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Full text of "Centennial, McKendree college, with St. Clair County history"

Publicity Committee 

Rev. W. C. Walton Ph. D. 

historian 

Dean E. P. Baker 

Judge C. E. Chamberlin 

Business Manager 

Paul R. Hortin 

Editor 

Joseph Guandolo 



^vs;; 



m 

c.a 





BISHOP McKENDREE was a pioneer circuit 
rider in the middle west. Thousands 
of the pioneer generation came under his 
personal influence. The college which hears 
his name, the landmark of a century, the 
Pharos of the Mississippi valley, has stood 
on the same spot for a century and shed 
forth her kindly beams on other thousands 
who have come within her influence. 
<! This book IS but a partial record of a 
century's achievement. It tells the deeds 
' it men and women who have served their 
tellowmen in college halls; in St. Clair, the 
first organized county in Illinois; in the 
n.ition; and in the world. McKendree's 
ciinpus IS sacred ground to thousands who 
here received an inspiration to nobler liv- 
ing. To these it will be a reminder of col- 
lege days. To others it will be a suggestion 
"t the possibilities that life holds for aspir- 
ing American youth. 



m 





IN MENTIONING THE FOI 
TO THANK THEM FOR tI 
ING THIS HISTORICAL 1 



}, WE WISH 
LP IN MAK- 
•^POSSIBLE. 



Mississippi Valley School Supply Company 

H. A. S. Coffee Company 

Meyer Brothers Drug Company 

KrenninG'Westermann China Company 

Martin J. Collins 

Ely a Walker Dry Goods Company 

Skinner &> Kennedy Stationery Company 

Roth'Homeyer Coffee Company 

First National Bank of East St. Louis 

The Southern Illinois National Bank of East St. Louis 

East St. Louis Daily Journal Company 

Union Trust Company of East St. Louis 

Gerold Storage, Packing &> Moving Company 

Interstate Stone &■ Marble Works, Inc. 

Hill-Thomas Lime &? Cement Company 

B. Goedde 6? Company 





m 'l.'lfAMK ■|■Hf•^/I FOR THEIR HEL^ hi la: 
[O 'I'f-ff/j IfETi'OiaCJAL VOUJrAE ?OSSi£.i.ji. j 



St. Louis Post'Dispatch 

Central Engraving Company 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company 

Amos James Grocer Company 

Blackwell Wielandy Company 

The City Dairies Company 

Langenberg Hat Company 

Vestal Chemical Company 

N. O. Nelson Manufacturing Company 

William Ford Company 

Vane'Calvert Paint Company 

Edward A. Langan Furniture Company 

Goodwill Industries of St. Louis 

Munger Linen Supply, Inc. 

A. W. Katz Poultry 6? Egg Company 




REV. C. C. HALL, D. D. 
President of Board of Trustees 




CAMERON HARMON, A. B., D. D., LL. D. 
President of McKendree College 




CLARK HALL 





THE CENTENNIAL GATEWAY 




Eissnmayer Gy; 




SCIENCE HALL 





BENSON-WOOD LIBRARY 



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THE CHAPEL 




Our McKendree 

A College 'mid plains is standing, standing there from olden days. 

The Pioneer of prairies, first in untrodden ways. 

For service and Christian culture, for efficiency she stands. 

Her sons and daughters praise her, with voices, hearts and hands. 

Hail to thee our dear old McKendree, 

May we always loyal he, 

Ifs a song of praise we'll raise to thee. 

Alma Mater, dear old M.-C, 

May we ever own thee true and wise and right. 

Honor Purple and the White, 

And for victory we'll alivays fight, 

'Till we win for old M-C-K. 
Enduring and strong she stands there, stands upon our College Hill, 
Though others may outnumber, she holds the first place still. 
For beauty and truth and }{nowledge, and for service ivithout hound. 
Then let us raise our voices, until the plains resound. 



BOOK I 

THE 

McKendrean 

The year book of 
McKendree College 

Stephen A. Kolesa 
Editor 



tffMC KEN DREE ^^^^^^::^;g^^E:;^>^^ 



Rev. C. C. Hall, D. D. 
Leonard Carjon . 
C. B. Peach . 



Rev. W. C. Walton, Ph. D 
Rev. Cameron Harmon . 



Bishop F. D. Leete 
Dr. C. B. Spencer 
Dr. E. C. Waremg 



Rev. F. M. Van Treese, D. D. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES-1927-1928 



President 

Secretary 

■ Tnasurer 

Fiscal Agent 

President of the College and Ex-officio Member of the Board 



HONORARY TRUSTEES 



EMERITUS TRUSTEE 



Indianapolis, Ind. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



East St. Louis, IlL 



TERM EXPIRES 1928 



Mr. W. R. Dorns O'Fallon, lU. 

Rev. O. L. Markman East St. Louis, lU. 

Mr. John M. Mitchell Mt. Carmel, 111. 

Rev. Frank Otto EdwardsviUe, 111. 

Rev. J. G. Tucker, D. D EdwardsviUe, 111. 

Mr. H. F. Hecker St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. H. H. Bailey Altamont, 111. 

Rev. F. O. Wilson, D. D. Olney, 111. 

Rev. Chas. D. Shumard, D. D Albion, 111. 

Mr. Ira Blackstock Springfield, 111. 

Mr. C. M. Roos Cairo, 111. 

Judge Chas. H. Miller Benton, 111. 



TERM EXPIRES 1929 



Dr. W. P. McVey 

Mr. W. C. Pfeffer . 

Mr. Harold Barnes 

Dr. J. L. McCormick, M. D. 

Rev. Ressho Robertson, D. D 

Mr. Leonard Carson . 

Mr. J. G. Wilkin . 

Mr. C. B. Peach 

Mr. W. A. Kelsoe 

Prof. H. G. Schmidt . 

Rev. J. W. Cummins 

Rev. W. H. Whitlock, D. D. 



. Carbondale, 111. 

Lebanon, 111. 

Harrisburg, 111. 

Bone Gap, 111. 

LawrenceviUe, 111. 

Granite City, 111. 

Robinson, 111. 

Lebanon, 111. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Belleville, 111. 

. Marion, 111. 

East St. Louis, 111. 



TERM EXPIRES 1930 

Rev. G. R. Goodman, D. D Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Rev. C. B. Whiteside Centralia, 111. 

Rev. C. L. Peterson, D. D Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Mr. E. B. Brooks Newton, 111. 

Rev. Robert Morris Murphysboro, 111. 

Rev. C. C. Hall, D. D. . . Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Hon. Chas. Deneen, A. M., LL. D Chicago, 111. 

Rev. M. H. Loar Carbondale, 111. 

Mr. C. P. HamiU Belleville, 111. 

Judge Louis Bernreuter Nashville, 111. 




Eight. 



MC KENDREE 



John Clay Dolley, Registrar 
Latin and Cree}{ 
A. B., Randolph-Macon College, 1888; M. A., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1918. 
Graduate study: 

University of Wisconsin, 1917-18; University of 
Michigan, summer 192a; Washington University, 
1922-23; American Academy in Rome, 1924; 
Travel in Greece, summer 1924. 

Edwin Percy Baker, Dean 
German 
A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1893. 
A. M., McKendree College, 1896. 
Graduate study: 

Sauveur School of Languages, summer 1896. 
University of Berlin, 1896-97. 

Edwin Rollin Spencer 
Biology 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1911; A. M., University 

of Illinois, 1914; Ph. D., University of Illinois, 
1920. 

LuELLA Mueller 

B. S., McKendree College, 1922; M. S., University of 

Illinois, 1925. 
Graduate Study: 

Chicago University, fall 1925. 

Ada Carroll 
Voice 
B. M., American Conservatory; Student of David 
Bispham, New York; Student of Oscar Sanger, 
New York. 

Standleigh Myron McClure 

Chemistry 

B. S., Drury College, 1914; M. S., Drury College, 1915. 

Graduate study: 

Northwestern University, 1915-16; University of 
Illinois, summer 1920; Harvard University, sum- 
mer 1922; University of Chicago, summer 1923. 

William Clarence Walton 

Philosophy and Education 

A. B., McKendree College. 1892; A. M., McKendree 

College, 1894; Ph. D., McKendree College, 1897. 
Graduate study: 

University of Chicago, summer 1909; University 
of Illinois, summers 1917-18; European Travel, 
summer 1925. 

Charles Jacob Stowell 

Mathematics 

B. S., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1911; A. M., Uni- 

versity of Illinois, 1912- Ph. D., University of 
Illinois, 1917. 
Graduate study. 

University of Illinois, 1923-24. 



A^mini5trcltil1lt 




A^mini5tvation 




C. John Bittner 

Social Science 
A. B., University of Valparaiso, 1916; A. M., Iowa 

State University, 1924. 
Graduate Work: 

Iowa State University, 1924-25; summer 1925; 

University of Chicago, summers 1926-27. 

Grant McDonald 

Piano, Organ, Theory of Music 
Graduate in Piano, Organ, and Theory, Drury College, 
1920; Mus. B., American Conservatory, summer 
192';; Student of Heniot Levy and of Josef 
Lhevinne. 

John William Andrew Kinison 
Bible and Religious Education 
A. B., McKendree College, 1915; B.D.,Garrett Bibical 
Institute, 1918; A. M., Washington University, 
1922. 
Graduate study: 

Washington University, 1921-22. 

Lennie Bertha LaRue 

Fre?ic)i and Spanish 
A. B., Missouri Valley College, 1923. 
Graduate study : 

Missouri Valley, summer 1923; University of 
Missouri, summer 1925; University of Missouri, 
i92';-26. 



Evelyn McNeely 

English 
B. S., University of lUinois, 1927. 

Glenn F. Filley 
B. S., Missouri Wesleyan, 1923. 
Graduate study : 

University of Illinois, summer 1924; University 
of Illinois, summer 1Q26. 

Joseph M. H.^rrell 
English 
A. B., McKendree College, 1921; S. T. B., Boston 
University School of Theology, 1924; A. M., 
Boston University, 1925. 
Graduate study: 

Harvard University, 1924-25; Northwestern Uni- 
versity, summer, 1920. 

Alleen Wilson 

Librarian 
A. B., Missouri Wesleyan College, 1919. 
Graduate study: 

Colorado University, summer 1920; Summer Li- 
brary Conference, Madison, Wisconsin, 1923; 
University of Illinois Library School, summers 
1924-25. 



MC KENDREE 



Alimiiustratiiin 



Claude E. Vick 

Education 
B. S., University of Illinois, igi';. 
Graduate study: 

University of Illinois, summers 1925-26. 

Wesley Charles Kettlekamp 

History 

A. B., Central Wesleyan College, 1921; A. M., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1922. 

Graduate study: 

University of Chicago, 1922. 

Olive E. Patmore 

Expression arid English 
Graduate School of Expression, Trevecca College, 

1920; A. B., Trevecca College, 1922. 
Graduate study: 

Boston School of Expression, summer 1923; Gym- 
nasium Course, Morse School of Expression. 

J. Wendell Dunn 
Physics 
B. S., McKendree College, 1925. 
Graduate study: 

University of Illinois, summers 1925-26. 

Oliver C. Wahl 

Vio/in 
Graduate in Violin and Theory, Beethoven Conserva- 
tory, 1926; Student of Ernest La Prade, summer 
1926; A. B., McKendree College, 1928. 

Pauline Harper 

Voice 
Graduate in Piano and Theory, Missouri Wesleyan, 
1909; Graduate in Public School Music Methods, 
Northwestern U.; Graduate in Voice, Missouri 
Wesleyan, 1920; Student Denver University, 
summer 1921; Student of John C. Wilcox; Voice 
pupil of John W. Bohn, 1926; Northwestern U. 
School of Music, summer, 1926. 



Mrs. Minnie Phillips 
House Mother 



Irvin R. Nelson 

Historv 
, McKendree College, 1928. 





^■^■^^^^^^.^^.g-^g^^^^^c KEN PRE E^^^^^:^:^^..^.-.^..-^ 

I 




^'cniors 



Clarence R. Brennan, A. B. 

East St. Lotus, lUtnois 

To he able to head a senior class, it is necessary to possess the 
best methods of diplomacy, a keen insight into human nature and 
an irresistible personality. Such is "Chick,"" our class president. 

His radiant smile, cheerful disposition and friendUness are typ- 
ical evidence of his true '"Shamrock"" ancestry. "Chick"' is one of 
the most popular men on the campus and ever dependable in his 

tasks. A pretty little co-ed seems to be his only weakness 

or is it his ""comfort and strength?" 

PRESIDENT CENTENNIAL CLASS; PRESIDENT PHILOSOPHIANS; PRESI- 
DENT Y. M. C. A.; PRESIDENT STUDENT ASSOCIATION; VICE-PRESI- 
DENT O.XFORD CLUB; DEBATE TEAM, '26. '37; PI KAPPA 
DELTA; BACHELORS. 



Daniel Earl Hussong, A. B. 

Raxatia, lUinms 

A pleasing personality enhanced by a rich basso voice, a friendly- 
smile and a congenial attitude have made "Huss" one of the pop' 
ular men on the campus. 

Though much of his time seemed to be occupied in the company 
of his lady fair, he found plenty of opportunities to take a remark- 
able part in student activities. He would be an asset to any or- 
ganization in which he might be interested, and with his native 
ability in song and public speech, "Huss"" will surely make his mark. 

QUARTET. "24. "25, "=6. '17; SONG LEADER; GLEE CLUB. '24. 'iv '^6. 
"17. -28; DEBATE. 1918; "GYPSY ROVER; " "MARTHA: " "BOHEMIAN 
GIRL." "MESSIAH;" "AS YOU LIKE IT; " "TAMING OF THE SHREW;- 
PLATO; NATURE CLUB; ALPHA PSI OMEGA; PI KAPPA DELTA; 
"LASS O' LIMERICK TOWN.' 



Ruth Henry, A. B. 

Oblong, Illinois 

Great things often come disguised in small packages, and so it 
is with Ruth. Her quiet, brown eyes and her merry smile are indeed 
an index to her serious and humorous nature. Just ask Chick. 

Anything attempted is that thing accomplished, when Ruth is 
the one to do it. A true McKendrean and a real friend is this 
demure member of the Centennial class. 
VICE-PRESIDENT STUDENT ASSOCIATION, CLIO PRESIDENT. 



Margaret Teague, B. M. 

West Frankfort, Illinois 

Some people are fortunate in being endowed with both beauty 
and talent. Margaret is a good example of such a combination. 
With these assets and a magnetic personality, she swept into the 
arena of her life. Earl Hussong. 

By her musical ability and achievements, she has attained the 
goal which has for its reward the degree. Bachelor of Music. 
CLIO PRESIDENT; GLEE CLUB; "MESSIAH;" "THE LASS O' LIMERICK 
TOWN;" ""THE BOHEMIAN GIRL;" ALPHA PSI OMEGA; STUDENT 
ASSOCIATION PIANIST. 



Ti(fiit)'-Tu'o 




Seniors 



Clifton Gould, B. S. 

Lebanon, Illinois 



The captain of our fast basketball squad has shown his i 
fulness on the athletic field as well as in the parlor. Active as a 
deer on the gridiron and basketball court, Hurley is as smooth 
as a dear when Peggy he courts. 

Versatile as an athlete, he is no less so as a speaker. His smooth, 
flowing tongue works equally well, whether for an impromptu, to 
a prospective Fuller Brush customer, or in making love. 

PLATO; MATH CLUB; FOOTBALL, -14. 'ij. 'i6, 'ij; BASKETBALL. ^6. 
"27, CAPTAIN. '28; TRACK, 'i^. '26, '27. CAPT.'MN, '28; ALPHA MU- 
OMEGA; McKENDREAN STAFF, '27; 'M" CLUB; PURPLE "M,'- -26, 



Joseph Guandolo, A. B. 

Conway, Pennsylvania 

That rare combination of athletic ability and keen intellect is 
one of the fine attributes of this lovable chap — Joe — in whose 
veins flows the blood of ancestors from Sunnyland. 

An indefatigable worker, with an unceasing interest in all stu- 
dent activities and a smiling way, make Joe a natural leader in 
whatever he undertakes. His talent in argumentation and writing 
assure him a bright future. 

FOOTBALL. 24, '25, ■26. -27, CAPTAIN, '26; BASEBALL, '26. '27. '28; AN- 
NUAL STAFF, '26. '27. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. "27; EDITOR, McKENDREE 
CENTENNIAL HISTORY; DEBATE. -26, -27, '28, CAPTAIN. '27. '28; VICE- 
PRESIDENT STUDENT ASSOCIATION; PRESIDENT OF CARNEGIE 
HALL; PI KAPPA DELTA; PRESIDENT PLATONIAN LITERARY SO- 
CIETY. 



Margaret Robinson, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illinois 

What girl's heart does not thrill when she sees a handsome 
athlete go forward to bring honors to his Alma Mater and to 
himself. Peg is no exception, for she was always "there" when a 
certain dark-haired Senior was in the fray. 

Peg will always be remembered when we chance to think of 
Shakespeare, for she interpreted Rosalind's part in "As You Like 
It" in a very realistic manner. 



Vivian Young, A. B. 

Mdrissa, Illinois 

For versatility, "Viv" is without peer. Her convincing person- 
ality won for her a position on the Debate Team of "26, and also 
the attentions of a dark-haired McKendrean known as Joe. 

She is an able impersonator and her readings are always appre- 
ciated. Her magnetic personality and her ready smile have won 
for her many friends. 



■Tit'eiit;y-Three 




cntcrrs 



LoRiN Mitchell, B. S. 

Olney, Illinois 

For excellence in scholastic ability, consistency in applying him- 
self to his studies, as well as his prominence in student activities 
in which he participated, "Mitch" takes his hat off to none. More- 
over, in school spirit, he's unequalled. 

"Mitch," with his easy smile, wavy hair as black as night, and 
that quality termed the "human touch." is one well-liked by both 
boys and girls. Success to this boy will not come as luck but as 
a deserved reward. 

"LIGHTIN;" McKENDREAN STAFF, -iS; MATH 



Dale Benner, B. S. 

East St. Louts, Illinois 

When looking for Dale around the campus, one is likely to be 
baffled in his efforts to find him, for he's here one moment and 
gone the next, making himself the most exclusive upper-classman 
on the hill. The blame, however, lies not on his hut Fate's shoulders. 

Dale has to be exclusive in order to hold a position with the 
Aluminum Ore Plant in East St. Louis and at the same time attend 
his classes. He's Edison II when it comes to sleep — may he not 
be also in achievement^ 
SHURTLEFF COLLEGE, 'ii. '23, '2,. 



GoLDA Taylor, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illinois 

In everyone's make-up there is both strength and weakness. 
Golda's most pronounced specimen of the latter is man, which she 
seriously tries to analyze. The object of her study is none other 
than Lorin Mitchell. 

By her Alpha Psi Omega pin, we know that Golda may well 
apply the following poem to herself: 

"Breathes there a woman with soul so dead. 
Who never to herself hath said, 
'I know that I can act'." 



ALPHA PSI 
ASS0C:iAT10 



lEC/ 



SECRETARY-TREASURER STUDENT 



Ray Bass, A. B. 

Eldorado, Illinois 

When Ray came to McKendree from Carbondale University, 
he cast his lot with the adventures of the matrimonial voyage. As 
a consequence, a McKendree co-ed has not only been his "assistant 
pastor" ever since, but also the fountain whence his wisdom pours 
forth. 

Aspiring to a bishopry, the presidency of a large educational 
institution, or at least to the pastorate of a large edifice of worship, 
Ray is guided by the highest ambition and loftiest ideals in thought 
and deeds. 
OXFORD CLUB. 




Twenty-Foi 




•enters 



James Stuart, B. S. 

Granite Citv, llhnois 

Here he comes, there he goes, and Jimmie is everywhere. Speedy 
and active always, this veritable bundle of nerves and activity is 
constantly in the limelight on the college campus. 

No introduction is required to know this jolly, good fellow, 
for with his peppy actions and cheery, radiant smile, the stranger 
is made to feel he has already met Jimmie. Could any other politi- 
cian or diplomat possess a more mysterious ability than this^ 
ASSOCIATE IN ATHLETICS; REVIEW STAFF; BACHELORS. 



Paul Hortin, A. 

Albion, Illinois 



To he diligent in his duties, consistent in his class work, con- 
genial with whom he comes in contact, true to his friends, and ar- 
dent in lo\'e, seem to be the motto of the busiest man on the campus. 

Persistent in his method and suave in his speech, Paul makes 
success out of all his undertakings. He is a leader of no mean caliber 
and a man of his type can always make the best of his opportunities. 

MANAGER CENTENNIAL HISTORY; PRESIDENT PLATO; PRESI- 
DENT ALPHA PSI OMEGA; PRESIDENT GLEE CLUB; McKENDREAN 
STAFF, -17; VICE-PRESIDENT Y. M. C. A.; SONG LEADER; MANAG- 
ING EDITOR. REVIEW; EGYPTIAN QUARTETTE; McKENDREE 
QUARTETTE; ORCHESTRA. '14. 15; ■•MARTHA;" "BOHEMIAN 
GIRL;" "EXPRESSING WILLIE;" MESSIAH CLUB. 



Earl Miller, B. S. 

Granite City, Illinois 

Earl is one of the very few among the Centennial graduates who 
is a natural scientist, devoted to the laws of science and ever search- 
ing for its marvelous secrets. To him steel is not a cold, lifeless 
matter, but a living potentiality with a pyramid of possibilities 
further to benefit mankind. 

Not a believer in getting his education from one institution. Earl 
has tasted of the scholastic food at Washington and Chicago Uni- 
versities. He leaves McKendree an out-and-out McKendrean. 
PHILO; WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY; CHICAGO UNIVERSITY. 



Edna Kinsey, A. B. 

Allamont, Illmois 

A scribe, an artist, a musician, and a tennis player is this versa- 
tile Senior. Whether the occasion demands light or serious con- 
versation, "Red" admirably adapts herself to the condition. 

Her ability as an artist won for her the post of art editor of 
the McKendrean for two years. You were always congenial, 
"Red" — we'll miss you. 

ORCHESTRA, 'is. '^6: CLIO; Y. W. C. A. TREASURER, -27. -28; PI KAPPA 
DELTA; VICE-PRESIDENT STUDENT ASSOCIATION; McKENDREAN 
ART EDITOR. 'iS. '27; EDITOR-IN-CHIEF McKENDREE REVIEW, 'iS; 
DEBATE CAPTAIN, '2^. 



Tu'ent;y-I'ue 




Seniors 



Dale Wilson, 

y^ewton, UUnc 



A. B. 



Those who really know Dale find in him a truly attractive 
personality. Clean cut in his appearance, he is no less so in his 
character. He has revealed his versatility by his contribution to 
scholastic, forensic, dramatic and musical activities of his Alma 
Mater. 

In a petite, golden-haired damsel, after many years of experi- 
mentation. Dale has announced to the world at large that he has 
finally found "Her" and all that he expected. 

PI KAPPA DELTA; DEBATE TEAM, '27. '28; PRESIDENT PLATO; VICE- 
PRESIDENT SYMPHONIC CLUB; PRESS CLUB; ORCHESTRA; BAND; 
Y. M. C. A.; "AS YOU LIKE IT." 



Clifton Oxendine, A. B. 

Pates, Tiprth Carolina 

A true son of America, Oxie wisely has taken full advantage 
of its heritage, especially that in the educational realm. Not only 
did he obtain his college degree by hard work, wise selection, 
careful study and persistence, in addition Oxie intends to exalt 
himself in the noble profession of teaching. 

In the lighter side of his life, he has shown himself to be "right 
there. "Oxie prefers jokes of the "apple-pie" type, however, he never 
fails to see the point in the flattest of jokes. 

CLASS PRESIDENT, '16; McKEN- 



Charles Jack, A. B. 

Opdyke. lUmois 

A scramble, a quick grab, a twist, and a long arm reaches up 
and this dependable basketeer scores another of his thrilling shots. 
Charley, the backbone of our basketball team, is one of the most 
popular athletes in McKendree. 

"Fair play" is the motto of Charley, who can also boast of 
having an engaging personality, a bushel of wit and a friendly 
disposition. To know him is to know a friend good and true. 

FOOTBALL, 'ifi. 'j?; BASKETBALL. '16. 'ly. 'is, CAPTAIN. '27; BASEBALL, 
•ij. -16. 17. CAPTAIN. 28; ALPHA MU OMEGA; PLATO PRESIDENT; 
•■M" CLUB; PURPLE "M." 27. '28. 



Vernal R. W. Hardy, B. S. 

ElUs Grove. Illmois 

Swift and dextrous on the tennis court, this tall and handsome 
young man applied his quick, efficient methods of the tennis court 
to every task and duty which fell to his lot. 

In striking contrast, a gentle and kind disposition makes his 
personality an unusually likable one and has won him many 
friends. To one young fair co-ed, at least, "Willy" is "just the 
darlingest thing." Being a man of vitality, his future is very 
promising. 

REVIEW, MANAGING EDITOR. "26. '27. EDITOR. '27: McKENDREE 
BULLETIN. EDITOR. -26, '27; PRESIDENT PLATO; TENNIS, -24. '27; 
MATHEMATICS CLUB; ASSISTANT IN CHEMISTRY; SIGMA 2ETA. 




cniors 



Elza Cralley. 

Mount Olive, llh 



B. S. 



Ordinarily very quiet, Elza can talk interestingly for a lengthy 
period when the subject happens to he biology. What he sees 
through the microscope would cover a mountain. 

Being a scientist by natural inclination, Elza has that pecu- 
liarly sympathetic understanding of the minute life. His pictur- 
esque descriptions of the many dilly-dallying little creatures 
beneath the magnifying glass makes biology seem a romancette. 
His interest in "little things," it is said, extends to include a 
"little" Belleville girl. 



Delbert Lacquement, a. B. 

Colhnsrille, Illinois 

A quick glance, a flashy smile, a friendly greeting — that is 
"Lacky," the "Fighting Parson" of our football team, and a real 
friend. 

His unselfish nature was revealed in his athletic career when he 
sacrificed personal glory for the good of the team. Playing the game 
well and fair, "Lacky" did much to keep up a fine morale among his 
team-mates with his peppy and cheerful spirit. Adversity will not 
deter this congenial chap from achieving his goal. 

PRESIDENT OXFORD 



Glenn ''Jack" Haskin, B. S. 

Oblong, Illinois 

A resounding slap on the back and a hearty, booming laugh, 
and you know that Jack is indulging in another of his quiet, re- 
served jokes. He has McKendree pretty well in hand, from the 
faculty to co-eds. 

His conscience severely chides him, however, for the multitudes 
of pleasant dreams he has shattered in the boys" dormitory during 
his windy career with the bugle. Jack is the proud possessor of 
those rare qualities which can arouse enthusiasm even at a funeral. 

FOOTBALL, 'ly; TRACK. •^6. 'ly. "^8; PRESIDENT PHILO; PRESIDENT 
BACHELORS; CHEER LEADER, '24-'a8; SECRETARY-TREASURER "M" 
CLUB; BAND. -14, '15; CIRCULATION MANAGER REVIEW; INSTRUC- 
TOR IN ACADEMY. 



William Kratzer, A. B. 

Jamestown, Missouri 

"Bill," one of our most popular and prominent students, is 
called the "Jim Reed of McKendree." He is for Missouri first, 
last, and always, because, as he aptly says; "A state is to be 
exalted that can produce such men as Jim and I." 

A man of aggressiveness, persistency and business ability, quite 
evident in everything he does, assure Bill a future bright and 
rosv. The services which he rendered for the glory of "Old Mc- 
Kendree" and fellow-students cannot be too much appreciated. 

PRESIDENT PHILO; BACHELORS; BUSINESS MANAGER McKEN- 
DREAN igay; GLEE CLUB. '25. 'zO. 'ly. '^S; BUSINESS MANAGER MC- 
KENDREE REVIEW; SECRETARY'-TREASURER GLEE CLUB, 'ly, -28. 




TwentySe 



MC KEND REE'^^^^^^s:?^;^-^.^^.^^ 




§'cntors 



Irwin R. Nelson, A. B. 

Williamsnlle, Missouri 

With a heart as big as he is tall and robust, Irwin is the type of 
man who inspires confidence and affection in everyone he meets. 
One would have to be as strong and efficient as Irwin to handle 
several classes besides participating in extra-curricular and schol- 
astic activities. 

With sterling character, consistent working methods and with 
a radiantly, pleasant disposition, this big, old boy can accomplish 
much in the teaching profession, which he chose as his life's work. 



Leonard Metcalf, A. B. 

Case>^ill«, Illinois 

Leonard is one of the few fortunate men who go to college to 
obtain an education, but in the process form an entangling alliance 
with the opposite sex and get a wife, too. He settled down early 
in his college career. 

As a result, Leonard is one of the most earnest, conscientious 
and hard-working students in everything he does. With his native 
ability coupled with that of his life-mate, success to him seems to 
be just around the corner. 
PHILO: OXFORD CLUB. 



Marion Kirkbride, A. B. 

Cdiro, Illinois 

Troubles befall all, and this blue-eyed Egyptian from Cairo has 
not been exempted. All through her senior year Marion has been 
under a terrific mental strain. 

The two vital questions of her life, to which the answers have 
not as vet been found, are "To let her hair grow or not to let it 
grow," and "To diet or not to diet." As for the former, we will 
say forget it, for gentlemen prefer blondes, regardless of whether 
or not they have bobbed hair, but for the latter, nobody loves 

a fat . 

■LASS O- Lt.MERlCK TOWN;' 



Helen Metcalf, A. B. 

Collmst'illf, Illinois 

We remember Helen as a prominent member of the McKendree 
Concert Company. This noted company entertained Southern 
Illinois in the summer of '17. 

Now Helen has a husband to entertain and she is proving her- 
self to be a capable minister's wife. Her sweet disposition, accom- 
panied by perseverance and pluck, cause McKendree to be proud 
to claim her as a daughter. 

1ARTHA;" MCKENDREE CONCERT COM' 



Tu^-ntv-E.ght 



IMC KENDREE"^^^^^::^^:^^,,.;.^.:..^ 




•cniors 



Kenneth Rippel, A. B. 

Moherly, Missour, 

Who could keep from laughing, when this witty and peppy 
Missourian was around? He could sing, too, for he was a member 
of the McKendree Quartette. Possessing a happy-go-luckv dispo- 
sition, his clever conversation made him a genuine humorist. This 
ability classified him as an able and interesting entertainer. 

On the stage he could take anv role and perform successfully, 
as can be noted by the many appearances he made. All McKen- 
dreans will remember how gallantly he played in "As You Like It." 

PRESIDENT GLEE CLUB; PRESIDENT PLATO; SONG LEADER; McKEN- 
DREE QUARTETTE; -GYPSY ROVER;" "MARTHA;" "LASS O' LIM- 
ERICK TOWN," "TAMING OF THE SHRE"';" "AN ECONOMICAL 
BOOMERANG;" "AS YOU LIKE IT;" SECRETARYTREASURER STU- 
DENT ASSOCIATION. 



Eugene Smith, A. B. 

East St. Lou.s, llhncns 

If he were the direct descendant of the highest nobility. Gene 
could not conduct himself in a more gentlemanly way, nor walk 
with a more portly and graceful stride. 

Tall and straight as a reed, he is as stately as any prince. But 
hidden within him there is a cordial and warm personality with 
plenty of response for affection. As a scholar, he ranks well; as 
a debater, he is hard to refute. 



Verdie Correll, B. S. 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Verdie"s large, dark, and mysterious eyes attract one's attention 
immediately. She must be a juggler and a magician, because of the 
apparent ease with which she accomplishes strange tricks with 
figures. 

As an impersonator, she soars beyond the ordinary, for did she 
not interpret the part of Adam in "As You Like It," with unusual 
success? We sometimes wonder, Verdie, just what you are think- 
ing, when your eyes get that far away look, because we know 
you aren't thinking of mathematical figures then. 



Viola Ragland, A. B. 

Greenville. Illinois 

Viola was with us for one, brief semester, yet she made many 
friends during this time. She came to us from Greenville College, 
where she was in school for three and one-half years. 

Viola is musically inclined, as is evidenced by her ability to 
play the piano. Indeed she was an excellent student for, her name 
never failed to appear on the honor roll. She is a real friend to 
those with whom she is associated. 
GREENVILLE COLLEGE, "as- '16. '27- 



(it>-.Nine 




Seniors 



Emmery H. Martin, B. S. 

Sumner, [llmois 



tellar McKendrean athlete, invincible 
ports. IS characterized by a generous 
still waters run deep," and when it 
which he believes, then his 



True to his type, this 
on the field of collegiate 
amount of reserve. But, 
comes to a matter of principles 
strong character is truly revealed. 

However, his reserve did not keep his thoughts from lightly 
turning to love. It would not at all be surprising if he soon lent 
his ears to the Heavenly strains from Lohengrin. 

PHILO; BACHELORS; TRACK. '16. '2-. '28, FOOTBALL, '28; BASEB.^LL. 
•17; CLASS PRESIDENT, '27; MATHEMATICS CLUB; "M" CLUB; BUS- 
INESS MANAGER REVIEW; PURPLE "M,' '27, iS; B.'HSKETBALL.^t, 28. 



Philip Glotfelty, A. B. 

Granite City, Illniois 

When a man goes out for football practice every day for four 
consecutive seasons without earning a letter, he certainly must be 
a man overflowing with the spirit of self-sacrifice, abounding with 
persistence, and especially fond of hard knocks. That introduces 
Rocky. 

Diminutive in size, Rocky played an inconspicuous, but heroic, 
role in athletics. But the honors he lost in football he gained as 
the custodian of our most beloved pet bear. Rocky wisely chose 
a field of service — the ministry. 
PLATO; Y. M. C. A.; CHEER LEADER, ■2;. ■26. -27. 



Helen Douglas, A. B. 

Oblong, /llmois 

"Doug" is McKendree's most famous man-hater. All but John 
Hall have given up hopes of ever obtaining her coveted smile. He 
still pursues her steadily, furiously, yea — even vigorously, but 
Helen will have none of him. 

Leap Year dates cause her to lose no sleep, for she knows John's 
persistence will urge him to ask for just one date. Alas, alack! 
Doug, we wish you joy! 

McKENDREE REVIEW STAFF. -26. '27; W 
SECRETARY-TREASURER JUNIOR CLASS. 



cKENDREAN STAFF. 



Lela Sites, A. B. 

Salem, Illinois 

Lela is small and peppy, and one of her chief delights is a mid- 
night feast. Last year she distinguished herself as a member of 
the "Eternal Triangle," and has proved to be the "survival of 
the fittest." 

She IS not thinking in terms proportionate to her advancement 
in the field of mathematics, as this year she is thinking in fewer 
numbers. Having linguistic possibilities, she is especially interested 
in the romance languages. 
CLIO PRESIDENT; MATH CLUB SECRETARY. 




•Seniors 



LossiE Morris, A. B. 

OTdlloii, Jllmois 

With a mischievous twinkle in his eyes, a pleasant disposition 
and a friendly manner, Lossie seems to have found the secret to 
creep into the hearts of his classmates. 

Unassuming usually, blatant never, this young minister has a 
future before him in the field to which his Master has called him. 
Though Lossie has been with us only one year, he leaves McKen- 
dree a true son of his Alma Mater. 

PARK COLLEGE, 'ii. '^y 



Robert Peach, A. B. 

Lebanon. Illmo.s 



With a pleasing baritone voice, a luxuriant crop of light hair, 
keen intellect and excellent acting abilities, Robert is an asset unto 
himself. This explains in part his success in musical operettas. 

From early childhood, Robert long aspired to attend McKen- 
dree College, on the campus of which he has romped many a day. 
His dream has more than come true, for he is one of the Cen- 
tennial class. He believes in education for business. 
GLEE CLUB, •lyii: PRESIDENT PHILO, "EXPRESSING WILLIE;' "AS 
YOU LIKE IT;" "BOHEMIAN GIRL: ' "MARTHA;" "LASS O' LIMERICK 
TOWN;" "MESSIAH." 



Fay Ragland, A. B. 

Greennllc, llUnois 

It is rather diiEcult to tell about Fay without telling about May 
at the same time. The twins spent two and one-half years in Green- 
ville College and one-half year in DePauw University. 

Wanting to graduate from the right place, they came to Mc- 
Kendree to conclude their college careers. At first they seemed to 
be quiet and reserved, but on better acquaintance they are known 
to be right jolly. Continued — in May's write-up. 
GREENVILLE COLLEGE, '25. '26; DePAUW UNIVERSITY, '27. 



May Ragland, A. B 

Greenville, Illinois 

If any distinction can be made, this half of the twins is the 
more mischievous. Both are excellent scholars and are interested 
in other activities too. 

By exhibiting skill in basketball they won their college G's in 
this sport. May was also yell leader for her class. These girls are 
good examples of true sisterly love. 
GREENVILLE COLLEGE, 'is. '26; DePAUW UNIVERSITY, '27. 




antiiu's 



Sam Kotelly, A. B. 

Chautauqua, \ew Tor\ 

A congenial personality, a ready wit, and the ability to speak 
well in several languages, peculiarly fit this ambitious young man 
for his chosen profession — law. His inclination to work hard and 
his ability to keep at it promise Sam the success which he deserves. 

Clean in thought and conduct, this Albanian boy unconsciously 
plays to advantage the best attribute for making friends. Naturally 
a future judge would blush when a girl tries to kiss him. 
PLATO; GLEE CLUB. 



Alfred Crossley, B. S. 

OTaUon, lUmo^s 

Beneath a rather quiet and pleasing personality, the explorer 
in human nature will find a heart of gold and sterling qualities of 
a faithful friend in this young lad. His character, clean intellect and 
sincere attitude towards others make him a good pal for any one. 

Though not spectacular, Al will achieve a high place in the 
chemical or business world, with his perseverance and stick-to-it- 
iveness. A pretty little girl at Belleville holds his heart in her 
little hand, and this explains why Al has rather neglected our fair 
McKendree maidens. 
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. ■24- 



Oliver Wahl, A. B. 

EdwardsviUe, llhnon 

Quiet and reserved, Oliver has the ability to make his violin, 
which he loves, do the talking for him. At his hands, this instru- 
ment, otherwise inanimate and lifeless, laughs with glee, cries with 
sadness, sighs with longing. 

To his active interest is due the credit for the organization of 
the McKendree band and orchestra. It is hoped by those who 
know of his activities, that he will remain at his post to tontinue 
his good work. 



Anthony Sigillito, A. B. 

St. Loms, Misscurt 

Coming to McKendree in his senior year, "Sig" at once took 
an active interest in several student organizations and became a 
true McKendrean. His congenial and sociable nature has made for 
him numerous friends from Italy, his birthplace, to McKendree. 

His record in college, his genuine earnestness in performing his 
work, and his confidence in himself assure success in his chosen 
profession. Girls? Well — he prefers blondes and brunettes. 



ThrtyTwo 




§'cniors 



Paul Gould, A. B. 

FreebuTg. Ubnois 

His serene pair of eyes can speak more eloquently for him than 
the golden tongue for the orator. This explains why Paul, a man 
of few words, has such a beguiling way with the opposite sex. 

Being a firm beHever in the dictum, "Early to bed, early to rise," 
the wonder is how he can work this paradoxical role of the gallant 
lover and still arise with the dawn. The "how" must be the secret 
of his success. 
PLATO; BAND; ORCHESTRA; Y. M. C. A. 



Ronald Mowe, B. S. 

Lcbdnon, llbmns 

Talented in music and very capable in athletics, "Pete" has 
made himself one of the most popular boys among his classmates. 
Perhaps his drawback in pushing himself before the spotlight is 
a certain degree of modesty which works to his advantage in 
making admiring friends. 

While to his sweetheart he is just a "baby," Pete is a real man 
when it comes to swinging a tennis racket or throwing the javelin. 
Popularity, he says, comes to him who does not seek it. 
TENNIS, 'i6, "17, '18; TRACK, "ly; BAND, '25; "M" CLUB; ALPHA MU 
OMEGA; ASSISTANT IN CHEMISTRY. 



Frank C. Brown, A. B. 

Lebanon, Illinois 

Entering McKendree way back in 1910, when the women wore 
long dresses and long hair, Frank attended school here whenever 
his profession left him free to do so, to become a proud member 
of the Centennial class. 

This elderly senior, with a more serious aspect upon life than 
most of his classmates, is keen in perceiving the humorous side 
of life. His laughter comes out in delightful ripples. A hard worker 
always, Frank is inspired by the Muses when it comes to writing 
original poems and songs. 

A.; MANDOLIN QUAR- 



Walter p. Whitlock, A. B. 

East St. Loms, Illinois 

Walter is a living example of what a preacher's son ought 
be. Quiet in manners, courteous to all and always willing to i 
his share for any good cause, he is much sought after. 



This lovable charac 



any 



group, IS 



ade 



more desirable by a soft, rich baritone voice. But really to know 

him, one must he enlightened by Laura. With his own abilities 

and those of his "running mate," Walter will shine brightly in 

the community in which he locates. 

PRESIDENT PLATO; Y. M. C. A.; GLEE CLUB; BAND, 'is. 'i6. 'n. 'iS; 

ORCHESTRA. -24. '26; MATHEMATICS CLUB; INSTRUCTOR IN 

ACADEMY. 



.s:^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ss> 



])uninrs 




Stephen Kolesa 

Far-famed and great as a football star, 
A speedy runner in baseball and track. 
Of this year's McKendrean, he's Editor-in-Chief, 
So you see in nothing is he ever slack. 
PRESIDENT FRESHMAN CLASS; VICE-PRESIDENT "M" 
CLUB; PLATO; FOOTBALL, '^s. '^6. '^7; BASEBALL. -26. 'ir. 
■i8; TRACK. 'i6. '27, '28; PURPLE "M." '26. '27. '28; BACH- 
ELORS; EDITOR INTERSCHOLASTIC PROGRAM. '28; 
ASSISTANT EDITOR McKENDREAN. '27; EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
McKENDREAN, '28. 

Lucille Hadfield 

With laugh and song, with mirth and play. 
She joyfully passes each happy day. 
Never selfish or dull at heart 
On McKendree's campus she plays her part. 

GLEE CLUB; "MESSIAH;" CLIO; QUARTETTE; REVIEV^' 
STAFF, '28; "BOHEMIAN GIRL;" MATH CLLIB; McKEN- 
DRE.^N STAFF. '28. 



Julia Wilson 

To accomplish all — she will never fail, 

For hers are the qualities that always win. 

She does not stop when things go WTOng, 

But picks up the threads and starts all over again. 

PRESIDENT V. \V. C. A.; CLIO; McKENDREAN STAFF. 



Thomas Perkins 

President of the Junior Class is he, 
A leader necessarily he has to be. 
Known all around this beautiful land. 
For he's McKendree's publicity' man. 

PRESIDENT JUNIOR CLASS; REVIEW STAFF; PLATO. 
BACHELORS; TRACK, '27, '28; "M" CLUB; ORCHESTRA- 
BAND; BUSINESS MANAGER McKENDREAN, '28. 



Edward Apple 

Here and there and everywhere 
You see this jolly boy. 
First he's here and then he's there. 
Ready and willing all things to enjoy. 



Margaret Shaffer 

From the tips of her toes to her beautiful eyes. 

She is maidenly, dainty and precise. 

Her gentle spirit and modest air. 

Prove her as diUgent as she is fair. 

GLEE CLUB; "BOHEMIAN GIRL;" "MESSIAH," CLIO. 



Constance G 



LENN 



Belle and Connie are very close friends. 
If you see them together, you'll think they're twins, 
Connie's eyes are blue, and brown is her hair. 
You'll always find that she'll treat you square. 

PIA KAPPA DELTA; GLEE CLUB; "MESSIAH;" DEBATE. 
•28; EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING. '2-; "BOHEMIAN 
GIRL;" "LASS O' LIMERICK TOWN;" CLIO; McKENDREAN 
STAFF. '28. 

Harold Culver 

He was the Junior's basketball star. 

Who played with a vim to win. 

When the game was close, or the score was a tie 

The ball was usually passed to him. 



PRESIDENT "M" CLUB. BACHELORS. 



T/n>t>-Four 



MC KENDREE 



Junior 



John Dolley 



Always smiling, his lessons ready, 

He is ever present, ever steady, 

For versatility he is also noted, 

Altho to his work, he is seriously devoted. 

PHILO; BACHELORS. 



Mary H 



UGHES 



If this fair maiden you should chance to meet. 
You would observe her as being demure and sedate. 
She is diligent, quiet, retiring and dependable. 
Her work is always very commendable. 

PRESIDENT GLEE CLUB; "BOHEMIAN GIRL;" "LASS O' 
LIMERICK TOWN." Y. \V. C, A. CABINET; BAZAAR 
PRESIDENT. 



Mae Goddard 

What's the use of grumbling and being down-hearted. 
What's the use of sighing and being blue. 
What's the use of weeping if you weep alone? 
Just laugh so the world may laugh with you. 
CLIO; "AS YOU LIKE IT;" NATURE CLUB. 

Charles Nichols 

His whole lite through he's looking for fun. 
One joke isn't finished, till another's begun. 
He hkes to sing and tease and play and jest. 
But oft-time seriousness reigns above the rest. 



PRESIDENT PHILO; BASEBALL, '17. 'iS; ORATORY, 'iS; PI 
KAPPA DELTA; DEBATE '28; GLEE CLUB; QUARTETTE; 
"LASS O'LIMERICK TOWN;" 



Lee Baker 

When we look at Lee we find. 
One with a keen and fertile mind. 
Content to follow his own life's call 
When duty summons he will never fall. ' 
PHILO; MATH CLUB; McKENDREAN STAFF, -27 

Alma Buess 

Quiet, reserved and dignified is she. 

Her image is so fair to behold. 

Her cheerful smile and her stately grace 

Will stay with her, tho she be a hundred old. 



Edith Plato 

When into your life the rain does fall. 
Don't be discouraged, just forget it all. 
For life's worth while and it's not a bore. 
If we sing a little and jest a little more. 
CLIO; GLEE CLUB; "BOHEMIAN GIRL." 

Harold Slaten 

Harold is the preacher among our number 
And never does his mental faculty slumber, 
Ever alert and busy through the day. 
Is he content to pursue his own life's way. 
OXFORD CLUB; Y. M. C. A.; PHILO. 





MC KENDREE^^^^^^^s^^.,,.^^^^ 



John Oster 

He's a Bachelor but he has no pin 

For httle Geneva, his heart did win. 

In hasehall. on second base may he be found. 

To tag the opponent, when he comes around. 



Geneva Grieve 

Thre: years of contact prove her as pure 
As she is quiet, wise and demure. 
She wastes no time on foohsh things 
Because for her the bell of business rings. 
CLIO; NATURE CLUB; REVIEW STAFF. -28. 



Robert Young 

Books! Oh books, how I admire you. 

What to me could be more fun 

Than to peruse your pages when I am blue 

And absorb your thoughts one by one. 

PLATO. 

Ray Goode 

Across the miles to East from West, 

Rode Goode, our Javelin King, 

He had in mind, to do his best. 

That laurels to McKendree, he might bring. 



Thomas Claire 

This minister's name is Thomas Claire 
Who came to McKendree in twenty-eight, 
His favorite expression everyone knows, is, 
"Let's see, now, if I have this straight." 



Dorothy Ikemire 

Ready and wilhng to do her share 
She lives her life each gladsome day. 
Her eye is clear, her face is fair. 
She is a friend who will always stay. 



Belle Pfennighausen 

Petit and dark is this fair Belle. 
She does her work and she does it well. 
With a cheery hello, she greets each one. 
She studies but she also has her fun. 

DEBATE. '17. '18; GLEE CLUB; Y. W. C. A CABINET; 
"BOHEMIAN GIRL;" "MESSIAH;" CLIO; FIA KAPPA 
DELTA; "LASS O' LIMERICK TOWN;" M^KENDREAN 
STAFF. -iS. 

LoY Wattles 

In declamation for Plato very witty 

Is this tall youth from fair Clay City, 

He has poise and voice and tact 

And he can wield the discus, when it's time for track. 

BACHELORS; PLATO; "M ' CLUB; TRACK. '26. '27. '18. 



MC KENDREE" 



inmns 



Erle Todd 

Captain of the Bear Cats of twenty-eight, 
Was this tall youth from fair Penn State. 
He led the boys through thick and thin. 
Always fighting and determined to win. 

PLATO; PRESIDENT CLASS, '25; PRESIDENT ALPHA MU 
OMEGA: FOOTBALL. -14. '25. '^6. CAPTAIN, '17; BASKET- 
BALL. '27; EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING, '27; PI 
KAPPA DELTA. 



Vera Smith 

Good natured. obliging, kind and true. 
She does all that is assigned to do. 
She likes to play and she likes to work. 
Let duty call for she will never shirk. 
CLIO; MATH CLUB, 



Edward Woo 

From across the Pacific, he comes to us. 
To study and to learn our ways. 
He is silent, but his mind is keen 
We hope he'll remember us always. 

Marvin Grupe 

On Plato's floor he took his stand. 

To make a speech I'll vow. 

Some day a favorite artist, he will be. 

For he can even paint a picture now. 

PLATO, 



Val Baggott 

Val hails trom the Sunny South 

Where the sun is always shining. 

A little flagrant, boastful and imperious. 

But under all there is a strain that is serious. 

football, -2-; tr.ack, '26, 2-. 

Audrey Bower 

Joyful, kind and obliging too, 

Audrey is a sincere friend to you, 

If she knows you once, she knows you forever, 

Because friendships to her, are not to sever. 

GLEE CLUB; CLIO; "BOHEMIAN GIRL;" DEBATE, 



Joe Williams 



Although his name was "Polky Joe," 
In a football game, he was never slow. 
He tackled his man, and he tackled him hard. 
Never letting him run, not even a yard. 

alpha mu omega; football, -2,, 'i-. 
Helene Ferrell 

Everyone watches for Helene 's smile 
Because it always greets you, 
She would go out of her way a mile, 
If a favor she might do for you. 
CLIO; Y. W. C. A. CABINET. 





Erwin Hake 



A proverbial school teacher. 



Alvenia Hecklinger 

Never a word said she. 



Laura Wilhite 

Without Walter she is lost 

Edmund Maxwell 

He has to be sighted Missouri. 



Edward Shadowen 



Marjorie Glotfelty 

a friend to all. 

CLIO; CLASS VICE PRESIDENT, '27; Y. \V. C. A. CABINET. 



Jeanette Sprinkel 

This brown-eyed lassie is our nightingale. 

glee club. 

Gilbert Ragsdale 

Whitey — yes he was. 



Elmo McCl 



Did I see him blush? 
PHILO; NATURE CLUB. 



Circe Magill 



Quiet and ever retiring. 
■MESSIAH." 



MC KENDREE 



S»'o]pltomin*C5 



Harry Pate 



"Now, I ask you. Ladies and Gentlemen."" 

PLATO; PI KAPP.'V DELTA, DEBATE. '2-, 'zs, ORATOR, 



Grace Renner 



Lavina Zook 



Prexy"s right hand man. 



Bovyard Clayton 



Tall and stalwart is he. 



ElTEL ScHROEDER 



Oh, go shave. 



Irene Smith 

Our Schumann-Heink. 

CLIO. GLEE CLUB, "BOHEMIAN GIRL;" QUARTETTE, 



Elizabeth M^ 



a smile for everyone. 



Albert Hagler 

A most pious man, indeed. 
PHILO, OXFORD GLUB; Y. M. C. A. 



Harold Yerkes 



A princely looking fellow 
PHILO. 



Pauline Brooks 



Same way with me. 
CLIO; NATURE CLUB. 




^iip ho mures 




John Montgomery 

Always interested in East St. Louis. 



WiLMA Schmidt 

She breezes from Breese. 



LORENE FULLERTON 

Slow, but ever dependable. 
CLIO; DEBATE. 'iS. 

Charles Hall 

A gay old soul. 

PHILO; GLEE CLUB; MATH CLUB. 



John Brian 

He comes from Sumner. 
PHILO; ALPHA MU OMEGA. 



Harriet Mulford 



Another quiet lass. 
"MESSIAH." 



Lela Aulvin 



A conscientious worker and ever of good cheer. 
CLIO; MATH CLUB. 

Herbert Engelhardt 

Patrick, you old Irisher. 

ALPHA MU OMEGA; PLATO; FOOTBALL. -27; "M' 



Earl Davis 



Husky's all right. 

PLATO; GLEE CLUB, "AS YOU LIKE IT.' 



Bernice Parrish 



McKENDREAN STAFF, '28; CLIO; SECRETARY-TREAS- 
URER NATURE CLUB; MECHANICAL DRAWING AS- 
SISTANT; BIOLOGY ASSISTANT. 



# up 111! mores 



Idris Cornwell 

And everywhere that Mary went 



Mildred Peak 

A true pal. 

CLIO; GLEE CLUB, "BOHEMIAN GIRL;" PIANIST. 



LORIN DOUTHIT 



Oh, that hne. 
PHILO; DEBATE, 



Dorothy Jackson 



Gone, but not torgotten. 
CLIO. 



Thelma Brandon 



Little women can do much, 
GLEE CLUB; CLIO, DEBATE, ' 



Lucius Tunnell 



Such a ""pressing" mar 
PLATO; MATH CLUB. 



George Awalt 



Run, Await, Run! 

TRACK, -27. 'iS; "M" CLUB; NATURE CLUB. 



Verna Jarvis 



We all like Vern. 
CLIO; ORCHESTRA, 



Arthur Hoppe 



Elizabeth Melson 

What could we have done without her? 
CLIO; MATH CLUB; Y. W. C. A. CABINET. 




•§*iiphamorc5 




Kendall Bop 



A man of chemistry, indeed. 



Zella M 



ALANDRONE 



It was always Hardy with her. 



Allene Beardsley 



Gentlemen prefer blondes 
CLIO. 



Saegesser 



Granite City, art calling me? 
GLEE CLUB; PLATO: ^L^TH CLUB. 



Merle Lang 

They call me Red-Head, Red-Head. 

MATH CLUB; "BOHEMIAN 

LUELLA ReINCKE 

Always willing to do a good turn. 
NATURE CLUB. 



Fred Merr'v 



Girls, he's took. 

OXFORD CLUB; Y. M. C. A,; PHILO. 



Nina Mae Harmon 



A chip off the old block. 
CLIO; "AS YOU LIKE IT." 



Louise Hal 



All hail. Hale. 
CLIO; DEBATE, 



;APPA DELTA. 



William Gillespie 

A true Egyptian — Cairo. 
PLATO; McKENDREE REVIEW, 'jg. 



Forty-Two 



Joyce Davidson 



Preach — but he couldn't. 

PLATO, GLEE CLUB; "BOHEML^N GIRL.' 



Evelyn Dunn 



He was so irresistible 
CLIO. 



Dan Hertensteii 



Mathematician plus. 
MATH CLUB; PLATO 



Pauline Thurmond 

Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, Livy. 



Leone Chappel 



"Well— I kinda think so.' 
CLIO. 



Marion Browj 



Buster Brown. 
CLIO. 



Bertram Smith 

He'll tell you the score. 

Irma Oglesby 



The most studious ot us all. 
CLIO. 



Martha Rogers 

Can she cook? 
CLIO; GLEE CLUB. 



Ray Hamilton 



Short and sure he wa 
BASEBALL, '^S. 



MC KENDREE Klfe^^^^^^^..^-^..^ 




1828^ 



1928 



Forty-Three 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 




JFrcslimcn 



Allen, Clark Lee — I, II, West Frankfort, III. 
AsBURY, Velma Valera -I, II, OTallon, III. 
Baggott, George Irvin — I, II, Zeigler, 111. 
Barnes, Charles Marvin — I, II, Granite City, 111. 
Bartelsmeyer, Ralph Raymond — I, II, Hoyleton, III. 
Beard, James Garfield — I, Altamont, 111. 
Beardsley, Whit.more Everett — I, II, St. Louis, Mo. 
Beckwith, Paul— II, East St. Louis, 111. 
Bennett, Herbert Russell -I, II, Olney, 111. 
Bergdolt, Margaret — I, II, Trenton, 111. 
Beutelman, Elvira Anna — I, II, Lebanon, III. 
Bingaman, Floyd Frederick — I, II, Brownstown, 111. 
Brissenden, Robert Edgar ~I, II, Clay City, 111. 
Broeg, George Frederick -I, Flora, 111. 
Brown, Ralph Bert -I, O'Fallon, 111. 
Bryan, Ouida Brewies — I, II, Johnson City, 111. 
Camp, Charles Franklin -I, II, Brighton, 111. 
Cariss, Marie Florence - I, II, Granite City, 111. 
Carmichael, Nell Cathern -I, II, East St. Louis, III. 
Church, Harmon Beare — I, II, Renault, 111. 
Clayton, Josephine Christine — I, II, Vienna, 111. 
Cothern, Genevieve Mae — I, II, Ramsey, III. 
Craig, Scott — II, East St. Louis, 111. 
Cralley, Jesse Albert — I, II, Mt. Olive, 111. 
Creed, Mildred Mary — I, II, OF'allon, 111. 
Crisman, Ernest Calvin — I, II, Columbia, N. J. 
Culver, Paul Milberne- I, II, Palestine, 111. 



111. 



Curry, Edward McCoy -I, II, Palestine, III. 
Dartt, Flora Agnes — I, II, Enfield, III. 
Davidson, Lois Mary — I, II, Salem, 111. 
Dey, Elisabeth Kathryn — I, II, Bunker Hill, 111. 
Dorris, Wilson Carl — I, II, Breeze, 111. 
Dressler, Myrtle Anna — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Duggan, Ruth Miller — I, II, St. Louis, Mo. 
Eaton, Mary Elizabeth —I, II, Edwardsville, 111 
Fiegenbaum, Bruce Otto — I, II, Edwardsville, 
Fink, Jordan Edwin — I, II, Carlyle, 111. 
Gard, John Lavern — I, Chester, 111. 
Gewe, Gladys Cornelia — I, II, Nashville, 111. 
Gilbert, Lester Henry — I, II, Nashville, 111. 
Globig, Sybella Marie— I, II, Beckemeyer, 111. 
Golden, Owen Newland — I, Flora, 111. 
Grant, Henry Clay — I. II, Mt. Vernon, 111. 
Green, Vera Elizabeth —I, II, Nashville, 111. 
Hamilton, Ruth Evelyn -I, II, Brownstown, 111. 
Harpstrite, Elvera Kathryn -I, II, New Baden, 111. 
Harris, Frances Elizabeth —I, II, Ashley, 111. 
Harris, Joseph Camovitch —I, II, Ashley, 111. 
Head, Lewis Nathaniel — I, II, Eldorado, 111. 
Hedges, Thelma Pearl— I, II, Flat Rock, 111. 
HiNES, Gail William- I, II, Alma, 111. 
Hines, George Bernard I, II, Newton, 111. 
Hortin, James F.— I, II, Albion, 111. 
Hosler, Melville -I, St. Louis, Mo. 




Howell, Nina Linden — I, II, McLeanshoro, 111. 
HuBBELL, Chlorus Francis — I, II, Flora, 111. 
IsLEY, Leonard Carlyle — I, II, Newton, 111. 
Jackson, William Lee — I, Allendale, 111. 
Jones, Clarence Robert — I, East St. Louis, 111. 
"Karr, Dwight Melvin— I, II, Geff. 111. 
Klein, Walter Peter — II, Granite City, 111. 
Koch, George— I, II, Belleville, 111. 
Kolb, Mildred Alice — I, II, East St. Louis, 111. 
Kratzer, Lela Kathryn — I, II, Jamestown, Mo. 
Kruger, Earl Eugene — I, II, Summerfield, 111. 
Kruger, Lorena Margerite — I, II, Belleville, 111. 
LowRY, Delton H. — I, II, Reyham, N. C. 
Martin, Alice Lillian — I, II, Freeburg, 111. 
Maynard, Paul Sylvan — I, II, Herrin, 111. 
Maynor, Lois Vera — I, II, Golconda, 111. 
McCollum, Marjorie — I, II, Louisville, 111. 
Meinen, Edna Margaret — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Middleton, Louis William — I, II, Salem, 111. 
MoRELOCK, Marion Leontine — I, II, Mascoutah, 
MowE, Orena Zillah — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
MuNDY, Van Allen — I, II, Elbert, Colo. 
Naumer, Bernetta Elizabeth — I, II, Lebanon, 111 
Nichols, Jesse Robert — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Philbrook, Leman Kenneth — I, II, St. Elmo, 111. 
Phillips, Irene Thema — I, II, Trenton, 111. 
Rawlinson, Howard Edmonds — I, II, Crossville, 
Reese, Myron — I, II, Jonesboro, 111. 
Phillips, William Maurice — I, II, Mt. Vernon, 1 



Reichert, Russell — I, II, Grand Cham, 
Riley, Opal Edith— I, II, Centralia, 111. 
Ritchey, Ralph C— I, II, Eldorado, 111. 
Ruth, Ella — II, Summerfield, 111. 
Sanders, Orland Miller — II, Ashley, 11'. 
Sanders, Vernon Joyce — I, II, Crossville, 111. 
Schubert, Ben — I, Mascoutah, 111. 
SiGGiNS, Oscar P. — II, Chebmanse, 111. 
Smith, Milton Phillips — I, II, Altamont, 111. 
Spangler, Frank — I, II, Woodlawn, 111. 
Spencer, Herbert Milberne — I, II, Christopher, 111. 
Stanford, Virginia Marjorie — I, II, Louisville, 111. 
Steinkamp, Wilmer — II, Mascoutah, 111. 
Steinkoenig, Louise Jane — I, II, Highland, 111. 
Stout, Harold A. — I, II, Mascoutah, 111. 
Tatalovich, Eli — I, II, Buckner, 111. 
Taylor, Howard Samuel — I, II, O'Fallon, 111. 
Tedor, Stephen Lewis — I, II, Zeigler, 111. 
Tedrick, Lowell Dale — I, II, Vandalia, 111. 
Thilman, Erna Margaret — I, II, Casey viUe, 111. 
Thomas, Bessie Lee — I, II, Lebanon, 111. 
Walker, Williard Carroll — I, Cobden, III. 
Weaver, James Carroll — I, East St. Louis, 111. 
Well, Clarence Emerson — I, II, Brighton, 111. 
Whitlock, Vera Elizabeth — I, II, East St. Louis, II 
Williams, Zoa Rowena — I, II, Olney, 111. 
Yargar, Laura Cathern — I, II, Stoy, 111. 
Zachais, Dorothy Marion— I, II, Nashville, 111. 



<=^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 




Fine Arts 



Lucille Hadfield, Margaret Shafer, Edith Plato, Mildred Peak, and Constance Glenn, having completed the two-year course 
in Public School Music have received certificates from the School of Music. 

The School of Music offers a four-year course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. Certificates are also granted 
in piano, organ, voice, violin, and public school music. 

Margaret Robinson, Grace Renner, and Lorena Kruger, having completed the course in Expression, have received certificates 
from the School of Expression. 

The School of Expression offers varied courses in public speaking, interpretation of literature, and staging of plays. 

FACULTY 

Grant McDonald ................. Piano 

Pauline Harper ............... Public School Music 

Ada Carroll ....... ........ Voice 

Olive Patmore ................. Expression 

Oliver Wahl ................. Violm 







Student Association 

Organized 1921 



OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

Eugene Smith President Clarence Brennan 

Edna Kinsey Vice-President Joseph Guandolo 

Kenneth Rippel ...... Secretary-Treasurer ...... Verdie Correll 

James Stuart Associate in Athletics James Stuart 

Lewis Head Cheer Leader Lewis Head 

Charles Nichols Song Leader Paul Hortin 

Lucille Hadfield Pianist Mildred Peak 

EiTEL ScHROEDER Custodian of Bear Eitel Schroeder 

The Student Association is composed of the regularly enrolled students. This representative student-body's purpose is to 
centralize student activities as well as to stimulate "McKendree pep". The year's program consists of: 
Student Chapel each Friday. Home-Coming Program. 

Disposition of Student Business. Annual Interscholastic Program. 




fMC KENDREE"^ ^^^^^^:^^.^....^^ 




The Press Club 

Orgamzed i(j2i 
Publishers of the McKendree Review 



Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Circulation Manager 
Assistant CircuLnvm 
Sports Editor 
Societv Editor . 
Feature Writer 
Exchange Editor 
Reporter 
Reporter . 



Edna Kinsey 

John Oster 

Emery Martin 

William Gillespie 

James Stuart 

. James Hortin 

Stephen Tedor 

Geneva Grieve 

. Lucille Hadfield 

Clifton Oxendine 

Nina Mae Harmon 

. Frank Brown 




Staff of the McKendrean 



Editor-mChief 
Business Manager 
Assistant Editor . 
Athletic Editor 



Stephen A. Kolesa 

Thomas Perkins 

Erwin Hake 

John Oster 





ASSOCIATE EDITORS 




Kendall Born 


Dorothy Ikemire 


Stephen Tedor 


Julia Wilson 


LoRiN Mitchell 




Constance Glenn 


Bernice Parrish 


OuiDA Bryan 


Belle Pfennighausen 


Lucille Hadfield 
Anthony Sigillito 





^MC KENDREE ^^^^^s:^:.^^^:...^ 




iilBigililB 






Clionian Literary Society 

Founded 1869 
Charter Granted by State of Illinois, 1881 



Lela Aulvin 
Allene Beardsley 
Audrey Bower 
Thelma Brandon 
Marion Brown 
Pauline Brooks 
OuiDA Bryan 
Alma Buess 
Leone Chappel 
Christine Clayton 
Kathryn Dey 
Evelyn Dunn 
Mary Eaton 
Lorene Fullerton 



MEMBERS 
Marjorie Glotfelty 
Mae Goddard 
Constance Glenn 
Geneva Grieve 
Vera Green 
Gladys Gewe 
Ruth Henry 
Nina Howell 
Mary Hughes 
Louise Hale 
Nina Mae Harmon 
Lucille Hadfield 
Thelma Hedges 
Dorothy Ikemire 

Vivian Young 



Verna Jarvis 
Dorothy Jackson 
Marion Kirkbride 
Edna Kinsey 
Merle Lang 
Elizabeth Mayes 
Zella Malandrone 
Lois Maynor 
Elizabeth Melson 
Orene Mowe 
Irma Ogelsby 
Bernice Parrish 
Mildred Peak 
Edith Plato 



Belle Pfennighausen 
Opal Riley 
Grace Renner 
Margaret Robinson 
Martha Rogers 
Margaret Shafer 
Lela Sites 
Vera Smith 
Irene Smith 
Virginia Stanford 
Margaret Teague 
Julia Wilson 
Lavina Zook 
Laura Yarger 








The Platonian Literary Society 





Founded 


1849 








"Vid 


Sdpientiae' 






Clark Lee Allen 


Jordan Fink 






Leonard Isley 


Ralph Ritchey 


Whitmore Beardsley 


William Gillespie 






Charles Jack 


Sam Saegesser 


Kendall Born 


Philip Glotfelty 






Stephen Kolesa 


Eitel Schroeder 


Robert Brissenden 


Clifton Gould 






Sam Kotelly 


Edward Shadowen 


Frank C. Brown 


Paul Gould 






Paul Maynard 


Eugene Smith 


Harmon Church 


Joseph Guandolo 






Louis Middleton 


Lucius Tunnel 


Bovard Clayton 


Marvin Grupe 






LoRiN Mitchell 


Erle Todd 


Harold Culver 


Vernal Hardy 






Clifton Oxendine 


Oliver Wahl 


Paul Culver 


Lewis Head 






Harry Pate 


LoY Wattles 


McCoy Curry 


Erwin Hake 






Thomas Perkins 


Walter Whitlock 


Joyce Davidson 


Dan Hertenstein 






Myron Reese 


Dale Wilson 


Earl Davis 


Paul Hortin 






Kenneth Rippel 


Robert Young 


Herbert Englehardt 


Earl Hussong 












r=-3^ ^ 


L'^i 




(=3=-^?^ 




<s^:^s:^ 


^^^331828^ 


^92^|.#fe^^ 


1^^^^:^ 



cs:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 




Pi Kappa Delta 

National Honorary Foren?i; 

I//inoi5 Theta Chapter 

Established 1924 

Membership — Intercollegiate Orators and Debaters 

OFFICERS 

President , ■ • • Eugene Smith 

Vice-President ... ... Harry Pate 

Secretary-Treasurer • .Joseph Guandolo 

Corresponding-Secretary Edna Kinsey 

MEMBERS 
Dr. Cameron Harmon HONORARY Dean E. P. Baker 

Olive E. Patmore J- W. A. Kinison 

INSTRUCTION 
W. C. Kettlekamp 
Clarence Brennan ACTIVE Louise Hale 

Edna Kinsey Charles Nichols 

Constance Glenn Joseph Guandolo 

Belle Pfennighausen Mary Richards 

Harry Pate Eugene Smith 

Fifty-Two 



<:^:^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s:£> 










Philosoph 


Lan Literary Society 






Founded, 1837 




George Baggott 




Glenn Haskin 


John Montgomery 


Lee Baker 




Gail Hines 


Irvin Nelson 


Herbert Bennett 




Arthur Hoppe 


Charles Nichols 


Clarence Brenna 


N 


James Hortin 


John Oster 


John Brian 




William Kratzer 


Robert Peach 


El:a Cralley 




Delbert Lacquement 


Howard Rawlinson 


Jesse Cralley 




Delton Lowry 


Anthony Sigillito 


Ernest Crisman 




Emery Martin 


Harold Slaten 


John Dolley 




Elmo McClay 


Frank Spangler 


LoREN Douthit 




Leonard Metcalf 


Stephen Tedor 


Albert Hagler 




Fred Mery 


Harold Yerkes 


Charles Hall 




Earl Miller 


Vernon Sanders 




FiftyTh 




Alpha Mu Omega 

Organized 1924 

President . . .............. Clifton Gould 

Vice-President . . Ronald Mowe 

Secretary-Treasurer . ■ Charles Jack 

MEMBERS 

George Baggott Chlrous Hubbell Edward Shadowen 

John Brian Leonard Isley Elliot Solero 

Idris Cornwell Charles Jack Eli Tatalovich 

Herbert Englehardt Louis Middleton Stephen Tedor 

Ray Goode Ronald Mowe Erle Todd 

Clifton Gould Charles Nichols Joseph Williams 
George Hines 



F,fty-FouT 




Bachelors 



President . 
Secretary-Treasurer 



. Glenn A. Haskin 
Clarence R. Brennan 



FACULTY ADVISOR 
Prof. S. M. McClure 



Clarence R. Brennan, '28 
El2a M. Cr alley, '28 
Glenn A. Haskin, '28 
William B. Kratzer, "28 
Emery H. Martin, '28 
LoRiN Mitchell, "28 
Irvin R. Nelson, '28 



MEMBERS 
James Stuart, '28 
Stephen A. Kolesa, '29 
John W. Oster, '29 
Harold Culver, '29 
Thomas J. Perkins, '29 
LoY E. Wattles, '29 
Kendall E. Born, '-^o 



BovARD W. Clayton, '30 
John Dolley, "jo 
Erwin Hake, '30 
Henry C. Grant, 'ji 
James F. Hortin, "31 
Robert E. Brissenden, "31 
J. W. Dunn, '25 




Sigma Zeta 

OFFICERS 

Master Scientist Elza Cralley 

Vice-Master Scientist Vernal Hardy 

Recorder Treasurer S. M. McClure 

MEMBERS 
Elza Cralley J. W. Dunn 

Vernal Hardy S. M. McClure 

Mary Richards C. J. Stowell 

The Society of Sigma Zeta was founded at Shurtleff College in 192'; and the Beta Chapter was established at McKendree in 
the following year. This organization has for its object the promotion of scholarship among students of the sciences and mathe- 
matics and restricts its membership to those having completed two years of these subjects with superior ratings. 

Since its organization, the society has enjoyed a steady expansion annually and now has chapters located in a number of the 
stronger small colleges of the Middle West. 




Alpha Psi Omega 



OFFICERS 



President 




. Paul Hortin 


Business Manager ... 




. Kenneth Rippel 


Secretary ...... 




Grace Renner 


















Miss Patmore 




MEMBERS 






FACULTY 




Dr Cameron Harmon 




Olive E. Patmore 


Pauline Harper 


Evelyn McNeely 
STUDENTS 


Ada Carroll 


Margaret Robinson 




GoLDA Taylor 


Margaret Teague 




Vivian Young 


Alma Buess 




Grace Renner 


Dorothy Harmon 




Kenneth Rippel 


Paul Hortin 


Earl Hussong 


Fred Jessop 



The Alpha Theta Cast of Alpha Psi Omega was granted to McKendree College in 1927 by the Grand Cast. Alpha Psi 
Omega is a national honorary dramatics' fraternity. The Alpha Theta Cast was installed with sixteen charter members, which 
for a college of this size, was an unusually large number of persons to be qualified to meet the requirements of the national 
organization. However, the large number of charter members is explained by the fact that McKendree has for some time had 
a strong department of dramatics and expression. 



F.ftySa. 



jMC KENDREE^ ^^^^s^a.,,,;^,-^ 




Treble Clef Club 





Orgai 


.zed 


IQ24 








OFFICERS 


















Vice-President 








Marion Kirkbride 














Pianist 










Lucille Hadfield 
















VOICES 




First Sopranos 


Second Sopranos 






First Altos 


Second Altos 


Marie Cariss 


Margaret Shafer 






Mary Eaton 


Lavina Zook 


Thelma Brandon 


Mary Hughes 






Edith Plato 


Irene Smith 


Vera Whitlock 


Edna Meinen 






Constance Glenn 




Elizabeth Mayes 


Opal Riley 






Belle Pfennighausen 




Orena Mowe 








Elvira Beutelman 




Margaret Teague 








Lucille Hadfield 




Erna Thilman 








Martha Rogers 




Dorothy Ikemire 








Audrey Bower 




Ruth Hamilton 








Mildred Peak 




Jeanette Sprinkle 













Margaret Shafer 
Orena Mowe 



QUARTETTE Lavina Zook 

Lucille Hadfield 





Men's Glee Club 



Organized 1924 
OFFICERS 



















Secretary-Treasurer 














Director 






Miss Ada Carroll 




VOICES 






First Tenors 


Second Tenors 


First Bass 


Second Bass 


Ben Underwood 


Paul Hortin 


Herbert Bennett 


Harold Culver 


Anthony Sigillito 


Van Mundy 


Earl Hussong 


Sam Saegesser 


Harold Yerkes 


Clarence Brennan 


Earl Kroeger 


Sam Kotelley 


Charles Nichols 


William Kratzer 


Robert Peach 


Jess Nichols 




EiTEL Schroeder 


Earl Davis 






Herbert Spencer 








QUARTETTE 








Ben Underwood 


Jess Nichols 






Paul Hortin 


Harold Culver 










McKendree College Orchestra 



Director — Oliver Wahl 







INSTRUMENTS 




Violins 


Saxophones 




Piano 


Clarinets 


DWIGHT KarR 


Clark Lee Allen 


Ruth Hamilton 


Paul Gould 


Ralph Ritchey 


Paul Culver 




Zella Malandrone 


Mary Eaton 


Milton Smith 








Laura Yarger 


Sam Saegesser 


Drums 




Bass 


Elvira Beutelman 


Mrs. McDonald 


Dale Wilson 


Cello- 


George Koch 
-Harold Yerkes 


Grace Renner 



With the major part of its personnel retained from last year and with the addition of several experienced musicians from the 
present student body, the McKendree Orchestra has this year enjoyed greater popularity than ever. 

Many new numbers have been added to the repertoire this season. These together with the favorites of previous years 
proved by their enthusiastic reception to be a vital part of chapel programs, recitals, concerts, and social affairs. 



Sixty 



-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




McKendree College Band 



Dnector — Oliver C. Wahl 



Saxophones 
Clark Lee Allen 
Milton Smith 
DwiGHT Karr 
Wilson Dorris 
Paul Culver 
Willard Walker 



INSTRUMENTS 

Clarinets 
Paul Gould 
Mary Eaton 
Laura Yarger 
Elvira Beutelman 
Grace Renner 



Trombone 
Ralph Ritchey 



Walter Whitlock 



Cornets 
Leman Philbrook 
George Baggott 
McCoy Curry 

Drums 
Dale Wilson 
Harold Yerkes 

Our remarkable success in all athletic events of the year may be partly attributed to the McKendree Band. Enthusiasm ran 
high when the band played at football and basketball game^, pep meetings, parades and similar affairs throughout the year. 

The band this year consisted of nineteen members. This is the largest number that has ever represented McKendree College. 

Attired in their new uniforms on Homecoming Day, they thrilled the returning McKendreans by the old school airs which 
were played during the parade and at the football game. 




Y. W. C. A. 



FACULTY ADVISORS 
Miss Alleen Wilson Miss Olive Patmore 

CABINET MEMBERS 

Julia Wilson 

Elizabeth Melson 

. Edna Kinsey 

Lavina Zook 

Marjorie Glotfelty 

. Mary Hughes 

Eliiabeth Mayes 

Lucille Hadfield 

This Christian organization, old in years and possessed with traditions noble and uplifting, holds a dignified position among 
the clubs on the College Hill. 

Each Wednesday evening the women meet for a devotional hour, in which they discuss different campus problems, and try to 
find practical solutions to them. Capable leaders speak on various, interesting topics, explaining how one may improve her 
spiritual and intellectual life. These meetings are much enjoyed by all of the members because of the social aspect and also 
because of the inspiration derived from the thoughts presented. Our Y. W. C. A. strives constantly to sow seeds that will 
make a rich and beautiful harvest. 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Social Chairman 
Program Chairman 
Finance Chairman. 
Chaplain . 
Pianist . 




Y. M. C. A. 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

DR. Walton, Professors Kinison and Vick 

President ... .......... . . Irvin R. Nelson 

Vice-President ............... John Montgomery 

Secretary ................ Dan Hertenstein 

Treasurer .............. Harold K. Yerkes 

With but a few in number, this organization has weathered the storms of opposition and has a staunch and firm foundation. 
The meetings are held each Wednesday evening at seven o'clock. The latch-string is always on the outside and all men are 
extended a sincere welcome. 

During this hour the serious features of campus activities are studied, and methods of improving one's spiritual experience 
are discussed. Once a month the Y. W.and Y. M. combine to have a joint session. These evenings prove interesting because of 
the devotional and musical programs. Things come and go but the Y. M. will remain to uphold Christian ideals and Christian 
living. 




The Oxford Club 

Founded by Dr. W. N. Sterns 1920 
Reorganized by Professor J. W. A. Kinison 1926 



Second Semester 
. Fred C. Mery 
John Montgomery 
Harold Slaten 



ACTIVITIES 
Meet wee}{ly for class m Homeletics Special mspiratwiial addresses b\ professionals in Christian wor}{ 

Create close fellowship between ministerial students Social recreation 

OFFICERS 
First Semester 
Delbert Lacquement ..... President . 

F. C. Brown ...... Vice-President . 

F. C, Mery ...... .Secretary-Treasurer . 

MEMBERS 
Dr. Cameron Harmon 
Dr. W. C. Walton 
Leonard Metcalf 
Frank C. Brown 
Clarence Brennan 
Delbert Lacquement 
Phillip Glotfelty 
LossiE E. Morris 
Harold Slaten 
Lewis Head 



Prof. J. W. A. Kinison 
Prof. J L. Harrell 
Dale Hagler 
Gail Hines 
Arthur Hoppe 
Bert Smith 
Herbert Bennett 
Fred. C. Mery 
John Montgomery 
Ernest Crismann 



Cl/ 



Lee Allen 




The Nature Club 

Organized 1926 
Founder — Dr. E. R. Spencer 



Sponsoring of Hature Study 
Bird Study 



ACTIVITIES 



Stellar Observation 
Beautification of College Campus 



President . 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Elza Cralley 
Bernice Parrish 



George Awalt 
Velma Asbury 
Pauline Brooks 
Herbert Bennett 
Alma Buess 
Elvira Beutelmann 
Verdie Correll 
Jesse Cralley 
Elza Cralley 
Ernest Crismann 
Leone Chappel 
Evelyn Dunn 
John Dolley 
Flora Dart 
Myrtle Dressler 
Bruce Fiegenbaum 



MEMBERS 

Marjorie Glotfelty 
Philip Glotfelty 
Owen Golden 
Sybil Globig 
Lavern Gard 
Mae Goddard 
Paul Gould 
Elizabeth Harris 
Gail Hines 
Chlorus Hubbel 
Lewis Head 
Arthur Hoppe 
Earl Hussong 
Louise Hale 
Louis Middleton 
Nell Marberry 



John Montgomery 
Orena Mowe 
Marjorie McCullum 
Elmo McClay 
Bernice Parrish 
Mae Ragland 
Fay Ragland 
Ralph Ritchey 
Luella Reincke 
Grace Renner 
Virginia Stanford 
Harold Slaten 
Vernon Sanders 
Bert Smith 
Margaret Teague 
Luella Mueller 



^ftMC KENDREE"^^^^^:;^^,..^....^ 




Mathematics Club 

Orgamzed 1926 
Founded by Dr. C. J. Stowell 



Verdie Corell . 




President ..... 


. Charles Jack 


Charles Jack . 




Vice-President .... 


Elizabeth Melson 


Lela Sites . 




Secretary-Treasurer .... 


Vera Smith 




REGULAR MEMBERS 




LoRiN Mitchell 


Clifton Gould 


Elizabeth Melson 


Walter Whitlock 


James Stuart 


Charles Jack 


Lela Aulvin 


Charles Hall 


Vernal Hardy 


Emery Martin 


Lucius Tunnel 


Dan Hertenstein 


Verdie Correll 


Samuel Saegesser 


Vera Smith 


Herbert Englehardt 


Eugene Smith 


William Gillespie 


John Dolley 


Lela Sites 


Lee Baker 


Glenn Stout 


Zella Malandrone 


J, W. Dunn 




ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 




Harold Stout 




Jesse Nichols 


John Hall 


Howard Rawlinson 




George Koch 


Elvera Harpstrite 


Maurice Phillips 




Van Mundy 


Thelma Hedges 


Russel Reichert 




George Baggott 


Leontine Morlock 


James Hortin 




Floyd Bingamon 


Bernice Parrish 


Lucille Hadfield 




Dorothy Zacheis 


Margaret Bergdolt 


Lois Davidson 




Mary Eaton 


Marion Brown 




Forensics 

FORENSIC LEADERS 

Dean E. P. Baker . . .............. Manager 

Professor W. C. Kettlekamp ............ Men's Debate Coach 

Dr. E. R. Spencer .............. Women's Debate Coach 



ORATORS 

Representative to the Illinois St.ite Oratorical Association 
Harry L. Pate 

Representative to the Pi Kappa Delta Convention 
Charles Nichols 

Representatives to Southern Illinois and Southeast Missouri Oratorical Association 

Charles Nichols 
OuiDA Bryan 



EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING 

Representatives to the Southern Illinois and Southeast Missouri Oratorical Association 

Dale Wilson 

OuiDA Bryan 




AFFIRMATIVE 
Eugene Smith, Captain 
Harry L. Pate 
Dale E. Wilson 
Arthur Hoppe, Alternate 



Men s Debate 

W. C. Kettlekamp, Coach 

AFFIRMATIVE DEBATES NEGATIVE DEBATES 

St. Louis Law School at St. Louis, Mo. . noyvdeaswn Shurtleff College at Alton, 111 lost 

Greenville College at Lebanon, 111. lost William Jewell College at Liberty, Mo. non-decision 

Eureka College at Eureka, 111. . . nondecision Pittsburg Teachers College, Pittsburg, Kan. non-decision 

Lombard College at Galesburg, 111 . . . non-decision Drury College at Springfield, Mo. .... won 

Iowa Wesleyan University at Mt. Pleasant la. . won Illinois College at Lebanon, 111. .... won 

Parson's College at Parsons, la. ... . lost Southeast Missouri Teachers, Cape Girardeau, Mo. won 

Missouri Wesleyan at Lebanon, 111. . . . lost Hastings College at Lebanon, 111 won 

Lincoln College at Lebanon, 111. . . won 

PI KAPPA DELTA CONVENTION AT TIFFIN, OHIO 

Two Man Team — Joseph Guandolo and Eugene Smith 

Hastings College (afF.) vs. McKendree (neg.) ............. won 

University of Dubuque, la. (aff.) vs McKendree (neg.) ........... lost 

South Dakota Wesleyan (neg.) vs McKendree (afF.) won 

Gustavus Adolphus, Minn, (aff.) vs McKendree (neg.) Jos* 

Jamestown, N. Dak. College (neg.) vs McKendree (aff.l ........... won 



NEGATIVE 
Joseph Guandolo, Captain 
Earl Hussong 
Charles Nichols 
Loren Douthit, Alternate 




Sixtv-Eight 



riMC KENDREE ^ ^fe^fes^,.,,.^^.,-^ 

ill 



AFFIRMATIVE 
Louise Hale, CapUin 
lorene fullerton 
Audrey Bower 




Women's Debate 



Dr. E. R. Spencer, Coach 



AFFIRMATIVE DEBATES 



Southeast Missouri Teachers at Cape Girardeau, Missouri 
Drury College at Lebanon, Illinois . . . . 



. lost 
non-decision 



A ^ua}{er friend informed me I was not content with being in the right when discussing any point, but had to be overbearing and 
insolent about it — of which he convinced me b>i mentioning several instances. Endeavoring to cure myself of this fault, which I now 
realize had lost me ynany an argument, I made the following rule: to forbear all direct contradictions of the sentiments of others and 
all over-positive assertions of yny own. Thereafter, when another asserted something I thought an error, I denied myself the pleasure 
of contradicting him abruptly, and shotting nnmediate/y some absurdity in his proposition. Instead, I began b>i observing that in 
certain cases or circumstances his opinion would be right, but m the present case there appeared or seemed to me some differences, etc. 

I soon found the advantage of this change in my manner. The conversations I engaged m went on more pleasantly. The modeit 
way in which I proposed my opinions procured them a readier reception and less contradiction. 1 had less mortification when I found 
to be in the wrong, and I more easily prevailed upon others to give up their mista\es and join with me when I happened to be right. 
To my new tactics I thin\it principally owing that I had early such weight with my fellow citizens when I proposed new institutions, 
or alterations m the old. and so much influence in public councils when I became a member. For I was a bad speaker, never eloquent, 
subject to much hesitation and my choice of words hardly correct in /anguage-and yet I carried yny points — From How To Win 
An Argument, by Benjamin Franklin. 



NEGATIVE 
Belle Pfennighausen, Captain 
Constance Glenn 

ThELMA BR.^NDON 





The "M" Club 

MEMBERS 

FOOTBALL 

Dr. Cameron Harmon, Erie Todd, Stephen Kolesa, Delbert Lacquement, Edward Shadowen, Val Baggott, Chlorus Hubble, 
Herbert Englehardt, Ray Goode, Irvin Nelson, Joe Guandolo, Charles Jack, Idris Cornwell, Bruce Fiegenbaum, Glenn Haslcin, 
Leonard Isley, J|ohn Hall, Clifton Gould, Emery Martin, Bovard Clayton, George Koch, Eli Tatalovich, George Hines, Glenn 
Martin, Joe Williams, George Broeg. 

BASKETBALL 

Clifton Gould, Harold Culver, Charles Jack, Emery Martin, Edward Shadowen, Chlorus Hubble. 

TRACK 

Clifton Gould, Ray Goode, Stephen Kolesa, Thomas Perkins, George Await, Glenn Haskin, Ronald Mowe, Loy Wattles, 
Val Baggott. Emerv M.irtin, Idris Cornwell, Harold Culver. 



BASEBALL 

Charles Jack, John Hall, Stephen Kolesa, Emery Martin, Joe Guandolo, John Oster, Idris Cornwell, Ray Goode, Bovard 
Clayton, Charles Nichols. 

TENNIS 

Ron lid Mowe, Vernal Hardy. 



Glenn F. Filley — Director of Athletics 

Coach Filley has in the three years he has been at McKendree 
estabhshed a reputation as Athletic Director equal to the great 
reputation he made while an athlete at Missouri Wesyelan. 

Successful as Coach has been in turning out good teams he has 
even stronger claims to the respect of McKendreans than that 
gained as a result of his accomplishments^ He is a man four-square, 
honored and respected by all who know him. 





Seventy 




Mc Ken dree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 

McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 



Football Scores 

CONFERENCE GAMES 

. 4 Millikm . 

iQ Lincoln . 

. 1 8 Macomb . 

o Shurtleff 

7 Carthage . 

o Carbon dale 



NON-CONFERENCE GAMES 

7 Scott Field 

I T, Cape Girardea 

o Scott Field 

I--, EvansviUe 



Total ........ 8i Total 

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 1028 



Sept. 21 Springfield Teachers . 


at Springfield, Mo. 


Oct. 27 


Lincoln College 


. at Lincoln, 111. 


29 St. Louis University 


.at St. Louis, Mo. 


Nov. 1, 


Shurtleff College 


at Lebanon, 11!. 


Oct. 5 Evansville College . 


at Evansville, 111. 


17 


Carbondale Teachers 


. at Lebanon, 111. 


I T, Rolla School of Mines . 


.at Rolla, Mo. 


^4 


Bradlev Tech. 


at Peroia, 111. 


19 Kirksville Osteopaths 


. at Kirksville, Mo. 









John Hall — Assistant Coach 

""Skipper" Hall proved to be an invaluable aid to Coach in turn- 
ing out the strong Centenarian teams. Though of much assistance 
in football. '"Skipper" proved most valuable in basketball and base- 
ball. 

The basketball reserves under his tutelage defeated some of the 
best independent teams in Southern Illinois, while the baseball 
team «-as one of the best that ever represented the College. 





Erle Todd 
Captain 

Rochester. Pennsylvania 

Todd completed four years of varsity com- 
petition this year. Ability to rifle long passes, 
his shrewd signal calling, and his high-class 
punt returning gave him the position of quar- 
terback on Brick Young's second All-State 
Team. 



Edward Sh.adowen 
Captain Elect 

Chustopher, Ill.no.s 

The smallest man on the squad, weighing 
but one-fifty, Eddie was one of our best 
ground gainers. He can pass and snare passes, 
carry the ball and back up the line superbly. 
Above all else, this Sophomore scintillant 
was a great team player. 



Joseph Guandolo 
End 

Conway, Pcnnsyhama 

A veteran of four campaigns, Joe leaves 
an enviable record. Almost perfection in the 
execution of plays, he is the peer of any end 
in the Conference and any McKendree has 
ever had. 



Football Summary 



An almost air-tight line and a flashing backfield combined to make the Centenarians one of the most successful teams in 
McKendree "s century of existence. Out of ten games played, only two were on the losing side.of the ledger, and there only 
because of a very small difference in the scores. 





LI Tatalovich 


Emery Martin 


Idris Cornwell 


Fullback 


Center 


Halfback 


Chnstopher, IJImo.s 


Sumner. Illmou 


Hewton, llhnois 



Elfs ability as a line plunger is unques- 
tioned. A fair punter at the opening of the 
season, he was a good one at the end. On the 
defense he worked havoc with the plays of 
the opposition. He is a Freshman. 



Waiting until his last year in school to 
go out for the team, Mick showed such stuff 
that he became regular center in midseason. 
He passed accurately and opened big holes 
for his backiield. 



When it comes to smashing the line, run- 
ning or punting, "Dudes" is one who knows 
how it is done. The punting of this stellar 
Newton lad gained ground and saved games. 
Cornwell has two more years in which to 
glitter. 



Opening the season on September 24th on Scott Field's gridiron, the Centenarians copped a 7 — o verdict. Captain Todd 
and^Cornwell starred for McKendree. The Purple line showed great promise, even though it did lack real co-ordination. This 
lack'of team play can be attributed to the number of Freshmen on the squad and lack of practice. 

Playing at MiUikin on October xst, the Bear Cats received their first set-back of the year. A muddy field slowed the 
fast'backfield but aided the heavy line. The Fillymen made four points on safeties while Millikin tallied a touchdown after 
blocking a punt. Score 7 — 4. 









George Mines 
Guard. Tackle 

Xewtun. lUmou 

Linemen much better than Hines are 
scarce. His broad shoulders and his knowl- 
edge of how to use them caused much com- 
motion. Hines is another Freshman who has 
done a great deal for his team. 



Clifton Gould 
End 

Mt. Carmel, Hhnoxs 
Stopping end runs has been "Hurley's" 
chief outdoor sport for the past four years. 
If Mt. Carmel has any more like him, we 
would like to see them. Goodbye. Hurley, 
we"ll miss you. 



BovARD Clayton 

End 

V,enna. Illinois 

When "Slim" extends his six-fcot-four, 
the boys must pass them high to get them 
over him. As a defensive end he is a capable 
understudy to men like Guandolo and Gould 



The Scott Field Aviators came to McKendree on October 7th, determined on victory. A water-covered grid checked the 
attacks of both elevens. The Aviators threatened to score in the final quarter. Booth, Flyer star, made a sixty yard gain on a 
pass, but was stopped by Kolesa's flying tackle three yards from the last line. Score o — o. 

Changing from straight football to an aerial attack in the final quarter resulted in a 13,-9 victory over Cape Girardeau 
Teachers on October 14. Cape led q — o as the last quarter opened. Todd heaved several successful passes to Guandolo m the 
final canto, two being for forty yards. With .i half minute to go, Todd tossed over the goal line to Guandolo to gain the verdict. 





Bruce Fiegenbaum 
Tackle 

Edwardsvi'.ie. llimois 

They called him the "EdwardsviUe Flash" 
and he lived up to it. ""Fiegie" was supreme 
in breaking through the line, stopping run- 
ners m their tracks, breaking up plays, and 
making himself a general nuisance to the 
other team. 



Glenn Martin 
Halfback 

F^urfield, illmo.5 

A snap ot" the ball, a run around the end, 
and a long gain — that's what happened when 
"Abe" got the ball. This versatile back was 
severely injured early in the season, but his 
lighting spirit was with the Bear Cats all 
along. Watch "Abe" Martin next year' 



Herbert Englehardt 
Tackle 

BciUwm. UUmns 

In every game "Pat" proved himself to be 
an important cog in the Bear Cat machine 
as a mighty tackier. When Englehardt 
brought them down they stayed down. Two 
down and two to go- -that is. years ot ser- 
vice, "Pat." 



The Homecoming game was won from Lincoln before a large crowd on October 22. Williams and Lacquement starred 
on the line. Ckirnwell hurdled the Lincoln line and ran sixty-five yards for a touchdown. Shadowen scored after a forty-five 
yard run and Hines scored after recovering a blocked punt. Prince of Lincoln made two touchdowns in the last quarter. 
Score 19 — 14. 





Leonard Islev 
End 

^iewton, Illinois 

Runs around Isley's end were rather 
scarce, for the Newton star held his own 
as a splendid end, both offensively and de- 
fensively. His brilliant blocking and tackling 
contributed largely to many a Bear Cat 
victory. 



Jack Haskin 
Quarterback 



Robii 



Ilhi 



Whenever Jack was called to take Todd'; 
place, he showed his stuff. He was a smarl 
signal barker and could pick out the holes ir 
the line when toting the ball. 



Val Baggot 
Guard 

Ze.gler. Illinois 

On the very first day of practice this 
"Burn Zeigler Coal" lad was injured. A 
month later he came back strong, displayed 
his wares, finally winning his "M." Such 
perseverance has made Val a fine guard. 



Although three stars were on the bench. Western Normal of Macomb was easily defeated by the Bear Cats on October 
29. Emery Martin's seventy yard run for a touchdown after recovering a fumble was the feature. Todd, Shadowen, and 
Tatalovich also starred. Macomb's aerial attack was smothered. The final score was 18 — o. 



On November 6th the Shurtieff Pioneers, our traditional rivals, held us to 
attack. Williams and Englehardt, tackles, played a great game for McKendree. 



scoreless tie. Tatalovich led the Purple 




MC KENDReI^ ^^^^s:^.^,^^^^^ 




Charles Jack 
End 

Opdyke, Illinois 

As a pass-snatcher, Charley was right 
there with the goods. Those big paws of his 
just seemed to drag the ball down, no matter 
where it was thrown. This is his last year. 



Stephen Kolesa 
Halfback 

EdwdrdmUe. Illinois 

"Steve", a Junior, has been running around 
ends for the past three years. The fastest 
man on the team, and he makes good use of 
his speed. His ability to snare passes won 
several games for McKendree. A demon on 
a dry field. 



Delbert Lacquement 
Guard 

Collinsvilk. Illinois 

The "Fighting Parson" has been tearing 
up opponents for four years. A deadly tack- 
ier and a fast charger, he was always break- 
ing through the opposition. He is one of the 
best guards McKendree has ever had. 



After being held to a scoreless tie for half the game, the Bear Cats broke away from Carthage in the second half to score 
a touchdown. Playing in a terriiic rainstorm that made the ball slippery and the eyesight almost useless, the Bear Cats, under 
the capable handling of Captain Todd, and aided by the brilliant running and pass snaring of Kolesa, made a march down the 
field and scored the only touchdown of the game on a short pass — Todd to Kolesa. 

S. I. N. U. of Carbondale gave the Centenarians their second set-back of the season on November i8. The Bear Cats 
played far below their usual game. Baggott and Fiegenbaum starred on the line. 







George Kock 


Chlorus Hubble 


George Broeg 


Guard 


Center 


Guard 


BcUnMe. /Ilmo.s 


Flora. nUnois 


Floral, lllmo^s 



After every game Kock was covered with 
bruises. It all goes to show how hard this 
Belleville guard fought, giving everything 
that he had — holding that line, and stopping 
those plays. And George is only a Fresh- 



"Fuziy's" oni-hundred and ninety pounds 
of beef stretched over a six-foot frame made 
him immovable at the pivot position. In the 
next three years of his collegiate career he 
should become an A-i center. 



Broeg happened to be another guard who 
did his duty well. Only a Freshman, he won 
the coveted "M." His ability made him use- 
ful to the Centenarians, and troublesome 
to the enemy. 



The Bear Cats brought one of McKendree's most successful seasons to a close on Thanksgiving Day with a i j — o vic- 
tory over Evansville College, of Evansville, Indiana. The backfield functioned at top speed_^while the line was at its best. 
Shadowen, Cornwell, Kolesa, Lacquement, and Hubbel were in the linielight. 




Seventy-Eight 




The Bas\etball Season 



After m.ikmg a bad start, m which six out of the first seven games were lost, the hristUng Bear Cats snapped out of 
their inferiority complex with a swish that paved the way to a long string ot brilliant victories over some ot the most for 
midable and highly-touted quintets of the middle west. 

The first tilt was more of the practice variety, m which the Centenarians easily smothered the Belleville Allan Cigar 
five by the lop'sided score of 60 to 21. This fracas helped Coach FiUey to pick some of his future stars. 

The most discouraging part of the season then visited the raw FiUey material with four straight defeats. The first tumble 
was dished out by St. Louis University by the score of j*; to i*; — a tilt in which the FiUeymen were outclassed in the clos- 
ing minutes of play. 

Two more games were then dropped to the fist Southwest Missouri Teachers" College by scores of 44 to 18 and 52 to 
44. A few days later the Bear Cats were badly bruised by Evansville College a team that boasts one of the finest quintets 
of the country — by the score of 46 to 25. 



Clifton Gould 
Captain 

Mt. Carmel, Illmou 

Possessing speed, knowledge of 
the game, calm judgment and 
skill, "Hurley" played a whale 
of a game as guard. "Hurley" 
made a good record while play- 
ing on the Mt. Carmel High 
teams, but in the three years that 
he has been playing for McKen- 
dree. he did even better. This is 
his last season. 



Harold Culver 
Captain-elect 

Palestine, Illinois 

Harold made good use of his 
six-foot-two on both offense and 
defense. A consistent player, he 
was second only to Jack in points 
scored, and second to none on 
defense. Opponents were much 
worried by this forward's ability 
to take the ball from them. Cul- 
ver should be one ot the best 
cage players in the state in 1928- 
1929. 




Chlorus Hubbell 

Flora, Illmois 

Only a Freshman, this tall Flora athlete, with his 
long arms that broke up passes and made baskets so 
easily, showed what a guard can do when groomed 
for a forward. "Fuzzy" did exactly what was expected 
of him, and, in future years, his ability will help the 
Bear Cats march to greater glories. He's a sharp fang, 
is "Fuzzy." 



A long string ot seven dazzling victories over great teams then was started by the Filleymen, who were finally brought 
to perfection by Coach FiUey. The first victim was none other than Carthage College — a tilt m which revenge was taken to 
the point of 48 to 28. On the following day the Filleymen presented a set-back to the Macomb Teachers, 3,5 to 44. In the 
two tilts the glittering Jack heaped up thirty points, while another star, Culver, took twenty-six. 

The next act on the program was a comedy m which Shurtleff took the feeble end of a j-j to 43 defeat, chiefly because 
of the pranks that Jack played with his twenty-two points and a batch of extra fine guarding. Another gem was added to the 
string a few days later at the expense of Carthage College, who was humiliated by a 39 to 22 upset. 

The sweetest, finest, and greatest victory of the season was enjoyed by the Filleymen over Southern Illinois Normal by 
the score of 24 to 2";, a tilt in which the mighty Culver, speedy Martin, and crafty Jack did their stuff. 

Evansville College was the theme for another splendid victory in a hot, peppery fight. The splendid guarding of Gould 
and Shadowen kept off the enemy, while the scintillating Jack kept on them with twelve points. This was Evansville's third 
defeat out of nineteen starts. 

On another road trip the Centenarians slipped a hot one to Lincoln College by nosing them out of a 26 to 27 victory in 
the last few minutes of play. The following evening marked the close of the season with a very inappropriate defeat by Illi- 
nois College, 55 to 19. 

The game with Illinois College pulled down the curtain over the career of the greatest cage star that ever graced a Mc- 
Kendree team — "Charlie" Jack. Jack set records that will stand for years — the high spot being the high point man m the Little 
Nineteen one year, and a runner-up another year. Capt. Gould and "Mickey" Martin also wore their cage armors for the last 
time. Their sparkling work will be hard to duplicate in future years. 



Emery Martin 

Sumner, Illinois 

Aggressive to the nth degree, "Mickey" was an im- 
portant cog in the Filley machine. Especially adept at 
long shots, Martin was equally good when shooting in 
the shadow of the goal. "Mickey" will b: lost through 
graduation. This was his third year at McKendree, and 
the second time he has won the "M." 



Charles Jack 

Opdyke, lUinois 

A peep into the score-hook will tell you something 
of Jack's achievements in making points, but it cannot 
tell you anything about his sparkling defensive playing; 
nor anything about his fighting spirit, courage, and ver- 
satility. "CharUe's" name goes into the Hall of Fame 
as one of the most brilliant and craftiest hasketeers that 
ever dribbled over a McKendree court. 




Bas\ethall Scores 



CONFERENCE GAMES 



McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 



McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 
McKendree 



. 26 


Carbondale . 


38 


Wheaton 


30 


ShurtlefF . 


48 


Carthage . 


44 


Macomb 


43 


ShurtlefF . 


• 39 


Carthage 


25 


Carbondale 


27 


Lincoln 


19 


Illinois 


NON-CONFERENCE GAMES 


. 60 


Belleville . 


2,5 


St. Louis U. . 


. 18 


Southwest Mo. Teachers 


34 


Southwest Mo. Teachers 


25 


Evansville . 


32 


Evansville 



Edward Shadowen 

Chustopher, Illinois 

There was never a man on the floor who fought 
any harder than "Eddie," who always said it with 
action, rather than words. With two more big years 
to go, this efficient Bear Cat guard has already proved 
himself to be one of the finest, cleanest, and squarest 
players that ever donned a purple sweater. 




Eighty-One 



MC KENDREE 






Ray Goode 

Jaielm, Discus, Shot 



Val Baggott 

Middle Distances, Relay 



Glenn Haskin 

Distances 



Trac\ 




LoY Wattles 

Discus 



Track prospects are better at McKendree than they have been since 1925. The return 
of Ray Goode gives needed strength m the field events. At this early date Goode is tossing 
the javelin around the 200 foot mark. Coach Filley is grooming him for the IQ28 Olympics. 

Other veterans of last year are Kolesa and Await, sprinters; Culver, hurdles; Perkins, 
Baggott, and Martin, middle distances; Haskins and Hall, distances; Captain Gould, 
Wattles and Cornwell in the field events. 

This Ime-up of old campaigners will be bolstered by a number of promising Frosh. The 
following look best at this time: Middleton, Klein, Isley, Bartlesmeyer, Phillips, Spencer, 
Tatalovich, Rawlinson and Hubbel. 

The Relay Team composed of Await, Haskin, Martin and Kolesa has already seen 
action this year. In the Western A. A. U. Indoor Meet held at the Colesium in St. Louis 
on March 31, this team broke their former record by seven and one half seconds. 

Dual meets will be held with Washington University and Ciirbondale Teachers. Triangu- 
lar meets with Shurtleff and S. I. N. U., and with Shurtleff and Springtield, Mo. Teichers. 





Clifton Gould — Captain 

Pole Vault, Broad Jump 



Ronald Mowe 

Javelin 





Emery Martin 

Middle Distances, Relay 



Thomas Perkins 

Middle Distances, Relay 



All Time Trac\ Records 



50-yard Dash 
100-yard Dash. 

22oyard Dash 

220-yard Low hurdles 
120-yard High hurdles 
440-yard Dash. 
880-yard Run 
One mile run . 
Two mile run 
Shot Put 
Discus 
Javelin . 

Running high jump 
Running broad jump 
Pole vault . 
Half mile Relay 

1200-yard Relay . 

One mile relay 



S.5 seconds 
. 10 seconds. 

23 seconds 

. 26.2 seconds 
16 seconds 
. 5J.I seconds 
2 minutes i .8 seconds 
4 minutes J5 seconds 
10 minutes 13 seconds 
42 feet 7}/^ inches 
126 feet 9 inches 
197 feet 7 inches 
10 1 4 inches 
9 inches 
3 inches 



5 feet 
21 feet 
12 feet 
minute 35.6 seconds 



2 minutes 20.5 seconds 
3 minutes 32 seconds 




George Awalt 

Daslies, Relav 




. Kolesa 1927 

Beedle 191 3 

Isom 1025 

Whitenberg 191 4 

Peterson 1927 

Whitenberg 1914 

Whitenberg 1914 

Darrow 1925 

.Perkins 1927 

. Rawlings 191 5 

Rawlings 191 5 

Cullen 1925 

Goode 1925 

Goode 192^ 

Isom 1925 

Beedle 1913 

. Gould 1926 

Peterson, Kolesa, i92'i- 

Darrow, L.om 

Await, Haskin, 

Martin. Kolesa 

Await, Martin, 

Baggott, Peterson 



1928 
1927 



Harold Culver 

High Jump. Hurdles 




Stephen Kolesa 

Dashes, Hurdles, Relay 




Idris Cornwell 

Hurdles, D<scus 





Emerv Martin 

Out Field 




BovARD Clayton 

Right Field 



Basehall 

1927 

The baseball season of 1917 was unique in that not one of the eleven games was played on the home field. 
Rain made a swimming pool of Hypes Field. The Bear Cats did not have one day of fielding practice during the 
entire season. Despite this handicap the team won four of the eleven games, and forced such teams as Washington 
University, Concordia, and Monmouth to the limit to win. 

Victories were gained over Western Military Academy, Shurtleff, and Eden Seminary. Among the defeats 
were several close games. Washington U. was held to a 2-1 score, Concordia }-o, the hard-hitting Monmouth 
aggregation to a 3-1 score, while Shurtleff took a <i-4 game in eleven innings. But two decisive defeats were 
suffered, one at the hands of Concordia, the other at the hands of the St. Louis U. Frosh. 

Three good right-hand hurlers, Cornwell, Hortin and Kaeser, did the flinging. Nichols and Guandolo cared 
for the receiving. A fast-fielding, accurate-throwing quartet. Hall, Oster, Captain Brown, and Zook made up 
the infield. The gardens were patrolled by a quintet of classy fielders. Jack, Kolesa, Martin, G. Magill and 
Clayton. 

The 1928 team should make a better record according to pre-season dope. Cornwell, ace of the hurling staff, 
is back, as are both catchers, Guandolo and Nichols. Oster, second baseman for the past two seasons, is the 
lone survivor on the infield, while Captain Jack, Kolesa, Clayton, Martin and Goode are back in (be outfield 



Charles Jack Captain 

Third Bdse 




John Oster 

Second Bii.'^e 



Charles Nichols ! 

•J . S I Catcher 





MC KENDREE 



f 




John Hall 



Baseball Schedule 

1928 

April 18 Western Military Academy ..... at Alton 

19 Washington University . . . . . at St. Louis 

21 Eden Seminary ....... at Lebanon 

26 Concordia Seminary . . . . . . . . at St. Louis 

May I St. Louis University ....... at St. Louis 

5 Blackburn College ........ at Lebanon 

16 Shurtleff College at Lebanon 

19 Blackburn College at Carlinville 

23 Shurtleif College ........ at Alton 

30 Concordia Seminary ........ at Lebanon 

June 2 Eden Seminary . . . . . . . . at St. Louis 

% 

'4Z. 

eMMM^ ^ Joe Guandolo 





Idris Cornwell 



Stephen Kolesa 

Center F.eld 




t 



n 



Vernal Hardy 

A veteran of three previous campaigns Hardy was one of the big 
guns of this year's net squad. Built on the lines of Bill Tilden, he 
moves over the court with the same ease. His driving service and 
his net -smashing make him a formidable opponent. 



Tennis 



The racquet-wielders of 1927 were handicapped because of the continuous spring rains. Only two matches 
were held, both being with the ancient and formidable McKendree rival, Shurtleff. 

On April 28, the Pioneers were defeated by a score of 3-2, by virtue of the excellent playing of Hardy and 
Mowe, who won their respective singles events and combined to cop a doubles match. A week later the 
Pioneers were defeated at McKendree by the same score. Mowe and Hardy dropped their singles events. 
They however won the doubles event as did Culver and Perkins. Edward Woo, Chinese player, came through 
in grand style to cop the deciding singles contest for McKendree. 

Playing in the Sectional Tournament at McKendree was made difficult because of the strong wind. Mowe 
and Hardy, singles entries, were eliminated in the second round. As a doubles combination they fared better, 
going into the finals. The finals were not played and both teams were eligible for the State Meet. Because of 
heavy rains the State Meet was not held. 

This year a card of ten contests has been arranged. Shurtleff, Eden, S. I. N. U., Illinois, and Blackburn 
will each be met twice. 

Prospects for a successful season look especially bright. Mowe, Hardy, Perkins, Culver, Woo, and Gillespie 
of last year's squad are back. Among the freshmen Klein, Baggott and Nichols look good. 

An attempt is being made to get the women of the College interested in women's intercollegiate tennis. 
More than a score of women have expressed their intentions of going out for the team. A tournament will 
probably be held to determine who will represent McKendree in the contests. 




i 



1 >^ 



Ronald Mowe 

"Pete" has been a hard-playing member of the Bear Cat tennis 
squad for three years. He plays a clean, rollicking game. His back- 
hand slices, cut service, and low, fast forehand drive have always 
been his strong offensive strokes. 




Tennis Schedule 

April 19 S. I. N. U. . . . . . . . . . . . at Lebanon 

May 3 Shurtleff ............ at Lebanon 

3 Illinois College at Lebanon 

7 S. L N. U at Carbondale 

11-12 Sectional Tournament. 

17 Blackburn , at Lebanon 

19 Eden at St. Louis 

22 Illinois College ........... at Jacksonville 

2'v-26 State Tournament 

29 Shurtleff at Alton 

31 Blackburn. ........... at CarlinviUe 




McKENDREE CENTENNIAL 



McKendree lives — one hundred years. 
Wrinkled age has worn a groove. 
Plowed b\ trtals, fakh and tears. 
Wisdom's wa\s are never smooth. 



God thought It good that faith and doubt, 
Li\e wind and calm support the tree, 
Ay\d let the Century full round out. 
The seasoned strength of McKendree. 



Those who cradled her at birth, 
Visioned with a Veteran's eye. 
Time turned many toward the Earth, 
E'er the infant ceased to cry. 



I miss the ills attending age. 

The Century's symptoms, where are they? 

The feeble step, the sour'd sage. 

The wrin\led face, the hairs grown gray'' 



Others stayed 'till manhood's rim 
Circled in her cultur'd scope. 
Those whose faith though feeble, dir; 
Died still drea»ni?ig half in hope. 



But pardon me this Westu^ard glance. 
The morning light now Eastward lies. 
And "Old McKendree's" permanence, 
Li^e a fixed star is in the s}{ies. 



As we retrace the Century's tracl{. And b\ the lustre of that light, 

Where are the years that faith made clear? To blend with those Diviner rays. 
What decade lool{s not askance back. Across the world and up the height 

Or forward mixed with faith and fear'' Lei us pursue nor lose our ways. 

—Van B. Sullins, '08 



Eightji-Eight 



BOOK II 

Centennial 
History 

of 

McKendree 
College 

By 

W. C. Walton, Ph. D. 



Preface 



A 



n enterprise that involves the records of a century of achieve- 
ment cannot he carried out in a few days. The events that occur 
within a year often put a new face on many matters. The sudden 
death of Mr. Jacob Kolf, who was the original business manager of 
the Centennial history, has necessitated soyne changes in the plan. 
The college Executive Committee felt that a Centennial History 
should he published to satisfy, in some measure the expectation that 
had been aroused by Mr. Kolf's activities, but not having the means 
available to carry out his plans in full, they dei'ised a new plan 
quite dijferent from that which was first intended. Therefore, 
soyne features had to he omitted. 0?ie was a roster of the students 
from the earliest records to the present. The fact that preparation 
of this history was spread over a period of two years, while the 
writer was at the same time carrying on his regular wor}{, may 
accouyit for some inaccuracies, duplications and omissions; and the 
fact that we were depe?ident upon the mails for the securing of some 
needed facts, made it ofteyi difficult, ayid sometimes impossible, to 
get them, hi these days some people are too husy to aiiswer letters 
at all. However, we are very grateful to the mayiy who have helped 
us. They are too many to merition b)i nayne here. We have tried to 
he accurate m the statement of facts and dates, hut it is too ynuch to 
expect that we have succeeded entirel>i. Where we could get the data, 
a brief shetch of every aluynnus appears up to the last twenty years. 
After that a roster of the yiames and addresses. Where graduates 
have paid for space, their sketches have been adjusted accordingly. 
Paid sketches of graduates iyi the last twenty years will appear in 
the biographical division of this wor\. 

W. C. Walton 



Mg KENDREE 



McKendree 
College History 



CHAPTER I. 



Early Education 



eDUCATION is an eternal process. Among primitive 
peoples it was accomplished chiefly in the home and by 
the efforts of the parents. Among civilized people while 
the home training has never been completely abandoned, tho 
perilously near it in some cases, the more important forms of 
education have been largely intrusted to institutions. From 
very early times history tells of schools of various kinds. There 
were the schools of the prophets in the days of King Saul, and 
not much later the schools of the ancient Greeks in which the 
Homeric poems were the text books and a Greek slave served 
as pedagogue to the Greek children. Then there were the rab- 
binical schools in which Paul sat at the feet of Gamaliel, and 
the Catechetical schools of the middle ages in which the fu- 
ture servants of the church were trained for their special 
religious duties. As the middle ages shaded into modern times 
and the renaissance developed in the fields of both religion 
and learning, the church began to foster the establishment of 
universities in important centers in Europe, such as Bologna 
which claims to be the oldest now in existence; Paris where 
the famous Abelard drew thousands to hear his learned lec- 
tures; Oxford, an offshoot of Paris, where rehgious conviction 
was so strong as to lead to the martyrdom of Latimer and Ridley 
on the very college campus; Cambridge, an offshoot of Ox- 
ford, which trained such master minds as Sir Isaac Newton, 
Charles Dickens, and Tennyson, who was England's greatest 
poet-laureate. Here Erasmus lectured and Tyndale began his 
work as a reformer. Dozens of other great institutions of the 
old world, similar to these in scope and purpose, might be 
mentioned. 

Less than a score of years after the landing of the Pilgrims 
at Plymouth the foundations were laid for an institution of 
learning which has since become one of the greatest American 



universities. Harvard was to some extent modeled after Cam- 
bridge. It IS located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and named 
for Rev. John Harvard who was a graduate of Cambridge 
University. He contributed to the proposed college in the 
new world his library of about three hundred volumes and a 
considerable sum of money. A few decades later came William 
and Mary College, named in honor of the joint sovereigns 
who occupied the throne of England at that time. Then came 
Yale, King's (now Columbia), Princeton, Dartmouth, Brown, 
and Pennsylvania. These eight had their origin prior to the 
Revolutionary War. The colleges of this period all had more 
or less of a European background, tho the conditions in the 
new country doubtless had a modifying influence in the or- 
ganization and plans of most of them. The college existed in 
New England before the elementary school. Then the latter 
became necessary to prepare students for college entrance. 
Higher education in those days was intended only for the 
professional class, more especially the ministry, but the pio- 
neers early came to a realization of the necessity of having 
elementary education for the masses. If public policies were 
to be determined by vote of the people the voters must have 
some education in order that democracy might be a safe form 
of government. Accordingly we find compulsory elementary 
education provided for by law in the Massachusetts colony 
as early as 1642. The whole college movement had a religious 
basis in an early day and much of it still has. The spirit and 
purpose of the first college in America is set forth in a little 
New England pamphlet printed in 164 j, as follows: "After 
God had carried us safe to New England and we had builded 
our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared 
convenient places for God's worship, and settled the civil 
government, one of the next things we longed for and looked 



MC KENDREE 



after was to advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity, 
dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches when 
our present ministers shall lie in the dust." Thus the primary 
purpose of Harvard was the education of the ministry. Yale 
was founded by a group of Congregational ministers. In fact 
the church has been responsible for the founding of the most 
of our early colleges even in the West. Many of the state 
institutions originated with the church. We have good author- 
ity for the statement that the University of Kansas was or- 
ganized by the Episcopalians and Presbyterians, while the 
State Agricultural College of Kansas began as a Methodist 
school. The University of Minnesota was first organized by 
church missionaries and later taken over by the state. Peter 
Cartwright, who was once a legislator as well as a pioneer 
preacher, introduced the bill in the Illinois Legislature which 
led to the founding of the University of Illinois. The Episco- 
palian Church organized the State educational system in Flor- 
ida. Nineteen of the first twenty-two Superintendents of 
Public Instruction of Kentucky were ministers of the gospel. 
In fact Christian influence has always been evident m the 
educational achievements of our country. Where education 
has been taken over by the state it has been to avoid sectar- 
ianism, not Christianity. The school founded by Stephen 
Girard m Philadelphia is unique in that its by-laws provide 
that no Christian minister shall ever be permitted to enter its 
grounds. But even this strange rule was not aimed against 
Christianity, but the school was intended primarily for or- 
phans, and It was the idea of Mr. Girard that their beliefs 
should not be biased by denominational teaching. It is also 
noteworthy that the Pilgrim Fathers believed that Christian- 
ity of the severe type which they enjoyed, not only justified 
three hour sermons in churches without fire in winter and 
equipped with seats without backs, but it also approved of 
compulsory education for much the same reasons that we do 
now. The leaders of that day said "The child is to be edu- 
cated not to advance his own personal interest but because 
the state will suffer if he is not educated." 

After the Revolutionary War was over there was a great 
tideof immigration into the MississippiValley.NewEnglanders 
moved into Ohio and Ohioans into Missouri. The population 
and development of this vast fertile region was soon well 
under way and educational standards began to be established. 
A few colleges were founded in this early period. Transyl- 
vania in Kentucky, Vincennes in Indiana, McKendree in 
Illinois, St. Charles in Missouri. The ordinance of 1787 pro- 
vided that in the Northwest Territory a section of land in 
each township should be set aside for education. In some 



states there was also a provision for an additional section for 
the establishment of a university. Illinois had an excellent free 
school law passed as early as 1825, but it never really went 
into effect for it was practically nullified by the succeeding 
1 egislature which passed a law providing that no citizen should 
be taxed for education without his own written consent. Illi- 
nois did not really have free schools till 1850. Prior to that 
time there were subscription schools in many communities 
where the teacher received a small fee from each pupil and 
"boarded 'round" among the various patronizing families dur- 
ing the school term. Abraham Lincoln managed to get enough 
education to enter the legal profession before the days of free 
schools, though the requirements for admission to the bar 
were not very severe at that time. As in New England, though 
perhaps in less degree, the church had its influence upon edu- 
cational effort. About this time the academy came into prom- 
inence both in the east and west. The first, of which the record 
IS clear, is the one established by Frankhn in Philadelphia which 
afterward developed into the University of Pennsylvania. The 
Academy differed from the earlier Latin Grammar school in 
having a broader purpose. The earlier school was primarily to 
fit students for college, while the later was also expected to fit 
them for useful lives. The religious element was strong and 
many of them were under direct control of the church. Others 
were semi-public institutions of learning owned and controlled 
by stockholders. The religious aim is plainly shown in the 
charter of the Phillips Academy of Andover, Massachusetts, 
which is one of the oldest. Its purpose was "To lay the foun- 
dation of a public free school or academy for the purpose of 
instructing youth, not only in English and Latin, writing, 
arithmetic, and those sciences which they are commonly 
taught; but more especially to learn them the GREAT END 
AND REAL BUSINESS OF LIVING * * * It is again de- 
clared that the first and principal object of this institution is 
the promotion of true piety and vinue.'^ During the first half 
of the nineteenth century these institutions developed in large 
numbers. By 1850, according to Inglis, there were over six 
thousand in the United States, with an enrollment of 26j,ooo 
students. After the middle of the century these began to be 
displaced by the tax-supported high school, until now they 
have almost entirely disappeared. However a few still remain 
in the east as Wilbraham in Massachusetts, Cazenovia in New 
York and Williamsport in Pennsylvania. A considerable num- 
ber existed in Illinois for a certain period but now have prac- 
tically all been replaced by modern high schools. They were 
once found m Belleville, Edwardsville, Carlyle, Anna, Albion, 
and other important towns in southern Illinois. 



IN 1757, John Wesley visited the University ot Glasgow. 
At that time James Watt was employed there as a maker 
of mathematical instruments. Thus two men met on 
common ground, both of whose achievements h.ive had a 
mighty influence in the new world. It was chiefly thru the 
efforts of Watt that we have the steam engine, while Wesley 
gave us Methodism. Both have been powerful forces m the 
civilization of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Meth- 
odism was not a new religion like Mohammedanism or Mor' 
monism, but merely a revival of vital interest in the Christian 
religion in England m Wesley's day. It has been well defined 
as "Christianity in earnest." Its earliest promoters were mem- 
bers of the Church of England. The Wesleys, 
Whitefield, and others preached a living Chris- 
tianity first to the churches and then,when they 
were excluded from the church buildings, they 
preached to the multitudes in the open field, on 
the streets, at the fair, at the coal mine, or any 
place where a crowd of people could be assem 
bled. In 1739 the first Methodist chapel m the 
world was built in Bristol, England. Later m 
the same year the "Old Foundry" in London 
was opened for worship by Mr. Wesley. In 
course of time as many societies were organ- 
ized their membership must have its terms 

and conditions defined, hence the "General BISHOP ASBURY 

Rules." There were more societies than preachers and there 



fore the few preachers travelled from place to place preach- 
ing the gospel all the time, hence the "itinerancy" as a 
peculiar practice of Methodism came into use. When no 
preacher was available these societies would come together 
and tell their experiences and exhort one another to right 
living. From this came the Methodist class meeting. Meth- 
odism came to America in a very early day. Wesley and 
Whitefield both visited the new world. Wesley spent many 
months in the colony of Georgia, while Whitefield travelled 
and preached in all the colonies from Georgia to Maine. His 
wonderful voice was heard by thousands. So great was its 
carrying power that it was claimed that some had heard his 
sermons distinctly across the Delaware river. He was like a 
flame of fire . The great awakening under Jonathan Edwards had 
largely subsided. Whitefield revived it. He preached to the Con- 
gregational churches of New England, and to the Presbyterians 
and Baptists of the middle colonies and the south. His evan- 



MC KE NDREE 

CHAPTER 11. 

Early Methodisrn 

gelistic seal led him to cross the ocean thirteen times and at 
last he finished his career on this side at Newburyport, Mass- 
achusetts, and his remains now rest under the little Presby- 
terian church in that city instead of in Westminster Abbey. 
But the real pioneers of Methodism were Philip Embury, 
Barbara Heck, and Captain Webb in the north, and Robert 
Strawbridge and Richard Owen, and others like them in the 
south. In Baltimore, John King first preached from a black- 
smith's block at the corner of Front .ind French streets. He 
made such a favorable impression on certain influential citi- 
zens who heard him that he was invited to preach in the 
Episcopal church of St. Paul's. He improved this opportunity 
with such fervor that he received no repeti- 
tion of the courtesy. But Methodism had now 
entered the city to stay and five years from 
the time King preached from the blacksmith's 
block, it was strong enough in Baltimore to 
entertain the annual conference. In 1784 in 
this same city at the Christmas Conference, 
the church was formerly organized by Dr. 
Coke who carried instructions and authority 
from Mr. Wesley. At this same conference 
occurred the ordination of Francis Asbury as 
the first real Bishop of the Methodist church 
in America. Asbury, designated by a recent 
biographer "The Prophet of the Long Road," 
postle of American Methodism. He was the 
1745 in Stafford- 




was the real 

only son of pious parents, born August 
shire, England, he was converted at fourteen, definitely en- 
tered the Wesleyan ministry at twenty-one, and came to 
America m 177 1 when he was twenty-six. He threw all his 
energy into the work, travelling and preaching constantly 
and advising his fellow-workers. His qualities of leader- 
ship and good judgmsnt were early recognized by his asso- 
ciates. Tho there was necessarily somewhat of a cessation of 
the work of Methodism during the Revolutionary War, it 
was promptly resumed when peace was established and the 
new government organized. The formal organization of the 
church was effected m 1784, the next year after the treaty was 
signed and three years before the Constitution of the United 
States was signed. After Asbury became bishop, his duties led 
him into the West where he travelled, preached, and presided 
m the conferences, continuously. He was an excellent judge 
of men and therefore skillful in his administration of the con- 



|mc KEND REE ^^^^^:^^:^...^>..:^ 



ferences. He was as much of a student as the circumstances 
permitted. He spent much of his time in the saddle and his 
library was in his saddle bags. But yet his biographers insist 
that he had some knowledge of the original languages of the 
Bible and the journal which he faithfully kept during the most 
of his itinerant life, indicates that he was a scholar of no mean 
attainments. His equestrian statue in the city of Washington, 
represents him in the role of the Methodist circuit rider. It 
stands on Sixteenth street in an aristocratic quarter of the city 
among the residences of the foreign ambassadors. It is said to 
be the only statue of the many on the streets of our great 
capital that does not represent a war hero. Asbury was a fa- 
miliar figure in the middle west for a generation. He was a 
true Itinerant but at the same time he was the friend of educa- 
tion. He assisted in the founding of several Methodist schools, 
notably Cokesbury, and in later years several were named 
for him. More than any other one man he may be regarded as 
the founder of the Methodist movement in America. He died 
March 31, 1816. His body lies in Mt. Olivet cemetery in 
Baltimore. He had many worthy co'laborers who were leaders 
in the work and without whom it could not have succeeded. 
A little later we will give sketches of the lives of some of 
these, especially those who labored in Illinois, in order that 
the reader may be better acquainted with the conditions pre- 
vailing in the period of the founding of McKendree College 
and have some slight acquaintance with some of the worthies 
whose labors made possible the results that have been realized 
in the later days. Methodism in Illinois had its organized be- 
ginning about the close of the eighteenth century. In some of 
the western states the first settlement of the country and the 
introduction of Methodism were contemporaneous. Scarcely 
had the settler erected his cabin when the itinerant appeared 
with his saddle bags containing a Bible, hymn book and Meth- 



odist Discipline. But this was not the case in Illinois. The first 
settlers were French Canadians who were strict Roman Cath- 
olics, who brought with them their priests and all necessary 
appliances for their own forms of worship. There were per- 
manent settlements in Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and perhaps other 
points for about a century before the first Methodist sermon 
was preached in the territory of the state. The exact year in 
which Methodism was brought into Illinois is not positively 
known. Dr. Leaton thinks that the first Methodist in the state 
was Captain Joseph Ogle who came to Illinois in 1785 and 
settled in the American Bottom in what is now Monroe 
County, and afterward moved to St. Clair County about 
eight miles north of Belleville, where he died in 1821 at the 
age of eighty. The first Methodist preacher to come to the 
state was Rev. Joseph Lillard, then a local preacher of Ken- 
tucky. During his visit he gathered the few scattered Meth- 
odists into a class and appointed Captain Ogle their leader. 
This was in 1793. Another preacher to visit the settlements 
in Illinois was John Clarke. He had been a travelling preacher 
in South Carolina. After visiting the Illinois settlements and 
preaching to them he went on to Missouri. It is claimed that 
he was the first Protestant minister to preach the gospel west 
of the Mississippi river. But the first Methodist preacher who 
really lived in Illinois was Hosea Rigg who came from Ken- 
tucky in 1796 and settled in the American Bottom in St. Clair 
County. He reorganized Captain Ogles class and later organ- 
ized another class in Madison County, in the Goshen settle- 
ment near EdwardsviUe. 

Another of the early settlers who aided much in the estab- 
lishment of Methodism was William Scott who came from 
Kentucky in 1797 and settled at Turkey Hill where he died 
in 1828. In 1803 the Illinois Mission was formed and recog- 
nized as a charge in the Western Conference, which then 





Lovely Lane Meeting House in Baltimore, where the 
Methodist Church was organized 



H.it worn hy Peter Cjrtwnght 
(Now in the McKendree Museum) 




Fir t M E Chir 1 1 St ill is 7 
Organi^^d through th^ ttforts ot M^ktndrLL and Walke 




Present Church at Shiloh 
Oldest M. E, Church in Illinois 



embraced all the territory west of the Allegheny mountains. 
The first missionary or pastor appointed officially by the con- 
ference to the Illinois circuit was Benjamin Young. At the 
close of the year he reported a membership of sixty seven. 
The charge embraced all the settlements from the mouth of 
the Kaskaskia to Wood River in Madison County. One of the 
preaching places was the house of Squire Reynolds, father of 
Governor John Reynolds, a short distance east of Kaskaskia. 
Another was the New Design settlement, a few miles south 
of where Waterloo now stands. Also Shiloh and Goshen were 
included in the circuit. In 1804 Rev. Joseph Oglesby was 
appointed to the Illinois circuit. Dr. Leaton says of him that 
no history of Methodism in the Mississippi Valley can be 
complete which does not speak largely of the labors of Joseph 
Oglesby. In iSo"; Charles R. Matheny was the preacher on 
the Illinois circuit. It was in the Cumberland District of which 
William McKendree was Presiding Elder. It was during this 
year that the first Methodist meeting house was built in Illi- 
nois. It was known as the Bethel Church in the Goshen settle- 
ment two and a half miles south of Edwardsville. In 1817 the 
second session of the Missouri conference was held m it. In 
1806 the western conference met in Ebeneser church, Nol- 
lichuckie, Tennessee, and Jesse Walker was appointed to the 
Illinois circuit. During this conference year in April, 1807 the 
first camp meeting in Illinois was held at Goshen. A little later 
in the same summer another was held at Three Springs, now 
known as Shiloh. This resulted in the organization of the Shiloh 
church, through the efforts of McKendree and Walker, which 
has been maintained continuously ever since, having celebrated 
its centennial in 1907 with appropriate observances, and is 
therefore the oldest existing Methodist church in the state of 
Illinois. In 1816 Bishop McKendree who had then occupied 
the episcopal olfice for eight years, organized the Missouri 
Conference at Shiloh. It included the territory covered by 



Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana. An armed guard of horsemen 
escorted the Bishop from Vincennes over the old trail which 
passed through the place where Lebanon now stands, tho at 
that time there were only two or three houses on the hill. 
This was a dozen years before the founding of McKendree 
but m those twelve years much progress was made in the great 
task of settling up the country. At the General Conference of 
1824 an enabling act was passed providing for the division of 
the Missouri Conference. This was done in the fall ot the 
same year. The joint session was held at the residence of Will- 
iam Padfield near Summerfield, beginning October 23, which 
was on Saturday, and closed the following Thursday. The 
journal of the session is signed by Bishop Roberts but the 
records show that Bishops McKendree and Soule were both 
present also. At th.it time the territory of the Illinois Con- 
ference was the whole state of Illinois and also the state of 
Indiana. In 1832 Indiana was organized into a separate con- 
ference leaving the boundaries of the Illinois Conference and 
the state the same. In 1840 the Rock River Conference was 
cut off the north end of the state. In 1851 the south end 
was likewise cut off and the Southern Illinois Conference or- 
ganized. In 1856 it was again divided and the Central Illinois 
Conference was organized. Yet after suffering all these divi- 
sions the Illinois Conference is still one of the greatest in 
Methodism. In fact the state of Illinois is divided into four 
great conferences. But the Southern, tho not equal to her Nor- 
thern neighbors in numbers and material wealth, is the orig- 
inal field of Methodism and is rich in history and tradition 
and in this respect will always have the advantage of the other 
conferences of the state. Perhaps its greatest legacy as well as 
its most valuable asset is McKendree College which has been 
the inspiration for much of the success of Methodism not only 
in IlHnois but in other and far distant states, as we shall at- 
tempt to show in later chapters of this narrative. 



HinetyFiie 



<=^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s:^ 



CHAPTER III. 

Early Methodist Leaders 



IT SEEMS appropriate at this point to 
give brief sketches of some of the more 
prominent leaders in the movement call- 
ed Methodism in the particular field occupied 
by McKendree College. Without these neith- 
er the church nor the college would have h.i J 
any existence, and the reader will have a 
better idea of how the results recorded in this 
narrative were brought about if he has some 
little acquaintance with a few of these men 
who left such a deep impress upon the age 
in which they lived. These "knights of the 
saddle bags" had a large part in the develop- 
ment of the wonderful civilization which it 
is our privilege to enjoy in these later days. 



BISHOP McKENDREE 

The man from whom our beloved college took its name 
was the fourth Bishop of the church in the order of election 
and the first who was a native born American, and whom one 
historian has characterized as the "chief founder of the de- 
nomination in the west." 

William McKendree was born in Virginia, July 6, 1757. 
His parents trained him carefully in the faith of the church of 
England. The morals of the youth were nearly perfect. He 
could remember to have sworn but one profane oath in his 
whole lifetime, though that vice was common all around him . 
He was but a youth at the beginning of the Revolutionary 
War, but he took up arms with the patriot army in their strug- 
gle for independence. He served several years, and attained 
the rank of Adjutant in General Washington's army. He was 
present at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781 . 

His home was on the Brunswick circuit in Virginia. In the 
year 1787 under the ministry of Rev. John Easter, famous for 
his eloquence, young McKendree's conscience was effectually 
awakened. In telling of it in later years he said, "The great 
deep of my heart was broken up. Its deceit and desperately 
wicked nature very clearly appeared. My repentance was sin- 
cere. I became willing and desirous to be saved on any terms. 
After three days spent in fasting and prayer and in listening 
to Mr. Easter while he was showing a large congregation the 
way of salvation by faith, with a clearness which at once 
astonished and encouraged me, I ventured my all upon Christ, 
and my soul was relieved of a burden too heavy to be borne. 




and joy instantly succeeded sorrow. For a time 
I was fixed in silent adoration, giving glory 
to God for his goodness to such an unworthy 
creature." 

His superior character and abilities soon led 
his brethren to believe that he should devote 
his life to the ministry. But in his self-distrust 
he shrank from the suggestion. Mr. Easter in' 
duced him to go with him a few trips on his 
circuit and try out his preaching abiHty. But 
after several attempts to preach he returned 
home fearful that he had answered before he 
was called. However Mr. Easter had more con- 
cKENDREE fidence in McKendree's abilities than he him- 

self had. So on Easter's recommendation at the next session of 
the conference, McKendree was received on trial in the con- 
ference and placed under the care of Philip Cox on the Meck- 
lenburg circuit. 

Of this appointment McKendree himself says, "I went 
immediately to the circuit relying more on the judgment of 
experienced ministers, in whom I confided, than on any clear 
conviction of my call to the work. When I yielded to their 
judgment I firmly resolved not to deceive them and to retire 
as soon as I should be convinced that I was not called of God, 
and to conduct myself in such a manner that if I failed my 
friends might 'oe satisfied that it was not for want of effort on 
my part, but their judgment was not well founded. Sustained 
by a determination to make a full trial, I resorted to fasting 
and prayer, and waited for those kind friends who had charge 
and government over me to dismiss me from the work. But I 
waited in vain. In this period of suspense I was frequently 
comforted and supported by the kind and encouraging manner 
in which I was received by the aged and experienced brethren, 
and by the manifest presence of God in our meetings which 
were frequently quite lively and profitable. Sometimes souls 
were convicted and converted, which afforded me consider- 
able encouragement, as well as the union and communion with 
my Saviour in private devotion which he graciously afforded 
me in the intervals of my very imperfect attempts to preach 
His gospel. In this way I became satisfied of my call to the 
ministry and that I was moving in the line of duty." 

As an example of some of the depressing experiences he had 
before he reached this conclusion, his biographer tells the 
following: At one of his appointments on this circuit, after 




MC KENDREE 



singing and prayer he took his text and tried to look his audi- 
ence in the face; but so great was his embarrassment that he 
could not lift his eyes from the Bible till after his attempted 
sermon was finished. After the service his host at that ap- 
pointment left the church supposing the preacher would follow 
him, but when he did not come after a reasonable time, the 
host returned to the church and found McKendree sitting on 
the lowest step of the pulpit stairs, his face covered with his 
hands, looking forlorn and dejected as though he had not a 
friend in the world. He very kindly invited the despondent 
preacher to go home with him. McKendree replied in a mourn- 
ful tone, "I am not fit to go home with anybody." 

Sometime later McKendree was sitting sad and alone in the 
parlor of the home where he was being entertained, when an 
aged minister whose name is not given in the record, came in 
and laying a kindly hand on his shoulder, said to him, "Brother, 
my mind is strongly impressed that God has a great work for 
you to do, and I believe the impression is from the Lord. Don't 
run away from the cross. Take it up. Go to the work and be 
faithful." While uttering these prophetic words, the tears ran 
down the old man's cheeks and he left young McKendree with 
his mind greatly moved. The history of the church through 
the years has recorded the result. He made full proof of his 
ministry. 

He was for a time under the influence of the reactionary 
O'Kelly who tried to induce him to send his resignation to 
Bishop Asbury. He was for a while uncertain whether or not 
to believe O'Kelly 's representations of the Bishop. He finally 
decided to satisfy himself as to the real character of Asbury 
by a visit and personal interview with him. Accordingly he 
made a trip on purpose to see the Bishop and came back fully 
convinced that O'Kelly had misrepresented him. He went 
back to his work with a devotion that never again wavered. 

In 1794 Bishop Asbury took McKendree with him to South 
Carolina and appointed him to Union Circuit. The next year 
he was back again in Virginia, but before the year closed he 
was sent to Greenbrier Circuit among the Allegheny Moun- 
tains; and thence to the Little Levels on the Kanawha River, 
the remotest part of the Virginia Conference. "Surely," says 
his biographer. Dr. Fry, "This was a style of itinerancy that 
would frighten many of his successors in these days, but such 
was the zeal of the preachers of that day that they delighted 
in the most self-denying labors." 

During the remainder of the century he traveled large dis- 
tricts as presiding elder. One of them extended along the 
Potomac in Maryland and Virginia, reaching from the Ches- 
apeake to the Alleghenies. He had now become one of the 
leading men of the church. 



His personal appe.irance was impressive. He w.is nearly six 
feet tall, with robust frame, and weighed about one hundred 
and sixty pounds. He had abundance of d.irk hair and keen 
yet kindly blue eyes. 

His voice was deep and flexible; his tones were clear and 
his enunciation good. His mind was quick and keen. His man- 
ner was calm and dignified, but he was so singularly observant 
that nothing in sight escaped his notice. One who knew him 
during most of his public life said of him, "His intellect was 
bright and his thoughts were diamond-pointed. He never said 
foolish things; never weak or common things. There was 
thought in all his words and wisdom in all his thoughts. He 
was the man for the times and the age in which he lived. I 
shall never see his like again. He was communicative, compan- 
ionable and sympathizing. There was no coldness, coarseness, 
or selfishness about him. Without eff^ort he found his way to 
the confidence and esteem of every one, old and young, white 
and black, rich and poor. As a pulpit orator his excellence 
consisted mainly in his power of analysis. In this respect I 
think I never heard his superior. He was not wanting in de- 
scription and pathos, but in argument he was overwhelming. 
His sermons were generally short, especially in the last years 
of his ministry. His public prayers were simple, comprehen- 
sive and brief; while they were at the same time the essence 
of humility and the breath of devotion." 

Asbury judged him fit to be the leader of the western itin- 
erancy. He passed into the valley of the Mississippi where a 
grand career awaited him. For thirty-five years he was the 
most influential figure in the Methodism of this valley. One 
writer says of him, "He was the most truly eloquent Bishop 
that his church has ever possessed, and one of the best preach- 
ers of any church or age." 

He never married because he chose to give his whole time 
and energy to the cause he loved and the church he served. 
And this left no opportunity for a settled home and domestic 
life. He died at the home of his brother near Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, March 5, 1835. His last words were, "All is well." His 
remains lie buried on the campus of Vanderbilt University at 
Nashville. A very modest stone with a very meager inscrip- 
tion marks the grave. Some years ago when Dr. Isaiah ViUars 
was president of McKendree, he started a movement to have 
the grave of Bishop McKendree moved to the campus of 
McKendree College But the authorities of Vanderbilt refused 
to consider the possibility of any such transfer. There are two 
pictures of Bishop McKendree at the college. One of them 
has the Bishop's own autograph pasted under the portrait. 
This was clipped from a letter that he wrote to that Lebanon 
pioneer. Uncle Ben Hypes. 



}{inetySa.'en 



.^^^^^^^^^MC KENDREE ^^^^^^^^^^ 



PETER CARTWRIGHT 

A very prominent character in early Methodism was the 
pioneer preacher, Peter Cartwright. A number of biographies 
of him have been written, but we wish to give here only a 
brief sketch which will enable the reader to better appreciate 
his part in the religious and educational history of his time. 

His own autobiography has been said by one Hterary critic 
to show the most "distinctly American spirit of any book yet 
written." Probably this is because it always records his tri- 
umphs but never his failures. 

He was born in Virginia, September i, 178-;, "a son of 
poverty." His parents moved to Kentucky while he was yet 
a child. His mother was a Methodist and tried to give her son 
religious training. His father was "not so much a bad, as a 
good-for-nothing kind of man." Therefore he was subject to 
no restraints except his mother's talks and prayers, which he 
says drew tears from his eyes and resolutions to reform and 
seek religion. But when he got away among his rough and 
thoughtless companions, he would forget his mother and go 
to the horse races. He was naturally wild and sometimes 
wicked, and in his youthful days delighted in horse-racing, 
card-playing, and dancing. In 1801 he was converted and joined 
the Methodist church. The following year he was licensed to 
exhort by Jesse Walker. In 1804 he was received into the 
Western Conference and appointed junior preacher on the 
Salt River circuit, with William McKendree as his presiding 
elder. Here McKendree directed him in a proper course of 
. reading and examined into his progress at each quarterly meet- 
ing. Later in hfe he acknowledged himself more indebted to 
McKendree than to any other person for his attainments, 
meager tho they were, in literature and divinity. In the sum- 
mer of 1806 he was married to Frances Gaines, a woman 
worthy to rank with the noble women of Methodism, and 
who exerted a more favorable influence on her husband than 
any or all other persons combined. Her character is well drawn 
by Solomon or whoever is the author of the last chapter of 
Proverbs. A woman who lived in the Cartwright home for 
some years says of her, "Sister Cartwright was one of the 
most industrious and amiable women I ever knew. Whatever 
she did seemed to be done better and quicker than anybody 
else could do it." His ministry was carried on in Kentucky, 
with the exception of one year in the Wabash district in Illi- 
nois, until 1824 when the Illinois Conference was organized. 
He then transferred to that conference and spent the remain- 
der of his life in Illinois. Prior to 1824 he had been twice 
elected to the general conference and had distinguished him- 
self as a bitter opponent of slavery, and had published his 




PETER CARTWRIGHT 



celebrated "Letter to the 
Devil." He had planned to 
be present at the organiza' 
tion session of the Illinois 
Conference at Summerfield, 
but was hindered by the 
death of his daughter, a 
little girl who was killed by 
a falling tree where they 
camped one night on the 
way . A little later he settled 
on a farm which he bought 
in Sangamon County near 
Pleasant Plains, which was 
his home for the remainder 
of his life. This farm is now 
owned by Mr. Walter 
Nottingham who has lived 
on it many years, and who 
was once a student in Mc 
Kendree. Mrs. Johnson 
whom we quoted above 
gives this brief description 
of Cartwright's personal appearance: "He was short, thick, 
heavy-set, with a large neck, coarse and rough in his manners, 
and anything else but grave. After preaching with power and 
praying as few men could, he would have a dozen or twenty 
persons, frequently some of the roughest in his congregation, 
all indulging in uproarious laughter at his jests before he was 
ten feet away from the pulpit. He was at times as kind and 
affectionate as any man, but often as abrupt as if entirely des- 
titute of feeling. He was however generally affectionate in 
his family. When his wife would chide him for leaving home 
so much when not all the family were well, I have seen him 
sit down and weep like a child. And when he came home from 
his round of quarterly meetings it was not an hour before he 
got up a general romp with the children." 

Rev. J. M. Gunn speaks of him as follows in "Methodism 
in Tennessee": "I never knew him to get hoarse or appear 
tired in his preaching. He was death upon whisky-drinking, 
tobacco, and coffee. Take him altogether he was one of the 
most powerful men I ever heard." 

Dr. Redford says of him: "Few men in the west have la- 
bored with more untiring energy in the ministry than Peter 
Cartwright. While traveling the Cumberland District he of- 
ten returned home from his quarterly meetings worn and 
weary, but in order to support his family he would work his 
fields by the light of the pale moon. Prompt in meeting his 




E.ght 



MC KENDREE 



appointments, it was very seldom that he disappointed a con' 
gregation." Before he left Kentucky he became a terror to evil' 
doers in that state, administering reproof with unsparing hand. 
He came to Illinois in 1824 and for nearly fifty years showed 
the same characteristics in his ministry here. In view of the 
extent of his labors, the severe privations he endured, the 
meager support he received from the church, the fiithfulness 
with which he performed his duties, and his deep devotion to 
the cause for which he labored, we conclude that it would be 
difficult to find his equal. True there were some things about 
him that we would have had different if possible. His manner 
of dealing with his opponents would not be tolerated in the 
church of today but it was very effective in dealing with a 
class of people who were common in his day. He died at 
Pleasant Plains Sept. 25, 1872. 

SAMUEL H. THOMPSON 
Samuel H. Thompson was born in Pennsylvania, March 16, 
1786. His parents were Presbyterians and he was carefully 
instructed in their faith. He received a good English education. 
He was converted at twenty and began to preach at twenty' 
three. He assisted in holding the first Methodist camp meet- 
ing in Indiana, which was a time of "great power and glory." 
He was presiding elder of the Illinois district when it covered 
more than two-thirds of the state. He was once nominated for 
Lieutenant-Governor of Illinois but he could not be induced 
to follow the electioneering customs practiced by candidates 
of that day, as well as this, so he was not elected. He served 
as agent for McKendree College and was president of the 
Board of Trustees. He was at different times pastor of the 
Lebanon circuit, Alton, Belleville, and other charges m Illi- 
nois. He was a man of fine personal appearance and in manners 
was a polished Christian gentleman. He had fine social qual- 
ities and was an admirable conversationalist. As a preacher 
his style was hortatory rather than didactic. His discourses 
abounded in anecdote and illustration. He could tell a story 
with a grace and force that strongly impressed those who 
heard him. He was very sympathetic and like Jeremiah his 
head was a fountain of tears. His sweet spirit endeared him 
to all who knew him. He was five times elected to the general 
conference; and on one occasion, the bishop being absent, he 
was chosen to preside during the entire session of his own 
conference. In his family worship it is said that he covered the 
field so thoroly that he sometimes prayed for his horse as well 
as for the various members of the family. He excelled in rais- 
ing funds for benevolent causes and was so frequently engaged 
in that work that he was called by some "the beggar general." 



On one occasion he closed his appeal by telling the people to 
come forward and lay their offerings on the table. Among 
those who responded was a man who put his hand deep into 
his pocket and took out a handful of silver in order to pick out 
a piece for his gift. Thompson saw him and as if supposing he 
intended to lay it all upon the table, exclaimed at the top of 
his voice, "Thank God for one liberal soul." By this time all 
eyes were fixed on the "liberal" gentleman who then felt that 
he must indeed lay down the entire handful. Peter Cartwright 
says of him, "Mr. Thompson had a passion for lost souls, and 
spent the best years of his life seeking them out and trying to 
show them the way to Heaven. No doubt many are now 
praising God in eternity because this self-sacrificing Metho- 
dist preacher taught them the way of life, m their mud hovels 
and murky cabins. During his last illness he requested that 
the neighbors be called in that he might preach to them once 
more, while propped up in bed before he left for Heaven. It 
was done. The room was crowded and such a sermon hardly 
ever fell from the lips of mortal man. The power of God fell 
on the congregation. They wept aloud and fell in every direc- 
tion. Many dated their start for Heaven from that sermon. 
And now having delivered his last message he said, 'My work 
is done and I am ready to go at my Master's bidding'." 

JOHN DEW 
Rev. John Dew was born July 19, 1789 in the state of Vir- 
ginia. In early youth he became religious and joined the Meth' 
odist church. At the age of twenty-four he felt the call to the 
ministry and joined the Ohio Conference in 181 3. After serv- 
ing three years he located and married a wife. After a few 
years he came west and joined the Missouri Conference in 
1824 just before the Illinois Conference was cut off from it. 
From that time on he was m the Illinois Conference. In 1830 
and again m 183,2 he was appointed pastor of the Lebanon 
Circuit. In 1835 he located again. This was probably for 
reasons connected with the support of his family. In 1836 he 
was readmitted and appointed president of McKendree Col- 
lege. He held this position only two years and then was 
appointed Presiding Elder of the Lebanon District. He held 
this position to the end of his life. His death occurred Sep- 
tember 5th, 1840, after an illness of two weeks. He was then 
only fifty -one years of age and presumably in the prime of his 
ability. The family left to mourn his loss consisted of his 
wife and seven children. His biographer says that as a minister 
he was able and useful. As a Presiding Elder his services will 
be long remembered. 




cs^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^S^ 



As a man he was honest; as a citizen he was public spirited; 
in the domestic circle he was kind and affectionate; as a 
Christian his walk and conversation recommended the reli- 
gion he had spent the greater part of hi? life in preaching to 
his fellowmen. 

Peter Cartwright, his intimate friend says of him, "He had 
a fine order of talent as a preacher, was a strong theological 
debater, had a clear and sound mind, and was well qualified 
to defend the doctrines of the Bible against infidelity, and the 
doctrines of Methodism against all sectarian assailants. He 
was popular and useful as a preacher, labored hard, suffered 
much in spreading the Gospel, lived beloved, and died la- 
mented by thousands." He was said to be of fine personal 
appearance with black hair and piercing eyes. His voice was 
very musical and in reading the Scriptures or lining the hymns 
he often produced a powerful effect on his hearers. 

JESSE WALKER 

Dr. Lea ton says that to Jesse Walker, Methodism in Illinois 
and Missouri is more indebted than to any other single indi- 
vidual. He was born in Virginia June 9, 1766 and hence was 
nineteen years older than Cartwright. He had very slight 
educational opportunities in his youth. Twenty days would 
cover the whole period of his school life. When only nine 
years of age he was religiously awakened under the preaching 
of a Baptist preacher in Virginia, but for the want of religious 
instruction and environment he later backslid and became 
very wicked. At twenty he was reclaimed and joined the 
Methodist church. He was at once appointed class leader and 
became very useful in that field. His friends urged him to enter 
the ministry but he refrained until he was thirty-six, when he 
finally yielded to the call and joined the Western Conference. 
At this time he was living in Kentucky and had a wife and 
two daughters. He had only moderate preaching ability, but 
he possessed a soul burning with desire for the salv.ition of 
others. He was unable to discuss the learned theological doc- 
trines, but he could tell the story of the cross with such 
pathos and power as to melt the hardest heart. 

Governor Reynolds, in his Pioneer History of Illinois, refers 
to him in the following words, "Mr. Walker was a man of 
great energy and courage; very excitable and producing great 
excitement in his congregations. He was a short well-set man, 
walked erect, and was possessed of great firmness, energy and 
perseverance. His complexion was sallow. His eyes were blue, 
small, and piercing. He was not a profound scholar, but a 
student of the Scripture and of human nature." 

Another writer says he usually wore a wide-rimmed hat 
which m.ide him resemble a Quaker in appearance. In the 



Spring of 1806 he paid his first visit to Illinois. He was greatly 
delighted with the country and felt that here God had a great 
work for him to do. He went back to Kentucky and finished 
the year on his circuit, and at the next conference he was 
appointed to the Illinois circuit. He arrived home from con- 
ference at noon. By ten o'clock the next day he was ready to 
start, with his family for his new field of labor in Illinois. They 
braved the handicap of high waters, storms, hunger, and cold 
as they traveled the two hundred weary miles from Hartford, 
Kentucky to Turkey Hill in St. Clair County, Illinois. Near 
there he located his family, and they lived there for several 
years while he was constantly travelling through the pioneer 
communities of Illinois and Missouri. His parsonage was an 
old log cabin belonging to William Scott. It had a plank floor, 
which was better than many had at that time, a stick chimney, 
and a big fire place with a hearth so low that the edge of the 
floor served as seats for all the family, around the fire. He 
immediately entered upon his labors as a circuit rider and at 
the next New Year's eve held a "Watch night meeting"which 
was said to be the first ever held in Illinois. In connection 
with that meeting he also held the first "love feast" in Illinois. 
In April 1807 he held the first camp meeting in Illinois, at a 
place about three miles south of the present city of Edwards- 
ville. Late in July of the same year he and William McKendree, 
then presiding elder of the Cumberland District, held another 
camp meeting at Three Springs, later known as Shiloh, which 
resulted in the organization of the Shiloh church, which is 
now the oldest Methodist church in Illinois. 

In one of his itineraries west of the Mississippi river he 
held a camp meeting on the spot where later was built the 
McKendree Chapel, which was the first Methodist church 
west of the Mississippi river. In 1819 he planted Methodism 
in St. Louis. When he and two other preachers arrived in 
town they found the Territorial Legislature in session. Every 
public house was crowded with guests and there was literally 
"no room for them in the inn." When their mission became 
known they were ridiculed and insulted by those who should 
have respected them. Walker's two companions soon deserted 
him. A little later he too became so discouraged by his treat- 
ment there that he decided to leave the wicked place to its 
fate and seek a more appreciative field of labor. He mounted 
his horse and turned his back on the future great city. But 
after going a few miles he reconsidered and in his own mind 
resolved that "by the Grace of God he would take St. Louis 
for Jesus Christ." So he turned back and renewed his efforts. 
When after a few days the only place where he was permitted 
to preach w,is closed against him, he boldly rented a room for 



ten dollars a month and held meetings there five days m the 
week and twice on Sunday. At the end of the conference year 
he had built a house of worship and reported seventy-five 
members in his church. Besides this he had estabHshed an out- 
point on his charge at Alton, thirty miles away, where he had 
a regular appointment to preach once a month at the house of 
Nathaniel Pinckard. In the Spring of 1825 he preached the first 
sermon inChicago,ortheplacethatafterwardsbecameChicago. 

Mr. Walker could not confine himself to any particular 
field. He adopted Wesley's motto, "The World is my parish." 
To hundreds of early settlers he was the first to carry the 
glad tidings of the Gospel. When John Sinclair was appointed 
to the Chicago District he found that wherever he went 
Walker had been there before him. Being ambitious to preach 
the gospel first to some of the newcomers, and hearing of a 
family that had just settled at Root River in Wisconsin, he 
made all haste to carry them the word of eternal life. On his 
way there he met Mr. Walker. On inquiry about his health 
Walker told him that he was quite well but weary, as he was 
just returning from a long trip looking after a family who had 
recently settled at Root River. In despair Sinclair gave up 
hope of ever being the first to take the gospel to anybody as 
long as Walker was anywhere in the country. 

One historian says Walker was to the church what Daniel 
Boone was to the early settlers — preceding all others long 
enough to be a pilot to the newcomers. His natural vigor was 
almost superhuman. No day's journey was too long for him 
to travel. No fare was too poor for him to live upon. To him, 
in travelling, roads and paths were useless things. He blazed 
his own course. If his horse could not carry him, he led the 
horse. Where the horse could not follow, he left him and 
pursued his course on foot. If night and a cabin did not come 
together, he would pass the night alone in the wilderness, 
which was no uncommon occurrence with him. He was never 
lost. As the church moved north and west it seemed to bear 
Walker before it. Every time you would hear from him he 
was a little farther on. When at last feebleness of body com' 
pelled him to take a place with the superannuates he did not 
long survive the process of retirement. 

PETER AKERS 
Peter Akers was born near Lynchburg, Campbell County, 
Virginia, September i, 1790. His parents, John and Agnes 
Akers, were Presbyterians and gave their children careful 
religious training. After being educated in the common schools 
of his state, he began to teach when only sixteen years of age. 
Later he attended two higher institutions of learning, one in 



Virginia and the other in 
North Carolina. He pur- 
sued the classical course 
and acquired habits of 
close and diligent study, 
but did not attain a degree. 
Then, altho his mother, 
wished him to enter the 
ministry, he decided to 
study law. He went to 
Sterling, Kentucky, where 
he first taught school for 
a time and then studied 
law in the office of Major 
Fleming of Flemingsburg, 




PETER AKERS 
President of McKendree College when 
It obtained its first charter in iS^';. 



Kentucky. He was admitted to the bar in 181 7 and became 
Major Fleming's partner. About two years later he began 
the publication of a paper called "The Star" but he did not 
continue long in editorial work. He was married March 12,, 
1818 to Miss Eliza Farris. She died of tuberculosis June 24, 
1821, leaving one son, Joshua Soule Akers, their first child 
having died in infancy. This son was the only one of his chil- 
dren who grew to maturity and lived to succeed his father in 
the gospel ministry. Shortly before the death of his wife in 
1821 he was converted in a Methodist revival meeting and a 
few months later began his career as a Methodist preacher. 
He was admitted to the Kentucky Conference in 1821 and 
his first charge was Limestone Circuit. The next year he was 
appointed to Kentawa on which charge he organized seven- 
teen Sunday Schools during the year and received as his entire 
cash salary the magnificent sum of $3,7.56.Thenext year he was 
appointed to the Fleming Circuit and m the course of this 
year he had a remarkable religious experience which probably 
affected his entire subsequent career. In 1826 he was sent to 
Lexington which was one of the prominent charges. It was 
here that he married his second wife, Elizabeth Reed. In 1832 
he came to Illinois where he remained a member of the Illinois 
Conference for the rest of his life. The next year after he came 
to Ilhnois his scholarship and ability was recognized in his 
election to the presidency of McKendree College. He was 
president when the first charter was obtained in 1835. He 
continued in this position three years and twice thereafter he 
was president of McKendree for short periods, but he seemed 
to feel that his principle work was in the pulpit. He served in 
numerous important charges and was presiding elder of the 
Springfield District two terms, Quincy District two terms, 
Jacksonville District one term, and the North Jacksonville 



One Hundred and One 



District two years. He was a member of eight General Con- 
ferences, but on account of his extreme modesty, refused to 
make a speech after the reporters were admitted in 1840. The 
first degree that McKendree College ever conferred was the 
Doctor of Divinity bestowed upon Mr. Akers in 1839. He 
published a book while he was President of McKendree, en- 
titled "Biblical Chronology" upon which he spent many years 
of study and research. He was a mighty pulpit orator and had 
no superior in Methodism in that field during the years of his 
active service. It is said that an audience would often listen 
to his preaching from two to four hours at a time with un- 
abating interest and without realizing that the sermon was 
long. Lincoln heard him one day in one of his great efforts and 
went away feeling that he himself was to be in some way 
concerned with the overthrow of slavery. He was a prophet 
with the spirit of Elijah or Malachi. The evil of slavery was 
one of his favorite themes. In 1856 he was preaching one 
Sunday morning in the college chapel. After discussing the 
subject of slavery at some length he approached the pulpit 
stand with a gravity which hushed the audience to a breath- 
less stillness, placed his long fore finger upon the page of the 
open Bible, and with all the solemnity of a Jeremiah, said, "I 
cannot give you the exact date but in the latter part of i860 
or the early part of 186 1 there will arise in this nation the 
greatest internecine war known to the history of the world. 
It will be brother against brother, family against family, and 
thousands of hearth stones will be made desolate. But thru 
this bloody baptism we must pass for the deliverance of the 
slave from bondage." His active ministry covered a period of 



forty-six years. In 1867 failing health made it seem wise to 
take the superannuate relation. But even after that he spent 
almost a score of useful years living in retirement in the city 
of Jacksonville, with his third wife who was Miss Anne 
Goheen. He lived in a house which the citizens of Jacksonville 
gave him in order to have him Hve in their city. His home was 
a mile from the Methodist church, yet as long as his health 
permitted, he could be seen regularly every Sunday morning 
walking the mile each way to and from church. A friend of 
his used to say that this was a splendid object lesson on the 
duty of church going, and that he was in reality preaching a 
sermon "two miles long" every Sunday. When his son the 
Rev. Joshua Akers left Illinois to take up work out west a 
few years before his father's death, in bidding him goodby 
the aged patriarch said, "My son, I am old. My time has been 
well lengthened out. My work is done. I cannot live much 
longer, but I am unable to give you the date of my death any 
nearer than to say it will occur on Sunday morning at the 
hour of the church service." When the time of his departure 
from earth did come, the son received a dispatch on Tuesday 
saying his father could not live much longer. He remembered 
his father's parting prophecy and after consulting a railway 
guide he reasoned thus, "I can leave here on Thursday, be 
with him on Saturday and thus see him alive, for he will not 
pass away till Sunday." Following this plan he arrived home 
and received his father's parting messages on Saturday, and 
on Sunday morning while the church bells of Jacksonville 
were ringing for the morning services his spirit took its de- 
parture. This was on Feb. 21, 1886. 




Saddle-bag used by Cartwright, now in the McKendree Mu 



Ctie Hundred ,ind Tu 



CHAPTER IV. 

Early Methodist Schools 



QETHODISM was born in a college when the Wesleys 
organized the "Holy Club" at Oxford; and while it 
has worked successfully among the poor and unedu- 
cated classes, it has also emphasized educational work. Its 
founders were educated men who taught an intelligent form 
of religion. Before the days of American Methodism, John 
Wesley established the Kingswood School in 1748. He care- 
fully worked out the course of study himself and declared 
that the youth who faithfully pursued and mastered its cur- 
riculum would in most cases be better educated than the 
graduates of Oxford or Cambridge. 

In America Asbury had established a school in Brunswick 
County, Virginia, which there is good reason to believe pre- 
ceded the more famous Cokesbury. He was fond of scriptural 
names and therefore it is not strange that it was called Eben- 
ezer. There is scarcely any record to be found concerning it 
now, but Mr. W. Embury Merritt once a prominent lawyer 
in Virginia, whose father Rev. Henry Merritt was a trustee 
of Ebenezer, said it was opened in 1784, at least a year before 
the opening of Cokesbury, and in all probability earlier in the 
same year that the Christmas Conference was held where the 
Methodist Episcopal church was formally organized. Bishop 
Asbury was not always pleased with the administration of 
the school. In his journal under date of December 8, 1794 he 
wrote : "I had a meeting with the trustees of Ebenezer Acad- 
emy. Matters are very discouraging. People in general care 
too little for the education of their children." 

Jesse Lee's history of Methodism in 1809 mentions the 
school as in operation at that date. There seems to be no 
authentic record as to when it was closed. One writer says 
it was finally sold by authority of the state legislature, but 
does not tell what was done with the money. A few years 
ago the Methodist Year Book contained a picture of the old 
stone building, erected for Ebenezer Academy, but now fallen 
into decay, and labelled it the oldest educational building in 
American Methodism. There is a tradition that the first prin- 
cipal of Ebenezer was a Scotchman who was brought to 
America on purpose to take charge of the school, and that he 
was a great linguist but rather ignorant in some of the prac- 
tical things of life. In order to make his living more economical 
he planted a garden. When his beans came up he noticed that 
the beans he had planted were on the tips of the growing 
plants. He concluded that by some strange mistake of nature 
they had started to grow with the wrong end up. So he 



immediately proceeded to dig them up and invert them. He 
was probably a better linguist than a gardener. 

COKESBURY 
Cokesbury College was the first Methodist educational in- 
stitution that claimed college rank. Before the Christmas con- 
ference of 1784 had adjourned, plans were laid for the founding 
of a Methodist college in the new world. The corner stone 
was laid with solemn ceremonies by Bishop Asbury on Sun- 
day, June 5, 1785. Dr. Coke had ardently advocated the enter- 
prise, and helped raise $5,000 for it in the short period of his 
official visit to America and the institution shared the names 
of these two great leaders. But Coke under orders from Wes- 
ley, hastened back to England while Asbury in the midst of 
his other arduous duties, took care of the infant educational 
enterprise. It was located at Abingdon, Maryland, twenty- 
five miles from Baltimore. Magnificent views extend in either 
direction. On the one hand the picturesque valley of the 
Susquehanna, and on the other the magnificent Chesapeake 
bay stretching away in the distance till it is lost in the ocean. 
The building is described by John Dickens, the Methodist 
Book Concern man of that day, in the following words: "The 
college is one hundred and eight feet in length and forty feet 
in breadth, and stands on the summit and center of six acres 
of land with an equal descent and portion of ground on each 
side. The whole building is painted on the outside and the 
windows glazed." Wesley sent out a middle aged clergyman 
from England to be the principal. In September, 1787 an 
examination of the Preparatory School took place, Bishop 
Asbury presiding. In December, Mr. Heath, the English Cler- 
gyman, was publicly inaugurated as president and Mr. Marsh 
and Patrick McCloskey as professors. There were then twen- 
ty-five students. Abingdon soon became a favorite place of 
residence for families desiring a beautiful locality and the 
advantages of a good school. It entertained the conference in 
1786 and later it became a common practice for the Baltimore 
Conference to begin its sessions in that city and then adjourn 
to Cokesbury College for the conclusion of its deliberations. 
The Cokesbury curriculum included, besides the English 
branches, the Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, and French 
languages. In the Methodist Discipline for 1789 is given a 
detailed statement of the purposes and rules of the institu- 
tion. From this we quote a few extracts. 



One Hundred and Three 




MC KENDREE 



Where Cokesbury College built 



"It shall be the purpose of the institution to educate the 
sons of Methodist preachers, orphans, and other children. It is 
expected that our friends who send their children to the college 
will, if they be able, pay a moderate sum for their education 
and board. The rest will be taught and boarded, and if our 
finances will allow it, clothed gratis. Our first object shall be 
to answer the design of Christian education by instilling into 
their minds the principles of true religion and training them 
in the ancient way that they may be rational scriptural 
Christians, and this is one of the reasons why we do not 
admit students indiscriminately. We shall inflexibly insist on 
their rising early in the morning; and we are convinced that 
this is of vast importance to both body and mind. The em- 
ployments which we have chosen for the recreation of stu- 
dents are such as are of great public utihty, as agriculture and 
architecture. In teaching the languages care shall be taken to 
read those authors only who join together the purity, ele- 
gance and strength of their several tongues. And the utmost 
caution shall be used that nothing immodest be found in any 
of our books. The price of education shall be four guineas. 
However the sons of travelling preachers shall be boarded, 
educated, and clothed gratis, except those whose parents, 
according to the judgment of the conference, are of ability to 
defray the expense." The regimen of the institution was re- 
markable for its vigor, if not for its wisdom. The students 
were required to rise at five o'clock in the morning in summer 
and winter, and to be in bed by nine o'clock in the evening 
"without fail." Also to study seven hours every day with 
intervals of exercise or recreation. No studies were allowed 
after seven in the evening. The recreations prescribed were, 
"gardening, walking, riding, bathing, out of doors; and the 
carpenters', joiners', cabinet makers' and turners' business in 
doors." It was also specified that the pupils shall not be al- 
lowed to sleep on feather beds, nor shall they engage in any- 



thing that the world calls play. During its ten years of 
history Cokesbury educated a number of youths who were 
afterward leaders in the church. It was also useful in furnish- 
ing an opportunity for an education to preachers' sons who 
probably would not have been able to secure it otherwise. 
And, especially, training and strict discipline for the sons of 
itinerant preachers whose fathers were not at home enough 
to give them the needed discipline. At midnight December 
7, 1795 the college was destroyed by fire. This ended its 
career. The fire was said to be of unknown origin but it would 
not be strange if it were started by some of the boys who 
doubtless chafed under the severe discipline of the school. 
When he heard of it Asbury wrote in his journal; "We have 
now a confirmed account that Cokesbury College is consumed 
to ashes. A sacrifice of about ten thousand pounds in ten 
years. I do not think the Lord called Methodists to build 
colleges. I wished only for schools. Dr. Coke wanted a college. 
I feel distressed at the loss of the library." The former site 
of Cokesbury is now a spot full of historic interest, shown 
in one issue of the Methodist Year Book. The old bell which 
survived the fire was in after years taken to Goucher College 
in Baltimore where it is still in service. 
AUGUSTA 
Augusta College in Kentucky had its origin thru a com- 
mission of the Ohio and Kentucky conferences. It was opened 
as a preparatory classical school some time in 1822, with Rev. 
John P. Finley as principal. In December of the same year it 
received a charter from the state of Kentucky, with full 
authority to confer degrees. It was the only Methodist col- 
lege then in existence which had that authority. The most 
influential man in securing the establishment of the college 
was Captain James Armstrong, a lay member of the Metho- 
dist church in Augusta. He furnished the land and bore the 
entire expense of erecting the first Methodist church 
building in his home town. That was in 1819. He likewise 
furnished the ground and led in the construction of the col- 
lege building, which after its completion was duly transferred 
to the trustees of Augusta College. The building was eighty 
by forty-two feet. On the first floor was a chapel besides two 
recitation rooms. On the second floor were six rooms and the 
third floor was divided into seven rooms. Among the distin- 
guished men who have served on the faculty are Rev. James 
S. Tomlinson, Rev. John P. Durbin, Rev. Henry B. Bascom, 
and Rev. Martin Ruter. The last named received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Transylvania University. It is 
claimed that he was the first minister in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church upon whom this degree was conferred 



One Himdrd and Four 



MC KENDREE 



In the list of Trustees of August.i is found the name of 
Bishop Joshua Soule. The college was noted for its religious 
atmosphere. The revival spirit prevailed. In January 1828, Dr. 
Durbin wrote to the Christian Advocate as follows: '"We 
have a most glorious revival. It commenced among our one 
hundred students. It would do you good to witness the 
soundness of their conversion and the ardor of their triumph. 
I had long believed that a college could be made not only the 
nursery of learning but of morals and religion as well. I am 
convinced of it more and more every day. I rejoice that we 
have in the West one regular college where our youth may 
be educated and neither their morals nor their principles cor- 
rupted. I am clearly convinced that our youth should not be 
taught by any man who is not decidedly pious." For a few 
years Augusta was the only Methodist school in America 
having legal authority to confer the baccalaureate and other 
degrees. Therefore students from distant states sought its 
advantages. The numbers were at no time great but included 
representative young men from the best families m Metho- 
dism. In 1829 the first class was admitted to the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. From that time till the repeal of the Charter a 
class was graduated each year. The total alumni list contains 
one hundred and fifty-three names. Among these are some 



II i m K 111 II! m iji 




Augusta College, founded in 1822; the first Methodist College 
in the west 

who came to prominence in the legal and medical professions 
and in the ministry. A larger list were students for ft time 
but did not come to graduation. Among these were Bishop 




BISHOP SIMPSON 
A graduate of Madison 



Randolphs. Foster and Pro- 
fessor John Miley, who was 
for many years a member of 
the faculty of Drew Theo- 
logical Seminary. It is said 
that Foster and Miley were 
fellow students and inti- 
mate friends. In after years 
Sallie Miley, John's sister 
became Mrs. Foster. Also 
Dr. John W. Locke, once 
president of McKendree, 
graduated from Augusta 
in 1841. 

Thedivisionof the church 
ini844brought about condi- 
tions which hindered the progress of Augusta and in 1849 
Its charter was repealed and its doors were closed. 
MADISON 

Madison College, located for a few years at Uniontown, 
Pennsylvania, represents another attempt at higher educa- 
tion in Methodism. Its history as a college dates from 1826. 
It developed from an academy known as Union Seminary 
which had been started m 1792 under the direction and 
leadership of Bishop Asbury, m this strong Methodist center 
which had already entertained several annual conferences. 
The college was organized under the patronage of the Pitts- 
burg Conference with Dr. Henry B. Bascom as president and 
professor of Moral Science, Dr. Charles Elliott as professor 
of Languages, and Dr. James H. Fielding as professor of Math- 
ematics. It was chartered by the Legislature of Pennsylvania 
in 1827 and rendered a few years of excellent service as a 
struggling Methodist college without sufficient endowment. 
In 182,3 Allegheny College, a Presbyterian institution found- 
ed in 181 f at MeadviUe, was ceded to the Methodist Church. 
This institution, with much the same patronizing territory 
and, having so much the start of Madison, so completely 
overshadowed the latter institution that its doors were closed 
and Its former supporters transferred their allegiance to Alle- 
gheny. The building occupied by Madison was afterward 
used for a college of the Methodist Protestant Church, then 
as a Female College, later as a school for the orphans of sol- 
diers, and still later as a private residence. Among the few 
graduates which Madison sent out during its short career was 
Bishop Matthew Simpson. Had the college done no other 
service than the training of this wonderful servant of God it 
would have justified its existence. Allegheny College, found- 




ed in 1815 and Dickinson, founded in 1785 are both to be 
counted among the early enterprises in religious education, 
but their early struggles are not a part of this story for they 
were both founded by the Presbyterians and became Meth- 
odist institutions by transfer, both in the same year, 183J. 
THE WESLEY AN 
The Wesleyan Academy now known as Wilbraham acad- 
emy and referred to in theCentennial number of theChristian 
Advocate as "the oldest school in Method- 
ism" was founded in 1817 at New Market, 
New Hampshire. This location proved unsuit- 
able in several ways. Altho for a time it 
was under the guidance of that genius of 
early Methodism, Dr. Martin Ruter, it 
went behind financially to such an extent 
that in 1823 it closed its doors. After a thoro 
reorganization, the school was opened the fol- 
lowing year at Wilbraham, Massachusetts. 
Its first principal in the new location was Rev. 
Wilbur Fisk, afterwards president of the Wes- 
leyan University, who distinguished himself 
in after years by refusing to accept the office 
of Bishop when he was elected by the General 
Conference on the first ballot. Dr. Fisk was a 
strict discipHnarian. An interesting story of his diHgence in 
this line is told in the early annals of Wilbraham. He always 
appealed to the best that was in his pupils to secure correct 
deportment, but incorrigibles, instead of being sent home, 
were treated with stripes, few or many according to their 
crimes. In extreme cases punishment was administered in the 
presence of the school as a warning to others. On one occasion 
a lad who had been a frequent offender was told to come next 
morning prepared for a switching. After the usual morning 
devotions he was called to the front and treated to a lengthy 




BISHOP BOWMAN 

Member of McKendree Board of 

Trustees 



homily on good behavior. Then down came the birch over 
his shoulders. But while the rest of the school were in a state 
of nervous fear it only produced a smile from the boy himself. 
His coat was ordered off and the switch was again vigorously 
applied. The rest of the pupils winced but the lad remained 
calm and comfortable. Next his vest was ordered off, only to 
find another and then another and then fell down a large atlas 
which had furnished effectual protection against the cutting 
blows of the switch. The whole school broke 
into roars of laughter in which the principal 
was compelled to join. After he had recovered 
his equihbrium he asked "Why did you fixyour- 
selfupin that way?" "You told me to prepare for 
a flogging and, I did so," was the meek reply, 
which again brought the house down. Without 
further attempt at correction he was allowed to 
resume his seat. He had earned his liberty. Sev- 
eral prominent leaders in Methodism have been 
connected with this school. Among them Rev. 
Robert Allyn who was Principal (from 1845 to 
1848) and later. President of McKendree Col- 
lege. During his administration the school 
prospered and increased in numbers. At the 
close of the year 1848 an alumni reunion was 
held in the grove north of the school. Many former students 
were present and memories ofold days were revived. On that 
occasion Mr. Annis Merrill ofSan Francisco delivered an able 
historical address. Ten years prior to that time he had been 
a professor in McKendree and his picture still hangs in 
McKendree's chapel. For more than a century this 
famous old school has been active in the field of sec- 
ondary education. It has prepared thousands for college 
or for the active duties of life and is still busy molding the char- 
acter of some hundreds of young Methodists every year. 




McKENDREE COLLEGE— Original building erected in 1828, destroyed by fire January, 1856 




One Hundred and Si 



ilMC KENDREE 



ON THURSDAY, September 20, 1827, when the leaves 
in the Wabash valley had just begun to take on their 
gorgeous autumn colors, a group of serious minded, tho 
ever cheerful Methodist preachers arrived at Mount Carmel, 
on the Wabash for the fourth session of the Illinois Confer- 
ence. They did not travel on limited trains or in limousines, 
but each on his own faithful steed, with the records of his 
year's work, his library, and his wardrobe, all in his saddle 
bags. The territory of the conference at that time included 
the two states of Illinois and Indiana, so the trip to conference 
meant several days' journey for some of the circuit riders. 
The conference host was the Rev. John McReynoIds. Altho 
It was necessary to furnish lodging for as many horses as men, 
the entertainment of the conference was not as heavy a task 
as at the present day. At the opening session only twenty- 
seven members answered roll-call, tho the records show that 
there were at least fifty-five members. Probably the others 
arrived later, in time to hear the bishop preach on Sunday. 
There were also fourteen young men there as applicants for 
membership in the conference. Of these, eleven were admitted 
on probation. The other three were rejected for reasons not 
stated in the minutes. And of those who were received on 
trial two did not make good. The minutes of the next con- 
ference show that one was dropped and one discontinued at 
his own request. Bishop Roberts was the presiding officer. He 
was the sixth in order of the bishops of the Methodist church, 
but the first who was a married man. These men were indeed 
serious minded and felt the importance of their business in 
the conference. They held two business sessions daily for a 
full week and opened the final session at six o'clock in the 
morning in order to be able to adjourn at noon that day and 
have the afternoon for a start on the long journey to their new 
appointments. At that stage of Methodism a preacher was 
rarely appointed to the same charge for a second year. They 
adopted resolutions of thanks to the citizens of Mount Car- 
mel for their hospitality and it is probable that a resolution 
of that kind was more than a mere formality in those days. 
By a formal vote each member was requested to furnish a 
brief biography of himself to be presented at the next session 
for the conference records. A course of reading and study for 
the preachers was presented by Bishop Roberts and adopted 
by the conference. But while this conference course was a 
means of culture for those in actual service and might in some 
measure atone for their educational deficiencies, yet all the 



CHAPTER V. 

The Conference and the Seminary 

more experienced of these men realized that it did not afford 
adequate training for men who are called to important posi- 
tions of leadership as most Methodist preachers are. So far as 
can be determined at this time not a single member of that 
group of Methodist preachers, not even the bishop, had a 
college education. But many of them realized the handicap of 
this deficiency and were anxious to provide educational op- 
portunities for their successors. In the afternoon session of 
Friday, September 2 1 , Peter Cartwright, who had then served 
more than a score of years in the ministry, had been a delegate 
to the General Conference, was one of the original members 
of the Illinois Conference, and at that time presiding elder of 
the Illinois District, arose in his place and presented a petition 
from "certain citizens of Greene County, Illinois" on the 
subject of establishing a conference seminary for the Illinois 
Conference. On motion this petition was referred to a com- 
mittee of three with instructions to report before the close of 
the present conference. The committee was composed of John 
Dew, Allen Wiley, and John Fox. On Tuesday, September 
25, this committee made a report recommending that a com- 
mittee of five be appointed "to obtain all the information they 
can on the subject of a conference seminary and report to the 
next conference." The committee appointed by the bishop 
was as follows, John Strange, James Armstrong, Charles Hoi- 
Iiday, Peter Cartwright, and William Shanks. The petition 
from Greene County was not copied into the minutes, and 
since the document itself is lost we have no means of knowing 
who signed it, or exactly what they asked the conference to 
do. At any rate this shows the existence at that early day of 
a sentiment among the people that there ought to be a Meth- 
odist institution of learning in Illinois. 

The minutes of the conference for 1828 contain several 
references to the "Seminary Committee." Following is a verb- 
al extract from the minutes under date of October 14, 1828: 

"The president called for a report of the committee ap- 
pointed at the last annual conference to take into consider- 
ation the subject of a conference seminary. Whereupon the 
committee asked and obtained further time; and on motion 
resolved that the vacancy in that committee occasioned by 
the absence of Peter Cartwright, be filled. The president 
appointed S. H. Thompson to fill the vacancy." 

In the minutes of the next day we find the following: 

"It was moved and seconded that the committee appointed 
at the last session to take into consideration the subject of a 




One Hundred and Se 



Imc KENDREE ^^^^^i^:^:^^,.^.^..^^ 



conference seminary, be discharged from any further consid' 
eration of the subject. This motion did not prevail. It was 
then moved that said committee have leave of absence for one 
hour to make out their report. Which motion was lost. On 
motion resolved that a certain memorial with accompanying 
documents, now in the hands of S. H. Thompson, be read to 
this conference. The said memorial and accompanying docu- 
ments, concerning a seminary at Lebanon, Illinois, were read, 
and on motion referred to a committee of three who shall 
report as soon as convenient. The President appointed S. H. 
Thompson, John Strange, and John Dew as that committee. 
The committee appointed to take into consideration the ad- 
dress of the committee of Illinois Circuit on the subject of 
the Lebanon Seminary, submitted their report which was 
read and on motion accepted. On motion the conference re- 
considered the vote by which the report of the committee 
on the above named address was accepted. On motion resolved 
that the report of the above named committee be amended by 
striking out so much of the said report as recommends that 
this conference, at its present session, proceed to appoint 
trustees to said seminary; and on motion the report as amend- 
ed was accepted. On motion resolved that this conference 
unite in requesting the stockholders of the Seminary at Leb- 
anon to meet as soon as convenient and so to alter and amend 
their constitution as to designate the number of trustees for 
said institution, and the manner of their appointment, more 
definitely. On motion resolved that the secretary of this con- 
ference be instructed to furnish the committee of the Illinois 
Circuit with a copy of the resolutions of this conference on 
the subject of the Lebanon Seminary." 

In the meantime let us see what had been taking place at 
Lebanon between the sessions of conference of 1827 and 1828. 
At that time Lebanon was a village of about two hundred 
people on the stage route between St. Louis and Vincennes. 
At that date it did not have a place in the list of conference 
appointments, but presumably it was a part of the Shoal 
Creek Circuit. For that year the preacher in charge was 
Thomas Randle. Lebanon Methodists, knowing of the action 
of the conference and believing that the seminary would cer- 
tainly be established at no distant date, determined to secure 
its location in their own town. The matter was talked up 
during the winter and on February 20, 1828 a meeting was 
held to take definite action regarding the founding of a sem- 
inary. This action indicates the splendid enterprise and zeal 
for education of these pioneer Methodists who were deter- 
mined that their children should have opportunities for 
mental .md religious culture. 



The available records do not give the names of those pres- 
ent at this meeting, but it is fair to suppose that they were 
the leading citizens of Lebanon and they are doubtless all 
included in the list of subscribers to the fund raised for found- 
ing the institution. 

They discussed the purposes of the school, the raising of 
funds, the purchase of a site, the kind of building to be erect- 
ed, and fixed the date of their next meeting for March 1, at 
which time if the work of securing subscriptions had pro- 
gressed favorably they would elect a building committee. 
They discussed three possible sites for the building, the first 
of which was eventually secured. It consisted of eight acres 
of land belonging to Richard Bradsby, which was purchased 
for three dollars an acre — a total of twenty-four dollars. This 
was the same as the original purchase price of Manhattan 
Island. While in real estate values Manhattan has outstripped 
McKendree, the moral values attaching to the latter are such 
that in the eyes of many they would outweigh the entire 
wealth of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. 

Before they adjourned articles of organization were formu- 
lated and written on paper which is now yellow with age but 
still preserved in the archives of the college. We give here a 
complete copy of this document together with the names of 
all the signers. 

ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION 

I. We, the undersigned, estimating mental improvement 
of the first importance to a commonwealth, as well as in a polit- 
ical, moral, and religious view, promise to pay the several 
sums annexed to our names for the purpose of creating an 
edifice in, or near, the town of Lebanon, St. Clair County, 
Illinois, for a seminary of learning, to be conducted as nearly 
as may be, on the plan of Augusta College, Kentucky, the 
hall of which shall be designed and used as a house of public 
worship, when this will not interfere with the design and 
object of the institution, and on the Sabbath day, 

II. The property shall be deeded to the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church for the purpose of safe keeping, and the benefits 
of incorporation, with this limitation, that it shall never be 
sold or appropriated to any other uses than as aforesaid, 
without the consent of all the shareholders. 

III. Ten dollars shall be the amount of a share, and a 
certificate from the board, countersigned by the secretary, 
shall entitle the holder to the benefits of a stockholder, which 
certificate may be transferred and entitle the holder to all the 
benefits of the original owner as stockholder. 

IV. Each shareholder, for each share, shall be entitled to 
one vote, in all elections for the appointment of such corn- 



One Hundred and Eight 




^MC KENDREE^^^^^^s^g^^ggyr:^ 






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A facsimile of the original Articles of Confederation written in 1828 



One Hundred and A(me 






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'r,,^ r /c^-i <rt •/Ix^OMA.^yvu.o-u^-^ ^^& .^i^K^ ' ^ 






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^•dkA- Co.^^^z<^rx^/U /^-rt/i 



Facsimile of the minutes of the stockholders of Lebanon Seminary, now preserved in the College Archives 
Note the motion which changed the name to McKendree College, and Peter Cartwright's signature 



mittes and other officers elective by a stockholder, to send 
one scholar for each share, free from house rent and charge 
for the use of the public library, etc., and also shall be free 
from charge for fuel. 

V. The lUinois annual conference is respectfully solicited 
to take the institution under its fostering care, and take such 
methods for increasing its funds, and endowing it with pro- 
fessors, and procuring other means for its advancement as may 
to them seem best; and it is very desirable that the Missouri 
annual conference should unite with the Illinois conference 
and make it a conference seminary for both conferences. 

VI. Should the annual conference refuse to accept the 
institution, the quarterly conference of the Illinois Circuit is 
requested to act in conjunction with the quarterly confer- 
ences in this district in its support. Each circuit shall have a 
right to elect one manager, and the stockholders shall elect 
seven from among themselves whose duty it shall be to solicit 
donations and subscriptions. They, or a majority of them, 
shall constitute the board of managers for the governing of 
the institution, selecting professors and teachers, library, as- 
tronomical, chemical, and philosophical apparatus, elementary 
books, etc. They shall regulate the internal economy, fix the 



price of tuition, specify the terms of the sessions, recess, and 
vacation, and by their by-laws direct and ordain such rules as 
may tend to its advancement, good order and respectabiUty. 

VII. The stockholders shall meet at the school house in 
Lebanon, on the ist day of March, ensuing, for the purpose 
of electing a building committee, secretary, and treasurer, de- 
fining their duty, and specifying compensation for their ser- 
vices, and to transact such other business as the interests of 
the institution may require. 

VIII. The principal building shall not be less than j6 by 
48 feet, with two wings of suitable dimensions for conven- 
ience, to be commenced as soon as $600 is subscribed. The 
subscription shall be paid to the treasurer in three install- 
ments, as follows: one fourth on the ist of June, one fourth 
on the 1st of September, and one half on the ist of December 
ensuing. 

IX. In case the conferences do not signify, by special 
communication to the secretary of the institution, their in- 
tention to aid the institution by the ist of October, the 
stockholders shall, on notice, convene and elect a suitable 
number of managers and other officers, whose power and 
duties shall be delegated to them by the stockholders. 



One Hundred and -^cn 



NAME 


AMOUNT 


NAME 


AMOUNT 


NAME 


AMOUNT 


Nicholas Horner 


$100.00 


Asa Hutchinson 


1000 


Charlotte Sherman 


5.00 


Nathan Horner 


50.00 


Prettyman Boyce 


10.00 


Abigail Scarntt 


5.00 


A, W. Casad 


50.00 


Thomas Nichols 


10.00 


Charles Slade 


10.00 


David Chamberlm 


50.00 


Pleasant Nichols 


10.00 


J. C. Bruner 


10.00 


Robert Rankin 


20.00 


Joshua Barnes 


10.00 


Huey Alexander 


10.00 


George Lowe 


20.00 


Robert Abernathy 


10.00 


Joseph Foulks 


10.00 


Edward Young 


20.00 


Robert Moore 


10.00 


Gen. James Moore 


10.00 


Charles McDonald 


20.00 


Theophilus M. Nichols 


10.00 


Enoch Moore 


10.00 


Philonidas Balch 


20.00 


Evan Barnes 


10.00 


Milton Moore 


10.00 


Daniel S. Witter 


20.00 


Elijah Moore 


1000 


Philip Teter 


10.00 


John Crocker 


20.00 


James Porter 


10 00 


Dempsie Guthrie 


10.00 


Samuel H. Thompson 


20.00 


Meredith Journey 


10.00 


Abner Oliver Kelly 


10.00 


Wesley Dugger 


20.00 


Samuel Stites 


10.00 


Martin L. Allen 


10.00 


John C. Dugger 


20.00 


Austin Lyon 


5.00 


Philip Searcy 


10.00 


Jarrett Dugger 


20.00 


Robert Middleton 


10.00 


Isaac McMahan 


10.00 


Isaac Ferguson 


20.00 


Peter Wright 


10.00 


John Thomas, Jr. 


10.00 


W. C. Ballard 


20.00 


John McDonald 


10.00 


Vision West 


10.00 


E. B. Clemson 


30.00 


Jacob Widmer 


10.00 


David L. West 


10.00 


John O'Fallon 


10.00 


John Thomas, Sr. 


10.00 


Daniel White 


10.00 


Charles ColHns 


10.00 


William Moore 


10.00 


William Lewis 


10.00 


Josiah Patterson 


10.00 


John Springer 


10.00 


Samuel Mitchell, Sr. 


10.00 


James S. Simpson 


10.00 


Thomas Stanton 


10.00 


William C. Brown 


10.00 


George McDonald 


10.00 


Caldwell Morrison 


10.00 


John Martmdale 


10.00 


John Lowe 


10.00 


William Clark 


10.00 


George Temple 


10.00 


Silas McCann 


10.00 


L Baum 


10.00 


David Lincoln 


10.00 


William Faires 


10.00 


Thomas B. Stevens 


10.00 


George W. Kerr 


10.00 


Richard Vanorsdol 


10.00 


James Moore 


10.00 


Betsey M. Riggin 


10.00 


Thomas Ray 


10.00 


William Middleton 


10.00 


John Dew 


10.00 


James Riggin 


10.00 


Adam Vineyard 


to. 00 


Daniel Whittenburgh 


10.00 


Abram Sublett 


10.00 


Daussy Boring 


10.00 


Thornton Peeples 


10.00 


F. T. Crabb 


10.00 


William Welsh 


10.00 


William W. Roman 


10.00 


Moses Twiss 


10.00 


John Brake 


10.00 


Thomas Mather 


10.00 


C. W. Ennis 


10.00 


John S. McCann 


[0.00 


T. W. Gray 


10.00 


Joseph Hypes 


10.00 

10.00 


James McCann, Sr. 
William Parkinson 


10.00 

10.00 


William Lunceford 


10.00 


George W. Vineyard 


$1385.00 



The names of the 105 subscribers to the Lehancn Seminary fund. These are the men who made possible the Lebanon Sen 
and who thus may be classed as the founders of McKendree College 




One Hundred and Elei 



IMC KENDREE 



The original draft of these articles, whose age is now past 
a full century, the paper yellow and crumbling, but the 
faded ink still legible, is sacredly preserved in McKendree's 
archives. The list of 105 subscribers is a veritable roll of 
honor. They deserve recognition as the friends and supporters 
of education at a time when their humble gifts were worth 
more to the cause than some of the princely gifts of more 
recent givers. 

This document, formulated chiefly by Rev. A. W. Casad, 
contains several points worthy of notice. In the first place, 
the seminary was to be conducted "as nearly as possible on 
the plan of Augusta College." From this it appears that these 
founders intended that the institution should eventually grow 
into a real college. Then the property was to be "deeded to 
the Methodist Episcopal Church for safe keeping." This indi- 
cates that they intended it to be a Methodist college. And 
the fact that the building was to be designed and used as a 
"house of public worship when this will not interfere with 
the design and object of the institution" shows that they 
expected it to be a religious institution. Both the Illinois and 
Missouri Conferences were invited to become its patrons, 
and to a certain extent its managers, because they felt that 
a church seminary could be more successfully operated with 
the widest possible cooperation of the church. But in case the 
conferences did not see fit to take it "under their fostering 
care" it was to be placed in part at least under church control 
in the district in which it was located. 

The conferences were given until October i to signify 
their intentions in reference to the enterprise, but the Illinois 
Conference did not convene until October 9 that year, and 
when the question of a conference seminary was taken up 
there did not seem to he a feeling of perfect cordiality toward 
the Lebanon enterprise. In fact the committee asked to be 
excused from further service without making any report at 
all, even tho one member had in his possession a document 
setting forth the plan of the Lebanon Seminary and asking 
the conference to elect trustees for it. The conference finally 
required the committee to make a report, and then instead of 
electing trustees they passed a motion requesting the stock- 
holders of the seminary to meet and determine more definitely 
the number of trustees the institution should have and the 
manner of their election. 

During the summer of 1828 some progress was made in the 
construction of a building. The building committee appointed 
at the meeting of March i, was Rev. A. W. Ca.sad, George 
Lowe, and Nathan Horner. These men were all enthusiastic 
supporters of the enterprise, but there were some difficulties 



to overcome. Altho $i,j85 had been subscribed it was not 
paid promptly. In fact by the terms of the subscription it 
was not all due until December i. It was a larger building 
than any that had yet been undertaken in the village of Leb- 
anon, and it was not easy to secure mechanics sufficiently 
skilled to work on such a superior sort of building as this was 
felt to be. So when October came the building was still far 
from completion. The March meeting had elected eight trus- 
tees, namely, Samuel H. Thompson, Nicholas Horner, George 
Lowe, Theophilus M. Nichols, Joshua Barnes, John Thomas, 
Sr., Samuel C. Stites, and David S. Witter. After conference 
the circuit preacher brought word of the action taken there. 
The responsibility of the next step was not left to the trus- 
tees alone, but a meeting of all the stock-holders was called. 
We have no means of knowing just how many came, but there 
was evidently a quorum and they proceeded to do business- 
The meeting was held in Lebanon on November 8. After 
discussing the whole situation they elected a Board of Man- 
agers consisting of thirty-three members, chiefly but not en- 
tirely chosen from the list of stock-holders. Every one who 
had subscribed ten dollars was considered a stock-holder. But 
a few of those chosen managers were from a wider area and 
had probably not been solicited. Of this board the Rev. 
Samuel H. Thompson was made president, David S. Witter, 
Secretary, and Nathan Horner, Treasurer. Following is the 
list with their residences From St. Clair County, Rev. John 
Dew, Joshua Barnes, Colonel Andrew Bankson, James Rig- 
gin, Thomas Ray, David L. West, Colonel E. B. Clemson. 
Rev. Samuel Mitchell, William Padfield, and William Brads- 
by ; from Sangamon County, Rev. Peter Cartwright and Rev. 
Charles R. Matheny; from Madison County, Rev. Washing- 
ton C. Ballard, Hall Mason, John C. Dugger, and Major 
Isaac Ferguson; from Mt. Carmel, Rev. Aaron Wood; from 
Kaskaskia, Hon. Shadrach Bond; from Kaskaskia Circuit, Rev. 
Smith L. Robinson; from Hillsboro, John Tillson: from Bond 
County, Peter Hubbard; from Carlyle, Charles Slade and 
Pomeroy Easton; from Jackson County, John Logan; from 
Washington County, Major John Phillips; from Vandalia, 
Colonel E. C. Berry; from Waterloo. Dr. Thomas Stanton; 
from Jefferson County, Rev. Zadoc Casey; from St. Louis, 
Rev. Andrew Monroe, Major John OTallon and George W. 
Kerr; from St. Louis County, Rev. Alexander McCallister; 
from Missouri District, Rev. Jesse Green. 

At this time also an elaborate constitution was formulated, 
defining in detail the powers and privileges of the organiza- 
tion; also rules and by-laws were adopted. The nature of the 
work both elementary and advanced was indicated, pnd the 



One Hundred and Twelve 




frlVlc KENDREE^ 



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Facsimile of a page of the original draft of the Articles of Confederation of Lebanon Seminary 
These articles are now preserved in McKendree's Archives 



Ont Hundred und Thirteen 



importance was emphasized of employing teachers who were 
able not only to teach the common branches but also the 
higher branches of mathematics, natural and moral philoso- 
phy, and the Latin and Greek languages. This was in keeping 
with the provision contained in the original articles, that the 
seminary should be conducted "as near as may be on the plan 
of Augusta College, Kentucky," which had then been in 
operation for about five years. Following is a copy of the 
constitution : 

ARTICLE I. 

Agreeable to the design of the original projectors of the 
aforementioned seminary of learning, said institution shall be 
placed under the control and management of the Illinois and 
Missouri Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, or either of said conferences, under the limitations 
and on the condition hereinafter named: provided said con- 
ferences, or either of them, shall at any future period accept 
the same and make it a conference seminary. 

ARTICLE n. 
All the property now belonging to the seminary, including 
the buildings and lands appropriated to the same, or which 
may be hereafter received by purchase or donation, that has 
not already been conveyed, shall be conveyed to trustees for 
the use and benefit of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 
manner and form as near as may be, agreeable to the deed of 
settlement contained in the discipline of said church securing 
the privileges of churches and meeting houses; provided the 
property aforesaid shall never be sold or appropriated to any 
other use or uses, than specified by the articles of association, 
to which the original subscriptions were appended, and pro- 
vided further that all individual privileges granted and guar' 
anteed to share-holders shall by this constitution be secured 

inviolate. 

ARTICLE III. 

For the better organization of said institution and with a 
view to carry into immediate effect the designs of its patrons 
and friends, there shall be appointed by the stock-holders, a 
board of managers, consisting of thirty-three members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, who shall have authority to 
make by-laws to regulate their own proceedings, and whose 
duty it shall be to regulate the internal concerns of the insti- 
tution, to appoint the times of sessions and vacations, fix the 
terms of tuition, elect a president and professors, procure and 
appoint competent teachers, regulate their salaries, take such 
measures as to them may seem best, to increase the funds of 
the institution, and in connection with the professors, attend 
the public examinations of the students and adopt as they 



may think proper a system of salutary discipline, and make 
an annual report of their proceedings and doings as also of 
the fiscal concerns of the institution. 
ARTICLE IV. 

The first meeting of the board of managers under the pro- 
vision of the foregoing article shall be held on Monday, the 
loth of November instant. 

ARTICLE V. 

There shall be a president, secretary and treasurer, ap- 
pointed by the stock-holders, who shall be ex-officio members 
of the board of managers; and at all meetings of the board of 
managers, seven members shall constitute a quorum to trans- 
act business, and the president or in his absence, such person 
as shall be chosen for the time being, shall preside in all 
meetings of the stock-holders, or of the board of managers. 
ARTICLE VI. 

The secretary shall keep a regular journal of all the pro- 
ceedings of the board of managers, and a regular account of 
all the receipts and expenditures of the institution, which 
shall be published with the annual report of the board of 
managers, signed by the president and countersigned by the 
secretary. 

ARTICLE VII. 

It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive and account 
for all moneys which may be collected for the benefit of the 
institution, including tuition fees and donations or subscrip' 
tions, and to open and to keep a regular account with the 
board of managers, and whenever called upon to exhibit a 
report of the fiscal concerns, etc., and to honor and pay all 
orders drawn on him by the board, which orders, when 
presented shall always be signed by the president and counter- 
signed by the secretary. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

The board of managers shall meet once every quarter, or 
oftener if they deem it necessary, and shall always, on a call 
of the professors, having ten days previous notice. 
ARTICLE IX. 

The provisions made in the third article of this constitu- 
tion, for the appointment of managers and defining their 
powers and duties, shall continue in force until the next 
annual conference of Missouri and Illinois, and if neither of 
the conferences at their next sessions should agree to make 
the above mentioned seminary their conference seminary, 
then the above regulations contained in the third article 
aforesaid shall continue in force until altered by the stock- 
holders. 



One Hundred and Fourteen 



MC KENDREE 












v/ 



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7^ 



A reprodu 



of part of the minutes of a meeting of the stockholders of Lebanon Seminary 



ARTICLE X. 
This constitution, except the first and second articles, may 
be altered or amended after the next meeting of the above 
named conferences, by a majority of the stock-holders pres- 
ent, should the conferences refuse or neglect to accept the 
conditions proposed in the first article. 

ARTICLE XL 

Should the conferences above named accept the above con- 
ditions, there shall be thirty-three managers appointed, one 
third by the Illinois, and one third by the Missouri Annual 
Conference, and the other third by the stock-holders, or a 
majority of those present, convened for the purpose, after 
twenty days notice. 

Or in case but one of the above-named conferences should 
accept the conditions above-named, then said conference so 
accepting shall have the power to appoint seventeen man- 
agers, and the stock-holders shall appoint the remaining six- 
teen, a majority of whom shall always be members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, whose powers and duties shall 
be the same as those prescribed in the third article of this 
constitution. 

ARTICLE XII. 

Whenever, in the judgment of the board of managers, the 
interests of the institution shall require it, they shall have 
power to call a meeting of the stock-holders, and the secre- 
tary shall be required to give at least ten days previous notice 
of such meeting, with the objects for which it is called, in as 
public a manner as possible. 

The responsibility of the enterprise was now upon the 
managers. After due deliberation they decided that to have 
the school in operation was a matter of too great importance 
to wait for the completion of the building. There were in 
Lebanon at that time two buildings that had been used for 
school purposes when some teacher maintained a subscription 
school. The Illinois Legislature had passed a free school law 



in 1821, but in 1827 they passed another providing that no 
citizen should be taxed for education without his written 
consent. So the free school law was practically nullified. Im- 
mediately after their meeting of November 8 the Board of 
Managers proceeded to rent the two small buildings above- 
mentioned and to employ two teachers. Within the space of 
two weeks the teachers were secured, Mr. Edward R. Ames 
and Miss McMurphy, and on November 24, 1828 the Leb- 
anon Seminary was formally opened for public patronage. 

During the first term there were seventy-two students en- 
rolled, five of whom were girls. The tuition charge for the 
lower branches was fixed at five dollars per session. For the 
higher branches, including mathematics, natural and moral 
philosophy, Latin, and Greek, the rate was seven dollars per 
session. This first school year ran for a period of five months, 
closing in the latter part of April. This was the first chapter 
in an educational serial which is still running. It will be noted 
that McKendree's opening antedates that of any other col- 
lege, now in existence, founded by American Methodism. 
Dickinson College, founded in 1785, and Allegheny College, 
founded in 181 5, both in Pennsylvania and both Methodist 
institutions now, were both established by the Presbyterians 
and passed to Methodist control the same year, 1835. So that 
neither can yet show a century of Methodist history. The 
original Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, 
was first opened in 183 1. The other Methodist colleges of 
earlier date have all passed out of existence, thus leaving 
McKendree the oldest Methodist college in America. 

Of the other Illinois schools that lay claim to antiquity 
Illinois College at Jacksonville was founded m 1829, the next 
year after McKendree's beginning, and Alton Seminary, 
which later developed into ShurtlefF College, was opened in 
1832. Accordingly McKendree may justly lay claim to being 
the first college in Illinois to complete a century of continuous 
existence in the same location in which it had its origin. 




One Hundred and F./l 



,.^^,y:^g^^c^^^^ftMc KEND REE;;^ ^^^^^:^.^,^^.:^^ 



IT WILL BE seen from the preceding chapter that the 
institution was not founded by direct official action of 
the church, but independently by the citizens of Leb- 
anon, most of whom were Methodists, and they fully ex- 
pected that the Illinois Conference would accept it as an 
institution of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

As already stated the Conference at the session of 1828, 
for reasons that do not appear in the record, did not imme- 
diately take the infant enterprise "under its fostering care." 
So the founders proceeded to execute the plans already formed 
independently of the conference. This led to the opening of 
the institution in November, 1828. 

At the next session of the Conference, at Edwardsville, in 
September, 1829, a joint committee from the Illinois and Mis- 
souri Conferences, made report on the subject of a conference 
seminary, declaring the two conferences able to establish and 
maintain a seminary superior to any "now in operation west 
of the Wabash River." This remark seems to be a sort of 
thrust at the institution already founded and in actual oper- 
ation at Lebanon. The conference accepted the report, ap- 
proved the plan, and instructed the committee to proceed to 
select a location for the proposed institution. 

A communication was read from Mt. Carmel in reference 
to the site of the seminary. Two days later, September 24, 
1829, the committee reported, recommending either Lebanon, 
Illinois, or Mt. Salubria, Missouri, one mile west of St. Louis. 

They also presented the following articles of confederation, 
as a compact between the two conferences and recommended 
their adoption. 

ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION 
Between the Illinois and Missouri Annual Conferences of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, for the purpose of estab- 
lishing a joint seminary of learning for both conferences, made 
and entered into at Edwardsville, Illinois, September 24, 
1829, by the Illinois conference on its own part, and by 
Alexander McAllister, Andrew Monroe, and Jesse Green, 
delegates empowered to act on the part of the Missouri 
Conference. 

ARTICLE I. 
There shall be by the conferences aforesaid, a seminary of 

learning located and established at 

under the following regulations 

and restrictions. 



CHAPTER VI. 

The College and the Church 

ARTICLE II. 

The Illinois and Missouri Annual Conferences shall have 
equal claim to all the rights and privileges, and immunities 
belonging to and growing out of said seminary of learning. 
ARTICLE III. 

It shall be the duty of the said conferences respectively, 
at each annual session, to appoint a committee of ways and 
means, to adopt such measures as to them may seem necessary, 
to raise funds to carry into effect the designs of this confed- 
eration. And all moneys or other means collected for this 
purpose shall be subject to the order of the Board of Mana- 
gers or Trustees, as the case may be, who may be appointed 
to superintend said institution. 

ARTICLE IV. 
Each conference shall annually elect seven trustees who 
shall constitute a board, who shall have authority to receive 
conveyances of real estate, and superintend the seminary, 
transact its business, make all necessary rules and regulations, 
for their own government, and for the government of the 
institution, to fill vacancies that may occur in their body dur- 
ing the year, appoint their own secretary and treasurer, and 
do all other matters and things pertaining to the management 
of said institution, provided nothing be done that shall any 
wise infringe the articles of this confederation. 



ARTICLE V. 

Any of the foregoing articles of this confederation may be 
altered, amended, or rescinded, upon the concurrent majority 
of each of these conferences agreeing thereto. 

On motion the conference proceeded to fill by ballot the 
blank in Article I by determining a location for the seminary. 
Mt. Salubria, Missouri had a majority over Lebanon, Illinois, 
and the blank was filled accordingly. 

This action was all reconsidered and rescinded on the fol- 
lowing day. 

Thus a pretentious effort came to naught; but the infant 
institution at Lebanon was in the field to stay and moving 
steadily along. In 1830, on account of the interest manifested 
in It by Bishop McKendree, the Board decided to call it the 
"McKendrian College." 

At the next session of the conference, held at Vincennes, 
on October 6, i8jo, a committee, consisting of John Strange, 
Peter Cartwright, George Locke, John Dew, and E. Ray, was 
appointed, "to take into consideration the expediency or in- 
expediency of adopting the McKendrian College of Illinois 
as the literary institution of this conference." 




One Hundred and Si 



Z) 


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jfMC KENDREE ^^^^^r^^:..^.^^..-^^ 



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Facsimile of the minutes of a Stockhc 
On the same day the committee reported in favor of adopt- 
ing the McKendrian College, by recommending the following 
resolutions : 

1. That the conference accede to the proposal of the man- 
agers of the McKendrian College of Illinois, in Lebanon, and 
agree to adopt the college as a conference seminary. 

2. That a committee of three be appointed by this con- 
ference to appoint a president whose literary and religious 
qualifications are such as will be a credit to the institution. 

3. That each preacher of the conference be required to 
open subscriptions and solicit donations from the friends of 
literature within their respective charges,which moneys when 
collected shall be paid to the person who shall be legally ap- 
pointed either by this conference or the managers, to super- 
intend the moneyed concerns of the institution. 

CSigned) John Strange, Chairman. 

John Dew, Peter Cartwright, and S. H. Thompson were 
then appointed a committee to choose a president, acting in 
conjunction with the Board of Managers. In the record of the 
next session of the conference, held at Indianapolis in Octo- 
ber, 183 1, the only reference to the college was the appoint- 
ment of Peter Cartwright to receive money collected for 
Lebanon Seminary and forward it to the trustees. 

In 1832 the conference met at Jacksonville, Illinois. At 
this session the "Lebanon Seminary" was again formally 
adopted by the conference in resolutions presented by S. H. 
Thompson and Peter Cartwright, and the latter was ap- 
pointed to act as agent for it. 

At the next session held in 1833 at Union Grove, in St. 
Clair County, we find the first evidence that the conference 
really felt some proprietorship in the institution, from the 
fact that they elected six "managers to the Lebanon Sem- 
inary." The men chosen were John H. Dennis, William G. 
McKee, Dr. Nathan M. McCurdy, Samuel H. Thompson, 
John Dew, and John S. Barger. On September 29, during the 
same session, the conference was informed that the Rev. 



ilders Meeting held Nov. 24, 1828 
Peter Akers had been elected president of the Lebanon Sem- 
inary and Smith L. Robinson and James S. Mitchell as agents 
for the Lebanon Seminary, by the Board of Managers. On 
the next day a committee of five, consisting of John Dew, 
John S. Barger, M. S. Taylor, Simon Peter, and Samuel H. 
Thompson, appointed at the preceding conference, to exam- 
ine into the conditions of the Conference Seminary, made a 
rather lengthy report of which we quote certain portions: 

"That the Seminary building is in an encouraging state of 
progress toward completion, and probably will be ready for 
occupancy against the first of December next." This building 
was begun in 1828 and it was supposed to have been pushed 
vigorously by the enthusiastic founders, yet after five years 
time and five actual sessions of the school, it was still in 
some way incomplete. 

Another paragraph of the report read as follows : 

"That It is the desire of the Board to have connected m 
some way with the seminary, a semi-monthly literary and 
religious periodical; that they desire the preachers of this con- 
ference to act as agents in procuring subscribers, etc.; and 
that they will take upon themselves the responsibility of 
publishing such a periodical, reserving to themselves the right 
of the net proceeds, if any, to the interests of the seminary." 

The committee also presented the following resolution: 
"That we agree to act as agents for a literary and religious 
periodical, contemplated to be published by, and to be under 
the control and superintendence of the Board of Managers 
of the Lebanon Seminary of the Illinois Annual Conference, 
but that this Conference will not take on themselves in any 
way the responsibility of publishing such a periodical." 

This resolution was promptly adopted by the conference, 
with much more unanimity than another that came up at 
the same session to the effect that all members of the con- 
ference be permitted to wear only "plain straight-breasted 
coats." It was adopted by a vote of twenty-one to eleven. 
We have no record as to whether the minority conformed to 
the action of the majority or not. 



One Hundred a-ni. Seventeen 



MC KENDREE i 



w 



>HE FIRST principal of the institution was Edward 
Raymond Ames. He was born near Amesville, Ohio, 
May 20, 1806. He attended college at Athens, Ohio, 
a state institution, but here he came under religious influence 
which had a lasting effect on his life and work. This was in 
1827. The next year he left college without completing the 
course, to become the first principal of Lebanon Seminary. It 
was his first experience in teaching, but he devoted himself 
to the task with an earnestness that insured success. He was 
not in the work primarily for the monetary reward, for his 
entire salary for the first year's work was only one hundred 
and fifteen dollars. He did not give up the job on account of 
the meager return in money, but accepted an 
appointment for the second year at twenty- 
five dollars a month, which was a very modest 
increase of ten dollars for the year, or a total of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars for his 
second year's salary. Before the end of the sec- 
ond year he reached the conclusion that he 
was called to the ministry and decided to be 
a preacher of the gospel instead of a teacher. 
The preacher in charge of the Lebanon Circuit 
that year was John Dew, who afterward served 
a term as president of McKendree; and the 
presiding elder was Peter Cartwright. He 
doubtless talked the matter over with these 
men and they were convinced of the genuine- 
ness ofhis call to preach. But tho he was a man 
of fine physique and commanding appearance, and might have 
made a splendid athlete, he was exceedingly timid and dis- 
trustful of his own ability. So that while no member of the 
quarterly conference to which his name was presented for 
recommendation, had any doubt of his sincerity, some who 
had known him for two years did not believe he had certain 
necessary abilities in sufficient degree to make him a successful 
circuit rider. When the vote was taken on the question of 
granting him a license to preach, it was a tie. Peter Cart- 
wright refused to exercise his prerogative as presiding officer 
to decide the question. So it was dropped and the conference 
passed to other business. It so happened that an aged colored 
man, who was a local preacher, belonged to the Lebanon 
church. In fact there were eighteen colored members reported 
for the charge in the minutes for that year. This man, as local 
preacher, was a member of the quarterly conference but for 



CHAPTER VII. 

Early Developments 

reasons of his own had not attended the meeting that day. 
One of the brethren happened to look out of the window and 
saw him going by on a load of wood. He ran out, hailed him, 
and urged him to come in to the meeting "because," said he, 
"we need you." When the old man had taken his seat in the 
meeting the pastor asked the chairman to refer back to the 
question of the recommendation of Mr. Ames. It was done 
and they voted again. The result was a majority of one vote 
in favor of granting the license. Thus the vote of a colored 
man made Edward R. Ames a preacher and the General Con- 
ference of 1852 made him a bishop. The Illinois Conference 
met in the fall of 1830 at Vincennes, Indiana. At that time 
it included within its bounds both the states 
of Illinois and Indiana. It convened on the 
thirtieth day of September. For some unavoid- 
able reason the bishop failed to reach the seat 
of the conference. The brethren proceeded 
at once to elect Samuel H.Thompson president 
pro tern. He presided during the entire con- 
ference and he, with the presiding elders, made 
the appointments for that year. 

Mr. Ames was admitted on trial as one of a 
group of seventeen young men who came in 
that year. One of the number was Wm. D. R. 
Trotter, who afterward became the son-in-law 
of Peter Cartwright and also has the distinc- 
tion of being the first man to receive the 
Bachelor's Degree from McKendree College. 
Another member of this class was Simeon Walker who was 
the father of Levi Walker who for several years carried the 
Southern Illinois "conference cane" which was the gift of 
Jotham A. Scarritt and is supposed to be always in the 
custody of the oldest living member of the conference. 

When the appointments were read, John Dew, who had 
been in charge of Lebanon the year before, was pastor of 
Shoal Creek Circuit with Edward R. Ames as junior preacher. 
Dew had been associated with Ames more or less during the 
previous year and possibly he had asked to have him as his 
associate on the big circuit. This was in the Kaskaskia District 
and the presiding elder was Samuel H. Thompson, who was 
chairman of the Board of Managers of the Lebanon Seminary, 
so that he was not entirely among strangers. As far as' the 
records indicate he made a success of his work as a circuit 
rider m spite of his timidity. One writer says of him, "He 




BISHOP AMES 
First Principal of Lebanon Seminary 




One Hundred and Eight 



had a strong voice, and spoke with great oratorical power 
and pathos. Great revivals everywhere attended his preach' 
ing. His strong characteristics were quickness, clearness and 
comprehensiveness of perception, an unbending will, and an 
intuitive perception of human character. In generalship he 
had few equals and no superiors in the church he served." 
When the Illinois Conference was divided in 1832 he fell in 
the division that became the Indiana Conference and re- 
mained in that body until he was raised to the episcopacy 
in 1852. He died in Baltimore April 25, 1879. 

Miss McMurphy, who was Mr. Ames' assistant m the 
first two years of the life of the seminary, was the subject of 
a complimentary resolution in the Board meeting at the close 
of the first school year. This may have been partly an effort 
to compensate for the lack of salary since the total amount of 
money she received for her year's work was eighty-three dol- 
lars and thirty-three cents. The resolution introduced by 
Colonel Clemson reads as follows: "Resolved, that after a 
fair and full examination, this Board approve the system on 
which Miss McMurphy teaches the Enghsh language, and 
that they consider her eminently qualified as a teacher in that 
branch of science." 

It seems that this lady and her system were particularly 
admired by the gallant Colonel, for we find in another part 
of the record the statement that Colonel Clemson "submitted 
sundry resolutions concerning Miss McMurphy 's system of 
teaching grammar." The Board seems to have winked at 
this partiality by appointing him a committee to wait on the 
lady with a proposal for her employment for another year. 
The record shows that she was employed for the second year 
at the same salary as Mr. Ames, namely twenty-five dollars 
a month. Our records do not furnish any further history of 
Mi.ss McMurphy after two years' service as a member of the 
faculty in the Seminary. 

The election of Rev. Peter Akers as president, is recorded 
in the minutes of the Board of Managers for September 27, 
iSjj. This is the first mention in the records of a president. 
Mr. Ames is designated as "Principal of the Seminary." In 
March, 1830 at a meeting of the Board of Managers, presided 
over by Peter Cartwright, a resolution was passed changing 
the name of the school from "Lebanon Seminary" to" McKen- 
dree College" in honor of Bishop McKendree and in consider- 
ation of a gift which he promised in the form of a bequest of 
certain lands which he possessed in Shiloh Valley. This name 
is used sometimes in the records of the Board after that date, 
but for the most part, both there and in the conference rec- 
ords it was still called Lebanon Seminary for several years. 



From time to time several members of the conference were 
appointed to act as financial agents for the college, sometimes 
in certain specified fields. The Board at one time requested 
that Mr. Ames be appointed in that capacity, probably with 
the idea that by reason of his two years' service as head of 
the institution, he was better acquainted with its needs than 
any other member of the conference. The condition of the 
finances may be inferred from the fact that Mr. Ames did 
not receive the balance of his salary until November, 1830. 
At a meeting in the month of April, 1830, the Board author- 
ized the Committee of Superintendence to use their own 
judgment m employing a principal and assistant for the com- 
ing year. There is no record now extant as to how they 
exercised their judgment, or who was at the head of the 
school from the close of Mr. Ames' term of service some time 
in the summer of 1830 until the election of Peter Akers 
September 27, 1833. The most reasonable supposition seems 
to be that the institution was under the general supervision 
of the pastor of the Lebanon Circuit. The pastors appointed 
to Lebanon in those years were: 1830, Stith M. Otwell; 183 1, 
John Dew; 1832, Smith L. Robinson. The record of the con- 
ference minutes in 1833 shows that Samuel H. Thompson was 
appointed pastor of the Lebanon charge, Peter Akers "Pres- 
ident of Lebanon Seminary," James Mitchell travelling agent 
for Lebanon Seminary in this state and Missouri, and Smith 
L. Robinson agent for the Seminary "thruout the United 
States except Illinois and Missouri." Mr. Akers took charge 
of the school after conference in the fall of 1833. We have no 
record of the enrollment at that time nor of other members 
of the faculty, except that later in the year John N. Coleman 
was employed as a teacher in the seminary at a salary of "$75 
for the present session." There is also evidence that girls 
were enrolled as students from the fact that Mrs. Peter Akers 
was employed, by action of the Board in April, 1834, as 
"principal teacher of the female department, acting under the 
superintendence of the president of the seminary." About 
this time the Board ordered that there should be "a charge 
of twenty-five cents additional for each student whose parent 
or guardian is not a stock-holder in the seminary, for house 
rent and fuel." In January, 1834, legislation was passed by 
the Board indicating that President Akers was about to with- 
draw from the position. It was suggested that an effort be 
made to secure either a single man or a man with a small 
family, from Augusta College, who would be capable of con- 
ducting the institution. It is not so stated in the records, 
but the inference is that the six hundred dollar salary was 
not sufficient to provide a "comfortable support" for Mr. 



Facsimile of a motion passed by the 
Akers' family. However in February another meeting was 
held at which the president's salary was increased from six 
hundred to seven hundred dollars a year. Then two months 
later when Mrs. Akers was employed as a teacher her salary 
was fixed at fifty dollars per session and since there were two 
sessions a year this would bring the family income up to 
eight hundred dollars a year. This seemed to be sufficient 
for present needs. 

It was during the administration of President Akers that 
Rev. Learner B. Stateler of the Missouri Conference came 
with the request that the Lebanon Seminary take two or 
three Indian boys from Missouri to educate free of charge. 
The president was not disposed to take the responsibility of 
deciding the question himself so he called a meeting of the 
Board and referred the matter to them. After due deliberation 
the Board requested Mr. Akers to notify the gentleman from 
Missouri that they "regret their inability to educate the In- 
dian boys gratuitously, either in whole or in part, but they 
would be willing to take them on the established terms of 
the institution." This settled the matter and the Indian boys 
did not come. In September, 1834, there was some legislation 
in regard to the price of board. We find the statement that 
when bedding and laundry are furnished by the student the 
price of board and lodging shall be one dollar, twelve and a 
half cents a week, and the "table shall at all times be well 
supplied with good wholesome food, well cooked, in sufficient 
quantity and suitable variety." 

It was also stated that "hereafter no student shall be ad- 
mitted without paying the price of tuition per session and 
one third the price of board per session in advance, or giving 
such security for the payment thereof as shall be satisfactory 
to the Board." It was in the fall of i8j4 that the Board began 
discussing the matter of a charter from the state. The school 
had been in operation for six years, was looked upon as a 
permanent institution and it was felt that this recognition 
from the state would be an advantage to the struggling young 
school. So the Board requested President Akers to draft a 
memorial to the Legislature "praying the grant of a charter 
to this institution." 

The story of the charters received from the Legislature by 
McKendree will be told in another chapter. Also a sketch of 



Stock -holders of Lebanon Seminary 

the life of President Akers is given elsewhere in this work 
and there will be later reference to him since he was twice 
re-elected to the presidency in the later history of the insti. 
tution. However, we give here an incident in college life 
which gives some idea of his unswerving purpose that the 
school over which he presided should in fiict be a Christian 
institution. 

A CALLED MEETING OF THE BOARD 
At the request of the President of the college, Rev. Peter 
Akers, a meeting of the Board was called on June 4, 1834. 
When the body had assembled, the following communication 
was read by Dr. Akers, touching the moral conduct of the 
students, which may reflect something of the spirit of the 
times: 

"To the Board of Managers of Lebanon Seminary, 
Dear Brethren : Suffer me to call your attention to a subject 
of vital importance to this institution, of which you are the 
guardians and patrons. It is understood that this is the Con- 
ference Seminary of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Illi- 
nois; over which you have called a travelling preacher to 
preside as your representative, and whom the conference, 
according to the Discipline of the church, has appointed to 
that office. The church, therefore, and the public generally, 
have a right to expect that the moral discipline and govern- 
ment of the institution shall be creditable to the church, and 
exert a salutary influence over the youth of our church and 
common country. That this expectation might be realized has 
been the prayer of the present administrator of the govern- 
ment of the seminary. And to render some service to the 
church and community in this way (and not merely to secure 
a subsistence for himself and family) was the leading motive 
with him in taking charge of the institution. But it must be 
obvious to every one that in order to sustain the pretentions 
of the institution, and answer the wishes and expectations 
of the friends of literature and morality, the Board of Man- 
agers should, both by precept and example, authorize their 
representative, the president of the institution, to employ 
such discipline as may be requisite for the promotion of the 
avowed object of the institution. The present incumbent had 
supposed that he was sufficiently authorized in the matter. 



One Hundred and Twenty 



by the general spirit of the hy-Iaws of the seminary, as s.inc- 
tioned by a special committee of the Board, and that he would 
always find himself abundantly sustained and aided in his 
efforts to promote the morality of the institution, by the 
ministers and members of the church that turned him from 
darkness into light, and from the power of Satan unto God. 
But he is sorry to have to say to the Board, that a recent 
occurrence has very much shaken his hope concerning a suffi- 
ciently extensive and practical co-operation for promoting 
the morality of the school. 

On last Wednesday afternoon, his department, with the 
exception of his own son, brother-in-law, and George Peeples, 
was entirely vacated. And several boys were also absent at 
the same time from the primary department. On making the 
necessary inquiry it was ascertained that they were all m 
town attending the circus. It was also ascertained on suitable 
inquiry, that with the exception of two or three young men 
and one small boy, they all had perynission of their parents to 
go to the circus! Of these parents nearly all are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and some of them are mem- 
bers of your Board of Managers. I cannot well describe the 
mortification, or rather crucifixion, experienced by the ad- 
ministrator of the laws of this institution, when he attempted 
to speak to the pupils on wholesome discipline and sound 
morality. The students felt that they were safely fortified, 
not only by the current opinion and custom of a great part 
of the "non-professing" community, but also by the acknowl- 
edged sentiment of their own "professing" parents; some of 
whom had elected to office the public servant then attempting 
a feeble moral lecture, m such circumstances as gave the 
hearers a decided victory over the speaker. He felt that his 
situation was critical in the extreme. Moral sentiment and 
the reputation of the Seminary, and of Methodism connected 
with it, were at once involved. He therefore concluded by 

/ '. 



informing the students that the Managers would shortly be 
called upon to determine officially upon the merits of such 
conduct in reference to the future. That if they should agree 
with the speaker in moral sentiment on such subjects, and 
would give a practical illustration of the same, then in all 
similar cases of trespass the delinquents might assuredly ex- 
pect suitable punishment, even to expulsion from the institu- 
tion. But that if the Managers should judge differently and 
choose not to adopt a measure quite so hostile to the Devil 
and his own country, the carnal mind, then as a conscientious 
man, having failed in the proper business on which he came 
to the institution, the speaker would immediately hand in 
his resignation. 

The writer of this unvarnished communication does not 
think It necessary to add a single argument m proof of the 
diabolical nature and grossly corrupting tendency of the cir- 
cus, and of all similar sports. They are the every day and 
Sunday School of the Devil, and his travelling missionaries, 
supported by the voluntary contributions of all, both parents 
and children, who are friendly, for the time being, to such 
institutions. Nor is it thought necessary to enlarge on the 
manifest inconsistency of sending the same children to a 
Christian Sabbath school and to the Sabbath school of Hell. 
Neither is it now the business of the writer to say to the 
Board all that probably should be said to "professors" gen- 
erally, who when they gather not with Christ scatter abroad. 
I have delivered my own soul. 

Your servant for Christ's sake, 

Peter Akers." 

After the reading of this communication by their worthy 
college president, the Board adopted a strong resolution au- 
thorizing the Faculty to use vigorous measures to enforce all 
the provisions of the institution for the proper restraint of 
wayward students. At the close of the year Dr. Akers re- 
sumed the work of the circuit rider. 






Reproduction of the i 



passed by the Trustees of Lebanon Seminary at the close of the first session 



yMC KENDRE^^^^^gg^^^^ 






^;^^::S<*j...^ J 






/-/^ 



f~y 










f 






^^!L^ 



— <^„ ,^ 






^ 



Facsimile of the statement of hills of tuition for the fi 



'^T C.2^^i^y^^H^ 




rst session ot the Lebanon Seminary. The original is in McKendree's archives 



One Hundred iirid IwinlyTwo 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 



REV. JOHN DEW 

Rev. John Dew was the president during the two years 
1836-1838. He was prominent among the early circuit riders 
and better educated than most of them, tho not a college 
graduate. A sketch of him appears in the chapter on "Early 
Methodist Leaders". 

He showed himself a leader among his contemporaries in 
the church of that period. Had his life not ended at fifty-one, 
while he was still in the prime of usefulness, his influence 
would no doubt have been more far reaching and he would 
have occupied a larger place in the history of the college and 
the church. It was under his leadership that McKendree first 
began to assume the character of a college rather than a mere 
preparatory school. Dr. Akers had secured the charter and 
Mr. Dew felt that there ought to be a college trained faculty. 
Looking to that end he secured two young men who had just 
graduated from the Wesleyan at Middletown, Connecticut — 
Annis Merrill and James W. Sunderland. They were fresh 
from an eastern college and were ambitious to pass on their 
college culture to the people of this new western country. 
Now for the first time departments of instruction were or- 
ganized in the institution. The president took charge of the 
department of English Literature, Professor Merrill, of An- 
cient Languages and Literature, and Professor Sunderland, of 
Mathematics and Science. Besides these there was a Prepara- 
tory Department in which there were two teachers. Rev. 
John S. Barger, principal, and Wesley Bennett, assistant. 

In August, i8j7, appeared the first printed catalog the 
college issued. It has twelve pages. It gives the names of the 
sixteen trustees, ten of whom were laymen; executive com- 
mittee; conference visitors; financial agents; and auditor. 
Then after the faculty, is a list of the students, twenty-two 
college and fifty-one preparatory. Then follows a statement 
of the course of study and instruction, and announcement of 
the examinations, public exhibitions, and vacations. This is 
followed by a table of expenses including tuition, room, board, 
wood, lights, and washing, which is estimated at a total of 
$87.50 to $99.50 a year. 

We quote several other interesting statements found in it. 

"It is earnestly recommended that students shall not be 
authorized to contract any debts. All students will furnish 
their own beds and furniture. No student will be admitted 
to the college classes who is under fourteen years of age, and 
unless he is personally known to some member of the faculty, 
he must present a certificate of good moral character. Im- 
moral or disorderly conduct is always considered a sufficient 
reason for directing the student to leave the institution." 



ANNIS MERRILL 
Annis Merrill was the younger brother of John Wesley 
Merrill. He was born in 1810 and graduated from the Wes- 
leyan in 1835. He came to McKendree one year earlier 
and staid one year later than his brother, and so spent six 
years of service in the college. In 1842 he decided to take 
up the profession of law. He went to Boston and spent 
several years in legal studies, and then in 1849 when multi' 
tudes were smitten with the gold fever he went along with 
the maddening crowd to California. He settled at San Fran- 
cisco and made that his home for the remainder of his life. 
He was concerned more, however, with the application of 
the law than with gold digging. When civilization had been 
established and the church gained a place he was always 
identified with the First Methodist Church in San Francisco. 
For many years he was the teacher of a large men's Bible class 
in that church, and it was said that he prepared each Sunday's 
lesson as carefully as he would a plea before the Supreme 
Court. He was elected a lay delegate to the General Confer- 
ence of 1876. He was one of the founders of the University 
of the Pacific and for many years was the president of the 
board of trustees of that institution. He acquired consider- 
able wealth in his long life. He was a man of great vitality, 
which he preserved so well that he was able to spend ninety- 
five years m this world. He left not only a fair fortune but a 
good name as a legacy to his children. 

JAMES WARREN SUNDERLAND 
James Warren Sunderland was born at Exeter, Rhode 
Island, February 9, 1813. He was graduated from the Wes- 
leyan University at Middletown, Connecticut in i8j6 and 
the same year was elected Professor of Mathematics and 
Science at McKendree. His term of service ran parallel with 
that of Professor Merrill. They had been friends during their 
college course and were friendly colleagues in educational 
work in this western educational enterprise. He had a good 
reputation in every respect while at McKendree. In the opin- 
ion of the students he seemed to be above reproach. Johnson 
Pierson, a member of the class of 1841 at McKendree, testified 
m a letter written soon after his graduation and still preserved 
in the archives of the college, to the extremely high regard in 
which Professor Sunderland was always held by the students . 
The students were willing at times to play pranks on the 
professors and make uncomplimentary remarks about them in 
their absence, "but never about Prof. Sunderland." He tried 
to resign his position several times, probably on account of the 
unsatisfactory salaries paid to the faculty in those days, but the 
board would refuse to accept his resignation, re-elect him and 



One Hundred and TwentyThree 



<.^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^^^:^ 




JAMES WARREN SUNDERLAND 



finally persuade him to stay 
another year. He did this un- 
til the commencement of 
1843, when he refused to re- 
consider. When the Board 
could hold him no longer, 
they placed in the minutes a 
highly complimentary reso- 
lution expressing the high re- 
gard in which they held him. 

From McKendree he went 
to Ursinus College at Col- 
legeville, Pennsylvania, 
where he maintained a long 
and honorable educational 
career, and where he also spent his years of retirement after 
he had finished his years of active service. He died on April 
9, 1904, at the age of ninety -one. 

Since it is not a long one, we give the list of students in 
this first catalog, as nearly as possible in the form in which 
they appear in the catalog. 

STUDENTS COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT 
NAMES RESIDENCE 

John Baker Lebanon 

Asahel Brown Macoupin County 

Samuel K. Casey Jefferson County 

James Y. Clemson Caledonia 

D. B. C. Cossitt Lebanon 
R. T. Cunningham 

William Edgar Rapides Parish, La. 

Henry H. Horner Lebanon 

William Jeter Louisville, Ky. 

Jeremiah Johnson Lebanon 
Thomas Leonard 

William T. Lucky Belleville 

Robert H. Mason Madison County 

William P. Mattox Clinton County 

Napoleon B. MuUikin St. Louis, Mo. 

Benjamin Norman St. Clair County 
Elihu McKendree Peter White Hall 

Johnson Pierson Burlington, W. T. 

Andrew Ray Salem 

Eli Robinson Carlinville 

John Scott Shiloh 

Joseph H. Tam Logansport, Iowa 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

Grafton Baker Lebanon 
William Baker 
James H. Barger 

Wesley Bennett Clarksburg, Va. 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Palmyra, Mo. 
Lebanon 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Lebanon 



Charles H. Bradford Lebanon 

William E. Bradford 
Joseph P. Chamberlain 
Samuel E. Chamberlain 
Franklin C. Coons 

E. S. Cossitt 
Alexander Covington 
J. W. Cunningham 
Levi L. Dunlap 
Dennis M. Foulks 
Ezra L. Foulks 
Samuel Foulks 
Theodore L. Gray 
William Gray 
Henderson Isbel 
James R. Isbel 
John H. Kavanaugh 
Joseph T. Kingston 
Harvey Lasley 
William Leonard 

F. M. Mattox 
John D. Miles 
William Miles 
Jerome B. MuUikm 
Alfred Padon 
John Penn 
William Penn 
Daniel E. Pierce 
James A. Pierce 
Elbridge J. Potter 
William B. Riggin 
James A. Roman 
William Roman 
William J. Ross 
Samuel Stites 
A. B. Sublett 
J. H. Sublett 
Cyrus F. Temple 
George D. Temple 
James Twiss 
William Twiss 
Ira Wakefield Union Grove 
J. D. Walton St. Louis, Mo. 
William D. Walton St. Louis, Mo. 
John H. Welch Lebanon 
Robert Vineyard 

Collegiate Department 22 

Preparatory Department 51 

Total 



St. Clair County 
Galliopolis, Ohio 
Lebanon 
Clinton County 
Lebanon 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Ridge Prairie 
Lebanon 

Shiloh 



Burlington, W. 
Lebanon 




One Hundred and Twenty-Fow 



MC KENDREE 



CHAPTER VIII. 

President McrrilVs Administration 



"*7'oHN Wesley Merrill was born at 
H 1 Chester, New Hampshire, May g, 1808. 
His father, Rev. Joseph Merrill was a 
Methodist circuit rider and named his oldest 
son after the founder of Methodism. This son 
grew up on various New England circuits, but 
in spite of this secured a good education. The 
father was a trustee of the Wesleyan Univer- 
sity at Middletown, Connecticut and was 
wiUing to sacrifice that his sons might be col- 
lege graduates. John W. graduated from Wes- 
leyan m i8j4 and from the theological sem- 
inary in 1837. He then decided to take a trip 
in the west as a means of recuperation of 
his health. His brother Annis had been for a 
year Professor of Ancient Language 




JOHN WESLEY MERRILL 

at McKendree, and he 
thought it would be interesting to visit his brother and this 
new seat of learning in the wilderness of the west. Mr. Mer- 
rill himself describes his journey to Lebanon in a very inter- 
esting manner, in a communication to an educational con- 
vention held at McKendree in 1868. We quote from it as 
follows: 

"In September 1837 my ten years' continuous course of 
study at the Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, Bowdoin 
College in Maine, Wesleyan University in Connecticut, and 
Andover Theological Seminary in Massachusetts, had closed 
and left me in such a state of health as to require immediate 
change. 

"In three weeks after my graduation I concluded to visit 
my brother in the west. It was a long, slow journey. We 
glided down the winding Connecticut River, into Long Is- 
land Sound, under the silvery light of the moon; then darted 
by rail from New York to Philadelphia, then slowly clam- 
bered over the Alleghenies to the Ohio River. We had an 
eighteen day voyage down the Ohio and up the Mississippi 
on a steam boat which was bringing home several western 
Congressmen and twenty Sioux Indians, all of whom were 
objects of deep interest to me. A new world reposed between 
the Alleghenies and the Rockies and now my wondering eyes 
beheld it. I spent the Sabbath at St. Louis and on Monday 
afternoon took the stage for Lebanon. My travelling com- 
panion on the way was a Jew — and where is not the wan- 
dering Jew? At my request he sang a solemn song in Hebrew 
from the Psalms. It touched my heart, and I longed that the 



scattered song of the "Father of the Faithful" 
might come to that faith in the Lord Christ 
which avails to salvation. 

"We had come late to the little village of 
Lebanon. It was a dark night and my first view 
was sufficiently draped, and my first impres- 
sions sufficiently obscure. I was soon invited 
to the hospitable roof of Mr. Nathan Horner 
where he and his estimable lady made me both 
welcome and happy. On the next day, with 
out taking time to examine the village or its 
surroundings, as Professor Merrill had delay- 
ed in New England to bring his family to Leb- 
anon, and as the college session had already 
begun, I immediately went to the college and 
took charge of my brother's classes, intending so to do until 
his arrival two weeks later. On Wednesday, urged to preach 
in the college chapel, I did so. On Saturday, riding out to 
Shiloh, I was induced by Rev. J. S. Barger to preach on the 
Sabbath forenoon. In the evening returning, I entered my 
room at Mr. Horner's, whence I came out only after about 
five weeks of suffering with the bilious fever. I shall never 
forget those weeks of prostration and pain; nor the kind at- 
tention of that true mother in Israel, Mrs. Horner, and of 
her children. The students daily brought me a pitcher of cold 
water from the college well, to cool my burning lips, and 
watched at my bedside in the solitary night. My calamity 
was their opportunity to bind my grateful heart to the family, 
the students, and the stranger land to which I had wandered. 
The second time I learned to walk; and as soon as possible, 
sitting down to rest by the wayside three or four times, both 
to and from the college, I taught my brother's classes, intend- 
ing to go south in two or three weeks. But two or three 
months slipped by and the Trustees came together one day 
(January 1, 1838) and elected me a professor and president 
of the college. I soon braided in with the golden cords already 
there, and we prevailed in the work before us. About fifty 
students were then in both departments of the college. I need 
not say with what interest and devotion I entered upon my 
work. I had the fond vision of a Harvard on the banks of the 
Mississippi unrolled before my thoughts. True the college 
edifice looked dingy enough with its two little wings, its 
tinkling bell, and its three or four log cabins joined on in the 
rear, where most of the students, from abroad, boarded. 



One Hundred and Twenty-Five 



lodged, and studied. It stood indeed in thickets where the 
sly panther could scarcely find his way, save in front and on 
the east. ****** So the thickets must give way and spare 
an open campus. On one set day a clique of villagers and not- 
able trustees, the fifty students, and the faculty, headed by 
the president, with chains and levers, axes and hoes, crowbars 
and grubbers, hatchets and brush-scythes, and other like pan- 
oply, entered the college premises, not as the crafty Ulysses 
in Calypso's isle cut timbers for his hidden craft, but as some 
bold phalanx in a contest. Dido's Tyrians were not a busier 
crowd. And ere the sun set, some cutting down the trees, 
others cutting with scythes the undergrowth, while these 
pried and dug up the stumps, and those bore away the wood 
and rubbish, an open space was cleared on the crown of the 
college grounds. The glee and shouts and antics then would 
provoke a smile on features braver than Cyrus' bravest gen- 
erals. The sun that night went down with joy and evening 
wept less copious tears. The forest yielded to the classic axe. 
The noble hickories and oaks were left for monuments and 
shade. 

"Here let me advert to the literary labors of the college m 
the four years of my connection with it. The work was as- 
signed to the professors and the best methods of study, reci- 
tations and reviews, used in the older colleges were adopted. 
A kind but strict discipline was preserved. Examinations at 
the ends of the terms and the years, were instituted, and 
these usually continued one week each. Exhibitions of orig- 
inal productions, accompanied the examinations at the close 
of the terms and at the anniversaries. General harmony pre- 
\^ailed. There were few cases of discipline and those requiring 
dismission were extremely rare. Study, cheerfulness, and good 
order were characteristics of the college. At sunrise and near 
sunset, for four years, I met the students in the chapel for 
religious services. There were often seasons of spiritual re- 
freshing from the presence of the Lord. The scriptures were 
read, a hymn was sung and prayer offered. God was pleased 
to visit the institution with several revivals of religion, and 
many students as well as others shared in its blessings. Learn- 
ing and religion mated well together. It happened to me not 
only to do the work assigned by the trustees, but where there 
seemed a want, there I applied my strength. It thus occurred 
that the first class to graduate read most of their college Greek 
with me. They read all of the first volume of the "Majora" 
and most of the second, besides they read the Medea and 
twelve books of Homer's Iliad. Few classes in the older col- 
leges read more Greek than this. It was found that the powers 



of our college charter were too narrow, and as it seemed de- 
sirable to introduce professorships in Sacred Literature, Eccle- 
siastical History, and Theology, as well as chairs in the other 
professions, it was suggested by me, that that end could be 
secured in a new charter, and it was agreed by the trustees 
to ask of the Legislature power to estabHsh "professorships 
in all the learned professions," and this power was generously 
and amply granted. When we had obtained the new charter, 
the senior class read with me one exercise in the gospels a 
week exegetically. Our students studied so diligently and the 
examinations were so satisfactory, that on the graduation of 
this class the college had taken a high literary rank in the 
state, and the number of our students was about one hundred 
and twenty-two during the year. This graduation occurred in 
August 1 84 1. About one year before this time I had been 
unanimously elected as professor of Sacred Literature in the 
Biblical Institute, then in its organic incipiency at Newbury, 
Vermont, which after a sojourn of twenty years at Concord, 
New Hampshire, finally settled down in the bosom of Boston. 
As for years this object had been almost as dear to my heart 
as life itself, I decided to accept jt, ***** * Thus closed my 
brief, laborious, and interesting connection with McKendree 
College." 

After teaching in the Theological School until 1868 Dr. 
Merrill became a pastor for a few years and retired from ac- 
tive service in 187J. However his long life of usefulness was 
by no means finished. His earthly career finally closed at the 
end of the nineteenth century when he was ninety-two years 
old. In 1896 Dr. M. H. Chamberlin, then president of Mc- 
Kendree, had a long correspondence with him. Dr. Merrill 
referred to the great satisfaction he had had in the water from 
the college well, when he lay sick at the home of Nathan 
Horner. Accordingly Dr. Chamberlin bottled up several gal- 
lons of water from the old well and shipped them to him by 
express. He was greatly delighted and claimed that he could 
recognize the unmistakable flavor of the water from the old 
well which is fifty feet deep and was dug in 1835- 

The aged theologian then wrote a poem entitled "The 
College Well" which was set to music by the Oliver Ditson 
Company of Boston and copies were furnished the McKendree 
Glee Club, who sang it frequently in their public concerts. 
Dr. Chamberlin hoped that it would become a popular col- 
lege song among the students, but the tune did not prove to 
be well adapted to the uses of the non-professional singer, so 
today it is well-nigh forgotten. 




One Hundred and Tw 



^MC KENDREE^^^^^^s:^^..;,^.:;,^^^ 



McKENDREE 
Ho! ding dong goes the college bell! 

Now gather, students, around the well. 
The bucket living water brings 

From the deep moss tunnel'd springs. 
From the wild gourd or cocoa shell 

Drink kindly greeting or farewell. 
With waters of the college well. 

The old McKendree College Well. 

Oft have you drunk its cooling lymph. 

Both man and lad and college nymph. 
As sparkling from its hidden cell. 

Its smooth, sweet waters tasted well. 
When from the gourd or cocoa shell. 

You drank kind greeting or farewell. 
In waters from the college well. 

The old McKendree College Well. 

JUDGE WILLIAM BROWN 

Judge William Brown was the other member of the faculty 
that carried the first McKendree class through to graduation. 
We have less information about him than any of the others. 
But all that we do know about him is to his credit. He was 
a lawyer in Jacksonville, Illinois, before he came to the 
college. His field of instruction was Economics and Political 
Science. He was a member of the committee appointed to 
visit the Legislature in the effort to secure a new charter at 
the beginning of the year 1839. His two able addresses deliv- 
ered in the Hall of Representatives to the first Legislature 
that convened in Springfield, seemed to have won the atten- 
tion and approval of all who heard them. The members of the 
Legislature were so favorably impressed that they appropri- 
ated funds to have them printed for free distribution through- 
out the state. It is likely that he, more than any other member 
of the committee was responsible for the success of their 
mission to the Legislature. He also served as field agent for the 
college in one of the attempts to endow it with scholarships. 
His later years were spent in law practice at Jacksonville. 

In the first few years of the history of McKendree, the 
school did not claim to be more than a seminary. Higher 
education existed only in its plan, not in its practice. The 
first students were all of elementary grade and there was 
no college graduate in its faculty until the Merrills and Sun- 
derland came. The most of the students had far outstripped 
their parents if they finished a preparatory course ready for 
college entrance. So it is not strange that no class went so far 
as to complete a college course until 1841. At that time these 
men, fresh from a New England college themselves, doubtless 



COLLEGE WELL 

Deep in the earth God hid these waters. 

For all McKendree's sons and daughters. 
Thousands have drunk their cooling lymph. 

Old men and lads and college nymph. 
All who drank, from last to first. 

Have quenched the burning of their thirst, 
With waters from the college well, 

The old McKendree College Well. 
We'll seek no springs of Hilicon, 

Of Castala or Lebanon, 
There gush from earth the cooling springs. 

That comfort to the thirsty brings, 
As they drink from flask or shell. 

The kindly greetings or farewell, 
In waters from the college well. 

The old McKendree College Well. 

held the same high standards in their work which they had 
seen maintained in the eastern institution. This first class 
carrying off their diplomas thirteen years after the institution 
was founded deserve all the distinction they will receive if 
we devote a chapter to them. However, the degrees conferred 
on the August day in 1841 were not the very first degrees the 
institution had bestowed. The corporation first exercised the 
powers granted to it by its state charter to confer degrees, by 
bestowing upon the Rev. Peter Akers, former president of 
the college, the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity. This 
was done on the thirteenth day of August, 1839. On the 
same day the degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon 
the Rev. Professor William M. Dailey, of St. Charles College 
in Missouri. 

A clause in the charter provided that any person present- 
ing himself for examination upon the entire course of study, 
if he could satisfactorily pass in all the subjects might receive 
the Bachelor's Degree without having attended as a resident 
student. In 1840 Rev. William D. R. Trotter presented him- 
self as an applicant for a degree under the above rule. Pres- 
ident Merrill, as chairman of the examining committee, re- 
ported to the Board that Mr. Trotter had successfully passed 
the required examinations and that he was recommended by 
the faculty for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. It was granted. 
So that the very first degree McKendree granted was the 
Doctor's degree to Peter Akers, the first Master's degree to 
Professor Dailey, and the first Bachelor's degree to Mr. Trot- 
ter, who was a son-in-law of Peter Cartwright and a Metho- 
dist circuit rider. But the first Bachelor's degrees earned in 




One Hundred and Twent\-Sei 



■csiS^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S^^SrS^ 



the usual way were those granted to the seven young men 
who constituted the class of 1841. They all received Bachelor 
of Arts degrees, as the Bachelor of Science was not conferred 
until some years later. That first commencement day was on 
the eighteenth of August and President Merrill describes it 
as follows: 

"The members of the graduating class were Richard F. 
Cunningham, Henry H. Horner, Jeremiah Johnson, William 
T. Lucky, Johnson Pierson, Eli Robinson, and William Weer. 
Their examinations had been passed with credit. Their ora- 
tions had been prepared, and in a grove hard by the college 
premises, over the road nearly in front of the college grounds, 
a stage had been erected, and here the exhibitions of the three 
lower classes had passed off well. The commencement day 
had arrived, a large crowd had assembled, the trustees and 
visitors were on the stage with the faculty, the senior class, 
one by one had made their addresses, the diplomas were dis- 
tributed and the degrees conferred. Now the first class in 
McKendree College had been admitted to the grade of Bach- 
elor of Arts; and this I think was the first class admitted to 
that degree in a Methodist college north of Kentucky and 
west of Pennsylvania." 

Some one, who did not sign his name, but probably a mem- 
ber of the faculty, wrote an account of the commencement 
for the Western Christian Advocate. A copy of it was found 
among the ancient records and we reproduce it here. 

REPORT OF THE FIRST McKENDREE COMMENCEMENT DAY 

August 18, 1841 
Mr. Editor: 

This was a proud day for McKendree College. A day 
ominous of good to the cause of education, religion, and hu- 
manity in Illinois. One that I trust will be long remembered 
by the multitudes who assembled on that occasion to witness 
the novel spectacle, the literary festival of crowning a class 
of young men with university honors. The young but prom- 
ising institution of learning, located in this place, has just 
graduated its first class. A stage was erected and other suit- 
able preparations made in a delightful grove adjoining the 
college; the chapel being too small to accommodate the large 
audience anticipated; and at the appointed hour a vast as- 
semblage gathered from the neighboring regions presented 
itself to witness the interesting exercises. There youth and 
beauty, age and wisdom, wealth and fashion, talent and learn- 
ing — for we have all these even in the far west — united to 
grace the occasion. We mean no disrespect to our transmoun- 
tain friends, but here was an audience with as much taste and 
intelligence as is usually met with east of the mountains. The 



literary exercises were of the highest order and it was re- 
marked by several who had attended the commencement oc- 
casions at several of our eastern colleges, that they would 
suffer nothing from a comparison with those of our most 
distinguished institutions. The following was the order of 
exercises. It would be invidious to single out cases where all 
were characterized for excellence, but we shall be excusable 
for saying a word of the valedictory. It was an effort which 
was peculiarly happy and impressive. The youthful orator, 
Jeremiah G. Johnson, seemed to breathe the sentiment of a 
warm and grateful heart, in words that carried with them a 
sweetness and pathos so genuine that most of the audience 
were melted to tears. The effect of this performance was good, 
and I doubt not but all went away deeply impressed with the 
worth of our young college, and firmly resolved that it should 
not longer languish for lack of countenance and support. 

"The next session of the institution will open on the second 
Wednesday in October, and with better prospects, it is be- 
lieved, from the present auspices, than any previous one. The 
trustees, the conference, and the community seem determined 
to sustain this college, and if the zeal in its behalf that was 
manifested at the late annual meeting of the joint Board of 
Trustees and visitors, is not suffered to wane, we may safely 
predict that in a very short time after the opening of the next 
session, the prospects will be really better than ever before. 
The resignation of the late worthy president, Rev. John W. 
Merrill, caused some regret among the friends, yet it is be- 
lieved that his place has been supplied by one in every respect 
competent to the station." 

We give here a brief sketch of each member of this first class. 

RICHARD FRISBIE CUNNINGHAM 
Richard Frisbie Cunningham was born June 21, 1826, at 
Abingdon, Maryland. While yet a small child he came with 
his parents to Illinois and settled in Lebanon. On October 
17, 1836, when he was only ten years of age he was enrolled 
in the preparatory department of McKendree College. A few 
years after he finished at McKendree, he enrolled in the Mis- 
souri Medical College of St. Louis, from which he received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1850. He took up the 
practice of his profession in his home town where he spent 
the remainder of his long and useful life. He was a capable 
and successful physician. 

About the time he began his medical practice he was mar- 
ried at Brighton, Illinois, to Miss Mary E. Risley, who was 
the daughter of a Methodist preacher. They were the parents 
of four children, James W., Frederick, Annie, and May. He 
was for many years president of the McKendree Alumni 



One Hundred and TwerUyEtght 




Association and at each annual meeting delivered an address 
that was not without merit m other respects, but usually 
excelling especially m its length. 

The huildmg is still standing on St. Louis St. in Lebanon 
which he occupied for many years as his office. He died at 
his home m Lebanon, December 29, iSgi. 
HENRY H. HORNER 
Henry Hypes Horner was born in Lebanon, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1821. His parents were Americans for several gen- 
erations back. His grandfather, Nicholas Horner, who came 
from Maryland to Illinois 
in 1812, was the largest sub- 
scriber to the original fund 
for the founding of Mc- 
Kendree College, and was a 
member of its first Board 
of Trustees. Since its first 
founding one or more mem- 
bers of the Horner family 
have always been in some 
way connected with the col- 
lege. Henry spent his youth 
m his native town and at 
the age of sixteen entered 
college. He graduated in 
the class of 1841 with the 
degree of A. B. and later received the Master's Degree. He 
was the salutatorian of his class. He belonged to the Philo- 
sophian Literary Society. After his graduation Mr. Horner 
taught school at Hillsboro, Illinois; was principal of Brandon 
Academy in Mississippi, for one year; and was professor of 
ancient languages in McKendree for the year 1844-45. He 
then turned his attention to law, which was his principal 
vocation for the remainder of his life. In 186'; he was chosen 
Dean of the McKendree Law School and remained in this 
position till 1889. At different times in his career he held the 
offices of City Attorney and Mayor of Lebanon, State's At- 
torney, and Master in Chancery. He was married November 
19, 1857 to Helen M. Danforth. Their children were Roland 
Henry, 'Wilbur Nathan, Walter Sargeant, Lottie M., Hattie 
Hypes, and Bertha Adele. Of these the third and fourth died 
in childhood. The others were all students in McKendree, 
and three of them graduated. Mr. Horner finished his long 
life in his native town, and died September 21, 1902. 
WILLIAM T. LUCKY 
William Thomas, son of Enoch and Mildred Lucky, was 
horn in Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Kentucky, April 24, 



JUDGE HORNER 

Former Dean of McKendree Law 

School 



1821. He entered McKendree m i8:,7 and graduated m 1841, 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He later received the 
Master's Degree. He was a member of the Philosophian So- 
ciety. He united with the Methodist church in 1840, and 
later became a minister of the gospel, but his life was spent 
in educational work rather than the pastorate. From 1841 to 
1844 he served his alma mater as principal of the preparatory 
department. From that time till 1852 he was principal of 
Howard high school, Fayette, Missouri. In 1852 he became 
president of Howard Female College m the same city, which 
position he held until 1861 . He then went to the Pacific Coast 
and became president of the Pacific Methodist College at 
Vacaville, California. Here he remained till 1867 when he 
became principal of Lincoln School, San Francisco. In 1868 
he was made principal of the State Normal School at San 
Jose, and in 187}, was chosen principal of the Los Angeles 
high school. He was married August 29, 1844 to Mary Jane 
Scarritt. Their children were Laura Ellet, Mary Cornelia, 
Edward Merrill, William Scarritt, and Arthur Mason. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the Pacific 
Methodist College in 1868, and from McKendree in i860, He 
died in San Francisco, CaHfornia, October 21, 1876. 
JOHNSON PIERSON 
Johnson Pierson was born June 24, 1814, in Ohio County, 
Virginia. He grew up on a farm and his early education was 
acquired in his native state. In i8_^5 he emigrated with his 
father's family to Burlington, Iowa. In i8j7 he entered Mc- 
Kendree, and graduated in the class of 1841. He was one of 
the founders of the Philosophian Literary Society. He was 
married October 28, 1841 to Miss Martha I. Howard of 
Lebanon. Their surviving children are J. L. and G. D. Pierson 
of St. Louis, and one daughter, Mrs. Robert Cameron of Chi- 
cago. After leaving college he was employed until 184-; as 
Principal of the Mt. Vernon Academy. He was then elected 
to the chair of Ancient Languages m the Iowa Wesleyan 
University at Mt. Pleasant, which position he held for four 
years. From 1852 to 1855 he was editor of the "Burlington 
Hawkeye." During the Civil War he was Commissioner of 
the Draft for the First Congressional District of Iowa. In 
1872 he became postal clerk in the U. S. mail service, from 
which work he was retired in 1885 on account of having 
reached the age limit. He spent much time in literary work, 
writing both prose and poetry. One of his published books 
IS an epic poem reciting the history of the Jewish people, 
entitled the "Judiad." He died at St. Louis in 1907 at the 
advanced age of ninety-three. 



One Hundred and TwentyJimi 



Imc KENDREE"^^^^^^^^....^^.^^ 



JEREMIAH G. JOHNSON 

Jeremiah G. Johnson, adopted son of Jeremiah and Esther 
Johnson, was born in St. Louis, November 3, 1822. He lived 
a brief but beautiful life. He was one of those noble souls 
capable of appreciating the joys of learning and the beauties 
of classical literature. He graduated in 1841 with the first 
honors of the class, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He was one of the founders of the Philosophian Literary 
Society. His body was not sufficiently vigorous to sustain the 
mighty intellect with which he had been endowed, and his 
health soon failed. He studied law, but did not live to fulfill 
the exceeding promise of his youth. He died a triumphant 
Christian death in Lebanon, IlHnois, August jo, 1845. His 
body was laid to rest in Ckjllege Hill cemetery where his 
weather beaten grave stone may still be seen with the in- 
scription on it still quite legible. 

ELI ROBINSON 

Eli Robinson was born in South Carolina in 181 "j. He was 
the son of a pioneer Methodist preacher who greatly desired 
to give his son a thorough education; but death claimed him 
before this ambition could be gratified. Through the influence 
of his father's friends the son found shelter and kind benefac- 
tors in the home of Nathan Horner of Lebanon, one of the 
original trustees of McKendree College, who, having but one 
son of his own (Henry H. Horner) to educate, with generous 
disposition furnished a good home and provided tuition fees 
for this orphan youth who was seeking an education. He 
graduated from McKendree in 1841 with the degree of A. B. 
He was a member of the Philosophian Society. He taught 
school several years after his graduation, and then studied 



law with Judge Wm. H. Underwood of Belleville. He suc- 
ceeded well in his chosen profession. Some years after we hear 
of him at Hastings, Minnesota, where he had an elegant home 
and his family consisted of his wife and two children, Frank 
and Ollie. Here he was visited by John L. Scripps of Chicago, 
who knew many of his early acquaintances at McKendree. 
Mr. Robinson died at Sioux City, Iowa, October 19, 1878. 
His son Frank having died some years before, he left only his 
daughter, Mrs. Ollie O'Connor. 

WILLIAM WEER 
William Weer was born in Philadelphia, December 20, 
1824. He graduated from McKendree in 1841 with the degree 
of A. B. He was a member of the Philosophian Society. One 
who knew him in his college days says, "He was a quiet stu- 
dious young man, avoiding all social life. His books were his 
closest companions." After leaving college he spent two years 
in the Rocky Mountains, hunting, fishing, and living the sim- 
ple outdoor life that enabled him to recover the health which 
he had lost in his overstudious college life. He studied law 
and practiced his profession in the state of Kansas. He was 
a member of the Kansas Senate, and State Constitutional con- 
vention. At the beginning of the Civil War he became Col- 
onel of the loth Regiment of Kansas Volunteers. After the 
war he located at Wyandotte, Kansas, where he died in 1866. 
He was married to Gloriana Harrison. Their children were 
Mary and Elizabeth, the latter of whom died in infancy. Mr. 
Weer was said to so greatly resemble his classmate, Henry 
H. Horner, in personal appearance, that they might easily be 
mistaken for brothers. 




Former President's Home. Built in 



One Hundred and Thnty 



MC KENDREE 



CHAPTER IX. 

College Charters 



IN THE EARLY history of the state the legislature was 
very suspicious of all corporations. For a long time it 
seemed very doubtful whether any college would be 
granted a charter. But President Akers, as well as the presi- 
dents of other schools then in operation, was active in pre- 
senting to the legislative body the claims for recognition of 
higher institutions of learning. Finally in the session of 183,5 
the assembled wisdom of the state, in a fit of literary and 
religious toleration, passed an omnibus bill, providing in one 
act charters for four colleges. One for the Methodists at 
Lebanon, one for the Presbyterians at Jacksonville, one for 
the Baptists at Alton, and another at Jonesboro, which how- 
ever did not develop into a college as the others did, if indeed 
it was ever in active operation at all. This legislation was 
passed at Vandalia where the capital was then located, in 
the building which was then a pretentious state capitol, and 
now serves as the court house of Fayette County. The orig- 
inal bill very neatly engrossed, may now be seen in the 
archives of the present state house at Springfield. It is of 
interest in educational circles because it was the first college 
charter granted by the great state of Illinois which now has 
more than a score of colleges and three great universities. We 
therefore give the complete text of this bill for the benefit of 
those who may be interested in reading it. The committee 
to which the bill was referred, in considering the matter, 
proposed three questions concerning it as follows: 

1. Are institutions of this character really needed in the 
state? 

2. Is It important to their success that the trustees who 
manage them should become corporate bodies? 

3. Can corporate powers be granted with safety to the 
public interests? 

After lengthy discussion they answered all three questions 
in the aiBrmative and recommended the passage of the bill. 
FIRST CHARTER 

An act to incorporate the colleges therein named. In force 
February 19, 1835. 

Section I . Beit enacted by the people of the state of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: That Hubbell Loomis, 
Benjamin F. Edwards, Stephen Griggs, George Smith, Enoch 
Long, Cyrus Edwards, and William Manning, and their suc- 
cessors, be, and they are hereby created a body politic and 
corporate, to be styled and known by the name of "The 
trustees of the Alton College of Illinois," and by that style 



and name to remain and have perpetual succession. The said 
college shall remain at or near Upper Alton in the county of 
Madison. The number of trustees shall not exceed fifteen, 
exclusive of the president, principal, or presiding officer of 
the college, who shall, ex-officio, be a member of the board 
of trustees ; no other instructor shall be a member of the board 
of trustees. For the present, the above named individuals 
shall constitute the board of trustees, who shall fill the re- 
maining vacancies at their discretion. 

Section 2. That Samuel D. Lockwood, WiUiam C. Posey, 
John P. Wilkinson, Theron Baldwin, John F. Brooks, Elisha 
Jenny, William Kirby, Asa Turner, John G. Bergen, John 
Tillson, Jr., and Gideon Blackburn and their successors, be, 
and they are hereby created a body corporate and politic, by 
the name of "The trustees of Illinois College," and by that 
style and name to remain permanently located in Morgan 
County; the number of trustees shall not exceed fifteen, ex- 
clusive of the president, principal, or presiding officer of the 
college, who shall ex-officio be a member of the board ot trus- 
tees; no other instructor shall be a member of the board of 
trustees. For the present, the aforesaid individuals shall con- 
stitute the board of trustees, who shall fill the remaining 
vacancies at their discretion. 

Section 3. That John Dew, Samuel H. Thompson, James 
Riggin, Nicholas Horner, George Lowe, Robert Moore, The- 
ophilus M. Nichols, Joshua Barnes, Samuel Stites, David L. 
West, Nathan Horner, Joseph Foulke, Thornton Peeples. 
John S. Barger, Nathaniel M. McCurdy, Anthony W. Casad, 
and Benjamin Hypes, and their successors, be, and they are 
hereby created a body politic and corporate, to be styled and 
known by the name of "The trustees of the McKendrean 
College," and by that style and name to remain and have 
perpetual succession; the said college shall remain located at 
or near Lebanon in the county of St. Clair; the number of 
trustees shall not exceed eighteen, exclusive of the president, 
principal, or presiding officer of the college, who shall, ex- 
officio, be a member of the board of trustees; no other in- 
structor shall be a member of the board of trustees. For the 
present the aforesaid individuals shall constitute the board 
of trustees, who shall fill the remaining vacancies at their 
discretion. 

Article 4. That B. W. Brooks, Augustus Rixleben, Win- 
stead Davie, John S. Hacker, Daniel Spencer, WiUis Willard, 
John W. McGuire, Thomas Sands, James P. Edwards, John 



One Hundred and Thirty-One 



Baltzell, William C. Whitlock, and Isaac Bizzle, and their 
successors, be, and they are hereby created a body poHtic 
and corporate, to be styled and known by the name of "The 
trustees of the Jonesborough College," and by that style and 
name to remain and have perpetual succession; the said col- 
lege shall remain located at or near Jonesborough, in the 
county of Union. The number of trustees shall not exceed 
fifteen, exclusive of the president, principal, or presiding oifi' 
cer of the college, who shall, ex-officio be a member of the 
board of trustees. For the present, the aforesaid individuals 
shall constitute the board of trustees, who shall fill the re- 
maining vacancies at their discretion. 

Article i. The object of said corporation shall be the 
promotion of the general interests of education, and to qualify 
young men to engage in the several employments and pro- 
fessions of society, and to discharge honorably and usefully 
the various duties of lite. 

Article 6. The corporate powers hereby bestowed shall 
be such only as are essential or useful in the attainment of 
said object, and such as are usually conferred on similar bodies 
corporate, namely; to have perpetual succession, to make 
contracts, to sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, to 
grant and receive by its corporate name, and to do all other 
acts as natural persons may, to accept, acquire, purchase or 
sell property, real, personal and mixed, in all lawful ways; 
to use, employ, manage, and dispose of all such property, and 
all money belonging to said corporation, in such manner as 
shall seem to the trustees best adapted to promote the objects 
aforementioned; to have a common seal and to alter or change 
the same; to make such by-laws for its regulation as are not 
inconsistent with the Constitution and laws of the United 
States or of this state, and to confer on such persons as may 
be considered worthy, such academical or honorary degrees 
as are usually conferred by similar institutions. 

Section 7. The trustees of the respective corporations 
shall have authority, from time to time, to prescribe and reg- 
ulate the course of studies to be pursued in said colleges, and 
in the preparatory departments attached thereto; to fix the 
rate of tuition, room rent and other college expenses, to ap- 
point instructors and such other officers and agents as may 
be needed in managing the concerns of the institution, to 
define their powers, duties and employments, to fix their com- 
pensation, to displace and remove either of the instructors, 
officers, or agents, as said trustees shall deem the interests of 
the said colleges shall require, to fill all vacancies among said 
instructors, officers and agents, to erect necessary buildings, 
to purchase books and chemical and philosophical apparatus, 



and other suitable me.ms of instruction, to put in operation 
a system of manual labor, for the purpose of lessening the 
expense of education and promoting the health of the stu- 
dents; to make rules for the general management of the affairs 
of the college, and for the regulation of the conduct of the 
students, and to add, as the ability of the said organization 
shall increase, and the interest of the community shall require, 
additional departments for the study of any or all of the lib- 
eral professions: Provided, however, that nothing herein con- 
tained shall authorize the establishment of a theological de- 
partment in either of said colleges. 

Section 8. If any trustee shall be chosen president of the 
college, his former place as trustee shall be considered vacant, 
and his place filled by the remaining trustees. The trustees, 
for the time being, shall have power to remove any trustee 
for any dishonorable or criminal conduct : Provided, however, 
that no such removal shall take place without giving to such 
trustee, notices of the charges exhibited against him, and an 
opportunity to defend himself before the board, nor unless 
that two-thirds of the whole number of trustees, for the time 
being, shall concur in such removal. The trustees for the time 
being, in order to have perpetual succession, shall have pow- 
er, as often as a trustee shall be removed from office, die, 
resign, or remove out of the State, to appoint a resident of 
the state to fill the vacancy in the board of trustees occasioned 
by such removal from office, death, resignation, or removal 
from the State. A majority of the trustees, for the time being 
shall be a quorum to do business. 

Section 9. The trustees shall faithfully apply all funds by 
them collected, according to their best judgment, in erecting 
suitable buildings, in supporting the necessary instructors, 
officers, and agents, in procuring books, maps, charts, globes, 
philosophical, chemical, and other apparatus, necessary to aid 
in the promotion of sound learning in their respective insti- 
tutions: Provided, that in case any donation, devise or be- 
quest shall be made for particular purposes, accordant with 
the object of the institution, and the trustees shall accept 
the same, every such donation, devise, or bequest shall he 
applied in conformity with the express condition of the donor 
or devisor: Provided, also, that lands donated or devised as 
aforesaid, shall be sold or disposed of as required by the 
twelfth section of this act. 

Section 10. The treasurers of said colleges always, and 
all other agents when required by the trustees, before enter- 
ing upon the duties of their appointments, shall give bond 
for the security of the corporation, in such penal sum and 
with such securities as the bo;ird of trustees shall approve; 



One Hundred and Tl. irt3r.T«.o 



i 



and all process against the said corporation shall be by sum- 
mons, and the serving ot the same shall be by leaving .m 
attested copy with the treasurer of the college, at least thirty 
days before the return day thereof. 

Section II. The said colleges and their preparatory de- 
partments shall be open to all denominations of Christians, 
and the profession of any particular religious faith shall not 
be required of those who become students; all persons, how- 
ever, may be suspended or expelled from said institutions, 
whose habits are idle or vicious, or whose moral character 
is bad. 

Section 12. The lands, tenements, and hereditaments, to 
be held in perpetuity, in virtue of this act, by either of said 
corporations, shall not exceed six hundred and forty acres: 
Provided, however, that if donations, grants, or devises in 
land shall, from time to time, be made to either of said cor- 
porations, over and above six hundred and forty acres, which 
may be held in perpetuity as aforesaid, the same may be 
received and held by such corporation for the period of three 
years from the date of every such donation, grant or devise; 
at the end of which time, if the said lands over and above 
the said six hundred and forty acres shall not have been sold 
by the said corporation, then, and in that case, the said lands 
so donated, granted, or devised, shall revert to the donor, 
grantor, or the heirs of the devisor of the same. 

Approved February q, 183^. 

When Rev. John W. Merrill came to the presidency m 
January, 183,8, he surveyed the field and the prospects and 
possibilities of the college and decided that it ought to have 
a new charter granting larger privileges and providing for the 
establishment of schools of theology, law, and medicine, if 
at any time such enlargement seemed expedient. He had just 
completed his course in Andover School of Theology, and 
probably dreamed of a new Harvard being developed here in 
the Mississippi Valley. On New Year's day, 1839, a meeting 
of the board was held at the home of John C. Gore, at which 
a committee of three was appointed "to attend the State 
Legislature and secure, if possible, the passage of an act pro- 
viding such amendment as it is desirable should be made to 
the college charter." The committee consisted of Professor 
William Brown of the McKendree Faculty, Rev. Benjamin 
T. Kavanaugh, the college agent, and Rev. Samuel H. Thomp- 
son, one of the trustees. The committee went at once to 
Springfield, where the Legislature was then in session. This 
was the first session of the Legislature held at Springfield. 
The final adjournment at Vandalia occurred July 22, 1837, 
and the business of state was formally transferred to Spring- 



field, the new capital. Bv permission of that body, Professor 
Brown delivered two lectures in the H ill of Representatives 
which seem to have been well received as they were ordered 
printed and five thousand copies distributed to the public at 
the expense of the state. The second of these was a direct 
argument for granting a new charter to McKendree. He set 
forth at length the present prosperous condition of the col- 
lege and its promise of much greater usefulness in the future, 
provided it receive a more liberal charter. The bill framed for 
this purpose was passed without delay and with very slight 
opposition and was approved January 26, 1839. 
REVISED CHARTER 

An act to incorporate the McKendree College, approved 
January 26, 1839. 

Section I. Be It enacted by the people of the State of 
Illinois, represented in the General Assembly: That William 
Wilson, Samuel H. Thompson, Thornton Peeples, John S. 
Barger, Benjamin Hypes, Hiram K. Ashley, Joshua Barnes, 
James Riggin, Nathan Horner, Benjamin T. Kavanaugh, The- 
ophilus Nichols, Crispin Cunningham, John Hogan, Jesse 
Renfro, Benjamin M. Bond, and Alexander N. Jenkins, and 
their successors in office, be, and they are hereby created a 
body politic and corporate, under the name and style of the 
"McKendree College" and henceforth shall be styled and 
known by that name, and by that style and name have per- 
petual succession. The number of trustees shall not exceed 
eighteen, exclusive of the president, principal, or presiding 
officer of the college, who shall ex-officio be a member of the 
board of trustees. No other instructor shall be a member of 
said board: Provided, however, that the board of trustees by 
a majority of two- thirds, at their annual meeting may increase 
the number of said trustees to any number not exceeding 
thirty-six. For the present, the aforesaid individuals shall con- 
stitute the board of trustees, who shall at their discretion fill 
the remaining vacancies, and such as may hereafter be created 
should the number be increased. 

Section 2. The object of said corporation shall be the 
promotion of the general interest of education, and to qualify 
young men to engage in the several employments and pro- 
fessions of society, and to discharge honorably and usefully 
the various duties of life. 

Section 3. The corporate powers hereby bestowed shall 
be such only as are essential and useful in the attainment of 
said object, and such as are usually conferred on similar cor- 
porate bodies, namely: to have perpetual succession, to make 
contracts, to sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, to 
grant and receive by its corporate name, and to do all other 




acts as natural persons may; to accept, acquire, purchase or 
sell property, real, personal, and mixed, in all lawful ways; 
to use, employ, manage, and dispose of all such property and 
all money belonging to said corporation, in such manner as 
shall seem to the trustees best adapted to promote the object 
aforementioned; to have a common seal, and to alter and 
change the same; to make such bylaws for the regulation of 
the corporation as are not inconsistent with the laws and 
constitution of the United States, or of this state, and to 
confer on such persons as may be considered worthy, such 
academical or honorary degrees as are usually conferred by 
similar institutions. 

Section 4. The trustees shall have authority from time 
to time to prescribe and regulate the course of study to be 
perused in said college, and the preparatory department at- 
tached thereto; to fix the rate of tuition, room rent, and other 
college expenses; to appoint the president of the institu- 
tion and other members of the faculty, and such other 
instructors, officers, and agents, as may be needed in manag- 
ing the concerns of the institution; to define their powers, 
duties and employments; to fix their compensations; to dis- 
place and remove the presidents, and any member of the 
faculty, either of the instructors, officers, or agents; to erect 
necessary buildings, and purchase books and chemical, phil- 
osophical and other apparatus, and other suitable means of 
instruction; to put in operation if the trustees shall deem it 
expedient, a system of manual labor for the purpose of pro- 
moting the health of the students and lessening the expense 
of education; to make rules for the general management of 
the affairs of the college and for the regulation of the conduct 
of the students; and to add as the ability of said corpora 
tion shall increase, and the interest of the community shall 
require, additional departments for the study of any or all 
of the liberal profession. 

Section 5. The trustees shall faithfully apply the funds 
by them collected, according to their best judgment, in erect- 
ing suitable buildings; in purchasing books, maps, charts, 
globes, philosophical, chemical and other apparatus necessary 
to aid in the promotion of sound learning in said institution. 

Section 6. Any donation, devise or bequest, made for the 
special purpose, accordant with the objects of the institution, 
if the trustees shall accept the same, shall be faithfully and 
truly applied in conformity with the express conditions of 
the donor or devisee. The lands, tenements and heredita- 
ments to be held in perpetuity in virtue of this act shall not 
exceed three thousand acres : Provided, however, that grants, 
donations or devises in lands which shall be made from time 



to time to said corporation, may be held for the term of ten 
years from date of such grant, donation or devise ; at the end 
of which time the said lands over and above the before named 
three thousand acres, shall be sold by the corporation; and 
in the case of neglect to sell, said lands so donated shall re- 
vert to the original donor or devisor, or to the lawful heirs 
of the same. 

Section 7. The treasurer and other officers of the insti- 
tution, when required by the trustees, shall give bond for 
the security of the corporation, in such penalty and with 
such security as the board shall approve; and all processes 
against said corporation shall be by summons and service of 
the same by leaving an attested copy with the treasurer at 
least thirty days before the return thereof. 

Section 8. The trustees shall have power to establish 
departments for the study of any of the liberal professions, 
particularly law and medicine, and to institute and grant 
diplomas in the same; to constitute and confer the degrees 
of doctor in the learned arts and sciences and belles lettres, 
and to confer such other academic degrees as are usually con- 
ferred by the most learned universities. 

Section 9. Said trustees shall have power to institute a 
board of competent persons, always including the faculty, 
who shall examine such persons as may apply; and if said 
applicants are found to possess such knowledge, pursued in 
said college as, in the judgment of said examiners renders them 
worthy, they may be considered graduates in course, and shall 
be entitled to a diploma accordingly, on paying such fee as the 
trustees shall affix; which fee however shall in no case exceed 
the tuition bills of the full college course. Said examining 
board may not exceed the number of ten, three of whom 
may transact business provided one be of the faculty. 

Section 10. In its different departments the college shall 
be open to all denominations of Christians, and the profession 
of any religious faith shall not be required in order for ad- 
mission; but those students who are idle or vicious, or whose 
characters are immoral, may be suspended or expelled. 

Section 11. Said college shall remain located at or near 
Lebanon, in the county of St. Clair, State of Illinois. The 
trustees shall hold at least one meeting in each year for busi- 
ness, and may appoint other stated meetings of the board; 
(special meetings may at any time be held by order of the 
president of the board), ten of whom shall constitute a quo- 
rum to do business; and it shall be lawful for the Illinois 
annual conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church to ap- 
point annually a board of visitors consisting of nine persons, 
who shall have power to sit with the board of trustees at 




One Hundred and Thirty-Foii 



I 



their annual meetings and participate with them exofficio as 
members of the board. 

Section 12. Hereafter the filling of vacancies in the hoard 
of trustees and the appointment of the president of the col- 
lege, professors, and tutors, shall be made only at the annual 
meetings as provided in the eleventh section of this act: 
Provided, that the trustees may fill vacancies in the profes- 
sorships, or employ additional professors or tutors, when 
necessary, until the succeeding annual meeting. 

Section 13. In cases of the division of the Illinois Annual 
Conference into two or more conferences of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, or if any other annual conference of the 
said Methodist Episcopal Church, shall unite with the said 
Illinois Annual Conference in the patronage and support of 
the said college, each annual conference thus patronizing said 
college shall have the same powers and privileges granted in 
this act to the said Illinois Annual Conference: Provided, 
that said visitors shall at no time exceed the number of trus- 
tees; and should it so occur by the increase of patronage that 
the number of visitors herein provided for shall exceed m 
number that of the trustees, the ratio of visitors shall be by 
the trustees so fixed as to limit the whole number of visitors 
to that of the number of trustees of said college. 

Section 14. The alteration of the name of the institution 
shall not affect the title to any property acquired by the 
institution heretofore but the title to such estate shall be 
vahd to the institution under the name set forth in this act, 
whether made to the same, or under the name and style of 
"The trustees of the McKendrean College," or "The trustees 
of McKendree College," that all contracts made with said 
corporation, whether made under the name of "The trustees 
of the McKendrean College or "The trustees of McKendree 
College" shall enure as well for as against said corporation 
under the name and style of "The McKendree College." 



Section 15. If any trustee shall be chosen president of 
the college, his former place as trustee shall be vacated and 
his place filled by the remaining trustees and visiting com- 
mittee as hereinbefore provided. The trustees for the time 
being shall have power to remove any trustee tor any dis- 
honorable or criminal conduct: Provided, that no such re- 
moval shall take place without giving to such trustee notice 
of charges against him, and an opportunity to defend himself 
before the board, nor unless that two-thirds of the whole 
number of trustees for the time being shall concur in said 
removal 

Section i6. This act shall be in force from and after the 
time at which the trustees of the McKendrean College shall 
accept the same, and the evidence of said acceptance shall 
be a copy of the order of the board ordering this act to be 
spread upon their journals, certified by the president and 
secretary of the board. 

Section 17. Should the corporation at any time act con' 
trary to the provisions of this charter, or fail to comply with 
the same, upon complaint made to the Circuit Court of St. 
Clair County, a scire facias shall issue and the Circuit Court 
of St. Clair County shall prosecute in behalf of the people 
of this state for a forfeiture of this charter. This act shall be 
a public act and shall be construed liberally in all courts for 
the purposes hereinbefore expressed, and so far as this insti- 
tution is concerned, all acts, as far as they may be contradic- 
tory to this act, are hereby repealed. 

Under this charter the college has worked for nearly ninety 
years and it still seems sufficient for our needs. It conferred 
no degrees under the first charter. The Illinois Conference 
is mentioned frequently, but according to the provisions in 
the charter itself the Southern Illinois Conference has all the 
rights and privileges originally granted to the conference 
which held the territory at that time. 




The Campus in Winter 



One Hundred and Thirty-Fife 



£^l^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 



CHAPTER X. 

College Finances 



w 



'HE YEAR 1839 marks the beginning of an interesting 
era in McKendree's history. The school was just com- 
; into collegiate rank. The faculty were college grad- 
uates, and the president had completed a three year post 
graduate course just before he took charge. A class of earnest 
young men were doing real college work, on a par with that 
done in the eastern colleges. There was a general feeling 
among the constituents that now they actually had a college 
after these ten years of strenuous but sometimes poorly or- 
ganized effort. In the conference session of 1837 ^^ was voted 
that the part of Bishop McKendree's bequest that would fall 
to the Illinois Conference for the promotion of education, 
should be reserved until "a literary institution shall be pre- 
sented over which this conference shall exercise control and 
supervision." The next year the conference passed resolution 
recommending that the Bible be made a prominent text book 
in the college. After the new charter was granted, President 
Merrill organized a class in the New Testament, which was 
appreciated by the members of the conference, many of whom 
felt that the principal reason for having a college was for the 
religious training of the youth. After the graduating exercise 
of 1841, which was considered a great literary triumph and 
was heralded far and wide as a demonstration of what the 
college could do for the young men in her care, the conference 
was highly elated and enthusiastically passed this resolution, 
"That we feel the deepest gratitude for that high literary 
reputation unto which McKendree College, under divine 
Providence, has attained, and that we will sustain the college, 
God being wiUing." This would indicate that they were no 
longer ashamed of their college, but rather proud of it. Re- 
vivals occurred there. Preaching services were held in the 
chapel, not only on Sundays, but on week days also. So that 
now its reputation seemed fairly well established as a reli- 
gious institution. The class of 1841 established its reputation 
from the literary standpoint. 

The charter, granted in 1839, was a recognition by the 
state authorities that its standards were such as could be 
commended to the general public. In fact, the charter was 
considered one of the chief factors in the success which imme- 
diately followed its issue. If it should grow into a great uni- 
versity it would need no enlargement of its corporate powers 
Under this charter it could confer any degree that Harvard 
or Yale could. When the news first came to Lebanon that the 
new charter had been granted, both the college and the town 



were stirred with enthusiasm and there was great rejoicing. 
The trustees had a meeting and ordered a grand illumination 
of the college building. Professor Sunderland, as the science 
man, was placed in charge of this part of the celebration. A 
meeting of the citizens was called and there were speeches 
and mutual congratulations. 

At this time also the financial prospects were very encour- 
aging. An endowment of $50,000 was fully subscribed, in the 
form of notes for $500 each, given by the subscribers, with 
interest at ten per cent payable semiannually. This was con- 
sidered ample for an institution of that size. The faculty con- 
sisted of only five members and their salary was from six 
hundred to eight hundred dollars a year. A writer of that 
period speaks of the situation as follows: "Young and enthu- 
siastic men were in the faculty, and everything promised great 
success and glory. It must be confessed that affliirs did show 
considerable signs of promise. The president was a learned 
man and an enthusiast in his department. The professors were 
well educated, full of vigor and as enthusiastic as the presi' 
dent. The field agent was active and shrewd, and could prove 
to every man who would subscribe for a scholarship, that the 
investment would be profitable." 

The first financial movement in the history of McKendree 
was the effort to raise a fund for founding an institution of 
higher learning. The original plan was the formation of a 
stock company. The most of the subscribers took one share 
each, tho several took more, and in one case two women took 
a single share in partnership. The idea was that each stock 
holder who so desired might receive dividends on their in- 
vestment m tuitions or other privileges. The money was used 
in the erection of the first building. The income of the school 
with which to pay teachers' salaries and other expenses was 
confined to the tuition fees from students whose fathers 
were not stock-holders. Of course this proved entirely inade- 
quate. Almost from the beginning, at any rate, after the Illi- 
nois Conference had taken over the school, one or more agents 
were appointed each year to travel thruout the territory and 
solicit funds for current expenses. Of course the agent's salary 
had to be paid out of his collections. 

In 1836, an elaborate scheme was devised for endowing 
the college. Rev. Benjamin T. Kavanaugh was appointed 
agent and was authorized to sell perpetual scholarships for 
either $5ooor$i,oooeach. The holder ofa five hundred dollar 
scholarship w,is entitled to send one pupil free of tuition 




One Hundred and Th 



MC KENDREE 



forever. Or for ,i thousand dolLir scholarship, he might 
send one pupil free of tuition, room, and board forever. In 
lieu of the cash which very few of the people ot that day 
had m the bank, he was authorized to accept the subscriber's 
note bearing ten percent interest and payable in ten years. 
The agent was also to collect money in hundred dollar sub- 
scriptions for the endowment of a "John Emory Professor- 
ship" m the college. Another line ot business he handled was 
to receive money from any person to be invested in Illinois 
lands, one half for the college and half for the person furnish- 
ing the money. Or by another plan the donor of the money 
was to have title to all the land, but its increase in value for 
the first five years was to belong to the college. At that time 
a national railroad was headed toward Illinois, and it was 
believed there would be an immense increase in the value 
of lands on that account. But President Andrew Jackson ve- 
toed the railroad bill, the land did not rise in value to any 
considerable extent, the rosy hopes of wealth from the un- 
earned increment were blasted, and the land purchase plan 
of endowment proved a dismal failure. 

However, by iSjg, one hundred of the five hundred dollar 
perpetual scholarships had been sold, or rather most of them 
had been exchanged for five hundred dollar notes bearing ten 
percent interest, payable semiannually. This, according to the 
figures, would produce an income of five thousand dollars a 
year besides what might be received from tuition fees paid 
by the students. This was a splendid outlook. The college 
seemed permanently endowed. But these notes were not due 
for ten years, and the signers were scattered over a wide 
area which made collections expensive. Then hard times came 
on. The veto of the national road and the United States Bank 
Charter hindered the progress of this new country and made 
its development very slow. Money was hard to get even for 
necessities and so many of the signers of the notes were not 
disposed to pay even the interest. Within a period of two 
years the whole scheme was compromised by exchanging the 
five hundred dollar notes for two hundred dollar ones, still 
payable in ten years, and thus at one blow reducing the 
$50,000 endowment to $20,000, and owing to the continu- 
ance of hard times and financial stringency, even these latter 
notes, for the most part, were never collected. So that the 
bubble burst and left the college burdened with debt and 
disappointment. 

The fallacy of the whole plan was evident when it was 
observed that the college promised tuition, room and inci- 
dentals, to the amount of $61.50 a year to each holder of a 
scholarship and enacted from him only the interest on five 



hundred dollars which amounted to $50 a year. Therefore 
the college was borrowing money at twelve and a half percent 
and loaning it at ten and at the same time paying agents to 
go thru the country to borrow the money and collect the 
interest. So it was very clear that the more of that kind of 
endowment the college had, the worse off it was. According- 
ly, the plan of endowment by scholarships was abandoned, 
at least for the time. When Dr. Wentworth came to take 
charge of the institution in 1846, he said it was "thatched 
over with mortgages," and had no means of paying its debts 
or current expenses. Therefore, the professors were placed 
on allowances paid by the churches, instead of salaries paid 
by the college. In 1854, after the former experience had been 
in some degree forgotten, another scholarship plan was de- 
vised, which was, if possible, worse than the previous one. 
This proposed to sell two classes of scholarships: one for $50, 
giving the holder seven years of free tuition; and one for $100, 
giving twenty years of free tuition. The holders of the first 
class were to receive in tuition fees the equivalent of fifty 
percent per annum on the money invested, or three hundred 
and fifty percent by the time the money had to be paid in. 
The other class were to receive only twenty-five percent, but 
continuing for twenty years. So that in the end the college 
would return to the purchaser of the scholarship five hundred 
percent of his investment. Probably the men who initiated 
this plan thought they were offering a business proposition 
to the public. At least there was one good thing about it. 
They were offering educational bargains, and thus diffusing 
culture among the people. Of course it was a hard bargain 
for the college and the result was more sacrifice on the part 
of the faculty or more debts for the college. But the old college 
had always stood by its end of the contract even tho it was 
a bad bargain. The trustees never even consulted a lawyer 
about the possibility of finding a legal way of escape from 
such a one-sided contract. The scholarships that were limited 
to twenty years have all expired, but of course the perpetual 
ones of the earlier series never would expire. Efforts have 
been made by committees of the trustees from time to time 
to secure the surrender of these perpetual scholarships and 
most of them have been so surrendered, however there are 
a few still m the possession of the descendants of the pur- 
chaser. One provision was that it was only valid for the use 
of the purchaser or his lineal discendants. On account of this 
provision, not many of them were ever used, and none have 
been presented for many years, tho one is known to exist in 
the family of Dr. Thomas Stanton, who was one of the orig- 
inal "managers," and who died at Alton many years ago. In 




One Hundred and Thim-Sei 



the early history of the college, the financial agent was an 
important officer. One or more was appointed by the con- 
ference the same as members of the faculty. Professor William 
Brown serving as agent, at one time undertook to raise a fund 
of $10,000 for the education of preachers' children. He suc- 
ceeded in getting about $6,000 of it subscribed and a part of 
it was actually paid in, though in all probability not more 
than enough to pay the expense of his agency. One year the 
conference appointed two agents, one to solicit funds in Illi- 
nois and the other in any territory outside of Illinois. One 
year an agent was authorized to go to England to secure funds 
for the college, however the records show no evidence that 
he ever went. In 1S4S, Rev. William H. Milburn was ap- 
pointed agent for McKen- 
dree and instructed to go to 
the eastern states, where 
wealth was more abundant, 
in quest of funds. He was 
then a very earnest young 
man in frail health and al- 
most blind. He had secured 
his education in the face of 
almost insuperable difficul- 
ties . Having defective vision 
in one eye, a surgical opera- 
tion was attempted to re- 
move the disability. An 
accident during the oper- 
ation resulted in a total 
loss of his good eye and left him with only a remnant of 
vision in the other. But in spite of this handicap, he had 
gone thru college as far as the senior year, when his health 
broke down and he gave up the idea of getting his degree. 
But he did not let this deter him from entering the ministry. 
When he started on this mission for McKendree he soon 
found himself travelling up the Ohio River on a steamboat 
which had three hundred passengers on board. Among them 
were a group of western congressmen on their way to Wash- 
ington. Altho young Milburn could not see much, he kept 
his ears open and thus learned much about the habits of these 
national representatives of the people. He was quite shocked 
at their vile conduct. When Sunday came he was invited to 
preach on the boat. He did so. Since the congressmen were 
anxious for the best of everything in the way of privilege, 
they occupied the front seats. They were a little curious to 
know what the young preacher would have to say. His ser- 
mon was full eloquence and pathos which held the attention 




REV. MILBURN 
"the Blind Chaplain" 



of the whole assembly. At the close he said, "Among the 
passengers on this steamer are a number of members of con- 
gress. From their position they should be examples of good 
morals and dignified conduct; but from what I have heard of 
them, they are not so. The union of these states, if dependent 
on such guardians, would be unsafe, and all the high hopes I 
have of the future of my country would be dashed to the 
ground. These gentlemen, for days past, have made the air 
heavy with profane conversation, have been constant patrons 
of the bar and encouragers of intemperance. Nay, more! The 
night, which should be devoted to rest, has been dedicated to 
the horrid vices of gambling, profanity and drunkenness. 
There is but one chance of salvation for these great sinners in 
high places, and that is for them to humbly repent of their 
sins, call on the Saviour for forgiveness, and reform their lives." 
As might be supposed, language so bold from a mere stripling 
twenty-two years of age, had a startling effect and made a 
deep impression on the gentlemen particularly addressed. In 
the afternoon a committee called on the young preacher and 
congratulated him upon his courage for having dared to tell 
the plain truth to sinners in high places. The committee 
assured him that the congressmen had taken his rebuke in 
the right spirit, and as evidence thereof, they handed him a 
purse of money as a mark of their appreciation and at the 
same time assured him that they would make him chaplain 
of Congress. This promise they did not forget, and when he 
was offered the appointment, he accepted and was thus the 
youngest man who ever spoke in the halls of congress. This 
new appointment interfered with his mission in behalf of 
McKendree, but it started him on a great career. In after 
years he became an author and lecturer of wide renown. He 
was known far and wide as "the blind chaplain." 

Another means of raising funds was through the organiza- 
tion of Educational Societies in every charge of the confer- 
ence. For a time this plan was pushed vigorously but after 
some years it seemed to produce in the people a feeling of 
apathy or actual disfavor on account of the constant calls 
for money without apparent return in benefit to the societies 
themselves. Still another plan which was open to the same 
objection was for the Presiding Elder to take a collection each 
quarter in every charge and send it to the college to pay 
teachers' salaries. By this plan the professor was as liable to 
reach the end of the year with a deficit in his salary as was 
the circuit rider. As a matter of fact, it nearly always hap- 
pened that way. 

But there were several times when the college successfully 
appealed to the sense of duty of the people to respond to a 



One Hundred and ThirtyEight 



MC KENDREE 



worthy call for help. One wjs when the building now known 
as "Old Main" was erected. This was during the administra- 
tion of President Wentworth and Rev. William Goodfellow 
was the solicitor. This was done in a period of two or three 
years closing with 1850. Again the same policy was pursued 
when the chapel was built in 1857-58. And again in 1859-60 
when under the direction of President Cobleigh the foun- 
dations were laid for a real endowment. This was the first 
permanent fund raised for the college and was the nucleus of 
the present endowment. In these cases the people were asked 
to make direct contributions to a worthy cause without re- 
ceiving any premium or bonus for their generosity, m the 
form of scholarships. When Dr. M. H. Chamberlin came to 
the presidency in 1894, the endowment was approximately 
$20,000. During his term two legacies came to the college. 
One from the Riggin estate of $14,000 and the other from 
the McCurdy estate of $10,000. After he had succeeded in 
raising the money to pay off a long standing debt of $5,500, 
he set himself the task of raising $100,000 of new endowment. 
This was a long hard task when financial conditions were 
so stringent as they were at that time. He secured a con- 
ditional subscription of $20,000 from Dr. D. K. Pearsons of 
Chicago, and finally after repeated extensions of the time 
allowed he was able to announce m chapel one morning m 
April, 1905, that the last dollar of the $100,000 had been 
subscribed. The enthusiasm ran high. A holiday was declared 
in which to celebrate the victory. A group of students bor- 
rowed Uncle Sam Hill's carriage and a long rope. By means 
of the rope about two dozen boys hitched themselves to the 
carriage and took the president and faculty for a ride around 
town to announce everywhere the glorious news that the 
college had $100,000 of new endowment. That evening there 
was a mass meeting to which all the citizens were invited. 
Enthusiastic speeches were made and extravagant predictions 
of the greatness in store for the old college in the future. The 
students rang the college bell and by a well planned system 
of relays they kept it ringing steadily all night long so that 
its iron tongue was permitted to grow quiet only with the 



coming of the dawn of morning. These subscriptions were.col- 
lected without material shrinkage so that when Dr. Cham- 
berlin retired, the endowment was something over $1 jo,ooo. 
During the term of Dr. John F. Harmon, it was increased to 
a little above $200,000. During the presidency of Dr. George 
E. McCammon, a financial campaign was made under the 
direction of Dr. Hancher with his team of experienced work- 
ers. They set one million and a half as the goal and spent 
about six months in preparing and canvassing the field. The 
goal was not reached, nor near it, but enough was subscribed 
and paid in to claim the $150,000 conditional subscription of 
the General Education Board, which brings the endowment 
to half a million. There are yet some thousands in unpaid sub- 
scriptions and a number of estate notes of which the value 
cannot be definitely known till the death of the giver. When 
these are all settled up, there will probably be another hun- 
dred thousand to add to the total. But the college needs today 
not less than a million dollars of productive endowment, and 
there is a feeling in certain quarters that before the close of 
our Centennial celebration, the friends of the college will 
come forward with enough to make it that figure. At the 
educational convention held at the college in 1868, on the 
fortieth anniversary of its founding, facts were brought out 
to show that up to that time the city of Lebanon and vicinity 
had contributed not less than twenty-four thousand dollars 
for the establishment and maintenance of the institution, 
which was three-fourths of what had been expended for that 
purpose. In 1909 when the charges were making payments on 
the conference note Lebanon subscribed $j,ooo. During the 
last mentioned campaign Lebanon, including the faculty and 
students subscribed $70,000. Of course McKendree has had 
debts. All institutions of that character do have them. They 
are unavoidable. There has been a very small portion of the 
time since her founding that she has not had debts hanging 
over her. At one time her bonded indebtedness amounted 
to as much as $150,000. But that has all been cleared away. 
At present there are no debts except a few current bills, 
but none of long standing. 




Philip Embury's horn now in 
McKendree Museum 



One Hundred and ■Thirty-N" 



IMC KENDREE 



CHAPTER XI. 

President Finley's Administration 



SHE PERIOD from 1S40 to 1850 w.is one of stress and 
strain for the young college, and during that time she 
passed thru one great crisis in her history. As before 
stated, the year 1839 marked a sort of peak of prosperity, 
when the new charter had been granted and the scholarship 
fund of $50,000 had been fully subscribed, which was fondly 
believed at that time to be an endowment which would pro- 
duce an income of $5,000 a year and enable the institution to 
pay Its professors a living salary. So at that time the Board, 
feeling that their financial problems were solved were inclined 
to give attention to certain moral problems which they deemed 
important. In those days the annual Board Meeting was held 
in August, and then, as now, entertainments were given in 
connection with it. Up to that time there had been no 
graduation exercises. One evening some members of the Board 
saw a play presented which was probably somewhat realistic 
and tried to show life as it was lived by the common run of 
humanity. The next day the Board passed the following reso- 
lution : 

"Resolved that the Board disapproves of the exercises held 
last evening, in which were portrayed scenes of wickedness, 
profanity, obscenity, and bloodshed; and that we disallow in 
the future all purely theatrical and immoral exhibitions." 

They voted that the Bible should be used as a text book in 
the college course, and the works of Ovid were stricken from 
the Latin course. The reason for the latter is not stated, but 
it was probably on account of certain passages in the book 
which were considered obscene and improper reading for 
modest young people. 

A feeling against Theological training for the ministry, 
which probably the preachers in that body knew nothing 
about by experience, called forth the following resolution: 

"Since the new charter confers authority to establish a 
Theological Seminary, Therefore, be it resolved, that Theo- 
logical Seminaries are contrary to the genius, the spirit, and 
the institutions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the 
Board is determined that no such department shall ever be 
added to McKendree College. Also we deem it proper that 
the teachers in this college shall be expected to impress no 
sentiments upon the students, adverse to the foregoing reso- 
lution." Only two or three years after the death of Elijah P. 
Lovejoy, at Alton, who was regarded as a martyr to the cause 
of abolition of slavery, we find this resolution in the records: 



"Whereas, the Board of Trustees and Visitors deem the 
advocacy of the cause of abolition, either in the private circle 
or the public assembly, by the agent, teacher, or member of 
the faculty of McKendree to be prejudicial to the best inter- 
ests of the institution, and of the country; therefore, if any 
one of the persons above enumerated shall so advocate the 
cause of abolition, the Board will deem it their duty to them- 
selves, the institution, its supporters, and the country, to 
adopt measures to dispense with the services of such persons." 

Of course we are not to infer from this that the college was 
a pro slavery institution, but it was probably an attempt to 
keep it neutral on a question which was discussed with great 
bitterness of feeling in those days. The next paragraph of the 
record stated that the passages of either of the above resolu- 
tions is not designed in any way to reflect upon the agents. 
teachers, or faculty heretofore employed in the college. 

It was about this time that the matriculation pledge was 
devised. It was a sort of oath of allegiance which had to be 
taken by every member of the student body. Then every stu- 
dent who violated any of the specific rules of the college was 
not only a law breaker, but he was guilty in the first place of 
breaking a solemn pledge to which he had affixed his signature 
with his own hand. This plan of requiring the students to 
"sign their rights away" as some of them have expressed it, 
has been kept up even to very recent years. Formerly the 
pledge was written at the top of every page in the matricula- 
tion register so that each student who wrote his name in the 
book would of necessity sign the pledge. As a matter of con- 
venience the last book of that kind which was provided, was 
made to order for McKendree and had the pledge printed at 
the top of every page. But since it was a printed form very 
few of the students ever re.id it or even looked at it, or were 
conscious m the slightest degree that they were signing a 
pledge at all. 

The pledge may have changed slightly in more recent 
years, but here is the original form of it : 

"I do solemnly promise to the Corporation and the Faculty 
that, during my connection with the institution, I will main- 
tain good moral character, observe quiet and gentlemanly de- 
portment towards all men, settle promptly all my college 
bills, perform to the best of my ability all my regular college 
duties, and cheerfully submit to all college regulations and 



One Hundred and Forlv 



IfMC KENDREE 



President Fmley came to the office m 1S41 atter the resig- 
nation of President Merrill. There was a feeling of great 
disappointment when Dr. Merrill left, but Dr. Finley was of 
more mature age, and highly esteemed in church circles so 
that most people were confident that he would be able to 
guide the precious craft through the shoals and keep her from 
going on the rocks. 

JAMES C. FINLEY 

James C. Finley was born in Somerset County, New 
Jersey, October 10, 1802, and died at Jacksonville, Illinois, 
July 27, 1885. He was reared a Presbyterian, like his parents. 
He received his liberal education at Princeton and then took 
a medical course m Philadelphia. After this he engaged m 
hospital practice for a time m Cincinnati. While m that city 
he was married and then went to Jacksonville, Illinois, where 
he practiced medicine until 183^. About this time he and his 
wife, who was formerly a Baptist, joined the Methodist 
church. Soon after that he abandoned the medical profession 
and entered the Methodist ministry. He was admitted to the 
Mississippi Conference in 1837 '"'"i ^^s transferred to the 
Illinois Conference in 1841. It was at this time that he took 
charge of the college. He was a man of fine ability and thor- 
ough scholarship. He endeavored to maintain the high stand- 
ards of scholarship established by Dr. Merrill, and in this 
he was quite successful, but the financial plan by which the 
college was to be supported, through the interest on the 
scholarships, proved a dismal failure. After four years of 
strenuous effort in which the plan was given a thorough trial. 
Dr. Finley decided that the case was hopeless and went back 
to the pastorate. He transferred to the Rock River Confer- 
ence where he labored for the next six years. In 1851, he re- 
turned to the Illinois Conference. He was again a member of 
the faculty at McKendree as Professor of Greek, for a year, 
just prior to the coming of Dr. Swahlen, in 1865. After that 
he spent one year as President of the Olney Seminary and one 
year in the faculty of the Illinois State Agricultural College 
at Irvington. He then retired and held the superannuate re- 
lation until his death in 1885. He lived at Richview till the 
death of his wife in 1881, and then with his daughter in 
Jacksonville. The Methodist Church in Lebanon has a me- 
morial window m his honor, which shows that he held the 
degrees of A. M. and M. D. 

He served the college at a time when there were extra 
burdens to bear. From the time when he took charge there 
were persistent rumors that the institution would soon be 
obliged to close up. But there was eternal hope in the hearts 
of a few of the trustees which no discouragements could sub- 



due. In 1842, the tees were reduced twenty-five per cent in 
the hope ot attracting more students who did not hold schol- 
arships. At the same time the President's salary was reduced 
to $400 a year to lessen the expenses of the college. Then the 
board ordered that all tuition fees shall be paid in advance 
or secured by note. Each professor was held responsible for 
the enforcement of this rule, and was required to refuse ad- 
mission to his classes to all who had not paid. Yet at the end 
of the year, a committee was appointed to collect unpaid tui- 
tion bills. The committee was instructed to require payment 
in cash or in notes bearing twelve per cent interest. This 
would make it cheaper for students with unpaid bills and no 
money, to borrow money and pay cash. 

In 1843, there was another reduction of salaries for the 
faculty. There was an order to sell all McKendree lands to 
raise money to pay debts. In the same session we also find 
this resolution in the record: 

"Whereas there are many debts pressing upon and humil- 
iating this Board, and whereas it is our ardent desire to relieve 
the college from its embarrassments. Therefore be it resolved, 
that all property not directly needed in carrying on the oper- 
ations of the college, be thrown on the market and offered for 
sale. And that the Executive Committee be requested to at- 
tend to this matter in view of meeting these debts." 

Most of their troubles were financial ones, and they delib- 
erated long and earnestly in the hope of finding the solution 
of their problems. On August 16, 1843, they had a morning 
session, then an afternoon session, then an evening session. 
And the record states that they adjourned at 12:30 A. M. 
August 17. At a meeting in March, 184";, Dr. Finley was 
requested to act as agent in the hope that he might collect 
enough money in the field to "keep the sinking craft afloat." 
It was at the conference session of this year that Rev. W. H. 
Milburn was appointed as agent. Both students and faculty 
were leaving the college as rats do a ship that is about to sink. 
The loss of students, especially from the upper classes, re- 
duced the sue of the graduating classes. The class of 1841 
had seven members. The next year there were five, and the 
next, seven again. But in 1844, there was only one, and in 
1845, but two. Of the faculty that graduated the first class^ 
President Merrill and Professor Brown had gone soon after 
the commencement of 1841 . After another year Professor An- 
nis Merrill left, and the next year. Professor Sunderland. Each 
of these men went away with an unpaid deficit in his salary. 
Their places were supplied by young men who were grad- 
uates of the institution and, of course, with little experience. 
By 184s, there were three McKendree men in the faculty. 



One Hundred and FortvOne 



IMC KENDREE 



Henry H. Homer of class of 1841, George L. Roberts of 1S42, 
and John L. Scripps of 1S44. EH Robinson, 1841, had also 
served in the faculty, but had resigned. In the summer of 
1845, President Finley also resigned and left Professor Rob- 
erts to report the situation to the meeting of the Joint Board. 
Some of the trustees were in favor of closing the school per- 
manently. But others were determined that it should go on. 
Before the meeting adjourned. Rev. Peter Akers, who had 
once before served in that capacity, was recalled to the pres- 
idency, and the young McKendree professors were confirmed 
in their several positions. The school opened as usual in the 
fall of 1845. We have no means of knowing how many stu- 
dents there were, for the records are lost and probably there 
was no catalogue printed. At least there is none now acces- 
sible for that year. But it must have been a discouragingly 
small number. It is likely that most of those who did come 
entered on a scholarship and hence there was no income with 
which to pay a faculty. A special meeting of the Board was 
called for November 17, 184'). There is no mention of Presi- 
dent Akers. He may have been absent seeking help among 
the churches, but Professor Roberts, who was also secretary 
of the Board, announced to that body that the board of in- 
struction had suspended the present session of the college. 
Benjamin Hypes at once made a motion that it should be 
resumed immediately. But instead of voting on that motion, 
they discussed it carefully from every point of view; and since 
there was no visible means of support for the faculty, it 
seemed best to let the work stay suspended for the present. 
So they agreed to meet again the following April and deter- 
mine then whether conditions would justify resuming work 
for the second session of the year. No more class room work 
was done that year, but the Board was active. They did not 
admit that the college was dead. It had only fainted. It could 
be easily resuscitated if the proper restoratives were applied. 
They did not wait till April but held a meeting in January, 
and another in May. They were continually planning and 
praying and working. There were no commencement exer- 
cises of the usual kind that year and no graduating class, but 
there was a Board meeting. Their persistent efforts were suc- 
cessful and arrangements were made and carried out for re- 
suming the regular college work in the autumn of 1846. Thus 
there was a longer vacation than usual and no graduates for 
the year 1846, yet the college did not lose a year of history, 
for class room work was actually carried on for a part of the 
year and the trustees were active all the year. This board did 
not have much money but they had as much grit and deter- 
mination as a whole kennel of bull dogs. They balked at no 



discouraging situation, but decided that the college must open 
in the fall of 1846. They selected as their new president a 
rising young preacher and educator from New England, 
named Erasmus Wentworth. 

We now give brief sketches of the classes which graduated 
under President Finley. 

THE CLASS OF 1842 
There were five members of the class — Thomas A. Brad- 
ford, Lloyd W. Brown, Jesse Haile Moore, George Lamb 
Roberts and Nathan Scarritt. 

THOMAS A. BR.ADFORD 
Thomas A. Bradford belonged to a Lebanon family, 
though we have very meager information concerning him. 
He was initiated into the Philosophian Society in 1840 and 
after his graduation went to California. Later he lived at 
Springfield, 111. and was prominent in Democratic political 

circles. 

DR. LLOYD W. BROWN 

Lloyd W. Brown became a physician and in after years, 
practiced his profession in Booneville, Mo., and later in 
Jacksonville, 111. He was a member of Philo. His last years 
were spent with some of his children at New Berlin, 111. 
GEN. JESSE H. MOORE 

Jesse Haile Moore had a remarkable career and was dis- 
tinguished in several different fields. He was an educator, a 
preacher, a soldier, and a 



statesman. He was born in 
St. Clair County, a member 
of the well known Moore 
family, his father fought in 
the Revolutionary War. In 
September of the year he was 
graduated, he was married 
to Miss Rachel Hynes of 
Davis County, Kentucky. 
He began his teaching career 
in the schools of Nashville, 
lUinois, and later taught in 
the seminaries of George- 
town, Paris, and Quincy. 

The last named afterward became Chaddock College. In 1 846, 
he was admitted to the Illinois Conference, and in 18^6, chang- 
ed from teaching to the work of the pastorate. In i86i, he be- 
came pastor of the First Methodist Church, Decatur, and a 
year later he resigned his church and entered the service of his 
country as Colonel of the 115th Illinois Volunteers. He con- 
tinued in the service till the end of the war. He was promoted 






JESSE H. MOORE 




One Hundred and FortyTi 



MC KENDREE 



"for gallant and meritorious conduct on the field of battle" 
and was mustered out as a Brigadier General. After the war, 
he returned to his ministerial duties and later became a Pre- 
siding Elder and also served as a member of the Book Com- 
mittee of the church. He also served two terms in Congress 
where he was a strong supporter of General Grant in his 
reconstruction policies. Later he was pension agent at Spring- 
field. In 1881, he was appointed United States Consul to 
Callao, Peru, South America. Accompanied by his wife, two 
sons, and a daughter-in-law, he went to this post of duty, 
where for two years he administered the office with great 
efficiency, and then he contracted yellow fever which caused 
his death, July 12, 188 j. An extract from a Callao paper 
shows the esteem in which he was held by the people among 
whom he had lived for two years. "Last night. General 
Moore, United States Consul, died. The public life of the 
deceased was connected with the greatest poHtical and mili- 
tary events of his country. His voice as a publicist was the 
highest authority, and only matters of international politics 
detained him in this port where certainly there was no one 
holding the position of consul who could so much honor it. 
With a deep feeling which the death of a useful member of 
society, and particularly so distinguished a gentleman as Gen- 
eral Moore, always inspires, we offer in the name of the 
public whom we represent, the most feeling expression of 
sympathy to his respected family." His body was brought 
back and buried with military honors at his old home in 
Decatur. 

GEORGE L. ROBERTS 
George Lamb Roberts was born in Kaskaskia, Illinois, 
March 16, 1821. His early education was obtained under the 
care of a private tutor. He then entered McKendree and be, 
came a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. He was 
especially proficient in the classic studies. The same year that 
he was graduated he was licensed to preach, and the next year 
he was employed as a tutor in the classics in McKendree. He 
was a member of the faculty for several years, and also was 
secretary of the Board of Trustees. In 1845, when Dr. Akers 
was elected president for the second time he spent much time 
away from the college and Prof. Roberts was made acting 
president in the absence of the president. When the college 
suspended its regular work for a part of the year 1845, Pro- 
fessor Roberts took advantage of the opportunity to enter a 
Divinity School of the Episcopal Church. After a time he 
became rector of St. James Episcopal church at Vincennes, 
Indiana. Here he became acquainted with a Bishop and some 
of the clergy of the Roman Catholic Church. The diocese 



was in possession of a valuable library which had been res- 
cued from the chaos of the French Revolution and brought 
to Vincennes. Mr. Roberts was given the privilege of this 
library. He was scholarly inclined and of course appreciated 
the opportunity to delve into the writings of the Church 
Fathers. These priests were captivated by his intelligence and 
social qualities, and he likewise by their learning and refine- 
ment, the result was that he left the Episcopal Church and 
went to the Roman Catholic. He remained in the Catholic 
communion until his death, December 15, 1905. At one time 
he occupied a Chair m the Roman Catholic College of St. 
Mary's of the Lake, in Chicago. Afterward he moved to Old 
Mission, Michigan, on Grand Traverse Bay. 

He was married April 28, 1846 to Miss Virginia E. Horner, 
of Lebanon, a daughter of Nathan Horner, long a trustee of 
McKendree, and a sister of Henry Hypes Horner, a member 
of the first class in McKendree. The wedding ceremony was 
performed by Rev. Thornton Peeples. Their daughter, Vir- 
ginia L. Roberts was graduated from McKendree in the class 
of 1872. After the death of Mr. Roberts, his widow went to 
Los Angeles, where she lived till past the age of ninety. She 
died February 6, 1920. 

REV. NATHAN SCARRITT, D. D. 

Nathan Scarritt, was born near EdwardsviUe, Illinois, 
April 14, 1821, and died in Kansas City, Missouri, April 
22,1890. He was the seven- 
th of twelve children. He 
grew up on his father's 
farm and at the age of six- 
teen entered McKendree. 
He paid his own way thru 
college by clearing timber 
from the campus, sawmt^ 
wood, and doing other forms 
of manual labor. He was 
graduated in 1842 with the 
highest honors of his class. 
He was a member of Philo. 
After teaching two years at 
Waterloo, Illinois, he went 
to Fayette, Missouri, where he taught with Dr. William T. 
Lucky of the class of 1841. 

These two McKendreans working together established a 
high school, out of which grew two successful colleges. Cen- 
tral and Howard-Paine, the latter for women. These are both 
leading institutions of the Methodist Church South, at the 
present day. Dr. Scarritt spent the remainder of his life as a 




NATHAN SCARRITT, D. D. 



One HuTidred and ForU-Three 



<::s^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



member of the Southern Church and made his influence felt 
in a remarkable manner. His sister married William T. Lucky 
and his daughter married Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix of the 
Methodist Church South. His brother Isaac was long a mem- 
ber of the Illinois Conference of the Methodist Church and 
his brother Jotham was one of the charter members of the 
Southern Illinois Conference and for half a century a trustee 
of McKendree. Nathan Scarritt was a trustee and a leading 
benefactor of Central College as long as he lived. He made 
some fortunate investments which gave him command of a 
considerable portion of this world's goods and he always 
proved himself a good steward. He made a plan before his 
death which was carried out by his children whereby he be- 
came the donor of $40,000 and thus the chief founder of The 
Scarritt Bible and Training School for Missionaries in Kansas 
City. He also built at his own expense the Melrose Metho- 
dist Church in Kansas City and served as its pastor for many 
years. He was several times a delegate to the General Con- 
ference of his church and was always a wise and able coun- 
selor. Kansas City has recognized and honored him by giving 
his name to one of her fine ward schools, as well as to one of 
her leading streets and her most beautiful park, which is 
called "Scarritt's Point." 

THE CLASS OF 1843 

This class contained nine members and was the second to 
graduate under Dr. Finley's administration. There are no 
catalogues extant for the years 1841-1846. We find the names 
of the graduates of those years in the records of the Joint 
Board and a few facts are obtainable concerning the later life 
of some of them. 

THOMAS S. DOREY 

Thomas Sterling Dorey was born April 8, 1821, at Tren- 
ton, New Jersey. When he was quite young his parents 
moved to Ohio, and later to St. Louis, Missouri. From there 
he came to be a student at McKendree. He became a member 
of the Philosophian Society, and received his Bachelor's De- 
gree in 1843. After graduation, he entered one of the Medical 
Colleges in St. Louis, and in due time became a Medical 
Doctor. He served for some years as surgeon in the United 
States Marine Corps, which was the Navy of that day, and 
once made a voyage to China. He lived only ten years after 
his graduation and was never married. His death occurred 
February 16, 185J. 

DR. J. R. M. GASKILL 

James Riley Monroe Gaskill was born near Troy, Illinois, 
May 18, 1820. While in McKendree he was a member of 
Philo. After his graduation, he attended the McDowell 



Medical College, and from that institution received the de- 
gree of M. D. in 1854. The next year he went to Marine 
Mills, Minnesota, and there engaged in the flour milling 
business with the firm of Judd, Walker and Company until 
1864. when he entered the Union Army as surgeon of the 
Forty-fifth Regiment of Illinois Infantry. He served in this 
capacity till the close of the war and marched with Sherman 
to the sea. After the war, he returned to Minnesota and 
engaged in the practice of medicine and the drug business 
until 1886 when he removed to Stillwater, Minnesota, and 
continued the practice of his profession until his death, which 
occurred April 7, 1894. He was a representative in the Terri- 
torial Legislature of Minnesota before it became a state and 
of its State Legislature in 1872-73. He was state inspector of 
prisons in Minnesota for three consecutive terms, and a mem- 
ber of the State Medical Society of Minnesota from the time 
of the Civil War. He was married in 1861 to Miss Clara 
Eldredge Hughs, of Greenville, Illinois. To them were born 
three sons and one daughter. Of these, only one son, Roy, 
survived the father. 

JUDGE WILLIAM H. SNYDER 

William Henry Snyder, son of Judge Adam W. Snyder, 
was born near Belleville, July 12, 1825. He spent several 
years as a student in McKendree, was a member of the 
Philosophian Society and received his A. B. degree in 1843. 
He served eighteen months in the Mexican War, holding the 
rank of First Lieutenant in the Fifth Regiment of Illinois 
Infantry. He studied law with Governor Koerner of Belleville 
and was admitted to the bar in 1845 before he went to the 
war. Later he held the positions of Postmaster of Belleville, 
State's Attorney of St. Clair County, and member of the 
Illinois Legislature. He was Judge of the twenty-fourth Judi- 
cial District from 1857 to 1861. He was a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of Illinois in 1869-70. In 1873, 
he was elected Judge of the twenty-second Judicial Circuit 
and served in this office three consecutive terms of six years 
each. He was married to Miss Jane E. Champion in June, 
1859. He died December 24, 1892. 

FREDERICK A. SNYDER 

Frederick A. Snyder was born m St. Clair County, 
December 21, 1828, the same year that McKendree College 
was founded. Tho three years younger than his brother men- 
tioned above, he came to McKendree at the same time and 
graduated in the same class, read law and was admitted to 
the bar at the same time. He also served in the Mexican War 
and was a Second Lieutenant while his brother was First. 
He served till thecloseof the war and then went to California 



One Hundred and Fort\-FouT 



i 



and located in San Francisco. Later he was a member of 
the Legislature of that state and was appointed with two 
others on a committee to revise the statutes of the state. He 
died at Lake Bigler, California, July 23, i8'J4, only eleven 
years after his graduation. A third brother of this family, 
John F. Snyder, did not graduate from McKendree, but be- 
came a physician and practiced medicine for many years in 
Virginia, Illinois. He was for many years president of the 
Illinois Historical Society, and the biographer of his father. 
Judge Adam W. Snyder, who, after a long and useful career, 
died suddenly after he had been nominated for Governor ot 
Illinois, with a prospect of almost certain election, had he 
lived a few months longer. 

DR. JOHN L. HALLAM 

John Locker Hallam was born near Brassington, Derby- 
shire, England, m February, 1819, and died at Centralia, 
Illinois, June 15, 1894. His father's family, consisting of 
parents and four children, came to Edwards County, Illinois, 
in 1827, and from that time on he was a resident of Illinois. 
He graduated from McKendree in 1843,, receiving the degree 
of A. B. He then took up the study of medicine and in 1846, 
received the degree of M. D. from the institution later known 
as the Missouri Medical College, in St. Louis. He began the 
practice of his profession in Louisville, Illinois, where he was 
married July 4, 1850 to Sarah G. Green, daughter of Doctor 
Peter Green, of that place. They had two children, William 
Locker and Bessie, now both deceased. In 1854, he moved to 
Centralia, and the same year his wife died. Twelve years 
after, m 1866, he was married to Mrs. Sarah A. Doyle. To 
them were born three daughters and one son. The son, John 
C. Hallam, attended McKendree and then studied medicine, 
giving promise of a brilliant career. He was assistant for a 
time to the famous surgeon. Dr. A. C. Bernays. He also 
travelled abroad. After some years of practice he was com- 
pelled by ill health to give up his work and died in 1914. The 
elder Dr. Hallam, besides being a successful physician, was 
a useful and public spirited citi2;en. He served several terms 
as a member of the city council in CentraHa, and also as a 
member of the Board of Education. He was United States 
Pension Examiner, physician for the Illinois Central Railroad, 
a Mason, being a charter member of Centralia Lodge No. 201, 
established in 1856. He also belonged to the Centrailia 
Chapter No. 93, Royal Arch Masons, and to the Methodist 
Church. 

Of the other four members of this class we have very 
slight information. James McAllister hved in St. Louis and 
Ira Wakefield in Lebanon. Both were members of the Philo- 



sophian Society. The names of George W. Leach and Wick- 
liffe Price do not appear m the Philo records, so of them we 
can only say th.it they graduated in 184J, receiving the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. 

A later word concerning Mr. McAllister is that he went 
to Washington, D. C. soon after his graduation, and obtained 
a clerkship in one of the departments of the government. 
Three years later he died of tuberculosis. He was never 

married. 

J. L. SCRIPPS 
The class of 1844 consisted of only one man, but measured 
by the lasting results attained it was as large as some classes 
which contained a dozen or a score of members. John Locke 
Scripps was born February 27, 1818, just a few months before 
Illinois became a state. He was of English ancestry. His 
father, George H. Scripps, settled near Cape Girardeau, Mis- 
souri where he engaged in the practice of law. He was a 
member of the convention which framed the constitution of 
the state of Missouri and later a member of the Legistalure. 
In 1836, he emancipated his slaves and moved to the free 
state of Illinois, locating at Rushville. Here John L. worked 
in his father's tannery and taught school. Later he entered 
McKendree and graduated with the A. B. degree in 1844. 
He then studied law and in 1847 went to Chicago and began 
the practice of his profession. After a few years he decided 
that journalism was more to his taste and accordingly pur- 
chased an interest in the newly established Chicago Tribune. 
Mr. Bross in his History of Chicago, states that Mr. Scripps 
was the Tribune's writer and editorial manager. He says, 
"Mr. Scripps' literary abiU- 
ties were of a high order; 
his style chaste, lucid and 
simple;his reasoning powers 
always strong and cogent; 
his arguments well timed, 
condensed and straight to 
the point. His invariably 
dignified and gentlemanly 
bearing, joined with these 
qualities, resulted m the 
elevation of the Chicago 
press and formed the founda- 
tion of the power it has jqhn LOCKE SCRIPPS 
since become." For political 

reasons, Mr. Scripps withdrew from the Tribune and start- 
ed the "Democratic Press" in i8'i2. However, in iS'io, the 
"Press" was consolidated with the "Tribune" and Mr. 
Scripps became the Editorin-Chief In that year he publish- 





Hundred and FortyFns 



ed a biography of Abraham Lincoln which was used as a 
campaign document and was doubtless one of the influences 
that caused his election to the presidency. From 1861 to 1865, 
Scripps was Postmaster of Chicago. This important post he 
filled with great acceptabiHty. During the Civil War, he 
showed his patriotism by organizing and equipping at his 
own expense. Company C of the Seventy-second Regiment, 
Ilhnois Volunteers, well known during the war as the 
"Scripps Guards." 

In 1865, he ventured into a new field of activity and be- 
came a partner in the banking firm of Scripps, Preston and 
Kean, of Chicago. His marriage occurred October 24, 1848, 
when he was united with Mary E. Blanchard of Greenville, 
Illinois. They had three children, of whom George died in 
1902, Mary Virginia died in infancy and Grace married Mr. 
F. B. Dyche, of Evanston, lUinois. Mrs. Scripps died in Jan- 
uary, 1866, and her husband in September of the same year. 
The class of 1845 had just two members of whom brief 
sketches follow. 

HON, FRANCIS HEREFORD 

Francis Hereford was 
born in Fauquier County, 
Virginia, July 4, 1825. His 
ancestors were English and 
Scotch. His grandfather, 
Francis Hereford, was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. His father, Francis 
Hereford, moved from Vir- 
ginia to Missouri where he 
practiced law until his death 
in 1 8-; I. Young Francis at- 
tended McKendree and 
graduated in 1845 with the 
degree of A. B. He belonged 




FRANCIS HEREFORD 



to the Philo Society. He studied law and then went to Cali- 
fornia in 1849. He was elected District Attorney of Sacra- 
mento in 1855. He afterward went to Virginia City, Nevada, 
where he remained till 1866. He then returned to the East 
and settled in Union, West Virginia. In 1868, he was Demo- 
cratic presidential elector, casting his vote for Seymour and 
Blair. In 1870, he was elected as one of the representatives 
of West Virginia, to the 42nd Congress. He was re-elected 
in 1S72, and again in 1874. In 1877, he was elected United 
States Senator by the Legislature of West Virginia. 

He was married in 1858 to Rebecca C. Pearis, of Sacra- 
mento, who died in 1866. In 1872, he was married to Alice 
B. Caperton, in West Virginia. Of this union were born two 
sons and two daughters. Senator Hereford died December 
21, 1891. 

FREDERICK SPIES 

Frederick Spies was born in Bavaria, Germany, Septem- 
ber 8, 1822. In his nineteenth year he came to America, 
arriving at St. Louis in January, 1842. He entered McKendree 
and graduated in 184^ with the degree of A. B. He then 
studied law in Transylvania University at Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. He was admitted to the bar at Belleville in 1846, and 
at St. Louis in 1849. In the latter city he spent the remainder 
of his life. He was married January 6, 1847, to Miss Julia A. 
Gray. To them were born seven children, three sons and four 
daughters, all of whom died young except two, Mary L. 
and Fannie. His wife died February i, i860. On March i, 
i86j he was married to Lisette Crecelius, daughter of John 
P. Crecelius of St. Louis County. To this union one son was 
born in 1866. Mr. Spies enjoyed the distinction of being the 
oldest living graduate for many years before his death which 
occurred in St. Louis, January i, 191 1. 




One Hundred and FortySi, 



CHAPTER XII. 

President Wentworth's Adm\ 



eRASTUS Wentworth was born m Stonington, Con- 
necticut, August 5, 1813. In his early youth he at- 
tended the Congregational Church at Norwich, 
Connecticut, hut in 1831 was converted in a Methodist re- 
vival and from that time on he was a Methodist. In 1832, 
he became a student in Cazenovia Seminary in New York 
State. In 1834, he entered the Wesleyan University at Mid- 
dletown, from which institution he graduated three years 
later. He then taught natural science in the academy at Gov, 
erneur. New York, for several years. In 1841, he joined the 
Black River Conference, and was appointed to teach m Troy 
Conference Academy at Poultney, Vermont. In 1846, he was 
elected president of McKendree, in which position he re- 
mained four years. In the summer of 1846, after a temporary 
suspension of a few months on account of financial diificulties, 
the Board of Trustees decided that the college must open as 
usual that fall. So they acted on the suggestion of Rev. Davis 
Goheen and advertised for professors who, instead of salaries, 
would be willing to accept the regular Methodist itinerant 
preachers' allowance, estimated in the usual way, according 
to the size of his family; and to be raised by the people in 
collections and contributions of cash and provisions, but 
chiefly the latter. A considerable number answered the ad- 
vertisement and out of these the Board selected the faculty. 
Dr. Wentworth, writing in the "Central Advocate" thirty 
years after, gives a very interesting account of his experience 
at McKendree. 

""The writer was not an applicant, but was chosen presi- 
dent without previous consultation. The position was readily 
accepted, though at a pecuniary sacrifice, as a providential 
opening to get a consumptive wife out of cold Vermont into 
the milder Mississippi valley. A move which doubtless pro- 
longed her life several years. The kindly ex-president, Dr. 
John W. Merrill, whom I met at the Eastham Camp Meeting 
that summer, said to me. Take a library with you and devote 
the next few years to study. It will be a perfect burial with- 
out books.' The advice, alas, could not be followed. But it 
was hardly necessary. The next four years were the busiest 
of a busy life. I was constantly preaching, lecturing, teaching, 
writing, dedicating churches, attending camp meetings, con- 
ferences, conventions, and conducting a weekly paper, the 
Lebanon Journal, the modest bud which at length bloomed 
into the full flowered and richly flavored 'Central Christian 
Advocate.' 




DR. E. WENTWORTH 



"The voluntary support 
system worked well. My 
"allowance' was less than 
three hundred dol lars a year, 
on which I laid up money, 
while I ran in debt at Dick- 
inson on a salary of a thou- 
sand. Our neighbors, the 
prairie farmers, were espec- 
ially liberal to the new pro- 
fessors who preached every 
Sunday m their school 
houses, bringing m corn and 
'side meat' more than we 
could possibly make use of. 
One brother put into my log crib forty bushels of Indian corn 
for five dollars. "I give you the corn," he said, 'I only charge you 
a bit {i2}4 cents) a bushel for hauling it.' We had a cow and 
her keeping, pigs, poultry, and a vegetable garden which it 
was next to impossible to protect from the wolfish hogs that 
ranged the woods, and made no bones of forcing pickets and 
could scale a six rail fence with the agility of a raccoon. 
Lovely were those years in that broad college campus with 
Its sunlit lawns, its graceful swells, its huge trees, the 
home of contemplation and retirement, yet made lively by 
the shouts of students with their games of 'shinney' and 
foot ball. Cottages nestled among the trees, as cosy, if not 
as handsome, as those provided for the accommodation of the 
guests at Saratoga. The college building itself was spacious, 
but a terrible eye sore. It took a fancy to burn down a few 
years after and everybody said, in view of its past utility, 
'Pax cineribus.' Built in early times before the age of saw 
mills, it was sheathed with rived clap boards and looked 
like a superannuated distillery. On its front gable rested a 
little bell from which the rope dangled to the ground between 
the front doors. One of our first improvements was to build 
a cupola and remove the bell to the center of the building. 
We remodelled and reseated the chapel, made the library 
and recitation rooms cheerful with paint, paper, and white- 
wash, doing much of the work with our own hands. 

"We followed the bad habit of the olden time, now happily 
abandoned, of early morning prayers; and compelled the boys 
to get up in the dark and cold, to go through, with freezing 
fingers, yawning muscles, drooping eye-lids, and empty stom- 



One Hundred and Forty-Seven 



|mc KENDREE ^^^^^rs^^.^.^,..^ 



achs, the forms of devotion which it was deemed an act of 
piety to shirk as often as possible. We commiserated the 
offenders against this barbardus college regulation, made jus- 
tice do homage to mercy, and occasionally excused a poor 
wight for sleeping over. The bell, small as it was, waked the 
old building at six in the dark winter mornings, as it would 
wake the dead; and yet many a drousy youth escaped debt 
marks with the plea 'Didn't hear the bell.' One day dry "Tom 
Harrison' of Belleville presented himself at the office with a 
lugubrious face as a candidate for excuse from prayers the 
morning previous. 'What is your excuse, sir?" 'Didn't hear 
the bell, sir !' 'What ! You rooming away up among the rafters, 
right under the cupola, why didn't you hear the bell?' 'Be- 
cause, sir,' said he with imperturbable face, but with light- 
ning glance of waggery from his sharp blue eyes, 'The rope 
made so much noise, sir.' He was excused." 

In 1850, Dr. Wentworth left McKendree to become pro- 
fessor of science in Dickinson College. Four years later he 
was appointed as missionary to China where he spent eight 
years and saw the opening of what proved to be one of the 
most successful of Methodist missions in heathen lands. 
After his return to the United States, he spent some years 
in the pastorate in New York State and Massachusetts. He 
was three times a member of the General Conference, in 
1868, 1872 and 1876. The General Conference of 1876 elected 
him Editor of the "Ladies' Repository" and Book Editor of 
the Western Book Concern at Cincinnati. Also in 1876, he 
was made a member of the committee of fifteen appointed to 
revise the Methodist Hymnal. His death occurred May 25, 
1886, when he was in his seventy-fourth year, at Sandy Hill, 
near Troy, New York. 

At McKendree in those days, the President was always 
Professor of Mental and Moral Science. His colleagues were 
Rev. Anson W. Cummings, A. M., Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Natural Sciences; Rev. Spencer Mattison, A. M., 
Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature; and Rev. 
William Goodfellow, Principal of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment. At the regular annual meeting of the Board for 1847, 
the President reported a full year of scholastic work, though 
on account of the vicissitudes thru which the college had 
recently passed, there was no graduating class ready. But 
Rev. William L. Deneen, who on account of ill health rather 
than age, was on the superannuated list, having availed him- 
self of the privilege provided by a rule passed some years 
before, had prepared himself and successfully passed examina- 
tion on the entire scientific course, and on recommendation of 
the faculty, was granted the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



This was the first time that degree was conferred by McKen- 
dree and Mr. Deneen was the graduating class for that year. 
A sketch of his life will be found in the History of the City 
of Lebanon. 

At a later session of the Board, two other members were 
added to the Faculty. Dr. Sylvanus M. E. Goheen was elected 
Professor of Physiology and Comparative Anatomy. His 
name appears on the Faculty page in the catalogue for the 
year 1847-48. Dr. William Nast of Cincinnati was elected 
Professor of German, but he evidently did not accept the 
place since his n<ime does not appear in any of the catalogues. 
At a meeting in July, 1848, the Rev. Ernest Kern, A. M., of 
the Missionary Institute of Basle, Switzerland, was elected 
to the Chair of German, a chair which at that time had no 
real existence. A notification of his election was sent him, 
but he also failed to appear. However, in the catalogue of 
1849, Michael Mummert is announced as the teacher of 
German. German was his Mother tongue and he was said 
to be an efficient teacher, tho he was at the same time a 
student m the Preparatory department of the college. But 
after one year the German department was allowed to lapse 
for a few years. Dr. Goodfellow was a very important mem- 
ber of the faculty since he had charge of the Preparatory De- 
partment which contained a majority of all the students 
enrolled. In 1848, he was charged with the additional respon- 
sibility of establishing a Normal Department. However, it 
did not materialize till many years after. In 1849, he reported 
his work in soliciting funds for a new building. He was so 
successful in this work that he was excused from teaching 
that he might devote his whole time to raising money for 
the building enterprise. G. N. Poston was appointed to teach 
in his stead. He (Goodfellow) succeeded in raising $10,000 
for the building, which was 
several times as much as the 
first building cost. The col 
lege was now on the up- 
grade. This was a substan- 
tial three story brick build- 
ing, well constructed and a 
real credit to the institution 
for that day. The corner 
stone waslaidonCommence- 
ment Day, 1850. The build- 
ing was constructed during 
the following year and com- 
pleted on June if, US';:. 
These exact d.ites are 




PROF. W. GOODFELLOW 



One Hundred and Forty-Eight 




established by records in the diary of Capt. Henry C. Fike, who 
was a student in McKendree at the time. This building now 
known as "OldMain" is therefore the oldest building on the 
grounds, and perhaps is still the most substantial of the nine 
that now compose the group of college buildings. After this 
successful achievement, Dr. Goodfellow felt that his best work 
in this field was accomplished and that it would be better for 
him to pass on to other fields. His father-in-law, Rev. John 
Dempster, who was one of the founders of Garrett Biblical 
Institute, and who received the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from McKendree in 1 848, had spent a number of his most active 
years as a missionary in South America. Dr. and Mrs. Good- 
fellow felt that they would like to carry on the work which 
Mrs. Goodfellow's father had established. Therefore, not 
long after leaving McKendree, they sailed for the southern 
hemisphere and did a monumental work in Argentina, es- 
pecially in the city of Beunos Ayres. They returned to the 
United States in 1869, and spent their declining years in 
Evanston. Sometime in the nineties when Dr. Chamberlin 
was president of McKendree, the aged Dr. Goodfellow vis- 
ited the scenes of his early labors by special invitation and 
spent a commencement with us. Dr. Wentworth also, as 
previously stated, after a few years more of college work, 
went to the foreign mission fields. There must have been 
something of the missionary spirit in the McKendree atmos- 
phere in those days. There was a romance in the life of the 
circuit rider and the pioneer educator that often fired him 
with enthusiasm to reach even more remote and more difficult 
fields, which he could only find in the foreign mission fields. 
The following incident occurred in Dr. Wentworth's term 
at McKendree; 



Several of the students who had an appreciation of good 
music were anxious to hear the famous singer, Jenny Lmd, 
who was to appear m St. Louis. President Wentworth having 
learned that a request for permission to make the trip to St. 
Louis was likely to come to him (a rule of the college in those 
days required a student to secure permission before leaving 
town), and feeling that the parents of the students might 
not approve the two days absence from their studies which a 
trip to St. Louis required at that time, decided to avoid an 
unpleasant refusal by hastening his own departure a few 
hours. The trip was made in those days by stage or private 
conveyance. The boys found the President had gone and his 
representative had no authority to grant the desired leave of 
absence. So they decided to take the risk of going without 
It. They procured a team of some sort for the drive to St. 
Louis and the late afternoon found them in the city where 
Jenny Lind was to sing. But being mud-spattered and hungry, 
they sought a moderate priced hotel where they might clean 
up and refresh themselves a little before time for the concert. 
There in the lobby of the hotel to which they happened to 
go they found the President himself, whiling away the hours 
before the concert with some acquaintances. The recognition 
between the boys and their President was immediate and 
mutual. Neither could ignore the other. So the leader of the 
truant music -lovers, with great presence of mind and a serious 
countenance, walked up to the President and told him they 
had come all the way to St. Louis to ask his permission to 
attend the Jenny Lind Concert. The President could see a 
joke himself, especially when it was as plain as that, and 
perhaps feeling that he had been outwitted in his effort to 
avoid an unpleasant duty, generously granted the permission 
and immunity from discipline, on their return home next day. 
And so the boys and their President heard the famous Jenny 
Lind together. 

THE CLASS OF 1848 
In the class of 1848, there were eight regular graduates 
besides two who had received their Bachelor's Degree at the 
Indiana Asbury University, at Greencastle, but were receiv- 
ing their master's degree from McKendree with this class. 
These were Rev. James A. Jaquess and Rev. Oliver S. Mun- 
sell. The former was the first president of the Illinois Women's 
College, at Jacksonville, and later Colonel of the 73rd Reg- 
iment, Illinois Volunteers, during the Civil War, and the 
other was for eighteen years President of the Illinois Wes- 
leyan University, at Bloomington. In 1876, he moved to 
Kansas and in 1880-81, he was a member of the Kansas Legis' 
lature. The regular members of the class were Thomas Ogles- 



One Hundred and FortyXi, 



by Harrison, Cornelius Gooding Harrison, George Huston 
Holliday, George Lunceford Phelps, James Henry Roberts, 
Henry Clay Talbot, Samuel Kinney Thomas, and Daniel 
White. 

The Harrison fimily were among the early settlers of 
Belleville and will be found prominently mentioned in the 
history of St. Clair County. There are no less than eight 
Harrisons of this particular family in the roster of JMcKendree 
students, and Mrs. Charles Harrison may be considered the 
ninth. She was Ida Blanck of Lebanon before her marriage. 

THOMAS OGLESBY HARRISON 
Thomas Oglesby Harrison was born at Belleville, May i , 
1827. He graduated from McKendree, July 19, 1848, and in 
the spring of 185c, he and his brother went to California, 
when so many were .seeking their fortunes in the gold fields. 
They went overland by the slow travel of the covered wagon. 
However, he did not find a fortune nor a permanent resi- 
dence, but came near losing his health. The next year, he 
returned, not across the plains, but by steamer around Cape 
Horn. A year later he was married to Eliza J. Calbreath. 
Their oldest child, Hugh, had Wentworth for his middle 
name, in honor of Dr. Wentworth, who was President of 
McKendree when the Harrisons were graduated. They had 
six other children, tho two of them died in infancy. After en- 
gaging in the milling business until i86o, he moved to Has- 
tings, Minnesota, where he lived until his death which oc- 
curred Feb. 20, 1863. His widow returned to Belleville to live. 

CORNELIUS GOODING HARRISON 
Cornelius G. Harrison, brother of Thomas, was in the 
same class with him, and went to California with him. Later 
he returned and they engaged in the milling business to, 
gether. But after the death of the elder brother in Minne- 
sota, the younger went back to California, where he made 
his permanent home and engaged in the banking business at 
San Jose. He was married to Sarah J. Spruance in 1857. They 
had five children, of whom two grew to maturity. His death 
occurred in 1904. 

Hugh G. Harrison, an uncle of the two above mentioned, 
attended McKendree as early as 1842, but did not graduate 
GEORGE HUSTON HOLLIDAY 
George H. Holliday was born at Harrisburg, Kentucky, 
August 5, 1824. After finishing his course at McKendree in 
1848, he settled in Macoupin County, Illinois, and for several 
years served as County Surveyor. Later he published the 
"Spectator" at Carlinville, the County Seat of the same 
county. During the term i8';5-i857 he was a member of the 



Illinois Legislature. In 1867, he was appointed a member of 
the commission to erect a new court house. He was married 
to Cinderella Chism in 1852. To them, six children were 
born, four boys and two girls. 

GEORGE L. PHELPS 
George L. Phelps was born in St. Clair County on a farm 
near the boundary line between St. Clair and Monroe 
Counties. He grew up in rural districts, took a course in 
mathematical studies under Rev. Wm. L. Deneen before he 
entered McKendree. He was a cousin of Col. Risdon M. 
Moore. He was a member of the Philosophian Society. After 
his graduation, he returned to his agricultural pursuits which 
he followed with great diligence and a high degree of success. 
He lived only ten years after his graduation. He was never 
married. His death occurred December j, 18^8 

HENRY C. TALBOT 

Henry Clay Talbot was born in Louisville, Kentucky, 
August 14, 1825. He came to Monroe County, Illinois 
about 1840. After his graduation, he engaged in newspaper 
work in Waterloo, 111. In 1853, he was the publisher of the 
"Monroe Advertiser," and in 1858, he became the publisher 
of the "Monroe Patriot." Later he was admitted to the bar. 
In 1862, he was elected to the Illinois Legislature. Beginning 
in 1868, he served four years on the State Board of Equaliza- 
tion. In 1872, he became County Judge of his county and 
held this office for four years. In his earlier life, he spent some 
years teaching, and he was always interested in educational 
affairs. He died Sept. 29, 1874. 

SAMUEL K. THOMAS 

Samuel Kinney Thomas was born at the residence of Hon. 
William Kinney, four miles northeast of Belleville, who was 
his kinsman. He left college to enter the Mexican War. He 
was in the battle of Buena Vista. After the war, he returned 
to college and graduated in 1848. He was a member of Philo. 
He received the B. S. Degree, but he desired to do the 
necessary work in the classics to entitle him to secure the 
A. B. Degree, so he entered college again, but before he had 
time to accomplish this purpose, he died from an attack of 
cholera, July 23, i84q. 

JAMES HENRY ROBERTS 

James H. Roberts was born at Kaskaskia, Illinois, Decem- 
ber 12, 1825. His ancestors on his father's side came from 
England with William Penn, and both parents were de- 
scended from Quakers. When his grandmother Gibson was 
a little girl, she sat on General Washington's knee when he 
made his temporary headquarters at her father's house just 
after the Battle of Brandywine. His father was a merchant, 



One Hundred and Fifiy 



^> 



JAMES H. ROBERTS 



and in his youth James as- 
sisted in the store, but he 
never seemed drawn toward 
that Hne of work. For a time 
he attended a private school 
kept byRev.Hubbell Loomis 
who was afterward prom- 
inently connected with 
Shurtleff College. While a 
student at McKendree, he 
was a member of Philo and 
took great interest m de- 
bates. Even before he grad- 
uated in 1848, he visited the 
Law School of Transylvania 
University at Lexington, Kentucky. While|_ there. ,he, heard 
Henry Clay make his great speech on the WilmotProviso. Some 
of his relatives wished him to be a physician, and to please 
them, he gave the matter a try-out. He says, "For weeks I read 
works on human anatomy with a naked skeleton before me." 
But he failed to get any inspiration in that line, and he soon 
took up the law in earnest. He studied law with Hon. Ed- 
ward Bates, who was afterward Attorney General in Mr. 
Lincoln's cabinet. He first established a law office as a member 
of a law firm in Vincennes, Indiana. A year or two later, in 
1855, he began practice in Chicago, the city which his father 
had helped to lay out m 1829 when he was a member of the 
Illinois Canal Commission. Mr. Roberts had very little to 
do with public life or office holding. He was for two years 
a member of the City Council of Chicago. He soon became 
disgusted with the political methods he saw practiced there. 
He says, "I resolved to seek no further public position, be- 
lieving that in the practice of my profession lay my happiness 
and welfare." He was admitted to practice in the United 
States Supreme Court in 1864. His first term in this court 
enabled him to hear arguments by some of the great lawyers 
of the country, such as Reverdy Johnson, William H. Seward, 
James T. Brady and others. He says, "During my stay in 
Washington in that court session, I saw Abraham Lincoln 
for the last time. I scarcely remember how early I came to 
know him as a boy; but early in the thirties, when I lived in 
Springfield, I saw him almost daily. I heard him debate with 
Douglas in Springfield in 1854. Again I heard them debate 
m 1858. I heard Lincoln's great speech in Chicago in 1861, 
just at the outbreak of the Civil War. I was also a personal 
friend of Douglas, and was at his home when he received 
Lincoln's challenge to a joint debate in 1858." 



In fact, it may be said of this remarkable McKendrean 
that he lived during some portion of the life of every presi- 
dent of the United States, except Washington, down to 
Woodrow Wilson. He was born the year before John Adams 
died, and he died June 25, 1920, just before the end of Wil- 
son's administration. He was personally acquainted with sev- 
eral of them, as well as with other illustrious men who might 
be regarded as unsuccessful candidates, as Webster, Clay, 
Douglas, and including William Jennings Bryan, with whose 
father he was a fellow student at McKendree. Mr. Roberts 
was twice married. First to Harriet E. Smith, September 16, 
1863. Their children were Lucretia B., and James Henry, but 
the son died in infancy. Some years later his wife died. His 
second marriage was to Susan M. Slater, November 10. 1870. 
They had one daughter who died when only a year old. 
DANIEL WHITE 

The other member of this class, Daniel White, came from 
a Carlyle family. He belonged to Philo, was a lawyer, and 
in his later life practiced his profession in San Antonio, 
Texas. We have not been able to secure further information 
concerning him, except that he died in 1865. 
THE CLASS OF 18-19 

This class consisted of thirteen members whose names are 
as follows: Reuben Andrus, Silas Lillard Bryan, William 
Hugh Corrington, Robert DoUahon, Wesley Davidson, Jos- 
eph Windsor Drury, Thomas Asbury Eaton, John T. Foster, 
Joseph N. King, William W. King, William Spencer Pope, 
Hiram Sears, and Thomas O. Springer. 

Concerning three of these men we do not have sufficient 
information to justify a separate sketch. These are Robert 
Dollahon, Wesley Davidson, and John T. Foster. They were 
all three members of Philo. Davidson enrolled from Jonesboro 
and Dollahon from Lawrenceville. The former was a lawyer 
and the latter a farmer. Foster's residence is given in the old 
catalogue as Pleasant Point, 111. In after years, he became a 
minister of the gospel. Brief biographies of all the others 
follow. 

REUBEN ANDRUS D. D. 

Reuben Andrus was born in Rutland, New York, Jan- 
uary 29, 1824. In early life he emigrated to Illinois. He was 
a student for three years in the Illinois College at Jackson- 
ville, but graduated from McKendree after having completed 
the classical course in 1849, receiving the degree of A. B. 
Later he received the degree of A. M. and in 1868 his Alma 
Mater honored him with the degree of Doctor of Divinity. 
The year after his graduation, in 1850, he was admitted 
to the Illinois Conference. Though a minister of the gospel. 



One Hundred and FijtyOn 



he had a long career in educational work. Among the var- 
ious positions he held were the following: Principal of the 
Preparatory Department of the Illinois Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, President of Quincy College, President of the Illinois 
Female College, and President of the Indiana Asbury Uni- 
versity. In 1867, he was transferred to the Indiana Confer- 
ence. He was a member of the General Conference of 1876. 
While in McKendree, he belonged to the Philo Society. He 
died at Indianapolis, Indiana, January 17, 1887. 

JUDGE SILAS LILLARD BRYAN 
Silas Lillard Bryan was born near Sperryville, Virginia, 
November 4, 1822. His parents were John and Nancy 
(Lillard) Bryan. He was one 
of the younger children of 
a large family. His parents 
died when he was about 
fourteen years of age, and 
soon afterward he came to 
Illinois to hve with some 
older members of the family 
who had already gone west 
to hve. He was ambitious to 
secure an education, and by 
his own energy and indus- 
try, he made his way thru 
college. An old building 
is still standing (1912) in 
the west edge of the city of Lebanon, where he and a fellow 
student "kept batch" and chopped wood during their college 
days. He completed the classical course at McKendree and 
received the degree of A. B. in 1849. Later he received the 
Master's Degree. He was a member of the Philosophian Lit- 
erary Society. He studied law and was admitted to the bar 
in 18^1. He located at Salem to engage in the practice of 
law. In 1852, he was married to Miss Mariah Elizabeth Jen, 
nings. To them were born nine children, of whom five grew 
to maturity. Among them the famous William Jennings 
Bryan. From 1852 to i860 Mr. Bryan was a member of the 
Illinois State Senate. From that date till 1872, he was Judge 
of the Circuit Court. In 1872, he was nominated as a can- 
didate for Congress on the Democratic ticket, but failed of 
election by a small margin. After his retirement from the 
bench, he practiced law at Salem for the remainder of his 
active life. He died at Jacksonville, 111., March jo, 1880. 

Judge James H. Roberts, who graduated just the year be- 
fore Bryan, tells this incident about his career in McKendree: 




SILAS L. BRYAN 



"Mr. Bryan was a hard 
student and stood in the 
front rank of scholarship, 
but he was a confirmed to- 
bacco chewer. The expec- 
torations of the young men 
indulging in this habit, es- 
pecially in thecoUege chapel. 
drew down on them a sharp 
rebuke from one of the New 
England professors who 
would not be reconciled to 
this bad Western habit. 
Bryan regarded it as aimed 
at him particularly, as it 
was well known that he 




WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN 

McKendree conferred LL. D. 

degree upon him 



stood at the front, if he were not the very chief offender. The 
reprimand immediately followed the morning prayer in the 
chapel service. Thereupon Bryan rose in his place and in a 
few words vindicated the tobacco habit as almost universal, 
and said he would not tamely submit to the public reprimand 
nor the abuse of any man, and especially before the assembled 
faculty and fellow students, without resenting it. His re- 
marks created consternation among the students, but instead 
of expulsion, as they had feared, they brought immediate 
apology from the professor, who admitted that he had spoken 
sharply, and perhaps without due consideration, and certain- 
ly with no intentions of hurting the feelings of Mr. Bryan. 
It is needless to say that the tobacco habit was not quelled." 
Mr. Bryan was a man of deep religious convictions and a 
member of the Baptist church. While on the bench as Circuit 
Judge, it was his custom to open court with prayer, claiming 
that altho the practice was without precedent, yet the Senate 
and House of Representatives, not only of Illinois, but of 
the nation, were opened with prayer, and the courts equally 
needed divine aid in the administration of justice. This pious 
father instilled into the mind of his son, William J., those 
religious principles which were always carried into his public 
career without the taint of hypocrisy, even amid the demor- 
alizing associations of party politics, and which secured for 
him the admiration of even his most inveterate opponents. 

REV. WILLIAM HUGH CORRINGTON 
William Hugh Corrington was born in Harrison County, 
Kentucky, March 28, 1826. He entered McKendree in 1847 
and graduated with the degree of B. S. in 1849. Later, 
he re-entered college, and after completing the classical 
course, he graduated with the class of i8')j, receiving the 



One Hundred and Fifty-Two 




JOSEPH W. DRURY 



degree of A. B. He w.is a 
member of the Philosophian 
Society. During the first two 
years after leaving college, he 
taught school at Chester and 
Rockford, Illinois, and acted 
as agent for McKendree Col- 
lege. In 1855, he was elected 
president of the Southern Illi- 
nois Female College at Salem, 
which position he held for 
eight years. He was .idmitted 
on trial to the Southern Illi- 
nois Conference in 1861, but 



did not become a pastor until 1864, when he was appointed to 
Vandalia. He served two years each at Vandaha, Flora, and 
Belleville, and then in 1870, was appointed presiding elder 
of the Lebanon district. After two years of service on the 
district, he died at Belleville, June 6, 1872. He was twice 
married. First to Maria Blackwell, October 31, 1853. Of this 
union one child was born, Alice Murray. The second mar- 
riage was to Mary A. Smith, January 30, 1857. Their chil- 
dren were James Courtney, Herschel Knox, Haller Smith, 
and Rhoda May. 

JOSEPH W. DRURY 

Joseph Windsor Drury was born in St. Louis, February 
5, 1832. He graduated from McKendree in 1849, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He was one of the founders of the Pla- 
tonian Literary Society. During the Civil War, he was Pro- 
vost Marshal of Monroe County, Illinois; and for three 
terms, served as sheriff and collector of his county. Dur- 
ing the session of the fifty-third Congress, he served as 
newspaper clerk in Washington, D. C. He was a member 
of the Illinois Legislature for two terms, and also was a 
member of the State Board of Equalization. He died at Water- 
loo, Illinois, March 4, 1902. 

REV. THOMAS A. EATON 

Thomas Alexander Eaton was born October 22, 1825, 
at Anchorage, near Louisville, Kentucky. He was one of 
the several children given to Thomas and Sarah Eaton. In 
1836, the family moved to Illinois and settled near Edwards- 
viUe. February 22, 1844, he was married to Miss Louisa M. 
Dougherty. Within a year his wife died, and soon after, their 
child. In the midst of this great sorrow, the impression was 
deepened in his mind that he ought to preach the gospel. 
Feeling his lack of preparation, he once at set about secur- 




THOMA3 A. EATON 



ing an education. He spent several years at McKendree, 
became a member of the Philosophian Society, and graduated 
in 1849 with the B. S. degree. He entered the Illinois Con- 
ference in 1850, and in the division of 1852, became a mem- 
ber of the Southern Illinois Conference, and was ordained 
by Bishop Ames. He was a faithful minister of the gospel in 
active service for 42 years, having served one term as pre- 
siding elder of the Lebanon District. He was a delegate to 
the General Conference of 1868, which met in Chicago. He 
was a member of the Board 
of Trustees of McKendree 
for forty years, until he re- 
signed the post in 1894. 
The college conferred upon 
him the degree of D. D. in 
1887. The last fourteen 
years of his life were spent 
at the home of his son in 
Kansas City, Kansas. He 
passed to his reward Octo- 
ber 20, 1907. In Carlyle, 
Illinois, November 6, i8')4, 
he was married to Miss 
Joanna Webster, with whom he travelled the journey of life 
for more than half a century. To them were born seven 
children, of whom three sons and three daughters survived 
their parents. 

JOSEPH N. KING 
Joseph Nicholas King was born near White Hall, Illinois, 
June 28, 1830. He was the son of Joseph and Sarah (Lindsey) 
King, who were both natives of England, though the mother 
was of Scotch ancestry on one side. He was the oldest of 
four children. Both his parents died before he was twelve 
years of age, and the four children went to live with an 
uncle, William King, who resided near Jacksonville, Illinois. 
While still a mere youth, he entered McKendree College and 
was graduated in the class of 1849, receiving the degree of 
B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society 
The next year after his graduation, he was married to Eliza- 
beth Rawlins Morrow, March 3, 1850. They located on a 
farm near White Hall, where they spent the remainder of 
their lives. They were the parents of nine children, William 
Joseph, Francis Edward, James Nicholas, Margaret Elizabeth, 
Mary Lenthall, Sarah Rebecca, Albert Henry, Frederic 
Charles, and Rachel Ellen. William and James died m child- 
hood. The others grew to maturity, are all married and en- 
gaged in various vocations in life. Mr. King was a member 




:d and F.fty-Three 



IM 



c KENDREE^^^^^s:^;^^.^^^^^ 



of the Methodist Church, Hved a consistent 
Christian Ufe, and trained his children in the 
ways of righteous hving. He never accumulat- 
ed large wealth, but was a successful farmer 
and a useful citizen. He died at his home 
February 25, 1885. 

WILLIAM W. KING 

William W. King was born in Green 
County, Illinois, April 22, 1832. He was a 
son of Joseph and Sarah King, of whom the 
former was born in England and the latter in 
Scotland. His early life was spent on the 
farm in Green County, where he attended the 
public schools and afterward McKendree Col- 
lege, from which he graduated in 1849, with 
the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. After graduation, he gave his time to farm- 
ing and teaching for some years. During the years of the 
Civil War, he gave his services to his country in the Union 
army. After the war, he was in the mercantile business m 
Quincy, Illinois for ten years. In 1876, he moved with his 
family to Lewis County, Missouri, where he resided on a 
farm till 1905. He then lived three years in Brookfield, and 
then in Rich Hill, Missouri until his death, which occurred 
May 17, iqi2, after he had attained the ripe age of full four 
score years. He was a man of bright mind, a great reader, 
and possessed inventive ability, having secured patents on 
several useful inventions. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church from early life till the time of his death 
He was married April 7, 1852 to Miss Martha F. Benier. 
Their four daughters are now Mrs. Fanny Hubbard and Mrs. 
J. A. Bailey of Lewistown, Mo., Mrs. J. E. Bailey of Rich 
Hill, and Mrs. J. F. Turner of Brookfield, Mo. 
MAJOR WILLIAM S. POPE 

William Spencer Pope was born near Hopkinsville, Ken- 
tucky, April 25, 1827,, and died in St. Louis, December 24, 
1906, in his eightieth year. His parents were Abraham and 
Elizabeth (Farley) Pope. They had five children — all sons — 
of whom William was the third. He became a student in 
McKendree some time during the forties and in 1849 re- 
ceived the degree of B. S. He then continued his studies 
in college, devoting special attention to the classics, and in 
1852 received the degree of A. M. He was a member of 
the Philosophian Literary Society. In his last two years in 
college, he served as tutor in Mathematics and was re- 
tained for a time after his graduation as adjunct professor. 
In 185J, he moved to northern Illinois, and for several years 




THOM.AS O SPRINGER 



was active as a teacher in Mount Morris Col- 
lege, editor, and public lecturer. He also con- 
tinued his law studies, begun at McKendree, 
and was admitted to the bar in Chicago. Dur- 
ing the Lincoln campaign of i860, he publish- 
ed a Republican paper at Mt. Morris, Ogle 
County, 111. Early in the Civil War, Governor 
Yates commissioned him to go south and look 
after the interests of the Illinois troops. He 
fitted up a hospital boat, took it south, and re- 
turned with it filled with wounded soldiers, 
after the battle of Shiloh. Later, Major Pope, 
as he was now called, accompanied Governor 
Yates to Washington to see President Lincoln 
in regard to the prosecution of the war, and 
the part of their state in it. He was made a paymaster in the 
army, was brevetted Lieut. -Colonel, and continued in the 
service till the close of the war. General Grant then recom- 
mended his appointment as paymaster in the regular army, 
but he declined the honor, having decided to return to the 
practiceof law. He located in St. Louis, and in a short time 
became one of the leading members of the Missouri Bar. The 
only public office he ever held was that of member of the 26th 
General Assembly of Missouri. He was a leader of the 
Republicans of the lower house, and one of the foremost 
champions of the act which secured for St. Louis the large 
tract of land now known as Forest Park. He was married 
December 20, 1866 to Miss Caroline E. Moore, daughter 
of Captain Henry J. Moore, of St. Louis. Their three chil- 
dren are Annie E., now Mrs. William L. Boeckeler of St. 
Louis, Carrie F., now Mrs. George B. McBean of Chicago, 
and William S. Pope of St. Louis. 

THOMAS O. SPRINGER 
Thomas O. Springer was born November 2, 1827, in 
Madison County, Illinois. He grew up on a farm and at- 
tended the public schools; later he entered McKendree and 
was graduated in the scientific course in 1849. He was one of 
the founders of the Platonian Literary Society. The death 
of his parents added new responsibilities, under which he 
conducted himself as a faithful elder brother, keeping the 
family together on the farm and assisting in the education 
of his younger brothers. In 1855, he was married to Miss 
Emma M. Thompson, who died in 1858. He was married 
again in 1872 to Miss Ella J. Randle, of Lebanon, Illinois. 
From 1856 to 1864, he was Clerk of the Circuit Court. He 
also held the office of supervisor. In politics, he was a Whig 
until the organiz<ition of the Republican party, and ever 




One Hundred and FiftyFon 



after that was a staunch RepuhHcan. He was a member of 
the Methodist Church, the order of A. F. iif A. M., R. A. 
M., and Knights of Honor. In 1890, Mr. Springer moved to 
Thornberry, Texas, and later to Compton, Cahf., where he 
died in 1909. 

REV. HIRAM SEARS 
Hiram Sears was born April 10, 1825, in Fayette County, 
Ohio. When he was eleven years of age, the family moved 
to Scott County, Illinois. Here he grew to manhood with 
very limited educational opportunities. His father died when 
he was seventeen, leaving him, the oldest son, as the main- 
stay of the family. After a lengthy struggle in the matter 
of personal reHgion, he became an earnest Christian, and felt 
It his duty to preach the gospel. In preparation for this work, 
he entered McKendree College and graduated in 1849, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He was a member of the 
Philo Society. He was married to Miss Mary H. Prentice 
May 25, 1851. Of their six children, but two survive their 
parents, namely Mrs. Rosa M. Rinehart and Miss Nellie 
P. Sears. He was admitted to the Illinois Conference m iS'ji, 



and in the division of the conference the next year he fell 
into the Southern Illinois Conference, and received in order 
the following appointments: Fairfield, Edwardsville, Finan- 
cial Agency of McKendree College, Alton, Brighton, Graf' 
ton. President of Southern Illinois Female College, Mt. 
Carmel, Cairo, Vandalia, Presiding Elder Vandalia District, 
Carbondale, Agency of McKendree, Upper Alton, Collins- 
ville. East St. Louis. After thirty-two years of faithful ser- 
vice, he was superannuated in 1883. Soon after, he was called 
to the Agency of the Western Seamen's Friend Society, with 
headquarters at Cleveland, Ohio. To this work he devoted 
nearly a quarter of a century of diligent service, preaching 
the gospel to the seamen of the lake region, promoting their 
temporal welfare, and once a year canvassing a large district 
in Ohio and Pennsylvania to secure funds for maintaining 
the work. In 1908, he suffered an apopletic stroke, which 
incapacitated him for further work. After lingering for two 
and a half years as an invalid in the care of his daughters, 
he passed from earth April 10, 191 1, on his eighty-sixth 
birthday. 




One Hmijti and Fi/t^r-Fu-e 



|mc KENDREE .^^^^^^g^:^-^.^.^.^.^ 



IN THE SUMMER of 1850, Rev. Anson W. Cummmgs 
took up the task which had just been laid down by Dr. 
Wentworth, and assumed the responsibilities of the 
office of president. He had already served on the faculty four 
years, having been appointed Professor of Mathematics and 
Natural Science at the same time that Dr. Wentworth was 
made president. He also devoted a part of his energies to the 
duties of Fiscal Agent. He served so effectively in every ca- 
pacity that when they needed a new president, the Joint 
Board did not look any further. He was a scholarly gentleman 
and a graduate of the Wesleyan University, of which his 
brother, Joseph Cummings, was for some years president. He 
was a strong believer in education, and devoted his best 
energies to that cause in McKendree's field, and after com- 
pleting his seven years of service here he returned to the 
East. After his retirement from active work, he lived in his 
old age at Wellsville, New York. He was the author of a 
book entitled "Early Schools of Methodism," pubUshed in 
1884, which contains much interesting information concern- 
ing pioneer education and sketches all the Methodist schools 
up to about 1840. When he took the presidency of McKen- 
dree, he was automatically transferred to the chair of Mental 
and Moral Science, or Philosophy, as we would call it now. 
His associates in the faculty were Spencer Mattison, who 
came to McKendree at the same time he did, and occupied 
the chair of Ancient Languages, Dixon Alexander, M. D., 
Professor of Mathematics, Rev. James Leaton, Professor of 
Natural Science, Rev. William Goodfellow, still listed as 
Principal of the Preparatory Department, and his assistants: 
Risdon M. Moore, just graduated at the last commencement, 
tutor in the classics, William S. Pope, B. S. and William H. 
Corrington, B. S., who had both received their degrees from 
McKendree the year before. President Cummings' salary was 
fixed at six hundred dollars a year, the other professors at 
five hundred, and the tutors at two hundred and fifty. Pro- 
fessor Cummings, before he was president, had charge of the 
college paper, and probably should be regarded as its first 
editor, tho President Wentworth nominally held that office. 
As far back as 18 j6, the Illinois Conference had recommended 
that a semi-monthly periodical be established in connection 
with the college, though it was specified in the resolution 
that the conference would assume no responsibility in the 
matter, but the preachers would act as agents. The paper 
was finally authorized by the Joint Board in July, 1S47. It 



CHAPTER XIII. 

President Cumming's Administration 

was first called the '"Lebanon Journal." In the report of the 
publishing committee to the Board in 1848, it is referred to 
as the "Illinois Advocate and Lebanon Journal." A printing 
outfit was secured from St. Louis and a student was found 
who was a practical printer, and he looked after the mechan- 
ical side of the work of getting out the weekly paper. The 
student printer was Thomas Coke Weeden, who was em- 
ployed for his period of apprenticeship on the "Gazette" of 
Carrolton, Illinois. The means of finding him was no doubt 
the ubiquitous circuit rider, who was always "on the go" 
and was an excellent channel of information, especially in 
Methodist circles. Mr. Weeden tells how, before time for 
college to open, he came from Carrolton, in Greene County, 
to Alton, by stage, then by boat to St. Louis, and by stage 
again from there to Lebanon. At first he "laid" the cases 
and set up type in Dr. Goheen's office on the Public Square 
in Lebanon. But as soon as practicable, a building for the 
special use of the college paper, was erected. Rev. G. W. 
Robbins, who was a carpenter before he became a preacher 
and a presiding elder, was the architect and builder. After 
the building was completed on the campus, it became the 
home of the Lebanon Journal and was known as the "Printing 
O&ce." During this period, the college not only printed the 
paper, but even printed the diplomas for the graduates. There 
is a record of the president securing an engraved cut for this 
purpose which cost fifty dollars. One of the catalogues of this 
period contains the announcement that "Those graduates 
who have not received diplomas may now secure them by 
sending in their application with the usual diploma fee." 
There is recorded in the minutes of the Board for 1849 a" 
order for the printing in the Illinois Advocate of "A correct 
list of the members of the Joint Board and the resolutions 
adopted on the death of Rev. Davis Goheen," who was an 
unusually active and useful member of that body. When Pro- 
fessor Cummings became President and Rev. James Leaton 
became a member of the faculty, he was made chief manager 
of the paper and Chairman of the Publishing Committee. In 
1852, the "Illinois Advocate" was moved to St. Louis, and 
its name was changed to "Central Christian Advocate." 

The General Conference of 1852, meeting in Boston, took 
cognizance of two periodicals, the Northwestern Christian 
Advocate and the Central Christian Advocate. The former 
was authorized and became one of the official publications 
of the church. The latter was put up to the Book Committee 



and Publishing Agents to publish if they saw their way clear 
to do It. After consideration, these authorities decided not 
to accept the responsibilities of publishing the Central. But 
the Methodism of that region would not be put off that way. 
The paper was already five years old and its readers regarded 
It as still their paper, tho its name had been changed and it 
had moved its home from Lebanon to St. Louis, as a matter 
of business policy. So the paper was carried on during that 
quadrennium as the organ of the conferences contiguous to 
St. Louis, and having proved its ability to survive, the Gen- 
eral Conference of 1856 took it over as one of the official 
organs of the church. 

Its home was in St. Louis for the remainder of the century 
and it was edited by such men as Rev. Dr. Benjamin F. 
Crary, Benjamin St. James Fry, and Jesse Bowman Young, 
all of whom were members of McKendree's Joint Board. 
The General Conference of 1900 moved it to Kansas City 
where it is now located. Its editor since that time has been 
the genial Cludius B. Spencer, also a member of McKendree's 
Board. In January, 1853, the Board appointed President Cum- 
mings to settle the accounts of the "Illinois Christian Advo- 
cate" and sell the press and office furniture. He was to receive 
thirty per cent of the proceeds for collecting the debts and 
ten per cent for seUing the press. He does not seem to have 
succeeded in the undertaking, for in July of the same year, 
Benjamin Hypes was ordered by the Board to "sell the press 
and office furniture and apply the proceeds upon the debts." 
Thus the first college paper at McKendree did not die but 
graduated and moved out into a greater field m the world 
at large. Accordingly, the "Central Christian Advocate" is 
now McKendree's oldest living graduate. 

By 1850, Professor Mattison had a son old enough to enter 
the preparatory department, and the next year the Board, 
recognizing the fact that a professor could not afford to pay 
tuition for his children out of the salary the college could 
afford to pay him, enacted a rule exempting the children of 
members of the faculty from paying tuition fees. The rule 
is still in force, though the professors' children pay all other 
fees, the same as other students. 

Another interesting bit of legislation which occurred in 
President Cummings' day was a resolution passed in 1852, 
permitting the two boys' literary societies, which were the 
only ones in the college at that time, to hold their meetings 
on Friday night, instead of in the afternoon, "provided there 
be no disorder, no injury of property, and they adjourn not 
later than half past nine o'clock, and do not meet at such 
times as will interfere with religious meetings." 



Mr. Weeden, the student printer of the college paper, 
wrote a reminiscent letter near the close of the last century, 
and sent m to the college an old copy of Virgil, which he 
had used while a student in McKendree. The book is now 
over a hundred years old. He said he obtained it from Newton 
Williams, who was a senior when Weeden was still in the 
preparatory department. Williams was in the class of 1850. 
He was an intimate friend of Professor Cummings. One warm 
evening just before commencement, the two went out to 
Silver Creek to bathe in its cooling waters. Neither could 
swim. Williams got beyond his depth. Cummings could not 
help him. After a few frantic and futile efforts, he gave it 
up and ran for help to the college. Some of the college boys 
went with all possible speed and got the body out of the 
water, but it was too late. They got the bellows from the 
Printing Office, hoping to inflate his lungs and thus induce 
respiration, but it was all in vain. "It was a very sad com- 
mencement," remarks Mr. Weeden. However, since Wil- 
liams had so nearly completed the course, the Board granted 
his degree and ordered his name to be placed in the alumni 
list. This tragedy suggests another which occurred during 
Commencement week in 1899. One pleasant afternoon five 
McKendree girls went "wading" in Silver Creek, probably 
at the same deep water hole where young Williams was 
drowned, commonly known as "Blue Bend." None of them 
could swim. In wading, one got beyond her depth. Another 
went to help her and was pulled into the deep water. An- 
other followed with the same result. The fourth managed to 
struggle through to the other side of the creek and climbed 
to safety on the opposite bank. The one remaining ran for 
help. But the distance was a mile, and when help arrived, 
the efforts of the two physicians, who with a number of 
students and others had hurried to the scene, were not suc- 
cessful in bringing breath back to the limp and lifeless bodies 
of the unfortunate girls. Of course the commencement fes- 
tivities were broken into. All entertainments of a social 
nature were called off. Commencement was reduced to the 
graduating exercises of the class and conferring of degrees. 
The unfortunate girls were Hallie Jack of Beaucoup, Florence 
Spies of St. Jacob, and Ruth Jepson of Lebanon. The last 
was the youngest daughter of Professor Albert G. Jepson, 
who for many years occupied the chair of Mathematics in 
McKendree. President Cummings passed through another 
sorrow during his stay at McKendree, which doubtless was 
deeper and more poignant than his experience with Newton 
Williams. That was the death of his wife, Mrs. Florilla Cum- 
mings. The inscription on the stone which marks her resting 




One Hundred and F./tv-Se, 



<:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^^S:^ 



place in College Hill cemetery says that she died March 8, 
1852, in the twenty-eighth year of her age. Other tragedies 
of this kind occurred in the homes of several of the early 
presidents of McKendree. Another grave stone right near 
that of Mrs. Cummings, was erected to the memory of Mrs. 
Esther Finley, the wife of President Fmley. She died m 1844 
and her death was followed by that of her daughter m the 
same month. Only a few yards away are buried four of the 
children of President Akers. Thus it appears that these edu- 
cational pioneers were not only making financial sacrifices 
and carrying burdens of work up to the limit of their en- 
durance, but they were also called to tread the path of sor- 
row time after time when death entered the home circle. 
McKENDREE MISSIONARY LYCEUM 
As evidence of the missionary spirit which characterized 
the college at the middle of the last century, we have the 
records of a missionary society which was called the Lyceum, 
which was organized November 20, iS-io. A preliminary 
meeting had been held a week earlier which was presided 
over by Risdon M. Moore, who was at that time a teacher 
in the institution, having graduated at the last commence- 
ment, at which time certain committees were appointed to 
report at the next meeting. So on the date above mentioned, 
the organization was completed and permanent officers elec- 
ted. Following is the list: President, W. S. Pope, Vice Pres- 
ident, R. M. Moore, Recording Secretary, O. V. Jones, 
Corresponding Secretary, W. B. Riggin, and Treasurer, D. 
Blackwell. The constitution adopted need not be reproduced 
in full here, but it indicates the object of the organization 
as two fold, "First, to aid in sending the gospel to the desti- 
tute portions of the earth, and second, to improve its mem- 
bers in their knowledge of religious subjects." Any person 
of good moral character was eligible to be elected to mem- 
bership, on presenting a written application and paying a 
fee of twenty-five cents. The first meeting of each collegiate 
year was to be held on the third Thursday evening in Octo- 
ber, and regular meetings were to be held thereafter every 
four weeks. The programs were to consist of essays and 
addresses. An anniversary meeting with suitable program 
was held each year on the "Sabbath night preceding the 
college commencement." The list of members is as follows: 
Daniel Alexander, J. H. Barger, R. M. Bell, D. Blackwell, 
W. H. Corrington, S. L. Edwards, W. C. Gillham, W. R. 
Howard, Z. R. Humphrey, O. V. Jones, J. W. Lapham, 
John Leeper, G. L. Moore, R. M. Moore, W. C Pitner, 
J. I. Rinaker, Isaiah Stickel, W. B. Riggin, W. F. Short. 



These twenty members were students or teachers in the 
institution. The organization probably did not live many 
years, but was soon crowded out by other commendable 
activities. 

THE CLASS OF 1850' 

This was the last class to graduate during the presidency 
of Dr. Wentworth. Colonel Morrison was not in the class 
but was a student under Dr. Wentworth. Brief biographies 
of these men follow. 

DR SAMUEL M. MARTIN 

Samuel Murray Martin was born at Leesburg, Virginia, 
February 13, 1828 just one week before the organization of 
the board that laid the foundations of McKendree College. 
He became a student in McKendree in 1848 and graduated 
in 1850, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. He later attended a 
medical college and received the degree of M. D. He was 
married November 2j, iS"?:,, to Miss Elizabeth Kerr. The 
following are the names of their six children: Arthur L., 
Nettie C, Mary L., Annie H., Minnie E., and Murray K. 
Having made preparation along the line of two professions, 
his time was divided between teaching and the practice of 
medicine. He taught a year in the Illinois Female College 
just following his graduation. In later years, he taught in 
the Jacksonville high school, the Winchester high school, the 
Canton Seminary of Canton, Mo., and for ten years, 1863- 
1873, he was County Superintendent of Schools of Morgan 
County, Illinois. From 1873 to 1877, he was County Clerk 
of the same county. In 1885, he was appointed physician to 
the Blackfeet Indians. In religion, he was a Methodist, in 
politics, a Democrat. He died near the close of the century. 
REV. WILLIAM McKENDREE McELFRESH 

William McKendree McElfresh was born m Nicholas 
County, Kentucky, April g, 182';. He was a son of Rev. 
John McElfresh, formerly a member of the Baltimore Con- 
ference. With his parents, he moved to Morgan County, 
Illinois, in the fall of 1834, to a farm near Jacksonville. He 
died at his home in Jacksonville, March 23, 1909. He grad- 
uated from McKendree in 1850, receiving the degree of B. S. 
Later he was granted the degree of M. S. and in 1897, that 
of D. D. In 1853, he was married to Miss Matilda J. Belford, 
who was his faithful companion and helper during his long 
ministerial career. He joined the Illinois Conference in 185 1 
and received the following appointments: 1851, Rushville; 
1852, Chili; 1853, Pulaski; 1854-55, White Hall; 1856, Dan- 
ville; 1857-58, Clinton; 1859, Grigsville; 1860-61, Winches- 
ter; 1862-64, Waverly; 1865-67, Island Grove; 1868-69, 

*Not,- Bv or...r th,s w.,s oniu.cJ from Chapter XII, 



One Hundred and F./tv-£.glu 



IIMC KENDREE 



Waverly; 1870-71, Delavan; 1872-75, Springfield District; 
1876, Bloomington University Charge; 1877-80, Danville 
District; 1881, Jacksonville Circuit; 1885-86, Alexander; 
1887-88, Versailles; 1890-92, Payson; 1893-94, Barry; 1895- 
97, Superannuated; 1898, Financial Agent of the Illinois 
Women's College; 1899-1909, Superannuated. He was a mem- 
ber of the General Conference of 1872, which was held m 
Brooklyn, New York. His conference class numbered forty- 
seven, of which he was the last to superannu.ite. 
COL. RISDON MARSHALL MOORE 
Risdon Marshall Moore was born near Cahokia, St. Clair 
County, Illinois, February 16, 1827. His father was Cap- 
tain Jonathan Moore, who 
was a soldier m the Black- 
hiwk War and the Civil 
Wir. His mother was Eliza- 
beth Lunsford before her 
marriage. He entered Mc- 
Kendree College in 1845 and 
graduated in 1850, receiving 
the degree A. B. Later he 
received the degree of A.M. 
and in 1895, that of Ph. D. 
from his alma mater. He was 
a member of the Philoso- 
phian Literary Society. For 
four years after his grad- 
uation, he was tutor in Latin and Greek in McKendree. He 
was then elected Professor of Mathematics, which position 
he held till 1866, excepting the three years 1862-65, when 
he was serving in the Civil War as Colonel of the 117th 
regiment of Illinois Volunteers. In this regiment were found 
a considerable number of McKendree students who left 
their college to fight their country's battles. In 1866, Colonel 
Moore went to Selma, Alabama, to engage in the coal mining 
business. In 1875, he was appointed special agent of the U. S. 
Treasury Department and in 1878 was transferred to San 
Antonio, Texas, where he resided, except for short intervals, 
until his death January 26, 1909. The most of this period he 
was holding a government appointment of some kind. He 
was married September 14, 1857, to Miss Helen Simmons of 
Northampton, Mass. To them were born four children: Al- 
bert Lincoln, George Samuel, Frank Risdon, and Helen Caro- 
line. All are now living except the eldest. Colonel Moore was 
a Republican in politics, a member of the Masonic order, a 
man of scholarly attainments, a great lover of the classics, a 




RISDON MOORE 



devout Christi.m and an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

His sister, Mrs. Mary FitzGerrell, is still living in Lebanon 
at an advanced age. She has always been interested in history 
and biography, and has stored in her own memory a wealth 
of information about persons connected with the early his- 
tory of Lebanon and the college. 

COL. WILLIAM R. MORRISON 

William Ralls Morrison, member of a prominent Mon- 
roe County family, was a student in McKendree in the 
forties, but did not stay till graduation because he left 
college to enter the Mexican War as a soldier in an Illinois 
regiment. He was in most of the battles of General Taylor's 
campaign. After the war closed, he did not return to college, 
but studied law and was admitted to the bar. From 1855 to 
1859 he was a member of the Illinois Legislature and during 
the last year he was Speaker of the House. When the Civil 
War broke out, he organized and became Colonel of the 49th 
Regiment of Illinois Volunteers. He fought with his regiment 
at Fort Donelson and other important battles, but resigned 
in the fall of 1863 to take his place in Congress as a "War 
Democrat." He had been elected while at the front. After 
his term in Congress, he practiced law in his home city of 
Waterloo from 1865 to 1873, when he was again sent to 
represent his district at Washington. From then till 1887, he 
was a member of Congress. He gained wide distinction dur- 
ing those years as an advocate of reduction of the tariff. He 
was for years Chairman of the Ways and Means Commission. 
His bill of 1884, which provided for a horizontal reduction 
of twenty per cent in all tariff schedules gained for him the 
nickname "Horizontal Bill." In 1885, he was defeated by 
General John A. Logan for the United States Senate, by only 
one vote. President Cleveland appointed him a member of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission in 1887, and he served 
in that body for ten years, and for six years was chairman. 
He spent his declining years at his spacious and commodious 
home in Waterloo, Illinois. He left no children, but be- 
queathed his home to the city, to be used as a public library. 
In 1899, McKendree conferred upon him the degree of LL. D. 
in recognition of his distinguished service as a lawyer and 
statesman. 

HON. WILLIAM ANDREW JACKSON SPARKS 

William Andrew Jackson Sparks was born near New 
Albany, Indiana, November 15, 1828. His parents, Baxter 
and Elizabeth (Gwin) Sparks, were natives of Pennsylvania. 
They moved from New Albany when William, the young- 
est of their ten children, was only a child, to Macoupin 




One Hundred and FiftyHme 



^MC KENDREE .^^^^^s:^^^^:::^^^^ 




W A J SPARKS 



County, Illinois. He enter- 
ed McKendree in 1847, and 
graduated in 1850, receiving 
the degree of B. S., and in 
iqoo, he was granted the 
honorary degree of LL. D. 
by his alma mater. He was a 
member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. After his 
graduation, he went to Car- 
lyle, Illinois, studied law in 
the office of Judge Breese, 
was admitted to the bar, and 
began the practice of law at 
Carlylein 1851. In 1853, he 
was appointed receiver of public moneys for the U. S. Land 
Office at Edwardsville, and held this appointment until the land 
offices of the state were consolidated at Springfield. He served 
one term in the Illinois Legislature, one in the Illinois State 
Senate, and four terms in Congress, representing the six- 
teenth congressional district of Illinois. He was elected on 
the Democratic ticket, and became prominent in his party, 
so that when Mr. Cleveland became President, he appointed 
Mr. Sparks to the position of Commissioner of the General 
Land Office of the U. S. His administration of this office 
gained him the hearty commendation of President Cleveland. 
He was married April 16, 1855, to Miss Julia E. Parker, of 
Edwardsville. They lived in Carlyle until 1895 when, Mr. 
Sparks having retired from active work some years previous, 
they moved to St. Louis. His death occurred there in 1905. 
He left a widow but no children. 

JAMES H. RIGGIN 

James H. Riggin was a native of Illinois. He was edu- 
cated in McKendree, where he graduated in the class of 
1850, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society, being one of the original founders 
of that organization. After his graduation, he engaged in 
mercantile business in the city of Belleville, but after a few 
years, having suffered some mental derangement, he was 
taken to the hospital for the insane at Jacksonville, where 
he died some years later. His remains lie buried in College 
Hill Cemetery. 

CHARLES NELSON STARBIRD 

Charles Nelson Starbird was born at Claremont, New 
Hampshire, November 29, 1823. He prepared for college 
at Kimball Union Academy and took his A. B. degree at 
Middlebury College, Vermont, in 1S45. He came to Illi' 



nois, did the work m McKendree required for the A. M- 
degree which he received with the class of 1850. He then 
settled in Chester, Illinois, where he practiced law and held 
the office of State's Attorney. His death occurred in 1858. 
NEWTON WILLIAMS 
Newton Williams was a member of this class, but four 
weeks before commencement in iS^o, he was drowned in 
Silver Creek. Since he had so nearly completed the work, 
the board granted the degree the same as to the other mem- 
bers of the class, and ordered his name to be placed in the 
alumni list. 

THE CLASS OF 1851 
THOMAS S. CASEY 

Thomas Sloo Casey, son of Zadoc Casey, once Governor 
of Illinois, was born April 6, 1832, and died at his home 
in Springfield, Illinois, 
March 1,1891. He was edu- 
cated at McKendree, grad- 
uating in 1851 with the 
degree of A. B., and later 
received the master's degree. 
He was one of the founders 
of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He studied law and 
was admitted to the bar in 
i8')4.Ini86o,hewaselected 
State's Attorney for the 
twelfth Judicial District, 
and was re-elected in 1864. 
In 1 862,heentered theUnion 

Army as Colonel of the iioth Regiment of Illinois Volun- 
teers. About a year later, he was severely wounded at the 
battle of Stone River and compelled to return home. In 1870, 
he was elected to the Illinois Legislature, and in 1872, to 
the State Senate. In 1879, he was elected Circuit Judge, and 
was immediately appointed one of the judges of the Appellate 
Court of the Fourth District. He served in this position until 
1885, when he moved to Springfield where he engaged in the 
practice of law until the time of his death. He was married 
in 1861, to Miss Matilda Moran, of Springfield. Of their 
three children, two daughters are now living: Carrie, now 
Mrs. D. C. Nugent, of St. Louis, and Louise, now Mrs. 
Baker, the wife of Lieutenant Baker, U. S. A. 
STEPHEN F. CORRINGTON 

Stephen Fletcher Corrington was born in Millersburg, 
Bourbon County, Kentucky, February i, 1830. He entered 
McKendree in the fill of 1847 and graduated in iS";!, re- 




THOMAS S. CASEY 



One Hundred and Si.xtv 



c^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^^s^ 



ceiving the degree of A. B. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Literary Society. He served as book-keeper and 
salesman for a firm in Jacksonville, lUinois, for a year and 
then taught school a year. He then studied law m the 
office of Judge Brown, of Jacksonville. He practiced law for 
a time in that city, and then moved to CarroUton, Illinois. 
In the fall of 1859, ^e was elected superintendent of schools 
of Greene County. He held this office till 1869, and is said 
to have traveled as much as 3000 miles a year in the discharge 
of his duties visiting the schools of the county. In 1859, he 
resumed the practice of law, and the same year he was elected 
city clerk, which office he held for four years. He was also 
a justice of the peace and notary public, making a specialty 
of collecting and conveyancing. Later, he held the office of 
master in chancery. His death occurred in the year 1887. 
He was married May 13, 1856 to Sue F. Bell, of Jacksonville. 
Their seven children were Rosabella May, Ailsie Gray, Anna 
Lenora, Sarah Emma, Francis Fletcher, Elijah Edward, and 
William Jeremiah. 

SURRY L. EDWARDS 

Surry L. Edwards was born at Guilford Centre, Ver- 
mont, March 13, 1827. He entered McKendree in the fall 
of 1847, and graduated in 185 1, receiving the degree of 
A. B., and later, A. M. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. He studied dentistry in St. Louis after 
teaching school for five years. He then practiced his pro- 
fession eleven years in Griggsville, Illinois, four years in Pe- 
oria, and then settled permanently in Des Moines, Iowa, 
where he practiced dentistry for many years, and ended his 
long and useful career in 1895. He was married April 24, 
1855, to Emma A. Dickinson, of Griggsville, 111. Their nine 
children are Lucy Jane, Rollin Wentworth, Horace Noble, 
Newton Olin, Walter Spencer, Mary Amelia, Esther Emma, 
Joseph Albert, and Benjamin Akers. Walter was drowned 
in 1882 at the age of eleven. 

NINIAN EDWARDS PRIMM 

Ninian Edwards Primm was born in the vicinity of Belle- 
ville, Illinois, April 16, 1830. He was named for Governor 
Ninian Edwards, to whom he was in some way related. 
He became a student in McKendree and graduated in the 
class of 1851, receiving the degree of B. S. The records of 
the literary societies do not indicate that he was a member 
of either one. There is some evidence that he studied law, 
but his career was short, for his death occurred in 1857 — 
only six years after his graduation. 

DR. WILLIAM B. RIGGIN 

William BoHvar Riggin was born in Lebanon, Illinois, 
December 11, 1826. He belonged to a prominent Lebanon 



family whose name appears in the story of the founding 
of McKendree. He was for several years a student in the 
college, and graduated in the class of 1851. He was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Society. He studied medicine, and 
received the degree of M. D., but was not permitted to 
practice his profession long. His career was cut short by 
his death at Asheville, North Carolina, August 8, 1856. 
GEN. JOHN I. RINAKER 

John Irving Rinaker was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 
in November, 1830, and died at his winter home m Eustis, 
Florida, January 14, 1915. He came to Illinois while still 
a youth, and secured a part of his education at Illinois 
College, but later transferred to McKendree, and graduated 
in the class of 18'ii. He was a member of the Platonian So- 
ciety. In 1892, McKendree gave him the honorary degree of 
LL. D. He studied law and began the practice of this pro- 
fession at Carlinville, Illinois, in 1854. That was his regular 
occupation all his life except for the time that he was a soldier 
in the Civil War. He practiced m the state courts, the dis- 
trict courts, and the United States Supreme Court. In 1872 
and in 1876, he was a Republican presidential elector. In 
1876 and m 1884, he was a delegate to the Republican 
National Convention. In 1894, he was elected to Congress, 
and served one term. He has served on various important 
boards, both in his own city and in others, and was for 
some years a trustee of McKendree College. In 1862, he 
went into the Union army as Colonel of the 122nd Regiment 
Illinois Volunteers, and came home at the close of the war 
with the title of Brigadier General. He was for sixty-six years 
a member of the Methodist Church. He was also a Mason, 
a member of the American Bar Association and various other 
organisations. He was married in 1855, to Miss Clarissa 
Keplinger, of Morgan County. Their four sons are: Thomas, 
Samuel, John Irving, Jr., and Lewis. John Irving, Jr. is an 
architect, and designed the present college library building 
in 1917. In the entrance of the building is a memorial tablet 
to General Rinaker. "Like an armed warrior; like a plumed 
knight, he met his last great summons, and, wrapped in the 
American flag, he moved out to his just and shining reward, 
alone and absolutely unafraid." 

ALEXANDER VAN WINKLE 

Alexander Van Winkle was born in Morgan County, 
Illinois, January 9, 1831, "the winter of the big snow." 
His parents were from Wayne County, Kentucky. Some 
of his ancestors were among the earliest immigrants to 
this country from Holland. One of them returned to Holland 
in 1633, bearing a letter from the church society in New 




ffMC KENDREE"^^^^^s:^;.^^^.>^^^ 



Amsterdam. The next year he returned to America with his 
bride and settled in New Jersey. From there his descendants 
have scattered to various parts of the country. Mr. Van 
Winkle entered McKendree College in 1848 and graduated 
in 1851, with the degree of B. S. In 1849, he and fifteen other 
young men became the founders of the Platonian Literary 
Society. In 1852, he helped to "navigate a prairie schooner," 
drawn by eight oxen, across the plains to California. He re- 
turned in 1858, and when the war broke out, enlisted in 
the army and served three years as a soldier. He spent a 
number of years in teaching, but in the declining years of 
his long life, he enjoyed the quiet farm life at his home 
near Franklin, Illinois. He was married February 28, 1862, to 
Henrietta Keplinger. Of this union, there were three chil- 
dren, Mary Henrietta and twin sons. Homer Alexander and 
Horace, the latter of whom died in infancy. The daughter is 
now Mrs. W. B. Otwell, of Carlinville. Some years after the 
death of his first wife, Mr. Van Winkle was married in 1890 
to Melissa J. Criswell, now deceased. He is a Methodist of 
the old school, having united with the church in his youth. 
In politics, he is a Republican, having voted with that party 
ever since its origin, but has never aspired to office himself. 
His death occurred in January, 1914. 

A. H. H. ROUNTREE 
Aaron Herbert Hawkins Rountree was born at Hills- 
boro, Illinois, January 2, 1822, and died at the same place, 
January 2, 1880, on his fifty-eighth birthday. His parents 
were Hiram and Nancy Wright Rountree. He entered 
McKendree in 1842, pursued his studies for two years, 
then after a period of teaching, returned and completed his 
course in 1851, receiving the degree of A. B. In 1859, he 
received the degree of A. M. While in McKendree, he was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. His career 
includes nine years of teaching, twenty-one of merchandising; 
and in 1874, he entered upon the business of banking. He 
was popular in his own city, having been alderman, mayor, 
and president of the Board of Education. He was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a Royal Arch Mason, 
member of the Eastern Star, and the Odd Fellows Lodge; 
and in all these lodges, he wielded the gavel. He was married 
at Huntsville, Alabama, March 20, 184'i, to Miss Eliza Agnes 
Walpole. To them were born nine children, of whom six died 
in infancy. The surviving ones are now Professor Hiram P. 
Rountree of Chicago, Mrs. Mary L. McHenry, Detroit, 
Michigan, and Mrs. Etta A. Stubblefield, Hillsboro, Illinois. 

COL. JONATHAN MERRIAM 

Jonathan Merriam was born in the state of Vermont, 

November 1, 1834. He came with his parents m 183,6, 



living in Springfield, Alton, and after 1841, in Ta:ewell 
County. He attended the Illinois Wesleyan University, and 
McKendree College, leaving the latter institution in 1852, 
on account of impaired health. He was a member of the Pla- 
tonian Literary Society. In 186;), McKendree conferred upon 
him the degree of A. M. In 1862, he enlisted in the Union 
<irmy and became Lieutenant-Colonel of the 117th Illinois 
Volunteers, the regiment which contained so many McKen- 
dreans. He was a member of the Illinois Constitutional Con- 
ventions of 1869 and 1870. He held the position of Internal 
Revenue Collector for the Springfield District from 1873 to 
1882. He was elected to the Illinois Legislature in 1894 and 
again in 1896. In 1898, he was appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley to the Office of United States Pension Commissioner 
at Chicago. He was for many years a trustee of McKendree 
College. He several times attended the reunions of his reg- 
iment at McKendree College. The last time was in 1916. In 
politics, he was a Republican and in religion, a Baptist. At 
the time of his death, he was a deacon in the Emanuel Baptist 
Church in Chicago, altho for the last six years of his Hfe his 
residence was at Wheaton. His death occurred as the result 
of a grade-crossing accident at Wheaton in September, 1919, 
within a few weeks of his eighty-fifth birthday. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, three sons, and three daughters, all married 
except the youngest daughter. His children all live in Illinois 
and his sons occupy positions of trust and honor in the busi- 
ness world. 

THE CLASS OF 1852 
HENRY C. PIKE 
Henry Clay Fike was born near Mascoutah, Illinois, De- 
cember 21, i8j2. His father, Abel Fike, with his family, 
came from South Carolina 
in 181 1 and located in the 
Turkey Hill settlement 
near Belleville. After pass- 
ing through the common 
schools, he entered McKen- 
dree College in 1847, while 
Dr. Wentworth was presi- 
dent, and graduated in i8';2, 
receiving the degree of A. B., 
;ind subsequently that ot A. 
M. He IS a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society, 
which he assisted in organiz- 
ing April 20, 1840. He was 
marnedDecember 25, i8'i'!,toMissLucyC.Power.of Trenton, 




HENRY CLAY FIKE 




Illinois. To this union two children were horn, May, who died 
in early childhood, and Miss Ellie, who lived with her father. 
Mrs. Fike died June 25, 1906. After graduating, Mr. Fike 
engaged in teaching up to the date of the Civil War, when 
he enlisted in the Union arnjy and served as quartermaster 
of the 117th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry from 
August, 1862, till the close of the war. This regiment was 
commanded by Colonel Risdon M. Moore, who was from 
the faculty of McKendree College. In 1867, Mr. Fike moved 
with his family from Mascoutah to Warrensburg, Missouri, 
where he engaged in business pursuits till 1882, when he 
became connected with the auditing department of the Mis- 
souri Pacific Railway Company, which he served for seven 
years. He completed two decades of service as clerk of 
the United States Internal Revenue OfBce in Kansas City, 
Missouri. Mr. Fike was officially connected with the State 
Normal School at Warrensburg for twenty-six years. He 
was a member of the Board of Education, and of the City 
Council of Warrensburg, each for six years. He is a member 
of the Masonic Fraternity, and of the National Union, a 
beneficiary organization; also of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, which he joined in 1848 while a student at McKen- 
dree. He has served as a Sunday School Superintendent for 
thirty-eight years. He was a lay delegate to the General 
Conference held in Baltimore, Maryland in 1876. In politics, 
he IS a Republican. His home was at Warrensburg, Missouri 
until his death, which occurred April i, 1919. 

CHARLES WESLEY JEROME 
Charles Wesley Jerome was born in Onandagua County, 
New York, September 8, 1828, the same year that McKen- 
dree was founded. He came with his parents to Illinois 
in 1834, and spent most of his early life on a farm m Mad- 
ison County. He entered McKendree in 1848, and was 
one of the sixteen original founders of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He graduated in 1852, receiving the degree of A. B. 
Three years later he received the degree of A. M. Immediate- 
ly after graduation, he became instructor in the Danville (111.) 
Seminary. After two years, he became principal of the Shelby 
Male and Female Seminary at Shelbyville, Illinois. He re- 
mained in this position till 1862, when he enlisted in the 
II ^th regiment Illinois Volunteers, and served as quarter- 
master in this regiment until the close of the war. As a part 
of his war experience, he was captured by Gen. Wheeler 
and paroled at McMinnville, Tennessee. After the war, he 
returned to Shelbyville for four years more. Then for four 
years he was principal of the Bedford Seminary, at Shelby- 
ville, Tennessee. In 1874, he was elected professor of Latin 



and Greek in the Southern Illinois Normal University, at 
Carbondale. After sixteen years of service in this institution, 
failing health induced him to resign his position and retire 
from active life. He was married m August, i8';S, to Miss 
Eugenia A. Morrison, of Delaware, Ohio. Their only son, 
Charles M., was born in 1867. After his retirement. Professor 
Jerome lived for some years in Atlanta, Georgia. His home 
was in Washington, D. C. for some years previous to his 
death, which occurred several years ago. 

JUDGE WILLIAM C. JONES 
William Cuthbert Jones was born at Bowling Green, 
Kentucky, July 16, 1831. He was a son of Dr. Cuthbert 
T. and EHza R. (Treat) 
Jones, who moved with 
their family to Chester, 
Illinois, when their son was 
only three years of age. He 
entered McKendree when 
quite young, and graduated 
in 1852, with the degree of 
A. B., later receiving the 
Master's degree, and in 
1895, his Alma Mater 
honored him with the de- 
gree of LL. D. He was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Lit- 
erary Society. He studied 

law at Bowling Green, Kentucky, and practiced this profession 
at Chester, III, Hopkinsville, Ky., and St. Louis, Mo. until the 
opening of the Civil War. He then enlisted m the Union army 
as a member of the Fourth regiment of the United States Re- 
serve Corps. In 1862, he was appointed paymaster of the 
United States Volunteers, with the rank of maior. He served 
this capacity until the close of the war. He then engaged 
in business in St. Louis, but soon returned to the practice 
of law, which he followed till his death, which occurred in 
1904. He was elected judge of the Criminal Court of St. 
Louis in 1874, and held this office till 1878. He was for many 
years a trustee of McKendree, and was president of the 
Board from 1897 tiU the time of his death in 1904. In politics, 
he was a Democrat. He belonged to the Royal Arcanum, 
Legion of Honor, Elks, and Knights of Honor. In the last 
named lodge, he was grand dictator of the State of Missouri. 
He was married November 20, i8')6, to Miss Mary A. 
Chester. Of their seven children, four are now living. Their 
names are: Mrs. Walter B. Watson, Mrs. Joseph Goodwin, 
and two sons, James C. and Giles F. Jones. They all reside 
in St. Louis. 




JUDGE JONES 




One Hundred and Si.vtv-Th 



LEBANON JOURNAL. 



D GOUEEN, B. HVPES, AITO G. L. ROBERTS-PUBUSHERS; \VSNTW0ETI1, EDITORi CUJlilTNGS, MATTISON, GOODFELLOW AND S. M. E. GOHEEN-ASSISTANT« - 


BEVC™ I» CE.E1^ U.TLLL,O^CI, mEKATUHI. SUI.CE. MOR^UTT, WLUi.OK, 1K»^ FORE.G, .M, IK.„E>T1C NEW, «D «L>CEa^>E..r. »VB.E.T,. 


VOL. 1. LEBANON, ILUNOIS, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9th, 1847. NO. 1. 



J ■ FortheLubaDoa Josraal. ; ," 

SABB.1TH CONVE.NTIQN. ' 
ifc Tiic SabUth AModotioB of Southern Illinoit 
»«Mcmbled al NaihriUe, Wishfbgton c^imty, 
jNot.Sd, 1847. . A respectable number of delc- 
■^ gates •wcrepn?«nt. The cooTomiOT was call- 
'6.1 to order at 11 o'cloei A. M., and the deTotiua- 
, al eieiciscs conducted by Roy. W. B. Carter, 
lathe abeeace of the Preaident of the Assi^i- 

lege, dolWcrcd tho — ."i"" »"W«>c<,. -•- 
The Convention 
D. James. Predden^^l*. 

' l.lfflBc1ier, Vice Presi 



opening adflrese. '" 
organiiedlyappouiting Rev 
eddenl;^r». C- Rl«g^ C 



btu^ Prof Cumming. mtd Be 


. Wm. Clifle, 


^xretarie.. 








meeting was 


a^Kms connected with the 


of various bu. 


objecu of the 


SeSlation, and in arranging the 


preliminaries 


Ir-m e.jping public mecung. 





and Rev. W. Forter. The ad- 
dress of Iho firet named genUcman, Rerr-Mr. 
Tbatcher, was a close and able argument on the 
*'Sabbath a« a perpetual inititulion, and lU ob- 
«rTaDC« as of lasting obligation." 

Rev. Mr. Cliffe followed in a speech of much 
Interest, ehowing that reform in regard to the 
proper obBerrancc of the Sabbath, must begin 

a woid,'uilI that pertains to the affiiirs of ©Ycry 

da/life. ' 

Dr. flnley argued with j;reat strength that 

Christianfc-arelhe "light of tho world," and that 

to maintain the Sabbath, ihej murt make the 
k largest sacrifices. 
^ \ Rev. Mr. Foster dwell with much interent 

on Iheojndirion of thmga ai they formerly ex. 
[ ^^Sslcd'iyiluB country. le*diiis to Sabbath dese- 



hospitality iu entertaining the members 
e ConrentioQ. 

ic opening address of ProC Cummings, and 
iscufisions in Convention, together with the 
, produced 



the great object of lh< 

More than one hundred copies of Edward's 
.Manual on the Sabbath, were distributed: a worit 
that ahould be in eTery family in the land, and 

llic next mectmg of the A.»sociaU"Qn -vrill be 

held at BeUerille, on the fir«l Wednesday m 

May next, to commence at 7 o'clock in the eTe- 

ning. Rot, Messrs. Elliott, Peck and Harrison 

ecomm ^^^^ ^^jj|^£^>lkled clerk. 

0*- Herald of RcligiuuB Liberty, and other 
paper* friendly to the better obserrance •f the 
Sabbath, please copy. 



EMERALD MOUND. 
T?» Tisited this delightful spot, the Tomantic 
denc«of Dajtiel Baldwib Esq., last Saturday, 
cnjoyod Uia hnapitalitJes of its worthy proprietor— ty 
DO means neglecting a ttroll upon the Bummit of this 
wonderful eleration. The view of the prairie at this 

huttJicrt is something in the sombre lod pensive as- 
pect of dying Nature. lha,t accords well with the fecl- 

Tisit to this sweet epot. The follow ingdesci 
it, i^Titten for an Ohio paper, by one of our i 
Editom, eometiine eince, cannot fciil to be read with 

"The Emerald Mound from which I 
ting, is a beautiful and romantic place. The 
principal elcTation is about eixty fret aboTc the 



> half a doien 
laped, Bcattered around it. 
t of tho large one ig level, and square, 



.aa worship. 



■Great, Ihe Holy and the 

ped "in spirit and in truth 

By aacending a stairway of twenty steps, we 
B transported back as many centuries, and 
ow not whether we are standing on the site 
a temple era tomb. We arc suiToundedby 

the viable signe of a people whose procci-sions 
i sacrifices and battles are forgi'ttcni and 
lir praploj-menls and language and sciences 
) losrtV the world. In the absence of all 

It there lived and died a race of men, on these 



.V sweet and deliglilliil place is the Emerald 
Mound. It has much to attract and please— 
Here are tlic mounds connecting the liWn;: .■ 
the present to the dead of the past. The liir 
reaching view of the adjoining lands and th'-i 
wave-like undulations, the busy herds of grazin; 
cattle, the large, rich fields of grain, llie go^^ 
taste exhibited in tho arrangement of building 
and gardens and shnibberj*, and, above all, thi 
kindness and intelligence of the eicellciit £iniil; 
wliose residence it is, altogether, render llr 
Mound one of the most interesting andbeautitu 
places — a place of comfort and happiness to tti- 
dwcUere, and of quiet enjoyroent and rest to 



it is both cspediciit and ncces..«n' thai 
hostilities should cease anionj! brrtbri 
have "one Lonl, om- lailh, one baptism." 
the essentials of dirisAitn am'/i/ sln-uld 
lically adopted, even tvliore ujiilijnnit 
practicable. This, is cs-seutia! tn our 
and efficiency in the great r ' 



the evangelical chinches, is the present \ 
and fonnidaUc cfforls of tlic Papacy. Tl 
of sin seems to have girded hiniM-lf for 
conflict. Upon the reviv.^l of the ai,;: 



For the Lebanon Joumal- 
INTERNATIONAL PATRIOTISM. 
Mk. EnlTon— 'I-he f.llouin; i.iri.i.nt 
related to me tho ,m,.n. r ,-,ri.rilr r,:.-! 

llrockviUe. Duvin::!;: 

al and •the rel°ls,"nn.! il i- :m.i,,iiV - v. 



ELlIir Bl'RUlTT. 



Rediiced facsimile of the first copy of the Lebanon Journal of which Anson Cummings was probably th: first editor 



REV. JOHN LEEPER 
John Leeper was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, Octo- 
ber i8, 1827. In 1837, he came with his father's family 
to Perry County, Illinois. From his parents, who were mem- 
bers of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, he received care- 
ful religious training. In addition to his common school 
education, he attended an academy at Collinsville, and after- 
ward McKendree College, from which he graduated in the 
class of 1852, receiving the degree of B. S. In 1855, he re- 
ceived the M. S. degree and in 1894, his Alma Mater honored 
him with the degree of Doctor of Divinity. He was a member 
of the Philosophi.in Literary Society. He was converted at 
a camp-meetmg in W.ishington County, and joined the Meth- 
odist Church. And, believing himself called to the mini.stry. 



he joined the Southern Illinois Conference in 1856. He was 
married March 30, 1854, to Miss Christiana A. Vernor, of 
Nashville, Illinois. Three of their five children grew to ma- 
turity. They are: Mrs. M. M. Waller, St. Louis, John C. 
Leeper, of East St. Louis, and Mrs. Florence Hoopes, of 
Sumner. Dr. Leeper served the following charges as pastor: 
Robinson, Palestine, Mt. Carmel Circuit, Carmi, Sparta, 
Ashley, Richview, Mt. Vernon, Effingham, Salem Circuit. 
Irvington, Litchfield, Sumner, Jerseyville, Duquoin, Collins- 
ville, Trenton, Cisne, Lawrenceville, Okawville, Freeburg, 
iind Hagarstown. He served a term as presiding elder on 
each of the following named districts: Mt. Vernon, Olney, 
and Vandalia. He died at Nashville, Illinois, July 7, 1906. 




One Hundred and Si.vtv-Fc 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Doctor A/(er's Third Term 



IN i8=;2, Dr- Cummings laid down the t.isk of the presi- 
dency and Rev. Peter Akers was for the third time 
called to take it up. No man was better acquainted 
with the college and its struggles, its successes and failures. 
He was now at the mature age of sixty-two, but still vigorous 
in body and mind, and especially rich in those experiences 
which are useful to a religious leader. This was a longer term 
than either of his preceding ones. He had .been president 
when the first charter was secured, and again during the 
year 1845-46. In the minutes of the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference for 1852, which was the first session of that body, is 
found a report on education, which refers to the fact that 
by the division of the Illinois Conference, McKendree Col- 
lege fiiUs as an heritage to the Southern Illinois Conference, 
and mentions as a cause of gratification the fact that Dr. 
Akers has again been made president, stating further that 
"His popularity as a preacher, his purity of morals, his fervent 
piety, in connection with his literary attainments, promise 
great usefulness to the college and the conference." He had 
been a member of the Illinois Conference almost from its 
beginning, and he did not think it worth while to transfer 
to the Southern Illinois, since the Illinois was still in Mc 
Kendree's patronizing territory. The conference was held in 
Belleville that year. Rev. Charles M. Holliday was appointed 
pastor at Lebanon, with Rev. W. L. Deneen as his assistant. 
Mr. Deneen was really on the retired list and lived in Leb- 
anon. The presiding officer was Bishop Edward R. Ames, 
who had recently been elevated to the episcopacy by the 
General Conference, which met in Boston in May, 1852. It 
seems probable that being so close to the scene of his early 
labors in the educational field, he would visit McKendree 
and see what progress had been made in the interval of nearly 
a quarter of a century, but we have found no record to show 
whether he did or not. The faculty associated with Dr. Akers 
at this time were : Rev. James Leaton, professor of Natural 
Science, Rev. Russell Z. Mason, professor of Mathematics 
and Philosophy, and Oran Faville, professor of Ancient Lan- 
guages, with Risdon M. Moore and William S. Pope as 
tutors. Leaton and Mason, as well as both the tutors were 
already in the faculty when Dr. Akers took charge. The 
next year Rev. Nelson E. Cobleigh came from New England 
to Southern Illinois and became pastor of the Methodist 
Church in Lebanon, and at the same time. Professor of An- 
cient Languages in the college, so that he served an appren- 



ticeship with Dr. Akers before becoming president himself. 
The next year he became a member of the faculty m Lawrence 
College, in Wisconsin, and Rev. George C. Jones took his 
place in McKendree. Prof. Jones served as secretary of the 
Joint Board, however not nearly so long as Professor O. V. 
Jones, who served a little later. Other new members of the 
faculty were Rev. Edward C. Merrick, professor of Math- 
ematics, and Rev. Werter R. Davis, professor of Natural 
Sciences. It was in this administration that we first find 
mention of O. V. Jones and S. H. Deneen as tutors, who 
later became prominent members of the faculty. Rev. Gallus 
Rutz was for several years teacher of German. Concerning 
some of these men, we have very slight information outside 
of the fact that they served in the faculty. But Professor 
Davis deserves more than a passing notice. 
REV. W. R. DAVIS 
He was horn in CircleviUe, Ohio, April i, 1815, and was 
therefore thirty-nine years old when he came to McKendree. 
He attended Kenyon College, but left there at the age of nine- 
teen without finishing the course because he was repelled by 
the lack of religion in the institution. He had strict religious 
training at home and deep religious convictions of his own. 
His father was a member of the Episcopal Church, and his 
mother a Presbyterian. But he was converted in a Methodist 
camp meeting and henceforth allied himself with Methodism. 
He used to say that he was "paternally an Episcopalian, 
maternally a Presbyterian, but by the grace of God, a Meth- 
odist." He was licensed to preach by James B. Fmley in 
1835. He was first a member of the Ohio Conference, but 
belonged to several different ones during his lifetime. He 
was once imprisoned in the state of Virginia for preaching 
against slavery. He was married in 184J, to Minerva Russell, 
with whom he lived for half a century till his death in 1893. 
In 1854, he was transferred to St. Louis and became pastor 
of Ebenezer Chapel. The next year he was elected to the 
chair of Natural Science in McKendree, where he spent three 
busy years, when he was elected to be the first president of 
Baker University at Baldwin, Kansas, and authorized to select 
the remainder of the faculty himself. He had a successful 
career at Baker, and for many years shaped the destiny of 
the "First College in Kansas." He was active, not only in 
educational work, but also in political affairs, for those were 
stirring times in Kansas in the midst of the slavery agitation, 
and doubtless President Davis had a large part in settling 




One Hundred and SixtyFwe 



IMC KENDREE 



the slavery question right in that great state. He spent the 
rest of his active ministry, and of his Hfe, in Kansas. Thirteen 
of his Kansas years were spent in the pastorate. He was a 
member of three General Conferences. After his active min- 
istry was completed, he spent his few years of retirement at 
Baldwin in the shadow of the college to which he had given 
so much of his life. There he saw his youngest son graduate 
and enter the ministry. One of his daughters became the 
wife of William A. Quayle, one time president of Baker, 
and afterward, bishop. 

In January, 1856, the original college building which was 
begun in 1828, was destroyed by fire. The origin of the fire 
has never been officially determined, but the opinion was 
expressed with much confidence by one who 
was a student there at the time, that it w,i< 
deliberately fired by certain disgruntled and 
unprincipled students. At any rate, the old 
building was gone. The building that rep 
resented so much labor and toil, so many pray 
ers and sacrifices at last went up in smoke. It 
occurred in the night, and scarcely anything 
of the contents was saved. But fortunately, 
there was insurance, thowe have no means of 
knowing what amount. It was originally an all- 
purpose building. It was used for an assembly 
room and often for church services, for class 
rooms, office, dormitory, and dining hall. But 
after the completion of the new brick build- 
ing in 1851, it was sufficient for recitation THE CHAPEL 
rooms and society halls, and so the old building was used 
principally for a chapel. So it was determined to build a new 
chapel. This was the great achievement of Dr. Akers' ad- 
ministration. At the meeting of the Board in June, 1856, the 
Executive Committee was authorized to apply the insurance 
from the old building toward the erection of a new chapel 
and to employ an agent to collect enough in addition to com- 
plete the building. When the Board met again in 1857, the 
building was in process of construction, but the agent had 
not succeeded in collecting enough money to finish the task. 
So the committee was authorized to raise a loan of $6,000 
for that purpose. During the following year, it was completed 
and the class of 1858 held their graduating exercises in the 
new chapel. The class consisted of the following persons: 
Stith Otwell Bonner, John Wesley Brock, Thomas Essex, 
Daniel Kerr, and Joseph W. Van Cleve. This was June 17, 
1858. In the late nineties, Mr. Brock visited the chapel service 
one morning, and in a reminiscent talk told the students 




about the first commencement held in the new building, and 
how the members of his class were the first who stood on 
that platform to receive their degrees. It was a large and 
commodious building for that period. At an educational 
convention held at the college in 1868 to commemorate the 
fortieth anniversary of its founding, the committee on build- 
ings referred to this as "the largest hall of the kind in the 
state." The auditorium is about forty-five by seventy feet, 
and heated at first by two large stoves. About 1898, a steam 
heat plant was installed to supply all three of the college 
buildings at that time on the hill. The stoves were then re- 
moved. The original seats were long, movable wooden bench- 
es with backs, usually arranged like pews in a church. The 
graduating class of 1890, as their gift to the 
institution, raised money to seat the center 
of the room with opera chairs. When Dr. 
Chamberlin was president, he secured the 
donation of enough chairs, thonotofthe same 
kind, to finish seating the room. Some of the 
old benches may still be seen in the gallery. 
The room will seat slightly more than four 
hundred people. So it has long since lost its 
rank as the largest hall of its kind in the state. 
Its tall spire is a land mark that can be seen 
for many miles, and is surmounted by a gilded 
globe three feet in diameter, and an arrow 
nine feet long to serve as a weather vane to 
indicate the direction of the wind. The top 
TODAY of the spire is approximately one hundred and 

forty-five feet above the walk in front. For many years it 
was a favorite problem for the class in trigonometry to meas- 
ure the height of the spire. Another achievement of Dr. Akers 
was the publication of his book on Biblical chronology. The 
title page of the book reads, "Introduction to Biblical Chron- 
ology from Adam to the Resurrection of Christ, by Rev. 
Peter Akers, D. D., President of McKendree College." It 
was printed for the author at the Methodist Book Concern 
in Cincinnati, 1855. It is an octavo volume of four hundred 
and eleven pages, and represents a vast amount of research 
and patient labor on the part of the author. It reaches some 
very remarkable, though in some cases, doubtful conclusions. 
It contains numerous carefully prepared tables to show com- 
parisons of the Jewish and Julian calendars. It has a very 
exact calendar of the period of the exodus, showing the day 
of the week, month and year on which many of the important 
events of that time occurred. In fact, it sets forth the calendar 
in such detail as to show that Moses died on Sunday, 



One Hundred and Si.vty-Six 



February 13, and that this was also the anniversary of his 
birthday. There are also long chapters on the fulfillment of 
various Old Testament prophecies. Such minuteness of in- 
terpretation indicates a tireless patience m research, but 
tends to destroy confidence in the reliability of the con- 
clusions reached. There is a copy of the book m the Mc 
Kendree library. 

Dr. Akers finished his work as President with the com- 
mencement, or the Board meeting, of iS-iV. He was desirous 
of returning to the work of the pastorate, and the Board 
elected Rev. James G. Blair of Ohio to fill the vacancy. How- 
ever, he did not accept the place, and later Rev. Nelson E. 
Cobleigh was chosen for the position. He did not actually 
assume charge of the work until January, 1858. In the mean- 
time, Rev. Werter R. Davis, who had already been in the 
faculty several years, was acting president. 

THE CLASS OF 1S53 
DR. GEORGE W. CALDWELL 
George William Caldwell was born near Waverly, Mor- 
gan County, Illinois, August 23, i8jo, not long after his 
father removed to Illinois from Kentucky. After attend- 
ing the pioneer country school, he entered McKendree in 

1848 and graduated in iS'ij, receiving the degree of A. B., 
and later, A. M. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society, of which he was one of the original founders. After 
his graduation from McKendree, he studied medicine at Rush 
Medical College of Chicago, and in the summer of 18^';, he 
began the practice of his profession at Zanesville, Mont- 
gomery County, Illinois, a thriving inland town on the old 
state road from Edwardsville to Springfield. The town is 
now only a memory, its site being lost except to those who 
reside in the immediate neighborhood. The Doctor has re- 
sided in Waggoner, a few miles north of his former home, 
for the past fifteen years. He was married September 19, 
185'T, to Miss Frances Cloud, daughter of Rev. Newton 
Cloud, a pioneer Methodist preacher and a prominent figure 
in the early history of Illinois. They have two daughters, 
Mrs. S. W. Kessinger of Litchfield and Mrs. E. V. Vorden- 
baumen of Shreveport, Louisiana. 

JOHN S. DENNY 

John Smiley Denny was born in Bond County, Illinois, 

August 13, 1827. He attended Greenville Academy in 1848- 

1849 and entered McKendree in 1852. He graduated in 
1853, with the degree of B. S. He was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. Until 1865, he taught school 
continuously. In 1859, he was elected county treasurer of 
Bond Countv, and attended to the duties of the office m 



connection with his teaching. In iSe^;, he was elected county 
clerk, which office he held for twelve years. In 1873, he was 
elected mayor of Greenville. He was county commissioner 
from 1878 to 1881. He was married April 10, 1854, to Miss 
Marietta Meers of Platteville, Wisconsin. Two of their chil- 
dren died young. The others are Ellen, Mary, Alfred M., 
Charles I., and Effie May. Mrs. Denny died in 1871, and 
about two years later he was m.irned again to Miss Dorcas 
Rosebrough. Ot' this marriage, there were no children. Mr. 
Denny died in March, 1888, at Greenville, respected and 
honored by all his fellow citizens. He was for many years 
an elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

PROF. OLIVER V. JONES 
Oliver Vanlandingham Jones was born in Caldwell Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, December 28, 1824. His early ancestors were 
from England, but his father, Fountain W. Jones, was born 
in Sumner County, Tennessee, and his mother, Mary Ann 
Vanlandingham, was a native of Kentucky. When he was 
SIX years of age, his parents moved to Illinois and settled 
in Gallatin County, near Shawneetown, where he grew to 
manhood. Bent on securing a good education, he earned 
the money himself with 
which to pay his way thru 
college. He entered McKen- 
dree in 1847 sritl graduated 
in i8')3, with the degree of 
A. B. He later received 
the A. M. degree. He was 
a member of the Philosoph- 
ian Literary Society. His 
connection with McKen- 
dree was continuous from 
the time he graduated till 
1879. He served as tutor 
in Mathematics until 1858, 
adjunct professor of Ma- 
thematics and English until 1862, professor of English 
and History till 1866, and from that date till 1879, he was 
professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. He was a life long 
Methodist. In 1846, he became a member of that church, and 
in 1867, he was ordained as a minister therein. In 1880, he 
served as pastor of the Wisetown Circuit, but the next year 
he was teaching again in the Illinois Literary and Commercial 
Institute in Lebanon. He was for several years connected 
with the Lebanon Journal. In 1883, he was appointed col- 
lector of Internal Revenue, which position he held until the 
time of his death, April 27, 1885. He was married in 1858, to 




OLIVER V. JONES 




One Hundred and S. 



|mc KENDREE'^ ^^^^gs:^^'s^^>^^^ 



Miss Mary E. Crocker, of Lee, Massachusetts. Their two 
children are William L. Jones, a graduate of McKendree and 
editor of the Lebanon Journal, and Mrs. Mary A. Morriss, 
of Colorado Springs, who is also a graduate of McKendree, 
class of 1890. 

ALONZO THOMPSON 

Alon~o Thompson was born at Centreville, in St. Clair 
County, IlHnois, February 22, 1832. In his youth, he at- 
tended school in a log school house in High Prairie. In 1848, 
he entered McKendree, and graduated in 1853, receiving 
the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was a member, 
and one of the founders of the Platonian Literary Society. 
For a time after graduation, he engaged in teaching and in 
the live-stock business. In 1856, he went to Nodaway Coun- 
ty, Missouri, settled at Maryville, and engaged in the real 
estate business. He was appointed county surveyor, and 
made justice of the peace. In 1858, he became deputy sur- 
veyor. At the opening of the Civil War, he took an active 
part in the raising of troops for the army. In 1862, he was 
elected to the Missouri Legislature, and from 1864 to 1868 
was auditor of the State of Missouri. He then moved to 
St. Louis, where he engaged in real estate business for some 
years. He went back to Maryville in 1877, and assisted in 
promoting a railroad enterprise. Later he moved to Omaha, 
Nebraska, and then to Fullerton, Nebr., and still later to 
Denver, Colo., where he resided until his death April 9, 
191 3. He was married December 6, 1857, to Miss Mary F. 
Vinsonhaler, of Nodaway County, Mo. Of their three chil- 
dren, one died in infancy. The others are Hattie Irene, born 
in 1858, and Elmer Ellsworth, born in 1861. Mr. Thompson 
was said to be a millionaire, and a believer in spiritualism. 
His fortune consisted mostly of lands and mortgages in Ne- 
braska, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and other states. 
His private records, which he has kept all through the years, 
show that he has paid in his life time over $';,ooo,ooo in 
taxes on real estate. 

SAMUEL LOUIS FOSTER 

Samuel Louis Foster was born in Curran Township, San- 
gamon County, Ilhnois, Jan. 29, 1830. He entered McKen- 
dree in 1850 and graduated in 1853, receiving the degree 
of B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary So- 
ciety. From the time of his graduation until i860, he en- 
gaged in farming and school teaching near his old home. He 
then went to Sherbourne County, Minnesota, where he 
farmed for three years. He then returned to Curran and 
engaged in farming and stock-raising until his advanced age 
made it preferable to retire from farm life, when he moved 



to Springfield, Illinois. He was married December 27, 1S55, 
to Miss Lydia Lee. Their oldest son, Charles, died in infancy. 
Their other children are : Mary Alice, Louis Kossuth, Robert 
Lee, and Margaret Belle. He died April 26, 191 1. 
REV. THOMAS N. McCORKLE 

Thomas N. McCorkle was a member of the class of 1853 
and of the Philosophian Society. His early home was atOray- 
ville, Illinois. He also engaged in teaching for some years. 
Further than this we have no knowledge of his career. 
JEREMIAH T. TOMLIN 

Jeremiah T. Tomlin enrolled in McKendree in 1852, and 
graduated in 1853. He was a Philo. For a period of years he 
occupied the Chair of Natural Sciences at the Illinois Wes- 
leyan. He afterward went to San Diego, California. 

THE CLASS OF 18.51 
THOMAS J. CALDWELL 

Thomas Jefferson Caldwell was born near Franklin, Mor- 
gan County, Illinois, January 11, 1833, and died May 1, 
1863, at the place of his birth. His parents were John C. 
and Louisa Caldwell, and he was the younger brother of 
Dr. G. W. Caldwell. He graduated from McKendree in the 
class of 1854, receiving the degree of A. B., and in 1856, 
that of A. M. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He was married August 25, 1859, to Eliza M. 
Trotter, daughter of Rev. W. D. R. Trotter, who was a 
member of the Illinois Conference of the Methodist Church. 
After his graduation, Mr. Caldwell taught for five years in 
the State Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, at Jacksonville. 
He then served for a term of years as assessor and treasurer 
of Morgan County. He was a member of Grace M. E. Church 
and Urania Odd Fellows Lodge in Jacksonville. 
JOSEPH BUTLER 

Joseph Butler came to McKendree from Jefferson County, 
near Mt. Vernon, Illinois. Data concerning his parentage 
and early life are not accessible. He became a member of 
the Philosophian Literary Society in 1851. He graduated 
in the class of 1854, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
soldier in the Civil War, and held the office of lieutenant. 
He studied law, but died in early life before he was fairly 
launched on his professional career. His remains were laid 
to rest at Mt. Vernon, Illinois. He was a nephew of Hon. 
Robert F. Wingate, at one time Attorney General of the 
State of Missouri. 

RISDON M. DENEEN 

Risdon Moore Deneen was born near Belleville, Illinois, 
July 25, 1833. He entered McKendree in the fall of 1850, 



One Hundred and Sixlv-Eight 



and graduated m July, i8'i4, receiving the degree of A. B., 
and later, A. M. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. He taught one year in a school near Mas- 
coutah. III, and two years in St. Louis. Then m 18^7, he 
went to California by ship. For a year, he engaged m mining, 
and then began teaching in this far western country. He 
taught one year at Healdsburg, m connection with Col. R, 
Mathieson, who was afterward killed m the Civil War. In 
1861-62, he was professor of Mathematics at Santa Clara, 
and 1862 to December, 1863,, he was professor of Mathe- 
matics m Union College, San Francisco. In January, 1864, 
he went from San Francisco to superintend the working of 
the Santa Rosa silver mine near Opodepe, in the state of 
Sonora, Mexico. At this mine, he was murdered sometime 
between the 24th and 26th of December, 1864. 
PROF. SAMUEL H. DENEEN 
Samuel Heddmg Deneen was born near Belleville, Illinois, 
December 20, 183, f. He was a son of Rev. William L. Deneen, 
who was a member of the 
Illinois Conference and one 
of the pioneer Methodist 
preachers. His mother was 
MissVerlinderBeall Moore 
before her marriage. He en- 
tered McKendree in the fall 
of 1850 and graduated in 
July, 1854, receiving the ^^' 
gree of A. B., and later, A. 
M. In 1876, he received the 
degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy from the Indiana As- 
bury University (now De- 
Pa uw). He was a member of 
the Philosophian Literary Society. After graduation, for one 
year he taught school and studied Latin. He was then for 
three years classical tutor in McKendree; then from i8';8 
to 1862, he was adjunct professor of Ancient Languages; 
and in 1862, was elected professor of Latin in McKendree. 
In August, 1862, he enlisted in the U. S. army and served 
as Adjutant of the 117th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers 
until November 23, 1864, when he was granted an honorable 
discharge on account of ill health. He then resumed his duties 
in the college, where he taught Latin and History contin- 
uously until 1886, when he abandoned the work of the class 
room on account of failing health. In 1890, he was appointed 
by President Harrison to the position of United States Con- 
sul at Belleville, Ontario, which post he held till 1893, when 




SAMUEL H. DENEEN 



he resigned to go into business m Chicago. In this city, he 
died April 13, 1895. He was married m 1859, to Miss Mary 
F. Ashley, a daughter of Hiram K. Ashley, who was one 
of the early trustees of McKendree, and secretary of the 
Board from 1843 to 1846. Of their children, three are living: 
Charles Samuel, Sadie Alice, and Florence. They are all 
graduates of McKendree. 

DR, ISAAC N. HIGGINS 

Isaac Newton Higgins was born at Griggsville, Illinois, 
August 4, 1834, and died in San Francisco, California, March 
20, 1885. He entered in McKendree in 1848 and graduated 
in the class of 1854, receiving the degree of A. B. Later 
he was granted the A. M. degree, and after completing a 
course in Rush Medical College of Chicago, he received 
the degree of M. D. from that institution. While in Mc 
Kendree, he was a member of the Philosophian Literary So- 
ciety. In spite of the inducements to follow his father's pro- 
fession, he seemed more inclined to literary pursuits, and 
hence never practiced medicine. His early efforts at poetry 
are lauded by his friend, H. C. Bradsby, as being worthy to 
be classed with the works of Poe or Gray; but since it was 
necessary that his work produce a means of livelihood as 
well as an outlet for his desire to write, he turned his at- 
tention to journalism. He was connected successively with 
the Pike County Union of Griggsville, the Pike County Dem- 
ocrat of Pittsfield, the Illinois State Journal of Springfield, 
several Chicago papers, the Associated Press in Chicago, and 
finally in 1870, he became Managing Editor of the San Fran- 
cisco Morning Call, which position he held until the time 
of his death. During the Civil War, he was adjutant of 
Colonel Mather's regiment, the 2nd Illinois Light Artillery, 
and at the same time, served as war correspondent for the 
Chicago Times. He was a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite 
Mason. 

LEWIS M. PHILLIPS 

Lewis M. Phillips was born in Washington County, Illi- 
nois, August 6, 1833. He entered McKendree in 18^3, after 
considerable preliminary training, and completed the scien- 
tific course in 1854, receiving the degree of B. S. He con- 
tinued his studies in McKendree and graduated in the clas- 
sical course in 1857, with the degree of A. B. He then 
studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1858. He taught 
school for several years while continuing his law studies, 
and then spent a year in the Law Department of Harvard 
University, and in 1861, graduated from that institution with 
the degree of LL. B. August 12, 1861, he enhsted in the 
United States army. He was in a number of important 




One Hundred and Sixty-Jiine 



IfMC KENDREE 



engagements, and tcDok an active part in the siege of Vicksburg. 
After the surrender of that place, he resigned his position 
as Lieutenant on account of ill health, and began the practice 
of law at Nashville, Illinois. He was commissioner of enroll- 
ments for the twelfth congressional district until the close 
of the war. He continued the practice of his profession until 
his death, which occurred December 27, 1880. He was mar- 
ried April 10, 1864, to Miss Mary A. Buck. Their three 
children were Clyde B., Paul L., and Myrtle K. 
THE CLASS OF 1855 

The catalogue of 1854 has one man listed as the senior 
class for the next year. This was Mr. Isaiah Stickel. For 
some reason, possibly because he did not wish to be in a 
class by himself, his graduation was deferred till the next 
year, and he finished in the class of 1856. So the only degrees 
conferred at the commencement of 1855 were the Doctor of 
Divinity upon Rev. James G. Blair, who was at that time 
vice-president of the Ohio University, (and who was, two 
years later, invited to become president of McKendree, but 
declined), and the degree of Master of Arts upon Dr. J. S. 
Harrison, who was already a Doctor of Medicine and a pro- 
fessor in the Cincinnati College of Surgery and Medicine. 
THE CLASS OF 1856 

The members of this class are James H. Barger, Caleb 
C. Burroughs, David Birch Halderman, Frederic James Hes- 
lop, John Hill, Dempsey S. Kennedy, Jacob Samuel Moore, 
Thomas Asbury Parker, David Howell Porter, Isaiah Stickel, 
and Elias Dimory Wilkin. Sketches follow of those concerning 
whom we have information. 

REV. JAMES H. BARGER 

James Hughes Barger, son of John S. and Sarah A. Barger, 
was born in Kentucky, June 29, 183 1. Nearly his whole 
life was spent in Illinois. He graduated from the Illinois 
Wesleyan University, July 6, 185 j, with the degree of A. B. 
This is claimed to be the first degree ever conferred by that 
institution. In 1856, he received the honorary degree of A. 
M. from McKendree. He was licensed to preach in 1850, 
joined the Illinois Conference in 1853, and was active in the 
work of the ministry till his death, which occurred October 
31, 1861, when he was accidentally shot on an island in the 
Mississippi River. His last appointment was presiding elder 
of the Quincy District. He was married September 5, 1853, 
to Miss Elisi A. Reddick, who with three children, sur- 
vived him. 

CALEB C. BURROUGHS 

Caleb C. Burroughs was born June 5, 1829, at Prince 
Frederick, divert County, Maryland and died at Salina, 



Kansas, March i, 1904. His parents were Joseph and Re- 
becca Burroughs. He came to Illinois at the age of nine, 
and became a student in McKendree and a member of the 
Platonian Society in 185 1. He graduated in 1856, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He was married in April, 1857, to Miss 
Nancy Phillips of MiddleviUe, New York. Their children 
were Joseph V. and Charles N. Burroughs. Some time after 
the death of his first wife, he was married to Miss Lizzie 
Brown, October 16, 1883. Of this marriage, one son was 
born — Harry B. Burroughs. After his graduation, he taught 
for some years in a seminary at Shelbyville, Illinois, where 
he was associated with his fellow alumnus. Professor C. W. 
Jerome, who was principal of the institution. His first wife 
was also a teacher in this school for a time. It was there that 
he made her acquaintance. After this period of teaching, he 
engaged in the book business in Decatur, Illinois, for a time, 
and then entered the manufacturing business and established 
the Union Iron Works of Decatur. In 1883, he went to 
Kansas and lived on a ranch for a time, and later resided in 
Salina, Kansas, where his death occurred. He was for many 
years a member of the Methodist Church, but later m life 
became a member of the Christian Church and a minister 
in that body. 

JOHN HILL 
John Hill was born at New Salem, Illinois, September 
6. 1839. He was a son of Samuel and Parthenia Hill. His 
father was a native of New Jersey, and after coming to Illi- 
nois, engaged in merchandising. John graduated from Mc- 
Kendree in 1856, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
member of the Philosophian Literary Society. On the death 
of his father, the year following, he assumed charge of his 
extensive business interests, which included the operating 
of a large woolen mill which was burned a few years later. 
He was editor of a local paper at Petersburg, Illinois, and 
took an active part in the Lincoln-Douglas campaign as a 
vigorous supporter of Douglas. He was elected to the Illinois 
Legislature and served as a member of the twenty-fourth 
General Assembly. After living in Jacksonville, Illinois, for 
some years, in 1872 he moved to Columbus, Georgia, where 
he was employed with the Eagle and Phoenix Woolen Mills. 
Afterward he became engineer for these mills and held this 
position until 1892, becoming widely known throughout the 
south as a mill expert. He was the inventor of numerous 
factory machines and fire protection devices, and later was 
prominent in several manufacturing companies, among them 
the Hill Automatic Sprinkling Company, and the Neracher 
and Hill Sprinkling Company of Warren, Ohio. He was also 



One Hundred and Seventy 



^MC KENDREE-^^fe^.^^....^^^ 



a well-known and extensive writer on mechanical and textile 
subjects. He married Lula C. Crawley of Jacksonville, Illi- 
nois. Their four children were: Perry N., John and B. Y. 
Hill, and one daughter, now Mrs. John C. Martin. They 
all reside in Columbus, Georgia, except the second son, John, 
who lives in Atl.mta. After a useful career, active to its 
very close. Mr. Hill died January 20, 1898. 
DEMPSEY S. KENNEDY 
Dempsey S. Kennedy was born February ^, iSj";. He 
became a student m McKendree m 1852, and graduated m 
the class of 1856, receiving the degree of A. B. He was a 
member of the Platonian Literary Society. He was engaged 
in farming near Nashville, in Washington County, Illinois. 
But he did not long survive his graduation. A promising 
career was cut short by his death, February 28, iS-iS. 
REV. JACOB S. MOORE 
Jacob Samuel Moore was born in St. Clair County, Illi- 
nois, February 16, 1835. He became a student m McKen- 
dree m iS'fo, and completed the classical course, receiving 
the degree of A. B. in i8'i6. Later he received the Master's 
degree. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary So- 
ciety. He was admitted as a probationer in the Southern 
Illinois Conference m 18^7, and was received in full con- 
nection in 1859. He served the following charges: Xenia, 
Sandoval, Central City, Flora, Lebanon, Upper Alton, and 
then for three years, 1865-68, he was president of the South- 
ern Illinois Female College at Salem. During the Civil War, 
he was captain in the Fortieth regiment of Illinois Volun- 
teers. After his retirement from the work of the ministry 
in 1869, he moved to Atchison, Kansas, where he lived until 
his death, which occurred October 20, 1880. He was married 
June 20, i860, to Miss Cornelia Randle. 

REV. THOMAS A. PARKER 
Thomas Asbury Parker was born m New Albany, In- 
diana, February 22, 1838, and died at Champaign, Illinois, 
June 18, 1921. When he was eleven years of age, his par- 
ents moved to Lebanon to educate their son in McKendree. 
He graduated in the class of 1856, when he was eighteen 
years old. After this, he studied medicine in St. Louis, and 
then went to Topeka, Kansas, to practice the physicians' 
vocation. While there, he became a member of the first 
faculty of Baker University, at Baldwin. He also joined 
the Kansas Conference in 1861. Later, he held many im- 
portant positions. He was president of St. Charles College, 
and Superintendent of Public Instruction for the state of 
Missouri. He was Grand Prelate of the Grand Commandery, 
Knights Templar of Illinois for nineteen years, a record never 



before attained. Early in the Civil War, he enlisted in the 
1 2th regiment Kansas Volunteers, and was appointed chap- 
lain. In later years, he was chaplain of the Legislature of 
Missouri, and afterward of the Illinois Legislature. He was 
a prominent member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and for twelve years was chaplain of the Soldiers' Home 
at Danville, 111. He was in the ministry of the Methodist 
Church for sixty years, and during forty-seven of those years, 
he was connected with the Illinois Conference. He was pastor 
of several important churches, and served a term as super, 
intendent of the Champaign District. He was also widely 
known as a lecturer and writer. He was a high grade type 
of Christian gentleman, and filled every position to which 
he was called with a high degree of efficiency. His wife 
passed away about six years before his death, but their four 
children survive him. His only son is Walter A. Parker of 
Chicago. Dr. and Mrs. Parker celebrated their golden wed- 
ding anniversary m July, 1914. 

JUDGE DAVID H. PORTER 
David Howell Porter was born near Ghent, Gallatm (now 
Carroll) County, Kentucky. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Porter, his father 
being a native of Virginia 
and his mother ot North 
Carolina. He became a stu- 
dent in McKendree in 185 1 
and graduated in 1856, re- 
ceiving the degree of B. S. 
He then studied law and re- 
ceived from McKendree the 
degreeof LL. B. in i86i.He 
was a member of the Pla- 
tonian Literary Society. He 
was married October 25, 
DAVID PORTER 1866, to Miss Sarah F.Copp, 

of Waterloo, Illinois. To 
them were born two sons, of whom one is now living. In 1861, 
Mr. Porter enlisted in the Union army and was elected lieu' 
tenant m Company E of the Second Illinois Cavalry. He was 
afterward transferred to the infantry service, and in 1864, 
became a captain in the 142nd Illinois Regiment. After the 
war, he located in Kansas City, Missouri, and engaged in 
the practice of law. From 1868 to 1872, he was editor of the 
"Kansas City Bulletin." In 1873, he was elected judge of 
the Kansas City Municipal Court. In 1874, he became asso- 
ciate editor of the "St. Louis Dispatch." In 1883, he was 
elected president of the Kansas City Municipal Council. In 




One Hundred and Seventy-One 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



religion, he was a Unitarian. He was a member of the order 
of A. F. 6? A. M. and of the Grand Army of the RepubHc. 
He was a man of sterling integrity — genial, kindly, cultured, 
and a true friend. His death occurred January 28, 1909, at 
Kansas City. 

LIEUT. ISAIAH STICKEL 

Isaiah Stickel was born in April, 1830. He entered Mc- 
Kendree at the age of twenty, and made his own way 
through college under circumstances of great difficulty. Be- 
fore finishing his course, he taught two years in Union 
Academy at Sparta, Illinois. He then returned to college 
and graduated in 1856, with the degree of A. B.; and later 
he received the A. M. degree. He was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. After graduation, he was prin- 
cipal of the Jacksonville grade school. Then for two years he 
was principal of the Monticello High School. In 1861, he en- 
listed in Company F of the second regiment of Illinois Cav- 
alry. He later became first lieutenant of this company. He 
served through the entire Civil War and was engaged in 
much actual fighting. During the last nine months of his 
service, he was mustering officer with headquarters at San 
Antonio, Texas. After the war, he located in Kansas, sixty 
miles west of Atchison, and engaged in mercantile pursuits. 
He was also active in church work and did much for the 
promotion of the interests of Methodism in that section. In 
1895, he removed to Baldwin, Kansas. There he was presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees which built a $50,000 Meth- 
odist church. After that, he entered and proved up a soldier 
homestead claim in western Kansas. He then returned to 
Baldwin to spend his old age in that college town. 
REV. ELIAS D. WILKIN 

Elias Dimory Wilkin was born near Newark, Ohio, Sep' 
tember 20, 1830. He was the second in a family of six sons 
and three daughters. When he was about fifteen years of 
age, the family moved to Crawford County, Illinois, where 
they engaged in farming. After being trained in the common 
schools and under a Methodist minister as a private tutor, he 
entered McKendree in 1850, and graduated in 1856, receiving 
the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He received the degree of D. D. 
from Blackburn College, a Presbyterian institution at Carlin- 
ville, Illinois. He had intended to make the law his profession, 
but after his conversion in 1848, he felt the call to the minis- 
try, and devoted his life to that work. He was admitted to 
the Illinois Conference in 1857. After three years as professor 
and president of Marshall Seminary, he took a regular pas- 
torate and was appointed to Champaign. At the opening of 



the Civil W.ir, he became chaplain of the Twenty-first Illinois 
(Grant's) Regiment. In 1865, he resumed the work of the 
ministry in his conference, and served with great accepta- 
bility the following charges: Charleston, Normal, Springfield 
Second Church, Mattoon, Pana, Paris, Champaign, Vermil- 
lion, Danville First Church, Carlinville, and Lincoln, cover- 
ing a period of nearly thirty-eight years in his entire ministry. 
He was twice married, first to Miss Harriet Mayo of Paris, 
Illinois, on December 20, 1857. She died October 31, 1881. 
His second marriage was to Mrs. Mary E. Hill of Palestine, 
Illinois, who survived him. In his death, April 8, 1895, Dr. 
Wilkin realized his oft-expressed desire of "Dying in the 
harness." He was in the fifth year of his pastorate at Lincoln, 
which he was trying to make the best of the five. Though 
he had been ailing for a few days, he was able to plan for 
his charge. As he was seated in his arm-chair he threw up 
his hands, "and he was not for God took him." 

THE CLASS OF 1857 
CAPT. WILLIAM H. COPP 

William Herbert Copp was born in Chautauqua County, 
New York, May 30, 1836. He came with his parents to 
Monroe County, Illinois, in 1844, and settled near Waterloo. 
He entered McKendree College in 1853, and became a mem- 
ber of the Platonian Society. 

He graduated from college, receiving the degree of B. S. in 
1857. He then studied law in a law office in Waterloo, and 
was admitted to the bar. But having no inclination to practice 
law, he engaged in farming near Waterloo. During the war, 
he was an officer in the Union army. He was captain of 
Company A of the 130th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers. In 
May, 1873, he was married to Miss Louisa Gilmore. He 
died April 2, 1885, leaving his widow with three sons and 
three daughters. Mrs Copp left the farm and moved to the 
city of Waterloo, where she still lives with her one unmar- 
ried daughter. 

JOSEPH H. MATTHEWS 

Joseph H. Matthews was born at Perry, Pike County, 
Illinois, December 3, 1835. He entered college in Septem- 
ber, 1853, a'""! graduated in 1857, receiving the degree of 
A. B., and later, A. M. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. For a year, he was a clerk in the office of 
the State Auditor at Springfield, Illinois. He was then em- 
ployed for some time with Prof. Norwood in making a 
geological survey of the central and southern portions of 
Illinois. He returned to Perry in the fall of 1859 and in 
December of that year, was married to Miss Kate Whittaker. 



One Hundred and Seventy-Two 



^^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



He spent p.irt ot the following year in farming and then 
engaged m the mercantile business with his father-in-law 
He died ot tuberculosis at Perry, March ji, 1861. 
REV. WILLIAM FLETCHER SHORT 
William Fletcher Short was born m the state of Ohio m 
the year 1829. In early childhood, he came with his parents 
to Morgan County, Illinois, where he grew to manhood. 
At the age of about twenty, he became a student in Mc- 
Kendree and took his college course there except the last 
year, which he spent in the Illinois Wesleyan at Blooming- 
ton, and having transferred his credits, he received his 
Bachelor's degree at that institution m 1854. I" 1817, he 
received the degree of A. M. from McKendree. In later 



years he was granted the degree of D. D. by the Ohio Wes- 
leyan University. While at McKendree, he was a member 
of the Philosophian Literary Society. After graduation, he 
spent three years teaching in a seminary at Jackson, Missouri, 
which was under the auspices of the Missouri Conference. 
He then joined the Illinois Conference and was pastor or 
presiding elder in that conference until 1875, when he was 
elected president of the Illinois Female College at Jackson- 
ville. He remained in this position until 189 j, when he was 
appointed superintendent of the Illinois State Institution for 
the Blind at Jacksonville. After four years of service here, 
he retired from active labor, and his useful life came to a 
close August 29, 1909. 




Ilijliii Jiliiitiili liitlfifllllt iiliiiiii.^J iflilELHill 



A pen and ink drawing of McKendree College as it appeared about i860 



One Hundred and Seventw-Three 



NIC KENDREE^^^^^^^.....^^^^^ 



CHAPTER XV. 

President CobleigKs Administration 
OCTOR Cobleigh's term as president 



1^ covered the years iS-jS to 1863. The 
catalogue of 1859 shows his faculty 
to have consisted of Risdon M. Moore, Math- 
ematics and Astronomy, Rev. Franklin O. Blair, 
Natural Science, Albert A.Scott, A. M., An- 
cient Languages, Hon. Augustus C. French, 
LL. D., Lecturer on Law, Rev. Oliver V. Jones, 
A. M., Adjunct Professor of Mathematics and 
English Literature, Samuel H. Deneen, A. M., 
Adjunct Professor of Ancient Languages and 
Literature. R. M. Moore was Fiscal Agent 
and S. H. Deneen, Librarian. That year there 
were one hundred and seventy-two students 
enrolled in all departments. The list included 
two future college presidents, McKendree H. Chamberlin and 
John E. Earp, as well as several other names that were destined 
to come to prominence. The Law Department was just in the 
process of formation. There was a law lecturer announced, and 
a course of study, but no students. They were to come the 
next fall. The course of study of the whole institution was 
classified under nine departments as follows: L Moral and 
Intellectual Philosophy. IL Mathematics and Astronomy. 
in. Natural Science. IV. Greek Language and Literature. 
V. Latin Language and Literature. VI. Belles Lettres and 
Enghsh Literature. VII. Hebrew and Biblical Literature. 
VIII. Modern Language — French and German. IX. Law. 
The course of study for the Freshman and Sophomore years 
was made up entirely of Latin, Greek and Mathematics. In 
the second term, for the sake of variety, they would study 
Greek, Latin and Mathematics; and in the third term, they 
secured still greater variety by studying Mathematics, Greek 
and Liitm. In the Junior and Senior years, they continued 
their classic studies, but also devoted some time to Science 
and Philosophy; but there were certainly no fads or frills 
in the course. Candidates for admission to the Freshman class 
had to be able to pass an examination in all the studies of the 
two year preparatory course, and be not less than fourteen 
years of age. Also in all cases, satisfactory testimonials of 
good moral character must be furnished. All fees had to be 
paid in advance. No student was to be admitted to classes 
until he showed a receipt from the fiscal agent. Tuition per 
term in the Preparatory Department was seven dollars; col- 
lege, eight dollars; Hebrew, French or German, two dollars 




PRESIDENT COBLEIGH 



extra; room rent, ten to twelve dollars a year; 
board, two dollars to two and a half per week; 
washing, sixty cents a dozen, and wood, two 
dollars a cord. There was also a statement that 
many students board themselves at a cost of 
seventy-five cents to a dollar a week. A daily 
record of merits and demerits was kept for each 
student, and the same was furnished to par- 
ents or guardians, if they so desired. If any 
student accumulated twenty or more demerits 
during a single term, he was subject to sus- 
pension or expulsion at the discretion of the 
faculty. 'No student was entitled to absent 
himself from class or from the city without 
the consent of the president. 
Now It seems appropriate to give brief sketches of certain 
members of the faculty who have not been sketched before, 
tho some will be reserved for later treatment. 
REV. NELSON E. COBLEIGH D. D. 
Nelson Ebenezer Cobleigh was born at Littleton, New 
Hampshire, November 24, 1814, and died at Atlanta, Geor- 
gia, February i, 1874. His early years were spent in pov- 
erty, and It was by hard effort and perseverence that he 
secured an education. He was graduated from the Wesleyan 
University in 1843, and the same year taught in the high 
school at Middletown. He joined the New England Con- 
ference in 1844, and was engaged in pastoral work until 
1853, when he was elected to the Chair of Ancient Languages 
in McKendree College. He held the position for only one 
year, and at the same time served as pastor of the Lebanon 
Methodist Church. The next year he was called to a similar 
position in Lawrence College, Wisconsin. He continued in 
this position until 1858, when he was called back to Mc 
Kendree to be president and professor of Mental and Moral 
Science. The record of the college Board of Trustees would 
seem to indicate that Dr. Akers had preferred to return to 
the pastorate in 1857, and Dr. Blair of Ohio was elected 
president, but declined. Prof. Werter R. Davis was the acting 
president. At commencement, i8';7, some of the students 
presented a petition to the Joint Board, requesting them to 
elect Dr. Cobleigh president. Doubtless some of them remem- 
bered him as professor and pastor when he was there a few 
years before. So late in the fall, they elected Dr. Cobleigh 
and he took charge early in 1858. He continued in the posi- 




One Htitidred and Seventy-Foii 



tion for five years. In a historical sketch which he re.id at 
the Educational Convention of 1868, Dr. Allyn says that 
the institution made more substantial progress in certain lines 
during his administration than it had under any of his pre- 
decessors. His son, Nelson Simmons Cobleigh, was graduated 
from McKendree in the class of 1862. The next year, the 
father accepted a call to become editor of Zion's Herald, 
which was the Methodist church paper for that part of the 
country, and published at Boston. So when the family moved 
to Boston, young Cobleigh took graduate work in Harvard. 
Dr. Cobleigh spent four years with Zion's Herald and then 
returned to the educational field as president of the Ten- 
nessee Wesleyan at Athens, Tennessee. After five years in 
this post, he was elected editor of the Methodist Advocate 
at Atlanta, Georgia, in 1872. This was a difficult position 
to fill, as editor of a journal of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church in the very heart of the Southern Methodist country. 
At that time, so soon after the Civil War, the estrangement 
between the North and South churches was at its height. 
He did his work with boldness and vigor, yet with such 
tact and an evident spirit of fairness as to win the respect 
and esteem of those opposed to him and the cause he repre- 
sented. So that after his death, those who were his most 
pronounced antagonists paid willing honors to his memory. 
He achieved honorable success m every field of labor to which 
he was called. One of his biographers says of him, "He was 
an acceptable pastor, earnest and logical as a preacher, a 
teacher of great and varied abilities, an editor of tact and 
discrimination, and a man of magnetic and forceful per- 
sonality." 

Dr. Cobleigh's second son, Edward Augustus, was en- 
rolled as a student in McKendree during his last year there. 
Later he became a physician and surgeon, and founder of the 
Chattanooga Medical College, of which he was president 
for fifteen years. At the time of his death m 1904, it had 
four hundred students. He was also instrumental m the 
founding of Erlanger Hospital in Chattanooga, and was one 
of Its managers. The only daughter in the Cobleigh family, 
Theda, married Rev. Frank A. Peake, a Presbyterian min- 
ister. He has also been a college teacher and Chautauqua 
lecturer. Mrs. Theda Cobleigh Peake has also had a career as 
a college teacher in the field of languages and of education. 

The record of the Board for the June meeting in i860 
contains a resolution passed on motion of Dr. Cobleigh, then 
president, "That we tender to the ladies and people of Leb- 
anon our hearty thanks for the bell and clock, which by their 
efforts and contributions have been placed in the tower of 



the new college chapel." This means that some time prior 
to that date the people of the community thru the influence 
of the ladies as leaders of the enterprise, the people of Leb- 
anon had furnished the money necessary to place these two 
pieces of useful equipment in the chapel, in which no doubt 
they all had a strong community pride. We have no infor- 
mation as to the maker of the clock, but it is a ponderous 
machine with weights hung on wire ropes, which descend 
through wooden tubes from the clock tower to the ground. 
One of these weights weighs eight hundred pounds. To wind 
the clock means to lift these weights a distance of fifty feet 
or more. It is accomplished by the operator turning a windlass 
with a crank large enough to use both hands. The clock has 
four faces showing on the outside of the tower in the four 
cardinal directions, with long wooden hands to point the 
hours. But these hive long ago gotten out of repair to the 
extent that the hands no longer function. But the clock is 
still kept wound. This needs to be done but once a week, 
and Its loud strokes, made by a hammer striking against the 
bell, can be heard over the greater part of the city, by day 
or night, so that it serves as a sort of community regulator 
to many of the citizens, and certain of the college classes are 
dismissed at its signal instead of the ringing of the bell. 

The bell has a more specific and more romantic history, 
which some may regard as traditional or even mythical, but 
It is embodied in a record left by Rev. Thomas A. Eaton, 
D. D., who was a graduate of McKendree and spent his 
life as a member of the Southern Illinois Conference. He says 
the bell was brought to St. Louis some time in the fifties by 
some Santa Fe traders who found it in a deserted church 
somewhere in New Mexico. It is supposed to have been a 
Roman Catholic Indian Mission Church. Dates and names 
molded in the bell showed that it was cast in Spam m the 
eighth century, and recast in the fourteenth. Both of these 
castings occurred before the discovery of America. The date 
that It was brought to Florida, some time m the sixteenth 
century, was carved upon it. After the traders brought it to 
St. Louis, It was recast again in that city, and shortly after 
was taken to the Illinois State Fair, held at Centralia in the 
fall of i8'i8. It was there placed on exhibition and offered 
for sale. During the days of the fair, visitors kept it almost 
constantly tolling to test the quality of its tones. After the 
fair, it was purchased by President Cobleigh and Professor 
R. M. Moore, who brought it to Lebanon and caused it to 
be placed in the tower of the new college chapel. Since that 
time, it has done constant service for every conceivable sort 
of college gathering, except on a few occasions when it was 



One Hundred and Seventy-Fne 



left tongueless by the depredations of certain ill-advised 
young students, whose feet were more active than their 
heads, and who preferred to climb to the belfry by night 
rather than to the commencement platform on graduation 
day. In fact, the clapper is no part of the original bell, since 
it has been replaced frequently through the mechanical skill 
of some local blacksmith. For many years, an extra bell clap- 
per was a necessary part of the college equipment, but in 
recent years McKendree students have found more dignified 
ways of amusing themselves than by the silly trick of stealing 
the college bell clapper. This old bell has called the students 
and the public to three score and ten annual commencements. 
It has often rung the old year out and the new one in. Once 
It rang continuously all night long when the students were 
celebrating the achievement of President 
Chamberlin in securing the first hundred 
thousand dollars of endowment for the col- 
lege. Thousands of students have obeyed its 
call to class, and doubtless many other thou- 
sands will hear and heed its mellow tones in 
the years which Ue in the future. 
PROF. F. O. BLAIR 
Franklin Otis Blair was born in Blandford, 
Massachusetts, November 30, 1822. He en- 
tered the Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, 
Massachusetts, in 1842. After completing his 
preparatory course there, he entered the 
Wesleyan University at Middletown, in 
1844, and graduated from that institution 
in 1848. In the same year, he began teaching 
matics at the Providence Conference Seminary at East 
Greenwich, Rhode Island. In 1850, he became principal of 
the Springfield Wesleyan Seminary at Springfield, Vermont. 
He joined the Vermont Conference in 1852, and took charge 
of Woodstock Grammar School at Woodstock, Vermont, in 
1855. The next year he was elected Adjunct Professor of 
Mental and Moral Science and Principal of the Female Col- 
legiate Institute in Lawrence University at Appleton, Wis- 
consin. He transferred to the Wisconsin Conference in 1857. 
In 1858, he transferred to the Southern Illinois Conference 
and became Professor of Natural Science in McKendree Col- 
lege. He continued in this position until 1871. From 1872 
till 1888, he was Agent for the American Bible Society. He 
was married August 7, 185J, to Miss Electa Ann Adams at 
Luzerne, New York. Of their two children, the daughter 
died in childhood. The son, Erwin Otis, grew up in Lebanon, 
was educated in McKendree, and went west, where in after 




DR. WILLIAMS 
(the 



years he became the editor and proprietor of the "Daily 
News" at Trinidad, Colorado. 

There is a house still standing adjoining McKendree's cam- 
pus which Professor Blair built as a home for his family during 
their sojourn in Lebanon. After the death of Mrs. Blair in 
1888, he made his home with his son in Colorado, where he 
lived for eight years until his death, October 14, 1896. He 
made an honorable place for himself in the history of Mc- 
Kendree, and when he went west he left his library to the 
college. 

PROF. S. W. WILLIAMS* 
Samuel W. Williams was born in Chilicothe. Ohio, De- 
cember 2, 1827. His father was of Welsh-Irish descent, and 
his mother of German, though both were native Americans. 
In jhis 'infancy, his parents moved to Cincin- 
nati where he was brought up. He was pre- 
pared for college in Woodward High School, 
and then entered the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, and graduated from that institution in 
the class of 1848. The same year he began 
teaching in Worthington Female Seminary. 
The next year he taught in Baldwin Institute 
in Berea, Ohio. In 1851, he became a tutor in 
the Ohio Wesleyan. After a few years of 
service there, he became Professor of Ancient 
Languages in McKendree in 1857. He enter- 
ed the employ of the Methodist Book Concern 
in 1859 as Book Editor and Assistant Editor 
of the Ladies' Repository .He was the sole editor 
of books practically all the time for more than forty years. 
Bishop Moore said of him, "Dr. Williams has read more 
manuscripts than any man in Methodism." He has 
been a frequent contributor to Methodist periodicals and 
is author of a book, "Pictures of Early Methodism 
in Ohio," a volume of three hundred and twenty pages, 
published in 1909. Early in the year 1892, when the 
editorial chair of the Central Christian Advocate at St. Louis 
became vacant by the death of Dr. Fry, Dr. Williams was 
sent to take charge of the paper until the General Conference, 
which was to meet in May of that year, could elect a new 
editor. Dr. Jesse Bowman Young was chosen editor and also 
commencement orator at McKendree's commencement that 
year, June 16. Dr. Williams came with him. It was thirty- 
three years after he had completed his term of service at 
McKendree and doubtless a third of a century had seen many 
changes. Probably there was no one either in the faculty or 
*EciiroT'.5 .\nte — Dr. Willuims died Fehritary. 1938. 



One Hundred and Seienty-Si.i 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



student body with whom he had been associated m his 
teaching at McKendree, but possibly a few of the same Bo.ird 
members were there. He also delivered an address m the af- 
ternoon of commencement day and presented to the college 
a picture of Bishop McKendree, which has hung in the chapel 
for thirty-five years. After he was relieved from duty on 
the Central Advocate, he returned to St. Louis and resumed 
his former post at the Book Concern. In 1912, when he was 
eighty-five years old, he retired from active work. He is 
spending the evening of life at his home m Wyoming, Ohio, 
where he is still an omnivorous reader. His wife was Laura 
L. Evans. Of their three children, one died in infancy. The 
others are Berthold Alexander and Laura Elizabeth. He re- 
ceived the degrees of A. B. and A. M. from the Ohio Wes- 
leyan and LL. D. from McKendree. He reached his hundredth 
year December 2, 1927. He received his first degree eighty 
years ago. The Literary Digest recently called him the "oldest 
college graduate in America." He was born before McKen- 
dree was founded and has talked with men who attended 
the funeral of George Washington. In his home is a library 
of five thousand volumes, which includes what is supposed 
to be the most complete collection of books on Methodism 
to be found in the United States. At his death, this collection 
will go to his Alma Mater, the Ohio Wesleyan University. 
Following are some reminiscences of his life at McKendree 
which he wrote by request for this history. 

PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF McKENDREE COLLEGE 
by Samuel W. Williams 

When I entered McKendree College as a member of the 
faculty in 1857, there were already five teachers and about 
one hundred and thirty students. My department was the 
Ancient Languages. James G. Blair of Ohio was the president- 
elect, and It was understood that he would accept the posi- 
tion offered to him. He finally declined to come, but mean- 
while Werter R. Davis acted as president. Dr. Davis was 
the Professor of Natural Science, including Physiology and 
Hygiene. He was ready and alert in his department to per- 
form the experiments required for illustration, and he handled 
his apparatus and materials as a master. He was a skillful 
manipulator of chemicals, and as chemistry is a part of the 
science of medicine, a medical college m Cincinnati conferred 
upon him, without his previous knowledge or intimation to 
that effect, the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

I do not think that he was much of a reader of miscel- 
laneous literature, but he managed to pick up a great deal of 
information, and he never was at loss for an apt incident or 
fact to illustrate his talks. In the pulpit he was listened to 



with pleasure and profit, and as a minister of the gospel, he 
was always in demand. There is an appreciative sketch of 
him in the Methodist Review and m the volume entitled 
"The Pastor-Preacher," published by the Methodist Book 
Concern and written by his son-in-law. Bishop William A. 
Quayle. 

Professor Davis, and others of the faculty, thought that 
on the declination of Dr. Blair, he should himself have been 
elected president of the college; but there was a strong pre- 
judice against him on the part of the resident trustees and 
the executive committee, and he was passed by. I think he 
was disappointed in not being elected. It is not my purpose 
to rehearse "The Sorrows of Werter." as Goethe did. but 
he certainly had cause to expect such a promotion. The trus- 
tees had adopted a rule that in the choice of a president the 
active members of the faculty should be consulted and their 
preferences ascertained; but when Dr. Blair finally decHned 
to come, they or their executive committee, without one hint 
as to his successor or declaration of their intention to elect 
any one else, offered the presidency to Nelson E. Cobleigh. 

Dr. Cobleigh had formerly been a professor m McKendree, 
and though he knew Lebanon well, he came about Christmas 
to look over the ground and examine the condition of affairs. 
Having satisfied himself as to the state and prospects of the 
college, he accepted the position, and in the Spring of 1858, 
he assumed charge. There was, however, no cordiality or 
confidence between him and the leading members of the fac- 
ulty — not so much on account of the person as the secret 
mode of his election — and at the end of the year, some of 
them left the institution. In this action, the trustees were 
peremptory and suspicious; the faculty were hasty and in- 
considerate. But perhaps it all turned out for the best; and 
both parties learned that all wisdom did not reside solely 
with them. 

Shortly afterward Professor Davis became the president 
of the Baker University at Baldwin, Kansas; and during the 
Civil War, he served as Colonel of one of the Kansas regi- 
ments. He was always considerate of the men under his 
command, and as occasion required, he acted as chaplain. As 
for myself, at the close of the college year, I returned to my 
home in Cincinnati. 

President Cobleigh was an eloquent speaker, and his ser- 
mons and addresses were pertinent and instructive. As a 
teacher, he was stimulating. His scholarship was good and 
he was acquainted with literature. He kept himself abreast 
with the thought of the age; and when he became editor of 
"Zion's Herald," and subsequently of the "Methodist Ad- 




((mY^RDER OF EXERCISES^^V)))); 

E2®KK10K](S = 

PRAYER, - - - - Br THE PaE9IDI;^T. 

MUSIC, 

Stbcoolc ro« laraovEMMT, .... J. O. Butler. 

Lite abd Death, L. M. Puillips. 

MUSIC. 

Beaoties or WigDOB, T. J. Caldwell. 

BltlErACTO.S or MaKKIKD, ... - KM UE.VEt>. 

MiMIOI. or POETRT, ....... S. H. D£>L£!«. 

LirE's Co.1TE«T», I. N. Hll.Gl.Hi. 

MUSIC. 

ADDRESS 10 TH[ PHILOSOPHIAM SOClEir, 

Br Prrf, BI>9ELU -f Bl.n.l.. 

BENEDICTION. 

T. S. Cahev. 

MlBD BA« A DtSTlNT. --.... S. F. ConRIHCTOH. 

Muetc. 
- - - - . S. L. Edwabd«. 

AI)D?.SSS ?0 TS5 PLATOlJIillv S02ISTT, 
JULY J*^ 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF 



J. O. BrTLr.R, 
L. M. PHILLIPS, 



MOUHT Vee 
Nashville. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF 



T J. CALDWELL, - 
R. M. IjENEEN, . 
S. H. DENEEN, 
I. N. HIGGINS, . 



Fba, 
Leba 



CANDIDATES FOK THE DEGREE OF 



T. S- CASF.Y, A. B. . - . 


. Shaw«eeto» 


S. F. CORRINGTON, A. B. . 


Jacksonvill 


S. L. EDWARDS, A. B. - 


- GBEEHritLI>. 


W. B. RIGGIN, A. B. - . 


Le.anoi.. 



_<f^iSM U S 1 .C»i>V_ 
..^tf^iTBENEDICTION.^ii'V^ 



^-^ PL'BLIfHED LT Xn 



^~hy<J 



/a^f 






Facsimile of commencem; 
vocate" at Chattanooga, he exhibited his talents better than 
he did in the class room or in the presidential chair of the 
college. He was a good administrator, but both he and his 
successor, Robert AUyn, were hampered by lack of funds. 
There was very little endowment and very little income. 
And the fees for tuition and incidental expenses were very 
small. It was almost impossible to pay the salaries of the in- 
structors, and indeed some of them were never wholly paid. 
Risdon M. Moore, the professor of Mathematics, was a 
patient and persevering instructor within the range of the 
text books used in his classes. He did not pursue his studies 
outside of them; and even if he had done so, he had no 
pupils who might wish to extend their researches in Astron- 
omy and fluxions. The professor preferred an active out-door 
life; and when he became a Colonel in the war between the 
states, he made a gallant and successful officer, and received 
the commendation of his superiors in command and of the 
general government. 



nt program for 1854 

Thomas H. Mudge was a member of a large and well 
known New England family which gave so many of its sons 
to the church and the ministry. He received a good educa- 
tion at the Wesleyan University, and turned his attention 
especially to the study of the Scriptures in their original 
tongues. He was also well-versed in the literature of the 
ancient classics and modern authors. He was named for one 
of his uncles, Thomas Hicks, who resided in the East — New 
Jersey, I believe. His uncle became partially insane, and as 
there was no hospital for persons in such condition, he was 
placed in the county jail for safe keeping. Tho he was not 
treated as a common prisoner, but was allowed the liberty 
of the precincts, and on one occasion when his keepers were 
not watching, he took advantage of the opportunity to es- 
cape. After roaming about for a number of days, without 
recapture, he returned of his own accord to the prison, carry- 
ing a few fagots that he had cut with his jack knife in the 
woods, and exclaimed as he gave himself up: 



One Hundred and Setenty-Eight 



MC KENDREE 



"Here comes old Hicks with a bundle of sticks, 

To mend the prison door. 

He has no doubt that he can get out 

As well as he did before." 

When our work in the class room was finished for the 
day, Professor Mudge and I often rambled thru the woods 
and over the fields about Lebanon. We both liked flowers, 
and he sometimes gathered bunches of them to adorn his 
sitting or dining room table. We once found a pretty blue 
flower which neither of us knew, but in consulting our books 
of botany, we identified it as a species of oxalis. The common 
sorrel we well knew, but this was a variety we had never 
before seen. I afterwards found it growing on one ot the 
hills north of Cincinnati, but in only a single spot. We once 
came across a patch of paw paw bushes. The professor had 
never seen a paw paw tree in New England, and he inquired 
of me what it was. I told him and said that it bore a fruit 
which was the delight of boys, and that as this was the 
season for paw paws, we might probably find some. On en- 
tering the clump, we discovered an abundance of the fruit, 
large and well ripened. Picking up one, I broke it open and 
began to eat. "What!" exclaimed he, "are they good to eat?" 
"Try one", I answered, and so he did. It was a new experience, 
but he relished it greatly, and so long as we could find them 
in the woods, he used them freely. His wife and children, a 
son and a daughter, likewise became fond of them. Later in 
the season, besides hickory and hazel nuts, we got wild 
grapes, two varieties, and persimmons. These latter were 
good until Christmas, and when I went home on a visit dur- 
ing our Christmas recess, I took a little box of them with me. 

After leaving McKendree, Professor Mudge began col- 
lecting materials for a Commentary on the Pentateuch. In 
his leisure from pastoral and professional duties, he wrote 
expositions of many passages in it. If he had lived to finish 
his task, it would have been his opus magnum. He went to 
considerable expense in procuring from abroad works which 
he thought would be helpful to him m his undertaking, most 
of them in foreign languages. 

Samuel H. Deneen was my helper in the department of 
Latin and Greek. He was an earnest and diligent worker and 
allowed no lagging in his classes. No slipshod pupil escaped 
his attention. He was a reader of general literature as well 
as of the ancient classics, and acquainted with poetry. He 
owned a good library and was fond of books. 

Oliver V. Jones had charge of the academic department, 
and was faithful and untiring as an instructor. He was not 
a reader of many books, and cared little for general literature ; 



but he liked to run thru the magazines and papers that came 
to the college, and talk about what was going on in the 
world. He kept his eyes open, and was a good judge of men 
and manners. This frame of mind was of service to him 
when he subsequently became editor of a political paper. 
Many of his evenings were spent in society. He was always 
tidy in personal appearance, and used to shave himself every 
day, Sundays excepted, though he did not follow the example 
of Bishop Hamline who performed this operation twice on 
Saturday — m the morning and late in the evening, so as not 
to break the Sabbath. 

Samuel H. Deneen, Oliver V. Jones and myself were then 
unmarried. There were two churches in Lebanon, the Baptist 
and the Methodist. Of course we always attended the latter. 
It was a facetious saying in town that the Methodist girls 
attended the church not so much for the sake of the sermons 
as on account of "The Sams and the hims." 

The Rev. Thomas F. Houts was the pastor stationed in 
Lebanon during my time at McKendree. He had been edu- 
cated as a lawyer; but God had touched his heart, and obey 
ing the call of the Divine Spirit, he entered the ministry. 
His sermons were generally interesting and he was a fluent 
talker. His style was wordy and sophomoric. Take a speci- 
men, on the overthrow of Sodom and Gomorrah. 

"The site of these ancient cities is now a stagnant and 
fetid lake. No trees deck its borders or relieve its shores with 
their verdure. No white pebbles line its bed, and the waves 
surge not against its bleak and desolate rocks. There they 
frown on that dark, still, dead sea, bearing witness to all 
time of God's everlasting and implacable displeasure of sin." 

But this is not more than half as grandiloquent as some 
of his sentences. Mr. Houts was, however, a student of 
divinity, and in process of time he came to entertain doubts 
concerning the "resurrection of the body." He adopted, per- 
haps with some modifications. Professor George Bush's the 
ory. This would have been innocent enough if he had kept 
his opinions to himself, but he began to preach them. I think 
he also published a small treatise on the subject, but it did 
not attract much attention from scholars, as being rather 
raw and rambling. But his theories subjected him to the 
notice of his conference. The minutes will probably show 
its action. 

Upon the whole, McKendree was a good school, both 
for the teachers and the taught. They equally learned les- 
sons which would have been difficult to learn elsewhere. 
If "History IS Philosophy-teaching by example," history was 
there enacted. 




One Hundred and Sef 




^'^ MOBNIRO, 9 O'CLOCK. 



f^xjsyo. 



ORATtOMS. 



ISdXJSIO. 



Lettera ud Libenv 



J H MATTyEwe 



Th« Conquest of Mind, 



B^TJSIC. 



MASTERS' ORATIONS. 

SoDga in the Silent World, X- J. Caluwl 

The Causes of Byron's llnhu|)|Hn(■»^, S H Df.xeen 



ADDRESS TO THE PHILOSOPHIAN SOCIETl 
BT JUDGE NILES. Be.I,LEVII.LE. 



IstfTJSIC 






PRAYER. -MUSIC. 

tmmm mmii mm to the cuADUATiJifl cuss. 



W. H. C#i-i-, Waterloo 

3. H. Mattuews, 
I. M. Phillips. 



Pcrrx . 



m. 


\B^Vi;'i\iJ Oi' .&.'iri'3. 




T. J. Caldwell, 






.luekvonvillc. 


R. M. Dexeen. 






SiULFroneisro.Ciil 


S. H. De.neen, 






Lcbauo... 


I N HicoiNS, 






Griggsvillc. 


HOISrORARY 


DEGl 


REES. 






c- 


Poein to li.e Alumni, 


By I. 


N. HiooiN,' 


A. M., Giife-fe-svllc. 


Address 10 Iho Alumni, 


By J 


I,. S< iiipr» 


A. M . Cliicaso. 



-.MUSIC- 



EVENING. — FESTIVAL OF TIIF, ALUMNI, 

AT TBS TEBAKDAH HOTKL. 8 O'CLOCK. 



755-7 



Facsimile of commencement program 
THE CLASS OF 1858 

This was the first class whose diplomas were signed by 
Dr. Cobleigh as president. Brief sketches of them follow. 
STITH OTWELL BONNER 

Stith Otwell Bonner was born at Staunton, Illinois, July 
7, 183,7. His parents were of Scotch-Irish descent. His grand- 
father, Henry Bonner, came from Virginia with his family 
and settled near Edwardsville in 181 4. His father was John 
Bonner, and his mother, Polly Davidson Randle, was the 
daughter of an itinerant Methodist preacher. Mr. Bonner 
entered McKendree College in i8')5, and graduated in 1858, 
with the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Phil- 
osophian Literary Society. He was married in 1861, to Julia 
A. Ballard, a grand-daughter of Washington C. Ballard, one 
of the early pioneers of Illinois. She died in 1867. In 1870, 



■8,7 

Jonathan and Frances Bascom, of St. Louis. By the first mar- 
riage, there was one daughter, now deceased. By the second 
marriage, a son and a daughter, LeRoy B. Bonner, now of 
St. Louis, and Mrs. Fannie Bonner Price, who long resided 
with her father at Edwardsville, Illinois. Since graduation, 
Mr. Bonner has followed various vocations, chiefly farming 
and horticulture. In 1888, he was elected Coroner of Mad- 
ison County, and held the office for a term of four years. 
After that he engaged in real estate and personal property 
auctioneering at Edwardsville. He was a member of the 
Methodist Church and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He died in Jacksonville, Florida, January 7, 1925. 
JOHN WF^LEY BROCK 
John Wesley Brock was born in Jersey County, Illinois, 
May 16, i8j6. He was the son of T. F. and Lucinda (Slaten) 



he was married to Mrs. Mary E. McHenry, daughter of Brock, the former being a native of Virginia and the 1 



One Hiitidred and Eighty 



\fMC KENDREE 



ter of Georgia. He entered McKendree m 1855, and grad- 
uated in the scientific course in 1858, receiving the degree of 
B. S. His was the first class to graduate in the present chapel 
building. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary 
Society. After graduation, he taught school for some time. 
In 1861, he enlisted in the Union army, being a member of 
the 27th regiment of Illinois Infantry, m which he served 
till the close of the war. After the war, he was engaged in 
various lines of business. He lived for a time in Five Oaks, 
Florida, and later in Denver, Colorado, where his death oc- 
curred in 1893. He was married in October, 1866, to Miss 
Maria Parshley, of Ohio. Their two sons both died in in- 
fancy. Their daughter, Georgia, grew to womanhood. 
THOMAS ESSEX 
Thomas Essex was born m St. Louis, December 15, 1837. 
He was educated in a private school in St. Louis, the high 
school at Arcadia, Missouri, and at McKendree College, 
where he received the degree of A. B. in 1858. He was a 
member of the Platonian Literary Society. He attended a 
law school in Cincinnati and received the degree of LL. B. 
in 1 86 1. He then settled in Ironton, Missouri, where he lived 
for fifteen years. He practiced law, taught school and edited 
the "Iron County Register." In 1867, he was elected to the 
Missouri State Senate, and in 1870, was reelected and served 
as president pro tem of that body. In 1875, he moved to 
Little Rock, Arkansas, and the following year was appointed 
Land Commissioner for the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and 
Southern Railroad. In 1881, he was also made Tax Com- 
missioner for the Missouri Pacific Railway in Arkansas. In 
1892, he retired from active life and spent his declining 
years m St. Louis. In 1866, he was married to Adeline V. 
Hypes, a daughter of Benjamin Hypes, of Lebanon. Their 
daughter, Carrie, became the wife of Professor Emory B. 
Lease, of the University of Cincinnati. Mr. Essex died July 

10, 1909. 

DANIEL KERR 
Danier Kerr was born in Scotland, June 18, 1837. He 
came to America with his parents m 1841 and located on a 
farm in Liberty Prairie, Madison County, Illinois. In 1848-49, 
he was a student in ShurtlefF College. In 1855, he entered 
McKendree and graduated in the class of 1858. He was a 
member of Philo. After receiving his bachelor's degree, he 
entered the Law Department of McKendree, which was then 
newly organized, and completed the law course in 1861. The 
following year he was admitted to the bar. In 1862, he en- 
listed in the 117th Illinois Volunteers, which was known as 
the McKendree Regiment. He entered the service as a pri- 
vate, but was mustered out in i86'i as a First Lieutenant. 



After the w.ir he began the practice of law in Alton. In 
1866, he moved to Edwardsville, from which place he was 
elected to the Legislature m 1868. In 1869, he moved to 
Grundy Center, Iowa, and was elected to the Iowa Legis- 
lature m 1883. In 1884, he was a presidential elector, and 
in 1886, was elected to Congress. He was reelected the fol- 
lowing term. After his career in Congress, Mr. Kerr retired 
from politics as well as from the practice of law and spent 
his later years on a farm in Iowa. He was accustomed to 
spend the winters m California. After leaving the law, he 
spent some years in another field as editor of the "New 
Century," and later of the "Argos." He died only a few 
years ago. 

JOSEPH WILLIAM VAN CLEVE 

Joseph William Van Cleve was born at Mt. Vernon, 
Jefferson County, Illinois, Feb. 20, 1837. He entered Mc- 
Kendree as a student in the fall of 1854 and graduated in 
1858, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He taught school in St. Jacob, 
Bethalto, Hillsboro, and Alton, in the last named place, for 
eight successive years. In 1870, he was admitted on trial in 
the Southern Illinois Conference, and in 1875, was received 
in full connection. He served the following charges : Equal- 
ity and Shawneetown, Jonesboro and Anna, Ashley, 
Jerseyville, Greenville, Olney, and Gillespie. In 1885, he was 
transferred to the Southern California Conference, where he 
spent the remainder of his life. He served several years as pre- 
siding elder. He was married March 5, 1859, to Miss Fanny 
Ransom Holmes. Their three children were William Holmes, 
Fanny Ransom, and Mary Evans. Some time after his wife's 
death, he was married a second time, June 30, 1872, to Miss 
Belle Zora Gird. Of this union, there was born one son, Ray 
Gird. Mr. Van Cleve's death occurred late in the century. 
JOHN VAN CLEVE 

John Van Cleve was born m Shrewsbury, New Jersey, 
May 28, 1804. His parents moved to Ohio in 1815. He 
was converted in 1822 and joined the "Old Stone Church" 
in Cincinnati. He was licensed to preach in 1825, and joined 
the Illinois Conference in 1828. In 185 1, he was transferred 
to the Missouri Conference and preached one year in St. 
Louis. He was then transferred to the Southern Illinois Con' 
ference, where he labored till the end of his life. He served 
as presiding elder in the Alton and Lebanon districts, and 
was four times elected as delegate to the General Conference. 
He was also a member of the General Missionary Committee, 
and his last illness occurred while he was in New York City 
attending the meeting of the Committee. He died at St. 
Luke's Hospital in 1875. McKendree honored him with the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity in 




One HuTidred and Eightv-One 



frMC KENDREE"^^^^^^^^.,..:^^...^ 



THE CLASS OF 1859 

This was the second class to graduate under Dr. Cobleigh's 
administration. Of course their training was mostly received 
under the former president. One member of the class is still 
living at this writing, and is now the oldest living graduate 
of the college. There was also in the class a future president 
of McKendree, McKendree Hypes Chamberlin, whose life 
history will appear in connection with the account of his 
administration as president. Some account of each of the 
others is given here. 

REV. LEMUEL CRAMP 

Lemuel Cramp was born at Bunker Hill, Illinois, April 
6, 1838. He entered McKendree in 1856 and graduated in 
1859, receiving the degree of B. S. In 1898, he received 
from his Alma Mater an honorary master's degree. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Society. 
After graduation, he taught for some 
years in the public schools at Troy, St. 
Jacob and Macon. In 1879, he joined 
the Southern Illinois Conference and 
spent the best years of his long life in 
the service of the church. During his 
ministry, he served some of the impor- 
tant charges of the conference, among 
them Lebanon and East St. Louis. He 
was married September 27, i860, to Miss 
Susanna Reed, of Lebanon. They had 
four children who are all married. Three 
of them were students in McKendree. 
Mrs. Cramp died November 30, 1896. 
Five years later he was married to Mrs. 
Mary L. Wiley of Brighton, Illinois. 
That city has been their home since his 
retirement in 191 3. Mr. Cramp is now 
the oldest living graduate of McKendree. He will have com- 
pleted his ninetieth year if still living by the time McKen- 
dree has finished her Centennial celebration . At the session 
of the Southern Illinois Conference held at the college in 
1927, Brother Cramp was awarded the Confe rence Cane which 
is supposed to belong to the oldest member of the conference. 

MADISON M. GOODNER 
Madison Monroe Goodner was born near N.ishville, Illi- 
nois, June 21, 1842. He was a son of Salem and Elizabeth 
(Cherry) Goodner. He entered McKendree in 1856 and 
graduated in i8';9, receiving the degree of A. B., and three 
years later, A. M. He was a member of the Platonian Lit- 
erary Society. He graduated from the law department of 




LEMUEL 
McKendree's oldest 1 



the University of Cincinnati in 1861, receiving the degree 
of LL. B. He practiced law many years in Nashville, was 
master in chancery of Washington County for several 
terms, having been appointed by Judge Silas L. Bryan, was 
mayor of Nashville for three terms, and county judge of 
Washington County from 1872 to 1876. He was a Repub- 
lican in politics. He was married in 1863, to Miss Marietta 
Cone, of Nashville. Two of their children are now living. 
Dr. Ralph A. Goodner, now practicing the medical profession 
in Nashville, and Mrs. Genevieve Allen, of Chicago. Judge 
Goodner died at Nashville, March 16, 1888. 
CHARLES M. HANDSAKER 
Charles M. Handsaker was born at Broughton, Derby- 
shire, England, September 29, 1836. He came to this coun- 
try in early life and showed an ambition to secure an edu- 
cation. He entered McKendree in 1855 
and joined the Platonian Society. He 
graduated in the class of 1859, receiving 
the degree of A. B. He was employed for 
some years as a civil engineer for the 
Wabash railroad. His death occurred at 
Mt. Vernon, Illinois, October 7, 1878. 
WILLIAM HARTZELL 
William Hartzell was born in Stark 
County, Ohio, February 20, 1837. He 
was of Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry. 
He came to Illinois very early in life and 
in 1855, became a student in McKen- 
dree College, from which institution 
he graduated in 1859, receiving the de- 
gree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was 
a member of the Platonian Literary So- 
ciety. Until 1862, he was engaged in mer- 
cantile business at Evansville and Ches. 
ter; he then began the study of law, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1864. He located at Chester for the practice of law. 
In 1874, he was elected to the forty- fourth Congress of the 
United States, and two years later was reelected to the forty- 
fifth. In 1897, he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court. He 
was married March i, 1866, to Miss Mary Isabella Holmes, 
of Chester. To them were born two children — Joseph H., now 
of Kansas City, and Mabel A., now Mrs. J. M. Randolph, 
of Chester. He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He 
died August 14, 1903. 

DR. JOSEPH KEENEY 

Joseph Keeney was born June 22, 1822. He received his 

college education at Williams College, Massachusetts, where 



One Hundred and Eighty-Two 



MC KENDREE 



he received the degree of A. B. He then took a medical 
course and came west to engage in the practice of medicine. 
He was located in Lebanon for some years and in 1859, re- 
ceived the degree of A. M. from McKendree College. He 
married Miss Helen Finley, whose father was for a time 
professor of Greek in McKendree, and for several years its 
president. They had one son, who afterwards became a 
surgeon in the United States Navy. At the opening of the 
Civil War, Dr. Keeney enlisted in the army and was present 
in the battle of Shiloh. He contracted a disease which com' 
pelled his retirement from the service and caused his death 
July 7, 1862, at his home in Lebanon. He lies buried in College 
Hill Cemetery. A memorial window in his honor has been 
placed in the present Methodist church of Lebanon. 

MONROE J. MILLER 
Monroe Joshua Miller was born near Salisbury, North 
Carolina, September 19, 1830. He was a son of Theobald 
and Elizabeth (Knupp) Miller, the former of German and 
the latter of Norwegian ancestry. When he was only a 
small child, his mother died, and a few years later his father, 
with his second wife and all his family, came west and 
settled m Southern Illinois. In early life, he determined to 
secure an education, though well aware that it depended 
upon his own efforts. After getting what training he could 
from the public schools, he worked in a printing office, 
assisted the editor, and got what practical experience he 
could. In 1853, he first entered McKendree, remaining one 
year only. He then secured a position in a newspaper office 
at Berlin, Wisconsin, and the next year attended school at 
Lawrence University, where Dr. Cobleigh was then pres- 
ident. When that able educator became president of Mc 
Kendree, Mr. Miller returned there and graduated under 
Dr. Cobleigh's presidency in 1859, receiving the degree of 
A. B. and later, A. M. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He was three times president of that so- 
ciety and four times editor of the "Plato Gem". He was 
licensed to preach by the Lebanon Quarterly Conference, 
but for a time engaged in newspaper work, and in August, 
1862, he enlisted in the 117th regiment of Illinois Volunteers, 
where he served his country faithfully for three years, and 
where he contracted the disease of tuberculosis, of which he 
died March 18, 1866. He was married July 28, 1863, to Miss 
Mary Virlinda Wright, of Lebanon. To them was born one 
daughter, Mary Elizabeth, now Mrs. Walter H. Offill, of 
St. Louis. There are also five grand-children all grown and 
all living in St. Louis. 



JOHN S. NICHOLSON 

John S. Nicholson was born at Oldham, England, Feb. 
13, 1832. His parents were Samuel and Mary Nicholson 
who, of course, were natives of England. He came to America 
in early life and entered McKendree in 1854. He graduated 
in 1859 with the degree of A. B., and afterward received 
that of A. M. He was a member of the Philosophian Society. 
He was married in i860 to Miss Jemima Harris. Some years 
after her death, he was married to Miss Jane Buck, in 1875. 
He left two sons, C. B. Nicholson and E. E. Nicholson. When 
he was only a boy, he worked in the printing office, so after 
finishing his college work, he naturally went into the news- 
paper business. In time, he became the editor and proprietor 
of the "Central Illinoisan," at Beardstown, Illinois, which 
in 1892 was consolidated with the Daily Star, which since 
that time has been a daily and weekly paper. He continued 
to be editor and publisher of this paper until the time of his 
death m April, 191 1. He was an active member of the Meth- 
odist Church, of which he was a trustee for thirty years. He 
also served as steward and was several times chosen as lay 
delegate to the conference. He held the office of Postmaster 
from 1904 till the time of his death. He served as presiden- 
tial elector, was frequently a member of the state conven- 
tion and has served on the Republican State Committee. 
THE CLASS OF 1860 
JOHN M. CHAMBERLIN 

John McLean Chamberlin was born in Lebanon, Illinois, 
January 20, 1837. His parents were David and Susan Cham- 
berlin, who were both native Americans. The father was 
a local preacher in the Methodist Church and one of the 
founders of McKendree College. He entered McKendree 
as a student in the fall of 1855 and graduated in i860, re- 
ceiving the degree of A. B. Later he received the degree 
of A. M. He was a member of the Platonian Literary So- 
ciety. He was married November 9, 1869, to Maggie E. 
Royse. To them were born four sons — Willis W., John M., 
Jr., C. Earl, 'and E. Clinton. They were all educated at Mc- 
Kendree College, and all graduated except one. Mr. Chamber- 
lin spent the greater portion of his active life in the mercantile 
world, being for many years a member'of one of the leading 
business firms of Lebanon, Illinois, engaged in general mer- 
chandise. He was a memberof the Masonic Order, and of the 
Methodist Church. He was for many years an active worker 
in the Sunday School, and a very efficient Sunday School 
Superintendent. He was for more than fifty years a trustee of 
McKendree. He was at one time president of the board, and 
served for many years as a member of the executive committee. 



One Hundred and Eig(it>-Tliree 



He was for twenty-two years treasurer of the college, and for 
a long period one of the commissioners of the endowment 
fund. He also served the interests of his home city for some 
years as president of the board of education, and as a mem- 
ber of the city council. He died in Lebanon .it the home of 
his son, C. E. Chamberhn, June ij, 1919. 

JOHN H. ECKERT 
John Hardin Eckert was born near Waterloo, Monroe 
County, Illinois, August 13, 1838, and died June 3, 1899, 
at Arkansas City, Kansas. He was a son of John and Arah 
(Williams) Eckert, who were both Americans, though the 
former was of German descent. He became a student in 
McKendree in 1856 and graduated in June, i860, receiv- 
ing the degree of B. S. Later he took a law course and re- 
ceived from McKendree the degree of LL. B., in 1877. He 
was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He was 
married November 29, 1861, to Frances Henryetta Sager. 
Their three children were lona May, Harry, and Fannie 
Arah. Mr. Eckert engaged in the mercantile business for 
some years after his graduation. Before, and for some years 
after, his admission to the bar he was postmaster of Lebanon 
under Republican administration. In politics, he was an 
ardent Republican all his life. In 1884, he moved to Arkansas 
City, Kansas, and entered upon the practice of law. A short 
time after, he became city attorney of Arkansas City and 
later filled other offices which were within the gift of the 
people. He also took an active interest in newspaper work. 
In 1893, he moved to a farm in Kay County, Oklahoma, 
where his last years were spent in a quiet but useful life 
in the country. He was a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. While not a member of any religious denom- 
ination, he was a close sympathizer with the Methodists. 
He was a devoted student of the Bible and a constant reader 
of religious literature. He was interested in every good work 
and was always anxious to promote the welfare of his fellow 
men. He was held in highest esteem by all his friends and 
acquaintances. 

WILLIAM H. HYPES 
William Henry Hypes was born at Lebanon, Illinois, No- 
vember 17, 1839, and died in his native city April 31, 1887. 
He was a son of Benjamin and Caroline (Murray) Hypes. 
His father was a native of Virginia, of German and Eng- 
lish ancestry, and his mother was born in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, of Scotch-Irish parentage. He took the classical course 
in McKendree and graduated in i86o, receiving the degree 
of A. B., and A. M. in 1863. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He was engaged in mercantile 



business for a number of years. In 1874, he was appointed 
United States Revenue Collector for the thirteenth district 
and held this position for eight years. He was married De- 
cember 20, 1877, to Miss Emehne L. Allyn, daughter of 
Dr. Robert Allyn, who was formerly president of McKen- 
dree, but at the time of his daughter's marriage, president 
of the Southern Illinois Normal at Carbondale. Of this mar- 
riage was born one daughter, Cornelia Allyn Hypes, who 
IS now the wife of Charles B. Whittlesey, a lawyer of New 
London, Connecticut. Mr. Hypes resided in Lebanon during 
his entire lifetime, and was a staunch and loyal friend of 
McKendree to the day of his death. He was a worthy son 
of his father, who was one of McKendree's earliest and 
best friends. 

CAPT. JOSEPH TABOR PARKER 

Joseph Tabor Parker was born September 22, 1838, in 
St. Louis, Missouri. When quite young he attended a Ger- 
man school where he learned to read and speak that lan- 
guage fluently. Then his father moved with his family to 
the city of New Orleans. Here he attended an academy for 
some time. At this place, his father died and the family moved 
to New Albany, Indiana. From here, they moved to Leb- 
anon, Ilhnois, in 1854, and in the fall of that year, young 
Joseph became a student in McKendree. He graduated in 
i860, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. He was a skillful musician, 
and composed several pieces of music which were published. 
He also wrote several poems which were set to music. He 
wrote numerous articles for various literary periodicals, and 
in addition to his other accomplishments, he had a taste 
for art and excelled in drawing. In recognition of his attain- 
ments in literature and the fine arts, he was elected an hon- 
orary member of the Belles Lettres Society of the Illinois 
Conference Female Seminary. In May, 1861, he became a 
soldier in the Union army, and as a member of Colonel F. P. 
Blair's regiment, was present at the capture of Camp Jackson. 
In August, 1862, he enlisted in the 117th Illinois regiment 
under Col. Moore. June 8, 1863, he was commissioned as a 
captain in Col. Kappner's regiment of heavy artillery (col- 
ored), raised at Memphis, Tennessee. He died at Memphis, 
October 17, 1863, of typhoid fever. 

COL. EBENEZER TOPPING 

Ebenezer Hibbard Topping was born in Athens, Coun- 
ty, Ohio, December 19, 1830. In 1841, he came with his 
parents to Perry County, Illinois. In 1850, he went to Cal- 
ifornia, where he was engaged for several years in mining. 
Returning in 1856, he became a student in McKendree, and 



One Hundred and BghtyFour 



graduated in i860, receiving the degree of A. B., and later 
that of A. M. In 1862, he enhsted m the United States army 
and was made captain of a company in the iioth regiment 
of Ilhnois Volunteers. Later he was promoted to be lieu- 
tenant-colonel, and in 1863, was placed m command of the 
regiment. His command entered the field at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky m 1862, and participated m the marches and battles 
of the army of the Cumberland m its campaigns through 
Kentucky and Tennessee. He was with Sherman at Atlanta 
on the famous "March to the Sea." He was mustered 
out at Washington after the grand review, June 8, 1865. He 
was married in 1863, to a daughter of J. R. Watkins. After 
the war, he settled on a farm in Kansas. In 1869, he was 
elected to the Kansas Legislature, and in 1870, became a 
member of the State Senate, and was re-elected the next 
year. In 1877, he was appointed by the Secretary of the 
Interior, Hon. Carl Schurz, to appraise Cherokee lands in 
the Indian Territory. While in McKendree, he was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. His death occurred late 
in the century. 

THE CLASS OF 1S61 
REV. JAMES F. CORRINGTON 
James Fletcher Cornngton was born at Greenfield, Illi- 
nois, February 21, 1840, and died at Chautauqua, Jersey 
County, Illinois, September 5, 1907. He was a son of Rev. 
James B. Corrington and Rhoda B. Larimore, who were 
both natives of Kentucky. He graduated from McKendree 
in the class of 1861, receiving the degree of A. B. Later 
he received the following degrees from the same institu- 
tion: A. M. in 1864, D. D. in 1896, and Ph. D. in 1890. 
He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. He 
was married July 3, 1867, to Miss Juliet A. Hamlin, of Salem, 
Illinois. Their only daughter is now Mrs. Joanna Corrington 
Leverett. He was a soldier in the Civil War, enlisting m 
1862, in the 122nd Illinois Volunteers, as a private. He after- 
ward served as quartermaster, and still later was promoted 
to the rank of captain. After the war, he engaged in mer- 
cantile business for a year in Alton, Illinois. He then became 
professor in the Military Academy at Lexington, Missouri. 
Then after serving as principal of the Lexington High School 
for a time, he was elected County Superintendent of Schools, 
and held this position four years. Then in 1873, he entered 
the ministry and became a member of the St. Louis Confer- 
ence of the M. E. Church. He was a member of the Masonic 
Order, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, being con- 
nected with the Ransom Post of St. Louis. During his min- 
isterial career, he was pastor of the following charges in the 



St. Louis Conference: Dresden, Independence, and Butler, 
two years each; in the city of St. Louis, he was pastor of 
St. Luke's twice and of Bowman twice, and of Tower Grove 
church; he was presiding elder of the St. Louis District from 
1885 to 1889, and secretary of the Twentieth Century Fund, 
1900 to 1902. After th.it, he took a supernumerary relation 
and retired from active work. 

WILLIAM P. HAISLEY 
William Penn Haisley was born in Wayne County, Indi- 
ana, December 21, 1831, and died in the year 1906. His 
parents were Quakers who lived in North Carolina until 
just prior to his birth, they moved west, stopping in Indiana 
for a few years where they could be associated with more of 
the Society of Friends than in their former home. Some years 
later they moved into the vicinity of Jacksonville, lUinois, 
where his boyhood was spent. He graduated from McKen- 
dree in the class of 1861. He then took a law course at Har- 
vard University and received the degree of LL. B. from that 
institution. While m McKendree, he was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. He was an intelligent and 
persistent traveller, and spent ten years of his life in travelling 
for the purpose of securing information. In 1868, he visited 
Florida, and being pleased with the country, eventually set- 
tled there, making his home at Ocala. In 1877, he was elected 
Superintendent of Public Instruction for the state of Florida. 
In 1878, he was married to Miss Julia Simmons of Lewes, 
Delaware, who, as his widow, still survives. 
LUCIUS MARCUS OLDEN 
Lucius Marcus Olden was born at Montpelier, Vermont, 
March 4, 1832. While he was a small boy, his parents 
came west and located at Alton, Illinois. He entered Mc- 
Kendree at the same time with his older brother William, 
m March, 1852, but did not pursue the course regularly. He 
finished the law course, receiving the degree of LL. B. in 
1861, and the classical course in 1863, when he received the 
degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. For some years after gradua- 
tion, he taught school and practiced law. He then travelled 
extensively through the west, finally stopping at Prescott, 
Arizona. Here for many years, he engaged m mining, fighting 
Indians, and leading the life of a typical frontiersman. His 
death occurred February 2, 1905, when he fell over a preci- 
pice while going down a mountain from his mill, and was 
instantly killed. He was never married. 

WILLIAM W. LEMMON 
William Washington Lemmon, a native of Bond County, 
Illinois, entered McKendree in 1858 and graduated in June, 




One Hundred and Eiglit-v 



i86i, receiving the degrees of B. S. and LL. B. He was 
a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He stood at 
the head of his class, receiving the first honors. Immedi- 
ately after his graduation, he enlisted in the United States 
army as sergeant major of the Eighteenth regiment of Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry. After serving in this capacity only 
a short time, he died August 7, 1861. He was a young man 
of great promise, and evidently had a successful career be- 
fore him which was cut off by his early death. 
MAJOR WILLIAM P. OLDEN 
William Pomeroy Olden was born in Montpelier, Ver- 
mont, January 5, 1831. He first entered McKendree in 1852, 
but owing to interruptions 
in his course he did not grad- 
uate till 1861, when he fin- 
ished both the law and the 
classical courses, and receiv- 
ed the degrees of A. B. and 
LL. B., both at the same 
time. He was a member of 
the first law class which 
graduated fromMcKendree. 
He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. 
After his graduation, he 
WILLIAM OLDEN taught school one year at 

Moro, Illinois, and in the 
summer of 1 862, he raised a company of soldiers of which he was 
chosen captain, and which became Company D of the 117th 
Illinois Volunteers, of which Professor R. M. Moore was 
colonel. Benjamin F. Olden, a younger brother of William 
P. was lieutenant of the same company. Before the close 
of the war. Captain Olden became major of the regiment. 
After the war, he began the practice of law in Springfield, 
Illinois, where he spent the remainder of his life. Aside from 
his law business, he was the author of a number of inventions, 
on which he secured patents. He was married January 5, 
1872, to Mary Q. Staley. Their children are William Q., 
born in 1873, Mary E., born in 1875, and Ulysses S., born 
in 1879. His death occurred March 3, 1904. 
SAMUEL BALDWIN RILEY 
Samuel Baldwin Riley received the degree of LL. B. as 
a member of the class of 1861. We have no recent informa- 
tion concerning him. 

THE CLASS OF 1862 
CAPT. HENRY A. CASTLE 
Henry Anson Castle was born at Columbus, Adams 
County, Illinois, August 22, 1841. His parents, Timothy 





HENERY CASTLE 



H. and Julia (Boyd) Castle, 
were natives of Vermont. 
His four great-grandfathers 
were soldiers in the Revo- 
lutionary War. After attend- 
ing the public schools, he 
entered Quincy College in 
1859, pursuing the classical 
course, but in 1861, he trans- 
ferred toMcKendree,chang- 
ed to the scientific course, 
and graduated in the class of 
1862, receiving the degree 
of B. S. Three years later, 
he received the degree of 

M. S., and in 1882, the honorary degree of Master of Arts. 
He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society and editor 
of the "Plato Gem." He has frequently been invited to deliver 
addresses before various organizations in the college, on com- 
mencement and other occasions. In 1912, five members of 
this class were still living. Castle, Marshall, Young, Harris 
and Cobleigh. The first three mentioned attended the com- 
mencement exercises in commemoration of the fiftieth anni- 
versary of their graduation. In August, 1862, Mr. Castle 
entered the Union army as a private, and at the close of the 
war, was mustered out as captain of a company m the i J7th 
Illinois Volunteers. After the war, he studied law, and prac- 
ticed that profession in Illinois and Minnesota. In St. Paul, 
he engaged in editorial work, and afterward became owner 
of the "St. Paul Dispatch," one of the leading papers of that 
city. He served the public as a member of the Legislature of 
Minnesota, postmaster of St. Paul, and auditor of the Post 
Office Department at Washington, D. C. He has written for 
many of the leading magazines, among them the North Amer- 
ican Review, Harpers, Saturday Evening Post, World's 
Work, McClure's and Collier's Weekly. He is author of 
"The Army Mule and Other Sketches." He was married 
April 18, 1865, to Miss Margaret W. Jaquess, of Quincy. 
To them were born three sons and four daughters. The oldest 
son, Charles W., is now a captain in the U. S. A. The other 
sons died after reaching manhood. Of the daughters, Mar- 
garet married Captain E. R. Stone, of the U. S. A. Anna 
married Fred C. Christy, of Phoenix, Arizona, while Helen 
S. and Mary J. resided with their father in St. Paul until 
his de.ith August 16, 1916. 

NELSON S. COBLEIGH 
Nelson Simmons Cobleigh was born June 29, 1845, at 
Wilbniham, Massachusetts. He was a son of the Rev. Nel' 



Otic Hundred and Eiglil\-Si.' 



|mc KENDREE"^^^^^s:^^..^^.>^^^ 



son E. Cobleigh, D. D., LL. D., a native of New Hamp- 
shire, and Charlotte M. (Simmons) Cobleigh, a native of 
Massachusetts. He entered McKendree in 1858 and grad- 
uated as valedictorian of the class in 1862, receiving the 
degree of A. B., and in 1865 the degree of A. M. He was a 
member of the Platonian Literary Society. At the time of 
his graduation, his father, the Rev. Doctor Cobleigh, was 
president of McKendree. He took a University course in 
Harvard in 1863-64. He received the degree of Master of 
Arts from Yale in 1865, and the same degree from the Wes- 
leyan University in 1866. He graduated from the Dio Lewis 
Normal Institute of Physical Education in 1864. He was 
married to Miss Martha A. Rice in Boston, June 29, 1869. 
Of their five children, only one son and one daughter, Rice 
and Nellie S., are still living. After entering upon his career 
of newspaper work, Mr. Cobleigh held the following posi- 
tions: Reporter for the Boston Daily Advocate and Bos' 
ton Traveller, Assistant Editor of Zion's Herald, Boston- 
City Editor of the Cleveland Daily Leader, City Editor and 
Associate Editor of the Cleveland Plamdealer. He was on the 
staff of the New York World from 1890, to his death and 
was Foreign Editor of this paper since 1893. He spent the 
year 1867 chiefly in travel and study in Europe. For two 
years he was a member of the City Council of the city of 
Cleveland, and served as Vice-President of that body. He 
was an honorary member of the Cleveland Light Artillery. He 
was also a member of each of the following learned societies 
and fraternal orders: American Institute of Instruction, Na- 
tional Geographical Society, Order of Elks, Eclectic Frater- 
nity, Wesleyan University Chapter, and the Ohio Society 
of New York. He died at his home in White Plains, New 
York, March 4, 1927. 

JOSEPH HARRIS 
Joseph Harris was born in Truro, Cornwall, England, 
December 25, 1830, and died at Los Angeles, California, De- 
cember 15, 1912. He came to America at the age of nine with 
his parents, who settled in Kentucky, but soon after moved 
to Cass County, Illinois, where he grew to manhood. He 
studied law for a time in Springfield, but abandoned it to 
enter the ministry, and joined the Illinois Conference in 
1859. He then entered McKendree and graduated in 1862, 
with the degree of A. B., and in 1865 received the degree 
of A. M. He preached a number of years in the Southern 
Illinois Conference, and from 1879 to 1886, occupied the 
chair of Mathematics in McKendree College. After two 
years in the supernumerary relation, he transferred to the 
St. Louis Conference. Among the charges he served in this 
conference were Trinity and St. Luke's, and his last work 




was assistant pastor of Union Church, all in the city of St. 
Louis. In 1896, he took the superannuate relation and for 
the last fifteen years of his life he and Mrs. Harris made 
their home with their daughter and son-in-law. Rev. and 
Mrs. Arthur Page Sharp, in Massachusetts. They were en- 
joying an extended visit in Los Angeles, when he was called 
to his final reward. He was one of the five members of his 
class who lived to see the fiftieth anniversary of their grad- 
uation, though he was unable to attend the reunion in r9i2. 
JOHN S. FITZGERRELL 

John Stanton Fitsgerrell 
was born in Jefferson Coun- 
ty, lUinois, March i, 1841. 
He was a son of James J. 
and Martha Ann (Martin) 
Fitzgerrell, who were both 
of Irish ancestry. He be- 
came a student in McKen- 
dree in the fall of 1858, and 
graduated in 1862, receiving 
at the same time the two de- 
grees, B. S. and LL. B. He 
was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Literary Society. 
He was married November 

25, 1862, to Miss Mary C. Moore, a daughter of Capt. Jon- 
athan and Ehzabeth Moore, of St. Clair County, Illinois. To 
them was born one son, John Stanton Fitzgerrell, Jr., who 
was educated in McKendree, and who, after a career in the 
practice of law in Bowling Green, Missouri, died in the 
early part of this century, due to heart failure. 

Soon after his graduation, Mr. Fitzgerrell entered upon 
the practice of law at Benton, Illinois, in partnership with 
F. M. Youngblood, later known as Judge Youngblood. His 
promising career was cut short by his death August 11, 
1863. He was a member of the Methodist Church. His 
widow moved to Lebanon where she might educate her son 
at McKendree, and still resides in this city (1928). 

JOHN N. GWIN 
John Newton Gwin was born in Crawford County, lUi- 
nois, February 26, 1837. He became a student in Asbury 
University (now De Pauw), but later came to McKendree, 
in 1857. In 1861, he left his studies and entered the United 
States army as a volunteer soldier. After serving five months 
he was discharged on account of sickness. As soon as he 
was able, he resumed his college work, and graduated in 
the class of 1862, receiving the degree of A. B., and later. 



JOHN FITZGERRELL 



f^r' 



'% 



\f j)j;(;R!ei;s CONFERRED. ^ 



M)in\us ton K s 



-1 



Reduced facsimile of cc 



^■Mt 



that of A. M. He was a member of the Philosophian Lit- 
erary Society. He studied law in the Cincinnati Law School, 
and received the degree of LL. B. from that institution 
in 1866. He made the practice of law his vocation. He died 
at Hot Springs, Arkansas, October jo, 1895. 
BOONE GRIFFIN 

Boone Griffin was born near Belleville, Illinois, July 27, 
1842. He was a son of Joseph and Sally Ann (Collins) 
Griffin, who were both natives of New York State. He en- 
tered McKendree in the late fifties and had completed the 
greater part of his college course before the beginning of the 
Civil War. In 1861, he, with some of his fellow students, 
went to Jefferson Barracks and enlisted in a Missouri Reg- 
iment for ninety days. When this period of service was ended, 
he decided to return to college. He was a member of the 
graduating class of 1862, but in the spring of that year, his 
health failed completely and he died at his home near Belle- 
ville, May 4, 1862. When the Board of Trustees assembled 
a month later, as a fitting memorial, it was voted that he 
should be honored with the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
and that his name should stand in the list of alumni of Mc 
Kendree College. 

DR. JAMES H LOWE 

James Henry Lowe was born near Summerfield, St. Clair 
County, Illinois, November 30, 1841, and died at his home 
in Kewanee, Illinois, April 20, iSgj. He was the oldest 
often children, and the first of these to pass from e.irth. While 



only a boy, he entered McKendree and graduated with the 
class of 1862, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. He studied law, but later 
he entered the Chicago Medical College of the city of Chi- 
cago, from which he received the degree of M. D. in 1873. 
He at once began the practice of medicine at Brimfield, Illi- 
nois, where he was married January 14, 1874, to Miss Au- 
gusta Sutton, who with four children, survived him. In 1882, 
he moved from Brimfield to Kewanee, where he practiced 
his profession successfully until the time of his death. He 
became a Christian at the early age of nine years, and was an 
earnest and faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. At the time of his death, he had been for several 
years president of the Board of Trustees of his church. An 
extract from his obituary says, "He will be greatly missed 
in the homes of Kewanee, where he ministered to the phys- 
ical needs; in the church, where he was so faithful; and in 
the temperance cause, where he was such a zealous worker. 
His life was full of useful work; his influence always right." 

DR. JAMES EDWIN MARSHALL 
James Edwin Marshall was born near FayetteviUe, St. 
Clair County, Illinois, May 22, 1842. His father, Edward 
B. Marshall, was born in Dorchester County, Maryland, 
in 1814, and his mother, Harriet (Barker) Marshall, in Ran- 
dolph County, Illinois, in 1821. He entered McKendree 
in January, 1858 and graduated in June, 1862, receiving the 
degree of A. B. June 19, 1862, and five years later, in 1867, the 
A. M. degree. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He studied in the St. Louis Medical College and re- 
ceived the degree of M. D. in March, 1864. He practiced med- 
icine and conducted a drug store at Centralia, 111. until i88j, 
when he became cashier of a banking firm and continued in this 
position until 1900, when the business was merged with a 
State bank. He was also for twelve years treasurer of the 
Centralia Building and Loan Association. He also served as 
president of the Board of Education in the same city. In 
1900, he moved to Chicago, and in 1905 to Evanston, where 
he died in 1926. For seven years he served as director in 
a wholesale grocery company in Evanston. He was married 
November 11, 1869, to Miss Catherine McKnight at Cen- 
tralia. Their children are Miss Zella Marshall, Mrs. Roy 
H. Goddard, and Mrs. Claude R. Ailing, all born at Cen- 
tralia and now residents of Evanston and Chicago. Dr. 
Marshall saw service in the Civil War in a hospital on the 
Mississippi River, and for a time was assistant surgeon in 
the tenth Missouri Cavalry. He is a member of Centralia 
Lodge No. 201, A. F. &? A. M., and for twenty-one years 



One Hundred and EigKtv-Eiglil 



i^Sl^^ll^^^^ss^^ss^ 




MKENDREE COLLEGK. 



>:fSJ':' 



REVERENDO NELSONI E. COBLEIGH. I). D. 

PR.^.SIDI. 

P.lOFESSOIilDUS. I 



)FESSO 



<1VLES1TAT1S McKlNDUl.l; HoNOKA.NDlS; Ejt'SL 
; HoNOKANDls VTQUE III VERKNDIS; O.MMBUS 
UE LlTEHAin'M FaUIORIDIS, IMPRIMIS 

iiujrs AcAiiiM.ix I'ATKONis: 



Nos, GRAUUM Ba 



, LEM HECI 



: L' R I , 



IIenricus Anson Castle, 
Nri.sox Simmons CoDLEuai, 

JoilANNrS SlANTON FiTZf. ERR ELL, 

Boon GnniEN,* 
Johannes Newton Gwin, 
JosEi'iius Harris, 
Jacodvjs Henrici.'s Lowe, 
•Iacouus Edvinus Marshall, 
Daniel Whittenberi; Phillips, 
RoBERTUs Allen Queen, 

GuLIELMt'S WaLLIS, 

Peachy Taliaferro Wilson, 
GuLiELMus Albion Young, 
verecunde ihdicamus. 




Facsimile ot an old commencement progra 

served as recorder, two years as eminent Commander, and 
treasurer for five years of the Cyrene Commandery, No. 
23 Knight Templars. He attended the triennial encampment 
of Knight Templars at Baltimore in 1871, and at Denver 
in 1892. He has been a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen for about thirty years. He is a member 



of the First Methodist Church at Evanston. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics, has voted for president twelve times, and 
ten times for the candidate elected. He has voted twelve 
times for governor of Illinois, and helped to elect eleven 
governors. He was present in two National Republican Con- 
ventions in Chicago, m the years 1904 and 1908. He attended 




One Uundred and £ightv-.\i 




DR. PHILLIPS 
President of McKendree in i8 



three World's Fairs — in Philadelphia, Chicago and St. Louis. 
He was one of the three members of his class who attended 
the reunion in 191 2 on the 50th anniversary of their graduation. 
DANIEL WHITTENBURG PHILLIPS 
Daniel Whittenburg Phillips was born in Washington 
County, Illinois, August 15, 18 j8. He was the youngest 
of the nine children of John 
and Sally (Whittenburg) 
Phillips, whocame from East 
Tennessee to Illinois in the 
same year that it became a 
state and settled in what 
was afterward known as the 
Beaucoup neighborhood, in 
1818. He was reared in a re- 
ligious home, converted at 
sixteen, became a student in 
McKendree College at eigh- 
teen, and graduated in the 
class of 1862, with the de- 
gree of A. B. Three years 
later he received the degree 
of A. M., and in 1883, was honored with the degree 
of D. D. He entered the ministry as a local preacher 
and in that capacity did much preaching, and served 
as supply pastor in several charges. He joined the 
Southern Illinois Conference in 1868 and was a mem- 
ber of this body until transferred to the Southwest Kan- 
sas Conference in 1884, where his membership remained 
until his death in Winfield, Kansas, September 2, 191 1. In 
the former conference, he was pastor at Mound City, Nash- 
ville, Mt. Vernon and Jerseyville. For two years he was 
president of the Illinois Agricultural College, located at 
Irvington. For four years, 1879-83, he was president of 
McKendree College, his own alma mater. During his incum- 
bency, a long standing debt of $7500 was paid, improvements 
made on the buildings, and the departments of Music, Busi- 
ness and Elocution were organized. In Kansas, he was pastor 
at Arkansas City, Wichita, Eldorado and Medicine Lodge. 
He was one of the founders of the Southwestern College at 
Winfield, Kansas. He served for ten years as the president of 
its Board of Trustees, and for one year was vice-president 
and professor in the college. After his retirement from active 
work in 1900, he spent the closing years of his life at Winfield, 
in close touch with this college, where his son. Prof. J. F. 
Phillips, is a member of the faculty. Dr. Phillips was first 
married m 1863, to Mary Ann Curlee, who died five years 



later, leaving one daughter, Eva May, now Mrs. Snyder, of 
St. Louis. In 1869, he was married to Susan E. Vasey, of 
Richview, Illinois, who now survives him. To them were 
born five sons, William L., George A., John F., Walter E., 
and Robert E. These are all now living except the second, 
who died in childhood. 

WILLIAM WALLIS 

William Wallis was born in Parsington, King's County, 
Ireland, June 5, 1836. His father's ancestors went to Ire- 
land from England in the army of William the Third and fought 
m the battle of Boyne. His mother's ancestors went to Ire- 
land with Cromwell's army and settled there. He was there- 
fore of Puritan blood. He came to America with his parents in 
1839. His father died a year later. He was reared on a 
farm, joined the Methodist Church at fifteen, learned 
the tanner's trade, taught school, and thus earned the 
money to go to college. He entered McKendree in 1856 
and graduated in 1862 with the degree of A. B. Three 
years later, he received the degree of A. M., and in 1900, that of 
D. D. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. 
August 13, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, 117th Illinois 
Volunteers. He was elected Second Lieutenant, afterward 
promoted to first lieutenant, and then to assistant adju- 
tant. He was mustered out of the service in August, 1865, 
and the following October, was admitted on trial to the 
Southern Illinois Conference. His appointments were as fol- 
lows: 1865, Mascoutah; 1866, professor in Southern lUinois 
Female College at Salem; 1867-68, East St. Louis; 1869-70, 
Collinsville; 1871-73, Brighton; 1874, EdwardsviUe; 1875, 
Piasa and Fidelity; 1876-77, Effingham; 1878-79, Centralia; 
1880, Olney; 1881-82, Carlyle; 1883-84, Ashley and Rich- 
view; 1885-90, presiding elder Mt. Vernon District; 1891-92, 
Carbondale; 1893-98, presiding elder Olney District; 1899, 
Effingham. Failing health compelled him to retire from active 
work, and he moved with his family to Lebanon. His death 
occurred March 15, 1901. He was buried in College Hill 
Cemetery. He was married September 8, 1868, to Miss Eva 
Hain, of Salem, Illinois. Their five children are William, 
Mary, Marshall, Robert and Edward. They all received a 
college education, and the last two are graduates of Mc- 
Kendree. Dr. Wallis was for many years a trustee of Mc- 
Kendree College, and was a delegate to the General Confer- 
ence of 1896. 

PEACHY TALIAFERO WILSON 

Peachy Taliafero Wilson was born in Christian County, 
Kentucky, October 26, 1832. In 1833, he came with his 
parents to Adams County, Illinois. He became a student 
in McKendree in February, 1856. After several years at 




One Hundred and H^ 



IfMC KENDREE 



McKendree, he went to Garrett Biblical Institute and grad- 
uated there in 1861. The next year he finished the course at 
McKendree and received the degree of A. B. He was a mem- 
ber of the Platonian Literary Society. In the fall of 1862, he 
sailed for India as a missionary, under the direction of the 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He 
was married at Calcutta, November iq, 186:,, to Miss Mary 
J. Whitcomb. To them were born five children. While Mr. 
Wilson was home on a furlough with his family m 1874, his 
wife died m Adams County, Illinois. He was married twice 
afterward, the third wife surviving him. His death occurred 
at Sitapur, India, February 13, 1898. He gave thirty-hve 
years of faithful service to the cause of Christianity as a 
Methodist Missionary. 

WILLIAM ALBION YOUNG 
William Albion Young was born in Montgomery Coun' 
ty, Illinois, August 20, 1836. His parents, William and Jane 
Young, were both native Americans. He entered McKen- 
dree as a student in April, i8';7, and graduated with the 
B. S. degree in 1862. He was a member of the Platonian Lit 
erary Society. During the Civil War, he was quartermaster 
of the first regiment of Illinois Cavalry. During the years 
1864-66, he was sheriff of Montgomery County. He served 
twelve years as a member of the State Board of Agriculture. 
He was for many years engaged in farming and fruit growing 
at his home at Butler, lUinois. He was a member of the Luth- 
eran Church, and of the Royal Arch Chapter of the Masonic 
Order. He was one of the three surviving members of the 
class of 1862 who attended a reunion at McKendree in 1912 
in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of their grad- 
uation. He was married m 1866, to Mary E. Ware. She died 
in 1870, leaving two sons, who both became physicians, 
Anthony, of St. Louis, and William Albion, Jr., of Spring- 
field, 111. In 1871, Mr. Young was married again, to Sarah 
Muenscher, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio. She died in 1898, leaving 
four children : Cornelia, who became a Red Cross worker in 
Russia, Frederica and Eunice, both of Chicago, and Charles, 
who was killed in a railroad accident after he was grown. In 
August, 1899, Mr. Young was married a third time, to Mrs. 
Emma J. Whiting, of Kansas City, who survived him. One 
who knew him well, said this of him, "He was a man of ex- 
ceptional abihty, a deep reader and thinker, and a born leader. 
He would have stood high in almost any field of endeavor, 
but he loved the trees and flowers and fruits on his farm so 
much that he was content to spend his life caring for them. 
His country home was one of the most deHghtful spots in 
all the region." He died April 3, 1922. 



ROBERT ALEXANDER QUEEN 
Robert Alexander Queen graduated in law with this 
class. 

THE CLASS OF 1863 
JOHN ELAM 

John Elam was born m Fayette County, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 22, 1839. He was a son of Rev. William and Mary 
Elam, the father being a minister of the Dunkard Church and 
a native of Virginia, while his mother came from Tennessee. 
He entered McKendree in 1861 and became a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He graduated from the law de- 
partment in 1863, receiving the degree of LL. B. He began the 
practice of law in Vandalia and soon became the partner of 
Judge Tevis Greathouse, and continued in this partnership 
until his death, which occurred August 22, 1875. He left a 
wife, a son, William, and a daughter. Fern. The son was 
drowned in the Kaskaskia River in 1901. 

WILLIAM HENRY KROME 

William Henry Krome was born July i, 1841. He grad- 
uated from McKendree m the class of 1863, receiving the 
degree of A. B. He was a member of Plato. Later he took a law 
course in the University of Michigan and received the degree 
of LL. B. He began the practice of his profession in the city of 
Edwardsville, where he spent the remainder of his life. He 
has served as mayor of his home city and as a member of the 
Illinois State Senate. In 1890, he was elected county judge of 
Madison County. In 1894, he was a lecturer in the McKeiv 
dree Law School. In addition to his different lines of legal 
work, he was for a large part of his life engaged in the banking 
business. For many years he was president of the Bank of 
Edwardsville. His death occurred March 7, 1917. 
WILLIAM CHRISTIAN 

William Christian, of Tamaroa, graduated in this class, 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws. We have no record 
of his subsequent career. 




MCKE^jmEE COLLEGE. 

CERTIFICATE OF CONATION TO^ THE\i;iSJ^WMEii 



TeifSJf &&-2r,'^j,„ <^„^v,^ ««^/»^. .^.^-/i^^; j1,/;,,J<.- .,w\i?i,,,//<.^/, y„,,.,. 



Reduced facsimile of an endowment certificate dated August 7th, 1863 



CHAPTER XVI. 

McKendree and the Wars 



fficKENDREE's alumni list begins m 1841 and up to the 
days of the Mexican War she had but few students. 
The most of these were singled out for leadership 
in civil lines, but there were a few McKendree men who 
participated in that early war. Among them were William 
R. Morrison, who was a captain in the Mexican, and a 
colonel in the Civil War; the two brothers, William H. and 
Frederick A. Snyder, the former a first lieutenant of the 
Fifth Illinois, and the other a second lieutenant in the Six- 
teenth U. S. A. regiment. These were both members of the 
class of 1843. In the list of privates there were Samuel Kinney 
Thomas, class of 1848; Joseph H. Tam, one of the founders 
of Philo; and Michael Mummert, one of the founders of 
Plato and the first teacher of German in McKendree. Doubt- 
less there were others if we had a complete list. At the 
beginning of the Civil War there were in the college in 
all Its departments, including the faculty, less than two hun- 
dred men. The Union Army, outside of the regulars, was 
recruited by a call for volunteers. The draft came later, and 
then it was a selective draft and not a conscription of all 
sound men between certain ages. So probably not a single 
one of the college group went except voluntarily. Also there 
were some new students each year of the war, and by these 
means the college work was kept going in spite of the large 
number who entered the army. At this time it is not possible 
to determine exactly how many McKendreans were in the 
war, but we have a record of at least thirty officers, and it 
seems likely that altogether there were not less than a hun- 
dred and fifty who were in the army and also students in 
McKendree either before or after their war service. As evi- 
dence of the patriotic principles employed in the administra- 
tion of the institution, and also as indication that there may 
have been some students who were not strictly loyal to the 
union, we find the following resolution in the records of the 
Board : "Students shall not be allowed to utter disloyal senti- 
ments against the government of the United States or make 
disloyal demonstrations in any other way, by displaying signs 
or badges indicative of disloyalty; and should any student 
continue to do so after suitable admonition, he may be ex- 
pelled or otherwise punished at the discretion of the faculty." 
The class of 1862 graduated in June of that year, twelve in 
number. We do not have at hand the titles of their orations, 
but there is a tradition that they reflected the patriotic sen- 
timent of the day and advocated the duty of citiiens to 



engage in righteous warfare when their country needed their 
service. The war clouds were hanging low upon the horizon, 
and there was much discouragement in many quarters over 
the outlook for the success of the war. It was that summer 
that Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, though 
it did not go into effect until the following January. It so 
happened that before college opened in the fall of 1863, at 
least two members of that class and two members of the 
faculty were officers in the Union Army. In September the 
117th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers was organized with 
Professor Risdon M. Moore as colonel and Professor Samuel 
H. Deneen as adjutant. This was called the McKendree 
Regiment because the majority of the McKendree soldiers 
were in that regiment. Henry C. Fike, of the class of 1852, 
gives a list of the officers of this regiment who were grad- 
uates or sometime students in McKendree. Colonel Risdon 
M. Moore, Quartermaster Henry C. Fike, Adjutant Samuel 
H. Deneen, Lieutenant Daniel Kerr, Sergeant Joseph T. 
Parker, Major William P. Olden, Lieutenant Benjamin F. 
Olden, Lieutenant William Wallis, Lieutenant James M. 
Truitt, Sergeant William P. Eaton, Captain Robert A. Hal- 
bert. Lieut.-Colonel Jonathan Merriam, Captain W. R. 
Whittaker, Sergeant Monroe J. Miller, Lieutenant David 
H. Wilderman, and of course a much larger number in the 
rank of private. In other branches of the army were General 
Jesse H. Moore, General James H. Wilson, General Wesley 
Merritt, General Lucian Greathouse, Colonel William R. 
Morrison, Captain William Herbert Copp, Captain Henry 
A. Castle, Major Bluford Wilson, and of course it is not 
claimed that this list is complete. 

After a few weeks of training, the 1 17th left Camp Butler 
November 11, 1862 and did service at various points in the 
war zone as far south as Vicksburg. In its three years service 
the regiment was engaged in six battles and thirteen skir- 
mishes. It marched 2J07 miles, traveled 6191 miles by water, 
and 778 miles by rail. A number of soldier boys came to 
McKendree after the war was over, in the fall of 1865, real- 
izing that with the handicap of maimed bodies, it was more 
necessary to have trained minds in order to succeed in the 
world's great struggle for the means of livelihood or for suc- 
cess in a business or profession. At one time there were three 
ex-soldiers reciting in McKendree classes, who had only one 
arm each; having lost the other in southern battlefields. This 
one-armed trio consisted of James B. Pinckard of Brighton, 



Otic Hundred and ?imety-Two 



c K ENDREE^ ^^^^^s^g^^^^^T,.^ 



James Haynes of ZanesviUe, and William F. Wilton of Huey. 
As an illustration of the kind of service the McKendree 
soldiers rendered m this great war, we quote briefly from an 
address delivered hy Professor Deneen at an educational 
convention held at Lebanon in 1884. "But if our land were to 
derive from its colleges no greater service than the zealous 
devotion with which they espoused the loyal cause in the 
late war, the nation would be amply repaid tor all the self- 
sacrifice and expenditure made in their behalf. All did well, 
but none better in proportion to age 
and numbers, than our own McKen- 
dree. From the tiring upon Fort 
Sumpter to the capture of Mobile, 
her sons gathered around the starry 
banner to defend its honor or die 
beneath its folds. They perished from 
fever in hospitals; they pined away 
from starvation in prison pens; they 
found a sudden grave beneath the 
waters of the Tennessee ; they fell m 
the fiery front above the clouds at 
Mission Ridge. From Fort Donaldson 
to Appomattox there was scarcely 
an important engagement in which 
the sons of McKendree did not do 
battle for equal liberty and an un- 
divided nation. They were found 
in all ranks from the private soldier 
to the Major General; but how- 
ever different in rank the spirit which animated them 
all was the same. It was at Fort Donaldson that Colonel 
Morrison, the present congressman, then in charge of the 
Forty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, received a disabling wound. 
It was at Holly Springs, when that post was surprised by 
Van Dorn, that a cavalry officer, Isaiah Stickle, a graduate 
of McKendree, while others were surrendering, drew his 
sabre, and exhorting his comrades to follow his example, and 
to prefer death to a rebel prison, cut his way through the 
superior numbers of the encircling foe, and brought his 
followers in safety to the Union lines. It was near Atlanta 
that another son of McKendree, Colonel Lucien Greathouse, 
leading his regiment in a charge against the serried ranks of 
the enemy, fell with a fatal wound while the air was ringing 
with the shouts for the victory which his fiery courage had 
helped to win. 

"The distinguished officer who in the latter part of the 
war started from Nashville with fifteen thousand cavalry 




THE THREE ONH-ARMED EX-SOLDIERS 
James Haynes, J B. Pinckard and W. F. Wilton 



and scattered havoc and desolation through Alabama and 
Georgia, defeated Forrest and destroyed his army, took 
Montgomery, which was for a time the capital of the Con- 
federacy, and feasted his troopers where the chieftains of 
secession had first met m council, and closed his eventful 
campaign by the capture of Jefferson Davis himself, was a 
student in McKendree. This was General James H. Wilson. 
Not less deserving of mention is another son of McKendree, 
M nor General Wesley Merritt, a cavalry officer, noted alike 
for impetuous valor and eminent ser- 
vices, prominent in campaigns in 
Virginia, who not very long ago 
was appointed Superintendent of 
the United States Military Academy 
at West Point. 

"But not to dwell longer upon the 
achievements of officers, it was a 
student of McKendree, a private 
soldier, a mere boy, who at the battle 
of Nashville, rushed into the thickest 
of the fight, tore their colors from 
the hands of the enemy, bore them 
m triumph to Washington City, and 
received m person the thanks of the 
nations representatives. 

"There was another McKendrean, 
Richard Thatcher, the son of a Meth- 
odist preacher of Southern Illinois, 
who joined the army when only fif- 
teen years old. His company was captured and he was taken to 
Salisbury prison, infamous on account of the inhuman Wirz 
whose fiendish life was fitly closed by a felon's death. There 
the poisonous air and the polluted water, the want of proper 
clothing and sufficient food, the daily suffering and the distant 
hope, had caused his young heart to despond and almost to des- 
pair of aid, either human or divine. One day while he was 
seeking to call away his thoughts from his own wretched condi- 
tion by reading the Bible, which among other losses he had 
contrived to retain, he was accosted by a fellow prisoner, low 
in stature but with a piercing eye: 'What book have you 
there, my friend^' The Bible,' was the reply. 'Let me see 
it. The rebels got mine when they made me a prisoner.' 
Taking the book he read some of the promises which have 
brought comfort and hope to so many of the unfortunate 
and suffering of earth. He then returned the volume to the 
young soldier saying, 'Cheer up, my brother, cheer up ! We 
shall yet find some means of deliverance. God has revealed 




One Hundred and Xmety-Th. 



-^r^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 



to me that I am never to die in this rebel prison!' The 
speaker was Boston Corbett, who afterwards fired the shot 
which put an end to the life of John Wilkes Booth, the 
assassin of Abraham Lincoln. The two captives resolved to 
hold a daily prayer meeting in the prison. Others came. The 
interest increased. A revival followed which resulted in 
many conversions Subsequently our young soldier made his 
escape from prison, and guided by the light of the stars and 
assisted by the counsels of slaves, journeying through forests 
and swamps, subsisting on such food and sleeping in such 
places as the veriest tramp would now disdain, he made his 
way in safety at last to the Union forces." 

It seems appropriate here to give an extract from Colonel 
Risdon M. Moore's account of the campaigns of the "Mc- 
Kendree Regiment," the 117th, which was written for the 
"McKendree Pigskin" which was puHished in 1905. After 
enumerating the list of officers of the regiment who were 
McKendreans, which we have already given above, he says. 

"A large per cent of the privates and non-commissioned 
officers had been college students and some were students 
after the war. The response to 'Father Abraham's' call for 
'three hundred thousand more' was so generous that the 
government found it difficult to arm and equip the vast 
number of regiments that were in camp within one month 
after the call. The number of infantry regiments rose from 
the sixties to over one hundred and thirty in Illinois. There 
were no tents and few guns and mustering officers were 
scarce. However we left for the front November 11, 1862, 
almost two months after final muster, and went into camp 
six days later at Memphis, Tennessee. 

"I shall always remember a dapper little staff officer, who 
escorted us from our steam boat to camp and began to let 
us know who he was by expressing regrets that his grand- 
father was dead. I, supposing he referred to some one re- 
cently killed, was slow to reply to his words of sorrow. As 
he kept repeating his regrets, I finally asked who his grand- 
father was, and was surprised to learn that he meant Pres- 
ident Harrison who died April 4, 1841, and .so had been 
dead more than twenty-one years. I thought, though I 
didn't say it, 'How blood will tell'' 

"On leaving Camp Butler, we had received our guns, a 
Belgian rifle calibre sixty-nine. However we soon discovered 
that they were worthless, as after bursting a cap eight or 
ten times they would no longer explode one. We had these 
rifles inspected several times by inexperienced officers like 
our nice little fellow whose grandfather was dead, but no 
one could tell what was the matter with our guns, and they 



were all alike. They would fire all right a few times and 
then they would cease to do duty. Finally General Sherman 
came out and discovered the trouble in a few minutes. The 
defect was irreparable, the guns were useless, and we were 
left out of the moving column, then ready to start for Vicks- 
burg, overland, by way of Holly Springs, under General 
Grant in December, 1862. 

"Being thus without arms we were placed in Fort Pickering 
in the lower part of Memphis. And there we were kept to 
man that fort with its hundred and twenty heavy guns, for 
nearly two years. At times, however, we were sent out on 
scout duty into Tennessee and Arkansas to drive out small 
rebel forces under Forrest and other rebel raiders. On July j, 
of 186 J, the regiment was sent down to Helena, Arkansas, to 
support General B. M. Prentiss, whose command was then 
severely threatened by the rebel commands of General Price 
and Marmaduke. Their assaults failed and the 117th took an 
honored part in sending them into the Arkansas woods 
to rest. 

"In December thereafter, Forrest threatened Memphis, and 
then we went for him, as he was ravaging and pillaging West 
Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, until he and his com- 
mand hastily went for other places of safety, to annoy Mem- 
phis no more for eight or nine months. 

"In January, 1864, we became a part of General A. J. 
Smith's command, in which we remained to the close of the 
war, participating in all his campaigns and battles, not resting 
between campaigns, at any time more than four or five days, 
and without tents at one time for more than six months. 

"We left Vicksburg for Meridian, Mississippi, as a part 
of the third brigade, fought with portions of S. D. Lee's and 
Polk's commands, driving them rapidly back on Jackson; 
crossed Pearl River on the 6th, and then kept them moving, 
fighting almost daily until we entered Meridian, February 
14, under the boom of cannon and the rattle of rifles, the 
117th in the lead. There we worked eight days destroying 
railroads, with corn for rations for man and beast, one hun- 
dred and fifty miles from the Mississippi River, our base 
of supplies. 

"We returned thence to Vicksburg by way of Canton, 
where the fighting was resumed as a business almost daily, 
until within a short distance from Vicksburg where we 
arrived March 4, having been gone twenty-nine days. In 
the meantime I had fallen heir to the brigade. 

"On the eighth we took steamers for Red River, having 
had four days for washing and for outward and inward 
;. On the eleventh, we tied up for the night at 




One Hundred and X'netyFour 



MC KENDREE 



Simmesport, Louisiana, on Atchafalaya Bayou; reconnoitered 
the twelfth; moved out from Simmesport a few miles on the 
thirteenth, driving off rebel cavalry: began a forced march 
at four A. M. for Fort De Russey, thirty-four miles up Red 
River on the fourteenth, and captured it at five P. M., tho 
it was one of the strongest of fortifications. Abbott, in 
writing up the brilliant battles of the war, cites De Russey 
as one of them, but gives the credit to General Banks who 
was not within a hundred miles of it at the time, and had 
nothing to do with our movements until two weeks later. 
After the fall of De Russey, we took our boats and ran up 
to Alexandria, Louisiana, where we waited the arrival of 
Banks' command, thus wasting ten precious days and thus 
giving the rebels time to concentrate or get together. We 
had divided or scattered them. This delay was the chief 
cause of Banks' defeat later at Mansfield, April 8, and the 
loss of the fruits of our victories up to that date, in which 
we had captured several thousand prisoners and over twenty 
pieces of artillery at De Russey, Alexandria, and Henderson 
Hill. We reached Pleasant Hill battlefield April 8, while 
Banks' command, parts of the thirteenth Army Corps under 
Ransom and the nineteenth under Franklin, were fighting 
at Mansfield or Sabine Crossroads. Banks, to display his 
army and his lack of generalship, had placed our command 
a day's march behind his rear, and besides this had cumbered 
us with his baggage and a part of his supply train. Hence 
we were fully twenty miles from the battlefield on the eighth, 
but hearing the boom of the cannon on the afternoon of the 
eighth, we abandoned all trains and hastened to the front 
at a quick step and met our routed forces at Pleasant Hill 
at dusk. Their condition gave an idea of our stampede at 
Bull Run. We fought the battle almost alone on the ninth 
and won a great victory, driving the rebels from seven to 
twenty-one miles. 

"Here again Banks' inefficiency was shown in falling back 
to Grand Ecore, thirty-six miles, where after four days the 
Confederates, discovering that we were retreating, came 
timidly up to us. There the second brigade, and my brigade, 
the third, went to the relief of our fleet and transports at a 
small place called Campti, fourteen miles up the river, where 
the Confederates under Dick Taylor had besieged Commo- 
dore Porter's fleet and our boats with our sick and wounded 
— about forty vessels of all kind, iron clads, tin clads, and 
wooden boats. 

"We released them under orders 'not to leave the camp.' 
We left again on the twentieth and fought our way to the 
Mississippi in battles at Cloutierville, Marksville, Alexan- 



dria, and vicinity, and at Yellow Bayou. The date of the 
last was May twentieth. This ended that disastrous cam- 
paign of about seventy-five days, wherein Banks showed up 
so badly and General A. J. Smith so brilliantly. We arrived 
at Vicksburg and found the river blockaded. We landed at 
Chico, Louisiana, and drove Marmaduke and company off, 
and opened the Mississippi. We landed at Memphis June 
tenth, to learn that Forrest had fallen upon the commands 
of Generals Sturgis and Grierson and cut them to pieces. A 
few years ago I opened a folio history of Professor Hamilton 
Mabie, a writer of some note, wherein he said in substance, 
that General Sturgis of the Federal army met General Forrest 
June lo, 1864, and almost annihilated him. This was a strange 
perversion of a sad history. Our command was hurriedly 
pushed out to the relief of Sturgis and Grierson. Sturgis 
should have been court-martialed and summarily dismissed 
for that disgraceful affair. After our return from relieving 
them, we were paid up and equipped for the work that 
Sturgis failed to do — whip Forrest. This we did handsomely 
in six pitched battles, fought July thirteenth, on the march 
from Pontatoc to Tupelo, Mississippi; two at Tupelo, one 
in the morning and one at night of the fourteenth. In this 
night battle the 117th did all the fighting; two on the fif- 
teenth, one at Tupelo and one at Crooked Creek, and then 
one on the sixteenth. In all of these engagements we chastised 
Forrest severely and gave him the only wound he received 
during the war. I learned this fact from Forrest himself some 
years after the war, in Montgomery, Alabama. 

"After a fruitless campaign down to Oxford, Mississippi, 
where we burned old Jake Thompson's residence, while he 
was m Canada scheming to burn Chicago, we returned to 
Memphis to wash up and secure supplies. Then we started 
up the river for St. Louis to drive off Pap Price and his Con- 
federates. At St. Louis, the 117th was first rushed down to 
De Soto, and then back to St. Louis and out to Franklin, 
thirty-six miles west, to meet Joe Shelby and others in line 
of battle. A few shots and shells sent them away in haste. 
We followed them up and out to the Kansas line without 
another chance to try our Springfields on them. From the 
Kansas border we returned to St. Louis and then were hur- 
ried off to Nashville to aid General Thomas against the dash- 
ing Confederate, Hood. The 117th went into line there 
November 3,0, while Schofield and Hood were in a desperate 
struggle for the mastery at Franklin thirty miles away. 
Franklin was one of the bloodiest battles of the war. Hood 
was so severely punished there that he was in no haste to 
pitch in at Nashville. Thomas assumed the offensive on the 



One Hundred and \,neU-Fn-e 



riMC KENDREE"^^^^^^^^^..^,..-^ 



fifteenth of December and annihilated him. It was of these 
battles that Lincoln told his dog story. Some critics com- 
plained that Thomas did not capture every man, horse and 
gun, in Hood's army. The story was that a farmer out west 
gave a troublesome dog a piece of fat meat with some powder 
and a piece of punk which had been lighted. The dog gulped 
the dose down, but in a few minutes there was an explosion 
and the late dog was scattered around in many pieces, and 
though all the pieces were there, they were no longer a dog. 

"We followed the retreating forces of Hood down to the 
Tennessee River, capturing many thousand prisoners and 
about ninety pieces of artillery. So that army, like the dog, 
was dead. 

"We went into camp at Eastport, Mississippi, and had the 
finest rest we had had for a year. Here again we had corn for 
rations for eight days. The soldiers took it good naturedly, 
saying, 'the next ration, boys, is hay.' 

"We left that camp for New Orleans and Mobile, February 
the seventh. We camped a few days at New Orleans and 
then took a steamer for Mobile, The George B. McClen- 
nan' steaming down the Mississippi and out through the 
south east pass and thence to Dauphine Island at the mouth 
of Mobile Bay. On March twenty-sixth we took small steam- 
boats and ran up to Danly's landing on Fish River. On the 
twenty-seventh, by rapid march, we invested Spanish Fort, 
driving a small Confederate force before us. On the second 
of April, I invested Fort Blakely, six miles further north. On 
April eighth a part of our corps assaulted Spanish Fort and 
carried it, and on the ninth we assaulted Blakely and carried 
it. We found an unfolded letter written by a Colonel of an 
Alabama regiment to his mother in Mobile, saying: 'Dear 
Mother- You have or will hear of the capture of Spanish 
Fort by the Yankees, but I write to assure you that there 
are not enough Yankees in Alabama to capture us in a 
month.' We captured him and his fort in less than twenty 
minutes. This battle ended the war for us as Lee had sur- 
rendered nine hours before we fought our last battle. 

"From Mobile we marched to Montgomery, arriving there 
April a^th, and from there we were sent home to be mustered 
out, by way of Selma, Meridian, and Vicksburg. From there 
we went to St. Louis by boat and thence on to Springfield, 
Illinois, by rail, where we were mustered out at Camp Butler 
on August 5, 1865, having participated in about thirty-five 
engagements, and having travelled by rail nearly a thousand 
miles, by water over six thous.md, and on foot nearly two 
thousand five hundred." 



One of the trio of one-armed McKendreans whose pic- 
tures appear above, James B. Pinckard, lost his right arm 
at Fort Blakely. Yet as stated by Colonel Moore, General 
Lee had surrendered more than nine hours before that battle 
was fought. If the more perfect means of communication 
which we have now had existed then, that soldier need not 
have gone through life with only one arm. These narratives 
of Colonel Moore, Adjutant Deneen, Lieutenant Fike, and 
others, make it clear that the McKendree boys played no 
inconsiderable part in the great Civil War. 

With the Spanish- American War in 1898, McKendree 
does not seem to have been so closely identified. It is true 
that Harry Van Treese, a former McKendree student, was 
one of Col. Roosevelt's "Rough Riders." And a number of 
other McKendreans got as far as the training camp in Flor- 
ida, among them, Rev. Orley E. Laird, class of '93, and the 
three Wallis brothers, Marshall, Robert, and Edward, sons 
of Rev. William Wallis, of the class of '62, while Cameron 
Harmon, Clair Moorman, and OUie Wallace, commonly 
known as "Irish," actually saw service in Cuba. Harmon 
held the position of wagonmaster, served till the end of the 
war, and came home with the victorious army by way of 
New York City. All these experiences were a wonderful 
inspiration to the young soldier boy, but as soon as prac- 
ticable, he came back to McKendree and finished his col- 
lege course. 

McKendree's connection with the World War is more 
difficult to determine with accuracy. The plan of the draft 
for soldiers included all able-bodied men between the ages 
of eighteen and forty-five who did not have some legitimate 
reason for exemption. This no doubt included hundreds of 
men out in the busy world who had at one time been stu- 
dents in McKendree. In the fall of niS, according to the 
plan devised by Congress, a chapter of the "S. A. T. C," 
or Student's Army Training Corps, was estabhshed in Mc- 
Kendree. These boys from eighteen to twenty-one were 
drafted for training, to be used for soldiers in case the war 
should last until they were needed at the front. 

This group was composed of a hundred young men, most 
of them just out of high school. When they were given a 
choice of going to the army training camp or training in 
college, they usually chose the latter, and the government 
bore the actual expense of their board and training. The 
Corps was in charge of Major Andrews whom some of the 
faculty still remember and whom some of the boys in the 
training corps will never forget. The Boys' Dormitory was 
transformed into a barracks, and military rules of living were 



One Hundred dnd HmctyStx 



MC KENDREE 




enforced. A strict physical 
examination had to be pass' 
ed and a few were rejected 
for physical reasons. The 
hoys received military in- 
struction under the major 
and took certain specified 
college courses which were 
supposed to be especially 
helpful to the future sol- 
dier. The boys wore their 
uniforms in the class room 
and we seemed more than 
GENERAL WESLEY MERRITT ever a part of the great war. 
But after the armistice was signed on that well remember' 
ed eleventh day of November, there were soon rumors 
afloat that the policy of the government would be changed. 
There were grave objections to spending the people's 
money in training soldiers if there was to be no im' 
mediate need for them. In fact, before Christmas, came 
the order to disband the "S. A. T. C." in the various colleges 
which had them throughout the country. It was done and 
soldier uniforms were no longer the prevailuig costume on 
McKendree's campus. But besides this training group many 
McKendree boys were actually in the war activities both 
at home and abroad, on this side of the ocean and "over seas." 
The Philo and Plato Societies both had their service flags. 
The stars on them represented men who were at the time 
or recently connected with the college societies. Of course 
there were also many Methodist young men m the war be- 
sides those who were at McKendree. Almost every church 
in the conference had its service flag. The idea came to a 
couple of young women who had been working for a few 
years in our conference as evangelists, that it would be a 
fine thing to combine all these flags into one. These excellent 
ladies were Miss May Paul and Miss Mary Olive, also 
known as "Little Mary." They were quite successful as 
evangelists and they undertook this new enterprise in the 
same indomitable spirit that brought success in their evan- 
gelistic work. They procured a huge banner and proceeded 
with their own hands to set upon it the five thousand stars 
that represented the Methodist soldier boys of one confer- 
ence. The task took weeks and even months. But the two 
women persevered and at conference time they brought the 
magnificent flag with them to Greenville where the confer- 
ence met that year (1918), and on the opening day it was 
unfurled and raised in the Greenville Church, with appro- 
priate ceremonies and abundance of patriotic speeches. Yet 
this enthusiasm was tempered and subdued at times by the 



fact that many ot the sons of members of the conference 
were at that time over seas in the army and several had 
already made the supreme sacrifice for their country in 
"Flanders Field" at the battle front of the most stupendous 
civil war that the world has ever known. After conference, 
the great flag was carefully furled and brought to McKendree 
College for safe keeping, where with its five thousand stars 
it may still be viewed by the visitor as it reposes in a wooden 
case with a glass cover. 

Among the boys who had been recently connected with 
the college and never returned from over seas or from the 
training camp, were Herschel Tritt, Paul Dee, Harold 
Adams, and Glen McCormack. As a memorial to the last 
named his fellow members of the Philosophian Society have 
started a movement to found a permanent scholarship to 
aid one needy student after another during all the years 
of the future m accomplishing the trying task of securing 
an education. 

We may safely conclude that McKendree's connection 
with the four great wars in which our country has been 
involved during the first century of her existence, has always 
been an honorable one. Yet it is also a safe prediction that 
her influence will he e.xerted in the most vigorous manner 
possible to prevent the occurrence of any war at all during 
her second century, upon which she is about to enter. 

A LIST OF McKENDREANS 
WHO WERE OFFICERS IN THE CIVIL WAR 

General James H. Wilson Colonel Risdon M. Moore 
General Wesley Merritt Colonel Jonathan Merriam 

General Lucien Greathouse Lieut. -Col. E. H. Topping 
General Jesse H. Moore Major William S. Pope 

General John I. Rinaker Quartermaster Henry C. Fike 

Surgeon J. R. M. Gaskill Quartermaster Charles W. 

Colonel James A. Jaquess Jerome 

Adjutant Samuel H. Deneen 
Adjutant Isaac N. Higgins 
Major William P. Olden 
Chaplain Elias D. Wilkin 
Captain Jacob S. Moore 
Captain William H. Copp 
Captain Joseph T. Parker 
Captain James Cornngton 
Captain Henry A. Castle 
Captain Robert A. Halbert 
Lieutenant Lewis M. PhiUi 
Lieutenant Isaiah Stickel 
Lieutenant Daniel Kerr 
Lieutenant Benj. F. Olden 
Lieutenant William Wallis 
Lieutenant James M. Truitt 
Lieutenant Lewis C. Bornman GENERAL JAMES WILSON 




One Hundred and N.metySex'en 



CHAPTER XVII. 

Presicie?it AINvfs Administration 



B 



OBERT Allyn was a born leader. He 
was both a physical and intellectual 



giant. He was almost as tall as Lincoln, 
but heavier built. He was born in Ledyard, 
Connecticut, January 25, 1817, and died at 
Carbondale, Illinois.. January 7, 1894. He re- 
ceived his college education at the Wesleyan 
University. It was located in his native state. 
He graduated in 1841 and for a year taught 
mathematics at the Wilbraham Academy. In 
1842 he joined the New England Conference 
and served four years in the pastorate. After 
that he devoted his life mainly to educational 
work. In 1846, he became principal of Wilbra- 
ham Academy and after two years took a 
similar position in the Providence Conference 
Academy. In 1852, and again in 1854, he was elected to the 
Rhode Island Legislature. In 1854, he was appointed Com- 
missioner of Public Education for the state of Rhode Island, 
and in that year was an official visitor to the United States 
Military Academy at West Point. In 1857, he accepted a 
position as professor of Ancient Languages in the Ohio 
University at Athens, Ohio, and after two years he became 
president of the Wesleyan Female College at Cincinnati. In 
1863, in the midst of the Civil War, he was elected president 
of McKendree. After guiding the destinies of McKendree 
for eleven years, which was the longest term of any president 
up to that time, he became the first principal of the Southern 
Illinois State Normal School at Carbondale, where he finished 
his educational and his earthly career. Many hundreds of 
graduates received diplomas bearing his signature, and not a 
few of them attained distinction in their respective fields. 
Bishop Mallalieu, Dr. Charles H Payne, and Dr. William F. 
Warren were at one time his pupils. He was a stalwart in 
defense of the right and condemnation of the wrong, by pen 
and voice and personal example. He excelled in talent for 
organization and executive ability. The movement to cele- 
brate the Centennial of Methodism in this state received 
much of its inspiration from him, and he was chief among the 
organizers of the Southern Illinois Teachers' Association. He 
was secretary of the Southern Illinois Conference for six years 
and represented that body in the General Conference in 1872. 
He was twice married. First to Emeline E. Denison, who 
died in 1844 leaving two children. Later he was married to 




REV. ROBERT ALLYN 

President of McKendree and later 
principal of Southern Illinois Normal 



Mary B. Budington, who died at Carbondale 
in 187Q, leaving four children. His oldest 
daughter. Emma, married William H. Hypes, 
a son of Benjamin Hypes, who has been often 
mentioned in this narrative. This daughter, 
Mrs. Hypes, was for many years a leader in 
the work of the Women's Foreign Missionary 
Society of this conference and was conference 
president of that body. The only other new 
member of the faculty when Dr. Allyn came 
to the presidency was William Fletcher 
Swahlen, who taught Greek and German and 
whose biography will appear in a later chap- 
ter. It was during his administration that the 
Educational Convention of 1868 was held to 
commemorate McKendree's fortieth annivers- 
ary and to inspire interest in her future. Substantial progress 
was made in building up the endowment fund but in that per- 
iod it did not reach a point where it was at all sufficient for the 
growing needs of the institution. Also a college paper, "The 
McKendree Repository" was established in 1867 and con- 
tinued into the next president's administration. It is regarded 
as one of the most successful journalistic efforts ever made 
at McKendree. Another event was the admission of women 
in 1869, and as a result of that, the organization of the Clion- 
ian Literary Society. The salaries of the faculty were raised 
to a figure more than double what they had been in the 
early days, and higher than they were many years later when 
by reason of its periods of depression, the college sometimes 
paid its teachers less than a Hving wage. 

When Dr. Allyn resigned the presidency of McKendree 
to become principal of the Southern Normal in 1874, the 
Joint Board at its session for that year adopted the follow- 
ing complimentary resolution : 

Whereas the election of the Rev. Robert Allyn to the 
Principalship of the Southern Illinois Normal University at 
Carbondale, and his acceptance thereof, has made it necessary 
for him to vacate the office of President of McKendree Col- 
lege which he has held for eleven successive years. It was 
assumed in that time of our national and local history when 
there was least encouragement for such institutions; for the 
exigencies of the Civil War, the extraordinary depreciation 
of money, and the enlistment of so many young men from 
the patronizing territory were sources of no little discour- 



One Hundred and TiinetyEight 



agement. But the work of Dr. AUyn wjs undertaken and 
continued up to the present with evidences of constant pros- 
perity. The members of the Joint Board, in view of these 
facts, and of his final separation from them, hereby resolve, 
That in our judgment the affairs of the college were never 
in more satisfactory condition than now. Throughout the 
incumbency of Dr. AUyn there has been no decline of the 
grade of scholarship in the college and no diminution of 
interest on the part of its students and patrons. There has 
been a steady increase of the influence of the college abroad, 
and the results of the teaching in its halls we have witnessed 
in the excellent character of the scholarship of the classes 
annually graduated. We cordially commend the spirit of 
piety, of harmony, and of patriotism, which has been man- 
ifest among the students, and we are rejoiced to know that 
many scores of them owe not only their mental, but also 
their spiritual trainihg to the president and his excellent col- 
leagues. We take pleasure in commending the retiring presi- 
dent to the confidence and esteem of the institution and 
community to which he may shortly remove, and devoutly 
pray that God may continue his life long m the midst of 
his abundant labor." 

We here present brief sketches of the students who 

graduated during the administration of Dr. Allyn. 

The first class whose diplomas he signed was 

THE CLASS OF 1864 

ABIJAH SMITH MEGUIRE 

Abijah Smith Meguire was born at Goshen, Cape May 
County, New Jersey, January 26, 1838. He became a student 
in McKendree in the fall of 1861 and graduated in 1864, 
receiving the degree of A. B. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Society. The same year of his graduation, he was 
appointed clerk of the War Department in Washington. He 
studied law in the ofiice of Walker and Stanton. In 1865, he 
went to New York City and continued his studies in the 
law office of Blatchford, Seward, and Griswold, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1866. He then formed a law partner- 
ship in Washington, D. C. with William L. De Zeng. In 
1871, he moved to Chicago, where he continued the practice 
of law. He was married March 20, 1872, to Miss Julia M. 
Hypes, of Lebanon, a daughter of Benjamin Hypes, the long 
time friend of the college. Their children are Grace A., Cor- 
nelia B., Helen R., and Frank H. The eldest died while still 
a young woman. Mr. Meguire practiced law for over forty 
years in Chicago before he retired from active work. He 
was a Methodist, a Mason, and a Republican. His death 
occurred in 1921. 



J. W. PURVIANCE 

James Washington Purviance was born at Carlinville, Illi- 
nois, February 25, 1842. He first became a student in Mc 
Kendree in J.muary, 1862, and graduated in June, 1864, re 
ceivmg the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Society. In addition to his regular college work he 
carried a law course under the direction of Ex-Governor 
French, which he completed about the time he graduated, 
and in October, 1864, he began the practice of law in Mem- 
phis, Tennessee. In July, 1865, he moved to Purdy, Ten- 
nessee and continued his law practice in that place until the 
next year when he was appointed prosecuting attorney and 
held the office till 1869, when he was appointed U. S. 
district attorney for the district of Western Tennessee, 
and held the position tor tour years. During this period his 
residence was at Memphis. In January, 1873, he was married 
to Miss R. C. Pharr, of Purdy, Tenn. and soon after located 
at Helena, Arkansas, where he engaged in the practice of 
law m partnership with J. M. Hewitt. Later he moved to 
Clarksville, Tennessee where he was located in 191 1. 
WILLIAM BATEMAN WESTCOTT 

William Bateman Westcott was born January 19, 1842, 
near Mt. Vernon, Illinois. He entered McKendree in 1861, 
and graduated m 1864, receiving the degree of B S. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. As soon as 
possible after commencement he enlisted in the 1 36th Illinois 
Infantry and served till the close of the war. He was married 
October 6, 1864, to Frances A. Hoyt, of Lebanon, Illinois. 
After the war he engaged in mercantile business at Ashley, 
Illinois for several years, and then became a commission mer- 
chant in St. Louis, where he remained for more than thirty 
years. In 1904, failing health induced him to go south where 
he could spend his declining years in a milder climate. He 
lived six years at Ada, Oklahoma, and some time at Dallas, 
Texas, where his death occurred December 11, 1914. His 
wife makes her home with her sister, Mrs. A. N. Simmons, 
at Cerro Gordo, Illinois. Two of their four children are dc 
ceased. He was a Methodist and a Knight Templar. 
NATHANIEL PARKER ROBINSON 

Nathaniel Parker Robinson graduated from the Law De- 
partment with the class of 1864. He received the degree 
ot LL. B., but we have no recent information concerning 
him. He was a member of Plato. 

CALVIN AUGUSTUS SPENCER 

Calvin Augustus Spencer was born at Du Bois. Illinois, 
December 9, 1838. His parents were Daniel and Larina Spen- 
cer. He with Mr. Robinson, just mentioned above, consti' 



One Hundred and HinetyHme 



MC KENDREE 



tuted the Law Class of 1864 in McKendree. He was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Society. He was married to Elvira 
Lee Jones May 5, 1881, and had one daughter. He was in 
business in St. Louis for many years and then moved to 
Wichita, where he engaged in the real estate business ^ 

THE CLASS OF 18(15 
DR. GALLAUDET OLIVER BAILEV 
Gallaudet Ohver Bailey was born near Lebanon, Illinois, 
December 25, 1843. He entered McKendree in 1861 and 
graduated in 1865, receiving the degree of B. S. The following 
year he was in the Poughkeepsie Business College, and then 
he entered the Rush Medical College in Chicago, from which 
he graduated in 1869. While in McKendree he was a member 
of the Platonian Society. He began the practice of his pro- 
fession in Beatrice, Nebraska in 1869, remained there five 
years, moved to Arlington, Illinois, where he continued his 
practice until 1906, and then moved to Burbank, California, 
where he finished his career. He was married February 25, 
1869 to Helen G. Arnold of Mason, Illinois. They had four 
sons and six daughters, tho not all of them are living. Three 
of the sons are druggists and the other a surgeon. Dr. Bailey 
had a long and useful career. He was not only useful pro- 
fessionally but also morally and religiously in the community 
where he lived. He was a firm believer in Scriptural Christian- 
ity and showed plainly the influence of the Christian training 
he had received in his father's home. His death occurred 
December 15, 1916 at Los Angeles. 

REV. JOHN E. EARP 
John E. Earp was born at Marion, Illinois, April 12, 1846, 
and died at Atlanta, Indiana, May 10, 1897. He was a son 
of Rev. Joseph Earp who was long a prominent member of 
the Southern Illinois Conference and a member of the Board 
of Trustees of McKendree. He graduated from McKendree 
at the age of nineteen, receiving the degree of A. B., and 
later A. M. While in McKendree he was a member of the 
Platonian Society. In 1879, he received the degree of Ph. D. 
from Lawrence College, and in 1882, Dickinson gave him 
the degree of D. D. He served for a time as professor in 
Central Wesleyan College and then spent two years study- 
ing Philology at the Universities of Tubingen and Berlin. 
He then became Professor of Hebrew and Modern Languages 
in Indiana Asbury University. Later he made a second trip 
to Europe for further studies in French and German. He 
was admitted to the North Indiana Conference in 1876, and 
ten years later he became President of Southwestern College, 
at Winfield, Kansas. He remained in this position until 1890, 
when he entered the pastorate in the Southwest Kansas 



Conference. In 1S96 he was transferred back to the North 
Indiana Conference and stationed at Atlanta, where his 
career of service and his life were both completed at the 
same time. In the reorganization of Asbury University, when 
it became DePauw, he rendered special service in the enter- 
prise which won for him the high esteem of Mr. DePauw 
and other members of the Board of Trustees on account of 
his business insight and excellent management of all affairs 
entrusted to him. The faculty of DePauw passed complimen- 
tary resolutions concerning him which contained the follow- 
ing expressions; "He was a close student of books, of men, 
of events, and was always abreast of the times.** ** He 
was a tireless worker and a man of unbounded energy and 
application.** ** Life to him was too sacred a thing to 
be trifled with, and time too precious a gift to be wasted. 
** ** He was a warm and true friend, nor did he spare 
himself labor or sacrifice in aiding those in need." 
REV. EDWIN ALONZO HOYT 
Edwin Alomo Hoyt was born at Hill, New Hampshire, 
March 8, 1845. When he was only eighteen months old his 
father, John W. Hoyt, and his mother's brother, Augustus 
C. French, moved with their families to Palestine, Illinois. 
Here he grew up and received his early education. After 
Mr. French retired from his second term as Governor of 
Illinois, he came to Lebanon to educate his children. Young 
Hoyt came to live with his uncle and attend McKendree. 
A little later his father moved to Lebanon in order that his 
children might all have educational advantages. Accordingly, 
the Hoyts became good patrons of McKendree. Augustus, 
Edwin, Charles, John, and Etta were all students at different 
times. The older sister, Frances, was married before girls 
were admitted to McKendree. Edwin paid his college ex- 
penses very largely by periods of teaching while securing 
his college course. He graduated in 1865, and shared the 
honors of the class with John E. Earp. In 1867, he joined 
the Southern Illinois Conference, and the same year was 
married to Miss Mildred Lee, a daughter of Judge Harvey 
Lee, of Sacramento, California. For twenty years he was 
engaged in the regular work of the pastorate, serving several 
important charges. He had various inducements to take up 
other lines of work. Dr. Fry urged him to become assistant 
editor of the Central Christian Advocate, and he was once 
elected president of a college, but he felt that he was called 
to the work of preaching the gospel, and could not be induced 
to leave it. The Missouri Wesleyan honored him with the 
degree of D. D. He was for several years president of the 
Board of Southwestern College. In 1887, he heeded the call 




MC KENDREE 



of the great expanding west, and transferred to the South- 
west Kansas Conference, and the remainder of his ministerial 
service was rendered in the state of Kansas. He held several 
important charges there and was superintendent of the 
Wichita District 1Q04 to igio. He represented his conference 
in the General Conference at Baltimore in iqo8. He also 
served as treasurer of his conference and chairman of the 
Board of Examiners. After leaving the district, the condition 
of his health was such that he took the retired relation which 
he held till his death November 2, 1916. His widow and his 
two daughters, Mrs. A E, Almond and Miss Laura, re- 
side in Wichita. 

DR. THOMAS N, LIVESAY 

Thomas Newton Livesay was born in Washington Coun- 
ty, Illinois, February 11, i8j6. He entered McKendree in 
September, 1861, and graduated in June, 1865, receiving the 
degree of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. After teaching school for a time, he took 3 medical 
course in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, grad- 
uating in 1868. The same year he located at Patoka, Illinois 
for the practice of medicine, where he has had a long and 
useful career, ending with his death Jan. 10, 1904. He was 
married September 16, 1866, to Mrs. E. O. Bilgen, daughter 
of Abram Phillips. Their two daughters are Sarah N., born 
in 1868, and Estaola B., born m 1871. 

VALENTINE CLAY RUCKER 

Valentine Clay Rucker, the only son of Rev. Alvm 
Rucker, was born in St. Francois County, Missouri, De- 
cember 7, 1847 He graduated from McKendree in the class 
of 186'), receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of 
the Platonian Society. In 1866, he became professor of Math- 
ematics in the Illinois Agricultural College at Irvington. At 
the same time he was studying law, and was admitted to 
the bar November 11, 1867. In June, 1868, he received the 
degree of LL. B. from McKendree. He was First lieutenant 
of Company C of the St. Francois County Regiment of the 
Missouri Home Guards. He received this commission Octo- 
ber 19, 1867. February i, 1868, he became editor of the 
Farmington Herald. He was a young man of great promise, 
but death claimed him almost in the beginning of his career. 
He died in the Christian faith November 5, 1868, at Far- 
mington, Missouri. 

THE CLASS OF 1866 
WILLIAM WALLACE ELIFF 

William Wallace Eliff was born April 29, 1840. His home 
was at St. Jacob, Illinois when he entered McKendree in 
1859. He graduated in 1866, receiving the degree of B. S., 
and also, LL. B. at the same time. He was a member of the 



Platonian Literary Society. He was married March 6, 1S70. 
He subsequently practiced law and taught school in Barton 
County, Missouri. He died of heart disease Januiry 8, 1880, 
at Lebanon, Illinois. 

EDWARD LIVINGSTONE FRENCH 
Edward Livingstone French, one of the sons of Governor 
French, was horn m Palestine, Illinois, July 24, 1846. He 
hecime a student in the Preparatory Department of McKen- 
dree m i8';7 when only a boy of eleven. His course was 
broken by several absences, one being a year m the army, so 
that he did not finish till 1866, when he received the degree 
of A. B. He was a member of the Philosophian Society. 
After his graduation he studied law one year at Springfield, 
Illinois, and two years in the University of Michigan, where 
he received the degree of LL. B. in 1869. He then practiced 
law one year in Lebanon and one year in Obey, Illinois; 
and then became professor of Latin and Natural Science in 
Wells College at Aurora, New York. He was married Sep- 
tember 7, 1870, to Miss Mary E. Wells of St. Louis. Their 
children were William Wells, who died m infancy, Herbert, 
Harry, Nora, and Helen. Mrs. French died in 1904. Late in 
the eighties Mr. French moved to California on account of 
his health, and there taught school for many years, at Ver- 
dugo, Glendale, Canada, and other places. He spent his de- 
clining years very quietly in the Soldiers' Home at Sawtelle, 
which privilege he earned by his service in the Civil War. 
He died only a few years ago. 

JUDGE OLIVER ALBERT HARKER 
Oliver Albert Harker was born at Fountain City, Indiana, 
December 14, 1846. He became a student in Wheaton College 
m i860 and studied there 
for two years. He then en- 
tered the army as a private 
m the Sixty-seventh Illinois 
Infantry. After returning 
from the war, he entered 
McKendree and continued 
there until he finished the 
classical course, graduating 
in 1866 with the degree of 
A. B. He was a member of 
the Platonian Society. In 
1908, after he had become 
prominentinhis professional 
field, McKendree bestowed 
upon him the degree of LL.B. After leaving McKendree he took 
a law course in the University of Indiana and was admitted 




JUDGE HARKER 

in the prim: of Life 



Two Hundred and On 



^c KENDRE^^^^^^^^^^^ 



to the bar. He then taught school for a few years, after which 
he began practicing law in Vienna, Illinois, in 1870. In 1878, 
he became circuit judge, which office he held until 1891. 
From that time to 1903 he was judge in the Appellate Court 
of Illinois. In 1903, he was elected dean of the College of 
Law of the University of Illinois, which position he held 
until 1916, when he retired from active service. But his 
energetic spirit could not be idle; so he busied himself editing 
a four volume edition of the Illinois Statutes, which was 
published in 19 19. He is the author of several monographs 
on legal subjects. Since retiring from the deanship he has 
still been a professor of Law in the school and is legal ad- 
viser to the university. 

He was married to Miss Siddie B. Bain of Vienna, March 
3, 1870. Their children are George M., Oliver A., and Mrs. 
Winifred Hewitt of Vienna. Judge Harker is a Methodist, 
an Odd-fellow, a member of the Order of Elks, and in politics 
is a Republican. He lives in Champaign, Illinois. 
REV. JOHN WEEDEN 

John Weeden was born near Pulaski, Illinois, June 30, 
1834. Even in his youth he was of a markedly religious dis- 
position. He entered McKendree before the war, but in 
1861 enlisted in the Union Army and served his country 
faithfully till the close of the war, when he resumed his 
studies, and graduated in 1866, receiving the degree of A. 
B. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. 
After his graduation he joined the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference where he labored faithfully through a long career. 
The last few years of his service were spent as a home mis- 
sionary in the west. He died at Bartley, Nebraska, July 
28, 1904. 

DR. B. M. HYPES 

Benjamin Murray Hypes was born in Lebanon, Illinois, 
July 31, 1846. His great-grandfather, Nicholas Hypes, emi- 
grated from Germany to America in colonial days, married 
Patience Reynolds of Puritan ancestry and settled in Vir- 
ginia. Their son, Henry H. Hypes, moved to Ohio, and his 
son, Benjamin, came to Lebanon in his youthful days, and 
was a student in "Lebanon Seminary" in the first year of 
its existence 1828. He afterward married Caroline Murray of 
Baltimore and their younger son is the subject of this sketch. 
The parents were among the sturdy pioneers of Illinois. The 
father was for sixty years a trustee of McKendree, and died 
at Lebanon at the age of 91. The mother attained the age 
of 95. The mortal remains of both now rest in College Hill 
Cemetery. Benjamin M. graduated from McKendree in 1866, 
receiving the degree of A. B., and later, that of A. M. He 




BENJAMIN HYPES 



wasamemberofthePlaton- 
ian Literary Society. He 
taught a year in Arcadia 
(Mo.) Seminary and spent a 
year as principal of the pub- 
lic schools in Bethalto, 111. 
He then spent a year in Rush 
Medical College in Chicago. 
Then, after a year as pro- 
fessor of Mathematics in 
Central Wesleyan College 
at Warrenton, Mo., he en- 
tered the St. Louis Medical 
College, from which he grad- 
uated in 1872. After spend- 
ing two years as assistant physician in the St. Louis City Hos- 
pital, he began his private practice in that city in 1874. He was 
one of the founders of the Marion-Sims Medical College in St. 
Louis, was vice-dean until the institution was made a part 
of the St. Louis University; and was a member of the faculty 
until his death. He was recognised as one of the leading phy- 
sicians of St. Louis and was a well-known writer for medical 
journals. The doctor was never married, but maintained a 
comfortable home of his own at 1615 Grand Avenue. He 
was for many years a trustee of McKendree. He greatly 
endeared himself to the students by the interest he took in 
the physical side of student life as evidenced by the donation 
of the "Hypes Athletic Field". His death occurred in 1924. 
After the funeral in St. Louis, the body was brought to 
Lebanon and placed in the Hypes family lot in College Hill 
Cemetery. 

PROF. WM. F. SWAHLEN 
William Fletcher Swahlen was born at Wheeling, West 
Va., April 19, 1839. His parents were Rev. John Swahlen, 
a native of Canton Berne, Switzerland; and Ann Gibbons 
Swahlen, a native of West Chester, Chester County, Penn- 
sylvania. He was educated at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, from which he graduated in 1863, with the degree of 
A. B. In 1866, he received the honorary degree of A. M. 
from McKendree, and in 1877, that of Ph. D. from the Iowa 
Wesleyan University. While a professor at McKendree, he 
was an honorary member of both Philo and Plato. He was 
professor of Greek and German in McKendree from 1863 
to 1883; president of McKendree from 1883 to 1886; acting 
president of Kansas Wesleyan University from i886 to 1887; 
professor of Greek in DePauw University from 1887 to the 
present time. In 1913, he completed his fiftieth year in edu- 



Two Hundred and Two 



MC KENDREE 



cational work. He was also an ordained minister in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. He was a member of the American 
Philological Association; one of the Gentleman's Literary 
Club of Greencastle; and of the Masonic Order. He had 
been secretary of the Faculty and of the Executive Committee 
at DePauw from 1888 until his death m iqi"). For many years 
he was the leader of the Students' class meetings. He was 
contributor to the church papers and other publications on 
Philological and other subjects. He was married June 26, 
1873, to Miss Carrie V. Hypes, of Lebanon, Illinois. Of their 
six children, three are now living: Ella Blanch, now Mrs. 
Joseph P. Allen, of Greencastle, Percy Hypes, physician and 
surgeon m St. Louis, and William Benjamin, also m St. Louis. 

THE CLASS OF 1867 
HON. WILLIAM FLAVIUS LEICESTER HADLEY 

William Flavius Leicester Hadley was born June 15, 1S47, 
near Collinsville, Illinois. His parents, William and Diadema 
Hadley, came to Illinois from Kentucky. His father was a 
local preacher in the Methodist Church. He graduated from 
McKendree in 1867, receiving the degree of B. S. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. After leaving 
McKendree, he entered the Law Department of Michigan 
University, from which he graduated m 1871. He then began 
the practice of law m Edwardsville. In 1874, he formed a 
partnership with W. H. Krome, which continued till 1890, 
when Mr. Krome was elected county judge. In 1886, he 
was elected State Senator and was offered the nomination 
for a second term, but was compelled to decline on account 
of sickness in his family. In 1895, he was elected to Congress 
as representative of the Eighteenth District. He was nom- 
inated for a second term, but being obliged to go to California 
for his health, he failed of election. He was a delegate to 
the National Republican Convention in Chicago, which nom- 
inated Benjamin Harrison for President. During the last 
years of his life he was president of the Bank of Edwardsville. 
He was married June 15, 1875, to Miss Mary J. West. 
Their six children are Winifred, Julia, Flavia, Lester, West, 
and Douglass. His death occurred in California, April 
25, 1901. 

JUDGE JAMES M. NORTH 

James Medley North was born in Williamson County, 
Illinois, March 29th, 1845. He became a student in McKen- 
dree in September, 1864, and graduated in the class of 1867, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Literary Society. For a year after his graduation he 
taught mathematics in the Seminary at Shelbyville, Illinois. 
He then travelled a year in the Rocky Mountains. He studied 



law for a while and taught at the same time m the Southern 
Illinois College at Carbondale. In 1869 aiid 1870 he was a 
law student in Chicago University, where he graduated in 
July, 1870, with the degree of LL. B. The next year he 
taught m the Carbondale, 111. high school, and the following 
year, located at Atchison, Kansas, and began the practice 
of law. While here he was the superintendent of the Meth- 
odist Sunday School. In 187;,, he moved to Jacksonville, 
Illinois and formed a law partnership with W. F. Goheen. 
A few years later he changed his location to Boulder, Colo- 
rado, where m 1877 he was County Judge of Boulder County. 
After some years of successful work in the field of legal en- 
deavor in Colorado, he obtained a government position which 
took him to Washington, D. C, where he spent the remain- 
der of his busy life. He died in Washington June 6, 1906, and 
his remains were taken to Boulder, Colo, for interment. He 
was twice married, but was a widower at the time of his 
death. He left two sons- Paul M. and James F., who are 
both lawyers and reside at Rocky Ford, Colorado. 
LIEUT. BENJAMIN F. OLDEN 

Benjamin Franklin Olden was born m Alton, Illinois, Jan- 
uary I, 1843. He first became a student in McKendree in 
i860. After one year in school, he taught school for a term 
near Edwardsville. In August, 1862, he helped to organize 
a company of soldiers which became Company D in the 1 17th 
Regiment of Illinois 'Volunteers. Mr. Olden was second lieu- 
tenant of the company, and before the war was over, became 
first lieutenant. After the war was over, he returned to 
college and graduated in the class of 1867, receiving the 
degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary 
Society. He was admitted to the bar and began the practice 
of law at Edwardsville in 1868. In September, 1870, he moved 
to West Plains, Missouri, where he practiced law for many 
years. Some years ago (191 5) he moved to Boise City, Idaho, 
where he is now engaged in the banking business. 
DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON GOODNER 

George Washington Goodner graduated in the class of 
1867, receiving the degree of B. S. He afterward took a law 
course m the University of Michigan and a medical course 
in Chicago. He went abroad at the time of the Franco- 
Prussian War and was for a time assistant surgeon in the 
Prussian Army. Later he practiced medicine in Chicago. We 
have no information as to the date of his death. 
GEORGE BYRON CHARLES 

George Byron Charles graduated in the class of 1867, re- 
ceiving the degree of B. S. We have been able to secure no 
further information concerning him. 



Two Hundred and Three 



'OMl^IA aAM'A. 









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JUNE IITH . 1868 



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Facsimile of an old commencement programme dated 1868 
Note that it is printed in Latin, as was the custom at that time 



Two Hundred and Four 



MC KENDREE 



HON, JAMES M. TRL'ITT 
James Madison Truitt was born in Trimble County, Ken- 
tucky, February a8, r842. His parents, Samuel and Cynthia 
Truitt were both natives of that state, but the femily came 
to Illinois m 1 81 1. In i86s, he enlisted as a recruit in the 
117th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers and was mustered out 
as second lieutenant. After the war, he resumed his studies 
in McKendree and graduated from the Law Department in 
1867, with the degree of LL. B. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. After being admitted to the bar, 
he formed a law partnership with J. J. Phillips, afterward 
one of the Supreme Judges of Illinois. He was elected to 
the Legislature of Illinois in 1872; in 1876 he was a presi- 
dential elector; m 1884, a delegate to the Republican National 
Convention; and in 1888, presidential elector-at-large from 
Illinois. He was appointed supervisor of the Census of 1900 
for the Eighteenth District of Illinois. He died at his home 
in Hillsboro, Illinois, July 2=^, 1900. 

THE CLASS OF 1S68 
REV. JOSHUA SOULE AKERS 
Joshua Soule Akers, son of the famous pioneer preacher, 
Peter Akers, was born near Jacksonville, Illinois, March 8, 
i8j7. His father was three times president of McKendree, 
and he himself was educated there, graduating m 1868, when 
he received the degree of A. B. He was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. Many years after, in recog- 
nition of his excellent service in the Christian ministry, his 
alma mater conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity, in 1894. He was licensed to preach in 1861; did 
missionary work in Wisconsin, was a pastor of several im- 
portant charges in the Illinois Conference; was presiding 
elder six years of the Aberdeen District in South Dakota. 
In iqoo he came back to Illinois and served as financial agent 
for the Illinois Women's College. About 1910, his wife died 
very suddenly, and after that his health declined rapidly, 
and his closing years were spent as an invalid in charge of 
his son. Rev. Edwin W. Akers. He died July 3,1, 191J. He, 
his father, and his son, together have rendered over one hun- 
dred years of service m the Christian ministry — an unusual 
record. 

LEWIS C. BORNMAN 
Lewis Cass Bornman was born near Belleville on the farm 
where he now resides, July 22, 1836. He is a son of Conrad 
Bornman and is of German descent. He entered McKendree 
shortly before the Civil War, but abandoned his studies to 
become a soldier in the Ninth Regiment of Illinois Volun- 
teers, where he served his country for three years and four 



months. After the war, he came back to McKendree and 
finished his course, graduating m the class of 1868, with the 
degree of A. B. He was a member of the Philosophian Lit- 
erary Society. He spent his life in a very quiet way on the 
old homestead, as a bachelor, but enjoying the respect and 
confidence of his neighbors. However, late in life, he changed 
his point of view and was married in October, 1914, to a lady 
from Freeburg. 

WILLIAM POMEROY EATON 
William Pomeroy Eaton was born at EdwardsviUe, Illi- 
nois, March 27, 1840. His English and Welsh ancestors came 
to America in i6jo. He was a son of Judge Henry K. Eaton, 
of Madison County. His mother's name was Elizabeth C. 
Pomeroy, and her ancestors were also English. Mr. Eaton 
entered McKendree in i8'i;7, but did not graduate till 1868, 
when he received the degree of A. B. He was m his senior 
year when the Civil War broke out, and he entered the army 
as a member of the 117th Regiment Illinois Volunteers, of 
which Prof. R. M. Moore became the colonel. He served 
three years and was sergeant of Company H. He was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Society. He was married October 4, 
18S2, to Miss Eliza A. Blackburn. To them were born six 
children, of whom five are living: Henry B., an attorney at 
EdwardsviUe, Prof. William J., Joseph King, now living on 
the old homestead, Samuel West and Thomas M. After his 
graduation, Mr. Eaton was engaged in teaching for a time, 
and was elected county superintendent of schools of Madi- 
son County. After ceasing to hold this office, he returned to 
the farm which he managed until his death, which occurred 
in 1909. He had held the offices of supervisor, school trustee. 
Republican central committeeman, and president of the 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and the Windstorm Insur 
ance Company. He was also for years president of the Madi- 
son County Old Settler's Association. He was a member of 
the Methodist Church, and belonged to Lodge No. qg, A. 
F &? A. M. 

THOMAS W. ECKERT 
Thomas W. Eckert was born in Monroe County, Illinois, 
November 6, 1840. He was a son of John and Arab (Williams) 
Eckert, the former being a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter, of Kentucky. He entered McKendree at the age of 
sixteen, but after three years, left without graduating. He 
afterward received the honorary degree of A. M., in 1868. 
He studied dentistry and practiced in St. Louis three years, 
then in Lebanon until, in 1873, he purchased the Lebanon 
Journal, of which he was editor until 1878. He then estab- 
lished the Belleville Republican in that city, which he con- 



Two Hundred and Fne 



^MC KENDREE'^^^^^:^^:^.,,.^:..^^. 



ducted successfully until 1884 when he removed to Arkansas 
City, Kansas, where he engaged in editorial work till a short 
time before his death. On account of ill he;ilth, he went to 
Los Angeles, California where he died June 2, 1909. He was 
married May 30, i860, to Miss Viola Calhoun, who with 
one son and two daughters, survives him. Mr. Eckert was 
postmaster of Lebanon during the years 1874-1876, and was 
a life long Republican. 

CAPT. ROBERT ALEXANDER HALBERT 
Robert Alexander Halbert was born in St. Clair County, 
Ilhnois, February 9, 1841. He was a son of John Halbert, 
a native of Virginia, and Clarissa Carr. He entered McKen- 
dree in 1857, but in his senior year transferred to Illinois 
College, at Jacksonville, graduated there in June, 1861, hav- 
ing attended that institution the last six months of his course. 
In 1868, McKendree conferred upon him the degree of A. M. 
While in McKendree, he was a member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. After teaching school for a year, he enlisted 
in the United States Army and became captain of Company 
H of the 117th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, and after 
three years of active service, was mustered out August 5, 
1865. He then studied law in the office of Hon. W. H. Under- 
wood and was admitted to the practice of law at the fall 
term of the Supreme Court held at Ottawa, Illinois, in 1866. 
In 1868, he was elected state's attorney for the Judicial 
District composed of St. Clair, Bond, and Madison Counties, 
for a term of four years. He was married April 14, 1869, to 
Miss Emma L. Underwood, a daughter of Judge Underwood, 
who was a graduate of Monticello Seminary. Of their four 
children, three grew to maturity. They are: Mrs. Clara 
Halbert Needles, of Belleville, William Underwood Halbert, 
who has been practicing law in Belleville since 1897, and 
Miss Mary L. Halbert, who is Assistant Librarian in the 
Belleville Public Library. Mr. Halbert died at Belleville, 
December 27, 1888. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON JUDY 
Thomas Jefferson Judy was born at Troy, Madison Coun- 
ty, Illinois, May 15, 1846. His parents were Thomas and 
Damaris Judy. He became a student in McKendree College 
in 1864 and graduated in 1868, receiving the degree of B. S. 
He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. He 
was married March 17, 1870, to Nancy M. McKee. They 
were the parents of six children: Robert, Nancy, Charles, 
Thomas, Edna, and Frances. They are all living except 
Charles and Thomas. In politics he was always a Democrat. 
He attended the Methodist Church. He engaged in mer- 
cantile business in Edwardsville for three years, and then 



moved to a farm, where he lived for the remainder of his 
life, engaged in farming and stock-raising. He tilled the posi- 
tion of school director and member of the County Board 
of Supervisors of Madison County. He was a member of 
the Masonic Lodge No. 99 at Edwardsville until his death, 
which occurred February 11, 1897, and his funeral was held 
under the auspices of the Masonic Order in connection with 
services at the Methodist Church. His remains rest in the 
Woodlawn Cemetery at Edwardsville. 

HARRISON W. HAPPY 

Harrison W. Happy was born in Perry County, Illinois, 
August 29, 1842. His parents, Burgin and Mary Happy, 
were both born in Kentucky. He entered McKendree in the 
fall of 1866 and graduated in the class of 1868, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. He has been married, but in 191 5 was a 
widower with no children. The profession of law has 
been his life work, tho at this writing he holds a position 
with the Federal Government at Washington, D. C. He is 
a member of the I. O. O. F. 

GARRETT CROWNOVER LAND 

Garrett Crownover Land was born in Mascoutah, Illinois, 
in August, 1846. He received his early education in the 
schools of his native city, after which he became a student 
in McKendree College, where he remained till he graduated 
in the class of 1868, receiving the degree of B. S. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. In the fall of 
1868 he entered the Law Department of Michigan Univer- 
sity at Ann Arbor. He pursued the course here for some 
time, but later transferred to Harvard Law School where he 
received the degree of LL. B. in 1872. He then returned to 
Warrensburg, Missouri, which had been his home for some 
years, and entered upon the practice of law in that place. 
He was a man of brilliant parts and what promised to be 
a brilliant legal career was cut short by an early death on 
November 4, 1882. He was never married. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON PARKINSON 
George Washington Parkinson was born near Highland, 
Illinois, January i, 1844. He was the eldest son of Alfred 
J. and Mary (Baldwin) Parkinson. He became a student in 
McKendree in 1863 and graduated with the degree of B. S. 
in the class of 1868. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He taught school for several years after 
leaving college. His marriage to Miss Mary McKee of Sum- 
merfield took place in 1875. Of their six children, three sur- 
vived the father. They are George M., of Highland, Illinois, 
Ralph W., of Magnolia, Arkansas, and Alfred W., of Siloam 



Two Hundred and Six 



Springs, Arkansas. After his marriage, Mr. Parkinson en- 
gaged in farming near Highland until about 1903, when he 
moved to Arkansas in the hope that the milder climate would 
improve his health. He held numerous positions of honor 
and trust, especially in relation to educational affairs. One 
who knew him well declared that "he was of the manly 
type of man and had many characteristics which com- 
mended him." He died several years ago. 

PROF. DANIEL BALDWIN PARKINSON 
Daniel Baldwin Parkinson was horn near Highland, Mad- 
ison County, Illinois, September 6, 1841. He was the second 
son of Alfred J. and Mary 
Parkinson. He entered Mc- 
Kendree in January, 1864 
and completed his course 
in 1 868 in the same class with 
his older brother, and receiv 
ed the degree of B. S. He 
also received from McKen- 
dree the degrees of A. M. m 
1874, and Ph. D. ini897. He 
was a member of the Pla- 
tonian Society. He was mar- 
ried December 28, 1876, to 
Miss Julia F. Mason. Some 
years after her death, he was 

married, July 30, 1884, to Miss Alice Raymond. Their two 
children are Raymond and Mary Alice. Except the first two 
years after his graduation, he spent his entire active life in 
educational work. From 1870 to 1873 he taught Natural 
Science and Mathematics in Jennings Seminary at Aurora, 
Illinois. From 1874 to 1897 he was professor of Physics and 
Chemistry at the Southern Illinois State Normal University 
at Carbondale. From that time till his retirement in 191 3, 
he was president of that institution. He was a member of 
the State and National Educational Associations, as well as 
other educational organizations. He was a member of the 
Methodist Church from 1865 to the time of his death in 
1922, and always an active worker in that body. 
DR. ELAM STAFFORD RAMSEY 
Elam Stafford Ramsey had his early home in Clinton 
County, Illinois. He became a student in McKendree in 
1865 and graduated in the class of 1868, receiving the degree 
of B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary So- 
ciety. He later studied medicine and practiced his profession 
in Carlyle, Illinois from 1874 to 1888, when he moved to 
Kansas City, Kansas, where he continued in the same pro- 




DR. PARKINSON 



fession till his death, which occurred m 1900. He was married 
to Miss Ida Breese, daughter of Justice Breese, of the Illinois 
Supreme Court. They had three children. Mr. Ramsey was 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, and was active in 
religious work. 

HON. GEORGE WASHINGTON SMITH 

George Washington Smith was born in Putnam County, 
Ohio, August 18, 1846. When he was but four years of 
age, his parents moved to Wayne County, Illinois, where 
he grew to manhood and learned the blacksmith's trade. 
Later, having determined on a professional career, he entered 
McKendree College, and graduated in the class of 1868, 
receiving the B. S. degree. He was a member of the Philosoph- 
ian Society. Later he took a law course in the University 
of Indiana, and was admitted to the bar in 1870. In 1871 he 
began the practice of law in Murphysboro, which was his 
home for the remainder of his life. He was married in 1884 
to Miss M. Ellis Dailey, of Murphysboro. In 1880 he was 
presidential elector on the Republican ticket, and cast his 
vote for Garfield and Arthur. He was first elected to Con- 
gress in 1889, and was re-elected after that for seven times 
in succession. In fact he held the position continuously until 
the time of his death. He died at his home in Murphysboro, 
November 30, 1907. 

JAMES J. ROWEN 

James Jacob Rowen was born at Winchester, Illinois, 
June 15, 1836. His parents were Ira and Polly (Kersey) 
Rowen, one a native of Maryland and the other of Delaware. 
He entered McKendree College in the fall of 1854, but after 
a time transferred his credits to the Ohio Wesleyan Uni' 
versity, and from that institution received the degree of A. 
B. in 1858 and that of A. M. in 1861. In 1868 the degree 
of A. M. was conferred upon him by McKendree. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Society. In October, 1865, he 
w,is married to Ellen C. Trotter, the daughter of the Rev. 
W. D. R. Trotter, who was the first editor of the Central 
Christian Advocate. Miss Trotter was a grand-daughter of 
Rev. Peter Cartwright. Mr. and Mrs. Rowen have three 
children now living: Edith Rowen, of Rock Springs, Wyo- 
ming, Mrs. W. A. Forrest, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Rowena 
Rowen, of Black Diamond, Washington. Mr. Rowen is a 
member of the Methodist Church, a lawyer, has taught 
school, and has been somewhat interested in politics. He 
was elected to the Colorado Legislature in 1879, and to the 
Wyoming Legislature in 1903. In 191 5 he was at Sheridan, 
Wyoming and was practicing the profession of law. 



Two Hitncired and Seie 



-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 



JUDGE THOMPSON BEVERLY STELLE 
Thompson Beverly Stelle was born on a farm in Hamilton 
County, Illinois, January 23, 1845. When the war broke 
out, his father, Jacob Stelle, offered his services to his coun- 
try, and Thompson, the eldest son. became the mainstay of 
the large family during that critical period. He had a great 
desire for education. As soon as he had secured sufficient 
preparation, he began teaching in the country schools. By 
working on the farm between terms and practicing rigid 
economy, he managed to make his way through McKendree 
College, where he graduated in 1868, receiving the degrees 
of B. S. and LL. B. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Literary Society. The same year of his graduation he was 
admitted to the bar and located in McLeansboro for the 
practice of law, where he spent the remaining thirty-eight 
years of his life. In 1869 he was elected county judge and 
served four years. He has been identified with nearly every 
important enterprise of his city and county. He has served 
the public as a member of the Board of Education, as alder- 
man and mayor of the city, and was presidential elector on 
the Democratic ticket in 1896. He was married February 11, 
187J to Miss Laura E. Blades of McLeansboro, who with 
seven children survived him. The children are Mrs. Edith 
E. Wright, Mrs. Eleanor M. Graff, Cyrus B., Raleigh B., 
William H., Elsie J., and John H. Judge Stelle was a good 
financier and an able lawyer. He used his wealth in such a 
way as to benefit the community as well as to promote his 
own interests. Death overtook him while still in the midst 
of hfe's activities July ji, 1906. 

JUDGE WARREN TRUITT 
Warren Truitt was born m Green County, Illinois, July 
4, 1847. He is a son of Samuel and Cynthia Truitt, who were 
both natives of Kentucky. He entered McKendree in 186^ 
and graduated in 1868, receiving the degree of B. S. In 1894, 
he received the degree of A. M. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He was married to Miss Kathryn 
Schade and they have one son living. He was principal of 
Bethal Academy, in Polk County, Oregon, from 1872 to 
1874. He was then elected county judge of that county, 
which office he held for four years, but refused to be a can- 
didate for re-election. He then began the practice of law at 
Dallas, Oregon. He was presidential elector for Oregon on 
the Republican ticket in 1876, and was chosen as messenger 
to bear the vote of that state to Washington, D. C. In 1890 
he was made registrar of the U. S. Land Office at Lakeview, 
Oregon, and in 1892 was appointed by President Benjamin 
Harrison to the office of United States District Iudt;e for 



the District of Alaska. This office he held four years, and 
resigned in 1896. He was first admitted to the bar in Illinois 
in 1870, and has practiced m the states of Oregon, Idaho, 
and Washington, in both state and federal courts. He is still 
engaged in law practice, maintaining offices in Moscow, 
Idaho, and Spokane, Washington. He was State Senator in 
Idaho from 1907 to 1909. He is a Mason and Knight Templar 
and, moreover, he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of 
Who's Who. 

JOHN ENOCH UTT 

John Enoch Utt was born June 18, 1849. Among his an- 
cestors are found representatives of the following different 
nationalities: Scotch, Irish, Welsh, Holland Dutch, and Ger- 
man. He entered McKendree in 1864 and graduated in 1868, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Literary Society. He was married in 1881 and has 
three children. He has been a railroad man for many years 
and has held responsible positions in the west, such as 
general freight agent for the Burlington, Cedar Rapids, and 
Northern. At present he is located at Omaha, Nebraska. 
He is a member of the Methodist Church, and in politics 
IS a Republican. 

OTTO HUGO WANGELIN 

Otto Hugo Wangelin was born at Lebanon, Illinois, March 
2, 1850. His parents, Hugo and Bertha Wangelin, were na- 
tives of Prussia. He entered McKendree as a student in 
1865 and graduated in 1868, receiving the degree of B. S. 
He was a member of the Platonian Society. He was married 
July 17, 1878 to Miss Emma Holbrook of Du Bois, a grad- 
uate of Monticello Seminary. Of their five children, Lyman 
died in infancy. The others are Etta May, Mrs. Louise 
Elliott of Globe, Arizona, Hugo O. Wangelin, of Bishop, 
California, and Mrs. E. B. Tinker, of Miami, Arizona. Soon 
after his graduation, Mr. Wangelin was admitted to the 
bar and practiced law for a year in Edwardsville, Illinois. 
He then abandoned the legal profession for newspaper work. 
He went west and for many years was editor and proprietor 
of the Daily Herald, of Boulder, Colo. He was a member of 
the Masons, Odd Fellows, and Elks. He continued in the 
newspaper work till the time of his death. 

JOHN HARRISON WILSON 
John Harrison Wilson was born in McLeansboro, Illinois, 
February 8, 1845. He is a son of John A. and Eliza (Grady) 
Wilson, who were both born in Shawneetown, Illinois. His 
fither's family originally came from Virginia to Kentucky 
and thence to Illinois in an early day. He entered McKendree 
in September, 186"; and graduated as a member of a class 



Two Hundred and Eiglit 



PiMCKENp RE E^ 



of sixteen in i868, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
member of the Philosophian Literary Society. During the 
vacation of 1867 he was a member of the United States 
Engineering Corps under General James H. Wilson, of the 
U. S. A., which surveyed a route tor a proposed ship canal 
from Lake Michigan to the Gulf. After his graduation he 
became assistant to the chief engineer m charge of the im- 
provement of the Rock Island Rapids. Later he was com- 
missioned inspector of this work. In 1869 he was transferred 
to the Des Moines Rapids Improvement and remained here 
until he took up the business of contracting for railroad 
supplies, which he has followed for thirty-five years, and is 
now also engaged in the real estate and loan business, with 
farming as a side line. He became a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, at McLeansboro September 22, 1878. He 
has taken little interest in politics, but has always been an 
advocate of good government. He served for twenty years 
in the City Council of McLeansboro, and two terms as 
mayor on the no-license ticket. He was married November 
27, 187J, to Alice J. Randall, of Clinton County, Illinois. 
They have four children, all married: A. F. Wilson, now 
mayor of McLeansboro, F. R. Wilson, Mrs. A. W. B. John- 
son, of Birmingham, Alabama, and Mrs. Lester Maxey, of 
Mt. Vernon, Illinois. 

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON TYNER 

William Henry Harrison Tyner was born in Williamson 
County, Illinois, December 28, 1841. He entered McKendree 
in September, 1864 and graduated in June, 1868, receiving 
the degree of A. B. He was a member of Philo Society. In 
September, 1868 he joined the Southern Illinois Conference 
and served the following charges in succession: Dongola 
Circuit, Mt. Carmel Circuit, the Newton Circuit, and the 
Pocahontas Circuit. In 1885 he transferred to the South 
Kansas Conference and McKendree lost sight of him. He 
was married June 16, 1868, to Miss Rebecca M. McDonald. 

There is a tradition that he is dead, but we have no 
reliable information concerning him. 

JOHN WRIGHT TIPTON 

John Wright Tipton graduated in the class of 1868, re- 
ceiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of Philo. When 
last known, he lived at Elizabethtown, Tennessee. 

William Henderson Bennett and Wilbur Fiske Goheen 
were both graduates in law in the year 1868 and received 
the degree of LL. B. The latter was a member of the Goheen 
family which was connected with McKendree history 



through several generations. When last known he lived at 
Jacksonville, Illinois. 

THE CLASS OF ISIi'.i 
CHARLES WESLEY BLISS 

Charles Wesley Bliss was born at Fillmore, Montgomery 
County, Illinois, January 8, 1846. His parents were Rev. 
Alfred Bliss, a native of Vermont and for many years a 
member of the Southern Illinois Conference of the M. E. 
Church, and Mrs. Direxia (Knowles) Bliss, a native of New 
Hampshire, who came to Montgomery County, Illinois in 
1838. Mr. Bliss entered McKendree in the spring of 1864 
and graduated in June, 1869, with the degree of A. B. Later 
he received the degree of A. M. from his alma mater. He 
was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He taught 
school and read law till 1871, when he moved to Hillsboro 
and opened a law office. He served two terms as city attor- 
ney of Hillsboro, and two terms as master in chancery of 
Montgomery County. He was president of the Board of 
Trustees of the Southern Normal at Carbondale from 1892 
to 1896. He has been president of the Hillsboro Board of 
Education, he has long been a member of the Methodist 
Church, and is at present a trustee of the church at Hillsboro. 
He belongs to the Masonic Order and is a Knight Templar 
and member of the St. Omer Commandery of Litchfield. In 
1892 he purchased the "Montgomery News," a weekly paper 
published at Hillsboro and has been editor and proprietor 
ever since. He was married October 15, 1872 to Miss Eliz- 
abeth Phillips. They have three children: Nai Celecta, now 
wife of Dr. H. A. Seymour, of Hillsboro, Clinton P. Bliss, 
junior editor of the "Montgomery News," and Marguerite, 
now the wife of Ben O. McLean, of Hillsboro, Illinois. During 
recent years he has been quite faithful in attending the 
McKendree "Home comings." He is an unusually interesting 
writer and speaker. 

WILLIAM PITT BRADSHAW 

William Pitt Bradshaw was born near Fairfield, Illinois 
April 7, 1846. He was a son of Greenup and Margaret (Bose) 
Bradshaw, whose ancestors were Kentuckians. He entered 
McKendree in 1866 and became a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He completed his college course in 1869, 
receiving the degree of B. S. Before his college days began, 
he had experience in the Civil War. He went into the army 
at the age of sixteen and was employed for fourteen months 
as news carrier and scout. After his graduation, he studied 
law, was admitted to the bar of Illinois, and began practicing 
in 1872 in Edwardsville, Illinois, and in 1874, he became the 
partner of Judge Metcalf in law practice. In 1894 he was a 



Two Hundred and ?{u 



lecturer in the McKendree Law School. He was married 
July i6, 1876, to Miss Sallie H. Harrison. They have two 
sons, Ernest W. and Courtlandt. Mr. Bradshaw died at 
Edwardsville, March i, 1904. 

JAMES M. HAMILL 
About the beginning of the twentieth century a book 
of over four hundred pages was written on "The Scotch-Irish 
in History." Its purpose was to 
show that much of the worth- 
while achievement in the world 
has been accomplished by men 
and women of that famous an- 
cestry. In this class was James 
Miller Hamill, born near Gar- 
vagh, Londonderry County, 
Ireland, November 28, 1840. He 
was the youngest of the eight 
children of William Kennedy 
and Elizabeth(Crawford) Ham ■ 
ill.When only seven yearsof age 
became with his father and 
some of his brothers and sisters 
to America. His mother had 
previously died in Ireland. They 
lived for a time at Port Kennedy, 
near Philadelphia, with rela- 
tives who had preceded them to 
America, and then came to Illi- 
nois and settled on a farm near 
Freeburg, in St. Clair County. 
James M. attended the public 
schools in Belleville and acquir- 
ed sufficient preparation to 
teach a country school. He had 
an earnest desire for education 
and the equipment that would 
enable him to achieve some- 
thing worth-while in life. Ac- 
cordingly, he earned the money, by teaching, to pay his way 
thru college. He first entered McKendree in the fall of 1861 
and joined the Philosophian Literary Society the same year. 
That was the year the Civil War broke out and patriotism 
flowed freely on College Hill. The following year the "Mc- 
Kendree Regiment," the one hundred and seventeenth Illi- 
nois, was organized with Professor Risdon M. Moore as 
colonel. On August i?,, 1862, Mr. Hamill enlisted in Com- 
pany C of this regiment for three years, or the duration of 





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the war. He fearlessly and faithfully endured the hardships 
and dangers of soldier life until the end of the war. His war 
experiences in:luded a part in the famous Red River expe- 
dition under General Banks, the battle of Nashville, under 
General A. J. Smith, the battle of Tupelo, Mississippi, and 
the attack on Fort Blakely, which was in fact the last battle 
of the war. He was mustered out in 1865 and immediately 
returned to McKendree to re- 
sume his interrupted college 
course, which he pursued con- 
tinuously, except for one year 
of school teaching, until 1869, 
when he finished the course, 
receiving the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts and the first honors 
of his class. While in college he 
boarded for a time in the home 
of Professor Deneen, and there 
formed a friendship with his 
son, Charles S. Deneen, now 
United States Senator from Illi- 
nois. He was a member of the 
convention which nominated 
Mr. Deneen for Governor of 
Illinois, and in 1910 was ap- 
pointed by Governor De- 
neen as a delegate to the 
National Conference on Uni- 
form State Laws at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Mr. Hamill was a loyal and 
enthusiastic "Philo." In writ- 
ing about his McKendree days 
he says, "While in college I 
was regular in my atten- 
dance at the meetings of the 
Philosophian Society, and do 
not remember ever asking to 
be excused from any performance, unless on account of 
sickness. I was just unsophisticated enough to think that 
every duty assigned by the society or any of its officers 
must be strictly performed even to the extent of the heroic 
duty of escorting the 'oldest girl in town' to a 'select per- 
formance' when I was appointed to perform that severe task. 
I was president of the organization more than once, and 
from president to janitor was the custom invariably followed. 
1 filled the position of critic more frequently than any other 



CLASS OF 1S6() 
2. Cyrus Happy j. Wm. P. Bradshaw 4. James H 
J M Hamill 6. A. McConaughty 7. David Logan 
8. N. J. Shepherd 9. Samuel Young 



Two Hundred and Ten 



office and liked it better. Next to the college, the society 
,ind Its library possessed the greatest interest and charm for 
me, for there "knowledge with her ample page, rich with 
the spoils of time, to my enraptured mind did freely unroll'." 
After the commencement of 1869, Mr. Hamill immediately 
began studying law in the office of his brother, William, at 
McLeansboro, and was admitted to the bar October 26, 
1870. It was during that year that he became junior partner 
in the law firm of Crebs, Conger, and Hamill, at Carmi, 
Illinois. While a member of this firm he assisted m securing 
the right of way for the St. Louis and Southeastern Railway 
Company, and thus became acquainted with General Edward 
F. Wmslow, one of the builders of the road. This acquaint- 
ance resulted m his being employed as attorney for the rail- 
road company, and later when the property was acquired 
by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company, he was 
appointed district attorney for that company, and occupied 
this position over a period of fifty years until his death. In 
addition to this position he also served as district attorney 
for the Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis from 
about iqoo to iqio. 

He was married November 8, 1877 to Miss Agnes Lillian 
Pace, a daughter of Charles T. Pace, of Mt. Vernon., Illinois. 
She also attended McKendree and graduated in the class of 
1873. She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society at 
McKendree. She has nearly all her life been a Methodist 
and a prominent worker in the various lines of church activ- 
ity. She has been president of the Women's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society of the First Methodist Church of Belleville 
for many years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamill had two sons. Edward W. was 
born in Belleville, December 26, 1878. He graduated from 
the Ohio Wesleyan University near the head of his class 
in 1901, and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. The next 
year he took a degree at Harvard, and after two years of 
teaching at Harvard and Ohio Wesleyan, he entered the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated in 
Architectural Engineering in 1907. But after a brief exper- 
ience in architectural work he found that teaching had a 
stronger appeal for him than any other vocation. He taught 
in the Yeatman High School in St. Louis, and was engaged 
to teach in the Ohio Wesleyan University for the school 
year of 1909-10, but what seemed an unusually promising 
career was cut off by his early death, which occurred June 
29, 1909. 

The younger son, Charles P. Hamill, was born in Belleville, 
September 23, 1882. He graduated from the Belleville High 



School, and then from the Ohio Wesleyan University m 
190;^, from Harvard m 1904, and from the Harvard Law 
School in 191 1. Since that time he had been practicing law, 
in partnership with his father until the latter's death in 1919, 
and since that time, alone. He succeeded his father as District 
Attorney for Illinois for the Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
road Company. He has been for some years a member of 
the Board of Trustees of McKendree College, and is niw 
a member of the Executive Committee. 

We quote from a letter written by Senator Charles S. 
Deneen, at that time president of the Board of Trustees of 
McKendree College, to Mrs. Hamill and her son, Charles 
P. Hamill, acknowledging their gift to the college to endow 
a chair of English Literature in memory of James M. Hamill. 
They (the Joint Board of Trustees and Visitors) 
are pleased, too, that a chair is to be endowed in 
memory of Mr. James M. Hamill, who represented 
in his student life, his patriotic service to his coun- 
try and in his professional career, the highest type 
of manhood and service. . . .My memory of Mr. 
Hamill runs back to my earliest childhood and he 
was one of my best friends. I am glad to know 
that his name is to be associated forever with the 
college." 
Mr. Hamill was a member of the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation, a Mason, and for many years prior to his death, a 
trustee of McKendree. His death occurred at his home in 
Belleville, October 4, 1919. 

CYRUS HAPPY 
Cyrus Happy was born January 28, 1845, in Perry County, 
Illinois. He is a son of Burgin and Mary (Williams) Happy, 
who were both born in Kentucky. He entered McKendree 
in 1866 and graduated in 1869, receiving the degree of B. S. 
He was a member of the Philosophian Society. He was 
married September 11, 1879, to Miss Minna Prickett. They 
have four children, Mrs. Claudine Kaufman, of Marshfield, 
Oregon, Mrs. Eloise Richards, of Spokane, Washington, 
Cyrus, Jr., and John. The older of the sons studied law in 
the University of Chicago. Mr. Happy has made the law 
his vocation since 1871, when he was admitted to the bar 
in Illinois. He was a presidential elector in 1876. He has 
been a member of the Masonic Lodge since 1869. He has 
for a long time been the senior member of a prominent law 
firm in Spokane, Washington. 

DAVID LOGAN 
David Logan was born at Flora, Illinois, February 22, 
1840. His ancestors were of English and Scotch origin. He 




Two Hundred and Elei 



p^c KENDRE^^^^^^^^^^ 



entered McKendree in 1865 and graduated in i86g, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. After his graduation he engaged in educational 
work. He was a teacher for twenty-two years: then was 
manager of a lumber yard at Edinburg, Illinois for twelve 
years. He retired from business in 1902. He is a Methodist 
and a Mason, and has made good in every position he has 
held. He was married August 20, 1874, and has three children 
now living, all of whom are graduates of the University of 
Illinois. His oldest son, who was a railroad mail clerk, was 
killed at the Union Station, St. Louis, December 24, 1910. His 
other son is an engineer now employed at Panama. His eldest 
daughter is married to Prof. C. S. Montooth, an Illinois 
school superintendent. His younger daughter, Grace, has 
been employed as dietician at the Reading Hospital in 
Pennsylvania. 

JAMES H. THOMAS 
James Harrison Thomas was born December 2, 1848 at 
Belleville, lUinois. He entered McKendree in 1865 and grad- 
uated in 1869, receiving the degree of B. S. He studied law 
for two years in the ofEce of Judge Underwood and was 
admitted to the bar in 1871. He practiced law for a time in 
East St. Louis and then changed to a business career. He 
was connected with a drug firm in Belleville for some years, 
but later went west. His death occurred at Denver, Colo- 
rado, December 20, 1915. He was married June 30, 1880, to 
Miss Hattie P. Sargent of the class of 1875, who survived him. 

N. J. SHEPHERD 
Nehemiah John Shepherd was born at Lebanon, Illinois, 
October 7, 1850. His parents, T. H. and E. A. Shepherd, 
were both American. He entered McKendree as a student 
in September, 1864, and graduated in June, 1869, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He was married May 22, 1872, to Pamelia J. Ralls, 
near Red Bud, Illinois. They have five sons and three daugh- 
ters, all living. His occupation during the years has been 
farming and doing the work of agricultural editor. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for seven- 
teen consecutive years has been secretary of Ionia Lodge 
No. 381, A. F. is' A. M. He has also been secretary, ever 
since it was organized, of the Eldon Chapter, No. 128, of 
Royal Arch Masons. He has been secretary for thirteen 
years of Eldon Lodge No. 462, I. O. O. F. He is a member 
of the Prairie Encampment, No. 86, I. O. O. F., and has 
been secretary of that body ever since it was organized. He 
has been a Notary Public for many years. In politics he is 



a Democrat. He moved to Miller County, Missouri in 1880, 
and now resides in Eldon. 

SAMUEL YOUNG 

Samuel Young was born February 10, 1847. He graduated 
from McKendree in the class of 1869, receiving the degree 
of B. S. He belonged to the Platonian Society. He was for 
many years engaged in the banking business in HiUsboro, 
Illinois. His death occurred January 5, 1881. 
FRANK A. McCONAUGHY 

Frank Alexander McConaughy was born at Lititz, Lan- 
caster County, Pennsylvania, December 25, 1849. His pat' 
ents were Dr. John B. and Mrs. Elizabeth (Martin) Mc 
Conaughy, both of Scotch-Irish descent. He came with his 
parents to Illinois at the age of five and from that time on 
his home was at Belleville. He first became a student in 
McKendree in the early sixties while his father was a surgeon 
in the Union Army. He graduated in 1869, with the degree 
of A. B., and received the Master's degree a few years later. 
He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He 
studied law with Judge William H. Underwood and was 
admitted to the bar in Illinois in 1871. Later he was admitted 
to practice in the Federal Courts, including the Supreme 
Court of the United States. He practiced law in Belleville 
until he moved to New York City in 1908, and since then 
he has been connected with one of the leading law firms 
as consulting counsel. In 1877 ^^ was elected city attorney 
of Belleville. For one year he was judge advocate general 
of the Illinois Division of the Sons of Veterans. He has been 
a prominent figure in many Republican conventions, and 
chairman of several. In one of these he was offered the nom- 
ination for Congress, but declined. He was one of the early 
members of the Illinois State Bar Association, and is now 
a member of the New York State Bar. He has made numerous 
public addresses, some of which have been published. He is 
not a member of any lodge or church, but usually attends 
the Presbyterian Church. He was married October 28, 1875, 
to Miss Lucy Wait Thomas, of Belleville. They have five 
sons and two daughters, all living except the second son, 
who died at the age of twenty-seven. The other four sons 
are all engaged in business or professional activities. The 
daughters are still living at home with their parents. 
THE CLASS OF 1870 
JOSEPH G. ALLYN 

Joseph Goodnow Allyn was born at East Greenwich, 
Rhode Island, April i, 1849. He is a son of Rev. Dr. Robert 
and Mary (Budington) Allyn. His father was for many 
years a prominent member of the Southern Illinois Confer' 



Two Hundred and Twelve 



^^^S:£> 



ence of the M. E. Church, and for eleven years president 
of McKendree College, He became a student in McKendree 
about the same time his father became president in 1864. 
He received the degree of A. B. in 1870, and later, A. M. 
He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. For 
two years after his graduation he taught Natural Science m 
East Greenwich (Rhode Island) Academy; he then studied 
a year in the School of Mines of Columbia College, New 
York. In 1873, he was elected professor of Chemistry in 
the Northwestern University at Evanston. 

He retired from active service and lived in Chicago for 
some years before his death, which occurred about 191 5. 
BENTON AXTELL 

Daniel Benton Axtell was born at Elyria, Ohio, April 
29, 1850. His father, Almon Axtell, was a native of Massa- 
chusetts. His mother, Sophronia Boynton, was from Maine. 
One of her ancestors came over in the Mayflower. In i860 
the family moved from Ohio to St. Joseph, Missouri. There 
he attended the public school, and also received private 
instruction in the higher branches. In 1868 they moved to 
Lebanon that the son and daughter might attend McKendree. 
He graduated in 1870, receiving the degree of B. S., and 
later, M. S. He studied civil engineering and was employed 
by the Iron Mountain Railroad. In 1880 he moved to Texas, 
and was the engineer in charge of the building of the Cotton 
Belt Railroad from Corsicana to Waco. Afterward he was 
employed on the construction of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, then commonly known as the "Sunset Route;" and 
while taking up an estimate in a deep cut he was overcome 
by the heat, from the effects of which he died at Del Rio, 
Texas, June 20, 1882. He left a widow and two small boys. 
His wife before her marriage, was Miss Ninevah Allen, a 
native of Fredericktown, Missouri. Mr. Axtell was one of 
the editors of the McKendree Repository during his last 
year in college. In March, 1870, he was elected president 
of the Platonian Literary Society. The subject of his grad- 
uating oration was "Esthetic Emotions." 

PROF. JAMES H. BROWNLEE 

James Henry Brownlee was born in Livonia, Indiana, De' 
cember 29, 1846. His father, Rev. James Brownlee, born in 
1812, in Ireland of Scotch parentage, was a Presbyterian 
minister. His mother, Lavinia (McClung) Brownlee, was 
born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, in 1817. James Henry became 
a student in McKendree in the fall of 1866, and graduated 
in the class of 1870, receiving the degree of B. S. He was 
granted the degree of Master of Arts by his alma mater in 
1876. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. 



He has been engaged in teaching ever since his graduation. 
He was two years principal of the Shiloh, Illinois schools; 
two years in a similar position at Grayville; fourteen years 
professor of Elocution and English Literature at the Southern 
Illinois Normal School at Carbondale; nine years professor 
of Oratory and Rhetoric at the University of Illinois; two 
years professor of Elocution in the Charleston, IlUnois State 
Normal; three years professor of Elocution in McKendree 
College; and seven years professor of Elocution and English 
Literature in Epworth University at Oklahoma City, Okla. 
He IS the author of two books, "Martial Recitations for the 
Veteran's Camp Fire" and "Wartime Echoes." The latter 
has reference to the Spanish War. He was a member of the 
G. A. R. and the Presbyterian Church. He was married 
December 25:, 1873, to Miss Sarah Carey, of Grayville, Illi- 
nois. They have two daughters, Elizabeth Emma and Mary 
Lavinia. The latter is now Mrs. George Frederickson. Mr. 
Brownlee's death occurred only a few years ago, but we 
do not have the exact date. 

THOMAS ELAM 

Thomas Elam was born in Fayette County, Illinois, Octo- 
ber 22, 1843. He is a son of Rev. William and Mary Elam. 
His father was a minister of the Dunkard church and a 
native of Virginia; his mother was from Tennessee. He 
entered McKendree in 1861 and remained two terms. He 
then went to California. In 1865 he returned to Illinois and 
re-entered college. He made his way through college by 
teaching and farming. He taught several terms in Madison 
and St. Clair Counties. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He graduated in the class of 1870, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He studied law in Vandalia, Illinois, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1873. He located in Clinton, 
Missouri, where he practiced law many years. A few years 
ago he returned to Vandalia where he resided with his sister, 
Mrs. Victoria Guffey, until the time of his death which 
occurred recently. Mr. Elam never married. 
EDITH M. FLINT 

Edith Maria Flint was born near Lebanon, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1845, and died in Lebanon, November 10, 1898. 
She was a daughter of William and Mary Flint who were 
of English descent and came to the vicinity of Lebanon in 
1842. She graduated from McKendree in the class of 1870, 
receiving the degree of B. S., and in 1873, M. S. She was 
one of the founders of the Clionian Literary Society and 
was the first woman to graduate from McKendree as a reg- 
ular student. After spending a few years in teaching, she 
was married to the Rev. L. W. Thrall, of the Southern 




Two Hundred and Th 



.:s:^:^^^^^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



Illinois Conference, September 29, 1873,. She was the mother 
of one daughter, Edith Laura, and four sons, Victor W., 
William F., Charles H., and Harold L., all of whom are 
graduates of McKendree. She spent her life as the diligent 
helper of her husband in the work of the ministry. She took 
a prominent part in the work of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society, and the Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union. Her funeral was held in the college chapel. 
OSCAR B. GRIFFIN 

Oscar Benjamin Griffin was a member of the class of 
1870 and received the degree of A. B. He was a member 
of the Philo Society. When he came to McKendree he 
registered from St. Morgan. We have no record as to how 
he spent the two years which intervened between his grad- 
uation and his death in 1872. 

THOMAS H. McBRIDE 

Thomas Harrison McBride was born near Belleville, Illi- 
nois, April 15, 1847. His parents were William John and 
Dovey (Harrison) McBride, who were both Americans. He 
entered McKendree in 1867 and graduated in June, 1870, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Literary Society. He took a medical course at the 
St. Louis Medical College, receiving the degree of M. D. 
from that institution in 1874. He was married May 6, 1874, 
at Joliet, Illinois, to Miss Mary Hardy. To them were born 
three children. He began the practice of medicine at Joliet 
in September of the same year, and continued in this pro- 
fession until his death, which occurred December 19, 1881. 
He was a member of the Richard Street Methodist Church. 
WILLIAM M. ROBINSON 

William Melrose Robinson was a member of the class of 
1870. He received the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. He 
belonged to the Philosophian Society. He afterward studied 
law, and practiced his profession in the city of Lawrence- 
ville. 111. We have no information as to the time of his death. 
HENRY SEITER 

Henry Seiter was born at Lebanon, Illinois, September 
22, 184'i. His parents were Michael and Eliwbeth Seiter, 
the former of German and the latter of English ancestry. 
He entered McKendree in 1866 and graduated in June, 1870, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Pla- 
tonian Literary Society. He took a law course in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, receiving the degree of LL. B. He was 
in the banking and real estate business in Lebanon for many 
years. He was a member of the lower house of the Illinois 
Legislature, 1878 to 1880, and of the state senate from 1882 
to 1890. In 1884, he wa.s the Democratic nominee for Lieu- 



tenant-Governor of Illinois. He is a thirty second degree 
Mason. He was twice married — to Alice I. Radefeldt in 
1872, and after her death to Mamie Badley, in 1879. Of the 
first marriage was born one son, Victor M., and of the sec- 
ond, two sons, Orville R. and Fay E. Seiter. Mr. Seiter was 
for many years a trustee of McKendree, and for a term of 
years was secretary of that body. He was also a member 
of the executive committee. He now (1928) resides with his 
son, Victor, at Kansas City, Mo. 

DR. EUGENE L. STOKER 

Eugene Lecompte Stoker, son of William and Martha Ann 
Stoker, was born at Louisville, Illinois, August 14, 1S50 and 
died at Centralia, Illinois, September 30, 1900. He received 
his early education in the pubUc schools of Centralia where 
his parents took up their residence when he was but a lad. 
He graduated from McKendree in 1870, receiving the degree 
of A. B. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. 
He studied law in the office of his father at Centralia and in 
due time was admitted to the bar of Illinois. He practiced 
his profession in Centralia until 1892 when he moved to 
Chicago and spent the remainder of his life in the legal 
profession in that city. He held the office of state's attorney 
of Marion County and was for one term he was a member 
of the state Legislature. He was married to Miss Maggie 
McKnight of Centralia. To them was born one son, William 
McKnight Stoker. Mr. Stoker was a member of the Meth- 
odist Church and a thirty-third degree Mason. He has held 
the office of Past Grand High Priest of Southern Illinois 
in that order. 

SAMUEL P. SPARKS 

Samuel Preston Sparks was born in Surry County, North 
Carolina, January i, 1844. He attended Chapel Hill College 
in Lafayette County, Missouri for one year; but at outbreak 
of the Civil War, he left college to enlist in the Union Army. 
He served three years in Fifth Missouri Cavalry. After the 
war he taught school for a time, then entered McKendree 
and graduated in 1870, receiving the degree of A. B., and 
later, A. M. He then studied law and for a time attended 
the St. Louis Law School. He afterwards located at Warrens- 
burg, Missouri for the practice of his profession. He served 
four years as clerk of the County Court of Johnson County, 
Missouri, and two terms in the Missouri State Senate. He 
was a lawyer of marked ability. His death occurred .it his 
home in Warrensburg, September 16, 1892. 

REV. DR M P WILKIN 
Milton Perry Wilkin was born in Crawford County, Illi- 
nois, August 17, 1846. He IS next to the youngest of the 



Tu'O Hundred and Fourteen 



^^^s:2:> 



nine children of Isaac and Sarah (Burner) Wilkm, who were 
of German descent, horn m Virginia, moved to Ohio, and 
afterward came to IlHnois in 1845. He entered McKendree as 
a student in March, 1868, and graduated in June, 1870, re- 
ceiving the degree of B. S. Later he received the degrees of A. 
M. and D. D. from Chaddock College. While in McKendree 
he was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He was 
married October 25, 1871, to Miss Jennie Greer. They have 
no children. After leaving McKendree, he taught school for 
a year, then joined the Southern Illinois Conference. He was 
transferred to the Illinois Conference m 1882, and continued 
m the regular work till 1909, when he took the superannuate 
relation and located at Urbana, Illinois. He has done much 
Chautauqua work, both as manager and lecturer. He has 
served as platform director of the Chautauqua at Havana, 
Illinois, and at Piasa Chautauqua in Jersey County, Illinois. 
Among his most popular lectures are the following: "What 
Will You Take," "What is the Matter with the World," 
"Stars to Sail By," "Scraps of Experience and Hints to 
Teachers," etc., etc. He has also done much campaigning 
and lecturing in the interest of temperance and prohibition. 
His death occurred April i^, 1926. 

THE CLASS OF 1871 
DR. LYMAN A. BERGER 
Lyman Adams Berger was born at Lebanon, Illinois, No' 
vember 22, i8'?4. He was the oldest son of Dr. Adolph 
Berger, who came from Germany and became one of the 
early residents of Lebanon, and was the leading physician 
of the town for many years. He grew up in his native town 
and received his education in the Lebanon public schools 
and McKendree College, where he graduated in the class 
of 1871 with the degree of A. B. He immediately entered 
the St. Louis Medical College and received the degree of 
M. D. from that institution in 1874. After practicing his 
profession two years, he went west on account of failing 
health. He spent several years in Idaho and then located 
in Kansas City, Missouri in 1880. In 1886 he went to Europe 
with his father, and remained there long enough to take a 
special course in obstetrics in the Universities of Berlin and 
Vienna. He then returned to Kansas City, where he engaged 
in the general practice of medicine and surgery until the 
time of his death July 8, 1897. He has held the following 
positions at various times in his career: chief of staff of the 
German Hospital, Kansas City; professor of Obstretics m 
the University Medical College of Kansas City; secretary 
of the State Medical Society of Missouri ; vice-president of 
the Pan-American Medical Congress at Washington, D. C. 



m iSqi. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society, 
Knight Templars, Shnners and Knights of Pythias. He was 
married December ji, 187=;, to Miss Lillie E. Dausm.m of 
St. Louis, who died m i88s. Their three children are: 
Mrs. G. W. Thaxter, Roswell, New Mexico, Mrs. E. P. 
Allen, K.msas City, Mo., and Miss Grace Berger, who was 
for some time a member of the staff of the Kansas City 
Public Library. 

JOHN H. BLUME 
John H. Blume was born July 10, iS'jo, at Pleasant Ridge, 
Madison County, Illinois, and died in the summer of 1873. 
He was of German parentage. His father was John H; Blume, 
Sr., and his mother, Christine (Dierking) Blume. He had two 
sisters, Mrs. C. F. Kayser, of Edwardsville, and Louise C. 
Blume, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and one brother, Wm. F. 
Blume, of Granite City, Illinois. He became a student m 
McKendree in September, 186";, when he was only fifteen 
years of age, and graduated m the Classical Course, as the 
valedictorian of his class, in 1871, receiving the degree of 
A. B. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society, 
and was elected president of that body in his senior year. 
He was never married, though at the time of his death was 
engaged to an excellent Christian young woman. After his 
graduation in 1871, he was elected professor of Ancient 
Languages m Jennings Seminary at Aurora, Illinois. Here he 
taught for two years, while in the same school the sciences 
were taught by his fellow McKendrean, Daniel B. Parkinson, 
later president of the Southern Illinois Normal University. 
He was elected for the third year, but died at his father's 
home after a brief illness, shortly before the opening of the 
next school year. He was a devout Christian and a faithful 
member of the Methodist Church. He was prepared for the 
great change and closed his eyes on the scenes of earth 
exhorting his loved ones to meet him in the Heavenly home. 

JOHN M. BROOKS 
John Melville Brooks was born at Townsend, Massachu- 
setts, February 12, 1850. He was descended from a distin- 
guished New England family. One of his ancestors, John 
Brooks, LL. D., served m the Revolutionary War and in 
the War of 1812, and for six years was Governor of Massa- 
chusetts. The parents of the subject of this sketch were 
John C. and Lefy (Hart) Brooks, who were both natives 
of Massachusetts. He prepared for college at Lawrence 
Academy at Groton, and Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, 
Massachusetts. He then came west, entered McKendree 
and graduated in 1871 with the degree of A. B. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. After his 



Two Hundred and Fifteen 



-^:s:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^e^^s^ 



graduation he taught school a year near Lebanon, and then 
entered the Law Department of Michigan University at 
Ann Arbor. He was admitted to the bar in 1874, and located 
at Saginaw, Michigan, where he spent the remainder of his 
life in the practice of law. He was a man of unusual ability 
in the line of his chosen profession, and was highly esteemed 
by his contemporaries for his noble character. He might have 
had a brilliant political career had he not steadfastly refused 
political honors. He was president of the Saginaw Valley 
Bar Association. He died very suddenly of heart failure, 
March 26, 1903. He was married July 6, 1876, to Miss 
Luella J. Dadmun of Boston, who still lives in Saginaw, 
Michigan. Of their four children, two are still living: William 
C. Brooks, of Portland, Oregon, and Melville D. Brooks, who 
is practicing law in Saginaw, Michigan. 
JOHN H. BAIRD 

John Hardin Baird was born in Sparta, Illinois, January 
25, 1850, and died at Emporia, Kansas, April 16, 1903, at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. McDill. His parents, John 
and Lucinda (Morrow) Baird, were both of Scotch-English 
ancestry and were born in the early part of the last century. 
His father was engaged in mercantile business for some years, 
both in Sparta and Pinckneyville, Illinois. He also served 
several terms as district judge in Illinois. John H. was one 
of a family of nine children, three of whom died in infancy, 
and three others before their parents. None of them were 
ever married, and John H. was the last of the family. He 
entered McKendree in the late sixties and graduated in the 
class of 1871, receiving the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. 
He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He went 
to Emporia, Kansas in the early seventies, and was engaged 
in mercantile business there till the time of his decease. He 
did not belong to any lodge, but was a member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

DANIEL H. DELZELL 

Daniel Holly Delzell was born in Walker County, Georgia, 
September 9, 1849. He graduated from McKendree in 1871, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He taught school for a year after his grad- 
uation and was also reading law with the intention of making 
that his vocation, when his promising career was cut short 
by the grim reaper. He died at the home of his father at 
Wakefield, Illinois, May 9, 1872. The testimony of one who 
knew him well was that he was an earnest Christian. 
JOHN C. DELZELL 

John Carter Delzell was born in McMinn County, East 
Tennessee, July 5, 1847. He graduated from McKendree with 



the degree of B. S. m 1871, and later, received the Master's 
Degree. He was a member of the Platonian Society. He was 
married to Lourenia B. Gillison, July 5, 1874 After his , 
graduation he spent one year in teaching, seven years as 
deputy clerk of Richland County, and one year as collector 
of Olney Township. At this time, his health having failed, 
he went to live on his farm near Wakefield, Illinois, where 
he spent the brief remainder of his life. He died July 11, 
1 88 1. He was a member of the Methodist Church and a local 
preacher, exercising his gifts in this line as opportunity 
offered, as long as his health permitted. 
THOMAS E. KNOX 

Thomas Ewing Knox, A. B., St. Paul, Minnesota. We 
have no information concerning him since the time of his 
graduation. 

JAMES P. LYTLE 

James Pollack Lytle was born in Troy, lUinois, November 
12, 1848, and died at Princeton, Illinois, April 19, 1902. He 
was a son of Dr. F. W. Lytle who was formerly a physician 
in Lebanon, 111. He graduated from McKendree in 1871, 
receiving the degree of A. B. He attended the St. Louis 
Medical College, where he received the degree of M. D. 
He was married in 1877, to a Miss Sawyer, of Tiskilwa, 
Illinois. To them were born three children, Blanche F., Ralph 
S., and James Albert. He practiced medicine at Princeton, 
Illinois for over twenty years, and was a prominent member 
of the profession. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and a Knight Templar in the Masonic Order. 
JOHN C. EDWARDS 

John Columbus Edwards was born in Monroe County, 
Tennessee, January 11, 1849. His father, Thomas Edwards, 
was from North Carolina, and his mother, Margaret 
(Stephenson) Edwards, was a native of Tennessee. He entered 
McKendree in 1868, and received the degree of B. S. in 
1871, and LL. B. in 1873. He was a member of the Philo- 
sophian Society. In 1882, he was married to Miss Lizzie R. 
Elliott. Their two sons are Hugh and John C. Mr. Edwards 
followed the profession of law, beginning his practice in 
McLe.msboro, Illinois. He held the office of state's attorney 
of Hamilton County for two terms, and was county judge 
of the same county for two terms also. He held an important 
appointment in the Treasury Department during the second 
Cleveland administration. At the expiration of his term of 
office he moved from Washington, D. C. to Chicago, where 
he engaged in the practice of law. In this city he died 
November 17, 1905. He was buried at McLeansboro, which 
was regarded as the home town of the family. Here the chil- 



Two Hundred and Sixteen 



dren grew to manhood, and here was the home from which 
three brothers went to McKendree College, graduated, and 
went out to hless the world with their influence. Judge Ed' 
wards was, from childhood, a member of the Methodist 
Church, but after his removal to Washington, he became a 
member of the Episcopal Church. 

ABRAM G. GORDON 

Abram Gooding Gordon was born m Randolph County, 
Illinois, November 6, 1849. His parents were of Scotch and 
German ancestry. His father. Rev. H. S. Gordon, was a 
farmer and a pioneer minister of the Free Baptist Church 
in Southern Illinois. His Scottish ancestors came to America 
before the Revolutionary War. Young Abram entered Mc- 
Kendree in 1868 and graduated in 1871, receiving the degree 
of LL. B. He was a member of the Platonian Society. Since 
then he has practiced law, and has been connected with many 
of the business enterprises of Chester, Illinois, where he has 
resided for the past thirty years. He and his son, Eugene R. 
Gordon, organized and operated the Gordon Telephone Com- 
pany Exchange at Chester. He was a member of the Baptist 
Church, independent in politics, and belonged to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He died Dec. 20, 1917. 
WILLIAM E. McBRIDE 

William Erastus McBride was born near Belleville, August 
I, 1849. He was a son of William J. and Dovey H. McBride, 
who were both Americans. After attending the Belleville 
high school, he entered McKendree in 1868 and graduated 
m 187 1, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of 
the Philosophian Literary Society. He was married Septem- 
ber I, 1875, to Miss Virginia Thatcher, of the class of 
1872. To them were born four children: Dovey, now Mrs. 
D. M. Church, Thomas, now residing on the McBride 
farm near Belleville, Olive, and Sadie, now Mrs. E. R. Crisp. 
All but one of these have been students in McKendree. 
Mr. McBride's business was that of farmer and stockman. 
He was a member and an active worker in the Methodist 
Church. He was for many years Sunday School Superinten- 
dent. Largely through his influence a church was built on a 
portion of the McBride farm. He died January 3, 189J. 
CHARLES W. WOOLVERTON 

Charles William Woolverton was born at Belvidere, Illi- 
nois, February 27, 1847 and died November 10, 1895, at 
Tuscola, Illinois. His parents were Charles W. and Amanda 
H. Woolverton. He became a student in McKendree in 1866 
and graduated in 1871, with the degree of A. B. Three years 
later he received the degree of A. M. He was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. He studied law, was ad' 



mitted to the bar, and began the practice of his profession 
in Tuscola, Illinois. He was soon a prominent figure in the 
courts of Douglass County, He was married June 12, 1888, 
to Mrs. Elizabeth C. Remine, who was at that time the 
official court reporter of the Judicial District composed of 
Douglass, Coles, and Edgar Counties. Their only daughter 
is now Mrs. Lutie Woolverton Rice. He was for ten years 
a member of the law firm of Bundy and Woolverton, and 
after the death of Mr. Bundy he carried on the extensive 
practice himself, without taking another partner. The nu- 
merous resolutions adopted by the courts, lodges, etc., etc., 
with which he was connected, indicate the high esteem in 
which he was held. He attended the Presbyterian Church 
and was a member of the Camargo Lodge No. 440, A. F. &? 
A. M., Tuscola Chapter No. 66, Royal Arch Masons, and 
Melita Commandery No. 37, Tuscola, Illinois. Mrs. Wool- 
verton is still living and makes her home with her daughter, 
Mrs. R. F. Rice, at Rossville, Illinois. 

JUDGE COLUMBUS A. KELLER 
Columbus Alonzo Keller was born near Mt. Vernon, 
Illinois, November 24, 185 1 and died at his home m San 
Antonio, Texas, in February, 1918. He entered McKendree 
in 1869, being admitted to the Junior Class on examination, 
and graduated in 1871, with the degree of B. S. He was a 
Philo. For the next two years he was a student in the Law 
School of the University of Michigan. He was admitted to 
the bar at Ottawa, Illinois, September 14, 1873. He was 
elected county judge of Jefferson County in 1877, which 
position he held for five years. In 1885 he moved to San 
Antonio, Texas, seeking a climate more favorable to his 
wife's health. His wife was formerly Nellie Raymond, of 
Lebanon. This change doubtless prolonged her life, but she 
died in 191 1, leaving one daughter, now Mrs. D. P. Allen, 
of San Antonio. Mr. Keller's second wife was Miss Essie 
F. Haynes, of San Antonio, who survived him. In McKendree 
he was a hard working student. He was president of Philo, 
a member of the editorial staff of the McKendree Repository, 
and in his senior year was elected president of the "College 
Association." In later life he was a prominent lodge man. 
He was a Knight Templar, a Shriner, and a thirty-third 
degree Scottish Rite Mason. In 1882, he was chosen State 
Grand Master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for 
Illinois. In 1912, he was chosen Grand Sire of that order 
for the World, in the convention at Winnipeg, Canada. He 
was also an active member of the Methodist Church, and 
a Democrat in politics. 



Two Hundred jnd Seve 




Reunion of the class of 187 
From left to right — 

WiUiam Edgar Ward, Charles Spies, Ellen Cecilia Axtell, George W 
Virginia Laura Thatcher (Mrs. W. E. McBride), William Austin Ke 
THE CLASS OF 1872 
ELLEN S. ALLYN 
Ellen Sophronia Allyn was born in East Greenwich, Rhode 
Island, June 5, 1852. Her father. Rev. Dr. Robert Allyn, who 
was born in Ck)nnecticut and died at Carbondale, 111., was 
president of McKendree College from i86j to 1874. Her 
mother, Mary B. Budington, was born in Leyden, Mass., 
and died in Carbondale, 111. From 1857 to 1859, Ella lived at 
Athens, Ohio, where her father was professor of Language 
in the Ohio University; and from 1859 to i86j at Cincinnati, 
where he was president of the Wesleyan Female College. 
During the first six years of her residence in Lebanon she 
attended a private school conducted by Mrs. Helen Finley 
Keeney and her sister, daughters of Dr. James C. Finley, a 
former president of McKendree. She became a student in 
McKendree in 1869, and graduated in 1872. She was the 
first woman to receive the A. B. degree from the college. 
She was devoted to the interests of the Clionian Society, 
which she joined soon after its organization. When Dr. Allyn 
became president of the Southern Illinois Normal School at 
Carbondale, she removed to that place with her father's 
family, and for the remainder of her father's lifetime, devoted 
much of her time to assisting him in the duties of his office. 
She was for many years a teacher in the Sunday School of 
the Methodist Church at Carbondale. Her death occurred 
several years ago. 



2 held at McKendree in 191 2 

illiam Flint, Leonidas Worthy Thrall, D. D., Thomas Jefferson Porter, 
:lsoe, Charles Shuman, George Key Edwards, Walter Watson, M. D. 
ELLEN C. AXTELL 
Ellen Cecelia Axtell was born at Elyria, Ohio, April 3, 
1845. She was of New England ancestry. Her parents were 
Almon and Sophronia (Boynton) Axtell, the former a native 
of Massachusetts and the latter of Maine. Philip De La Noye 
(later anglicized to Delano) one of her ancestors on the moth- 
er's side, came to America in the ship "Fortune" which 
followed the Mayflower. His grandson married a grand' 
daughter of Bettie Alden, the oldest child of John Alden 
and Priscilla. Miss Axtell's grandmother Boynton's maiden 
name was Delano and she was thus descended from the 
famous New England Aldens. In i860 her parents moved to St. 
Joseph, Missouri, and eight years later, to Lebanon, Illinois. 
Here both she and her brother, Benton, became students in 
McKendree. He finished in the class of 1870, and she in 
1872. After that. Miss Axtell taught five years in the public 
schools of St. Louis. In 1877, she gave up teaching on account 
of her health, and a little later went to Cleveland, Ohio, and 
studied art. Upon the death cf her brother in 1882, she went 
to Waco, Texas to live with his family. Soon afterward the 
teacher of art in Baylor University died, and Miss Axtell 
was appointed to the position. Two years later her mother 
died, and she went to live with her sister in St. Louis. There 
she attended the St. Louis Art School for two years, and 
then opened a studio, first in her own home and then at the 



Two Hundred and Eighteen 



MC KENDREE 




Y. M. C A. Building, where she taught various Hnes of art 
work. After working m St. Louis a number of years, she 
returned to Texas, still pursuing her favorite vocation. She 
made a specialty of china painting. She came to Lebanon to 
attend the reunion of the class of 1872 on the fortieth anni- 
versary of their graduation. Her death occurred at Magnolia, 
Texas, February 24, 1917. 

DR. AUGUSTUS C. BERNAYS 
Augustus Charles Bernays was born at Highland, Mad- 
ison County, Illinois, October 16, i8';4. He attended the 
schools of St. Louis during 
the Civil War, and after the 
removal of his family toLeb 
anon, he became a student 
m the Preparatory Depart - 
mentofMcKendreeCollege. 
He completed the Classical 
Course and received the de- 
gree of A. B. in 1872. He was 
a member of the Platonian 
Society. He was the young- 
est member of the class and 
was still under eighteen at 
the time of his graduation. 
The following autumn 

he went to Germany to pursue his medical studies. He 
entered Heidelburg University and four years later received 
the degree of M. D. "summa cum laude," being the first 
American to graduate from this famous university with 
highest honors. He then spent a year in post graduate studies 
and hospital work in Heidelburg, Berlin, and Vienna. Also, 
m England he succeeded in becoming a member of the Royal 
College of Surgeons in London. In 1877 he came to St. Louis 
to take up his life work as a specialist in surgery. He was 
a pioneer in abdominal surgery, introduced antiseptic treat- 
ment in this country, and invented surgical instruments now 
used the world over. He was a teacher many years. First in 
the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, and later 
in the Marion-Simms Medical College, which is now the 
Medical Department of St. Louis University. Dr. Willard 
Bartlett of St. Louis said of him- "He had more gifts of 
various kinds than any man I ever knew. He ranked high 
as an investigator, operator, and teacher. While in my eyes, 
his greatest merit lay in his ability as an operator — in his 
being able to do things successfully which others refused to 
attempt — he was also a great teacher." 



DR. BERNAYS 



Dr. G. G. Cottam of South Dakota, a pupil of his, gives 
the following testimony of his ability as a teacher: "He pre- 
sented the plain, unvarnished truth without affect.ition and 
so convincingly that to hear him was to believe him. In the 
early nineties, when I first heard him, he was lecturing on 
pathological anatomy; later clinical surgery was added, and 
his fourfold qualification as embryologist, anatomist, path- 
ologist, and surgeon, of each of which he was a master, 
enabled him to deal with his subject in a manner wholly 
impossible for one lacking m any of these four closely con- 
nected branches." 

Dr. Bernays was never married, but maintained a well 
equipped home which was presided over by his sister, 
Thekla, who was a student in McKendree with him, and 
remained with him to the end of his career, devoting herself 
to his comfort. She accompanied him on several trips to 
Europe and on a trip to Japan, and after his death, which 
occurred in May, 1Q17, she wrote his biography m a very 
interesting volume, to which we refer the reader for further 
information about this remarkable man. 
LOUIS F. BOHM 

Louis Frederick Bohm was born on a farm near Edwards- 
viUe, Illinois, November 18, 1849. His parents were natives 
of Germany. Louis completed the classical course at McKen- 
dree in 1872 and received the degree of A. B. After his grad- 
uation he taught in a country school two years, and the 
following year was appointed to teach in the Edwardsville 
High School. Early in the spring of 1874, he was compelled 
to give up his school work on account of failing health, and 
died April i, of that year. At college Mr. Bohm excelled 
especially in the languages. Not only was he a master of 
German, his mother tongue, but also ranked high in Greek 
and Latin. He never married. 

GEORGE K. EDWARDS 
George Key Edwards, A. M., of the class of "72, was born 
December jo, 1846, near Madisonville, Monroe County, 
Tennessee. He is the son of Thomas H. and Margaret (Ste- 
phenson) Edwards. The family moved before George was 
three years old to the farm on which he lived to the end of 
his life, near McLeansboro, Illinois. George was married 
April Q, 1885, to Miss Ada Daily, of McLeansboro. They 
have four children, Kate, a teacher in the McLeansboro High 
School, George, Paul, and Frank, the youngest. After grad- 
uating at McKendree, Mr. Edwards taught school in Illinois, 
Kansas, and Montana, nine years in all, and then engaged 
in farming and stock-raising on the farm on which he himself 
was raised. For many years he has been also a public lecturer. 




Two Hundred and H- 



^MC KENDREE"^^^^^:^^^...^;^..^ 



and a writer for magazines, religious and temperance journals, 
and other publications. The "Ram's Horn," a religious pub- 
lication of international fame, once printed a friendly cartoon 
of this physically slight, slender man, representing him as a 
very big, fat, heavy, short man. Mr. Edwards has devoted 
much time to Sunday School work, both on the public plat- 
form and in private life . His death occurred only a few years ago . 

STEPHEN G. H. EDWARDS 
Stephen Gardner Hicks Edwards was born at Mt. Vernon, 
lUinois, December 23, 1850 He was the son of Dr. F. H. 
and Margaret Elizabeth (Hicks) Edwards. His paternal grand- 
father, Rev. William Edwards, was a pioneer Methodist 
preacher in Illinois, and for many years chaplain of the 
Illinois Grand Lodge of I. O. O. F. His maternal grandfather, 
Stephen Gardner Hicks, was an officer in three wars — Black- 
hawk, Mexican, and Civil. Stephen's mother lived to the 
end of her long life at Sandoval, Illinois, their home when 
he was a student in McKendree. After finishing his college 
course, he attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, 
where he received the degree of M. D. Then he formed a 
partnership with his father, and for the next twelve years, 
practiced medicine in Sandoval. Early in 1887, he went to 
Texas on account of his health, and on April 30 of that 
year he died at Castroville, Texas, leaving a wife and four 
children. One of his sons, Dr. Frank M. Edwards, is now 
a practicing physician; the other. Dr. Ralph D. Edwards, is 
a dentist. His daughter, Lydia, is a talented musician; the 
other, Elizabeth, is the wife of Chas. W. Hall, a prominent 
business man of Sandoval. Dr. Edwards' wife never re-married. 

WILLIAM M. ESSEX 
William Monroe Essex, salutatorian of the class of 1872, 
was born in St. Louis, November 12, 185 1, and died in the 
same city January 23, 1875, a victim of the "white plague." 
He never married. He became a teacher after graduating from 
McKendree, and continued enthusiastically in the service of 
the cause of education up to a short time before his death. 
He was for a time professor of Mathematics in the Springfield 
(Missouri) Female College. He was a younger brother of the 
late Thomas Essex, who was also an alumnus of McKendree, 
class of 1858. 

GEORGE W. FLINT 
George William Flint was born on a farm near Lebanon, 
Illinois, February 6, 1847, and died at his home near Ray 
mond, Illinois, February 11, 1926. He was the oldest son of 
William and Mary (Gedney) Flint, who were both natives 
of England and came to America soon after their marriage 
in the home land. George W. graduated from McKendree in 



the class of 1872, receiving the degree of B. S., and later, 
M. S. He was a member of the Platonian Society. A year 
after his graduation he went to Glenwood, Iowa, where he 
engaged in teaching for several years. Here he was married 
February 24, 1876, to Miss Ada M. Carter, of Glenwood. 
She died in August of the same year, at the age of twenty. 
He then returned to Illinois and engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness, first at Mt. Olive, and later at Greenville. On May 4, 
1881, he was married to Miss Annie E. Kirkland of Walsh- 
ville, Illinois. Mrs. Flint died in March, 1912, leaving two 
children. Earl W., and Mary Louise. From the spring of 
1896 until his death, Mr. Flint lived on a farm near Raymond, 
which for a number of years has been managed by his son 
and daughter. The residence is a large roomy house, lighted 
with gas, heated with hot water, and supplied with all 
modern conveniences. Mr. Flint had five brothers who were 
students at McKendree, tho not all of them graduated. 

MARGARET E. GILBERT 
Margaret Elizabeth Gilbert, daughter of Edward and 
Margaret E. (Roosevelt) Gilbert, was born March i, 1850, 
on the old Greenwich plantation of colonial days, five miles 
from Savannah, Georgia, and died January 29, 1906, at Los 
Angeles, California. Most of her childhood was spent on a 
farm near Lebanon, Illinois. Before the doors of McKendree 
were open to women, Miss Gilbert attended a young ladies' 
seminary in Jersey City, and Almira College, at Greenville, 
Illinois. She entered McKendree in 1869 and graduated in 
1872, with the degree of B. S. She was one of the founders 
of the Clionian Society. She was married October 10, 1876, 
to Charles Colgate Galusha, of Rochester, New York. One 
of her classmates. Miss Ellen Allyn, served as bridesmaid 
at the wedding, which took place at the Gilbert homestead 
two miles east of Lebanon. Their two sons were Eldon Gil- 
bert and Charles Edward, the latter of whom died when but 
two years old. Her husband, after a long period of ill health, 
died March 18, 1881. In December, 1902, Mrs. Gilbert, with 
her son, Eldon, and her sister, Euretta, moved to Los Angeles, 
where she died only about three years later. 

SAMUEL HASTINGS 
Samuel Hastings was born at Ingraham, Clay County, 
Ilhnois, July 24, 1850, and died in Cairo, Illinois, September 
22, 1905. After graduating at McKendree in 1872, where he 
was a member of the Platonian Society, he taught school for 
several years in Clay County, and then moved to Cairo and 
engaged in the wholesale grain business. On September 24, 
1876, he was married to Miss Anisee Barney at Ingraham, 



Two Hundred and Twenty 



Illinois. To them were born four children: Lelia M,, Maude, 
Oris B., and Mary Alice. The grain business established by 
Mr. Hastings in 1885 has now passed to his son, Oris, and 
his brother, Ira. He also served the public as a member of 
the City Council of Cairo, and as County Commissioner of 
Alexander County. He was also president of Cairo's Board 
of Trade, and one of the trustees of the State Hospital for 
the Insane at Aurora, Illinois. 

GEORGE W. HILL 

George Washington Hill was born at Ewing, Franklin 
County, Illinois, October 31, 1874, and died at Murphys- 
boro, Illinois, October 29, 1897. His parents were Judge John 
W. Hill, a native of Virginia, and Margaret (Beattie) Hill, 
born in Alabama. At McKendree, Mr. Hill was a member 
of the Philosophian Society. After his graduation in 1872, 
when he received the degree of B. S., he was elected pro- 
fessor of Science and Latin in Ewing College. He spent 
a year there and then located at Murphysboro, serving as 
principal of the public schools of that city for a time before 
entering upon the practice of law. In 1884 he was elected 
State Senator from the 50th Illinois District. He took an 
active interest in politics, served many years as chairman of 
the County Central Committee of his party, and was a 
delegate to the Democratic National Convention which nom- 
inated Grover Cleveland for president in 1888. Mr. Hill was 
married October 27, 1875 to Miss Fannie Ingram, daughter 
of Col. W. T. Ingram, M. D., of Murphysboro. Five children 
were born to them, three of whom are still living. These 
are Margaret, now Mrs. D. M. Parkinson of San Antonio, 
Texas; Frances, now Mrs. A. C. Butterworth of Little Rock, 
Arkansas; and Miss Helen, the youngest daughter, who lives 
with her mother in Murphysboro. The only son, Dr. W. 
C. Hill, died in 1906 at Murphysboro, where he was en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine. 

JOHN C. KEET 

John Charles Keet, son of Thomas Josiah and Elizabeth 
(West) Keet, was born at Keetsville, Missouri, August 9, 
1850. While in McKendree he was a member of the Platonian 
Society. He graduated in 1872 with the degree of B. S., and 
later received the degree of M. S. On December 18, 1875 
he was married to Miss Lyda Hypes at her home in Lebanon. 
Miss Hypes was one of the founders of the Clionian Society, 
and was a student in McKendree at the same time with Mr. 
Keet. To them were born five children: Florence, Bertram, 
Harry, Belle, and Margaret. Mr. Keet engaged in merchan- 
dising at Springfield, Mo. soon after his graduation, and 
continued in this business until his death February 20, 1905. 




W. A. KELSOE 



WILLIAM A. KELSOE 

William Austin Kelsoe, a veteran newspaper man of St. 
Louis, IS one of the two surviving members of the class of 
1872, the other survivor be- 
ing Zachary Taylor Remick, 
of Trenton, Illinois. 

Mr. Kelsoe traces his an- 
cestry back to American col- 
onists from Europe, includ- 
ing the four countries of the 
British Isles and two on the 
Continent. The mother of 
his father. Alexander Kelsoe, 
a native of Tennessee, was 
a North Carolina Huston 
(also spelled Houston). Her 
husband, Archibald Kelsoe, 
is said to have changed the 

spelling of his family name to have it end like Monroe, 
Defoe, Kehoe, Bludsoe and other names ending in "oe," Arch- 
ibald's brothers and their children keeping the old-time Scotch 
and Irish spelling, Kelso. 

Mr. Kelsoe's parents were both school teachers before their 
marriage. He still has the teacher's certificate under which his 
mother taught a country school in Athens County, Ohio, 
when she was Miss Elizabeth Watkins, her father being 
Mathew Watkins, a soldier of the War of 1812 and a son 
of Jonathan Watkins, a soldier of the American Revolution. 
She was married to Alexander Kelsoe in 1849 at Rock Island, 
Illinois, where she was then living with a married sister, 
Mrs. Austin (Esther) Prouty. Alexander Kelsoe was then 
circuit clerk of Bond County, Illinois, but before that he 
had taught school in the county several years and had at- 
tended McKendree College in 1844. 

W. A. Kelsoe, born Feb. i, in Greencastle, the capital of 
Bond County, lost both parents before he was eleven years 
old, his mother in his early infancy, and until he became of 
age he lived most of the time with the family of an uncle 
and aunt, William and Martha Watkins, the latter being a 
Greenville Greenwood, of Boston parentage and culture. His 
early education was received at public schools in Greenville, 
Pocahontas and Vandalia, a private school in Greenville for 
boys, and a country school near Highland, 111. Entering Mc- 
Kendree College in September, 1866, he devoted two years 
exclusively to studies in the regular scientific course and the 
next two largely to Greek and Latin. Then he put in nine 
months as a teacher of a country school not far from Lebanon, 



Two Hundred and Twenty-One 



returning to the college campus in June, 1871, to read Greek 
and Latin daily to Professor S. H. Deneen (the flither of 
the present United States Senator) under a shady tree the 
rest of the summer. 

Mr. Kelsoe says that he was not a brilliant student and 
that he owed his election to an editorship (twice) on the 
college paper and to the presidency of the Platonian Society 
in the fall of 1869 and again in the fall of 187 1, not to oratory 
or any literary achievement, not to his record in the recitation 
room, but largely, in fact, almost entirely to his work on the 
ball field and in the college gymnasium. He is credited with 
having won high honors in an essay contest, but his good 
fortune then was due, he says, to the fact that one of the 
members of his class. Miss Virginia Leonora Roberts, was 
not a competitor, this brilliant young lady having been the 
winner in a similar contest the year before. And the high 
prize this time, in June, 1872, was not for Mr. Kelsoe alone, 
he tells us. He had to share it with another great woman in 
the graduating class that year. Miss Ellen Sophronia Allyn^ 
a daughter of the college president. 

After graduating at McKendree, Mr. Kelsoe accompanied 
his youngest classmate, Augustus Charles Bernays, (later 
nationally famous as a surgeon) to the old University of 
Heidelburg, Germany where they were joined later by 
another classmate, the valedictorian of the class. Rev. Thom- 
as Clark McFarland. 

From the Centennial History of Missouri, page 501, we 
learn that "at Heidelburg, Mr. Kelsoe studied philology and 
old German literature under Professor Bartsch, history and 
literature under Professor von Treitschke, international law 
under Professor Bluntschli. the master works of literature 
under Professor Kuno Fischer and physics under Professor 
Kirchhoff, all men celebrated in their respective fields of 
education." 

His stand for the settlement of international controversies 
by arbitration, publicly advocated on more than one occasion 
at McKendree, was greatly strengthened at Heidelburg. 
"Old McKendree" and "Alt Heidelberg" have never, no, 
not for a single moment, since his student days, cea.sed to 
be very dear to him. 

Twice the college (McKendree) has honored him with 
election to its Board of Trustees — in 1893, and 1926. One 
of its present members, Charles Pace Hamill, who.se parents 
were Mr. Kelsoe's fellow students at McKendree, was asso- 
ciated with him in newspaper work at the St. Louis World's 
Fair, being connected with the Exposition's Local Press Bu- 
reau, and so were Professor Willi.im F. Thrall, J. Paul Ed- 



wards and G. Roy Flint, themselves McKendre<ins, as their 
fathers were before them. Dr. Theodore Lewald, who had 
charge of Germany's wonderful exhibit at the Fair, was a 
member of Mr. Kelsoe's college fraternity at Heidelburg, 
the Verbindung Rupertia, named for Carl Rupert, the foun 
der of the present Germany's oldest university. 

Mr. Kelsoe was married in 1877 at Kansas City, Mo., to 
Miss Frida Hillgaertner, whose acquaintance he had made 
at McKendree College and whose father was prominently 
identified with the German press of that city, as he had 
been in the Fifties with the Illinois Staatszeitung of Chicago, 
Mrs. Kelsoe's native city, where some of her relatives are 
still hving, notably Mr. Charles Roden, the head of the 
Chicago Public Library and president of the national asso- 
ciation of American Librarians. Dr. Hillgaertner was with 
Carl Schurz in the German Revolution of 1848, and Mrs. 
Hillgaertner was of the German nobility, a von Roden of 
Hanover and a great-granddaughter of Baron von Freytag. 

Mr. Kelsoe's long service in St. Louis newspaper work, 
beginning in August, 1874, has seemed to him to have been 
a continuation of his college training, and he says he has 
never regretted his choice of journalism as his life vocation. 
Much of his newspaper experience is told in his work, the 
"St. Louis Reference Record," published late in 1927 by the 
Von Hoffman Press in St. Louis. Since Mrs. Kelsoe's death, 
in 1920, he has made his home with their only child, Stephen 
Hillgaertner Kelsoe, connected with the St. Louis Public 
Library. 

DR. GEORGE S. LIGGETT 
George Samuel Liggett was born in Williston, Vermont, 
October 27, 1853. He was a son of William C. and Ellen O. 
(Whitney) Liggett. His mother was a member of the cele- 
brated Whitney family of New England. At an early age 
he came with his parents to Lebanon, where in due time 
he entered McKendree College and graduated in 1872, re 
ceiving the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. In 1876 he 
received the degree of M. D. from the St. Louis Medical 
College. He spent the next year as interne at the St. Louis 
Public Hospital. His first private practice was at Mt. Vernon, 
Illinois. After a year he accepted a position as company 
physician for the Iron Mountain Mining Company in Mis- 
souri. In 1884, Dr. Liggett moved to Oswego, Kansas, where 
he spent the remainder of his life. He had a large general 
practice, and made a specialty of microscopic work. He wrote 
much for medical and other scientific journals. He has served 
as county health officer, county physician, mayor of Os- 
wego, member of the City Board of Health, Government 




Two Hundred and Twentv-T 



IfMC KENDREE 



pension examiner, president of the County Medical Society, 
secretary of the Southeast Kansas Medical Society, and the 
American Medical Society, and filled other public and semi- 
public positions of honor and trust. While m McKendree 
he was a member of the Platonian Society, and m later life 
was prominent in several fraternal organiz,ations. He was 
married in February, 1882, to Miss Marianna Henderson, 
of Glasgow, Mo. Of their three sons, the oldest and youngest 
are now living. The second died m his twentieth year. Dr. 
Liggett's death occurred at his home m Oswego, Kansas, 
January 16, iqij, in the sixtieth year of his age. 
REV. THOMAS C. McFARLAND 

Thomas Clark McFarland, born near Sparta, Illinois, Oc- 
tober 8, 1850, was valedictorian of the class of 1872. He 
received the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He taught 
school in Cahfornia, and also did newspaper work on a San 
Francisco paper in 1872 and 187J. He then went to Heidel- 
berg, Germany, where he joined two of his McKendree class- 
mates, Bernays and Kelsoe. After attending university lec- 
tures on philology and literature a year at Heidelberg and a 
year at Strassburg, he returned to the United States and 
entered the Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati, where 
he remained a year. He then spent two years in the McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary at Chicago, graduating there with 
the class of 1878. That year he was ordained a minister of 
the Presbyterian Church, and soon afterwards accepted a 
pastorate at Bellevue, Iowa, where he remained one year. 
Then he served in turn, four years at Malcolm, Iowa, three 
at Petersburg, Illinois, one at Mitchell, South Dakota, seven- 
teen at Williamsburg, Iowa, and seven in California. He 
removed to California on account of his health, and lived 
at Beaumont, in that state. On September 20, 1880, he was 
married to Miss Myra Delia Wynkoop of Bellevue, Iowa. 
Mrs. McFarland died November 2j, 1903, leaving three 
children, John S., Isabel, and David Hawthorne. While m 
McKendree he was a member of the Platonian Literary So- 
ciety. He died m Los Angeles, Jan. 24, 1914. 
THOMAS J. PORTER 

Thomas Jeiferson Porter was born May 10, 1851, at Mid- 
dleburg, Tennessee. He was the son of William G. and Mary 

A. (Stubblefield) Porter. Young Thomas entered McKendree, 
joined Plato, finished his course, and received the degree of 

B. S. in 1872, later receiving the Master's Degree. He became 
a travelling salesman soon after graduating. During the years 
between 1887 and 1899, he was engaged in the mercantile 
business for himself, but since 1901 he had been engaged in 
the life insurance business. He was state agency director 



ot the Kansas City Centr.il Life Insurance Company for that 
state. On May 10, 1880, Mr. Porter was united in marriage 
with Miss Sallie A. Hughey, at the home of the bride, m 
St. Louis. She was a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Hughey, 
who lived m Lebanon when Mr. and Mrs. Porter were both 
students m McKendree. The Porters lived for many years 
m Galena, Missouri. Mr. Porter attended the reunion of 
his class m 1Q12. His death occurred a few years later. 
2ACHARY T. REMICK 

Zachary Taylor Remick, son ot George W. and Eleanor 
Remick, was born March 1 . 1850, m Clinton County, Illinois, 
two miles south of Trenton. After graduating at McKendree 
in 1872 with the degree of Bachelor of Science, he taught 
school for four years at Summerfield, three at Columbia, two 
at Shiloh, and five at Trenton, where he is still living. After 
teaching fourteen years he engaged in the milling business 
in Trenton with his father-in-law and brother-in-law, and 
later for fifteen years in the grain and lumber business. He 
is at present interested in the loan, insurance, real estate, 
and collection business, and was for some years president 
of the First National Bank at Trenton, Illinois. He has served 
for many years as notary public and police ludge. In 1904, 
he was nominated without his consent for county super- 
intendent of schools and was beaten by only 300 votes, al- 
though running on the Republican ticket in a county ordin- 
arily Democratic by 1000 to 1200 votes. Whilein McKendree 
Mr. Remick was a member of the Philo Society. On Decem- 
ber 3, 1880, he was married to Miss Kate Eisenmayer, a 
daughter of the late Andrew Eisenmayer, of Trenton, and 
a sister of the late J. C. Eisenmayer, both of whom have 
been trustees of McKendree College. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Remick four children were born. Arthur, the oldest, is an 
architect in New York City; A. B. Remick, the second son, 
studied law and is now connected with an advertising agency 
in St. Louis; Christine, the only daughter, was a student 
in McKendree, and is now the wife of Walter Siegmond, 
of St. Louis: the youngest child, Walter, died when only 
three years of age. He is still Hving in Trenton (1928) and 
takes an interest in business. For a number of years he 
served as organist in the Methodist Church at Trenton. 
VIRGINIA L. ROBERTS 

Virginia Leonora Roberts was born July 2r, 1851, in 
Lebanon, 111. She was a daughter of Rev. George Lamb 
Roberts, a native of Kaskaskia, one of whose ancestors came 
to America with William Penn and was the first governor 
of the province of New Hampshire. On her mother's side 
she was descended from Nicholas Horner, a native of Eng- 




Two Hundred and T, 



land, who came from Baltmiore to Lebanon in 1812, over a 
century ago. Her mother was Virginia E. Horner, a native 
of Lebanon. Miss Roberts was born in the historic old house, 
built and occupied by her maternal grand-parents, Nathan 
and Nancy (Hypes) Horner. In this home Bishops Asbury, 
McKendree, and Soule had been entertained as guests, and 
here too, Edward R. Ames, afterward bishop, preached his 
trial sermon before being licensed to preach. Miss Roberts 
was one of the founders of Clio. She graduated in 1872, with 
the degree of B. S., after which she taught school two years 
in Lebanon, and was then chosen principal of a school in 
Atchison, Kansas. Here she met John C. Kerr, to whom she 
was married November 24, 1880. To them were born three 
children, Edward Roberts, now living in California, Mabel 
Virginia, a teacher in the public schools of San Diego, Calif., 
now the home city of the Kerrs, and Margaret, now the 
wife of George A. Otis, and living in the same city. Mrs. 
Kerr died Nov. 5, 1918, in San Diego, Cahfornia. 

CHARLES SHUMAN 
Charles Shuman was born in Philadelphia, Pa., February 
21, 184J. His parents were Charles and Magdalena (Elbert) 
Shuman, both natives of Heidelburg, Germany. They came 
to America in i8j9, first locating in Philadelphia, and after- 
ward settling in Illinois in 1857. Charles entered McKendree 
where he pursued the scientific course, and was a member 
of Plato Society. He graduated in the class of 1872. He then 
taught school two years in "Looking Glass Prairie," St. Clair 
County, Illinois, spent one year at the Southern Illinois Nor- 
mal at Carbondale, and then taught three years in Moultrie 
County, Illinois. He served three years as township super- 
visor and eighteen as county clerk of Moultrie County, 
being elected on the Democratic ticket. In 1891 he was 
elected vice-president of the State Bank of Sullivan, Illinois, 
and six years later, president. In 1905 this bank became the 
First National Bank of Sullivan. He was the head of the 
bank for many years. He was also for many years extensively 
engaged in farming and stock-raising. His farm of 850 acres 
near Sullivan includes the farm on which he worked when 
a boy. He was married September 8, 1874, to Miss Mary 
R. McPheeters at the home of the bride's parents, Major 
and Mrs. Addison McPheeters. They have two sons. Bliss, 
who manages the Shuman farm, and Irving, who is a cashier 
of the First National Bank of Sullivan, and one daughter. 
Bertha, who became a teacher after graduating from DePauw 
University. He died at the Mullanphy Hospital of St. Louis, 
April 6, 1916. 



CHARLES SPIES 
Charles Spies was born on a farm near Marine, Illinois, 
June 13, 1850. He graduated from McKendree in the scien 
tific course in 1872. He was a member of the Platonian Liter- 
ary Society. From 1873 to 1875, he was principal of the St. 
Jacobs public schools. He was engaged in the drug business 
in St. Jacob for twenty-four years, and for twelve years of 
the same period was secretary of the Valier and Spies Milling 
Company of that place. He was also Township Treasurer 
for eight years. Later he moved to St. Louis and became 
vice-president of the C. F. Blanke Tea and Coffee Company 
of that city. He is the son of Jacob and Katherine (Kaufman) 
Spies. He was married August 6, 1874, to Miss Emma 
Blanke of Marine, Illinois. To them were born three daugh- 
ters. Stella graduated at McKendree and married Victor M. 
Seiter. They live in Kansas City. Florence, the second daugh- 
ter, was accidentally drowned while a student in McKen- 
dree. Linda, the youngest, is still living with her mother in 
St. Louis. Mr. Spies' death occurred in November, 191 5. 

VIRGINIA L. THATCHER 
Virginia Laura Thatcher was born September i, 185a, 
at Marion, Illinois. Her parents were Rev. John and Virginia 
(Wells) Thatcher. Being a Methodist preacher's daughter, 
she lived in many towns during her girlhood, the family 
moving in turn to Xenia, Benton, Salem, Fairfield, Mascou- 
tah, Ashley, Tamaroa, and Mt. Erie, all in the Southern 
Illinois Conference. After her father's death in 1869, the 
widow and children located in Lebanon where Miss Jennie 
attended McKendree and graduated in 1872 with the degree 
of B. S. She was one of the founders of the Clionian Literary 
Society. She taught school in Lebanon for a time after her 
graduation, and in 1875, on her twenty-third birthday she 
was married to William E. McBride, of the class of 187 1, 
with whom she lived happily until his death in 1893. Their 
four children are Dovey M., who married Dr. O. C. Church; 
Olive, William, Thomas, and Sadie E., who married Prof. 
Ernest R. Crisp. The son now has charge of the McBride 
farm in St. Clair County, which was owned by his father, 
grandfather, and great-grandfather, having been in the 
McBride family for more than a hundred years. After liv- 
ing on the farm for thirty-three years, Mrs. McBride moved 
to Lebanon and lived till her death in the home formerly 
occupied by her mother. One night, January 30, 1918, 
she went to bed as usual, after talking over plans to visit 
her youngest daughter in Chicago, and woke up in Eternity. 
She thus made the transition from this world to the next 
without a single day of illness. 



Two Hundred and Twenty-Four 



REV, DR. L. W. THRALL 

Leonidas Worthy Thrall was born on a farm near Bone 
Gap, Edwards County, Illinois, February 21, iSso. He is a 
son of Worthy and Hannah (James) Thrall. His mother was 
of Welsh ancestry, and his father was a great-grandson of 
Samuel Thrall, a captain in the American army during the 
War of Independence, and a descendant of William Thrall, 
who came to America from England with a band of Puritans 
and settled at Windsor^ Connecticut, in i6jo. Before entering 
McKendree College. Leonidas attended the academy of the 
Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois; and before 
his graduation he taught a school for colored children at 
Lebanon. He completed the classical course and received the 
degree of A. B. in June, 1872. In 1875 he was granted the 
degree of A. M., and in 1895 his Alma Mater honored him 
with the degree of Doctor of Divinity. After his graduation 
he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and was received into full connection in the Southern Illinois 
Conference m 1874. After a few years of work m this con- 
ference he was transferred to Kansas, and served the churches 
at Hartford, Columbus, and Independence, Kansas. He then 
returned to Illinois in 187Q and served m turn the following 
charges: Ashley, Grayville, Metropolis, Salem, Greenville, 
Lebanon, and Flora. For six years beginning 1893 he was 
presiding elder of the Vandalia District, making his home 
first at Salem and later at Lebanon, that his children might 
more conveniently attend college. 

While in Hartford, Kansas, he served as president of the 
Hartford Collegiate Institute of that city. He once served 
as financial agent for McKendree College, and was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees for thirty years. He was a 
delegate to the General Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, which convened at Cleveland in 1896; and 
again to the one in Chicago in 1900. It has been truly said 
of Dr. Thrall that he was one of the ablest pulpit orators m 
the Methodist Church, and he was known throughout South- 
ern Illinois as a public speaker at Memorial Day exercises. 
Fourth of July celebrations, and educational meetings. 

Dr. Thrall was twice married. His first wife was Edith 
M. Flint, the first woman to graduate from McKendree 
College (class of 1870) and one of the founders of Clio. They 
were married September 29, 1873, at the old Flint home one 
mile east of Lebanon. Mrs. Thrall died November 10, 1898, 
at Lebanon. Her funeral was held in the college chapel. Their 
five children. Edith Laura, Victor W., William F., Charles 
H., and Harold L., are all graduates of McKendree. On 
December 27, 1900, Dr. Thrall was married to Emily M. 



Jones, of Ingraham, Illinois. Their only child, Mary Vir- 
ginia, was born on St. Patrick's day, 1902. He died at Du 
quoin in 1018. 

JUDGE WILLIAM E. WARD 
William Edgar Ward was born in Belleville, Illinois, May 
13, 185 1. His parents were John Ward and Lucy L. Ash, 
pioneer citizens of St. Clair County. He graduated from 
McKendree in 1872, receiving the degree B. S., and a year 
later was admitted to the bar at Mt. Vernon, Illinois. In 
addition to his law practice he has been city attorney of 
Belleville five years. Township Clerk and Township Attor- 
ney, two years each. In 1892 he was elected city justice 
of Belleville, and held the office thirty-five years. Judge Ward 
was married May 13, 1874, to Miss Elizabeth G. Phillips, 
of Belleville. They have five children: William H., Marian 
Frances, Edgar A., Florence, and Ardella. They are all mar- 
ried but one. Mr. Ward was a member of the Philosophian 
Society while in McKendree, and belonged to the Knights 
of Pythias and the Liederkranz Singing Society of Belleville. 
He died in Belleville December 4, 1927. 

DR. WALTER WATSON 

Walter Watson was born 
May 14, 1851, at Mt. Ver- 
non, Illinois. He is a son of 
Joel Franklin and Sarah 
(Taylor) Watson. He grad- 
uated from McKendree m 
the class of 1872, receiving 
the degree of B. S. Later he 
received the Master's de- 
gree from his Alma Mater. 
While m college he was a 
member of the Philosophian 
Society. After his gradua- 
tion he taught school for a 
time at Grayville, Illinois, and then entered the Medical 
College of Ohio at Cincinnati, from which institution he 
received the degree of M. D. m 1875. While there he won 
the college prize in ophthalmology and by competitive exam- 
ination secured a position as interne m the Good Samaritan 
Hospital of Cincinnati. After serving a year in the hospital 
and a year as demonstrator of anatomy in the medical college 
where he graduated, he returned to Mt. Vernon in 1877 and 
began the practice of medicine in his home town, having 
formed a partnership with Dr. W. Duff Green of that place. 
In 1893 he was appointed superintendent of the Hospital for 
the Insane at Jacksonville. Illinois. He was a member of the 




DR. WATSON 



Two Hundred and Twenty-Fne 



riMC KENDREE^^^^^;^^:^...^.^.^^ 



Democratic State Central Committee of Illinois for seventeen 
years. While he was chairman of this committee, the party 
polled the highest vote in its history in this state. He was 
a delegate-at-large to the National Democratic Convention 
which nominated Grover Cleveland for president in 1892. 
Dr. Watson retired from regular practice some years ago. 
He stood high both as a physician and surgeon, but it was 
in surgery, of which he made a specialty, that he won his 
chief distinction. On September 16, 1888, he was married 
to Miss Nettie M. Johnson, of Champaign, Illinois, who 
died April 7, 1897. Their only child, Margaret, is the wife 
of Thomas Perry, of Westerly, Rhode Island. He died Jan- 
uary 8, 1922 

THE CLASS OF 1873 
REV. WILLIAM F. BROWN 
William Fletcher Brown enrolled as coming from Walsh- 
ville, lUinois. His membership in the Philosophian Society 
shows that he came as early as 1865, but he did not finish 
his course till 1873,, when he received the degree of A. B. 
He joined the Southern Illinois Conference in 1874 and 
served in the pastorate in this conference till 1882, when 
he transferred to Iowa. Later he moved to Kansas. In 191 1 
he was at South McAlester. Oklahoma. We have no later 
information concerning him. 

THOMAS I. BRISCOE 
Thomas Ira Briscoe, son of Edward and Nancy Briscoe, 
was born in Pike County, Illinois, August 27, 1845. He 
grew up on a farm and after passing through the public 
schools, he entered McKendree and graduated in 187J, re- 
ceiving the degree of B. S. He was a Philo. Later he entered 
the Law School of the University of Michigan and received 
the degree of LL. B. in 1876. He practiced law for a few 
years at Pittsfield, Illinois, and then in 1878 he vyent to 
Colorado and engaged in the mining business. At the last 
report from him a few years ago he was still concerned with 
mining interests and his home was at Buena Vista, Colorado, 
which is the county seat of Chaffee County. He was county 
commissioner for one term, sheriff for one term, and county 
judge for one term. He was married in July, 1895, to Miss 
Minnie Oliver of Pittsfield, Illinois. He is a member of the 
Masonic Order and has been twice master of the local lodge 
in his home city. He has not had an opportunity to visit 
his Alma Mater for many years, but nevertheless he is still 
a loyal McKendrean. 

BENJAMIN H. CHAPMAN 
Benjamin Harvey Chapman was born m Green County, 
Illinois, October 28, 1846. He became a student in McKen 



dree in 1869 and graduated in 187},, receiving the degree 
of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. 
After his graduation he studied law at Springfield, Illinois. 
He began practicing law in Vandalia, Illinois, about the year 
1878, and later became a member of the law firm of Henry 
and Chapman. In 1884 he moved to Kansas City and be- 
came a member of the law firm of Brown, Chapman, and 
Brown. He afterward became interested in gold mines in 
South America, and while looking after these interests, his 
death occurred at Medellin, United States of Columbia, 
about the year 1905. He was never married. He was an 
attendant and supporter of the Methodist Church, a good 
lawyer, a high-minded and honorable man, a companionable 
and trustworthy friend. 

JOHN TETHERING TON 
John Tetherington was born near Caseyville, Illinois, Oc- 
tober 8, 1849, and died at Edwardsville, August 31, 191 1. 
He graduated from McKendree in the class of 1873, receiv- 
ing the degree of A. B. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He was married October 8, 1878, to Miss 
Mary I. Renfro. They have seven living children. He spent 
a good portion of his life on a farm in Madison County. 
For a number of years he was treasurer of that county. 
During his later years he retired from the farm and resided 
in Edwardsville. He was a Ma.son and also belonged to the 
Order of Red Men . 

OLIVER M. EDWARDS 
Oliver Mathis Edwards was born at McLeansboro, Illi- 
nois, March 30, i8si. His parents were Thomas H. and 
Margaret Edwards. The father was a native of North Caro- 
lina, and the mother of Tennessee. Oliver entered McKen- 
dree in 1869 and graduated in June, 1873, with the degree 
of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. 
He was married November 20, 1873, to Miss Louise Alice 
Vollintme, who was a student of McKendree from 1869 to 
18" I. They have five children; Emory, William H., lona, 
BeuLih, and Oliver Mathis, Jr. The youngest followed his 
father's footsteps for a time in being a student in McKendree. 
After his graduation Mr. Edwards made farming his principal 
business until 1906, since which time he has resided in So- 
rento, Illinois, with his wife and son. He has always been 
identified with educational interests in the community where 
he lived. He taught school himself for seven years, and was 
a member of the Board of Directors eighteen years. Since 
living in Sorento he has been a member of the Board of 
Education for four years. He has been a member of the Metho- 
dist Church since he was thirteen years of age, and for many 



Two Hundred and TwentySv 



MC KENDREE 




DEAN EDWARDS 



years a Sunday School Superintendent. He has always been 
active in public affairs, especially so m the interest of the 
Republican party. In March, 1912, he was appointed post- 
master of Sorento, Illinois, by President Taft. He has been 
for fifteen years a Mason, and for twenty years a Modern 
Woodman. 

DEAN WILLIAM W. EDWARDS 

William Wirt Edwards 
WIS born March 3, 1853,, 
at Pinckneyville, Illinois, 
where his parents, William 
md Juliet M. Edwards, 
were among the early set 
tiers, having located there 
tbout the year 1832. His 
tither, William Edwards, 
was for some years a mer- 
chant, but later he studied 
and practiced law, and at 
the time of his death m 
i8s4. stood high m the legal 
profession. The widowed mother, a woman of cultured 
mmd, by reason of home study and extensive reading, was 
deeply interested in the education of her children, and ren- 
dered them every assistance which her limited means would 
permit. When William W., her youngest son, had finished 
the village school, she came with him to Lebanon in 1869 
and remained there with him during most of the time he 
was pursuing his college course. He graduated m 187}, with 
the first honors of his class, receiving the degree of A. B. 
and three years later, A. M. For three years he engaged in 
teaching and studied law. In 1876, he was admitted to the 
bar and began the practice of law at Carleton, Nebraska, 
where he remained five years. In 1878 he was elected county 
judge. On September 11 of the same year he was married to 
Miss Cora Malone, of Steelville, Illinois. For thirty-eight 
years she shared with him the vicissitudes of life as a beloved 
companion and a wise counsellor, devoted to her home and 
family, also finding much time for active religious work, for 
which her character and talents especially fitted her. At her 
death in November, 1916, she left four sons and five daugh- 
ters, all of whom are still living. About four years later, 
Mr. Edwards was married to Mrs. Louise Watson, of Spring- 
field, his present wife. 

In 1883, Mr. Edwards entered the ministry and joined the 
Southern Illinois Conference. From that time until his retire- 
ment in 191 1, he served pastoral charges except the years 



in which he was engaged in educational work. He was for 
ten years, i88sr to 189";, a member of the faculty of McKen- 
dree College, first as professor of Latin, and later .is dean 
of the Law Department. He also served five years as principal 
of the McCray-Dewey Academy, at Troy, Illinois. Even 
after his retirement, he was so strongly drawn toward edu- 
cational work that he founded the Lincoln College of Law 
at Springfield, Illinois, which was chartered by the State in 
May, 1912, and of which he is still the dean. This school 
maintains a strong course of study, and has obtained favor- 
able recognition by the profession m general, as well as by 
other institutions of like character. Dean Edwards says: "In 
reviewing the experiences of the more than half century of 
my active life, I derive the greatest satisfaction from the 
thought that I may have contributed somewhat to the suc- 
cess of the youth with whom I have come in contact." 
FRANK W. MARSHALL 

Frank Wyman Marshall was born at Clinton, New Jersey, 
March 3, i8<f3,. He is a son of Rev. Lyman and Eliza W. 
Marshall, who were both native Americans. His father was 
for many years pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Leb- 
anon. He entered McKendree m 1869 and graduated m 1873, 
receiving the degree of A. B., a.nd later A. M. In 1897, 
McKendree conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doc- 
tor of Music. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He spent some years in teaching after his graduation, 
being principal of the high school at Shelbyville, 111., and 
then was superintendent of schools at Upper Alton. He then 
went into newspaper work and for fifteen years was employed 
with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He is a gifted musician, 
and gave much time to amateur and professional work in 
that line. He was for nearly thirteen years in charge of the 
Church Music Department of the Presbyterian Board of 
Publication in Philadelphia. He was a director of the Winona 
Summer School Association for more than twenty years. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and of the Masons, 
Odd Fellows, and Knights of Pythias. He was married Octo- 
ber 6, 1874, to Miss Sarah Seaman, of Lebanon. They have 
one son and three daughters. The son is a graduate of Ox- 
ford University and is a practicing physician. The daughters 
are married and living in the west. 

Mr. Marshall died in New York City, May 14, 1924. 
He was buried in College Hill Cemetery. 
HENRY M. NEEDLES 

Henry Mace Needles was born at Mt. Sterling, Brown 
County, Illinois, October 9, 1853. His parents were James 
B. and Christina M. Needles, who were native Americans 



Two Hundred and Twent^-Scr 



.^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



of English descent. He entered McKendree in 1870 and 
graduated in the class of 1873, with the degree of B. S ; 
some years afterward, he received the Master's Degree. He 
took a law course in the University of Wisconsin, and there 
received the degree of LL. B. in 1876. While at McKendree 
he was a member of the Philosophian Society. He was married 
May 9, 1875, to Clarissa L. Scott. Their children are Homer 
Needles, Mrs. Marjorie Needles Lyon, and Elmer H. Need- 
les. Some years after the death of Mrs. Needles, he was 
married to Miss Clara Halbert. To this union there was 
born one child, Dorothy Needles. Mr. Needles has practiced 
law since 1876. He was public administrator of St. Clair 
County from 1880 to 1884, and for twelve years was police 
magistrate of Belleville, 111. He was a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church and of the Blue Lodge chapter, con 
sistory and commandery, in Masonry. He died in 1927. 
JOHN F. SOMMERFELDT 

John Frederick Sommerfeldt was born at Marine, Illinois, 
October i, 1847, and died in St. Louis, Mo., April ig, 1909 
He was a son of J. G. and A. M. Sommerfeldt, who were 
of German nationality. He was educated in the public schools 
and in McKendree College, from which institution he grad 
uated June la, 1873, receiving the degree of B. S. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. He was mar 
ried December 26, 1883, to Mrs. J. C. Cox. To them were 
born three children: Grace, born September 27, 1884; Philo 
born February 9, 1886: and Zelma, born June 6, 1890. He 
taught school for a number of years, but in his later life 
was engaged in insurance business in the city of St. Louis 
where his closing years were spent and where some members 
of his family still reside. 

MARY A, RAYMOND 

Mary Alice Raymond was born in San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, September 26, 1856. She is a daughter of Charles F. 
Raymond, a native of Beverly, Massachusetts, and Jennie 
K. Fielding, of East Randolph, Vermont. She became a stu- 
dent in McKendree in September, 1870, and graduated in 
June, 1873, with the degree of B. S. She was a Clio. After 
her graduation, she taught school in Mt. Vernon for eight 
years, and in the Art Department of the Southern Illinois 
Normal University for two years. On the thirtieth day of 
July, 1884, she was married to Professor D. B. Parkinson, 
who had then been a member of the faculty in the Normal 
School for ten years. They have one son, Raymond, and 
one daughter, Mary Alice. Mrs. Parkinson was a member 
of the Methodist Church. 



WILLIAM H. STEWARD 

William Henry Steward was born ;n Salem County, New 
Jersey, June 23, 1850, and died at Carlinville, Illinois, Octo 
ber 10, 1912. His parents were William and Rebecca (Abbot) 
Steward, both being of Scotch ancestry. When he was only 
four years of age his parents came to Illinois and settled in 
Bunker Hill Township of Macoupin County. In 1869, he 
became a student in McKendree College, and graduated in 
the class of 1873, with the degree of A. B., later receiving 
that of A. M. He studied law for a time in Springfield, and 
then entered the Law Department of the Northwestern 
University, where he took a full course and graduated. He 
began the practice of law in Carhnville, Illinois, in 1876- 
Here for three years he was the law partner of W. H. Snell- 
ing; he then entered into a partnership with Mr. M. L 
Keplinger, which continued thirty-three years, till the time 
of his death. He was closely associated with the affairs of 
his home city and community. He has held the position of 
Alderman, and again of city attorney in Carlinville; he 
was a member of the Examining Board of the Carlinville 
Building and Loan Association from the time of its first 
organization; a member of the building committee of the 
School Board during the construction of the North School 
Building, and for many years has been secretary of the Car- 
linville Cemetery Association. More than thirty years ago 
he became a member of the Methodist Church, and ever 
since has lived a consistent Christian life, giving many years 
of service as a member of the official board. He was married 
October 14, 1880, to Miss Addie Miller, of Carlinville. 
Their eldest daughter, Edna, died some years ago, while 
their other children, Helen and Elwood, are now grown to 
womanhood and manhood. From Mr. Steward's published 
obituary we quote: "He was one of the men for whose life 
we need make no apology. As a friend he was true as steel, 
of approved integrity, just and generous in all his dealings. 
As a citizen he was in all respects a man ranking as the best 
of men. What he believed to be right he did as nearly as 
was in his power to do." His death came as the result of a 
paralytic stroke. 

Of the following members of the class of 1873, we have 
no recent inform,! tion. 

FRANCIS M. MARION 

Fr.incis Marquis Marion graduated with the degree LL. 
B. He engaged in farming near Mulberry Grove, Illinois. 

MARQUIS L. McALLILLY 
Marquis Lafiyette McAllilly graduated with the degree 
of B. S. He afterward studied medicine and practiced his 



Two Hundred and TwanyEight 



frMC KENDREE'^^^^fe^^^.,..^-;.-^^ 



profession as a physician at St. Jacob, Illinois. Later, at 
Nickerson, Kansas. He was a Philo. 

WILSON WEATHERSBEE 
Wilbon Weathersbee graduated with the B. S. degree. He 
was a member of the Philosophian Society. He engaged m 
farming at Akin, Illinois, and later at Benton, Illinois. 

THE CLASS OF 1874 
JOHN F. ARNOLD 

John Fletcher Arnold was born in Grove Township, Jas, 
per County, Illinois, April 21, 1851. His parents, John F 
and Rebecca J. Arnold, were both of American descent. He 
entered McKendree in 1870 and graduated m 1874, with 
the degree B. S. In 1877 he received the degree M. S., and 
m iSS') the honorary degree, A. M. He was a member of 
the Platonian Society. In 1876 he was married to Delia B 
Barton. To them were born five sons, Edward E., Eugene 
P., Virgil H., Lawrence F., and Dale J. Arnold. Mr. Arnold 
has been engaged in educational work ever since his gradua- 
tion, and has held the following positions: superintendent 
of the Newton City Schools for eight years: county super- 
intendent of schools of Jasper County for twenty -five years. 
In i8go he was a candidate for State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction. In 1903 and 1904 he was a member of 
the Examining Board to examine candidates for West Point 
and Annapohs. He was a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge 
No. 161. He died July 9, 1921, at Jacksonville, Illinois. 
WILLIAM H. BLACK 

William Hampton Black, son of William M. and MiUy 
G. Black, was born near Lebanon, Illinois, March 6, 1852. 
He graduated from McKendree in the class of 1874, receiving 
the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Society. 
For some years after his graduation, his home was in Texas, 
but later he moved to Beulah, Kansas, where he died Sep- 
tember 8, 1884. 

JUDGE E. DAYTON BROWN 

Erastus Dayton Brown was born on a farm near Walsh- 
ville, Illinois, April ij, 18'; i. His father was a native of 
Connecticut, his grandfather was one of the early settlers 
of New England, and his grandmother was a first cousin to 
Neal and Lorenzo Dow. His mother was Miss Mary Kirklin, 
of Jersey County, Illinois. She died when he was only two 
years old, and his father died in 1875. Mr. Brown attended 
college a year at Lincoln, and then entered McKendree in 
1871 and graduated in 1874, receiving the degree of B. S. 
He was a Philo, and took an especially active part m de- 
bating. In 1881, he was married to Miss Anna E. Nicholson, 
of Bond County, Illinois. To them was born one daughter, 



Mabelle Claire, who is now Mrs. Walter Birge, of St. Louis, 
After leaving college, he studied law with Dysert and Brown, 
of Macon City, Missouri, and was admitted to the bar in 
1876. He located in Edina, Missouri for the practice of law, 
and was elected judge of the Probate Court in 1877, and 
was re-elected for a second term. In i88j he became legal 
representative of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Company for several counties m Northeast Missouri. In 
1886 he became financial agent of the company for the state 
of Kansas. In this he was very successful, and is said to have 
loaned more than three million dollars for his company on 
Kansas farms, with no loss to his company. After retirement 
from active service, he made his home in Carthage, Missouri, 
where he died m 1914. 

HON, WILLIAM V. CHOISSER 
Willi, im Voltaire Choisser was born in Hamilton County, 
Illinois, August 28, 1848. His father was of French and his 
mother of Irish ancestry. When scarcely fourteen years of 
age, he enlisted in the Union Army in 1862 and served three 
years till the close of the war. He was with Sherman in the 
famous "March to the sea" and in the Grand Review at 
Washington at the close of the war. After attending school 
at Carbondale and at Ewing College, he entered McKendree 
m 187J and graduated in the class of 1874, with the degree 
of B. S. He was a very active member of the Philo Society. 
After leaving McKendree he studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1876. He located in Harrisburg, Illinois, where 
he spent the greater part of his professional life in the prac- 
tice of law. In i8q7 he assisted in the organization of the 
City National Bank, and was its president from the time 
of its organization. In politics he was a Democrat. He served 
four years as State's Attorney of Saline County. In 1884 he 
was elected a member of the Illinois Legislature. In 1892 
he was a presidential elector, and voted for Mr. Cleveland 
for president. In 1891, he was appointed by Governor Alt- 
geld, commissioner of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary, 
and served four years. He was a delegate to the National 
Democratic Convention in Denver in 1908, and again to 
the one in Baltimore in 1912. He was appointed warden 
of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary by Governor Dunne 
in 191 J, and held the position until his death in May, 1917. 
He was prominent in the Masonic Order, being a member 
of both the Consistery and Commandery. He was married 
in 1 88 1, to Miss Kate Pearce. Of their five children, one 
died in infancy. The others are Robert E., who graduated 
at McKendree in 1906, Roger M., Nelle W., and Mary 
Louise. The latter married E. F. Hayes, of Mattoon. 



Two Hundred and Twenty?{it 



JEREMIAH T. DEW 
Jeremiah Thornton Dew was born in Clinton Cbunty, 
Illinois, November 5, 1847. His grandfather, Rev. John Dew, 
was a native of Virginia, a pioneer Methodist preacher, came 
west with Bishop McKendree, was long associated with 
Peter Cartwright, and was once president of McKendree 
College. His father, Samuel P. Dew, was a native of St. 
Clair County, Illinois. His mother, Eliza Walker, was a native 
of Clinton County and a member of a prominent family of 
pioneer Methodists. Their son, Jeremiah T. grew up on a 
farm in the famous "Looking Glass" prairie near Summerfield. 
He attended school for some time in St. Louis and then 
entered McKendree, where he graduated in 1874, receiving 
the degree of B. S., and three years later, that of M. S. He 
was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He studied 
law at Nashville, Illinois and Topeka, Kansas, and then 
located in Kansas City, Missouri for the practice of his 
profession. He became a member of the law firm of Tom- 
linson, Ross ii Dew; later, that of Dew, Downs &? Parkinson; 
still later. Dew, Parkinson &? Barnes. He was a member of 
the Kansas City Bar Association and has served as its pres- 
ident. He was prominent in the G. A. R., having served in 
the 145th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers during the last 
year of the Civil War, though only sixteen years old at the 
time of his enlistment. He has served as Commander of 
Farragut Post No. j, G. A. R., was for about fifteen years 
Post Adjutant, and has filled many other stations of honor 
in the order. He was a member of the Masonic Order. He 
was a Republican in politics, though not a strict partisan in 
municipal affairs, and has never sought political preferment 
for him.self. He was a member of the Illinois Historical So- 
ciety, also of the Missouri State Historical Society. He was 
married in July, 1877, to Miss Julia E. Parkinson, of High- 
land, Illinois, who was a member of his college class at 
McKendree. Mrs. Dew died October 17, 1887, leaving three 
children: Emma, Arthur Samuel, and Julia L. Mr. Dew was 
president of the graduating class of 1874, and while a student 
in McKendree, was one of the editors of the McKendree 
Repository. He died in April, igi";. 

REV. JOHN W. FLINT 
John Wesley Flint was born near Lebanon, Illinois, Jan- 
uary 9, 1849. He was among the oldest of the nine children 
of William and Mary Flint, who came to Lebanon in 1842. 
He entered the Preparatory Department of McKendree in 
1867 and graduated as a member of the class of 1874, receiving 
the A. B. Degree and the first honors of his class. He was 
a member of the Platonian Society. McKendree also made 



him a Doctor of Divinity in 1900. He entered the Southern 
Illinois Conference in 1875, and spent fifty years in the work 
of the Methodist ministry. He held a number of the im- 
portant charges in the conference and was presiding elder 
twelve years, covering one term on the Mt. Vernon Dis- 
trict and one on the Vandalia District. He was the leader 
of church building enterprises at Flora, Lawrenceville, and 
Fairfield, where he closed up his half century of service in 
the ministry. He was a member of the General Conference 
which met in Los Angeles in 1904. He was married Sep- 
tember 6, 1875, to Miss Mary E. Robertson, of Freeburg, 
Illinois. Their oldest daughter, Mrs. Minnie Phillips, died 
in 1912, leaving her husband and three children. Another 
daughter is Mrs. Mary Flint Morgan, whose husband is a 
member of the faculty of the University of Missouri. Gilbert 
Roy Flint, the only son, lives in Fairchild. The youngest 
living daughter, Annie, lives in Madison, Wisconsin. Mrs. 
Flint was born on the same day as her husband, but died 
about a year sooner. Dr. Flint died July 4, 1926, the one 
hundredth anniversary of the death of Thomas Jefferson. 
The funeral was held in Lebanon and he was laid to rest 
in College Hill Cemetery. There were thirty-five of his fellow 
ministers at the funeral. He was for thirty years a trustee 
of McKendree. 

WILLIAM A, HARNSBERGER 
William Augustus Harnsberger was born at Alhambra, 
Madison County, Illinois, September 7, 185 1. He can trace 
his ancestry back to a pioneer family who settled in Virginia 
more than two hundred years ago. After receiving the usual 
preliminary training, he entered McKendree College, and 
after completing the course, graduated in the class of 1874, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Phil- 
osophian Literary Society. After leaving McKendree, he 
entered the Union College of Law in Chicago, from which 
institution he graduated in June, 1877, receiving the degree 
of LL. B., and was the same year admitted to the bar of 
Illinois. The following year he was admitted to the bar of 
the State of Missouri, and began the practice of law in Kansas 
City, which has been his occupation since that time. He was 
married December 20, 1907, in Kansas City, Kansas, but has 
resided since that time in Kansas City, Missouri. He regards 
himself as a Republican in politics, but does not consider 
himself bound by any party in the matter of local and mu- 
nicipal affairs. He was reared in a Methodist home and is 
a believer in the Christian religion, but is not affiliated with 
any branch of the church. He is a member of the" Masonic 
Order. 



Two Hundred and Thirty 



MC KENDREE 



SALLIE M^ HUGHEY 
Sallie Maria Hughey was born at Harnsburg, Illinois, 
January i6, 1852. She is a daughter of Rev. George W. and 
Elizabeth A. Hughey. Her father was a prominent Metho' 
dist preacher and author who spent more than half a century 
in the service of the church in various capacities. She became 
a student in McKendree in 1870 and graduated in the class 
of 1874, receiving the degree of B. S. She was a member of 
the Clionian Literary Society. She was a music teacher and 
church organist and worker in other lines for some years 
after graduation. May 10, 1880, she was united in marriage 
to Thomas Jefferson Porter, who was her school mate at 
McKendree and a member of the class of 1872. Their home 
was for many years at Galena, Stone County, Missouri. Here 
for several years she had the privilege of ministering to the 
wants of her aged parents, who made their home with her 
in their declining years. She is a member of the Methodist 
Church, the Order of the Eastern Star, and the Women's 
Christian Temperance Union. For ten years prior to 1900, 
she was active in the County Sunday School work ; and she 
was for twenty years superintendent of the Loyal Temper' 
ance Legion. Since the death of her husband, her home has 
been in Kansas City, Missouri. 

NORMAN A. LOUGH 

Norman Allyn Lough was born in Richland County, 
Illinois, October 10, 1S52. He is the son of R. C. and M. 
A. Lough. After receiving a preliminary education he en- 
tered McKendree College and graduated in the class of 
1874, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. After his graduation, he studied 
law and made that his life profession. He was city attorney 
of Olney, Illinois, but later went to Chicago, where he en- 
gaged in law practice for a number of years until an attack 
of pneumonia made advisable a change of residence to the 
hills and sunshine of Colorado. His home is now at Grand 
Junction, Colorado. He is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, and the Knights of Pythias. He was married 
January 9, 1877, to Miss AUie Conklin. They have two 
children now living, Clarence R. and Herbert M. Lough. 
ISABEL L LYNCH 

Isabel Irvin Lynch was born in Shiloh Valley, November 
2j, 1855. Her parents were Nehemiah and Ehzabeth (Cal- 
breath) Lynch, who were both native Americans. She entered 
McKendree in the fall of 1872 and graduated in the class 
of 1874, with the degree of B. S. She was a member of Clio. 
After her graduation, she lived at her home in Lebanon until 
1889. Since that time she has been employed principally as 



sales-lady in mercantile establishments. She served two years 
in Beardstown, three years in Galena, Missouri, and since 
that time has been with the Robeson Department Store in 
Champaign, Illinois, where for many years she has been 
superintendent of the department of ladies' furnishings. 
Since early youth she has been a member of the Metho- 
dist Church. 

JOHN W. LORD 
John Wesley Lord was born near Trenton, Illinois, April 
18, 1853. He was the son of John and Ann Lord, who were 
both natives of England. He entered McKendree in the fall 
of 1870 and graduated in the class of 1874, with the degree 
of B. S. He was a member of the Philo Society and was 
president of that organization. He was married to Miss M. 
F. Towling of Decatur, Illinois, September 18, 1879. They 
have two children, Walter C. and Bonnie C, both married. 
After his graduation Mr. Lord taught school one year and 
then took up the study of Chemistry and Pharmacy. In 
1881 he purchased a drug store at New Douglass, Illinois, 
which business he carried on till 1887. While living m New 
Douglass, he served as postmaster and school director. Then 
for seven years as a registered pharmacist he held a position 
as prescription clerk in a drug firm; but in 1894, he accepted 
a position as chemist in the laboratory of Irwin, Kirkland 
&' Co., of Decatur, Illinois. He remained with this firm until 
1900, when he became senior chemist in the laboratory cf 
Flint, Eaton &' Co., in the same city. He is a member of 
the First Christian Church of Decatur, has served as dea- 
con, clerk, and treasurer of the church, and at present holds 
the office of elder. He also belongs to the "Modern Amet' 
ican Fraternal Order." 

SAMUEL P. McKEE 
Samuel Patton McKee was born near Summerfield, Illinois, 
January 10, 1849. He is the elder son of Dr. Samuel P. 
McKee and Mrs. Mary (Thompson) McKee, the former 
born near Louisville, Kentucky and the latter near Edwards- 
ville, Illinois. His father was a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of McKendree, and his maternal grandfather. Rev. Sam- 
uel E. Thompson, was a well-known pioneer preacher and 
one of McKendree's founders. Mr. McKee entered Mc- 
Kendree as a student in 1869 and graduated in 1874, with 
the degree of B. S. and received the degree of M. S. three 
years later. He taught school three years, but his principal 
occupation has been farming, which he has followed con- 
tinuously except from 1890 to 1903, when he was employed 
in Kansas City. On November 24, 1874, he was married to 
Miss Frances E. Walker, of Richview, Illinois. Of their child- 



Two Hundred and Thirty-On 



ren, two died in early childhood. They have only one daugh- 
ter now living. While in McKendree, Mr. McKee was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Literary Society. He is a Republican 
in pohtics, and an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church. 

JULIA E. PARKINSON 

Julia Emma Parkinson, born March 26, 1850, was a mem- 
ber of the prominent Parkinson family of Highland, Illinois. 
Several of her brothers were graduates of McKendree. She 
was a Clio, and graduated in the class of 1874. In 1877, she 
was married to J. T. Dew, who was a member of the same 
class. She died October 17, 1887, leaving three children. 
Additional data will be found in her husband's sketch. 
SARAH A. SHEPHERD 

Sarah Abbie Shepherd was born in Lebanon, Illinois, Oc- 
tober 10, 1854. Her father, Thomas H. Shepherd, was a 
native of St. Louis, of English and German ancestry. Her 
mother, Ehza A. Calbreath, was of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 
She became a student in McKendree in 1872 and graduated 
in the class of 1874, receiving the degree of B. S., and in 
1877, that of M. S. She was a member of the Clionian Lit- 
erary Society. October 20, 187';, she was married to Rev. 
John D. Gillham, D. D.. who was for many years a prom- 
inent member of the Southern Illinois Conference. They 
spent twenty-six years of wedded life together before the 
husband was called to his reward. During that period they 
served the following charges in the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference- Cairo, Litchfield, Carbondale, Belleville, Lebanon 
District, and Centralia. Dr. Gillham died at Centralia, May 
1";, 1Q04. In November of the same year, Mrs. Gillham 
moved to Los Angeles, California, where she now resides. 
She is a member of the First Methodist Church of that city, 
and was a teacher in the Sunday School until compelled by 
illness to give up her class. She has six living children. 
AUGUSTUS A. PARKINSON 

Augustus Alfred Parkinson was born near Highland, Illi- 
nois, November 14, 1847. He is a son of Hon Alfred J. and 
Mary E. (Baldwin) Parkinson. He graduated from McKen- 
dree in the class of 1874, receiving the degree of B. S., and 
later, M. S. He studied law in the University of Michigan, 
and received the degree of LL. B., from that institution. He 
was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He was a 
Methodist in religion and a Republican in politics. He was 
married in 1876. to Miss Mary Harrison. He practiced law 
for some time at San Jose, California. He died at Highland, 
Illinois, May 18, 



CORNELIA E. SHEPHERD 
Cornelia Ellen Shepherd was born November 2, 1856, at 
Lebanon, Illinois. Her parents were Thomas H. and Eliza 
Shepherd. She entered McKendree in the fall of 1872 and 
graduated in the class of 1874, receiving the degree of B. S. 
She was a member of the Clionian Society. She taught school 
for two years after her graduation, but her chief occupation 
during the intervening years has been home keeping. She 
has always been an active worker in the Methodist Church 
and a member of the various organizations connected with 
it, such as the W. F. M. S., the W. C. T. U., and various 
other social or religious societies. 

REV. HEZEKIAH M. SHORT 

Hezekuih M. Short, son of Ignatius T. and Mary Short, 
was born February 14, 1845, in Macoupin County, Illinois. 
He became a student in McKendree College in September, 
1867 and joined the Platonian Society. He graduated in the 
class of 1874, receiving the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. 
He was admitted to the Illinois Conference in 1875, and 
was pastor of various charges — among them were Chatham, 
Merritt, and Hardin. After retiring from the ministry, he 
went west and engaged in the real estate business in Denver, 
Colorado. Before entering college he served as a soldier in 
the Civil War, being a member of the 133rd Illinois Volun- 
teers. He was married January 10, 1882, to Miss Mattie 
Cline, of Denver. Their five children are Mabel N., Myrtle 
E., C. Paul, Hazel R., and Halford D. After going to Den- 
ver, he was a member of the Trinity M. E. Church and 
served as class leader and Sunday School teacher. His death 
occurred May 23, 1901. 

JUDGE CHARLES E. SMALL 

Charles Edwin Small was born at CollinsviUe, Illinois, 
July 27, 1854. His parents were Edwin and Agnes P. Small. 
He graduated from McKendree in 1874, receiving the de- 
gree of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Society. 
After leaving McKendree, he studied law at Michigan Uni- 
versity and was admitted to the bar in 1878, at Kansas City, 
Missouri. He has devoted his life to the legal profession, 
having been a member of a leading law firm in Kansas City 
since 1878. In 1919 he was appointed to the Supreme Court 
of Missouri. He was married November 12, 1879, to Miss 
Liura Hughey, of the class of 1875. They have seven chil- 
dren. The oldest son, Charles H. Small was vice-consul 
to Bogota, South America, during the years 1910-1912. Judge 
Small died October 24, 1924- 




Two Hundred and Jhirty-Tu 



JAMES A. WILLOUGHBY 
James Amos WiUoughby was born in Looking Glass Prai- 
rie, near Lebanon, May 2, 185';. His father, William E. 
WiUoughby, was born in Delaware, and his mother, Mary 
Moore, in Georgia. He graduated from McKendree m 1S74, 
receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of the Pla- 
toman Society. From McKendree, he went to the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, where he received the degree of LL. B m 
1876. After that, he engaged in the drug business in Lebanon 
for four years. He was then elected county clerk and re- 
corder for St. Clair County and moved to Belleville, where 
he made his home for the remainder of his life. In 1885 he 
became editor of the Belleville Advocate and made it a 
leading paper. In 1890 he was appointed postmaster of Belle- 
ville. In 1894 he was elected State Senator on the Republican 
ticket. Governor Deneen made him a member of the Railroad 
and Warehouse Commission, and he was a member of that 
body until it was absorbed by the Public Utilities Com- 
mission. In 1904 he served as Comptroller of the Currency 
for two banks m Oklahoma, so that his sphere of influence 
reached beyond the borders of his own state. He was a 
member of the Masonic Fraternity. He was married No- 
vember II, 1886, to Miss Lis:;ie V. Hughes. In his later 



g^ f /a ^a^ieiitiit 



COLLEOE CHA-PEL, 

Mloii(l,tn (Biciiiiin, iHerctiibcr 13. 

' "" 1878 '" 

p. T. KNTltEKIN', Pies. 



INVOCVTIOS. ll OVEKTUKE, 

•Poet and Peasant," . . (Suppe.; 

MIS9E3 McCrackek ;inil LEEl-Elt. 



years, his health was much impaired and he spent much 
time in the hospital where his death occurred July 4, 1916. 
He was buried at Belleville, where the most of his active 
life had been spent 

There are three other members of this class concerning 
whom we have no recent information, namely, Beniamin 
Moore Curtis, Charles Smith Frost, and John Godfrey 
Goethe. There is a strong probability that all three are dead. 
Ot Mr. Curtis, we only know that he enrolled in McKen- 
dree from Summerfield, was a member of the Platonian So- 
ciety, received the B. S. degree, and some time after his 
graduation, his address was Topeka, Kansas. 

Charles Smith Frost was born at Jersey ville, January ai, 
1852. He took the first part of his college course at Browder 
Institute, in Kentucky. He came to McKendree in the fall 
of 1873, and graduated with the class of 1874, receiving the 
degree of B. S. It was his purpose to study medicine. 

John Godfrey Goethe was born in St. Louis, January 25, 
i8'>o. He took the first three years of his college course at 
the Central Wesleyan College at Warren ton. After teaching 
school for several years, he came to McKendree and finished 
his course, receiving the degree of B. S. He afterward went 
to California. We have no late information about him. 



OU.VTION-, Winch Shall Triumph. 

.1 U. La1!GE. 

GiXJA-RTEX, 

"Spiuno IS Coming." . . . (GoMbcck.) 

Mt.ssES Patkin anil iMcCracken. 
MESSH8. Entrekin anil Casev. 



0U.\T10.\- 




W. W Flint. 


The Victors 


OK.VTK 


^ 




NMtioua 
C. S. Fhexrk. 

eoisro. 


Safeguards. 


"Uaily 


n 


Mis 


the. Summer Birds 
8 Florence I-eefe 


" (DaPinna) 



DECLAMATION, . "Thn Loneliness or Go 
W. n. PiEiCE 



t_6=^IJE3)EDICTI0N.' 



Facsimile of an old programme of the Platonian Literary Society 



Two Hundred and Thirtv-Tdr. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

Women ni McKendree College 



IN THE DAYS of the Lebanon Seminary, the institution 
was co-educational. There is no account of any legis- 
lation on the subject in the records, but the very first 
year the school opened there was one woman in the faculty, 
and while we have no list of the students enrolled, there are 
traditions that both boys and girls were included. After a 
few years there seemed to be a disposition on the part of 
the management to segregate the girl students. In April, 
1834, the Board passed a resolution employing Mrs. Peter 
Akers to be the "Principal teacher of the female depart- 
ment," acting under the superintendence of the president of 
the Seminary. Her salary was fixed at fifty dollars per session. 
There were two sessions a year of five months each. In Sep- 
tember of the same year, another resolution was passed 
instructing the committee on seminary building to '"make 
an arrangement and prepare a home for a female school." In 
January, 1836, a scale of tuition fees was placed in the rec- 
ords with the statement that it applied to both male and 
female students. The fees were as follows: For reading, writ- 
ing, and the four primary rules of arithmetic, five dollars per 
session. For higher arithmetic, grammar, and geography, 
without the use of the globe, seven dollars per session. If 
geography lessons with the use of the globe were desired, 
the fee was three dollars more. Then we find the statement, 
"In the female department, for drawing, painting, and needle 
work, three dollars extra." From this it appears that, not 
only were girls admitted to the school, but as early as i8j6 
there was instruction for beginners in the fine arts and home 
economics. On the same date there is this record: "Male 
and female departments shall be maintained for this session." 
Also Miss Polly Thorp was elected principal of the Female 
Department at a salary of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars per session. 

The Board had another meeting in April, 1836, which 
was about the middle of the session. From the following 
resolution, passed at that meeting, it may be inferred that 
the "Female Department" was doing satisfactory work: 
"Resolved, that it is expedient and the wants of the country 
demand, of the Trustees of McKendree College, the estab- 
lishment of a Female Institute connected with the college, 
but conducted in a separate building with a female boarding 
house connected with it. And that our agent is hereby 
authorized and requested to use his best efforts in his con- 
templated tour in the east, to raise the sum of twenty 



thousand dollars for that object." In October, 1836, it was 
ordered that the female school taught by Miss Thorp should 
be held in the north room of the college building until further 
orders. It is also recorded that Rev. Rufus Spalding was 
invited by the Trustees of McKendree to take charge of a 
female academy. However, there is no record to show that 
he accepted the invitation. 

After 1836 there is no mention of girls in the school for 
more than thirty years. Why they were no longer there, 
whether they were legislated out or voluntarily withdrew, 
can be only a subject of conjecture. Mrs. Mary Fitzgerrell, 
a daughter of Jonathan Moore, came to Lebanon in 1850 as 
a member of her father's family. Her brother, Risdon M. 
Moore, graduated from McKendree that year and she would 
have been glad to become a student in the institution, but 
was not permitted. She attended a school for girls which 
was held in the basement of the Methodist Church, but 
for a taste of higher education, was obliged to go to the 
Illinois Women's College at Jacksonville. The first McKen- 
dree catalogue was published in 1837. It contains no girls' 
names. Nor does any other of the catalogues until 1870. 

By the middle of the century there was a feeling in cer- 
tain quarters that while it was a fine thing to give educa- 
tional privileges to the intelligent young men who were to 
be the leaders of the coming generation, their sisters also 
should have the same privilege, or at least not be barred 
from it by a Christian college, for which many noble women 
had made sacrifices as well as men. It was a sentiment that 
had to have time for growth before it would be generally 
accepted. Illinois Women's College at Jacksonville, whose 
first president was a McKendree man, had been in success- 
ful operation for several years, demonstrating that the women 
of this western country were capable of acquiring higher 
education, and that some even at that early day were anx- 
ious to receive it. Several colleges had already tried the 
experiment of co-education and some of McKendree 's pa- 
trons felt that it would be an appropriate step to admit 
women to the privileges of higher education. At the meeting 
of the Joint Board in 1852, President Anson W. Cummings 
presented a resolution to the effect that women should be 
admitted to McKendree on the same terms as men. It was 
discussed a while, then laid on the table until the next 
annual meeting, and then forgotten. 



Two Hundred and Thirty-Four 



In 1865, a committee which had been appointed to con- 
sider this question, failed to agree. A majority of the com- 
mittee, thru their chairman, Rev. Joseph Earp, presented a 
report favoring the proposition, while a minority report 
against it was presented by Hon. A. W. Metcalf. There 
was an interesting discussion m which the arguments were 
not recorded, and then the whole matter was referred to 
the Southern Illinois Conference, as a means of avoiding de- 
cision on a question which had strong advocates on both 
sides. But the question would not down. 

At the meeting of the Joint Board on June 10, 1868. Dr- 
B. F. Crary introduced a resolution providing for the ad- 
mission of young women into the college as students. After 
"considerable discussion" it was laid on the table "for the 
present." In the afternoon session of the same day the rec- 
ord says, "The resolution offered by Dr. Crary to admit 
young women into the college on the same terms as young 
men was taken from the table, and after some further dis- 
cussion. Rev. P. P. Hamilton moved that said resolution 
be laid upon the table and made the special order of business 
on the second day of the next annual meeting of this Board 
at 10 o'clock A. M., which motion was adopted." 

This action postponed the matter for a year. Then Rev. 
Ephraim Joy moved that copies of the resolution be sent 
to each of the patronizing conferences, in order that they 
might take action in regard to it. Later on the same day, 
Dr. Crary offered this resolution, "Resolved, that the faculty 
be requested to organize a Normal Department in this insti- 
tution." Dr. A. C. George moved to amend it by adding 
the words, "To which both males and females shall be 
admitted." The chairman, Rev. Thomas A. Eaton, ruled the 
amendment out of order. Then Dr. Crary appealed from 
the decision of the chair, and when the vote was taken the 
chair was not sustained. The amendment was then adopted, 
and then the resolution as amended. 

If the order of the Board had been carried out immediately 
and the Normal Department established, girls might have 
entered McKendree that year by the door of the Normal 
Department. But it was not done. Another year soon 
slipped by, and on Wednesday, June 9, which was the 
second day of its session for 1869, the Board adopted 
various reports and recommended the class for graduation. 
Then the hour of ten o'clock having arrived, according to 
their legislation of the year before, the resolution in regard 
to the admission of women as students in McKendree, 
which had been "lying on the table" for a whole year, was 
taken up for further consideration. It was the motion of 



Rev. Joseph Earp which brought it before the house again. 
Of course it was discussed again at length. When the vote 
was taken the result as shown in the records was fourteen 
yeas and seven nays. This was a clear two-thirds majority 
m favor and it was declared adopted. It would be interesting 
to know how each member voted, but while a record of 
that kind is kept m Congress, it is not in McKendree's 
Board, and as the men who voted that day are all dead, 
without a single exception, that bit of information is entirely 
beyond our reach. 

The resolution, as finally adopted, reads as follows: 
Whereas the universities and colleges of the west 
are opening their doors to women, and whereas 
women need education as much as men, and where- 
as McKendree College owes a debt of gratitude to 
noble Christian women, therefore be it resolved 
that young women be hereafter admitted to all 
the classes of McKendree College on the same 
terms as young men. 

B. F. Crary 
J. W. Phillips 
This was a piece of epoch-making legislation in McKen- 
dree. The admission of women into the college where they 
had not had any place for more than thirty years worked 
radical changes in the institution. The presence of the more 
gentle sex m the class room doubtless had a civilizing and 
cultural effect on the men of the college and m all probability 
improved the quality of the education which they secured. 
Yet strange as it may seem there was a feeling of opposition 
to this splendid step of progress, on the part of certain 
students whom the Apostle Paul would likely have char- 
acterized as "lewd fellows of the baser sort." These seemed 
to have a feeling similar to that of a certain saloon keeper, 
who, when the temp- 
erance campaigners came 
to hold a prayer meet- 
ing in his saloon, de- 
clared that it was "no 
place for women." This 
sentiment was expressed 
in a college prank doubt- 
less perpetrated by some 
of this class of college 
boys, when the news 
was spread abroad that 
women were to be ad- 
mitted to the college. 




EDITH FLINT (THRALL) 
First woman graduate 



Two Hundred and Thim-Fne 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



Professor Blair had a gentle mare which he kept tor a driv- 
ing horse. The next morning this mare was found in one 
of the recitation rooms on the second floor, with a large 
placard hung about her neck bearing this inscription "First 
female student in McKendree." 

Of the men who framed, signed, and presented the reso- 
lution to admit women, the first. Dr. Benjamin F. Crary, 
was a member of the St. Louis Conference, which was then 
an official patron of McKendree and sent Conference vis- 



PREPARATORY 
Elizabeth Gray Gilbert 

Jersey City, H- ]■ 
Nellie Frances Raymond 

Lebanon 

Virginia Laura Thatcher 

Lebanon 

Harriet Floyd 

Lebanon 

Virginia Leonora Roberts 

Lebanon 

Elvira Robinson 

Cottonwood Grove 

Jeannette Ross 

Cottonwood Grove 

Amelia Frances Slayback 

Hilhboro 

Olive Mary Slayback 

HiUshoro 

Maggie Elizabeth Gilbert 

Summerfield 

Louisa Alice Vollintine 
Cottonwood Groi'e 



1^^^ 



EXHIBITION 

OF THE 

i'cijanon |nnalf Institute. 




Reduced facsimile of programme presented by the pupils of the 
Lebanon Female Institute, 1S.5S 



quest, presented the case of Miss Mary Julia Jewett, who 
according to his statement had completed a course of study 
"about equivalent to the college course" and would like to 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts. A committee, con- 
sisting of Professor Blair, Professor Deneen and Dr. George, 
was appointed to examine her as to scholarship. The next 
day the committee presented a favorable report and the 
degree was granted; so Miss Jewett was the first woman 
to receive a degree from McKendree. This was in 1869. 



FRESHMAN 

Ellen Sophronia AUyn 

Lebanon 

Georgiana Floyd 

Lebanon 

Adeline Floyd 
Lebanon 

Eliza Maria Hypes 
Lebanon 

Kate Leonora Parker 
Lebanon 

Carrie Hannah Thrall 
Bone Gap 



SOPHOMORES 
Mary Waity Adams 

Granger, Minn. 

Martha Jane Toney 

Lebanon 

SENIOR 

Edith Maria Flint 

Lebano7i 



itors each year who were members of the Board, the same 
as those from our own conference. He was at that time 
editor of the Central Christian Advocate, which was then 
published in St. Louis. The other. Rev. John W. Phillips, 
was for many years a prominent member of the Southern 
Illinois Conference, and served one term as presiding elder 
of the Alton District. He was a brother of Rev. Daniel W. 
Phillips, who was afterward president of McKendree. Be- 
fore ,the close of the session in which the legislation for the 
admission of women was passed. President Allyn, by re 



Before women were admitted to McKendree as students, 
there was a girls' school carried on for several years in the 
basement of the Methodist Church in Lebanon. It was 
known as the "Lebanon Female Institute." We reproduce 
here a program presented by the pupils of that school. It 
bears no date, but circumstantial evidence indicates that it 
was some time in the year 1858. 

The college catalogue of 1870 shows that those names 
which we have listed above are those of girls who enrolled 
m McKendree in the fall of 1869. 




Hundred and Thirty-Six 



^^Sl^^^^^^^^^^s^^s^ 



CHAPTER XIX. 
President Locke's Administration 



IN June, 1874, Dr. Robert Allyn notified the Board at 
their annual meeting that he was not a candidate for 
re-election, since he had decided to accept the position 
offered him as Principal of the new State Normal School 
being established at Carbondale. In that institution whose 
income was provided thru taxation, there would be no wor- 
ries about lack of endowment, unpaid salaries, and similar 
financial inconveniences which he had experienced at Mc- 
Kendree. 

The committee appointed to nominate a new president 
proposed the name of Rev. John W. Locke, of the Southeast 
Indiana Conference. He was unanimously elected and notified 
by telegraph. He agreed at once to accept the position, sub- 
ject to investigation of the conditions, which would take 
a little time. The salary of the new president 
was to be $i,')00 and that of each professor 
$qoo, all of which were guaranteed by the 
Board, regardless of what the income ot the 
college might be. The outlook for the college 
was hopeful in many ways, but the lack ot en- 
dowment made it very probable that the in- 
come would not meet expenses for the coming 
year. And the Board still had the arrearages 
in salaries for several years back to struggle 
with, as well as cases of unpaid notes and in- 
terest due the endowment fund. 

John Wesley Locke, the oldest child of Rev. 
George and Elizabeth Locke, was born at Paris, 
Kentucky, February 12, 1822. His father died from exposure 
while in the Wabash District in 185';. The widow then 
opened a young ladies' academy at New Albany, Indiana, 
where young Locke taught mathematics at the early age of 
fourteen. His college education was obtained at Augusta 
College m Kentucky, where he had as classmates, Randolph 
S. Foster, afterward bishop, and John Miley, who was for 
many years was a professor in Drew Seminary. He grad- 
uated in 1841 when he was only nineteen. The following 
year he was admitted on trial into the Ohio Conference 
where he served in the pastorate for seven years. He was 
the eighth minister of the gospel, father and son in direct 
line. In after years his son, Edwin Locke, became the ninth 
m the line of preachers of the gospel. In 1852 he was elected 
president of Brookville College in Indiana, and served 111 
that position four years. He then became presiding elder 




DR. J. W. LOCKE 



of the Connersville District. After one term m this field, 
he was elected to the Ch,ur of Mathematics m Asbury 
University (now DePauw), He filled that position with a 
high degree of acceptability for twelve years. Then after a 
brief pastorate m Jeffersonville, Indiana, he was called to 
the presidency of McKendree. After four years, in which 
the college reached the highest point of attendance it had 
attained up to that time, he then became presiding elder 
of the Lebanon District. He also served a term in the same 
office on the Alton District. He also served several of the 
leading churches in the Southern Illinois Conference as pastor. 
He had been a member of three General Conferences before 
he came to Southern Illinois, and he was three times chosen 
to represent that body. So he probably holds a record of 
which no other member of this conference 
could boast, that of having been a member 
of six General Conferences. Dickinson College 
honored him with the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity. He was a fine scholar, an excellent 
teacher and administrator, a true friend, a pa- 
triot, a real manly man. He was twice married. 
First, to Miss Matilda Wood, a daughter of 
Colonel Wood of Ohio. To them were born 
two sons and one daughter. The sons, George 
W. Locke and Edwin Locke, are both dead. 
The latter was for many years a member of 
the Kansas Conference, and once secretary 
of the General Conference. The daughter is 
Mrs. Bettie Hamilton of Greencastle, Indiana. After the 
death of the first Mrs. Locke, he was married to Mrs. Mary 
E. Hill, who was the widow of a member of the Southern 
Illinois Conference. A few years after this, he retired and 
made his home m Lebanon. This was m the autumn of 
i89'5'. His death occurred December 29, of that same year. 
His widow lived in Lebanon for about twenty years after, 
until her death. 

It seems appropriate to make a little survey of the college 
as it was in the beginning of Dr. Locke's administration. 
The catalogue for his first year shows a total of 263 students. 
One hundred and two of these were preparatory students 
and the remainder of college grade. The graduating class 
had nineteen members. The faculty of liberal arts was com- 
posed of five teachers including the president, who taught 
Mental and Moral Philosophy. Henry H. Horner was the 



Two Hundred and Thnty-Seie 



IMC KENDREE 



only instructor in the Law Department, there was a teacher 
of elocution, and a tutor who assisted in the work ot the 
preparatory department. Among the requirements for ad- 
mission, we note that a student must be fourteen years old 
to enter the Freshman class, and in all cases, satisfactory 
testimonials of good moral character must be presented. In 
the paragraph on general information, parents and guardians 
are informed that daily records are kept of the merit and 
demerit of each student, the former denoting the excellencies 
of each in his recitations and other college duties, and the 
latter, his delinquencies and deficiencies of each in his re- 
spective duties. The president will furnish an exhibit of 
these records in any particular case when requested by the 
student or his friends. It is also stated that "The Faculty 
are determined that the college shall not be infested, and 
the whole community embarrassed and perhaps corrupted 
by idle and dissolute members." There is an interesting list 
of requirements: "Regular and punctual attendance at the 
morning services in the chapel, at church, and at the Sun- 
day afternoon lecture; the strict observance of the hours 
prescribed for study; the faithful performance of the exer- 
cises, studies, and duties assigned by the faculty; a prompt 
account of the reason for any neglect of duty, or absences; 
the subordination of all other exercises to those prescribed 
by the Faculty." There is also a remarkable list of prohi- 
bitions in those days, long before the eighteenth amend- 
ment: "Irreverence during religious services at church or 
chapel; violation of the Sabbath by engaging in any kind 
of play or amusement, or by assembUng, except for worship, 
in the rooms of students or elsewhere; disrespect towards 
the faculty; ungentlemanly treatment of fellow students or 
citizens; absence from room during the hours of study; loud 
conversation, loud laughing, wrestling, jumping or other 
unnecessary noise in the college buildings or campus; dis- 
turbance of the regular recitations and exercises in any way 
whatever; the frequenting of taverns, groceries, billiard 
saloons, bowling alleys, or any such places of drinking or 
amusement; lounging about stores or public places, or re- 
maining there longer than business requires; using profane 
or obscene language; visiting circuses or shows; keeping 
pistols, dirk knives or any unlawful weapons; card-playing 
and gambling of every kind; writing upon or otherwise de- 
facing the college building or furniture; disorderly conduct 
at boarding houses or elsewhere; leaving town without the 
knowledge and consent of the faculty; boarding at hotels or 
public houses without the written permission of the faculty; 
tiking lessons in any branch of study, in the regular college 



terms, from any person not connected with the faculty, ex- 
cept by permission." 

A table of average expenses is given to serve as a sort of 
guide to the prospective student in estimating his necessary 
expenditures during his college career. By comparing these 
with the list given in Dr. Merrill's time, it will be seen that 
expenses had increased somewhat, tho it was still not a 
very expensive proposition to go to college. 

EXPENSES 
Tuition in Preparatory Department, per term $6.00 

Tuition in Collegiate Department, per term 8.00 

Contingent expenses, per term 6.00 

Boarding, room furnished, (lights excepted) per week j.50 
Washing, per dozen .75 

Wood, per cord 2.50 

For Law, extra 7.00 

For German, French, or Hebrew, extra 5.00 

Commercial Department, extra 5.00 

All bills must be paid in advance. 

There is also given in the catalogue a list of the titles of 
the Sunday afternoon lectures. One for every Sunday during 
the college year. The lecturers named are ex-president Allyn, 
President Locke, Professors Jones, Deneen, Swahlen, and 
Edwards, Reverends Reuben Andrus, T. M. Post, Earl 
Cranston, Lyman Marshall, T. H. Herdman. and G. W. 
Hughey. 

Dr. Locke was formally inaugurated with much speech- 
making and enthusiasm in September, 1874. The Board had 
voted to guarantee the salaries of the president, $1,500 and 
the four professors, $900 each. These professors were O. 
V. Jones, S. H. Deneen, W. F. Swahlen, and E. E. Edwards. 
The regular income of the institution did not fully meet 
these claims. There were also other arrearages in salaries. 
President Allyn was not paid up in full and these same pro- 
fessors had other claims for unpaid salary which were morally 
just as binding as the one for the current year. In 1872, the 
Board had voted that interest on the endowment fund, when 
paid, as it often was, long after it was due, should be applied 
to the claims of the year in which it should have been paid. 
But this was not done. When it was needed for current use 
as soon as it was paid, it was so applied. All these difficulties 
caused the Board much perplexity and were responsible for 
many lengthy debates. They usually appointed a committee 
to consider the matter and then discussed the report at 
great length. Perhaps they would recommend the appoint- 
ment of a new financial agent with the provision that the 
first money he collected should be applied to these deficits. 



-^^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s:g> 



and then the matter would rest until the next .mnual meet- 
ing of the Board. In reference to one of the financial agents, 
whose name need not he mentioned here, the report at the 
end of his first year showed that he had collected enough 
to pay his own salary except Siof. This of course left the 
institution $105 deeper m debt than before. He also secured 
a few thousand dollars in subscriptions to the endowment 
but it is doubtful whether they were ever paid at all. The 
Board was also troubled by a note for $<;,ooo, due to the 
French estate, with interest at 10%. There was even a 
claim of $217 still due to Professor S. W. Williams, whose 
service to the college had been rendered nearly twenty years 
before. The French note had been due several years and 
there were many hundreds of dollars of accrued interest, 
because they didn't have enough current income to pay the 
salaries, so the interest had been neglected, yet the French 
heirs needed the money and wanted it paid. At the meeting 
of 1875, the Board appointed a committee to ascertain the 
assets and liabilities of the institution. They reported the 
total assets in real estate and endowment to be $92,035, 
and the liabilities consisted of debts except back salaries due 
the faculty; to the amount of $6,500, and unpaid salaries 
$6,605, making a total of $13,105. Therefore the assets ex- 
ceeded the liabilities by $78,930, which in those days seemed 
a great sum. Yet those assets were not liquid but so thor- 
oughly frozen that the institution could not pay its debts. 
Dr. Locke in one of his reports told of unsuccessful efforts 
to borrow money and said he was forced to the conclusion 
that the credit of the college was not good. He said if any 
one church in the conference owed this debt, he was sure 
it would be paid, but since the responsibiHty was so widely 
distributed, no one felt it very keenly and therefore it was 
allowed to drag on indefinitely. 

The French note was not paid till years afterward m the 
administration of President Phillips; and the salary debts 
were probably never paid. At one meeting the executive 
committee reported that the faculty would settle on a fifty 
per cent basis provided the French note was paid. At a later 
meeting the president reported that the entire faculty would 
remit all claim to back salaries if the college would pay its 
other debts and thus stand free of all financial incumbrance. 
In 1875 the Board resolved that brick walks should be laid 
thruout the campus. But this was never done. There were 
only gravel walks until 191 1, when the new dormitories 
were built, and granitoid walks were laid around the build- 
ings so far as needed, and down the front from the chapel 
to the street. The corner entrance to the campus and the 



winding walk from there to the chapel were not built until 
1927. At the session in June, 1877, the following resolution 
was passed, providing for a music department: "Resolved, 
that the Faculty and Executive Committee be hereby author- 
ized to engage the services of a first class teacher of music, 
and as far as possible, organize a department of music for 
the ensuing college year. The salary ,ind expenses to be paid 
out of the tuition and rents of such department." During 
the following year, a Mr. Hodgden was employed to establish 
the work, but in the first few weeks met with so little re- 
sponse among the students that he .ib.mdoned the project. 
In the year 1878-79, the Board authorized the establish- 
ment of a Commercial Department, and elected Professor 
J. W. Whittlesey to have charge of it. The catalogues men- 
tion a Commercial Course as much as two years earlier than 
this, even indicating the subjects taught and the text books 
used; but no teacher is mentioned nor any students listed 
as belonging to the department. At the meeting just men- 
tioned, a committee was appointed to consider the question 
of fitting up the Athleton as a home for the Commercial 
Department. As far as we can learn, this building had been 
erected chiefly thru the efforts of the students, especially 
those interested m athletics. In several previous years, re- 
ports were made in the Board meeting in reference to the 
Athleteon commending the students on their enterprise, but 
not acknowledging that the college had any financial respon- 
sibility m the matter. But athletics in McKendree at that 
time did not have a very efficient organization, hence interest 
waned, and the building was for the most part standing 
idle. The committee of investigation at this time reported 
that they had difficulty in gaining access to the building, 
because no key was in possession of the college authorities. 
When they did succeed in examining the building, they re- 
ported that it could easily be adapted to the need of a com- 
mercial department, but that the financial claims of Dr. Allyn 
,ind others must be satisfied before it could be taken over 
for this purpose. The records do not tell us how it was done, 
but in some way these claims must have been released, for 
the building passed under college control the same as the 
other buildings on the hill. This structure was all in one 
large room with a twenty foot ceiling. It was eventually 
fitted out with school desks and became a study hall for the 
use of students between classes. Some member of the faculty 
was always in charge, to maintain order and preserve proper 
working conditions. Sometimes he would also carry on a 
recitation at the front of the room, and then the conditions 
were not much different from the old time one-room school. 




Two Hundred and Thirty-H 



■cs::^:?::^ 



..^^^c^^^^MC KENDREE ^^^^fesg:^:.^^^^..^ 



Students chafed under the rule requiring them to remain in 
the study hall when not in recitation, claiming that they 
were not school children who needed to be watched while 
they studied. So the plan was eventually abandoned, and in 
1893, when Morris L. Barr was president and E. B. Waggoner 
was professor of Science, the building was taken over for the 
Science Department. This gave opportunity for some expan- 
sion of that important part of the college work. In 1916, 
when Dr. Hurt was president, the roof was raised and two 
other floors built in, so that it became a three-story building, 
of which the third story contains the chemical laboratory, 
the second the biological laboratory, and the first floor is 
divided into three lecture rooms- one for chemistry, one for 
biology, and one for mathematics. The Commercial Depart- 
ment never had any very definite quarters which it could 
claim exclusively, but it had an actual place in the college 
for about a quarter of a century. It was housed wherever 
vacant space could be had, even tho at times the rooms had 
to be shared with other lines of college work. The depart- 
ment reached its highest point of efficiency while under the 
direction of Professor Waggoner. Such subjects as short hand 
and typewriting were taught at different times, tho not con- 
tinuously. Book-keeping and business arithmetic were re- 
garded as the foundation stones of a business education. For 
some years while Professor Waggoner was in charge of it, 
the Commercial Department had its regular commencement, 
at which a suitable address was delivered and the graduates 
received certificates as evidence that they had completed 
the work. These certificates helped them to procure a posi- 
tion in the business world, and some thought the department 
was doing a great work. However, the course could be com- 
pleted in about six months, and some of these young people 
who were anxious to get into the business world where they 
could earn money did not know enough about a real college 
course to appreciate the years of hard toil and effort which 
it required, and sometimes told people that they were grad- 
uates of McKendree College. Evidently the six months grad- 
uate would not be a credit to a hterary institution. There- 
fore, to avoid this confusion and sometimes harmful pretense, 
on the recommendation of President Chamberlin, the Com- 
mercial Department was abandoned. 

On June 10, 1875, at the close of Doctor Locke's first 
year, the following degrees were conferred : Bachelor of Arts 
upon George Washington Atterbury, Charlotte Augusta 
Dressor, Thomas Edward Green, John Theodore Handsaker, 
Edward Parker Keach, Edward Henry Parkinson, Charles 
Sylvester Royse, Hattie Parsis Sargeant, Edward Baker Wag- 



goner, and Thomas Corwin Watkins; the degree of Bachelor 
of Science was given to the following: Orla Samuel Casad, 
Samuel P. Herron, John Warren Hoit, William Harrison 
Horine, Laura Artella Hughey, Anna Rebecca Laird, John 
Laird, George Hanna Logan, and George Douglas Phillips. 
George Washington Hill received the degree of LL. B., Rev. 
James A. Robinson received the degree of D. D., and the 
honorary degree of A. M. was conferred upon John D 
Johnson and Henry Z. Gill. 

Brief sketches of these will follow, except of those whose 
biographies appear elsewhere in this work. 
GEORGE W. ATTERBURY 

George Washington Atterbury was born at Litchfield, 
Illinois, in 1854. His parents, A. D. and Julia Atterbury, 
were both native Americans. He entered college in 1871 and 
graduated in 1875, receiving the degree of A. B., and later, 
A. M. He was a member of the Philosophian Society. For 
two years after his graduation he was principal of the public 
schools at Jennings, St. Louis County, Missouri. Then for 
two years he held a similar position at Nashville, Illinois. 
For the next twenty years he was employed as travelling 
salesman and bank clerk. Most of the years since then he 
has been associated with the Atterbury Motor Company, 
of Buffalo, New York, of which company he has been presi- 
dent for many years. He was married in 1881 and has four 
children. Later he moved to the far west. In 1927 he lived 

at Woodland, Calif. 

ORLA S. CASAD 
Orla Samuel Casad was born near Trenton, Clinton Coun- 
ty, Illinois, January 31, 1846. His parents were John M. 
Casad and Elizabeth A. Moore. The father was of French 
descent though American born. When he was eight years 
of age, the family moved to Summerfield, in St. Clair County, 
where he grew to manhood. While a mere youth he enlisted 
in Company B of the 62nd Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, 
and served three years as a soldier in the Civil War. He 
entered McKendree in 1872 and finished the Scientific Course 
in 1875, receiving the degree of B. S. Later he received the 
degree of LL. B. He was a member of the Philosophian So' 
ciety. He was married in September, 1876, to Alice M. 
Babcock. Of their four daughters, one is deceased, two are 
married, and the other, Josephine, now resides with her 
parents in Pittsburg, Kansas. After his graduation, Mr. 
Casad taught school for some years. In 1878, he emigrated 
to Donna Ana County, New Mexico, where he edited a 
newspaper and practiced law. In 1880, he came to Crawford 
County, Kansas, and settled in the town of Pittsburg, where 
he still lives. He served as postmaster of Pittsburg for four 



MC KENDREE 



years and two terms as justice of the peace. He now holds 
the office of police magistrate. He is a member of the Meth- 
odist Church and the A. F. and A. M. He was a soldier in 
the Civil War and a captain in the Kansas National Guards, 
i8qi-i896. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and 
of the G. A. R. 

CHARLOTTE A. DRESSOR 

Charlotte Augusta Dressor was born near Greenville, Illi- 
nois, August ji, 1850. She entered Almira College at Green- 
ville in 1866. She continued there a year and a half and then 
after an interval of several years, during which time girls 
had been admitted to McKendree, she enrolled in that insti- 
tution in 1871. She graduated m 187'; with the first honors 
of her class, receiving the degree of A. B. She was a member 
of the Clionian Literary Society. In the summer of iSv"; she 
was elected professor of Natural Sciences m the Illinois Fe- 
male College at Jacksonville. She filled this position only one 
year and was then made professor of Ancient Languages in 
the same institution. Her educational career, which promised 
to be a brilliant one, was cut short by her death September 
24, 1876. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

THOMAS E. GREEN 

Thomas Edward Green was born at ShippenviUe, Penn- 
sylvania, December 27, iS-iS. He entered McKendree in 
September, 1872 and graduated in the class of 1875, receiving 
the A. B. degree. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Society. He attended the Princeton Theological Seminary 
during the years 1878-79. In 1889, he received the degree of 
S. T. D. from Griswold College. He was married April 27, 
1880, to Laura Elizabeth Johnson, of Mt. Carmel, Illinois. 
To them were born two daughters, Elinore and Gladys. The 
former married R. W. Goodell and the latter J. B. Terbell. 
Mr. Green's life work has included the three lines of clergy- 
man, author, and lecturer. He was pastor of Presbyterian 
churches at Mt. Carmel and Sparta, and later of the Eighth 
Presbyterian Church of Chicago. In 1886 he became a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal Church and served for two years as 
rector of St. Andrews" Episcopal Church, Chicago. From 
1888 to 190J he was rector of Grace Church, Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. In 1898 he was elected Bishop of Iowa, but declined 
the office. He also held the following positions of honor at 
different times: General Chaplain of the Sons of the Revo- 
lution, Grand Prelate of the Knights Templar, Chaplain 
First Regiment, Iowa National Guards, Chaplain of the 
National Democratic Conventions of 1884, 1892, and 1896. 
He was a deputy to the General Convention of the Episcopal 



Church in the years 1889, 1892, 189';, and 1898. He is the 
author of numerous books and magazine articles, and m 
1909- 1910 was associate editor of Hampton's Magazine of 
New York. During the years 190J to 1908, he travelled ex- 
tensively in Europe and Japan, and in I9i0'i9ii, made a trip 
around the world. He has been a lyceum lecturer since 1903. 
For some years his residence has been in Chicago. 

LAURA A. HUGHEY 
Laura Artelia Hughey was born January 12, iSi'i, at 
Rosaclaire, Illinois. She is a daughter of Rev. George W. 
and Elizabeth A. Hughey. Her father was a Methodist 
preacher in the Southern Illinois and Missouri Conferences 
for more than half a century. She graduated from McKendree 
in the class of 1875, receiving the degree of B. S. She was a 
member of the Clionian Literary Society. After graduation 
she taught in the public schools of Belleville, lUinois. No- 
vember 12, 1879, she was married to Mr. Charles E. Small, 
who was also a graduate of McKendree. Since that time her 
home has been in Kansas City, Missouri, where her husband 
is engaged in the practice of law. They have five sons and 
two daughters. The eldest son was U. S. vice-consul to 
Bogota, South America during the years 1910-1912. Mrs. 
Small IS a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
THOMAS T. HANDSAKER 

Thomas Theodore Handsaker was born in Madison Coun- 
ty, Illinois, July 6, iSsi- He entered college in the fall of 
1868 and graduated in the class of 187';, receiving the degree 
of A. B. He was a member of Plato. He was a Methodist 
and a Republican. After his graduation, he engaged in jour- 
nalistic work for several years, and later in educational work. 
August 6, 1878 he was married to Miss Mary E. Morris, of 
Cincinnati. They then went to California, where Mr. Hand- 
saker taught school for many years. He also taught in Oregon 
for three years. His work was in Orange, California for some 
years, and later in San Francisco. We have no recent infor- 
mation concerning him. 

JOHN W. HOYT 

John Warren Hoyt was born in Palestine, Illinois, August 
22, 1853, and came with his parents to Lebanon in September, 
1859. He was a son of John W. and Rowena (French) Hoyt. 
His father was a local preacher in the Methodist Church 
and a resident of Lebanon for many years, until his death. 
His mother was a sister of Governor A. C. French. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of Lebanon and 
McKendree College, where he graduated in 1875, with the 
degree of B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian Society. 
He graduated from the St. Louis Medical College in 1878, 




Two Hundred and Forty-Oi 



riMC KENDREE"^^^^^^s:^^.^?^>,r-..^ 



and later went abroad and studied in Germany. He practiced 
his profession in Olney, Illinois, St. Louis, and Kansas City, 
Missouri. He was married to Miss Carrie A. Brown ("8i), 
of Lebanon, December 30, 1884. His death occurred at Kansas 
City in 1892, while he was still in the prime of life and in 
the midst of a useful career. His funeral was held in the 
Methodist Church in Lebanon, and he lies buried in College 

Hill Cemetery. 

SAMUEL P. HERRON 

Samuel P. Herron was born in July, i8';4, at Arrow Rock, 
Missouri. He entered McKendree m 1872 and graduated in 
1875, with the degree of B. S. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He was married June 26, 1878, 
to Miss Emma C. Moore, of Lebanon, who was also a grad- 
uate of McKendree. His business during most of his active 
life was that of a druggist. He was located for many years 
in Chicago, later in St. Louis, and still later in Santa Monica, 
California. He is now retired from active business and lives 
in Richmond Heights, St. Louis County. He is a member of 
the Royal Arcanum. Mrs. Herron died in June, 1927. 
WILLIAM H. HORINE 

William Harrison Horine was born at Waterloo, Illinois, 
July 3, 1855. He entered McKendree in 1871 and graduated 
in the class of 1875, with the degree of B S. He was a mem- 
ber of the Platonian Society. Later he studied law and settled 
in Springfield, Missouri. For many years he had a very suc- 
cessful practice and he was considered a wealthy man. His 
death occurred July 19, 1921. His funeral was held in the 
old church in Waterloo where his Methodist parents had 
been members, and he was buried in the cemetery at that 

place. 

JOHN D. JOHNSON 
John D. Johnson was born m Belleville, Illinois, April 

19, 1S44. He was educated in the public schools and McKen- 
dree College. However he 
did not complete the col- 
lege course, but left school 
to enter the Union army, 
where he did service for his 
country, holding the rank of 
first lieutenant. In 1868 
he moved to St. Louis, 
where he became deputy 
county marshall and dep- 
uty clerk of the Court of 
Criminal Correction. In the 
meantime he studied law, 
and was admitted to the bar 
in 1870. Since then he has 




JOHN D JOHNSON 
As he appeared in the early part 



practiced law in St. Louis. For a few years he was in partner- 
ship with Judge W.C.Jones, but for a longer period with his 
brother, Hon. Charles P. Johnson. While at McKendree he 
was a member of the Platonian Society. The college gave 
him the honorary degree of A. M. in 1875. He is still living, 
and was present at the "Homecoming" of 1926. At the 
reminiscent meeting held in the chapel, he presented a re- 
ceipt for tuition paid by him to R. M. Moore, Fiscal Agent, 
in the fall term of 1856. This was evidence that he had been 
a student in McKendree seventy years before but still in 
vigorous health and with a figure tall and straight as an 
Indian warrior. He gave the receipt to the college as an 
interesting souvenir. 

EDWIN P. KEACH 
Edwin Parker Keach was born at Wapello, Iowa, No- 
vember 4, 185 1. After taking a part of his college course at 
Westminster College in Missouri, he came to McKendree, 
where he finished in 1875, receiving the degree of A. B. 
He belonged to the Platonian Society. He took a Theological 
course at Danville, Kentucky, where he graduated in 1878. 
He then entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church 
and served several pastorates, mostly in Missouri. He was 
also for a time editor of the "Texas Presbyterian." Later 
he became a missionary to the Cherokee Indians, with head- 
quarters at Hulbert, Oklahoma. He was married November 
7, 1878, to Miss J. Russell. To them were born five chil- 
dren — Edith, Annie, Louise, George, and Edwin. The young- 
est daughter, Louise, married Rev. A. W. Moore, who be- 
came a missionary in India. 

ANNA R. LAIRD 
Anna Rebecca L.iird was born in Jefferson County, Illi- 
nois, April JO, 1850. Her parents were Nicolas and Jane 
(Martin) Laird, who were both native Americans. She be- 
came a student m McKendree in the fall of 1872 and grad- 
uated in 1875, with the B. S. degree. She was a member of 
the Clionian Society. After graduation she taught school 
two years, then took a course in a business college in Evans- 
ville, Indiana. Then after teaching two years more she was 
married to Mr. Peter Smith, March 24, 1880. He died in 
1890, leaving no children. Mrs. Smith, being compelled to 
support herself by her own efforts, found employment in a 
woolen mill at Topeka, Kansas. In 1906 she secured a position 
in Oakland, California, but two years later she became a 
member of the Old People's Home, Anderson, Indiana, where 
she is comfortably spending her declining years. She is a 
member of the "Church of God." 



Tifo Hundred and Fort'i-Two 



^^^iK^^^^^^^^^^^g^^^^ 



REV. JOHN M. LAIRD 
John Martin Laird was horn in Jefferson County, Illinois, 
October 22, 1848. He entered McKendree m the fall of 1872 
at the same time with his sister, and they both graduated in 
the class of 187';, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
member of the Platonian Society. In June, 1875, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Lizzie Meyers. To them were born three sons, 
Charles N., John F., and Walter P., and one daughter, 
Blanche. He joined the Southern Illinois Conference in 187=; 
and served m the regular pastorate till 1892. He then with- 
drew from the Southern Illinois and went to Oklahoma. Af- 
ter some time he resumed the work of the ministry, and 
several years later he was transferred to California, where 
his death occurred at Fort Jones, April 7, igoq. 

GEORGE H. LOGAN 

George Hanna Logan was born in Big Prairie, Illinois, Sep- 
tember 4, i8';5 and died in the same community December 
31, 18S7. He was a son of Thomas and Lucy (Land) Logan 
After receiving a public school education, he entered Mc- 
Kendree and graduated m the class of 1875, with the degree 
of B S. He was a member of the Platonian Society. After 
graduation he spent some years m teaching, and was also 
for some time engaged in the jewelry business, being a mem- 
ber of the firm of Logan and Snively; but the greater part 
of his life he spent m agricultural pursuits. He was married 
March 27, 1879, to Miss Margaret Williams, who was also 
for a time a student at McKendree This union was blessed 
with five children -Ella Maud, Lucie Belle, Thomas Wyatt, 
Helena Lee, and William Tuley. The last named died in 
infancy. Two of the daughters are married. Mr. Logan was 
a faithful member of the Methodist Church, and m poli- 
tics a Republican. 

GEORGE D. PHILLIPS 

George Douglas Phillips was born at Nashville, Illinois, 
in September, 1856. His father was a prominent member of 
the Southern Illinois Conference and for years a member of 
the Board of Trustees of McKendree. His uncle, D. W. 
Phillips, was for several years president of McKendree. Mr. 
Phillips graduated in 1875, with the degree of B. S. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Society. He was engaged in 
business in Alton for some years, and later moved to Chicago. 
REV. EDWARD H. PARKINSON, D. D. 

Edward Henry Parkinson, son of Alfred J. and Mary E, 
(Baldwin) Parkinson, was born at Highland, Illinois, January 
10, i8'i2. After completing the public school courses, he 
entered McKendree, and having finished the classical course, 
he received the degree of A. B. in June, 1875- He was a 



member of the Platonian Literary Society. After leaving Mc- 
Kendree, he entered Garrett Biblical Institute, where in 
1878 he received the degree of S. T. B. He afterward received 
the Master of Arts and in 1892 the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from his alma m.iter. He was married October 20, 
1881, to Miss Carrie Hollis He has been a Methodist for 
more than half a century and for over a quarter of a century 
a Methodist minister. The active years of his ministry were 
spent chiefly m Kansas, so that he had a share in freeing 
Kansas from the liquor traffic. For eleven years he lived in 
Chicago and inaugurated various movements in behalf of 
national prohibition. Among these may be mentioned the 
hand-to-hand and house-to-house campaign for the distri- 
bution of literature to the voters. Another campaign dis- 
tributing circulars and posters by mail to reach every county 
in the United States. He then began a movement through 
the newspapers, furnishing short articles to as many as a, 
thousand newspapers in a single year. Later he was active 
in circulating petitions to present to Congress m the interest 
of nation-wide prohibition. He lived to see the i8th amend- 
ment passed and died March 17, 192:,. He was buried at 
Celphos, Kansas. "He was one of God's noblemen." 
MRS- HATTIE SARGEANT THOMAS 

Hattie Persis Sargeant was born m Lebanon, Illinois, in 
, i8s5. Her parents were John L. and Abigail (Danforth) 
Sargeant, who were among the early settlers of the town 
of Lebanon. After attending the public schools, she entered 
McKendree and graduated in the class of 1875, with the 
degree of A. B. She was a member of the Clionian Literary 
Society. She was married June 30, 1880, to James H. Thomas, 
of Belleville, who about that time became editor of "The 
Belleville Advocate." After a residence of five years in Belle- 
ville, they moved to Denver, Colorado. Mrs. Thomas' two 
sons, John and Garland, both grew to manhood, but the 
elder, a youth of great promise, died soon after graduating 
from the school of mines. The younger is now in business in 
Chicago. Mrs. Thomas died at Chicago, August 29, 1920. 
REV. CHARLES S. ROYSE 

Charles Sylvester Royse was born at New Albany, Indi- 
ana, April 8, 18'ii. He entered McKendree in September, 
1870, and graduated m June, 187-;, with the degree of A. B. 
He was a member of the Philosophian Society. He was a 
student for a time in Garrett Biblical Institute, and then 
entered the ministry of the Methodist Church. He preached 
five years in Illinois, five in Iowa, fifteen in Minnesota, and 
five in Dakota. He is now on the retired list. He was mar- 
ried April 16, 1876, to Rose A. Nichols. Four of their chil- 




Two Hundred and Forty-Th 



^MC KENDREE^^^^^^:^^^..^,^^..^^ 



dren are now living; George, Maud. W.ilter, and Clara. Mrs. 
Royse died August ii, 191 1. 

PROF. EDWARD B. WAGGONER 
Edward Baker Waggoner was born in Madison County, 
Illinois, near the village of Godfrey, August 22, 1852. His 
father, Wesley F. Waggoner, was a farmer, but also a car- 
penter and mechanic. His mother's maiden name was Eliza 
Ferguson. There were five children in the family, of whom 
Edward B. was the oldest, and the only one still living. He 
received his early education at the Bethany country school, 
near Godfrey, entered the Preparatory Department of Mc- 
Kendree in 1869 and graduated from 
the college in 1875, receiving the de- 
gree of A. B., and later, A. M. He 
was one of the honor men of his class 
and a member of the Platonian 
Society. He spent some time teaching 
before he finished his college course, 
but after his graduation he made it 
the regular business of his life, and 
his career as an educator continued 
without interruption for more than 
half a century . He taught successively 
at the Jones school, east of Brighton, 
the Ferguson School, north of Bright- 
on, the Bethany School, the Piasa 
School, served a year as principal of 
the Chatham schools, then spent a 
year in graduate work at Valparaiso 
University. He was then elected professor of Science in Mc- 
Kendree in 1881. He continued in the McKendree faculty 
until 1922, with the exception of one year when he was 
professor of Science in Southwest Kansas College at Wmfield. 
He thus rendered full forty years of service in McKendree, 
and then tapered off with five years of service as teacher of 
Science in the Lebanon High School. At that time, real- 
izing that the work was heavy for one of his years, he 
decided to retire. His alma mater then employed him to 
build up and care for a museum such as McKendree ought 
to have. This is work to his liking, for when he was pro- 
fessor of Science, he collected a large amount of material 
which he will now re-assemble as soon as suitable provision 
can be made for its proper display. Professor Waggoner has 
always shown especial skill in the work of teaching, as many 
hundreds of students will testify. His aim was always, not 
only to impart knowledge, but to develop character. He has 
been for many years and still is an active worker in the 
Methodist Church .ind Sunday School. He served for more 




PROFESSOR WAGGONER 



than thirty years as superintendent of the Methodist Sun- 
day School in Lebanon, and for many years was active in 
the work of the Epworth League. He has served as district 
president of that organization. He has ser\'ed as an institute 
speaker, not only in the County Institutes of the public 
schools, but also Sunday School and Epworth League Insti- 
tutes. He has always been a loyal citizen of the community 
and nation, a Republican in poHtics, but always standing 
for good government and the principles of righteousness in 
his own community. He is a charter member of the M. W. 
A. in Lebanon. 

Professor Waggoner has been 
twice married. First, to Ella L. 
Sargent, of the class of "77 in Mc- 
Kendree, in 1883. Their four children 
were Carrie L., Leroy S., Ella Mabel, 
and LottieA. Of these, only two are 
now living, Leroy and Mabel, now 
Mrs. R. C. Sayre, of Decatur. His 
present wife, before her marriage, 
was Miss Ella Cowen, of Jersey ville. 
She, too, is the mother of four child- 
ren, Marian E., a teacher in Kankakee, 
Morris, who has been a high school 
teacher for some years in northern 
Illinois, Beatrice C, now Mrs. 
Bertram Jones, and Kenneth C, 
who is teaching in Kentucky. Mrs. 
Waggoner also attended McKendree 
before her marriage, ,ind has been a life long Sunday School 
worker. Both she and her husband are still teachers in the 
Sunday School. She is active in the Missionary Society and 
other organizations of the church. Also she was the founder 
and has been, for twenty-two years, the president of the 
Lebanon History Club. 

REV. THOMAS C. WATKINS, D. D. 
Thomas Corwin Watkins was born at Antrim, Ohio, 
March 7, 1847. He completed his course in McKendree in the 
class of 1875, receiving the degree of A. B. He also received 
the degree of A. M. in 1878 and D. D. in 1887 from his alma 
mater. He completed a course in Boston University School 
of Theology and received the degree of B. D. from that 
institution in 1878. While m McKendree he was a mem- 
ber of the Pl.itonian Society. He was married to Miss 
Emm.i D. Hadley, a teacher, in Medford, Massachusetts. 
Their sons, Thomas Webb and Charles Hadley, are both 
t;raduates of Harvard. The former has been for a number 




Two Hundred and Forts-Four 



MC KENDREE 



of years principal of Kent's Hill Seminary, which is a Meth- 
odist secondary educational institution in Maine. Their 
daughter, Margaret, graduated from Boston University in 
the class of 1913. Mr. Watkins began preaching the Gospel 
in his youth. He supplied charges in various places while 
getting his education. He joined the New England Confer- 
ence in 1878, and was a member of it for the remainder ot 
his life. One of his notable achievements was the establish- 
ment of the Stanton Avenue Church in Boston. He organized 
the church, starting with only four members, and led them 
in the enterprise of erecting a new church building. It is 
now one of the strong churches of that New England city 
He was for six terms secretary and two terms president of 
the Boston Preachers' Meeting. For fifteen years he was 
secretary and treasurer of the New England Conference 
Bureau of Entertainment. He retired from the active pas- 
torate in 1920, but retained certain duties in connection 
with the conference until the time of his death, which oc- 
curred on September 21, 1924. His last charge was Needham 
Heights, which continued to be his home until his death. 
It is claimed that he was the first to suggest the motto of 
the Epworth League, "Look up, lift up." 

THE CLASS OF ISTlj 
LOUISE C. BLUME 

Louise Charlotte Blume was born January 19, 185J, at 
Pleasant Ridge, Madison County, Illinois. She is a daughter 
of John H. Blume, Sr. and Christine (Dierking) Blume — both 
German. She first became a student in McKendree in Jan- 
uary, 1873 and graduated in June, 1876, receiving the degree 
of B. S. She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. 
She was employed in educational work from the time of her 
graduation until her retirement. She taught in the schools 
of Madison County for thirty-three consecutive years, elev- 
en years of this time, in the Granite City schools. For four 
years or more she was a member of the faculty in the Bible 
Training School in Fort 'Wayne, Indiana. She had charge of 
the departments of English and German. She was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, though a lover of all 
the churches, and an earnest active Christian worker m 
whatever line of service the opportunity offered. Her death 
occurred at Edwardsville, Illinois March 13, 1921. 
CHARLES P. BELL 

Charles Patterson Bell was born January 20, 1859, at 
Ullin, Illinois. He entered McKendree in the fall of 1873 
and became a member of the Platonian Society. He graduated 
in 1876 with the degree of B. S. He intended to make the 
law his profession and settle in Cobden, Illinois. In religious 



belief he was an Episcopalian, m politics a Republican. Later 
he went into the mercmtile business in Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas, where he died m 1881. 

FRANKLIN P. CREWS 

Franklin Pierce Crews was horn at Island Grove, Illinois, 
December 23, i8<;4. He entered college in 1872 and joined 
the Platonian Society. He graduated in the class of 1876, 
receiving the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. In politics, he 
was a Democrat, and in religion a Methodist. After he left 
college, his home was in Teutopolis, Illinois He was ad' 
mitted to the bar in 1878, and intended to make the legal 
profession his vocation. We have no recent information con- 
cerning him. 

LLEWELLYN CALHOUN 

Llewellyn Calhoun was born near New Boston, Mercer 
County, Illinois, March 11, 1849. He is a son of Dr. David 
and Susannah Calhoun. His father died when he was but a 
small child, and later his mother married an ignorant man 
who opposed young Llewellyn's efforts to secure an educa- 
tion. He therefore secured his schooling, both in the district 
school and in McKendree, in the face of much opposition 
and entirely without assistance from his family. He paid his 
way chiefly by teaching school at intervals alternating with 
his years in school. He entered McKendree in 1867 and 
graduated in 1876, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
member of the Philosophian Literary Society. He was mar' 
ried February 24, 1876, which was his senior year in college, 
to Miss Rebecca Mildred Rutledge. She was elected an hon- 
orary member of the class of '76. He then studied law and 
graduated from McKendree's Law Department in 1879, re- 
ceiving the degree of LL. B. His little daughter one year 
old was made an honorary member of the class of 1879 She 
is now Mrs. Grace R. Seabott. Since his graduation, Mr. 
Calhoun has been engaged in various occupations. He taught 
school four years; was in the railway mail service during 
President Garfield's administration; was travelling salesman 
in Texas and the Southwest; in 1885 he entered the field 
of journalism and worked on the Fort Worth (Tex.) Gazette, 
the Dallas and Galveston News, the St. Louis Republic, and 
the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. In 1890, he became editor of 
the Fort Worth Evening Mail; and during the years 1892-96 
he was editor of "Industrial Education" at Fort Worth, 
Texas. During the years since that time he has been engaged 
in the adjustment of insurance for several of the old line 
companies, which work has taken him to all parts of the 
United States, and^to Canada, Alaska, Mexico, West Indies, 
and the Bahama Islands. His home at present is in Seattle. 




Hundred and Fortv-Fue 



MC KENDREE ^^^^^s:^;^-^.^..^^^^ 



Washington. He is a member ot the Christian Science Church 
and the Knights of Pythias. 

HON. PLEASANT T. CHAPMAN 

Pleasant Thomas Chapman was born on a farm in Johnson 
County, Illinois, October 8, 1854. His parents, D. C. and 
M. E. Chapman, were of English ancestry. After receiving 
his early education in the home schools, he entered McKen- 
dree in 1871, and after completing the Classical Course, he 
received the A. B. degree in 1876, and A. M. in 1879. After 
leaving college he read law and was admitted to the bar in 
1878. He located at Vienna, Illinois, which is still his home. 
He has served two terms as county judge, two terms as 
county superintendent of Schools, three terms as State Sen- 
ator, and has ably represented his fellow citizens as a member 
of Congress. He has also for many years been engaged in the 
banking business. He was married to Miss May Copeland, 
December 20, 1882. Of their four children, one daughter 
died in infancy; the elder son, Ward, Hves in Chicago and 
is special agent for the National Fire Insurance Company; 
their daughter, Marian, married Lieutenant Paul C. Rabory, 
of the U. S. A. , the younger son, Ralph, is teller in the First 
National Bank of Vienna. Mr. Chapman is a member of the 
Methodist Church, a thirty-second degree Mason, member 
of the I. O. O. F. and the Knights of Pythias. 
EDWIN W. DRESSOR 

Edwin Washington Dressor was born at Cottonwood 
Grove, Illinois, December 12, 1854. He entered McKendree 
in 1869, and after completing the Scientific Course, he re- 
ceived the degree of B. S. in 1876. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. In politics, he is a Republican. 
He married Miss Mary Kirkland and established a residence 
near Greenville, Illinois. After a long career as a successful 
farmer and stock -raiser, he retired from active business and 
now resides in the city of Greenville. 

WALTER C. GOFORTH 

Walter Cyrus Goforth was born at Mt. Carmel, Illinois, 
September i j, 1856, and died in St. Louis, Missouri, October 
3,1, 1911. He entered McKendree in 1872 and graduated in 
1876, receiving the degree of A. B. Later he received the 
Master's Degree. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1880. 
He practiced his profession in St. Paul, Minn, for many 
years until failing health compelled him to abandon pro- 
fessional work. In his later years he travelled much, and 
while seeking to improve his health, spent winters in Florida 
and in California. While at the seacoast he gathered shells 
from both oceans, carefully classified them, ,ind after pro- 



viding a handsome glass cabinet for their proper display, 
presented his entire collection to McKendree College. He 
was married October 3, 1883, to Miss Julia Belle Nichols, 
of Lebanon. Their deaths occurred within a month of each 
other. They left no children. They were both buried m 
College Hill Cemetery. 

REV. JOHN N. HUGGINS 

John Newton Huggms was born at New Athens, Illinois, 
August 31, 1856, and died at his home in Statesville, North 
Carolina, December 5, 1909. He became a student in Mc- 
Kendree in 1 87 1 and graduated in 1876, receiving the degree 
of A. B. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary So- 
ciety. He studied law and practiced this profession two 
years in Belleville, Illinois. Later he moved to Miami, Mis- 
souri, where he practiced law for several years. While at 
McKendree, he was converted and joined the Methodist 
Church. Having for some time felt called to the work of 
the ministry, in 1884 he gave up the law and entered the 
ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, becom- 
ing a member of the Southwest Missouri Conference. He 
ser\'ed as pastor at Carthage, Brooklyn Avenue, Kansas City, 
presiding elder of the Springfield District, Jefferson City, 
and Marshall. In 1899, failing health led him to seek a differ- 
ent climate. He was transferred to the Western North Caro- 
lina Conference and here served as pastor at AsheviUe, Con- 
cord, and Lexington. In 1907 he was made presiding elder 
of the Statesville District, which position he held at the 
time of his death. He was married March 24, 1887, to Miss 
Janie Pipkin, daughter of W. H. Pipkin, at that time post- 
master of Springfield, Missouri. Their three children are 
Harvey, Helen, and Reuben. The eldest died at the age of 
seven, while his father was pastor in Jefferson City, Mis- 
souri. Mrs. Huggins, since her husband's death, has resided 
in Springfield, Missouri. 

SYLVESTER M. IRWIN 

Sylvester Milton Irwin was born in Montgomery County, 
Illinois, October 27, 18'; i, of native American parents. He 
entered McKendree in the fall of 1870 and graduated in 
1876, with the degree of B. S. He received the degree of 
M. S. in i88i. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary 
Society. He was married in October, 1876, and has three 
sons, Walter S., Ira M., and Roy L., ranging in age from 
thirty-five to twenty-five. They are all engaged in business 
in Decatur. In the years intervening since his college days, 
Mr. Irwin has spent sixteen years as a pharmacist and twenty 
as a manufacturing chemist. He was for eighteen years office 
manager of the firm of Irwm, Neisler, &? Co., Manuficturing 



Two Hundred and FortyStx 



Pharmacists. He is at present general manager ot the Bush- 
way Extract Company, of Decatur, Illinois. He has been a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since he was 
sixteen years of age. His home is at Decatur, Illinois, where 
he has resided for many years. 

JUNIUS N. McCURDY 
Junius N. McCurdy was born at Augusta, Arkansas, 
April 7, 1856. His parents were Isaac M. McCurdy, of 
Scotch descent, and Sarah Elizabeth (Quitt) McCurdy, who 
was of English ancestry. He entered McKendree in Septem- 
ber, 1871, and graduated in the classical course m June, 
1876, receiving the degree of A. B., and later, that of A. M. 
He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. After 
graduation, he was engaged in mercantile business for a per- 
iod of about twenty years. He was mayor of his city for six 
years and city recorder for four years. He is still prominent 
in political circles. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, 
the Legion of Honor, and the Woodmen of the World. He 
was married February 18, 1880, to Miss Ella M. Cornelius. 
They have six children living, and all grown to maturity. 
They are Junius C, Edward P., Isaac M., Ara Bessie, Laura 
Maude, and Floy Lucile. Mr. McCurdy "s home is still at 
Augusta, Ark. 

JOSEPH W. McKEE, M. D. 
Joseph William McKee was born May 5, 1854, at Sum- 
merfield, 111. His parents were Dr. Samuel P. McKee, a native 
American and one time member of the Board of Trustees of 
McKendree College, and Mary M. (Thompson) McKee, a 
daughter of Rev. Samuel H. Thompson, who was one of the 
founders of McKendree College and twice president of its 
Board of Trustees. Mr. McKee entered McKendree as a 
student in 1872 when he was a youth of eighteen, and grad- 
uated in 1876, with the degree of A. B. In June, 1879, he 
received the degree of A. M. He afterward took a medical 
course in the Northwestern University Medical College 
and received the degree of M. D. in 1884. While in McKen- 
dree he was a member of the Philosophian Society. After 
graduating, he taught in a country school two years and was 
two years principal of the school at Rich view, Illinois. After 
finishing his medical course, he located in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, where he has been practicing medicine ever since. He 
took a post graduate course in the New York Eye and Ear 
Infirmary and since that time his practice has been limited 
to his specialty — the diseases of the eye, ear, nose, and 
throat. He was married September 28, 1886, to Miss Emma 
Parkinson, of Highland, Illinois. She was the youngest daugh- 
ter of Hon. Alfred Parkinson, at one time a member of Mc- 



Kendree's Board of Trustees. Their children are Wilbur P., 
Joseph Wallace, Raymond E., and Mary Mildred McKee, 
Dr. McKee is a member of the Jackson County Medical 
Society, the Missouri State Medical Association, and the 
American Medical Association. He belongs to the Howard 
Memorial Methodist Church m Kansas City and his been 
Sunday School superintendent for many years. 

MRS. EMMA CARRIE HERRON 
Emma Carrie Moore was born at Lebanon, Illinois, being 
the daughter of Thomas and Mary J. (Nichols) Moore, who 
were both native Americans. She attended the public schools 
of her home town and then entered McKendree in September, 
187J. She completed the scientific course and graduated m 
June, 1876, receiving the degree of B. S. Later she received 
the Master's Degree. She was a member of the Clionian 
Literary Society. In June, 1878, she was married to Samuel 
P. Herron, who was also a graduate of McKendree, class of 
'75. She has resided for long periods both in Chicago and 
St. Louis, where her husband was engaged in business as a 
druggist. Their home was at Santa Monica, California for 
some years, and later m Richmond Heights, St. Louis County. 
In religion, Mrs. Herron was non-sectarian. She was a mem- 
ber of the St. Louis chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Republic. She died in St. Louis, June 17, 1927 and was 
buried m College Hill Cemetery. 

ANDREW J. PENROD 

Andrew Jackson Penrod was born in Union County, Illi- 
nois, January 8, 1850. His parents were Allen and Lucinda 
Penrod. After completing the course at McKendree, he re- 
ceived the degree of B. S. in 1876, and later, M. S. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. After his 
graduation, he spent ten years in teaching; then for a number 
of years engaged in mercantile business, and later was soli- 
citor for several different firms in commercial business. He 
has also been in newspaper work as correspondent for several 
different papers. He was married October 19, 1890, to Miss 
Mattie Delleney. They have one daughter, Viola. They 
lived for a number of years in Brownwood, Texas, and later, 
in Dallas. Mr. Penrod is not a member of any church or 
lodge, and in politics, he is an eclectic, having voted at 
different times with the Republican, Populist, and Socialist 
parties. 

JUDGE M. W. SCHAEFER 

Martin W. Schaefer was born at Troy, Illinois, March 
20, 1857. He IS a son of Jacob and Margaret (Noll) Schaefer, 
who are natives of Bavaria, Germany. He entered McKendree 
as a student in 1870 and graduated in 1876; but was out of 




Two Hundred and FortySev 



^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 



school two years of that time. He received the degree of 
A. B. m 1876, and in 1879 he completed the law course and 
received the degree of LL. B., and at the same time that of 
A. M. While in McKendree he was a member of the Pla- 
tonian Literary Society. The same ye;ir he graduated he was 
admitted to the bar in the state of Illinois. He was married 
November 11, 1879, to Louisa Weigel. Their children are 
Edna, now Mrs. M. L. Harris; Elmer, died in 1898; Leota, 
now Mrs. G. L. Tarlton; and Edwin, Otho, and Corinne. 
Mr. Schaefer practiced law in Belleville from about 1887. 
He held the oflice of city attorney of Belleville for six 
years, state's attorney of St. Clair County for two terms 
of four years each. He was elected judge of the Third Judi- 
cial Circuit of Illinois in 1897, which office he held for a 
term of six years. He then became a member of the law firm 
of Schaefer and Kruger, of Belleville, and engaged in the gen- 
eral practice of law. He was also general counsel of the East 
St. Louis and Suburban Railway Company, and the Alton, 
Granite City and St. Louis Traction Company. He was a 
member of the German Evangelical Church at Lebanon, 111. 
He became a member of the Odd Fellow's Lodge in Lebanon 
in 1880, but later was a member of the Pride of the West 
Lodge No. 650, Belleville. In 1892-189?, he was Grand Master 
of the Illinois Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows. He died at 
Belleville, March 21, 1922. 

JUDGE ALBERT WATSON, LL. D. 
One of the most highly respected and influential citizens 
of his community is Judge Albert Watson, of Mt. Vernon. 
He is the younger son of Joel 
F. and Sarah M. (Taylor) 
Watson, and was born at 
Mt. Vernon, Illinois, April 
15, 1857. His native city has 
been his home all his life. He 
was educated in the public 
schools of Mt. Vernon, and 
after finishing the high 
school, entered McKendree 
College, where his older 
brother, Dr.WalterWatson, 
had previously taken his col- 
lege course. While at Mc- 
Kendree he was a member 

of the Philosophian Literary Society. He was graduated in 
the class of 1876, receiving the degree of B. S. After that, 
he studied law in a law office in Mt. Vernon and was ad- 
mitted to the bar. Since that time the legal profession has 




JUDGE WATSON 



been his major interest during his long and active career. He 
was married August 12, 1880, to Miss Mary Eunice Way 
Their four children are Mrs. Marina W. Frazier, of Ocono- 
mowoc, Wisconsin; Captain Joel F. Watson, U. S. A., San 
Francisco, California; Miss Alice E. Watson, Ph. D., a 
teacher in Forest Hills, Long Island, a suburb of New York 
City; and Allen Stanley Watson, attorney-at-law, Mt. 
Vernon, Illinois. Judge Watson, in addition to his work as 
a lawyer, has engaged extensively in the banking business. 
He was for fifteen years president of the Ham National 
Bank of Mt. Vernon. He was also founder, and for some 
years president of a number of village banks in surrounding 
towns. He was twice city attorney of Mt. Vernon, four 
years state's attorney of Jefferson County, and two years 
master in chancery. In 191 1, on the death of Judge Vick- 
ers, of the Supreme Court of Illinois, Governor Dunne could 
find no more suitable person to fill the vacancy than Mr. 
Watson. And thus he became a member of the highest 
court in the state, a position which he fills with great 
acceptability. 

Among the honors that have come to him from his fellow 
workers in the legal profession is the presidency of the 
Jefferson County Bar Association, which position he held 
for twenty years. He was also one of the founders and first 
president of the Bar Association of the First Supreme Judi- 
cial District. Among the specific instances of service rendered 
during his legal career, it should be mentioned that he has 
been for fifty years attorney for the L. £s? N. Railroad, and 
at the same time, for many years attorney for the Southern 
and C. 6? E. I. Railroads. In June, 191 5, he became president 
of the Illinois State Board of Law Examiners, and still holds 
the position. In the discharge of his duties in this office, he 
has examined about ij,ooo applicants for admission to the 
bar. He believes in fraternalism and is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. He was Grand Chancellor of Illinois in 
that order in 1909-1910. He was in charge of the completion 
and dedication of the Pythian Orphans' Home at Decatur, 
Illinois. The dedication ceremonies took place June 9, 1910. 

Judge Watson was reared in a Methodist home and for 
sixty years has been a member of the First Methodist Church 
in Mt. Vernon. For many years he has been a trustee of that 
body. Since October, 191'?, he has been teacher of the Men's 
Bible Class in the Sunday School of his church. This class 
IS an outstiinding religious organization with a large enroll- 
ment, and maintains an average attendance of about one 
hundred. 



Two Hundred and Forty-Eiglit 



At the session of the Southern Illinois Conference held 
at McKendree College in 1927, he was elected by an almost 
unanimous vote of the Lay Electoral Conference, as leader 
of the Lay Delegation to the General Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, which meets in May. 1918, at 
Kansas City, Missouri. 

At the time of the Civil War, Judge Watson was only 
a child, and therefore could take no part in it. When the 
United States entered the World War, he was beyond the 
age of active service at the front, but his patriotism was 
plainly shown in his efficient service as chairman of the local 
draft board, from April, 1917 to February, 1918. At that 
time he was promoted to the district draft board, where 
he served till Armistice Day, 1918. Each of these boards 
achieved a Number One rating from the War Department, 
hi 1904 he was the nominee of his party for the office of 
Attorney General of Illinois. Although not elected because 
his party was in the minority at that time, yet he ran far 
ahead of his ticket. 

Because of his accomplishments out in the work-a-day 
world, Judge Watson was selected as one of the chapel 
speakers who addressed the students in chapel, one each 
week during the Centennial year at McKendree. At a meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees and Visitors in September, 
1927, the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was bestowed 
upon Judge Watson, and it should be stated that this honor 
came to him unsolicited and without his knowledge. It was 
therefore the spontaneous recognition of true merit and 
service. 

THE CLASS OF 1877 
EDWIN L. ASH 

Edwin Linder Ash was born on a farm at Turkey Hill, 
in St. Clair County, Illinois, October 9, 1857. He was a son 
of John P. and Sabina Ash, who were both native Amer- 
icans. When their sons were of suitable age, they moved 
to Lebanon to give them a better opportunity to secure 
college training. Edwin L. entered college in March, 1874 
and graduated in June, 1877, receiving the degree of B. S., 
and later, M. S. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He spent the greater part of the twenty years fol- 
lowing his graduation in the west. He died at Ogden, Utah, 
January 21, 1897, leaving a widow, but no children. 
STEPHEN M. BAILEY 

Stephen Milburn Bailey was born near Lebanon, Illinois, 
November 26, 1857. His parents, Stephen and Mary Bailey, 
were both natives of the state of Delaware, and both died 
in Lebanon at a very advanced age. Mr. Bailey entered Mc- 



Kendree m the fall of 1872, and having completed the scien- 
tific course, received the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
1877. Later he entered the University of Michigan and 
graduated from that institution m 1880, with the degree of 
LL. B. While in McKendree he was a member of the Pla- 
tonian Literary Society. He was married November 26, 
1885, to Miss Louisa K. Gerne, of Lebanon. They have 
two children, Leon and Irene Bailey. After completing his 
education, Mr. Bailey went west and located in Fairbury, 
Nebraska. There for many years he has been engaged in the 
gram, coal, and stock business. He was a Democratic pres- 
idential elector in 1904 and 1912; mayor of Fairbury four 
terms; county treasurer four terms; and a banker for many 
years. He has been Chaplain of the Blue Lodge; Commander 
and Shriner of Masonry; a member of the Order of Elks, 
Knights of Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

MRS. IDA BLANCK BAKER 
Ida Belle Blanck was born in Lebanon, Illinois, August 
15, 1858. Her parents were Charles and Jennie (Cape) 
Blanck, the former being of German and the latter of Amer- 
ican ancestry. She became a student in McKendree in 1873 
and graduated in the class of 1877, with the degree of A. 
B., later receiving A. M. She was a member of the Clionian 
Literary Society. While a student, she won the "Citizen's 
Prize" in June, 1875, as the best reader. She is a member 
of Grace Methodist Episcopal Church in Chicago. She was 
married August 3, 1878, to Hon. James D. Baker, then of 
Lebanon, Illinois. They resided for many years in Chicago, 
where Mr. Baker died some years ago. Mrs. Baker still has 
her permanent home in that city. 

ATKINS H. CARTER 
Atkins Harrison Carter was born at Butler, Choctaw 
County, Alabama, January 18, 1853. His parents were Joel 
D. and Amelia S. Carter, who were both of pure English 
stock. He became a student in McKendree in September, 
1873 and graduated in June, 1877, with the degree of B. S. 
later receiving the degree of M. S. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He studied law at the Union 
College of Law in Chicago and received the degree of LL. 
B. in 1 88 1. He has not devoted all his time to the law since 
then, but for twenty-four years has been principal of the 
public school in Fort Smith, Arkansas. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was married 
December 25, 1883, to Miss Mattie E. Liggett, of Oswego, 
Kansas. They have no children. 



Two Hundred and FortyHii 



__^^^^^^^^^^#MC KENDREE 



MRS. ANNIE CUNNINGHAM PEARN 

Annie Cunningham was born at Lebanon, February iS, 

1857. She is the daughter of Dr. Richard F. and Mary 

(Risky) Cunningham. Her father was a member of Mc- 

Kendree's first graduating class. She entered McKendree in 

1872 and graduated in the class of 1877. She delivered the 

salutatory in Greek as her part of the graduating exercises. 

While in McKendree she was a member of Clio, and she 

belongs to the Methodist Church. She was married at Leb 

anon, March 30, 1880, to John Grigg Pearn, of Beardstown , 

Illinois. For many years their home has been at Ashland, 

Illinois. 

MINERVA E. LANE 

Minerva Ellen Lane was born at Marshall, Illinois, in 
1859. She is a daughter of Rev. Joseph Lane, who was a 
member of the Illinois Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Her mother's maiden name was Hannah A. 
Piggott. Her father was especially active in the pastoral phase 
of church work and was particularly successful in clearing 
up church debts as well as misunderstandings among the 
members. The mother was active in the missionary work as 
well as an ardent student of general literature and the Bible. 
She believed heartily in education, and when she was left 
a widow with two children, George and Minerva, she made 
it the ambition of her life to give them a good education. 
She came to Lebanon where they both attended McKendree. 
The brother pursued the course as far as the senior year 
when he dropped the college work and took up the study 
of law. He afterwards became a successful lawyer. Minerva 
finished the college course, graduating in the class of 1877 
with the degree of A. B., and in 1880 received the degree 
of A. M. She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society 
and was noted for the efficiency with which she filled the 
office of treasurer. After her graduation she taught school 
for a time at Elsah, Illinois. She then accepted a position as 
book-keeper for an implement firm in St. Louis, and then 
was employed for some time by a real estate company. For 
many years she has been secretary of Forest Park University, 
a young ladies" school of St. Louis. In this position she is the 
efficient assistant of the president and does much field work 
in securing students for the institution. She is a woman of 
much ability in this line of work. Some years ago she com- 
pleted the course of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific 
Circle. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
REV. EDWIN G. LOCKE, D. D. 

Edwin Garretson Locke was born at Brookville, Indiana, 
February 9, 1857. He was the younger son of John W. and 
Matilda Locke. His father was many years a member of the 




DR. E. G. LOCKE 



Southern Illinois Conference 
and for four years president of 
McKendree College. He en- 
tered McKendree in the fall 
of 1874 and graduated in the 
class of 1877, while his father 
was president of the college. 
In 1896, Taylor University 
honored him with the degree 
of D. D. While in McKendree, 
he was a member of the Philos- 
ophian Society. After his grad- 
uation, he taught school for 
three years, two in Illinois and 
one in Holly Springs, Mississippi, and studied law in the 
office of Hon. Charles W. Thomas, of Belleville, during the 
vacations. He then changed his plan, and yielding to the call 
to the ministry, he joined the Kansas Conference in 1881. 
During his ministerial career he held some of the important 
charges of his conference, both in Kansas City and Topeka. 
He also served as presiding elder of the Topeka District. He 
served for twenty years as secretary of his conference and twice 
represented it in the General Conference. In the general con- 
ferences of 1896 and 1900 he was associate editor of the 
Daily Christian Advocate. In 1916 he was secretary of the 
General Conference. Dr. Locke was twice married. Paul, 
the only child of his first marriage, died in infancy. His sec' 
ond marriage was to Miss Mary A. Myers, of Jefferson ville, 
Indiana. The children of this marriage are John M., who 
died in youth, and two daughters, Rachel, and Ruth Joan. 
Dr. Locke was a forceful and attractive public speaker and 
did much work in this line for the church and other good 
causes outside of the regular work of the ministry. His death 
occurred June 14, 1918. 

MRS. ELLA SARGENT WAGGONER 
Ella Lovell Sargent was born August 10, 1857, at Lebanon, 
Illinois. Her parents were John L. and Abigail (Danforth) 
Sargent, who were of English ancestry. She entered Mc- 
Kendree in 1872 and graduated in 1877, receiving the degree 
of A. B., and later, A. M. She was a member of the Clionian 
Literary Society. She was married July 3, i88j, to Prof. E. 
B. Waggoner, of McKendree College. To them were born 
four children: Carrie, Roy, Mabel, and Lottie. They were 
all students in McKendree. Carrie died in California some 
years after her marriage. The others live in Illinois, except 
Lottie, who was a trained nurse in St. Louis, and later in 
Oklahoma. She was married to Mr. Whitlatch. Her death 



Two Hundred and Fifty 



occurred a few years later as the result of a surgical oper.i- 
tion. Mrs. Waggoner was a member of the Methodist 
Church. She was a good home-maker and a faithful mother 
to her children. She died after a short illness at her home 
in Lebanon, February i8, i8q2. 

THE CLASS OF 1878 
JOHN F. ASH 

John Fremont Ash was born in the Turkey Hill settle- 
ment, in St. Clair County, Illinois, September 29, 18';';. He 
was a son of John P. and Sabina Ash, who were both Amer- 
icans. When their sons were of suitable age they moved to 
Lebanon to give them an opportunity to secure a college 
education. John F. became a student in McKendree in 187J 
and graduated in June, 1878, receiving the degree of A. B. 
At the same time he also received the degree of LL. B. and 
was admitted to the bar for the practice of law the same 
year. He was the salutatorian of his class and won a prize 
m an essay contest. He was a member of the Platonian 
Society. He was a Democrat in politics. He went west and 
located in Denver, Colorado, where he died August ji, 1805. 
WILLIAM J. BADLEY 

William Johnson Badley was born at Upper Alton, Illi- 
nois, May 26, 1852. He became a student m McKendree m 
1875 and graduated in the class of 1878, receiving the degree 
of A. B. He was a member of the Platonian Society. At 
the time he was attending McKendree, his father was a 
farmer living near Summerfield. He left college intending to 
follow the profession of a druggist. He went to Mariana, 
Arkansas, where he was married to Miss Lena Wright, De- 
cember 15, 1879. He died at that place March 13, 1880, as 
the result of a severe attack of pneumonia. He was a Metho- 
dist m religion and a Democrat in politics. 
GEORGE L. BROWN 

George Luther Brown was born at Lebanon, Illinois, April 
20, 1858. His father, Luther Brown, was a native of Ver- 
mont, of English ancestry. His mother, Caroline E. Baldwin, 
was a native of New York and of Scotch descent. George 
grew up in Lebanon, attended the public school, and entered 
McKendree in 1874. He graduated in 1878 with the degree 
of B. S., and later received that of M. S. He was a member 
of the Philosophian Literary Society. After graduation, he 
was engaged in general merchandise for eight years in New- 
ton, Illinois and at Lebanon. In 1886 he went to Arkansas 
City, Kansas and engaged in insurance and real-estate busi- 
ness. The following year he moved his family to that city, 
which has been his home up to the present time. In 1896 
he became the president and general manager of the Brown 



Investment Company with headquarters at Arkansas City. 
This company is still doing a flourishing business. In 1907, 
Mr. Brown was elected mayor of Arkansas City. He served 
one term and declined to be a candidate for a second, since 
he did not find political life agreeable. He was married Sep- 
tember 14, 1881, to Miss Iva Lee Wise, of Lebanon, who 
was one of his classmates at McKendree. They have three 
sons and two daughters, all now living. 

AUGUSTINE P. CARTER 

Augustine Peck Carter was born at Beardstown, Illinois, 
February 22, 18^^. He was the son of Thomas H. and Marcia 
(Peck) Carter. He graduated from McKendree m the class 
of 1878, receiving the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. He 
was a member of the Philosophian Society. He was married 
July 20, 1882, to Miss Frances Henderson. They have one 
child. Miss Marcia Peck Carter. He spent his life as a railroad 
man. He was first employed as a clerk in the Division Super- 
intendent's office of the St. Louis Division of the Chicago, 
Burlington, and Qumcy. He served m various capacities 
during his lifetime in the employ of the Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern and the Great Northern Railway. When 
death came Nov. 20, 1903,, he was General Adjuster and 
Claim Agent tor the Norfolk and Western Railway at Roa- 
noke, Virginia. He was a member of no church or lodge. 
His widow, Mrs. Frances Henderson Carter, lives m New 
York City. She suggests the following quotation as suitably 
characterizing her late husband : 

"His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed m him 
that nature might stand up and say to all the world, 'This 
was a man'!" 

EDWARD A. DENEEN 

Edward Ashley Deneen was born March 10, 1861, at 
Lebanon, Illinois. He was the eldest son of Professor Samuel 
H. and Mary F. (Ashley) Deneen. He became a student in 
the Preparatory Department of the college in 1872, and 
continued in school until he completed the classical course 
in 1878 and received the degree of A. B. He was the vale- 
dictorian of his class. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society and voted with the Republican party. In 
May, 1881, he entered the United States Mail Service as 
postal clerk, but on account of failing health he resigned 
this position March ji, 1882. He died of consumption Feb- 
ruary 12, i88j. 

REV. FRANK W. DOWNS 

Frank Washington Downs was born m the state of Ohio, 
February 9, 1853. He became a student in McKendree in 
the early seventies and graduated in the class of 1878, re- 




Two Hundred and FiftyOne 



^ftMC KENDREE^^^^^:^^^,...^;,.^^ 



ceiving the degree of A. B. He was a member of the Pl.i- 
tonian Society. He was an enthusiastic young orator, and 
represented McKendree in the state oratorical contest held 
in Monmouth in 1877. He was also the "Flag Orator" at 
McKendree in 1876. He entered the ministry of the Meth- 
odist Church and spent the best years of his life in that 
branch of service, working chiefly in the far west. He was 
located for a number of years in San Diego, California. He 
was married September 17, 1885, to Miss Elinor Lemen, of 
Collinsville, Illinois. They have one son, Robert F. Downs. 
ROLAND H. HORNER 

Roland Henry Horner was born at Lebanon, Illinois, Sep- 
tember II, 1858. His parents were Henry Hypes Horner, 
who was a native of Lebanon, Illinois, and Helen (Danforth) 
Horner, who was descended from some of the "Mayflower 
immigrants."' He entered McKendree in 1874 and graduated 
in 1878, receiving the degree of A. B. Later he received the 
degree of Master of Arts. While in McKendree he was a 
member of the Philosophian Literary Society. He also studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in Illinois. He was married 
in 1884 to Miss Louise Sauter. They have two daughters, 
Ethel and Helen, who are graduates of McKendree; and 
four sons, two of whom have been students in McKendree. 
Mr. Horner was employed two years on the surveying corps 
of the Union Pacific Railroad, several years as superintendent 
of gold and silver mines in New Mexico; was also mine 
superintendent in Georgia. Since 1894 he has been a lawyer 
in Lebanon. He has held the office of city attorney and 
mayor of Lebanon. He has also been justice of the peace in 
Lebanon for many years. 

KATE C. LIGGETT 

Kate Clara Liggett was born at Lebanon, Illinois, May 
29, 1854. Her father was William C. Liggett, of St. Louis, 
who was of Scotch-Irish descent, and her mother was Ellen 
O. (Whitney) Liggett, a native of Vermont and of English 
ancestry. She entered McKendree in the fall of 187'i and 
graduated in June, 1878, receiving the degree of B. S. She 
afterward received the degree of M. S. She was a member 
of the Clionian Literary Society. She is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

GEORGE W. LOCKE 

George William Locke was born in April, 1852. He was 
the older son of Rev. John W. and Matilda Locke. His boy- 
hood was spent largely at Greencastle, Indiana, where his 
father was professor of Mathematics in De Pauw University. 
In 1874 the father became president of McKendree and his 
sons became students in the institution. George W, grad- 



uated from the Law Department in 1878, receiving the de* 
gree of LL. B. He was employed as a teacher for some years 
and spent a few years as a member of a surveying company 
in Indian Territory. He then engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in East St. Louis for a number of years, and later followed 
the same business in St. Louis. He was married to Miss 
Fannie Parker and had one daughter, Mrs. David R. Smith, 
of St. Louis. He suffered a paralytic stroke in 1896, from 
which he never entirely recovered. His death occurred in 
St. Louis, in June, 1918. He lies buried in College Hill Cem- 
etery, at Lebanon. 

HON. CICERO J. LINDLY 
Cicero Jefferson Lindly was born near St. Jacob, Madison 
County, Illinois, December 11, 1857, ^^'^ '^i^'l ^^ his home 
in Greenville in September, 1926. He entered McKendree 
in the early seventies and would have graduated in the class 
of 1877, but having decided to turn his attention to the 
law, he dropped his regular college course to give his time to 
the law course. He then finished in the class of 1878, receiv- 
ing the degree of LL. B. He was a member of Philo. He was 
married December 22, 1880, to Miss Alice J. McNeil, of 
Greenville. Their three children are all deceased. The death 
of his son when a lad of a dozen years or so was especially 
sad. He accompanied his father on a trip to Colorado, and 
there sickened and died. In 1880 Mr. Lindly purchased a 
section of land near Greenville, where he lived till 1900, 
when he moved into the city of Greenville and resided 
there for the remainder of his life. He was prominent in 
various political circles. He was a presidential elector in 
1884, casting his vote for Blaine and Logan. He was a del- 
egate to the National Republican Convention in Chicago 
in 1888. In 1890 he was a candidate for Congress, but was 
defeated by a small majority. In 1891 he received the entire 
Republican vote of the Illinois Legislature for United States 
Senator, but Former-Governor John M. Palmer was elected 
by a majority of only three votes. In 1897 he was appointed 
Chairman of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission by . 
Governor Tanner. In 190J he was elected to the Illinois 
Legislature and served six years. In 1913 he was appointed 
Master in Chancery of Bond County. He was a member of 
the Christian Church, a thirty-second degree Mason, a 
Knight Templar, a Shriner, an Odd Fellow, an Elk, a Knight 
of Pythias, and a Modern Woodman. 

MRS. SARAH MILLS PRIBBLE 
Sarah Marguerite Mills was born at New Albany, Indi- 
ana, May 10, 1857, and died at Lebanon, Illinois, June 21, 
1897. She was a daughter of Robert and Sarah (Norvell) 




Fifty-Two 



MC KENDREE 



Mills, who were both native Americans. She entered Mc- 
Kendree in 1872 and graduated m 1878, receiving the degree 
of B. S. Later she was granted the degree of M. S. For 
twelve years after her graduation she was a teacher, and 
organized a literary society and a Sabbath School m the 
neighborhood where she taught. In August, i8qo, she was 
married to Thomas J. Pribble. They had three children, 
Clark, Arlie, and Grace. She was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church and was a faithful worker m every line of 
endeavor which she undertook. 

MRS. ADDIE MOORE SAGER 
Addle Viola Moore was born in Lebanon, Illinois, Sep- 
tember 21, 1859. She was a daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Nichols) Moore, and was a grand-daughter of one of the 
founders of McKendree. She graduated in the class of 1878 
with the degree of B. S. She was a member of Clio. She was 
married September 21, 1881, to Charles E. Sager, of Lebanon. 
They spent most of their lives in St. Louis where Mr. Sager 
was m business, though for a few years of their later life they 
lived in Lebanon, while Mr. Sager was a partner in the hard- 
ware business which was established by his father in an early 
day. Their son, Roy, was a student in McKendree. Mrs. 
Sager died in October, 1923 and was buried in College Hill 
Cemetery. She was a member ot the Methodist Church and 
of the "Daughters of the American Revolution." 

MRS. HATTIE MORRISON MILNOR 
Hattie Alicia Morrison was born at Carmi, Illinois, April 
12, 1856. Her parents were Rev. A. B. Morrison, a native 
of Ohio, and formerly a member of the Southern Illinois 
Conference but later of the Southern California Conference. 
Her mother, Charlotte Milner, a native of Ireland, died in 
1892, at Santa Monica, Calif. She entered McKendree in 
the fall of 1874 and graduated in June, 1878, receiving the 
degree of B. S., and three years later, M. S. She was a member 
ot the Clionian Literary Society and held the oiBce of pres- 
ident of that organization. After her graduation she taught 
school for five years, holding positions at Anna, Cobden, 
and Litchfield. She was married April 2, 1884, to Mr. M. 
M. Milnor, a druggist of Litchfield, Illinois, and her home 
has been in that city ever since. She is an active worker in 
the Order of the Eastern Star and for two years served as 
Worthy Matron of that order in Lavonne Chapter No. 5'i, 
located at Litchfield. 

ALLAN D. METCALFE 
Allan Deneen Metcalfe was born at Edwardsville, Illinois, 
October 17, 1859, and died in the year 1902. He was the 
son of Hon. Andrew W. Metcalfe, and his wife, Sarah 



Deneen Metcalfe. After receiving training in the public 
schools, he entered McKendree College and graduated 111 
the class of 1878, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
member of the Philosophian Literary Society. Later he grad- 
uated from the Chicago Law School and was admitted to 
the bar in 1882. He practiced law m Edwardsville. He was 
married m January, 1885, to Miss Lillie Wheeler, of Edwards- 
ville. Their children are Donald W., Margaret, and Jessie, 
all of whom are now living. 

MRS- JULIA NICHOLS GOFORTH 
Julia Belle Nichols was born at Lebanon, December 19, 
1857, 'i'""^ died in St. Louis, Mo., September ix, 191 1. She 
was a daughter of William and Caroline Nichols, both of 
whom were natives of Kentucky. She grew up in Lebanon, 
was educated in the public schools and McKendree College, 
where she graduated in the class of 1878, receiving the de- 
gree of B. S. She was married to Walter C. Goforth, of the 
class of 1876, October 3, 1883. They lived for many years 
in St. Paul, Minnesota, and later in St. Louis. She preceded 
her husband to the grave by lust one month. They left 

no children. 

OSCAR L. PARKINSON 
Oscar Louis Parkinson was born at Highland, Illinois, 
December 24, 1856. He is the son of Alfred J. and Mary E. 
(Baldwin) Parkinson, of whom the former was born in Ten- 
nessee and the latter in the state of New York. He entered 
McKendree in the early seventies and graduated in the class 
of 1878, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a member of 
the Platonian Literary Society. He was married December 
2, 188';, to Miss Virginia Parkinson, of Mineral Point, Wis- 
consin. They have two children, Florence A, and Donald 
L. He lived in Kansas for a time, but in recent years has 
resided at Harrison, Arkansas, which is his present home. 
He has been engaged in farming, the hardware business, and 
real estate business. He and his son are proprietors of the 
"Pine Hill Dairy Farm," where they raise thoroughbred 
Jersey cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs. He is a member and 
a prominent worker in the Methodist Church, in which he 
has served as trustee, class leader, and Sunday School 
superintendent. For years he has been a radical Prohibi- 
tionist. 

JUDGE FRANK PERRIN 

Frank Perrin was born near Mascoutah, in St. Clair Coun- 
ty, Illinois, September 10, 1858. His parents were Frank and 
Catherine Perrin, who were of French descent. He entered 
McKendree in the fall of 1874 and completed his course in 
1878, receiving the degree of B. S. He then pursued his law 
course in McKendree and received the degree of LL. B. in 



Two Hwidred and FtftyThrcc 



i88o. From that time on he devoted his whole hfe to the 
profession of law. He practiced law in Mascoutah for many 
years, and was for fourteen years city attorney in that 
place. Other positions which he held might be mentioned 
as follows: ten years a member of the C!ounty Board of St. 
Clair County; two years assistant State's Attorney; four 
years county judge in Belleville; and for the remainder ot 
his life, probate judge. He had but a few months to serve 
to complete another term at the time of his death in 1Q26. 
He was a reliable and faithful public officer in every position 
he held. He was first married to Miss Amelia Letherbury, 
and after her death, to Miss Ida Ludwig. As a result of the 
first marriage, he had two sons and one daughter. By the 
last marriage, he had one son. For many years he lived in 
the city of Belleville, and as long as he filled his last public 
position he was ex-officio custodian of the museum of the 
St. Clair County Historical Society. 

RICHARD THATCHER 
Richard Thatcher was born near Mt. Pleasant, Illinois, 
March 23, 1846. His parents were Rev. John and Virginia 
(Bolls) Thatcher. His father was a member of the Southern 
Illinois Conference. When he was in his sixteenth year, he 
entered the Union army as a drummer boy in the iiith Reg- 
iment of Illinois Volunteers. At the close of the war he was 
presented with a drum by the officers of the regiment in 
recognition of his faithful service. Before the Battle of At- 
lanta, he was taken prisoner and confined for two months 
in Andersonville prison. From the effects of this experience 
he never fully recovered. While in prison he became a friend 
of Boston Corbett, the slayer of John Wilkes Booth. In 1866 
he entered McKendree, but after one year he left college 
to engage in teaching. Later, he returned and completed the 
course, graduating in 1878 with the degree of B. S. Later, he 
received the M. S. He was a member of the Philosophi.in 
Literary Society. After graduation he was engaged in high 
school work for some years in the state of Kansas, also for 
a time, in newspaper work. In 189J he was elected president 
of the new "Central State Normal School," at Edmond, 
Oklahoma. Here he taught for sixteen years, until failing 
health compelled him to give up the work in 1909. He was 
married in September, 1869, to Melissa D. Deford, of Ashley, 
Illinois. Of their five children, the oldest, a son, died in 
infancy. Their daughters, Edna, May, Blanche, and Ethel, 
are all married and living in the west. He died November 
28, 1909. He was reared a Methodist, and for some time 
was a preacher in the Southern Illinois Conference, but on 
account of throat trouble, was compelled to abandon the 



work. Loiter in lite he was a Presbyterian as a matter of 
convenience. In 191 1, a bronze bust of him was placed in 
the school where he taught so long, bearing this inscription: 
"Dedicated to the memory of Richard Thatcher, by his 
friends, fellow-teachers, and pupils; his brethren of the Ma- 
sonic Order and G. A. R., and his co-workers in the church." 
PROF. HENRY D. WALKER 

Henry Dew Walker was born in Illinois, February 2, 1849, 
and died at Olathe, Kansas, February 3, 1909. He was a son 
of the Rev. Samuel Walker, who was for many years a mem- 
ber of the Southern Illinois Conference. At the age of twen- 
ty, he entered McKendree and became a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. After being out of school at 
intervals in order to earn expense money, he graduated in 
the class of 1878, receiving the degree of B. S. He was en- 
gaged in teaching nearly all his life in several different Hnes. 
For a number of years before his death he was in charge of 
the Deaf and Dumb Asylum at Olathe, Kansas. At his death 
he left a widow, who now resides in Pasadena, California. 
WILLIAM C. WATKINS 

William Clement Watkins, son of J. R. and Margaret 
Watkins, was born at Antrim, Ohio, May 10, 1856, and 
died at Fairfield, Illinois, May 21, 1891. While a student in 
McKendree, he was a member of the Platonian Literary So- 
ciety. He graduated from McKendree in the class of 1878, 
receiving the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was a 
brother of Rev. Thomas C. Watkins, of the class of 1875. 
In October, 1880, he was married to Miss Lou Hall, of Huey, 
Illinois. To them were born two children, Charles and Clara. 
The former is married and lives in Los Angeles, California. 
The latter is now Mrs. Clayton Hale, and also lives in 
California. Mr. Watkins" occupation was the real estate 
business, in which he was engaged for a number of years 
at Fairfield, Illinois. He was a member of the Methodist 
Church and of the Odd Fellows Lodge. 

MRS. IVA WISE BROWN 
Iva Lee Wise, a daughter of Adam H. and Julia A Wise, 
was born at Lebanon, Illinois, June 9, i860. Her youth was 
spent in her native town and she became a student in Mc- 
Kendree in 1874. She graduated in the class of 1878 with 
the degree of B. S. She was a member of Clio. She was 
married September 14, 1881, to George L. Brown, of Leb- 
anon, who was a member of the same graduating class. They 
have three sons and two daughters, all living. Their residence 
was at Newton, Illinois and Lebanon until 1887, when they 
moved to Arkansas City, Kansas, where they have lived 
ever since. She is a member of the Methodist Church. 



Two Huticired and F\jty-Four 



^MC KEN DREE"^^^^^^:^;^.^,;.^^.^^ 



CHAPTER XX. 

College Papers in hicKendree 



'he first college paper published at McKendree was 
known as '"The Lebanon Journal." As early as 1836 
It was proposed in the Illinois Conference that a 
semimonthly paper be published at the college, that would 
serve both as a college paper and a conference paper. The 
members of the conference pledged themselves to act as 
agents for the paper but not to be financially responsible 
for It. However, this proposal was not carried out until 
1847, when Rev. Erastus Wentworth was president of the 
college. At the annual meeting of the Board in 1847, legis- 
lation was passed authorizing the college to publish a semi- 
monthly paper, beginning with the first week of November. 
As a matter of fact the first issue was dated December 9^ 
1847. The delay was on account of securing the means nec- 
essary to start the enterprise. The explanation given by the 
publication committee in the first issue was that they had 
to build a printing office and procure a press, type, fixtures 
and other equipment. For the means of securing all these 
things they were entirely dependent on the donations of 
friends of the enterprise. The announcement says, "We now 
have a good office, pre.ss, and new type." It ought to be 
stated that for the labor of erecting the office building thev 
were chiefly indebted to Rev. G. W. Robbins, then presid- 
ing elder of the Lebanon District, and who was a carpenter 
before he became a preacher. The Journal was not a student 
publication, as were most of the later papers issued at Mc- 
Kendree, but was edited by the faculty, and published by 
the Joint Board through a committee appointed for the pur- 
pose. Only the printer was a student. His name was Thomas 
G. Weeden. He was a practical printer, having served his 
apprenticeship in the employ of the Garrollton Gazette, in 
Green County, Illinois. At McKendree he divided his time 
between the paper and his college studies. His work was 
creditable tn both lines. 

The editor-in-chief was Dr. Wentworth, president of the 
college, with all the rest of the faculty as his assistants. 
However, after the first issue, the president's many duties 
took him away from home so much that the editorial work 
was mostly done by other members of the faculty. The 
assistants whose names appear with Dr. Wentworth's in 
the first issue, were Professors Cummmgs, Mattison, Good- 
fellow and Goheen. It appears that the editorial responsi- 
bilities fell chiefly upon Professor Cummings during the re- 
mainder of Dr. Wentworth's term and after Dr. Cummings 



became president. Professor James Leaton did the most of 
the editorial work. After carefully looking through the twen- 
ty-six numbers which constitute volume one of the Lebanon 
Journal, one is led to the conclusion that it is not only a 
college paper but a church and family paper as well. It is a 
folio sheet with four pages, twelve by eighteen inches, care- 
fully edited, and containing not only church news but articles 
of a literary and scientific nature, such as you might expect 
to find m a good magazine, and would be interesting not 
only to college students but also to intelligent people m 
general. The editor's salutatory m the first number contains 
the following: "If it be asked by what authority we assume 
the responsible office of conductor of a public print, be it 
known that among the multiplied ex-officio relations of our 
present position (President of McKendree College) some 
prying genius has discovered that of editor, or rather chair- 
man of a corps of editors, of the Lebanon Journal. ****** 
The Journal will be devoted to local news, general mtelli' 
gence, literature, science, moraUty and religion. If we shall 
succeed in our present intent of gathering up and condensing 
for our little sheet, a suitable variety of entertaining and 
useful matter for the pleasure and profit of our readers, we 
shall not only congratulate ourselves upon our success, but 
shall feel that without boasting we may apply to our sheet 
the lines of one of the old poets, 

'The bee is little among such as fly. 

But her fruit is the chief of sweet things'." 

From the publishers' address we quote the following: 
"The Lebanon Journal will be published semi-monthly at 
the rate of one dollar per annum, in advance, or one dollar 
and twenty-five cents if not paid till the expiration of six 
months.* * * * * * No labor will be spared to make it a 
good family paper and an efficient .luxiliary m the promotion 
of useful intelligence, science, literature, sound morality, and 
pure religion. It will eschew the ultraism of the day, party 
in politics, and bigotry in religion." 

There is a brief description of Lebanon under the caption, 
"Our Village." There is reference to its location and climate; 
then the statement that "the high road from Vincennes to 
the principal commercial mart of the far west passes directly 
through the place. The amount of daily travel usually sur- 
passes the estimate of those who have not witnessed the 
hourly passage of teams of every description wending their 
way to market, to swell the business of the capital of the 



Two Hundred and F./tv-Fiie 



^#MC KENDREE''^^^^^:^^^..^.^^,..-^ 



Great Valley. This will one day he the route of railroad 
communication between Cincinnati and St. Louis. The tele- 
graph line already passes along our principal thoroughfare. 
Some four hundred people inhabiting the rolling ridge which 
bears the popular name of the ancient land of cedars, deem 
themselves particularly fortunate. For a place of its size ours 
does its share of the country's business. In addition to its 
stores and machine shops, it has a steam flour mill and 
a site has been selected for the erection of a steam saw mill. 
Living is cheap, the climate healthy, and work abundant. 
What more can any people wish, with the blessing of Provi- 
dence, to make them wealthy and happy?" 

Belleville is referred to as "a thrifty village, destined to 
become a city." It had at that time three thousand inhab- 
itants, of whom one-half were German. Chicago had a pop- 
ulation of twenty thousand and St. Louis had sixty thousand. 
So that at the middle of the last century, St. Louis was three 
times as large as Chicago, while now the ratio of the two 
cities is just the reverse. Illinois had just ratified her new 
constitution. It was stated that a justice of the peace in 
Pike County was opposed to the new constitution because 
he had sworn to support the old one when he entered upon 
the duties of his office. The paper philosophizes upon political 
situations and announces candidates, but does not side with 
any particular party. Questions of church policy are discussed 
and even the opinion of a Methodist bishop is boldly and 
freely controverted. An item entitled, "Literary Societies of 
McKendree College" s.iys, "The Philosophian has been re- 
suscitated and a new one created with the name 'McKendree 
College Lyceum.' Both are in a flourishing condition." 

There is a column of college news which tells, .unong 
other things, that the Wesleyan University at that time 
had one hundred and nineteen students, under the direc- 
tion of a president, four professors and two tutors. Dick- 
inson had a student body of one hundred and seventy-five 
and a faculty of eleven. 

Professor Stoddard of Middlebury College (Vermont) had 
resigned his position on account of ill health. Indiana As- 
bury University expected more of its teachers than Dick- 
inson for it had two hundred and thirty-seven students in 
charge of five professors. 

Nearly two columns of the paper are devoted to adver- 
tisements. Among them is one for the college. An announce- 
ment signed by E. Wentworth, president, states that "The 
next quarter of McKendree College will begin Wednesday, 
December 2j. For terms see advertisement." It seems a little 
strange to us of the present day that the new quarter should 



begin just two days before Christmas. In these times it 
would be impracticable to get the students to begin any- 
thing but a hohday so near the great international festival. 
The advertisement states that the fees are to be paid in 
advance. For the quarter of twelve weeks, the fees were: 
Tuition, $6.00; Room rent, $i2.')0: Library fee, twenty-five 
cents; Contingent fee, sixty-two and a half cents. No de- 
duction or refund in any of these except in case of sickness. 
Board in the Commons, $1.25 a week. Students furnish their 
own fuel and lights at about twelve and a half cents per 
week for each; and all room furniture except stoves. Indi- 
viduals board themselves at about fifty or seventy-five cents 
per week. Books furnished at less than St. Louis retail prices. 

There was also a "Funny Column" from which we quote 
two samples: 

"ShaJ^espeare Modernized — As two loafers, sitting m 
front of a ten pm alley, were exchanging hopes and 
sympathies, one drew his wallet from his pocket and 
said, 'He who steals my purse steals trash.' "Yes,' replied 
the other, 'and he who filches from you your good name, 
takes from you what you never had'. " 

"'Curious Excise Entry — Alexander Gun, an officer in 
Scotland, being dismissed from employment for making an 
error in his returns, an entry was made in a book kept 
for that purpose, as follows: 'A gun, discharged for 
making a false report'." 

It gives news, local, national, and international. The editor 
comments on the fact that a telegraph line is being construct- 
ed from the east to St. Louis, and right thru Lebanon, but 
regrets the fact that his town cannot afford a station on the 
line, but news going over the wires must go through to St. 
Louis and then back to Lebanon by stage coach. But he 
consoles himself with the prediction that it will not be many 
years till there will be a railroad to St. Louis. He also refers 
to and most heartily approves the construction of macadam 
roads between Belleville and St. Louis, and part way between 
Belleville and Lebanon. The paper also contained announce' 
ment of steamship sailings and arrivals at the Atlantic sea- 
board; congressional news; an article in the scientific column 
on the theory of hailstones; an account of a railroad meeting, 
held for the purpose of trying to induce the Ohio and Miss- 
issippi Railroad Company to build their proposed railroad 
through the town of Lebanon, which they eventually did, 
or at least near it; funerals and weddings thruout the terri- 
tory, and in case of a wedding, sometimes an acknowledg- 
ment that cake had been received by the editor; accounts 
of temperance meetings and Sunday School conventions and 




Two Hundred and F.ftv-S: 



MC KENDREE 



camp meetings; a warning to be prepared for a cholera epi- 
demic ; a discussion of the new republic in South Africa • 
the story of an encounter with an alligator in South Carolina ; 
an anecdote of Dr. Chalmers; arguments on the importance 
of Sabbath observance; and many other things, similar and 
dissimilar. It gives a much fuller account of the session of 
the Illinois Conference, held in Belleville in September, 1848, 
than can be found in the conference minutes. It was presided 
over by Bishop Morris. It began on Thursday and continued 
till a week from the following Friday and the appointments 
were read late that night. So that it lasted fully nine days. 
The appointments are published for the eight districts of 
the Illinois Conference; also for the four districts of the 
German Missions, and the three districts of the Missouri 
Conference. 

Peter Akers was appointed presiding elder of the Qumcy 
District, Peter Cartwnght of the Springfield District, and 
Colin D. James of the Lebanon District. The last named was 
the son-in-law of Dr. A. W. Casad, of Lebanon, and the 
father of Dr. Edmund J. James, late president of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. Dr. Casad was a long time resident of 
Lebanon and one of the founders of McKendree. His pro- 
fessional card as a physician is found in the advertisement 
column of the "Journal." The pastor appointed to Lebanon 
was Rev. William ClifFe, with Daniel Fairbank as his assist- 
ant. Four men were appointed to McKendree College, name- 
ly: Erastus Wentworth, president, and Anson W. Cum- 
mings, Spencer Mattison, and William Goodfellow, pro- 
fessors. The other member of the faculty at that time, Dr. 
S. M. E. Goheen, was a physician instead of a preacher and 
not a member of the conference. The next issue of the paper 
gave the reports in full of the various conference committees, 
and a two and a half column account of the bishop's sermon. 
In one issue is a long article discussing, "Objections to Sus- 
taining Colleges." It sets forth that some have objected to 
making contributions to McKendree on the ground that it 
"was established for the education of rich men's sons." A 
bit of statistical information is found, that there are thirty 
thousand clergymen of all denominations in the United 
States at that time, which was doubtless interesting to many 
readers, since it was before the day of the "World's Al- 
manac." There are biographical sketches of some of the early 
Methodist pioneers, letters of Peter Cartwright, and sto ries 
of Jesse Walker. There is a vigorous article on the subj ect 
of fencing, cleaning up, and beautifying College Hill Cem- 
etery; and a suggestion that like treatment ought to be 
given Shiloh Cemetery. 



One issue contains the story of a Frenchman who was 
exhibiting some sacred relics to wondering tourists. Among 
other things, he showed a sword which he claimed was 
"the sword which Balaam had when he would have slain 
the ass." A spectator remarked that Balaam did not have 
any sword on that occasion, but merely wished for one. 
"Very well," replied the Frenchman, "this is the one he 
wished for." That Frenchman must have many direct de- 
scendants in the European countries today. 

One article quotes from the Northern Christian Advocate . 
That paper, giving a review of the Illinois Conference min - 
utes, calls attention to the preachers' salaries m Illinois, 
stating that the largest salary received m that conference 
was three hundred and forty-four dollars, by Dr. Akers. 
The others ranged from one hundred to two hundred and 
fifty. "The Northern" concluded with the remark that "The 
preachers of Illinois are not likely to become rich, though 
they live m a rich country." "The Journal" points out that 
the minutes only report cash payments and take no account 
of other items received by the preachers, such as donations 
for the table, house rent, fuel, horse feed, etc., and concludes 
with the statement that "Illinois preachers are as well sup- 
ported, if all Items are considered, as the average of those in 
the east. Though it is rare for a Methodist preacher to get 
rich, it IS equally rare for a faithful and efficient laborer 
to Starve." 

From occasional references to that point, we conclude 
that "The Journal" had about one thousand subscribers; 
but many of these did not pay promptly and some not at 
all. It was issued continuously from the college press for 
five years. But by 1852 its debts had accumulated to a point 
where they were embarrassing. So the Board of Trustees 
decided to abandon the publication of a paper. During its 
later years, it had changed its title somewhat and was called 
"The Illinois Advocate and Journal." This indicated that 
It was becoming more of a church paper, and the leaders 
of the Illinois and Missouri Conferences felt that it was 
needed in their work. Therefore, retaining so much as pos- 
sible of the subscription list, the printing office was closed 
in Lebanon, and another opened in St. Louis, and the paper 
was moved to that city under the name "Central Christian 
Advocate." The General Conference of 1852, held in Boston, 
failed to adopt it as one of the oilicial papers of the church, 
so it was conducted for four years as an unofficial church 
paper in the interest of the conferences contiguous to St. 
Louis. During these years it was edited by Rev. W. D. R. 
Trotter, 1852-1854, and by Rev. John L. Conklin, 1854- 




Two Hundred and F./tv-Set 



LEBANON JOURNAL . 



, S. Maituos, W. Gooon 



8; M. E. GoBE 



LEBANON, ILLINOIS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER IS, 



Rev. Davhs GTohli 



Sonia} at ( «Df('rea(«— BbbopS Sermon, 

_. ii^- t«|Ai.-l fliuKO m BcUtnUemu cruwdeil a 
u Mriy hnor, Iho aides wore doealj r^liol, imoj 



r tbe forlorn bow of the U'va oo i 



as ablr. is a 
!Tcr. He hi 
' David (or >i 



lling to do Ihc 1 Krolher Jiiiics, ol UrcenviUo circuit, said— 
ened a fountain There is a vow upon me. I must speak. When 



'Ev.rrlne'of "Uu 



j 4)oy ; but his g 



the reason of the deluge. Come dowh to | now ? God i 

Psalmist's day — " God looked down from l Wbrk now, hi 

en upon the children of men to see if there in the house 
did understand, that did seek U is ijujrhaus 

gone back — they j ed. But bow shall we, know that we are sane- 1 
art- allugethcr become filthy — there is none that i tified,? By the direct vjitnefs of the Spirit, the i 
d..elh good, no not one"'! Listen to Isaiah, deep, powerful injj^resMpn ' which amounts to Brothf^ Jesse Renfro, a local pr«3iCher, re- 
"Hcar, 0.beavens,andg;ireear,Oaiirth, I have consciousnHs&^C^'s Vrocbunation of hkoselfllTlftHted— lfe«l,it to be a great prirUege to be 
nounshedAndbroughtupcbildren,ft]idtheTh^Tobjasilcnt, yet uriteislakaBle influence. TTuits [ in the Cijmpany of" so many n ' " 

rebelled agaiiist me ", " ITm'wboIe head is 1 should follow. In cdnfmna ' 



IB grace conquered me. l have sul- 
a£iction,butoutofaU God has'de. 



, feared for the ebtjit^. tjrinkiojr. i 



Reduced facsimile of Lebanon Journal which later became the Central Christian Adv 



1856. The General Conference of 1856 took it over into 
the family of advocates anid since that time it has been one 
of the official papers of Methodism. Its editor for the quad- 
renium 1856-60 was Joseph Brooks; for the next four years 
it was edited by Charles Elliott. In 1864 Dr. Benjamin F. 
Crary was elected editor and held the office for eight years. 
In 1872 Dr. Benjamin St. James Fry was chosen editor and 
continued in that important position until the end of his 
life, which occurred only a few months before he had finished 
four quadreniums of service. The Book Committee appointed 
Dr. Samuel W. Williams, of the Cincinnati Book Concern 
and one time professor m McKendree, to take care of the 
editorship until the meeting of the General Conference in 
1892. That body elected Dr. Jesse Bowman Young, who 
continued at the helm for eight years, and then the General 
Conference of 1900 elected Dr. Claudius B. Spencer, who, 
at this writing, is just completing his twenty-eighth year of 
faithful service in this important field. In 1900 the "Central 
was moved from St. Louis to Kansas City, where it is now 
located. All of these editors, from Dr. McCrary to Dr. Spen- 
cer, have been Trustees of McKendree. In closing up the 
affairs of the paper at Lebanon, Benjamin Hypes, treasurer 
of the college and member of the Board, was instructed to 
sell the printing outfit and apply the proceeds on the debts 
of the paper. The debts not covered by this sale were prob- 
ably absorbed into the larger debt carried by the Board of 
Trustees. Thus ended the first journalistic venture of Mc- 
Kendree College. While it did not continue in the form in 
which it started, it set in motion an influence for the good of 
hum;inity which is still going and still increasing in power. 



Another "Lebanon Journal" was established some time 
after the Civil War, which was for about half a century 
the local city paper of Lebanon. This was not strictly a 
college publication, yet it was quite closely associated with 
McKendree. Professor O. V. Jones was its editor during 
the last few years of his life, and after h's death in 1885, 
the paper was conducted by his son, William L. Jones, until 
1913. For this period of twenty -eight years. Editor Jones, 
of the class of 1879, recorded many college events in this 
semi-college paper. In 191 j, the paper passed to the hands 
of Rev. J. G. Dee, who had been a classmate of Mr. Jones 
in McKendree. He also made it somewhat of a college paper. 
About 1920 the Journal was destroyed by fire, and since 
Lebanon already had another paper, it was never resurrected. 
THE McKENDREE REPOSITORY 
One of the most successful journalistic ventures ever 
undertaken at McKendree was the "McKendree Reposi- 
tory." It first appeared in the fall of 1867 and lasted about 
a decade. In its early years it was an eight page periodical 
published semi-monthly by the students of the college. The 
price was two dollars a year. The first plan of publication 
was that the work was to be done by editors and publishers 
elected by the "College Meeting," which was an association 
of all the students in the institution who cared to be present 
and vote. After a time there was some dissatisfaction and 
the senior class was entrusted with the task of editing and 
publishing the paper, but this method did not prove any 
more satisfactory, and so they soon returned to the first 
plan. An article published in the issue for December, 1871, 
set forth many arguments for having the work done by 
representatives of the literary societies. So some time later 
that plan was adopted. In April, 1871, under the College 



Two Huyuhed and F<ftyBght 



MC KENDREE 



Meeting plan, we find the following officers m charge. 
Editors: W. H. Steward, G. W. Hill, T. C. McFarland, and 
O. M. Edwards. Publishers: W. M. Essex and T. J. Porter. 
Board of Control: J. M. Brooks, L. A. Berger, J. P. Lytle. 

It IS difficult to give any brief description of so varied 
and versatile a periodical as this was. In the main, its pages 
are filled with serious thoughts, though each issue had its 
column of jokes. There are extensive quotations from ex- 
changes or from other sources, when the editors thought 
they had found something worth quoting. There is also 
much that appears to be the product of the campus, that is, 
articles of student authorship, but a marked tendency to 
conceal the actual author's name. We also find occasional 
contributions from the members of the faculty. For example, 
a history of McKendree College, prepared by Dr. Allyn for 
the educational convention of 1868, was published as a serial. 
It ran through nearly a whole year. Every number had edi- 
torials of more or less merit, and some of them were really 
excellent, though the identity of the writer is rarely revealed. 
There are long lists of personals which must have been inter- 
esting reading for the students of that day. It was probably 
easier to keep track of former students at that time than it 
is now, because they occupied a relatively larger position of 
leadership in the outside world than they do in the much 
larger and more complex public life of today. There were 
also accounts of special events, such as the County Teachers' 
Institute m Belleville, in which McKendree seems to have 
been well represented, both in attendance and on the pro- 
gram; or the passage of the "Temperance Bill" by the Legis- 
lature of Illinois. Of course important happenings about the 
campus were reported, such as the open sessions of the lit- 
erary societies and their semi-annual exhibitions. The last 
page and some space previous to that was devoted to paid 
advertisements. The paper was maintained by its advertise- 
ments and its subscription list, and the main dependence 
was the latter. Therefore the paper contained frequent ref- 
erences to its need of money and exhortations to those who 
were in arrears to pay up. There is evidence that an occa- 
sional issue was omitted for lack of means to pay for the 
printing. And probably the chief reason for its final demise 
was a financial one. 

There is an occasional bit of high grade philosophy m 
its columns, though in many cases it was obtained from 
some exchange. The paper had a fine list of exchanges, and 
must have obtained the favorable recognition of many of 
the best college papers in the land, as well as some of a more 
general character. 



We find the following list of "Regular Exchanges" m 
the issue dated April 20, 1S72: "College Argus," "Lafayette 
Monthly," "College Courant," "Yale Courant," "Cornell 
Era," "Targum," "Williams Vidette," "Madisoniensis," 
"Southern Collegian," "Harvard Advocate," "Western Col- 
legian," "Irving Union," "Miami Student," "Notre Dame 
Scholastic," "Bethany Guardian," "Chronicle," "Monmouth 
Courier," "Acorn," "Simpsonian," "Collegian," "Tripod," 
"College World," "College Review," "Beloit Monthly," 
"Brunonian," "The Nation," "Newspaper Reporter," "Har' 
pers Weekly," "Qui Vive," "St. Louis Home Journal," 
"Lebanon Journal," and "Edwardsville Republican." Also 
In May, 1872, is published an account of the demolition 
of the row of brick houses along the eastern edge of the 
campus, which had long served as rooming quarters for 
students. The article is entitled "Our Classic Bricks." The 
writer does not lament their passing, but says it is a mark 
of progress. Although they have served a useful purpose in 
their day, he hints that now they would be more useful 
converted into brick walks in various parts of the campus. 
There is a sket;h of the founding of the Philosophian Society. 
The majority of the orgiinal members were still living m 
1872. In the June number of that year is an account of the 
reunion of the diss of 1862, on the tenth anniversary of 
their graduation. Of the twelve members of the class, eight 
were present, as follows: Nelson S. Cobleigh, Cleveland, 
Ohio; Joseph Harris, Mt. Vernon; William Wallis, Brighton; 
James E. Marshall, Centralia; John N. Gwin, Effingham; 
Henry A. Castle, St. Paul, Mmn.: James H. Lowe, Bslleville; 
and Daniel W. Phillips, Nashville. Tnis was a fine showing, 
since two of the class, Boone Griffin and John S. Fitzgerrell, 
were already dead, and Peachy T. Wilson was a missionary 
in India; leaving only William A. Young, of Hillsboro, who 
might have been expected to be there and was not. In all 
probability he had some good excuse but did not send it. 
In this same issue other commencement events are chron- 
icled. There is a vivid and detailed account of the society 
exhibitions, as well as the prize declamation contest, which 
was won by William W. Edwards, afterwards for ten years 
a professor m McKendree. On Wednesday afternoon, the 
Hon. Jehu Baker delivered an address which was highly 
commended by the Repository reporter. There is also an 
account of the presentation of the flag, which passed from 
the custody of the Junior class to that of the Sophomore. 
Both the speech of presentation by W. V. Wilbanks and 
that of reception by T. C. Watkins, are represented as un' 
usually worthy efforts of these flag day orators. A full page 




Tu'O Hundred and Fifty-X' 



is given to the graduating exercises of the class of 1872. 
There were twenty -four members of the class, and each de- 
hvered an oration. There were two sessions of the program, 
with an interval of two hours between for luncheon and 
sociability among the commencement guests. Each of the 
orators and his oration is given separate treatment in the 
report. Of this large class, only two, W. A. Kelsoe and Z. 
T. Remick, are still living. The Latin Salutatory was deliv- 
ered by William M. Essex and the valedictory by Thomas 
C. McFarland, both of whom have passed from earth. We 
quote a couple of remarks with which the interesting article 
is brought to a close. "The addresses of the young lady 
graduates were on the whole better than those of the young 
men." "The bouquet nuisance should be abated at once." 
At this distance in time we are unable to explain just why 
it was regarded as a nuisance to "say it with flowers." Space 
will not permit anything like a complete account of the 
entire file of this great old college paper, but it may give 
the reader some idea of what the series was like if we give 
a rather detailed description of a single issue. For this pur- 
pose we have chosen what seems to be a representative num- 
ber toward the latter part of the series. It is number 4 of 
Volume VIII, dated February, 1875. The front cover page 
contains only the name of the paper in large Old English 
letters. The second page or the inside of the cover is devoted 
to advertisements. The literary material begins on page three. 
Under the title "McKendree Repository" is the motto, 
"Devoted to Literature, Science, and the Interests of Mc- 
Kendree College." The first article on the page is a poem 
entitled, "Be not the First." It is labelled "Selected " The 
first stanza reads, 

"Oh be not the first to discover 

A blot on the name of a friend, 

A flaw in the heart of a lover. 

Whose faith may be true to the end." 
There are eight stanzas in the poem. The next article is 
entitled, "Incorporation of McKendree." It is a brief and 
not very accurate account of the granting of McKendree's 
first charter in 1835. It is written from Jacksonville, Illinois, 
and signed "Alumnus." 

The fourth page contains a column and a half account of 
the exhibitions of the three literary societies, which had 
been presented just before the Christmas vacation on the 
14th, 15th and i6th of December. It is a lump criticism, 
mostly favorable, of the essayists, declaimers, and orators, 
in three groups, according to the class of performance rather 
than the society which furnished it. The report is signed. 



"Auditor." Next is an account of the celebration of the 
Clio Anniversary, December 10. The chief feature of the 
program was an address by Mrs. Hattie McCoy North, 
which set forth at length some of the achievements of mod- 
ern woman, and some of the things she may be expected to 
accomplish in the future. On page five is an essay on "Secrets 
of Success." It is signed with the initials of E. H. Parkinson. 
We might infer that he is its author. 

Page six contains a well written article on "The Beautiful," 
which occupies three -fourths of the page. The remainder 
contains a dozen or so brief quotations of which this is a 
sample: "An unjust accusation is like a barbed arrow, which 
must be drawn backward with horrible anguish, or else will 
be your destruction." Jeremy Taylor. 

Page seven contains an article of highly religious tone on 
the nature of "The Christian Sabbath," and the remainder 
of the page is taken up with an obituary sketch of William 
Monroe Essex, of the class of '72, together with a set of 
resolutions signed by a committee from the Philo Society, 
of which he was a member. 

The eighth page has the business announcement of the 
editors and publishers. We note that the publishers at that 
time were George D. Phillips from Philo and C. W. Parkin- 
son from Plato. The editors were Robert Casey and Orla 
S. Casad from Philo, T. C. Watkins and E. B. Waggoner 
from Plato, and Minnie Lane and Laura Hughey from Clio. 
The subscription price at this time was $1.50 a year. Then 
follows somewhat more than a page of "McKendriana," 
made up of personals and current news, a large part of it 
relating to the policies of the institution; for example, the 
statement that more written examinations are being required 
than formerly. Then are mentioned the titles of some lectures 
which had already been delivered at the college : "The Man 
for the Times," by President Locke; "The True Man above 
Price," by Rev. Lyman Marshall, then pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church in Lebanon; "Difficulties and their Lessons," 
by Professor S. H. Deneen. During this year, for the first time 
the students had been seated in chapel according to classes; 
the four college classes occupying the center, with the sen- 
iors in front, and preparatory students on the sides. Also 
there was an announcement that the much talked of brick 
walks were soon to be built on the campus. Then follows 
a highly philosophical and ethical article, entitled, "The 
Highest Motive." This is quoted from an exchange, "The 
College Transcript." Then there is a little extract from Eng- 
lish history, characterizing Sir Robert Peel. The most of 
page ten is taken up with what appears to be a prize essay, 



Two Hundred and Sixty 



c KENDReE^ ^^^&s;S^^:^s^ 



with the title "Pearl-handled Sickles," and signed, "Emilie." 
It may he that the readers of that time could recognize the 
writer from that name. The rest of the page is chiefly "Col- 
lege News" gleaned from exchanges and containing such 
Items as these: "Drew Theological Seminary has one hundred 
and eighteen students;" "Dr. Marvin has accepted the Chan- 
cellorship of Kansas University:" "Since last June, Syracuse 
University has receivedcontributions amounting to$i75,ooo." 
"President Allyn and the students of the Southern Illinois 
Normal are engaged in the collection of a museum of natural 
history." 

On p;ige eleven we find a column of personals, chiefly 
about former students, including the announcement of three 
marriages, in which one or both the parties were old Mc- 
Kendreans. Then an article on "How to Educate," signed 
(N). On the next page is a column of humor. We quote a 
sample: Student to Professor of Geology, "To what age do 
I belong, Professor?" "I don't know. I have only learned to 
classify rocks, not bricks." This is followed by a highly 
philosophical article on "Practical vs. Disciplinary." On page 
thirteen appears the directory of the "College Meeting" and 
Literary Societies. Some of these names might awaken pleas- 
ant recollections in the mind of some old time McKendrean, 
so we reproduce them here : 

OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE MEETING 

President, E. H. Parkinson; Vice-president, R. P. Robbins; 
Secretary, Lottie Dressor. 

SOCIETY OFFICERS 
PHILOSOPHIAN 
President, Thomas E. Green; Vice-president, Joe Lindly; 
Recording Secretary, W. H. Phillips; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, O. M. Edwards; First Critic, Lee Harrison; Second 
Critic, O. Barnickol; Librarian, J. W. Vandeveer; Janitor, 

A. S. Hamill. 

PLATONIAN 

President, C. W. Parkinson; Vice-president, A. H. Car, 

ter; Recording Secretary, W. Westbrook; Corresponding 

Secretary, J. G. Pearn; First Critic, P. T. Chapman; Second 

Critic, T. C. Watkins; Librarian, T. H. Jones; Janitor, J. 

T. Handsacker. 

CLIONIAN 

President, Hattie Sargent; Vice-president, Ida Blanck; 
Recording Secretary, Zie Robertson; Corresponding Secrc 
tary. Belle Hawley; First Critic, Lottie Dressor; Second 
Critic, Liz2ie Meyer; Librarian, Mary McKee; Janitor, Julia 
Nichols. 

The remainder of the page is filled with a travel letter 
from Italy, by Mack Swiveler, who was at that time tra' 



veiling m Europe. Page fourteen is devoted to exchanges 
and a few quotations from standard writers, including one 
from Plato, the Philosopher. Page fifteen has its first column 
tilled with a directory of the Lebanon churches and lodges. 
The rest of the page, as well as all of page sixteen, is de- 
voted to advertisements, mostly of Lebanon business firms. 
A few names appear which may still be found in a business 
directory of Lebanon, such as Grauel, Hoffman, Remhardt. 

This completes the survey of a single copy of the "Re- 
pository." Many of the others are quite similar. They are 
still interesting reading to the person who is acquainted 
with the McKendree of that period, or who has friends or 
relatives who were in McKendree at that time. 
THE McKENDREE SKETCHBOOK 

For a considerable period McKendree was without a col- 
lege paper. Then during the presidency of Dr. Herdman, a 
paper was published for a short time, called the "Sketch 
Book." It was a small quarto published monthly by the stu- 
dents, under the supervision of a member of the faculty. It 
was short-lived and seems to have passed into such a state 
of oblivion that we have not been able to bring to light a 
single copy of the paper. But nevertheless it was a real 
paper and has a clear place m the memory of some of the 
students of that period. 

THE McKENDREAN 

Again in the early part of Dr. Chamberlin's administra- 
tion, a paper was published which was called "The Mc- 
Kendrean." It was edited and published by two students 
of that day, W. L. Cunningham, 96, and T. P. Brannum, 
"97. These young men edited and published the paper, gave 
the subscribers the best they could for their money, and 
assumed all the financial deficits. Of course there were no 
profits. Yet there may have been perquisites. According to 
the custom of that day, they secured the privilege of pub- 
lishing the local time table of the B. 6? O. railroad, and 
in return for this, the editor received the courtesy of a pass 
on the railroad. Mr. Cunningham, being the senior member 
of the firm, enjoyed the privilege of the pass. Since it was 
not transferable and could be used by only one person, Mr. 
Brannum had to pay his fare on the railroad. The literary 
societies each had its contributor to the McKendrean. Philo 
was represented by Mr. J. H. Land, Plato by Mr. C. E. 
Neil, and Clio by Miss Josie M. Otwell. Charles Page An- 
drews was also a frequent contributor. The first number of 
the McKendrean appeared in the fall of 1894, and during 
the spring of 1895 the whole enterprise was relinquished 
by its energetic founders, and turned over to the students 




Two Hundred and SixtyOn 



IVIC KENDREE^ 



of the college. It was conducted by them for about a year 
and then allowed to lapse, because another local city paper 
was started by John M. Chamberlain, Jr., called the Lebanon 
Leader, which offered sufficient space in its columns to take 
care of all college needs in that line. This seemed better than 
to run an independent paper which was always a financial 
liabihty to its sponsors. The two editors of the McKendrean 
both entered the ministry. Brief sketches of them appear in 
connection with their college classes. The senior, Mr. Cun- 
ningham, died recently, but Mr. Brannum lives now at Red- 
lands, California. 

THE McKENDREE HEADLIGHT 

The next journalistic venture was "The McKendree 
Headlight." This differed from the other papers which pre 
ceded it, except the very first one, in that it was not a stu- 
dent publication. But it was edited and published by Pres- 
ident John F. Harmon, with occasional contributions from 
other members of the faculty and some of the students. 

The first issue is dated October, 1909. It was published 
monthly, at fifty cents a year. The motto on the first page, 
right under the heading, reads, "We shall endeavor to treat 
all better than they treat us." The salutatory editorial is 
reproduced here. 

"The McKendree Headlight comes to occupy a vacant 
field and to speak where silence has long reigned. Knowledge 
and righteousness shall feed her fires, and her aim shall be 
to point our youth to the highest heights and noblest attain- 
ments possible. A good education is the birthright of every 
American. 'When wisdom entereth- into' _thine heart, and 
knowledge is pleasant to thy soul; discretion shall preserve 
thee' and thy living shall be to the sufferings and^^needs of hu- 
manity as rain to the parched earth or as showers to droop- 
ing plants. Even though your purposes be not high nor the 
aim of your ambitions beyond personal gain or happiness, 
still we entreat you to get knowledge, for 'happy is the man 
that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understand- 
ing; for the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise 
of silver and the gain thereof than fine gold.' Then why be 
ignorant when the path of knowledge lies wide open and 
leads to every good thing. In all thy getting, get a thorough 
education — get a good understanding — get wisdom. The 
Headlight will not speak with the language of the learned, 
nor in words hard of understanding, neither will she dwell 
on the mountiiin where knowledge is enthroned; but her 
dwelling shall be with the humble and her language that 
of the field and forest." 



Another article on the second page tells of the paper's 
financial basis. "This paper is published in the interest of 
McKendree College and is entirely dependent upon sub- 
scriptions for support. The paper will be issued monthly. 
Price fifty cents per year. Four paid up subscriptions from 
each pastoral charge in the conference will support the pa' 
per and put us in touch with every pastor and leading lay 
men in every charge. Please send your subscription to the 
editor at Lebanon, Illinois. We also solicit your advertising." 

Still another article in the first issue referring to the paper's 
future is entitled, "Help us solve the problem." It reads as 
follows; "For many years McKendree has greatly felt the 
need of a college paper, but no funds have been available 
for that purpose. A college paper seems absolutely essential 
to the highest success of the college. So without money we 
are taking the risk, personally, and with this issue of the 
"Headlight" we put an eight page monthly in the field. 
Price fifty cents per year. If every one who reads this issue 
will send fifty cents for a year's subscription, its financial 
problems will be settled, and we will be put in touch with 
the alumni, with present and prospective students and their 
parents, with all our ministers, with the trustees, with lead' 
ing laymen of the conference, and with the citizens of Leb- 
anon. There are a few laymen in every charge in Southern 
Illinois who would subscribe for the paper if they knew 
its mission. Readers, help us to get started and then when 
you get in a close place, call on us and we will give you a lift." 

A whole column is given to the account of how Lebanon 
set the pace for raising money to pay the conference note. 
This was a note for $jo,ooo, given by the conference to the 
endowment fund of McKendree. According to the appor- 
tionment to the charges, Lebanon's share was $229, or $22.90 
a year for ten years. The matter was presented in the church 
on Sunday morning. When the meeting closed, the subscrip- 
tions totaled over $2,000, and a committee was appointed to 
see those who could not be reached at church and raise the 
total to $j,ooo. 

In the eight pages of this first issue there are forty-seven 
separate articles and a quite complete announcement of the 
Conservatory of Music. At that time, Professor F. M. 
Church was Musical Director and teacher of piano, and 
Miss Amy Pinkerton was teacher of Voice. The Headlight 
was an efficient news organ for the period it covered. It 
made frequent mention of former McKendreans, and since 



Hundred and Sixty-Two 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



its editor, President Harmon, spent much time m the field 
and among the charges where students might he turned 
toward McKendree, he naturally brought to the paper many 
Items of news from all parts of the conference. In this way 
many interesting events have been put on record which 
otherwise would have passed into oblivion. There were also 
many contributed articles, but the editor had one rule which 
he always insisted upon — they must be short. If any writer 
was too lengthy, his article had to be cut in sections and 
appear as a serial. However, an exception to that rule occurs 
in the number dated February, igio, when a letter from 
William J. Ross, of Hutchinson, Kansas, full of reminiscences 
of the period when he was a student in McKendree in 1837 
and following. In the catalogue for 1837 a"'^ also i8j8, we 
find Mr. Ross" name. His address was Burlington, Iowa Ter. 
We quote a few extracts from the letter : 

"Professors Merrill and Sunderland occupied a room on 
the ground floor of the east wing ot the college building 
until Prof. Merrill got married, which I think was during 
the vacation of 183,7, after which he lived m town, leaving 



Sunderland to 'batch it' alone, which he continued to do 
as long as I remained m school. President Merrill, a brother 
of the Professor, was a sparely built, small, weakly man, 
a diligent student and an able minister. 

"In 1838 the trustees had a long one story frame building 
erected just north of where the new college was to be built, 
and It was used as a dormitory." [This was the building 
that later became the residence of the president of the 
college, and many years later it became the residence of 
the head janitor. | 

"It was President Merrill who at prayers one morning 
m commenting on Proverbs, 22, 11, pitched the key note of 
my life. I remember once hearing Rev. John S. Barger, prin- 
cipal of the Preparatory Department, preach from eleven 
o'clock, A. M. until three P. M. — a four hour sermon." 

In the issue tor May, 1910, we find this little poem, 
written by Arthur H. Mueller, then a member of the sen- 
ior class. He IS now a physician, practicing his profession 
m Denver, Colorado. 



Some may shout for grand old Harvard 
Some may root for Tennessee 
But give me old McKendree 
For she's good enough for me. 

Through many a hard fought battle 
She has won the victory; 
She's the first among the winners. 
So she's good enough for me. 

After two years, m the fall of 191 1, the "Headlight" was 
turned over to the Y. M. C. A., and that body appointed 
the editorial staff from among the students. The subscription 
price remained at fifty cents. The first editorial staff under 
the new plan was as follows : 

Editor-in-Chief, Clark W. Hoar; Literary Editor, Clark 
R. Yost; Religious Editor, Robert M. Peters; Social Editor, 
T. Ralph Isaacs; Business Manager, H. Warren Bullington; 
Assistant Business Manager, Ernest M. Fisher. At the be- 
ginning of the year 191 3, the form was changed somewhat. 
The page was folded once more and a cover of heavier paper 
put on it, giving it a magazine form. 

After a time the idea that the Y. M. C. A. was publishing 
the paper dropped out of the public mind. The announce- 
ment on the editorial page in January, 1914, is as follows: 
"The Headlight is published by the students of McKendree 



She doth bless the world with heroes 
Yes, the best the world will see; 
She's earnest, kind and faithful 
And she's good enough for me. 

Then three cheers for "Old McKendree," 
Yes we'll give her three times three; 
To her our hearts beat loyal. 
And she's good enough for me. 

College at the College Press Hall, and entered at the Post 
Office at Lebanon, Illinois, as second class mail matter. Sub- 
scription price, 50C per year." 

At that time the following students constituted the edi- 
torial staff: I. G. Moorman, Editor-in-Chief; G. F. Cummins, 
Business Manager; C. Trueb, Circulation Manager; E. E. 
Reisner, Literary Editor; P. A. Shields, Athletic Editor; 
Mrs. L. D. Wiggins, Religious Editor; Mabel Crump, Social 
Editor; Emma Berry, Intercollegiate Editor. 

In the same issue is the announcement that Cyrus Stokes 
Gentry had received the appointment to the Rhodes Scholar- 
ship at Oxford University. This was to cover a three year 
period, beginning in the fail of 1914. It carried at that time, 
a cash stipend of $1,500 a year, which with reasonable econ- 
omy, would meet the expenses of a student in Oxford. Since 
the war, the stipend has been increased to $2,000. 



Two Hundred and S^xty■Three 



|mc kendree"^^^^^^^...^^^^ 



We quote from the ""Headlight's" characterization of Mr. 
Gentry: ""As a student. Gentry approached the ideal. Not 
only did he excel in his class room and literary work, but 
also he was a brilliant athlete and a genuine 'good fellow" on 
the campus. Although he was never a 'grind,' he was always 
a good student and equally popular with faculty and fellow 
students. He was a star member of the basket ball and gym- 
nastic teams, his work in the gymnasium perfectly equipping 
him for his present position as director of athletics." 

It may be appropriate to say here that Mr. Gentry went 
to Oxford and entered upon his scholarship, taking up the 
study of law. However, the breaking out of the World War 
affected the work of the university so much that his scholar- 
ship was suspended and he went into war work in France, 
and then returned to Oxford and finished his law course 
after the close of the war. He is now practicing law in 
Houston, Texas. He was the second McKendrean to secure 
a Rhodes Scholarship. The first was Newton E. Ensign, of 
the class of 1904. A sketch of him is found elsewhere m 
this history. 

THE McKENDREE ECHO 

At the close of Dr. John Harmon's administration, the 
Headlight was allowed to lapse for a time and there was 
no college paper. But some time in the fall of 191 5, the matter 
of a paper began to be agitated. In due time, arrangements 
were made to publish a paper semi-monthly. A contest was 
put on and a prize offered for the best name for the new 
paper. Many were proposed, but the one finally chosen was 
"McKendree Echo." The Echo was a four page paper, but 
the pages were just twice the size of the original form of 
the Headlight, so that gave the same amount of space. How- 
ever, sometimes an extra leaf was put in and that made it 
50 per cent larger. It was about the same type of paper the 
Headlight had been. In an editorial in the first issue in the 
fall of 1916, we find this statement: 

"It is our purpose to present the news of College Hill in 
an interesting and impartial fashion, and to make our college 
paper truly representative of college life. To do this we 
must have the support of the students as a whole. It is 
your paper we are endeavoring to publish, and if it is to 
be made an expression of the spirit of McKendree College, 
you must get behind it with your enthusiasm and energy, 
and boost. Help us with your contributions. If you know 
a good joke on your fellow student, let us know about it. 
If some amusing incident has happened under your obser- 
vation, write it up and hand it to a member of the staff. 
Help us by paying your subscription promptly and by work- 



ing to enlarge our circulation. If each one would do just a 
little toward the making of a real college paper, the sum 
total of work done would insure success. To print all the 
news all the time, we recognize as an impossible achieve- 
ment. To print all the news part of the time is too hard a 
job for most papers. But with your assistance we expect to 
print a good share of the news most of the time." 

From this it will be seen that the "Echo" was primarily 
a newspaper. In the main it lived up to that ideal fairly 
well. In the fall of 1Q16, the Editorial Staff was as follows: 

Editor, Homer C. Bower; Assistant Editor, Leone Pixley; 
Business Manager, G. Orville Greer; Assistant Business 
Manager, Guy E. Tucker; Circulation Manager, Roscoe B. 
Early; Assistant Circulation Manager, Lura Witherspoon. 

The price of the paper at this time was seventy-five cents 
a year. We give a few brief extracts from the paper which 
may prove interesting to the later reader. There is an article 
advocating the establishment of intercollegiate debates. It 
has taken more than ten years to reach this ideal. Here is 
a little suggestion in the line of athletics. "All those who 
find foot -ball a little rough and who are interested in a nice 
gentle game, please come out at 4 o'clock for a tiddle-de- 
winks rehearsal. And, we might add, if any one player gets 
the idea that he can run the athletics of a college, he had 
better go to the Sahara desert where he can be monarch 
of all he surveys." 

There is an account of a special meeting of Plato held in 
honor of Captain Fike, who was one of the founders of 
Plato, and was at that time in Lebanon attending the reunion 
of the McKendree Regiment, the 117th Illinois, who fought 
in the Civil War. The program was chiefly impromptu, and 
is given as follows : Selection by the orchestra. Solo by Pavey. 
Declamation by Merkel. Then a debate on the question. 
Resolved, That the Democratic party is more entitled to 
the suffrage of the voters at the coming election than the 
Republican party. The affirmative speakers were Professor 
Gentry, Professor Thrall, and V. S. Morriss. The negative, 
Professor Waggoner, J. B. Sager, and St. Clare Flint. It is 
stated that the speeches were all "funny," but special men- 
tion is made of th'at of Professor Waggoner, because he held 
the Democratic party responsible for the bad weather, the 
high prices, and the war. 

The College Directory, giving the officials of the various 
organizations found in the institution requires more than a 
full column in the paper. It gives the list of officers of the 
Athletic Association, The Carnegie House Council, The 
Clark House Council, Clio, Plato, Philo, Y. M. C. A., 



Hundred and SixtyFo 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^e^^S:^ 



Y. W. C. A., International Prohibition Association, Katter 
Keule, Gamma Kappa Nu, and Phi Beta Kappa. 

There is an announcement of the Music Recital of the Con- 
servatory Faculty. On this program, a specially interesting 
trio was to appear — Professor Fransee, Violinist; Professor 
Zinkeisen, Cellist; and Professor Moore, Pianist. This trio 
pl.iyed at the session of the Southern Illinois Conference at 
Robinson in iqi6, and received high commendation. 
THE McKENDREE REVIEW 
The latest of McKendree's group of college papers is the 
"McKendree Review." It started on its career November 
IS, 1921, and is still going strong. Its seven years of history 
indicate that it is already past the worst dangers of infancy 
and bids fair to become the longest lived of all McKendree's 
periodicals. Unlike its predecessors, it is a weekly. It has 
four pages and sometimes six, according to the demands 
that may be made from time to time for more or less of 
news space. When some important event occurs, like the 
home-coming, or the high school meet, or a basket ball tour- 
nament, the two extra pages are inserted. Just beneath the 
title of each issue appears the motto, "Devoted to the Inter- 
ests of McKendree." The editorial announcements indicate 
that from the very beginning, it was published by the class 
m journalism. In fact, it is probable that it first had its 
existence for the sake of the class in journalism, in order 
that they might have opportunities to practice the journal- 
istic art. But even then it was necessary to have editors 
and officers in order to fix certain responsibilities in the 
diversified work of publishing a college paper. The first 
staff consisted of only four members: Mabel Bower, Editor; 
Mildred Wilton, Assistant Editor; Violet Glenn, Circula- 
tion Manager; and Fred Faverty, Business Manager. The 
same plan of publication has been followed down to the 
present time, but now it carries a more elaborate staff than 
in its first year. In the issue of January 19, 1928, we find 
the following staff announced : Editor-in-Chief, Edna Kinsey; 
Managing Editor, John Oster; Business Manager, Emery 
Martin; Advertising Manager, William Gillespie; Cir- 
culation Manager, James Stuart; Assistant Circulation 
Manager, James Hortin ; Sports Editor, Stephen Tedor ; Society 
Editor, Geneva Grieve; Feature Writer, Lucille Hadfield; 
Exchange Editor, Clifton Oxendine; Faculty Advisor, Belle 
M. Nixon; Reporters, Nina May Harmon and Frank C. 
Brown. 

In the earlier years of the Review, one of its editors who 
deserves special mention was Mr. Milburn P. Akers, who 
was a student in McKendree at the time. He served as 



editor and general manager of the paper and did much to 
promote its interests until after his graduation. When later 
he went into the newspaper work himself as publisher of 
the Wood River Journal, he did not lose interest in the 
Review, but gave the stiff the benefit of his experience 
whenever possible. For some time the Review was printed 
in the office of the Wood River Journal under the direct 
supervision of its former editor. But of course there were 
difficulties in having the editorial office and the printing 
office so far apart, and sometimes there were delays in trans, 
portation which prevented the paper from being distributed 
to the students on time. So m recent years it has been 
printed in Lebanon. 

In its early years the subscription price was Si.'jo a year. 
Then it was raised to one dollar a semester, or two dollars 
a year. Of course it is not published during the summer 
vacation nor in the Christmas recess, and usually the pub- 
lication IS omitted in examination week, when the staff is 
too busy to get out the paper and the students are too busy 
to read it if it should be printed. Perhaps on the average, 
there are thirty issues a year. In 1926, the incidental fee 
was raised one dollar a semester, and seventy-five cents of 
that was applied to a subscription to the Review for every 
student. This is collected by the fiscal agent of the college 
and paid over to the business manager of the Review. This 
relieves the management of the task of making a canvass 
among the students, and since by this plan every student 
is a subscriber, it became possible to reduce the price to 
$1.50 a year. This, with the income from advertisements, 
meets the necessary expense of the paper. It is primarily 
a muis paper, having for its aim to record the principal 
events of the campus from week to week. Of course there 
are editorials also in every issue. Some of these very faith- 
fully reflect student sentiment on important questions of 
the campus, and others represent such ideas as the editorial 
writer wishes the students to entertain. A glance at one 
of the early copies may give some idea of the character of 
the paper. The second number of Volume I takes a whole 
column to set forth the very important announcement that 
the General Education Board had appropriated $150,000 to 
become a part of McKendree's endowment on condition 
that the college raise $350,000 more from its own constit- 
uency. This was in the midst of the "McKendree Move- 
ment" and of course aroused great enthusiasm. The same 
issue contains an account of the joint-meeting of the Young 
Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations, a basket 
ball game between the Freshmen and the Juniors, in which 



Two Hundred and Sm 



the Freshmen were victorious; an account of a convocation 
of colleges and universities held in Chicago to consider the 
question of World Peace, in which McKendree was repre- 
sented by President McCammon and Hon. Charles S. Den- 
een. The big headline article on the front page declared that 
by defeating Shurtleff in the last game of the season Mc- 
Kendree had won the foot ball championship of Southern 
Illinois for that year. There are two columns of editorials, 
chiefly concerning the "McKendree Movement" for new 
endowment. There is a long article on methods of caring 
for a cold, as advocated by various members of the faculty 
and student body. There are a few jokes and a column and 
a half of personals, in which we are informed, among other 
things, that Professor McClure entertained the "Bachelors' 
Club" at a dinner Monday evening, and the Clio Quartette 
sang at a banquet at Union Church, St. Louis. On the last 
page is a two column report of an evening entertainment 
in Singer Hall given by the McKendree players of the Ex- 
pression Department, under the direction of Miss Chese- 
man. The performers in the first play, "The Beauty and 
the Beast," were chiefly from the Public School. The names 
mentioned are John DoUey, Grace Renner, Orena Mowe, 
and Robert McCammon. In the play "Suppressed Desires," 
the principal actors were Alice Walton, Mildred Wilton, 
and Fred Faverty. The last play, "The Brink of Silence," 
was presented by Alonzo Catt, Harold Van Dyke, and 
George McCammon. 

There is also a sonnet by Gladys Parker, which seems 
worthy of reproduction here. 

SONNET 
When I do look about me in this age 
And see the turmoil, strife, and envying of man, 
When I behold the war of industry that's waged, 
And see the greed of all on every hand; 
When hard men seem barren of love 
Toward bleeding, torn, toil-worn humanity. 
And mankind's soul all shriveled up whereof 
Is born a hate for toil and honesty; 
Then of Thy strength, Oh God, I remind me; 
That Thou among the hearts of men must go, 
And show each one himself as Thou dost see; 



And help him know that love of toil will grow 

Into a satisfying happiness 

Which will defend him from all restlessness. 

Now let us glance through a quite recent issue of the 
Review, dated January 19. We find the following items: 

A report of Senator Williams' chapel address; an account 
of Dr. Harmon's visit to Atlantic City where he attended 
the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges; 
the story of the "open house" held recently in each of the 
dormitories; announcement that the McKendree quartette 
sang at the Billy Sunday meeting in St. Louis; and that the 
McKendree basket ball team had lost the game with Evans- 
viUe. 

On the second page are several brief editorials, a review 
of an article by Professor Walton on McKendree History, 
which was published lately in the magazine. The Christian 
Student; and the usual column of "The Campus Owl." Page 
three contains an account of a recital given by the Music 
and Expression Departments and an open session of Clio, 
a list of new books just received by the library, and the 
report of the monthly meeting of the Dames Club. 

The last page is filled with miscellaneous matter and ad- 
vertisements. The Review is a member of the Illinois College 
Press Association. It is not only a medium of transmission 
of college news among the students themselves and the col- 
lege community, but it goes out into all parts of the con- 
ference and into the high school and thus keeps the patron- 
izing territory of McKendree to some extent informed on 
the progress of affairs at McKendree. 

THE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Another publication which has been published with more 
or less regularity since 191 3 is entitled McKendree College 
Bulletin. This is published monthly unless an issue is omitted 
for some good reason. When the president has some message 
for the preachers of the conference and the general public, 
the College Bulletin becomes the means of its conveyance. 
The annual catalogue is issued as a number of the bulletin 
and therefore it can be mailed at the second class postal 
rate, which is a considerable saving to the college in the 
matter of postage. Also the Summer School announcement 
is issued as a number of the college bulletin for economic 
reasons as well as for reasons of convenience. 



Two Hundred and StxtySix 



CHAPTER XXI. 

President Houghton s Administration 



'-^^'\ R- Locke was succeeded m the presidency by Rev. 
jLj Ross Clark Houghton, D. D., then of the Missouri 
Conference. He was born in Turin, New York, July 
9, 1839. He was educated at Union College, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, and Boston University School of Theology. He re 
ceived the degree of D. D. from McKendree in 1878, and 
L. H. D. from Willamette University in 1889. He served 
Methodist churches in several cities in New York State, in 
St. Louis, in Indianapolis, and in Portland, Oregon. In 1895, 
he transferred to the Congregational Church and became 
pastor in Chelsea, Massachusetts. Here he remained till 
1902, when he retired from pastoral work. He died at Mai- 
den, Massachusetts, December 10, 1904. He was married 
September 25, 1862, to Adelaide R. Wilcox, who with one 
of their three children, survived him. He was a member of 
the Society of American Authors, and several other learned 
societies. He was the author of several books with the fol- 
lowing titles: "Christian Education and its Relation to 
Christian Work," 1871; "Novels, and How to Read Them," 
1872; "The Social Evil," 1872; "Future Punishment," 1877; 
"Women of the Orient," 1877; "At the Threshold," 1881; 
"Ruth the Moabitess," 1882; "John the Baptist," 1889. 

When he came to McKendree it was as a sort of experi- 
ment. He had a plan for relieving the financial stress of the 
college, but it did not seem to bring the expected results, 
for at the end of the first year he relinquished the work. 
His report to the Board at commencement indicates that he 
was the pastor of some church which took much of his time 
during the year that he was President of McKendree. There 
was no other change in the faculty of the college proper, 
that year. Professors Jones, Deneen, Swahlen, and Edwards 
remained at their posts in spite of the increasing deficits in 
salaries. In addition to these regular college teachers. Pro- 
fessor James H. Brownlee was the teacher of elocution; Pro- 
fessor J. W. Whittlesey was in charge of the Commercial 
Department; and the Law faculty consisted of Henry H. 
Homer as Dean, and Gustavus Koerner, Joseph Gillespie, 
and James M. Hamill as lecturers. 

The year was a hard one. The enrollment suffered a fur- 
ther slight decrease, and the income from the endowment 
was meager. At the meeting of the Board that year, a com- 
mittee was appointed to secure the legal release of all claims 
against the Athleton. We find no further record of the 
matter but we may infer that the object was accomplished 



by the committee working on the sympathies of the claim- 
ants until they were wiUing to relinquish all claims. 

At the end of the year Dr. Houghton did not wish to 
carry the experiment further and presented his resignation 
at the same time with his report, and again gave his time 
to the pastorate and the writing of books. Although he 
was in charge of the institution only one year, the class 
which graduated that year was an important one. As they 
went out into the world, they doubtless carried with them 
the impress of his teaching and example, and thus through 
this class he wielded an influence in the world which eter- 
nity alone can completely measure. Brief sketches of the 
members of the class follow: 

THE CLASS OF 1879 
JAMES H. ATTERBURY 

James Hardin Atterbury was born at Litchfield, Illinois, 
March 7, 1858. His parents were A. D. and Julia Atterbury. 
He enrolled in McKendree in September, 1874 and grad- 
uated in 1879, receiving the degree of A. B. He was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Society. 

After leaving McKendree he took a law course in the 
University of Michigan and received the degree of LL. B. 
from that institution. He has been engaged in the practice 
of law at Litchfield for many years. He is married and has 
one son, James H. Atterbury, Jr. 

WILLIAM COSTELLO 
William Costello was born near Fayetteville, St. Clair 
County, 111., December 26, 1839. His inspiration to secure 
an education came rather late in life, but after suitable pre- 
liminary education, he entered McKendree and graduated 
in the class of 1879. He was a member of Philo. He was 
married February 9, 1865, before his college days, to Miss 
Nancy S. Turner. Their two children are Don Costello, 
undertaker and furniture dealer in Litchfield, Illinois, and 
Lizzie Costello Kennett, who also resides in Litchfield. Mr. 
Costello was engaged in various occupations during his life- 
time, among which might be mentioned those of farmer, 
teacher, and bookkeeper. He was engaged in business in 
the city of Nashville, Illinois, for some years, and was a 
member of the City Council of that city. Later he moved 
to Freeburg, Illinois, where his death occurred February 
21, 1897. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. 




Two Hundred and SixtySevi 



|mc kendree-^^^^^^^....^^.^^ 



JAMES A. BISHOP 

James Alonzo Bishop was born near Mascoutah, Illinois, 
in January, 1854. His parents were George B. and Malvina 
Bishop. He grew up in the neighborhood where he was 
born and after completing the home schools, he entered Mc- 
Kendree College, where he graduated in the Scientific Course 
and received the degree of B. S. in 1879. He was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. He has spent much of his 
life since graduation in educational work. Among the positions 
he has held in that line of work are the following: Principal 
of a ward school in Moline, Illinois; Principal of the high 
school at Rock Island; Professor of Chemistry in Harvey 
Medical College of Chicago; and a similar position in a 
Chicago Dental College. In recent years he was a travelling 
salesman. He was married in 1887 to Miss Lulu Liebrock, 
of Mascoutah, Illinois. They have one daughter, Amie 
Louise, who with her mother resides at the family home 
at Mascoutah, though the husband and father, owing to 
the nature of his business, of necessity spent much of his 
time away from home. He was a member of the Masonic 
Order. He died in January, 1928. 

REV. JAMES G. DEE, D. D. 

James Godfrey Dee was born March 19, 185 1, only a 
few miles from the city of Lebanon, which has been his 
permanent home since 191 j. His parents, Hiram and Mary 
(Walker) Dee, were both native Americans. Mr. Dee grew 
up on a farm, and after finishing the country school, he 
entered the Preparatory Department of McKendree College 
in 1870. He was an active member of the Platonian Society. 
He alternately attended college and taught school, thus 
working his way to the attainment of an education. He 
graduated in the class of 1879, receiving the degree of B. 
S., and later, M. S. In 1898, his Alma Mater conferred 
upon him the honorary degree of A. M., and in the Cen- 
tennial year that of D. D. On August 14 of the year he 
finished college, he was married to Miss Fannie M. Norman, 
whose home was in Clinton County, near Carlyle. He joined 
the Southern Illinois Conference in September of the same 
year, and therefore Mrs. Dee has been his partner in the 
work of the ministry for almost a half century. Of their 
children, five grew to maturity. Norman Bliss, the oldest, 
is a graduate of McKendree, and therefore a sketch of him 
will be found elsewhere in this history. Paul, the second 
son, was a student in McKendree, but did not graduate. 
He came to an untimely death in the army training camp 
during the World War. He left a young widow and a little 
son only a few weeks old, whom he had never seen. He 



lies boned in College Hill Cemetery. The three daughters 
are all graduates of McKendree. They are Mrs. Nelle Kruh, 
of St. Louis, Mrs. Lois Dolley, of Berkeley, California, and 
Mrs. Dorothy Adair, of St. Louis. 

During his half century in the ministry, Dr. Dee has been 
an active and enthusiastic worker in the interest of the 
kingdom and the churches which he served. He was for 
six years Presiding Elder of the Mt. Carmel District, and 
during that time published a District Advocate to promote 
the interests of the work in his district. He was also the 
editor of The Lebanon Journal for several years after he 
came to Lebanon. 

He holds the retired relation in the conference, but that 
does not keep him from preaching. He has supplied some 
nearby charge nearly all the time since he has lived in Leb' 
anon, except the two years that he was pastor of the Leb- 
anon Church. He has always been an ardent friend of 
McKendree College, and was for ten years a member of 
its Joint Board. 

In recent years he has served his community m civil as 
well as in religious affairs by holding the office of Police 
Magistrate. No delinquent ever leaves Judge Dee's court 
without feeling that he has received justice, and sometimes 
mercy as well, at the hands of this officer of the law. He 
always imposes the penalty provided by law when the guilt 
of the individual is clearly established, but sometimes stays 
the fine and remits his own fee, on condition of good be 
havior in the future. The offender also gets sound advice 
administered freely, and this is sometimes more effective 
than the strict penalties of the law. 

DR. SAMUEL E. EARP 

Samuel Evingston Earp, son of Rev. Joseph Earp of the 
Southern Illinois Conference, was born at Lebanon, Decem- 
ber 19, 1858, while his father was pastor at Lebanon. In 
1876, when his father was pastor at Alton, he became a 
student in Shurtleff, but in 1877 he transferred to McKen- 
dree and graduated in the class of 1879, receiving the degree 
of B. S. He was a member of the Platonian Society. He then 
entered the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Indianapolis, from which he graduated in 1882 with the 
degree of M. D. and the highest honors of his class. He 
also won the "Waters Gold Medal" and the first prize in 
obstetrics. Besides his general medical practice, he was for 
many years a member of the faculty of the medical college, 
and for several years Dean of the Faculty. Since 1886, he 
has been consultant in one or more of the hospitals in In- 
dianapolis, and for eight years he was surgeon of the Police 



Two Hundred and Sixty-Eight 



MC KENDREE 



and Fire Departments. In 1908 he was the founder of a 
medical journal called the "Medical and Surgical Monitor." 
The name was afterward changed to "Indianapolis Medical 
Journal." Of this Dr. Earp has been Editor-in-chief for many 
years. He is a member of the Indianapolis Historical Society 
and was for five years its president. He is a member of the 
County, State, and National Medical Associations. He has 
been for thirty years Medical Examiner for the Knights of 
Pythias. He is a frequent contributor to the current liter 
ature of the medical science. He was for .1 term of years 
Mayor of the city of Indianapolis. 

Dr. Earp was married m 1897 to Miss Evelyn P. Byers. 

They have two sons, Leon and Evanson. In politics he is a 

Republican; in religion a Methodist. He is a thirty-second 

degree Mason, and Noble of Murat Temple Mystic Shrine. 

WILLIAM L. JONES 

William Lucius Jones was born in Lebanon, Illinois, June 
7, iS-jg. His parents were Professor Oliver V. Jones, a native 
of Kentucky, and Mary E. Crocker, who was born in Mass- 
achusetts. He entered McKendree in 1S74 and graduated in 
1879, receiving the degree of A. B. He was a Philo. In 1881 
he became editor of the Lebanon Journal and continued as 
editor and proprietor of that paper until 1913, when he sold 
out to his McKendree classmate, Rev. J. G. Dee, and went 
to Colorado for the benefit of his health. In 1891 he was 
elected president of the Southern Illinois Press Association. 
Every year for twenty years he was a delegate to the Na- 
tional Editorial Association, and for sixteen years a member 
of the Executive Committee of that body. He became a 
member of the Republican County Central Committee of 
St. Clair County in 1892. In 191 1 he was appointed by 
President Taft to the position of Postmaster of the city of 
Lebanon. His death occurred m Colorado Springs, Colo., 
September i";, 1915. His funeral was held m the Lebanon 
Methodist Church, and he was laid to rest in the College 
Hill Cemetery. 

MRS. MARTHA LIGGETT CARTER 

Martha Elizabeth Liggett was born in December, i860, 
at Lebanon, 111. Her parents were William Carr Liggett, a 
native of St. Louis, and Ellen O. Whitney, of Williston, 
Vermont. She entered McKendree in 1876 and graduated in 
1879, with the degree of A. B. In 1890 she received a Chau- 
tauqua diploma. She was a member of Clio. She was married 
in i88j, to Atkins Harrison Carter, who is also a graduate 
of McKendree. Since then Mrs. Carter's chief occupation 
has been that of home maker, with side lines as church and 
club worker. She is a member of Central Methodist Church, 
of Fort Smith, Arkansas, where her home has been since 1887. 



IRA W. MARSHALL 

Ira Waldron Marshall was born m Manchester, New 
Hampshire, May 3, 1857. He was a son of Rev. Lyman Mar- 
shall, who was for many years pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church in Lebanon, and m honor of whom the church is 
called "Marshall Memorial Church." He entered McKen- 
dree in 1874 and graduated in 1879, receiving the degree of 
A. B. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. 
Since his graduation he has been engaged in various occu- 
pations. He was long in the printing and stationery business 
in Philadelphia; for years a professional musician; and for 
ten years he was a prison missionary in New York City, to 
which work he was enthusiastically devoted. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church. His death occurred in New 
York City, March j, 191 j. 

OLIVE B, SHEPARD 

Olive Belle Shepard was born m Orio, Illinois, March 14, 
1859. She is a daughter of the Rev. Morrill A. and Mary 
(Moorhead) Shepard. Her father was a Baptist preacher, but 
spent a large part of his life in business in St. Louis while 
he resided in Lebanon. So that Olive Belle had Lebanon for 
her home during her youth and much of her later life. She 
entered McKendree in 1875 and graduated in 1879, with the 
degree of A. B. She was a prominent member of Clio. She 
pursued a post graduate course in Boston University, but 
did not take a degree there. She has interested herself m an 
amateur way in both art and music. She is a member of the 
Methodist Church and for many years was a member of the 
choir of the Lebanon Church. She is spending her declining 
years in the "Old Folks Home" at Lawrenceville, Illinois. 
REV. JOSEPH W. VAN CLEVE, D. D. 

Joseph William Van Cleve was born m Macoupin County, 
Illinois, February 19, 1859. His parents were Rev. William 
and Sarah (Calaway) Van 
Cleve. His father was born in 
Bergen County, New Jersey, 
of Dutch ancestry; his mother 
was born in Jersey County, 
Illinois, and was of Scotch-Irish 
descent. He entered McKen- 
dree in 1876 and graduated in 
1879 as the valedictorian of his 
class, receiving the degree of 
A. B. Later he received the 
following degrees from Mc- 
Kendree: A. M., 1882, Ph.D., 
1894, and D.D.m igoo.Hewas dR J. W. VAN CLEVE 





Two Hundred and Sixty-]^. 



MC KENDREE 



a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He was married 
September 17, 1882, to Miss Rachel Annis Talley. They have 
four children — Luella May, Ethel Annis, Arthur Talley, and 
Edith Joy. He joined the Southern Illinois Conference in 
1880 and served pastoral charges until 1902. He v,'as Statis- 
tician of the conference during the years 1887-1891, and sec- 
retary 1892-1900. In 1902 he transferred to the Illinois Con- 
ference, where he held several important charges and was 
Superintendent of the Decatur District. He was a member of 
the General Conferences of 1896, 1900, 1908, 1912, 1916, and 



1920. He was a member of the Board of Control of the Ep- 
worth League, 1896 to 1904. He was elected a member of the 
General Board of Conference Claimants in 1908. He was in 
demand as a lecturer, temperance worker, and orator for 
special occasions. He was a Mason and a Knight Templar. Dur- 
ing the last years of his effective service, he was secretary of 
the commission on finance, with headquarters in Chicago. He 
retired in 1922 and made his home in Evanston, where he 
died June 29, 1926. 




^jr/jr-jc?. 



/6S6 



A century of building and endowment growth. In addition to this amount the Southern IMinois Conference gives the college $10,000 a year 
which is the equivalent of $200,000 of added endowment. 



Two Hundred and Seventy 



MC KENDREE 



HT THE MEETING of the Boafd 111 Juiic, 1S79, It wds found 
th.it Dr. Houghton's special plan with reference to 
college finances had not been a complete success. 
What this plan was we do not know, for it is buried in the 
committee reports which were not copied into the record 
and the papers have been lost, and the Board members of 
that day have all without exception passed into the great 
beyond. But whatever it was. Dr. Houghton himself con- 
sidered it a failure and therefore, with his report, presented 
his resignation as president. Professor E. E. Edwards of the 
Science Department also resigned at the same time. Before 
the session was over, the Board requested all the other mem- 
bers of the faculty to resign also. Then with the slate clear, 
they proceeded to elect a faculty one at a time by ballot. 
Dr. Houghton's name was placed m nomination for president 
for another year, and was elected by a vote of sixteen to 
nine. But this vote was not satisfactory to Dr. Houghton 
himself. If there were nine members of the Board who were 
against him, he did not want the office. He therefore "did 
not choose" to accept. Then the name of Rev. Daniel W. 
Phillips was placed m nomination and he was unanimously 
elected. He was a graduate of McKendree of the class of 
1862. A sketch of his life will be found in connection with 
that class. He had been for nearly twenty years a member 
of the conference, and for a number of years a member of 
the Joint Board. He was therefore acquainted with the sit- 
uation, and tho recognizing the difficulty of the task, he 
accepted the responsibility of guiding the progress of the 
institution for a year at least. As a matter of fact, his term 
of office proved to be four years. In selecting the remainder 
of the faculty, the Board suspended the ballot rule in the case 
of Professor Deneen and reelected him by acclamation with a 
unanimous vote. In case of each of the other positions to be 
filled, two candidates were nominated and one chosen by a 
majority vote. Professor Swahlen was reelected to the Chair 
of Greek and German, which he had long held, and Professor 
Harris was elected for the second year to the Chair of Math- 
ematics. In Professor Edwards case, his resignation was the 
result of a genuine desire to change his field of work, so it 
was accepted by the Board and his efficient service commend- 
ed. The position was filled by the election of Miss Lucy 
Jane Rider, who afterward became so well-known to the 
church at large in connection with the Chicago Training 
School. This group composed President Phillips' faculty of 

'Editor's Note — His picture appears on page one hundred and ninety. 



CHAPTER XXII. 

President P/nllip's Administration 

liberal arts, which remained the same for his four year period, 
except that Miss Rider left after two years and was suc- 
ceeded by Professor E. B. Waggoner, In addition to these, 
the faculty page in the catalogue shows the names of Ida 
Maria Miller, Professor of Elocution and Phonetics; Frank- 
lin F. Roose, Professor of Book-keeping and Penmanship; 
Henry H. Horner, Gustavus Koerner, and James M. Hamill, 
Professors m the Law Department; and George H. Farwell, 
Professor of Instrumental and Vocal Music. Sketches of the 
other members of the mam college faculty have already been 
given except Miss Rider, so a brief biography of her is pre- 
sented here. 

Lucy Jane Rider was born m New Haven, Vermont, Sep- 
tember 9, 1849. She graduated from Oberlin College in 1872 
with the degree of A. B., and received the degree of A. M. 
from the same college in 1880. She long cherished the ambi- 
tion to become a foreign missionary. This led her to take a 
medical course in Philadelphia. She afterward studied in the 
Medical School of Northwestern University and received 
the degree of M. D. from that institution. She was also a 
student for two years in the Boston School of Technology 
and for some time a student m the School of Divinity of 
Chicago University. 

After her two years at McKendree, she devoted herself 
to the great Sunday School movement of that day, under the 
inspiration of John H. Vincent. She was associated m this 
enterprise with the well-known Illinois leader in Sunday 
School work, B. F. Jacobs. In 1885 she was married to Mr. 
Josiah Shelley Meyer, and the next year they together started 
the enterprise afterward known as the Chicago Training 
School, which in the succeeding years has achieved such 
wonderful results in preparing thousands of young women 
for various lines of Christian work. After devoting thirty- 
seven years of her life to this work, she passed to her reward 
March 16, 1922. 

During Dr. Phillips' four years, the financial affairs of 
the college drifted along about the same. There were still 
shortages in the salary payments, but the spirit of sacri- 
fice was still strong in the faculty and there was less said 
about deficits in the records of the Board. One great achieve- 
ment of this administration was the payment of the note 
of $5,000 to the heirs of Governor French. This obliga- 
tion had been hanging over the college ever since the death 
of Governor French in T864. The enrollment of students was 



Two Hundred and Seventy-One 



MC KENDREE 



slightly larger at the end than at the beginning of his term. 
The four graduating classes whose diplomas were signed by 
him were at least up to the average in size. The class ot 1880 
had nine members, 1881 had twenty -one, 1882 had twenty 
five, an unusually large class, and the class of i88j dropped 
to seventeen. Brief sketches of the members of these four 

classes follow. 

THE CLASS OF ISM) 
SHELBY C. BROWN 

Shelby Cullom Brown was born at Mt. Vernon, Illinois, 
March 4, 1855. His father, Russell Brown, was born in the 
state of New York and his mother, Nellie Brown, was born 
in Illinois. He entered McKendree as a student in 1877, and 
after completing the required courses, received the following 
degrees: B. S., 1880; LL. B., 1882; and M. S. in 1883. He 
was married December 22, 1887, to Miss Ella O. Heller. They 
have two sons, Shelby Gale and John Russell, born in 1889 
and 1897 respectively. Since his graduation Mr. Brown has 
followed the profession of law, practicing in Chanute, Kan- 
sas. He has held the position of City Attorney of Chanute 
and County Attorney of Neosho County. He has been active 
in politics in the interest of his friends, but never sought 
political preferment for himself. He is a member of the 
Methodist Church and the following fraternal orders: Ma- 
sons, A. O. U. W., and Elks. 

PROF. THOMAS H. JONES 

Thomas Henry Jones was born September 8, 1855, at 
Middleport, Meigs County, Ohio. His parents were Moses 
Jones, a Virginian of Welsh-American descent, and Aurilia 
A. (Shaug) Jones, a native of Ohio, of German-American 
ancestry. When he was quite young, his parents came to 
Illinois. He entered McKendree in 1874 and graduated in 
June, 1880 with the degree of A. B. In i88j he received the 
degree of A. M. He was a member of the Platonian Literary 
Society. He was married August 8, 1882, to Laura L. John- 
son, daughter of Dr. Wm. M. Johnson, of Johnsonville, 
Wayne County, Illinois. Their children are Shelby Corwin, 
a graduate of the Missouri Botanical Garden; Hubert Mel- 
vin, deceased; Theodore Raymond; and Ralph Waldo. Prof. 
Jones spent twelve years in public school and college work. 
He was associate principal of the Wayne County Normal, 
principal of the Odin Public Schools, Superintendent of 
Schools, Yates Center, Kansas, Dean of Normal Department 
and Professor of English Literature in Kansas Wesleyan 
University, President of Eldorado (Kan.) Normal and Busi- 
ness College, President of Orchard City College, Flora, 111. 
and President of Jennings Seminary, Aurora, lUinois. He 
spent about twenty years as manager of a large horticultural 



company in Kansas. He spent several years as Horticultural 
Editor of the Farm, Field, and Fireside, published in Chicago, 
and was also Editor-in-chief of the American Fruit and Veg- 
etable Journal. In recent years he has been at the head of a 
land investment company in St. Louis. He is a member of 
the Methodist Church, the Masons, and the order of Knights 
and Ladies of Security. He is a Republican in poHtics. His 
home is in St. Louis. 

MADISON M. LINDLV 

Madison Monroe Lindly was born in Illinois, June 10, 
i8';6. His parents were John J. and Amanda Lindly, who 
were both native Americans. He graduated from McKendree 
in June, 1880, receiving the degree of LL. B. He was a mem- 
ber of the Philosophian Literary Society. From 1890 to 1894 
and from 1900 to 190J he was Deputy United States Marshall 
in charge of the United States Court at McAlester, Indian 
Territory — now Oklahoma. Except in those periods, he prac- 
ticed law at McAlester from 1890 until his death. He was 
married December 5, 1883, to Miss Laura I. Mousley, of 
Shipman, Illinois, also a graduate of McKendree, of the class 
of 1882. They have three children — John M., Mary M., and 
Charles M. He was a member of the orders Knights of Py- 
thias and Odd Fellows. He died in September, 1920. at 
McAlester, Oklahoma. 

MRS. MARY LINDLY TAYLOR 

Mary Agnes Lindly was born in Lebanon, Illinois, Sep- 
tember 19, 1859. She was the daughter of John J. and Aman- 
da Lindly, who were both Americans. She was educated in 
the Lebanon Public Schools and McKendree College, from 
which she graduated in the class of 1880, receiving the de- 
gree of B. S. She was a member of the Clionian Literary 
Society. Before her graduation, October 5, 1878, she was 
married to John A. Taylor, who was also a student in Mc- 
Kendree. They lived successively at Freeburg, Illinois, Terre 
Haute, Indiana, and on a farm in Dakota. In 1889 they re- 
turned to Illinois and Mr. Taylor entered the Methodist 
ministry and became a member of the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference. She constantly shared her husband's labors in the 
ministry. Of their three children, one died in infancy. The 
others are Mrs. Blanche Hake, of Cairo, 111. and Fred L. 
Taylor, who studied law but is now engaged in business. 
For the last four years of her life Mrs. Taylor's home was 
in Carbondale. She died September 26, 191 3, and was buried 
in College Hill Cemetery. 

REBECCA J. LOUDEN 

Rebecca Jane Louden was born near Trenton, Illinois, 
February, i8'>9. Her parents were John and Rosanna (Craig) 




Two Hundred and So. 



<.^:^^^^^^^^^^;^^^^^^^^^^S^^s:^ 



Louden, who were both natives of Ireland, coming to Amer- 
ica m early life. She entered McKendree in 1877 and grad- 
uated m 1880, receiving the degree of B. S., and later. M. S. 
She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. Her life 
was very largely spent in ministering to others, especially 
the inmates of her own home. After her father's death, she 
was faithfully devoted to her mother, with whom she lived 
to the end of her life. She was for twelve years assistant 
Postmaster at Lebanon, while her brother, John C. Louden, 
was Postmaster. She served faithfully for many years as a 
member of the executive committee and treasurer of the 
Alumni Association of McKendree College. She belonged 
to the Methodist Church and the order of the Eastern Star. 
She died March 12, iQij, at La JoUa, California, and was 
buried m College Hill Cemetery. 

MRS. IDA MILLER WEIR 

Ida Maria Miller graduated in the class of 1880, receiving 
the degree of M. S. She is registered in the catalogue as com- 
ing from Neosho, Missouri. She taught expression, or elocu- 
tion, as it was then called, for several years in McKendree. 
Later she went to Kansas where she was married to Mr. Ar- 
thur J. Weir. We have no recent information concerning her. 
P£RRY W. THATCHER 

Perry Wells Thatcher was born at Mt. Vernon, Illinois, 
March 5, iS-ig. He was a son of Rev. John and Virginia 
(Bolls) Thatcher, who were both native Americans. He en- 
tered McKendree m the fall of 1877 and graduated in 1880, 
receiving the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was the 
valedictorian of his class. He was a member of the Philosoph- 
lan Literary Society. He was married in 1886 and had one 
daughter, Clementine. He was a great lover of music. His life 
business was teaching music, and several pieces of his own 
composition were published. He was a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. He died at Chicago, October 25, 1904. 
LOUIS ZERWECK 

Louis Zerweck was born in Cleveland, Ohio, January 26, 
1844. His parents were John Philip and Anna Margaret 
Zerweck, who were Germans. He entered the Law Depart- 
ment of McKendree in January, 1877, and graduated in 
June, 1880, receiving the degree of LL. B. He was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. He was married December 
26, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Thomas. Their children are 
Clara L., Nellie M., Louis P., and Susie, all of whom have 
been students in McKendree. They are now all married. 
Mr. Zerweck practiced law in Lebanon for many years. He 
has held the office of Public Administrator of St. Clair 
County; member of the County Board of Supervisors; Jus- 



tice of the Peace; and was Mayor of Lebanon two terms. 
He was United States Revenue Collector during the Cleve- 
land administration. He was a member of the Masonic Or- 
der, the Odd Fellows, and the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. He died January 12. 1920. 

THE CLASS OF LSSI 
MRS. JULIA ALEXANDER NAY 

Julia Estelle Alexander was born m St. Louis, Missouri, 
June 2s, 1861. She is the daughter of Charles H. and Kate 
Alexander, who were both born in Ohio. She entered Mc- 
Kendree in 1879 and graduated in the class of 1881, receiving 
the degree of B. S. She was a member of the Clionian Literary 
Society. She was married December ji, 1881, to Rev. C. S. 
Uzzell, of the Methodist Church, at Trinidad, Colorado. 
Their three children are George, Thomas, and Ruth. Mr. 
Uzzell died in May, 1889. September 9, 1891, Mrs. Uzzell 
was married to Mr. Frank Nay, of St. Louis. They h,ive 
three children, Lucile, Lloyd, and John. Mr. Nay is now 
Comptroller of all the Rock Island Railway lines. Mrs. Nay 
is a member of the Methodist Church, and of the Royal 
Neighbors. She has devoted much time to home missionary 
work, temperance work, and Christian work in general, es- 
pecially among the young people of the church. 
MRS. JOSEPHINE AMOS ALVORD 

Josephine Mary Amos was born near Carlyle, Illinois, 
March 4, 1861. She was the daughter of Peter H. and Mary 
S. Amos, who were both native Americans. She became a 
student in McKendree in September, 1S77, and graduated 
in the class of 1881, receiving the degree of B. S. She was 
a member of Clio. She was married December 27, 1883, to 
Horace H. Alvord. They lived several years m Houston, 
Texas, where Mrs. Alvord died June 25, 1886, leaving one 
daughter, Edith Nina, who also died August 7, 1890. Mrs. 
Alvord was a faithful member of the Methodist Church. 
PROF. SANDERS W BLACK 

Sanders Whiting Black was born m St. Clair County, 
Illinois, November 7, 185'). His parents, William M. and 
Milly G. Black, were both native born Americans. He en- 
tered McKendree in the fall of 1876 and graduated m the 
class of 1881, with the degree of B. L. He was a member of 
the Platonian Society. Since his graduation, he has done 
graduate work in several institutions, chiefly the University 
of Missouri and Chicago. He was married m June, 1886, to 
Ida L. Collins, at Monmouth, Kansas. His career as an edu- 
cator has included the following positions: Teaching in dis- 
trict schools two years; Principal of Schools at Monmouth, 
Kansas two years ; Superintendent of City School at Chanute 




Two Hundred and Se 



<:s:S:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^S:^ 



IN LIMINE. 



M LIMINE 



1 ORDER OF EXERCISES, f % ORDER OF EXERCISES, f 



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AFTERXOOX SESSIoy 

2 PM, 







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MUSIC. 




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L.VTIX SAL 
ORATION, 


L-IATORY, 


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MUSIC. 


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MUSIC. 


MUSIC. 




. - - Beauty. - - 
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liE\"EI)liri(_)N. 



MUSIC 


INVOCATION. 


MUSIC. 


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- National Evils. - 


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CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 

MUSIC. 


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AUDREYS TO T 


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MUSIC. 


BENEDICTION. 


MUSIC. 



Facsimile of commencement programme under Dr. Phillip's administration 



Kansas five years; Superintendent City Schools, Pittsburg, 
Kansas six years: occupied Chair of Latin, German, and 
Agriculture in the Cherokee County High School for nine 
years; and for many years he has been President of the Pan- 
handle School of Agriculture and Mechanics, at Goodwell, 
Oklahoma. He is a member of the Christian Science Church, 
and of the following fraternal orders : Masons, Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, Maccabees, and A. O. U. W. He is also 
a member of the National Educational Association. 
JOHN H. G. BRINKERHOFF 
John H.G.Brinkerhoff was born in Hackensack, New Jer 
sey, December 14, 1844. His parents were Phillip and Sarah 
(Scott) BrinkerhofF, who were both American born, though 
the former was of Holland Dutch descent, and the latter of 
Scotch and Holland Dutch ancestry. He became a student 
in McKendree in 1878 and graduated from the Law Depart- 
ment in 1881, receiving the degree of LL. B. He was not 
a member of either literary society. He was married to Miss 
Amanda Clark at Mascoutah, Illinois, December 25, 1872. 
They have two daughters, Jennie and Amy, and four sons, 
Clarence M., Roland C, John P., and Richmond H. Mr. 
BrinkerhofF was Superintendent of Schools at Lebanon for 
ten years, and held a similar position at Salem for ten years. 
He was Deputy Treasurer of Marion County for five years 



and Police Magistrate for two years. He was an elder and 
preacher in the Christian Church, a Mason, and an Odd 
Fellow. He is author of a History of Marion County, also 
of several poems, one of which entitled, "Just as their Dad- 
dies Did," has been used extensively by Professor Brownlee 
in his public readings. He was President of the Old Settlers 
Association of Marion County. He died in 1915. 
MRS. ANNA BROOKS FREARK 
Anna Mary Brooks was born at Bentonsport, fowa, Feb' 
ruary 28, 1858. She is the daughter of Rev. Strange Brooks, 
a Methodist preacher. She entered McKendree in September, 
1878, and graduated in the class of 188 1, receiving the degree 
of B. S. She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. 
She was married September 4, 1882, to Rev. C. S. Freark, 
who was her classmate at McKendree. Their living children 
are Winona, who graduated from Baker University in 1906 
and has since been a teacher in the Clay County (Kansas) 
High School; Christine B., who graduated from the Kansas 
State University; Clinton Joyce; and Christian S. Three 
daughters, Maude, Frances, and Ruth, died in childhood. 
Mrs. Freark is a member of the First Methodist Church at 
Lawrence, Kansas, is always anxious to do what she can to 
help every good work, and believes that women ought to 
be permitted toexercise the right of suffrage always. She avails 
herself of this privilege whenever the opportunity is offered. 



'Ywo Hv.n'ired, atiJ Setent>-FouT 



ffMC KENDREE 



DR. JAMES M. G. CARTER 

James Madison Gore Carter was born in Johnson County, 
Illinois, April !<;, 1843. He was educated chiefly at the State 
Normal University of Normal, Illinois, St. John's College, 
and the Medical Department of the Northwestern Univer- 
sity, from which he received the degree of M. D., 1880. He 
received from McKendree the honorary degree of A. M. in 
1881, and therefore he is listed in the class of 1881. He was 
married to Eunice Northrop in 187},. She died in 1887. He 
was married a second time in 1887, to Mrs. E. P. Earle, of 
Chicago. He served in the Civil War. He is .1 member ot 
the G. A. R., a Knight Templar, an Odd Fellow, and has 
been President of the Chicago Medical Society. He is the 
author of several books. Among them are : "Outlines of Med- 
ical Botany m the United States," "Catarrhal Diseases of 
the Respiratory Organs," and "Diseases of the Stomach." 
He has had a long and successful medical career, having re- 
sided for many years at Waukegan, Illinois. 
PETER T. ENTREKIN 

Peter Thomas Etrekin was born at Carlyle, Illinois, July 
11, 1858. He was the son of Andrew J. and Sarah A. (Amos) 
Entrekin. He entered McKendree in 1878 and graduated in 
the class of 1881, receiving the degree of B. S. He was a 
member of the Platonian Literary Society. He then entered 
the St. Louis School of Pharmacy, from which he graduated 
in 1886. He spent his life as a druggist, following this pro- 
fession for many years m Dallas, Texas. He was married in 
March, 1884, to Miss Virginia Belle Cooper, of Alton. She. 
died in Dallas, Texas, April 21, 1907 and her husband died 
March 28, 1908. They left no children. Mr. Entrekin was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and voted 
with the Democratic party. 

REV. JACKSON C. HALL 

Jackson Caleb Hall was born at Nashville, Illinois, January 
2";, 1862. His parents were Dr. A. A. and Lucretia (Goodner) 
Hall. He entered McKendree in 1877, completed the Classical 
Course, and received the degree of A. B. in 1881. He was 
a member of the Philosophian Society. He was a Republican 
in politics and a member of the Christian Church, of which 
he became a minister and served m that capacity for many 
years. He lived for .some time at Albion, Illinois, and after- 
ward moved to Los Angeles, California. 
HON. ALLEN G. FISHER 

Allen GaskiU Fisher was born at Bakersville, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 16, i86j. His parents were Rev. G. W. and Mary 
Jane Fisher. His father was a Presbyterian minister and was 
stationed for some years at Trenton, 111. Allen G. graduated 



from McKendree in the class of 188 1, receiving the degree 
of A. B., and in 1884 from the Washington University Law 
School, where he received the degree of LL. B. He located 
m Chadron, Nebraska, for the practice of law, and that place 
has been his home during his entire professional career. He 
has been City Attorney, Mayor, member of the Board of 
Education and of the Nebraska Legislature. He is a Meth- 
odist, a Mason, Shriner, an Odd Fellow, and belongs to the 
Eagles, Elks, Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen, Royal 
Neighbors, Royal Highlanders, and the Commercial Club. 
He was married to Miss Flora R. Yanaway, of Toledo, Illi- 
nois. They have seven children, though not all are living. 
One of his daughters, Bessie V. Fisher, was a student in 
McKendree a tew years ago. 

MRS. CARRIE BROWN HOYT 

Carrie Agnes Brown was born at Lebanon, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 5, 1863. She was a daughter of Luther and Carrie 
(Baldwin) Brown, who were natives, the former of Vermont 
and the latter of New York State. Her youth was spent in 
Lebanon, where, after attending the public schools, she en- 
tered McKendree in September, 1877, and graduated m the 
class of 1881, receiving the degree of B. S., and later, M. S. 
She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. She was 
married December 30, 1884, to Dr. John W. Hoyt, of the 
class of 1875. They resided for some years m Olney, Illinois, 
and later m Kansas City, Missouri, where Dr. Hoyt was 
engaged in the practice of medicine, and where he died in 
1892. Mrs. Hoyt's death occurred January 19, 1909, at Sioux 
City, Iowa. 

PROF. JAMES S. CARSON 

James Sylvester Carson was born at Hoyleton, Illinois, 
October 6, i8')9. His parents, K. L. and Catherine Carson, 
are both native Americans. After completing the courses 
offered by the home school, he entered McKendree and grad- 
uated in 1 88 1 as the valedictorian of his class, with the degree 
of A. B. He afterward received the degrees of A. M. and 
LL. B. from McKendree, and has done graduate work in the 
University of Chicago. While in McKendree he was a mem- 
ber of the Platonian Literary Society. He was married August 
16, 1883, to Anna F. Spies, of the class of 1882. They have 
three sons: James W., Oliver J., and Charles L. Professor 
Carson has been employed in educational work in the state 
of Kansas for the last twenty-five years. For many years his 
work has been in Wichita, where he has been employed as 
Ward Principal, Department Teacher, High School Principal, 
and Superintendent. He was a candidate for County Super- 
intendent of Schools in Sedgwick County, of which Wichita 
is the County Seat. In May, 191 3, when he was delivering 



Two Hundred and Seventy-Fne 



.^r^^r-^^^^i^C^^^^MC KENDREE^^fe^r^.^.....^^.^^ 



the Commencement address for the Valley Center High 
School, he was stricken with apoplexy and died four days 
later. He is survived by his wife and three sons. 

JOSEPH C. CREIGHTON 

Joseph C. Creighton was born in Wayne County, Illinois, 
in 1854, and died at Salt Lake City, Utah, in January, 1899. 
His parents were John M. and Mary Ann (Crews) Creigh- 
ton. He graduated from the Law Department of McKendree 
in 1881, receiving the degree of LL. B. He was a member of 
the Philosophian Literary Society. He was married in 1883,, 
to Miss Cordelia Allen. They had no children. Mr. Creigh- 
ton followed the profession of law during his active life with 
good success and was recognized as an able and honorable 
lawyer. He served two terms as State's Attorney of Christian 
County. He was a member of the Methodist Church. 
REV. CHRISTIAN S. FREARK 

Christian Simon Freark was born December 29, 1854, at 
Fosterburg, Illinois. His father. Christian Freark, was a farm- 
er in Madison County, Illinois. He became a student m 
McKendree in September, 1877, and after completing the 
Classical Cour.se, graduated in 1881, receiving the degree of 
A. B. He was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. 
He entered Garrett Biblical Institute, but before he had com- 
pleted his course, his health failed and he was obliged to 
abandon his Theological Course. He was admitted to the 
Kansas Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 
1882. He served charges in this conference in the Atchison 
and Kansas City Districts until 191 j, when he took the 
supernumerary relation, and resides at Lawrence, Kansas- 
He was a very earnest, and according to the testimony of 
his members, a very acceptable pastor and preacher. He was 
married September 4, 1882, to Miss Anna M. Brooks, who 
graduated from McKendree in the same class with himself. 
Of their seven children, four are now living. He is a member 
of the Masonic and Odd Fellows Lodges m L.iwrence. 
WILLIAM W. FLINT 

William Wmterton Flint was born at Lebanon, Illinois, 
March 23,, 1858, and died at Lebanon, January 25, 1896. His 
parents, William and Mary Flint, were both English, and 
came to Lebanon in 1842. He became a student in McKen- 
dree in 1875 and graduated in the class of 1881, receiving 
the degree of B. S. In 1884 he received the degrees of M. S. 
and LL. B. He was a member of the Platonian Literary So- 
ciety. He was married September 7, 1887, to Miss Carrie 
Beck, of Lebanon. Their only son, Charles William, is a 
graduate of the Lebanon High School and is now employed 
in mercantile business in Chicago. Mr. Flint spent some 



years in farming, several as a lumber dealer in Lebanon, was 
m the real estate business tor a while m Pratt, Kansas, and 
editor of a paper m Trenton, Illinois. For some time before 
his death his health was too frail to permit him to engage in 
any active occupation. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

PROF. JOHN W. HENNINGER 

John Wesley Henninger was born December 21, 1857, '^^ 
Hagarstown, Illinois. His parents were John B. and Amanda 
E. Henninger, the former a native of Virginia and the latter 
of Kentucky. He entered McKendree in 1878, having pre- 
viously been a student in the Wesleyan University. He grad- 
uated with the class of 1881, receiving the degree of B. S. 
Three years later he received the degree of M. S., and in 
1892, after finishing the Law Course, he was granted the 
degree of LL. B. In 1906 he received the degree of Ph. M. 
from the University of Chicago. While in McKendree he 
was a member of the Platonian Literary Society. He was 
married in 1890, to Miss Clara K. Kimlin, of Quincy, Illi- 
nois. They have three children: Ellen Louise, Thomas, and 
Julia. The following are some of the principal positions held 
by Professor Henninger since leaving McKendree: Principal 
of the Bloomington High School four years; Superintendent 
of the Charleston city schools six years; Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction of the State of Illinois two 
years; Superintendent of the Jacksonville city schools four 
years; President of the Macomb Stiite Normal four years. 
During all these years he was an active member of the Illinois 
State Teachers' Association and the National Educational 
Association. He was also one of the organizers of the South- 
ern Illinois Teachers' Association. He was a Knight Templar 
and a member of the Knights of Pythias. He was a life long 
Methodist and active Christian worker. He was a member 
of the Illinois Conference and pastor of Methodist churches 
for several years. In 1914 he was elected Professor of Phil- 
osophy in the Illinois Wesleyan University. He died at 
Bloomington, July 25, 1918. 

ELIZABETH E. HOLDING 

Eliz.iheth Ella Holding was born at Virden, Macoupin 
County, Illinois, September i, 1858. Her father. Rev. Rich- 
ard Holding, after spending about forty years in the Meth 
odist ministry — mostly in the state of Kentucky, died in 
1868, leaving five children, of whom Elizabeth was the young- 
est. Her mother died in 1866. She made her home for a time 
with her brother. Rev. Carlisle B Holding, in Carbondale, 
Illinois, and attended the Southern Illinois Normal School. 
L.iter she entered McKendree College, where she gradixited 




Twn Hundred and Sev 



c KENDREE^^^^^^^:^^^,^.^.,.^^ 




Facsimile of the programme of the music soiree by the scholars of the Conservatory of Music of McKendree College held on June 



in 1881. receiving the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. She 
was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. While in 
McKendree she became an intimate friend of Lucy J. Rider — 
afterward Mrs. Meyer, who was then a teacher there. Soon 
after graduation she went to teach in a mission school in 
Santiago, Chili, South America. In 1885 she returned to the 
United States and taught in Salt Lake City as a home mis- 
sionary under the direction of Dr. Iliff until the opening of 
the Chicago Training School for missionaries under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Meyer. After about four years of efficient service 
m the Chicago Training School, she was chosen on the recom- 
mendation of Mrs. Meyer herself as instructor in Bible in the 
Scarritt Training School in Kansas City. After a career of 
notable success in this institution, she was called from labor 
to reward, August 28, 1896. "Her Hfe was an inspiration 
to nobler thought and action, to all who came under her 

influence." 

WILBUR N. HORNER 

Wilbur Nathan Horner was born at Lebanon, St. Clair 
County, Illinois, May 2, i860. He is a son of Henry Hypes 
Horner, who was a member of the first class that graduated 
from McKendree. He graduated m the class of 1881, receiv- 
ing the degree of A. B. The following year he received the 



degree of LL. B., and m 1884, A. M. He was the salutatorian 
of his class, and was a member of the Philosophian Literary 
Society. His education was completed by taking a post grad- 
uate course at Columbia University, New York. For seven 
years he engaged in the practice of law in Belleville, Illi- 
nois, being associated with ex-Governor Gustavus Koerner. 
He removed to Chicago in 1893, and shortly after formed 
a law partnership with ex-United States Senator Lyman 
Trumbull, of Chicago, and continued in this partnership 
until Senator Trumbull's death; since which time he has 
practiced law alone and has made a specialty of corporation 
work. He has travelled extensively in Europe and is a member 
of numerous clubs in Chicago, New York, and other cities. 

For several years, having retired from active service, he 
has lived with his two younger sisters at the old Horner 
homestead in Lebanon. 

MARY E. LEONARD 

Mary Emma Leonard was born May 16, iS-vv. Her parents 
were George Leonard, who was of Irish descent, and Harriet 
M. (Parker) Leonard, who was of English ancestry. She en- 
tered McKendree in 1878 and graduated in 1881 with the 
degree of B. S. In 1893 she received the degree of Ph. D. 
from McKendree, which was earned by resident graduate 



Two Hundred and Seientv-Sei-eii 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^ 



work. In 1894 she received the degree of M. L. from Cornell 
University, at Ithaca, N. Y. This also was secured by resi- 
dent graduate study. While at McKendree she was a mem- 
ber of the Clionian Society. In 1886 she graduated from the 
Kansas State Normal School and therefore holds a life cer- 
tificate to teach in the public schools of Kansas. She taught 
two years in that state as high school principal, one at Lone 
and the other at Osage City. She was principal of the schools 
at Palms, CaHfornia from 1889 to 1893, and in 1894-95 she 
held a similar position at Escondido, California. December 
27, 1890, she was granted a life certificate in the schools of 
that state. She taught English and Latin in the high school 
at Elsinore, California, 1898-99. She compiled a set of abstract 
books for Sangamon County, Illinois and built up a good 
abstract business in the years 1903-1912. In March, 1912, 
she returned to California and went into the real estate 
business in the city of Los Angeles. She is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, belongs to the Founder's 
Chapter of the American Women's League, and is a mem 
ber of the American Women's Republic. 

MRS. CARRIE PADON PHELPS 
Carrie Olive Padon was born at Summerfield, February 
3, 1862. She graduated from McKendree in the class of 1881, 
receiving the degree of B. S. She was a member of Clio. She 
was married to George L. Phelps, of Columbia, December 
17, 1884. Mr. Phelps was also educated at McKendree, but 
died in 1899, leaving Mrs. Phelps with six children. She 
bravely undertook the task of rearing and educating these 
children; all of whom grew to maturity, though three of 
them succumbed to the influenza epidemic in 1917. Mrs. 
Phelps taught m the public schools of Illinois and Missouri 
for several years, served eight ye;irs as County Superintend- 
ent of Schools of Howell County, Missouri, taught in the 
Agricultural College of New Mexico, served as Postmistress 
of State College, New Mexico, and as Home Demonstration 
Agent for the College. She is now serving a two year contract 
as House Manager of a Boys' School in Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Islands. In June, 1928, she expects to return to her home in 
State College, New Mexico. She is a member of the Royal 
Neighbors and the Knights and Ladies of Security. 

OSCAR R. SILLIMAN 

Oscar Rudolph Silliman was born at Carmi, Illinois, April 

12, i86i. He graduated from McKendree in 1881 with the 



degree of B. S. He w.is a member of the Philo Society. Later 
he took a law course in the Illinois Wesleyan, though he 
did not practice law. He taught school for some years in 
Illinois, and then went to Colorado in the hope of improving 
his health, which had not been good from the time of his 
recovery from a severe case of typhoid fever. He went to 
Durango, Colorado, in 1892 and engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness until 1909, when the state of his health became such 
that he was compelled to sell his business and take up work 
in the open air. He bought a fruit and dairy ranch near 
Durango and lived on it with a fair degree of health until 
his death, which occurred December 26, 1921, as the result 
of a tumor on the brain. He was married in 1902 to Miss 
Etta Hornady, of McCune, Kansas, who was at that time 
teaching school in Animas City, Colorado. Their one daugh- 
ter IS now married and lives in Denver, which is also the 
present home of Mrs. Silliman. 

JACOB A. SPIES 

Jacob Alfred Spies was born at Marine, Illinois, March 
14, iS-ig. He is a son of Jacob and Katherine Spies, who were 
natives of Germany. He entered McKendree in January, 
1878, and graduated in June, 1881, receiving the degrees of 
B. S. and LL. B., both at the same time. He was a member 
of the Philosophian Society. He was married to Anna Spies, 
June 17, 1886. They have four children: Anna Agnes, Eliza- 
beth, Charles, and Adolph. When Mr. Spies finished his 
college course, having carried the Law Course at the same 
time, his health was broken ; so for two years after his grad- 
uation he travelled in Europe and succeeded in regaining 
his health. In 1885 he came to Palo Alto County, Iowa, 
then a vast praine, and invested in land, and engaged in 
farming for a period of five years. When the country de- 
veloped, he built and operated a line of grain elevators and 
lumber yards, which he operated till 1904, when he sold 
the business. About the same time the American Savings 
Bank of Graettinger was organized, of which Mr. Spies be- 
came president, and which position he still holds. In 191 1 
he purchased a controlling interest in the Union Dairy Com- 
pany, of St. Louis. 

He then moved to St. Louis and lived in that city until 
1917, when he moved back to his Iowa home, where he 
now lives and is engaged in the practice of law. 



Two Hundred and Sex'cntyEight 



^MC KENDREE K^^^^s:^:^-s^g^>.r^^ 



THE CLASS OF 1SS2 
MRS, CAROLINE THRALL CAMPBELL 

Caroline H. Thrall was horn m Edwards County, Illinois, 
January i8, 1845. Her parents were Worthy Thrall, a native 
of Vermont, of English descent, and Hannah James, who was 
born in Ohio, of Welsh ancestry. She entered McKendree in 
1869, but failing health, two years later, necessitated the 
abandonment of school work for some years. Returning to 
Lebanon in 1881, she completed her course and was graduated 
in 1882, receiving the degree of B. S. She was one of the 
founders of Clio, and a member of the committee which 
drafted the constitution and by-laws. She was reared 
in a Methodist home and united with the church at the age 
of nine. September 2, 1875, she was united in marriage to Rev. 
C. W. Campbell, a Methodist preacher. Their children are 
Mrs. Ettie C. Marshall, of Jennings, La., and Leo F., for 
some time a student in McKendree. Mrs. Campbell taught 
four years in Houston Seminary while her husband was prin- 
cipal of that institution. Since that time, in addition to her 
household duties, she has been "assistant pastor" in the var- 
ious charges her husband has held. She died at Lake Charles, 
Louisiana, December ji, 1924. 

SENATOR CHARLES S. DENEEN 

One of the most highly respected names to be 
found in the long history of McKendree College 
and the city of Lebanon, is that of Deneen. That 
name seems to have reached its climax of renown 
m the present senior United States Senator from 
Illinois, Charles S. Deneen. His ancestry can be 
traced back to the founders of the American 
Republic. His grand-father. Rev. William L. 
Deneen, was born in Pennsylvania in 1798 and 
came to Illinois in his early manhood. He married 
Verlinder Moore, the daughter of Risdon Moore, 
who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 
After helping to win the war of Independence, Moore went 
to Georgia, then came to Illinois in time to help lay the found - 
ations and formulate the policies of the great prairie state. 
The three children of William and Verlinder Deneen were 
Risdon M., Samuel H., and their sister, who married Judge 
Metcalf of Edwardsville. Samuel Hedding Deneen married 
Sarah Ashley, daughter of Hiram K. Ashley. Of their four 
children, Charles Samuel was the second, born May 4, 1863. 

He thus comes of pioneer stock, eminent for both their 
piety and their patriotism. His ancestors helped to make this 
country what it is, and he is using his abilities in an effort 
to maintain the high ideals which his ancestors helped to 




SENATOR DENEEN 



establish. His people were also closely identified with Mc- 
Kendree College. His great grandfather, Nathan Horner, was 
one of the founders, its iirst treasurer, and for thirty-eight 
years a trustee. Henry Hypes Horner, his great uncle, was 
a member of the first graduating class, and for twenty-four 
years. Dean of the Law Department. Benjamin Hypes, another 
great uncle, was treasurer for thirty-five years, and a trustee 
for sixty years, which is the longest official connection on 
record. William L. Deneen, his grandfather, received a degree 
from McKendree and was a trustee for eight years. Hiram 
K. Ashley, his other grandfather, was a charter trustee and 
served until 1851. Risdon Marshall Moore, his second cousin, 
graduated m 1850 and served in the faculty from that time 
until 1866, except the time he was m the Cn'il War as 
Colonel of the 117th Illinois, known as the McKendree 
Regiment. Risdon M. Deneen, his uncle, graduated from 
McKendree in 1854. Samuel H, Deneen, his father, graduated 
m the same year and taught Latin in McKendree for thirty 
years. Charles Samuel is the second of his father's four 
children, all of whom graduated from McKendree. Mr. 
Deneen feels that he owes much of his life's success to the 
college. His early home was adjoining the camp- 
us, and he grew up m the college atmosphere. 
He became a student there as soon as he was 
old enough, under the rules. In McKendree's 
class rooms he learned habits of close and thorough 
study, and in the Philosophian Society he learned 
to think on his feet. In his contacts with both 
te.ichers and students he received the inspiration 
that made him ambitious to serve his fellowmen. 
He completed the course and graduated in 1882, 
receiving the degree of A. B. Of the twenty-five 
members of his class, one other attained emin- 
ence m public life, both in the state and nation. 
This is . Ex-Senator Lawrence Y. Sherman. In 
1885 Mr. Deneen received the degrees of A. M. and LL. 
B. from McKendree, and m 190'; that of LL.D. 

In recognition of the debt he owes his Alma Mater he has 
rendered eminent service to her in many ways. He became 
a trustee in 1900 and has therefore served for twenty-eight 
consecutive years. For ten years he was president of the 
Board and a member of the Executive Committee. He has 
contributed liberally to the endowment fund, besides being 
the sole donor of the ten acre experiment field, adjoining the 
city limits of Lebanon, which is owned by the college but 
conducted by the University of Illinois. When McKendree 
was in an endowment campaign he gave several days of his 




Two Hundred and S: 



^Sl^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^s^ 



valuable time, speaking in important centers ,ind presenting 
the claims of the oldest Methodist College in Illinois. Jn fact 
but few men in all her century of history can show a record 
of service to the institution equal to his. 

Mr. Deneen began the practice of law in Chicago a few 
years after he left McKendree, and has considered that city 
his home ever since. He served a term in the legislature of 
Illinois, two terms as State's Attorney of Cook County, and 
two terms as Governor of Illinois. He then returned to his 
law practice in Chicago until he was elected United States 
Senator. But his public life is a matter of common knowledge 
and need not be repeated here. He was married May lo, 
1891 to Miss Bina Day Maloney of Mt. Carroll, Illinois. 
They have four children — Edward Ashley, Dorothy, Frances 
and Bina. 




EXHIBITION! 

^MlQSQPHIAN $ SOCIETY, ^ \ 

pf 1 President o( the E 

'"^ CHARLES S. DENEEN 

Facsimile of Philo programme with Senator Deneen"s name 
MRS. CORA DUNSDON McKEE 
Cor.i Irene Dunsdon was born at Jerseyville, Illinois, Feb' 
ruary 11, 1862. She graduated from McKendree in the class 
of 1882, with the degree of B. S. She was a member of Clio. 
Soon after her graduation she was married to Horace N. 
McKee, who was also a McKendrean. She died at Lebanon, 
Illinois, May jo, 1884. 

JAMES R. LARGE 
James Robert Large was born at Freedom, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 13,, 1854. He IS the son of Samuel and Mariah Large, the 




former of whom was horn in Queen's County, Ireland, and 
the latter was of Scotch-Irish descent. He entered McKen- 
dree in September, 1875, and graduated in the class of 1882, 
receiving the degree of A. B., and later, A. M. He was a 
member of the Platonian Literary Society. In addition to his 
college course, he took a course in the Bryant and Stratton 
Business College, in Chicago. He has spent the years since 
graduation in various occupations — among them, teaching in 
the public schools, travelling salesman, book-keeper, clerk, 
and some lines of literary work. On the day of his graduation 
he delivered the Latin salutatory, and gained distinction as a 
student by his high grades in Greek. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the order of Knights of 
Pythias. He is unmarried and lives at Agnew, California. 
MRS. SUSANNA LARGE McGAW 

Susanna Hunter Large was born at Owaneco, lUinois, 
March 7, 1858. She is the younger sister of James Robert 
Large, but graduated in the same class with him in 1882, 
receiving the degree of B. S. She was a member of the Clionian 
Literary Society. She was a teacher in the public schools until 
1890, when she was married to Mr. William McGaw. They 
have one son and three daughters. Mrs. McGaw is a member 
of the Methodist Church and active in religious work. She 
has served as class leader and Sunday School Superintendent. 
Her home is still at Owaneco. 

JUDGE WILLIAM H. LITTICK 

William Littick was born near Vandalia, Illinois, February 
4, 1859. He is a son of Marcus A. and Mary Littick, who 
were both native Americans. He graduated from McKendree 
in the class of 1882, receiving the degrees of B. S. and LL. B , 
both at the same commencement. He was a member of the 
Philosophian Literary Society. He was married in October, 
1885, and has one son, George S. Littick. He has been engaged 
in the practice of law ever since his graduation and for many 
years has been located in Kansas City, Kansas, where he is 
still in the active practice of his profession. He was Munici- 
pal Judge of Kansas City one term. He is a member of sev- 
eral fraternal orders. 

JUDGE J. McCABE MOORE 

John McCabe Moore was born at Carlyle, Illinois, June 
II, 1862. His parents were David A. and Matilda J. Moore, 
,ind his father belonged to the numerous family of Moores, 
whose ancestors came to Illinois from Virginia. He graduated 
from McKendree in the class of 1882, receiving the degree of 
B. S., and later, M. S. He was a member of the Philosophian 
Society. After leaving McKendree, he read law in Carlyle, 
Decatur, and Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in 1886. 



Two Hiitidred and Eight; 



MC KENDREE 



He settled m Kansas City, Kansas for the practice of law m 
1886. For live years he held the office of Judge of the District 
Court of Wyandotte County, Kansas. He was first assistant 
United States District Attorney for the District of Kansas 
for two years, when he resigned and resumed the practice 
of law in Kansas City, Missouri, where he has ever since 
been located in business, though he resides m Kansas City, 
Kansas. He was married June 20, 1894, to Miss Nellie Mc- 
Cracken. of Nashville, Illinois, who was one ot his school 
mates in McKendree. He is a thirty-second degree Scottish 
Rite Mason. 

MRS. LAURA MOUSLEV LINDLY 

Laura Irene Mousley was born at Shipman, Illinois, in the 
year i86j. She is the daughter of John R. and Thyrza Mous- 
ley, who were both native Americans. She became a student 
in McKendree in September, 1878, and graduated m June, 
1882, receiving the degree of B. S. and a diploma in Elocution. 
She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. She was 
married December 5, i88j, to Madison M. Lindly, who grad- 
uated from McKendree in the class of 1880. They have three 
children — John M., Mary M., and Charles M. Mrs. Lindly 
taught music for some time in Illinois, and also after moving 
to Oklahoma. She is a member of the- Episcopalian Church, 
the Order of the Eastern Star, and the Rebekah Lodge, No. 
I';, McAlester, Oklahoma. Her home was in McAlester 
from 1890 until after the death of her husband, when she 
moved to Lafayette, Indiana. 

HON. FRED MOESER 

Frederick Moeser was born near the village of Smithton, 
in St. Clair County, lUinois, September 13, 1857. He is a son 
of Henry and Christina (Stephens) Moeser, who were both 
natives of Germany, but came to America and settled in St. 
Clair County about the middle of the nineteenth century. 
After preliminary education in the public schools of his own 
township and in Belleville, he entered McKendree College, 
from which he graduated in 1882, receiving the degree of 
B. S. He was a member of the Philosophian Literary Society. 
He then entered the Law Department of the University of 
Missouri, from which he graduated in 1883 with the degree 
of LL. B. He was afterward admitted to the bar, both in 
Illinois and Missouri. He located in Freeburg, Illinois, where 
he served as City Attorney and Principal of the Public School 
until 1905, when he moved to East St. Louis. In the fall of 
1912 he was elected County Auditor of St. Clair County, 
which position he held till his death. At the old homestead 
near Tamaroa, Illinois, he was married, April 26, 1883, to 
Miss Melissa J. Smith. They have three children, all grown — 



Ralph E. Moeser, M. D., now in the employ of Armour and 
Co. of Chicago as Assistant Physician; F. Adolph Moe- 
ser, a commercial graduate, now employed as book-keeper for 
Texas Motor Car and Supply Company of Cuero, Texas; and 
Miss Geneva Moeser, a graduate of the East St. Louis High 
School, who, since her graduation, has been employed as a 
teacher in the public schools of that city. She has talent in 
music and took up a special course in that subject m the Mc- 
Kendree Music Conservatory in 191 3. Mr. Moeser died at 
his home in East St. Louis, December 22, 191 5. 
REV. REUBEN E. PIERCE 

Reuben Edward Pierce was born near Harrisburg, Illinois. 
He IS the oldest son of Rev. Dr. Benjamin R. Pierce, who 
was for fifty years a member of the Southern Illinois Confer' 
ence. Both he and the mother, Mrs. Elizabeth H. Pierce, were 
of Puritan stock and Revolutionary parentage. After consid- 
erable preliminary training elsewhere, he entered McKendree 
in 1880 and graduated in 1882 with the degree of A. B. Later, 
he received the degree of Master of Arts. He was a member 
of the Platonian Literary Society. He took a full course at 
Garrett Biblical Institute and received the degree of B. D. in 
1887. He was received on trial in the Southern Illinois Con- 
ference in 1882. He served pastoral charges in that conference 
until 1899, except three years that he was a missionary in 
New Mexico. In 1899 he was transferred to the Illinois Con- 
ference and m 1908 to the Colorado Conference, and was 
made Superintendent of the Colorado Children's Home So- 
ciety. In 1914 he was transferred to the Rock River Confer- 
ence. He was married in 1886, to Miss Fannie F. Gillham, of 
Edwardsville, Illinois. They have three children — Raymond 
Clark, who graduated from the University of Illinois; a 
daughter, Mary Pierce, and the youngest son were educated 
in the University of Denver. Mr. Pierce is a member of the 
Odd Fellows Lodge. After his retirement, he lived m St. 
Louis for a time, but now resides at Manatee, Florida. 
HUBERT W. REYNOLDS 

Hubert Winfield Reynolds was born at Mascoutah, lUi 
nois, July 7, 1861. He was a son of Nathan J. and Mary J. 
Reynolds, who lived at Belleville when their children at- 
tended McKendree. He entered college in September, 1878, 
and graduated in the class of 1S82, receiving the degree of 
B. S., and later, M. S. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. He spent most of his life after graduation 
in the employ of the railroad, for a time as telegraph operator, 
but for the last twenty-one years of his life he was a bridge 
collector for the Terminal Railroad Company of St. Louis. 
He died October 26, 1906. One who knew him in his college 




Two Hundred and Eighty-0. 



MC KENDREE 



days says of him that he was "an exemplary young man." 
He was a Methodist, and in politics, a Republican. 
MRS. ANNIE REYNOLDS MULLEN 
Annie Catherine Reynolds was born August 29, 186a, at 
Mexico, Missouri. She is a daughter of Nathan J. and Mary 
J. Reynolds. She entered McKendree as a student in the fall 
of 1878 and graduated in June, 1882, with the degree of 

A. B. She was a member of the Clionian Literary Society. 

She was married in December, 1884, to Chas. T. Mullen. 

Their home has been at Belleville, Illinois, for many years. 

Mrs. Mullen is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church. 

GEORGE P. RAMSEY 

George Price Ramsey was born near Xenia, Clay County, 

Illinois, January 19, 1863. He is a son of George D. and Mary 

Ann (Price) Ramsey, of whom the former was a native of 

Ohio, of Scotch descent, and the latter was born in Indiana, 

of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He entered McKendree in the Spring 

of 1880 and graduated in the class of 1882, with the degree of 

B. S., later receiving that of M. S. He was a member of the 
Platonian Literary Society. He studied law and has made 
that his profession since 1885. He served two terms as City 
Attorney of Mt. Carmel, Illinois, and an equal period as 
State's Attorney of Wabash County. In 19 ij he became 
Assistant Attorney General for the state of Illinois. He is a 
member of the B. P. O. E., the K. of P., and of the Episcopal 
Church. He was married July 16, 1884, to Miss Amanda L. 
Phillips. They have two children — Mary Ethelyn Bellaire, 
born in 1885; and Edgar Phillips Ramsey, born in 1887. 

PROF. FRANKLIN F. ROOSE 
Franklin Frederick Roose was born July 3, 1855, in Mo' 
line, 111. He attended the Rock Island Public Schools. Later 
he spent two years at the Illinois Wesleyan University. He 
then went to Quincy, Illinois, where he taught certain 
branches in Chaddock College and continued his studies in 
a business course which he had begun at Curriers Business 
College. He graduated at the Gem City Business College at 
Quincy in 1880. The following September he entered Mc- 
Kendree, and while pursuing his studies in the Scientific 
Course, he paid expenses by running a business department 
in McKendree. He graduated in 1882 with the degree of 
B. S. In 1885 he received the degree of M. S., and in i886 
he received the degree of A. M. from the Iowa Wesleyan 
University. June 20, 1882, he and his wife sailed for South 
America to teach in the American College at Pernambuco, 
Brazil. As the climate did not agree with him, he returned 
after a year and established the Lincoln Business College 



at Lincoln, Neb., of which he continued to be the head till 
1891, when It had an enrollment of about one thousand stu- 
dents. He then became the founder of the Lincoln Normal 
University, which is one of the leading institutions of its 
class. For six years he was editor of the Western Workman, 
the official organ of the A. O. U. W. He has held the office 
of Head Adviser m the M. W. A. He was past master Work- 
man of the A. O. U. W. and past Chancellor Commander 
of the K. of P. He was one of the founders of the Woodmen 
of the World, and for nine years supreme treasurer of that 
body. He was also one of the founders of the Fraternal Union 
of America, and has been supreme president of the order. 
He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, both York and 
Scottish Rite, and a Shriner. He was Fraternal Commissioner 
for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition in 1898, and has held 
numerous other offices and positions of honor and trust. His 
home was in Denver at the time of his death in 1921. 
MRS. ELIZABETH MORRISON ROOSE 

Elizabeth Morrison was born at Wapella, Illinois, October 
21, 1858. She is a daughter of H. B. Morrison, of Scotch-Irish 
descent, and Caroline Sears Morrison, whose ancestors were 
English and German. She became a student in McKendree 
in 1880 and graduated in 1882 with the degree of B. S. She 
was a member of the Clionian Society. She was married to 
Prof. F. F. Roose in 1880. To them were born two children — 
a son, Samuel Morrison, now deceased; and a daughter, Car- 
lotta Estelle. In addition to her home duties, Mrs. Roose has 
devoted some years to professional occupation in connection 
with her husband's work. She was one year a teacher in 
Pernambuco, Brazil, S. A., and one year Principal of the 
Shorthand Department of the Omaha Business College, of 
Omaha, Nebraska. She has been a member of the Methodist 
Church since 1877, and belongs to the Woodman Circle, 
R. W. A., F. U. of A., and the Eastern Star. She lives in 
Denver, Colorado. 

JUDGE WILLIAM M. SCHUWERK 

William Martin Schuwerk was born April 12, 1856, at 
Cleveland, Ohio. His father, Peter Paul Schuwerk, was born 
in Wurtemburg, Germany, and his mother, Elizabeth Mosser, 
was born in Switzerland. He entered college in the fall of 
1876 and graduated in June, 1882, receiving the degree of 
B. S., and later, M. S. He was a member of the Platonian 
Literary Society. For three ye;irs after graduating, he was 
Principal of the Evansville Public Schools. Since that time 
he has devoted himself wholly to the legal profession. In 
1889 he was elected to the Illinois Legislature. In 1904 he 
was appointed Master in Chancery of Randolph County, 



Two Hundred and EtghtyTwo 



^I^^^^^^^^^^^^^s:^ 



which position he held for six years. In iqio he was elected 
County Judge of the same county, and is still serving in 
that office. He has always been active in politics and belongs 
to the Democratic party. He is a member of Kaskaskia Lodge 
No. 86, A. F. &? A. M.; Elwood Lodge No. 895, located 
at Evansville, Illinois; Hercules Lodge No. 285, Knights of 
Pythias, at Chester, Illinois; Stayley Chapter No. loj, Royal 
Arch Masons, at Sparta, Illinois; and to Murphysboro Lodge 
No. 572, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He was 
married June 7, 1883, to Miss Mary M. Hoffman. They have 
four children: Mrs. Myrtle Schuwerk Sauer, William H., 
Walter J., and Paul E. Schuwerk. All have been students 
at McKendree. 

JOHN A. SHEPARD 

John Adams Shepard was born August 14, 1861, m Wa- 
bash County, Illinois. He is the only son of Morrill A. 
Shepard, of English- American descent, and 
Mary (Moorhead) Shepard, of Scotch-Irish 
descent. He removed with his parents from 
Evansville, Indiana to Lebanon, Illinois, m 
the year 187 1. He received a portion of his 
education in the public schools of Lebanon. 
He entered McKendree College in 1877 and 
graduated m 1882 with the degree of A. B. 
Later he received the degree of A. M. He 
was a member of the Philosophian Society. 
From the date of his graduation till 1901 he 
was engaged in mercantile business. Since that 
time he has been a real estate dealer in the 
city of St. Louis. He was married m 1902, 
to Miss Mary E. Todd, of Jackson, Tennessee. 
MRS. ANNA SPIES CARSON 

Anna Frances Spies was born at Maunie, Illinois, April 
'), 1863. Her parents, Jacob and Catherine Spies, were both 
German. She entered McKendree m September, 1879, and 
graduated in June, 1882, receiving the degre