same bulk of oysters. 
Bake one hour. 

HAM PATTIES. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Chop fine some scraps of lean ham. Mix with this a good deal 
of crumbed bread. Season with pepper. If the ham is all lean a 
lump of butter. Moisten with milk to a soft paste. Fill your muffin 
tins with this and break an egg upon the top of each. Sprinkle 
pepper and salt on this and a few cracker crumbs and bake until 
the egg is done. Takes about 10 minutes. 

HAM FOR SANDWICHES. 

One pint of Chopped ham, 1 teaspoonful of mustard, 5 table- 
spoonsful of vinegar, 1 egg, pinch of salt. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

MRS. LUCY WOODBRIDGE SMITH. 

Boil 3 chickens till tender, then skin them and cut the meat in 
small pieces. While the water they were boiled in is hot, skim off 
all of the grease. Take a quart of the remainder and pour it over 
one-half box of gelatine. Season with salt and pepper. Pour this 
over the chickens and set it in a cool place. 

LETTUCE DRESSING. 

MRS. SESSIONS, COLUMBUS, O. 

One dessertspoonful of butter with a little flour rubbed into it. 
Take f of a teacup of vinegar and J of water, and let it just come 
to a boil, then stir into this the butter and flour. Add 1 teaspoon 
of sugar, 1 dessertspoon of ground mustard, a little cayenne and 
salt, and 1 egg, beaten lightly. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

MRS. PILLSBURY. 

Boil a large potato, mash it very fine. Mix the yolks of two eggs 
with the potato, until smooth. Stir into this 4 tablespoons of salt, 
1 tablespoon of made mustard and a little pepper. Add to this the 
green fat of the lobster. Chop the lobster, reserving the claws to gar- 
nish. Take one large head of lettuce, lay the outer leaves on the dish. 



58 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Chop the rest of lettuce and add with the dressing to the lobster. 
Mix thoroughly, and when mixing add 1 cup of vinegar. Garnish 
the dish with two hard-boiled eggs, sliced and laid around with the 
claws. 

MINT SAUCE. 

MRS. LOVELL. 

Two tablespoons of chopped mint, one tablespoon of sugar and 
a half tea cup of vinegar. Made an hour or two before serving. 

MINT SAUCE. 

MRS. HAWKS. 

Chop or cut into small pieces a handful of mint, put 2 table- 
spoonsful of sugar on it. Have vinegar with nearly half water hot, 
and pour over the mint, cover and let stand a little while before 
using. 

MAYONNAISE. 

Yolks of 2 eggs beaten light, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 teaspoon of 
sugar, 1 teaspoon of dry mustard, 1 tablespoon of olive oil or melted 
butter, a little pepper, 4 tablespoons of hot vinegar, which must be 
added slowly, beating all the time, stir until thick and light. It 
can be returned to the fire and stirred till it thickens, but must 
not boil. This is sufficient for 6 persons when you use lettuce, 
but not for salmon, lobster or chicken salad. 

HOT SLAW. 

Slice your cabbage fine and make a dressing of £ cup of vine- 
gar, I cup of cream, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 teaspoon of 
salt, 1 tablespoon of sugar, pour on the slaw and set it on the 
stove in a covered kettle and let it come to a boil. Serve hot. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

The yolks of 3 eggs, a heaping teaspoonful of mustard, a tea- 
spoonful of sugar, a little salt, a few drops of essence of celery. 
Stir gradually into this as much salad oil as you like, or if you 
prefer it, melted butter, and stir, and stir with a fork ad libitum, ad 
infinitum. Add 2 tablespoons of vinegar and a little cayenne pep- 
per. It will be thick like jelly. When you use it, thin with vine- 
gar to the consistency of cream. 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 59 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

FOR SALADS, TOMATOS, ETC. 

MRS. C. R. RHODES. 

Break the yolk of a fresh egg on a plate and stir briskly round 
and round with a silver fork, adding very slowly olive oil, and £ 
teaspoonful of salt. Consistency comes from the oil and salt. When 
the egg has absorbed a gill of oil, and is as stiff as mush, add 
slowly a little vinegar and a pinch of cayenne pepper. 

STEWED OYSTERS. 

Drain the liquor from 2 quarts of firm, plump oysters; mix 
■with it a small teacupful of hot water, add a little salt and pep- 
per, and set over the fire in a saucepan. When it comes to a 
boil, add a large cupful of rich milk (cream is better.) Let it boil up 
once, put in the oysters, let them boil for five minutes or less— 
not more. When they "ruffle," add 2 tablespoonsful of butter, and 
the instant it is melted and well stirred in, take the saucepan from 
the fire. Serve with oyster or cream crackers, as soon as possible. 
Oysters become tough and tasteless when cooked too much, or left 
to stand too long after they are withdrawn from the fire. A good 
and safe plan is, to heat the milk in a separate vessel set in an- 
other of hot water, and after it is mingled with the liquor and 
oysters, stir assiduously or it may " catch," as the cooks say— i. e., 
scorch on the sides or bottom of the saucepan. 

OYSTER PIE. 

MRS. DOUGLAS PUTNAM. 

Cover a deep plate wdth rich puff paste and bake it, then fill 
with oysters, seasoned with a little salt, pepper, and plenty of but- 
ter, and 2 hard-boiled eggs sliced. Cover with just a sprinkling of 
cracker crumbs: over all pour the liquor from the oysters, and 
cover with puff paste, securing the edges well, and pricking the 
paste several times with a fork. Twenty minutes in a hot oven is 
required to bake it. 

OYSTER PIE. 

MRS. L. EDGERTON. 

Spread rich paste around the edge and sides of a large deep dish. 
100 oysters, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, 1 tablespoon of nut- 
meg, cinnamon, and mace, mixed, 6 hard boiled eggs, chopped fine. 



60 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Pour oysters into the dish with as much liquor as you desire. Add 
seasoning, eggs and butter. Put on an upper crust, and bake in a 
quick oven. 

OYSTER PIE. 

DAPHNE. 

Line a deep dish with puff paste. Put in oysters, seasoned with 
bits of butter, salt and pepper. Then pour on some of the oyster 
liquor and cover with the pie crust. Cut a hole in the top of crust, 
and bake thoroughly. It is well to sprinkle a little flour over the 
oysters. 

OYSTER SAUCE FOR TURKEY. 

MRS. M. L. OLDHAM. 

One quart oysters. Put them on in thin liquor and let come to 
a boil. A heaping tablespoon of flour, rubbed into a half tea cup of 
butter. Add this to the oysters, stirring. At last add a tea cup of 
sweet cream. 

FRICASSEED OYSTERS. 

FOURTH STREET COOKING CLUB. 

Let 1 quart of oysters and their liquor come to a boil. Pour 
off the liquor into a hot dish. Melt a piece of butter the size of an 
egg and stir into it, while on the stove a tablespoonful of flour, then 
a cupful of the oyster liquor. Take from the fire and mix in the 
beaten yolks of two eggs, a little salt, a very little cayenne pepper 
and one teaspoonful lemon juice. Heat this without letting it boil 
and put in the oysters. These may be served on slices of toast or 
in shells, or papers. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Take fifty large oysters. Put in a stew pan and let come to a 
boil — no more. Take out of liquor, have ready one cup of vinegar 
in which has been boiled whole black pepper, nutmeg, salt and 
cloves to taste. Pour this over the oysters. 

OYSTER SAUCE FOR CHICKEN OR SALMON. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Let a dozen or more oysters come to a boil in their own liquor. 
Mix a half cup of flour with $ cupful melted butter, rub till smooth. 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 61 

Put in a stew pan with the oyster liquor, adding salt, cayenne pepper, 
and a cup of sweet cream. Put on fire and let simmer till free from 
lumps. Just before taking from the fire add the oysters, cut in small 
pieces. Pour over fish on platter, but for chicken put in gravy boat. 

OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

MRS. H. C. EVANS. 

Strain the liquor off of a quart of oysters. Put 1 cup of cream 
or rich milk and 1 cup of butter in the kettle. When this comes to a 
boil add 1 teaspoonful flour wet with a little cold water. Drop in the 
oysters. Let them boil up, adding salt and pepper. Lay slices of 
nicely toasted bread in a dish. Pour oysters over them and serve. 

OYSTER CHOWDER. 

MRS. RAMSEY. 

Three-fourth pounds of pickled pork, 10 medium-sized potatoes, 
6 small onions, 1 quart or can of oysters. Cut the pork into small 
pieces and fry in the kettle, chowder is to be prepared in. Next put 
in the onions and one quart of water, partly cook, then add the pota- 
toes and another quart of water ; when they are cooked enough put 
in a pint of milk and the oysters, season to taste and add crackers 
just before serving them. 

OYSTERS WITH POTATOES. 

MRS. RUTH M. HILL. 

Line a good sized, round, deep dish with nicely mashed potatoes, 
have your potatoes rather stiff, build it up as high as you can at the 
edge, put into the oven to brown. When nicely browned take out 
and turn in two quarts of oysters, properly seasoned with butter, salt, 
and pepper. Stew in the fluid without water or milk. Slightly 
thicken with rolled crackers. Sprinkle a few cracker crumbs over 
the top. Brown to a rich color. 

ERIED OYSTERS. 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON. 

Season rolled cracker with pepper and salt. Roll the undrained 
oysters in this, one at a time, covering them well. Fry in butter, being 
careful not to scorch. Do not cook too long, large oysters requiring 
only a few minutes after browning. Cook quickly and serve immedi- 
ately. They should be plump and juicy. 



62 Centennial Cookery Book. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

MRS. PILLSBURY. 

Take large oysters and lay on towel and dry, having cracker-meal 
ready, dip the oysters in meal, then in well-beaten egg, then in cracker 
meal, then fry in hot lard. 

ESCALOPED OYSTERS. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

Butter the bottom and sides of your baking dish. Then put in a 
thick layer of oysters, each of which has been examined carefully for 
pieces of shell ; put lumps of butter thickly over the top, and pepper 
and salt. Then put on a layer, not too thick, of bread crumbs und 
pounded cracker, half and half. Add another layer of oysters, season- 
ing, bread and cracker crumbs, untill the dish is full, covering the top 
with the crumbs and with lumps of butter. There is no liquor of any 
kind to be added to this. If there has not been too large a proportion 
of bread and cracker used it will be moist enough — and will be much 
better. Bake at least one hour. 

ESCALOPED OYSTERS. 

MRS. PILLSBURY. 

For one quart of oysters. Butter a pudding dish, then sprinkle 
a layer of bread crumbs, then put in a layer of oysters, then season 
with bits of butter, salt and pepper, then an< ther layer of bread 
crumbs; moisten with equal quantities of milk and oyster liquor, 
repeat until dish is full, having crumbs on top. Place small bits of 
butter on top. Cover until nearly done, then remove cover and 
brown. Bake one-half hour. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Mix into a pint of grated green corn three tablespoonsful of milk 
one tablespoonful of flour, a piece of butter the size of a hickory nut, 
one teaspoonful of salt, half a teaspoonful of pepper, and one egg. 
Drop it by desertspoonsful into a little hot butter, and saute it on 
both sides. It resembles, and has much the flavor of fried oysters. 
It is a good tea or lunch dish. Serve it hot, on a warm platter. 

POTATOES IN CROQUETTES. 

Mash boiled potatoes through the colander. Mix 2 eggs, (1 at 
a time) with a quart bowl of the mashed potatoes, (peach blows 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 63 

are the best.) Spread flour on the board, make small rolls of the 
potatoes, beat 2 or more eggs, dip rolls of potatoes in egg, and then 
roll it in bread crumbs dried and powdered fine. Cook two or 
three moments in hot fat, turning them. 

PATE DE VEATJ. 

MRS. DOUGLAS PUTNAM. 

Three and one-half pounds finest part of leg of veal chopped 
very fine, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of salt, 1 tablespoonful of pepper, 
1 nutmeg, a slice of pork chopped fine. Work all together in the 
form of a loaf of bread, put bits of butter on top and grate over 
it crumbs of bread. Put into dripping pan with a little water, and 
baste often. Bake 2 hours. To be eaten cold cut in slices. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Four cold boiled potatoes, 2 hard-boiled eggs, chop fine together, 
1 teaspoon of pepper, 1 teaspoon of mustard, 2 teaspoons of salt, 1 
egg beaten light, 2 teaspoons of sweet cream, 4 teaspoons of good 
cider vinegar. 

POTTED MEATS. 

No way of preparing cold meats is so successful as potting. This 
process is in England an every-day affair for the cook. If there be 
ham, game, tongue, beef or fish on the table one day, you are quite 
sure to see it potted on the next day at lunch or breakfast. It is a 
very good way of managing left-over food, instead of invariably 
making it into hashes, stews, etc. These potted meats will keep a 
long time. They are not good unless thoroughly pounded, reduced 
to the smoothest possible paste, and free from any unbroken fiber. 

Potted Ham. — Mince some cold cooked ham, mixing lean and fat 
together; pound in a mortar, seasoning at the same time with a 
little cayenne pepper, pounded mace and mustard, Put into a dish, 
and place in the oven half an hour; afterward pack it in potting- 
pots or little stone jars, which cover with a layer of clarified butter 
(lukewarm) and tie bladders or paste paper over them. This is 
convenient for sandwitcb.es. The butter may be used again for 
basting meat or for making meatpies. 

Potted Tongue (Warne). — Ingredients: One pound and a half of 
boiled tongue, six ounces of butter, a little cayenne, a small spoonful 
of pounded mace, nutmeg and cloves, each half a teaspoonful. The 
tongue must be unsmoked, boiled, and the skin taken off. Pound it 
in the mortar as fine as possible, with the spices. When perfectly 



64 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

pounded, and the spices are well blended with the meat, press it into 
small potting-pans ; pour over the butter. A little roast veal, or the 
breasts of turkeys, chickens, etc., added to the tongue, are an im- 
provement. 

Potted Be. — This is well-cooked beef chopped and pounded with 
a little butter, pepper, salt and mace. Manage as for potted ham. 

POTTED LIVER. 

MRS. SLACK. 

Boil a calf liver till tender. Chop very fine, season with salt and 
pepper and a little sage. Add a small piece of butter, mix well with 
three or four tablespoon sful of the liquor the liver was boiled in. 
Press down solid in pudding dish. Put over it a little of the liquor 
and set in oven twenty minutes. 

PRESSED VEAL OR CHICKEN. 

MRS. H. C. EVANS. 

Four pounds of veal or two chickens, covered with water and 
stewed slowly till meat will drop from the bones, then chop. Let 
the liquor boil down to a cupfull. Put in a small cup of butter, 1 
tablespoonful salt, 1 tablespoonful pepper, 1 egg, beaten, a little all- 
spice. Stir through the meat and press. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

MRS. BEMAN GATES. 

Boil the chicken till very tender. Take out the bones and gristle ; 
remove the skin and fat. Boil the gravy down to 1 cupfull to a 
chicken. Add a little butter, season with pepper and salt. Add £ 
cupfull of gelatine, dissolved in water. Pick, not chop the chicken, 
into small pieces. Heat thoroughly with gravy. Then pour into a 
pan and put a light weight upon it. Slice when cold. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

Two cups of well-boiled rice, 1 tablespoon of melted butter, 2 
beaten eggs, 1 tablespoon sugar, a little flour and salt. Roll in the 
flour and drop in boiling lard. Eat hot. 

RUSSIAN SALAD. 
MRS. DR. IDE. 

One cup each of string beans, peas, beets, sweet potatoes, Irish 
potatoes, carrots, chopped pickles, and 2 stalks of celery, or one cup 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 65 

of cabbage and celery seed. Canned beans and peas can be used. 
All of the vegetables must be cooked and then cut in J inch cubes. 
When cold, mix with French dressing prepared as follows: I full 
pint of vinegar, 1 tablespoon of salt, 1 tablespoon of mustard, 1 tea- 
spoon of pepper. Sufficient for a company of 25. 

SYDNEY SMITE'S SALAD DRESSING. 

Two boiled potatoes, strained through a kitchen sieve; 

Softness, and smoothness to the salad give ; 

Of mordant mustard take a single spoon 

Distrust the condiment that bites too soon ; 

Yet deem it not, thou man of taste, a fault, 

To add a double quantity of salt. 

Four times, the spoon with oil of Lucca crown 

And twice with vinegar procured from town ; 

True taste requires it, and your poet begs 

The pounded yellow of two well-boiled eggs. 

Let onion's atoms lurk within the bowl, — 

And (scarce suspected), animate the whole; 

And lastly, in the favored compound toss 

A magic spoonful of Anchovy sauce. 

Oh, great and glorious ! Oh, herbaceous meat ! 

'T would tempt the dying Anchorite to eat, 

Back to the world he'd turn his weary soul 

And plunge his fingers in the salad bowl. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

MRS. LYDIA PUTNAM. 

Yolks of 8 eggs, 1£ teaspoonsful salt, 1£ sugar, 2 ground mus- 
tard, a pinch of cayenne pepper, 1 cup butter, 1£ cup sweet cream, 
1 pint vinegar. Boil till it thickens. 

SALAD DRESSING No. 2. 

One heaping teaspoonful each of mustard, salt, and butter, 2 
of cream, 3 of sugar, f cup of vinegar, 2 yolks of eggs, beaten. Put 
all together and set on the stove, stirring constantly until it thickens. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

MRS. H. W. LEONARD, CINCINNATI. 

One-half pint of vinegar, \ size of egg in butter, tablespoon of 
sugar. Boil this. Beat the yolks of four eggs or the whole of two 
5 



66 Centennial Cookery Book. 

with £ cup cream. Add to the other two teaspoons of mustard, 
celery seed. 

SLAW. 

One-half head cabbage, cut fine ; 1 large stalk of celery, cut fine, 
1 hard-boiled egg, 2 ounces grated horseradish, 2 teaspoons mustard. 
Mix with vinegar, pepper and salt, to taste. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

MRS. PROF. MITCHELL. 

Two cups salmon, well picked with a fork, # 1 cup fine cracker 
crumbs, 1 cup cream ; mix well and season with pepper, salt, and 
a little nutmeg. Roll in cracker crumbs, then in beaten egg, and 
again in cracker crumbs. Let them stand several hours before frying; 

SALMON SALAD. 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

One can of salmon ; remove all the bones and oil, and shred the 
salmon into small pieces. Take a little more celery than there is 
salmon, and cut it into small pieces, and mix it thoroughly with a 
fork. Use Sydney Smith's dressing. 

SWEET BREAD CROQUETTES. 

MRS. J. L. BLYMEYER. 

Throw the sweet breads into cold water for an half hour, then 
cook until tender in salt water. Then throw them into cold water 
for a few minutes. Take out all the pipes and chop fine. To one 
pint chopped meat take I pint cracker crumbs or fine bread. One 
egg. Season to taste and mould into forms. 

TO BOIL SWEET BREADS. 

Boil in a little water till tender. Take from the water and gash 
well. Put butter, salt and pepper over them. Very delicate. 

TO FRY AS CUTLETS. 

Parboil after separating and removing stringy portions, then dip 
in beaten egg and cracker crumbs and fry as cutlets, or 

Prepare and cut the size of a walnut, dip in egg and cracker 
crumbs, and fry as doughnuts, skimming out with skimmer. 



Salads, Salad Dressing, Oysters, Etc. 67 

TO STEW SWEET BREADS IN CREAM. 

MRS. HICKOK. 

Put 1 tablespoon ful of butter and 1 tablespoonful of flour in a 
tbick saucepan over the fire, and stir till smoothly blended. Have 
ready also $ pint of milk, and h pint of cream, hot, and add this gradu- 
ally to the buttered flour, till it is a smooth sauce, into which put the 
sweet breads, previously boiled, and cut into inch squares. Serve hot. 
(One may add nicely stewed and strained tomatos to the sauce.) 

TO BROIL SWEET BREADS. 

After blanching the sweet breads as above, cut in slices 2 an inch 
thick. Put between the bars of a buttered wire gridiron, and broil 
each side about 5 minutes, over hot coals. Season lightly with pepper, 
salt and butter. Serve hot. 

TO FRY SWEET BREADS 

Slice the sweet breads as for broiling. Season with pepper and 
salt. Dredge in a little flour. Have hot in the frying pan equal parts 
of butter and lard. Fry the sweet breads a light brown on both sides 
Remove to the platter. Make a thickening of I dessertspoon of flour, 
and 1 gill of water stirred into the fat in the pan. Season it and pour 
it over the sweet breads. Serve hot. 

SWEET BREADS FOR INVALIDS. 

MRS HICKOK. 

Put the sweet breads (fresh from the market) into sufficient cold 
water to cover them well, adding 1 tablespoonful of salt to 1 quart of 
water. Let them lie in the salt water at least 1 hour, then place them 
over the fire, in more cold water, and salt, (adding other seasoning if 
you like, whole spices, pepper corns, parsley, bay leaves, lemon peel, 
onion, or any dried herb except sage. Do not confuse seasoning). 
Preserve them intact and use them successively. Then slowly bring 
them to the boiling point. This is called " Blanching" and must al- 
ways be done. After boiling gently 15 minutes lay them again in cold 
water for 10 or 15 minutes. This will harden them, or make them 
more firm to cut, then trim them from all superfluous membrane and 
fleshy fibre. They can now be set away till wanted for use. 

TURBOT. 
MRS. JOHN EATON. 

Six lbs. of fresh white fish, steam until tender, remove all bones 
and dark skin. Mince fine with fork. Season with salt and pepper. 



68 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

DRESSING FOR TURBOT. 

Boil 1 quart of milk, thicken it with flour to the consistency of 
cream seasoning with salt and pepper, £ lb. of butter, 2 eggs beaten 
light. When dressing is cool, add eggs. Place a layer of fish in a 
pudding dish and cover with dressing, sprinkling lightly with cracker 
crumbs rolled fine, repeating this till all fish is used. Sprinkle top 
with cracker crumbs. Bake f of an hour. Sufficient for 12 people. 

VEAL LOAF. 

MRS. M. S. NORTHROP, BELPRE. 

Three pounds of finely chopped veal (lean), 3 eggs (raw), 6 crack- 
ers, powdered, 2 tablespoons of milk or cream, 1 heaping tablespoon of 
salt, 1 tablespoon of thyme, 1 tablespoon of pepper. Mix all well to- 
gether and form into a loaf. Put bit of butter on it, and baste often. 

VEAL LOAF. 

MRS. HORACE NORTON. 

Three lbs. of veal, uncooked, 2 lbs. fresh pork, chopped fine, 8 or 
10 crackers rolled fine, 2 tablespoons black pepper, 2 tablespoons salt, 
1 tablespoon thyme, 2 bunches of parsley, 5 eggs. Mix all well to- 
gether, pack firmly into an oblong loaf. Bake with water in the bot- 
tom of the pan, basting same as roast beef. Bake from 1 £ to 2 hours 
according to the thickness of the loaf. Save some of the liquor the 
veal is boiled in for basting. 



Eggs, Omelettes, Etc. 69 

Eggs, Omelettes, Etc. 



The turnpike road to people's hearts I find lies through their mouths, or 
I mistake mankind." 



A DELICATE WAY TO BOIL EGGS. 

Have a pan of boiling water, put the eggs in and cover up closely, 
do not return it to the fire, but let it stand five minutes for those who 
like soft eggs and a minute or two longer for those who like them 
harder. The whites are more like poached eggs. The fresher the egg 
the longer it takes to cook. 

TO BOIL EGGS. 

Wash them before boiling. Let the water be boiling when you 
put them in and keep it boiling 3 minutes for very soft, in 4 minutes 
the yolk will be soft, 6 minutes will make it hard. Boil eggs 8 minutes 
for salads. 

EGGS— BREADED. 

Boil the eggs hard and cut in round thick slices. Dip each in 
beaten eggs well seasoned with pepper and salt, then in fine bread 
crumbs and fry in butter hissing hot. Drain off every drop of grease 
and serve hot. 

EGG AU PLAT. 

Two eggs, 2 tablespoons bread crumbs, 1 ounce butter, pepper, salt 
and a little nutmeg. Melt the butter in a small flat dish and sprinkle 
over 1 tablespoon of the bread crumbs. Break into this the eggs and 
sprinkle over the rest of the bread crumbs, also the pepper, salt and 
nutmeg. Bake in a quick oven five minutes. 

OMELETTE. 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON. 

Three eggs beaten separately, \ cup milk, 2 tablespoons corn-starch, 
a little salt, a small half teaspoonful baking powder. Mix quickly add- 
ing the whites last, and pour into a moderately hot skillet in which is 
plenty of butter. Cover and set on back of the stove as it scorches 
quickly. When done fold together and serve on hot platter. 



70 Centennial Cookery Book. 

OMELETTE. 

MRS. WOODRUFF. 

Four eggs beaten separately, 2 teacup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon flour, 
pepper and salt. Fry in butter. 

OMELETTE. 
MRS. DUDLEY WOODBRIDGE, DETROIT. 

Beat the whites of 6 eggs to a stiff froth, seasoning as for omelette, 
and pour into a buttered baking pan. Pour on the froth (at equal 
distances) six tablespoons of cream. Then drop into each depression 
made by the cream, a yolk of egg, whole. Bake in good oven, and 
serve hot. 

A VERY DELICATE OMELETTE. 

MISS M. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

Six eggs, the whites beaten to a stiff froth and the yolks well 
beaten. A teacup full of warm milk, with a tablespoonful of butter 
melted in it. A tablespoonful of flour, wet to a paste with a little of 
the milk, and poured to the milk. A teaspoon of salt an a little 
pepper. Mix all except the whites, add those last ; bake immediately 
in a deep, round dish, or tin cake pan. Some like a little onion and 
parsley, chopped fine, and very fine chopped ham, or dried beef stirred 
through the omelette, before the whites of the eggs are added. Leave 
the omelette in the oven, till brought to the table in the pan it is 
baked in ; it should be eaten immediately. Do not have the oven too 
hot and be careful that it does not bake too fast on top. It requires 
about 15 minutes to cook it thorough properly. Eat it with butter. 

TO SCRAMBLE EGGS. 

Have some butter in skillet, very hot. Season the eggs well, pep- 
per and salt, and beat very light. Put into the melted butter and stir 
constantly till done — which will be as soon as they have become thick. 

TO POACH EGGS. 

Put a good deal of water in the skillet and let it be boiling. Break 
one egg at a time into the water ; keep pouring the water with a spoon 
over the eggs till th^y are done. An egg poacher with rings, in which 
to place the eggs and keep them in shape, makes them look much 
nicer. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

MISS E. L. NYE. 

Two ounces butter, J pound flour, rubbed together, 2 ounces 
grated cheese, yolks of two eggs, white of one. Mix well and roll 



Eggs, Omelettes, Etc. 71 

them. Cut in strips hall' inch vide, four or five inches long and bake 
in a moderate oven about five minutes. Place on a plate in form of 
log cabin. 

WELSH RABBIT. 

MRS. S. WOODBRIDGE SCOTT, CHILLICOTHE. 

Pour 2 cups of boiling milk over 1 cup of grated cheese and stir 
until dissolved and smooth. When cool add 3 eggs, well beaten, and 
a biscuit or small piece of bread crumbed up. Pour into a baking 
dish and bake a light brown. 

CHEESE FONDU. 

ANNIE G. RATHBURN. 

Two cups sweet milk, 1 cup bread crumbs, 3 eggs, beaten very- 
light, 1 tablespoonful melted butter, pepper and salt to taste. Soak 
the bread crumbs in the milk, adding a pinch of soda if it is not per- 
fectly sweet ; add the eggs, butter and seasoning, and lastly stir into 
the mixture a half pound of grated cheese. Butter a pudding dish 
and pour the fondu into it. Bake until it is slightly brown. 



72 Centennial Cookery Book. 

CAKES AND ICINGS. 



WHATEVER PLEASES THE PALATE NOURISHES. 



: We can afford no more at such a price!" 

— Shakespeare. 



ANGEL'S FOOD. 

MRS. MORRISON. 



Whites of 11 eggs, 1£ tumbler of powdered sugar, sifted, 1 tumbler 
flour, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar. Beat eggs on a 
large platter. On the same platter add the sugar, then the flour which 
must be sifted 4 times, then measured, then add the cream of tartar and 
sift again. Add the vanilla last. Don't stop beating till you put it in 
the pan to bake, don't grease the pan. Bake 40 minutes in a moderate 
oven. Try with a straw and if too soft let it remain a few moments 
longer. Turn upside down and cool in the pan, when cold take it out 
and ice it. If the tube in the center of the pan is not higher than the 
sides, put something under the edge so it won't lie flat when turned 
over. The tumbler with which you measure should hold half a pint. 

ANGEL'S FOOD. 

MRS. REDDINGTON, WISCONSIN. 

Whites of 10 eggs, 1$ tumbler sugar, 1 tumbler sifted flour, 1 heap- 
ing teaspoon cream of tartar. Beat the whites with a wire spoon till 
they are very stiff, add the sugar and beat it well, lastly stir in the flour 
and cream of tartar sifted together very lightly. Bake 40 minutes in a 
moderate and steady oven. If it is baked in a sheet it will not take so 
long. 

CUSTARD ALMOND. 

One half pint of sweet cream (small), yolks of 4 eggs, 3 or 4 table- 
spoons of sugar, 1 teaspoon (or a little more) of corn-starch dissolved 
in a little water. Beat yolks of eggs and sugar together and add the 
starch. When the cream boils stir it in and cook till sufficiently thick. 
Blanch J pound of almonds, chop £ of almonds fine and stir into the 
cream, split the other \ and lay on the icing. 



Cakes and Icings. 73 

FILLING FOR ALMOND CAKE. 

MISS IRISH. 

One cup thick sour cream, 1 cup powdered sugar, 1 lb. (in the 
shell) almonds blanched and chopped, the finer the better. Flavor 
with vanilla. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

MRS. EUNICE ANDERSON. 

Three-fourth pound of butter, washed, to free from salt, and 
creamed, 1 pound loaf sugar, pounded and sifted, 1 pound flour, 
whites of 15 eggs. Flavor with lemon or rose water. 

BLACK CAKE. 

MISS MAME SLACK, KENTUCKY. 

Mix 1 pound of butter, 1 pound sugar and 10 eggs, well together. 
Add 1 teacup of molasses, 1 pound of flour, 1 ounce cinnamon, 1 ounce 
cloves — beat well. Add 2 pounds raisins, 1 pound currant, \ pound 
citron, 1 teacupful quince preserves, 1 teacupful raspberry preserves, 
1 teacupful strawberry preserves, 1 teacupful blackberry preserves or 
jam, 1 pound orange preserves (optional). Roll the currants, raisins, 
and citron in flour to keep from sinking. Stir lightly. Bake 7 hours. 

BERMUDA SPICE CAKE. 

MRS. H. WHITNEY. 

One-half pound brown sugar, \ pound butter (a little less), 3 
eggs, § cup sweet milk, \ cup molasses, \ cup corn meal, 2 2 cups 
flour, \ pound raisins, \ pound currants. A little citron. 

BRADLEY'S CAKE. 

GRACE MAY THOMAS. 

One cup sugar, \ cup butter, 1 cup cold water, 5 eggs (whites), 
3 cups flour, 3 teaspoonsful baking powder. Vanilla to taste. Bake 
in layers. Between layers put the ordinary icing and add English 
walnuts or any nuts, which may be preferred. 

BACHELOR'S BUTTONS. 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

One -half teacup butter, 2 eggs, 3 small cups of *flour, 2 cups 
powdered sugar. Rub the butter and flour together, then the sugar 



74 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

and moisten it with the eggs. Flavor with vanilla. Drop on tins, 
making large as macaroons. Very good. 

These can be made twice the size of a macaroon. Add a pinch 
of preserve on each after baking ; cover with icing. 

CARAMEL CAKE, 
MRS. DOUMONT. 

Three cups of sugar, 1J cups of butter, 1 cup of milk, 4J cups pre- 
pared flour, 5 eggs. 

CARAMEL FOR FILLING. 

Three coffee cups of brown sugar, 1 coffee cup sweet milk, $ coffee 
cup of butter. Stir gently while cooking. Cook till it will stiffen 
when cool. Spread (while warm) on the layers of cake. The cake 
should be baked in layers as for jelly cake. Cover the top with the 
same and set in an open sunny window to dry. 

DAPHNE'S CREAM CAKES. 

Four teacups of flour (or less), f teacups of butter, 3 teacups of 
sugar, 5 eggs, 1 teacup sour cream, cinnamon, nutmeg. Bake in small 
pans. When partly baked sprinkle over several raisins and sifted 
sugar. Daphne always tried baking 1 or 2 cakes to tell the amount of 
flour needed, and seldom used quite 4 cups. 

CREAM CAKES. 

MRS. G. R. WOODRUFF. 

Boil 1 cup butter in 1 pint of water, while boiling stir in 3 cups of 
flour, then take from the fire and stir in gradually 10 eggs till quite 
smooth. Do not beat them. Add \ teaspoonful soda and drop on tin 
sheets the size you want them. Bake a half hour. 

MIXTURE FOR FILLING. 

Boil 1$ pint rich milk and stir into it while boiling 5 eggs, 2 cups 
sugar, 1 cup flour beaten together. Flavor to suit the taste. When 
cool remove the top of the cake and lay in some of the mixture. 

FRENCH CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. C. R. RHODES. 

One teacup pulverized sugar, 3 eggs, 2 tablespoonsful cold water 
and put all together in a dish and beat light, 1£ cups flour, 2 table- 
spoons baking powder. Bake in 2 jelly cake pans. Split each cake 



Cakes and Icings, 75 

and turn the cut side up, except the top one which must be sprinkled 
with fine sugar. 

CREAM FOR FILLING. 

One-half pint sweet milk, 1 tablespoon ful common starch, 1 egg, 
all mixed and boiled till stiff as mush, then take from the fire and add 
£ teacup sugar, 1" tablespoonful butter and 1 tablespoonful vanilla ex- 
tract. Spread between the cakes. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. DROWN. 

One cup of sugar, 1£ cups of flour, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of cream 
of tartar, J teaspoonful soda. Bake in 3 layers. 

CREAM. 

One pint of milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoonsful of flour, 1 tablespoonful 
of corn starch, 1 cup of sugar. 

CUP CAKE. 

MRS. BEMAN GATES. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour, 4 eggs, f cup of 
milk, 1 teaspoon of baking powder. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of brown sugar, 1 pound of raisins, 1 
cup of molasses, 1 pound of currants, 1 cup of very strong coffee, 
citron, 1 egg, cloves, 4 or 5 cups of flour, baking powder. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

Beat 12 eggs, whites and yolks separately, mix together and add 
gradually 1 pound of sugar. Beat this 10 minutes, then stir in very 
lightly 1 pound of flour. It must not be beaten after the flour is in. 
Bake in jelly cake tins in a quick oven. 

The Mixture. — Soak 5 box of gelatine 1 hour, pour over \ cup of 
warm water stirring till it is dissolved. Beat 1 pint rich cream to a 
froth, also the whites of 8 eggs. Grate 2 cocoanuts, stir the gelatine 
into the cream and add cocoanut and sugar enough to sweeten, 1 tea- 
spoonful vanilla, then the whites of the eggs. Spread this between 
and on the top, also grated cocoanut on the top. 



76 Centennial Cookery Book. 



COCOANUT CONES. 
MRS. WOODRUFF. 

1 grated cocoanut, \ pound powdered sugar, whites of 2 eggs, mix 
together, form in cones and bake» on buttered paper. 

CRULLERS. 

MRS. JAMES HOLDEN. 

Three eggs well beaten, 3 heaping tablespoons of pulverized sugar, 
3 tablespoonsful of melted butter, nutmeg for flavoring, flour enough 
to roll conveniently. Fry in hot lard. 

CUP CAKE. 

MRS. WM, R. PUTNAM. 

One and one-half cups of butter, 3 cups of sugar, 5 cups of flour, 6 
eggs, 1 teaspoon of soda, 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar. 

COOKIES. 

MISS BARBER. 

Two cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, \ cup of water, 2 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon soda. 

COOKIES. 

MISS BARBER. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 eggs well beaten, \ teaspoon 
of soda. , 

One teaspoon of nutmeg, \ teaspoon of cloves, flour enough to 
make a soft dough, 2 cups or more. 

MRS. GEORGE DANA'S COOKIES. 

Two cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, (or less if some cream is used,) 
\ cup sour cream, 1 teaspoonsoda, flavor with lemon, flour to make 
just thick enough to roll out- 

SPICE COOKIES. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

One cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 pint molasses, 1 teaspoonful soda, 
2 tablespoonsful ginger, 1 tablespoonful cloves, 2 tablespoonsful cinna- 
mon. Flour to make stiff enough to roll. 



Cakes and Icings. 77 

VERY RICH COOKIES. 

MRS. EUNICE ANDERSON. 

One cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 beaten egg, nutmeg, enough 
flour to make a moderately stiff paste. Roll with as little kneading 
as possible. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

CINCINNATI WOMAN'S EXCHANGE. 

Two cups butter, 2^ cups sugar, 4 eggs, teaspoon soda. Elour to 
make stiff enough to roll. 

COLORADO CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. G. R. WOODRUFF. 

One cup sour cream, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1 egg, $ teaspoonful 
soda, dissolved in a spoonful hot water, 2 cups flour. Flavor. Stir 
them all together without beating the eggs separately. 

DELMONICO FILLING. 

MRS. W. G. WAY. 

Two and one-half cups of light brown sugar, 1£ cup cream, 
1 tablespoonful butter, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Boil until it waxes in 
water. Spread while warm. 

DETROIT SPICE CAKE. 

MRS. D. B. WOODBRIDGE. 

Three pounds seedless raisins, H pound citron, 1 pound butter, 
2$ cups sugar, 2 cups sweet milk, 4 cups flour, 6 eggs, 2 large teaspoons 
of baking powder, 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 2 teaspoons mace. Bake 
in loaves. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. DR. S. P. HILDRETH. 

One [pint of light dough, 3 eggs, 8 tablespoons melted butter, 
8 tablespoons sugar, spice, 1 small teaspoon soda. Mix stiff and let 
them rise 5 hours. Mix again, roll out and fry them. 

MRS. DR. S. P. HILDRETH'S HARD CAKES. 

Three eggs, 1J- cups butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 small teaspoon 
soda, 1 nutmeg. Flour enough to roll very thin. 



78 Centennial Cookery Book. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. A. B. WATERS. 

Four pints flour (or more, if needed, to make dough stiff), 4 eggs, 
1 pint sugar, very fine ; melt butter size of an egg, so that you can put 
it right in ; 4 heaping teaspoons cream tartar, 2 level teaspoons soda, 
dissolve the soda in a little water, 1 small nutmeg, 1 pinch of salt. 
Beat the eggs well in a pint cup, then fill up the cup with sweet milk. 
Then stir with a large spoon till stiff enough to take up and work out 
into a soft dough. This can be set away and fried from day to day. 
Rolled in white sugar before frying. 

MRS. SALA BOSWORTH'S DOUGHNUTS. 

Four pints of flour, 4 teaspoonsful baking powder, 1 grated nut- 
meg, salt, 1 pint of sugar, 1 tablespoon ful of butter. Beat up 4 eggs 
in a pint cup and fill it with sweet milk. Mix and knead well. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

MRS. BETTY WASHINGTON LOVELL. 

Two pounds of flour, 1 cup of yeast, 2 pounds of sugar, 5 eggs, 1 
quart of milk, $ pound of butter. Warm the butter and milk together. 

ELECTION CAKE. 

MRS. JAMES HOLDEN. 

One cup of sugar, 1 cup of yeast, 2 cups of milk, flour for a stiff 
dough, rise over night. In the morning add 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of 
butter, 3 eggs, 2 cups of raisins. Mix not quite as stiff as bread. Put 
into pans, rise and bake. 

FIG LAYER CAKE. 

MRS. R. B. HART. 

One cup of sugar, 3 even tablespoons of butter, 1 egg and yolks of 
2, $ cup of milk, 2 cups of flour, 2 spoons baking powder. Bake in 3 
layers. 

FOR FILLING. 

One cup of sugar, £ cup water. Boil until thick. When cool add 
white of 1 egg well beaten. Chop 8 rigs fine and add the figs to sugar 
and egg, beat well and spread between the layers. 



Cakes and Icings. 79 



FIG CAKE. 

MISS IRISH. 

One and a half cup of sugar, whites of 5 eggs, small f cup of but- 
ter, 1\ teaspoonsful baking powder, \ cup milk, 2 cups flour. Bake in 
a sheet. Make boiled icing and put in I cup finely chopped figs. 

COMMON FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. RHODES. 

One large cup of butter, 2 of brown sugar, \ cup Orleans molasses, 
4 cups flour, \ pint sweet milk, 3 eggs, 3 teaspoonsful baking powder, 
3 teaspoonsful cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful cloves, 1 nutmeg, 3 teacups 
fruit. Bake 1$ hours. 

FRUIT LAYER CAKE. 

One-half cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, \\ cup of flour, \ cup of 
rose water, 1 cup of raisins (chopped), 2 eggs, \ teaspoonful soda. 
Bake in 3 layers, frosting or jelly between. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. W. B. MASON. 

One pound sugar, f pound butter, ^ pound flour, 8 eggs, 1 tea- 
cupful of sour cream, 1 teaspoonful of soda, or sweet milk and baking 
powder, 2 pounds raisins, 2 pounds currants, \ pound citron, 1 nutmeg, 
1 ounce cinnamon, 1 ounce spice, \ ounce cloves. Bake two hours. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. H. C. VINCENT. 

Two cups sugar, one cup sour milk, one cup butter, Z\ cups of 
flour, 3 eggs, 1 small teaspoonful soda, 1 pound raisins and spices. 

MRS. BLIS'S POUND FRUIT CAKE. 

MRS. L. E. PUTNAM. 

Beat to a cream one pound of butter and one pound fine white 
sugar. Add the well beaten yolks of twelve eggs and beat the whole 
well together. Then add two glasses rose water, half an ounce of 
mace, powdered, and \ pound sifted flour. Then mix in 1 pound 
stoned raisins, well dredged with flour, 1 pound currants, well washed, 
well dried and well dredged with flour, \ pound citron, finely sliced 



80 Centennial Cookery Book. 

and dredged. Beat the whites of the twelve eggs to a froth. To little 
over half a pound of flour add (well sifted through the flour) two tea- 
spoonsful cream tartar, and stir the whites lightly into the flour. Add 
this to the other mixture. With one teaspoonful soda, well dissolved 
in hot water, two tablespoonsful. Bake as soon as the soda is mixed 
in, taking an hour and a half to two hours for baking. Cover with 
icing before the cake is cold. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

MES. Z. D. WALTER. 

One pound sugar, 1 pound butter, 1 pound flour, 2 pounds raisins, 
2 pounds currants, ^ pound citron, 1 coffee cup brown sugar, 1 coffee 
cup molasses, with 1 teaspoonful soda, dissolved in it, 1 cup strong, 
clear coffee, 10 eggs beaten separately, 1 grated nutmeg, 1 dessertspoon- 
ful cinnamon, very little allspice. Wash and dry the currants, seed 
raisins, and chop half. Bake slowly 4 hours, with pan of water in the 
oven. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

MRS. BETTY WASHINGTON LOVELL. 

Six cups of flour, 3 teacups of molasses, 1 teacup of butter, 1 tea- 
cup of cream, 1 spoonful of soda (tablespoon,) ginger to your taste. 

HARD GINGER CAKES. 

CINCINNATI WOMAN'S EXCHANGE. 

One pint of molasses, 6 dessertspoonsful of lard, 1 dessertspoonful 
of soda, 2 dessertspoonsful of ginger, 1 teaspoonful of salt, gill of tepid 
water, flour enough to roll and cut out. 

GINGER BREAD. 

REBECCA STONE. 

One cup of sugar, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of cream, 3 cups of 
flour, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon of ginger, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon of salt. 

GINGER BREAD. 

MRS. KATHERINE WILKINS. 

One cup of molasses, 1 cup of brown sugar, 1 cup of lard, 1 cup of 
sour milk, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon of soda, 1 tablespoon of ginger, 1 tea- 
spoon of cinnamon, 1 teaspoon of allspice, \ teaspoon of cloves, 5 cups 
of flour. Good. 



Cakes and Icings. 81 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

MRS. ARIUS NYE. 

One cup of sour milk or buttermilk, 1 cup of shortening, 3 cups of 
molasses and 5 cups of flour, 1 large tablespoonful of ginger, 1 large 
teaspoon of soda, beat well. 

GINGER BREAD. — Without Eggs. 

One cup of butter, \\ cups of molasses, 2 teaspoons of soda with 1 
cup of boiling water poured over it, 1 tablespoonful of ginger, a little 
cinnamon, flour as needed — about 4 cups. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

MRS. DR. S. P. HILPRETH. 

One tumbler of molasses, 2 tablespoons of butter, 1 teaspoon of 
soda, 1 tablespoon of ginger, flour enough to roll very thin. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

MRS. J. L. RECKARD. 

Three-fourths of a cup of lard, 1 pint of molasses, 1 tablespoon 
each of ginger and soda, 1 teaspoon of mustard, ^'tir the soda, dis- 
solved in a little warm water, in the molasses and mix with the melted 
lard, adding flour. Roll as thin as possible. 

GINGER BREAD. 
MRS. EPGERTON. 

One cup of butter, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of sour 
milk or cream, 1 tablespoonful of ginger, 1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 2 
eggs and spice to your taste, 5 cups of flour, 1 teaspoonful of soda. 

NANTASKET GINGER BREAD. 

MRS. I. R. WATERS. 

Two pounds of flour, 1 pound of sugar, i pound of butter, rub the 
butter and sugar to a cream and add 5 eggs, 2 tablespoons of ginger, 1 
teaspoon of soda, then the flour. Roll very thin and cut in small 
cakes, and bake a light brown. 

SOFT GINGER COOKIES. 

MRS. EATON. 

Two cups molasses, 11 tablespoons melted lard (or half butter), 
9 tablespoons hot water, teaspoon salt, 3 teaspoons soda, dissolved in 
6 



82 Centennial Cookery Book. 

the molasses, tablespoon ginger. Flour enough to make very soft 
dough. 

SOFT GINGER CAKES. 

MRS. G. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

One and a half tea cups molasses, 1 egg, £ cup of butter or lard, 
f cup of boiling water, 1 teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in the water, 
3 cups (before it is sifted) of flour, 1 tablespoon ginger. If lard is 
used, add salt. Drop on buttered tins. 

GOLD AND SILVER CAKE. 

MRS. B. GATES. 

One-half cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, \ cup milk, whites 
of 3 eggs. Repeat this for the Gold Cake, using the yellows of the 
eggs, and adding a little more milk. 

Flavor the Silver Cake with almond. Flavor the Gold Cake with 
vanilla. 

GERMAN BREAD. 

MRS. BEACH. 

Take enough of the light dough (ready for baking) for one loaf 
of bread. Add to it 1 small cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon of butter or 
lard, 1 cup of stoned raisins, spice to suit the taste, the beaten whites 
of 2 eggs. Knead well. 

GRANDMA DUNN'S CAKE. 

One cup of butter, 3 cups of sugar, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon of soda, 
1 cup of sour milk. Flour enough to make it stiff. 

HARVARD CAKE. 

MRS. HOLDEN. 

One -half cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, f cup of milk, 3 eggs, 
3 cups of flour, 1 small teaspoonful of soda, two of cream of tartar. 

HERMIT COOKIES. 

MRS. JOHN EATON. 

Three eggs, 1$ cup of brown sugar, \ cup of butter, 1 cup of 
currants, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon. Dissolve soda 
in a little milk. Flour enough to roll. 



Cakes and Icings. 83 



HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

One and a half cups butter, 3 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 5 cups 
flour, 2 cups of hickory nut meats, 6 eggs, beaten separately, 3 tea- 
spoons of baking powder. 

HARRIET'S CAKE. 

MRS. H. B. S. 

One and a half cup of butter, 3 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 5 cups 
flour, 6 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, 1 teaspoonful soda, 
2 teaspoonsful cream-tartar. 

ICING FOR CAKE. 

To the white of 1 egg, allow 5 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. 
Put the sugar into the egg before beating it. Stir briskly in a deep 
bowl. Flavor to taste. 

BOILED ICING. 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

Boil 1 cup of sugar in water enough to cover it. Boil until ropy. 
When boiling pour on the unbeaten white of an egg and beat rapidly 
to a froth with a knife. 

BOILED ICING. 

MISS BARBER. 

One-half cup of water, 2 cups of sugar. Boil till it strings. Beat 
in a pan set in cold water till it is cooled. Beat the whites of 2 eggs 
and stir into the sugar and water. 

FROSTING. — Excellent. 

MRS. BEMAN GATES. 

To the white of 1 egg add 4 tablespoons of powdered sugar, full. 
Mix sugar and egg without beating the egg. Beat together till the 
frosting drops from the spoon, and makes little mountains standing 
alone. 

ICING FOR CAKE. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

One-fourth pound of sugar to white of 1 egg. Beat the white to a 
froth. Add sugar and beat until stiff. Never fails. 



84 Centennial Cookery Book. 

SOFT FROSTING WITHOUT EGGS. 

MRS. NORTHROP. 

One cup of sugar, \ cup of sweet milk. Boil from 5 to 8 minutes. 
When it " hairs ", it is done. (Take a little on the finger and press it-) 
When it is partially cool add the flavoring. Beat very hard until 
white. If too thick to spread nicely, add a little milk. 

FROSTING FOR ANY CAKE. 

MRS. EATON. 

When white of 1 egg is "beaten, stir in spoonful by spoonful 10 
teaspoons of sifted pulverized sugar. Beat thoroughly. Spinkle in \ 
of a teaspoon of cream of tartar, add J of a teaspoon of water, drop by 
drop, stirring all the while. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

MRS. HOLDEN. 

One-half cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, £ cup of milk, 3 egrgs, 1 tea- 
spoonful of cream of tartar, \ teaspoonful of soda, 2 cups of flour. 

LADY CAKE. 

MRS. A. G. GARD. 

Two cups of flour, lj cups of sugar, \ cup of sweet milk, \ cup of 
butter, 3 eggs, 1 large teaspoonful of baking powder. Try it. 

NUT JUMBLES. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

One-half pound of sugar, \ pound butter, 3 eggs, add \ pound 
chopped almonds and a little lemon juice. Stir in lightly from \ to | 
of a pound of flour. Flavor with rose water or orange flower water. 
Cocoanut can take the place of the almonds if preferred. 

DAPHNE'S JUMBLES. 

One and a half pounds flour, 1 pound sugar, \ pound butter, 
4 yolks and 2 whites of eggs, nutmeg, 1 glass full of rose water. 
Roll them thick with powdered sugar, and bake on tins. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

MISS IRISH. 

Two cups sugar, \ cup butter, 1 cup milk, 3 cups flour, 3 eg«;s. 
Makes 5 layers. For the jelly, grate the rind and use the juice of 



Cakes and Icings. 85 

two large lemons. 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon butter, 2 cup water, 
1 tablespoon flour, mixed with a little water, and boil till it thickens. 



JUMBLES. 

MRS. B. GATES. 

One-half pound of butter, 2 pound sugar, 1 pound flour, 4 eggs. 
Save some of the sugar to sprinkle on after rolling. 

JELLY ROLL. 

MRS. D. B. TORPY. 

One pint granulated sugar, 1 pint flour, 2 teacup cold water, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder, 6 eggs. 

JAM CAKE. 

MISS MARY SLACK, KENTUCKY. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup sweet cream, 
4 cups flour, 1 cup jam, 1 cup raisins, 2 cup citron, 1 tablespoonful of 
cinnamon, 1 tablespoonful cloves, 1 tablespoonful baking powder. 
Bake 2 hours. 

MOTHER'S LOAF CAKE. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

Three pounds flour, 2 pounds sugar, If pounds butter, 1 5 pounds 
raisins, 1 2 pint yeast, 1 2 pint warm milk, 3 eggs, 3 nutmegs. Mix 
sugar and butter together, and use one-half when you wet up your 
cake, at night. Put in a warm place to rise. Beat well in the morn- 
ing, and add the remainder of the sugar and butter, also the eggs. 
Let it rise the second time. When light, just before baking, put in a 
half teaspoonful of soda. Bake in loaves. 

MRS. GOVERNOR MEIGS'S LOAF CAKE— 1830. 

DAPHNE. 

Make up 4 pounds of dough the night before. Next morning put 
the dough in a wooden bread bowl and mix with it 14 pounds of 
butter and 2 pounds of sugar. Then break 7 eggs and put the yolks 
in, 1 saucer full of every kind of spice, 1 teacup of flour. Then beat 
up the whites of the 7 eggs and stir the whole up well. 1 pound of 
raisins, stoned, and well floured. Put this in buttered cake pan and 
let it stand 3 hours. Then bake it 2 hours. Give it two good coats of 
icing. Flavor with lemon. 



86 Centennial Cookery Booh. 



LOAF CAKE BY MEASURE. 

MRS. G. DANA. 

Two cups milk, 2 cups sugar, 2 cup yeast. Make into a batter at 
night. In the morning, add 1 cup butter, 1 cup lard, 2 cups sugar, 
2 eggs and spices and fruit. This makes 4 loaves. 

FRENCH LOAF CAKE. 
MRS. ISRAEL WATERS. 

Five cups powdered sugar, 3 cups fresh butter, 2 cups sweet milk, 
10 cups dried and sifted flour, 6 eggs, 3 nutmegs, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 
pound raisins, \ pound citron. Stir sugar and butter to a cream, add 
part of the flour with the milk a little warm and the beaten yolks of 
eggs, then add the rest of the flour, beaten whites of eggs, spice and 
soda and last of all, the fruit. This makes 4 loaves. Bake 1 hour. 
More fruit improves it. Use of currants 1 pound. 

LIGHT CAKE— 13 LOAVES. 

MRS. I. W. ANDREWS. 

Eight pounds of flour, 5 pounds of sugar, 3 pounds of butter, Im- 
pounds lard, 3 pints of milk, 1 quart of yeast, 8 eggs, 4 nutmegs, 1J 
ounces of mace. Mix two pounds of sugar and all the lard in the 
flour. Add the milk, with the yeast and eggs beaten together. Let it 
rise, then add your butter and sugar after being well mixed. Add the 
fruit after second rising. If too rich leave out 2 pound of butter and 
\ pound of lard. 

R. E. LEE CAKE. 

MISS MARY SLACK, KENTUCKY. 

Make batter same as for jelly cake. Squeeze the juice from 4 
lemons and 4 oranges. Strain on 1 lb. sugar. Stir until dissolved. 
Crate 1 cocoanut. Bake cake in jelly cake pans, and as each one is 
baked, spread on a layer of the juice and sugar, then sprinkle cocoa- 
nut over it and drop some of the juice over cocoanut. Then take an- 
other layer of cake, and so on until all the cakes are used. Spread 
icing or sprinkle sugar over the top. 

LOAF CAKE. 

Three cups bread dough, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs, 2 cup 
milk, 2 lb. raisins, teaspoon soda. Spice to taste. 



Cakes and Icings. 87 

MARBLE CAKE. 

MRS. J. L. RECKARD. 

White — One cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 4 cups flour, 1 cup sweet 
milk, whites of 7 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder. 

Dark — One cup molasses, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 
cups dark brown sugar, 5 cups flour, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 2 of 
allspice, 1 of cloves, 1 of nutmeg, 3 teaspoons baking powder. This 
will fill a six-quart pan. Put a layer of the white and add the dark 
and white according to fancy. 

OX EYES. 

MRS. S. P. HILDRETH. 

Two cups of sugar, 2 cups of butter, 3J cups of flour, 6 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon soda, nutmeg. Drop on buttered paper and put a raisin in the 
center of each cake. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

MRS. HAWKS. 

Two coffee cups of sugar, 2 coffee cups of flour, \ cup of water, 
grated peel and juice of 1 orange, 5 eggs, 2 teaspoons of baking powder. 
Stir beaten yolks thoroughly with warmed sugar, add water with the 
grated rind and juice of the orange mingled, mix in well \ the flour, 
then \ the whites beaten stiff, then very lightly, the rest of the flour, 
and whites of the eggs. 

Cream. — Dissolve f of a sheet of isinglass in \ of a teacup of 
boiling water, strain, add grated peel and juice of 1 orange. Add 
nough powdered sugar to make it thick as icing. Some use instead, a 
plain white frosting, flavored with orange juice. 

PINE APPLE CAKE. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

Make by recipe for Angel's Food and bake in layers. 
Filling. — Buy grated pine-apple, press all the juice out in hair 
sieve, add 2 or 3 tablespoons of icing. 

POUND CAKE. 

MISS IRISH. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, £ .cup of milk, 2 
cups of flour, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Add fruit and 
citron, if you like. 



Centennial Cookery Book. 
POUND CAKE. 

MRS. WM. R. PUTNAM. 



One pound of sugar, 1 pound of flour, I of a pound of butter, 8 
eggs, nutmeg. Rub butter and sugar together till very light, add 
yolks of eggs, spice, and part of flour, then the beaten whites, and 
remainder of flour. Beat well together. 

EUSK. 

MRS. WM. R. PUTNAM. 

One pint of milk, 1 teacup of butter, 2f cups of sugar, 4 eggs, 
yeast. Make the milk into a sponge. 

ROSE CAKES. 

MRS. H. B. S. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 5 eggs, leaving out £ the 
whites, 1 gill of rose water, a little flour. Eoll in sugar. 

PERFECTION SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

Six eggs, 1 pint flour, 1 pint sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls water. Beat 
the sugar and yolks well together. Beat the whites separately. Then 
put the whites into the sugar and yolks and beat a good while. Then 
stir in the flour, only enough to mix well. Bake quick in hot oven. 
Bake in loaf or in sheets. 

SPONGE CAKE ROLL. 

HOUSEKEEPER'S FRIEND. 

Three eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon butter, 1 teaspoon 
baking powder. Spread in a turkey pan and bake quickly. Roll while 
hot with currant jelly or jelly for roll. 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, juice of 1 
lemon, 1 teaspoon cold water. Stir on the fire until it thickens. 

HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. BEACH. 

Two eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of flour, \ cup of water nearly 
boiling, 1 teaspoonful of baking powder, lemon or vanilla. Beat the 
eggs separately, add sugar, etc., then flour and hot water alternately, a 
little at a time and bake in a quick oven. 



Cakes and Icings. 89 

DAPHNE'S SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, 1 pint of flour before it is sifted, 1 pint of sugar, £ teacup 
water. Heat the flour and sugar, then rub the sugar and the yolks of 
the eggs together for a very long time, till almost white. Grate in \ 
of the nutmeg after you add the water, and juice \ a lemon. Beat the 
whites till very stiff, then put in \ the whites and \ the flour (very 
lightly), then stir in (very lightly) the rest of the flour and (partially) 
stir in the rest of the eggs. This is better baked in a loaf, with icing 
with a little lemon extract in it. 

VELVET SPONGE CAKE. 

MRS. DANA. 

Two cups of sugar, whites of 3 eggs, yellows of 6 eggs, 1 cup boil- 
ing water, 2i cups of flour, 1 tablespoon of baking powder. Beat the 
yolks a little, add the sugar and then beat 15 minutes. Add the 3 
beaten whites and the cup of water ju>t before the flour. Flavor with 
extract of lemon. Bake in 3 layers. Make icing of 3 whites of eggs 
beaten stiff, and 6 dessertspoonfuls pulverized sugar to each egg. 

SPONGE MOLASSES CAKE. 

A large spoon very full of shortening, 1 cup molasses, 1 large tea- 
spoon soda (heaping full) dissolved in a cup of boiling hot water, 2$ 
cups of flour. 

SPICE CAKE. 

MRS. R. B. HART. 

Two cups sugar, 3 cups flour, h cup butter, 1 cup milk or water, 
yolks of 5 eggs, 2 teaspoons of cloves, 3 teaspoons of cinnamon, 2 tea- 
spoons of allspice, 3 teaspoons of ginger, 1 nutmeg, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder. Bake in 3 layers, using icing between. 

SPICE CAKE. 

MRS. JOHN EATON. 

One cup of sugar, J cup of molasses, £ cup of butter, 2 or 3 eggs, £ 
cup of milk, sweet or sour, 1^ teaspoon soda, lj teaspoon cinnamon, 1J 
teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 teaspoon of cloves, 1 cup of 
raisins. Have the batter a little stiff. About 2 cups of flour. 

SPICE CAKE. 
MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 
One cup butter, 3 cups sugar, 5 cups flour, 1 of sweet milk, 5 eggs, 



90 Centennial Cookery Book. 

1 pound of raisins, chopped fine, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 1 
tablespoonful cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful cloves, 1 teaspoonful nutmeg. 

SPICE CAKE. 

MRS. H. C. VINCENT. 

Two cups brown sugar, 2 cups flour, 1 cup sour milk, £ cup butter, 
1 teaspoonful soda, yolks of 6 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of all kinds of spices 
or as much as you like. Bake in layers, with frosting between. 

SEED CAKE. 

MRS. B. GATES. 

Four eggs, 4 cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, J cup of milk, 4 spoon- 
fuls of caraway seed, baking powder, flour enough to roll well. Roll 
thin. 

SEED CAKES. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

Three and a half pounds flour, 1\ pound sugar, | pint water, 1 tea- 
spoon of soda, plenty of caraway seed. 

SAND TARTS. 

MRS. HARRY THOMAS. 

One pound of butter rubbed into 2 pounds of flour, add 2 pounds 
of sugar, and wet the whole with whites of 3 eggs and the yolks of 4. 
Roll very thin, cut in diamond shapes, glaze with the white of 1 egg, 
cover with nuts chopped fine and ground cinnamon. 

SAND TARTS. 

MRS. W. G. WAY. 

Two cups of light brown sugar, 1 cup of "butter, 3 eggs, leaving out 
1 of the whites to spread on top, 3 cups of flour, a little baking 
powder. Work the butter, sugar, yolks of eggs, and 1 white, flour 
and baking powder all together. Roll out thin, spread on the white 
of egg beaten to a stiff froth. Sprinkle over this ground cinnamon 
and granulated sugar. Cut in squares with a knife and bake in a 
moderate oven. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

MISS M. ROSS, CINCINNATI. 

Take a handful of industry, mix it thoroughly with family love, 
season well with good nature and mutual forbearance. Gradually stir 



Cakes and Icings. 91 

in smiles, jokes, and laughter, to make it light ; take care these in- 
gredients do not run over, or it will make a cloud instead of what you 
wish. Follow this recipe carefully, and you will have an excellent 
supply of sunshine, warranted to keep in all weather. 

MKS. DE STEIGUER'S CAKE. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 5 eggs, stirred in separately, 1 
cup of corn starch, flour to make it right consistency, flavoring to 
taste. 

TEA CAKE. 

MRS. GEO. HARRISON. 

One cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon of butter, 2 cups of flour, 3 eggs 
beaten separately, £ cup of milk, 2 teaspoons of baking powder. 

TEA CAKES. 

MRS. H. WHEELER, KY. 

Three eggs separated, 1 teacup of sugar, 1 teacup of butter, 1 quart 
of flour, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, vanilla. Roll 
thin. Cover with icing and scatter colored caraway seeds over them 
for children's parties. 

TEA CAKE. 
MRS. H. FEARING. 

Four cups of flour, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of sour milk, 2£ cups of 
sugar, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon of soda. 

MRS. VINTON'S CAKE. 1835. 

One pound of flour, £ pound sugar, \ pound of butter, 6 eggs, 1 
cup sour cream, 1 nutmeg, 1 teaspoonful soda, 2 teaspoonfuls cream 
tartar. To be baked quick in tin shapes. Raisins if you choose. 

MOTHER'S BEST WHITE CAKE. 
MRS. A. T. NYE. 
One pound of flour, 1 pound of sugar, \ pound of butter, 15 eggs, 
whites only. 

WHITE PERFECTION CAKE. 

RECOMMENDED BY MRS. NORTHROP, BELPRE, AND MRS. A. W. KING. 

Three cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter (coffee cup), 1 cup of milk 

(sweet), 1 cup of corn-starch, 3 cups of flour, 1 teaspoon soda (small 

. spoon), 2 teaspoons cream tartar, whites of 12 eggs. Flavor with ex- 



92 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

tract of lemon or almond. Cream the butter and sugar. Add the 
corn-starch which has been previously moistened with half the milk. 
Dissolve the soda in the other half of the milk, then add to the mix- 
ture, then add the flour and cream of tartar, sifted together, and lastly 
the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. 

WHITE CAKE. 

MRS.- H. B. SHIPMAN. 

One cup butter, 3 cups sugar, 5 of flour, ljj cup milk and the 
whites of 6 eggs beaten very stiff. 1 teaspoonful soda, 2 teaspoonfuls 
cream tartar. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

MRS. A. W. KING. 

One cup butter (coffee cup), 3 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 4^ 
cups flour, 4J teaspoons baking powder, whites of 10 eggs. Cream the 
butter and sugar, add half the milk, sift the flour and baking powder 
together, add part of it, then the milk, then the remainder of the flour. 
Lastly the eggs. Bake in layers. This may be varied by taking \ the 
mixture and adding raisins, currants and spices to taste. Put together 
the layers with frosting. Sift your flour and sugar 2 or 3 times before 
measuring. 

WHITE NUT CAKE. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Whites of 6 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup milk, 3 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Flavor with almond. \\ pound 
English walnuts broken, not too fine. 

WASHINGTON CAKE. 

MRS. H. CHAPIN. 

One pound sugar, 1 pound flour, f pound butter, 6 eggs, 1 pint rich 
milk, 1 teaspoon soda, cinnamon and nutmeg. 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 93 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 



"the proof of the pudding lies in the eating." 



" Every leading dish has its kindred and antagonistic one." 



AN ATTRACTIVE PUDDING. 

MRS. D. B. WOODBRIDGE, DETROIT. 

Use pink gelatine. Make a boiled custard, with the yolks of 4 eggs, 
1 pint of milk and sugar to taste. Soak ^ of a box of gelatine in a lit- 
tle cold water, then pour over | of a cup of boiling water. When the 
custard is cold, add to it the gelatine and the whites of 4 eggs, beaten 
stiff. Flavor with vanilla. Stir together and pour into a mould. It 
will settle into 3 layers making an attractive pudding. 

BAKED CUSTARD. 

MISS MARTHA PUTNAM. 

Five eggs well beaten and run through a gravy strainer, f cup of 

sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt. Put the above into a two quart bowl 

and fill with sweet milk. Fill cups from this and set in a pan of hot 

water and bake one hour. 
f 

BIRD'S NEST PUDDING. 

MRS. FRAZYER. 

One quart milk, 4 eggs, £ nutmeg, $ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons 
butter, 3 tablespoons sugar. Place these, with the exception of the 
eggs, on the fire until it reaches boiling point, then stir in quickly the 
eggs, well beaten, and stand away to cool. Then cover a dish with pie 
paste and place in apples enough to cover the bottom of the dish, the 
cavity of each filled with a small piece of the paste, in which place 
four or five dried currants. Pour over the whole the custard and bake 
one hour and a half. 



94 Centennial Cookery Book. 

MORGANZA BAKED CUSTARD— 1812. 

MRS. DUDLEY WOODBRIDGE. 

Nine eggs minus 4 whites, beaten up, whites and yellows together, 
with about 12 heaping teaspoonfuls of sugar. Take 1 quart of new 
milk, let it come to a boil. Then pour the milk into the eggs, stirring 
them briskly while doing so. Put your custard in cups, and grate a 
little nutmeg over the top, set them into a pan partly filled with hot 
water. Bake them in a moderate oven. 

BOSTON SAGO PUDDING. 

MRS. JOHN MEANS, ASHLAND. 

One large teacup of sago, 4 pints of boiling water poured on it. 
Set it over a kettle of boiling water and cook it till it is soft and clear. 
Then stir in 2 teacups of sugar and 1 teaspoon of essence of lemon. 
Peel 12 apples and pour over them the sago. Then bake till the apples 
are done. Eat with cream — hot or cold. 

BROWN BETTY. 

MRS. GEO. DANA. 

Pare the apples and chop them fine. Then put in a well greased 
pan, a layer of apples, an inch thick. Sprinkle over it sugar and spice. 
Then add a layer of fine bread crumbs and then another layer of 
apples, sugar and spice, etc., etc. Put on the top a piece of butter, the 
size of an egg, and pour over the whole a teacup of water. Bake two 
hours and eat with sauce. 

SAUCE. 

Take twice as much sugar as butter, then beat up 1 egg, very light, 
with any spice preferred. Add a very little boiling water, and hold 
the sauce over hot water, which is boiling, beating it very hard for a 
few minutes till it is hot. 

BAKED APPLES. 

MRS. H. C. EVANS. 

One tablespoonful flour stirred into 1 teaspoonful melted butter, 
1 teaspoonful ground cinnamon, 4 large tablespoonfuls sugar, £ pint 
boiling water. Stir all together and let simmer a few minutes. Pour 
over baked apples while hot, before serving. 



Paddings and Pudding Sauces, 95 

BATTER PUDDING. 

MRS. CAROLINE DAWES. 

Two cups sour cream, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons soda, 3 eggs. 
Flour enough to make rather a stiff batter. Bake. Eaten with sauce. 

STEAMED BERRY PUDDING. 
MRS. DE STEIGUER. 

Four cups flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons 
melted butter, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt. Stir fruit 
to suit the taste into the batter, pour it into a buttered pan, and steam 
1£ hours. 

Sauce for Same. — One cup sugar, £ cup butter, 2 tablespoons 
corn starch, wet with cold water. Add boiling water, place it over 
the fire till it boils. Flavor to taste. 

BLACKBERRY PUDDING. 

MRS. M. M. POND. 

A nice blackberry pudding is made of \ cup of sour cream (good), 
1 even teaspoonful of soda, same of salt, 1 heaping tablespoonful of 
sugar, and flour enough to make a stiff batter; lastly, stir in 1 pint of 
nice large berries — slightly. Put in a pudding dish and steam f of an 
hour. Serve with sugar and cream. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLING. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

Core as many small apples as will fit into a pudding dish. Make 
pie crust and incase each apple in a piece of the crust, having first put 
a little butter, some sugar and ground cinnamon in each apple. Mix 
water, butter, sugar and spice as for sauce and pour some of it over 
the dumplings. Bake till done, putting more of the sauce over them 
as it cooks away. Serve hot. , 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

Five eggs to a quart of milk, 5 tablespoons of sugar, add flour 
when cool. When the custard is done and hot, add a little of the 
beaten egg, then heap the rest in spoonfuls, making an uneven 
surface. 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. 

A layer of sliced apples, a little nutmeg and sugar, a layer of bread 
and butter, then a layer of apples, so continue until you have filled 



96 Centennial Cookery Book. 

your pan, the last layer being apples, add a cup of hot water, suf- 
ficient to wet the bread. Bake 1 hour in a moderate oven. 

A delicious pudding is made by using rhubarb instead of apples. 
Cut up the rhubarb without taking off the skin. Slice as you would for 
pies. 

A NICE CHEAP PUDDING. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

Three tablespoonfuls melted butter, 1 cup of sugar mixed with 
butter, 1 egg well beaten, 1 pint flour, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of soda, 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. Beat well, and bake 30 
minutes. To be eaten hot with sauce. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

MRS. H. W. ROSSETER. 

Two cups of bread crumbs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 quart of milk, 5 eggs, 
3 tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate. Boil bread and milk until it 
thickens. After it is cool stir in the beaten yolks of 5 and whites of 2 
eggs with the sugar, add the chocolate. Bake 2 hour. Beat 3 whites, 
5 tablespoonfuls of sugar, and I teaspoonful of vanilla. Spread over 
the top and brown. Eat cold with cream. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

MRS. D. E. BEACH. 

One pint of milk, 2 tablespoons of corn starch, \ cup of sugar. 
Flavor. Boil the milk, adding the sugar and corn starch, and when 
thick, stir in lightly \ of a grated cocoanut and the beaten whites of 3 
or 4 eggs. Mould, and eat cold with cream. 

CRAWFORDSVILLE SNOW PUDDING. 

One cup of Cooper's gelatine,, after it is broken into fine bits. Pour 
Z\ cups of water over it and let it stand till dissolved. Add 2 cups of 
sugar, and juice of 2 lemons. Strain and set in a cool place till it 
begins to jelly, then add the well beaten whites of 3 eggs. Stir in well, 
and turn into a mould. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 cup of sweet milk, 
1 pint of flour, 2 eggs, 2 heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Serve 
with rich sauce. 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 97 



CUP CUSTARD. 

MRS. BARBER. 

One quart of milk, 4 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 salt spoon of salt. 
Boil the milk. Beat the eggs with the sugar and salt till very light 
and add the hot milk slowly. Pour into small cups which have been 
set in a dripping pan, making 8 teacupsful. Grate nutmeg over the 
top of each. Pour boiling water into the pan after it has been set into 
the oven. Bake slowly, testing (after the first 20 minutes) with a knife 
blade. The moment the knife blade comes out smooth, they are done. 
The more slowly they are cooked the more creamy they are. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

MISS BARBER. 

Divide and subdivide sweet oranges. Place them in a deep dish 
and pour a rich corn starch custard over them. Bake slowly. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

One quart new milk, yolks of five eggs, whites of seven eggs 
(two of these whites are for the meringue), 6 tablespoons of sugar, 
vanilla flavoring, 1 teaspoonful to a pint, heat the milk almost to boil- 
ing. Beat the yolks well, stir in the sugar and stir carefully into the 
milk, removing it from the fire to do so. Stir in the whites of five 
eggs, after beating them to a froth. Return the whole to the fire, stir 
carefully until it is thick, but not until it breaks; pour in the vanilla 
now. Pour into glass cups. Whip the whites of the two eggs remain, 
ing to a meringue with a heaping tablespoonful of powdered sugar, 
and when the custard is cold, pile a little of this on the top of each 
cup. A preserved strawberry or cherry or a little bright colored jelly 
can be placed on the top of each. 

CUSTARD. 

One quart of milk, 4 eggs, beaten separately. Beat with the yolks 
$ cup sugar. Stirr into the egg scalded milk, spoonful by spoonful, 
return to sauce pan and cook till thickened. Pour over the oranges. 
'Spread over top the whites, beaten, with enough sugar for a stiff 
meringue. Place in oven to brown. To be served when cold. 
7 



98 Centennial Cookery Book. 

CUSTARD PUDDING. 

MRS. BENJAMIN DANA. 

One quart of milk, 1 pint of flour, 6 eggs, and a little salt. To 
be eaten with rich sauce. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

MRS. CUTLER. 

One quart of milk ; take one-half the milk and heat it, when 
nearly boiling add 2 tablespoon fuls of corn starch, dissolved in cold 
milk and a little sugar. When ready to take oft, stir in the whites of 
2 eggs, beaten stiff". Make a custard of the other one-half quart of 
milk and the yolks of the eggs, and pour over the pudding, when cold. 

This same pudding is delicious with whipped cream poured over 
it. Take 2 a bowl full of cream, beat it with a Dover egg beater, and 
as the cream grows light and puffy take it off and sweeten it, and 
flavor it with vanilla. 

DELMONICO PUDDING. 

One quart scalded milk, 3 tablespoons corn starch, moistened with 
a little cold milk ; stir into the boiling milk the beaten yolks of 5 eggs, 
4 tablespoons of sugar ; stir it all well together, then take it off and 
flavor it ; pour into a pudding dish ; place over the top of this the 
whites of 5 eggs, the juice of the lemons and a heaping tablespoon 
of sugar, beaten to a stiff froth ; set this into your oven and brown 
it. It may take from 5 t<? ^2 minutes to do it. 

EVE'S PUDDING. 

MRS. H. L. HART. 

Six eggs, 6 apples, 6 ounces of bread crumbs, 6 ounces of currants, 
6 ounces of sugar, salt and nutmeg. Boil 3 hours. Serve with sauce. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

MISS IRISH. 

One cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of sugar, 2 cups of flour, 2 eggs well 
beaten, 2 tablespoonfuls of baking powder. Put any kind of small 
fruit — tart apples are perhaps the nicest — in a well buttered dish, pour 
the batter over it and steam 1 hour. Serve with sauce. One-half the 
receipt will do for a family of four or five. 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 99 



FRUIT PUDDING. 

MRS. M. P. WELLS. 

One cup of molasses, 1 cup of sweet milk, £ cup of butter, 2 cups 
of raisins, seeded, 4 cups of flour, 1 teaspoonful of soda, 2 teaspoonfuls 
of cream of tartar, a little salt, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Steam 
4 or 5 hours. Serve with rich sauce. 

* FIG PUDDING. 

MRS. F. G. SLACK. 

One teacup of suet, 1 teacup of molasses, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of 
soda, 1 teacup of milk, 3 teacups of flour, 1 teacup of figs cut the size 
of raisins. Steam 2 or 3 hours. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

Whites of 9 eggs, 9 teaspoons of jelly, 4£ teaspoons of sugar, 1 tea- 
spoon of essence of lemon. Beat this 1 hour, and have a glass dish of 
rich cream and place the float upon it. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

One quart of milk, as soon as it boils stir in the yolks of four 
beaten eggs, f of cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, let them boil up a 
moment, stir constantly, pour into a covered dish, season with vanilla. 
Have your whites well beaten and drop on the top of the custard Jby 
the spoonful, then cover immediately. The steam thus confined will 
cook the islands sufficiently. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 
MRS. LAURA TORRANCE, MONTREAL. 

One-half pound of figs minced, rather less than \ pound of suet, 
\ pound of brown sugar, \ pound of bread crumbs, 1 cup of milk, 1 
ounce of orange peel, 5 eggs, and a little ground cinnamon and ginger. 
Mince the figs small. Boil 5 hours. Serve with sauce. Six ounces of 
suet is sufficient. It is very good without the orange peel. 

FOUR MINUTE PUDDING. 

Three tablespoonfuls of corn starch, 1 quart of milk, dissolve the 
corn starch in some of the milk and mix with it a little salt and 3 eggs 
well beaten. Heat the remainder of the milk in a bucket set in hot 



100 Centennial Cookery Book. 

water, add the above preparation and boil 4 minutes, or until it 
thickens, stirring it briskly. To be eaten with liquid sauce. 

GOLD AND SILVER PUDDING. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

One quart of milk, 6 tablespoonfuls of flour, add a little salt. Take 
£ of the milk and let it come to a boiling heat, then add the remainder 
of the milk and flour stirred together. When* this is cool put in the 
beaten yolks of 6 eggs. Bake about half an hour. For the icing take 
the whites of 6 eggs, J cup of sugar beaten till very stiff. Flavor with 
lemon. To be eaten cold. 

GRAHAM FLOUR PUDDING. 

MRS. JOHN EATON. 

One and a half cups Graham flour, £ cup of molasses, \ cup of but- 
ter, 5 cup of sweet milk, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 cup of raisins, 1 
teaspoon of cinnamon, \ teaspoon of cloves. Steam 2 hours. 

GELATINE CUSTARD. 
MRS. TURNER. 

One cup sugar, 1 pint tepid water, the whites of 4 eggs, \ package 
of gelatine dissolved in the water. Beat the whites to a stiff froth and 
put iu the dissolved gelatine and beat all together half an hour. Fla- 
vor with lemon or vanilla. Make the yolks into a custard and pour 
over it. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

MRS. WOODRUFF. 

One cup Graham flour, 1 egg, f cup molasses, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 
cup sweet milk, salt, 1 cup raisins. Steam 3£ hours. Served with 
sauce. 

HUNTER'S PUDDING. 

MRS. GALLAHER, BELLAIRE. 

One cup of butter, 1 egg, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of raisins, 1 cup 
of sour milk, 2 teaspoons soda, all kinds of spice. Make a stiff batter 
and steam 3 hours. Serve with sauce. 

HENRIETTA ROBBINS'S PUDDING. 

Mix 5 spoons of flour and 5 spoons of milk with 5 well beaten eggs, 
mix the yolks with the flour and milk, then turn 1 quart boiling milk 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 101 

upon it, after which stir in the well beaten whites with it. Bake 15 
minutes. To be used immediately with sauce. 



INDIAN TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

MRS. ROSSETEK. 

Boil 1 pint of milk into which stir 5 large spoonsful corn meal 
which has been wet up with £ pint cold milk, add £ cup tapioca 
(soaked) and f cup of molasses, salt, then add \ pint more of cold 
milk. Bake and eat while hot with plenty of butter. 

From the American Frugal Housewife.— By Mrs. Child, Boston, Mass. 1836. 
BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

FURNISHED BY MRS. D. H. GARD, COLUMBUS, O. 

Scald a quart of milk, (skimmed milk will do) and stir in 7 table- 
spoons of sifted Indian meal, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 teacup of molasses, 
1 great spoon of ginger or sifted cinnamon. Bake 3 or 4 hours. If you 
want whey you must be sure and pour in a little cold milk after it is 
all mixed. A little chopped apple can be added which makes it very 
nice. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

MRS. I. H. NYE. 

Two quarts milk, 7 tablespoons corn meal. Stir in the milk while 
boiling, when cool add 1 tablespoon flour, 4 eggs, nutmeg or other 
spices, 1 teacup molasses, butter size of an egg. Bake 2 hours. 

KING GEORGE'S PUDDING. 

MRS. CUTLER. 

One pint of bread crumbs, J pint of flour, 1 teaspoon baking pow- 
der sifted in the flour, a little salt, \ pound raisins, \ pound currants, 
£ pound chopped suet, 1 coffee cup of milk, 1 egg. Tie tightly in a bag 
and boil 3 hours, or in a covered tin mould, in water, one hour and a 
half. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

MISS IRISH. 

One cup butter, 2 cups sugar beaten to a cream, add 2 eggs beaten 
very light. Stir in 4 tablespoons boiling water and flavor to taste. 
Instead of water one may use syrup left over from canned fruits. 



102 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

MRS. H. L. HART. 

Two dessertspoons flour, 3 dessertspoons sugar, a small piece of 
butter, a little salt. Mix sugar, flour and butter with 2 spoons cold 
water and add 1 pint boiling water. Flavor to taste. 

» 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

OLD SOUTH CH. COOK BOOK. 

One tablespoon of butter, h pint sugar, grated peel and juice of 
one lemon, \ pint water, boil, cool a little and stir in yolk and white 
of a well beaten egg. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

To 1 teacup brown sugar, 1 dessertspoon flour, rubbed smoothly 
together. Over this pour a little boiling water, stirring. When boiled 
add a large lump of butter, teaspoon of vinegar and nutmeg. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, \ cup butter, 2 eggs, 5 lemon. Rub butter and 
sugar to a cream, add eggs and beat very light. Put the same in a cup 
over the boiling tea kettle and stir often. Just before serving add 
grated rind and juice of lemon. 

For apple dumplings use more sugar. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

MRS. T. H. HAWKS. 

One large cup of sugar, nearly half a cup of butter, 1 egg, 1 lemon, 
all the juice and half the grated peel, 3 tablespoonfuls boiling water, 
cream the butter and sugar and beat in the egg, beaten very light, add 
the lemon ; beat hard ten minutes and add one spoonful of the water 
at a time. Put in tin pail and set within the uncovered top of the tea 
kettle, which you must keep boiling until the steam heats the sauce 
very hot— but not to boil. Stir constantly. 

ANOTHER LEMON SAUCE. 

MRS. T. H. HAWKS. 

Take 1 cup of sugar and \ cup butter, and when it is creamed stir 
it into boiling lemonade, made of 1 lemon and \ pint of water. 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 103 

PUDDING SAUCES. 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

Foam Sauce.— One teacup of sugar, § teacup of butter, 1 teaspoon 
flour. Beat together till smooth, then place on the fire and stir in 
rapidly 3 gills of boiling water. Season with nutmeg, or to suit the 
taste. 

Another. — The beaten whites of 2 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of 
cream, beaten to a stiff froth. Flavor to taste. 

SAUCE FOR STEAMED DUMPLINGS. 

One-half cup of butter, beaten to a cream, h cup of pulverized 
sugar, 1 spoonful of hot water; beat well. Add grated nutmeg on 
top. 

MRS. HORaCE NORTON'S PUDDING. 

Juice of 3 lemons, f of a pound of sugar, whites of 8 eggs. Beat 
to a light froth and bake 10 minutes. This is complete, or you can 
make of the yolks a soft custard and pour over when served. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Take six large juicy oranges, slice them, removing seeds and rind. 
Place them in a pudding dish with plenty of sugar between layers. 

ORANGE CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

Slice oranges over the bottom of the pudding dish, and sweeten 
sufficiently. Pour over it the above mixture, using only the yolks of 
the eggs, and a cup of sugar. Make a meringue of the whites of the 
eggs. Pour over the pudding and brown slightly. To be eaten cold. 

PORTLAND PUDDING. 

One cup of chopped suet, 1 cup of raisins (chopped), 1 cup of 
milk, 1 cup of molasses, 4 cups of flour, \ teaspoon of soda. Mix well 
together. Add the soda last and boil the pudding 3 hours. 

POOR MAN'S PUDDING. 

Chop and fill a small baking pan with apples. Make a batter 
with 1 egg and 1 pint of milk, and 3 cups of flour, and pour over the 
apples, and bake it. 



104 Centennial Cookery Book. 



POOR MAN'S PUDDING. 

MRS. BEACH. 

One cup of molasses, 1 cup of suet or butter, 1 cup of milk, 1 cup 
of raisins, 4 cups of flour, some spice, 1 teaspoon of soda dissolved in 
the molasses. Boil 4 hours. Eat with sauce. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

E. W. C. 

Stew $ pound of prunes till they are very soft. Put them through 
a colander, sweeten and flavor with vanilla. Beat the whites of 4 
eggs very stiff, then beat in the prunes, place in a dish and bake till 
it will not stick to a straw. Make a custard of the yolks and after the 
prunes are baked pour it over them. If rightly made this will be a 
light frothy dish with custard dressing. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

MRS. H. C. EVANS. 

One pint of milk boiled, 2 tablespoonfuls of corn starch, a little 
butter, 1 cup of sugar, 3 eggs. Stir into the boiling milk. Fill the 
pudding dish with peaches halved. Cover with sugar. Pour over 
them the batter. Crack pits and put meats on top. 

RICE PUDDING. ' 

MRS. E. S. McINTOSH. 

One and a half cups of rice. Put on the stove in cold water and 
let simmer 1 hour. Then add 3 pints of new milk and let boil for J 
hour. Put into a large pan 4 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls of salt, J of a nut- 
meg, 5 large tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 pint of raisins that have been 
already put on the stove in cold water and come to a scald, add rich 
milk, part cream if you have it) enough to fill your pan. Bake \% 
hours. Stir twice while baking, to keep the raisins from settling to 
the bottom. The above quantity will fill a six quart pan. Half the 
quantity will be enough for a small family. 

RICE PUDDING. 

MRS. H. FEARING. 

Oae quart milk, £ teacup of rice, £ teacup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of 
salt. Flavor with nutmeg or vanilla. Bake in a moderate oven from 
2 to 3 hours. Stir occasionally. Use a morsel of butter. 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 105 

KICE PUDDING. 

MRS. FANNY NYE POTTER, ZANESVILLE. 

One small cup of rice, 1 quart milk, 6 tablespoons sugar, 3 eggs, a 
pinch of salt, 1 lemon, butter size of an egg. Boil the rice in the milk 
till soft. The grating of the lemon, yolks of the eggs, and half the 
sugar, mixed with the rice while hot. The whites with juice of lemon 
and remainder of sugar. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup chopped suet, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup hot water or milk, 
Si cups flour, 1 cup raisins, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, h 
teaspoon cloves. Steam 3 hours. 

SUET PUDDING. 

MISS IRISH. 

One cup molasses, 1 cup suet, I cup milk, 3 cups flour, 2 cups rai- 
sins or chopped figs, 1 tablespoon soda, 1 tablespoon allspice, 1 table- 
spoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful cloves. Steam 2 hours and serve with 
a sauce. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

MRS. II C. EVANS. 

One-half box gelatine dissolved in 1 pint of water. Let about J 
of the pint of water be put on the gelatine cold, when soft, put the 
rest of the pint on boiling hot, 1 cup of sugar, juice of 2 lemons. Mix 
all together and strain. When cold and it begins to stiffen beat it to a 
froth, then add the whites of 4 eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Beat well 
together. Put in cups or a mould to cool. Take the yolks of eggs and 
I2 pints milk, make custard and pour round it just before serving. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

MRS. OGBORN. 

One box gelatine soaked in a quart of water 1 hour, 2 cups of 
sugar, pour over 1 pint of boiling water, set it away to cool, when it 
begins to congeal add the whites of 6 eggs well beaten. Beat until 
thoroughly mixed. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

One teacup of sago, 1 quart of cold water, stand 4 hours, then put 
the same pan on the stove and let it come to boiling point, have a pud- 
ding dish with apples sliced, pour the sago over these, you need to salt 
and sweeten the sago first, put a few bread crumbs over the top. Bake 
until the apples are tender. Serve with cream. 



106 Centennial Cookery Book. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

One cup tapioca in a pint of milk, set it near the fire to soak, stir- 
ring it often. Let it stand 2 or 3 hours, then add a pint of cold milk, 
5 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup raisins, a little salt and spice to your taste. 
Bake one hour and a half. 

TROPICAL SNOW. 

MRS. D. E. BEACH. 

Eight oranges, 5 bananas, 1 cocoanut, 1 cup of sugar, Slice the 
bananas thin. Cut the oranges into small pieces. Grate the cocoa- 
nut. Arrange the orange, banana and cocoanut in layers, sprinkled 
with sugar. Have the top layer of cocoanut, with a few slices of 
banana for ornament. 

MRS. H. A. TOWNE'S PUDDING. 

Boil f of a cup of butter in 2 tablespoons of flour, stirring all the 
time, add a tumbler of sweet milk and stir until the consistency of 
starch. Take from the fire and add the unbeaten yolks of four eggs. 
Make this in the morning. Before dinner add the whites well beaten 
and 2 tablespoons of sugar. Bake 25 minutes. Eat with liquid sauce. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Take 3 tablespoonfuls of tapioca, soak in J cup of water. Take 
the yolks of 3 eggs and mix with 1 cup of sugar, and a little salt. Stir 
all together. Add 1 quart of boiling milk, 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Let it thicken a little, only a few minutes. Beat the whites of the 
eggs to a stiff froth, add 1 tablespoonful of sugar. Turn the pudding 
into a dish, drop the frosting on it in spoonsful and set it in the oven 
to brown slightly. To be eaten cold. 

ANOTHER TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One teacup of tapioca soaked in 1 quart of water, 12 apples peeled 
and cored, a little sugar and cinnamon in each. Bake till about half 
done. Let the tapioca come to a scald, pour over the apples and bake 
an hour. To be eaten warm with sauce. 

TAPIOCA APPLE PUDDING. 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON. 

Soak for 2 hours a teacup of tapioca in more than enough water 
to cover, keeping it warm, (when done the pudding should be trans- 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces. 107 

parent: otherwise not sufficient water has been used.) Put in a but- 
tered baking dish alternate layers of the tapioca flavored with vanilla 
and sliced apples, adding to the batter sugar and small bits of butter. 
Bake an hour or more — until the apple is done. Serve with cream or 
sweet sauce. 

TAYLOR PUDDING. 

One cup of sour milk, 1 cup of suet, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of 
raisins, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of soda, flour enough to make a stiff 
batter. Steam 3 hours. To be eaten with sauce. 

THANKSGIVING PUDDING. 

MRS. WEBSTER, MAINE. 

Two pounds of raisins after being stoned and cut, 1 pound of beef 
suet chopped fine. 1 pound of crackers, 8 eggs, 2 nutmegs, \ pound of 
sugar, 1 tablespoon of cinnamon, 1 pint milk, 1 teaspoonful of cloves, 
salt. Beat eggs very light, then put in \ the milk and beat both to- 
gether. Stir in gradually the cracker, then the other ingredients, 
lastly the remainder of the milk. If not thick enough add a little 
more cracker. Steam 6 hours. 

SAUCE FOR THE ABOVE. 

MRS. WEBSTER. 

One and one-half pounds of sugar, \ cup of butter, yolk of 1 egg. 
Rub well together and add the white of the egg beaten to a stiff froth. 
Add 1 cup of boiling water and flavor to taste. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

(to be eaten with roast beef.) 

MRS. D. H. GARD, COLUMBUS. 

Six tablespoons of flour, 4 eggs, and milk enough to make a thin 
batter. Put 2 tablespoons of lard in a small dripping pan ; when the 
pan is hot pour in the batter. Bake 20 minutes. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

MRS. DR. SAM'L. HART. 

Chop fine 3 dozen ripe tomatos, 2 onions, 3 red peppers. After 
boiling until a fine pulp, add 2 cups of sugar, 4 teaspoons of salt, 3 
cups of vinegar, 2 tablespoons of mace, 2 tablespoons of cinnamon, 2 
tablespoons of cloves, 2 ounces of mustard seed, whole. Boil fifteen 
minutes and seal up. 



108 Centennial Cookery Booh. 



Preserves and Jellies. 



Will't please your honor, taste of these conserves." 

— Shakespeare. 



Preserves, as our grandmothers used them are obsolete. A general 
rule for making them was a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. The 
fruit peeled and laid in the sugar over night. Simmer over a slow fire 
taking the fruit out often, cooling on a platter and returning. When 
the fruit is considered done, remove and boil the syrup down and pour 
over fruit. When cold put in glass jars. Quinces should be parboiled 
before adding sugar. 

APPLE JELLY. 

MRS. A. M. L. BARBER. 

Cut a peck of Pippin apples, into quarters after paring and coring 
them. Put them into enough water to prevent burning, but not 
enough to make the juice thin ; about one quart of water would suffice. 
When the apples are cooked thoroughly strain through a flannel bag 
without squeezing. Then to each pint of juice allow f of a pound of 
sugar. Put the juice on and boil 10 minutes ; add the sugar and boil 
20 minutes longer; add the juice and peel of 2 fresh lemons, if you 
choose. A little bunch of rose geranium leaves boiled into it, 2 or 3 
minutes before it is done, is nice. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

MRS. JAMES HOLDEN. 

One quart of cranberries, 1£ cups of water; boil fast till broken; 
then add 1 pint of sugar, and boil up 2 or 3 times. 

CRAB APPLE PRESERVES. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Take large crab apples — prick them. To every pound of fruit 
allow a pound and a half of sugar and one pint of water ; boil and skin 
till clear; then to each pound of fruit the juice and chipped rind of 
one lemon. Put in the crab apples and boil slowly till tender. Fill 
your jars half full of fruit and cover with the juice. 



Preserves and Jellies. 109 

CUKRANT JELLY. 

MRS. BLENNERHASSETT's. 

Place the currants in a stone jar set in hot water ; leave it several 
hours till the skin of the fruit look empty of juice. Put the currants 
in a flannel jelly bag and let them drip all night, without squeezing. 
Next morning add 1 pound of sugar to every pint of juice, and boil 
from 5 to 15 minutes. 

Mrs. Blennerhassett's thoughtt he art of making jelly consisted in 
using the currants before they were thoroughly ripened. 

TO PRESERVE CURRANTS. 

To 7 pounds of ripe currants add 7 pounds of sugar, 2 pounds 
of raisins. Put all in a kettle together and let them boil slowly until 
the fruit is done. Then dip out and cook the syrup 2 or 3 hours. 

FOX GRAPE JELLY FOR CAKE. 

MRS. ROLSTON. 

Pick off of stems and wash. Put in a kettle and add as little water 
as will do to start them cooking without burning. When soft rub 
through a sieve. To every pint of the juice add 1 pint of sugar. Re- 
turn to the kettle and let boil 20 minutes, or until it will harden into 
jelly. 

ORANGE MARMALAD.— (good). 

MRS. HOLDEN. 

Grate the rough, dark places from the orange, quarter the orange, 
put the peel in weak salt and water 2 hours, boil in plenty of soft 
water till tender, scrape the juice and pulp from skin and seeds, cut 
the peel in thin, long slices ; 1 pound of sugar for 1 pound of orange. 
Boil 20 minutes or longer. 

PEACH PRESERVES.— (very rich). 

Use large, white clingstones, pare and remove the stones. To 
every pound of peaches, allow % of a pound of sugar. Make a thin 
syrup, boil the peaches in the syrup till tender, but not till they break. 
Put them into a bowl and pour the syrup over them. Put them in a 
dry, cool place and let them stand 2 days. Then make a new, rich 
syrup, allowing f of a pound of sugar to one of fruit. Drain the 
peaches from the first syrup and boil them till they are clear in the 
second syrup. 



110 Centennial Cookery Booh. 



WATERMELON RIND PRESERVES. 

Cover the bottom and sides of the kettle with vine leaves. Put in 
a layer of rind and then a layer of vine leaves. In each layer put a 
small piece of alum, cover with leaves, then put a wet towel over the 
top, and water enough to cover them well. Let then simmer an hour. 
Then take them out on a dish and make a syrup of a pound of sugar 
and a pint of water, to a pound of rind. When the scum has stopped 
rising, put in the fruit and let it simmer a half hour. Take out the 
rind on a dish and let the syrup simmer an hour, then put in the fruit 
and simmer another half hour, then take it out and let stand until 
morning, then pour off the syrup and boil until thick as honey, and 
pour over the rind in a jar. Season with mace, ginger, or whatever 
you prefer. 



Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. Ill 



Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. 



Custards for supper and an endless host of other such lady- 
like luxuries." — Shelly. 



"Sweet to the sense and lovely to the eye." 



APPLE ICE. 

MRS. RAMSEY. 

Take fresh stewed apples that look white, run them through a 
sieve. To 1 teacupful of the sauce take 6 tablespoons of sugar and 
the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Beat all together with a 
fork, flavor with lemon. 

AMBER CREAM. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Soak J box of gelatine in 1 quart of milk 10 minutes. Let it come 
to a boil and stir in the yolks of 6 eggs beaten with 7 heaping table- 
spoons of powdered sugar. Cook until like soft custard. When it 
has been off the stove just 5 minutes, put in the beaten whites, flavor 
and mould. 

BOHEMIAN CREAM. 

Four ounces of any kind of fruit passed through a sieve. After 
sweetening, 1A ounces isinglass dissolved to J pint fruit, 1 pint of rich 
cream whipped. 

BEVIVO. 

MRS. F. F. OLDHAM. 

One-half box gelatine, 1 pint boiling water, 1 teacup sugar. Fla- 
vor with vanilla. 3 pints rich cream, whipped. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 

MRS. PIERCE. 

Soak £ box of gelatine in a cup of cold water. Boil 1 pint of cream 
or rich milk and 11 tablespoonfuls of sugar. Blanch and roll f of a 



112 Centennial Cookery Book. 

pound of almonds. Pour the hot milk over them and when cool add 
the gelatine, flavor with vanilla, add 1 pint of whipped cream last- 
For peach or strawberry cream omit the vanilla and almonds and add 
1 teacupful of fruit cooked as thick as marmalade, and use only \ cup 
of sugar. 

BANANA ICE CREAM. 

MRS. E. G. BRIGHAM. 

One pint of milk, 1 pint of cream, 2 eggs, 1 coffeecup of sugar, 
vanilla to taste. Beat the eggs till frothy, add the sugar gradually 
and then stir till eggs and sugar are thoroughly mixed. Lastly add 
milk and cream. Stir all well before placing in the freezer. When 
the cream is half frozen add 3 bananas finely cut with a silver knife. 
For peach cream leave out the eggs and use 1 can^of peaches rubbed 
through a fine colander or sieve. Mix with the cream and freeze. 

CURRANT ICE. 

One pint of currant juice, 1 pound of sugar, 1 pint of water. Mix 
well, and when partly frozen add the whites of 3 eggs well beaten. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MRS. REBECCA JOHNSON. 

Dissolve £ box of Cox's gelatine in 1 coffee cup of new milk ; when 
thoroughly dissolved add 1 coffee cup of sugar. Place upon the stove 
and stir until the sugar is dissolved — do not let it cook, merely heat it, 
until the mixture is smooth. Then let it cool but not stiffen ; into this 
stir 1 pint of cream, which has been whipped to a stiff froth, add 
lastly the beaten whites of 7 eggs. Chopped almonds. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MRS. W. G. WAY. 

One pint of thick cream beaten to a stiff froth ; £ box Cox's gela- 
tine, dissolved in enough cold water to cover it. Heat 1 gill of milk 
and pour it over the gelatine ; add 1 cup of pulverized sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of vanilla, whites of 2 eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Stir all 
well together, and pour over a mould lined with sponge cake. Set in 
a cool place to harden. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MRS. H. WHITNEY. 

Mix with the yolks of 4 eggs \ pound sugar, $ pint new milk ; put 
it over the fire until it thickens like custard ; do not let it boil. Soak 



Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. 113 

J box of gelatine in a little water and add it. Put in a pan placed 
on ice a pint of very rich cream, flavored. When cold whip it. Pour 
the cream into another dish and put the custards into the pan on ice. 
Stir it until it becomes like jelly, then add cream very lightly. Line a 
dish with sponge cake ; pour in the Charlotte and put on ice. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

MRS. M. P. WELLS. 

One quart cream, 3 tablespoons Cox's gelatine; let the gelatine 
dissolve on the stove in a little of the cream ; not too hot. Season the 
rest of the cream pretty sweet with sugar and flavor with vanilla. 
Whip the cream to a stiff froth, stir in the gelatine. Line a glass dish 
with pieces of sponge cake and pour over the cream. Prepare in the 
morning for tea. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE— No. 2. 

One ounce Cooper's isinglass or Cox's gelatine, soak about an hour 
in a pint of milk, place over the fire until dissolved ; add £ pound 
sugar, and flavor with vanilla. Whip 1 quart cream. Remove the 
froth as it rises to a large bowl. Stir the dissolved isinglass, etc., un- 
til it begins to cool and thicken, then mix with the whipped cream. 
Beat all well and pour into moulds lined with sponge cake or with 
lady fingers. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE.— (good). 

MRS. CAROLINE BUTLER. 

One-third of a box of Cox gelatine soaked for 1 hour, in 1 pint of 
cold milk, place over the fire and stir till dissolved, then add | pound 
of sugar. Flavor to taste with vanilla. 1 quart of cream whipped 
(with egg beater), removing to another bowl the froth as it rises. Stir 
the gelatine and milk, till it is cool and begins to thicken, mix with 
whipped cream, beat all together and pour into mould. (Should be 
prepared the day before using, unless cooled on ice). 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

One box of gelatine dissolved in 1 cup of milk, 3 heaping table- 
spoons grated chocolate. Boil 2 quarts of milk, sweeten to taste, 
add chocolate and gelatine. " Pour into moulds and cool. Eat with 
sugar and cream. 

8 



114 Centennial Cookery Book. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

MRS. JOHN EATON. 

One quart of milk, 1 package of Cox's gelatine soaked in 1 cup of 
the milk 1 hour, 4 heaping tablespoons of grated chocolate wet with a 
little of the milk, 3 eggs beaten separately, f of a cup of sugar, 2 tea- 
spoons of vanilla. Boil the milk, stir in gelatine. Beat sugar and 
yolks together, add chocolate. Stir into this mixture, spoonful by 
spoonful of scalded milk and gelatine. Keturn to saucepan, stirring 
steadily till it almost boils. Remove from fire. Beat whites to a stiff 
meringue and stir in saucepan. Pour into moulds. Serve with cream 
and sugar. This quantity is sufficient for 12 people. 

i 

COFFEE CREAM. 

MISS ELEANOR HAWKS. 

One pint of milk, £ box (scant) gelatine, lj ounce ground coffee, £ 
pint rich cream, 2 eggs, f cups sugar. Dissolve gelatine in % pint of 
milk, put the coffee in the other half, let it stand 1 hour, then steam 
coffee in milk 10 minutes, add gelatine and sugar beaten with the 
yolks, strain through fine muslin. When it begins^to stiffen, beat the 
cream and whites of eggs separately, then add to the mixture. Pour 
into a mould and when cold it is ready for use. Chocolate can be used 
as a substitute for coffee, in which case 2 tablespoons of grated choco- 
late is sufficient. x 

CARAMEL JELLY. 

MISS ELEANOR HAWKS. 

A delightful addition to baked custard. 

Three-fourth cup granulated sugar, £ box gelatine, 1 large pint 
water, 6 drops almond extract. Soak the gelatine in £ pint water 30 
minutes. Let the other half be boiling hot on the stove. Melt the 
sugar in a small pan, without water, stir constantly. When it boils and 
is of a rich amber color, stir very slowly into the boiling water, add 
gelatine and water, strain, flavor and pour into a bowl. When the cus- 
tard is baked and cold, turn it on a platter, and pile the jelly around 
it. If the custard is baked in a square pan, it will look much prettier 
when turned out. 

COFFEE JELLY. 
MRS. RAMSEY. 

Soak one-half paper of gelatine in just enough tepid water to 
cover it. Take 1 scant pint of milk, put it on in a double boiler, and 
just before it comes to a boil stir in 4 well beaten eggs and § of a cup 
of sugar (beaten together). Do not let it boil only scald, until it be- 



Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. 115 

comes a little thick. Take from the fire and put in the dissolved 
gelatine, and 1£ cup of very strong coffee, which has been previously 
boiled and settled, pour into moulds to cool. In very warm weather 
use a little more gelatine, to insure its being hard enough. To be 
eaten with cream and sugar. 



COFFEE JELLY. 

MRS. PROF. MITCHELL. 

Two-third box gelatine soaked till soft in 1 pint cold water, 1 quart 
strong hot coffee poured into this and sweetened to taste. Mould. 
Eat with sugar and crearn. 

CORN STARCH BLANC MANGE. 

MISS VIRGINIA S. NYE. 

One pint milk, 2 heaping tablespoons corn starch, £ teacup 
sugar (scant), whites of 3 eggs. Dissolve corn starch in a little cold 
milk and stir into the boiling milk with the sugar. When it is quite 
thick stir in the well beaten whites. Flavor and pour into a mould. 

Soak \ box of gelatine in a quart of milk 1 hour. Put on the fire 
and stir as it warms. Take the 3 yolks acd beat with a small cup of 
sugar. Add to the scalding milk stirring to the boiling point. Season 
with lemon or vanilla. Strain into a mould. 

FROZEN FRUIT CUSTARD. 

One pint of rich milk, 1 pint of cream whipped, yolks of 3 eggs, 
1£ cupfuls of sugar, 1 pint of fresh peaches cut into small pieces, or 
fresh ripe berries. Beat the whites and sugar well together. Heat 
the pint of milk almost to the boiling point and add it gradually to 
the beaten eggs and sugar, return to the kettle and stir constantly 
until it has slightly thickened. When the custard is partly frozen, 
add the whipped cream, stir a few minutes longer and then stir in 
the fruit. 

ICE CREAM— Peach. 

MRS. MORRIS, CINCINNATI. 

One quart of rich cream, 1 pint of new milk, 1 cup of sugar, 1 
large spoonful of gelatine, dissolve in a little of the milk. Heat the 
milk and stir in the gelatine and sugar, add the cream and 2 quarts of 
yellow peaches, and 1 cup of sugar mashed together with a fork. 



116 Centennial Cookery Book. 

4 

ICE CREAM.— Perfect. 

SOUTH CH. COOK BOOK. 

One quart of cream, 1 quart of milk, 1 pint of sugar, J of a box of 
Cox's gelatine and flour to taste. Dissolve the gelatine in 1 pint of 
milk on the back of the stove and add the other ingredients. No boil- 
ing necessary. 

MRS. OGBURN'S ICE CREAM. 

Four-fifths cream to one-fith milk, 1 heaping teaspoon of gelatine 
to each quart, dissolve the gelatine in milk, flavor with vanilla. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

MRS. NAHUM WARD. 

Soak in cold water a little more than \ a box of Cox's gelatine 
until soft. Scald a quart of milk in a bucket set in hot water, stir 
the gelatine into the milk until dissolved. Beat the yolks of 8 eggs 
with a little sugar and stir into the milk, and let it cook a little, but 
not till it curdles. Flavor with almonds and turn into a mould, wet 
with cold water. Let it stand 10 hours before using. 

ICED APPLES. 

MISS MARY SLACK, KY. 

Pare and core nice cooking apples, make very sweet, put into a 
pan with a little water, cover closely, and stew rapidly on top of the 
stove until thoroughly cooked. Place them in a baking dish. Make 
a nice icing and put over thick. Set it in the stove and brown lightly. 
When cold serve with thick cream. 

CARO DANA'S LEMON ICE. 

From 8 to 10 lemons. Sugar more than for lemonade. 2 quarts 
water. Let the lemon peel stand in whilst you cool it on ice, then 
strain and freeze. 

OAKLAND FROZEN LEMONADE. 

MRS. G. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

To 1 quart of rich lemonade add the well beaten whites of 6 eggs. 
Mix them well and freeze the mixture. 

LEMON ICE. 

Five lemons, 4 cups of sugar, 1£ quarts of water, 1 large table- 
spoon of gelatine dissolved in a little water. When almost frozen add 
the whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff, then finish freezing. 



Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. 117 

LEMON JELLY. 
One-half box of gelatine, the peel and juice of 2 lemons. Let it 
stand over night in 1 pint of cold water, then add 1 pint of boiling 
water and 1 pint of sugar. Stir till all is dissolved, then pour into a 
mould. 

LEMON JELLY. 

MRS. COLLIER. 

One box of gelatine, 1 pint of cold water, 3 lemons, squeeze these, 
cut up the peel and soak these in the gelatine an hour, add a pound 
of sugar, pour over this 1 quart of boiling water, strain and cool. 

LEMON JELLY. 
One Box Cox's gelatine soaked in 1 pint cold water. When dis- 
solved add 1 quart boiling water, in 1 pint of which, some sticks of 
cinnamon have been boiled. 1£ pounds (2 pints) of sugar, juice of 4 
lemons. Strain through fine tin strainer. 

LEMON CREAM. 

Eggs 3, beat the yolks with the juice of 3 lemons, 1 cup sugar. 
Set it at the back of your range, or in a pan of boiling water and stir 
until it becomes thick, then pour it into a dish, whip the whites to a 
stiff froth, use the juice of 1 lemon and a spoonful of sugar to flavor 
with, heap this over the cream and serve. 

LEMON BUTTER. 

C. D. BLYMYER. 

Three lemons, outside and juice, 6 eggs, 1 pint sugar, butter size 
of an egg. Beat the lemons, sugar and eggs together. Put the butter 
in a kettle and when hot add the lemons, etc. Stir until it commences 
to blubber, then it is done. 

MACEDONIAN JELLY. 

MRS. M. D. FOLLETT. 

Let 2 ounces of gelatine dissolve in 3 pints of cold water, set for 
half an hour on the fire and melt gradually, add the juice of 4 
lemons, 12 spoonfuls of sugar, and stir in the well beaten whites of 2 
eggs, over a slow fire. As soon as it boils throw in a large spoonful of 
cold water. Skim the froth from the top, and strain through a wet 
flannel jelly-bag. Cool a little of this jelly in a mould, and place on 
ice. As soon as set, add Malaga grapes removed from the stem, add 
another layer of jelly, then grapes, repeating the process till the mould 
is full, having a layer of jelly on top. While the layers are cooling, 
keep the rest of the jelly warm on the fire. Instead of grapes, small 



118 Centennial Cookery Book, 

pieces of pine-apple may be used, or the kernels of English walnuts 
in halves. 

MOONSHINE. 

MRS. G. W. WAY. 

Beat the whites of 6 eggs in a broad plate to a stiff froth. Then 
add gradually 6 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. To make it thicker 
use more sugar up to a pint. Beat in about 1 heaping tablespoonful 
of preserved peaches, cut in tiny bits, or 1 cup of jelly. Set on ice 
until thoroughly chilled. In serving pour in each saucer some rich 
cream flavored and sweetened. On the cream place some of the 
moonshine. 

NEAPOLITAN BLANC MANGE. 

MRS. EATON. 

One box gelatine, 3 pints of milk, a pinch of salt. Put the gela- 
tine into the milk and boil up once. Sweeten to taste. Divide into 4 
parts. One part flavor with vanilla, 2nd part heat together with yolks. 
Steam till melted 1 little square of chocolate and pour 3d part of milk 
and gelatine over this. Fourth part tint with cochineal. Flavor as 
you wish. Wait until almost cold, then pour in mould each layer, 
one on the other. Set away until cold and hardened. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

MRS. S. N. LOVELL. 

Peel and cut up 6 oranges, sugar well, \ box of gelatine, \ pint 
cold water, soak 1 hour. \\ pints boiling water, sugar and flavor with 
2 lemons and stick cinnamon, color with burnt sugar. Pour over 
oranges. 

ORANGE SPONGE. 

MRS. H. C. EVANS. 

One pound of sugar in a bowl, 6 good sized oranges, squeeze, and 
stir the juice on sugar. Dissolve 3£ sheets of Cooper's isinglass in 
water. Add this to the sugar. Juice of \\ lemons, drop in the whites 
of 3 eggs well beaten. Beat all together till it is thick and frothy. 
Put in a shape, and set on ice. 

PEACH JELLY. 

Dissolve in sufficient water, 1 ounce of isinglass, strain it. Halve 
12 large peaches and pare them. Make a syrup of 1 pound sugar and 
a half pint of water. Into this put the fruit and kernels, boil gently 



Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. 119 

15 minutes, then place the fruit on a plate, and cook the syrup 10 
minutes longer. Add to it the juice of "> lemons and the isinglass. 
A pyramid mould is pretty for this. Fill part full of jelly, and when 
set, put in } of the peaches, lot it harden, and then add more jelly 
and so on. Base of mould be of jelly. 

PINE-APPLE JELLY. 

MRS. JOHN NEWTON. 

Four large tablespoonfuls of Cox's gelatine, 1 pint of water, 1 large 
cup of sugar, juice of 2 lemons. Make it scalding hot and strain. 
While cooling stir in •> can of grated pine-apple. 

RUSSIA CREAM. 
MRS. DR. WOOD-BRIDGE, BELLAIRE, O. 
Four eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 quart of milk, ^ box gelatine dissolved 
in £ pint of warm water. Beat the yolks of eggs and sugar together, 
and cook with the milk like custard. Take from the fire and add the 
well beaten whites of the eggs, stirring rapidly for a few minutes. 
Add the gelatine, then a teaspoonful of vanilla. Pour into a mould to 
harden. Turn out upon a platter and cut off in blocks as in ice cream. 
Make this the day before. 

SCORCHED CREAM. 
MISS MARTHA PUTNAM. 
One quart sweet milk, 3 eggs, 6 ounces sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls 
flour. Bring the milk to a boil, and stir in the ingredients. Boil all 
together two or three minutes. Pour into a deep dish, and sprinkle 
sugar over the top, and scorch with a very hot flat-iron. Eaten cold, 
is nice to eat with ripe currants or any small fruit. 

TAPIOCA AND PEACHES. 
MRS. H. C. EVANS. 
One cup tapioca soaked, when soft add 1 cup sugar, and cook in 
water till tender. When done stir in canned peaches. Put in mould. 
Eat cold with cream. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

MISS IRISH. 

Two tablespoonfuls of tapioca, wash, and soak 2 hours. Put in a 
quart of boiling milk and cook i hour. Beat the yolks of 4 eggs with 
a little sugar, add, and cook three minutes longer. Beat the whites to 
a stiff froth, take the pudding from the fire and stir in flavoring and 
beaten whites. Serve cold. 



120 Centennial Cookery Book. 



Pies, Pastry, Etc. 



" Compounded of many simples." 



MOTHER'S APPLE PIE. 

MRS. H. B. SHIPMAN. 

Roll out the paste to fit the pie-plate and fill with early Chandlers, 
pared and quartered. Cover with a rich crust. Do not press the edges 
together, but trim thern off evenly. Bake about | of an hour. When 
done, remove the top crust carefully, mash the apple fine and season 
with a cup of sugar, small piece of butter and a little nutmeg. Sift 
powdered sugar over the top. Serve the day it is baked. 

APPLE MINUTE PIE. 
MRS. A. T. NYE. 

To be made of the early summer apples. 

Line and cover pie-plate with pastry, sprinkling flour between, that 
they may be separated. Stew and season early Chandlers, and fill the 
pies after baking the crusts. To be eaten the same day. 

APPLE TART. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

Make crust enough for two pies. Peel and cut your apples and 
fill the dish (no under crust). Bake till the apples are soft, and crust 
brown. Take oft the crust, turn upside down on plate. While the 
apple is hot, break and stir in an egg, a lump of butter, and 3 spoon- 
fuls cream. Sweeten pretty sweet, add cinnamon. Eat with cream. 

CHOPPED APPLE PIE. 

Chop apples fine, 2 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, or till sweet enough, 1 cup 
cream. Bake without upper crust. 



Pies, Pastry, Etc. 121 



CUSTARD PIE. 

MRS. H. C. EVANS. 

One pint of milk, 3 eggs, saving out 2 whites. Beat the eggs with 
2 tablespoonfuls flour and sugar to taste. Scald the milk in a bucket 
set in boiling water. Stir in eggs and flour and let cook until thick. 
Season with lemon and put in crusts previously baked. Beat the 2 
whites with about a half cup of sugar, and pour over top. Set in the 
oven a few moments to harden. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

MRS. ROSSETER. 

One grated cocoanut, 1 pound sugar, \ pound butter, 6 eggs. Beat 
sugar and eggs as for cake, then mix in eggs and cocoanut. No upper 
crust. Makes 3 pies. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

MRS. DR. SAM'L. HART. 

Two eggs, 4 tablespoons of sugar, 1 coffee cup of grated cocoanut, 
1 pint of milk, 1 tablespoon of corn starch, a small piece of butter. 
Bake with one crust. 

PUMPKIN OR SQUASH PIE. 

Cook well and strain. To 3 pints of pumpkin add 2 eggs, 2 cups 
of sugar, 1 teaspoon of ginger, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon, 1 tablespoon of 
butter, then 1 quart of sweet milk. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

MRS. C. S. HALL. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons of corn starch, 4 tablespoons of 
chololate, 6 tablespoons of sugar. Mix all together and stir into a 
pint of boiling water. Make the crust and bake first. Beat the whites 
and put on top when baked. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. CAROLINE D. DAWES. 

Three cups of rich cream, sweeten to suit taste, 1 small tablespoon 
of flour, a little salt and nutmeg. 



122 Centennial Cookery Book. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE. 

MISS IRISH. 

Beat thoroughly the yolks of 2 eggs with 1 cup of sugar, add 1 
small tablespoonful of flour and 1 small tablespoon 'of corn starch 
(dissolved in a little milk), pour into 1 pint of boiling milk and let it 
cook about 3 minutes, flavor with extract of orange and pour into a 
baked crust- Beat the whites with 2 tablespoons of sugar, flavor 
with orange, spread on top, and slightly brown in the oven. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. SLACK. 

One pint of cream, 3 tablespoons of sugar, 1 tablespoon of flour, a 
little nutmeg, white of 1 egg — not beaten separately but stirred thor- 
oughly with the flour and sugar. Bake with 2 crusts. Bake slowly, 
keeping a place open in the upper crust to let the steam escape. 

MOTHER FAY'S CREAM PIES.— 1800. 

One quart of cream, 1£ cups of sugar, whites of 2 eggs well beaten, 
2 teacups of stoned raisins, nutmeg. Stir well together. This will fill 
2 large deep pudding dishes. Line the dish with pastry, (not too 
short) pour in ^ the above, wetting the crust around the edge, then 
add upper crust and prick. Bake slow and eat cold. 

CREAM PIE. 

MRS. M. SIMPSON, CRAWFORDSVILLE, IND. 

One and one-half pints of sweet milk, 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1J 
teacups of sugar, 1 tablespoon of butter, 3 eggs, flavor to taste. Boil 
the milk and stir in the yolks and £ of the sugar and flour well beaten 
together, then the butter. Have the crust pricked to prevent blister- 
ing and then bake it. When baked add the custard. Set it in the 
oven a few moments. Beat the whites to a froth, with the rest of the 
sugar. Spread this on the pie and brown it slightly. 

LEMON PIE. 

MRS. PROF. BEACH. 

One lemon cut in 1 cup of cold water. Heat slowly and simmer a 
few minutes. Strain out the rinds and seeds, pressing all the juice 
out. Add 1 cup of sugar and 1 tablespoonful of corn starch dissolved 
in cold water. Cook this till it thickens, and then add the beaten 
yolks of 2 eggs. Bake the crust separately, fill it with the mixture. 
Beat the whites stiff with 1 teaspoonful of sugar. Spread on top and 
brown. 



Pies, Pastry, Etc. 123 

LEMON PIE. 

MRS. C. S. HALL. 

One cup of sugar, f cup of water, 3 tablespoonfuls of flour, 1 piece 
of butter size of an egg. Grate the rind of 1 lemon, slice the inside 
very thin and lay in the bottom of the pan, before putting the custard 
in. If the lemon is good this will make 2 pies. Make crust the same 
as for custard pie. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 

MRS. WELLS. 

The juice and grated rind of 2 lemons, h teacup butter, 4 spoonfuls 
cream, 6 eggs, 3 cups sugar, $ pint milk. The lemons, yolks, and but- 
ter beaten together, then add sugar, whites and cream. 3 pies. 

MPS. GOV. MEIGS'S MINCE PIE— 1830. 

DAPHNE C. SQUIRES. 

Three pounds of beef, parboiled, 2| pounds suet, 9 pounds apples, 
2$ pounds sugar, 4 tablespoons salt, 2 tablespoons fine pepper, 1 tabie- 
spoon cloves, 2 tablespoons mace, 1J tablespoon cinnamon, 1 pint of 
boiled cider, or syrup of fruit. 

MINCE PIES. 

MRS. EDGERTON. 

Three pounds beef, 2 pounds suet, 1 pound currants, 1 pound rai- 
sins, 1 pound citron, 4 pounds sugar, 4 quarts chopped apple, 1 pint 
raspberry jam, 1 quart boiled cider. Nutmeg, cloves, mace, also grated 
rind of lemon and orange and the juice of the lemon. 

MINCE PIES. 

mrs. e. s. Mcintosh. 

One-third of meat from the neck of the beef, two-thirds of apples. 
6 pounds of beef, 2 pounds fat pork, cook together and chop fine. 
Measure meat after chopping and add twice as much chopped apples, 
then add 1 pound suet chopped fine, 2 pounds raisins, 2 pounds dried 
currants, A pound citron, 2 nutmegs 1J tablespoonfuls cinnamon, 6 
pounds sugar. Pack when well mixed in jars and run suet over the 
top, when you want to use add cider, sweetened to taste and bake. 

MINCE PIES. 

MRS. I. R. WATERS. 

Two pounds boiled and chopped meat, | pound fat salt pork, 



124 Centennial Cookery Book. 

chopped fine, 2 pounds sugar, 1 cup molasses, 3 pounds apple, chopped 
fine, 1 pound currants, 3 pound raisins, £ pound citron, 1 ounce cinna- 
mon, 1 ounce cloves, 2 nutmegs. Make quite moist with boiled cider. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

MRS. BARBER. 

For 1 pie a full $ pint of rich milk, 1 heaping tablespoonful of 
pumpkin, ] egg, beat white and yellow separately, £ teaspoon flour. 
Sugar to suit your taste. A little ginger, cinnamon, and nutmeg. 
Beat all well together, adding the whipped white of the egg last, which 
should be stirred in quickly, but thoroughly. Bake 15 or 20 minutes 
in a quick oven. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

MR3. HILDRETH. 

One quart stewed pumpkin, 3 pints of milk, 6 eggs, sugar, nut- 
meg, ginger, and other spices to your taste. 

POTATO PIE. 

MRS. H. FEARING. 

One-fourth pound potatoes, 1 quart of milk, 3 tablespoons melted 
butter, 4 well beaten eggs, add sugar and flavoring to taste. 

PEACH COBBLER. 

MRS. REPPERT, SCOTT's LANDING. 

Take 1 quart of flour, 4 tablespoons of lard or butter, \ teaspoon 
of salt, mix as for biscuit, either with sweet milk or water, roll thin 
and line a pudding dish or dripping pan. Mix 3 tablespoons of flour 
and 2 of sugar together and sprinkle over the crust, then put in layers 
3 pints of thin sliced peaches, and now and then a slice of the crust. 
Sprinkle over them 1 coffee cup of sugar, wet the edges with a little 
flour and water mixed. Put on upper crust, press the edges together, 
make 2 openings in top an inch in length. Bake in quick oven half 
an hour. Serve with cream. 

PUFF PASTE. 

MRS. EDGERTON — MRS. BLISS. 

Into 1 quart of flour stirr 1 teaspoonful of salt, if you intend to 
use butter as shortening. If you intend to use half butter and half 
lard stir in 2 teaspoons of salt. Cut \ pound of shortening into the 



Pies, Pastry, Etc. 125 

flour, but do not moisten the flour in stirring it in. With \ tumbler of 
cold water wet the flour as lightly as possible to a stiff paste. Flour 
the moulding board and the rolling pin, roll out the paste to % an inch 
in thickness, cover it with J of a pound of the shortening, cut in small 
bits, sprinkle with flour, roll it up into a long roll, flour it again, fold 
in the ends, and with the rolling pin floured, roll it out again to $ an 
inch in thickness. Cover it with another pound of shortening and 
repeat the same process as before, then roll it out and use immediately. 

PIE CRUST. 

One teacup of lard, 3 teacups of flour, pinch of salt. Mix lard and 
flour together until fine, then add water to make proper consistency 
to roll. Don't work much. 

PUFF PASTE. 

MRS. ARIUS NYE. 

Rub h a pound of butter into 1 pound of flour, whites of 4 eggs 
beaten, 2 ounces of loaf sugar. 

PUFF PASTE.— Celebrated. 

MRS. JEROME BUCKINGHAM. 

One pound of flour, 1 pound of butter, 1 egg. Mix the flour and a 
lump of butter or lard, size of an egg, and the egg to a very stiff paste 
with cold water. Knead well for 10 or 15 minutes; divide the butter 
into 6 equal parts, squeeze the buttermilk all out of the butter. Roll 
the paste and spread on 1 part of the butter, dredging it with flour. 
Repeat until all of the butter is rolled in. 

PIE CRUST. 

MISS CUTHBERT. 

One pint of flour, heaping tablespoon of lard, a little water, spread 
the dough and roll the butter into the crust, a little salt. 

" Rhubarb takes all flavors and gives none, therefore, it helps to 
make up a deficiency of a more costly material." 

Wash your rhubarb, mince it fine, sweeten it and bake it until 
soft, when cold stir in raspberries or other fruit, and make into pies 

PIE PLANT PIE. 

MRS. G. M. WOODBRIDGE. 

One cup of stewed pie plant, 1 cup of sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, white 
of 1 egg, dissolve 1 spoon of butter, flavor with lemon. Bake in a 



126 Centennial Cookery Book. 

bottom crust. Make meringue of the whites of 2 eggs. Lay this over 
the top and brown slightly. 

Some bake the crust separately, and putting the pie plant, sugar, 
etc. together, set it in hot water, and stir, and cook, and then put it 
into the crust and add meringue. 

PEACH TAKT. 

MRS. H. WHITNEY. 

Line a baking dish with pastry and after baking, fill with cut 
peach preserves. Cover with whipped cream. 

SQUASH PIE. 

MRS. J. H. PARSONS, COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

One-half pint of stewed and sifted squash, 1 egg, a piece of butter 
the size of an egg, 2 cup of sugar, 2 pint of sweet milk, J teaspoon each 
of nutmeg and cinnamon, and a pinch of salt. Beat all together but 
the milk, then add the milk. Bake in a deep pie dish | of an hour. 

STRAWBERRY RICE MOUNTAIN. 

MRS. R. M. HILL. 

Cook rice as for ordinary use, (rather stiff), spread a large flat 
plate with rice, then a layer of strawberries, then rice, then straw- 
berries, forming a pyramid having a large strawberry on top. It will 
add greatly to the appearance to have a row of the nicest berries 
carefully and evenly arranged around the edge. Make in the morn- 
ing and eat cold with sugar and cream. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

housekeeper's friend. 

Take 3 pints of flour, 1 2 cups of shortening, (part lard and part 
butter) 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 cup of cold water. Cream the shortening 
until very light, drop through the flour, add the salt, then sprinkle the 
water in Turn it out on a pastry board, mix it a little with a broad 
knife, then gently pound with a rolling pin until ready to roll out, roll 
nearly a half inch in thickness, cut in long squares or put in round 
pie pans and bake quickly. As soon as it is done split open, butter 
the inside of both pieces and sugar liberally, then put a layer of ber- 
ries on the under crust and sugar, place the top crust on and sugar the 
top well. It takes 3 pints of berries. 

Syrup for Same. — One pint of berries, 2 pint of sugar. Boil 10 
minutes, strain and cool. Pour this over when you serve if you like. 



Candies. 127 



CANDIES. 



"Sweetmeats, messengers of strong prevailment in unhardened 
youth." — Shakespeare. ( 



For all candy making it is important to have suitable kettles to 
boil in. Copper or porcelain lined are the best; iron will discolor the 
candy. Use a gas or coal oil stove as the heat can be better regulated. 
Granulated sugar is best. Candy should not be stirred while boiling. 
Cream of Tartar should not be added till the syrup is boiling. Butter 
should be put in when candy is almost done. Flavoring is best put 
in when candy is poured in the plates to cool. 

AMBER CANDY. 

MRS. WOODRUFF. 

Two cups sugar, 1 cup vinegar. Boil but not stir until it crisps in 
cold water, turn on buttered pans, thin. When cold break and eat. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 tablespoonful sweet milk, 1 
tablespoonful essence lemon, butter size of an egg. 

CREAM CANDY. 

Two pounds coffee sugar, 1 teacup water, 4 teaspoonfuls vinegar, 
1 teaspoonful butter, 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla. Do not stir, and do not 
cook too long. Dry by dropping in cold water. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

MISS M. HARTE. 

Two cups of brown sugar, \ cup of water, 2 tablespoons of vine- 
gar, a small piece of butter, boil 10 minutes and then put £ cup of 
chocolate in the mixture, pour on buttered plates, when cool cut in 
squares. 



128 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

CHOCOLATE DROPS. 

MISS M. HARTE. 

Four cups of confectioner's sugar, 1 cup of cream (flavoring), boil 
6 minutes, beat till cool, when cool mould, and roll in 1 cake of melted 
chocolate. The creams of English Walnuts may be made in the same 
way. 

(PARLOR) ENGLISH WALNUTS. 

MISS M. HARTE. 

Take equal amount of egg and water in 2 tumblers of the same 
size, put in enough confectioner's sugar to stiffen, flavor with vanilla, 
press in squares and put a piece of english Walnut on top. 

CREAM FIGS. 

Wash and open the figs and put a ball of cream (such as used for 
chocolate drops) inside each fig. 

FRUIT CANDY. 

MRS. C. D. BLYMYER. 

Two pounds coffee sugar, 2 pounds almonds blanched and split, 1 
pound raisins stoned, £ pound figs, cut size of almonds, \ pound 
citron, teacup of cream, butter size of an egg. Mix with a little water 
as if making starch, add butter, cream and vanilla. Boil until it be- 
gins to thicken, then put in the fruit and stir until creamed and white. 
Pour into wet napkin and roll up as if a boiled dumplin. Do not eat 
until entirely cold. It will slice like fruit cake. 

LEMON CANDY. 

MRS. BARBER. 

One pound sugar, 1 cup water. Boil slowly £ hour, clear with a 
little hot vinegar. Test by dropping into water, and when brittle, 
flavor strongly with lemon. Pour into buttered tins and when cool 
mark off into squares. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

One quart of molasses, £ cup of vinegar, 1 cup of sugar, butter the 
size of an egg, 1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water and stirred 
in just before removing from the fire, flavor to taste. When suf- 
ficiently cool pull until white. 



Candies. 129 

NUT CANDY. 

MISS MAY WOODRUFF. 

Five cups of sugar, 6 tablespoons of water, 4 tablespoons of vine- 
gar, 1 tablespoon butter. Boil (witbout stirring) till it crisps in cole- 
water. Line buttered pans witb peanuts and pour the candy over 
them. When nearly cold mark off into squares. 

NUT CANDY. . 

MRS. W. W. MILLS. 

Three cups of brown sugar, \ cup of vinegar, \ cup of water, butter 
the size of an egg. Test in cold water. When done pour over a but- 
tered plate that has been lined with hickory kernels. 

ORANGE BON-BONS. 

Sprinkle enough orange juice into a cup with confectioner's sugar 
to make of right consistency to mould into any desired shape, then 
roll in granulated sugar and place on buttered paper. 

PEPPERMINTS. 

Mix thoroughly in a tin cup 1 tumblerful of confectioner's sugar 
with 8 teaspoons of cold water and flavor with peppermint. Place the 
tin cup with its mixture in a pan of boiling water and let it boil 3 min- 
utes, then drop it from a teaspoon on to buttered paper. Color pink 
with cochineal. 

TAFFY. 

MISS BARBER. 

Two cups of molasses, 1 cup of brown sugar, butter size of an egg, 
1 tablespoon vinegar, add last a pinch of soda. Put all together in a ket- 
tle and boil twenty minutes. Cool in shallow tins and then pull. 

WHITE TAFFY. 

Two pounds granulated sugar, 1 teacup cold water, 2 teaspoons 
vinegar, 2 teaspoons butter. Boil without stirring till brittle when 
tested in water. When done add 1 tablespoon vanilla and pour on 
buttered platter to cool. Pull rapidly till white and brittle. Cut into 
sticks. 

9 



130 Centennial Cookery Book. 



FRENCH CANDIES. 

MARY HART. 

One and a half pound of confectioner's sugar mixed thoroughly 
with \ of a cocoanut grated. Add enough water to make a stiff dough. 
Put this on a candy board (a bread board will answer the purpose) 
knead in more sugar and divide into 4 parts. Take 1 part and before 
moulding into balls mix in \ of 5 cts. worth of cochineal (liquid) into 
\ of this. Mould all this into balls and put a pink ball on top of a 
white one. With another part get 5 cts. worth of dates and seed them. 
Place a ball of cocoanut cream between each date. With the third 
part take \ of a cake of chocolate melted and roll the cocoanut balls 
into this. With the fourth part get 5 cts. worth of both almonds and 
English walnuts. Take out the meats of both and place a meat on 
each ball. 

HONEY CANDY. 

MARY M. HART. 

One cup of honey, 1 cup of sugar, \ of a cup of water, a small 
piece of butter. Boil till brittle when tested in water. Pull while 
cooling. 

HICKORY NUT CANDY. 

MARY M. HART. 

Two cups of sugar, \ cup of water. Boil till brittle. Flavor with 
vanilla. Have 1 cup full of hickory nut meats. Spread on a buttered 
plate and pour the candy over the nuts. When cool cut in squares. 

VINEGAR CANDY. 

MARY M. HART. 

Two cups of sugar, \ cup of water, \ cup of vinegar, 1 teaspoon of 
lemon, a small piece of butter. Boil till brittle. Pull white. 

FIG CANDY. 
MARY M. HART. 

One cup of sugar, \ cup of water, \ tablespoonful of cream tartar. 
Don't stir while boiling. Just before taking from the fire, stir in cream 
tartar. Wash the figs, open and lay in a tin pan. When the candy is 
brittle, pour over the figs. 



Candies. 131 

PEANUT CANDY. 

MARY M. HART. 

Two cups of sugar, \ cup of water. When boiling add 1 teaspoon- 
ful cream tartar dissolved in a little water. Cook until brittle when 
dropped in cold water. Butter the size of a hickory nut. Have pea- 
nuts shelled and on a buttered plate. Pour candy over. When cool 
cut in squares. 

CANDIED HOARHOUND— pure. 

MARY M. HARJT. 

Boil hoarhound, 10 cts. worth, in water until juice is all extracted, 
take 1 cup of sugar and water, when boiled to a feather add hoarhound 
juice. Boil again till brittle. Pour on a plate dusted with fine sugar. 
Cut in sticks. This is good for a cold, being pure. 



132 Centennial Cookery Book. 



Butter and Cheese. 



" She brought forth butter in a lordly dish.' 



TO MAKE A NO. 1 BUTTER. 

JAMES WEST. 

In order to make a number one grade of butter, have no stagnant 
ponds or mudholes in the pasture, but perfectly pure water for the 
cows to drink, and clean, dry quarters for the cows to lie in. Scald 
the milk buckets at least once a day, in short, thoroughly scald all 
the vessels used about the milk. Strain and keep it in a room or 
cellar kept for that purpose only. (Milk and butter take up the odors 
thrown oft from vegetables or even the unavoidable mould that gene- 
rates in a common cellar or room used for storing any and everything). 
Let the milk stand from 24 to 36 hours before skimming. When 
enough cream is gathered for a churning, bring it to 62° by putting 
the jars on ice. When churned, work as much of the milk out as you 
can, and salt 1 ounce to the pound. After working in salt, set by in a 
cool place a few hours, then thoroughly work and roll. Never use 
the paddle with a sliding motion, nor slick it over the butter while 
rolling, or after, as a sliding motion breaks the grain and makes the 
butter oily. Manage to have the butter come solid, then there will be 
no trouble in having a nice roll that will keep its shape. But butter 
churned soft and hardened up with ice or in other ways, will not keep 
its shape and more than likely will become rancid in less than a week. 
To make butter in winter keep the milk where it will not freeze. Never 
set your cream by the fire to warm up and get ready to churn, rather 
set it in warm water until the right temperature is obtained, and scald- 
ing the churn until it is thoroughly warmed. 

BUTTER. 
MRS. WALDO PUTNAM. 

To make good butter it is essential to have a room for butter and 
milk only, and to have it well ventilated. The old way is to set in 
shallow pans. Let it stand from 24 to 36 hours, (longer in winter), be- 
fore skimming. Churn, salt, set it away. The next day work out all 
the buttermilk and make into rolls. 



Butter and Cheese. 133 

BUTTER. 

MRS. G. 8. MARSHALL. 

I have practiced this way of making butter for 30 years. Have- 
thoroughly cleansed stone crocks sunned and rinsed with cool water 
and set in a pure, well-ventilated cellar. Into them strain the milk 
and let stand uncovered for 24 hours. Skim cream in a jar which 
must be covered. As each skimming is added stir well the cream. 
This is to prevent the mould from forming on the top of the cream. 
Keep the cream in the coolest possible place, in a refrigerator, if you are 
fortunate enough to have one. I have an ice box. I use a stone churn 
with a wooden dasher and cover, and churn every other day in warm 
weather. If the cream has a temperature of 60° the butter will form 
in about 20 minutes. Have ready a wooden bowl and ladle which 
have been scalded and cooled. Into this put the butter as gathered. 
Wash 2 or 3 times in cold water and salt to taste. I use about 1 ounce 
to a pound. When it has stood 8 hours, work well. Make into rolls 
and sell for 20 cts. per pound. 

CREAM CHEESE. 

MRS. ISRAEL DEVOL. 

Cream cheese made from Jersey milk. Set the milk at night in a 
cool place. In the morning take the thick cream off, strain morning 
milk into the same vessel, warm the milk to 90°, have the rennet pre- 
pared by soaking over night in salt and water. Put in 1 tablespoonful 
of rennet to a gallon of milk. If rennet is good it will bring it in 15 
minutes. Let it set 10 minutes after it coagulates, then cut with a long 
knife both ways. Let stand for \ hour, then stir gently every 10 min- 
utes for 4 or 5 times. Put a thin cloth strainer over the basket or tub 
with holes in it. Take hold of two corners of cheese cloth, moving the 
curd, from one side to the other a few times, then let set a few minutes, 
turn again and twist up the cloth. Next take a knife and cut curd into 
inch squares, then twist up the cloth again. Keep at this every few 
minutes until dry enough to chop and salt ready for pressing, using £ 
teaspoon of salt to 1 pound of curd. Put in hoop and put to press. 



134 Centennial Cookery Book. 



SICK ROOM. 



It is a dangerous thing to constantly carry exercise to the fatigue 
point. Every woman should make an inflexible law of her life to lie 
down in the middle of the day at least fifteen minutes, closing the 
eyes and shutting off as far as possible all anxious thought. 

In the recumbent position every muscle of the body is placed at 
perfect rest; all tension is removed from nerve centres. 

BEEF TEA. 

One pound of lean beef, 1 pint of water. Chop the meat and let 
it stand on ice over night, or several hours during the day. Boil 15 
minutes. Some let it simmer slowly on the back of the range for 2 
hours — then strain. 

CREAM OF TARTAR BEVERAGE. 

Two even spoonfuls of cream of tartar, 1 pint of boiling water, 
sweeten to taste, or, 

One tumbler of cold water, 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar, 1 of 
sugar. 

AN OLD-FASHIONED RECIPE FOR A LITTLE HOME COMFORT. 

Take of thought for self one part, two parts of thought for family ; 
equal parts of common sense and broad intelligence, a large modicum 
of the sense of fitness of things, a heaping measure of living above 
what your neighbors think of you, twice the quantity of keeping 
within your income, a sprinkling of what tends to refinement and 
aesthetic beauty, stirred thick with Christian principle of the true 
brand, and set it to rise. 

DISINFECTANTS. 

Copperas. — One pound of copperas dissolved in 1 quart of water 
will destroy the foulest smell. 

Copperas. — One and one-half pounds dissolved in a gallon of water. 
Sixty pounds to a barrel of water. 

SULPHUR TO DISINFECT A HOUSE. 

For a room 10 feet square, 2 pounds of sulphur should be used. 
Shut your room tight, put your sulphur in an iron pan, set it on fire 



For Sick Room. 135 

with hot coals, sprinkled with a little saltpetre. Keep the room closed 
12 hours. It would be well to set your pan upon bricks in a vessel of 
water. 

ZINC SOLUTION. 

Common sulphate of zinc and common salt, dissolved in water, 4 
ounces of zinc, 2 ounces of salt, 1 gallon of water. Use this on bed 
linen, clothing, towels, etc., boiling hot if possible. 

EXCELLENT DISINFECTANTS. 

Fresh air— sun-light — hot water — flowing water, soap and a scrub 
brush — ventilation and cleanliness — the broom and the dust cloth. 

Dysentery in its worst form has been cured by drinking wheat 
flour stirred in water to about the consistency of cream. You may 
add a pinch of salt. Good in cases of chronic diarrhoea. 

FLAX SEED LEMONADE. 

Four tablespoons of seed, 1 quart of boiling water, juice of 2 
lemons, sweeten to taste. Steep 3 hours, if too thick add cold water 
with the lemon juice. Good for colds. 

GEMS.— For Dyspeptics. 

MRS. M. D. FOLLETT. 

One cup of gluten flour, 1 cup of milk, 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder, 1 tablespoonful or less of butter. Beat well and bake in hot 
gem-pans in a quick oven. Butter may be omitted. 

Gluten flour is prepared from whole wheat and is nearly free from 
starch. 

HOT MILK AS A RESTORATIVE. 

Heat it as hot as it can be sipped. Take a goblet of it when 
fatigued in mind or body. It is cordial and reviving in its influence. 

IN-GROWING TOE-NAILS. 

Heat very hot a small piece of tallow in a spoon and pour it on 
the granulations. Pain and tenderness are relieved at once, and in a 
few days the edge of the nail is exposed so as to admit of being cut 
away. 

MILK AND LIME WATER. 

Take a lump of unslacked lime, put it in a glass bottle, add water 
until the lime is slacked and of the consistency of thick cream. The 



136 Centennial Cookery Book. 

lime settles at the bottom leaving the water clear. Three or four 
tablespoons of this may be put to a goblet of milk and it will agree 
with any one. 

MOSS LEMONADE. 

One handful of Irish moss washed well in several waters. 1 quart 
of boiling water poured upon the moss and left to cool. Steep it for 5 
an hour, sweeten and add the juice of 1 lemon. 

OAT MEAL AND BEEF TEA. 

Two tablespoonfuls of fine oat meal made perfectly smooth in 2 
teaspoons of cold water. Put this into a pint of strong beef tea. Boil 
8 minutes. Keep stirring all the time — if lumpy, strain. 



Miscellaneous. 137 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



"Who sweeps a room as for Thy law, 

Makes that and th' action fine." 

— Herbert. 



BEEF GALL. 



Get it fresh from your hutcher. Use 1 tablespoon to a gallon of 
water. Put in a large tablespoon of salt, set in a cool place. Good for 
washing carpets, calicos, etc 

CEMENT FOR MAKING LEATHER BOOTS WATER PROOF. 

Used for a century by New England fishermen. 

Four ounces tallow, 1 ounce resin, 1 ounce beeswax. Melt together 
with a gentle heat and add equal bulk of Neat foot oil. Melt when 
used and rub in boots before the fire. 

CLEANING FLUID. 

MRS. GEO. DANA. 

One gallon gasoline, 1 ounce alchohol, i ounce bay rum, ^ ounce 
spirits of ammonia, 3 ounce chloroform, \ ounce ether, \ ounce pow- 
dered borax. Add more borax and more ammonia for badly soiled 
articles. 

CORN STARCH PASTE. 

Corn starch makes the best paste for scrap books. Dissolve a 
small quantity in cold water, then cook it thoroughly. Be careful not 
to get it too thick. When cold it should be thin enough to apply with 
a brush. 

CLEAR STARCHING AND IRONING.— French System. 

White soap, Coleman's starch, 2 clean dusters, a soft cloth to use 
as a damper, an old raisin box with a layer of powdered bath brick 
collars, cuffs, shirts, etc., washed and dried but unstarched, a handful 
of dry starch in a bowl, h teaspoon of lump borax dissolved in a tea- 
cup of boiling water placed at one side of basin. Pour some cold water 
over the starch, a little at a time until the lumps are gone, then add 



138 Centennial Cookery Book. 

the cup of borax water. It now has the consistency of good milk or 
thin cream. Take the piece of white soap and rub in the starch water 
as if washing, until it is quite pasty. Add a few drops of Paris blue 
dissolved. Take 6 collars for instance, dip them in cold water and 
wring them out. Then wash them in the starch water, wring them out 
and wash them as it were in the air. Then lay one by one in a clean 
cloth, wringing in the cloth. Have a hot iron, rub in the brick dust, 
dust with cloth. Have a piece of white wax in the layers of a clean 
cloth. Rub iron hastily over. Dust again. For a beginner 'tis best to 
lay a cloth over the collar first. An expert will dispense with this. 
Iron first on one side and then the other until the steam ceases to rise, 
then polish by bearing more heavily on the iron. Bring the two but- 
ton hole ends together, dampen with the lips and press iron on the two 
ends. Hang the circled collar on a clean stick to dry. 

EXCELLENT HAIR WASH. 

Take 1 ounce of borax, 2 ounce of camphor ; powder these ingre- 
dients fine, and dissolve them in 1 quart of boiling water. Damp the 
hair frequently. This wash cleanses and strengthens the hair. The 
camphor will form into lumps after being dissolved, but the water will 
be sufficiently impregnated. 

LEAKING LAMPS. 

If lamps be cleaned and wiped dry and the wicks turned down 
below the top of the burners, there will never be a trace of oil upon 
the outside. 

MIXTURE FOR WASHING CARPETS. 

MRS. ROLSTON. 

One bar soap, 4 ounces borax, 8 ounces sal soda, 2 ounces alum. 
Boil in 2 gallon of water 15 minutes; add 4 gallons of water. Wash 
with this as much of the carpet as you can reach at once. Then 
take a smooth shingle and draw toward you, taking up all the lather 
into a bucket by itself. Then wash with clean water and clean cloths. 
Wipe as dry as possible with dry cloths, and proceed to another 
place. 

SILVER CLEANER. 

GORHAM MANUFACTURING CO. 

MRS. G. BUTTS. 

Dissolve 1 pound Spanish whiting in water, stir it thoroughly, and 
let it settle, then pour off the top, so the grit will be freed. Let the 
residue settle again, and pour off the top, thus obtaining the pure 



Miscellaneous. 1 39 

whiting; add 1 ounce of borax, dissolved in as little water as neces- 
sary ; add £ pint spirits of camphor, 1 pint aqua ammonia. Put in a 
bottle and cork tight. 

Sweet Potatoes keep well in sand. 

Sweep Carpets with saw dust, wet with borax and ammonia 
water. There is nothing that freshens up a carpet like this for you 
have to sweep so hard to get out the saw dust that you clean your 
carpet well. 

TO PRESERVE EGGS FOR WINTER USE. 

MRS. GEORGE DANA. 

One gallon cold water, 1 pint coarse salt, not quite 1 pint unslacked 
lime. Mix all together in a stone jar and let it stand 24 hours. It is 
then ready for the eggs, which may all be put in at once, or from time 
to time. 

ANOTHER WAY TO PRESERVE EGGS FOR WINTER USE. 

Grease the surface of the egg thoroughly with a piece of bacon rind. 
Pack in salt, taking care that the eggs do not touch each other, or the 
sides of the jar. Always put the small end down. 

TO CLEAN MARBLE. 

Two parts washing soda, 1 part pumice stone, 1 part finely pow- 
dered chalk. Sift through a fine sieve and mix with water. Rub the 
slab well with this and then M r ash with soap and water. 

TO WASH BLANKETS. 

MRS. C. W. ROLSTON. 

One bar kitchen soap cut and dissolved in hot \vater, 2 tablespoons 
powdered borax. Fold blankets and soak over night or several hours. 
Do not rub unless there are spots. Squeeze and douse and pull from 
one hand into the other. Rinse in two or three lukewarm waters and 
hang in a hot sun without wringing. 

Potato water made from boiling 12 or 15 potatoes in 6 quarts of 
water, pare and slice the potatoes, boil and strain through a hair sieve, 
when cool enough use it to wash calicoes without soap. 

Bran water is good to prevent fading. 

Alum will restore green. Dissolve alum one-half the size of an 
egg in a bucket of water. 



140 Centennial Cookery Booh. 

Clean zinc with kerosene oil. 

Clean copper with turpentine and fine brick dust. Soda is also 
good, sprinkle on and cover with a wet cloth. 

Whites of eggs for burns ; also dry flour. 

Hot water prevents discoloration from bruises ; use it hot as can 
be borne. 

Hot mush will remove pain ; it can be used in place of hot fomen- 
tations. Spread thick like a mustard plaster. Will keep warm for 
hours. 

HOW TO KEEP AWAY "FLY TIME." 

In April and May when the flies seek the sunny window panes kill 
them then and there. This must be repeated every day. Those large 
torpid flies will lay thousands of eggs which will be flies by the last of 
April. Kill them all winter, they often come out with the warm days. 
Don't let one escape out. 

CEMENT FOR FRUIT JARS. 

One pound of resin, 2 ounces of mutton tallow, 2 ounces of bees- 
wax. Melt it together. 

TO CURE A FELON. 

Put your finger in a bag of salt. — H. Fearing. 

TO KEEP OFF FLIES. 

Sponge the pictures with onion water. This will not injure gilt, 
wood or glass, and will prevent flies from settling. 

Wash matting with salt and water to keep it from turning brown. 

Wash oil-cloths with milk and water. 

To take fruit stains out of cotton or linen, pour boiling hot water 
through the stain before washing. 

To get rid of rats pulverize copperas and sprinkle it in their holes 
and wherever they are troublesome. 

Oil marks on wall-paper, or the marks where inconsiderate people 
rest their heads, are a sore grief to good honsekeepers, but they can be 
removed without much trouble. Take pipe-clay or fuller's-earth, and 
make into a paste, about as thick as rich cream, with cold water ; lay 
it on the stain gently, without rubbing it in ; leave it on all night. It 



Miscellaneous. 141 

will be dry by morning, when it can be brushed off, and unless an old 
stain, the grease spot will have disappeared. If old renew the appli- 
cation. 

Grease on a carpet, if not of long standing, can be readily disposed 
of by washing the spot with hot soap-suds and borax — half an ounce 
of borax to a gallon of water. Use a clean cloth to wash it with, rinse 
in warm water, and wipe dry. 

If spermaceti is dropped on any garment or furniture, first carefully 
scrape off all that can be removed without injury to the material ; 
then lay brown paper over the spot, or a piece of blotting-paper, and 
put a warm iron on the paper until the oil shows through. Continue 
to renew the paper and apply the warm iron until the paper shows no 
more oil. 

Spots on furniture, from anything hot, or from alcohol, can be re- 
moved by rubbing hard with sweet-oil and turpentine. When the 
spots disappear, wash in milk-warm soap-suds, dry quickly, and polish 
by rubbing briskly with chamois-skin. 

When velvet has been wet and becomes spotted, hold the wrong 
side over steam, and while damp draw the wrong side quickly over a 
warm iron. It takes two to do this well— one to hold the bottom of 
the iron upward, and the second to draw the velvet across it. 

Paint, pitch or tar can be removed from cloth or wood by rubbing 
it with turpentine. If the paint has become dry, put a few drops of 
the turpentine on the spot, and let it stand a short time; then rub the 
spot, and if all the paint is not removed, repeat the work. When en- 
tirely gone, rub off with alcohol. 

Paint and putty can be taken off glass by wetting the glass several 
times with a strong solution of soda. Wet the glass often with it till 
the spots soften and can be washed off, and then polish with alcohol. 

Ivory that has been spotted, or has grown yellow, can be made as 
clear and fresh as new by rubbing with fine sand paper, and then 
polishing with finely powdered pumice-stone. 

Marble can be nicely cleaned in the following manner: pulverize 
a little bluestone, and mix with four ounces of whiting ; add to these 
four ounces of soft soap and one ounce of soda dissolved in a very 
little water. Boil this preparation over a slow fire fifteen minutes, 
stirring all the time. Lay it on the marble while hot, with a clean 



142 Centennial Cookery Book. 

brush. Let it remain half an hour ; then wash off in clean suds, wipe 
dry, and polish by quick rubbing. 

Grease can be removed from stone steps or passages by pouring on 
it strong soda water boiling hot ; then make f uller's-earth into a thin 
paste with boiling water ; spread it over the stain or spot, and let it 
remain all night. If the grease has soaked and dried in, it may be 
necessary to repeat this for two or three nights, scrubbing it off each 
morning with strong soap-suds and lye. When houses are under re- 
pair and being painted, it is important that one should keep watch for 
such oil spots, as painters are not overcareful in handling their oils, 
and such spots are very annoying. 

If ink has been spilled over rose-wood or mahogany furniture, half 
a teaspoonful of oil of vitrol in a tablespoonful of water, applied with 
a feather, will quickly remove it. 

A Carpet can be mended by cutting a piece like the carpet a little 
larger than the hole. Put paste around the edge of the patch, then 
slip it under the carpet and rub it well with a warm iron until dr7. 
If the figure be matched it makes a very neat job, as well as a quick 
one. 

It is said if feather beds and pillows be left out in a drenching 
rain every spring and afterward exposed to the sun and air on every 
side until dry, they will be much freshened and lightened. 

WASBING RECIPE. 

Ten pints of water, 1 pound of soap, shaved finely so as to form 
a thick soap suds, to this add 2\ tablespoons of kerosene — if you find 
any oil on the top add more soap. To every gallon of water add 
1 pint of this solution. 

WASHING RECIPE No. 2. 

CLARA DeVERIS. 

Ten gallons water, 1 pound soap, cut fine, 1\ tablespoons kerosene 
oil. Boil the clothes 10 minutes (or more). Rinse in several waters. 
Spots should be removed before boiling. 

Washing fluid. 

MISS JULIA BARBER. 

Dissolve 1 box of concentrated lye in one quart of water, add to 
it 2 ounces muriate of ammonia, 2 ounces carbonate of potassa and 3 



Miscellaneous. 143 

quarts of water. Keep in a stone jug or jar. Use \ teacupful in the 
water in which the clothes are boiled (about 3 pailsfull) after rubbing 
them through one water. 

EMERGENCIES — HOW TO AVOID AND HOW TO MEET 

THEM. 

For Poisons. — Give a tumblerful of sweet oil, cream or milk, or 
white of egg beat up in water. Then cause vomiting as soon as pos- 
sible by large draughts— at least a pint of luke-warm water, or mustard 
and water. 

For Cuts. — If the blood is bright and flows in jets, apply firm 
pressure upon the artery above the cut, nearer the heart. If the blood 
comes in a steady stream, apply pressure just below the cut. For a 
slight cut let the blood flow for half a minute — then dip in cold water. 
Draw the edges together with sticking plaster, and keep the part quiet 
a few days. 

Nose Bleed. — May be spontaneous and beneficial, relieving fullness 
of the head. If accidental or undesirable, it may usually be checked 
by keeping the head nearly erect, applying ice or cold water to the 
bridge of the nose and nape of the neck — or snuffing up cold water. 
The clothing should be loose around the neck. 

Precautions in Use of Kerosene. — Burn only the best oil — which has 
been thoroughly tested. Lamps should be filled every day and never 
lighted when less than half full. Fill lamps by daylight. If obliged 
to fill a lamp at night, place the light at least a yard oft', and not in a 
currant of air. Never fill a lighted lamp. Never pour oil on a fire to 
kindle it. 

For Burn and Scalds. — For slight burns dip the part instantly in 
cold water. For severer scalds immerse the part in strong brine, or 
sprinkle it quickly with cooking soda, and lay over it a wet cloth. 
When the skin is destroyed, the air may be safely excluded by either 
of the following: Sweet oil, collodion, pure gum arabic, linseed oil, 
whiting and water, chalk and vinegar. 

Lightning. — During a thunder-storm keep away from doors and 
windows. The lower part of the house is safer. Do not seek shel- 
ter under a tree. Dash cold water on one who is struck. 

To Prevent Sunstroke. — Work slowly; abstain from liquor; put a 
wet covering on the head ; cease to labor as soon as headache or dizzi- 



144 Centennial Cookery Book. 

ness come on. If a person has a sunstroke place him in the shade; 
loosen the clothing; apply cold water to the head and chest; when 
perspiration begins, a little stimulant may be given. 

Fainting. — Place the person flat upon the back ; allow access of 
fresh air ; sprinkle a little cold water on the face. 

Apoplexy. — Keep the person in a sitting posture ; loosen neck- 
clothing. Send for physician at once. 

Choking. — Hold the head low and slap the back. Blow forcibly 
into the ear. 

To dislodge a bean or other hard substance from the nostril, close 
the other nostril with the fingers and blow forcibly iuto the mouth. 

Remove insects from the ear by tepid water. Never put a hard 
instrument into the ear. 

For dust in the eyes, avoid rubbing; dash water into them. If 
this fails hold the lids down for a few moments by placing the finger 
upon the lashes — and roll the eye around. 



COOKING HUSBANDS. 

A Baltimore lady has written a receipt for "cooking husbands so 
as to make them tender and good." It is as follows : "A good many 
husbands are spoiled by mismanagement. Some women go about as 
if their husbands were bladders, and blow them up. Others keep 
them constantly in hot water, others let them freeze by their careless- 
ness and indifference. Some keep them in a stew by irritating ways 
and words. Others i - oast them. Some keep them in pickle all their 
lives. It cannot be supposed that any husband will be tender and 
good managed in this way, but they are really delicious when properly 
treated. In selecting your husband you should not be guided by the 
silvery appearance, as in buying mackerel, nor by the golden tint, as 
if you wanted salmon. Be sure to select for yourself, as tastes differ. 
Do not go to market for him, as the best are always brought to your 
door. It is far better to have none unless you will patiently learn 
how to cook for him. A preserving kettle of the finest porcelain is 
best, but if you have nothing but an earthenware napkin, it will do 
with care. See that the linen in which you wrap him is nicely washed 



Miscellaneous. 1 T> 

and mended, with the required number of buttons and strings nicely 
sewed on. Tie him in the kettle by a strong silk cord called comfort, 
as the one called duty is apt to be weak. They are apt to fly out of 
tin' kettle and be burned and crusty on the edges, since like crab and 
lobsters, you have to cook them while alive. Make a steady fire out 
of love, neatness and cheerfulness. .Set him as near this as seems to 
agree with him. If he sputters and fizzes, do not be anxious; some 
husbands do this till they are quite done. Add a little sugar in the 
form of what confectioners call kisses, but no vinegar or pepper on 
any account. A little spice improves them, but it must be used with 
judgment. Do not stick any sharp instrument into him to see if he is 
becoming tender. Stir him gently, watch the while lest he lie too flat 
and close to the kettle and so become useless. You cannot fail to 
know when he is done. If thus treated you will find him very 
digestible, agreeing nicely with you and the children, and he will 
keep as long as you want, unless you become careless and set him 
in too cold a place." 



10 




" I have just received the Price List and Samples of 
Lundborg's Perfumes, for which I sent the manufacturers 
fifty cents a few days ago. Everybody says they are the best, 
and everybody is right. I must get a large bottle of one of 
the odors the first time I go out." 




Edenia." 

LUNDBORG'S RHENISH COLOGNE. 

If you Q3,nnot obtain Lundborg's Perfumes and Rhenish Cologne 
in your vicinity, send your name and address for Price List to the 
manufacturers, 

YOUNG, LADD & COFFIN, 

24 Barclay Street, isteaa^ yo:r,:k:_ 



INDEX 



Breads, Yeasts, Hot Cakes, Etc.— 

Apple Johnny cake 

Bread 

" No. 2 X 

" No. 3 2 

" No. 4 2 

Boston brown bread 2 

q 

Boston tea cake 

o 
Light bread 

Buns 3 

Brown bread 

" No. 2 3 

" " No. 3 3 

" No. 4 3 

Boston brown bread 

" No. 2 4 

Brown muffins 

Baking powder biscuit 

Cracked wheat 

Crackers 

Cracker toast 

Corn muffins 

Corn bread 

Corn cakes 

Corn bread No. 2 7 

Drop cakes 

French toast 

" No. 2 7 

Fritters 

7 
French rolls ' 

Graham muffins 

Graham bread 

Huckleberry cake 

Haresa 

Indian bread 

Light rolls 

" No. 2 » • 9 

11 



2 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Lapland cake 9 

" No. 2 9 

Muffins 9 

" No. 2 10 

" No. 3 10 

" No. 4 10 

" No. 5 10 

Maryland biscuit 10 

Parker house rolls 10 

Pocket books 1 

Pumpkin bread 1 

Popovers 1 

" No. 2 1 

Potato biscuit 1 

Rice cake 12 

Rolls 12 

Steamed bread 12 

Split cake 12 

Shortcake 12 

Sally Lunn 13 

" No. 2 13 

" No. 3 13 

Sponge 13 

Tea cakes 14 

Vineyard corn bread 14 

Waffles 6 

" No. 2 14 

Wafers 14 

Yeast 15 

" No. 2.. 15 

" No. 3 15 

" No. 4 15 

" No. 5 15 

" No. 6 16 

Roasts, Broils, Meatpies and Fish. — 

Broiled steak 17 

" No. 2 17 

Broiled chicken 17 

Beef roast 17 

Brine for beef 18 

Braised beef 18 

Brine for beef No. 2 18 

Codfish balls 18 



INDEX. 



Codfish and eggs No. 1 18 

Codfish and eggs No. 2 

Codfish dinner "' 

Chowder 

Curing hams 

" " No. 2 

" No. 3 

Calf's head dinner 

Fried chicken and mush 

01 

Fried chicken 

Stewed chicken and rice 



" " " No. 2., 

Stewed chicken 

Sausage 

" No. 2 

" No. 3 

Turkey 

" No. 2 



Soups.- 



19 

L9 

20 
20 



Chicken pie 

22 
Corning beet- 

22 
Dressing for turkey " 

Drawn butter . 

Drippings 

Flank of beef 

Mackerel 

Meat.. 



22 
23 
28 

23 
23 



Pickle for beef 24 



24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
26 



Bezique soup 

Beef soup 

Bouillon of Beef 

" " " No. 2 

" " " No. 3 

Black bean soup ' 

Cherry soup ' 

Consomme v soup 

Clear soup.. 

Corn soup 

Green pea soup 

Gumbo soup 

Julienne soup 

Mock turtle soup 

" No. 2 31 



28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
29 
29 
29 
29 
30 
30 



4 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Mock oyster soup 31 

Mock bisque soup 31 

Oyster soup 31 

" " No. 2 32 

" No. 3 32 

Potato soup 32 

Tomato soup 32 

Tapioca 32 

Vegetables. — 

Hints for cooking vegetables 33 

Asparagus 34 

Boston Baked Beans 34 

" No. 2 34 

Baked corn 35 

Escalloped Cabbage 35 

Cabbage 35 

Corn oysters 35 

No. 2 35 

No. 3 36 

Corn Fritters 39 

Cucumbers 36 

Egg Plant 36 

Maccaroni 36 

Escalloped onions - 36 

Parsnips 37 

Peas 37 

Peas (French) 37 

Peas'(Creole) 37 

Potatoes (Irish way of cooking) 37 

(Stuffed) 37 

Escalloped Sweet Potatoes 37 

Saratoga Potatoes 38 

Stewed Potatoes 38 

Southern Potatoes 38 

Plain Pilav 39 

To boil Rice 39 

Eipe Tomato Dolma 39 

Green Tomato Dolma 39 

Stewed Tomatos '. 40 

Green stewed Tomatos.. 40 

Escalloped Tomatos 40 

Turnips 40 



INDEX. 5 

„ , JN 41 

Tomatos (Baked) 41 

Rice Croquettes 

Beverages. — 

42 
Coflee (French) 42 

Chocolate 4 2 

Coffee (boiled) 42 

Mock Cream for Coffee 4g 

Proportion of Coffee 43 

Cherry Shrub 43 

Lemonade 4 „ 

Domestic Ginger Beer 43 

Mead 44 

Raspberry Vinegar 

Tea 44 

Black Tea 44 

Egg Lemonade 

Syrups 

Catsups, Pickles, Etc. 

45 

Bordeaux sauce 

Catsup, cucumber 

" ripe tomato 

« " " No. 2 4& 

" No. 3 46 

46 

" green tomato 

" currant 

" gooseberry 

Chow-chow 47 

M " No - 2 47 

Chili sauce .„ 

Pickles, old receipe 4g 

Pickled corn - 

cabbage 4g 

cherry 49 

" cucumber 

No. 2 • 4J 

« No. 3 

, 50 

" chopped 

" French 

" green tomato 



No. 2. 
No. 3. 



50 
51 



6 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Pickle, German 51 

" grape 51 

" martines 51 

" peppers 51 

" plums 52 

" peach 52 

" tomatos 52 

" sweet 52 

" sweet tomato 52 

Spanish 53 

" yellow 53 

Spiced currants 53 

Salads, Salad Dressings, Oysters, Croquettes, Etc. — 

Baked salmon 54 

Beef loaf 54 

Chicken salad 54 

" No. 2 54 

" No. 3 55 

" No. 4 55 

Chicken croquettes 55 

" " No. 2 55 

Cabbage dressing 56 

" No. 2 56 

No. 3 56 

Cream fish 56 

Celery salad 56 

Escalloped salmon 56 

Ham patties 57 

Ham for sandwiches 57 

Hot slaw 58 

Jellied chicken 57 

Lettuce dressing 67 

Lobster salad 57 

Mint sauce 58 

Mayonnaise dressing 58 

No. 2 58 

" " No. 3 59 

Oysters stewed 59 

Oyster pie 59 

" No. 2 59 

" No. 3 60 

" sauce for turkey 60 



INDEX. 7 

Oysters friccaseed 60 

pickled 60 

Oyster sauce for salmon 60 

Oysters on toast 61 

Oyster chowder 61 

Oysters and potatoes 61 

" fried. No. 1 61 

" No. 2 62 

" escalloped. No. 1 - 62 

No. 2 62 

Potatoes in croquettes 62 

Pate de Veau 63 

Potato salad 63 

Potting meats 63 

Potted liver 64 

Pressed veal 64 

" chicken 64 

Kice croquettes.. 64 

Russian salad 64 

Salad dressing 65 

" No. 2 65 

" No. 3 65 

Slaw 66 

Salmon salad 66 

" " No. 2 66 

Sweet bread croquettes 66 

" boiled 66 

" fried 66 

" stewed.. 67 

" broiled 67 

" " for invalids 67 

Turbot 67 

Veal loaf 68 

" " No. 2 68 

Eggs, Omelettes, Etc. — 

A delicate way to boil eggs 69 

To boil eggs 69 

Breaded eggs 69 

Egg au plat 69 

Omelette 69 

No. 2 70 

No. 3 70 

No. 4 70 



8 Centennial Cookery Book. 

To scramble eggs 70 

To poach eggs 70 

Cheese straws 70 

Welch rabbit 71 

Cheese fondu 71 

Cakes and Icings. — 

Angel's Food 72 

Almond cake 72 

Brides " 72 

Black " 73 

Bermuda spice cake 73 

Bradley's cake 73 

Bachelor's Buttons 73 

Caramel cake 74 

Cream cake 74 

" No. 2 74 

" No. 3 74 

Cream sponge cake 75 

Cup cake 75 

Coffee cake 75 

Cocoanut cake 75 

Cocoanut cones 76 

Crullers 76 

Cup cake No. 2 76 

Cookies 76 

No. 2 76 

No 3 76 

No. 4 76 

No. 5 77 

No. 6 77 

Colorado cream cake 77 

Detroit spice cake 77 

Doughnuts 77 

Doughnuts No. 2 78 

" 3 78 

" 4 78 

Election cake 78 

Fig layer 78 

Fig cake 79 

Fruit cake 79 

Fruit layer cake 79 

Fruit cake No. 2 79 



INDEX. 9 

Fruit Cake No. 3 79 

'• 4 79 

" 5 80 

Ginger bread (soft) 80 

" (hard) 80 

" 80 

« 80 

« 81 

Ginger snaps 81 

" 81 

" bread 81 

" (Nantasket) 81 

Ginger cookies 81 

" No. 2 82 

Gold and Silver 82 

German bread 82 

Grandma Dunn's cake 82 

Harvard 82 

Hermit cookies 82 

Hickory nut 83 

Harriet 83 

Icing 83 

Icing (boiled) 83 

" No. 2 83 

" " 3 83 

" " 4 83 

Icing without eggs 84 

Icing with cream of tartar 84 

Ice cream cake 84 

Jumbles 84 

No. 2 84 

Lady cake 84 

Lemon jelly cake 84 

Jumbles No. 3 85 

Jelly roll 85 

Jam cake 85 

Loaf cake 85 

" " No. 2 .'. 85 

" No. 3 86 

" No. 4 86 

Lee cake 86 

Loaf cake No. 5 86 

Marble 87 

Ox eyes 87 



10 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Orange cake 87 

Pine-apple cake 87 

Pound cake 87 

" " No. 2 88 

Eusk 88 

Kose cake 88 

Sponge cake 88 

" roll 88 

" " No. 2 89 

" " 3 89 

" " 4 89 

" " 5 89 

" (molasses) 89 

Spice cake 89 

" No. 2 89 

" " 3 90 

" " 4 90 

Seed cake 90 

" " No. 2 90 

Sand tarts 90 

" No. 2 90 

Sunshine cake 90 

Mrs. de Steiguer's cake 91 

Tea cake 91 

" " No. 2 91 

" " 3 , 91 

Mrs. Vinton's cake 91 

White " 91 

" No. 2 91 

" 3 92 

" mountain cake 92 

nut " 92 

Washington " 92 

Puddings and Pudding Sauces. — 

An attractive pudding 93 

Baked custard 93 

Birds nest pudding... 93 

Baked custard. No. 2 94 

Boston sago pudding 94 

Brown Betty 94 

Baked apples 94 

Batter pudding 95 

Blackberry pudding 95 



INDEX. 11 

Baked dumplings 95 

Boiled Custard 95 

Bread and butter 95 

Cheap pudding 96 

Chocolate pudding 96 

Cornstarch " 96 

Crawfordsville " 96 

Custard 96 

" orange 96 

" boiled 96 

" pudding 97 

Corn starch pudding 98 

Delmonicos " 98 

Eves " 98 

Fruit " 98 

No. 2 99 

Fig " 99 

Flour " 99 

Floating Island 99 

" No. 2 99 

Fruit pudding. No. 3 99 

Flour " 100 

Gold and silver pudding 100 

Graham flour " 100 

Gelatine " 100 

Graham " 100 

Hunters " 100 

Henrietta's " 100 

Indian " No. 1 101 

No. 2 101 

No. 3 101 

King George's " 101 

Pudding sauce 101 

" No. 2 102 

" No. 3 102 

" No. 4 102 

" " No. 5 102 

" No. 6 102 

" " No. 7 102 

" No. 8 103 

Mrs. Norton's pudding 103 

Orange " 103 

Orange corn starch pudding 103 

Pcor man's " 103 



12 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Portland corn starch pudding 103 

Poor man's " No. 2 104 

Prune " 104 

Peach " 104 

Rice " 104 

Rice " No. 2 105 

Suet " 105 

Suet " No. 2 105 

Snow " 105 

Snow " No. 2 105 

Sago " 105 

Tapioca " 106 

Tropical snow 106 

Mrs. Towne's pudding 106 

Tapioca " No. 2 106 

Tapioca " No. 3 106 

Taylor " 107 

Thanksgiving " 107 

Yorkshire " 107 

Preserves and Jellies. — 

Apple jelly 108 

Cranberry sauce 108 

Crab apple preserves 108 

Currant jelly i 109 

Currants preserved 109 

Fox grape jelly 109 

Orange marmalade 109 

Peach preserves 109 

Watermelon preserves 110 

Ices, Creams, Jellies, Etc. — 

Apple ice Ill 

Amber cream Ill 

Banana ice cream 112 

Bavarian cream Ill 

Bohemian cream Ill 

Bevivo Ill 

Currant ice 112 

Charlotte Russe 112 

" " No. 2 112 

" No. 3 112 



INDEX. 13 

Charlotte Russe No. 4 H3 

" No. 5 113 

" No. 6 U3 

Chocolate Blanc Mange I 14 

« " '< No. 2 114 

Coffee jelly H4 

" No. 2 115 

Caramel jelly H4 

Coffee cream H4 

Corn Starch Blanc Mange and Spanish cream 115 

Frozen fruit custard 115 

Ice Cream 115 

Ice Cream. No. 2 116 

Italian cream 116 

Iced apples H6 

Lemon ice H" 

" No. 2 116 

jelly 117 

" No. 2 117 

" No. 3 117 



cream 



117 



butter 117 

Macedonian jelly 117 

Moonshine H8 

Neapolitan Blanc Mange 118 

Oakland frozen lemonade 118 

Orange jelly 118 

Orange sponge 118 

Peach Ice Cream 118 

Peach jelly 119 

Pine-apple jelly H 9 

Russian cream 119 

Scorched cream H9 

Tapioca and peaches — 119 

Tapioca cream 119 

Pies, Pastry, Etc.— 

Apple pie 120 

Apple minute pie 120 

Apple tart 120 

Apple pie (chopped) 120 

Custard pie 121 

Cocoanut pie •••• 121 

Chocolate pie 121 



14 Centennial Cookery Book. 

Cream pie 121 

" No. 2 122 

" " " 3 122 

" " " 4 122 

" " 5 122 

Lemon pie 122 

" No. 2 123 

" " 3 123 

Mince pie. Mrs. Gov. Meigs 123 

" No. 2 123 

" " 3 123 

" " 4 123 

Pumpkin pie 124 

•' No. 2 124 

Potato pie - 124 

Peach cobbler 124 

Puff paste 124 

Pie crust 125 

Puff paste No. 2 125 

" 3 125 

Pie crust 125 

Pie plant pie 125 

Peach tart 126 

Squash pie 126 

Strawberry mountain 126 

short cake 126 

Candies. — 

Amber 127 

Butter scotch 127 

Cream candy 127 

Chocolate caramels 127 

No. 2 128 

English walnuts 128 

No. 2 128 

Cream fig 128 

Fruit 128 

Lemon 128 

Molasses 128 

Nut 129 

" No. 2 129 

Orange bon-bons 129 

Pepper mints 129 



INDEX. 



15 



1 9 9 

Tafi v ; 129 

White taffy 130 

French ,,n 

Hone > r "'"" 130 

Hickory nut .„ Q 

Vinegar 130 

Fi S 131 

Peanut ,oj 

Hoarhound 

Butter and Cheese. — 

132 
Butter. No. 1 ' 

« v n 9 

" No. 3 ■•• JJJ 

Cream cheese ■ 



Sick Room. — 

134 

Beef tea .„4 

Cream of tartar beverage 

Dysentery "** lg5 

Disinfectants j__ 

Flax seed lemonade 

, ,. loo 

Gems for dyspeptics 

Hot milk as a restorative 

., loo 

Ingrowing toe-nails 

Milk and lime water 

Moss lemonade 

Oat meal and beef tea 



Miscellaneous. — 

Beef Gall-for washing calicos, carpets, etc j37 

Cement for leather 

j, . , i-O/ 

Cleaning fluid ^ 

Corn starch paste * 

Clear starching and ironing 

Hair wash ..„„ 

Leaking lamps 

Mixture for washing carpets 

, loo 

Silver cleaner 

Sweeping carpets 

To preserve eggs for winter use 

« " No. 2 139 



16 Centennial Cookery Book. 

To clean marble 139 

To wash blankets 139 

How to keep away "fly time" „ 140 

Washing receipe 142 

" No. 2 142 

Washing fluid 142 

Emergencies— how to avoid and how to meet them 143 

Cooking husbands 144 



PURIFY YOUR BLOOD 



Good health depends upon pure blood; 
therefore, to keep well, purifj the blood 
by taking Hood's Sarsaparilla. This medi- 
cine is peculiarly designed to act upon the 
blood, and through that upon all the or- 
gans and tissues of the body, it lias a 
specific action, also, upon the secretions 
and excretions, and assists nature to ex- 
pel from the system all humors, impure 
particles, and effete matter through the 
lungs, liver, bowels, kidneys, and skin. 
It effectually aids weak, impaired, and 
debiliated organs, invigorates the nerv- 
ous system, tones the digestion, and im- 
parts new life and energy to all the func- 
tions of the body. A peculiarity of Hood's 
Sarsaparilla is that it strengthens and 
builds up the system while it eradicates 
disease. 



•• 100 iiose> one Dollar, ' so often told ( ' 
this peculiar medicine, Hoods Sarsapa- 
rilla, is not a catch line only, hut i- 
lutely true of and original with this pre- 
paration ; and it is as absolutely true that 
it can honestly he applied only to Hood's 
Sarsaparilla, which is the very best spring 
medicine and blood purifier. Now, read- 
er, prove it. Take a bottle home and 
measure its contents. You will find it 
to hold 100 teaspoonfuls. Now read the 
directions, and you will find that the 
average dose for persons of different ages 
is less than a teaspoouful. Thus economy 
and strength are peculiar to Hood's Sar- 
saparilla. 

"Hood's Sarsaparilla has driven the 
poison from my blood, and though 76, I 
feed active and strong as at 50." W. H. 
Groesbeck, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Hood's Sarsaparilla Purifies the Blood 



"I wish to say that I had salt rheum on 
my left arm three years, suffering terri- 
bly; it almost disabled me from work. I 
took three bottles of Hood's Sarsaparilla, 
and the salt rheum has entirely disap- 
peared." H. M. Mills, 71 French Street, 
Lowell, Mass. 

" Hood's Sarsaparilla has done me a 
very great deal of good. It has built up 
my" general health, given me a regular 
appetite, and made me full of new life 
and energy. The sores on my face with 
which I have suffered many years are so 
much better that I feel well paid for tak- 
ing the medicine." Maky Atkinson, 
Summerville, Pa. 



" I must say Hood's Sarsaparilla is the 
best medicine I ever used. Last spring I 
had no appetite, and the least work 1 did 
fatigui d me ever so much. I began to 
take Hood's Sarsaparilla, and soon I felt 
as if I could do as much in a day as I had 
formerly done in a week. My appetite is 
voracious." Mrs. M. V. Bayard, Atlantic 
city, N. J. 

"Hood's Sarsaparilla helps me more 
than any other medicine I have ever 
taken for general debility, and I have 
tried almost everything. Our whole fam- 
ily use it, and I "consider it ahead of all 
other medicines for giving strength." 
Mrs. E. Breneiser, Maueh Creek, Pa. 



Makes the Weak Strong — Creates an Appetite 



"I was in bad condition with fainting 
spells and general debility. I was run 
down, ate hardly anything, and hardly 
dared goout on the street alone for fear of 
having a fainting spell. Hood's Sarsapa- 
rilla has done me a wonderful amount of 
food, as I am now in good health again. 
Ay appetite has been good ever since tak- 
ing the medicine, and 1 can eat a square 
meal with relish." Mrs. Mollie cutter, 
119 Eleventh Street, Covington, O. 

Wallace Buck, of North Bloomfield, N. 
Y., suffered eleven years with a terrible 
varicose ulcer on his leg, so bad that he 
had to give up business. He was cured of 
the ulcer by Hood's Sarsaparilla. 



" My wife had dyspepsia. She could 
not keep her food down, and had that op- 
pressed feeling after eating. She had no 
appetite, and was tired all the time. She 
tried numerous medicines without being 
relieved, but the first bottle of Hood's 
Sarsaparilla did her a great deal of good. 
She has now taken two bottles, and can 
eat anything she wants without having 
that distress, and has no trouble in re- 
taining her food.'' John Battenfield, 
Marion, O. 

"Hoods Sarsaparilla as a blood purifier 
has no equal. It tones the system, 
strengthens and invigorates, giving new 
life. I have taken it for kidney com- 
plaint, with the best results." D. R. 
Saunders, 81 Pearl Street, Cincinnati, O. 



IBE SURE TO G-ET 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Sold bv all druggists. £1 ; six for $5. j Sold by all druggists. SI ; six for ?5. 
Prepared' by C. 1. HOOD A Co., Lowell, Prepared by C. I. HOOD & CO., Lowell, 
Mass. , Mass. 

IOO Doses One Dollar IOO Doses One Dollar 

n 



PIONEER HOUSES: 



A. T. NYE & SON, 

Stove Founders, 

Established a. D. 1828. 



NYE HARDWARE CO., 

Merchants, 
Established a. D. 1848. 



TO SECURE THE BEST RESULTS 

FROM THE RECIPES FURNISHED IN THIS BOOK, YOU SHOULD 



BUY AT ONCE ONE OF 



NYE'S LEADER 

COOKING STOVES 




MADE IN A LARGE VARIETY OF STYLES, PATTERNS AND SIZES. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE, HOME MADE, 

HANDSOMEST AND BEST. 

Nye Hardware Co., 

GENERAL HARDWARE DEALERS, 

NOS, 10 AND 12 FRONT STREET, 
.MARIETTA, OHIO. 



BTackmoiT &■ Kinsev, 



DEALERS IN 



PROVISIONS 



AND COVERS OF 



"BUCKEYE" 

AND 

"SILVER STAR" 



BRANDS OF 



38 & 40 Vine Street, 



o 



Li^DjES ! 



# ^ ' ^1 ■■' hu ^ * * 



•?tf* *w 



IF YOU WILL WEAR A NICE FITTING, COMFORTABLE PAIR OF 



SflOES 



J*K: J*J& >\ tH I I h i JS ^& ^& 



DURING THE PREPARATION OF THESE PISHES, YOU WILL BE MORE 

CERTAIN OF SUCCESS THAN IF TORMENTED BY AN ILL-SHAPED SHOE. 

THE FORMER YOU WILL BE MORE LIKELY TO OBTAIN OF 

TfIB f. LiOl^D SjIOB qO. 

THAN ELSEWHERE BY REASON OF THE LARGER ASSORTMENT THERE 
OFFERED. WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR STOP AT 

5f FfyD/slT STREET, • • 

• ■ • • • ^l^JETT^ OfiJO, 



AND GET A FIT. 



^JLihj^E^Y. • «• m » a a 

KEEPS A FULL LINE OF MILLINERY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

PATTERN HATS AND BONNETS A SPECIALTY. 

WHEN USING RECEIPTS IN THIS BOOK REMEMBER TO GET 

S^Y e ^ FU^ofjs, Sj?iee;£ # m 
m % m Ano B^ir^) PoWoef' 

MADE ONLY BY W. II. STYER, THE LEADING DRUGGIST, MARIETTA, 0. 



•#• •#• •#• ••• ••• •#• •#• 

• •••••• 

Our Laundry Starch 

Is the Best Ever Offered the Public. 

No Housekeeper 

Should Allow her Laundress to Get 
an Inferior Article. 

Our Corn Starch 

FOR FOOD is Perfectly Pure and 
Thoroughly Sweet. 

Never Take Starch 

Unless it Bears the Name of 



The George Fox Starch Co. 



Cincinnati, O. 



NEAL'S : CARRIAGE : PAINTS. 

SEVEN BEAUTIFUL SHADES. 
Brilliant, Simple, Durable anb Economical. 

Cfye ©rigtnal anb (Drily Complete £ine of 

«£tquib damage paint ecer 3" tr00UCC0 - 

BEWARE OF WORTHLESS IMITATIONS. 

J8QT" Just the thine; for repairing old Buggies and Wagons. Experience not 
necessary to apply. One coat for old work. VARNISHING UNNECESSARY. 
Dries perfectly hard, with a beautiful gloss. An old buggy can be repainted 
at a cost, not to exceed ONE DOLLAR. 

The MERITS of the MATERIALS USED, and our SPECIAL MANUFAC- 
TURING FACILITIES, enables us to present a CARRIAGE PAINT which is 
absolutely unsurpassed, while the simplicity of application and the beauty of 
appearance will be manifest at once. 

ACME WHITE LEAD & COLOR WORKS, ^JES™* DETROIT, MICH. 
£or Sale by W. £}. Buell & Co., Marietta, 0. 



GATES & PAYNE, 



Seebsmen 

And GENERAL MERCHANTS, 
No. 1 1 Front Street, 

MARIETTA OHIO. 



J& 






s # §\ 



# 



£> e^ /^ 



• •• 



^ «r .%• 



$ J8f 








ft 



# 



^ ^ £ 






©• «» 



•% 



AKKON, OHIO, 

MANUFACTURERS OF SUPERIOR BRANDS OF 

CRACKERS, 

CAKES and BISCUITS. 

THESE GOODS ALWAYS FRESH ARE KEPT IN STOCK BY 

BOSWORTH, WELLS & CO., 

MARIETTA, OHIO. 
C. T. BUTLER. J. E. VANDERVOORT. 

BUTLER k VANDERVOORT. 

Dry Goods Retailers ami Jolliers. 

47 FRONT ST., MARIETTA, O. 



N. B. We spare no pains to secure for our customers the 
best fabrics, both Foreign and Domestic, and aim to offer the most 
thoroughly reliable goods at the most attractive prices. We make 
a specialty of Black Silks and ask a comparison of qualities and 
prices with goods orlered anywhere in this country. We shall be 
pleased to send samples by mail on application. 

BUTLER & VANDERVOORT, 
General Dry Goods Dealers. Marietta, Ohio. 




For beatity of polish, saving of labor, freeness from dust, 
durability and cheapness, truly unrivalled in any country. 

CAUTION. — Beware of worthless imitations under other names, 
put up in similar shape and color intended to deceive. Each 
package of the genuine bears our Trade Mark. Take no other. 



DUTCHER'S READY CLEANER 



AN INDISPENSIBLE REQUISITE! 

Removes Grease, Oil, Paint, Stains, Dirt from Clothing, Hats, 
Carpets, Dress Goods, Soiled Hands, Laces, Fine Fa- 
brics, and Cleans Hats, Coats, Vests, Pants, 
Dress Goods and Woolen 
Fabrics Quick. 

NO ODOR. Articles cleansed may be used at once. Renders 
soiled bands clean and soft. Removes the odor of perspiration, leav- 
ing the skin refreshed, enlivened and clean. Once used it will be 
added to the list of 

HOME COMFORTS. 

Mks. F. says: — I removed the grease from hot lard spilled upon 
my cashmere dress, with the first application of Ready Cleaner. Using 
it freely I dissolved the grease, then rinsed with cold water. 

Mrs. C. — A large kerosene lamp fell to the floor and scattered its 
contents upon the carpet. Ready Cleaner took out all the grease 
without injury to color or fabric. 

Mks. L. — I have used Ready Cleaner to remove soiled spots in my 
carpets and clothing. It is a success in every place. 

H. E. L. — A few strokes of the sponge, wet with Ready Cleaner 
removed gearing grease from my overcoat. 

A lady in Brandon, Vt , says: — My son spilled kerosene on bis 
clothes from head to foot. I supposed the suit was ruined. I used 
Dutcher's Ready Cleaner and soon removed every particle of grease. 
After pressing, the suit was as good as before. 

ECONOMY. 

Use Dutcher's Ready Cleaner. Clean up the old hats, coats, vests, 
pants, dresses, outside garments; press them over, mend them up and 
they will answer for another six months It costs but 25 cents. 

Mechanics, Artisans, and those whose occupations necessitate 
soiled bands, will find in the Ready Cleaner an article that will at 
once render their bands clean and soft. Ask your druggist to order it. 

In large bottles 25 cents. For sale by the trade generally. 

FREDERICK DUTCH ER & SONS, Prop'rs, St. A/bans, Vt. 



23aron & King, 

2lrttsttc 4 • * 
■f photographers 

Hen? Styles, Hett) Accessories, Herr> Designs. 



* 



Cfye Dery finest VOovt a\ Heasonable prices. 



Successors to 3. d. Cabroaiiabcr. Come anb See us. 

C. VO. Jltoore. 3. m. Keeb, 

O:. IP. Hloore & Co., 

(5eneral f ••• 
+ 2fiercfyanbise 

(Brain, ^eeb, Salt, probuce anb ^lour. 
Always on tjanb, Shingles, (Blass, Hails, £ime. 

f)armar, ^)I?io. 



SHOCKING ACCIDEN 



m 



AND 



WONDERFUL CURE. 

[From the New York Daily Times, July 3, 1885] 

Shocking: Accident and Wonderful Cure. 

An occurrence so remarkable in its results that they would 
not be believed if not fully attested has recently taken place here. 
A boy named John H. Malkmus, employed in the soap and per- 
fumery works of Mr. Solon Palmer, Nos.374 and 376 Pearl Street, 
took hold of a dull red hot iron. His right hand was terribly 
burned, and he suffered excruciating torture. Palmer's Lotion was 
promptly applied, the bandages being kept well saturated with it. 
In an hour the pain was almost gone. In five days the hand was 
well, and not a scar remained. The boy made an affidavit that 
the marvelous cure had been effected solely by the use of Palmer's 
Lotion. 

PALMER'S LOTION IS EQUALLY EFFICACIOUS IN THE CURE OF 



QUINSY SORE THROAT, 
PUTRID SORE THROAT, 
CANKER IN THE MOUTH, 
SORE EYES. BRUISES, 



PIMPLES, RINGWORM, 

TETTER, BARBER'S ITCH, 

ECZEMA, PILES, 

SALT RHEUM, CHILBRAINS, 



And every other disease of the skin or mucous membranes that can 
be reached by an external application. It is kept in every work- 
shop, kitchen and bedroom wherever its marvelous healing pro- 
perties are known. 

PAUVLRR'S LOTION SOAP 

possesses all the valuable properties of the Lotion, but in a milder 

form. It is the great Skin and Complexion Soap, 

For full particulars, see large circular. 

Prepared Only by 

SOLON PALMER, 
374 & 376 Pearl St. NEW YORK. 



5$W Sale h'Q ?&i:ii£$i&i& (Stanerallg. 



X[ romii@ Floor 



You have undoubtedly in your experience, had occasion to 
paint a floor, steps or piazza. 

If such is the case, the chances are that you realize that the 
same paint used for painting the exterior of houses will not answer to 
paint floors, yet up to the time we invented the GRANITE FLOOR 
PAINT that was what must be used. 

There are three great faults with the paints heretofore used, 
namely: First, they require a long time to dry, which causes great 
inconvenience ; second, they never dry perfectly hard, and conse- 
quently will not wear; third, cold water will stain, hot water blister, 
and soap will to a certain extent remove them. 

After many long and costly experiments we succeeded in perfect- 
ing the GRANITE FLOOR PAINT, and present it to the public with 
the assurance that it has none of the above faults. 

It is sure to become as great a favorite as our other popular speci- 
alty, NeaVs Carriage Paint, which is prepared ready for use in eight 
beautiful colors, and renders the repainting of a buggy possible at a 
cost of not to exceed one dollar. 

ACME WHITE LEAD & COLOR WORKS, 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS, 

DETBOIT, MICHIGAN. 

For sale by W. B. BUELL & CO., MARIETTA, OHIO. 



J. H. DYE & SONS, 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED 



STABLES, 



No. 41 North Third Street, 



MMLMJIMTTMo &MM 




VE invite the attention of all good housekeepers 
to the merits of THE J. MONROE TAY- 
LOR GOLD MEDAL SALERATUS AND SODA, 
as superior in quality, more healthy, and to pro- 
duce whiter and lighter bread foods of all kinds, 
and to take a little less to do the work. 

These goods are manufactured with special re- 
gard to their healthfulness by an improved chemical 
and mechanical process, and not in use by any other 
manufacturer of soda or saleratus. 

By these processes the alkalies are three times 
refined, the carbonic acid thoroughly washed and 
filtered, thus eliminating all sulphates and impurities 
(which are left in many inferior brands) rendering 
the Gold Medal absolutely of the highest degree of 
purity, and so justly celebrated wherever introduced. 

The Gold Medal Saleratus or Soda, which are 
one and the same thing, if properly used with sour 
milk or buttermilk, or pure cream tartar, will be 
found much cheaper, more healthy, and superior to 
the best brands of baking powders, to say nothing 
of the many cheap brands, which are inferior, inju- 
rious, detrimental to health, and should be avoided. 



£. R. DUBKEE & COS 

SELECT SPECIALTIES 




SPICES & MUSTARD 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL-WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure. Some manufacturers use the word pure as a 
decoy. Consumers would do well to remember that an article may be pure, but 
lack other essential qualities. Our Select Spices are warranted uniform in quality, 
and to excel all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 

SALAD DRESSING 

AND 

COLL n^E^ul? SAUCE. 

THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY GENUINE. 

WITHOUT A RIVAL AS A DRESSING FOR ALL SALADS, AND AS 
A SAUCE FOR COLD MEATS, ETC. 

It is prepared with extreme care; all its ingredients are of the purest and best, 
and will keep good for years. 

We warn consumers against all mixtures put up in imitation of our style of package. 





CHALLENGE SAUCE, 

For BOAST BEEF, CHOPS, SOUPS, GRAVIES, FISH, Etc. 

A STRICTLZ FIEST-CLASS TABLE SAUCE. 

Pleases the taste; promotes digestion; stimulates the appetite. 

Connoisseurs have pronounced it the only really good American 
Sauce, and in many respects greatly superior to any imported. 



GELERY SALT. 

Stronger in Flavor than the Plant itself. Put up 
in Attractive Style. For Table Use. 



THESE GOODS ARE SOLD EY ALL DEALERS IN FINE GROCERIES, AND 
ARE WARRANTED TO GIVE FULL SATISFACTION. 



GEORGE DANA & SON, 

BELPRE, OHIO. 



PRODUCERS OF 



PURE CIDER VINEGAR, 

BXPORATED FRUITS 

AND PACKERS OF 

HERMETICALLY SEALED FRUITS 

AND 

VEGETABLES. 



ALL GOODS OF EXTRA QUALITY 

AND GUARANTEED TO BE ABSOLUTELY PURE. 



DANA FARM, 

Settled 1789. BELPRE, O 




an 

yJUrrmer {omji lainfi 
and al\ 

B°we\ Troubles 

art cured hy 

Pmyi 

JHl ara3$ists sell it. 



M. SEIPEL & CO,, 



ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR 




n 



ij 



DS AND NOTIONS 



ALSO KEEP A FULL LINE OF 

DRY GOODS and 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 
21 large 2lssorteb StocF at £otr>est prices. 

AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED 

DAVIS SEWING MACHINES. 

No. 61 FRONT STREET, 

MARIETTA, OHIO. 



G. L. SPENCE, 



THE ONL-Y 



MOSIC: AND: ART: STORE 



IN MARIETTA. 

DECKER BROS., J. & C. FISCHER. HAINES BROS., 
AND OTHER FIRST-CLASS PIANOS. 

AND THE WORLD-FAMED ESTEY ORGAN, 

ALL SELL ON EASY PAYMENTS. 
LARGE STOCK OF PICTURE??. 

ALL KINDS. GRADES AND PRICES. 

CABINET FRVMES AND ALBUMS. 

EASELS, LARGE AND SMALL, 

WALL POCKETS AND FANCY GOODS 
FOR XMAS, BIRTHDAY AND 

WEDDING PRESENTS. 
SEVERAL DIFFERENT MAKES OF SEWING MACHINES 

SOLD AT ROCK BOTTOM PRICES. 
TUNING AND REPAIRING PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

REPAIRING SEWING MACHINES, 

NEEDLES, OIL, AND PARTS AT 

G. L. SPENCE, NEAR COURT HOUSE. 



The L. & M. Pure Prepared Paints 
sold only by W. H. Buell & Co., Ma- 
rietta, O., covers over 250 square feet 
two coats, at a cost for material not 
exceeding $1.25. Estimate the cost of 
painting your dwelling upon this basis. 
Every package bears the following 
guarantee: "Any building that is not sat- 
isfactorily painted with our paint, or upon 
which its use has not cost less than if other 
paints had been used, will be re-painted at 

our expense." 

Yours truly, 

Longman & Martinez. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




014 487 740 8 



. 



on i