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Full text of "A century and a half of Pittsburg and her people"

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UNIVERSITY 

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THIS BOOK PRESENTED BY 

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A CENTURY AND A HALF 



OF 



PITTSBURG AND 
HER PEOPLE 



GENEALOGICAL MEMOIRS OF THE LEADING FAMILIES 
OF PITTSBURG AND VICINITY, COMPILED 
UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPER- 
VISION OF 

JOHN W. JORDAN, LL.D. 

OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ILLUSTRATE D 



VOLUME III 



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THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

4 1908 .,;, 



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Copyright, 1908, 

BY 

LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



THE OLIVER FAMILY. In scanning the pages of local history for 
Greater Pittsburg one frequently finds the names of men of such prominence as 
to be classed among those of state-wide, and even national fame. Such, indeed, 
is the name of Oliver, so well known in commercial circles from ocean to ocean 
— a name linked with Carnegie and other iron-masters who have, by their own 
genius and persistence in the mineral and metal world achieved no common 
success, but have become true captains of industry and leaders in their own 
special lines of work. In political, professional, journalistic and other callings 
the name stands for much that is superior and worth preserving — a record 
that their success and worthy achievements may be emulated by those who come 
after them. 

( I ) The first representative in this country of the Oliver family, of which 
this notice treats, was Henry W. Oliver, who married Margaret Brown. This 
worthy couple was of genuine Scotch ancestry, but natives of Ireland, from 
which country they emigrated to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1842. Their home 
before coming to America was Dungannon, county of Tyrone, Ireland. LTpon 
coming to this country the emigrant ancestor engaged in the harness and 
saddlery business, which trade he had followed before coming here. He 
continued and prospered in this w'ork until 1866, when he was able to retire 
with a competency. He was a member of the Christian church and reared his 
family in that communion. The American ancestor and wife were the parents 
of four sons and two daughters, as follows : i. David B., whose sketch appears 
in this family history. 2. Mary, who married B. D. Holbrook, of Onawa, 
Monona county, Iowa, and had issue — Park K., who married Virginia Rob- 
inson, whose children are Weare and John S. Holbrook ; George O., who mar- 
ried Georgietta Xorris, and had Xorris and Helen ; David O., who married 

Abbie ; Evans, who married Joanah Oliver, whose issue is Bernard 

and Joanah ; Edith O., wife of Rex Kennedy. 3. Henry W., deceased, whose 
sketch appears within this family history. 4. James B., deceased, married 
Amelia Shields, still living. (See sketch of James B.) 5. George T., of whom 
later. 6. Margaret, wife of Doctor Cadwallader Evans, of Pittsburg, whose 
family consists of ten children — Henry O., married Louise Straub, whose child 
is Oliver; George O., married Annie Young, and they have Margaret B. ; 
David O., deceased; Berne H., Cadwallader, Jr., Mary Frances. Margery. 
Dorothy, Deane M., Norman .K., all born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Henry 
W. Oliver, the emigrant, died in 1888 and his wife in 1900, and were buried 
in the Allegheny cemetery. 

(II) Henry W. Oliver, son of Henry W. and Margaret (Brown) Oliver, 

iii— 1 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



•was born in Dungannon, county Tyrone, Ireland, February 25, 1840, and was 
but two years of age when his parents came to this country. He was educated 
at the pubhc schools and at Newell's Academy, with no special training more 
than the ordinary youth of his time received, if indeed as much. At the age of 
thirteen years he began his business career as messenegr boy for the National 
Telegraph Company, in the city of Pittsburg, which was by no means the 
Greater Pittsburg of the twentieth century. Two years later, having filled well 
his position, he was called to the employ of Clark and Thaw, then general 
forwarding agents, and remained with them seven years. In 1859 1''^ was made 
the shipping clerk for the iron manufacturers, Graff, Bennett and Company, 
with whom he remained until the first call by President Lincoln for volunteers 
to suppress the rebellion, April, 1861, when he enlisted in the Twelfth Penn- 
sylvania Regiment of Volunteers, and served his term of three months. Later 
in the war, when the Confederate General Lee sought to invade Pennsylvania, 
he again enlisted in an emergency regiment. 

January i, 1863, he organized the firm of Lewis, Oliver and Philips, and 
began the making of nuts and bolts on rather a small scale. In 1866 his two 
brothers were admitted to the firm, which continued to operate until 1880, when 
the firm was changed to Oliver Brothers and Philips. In the meantime the 
business had grown to gigantic proportions and they were rated as leaders in 
bar iron and specialties in the markets of the world. In 1888 the works were 
incorporated under the title of the Oliver Iron and Steel Company, as now 
known. Mr. Oliver was the chairman of the board of directors of the new 
company. He had also become identified with other large industries and con- 
nected with the building of railroads, the great need of which, in the business 
in which he was engaged, he saw the need of securing for Pittsburg. First he 
became interested in the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad, the first line to 
really compete with the Pennsylvania and Baltimore and Ohio railroads for 
freight and tonnage at Pittsburg. He was one of the original proprietors of 
the road and one of its largest stockholders after it was established. He was 
also interested in the Pittsburgh and Western Railroad, and from 1889 to 1894 
was its president. He then desired better freight facilities between Pittsburg 
and Chicago and promoted the Akron and Chicago Junction road, connecting 
the Pittsburgh and Western with the Baltimore and Ohio system. As a rail- 
road man he introduced many improvements of great merit and value, including 
the steel cars, in which he was largely interested. His mining interests in 
Pennsylvania, his coal lands, his copper mines in the far away Arizona country, 
together with his vast interests in the iron ore product of the Minnesota district 
were among his most valuable holdings. He was one of the pioneers in the 
Meseba ore district, and organized the Oliver Iron Mining Company, in which 
later he interested the Carnegie Steel Company in the famous Lake Superior 
country. Of later years his vast accumulation of wealth was invested in Pitts- 
burg property, both in improved and unimproved realty. He purchased many 
tracts of land within the present city limjts and erected fine business structures 
on the same with the view of the future needs of the place, in which he always 
had great faith. 

It mav be said from the time he entered upon life's business career as a 
modest messenger boy until his death in 1904, he was always active, energetic, 
public-spirited and highly successful. His whole life was busy with planning 
and then putting into execution his cherished plans, which were the original 



V- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



offspring from his own active brain. It was this which eventually brought 
the vast estate which he held at the time of his death, and at the same time he 
seemed not unmindful of others. His neighbors, his home city and the com- 
monwealth always found a place in all of his considerations. At the time of his 
death he was chairman of the Oliver and Snyder Steel Company. 

Upon the formation of the Republican party, in 1856, Mr. Oliver with 
enthusiasm adopted its principles and ever continued to uphold and defend 
the same. He was known as an able and successful advocate of the great and 
progressive measures of his party. From 1S79 to 1882 he was president of 
the common council of Pittsburg. He was a delegate to the Republican Na- 
tional Conventions of 1872, 1876, 1888 and 1892. In 1880 he was the presi- 
dential elector-at-large from his state. In 1882' he was selected by President 
Chester A. Arthur to represent the iron and steel interests of the country on 
the commission which was appointed to draw up and submit a new tariff to 
congress, and it was largely through his work in this commission that the 
metal schedule of the tariff of 1883 was so shaped as to mainly satisfy the 
manufacturing and industrial interests of the country. January i, 1881, he was 
nominated by the Republican legislative caucus for the office of United States 
Senator, but on account of a division, which sometimes has characterized the 
party in Pennsylvania, he failed of election. 

Mr. Oliver was united in marriage in 1862 to Edith A. Cassidy, of Pitts- 
burg, by whom one daughter was born, Edith, who married Henry R. Rea, 
now one of his executors. Mr. Oliver passed from earthly scenes February 8, 
1904. The following is an extract from one of the editorials on his death, 
the same appearing in one of the Pittsburg dailv papers : 

"To the general public, Mr. Oliver has been known recently as a man of 
enormous wealth. By those whose happy privilege it has been to know him 
well, however, he will be held in endearing memory not for his millions, nor yet 
for his mammoth enterprises, but for his engaging personality, his winsome 
disposition and his truly generous nature. His view was broad, his methods 
fair and his judgment always good. He was neither churl nor niggard. Per- 
haps he was too optimistic, but be it said to his credit that he was never pessi- 
mistic, and there were days and years during his eventful life when this very 
optimism proved a saving grace, more precious than any other quality of his 
character. Endowed with such a nature, which he permitted neither reverses 
nor riches to neutralize, his circle of acquaintances and associates was wide 
and influential, and to those his death is a personal bereavement. Mr. Oliver's 
place in history will be that of a great 'Captain of Industry.' 

"In his untimely death Pittsburg loses an ideal citizen. He was a public 
spirited man in the best sense of the word. A citizen who had at heart the 
commercial integrity and advancement of his municipality. He amassed great 
wealth, but it came to him as a reward for his financial genius that was clean 
and wholesome, untainted by any law or selfish desire. He was an upright 
man, conscientious and followed his light, illuminating pathway in straight 
ways. Cut off in the vigor of his years, he went to an honored tomb with the 
blessings of all who knew him and all who love the American citizen that gives 
his talents and wealth of character to raise and ennoble the successful men 
with whom honesty and integrity are the controlling motives." 

After his death the select and common council of the city of Pittsburg 
unanimously voted to perpetuate his memory by renaming Mrgin Alley (which 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



thoroughfare was greatly widened through his influence), and called it "Oliver 
Avenue," which runs parallel and between Fifth and Sixth avenues. 

(II) George Tener Oliver, son of Henry W. and Margaret (Brown) 
Oliver, was born in Ireland January 26. 1848. His parents had, however, 
been residents of Pittsburg since 1842, and were visiting their old home in 
Ireland at the date of his birth. He was educated in Allegheny City and at 
Bethany College, West Virginia, graduating in 1868. He became a lawyer 
and was admitted to the Allegheny county bar in 187 1, practicing successfully 
until 1881, when he retired from the legal practice to engage in the wire busi- 
ness. He was first vice-president of the Oliver Wire Company, continuing 
until 1899, when he became president. He was also president of the Oliver 
and Snyder Steel Company until he disposed of his manufacturing interests in 
1901. January i, 1901, he purchased the Pittsburgh Gazette, the oldest news- 
paper west of the Allegheny Mountains. He has since been in active control 
of this journal, as well as the Pittsburgh Chronicle-Telegraph, which was the 
first evening paper in Allegheny county. Politically Mr. Oliver is a staunch 
supporter of the Republican party. In 1884 he was a presidential elector, and 
was president of the Central Board of Education in Pittsburg from 188 1 to 
1884. He is a member of the leading clubs of Pittsburg, as well as of the 
Union League Club and University Club of New York city. In 1871 he mar- 
ried Miss Mary Kountze, of Omaha, Nebraska, by whom six children were 
born, as follows: i. Margaret K., married John P. Young; 2. Mary D., mar- 
ried Doctor Alexander C. Blair; 3. George S., unmarried; 4. Augustus K., 
unmarried ; 5. Jean, unmarried ; 6. Bennett. 

(II) David B. Oliver, son of Henry W. and Margaret (Brown) Oliver, 
was born in Dungannon, county Tyrone, Ireland, October 31, 1834. The 
father and mother emigrated to this country on account of their liberal political 
views, which interfered with the prosecution of his business in Ireland. David 
B. Oliver was educated in the public schools of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 
He has always taken an active part in educational matters, having served more 
than thirty-five years on the school board, consecutively, twelve years of which 
time he was its president. In 1866, with his brother, James B. Oliver, he was 
admitted to the firm of Lewis, Oliver and Philips, manufacturers of bolts and 
nuts, at South Pittsburg. In 1880, when Mr. Lewis sold his interest, the firm 
was reorganized and the firm of Oliver Brothers and Philips was formed, of 
which he was made general manager. In 1888, when the business was incor- 
porated as the Oliver Iron and Steel Company, David B. Oliver also became 
general manager, continuing until 1891, when he retired from active business 
hfe. 

He married, in 1861, Rebecca B. Cunningham, of an old Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, family, her great-grandfather, John Scott, having iDcen 
the first member of congress elected from the district on its original formation 
in 1798. David B. and Rebecca B. (Cunningham) Oliver are the parents of the 
following children: i. Henry, of whom later; 2. John C., of whom later; 3. 
Mildred; 4. Nora B., who married Charles S. Shoemaker; 5. Rebecca B., who 
married John Henry Ross; 6. Robert M. ; 7. Jessie; 8. Virginia; 9. Charles, 
and seven who are deceased. 

(II) James B. Oliver, son of Henry W. and Margaret (Brown) Oliver, 
was born in .Mlegheny City, Pennsylvania, in April, 1844, and received his 
education in the public schools. In 1865 he was admitted to the firm with which 







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PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



his brothers were connected as extensive iron workers and steel makers. He 
has been one of the prominent developers of this branch of industry. This com- 
pany was first established in 1863, as the Oliver and Philips Company, and in 
1887 was known as the Oliver Iron and Steel Company, it having been incor- 
porated as such at that time. For thirty-seven years Mr. Oliver devoted his 
time and talents to the business, which has come to be one of large proportions. 
Mr. Oliver was the vice-president of the Oliver Steel and Iron Company and 
later president, and has spent the best years of his manhood in developing the 
business with which the Oliver family are famous throughout the country. He 
was recognized the country over as an expert in iron and steel business opera- 
tions. Politically he was a supporter of the Republican party. He married 
Amelia Shields. 

(HI) Henry Oliver, son of David B. and Rebecca (Cunningham) Oliver, 
was born October 19, 1862, at Wooster, Ohio. He was educated at the public 
schools of Pittsburg and at Allegheny City. He also attended Yale University, 
from which he graduated with the class of 1885. A few years later he became 
a chemist at the Oliver Iron and Steel Company's works, where he remained 
several years. He next became superintendent of the Hainsworth Steel Com- 
pany and retained that position after the company was acquired by the Ameri- 
can Steel and Wire Company. Subsequently he became general superintendent 
of the Shoenburger works of the American Steel and Wire Company, which 
position he resigned in October, 1902, to become vice-president of the Oliver 
and Snyder Steel Company. Upon the death in 1905 of James B. Oliver (his 
uncle), he was elected president of the Oliver and Snyder Steel Company. He 
is also president of the Monongahela Natural Gas Company and vice-president 
of the Oliver Iron and Steel Company, which positions he still holds. 

He was married January 21, 1903, to Eliza Robinson, daughter of General 
James F. and Mary (Wheeler) Robinson, of Lexington, Kentucky. Two 
children bless this union, born in Leetsdale, a suburb of Pittsburg — Henry, Jr., 
and Alary Robinson. 

(Ill) John C. Oliver, son of David B. Oliver (2), was born in Pitts- 
burg, October 29, 1863, and received his early education in his native city and 
later attended Yale University, graduating with the class of 1885, when he 
became superintendent of the Fifteenth Street Mill of the Oliver Iron and 
Steel Company, where he remained until 1894. He then became associated with 
the Monongahela Tin Plate Company as its general manager and vice-presi- 
dent, remaining with them until they sold out in December, 1898, and then 
connected himself with the American Tin Plate Company, being their manager 
in the Pittsburg mills district up to January, 1900, when he became vice- 
president of the Oliver Iron and Steel Company. Upon the death of his uncle 
(James B. Oliver) he became president, and holds the position at the present 
time. He resides in Allegheny City, where he has represented his ward, the 
Eleventh, in the city council for the past sixteen years. Politically he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the Duquesne Club, Pittsburgh Club. Allegheny 
County Club, the University Club of New York City, and the Graduate Club 
of New Haven, Connecticut. He is unmarried. 



THE ARONSON FAMILY. Many of the great business enterprises 
and large fortunes which have come into the possession of Pittsburgers during 



6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

its history, have been gained by young and middle-aged men who had the 
ability to' grasp the opportunities about them, and with courage and much 
faith in the citv's future put their full manhood into the special line they 
seemed best adapted to. Fortune is a lazy goddess. She never comes to us, 
but may be found and won by energy and' concentration of our powers. The 
Aronso'ns, of Greater Pittsburg, are among the most notable men of this class ; 
they did not wait for time to develop the city about them, attaining a fortune 
possibly by the rise of real estate in their old age, but they early set their 
energies to work to help advance the city's growth, and their efforts have been 
crowned with the success that all may attain in this country, where every man 
is a sovereign. 

The Aronson brothers — four in all — are lawyers, real estate dealers, oil 
and gas operators and general bankers. Their success has been almost phe- 
nomenal in the last decade, which more than covers the period which they 
have operated in the city in these special lines of business. Each one of the 
brothers is especially adapted to the department over which he has charge in 
the combined operations, which have come to be of immense proportions and 
constantly on the .increase with the passing years. Their ability and honesty 
of dealing puts them each and all in touch with the best business element of 
western Pennsylvania, to which their operations are chiefly confined. 

In 1900 I.' Leonard Aronson, then but twenty-one years old, was admitted 
to the Allegheny county bar and opened an office at No. 518 Fourth avenue, 
Pittsburg, where with his brother, Harry M. Aronson, who was not admitted 
until a few years later, he is still practicing law under the firm name of Aron- 
son & Aronson, which has come to be one of the strong law firms in Allegheny 
county. In 1902-3, seeing the future demands for outside real estate property, 
the Aronsons formed the "Aronson Realty Company," having in _ view, 
primarily, the attending to any real estate transactions and the placing of 
mortgages in the densely populated region surrounding the Hill and Hump. 
This "proved a successful business venture, as there was a great demand among 
the foreign population for such facilities. At first the business was transacted 
in a small office at 704 Fifth avenue, but soon grew to such magnitude that 
larger quarters had to be secured, when they acquired a perpetual lease on the 
building located at the corner of Fifth avenue and Tunnel street, which they 
remodeled at much expense, and which has since been known as the Aronson 
building. Within a short time their business prospered with such rapidity that 
other branches or departments had to be organized. The original Aronson 
Realty Company was organized under the incorporate laws of Pennsylvania 
in June, 1903, with a capital of one hundred thousand dollars, the purpose 
being to conduct a general real estate, insurance and collecting agency. This 
was "followed in September of the same year by the Aronson Brothers Corn- 
pan)', bankers. It is now capitalized at three hundred thousand dollars. This 
company does a general banking, brokerage and foreign exchange business. 

In the same month — September, 1903 — the "Real Estate Auction Com- 
pany," with a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, also incorporated under 
the Pennsylvania laws, was formed for the purpose of conducting a real estate 
auction business, which has also been successful. Still later the four brothers 
organized what is known as the "Lawyers' Oil Company," which does a general 
business in oil and gas, and is capitalized at seventy-five thousand dollars. 

In the month of February, 1905, the Aronson hrotliers secured a charter 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



for the Real Estate Savings and Loan Association, capitalized at an even 
million dollars. This company issue loans on real estate on weekly, monthly 
and yearly payments. Other companies owned by these brothers are the Aron- 
sonia Improvement Company and the Standard Construction Company, making 
their combined capital over a million and a half dollars. 

The offices of all these companies, known as the Aronson Enterprises, 
are in their building at No. 646 Fifth avenue. They are all equipped with the 
most modern fixtures, appliances and furniture suitable for carrying on their 
enormous transactions. More than eighty trained clerks, accountants and 
salesmen are employed by the concern. No outsiders are connected with the 
business, the whole being .handled by the four brothers, I. Leonard Aronson 
being president of all the branches, Harry M. being secretary and treasurer, 
while the brothers, Jacob H. and Joseph A. Aronson, have charge of various 
departments. Joseph A. has charge of the soliciting department and looks 
well to the inside sales, while Jacob H., the youngest of the four brothers, 
although but twenty-four years of age, is looked upon as one of the best judges 
of realty in Greater Pittsburg. He has charge of a score or more of sales- 
men, several of whom are three times his age. The rent department of this 
business house has on its list over twenty-five hundred tenants. Their banking 
department has been highly successful. Miniature banks are provided for their 
patrons who desire them for small savings. The Foreign Exchange depart- 
ment, in which are found men who can talk almost any language, looks after 
the forwarding of money to all foreign parts of the world. A steamship 
ticket agency is also conducted very successfully. 

The president of this combined business enterprise, L Leonard Aronson, 
is largely interested in down-town realty as well as some of the best financial 
institutions in the city. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and 
sees a "greater" for the future of his city. Combining his own time and talent 
with that of his brother, Harry M. Aronson, and with the two younger brothers 
the success of their business has been assured from the start. 

Concerning the ancestry and personal history of the four Aronson 
brothers who make up the business company just mentioned, it may be said that 
the father is Samuel Aronson, from Breslin, Germany, who came to the 
L'nited States in 1865, settling at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he was 
engaged in the dry-goods business, being connected with several wholesale 
establishments until 1894, when he retired from active business pursuits. He 
is of the Reformed Jewish church and reared his family in this religious faith. 
He married Miss Leah Goldman, a native of Pittsburg, born in 1856. The 
date of her marriage was 1873. The children of this union were: i. Annie, 
now wife of Bennett Levy, born in Pittsburg in 1876. 2. L Leonard, born in 
Pittsburg in 1878, now an attorney and banker. 3. Joseph A., born in 1879, 
now one of the real estate firm of the Aronson brothers. 4. Harry AL, born 
in 1881, in Pittsburg, now the secretary and treasurer of the real estate com- 
pany composed of himself and his brothers ; also a practicing attorney, of the 
firm of Aronson & Aronson. 5. Jacob H., born in 1883, in Pittsburg, one of 
the real estate firm. 6. Ida ]\I., born in Pittsburg in 1886. 7. Emma S., born 
in Pittsburg in 1888. 8. Harvey M., born in Pittsburg in 1890. 

Aaron Goldman, Mrs. Samuel Aronson's father, was a native of Germany, 
and came to America in 1835, first locating in Louisiana, but later came to 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he died December 21, 1906. He was one of the 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



early Hebrew settlers of Pittsburg. He was born in Slavant, Germany, 
December i6, 1821, and coming to "New Orleans in 1835 was there engaged 
with an uncle in the cotton brokerage business until 1849, when he came to 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and was here engaged in the dry-goods trade until 
after the close of the Civil war. He then engaged in the wholesale liquor 
business, continuing until about 1896, when he retired from active life as a 
business man. Several years before his death he fell from a street car and 
injured one of his limbs, so that he was deprived of the use of it the remainder 
of his life. 

Harry M. Aronson, son of Samuel and Leah (Goldman) Aronson, was 
educated at the public schools of Pittsburg, on Grant street. After graduating 
from the Pittsburgh High School he took a law course at the Western Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1902, and was admitted 
to the Allegheny county bar in June, 1902, and soon thereafter was admitted 
to the Pennsylvania supreme court, United States circuit court, United States 
district court and the United States supreme court. He became a partner and 
member of the firm of Aronson & Aronson, composed of himself and I. Leon- 
ard Aronson, his brother. In 1903 he became secretary and treasurer of the 
Aronson Realty Company at No. 646 Fifth avenue. In 1904 he was made 
the treasurer of the Aronson Brothers' Banking Company and also treasurer 
of the Aronson Real Estate Auction Company. In 1906 he became treasurer 
of the Lawyers' Oil Company, and aided in forming and became treasurer of 
the Real Estate, Savings and Loan Association, all Pennsylvania corporations. 

Mr. Aronson has never been active in politics, preferring to pay strict 
attention to the many business enterprises with which he is associated, and in 
which he has been eminently successful. He is a member of the Eighth Street 
Temple, now being erected at the corner of Fifth and Morewood avenues. He 
is also connected with the Jewish Home for the Aged, and the Jewish Hospital. 
He is a director of Harmony Club, and a member of Americus Club and the 
Duquesne Club. 

EDWARD JAMES SMAIL, a prominent member of the Pittsburg bar, 
is the son of Samuel and Catherine (Mainhart) Small. He was born at 
Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1859. When 
about three years of age he accompanied his parents on their move to Johns- 
town, Cambria county, where he passed through the public schools. Having 
returned to his native county, he entered the Greensburg Academy, and later 
taught in the public schools of Westmoreland county. Subsequently he attended 
the Southwestern State Normal College, from which he graduated in June, 
1880, and in August of the same year began the study of law in the office of 
ex-Governor William A. Stone, where he was an earnest student, and in Jan- 
uary, 1883, was admitted to the bar. He became a practitioner in all of trie 
courts, and at an early age became a prominent member of the bar. Within 
a few years his reputation had extended until he became one of the accepted 
leading attorneys of Pittsburg. He has been connected as counsellor with 
many of the most important cases before the Pennsylvania courts, and is now 
enjoying the fruits of a lucrative legal practice. Being thorough in every detail 
of his profession, well read and abundantly trained, careful at every point, both 
in the preparation of papers and the examination of his witnesses, coupled with 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



a forceful, pleasing address, the natural result has been the career of a highly 
successful lawyer. He has long since been an officer, stockholder and attorney 
for several extensive corporations. 

Politically Mr. Small is an enthusiastic supporter of the Republican party, 
in which he has been a leader in numerous campaigns, where his potent work 
was instrumental in bringing victory to his party. Among the societies to 
which he belongs may be named the Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce, the 
Americus Republican Club, the Young Men's Tariff Club and the Masonic 
Country Club. He is also a member of the various Masonic fraternity socie- 
ties, being a past master of Braddock's Field Lodge, No. 510; Shiloh Chapter, 
No. 257; Tancred Commandery, No. 48, Knights Templar; Thirty-second 
Degree Consistory Mason; life member of Syria Temple (Shriners), also a 
past exalted ruler and life member of Pittsburg Lx>dge, No. 11, Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, which he has represented in the Grand Lodge. He 
also belongs to the Royal Arcanum and the Junior Mechanics orders. 

Since 1884 Mr. Small has resided at Braddock, Pennsylvania, and has 
been largely interested in its financial, social, religious and educational institu- 
tions. He was j stockholder in the Laiion National Bank, now absorbed by 
the First National Bank, and has served as member and president of the board 
of education many years, as well as being one of the trustees of the Carnegie 
Free Library. He is a consistent member and secretary of the church board 
of the First Christian church. 

Mr. Small was married in 1883 to Miss Ella Dyer, daughter of E. F. D. 
and Eliza A. (Ashworth) Eshelman, of the Second ward of Allegheny City. 
The children born of this union are: i. Hazel Inez. 2. Edward James, Jr., 
and 3. Nellus Urilda. 

THE CRAIG FAMILY. The Craigs, of Pittsburg, to which belonged 
the Revolutionarv soldier and pioneer citizen. Major Isaac Craig, and his 
influer\,tial son, Neville Craig, who wrote the history of his father's life in i854,v 
came in 1765 or 1766 to America from the neighborhood of Hillsborough, 
county Down, Ireland, and landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He had 
been apprenticed in his native land to the house-carpenter's trade, at which 
he worked in Philadelphia until he formed an intimate acquaintance with the 
active and enterprising men of the place and acquired a correct knowledge 
of the mode of doing business there, after which he assumed the responsibilities 
of a master carpenter. In this situation he continued to labor until the break- 
ing out of the war for independence. In November, 1775, he received an 
appointment as the oldest lieutenant of marines in the navy, then being fitted 
out by this continent — and in that capacity he served ten months on board the 
"Andrew Doria," commanded by the gallant but unfortunate Nicholas Biddle, 
who was soon after blown up by the Randolph frigate in an action with a 
British man-of-war ship. While on board that ship it formed one of the 
squadron commanded by Commodore Hopkins, who made a descent upon the 
island of New Providence, in the West Indies, took possession of the two 
forts, Nassau and Montogu, captured the governor, and seized a large quan- 
tity of military stores, then much needed by the American army. Engaged 
in that expedition were several officers of note, including the gallant Scotchman, 
Paul Jones, and Commodore Abraham Whipple. 



10 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Soon after he returned from this expedition Mr. Craig was proinoted 
from lieutenant to captain of the marines, and in November of the same year 
was ordered to do infantry duty, which he did several months. He was 
present at the famous Delaware crossing by Washington, the capture of the 
Hessian band at Trenton, New Jersey, and was at the battle of Princeton. 
In February, 1777, the commandant of the marines was ordered to take charge 
of some pieces of artillery and to instruct the men in that service. From that 
date until the close of the war Isaac Craig served as an artillery officer. 
March 3, 1777, Captain Craig was appointed captain of artillery in the regi- 
ment then formed under Colonel Thomas Proctor, in which regiment he 
continued to serve until it was disbanded at the close of the war. 

September 11, 1777, he was engaged at the battle of Brandywine. His 
company suffered great loss, and he was wounded, though not seriously. The 
ensuing month he was at the battle of Germantown, Pennsylvania. The fol- 
lowing winter, that of 1777-78, was spent by the army in log huts at Valley 
Forge ; the suffering of which every reader of history well knows. Early in 
the spring of 1778 Captain Craig and several officers were ordered to Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, "to learn the art of laboratory," which was the preparation of 
ammunition and general supplies, scientifically tested, for the use in the artil- 
lery service especially. Here he labored hard and became skilled, and well it 
served him in later years, after the Revolutionary war, in preparing ammuni- 
tion for Generals Wayne, .St. Clair and Harrison. 

Captain Craig remained at Carlisle from February i to August, 1778, and 
thus was not present with the army during the retreat of the British troops 
across New Jersey from Philadelphia in June, nor at the battle of Monmouth. 
Letters still in possession of the family show that Captain Craig, in April, 

1779, was in command of the fort at Billingsport, on the Delaware, below 
Philadelphia. In July of the same year he was in General Sullivan's army, 
marching against the Six Nation tribes of Indians and their white allies, the 
British Tories, under the notorious Brandt and the Butlers, in the Genesee 
valley of New York state. After the return of Sullivan into the settlements. 
Captain Craig rejoined his regiment, and in January, 1780, was with the army 
at Morristown, New Jersey. During the intensely cold winter of 1779 and 

1780, the night of January 14, the time set for Washington to attack the Brit- 
ish on Staten Island, Captain Craig was detailed to command the artillery, 
consisting of four six-pounders and two five and one-half inch howitzers, but 
finding the communication had not been cut oft' for recruits to the enemy, as 
was supposed, the American army retreated with but small loss, however. 

April 20, 1780, an order was issued from General Washington (through 
Timothy Mattack) for Captain Craig: "Ordered that Lieutenants, Sub-lieu- 
tenants, Justices of the Peace and others of the counties through which Cap- 
tain Craig shall pass, to give him such aid and assistance in transporting such 
stores and artillery supplies as the occasion may require." In compliance to 
orders from Colonel Brodhead. Captain Craig took the "Virginia Road" (the 
Braddock Route), and reached his destination on the evening of May 29, and 
from that time until the day of his death, in May, 1826, he resided in or near 
Pittsburg. 

In the winter of 1780-81 it was decided by Governor Jeft'erson, of Virginia, 
who wrote Washington for a supply of artillery, to engage in the Kentucky 
expedition against Detroit, and they ordered that Captain Isaac Craig be the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE ii 



commander-in-chief of such artillery. The supplies being very low at Fort 
Pitt he was compelled to go to headquarters for additional supplies. The 
Craig descendants still have much correspondence between Washington, Gen- 
eral St. Clair and Captain Craig concerning this expedition. Arrangements 
having finally been made, he embarked for the Falls of the Ohio the middle of 
May, acting under General Clarke, who had depended on the Ker»tucky troops 
to join him, which they failed to do, thus leaving the proposed expedition a 
failure. Craig remained at the Falls until November, and finally General 
Clarke allowed him to return to Fort Pitt. A letter, dated Fort Pitt, Decem- 
ber 29, 1 78 1, to General Washington from General Irwin, then in command 
at Fort Pitt, says: "Captain Craig with the detachment of artillery arrived 
the 26th. He got up the river with much difficulty, being forty days on the 
way, occasioned by low water. He was obliged to throw overboard his gun- 
carriages, but brought his pieces and stores safely." 

The same letter mentions the melancholic intelligence of "A Colonel 
Lochry, of Westmoreland county, and about one hundred men, volunteers for 
the defense of that country, who started to join General Clarke and were all 
killed or taken by the Indians." Captain Craig confidently believed that he 
was watched on his way up the Ohio by Indians, and that nothing but his 
vigilance prevented his party from an attack. 

When Fort Pitt was threatened by the Canadians and Indians it was 
found that the old log magazine, built when the fort was, was badly decayed 
and very insecure, so it was planned to build a substantial stone building, 
which work was placed under the superintendency of "the late Captain, then 
Major, Craig" (who had been promoted during his absence down the river 
to take rank October 7, 1782), which as documents show go to prove fright- 
ened an intended invasion away, as three hundred British and five hundred 
Indians had started to attack Fort Pitt, but finding that the place was being 
rebuilt, and supposedly greatly strengthened, they abandoned the scheme. 

In November, 1782, Major Craig had orders to take Lieutenant Rose and 
six active men and proceed to Cuyahoga and Grand River, for the purpose of 
learning whether or not the British were attempting to build a military post at 
Sandusky. They left November 13, taking one horse with them and plenty of 
food, as they believed ; they crossed the Little and Big Beaver and eluded the 
Indians. One man was left with the horse and supplies at some point en 
route, and the party was to unite with him again, but they were gone so long 
they never met again. The weather was cold and roads almost impassable. 
They did, however, learn that no work had been commenced by the British at 
Sandusky, and hence retraced their steps homeward. On the way back to 
Pittsburg the stream had frozen over, but not sufficient to bear a man's weight, 
so they proceeded, one man ahead broke the ice with a stick, and the party 
stripped off their clothes and waded the ice-cold water, carrying a torch in one 
hand and their clothing in the other. Upon reaching the homeward shore, 
they, with lighted torches, built a camp-fire and dried and warmed themselves 
before marching home. While they were out as spies in an enemy's country 
the treaty of peace was being signed between the United States and Great 
Britain. 

With the close of the Revolution and the consequent disbanding of the 
army and its officers Major Craig, with the remainder, necessarily had to seek 
some employment, so he and Stephen Bayard, a lieutenant-colonel in the army. 



12 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



formed a partnership to engage in tlie mercantile business at Pittsburg, with 
the design to also deal in lands and town lots. They bought of the Penns the 
first land sold within the limits of what is now Pittsburg. The date was 
January 22, 1784; the land was described as: "A certain tract of land lying 
and being a point formed by the junction of the Monongahela and Allegheny 
rivers, boun4ed on two sides by the said rivers, and on the other two sides by 
the fort and the ditch running to the Allegheny, supposed to contain about 
three acres." Four months later the Penns concluded to lay out a town here 
and these two original purchasers waived their rights and took instead, on 
December 31, 1784, thirty-two lots of ground on the new plat, which really 
covered all the ground contained in the three-acre tract except that used for 
streets, and in addition all within the outworks of Fort Pitt. The evils of 
intemperance were not then so minutely regarded as they are now, so the firm 
above mentioned extended its business to the establishment of a distillery. 
They had designed to erect a wind-mill to propel their milling machinery, 
having seen its utility while in service in the West Indies, but it was not carried 
out, and soon steam power came into use. 

His recollections were that in 1796 Pittsburg had about one hundred and 
two houses. He wrote in his journal July 25, 1784: "I have provided a house 
for the reception of the goods when they arrive. I have a distillery." They 
engaged in mercantile business in 1784, and had a saw mill up the Allegheny. 
He wrote to a Philadelphia firm in 1784: "I am greatly in need of three 
barrels of whiskey and one of rum, for want of which my neighbors get all 
the skins and furs." 

Major Craig had a taste for mathematics, was an expert carpenter, was 
fond of mechanical art and philosophical experiments, and no doubt for this 
reason he was made a member of the American Philosophical Society in 
March, 1787, being elected a complimentary member, without his asking. 

In September, 1789, an act was passed by the legislature incorporating 
the First Presbyterian church of the town of Pittsburg; there were eleven 
trustees named, six of whom were Revolutionary soldiers and all officers, 
including Major Isaac Craig. He aided in building the original log meeting- 
house, as well as the later brick edifice. In October, 1789, Stephen Bayard 
withdrew from his firm relations with Major Craig, who in turn sold his 
interest to other Philadelphia men and then removed to his farm, adjoining 
that of his father-in-law and brother-in-law, Presley Neville. He continued 
there but a short time, however, as with the organization of the new national 
government his old commander and warm friend. General Henry Knox, was 
appointed the first secretary of war, and in February, 1791, he offered him the 
situation of deputy quartermaster and military storekeeper at Pittsburg, then 
but a mere frontier hamlet. He accepted it, and as that was before "political 
jobs" gave the clerks fat offices, he had much hard work, but filled the 
position well. This was prior to the introduction of steamboats, and the quar- 
termaster had to provide ffat-boats to convey troops and supplies down the 
Ohio and Mississippi rivers, and other crafts, keel boats, etc., to convey similar 
articles up the Allegheny and French creek to Fort Franklin and Lc Boeuf. 
In December, 1 791, he was called upon by the secretary of war to superintend 
the construction of a fort, which at his request was called Fort Fayette, after 
that chivalric Frenchman under whom his brother-in-law, Presley Neville, had 
served as an aide-de-camp. He also superintended similar works at Wheeling 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 13 



and Le Boeuf, as well as Presq' Isle. In 1794, when a line of mail boats was 
established between Pittsburg and Fort Washington, on the Ohio river, he 
was the director of building such mail boats. 

In jMarch, 1791, there was an Indian scare at Pittsburg, and at a mass 
meeting it was resolved to ask the loan of one hundred guns from the United 
States, which were in charge of Major Craig, he being the quartermaster. 
He was told that they would take them by violence unless he gave them up 
peaceably, and that if the government wanted them within sixty days they 
would return them. Major Craig disliked to do this, but knowing his power- 
less condition he let them go. They were not needed, as the sequel was, and 
later the secretary of war informed him he did right ; also that the guns had 
been given to Pennsylvania as their portion of arms some months previous. 

At the time of the "Whiskey Insurrection" in 1794, the house of General 
John Neville, the inspector of revenues, and the father-in-law of Major Craig, 
was twice attacked by armed men. The last attempt was successful, his dwell- 
ing house, barns and out-building were burnt to the ground ; the mail robbed ; 
the inspector, his son and other adherents of the national government driven 
from the country. At the same time General Anthony Wayne was preparing 
for his decisive campaign against the western Indians. Reinforcements, sup- 
plies and munitions of war had all to be sent from Pittsburg to Fort Wash- 
ington, and this all under the direction of Major Craig, and he at the same 
time was being urged by Alexander Hamilton to not abandon his post, and 
added : "Even in the worst event, you will find safety in the fort." Several 
nights he was compelled to seek refuge in the fort, but days his duty called 
him up and down the river on horseback, on which trips he always went well 
armed. For that and other faithful duties he was tendered the office of com- 
missary general to General Wayne's army in November, 1794, but declined 
on account of the condition of his family, but he named Major Kirkpatrick, 
who was at once appointed and remained with the army until Wayne's death 
at Erie, December 15, 1796. 

In 1797, General O'Hara and Major Craig commenced the manufacture 
of glass at Pittsburg, which (possibly), aside from the works in Fayette 
county, was the first glass works established west of the Alleghenies. 

In the trouble with France and Spain, in 1798, he had to superintend 
the building of an ocean boat at Pittsburg suitable for such service. He also 
built two galleys, "President Adams" and "Senator Ross," in 1798. 

Like three-fourths of the officers of the Revolutionary army, jNIajor 
Craig belonged to the party to which Washington and Hamilton belonged, 
politicallv, and when Mr. Jefferson came into power Major Craig was removed. 

In the war of 1812-14 his services as an expert were in demand as an 
artilleryman. This was his last public work. During the last years of his life 
he became financially embarrassed on account of liabilities he had assumed for 
friends, and his real estate was all sold, and in the autumn of 181 5 he removed 
to a good farm, owned by his wife, on Montour Island in the Ohio river, nine 
miles below Pittsburg, where he passed his last days in comfort. Born of 
Protestant parentage ; moral character never impeached ; he read his Bible 
daily, even through the trying days of war, and he passed peacefully from 
earth's shining circle June 14, 1826, and was buried in the First Presbyterian 
burying ground at Pittsburg. His son paid this tribute to his father: "A 
sincere Christian, an honest man, a faithful and diligent officer, a good citizen. 



.14 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



kind neighbor, affectionate husband and a most indulgent father." 

Major Craig married, February i, 1785, jMiss Amelia Neville, only 
daughter of General John Neville, a native of Virginia, he who had been a 
colonel of one of the Virginia regiments, and who then resided at Woodville, 
eight miles from Pittsburg. He had there entered a large tract of land while 
it was supposed to belong to Virginia. The children by this union, aside from 
three who died in infancy, were as follows: i. Harriet, born December 25, 
1785, in Fort Pitt, died May 29, 1867; married John H. Chaplin and had issue 
— Lieutenant William Craig and Amelia.. 2. Neville B., born March 29, 1787; 
married Jane Ann Fulton. 3. Matilda, born March 12, 1788; married Reese 
E. Fleeson and had issue — Reese C, Isaac Craig, William, Thomas Plunket 
and Eugene. 4. Presley Hamilton, born May 28, 1789; died August 8, 1848; 
surgeon in the United States army and medical director, under General Taylor, 
in the war with Mexico. 5. Henry Kno.x, bom March 7, 1791 ; died Decem- 
ber 7, 1869, of whom further mention will be made. 6. John Neville, born 
February 7, 1793; died July 21, 1870, unmarried. 7. William, born November 
26, 1794; died young. 8. Isaac Eugene, born March 3, 1797; lieutenant in the 
United States army (engineers' corps) ; fell in a duel with Lieutenant ]\Iaul 
over a remark made by Maul concerning a Carlisle lady — both fell with the 
first pistol shot. 9. Oldham G., born March 14, 1800; died suddenly of heart 
trouble at Cologne, Germany, October 4, 1874. He was a bank teller of Pitts- 
burg and left issue — Isaac. Eugene, Samuel, Robert, Caroline and Morgan. 

10. Amelia Neville, boin July 9, 1801, and died October 22, 1877, unmarried. 

General John Neville, grandfather of the children just named, was, born 
in Virginia, July 26, 1731, and died July 29, 1803, in what is now Neville town- 
ship, Allegheny county, and w^s buried in Trinity churchyard, Pittsburg. He 
married Winfred Oldham, daughter of Colonel Oldham, a native of Virginia. 
They had two children — General Presley Neville and Amelia, who married 
Major Isaac Craig. 

General Presley Neville, son of General John Neville, was born in Win- 
chester, Virginia, September 6, 1755, and died December i, 1818. He married 
Nancy Morgan, the accomplished daughter of the celebrated General Morgan, 
leader of the rifle corps of the Revolution, and of whom Breckenridge said : 
"Blessed him with an offspring as numerous and beautiful as the children of 
Niobe." Mr. Neville was an aide-de-camp on General Lafayette's staff and 
an accomplished man. His declination to accept the nomination for congress 
in August, 1798. was a great disappointment to his district, which then com- 
prised Greene, Washington and .Allegheny counties,. On two occasions he 
entertained the celebrated Frenchmen — once the duke of Orleans, and the 
uncrowned King, the Marquis Lafayette. He then resided at the corner of 
Water and Ferry streets, Pittsburg, where he received and entertained these 
noted Frenchmen, then subjects of the fallen monarchy. At the ceremonies 
over the death of Washington a famous oration was delivered in Pittsburg 
by General Neville on January 11, 1800. 

(II) Harriet Craig, eldest child of Major Isaac Craig, born in old Fort 
Pitt, December 25, 1785. married John H. Chaplin and had issue — Lieutenant 
William Craig Chaplin and Amelia Chaplin. 

(III) Lieutenant William Craig Chaplin was born in Pittsburg, April 

11, 1810, and died April 25, 1856, in the officers' quarters at the Charleston 
Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts. He married, February 8, 1S33, Sarah J. 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 



Crossan, born in Pittsburg January 14, 1S13, daughter of James and Xancy 
(Morrow) Crossan. The issue by this union was: i. James Crossan Chap- 
hn, of whom later. 2. Ameha Neville Chaplin, who died aged seventeen years. 
3. Annie C, now living in Allegheny ; married George A. Q. Miller. 4. Wil- 
liam Huntington Chaplin, who died unmarried. 5. Presley Neville Chaplin, 
who married Josephine Wharton, both deceased. Their issue was Oliver. Etta 
and Amelia Neville. 6. John M. Chaplin, of whom later. 7. Melchoir Beltz- 
hoover Chaplin, of whom later. 8. W. Wilson Chaplin, of whom later. 

Concerning Lieutenant William Craig Chaplin, it should be added in this 
'connection that he was a lieutenant in the United States navy from 1826 to 
185 1, and had a brilliant naval career. He was the son of John Huntington 
Chaplin, an attorney-at-law of Pennsylvania, who died at Pensacola, Florida, 
and his father was Benjamin and his mother Amanda Sarah (Huntington) 
Chaplin. Amanda Sarah was the daughter of Colonel Jabez Huntington, born 
in Windham, Connecticut, 1738, a graduate of Yale College in 1758. He was a 
member of the Connecticut council, 1764-1781 ; high sheriff, 1782, and died 
November 24, 1782. He married August 6, 1760, Judith Elderkin, born in 
Norwich, Connecticut, who was the attorney of Connecticut ; member of 
"Committee of Safety" under General Trumbull during the Revolutionary war, 
and was prominent both in civil and military affairs. He died at Windham, 
Connecticut, and had descended from John Elderkin, of England, who came to 
Massachusetts in 1637 and to Norwich in 1664. He married, in 1660, Elizabeth, 
widow of William Gaylord, of Windsor. He died at Norwich, June 23, 1687, 
aged seventy-one years. 

Colonel Jabez Huntington (H), a son of General Jabez Huntington, born 
in Norwich, Connecticut. January 26, 1691, died at Norwich September 25, 
1752. He was prominent in civil and military affairs. He married. May 21, 
1725, Miss Sarah Wetmore, who died March 21, 1783. He was the son of 
Christopher Huntington, born November i, 1660; died April 24, 1735, at 
Norwich, Connecticut. He was deacon in the church of that town from 1695 
to 1709, and was a large land-owner. May 26, 1681, he married Sarah Adgate. 
born in January, 1663: died in February, 1706, at Norwich, Connecticut. She 
was the daughter of Thomas and Airs. Mary Bushnell (widow of Richard), 
nee Alarvin, daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth Alarvin, born in England and 
came to America in 1635. 

Christopher Huntington was the son of Christopher Huntington, born in 
England, came to Roxbury, Massachusetts, 1633, and to Norwich, Connecticut. 
1660, where he died June 28. 1706. He married Ruth Rockwell, of Windham, 
Connecticut, born in England August i, 1633. She was the daughter of Wil- 
liam and Susan (Chapin) Rockwell. Her father came to America in the ship 
"Mary and John." He was married in England, April 14, 1624. He was a 
Puritan, who in 1630, with one hundred and forty families, organized a church 
and left for America. His family was of Norman origin, running back to Sir 
Ralph de Rockville, a Knight of the tenth century. The widow of William 
Rockwell afterward married a member of the colony, Alatthew Grant, the 
ancestor of General and ex-President U. S. Grant. 

Christopher Huntington (I) was a son of Simon and Margaret (Baret) 
Huntington, born in England. He died on ship, off the coast of Massachusetts, 

in 1633-^ 

(IV) William Wilson Chaplin, son of Lieutenant William Craig Chaplin, 



i6 ■ A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



was born on the old homestead on Neville Island, in Allegheny county, July 4, 
1854, and died June 29, 1907. He obtained his education in the public schools 
of Pittsburg. After graduating from the high schools he entered the Pittsburgh 
Oil Exchange as assistant clearing house manager. At the end of two years 
he was elected as manager of the company. Next he accepted a position as 
manager of the Pittsburgh Petroleum, Stock and Metal Exchange, beginning 
in 1894. He then went into the city controller's office under H. I. Gourley, 
where he remained until he was elected secretary and manager of the Pitts- 
burgh Stock Exchange, in March, 1899. He held this position until his death, 
gaining each year the respect and admiration of bankers and brokers with 
whom he came in contact. He was a member of the Sacred Heart Roman 
Catholic church. He married, April 5, 1874, Annie M. Knox, daughter of 
James B. and Henrietta (Beale) Knox. Their four children were — George 
Knox Chaplin, Ethel Barr Chaplin, Melchor Cooper Chaplin, who died in 
1904, aged twenty-nine years, and John Bryan Chaplin, who died in 1893, aged 
nine years. 

(IV) James Crossan Chaplin, son of Lieutenant William and Sarah J. 
(Crossan) Chaplin, and commander in the United States navv, was born in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, May 14, 1836, died at sea September 23, 1866, buried 
in St. Leonard's church-yard September 24, 1866, at Bridgetown, Barbadoes, 
West Indies. He entered the United States navy October 4, 1850, and was 
among the first to distinguish himself at the beginning of the Civil war, having 
an enviable reputation for ability and courage. At the time of his death he was 
executive officer of the steam-sloop "Monocacy," ten guns and 1,030 tons. The 
commander paid this tribute to him : "For daring and cool bravery in the 
performance of his duty he is not surpassed by that of any other in the service." 
Of the sixteen years' service in the navy he spent twelve on the seas. Secretary 
of the Navy Gideon Wells said to him in a letter after his gallant conduct at 
Mathias Point in June, 1861, "The department highly appreciates vour brave 
and heroic bearing on the trying occasion, and I am happy to communicate 
to you the compliments extended by sending an extract of vour commander's 
report as follows: 'In the hour of danger his presence of mind never forsook 
him. Cool, calm and courageous, he was of such stuff as heroes are made. 
In the social side his many virtues shone to equal advantage. He was one of 
nature's noblemen and not one of the large circle who shared his friendship 
will ever forget his genial ways and warm heart.' " (See page 410, Farragut 
and Our Naval Commanders.) 

He married Martha Flarris, who still survives. Their children were: i. 
Virginia S. 2. James Crossan, of whom lat«r. 3. Mary C. 

(V) James Crossan Chaplin, son of Lieutenant-Commander James C. and 
Martha (Harris) Chaplin, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 7, 
1863. His father died when he was but three years of age, leaving three chil- 
dren, whose early lives were spent in Missouri. In 1879 Mrs. Chaplin, the 
mother, removed to Sewickley, near Pittsburg, and James C., her son, accepted 
a position in the Citizens' National Bank, which place he resigned to accept a 
better position in the Fidelity and Trust Company, where he remained ten 
years. He was first teller and then treasurer, but upon the formation of the 
Colonial Trust Company he was appointed its vice-president. He has been 
numbered among the most successful business factors of his borough. The 
record he has made during the last fifteen years is well worthy the emulation 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 17 

by the rising young men of Pennsylvania. He has always been active in local 
affairs in Sewickley, including its politics, having served two terms in the 
council. He is a vestryman and treasurer of St. Stephen's Protestant Episcopal 
church and is connected with a number of prominent business enterprises, and 
a director of several financial institutions. In society Mr. Chaplin and his 
wife, formerly Miss Fanny Campbell, daughter of the late Colonel David 
Campbell, are as prominent as Mr. Chaplin is in business circles. He is a 
member of the Pittsburg Chapter of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution. 
They have two children, James Crossan (HI) and David Campbell. 

(IV) John M. Chaplin, son of Lieutenant William Craig and Sarah 
(Crossan) Chaplin, was born January 5, 1849, at officers' quarters. Navy 
Yard, Memphis, Tennessee, and received his education under private tutors in 
Pittsburg and at the academy at Tuscarora, Pennsylvania, graduating in 1866. 
He then became clerk for his uncle, Colonel James M. Cooper. He resigned 
that position to become discount and bills of exchange clerk in the Bank of 
Pittsburg. After ten years of successful operations there he became manager 
of the Pittsburgh Clearing House, where he remained twenty-one years and 
finally retired as assistant manager. He was treasurer of the Bankers' and 
Bank Clerks' Mutual Benefit Association in 1891, and its president in 1894. 
He was an active participant in the organization of the Duquesne and the 
Pittsburgh Clubs. From 1878 to 1881 he was secretary and treasurer and a 
member of the board of governors of the last named club. In religious belief 
he is an Episcopalian and in politics a Republican. Since retiring from the 
clearing-house he has made his home on Neville Island, on the old homestead 
his ancestors owned and for whom the island was named. In this quiet resort 
he enjoys life. He being an admirer of fine dogs, he has a great variety of 
them about his spacious homestead. He belongs to the Pennsylvania Society 
of the Sons of the Revolution, and is also a member of Pittsburg Chapter of 
the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. He is unmarried. 

(IV) Melchior Beltzhoover Chaplin, son of Lieutenant William Craig 
Chaplin, was born on Neville Island, Neville township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, September 19, 1852, and died May 21, 1904. Upon reaching 
manhood he entered as a clerk in a mercantile house and remained there some 
years. In 1883, with Lewis B. Fulton, he established the well known firm of 
Chaplin-Fulton Company, who began the manufacture of gas meters, regu- 
lators and kindred goods ; also iron and brass goods. The business was highly 
successful and was later incorporated. Mr. Chaplin was its treasurer until his 
death. The style of the incorporated company was the Chaplin-Fulton Manu- 
facturing Company, and so continues. 

Mr. Chaplin married Kitty S. Craig, daughter of Andrew and Mary Ann 
(Houston) Craig, of Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. (No relation to the 
General Craig family.) There were three children born of this union: Wil- 
liam Craig Chaplin, born July 11, 1882; unmarried. After his education had 
been obtained he entered his father's business, and at his death succeeded him 
as treasurer of the Chaplin-Fulton Manufacturing Company. 2. Mary Craig 
Chaplin, married Alexander Montgomery Brooks, of Sewickley. 3. Sarah C. 
Chaplin. 

(IV) W. Wilson Chaplin, son of Lieutenant William Craig Chaplin, was 
born on Neville Island, Pittsburg, and died in June, 1907. 

(II) Henry Knox Craig, fifth child of Major Isaac Craig, was born 



i8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



March 7, 1791, and educated at Pittsburg; entered the United States army and 
received a commission as second lieutenant of an artillery company March 
17, 1812. He fought at Fort George and Stony Creek, Canada, and received 
promotion to rank of captain December 23, 1813. In 1814 he had command 
at Fort Niagara, New York. In ]\Iay, 1815, was transferred to the light 
artillery as captain. He held the same position in the Third Regiment of 
Artillery, and was appointed major of ordnances in 1832. During the Mexican 
war he was chief of ordnances at headquarters of the army of occupation. He 
was distinguished at the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, Mexico, 
May 8 and 9, 1846. He was breveted lieutenant-colonel of the United States 
army for meritorious conduct in the various conflicts at Monterey, Mexico, 
September 21 and 23, 1846; was appointed colonel of ordnances in 1851, and 
remained chief of that department up to 1861, and was retired in 1863. For 
his long and faithful services he was brevetted brigadier-general. One of his 
sons. Lieutenant Presley Oldham Craig, of the United States artillery, was 
killed at the first Bull Run fight, July 21, 1861. Another son, Benjamin Fan- 
ueil, born in 1829, died in 1877, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania 
as a Bachelor of Arts in 1848, and in 1851 graduated in medicine. He became 
a well-known chemist and had charge of the chemical department in the sur- 
geon-general's office at Washington. The only daughter of General Craig 
living is Jane Bethum. widow of General Hawkins. General Craig died 
December 7, 1869. 

(II) Neville B. Craig, second child of Major Isaac and Amelia (Neville) 
Craig, was born March 29, 1787, in Colonel Boquet's redoubt, and died March 

3, 1863. He was educated at the famous Pittsburgh Academy and at Prince- 
ton College; he was admitted to the bar August 13, 1810; was city solicitor 
from 1821 to 1830; owner and editor of the Pittsburgh Gazette (which he con- 
verted into the first daily in the city) from 1829 to 1841. About that time he 
was elected to the state legislature. Subsequently an investigation was made 
regarding members supplying themselves with merchandise at the expense of 
the commonwealth, and the result shows "That every member, with the single 
exception of Craig, of Allegheny county, all had used his share of this plunder." 

"The Centennial Volume of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg" 
styles Mr. Craig "the historian par excellence of -the city he adorned." His 
publications are to-day authority ; they are The Olden Time, two volumes, 
1846-7; History of Pittsburgh. 1S51 ; Memoirs of Major Stobo. 1S54; Life and 
Services of Major Isaac Craig. 1854; and an Exposure of Some of the Many 
Misstatements of H. M. Breckcnridge's History of the Whiskey Insurrection, 
1859. Mr. Craig was a member of the First Presbyterian church, of Pittsburg, 
the American Antiquarian Society, and other bodies. 

He married May i, 1811, fane Ann Fulton, born August 11, 1789, at 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; died January 14, 1852, at Pittsburg. She was the 
daughter of Henry and Isabelle Fulton, whose issue was : 

I. Isabelle Wilson, born September 25, 1812; married Rev. Henry G. 
Comingo. 2. Emily Neville, born June 29, 1814; married Lieutenant Alfred 
Beckley, of the United States army. 3. Mary Jane, born March 23, 1816; 
died April 22, 1834, at Washington, Pennsylvania; married Rev. William Orr. 

4. Harriet Matilda, born September 26, 1817; died January 14, 1850. 5. 
Margaret Fulton, born August 22, 1821. 6. Isaac, born July 8, 1822; married 
Rebecca McKibhin. 7. Henry Fulton, born August 5, 1824; died December 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 19 



12, 1824. 8. Eliza Gray, born August 27, 1828 ; married Alexander M. Wall- 
ingford. 9. Annie Neville, born July 11, 1831 ; married John S. Davidson. 
10. Presley Neville, born July 12, 1833; died April 22, 1834. 

(Ill) Isaac Craig, son of Neville B. Craig (II), was born July 18, 1822, 
and was the grandson of !Major Isaac Craig. Few men in Pennsylvania de- 
serve more gratitude and grateful recognition than this member of the Craig 
family. As author and historian he became authority in western Pennsylvania 
and the great Ohio valley. He was so looked upon by the Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania, the same in Chicago, Bufifalo, Virginia and the Aztec Club. 
All have testified their approval of his correctness. He was a member of all 
these historical societies just named. He was the vice-president of the Penn- 
sylvania Historical Society, member of the Pennsylvania Sons of the Revolu- 
tion, and his whole life was devoted to research and study. He married January 
12, 1847, Rebecca McKibbin, and their issue was: i. Neville B., born Decem- 
ber I, 1847; married Margaret Sullivan. 2. Jane, born July 14, 1849, died 
July 24, 1857. 3. Emily Neville, born May 11, 1851, died August 28, 1851. 
4. Winfred Oldham, born November 10, 1852. 5. Chambers McKibbin, born 
December 26, 1854. 6. Henry Fulton, born November 21, 1858, died July 29, 
1861. 7. Isaac, born December 27, i860. 8. Rebecca, born May i, 1863. 9. 
Presley Neville, born April 2, 1865, died December 17, 1870. 10. Oldham 
Gray, born September 3, 1869. 

(Ill) Isaac Eugene Craig, son of Oldham and Matilda (Roberts) Craig, 
was born near Pittsburg, February 7, 1830. He was educated in Pittsburg 
and Philadelphia, and went to Europe in 1853 and became a noted artist and 
portrait painter. He finally settled in Paris and remained until 1855, when he 
came to his native land, but returned to Europe in 1862 and spent one year in 
Munich, later locating in Florence, where he was made honorary member of 
the Academy of Fine Arts. Besides painting portraits of John T. Hart, the 
Kentucky sculptor ; Hiram Powers, Thomas Ball, John A. Jackson and a full 
length portrait of Hugh D. Evans, LL. D., of Baltimore, Maryland, he painted 
views from Venice, and the following among many other subjects: "Saul and 
David." "The Emigrant's Grave," "Daughter of Jarius," "The Brazen Serpent," 
"Pygmalion," "Shylock Signing the Bond," "Peace," "Venus and Cupid," and 
the "Supper at Emmaus," a large picture for the church of St. Thomas at 
Whitemarsh, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Annie Neville Craig, daughter of Neville B. Craig (II), was born 
July II, 1830, and married John S. Davison. He was born in New York city 
September 3, 1825, and died July 2, 1868. He received his education in his 
native city and graduated from Princeton College with the class of 1844. He 
had intended to become a minister, but on account of ill health came to Pitts- 
burg about 185 1 and established a book-store, being the first in the city; it was 
on Wood street, near Market street. Subsequently he engaged in the hardware 
business, with saddlery goods, on Wood street, operating under the firm name 
of Mair & Davison, which he continued until his death. His wife died in 1906. 
Their children were: Neville Craig Davison, of whom later mention is made. 
Frederick Finley, who married Mary Johnston and had children — Annie Neville 
and Sarah Shuman. Mary, wife of Robert R. Reed. 

(IV) Neville Craig Davison, son of John S. and Annie Neville (Craig) 
Davison, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, January 3, 1861, and received 
his education at the public schools of the city, graduating from the State Col- 



20 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



lege in 1883. He then became a chemist for the National Steel Works, with 
whom he remained until 1900, when he engaged in business for himself as a 
mechanical engineer, under the firm name of N. C. Davison & Company. He 
is a member of the University Club and of the Society of the Sons of the 
Revolution. He is unmarried. 



MAJOR ADAM MERCER BROWN up to his retirement in 1903, was 
one of the well-known members of the Allegheny county bar, practicing at 
Pittsburg. He was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, son of Joseph and 
Mary (Marshall) Brown, he being one of their six children. He descends from 
German ancestry through the following lineage : 

(I) Adam Brown, the emigrant to this country, came from Germany 
prior to the Revolutionary war, settling at Big Springs, Pennsylvania, where 
he spent the remainder of his life. He was one of the early-day tillers of the 
soil, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war under Washington. He was 
a very devout member of the Presbyterian church. Among his children was a 
son, named after him, who was the grandfather of the subject. 

(H) Adam Brown, son of the American ancestor, Adam (I), was born in 
Germany, and came to Butler county, Pennsylvania, during the last years of 
the eighteenth century according to an account found in the History of Butler 
County, published in 1905. He settled in what was later known as Middlesex 
township, and owned some four hundred acres of land in that neighborhood, 
and near the site of Brownsdale. There he cleared up a farm, which he highly 
improved. He served as one of the early constables of his township. Politically 
he voted the Whig ticket and in his faith adhered to that of the Presbyterian 
church. He was a man fairly educated, both in English and German; he wielded 
considerable influence in his county and was esteemed by all the pioneers. He 
was buried in the old Presbyterian cemetery in Middlesex township. He mar- 
ried Agnes Plolmes, of Ireland, but who resided at the time of her marriage in 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. Both she and her husband died in the 
nineteenth century. The children born to them were as follows: i. John, who 
died on a portion of the old farm. 2. Adam. 3. Joseph, the subject's father. 
4. Thomas R., who died in Pittsburg. 5. Elizabeth, who married James Mc- 
Candless and died in Butler county. 6. Martha, wife of Johnson White, who 
died in the same county. 7. Margaret, who married William White and died 
in Ohio. 

(HI) Joseph Brown, son of Adam (H) and Agnes (Holmes) Brown, 
was born, reared and died in Butler county, Pennsylvania. He was born in 
1800 and died about 1884, on the farm which had been in the Brown family 
from the first settlement in the country. He erected a mill and carried on mill- 
ing and operated an old-fashioned distillery in conjunction with his farming 
operations. His place was one of the best improved in all of that section of 
the state. He married Mary Marshall, born 1798, and died in 1877. She was 
a native of Ireland, the daughter gf James and Jane Marshall, who came to 
the United States after their daughter had reached womanhood, and located in 
Butler county. James and Jane Marshall were the parents of eight children, 
several of whom became prominent in business and professional life. One son, 
James Marshall, was one of Pittsburg's most enterprising and well-known busi- 
ness men. Another son, Thomas M. Marshall, became one of Pennsylvania's 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 21 



brilliant attorneys, leaving a history behind him well worthy of record. Samuel, 
another son, was judge in the court of common pleas in Butler county several 
years, while his brother David was a well-to-do merchant of the same county. 
Joseph and Mary (Marshall) Brown were the parents of six children, as fol- 
lows: I. Jane, wife of David Douthett, of Brownsdale, Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. Adam Mercer, the subject, of whom later. 3. Esther L., widow 
of General William Blakeley, a brigadier in the Civil war ; she resides in Butler 
county with her daughter. 4. William M. Brown, still living in Allegheny, 
Pennsylvania, formerly a farmer and at one time sheriff of Butler county, 
Pennsylvania. 5. James, deceased. 6. Sarah B., wife of D. B. Douthett, a 
former member of the Pennsylvania state legislature as a member of the house 
of representatives from Butler county. He is now a resident of Wilkinsburg. 

(IV) Major Adam M. Brown, son of Joseph (III) and Mary (Marshall) 
Brown, was born in Middlesex township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, August 
3, 1829. He attended the Butler Academy, and private training was given him 
in Pittsburg, to which city he was sent to complete his education. His parents 
from the first had intended him to become a merchant, but after finishing his 
education he was prevailed upon to take up the study of medicine, so he began 
reading under Dr. A. G. McQuaide, of Butler, but some time later, however, 
through the advice of Thomas M. Marshall, he abandoned his medical studies 
and took up law instead of medicine for his profession. He entered the 
office of Thomas M. Marshall and in 1854 was admitted to the bar in 
the Pennsylvania courts and became a law partner with Mr. Marshall, con- 
tinuing until 1865, when he severed his connection with him and opened an 
office for himself on Fifth avenue, Pittsburg, where he was located up to his 
retirement in 1903. Early in life he became much interested in military mat- 
ters, and for several years was major of the Washington battalion of the^ Penn- 
sylvania Guards. 

Almost from the beginning of his professional career Mr. Brown inter- 
ested himself in politics, being a staunch defender of the general principles of 
the Republican party, although purely on principle, as he never cared for politi- 
cal preferment in the way of office-holding. But few, if indeed any, have con- 
tributed more to the success of the Republican cause in western Pennsylvania. 
He was a member of the select council of Pittsburg three years, and was a dele- 
gate to the national convention which nominated President Lincoln in 1864, 
and Grant and Colfax in 1868. By his earnestness in those two great conven- 
tions — the one in the very darkest days of the Civil war and the other just after 
it had closed — he acquired a reputation even throughout the nation. At the 
outbreak of the war he devoted himself with all of his energies in aiding and 
maintaining the union ; his efforts to encourage enlistments and volunteers for 
the army from his section of the commonwealth were very marked. He was 
frequently urged by his legion of admirers to become a candidate for congress, 
also for a place on the judiciary, both of which he declined. In 1874 he was 
sought out for a candidate for mayor of Pittsburg, but declined the honors. 
In 1873 he was one of the chief organizers of the Anchor Savings Bank of 
Pittsburg, of which he was made president. He has also been a director in 
the Cash Insurance Company and the Odd Fellows Saving Bank. He achieved 
general popularity on account of his conceded patriotism and public spirit, and 
enjoys the respect and full confidence of all who have so long known him as 
friend and valuable citizen. 



22 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



His legal practice has been nearly all in civil cases, but on important crim- 
inal actions he has appeared as counsel. He has ever been able to hold the at- 
tention and command the respect of judge and jury, where on more than one 
occasion he has achieved positive forensic triumphs. In a celebrated trial, in 
the case of James Nutt, charged with the murder of Captain Dukes, in 1884, he 
defended, and by his extraordinary skill and eloquence combined he succeeded 
in obtaining an acquittal. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the United Presbyterian church, where he has 
for forty-odd years served on the official board. He is a man whose percep- 
tion of the justice and propriety of things make him unbending to the wishes 
and offers made by designing men. In 1902, after retiring from the legal prac- 
tice, he was appointed by the governor of Pennsylvania to the office of recorder 
of Pittsburg, so called by the provisional act of assembly, but really to assume 
the office of mayor, which officer had been removed. Subsequently he was re- 
moved from said office by the same governor, which removal resulted in a po- 
litical revolution that swept from power the political organization which had 
had absolute control of the city and county for over twenty-five years. 

Mr. Brown was married in 1854 to Lucetta Turney, daughter of Adam 
and Hannah (Weber) Turney, of Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. Her mother was a daughter of Rev. John William Weber, founder 
of the German Reformed United Evangelical church, at the corner of Sixth 
avenue and Smithfield street, Pittsburg, the earliest church in the city. Mr. 
Turney was of Scotch-Irish lineage. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are the parents of 
the following children, who are living : Judge Marshall, of the court of com- 
mon pleas of Allegheny county; John, an attorney, of Pittsburg; Thomas M., 
an attorney, of the same city; Sarah B., widow of Dr. Herron, residing at Pitts- 
burg; Caroline, wife of John H. Herron, of Pittsburg; William J., of Dalton, 
Pennsylvania. 

John Dean Brown, youngest son of Adam M. Brown and wife, was born 
in Pittsburg. He finished his education at Harvard University and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1889, since which time he has been in constant practice in 
Pittsburg. Politically Mr. Brown is a supporter of the Republican party and 
in religious faith a United Presbyterian. 

He was united in marriage June 2, 1898, to Helen Dorothy, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Otis Shepard. By this union the issue is Dorothy Westlake 
Brown, born June 26, 1900. 



ANDREW JACKSON BURBANK, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, comes 
of an old New England family, the American ancestor of which was one of 
three brothers who came from England prior to 1640 and settled at Haverhill, 
Massachusetts. One of the three brothers mentioned soon returned to Eng- 
land and the other two remained, and it is believed that from one, named Tohn 
Burbank, descended Andrew Jackson Burbank. From recent biographical 
works on Luther Burbank, now of California, the man who above all others 
has propagated thousands of plants, as well as vegetables and fruits, making 
improved varieties, including the most beautiful roses and numerous other 
flowers, the celebrated "Burbank" potato, the seedless orange, etc., it appears 
that he too comes from this family tree of New England. He was born near 
Boston, at Lancaster, Massachussetts, and is from English ancestry on his 
father's and Scotch descent on his mother's side. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 23 



The genealogical line as relates to Andrew J. Burbank is as follows : 

(I) John Burbank, who came to Massachusetts prior to 1640, settling at 
Haverhill, removed in 1674 to Suffield, Connecticut, where he purchased land. 
He married and among his children was a son, Ebenezer. 

(H) Ebenezer Burbank, Revolutionary soldier, married and was the 
father of a son named for himself. 

(HI) Ebenezer Burbank, Jr., married and had a son, Alanson S. 

(IV) Alanson S. Burbank married, and by such union was born George 
A. Burbank, who became the grandfather of Andrew J. of this sketch. 

(V) George A. Burbank, grandfather, married and was a resident of 
Orange county, Vermont, where the family are spoken of in Vermont histories 
as being early settlers in that state. He was by occupation a merchant, and 
died about 1S36. Among his children was Gustavus Adolphus Burbank. 

(VI) Gustavus A. Burbank, the father, was born in 1815 at Wells River, 
Vermont. He was by occupation a lawyer and banker, and died in 1897. Po- 
litically he was a Democrat and in religious belief a Presbyterian. The children 
of Gustavus A. Burbank were : Andrew J., Catherine M., Charles D. and 
George A. 

The following are references found in different records and publications 
bearing on the Burbank family as early residents of New England : 

In the work entitled "Pioneers of Massachusetts" it is stated that 
John Burbank (American progenitor of Andrew J. Burbank) was admitted as 
a "freeman" May 13, 1640; was a town officer, a "proprietor," and that he had 
children: John, known as "Little John"; Timothy; Ebenezer; Lydia, bom 
February 7, 1644; Caleb, born March 19, 1646; Mary, born March 16, 1655, 
buried July 12, 1660. 

John (I) made his will April 5, 1681, which was probated April 10, 1683. 
This instrument was made when he "was aged and decrepit." He bequeathed 
his property to his wife "Jemima" and sons Caleb and John, his grandson John 
(son of Timothy, deceased), and to his daughter Lydia Burbank. His widow 
died March 24, 1692-3. 

In the Genealogical Dictionary of New England, Vol. I, it states : "John 
Burbank, of Haverhill, Massachusetts, son of John, married, October 15, 1663, 
Susanna, daughter of Nathaniel Merrill, and in 1680 removed with several 
children to Suffield, Connecticut, where his wife died 1690. He had a second 
and third wife, but no issue except by the first marriage." 

In the same record is mentioned Joseph Burbank, who came from England 
in 1635 in the ship "Abigail," from London, aged twenty-four years. When he 
arrived at the custom house it was writ "Borebanke," but where he sat down is 
unknown. It is likely that this Joseph was one of the three brothers before 
named (one being the ancestor of Andrew J. Burbank), and the one who re- 
turned to his native country soon after coming here. The other, so it is be- 
lieved, came from England in 1635, and that John (I) settled first at Haverhill 
in 1640, and then removed in 1674 to Suffield, Connecticut. 

(VII) Andrew Jackson Burbank was born at Wells River, Orange 
county, Vermont, July 25, 1833, ^'^'^ educated at the academies at Danville and 
St. Johnsbury and the seminary at Newbury, Vermont. He learned the trade 
of house finishing in St. Johnsbury, and later worked at the Amoskeag Loco- 
motive works at Manchester, New Hampshire, and in the Essex Machine and 
Locomotive Works at Lawrence, ^^lassachusetts. Later he was employed at 



24 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Nashua, New Hampshire, setting up or assembling machinery for the new 
Jackson Manufacturing Corporation. This machinery was built at the Essex 
Machine and Locomotive Works. In 1855 he went to Minnesota, and during 
the panic of 1857, with thousands of other business men, lost his property. In 
1859-60 he had so far recovered as to be engaged in the lumber business at 
Hannibal, Missouri, where he was at the outbreak of the Civil war. His whole 
sympathies being with the North, his life was threatened and his stocks of 
lumber at Chillicothe and Laclede, Missouri, were burned. He left Missouri, 
going to Vermont, where he engaged in the manufacture of furniture at New- 
bury, remaining until 1862, when he came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where 
he was in the office of the collector of internal revenue for the Twenty-second 
district of Pennsylvania. Subsequently he received the appointment of United 
States inspector and gauger of distilled spirits and coal oil, which office he 
held until the war closed, when it was abolished. Mr. Burbank then purchased 
a one-fourth 'interest in the steamboat "Le Claire" No. 2, which plied on the 
waters of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. In addition to his being a part 
owner in the boat he was also first clerk. After leaving the river he engaged 
in the oil business in Venango county and real estate in Pittsburg, in which he 
was quite successful in his operations. 

Politically Mr. Burbank is a supporter of the Republican party. He rep- 
resented the Eighteenth ward of the city in select council (the same territory 
being at the time he first settled there within Collins township). He is an ad- 
vanced Mason, having received the thirty-second degree in that order ; is a 
life member of Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Pittsburg; also a member of "The Lyceum," a Masonic club of 
Pittsburg. At this date (1908) he is engaged in real estate, mortgages and 
judgment notes as a private business. 

Mr. Burbank has been twice married, first at Haverhill, New Hampshire, 
August 26, 1862, to Mrs. Esther Eaton, nee Hall, who died November 28, 
1886. By this marriage three children were born, two of whom are still living: 
Andrew Carlton, unmarried, located at Choteau, Montana; and Mary A., who 
married John C. Hilbert June 21, 1887, and they have one child, Esther Abbie, 
born May 10, 1888. For his second wife he married April 29, 1891, in Sharps- 
burg, Pennsylvania, Mrs. Sarah M. Gercke, nee Himmens, born in Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, March 26, 1837. No issue by this marriage. 



JAMES ISAAC BUCHANAN, of Pittsburg, was born in 1853 in Ham- 
ilton, Ontario, and is descended on both sides from Scottish ancestry. His 
father, the late Honorable Isaac Buchanan, was a native of Scotland, and at 
one time held the office of president of the executive council, Canada. He mar- 
ried Agnes, second daughter of Robert Jarvie. of Glasgow, Scotland, and of 
this marriage James Isaac Buchanan is the fifth son. 

James Isaac Buchanan received his education in his native place and at 
Gait (Tassie's) Collegiate Institute. His early business training was obtained 
in the house of Buchanan & Company, Hamilton, Ontario. About thirty years 
ago he removed to Pennsylvania, settling first at Oil City, where he was em- 
ployed by the Oil City Trust Company, and afterward by Captain J. J. Vander- 
grift, with whom he removed to Pittsburg about twenty-three years ago. In 
that city he has been and is interested in banking and in various industrial and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 25 



commercial companies and enterprises. He is trustee for the estate of J. J. 
Vandergrift (founder of the town of Vandergrift) and belongs to the board 
of directors of the Keystone National Bank of Pittsburg. He has also offi- 
ciated as trustee of other estates and is president of the Pittsburgh Trust Com- 
pany and the Terminal Trust Company. He is president of the Pittsburgh 
Terminal Warehouse and Transfer Company, the great river and rail ter- 
minal ; director of the Unity Oil Company ; director, secretary and treasurer 
of the Keystone Commercial Company ; director of the Washington Oil Com- 
pany, the Taylorstown Natural Gas Company and the Natural Gas Company 
of West Virginia. He is a member of the Pittsburg Chamber of Commerce, 
the Pittsburg board of trade, and is senior member of the firm of J. I. Bu- 
chanan & Company, investment securities and managers of properties. 

Among other public institutions with which he is prominently identified 
are the Botanical Society of Western Pennsylvania, the Humane Society of 
Western Pennsylvania and the Pittsburgh Orchestra Committee, of which he 
is chairman. He is an honorary member of the Humane Society of Baltimore, 
Maryland, and a life member of the following organizations : American Geo- 
graphical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Art 
Society of Pittsburg, St. Andrew's Society of New York and St. Andrew's 
Society of Philadelphia. He is past master of St. John's Lodge No. 219, F. 
and A. M., Pittsburg, and an active member and deputy for Pennsylvania of 
the supreme council. He belongs to the Duquesne Club, the Country Club, the 
Oakmont Country Club, the University Club, the Cornell Club and the Cana- 
dian Association, all of Pittsburg ; also the Thousand Islands Yacht Club, the 
Caledon Mountain Trout Club, Ontario, and the Bostonais Association, Que- 
bec. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and has filled the office of 
president of the Presbyterian Union of Pittsburg and Allegheny. 

Mr. Buchanan married in 1901 Eliza, fourth daughter of the late Isaiah 
Graham and IMargaret (McDowell) Macfarlane, of Pittsburg, the latter the 
daughter of Samuel McDowell, formerly of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. 



HENRY HENNING, one of the organizers and the president of the 
Knoxville (borough) St. Clair Savings and Trust Company, and a foremost 
business factor of that place, was born in Mount Oliver, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, October 31, 1847, son of Adam and Marie (Hochhouse) Hen- 
ning, he being one of seven children. His father was a native of Hessen, Ger- 
many, born November 14, 1806. He was reared in his native country and 
learned the cooper's trade, which occupation he followed the most of the time 
during the active years of his life. In 1846 he emigrated to this country, locat- 
ing in Mount Oliver, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He there purchased a 
homestead, on which he spent the remainder of his life, dying February 7, 
1891. In his early life he was a Democrat in politics, but the nomination of 
Abraham Lincoln, the anti-slavery candidate for the presidency in i860, caused 
him to ally himself with the Republican party, which he ever afterward sup- 
ported. He was of a conservative disposition, but was widely known for his 
numerous charitable acts and liberal contributions. In his religious convic- 
tions and creed he was of the Presbyterian faith. He married Miss Marie 
Hochhouse, born in Hessen, Germany, in 1816; she died in May, 1892. To 
them were born seven children, five of whom survive, as follows : Catherine, 



26 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



wife of Simon Schwartz, of Mount Oliver, Pennsylvania, residing on the old 
Henning homestead. Henry, of this sketch. Margaret, widow of John 
Schwartz, Mount Oliver, Pennsylvania, living on a part of the old homestead. 
Sophia, unmarried, residing at the old home place. Mary, who lives with her 
sister Sophia. 

Henry Henning, the subject, acquired his education at the schools of 
Mount Oliver, but at the tender age of nine years went to work on the farm 
of Jeremiah Knox, under whom he studied gardening and the business of a 
nurseryman. At that date Mr. Knox grew thousands of grapevines, and by 
the time young Henning was fifteen years of age he had charge of this depart- 
ment of Mr. Knox's business. When seventeen years old he went to Phila- 
delphia to complete his knowledge of the nursery business, remaining one year 
in the employ of Robert Buist, then the most extensive florist in the United 
States, After his year's instruction there he returned to Allegheny county and 
established a greenhouse at the nursery farm of the Lebanon Nursery, under 
Henry Bockstoce. After two years Mr. Henning had fully installed the florist 
business for that nursery, and in 1867 went to Iowa, where he was employed 
at his trade at West Union, Fayette county. There he propagated and grew 
plants for a Mr. Morris, who had but recently engaged in the business at that 
point. He continued there two years and nine months, and during this time 
he was united in marriage. In April, 1870, he returned to Pennsylvania to 
take charge of the propagating department of the nurseries of the Jeremiah 
Knox farm. He remained there one year, when the nurseries passed into the 
hands of Cummings & Company, and Mr. Henning was made general superin- 
tendent of the entire farm. In 1874 he was engaged in gardening for himself 
at Mount Oliver; four years later he leased the Knox farm, operated it three 
years, and then removed to Knoxville, engaging in the grocery business, also 
handling feed and seeds, later adding builders' supplies. During the following 
twenty-five years he was one of the foremost business factors of Knoxville. 
In 1903 he was one of the organizers of the St. Clair Savings and Trust Company 
of Knoxville, he being one of the largest stockholders, and was niade its presi- 
dent, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Henning was one of the first signers to a petition asking for a charter 
to be granted for a borough at Knoxville, and served as burgess from 1903 
to 1906. He has been closely identified with every movement looking to the 
advancement of the borough's interest. Politically he is a Republican, and has 
served several years on the school board and borough council. 

Mr. Henning married, September 27, 1869, Celia, daughter of Marcus and 
Mary (Wilbur) Lasell. The father was a well-known farmer residing near 
West Union, Iowa. By this union were born seven children, five of whom 
survive: George A., a train dispatcher for the Pittsburg Railways Company. 
Louis M., foreman for the John Seibert Construction Company, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. Laura M., at home. Edward, associated with the subject in 
business. Frank, teller in the St. Clair Savings and Trust Company. 

LOUIS ROTT, a well-known resident of Homestead, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, president of the First National Bank of Homestead, and closely 
and prominently identified with the political and financial interests of that sec- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 27 



tion of the state for many years, is a representative of an old and honored 
family of Germany- 
Christian Rott, grandfather of Louis Rott, was a native of Germany, 
where his entire life was spent. Little is known of him save that he was man- 
ager of iron works in Isenhutte, Germany, and was a man of influence in the 
community. He married and had children. 

Christian Rott, son of the Christian Rott mentioned above, served for a 
time as a soldier in the German army, then studied veterinary surgery. Later 
he worked in the silver mines of Mr. Koch, father of the celebrated specialist, 
Dr. Koch, and was also engaged in making tools for use in blacksmithing. He 
emigrated to America in 1850, settling in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
died in 1875. He was the first toolmaker in what was at that time Crogansville 
and is now the Twelfth ward. He then accepted a position with Newmyer & 
Graff, with whom he continued until he retired from active work. He was 
buried in Allegheny Cemetery. He married, in Germany, Louisa Heisecke, 
and they had children: i. Frederick, a resident of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
2. Christian, born in Badenhausen, Brunswick, Germany, October 29, 1841, 
received the main part of his education in the public schools of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and at the age of sixteen years commenced to work in the shovel fac- 
tory of Newmyer & Graff, in that city. He remained with them for a period 
of two years, when he unfortunately fell from a skylight, broke both of his 
arms, and never completely regained the use of one of them. He then ac- 
cepted the position of bookkeeper in a soap factory in Pittsburg, and after a 
time was advanced to the position of foreman of the works, a position he re- 
tained for a period of four years. He became a member of the firm of George 
A. McBeth & Company in 1878, and this business developed to such an extent 
that they were considered the foremost lamp manufacturers in the world at that 
time. He was very successful in his various business undertakings, making 
several trips to Europe and gaining a great amount of knowledge concerning 
the art of glass-making. He was at one time secretary of three building and 
loan associations. He has been an ardent supporter of the principles of the 
Republican party, was member of the Pittsburg city council for one year, and 
active in the organization of the borough of Wilkinsburg. He is a member of 
the Swedenborgian church of Allegheny, and of the following fraternal or- 
ganizations : Legion of Honor, Royal Arcanum, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He married, in June, 1871, Sarah Johnson, daughter of C. C. John- 
son, of Monongahela City, Pennsylvania, and they have had children : Wil- 
liam, Frederick, Cora and Walter Christian. 3. Louis, see forward. 

Louis Rott, third and youngest son and child of Christian and Louisa 
(Heisecke) Rott, was born in Badenhausen, Brunswick, Germany, October 
22, 1844. He was six years of age -when he came to the United States with 
his parents, and his education was acquired in the public schools of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. At the age of fourteen years he obtained a position in the drug 
business of W. J. Radcliff, with whom he remained for five years, when Mr. 
Radcliff sold the business to B. L. Fahnestock, also of Pittsburg, and Mr. Rott 
continued in the employ of the latter-named gentleman for a further period of 
sixteen years. He removed to Homestead in 1882" and opened a drug store on 
his own account, at the corner of Ann street and Eighth avenue, and soon be- 
came an important factor in borough matters. He has been closely and promi- 
nently connected with many of the most important financial enterprises of this 



28 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



section. He is a director in the Homestead Baking Company, also in the 
Homestead Brick Company, and director and president of the First National 
Bank. In politics Mr. Rott has always been an uncompromising Republican 
in general elections. He voted for Horace Greeley, and was chairman of the 
meeting at the time of the old Fifth ward market house. He served for three 
years as councilman in Bellevue ; was school director and secretary of the 
school board for three years ; served two terms of three years each as council- 
man in Homestead, and was treasurer of the borough for ten years ; was elected 
burgess in 1906, an office he is holding at the present time, and made the first 
yearly report ever made by a Homestead burgess ; he has been a member of 
the Republican executive committee since the incorporation of that body. He 
was baptized- in the Lutheran church in Germany, but since coming to Home- 
stead has been a member of the Episcopal church, of which he has been senior 
warden for some years, and of which his family are also members. He has 
taken a leading part in fraternal life for many years and is connected with the 
following fraternal organizations : One of the organizers of Magdala Lodge 
No. 491, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was its secretary for many 
years; this was the first lodge of this order in Homestead. He and Mr. Mc- 
Andress selected the name and have been successful in erecting the finest lodge 
hall in Pennsylvania, at a cost of forty thousand dollars. He was one of the 
organizers, July 28, 1890, and is now past master of Homestead Lodge No. 
582, Free and Accepted Masons, of Homestead ; member of the Grand Lodge 
of Pennsylvania; member of Shiloh Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Pitts- 
burg; and was initiated in Stuckradt Lodge No. 430, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of Pittsburg, July 7, 1870. He is a member of the Golden Eagles ;.one of 
the organizers of Boaz Council No. 814, Royal Arcanum, Homestead; a char- 
ter member of the Improved Order of Heptasophs of Homestead ; past exalted 
ruler of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; member of McAndress 
Encampment; and has been a member of the Knights of Pythias since 1866, 
formerly of Grant Lodge No. 258 of Pittsburg, and now of Homestead Lodge. 
Mr. Rott married, first, in June, 1876, Arabella Jeannette McCandless, 
daughter of Robert and Ann (Lafferty) McCandless. Mrs. Rott was the prin- 
cipal of the Sixteenth ward school, and was an active worker in church circles. 
They had children: i. Louis Edwin, is a bookkeeper in the employ of Feath 
& Kerr, and resides in Munhall borough. He married Eva Stemler and has 
one child, Dorothy Louise. 2. Robert George, is clerk in the employ of the 
Carnegie Steel Company and resides in Homestead. 3. Charles Henry, died, 
and is buried in Homestead Cemetery. 4. Albert John, displays great and 
marked artistic talent in various directions. 5. A son who died in infancy. 
Mrs. Rott died, and is buried in Allegheny Cemetery. Mr. Rott married, sec- 
ond, Margaret Virginia McCandless, a sister of his first wife, also active in 
church matters. Robert McCandless was one of the incorporators of the St. 
James Episcopal church at the corner of Sixteenth street and Penn avenue, and 
willed ten thousand dollars to this institution at his death. 



ALEXANDER TAYLOR, the present (1907) manager of works of the 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, was born in Glasgow," 
Scotland, July 25, 1864. His paternal grandfather was Alexander Taylor, and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 29 



among his children were : Angus McDonald, John, Thomas, Adam, and Mar- 
garet, who married John Rust:, of Boston. 

Angus McDonald Taylor, the eldest of his father's children, became the 
father of the subject of this notice. He was born in Paisley, Scotland, April 
I, 1839, and came to this country in 1870, settling in Allegheny City, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was employed for many years as shipping clerk for Brown 
& Company, of the Wayne Iron and Steel Works. He married, in 1863, Mar- 
garet Willis Bennie, who was born November i, 1841, in Scotland. They had 
five children: i. Alexander, subject. 2. John B., married Marie Lansing. 3. 
Angus McDonald, Jr., married Nora Elliott, and they have children, Margaret 
and Elliott. 4. James C, married Anna Fritche. 5. Margaret, wife of Charles 
H. Holyland, and they are the parents of two children, Willis and Charles. 

Alexander, Taylor, the subject, was reared in Allegheny City, where he 
attended the public schools and later graduated from the Curry Institute, Pitts- 
burg. It was in September, 1888, that he entered the employ of the Electric 
Company, as one -whose duties were in the winding department. He remained 
there until 1891, and was then transferred to the storeroom as stock man. 
Subsequently he was connected with the purchasing agent's office as a clerk, 
and in May, 1897, he was placed in charge of the Allegheny foundry. January 
I, 1901, he was made assistant superintendent of the foundry, and in Septem- 
ber of the same year he received the appointment of superintendent of the 
foundries, with headquarters at Allegheny City. October 5, 1902, he was pro- 
moted to superintendent of production, which position he held until August, 
1905, when his title was extended to superintendent of production and stores. 
In September 1905, he was made superintendent of the East Pittsburg works, 
and December 15 the same year, owing to the absence of the manager, Mr. 
Philip A. Lange (occasioned by his call to the Manchester works of the British 
company), Mr. Taylor was made acting manager of the works, having charge 
of the East Pittsburg, Cleveland, Newark and the New Allegheny works. Mr. 
Taylor's steady rise in the Westinghouse organization has been due chiefly to 
the untiring interest he has taken in the business, doing each known duty to 
the best of his ability. 

He is a thirty-second degree Mason, being a member of Allegheny Blue 
Lodge No. 223, Allegheny Chapter No. 217, Allegheny Commandery No. 35 
and the Pennsylvania Consistory in the Valley of Pittsburg. Politically he is 
a Republican, and while living at Bellevue served on the borough council from 
1899 to 1902. He has also served eleven years in the National Guard of Penn- 
sylvania, in the Eighteenth regiment, resigning with the rank of regimental 
commissar}' sergeant. 

December 21, 1887, Mr. Taylor was married to Estella Blanche Johnston, 
daughter of W. G. and Matilda (Klages) Johnston. Her father was a member 
of the well-known firm of Johnston Brothers, carriage builders. Mr. and Mrs. 
Taylor are the parents of two sons: Harold A., born December 21, 1888, and 
Lester M., born March 23, 1890. 



PETER SNYDER, a well-known citizen of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, re- 
siding at No. 3405 Ward street, is engaged in the boat building business, and is 
well known throughout the sporting world as an oarsman of merit. He is, as 
the name indicates, of German descent. 



30 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



John Snyder, father of Peter Snyder, was born in Germany in 1805. He 
emigrated to the United States about the year 1820, and settled in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. There he purchased a large tract of land near Belt City 
from the Indians, and this is still in the possession of some of his descendants 
and those of his sister Catherine. He spent the greater part of his life on this 
property and died at an advanced age. He came to Pittsburg and associated 
himself in the ice business with a Mr. Walker, and they were the first mer- 
chants who delivered ice from a wagon in the city of Pittsburg. The runner 
from which they derived their supply was located on a piece of land which is 
now called Snyder's Landing. They continued this business very successfully 
for a number of years, and in addition had a number of other business interests. 
One of them was a saloon on the Diamond, which is still remembered by many 
Pittsburg citizens as a meeting place for Republican politicians. Mr. Snyder 
was an active supporter of the Republican party and a member of the Catholic 
church. He married Mary Elizabeth Block, a resident of Pittsburg, born in 
France. She was a descendant of an old and honored family who were noted 
for their longevity. Her father attained the advanced age of one hundred and 
six years, and died in the full possession of all his faculties. He was a mes- 
senger to Napoleon. The children of John and Mary Ehzabeth (Block) Sny- 
der were: i. John, who married Nora Mitchell. 2. George, unmarried, who 
enlisted in the" Thirteenth regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed 
in the battle at Spottsylvania. 3. Catherine, who married Peter Lineham. 4. 
Frank F., married Anna Kearney. 5. A child who died at an early age. 6. 
Peter, the particular subject of this sketch. 

Peter Snyder, son of John and Mary Elizabeth (Block) Snyder, was born 
on the old homestead, West End, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 10, 1849. 
He attended the schools of the First ward, where he obtained a good educa- 
tion. When he entered upon his business career, boat building immediately 
engaged his attention, and while still a very young man he was 
engaged in building shell boats for racing purposes. This brought him into 
contact with the racing world, and he acquired an excellent reputation as a 
professional rower. He was a member of the Undine and Blackmore Boating 
Clubs, and is at present (1907) a member of the Columbia Club. He has rowed 
in numerous races and still keeps up his practice during his summer vacations. 
He became a member of the fire department of Pittsburg in 1883, and has filled 
in succession all the positions from hoseman up to engineer of Oakland dis- 
trict, to which position he was appointed in 1902. He is now stationary engi- 
neer of No. 24. He is the sole possessor of the fireman's medal which was 
awarded for bravery to any fireman in Pittsburg. He is greatly interested in 
educational affairs and was a school director of the First ward. His religious 
affiliations are with the Catholic church, and he is a member of the Republican 
party. 

Mr. Snyder married Margaret Kearney, who died on July 4, 1900, a daugh- 
ter of Martin Kearney, and they had children: Elizabeth, born March 15, 1868, 
married John Gray, and has children, Joseph and Margaret ; Martin, born 
March 17, 1870, married Theresa Kennedy, and had children, Peter, Ellen, 
William, David, Theresa, Michael, Richard and Michael ; Sadie, born August 
5, 1872, married William O'Leary and has children, Hildreth and Margaret; 
David B., born in June, 1874, died at the age of twenty-four years; William, 
born March 18, 1876, died in 1900; Peter, born July 21, 1878, was drowned at 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 31 



the age of seven years; Catherine, born July 5, 1887, married Louis A. Wells, 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Margaret Gray, the granddaughter of Peter 
Snyder, was married on September 11, 1903, to J. A. Miller, and has children, 
Cecila and Elizabeth. Mr. Snyder married Katherine Porter June 26, 1907. 



PETER FEY, one of the oldest and most substantial business men of 
Homestead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and who has taken a leading part 
in advancing the financial interests of that section, traces his ancestry to 
France, their ancestral home being in Alsace-Lorraine. Colonel De Fey, great- 
great-grandfather of Peter Fey, was an officer under the command of General 
LaFayette during the war of the Revolution, and was of marked assistance to 
General Washington. Peter Fey, an uncle of the subject of this sketch, served 
sixteen years with gallantry in the French army, then came to this country, 
and for many years was in military service in the United States. 

Nicholas Fey, father of Peter Fey, was born in France and emigrated to 
the United States in 1849. He settled in West Homestead, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in farming operations and coal mining. 
He had been a stonemason in France, working as a journeyman in Paris, Lyons 
and several other towns, and thoroughly understood the manufacture of brick. 
In America he was connected with the old West Brick Plant, which manufac- 
tured brick on a large scale. He married Magdalena Decker, also a native of 
France, and they were the parents of children: i. Catherine, who married 
Bernard Kroege.r, deceased, a farmer at Bull Run. 2. John, resides in Thomp- 
son's Run, was formerly engaged in farming and mining operations, is now in 
the grocery business in Duquesne borough. He married Susan Miller. 3. Cas- 
per, is a farmer and resides in Boston, Pennsylvania. He married jSIargaret 
Bickar. 4. Anna, married Henry Ruhe, a farmer, now filling the office of 
street commissioner. They reside in Duquesne borough. 5. Nicholas, Jr., is 
a miller and plumber, and resides in Duquesne borough. He married Caroline 
Rogers. 6. Peter, see forward. 7. Jacob, died at the age of eighteen years at 
Bull Run, and is buried in the Bull Run cemetery. 8. William, an engineer, 
married Elizabeth Garver, and resides in Duquesne borough. 

Peter Fev, third son and sixth child of Nicholas and Magdalena (Decker) 
Fev, was born in an old log house in West Homestead, which stood near the 
big' spring just across the borough line, November 25, 1856. He was educated 
in the public schools of Mifflin township and Dravosburg, and made the most 
of his opportunities in this direction. At the age of fourteen years he com- 
menced to assist in the farming and coal mining operations, and was thus 
occupied until 1880, when he removed to Homestead. He accepted a position 
in the Pittsburgh Steel Works, now the Carnegie Steel Mills of Homestead, 
but abandoned this occupation at the expiration of two years and established 
himself in the grocery business. For a period of sixteen years he was in 
business in Sixth avenue, and was one of the last to desert that thoroughfare, 
as it was at one time the main business street. Since 1905 his business has 
been located at No. 313 Eighth avenue, and has grown to such proportions that 
he has found it necessarv to extend the building through to Seventh avenue, 
and uses both floors of the structure. In addition to carrying on this business 
Mr. Fey found time to devote to a number of other business enterprises. He 
was one of the organizers of the Homestead Savings and Trust Company, and 



32 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



was elected the second vice-president, advancing to the office of first vice- 
president, and is now (1907) president and head of this important financial 
institution. It was largely due to his individual efiforts that the McClure build- 
ing was purchased and remodeled, which was one of the most progressive 
moves made by this company. Mr. Fey has also invested considerably in real 
estate, and is considered one of the largest property holders of this section. 
He is one of the promoters and a director of the Board of Trade, which 
promises an immense advantage to the future of Homestead. He and his fam- 
ily are members of the Catholic church in Homestead. He is also a member 
of the following organizations : Knights of Columbus, Catholic Mutual Benefit 
Association, Knights of St. George, and Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 

He married, September 28, 1880, Lizzie Rushe, daughter of John and 
Christina Rushe, and they have had children : Anna, married John B. Con- 
nolly, one of the clerks of the court; Gertrude, Estella, Mary Edna, Howard 
Sylvester, Elizabeth Catherine and Loyola Cecelia. 



REVEREND EDWARD P. GRIFFIN, rector of St. Mary's on the 
Mount and superior of the Pittsburg Apostolate, was born October 14, 1863, 
in Brooklyn, New York, son of Edward Griffin and grandson of Patrick Grif- 
fin, who was born in Ireland and in 1828 emigrated to the United States. 

He was fitted for his sacred profession at St. Vincent's College, near La- 
trobe, Westmoreland county, and was there ordained a priest July 13, 1888. 



ALEXANDER MURDOCH, assistant secretary and treasurer of the 
Pittsburgh Bank for Savings, was born October 19, 1877, son of Alexander 
A. Murdoch and grandson of John Murdoch, Jr. Alexander A. Murdoch was 
born April 9, 1840, on the Squirrel Hill farm, received his education in the 
public schools, and all his life was engaged in the nursery and greenhouse 
business. May i, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Ninth Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Reserve Volunteers, a regiment which was attached to the hard-fighting 
and finally victorious Army of the Potomac. During his three years of service 
Mr. Murdoch participated in the many famous battles of that army, missing 
only Gettysburg, when he was away on detached service. He had many nar- 
row escapes, but was never wounded, although the privation and exposure 
which he endured were ultimately the cause of his death. May 11, 1864, he 
was honorably discharged with the rank of corporal, and returned to his for- 
mer occupation, in which he was engaged during the remainder of his life. 
He was a Republican and a member of the Shady Side Presbyterian church. 

Alexander A. Murdoch married, November 12, 1871, Lydia, daughter of 
Samuel McMasters, an old-time resident and hatter of Pittsburg, and one of 
the first to build in Birmingham, now the prosperous South Side. Mr. and 
Mrs. Murdoch were the parents of the following children : Lydia, wife of 
Robert Jones, of Pittsburg, children, Robert Jamison and Alexander Murdoch ; 
Jane Robb, wife of A. C. Dickey, of Pittsburg; and Alexander, of whom later. 
Alexander A. Murdoch, the father, died February 9, 1893. 

Alexander Murdoch, son of Alexander A. and Lydia (McMasters) Mur- 
doch, received his education in the Pittsburg schools, and in 1896 entered the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 33 

service of the Bank of Pittsburgh, beginning as messenger boy, and during 
the ensuing five years gaining several promotions. In 1901 he was appointed 
teller of the Pittsburgh Bank for Savings, and since 1906 has filled his present 
position, that of assistant secretary and treasurer of that institution. He has 
always been greatly interested in the American Institute of Bank Clerks, which 
he has served as vice-chairman. He is an active member of the Shady Side- 
Presbyterian church, and for several years has been assistant superintendent of 
the Sunday-school. Mr. Murdoch's home is with his widowed mother. 

HON. JAMES FRANCIS BURKE, representative in congress and the 
well-known attorney-at-Iaw, was born October 24, 1867, at Petroleum Center, 
\'enango county, Pennsylvania, of American parentage. He is the son of 
Richard J. and Anna (Arnold) Burke. He obtained his primary education at 
the public schools and also had the benefit of excellent private tutors, and chose 
law for a profession. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1892, 
and has been in the practice of law at Pittsburg since 1893. His father died 
in 1875, leaving a widow and three sons: James Francis (subject), John Jay 
and Edward Clinton Burke. When but thirteen years of age young Burke 
was sent to Pittsburg, and there found employment in a dry goods store, but 
this seemed not to be his permanent business, as his tastes ran in different direc- 
tions than that of a merchant, so he soon entered the law office of William 
Scott, general counsel for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, at Pittsburg. 
Here he also completed his high school course within the next four years, 
the meantime studying shorthand under private tutors, with the result that at 
the age of eighteen he had become one of the most expert stenographers in the 
United States and received an appointment as official stenographer of the 
United States court. He was elected secretary of various legislative commis- 
sions in Pennsylvania as well as official stenographer of the National Republi- 
can convention at Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1892. During all this time he 
carried on his law studies with much vigor and earnestness under Lieutenant 
Governor Walter Lyon of Pennsylvania. While attending the University of 
Michigan he founded the American Republican League and became its first 
president, establishing a branch in every leading university in the L'nited 
States. While in this position he was elected secretary of the Republican Na- 
tional Committee, but resigned the office to give his exclusive attention to Re- 
publican work in colleges. During the campaign of 1892 he was the youngest 
speaker sent out by the national committee, addressing large audiences in fif- 
teen states. At its close he declined a consular appointment tendered by Presi- 
dent Harrison, but in December, 1893, he began the practice of law in Pitts- 
burg, since which time he has won many laurels by his surpassing success in 
a number of famous murder trials. Not alone in his own political party — Re- 
publican — is he acknowledged as a strong, eloquent speaker, but even by the 
other parties in the country, through their newspaper organs, has he been 
highly complimented for his magnetic qualities in delivering his ma.iv forceful 
speeches in Tremont Temple, Boston ; the Academy of Music, Philadelphia, 
and the Auditorium, Chicago. Besides being what is termed a "born politi- 
cian," he knows no such term as "fail" in whatever else he turns his attention 
to. He possesses much ability as a poet and delights in literary works. 

He was elected from the Thirty-first congressional district of Pennsylvania 

iii— 3 



34 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

to a seat in the house of representatives in congress for the years 1905 and 
1907, where his abiHty was at once recognized. 

Mr. Burke is of the Roman Catholic religious faith and is an honored 
member of the Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce, board of trade, Duquesne, 
Pittsburgh Coaching, Pittsburgh Automobile, Traffic, Americus, Tariff and 
Colonial Clubs. His home is in the East End, Pittsburg, with offices in the 
Berger building, being of the law firm of Lyon, Hunter & Burke. 

He was united in marriage April 15, 1895, at Detroit, Michigan, to Jo- 
sephine B. Scott, daughter of Mrs. N. A. Scott, of Detroit, the widow of the 
late Captain J. B. Scott, a wealthy steamship director of the Great Lakes. 

WEST FAMILY. Among the old and honorable families of Penn- 
sylvania, representatives of which have attained prominence in various walks 
of life, may be mentioned the family of which this article treats. 

Edward West, the first representative of whom we have any authentic 
record, came to Pennsylvania from Virginia at an early date, settling in Wash- 
ington county. He married, and among the children born to him was a son 
named Joseph. 

Joseph West, son of Edward West, was a wood turner by trade, which 
line of work he followed throughout the active years of his life. He was prom- 
inent in the politics of his day. He married, first, Mary (Lowrey) Hay, a 
widow, daughter of Colonel Alexander Lowrey, a sketch of whom is included 
in this. She was the mother of two sons by her first husband — Lowrey and 
John Hay — who went west and purchased a large stock farm, which they sub- 
sequently laid out in lots and which became the town of Shawneetown, Illinois, 
at which place Lowrey Hay was killed. Joseph and Mary (Lowrey) (Hay) 
West were the parents of four children, namely : Alexander Lowrey, moved 
to Illinois, married, and was the father of several children. Edward, also re- 
moved to Illinois. • Joseph, see forward. Matthew Hay, see for-ward. Joseph 
West married, second, Katherine Whittaker, who bore him children : Aaron, 
Samuel, James, Charles, William, Frank, Katherine, married David Sheppler ; 
Nancy, married Cooper Dryden. 

Joseph West, third son of Joseph and Mary (Lowrey) (Hay) West, was 
born in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He married Sarah 
Whittaker, born in the same township, and by this union were born the follow- 
ing children : Martha, Mary A., Aaron, Lowrey H., see forward ; Joseph, 
Sarah, Margaret, Matthew, Alexander, Edward. Lowrey H. and three broth- 
ers inherited the old homestead, which they farmed until 1870, at which time 
the place was purchased by the Homestead Improvement Company. 

Matthew Hay West, fourth son of Joseph and Mary (Lowrey) (Hay) 
West, was born in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 
23, 1799. He was educated in public schools, reared on a farm, and his first 
work was farming, after which he conducted flour mills for several years for 
Daniel Risher at Six Mile Ferry. In 1840 he associated himself with Foster 
Willock in Pittsburg, the partnership continuing for about three years. He 
then moved to Baldwin township, becoming owner of a farm, the patent of 
which was taken out by John Baptist Christopher Lucas, of St. Louis, where 
the Lucas family became very prominent. He was a man of more than ordi- 
narv abilities, and his counsel was sought by the neighbors in the settling of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 35 



estates and other important matters. He served in the capacity of school direct- 
or, and treasurer and director of the Old Plank Road. He was a Presbyterian 
in religion and a staunch supporter of Republican principles. 

Matthew Hay West married, first, about 1821, Elizabeth Hofifer, who bore 
him children: i. Jacob H., a graduate of Jetiferson College, Canonsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was a classmate of ex-Judge Kirkpatrick. He died unmar- 
ried at the age of twenty-seven years ; he was buried in Lebanon Cemetery, 
Pennsylvania, where five generations of the family are buried. 2. Mary, mar- 
ried Samuel McClure, of Pittsburg, four children : William, of New York 
city; Matthew Hay West, died in 1907, late of Sioux City, Iowa; Robert D., 
died in 1906, late of Mt. Morris, Illinois ; Samuel, of Homestead, Pennsylvania. 
Matthew Hay West married, second, IMary Glass, born in 1813, and died in 
1871, a daughter of Johnston and Agnes (Thornberry) Glass, the former of 
whom was a son of Johnston Glass, Sr., who died in 1803 and was buried in 
Lebanon Cemetery, and the latter at native of county Tyrone, Ireland. John- 
ston and Agnes (Thornberry) Glass were the parents of eight children : Samuel, 
Robert, John, Johnston, Eliza, Mary, wife of Matthew Hay West ; Margaret 
and Nancy. All these children are now (1907) deceased with the exception 
of Nancy, who resides in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in her ninetieth year, the 
only living representative of the Glass family, who were among the early pio- 
neers of Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Thirteen chil- 
dren were born to Matthew Hay and Mary (Glass) West, as follows: i. 
Eliza — Mr^s. Eliza Irwin — of Emsworth, Pennsylvania. 2. Agnes — Mrs. Agnes 
Neel — late of Mifflin township, died in 1903. 3. Samuel G., married I\Iary 
Speelman, who bore him several children. 4. Elizabeth — Mrs. John Noble — 
now of Oklahoma; she is the mother of several children. 5. Joseph, died aged 
five years. 6. Johnston G., deceased ; he was ex-coroner of Allegheny county, 
served as a member of Company Eleven, Sixty-second Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteers ; he married Mary Harlan Vickroy, of Johnston, and had children : 
Vickroy, Ethel, Kenneth and Agnes. 7. Matthew Hay, Jr., of whom later. 8. 
Sarah, died March 30, 1902, buried in Homestead Cemetery. 9. Anna Mar- 
garet, died in 1870, aged twenty years, buried in Lebanon Cemetery. 

10. Edward E., born November 18, 1852, of Mifflin township, Pennsylvania. 

11. Elva L.. married Charles Dudgeon. 12. IMary Lowrey, died aged three 
years, buried in Lebanon Cemetery. 13. Robert G., born in 1856, died in 1902, 
aged thirty-six years, buried in Homestead Cemetery. Matthew Hay West, 
father of these children, died in 1872, and his remain were interred in Lebanon 
Cemetery. 

Lowrey H. West, son of Joseph and Sarah (Whittaker) West, was born 
on the old family homestead, which tract of land is now included within the 
limits of the borough of Homestead, February 19, 1826. For many years he 
has been interested in real estate business at Homestead, Pennsylvania, in 
which he has been successful. He has also had property interests in portions 
of the western states. For many years he has been counted among the most 
substantial citizens of Homestead, exerting his influence always on the side of 
right and justice. Both he and his wife have long been members of the Pres- 
byterian church, in which he has served as an honored elder for a number of 
years. 

Lowrey H. West married, October 30, 1851, Eliza J. Snyder, born in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob and Jane (Wilson) Snyder. Jacob 



36 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Snyder, who was well educated and a great reader, was born in Switzerland, 
accompanied his parents to America in August, 1807, they purchasing a farm 
in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder 
were members of the Presbyterian church. Seven children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. West, namely: i. North, who ranks high as a business man of Pitts- 
burg, a member of the firm of H. West & Company, paper manufacturers; he 
married Martha Walker June i, 1876; one child, Marguerite Allison West. 
2. Lowrey H., Jr., married Anna Ballard, of Lake City, Minnesota, and they 
settled in San Buenaventura, California, where he engaged in the fruit grow- 
ing business. 3. Joseph Aaron, well known as an extensive brick manufacturer 
and realty dealer of Homestead, Pennsylvania ; he married Ada B. Hargrave, 
of Latrobe, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 4. Joseph S., born January 
24, 1858, married Fannie Evans, of Ohio. 5. Laura, married the Rev. William 
Evans, of Grand Junction, Iowa. 6. Ida B., died in infancy. 7. Martha E. 

Dr. Matthew Hay West, Jr., son of Matthew Hay and Mary (Glass) 
West, was born in Baldwin township, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1845. He 
there spent his early days, and his education was acquired in the public schools 
of the district. Later he took up the study of medicine at Hospital College, 
Louisville, Kentucky, and subsequently graduated from the medical depart- 
ment of the Northwestern University of Chicago in 1881. He began the active 
practice of his profession in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, remaining two 
years. He then assumed charge of the Allegheny City Home and Insane Asy- 
lum, and continued his connection therewith for a period of five years. He 
then engaged in active practice at Homestead, and at the expiration of eight 
years retired from the same, and from that time had devoted his time and at- 
tention to personal business, being interested in a variety of enterprises. For 
the past twelve years he served as vice-president of the National Bank of 
Homestead, and was one of the incorporators of the Homestead and Mifflin 
Street Railway Company, serving as president of same for about three years. 
In 1907 he was one of the largest owners in the Homestead Park Land Com- 
pany, and a director in the same, and about the year 1903 purchased the Law 
farm, and was also the owner of other extensive tracts of land in Homestead. 
He was prominent in the affairs of the community in which he resided, and 
was frequently called upon in the settling of estates. 

Dr. West was a member of the Presbyterian church, a member of the 
session, and served in the capacity of trustee for several years. He adhered to 
the principles of Republicanism. He served as school director, and frequently 
had been chosen as delegate to political conventions. He was a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, many years ago having attained the thirty-second de- 
gree. He was a member for many years of Ionic Lodge, Allegheny City, was 
a charter member of Homestead Blue Lodge, in which he had passed all the 
chairs, and was also amember of the chapter, commandery and consistory, all 
of Homestead. Mr. West died at Homestead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
November 6, 1907, and was buried at South Side Cemetery, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Colonel Alexander Lowrey, above mentioned, was born in the north of 
Ireland in December, 1725, a son of Lazarus Lowrey. His parents, with sev- 
eral other children, came to America in 1729, and settled in Donegal township, 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. His father became an Indian trader, which 
occupation Alexander Lowrey engaged in about the year 1748, in partnership 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 37 



with Joseph Simon, of the town of Lancaster, the fur trade with the Indians 
being at that period quite hicrative. This connection continued forty years, 
and was finally closed and settled without a word of difference between them, 
and with many large gains, though there were many and severe losses from 
Indian depradations on their trains and trading posts. Colonel Lowrey estab- 
lished several trading posts in western Pennsylvania, one of which was at Low- 
rey's Run, near Emsworth, Pennsylvania. He was also engaged in freighting 
goods from east of the mountains, among the commodities being salt, a very 
necessary article to the settlers in the region, which at that time was little more 
than a wilderness. 

Colonel Lowrey from the first was outspoken and ardent for separation 
from the mother country. In July, 1744, he was placed on the committee of 
correspondence for Lancaster, and was a member of the Provincial Conference 
held at Philadelphia July 15, of that convened in Carpenters' Hall June 18, 
1776, and of the convention held the following July. He was chosen a member 
of the assembly in 1775, and with the exception of two or three years serveiJ 
as a member of that body almost continuously until 1789. In May, 1777, he 
was appointed one of the committee to procure blankets for the army. In 1776 
he commanded the Third Battalion of Lancaster County Associators, and was 
in active service in the Jerseys during that year. As senior colonel he com- 
manded the Lancaster county militia at the battle of Brandywine. At the close 
of the Revolution .Colonel Lowrey retired to his fine fami adjoining Alarietta, 
Pennsylvania. Under the constitution of 1789-90 he was commissioned by 
Governor ^Mifflin a justice of the peace, and held the office until his death, Janu- 
ary 31, 1805. His remains were interred in Donegal churchyard. Colonel 
Lowrey was a remarkable man in many respects, and his life was an eventful 
one, whether considered in his long career in the Indian trade, a patriot of the 
Revolution, or the many years in which he gave his time and means to the 
service of his country. He was greatly beloved by his neighbors, and during 
his long life shared with his associate. Colonel Galbraith, the confidence and 
leadership accorded to both in public, church and local affairs. 

Colonel Lowrey married, first, September 26, 1752, Mary Waters, born 
in 1732, and died in 1767, and their children were: i. Alexander, born April 
21, 1756, settled near Frankstown, Pennsylvania. 2. Elizabeth, born October 
31, 1757, married Daniel Elliott, of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and 
moved to St. Clair township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he died 
in 1794; his wife died several years previous. They had issue: John, West, 
Mary and William Elliott. 3. ]\Iary, born May 21, 1761, married, first, John 
Hay, who was drowned in the Monongahela river at Nine Mile Run, leaving 
two sons — John and Lowrey Hay — who on arriving at age removed to the 
state of Illinois, on the Wabash river. One of these sons was present when 
Abraham Lincoln was nominated in Chicago, Illinois, and carried a fence rail 
down the aisle. She married, second, Joseph West, aforementioned. 4. Laza- 
rus, born January 27, 1764, married a Miss Halliday, daughter of Captain John 
Halliday ; with his brother Alexander he settled in what is now Blair county, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Margaret, born in September, 1765, died March 24, 1818; 
she married, in August, 1784, George Plumer, born December 5, 1762, at Ft. 
Pitt, and died June 8, 1843, near West Newton, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. He served in the legislature from 1812 to 1818, and represented the 
Westmoreland district in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth United 



38 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

States congresses. Their children were : Jonathan, who died unmarried ; Al- 
exander, who married Susan Robinson ; John Campbell, Lazarus Lowrey, 
Mary, Nancy, Sarah, William, Elizabeth and Rebecca Plumer. Colonel Low- 
rey married, second, 1774, Ann (West) Alricks, widow of Hermanus Alricks, 
and had issue: i. Fanny, born February i, 1775, married Samuel Evans, of 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, born 1758, died April 21, 1805, at Colonel Low- 
rey's homestead in Donegal township ; he was a son of Evan and Margaret 
(Nevin) Evans; he served in the legislature, and also as associate judge in 
Chester county. Their children were : Alexander, Evans Reese^ Ann, Mar- 
garet, Jane H. and Elizabeth Evans. Colonel Lowrey married, third, Mrs. 
Sarah Cochran, of York Springs, Pennsylvania, in 1793. 

EDWARD L. STRATTON, a well-known and successful railroad con- 
tractor residing in Greater Pittsburg, was born in Thompsonville, Sullivan 
county. New York, May 8, 1852. His father was born in New York state in 
1817, and learned the millwright's trade and followed that and was a contractor 
in such work. He died in 1859. He married Miss Emma L. Bowers, born in 
1826. They were the parents of the following children: Charles D., born in 
1841, now lives in New York city. James N., born in 1844, died in 1901. He 
was postmaster at Station "B" of Toledo, Ohio. Alice L., who married a Mr. 
Kirkpatrick, was born in 1849. Edward L., the subject. Mary Hammond, 
born in 1855, died in 1881. Ada H., born in 1857, married a Mr. Thorpe, and 
they live in Middletown, New York. 

Edward L. Stratton was educated at the public schools of Sullivan county, 
New York, his native county, after which he took up the work of a railroad 
constructor and contractor, which he has followed ever since. In 1882 he 
came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, with Messrs. Jones, Drake & Company, which 
later became the Drake-Stratton Company. In 1890 Mr. Stratton left that 
company and formed the contracting firm of Stratton & Foley, with which he 
remained connected for two years and then sold, the firm then being known 
as Jutty & Foley. In 1893 he organized the firm of Stratton & Company, which 
relation was continued two years, and then Mr. Stratton formed the present 
company with which he is connected. 

He is an advanced Mason, belonging to Monongahela Valley Lodge No. 
461, of which he is a past master. He also belongs to Duquesne Chapter 
No. 162 of Pittsburg, Commandery of Knights Templar No. 48, and to the 
Consistory of Pennsylvania. Temple of Mystic Shriners. He is also a member 
of the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 407 of Cold Center, Pennsylvania. He 
has held the office of school director since 1904, and in 1906 was elected presi- 
dent of the board. 

He married Miss Fanny, daughter of George W. Frantz, of Cold Center, 
Pennsylvania. Her father was a past master of Cold Center Lodge of the Ma- 
sonic order at the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Stratton are the parents 
of the following children: William, born August 11, 1886, and died December 
24, 1887; Thurman F., born October 21, 1888; Edith H., born January 9, 1891. 

DOCTOR CHARLES EDWARD, LINDEMAN was born in Kittanning, 
Pennsylvania, September 28, 1869, a son of John and Margaret Lindeman. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 39 



The father was born in Germany in 1831, and after coming to America en- 
gaged in business in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, at the borough of Kit- 
tanning, where he carried a stock of groceries and became an influential citi- 
zen of the place. He was a member of the select council and was elected as 
overseer of the poor for a number of years. His wife was a native of Ger- 
many, and they had the following children: i. George. 2. Dr. Adam. 3. 
Margaret. 4. John. 5. William. 6. Frederick. 7. Mary. 

Dr. Charles E. Lindeman was educated in the public schools of his native 
county and entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
from which he graduated in 1899. In 1900 he came to this county and settled 
as a physician and surgeon at Homewood, within Greater Pittsburg, where he 
is still practicing his profession. 

He married Miss Louise, daughter of Philip Bender, of Meadeville, Penn- 
sylvania. Dr. Lindeman is a member of the Homewood Medical Society, the 
Allegheny County Medical Association, the Pennsylvania State ^Medical Asso- 
ciation, the American ]\Iedical Association, the Pittsburg College of Physicians, 
and of Homewood Lodge, F. «i A. ]\L ; Wilkinsburg Chapter, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons ; Pittsburg Consistory ; Syria Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. ; and Meadeville 
Lodge, B. P. b. E. 



CLYDE O. ANDERSON, M.D., and JAMES McALLISTER ANDER- 
SON, ALD., both well-known physicians and surgeons of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, the former with offices at No. 7041 Frankstown avenue in that city, the 
latter having his office at No. 1112 Swissvale avenue, Wilkinsburg, are of the 
younger generation of medical practitioners who have, nevertheless, gained an 
enviable reputation in their profession. They are descendants of a family which 
has been domiciled in the state of Pennsylvania for some generations, and 
which is of Scotch-Irish origin. They have been closely identified with a 
variety of interests of the state for many years. 

(I) William Anderson, great-grandfather of the above-mentioned, was 
of Scotch-Irish descent and was born in Ireland. He emigrated to this coun- 
try during the latter part of the eighteenth century and settled in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, where he acquired landed property. He married Nancy 
Carlin, and they were the parents of children : John, see forward ; Nancy, un- 
married; Robert, George and Joseph, unmarried; Rebecca, married Peter 
Rinks. 

(II) John Anderson, eldest child of William (i) and Nancy (Carlin) 
Anderson, was born on the family homestead in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1802. He became a merchant and conducted a general store in 
Merwin, in the same county, for many years. His death occurred in 1873. 
He married Rachel Hill, daughter of Jacob Hill, the former one of the pioneer 
settlers of'W'estmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He was engaged near Del- 
mont in the manufacture of gimpowder, which he made from the charcoal of 
willow twigs, and was the first to manufacture powder in the western part of 
Pennsylvania. He also operated a distillery, and attained prominence and 
wealth. John and Rachel (Hill) Anderson had children: i. Jacob H., see 
forward. 2. Nancy, who married Thomas Humes and had children : John, 
Elizabeth, ^Meredith, Clyde and Harry. 3. Robert, married Matilda Ludwig; 
had children : Effie, Victor, Frank, Ollie, Earl and Oran. 4. Joseph, married 



40 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Rachel Remaley : had children : Elizabeth, Margaret, Nancy, Sadie and Claude. 
5. John, removed to Nebraska, where he now owns an extensive ranch. He 
married Sadie Hill and raised a numerous family. 6. George, married Mary 
Hoffman, of Delmont, and has a large family. 

(HI) Jacob H. Anderson, eldest child of John (2) and Rachel (Hill) 
Anderson, was born at Murrysville, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1838. During 
his young manhood he taught in the public schools for some time, later enter- 
ing the oil business and becoming one of the first prospectors and drillers in 
that section of the state. He was an associate of the famous "Coal Oil Johnny." 
He continued in that field of industry very successfully for a period of five 
years, during that time amassing what was considered at that time a very 
comfortable fortune. During the progress of the Civil war he enlisted in 
1863 in Company A, Westmoreland Reserves, Captain Murray commanding, 
and served faithfully until ill health compelled him to accept an honorable dis- 
charge. Upon his return from the oil regions he located in Westmoreland 
county, where, in 1866, he purchased a farm of about one hundred acres, which 
he cultivated until shortly before his death, April 5, 1900, when he removed to 
East End, Pittsburg. He married, December 6, 1866, Elizabeth McAllister, 
born in 1843 on the Island of Isia, daughter of John and Isabel (McMillan) 
McAllister. John McAllister was a native of Isla, which is one of the Heb- 
rides, and was a coppersmith by trade. He was apprenticed to this occupation 
to save him from impressment into the British navy, whose press gangs were 
at that time- — during the war of 1812 — impressing many of the inhabitants 
of the coast towns and villages. The law protected such as had been inden- 
tured, hence his apprenticeship. He came to America in 1850 and settled at 
Sardis, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm of 
one hundred and fifty acres, which is still in the possession of the family. He 
attained the age of seventy-five years, and had the following named children : 
Alexander, deceased ; Angus, married Julia Harvey ; Margaret, married David 
Bryan; Duncan, born 1838, was a soldier during the Civil war, enlisting in 
Companv A, One Hundred and First Regiment, was wounded at Eair Oaks 
and still carries the bullet in his body. He is now a banker at Parnassus, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. Elizabeth, married Jacob H. Anderson ; 
Margery, unmarried ; John, married Mollie Welty ; James, deceased, married 
Amanda Ludwig; Annie, died in childhood. Jacob H. and Elizabeth (McAllis- 
ter) Anderson had children: I. Eila, born December 2, 1867, married E. M. 
Wilson. 2. Isabel, born in 1868, died in 1869. 3. Clyde O., see forward. 4. 
James McAllister, see forward. 5. Margery, born in March, 1876, married 
Thomas E. Mallisee. 6. Daisy, born in August, 1879, married Rev. W. H. 
Hanna. 7. David Rex, born in August, 1881, married Mamie Speer. 

(IV) Clyde O. Anderson, M. D., third child of Jacob H. and Elizabeth 
(McAllister) Anderson, was born in Sardis, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 17, 1870. He obtained his early education in the public schools 
and academy, and then entered the medical department of the Western Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated with honor in 1895. He 
is now filling a responsible position on the surgical staff' of the West Penn- 
sylvania Hospital, and his work is highly esteemed by his brother practitioners 
as well as by a large class of patients. 

He married, December 29, 1897, Grace Camp, daughter of Dabiel and 
Augusta (Nichols) Camp, of Newton, Connecticut, and they have children: 





w^-^- 




PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 41 

Donald C, born September 20, 1899; Clyde McAllister, born July 24, 1902, 
died August 4, 1904, and Elizabeth Grace, born August 3, 1907. 

(IV) James ^IcAllister Anderson, M. D., second son and fourth child of- 
Jacob H. (Ill) and Elizabeth (McAllister) Anderson, was born at Sardis, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, April 5, 1873. His early years were 
spent on the home farm, and his education was acquired in the public schools 
in the Slippery Rock State Normal School, the Ohio Normal University, and 
he then entered the medical department of the Western University of Penn- 
sylvania, from which he was graduated in the class of 1902. He took up the 
private practice of his chosen profession in the fall of 1902, locating at 
Wilkinsburg, and is enjoying a lucrative and constantly increasing practice. 

He married, August 20, 1903, Edna Florence Alexander, daughter of 
John R. and Annie (Stuart) Alexander, and they have one child, John Murray, 
born January 2, 1906. 



JA^IES M. SWANK, a distinguished representative of Westmoreland 
county, is widely known not only in Pennsylvania, but throughout the country 
for the many and valued services he has rendered in the industrial, agricul- 
tural and newspaper worlds. Particularly in the first named of these three 
has he become a recognized authority. His statistics and statements of facts 
are accepted the world over as being entirely reliable. He is acknowledged 
as a trustworthy statistician, a wise counsellor, an economist, a historian and 
a statesman. He has been a valuable contributor to the literarv field, and while 
he has dealt mostly with the facts of one line of production, he has not entirely 
neglected others. 

He is a descendant of old and honored families of Pennsylvania, four 
generations of his ancestors on both sides of the family having been identified 
with the state. His father, George W. Swank, was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1810, the youngest son of John Swank, a pioneer 
settler in Ligonier valley, who had migrated thence from Franklin countv, in 
the same state. The first of this family of whom anything definite is known 
was an early settler in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. The family is of 
German origin, and were Lutherans in religion. Mr. Swank's maternal great- 
grandfather, John Moore, was a member of the Pennsylvania constitutional 
convention of 1776, later was the first president judge of Westmoreland 
county, and still later was a member of the state senate. He had two sons, 
both of whom were surveyors, one being the father of Mrs. George W. 
Swank, the mother of James M. Swank. 

James M. Swank was born in Loyalhanna township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, July 12, 1832. He removed with his parents to Johns- 
town in 1838, and there received a good common school and academic educa- 
tion. His first business occupation was as clerk in the store of his father, 
and while thus employed, in 1852, he was invited to take charge of the local 
Whig newspaper. This invitation he accepted, and with the exception of brief 
intervals, was its editor and publisher until 1870. One year after the com- 
mencement of his labors in this field the name of the paper was changed to 
the Cambria Tribune, and later to the Johnstown Tribune, under which name 
it is still published. Mr. Swank severed his connection with this paper in 
1870, when he went to Washington City and became a clerk of the committee 



42 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

on manufacturers of the house of representatives. Later he was chief clerk 
of the department of agricuUure. He resigned the latter position in Decem- 
ber, 1872, in order to take charge of the work of the American Iron and Steel 
Association in Philadelphia. As secretary and general manager of this 
Organization he has devoted thirty-three years of the best years of his life to 
its interests, and is still actively identified with it. He was especially qualified 
for the work he has thus undertaken. Having spent the greater part of his life 
up to this period in the western part of Pennsylvania, he was practically 
acquainted with the growth and development of the iron industry in that 
important field. He had inherited a liking for public afifairs, and was person- 
ally familiar with the eftects of legislation upon the industries of the country, 
particularly the iron industry ; the steel industry was in its very earliest infancy. 
The years he had spent in Washington had given him a practical insight into 
the methods of congressional legislation, and he had made many valuable 
friends among the public men of the day. 

The American Iron and Steel Association was organized in 1864, and 
was intended to be a bureau of general information for the American iron 
trade, and to be a central agency for the interests most concerned. Mr. 
Swank entered into the work of the association with zeal and enthusiasm. 
He early decided that the statistical reports should appear annually and in' 
uniform style, and that a directory ought to be compiled and published at 
regular intervals. These improvements were at once introduced ; the annual 
report appears in the spring of the year, and the directory regularly every two 
years. The Weekly Bulletin of the association was enlarged, and its influence 
was materially increased. Mr. Swank has been the editor of all the publica- 
tions mentioned. Under his management the information promulgated by the 
association became an authority. The friends of protection in congress relied 
upon it whenever an economic legislation was under consideration. He also 
published in the annual report for 1876 an accurate history of the industrial 
policies of Great Britain and the United States, and in 1877 he issued Hold the 
Fort, a series of tariff tracts which have been gratuitously and systematically 
distributed by the association. For the last twenty-five years Mr. Swank has 
been active in opposing every bill that has been presented in congress which 
has had for its object the substitution for protective duties of a tarilT for 
revenue only. Special arguments against these measures were prepared and 
manufacturers were aroused to the dangers which confronted them. 

The administration of Mr. Swank has been of so excellent a character 
that the statistics issued by the American Iron and Steel Association have 
become recognized authorities in all countries. He has brought even higher 
honor to the association in the reputation he has established of its absolute 
leadership, in teaching the value of accurate and rapidly collected statistics. 
The correspondence of the association is enormous, and in general may be 
said to be controlled by Mr. Swank. The immense amount of work that all 
this entailed has never seemed to overburden him, for it was with him a labor 
which engaged his heart as well as his intellect. 

Mr. Swank published in book form in 1878 an Introduction to a History 
of Iron Making and Coal Mining in Pennsylvania. He was selected by Gen- 
eral Francis A. Walker, director of the United States Census Bureau, to 
collect the statistics of iron and steel for the census year 1880, and he accom- 
plished his final report on these in 1881, with a historical sketch of the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 43 

manufacture of iron and steel in all countries, and particularly in each state 
and territory which had been engaged in their production, the colonial and 
other pioneer iron masters receiving special attention. The historical part 
was afterward published in book form. A second edition, enlarged, appeared 
in 1891. both editions being entitled Iron in All Ages. He has made many 
other contributions of a historical character. At the close of twenty-five years 
of continuous service as the executive head of the association, he published a 
souvenir volume of two hundred and twenty-eight pages, containing selections 
from his tariff and historical writings, and which was entitled Notes and Com- 
ments on Industrial, Economic, Political and Historical Subjects. Mr. Swank 
still gives his personal attention to all the details of the office of the American 
Iron and Steel Association. 

While chief clerk of the department of agriculture he prepared a history 
of that department. He has now (1906) in preparation a "History of West- 
ern Pennsylvania, With Special Reference to Its Industrial Development." 
Mr. Swank has ever been a broad-minded protectionist, favoring reduction of 
tariff as well as increase as the exigencies of the times demanded. His 
scientific mastery of the subject has enabled him to judge wisely, and his 
judgment has never been based upon a narrow range of facts. It is to be 
hoped that he may long be spared to continue his useful work, and that his 
legacy of learning and philosophy may never be lost from our laws and public 
policy. 

DILWORTH FAMILY. Of English origin, the Dilworth family, rep- 
resented in Pittsburg, has descended from the emigrant, James Dilworth, of 
whom the "Book of Arrivals" as now on file among the records of Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, says : "James Dilworth, of Thornley, in Lancashire, 
husbandman, came in the ship "Lamb," of Liverpoole, the master, John 
Tench, arrived in this river in the 8th month, 1632, had a son named William." 

(I) James Dilworth, the English emigrant, came to America in 1682, 
and in 1692 settled in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased one 
thousand acres of land. He died there in 1699. He married Ann Wain, 
sister of Stephen Wain, a prominent Quaker, and their children were : William, 
born in England ; Richard, Jane, Hannah, Jannette, Rebecca and James. 

(II) William Dilworth, eldest child of James and Ann (Wain) Dilworth, 
had a son named Anthony Dilworth. 

(HI) Anthony Dilworth, son of William Dilworth, married, and among 
his children were sons named Samuel and Benjamin. 

(IV) Samuel Dilworth, son of Anthony Dilworth, was a farmer in Ross 
township, now Bellevue, Pennsylvania. He married in 1790, Elizabeth White, 
who died in 1841 ; their seven children were : William, Sarah, Amanda, Mar- 
garet, Jane, Albert and Benjamin, who married Ma tilda Holmes June 18, 1836. 

(V) William Dilworth, Sr., son of Samuel and Elizabeth (White) Dil- 
worth, was born in Dilworthtown, Chester county, Pennsylvania, May 20, 
1791, and in 1795, when aged four years, came with his father and mother 
and two sisters over the mountains, their conveyance being a team of oxen ; 
they also had with them a bull calf and a salt-pan. The father, Samuel Dil- 
worth, was offered all of East Liberty Valley for the bull-calf and salt-pan, 
but as the soil was moist he did not like it, and settled Dilworthville, Alle- 
gheny county, west of Pittsburg — now Bellevue, Pennsylvania. In 1795 



44 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Samuel Dilworth built a log house which is partly standing at this date ( 1907) 
and is located on Miller street, Bellevue. At that time Pittsburg was but a 
small hamlet with two stores. 

In 1812 William Dilworth, Sr., was interested for the defense of the 
country against the British and Indians, and marched to Sandusky under the 
command of General Harrison, with the "Pittsburg Blues." For three score 
years he was a prominent factor in the business and religious circles of Pitts- 
burg. He mingled with two generations of men active in the pioneer operations 
of his times. He was a devout Christian and noted for his charity. He 
became a master builder, and was awarded the contract to construct numerous 
bridges in Allegheny county, including the one over the Monongahela river, 
the firm being Colhart & Dilworth. In 1834 they built the court house in 
Pittsburg. He was president of the board of managers of the House of Refuge 
up to the January before his death. In 1834 he was a member of the state 
legislature, and was ever an active citizen. He had seldom if ever seen an ill 
day until his death, supposedly, from heart failure. He and his good wife had 
celebrated their golden wedding anniversary a few years prior to his death. 
He made many friends, and was accustomed to come to the city from his 
homestead during the latter years of his life, almost daily, and was ever 
greeted by old and young, both of whom in him found a close friend. He 
would call on his sons and other prominent business men, and was never 
happier than when recounting some of his early-day experiences in and near 
Pittsburg. He never sought public office, neither did he shrink from holding 
such positions as were needful, but which there was no salary attached to. 
He married Elizabeth Scott, born May 6, 1797, at Pennysville, Pennsylvania, 
and he died in February, 1871. She was the daughter of Hon. Samuel and 
Sarah (Thompson) Scott. Her father was a farmer of Ross township, 
Allegheny county, coming from Delaware after the Revolutionary war, 
settling at the head of Girtie's Run, Allegheny county. After two years he 
returned to Delaware for his family. He was an only son of Samuel Scott, 
who went to the wild land of the south from the head of Elk river, Delaware, 
on an exploring expedition, and was never heard from afterwards. Samuel 
Scott's grandfather, also named Samuel, was born in Manchester, England, 
and was a miller by trade. He married Margaret Walker, of county Tyrone, 
Ireland, who came to this country with her father, Amasa Walker, and settled 
in Connecticut, near Woodstock. After the marriage of William Dilworth, 
Sr., he went to housekeeping at Mount Washington, where they ever after- 
ward resided. He found need of more school room privileges on Mount 
Washington and built a school building on his own land, which provided for 
his own and many other children, he bearing the total expense for teacher 
and all connected with carrying on the school. His wife died there May 25, 
1883. She was a devout Christian and a kind-hearted woman. She was one 
of the original members of the First Presbyterian church. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Dilworth, Sr., were all born on Boggs avenue. Mount 
Washington (Coal Hill), Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and were as 
follows : 

1. William, Jr., born February 23, 1818, died December 25, 1877; married 
(first) Mary Mason, and (second) Maria Salisbury. 

2. Daniel Scott, born September 12, 1819, died January 8, 1877; married, 
December 15, 1841, at Cincinnati, Ohio, Mary Olivia Parry. / 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 45 

3. Dr. Samuel Dilworth, born July 23, 1821, at the old homestead, Mount 
Washington. He was educated in Washington and Jefferson College, and at 
the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. After graduating he began 
practicing in Pittsburg, having his office for many years on the corner of 
Cherry and Second avenues. He was for a time engaged in the river supply 
business, his place of business being the corner of Cherry and Water streets. 
He owned a summer home at what is now (1907) Fifth and Shady avenues. 
He married Jane Fulton, a daughter of Andrew Fulton, the glass founder, 
and of this union there was one child, Fulton, who died when about twenty 
years of age. Dr. Dilworth died August 12, 1862, at the Andrew Fulton 
residence on Front street, now known as the Fulton Law Building. 

4. Sarah S., born February 5, 1823, died August 25, 1893; married John 
C. Bidwell. 

5. Eliza, born January 5, 1825, died February 23, 1880; married Moses 
DeWitt Loomis, Sr. 

6. Joseph, born December 25, 1826, died February 26, 1885 ; married 
Louisa Mendenhall Richardson January 15, 1850. 

7. Mary Jane, born January 23, 1829, still living; married Dr. Benjamin 
Frank Richardson, now deceased. 

8. James R., born February 26, 1831, died November 27, 1850. 

9. Adaline, born January 19, 1834, died May 19, 1841. 

10. Agnes, born March 18, 1836, died May 19, 1841. 

11. George W. Dilworth, of the firm of Dilworth Brothers, who for two 
score years was one of Pittsburg's most prominent citizens and enterprising 
business factors, was born on what was then known as Coal Hill, now Mount 
Washington, June 29, 1838. He obtained his education in Pittsburg, but this 
did not cease with his school days, for being a great reader his knowledge 
kept increasing all through life, and he was especially much interested in his- 
tory. His first business venture was when he became a partner of his brother, 
John Dilworth, the firm being known as John S. Dilworth & Companv. After 
some years he left his brother, and the firm of Dilworth, Harper & Company 
was established. In 1871 Mr. Harper died and Joseph Dilworth was admitted 
to the firm, when the name was changed to Dilworth Brothers, who were 
known far and near as the leading wholesale grocery firm of Pittsburg. Few 
men had a wider circle of acquaintances and enjoyed the respect and esteem 
of the community to so great an extent as did he. He died suddenly December 
4, 1900. 

Not alone in business was he prominent. He was never too busy to turn 
aside to attend to some call of justice and kindness. He had varied business 
interests, being a director of the Citirens' National Bank ; a trustee of the 
Dollar Savings Bank ; as well as a director in several other mercantile cor- 
porations. In social relations he was one of the oldest members of the 
Duquesne Club, and its chairman at the time of his death. He held many 
positions of trust and honor, being a member of the board of directors of the 
\\'estern Pennsylvania Institute for the Blind, and of the Homewood cemetery. 
He was one of five of the appraisers in the condemnation proceedings for the 
L'nited States government against the Monongahela Navigation Company. 
Mr. Dilworth married, in November. 1865, Mary Barry, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Barry, who survived him, as did his three daughters — Mrs. Otis 
H. Childs, Florence and Pauline Dilworth. 



46 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



12. Francis Albert, born April 6, '1840, died February 23, 1888; married, 
September 17, 1868, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Julia D., daughter of Calvin Butler 
and Mary (Darst) Williams, both natives of Cincinnati. At the breaking out 
of the Civil war he became much interested in the Union cause, and in August, 
1862, at his home on Mount Washington, recruited a company which he took 
to Harrisburg. It became a part of the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteers (Colonel Bayne), as Company H. Mr. 
Dilworth was commissioned first lieutenant on August 23, 1862; he was 
promoted to captain. At the battle of Fredericksburg he was severely wounded, 
at the time believed seriously so, but was taken to Washington City and 
thence removed to his own home by his brother George, and finally recovered, 
receiving an honorable discharge May 29, 1863. After the war he engaged 
in the oil business, and was the first to consider the piping of gas to Pittsburg, 
but his ideas were too far in advance of the times, hence history gives the 
credit to another. He was engaged in producing and refining oil many years. 
Later he became a broker in the same community, with offices at Pittsburg 
and Philadelphia, and was thus engaged at the date of his death. Politically 
he was a supporter of the Republican party. He belonged to the Masonic 
fraternity, and was a member of the Shadyside Presbyterian church. To his 
life his family can point with pride as the embodiment of all that was noble, 
generous and good. He married Julia D. Williams, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
they were the parents of the following children: i. Leila A., married Wil- 
liam Larimer Jones ; children : i. William L., Jr. 2. Susie Harley. 3. Francis 
Albert, Jr. 4. William Butler. 5. Mary Elizabeth, married Richard S. 
Suydam ; children : Elizabeth D. and Louise D. 

(VL) William Dilworth, Jr., son of William Dilworth, Sr., was born 
at Coal Hill (Mount Washington), Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 
23, 1818, and died December 25, 1877. He was extensivelv engaged in the 
lumbering and oil business. He married (first) Mary Mason, by whom were 
born the following children: Adeline, born 1842, died 1885, married A. A. 
Gectmon ; Althea Rebecca, married George Thomas Robinson ; Josephine 
Alden, married Henry Clay Kessler; Clara, married Thomas Bakewell Kerr; 
Sarah Scott, born 1857, married Frederick Dorsey Hager. 

(VI) John Scott Dilworth, second son of Colonel William Dilworth, Sr., 
was educated in the private schools of Mount Washington (now in the limits 
of Pittsburg), and upon arriving at man's estate clerked for the firm of Dil- 
worth & Colter, who were engaged in the contracting business, and during 
that time built the Monongahela river bridge and the court house of Allegheny 
county, which was erected in 1834. He later built a powder magazine on the 
property of his father, at Mount Washington, where he stored powder, he 
being agent for the Hazard Powder Company. Having been a large stock- 
holder in the various steamboats plying the rivers, he became clerk on one 
running between Pittsburg and Cincinnati. In the early portion of the 
nineteenth century he established the wholesale grocery house of Williams & 
Dilworth, which was located on Wood street. This firm later became Schriver 
& Dilworth, and still later John S. Dilworth & Company, he taking into 
partnership his sons, Neville B. and William P., and later his son DeWitt. 
In 1871 the business was sold and is now carried on by Dilworth Brothers 
Company. This enterprise was a success from the outset, and the Dilworth 
descendants are now reaping the reward of the efforts of their ancestor. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 47 



While engaged in the business just mentioned, he also embarked in the oil 
business, becoming owner of oil and coal lands in Ohio. He owned the Mount 
Nebo coal mine and Lowellville iron furnace at Lowellville, Ohio, and had 
many oil wells in that state, which proved very valuable property. The most 
of the winter months he spent in the south, generally in Louisiana, where he 
would purchase sugar crops of plantation owners and ship the product to 
Pittsburg and New York, both before and after the Civil war. In 1868 he 
bought the famous Magnolia Grove plantation in Louisiana, and conducted 
it very successfully until 1871, when he sold it. He traveled extensively both 
in America and abroad, generally for the benefit of his health and for the 
pleasure gained thereby. He was a good conversationalist, and withal an ex- 
cellent story teller. He was a director in the Pittsburg Bank of Savings and 
the Citizens' National and other banks. As the result of his many business 
enterprises he accumulated a goodly fortune. 

He married, at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 15, 1841, Mary O. Parry, 
bom October 16, 1820, died September 19, 1903. She was born at Rich Hills 
plantation. Deer Creek, Ross township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, the 
daughter of Henry Parry, who married, July 20, 1797, Sarah Cadwalader, 
daughter of General John Cadwalader, a native of Maryland, and who was 
born March 3, 1778, and died April 26, 1842, in Pittsburg. Henry Parry 
was a native of South Wales, born 1761, and died October 7, 1847, in 
Pittsburg. The children of Mr. and Mrs. John Scott Dilworth were as follows : 

1. Agnes Eliza, born September 17, 1842, died June 28, 1845. 

2. William Parry Dilworth, born March 10, 1844, in the city of Alle- 
gheny, Pennsylvania, first son of John and Mary Parry Dilworth. His early 
schooling was obtained in Allegheny and Pittsburg private and public schools 
and the Agricultural State College at Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. At the age of 
eighteen years he left school and enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and 
Thirty-sixth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, on August 9, 1862, for the 
term of nine months, with the rank of private, and was mustered out of the 
L^nited States service at Belle Plain Landing, Virginia, on March 10, 1863, 
with the rank of corporal. He was enrolled a member of Duquesne Post, No. 
259, Department of Pennsylvania, Grand Army of the Republic, on January 8, 
1889. He died at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, January 19, 1906,' aged sixty-two 
years, unmarried. 

After being mustered out of the service of his country he engaged in 
buying, selling and shipping oil at Oil City, Pennsylvania. After a few years 
he sold out his business to Captain J. J. Vandergrift, and entered his father's 
wholesale grocery firm (John S. Dilworth & Company), and through a num- 
ber of years, by ability and attention, maintained its old-time prestige with 
extended influence. In later years he was interested in mining and shipping 
Youghiogheny coal near Scott Haven, Pennsylvania, to the east and west, the 
corporation bearing his name being largely owned by him. As a friend he 
was genial and kind and true to old acquaintances, a good story teller, with a 
retentive memory of old times. He manifested most kindly traits of character 
in his care and devotion to his widowed mother, and in the advice and guidance 
of a large family of six brothers, to whom he w^as guide and mentor through 
many years. He was a staunch Presbyterian, a member of all the Masonic 
bodies, a life member of the American Republican Club, and a charter 
member of the Duquesne Club. 



48 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



3. Mary Laura, bom March 2, 1846, died March 14, 1850. 

4. Neville Bausman, born November 19, 1848, married, December 28, 
1899, Jessie Black, daughter of Dr. Alexander Black. 

5. James Reese, born September 26, 1850, died April 4, 1853. 

6. DeWitt, born October 27, 1853, married March 6, 1877, Florence Coe, 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and their issue is Edward C. DeWitt Dilworth. 
He received his education in the Pittsburg schools and at the academy in 
Philadelphia, after which he assisted his father in the grocery business for 
some years and then engaged in the oil business up to 1896, since which time 
he has been engaged in contracting and constructing street railways. Politically 
he is a Republican. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity. 

7. Linford Lardner Dilworth, born in Oakland, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
October 14, 1855, was the fifth son of John S. and Mary (Parry) Dilworth. 
He was educated in private and public schools of Pittsburg and Pennsylvania. 
Early in life he was employed in his father's wholesale grocery store, Second 
avenue, Pittsburg, John S. Dilworth & Company, commission and oil interests. 
During the big strike at Homestead Steel Works he was employed there, 
holding a trusted position until he was compelled by sickness, being poisoned, 
to relinquish his position with the Carnegie Steel Company. He was chief 
clerk in the department of public works of the city of Pittsburg for a number 
of years, also superintendent of the board of the city of Pittsburg. He was 
active in politics, and for a number of years was the president of the Nine- 
teenth Ward Republican Association. He was kind and good to all, honest 
and courteous in all his dealings. He died December 3, 1906, at 6216 Stanton 
avenue, Nineteenth ward, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He was unmarried. 

8. Harry Parry Dilworth, born September 11, 1857; married June 20, 
1899, Annie Stephenson. 

9. John Cadwalader Dilworth, seventh son of John S. and Mary (Parry) 
Dilworth, was born in Oakland, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, July 6, i860. He 
was educated in private and public schools in Pittsburg and Philadelphia, and 
was employed in his father's wholesale grocery store, oil brokerage and manu- 
facturing of oil tanks, and later in the salt business. He married (first) Julia 
W. Creighton, at Philadelphia, October 12, 1886. Their son, Creighton Dil- 
worth, was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1887. John C. 
Dilworth married (second) Elizabeth Shryock Gill, at Meadville, Pennsylvania, 
January 4, 1899 ; one son, John Gill Dilworth, born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
December 17, 1900. Mr. Dilworth is a member of Calvary Protestant Episcopal 
church, a life member of the American Republican Club, a member of all the 
Masonic bodies, and a member of Duquesne Club, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

10. George Morgan, born August 18, 1863, married April 3, 1905, 
Carrie S. Hays. 

(VH) Neville Bausman Dilworth, son of John Scott Dilworth, was 
educated in Pittsburg, and when grown to manhood went south with his father 
and had charge of the Magnolia sugar plantation, and remained there until 
1 87 1, then returned to Pittsburg and became a partner with his father in the 
wholesale grocery business, as John S. Dilworth & Company, remaining until 
1875, when he went to New York city, and was there connected with the large 
merchandising firm of Allen & Evans. Later he went to Montana and there 
engaged in contracting, having several government contracts. From there he 
went to North Carolina, where he was interested in several enterprises, and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE ' 49 

was president of the Piedmont-Morganton (North Carolina) Bank. He 
returned to Pittsburg in 1900 and became a partner of Sanfuel W. Black in 
the real estate business. The firm is known as the S. W. Black Company, 
incorporated, of which he is now vice president. He is a member of the Union 
Club and the American Club. Fraternally he is a Mason. 

(VI) Mary Jane Dilworth, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Scott) 
Dilworth, was born January 23, 1829. and is still living. She married, Novem- 
ber 20, 1849, Benjamin Franklin Richardson, M. D., born at New Lisbon, 
New Jersey, December 19, 1817, and died December 9, 1890. He received his 
medical education at Philadelphia Medical College, and soon after graduating 
went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he practiced for forty years, with the single 
intermission of a few years in Pittsburg, after which he returned to Cincinnati 
and there died. He was a professor of medicine in Miami Medical College, 
and was held in the highest esteem. He had two children : Fannie, born 
December 11, 1850, married December i, 1881, Henry B. Lupton, born Decem- 
ber 23, 1849, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and they have three children — (i) Jeannette 
Lupton, born August 31, 1882, in Pittsburg, on the old homestead; married 
John King Scott, June 2, 1906. (2) Dilworth Richardson Lupton, born 
September 15, 1883, at Cincinnati, Ohio. (3) Albert Dilworth Lupton, born 
October 18, 1884, died April 16, 1885. The second child born to Dr. Richard- 
son and wife was William Dilworth Richardson, born November 6, 1857, died 
in Paris, France, June 30, 1902; he married June 20, 1887, Lottie E. Mitchell, 
and thev had one child, Dorothy Dilworth Richardson, born March 23, 1888. 

(VI) Eliza Dilworth, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Scott) Dil- 
worth, was born January 5, 1825, died February 23, 1880. She married Moses 
DeWitt Loomis, by whom she had children: i. Hazard Loomis, died aged six 
months. 2. Stanley Loomis, married Charlotte Brundred, of Oil City, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of William James and Rachel (Magee) Brundred, of New 
Jersey ; they had four children : William Brundred Loomis, married Josephine 
Gotell, of Oil City, and to them was born William B., Jr. ; Charlotte Loomis, 
married Frank E. Spencer, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and has two children, 
— Stanley and Frank E., Jr. ; Lucille Loomis, married Dr. Rafifaele Bastianelli,' 
of Rome, Italy, no issue ; DeWitt Loomis married Mildred Goettcl, 
and has one child — DeWitt Loomis, Jr. 3. DeWitt Loomis, now de- 
ceased, married Annie Wallace, of Augusta, Georgia, and they have two 
children — Ann and Elizabeth. 4. Hazard (the second), died aged three year.s. 
5. Harry, died aged thirty-three years ; married Henrietta Virginia Vander- 
grift, daughter of Captain J. J. Vandergrift, and they have one child — Vir- 
ginia, who married Captain Thomas Summerland, now retired from the 
United States army, and they are parents of two children. 6. Elizabeth 
Dilworth Loomis, married Benjamin F. Brundred, of Oil City, Pennsylvania, 
and their seven children are as follows : Elizabeth, married Harold D. Brown, 
issue, Elizabeth Dilworth Brown ; Rachel, William James, Ruth, Loomis, Ben- 
jamin Ford, Latham Loomis. 7. Latham, son of Moses DeWitt and Eliza 
(Dilworth) Loomis, died aged seventeen years. 

(VI) Joseph Dilworth, son of William Dilworth (5), was born Decem- 
ber 25, 1826, died February 26, 1885, and married Louise Mendenhall 
Richardson, January 15, 1850. As a young man he clerked for Schriver & 
Dilworth, wholesale grocers, and later, about 1856, engaged in the powder 
business with D. W. C. Bidwell, under the firm name of Dilworth & Bidwell, 



so A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

representing the powder mills of the Dupont and Hazard companies. Still 
later in life he engaged in the iron trade, forming in 1858 the firm of the 
Dilworth-Porter Companj', manufacturers of railway supplies, and in 1880 
it was changed to Dilworth, Porter & Company (limited), which is the present 
title. In 1869 he became a partner in the firm of Dilworth, Harper & Com- 
pany, consisting of his brother, George W. Dilworth, Albert Harper and 
Joseph Dilworth, doing a grocery business as wholesalers. On the death of 
Mr. Harper, in 1871, the firm became Dilworth Brothers, which continued 
until 1902, when it was incorporated under the firm name of Dilworth Brothers 
Company, as it is now known. He achieved great business success in his life. 
He was one of the organizers and stockholders in the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road, of which he held a directorship. He was connected with this great 
trans-continental line until Henry Villard became its president. For many 
years he was a director in the Citizens' National Bank of Pittsburg; was a 
trustee of the Young Men's Christian Association ; one of the founders of the 
Pennsylvania College for Women, and was an original member of the First 
Presbyterian church. Upon his removal from Mount Washington to the 
East End he became one of the founders of Shady Side Presbyterian church , 
was very active in church work and one of the trustees in Shady Side church 
up to his death. He was president of the National Iron and Steel Publishing 
Company, publishers of American Manufacture. He became county commis- 
sioner of Allegheny county at the troublesome time of the liquor license 
question, and did noble work for the people. 

The children of Joseph Dilworth and wife Louise were as follows: i. 
Elizabeth, widow of Carter Curtis Beggs, of Pittsburg, whose issue was — 
Louise, wife of Henry Sproul, and they have one child, Henry ; Virginia 
Crossan, wife of T. Morris Carnegie, of Pittsburg, with issue — T. Morris, 
Jr., and Carter Beggs. 2. Lawrence, married Virginia Snyder Crossan, 
daughter of John McDonald Crossan ; they have four children : Mary Louise, 
wife of R. K. Forsyth, of Pittsburg, with issue of two children — Lawrence 

'.Dilworth and Virginia Crossan; John Crossan, Joseph and Dorothy. 3. 

• Charles Richardson, married Elizabeth Tiffany, of Springfield, Massachusetts ; 

. jj.o issue. 4. Louise Richardson, married Harry Clyde Beggs, and their issue 
is Joseph Dilworth, who married Elizabeth Kerbaugh, of Philadelphia, no 
issue ; Lawrence Dilworth, unmarried ; Harry Clyde, who died aged sixteen 
years, in 1906. 5. Joseph Richardson, who married Annie Wood, of Pitts- 
burg, and their issue is : Dewees Wood and Joseph Richardson. 



THE McCORMICK FAMILY has been a factor in the development of 
Pennsylvania ever since 1788. In that year two brothers, Joseph and 
John, left their home in county Tyrone, in the Province of Ulster, Ireland, 

,,and settled on the hill above Larimer Station. Joseph was unmarried and died 
without issue at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. Several years before 
leaving home John was married to Sarah Sloan, whose brother, William Sloan, 
was a physician of some prominence in Ireland. The family still resides in 

■ Cookstown, Ireland, the present representatives being three daughters. Four 
children were born to John and Sarah McCormick before leaving Ireland : 
William, Andrew, Jane and Joseph. After reaching Westmoreland county six 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 51 



other children were born: John, David, Sarah, Samuel, Thomas and 
Elizabeth. 

This sketch deals almost altogether with John McCormick and his 
descendants. He was the first child born after the establishment of the new 
home in Westmoreland county, and it was natural that he should remain 
throughout his life near the place of his birth. It is possible here to make only 
the briefest mention of the others, most of whom moved from Westmoreland 
county and located elsewhere. 

William, the tirst born, was married to Elizabeth Wilkinson and moved 
to Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he died. There 
were born to him seven children, whose descendants are still living in Allegheny 
county. 

Andrew was born April i, 1784, and died April 17, 1845. He married 
Anne Campbell in 1809, and moved to Warsaw, Jefferson county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1835. The Scotch-Irish settlement six miles from Warsaw was known 
as Beechwood. To them were born eight children. Two of these have been 
well known, Samuel B., who was prominent in the educational affairs of the 
county, and who lived for many years in Johnstown, but who later removed to 
Oakland, California, where, until his death. May i, 1903, he was one of the 
prominent men of that great state. The other, James C. McCormick, long a 
prominent business man in Pittsburg, is now living in retirement at Sewickley, 
having passed his ninetieth birthday. His ninetieth anniversary was celebrated 
by the gathering in his delightful home of a large number of relatives on the 
evening of March 3, 1905. 

Jane died without issue. Joseph married Jane Crosby, lived for a time 
on Bush Creek, and in 1834 moved to Logan county, Ohio. He and his de- 
scendants have been identified largely with the growth and development of 
Bellfontaine, Ohio. Six children were given to them, one or two of whom 
later settled in Pittsburg. 

David McCormick married Alary Campbell, lived for a time near Larimer, 
and later moved to Jefferson county. Pennsylvania. He died at Brookville, 
leaving a family of six children, some of whom later moved to Minnesota, 
becoming pioneers of that great state. 

Sarah died unmarried. Samuel married Margaret Kamerer and lived and 
died at Cadiz, Ohio. Eight children were born to them, one of whom, John, 
moved to Omaha and became prominent in the banking business and social 
life of that city. His son later moved to Wyoming. Another, Adeline, lived 
in Henry county, Illinois, and others settled in Cadix, Steubensville, and round 
about where their descendants still reside. 

Thomas, who married Jane Brice, also moved to Jefferson county, where 
he died, and where his descendants still reside. 

The youngest child, Elizabeth, married Samuel Osborne, and settled and 
remained in the vicinity of the original home of the family near Irwin. Their 
children were Josiah, Sarah, Susannah, Jane, John M., Aaron, Albert and 
Samuel. Josiah moved to Pittsburg. Sarah married James McIIvaine, of 
Verona, Allegheny county, where the family still resides. Susannah died while 
still a child. James married Carey Coffin, of Allegheny City. She died in 
1892, leaving children : Elizabeth, William, Irene and Lillian. Lillian married 
W. R. Emery, lives in Chicago. The others live in Pittsburg, William being 
prominent in the great manufacturing firm, Riter & Conley. John M. Osborne 



52 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



lived and died near Irwin. Aaron was killed in the war. Albert married and 
went to Buckhannon, West Virginia. Samuel, the youngest, lives in Allegheny. 

This sketch deals with the fifth son of John and Sarah AlcCormick, 
whose name was also John. He was born August 22, 1789, near Larimer 
Station, and lived his entire life of eighty-four years within a mile or two of 
his birthplace. He learned the trade of a tanner with Mr. Casper Walthour, 
being apprenticed in 1804 when fifteen years of age. Later he built a tannery 
at Larimer, continued in business for several years, but finally sold it and 
also the land in connection therewith. His father and mother were both pos- 
sessed of unusual mental attainments, his mother receiving considerable medi- 
cal instruction in Ireland from her brother, Dr. Sloan, and in the new home 
winning very remarkable reputation as a midwife. John inherited the mental 
ability of his parents and was indefatigable in, his pursuits of information. 
Without opportunity to secure an education in the schools he made up for it 
largely by his personal endeavors, and was recognized as one of the best and 
most intelligent men in the community. In the latter part of his life until 
shortly before his death, he was justice of the peace at Irwin, and while some- 
times irascible, he was noted for the accuracy of his judgments and the 
integrity and righteousness of his decisions. His erect form, his extreme 
neatness of dress, his ruddy complexion, and his perfectly white hair combined 
to make him one of the handsomest and most imposing men in the community. 
A member of the family said to the writer John was a little prouder than 
Lucifer, Andrew a little meeker than Moses, while the rest of the boys ranged 
along the degrees "between the two extremes. His closing years were spent 
with Rachel a couple of miles from Irwin. Almost to the last he was accus- 
tomed to walk the entire distance for his daily Gazette, which was read with as 
much care and, inasmuch as he was as intense in his politics as in everything 
else, with as much approval as he read his Bible. It is needless to say that in 
giving to his son, born in 1840, the name of William Henry Harrison, he was 
a Whig, an ardent admirer of Horace Greeley, whose name he gave to his 
youngest born, and as a Republican he was no less pronounced in his views 
and vigorous in giving expression to them. This characteristic belonged to 
the Scotch-Irish people who settled western Pennsylvania, and is readily 
recognized as a racial trait. John McCormick married in 1817 Esther Sowash. 
who lived near Irwin. The Sowash family were descended from the French 
Huguenots. Esther's mother was a Thomas, whose father was a captain in 
the Revolutionary war. Descendants of Captain Thomas are still living in 
Greensburg. The Sowash family itself belonged to Alsace Lorraine,-and after 
the repeal of the Edict of Nantes moved to Holland, thence emigrated to this 
country more than two centuries ago, settling upon the James river. To John 
and Esther McCormick were given a large family. They were all their lives 
members of the United Presbyterian church as were their children also. 
Esther died in the year 1866 and John in the year 1873. 

Eli, the oldest except William, who died in infancy, was born at Larimer 
Station, May 14, 1820. He attended school until he was fifteen, then engaged 
in farming; again attended school two years preparing to teach, and in 1843 
began teaching, in which he continued until the year 1854. He won remark- 
able distinction as a teacher, being one of the first to depart from the old 
custom of hammering knowledge into the head of a pupil in intervals between 
frequent thrashings and introduce the more rational methods of arousing the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 53 



ambition of the student to knowledge for himself. His schools were not noted 
for the quietness that prevailed, but were noted for the quality and quantity 
of the work accomplished. There are men still living who attribute to Eli 
McCormick as their teacher all that they afterwards became. He was really 
one of tlie great teachers of his day. While still teaching he opened a drug 
store in Adamsburg, 1848, retaining it up to 1855, at which time he moved to 
Kittanning, where he remained until 1858. After this he traveled for a time 
for a drug firm, and later returning to Irwin to engage in the wholesale notion 
business. He and his notion wagons will long be remembered by the country 
storekeepers who lived in this and adjoining counties. In the closing years 
of his life, like his father before him, he filled the office of justice of the 
peace with great success and general approval. His mind was judicial, his 
patience was great, and his knowledge of law was quite extensive. He was 
well read, a most vigorous writer, a wise man, and his office was a place in 
which his friends loved to gather in order to listen to his ceaseless flow of 
story and wisdom. He died in 1890, mourned by the entire community. 

He was married December 29, 1846, to Sophia Kepple, the youngest 
daughter of Jacob Kepple, of New Salem, or Delmont, as it is now called. 
His widow still survives him, living on the spot to which they returned to 
Irwin many years ago. Their livirjg sons are John Quincy Adams, born in 
1847, who was long engaged with his father in business, and since then has 
been connected with the Pennsylvania railroad offices. He was married to 
Maggie Cooper and they live quietly in their own home in Allegheny. Jacob 
Kepple McCormick, the second son, engaged also with his father in business, 
later studied for college with his uncle, James I. McCormick, and attended 
Washington and Jefferson College until the middle of his junior year, at which 
time he also entered the Pennsylvania railroad offices, where he has continued 
from 1879 to the present time. He married Mima Harris and they live in 
Sewickley. Three children have been born to them, of whom one still lives. 
Edward Baker McCormick also prepared for college with his uncle and en- 
tered Washington and Jefferson College in 1881, graduating in 1885. He read 
law with John F. Wentling, Esq. He was quartermaster during the first part 
of the war in the Philippines, and like all the rest of the family is a Republican 
in politics. He is one of the ablest lawyers of the Greensburg bar, and inas- 
much as further mention will be made of him elsewhere, it need only be said 
that he married Henrietta B. Clawson, and that three children have blessed 
their union. Roscoe Taylor McCormick, the next son, entered the Western 
University of Pennsylvania in the engineering department, and graduated in 
the class of 1888. For some years he was connected with the firm of Riter & 
Conley, and for some years past has been manager of the Petroleum Iron 
Manufacturing Company, with offices in the Farmers' Bank building, Pitts- 
burg. He married in 1890, Anna Ridinger, daughter of Stephen Ridinger, 
and they live in Wilkinsburg. The remaining children of Eli died, James I. 
and Frank in infancy, and Mary in adult life. Mary married William Rush 
Hanna, and to them was born Elton, who still lives at Irwin. 

John Calvin McCormick was the second son of John and Esther, who 
lived to adult life. He was born February 22, 1822, and still lives on his farm 
five miles west of Irwin, hale and hearty and full of reminiscences of the 
early days. He has lived within a mile or two of his birthplace for the eighty- 
six years of his life, and looks happily into the future, deeply interested in 



54 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



the events of today. He was first married to Mary Hartford, and to them 
were born three children : Hester, married WilHam Miller, living with their 
five sons and daughters, near her father's home ; Jane Hartford, married to 
Samuel A. Thompson, now deceased, living with her four children at Swiss- 
vale, and Mary Rachel, married Edward D. Hickman, and living near 
Freedom, Butler county. Five children have been born to them. 

Calvin was married in 1862, to Priscilla Kistler, who died in 1893. To 
them were born John Calvin, who with his wife, Nellie Cummings, and their 
four children are living in Swissvale ; Anna Katherine, Nancy Hamilton and 
George, who live with their father in the old homestead, one of the loveliest 
places in all the region round about, and where the home life, in the midst of 
which Calvin McCormick is spending his closing years, is as beautiful as the 
old homestead itself; Charles, who lives in East McKeesport, was married in 
1899 to Caroline White, to whom have been given two children ; and James 
Hartford, a graduate of the Washington and Jefferson College in the year 
1896, and of the United Presbyterian Theological Seminary in 1899, and now 
pastor at Conneaut Lake, was married to Lulu Ferguson, and to them have 
been given one child. George is connected with the Union Switch and Signal 
Company, and Charles with the Westinghouse Air Brake. As Calvin McCor- 
mick sits upon the veranda of his home looking out upon the pike he is able 
to recall the old scenes of coaching days, when along the Pittsburg and Phila- 
delphia pike there passed the ceaseless stream of vehicles transporting people 
and freight between eastern and western Pennsylvania. Marvelous indeed is 
the history from 1830 until the present time, all of which he recalls, and blessed 
is he who is able to pass the last quiet years amid scenes so good to look upon 
as Calvin McCormick's homestead. 

Passing by Sarah, who died while still a young woman, the next son was 
George, born in October, 1825, and died December 16, 1903. He was married 
in 1850 to Martha George. Two children were born to them, one dying in 
infancy, and the other, Elizabeth, married William Carpenter Sarver in 1872, 
and died a few years ago, leaving seven surviving children. Martha George 
McCormick lived only three or four years, and George married (second), in 
1857, Nancy Hamilton, and to them were born Frank, dying in infancy; Henry 
Harrison, died in 1891 ; William, married Jane Overly and now lives in 
Jeannette, and Anna Wentling, in 1895, married Robert J. Sime, who also 
lives in Jeannette. Two other children died while very young. George McCor- 
mick, with the exception of the last year or two of his life, lived in or near 
Irwin. He was early in life connected with the drug business in Adamsburg 
and elsewhere, was United States ganger for some years, and the greater part 
of his life engaged in the occupation of house painter. He was a man of 
sterling worth, stood high in his community, was well thought of by his 
neighbors, and lived his life well to the fullness of old age. He was a member 
of the Pennsylvania legislature in 1889 and 1890. 

The next son, James Irwin McCormick, was born March 24, 1828, and 
died August 18, 1881. He attained high distinction as a physician and we 
make very brief mention of him here. As a youth he acquired knowledge 
with great ease so that by the time he was seventeen he began to teach in the 
schools of North Huntingdon township. Meanwhile he read Latin, Greek 
and studied mathematics with Rev. W. D. Moore, later a distinguished lawyer 
of Pittsburg, and was able to enter the sophomore class at Washington and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE ' 55 

Jefferson half advanced. He pursued the entire course at Washington College 
to the end of his junior year. He obtained permission to remain out the 
first half of the senior j-ear with the understanding that he was to be examined 
upon the work at the beginning of the second half, and was to be graduated 
with only one-half the last year in residence. This understanding was repu- 
diated with the result that he stood his examination at Franklin College and 
received his diploma at that institution. He taught in Johnstown, Greensburg 
and other places, and in 1855 was appointed by Governor James Pollock as 
superintendent of schools, finishing the term of Matthew McKinistry. His 
scholarship was so accurate, his ability so great, and his devotion to the educa- 
tional interests of the county so intense that in two years as county superin- 
tendent he added immensely to the efficiency of the public school system. 
Later he established an academy at New Derry, which many who still live 
attended as students. Meanwhile he was reading medicine with Dr. William 
Burrell, and was graduated from Western Reserve Medical College in 1859 
or i860. He first settled in New Florence, but a few months later moved to 
West Fairfield, where he enjoyed an extensive practice throughout Ligonier 
valley. He returned in 187 1 to the place of his birth, Irwin, where he continued 
until his death, August 18, 1881. Shortly after his return to Irwin he was 
appointed examining surgeon for pensions, which office he held to the time of 
his death. He was the candidate of his county for congress and was held in 
the highest estimation by the people of the entire county. Throughout his 
life he was deeply interested in the public schools, and was always a member 
of the school board, and without receiving any return for his service prepared 
youth for college year after year. He was married September 26, 1885, to 
Rachel Long Black, a daughter of Samuel and Jane Black, who lived near 
Irwin. The Black family came from the north of Ireland about the same time 
as the McCormicks, settling in the immediate neighborhood. Samuel Black 
was a brother of William Black, whose son, James Black, is remembered 
by thousands of his students still as president of the University of Iowa, of 
the Pennsylvania College for Women, as vice-president of Washington and 
Jefferson, and during the closing years of his life vice-president of Wooster 
University. Jane Black's maiden name was Jane Mansberger, whose father 
died on the Ludwig farm east of Greensburg, 1825, as he was on his way to 
Ohio to take up land which he was entitled to as an officer of the Revolution- 
ary war. Captain John Mansberger had lived in or near York, and was 
married to Rachel Long, the daughter of Captain Long, also an officer in the 
Revolutionary war. On the death of her husband Rachel Long Mansberger 
remained at the Ludwig farm and there brought up her children. Rachel 
Long Black, the wife of Dr. McCormick, bore the name of her maternal 
grandmother, and died August 10, 1869, at the age of thirty-five. She was 
one of the rarely beautiful women both in person and character, and made 
very happy the home of her husband and children. While firm and strong 
in her conceptions of right she was gentle, lovable and beautiful alwavs, and 
never in the thirty-five years of her life was known to exhibit sign of impa- 
tience or irritability. Two years after her death Dr. McCormick was married 
to Margaret Mansberger Black, a sister of his former wife, who with her two 
childen, Mary Alice and Eugenia, lives still in Irwin. Two other children, 
Charles and James Irwin, were born of the second marriage, and both died 
while still quite young. 



56 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Of the first marriage seven children were born, two dying in infancy. 
Among the others there was no death until the recent departure of Dr. John 
McCormick, in Greensburg. The eldest was Emma, born in Stewartsville, and 
married in 1881 to George Kifer, and moved in 1883 to a farm near Sioux 
City, where she and her husband and four children still live. Emma, on the 
death of her mother, at the age of thirteen, took charge of the home and 
continued as efficient keeper of the house until her marriage. Samuel Black 
McCormick was born in Irwin on May 6, 1858, and his boyhood, until his 
father returned to Irwin in 1871, was spent at West Fairfield, in the Ligonier 
valley, a beautiful spot, and in those days a community filled with young people, 
furnishing an environment peculiarly excellent and wholesome. At fifteen he 
began a mercantile life with Mr. Leonard Hunker, but at seventeen felt that 
he should return to his studies. With his father he began preparation for col- 
lege, and also began teaching at a little past sixteen in the North Huntingdon 
schools. Two years later, in 1877, he entered the sophomore class of Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, graduating in the class of 1880. He afterwards 
taught in Canonsburg Academy and in the Washington and Jeft'erson College, 
assisting in the department of Greek. While still a student in college he had 
passed the preliminary examinations as a student at law and was registered 
with his uncle, Hon. H. H. McCormick. He was admitted to the Allegheny 
county bar in July, 1882. One year later he removed to Denver, Colorado, 
where he engaged in the practice of law with R. D. Thompson, continuing 
until June i, 1887. He was married to Ida May Steep, of Washington, Penn- 
sylvania, September 29, 1882. While practicing law he was moved to enter 
the ministry, and returned to Allegheny and entered the Western Theological 
Seminary in September, 1887. He was ordained as a minister and installed as 
the pastor of the Central Presbyterian church, Allegheny, on April 30, 1890. 
During his five years' pastorate at this church he frequently met the classes in 
the Theological Seminary, and was a member of the board of directors, was 
also a member of the Freedmans board, and of the Pennsylvania College of 
Women, and of the sustentation committee of Pennsylvania. He was called 
in October, 1894, to be the pastor of the First Presbyterian church, Omaha, 
and continued as such for three years. He then became president of Coe 
College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and remained president until September, 1904, 
when he returned to Pittsburg as chancellor of the Western University of 
Pennsylvania, to which he had been elected in the preceding May. He received 
the degree of D. D. from his Alm.a Mater in 1896, and the degree of LL. D. 
at the centennial of the college in 1902. In returning to his old home in Pitts- 
burg and in undertaking the important work of developing a great university 
in western Pennsylvania he has full scope for all the ability and energy he 
possesses. Four children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. McCormick, James 
Irwin, named for his grandfather, a student in the Western University of 
Pennsylvania ; Gertrude, a student in Coe College ; Samuel Black, a student in 
Shadyside Academy, and Rachel, called for her grandmother. 

The third born of Dr. McCormick was John McCormick, born in New 
Florence in i860, and died in Philadelphia on March 25, 1905. Like his 
brother, he was brought up in the Ligonier valley, and his schooling was in 
West Fairfield and in Irwin. He taught several terms in North Huntingdon 
township, and meanwhile studied mathematics and Latin with his father. He 
was unusually quick at learning, and with the preparation that he had made 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 57 

was ready to enter medical college at Cleveland, from which he was graduated 
as M. D. in 1882. He practiced for a little while at Irwin and then removed to 
United, where he enjoyed a very large practice until his removal to Greens- 
burg in 1888. From that date until his untimely death a short time ago he was 
recognized as one of the leading physicians of Greensburg, his practice always 
being very large and extending into districts remote from his home. Less 
scholarly than his father, he was perhaps better adapted to the career of 
physician than he, and gave himself absolutely to the practice of his profes- 
sion. In the twenty-three years of his practice he was absent for more than 
a day only three times, and his total vacation did not perhaps exceed a single 
month. His kindness of heart, his skill in his profession, his undoubted 
wisdom, his unwearied effort in behalf of his patrons, his sincerity and integ- 
rity, his willingness to devote his strength to the service of the people whether 
he received compensation for it or not, so endeared him to the people of his 
community that he was mourned by thousands when he was cut off in the 
midst of his usefulness. Only occasionally is it given to any one so universally 
to win the aft'ection and regard of an entire community. Some years ago in 
a surgical case he contracted blood poisoning and this, as was ascertained 
after his death, was the cause of his premature passing away. Like his father 
before him he was appointed United States examining surgeon for pensions, 
continuing in this until the day of his death. While still a student in the medi- 
cal college he married Anna D. Kunkle, and to them were born twelve children, 
of whom ten yet live, Sarah, married to Mr. Albert McClellan; Floy, married 
to Phil K. Shaner ; Earl, who received his education in Washington and Jeffer- 
son College, together with Jean, Emma, John, Paul, Helen, Rebecca and 
Dorothy, who live with their mother in Greensburg. 

The fourth child born to James I. McCormick was Margaret Isabelle, 
who married Dr. Albert Stright Sherrick, and resides with her husband and 
children in Alverton, Westmoreland county. To Dr. and Mrs. Sherrick have 
been born nine children, of whom Hugh, Viola, Eugenia, Joseph, Emeline and 
James are living. 

The fifth child was William Henry Harrison McCormick, born in 1864, 
married Emma Weaver and residing for many years past on Mulford street, 
Brushton, Pittsburg. Harry McCormick is well known in Pittsburg, where 
he has been connected with the Western Union, Associated Press, and at pres- 
ent with the Keystone Security Investment Company. Three sons have been 
born to them, Charles, connected with the Pennsylvania railroad ; Albert, a 
student in the Pittsburg High School, and Norman, who was accidentally 
killed at the age of thirteen. 

Silas McCormick was the sixth son of John and Esther McCormick, 
and was born at Irwin in 1830. He has lived in the town of his birth during 
his entire life. Like most of his brothers he taught school in his early years, 
prepared himself for college, and in 1854 entered Jefferson College, Canons- 
burg, from which he was graduated in the class of 1858. He read law and was 
admitted to the Westmoreland county bar in 1868, and has been engaged in 
Dracticing law from that time until the present. He was married to Henrietta 
Gaut, who died in 1900. Silas McCormick is a careful and painstaking lawyer, 
is thoroughly reliable, and enjoys the high regard and affection of the people 
among whom he is known. He can cover a walk of ten miles as rapidly and 



S8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



with as little weariness as when a young man he used to walk from Pittsburg 
to Canonsburg at the beginning of the college year. 

The next son, Samuel, born in 1832, spent his life in Irwin and in 
Pittsburg. He was a soldier in the federal army during the war of the rebel- 
lion, and afterwards for long years was connected with the firm of Godfrey 
& Clark, Pittsburg. For a season he was in business for himself, but later 
returned to his old firm. He was married to Lucile Smith, of Allegheny, and 
to them was given one daughter, Violet Blanche, who is married to James 
Hartley, and lives with her husband and three children at Emsworth. Mrs. 
McCormick lives with her daughter Violet. For the last twenty-five years of 
his life Samuel lived at Irwin, but a few months preceding his death went to 
the Soldiers' Home at Dayton, Ohio, where he died. He was a man of large 
ability, and had he given himself full opportunity to exercise his powers would 
have made a notable success. 

We mention next Rachel, born in September, 1834, and married in 1864 
to Mr. John George, a man well and favorably known in a large region around 
Irwin. To them were born two children, Harry, in 1865, and Lilla Belle, in 
1866. Harry with his wife lives at Braddock, and Lilla, who is connected 
with the Etna Life Insurance Company, Pittsburg, makes her home for the 
most part at Calvin McCormick's. 

Passing by Albert and Mary Elizabeth, who died while still 3'oung, and 
also Horace Greeley, the last born child of John and Esther McCormick, we 
come to Henry Harrison, who in his life achieved highest distinction and was 
known most largely of all the sons. Born in 1840 he was very young at the 
beginning of the war of the rebellion, but saw service before that was con- 
cluded. He read law and was admitted to the bar of Westmoreland county, 
and also in Allegheny county, where he practiced from the time of his admis- 
sion until his death in 1885. He was an able lawyer, was popular with his 
fellow attorneys, had a fine appearance, and readily adapted himself to any 
situation. He served honorably in the legislature of his state and was speaker 
in the house of representatives in 1874. A little later he was appointed United 
States attorney for the western district of Pennsylvania by President Grant 
and served as such about five years. He returned to private practice in 1880, 
and continued until his death five years later. Generous, brilliant, possessing 
an excellent knowledge of the law, a great influence with his fellows, he was 
one of the most popular men at the Pittsburg bar. It was his delight to help 
a friend, and the younger attorneys especially received from him many words 
of counsel and many acts of kindness. His life seemed scarcely more than 
begun when a little more than forty-five he died. He was married in 1875 to 
Martha Sharon, of Cadiz, Ohio, who still survives him and makes her home 
with her brother, Mr. John Sharon. Harry McCormick, as he was popularly 
called, was engaged in the trials of many noted cases, and his fame as an at- 
torney spread all over western Pennsylvania, and had he lived doubtless he 
would have received many further honors both in the forensic and political 
world. 



JOHN A. YOUNG. The growth and development of a city depend in a" 
great measure on the men who are interested in promoting them. If their 
efforts are turned in the right direction the improvement in this direction is 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 59 

assured. The real estate dealers in every large city are the men who have 
this matter in charge to a considerable extent, and among the most enterpris- 
ing and reliable of all the firms engaged in this business in the city of Pittsburg 
may be mentioned that of J. A. Young & Company, of which John A. Young, 
whose name heads this sketch, is the founder and the leading spirit. This 
firm has its offices at No. 6000 Penn avenue, and is noted for its excellent 
business methods and the system which characterizes all its dealings. The 
ancestors of Mr. Young were among the first settlers in the state of Virginia, 
whence they came ultimately to Pennsylvania. 

John Young, grandfather of John A. Young, was born in Virginia and 
removed to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in the dis- 
tillery business. In this line of trade he was very successful, amassing a 
considerable fortune, but of which he lost a great part during the "Whiskey 
Insurrection." The later years of his life were spent with his son David, his 
death occurring at the age of ninety-nine years in 1858. He had three sons- 
John, Jacob and David. 

David Yoimg, son of John Young, was born in Blair county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in April, 1816. His early years were spent in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, where he learned the trade of carpentering. He removed to 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, about the year 1842, locating on a farm near 
Wilmington, but continued at his work as a carpenter and builder until 1864, 
when he retired to a farm near Greenville, and devoted his entire time and 
attention to agriculture. It was here he died in March, 1900. His two older 
brothers were living in Columbiana county, Ohio, and in 1832, David traveled 
through Pittsburg by wagon to join them. It was his delight when visiting 
Pittsburg in later years to note the changes which' had been made since that 
time and to compare the city with its former small beginnings. He spent 
some years in Columbiana county. In politics he was an ardent Abolitionist, 
being among the first agitators for the freedom of slaves, and upon the organ- 
ization of the Republican party in 1856, was one of the most active workers in 
his section for the success of that body. He was a highly respected and 
influential citizen of his day. He married ffirst) in Columbiana county, Ohio, 
Mary Duncan, by whom he had five children, of whom two are now living: 
James D., a resident of Greenville, Pennsylvania, and Nancy A., who married 
W. H. Shaw, also of Greenville, Pennsylvania. He married (second) Mar- 
garet Anderson, born near Shade Gap, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
about 1821, and died in Mercer county on the family homestead at the age of 
eighty-three years. They had four children, all boys, of whom the following 
are now living: John A., the subject of this sketch; William A., a wholesale 
merchant in Leadville, Colorado; and David C, the present (1906) recorder of 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania. 

John A. Young, eldest surviving son of David and Margaret (Anderson) 
Young, was born on a farm near Greenville, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, 
January 14, 1856. His childhood and youthful years were spent under the 
parental roof, and his education was acquired in the public schools, supple- 
mented by a course at the business college of Bryant, Stratton & Smith, in 
Meadville, Pennsylvania. As he was the eldest son of the family he was kept 
at work on the farm, and assisted in the management of it. He was thus 
employed up to his twenty-first year, when he left home and visited the west, 
notably Colorado, where he engaged in the mercantile business. He conducted 



6o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



two stores under the firm name of J. A. Young & Company, one in Leadville 
and the other in Villa Grove. Five years later his brother, William A., suc- 
ceeded him, and John A. returned to the east, remaining for some time in 
Mercer county. He removed to Pittsburg subsequently and engaged in the 
grocery business. This, however, not proving congenial, he soon disposed of 
it and identified himself with real estate afifairs. He associated himself with 
W. W. Elderkin in 1893, under the firm name of Elderkin & Young, and this 
business partnership was continued very successfully until 1896, when Mr. 
Young purchased the interest of his partner and in April of that year the firm 
of J. A. Young & Company, with Mr. A. O. Pyle as a partner, was formed. 
This firm is now, and has been for a number of years, one of the best known 
in the real estate field, particularly in the East End of Pittsburg. Their 
reliability, sterling integrity, and practical business methods are proverbial, 
and thev enjoy a large patronage. Mr. Young is a stanch Republican in 
politics and his religious affiliations are with the Presbyterian church, of which 
he is a trustee. He is a member of the following organizations: Fort Pitt 
Lodge, No. 634, Free and Accepted Masons, of Pittsburg; Pittsburg Chapter, 
No. 268, Royal Arch Masons; Mount Moriah Council, No. 2, Royal and 
Select Masters; Duquesne Commandery, No. 72, Knights Templar; and 
Alhambra Lodge, No. 293, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Greenville, 
Pennsylvania. He married, in 1888, Anna Bieghle, of Mercer county, Penn- 
sylvania, and they have four children : Walter D., John Clifford, Margaret A. 
and James A. 

WILLIAM LARIMER, JR., was born at Circleville, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, October 24, 1809, and died near Leavenworth City, 
Kansas, May 16, 1875. 

The original family name was French, Lorimier, derived from the Latin 
Lorum. a thong. The English form, Lorimer, may be found in many of the 
English dictionaries. It indicates the name of an ancient trade ; not the trade 
of working in leather, as the word "thong" might suggest, but the "Lorimer" 
was a maker of bits, spurs, stirrup irons and all kinds of metal mountings of 
brass and iron, including armor. The name suggests this last, as it is some- 
times recorded as being derived from the French, "I'armov." The first record 
of the name as yet found by us is in 1080, when a certain Durand Lorimer 
went from Caen, France, to Scotland, doubtless with the forces of William the 
Conqueror. In Scotland, Lorimer is quite a common name at the present time. 

The first record found of the Larimers in this country relates to Robert 
Larimer, the lineal ancestor of William Larimer, Jr., with whom our sketch 
deals. This Robert Larimer was born about 1690 and came to this country 
from Scotland, where his ancestors had located when driven from Alsace- 
Lorraine by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. He settled in Berwick town- 
ship, York county, Pennsylvania, early in 1700, and died in York county in 
1772. During his residence in America he had accumulated considerable 
property, as there are records of taxes paid on a farm of two hundred acres 
in Berwick township, and of a farm in Mount Joy township. 

The children of Robert and Sarah Larimer were Thomas, John, William, 
Mary, Margaret, Jean and Robert. Thomas, the eldest son, was born about 
1745. To this son was deeded the farm in Mount Joy township, and there he 



I 



i 





PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 6i 



established his home. He married Catherine , of Berwick township. 

During the Revolutionary war, Thomas Larimer served in a German regiment 
commanded by Colonel Weltner. He died at his homestead in Mount Joy 
township, Adams county, in September, 1816. His lands and bonds he be- 
queathed to his children. The homestead still stands near the town of Gettys- 
burg. The children of Thomas and Catherine Larimer were William, Sr., 
Thomas, Margaret, Mary, Sidney, Nancy and Elizabeth. 

William Larimer, Sr., eldest son of Thomas Larimer, was born in 1771. 
About twenty years of his life were spent in Adams county, but about 1790 
he had removed to Westmoreland county. He was twice married. His first 
wife, Martha McNease, of Westmoreland county, died young, leaving two 
children, John and Catherine. The second wife was Anne Sheakley, of Adams 
county. The children of William and Anne Larimer were Margaret, George, 
William, Jr., Martha, Washington, Hamilton, James, Anne, Thomas and Mary. 

William Larimer, Sr., was an energetic man, possessed of good business 
qualifications. When he died, September 18, 1838, he left his affairs in a flour- 
ishing condition and his children were unusually well provided for. Anne, the 
wife of William Larimer, Sr., was a woman well fitted both by character and 
inheritance to be a helpmeet to her husband in their pioneer life in West- 
moreland county. Her grandfather, William Sheakley, was a man of ability 
and wealth. W'hen it became evident in 1775 that the colonies would take up 
arms against England, he was elected one of the committee of observation for 
York county. Anne's father, George Sheakley, was commissioned ensign under 
Captain John Mcllvain, at the age of nineteen, during the Revolutionary war. 

The home of William and Anne Larimer was known as the ''Mansion 
Farm," now the site of Circleville, North Huntingdon township. The home- 
stead has been remodeled, but the large oak logs of the original house are still 
there, and are more like iron than oak, their dark brown coloring similar to the 
antique oak of today. There, on the "King's Highway" (the old turnpike), 
between the far east and the Ohio river, William and Anne Larimer lived for 
about fifty years, and there entertained many of the prominent men of the time 
who journeyed to the West or the South, among whom were William Henry 
Harrison and Aaron Burr. Anne had seen General Washington also as he 
passed her childhood home in York count}- in his carriage. Washington was 
President of the L'nited States at that time (1794). An interesting incident is 
related in regard to a business transaction between Mr. W. H. Harrison and 
William Larimer. The latter sold a negro girl to Mr. Harrison, neither of them 
knowing at the time that a law had been passed making the buying or selling 
of slaves in Pennsylvania illegal. As soon as Mr. Larimer was cognizant 
of the error he at once returned the money to Mr. Harrison, and the girl was 
returned. 

William Larimer, Jr., third child of William, Sr., and Anne Larimer, 
was born in the old Larimer homestead, now Circleville, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, October 24, 1809. His wife was Rachel McMasters, daughter of 
John and Rachel Hughey McMasters (who were also wealthy pioneers), whom 
he married at her home at Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, October 16, 1834. 
The children of William and Rachel Larimer were John, William, Edwin, 
Thomas, Cassius, Joseph, George, Annie and Rachel. The two daughters, 
Annie and Rachel, settled in Pittsburg. Annie married T. M. Jones, of the 



62 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



firm of Jones and Laughlin, in 1858. Rachel married James Ross Mellon, son 
of Judge Thomas and Sarah Negley Mellon, of Pittsburg, in 1867. 

William Larimer, Jr., was one of the prominent business men of his day. 
Larimer township, in Somerset county; Larimer station, on the Pennsylvania 
railroad ; Larimer avenue, in Pittsburg ; Larimer county, in Colorado ; Larimer 
street, in Denver, and Fort Larimer, in Arkansas, were all named in his honor. 

At Larimer Station he and Hon. John Covode organized the Westmoreland 
Coal Company, which is still one of the largest in the state. But his first 
extensive business enterprise was with his friend and neighbor, John Irwin, 
of Irwin, Pennsylvania, in the "Conestoga Wagon System." By means of 
wagons they carried goods between Pittsburg and Philadelphia as early as 
1830, many years before the railroad was projected. His next business venture 
was in partnership with his brother-in-law, John McMasters, Jr., in mer- 
chandising. It was a time of new enterprises, and in many of them William 
Larimer was interested. For over twenty-five years he was very successful 
and held many important positions. He was the first president of the Pittsburg 
and Connellsville Railroad ; treasurer of the Ohio and Pennsylvania (now Pitts- 
burg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago) Railroad; chief proprietor and creditor of the 
Youghiogheny Slack Water System; chief projector and builder of the Rem- 
ington Coal Railroad at McKee's Rocks, and a large shareholder in numerous 
California gold mining enterprises and Overland Transportation Companies. 
He was uniformly successful in all his enterprises and acquired considerable 
wealth, indeed a large fortune for those times. His public spirit, enterprise 
and generosity made him hosts of friends to whom the hospitality of his homes, 
one in Penn avenue, Pittsburg, and the other in Larimer avenue. East End, 
was ever free. 

Politically, Mr. Larimer identified himself with the anti-slavery move- 
ment, and assisted in the organization of the old Liberal party, supporting 
Birney for president in 1844. From this time up to the defeat of General Scott 
in 1852 he was in sympathy with the principles of the Whig party, and took 
quite a prominent part in the politics of Pennsylvania. He was made major- 
general of state militia in 1852, and was mentioned as a possible candidate for 
governor. Religiously he was an "old school" Presbyterian. He was also 
an enthusiastic temperance worker, and gave substantial aid to the cause. 

After financial difficulties, which reached a climax during the general 
business depression in 1854-55, General Larimer decided to start anew in the 
West, and left Pittsburg for Nebraska the next year. Soon after his arrival 
he was elected to the legislature of that territory. He took an active part in 
behalf of Republican principles, and the meeting at which the Republican 
party of Nebraska was organized was held at his home in Omaha. He moved 
to Kansas in 1858, but remained there only a few months. During the Pike's 
Peak gold excitement of that year he went to Colorado. He was one of the 
founders of the city of Denver, and he built the first house on the site of the 
present city, on the land which he and his son, William H. H. Larimer, had 
preempted for their own private possession. While a resident of Colorado, Gen- 
eral Larimer served for a time as United States commissioner and judge of 
probate for the First Judicial District of the territory. He became well known 
throughout the West, being prominently identified with the public interests of 
Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado for more than twenty years. 

At the outbreak of the Civil war. General Larimer raised the Third Regi- 




? 

^ 




PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 63 

ment of Colorado Volunteers, and was its first colonel. After a short term 
of service he resigned and returned to Kansas, but soon entered the service 
again as captain of General Blunt's bodyguard. After the massacre of Baxter 
Springs he was commissioned captain of Company A, Fourteenth Kansas 
Cavalry, by Governor Thomas Carney. 

After the war General Larimer was a member of the Kansas state senate, 
1867-70. After that time it was said of him, "He is earnest in his convictions, 
conscientious in the discharge of his duties, and zealously labors for the good 
of the people he represents." At this time he was frequently spoken of by the 
press of the state in connection with the gubernatorial chair and United States 
senatorship. While General Larimer was living in Pittsburg he was personally 
acquainted with prominent bankers, journalists and statesmen of New York, 
Philadelphia and western Pennsylvania, and many of them were entertained 
at his home in Penn avenue. The great editor and philosopher, Horace Greeley, 
was a frequent guest. Mr. Greeley looked more like a farmer than a noted man 
of letters. One morning when ^Ir. Greeley and Mr. Larimer were walking 
down Penn avenue, a neighbor, seeing them, stepped back into his house, "to 
spare Mr. Larimer the embarrassment of introducing his country cousin,'' thus 
missing an introduction to the great journalist. In later years Mr. Greeley 
visited General Larimer in his cabin in the early pioneer days of Denver City. 
After years of friendship and correspondence, it was natural that General 
Larimer should take a prominent part in the Greeley campaign in 1872, and 
should be .the first man to suggest the name of Mr. Greeley in connection with 
the presidency. After Mr. Greeley's death, in response to his daughter's re- 
quest, his letters to General Larimer were sent to her. When the letters were 
returned, Mrs. Smith sent her father's favorite pen to his life-long friend. 
Another friend of General Larimer's was Governor Samuel Houston, the 
liberator and first governor of Texas. He expressed his appreciation of the Gen- 
eral in gifts of value ; at one time presenting Mrs. Larimer with a beautiful 
brocade gown, and on another occasion with two miniatures of himself in solid 
gold frames. 

Not only was General Larimer loved by his friends, but he had a personal 
magnetism that held an audience's attention when he was called upon for a 
public speech. He was a man of fine appearance, with a martial bearing due 
to his life-long military training. His height was about six feet, his hair a soft 
brown, his eyes hazel. He could speak in public without notes or the slightest 
preparation. He had command of a great fund of general knowledge, and 
never seemed at a loss for words with which to express himself. The. way in 
which he was received by an audience is shown in the following quotation from 
the Rocky Mountain News of September 11, 1862. At the time he delivered 
the speech mentioned (two paragraphs of which only are given), he was re- 
cruiting officer for the Third Regiment of Colorado Volunteers : 

"The war meeting held here Saturday night last was the largest and most 
enthusiastic ever held in the territory. The meeting was scarcely organized be- 
fore General Larimer was called for by the immense crowd in attendance. He 
came forward and was received with hearty cheers and most kindly feelings. 
Lights were called for in order that they might see his face. When these were 
brought the applause was renewed. The general spoke as follows : 

" 'Mr. Chairman and fellow citizens : I am an old pioneer. I came to 
this country in the fall of 1858. I am one of the first settlers of our Rocky 



64 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Mountain Territory. I wrote one of the first letters ever written from this 
country, certainly the first ever written from Denver City. I had dated my let- 
ter the night before, "Golden City," but after writing it, we met and changed 
the name to Denver, after our governor, an honor to his country and to his 

name. Well, Denver is there still, and I believe will be for ages to come. 
♦ * * 

" 'Abraham Lincoln has been trying to preserve the Constitution and the 
Union, sustaining every state in all its rights, whether real or fancied, and to 
leave slavery untouched wherever it existed, believing that the National gov- 
ernment was not responsible for it. He has been moving slowly, and has done 
everything that could be done to conciliate and assure the South that their in- 
stitution should be untouched. In this course I have been disposed to stand by 
the President. Now I begin to think I can see the hand of God in this matter. 
Had this war been ended a year ago, slavery would have remained untouched ; 
the millions who have so long been bowed down by tyranny and oppression 
would never have scented the air of freedom and universal liberty as it passed 
on every breeze over the plantations of the South from every far-off blood- 
stained battlefield ; but now they have breathed its breath, heard its words, 
drunk in its spirit, and "as the lightning cometh out of the east and shineth into 
the west," so has the light of universal freedom flashed tongue to tongue and 
mind to mind over all the land.' '' 

William Larimer, Jr., spent the last years of his life on his farm near 
Leavenworth, Kansas, where he died on Sunday morning, May i6, 1875. Of 
him it may be truthfully said he was a man of ability, genial and companion- 
able, broad-minded, always ready to give the best he had, true to his Huguenot 
descent and principles. He served his country as an officer of the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania and of Nebraska, and in the Civil war. The following 
are his seven commissions: i. Second lieutenant. Eighth Infantry, August 3, 
1828, by John Andrew Shulze, Governor of Pennsylvania. 2. Major First 
Battalion of Sixth Regiment Allegheny County Volunteers, April 15, 1845, by 
Francis R. Shunk, Governor of Pennsylvania. 3. Brigadier-General, June 4, 
1848, Pennsylvania Troops, by William F. Johnston, Governor of Pennsyl- 
vania. 4. Major-General, December 22, 1852, by William Bigler, Governor of 
Pennsylvania. 5. Captain LaPlatte Guards, October 17, 1855, by Mark N. 
Izard, Governor of Nebraska. 6. By Hon. James H. Lane, August 7, 1862, 
to raise Third Regiment Colorado Volunteers. 7. By Governor Thomas Car- 
ney, August 7, 1863, Captain Company A, Fourteenth Kansas Volunteer 
Cavalry. 



GEORGE W. McNEIL, M. D., a well-known physician in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, who has not alone attained eminence in his profession, but has 
been prominently identified with all movements tending toward public improve- 
ment in that city for a number of years, is descended from an old and honored 
family. 

John M. McNeil, M. D., father of Dr. George W. McNeil, was born in 
Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, in 1820. For a number of years he was the 
owner of and personally conducted a grist mill at Bull's Run, but later he 
turned his attention to the profession of medicine, in which he became 
eminently successful. He became a student at Jefiferson Medical College, from 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 65 

v.hich institution he was graduated, and immediately proceeded to practice 
his profession. Fie settled at Salem Cross Roads, where he obtained a large 
circle of patients, and there he spent his life. He married Jane McCall, and 
had children ; George W., of whom see forward ; Mary, who married George 
McLaughlin ; John M., deceased ; S. D., also deceased ; and Nannie. 

George W. McXeil, M. D., son of Dr. John M. and Jane (McCall) 
McNeil, was born in Salem Cross Roads, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1S50. His early education was obtained in the public schools and the 
academy, and he then attended the Ann Arbor and Jefferson Medical Col- 
leges, from which he later graduated. Immediately after his graduation he 
commenced the practice of his chosen profession at Salem Cross Roads, and 
his conscientious and faithful devotion to his work have met with well merited 
success. He was in the Dixmont Hospital for two years, and was president of 
the Allegheny County Medical Society in 1878. In spite of the demands which 
his professional work makes upon him, Dr. McNeil finds time to give his per- 
sonal attention and labor to matters of public interest, and has been the prime 
mover in many schemes which have tended to the advantage of the city. He 
has been a member of the common council for three terms and of the school 
board for nine years. He is also a member and active worker in the 
Presbyterian church, and is highly esteemed for his many charities. 

He married Mary Young, daughter of George M. Young, and has chil- 
dren : John M., born in 1886; Edith, in 1890; and Florence Irene, in 1892. 
Mrs. McNeil died in 1892. 

GEORGE B. KELLY, of Braddock, near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, a 
dealer in real estate, was born January 31, 1856, son of William Guy and Mary 
(McCracken) Kelly, he being one of twelve children, five of whom survive. 
The parents were both natives of Dromore, county Down, Ireland, and were 
there married. In 1845 they emigrated to this country with their three chil- 
dren, and remained at Albany, New York, two years, and then came 
to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, via the canal. They located at Wilkins- 
burg, where they followed farm life. He died in 1876, aged sixty-nine 
years. In politics Mr. Kelly was a Republican. In religious faith the family 
was, while living in their native country, members of the old Covenanters, but 
upon coming to this country became connected with the United Presbyterian 
church. Mrs. Kelly died in 1894, aged eighty-six years. Their surviving 
children are: Robert, a contractor, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania; Samuel, of 
the Kelly- Wood Real Estate Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; Anna, wife 
of William Beam, of Rummerdale, Pennsylvania ; Sarah, wife of William 
McHenry, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; George B., of this sketch. 

George B. Kelly was only permitted to acquire but a limited education in 
the country schools, and at the age of twenty-two years left the farm and came 
to the city of Pittsburg and engaged in the live-stock business at the city 
stock-yards. He was thus connected for several years, and in 1890 engaged 
in the real estate business at East Liberty, and still follows the same in a most 
honorable and satisfactory manner. 

In his political choice Mr. Kelly is a Republican. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and is one of the trustees of Lincoln Avenue 
church. He belongs to Duquesne Lodge, No. 574, Free and Accepted Masons. 



66 ' A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



In 1882 he was united in marriage to Miss Anna Palmer. Their children 
are : Margaret, a graduate of the Pittsburg High School and of the Woman's 
College of Baltimore, Maryland, and Alice, who graduated from the Pittsburg 
High School in 1907. 



DR. JOHN McCULLOUGH WILSON, a member of the medical pro- 
fession of Pittsburg, who comes of Scotch-Irish ancestry both on the paternal 
and maternal side, was born in Dennison, Ohio, August 14, 1872, a son of 
Dr. Thomas H. and Harriet (McCullough) Wilson, he being the second child 
of four in his parents' family. His grandfather Wilson was among the gold 
prospecters in California when the precious metal was first discovered in 1848. 
While there he met with an accident resulting in death. Dr. Thomas Wilson, 
the subject's father, was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, September 4, 1846. 
He remained under the parental roof until the breaking out of the Civil war, 
when he entered the service of his country, though at the time being but 
fifteen years of age. He enlisted in Company H, Eightieth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. The place of his enlistment was Fort Meigs, and he served about 
three months in the ranks when he was chosen from out his command by 
General W. T. Sherman to take charge of the mail, and in this capacity he 
remained with Sherman during the entire war. After peace had been declared, 
he returned home and began the study of medicine with Dr. Ingraham, of 
Coshocton county, Ohio, and later entered Starling Medical College at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1868. The same year he located at 
Dennison, Ohio, where he began the practice of his chosen profession, and 
where he is still in practice — the oldest physician of the place in point of serv- 
ice. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and the Union Veteran 
League. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has been 
a member of the official board for many years. In politics he is independent, 
and while he is inclined toward Democracy he is a warm supporter and admirer 
of President Theodore Roosevelt. During his short residence in Pittsburg he 
served as member of the common council from the Twentieth ward. For nearly 
twenty years he has served as a member of the Dennison (Ohio) school board, 
ever taking much interest in both religious and educational matters. 

, He married Miss Harriett McCullough, by whom was born the foUowiiig 
four children, all still Hving: i. Ella, wife of George S. McCaw, of Denni- 
son, Ohio. 2. Dr. John M., of this notice. 3. Dr. Roy A., of Dennison, Ohio. 
4. Nettie, wife of F. N. Levens, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

The subject. Dr. John M. Wilson, acquired his education in the Dennison, 
Ohio, common and high schools, and at Scio College, Scio, Ohio, after which 
he took up the study of the science of medicine. In 1893, in company with 
his brother, he entered the University of Western Pennsylvania (medical de- 
partment), and graduated therefrom with the class of 1896. Following his 
graduation he was appointed resident physician at the City Hospital at Marshal- 
sea, serving in such capacity for two years, when he established himself in a 
regular practice in the East End, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, since which date he 
has built up a large, lucrative practice. 

He is a member of the Western Pennsylvania Medical Society, the Alle- 
gheny Medical Society, the State Medical Society, the American Medical 
Association, and the College of Physicians. He is an advanced Free Mason, be- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 6j 



ing a member and past master of Duquesne Lodge. No. 546, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Pittsburg Chapter, No. 268, Royal Arch Masons; Duquesne Com- 
mandery. No. 72, Knights Templar ; Pennsylvania Consistory, Valley oi 
Pittsburg, A. & A. Scottish Rite. He is also connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Nicholson Lodge, No. 585. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and politically is a Republican, but has never had 
any aspirations to become an office holder within any political organization, 
preferring to devote his whole time and energy to his profession. 

HON. JOHN FREMONT COX, a leading attorney-at-law in Pittsburg, 
but residing at Homestead, Pennsylvania, was born in Mifflin township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1852, a son of William and Anna 
(VVhitaker) Cox. The father, William Cox, was born in England November 
10, 1806, and died on October 3, 1891. He came to America in 1831, settling 
in Pittsburg, in what is now the Twenty-second ward. He was the son of 
Thomas and Catherine Cox, of Northamptonshire, England. When he reached 
his majority the subject's father married, in England, Hannah Ford, and soon 
thereafter emigrated to this country with a view of bettering their condition. 
In Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Mr. Cox found suitable lands for salt 
works, and located opposite Homestead, where he successfully operated sev- 
eral years. He then went to Mifflin township, and by industry and frugality 
became a wealthy farmer. In 1878 he moved into Homestead and there ever 
after lived a retired life. He at one time owned five valuable farms, four of 
which were located in Lawrence county and one near Homestead, and these 
were all occupied by his children. In his religious faith he was a Methodist 
Episcopal and in political party choice a Republican. For many years he 
served his church in the capacity of class-leader and steward. He was twice 
married. His first wife died many years ago and left eight children, as fol- 
lows : Sarah, Catherine, Joseph, Thomas, Elizabeth, William, George and 
Asa. For his second wife Mr. Cox married Mrs. Anna Whitaker, the daugh- 
ter of Christian and Anna (Forney) Dellenbaugh, all natives of Switzerland, 
Mrs. Cox. born March 9, 1810, being but eleven years of age when she came 
to this country. By her marriage to Mr. Cox the issue was one son — Hon 
John Cox, of this notice. 

John F. Cox, a son of William and Anna Cox, spent his early years on 
his father's farm and attended the public schools. In 1870 he entered West- 
minster College, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, where he remained four 
years, and he then entered LTnion College, Alliance, Ohio, where he graduated 
with the class of 1875. He taught school three years at Homestead and 
Camden, in his native township. He chose law for his profession and studied 
under Major W. C. Moreland and John H. Kerr, of Pittsburg, being admitted 
to the Allegheny county bar in 1880. Since that date he has been in constant 
practice and has won an enviable reputation as a successful lawyer. He was 
one of the associate council in the celebrated "Homestead Strike" cases in 
1892. Politically IMr. Cox is a staunch supporter of Republican party principles 
and was elected burgess of his borough for two terms in succession. In 1885 
and 1887 he served his district as representative in the state legislature. He 
was chosen on the judiciary committee, general and local, and was chairman 
of the committees on retrenchment and reform. \\'hile in the legislature he 



68 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



espoused the cause of the laboring man and his bill to modify the conspiracy 
laws of the commonwealth was among the most important measures before 
that session in the true interest of the working classes. While he secured its 
passage in the house it was defeated in the senate by a tie vote. 

Mr. Cox is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and belongs to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics, and the Independent Order Artisans. 

He was united in marriage, April 15, 1884, to Elvira, daughter of Captain 
A. C. and Mary J. (Lynch) Ackard. By this union was born the following 
children : Annie Luella, wife of John F. Dittman, residing at Homestead, 
Pennsylvania, and Robert Pattison, now a student at Westminster College, 
which his father attended. 

While Mr. Cox has his residence at Homestead, he maintains his law 
office at Pittsburg, in the new Berger office building, where he enjoys a large 
legal practice and counts his friends by the legion. For twenty-seven years he 
has stood before the Pittsburg bar, and during all these years has merited and 
had the esteem of the bench and bar in Allegheny and adjoining counties, as 
well as formed a wide circle of friends and admirers throughout the state. 



WILLIAM Y. HUA'IPHREYS, of Pittsburg, is a representative of a 
family which can be traced in England from the reign of William the Con- 
queror, several of the name being registered in the Doomsday Book. Members 
of the family were also enrolled in the ranks of the crusaders and endured the 
manifold perils and privations which beset those who consecrated themselves 
to the redemption of the holy sepulchre. 

Michael Humphreys, founder of the American branch of the race, came 
in 1643 from Lyme, England, and settled at Simsbury, Connecticut, and 
George Humphreys, great-grandfather of William Y. Humphreys, bore an 
honorable part in the war for independence. In 1775 he was colonel of the 
Seventeenth Regiment, Connecticut Militia, and was among those who rallied 
for the defense of Concord. 

George D. Humphreys, grandson of the Revolutionary hero, moved from 
Canton, Connecticut, to St. Louis, Missouri, and established the Mississippi 
Glass Company, of which he was president at the time of his death. He 
married Sarah Frances Young, and their children were : George, deceased ; 
William Y., of whom later; May, wife of William H. Coolidge, of Boston, 
Massachusetts ; and Ellen, wife of the Rev. Harry Hillard, of Oakland, 
California. The death of Mr. Humphreys, the father, occurred about 1877. 

William Y. Humphreys, son of George D. and Sarah Frances (Young) 
Humphreys, was born May 8, 1861, in St. Louis, where he was educated in 
public and private schools. At the age of sixteen, upon the death of his 
father, he entered the service of the Mississippi Glass Company. In 1887 he 
came to Pittsburg and engaged in the iron brokerage business under the firm 
name of Preston & Humphreys. The partnership was subsequently dissolved, 
and Mr. Humphreys became the senior member of the firm of Humphreys, 
Griffin & Company, an organization which was very successful and still con- 
ducts a large business in iron and steel. In i8g6 Mr. Humphreys organized 
the Bessemer Coke Company, and the following year formed the Empire Coke 
Company. Subsequently he founded the Columbia and Duquesne Coke Com- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 69 

panics, and shortly after merged them all together, with three other plants, 
forming the present Bessemer Coke Company. This firm, which began with 
one hundred ovens, has in a few years become next to the largest of the inde- 
pendent coke companies operating in the Connellsville region, employing about 
two thousand men and operating fourteen hundred ovens. 

Mr. Humphreys still retains the presidency of this company, and is also 
president of the Millsboro Coke Company, as well as vice-president of the 
Powell Coal & Coke Company and of the Pittsburg Coal Washer Company, in 
addition to being connected with numerous other enterprises. 

Air. Humphreys married. Xovember 21, 1892, Ellen Stephenson, daughter 
of John G. and Elizabeth Y. (Patterson) Stephenson, and they are the parents 
of six children: i. William Y., Jr. 2. John G. 3. Elizabeth S. 4. Alan S. 
5. Katherine S. 6. Richard A. While a very domestic man Mr. Humphreys 
is extremely fond of yachting, hunting and all outdoor sports, believing that 
a liberal amount of healthful pleasure is conducive to the best results in work. 



DR. JAMES A. LIBBEY, of the dental surgeon's profession of Pitts- 
burg, was born on a farm in Moon township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, 
August 29, 1846, the son of Bennett and Agnes (Littell) Libbey. His father 
was born in Vermont in 1805, and died in 1856. He was the son of Josiah 
Libbey, whose ancestors came to America in 1623 and settled in Vermont. 
Among the first of this family to come to our shores were five brothers ; one 
settled in Vermont, one in Massachusetts, one in New Hampshire and two in 
Maine. Bennett Libbey was a wood turner by trade and followed it all his 
life. At a very early day he settled in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, where he 
both farmed and worked at his trade. In his declining years he removed to 
Rochester, Pennsylvania, where he died. He was a member of the United 
Presbyterian church and much devoted to his family and home enjoyments. 
Politically he voted the Democratic ticket until the formation of the Repub- 
lican party, and then espoused that party's cause. He cast a vote for General 
John C. Fremont for president, and was afterward much interested in local 
and national politics. 

He married Agnes Littell, daughter of William Littell and wife ; she was 
born February 23, 1809, and died in November, 1889. In church and all 
benevolent affairs she was a very active woman. (See family history of the 
Littells elsewhere in this work.) Bennett and Agnes Littell were the parents 
of four children, as follows: i. Alice, unmarried, living at Salineville, Ohio. 
2. William Bennett, commonly known as Lieutenant Libbey, served in the 
Civil war in the Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, and died aged fifty-three 
in 1893. He was a dentist at Washington, Pennsylvania, and married Addie 
Sutton, to whom were born two daughters. 3. John Edgar, who died aged 
sixty, in 1903, married Mary McLain, and had one son, McLain, who was 
the assistant editor for the Washington Observer. John Edgar was also a 
dentist and practiced his profession for twenty-five years. He was a person 
of considerable note. He was of the United Presbyterian faith and devoted to 
the church of his choice. 4. Dr. James A. Libbey, the subject of this memoir. 

Dr. James A. Libbey spent his youthful days in Beaver county, Pennsyl- 
vania, attending the common schools and the Beaver Academy later. After 
leaving the academy he became a traveling salesman for the Wheeler & Wil- 



70 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

son Sewing Machine Company, continuing with them for six years. He then 
came to Pittsburg and took up dentistry with Dr. J. G. Templeton, and gradu- 
ated from Penn College of Dentistry with the class of 1882. Unassuming in 
manner, yet the profession in western Pennsylvania perhaps does not have a 
representative better posted in dentistry than he. He is a member of the 
Odontological Society, and was the president of that body from 1887 to 1893. 
He belongs to the Lake Erie Dental Association, and was its president in 1893; 
is a member of the Pennsylvania State Dental Society, and was its president 
in 1894; and is also a member of the National Dental Association, and was its 
president in 1902. He was member of the State Dental Board from 1890 to 
1902, serving as its president the last year named. 

Dr. Libbey is a member of the Presbyterian church, a ruling elder and 
superintendent of the Sunday-school for six years. Politically he is a Repub- 
lican. He is an advanced Mason, belongs to Orient Lodge, F. and A. M. ; Du- 
quesne Chapter, of which he is past high priest, and belongs to Pittsburg 
Commandery and the Consistory. 

He was united in marriage September 6, 1876, to Anna Russell, born in 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1849, daughter of Thomas and Clara 
(Cunningham) Russell. Dr. and Mrs. Libbey are the parents of two sons: 
I. James T., born at East Liverpool, Ohio, June 17, 1879, graduated from the 
Western University of Pennsylvania with the class of 1904 as a civil engineer, 
and is now stationed at Lakewood, New York, for the Erie Railroad Company ; 
he married Maud Hunter in March, 1906. 2. Wilber F., born in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, April 10, 1885, attended the Western University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and was fitted for a civil engineer. He is now at home. 

DR. JOHN LAUGHLIN MARTIN, who is one of Greater Pittsburg's 
prominent young physicians and surgeons, comes from one of the highly es- 
teemed families of the city. He is the son of Rev. Daniel Cowgill and Lu- 
crecia Mott (Mcintosh) Martin. The Doctor was born at Princeton, Indiana, 
July 29, 1878. He spent his early days in his native place, and when about nine 
years of age his parents removed to Pennsylvania, locating in Shaler township, 
Allegheny county. In 1899 the family removed to Pittsburg. The Doctor's 
education was commenced in the public schools, and in 1895 he entered Geneva 
College, at Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, from which institution he graduated 
in 1898. In April of the year last named he enlisted as a private and was pro- 
moted to corporal in Company B, Tenth Pennsylvania Regiment, to do service 
in the Spanish-American war. His regiment was first ordered to Mt. Gretna, 
Pennsylvania, and from there left for San Francisco, three weeks later sailed 
for the Philippine Islands, arriving July 14, and was in one of the first regi- 
ments to land in that country. He remained there in active service until Sep- 
tember, 1899, when he returned to San Francisco and was honorably dis- 
charged and mustered out of service. He at once returned to Pittsburg, and 
soon thereafter entered the Western Pennsylvania Medical College, graduating 
from that institution in 1903, after which he was made resident physician at 
St. John's Hospital at Allegheny, where he continued three months, and was 
then resident physician of the Western Pennsylvania Hospital four months. 
The next year he spent in the South Side Hospital. The next seven months 
he was physician at the Marshalsea Asylum at Marshalsea, Pennsylvania. In 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 71 



July, 1907, he opened his office as physician and surgeon in most elegantly 
equipped office rooms at No. 127 North Highland avenue, Pittsburg, where he 
now enjoys an excellent practice. 

Dr. Martin is a member of the Allegheny Medical Society, a member of 
the Pennsylvania State Medical Association, of the American Medical Society, 
and of the West Pennsylvania Society. Politically he is a supporter of the Re- 
publican party. In business affairs he is ever alert to the best interests of the 
city in which he resides. He is connected with the Pittsburg Board of Trade 
and seeks to further every good enterprise. He belongs to the Reformed Pres- 
byterian church on North Highland avenue, where he is an active worker in 
the Sunday-school and young people's societies. 

Dr. Martin was married at Somerset, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1906, to 
Mary Margaret McClean, born in Washington, District of Columbia, September 
22, 1878, and a graduate of Washington Seminary of that city. She is the 
daughter of John and Jane (Olmstead) McClean. Her father is a prominent 
contractor and builder and constructed the Insane Asylum at Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia. Mrs. Martin's family trace their lineage back to members 
of Revolutionary fame. The Doctor and wife now reside at No. 401 North 
Highland avenue, Pittsburg. 



CAMPBELL G. ELWOOD, proprietor of Kenwood Lawn, Pittsburg, and 
also connected with the fire insurance business, was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, September 5, 1852, son of John and Sarah (Campbell) 
Elwood. His father was born in Westmoreland county and both himself and 
wife were of Scotch-Irish extraction. The grandfather Elwood came from 
Ireland. In his early life the subject's father was a barn-builder, but later be- 
came a farmer. He died in 1864, aged either forty-five or forty-six years. 
Politically he was a Democrat. He married Miss Sarah Campbell, a native of 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, born in 1822. Her people also were of 
Scotch-Irish stock and came from Ireland originally. She is now eighty-five 
years of age and makes her home with her son, Campbell G., in Pittsburg. 
Mr. and Mrs. John Elwood were the parents of four children, three of whom 
still survive: i. Campbell G., of this notice, of whom later. 2. Sadie, unmar- 
ried. 3. Nannie, wife of Sloan Smith, of Seattle, Washington. 

Campbell G. Elwood remained at home until fifteen years of age, receiving 
only a limited education. Soon after his father's death he was forced to work 
to assist in the support of the family. In 1867 he went into the lumbering dis- 
tricts of Indiana and Clearfield counties, Pennsylvania, where he worked about 
two years. He then went to Saltsburg and learned the carpenter's trade, and 
in 1877 went to the oil fields of Venango county, Pennsylvania, where he fol- 
lowed tank-building, drilling and dressing tools. After one year in that locality 
he went to the Bradford oil region, where he drilled, dressed tools and con- 
tracted for some time. His next work was the superintendency of Pugh & 
Emerson's plant in their McKean county, Pennsylvania, field of operations. 
He held this position until 1882, when he moved to Pittsburg and took charge 
of laying a line of thirteen miles for them from Marysville to Pittsburg, com- 
pleting the task within sixty-two days, he having the entire charge of the 
work. He remained with this firm in Pittsburg for two years, at which time 
they sold out, after which Mr. Elwood became superintendent for the George 



72 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

W. Westinghouse gas interests. When the Philadelphia was formed he was 
made assistant superintendent of that business and assigned to the east dis- 
trict, in which capacity he remained seven years and resigned to accept the 
position of assistant superintendent under E. M. Bigelow, city superintendent of 
highways and sewers. He continued in this work for six years, then engaged 
in contracting, grading and paving. This required more capital than he could 
then command, and he sold his business to another and entered the fire insur- 
ance business, with which he is still identified. In 1895 he sub-leased and began 
the operation of the Kenwood Lawn, which property he purchased April 
I, 1906. 

In politics Mr. Elwood is a supporter of the Republican party generally. 
He has been a dominant factor in politics for many years, and his eflforts to 
promote honest city and county government have come to be a part of the 
local history of the city and county in which he resides. It goes without say- 
ing that his efforts along reformed political lines have not been without bitter 
opposition, but not without having resulted in much good for the masses. 

He is a member of James B. Nicholson Lodge No. 585, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, also of the Protected Home Circle. 

Mr. Elwood was united in marriage in 1895 to Miss Lydia, daughter of 
James Simons and wife. Her father is the present government inspector on 
the river at Pittsburg. No issue by this marriage union. 



JAMES VERNER McMASTERS, ESQ., alderman representing the 
Second ward of the city of Pittsburg, was born in this city December 24, 1854, 
son of Samuel and Isabella (Calvert) McMasters, he being one of seven in 
his parents' family. The father, Samuel McMasters, was born in county 
Down, Ireland, in 1834, and came to the United States in 1844, locating in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he spent his later years in various business 
enterprises, including the livery business, which he conducted for a number 
of years. In politics he voted the Democratic ticket. He was a citizen of more 
than ordinary influence and an^ active party worker. He served as alderman 
three terms from the Fifth ward of his city. He died in the month of Decem- 
ber, 1 90 1. He married Isabella Calvert, a native of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
born in 1823 ; her parents came from Ireland at an early day. She died in De- 
cember, 1899, aged seventy-six years. The issue of Samuel and Isabella (Cal- 
vert) McMasters was seven children, four of whom survive, as follows : Anna 
L., wife of Ezekiel Guy, Binghampton ; Richard E., of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Isabella, wife of C. V. McClure, Pittsburg; and James Verner, of whom 
later. 

James V. McMasters obtained his education in the Third ward public 
schools of Pittsburg, and in his young manhood days began his career as a 
clerk in the prothonotary's office of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, under B. 
F. Kennedav, the prothonotary. After about two years thus engaged he en- 
tered the office of his father, who was alderman of the Fifth ward of the city, 
remaining until 1877, when he became an employe of James Getty, a whole- 
sale liquor dealer of Pittsburg, serving in a clerical capacity until 1885, when 
he was elected alderman of the Second ward, which position he has held five 
consecutive terms — twenty-two years. Politically Mr. McMasters is a Repub- 
lican. He is accounted one of the leading representative men of his city. He 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 73 



is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 11, 
Pittsburg, and is also connected with the American Mechanics order. Since 
the death of his father he has resided at the JMononrahela House. 



GEORGE ELIAS ALTER, numbered among the successful practicing 
attorneys-at-law in Greater Pittsburg, was born at Springdale. Allegheny coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1868, son of Elias and Martha (Person) Alter. The 
line of his ancestry is traced as follows from Germany ; 

(I) Jacob Alter, the American ancestor, was a native of Hesse-Darm- 
stadt, Germany, and came to America on the ship "Beulah" from Rotterdam, 
and was qualified as a citizen at Philadelphia September 10, 1753. He took the 
oath of allegiance in 1778, having settled in Cocallico township, Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania. He was enrolled in the Revolutionary army in the Sec- 
ond Battalion, Pennsylvania Line, United States Infantry. Afterward he re- 
moved to Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and there established a flouring 
mill known as Alter's Mill, on Conodeguinet creek, and acquired a large tract 
of land in West Pennsboro and Franklin townships. A part of the Alter lands 
are situated near Alterton Station, on the Cumberland Valley railroad, and 
still in the hands of the Alter family. Jacob Alter, the American ancestor above 
named, married Margaret Landis. 

Of the Landis line it may be stated in this connection that Hans Graafe 
came from Switzerland to Philadelphia in 1696 and settled in the Paguea 
valley. In 1718 he removed to "Graaf's Hal," afterward Earl township, Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased fourteen hundred and six 
acres of land and built a mill on the Conestoga creek. He is said to have been 
a very prominent man in his day and was one of the commissioners to lay out 
a road from Lancaster to Philadelphia in 1733 (see Colonial Records, Volume 
III, page 521). The township of Earl was named for him and in the foreign 
tongue was "Graaf." In ex-Governor Pennypacker's book, "Settlement of 
Germantown" (1899), on page 63, he is named as one of those who sent chil- 
dren of the famous school kept by Francis Daniel Pastorious at Germantown. 
To Hans Graaf and wife, Susanna, were born nine children, including a 
daughter named Veronica. 

Benjamin Landis came from Switzerland and settled in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, prior to 1720, taking up eight hundred acres of land in Manheim 
township. He was a preacher of the Mennonite denomination. He had a son, 
Henry Landis, who took up land by patent and purchase in Manheim township, 
where he died in 1769. He married Veronica Graafe, above named, and of 
their children was the above-named Margaret Landis, who married Jacob Alter 
some time between 1760 and 1767. 

(II) David Alter, fourth child of Jacob and Margaret (Landis) Alter, 
was born February 7, 1775, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. On Septem- 
ber I, 1797. he married Elizabeth Mell, and about the year 1800 David and his 
wife moved from Cumberland county to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and 
effected settlement on Puckety creek, about two and a half miles from the 
present town of Parnassus, on the Allegheny river. Here he purchased lands 
on both sides of the creek, which is the dividing line between Allegheny and 
Westmoreland counties, and there built a grist mill which was known as Alter's 



74 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Mills for over half a century. He died in 1838. His sister, Susanna Alter, 
was the wife of Governor Joseph Ritner. 

(HI) Elias Alter, the ninth son of David and Elizabeth (Mell) Alter, 
was born May 20, 1820, and he became the subject's father. The place of his 
birth was at Alter's Mills, on Puckety creek, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
He was reared on his father's farm and learned the carpenter's trade, and sub- 
sequently removed to Manchester, a part of the late city of Allegheny and now 
a part of Pittsburg, where he worked at his trade, and at one time conducted 
a planing mill. His education was such as was afforded at the schools common 
at that day. In his religious faith he was a Methodist Episcopal from his early 
years to the date of his death. He held the positions of trustee, steward and 
class-leader in the church at Springdale. In politics he was an ardent sup- 
porter of Republican party principles. In his home township — Springdale— he 
held the offices of assessor and school director, being for several years president 
of the sc'hool board. During the Civil war he volunteered in the Union cause, 
but was rejected on account of physical incapacity, having been seriously crip- 
pled by accidents in working about planing mill machinery. He was united in 
marriage in 1849 to Martha Person and in 1861 moved to Millerstown, Al- 
legheny county, and from there in 1867 to Springdale, where he continued to 
reside until his death, January 5, 1889. Martha Person was born in the city 
of Pittsburg May 23, 1823, and died at Springdale June 14, 1906. She was 
the daughter of Andrew and Mary (Lindsey) Person, both of whom were na- 
tives of Pennsylvania, the former being of Scotch-Irish and the latter of Ger- 
man ancestry. 

(IV) George Elias Alter, son of Elias and Martha (Person) Alter, was 
educated at the public schools, supplemented by private study. He early chose 
law as his profession and fitted himself for such work and occupation. He 
was admitted to the bar of Allegheny county December 16, 1893, and is at 
present a member of the law firm of Alter & Wright, formed January i, 1907. 
He is painstaking and correct in his methods and has already built up a lucra- 
tive legal business. Aside from his business as an attorney-at-law he is one 
of the directors of the Springdale National Bank and has held such position 
since the bank was organized. 

He affiliates with the Republican party and is a member of the Republican 
county committee for Allegheny county, and has been a delegate to the Repub- 
lican state conventions of 1906 and 1907. He is at this date ( 1907) president 
of the council of the borough of Springdale and formerly of the , Springdale 
school board, and is now one of the candidates from his district for member of 
the next session of the Pennsylvania legislature. In his church relations he is 
connected with the Methodist Episcopal church and has been so identified since 
1880. He has been a member of the official board since 1887 and a trustee 
continuously since 1890. He has also been superintendent of the Sunday-school 
since lanuary, 1902. Socially and fraternally Mr. Alter is connected with the 
following societies : The Pittsburg Young Men's Christian Association, being 
a member of the committee on evening classes ; belongs to Friendship Conclave 
No. 3, Independent Order of Heptasophs, joining in 1892 ; Springdale Lodge 
No. 1052, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, since 1896. being now a past 
grand and member of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania ; and is also a member 
of Pollock Lodge, F. and A. M. In stature Mr. Alter is of somewhat excep- 






PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 75 

tional size, being six feet four inches in height in his stockings and weighing at 
present two hundred and twenty-five pounds. 

Concerning the subject's domestic relations it may be said he was united 
in marriage, September 11, 1902, at Grace Cathedral (Episcopal), Indianapolis, 
Indiana, to Miss Diana J. Swanton, daughter of Job B. and Diana (Swanton) 
Swanton, both natives of Ireland. Her father is an expert in the manufacture 
of glue. Mrs. Alter was educated in the public schools at Peabody, Massachu- 
setts, and Springdale, Pennsylvania, also at the high school of Allegheny Ci>^v 
and at Smith's College, at Northampton, Massachusetts. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Alter have been born two children: i. Kathleen Elisabeth Alter, born at 
Springdale, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1905. 2. Helen Martha Alter, born at 
Springdale, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1907. 

GEORGE T. BARNSLEY, a civil engineer and the present county road 
engineer of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, is a native of Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, born in 1864, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Barnsley. He 
descends from an English and French Huguenot family which settled in Penn- 
sylvania, above Philadelphia on the Delaware river, in 1756. One of the proud- 
est pages in the history of this family is that connected with the war for inde- 
pendence, in which its members took an active part. 

George T. Barnsley was educated at public and private schools in Mont- 
gomery county, and later took a course at Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, 
Pennsylvania, and there obtained a thorough knowledge of civil engineering 
so far as text-books could enlighten him. He then sought out the practical 
workings of his professional knowledge by entering the employ of the Norfolk 
and Western Railway Company, beginning as a rodman in the engineering 
corps of that company in 1887. He put his every care and energy into the task 
at hand and, was soon promoted, and remained in the employ of that corpora- 
tion for nearly six years, after which his services were in demand by more 
than one company having engineering work to perform. He was the engineer 
for various railroads, including the Pennsylvania system, where he gained the 
needed experience to make him a master of his profession. He paid special at- 
tention to bridge and tunnel construction, in which branch of civil engineering 
he was looked upon as an expert. 

In 1901, when the great Wabash system of railway decided to gain an en- 
trance to Pittsburg, he was sought for as the proper man to manage the work, 
and in this he proved his skill fully adequate to the undertaking. He was made 
resident engilieer in charge of the Pittsburg terminals, which work included 
the Monongahela river bridge. This took his time until June 15, 1905, when he 
was made chief engineer of the lines of the Wabash road east of Toledo, Ohio. 
He severed his connection with the company named October 16, 1905. The 
work of his engineering skill while with this corporation will long stand as so 
many monuments to his care, good judgment and correct knowledge of modern 
civil engineering, while the same also commemorates the long, hard-fought con- 
test which it was necessary to go through in order that the Wabash svstem 
might gain its entrance into the city of Pittsburg, thus giving the place another 
great trunk line. As resident engineer of the Pittsburgh, Carnegie and Western 
road he superintended the gigantic work on the Pittsburg terminal, construct- 
ing the famous cantilever bridge, the station and Duquesne way improvements. 



76 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Indeed, few men can point to more engineering feats of a purely modem 
type m engineering than Mr. Barnsley. His name stands for all that is re- 
markable and excellent in his profession throughout Pennsylvania and adjoin- 
ing states. By sheer native genius for this kind of skill has he forged his 
way to his present position, with no lack of will, energy and studious habits 
to bring about desired results. He was made the chief road engineer for Al- 
legheny county in 1906, a position which he is eminently fitted to fill. 

He is among the prominent members of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers, as well as of the Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania. He is 
also an active member of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, a life member of the Franklin Institute, member of the Engineers' 
Club of Philadelphia, the Art Society of Pittsburg, and many other societies 
of art and science. 

He was married in 1890 to Miss Susa C, daughter of Josiah and Mary 
Jones, at Olney, Maryland. One son bears his name, George T., born in 1893. 

JAMES McCLINTOCK CREIGHTON, deceased, was well known in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and during his active career was prominently con- 
nected with the railroad and transportation companies of Pennsylvania. He 
was a descendant in the third generation of James Creighton, a farmer of 
Donegal county, Ireland, a member of the Episcopal church, and a man of 
character and influence in his neighborhood. James Creighton married Mar- 
garet Stewart, who bore him two sons, John and David. (See sketch of 
William Creighton.) 

John Creighton, the eldest son of James and Margaret (Stewart) Creigh- 
ton, learned the trade of carpenter in his native land. He was the first of the 
family to come to the United States, and he settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
where he engaged in contracting and building. He was prosperous in business 
and became the owner of Pittsburg real estate, the ^ite of the present jail in that 
city being a portion of his property. He was an Episcopalian in religion and 
a Republican in politics. He married Catherine McClintock, who bore him 
three sons and one daughter. 

James McClintock Creighton, eldest son of John and Catherine (Mc- 
Clintock) Creighton, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 27. 
183 1, and died November 20, 1887, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His early 
education was obtained in the public schools of his native city, and at the age 
of fifteen he engaged in business as a clerk. After a few years of mercantile 
life he entered the employ of Leech's Canal Packet Line, continuing for a 
number of years. He then entered the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad, 
being connected with the transfer department at the old Duquesne Station. By 
capable and efficient work he was soon promoted to the position of assistant 
superintendent of that department, later to that of general agent, and subse- 
quently to that of superintendent of the Western Pennsylvania Railroad, with 
headquarters at Blairsville. After a term there he was made manager of the 
Union Line at Philadelphia, and then general freight agent for the same com- 
pany. His ability was now well known and attracted the attention of men 
prominent in the control of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, with the result 
that he was elected vice-pt'esident of that road. Here his wonderful executive 
abilitv was given greater opportunity, and he was instrumental in obtaining 




JAMES M. CREIGHTON. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 77 



many valuable concessions and franchises that enabled that company to- enter 
Philadelphia and compete for eastern business. He resigned the vice-presi- 
dency and retired from railroad life to accept the presidency of the Ohio Valley 
Gas Company at East Liverpool, Ohio. This position he retained until his 
death. j\Ir. Creighton took an active interest in matters political and always 
acted with the Republican party. He held membership in the Episcopal church 
and in the Masonic order of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Creighton married, July 22, 1858, Louise H. Roessing, born in Wa- 
pukonett, Ohio, December 14, 1839, daughter of Bernhard and Julia (Wescott) 
Roessing. The children born of this marriage were: i. Catherine C. 2. 
Julia W., married John C. Dihvorth, and died January 19, 1892, leaving a son, 
Creighton (see Dihvorth sketch). 3. Bernhard, deceased. 4. John, engaged in 
the mining business in Nevada, married x^da Greenstein. 5. Laura H., wife of 
Jesse L. Van Gorder, children: Louise, John, Jesse and Catherine. 

Bernhard Roessing, father of Mrs. Creighton, was a native of Hershfield, 
Germany, and wnth his three. brothers came to the United States and settled in 
Ohio. He later came to Butler, Pennsylvania, where he was a prominent mer- 
chant in business life covering a period of forty years. He married Julia 
Wescott, of Oswego county. New York, a daughter of an old and prominent 
New England family. They were the parents of six sons and three daughters. 
Bernhard Roessing died at the age of seventy-three, his wife attaining the same 
age. 

Louise H. (Roessing) Creighton was quite young when the family re- 
moved to Butler, Pennsylvania. She was educated "in the public schools and 
Witherspoon Institute. She is a member of the Episcopal church and a gen- 
erous contributor to its support. She resides at 6104 Hoeveler street, Pittsburg, 
Pennsvlvania. 



\VILLL\M CREIGHTON, of Crafton borough, with whose development 
he has been closely connected and largely instrumental, is a descendant in the 
third generation of James Creighton, of Ireland. (See sketch of James 
McC. Creighton.) He is a son of David Creighton, one of the two sons of 
James Creighton. 

David Creighton was born in county Donegal, Ireland, 1795, and died in 
Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, 1855. He received an excellent education in the 
schools of his native land, was a bookkeeper by occupation, and accumulated 
property which he lost largely through litigation. When his elder brother John 
emigrated to the United States, David remained at home, married and reared a 
family of six children. In 1848, accompanied by his wife and children, he 
sailed' for this country to join his brother in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, but on 
the vovage Mrs. Creighton died and was buried at sea. David and the children 
continued their journey to Pittsburg, where he settled on the South Side, pur- 
suing his occupation of bookkeeper in that city, and keeping his children with 
him until his death in i860, when the family scattered to various sections. His 
children were: i. John, born 1835, engineer by profession, Methodist in 
religion. Democrat iii politics ; married Sadie Jones, now deceased, no children. 
2. WilHam, see forward. 3. Elizabeth, unmarried, resides in Philadelphia. 4. 
Tames, died at the age of sixteen years. 5. Jane, wife of Charles Peffer, of 
Tarentum, Pennsvlvania, three living children. 6. Henry, late of New Bright- 



78 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



on, Pennsylvania ; he was an engineer by profession ; married Millie Jones, and 
left three sons, who with their mother reside at New Brighton. 

William Creighton, second son of David and Jane (Erskine) Creighton, 
the latter of whom was a daughter of William and Jane Erskine. of county 
Donegal. Ireland, was born in county Donegal, September 15, 1837. He at- 
tended the public schools of the Third ward, Pittsburg, acquiring a practical 
education. He was employed in Pittsburg by different firms until arriving at 
majority, when he became a riverman, boating coal to New Orleans and other 
river points. He became a pilot, and during the war was in charge of the 
movement of river coal for the government. In 1863 he retired from the river 
and began farming, also owning rriany teams and conducting general contract- 
ing, grading, etc. He went to the oil regions when the Allegheny county field 
was exploited, and for ten years was engaged in a very heavy business of 
hauling and delivering to the wells their machinery and supplies. He is one 
of the representative citizens of Chartiers township, and his residence in Graf- 
ton, which was built in 1871, was the second building erected in the borough 
which now (1908) contains many thousands. He is the owner of large real 
estate holdings in Crafton and farm property in Morgan county, Ohio. In 
1881 he was elected supervisor of Chartiers township, and reelected several 
times since to the same office ; in 1898 was made chief inspector of the county 
roads ; in 1903 assistant superintendent of county roads, which position he still 
retains, and has served as councilman and assessor of the borough of Crafton. 
He is a director of the Trust Company of Crafton. He is a Republican in 
politics, casting his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He has always been an 
active political worker, and stands high in the local councils of his party. Mr. 
Creighton, now in his seventy-first year, is hale and hearty, and is a man of 
commanding influence in his borough. 

William Creighton married, in March, 1863, Elizabeth Dinsmore, born in 
Crafton, in 1837, daughter of Henry and Margaret Dinsmore, who were the 
parents of eight children. The homestead of the Dinsmore family, where Mrs. 
Creighton was born, was an old log cabin located about midway between Brad- 
ford and Noble avenues, about one square distant from the crossing point of 
those two thoroughfares. Henry Dinsmore with his wife and eight children 
made their home in the log cabin from 1822 until 1847. Prosperity favored the 
Dinsmore family and a more modern and commodious homestead soon sup>- 
planted the crude structure, occupied by the family for over twenty years. Al- 
most adjoining the log cabin Mr. Dinsmore erected his new house, which is 
still in a good state of preservation. The exact date of the erection of the log 
house is difficult to determine, but it is known to have stood at least a century, 
and has probably been standing for a period of twenty-five years longer. Five 
acres of the original Dinsmore farm, together with the log house, were in the 
possession of Mrs. William Creighton at the time of her death, and it is a point 
of interest because of its connection with the early history of the Chartiers 
Vallev. Mrs. Creighton died January 26, 1908, aged seventy-one years. She 
was the last survivor of the eight children of Henry and Margaret Dinsmore. 
She was an earnest, active, useful member of the Hawthorne Avenue Presby- 
terian church and very liberal in her benefactions. 

Children of William and Elizabeth (Dinsmore) Creighton: i. Jane, 
widow of James Murphy and mother of two children, Creighton and Marie 
Murphy. 2. Margaret, wife of Vance Spohn, a merchant of Crafton ; chil- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 79 



dren : Harry, William, Alice and Grace. 3. William, cultivates his father's 
farm of two hundred and forty acres in Morgan county, Ohio; married Mar- 
garet Kelly, children : William, Regis, Jennie, Josephine, Vincent and Mildred 
4. Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Davin, superintendent of street car lines north 
of the river; children, Delia and Elizabeth; the family resides in Crafton. 5 
David, died at the age of two years. 6 and 7. James McClintock and Ella 
(twins), died in infancy. Mr. Creighton and family are members of tht 
Hawthorne Avenue Presbvterian church. 



JOHN 'A. HARBAUGH, who has been closely identified with the busi- 
ness interests of the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, for many years, and who 
has his place of business at No. 514 Homewood avenue, in that city, is well 
known throughout the community for his sterling integrity and reliable busi- 
ness methods. He is a representative of one of the old families of Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania. 

Henry P. Harbaugh, father of John A. Harbaugh, was a native of New 
Stanton, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he was born in 1816. 
Early in life he established himself in the mercantile business, and this he fol- 
lowed all his life. He married Sarah Kintigh and has children: John A., of 
whom see forward ; Fannv K., Frank, Jennie M., Clark M., Margaret and 
Harry P. 

John A. Harbaugh, eldest child of Henry P. and Sarah (Kintigh) Har- 
baugh, was born in New Stanton, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber I, 1846. He was educated in the public schools and in Mount Pleasant 
College, and upon the completion of his education taught school for one term. 
He came to Pittsburg in 1867 and established himself in the hotel business, 
with which he was associated for a period of four years. He located in Home- 
wood avenue in 1871 and commenced a general store, which he has now (1906) 
conducted very successfully for thirty-five years. His pleasant demeanor, cour- 
teous manner ^nd excellent business methods rendered this enterprise a profit- 
able one. He h?s always taken an intelligent and active interest in public af- 
fairs, and was elected school director for a period of three years. 

He married Elizabeth Lobingier, daughter of John C. Lobingier. and they 
have had children : Harry, deceased ; Blanche S., Maude E., Birdie M., Percy 
C, Edward J. and Elizabeth L. Mr. Harbaugh is a member of Dallas 
Lodge No. 508. Free and Accepted Masons ; Chapter No. 268, and Duquesne 
Commandery No. 72. 



MAJOR EDWARD LEE KEARNS, prominent in the legal profession 
of Greater Pittsburg, w-as born at the Bolton Hotel, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
March 31, 1873, son of Edward P. and Martina (Burke) Kearns. He traces 
his ancestry in this country as follows : 

(I) Edward Kearns, the grandfather, was born at Carrick Macross, 
county Monaghan, Ireland, September 17, 1793, and came to Baltimore, Mary- 
land, while quite young and to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 15, 1807. He 
died in Pittsburg October 14, 1864. Among his children by his wife, Mary 
Quinn, whom he married at Pittsburg February 6. 1823, was a son named Ed- 
ward P. Kearns. 



8o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



(II) Edward P. Kearns, the father of Major Edward Lee Kearns, was 
born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, February 23. 1833. He was educated at the 
public schools of his native city and at Gray's School. He represented the old 
Third ward in council for two terms and was connected with the Pittsburg 
Post. He also worked in the old postoffice. He was a partner of Bartley 
Campbell, the once famous actor and playwright, and they jointly published 
the Working Man's Advocate. Later he was in the United States revenue serv- 
ice, and was appointed collector of internal revenue by President Cleveland 
during his second term of office on May 23, 1893. He is still living and keep- 
ing house at 5639 Woodmont street, Pittsburg. He married Martina Burke, 
born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, October 13, 1844, daughter of Michael and 
Mary A. (Findlay) Burke. Michael Burke and Mary A. Findlay were married 
at Lockport, New York, April 6, 1824, and moved to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
locating there in the early part of the last century. 

Concerning Michael Burke it may be said that he was a noted character 
of his day and generation, full of energy and pluck, and accomplished much 
for the material upbuilding of the commonwealth and was a highly respected 
citizen of Harrisburg many years. He was born September 29, 1797, in Temple 
Trathen, county Tipperary, Ireland, and when very young went to Newfound- 
land. He was a contractor and constructed portions of the Juniata division of 
the Pennsylvania canal between Mexico and Lewistown, Pennsylvania. He 
commenced and was interested in the first packet line from Philadelphia to 
Harrisburg, and was also interested in the portable line over the mountains, 
described in the general chapters of this work. The first and pioneer blast 
furnace erected at Harrisburg was built by Mr. Burke and Governor David 
Rittenhouse Porter. It stood along the line of the Pennsylvania canal above 
State street. He also constructed portions of the Pennsylvania railroad be- 
tween Harrisburg and Pittsburg, as well as parts of the Northern Central rail- 
road between Harrisburg and York, Pennsylvania. The original bridge span- 
ning the waters of the Susquehanna river at Rockville just above Harrisburg 
was under his supervision at the time it was erected at an early date. This 
stood on the site of the present wonderful stone arch bridge recently erected. 
At Baltimore, Maryland, he constructed the reservoirs in i860, and was en- 
gaged in the erection of the reservoir at Washington, District of Columbia, at 
the time of his death, August 16, 1864. 

He became widely known as well as popular in Harrisburg in his interest 
in the first waterworks system the city had constructed. Mr. Burke was chosen 
to a seat in the borough council of Harrisburg, and for a time was president 
of the legislative body of the city, and became personally responsible for the 
payment of loans secured for the construction of the waterworks. The coat- 
of-arms of the Burke family have inscribed on them, "Un Roy, LTn Lov and 
Un Foy." 

(Ill) Major Edward L. Kearns, eldest son of Edward P. and Martina 
(Burke) Kearns, was educated at the Harrisburg Academy and at Pittsburg 
College. He left college to read law with David T. Watson, Esq., of the Al- 
legheny county bar. He was admitted to the bar on December 14, 1895, since 
which time he has been in constant practice. In 1899 he formed a partnership 
with Andrew G. Smith, under the firm name of Smith & Kearns, which con- 
tinued until October i, 1905, since which time he has practiced alone at No. 
561 Frick .'Xnncx, Pittsburg. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 8i 



He was assistant custodian of the Federal building at Pittsburg, under 
his father as custodian, in 1894. In military affairs Mr. Kearns has for many 
years taken an active part in Pennsylvania. He enlisted as a private in Troop 
M, First United States Volunteer Cavalry ("Rough Riders"), in 1898. The 
troop was stationed at Tampa, Florida, and mustered out of service at Montauk 
Point, Long Island. He did not see service. He then enlisted as private in 
Company B, Eighteenth Regiment (Duquesne Greys), January 19, 1899. He 
was elected second lieutenant of Company B March 29, 1899; elected first lieu- 
tenant of Company B January 31, 1900; appointed captain and regimental ad- 
jutant November 13, 1902; elected major March 4, 1904. He was assigned to 
command the battalion consisting of Companies F, I, D and G, and served as 
first lieutenant of Company B during the hard coal strike while the regiment 
was doing duty at Shenandoah, October, 1902. 

He belongs to the following clubs and societies : Harkaway Hunt, Ameri- 
cus Republican Club, Pittsburg Field Club, Fort Pitt Rifle Club, Pittsburg 
Polo Club and the Pennsylvania Forestry Association. 

Major Kearns is unmarried and is of a family of the following children, 
born to Mr. and Airs. Edward P. Kearns: i. Edward Lee, born March 31, 
1873. 2. Burke U., born March 10, 1877, resides in Pittsburg and is em- 
ployed as chief clerk for the Vandergrift Distilling Company of Pittsburg. 3. 
A. Reginald, born May 22, 1878, a mining engineer at Cananea, Sonora, Mex- 
ico. All were born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 



JAMES MOORE FULLERTON, among the most prominent of Pitts- 
burg's funeral directors, is a native of this city, born June 13, 1850, son of John 
and Unity (Gallaher) Fullerton. John Fullerton, the father, was born at 
Omagh, county Tyrone, Ireland, September 7, 1810, and he was the son of 
William and Elizabeth (Wilson) Fullerton. The family comes of old Scotch 
Presbyterian ancestry. The grandfather, after leading a quiet life on the farm 
in countv Tyrone, Ireland, died when John was but nineteen months old. The 
grandmother, who was a native of the same place and who died in 183 1, brought 
her family of eight children to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1823. Of this im- 
mediate family none survive. They were as follows: i. Mary, who married 
John Ramsey and died at the age of ninety-one years. 2. Jane, a maiden lady, 
who died aged about seventy-three. 3. Margaret, who married John Moore, 
and died at the advanced age of ninety-nine years, six months and twenty-eight 
days. 4. Eliza, who married John Mitcheltree, of Middlesex, Pennsylvania, 
and died aged ninety-three years. 5. Ann, who married James Gardner, died 
at the age of seventy-four years. 6. James, who died in Pittsburg, aged fifty- 
five years. 7. Robert, who was supposed to have been captured by the Indians 
in 1845, was never afterward heard of. 8. John, who became the father of the 
subject of this sketch. He died May 21, 1901. 

John Fullerton, the father, obtained his education both in Ireland, and 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He came to the city of Pittsburg when but twelve 
years old, and was a constant resident for seventy-nine years. Thus he saw 
the place grow from one of small importance to its present magnitude, and in 
his later years he took great delight in relating things connected with this won- 
derful transformation. It is said that he was perhaps the best-posted man of 
his day concerning the city and its growth. He was the founder and organizer 



82 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



of the Pittsburgh Historical Society, in which he took an active part up to the 
date of his death, and to whom future generations and general historians will 
ever be greatly indebted. When a mere lad he was bound out, after the 
olden style, and became an apprentice to Samuel Boyce in the tobacco busi- 
ness, learning all the various branches of that trade. At the expiration of his 
apprenticeship he established himself in business in Pittsburg, and followed it 
for fifty-eight years, having been in business longer than any other man in 
the city at that time. During the Civil war he was largely engaged in the man- 
ufacturing business and employed many men in his establishment. He became 
an extensive jobber in tobacco goods, and continued in active business to 1885, 
being then eighty-five years of age. From that date to the time of his death 
he led a retired life. He was one of the original organizers of the Second Na- 
tional Bank of Pittsburg, and also of the Pittsburgh Insurance Company, of 
which he was a director, the son, James M., still remaining a director in place 
of his father. In his political views he was a Republican, but cared not for 
office, but was school director in the Fourth ward of the city. He was con- 
nected with the Methodist Episcopal church for more than fifty years ; at first 
a member of the old Wesley chapel on Smithfield street, where he served on 
the official board. Subsequently he joined the Christ church on Liberty street, 
and still later the North Avenue church in Allegheny City. In each of these 
he bore a conspicuous part. His wife, who also held the same church relations, 
died September 7, 1895, aged seventy-six years. 

He married Unity Gallaher, May 21, 1839, and to this union were born the 
following children: i. John T., who died September 18, 1904. 2. Susan A. 
3. William W., of Venango, Pennsylvania. 4. Samuel R. 5. James M., of 
whom later. 

James M. Fullerton, the subject, attended the Fourth ward schools and 
later a private school at Sewickley, thus gaining a good education. He also 
took a preparatory course in business, and then entered his father's store, later 
becoming a partner with his brother, William W., under the firm name of 
John Fullerton & Sons. In 1883 he withdrew from the firm and engaged in 
the undertaking business, locating on Penn avenue. His business prospered 
under his excellent management, and he removed to more suitable quarters on 
Ninth street, where offices, a chapel for services and a show room were fitted 
up. He remained there until July 19, 1904, when he moved to his present quar- 
ters at 2007 Fifth avenue. He is a skillful embalmer, which, together with his 
courteous manner, has won for him the success which has crowned his efforts. 
In 1904 he was president of the Pennsylvania Funeral Directors' Association, 
and is at present the president of the Allegheny County Funeral Directors' 
Association. 

In politics Mr. Fullerton is a Republican, and served as chairman of the 
Fourth ward committee for a number of years. He is a member of the Tariff 
Club and numerous other political organizations, in which he alwavs takes a 
lively interest. During the years 1904, 1905 and 1906 he was a member of the 
common council from the Fourth ward. He served twelve years on the school 
board of which his father had been a member, and represented the Fourth 
ward in the central board of education. In fraternal societies he is prominent, 
being a member of Franklin Lodge No. 221, F. and A. M. ; Schenley Park 
Lodge No. 1039, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Lodge No. 11, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, Pittsburg ; the Junior Order of United 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 83 

American Mechanics, Lodge No. 117; and the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 
392. He attends and aids in the support of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
the church of his father. 

Mr. Fullerton married, December 13, 1906, Miss LiUie Wagner, daughter 
of Gottlieb and Mary (Hite) Wagner, the former a native of Germany and 
the latter born in Pittsbure. 



CHARLES B. GREEN. Among the younger generation of men^who are 
spending their lives in the public service, and by their order-loving e.xample are 
doing much to further the interests of the community, may be mentioned the 
name of Charles B. Green, who resides at No. 522 Aspen street, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

George T. Green, father of Charles B. Green, was born in North Buffalo, 
Pennsylvania, in 1848, and died in 1888. He was prominently identified with 
the lumber trade throughout his life. He married Annie E. Gray, and they had 
children : Harry L. ; Charles B., of whom see forward ; John L., who died in 

1883; Mary, who married Hawley ; Cecelia, who died in 1904; and 

George T., Jr. 

Charles B. Green, second son and child of George T. and Annie E. (Gray) 
Green, was born in Modoc, Pennsylvania, October 23, 1878. He attended the 
public schools, where he received a good education, and at a suitable age was 
apprenticed to learn the glass trade. He followed this occupation for a num- 
ber of years and was then in the hotel business for five years. He was offered 
and accepted a position in the postoffice in 1900, where his systematic work, 
careful and conscientious attention to the details of his office and general effi- 
ciency rapidly earned for him the promotion he deserved. He was appointed 
clerk in charge of the Belmar station of the Homewood district May i, 1906, 
being the first to hold that office. Here his executive ability and excellent busi- 
ness methods are winning- much commendation. 



HUDSON SAMSON, deceased, one of the oldest and most prominent 
funeral directors in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and who was the father 
of many innovations in his particular line of business, was a representative of 
a family which had been settled in this country for some generations, and which 
had come originally from England. In the "Life and Letters of John Win- 
throp," edited by Robert C. Winthrop, and published in January, 1864, it is 
recorded : "The Samsons were an ancien.t and knightly family of Samson's Hall, 
in Kersey, near Groton, in Suffolk, England, Governor Winthrop's native 
place." Abraham Samson, the pioneer ancestor of the Samson family in this 
country, landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1629. Samuel Samson, the 
grandfather of Hudson Samson, was a noted Quaker. 

Jonathan M. Samson, son of Samuel Samson, was a resident of Nantucket, 
Massachusetts, and was also a Quaker. He died at the home of his son Hudson 
in Pittsburg in 1894. He married Elizabeth Draper, a ]\Iethodist, and among 
their children was a son, Hudson. 

Hudson Samson, son of Jonathan M. and Elizabeth (Draper) Samson, 
was born in Pulaski, Oswego county. New York, April 29, 1840. In early life 
he was never in very robust health, and this precluded the thought of a collegi- 



84 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

ate education. His political ideas were early developed by his father, who was 
a strong abolitionist in the days when abolitionists were reviled throughout the 
north. Hudson Samson came to Pittsburg and settled there in 1859 with the 
express purpose of engaging in the business of undertaking, and for this line 
of work his kindly nature seemed well adapted. He subsequently formed a 
partnership with Robert Fairman, under the firm name of Fairman & Samson, 
and this business venture proved a great success, continuing in force for a 
period of eight years, when Mr. Samson purchased the interest of Mr. Fairman 
and continued the business alone until his death, which occurred July 14, 1903. 
He was one of the first to introduce many of the improvements which have 
been made in this very necessary profession, and was a pioneer in the art of 
embalming. He erected what was at the time the finest funeral director's 
establishment in the United States, in 1884, on Sixth avenue, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and one year later built a crematory as an addition to this, it being the 
first ever erected in the business section of a large city. This innovation met 
with immediate and marked success, many of the most prominent residents of 
Pittsburg and its vicinity having been cremated in this establishment. In recent 
years, when the health of Mr. Samson commenced to fail, he spent considerable 
time in travel and delegated a great part of the work of the business to his son, 
Harry Gilmore Samson. Mr. Samson was actively interested in a number of 
business ventures outside of his undertaking and embalming establishments — 
banks, trust companies, etc. — and was the owner of large real estate holdings 
in Pittsburg, Allegheny and the East End, among which was a place known as 
the "Samson tract," on which the Carnegie Technical School now stands. He 
was a trustee of Allegheny College, Beaver College, of the Young IMen's Chris- 
tian Association, and of the Pittsburg Free Dispensary, and was treasurer of 
the Allegheny County Anti-Saloon League. He was president of the Valley 
Camp Meeting Association from its organization, president of the National and 
State Funeral Directors' Associations for a number of years, and president of 
the National City Evangelization Union of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He was a member of the board of Deaconesses' Home, and of the Oakland 
Methodist Episcopal church. He was connected with the following fraternal 
organizations : Tancred Commandery, Knights Templar, and Franklin Lodge 
No. 221, Free and Accepted Masons, in which he had attained the thirty-second 
degree, having gone through the order up to the Pittsburgh Consistory. He 
was possessed of great ambition, endurance and perseverance. He was equal 
to every emergency in business affairs in which a clear mind and logical reason- 
ing powers are necessary to cope with any difficulties which may arise. These 
advantages he possessed to a remarkable degree. Much of his time and labor, 
however, were devoted to the cause of suffering humanity. In these efforts he 
was sparing of neither his purse nor his personal efforts. He gave liberally to 
charitable and religious institutions, and it was his greatest delight to assist 
small and struggling congregations to build churches in which they could wor- 
ship undisturbed. It is estimated that he erected at the very least twenty of 
these structures in various new districts in the middle and far west, where new 
towns and rush settlements spring up and little thought would have been given 
to the work of religion were it not for his efforts. He was known throughout 
the country for his charity and philanthropy, and his business associates es- 
teemed him for his sterling worth and for the honesty and reliability which 
characterized all his business transactions. He married, February 4, 1862, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 85 



Susan Gilmore, of Utica, New York, and they had six children, of whom but 
one is now living, Harry Gilmore Samson. 

Harry Gilmore Samson, only surviving child of Hudson and Susan (Gil- 
more) Samson, was born on the site of the present postoffice in Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, July II, 1870. He was the recipient of an excellent education in the 
public schools of Pittsburg and Allegheny, later attended the Allegheny Pre- 
paratory School, the Western University, the Pittsburg College of Pharmacy, 
and finally the School of Embalming. At the completion of his college educa- 
tion in 1888 he entered the employ of his father in the undertaking and em- 
balming business, and was thus employed until the death of the latter in 1903. 
He was thoroughly conversant with all the details and responsibilities of the 
business, having had almost sole control of affairs for some time prior to this 
period, and thus experienced no difficulty in assuming the entire management 
of affairs. He not alone conducted the business with the same efficiency that 
had characterized it during the lifetime of his father, but his energy and quick 
insight into matters have gained increased patronage. Upon the death of his 
father Mr. Samson was elected "to take the place of the former as director in 
a number of instances : Pittsburg Free Dispensary and the Allegheny County 
Anti-Saloon League, of which latter he was elected treasurer. He is also treas- 
urer of the Pittsburg district of the Pennsylvania Anti-Saloon League, and a 
charter member of the Athelia Daly Home for Working Girls. He has been 
compelled to refuse a number of other positions of honor and trust, as they 
conflict with the numerous demands made upon his time by his business. He 
is well adapted for his vocation both by nature and by acquired training, and 
is highly honored and respected in the community in which he lives. He is a 
member of Pittsburg Lodge No. 484, Free and Accepted Masons, and of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and is a member and president of the board 
of trustees of the Oakland Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, October 18, 1893, at Saegertown, Pennsylvania, Elizabeth 
Saeger, and they have had children: Howard Saeger, Hudson Gilmore, and 
E. Herbert, deceased. 



JAMES C. REYMER, who was superintendent of the Pittsburg Manu- 
facturing Company for thirty years and is now vice-president of the same con- 
cern, was born in Penn township. Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 
26, 1834, son of Peter and Maria (Evans) Reymer. 

His father, born in 1797, was a farmer of Diamond township, this county, 
and died December 25, 1876. He married Miss Maria Evans and their children 
were: i. Philip. 2. Margaret Ann. 3. Peter G. 4. Harmon D. 5. Jacob. 
6. James C. 7. Sarah. 8. George. 9. Louisa. 10. Cornelia. 11. Evans. The 
mother died in 1865. 

James C, the seventh child in his parents' family, was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of his native county and then went to work in a candy factory. Later 
he became foreman in a machine shop in Fort Pitt, where he remained twenty 
years. He then associated himself with the Pittsburgh Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of whose plant he was foreman for thirty years and of which he is now 
the vice-president. 

He is one of the charter members and a past master of Duquesne Lodge 
No. 546 of the Masonic fraternity at Pittsburg, and a charter member of Pitts- 



86 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



burg Chapter No. 276 and Duquesne Commandery No. 72. Politically he sup- 
ports the Republican party and in church affiliations is connected with the 
Baptist denomination. 

He married, December 24, 1868, Mary, daughter of John and Rachel Cut- 
ter, of Pittsburg. Her father was a contractor and builder. The children born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Reymer are: i. James, born August 9, 1869, died April 2, 
1893. 2. Charles H., born February 17, 1873. 3. Harmer D., born September 
28, 1877, died January 8, 1881. 4. Ralph Evens, born June 25, 1880. 



JOHN W. SHERRER, who has been prominently identified with the busi- 
ness interests of the city of Pittsburg for many years, and whose commodious 
offices are located at No. 6124 Penn avenue, in that city, is one of those men 
who by sheer force of determination, energy and ambition rise to the highest 
rank in whatever calling in life they have chosen to make their own. 

John Sherrer, father of John W. Sherrer, was born in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, December 14, 1829. There he spent the early years of his life and there 
he engaged in the contracting and building business, in which he was eminently 
successful. He removed to Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and was the builder 
of the first oil refinery in Pennsylvania, this being erected in Oil City. It was 
in this city that he also met with three great reverses — fire, flood and the failure 
of a firm with which he had business dealings and which involved him in heavy 
losses. He determined to remove from Oil City, and decided on Connellsville 
as being a suitable location, and there he resided for a period of thirty years, 
actively engaged in the building and contracting business. He then retired 
from business and removed to Pittsburg, where he died in igo6. He was a 
staunch supporter of the Democratic party and was a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian church. He married Jane M. Moffitt, born in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, January 30, 1838, daughter of Samuel H. Mofifitt, for many years a school 
teacher and well known in educational circles in his day. Mr. and Mrs. Sherrer 
had eleven children, of whom nine are now living, among them being John W., 
the subject of this sketch. 

John W. Sherrer, son of John and Jane I\I. (Mofifitt) Sherrer, was born in 
Oil City, Pennsylvania, August 7, 1867. He was reared under the parental 
roof, attending school part of the time, but obtaining the bulk of his education 
in a practical rather than theoretical manner. At the age of twelve years he 
obtained a position in the office of the Connellsville Coke and Iron Company, 
which was later merged into the H. C. Frick Company. He remained in this 
office in Leisenring, Fayette county, for nine years, and then removed to Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, where he obtained employment in the real estate office of 
\'an Gorder & Lloyd, with whom he was associated in business for a number 
of years. His next position was as bookkeeper in the City Deposit Bank of 
East Liberty, where, however, he remained but nine months, and then estab- 
lished himself in the real estate business, in which he has met with unmeas- 
ured success. He is honored and esteemed throughout the busine.ss circles of 
Pittsburg for his sterling integrity, his reliability and practical business meth- 
ods. He is a liberal-minded man and adheres to the Independent party in poli- 
tics. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and of Hailman 
Lodge No. 321, Free and Accepted Masons, of Pittsburg. 

He married, September 20, 1902, Cora Coyle, daughter of Daniel Coyle, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 87 

deceased, who was a veteran of the Civil war and prominently identified with 
the early development of the steel industry in Pittsburg. 



FRANK JACOB ORTH. If a list were made of the younger generation 
of attorneys who have achieved a marked degree of success in the courts of 
the state of Pennsylvania it would be incomplete were the name of Frank 
Jacob Orth missing from the roll. Mr. Orth divides his time pretty equally 
between corporation and civil practice, and has attained an enviable reputation 
as a pleader and counsellor. He traces his ancestry to both France and Ger- 
many, and unites in his legal work the fire and vivacity of the one nation with 
the thoroughness and love of method of the other — a most happy and success- 
ful combination. 

Johann Orth, grandfather of Frank Jacob Orth, was a blacksmith in a 
village in Alsace-Lorraine, which was at that time a French possession, and 
was also the Lutheran minister of the district in which he resided. He left his 
home in France for America in 1848, taking with him his family, consisting of 
his wife and three children — two boys and one girl. On the voyage toward 
his new home he died and was buried at sea. The mother landed in New York 
w-ith her children and died two weeks after her arrival here. The sons were: 
Jacob, of whom see forward, and George, who with his sister and brother lo- 
cated somewhere in New Jersey. He learned the trade of glass-blowing and 
became an expert at this. He took an active part during the Civil war, and sub- 
sequently died from the effects of a wound received while in service. 

Jacob Orth, son of the minister, was born in Alsace-Lorraine July 4, 1836, 
and was but twelve years of age when he arrived in this country. He was 
the youngest of the children, and with his brother George learned the trade of 
glass-blowing. He also became very expert in this avocation, and migrating 
to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, commenced work at his trade. He went to the west 
during the Pike's Peak gold excitement in 1859, remained there for about four 
or five years and then returned to Pittsburg. He obtained employment as 
foreman for the Abel Smith Company, glass manufacturers, and was the man- 
ager of the business for a number of years. He then accepted a position as 
superintendent of the plant of Phillips & Company, and after some years re- 
tired from an active business life, and died January 17, 1906. He was also for 
a time a member of the firm of W. A. Lauffer & Company, stone contractors. 
He was actively and intelligently interested in the political situation of his town 
and country, adhering to the Republican party in national affairs, and»voting 
with the Independent party on local issues. He was a member of the Lutheran 
church, and possessed considerable influence in the community. He married 
Margaret C. Lauffer, born in Pittsburg in 1843, daughter of John Lauffer, 
who emigrated to this country from Germany, where he had learned every de- 
tail connected with the glass-blowing industry. Here he turned his attention 
to the building of furnaces for glass-blowing, and was the designer and con- 
structor of the first wood furnace for glass-blowing in the United States. He 
later became prominently identified with the glass industry in Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. Jacob and Margaret (Lauffer) Orth had children: i. Margaret, 
deceased. 2. Elizabeth G., who was possessed of a beautiful mezzo-soprano 
voice and was well known as a church and concert singer. She married James 
M. Cook, deceased, who was a prominent attorney. 3. John H., employed bv 



88 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Boggs & Buhl, of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 4. Mary Emma, resides at home. 
5. Ida L., deceased. 6. Albert G., a bookkeeper, who resides at home. 7. 
Frank Jacob, the subject of this sketch. Mrs. Orth is still living in the old 
family residence at No. 2306 Carson street. South Side, Pittsburg, which has 
been her home for thirty-five years. 

Frank Jacob Orth, youngest child of Jacob and Margaret (Lauffer) 
Orth, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 26, 1878. His childhood 
and youth were spent under the parental roof, and he attended the public 
schools and later the high school, from which he was graduated with honor 
in 1896. In the same year he registered as a student of law with his brother- 
in-law, James M. Cook, a prominent member of the Allegheny bar. In the 
fall of the following },ear he entered the University of Pennsylvania, in 
Philadelphia, and studied law for two years. He then entered the law depart- 
ment of the Western University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated 
in the fall of 1899. In March of the following year he was admitted to 
practice at the Allegheny county bar, and in 1902 was admitted to the supreme 
court of Pennsylvania. One year later he was admitted to practice in the 
superior court of Pennsylvania, and in 1904 to the circuit and district courts 
of the United States. Immediately after his admission to the bar he opened 
commodious offices in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and devoted his time and 
attention to corporation and civil practice, in which he has been more than 
ordinarily successful. He is a fluent, eloquent pleader, and his arguments 
are presented in a most forceful, convincing and logical manner. He is asso- 
ciated with the following organizations : Dallas Lodge, No. 508, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Pittsburg, and with Zerubbabel Royal Arch Chapter, 
No. 162; Greek College Fraternity, Theta Nu Epsilon, and Rho Chapter of 
the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Orth is still unmarried and resides with 
his mother. 



PAUL SYNNESTVEDT, an attorney-at-law, making patent law a spe- 
cialty, was born in the city of Chicago, Illinois, in 1870, son of Otto and Julia 
(Borchsenius) Synnestvedt. The subject's father was born in Bergen, Nor- 
way, and came to the LTnited States some time prior to the Civil war, locating 
in Chicago. His wife was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, and came to this 
country about the same time as her husband. They were united in marriage 
in Chicago, and were the parents of ten children, including the subject. Paul 
Synnegtvedt. 

Mr. Synnestvedt, of this notice, was educated at the public schools of 
Lincoln. Nebraska, and later at Chicago, Illinois. He also attended the Chi- 
cago Manual Training School and the Northwestern University Law School, 
graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. After finishing his educa- 
tion he was made general air brake inspector for the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railway Company, serving from 1888 to 1891. From 1891 to 1897 he was 
mechanical expert and solicitor of patents for the Crane Company, of Chicago, 
and since that date has practiced law. He came to Pittsburg in 1902, since 
which time he has paid special attention to patent office practice, having 
secured a large business in this line. He is a member of the bar of the L'nited 
States supreme court, the United States circuit court, bar of the supreme court 
in Illinois, and in 1903 became a member of the American Bar Association. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 89 



Among the societies in which he liolds membership may be named the 
Air Brake Association, of which he is a charter member; the Western Railroad 
Club; the Pittsburg Railroad Club, and the Union Club of Pittsburg. 
Pohtically he is an independent voter. In his religious faith he is of the New 
Jerusalem or Swedenborgian denomination. 

He was united in marriage at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1893, to Miss 
Anna E. Lichner, daughter of Frederick and Anna M. Lichner, of Allegheny 
City, Pennsylvania. By this union has been born nine children. 

While Mr. Synnestvedt takes care of any legal business entrusted to him 
he does special work in assisting inventors in the vicinity of Greater Pittsburg 
to secure strong claims on United States and all foreign letters patents. His 
whole training and practical experience in mechanics and scientific appliances 
and the rules governing -the same has fitted him admirably for the successful 
execution of such special legal business. 



EDWARD E. BONNEVILLE. The Hotel Henry is among the most 
successful, popular and best equipped of the city of Pittsburg, and this is due' 
in the first place to the careful management and popularity of the genial pro- 
prietor and manager, Edward E. Bonneville, whose unvarying courtesy and 
careful thought for the comfort of his guests have brought matters to this 
desirable pass. Mr. Bonneville is descended from one of the honored pioneer 
families of Maryland. 

Samuel Bonneville, grandfather of Edward E. Bonneville, was a suc- 
cessful farmer in Maryland, and lived to an advanced age. He married Hester 
Ann Bowen, and among his children was a son. Tubman F., the father of our 
subject. 

Tubman F. Bonneville, son of Samuel and Hester Ann (Bowen) Bonne- 
ville, was born near Pocomoke City, Alaryland, in 1829. His early years were 
spent on the farm of his father, and he was trained to become a farmer, but 
later removed to Pocomoke City, where for a number of years he has been 
the chief magistrate and one of the most influential citizens of the town. 
Although seventy-seven years of age at the time of this writing, he is said to 
be the youngest man in the city in the matter of activity and conduct of public 
affairs. In politics he is a Democrat, and it is due to his efforts that many 
improvements and alterations have been made in the town. He married 
Elizabeth Grace Veasey and they had eight children, of whom five are now 
living : Francis Lee, commercial salesman for M. H. Pulaske, of New York ; 
Earl S., employed in the Hotel Anderson, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania : Frederick 
Lay, employed in the Hotel Henry, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; William T., a 
resident of Pocomoke City, Maryland ; and Edward E., the particular subject 
of this sketch. 

Edward E. Bonneville, oldest surviving child of Tubman F. and Elizabeth 
Grace ( \'easey ) Bonneville, was born near Pocomoke City. Maryland, Sep- 
tember 14, i860. Here his early years were spent, attending the public schools 
of the district and those of Pocomoke City. When he had attained his sixteenth 
year the family removed to Pocomoke City, and there he remained for two 
years. He went to Norfolk, Virginia, in 1878, obtaining employment as a 
clerk at the cigar stand of the Purcell House, but his excellent management in 
this position soon obtained for him promotion to that of clerk of the hotel 



90 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Itself. He went to Indianapolis in the latter part of 1881, serving in the 
capacity of clerk in the Denison Hotel until February, 1889, when he removed 
to Pittsburg, and accepting the position of clerk in the Anderson Hotel, 
retained this until September, 1898. He took possession of the Hotel Henry 
October i, 1898, and since that time this has been under his sole management. 
The success of this undertaking has been an undoubted one, as the popularity 
of the place testifies. The rooms and ofiices are elegantly and comfortably 
furnished, they are models of neatness in every respect, no trouble and expense 
are spared where the comfort of the guests of the hotel is concerned, and the 
cuisine is unexceptionable. This is all due to the executive ability and method 
of Mr. Bonneville, and his watchful eye is over all. A proof of the confidence 
placed in his judgment is the fact that he has been the president of the Penn- 
sylvania State Hotel Association. He is of pleasing personality and his genial, 
courteous demeanor make friends of all who have enjoyed his hospitality. He 
is a man of liberal, broad-minded views and a stanch supporter of the Inde- 
pendent party in politics. He married, August 31, 1888, Alice Beckman, of 
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and they have no children. 



EDWARD MELLON. The death of Edward Mellon, which occurred 
November 5, 1898, removed from the city of Pittsburg one of its most estimable 
and public-spirited citizens. His birth occurred in county Tyrone, north of 
Ireland, in 1842, a son of Roger Mellon. 

Roger Mellon (father), a native of the north of Ireland, accompanied by 
a daughter, left his native land to seek a home in the new world. He landed 
in New York city, but directly made his way to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where 
for many years he "run the river" between Pittsburg and New Orleans. The 
next occupation to which he turned his attention was the keeping of a stand in 
the market, which line of work he followed for more than half a century, during 
which time he became one of the best-known marketmen in Pittsburg and be- 
loved for his many excellent qualities. After the death of his wife in Ireland he 
sent for the remainder of his family. They located first in "'Duquesne way," later 
changing their residence to Fourth avenue, where his death occurred about the 
year 1894. He was a devout Roman Catholic, and at the time of his death was 
a member of St. Paul's Cathedral. He took an active part in politics, affiliating 
with the Democratic party. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Mellon were the parents of 
nine children; i. Roger, who followed the occupation of riverman. 2. Ed- 
ward, of whom later. 3. James, a resident of St. Louis for many years, from 
whence he removed to Memphis, where he still resides. 4. Patrick, a resident 
of Butler, Pennsylvania. 5. Sarah, who accompanied her father to this country, 
died unmarried. 

Edward Mellon accompanied his brothers to the LTnited States after the 
death of his mother, and his opportunities for acquiring an education were very 
meagre, he being a student for a short period of time in the old parochial 
school which stood on the point. His first employment was with his father 
"running the river." During the Civil war he enlisted in the LTnited States 
service, being under the command of General Sherman, and was wounded in 
the shoulder in battle. After the cessation of hostilities he entered the employ 
of the Pan Handle division of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and in the 
faithful discharge of his duties was deprived of one of his legs. He was then 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 91 



given a position as watchman, in which capacity he rendered efficient service, 
and altogether was for over three decades in the employ of the company, win- 
ning and meriting the commendation of his employers and enjoying the respect 
and confidence of his fellow workmen. He was a man of genial disposition 
and kindly spirit, and therefore possessed a host of friends who valued him at 
his true worth. He was a member of St. Paul's Cathedral, constant and con- 
sistent in his duty to his church and religion. He was confirmed by Bishop 
O'Connor. He was a Democrat in politics. 

Mr. Mellon married, in 1870, Margaret Marron, born about the year 1850, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Macabe) Marron, of county Monaghan, Ire- 
land, where ]Mrs. Mellon was born. When a small child she was taken to Glas- 
gow, Scotland, by her parents. Her mother died in that city, and when Mar- 
garet was fifteen years old her father brought her and a sister to the United 
States. The journey to New York was made in the old steamship "Caledonia." 
They came direct to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and settled on "The Point," and 
seven years later the death of Mr. Marron occurred there. Mr. and ]\Irs. Mel- 
lon spent the greater part of their married life on Fourth avenue, Pittsburg, re- 
siding there during the court house fire and the great strike and riot. The chil- 
dren born of this marriage are: Mary, wife of Joseph Woods, of Mt. Wash- 
ington; Thomas; Margaret, wife of William Johnson, of the West End, Pitts- 
burg; Edward, a resident of Pittsburg, married Stella Rafferty; Sarah, Anna, 
Elizabeth, Alice, James and William reside at home. 



EDWARD JACOB KENT, one of the active members of the Allegheny 
county bar, who has a constantly increasing practice, was born March 2, 1868, 
near Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, son of Thomas Conrad 
and Margaret (Ruftner) Kent. 

(I) Frederick Kent, the great-grandfather, was a native of Germany, 
and came to this country about 1790, settling in western Pennsylvania, where 
he followed farming for an occupation. In his religious faith he was a Roman 
Catholic. He married, and among his children was one son named Conrad. 

(II) Conrad Kent, son of Frederick Kent, became the paternal grand- 
father of the subject of this notice. He lived in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, and among his children was a son, Thomas Conrad Kent. 

(III) Thomas Conrad Kent, the father of Edward J., was born in 
January, 1848, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, son of Conrad Kent 
and wife. By occupation he was a farmer, as had been his forefathers. He 
received a good common-school education at the public schools of his native 
county. In his political choice he was a Democrat and in religion a Catholic. 
He married Miss ]Margaret, eldest daughter of Isaac and Mary RufTner, of 
New Alexandria, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Edward J. Kent, subject, attended the common schools until about 
fourteen years of age, when he began his college course at St. Vincent's Col- 
lege, Beatty, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He remained in that most 
excellent educational institution until nineteen years of age, and then entered 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, taking a two-years' course in the 
law department and graduating with the class of 1890, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. He at once began the practice of his profession and now 
enjoys a lucrative practice in the courts of his state. Aside from his legal 



92 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

business he is largely interested in the coal trade, being president and a director 
in the Rex Carbon, Pittsburgh and Washington Coal Companies, also connected 
with the Tradesman's Oil Company and the Meadow Lands Coal Company, 
of which he is a director, as well as the Coal and Coke By-Products Company. 
In politics Mr. Kent affiliates with the Republican party, while in his religious 
faith he is a Catholic. He is connected with the following societies and clubs: 
Pittsburg Council, No. 375, Knights of Columbus ; Duquesne Club ; Monon- 
gahela Club ; Pittsburg Country Club ; Harkaway Hunt Club ; Keystone Club ; 
Automobile Club ; Matinee Club, and is the colonel of the Republican Club. 

He was united in marriage October 17, 1893, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
to Eleanor A. Lyons, of Pittsburg, the daughter of Dennis and Anna Lyons. 
The father was connected with the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad, and 
served in the Civil war from 1861 to 1865 in the Union cause. Mrs. Kent 
was educated at the public schools until about fourteen years of age, when she 
entered Mount Mercy Academy, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The children born 
of this union are: i. Raymond Lyons, born August 10, 1895. 2. John Ed- 
ward, born February 18, 1897. 3. Herbert Richard, born October 3, 1899. 
4. Eleanor Lyons, born June 5, 1901. 

GORDON FISHER. Among the younger members of the legal fra- 
ternity in Pittsburg is Gordon Fisher, born November 2, 1873, ^^ Swissvale, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, the second son of Rev. Samuel Jackson, 
D. D., and Annie (Shreve) Fisher. On his father's side he descended from 
Anthony Fisher, who came from England and settled in Dedham, Massachu- 
setts, in 1637, and who became a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company in 1644. One of his ancestors. Jonathan Fisher, was a 
lieutenant in the American army under General Washington and died in 1777, 
while in camp at Morristown, New Jersey. His great-grandfather, grand- 
father and father were Presbyterian ministers and graduated respectively from 
Williams, Yale and Hamilton colleges. The two were moderators of the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian church, and his grandfather was for a 
time president of Hamilton College. His father was for thirty-five years 
pastor of the Presbyterian church at Swissvale, and for a number of years a 
member of the faculty of the Pennsylvania College for women and president 
of the Presbyterian Board of Missions to the Freedmen. One of his ancestors 
was the Rev. John Davenport, the founder of New Haven, Connecticut, and 
another was Colonel John Brinkerhoff, the host and friend of General Wash- 
ington at Fishkill. New York, during the Revolutionary war, while another 
was Philip Schuyler, the first mayor of Albany, New York, and uncle of the 
general of the same name of Revolutionary fame. Among other direct paternal 
ancestors he numbers Arent Schuyler, born in 1662. and was the first among 
the English or Dutch to lead a hostile party from the province of New York 
into Canada, and who was commissioned a captain in the war against the 
Indians. Another was Abraham Davenport, who was a member of the Con- 
necticut legislature in 1773. and whose action in the "Dark Day" incident has 
been told in the poem by John G. Whittier which bears his name. Still 
another was Dr. Cogswell, a surgeon of the Second Connecticut Regiment 
during the Revolution, and who was a brother of Dr. M. F. Cogswell, the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 93 



founder of the first asylum for deaf mutes in the world, at Hartford, 
Connecticut. 

On his mother's side Gordon Fisher, subject, is descended from Thomas 
Shreve, who came from England to Plymouth, Massachusetts, about 1641. 
His maternal grandfather, Ralph H. Shreve, was educated at West Point, was 
at one time chairman of the Republican committee of New Jersey, and at the 
time of his death was clerk of the United States district court of New Jersey. 
Among Mr. Fisher's direct maternal ancestors was Caleb Shreve, who, during 
a part of the Revolutionary war, was a member of the New Jersey legislature 
and served on important committees for the prosecution of that war by appoint- 
ment of the United States or Colonial government. Another was John Inskip, 
a captain of the Second Gloucester (New Jersey) Battery during the 
Revolution. 

Gordon Fisher was prepared for college at Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, 
and was graduated from Princeton University in 1895, with the degree of 
A. B. He studied law at the New York Law School, receiving the degree of 
LL. B. from that institution in 1897, and was admitted to the bar of Allegheny 
county in December of that year. Since then he has followed the practice of 
law at that bar, and is now a member of the firm of Dalzell, Fisher & Hawkins. 

He was united in marriage June 6, 1901, to Matilda Carothers Milligan, 
a daughter of John W. Milligan, whose father, Robert Milligan, settled in 
what was formerly Wilkins township during the early years of the last century 
and whose family has lived in this county ever since. 

"WILLIAM FRANKLIN AUGERMYER, who has been closely con- 
nected with the business interests of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, for a great 
number of years, and who resides at No. 7226 Mount Vernon street, in that 
city, is a representative of a family which settled in the state of Pennsylvania 
many years ago. 

John Henry Augermyer, father of William Franklin Augermyer, was 
born in Harmony, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1829, died in 1902. He 
was a carpenter and cabinet maker by occupation. He married Susanna 
Koonce, of Springfield, Ohio, and among their children was William Franklin, 
of whom see forward. 

William Franklin Augermyer, son of John Henry and Susanna (Koonce) 
Augermyer, was born in Greenville, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, December 
25, 1864. His education was acquired in the public schools of his district, and 
upon its completion he entered upon his business career. His first position was 
in a dry goods and house furnishing store, where he remained for some time, 
coming to East Liberty in 1888, as foreman in a hardware store. He retained 
this position until 1896, when he removed to Homewood and established him- 
self in the hardware business. His thorough knowledge and his excellent and 
systematic methods have enabled him to build up a very satisfactory business, 
which is constantly on the increase. He married Mary N. John, and has had 
children: Frederick Leslie, born November 6, 1891, died in July, 1892. Henry 
Cecil, born December 17, 1893. Mary Elizabeth, born April 19, 1903. 

ALA.JOR WILLIAM MARSHALL McJUNKIN. Among the early 
Scotch-Irish pioneers of western Pennsylvania was the well-known and always 



94 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

highly esteemed Mcjunkin family, from which descended William M. 
Mcjunkin, a present member of the Pittsburg bar. He was born in Plum 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 3, 1870, a son of James 
and Mary Elizabeth (Carpenter) Mcjunkin. 

The paternal great-grandfather, William Mcjunkin, came into and settled 
in Plum township, Allegheny county, in 1788. He was of Scotch-Irish descent 
and followed agriculture for a livelihood. His father, the great-great-grand- 
father, was probably Robert Mcjunkin, who moved from Scotland to Ireland 
about 1745, and about 1785 his son William married and with his family 
emigrated to this country. 

(I) William Mcjunkin, the great-grandfather, received a good common 
school education in his native country and was of the Presbyterian faith. He 
was an active member in the Plum Creek Presbyterian church in Allegheny 
county. He assisted in building the original house of worship in that township. 
It stood on one corner of his farm. He also built the first block-house in that 
vicinity, a part of the remains of which can still be seen, and he with his 
neighbors for many miles around took refuge there from the Indians. He 
married in Ireland and had the following sons: i. William (subject's grand- 
father). 2. David, who moved to Butler county, Pennsylvania, shortly after 
1800 and became the ancestor of the Mcjunkin family of that portion of the 
state. 3. James, who removed to Ohio, and later to the Shenandoah Valley, 
Virginia, where that branch also became numerous. 

(II) William Mcjunkin, the grandfather, married Mary Meaner. He 
was an elder in the old Plum Creek Presbyterian church for many years. Their 
children were ten in number, James, the subject's father, being one of the 
youngest in the family. 

(III) James Mcjunkin, son of William Mcjunkin (II) was born in Plum 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1824. He obtained' a 
common school education, was a devout member of the Presbyterian church, 
and in politics was a supporter of the principles of the Republican party. He 
served as school director and road supervisor for many years. He was an 
elder in the Presbyterian church which his father and grandfather had been 
connected with in the early days of that church in Allegheny county. He, 
like his forefathers, is a tiller of the soil and an industrious citizen. He 
married Mary Elizabeth Carpenter March 11, 1869, and by this union six 
children were born, as follows: i. William Marshall, the subject of this 
notice, of whom further mention is made. 2. Eleanor C. 3. Walter L. 4. 
James. 5. Mary E. 6. Rebecca L. 

Concerning Mrs. Mary Elizabeth (Carpenter) Mcjunkin's ancestry it may 
be said that she was born June 21, 1844, the daughter of Jeremiah Murrv and 
Eleanor (McFadden) Carpenter. Her paternal ancestor in this country was 
Heinrich Zimmerman, who came about 1698 from canton of Berne, Switzer- 
land, and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, about 1703, bringing his 
family with him. Of his six sons, five were surveyors and scriveners. The 
father of this family was much more progressive and intelligent than his 
average neighbor and educated his children in the English language and taught 
them to become thoroughly American in their notions. As one evidence of his 
advanced ideas, it may be stated that upon coming to this country he translated 
his own name to conform to the English language, which changed it to Henry 
Carpenter, which all of his descendants have followed. He married and had a 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 95 



son named Daniel, who married and had a son named for himself and Daniel 
second, had a son John, the father of Jeremiah AI. Carpenter, who was 
father of Mrs. James Mcjunkin, mother of the subject. Jeremiah M. Car- 
penter was born at what was later known as Hamilton's Mill. He had a good 
education and followed teaching in his earlier years, but later became a farmer 
and surveyor, and attended to the duties of a scrivener or drawer of contracts. 
He was a Democrat and held the office of justice of the peace. He belonged 
to the militia, and in church relations was a Presbyterian, being one of the 
ruling elders in the old Plum Creek church. His wife was Eleanor, daughter 
of James and Margaret (Stewart) McFadden, and a native of West Middle- 
town, Washington county, Pennsylvania. They were the parents of six 
children, including Mrs. Alcjunkin. 

(IV) William jMarshall Alcjunkin, son of James and Mary Elizabeth 
(Carpenter) Mcjunkin, attended the common schools and later Grove City 
College, graduating in 1896. He then began the study of law, being admitted 
to the Allegheny county bar in January, 1900. He had five years' military 
instruction in tactics, graduating with the rank of major, and at that time 
received recommendations to the war department at Washington, District of 
Columbia, for proficiency in military tactics. He played on the Grove City 
foot-ball team for three years, and after coming to Pittsburg in 1896 was a 
member of the Pittsburg Athletic Foot-ball Team for three years. His practice 
has been chiefly confined to criminal law. He was assistant district attorney of 
Allegheny county from September 15, 1906, to January 6, 1907. 

Politically Major Alcjunkin is a Republican. In church connection, like 
his ancestors on both sides, he is a Presbyterian. He is now a member of the 
First Presbyterian church of Oakmont, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, with 
which he united in October, 1905. but prior to that time belonged to the old 
Plum Creek Presbyterian church, where he served as Sabbath-school superin- 
tendent for five years, and as an elder in the church for six years, he being of 
the fourth generation in his family to hold such office. He is at present elder 
in the Oakmont church. 

Mr. Mcjunkin belongs to Duquesne Lodge, No. 546, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Pittsburg Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 268; Duquesne Oam- 
mandery. Knights Templar, No. 72 ; and Pittsburg Consistory, Thirty-second 
degree Masons. 

He was united in marriage August 16, 1905, to Miss Jennie W. Wake- 
field, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Mcjunkin was a graduate of the Indiana 
Normal School. Her grandfather. Rev. Samuel ^^^akefield, was for many 
years a prominent IMethodist Episcopal minister in the Monongahela valley, 
and was the author of many hymn books, a large number of which are still in 
use in the service of the jNIethodist church. 



LOUIS ALBERT ■\IEYRAN, one of the stirring, well-trained business 
factors in various important producing industries in western Pennsylvania, is 
the son of Charles and Sophia (Flowers) Meyran, and is a native of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, born June 23, 1859. On the paternal side he is of German 
ancestry, his father being a native of the province of Hanover. His mother 
was American born. The father. Charles Meyran, with valuable business fore- 
sight became one of the earliest pioneers in the gas business of Pittsburg, and 



96 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

in 1885 organized the Manufacturers' Gas Company, the prime object of which 
was to convey the natural gas of certain wells flowing in Washington county, 
Pennsvlvania, to the city of Pittsburg — a scheme which at that date was counted 
as a wonderful engineering task. At the present time gas is piped into the 
city from points more than one hundred miles distant, and the daily amount 
furnished aggregates more than one hundred and twenty millions of cubic feet. 
It was to this innovation that the Iron City owes much of its present-day 
enterprise and wealth, as gas has been made to substitute coal for domestic and 
manufacturing purposes to a large extent. 

Louis Albert Meyran obtained his preparatory education in the excellent 
public schools of his native city, and after taking a course in the Western 
University of Pennsylvania he went abroad and studied for three years at the 
leading college of Hanover, Germany, and was graduated therefrom in 1878. 
His first business association was in the city of Chicago, where he was for a 
time an iron and steel broker. In 1882 he became connected with the Canons- 
burg Iron Company (limited), which later became the Canonsburg Iron & 
Steel Company, of which he was both secretary and treasurer. He is also 
vice-president of the Manufacturers' Light & Heat Company, having been 
connected therewith from its earliest operations. He is vice-president of the 
Germania Savings Bank of Pittsburg, organized l_y his father in i"j3. and 
now one of the leading financial institutions in the city. He is also connected 
with various other successful business operations. His success is almost phe- 
nomenal, when one comes to know that he is but little past middle life. In the 
great and shrewd commercial world he is well and favorably known for his 
fair dealings and daring, progressive methods along legitimate business lines. 
Being a native of Pittsburg, he has ever sought to do his part toward building 
her interests up to a modern, high standard. Among the organizations with 
which he is connected may be named the Engineers' Society of \\'estern 
Pennsylvania and the "Technischer Verein." 

In 1885 he married Miss Marie, daughter of Charles F. and Henrietta 
Plerrosee. They have one son, Carl P., born September 27, 1891. 



ROBERT CAMPBELL CLARKE, M. D. Among the foremost citizens 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one who has done much to advance the plans 
for public improvement in that city is Dr. Robert Campbell Clarke, whose 
elegant and commodious offices are located at No. 129 South Highland avenue. 
He is descended from the Argyles of Scotland, who during the religious perse- 
cutions in that country allowed some branches of the family to migrate to 
Ireland, and it is from one of these that the Doctor traces his descent directly. 

Andrew Clarke, father of Dr. Robert Campbell Clarke, was born in county 
Derry, Ireland, where his early years were spent and where he was married. 
He emigrated to the L^nited States in 1850, locating at Cochranton, Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm and engaged in agriculture. 
In this occupation he was very successful, and the homestead farm is still in 
the family, now owned by one of his sons — Charles H, Andrew Clarke died 
in Ireland in 1885 while on a visit to his native land. He married Mar\- Camp- 
bell, a native of Tyrone county, Ireland, who died on the home farm July 2, 
1899. She was a niece of Colonel Robert Campbell, who was one of the prom- 
inent characters of the western portion of the L^nited States in the early days. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 97 



and was at one time Indian commissioner under President Grant. Washington 
Irving has written of him extensively in his "Astoria." Andrew and Mary 
(Campbell) Clarke had seven children, of whom four are now living: Mary 
C, widow of Dr. John H. Devore, resides in Corry, Pennsylvania; Bessie, 
unmarried, resides at Cochranton, Pennsylvania; Charles H., resides on the 
home farm at Cochranton, Pennsylvania; and Robert Campbell, the particular 
si'.bject of this sketch. 

Robert Campbell Clarke, M. D., youngest surviving son of Andrew and 
Mary (Campbell) Clarke, was born in Cochranton, Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 7, 1855. His childhood and youth were spent upon the home 
farm, and he acquired his early education in the district school. From the time 
of his fourteenth year he commenced to educate himself, and so successful were 
his efforts in this direction that in a short time he commenced to teach school. 
This occupation he continued for three years and was also engaged in 
reportorial work for the various country newspapers in the vicinity of his 
home. He took up the study of" medicine in the spring of 1878 under the pre- 
ceptorship of his brother-in-law, Dr. John H. Devore, of Union City, Penn- 
sylvania. During the following fall he entered the medical department of the 
University of Wooster, at Cleveland, Ohio, and was graduated from this 
institution with honor in the class of 1881. He immediately commenced the 
practice of his profession, locating in Columbus, Warren county, Pennsylvania, 
where he obtained a large and lucrative patronage and where he remained for 
a period of ten years. During this period, in 1889, he visited London, 
England, and took a post-graduate course in the London Hospital. He took 
another post-graduate course in the spring of 1891 in the New York Polyclinic, 
and one year later removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where the reputation 
of his skill and general competency had preceded him, and he was soon in the 
possession of an enviable practice. He has the entire confidence of a large 
circle of patients, and he is highly esteemed by his professional colleagues as 
well. He is a man of extensive reading and is liberal minded in his views, 
and is well known for his charities, although these acts are performed in the 
most unostentatious manner. In his political affiliations he is a Democrat, and 
is president of the school board of the Twentieth ward, having always taken an 
active interest in all educational matters. He is a director of the Pittsburg Board 
of Trade, and is surgeon of the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad, and examin- 
ing physician of the Central Accident Insurance Company, of Pittsburg. He 
is a member of the Sixth L'nited Presbyterian church, and is connected in 
various capacities with the following organizations : The Allegheny County 
Medical Societv ; the College of Physicians ; the Pennsylvania State ^ledical 
Society ; the American Medical Association ; American Association of Railway 
Surgeons; is a member of Hailman Lodge, No. 321, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Pittsburg ; Columbus Chapter, No. 200, Royal Arch Masons, of 
Corry, Pennsylvania ; Duquesne Commandery, No. 72, Knights Templar, of 
Pittsburg ; Pittsburg Consistory, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite : Syria 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; J. B. Nicholson 
Lodge, No. 585, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

He married, November 18, 1884, Cora A. Dean, daughter of Benjamin 
DeaiT, of Columbus, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Clarke died April 26, 1899, in Denver, 
Colorado, and is buried in Columbus, Pennsylvania. 



98 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



JOHN MORROW ARNOLD, proprietor of the Hotel Lamont, at East 
End, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, so well and favorably known in hotel, business 
and social circles, was born August lo, 1849, i^ Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, son of Robert and Rachel (Morrow) Arnold. 

(I) John Arnold, the great-grandfather, was born in Lancaster county, 
this state, and lived to the advanced age of one hundred years. He died in 
the county of his birth and was buried in the Dutch' burying-ground with 
military honors, he having served in the Revolutionary war. Among his chil- 
dren was a son, Joseph, who moved to Kentucky and engaged in the horse 
business in the famous blue grass district. Another son was John, the subject's 
grandfather. 

(H) John Arnold, son of John (I), was a native of Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, and died in the forties. He married Miss Elizabeth J\IcMillen, 
a lady of Scotch descent. He was in politics a Democrat and in his religious 
faith a Seceder in the Presbyterian church. He was buried at the Cross-roads 
cemetery in Washington county, Pennsylvania. The issue of John and Eliza- 
beth (McMillen) Arnold, was eleven children, including the subject's father, 
and were: 'Levi, Simon, Henry, Robert, Nancy, John, Sarah, Elizabeth, Ann, 
Wilson and Joseph. 

(HI) Robert Arnold, son of John Arnold (H) and wife was born in 
Washington county, Pennsjlvania, April 21, 1820, and died April 26, 1886, at 
Houston, Washington county. He learned the blacksmith's trade and later 
engaged in merchandising, first in his native county and subsequently in Pitts- 
burg. He finally retired to his old home in Washington county, where he died. 
He was a supporter of the Democratic party and a member of the United 
Presbyterian church. He belonged to the old-fashioned militia and often 
related his exciting experiences at training-day and muster times. He married 
Rachel, daughter of John and Rachel Morrow. His wife was of the following 
family of sons and daughters: Elizabeth,, William, John, Nancy, Mary, Rachel. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Arnold were the parents of the following five sons : 
Plenry Hagen, John Morrow (subject), Robert Watson, James Stevens and 
William Simon. 

(IV) John M. Arnold, second son of Robert and Rachel (Morrow) 
Arnold, was born August 10, 1849. He attended school in Washington, Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, and graduated from that most excellent commer- 
cial school, Dufif's Commercial College, Pittsburg, in 1868. He then took up 
the profession of bookkeeper, being thus employed for a time at the Hope 
Cotton Mills, Allegheny City, and at other places until he went to New Castle, 
Pennsylvania, as the treasurer of the New Castle Sheet Mills. Later he was 
employed by the firm of W. H. Brown, Pittsburg, dealers in coal and coke, 
and was thus connected for twenty-five years, and through this relation was 
placed in charge as general manager of the Monongahela House — an old 
landmark of the city. He remained there as long as Captain Brown held the 
property, which was from 1891 to 1900, after which he came to the East End 
and leased the Hotel Lamont, a hotel with one hundred rooms, of which he 
is still the proprietor and which is carefully and successfully operated. This 
building consists of the main structure and two spacious annexes. 

Mr. Arnold has never aspired to public ofifice, but served at one time many 
years ago as school director in the Twenty-third ward of Pittsburg. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church and has been in various church 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



offices, including that of member and president of the board of trustees of the 
Smithfield Methodist church, and also served as a Sunday-school teacher for 
a number of years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being connected 
with the degrees to the thirty-second, with the Knight Templars and the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a member of the Royal Arcanum order. 

Mr. Arnold was united in marriage July ii, 1872, to Kate G. Loor, of 
Greensburg, the daughter of John and Catherine (Getzendanner) Loor. 

JOHN H. DAVIES, deceased, who in his lifetime was among the honored 
and influential men of Greater Pittsburg, was born September 5, 1835, in 
Wales, and died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 26, 1902'. He was a 
son of Howell and Elizabeth (Lewis) Davies. 

Howell Davies, the father, was born in Wales in 1814, and died in Pitts- 
burg in 1905, aged ninety-one .years. He was a stationary engineer by 
occupation. He came to America, accompanied by his wife and children, in 
1842. He was a member of the Welsh Baptist church (Chattam Street 
Branch). He served in the LTnion cause during the Civil war in the commis- 
sary department, and politically was a staunch Republican. His wife, Elizabeth, 
died at the age of eighty-six years. They were the parents of eight children, as 
follows: I. Anna, deceased, married William Jones, and was the mother of 
seven children; she died about 1871. The family resided in Covington, Ken- 
tucky. 2. John H., subject of this memoir. 3. Margaret, married Thomas 
Williams, and they became the parents of three children ; this family resides in 
Philadelphia. 4. Howell, Jr., deceased, was a lieutenant under Captain Benja- 
min Morgan in the Civil war, and was killed at the battle of Peach Orchard, 
Georgia. He was unmarried. 5. Elizabeth, died unmarried. 6. Thomas, 
deceased, served all through the Civil war in a cavalry regiment. He married 
and reared a family. 7. Sarah O., married Thomas Davies, a prominent 
merchant of Philadelphia — no issue by this union. 8. Mary, unmarried, lives 
in Philadelphia. 

John H. Davies, subject, was but seven years of age when his parents came 
to America. He received his education at the public schools of Pittsburg, but 
was somewhat limited on account of his having to go to work at a very young 
age in order to support himself. When but nine years old he went to work as 
best he could in the iron works of Everson & Preston. He took up the various 
branches of the rolling mill department, and when less than twenty years of 
age was a master "roller," and very competent at that line of iron working. 
Subsequently he worked in the iron mill of Brown & Company, and later 
entered the employ of D. B. Oliver & Company, where he put in the foundation 
and equipped the rolling mill department of those great works. Later he became 
a member of the Lewis Foundry and Machine Company, being connected there- 
with for a period of thirty-five years. He also held an interest in the Thomas 
Evans & Company Glass Works of the South Side, Pittsburg. He was 
variously connected with financial institutions, including the largest stockholder 
of the Iron and Glass Dollar Savings Bank, of South Pittsburg, and was one 
of the directors of the same. He was interested in the South Side Street Rail- 
way Company. He was an honored resident of the South Side for over forty- 
five years. In his political affiliations he was a staunch Republican, and was 
of the Baptist church faith. He contributed largely of his means to the church 



loo A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



and charitable objects. He was much devoted to his family and home, where, 
outside of his business hours, he could always be found. In his death the city 
lost one of its most highly esteemed citizens. 

He married, February 26, 1867, Rev. Gray, pastor of the Orchard Street 
church officiating, Miss Jane Harris, daughter of Thomas D. and Sarah 
(Jenkins) Harris. She was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, December 11, 
1842. Mr. and Mrs. Davies were the parents of the following eight children: 
I. Charles H., born in South Pittsburg, November 2t,, 1867, now a teller in 
the Iron and Glass Dollar Savings Bank, of the South Side; he married Fannie 
Carless and they are the parents of four children — Viola, Howard and Made- 
line (twins), and Helen J. 2. Margaret J., born September 24, 1869; married 
Edmond Wenzell, of Pittsburg, and they have children — Helen J., Alfred and 
Sarah. 3. Thomas D., born May 7, 1871, now a resident of Duquesne, Penn- 
sylvania ; married Eulalia Happenny, whose child is Edward. 4. John W., 
born May 30, 1873, now of the firm of the Lewis Foundry and Machine Com- 
pany, at Groveton, Pennsylvania. 5. Howell C, born July 6, 1875, now a 
practicing physician at Youngstown, Ohio ; he married Elizabeth Tarr, and 
their issue is one son, Howell, Jr. 6. Sarah E., born October 2, 1877, at home. 
7. Harry M., born March G, 1880, of Pittsburg, with the Cheat River Eumber 
Company; he married Miss Bessie Richardson. 8. William B., born March 8, 
1884, now (1907) attending the Lehigh L'niversity at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Jane (Harris) Davies comes of a family with a remarkable history. 
Thomas D. Harris, the father, was born m Wales and there learned the mason's 
trade, following it in his native land. When twenty years of age he married 
and came to America, locating in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he at once 
found a demand for skilled workmanship in his line. Here he built many of 
the first iron furnaces, and in 1853 went to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where 
he also constructed the first iron furnaces and remained until 1855, when he 
removed to Tennessee and located with his family. There he engaged in the 
iron and steel business and operated a foundry. When the Civil war broke 
out, being loyal to the LTnion, he lost all of his property. His plant was con- 
fiscated and removed to Knoxville, where it was used by the Confederate 
states for making munitions of war. He was one of fifty men who were com- 
pelled to flee from the country in which he lived on account of his politics, he 
being a Republican. Mrs. Davies, who was his eldest child, relates a very 
interesting account of what the family had to pass through in those dark days 
of rebellion. She was then but a mere girl, and tells now of being present when 
the rebels came with a rope to hang her father, but he fortunatelv made his 
escape with Governor Andrew Johnson, paying a man a goodlv sum of money 
to let him through to the L'nion lines. He traveled many miles through a 
wilderness and over the mountains, leaving blood in his tracks from his feet 
after his shoes had worn through. He was sent to his old home at Pittsburg, 
and knowing that his family had plenty of means for immediate use he sought 
and found work in Pittsburg, but the separation from his family caused him 
great mental affliction, and grief preyed upon his mind until he determined to 
go south and try and rescue his family, who by the way, were not illy treated 
by the Confederates. They simply would not tolerate a man of his political 
type. They remained for a time at Louden, Tennessee, but later were driven 
from that place, and finally taken to Knoxville, where they went before the 
provost marshal and were declared prisoners of war. Mrs. Davies (then the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE loi 



eldest of the children) obtained a letter from General Bushrod Johnson and 
presented the same to General Robert E. Lee, of the Confederate forces, who 
sent the family, consisting of mother, three daughters and one son, to pass 
through from Libby Island, near Richmond, by boat to Annapolis, Maryland, 
where they were exchanged for Union prisoners of war, and then sent to 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. During all this time Mr. Harris was at Pittsburg, 
working at his trade and unable to get back south or to hear from his family, 
although they could hear from him. Finally he gave up work at his trade and 
decided to go anyhow, be the result what it might, hazardous though he knew 
the undertaking to be, and strange to relate, perhaps an act of Providence, 
upon his going to the Union station, to take the train for the southland in 
search of his family, who should meet and greet him there but his family, who 
chanced to be in the station, having arrived but a short time before and were 
making some inquiries regarding him. The scene along the streets coming up 
Penn avenue from the station was one never to be forgotten by those who 
witnessed it : The family were well clad, but of the southern styles and colors, 
and the children and youth of Pittsburg knowing they were from the south, 
made much sport of their appearance, and put them to great shame, not know- 
ing the sequel to their wanderings since last they were united as one family. 

After this meeting Mr. Harris managed the iron plant of Bennett & 
Company for many years, after which he lead a retired life. He usually resided 
in Bayardstown, as then known, and was a deacon of Chattam Street Baptist 
church, having helped to erect the edifice and which subsequently contained a 
memorial window placed there to his memory. He was a staunch, uncom- 
promising Republican, and served on the school board for nine years. He was 
a member of the Odd Fellows order. He died aged seventy-one years, and 
his faithful wife died at the age of eighty-six years. Their children were as 
follows : Jane, who married John H. Davies of this sketch. Adaline, wife of 
Rev. R. W. Davies, of Plymouth, Pennsylvania. Sarah, wife of Charles H. 
Phillips, of Pittsburg, the mother of two children — Agnes and Charles. 
Charlotte, wife of Thomas McClelland, of Allegheny City. Charles H., 
deceased at the age of six years. 

WILLIAM JAMES McMARLIN, treasurer and secretary of the Ex- 
panded Aletal Fireproofing Company, of Pittsburg, is a son of James A. and 
Emeline (Duncan) McMarlin, and was born in Mars, Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, March 23, 1872. Among the many clans of Scotland none have a 
more ancient or a more honorable record than the McMarlins, who trace back 
manv centuries in the history of their original country. The head of the Ameri- 
can branch of this family came to this country from the north of Ireland and 
settled in Pennsvlvania, where the descendants have been both prosperous and 
numerous, as well as prominent in professional, business and public life. The 
lineage of the subject is as follows : 

(I) William McMarlin, a native of Tyrone, Ireland, was born in 1753 
and coming to our shores, settled on the banks of the Susquehanna river, near 
the site of the present city of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1843. 

(II) William McMarlin, son of the American ancestor, William (I), 
was bom near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in October, 1798, and was reared on 
his father's farm. He was educated in the pioneer subscription schools and 



102 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



married Magdalena Burkhart, daughter of Jacob Burkhart and wife, of Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania. In 1822 he purchased a farm consisting of one 
hundred and thirty-three acres in Adams township, which tract he cleared from 
out the dense forests and made him an excellent as well as valuable farm- 
home. They were the parents of eight children, one of whom was James A., 
who became the father of the subject. In early life William McMarlin was a 
Covenanter in his religious faith, but later united with the Presbyterian church 
and held the office of an elder in that denomination for more than thirty years. 
Politically he first voted with the Whig party and later with the Republican 
party, which followed it into power. He died at Tally Cove in October, 1883. 

(III) James A. McMarlin, son of William (II), was born March 17, 
1837, and was reared and educated in Butler county, Pennsylvania. He enlisted 
in 1861, when Lincoln made his first call for men to suppress the Rebellion, and 
was a member of Company A, First Pennsylvania Cavalry, Captain William 
Williams commanding. He served the six months' term of his enlistment, was 
honorably discharged and then re-enlisted in Battery L, Second Pennsylvania 
Artillery, Captain Paul Jones commanding. He participated in the memorable 
battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, North Anna, Bethesda, 
Fort Harrison, and was at Lee's surrender at Appomattox. He received his 
final discharge Februan,' 11, 1866. and returned to his home in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a staunch Republican in politics, and held numerous 
local offices, including township positions, and in 1884 was elected treasurer of 
Butler county. He and his wife were members of the Cfnited Presbyterian 
church. 

He married, October 3, 1864, Miss Emeline, daughter of Samuel and 
Rebecca (Caldwell) Duncan. Their children are: i. Grant, deceased; 2. John 
G. ; 3. William J. ; 4. Harry S.. deceased ; 5. Jacob S. ; 6. Bertha P. 

(IV) William James McMarlin, son of James A. and Emeline (Duncan) 
McMarlin (III), was educated in the public and high schools of his native 
place and from his sixteenth to his twentieth year was associated with his father 
in oil production in Western Pennsylvania, and there gained a thorough 
knowledge of the business. Later he found ready employment with J. G. and 
W. Campbell, then engaged in the oil-well supply and foundry business, and 
after five years of close attention he was master of that business. Thus well 
equipped for practical business life he determined to seek a wider field for his 
operations, and in 1897 made his way to Pittsburg, where he took the manage- 
ment of the Expanded Metal Fireproofing Company, an enterprise which sup- 
plies material and puts in place high grade, concrete-steel fireproofing for 
floors, roofs, columns, partitions and outside walls. They are the only concern 
in Pittsburg doing this special kind of builders' work. That Mr. McMarlin 
was well calculated for the line which he was called to is attested by the fact 
that during the years he has conducted the business the establishment has more 
than increased tenfold, growing from fifty thousand dollars a year to more than 
that amount a month. 

In addition to this branch of industry, Mr. McMarlin is the vice-president 
and director of the Merchants and Manufacturers Paper Company, and treas- 
urer of the McDowell Manufacturing Company of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
By his indomitable energy and concentrated effort he has attained to a marked 
business success in his career and, should he be spared, has yet a greater field 
before him. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 103 



He is a lover of outdoor sports and frequently finds a needed diversion 
from business routine by fishing-, enjoying the ball ground and watching a fair, 
spirited horse race. He belongs to the Union, Bellfield and German Clubs of 
Pittsburg and is a thirty-second degree Mason, having taken the numerous 
degrees in that fraternity, and is a member of the Mystic Shriners. 

He was married to Miss Olive Logan, daughter of Harold A. and Louise 
(Logan) Price, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 9, 1894. Their children 
are: Eleanor Phyllis, born September 11, 1895, and Gladys Louise, born 
November 14, 1896. 



JACOB KATES RUSSELL, a resident of Wilkinsburg, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, and road foreman of engines on the Pittsburg Division 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad, traces his ancestry to Ireland. 

John Russell, grandfather of Jacob Kates Russell, was born in Ireland, 
and emigrated to the United States about the year 1804. He settled in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, where he married Rebecca Seymore, November 28, 
1805. She was born March 27, 1789, and died April. 8, 1880, a descendant of 
the early Swedish settlers on the Delaware in Pennsylvania. They had one 
son : John George. 

John George Russell was born in Philadelphia, October 19, 1806, and died 
June 9, 1845. He received his education in the common schools of his native 
city, and was apprenticed to learn the trade of bookbinding. Later he estab- 
lished himself in that business, forming a partnership with Captain Jacob 
Kates. 

They were the first to introduce the use of machinery in the bookbinding 
business in Philadelphia, and at that time it was thought to be an impossibility 
to utilize machines in this line of industry. During the Catholic riots in Phila- 
delphia he served as an officer in the militia organized to quell the disturbances. 
In politics he was a Whig, and was a vestryman in Trinity Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the district of Southwark, Philadelphia. He married, January 3, 
1830, Isabella Collison. She was born October 14, 1809, and they had children: 
I. William, born November 19, 1830. 2. Isabella, born January 6, 1832; mar- 
ried Edward C. Richardson, November 8, 1853, and died June 11, 1888. 3. 
George, born September 29, 1833, died the following day. 4. John G., born 
January 13, 1835, died July 2, 1837. 5. Mary Ann, born October 23, 1836, mar- 
ried May 12, 1857, Dr. Samuel Neeper, and died July 12, 1875. 6. Jacob Kates, 
see forward. 7. Garey Hart, bom March 17, 1841, married SeptemlDer 13, 1868, 
Cecelia Gabrima O'Connell. 8. George W., born February 24, 1842, married 
October 27, 1867, Sarah Ann Widensall. 9. Peter Rodgers. born November 17, 
1844, married February i, 1866, Eliza Meris, and died March 8, 1867. 

Jacob Kates Russell, fourth son and sixth child of John George and Isa- 
bella (Collison) Russell, was born in Philadelphia. November 28, 1838. His 
education was acquired in the public schools of Lancaster county and city, and 
in White Hall Academy in the Cumberland valley. He entered the machine 
shop of Miller & Fellenbaum, at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, as an apprentice in 
1855. After serving there two years he entered the employ of the Peimsylvania 
Railroad Company in the shops at Altoona as a machine apprentice. He 
engaged in the same shops as a journeyman in April, 1857, working as such 
until May, 1861, when he was advanced to the position of locomotive fireman 



I04 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

of the Pittsburg Division. In September of the same year he was further 
advanced to the position of machine gang- leader at the Pittsburg Division 
engine house. He was appointed an engineman in April of the following year, 
in which capacity he served on the Pittsburg', Tyrone and Middle divisions 
until April, 1874, when he was made engine-house foreman at Altoona, a posi- 
tion he held four years, when he was appointed to his present responsible posi- 
tion. He removed to Wilkinsburg in 1902, where he now resides. His politi- 
cal affiliations are with the Republican party and he is a member of the Presby- 
terian church. Hie has been a deacon and elder in that church since 1870. 

On September 20, 1864, Mr. Russell married Ellen Rebecca Ward, 
daughter of John Ward. She died October 8, 1874. On June 24, 1880, he 
married Jennie Montgomery Campbell, daughter of John Gemmill, and has had 
children : Rose Montgomery and John Kates. The latter, born November 22, 
1885, died December 27, 1892. 

GENEALOGY OF THE NEGLEY FAAHLY. (Compiled by Georgina 
G. Negley, of 305 North Negley avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.) The 
Negley family is descended from John Nageli, of Canton Berne, Switzerland, 
co-temporary and fellow worker with Zwingli, with whom he went from 
Switzerland into Germany in the Sixteenth century, preaching the Reformation. 
The original Swiss spelling of the name "Nageli" still maintains with the Swiss 
branch of the family, was first modified to Naegly, and a century since to its 
present Anglicized form — Negley. The Swiss name has a floral signification, 
meaning "a little pink," and the crest used by one branch of the Swiss family 
in modern times presents the carnation as its distinguishing feature. The 
name is beloved by the Swiss, as also by the Germans, through their devotion 
to Hans George Nageli, the illustrious composer, lecturer and author of 
valuable works on music, member of congress and simultaneously president of 
the Swiss Association of Music. He was born in the canton of Zurich, May 
26, 1768, and died in Zurich December, 1836. He is affectionately known as 
"bater Nageli," "Father of the folk songs of Switzerland," and founder of 
choral societies. 

Another illustrious member of the Swiss family was Carl Wilhelm Nageli, 
naturalist, born in 1817 near Zurich, professor of botany at Zurich and later 
at Munich. He opened new fields in all branches of botany and was the author 
of a large number of master works on this science. A German branch of the 
family has long been identified with Heidelberg, Professor Nageli having occu- 
pied with distinction the chair of medicine in Heidelberg University, in which 
office he succeeded his illustrious father-in-law, Professor Mai, a great-uncle 
of Mrs. Matthew B. Riddle, of Allegheny. 

(I) Jacob Negley, descendant of the John Negley of Switzerland, and 
father of the founder of East Liberty, Pennsylvania, born at Frankfort-on-the- 
Main, Germany, sailed with his wife and children in 1739 for America; died 
on voyage and was buried at sea. 

(H) Alexander Negley. son of Jacob Negley, was born in Frankfort, 
Germanv, in 1734: came to .\merica in 1739, when the family located in eastern 
Pennsylvania. In 1778 Alexander settled within five miles of Fort Pitt, on 
the present site of Highland Park, where he died November 3, 1809. He was 
the first white settler in the East Liberty valley; served his country in the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 105 

Revolutionary war, and was largely instrumental in building the first church 
erected in Pittsburg. He married, in 1762, Mary Ann Berkstresser, who died 
in 1829. Their children were: i. Felix, born September 22, 1764, died April 
19, 1836. 2^'jacob3_ born August 28, 1766, died March 18, 1826. 3. Peter, 
died in infancy, 1768. 4. EIizaT5eth, born February' 15, 1772, died November 
15, 1855; she married John Powell and was the mother of eight children. 5. 
Peter, born February 6. 1774, died 1791. 6. Margaret, born June 10, 1776, 
died March 11, 1857; married Phillip Burtner and they had ten children. 7. 
John, born April 6, 1778, died August 11, 1870. 8. Alexander, born August 
I, 1781, died August 2, 1807. 9. Casper, born March 17, 1784, died May 23, 
1877. 10. Mary Ann, born August 20, 1786, died December 4, 1833; married 
Samuel Byington and they had four children. 11. Henry, born October 20, 
1790, died 1791. 

(HI) Felix Negley, son of Alexander Negley. born September 22, 1764, 
served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war ; married Ruth Horton. Mav 28, 
1800. He died April 19, 1836. an'd his wife in 1873 ; they resided at Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania. Their children were: i. Alexander, born March 17, 1802, 
died January 25, 1806. 2. Thomas, born August 2, 1803, died January 10, 
1804. 3. Mary, born February 8, 1805, died December 25, 1886; married 
James Humes and they were the parents of thirteen children. 4. Felix, born 
November 24, 1806, died April 11, 1852. 5. Margaret, born September 13, 
1808, died July 2, 1892; married Robert Hare, and they were the parents of 
eleven children. 6. Ruth, born April 10, 1810, died June 10, 1882; married 
Dr. J. H. Goodwin and was the mother of nine children. 7. Elizabeth, born 
February 2, 1812, deceased: married P. N. McDowell, and they had three 
children. 8. Barbara, born August 8, 1813, died June 3, i860; married Leslie 
Jack and they had five children. 9. Rebecca, born June 3, 1815, died March 
19, 1896; married Hugh Lessley and they had fifteen children. 10. Fanny, born 
May 3, 1817, died October 29, 1884; married S. N. Christy and had three chil- 
dren. II. Jane, born March 11, 1819; married George Lessley and they had 
eight children. 12. Eleanor, born January 20, 1821. 13. Catherine, born 
October 17, 1822; married James Lacey and they had eight children. 14. 
Nancy, born May 27, 1824, died August 18, 1839. 

(HI) John Negley, son of Alexander and Alary Ann (Berkstresser) Neg- 
ley, was born in Fort Ligonier, April 6, 1778 : married Anna Elizabeth Patterson 
June I, 1816. He died August 11, 1870, in Butler, Pennsylvania, and she died 
in August, 1835. Their children were: i. Mary Berkstresser, born May 29, 
1817, died in Butler, August, 1905 ; she married John G. Muntz and they were 
the parents of five children. 2. Elizabeth Hull, born January 10, 1819, died 
August 17, 1835. 3. Susannah, born February 13, 1821, married Joseph P. 
Patterson. 4. John Henry, born February 7, 1823. 5. Felix Casper, born 
February 28, 1825, died in Pittsburg October 5, 1901. 6. Minerva, born Feb- 
ruary 6, 1827; married Samuel Haseltine, and they had four children. 7. 
James Alexander, born April 3, 1829: married Elizabeth Mytinger, and they 
had six children. Residence, Philadelphia. 8. Anna iMcClain, born January 
26, 1831, died February 28, 1831. 9. \\'illiam Clark, born February 21, 1833, 
died September 17, 1850. 10. Albert Gallatin, born February 22, 1835: married 
Elenora Reynolds and had five children : residence, Florence, Alabama. 

(IV) John Henry Negley, son of John and Ann Elizabeth (Patterson) 
Negley, was born February 7, 1823, is still an honored resident of Butler, 



io6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Pennsylvania, which district he represented in the Pennsylvania legislature for 
many years. He has also been prominent in editorial life. He married Mary 
Harper and to them were born ten children, five of whom still survive. 

(IV) Major Felix Casper Negley, son of John and Ann Elizabeth (Pat- 
tersen) Negley, born February 28, 1825, died in Pittsburg October 5, 1901, 
where he had long been an honored resident. He was identified with the coal 
interests of Pittsburg. He served his country in the Mexican and Civil wars 
and was one of that party who in 1849 braved the hardships and dangers of 
the west in pursuit of gold in California. The Negley family are indebted to 
Major Negley for his faithful efforts to preserve the genealogy of the family, 
and to his record the present compiler is largely indebted. He married Mar- 
garet Ann Dickson, who resides in Edgewood, Pennsylvania. Their children 
are as follows: i. John Dickson, married Isabella Scully; resides in East 
Orange, New Jersey, and has six children. 2. Mary Elizabeth, married John 

5. Scully, resides in Pittsburg; have four children. 3. William Alexander died 
in infancy. 4. Margaret Brown, married William \V. Ramsey, resides in Idle- 
wood, Pennsylvania; has four children. 5. Rachel Blair, died in childhood. 

6. Minerva Susan, resides in Edgewood. 7. Felix Casper, married Mary S. 
Appleton, resides in Butler, Pennsylvania, and has four children. 8. Jessie 
Patterson, married Joseph Mitchell ; has two children. 9. Henry Hull, who 
married Annie St. Claire Williamson, and they have one child, Ronold Dickson 
Negley. 10. Anna Scott, married George M. Schmidt, resides in Edgewood. 
II. William George, married Martha I. Thomas, and their son is Paul Thomas 
Negley, and the father is practicing law in Pittsburg. 12. Alice Keziah, 
resides in Edgewood. 

(Ill) Alexander Negley, son of Alexander, Sr., founder of East Liberty, 
was born August i, 1781, married Mary Miller about 1803. He died xA.ugust 
2, 1807. The children born of this union were: i. Peter, born about 1804. 
2. Mary, born about 1806. Both of the last named went west. 

(Ill) Casper Negley, son of Alexander, Sr., born March 17, 1784, was 
twice married. First to Elizabeth Fluke, November 6, 1823. She died May 20, 
1844. The children of this union were: i. Mary Ann, born June 11, 1824, 
married Aaron Reimer — they had eleven children. 2. John Fluke, born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1826, married Virginia Schuchman, and had eight children. ^. 
Alexander William, born August 19, 1827, twice married — to Mary Ann 
Mohler, who died January 18, 1848; they had four children. For his second 
wife he married Eliza Jane Ashbaugh, by whom were born ten children. 4. 
George B., born April 2, 1830, died in the west September 4, 1854. 5. C. 
Madaline F., born October 30, 1832, married David Moehler, by whom he had 
two children. He died in 1852 and she died December 19, 1855. 6. Felix 
Henry, born May 24, 1833, married Mary Ann Simons, and they had six chil- 
dren. She died in 1897. 7. Jacob Lewis, born August 13, 1835, married Kate 
Joyce and they had nine children. 8. Casper Samuel, born August 2, 1838, 
married Sarah Jane Bunting, by whom were born six children. 9. Daniel 
Frederick, born December 28, 1839, married Mary N. Coleman, and to them 
were born six children. She died June 25, 1877, after which he married again. 
For his second wife Ca.sper Negley (III) married Mary Magee, who "died 
December 16, 1863. He died May 23, 1877. 

(Ill) Jacob Negley, Sr., who laid out the town of East Liberty, and for 




BARBARA A. NEGLEY. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 107 

whom the avenue on which he resided is named, was the second son of 
Alexander Negley, Sr., and was born August 28, 1766, in Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania, coming with his parents to East Liberty in 1778, when but 
twelve years of age. His descendants have to a greater extent than any other 
branch of Alexander Negley's family remamed in Pittsburg, where many of 
them have proven themselves important factors, especially so in the molding 
of the religious and educational life of the city. His great landed interests, 
to which were added his wife's large real estate holdings, together with 
superior judgment and acumen, made him a recognized power of his day in 
this vicinity, where, in 1816, he built the first steam flouring mill west of the 
Allegheny mountains. His appreciation of the future importance of Pittsburg 
is shown in the fact that he laid out Penn avenue one hundred feet wide as far 
as it passed through his own and his wife's domains, which is now the business 
center of East Liberty. He endeavored to have that width continue into the 
city, but was unable to convince the other property holders of the wisdom of 
his proposition. 

June 19, 1795, Mr. Negley married Barbara Anna, daughter of John 
Conrad Winebiddle. She was born in Pittsburg September 15, 1778, and died 
May 10, 1867. Mr. Negley died March 18, 1826. During the forty-one years 
of her widowhood, as well as in earlier life, Mrs. Negley proved herself a 
woman of rare graces of character, as well as superior executive ability. 
Among her many beneficences stands out prominently the beautiful site of the" 
East Liberty Presbyterian church, and its rich-toned bell, which, since 1867,' 
has been pealing forth an invitation to the House of God. The remains of 
Jacob and Barbara Negley are interred in their family lot in the beautiful 
Allegheny cemetery. The children born to this worthy couple were as follows : 
I. John, born June 28, 1796, died February' 20, 1802. 2. Elizabeth, born June 
23, 1798, died November 11, 1799. 3. Jacob, born February 16, 1800, died 
January 30, 1830. 4. Daniel, born April 10, 1802, died December 4, 1867^ 5. 
M^ary Ann, born October 4, 1805, died in October, 1829; married Daniel Berlin 
and had two children, one dying in infancy. 6. George Gibson, born April 
27, 1808, died March 26, 1884. 7. Catharine R., born February 13, 1810, died 
August II, 1897. 8. Margaret, born February 7, 1812, died May 3, 1815. 9. 
William, born June 25, 1814, died September 14, 1816. 10. Sarah Jane, born 
February 3, 1817. 11. Alexander, born March 2, 1819, died February 12, 
1864. 12. Isabella M., born October 25, 1821, died March 3, 1849; married 
Richard C. Beatty, M. D. ; they had three children. 

(IV) Jacob Negley, Jr., son of Jacob Negley, Sr., was born June 28, 
1796, died January 30, 1830; married Mary Ann Scott December 20, 1824. 
Their residence was at the head of North Negley avenue, which property 
was inherited and named '"Baywood" by their son, Major-General James S. 
Negley, the site later purchased by Alexander King. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Jacob Negley, Jr., were as follows: i. James Scott, born December 22, 
1826, died August 7, 1901. 2. Rebecca, born June 20, 1828, died July 9, 1847. 

(IV) Daniel Negley, son of Jacob Negley, Sr., was a merchant in East 
Liberty for many years, and had his homestead on Stanton avenue, near 
Highland avenue. He was twice married, in 1824 to Jane Backhouse, who 
died about 1832. The issue by this marriage was: i. John Roup, born 1824, 
deceased. 2. William B., born June 5, 1828, died January 16, 1894. 3. James 



io8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Ross, was killed at the battle of Perrysville, Kentucky, in the Union army, 
1862. Daniel Negley later married Keziah P. Cox, born June 9, 1813, died 
January 15, 1892. He died December 4, 1867. The children by his second 
marriage were: i. Anna Barbara, married Charles B. Seely, who died August 
2, 1861, the mother of two children. 2. Keziah Jane, married Major Oliver 
M. Irwin; she died May i, 1857. 3. Kate R., married Joseph H. Hill. She 
died July 29, 1869. 4. Edward Cox. 5. Robert Heberton. 6. Sallie Ella, 
who married Dr. David McMasters. She died on October 10, 1874. 
7. Daniel Charles. 

(V) John Roup Negley, son of Daniel Negley (IV), born 1824, deceased, 
was a merchant in the East End of Pittsburg for many years, retiring from 
active life about two years prior to his death. He was a leading member in 
the East End Presbyterian church and a leader in the choir for many years. 
He married Caroline B. Newton, still living (1907) at Ligonier, Pennsylvania. 
Their seven children, who grew to maturity, were as follows: i. Orrin New- 
ton Negley, residing at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 2. Daniel N. Negley, 
deceased. 3. Richard B. Negley, now residing in California. 4. Kesiah J., 
who married George Senft, of Ligonier. 5. William Ross Negley, a real 
estate dealer in Pittsburg, who married Tillie ]\I. Garby, and their issue is — 
William Earl, born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania; Vida Clare and Johanna 
B. 6. Frank Negley, a resident of California. 7. Annie D., who married J. 
W. Sloan of Pittsburg and is now deceased. 

(V) Major William B. Negley, son of Daniel Negley, by his first wife, 
was a prominent lawyer and closely identified with the growth of Pittsburg. 
Following in the footsteps of his ancestors, he was a zealous worker toward 
the ecclesiastical up-building of the city, being one of the organizers and ardent 
workers in the Shady Side Presbyterian church, when it was formed from the 
mother church. East Liberty Presbyterian church. Major Negley was born 
June 5, 1828; married Joanna Bruce, and died January 16, 1894. 

(V) Colonel Edward C. Negley, son of Daniel Negley, was educated at 
Keating Academy and at Jefferson College, where he studied law. At the open- 
ing of the Civil war he forsook his studies and joined the LTnion army, enlisting 
in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer .Artillerw He 
served in all twenty-three months. He was with the Army of the Potomac 
and participated in the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville and Fredericks- 
burg. His last service was in the First Independent Brigade, holding Sher- 
man's line of communications. He enlisted as a private, but left the service as 
first lieutenant. Upon his return from the army he engaged in the grocerv 
business at East Liberty, continuing until 1868, when he applied for and soon 
received the appointment for a clerkship in the Pittsburg postoffice. In 1873, 
under President U. S. Grant, he was appointed postmaster at Pittsburg and 
held the office until 1877, when he was appointed deputy sheriff of Allegheny 
county. Later he was assistant and finally secretary of the department of 
charities for the city. In i8go he was elected alderman from the Nineteenth 
ward of the city and is the present incumbent, having been reelected four times. 
In 1902 he was appointed police magistrate under Mayor Brown. This he 
held eleven months and again, in 1903, was made police magistrate. Politically 
Mr. Negley has always been a supporter of the Republican party. He is a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic and is the commander of Post No. 
117, at Pittsburg. 



I 




■f<i^^'i>f<^%}^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 109 



He married Rebecca J-, daughter of William Crawford. Her father 
was formerly of the firm of Schnellenburger & Company. The children born 
of this union are: i. Jennie Lafevere. 2. Katie Edna, married E. M. Gerst 
and is the mother of Rebecca Negley Gerst. Robert Heberton, who married 
Beatrice Wright. 

(V) Robert Heberton Negley, son of Daniel Negley by his second mar- 
riage, for many years a business man of Pittsburg, married Annie M. Hugus, 
and they reside on South Negley avenue. Their children are : Paul Hugus, 
married Gertrude Hanna, and Edward Cox. The last named married Sarah 
Gerst and they have two children, Anna Priscilla and Eugenie Elizabeth. 

(\') Daniel Charles, son of Daniel Negley by the last marriage, is con- 
nected with the insurance business of the city. He married Lily B. Berry 
and resides in Pittsburg. They have one child, Clara L., who married George 
H. Flinn, and has two children — Louise and George H., Jr. 

(IV) Alexander Negley, son of Jacob Negley, Sr., was a favorite char- 
acter of his day in East Liberty. ]\larch 2, 1819, he was born in and occupied 
imtil death the Negley mansion, corner North Negley and Stanton avenues. 
He married Sophia Mcllvaine, and died February 12, 1864. Their children 
were : Alexander and Elizabeth, but both died in childhood. 

(TV) Catharine R. Negley, daughter of Jacob and Anna Barbara Negley, 
was born February 13, 1810. She built a homestead on her paternal inheritance, 
where she resided, taking a keen interest in the growth of Pittsburg, until her 
death, August 11, 1897, in the eighty-eighth year of her age. 

(IV) George G. Negley, son of Jacob and Anna Barbara Negley, was 
born April 27, 1808, at the old Negley home on North Negley and Stanton 
avenues, and through the seventy-five years of his useful life spent in the 
vicinity contributed in many ways toward the up-building of his. native city, 
which he remembered as a struggling town. True to his ancestral blood he left 
the impress of his sterling integrity and wise judgment on the life of Pitts- 
burg, being especially active in promoting its religious and educational advance- 
ment. During the Civil war he contributed largely towards the cause of the 
Lnion, and through many years of his life was an office holder in the East 
Liberty Presbyterian church. Mr. Negley was twice married, in 1832 to 
Eleanor Boyd of Tarentum, Pennsylvania, born January 5, 1807, and died 
May 10, 1854. The children of this issue were: i. Jacob B., died January 
15, 1898. 2. William Mcllvaine. 3. Olive N., died in childhood. 4. Henry 
Hillis, North Negley avenue. 5. Theodore Shields, Fayette City, Pennsylvania. 
6. Mary E., died December 22, 1894. 

George G. Negley married Eliza J. Johnson, of Allegheny City. Mrs. 
Negley was born March 25, 1835, and died ]\Iay 12, 1883. Mr. Negley died 
March 26, 1884, being interred in the Negley lot in the Allegheny cemetery. 
The children of the last marriage were : Sarah J. Mellon Negley, North 
Negley avenue ; Anna Barbara, married Joseph K. Brick, of Philadelphia, where 
they reside ; ]\I. Alice Negley, North Negley avenue ; Georgina G. Negley, 
North Neglev avenue ; Alexander Johnson Negley, North Negley avenue. 

(V) Jacob B. Negley, son of George G. Negley, for many years identified 
with the banking business of Pittsburg, married Cynthia Trull. He died 
January 15, 1898, and she died May 12, 1901. 

(V) William !M. Negley, son of George G. Negley. for many years con- 
nected with the coal interests of Pittsburg, married Isabella Douglass, and 



no A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



they reside in Pittsburg. The children by this union are: i. Anna Boyd, 
deceased. 2. Sadie Bell, deceased. 3. William Douglass, deceased. 4. George 
Gibson, deceased. 5. Eleanor Johnson, deceased. 6. Harvey B., of Pittsburg. 
7. Walter, died in infancy. 8. Oliver James, of Pittsburg. 

(V) Rev. Theodore S. Negley, son of George G. Negley. active in the 
ministrv of the Presbyterian church, is at present pastor of the Little Redstone 
Presbyterian church, which some years since celebrated the centennial of its 
organization. He married Susan C. Todd and the issue by such union was : 
Mary Hunter, deceased ; George Decker and Jeanette Boyd. 

(V) Henry Hillis Negley, son of George G. .Negley, has for many years 
been prominently identified with the real estate interests of Pittsburg and its 
commercial life, serving in the directorate of numerous financial and phil- 
anthropic institutions, as well as long occupying the office of president of the 
board of trustees of the East Liberty Presbyterian church, founded by his 
grandparents. As Mr. Negley's interests largely lay in the East End, he has, 
through his being identified with the Pittsburg Board of Trade as an officer, 
contributed largely to the growth and improvement of the East Liberty Valley. 
In the practical study of botany and horticulture he has attained distinction. 
He married Margaret Johnston and they reside on North Negley avenue. 

(V) Alexander Johnson, son of George G. and Eliza (Johnson) Negley, 
represents 'the fourth generation of the historic name of the first white settler 
in the East Liberty Valley. He was for many years identified with the banking 
interests of Pittsburg, being later engaged in the development of lumber and 
mining interests in the west and in Canada. Among other things Mr. Negley's 
Cultivated taste is manifest in his love of nature and orchid culture. He 
married Elizabeth G. Wishart. They reside on North Negley avenue, Pittsburg. 

(IV) Sarah J. Negley, daughter of Jacob Negley, Sr., was born February 
3, 1817, in the Negley mansion, North Negley and Stanton avenues, and is now 
(1907) the sole survivor of her father's family. At the age of ninety she still 
graces the old homestead built on the property which was a gift from her 
mother, Barbara Anna (Winebiddle) Negley, on North Negley avenue, fol- 
lowing' with keen interest and clear intellect the development of her native city, 
and contributing of her bounty to church and philanthropic work. August 22, 
1843, Sarah Negley married Thomas Mellon, who later became associate judge 
of the court of common pleas. Their three surviving sons are business men 
of prominence in Pittsburg. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mellon 
are as follows: i. Thomas Alexander Mellon, married to Mary Caldwell: 
both deceased. 2. James Ross Mellon, married to Rachel Larimer. 3. Sarah 
Emma Mellon, died in childhood. 4. Anna Rebecca Mellon, died in childhood. 
5. Andrew William Mellon, married Nora McMullen. 6. Richard Beatty 
Mellon, married Jennie T. King. 7. George Negley Mellon, died September 
15, 1887, aged twenty-seven years. 

(By Georgina G. and Henry H. Negley, Pittsburg. Pa.) 

NEGLEY FAMILY. The most beautiful and popular residential section of 
Pittsburg is the East End of the city, familiarly known as East Liberty \'alley, 
the location at the present day of some of the most palatial and artistic homes 
to be found in America. The history of this section is inseparably connected 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE iii 



with the names of the early settlers, many of whom are memorialized in its 
streets. . It is but fitting that one of the principal avenues should bear the name 
of him who laid out the town of East Liberty, Jacob Negley, and whose father, 
Alexander Negley, was the first white settler in the East Liberty Valley, where 
he acquired a large tract of land, and the East End of Pittsburg was long 
known as Negleystown. The Negley family are descended from John Nageli, 
of Canton Berne, Switzerland, who came from Switzerland into Germany 
preaching the Reformation with Zwingli, the celebrated reformer and patriot 
of the early part of the Sixteenth century. He accompanied Zwingli to Frank- 
lort, in Germany, where they labored perseveringly and successfully in religious 
effort, the name Nageli being often mentioned in connection with that of 
Zwingli in church histories of that time. 

(I) Jacob Negley, the father of the founder of East Liberty, and his two 
brothers sailed from Germany with their families for America in 1739. Jacob 
Negley died en voyage and was buried at sea, his widow and three children 
proceeding to this country, settling in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, when Alex- 
ander was but five years of age. One brother settled in Maryland and the 
other, with his family, settled on the banks of the Delaware river, and Negley's 
Hill, still so-called, within the suburban limits of Philadelphia, commemorates 
the family residence there. 

(H) Alexander Negley grew to manhood in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
which adjoins Philadelphia, and it is said that he became enamored of the west 
during his term of service in the Revolutionary army, and when General Wash- 
ington sent two companies of troops over to Fort Pitt to help the settlers drive 
away the Indians, who had been causing them great annoyance, Alexander 
Negley, as a member of one of these companies, was so well pleased with the 
west that he determined to make it his future home. Upon leaving Bucks 
county, owing to the Indian insurrection in the vicinity of Fort Pitt, however, 
he first located for a time on a farm between New Florence and Ligonier, Penn- 
sylvania, and this property is now a portion of the estate of his great-grandson, 
James Ross i\Iellon. In 1762 he married Mary Ann Berkstresser, and to them 
was born within old Fort Ligonier a son named John, the farnily being in 
the fort at the time of his birth seeking refuge from the Indians. Later in the 
same vear — 1778 — with his wife and five children he migrated to what is now 
Allegheny countv, where he settled on a farm on the Allegheny river, the 
present site of Highland Park and the city reservoirs. Here he built a large 
red brick mansion and beautified the grounds with orchards and groves. There 
he spent the remainder of his life and died November 3, 1809, aged seventy-five 
years, leaving a widow and eight surviving children, three having died in child- 
hood. He was buried on his farm, as were a number of his family and 
neighbors. The farm comprised about three hundred acres, including Negley's 
Run and Heath's Run, incorrectly called Hite's Run, extending southwest- 
wardly over half way to where the Pittsburg and Greensburg turnpike, now 
Penn avenue, was afterward located. He utilized Negley's Run, which took 
its name from him, by erecting a grist mill and a fulling mill upon it, and pur- 
chased a farm apiece for each of his children. At that date there was no city 
of Pittsburg, only a few log houses about Fort Duquesne. The homestead 
was inherited and occupied by his son, Casper Negley. Another son. Jacob 
Negley (III), born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1766, he for 



112 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

whom the avenue is named and who was so closely identified with the city's 
life and early growth, in addition to the property inherited from his father 
purchased large tracts of land. In honor of Mr. Heath, from whom a portion 
of the land was bought, he named his home farm "Heath's Delight." The tract 
adjoined the property of Colonel George Croghan, who had previously purchased 
the property on Stanton avenue from Mr. Negley, now called the Schenley 
estate. Jacob Xegley at this time owned nearly all the land (except the old 
homestead in the present Highland Park, which his brother Casper had in- 
herited) which is now included in the Nineteenth ward and a portion of the 
Twentieth ward, this whole region then being called Pitts township, besides 
adjoining property, comprising an area of about fifteen hundred acres, on which 
is laid out a town at the junction of the Pittsburg and Greensburg turnpike 
and Frankstown road, long known as Negleystown, afterward called East 
Liberty. He had also improved much of the land and brought it to a high 
state of cultivation. At the time of its acquisition that portion lying between 
what is now Stanton avenue and Penn avenue was mostly covered with a dense 
growth of white oak and hickory timber, which he cut off, converting the land 
into an extensive meadow. Pie also continued to operate his father's mills, 
and in 1808 he built what was then regarded as the finest residence west of the 
Allegheny mountains, a large red brick edifice known as the Negley Mansion, 
at the intersection of what is now Negley and Stanton avenues, the brick being 
made on the grounds. This building was but recently removed to make way for 
modern improvements. Mr. Negley located what is now Negley avenue, in a 
direct southern line from his front door to the Pittsburg and Greensburg turn- 
pike, and it was then familiarly known as Negley's lane. He planted fruit 
orchards and had about a hundred acres around his home under fine cultivation. 

About at the present intersection of Penn and Collins avenues, the latter 
until comparatively recent times called Mill street, Mr. Negley, in 1816, erected 
the first steam flouring mill west of the Allegheny mountains, for at this early 
date milling throughout the country was done by rudely constructed mills on 
small streams, which became dry and the mill stood idle throughout the summer, 
causing great inconvenience and sometimes partial famine. The cost of the mill 
was great as the machinery had to be brought over the mountains by wagons 
from Philadelphia. 

Another of the early land owners of the East Liberty Valley closely con- 
nected with Mr. Negley was John Conrad Winebiddle, another name memorial- 
ized iii one of the avenues. Mr. Winebiddle came from Germany in early 
manhood, where he was born at Bernzabern March 11, 1741. His father and 
mother having been laid to rest on the other side, and being the sole survivor 
of the family, Mr. Winebiddle came to America possessed of considerable gold, 
and established a tannery on the banks of the Allegheny river, in the vicinity of 
Lawrenceville, about where the government arsenal was later located. His 
business was very prosperous and lucrative, and he invested his money largely 
in real estate, buying up five hundred and fifty acres. The tract which he thus 
acquired extended from the Lawrenceville district to Negleystown. Mr. Wine- 
biddle married Elizabeth Weitzel, and their first home was on the Allegheny 
river, not far from the tannery from where the fleets of canoes filled with Corn- 
planter Indians sailing back and forth to the town was a frequent and 
interesting sight. Later the family occupied the home on Second street, now 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 113 



Second avenue. They had five children, four of whom hved to inherit the large 
estate. These were Anna Barbara Winebiddle. who married Jacob Negley ; 
Kitty Winebiddle, who married John Roup ; J. Conrad and Phillip Winebiddle. 

Thus were united the Winebiddle real estate interests with the already 
large Xegley estate. Mr. Winebiddle, like Mr. Negley, was an energetic, in- 
dustrious man. He died September 11, 1795, being buried in the churchyard 
of the First German United Evangelical Protestant church, of which he was one 
of the founders. His remains, with those of his wife, were later transferred to 
the Baum burial lot in the Allegheny cemetery. He left his beloved widow 
and his beloved son-in-law, Jacob Negley, the executors of his estate. Thus 
Jacob Negley controlled a vast region when he laid out East Liberty Valley. 
Mr. Negley's keen foresight is shown in the fact that as far as he could control 
the laying out of Penn avenue, then the Greensburg turnpike, he made it one 
hundred feet wide. He endeavored to prevail on all the property owners and 
heirs to do likewise, but did not succeed in his efforts except through the land 
owned by himself and his wife, that portion extending through East Liberty 
being a monument to his memory. Mr. Negley died March 18, 1826, and was 
buried in the churchyard of the United Evangelical Protestant church. His 
remains, being later removed, now lie beside those of his wife and children in 
the Negley lot in the beautiful Allegheny cemetery. 

Mr. Winebiddle's will, dated September 3, 1795, and recorded in the first 
Will Book of the county, is an interesting document. Besides dividing among 
his children a considerable sum of money and some slaves (slavery had not yet 
been abolished in Pennsylvania, only the time of servitude was limited), he left 
them two houses apiece in the "Town of Pittsburg," situate on Water, Market 
and Wood streets, and also, besides his farm on the bank of the river where his 
tannery stood, he divided between them the five hundred and fifty acres of land 
in what was then Pitt township. This latter tract was bounded by what is now 
the Allegheny cemetery, the lands of Colonel Croghan ( father of the late Mrs. 
Schenley) and the estate of Jacob Negley, Centre avenue, the Penn railroad 
and the eastern Lawrenceville boundary. A significant fact is that Mr. Wine- 
biddle's children held this latter tract almost intact until their death, when it de- 
scended to the heirs of the Winebiddle family, the Negleys, Roups and Wine- 
biddles. Of the Winebiddles name but one representative remains, though there 
are many descendants. 

These hardy pioneers heartily appreciated the necessity for providing re- 
ligious and educational advantages for their children, the spiritual culture of 
their own families and their neighbors being always a matter of prime 
importance. Loyalty to religion and generous contribution to its support is a 
strongly marked feature of the true Negley character. We have seen how the 
remote ancestor, John Negley, previously mentioned, aided and supported the 
faithful Zwingli. Following the flight of time we find Alexander Negley, 
Sr., proving himself the strong supporter of the renowned Father Weber, who 
accomplished so much in what is now Westmoreland county as well as in 
Allegheny county at an early day in organizing German Reformed churches. 
The first house of worship planted within the present limits of Pittsburg was 
that of the First German United "Evangelical Protestant congregation at Smith- 
field street and Sixth avenue. John William Weber was the founder of the 
congregation and in 1782 became its pastor. The Cash Book still preserved in 



114 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



the congregation contains the names of forty-two men who laid the foundation 
for the first church in this city, and among these are the names of Alexander 
Negley and Conrad Winebiddle. Except for the hauling and work which the 
members gave, Jacob Negley was largely instrumental in erecting the first 
church building, the land having been granted by the Penns. A small meeting 
house had been previously used. 

Mr. Negley was also associated with the building of the First Presbyterian 
church of Pittsburg, located on Sixth avenue, a later organization. In these 
early days, from 1782 on, the country was wild and the roads very bad in 
winter time, so that for the people of Negleystown to attend church service at 
such a distance was difficult indeed. For this reason Alexander Negley had a 
preacher, usually Mr. Weber, come and hold religious services at his home, now 
Highland Park, about once a month, for his own family and the neighbors. 
It was at one of these services that his son Jacob first observed and became 
enamored of his future wife, Anna Barbara Winebiddle, who was but twelve 
years of age. About five years later they were married. 

iVIr. Jacob Negley, from his home at the corner of what is now North 
Negley and Stanton avenues, built a raised cinder path to the site of the present 
East Liberty Presbyterian church edifice, on what is now the corner of Perm 
and South Highland avenues, for a foot-path for the use of his children, and he 
built a comfortable frame school house of good dimensions in the early part of 
the nineteenth century, some years previous to 1819, to provide educational 
facilities for his own children and the youth of the neighborhood. For years 
previous to 1819 religious services were held in this school house, also in the 
spacious parlors of the Negley mansion, where he had a portable pulpit erected, 
and some of the children were baptized. In the year 1819 the school house gave 
way to a church building, the first in the E^st Liberty "Valley on the same site, 
erected upon a lot containing one and one-half acres of ground, which Mrs. 
Anna Barbara Negley conveyed to certain persons to be held in trust for the 
"East Liberty Congregation," the property being a portion of her paternal in- 
heritance. A subscription amounting to one thousand, seven hundred thirty- 
five dollars and sixty-two and one-half cents was immediately raised for the 
purpose, as the old record specifies "of building a school and meeting house, 
said meeting house to be for the use of the Presbyterian Congregation, called 
the East Liberty Congregation." This deed bears date April 12, 18 19. As 
the amount raised was insufficient, Mr. and Mrs. Negley also contributed very 
largely to the building fund. The first church building on this sacred site 
was of brick, forty-four feet square, with one corner towards the Greensburg 
turnpike, now Penn avenue, thus presenting a double front. The pulpit occu- 
pied one corner. It has been stated on reliable authority that at that time the 
houses in Pittsburg numbered but a little over fourteen hundred all told, and 
that its population scarcely exceeded seven thousand souls. 

For some years ministers of various denominations, mostlv German Re- 
formed, Methodist and Presbyterian, held occasional services as it was possible 
to secure them, and a Sabbath-school was organized with two teachers, Luke 
Loomis and Isaac Harris, and nine pupils. John Roup, who married Kittv 
Winebiddle, was the first Sabbath-school superintendent. It is believed that this 
Sabbath-school has continued without interruption imtil the present time. On 
the eighth of February, 1828, the Board of Home Missions commissioned the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 115 

Rev. John Joyce to "publish the Gospel, and administer its ordinances in the 
neighborhood of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, at discretion." Soon the families 
interested appointed Messrs. Francis Bailey, another ardent supporter of the 
struggling church, and John Roup to present a petition to the Presbytery of 
Redstone, within whose territory this region lay, praying for a church organiza- 
tion in East Liberty. The petition was presented April i, 1828, but met with 
spirited opposition from the representatives of Beulah church, who regarded 
the proposed enterprise as a serious infringement upon their congregational 
boundaries. The prayer of the two zealous petitioners, however, was finally 
wisely granted, and the formal organization was effected on Sabbath, September 
28, 1828. The population of Pittsburg at that time is said to have been about 
fifteen thousand. April 7, 1845, Thomas Aiken and R. Beatty. AI. D., were 
appointed a committee to procure a charter for the church. May 5, 1846, 
Thomas Aiken and George G. Negley drafted a constitution and by-laws to be 
incorporated with the charter, and on April 5, 1847, the charter was adopted. 
In 1847, when the congregation were about to erect the second house of wor- 
ship, also a building called the lecture room, in which Mr. Moore's Academy 
held its sessions, Mrs. Negley added another piece of property, eastward v,:' her 
fomier gift, which proved a wise addition, as it secured the fine frontage 
possessed by reason of the opening of South Highland avenue, which, as with 
the opening of Baum street, while it materially lessened the size of the church 
lot, as given by her, enhanced its value. 

The latest gift of Mrs. Negley to the church was the melodious bell which 
still summons to worship and whose first peals sounded her requiem, as the 
funeral procession wended its way to the Allegheny cemetery, where in May, 
1867, she was interred in her family lot. 

In 1864 the third church building was erected, a fine, substantial brick 
structure, built after a decided!}' ecclesiastical style of architecture. On the 
sixtieth anniversary of the organization of this historic church the spacious 
stone edifice now occupied by the congregation was dedicated September 30, 
1888, the fourth church building succeeding the school house. William G. 
Johnston, the historian at the dedicatory services, in recounting the early be- 
ginnings of Christian efforts in East Liberty by Jacob Negley and the benefi- 
cence of his wife in the work, said : "With some degree of fitness we may 
employ the words which she of Samaria addressed the wearied Savior as he 
sat and rested by Sychar's well at noontide — 'Our Father Jacob gave us this 
well and drank thereat, he and his children.' " 

The East Liberty church has been the Mother Church of the Presbyterian 
churches in this vicinity — Shady Side. Point Breeze, Park Avenue, Tabernacle, 
Highland and Valley View Presbyterian, and the Sixth United Presbyterian 
churches. It may be added that the interest in educational work in the history 
of East Liberty has continued in many of Jacob Negley's descendants. 

His son, George G. Negley, was an energetic promoter and director in the 
old township schools of the Nineteenth ward, when the district was known as 
"Collins Independent School District," previous to annexation to the city. He 
was also one of the directors after annexation to the city and rendered most 
efficient service. In 1869 a lot two hundred and five by three hundred and fifty 
feet was purchased from Alexander Negley, and the contract was let for a 
building costing about thirty thousand dollars. This was, as the place increased 
in school population, superseded by the present fine structure. 



ii6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



As the estates of Jacob Negley and Conrad Winebiddle came into the 
possession of their heirs, numerous homesteads were established, some of which 
still remain, and a few have been removed in the memory of many yet living. 
Of the twelve children of Jacob and Anna Barbara Negley, eight survived child- 
hood. Of these four sons and four daughters but one is living at this date 
(July, 1907), Sarah J. Negley, who became the wife of Judge Thomas Alellon, 
and still resides in the homestead — surrounded by beautiful and spacious 
grounds — which they erected on the property which was a gift from her mother, 
Anna Barbara Negley. 

The eldest son of Ja'cob and Anna Barbara Negley who grew to manhood 
was Jacob Negley, Jr., who had his residence on the property at the head of 
North Neglev avenue. This was inherited and named "Baywood" by his son, 
Major-General James S. Negley, a hero of the Mexican and Civil wars, and 
who represented Pittsburg for many years in congress and of whom later 
mention will be made. Daniel, the ne.xt in age, built a homestead on Stanton 
avenue. His son, the late Major William B. Negley, true to his ancestral blood, 
was one of the organizers of Shady Side Presbyterian church. Three of 
Daniel's sons are living. 

On Highland avenue, two squares north of Penn avenue, was formerly 
situated "Rural Home," the homestead of another son, George G. Negley, 
which still lives in the memory of the present generation. For many years it 
stood as a land-mark in East Liberty. This mansion was a spacious structure 
built after the modified Colonial style of architecture, and was most beautifully 
placed in a picturesque setting of more than seven acres of finely cultivated 
grounds. When clad in summer verdure, the green lawns, wide spreading 
shade trees, the long driveways and flower gardens, planted with exquisite 
taste from Mr. Negley's private conservatories, made the place one of the most 
strikingly beautiful and attractive of any of its day in Pittsburg, a love of floral 
culture being a characteristic taste in the Negley family. In the march of time 
the house has been removed and the property divided into building lots, two 
churches and many dwellings occupying the old site. In the early days Rural 
avenue was a private driveway to "Rural Home," and when it was opened to 
the public Mr. Negley deferred the naming of the new street to his wife, Mrs. 
Eliza Johnson Negley, who named it Rural avenue in honor of the old home- 
stead, which name it still retains. Four sons and four daughters of George G. 
Negley's family still survive, five of them now living on Negley avenue. The 
homestead of another daughter, Catherine R. Negley, is still standing on North 
Negley avenue, opposite Black street, being occupied by Henry H. Negley, a 
son of George G. Negley, and his wife. The youngest son' of Jacob and Anna 
Barbara Negley, Alexander Negley, occupied the paternal homestead, corner 
of North Negley and Stanton avenues, until his death, February 12, 1864. The 
Baum homestead, corner of Roup and Harriet streets, where the present house 
has stood on a portion of the Winebiddle tract of land for nearly a century, 
is still occupied by the great-grandchildren of Kitty Winebiddle Roup, whose 
only daughter married William Baum. 

(V) Major-General James Scott Negley, son of Jacob Negley, Jr., was 
for many years a conspicuous personage in the history of Pittsburg. He had 
an enviable record for heroism in both the war with Me.xico and the Civil war 
and was promoted to the rank of Major-General after the battle of Stone river. 
He was born December 22, 1826, at East Liberty, Pennsylvania, and was edu- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 117 ■ 

cated at the public schools and at the Western University of Pennsylvania, but 
before his graduation he enlisted in the Duquesne Grays, which organization 
became a part of the First Pennsylvania Regiment. He participated in the 
siege of \'era Cruz and battles of Cerro Gordo, La Perote and Las Vegas, and 
was at the siege of Puebla. After this war .ended he returned to Pittsburg and 
for a time engaged in manufacturing pursuits, but soon began farming and 
horticulture. He became one of the most skilled horticulturists in the whole 
country. While thus engaged and prior to the Civil war, he took a d^ep interest 
in the military matters of his state, and was chosen brigadier-general of the 
Eighteenth Division of the state militia. Foreseeing the civil conflict coming 
on, he as early as December, i860, made formal offer of an organized brigade 
to the governor of Pennsylvania, but it was not until the President's first call 
for troops, April 17, 1861, that authority was given him, after having been 
summoned to Harrisburg by the governor, to recruit and organize volunteers. 
He was mustered in as brigadier-general of volunteers and placed in command 
of the state encampment at Lancaster. General Patterson chose him to lead 
one of his brigades in the Shenandoah campaign during the early part of the 
rebellion. He was prominent at the engagement at Falling Waters, Virginia, 
and after his three months' term had expired he was placed in command of the 
volunteer camp at Harrisburg and later, with his brigade, joined General 
Sherman's command in Kentucky. Under General Rosecrans, General Negley 
became quite prominent again in the operations of the Tennessee campaign. 
He led the forces against Morgan's command at Shelbyville ; was at the battle 
of Lavergne, October 7, 1862, and defeated the Confederates under Anderson 
and Forrest. At the battle of Stone river, in front of Murfreesboro, he com- 
manded the Eighth Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, and throughout that 
never-to-be-forgotten campaign performed heroic services of which the govern- 
ment was not unmindful. He drove Breckenridge from the intrenchments and 
insured .final success to the Union army. For this valor and gallantry in this 
signal victory, he was promoted to the rank of major-general of volunteers. 
He led the advance at Lookout Mountain and drove the enemy from its position 
and skilfully saved General Thomas' corps from an overwhelming defeat at 
Davis' Cross Roads. At Chickamauga, Rossville and Chattanooga his services 
make for him, indeed, a proud record. In one of the descriptions of the en- 
gagement at Chattanooga the writer speaks of General Negley in these words : 

"Negley was in the thick darkness with his noble Eighth Division, beating 
back the relentless tide. Johnson appeared, too, with the remnant of his com- 
mand. Rousseau was sent into the fiery cauldron to extricate his struggling 
division comrade. The lines had been broken at every point on the right ; the 
center, under General Negley, struggling fiercely, must be swallowed up ; the 
left and all would be gone unless the destroying tide could be stayed, no one 
could do it save he, though all were manfully fighting. Negley, unprotected 
on his right, was fighting an overwhelming enemy on three sides of him, and 
was holding them stubbornly. Like Sheridan's division, it waded through fire 
without breaking anfl the men marched proudly among their companions in 
arms to take new positions." 

Soon after this engagement General Negley resigned, took leave of his 
command and returned to Pennsylvania. In 1868 he took an active part in 
politics and was in the campaign of "Grant, Colfax and Peace," and elected to 
a seat in the Forty-first congress from the Twenty-second congressional district 



ii8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



of Pennsylvania, by almost five thousand majority. He was reelected to the 
Forty-second and Forty-third congresses, and again in 1874 was elected to 
congress as well as to the Forty-ninth congress, after whicli he retired, and in 
New York city embarked in railroad enterprises. While in congress he con- 
ceived the idea of making Pittsburg a deep water harbor and obtained the first 
appropriation for this purpose. He also aided Ohio river and other river 
and harbor enterprises. He was largely interested in Mexican railway building. 
At one time he was president of the Union National League of America ; 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic ; Scott Legion ; Masonic fraternity ; 
National Board of Steam Navigation ; Shipping League, etc., holding official 
places in all. Pittsburg will long remember his work in securing the appro- 
priation for the Davis Island Dam. 

General Negley was twice married, first to Kate Losey, in 1848. She 
died November 29, 1867. The children born of this union were: Cliiiford DeN., 
born September 8, 185 1, deceased. James S., died February 15, 1889. George, 
died November 29, 1867. Later Mr. Negley married Grace Ashton, by whom 
was born the following children : Grace, who married Enoch Farson and had 
two children. They reside at West Chester, Pennsylvania. Edith, residing in 
New York city. Mabel, residing in New York city. 

General Negley passed from the scenes of earth August 7, 1901, and was 
laid to rest in the Negley family lot in Allegheny cemetery with military honors. 



NICHOLAS H. SNIDER, for many years a well-known blacksmith of 
Pittsburg, was born February 6, 1826, in Chambersburg, Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a son of John and Charlotte (Funk) Snider, of Cham- 
bersburg. Sarah Snider had two sisters, Elizabeth and Emma. Nicholas H. 
Snider lost his father when a child, and his widowed mother was left with a 
family of young children, which included in addition to Nicholas H. two 
daughters, namely : Mrs. Sarah Piatt, of New Castle, and Mrs. Charlotte 
Brown, of East Liberty. 

Nicholas H. Snider was thrown upon his own resources at an early age, 
and thus was unable to attend school in his native place but a short period, 
and his education was chiefly acquired in the night schools of Pittsburg. Before 
leaving Chambersburg he learned the trade of horseshoer, and when he came 
to Pittsburg, at about the age of fifteen years, he worked at general blacksmith- 
ing for different firms, among them that of the Schoenbergers, Jonas & Laugh- 
lin. Spear & Company and the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. The last 
place he worked was with Zug & Company, with whom he remained for twenty 
years. Over forty years ago he accidentally discovered a process for making 
open-hearth steel, but his method was never put into practical operation. For 
some eight years after his marriage he made his home on Pike street, and in 
1857 moved to Carson street, near Twenty-third street, later taking up his abode 
in a house which he built on Sarah street, also erecting several other dwellings 
in that neighborhood. In 1887 he built the house on Twenty-fourth street in 
which he passed the remaining years of his life. For forty years or more he 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and for a long time was connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, but ultimately withdrew. In 
politics he was a Whig and later a Republican, but in local affairs voted for 



/ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 119 

the man whom he deemed best fitted for the office. During their latter years he 
and his wife attended the Walton Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Snider married, in 1846. in Pittsburg. Adeline Stewart, born October 
I, 1826. in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where she passed her entire life, a 
daughter of Peter and Alice (Rodgers) Stewart. Peter Stewart was born in 
Maryland, of Irish parentage, and was a brick molder by occupation. He was 
one of a family of six children, namely: Peter, James, William, Noah, George 
and Elizabeth Porter. Alice (Rodgers) Stewart was born on the Brandy wine, 
a few miles from New York city, daughter of George and Margaret (Simp- 
son) Rodgers, natives of Scotland. She died in the year 1866. Peter and 
Alice (Rodgers) Stewart were also the parents of one son, George Rodgers 
Stewart, a machinist, and four daughters, the sisters of Mrs. Snider being 
Eliza. Mary, Margaret and Ellen. Children of Nicholas H. and Adeline 
(Stewart) Snider: i. Alice Elizabeth, born in 1847, died in 1849. 2. Stewart, 
born December 3, 1849, died aged thirty-three ; a bookkeeper. 3. Charlotte 
Ellen, born in 1851, died at the age of twenty-four years. 4. John A. 5. Mary 
A. 6. George C, born i860, died in his forty-third year. 7. Adeline, born 
1862, died in 1881. 8. Cassadela, born in 1865, died in childhood. 9. William 
Fleming, born in 1866, died in childhood. 10. Harrison, born in 1869, died in 
1872. II. Mattie, born in 1871, died in 1873. John A. and Mary A. are the 
only ones living of the family. 

The death of Mr. Snider occurred March i, 1906. For sixty-five years 
he had been a resident of Pittsburg, and both as a business man and a citizen 
had borne an honorable name. His domestic virtues were peculiarlv marked. 
He possessed a quiet, even, affectionate disposition, was fond of home life and 
devoted to his wife and children. His wife died April 26, 1904. Their remains 
are buried side by side in Allegheny cemetery. 



JOSEPH MICHAEL DONAHUE, of Pittsburg, proprietor of a whole- 
sale baking business, was born September i, 1 851, at Mount Oliver, South Side, 
Pittsburg, a son of John Donahue, who was born about 1824, in countv Sligo, 
Ireland, and at the age of four years was taken to England, where he received 
a good education. In 1838 he came with his father to the United States. 
They settled at Lawrence Junction, Ohio, and engaged in mining, John soon 
becoming the owner of a small mine, which he worked until 1845. In that 
year he moved to Mount Washington, Pittsburg, where for twenty-five years 
he worked in the neighboring mines. He was a Democrat and a member of 
St. John's Roman Catholic church. He helped lay the foundation of St. Paul's 
Roman Catholic church on Grant street, the first church built in Pittsburg. 

John Donahue married Frances Murtuch, born in county Cavan, Ireland, 
and the following children were born to them: Mary, Rose, Jane, Joseph 
Michael, of whom later; James, Charles, William, Katharine, John and Daniel. 

Joseph Michael Donahue, son of John and Frances (Murtuch) Donahue, 
attended school until the age of thirteen, when he went to work in the plate-cut 
nail factory of the Jones & Laughlin Company, and later was employed by 
different companies at milling until 1902. He then turned his attention to the 
baking business, and is now the successful proprietor of a wholesale establish- 
ment. He belongs to the Ironworkers' L^nion, called the Mellicated Association, 
and the Catholic Beneficial Association. He is a member of the Roman 
Catholic church of Knoxville. 



t> 



I20 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Mr. Donahue married, January i, 1874, the Rev. Father Thomas, of St. 
Paul's Monastery of the Cross, officiating, Louise Riece, and they have been 
the parents of the following children: Francis, born July 5, 1875, died August 

6, 1875; Emma, born July 15, 1876, died August 15, 1876; Joseph, born 
October 29, 1877, died April 7, 1878; George, born December 25, 1879, ^'ed in 
April, 1880; Catharine, born December i, 1880, educated in the Pittsburg 
schools; Charles, born June 28, 1883, died in August, 1883; Louise, born 
October 9, 1885, graduated from the Pittsburg high school in 1902, and is now 
a stenographer; and Lawrence, born December 20, 1888, received a good 
education and is now employed in his father's bakery. 

Mrs. Donahue is a daughter of Charles Riece, who was a glass-blower in 
Pittsburg. His wife was, like himself, of German descent, and their children 
were: Edward, Charles, Matilda and Louise, who was born November 28, 
1855, on the South Side, and became the wife of Joseph Michael Donahue. 

THE WENZELL FAMILY is represented in Greater Pittsburg to-day 
bv the children of Peter and Magdalena (Neuenhagen) Wenzell. The former 
generations spelled their name with but one "1." The first of this family to 
come to this country was Martin Wenzell and family, who were natives of 
Niederkaufungen, Hesse Cassel, Germany. The ancestor was a blacksmith 
until he retired from active life. In 1845, with his wife and children, he came 
to America, experiencing considerable difficulty in making their ocean voyage, 
coming in the old-time sailing boat, as they were compelled to at that date. 
When about half way over the Atlantic they were caught in a terrific storm and 
driven back. After spending ninety days on the briny deep, they finally landed 
at Baltimore, Maryland. From that city they came to Pittsburg by way of the 
old canal and stage coach route. They located on the South Side, where the 
father found employment in the iron works, working at his trade most of the 
time. They were members of the Presbyterian church, and politically he was 
a Whig and later a Republican. The parents both lived to a good old age, 
being blessed with a family of eleven children, as follows: i. Valentine, late 
of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, who married and reared a family. 2. Andrew, 
late of Detroit, Michigan; married and had children. 3. Mrs. Catherine Metz- 
gar, late of Pittsburg, married and reared a family. 4. Peter, deceased, of 
whom further mention will be made. 5. Mrs. Elizabeth King, living near 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, married and reared a family. 6. Sophia, deceased, 
wife of Louis Beck, a tanner, of Detroit, Michigan, married and has a family. 

7. Louis, late of South Pittsburg, married but had no issue. 8. Mrs. Margaret 
Rectanus, married and reared a family. Her residence was Randolph, Ohio. 

(II) Peter Wenzell, son of the German emigrant above named, was born 
in Germany in 1829, attended the common schools of his native land and was 
sixteen years of age when the family came to this country. He took up the 
trade of an iron molder, serving his apprenticeship with the Anderson foundry, 
and remained there learning the various branches of that business for some 
time. After mastering the trade he was made foreman of the shops. He was 
considered an expert at making explosive shells, and during the Civil war he 
set the cores in shells which were being made under his own supervision. He 
later became very prominent in the iron business and was one of the firm of 
F"isher, Wenzell & Company. This extensive plant was located, as it is now. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 121 



at Twenty-first and ^lary streets. They first made a specialty of stoves, but 
later branched out and manufactured a general line of machinery. In 1886 
Mr. Wenzell sold his interest in the business to his partner and retired from 
business. This plant is now a part of the great Jones & Laughlin plant on the 
South Side. Being an excellent business man, Mr. Wenzell accumulated much 
property, which is now enjoyed by his children. He was a liberal giver to all 
worthy causes and hence was beloved by the general community. He was a 
member of Zimmerman Presbyterian church and a supporter of all its interests. 
In politics he was a Republican. He was a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

He married on November 12, 1854, Magdalena Neuenhagen, born in 
Oberkaufungen, Germany, April 14, 1833, and died July 5, 1889. This worthy 
couple had been acquainted as lovers in the Fatherland and he sent for the 
young lady to come to America and join him in wedlock, which she did soon 
after arriving here. They were the parents of twelve children : i. Mary, wife 
of Heinrich Becker, now residing in Cassel, Germany; no issue. 2. Emma 
G., wife of Julius Freudenburg, of Pittsburg, formerly Mrs. KaufTeld, having 
one child, Herman Kauffeld. 3. Louis J., of whom later. 4. Peter, Jr., a 
prominent grocer of South Pittsburg, married Miss Kate Nies and thev have 
one daughter — Lillie. 5. Anna, wife of Emil Olnhausen, and they are the 
parents of Ralph, Gertrude and Magdalena. 6. Edward, of Cambridge, Ohio, 
married Margaret Davies, daughter of the late John H. Davies, a sketch of 
whom appears in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wenzell are the parents 
of Helen, Alfred and Sarah. 7. Richard, of Mount Oliver, Pittsburg. 8. 
Alfred, died aged fifteen years. 9. Carrie, died aged six years. 10. Richard, 
who was a twin to Edward, died aged two years. 11. One child died in infancy. 
12. Magdalena, unmarried. 

(Ill) Louis J. Wenzell, son of Peter Wenzell (II), was born July 9, 
1858, and attended the schools of South Pittsburg. When a young man he 
went into his father's foundry and learned the trade of a molder, with all the 
side branches of that work. He continued working with his father until the 
latter went out of business, and then for some time with the successors to the 
business. He was a foreman in the molding department and left this work in 
1891, at which time he was employed by Jones & Laughlin in their iron works, 
with whom he is still working in the steel department chiefly. He is now on 
his sixteenth year with this company. He is interested in residence property 
throughout the city and owns a fine home at No. 139 South Twenty-second 
street : this lot he purchased from Joseph Walton, and upon it erected a two- 
story brick residence in 1889. J\lr. Wenzell is a member of the German Presby- 
terian church, and politically is a supporter of the Republican party. 

He was married April 14, 1887, to Miss Martha Elizabeth Hofmeister, 
born Alay 19, 1861, daughter of Peter and ^lartha E. (Schnell) Hofmeister, 
whose family history is given elsewhere in this work. To this union were born 
the following children: i. Louis Peter, born on the South Side, Pittsburg, 
February 10, 1888, graduated from the Pittsburg high school in 1906. 2. 
Henrietta H., born March 22, 1890, graduated from the Pittsburg high school 
in 1907, member of South Side Presbyterian church. 3. Frank Schnell, born 
November 21, 1897, died June 6, 1898. 4. Martha E., born December 30, 
1899, a stud'ent at the Alorse school. 

(HI) Peter Wenzell. Jr., fifth child and second son of Peter W^enzell, 



122 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Sr. (II), is one of the successful merchants of Pittsburg, and conducts the 
grocery business on the South Side which his father established thirty-eight 
years ago. He bought it from his sisters over nineteen years ago and enjoys 
a paying patronage and stands high as a business man in his section of Greater 
Pittsburg. He was born in the same house in which he now lives, at 112 Tenth 
street, South Pittsburg, April 24, 1863. He obtained his education at the public 
schools and at first worked for the Adams Glass Company, but soon decided to 
learn the trade of a molder under the careful instructions of his father. After 
he had fairly mastered the trade he found it was not suited to his tastes and 
abandoned it and entered the grocery business by purchasing a store from his 
father, which was then being operated by his sisters. He has followed this 
ever since, and has made a successful merchant. Mr. Wenzell is a member of 
the German Presbyterian church and politically a Republican. He belongs to 
the American Mechanics' Lodge. 

He was married November 18, 1886, to Miss Catherine Nies, born Septem- 
ber I, 1867, daughter of Henry and Catherine (Weichoens) Nies. By this 
union were born: i. Lillian, born April 24, 1888, graduated from the Bedford 
school and is now residing at home. 2 and 3. Magdalena and Emma, died in 
infancy. 

Henry Nies, the father of Mrs. Wenzell, was born in Germany and came 
to America at the age of eighteen years, settling in Pittsburg. By trade he was 
a blacksmith, and followed this in this country. He died aged sixty-eight years, 
about 1892. His wife was born in Germany and came to America when a small 
child, when about five years of age. with her parents. She died in 1900, aged 
seventy-seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Nies are the parents of four children : 
Emma, Willmina, Earnest Daniel and Catherine, now Mrs. Peter Wenzell. 



ALEXANDER WILSON, deceased, who both socially and among the 
members of his trade stood high and was considered a leader because of his 
many strong qualities of character and ability, was born in county Down, Ire- 
land, in August, 1820, and died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, November 16, 1887. 
He was the son of Adam Wilson, who also came from Ireland to Pittsburg, and 
died at the age of seventy-six years. 

Alexander Wilson, of this memoir, was educated in the schools of his 
native country and later learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed many 
years. After his marriage he with his familv, consisting of wife and three 
children, emigrated to America, first locating in Canada. While on their 
voyage his wife was taken ill and died at sea. His children were then placed in 
a boarding school, where they were well cared for, in the citv of Montreal. 
Later Mr. Wilson came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where on October 9, 1852, 
he took out his naturalization papers and became a citizen of the U^nited States. 
After removing to this city he took up his carpentering trade and finally became 
a large contractor and builder, under the name of A. & S. Wilson & Company, 
his partner being his brother, Samuel Wilson. Besides these there were 
brothers, Joseph and James, the last named the only survivor now. This firm 
built many public and private buildings in Pittsburg, in which their workman- 
ship pleased their patrons. Alexander Wilson was a verv devoted Christian 
worker, first belonging to the LTnited Presbyterian church, and served as one 
of the elders in that body for many years. Subsequently he withdrew from that 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 123 

church and united with the Bellefield Presbyterian church. He was a liberal 
contributor to the cause of Christianity and kindred works, including the 
various charities. He did all in his power to build up churches and paid 
liberally toward the erection of church edifices. He was connected with the 
Union National Bank of Pittsburg. In political belief he was a Republican. 

Mr. Wilson married, for his first wife. Miss Gumming, who died as above 
stated ; for his second wife he married Mary Craig, born in Pittsburg, and 
died April 18, 1901. One of the children by the former marriage was Jane, 
now the wife of William J. Julerton, of Pittsburg, whose children are: Alex- 
ander and Harry B. By the second marriage there were six children born to 
Mr. Wilson, as follows: i. Sarah, widow of John Fayundus, bv whom three 
children were born. 2. James C, deceased, married Lucy Carlisle, and their 
children were: Alexander and James C. 3 and 4. (Twins) Agnes and Eliza- 
beth. 5. Samuel, deceased, of Pittsburg, married Laura Keys, also deceased ; 
their issue was one child, Louisa, wife of D. L. Hamilton. 6. Mary, wife of 
S. H. Lloyd, of Pittsburg, and the mother of two children — Mary C. and Jeane. 

FRANCIS J. BOYLON, an expert coppersmith, employed with the H. K. 
Porter Locomotive Works, of Pittsburg, was born in England, in 1867, and 
accompanied his parents, Dennis and Ann (Duffey) Boylon, to this country 
in 1870. They settled in Pittsburg, where he received his education and 
learned the barber's trade. He was engaged with Armour & Company as 
collector, continuing in this two years and he then entered the employ of the 
H. K. Porter Locomotive Works as their coppersmith, which position he still 
holds acceptably. At this date (1907) he is president of the H. K. Porter 
Relief Association, financial secretary of Sharpsburg Council. No. 972, 
Knights of Columbus, and president of St. Ann's Council of St. Mncent De 
Paul Society. He has served his borough for three terms as councilman, and 
was chairman of the police committee two years. He was also chairman of 
the ordinance committee one year and of the street committee one year. He 
was a promoter of the ^Nlillvale street railway and father of the present water 
works system as well as the street paving improvements of Millvale. 

He married Mary C. Johnson, daughter of Peter and Mary (Flanigan) 
Johnson, by whom the following children were born: i. Esther, born April 
14, 1897. 2. Francis, born January 5, 1902. 3. Bernard, born June 9, 1904. 
4. Margaret, born March 10, 1906. 

Denis Boylon, the father of the subject, was born in Ireland, reared in 
England, and came to America in 1870. By trade he was a machinist and was 
employed in difTerent shops, but the last five years of his life he was with the 
Pittsburg Locomotive Works. He died February 26. 1905, in Millvale, Penn- 
sylvania. In his religious faith he was a Roman Catholic and politically a 
Democrat. He married in England, Ann Dufifey, born in 1846. They were 
the parents of the following children: i. IMary, born in England, married 
John Fitzge'rald. 2. Francis J., subject. 3. Anna. 4. I\Iargaret, who mar- 
ried Joseph Lee. 5. Thomas, married Irene O'Connor. 6. Denis, at home. 
These children were all born in Pittsburg with the exception of the first two. 

Peter Johnson, the father of Mrs. Boylon, was born in New Jersey. His 
wife was the daughter of Patrick and ]\Iary (Kennedy) Flanigan. By this 
union were born James, in 1869, died aged two years, and Mary, the subject's 



124 ^-i CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

wife. The father of Peter Johnson was William H. Johnson, born in New 
Jersey and married a Miss Holmes. He was a lawyer and at one time judge 
of Monmouth county, New Jersey. That family was of English extraction ; 
their children were : James, now residing at Ocean Grove ; Anna, who mar- 
ried John Conover, of Hazlet, New Jersey ; Ellen, deceased, married M. Van- 
devier, of Keyport, New Jersey; Matilda, married John Hendrickson, of 
the last named place, and he is now deceased. 



LOUTELLUS A. BURNETT, of Aspinwall, president of the First 
National Bank, of Aspinwall, Pennsylvania, and The Springdale National 
Bank, of Springdale, Pennsylvania, was born July 31, 1871, at New \'ernon, 
Mercer county, a son of Abijah H. Burnett and grandson of Peter Burnett. 

Peter Burnett was born in Trumbull county. Ohio, where he led the life 
of a farmer. He was a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he was an earnest worker, supporting it with his influence and 
giving liberally of his time and money. Peter Burnett married Bethsheba 
Axtell. and their children were: Samuel, who died while serving in the army 
during the Civil war; Abijah H., of whom later; Washington D., of James- 
town, Pennsylvania; Mary, wife of Clark Davidson, of Nokomis, Illinois; 
and Spencer, of Ashtabula, Ohio. Mr. Burnett died in 1888 and his widow 
passed away January 4, 1895. 

Abijah H. Burnett, son of Peter and Bethsheba (Axtell) Burnett, was 
born in 1843, in Mercer county, and was in college at Allegheny when he 
enlisted as private in Company B, Eighty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers. He was in the Army of the Potomac and served throvighout the war, 
participating in every battle in which his regiment was engaged. He rose in 
direct line to the rank of adjutant of the regiment. At the close of the war he 
returned to Mercer county and settled at New Vernon, where he engaged in 
mercantile business, which he conducted until 1896, when he sold out. The 
same year he was elected sheriff of the county and moved to Alercer. At 
the expiration of his term of office he purchased a farm at Greenville, where 
he has since lived, following- agricultural pursuits. For twenty-four years 
prior to his election as sheriff he held the office of justice of the peace. He is 
commander of the Northwestern Association of the Grand Armv of the Repub- 
lic, and affiliates with Free and Accepted Masons, of Sandy Lake. He is a 
Republican and a member of the Alethodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Burnett married Dorothy C. Boyd, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth 
Marsteller Boyd, of Mercer county, who died March 8, 1906, and thev were 
the parents of three sons: Loutelius A., of whom later; Quinton J., born in 
1877, married Cora B. Brown ; and Ingle B., born in 1884. 

Loutelius A. Burnett, son of Abijah H. and Dorothy C. (Boyd) Burnett, 
received his education in the public schools of New \'emon and at the 
McElvain Institute. New Lebanon, where he took a three vears' course. In 
1887 he entered Grove City College, graduating in 1889. In 1890 he was 
appointed deputy sheriff' of Mercer county and served three years. In 1893 
he moved to Greenville, where he purchased an interest in the largest fire 
insurance agency in Mercer county. One year later he bought the remaining 
interest and thenceforth conducted the business until 1000. He then sold out 
to his brother and engaged in the needle business as a jobber, handling the 



I 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 125 



entire output of the Crown Needle Company, of Aachen, Gennany. He is 
president of both the Springdale National Bank, which he organized in 1906, 
and the First National Bank, of Aspinwall, which he organized in 1897, is 
vice-president of the Farmers' and Mercantile Trust Company, of Greenville, 
in the organization of which in igo2 he was also instrumental, and a director 
in the Aspinwall Savings & Loan Association. He is an ardent supporter of 
all educational interests and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Burnett married, in 1892, Anna J., daughter of Emery and Jane 
(Hutchinson) Marsteller, of West Middlesex, Mercer county, the Marstellers 
being of German extraction. Mr. and Mrs. Burnett have three children: 
Clifton A., born December 2, 1894; Etta M., born September 2, 1898; and 
Dorothy, bom October 31, 1900. 



JAMES KERR BOYD, an employe of the Union Switch & Signal Com- 
pany, Swissvale, Pennsylvania, was born February 7, 1855, in Edgewood, 
Pennsylvania, a son of Thomas Boyd. He received a common-school edu- 
cation, and in 1874 commenced the moulders' trade with the I. G. McFarland 
Foundry Company, at Brushton, Pennsylvania, and after that worked for 
eleven years with the Bradley Foundry Company, of Pittsburg. In 1887 he 
went into the employ of the Union Switch & Signal Company, where he is 
still engaged. In 1882 he was married to Margaret Gray, to whom two sons 
were born : Herbert Spencer, born January 3, 1885, and Oliver Gray, born 
January i, 1888. Mrs. Boyd died in 1895. In 1907 Mr. Boyd was again 
married to Mrs. John \'enning. 

Thomas Boyd, the subject's father, was born in 1805 in Stoystown, Penn- 
sylvania, and at the age of fifteen years commenced driving a stage coach 
between Pittsburg and Philadelphia. In 1825, when General Lafayette came 
to Pittsburg, he was one of Mr. Boyd's passengers. Mr. Boyd married Eliza- 
beth Giliam. and they had children as follows: 

(i) William Oliver, born in 1838. He was engaged in the war of 1854 
to 1856 with the Indians. He is now residing in Grafton, West Mrginia. of 
which town he was ]Mayor for six consecutive years. 

(2) Samuel T., born February 2, 1840. He enlisted in the Union .-Xrmy 
in 1861 as a member of the First Maryland Cavalry, and served for three 
years, and was honorably discharged in 1864. He then went to railroading 
on the Pennsylvania Railroad, where at the time of the Pittsburg riot in 1877 
he was detailed to haul the burned engines to the sidetracks outside the city. 
The depot was burned at that time. He was killed on the railroad September 
21, 1877. 

(3) Mary Jane was born June 11, 1842. During the time of the Civil 
war she was employed at the Pittsburg .Arsenal, and was engaged there at 
the time of the explosion, but escaped uninjured. She died March 12, 1868. 

(4) Catharine Mrginia was born January 26, 1844. She married 
Henry Snyder, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 

(5) 'Amanda P., born November 26, 1847, died January 4, 1873. The 
father'died March 30. 1884. and the mother November 6. 1863. 

James K. Boyd is' now residing at 7930 Tioga Street, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 



126 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



BENJAMIN F. ABEL, well known in business circles of Greater Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and its vicinity, has been engaged in the concrete and 
real estate business for the past twelve years, and resides at No. 7705 Ben- 
nett street. He is a descandant of German ancestry. 

Henry Abel, father of Benjamin F. Abel, was born in Germany, April 
4, 1835, and emigrating to America in 1857, located in Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was successfully engaged in the butcher business, and died 
in 1865. He married Caroline Lutz. born September 27. 1837, who died 
April 17, 1900. They had children: Catherine, born in i860; John C, born 
in 1862 ; and Benjamin F., concerning whom see forward. After the death 
of her husband Mrs. Abel married Barney Stender, by whom she had the fol- 
lowing named children : Mary, August, Sophia, Annie, Lizzie and Harry. 

Benjamin F. Abel, second son and third and youngest child of Henry 
and Caroline (Lutz) Abel, was born in Strawberry Alley, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, June 23, 1864. He was an infant at the time of the death' of his 
father, and was educated in the Sacred Heart School, located in Station 
street. .\t a suitable age he was apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's trade. 
a calling he followed for a period of twelve years, and then engaged in con- 
crete and real estate business, in which he has met with a satisfactory amount 
of success. He removed to Brushton in 1901, in which place he has since 
successfully carried on his business, and has established an enviable reputation 
for reliability and up-to-date business methods. 

He married, December 3, 1893, Lizzie J\L Muenzmay, born October 25, 
1868, a daughter of Joseph and Eva (Dormayer) Muenzmay. Joseph Muenzmay 
was born July 24, 1834, in Cochem, Germany, and emigrated to the United States 
in July, 1903. He was a shoemaker by trade, and followed this occupation 
very successfully until 18S6, when he retired from active business life on 
account of poor health. He removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1903, and 
has since that time made that city his home. He married Eva Dormaver. 
born March 27, 1835, and they had children as follows : Johanna, born Feb- 
ruary II, 1861 ; Gretchen, born March 27, 1862; Joseph P., born Novemljer 
21, 1863; Jacob, born July 11, 1865; Albert, born December 26, 1866: Lizzie 
M., born October 25, 1868: Malhias J., born .April 26, 1870; Andreas, born 
January 4, 1872; Helena, born March 2, 1873; Dora, born September 11, 
1874; Theodore, born December (\ 1877. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin F. .Abel are as follows: Joseph B. .Abel, born August 21, 1894. and 
Eva J. .\bel, born February 6, 1896. 

JOHN T. AHLLER, a resident of Sharpsburg, Pennsvlvania. and a 
master mechanic, was born in Sterlingshire, Scotland,"in 1852, son of John F. 
and Christina (Thom) Miller. The father was a native of Scotland, born m 
1823, and came to this country in 1881, locating first at Uniontown. Penn- 
sylvania, and later came to Allegheny county, where he died in 189s. His 
children were as follows: i. Jean, wife of Edward McMaster. 2. T- T.. the 
subject. 3. Alexander, who is master mechanic for the Vermont Central Rail- 
road Company. 4. Christiana, wife of George Barber. 5. Charles F., who 
married Mary McFarland. 6. Daniel, who married Helen Russell. 7. George, 
who married Mary Zelka. 8. William, unmarrieil. The last named served' in 
the late Spanish-American war. 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE i.27 



The father, John F. Miller, was a Presbyterian in church faith and in 
politics a Republican. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, having- 
advanced to the Scottish Rite degree. He died in 1S95, and his wife died in 
Scotland in 1876. 

John T. Miller, of this notice, was educated in the schools of his mtive 
shire and at Edinburgh. In 1876 he entered the Tonic Solfa Musical College, 
of London, England, graduating in 1878. He then followed music teaching 
until 1880, when he came to America. After traveling through the United 
States for several months he located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
engaged with the Oliver Steel Company as a machinist, having learned that 
trade in his native land. Subsequently he was employed by the firm of Wil- 
son \\'alker & Company, and was advanced to master mechanic and remained 
with them two years. After that date he was foreman in various shops until 
1900, when he entered the employ of Moorehead Brothers as master mechanic. 

In politics Mr. Miller is a supporter of the Republican parts- and in 
church faith a Presbyterian. He is identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, lodge Xo. 84, at Birmingham, South Side, Pittsburg. 

April 20. 1892, he married Margaret J. Eaton, daughter of David Eaton 
and wife. She was born in the north of Ireland and came to this countrv 
when aged but eleven years. Mr. and Airs. Miller are the parents of the fol- 
lov.ing children: I. Christine T., wife of Ralph G. Hetzel, and they are the 
parents of George T. 2. John W., at home. 3. Leanis \V. 4. Marguerite J. C. 



CHARLES CHAUNCEY MELLOR, well known in western Pennsyl- 
vania as a business man and musician, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
September 26, 1836, the son of John H. Mellor. who settled in Pittsburg and 
established a music business in 1831, dying in 1863. 

John H. Mellor was a native of Stockport, and his wife, Ann (Hillier) 
Mellor, of Bath, England. His father, James Mellor, was a worker in a 
woolen mill in Bolton, England, and emigrated to the L'nited States in 1818. 
Here he worked at his trade for three years before he accumulated enough 
to enable him to bring his family to this country. From the age of six years 
John H. Mellor worked in woolen mills up to the date of the family coming 
to this country,, when he was thirteen years of age. Subsequent to that he 
engaged in other employment and acquired an education in his leisure hours, 
especially in music, in which he became quite proficient. By natural gift he 
was a musician, and what he lacked in opportunity he made up by industry 
and application. At the age of twenty-four he settled in Pittsburg and 
engaged in the music business, thus founding the Mellor Musical House, now 
the C. C. Mellor Company. He soon established himself not only as a leading 
business man, but also as an authority in music and a prominent citizen, and 
for twenty-seven years he was organist of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church. 

Charles C. Alellor was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1836, the eldest 
of a family of five children. He was carefully educated in music, and in boy- 
hood was inclined to take up the study as a profession, but on arriving at 
man's estate decided to identify himself with his father's business and entered 
into his establishment. He became a skillful performer on the pipe organ, 
for twenty-one years serving as organist in the First Presbyterian church. He 
has devoted much of his spare time to scientific and literary pursuits, although 



128 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



music was always his specialty. For nearly half a century Ije has been instru- 
mental in advancing many worthy undertakings to promote and develop 
musical talent in his community ; has been liberal in both time and money in 
aiding enterprises for the training and conservation of local musical talent, 
many of the amateurs who have succeeded owing it to his fostering care and 
friendly assistance. He combines to a large degree his musical and business 
talents, making his a strong character, prized by all with whom he mingles. 
The music house established by his father has been enlarged and the business 
extended and occupies a high position in the commercial and musical world. 
Mr. Mellor assisted in organizing the Academy of Science and Art ; the 
Western Pennsylvania Botanical Society; the Art Society; the Mozart Club; 
the Pittsburg Society, and the Iron City Microscopical Society. In all of these 
bodies he has held official positions, aiding with advice and practical counsel 
to carrv out the objects for which they were formed. He is now a trustee of 
the Carnegie Institute, and has been chairman of the museum committee since 
its organization, in 1896. He is a man of unassuming, modest manners, but 
is justly entitled to rank high among the thoughtful and successful men of 
his state. 

In 1867 Mr. Mellor married Laura Reinhart, the leading solo soprano of 
the choir of the First Presbyterian church of Pittsburg. Of their six children, 
three (sons) survive, of whom Walter C. and George E. are officials of the 
C. C. Mellor Company. These children were reared in the very atmosphere 
of music, art and literature, thus taking on the refinement which always 
characterizes such surroundings. 



ISAAC REESE. The Reese family represents a notable race of iron- 
workers. It has been identified with the industrial interests of Pennsylvania 
since the early part of the last century. Its members have been conspicuous for 
their ability to demonstrate, to put into active operation and to achieve success. 
They have been progressive in all that pertains to iron and steel working, in 
the way of the manufacturing of brick for furnace building, in the line of 
inventions and discoveries to facilitate manufacturing processes, and in capabil- 
ity for expert computation, designing, construction and a thorough knowledge 
of shop-fitting and general machinery. The grandfather of the present senior 
generation went from Wales to Germany in the eighteenth century to build a 
puddling furnace, of which he took charge for two years, returning at the end 
of that time to iiis native countrw 

(I) The father of the present senior generation was William Reese, who, 
with his wife, Elizabeth (Joseph) Reese, came to America from southern 
Wales, where in the latter country their eldest son, Isaac, the subject of this 
sketch, was born April 29, 1821. The parents crossed the ocean in the ship 
"Twin Brothers," which carried on this trip the first railroad iron, flat bars, 
ever brought to the United States. They landed in Philadelphia in 1832 with 
their seven children, all of whom had been born in Llannellv, southern Wales. 
The father had been an ironworker in the mills of the old world, and readily 
found like employment in this country, first in Phcenixville, Pennsylvania, where 
he was virtually the pioneer ironworker of the state. Later he erected a forge 
in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he managed for some time. Subse- 
quently he moved to Bcllefonte, Pennsylvania, where he built the first sand- 




, I-gii^ Jfi-t-7ri-:Qi j-uc Co 




<^Ul.c^ 



{fu.^^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 129 



bottom furnace, as applied to puddling, in the United States, and where the 
first "bloom" under the boiling process was made. He came to Pittsburg in 
1837 and was employed by Hogg, Bealor & Company, shortly after known as 
Hogg & Hartmann, rolling mill operators, in their mill in Birmingham, the 
South Side of Pittsburg, the mill now known as the Fifteenth Street Mill. He 
remained at this mill for about five years. Next he managed for fifteen years 
the Spang Rolling Mills in Pine Creek, in the vicinity of Pittsburg. He then 
went west and engaged in farming for aljout ten years, after that returning to 
Pittsburg, where he spent the remaining years of his life. He lived to the re- 
markably advanced age of one hundred and four years. In religious faith 
he was a Baptist. His special traits, as also the characteristics of his wife, 
who lived to the goodly age of seventy-four years, were industry and 
uprightness of character. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Reese were the parents of ten children, seven of 
whom, as stated, were born in Wales. Three were born in America. The 
children were as follows: i. Rachel, deceased. 2. Isaac, the subject. 3. 
Leah, deceased. 4. Jacob, deceased. 5. Rebecca, deceased. 6. Abram, of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 7. Joseph, who was a soldier, deceased. 8. Mary 
Ann, deceased. . 9. Benjamin Franklin, now of Bolivar, Pennsylvania. 10. 
Elizabeth, who married the Reverend Joel V. Stratton, now of Pittsburg. 

(II) Isaac Reese, second child born to William and Elizabeth Reese, was 
the eldest son. When ten years of age he went to work to assist his father 
support a. large family. He entered the mills in Wales and was but eleven years 
old when his parents removed to this country, where he worked wath his father 
at Phoeni.xville. He was sixteen years old at the time the family came to Pitts- 
burg. By that time he had become a valuable workman and was efficient at 
the art of hammering, having learned the trade. At the age of seventeen he 
had two assistants under him and continued to work in this manner for ten 
years. He then embarked in the iron business as partner in a blast furnace in 
Clarion county, an unfortunate venture, the panic of 1849 soon after sweeping 
him from his feet. He returned to his trade, which was always lucrative, and 
after a few vears had capital enough to embark in the coal business with his 
brother Abram. This enterprise was soon abandoned, the financial returns not 
being satisfactory. Mr. Reese was then, on account of his large acquaintance 
among the various iron mills and his known honesty and ability, invited to join 
the firm of Johnson, Taylor & Company in the manufacturing of fire-brick. 
Both Andrew and Thomas Carnegie were then interested in the firm with which 
he united. Mr. Reese knew nothing about brickmaking, but it was for his 
ability as a salesman of the brick to tlie large mills that he was invited to join 
the firm, which he did, and soon familiarized himself with every detail and be- 
came an expert in that business. He devoted his time and energy to the de- 
velopment of abetter grade of brick, and discovered new clay from which, by a 
new process, he made better brick. Upon this brick he stamped the distinguish- 
ing word, "Woodland." This was a fire-brick for crucible furnaces superior to 
ariy which had heretofore been produced in Pittsburg. He saw the possibilities 
of a great business, and he has practically had the exclusive sale of fire-clay 
brickin and around Pittsburg for crucible furnace purposes since he first dis- 
covered his process. Three years after entering the firm already mentioned he 
purchased all other interests of the concern and controlled the business for 
fourteen years. 



I30 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Owing' to the panic of 1873 he again failed, losing every dollar he had 
in the world as on other occasions ; but, as he said recently to a friend : "I have 
failed several times in my life, but my credit never failed me once. I borrowed 
five thousand dollars at sixty years of age, with only forty dollars cash in the 
world." This last venture was the most successful of his business life. It was 
in 1878 that he saw the necessity of a brick which would offer a greater resist- 
ance to intense heat, especially for the heating furnaces for steel, so he invented 
and patented a brick called the "Reese Silica Brick," which stood the test of 
five thousand degrees, whereas no other brick was ever known to stand more 
than three thousand degrees. The new brick was especially adapted to the 
open-hearth furnaces for the smelting of steel, copper and glass. Through the 
discovery of this excellent brick, the financial success of Isaac Reese was 
thereafter assured, a just reward of his inventive genius and studious research. 
The following anecdote bears witness apropos : Judge Weir, of Montana, now 
deceased, but formerly of the old law firm of Gibson & Weir, the famous civil 
law firm of Pittsburg, which had managed Mr. Reese's affairs in bankruptcy 
proceedings, returned to Pittsburg some years after and naturally inquired con- 
cerning Isaac Reese. Being told what he was doing, and meeting him on the 
street a few days after, he slapped him on the shoulder, saying; "Well, old war- 
horse, I hear that you have staggered to your feet, and there is not a man in 
Pittsburg more deserving." 

Mr. Reese established a large plant in Manorville, Pennsylvania, and later 
another plant in Cowanshannock, in the same county. These mills were called 
the Phoenix Fire-Brick Works, and Mr. Reese was the sole owner. He also 
made brick called "Phoenix" and "Globe," especially adapted for rolling-mill 
uses, and also for blast furnaces. In order to meet the great demand for his 
brick he added two other plants at Retort, Pennsylvania, in Centre county; 
these plants were called the "Retort Works." When his sons became of age, 
in about 1896, he took them into partnership with him. These sons were 
George W., Benjamin F. and Walter L. Reese, the firm being then changed 
to Isaac Reese & Sons, and later still to Isaac Reese & Sons Company. In 
1900 the business was incorporated under the latter name, with Isaac Reese as 
president and general manager. This relation continued until 1902, when the 
firm sold out to the brick trust, but retained stock in the same. There were 
thirty-four brick plants merged into the trust known as the Harbison & 
Walker Refractories Company, into which the Reese plants entered. The 
Reese plants were the only ones to preserve their individualitv and to retain 
their own offices and the firm name of Isaac Reese & Sons Companv. 

The sons of Isaac Reese have been associated with their father in all of 
his later important enterprises. George W., the eldest son, on the formation 
of the Harbison & Walker Refractories Company, was one of the vice- 
presidents of this combine, and is still an efficient member of the board of 
directors. He is at present identified with leading industrial interests in west- 
ern Pennsylvania and elsewhere. Benjamin F., the second son. was considered 
an expert in the intricacies and details relating to gas and oil product, and was 
well versed in all that related to the manufacture of brick, mill construction 
and matters pertaining generally to the iron industry. At the time of his 
death in 1904 he was the largest individual stockholder in the Kittanning Plate 
Glass Company, a concern known throughout the country for its complete and 
modern equipment. The keen foresight, comprehensive knowledge and e.xcel- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 131 

lent management of this son were dominating influences many times in family 
council and affairs. Walter L., the youngest son, is known for his practical 
and intuitive grasp of business matters. His conservative attitude and well- 
balanced judgment on important questions relating to finance and business 
detail have won for him the confidence of associates and friends. Of these 
sons, George married Nita Truby, of Kittanning, Pennsylvania. His daughter, 
Margaret, is the wife of Woodward Patterson Brown, of Kittanning. Ben- 
jamin died without issue. Walter L. married Tirzah Thomas, of Latrobe, 
Pennsylvania. The remaining children of Isaac Reese are two daughters, 
Elvira and Emma, the latter the wife of F. L. Snowden. The two grandsons 
of Isaac Reese are Reese Olver Snowden and Francis Laird Snowden, Jr. 
The elder of these grandsons, Reese Oliver, has been identified with the oil and 
gas interests of the Standard Oil Company and the Kansas Natural Gas Com- 
pany of Pittsburg for several years. The younger, Francis Laird, a recent 
graduate of Yale University, is now in the engineering department of the 
Carnegie Steel Company, Clairton", Pennsylvania. 

The domestic life of Isaac Reese has always been a happy one. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Jones in Pittsburg, on May 24, 1844. who had come to America 
with her parents when seventeen years old. Elizabeth Jones was born in 
Llanbrynmair, Whales, on February 21, 1824. Her forebears were God-fearing 
people. Her line of religious ancestry dated back on the paternal side to 
1663, and on the maternal side to 1668. Her parents, Robert and Mar\' Bebb 
Jones, exemplified the best traits of the Welsh character. They were devout 
and consecrated Christians, and they belonged through ties of relationship to 
the famous Roberts family of Llanbrynmair, of which the Reverend John Rob- 
erts and his three sons, noted as preachers and authors, and honored through- 
out the principality and wherever the Welsh language is spoken, were dis- 
tinguished members. Concerning Elizabeth Jones Reese, her biographer, the 
Reverend B. Gwernydd Newton, in portraying the irresistible charm of her 
unsullied personal life and her unselfish devotion to family and friends, savs: 
"There was a majesty about her which impressed ever\one. She possessed a 
religious nature, an inbred sympathy with truth and an innate proneness toward 
virtue. To do right was to be true to nature. She loved the beautiful and the 
pure as naturally as she breathed. She sought the invisible as bv natural 
impulse and found the father in Heaven as by intuition. Endowed with an 
ardent and spiritual imagination she was a lifelong lover of nature. Her earliest 
recollection was sharing, when but four years of age, a morsel of bread with 
the birds that gathered around the old homestead, suggestive of her innate 
sympathy and the love of God's creatures which so beautifully characterized 
the whole of her after life. Glorious as was the sunrise, it did not compare 
with the sunset of her life. When the shadows were falling, the promise was 
indeed realized, 'At eventide it shall be light.' " 

Isaac Reese felt deeply the loss of this helpmeet and friend. He has now 
retired from active business pursuits and is wisely devoting himself to less 
arduous tasks and is enjoying the fruits of a busy and successful . career. 
Isaac Reese has always been a friend of the working man. No better proof of 
this can be furnished than the statement that he never had a strike. Soon after 
the trust was inaugurated a disastrous strike took place and every mill in the 
combine went out with the exception of the two oldest mills of Mr. Reese. 
The fraternal relations of Mr. Reese are with the Masons. He looks upon the 



132 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

casting of his vote as a solemn duty, and, when over eighty 3'ears of age, trav- 
eled several hundred miles in order to deposit his ballot at the polls. It is the 
same in regard to a business meeting of his church. No effort is ever spared 
by him in this regard. 

The authoritative personality of Isaac Reese, coupled with the rare qual- 
ity possessed by him of a courage equal always to his convictions, make him 
one of the truly representative men of the times as well as a dominant factor in 
local business aiifairs. No matter how unsurmountable the difficulties, nor how 
grave the responsibilities and emergencies, he has stubbornly held his own 
when thoroughly convinced that a certain course of action was the right one. 
This sense of conviction and strength of will has not only enabled Mr. Reese 
to preserve an imperturbable calmness in the face of apparent defeat and to 
take his place courageously, again and again, on the lowest round of the ladder, 
but has been the influence which has urged him to further action, sometimes 
an almost superhuman effort, which has eventually wrung success from the 
grasp of defeat. Always deliberate and painstaking, nothing is ever too trivial 
for the patient thought of Mr. Reese whenever a question or project which 
concerns vital interests is under consideration ; no detail is deemed insignificant, 
no point of view or plan of another is overlooked, no opinion is derided. While 
conservative always, yet he hears and sees all sides, he makes personal investi- 
gation, even to the extent of wearisome journeys, and then decides. His judg- 
ment, therefore, is well-nigh unimpeachable, and his counsel is sought and his 
advice heeded bv old and young alike. Mr. Reese is conscientious in all his 
business dealings ; he is thoughtful and appreciative of the labors of others, 
and it is recorded that no "strike" has ever marred the relation between 
emplover and employed where he has had controlling direction. He-is known 
as a just man in his benefactions, and he is faithful to trust and obligation and 
loyal to his friends. Mr. Reese finds his greatest pleasure in his home, and 
few self-made men who have known the toil since childhood which he has 
known are as well-versed in books, and are as appreciative of the hallmark 
of the college as he is. His greatest satisfactions in life are his family, his 
church, his well-stocked library, and the educational interests of the young 
people of the connection and community. Although advanced in years, Mr. 
Reese is anything but venerable in appearance or spirit. He is active physically, 
and he loves good company ; he can walk a mile or spin a tale with the best. 
But where he sits, there sits the head, and, instinctively, all recognize this fact. 
The same undaunted spirit which in days past has brought him as a war- 
horse staggering to his feet after downthrow and when destruction to every 
hope seemed imminent ; which has made him declare with emphasis, "I will 
burn the brick even though I burn down the kiln to do it," when the last dollar 
had been spent and the tangible result was an experimental ruin ; which has 
carried him through heart-breaking bereavement, through bankruptcy and dis- 
appointment ; the same spirit which has "taken hold" of anything, and any- 
where, and has accomplished in spite of opposition and the seemingly impossi- 
ble nature of the undertaking, is still the chief characteristic of this man of 
past and present day affairs. Few men have made and lost, and then, in 
advanced life, through personal, indomitable will and push, have retrieved their 
fortune a hundred-fold as Mr. Reese has done. All honor to his achievements. 

Jacob Reese, of distinguished memory as the inventor of the essential 
conditions of the basic Hessemer and the basic open-hearth process for steel 




Z rfii/zj Sisioriciil Biib '. 



%'<;x5ijA\^\\$OU^ \ 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 133 



making which revolutionized the industry in the United States, was the fourth 
child of WilUani and EHzabeth Reese. He was born in Llannelly, Wales, July 
14, 1825. His father, as said, constructed the first sand-bottom furnace as 
applied to puddling in the United States, at Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, and his 
son Jacob, a mere lad, assisted in making the first "bloom" under the "boiling" 
process. Jacob built and was general manager of the first iron works in 
Sharon. Pennsylvania. He erected and was the first superintendent of the 
Cambria Iron Works in Johnstown, Peimsylvania, antedating John Fritz, the 
recent recipient of the Bessemer gold medal of the British Iron and Steel 
Institute. He built and operated the Fort Pitt Iron Works in Pittsburg, of 
which he was part owner, and during the Civil war made iron armor plate 
of one inch thickness for the United States government. He brought probably 
the earliest shipments of ore from the lake regions, which ore w'as used as a 
"fix" for the "boiling" furnaces which had superseded the puddling furnace 
and before there was a blast furnace in AIleghen\' County. Prior to the erec- 
tion of the Fort Pitt Iron Wor^ks, known familiarly as the Reese & Graff 
mill, Mr. Reese with the same partner owned and operated the largest oil 
refinery in the state, the Petrolite Oil Refinery, of Pittsburg. During his life- 
time Jacob Reese took out about one hundred and seventy-five patents in the 
United States, and has a record of over five hundred inventions and discov- 
eries. He discovered that basic slag from basic Bessemer process, when prop- 
erly ground, is a good fertilizer, and worked up an industry in this. Jacob 
Reese was eminent as a metallurgist and scientist. His long legal contest over 
his patent claims for the open-hearth process of steel-making made his name 
known the world over among capitalists and men of science. In practical 
•demonstration he w-as foremost as an engineer and worker. He was a stock- 
holder in many concerns of magnitude. He was a resident of Pittsburg for 
over fifty years. He moved to Philadelphia in 1892, where he died on March 
25, 1907, from paralysis. At the time of his death he was working on a system 
of language for deaf mutes. Jacob Reese was Fellow of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science ; a member of Franklin Institute and 
the Philadelphia Academy, Philadelphia; he was past master of Franklin 
Lodge 221, Free and Accepted ]\Iasons held at Pittsburg; he was a thirty- 
second degree Mason, and a master Mason for fifty-two years ; he was a 
Knight Templar ; he had held the office of deacon in the Baptist church for 
sixty-one years ; he was a public advocate of temperance, a platform orator 
and a parliamentarian. During the whole of his adult life he was identified 
with all leading philanthropic, civic and industrial movements in Pennsylvania. 
Jacob Reese for a time was manager of the Clinton Iron Works at Pittsburg, 
owned then bv English, Bennett & Co., and in this mill he made the first 
iron rails that were made in Pittsburg. While in the oil refinery business he 
had one tank, the largest ever made for oil refining up to that time, with a 
■capacity of one thousand barrels ; also the largest still. 

Jacob Reese married, first, Eliza Matthews, of Pittsburg, by whom the 
following children were born : George, Frank, Walter and Harvey Reese, of 
Philadelphia and New York city ; Mrs. John O. Everson. of Pittsburg, and 
jNIrs. Barton Kinne, of New York. George, the eldest son. has patented sev- 
eral valuable inventions. Fle is a member of Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, 
and a writer on scientific topics. Frank has been a patent attorney for a 
number of years. Walter is engaged in business in Brooklyn. Harvey Reese, 



134 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

who is a medical practitioner of New York city, is a former president of the 
Pittsburg Press Club and was for some years engaged in newspaper work in 
Pittsburg. In the fall of 1901 Mr. Reese married for his second wife Miss 
Jessie McElroy, of Philadelphia. 

No more valuable contribution to the early history of iron and steel 
making in the United States, as setting forth the first steps in the processes 
which were to revolutionize the industry, may be found than in the following 
personal and unpretentious narrative of the life of Jacob Reese, written in 
simple language, and which was found after his demise : 

I was born in Llannelly, Wales, July 14, 1825. My father, William 
Reese, and my mother, Elizabeth Reese, with their family emigrated to the 
United States and landed in Philadelphia on the 14th day of May, 1832. 
William Reese obtained employment at Phoenixville, and moved his family 
there. While at Phoenixville he made the acquaintance of John Savage and 
George Thompson, who owned property in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, 
and there William Reese was engaged to build an iron works at Trough 
Creek, and the family moved from Huntingdon. A blast furnace and forge 
were built, and cast and wrought iron were produced in 1834. I spent most 
of mv time with my father at his works, and received my earliest impressions 
in metallurg}- and mechanics. As Chillcott's, a little town three miles away, 
was the nearest store for domestic supplies, I was often required to go there 
through the-woods, and learned to avoid wild animals, for the woods were full 
of them. 

In 1835 the family moved to Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, and father built a 
furnace and introduced the boiling- process for the Valentines. There were no 
fire brick to be had in this country, so father ordered fire brick from Scotland 
to build a furnace. Unfortunately, the vessel carrying the brick sunk, so 
father built his furnace of sandstone. He lined the sides with forge cinder, 
and the bottom' with limestone. When the furnace was ready and my father 
was working at it a number of prominent men from Bellefonte and Phila- 
delphia were present to see the new departure in making iron. When the heat 
was ready I pulled up the door, and father, with a long tongs, drew a large 
red hot ball out of the furnace and threw it under the hammer ; my brother, 
Isaac, pulled down the gate and let the water on, the big wheel turned and the 
hammer came down and smashed the iron ball into "smithereens." I saw that 
it was a failure. My father was cool. He said: "Don't cry, Jacob; shut the 
water off, Isaac ; pull up the door, Jacob ; I know what's the matter." Then 
he drew another red hot ball out, and let it lie on the standing, and, taking the 
ladle, he poured about a quart of water on the hot ball ; a great blue flame 
arose as high as father's head ; the ball was put under the hammer, the gate 
raised, the hammer pounded on the ball, which father turned with the tongs, 
while the cinders flew in all directions. And thus was made the first bloom 
by the boiling process in the United States. 

The balance of the iron was treated in the same manner, and the new 
process was pronounced a success. I then asked father how it was that cold 
water made the iron good, and he said that the lime bottom had made the 
iron too dry, and that you must make the "blue blazes" come out of dry iron 
before it will work properly. I asked father what "blue blazes" was. He 
replied: "You will find that out when you go to school." About a week after 
I was fishing with a fly on Spring Creek, when Judge Burnside came along 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 135 

and asked me to let him fly a few for me. I replied : "If you will tell me 
what 'blue blazes' is I will." He said : "O, you are Mr. Reese's son who 
made the good iron by making the 'blue blazes' come out of it ; that, son, was 
a wonderful thing to me ; it belongs to the realm of chemistry, of which I am 
not familiar ; but I am going down to Philadelphia next week and I will bring 
you a book that will tell you all about 'blue blazes.' " He fished a while, and 
then went away. About two weeks after that Judge Bumside came to our 
house and gave me the Oxford edition of Chemistry, which, he said, if I would 
carefully study would lead me into a wonderland that is full of delightful 
pleasure and profit. With my grateful 'thanks he departed, and I laid aside 
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and commenced to study the wonderland of 
chemistry. The panic of 1837 closed the works at Bellefonte and father moved 
the family to Pittsburg, and there at the works of Hogg, Bealer & Co., 
father, Isaac and I were employed until 1839, during which year we were in 
Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania. In 1840, being then fifteen years of age, I 
obtained employment as hammerman at the works of Spang & Co., which 
was located at Pine Creek, about five miles from Pittsburg. Here I had 
practical demonstration of both the puddling and the boiling process, and saw 
the great advantage chemistry was to the manufacturer of iron, and I contin- 
ually compared the book chemistry with the mill practice. 

In 1850 I saw an advertisement offering $1,000 for the best plan of a nail 
factory. I made the drawings of a works to produce twenty tons per day. 
Aly drawings were accepted, and I assisted in building the works at Sharon, 
Mercer County, Pennsylvania. I there introduced an improvement which 
made the blue nail. I took out a patent on it which brought me considerable 
revenue. In 1852 I was employed by English, Bennett & Co. and moved to 
Pittsburg and altered the Clinton Bar mill to a rail mill, after making 1,000 
tons of railroad iron for the Cleveland, Columbus & Cincinnati Railroad Com- 
pany. I was employed as engineer for the Cambria Iron Company, and spent 
1854 and 185s in the construction and management of the Cambria Iron Rail 
!Mill at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. After making several thousand tons of 
rails for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, I returned to Pitts- 
burg and was engaged in the sale of rolling mill supplies during the years 
1856-1859. In i860 I engaged in the petroleum business, and built the Petrolite 
Oil Works at Thirty-second street in Pittsburg. The works was composed in 
part of two stills of 300 barrels capacity, two stills of 500 barrels capacitv, and 
one still of 1,000 barrels capacity, and a thousand barrel agitator bv means of 
which I purified the oil by blowing a blast of air through it. In 1862 I built 
the Fort Pitt Iron Works at Thirty-second street and the Allegheny riv^er in 
order to make hoop iron for binding the oil barrels for the refinery. In 1864 
I built an addition to the Fort Pitt Steel Works. In 1865 I built the Southside 
Rolling Mill and Tube Works. In 1866 I built a metallurgical plant at Thirty- 
second street and the Allegheny river, Pittsburg. The plant comprised in part 
a cupola thirty-six inches in diameter and thirty feet in height ; two con- 
verters and an open-hearth, each having a capacity to operate on five hundred 
pounds of metal at each heat ; a root blower for the cupola, and a direct acting 
blowing engine for producing the pressure blast for the cupolas ; also an 
apparatus for producing carbonic o.xide, and a hydro-carbon vapor at a high 
temperature and a pressure of 100 pounds to the square inch. The construc- 
tion and operation of this plant cost me over $50,000. It was here that I 



136 ■ A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

indurated lime by intense heat, mixed it with tar and formed an indurated 
Hning- with which I Hned the converters and the open-hearth. In this plant 
I mehed pig iron that was high in phosphorous in the cupola, poured it into the 
converter having a basic lining and a basic bath, then blew the molten metal 
with an air blast until the silicon and carbon were eliminated, and then con- 
tinuing the blow until the phosphorous was oxidized to phosphoric acid and it 
united with the lime in the basic bath forming a phosphate of lime for agri- 
cultural purjjoses, then pouring the steel into ingots. It was there that 1 
desiliconized molten iron in a ganister lined converter, then poured it into a 
basic lined converter and therein blew the molten metal with an air blast until 
it was deoxidized, decarbonized and dephosphorized, and the cast iron con- 
verted into pure steel. It was there that I melted cast iron in a cupola, poured 
it into a basic lined open-hearth, and, in the presence of a basic bath, converted 
the crude iron into dephosphorized steel. It was there that I demonstrated 
and perfected my invention of Lime Lining, Lime Additions and the Over 
Blow, as shown in the testimony in the case of Reese vs. Thomas et al.. decided 
in the United State Patent Office November 26, 1881. In 1868 I had built the 
Fort Pitt Steel Works. With others I also built and operated the Grafton 
Blast Furnaces at Latonia, Ohio. 

In 1877 I was so impoverished by loss of fire, explosions and creditors, 
that I was unable to proceed and failed. Having lost every dollar, I was com- 
pelled to start anew. In 1879 I sold some patents to Andrew Carnegie for a 
semi-annual payment of $2,500, during the life of the patents or their improve- 
ments. Mr. Carnegie transferred the agreement to the Bessemer Steel Com- 
pany, and they transferred it to the Steel Patents Company. After years of 
expensive litigation they were, by mandamus, compelled to pay. 

In 1879 the United States Patent Commissioner declared an interference 
between Jacob Reese, Sidney G. Thomas, Henry Harmet, Philip Osan and 
Henderson. After a vigorous contest the Commissioner of Patents decid;d 
that Jacob Reese was the prior inventor of cases A and B. which cases covered 
the Lime Lining, the Basic Bath, and the Over Blow, the essential conditions 
of the Basic Process for the manufacture of steel. The last patent that comes 
under this agreement was issued in April. 1906, and will not expire until 1923. 

Abram Reese was the sixth child of William and Elizabeth Reese, and has 
the honor of Jiaving rolled the first rail west of the Mississippi river in Iun«, 
1871. Mr. Reese was tlien superintendent of the Vulcan Iron Works, located 
in south St. Louis. A piece of the rail is preserved at Jefferson, the capital of 
Missouri. General U. S. Grant, president of the L^nited States, visited the 
works about this time, and congratulated the owners and superintendent on the 
achievement. Abram Reese has an enviable record as an inventor. When a 
>-oung man he invented a bolt machine of such perfection, and which shapetl 
head and spike in one operation, that the principle on which the machine was 
built is unchanged today. This machine was operated for years in the Lewis, 
Oliver & Phillips mill in Pittsburg. He is the inventor of the only known 
machine which rolls shaped metal with one roll ; that is, a horseshoe complete 
in one operation, or an ax with a hole in it, and the like. The machine was 
operated in the Reese and Grafif mills in Pittsburg, and is in successful running 
now, elsewhere, for the manufacture of probably half a hundred specialties. 
He is the inventor of the Universal Mill, and the inventor of the gas conduit 
now in general use. Other of his more notable inventions are: A machine 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 137 

for re-rolling old rails, a safety car stove, live stock feeding- apparatus for 
freig-ht cars, a brake, corrugated sheet iron for roofing, a garden hoe, and sup ■ 
plementarv devices in number. Abram Reese worked in" the rolling mills or 
Pittsburg when a boy. He was the first labor boss at the Cambria Iron Works 
at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, when this mill was being built and managed by 
his brother Jacob. Abram Reese puddled the first "heat" in the Cambria Iron 
Works. ^Ir. Reese was later manager of the Fort Pitt, or the Reese & Graff 
mill, as the works was known, in Pittsburg, of which his brother Jacob was 
part proprietor, and during the Civil war operated this mill in the interest 
of the I'nited States government, making iron armor plates. He was later 
general manager of the Excelsior Iron Works, located on the present site of 
the Schoen Steel Car Company at Woods Run. After this he was superin- 
tendent of the Vulcan Iron Works at St. Louis. In later year j\lr. Reese.- 
equipped and started a mill for the re-rol!ing of oil rails in Louisville. Ken- 
tucky. He has engaged in other enterprises was at one time manager of the 
Petrolite Oil Refinery of Pittsburg, and was one of the pioneer oil operators 
during the early excitement in Oil City. He has been interested in coal and 
mining, and superintended what were the earliest shipments of ore, probabh-, 
to Pittsburg from the lake region. Abram Reese was born in Llannelly , 
Wales, in 1829. and came to this country with his parents in 1832. He was'a 
child when his father built the first sand-bottom furnace as applied to puddlinj; 
in the United States, at Bellefonte, where the first "bloom" was made. hV; 
has retired from active pursuits in recent years and lives quietly at his home, 
216 North Lang avenue, Pittsburg. East End. Three of his sons are identified 
with present day iron and steel interests in Pittsburg; Harry W„ as manager 
of the spiral spring department of the Pittsburg Spring and Steel Company ; 
Arthur B.. as connected with the Carnegie interests: and Stanlev C. in thr 
mechanical engineering department of Jones & Laughlin : his remaining chil 
dren. Charles and Cara. are in the newspaper business. His wife is IMar'- 
Godwin, of Hiworth. Wiltshire. England. Her brothers were pioneer potter; 
of Ohio and West Virginia. 

Joseph, the seventh child of William and Elizabeth Reese, lost his life 
as a result of the charge on Stone River during the Civil war. He enlisted 
from Youngstown. Ohio, in the Twenty-third Volunteer Infantry, the same 
regiment and company to which William McKinley, who in later years was 
President of the United States, belonged. William ]\IcKinlev certified to 
assisting the wounded after this charge into a vacant house, and that one of 
the wounded was Joseph Reese. The house was burned by the enemy and the 
wounded perished. 

Benjamin Franklin Reese, the youngest son of William and Eliza- 
betli Reese, is a native-born American, and at present a resident of Bolivar, 
Pennsylvania, a member of the firm of Reese Hammond Fire Brick Company 
of that place. He received an academic education in Pittsburg. As a vouth 
he enlisted in the Sixth Regiment. United States Cavalry, Julv 6, 1861, at 
Pittsburg, and was in honorable service until the time of his official discharge 
at Petersburg, Virginia, July 6, 1864. For forty years he has been identified 
with the brick business, both in practical working and manufacture, and as 
part proprietor of large concerns. His life throughout has been the exemplifi- 
cation of faithfulness to duty and loyalty to friends, while his time and 
strength, and also his means, have been at no time withheld from anv move- 



138 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



ment or reform which sought the uplifting of humanity. Mr. Reese married 
Dcra Berkey, of Bolivar, and he has one son, William, who is now a student 
at the Bolivar Academy. 

The only surviving daughter of William and Elizabeth Reese is the wife 
of the Reverend Joel V. Stratton, a Baptist clergyman, of Pittsburg. The 
couple have two children, William C, who is a mining engineer, and Anna R., 
who is in the newspaper business. 



THE VINCENT FAMILY, representatives of which have been active 
and prominent in various professional circles, and who have wielded an 
influence for good in the communities in which they resided, was founded in 
this country at an early date. 

Rev. George Carothers Vincent, D. D., LL. D., the first of the family 
of whom we have definite information, was born on a farm near Harrisville, 
Pennsylvania, April 4, 1813, and died in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, Octo- 
ber 16, 1889. He was the youngest of a family of seven sons and three 
daughters, children of James and Charity (Gilmore) Vincent. George C. 
Vincent received at the hands of these parents careful religious instruction, 
and such training in the common English branches as the neighborhood schools 
afforded. In the fall of 1833, at the solicitation of some friends in Belmont 
county, he visited there and later in the year became a student in Franklin 
College, at New Athens, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1836. Soon after 
the close of his college career he entered the Theological Seminary of the 
Associate Presbyterian church, located at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. After 
the completion of his theological course he was sent on a tour as a home mis- 
sionary to western Illinois and Iowa. Early in the summer of 1841 he was 
called to the pastorate of the First Associate congregation of Washington, 
Iowa, and of the Grandview, Iowa, church, which he had established as the 
home missionary of that section. These calls were accepted and he became the 
resident pastor in November, 1841. The toils and hardships of these pioneer 
pastors were very great. They traveled on horseback to preaching stations 
from fifty to one hundred miles in this new territory, in addition to serving 
their own churches. The country was almost destitute of mone}-, and for 
months the minister could scarcely find money enough to pay postage. But 
food was plenty, and the people did all in their power to make their ministers 
comfortable. The most discouraging feature of the work in those early days 
was the sickness, which was almost universal. The malaria was in itself very 
debilitating, but it induced many other diseases, among which consumption 
was the most fatal. This disease took from the young pastor his beloved 
partner, Margaret Cowden (Walker) Vincent, the eldest daughter of Rev. 
Dr. John Walker, of New Athens, Ohio, to whom he had been married Sep- 
tember 10, 1838. After a lingering illness she died in June, 1844. During 
the trying times that followed this bereavement Dr. Vincent cared as best he 
could for the growing work and for the three little motherless bovs dependent 
upon his care. 

In July, 184S, Dr. Mncent was married to Mrs. Martha Hanna Carna- 
han, the widowed daughter of James Hanna, of Cadiz, Ohio.. He continued 
in charge of the work until the fall of 1847 when, on account of broken 
health, he was compelled to seek a change of climate. Late in the fall of that 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 139 

year he accepted a call to the First Associate congregation of Mercer, Penn- 
sylvania. During his pastorate there he was principal of the Mercer Academy. 
In 1852 Westminster College was founded at New Wilmington as an enlarged 
outgrowth of the academies at Alercer and Greenville, of which Rev. D. H. 
A. McLean was principal. These principals became professors in the college, 
and as it became more fully organized Professor Vincent was chosen vice- 
president. During the time of his association with the college he founded the 
IVcstminster Herald, a weekly religious newspaper, which was afterward 
merged with The Preacher, a similar paper published in Pittsburg, and the 
new paper took the name of The United Presbyterian, and Rev. Vincent 
became an associate editor. 

During the years of labor in the college a large number of gifted men and 
women were graduated and sent forth into the ministry, to the law and medi- 
cine, and to teaching, and the influence of the college was felt near and far. 
Desiring to have some relief from the exacting cares of college life, he resigned 
his professorship in 1871 and accepted a call to the First United Presbyterian 
church of Brookville, Pennsylvania, where he enjoyed many years of successful 
work in the ministry. In 1877, without any knowledge of the matter on his 
part, he was chosen to the presidency of Franklin College, his alma mater, at 
New Athens, Ohio. As several of the younger members of the family had 
not received their education his desire to make suitable provision for them 
induced him to give up his delightful pastorate and once more enter upon the 
college life, and he became president of the college in the fall of 1877. The 
college work was greatly advanced under his administration. The faculty was 
enlarged, a fine new college building was erected, and a multitude of young 
people prepared for a career of usefulness. He continued in the work until 
1884 when, having provided an education for his family, he felt he should 
return to the pastorate. In October, 1884, he accepted a call to the pastorate 
of the First United Presbyterian church of Latrobe, Pennsylvania, with which 
was associated the neighboring congregation of Fairmount. He continued 
to minister to these churches until his removal to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
in the summer of 1889. His health was now much broken, and he continued 
to decline until October 16, 1889. when, surrounded by his family and sup- 
ported by a strong, triumphant faith, he passed to his reward. 

He was honored with the degree of Doctor of Divinity by Washington 
College in 1864, and with that of Doctor of Laws by Franklin College in 
1884. Rev. J. B. McMichael, president of Monmouth College, a former 
student under Dr. Vincent's care, wrote of his death as follows : "Fifty years 
in the ministerial armor, a true, knightly soldier of the cross, bravely battling 
wrong and defending the right, teaching the ignorant, warning the unruly, 
comforting the feeble, consoling the dying, and with tongue and pen pointing 
all to Jesus, the lamb of God for salvation. What a long, useful life! But 
life's battle is at last ended, the victory is won, the last enemy is conquered, the 
work and warfare are all behind, the rest and reward of faithful service are 
before thee, thou man of God. Fare thee well, faithful guide of my boyhood, 
good-bye teacher. Thy work is done, all done, well done, and thou art gone to 
be with the Great Teacher. Write 'blessed are the dead which die in the 
Lord, from henceforth ; yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their 
labors ; and their works do follow them.' " 

To the Rev. Dr. \'incent were born nine children: i. John Walker, 



140 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

, born June 13, 1839, at Washington. Iowa, died at Falmouth, Virginia, Decem- 
ber 19, 1862. 2. Alvan Stuart, born April 13, 1841, pastor of United 
Presbyterian church, Siloam Springs, Arkansas. 3. Robert Milton, born May 
8, 1843, engineer, Buffalo, Wyoming. 4. James Hanna. born July 31, 1846, 
■died in 1848, at Mercer, Pennsylvania. 5. William Hanna, born October 24, 
1848, see forward. 6. Mary Margaret, born June 21, 1851, at New Wilming- 
ton, Pennsylvania, died at Douglass, Wyoming. March 2, 1907, married 
William Finley Hamilton. 7. Charity Jane, born July 3, 1853, see forward. 
8. James Rankin, born July 28, 1855, see forward. 9. Anna Martha, born 
November 28, 1857, ^t -^'^^^' Wilmington, Pennsylvania, died June 5, 1894, in 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania. The second wife of Dr. Vincent died in Allegheny, 
Pennsylvania. September 25, 1899. 

William Hanna Vincent, fifth son of Dr. George C. Vincent, was born at 
Mercer, Pennsylvania, October 24, 1848. He was but a boy of a few years 
when his father moved to New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, and became the 
founder of Westminster College. He graduated from this college in June, 
1869, and after teaching for a year entered the United Presbyterian Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Newburg, New York, in which he pursued his studies for the 
ministry for two years, but graduated from the Allegheny Theological 
Seminary in April, 1873. He became pastor of Fairfield church, near Ligonier, 
Pennsylvania, in April, 1874, establishing at the same time a branch church in 
Ligonier. During the winter of 1878-79 he took a post-graduate course of 
study in Edinburgh University, Scotland, and traveled in Scotland, England 
and France. He was called to the First United Presbyterian church, of Mans- 
field, Ohio, and became the pastor July i, 1887. After three years of successful 
ministry in that city he was in 1890 appointed by the Board of Home Missions 
to take up the work of the United Presbyterian church in Detroit, Michigan, 
where the congregation had been swept away by the secession of many of the 
ministers and churches of that Presbytery in the previous year. After restor- 
ing the work of the First church, the Second church was established in the 
western part of the city, both of which are now prosperous and influential 
churches. On the first of January, 1903, he accepted a call to the newly formed 
Third United Presbyterian church, of Youngstown, Ohio, and continued there 
initil the church became strong and well-established. During the month of 
March, 1906, a call was tendered him by the North End United Presbyterian 
church of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, a field with fair opportunities for mission 
work. The call was accepted and the pastorate begun in June. 1906, and a 
prosperous work has been inaugurated. 

Dr. William H. Vincent married, June 3, 1880, M. Nettie Jamison, only 
daughter of Hon. John C. Jamison, of Cadiz. Ohio. Children: i. Eleanor 
Marie, born at Ligonier, Pennsylvania, May 30, 1882; she graduated from the 
Detroit High School in June, 1900, and from Westminster College in June, 
1903 : she entcretl upon the profession of teaching and has charge of the de- 
partment of English literature in the Bellevue High School. 2. George Clark, 
born at Ligonier. Pennsylvania, January 29, 1884; he graduated from the 
Detroit Central High School, January 24, 1901, and from Westminster Col- 
lege in June, 1904. He won by competitive examination the first appointment 
from Ohio to the Cecil Rhodes Scholarship in Oxford (England) L'niversity. 
After three years of study and travel abroad he graduated with high honors. 
He is now a student in the United Presbyterian Seminary of Allegheny, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 141 

Pennsylvania. 3. Martha Olive, born in Detroit, Michigan, July 2, 1894; she 
is a pupil in the Fifteenth ward school, of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

Charity Jane Vincent, daughter of Dr. George C. Vincent, was born at 
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1853, and died in Allegheny, Penn- 
sylvania, January i, 1902. She graduated from Franklin College, classical 
course, in June, 1879. She studied medicine in the Women's Medical College 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which she graduated, and at once entered 
upon the practice of her profession in the Hospital for W^omen and Children 
on Staten Island, New York. xAfter practicing in the hospital for about a 
year she entered upon the general practice in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber I, 1882. She soon came into a large practice, and was greatly respected 
by the people and by the members of her profession. She was called to manv 
of the best homes of Allegheny and Pittsburg, and gave herself unsparinglv 
to the pursuit of her profession. She was largely instrumental in the establish- 
ment and development of the United Presb}-terian Orphans" Home of Alle- 
gheny, and of the United Presbyterian Hospital, now called the Columbian 
Hospital, of East End, Pittsburg. To these she gave her time and toil and 
money almost without stint, and to the hospital gave her professional services 
without salary. She was also secretary of the Treedmen's Department of the 
Women's Board, which made large demands upon her time and strength. 
Unconsciously to herself and friends the burden grew too heavy for her, and 
her life gave way under the strain. Suddenly, without warning, with' scarcely 
an hour's sickness, the Master came and called her home at midnight, January 
7, 1902, only her friend, Miss Mahan, being with her when the summons 
came. 

Dr. James Rankin Vincent, sixth son of Dr. George C. Vincent, was 
born in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, July 28, 1855. His boyhood days 
were spent at New Wilmington and Brookville, removing to the latter place 
at the age of fifteen and remaining five years. He attended the public schools 
of both places. He then went to New Athens, Ohio, and attended Franklin 
College four years, his father being president of the institution at that time. 
He attended lectures at the Medical College of Ohio, at Cincinnati, where he 
was a student three years, graduating therefrom in 1884. In March of the 
same year he located at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, and was soon in the tnidst 
of a lucrative practice. In 1891 he removed to East Liberty, Pittsburg, where 
he continues very successfully the practice of his profession. He was one of 
the leaders in the establishment of the Pittsburgh Hospital, was one of the 
first members of the hospital staff, and so continues to the present time (1908). 
He is a member of the Allegheny County Medical Society, the Pennsylvania 
State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He was a 
inember of the filtration commission, consisting of twelve men, appointed by the 
mayor to investigate the water supply for the city of Pittsburg and devise some 
means of getting rid of the impurities which had long been a menace to the 
health of the city. The labors of this commission resulted in the establishment 
of the present filtration plant. In 1901 Dr. \"incent prepared and drafted a bill 
which he had introduced and was passed by the legislature of that year, called 
the Pure Milk Bill. This act is now in successful operation and has resulted 
in a great improvement in the quality and purity of the milk supply and a 
marked decrease in mortality among children and infants. Dr. Vincent is a 
member of the United Presbyterian church, and an adherent of Republican 



142 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

principles. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Fraternal 
Lodge, No. 32, Pittsburg Chapter, Duquesne Commandery and Syria Shrine. 

Dr. James R. Vincent was married in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 16, 1886, by the Rev. George C. Vincent, his father, to Fannie McLean, 
daughter of Wilson, deceased, and Anna (McNeary) McLean. She was born 
in Washington county, Pennsylvania, reared in Wilkinsburg, and was a 
successful teacher in the schools of that city. 

EDWARD MANNING BIGELOW. Among the characters destined to 
stand out prominently on the pages of Greater Pittsburg history is that of 
Edward M. Bigelow, for so many years the director of the department of public 
works. He was born November 6, 1850, in Pittsburg, and was one of a family 
of five children born to Edward M. and Mary (Steel) Bigelow. His life so far 
has been spent in his native city. After attending the public schools he entered 
the Western University of Pennsylvania, but before he graduated he withdrew 
from that educational institution to accept the position of civil engineer. 
Subsequentlv he was appointed engineer in charge of the surveys of the city. 
and in 1880 was made city engineer of Pittsburg, continuing to fill such 
important place until the revision of the form of municipal government eight 
years later. He was then elected director of the department of public works 
and was unanimously re-elected every four years. During all of these years 
Mr. Bigelow had complete directorship of all municipal improvements, and 
he has accomplished so much for the benefit of the people of his native city 
as to have well earned the title of public benefactor. L'nder his administra- 
tion and largely through his initiative a transformation has been wrought in 
the environments of the city, such as was brought about in Paris, France, by 
the celebrated Haussman, and the city of Washington in our own country by 
Shephard, however, with none of the obnoxious business complications found 
in their work, as excellent as it was in adornment of the two national capitals. 
Within his terms of office all the important public works of the city of Pitts- 
burg which now exist, save the City Hall, have been created or rebuilt. How- 
ever, the great work of his life, and that which will stand as a lasting monu- 
ment to his skill and executive ability, is the creation of the Park system. 
When he took the office he so long and so ably has filled the public park 
grounds of the city comprised but a narrow strip of land a square in length 
in the middle of the street. Not having enjoyed park privileges, the popula- 
tion of Pittsburg- was not alive to their great value, hence ^Ir. Bigelow had 
to work against some public sentiment, but by working under the guise of 
improving and making more attractive the grounds about the reservoirs, he 
added one tract after another until out of the total of less than sixty acres 
devoted to parking purposes about nine hundred acres is now embraced in 
parks, which lend a charm to the city which' is rarely excelled in anv part of 
the country. The greatest of these parks is Schenley Park, containing four 
hundred and nineteen acres, the nucleus of which was a gift of three hundred 
acres and one hundred more at a nominal price purchased of Mrs. Mary E. 
Schenley. 

Mr. Bigelow's tact and services in securing this property, which will ever 
remain a blessing to the city, was so fully appreciated by the better class of 
citizens of Pittsburg that he has the distinction only given to two Americans 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 143 



— that of having' a statue of himself erected for him in his hfetime. This was 
efTected by public subscription, and the idea was first suggested by one of an 
opposite political party to which he belonged and the fund was made up, 
amounting to over twelve thousand dollars, in a few weeks, donations coming 
in freely from rich and poor alike, all wishing to do him honor in the erection 
of the magnificent life-size bronze statue which stands at the main entrance 
of Schenley Park. He is known as the "Father of Parks." 
Mr. Bigelow is of the Presbyterian faith. 



ABNYR CLARKE BAXE, connected with the Municipal and Corpora- 
tion Securities Company, of Pittsburg, forms the subject of this sketch. He 
traces his ancestry to Scotland and England, and has descended from promi- 
nent families on both paternal and maternal branches. Bane is an old and 
honored Scotch name, dating back to the ancient Kings of Scotland, to one 
Donald VH, to whom was given this name as a mark of a successful warrior ; 
he was afterward known as Donald Bane and was the last of the ancient 
kings of Scotland — from 1094 to 1098. Through him and his descendants has 
been transmitted the name to the present generations of Banes. Early in 
1600 they were among those who laid well the foundations of this country, 
and who fought for and won American independence. 

In this country the ancestors of the subject — Abnyr Clarke Bane — are as 
follows : 

(I) Mordecai Bane, married Naomi Medley. 

(II) Joseph Bane, married Parthenia Ellis. 

(III) Isaac Bane, married Sarah Furgeson. 

(IV) John Bane, married Margaret Milliken. 

(V) Abnyr Bane, married Sarah Sellers. 

(VI) John Furgeson Bane, married Martha Lindley Post. 

(VII) Abnyr Clarke Bane, married .A.da Jean Coleman. 

(VIII) Harvey Coleman Bane, the subject's son. 

On the maternal side Air. Bane descends through the mother, Martha 
Lindley (Post) Bane, to the Lindley s, the Logans and the Crackrafts, all of 
whom were instrumental in building up this country. The mother was a 
member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, having descended 
from Major Charles Crackraft, M. D., an officer and soldier in the war for 
American Independence. 

(3f John Furgeson Bane, father of Abnyr C. Bane, it should be stated 
that he was born February 24, 1829, at Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, and died 
September 17, 1866, at Claysville, Pennsylvania. He obtained a good com- 
mon-school education, and was in the government service as one of the 
engineering corps during the Civil war from 1861 to 1865. In such service 
he contracted a cold from which he never fully recovered. In church faith 
he was a Presbyterian and politically was a Republican. His business was 
that of general contractor and builder. He married Miss Martha Lindley 
Post, born Mav 7, 1829, near Claysville, Pennsylvania, and died September 
13, 1897, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The issue by this marriage was as 
follows: I. Anna Belle, who died in infancy. 2. Sarah Margaret, who mar- 
ried Thomas A. Bentley, July 15, 1875, and died in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, 
October 7, 1890. 3. William Cotteral Bane, who is a prominent and highly 



144 ^ CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

successful physician at Denver, Colorado. 4. Lindley Post Bane, who is a 
resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

(\'II) Abnyr Clarke Bane (subject) was born at Claysville, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 21, i860, a son of John Furgeson and Martha Lindley (Post) 
Bane. He was educated in the public schools of Claysville, Pennsylvania, and 
at Washington and Jefferson College. For several years he was associated 
with the firm of Pusey & Kerr, of. Pittsburg, resigning the position to form 
the firm of Crumrine, Bane & Bassett, engaged in the wholesale wall paper 
business. Mr. Bane withdrew from the firm in 1S90, and formed the firm of 
A. Clarke Bane & Company, jobbers of wall paper, in which business he 
remained until 1905, when he accepted a position with the Pittsburg Life and 
Trust Company, of Pittsburg, as director of agents. On January i, 190S, he 
became connected with the Municipal and Corporation Securities Company, of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Pohtically Mr. Bane is a firm believer in the general principles of the 
Republican party. He is a member of the Bellefield Presbyterian church, in 
which he holds the office of deacon, and is a teacher in the Sunday school. 
He also belongs to the Bellefield Brotherhood. In civic societies he is num- 
bered among the active ]\Iasons of Pittsburg. He is identified with the order 
from the Blue lodge to the Knights Templar, Consistory and Mystic Shriners. 
He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution of Western Penn- 
sylvania and the Oakland Board of Trade. 

He was united in marriage, February 17, 1S92, at Canonsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, to Miss Ada Jean Coleman, daughter of Doctor James Harvey and 
Alary Isabella (White) Coleman. She was educated in the private and public 
schools of Canonsburg, and after finishing a four years' course in Jefferson 
Academy spent three years in a Southern college at Macon, Georgia. Mrs. 
Bane is a member of the Pittsburg chapter of Daughters of the American 
Revolution, and also of the Dolly Madison Chapter, Daughters of 1S12. She 
is a member of the Pocohontas Memorial Association. To Mr. and Airs. 
Bane has been born one son — Harvey Coleman Bane, born in Pittsburg", Penn- 
sylvania, December 4, 1S92. He is a member of the John Hart Chapter, 
Children of the American Revolution, and of the Bellefield Presbyterian 
church and Sabbath-school. 

Concerning the ancestry of Mrs. Ada Jean (Coleman) Bane, it may be 
stated that Thomas Coleman (I) was born in Marlborough, Wiltshire, Eng- 
land, in 1599, and arrived at Boston, Massachusetts, with Sir Robert Salton- 
stall, June 3, 1635. He was one of the town officials in 1637, and one of the 
original purchasers of the Island of Nantucket in 1659, of which he owned 
the one-twelfth part. He had a house and other tracts of land set otf to him 
at various times by the committee who laid out lands. As is disclosed by the 
old book of "Records," he sensed on the jury October 20, 1673. The date of 
his death was August 14, 1682, aged eighty-three years. His wife Susanna 
died November 17, 1650. 

The genealogical line from this, the American ancestor, runs as follows 
to Mrs. Bane: 

(II) Tobias Coleman, married Lydia . 

(III) Thomas Coleman, married Phoebe Pearson. 

(IV) Benjamin Coleman, married Anna Brown. 

(V) Samuel Coleman, married Susannah Atkins. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 145 



(\'I) Christopher Coleman, married Ruth Simpson. 

(VII) James Coleman, married Jean Scton Piaxter. 

(VIII) James Harvey Coleman, married Alary Isabella White. 

(IX) Ada Jean Coleman, married the subject nf this notice, Abnyr 
Clarke Bane. 

(X) Harvey Coleman Bane, son of Air. and Mrs. Bane, is the eighth 
in g-enealogical line on his father's side and the tenth on his mother's line. 

Mrs. Bane's great-grandfather, Christopher Coleman (VI), enlisted in 
the Revolutionary war at the age of fourteen years, in 1775, as bombadier, 
and served throughout the war as private and captain. 

James Coleman and his brother Jacob (sons of Christopher) served in 
the war of 1812-14. Two of the sons of James Coleman — David and John — 
were soldiers in the Mexican war, while six of his (James) sons served four 
years in the Civil war. Three of these sons were officers — General David C. 
Coleman, Colonel John P. Coleman and Captain Julius Francis Coleman. 

The Colemans are from an old English family, and are made mention of 
in English history as earlv as 1176, A. D. The Coleman crest is a cross sur- 
mounted by a unicorn's head charged with three roses. The motto : "Be 
Just and Fear Not, Let all the Ends thou Aimest at, be thy Country's, thy 
God's and Truth's." 

Other ancestors of Mrs. Bane are the Setons, who trace back to Dougall 
de Seton. of Dunfermline, Scotland. The surname of Seton was first assumed 
by George, fifth Lord Seton, during the reign of King Alalcolm Canmore in 
the eleventh century. Mrs. Bane's great-great-grandfather was Captain 
Henrv- Seton, who served in the war for American independence. He was a 
captain in the French Chasseurs Brittaniques and was severely wounded. He 
returned to Scotland and was married to his cousin, Margaret Seton, daughter 
of (jeorge. seventh Baron of Carriston. She is also a descendant of the 
Harvevs, Baxters and Whites. 



DR. SAMUEL SHAW STEWART, a retired physician of Edgewood, 
was born February 10, 1831, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, a son of 
John Stewart and grandson of John Stewart, a native of Ireland, who in 1749 
came to the American colonies and settled in Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he took up a tract of land of about two hundred and fifty acres 
and erected a homestead dwelling. This neighborhood has since been named 
Stewart Station in his honor. He served with distinction in the Revolutionary 
war, and afterward became a captain of militia. His original commission is 
now in the possession of his grandson. He was a man of masterful character 
and a leader in local affairs, much honored and esteemed by his neighbors. 
He was a successful farmer. In politics he was a stalwart Whig and in 
religion a strict Presbyterian. 

John Stewart married Margaret Cavitt, and the following w;ere their chil- 
dren : John, of whom later ; Alexander, married and settled in Iowa ; Margaret, 
wife of David Long; Sarah, died young; Lydia, wife of David Shaw; Jane, 
wife of John Howell ; Mary, wife of a Mr. liowers ; and Ella, wife of Joseph 
Hughey. 

John Stewart, son of John and Margaret (Cavitt) Stewart, was born in 
1789, on the old homestead at Stewart Station, and received his education in 
iii— 10 



146 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

the local schools of that period. He became a very successful farmer, and was 
one of the most active members of the Associate Reformed church. 

Mr. Stewart married Margaret Shaw, and their children were: i. Jane, 
wife of William Shaw, children, Jennie, widow of Robert Stevenson, and Mar- 
garet. 2. John, married Martha Clark, children, Samuel, deceased, married 
Ida Jones, and William S., a physician of Braddock, married Stella Swart- 
wood. 3. David, married Mary Shaw, children, Samuel S. and Martha, wife 
of J. F. Graff. 4. Samuel Shaw, of whom later. 5. Thomas, married Nancy 
Irwin, children, John Irwin, married Esther McAteer, and Mary, wife of 
Joseph T. Miller. 6. William, a physician of Philadelphia, and one of the 
founders and for ten years dean and professor of medical obstetrics and clin- 
ical gynecology in the Medico-Chirurgical College of Philadelphia. He was 
also one of the founders and the first vice-president of the American Academy 
of Medicine and a director of the Charity Hospital of Philadelphia. He was 
nine years director of the public schools, and was a member of the Philadelphia 
County Medical Society, the Obstetrical Society, the State Medical Society, the 
American Medical Association, the Academy of Natural Sciences, and the 
Geographical Society. He also belonged to the G. A. R. and the Loyal Legion, 
having served with distinction in the Civil war. He married Delia Allman, 
children : Mabel, Ethel, wife of George Barr, Delia, wife of Henry Lewis, 
Margaretta and Dorothy. 7. Robert, formerly district attorney of Allegheny 
county, married Caroline McMasters, children : John, a physician, married 
Elizabeth Walker, Harry, married Camille Hawthorne, James, Margaret, wife 
of A. C. Dinkey, Robert, died young, Leonora, wife of Edward Williams, and 
Caroline. 8. Martha, died young. 

Samuel Shaw Stewart, son of John and Margaret (Shaw) Stewart, was 
brought up on the old homestead at Stewart Station, receiving his elementary 
education in the common schools of that region. Later he studied at Antrim 
College, Ohio, going thence to Washington and Jeiiferson College. After a 
course at the latter institution he went to Philadelphia, matriculated at Jef- 
ferson Medical College, and graduated in the class of 1861, receiving the degree 
of Doctor of JMedicine. 

The Civil war having just begun, he enlisted in the northern army a.'' 
assistant surgeon of the One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, having charge of this regiment until promoted to the rank 
of surgeon of the Fifty-sixth Regiment. He was at Antietam, Fredericksburg 
and Chanceliorsville, and also participated in many of the other important 
battles of the war. On returning from military service he began the practice 
of medicine, settling at Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, where he remained 
three years, building up a large practice and having six hundred families on 
his list of patients. He was the only physician there. 

His health not being equal to the strain of so much work, he decided to 
move to Philadelphia, and there spent three years, enjoying a good practice. 
In 1872 he returned to the old homestead at Stewart Station, whence, after a 
period of rest, he moved to Allegheny City, where for eighteen years he prac- 
ticed his profession successfully. In 1899 he retired from all active labor and 
removed with his family to Edgewood, where he now resides. He is a member 
of the Allegheny Medical Association. 

Dr. Stewart married, December 24, 1863, Jane, daughter of John and 
Martha (Smith) Shaw, and they have had the following children: John S., 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 147 



once prominent among the younger physicians of Philadelphia, but now 
deceased ; William Greer, deceased, married Caroline Lysle ; David, married 
Betty Cunningham, children: John and Elizabeth; Eula, wife of John C. 
Cuthbert, one daughter, Jane Stewart ; and Samuel B., who is unmarried and 
at home. Dr. Stewart is a member of the Second United Presbyterian church 
of Wilkinsburg, and served as an elder of the Stewart Station church many 
years. He is a Republican, but has no time for politics. 

DR. HUGH WILSON ARTHUR, a leading representative of the dental 
profession, and of civil as well as professional prominence in the city of Pitts- 
burg, is a descendant of an English ancestry which dates back to early days. 
Certain members of the family settled in the north of Ireland, taking active part 
in the development and progress of the communities in which they resided. 

Hugh Arthur, the earliest known ancestor, was born in the north of Ire- 
land, from whence he emigrated, in the early part of the eighteenth century 
on account of political complications, settling in Baltimore, Maryland. His 
occupation was that of millwright, in which he had attained eminence by rea- 
son of natural skill and ability, and was in consultation with Robert Fulton 
in his steam navigation experiments. During the war of 1812 he served in 
the militia at Baltimore, rendering efficient service. He was a Protestant in 
religion. His wife, Margaret (Cathcart) Arthur, came from the north of 
Ireland in the same sailing vessel with Hugh Arthur, but they were not ac- 
quainted at the time ; they met later in the city of Baltimore, where her family 
also settled. She was also a Protestant in religion. 

William Cathcart Arthur, son of Hugh and Margaret (Cathcart) Arthur, 
was a native of Baltimore, Maryland. By occupation he was a master me- 
chanic, and for many years served as superintendent of street car lines in his 
native city. He took an active part in the advancement of education, and for 
many years served in the capacity of commissioner of public schools. He was 
a member of the Presbyterian church, in the work of which he always evinced 
a deep interest, and a Republican in politics. He married Alary Jane Long, 
daughter of James and Hanna (Buchanan) Long, of Scotch-Irish stock, com- 
ing from east of the mountains early in the eighteenth century. 

Hugh Wilson Arthur, son of William C. and Mary Jane (Long) Arthur, 
was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. His literary education was ac- 
quired in public schools and Baltimore College. He then entered the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, from which he received the degree of Doctor 
of Dental Surgery in 1868, and the degree of Doctor of Science was conferred 
on him by the Western University of Pennsylvania in 1907. His skill and 
proficiency in matters pertaining to his profession have placed him high among 
his professional brethren and have gained for him a large and prosperous 
patronage. He is the inventor and originator of many useful appliances in 
his profession. He was a member of the faculty and president of the Pitts- 
burg Dental College, Department of the Western University, for six years, 
was a member of the Pennsylvania State Dental Council, and is a member of 
the State Board of Dental Examiners. He has kept in touch with the ad- 
vanced thought along the lines of his profession by membership in the Pitts- 
burg Dental Society, Odontological Society of Western Pennsylvania, Odon- 
tographic Society of Pittsburg, Lake Erie Dental Society and Pennsylvania 
State Dental Society, in all of which he served as president. He was also a 



148 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



member of the National Dental Association and of several Dental Congresses. 
He was a member of the council of Bellevue, where he resides, and also a 
director of public schools, serving as president of the board. He is a member 
and elder of the Presbyterian Church and a Republican in politics. During 
the Civil war Dr. Arthur enlisted as sergeant of a company in the Ninth Regi- 
ment, Maryland Infantry; was wounded and captured in an engagement at 
Charlestown, Virginia, and for five months, during the winter of 1863-64, was 
a prisoner in Richmond and Belle Island. 

Dr. Arthur married, October 2, 1872, in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
Anna E. Watts, daughter of Edmund and Henrietta (Wilson) Watts. The 
former was of English birth and came to this country in 1827; the latter of 
Scotch-Irish descent. Mrs. Arthur was educated in the New Brighton Acad- 
emy. The children of Dr. H. W. and Anna E. (Watts) Arthur are: Edmund 
W., a graduate of Western University of Pennsylvania and an attorney, prac- 
ticing in Pittsburg; Walter C, M. D., D. D. S., a graduate of the University 
of Maryland, dental and medical departments ; Henrietta W., a graduate of 
high school; Mary H., a graduate of high school; Hugh, a graduate of West- 
ern University of Pennsylvania and an editor of Pittsburg ; Charles McK., who 
received an academy and commercial course and is now employed with a bank- 
ing institution ; William C. a graduate of the Western University of Penn- 
sylvania and also engaged in banking. 



WILLIAM COLBERT, a retired employe of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, in whose service he spent his entire active life, serving continuously 
for over four decades, was born at Athea, county Limerick, Ireland, in Decem- 
ber, 1828, a son of John and Bridget (Mangan) Colbert. 

John Colbert (father) was a native of Ireland, received an excellent edu- 
cation in his native land, being intended for the priesthood, and in early life 
followed agricultural pursuits. About the year 1846, accompanied by his 
wife, Bridget Colbert, and eight children, he emigrated to the United States, 
settling in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in what is now the Ninth ward. He en- 
gaged in the hotel business, which proved exceedingly remunerative. He was 
a member of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Colbert were: William, see forward; Daniel; Mary (Mrs. Carrey) ; Katie 
(Mrs. McDonald); Johanna (Mrs. O'Keefe) ; Ellen (Mrs. McCartney); 
Michael and Patrick, who were brave soldiers and fought in the Civil war. 

William Colbert attended the common schools of Ireland, and after tak- 
ing up his residence in Pittsburg with his parents attended Iron City College. 
In 1850 he was employed by the stage company running in connection with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad between Beattys and Brinton. In 1853 he was 
given a position as brakeman with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; two 
years later was promoted to conductor: in i860 was advanced to fireman, and 
January 7, 1864, was put at the throttle, a full-fledged engineer. He served 
continuously for over forty years, and his entire career was on the Pittsburg 
Division known as the "River Rim," and during all tliat long time never met 
with an injury while on duty. He was the first man hired bv Superintendent 
James A. Scott. He was for many years under Andrew J. Carnegie, and for 
the excellent service rendered the company, in addition to his regular pension 
from the railroad company, he received a special pension from Mr. Carnegie. 
During the great Pittsburg riot his life was threatened by the strikers, but he 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



149 



remained manfully at his post and received the commendation of the company. 
In igcHD, owing to old age, he was placed on the retired list. 

For over half a century Mr. Colbert was a resident of one neighborhood ; 
he then moved to Lawrenceville, where he resided three years, after which 
he moved to the old Alackin Mansion, near Crofton, one of the finest in Alle- 
gheny county, a beautiful residence in which he has resided for the past twelve 
years. It was purchased from the Mackin estate by Mr. and Mrs. Colbert, it 
having been the property of Mrs. Colbert's father. Mr. Colbert is a member of 
St. Phillip's Roman Catholic church of Crofton, and was a liberal contributor 
to the erection of the same. He is a member of the Old Veterans of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad. 

]\Ir. Colbert married. May i, 1862, IMary Ann Mackin, born March 27, 
1839, daughter of John and Ann (McDonald) Mackin. The ceremony was 
performed by Rev. Father Garland in St. Patrick's church of Pittsburg. Mrs. 
Colbert was baptized in St. Patrick's church by Father Garland, as were also 
her ten children. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Colbert were: i. Annie E., 
married James Kenney. 2. Mary Frances, married Henry Shaffer, three 
children : Maud, Florence and Irene, deceased. 3. John H., attended the 
College of the Holy Ghost, was employed by the government eight years, and 
is now (1908) serving in the capacity of clerk for the Fort Wayne Railroad. 
He married Mary Lewis, and has four children : Marie, John, Genieveve and 
Raymond. 4. Charles, who died in infancy. 5. William, attended the Col- 
lege of the Holy Ghost and Duff's College, was in the postal service in Alle- 
gheny City, after which he was clerk for two years for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, and is now at home engaged in looking after the farm and estate. 6. 
Joseph M., deceased; he attended Duff's College; was engaged in the dairy 
i)usiness, and was a member of St. Philip's Roman Catholic church. His 
accidental death in 1904, at the age of thirty-one, removed from the community 
a valued citizen who was highly esteemed by all with whom he was brought 
in contact. 7. James A., owner and proprietor of the Chartiers Valley Ice 
Plant ; he resides at home. 8. Linus C. 9. Leo, who died in infancy. 10. 
Raymond, twin of Leo, who died at the age of eight years. Another inmate 
of the home of Mr. and Mrs. Colbert is Ellen Grant, who has lived with them 
for many years and who is treated as one of the family. 



PRINCIPAL C. H. GARWOOD. Among the best schools of the city, 
those of the Homewood sub-district hold high rank. Their position in this re- 
spect is due in a very large measure to the active, able and businesslike methods 
employed by Principal C. H. Garwood in his organization and management of 
these schools. 

He was born at Brownsville, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, August 26th, 
1873. His experience in school work began in the country schools of Fayette 
county. This was followed by two years as vice-principal in the Brownsville 
schools, one year as principal in Belle Vernon, almost two years as principal 
of the East Pittsburg schools, from which place he came to Homewood in 
April. 1899. 

That his ability as an organizer and executive is recognized, not only in 
educational circles, but elsewhere, is evidenced by his selection to serve as 
president of the Homewood Board of Trade; as State Chairman to secure 



150 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

state aid for aged teachers ; president of the Pittsburg Teachers' Retirement 
Association; Assistant Superintendent of the Methodist Episcopal Sunday- 
school, and as an official member of the church board and the Building and 
Loan Association Board. As secretary of the Carnegie Branch Library Com- 
mittee of the Homewood Board of Trade, Mr. Garwood has been largely in- 
strumental in securing the fine Carnegie Branch Library at the corner of Ham- 
ilton and Long avenues. He is an active member of the Pittsburg Principals' 
Association and secretary of the Pittsburg Teachers' Institute. 

Principal Garwood's success is due to the exercise of a keen, well-balanced, 
discriminating judgment, coupled with a large appreciation of the capabilties 
and possibilities of the individual members of his teaching corps, and the in- 
variable use of the utmost good sense, tact and justice in all his dealings with 
teachers, pupils and patrons, thus meriting and securing the loyal support of 
these three classes and the respect and earnest cooperation of a board of direct- 
ors who have at heart the best interests of their schools. 

He married Mary B., daughter of Mrs. E. A. Gabler, of Brownsville, 
Fayette County, July 18, igoo. They have one son, Clyde Harry Garwood, 
Jr., born March 7, 1902. 

HOMER E. LESLIE, who resides at No. 532 Homewood avenue, Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, has been prominently identified with the business and public 
interests of the city for a number of years. He is a representative of a family 
which has always borne its just share of the responsibilities of good, order- 
loving citizens. 

Millard F. Leslie, father of Homer E. Leslie, was born in New Kensing- 
ton. He was an enterprising, energetic man of affairs, constructed the low 
grade division of the Allegheny Valley railroad, and then held the position 
of conductor for a number of years. He removed to Pittsburg in 1880 and 
established himself in the undertaking business, where his tact and careful 
management soon brought him a lucrative patronage. He married Alice Lane, 
and had children : Homer E. and Edward, the latter a physician of Pittsburg. 

Homer E. Leslie, a son of M. F. and Alice (Lane) Leslie, was born in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1872. He was an earnest student at 
the public and high schools of his native city, and upon attaining manhood 
entered upon a business career. He has been successfully established in the 
undertaking business for a period of si>t years. He has always taken an ac- 
tive interest in the public affairs of the city and has been a member of the 
executive committee of the ward in which he resides. He was also secretary 
of the Homewood Board of Trade for three years. He enlisted in the Span- 
ish-American war with the Fourteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
June 15, 1898, and was mustered out February 28, 1899. He is a consistent 
member of the Homewood Avenue Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married Mabel B. Scott, daughter of John W. Scott, and had children : 
Edward Van Kirk, born December 22, 1900, and Alice Scott, born August 15, 
1904. 

HENRY J. MEYER was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, January 6, 
1858, a son of Gregory and Margaret (Levo) Meyer. The father was born in 
Switzerland in 1830, and coming to this country, located at Pittsburg in 1847, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 151 



engaging in the butchering business. Later he operated the old Voeglty flour- 
ing mills, after which he was engaged in the grocery and liquor business in 
Allegheny City. He was active in business matters up to the time of his death 
in IQCXD. He was a select councilman from his ward for several years and 
also president of the Real Estate Bank. He was an active business man and 
connected with several successful insurance companies. He married Margaret 
Levo, of Aetna, Pennsylvanfa, who died in 1905. They were the parents of 
the following children: i. Henry J. 2. Joseph J. 3. Annie, who married 
Charles Schawn. 4. Albert. 5. William. 6. Bertha. 7. Adolph. 

Jacob Levo, grandfather of Henry J. Meyer, came from Germany in 
1830 and engaged in farming at Aetna. He married Aplonia Adelman, and 
their children were Margaret, Maria Theresa, Josephine, Jacob and John. 
Jacob Levo died at the age of seventy years and his wife in 1895, aged ninety- 
three. 

John Meyer, the paternal grandfather of Henry J. Meyer, was born and 
died in Switzerland. He was in the employ of the government in the custom 
post, a position that has been handed down and is still held by one of the family. 

Henry J. Meyer was educated at the public schools and at St. Mary's 
School, after which he clerked in his father's grocery store until seventeen 
years of age, when he learned the sign painter's trade and followed that busi- 
ness for fifteen years. In 1892 he moved to the East End, where he engaged 
in the wholesale liquor trade. He is a member of the Pittsburg Elks, No. 11, 
and the East End Board of Trade, of which he is one of the directors. He be- 
longs to the Colonial Republican Club and takes much interest in local poli- 
tics. He is a life member of the Exposition Society. 

]\Ir. Meyer was united in marriage, in 1882, to Miss Emma, daughter 
of Charles B. and Annie (Deaner) Welter. They are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: i. Oscar G., born September 9, 1884. 2. Eleanor E., born 
December 18, 1886. 3. Margaret, born September 21, 1896. 

JACOB HARTMANN was born in Germany. He emigrated to this coun- 
try in 1847, bringing with him the habits of thrift and industry that characterize 
the German nation. These he has used for the past fifty years to great ad- 
vantage in the dairy business, in which he is still actively engaged, and of 
which he has made a decided success. His dairy is a model of neatness and 
fully equipped with all the modern improvements which have been made in 
that branch of industry. 

Mr. Hartmann married (first) Mary Numacker, who died in 1862. His 
second wife is also deceased. His children are : Thomas. Frank W'., Christian 
W. and George J. 

THOMAS J. HAWKINS, who is engaged in the sale of real estate and 
coal at Pittsburg, is a native of England, born April 12, 1866. His father, Mar- 
tin Hawkins, was born in Ireland in 1829 and was nearly all of his active life en- 
gaged in contracting work, in which he was successful. He came to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, in 1867. and died March 3, 1899. He married, October 28, 1850, 
Miss Sarah Martin, of England. The children of this union were: John, bom 
in 1852: Sarah E., wife of Mr. Dugan ; Agnes, wife of Mr. Holtihan ; Charles 
]\I. and Thomas J. 



152 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Thomas J. Hawkins received his education at the common and high 
schools, coming with his father's family to Pittsburg in 1867. He was engaged 
for five years in mercantile pursuits. In 1886 he established himself in the 
wholesale tobacco business, continuing until 1904, when he embarked in the 
real estate and coal trade. Politically, Mr. Hawkins votes the Republican 
ticket. He was elected a member of the select council of Pittsburg in Febru- 
ary, 1905, served one year, and in 1906 was re-elected for the term of four 
years. He was married, November 19, 1891, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of 
Jacob and Josephine Haines, of Pittsburg. Their children are: i. Abigail, 
born October 5, 1892. 2. Ferdinand D., born December 24, 1895. 3. H. D. 
born August 19, 1898. 4. Marion, born March 5, 1901. 

Jacob Haines was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 183 1, and was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of glass. He married Josephine Getsinger, of New 
Jersey, and their children are: Abigail C, Mrs. Knapp, George, Elvira M. and 
Elizabeth J., Mrs. Hawkins. 



FRAUENHEIM FAMILY. The first of this branch of the Frauenheim 
family to come to America was Edward Frauenheim, a native of Osnebruck, 
German}-, born October i, 1820. He arrived in this country July 4, 1840, and 
from the first impression given him by witnessing the National Independence 
day celebration in the city of New York he concluded that this was the greatest 
country on the globe, and this opinion he ever afterwards held. Before leaving 
his native land Mr. Frauenheim secured a good education, after which he 
taught school until twenty-three years of age, at which time he came to the 
United States. From New York he went direct to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
via the old Ohio and Pennsylvania canal. He first worked at the trade of car- 
penter on St. Philomena church on Fourteenth street. He then followed clerk- 
ing for a short time, after which he engaged in the grocery business on the 
corner of Logan street and Fifth avenue, on what was then known as the old 
Butler road. In 1861 he purchased an interest in the brewing business of the 
city, and in this venture was highly successful, accumulating considerable 
property. He was associated with Leopold Vilsack and their successors in that 
line of business, the Iron City Brewing Company. 

Besides this great industry, which he aided in establishing, he was the 
president of the Keystone Pump Works (now the Epping-Carpenter Com- 
pany), president of the Pittsburg Commercial Company, and one of the 
founders of the German National Bank, of which he was a director. He was 
deeply interested in the welfare and general development of the city. In 
municipal affairs he represented his ward in the council for many years, and for 
<a. term or more was treasurer of the Sixteenth Ward School Board. His death 
came suddenly, June 16, 1891, due to paralysis of the heart, while seated read- 
ing his daily paper at home, tlis remains were interred in St. Mary's cemetery 
at Pittsburg. 

Mr. Frauenheim married, in Pittsburg, in 1851, Mary Meyers, born in 
Germany September 28, 1832, and died November 22, 1904, aged seventy-two 
years, a daughter of Joseph Henry and Anna Mary Meyers, whose children 
were as follows: i. John H. A., born October 7, 1829, married April 22. 
1851, Susan Mills, and died November 14, 1884. 2. Mary, aforementioned as 
•wife of Edward Frauenheim. 3. John F. J., born Jaiuiarv 24, 1835, died 1836. 






-ul,- ^s^a^u^^^JU^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 153 

4. John H., born January 10. 1837, died August 12, 1838. 5. May Catherine, 
born August 21, 1839, died October 30, 1840. 6. Joseph, born September 5, 
1S41, married Mary Rioser, and died July 30, 1896. 7. Josephine, born Jan- 
uary 18, 1844. 8. Alphonso Alycon, born March 22, 1846. 9. Anna S., born 
March 6, 1848, died February 20, 1877. 10. Anthony. 11. Marie Agnes, born 
January 14, 1850. died July 22, 1850. Joseph H. Meyers, father of these chil- 
dren, was born in Germany, April 13, 1800, and died November 4, 1882. He 
came to the United States and located first in Baltj^nore, Maryland, November 
14, 1836, and removed from there to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, January 2, 1837. 
He became a citizen of the United States in January, 1842. His wife, Anna 
Mary Meyers, was born in Hanover, Germany, December 17, 1809, and came 
to the United States November 18, 1828. 

Mrs. Mary (Meyers) Frauenheim accompanied her parents from Ger- 
many. She received her primary education at St. Philomena's school, Four- 
teenth and Penn streets, and subsequently pursued higher branches of education. 
Her onlv surviving sister is Mother M. Evangelista, a learned and famous 
woman in the Catholic church. She is the mother-general in the United States 
of the Sisters of Notre Dame, whose mother house is in Baltimore, Maryland. 
Mrs. Frauenheim was a devout follower of the tenets of the Roman Catholic 
church, and contributed largely of her ample means to the numerous charities 
connected with the church of her choice, St. Augustine's, on Thirty-seventh 
street, to the erection of which she donated one hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars. Both she and her daughter Rose were deeply interested in the 
welfare of tlie church and various hospitals and in adding to the happiness and 
comfort of the poor and unfortunate in the community. She was also a 
generous donor to several charitable institutions in western Pennsylvania. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Frauenheim are as follows : 
I. Aloysius, see forward. 2. Mary, married W. A. Heyl, and their children 
are : Anna R., Elizabeth Florence, Alexander Theodore, Josephine, William 
Edward and Clementine. 3. Rose, unmarried. 4. Clara Josephine, married 
J. J. O'Reilly, and has children : Louisa, Rose Marie, Agnes Elizabeth, Edward 
F. and Josephine. 5. Edward J., whose sketch follows this in the work. 6. 
August A., see forward. 7. Clementine E., married William N. Epping, whose 
sketch follows that of Edward J. Frauenheim in this work. 

Aloysius Frauenheim, eldest child of Edward and Mary (Meyers) Frauen- 
heim, was born in Riceville, a part of the city of Pittsburg, November 25, 1851, 
and died January 18, 1900. at his late residence on Stanton avenue. He at- 
tended St. Philomena parochial school, known as Holy Trinity, making his first 
communion in Holy Trinity. Subsequently he attended St. Vincent's College, 
at Latrobe, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was 
graduated. He secured his first real employment in the German National Bank 
of Pittsburg, where he held several responsible positions, commencing in that 
well-known banking house as bookkeeper, in which capacity he served five 
years. He next entered the employ of the firm of Frauenheim & Vilsack. In 
1889 the firm was merged into the Iron City Brewing Company, and he was 
elected its secretary and treasurer, which position he held until the formation of 
the new company, known as the Pittsburg Brewing Company, and of this con- 
solidated company he was elected president. Ai the time of his death he was 
vice-president of the German National Bank of Pittsburg, the Epping-Carpenter 
Company, and the German Catholic Press Company, publishers of the Pitts- 



154 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



bur^ Bcobiichter and the Obscrx'cr. He was also director of the Pennsylvania 
National Bank and the East End Charity Hospital, a member of the board of 
trustees of St. Augustine's church, of which he has been a member for many 
years and also its treasurer, and a member of Branch No. 45, C. M. B. A., and 
of Branch No. 5, Knights of St. George, and of the Poor Souls' Society. 

In his church life he was indeed most devout and zealous. He was one 
of the leading members of St. Augustine's church and congregation, and in 
this, as well as other parishes, he was a liberal supporter of all charitable and 
truly religious works. He, together with other members of his family, donated 
one hundred thousand dollars toward the erection of the new edifice of St. 
Augustine. Politically Mr. Frauenheim was a supporter of the Democratic 
party. He represented his ward, which was then the Fifteenth in the city, as 
a member of its select council, in 1881, and also from 1890 to 1894. When the 
("lerman National Bank was about to close its doors he undertook to save it 
from collapse, and this work, as well as constant strain and mental anxiety, 
undermined his health, and from the effects of it he never full)' recovered. It 
was the banking house his father had helped to found, and hence he had more 
than ordinary interest in its welfare and in keeping its name and honor good 
before the financial world. 

Mr. Frauenheim married Catharine Heyl, daughter of the late Martin 
Heyl, the well-known tobacco merchant of Pittsburg.- Their children were : 
Joseph A., Camille Marie. (Mrs. Reill}-), Harry T., Alav Florence, Aloysius, 
Edward and Anna Katherine. 

The following facts have been copied from the files of the Pittsburg 
Observer of January 25, 1900, and have relation to the character of Mr. Aloy- 
sius I'rauenheim, with some details concerning his funeral rites : 

"He was the first to discover the unstable condition of the German Na- 
tional Bank and labored unceasingly to get the bank's afifairs in such shape that 
the creditors would not lose their money. He gave his time unsparinglv to 
the settlement of the bank's afifairs, and finally; when the Comptroller of 
Currency examined its condition and exacted the one condition upon which 
the bank might resume its business — that being that the bank building should 
be purchased — Mr. Frauenheim and his father's partner, Leopold \'ilsack, 
within forty-eight hours furnished the money ($450,000), and had the satisfac- 
tion of seeing the institution resume its business." 

"He was in no way connected with the circumstances which led to the 
bank's condition, but he felt a keen pride in its stability, as it had been partly 
founded by his father, Edward Frauenheim." 

"Within ten days of his death he tendered his resignation as president of 
the Pittsburgh Brewing Company, which the board of directors declined to 
accept. They passed resolutions granting him a year's leave of absence, on full 
pay, but this he refused on the ground that he could not accept compensation 
where he was unable to perform the work." 

"He was extremely fond of music, being an accomplished pianist, and when 
but seventeen years of age played the organ at Saint Paul's Cathedral. He was 
a director of several musical societies." 

"He did much in the way of private charities, but alwavs shrank from any 
sort of publicity in connection with such gifts." 

"The funeral was from Saint Augustine's church. The edifice was crowded 
to the very doorways, while Innidrcds stood outside, unable to gain entrance. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 155 

As the remains were borne down the aisle and placed before the sanctuary, 
members of Branch Xo. 5, Knights of Saint George, acted as guards of honor. 
Solemn High Mass of Requiem was celebrated, with Reverend Father Hyacinth 
officiating, supported by Father Charles, Father Didakus and Father Raphael, 
with others. At the same time masses were said at the two side altars by 
Fathers Gregory and Alphonsus. Bishop Leo Hard, of North Carolina, preached 
the funeral sermon, and spoke tenderly of the Christian graces of the deceased, 
and paid a tribute to him as a good son, a good husband, a good father, a good 
citizen and a good friend. The congregation was made up of rich and poor, 
prominent and lowly. Catholics and Protestants. At Saint Mary's cemetery 
about three thousand people gathered by the time the funeral procession of over 
one hundred and seventy carriages arrived, and while the casket was being 
lowered the orphan children sang a dirge, after which the Benedictus was sung 
by the priests, and this was followed by a dirge by the male chorus. Beautiful 
flowers were furnished by members of the various societies to which the 
deceased man had been a member. 

"The pallbearers were: Messrs. M. H. Hager, Berger, William E. Lich- 
enlaub, Anthony Schillo, J. H. Friday, William Hoeveler, Michael Winter and 
William Loeffler." 

August A. Frauenheim, son of Edward and Mary (Meyers) Frauenheim, 
was born in the city of Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, November 10, 1866. He 
attended the schools of his native city, also St. Vincent's College, at Latrobe, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated. 
He then entered his father's office and was later made a member of the firm in 
the brewing business known as the Iron City Brewing Company. He also 
became one of the directors, and after the death of his father, and when the 
company was consolidated and became known as the Pittsburgh Brewing Com- 
pan}-, he was retained as one of its active directors. He is a director of the 
German National Bank, of which his father was one of the founders, the 
Duquesne Fireproofing Company, the Epping-Carpenter Company, of which 
he is vice-president, and many other enterprises, and is also president of the 
Iron City. Sanitary Alanufacturing Company. Socially he is connected with the 
Duquesne, Country and German Clubs. 

Mr. Frauenheim married Marie A. Deitrich, daughter of Francis J. Diet- 
rich, who is classed among the prominent citizens of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



EDWARD J. FRAUENHEIAl was during a long and active career one 
of Pittsburg's most representative citizens — a man of large business concerns ; 
connected with many industrial and financial institutions ; at times very active in 
public aiifairs ; deeply interested in benevolent causes, and enjoying a degree of 
confidence and esteem which would have opened to him broad avenues in 
political life had he chosen to engage therein. 

He was born February 13, 1865, in Fifth avenue, Pittsburg, near Pride 
street. His parents were Edward and Mary (Meyers) Frauenheim, whose 
family records appear on other pages of this work. After attending the public 
schools he entered St. Vincent's College, where he completed the full course 
and graduated with honors. He then entered his father's office and was asso- 
ciated with him until the death of the parent. When the Pittsburgh Brewing 
Company was organized he was one of the most active factors in its establish- 



156 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

ment, was elected to the vice-presidency of the corporation, and discharged 
the duties of the position with unexceptionable diligence and ability until his 
death. He was also largely interested in various other important enterprises 
having leading places in the commercial life of the city : The Iron City Sani- 
tary Manufacturing Company, of which he was president ; the Duquesne Fire- 
proofing Company, of which he was vice-president ; the German National Bank, 
of which he was vice-president ; and the East End Savings and Trust Company, 
the Epping-Carpenter Company, the Turtle Creek Land and Improvement 
Company, and the Beobachter Publishing Company, in each of which he was a 
director. 

Mr. Frauenheim was a Democrat in politics and took an active part in 
political affairs, but without any purpose to self-advancement. He was honored 
by election as delegate to the Democratic national convention in 1896. After 
the adoption of the new city charter of Pittsburg he was urged to accept the 
nomination of his party for the mayoralty, but declined to allow the use of his 
name. Under the administration of Mayor William B. Hays, Mr. Frauenheim 
was appointed city treasurer, and he discharged the duties of this important 
position with entire fidelity and great ability until shortly before his death, when 
he resigned on account of his impaired health. 

Mr. Frauenheim was a Roman Catholic in religion, a communicant and 
trustee of St. Augustine's church, of which his parents were among the earliest 
attendants, and he as well as they were always among the most liberal con- 
tributors to its support and in aid of its various benevolences. He was a highly 
popular member of various leading clubs — the Duquesne, the Monongahela, the 
Columbus and .the Pittsburg Country Clubs. He was a man of tender and 
sympathetic disposition, and was deeply interested in the East End Hospital, 
both in a personal way and as a member of its board of directors. His 
benevolences were not, however, restricted to organized bodies, and many 
individuals were in times of need the recipients of his bounty. 

Mr. Frauenheim was married, October 2, 1889, to Marie Antoinette Vil- 
sack, eldest daughter of Leopold Vilsack, his father's former business partner. 
Of this marriage were born children : Dorothy L., Edward J., Jr., Walter 
Gordon, Marie Regina, Norman A., William A. and Richard J- Frauenheim. 

Mr. Frauenheim died at his home in East End, June 28, 1905, in the 
forty-first year of his age. The funeral services took place in St. Joseph's 
Roman Catholic church, Bloomfield, on June 30, and were attended by a very 
large concourse of friends, which included representatives of every phase of 
city life — masters of industry and finance, professional men, and officers and 
members of various prominent organizations, all bearing testimony by their 
presence to the public recognition of the lame'nted deceased as a man of great 
usefulness of life and lofty character. The interment took place in St. Mary's 
cemetery. 

WILLIAM N. EPPING. general manager of the Epping-Carpenter Man- 
ufacturing Company, was born in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 
12, 1869, son of Henry and Amanda (King) Epping. 

The father was iDorn in Germany in 1844. He married Amanda King, 
hf)rn in America, and is still living. Her husband died at Pittsburg in 1895. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Epping were: i. Mathilda K., de- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 157 

ceased. 2. William N., of whom further mention is made. 3. Henry M., 
deceased. 4. Ellen AL, deceased. 5. Edward L., deceased. 6. John R. 7. 
Raymond L. 

William N. Epping received his education at the public schools of Pitts- 
burg, graduating from the high school June 28, 1888, from whence he entered 
the employ of the Carbon Steel Company as its purchasing agent and pay- 
master. He continued at this for six years, resigning in 1894, to accept the 
position of cashier in the Pittsburg postoffice under John D. O'Donnell, post- 
master. At the expiration of four years he accepted the position of general 
manager and secretary of the Epping-Carpenter Company, manufacturers of 
pumping machinery, which position he still holds (1907). 

Politically Air. Epping is independent and in his religious faith is a Ro- 
man Catholic. 

Air. Epping was imited in marriage, November 28, 1894, to Miss Clemen- 
tine E., daughter of Edward and Mary R. (Meyer) Frauenheim. To this 
union were born: Inez Elizabeth,' November 11, 1899; William Edward, July 
8, 1902, and Clementine Elizabeth, June 30, 1907. 

(For the Frauenheim family see preceding sketches.) 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM STEWART McKEE, expert stairbuilder by 
trade, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 9, 1871, a son of Joseph and 
Hannah (May) McKee. His father was born in Ireland, March 17, 1832, and 
lived in Scotland until 1850, when he came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, at the 
age of seventeen years. Here he engaged in the hotel business. He married 
Hannah May and by that union were born the following children: i. James, 
born in 1859, died in 1863. 2. Lizzie, born in 1861, died in 1865. 3. Annie, 
Airs. Alaloney, born in 1863. 4. George B., born in April, 1865. 5. Blanche, 
born January 9, 1867, married Air. Van Ballcken. 6. Lillie, born January 
I, 1869, wife of Air. Wright. 7. William Stewart, subject, born June 9, 1871. 
8. Joseph, born September 3, 1873. 9. Alary, born in 1875, -wife of Air. An- 
drews, lb. Lydia, born in 1878, wife of Mr. Donnall. The mother died in 
the month of September, 1892. 

William S. AIcKee, of this notice, was educated in the Pittsburg public 
schools and at the Iron City College of the same city. He was of the opinion 
that the far west would afford him a better opportunity to advance in a busi- 
ness career, and went to Utah, where he followed the life of a ranchman until 
1891, when he returned to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and here learned the stair- 
builders' trade, which business he followed until 1898. In February of that 
year he was elected captain of Company F of the Fourteenth Regiment of 
Pennsylvania National Guards. On February 4, 1898, he entered the United 
States Volunteer Service, and was commissioned captain by the governor. 
He was mustered out of service at Somerville, South Carolina, February 28, 
1899. During his service he was at Hastings. Pennsylvania; Fort Delaware; 
Fort Alott, New Jersey ; Camp Alead, Pennsylvania, and Camp Alonroe, South 
Carolina. On September 19, 1905, he was elected Alajor of the Fourteenth 
Regiment, N. G. P. . 

Upon his return from "the Spanish-American war he engaged in the hotel 
business en Frankstown avenue. Pittsburg. In 1902 his house burned and his 
only son, Harry AIcKee, lost his life in the fire. After this sad occurrence 



158 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Mr. ^McKee removed to Homewood, where he is now engaged in the hotel 
business. 

In 1891 he married Miss A. Smith Dean, the daughter of Wilham Dean, of 
Barnsley, England. Pohtically, Mr. McKee is a supporter of the RepubUcan 
party, and in his rehgious faith is an EpiscopaHan. He is a member of the 
Pittsburg Lodge of Elks, No. 11 ; Ivy Lodge, K. of P., No. 4; United Spanish 
War Veterans, No. i. Department of Pennsylvania; Wilkinsburg Lodge, No. 
1048, Fraternal Order of Eagles; the Homewood Board of Trade; Junior 
Order United American Mechanics, No. 38; and the Homewood Conclave, 
Independent Order of Heptasophs. 

JOHN PETER JACOB YOUNG, a life-long resident of Pittsburg and 
now on the list of her retired business men, was born June 13, 1846, on Penn 
street, a son of Jacob Young, who was born June 30, 181 2, in the town of 
Rehvwer, Rhenish Bavaria, where he received a limited education and learned 
the cabinet maker's trade. In October, 1836, he came to the United States and 
settled in Pittsburg, where he worked at his trade for the Singer Company and 
the Woodwells Company. For a few years he was foreman in the John Mackle- 
wain Furniture Company, after which he bought Mr. Mackelwain out and for 
five years conducted the business. He was an old-time Whig and a member 
of the German Lutheran church. 

Jacob Young was thrice married, his first wife being Elizabeth Swarjn, 
born February 12, 1813, in Rhenish Bavaria. Their children were: Angert, 
wife of August Mueller, a contractor, children, Adella, Dickerman, Joseph 
Max; John Peter Jacob, of whom later; Elizabeth, and Joseph. Mrs. Young 
died September 13, 1850, and Mr. Young subsequently married Catharine 
Miller, a native of Prussia, who bore him four children: Catharine, Amelia, 
Frederick and George. The third wife of Jacob Young was Rosealia Good, 
born in Europe, and the following were their children : Anna, Rosie and 
William. 

John Peter Jacob Young, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Swarm) Young, 
^graduated from Hazlet's Academy, on the Brownsville Road, and in 1862 en- 
listed in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, Colonel Collier commanding. ]\Ir. Young served with the rank 
of corporal, participating in the battles of Antietam and the Wilderness, and 
was also in the three days' conflict at Gettysburg, where he was wounded in 
the neck and almost lost his speech. He was then transferred to Company 
I, Fourteenth Regiment, Veteran Reserves, and remained in the service until 
the close of the war. 

After his return home he was for five years engaged in the express busi- 
ness, and then for twenty years devoted himself to the scrap iron industry, re- 
tiring in 1903. He is an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
and in politics is a Republican, having cast his first vote for Grant. He is a 
member of Grace Presbyterian church, of which he was one of the first trustees. 

Mr. Young married Catiiarine, born September 7, 1853, daughter of Dan- 
iel and Catharine Dailey, the former of Irish descent and the first drayman 
of Pittsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Young became the parents of the following chil- 
dren : I. John W., born December 29, 1873, graduated from Duff's College 
with a life certificate, and is now a translator for the Pennig Postal Cable 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 159 



Company, New York. He married Josephine Alinyun of that city, and they 
have one child, Ahce. 2. Oliver George, born January 23, 1875, died May 20, 
1888. 3. Ralph Dailey, born January 16, 1876, graduated from Duff's College, 
and since June, 1907, with his brother, Howard, has owned the McElroy & Co. 
Broom and Paper Manufacturing Company. He married Maggie Kester, of 
Pittsburg, and they have one child, Margaret. 4. Grace Edna, born March 
5, 1878, graduated from Duff's College and became the wife of William Herb- 
ster, manager for John Sichley, Jr., Company. 5. Howard, born September 
12, 1879, a graduate of Duft''s College, and now purchasing agent for the 
Boston Store, Pittsburg. He married Gertrude Brandt. 6. Catharine May, 
born May 19, 1881, graduated from Duff's College and became the wife of 
Roy Anderson, bookkeeper for the American Bridge Company, Pittsburg. 
They have one child, John. 7. Elizabeth Roth, born January 22, 1883, grad- 
uated from Duff's College and became the wife of Robert Reno, glass manu- 
facturer of Freedom, Pennsylvania. They have three children : John, Eliza- 
beth and Howard. 

The mother of these children died July 4, 1888, and Mr. Young, not long 
after, married her sister, Maggie Dailey, born April 13, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. 
Young are the parents of three children: Edith Margaret, born January 21, 
1890, a graduate of Duff's College; Earl \\'ell, born August 8, 1891, attending 
Union High School, and Ruth Olive, born February 3, 1900, at school. 



ADAM HAHN, who has been for half a century a resident of Pittsburg 
and has served his day and generation both as a citizen and as a soldier, was 
born July 25, 1842, in the Grand Duchy of Hessen, Germany, son of Herman 
Hahn, a native of the same place, where he was born April 5, 1809. He re- 
ceived a limited education and followed the calling of a farmer. In 1847 he 
came to the United States, making the voyage in six weeks and landing in New 
York, whence he proceeded to Pittsburg, settling in Birmingham, now the 
Twenty-ninth ward. For seven years he was employed in Ihmsen's glass 
house, and in 1854 moved to Monroe county, Ohio, where he bought a farm of 
one hundred and twenty-four acres, which he cultivated for a year and a half. 
He then sold the property, returned to Pittsburg, and again obtained employ- 
ment in the glass works, remaining until 1874, when he retired. Politically 
he was a Republican, and cast his first vote in 1852 for Franklin Pierce. He 
was a member of the German United Presbyterian church, in which for many 
^•ears he served as elder. A church in the Twenty-sixth ward was named in 
his honor. 

Mr. Hahn married Anna Eva Diehle, born in April, 1809, in Germany, 
and their children were: i. Jacob, born in 1834, in Germany, as were all his 
brothers and one sister. He was manager of the Pittsburg Ihmsen Lim Glass 
Works, and he and his wife were members of the Ruster church. He married 
Catharine Erbe, of Pittsburg. Children : Herman, John, Catharine and Ma- 
tilda. Jacob Hahn died September i, 1901. 2. John, born in 1837, employed 
as a bottle blower at Ihmsen's Glass Works. He married Sophia Pheil, of 
Pittsburg. Children : Amanda, Wilhelmina, William, Harry and Anna. 3. 
Mary, wife of Joseph Schmidt, a mill worker of Tennessee. 4. Adam, of 
whom later. 5. Louisa, born in September, 1849, in Pittsburg ; wife of John 



i6o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Nusser, a native of Germany and a lithographer. Children: William, Annie, 
Katharine, Edna, Mabel and May. 

Adam Hahn, son of Herman and Anna Eva (Diehle) Hahn, was five 
years old when brought b}- his parents to the United States in 1847. He at- 
tended school for about five years, and when in his twelfth year entered. the 
glass works, where he was employed until the age of eighteen. He then learned 
the carpenter's trade, which he made the occupation of his life, also engaging 
in contracting and helping to build some of the finest churches in Pittsburg. 
He also constructed the largest and finest window-frame in Pennsylvania. 

In 1864 he enlisted in the Fifth Heavy Artillery Regiment of Pennsylvania 
and received an honorable discharge June 30, 1865, having served against the 
Moseby guerrillas. For many years he has filled the office of assessor. In 
politics he is a Republican, having cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He 
is a member of the Rlister church. 

Mr. Hahn married, July i, 1866, the Reverend Pholster, of the United 
Presb)'terian Ruster church, officiating, Amanda Louisa Lauer, and they be- 
came the parents of the following children: i. Herman, born October 12, 
1867, graduated from the Pittsburg high school and attended Dufif's Business 
College ; now a carpenter in Pittsburg. He married Katharine Seese, of Pitts- 
burg ; one child, Le Roy. 2. Catharine, born January 10, 1870, died July 28, 
1870. 3. Anna Elizabeth, born August 25, 1871, wife of James O. Fisher, 
of Pittsburg, assistant manager in a furniture store ; children, Oliver, Athalia, 
Dorothy and Volorse. 4. Amanda Louise, born May 29, 1874, wife of Wil- 
liam Hagmeier, a railroad track inspector of Pittsburg ; children, Anna, Wil- 
liam, Harry and Amanda. 5. George Henry, born September 7, 1876, head 
bookkeeper at McKinney's brass works ; married Minnie Neeb ; one child, 
Raymond. 6. Clara, born July 7, 1881 ; wife of William Kauffeld, salesman 
in shoe store in Pittsburg: children, Amy Amanda and Charles William. All 
the children of Mr. and Mrs. Hahn were born in Pittsburg. 

Mrs. Hahn is a daughter of Henry Lauer, who was born September 15, 
1810, in Prussia, and in 1833 came to the United States and settled in Pitts- 
burg, where he engaged in business as a brewer. He married Christina Stan- 
ger, also a native of Germany, and one child was born to them, Amanda Louisa, 
wife of Adam Hahn. Mrs. Lauer died September 15, 1868, and the death of 
Mr. Lauer occurred September 15, 1879. 



THOMAS A. INGRAM. The first of this Ingram family to come to 
America was the subject's grandfather, Thomas Ingram, born near Belfast, 
Ireland, and who came to this country in 1818, with his son, Edward Ingram, 
father of the subject of this sketch. (See Mary Ingram sketch.) Edward 
Ingram married Sarah Arthurs, daughter of William and Rachel Arthurs, na- 
tives of Scotland. They had five sons, as follows: i. Thomas A., of whom 
later. 2. William. 3. Nathaniel. 4. Arthur. 5. Edward. These children 
all died in infancy, except Thomas A., of this notice. Edward was a farmer 
and a large portion of the five hundred acre tract taken by his father descended 
to him. He was a member of the Episcopal church, as had been his forefath- 
ers. He died in May, 1877, survived by his wife and Thomas A., his son. 
His wife died in June, 1905. 

Thomas A. Ingram was born in Chartiers township, now in the borough 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE i6i 



of Ingram, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1854. He was educated at the 
public schools and the Western University of Pennsylvania. In 1870 he en- 
tered the Chambersburg College, where he remained until 1872, when he en- 
tered the Iron City Bank of Pittsburg, remained one year, and in 1874 engaged 
in the real estate business on his own account in Pittsburg. In 1876 he left 
the city and returned to his home on the farm, marrying Nannie A. Forse, 
daughter of William and Mary (Boyer) Forse, and two sons blessed this 
union — Thomas, born June 22, 1877, married Virtue Palmer, of Ingram, and 
Howard, born in 1887, died in 1890. Since his marriage Mr. Ingram has re- 
mained on his farm, on a part of which stands the borough of Ingram. The 
station on the railroad was named in honor of his father. A greater part of 
the farm has been converted into building lots and sold. Mr. Ingram, like all 
of his ancestors, is an Episcopalian in faith and profession. Politically he af- 
filiates with the Republican party. 



MACWERTH ^I. \\'ALLY, one of the successful men who engaged in 
the oil producing business, and now a resident of Etna, a suburb of Pittsburg, 
was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, December 5, 1866, the son of 
Thomas and Sarah A. (Crafford) Wally, the latter born in 1841. 

(I) The great-grandfather was a native of Scotland, the date of his com- 
ing to America not now known, but he settled in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, 
near Eldorado, where he reared his family. He was a pioneer in Methodism. 
One of his sons, Nicholas Wally, resided at Marionsburg and Silver Creek, 
where he owned and operated a grist mill. 

(II) John Wally, the grandfather of the subject of this notice, was born 
in Clarion county. Pennsylvania, in 1805, and married Charlotte Trutby, by 
whom was born the following children : William, Polly, Catherine, John L., 
Thomas, Nancy Ann, James, Theressa and Caroline. The father of this 
family was a farmer all his life and died in 1882. He was interested in 
educational matters and all that tended to elevate his fellow-men. In church 
relations. he was a Alethodist and a very devout Christian. He was benevolent 
and full of deeds of genuine charity. . Politically he was a Democrat and 
served as school director for many years. 

(III) Thomas Wally, the father of the subject, was born in Armstrong 
county in 1838. He learned the carpenter's trade and followed contracting 
and building. He built boats for others and one for himself, which he used in 
the transportation of oil from Oil City to Pittsburg for some time. When the 
oil excitement had somewhat subsided he sold his boat and followed the oil 
fields, contracting and rig building. In 1899 he returned to his farm, where 
he still resides. He loves to relate the early experiences of his life in the 
great oil fields. Politically he is a Democrat, and in church relations a Metho- 
dist. He has served as assessor of his township of Perry, in Allegheny 
county, and in other local offices, including that of school director. 

He married Sarah Cratiford, daughter of William Crafford and wife. 
They were the parents of the following children: i. James C, born in 1861, 
married Cora Steel. 2. Perry L., born in 1862, married Carrie Burger. 3. 
Alexander, born in 1864, married Emma Steel. 4. Macwerth M., married 
Lucy Hamilton. 5. Olive M., born in 1869, died aged twenty-one years. 6. 
W. C, born in 1871, married Emma Kenese. 7. Rebecca, born in 1873, 

iii— 11 



i62 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



unmarried. 8, Charlotte, born in 1875, unmarried. 9. Jemima, born in 1877, 
died aged eight years. 10. John S., born in 1880, married Mary Strosnider. 
II. Jennie, born in 1882', married Albert Calhoun. 12. Thomas O., born in 
1885, unmarried and at home. 

(I\') Macwerth M. Wally, the fourth child of Thomas and Sarah (Craf- 
ford) Wally, was reared and educated in Perry township, Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, and when a young man entered the oil fields as a driller and 
tool man, working his way up to a driller and contractor. At the present 
time he is among the most successful oil producers and owns one of the fine 
homes in Greater Pittsburg. He is connected with the Brotherhood of Elks, 
No. 932. In religious faith he is a Baptist, and politically a supporter of the 
Democratic party. 

On June 2, 1898. he married Lucy Hamilton, daughter of Benjamin and 
Alverna (Wright) Hamilton. Benjamin Hamilton was born May 17, 1854. at 
New Freeport, a son of Hughey and Ellen Hamilton. Hughey Hamilton was 
a prominent farmer and extensive land owner, politically a Democrat, and in 
church relations was a Methodist. Alverna (Wright) Hamilton was born in 
March; 1859, at Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, the daughter of George and 
Lucy Wright, of Waynesburg, Greene county, Pennsylvania. George Wright 
held many offices, including that of sheriff, and was a Methodist. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wally are the parents of one daughter — Georgia A., born April 12, 
1899. Lucy Hamilton Wally was born February 18, 1877, born and raised 
at New Freeport, Green county, Pennsylvania. She graduated from the 
Waynesburg College in 1893, and received a very fine musical education. 
In religious faith she is a prominent member, an enthusiastic worker and 
strong supporter of the Baptist church. Benjamin Hamilton, her father, is 
a great advocator of good roads, and was a road commissioner of Greene 
county for years. He is a blacksmith and machinist by trade, and owns one 
of the finest shops in the county. In church relations he is a Baptist, and 
politically a supporter of the Democratic party. 



JAMES BLACKWELL JONES, the principal head of the iron and steel 
firm of J. B. Jones & Company, North Side, Pittsburg, and prominently con- 
nected with the financial institutions of Pittsburg, was born in Allegheny, July 
10, 1853, a son of Edward and Mary Jones, and grandson of Edward and 
Elizabeth ( Blackwell ) Jones. 

Edward Jones (grandfather) was a native of England, from which 
country he crossed the ocean, settling first in Canada, near Hamilton, where 
he was engaged in farming. He later came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where 
he lived retired in Westview, Ross township, until 1892 when, accompanied 
by his wife, he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where his married daughter, Julia, 
resided. Mrs. Jones, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Blackwell, and who 
was married to Mr. Jones in England, bore him four children, as follows: i. 
Edward, Jr., see forward. 2. James B., now of Milwaukee, formerly a partner 
with his brother Edward in the iron and steel business. In 1870 he removed 
t»j Milwaukee where, after twenty-five years' manufacturing corks and bungs 
he now lives a retired life. He is a man of pleasing manner and personalitv, 
and is highly esteemed for his many sterling qualities. 3. John, who lived a 
short time in Pittsburg, after which he went west. 4. Julia, married, and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 163 

resides in Cleveland, Ohio. ^Ir. and Airs. Jones were Presbyterians in religion 
and he was a Republican in politics. He died at the age of eighty, and his 
wife attained the same age. dying at about the same time as her husband. 

Edward Jones, Jr. (father), was born in England and came to America 
with his parents when a mere child. He was educated in the Canadian schools 
and followed farming in his early days. On attaining his majority he revisited 
his English home, where he married and returned to Canada with his bride, 
a winsome Irish lass. In 1848 he came to Pittsburg, where he was a merchant 
on Liberty street. After a few years of mercantile life he sold his business 
and established with his brother, James B., the iron and steel firm that is now 
conducting business under the name of J. B. Jones & Company. He dissolved 
partnership with James B. and entered the queens and glassware business, 
continuing until his death by an accident in 1858, aged forty. He was an 
alert, progressive business man and a good citizen. He was a member of the 
Presbyterian church and affiliated with the Republican party. He was kind- 
hearted and affectionate in disposition, and universally beloved by all with 
whom he was brought in contact. His wife, Mary, died about 1861, aged 
about forty. She rests beside her husband in Mount Union cemetery in Alle- 
gheny. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Jones: i. John B., born 
in 1843, died in 1883. In 1870 he founded the firm of J. B. Jones and was an 
active member until his death. The place of business was first on Morgan 
street. In 1872 he admitted his brother, James B., into the firm and it became 
J. B. Jones & Brother. He was prominent in Allegheny city politics and 
served in the city council. He enlisted in the Union army and served 
eighteen months under Colonel Clark. He was a whole-souled, jovial, gen- 
erous man, and known through the length and breadth of Allegheny as "Major 
J. B. Jones." He married Catherine Carroll, who bore him three children: 
Josephine and William, living, and Edward, deceased. 2. James B., see 
forward. 

James Blackwell Jones, youngest son of Edward and\Mary Jones, was 
educated in the Fourth ward school of Allegheny and in the Xewell Institute 
of Pittsburg. He began his business life as clerk for the Clark Transfer Com- 
pany. Two years later he entered the employ of his brother, John B., and in 
a short time (1872) was admitted to partnership in the iron and steel business, 
under the name of J. B. Jones & Brother. In 1882 the present plant on Lacock 
street was erected. On the death of John B. Jones, in 1883, he purchased his 
interest from the heirs and reorganized the company under the present name 
and title, J. B. Jones & Company. The firm conducts an extensive business, 
and is well known and highly rated. In addition to this Mr. Jones is a director 
of the Land Trust Company, the Allegheny Savings and Trust Company, the 
Ben Franklin Insurance Company, the Miller Non-Corrosive Metal Company, 
the Columbia Plate Glass Company, all institutions of sterling worth in Pitts- 
burg. He is a Republican, and after the death of his brother became actively 
interested in the municipal affairs of Allegheny; he represented the Fourth 
ward in the council. He is a member of the Central Presbyterian church of 
Allegheny. In 1892 he became a member of McKinley Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons ; he holds membership in Allegheny Chapter. Royal Arch 
Masons ; .Allegheny Commandery, Knights Templar : Pennsylvania Consistory, 
Scottish Rite; and Syria Temple, Xobles of the Mystic Shrine. For the past 
thirteen years Mr. Jones has been a resident of the East End, at 4738 Ben 



i64 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Venue avenue, where he erected a beautiful house and where he has large 
property interests. 

Mr. Jones married, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in September, 1874, 
Margaret, daughter of Thomas Archibald. She died in 1884, in her thirtieth 
year. Their children were: Blanche, died at the age of five years. John, 
now a member of the J. B. Jones Company, and prominently identified with 
the Masonic bodies in which his father holds membership. He married Lavina 
Loder, of East End, Pittsburg. Archibald Nevin, secretary of the J. B. 
Jones Company ; he is a Presbyterian in religion and a Republican in politics. 
Margaret. Elizabeth Bessie, wife of Harry Dixon Miller, of Pittsburg, 
manager of the Miller Non-Corrosive Metal Company, office, Westinghouse 
building, Pittsburg. They have one daughter, Jane E. Miller. Mr. Jones 
married (second) Jennie Cook, daughter of John and Jane E. Cook, and they 
have one daughter, Jane Reed Jones. ' 1 



HUGHES AND DAUBENSPECK FAMILIES. These two old families 
of Pennsylvania are ably represented today in Greater Pittsburg and through- 
out the United States in general through the descendants of John Hughes and 
George Daubenspeck. Dr. William George Hughes, the special subject of this 
notice, is a grandson of John Hughes and a son of Hudson and Naomi (Dau- 
benspeck) Hughes, and was born in North Hope, Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
October 26, 1872. 

John Hughes, the paternal grandfather, is now a prominent man in Butler 
county. His parents were natives of Scotland, and came to this country at an 
early date, settling in Pennsylvania, and John was among the early' iron 
manufacturers, engaged for many years in the blast furnace business ; he 
owned and controlled the Old Maple Furnace in Butler county. He conducted 
a successful business and after the old furnace was abandoned he turned his 
attention to farming pursuits and subsequently moved to Virginia, where he 
embarked in the lumber business. Later he returned to his native state and 
became interested in the oil business, which he still follows. At this writing 
(1907) he is eighty-five years of age. He has long been an active worker in 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a liberal contributor in the building 
of the Farmington, Pennsylvania, church. He is broad-minded and public- 
spirited, believing that the world should and does progress. In his politics he 
is a Republican and takes much interest in public matters. He married Miss 
Rose Mullin, a native of Butler county, Pennsylvania, but of Irish extraction. 
She died in 1903, and they were the parents of seven children : George, 
Hudson, spoken of later; William, Hettie, Wesley, Elmer and Elizabeth, now 
Mrs. Robert Blair. 

Hudson Hughes, son of John Hughes and wife, was born in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, and died in the autumn of 1881. He received a good 
common-school education and learned the blacksmith's trade. For a number 
of years he was engaged in the oil business, working at drilling wells and 
kindred work connected with oil wells. Later he moved to Virginia anil there 
followed the same line of work. He returned to Pennsylvania on account of 
failing health, dying in a year or two thereafter, aged about forty years. He, 
like his venerable father, was a very energetic and progressive man, and 
owned considerable property. He was a local minister in the Methodist Epis- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 165 



copal church and frequently preached the Word ; he was of a religious turn 
of mind from his earliest youth. He was also a natural genius in many 
particulars, being able to do work successfully in many branches where skill 
was demanded. It is said of him that he was extremely kind and not lacking 
in humor. He married Miss Naomi Daubenspeck, born in 1847, daughter of 
George W. and Mary (Mortimore) Daubenspeck, and became the mother of 
one son, Dr. Hughes, of this sketch. After the death of Hudson Hughes his 
widow married Frank L. Clark, of Oil City, Pennsylvania, who died Septem- 
ber 7, 1904, leaving the following children: i. Pearl Irene, wife of Seth V. 
Green, and mother of H. H. Vance Green, whose family reside in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. 2. Frank W., a student at this date. Their father, 
Mr. Clark, was an expert in coach painting. 

On the maternal side, or the Daubenspeck line of the ancestry of Dr. 
Hughes, George Daubenspeck was the great-great-grandfather, and he emi- 
grated from Germany to America about 1780, settling east of the Allegheny 
mountains in Pennsylvania, and took up a tract of land along the Allegheny 
river or its tributaries. He had three sons, who came to Armstrong and 
Butler counties. 

George Daubenspeck, son of the George just named, was born in 1790 
and died in 1850. He followed farming, having a splendid farm of six hundred 
acres in Parker township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, which he divided 
among his children. In his religion he was a member of the German Re- 
formed church. He married a Miss Meales, who lived to be nearly eighty 
years of age, and was the mother of eighteen children and not one pair of 
twins. They reared a family of eight children : Jacob, Polly, Lydia, Peggie, 
George, Samuel, Lewis, William, John and Betsy. 

George W. Daubenspeck, son of George (II), was born in ]\Iarch, 1816, 
and died July 23, 1904. He received a common school education and owned a 
three-hundred acre farm given to him by his father, and upon which he resided 
until 1891 when, on account of the death of his wife, he sold and moved to 
Oil City, Pennsylvania, and lived a retired life. He was a member of the 
Lutheran church, contributing both time and money toward the up-building 
of the same. He was a man of more than usual prominence in public aflfairs 
in his township and county, filling various offices, including those of veterinary 
surgeon and school director, he ever taking much interest in the public schools. 
He married Mary Mortimore, a native of Butler county, Pennsylvania, and 
they were blessed with the following children: i. William, born in 1844, 
died in 1867. 2. Naomi (mother of Dr. Hughes). 3. Subina, wife of C. C. 
Kramer. 4. John C, of Butler county, Pennsylvania. 5. Perkins L., died 
aged twenty-three years. 6. Oliver P., of North Washington, Pennsylvania. 
7. Marcus B., of Franklin, Pennsylvania. 8. George A., of Franklin, Penn- 
sylvania, who has been since 1897 in the employ of the Prudential Insurance 
Company, where he has been assistant superintendent for the past seven years. 
He was engaged in mercantile business at Oil City. Pennsylvania, and was a 
justice of the peace. Later he moved to Caster's Corners, Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, and engaged in the same business, and was made postmaster 
there. He is a member of the First Baptist church and politically is a Repub- 
lican. He belongs to Lodge No. 255, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
stands high in the community in which he resides. He was united in marriage 
to Cora Hagan, daughter of William Hagan, of Oil City, Pennsylvania. Their 



i66 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



children are : DeWitt, Ruth M. and Perry L. 9. Mary C, wife of Albert 
Cramer, died in 1888. 10. Margret I., wife of Lewis Eberheart, residing at 
present in West Virginia. 11. Jennie, wife of Dan Clark, of Oil City. 12. 
Nora, died at age of thirteen. 

Dr. William George Hughes, subject, who is prominent in the dental 
profession of Greater Pittsburg, was one of the first to graduate from the 
Pittsburgh Dental College. He spent his early life attending the public 
schools. His father died when he was but nine years of age, when a boy most 
needs the paternal care, and young Hughes was employed in a cigar factory 
at Oil City, Pennsylvania. Later he became a messenger boy in the employ 
of the B., N. Y. & P. railroad, in the office of the superintendent, where he 
became time-keeper. Not fully satisfied that that was the line of work he most 
desired, he went into the shops of the Innis Engine Company to learn the 
trade of a machinist, and from there went to the Oil City Boiler Works, then 
to Joseph Reed & Company, and next to the Standard Oil Company's "Na- 
tional Transit Company," where he remained for seven years, part of the time 
employed in the electrical department, over which he had charge for one year. 
During this engagement he attended night school, and in 1895 decided to take 
up dentistry for his profession and went to Warren, Ohio, where he was 
apprenticed to Dr. H. E. Dunn. The next year he came to Pittsburg and 
entering the Western University of Pennsylvania (dental department), gradu- 
ated from that institution with the first graduating class which was sent out 
from the college. While attending college he ran the Monongahela House 
electrical plant, and when the Park Building was completed he operated the 
plant there. After completing his dental course he began the practice of his 
profession, at the same time carrying on business with A. S. Jones, doing 
electrical work and equipping steamboats with electric plants, as well as other 
electrical work. He conducted his dental parlors at Nc 6216 Penn avenue 
from 1899 to 1905, when he removed to his present location at 6223 Penn 
avenue, where he now enjoys a lucrative practice. 

He is a member of the Odontological Society; of the Free and Accepted 
Masons ; and of Gourgus Lodge of Perfection, A. A. S. R. The Doctor is 
a member of the Second Presbyterian church of Pittsburg. 

He was united in marriage, April 16, 1901, to Sarah Rankin, born in 
Pittsburg, daughter of William W. and Eliza (Glass) Rankin, of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. This union was blessed with two children, Francis Naomi, 
born January 13, 1904, died aged ten months, and William Rankin, born 
March 18, 1905, died at the age of one year. 



GEORGE COLEMAN BLACKMORE, president. of the United States 
Radiator & Boiler Company, of Pittsburg, was born July 17, 1866, in Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada, son of William Blackmore, and grandson of James Black- 
more who was of an ancient family which had its origin in the Highlands of 
Scotland. 

Earlv in the last century James Blackmore, with his brothers, John and 
Philip, migrated to the south of England, taking up their abode at Truro, 
Cornwall. James subsequently settled permanently at a place called New 
Bridge, or Buzzoar, where he passed the remainder of. his life. He was the 
father of four sons : John, whose children were William, John, Frank and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 167 

Elizabeth ; Thomas, whose only surviving child is James, of Toronto, Canada ; 
William, of whom later; and Richard, who has two daughters, Annie and 
Ellen. James Blackmore, the father, died in 1825. 

William Blackmore, son of James Blackmore, was born in 1816, at Truro, 
Cornwall, learned mechanical engineering and practiced that profession in his 
native country. About 1840 he emigrated to Canada, settling in Toronto, 
where he obtained a position as mechanical engineer with the Grand Trunk 
Railway Company, which he held until the close of his life. He was a man of 
deep religious feeling, being a very active member of the Wesleyan Methodist 
Episcopal church of Toronto, in which he served as elder, and to the work of 
which he was earnestly devoted. 

William Blackmore married Julia Elizabeth Stevens, and there were 
eleven children born to them. The death of W'illiam Blackmore, the father 
of this large family, occurred in 1870. His wife. Julia Elizabeth, died in 1894. 

George Coleman Blackmore, son of William and Julia Elizabeth 
(Stevens) Blackmore, passed the first twelve years of his life in Toronto, 
going thence, in 1878, to St. Thomas, and receiving his education in the 
schools of these two places. In 1886 he went to New York, where he engaged 
in business for himself as president and general manager of the Blackmore 
Heating Company. Later he came to Pittsburg and engaged in the manufac- 
ture of heating appliances, becoming president of the United States Radiator 
& Boiler Company, the position which he now holds. He is president of 
another important company and director in a number of others. In 1905 he 
moved witla his family to Edgewood Park, where he erected a handsome 
dwelling on Maple avenue. He is a member of the Edgewood Presbyterian 
church. 

Mr. Blackmore married, in 1896, Jennie Belle, daughter of Alexander 
and Elizabeth (Lawther) Mcllwain, of Kittaning, Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania, and they have become the parents of the following children : George, 
Wilfred, Dorothy Mildred, Norman Lawther and Virginia Belle. 



GEORGE W. ELY, M. D., one of the younger generation of physicians 
who have attained prominence in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, has a 
large and lucrative practice, and is possessed of the confidence and esteem of 
the entire community. He has not hesitated to place his life at the disposal of 
his country, and was in active service in the United States army in the 
Philippines for two years. 

Magloire Ely, father of Dr. George W. Ely. was born in Burlington, 
Vermont, in 1828, and was extensively engaged in the manufacture of window 
glass. He was a man of considerable prominence in his district and was pres- 
ident of the school board for many years. He married Mary Voran, and had 
children: George W., see forward; Andrew, who died in 1850; Victor, who 
died in 1888; Cordelia, who married J. B. McCarty. of Corning, New York; 
Amelia (who died in 1881), married T. V. Keefe ; Aminda, married McClel- 
land \'idean; John F., Charles F. and Nelson C, who comprise the firm of 
Elv Brothers in Jeannette. Pennsvlvania ; Ida. married Frank L. demons, of 
Covington, Pennsylvania: Adele,' married Dr. E. C. Stuart, of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania : Francis, a well-known physician of Pittsburg ; and Louis X., 
who is engaged in the iron business at Monessen, Pennsylvania. 



i68 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



George W. Ely, M. D., son of Magloire and Mary (Voran) Ely, was 
born in Blossburg, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, January lo, 1872. His early 
education was obtained in the public schools, and he then became a student at 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and was house surgeon in Bellevue Hos- 
pital from 1894 to 1896. He was acting assistant surgeon in the United 
States army during the Spanish-American war. He now holds the position 
of surgeon at the St. Francis Hospital of Pittsburg, where his services are 
duly appreciated. He is conscientious and faithful in the performance of the 
duties connected with his profession, and is highly esteemed by a large circle 
of patients. 

He married Florence I. Renz, daughter of John Renz, of Ottawa, Illinois, 
and they have children : Louise, Ruth and Edmund. 

\ 

TAMES JOHN CAMPBELL, present auditor and assistant secretary of 
the Carnegie Steel Company and kindred interests, was born December 6, 1865, 
at Washington, District of Columbia, a son of Joseph Campbell. The history 
of the family in America is as follows : 

James Campbell, the grandfather, came to America from Coleraine, county 
Antrim, Ireland, with his wife, and settled near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 
the early part of the nineteenth century, but owing to his ill health in about 
fifteen years he returned with his family to his native home. 

Joseph Campbell, the subject's father, and the son of James Campbell, 
was born in Coleraine in 1835, after his parents had returned from this country. 
In 1858 he came to this country, and the same year enlisted in the ordnance 
•corps of the United States army and served continuously until his death, which 
occurred in November, 1893. The first twenty-three years of this exceptionally 
long service was spent in Washington in the government arsenal, and the 
remaining twelve years at the Allegheny (Pennsylvania) arsenal, at Pittsburg. 
At Washington he was first sergeant through all the stirring period of the 
Civil war, and was in charge of the small detail of men who, in the presence 
of Secretarv of War Edwin M. Stanton, buried the remains of the assassin of 
President Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth, under one of the flagstones of the floor 
in one of the rooms in the United States prison at Washington, located at the 
arsenal. He married Elizabeth Jane Gamble, who was also of Scotch-Irish 
stock, and her native place was the same as that of her husband. She came 
to America in 1861, and was united in marriage to Mr. Campbell at St. Thomas' 
Episcopal church. New York, in 1863. Eight children were born of this 
imion, the subject being the second eldest. The family consisted of four sons 
and four daughters. 

James John Campbell, subject, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Jane (Gamble) 
Campbell, was educated in the public and high schools of Washington. District 
of Columbia, and came to Pittsburg in his seventeenth year. He was first 
employed as a clerk in a grocery store and later entered the accounting 
department of the Pennsylvania company as a junior clerk. Two years later 
he was made clerk and stenographer for a lumber company, but left this 
position after eleven months to enter the service of the Carnegie Brothers & 
Company, Limited, February i, 1886, as clerk and stenographer to the purchas- 
ing agent. He was transferred to the accounting department in 1889. and 
the same year was promoted to chief clerk of a division of that department. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 169 

In December, 1895, he was promoted to assistant auditor of the Carnegie 
Steel Company, Limited (successors to Carnegie Brothers & Company), and 
January i, 1900, was elected auditor and assistant secretary of the Carnegie 
Steel Company, the corporation that took over the business of the limited 
partnership, and has continued to hold such positions to this date — June, 1907. 
He also holds similar positions in several allied and subsidiary corporations. 
December 31, 1899, he was admitted to partnership, as one of Andrew Car- 
negie's famous and favored young partners, in the Carnegie Steel Company. 

Air. Campbell is a supporter of the Republican party, and in church 
relations is identified with the Presbyterian church of Pittsburg. He belongs 
to the Duquesne Club, Oakmont Country Club and the Carnegie \"eteran Asso- 
ciation, a society which was organized after Mr. Carnegie's retirement from 
business, and composed of Mr. Carnegie and most of those who had been his 
partners in business. 

April 23, 1891. he married Kate Bell Bauersmith, daughter of, a prominent 
and well-known Pittsburg contractor and builder. Two children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Campbell — Sarah Catherine, born August 7, 1894, and 
James J., Jr., born October 12, 1903. 

The business career of Mr. Campbell has been well worth patterning 
after by young men. He commenced in an humble way, but by faithfulness in 
his various positions has forged his way to the front and to where he has 
gained the confidence of the great steel magnates of the land. His skill and 
correctness as an accountant have long been recognized and have been the 
base of his present valuable position in the great industry with which he is 
connected. 

WILLIAM HOFFMAX, the genial and popular proprietor and manager 
of the Hoffman Hotel, at No. 612 Homewood avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, is a representative of a family which was settled in Ohio many years ago. 

Peter Hoffman, father of William Hoffman, was born in Aleigs, Ohio, 
in 1842. On February 13, 1865, he enlisted as Corporal in Company K, 
Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged from service in 
January. 1866, at Macon, Georgia, having served with bravery and gallantry. 
He married Mary Hauck, and they had children: John F., born August 11, 
1868, and William, the subject of this sketch. 

William Hoffman, second and youngest son and child of Peter and Mary 
(Hauck) HofTman, was born in Pomeroy, Ohio, August 27, 1870. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native city, and upon attaining manhood 
went to Wheeling, West Virginia, and worked in a restaurant. He then came 
to Pittsburg in July, 1886. He was the manager for Thomas Dugan from 
1891 to 1896 in Elwood City, and then removed to New Castle, Pennsylvania, 
where he was in business for a period of six years. In July, 1886. he opened 
and conducts at the present time ( 1906) the' Hoffman Hotel. This hotel is 
a model of its class and size. The rooms are comfortably and elegantly fur- 
nished, the office conducted in an inviting and systematic manner, and the 
cuisine is not to be surpassed. The courteous and cheerful demeanor of the 
host make this hotel an ideal resort. He is a member of Lodge No. 69, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; of Lodge No. 1048, Order of the 
Fraternal Eagles; of Lodge No. 601, Order of Heptasophs ; and of Lodge 
No. 384, Knights of Pythias. 



I70 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



He married Fannie Cox, daughter of Charles Cox, of Pittsburg, and they 
have children: Minnie P., born November 5, 1891, and William, Jr., born 
September 12, 1893. 



• ADDISON COURTNEY GUMBERT, a well-known citizen of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, who resides at No. 355 Shetland avenue, has achieved 
more than a local reputation in the baseball field, and has attained prominence 
in the public offices he has filled with dignity and efficiency. 

Robert Gumbert, father of Addison Courtney Gumbert, was born in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1834. He held the position of yard master for the 
Pennsylvania Railroad for a period of forty years, and vv'as noted for the 
capable manner in which he performed the various duties pertaining to his 
office. He married Henrietta Skeen and had children : Addison Courtney, 
see forward ; Sarah E., Charles K., Ida M. and William S. He died in 1902. 

Addison Courtney Gumbert, son of Robert and Henrietta (Skeen) Gum- 
bert, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 10, 1867. His education 
was acquired in the public schools of the city, and upon attaining a suitable 
age he accepted a position as clerk in a grocery store in 1883, remaining there 
for three years. He was then offered a position in the office of the county 
treasurer, which he held in 1885, when he received an appointment to the 
office of the prothonotary, and served as clerk of the court of common pleas 
No. I from 1896 until December, 1906. He was elected to the office of sheriff 
in November, 1906, leading Edwin S. Stuart, candidate for governor, by 
nearly two thousand votes. He played ball from 1888 until 1896 with the 
Chicago, Boston Brotherhood, Pittsburg. Philadelphia and Brooklyn teams, 
and as a pitcher holds the record of pitching for the longest unfinished game 
in the league — twenty innings. He resigned from ball playing in 1896. He is 
a member of Oakland Lodge, No. 535, Free and Accepted Masons ; of Lodge 
No. II, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of Pittsburg; of James B. 
Nicholson Lodge, No. 585, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Home- 
wood Circle, No. 119, Protected Home Circle. He is also a member of the 
Lincoln Avenue Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married Anna Boyle, daughter of William M. and Josephine Boyle, 
and they have one child. William Boyle, born February 18. 1900. 



SYDNEY GILBRETH WHITE, M. D., is numbered among the skillful 
and active practitioners in the medical profession in Greater Pittsburg, where his 
ability in treatment of diseases has won for him a large and constantly increas- 
ing practice. He is a native of Ohio, born in Ashland, Ashland county, 
August 8. 1865, son of William Reed White and Hannah Eva (Paul) White, 
his wife. The father was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, Januarv 30, 
1823, son of the American ancestor of this family of Whites. William Reed 
White died May 26, 1899. He obtained his education at the connnon schools, 
such as existed in his boyhood, days, and followed farming for his occupation 
throughout his days. In 1865 he went to Ashland county, Ohio, and purchased 
a farm consisting of one hundred and seventy-six acres. His buildings were 
burned and he erected a new and more valuable set of buildings, including a 
commodious farm house. He raised and handled many sheep in connection 



' PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 171 

with his farming operations. In politics he was a Prohibitionist and a strong 
advocate of the temperance cause. Active in the advancement of the cause 
of education, he served as a school director, the only official or public position 
he ever aspired to. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church at Ashland. 
For his first wife he married Jane Reed, by whom one child was born, a 
daughter. Agnes, widow of Newton Craig, of Richland -county, Ohio. 2Mr. 
White's first wife died young, and for his second wife he married Hannah 
Eva Paul, born in Apollo, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1840, 
and died December 28. 1900. She was the daughter of Robert and Sidney 
(Gilbreth) Paul. By tlie second marriage Mr. White was the father of the 
following children: Robert Park; James Reed, born May 21, 1861, died April 
21, 1864: William Alvin ; Joseph, born ^^lay 31, 1864, died September 19, 
1864: Sydney Gilbreth (subject); Hazeltine May, born May 16, 1867, died 
April II. 1870; Samuel Ernest Paul; John Robinson; Alfred Mc^Millen; Eva 
Ada. widow of Thomas Gillis. and now resides at Haysville, Ohio, born July 
2^, 1874; \\'alter Mackling Lowfie. 

( in ) Robert Parks White, son of Williain Reed White by the second 
marriage, was born December 27, 1859, at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, but he 
grew to manhood in Ashland county. Ohio, to which section his parents 
removed. After gaining a good education at Ashland College, at Ashland, 
Ohio, he entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
from which he graduated in 1886. receiving first prize in surgery and operative 
surgery. He was appointed assistant demonstrator of anatomy in C)ctober, 
1885. and began the practice of medicine in January, 1886, at Warsaw. Indiana, 
continuing in general practice until 1892. after which he confined his practice 
to the diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He moved to Fort Wayne in 
May, 1900. and was appointed oculist and aurist for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company for the territory west of Pittsburg in July, 1900. and still 
holds that position. He was married at Easton, Pennsylvania, December 27, 
1884, to Josephine Poff, by whom one daughter was born — Ignota Bell, born 
October 24, 1885. Dr. W'hite belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is ad- 
vanced to the York and Scottish Rites. Thirty-second degree; belongs to the 
Mystic Shriners. having held the offices of Past Master, High Priest, Eminent 
Commander, etc. 

(Ill) William Alvin White, third child of William Reed White, was 
born November 18, 1862, graduated from the Western Reserve College, 
Cleveland, Ohio, March 4. 1891, and is practicing medicine in Ashland county, 
Ohio. He married Ida J. Hunter, of Richland county, September 16, 1891, 
and his children are: Eva Pauline, born August 25, 1895. died July 2. 1896; 
W. Alvin Dale, born September 3, 1900; Dorothy Angeline, born July 21, 
1902. 

(Ill) Rev. Samuel Ernest Paul White, the seventh child in the family 
of children born to William Reed White by the second marriage, was born 
lanuarv I, 1870. He spent his early years on the farm in Richland county, 
Ohio, and attended the district schools until eighteen years of age. The 
next two years he spent mostly at Ashland College, taking in addition to the 
regular course one in elocution under the direction of Professor Fox. The 
next year he taught district school and in the autumn of 1891 entered the 
preparatory department of the University of Wooster, Ohio. He continued in 
regular attendance in this university and graduating in the classical course, 



172 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1896. In the fall of 1896 he entered 
the junior class in the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, and 
the year following entered the middle class in the McCormick Theological 
Seminary, Chicago. Here he continued his studies in theology, graduating in 
the class of 1899, which year he gained the degree of Master of Arts. He is 
now pastor of the Presbyterian church at Bemidji, Minnesota. On October 
22, 1900, he was united in marriage to Miss Ella Williamson, to which union 
there was born two children — Eva May, born May 5, 1903, and Ernest Kelly, 
born July 22, 1904, died June 2, 1905. 

(HI) Dr. John Robinson White, son of William Reed White, was born 
May 29, 1871. He graduated at the Indianapolis (Indiana) Medical College 
in April, 1898, and is now practicing his profession at Warsaw, Indiana. He 
is a member of the Masonic order. Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery at 
Warsaw, and the Indiana Consistory. He married Blanch Boydson, who was 
born June 13, 1880, and graduated from the Warsaw High School in 1897. 
They were married October 25, 1900, and the issue has been : Donald Robert, 
born April 7, 1903, and Helen Louise, born November 21, 1905. 

(Ill) Alfred McMillen White, son of William Reed White, was born 
July 29, 1872. He was educated at the Savannah Academy, Ohio, and at the 
University at Ashland, Ohio. He founded the East End Sanitarium, and is 
manager of that institution now. He belongs to the Masonic order and is well 
advanced in Masonry. He married Blanch Breeding and they have one 
daughter, Eleanor. 

(Ill) Walter Mackling Lowrie White, son of William Reed White, was 
born June 15, 1876. He is engaged in the iron works at Vandergrift Heights, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He married Daisy M. Plucker, born 
February 16, 1880, at Reading, Pennsylvania, and they were married October 
22, 1903. Their issue is: Twins, born May 16, 1904, at Parkersburg, West 
Virginia — one lived a few hours and the other four days. The third child 
was Thelma G., born July 2, 1905, at Parkersburg, and the fourth, Thomas 
Arthur, born June 5. 1907, at Vandergrift, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Dr. Sydney Gilbreth White, son of William Reed White and 
wife, Hannah Eva (Paul) White, was educated at the Ashland College, 
Ashland, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1892, receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Literature. In 1893 he graduated from the Baltimore Medical 
College and immediately engaged in the general practice of his profession at 
Helena, Ohio, where he continued until 1905, at which time he removed to 
Warsaw. Indiana, where he devoted his time and talents to operating a private 
sanitarium, treating patients from all parts of the United States for the relief 
and cure of alcohol and drug disorders, very many of whom were perfectlv 
cured of the habit. On April i, 1902, the East End (Pittsburg) Sanitarium 
was founded by Alfred M. White as a purely private institution for the treat- 
ment of alcohol and drug addicts, and neurotic patients generally, and this 
offered the subject a better opportunity and he accepted the position of 
physician in charge as the chemist, with his brother, Alfred M. White, as 
manager. He has continued here since his coming in 1902. 

Dr. White is a member of the Presbyterian church at Pittsburg as well as 
a member of the session of that denomination. He is prominent in Masonic 
circles, being a member of Lake City Lodge, No. Jt, ; Warsaw Chapter, No. 
88; Warsaw Commandery, No. 10; Adoniram Grand Lodge of Perfection, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 173 



Saraiah Council, Indianapolis Chapter and Indiana Consistory. He was 
united in marriage, August 30, 1893, at Pavonia, Ohio, to Effie Shively, 
daughter of Samuel and Lititia Shively, farmers. She was educated at Ash- 
land College, Ohio. They are the parents of two children, George DeWitt, 
born in Warsaw, Indiana, November 4, 1896, and John Robert, born at the 
same place October 20, 1900. 



CAPT. PATRICK FRANCIS HODGE, one of the veterans of the Civil 
war, as well as a veteran conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad, now retired 
at his own instance, together with other members of his family has made a 
history worth preserving in a work of this character. 

Captain Hodge is a native of Sarah Furnace, Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
born November i, 1839, a son of Patrick and Mary (Keegan) Hodge, of 
Drogheda, county Meath, Ireland. When but two years of age his father 
died, and he was left to gain his own support, which he accomplished by 
working on a farm in his native land. His father was born in 18 10, and died 
in July, 1841, aged thirty-one years. The grandfather's name was George 
Hodge, who lived to the age of seventy-five years. He married and was the 
father of four children. Patrick and George, two of his sons, came to America 
in 1836. George located at Salem, Massachusetts, and married, and one of 
his sons became a prominent New England lawyer. Patrick, the subject's 
father, settled in what was then Bedford (now Blair) county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1836. He worked in blast furnaces as a practical iron maker. He was a 
devout member of the Roman Catholic church. He married, in 1837, Mary 
Keegan, daughter of James and Anna (Ballard) Keegan. She was a native 
of countv Meath, Ireland, and was seventy-two years of age at the time of her 
death. They had two children: i. Patrick Francis, subject, born in 1839. 
2. James, born July 4, 1841, died in 1895. He followed farm life on a fifty-six 
acre farm he purchased in Blair county, Pennsylvania. He married Phoebe 
Wilt, also deceased, and they were the parents of two children, Charles and 
Mary E., the latter now residing with her Uncle Patrick at Swissvale, 
Pennsylvania. 

Returning to the subject of this memoir it may be said that at the out- 
break of the Civil war in 1861 he served in the "three months' men" service, 
and then enlisted, September 20, 1861, in Company A, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania 
\'olunteer Infantry, and was soon thereafter promoted to second sergeant, 
was commissioned lieutenant in April following, as first lieutenant in August, 
1863, and was advanced to captain February 15, 1865. Previous to 1864 he 
was in the Department of the South, and was twice wounded at the battle of 
Pocotaligo, South Carolina. From the battle of Cold Harbor on he was with 
the Army of the Potomac, was wounded in the lower jaw, and was made 
prisoner of war at Drury's Blufif. He was kept at Petersburg and Libby 
prisons until able to move, and was one of the six hundred officers exposed to 
the Union fire at Charleston. At one time while on the move he jumped out 
of a freight car but was compelled to give himself up at Edisto Island. While 
confined "at Columbia, South Carolina, he again made his escape, after being a 
prisoner eight months, and reached the federal lines near Pocotaligo after 
lying all night in water between there and the Confederates. He returned at 
once to his regiment, and served as provost-marshal of Buckingham county, 



174 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Virginia, until after the close of hostilities, being mustered out of service 
August 30, 1865. In 1866 he found employment as a passenger brakeman on 
the Pennsylvania Railroad. Two and a half years later he became a conductor 
running between Pittsburg and Altoona, Pennsylvania, and remained a con- 
ductor of this railroad up to 1903, when he voluntarily resigned, a little short 
of the company's age limit. 

Captain Hodge is a Republican of no uncertain quality. He was for 
years commander of Wilkinsburg Grand Army post, and is a member of the 
Loval Legion, Union \'eteran Legion and the Order of Railway Conductors. 
He and his family are members of the Roman Catholic church. 

He was united in marriage September 16, 1869, to Susan, a daughter of 
Edward and Mary (Cassidy) McGraw. She was born in Freedom, Blair 
county, Pennsylvania, and by this union two sons were born, George Edward 
and Gerald F. 

Captain Hodge has had a wonderfully checkered career, but has_ proven 
himself worthy the high esteem in which he is universally held. Among the 
local offices he has ably filled may be mentioned that of school director for 
eight years and tax-collector for the same length of time. His residence has 
been in Swissvale since 1898. 

George Edward, the eldest son of Captain and Mrs. Hodge, was born 
at Brushton, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburg, July 18, 1879, and died at Chester, 
Pennsylvania, February 10, 1903. He was educated at the common schools 
of Wilkinsburg, Pittsburg Academy and the Western Pennsylvania L'niversity, 
graduating as a chemist. At the date of his death he was superintendent of 
the Tide-water Open Hearth Furnaces at Chester, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried Miss Anna Leas, of Glassport, and was the father of one child, born after 
his death — George Edward Hodge, Jr. This was indeed a sad blow to the 
(loting parents, who in this first-born son saw a splendid future, but which 
was cut down in the bloom of his young manhood, when all life's sea seemed 
fair and every breeze blowing but happiness and prosperity to himself and 
family. 

Gerald F. Hodge, second son of Captain Hodge and wife, was born 
August I, 1882, and was educated at the parochial and public schools of 
Wilkinsburg and Swissvale. He is now engaged in the real estate business at 
Swissvale. He married Bessie Wilkins, of Wilkinsburg, by whom one 
daughter was born, Sarah, born November 26, 1906. 



THE SCHUSLER FAMILY, of Pittsburg, of which Henry Schusler, 
the subject of this notice, is a member, was first represented in America by the 
late John Peter Schusler, the father of Henry. He was a native of Baden, 
Germany, born in 181 5, and died in Pittsburg. He received his education in 
his native land and then learned the butcher's trade, commencing at the early 
age of fourteen years. He followed his trade in Germany until he was 
married and had three children, when he-decided to come to America, which he 
did in 1846, coming direct to Pittsburg with his wife and son John, the other 
two children having died in Germany. They first landed at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and came part of the distance to Pittsburg by wagon and the remainder 
of the way by steamboat. They arrived in America during holiday times, 
landing either Christmas or New Year's day. At first, upon going to work 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 175 



here, he assisted in unloading boats for the steamboat companies, laying by 
each week what he could above supporting his little family. When he had 
earned and saved up enough to do so, which was not a great while, he opened 
a butcher shop on his own account on U'ylie avenue, where he continued until 
1854, when he moved to East Liberty, locating on Frankstown avenue. He 
conducted a successful business there for two years, then sold and later estab- 
lished himself in a market on Smithfield street, where he operated for a time, 
but seeming to have a special liking for the East End, he moved back there 
and opened a most excellent market, conducting the same up to the date of his 
death. He was one of the most enterprising and highly esteemed citizens in 
the East End, and his memory is cherished to-day for his many virtues, both 
socially and in a business sense. He built and did much to improve the part 
of the city in which he owned property, and never shirked his duty toward the 
upbuilding of the city's best interests. He was of the German Lutheran faith 
and gave liberally toward that denomination. Politically he was a Democrat, 
but never sought for public offices." At one time he was a member of the Odd 
Fellows order, but not latterly. 

He was married in his native country to Miss Margaret Hess, who became 
a devoted wife and a Christian mother to his children, who numbered ten. 
Mrs. Schusler died on Easter morning, 1889, aged seventy years. Tlie follow- 
ing is concerning their children: I. John, born January 18, 1842, in Germany, 
is now living a retired life at No. 216 Shady avenue, Pittsburg. He followed 
the business of a butcher up to 1900. His military record during the Civil 
war should be recorded in this connection: He enlisted August 5, 1861, in a 
cavalry company, served six months, and later was attached to the Maryland 
cavalry and served three years and six months. He was in sixty-six battles 
and skirmishes, and was honorably discharged September 15, 1864, at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He cast his first vote for President Lincoln and was 
a Republican ever afterwards. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, a 
member of Hailman Lodge, No. 321, Ancient Free and Accepted IMasons ; is 
a member of the Grand Army Post, No. 117. He married in 1868 Margaret 
Krebs, by whom were born si.x children: William M., Philip J., Peter J., 
Alargaret, Emma and Louisa. The second and third born children of John 
Peter and Margaret (Hess) Schusler were daughters, who died young. 4. 
William, late of Pittsburg. 5. Peter, of Pittsburg. 6. Anna Alary, wife of 
Adolph Godell (see his sketch). 7. Adam, late of Pittsburg. 8. Louisa, wife 
of Edward Krebs and mother of five children ; the family reside on North 
Negley avenue, Pittsburg. 9. Henry. 10. Margaret, deceased. 

Henry Schusler (subject) takes much interest in local history and believes 
every family should preserve the record they have made so far as possible, 
and it is to him the reader is indebted for the sketch of his father's family 
record. Henr\- Schusler was the ninth child of his parents, and was born May 
23, i860, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He was educated at the schools of his 
native place, and when seventeen years of age entered the employ of L. C. 
Castner as a clerk in his drug store on Penn avenue, with whom he remained 
one year, and then was engaged by S. S. Marvin as salesman for a number 
of years, after which he engaged in business for himself, chosing wholesale 
woodenware for his business ; this he followed for three years, when he 
changed to that of a real estate brokerage business, which he continues to 



176 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

follow. He has built several good buildings and otherwise improved this 
portion of the city and accumulated and saved a competency. 

Mr. Schusler is prominently identified with the Lutheran church, and for 
many vears was connected with the German Lutheran church on Collins 
avenue] but is now a member of Bethany Lutheran church on North Highland 
avenue, and is serving as an elder. He was one of the liberal donors to the 
building improvements of this denomination, including the Bellmar church. 
Politically Mr. Schusler votes an independent ticket, not believing in being 
tied by party lines. He is an advanced Mason, belonging to Dallas Lodge, 
F. & A. M.', No. 508; Shiloh Chapter and Tancred Commandery; also the 
Shriners. 

He was united in marriage May 26, 1887, to Emma, daughter of William 
and Doratha (Krebs) Getting. The fruit of this union is three children: i. 
Frank W., born April i, 1888. 2. Howard H., born July 9, 1892. 3. Carl H., 
born January 10, 1902. 

HOFMEISTER FAMILY. Peter Hofmeister, deceased, was among the 
highly honored German citizens of Pittsburg, one who always upheld the good 
orcler of his adopted country and was possessed of a public spirit commendable 
to any one, either native or foreign born. He was born in Quendel Kurhessen, 
Germany, in 1820, and died April 6, 1901. He was the son of Andrew Hof- 
meister, a farmer, and who belonged to the German Lutheran church. He 
died at about the age of fifty years. His family consisted of his wife and 
six children: i. Martin, of Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. 2. Catherine, de- 
ceased, wife of Martin Myers, of Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. 3. Maria. 4. 
Peter, mentioned hereinafter. The names of the two youngest is not known. 
The three surviving children came to America about 1847, ^s did the Schnell 
family, into which Peter Hofmeister intermarried. 

Peter Hofmeister learned the weaver's trade in his native country and 
followed linen weaving. He attended school in Germany and night schools 
after coming to this country. In this way he v;as enabled to master the 
English language quite well. ' He learned the plasterer's trade and was consid- 
ered one of the finest mechanics in this line in all the country in which he 
worked. He prospered financially and possessed many good pieces of property 
in this city. He resided in Lawrenceville from 1857 until his death. He 
was much interested in church work, and was an elder and treasurer of his 
church, the St. John's German church of Lawrenceville. He was also a 
Sunday-school superintendent for many years. He was later a member of the 
Thirty-ninth Street Presbyterian church. He was charitable and benevolent 
in allhis dealings with his fellowmen. Politically he was a staunch Republican. 
He was one of the prime movers in the organization of the Fire Company at 
Lawrenceville and helped to build many of the churches in the neighborhood. 

He married, September 14, 1848, Martha Elizabeth Schnell, a native of 
Hessen Cassel, Germany. She is now (1907) the oldest member living in the 
Thirty-ninth Street Presbyterian church Of Pittsburg. By this marriage union 
the following children were born: i. Henry, of Lawrenceville. 2. Chris- 
topher, deceased. 3. Andrew, of Pittsburg. 4. Henrietta, wife of Peter 
Schusler, a sketch of whose family appears in this work. 5. Martha Eliza- 
beth, wife of Louis J. Wenzell (see sketch). 6. Peter, of Pittsburg. 7. Anna 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 177 



E., at home. 8. William, deceased in childhood. The three youngest children 
died in infancy. 

Henry Schncll, father of Mrs. Peter Hofmeister, was born in Germany 
and came to this country at the same time the Hofmeisters did, in 1847. He 
died at the ripe old age of ninety-six years, about 1886. He and his wife 
Martha were the parents of the following children: i. Augustus, who was a 
soldier in the Civil war. 2. Adam. 3. Henry, who also served in the Civil 
war. 4. Martha E. (Mrs. Peter Plofmeister). 5. Christiana. 6. William, of 
Baltimore, Maryland. 7. Maria, wife of Daniel House. 8. Eliza, wife of 
George Schoen, who was a soldier in the Union cause in the Civil war. 9. 
Elizabeth, of Baltimore, Alaryland, now deceased. 



FLETCHER K. LEIGHTOX, one of Pittsburg's retired business men, 
and a resident of Edgewood Park, was born March 3, 1839, in Steuben, Maine, 
son of Henry D. Leighton, grandson of Jonathan Leighton, and great-grandson 
of Thomas Leighton, who was one of the earliest settlers of that state, where 
he took up a considerable tract of land which he cleared of timber and brought 
into a state of cultivation. Thomas Leighton's wife was Lydia Tracy, and the 
following children were born to them : Jonathan, Mark, Alex, Hateval, Israel, 
Daniel, Isaiah and Asa. 

Jonathan Leighton, son of Thomas and Lydia (Tracy) Leighton, was the 
first male child born in Steuben, Maine. He married Annah, daughter of Cap- 
tain Dyer, who served in the Revolutionary war and was one of the pioneer 
settlers of Maine, owning land near Dyer's Bay. The following children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Leighton : Jonathan, married Lydia Stroup ; Lydia, 
married Stephen Hill : Charity, married William Xash ; Thomas, married Per- 
sis Dyer: Henry D., married Lovice Wass ; Handy, married Rebecca Wass; 
Betsev, married Oliver Randall : Theressa, married John Coy : Annie, mar- 
ried Benjamin Godfrey : Tryphena, married Bingham Nash ; Irene, married 
Isaac Small ; Persis, married Oliver Cleves ; Almon, married Sarah Trecarton. 

Henry D. Leighton, son of Jonathan and Annah (Dyer) Leighton, was 
born in 1799, in Steuben, Washington county, Maine, and all his life followed 
the calling of a master shipbuilder. His political principles were those indorsed 
bv the Whig partv. By that party he was sent to tlie state legislature of ]\Iaine 
and there served one term. He was an active member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, in which he served as elder. 

Henry D. Leighton married Lovice Wass, and their children were : Cath- 
erine, married Albion K. P. Moore ; Ann, married, first, George W. Waite, and, 
second, John D. Holden ; Arriczene, married Coffin Small ; Mary, married 
Guilford Stephens : Eliza, married Horatio Campbell ; Ellen, married Thomas 
J. Campbell ; Fletcher K., married Mary A. Johnson ; Truman W., married 
Emma Shute ; Clara, married James Parkin. 

Henrv D. Leighton, the father, died in 1881, and Lovice, his wife, died 
in 1864. 

Fletcher K. Leighton, son of Henry D. and Lovice (Wass) Leighton, was 
brought up at Steuben, Washington county, Maine, and was educated in the 
local schools. At the age of twenty-one years he built a shingle mill, which 
he operated for some years. In 1862 he enlisted in the Eleventh Regiment, 
j\Iaine Volunteer Infantry, and served one year, taking part in the Peninsular 
iii— 12 



178 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



campaign under General McClellan and participating in the battles of Fair 
Oaks and Malvern Hill, as well as a number of other engagements and many 
skirmishes. He was discharged with the rank of orderly sergeant. After his 
return home he went into business as a carpenter. 

On April 3, 1864, he married Mary A., daughter of Stephen Johnson, of 
East Sullivan, Maine. They have been the parents of the following children: 
I. Julia A., deceased; 2. Henry S., married Mattie McGrau, and they have 
the following children: Lois A., deceased, and Marguerite I. 3. Annie G., 
married Dr. Alexander M. Stevenson ; their children are : Julia L. and John 
Alexander M. 4. Charlotte J., deceased, wife of Dr. W. A. Clementson. 5. 
Frank K., at home. 6. Ella C., deceased. 7. Leone E., at home. 

In 1869 Mr. Leighton moved to Confluence, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he built and operated a stave mill and a lumber mill. In 1879 he 
moved to Braddock and went into the plumbing business, frorh which he retired 
in 1896. In 1885 he built a roller skating rink, which burned down in January, 
1903, and he built the present three-story brick business and apartment building 
on the site of the old rink. 

In politics Mr. Leighton is a Republican, and while a resident of North 
Braddock served three years as a school director and four years as burgess of 
that borough. In 1903 he moved to Edgewood, purchasing the property on 
West Swissdale avenue which is now his home. He is a member -of Post 
No. 181, G. A. R. 



WILLIAM EUGENE SEIBERT. Members of this family have been 
connected with the banking business of Pittsburg for many years. William 
E. Seibert, first bookkeeper in the Fidelity Title and Trust Company of Pitts- 
burg, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1875, a son of 
Charles and Philomena (Zinsmeister) Seibert. (The reader will find an 
extended account of the Seibert family elsewhere in this work.) 

Charles Seibert, the son of NicoHs and Catherine (Mohr) Seibert, was 
born in Germany and was about four years of age when his parents located 
near Sandusky, Ohio. He attended the public schools and in 1852 the family 
removed to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. Mr. Seibert began his early life as 
a bookkeeper in the Third National Bank of Pittsburg, and after several years 
of valuable experience he accepted a position with the Germania Bank, and 
was promoted to teller of the institution and held the same many years. On 
account of ill health he, with his wife, removed to California, remained three 
years and returned as far as St. Louis, Missouri, where he accepted a position 
in the International Bank of that city, and there remained seven years. In 
1906 he returned to Pittsburg, and now leads a retired life. He has a splendid 
military record. He enlisted in 1861, at the opening of the rebellion, in Com- 
pany G, of the Sixty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment, and took part 
in every engagement of his division. He was a brave soldier, was in the 
thickest of every battle, yet never received even a slight wound. He was 
promoted to second lieutenant and honorably discharged July 4, 1864. His 
brother, Nicholas Seibert, was a member of the same company and was 
wounded at the battle of Gums Mill the second day of the seven days' fight at 
that point. He was taken a prisoner of war, but later exchanged. 

Charles Seibert was married to Philomena Zinsmeister, and tliev were the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 179 



parents of four children: i. Henry, treasurer of the Manufacturers' Heat 
and Light Company, Pittsburg. 2. Charles A., assistant secretary and auditor 
of the Iron City Trust Company, Pittsburg. 3. William E., of whom further 
mention is made. 4. Estella, of Pittsburg. 

William E. Seibert, a son of Charles and Philomcna (Zinsmeister) Seibert, 
began his business career as a collector, after having first obtained a good edu- 
cation. When about seventeen years of age he commenced the work of 
collecting with Joseph Eichbaum & Company, with which firm he remained 
until they closed out their business operations. He was promoted from time 
to time — to assistant bookkeeper, general bookkeeper, head bookkeeper and 
cashier, performing his several duties so well that when the business was closed 
up by the Fidelity and Trust Company he \vas tendered a position with them, 
and has been with that extensive institution for the past eight years. 

He was married. October 16, 1901, by Rev. Kennedv, to Katherine Hunter 
Benner, born at Bellefont, Center county, Pennsylvania. One daughter has 
blessed this union, Dorothy Virginia. 

' Mr. Seibert has spent the greater portion of his life in Oakland, but has 
been a resident of the East End since 1901. He has been honored with a 
rmembership in the American Institute of Banking and is accounted an up-to- 
date accountant and banker. 



JOSEPH ANTHONY SCHLERNITZAUER was bom in the Twenty- 
ninth ward of Pittsburg, a son of Anthony Schlernitzauer and grandson of 
Peter Schlernitzauer, who was a farmer. He was a native of Alsace, then a 
province of France, and was a mayor, which was considered a very great honor 
in those days, as the most intelligent man was chosen for the position. 

Peter Schlernitzauer came to the United States in 1846, accompanied by 
his wife and ten children. He settled first in New Jersey, later moving to the 
South Side of Pittsburg.' His wife was Mary Bellotte, and the following chil- 
dren were born to them: John, Anthony, Peter, Nicholas, Florian, Madeleine, 
Mary, Pauline, Barbara and Marian. Peter Schlernitzauer died in 1878, at the 
age of eighty, and his wife passed away in 1865. 

Anthony Schlernitzauer, son of Peter and Mary (Bellotte) Schlernitzauer, 
received a good education in his native country. In New Jersey he learned the 
art of flattening window-glass. In 1857 he went to Pittsburg, settled on the 
South Side and secured employment in the glass factory of McCullough & 
Company. Later he entered the service of D. O. Cunningham, then known 
as the Cunningham & Ihmsen Company, remaining until 1885, when he retired. 
In local politics he was liberal in his views, but in matters of national impor- 
tance adhered to the Democratic party. He was a member, of St. Peter's 
Roman Catholic church. 

A. Schlernitzauer married, in Pittsburg, Rachel Crestline Dusch, a native 
of France. Her father, George Dusch, was a millwright, and in 1840 came 
with his family to the United States, settling in Pittsburg. Later he removed 
to Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Schlernitzauer became the parents of the follow- 
ing children : Joseph, William, Rosalia, wife of P. J. Callaghan, of Allegheny ; 
Theresa, wife of M. Shill, of Carrick ; Katherine, teacher in the Wickersham 
public school; May and Charles. A. Schlernitzauer died in 1886. Two of the 
children, John and Anna, are also deceased. 



i8o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Joseph A. Schlernitzauer was educated in St. Peter's parochial school and 
in the public schools of the Twenty- fourth ward, which he left at an early age. 
He then obtained employment as roller-boy in the glass factory of D. O. Cun- 
ningham & Company, and in the course of time rose through the different 
grades to his present position of flattener, which he has filled since the age of 
nineteen. While working in the factory he felt a laudable desire to supply the 
deficiencies of his early education, and therefore attended night school, receiv- 
ing the instructions of Professors Forner and McClure. He has prospered 
materially, having been always quick to see any opportunities and to avail 
himself of them. He is a stockholder in several banks and manufacturing 
concerns. In 1892 he was made school director of the Twenty-fourth ward, 
in 1902 was chosen a member of the select council of that ward, and in 1906 
was reelected to the same body. He has always taken much interest in politics 
and has served as chairman of several committees. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Schiller's Glocke Turning and Singing Society, and for a number 
of years served as its president. In politics he has been an unwavering Demo- 
crat. He is a member of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. Mr. Schlernitz- 
auer makes his home with his widowed mother. 



DR. ARTHUR C. MAGILL, prominent in the role of medical practition- 
ers in Pittsburg, was born in Tidioute, .Warren county, Pennsylvania, 
November 5, 1861, a son of Arthur and Jane (Courson) Magill. 

This Magill family traces their ancestry back to John Magill, of Belfast, 
Ireland, but originally they came from Scotland. He came to America at a 
very early date and located at Philadelphia. He was married and had two 
sons, one of whom became the noted Professor Magill, one of the founders and 
who held a chair in Amherst College, at Amherst, Massachusetts, which college 
was founded in 1821 as a Congregational school of learning. He never mar- 
ried. His brother married and reared a family in Pennsylvania. He never 
changed his name from Magill to McGill, as some in this country did. and 
none of his descendants have deviated from the original way of spelling the 
name — ''Magill." 

A direct descendant of this brother was Arthur Magill, who was a resident 
of Warren county, Pennsylvania, where he owned a hundred-acre farm, 
situated one mile from the beautiful village of Tidioute. He was a man of 
more than ordinary mould, and served through the war of 1812-14, and died 
at the age of eighty years. He was a devout member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He married Jane Arters, who bore him a family of ten children, 
all of which grew to maturity. 

Arthur Magill, son of Arthur and Jane Magill, and the father of Dr: 
Magill of this notice, was born on the old Warren county homestead referred 
to in 1816, and died December 20, 1862, aged forty-six years. He was educated 
in the common schools of his day and devoted most of his life to agricultural 
pursuits, but during the season for navigation he acted as a pilot and run rafts 
of lumber down the Allegheny river. His farm consisted of one hundred and 
eighty acres, and in this land he took much pride. He erected a fine farm 
house on the place after the old colonial style of architecture. This is still in 
a good state of preservation and is the fifth house built on the original home- 
stead. Politicallv he was an old-line Whig, and was county commissioner at 




^S6^^>--^^ 




PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE i8i 



the time the borough of Tidioute was incorporated, as well as when the court- 
house and jail of Warren county were built. He was a member of the 
Alethodist Episcopal church, in which he was a local minister. He married 
Miss Jane Courson, born in Tidioute, Pennsylvania, in 1821 ; she died March 
31, 1897. aged seventy-six years. She was the daughter of Anthony and 
Elizabeth Courson. Mr. and Mrs. ]\Iagill were the parents of ten children: i. 
Charles, died in infancy. 2. Elliott, who shot himself accidentally when aged 
eighteen years. 3. Loretta, widow of Rev. L. D. Appleton, whose son is Dr. 
Appleton. 4. Mary M., widow of Charles Mason, and she is the mother of 
five children and resides in Florence, New York. 5. Ora B., widow of H. R. 
Burgess, and she has two children. 6. Benton S., of Tidioute, Pennsylvania, 
married Alice Cummins, and they have four children. 7. Simon B., who was 
burned to death in 1901 in the fire which destroyed the "City of Pittsburgh," 
he being a passenger in the ill-fated boat. He married Ella Morrison, and 
they had two children. He was a prominent lumberman at Tidioute, Penn- 
sylvania, and was here on a visit to his brother at the time of the accident. 8. 
Clara, wife of i\'I. S. Van Every, who is the mother of two children. 9. Arthur 
Courson, subject. 10. Emma, who married Stephen Evans. 

Dr. Arthur C. Magill spent his youthful days in Tidioute, and worked 
on his father's farm until eighteen years of age, and then read medicine under 
Dr. C. A. Devendorf, of Tidioute, for three years, when he graduated from 
the Detroit College of Medicine. He practiced medicine in Tidioute for 
thirteen and a half years, and then came to Pittsburg, locating at No. 4404 
Penn avenue, where he has met with much success as a physician and surgeon. 
He owns considerable property in the Sixteenth ward of Pittsburg. Dr. Magill 
is a member of the Allegheny County Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association. He is connected with Perfection Masonic lodge and the 
Knights Templar; and is also a member of the Pittsburg Consistory and Erie 
Shriners. Politically he is a Republican. Dr. Magill was united in marriage 
to Anna Bell Porterfield, a daughter of R. A. and Margaret (Truby) Porter- 
field. No issue. 

HON. ANDREW JACKSON BARCHFELD, M. D., the present mem- 
ber of congress from the Thirty-second congressional district of Pennsylvania, 
and one of the leading physicians and surgeons of the south side of Pittsburg, 
well represents the true type of American manhood and citizenship developed 
only by the great competitive struggle of life wherein each man must needs win 
or fail by his own inherent qualities of mind and heart. The record of such a 
life must ever prove of value to the present and rising generation of young men 
who aspire to a successful career. In three special roles, at least, has Doctor 
Barchfeld met with signal success — as a medical practitioner, a successful 
business man and an honorable and highly capable law-maker in municipal, 
state and national governing bodies. 

Doctor Barchfeld was born on the south side, in Greater Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, May 18, 1863, a son of Henry and Mary (Neuenhagen) Barch- 
feld. Of his ancestors it may be stated that his paternal grandfather, John 
Barchfeld, was a well-known manufacturer of woolen goods and yarns in 
Cassel, Germany, in which country he commanded the respect of all by reason 
of his business qualifications and sterling integrity. Among his children was 
the subject's father, Henry Barchfeld, born May 18, i82'7, a native of Cassel, 



i82 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Germany, where he was educated and studied engineering. In 1847, believing 
that this country afforded better facilities for advancement in his line of pro- 
fession, he emigrated to Pittsburg and settled on the south side and was there 
first employed to take charge of an ore plant at Emlenton, on the Allegheny 
river. He continued in this position for five years, and then resigned to assume 
similar duties at the Loud Soda Factory, where later was built the American 
Iron and Steel Works. In 1856 he opened a general store in one of the suburbs 
of the city, which business he conducted until the breaking out oi the Civil war, 
when he enlisted as a member of Company G, Two Hundred and Fifth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment, and served his adopted country until 
the close of that great struggle. He then returned to Pittsburg and followed his 
former occupation of an engineer, during which time he was in charge of the 
construction of the bridges on the Fort Wayne and Pan Handle Railroad, 
which work was then considered masterpieces of engineering skill. He was 
married in Baltimore, Maryland, to Miss Mary Neuenhagen, born February 
16, 1825, and whose father was a German officer under Napoleon at the battle 
of Waterloo. He was with the great emperor at Moscow, and spr'ang from a 
long line of military ancestry. Henry and Mary (Neuenhagen) Barchfeld 
had five children, two of whom died in early childhood, and the remaining 
three were Martin L., who resided in Pittsburg; Mary, who married George 
H. Geyer, who had charge of the structural iron department of the American 
Iron and Steel Works of Pittsburg, and the subject, Doctor A. J. Barchfeld. 
The mother died June 16, 1879, and the father in 1882. The father had a good 
reputation in Pittsburg as an expert accountant, and was the secretary of eight 
building and loan associations. 

Doctor Andrew J. Barchfeld, subject, obtained his primary education at 
the public schools of his native city, and after taking instructions under a 
private tutor entered the high school. Having chosen the science of medicine 
for his profession, he began his technical studies under the direction of that 
able preceptor, the late Dr. E. A. Wood, a distinguished physician and 
surgeon of Pittsburg. Subsequently he matriculated in the Jefferson Aledical 
College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1884, with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine, having shown his ambition by taking his 
hospital course between his second and third year of college life. This 
eminently fitted him to enter the active practice of medicine and surgery, which 
he did at his native city, where he has been actively engaged ever since. He 
has kept fully abreast with the advancing science of his profession and is' a 
constant and intelligent reader of all the late medical books and periodical 
publications. He has shown a marked and rare judgment in the diagnosing 
of diseases and the treatment of the same. On account of his loyalty to the 
profession and his generous treatment of his fellow-practitioners he has never 
yet violated any known unwritten rule of the professional code of ethics. Nature 
has fitted him with a robust physical constitution, such as only possess a clear, 
sound and vigorous mind. His heart is in his work and his manly methods 
have won for him the respect and admiration of his large practice and the 
members of the various medical societies. At one time he had for his partner 
in practice Dr. Lehner. He holds a membership in the American Medical 
Association, the Pennsylvania Medical Society, the Allegheny County Medical 
Society, and the South Side (Pittsburg) Medical Society. He is the president 
of the board of directors of the South Side Hospital and a member of the 



I 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 183 

medical staff. For many years he has served as physician to the county 
coroner, and held the position of city physician. 

Aside from his professional sphere the doctor has won for himself a 
name among the higher type of politicians and law-makers of his state and 
nation. For more than a quarter of a century he has taken an active part in 
the deliberations of the Republican party. He has been instrumental in fram- 
ing and carrying into effect numerous wholesome laws for the benefit of his 
fellow-countrymen. In 1885 he was elected to the office of member of the 
board of education of the city of Pittsburg, serving three years. In 1886 lie 
was elected a member of the City Council, representing the Twenty-sixth 
ward of the city. He served on the railroad committee of that municipal 
governing body. After two terms as councilman he declined further nomina- 
tion. During his last term of such office he was successful in passing the 
ordinance to locate the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad depot on the land formerly 
occupied by the old stone yard, and for which the city received no revenue. 
He defeated the so-called "machine ring" and secured for the city a yearly 
revenue of three thousand dollars for the use of such ground. In 1888, 1892 
and 1896 he was the Republican candidate for state senator, but owing to an 
unfortunate set of party rules and the influence he had worsted in the council, 
he was defeated, but with his supporters had the satisfaction of knowing that he 
received over a thousand majority in his district. For more than a decade 
he was a loyal supporter of United States Senator Matthew Stanley Quay. 
He was a delegate in 1886 to the state convention that placed in nomination 
General Beaver for governor of Pennsylvania, and in 1894 was delegate when 
Governor Hastings was nominated. On numerous occasions he was chairman 
of the city Republican committee. From 1895 to 1897 he was president of the 
company which published the South Pittsburgcr, to which he was a frequent 
contributor of strong, fearless articles in opposition to the reign of political 
machine policies. During the two McKinley presidential campaigns he was 
sought out as an able advocate of his party principles and made manv stirring 
political speeches. In 1902 he was accorded the nomination for congressman 
from his district, and by only a narrow margin was defeated after a long, 
heated campaign by a combination of Democrats and dissatisfied Republicans. 
He was prominent in both presidential and gubernatorial campaigns in western 
Pennsylvania. In 1904 he was elected member of congress from his district to 
serve in the Fifty-ninth congress. He received nineteen thousand three hun- 
dred eighty-four votes as against four thousand six hundred and ninety for 
John Pierce, Democrat, and five hundred forty-one for F. F. Norris, Prohibi- 
tionist, with nine hundred seventy-one for the Socialist candidate, W. J. Ritchey. 
He served on the committees of patents and alcoholic liquor traffic. 

In the 1904 presidential campaign, when Theodore Roosevelt was elected, 
Doctor Barchfeld was in much demand as a public stump-speaker and proved 
a valuable advocate of his party under its illustrious standard-bearer. The 
doctor had been a great admirer of the lamented McKinley and greatly mourned 
his tragic death. 

In 1906 Doctor Barchfeld was reelected to a seat in congress, serving 
in the house in the Sixtieth congress. During his first term he was appointed 
to investigate the management of the Government Hospital for the Insane 
in the District of Columbia. In June, 1907, he was elected Republican county 
chairman by the unanimous choice of his party. 



i84 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



He is one of the stockholders in the People's Trust Company of Pittsburg 
and an able business man. He is the president of the South Side Hospital, 
Pittsburg, and a member of the German United Evangelical church. Fra- 
ternally Doctor Barchfeld is identified with Peter Fritz Lodge No. 474, of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past noble grand ; also 
belongs to Fort Pitt Lodge No. 171, Knights of Pythias. He is a member of 
the South Side Board of Trade and a stockholder in various insurance com- 
panies of Pittsburg. Another business in which he was successfully connected 
was the introduction upon the market of what is known as the American 
Cottonpicker. 

He is known throughout Allegheny county as the "Big Doctor," on 
account of his great height, standing six feet and five inches. His father 
was six feet and two inches, while the mother was six feet in height. The 
paternal grandfather was six feet and four inches, and the maternal grand- 
father six feet and five inches. The doctor loves to be busy and doing some- 
thing for somebody all the time. He is easy of approach, kind and gentle of 
manner, hence universally respected. Thousands have been made happy by 
his magnetic presence and his big heart. He is an excellent entertainer and 
pleasing conversationalist. 

He was united in marriage May 21, 1885, to Miss Anna Maria Pfeiffer, 
daughter of Philip and Nancy (Boll) Pfeiffer, of Pittsburg. The issue by this 
union was one son — Elmer A. Barchfeld, born May 2j, 1886, now attending 
Princeton University. Mrs. Barchfeld died April 14, 1903. For his second 
wife he married, November 26, 1904, Alice Meyers, nee Davis, widow of Moses 
Meyers and a grandniece of Hon. John L. Dawson, member of congress from 
Pennsylvania. 

J. LEDLIE GLONINGER, deceased, was one of Pittsburg's highly 
esteemed men, who was prominent in business circles and much admired by 
his fellow citizens. He was born in Baltimore, Maryland, April 30, 1862, and 
died December 10, 1903. He was of the fifth generation from the American 
ancestor, and descended through the following geneological line : 

(I) Philip Gloninger (American progenitor), was born in the Palatinate, 
Germany, and was one of the sufferers from that desolation which swept over 
that section of Europe on account of religious persecution. When twenty- 
eight years of age he came to America and settled as a farm hand in Upper 
Leacock township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. There he was in the 
employ of John Swope. He was a very industrious young man, and met w'ith 
favor in the eyes of the father (John Swope), and married Anna Barbara, the 
daughter of John and Anna Dorotha (Line) Swope. Anna Barbara was born 
in Upper Leacock township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, March 12, 1731, 
and died September 23, 1810. Philip Gloninger, her husband, died December 
II, 1796, and both were buried in the graveyard of the old Reformed church at 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania. After the marriage of Philip and Barbara they moved 
to Lebanon county, but it was then within Lancaster and known as Lebanon 
township of Lancaster county. They resided there the remainder of their 
lives. The old Gloninger house is still standing on the south bank of the 
Quitapahilla Creek. In early days it was styled "Gloninger's Fort. " During 
the terrible Indian wars it was used as a place of safety by the inhabitants of 
the far surroiniding country. One of the histories says ; "It is a good speci- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 185 



men of the solid architecture of those early days, with its pitched roof and 
original port-holes for windows, and it serves as an interesting land-mark, 
because here the first Gloningers lived, from whom descended locally quite an 
illustrious family." 

Philip and Anna Barbara (Swope) Gloninger reared a family of several 
children, including the following: I. George, who married Mary Funk. 2. 
Hon. John, born September 19, 1750, married Catherine Orth. 3. Peter, born 
September 14, 1763, married twice, but the first wife's name is unknown, and 
for the second wife he married Eliza Keller. 4. \'alentine, born January 11, 
1776, died March 24. 1844. 

(II) Captain Peter Gloninger, son of Philip Gloninger (I) and wife, 
was born in Lebanon township. Lancaster county, Pennsylvania (now Lebanon 
county), September 14, 1763, and resided in Lebanon. He was a captain in 
the Fourth Battalion, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Baltzer Orth, in 
1789 and 1790. He was elected acounty commissioner in 1815. He was an 
at?ectionate husband and fond father, sedate in manner and of a thoughtful, 
quiet turn of mind. He was twice married. The name of his first wife is not 
known ; she died in young womanhood, leaving one son. who was reared by 
relatives in Baltimore, JMaryland. After residing in Lebanon many years 
Peter Gloninger moved to Baltimore, where he remained until 1832, when he 
moved to Canal Dover, Ohio, where he purchased a large tract of land, a part 
of which is still owned and occupied by his descendants. The issue by his 
first marriage was: i. William, born September 7, 1800, died. 2. John, born 
May 26, 1803 ; married Mary J. Ringgold. For his second wife Peter married 
Maria Eliza Keller, born August 29, 1792, died July 21, 1859. She was buried 
in the cemetery at Canal Dover, Ohio, beside her husband, who died December 
2, 1835. Thev had the following children: i. Mary Elizabeth, born August 2, 
1812, married John Hildt. 2. Philip, born January 27, 1816, died February 
15, 1818. 3. Catherine, born June 14, 1819, married Samuel Kuhn. 4. 
Daniel Keller, born July 11, 1821, died August 19, 1848, unmarried. 

(III) John Gloninger. sen of Captain Peter Gloninger by his first wife, 
whose name is not now known, was born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, 
May 26, 1803. His mother died when he was a small boy and he was taken 
and reared by his mother's relatives living near Baltimore, Alaryland. They 
being Catholic, he was reared in that faith, and his descendants are of the same 
religion. John Gloninger married, June 8, 1828, Miss Mary J. Ringgold, 
famous in the Mexican war, and a first cousin of Archbishop Eccleston, fifth 
archbishop of Baltimore. Mrs. John Gloninger possessed a mind of rare 
vigor, which had received a most careful culture. Her memory was strong 
and retentive, and remained unimpaired until the end of her life. She dis- 
tinctly recalled the stirring scenes of the war of 1812-14, as they occurred in 
the vicinity of Baltimore. Her mind had a strong bent towards poetry, and 
next to her church the poets gave her the greatest enjoyment. Four children 
was the issue of this union: i. Henry, died in Baltimore in childhood. 2. 
Alice E.. married Redmond J. Grace. 3. John Ringgold, born in Bahimore, 
Marvland. October 16, 1831, died November i, 1887; married June 21, 1859, 
Marv Ledlie. 4. Man,- Augusta, married Gilbert de Lafayette de Balan Fet- 
terman. (See elsewhere in this work for sketch of the Walsh and Fetterman 
family.) 

(iV) John Ringgold Gloninger, son of John and Alary J. (Ringgold) 



i86 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Gloninger, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, October i6, 1831, and died 
November i, 1887. He received his education at St. Mary's College, Balti- 
more, and retained throughout his life much of the classical training of his 
earlier years. The early part of his career was spent in and near Baltimore. 
He was engaged in the glass business at New Castle, Pennsylvania, at one 
time. He had been thoroughly trained in mercantile houses at Baltimore and 
later was a prominent factor in the city of Pittsburg, where he resided for 
forty-five years, the larger portion of his time being in active business opera- 
tions. He was connected with the City Insurance Company, of which he was 
vice-president ; he was a man of much sterling worth and greatly esteemed. 
His death occurred on the morning of November i, 1887. He was struck by 
the day express train on the Pennsylvania railroad, near Bessemer station, 
shortl}- after ten o'clock, and killed instantly. It being All Saints' Day, he had 
left his home to attend early Mass at St. James' church, Wilkinsburg. The 
accident occurred on his way to Brushton, where he had a business errand. He 
married, June 21, 1859, Mary Ledlie, by whom children were born: i. John 
Henry, born May 8, i860. 2. James Ledlie, born April 30, 1862. 3. Caroline 
Grace, born July 15, 1864, married October 6, 1886, Alfred D. V. Watterman, 
LL. D., a prominent attorney of Pittsburg and the brother of Right Reverend 
John A. Watterman, Roman Catholic bishop of Columbus, Ohio. Air. and 
Mrs. Watterman have children as follows: Alfred, born February 4, 1889, 
died July 13, 1889; Florence, born August 10, 1890. 

(\ ) J. Ledlie Gloninger, late of Pittsburg, was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, April 30, 1862, a son of John Ringgold and Mary (Ledlie) Glon- 
inger. He was baptized in the Baltimore Catholic Cathedral and educated in 
a most painstaking manner. He was a member of the firm of Black & 
Gloninger, insurance and real estate agents of Pittsburg. Much of the almost 
phenomenal success of that firm was due largely to his energy and business 
ability. He was a thorough master of his business in all of its branches. In 
social circles he stood out as a leader. He belonged to Duquesne Council, 
Knights of Columbus, and was the first. Grand Knight of that body. He also 
held membership in the Duquesne Club, Monongahela Club and other societies. 
He was ever a liberal giver towards the church of his choice — Catholic — and in 
all that tended to upbuild the city and commonwealth he ever performed well 
his part. 

January 12, 1888, he was married by Right Reverend Father Kennoy, at 
St. Philip's church, in Grafton, Pennsylvania, to Miss ]\Iary Josephine Walsh, 
daughter of Moses P. and Mary Elizabeth (Carron) Walsh. See Walsh 
history in this work. 

The children by this union were as follows: i. Marie, born February 11, 
1889, a graduate of Mount Aloysius Academy, of Cresson, Pennsylvania, with 
the class of 1907. 2. John Ringgold, born November 26, 1890, student of St. 
Mary's College. 3. James Ledlie, Jr., born March 21, 1894. 4. Dorothy, born 
June 19, 1896. 5. kathryn, born May 11, 1898. 6. Grace, born March 3, 
1904. Mr. Gloninger died December 10, 1903, and was buried in the family 
plot at Mount Calvary cemetery, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



HARRY B. LITTELL, a representative of one of the old and highly 
respected families of Pennsylvania, and prominently identified with the dental 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 187 



profession of Greater Pittsburg, was born at Corydon, Wayne county. Iowa, 
July 16, 1864, a son of William F. and Mary (Sharp) Littell. The following 
is concerning his ancestors : 

(I) William Littell was born in the north of Ireland, 1740, on the large 
estate near Dublin, Irelartd, called "Hazel Hatch," owned by his father. Will- 
iam came to America when a young man and was secretary to General 
Washington. He settled in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, south of the Ohio 
river, where he owned several large tracts of land. His original homestead 
was located at what was called Service Postoffice, Beaver county. It is related 
of him that once he took a fancy to a gun owned by a friend, with whom he 
exchanged for it one of his tracts of land. It should be remembered, however, 
that land was very cheap then, while good fire-arms were scarce. He became 
a justice of the peace, and like many another of his day owned a small dis- 
tillery. His name seems to appear on the United States pension rolls in 1818. 
giving his age as seventy years, but this does not agree within eight years of 
the dates found relating to his birth. He married Bessie Walker, a native of 
Ireland, by whom he reared a family of nine children : James, William, David, 
Thomas, jane (Mrs. Calhoun), Elizabeth (Mrs. Reed), Alice (Mrs. Sharp), 
Agnes (Mrs. Libbey) and Mary (Mrs. Todd). 

Of this family James was the first child, and he became the grandfather 
of Mrs. H. B. Littell. 2. William, who lived and died in Beaver county, 
married and had children, among whom were four sons who served in the Civil 
war, as follows: General Johns, Captain William, Dr. Washington and Henry. 
3. David, born in 1797, and died in 1866, became the grandfather of Dr. Lit- 
tell, of this notice. David Littell was a tanner and conducted a tannery at 
Service, in Beaver county, and also farmed his extensive farm lands in that 
neighborhood. He was a member of old Service church of the United Presby- 
terian denomination. In politics he was an old-line Whig. He married Miss 
Jane Shiilito, born in 1801, a daughter of George Shillito, a native of Ireland. 
She was a member of Rev. Dr. Anderson's church. This Anderson established 
one of the earliest theological schools in this country. David and Jane Littell 
were the parents of the following children: i. George, who resides on the 
homestead in Beaver county. 2. James, deceased, of Wayne county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Belinda, wife of John McKee. 4. William F., father of Dr. H. B. 
Littell, of whom presently. 5. Elizabeth, wife of John Parkinson, of Beaver 
Falls, Pennsylvania. 6. Agnes, wife of John D. Gray, of Ohio. 7. Rev. David 
S., of Pittsburg. 8. John R., of Seneca, Pennsylvania. 9. Joseph C, 
deceased. 

(Ill) William Frazer Littell, son of David and Jane (Shillito) Littell, 
received his education in the common schools of his native township in Beaver 
county. His chief occupation was dealing in western lands and buying and 
selling live stock in Iowa and Kansas. He was an excellent business man and 
accumulated considerable property. He was a life-long member of the United 
Presbvterian church. He was an ardent temperance man and carried on the 
first temperance remonstrances against the saloon traffic in southern Iowa. 
Politically he was a Republican. 

He married Mary J. Sharp, daughter of William Blair Sharp, who was 
of the strict Seceder stock in the Presbyterian church. He was a "conductor" 
on the underground railroad before the abolition of slavery in eastern Ohio. 
About 1862 thev went to Wayne county, Iowa. Their children are : Harry 



i88 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



B., D. D. S., of Pittsburg, and Rev. Edward Shillito, of whom later mention 
is made. 

(IV) Rev. Edward S. Littell, son of William F. and Mary J. (Sharp) 
Littell, was born September 21, 1867, at Service, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 
He obtained his primary education at the public schools of Allerton, Iowa, 
graduating therefrom in 1886. He then attended Amity College of College 
Springs, Page county, Iowa, for two years, and then attended Monmouth Col- 
lege, Monmouth, Illinois, three years, graduating from the last named institu- 
tion in 1891. The next three years he attended the Allegheny Theological 
Seminary, graduating in 1894. He was pastor of Uniontown congregation in 
Indiana county, Pennsylvania, five years, lacking a few months ; was doing 
missionary work in New York a little over a year, and was pastor of the 
Zelienople United Presbyterian church, in Pennsylvania, which is his present 
charge. 

Mr. Littell's first business venture was to work with a carpenter for one 
summer, for which services he has not yet received his" remuneration. His 
next labor was herding cattle on the prairies of Kansas in the summer of 1887 
for G. W. De Camp, of Emporia, Kansas. Politically Mr. Littell is in many 
ways in full sympathy with the Republican party, but on account of the tem- 
perance issue usually votes with the Prohibitionists. As a minister of the 
United Presbyterian church he was secretary of National Reform Work in 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, and is one of nine members of the Littell family 
in this country who are now United Presbyterian ministers. 

He was married to Mary Harris, born July 27, 1867, at Harrisville, West 
Virginia, June 19, 1895. She was educated at the home schools, Knoxville 
College, New Concord, Ohio, and studied art at Wheeling, West Virginia. 
Her father, known as Judge Harris, was a member of the committee that 
formed the constitution of West Virginia. He was widely respected as a gen- 
tleman of Christian and business abilities. Mrs. Littell's mother was Margaret 
Rutherford and a relative of the Scotch divine, Samuel Rutherford. Her 
father was a second cousin of Sir Walter Scott. Judge Harris' brother was 
General L. M. Harris, the guard in immediate command when General Lee's 
last battery was silenced. Slary H. Littell's great-grand uncle was the James 
Harris who was founder of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Littell are as follows: i. Margaret, born at West Lebanon, 
Pennsylvania, May 19, 1896. 2. Isabel, born at the same place October 5, 
1898. 3. Lillian, born at Zelienople, Pennsylvania, March 17, 1905. 

(IV) Dr. Harry B. Littell, son of Wi'lliam F. and Mary (Sharp) Littell, 
was born July 16, 1864, and was educated in the public schools and at College 
Springs, Page county. Iowa, and at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois. 
He spent one year in the office of Dr. J. A. Libbey in Pittsburg, taking up the 
profession of dental surgery.. Subsequently he graduated from the Philadelphia 
Dental College in 1892. He then came to Pittsburg and opened an office, first 
on Butler street, and in 1900 moved to 6202 Penn avenue, his present location. 
He has built up a lucrative practice, being a skillful dentist and fully up to the 
modern science. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church and is a 
teacher in the Smiday-school. Politically he is a Republican. He owns con- 
siderable realty in Pittsburg, including a two-story flat built in 1904 on 
Marchand street. He is a member of the Odontological Society. 

Dr. Littell was united in marriage to Miss Jennie D. Littell, daughter of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 189 



Jonathan Littell, a son of James and Anna (Calhoun) Littell, James being a 
son of Wilham Littell, the American ancestor. Jonathan Littell was born in 
Columbiana county, Ohio, 1825, and died in 1880. He was engaged in the 
lumber trade and conducted a hotel in Pittsburg many years. At one time he 
was engaged in boating on the river between Memphis and New Orleans, and 
built and ran the boat known as "White Wings." He was also engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits and was a partner of John Might. Later he engaged in the 
drug trade in Alabama. At another time he was connected with the pottery 
and oil business, and was appointed L'nited States ganger, giving a bond for 
sixty thousand dollars. He was Republican in politics, and served on the city 
council and school board. In church connection he was of the United Presby- 
terian denomination. He married Mary Might, daughter of John and Susan 
(Smith) Might; she died aged sixty-seven years. Their issue was: i. James, 
of Pittsburg. 2. John, of Ohio. 3. Frank, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 4. 
Jennie, wife of Dr. Harry B. Littell. Mrs. Littell was educated in the private 
schools of Pittsburg and at Palmyra, ^Missouri. She also secured an excellent 
musical education, and besides teaching in the conservatory at Bloomington, 
Indiana, taught in different parts of Allegheny and Westmoreland counties, 
Pennsylvania. She had as high as thirty-five pupils in a music class at one time. 



WALTER ROSS FOSTER, M.D., of Crafton, near Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, has been in practice many years in Allegheny county, and at Crafton 
since 1886. He was born at Carnegie, Pennsylvania, May 21, 1864, a son of 
David and Elizabeth (Ross) Foster. The paternal grandfather, Alexander 
Foster (I), came from Ireland in 1790, locating in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, and in 1832 came to Allegheny county settling near McKeesport, 
where he resided until his death in 1854, his wife surviving him ten years. 
They had six sons and one daughter. 

(II) David Foster, the Doctor's father, was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1820, a son of Ale.xander (I), and accompanied his parents 
to this county in 1832. By trade he was a carpenter, which he followed until 
1850, when he bought a farm and turned his attention to agriculture. In 1887 
he sold his entire estate and retired from active business. In 1845 he married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Captain Peter Ross (a son of Philip Ross, a captain in 
Washington's army and the first settler of Mansfield, Pennsylvania) and Ma- 
tilda (Elliott) Ross. By this union were born the following children: Ross, 
who died in infancy; Matilda, wife of John A. Bell; David Gilmore ; George 
W. M. ; Sarah E., wife of Rev. Cyrus W. Hatch ; Maudeline, w'ho married W. 
H. Bailey ; Casey Alexander ; Walter Ross ; and Mary E., wife of John S. 
Robb, Jr. The parents were members of the United Presbyterian church. 

(III) Dr. David Gilmore Foster, son of David Foster (II), was a native 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, born in 1852. He attended the Mansfield 
and Tuscarora .-Xcademies and later graduated from Jeiferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, receiving his diploma in 1873. In the same year he settled at 
Crafton. Pennsylvania, where he became a distinguished doctor, following the 
profession until his death August 19, 1894. He was twice married, first in 
1874, to Phoebe, a daughter of Thaddeus and Phoebe Paul. One child was 
born of this union, Gilmore David. Mrs. Foster died in 1879, aged twenty-six 
vears. In 1881 Dr. Foster married Harriet, daughter of George R. and Mary 



I90 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Elliott Pearson, of Pittsburg, by whom two children were born, Annie Elliott, 
and Elizabeth Ross, who died January i, 1889. Dr. Foster was a Mason, a 
member of the Allegheny County Medical Society, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the American Mechanics, etc. In politics he was an ardent Repub- 
lican, and in religion was a member of the Episcopal church. 

(Ill) Dr. Walter Ross Foster (subject), son of David Foster (II), spent 
his youthful days on the farm and attended the primary schools and later the 
academy of Carnegie. He graduated from the State College in 1884, then en- 
tered Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, from which he graduated in 
1886. He immediately settled at Crafton, where he still practices with much 
success. He has been one of the surgeons of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany for more than twenty years, and physician for the Pittsburgh Railway 
Company for eight years, for the St. Paul's Orphans' Asylum six years, and 
physician for the Crafton district of the Allegheny poor for twenty years. He 
belongs to the Allegheny County Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State Medi- 
cal Society and the American Medical Association. The Doctor is a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Lodge No. 249. He was one 
of the prime movers in establishing the Chartiers Valley General Hospital to 
be located at Crafton, taking in the West Pittsburg-McDonald district, and 
which is to be non-sectarian. He is interested in every movement that tends to 
better the community in which he resides. He possesses one of the best private 
libraries in western Pennsylvania. He enjoys the sport of hunting, which he 
frequently indulges in during the game seasons. Within his office may be seen 
a fine collection of rare pieces of taxidermist's handiwork, consisting of many 
varieties of birds and beasts, including a large elk which was killed by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt prior to his nomination as vice-president. He also has a panther 
mounted fifty-nine years ago by the government taxidermist, Mr. James Har- 
ing. In the collection is a valuable redbird, found only in South America, 
called cock of the rock. 

Politically Dr. Foster affiliates with the Republican party and takes an 
active part in national campaigns. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Na- 
tional Guards in 1886-87, being a member of General Hartranft's staff. He is 
a member and active in all the work of the First Presbyterian church at Ctaf- 
ton, and has served twelve years on the board of trustees for that body. When 
the present church was erected he was active in the management of its building. 

He was united in marriage, September 25, 1890, to ]\Iiss Rachel Gray, 
eldest daughter of Colonel Joseph and Mary (Kuhn) Gray. (See Gray family 
sketch.) Dr. and Mrs. Foster are the parents of two children: i. Mary Eliza- 
beth, born February 2. 1892. 2. David Gray, born October 25, 1894. 

ALEXANDER MILLER VOIGT, a son of Louis Henry and Amanda 
(F.) Voigt, was born September 4, 1847, at Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. The American ancestor of this family was Rev. Henry 
E. F. Voigt, grandfather of the subject. 

(I) Rev. Henry E. F. Voigt was born in Germany in 1787, and died in 
1875, in his eightj'-ninth year. He was educated for the ministry, and in about 
1826 came to America as a missionary of the German Reformed church. At 
first he located in Ohio, but subsequently removed to Pennsylvania, settling at 
Mount Pleasant. After a period of eight years occupied with preaching the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 191 

gospel in this country he sent for his wife and three children, wliom he had 
left in his native land. He purchased a property consisting of a house and five 
acres. He there lived for over forty years, traveling on horseback over the 
wilds of Westmoreland, Fayette and Somerset counties. He was one of the 
most thoroughly excellent men of his day. He was married to Miss Louisa 
Cronemeyer, born in Germany 1802, died January 19, 1891. This union was 
blessed with six children, the first three being born in Germany. They are as 
follows: I. Louis Henry, born in Demolt, Germany, died in Pittsburg, 1895, 
•of whom later mention is made. 2. Henrietta, born in 1824, is the wife of 
David Cherry, and they have eight children. 3. Augusta, deceased wife of 
Robert AlcClean. 4. Augustus, who died when less than three years of age. 
5. Louisa AL, wife of Peter Kiel, of Pittsburg. 6. Charlotte, of Mount Pleas- 
ant, Pennsylvania. 

(H) Louis Henry Voigt, son of Rev. Henry E. F. and Louisa (Crone- 
meyer) Voigt, first attended the public schools of Germany, coming to this 
country when aged about fifteen years. He embarked in the mercantile busi- 
ness when a young man and conducted a general store at Mount Pleasant, 
\\'estmoreland county, until 1861. when he came to Pittsburg and here engaged 
in the produce trade at Xo. 813 Liberty street, where he continued to conduct a 
prosperous business for thirty-five years. Later he moved his store to the corner 
of Fifth and Liberty streets, where he was at the time of his death, November 10, 
1895. He accumulated considerable property in Pittsburg. He was a member 
of the German Reformed church, and in politics a Republican. He married, at 
Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, Miss Amanda Miller, daughter of Alexander 
Miller, born in Westuioreland county, Pennsylvania. November 22, 1827, and 
is now ( 1907) eighty years of age. She has lived in Pittsburg since the first 
year of the Civil war. She is still active and attends to her home duties. She 
is one of the old-time type of saintly old ladies ; never fails of attending church, 
and is a member of Grace Reformed church, at the East End, Pittsburg. The 
children by her marriage to Mr. Voigt are as follows: i. Alexander Aliller, 
subject. 2. Dr. Charles H., of Allegheny. 3. William C, died aged fift\--five 
years, in 1907. 4. Minna Louisa, of Pittsburg. 5. Efifie Marie, wife of John 
E. Ash, and mother of three children : Marie, Charles and Elizabeth. 6. Ella 
\ ., wife of Richard Floyd, of Pittsburg. 

( HI) Alexander Miller Voigt, son of Louis Henry and Amanda (Miller) 
Voigt, was educated in the public schools and at Mt. Pleasant College, after 
which he attended Duff's Commercial College. For thirty years he was in busi- 
ness with his father under the firm name of L. H. \'oigt & Company, and 
Voigt, Mahood & Company, and later as A. AL Voigt & Company, which last 
was consolidated with \'oigt, AIcAfee & Company as the Grocers' Supply and 
Cold Storage Company. They put in operation the first machine cold storage 
plant for storage purposes in the city. Their place of business on Seventh 
street after four years was burned, and they then moved to 937 Liberty ave- 
nue, where they were engaged in the wholesale grocery business until 1895, 
when Mr. Voigt sold his interest and went to Mont Chateau, West Virginia. 
and there opened a summer hotel, in which he is still interested. This resort 
is on the Cheat river, about one hundred miles from Pittsburg. In 1902 Mr. 
Voigt was made superintendent of the Seventh Street bridge in Pittsburg, and 
still fills the position acceptably. He is a member of the German Reformed 
church, in which he is now an elder. He was made a Mason in 1878, and is 



192 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



affiliated with Dallas Lodge No. 508, F. and A. M. ; Zerubbabel Chapter No. 
162, R. A. M. ; Tancred Gommandery No. 48, K. T., the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite of Pittsburg, and Syria Temple, Mystic Shrine. He was one of 
the first members of the well-known Americus Club, of which he was a trustee 
for a number of years. 

Mr. Voigt was united in marriage, February 18, 1869, to Alary E. Phil- 
lips, born in Pittsburg in March, 1851, a daughter of Thomas and Marv (An- 
derson) Phillips. They are the parents of four children: I. Nellie Amanda, 
born in January, 1870, wife of Dr. George H. Proctor ; they have one son, 
George Voigt Proctor. 2. Lewis Lee, born in 1872, of the firm of Hastings & 
Voigt ; he married Grace Wainright, daughter of Joseph Z. Wainright, and 
they have three children: Louis Wainright, Elizabeth and Lewis Lee. 3. 
Aimee Marie, born in 1882, married Frank J. St. Clair; they have one child, 
Alexander V. 4. Harrold Alexander, born in October, 1885, now with the 
Carnegie Steel Company as both stockholder and employe. 



JOHN WARD, who has been for thirty-six years a resident of Pittsburg, 
and two years ago placed himself on the list of the city's retired business men, 
was born in 1836 in county Mayo, Ireland, a son of John Ward, a native of the 
same county, where he was born in 1786. In 1848 he emigrated to the United 
States and settled in Pittsburg. He married Ann Morris, and the following 
children were born to them : William ; Patrick James ; John, of whom later ; 
George; and Ann. Mrs. Ann (Morris) Ward died in 1847, and the death of 
Mr. Ward occurred in 1881. 

John Ward, son of John and Ann (Morris) Ward, received his education 
in parochial schools in Pittsburg, and also in those of his native land, having 
been twelve years old when the family came from Ireland. After leaving school 
he served for six years as clerk in a store, and in 1856 learned the plasterer's 
trade, which he followed until 1859. -f" 1862 he enlisted for three vears in 
Company K, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olun- 
teer Infantry, and was in the following engagements: Chancellorsville, May 
I, 2 and 3, 1863; Hay Market, Virginia, June 25, 1863; Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, in July, 1863; Falling Waters, Maryland, July 14, 1863; Auburn Mills 
or Coffee Hill, October 14, 1863; Bristow Station, Virginia, October 14, 1863: 
Kelly's Ford, November 7, 1863; Mine Run, Virginia, November 30 and De- 
cember I, 1863; Morton's Ford, Virginia, February 6 and 7, 1864; Wilderness, 
Virginia, May 5 and 6, 1864; Poe River, May 9 and 10, 1864; Spottsylvania, 
Virginia, May 12, 13, 14 and 15, 1864; Tolopotomy Creek, Virginia, May 20, 
1864; Milford Station, Virginia, May 21, 1864; North Anna, Virginia. 
May 23 and 24, 1864; Cold Harbor, Virginia, June i, 2, 3, 9 and 
12, 1864; Petersburg, Virginia, June 16, 17 and 22, 1864; Deep Bottom. 
Virginia, July 27 and August 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, 1864; Ream Station, 
Virginia, August 24 and 25, 1864; assault and capture of Rebel fort in 
front of Petersburg, October 27, 1864; and was in all other engagements under 
General Grant in the Army of the Potomac. On October 14, 1863, he was 
wounded at Coffee Hill or Auburn Mills. From May 10, 1864, to June 17, 
1864, he was commander of the company. On September 14, 1864, he was ap- 
pointed lieutenant, and in October was detailed to take command of the First 



PITTSBURG AKD HER PEOPLE 193 



Brigade, First Division, Second Pioneer Army Corps. He served as a lieuten- 
ant until the close of the war, when he received an honorable discharge. 

After the war Mr. Ward returned to Clarion county, and in 1866 opened 
a general store, continuing the business until 1871. At this time he was ap- 
pointed postmaster, and held the office until he disposed of his business, which 
was in 1871. He then returned to Pittsburg and engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, prospering so that in 1873 he built a store on the corner of Liberty avenue 
and Ellia street, but lost everything in the panic of that year. In consequence 
of this disaster he resumed work at the plasterer's trade, and took contracts 
until 1884. In that year he established himself in the dry-goods and wall- 
paper business at 5140 Butler street. Eighteenth ward, which he continued 
until 1905, when he retired. 

Mr. Ward married, in 1870, Mary H. E., daughter of Christopher Fox, 
who was born April 11, 1805, in Huntingdon county, and was one of the first 
settlers — in 1833 — in Clarion co.unty, owning one of the best farms in the 
countv, eight miles from Clarion town, the county seat. He married Katherine 
Mathews in January, 1835. She was born ]\Iarch 11, 1814, in Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania. Christopher Fox's parents were of German and Irish 
descent. Katherine (Mathews) Fox's parents were of Irish and Scotch 
descent. The following were Christopher and Katherine (Mathews) Fox's 
children: George W., of Minneapolis, Minnesota; "Henrv B. ; Thomas I.; 
Charles C. ; Susanah R. ; Sarah _T. ; Mary M. ; Emily C. ; and Mary H. E., wife 
of John Ward. Mr. Fox died in 1882, and his widow passed away in 1897. 
George W. Fox enlisted at Clarion, Pennsylvania, August i, 1861, in Company 
F, Sixty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was sergeant, second 
lieutenant and first lieutenant in the company. He was discharged March 23, 
1863, on account of wounds received at the second battle of Bull Run, August 
29, 1862, and returned to the service August 28, 1863, as first lieutenant in 
Companv B, Twentv-second Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. He was dis- 
charged June 30, 1866. his services being no longer required, as the war had 
closed. He then went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, September 9, 1866, where 
he has resided since that date. He was married December 24, 1868, at Mans- 
field, Ohio, to Helen M. Smith, and they have had two children. Henry B. 
Fox enlisted in the first three-month men called, and re-enlisted in 1862 and 
served until the close of the war. He has resided in New Bethlehem, Penn- 
sylvania, since the close of the war. He married Mary E. Himes, of New Beth- 
lehem, Pennsylvania, before the war, and they had six children, three sons and 
three daughters. Thomas I. Fox resides at and owns the old homestead, one of 
the finest farms in Clarion county. He married Miss Jane Anderson, and they 
have one daughter, Mrs. Edna Seifert, of New Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and 
one son, Frank, who resides on the farm with his parents and has three chil- 
dren deceased. Charles C. Fox is the foremost business man in Curllsville, 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania, owning a general store and a fine farm adjoining 
the place where he was born. He also owns another farm in the same county. 
He married Miss Rossey Brown, and they have three children living — two sons, 
Harold and Ward, and one daughter, Ruth Katherine, and one son deceased. 
Sarah J. resides on the old homestead with her brother, Thomas I. Mary M. 
is the widow of Frank Klein and a resident of East Brady,' Pennsylvania. Em- 
ily C. is the widow of John C. Over, and her daughter Leida resides in Curlls- 

iii— 13 



194 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

ville, Clarion county, Pennsylvania. Susanah R. was the wife of ex-Judge 
Hicks, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and died May 3, 1904. 

GEORGE M. SCHMIDT, now engaged in the real estate business at 
Pittsburg, is the son of George and Elizabeth (Lang) Schmidt. The father, 
George Schmidt, is a native of Germany, and came to America before the Civil 
war and settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the real estate 
business, which he has continued in until the present time. His children are 
as follows: i. Anna Charlotte. 2. Elizabeth Minerva. 3. Edna Birrtha. 4. 
Henry Frederick. 5. George M. 

George M. Schmidt was reared and received his earlier education in Pitts- 
burg, later entered Princeton University, from which he graduated with the 
class of 1893. He then entered the real estate business with his father, and is 
still thus engaged. 

He was united in marriage to Anna Scott Negley, daughter of Major 
Felix Casper and Margaret A. (Dickson) Negley. Margaret A. Dickson was 
the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Brown) Dickson. j\Iajor Felix Casper 
Negley was born February 28, 1825, and died in Pittsburg October 5, 1902. 
He was the son of John and Anna Elizabeth (Patterson) Negley. (See com- 
plete genealogical sketch of the Negley family in this work.) The children of 
Major Negley were as follows : i. John Dickson, of East Orange, New Jersey, 
married Isabella Sculley. 2. Mary Elizabeth, wife of John S. Sculley. 3. Mar- 
garet Brown, married William W. Ramsay. 4. Felix Casper, married Mary 
Seton Appleton. 5. Jessie Patterson, married Joseph L. Mitchell. 6. Henry 
Hull, married Anne St. Clair Williamson. 7. Minerva Susan, unmarried. 8. 
Alice Keziah, unmarried. 9. William George, married Martha Thomas. 10. 
Anna Scott, wife of George M. Schmidt. 



DAVID GEORGE CLARK, a well-known citizen of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, who resides at No. 7001 Susquehanna street in that city, who has been 
prominent and influential in business circles as well as in the political affairs 
of the city, is a native of this country, but of English descent. 

Clark, father of David George Clark, was born in England, died 

in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in September, 1865. He had learned tlie trade of 
carpentry in England, emigrated to this country in 1831, and followed this oc- 
cupation throughout the active years of his life. He married Elizabeth Baker, 
also a native of England, and they had children: William J.; Benjamin J., 
who died September 25, 1865; Mary Elizabeth, who died in 1900; David 
George, of whom see forward ; John W. 

David George Clark, third son and fourth child of — and Elizabeth 

(Baker) Clark, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1845. His 
education was acquired in the public schools of his native city, and he was 
then occupied with farm work for a number of years. He accepted a position 
as commercial salesman with a firm of tobacco dealers and traveled for them 
for fifteen consecutive years. He associated hidiself in business with the Peo- 
ple's Realty Company, with offices at No. 614 Homewood avenue, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, in 1903, and this business connection exists up to the present 
time (igo6). He devoted much time and attention to forwarding the public 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 195- 

welfare of the city, was assessor of the Twenty-first ward for one term, and 
judge of elections many times. He is a charter member and a consistent at- 
tendant at the Homewood Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of 
Allegheny Chapter No. 445, Royal Arcanum, and of the Junior Order of United 
American Alechanics. 

He married Alary Jane Anderson, daughter of Thomas Anderson, and they 
have had children: William L., born in March, 1882; Thomas H., born No- 
vember 3, 18 — , deceased; Benjamin H., born in 1878; Edward H. 



CHARLES A. BINGAMxA.N, although one of the younger business men 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, has been closely identified with its commercial and 
manufacturing interests for some time, and has acquired a reputation for busi- 
ness ability which is second to none. He is descended from one of the old fam- 
ilies of the state. 

Joseph P. Bingaman, father of Charles A. Bingaman, was born in Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, in November, 1838. He was occupied as a teacher in 
the public schools for a number of years, and came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
in 1867. He entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, where 
his services were highly valued for a number of years. He was prominently 
identified with the municipal government for a period of twenty-five rears, and 
was esteemed for the efficient manner in which he managed all affairs entrusted 
to his care. He married Fannie Slagle, daughter of Christian Slagle, and had 
children : Charles A., see forward ; \^'alter S., a well-known physician of Pitts- 
burg; and Nancy S. 

Charles A. Bingaman, son of Joseph P. and Fannie (Slagle) Bingaman, 
was born in Fairfield, Iowa, September i, 1874. His education was acquired 
in the common and high schools of Pittsburg. He then entered upon his busi- 
ness career, being engaged in the cement business for some years, and in 1904 
associated himself in business with Norman A. Savage, imder the corporation 
name of the Bingaman-Savage Brass Company, for the purpose of manufac- 
turing brass specialties, etc. In this undertaking they have been very success- 
ful, having earned a reputation for sterling integrity and reliability in all their 
business dealings. Mr. Bingaman is a man of pleasant, cheerful demeanor and 
courteous manners, and has a host of friends. He is a member of the follow- 
ing organizations : Homewood Lodge No. 635, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Pittsburg Lodge No. 11, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Improved 
Order of Heptasophs ; Sons of the American Revolution ; and the Americus Re- 
publican Club. 



FREDERICK WTRTH. The late Frederick Wirth, for many years a 
popular hotelkeeper of Pittsburg, was born March 6, 183 1, at Burbach, Saur- 
bricker, Prussia. After leaving school he was employed in the coal mines, and 
at the age of sixteen emigrated to the United States, settling in Pittsburg, where 
he was employed by a Mr. Tickheisen, of Baldwin township, Allegheny county. 
He afterward turned his attention to iron work, and then became proprietor of 
a hotel on Carson street. His success speedily demonstrated the fact that he 
had not mistaken his calling, and in 1889 he opened a hotel on his property on 
the corner of Thirtieth and Carson streets, which he conducted until 1893. His 



196 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

genial qualities as a host caused his hotel to be a place where debates were 
held and topics of the day freely discussed. In 1893 he retired from business, 
thenceforth making his home in a house which he had erected in 1883 on the 
corner of Thirtieth street and Corey alley. He was a Democrat and a member 
of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Wirth married, in 1876, Mrs. Mary C. Snyder, and the following chil- 
dren were born to them : Robert, died when three years old ; Gilbert, died in in- 
fancy ; Charles; and Florence Magdalen, died October 7, 1891, aged six years. 
Charles, the youngest of the three sons, was born in January, 1883, and edu- 
cated in a Roman Catholic parochial school, the Wickersham public schools 
and the Pittsburg Academy. Three years ago he adopted the theatrical pro- 
fession, and has since taken prominent parts in such leading dramas as "A 
Woman's Struggle" and "When the Worlds Sleep." 

The death of Mr. Wirth, which occurred May 7, 1905, deprived the com- 
munity of an excellent man and an active, public-spirited citizen, a liberal con- 
tributor to church work and to the relief of the poor, a man of the kindest dis- 
position, one to whom an appeal for help was never addressed in vain. 

Mrs. Wirth is a daughter of Jacob Hartz and a granddaughter of John 
Hartz, who brought his family from Germany when he was quite advanced in 
years and had retired from business. He died in the home of his daughter. 

Jacob Hartz, son of John Hartz, lived on Twenty-second street, or rather 
on the site of Twenty-second street, all that section of the city being then a 
large farm which he rented from a prominent family. He moved after a time 
to a farm twelve miles from Pittsburg, but returned to the city and opened a 
grocery store on Pine street, which he conducted until advancing years forced 
him to sell the business to his son. Jacob Hartz married Mary Magdalene Bicker, 
and their children were : Margaret, deceased, wife of Peter Snyder ; Kate, 
widow of George Bauldauf ; John, of Carnegie, Pennsylvania ; Peter, of the 
same place ; Mary C. ; Barbara, widow of Charles Wild : Jacob, deceased ; and 
Magdalene, also deceased. Jacob Hartz died in 1884. and his widow passed 
away in 1888. Both were devout Roman Catholics. 

Mary C. Hartz, daughter of Jacob and Mary Magdalene ( Bicker) Hartz, 
was born on what is now Twenty-second street, and married, in 1864, John A., 
born in 1837 ""• Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, son of Henry Snyder, who brought 
his family to the United States and settled in the neighborhood of Twelfth 
street. He died soon after during an epidemic of cholera, and John A. Snyder, 
being thus left fatherless at an early age, was sent by the parish priest of St. 
Michael's church to St. Vincent's College to prepare for the priesthood. On 
leaving college he became a teacher in the parochial school of St. Michael's 
church, and later was elected justice of the peace, serving in that office during 
the remainder of his life. He spoke seven languages and acted as court inter- 
preter in Pittsburg. He was a strong Democrat and an active worker for the 
organization. He died August 10, 1875, leaving one son, Henry A., who was 
a machinist, and at the time of his death kept a grocery store on Carson street. 
He married Catharine Mauhler, and died in 1892. 



PETER BOCK, residing at No. 419 North Euclid avenue, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, is the proprietor of one of the largest grain, feed and hay estab- 
lishments in the city. He is a man of excellent business capacity, carrying into 



I 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 197 



his business methods those methodical habits of thrift and industry inherited 
from German ancestors. 

George Bock, father of Peter Bock, was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 
1822, and died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 1887. He was educated in his native 
land and there also learned the trade of stone masonry, which had been the oc- 
cupation of his father. At the age of sixteen years, in company with two of 
his brothers, he emigrated to America, where he followed his trade for a num- 
-ber of years. Later he branched out into general contracting, making a spe- 
cialty of laying the foundations of buildings, and some of the most imposmg 
and miportant buildings in Pittsburg, notably on the East Side, stand on foun- 
dations which were laid by him. Among tliese may be mentioned the founda- 
tion of the fir&t Roman Catholic church erected in the East End, that of St. 
Peter and St. Paul, in 1857. This church is now located on Larmer avenue. 
He built his own residence in Negley street (now avenue J, and was the owner 
of a number of other pieces of property, which have now greatly increased in 
value. He married Elizabeth Leibeck, born in Hessen, Germany, in 1822, and 
died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1897, and they were the parents of children : 
I. Caroline, who died at the age of seventeen years. 2. Simon, who died in 
1904, married Nina Bruchster, and had five children. 3. Henry J., married 
Annie ^laloney, and resides on Negley avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 4. 
George. 5. Aiary, of Pittsburg. 6. John, who died at tne age of forty-two 
years. 7. Josephine, who married Frederick Schaud, of Pittsburg. 8 and 9. 
Albert and Peter, twins; concerning the latter see forward. 10. Annie. 

Peter Bock, seventh son and ninth child of George and Elizabeth (Lei- 
beck) Bock, was born on North Negley avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 
20, 1864. He received an excellent education m the parochial schools of St. 
Peter and St. Paul, and upon its completion he entered the business of his 
father, a grain and feed line, where he gained a practical and thorough knowl- 
edge of this line of trade. He remained thus employed until 1885, when he 
entered the employ of W. J. Mackey, and at the end of five years entered into 
a partnership with L. P. Koss, also in the grain and feed business, under the 
firm name ot Peter Bock & Company. They also carried on an express business 
under the firm name of L. P. Ross & Company. In both of these enterprises 
they met with unqualified success, and the partnership continued until 1892, 
when Mr. Ross sold his interests to Mr. Bock, who thenceforth carried on the 
business alone on the same methods which had previously characterized it. The 
business, which is carried on on a large scale, is second to none in the city, arid 
is now (1907J located on North Euclid avenue. Mr. Bock has a number of 
other business interests, among them large real estate holdings. He is a mem- 
ber of St. Peter and St. Paul's Roman Catholic church, and of the Catholic 
Mutual Benefit Association. His political support is given to the Democratic 
party. 

Mr. Bock married, September 2j, 1885, Emma Florig, and they have had 
children: Edward P., born January 15, 1887, is an architectural draftsman; 
Alarie Z., born July 19, 1891 ; and Leo A., born in November, 1893. 



HON. CHARLES F. KIRSCHLER. As an example of the success which 
may be attained by honest, determined effort and perseverance there can be no 
name more entitled to mention than that which heads this sketch, that of Hon. 



198 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Charles F. Kirschler, mayor of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. Mayor Kirsch- 
ler, as his name indicates, is of German descent, his ancestors having been 
highly respected members of the community in Germany. 

Christopher Kirschler, father of Mayor Charles F. Kirschler, was born 
in Baden Baden, Germany, in 1828, and there his childhood and early youth 
were spent. He was about fifteen years of age when he emigrated to the 
United States, located in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, where he resided for a 
number of years. Shortly after his marriage he established himself in the 
mercantile business, in which he was successfully engaged until about 1870 
or 1872, when he removed to Allegheny and engaged in the hotel business, 
with which he was closely identified until his death in 1876. His political 
affiliations were with the Republican party, and during the Civil war and 
until the time of his death he wielded considerable influence in the counsels 
of that party. He married, in 1850, Christina Hillenbrand, born in Franken- 
bach, Wuertemberg, Germany, in 1826, daughter of Andrew and Hannah 
Hillenbrand, who came with their children to this country in 1846. The family 
went directly to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, settling in that section which is now 
the junction of Penn and Negley avenues. Subsequently they removed to Lovi, 
Beaver county, where Christina met and married Christopher Kirschler. She 
was for many years a member of the German Evangelical church, and an 
active and consistent worker in its interests. She was known throughout the 
city for her charity, and died, after an illness of five weeks, at the home of 
her daughter, Mrs. William A. Hadfield, No. 413 Jackson street, Allegheny, 
May 10, 1906. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Kirschler were nine 
in number, of whom the following are now (1907) living: i. Mary, wife of 
Charles Beeler, Wallrose post office, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 2. Andrew, 
Ogle post office, Butler county, Pennsylvania. 3. Simon, director of the depart- 
ment of charities, Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 4. Elizabeth, married James Mc- 
Farland, a resident of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 5. Emma, married William 
A. Hadfield, of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 6. Hon. Charles F., see forward. 
7. Edward, resides in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

Hon. Charles F. Kirschler, third surviving son and sixth surviving child 
of Christopher and Christina (Hillenbrand) Kirschler, was born in Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1864. His early years were spent under the 
parental roof, and he attended the public schools of Allegheny. Later he was 
a student at the Iron City and Duffs business colleges. He was but fourteen 
years of age when he accepted a position as errand boy in Palmer's wall paper 
store, in Wood street, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, remained there for one year 
and then secured a position as messenger in the Third National Bank of Alle- 
ghenv. Here he remained about twelve years, his ambition, reliability and 
careful attention to all the details of the numerous duties which fell to his 
share winning for him steady promotion, so that at the end of this period he 
held the position of general bookkeeper. At this time he purchased the grocery 
business of James Lockhart, located at No. 103 Federal street, but one year 
later disposed of it to advantage and associated himself with the D. Lutz & 
Son Brewing Company, being elected secretary and treasurer of this corpora- 
tion. He remained in this capacity for about seven or eight years, severing 
his connection with them in 1902. He then entered into a business association 
with F. H. Tooker and A. L. Brahm, and together they purchased Newell's 
Hotel, in Fifth avenue, Pittsburg. They conducted this very successfully until 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 199 

1904, when Mayor Kirschler retired from the business in order to accept the 
presidency of the Provident Trust Company of Allegheny, to which position 
he had been elected, and which he is tilling at the present time. Since his early 
manhood he had been a stanch supporter of the Republican party, taking a 
keen interest in doing all in his power to advance its Cause. He served as a 
member of the select council of Allegheny four years, during that time being 
chairman of the committee on iinance. His conscientious and efficient manage- 
ment of the matters entrusted to his care did not pass without attracting the 
commendation it so justly deserved, and in the spring of 1906 he was nominated 
and elected to the office of chief magistrate of the city of Allegheny, a position 
he is now filling with dignity and ability. He is noted for his strict sense of jus- 
tice and his devotion to the duties which his position entails, and has won the 
hearty respect and esteem of all political factions. He is an attendant at the 
German Evangelical Lutheran church, and is a member of Allegheny Lodge 
No. 339, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the L^nion Club of 
Pittsburg. 

He married, in 1892, Ida May McClurg, daughter of John McClurg, 
president of the James McClurg Company, cracker bakers, and they have 
had children : Carl F., Jr., John, deceased, and Elizabeth. 



DAVID KERR BRYCE, deceased, who was for many years a member of 
the firm of Bryce Brothers, glass manufacturers of the city of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, was a son of James and Elizabeth (Hughes) Bryce, honored residents 
of the city. 

He was born in the Twenty-si.xth ward of Pittsburg May 13, 1849, and 
died September 22. 1885. He attended the public schools of the city until he 
was twelve years of age, and was then given an office position in the business 
of his father, which was then known as Bryce, Walker & Company, and thus 
entered upon his business career. Later the firm name was changed to Brvce 
Brothers. He was very methodical in his business dealings, of strict integrity, 
and was held in high esteem in business circles. He kept well abreast of the 
times in all matters of public importance, and was a strong advocate of the 
cause of temperance. His political support was given to the Republican party, 
in whose work he took a deep interest, but he was never an office seeker. Early 
in life he became a member of the United Presbyterian church, and was a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees of the First United Presbyterian church of Pitts- 
burg during the ministry of Rev. Dr. W. J. Reid. He served as recording sec- 
retary of the board of trustees for many years, and was a man of sincere inter- 
ests. He was of kind and gentle disposition, beloved by his employes, and 
possessed of many friends. His death was truly and deeply regretted. He 
married, June 19, 1879. Rev. W. G. Reed officiating, Mary N. Norris, a daugh- 
ter of Dowling and Elizabeth K. (BrowneT Norris, and they had two children, 
George D. and Howard, both of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Bryce is a member 
of the L^nited Presbyterian church, and devotes the greater part of her time to 
the cause of religion. She has been a teacher in the Sabbath-school connected 
with that institution for many years, and is a member of the board of trustees 
of tlie Home for Aged People, a member of the Young People's Church L^nion, 
and of the board of directors of the United Presbyterian \\'omen's Association. 

Robert Norris, grandfather of Mrs, Bryce and the American ancestor of 



2DO 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



the Norris family in this country, was a native of Ireland who emigrated ta 
America many years ago. He lived for a short time in the state of New Jersey, 
later removing to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he took up a large 
tract of land in West Deer township, on which he resided all his life. His oc- 
cupation was that of farming. He was a charter member of the United Pres- 
byterian church of Deer Creek, and devoted to its interests. He married, first. 
Rlary Mackrell, and had children: i. James, deceased, married Christiana 
Cornahan, and had nine children. They were also farmers and lived in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. 2. William, deceased, was also a farmer in Butler 
county, where he died in 1906 at the advanced age of ninety-four years. He 
married, first, Mary Watson, by whom he had two children. He married, sec- 
ond, Nancy Hemphill, and raised a family of eleven children. 3. Martha, de- 
ceased, married, first, J. Henry; second, a Mr. Shaw; had four children. 4. 
Margaret, deceased, married, first, a Mr. Culmer ; had four children; second. 
George Gibson ; had four children. 5. Jane, deceased, married William Daw- 
son, a farmer of West Deer township, and had nine children. 6. Mary Ann, de- 
ceased, married James Harvey, a farmer of Butler county, Pennsylvania, and 
had six children. 7. Nancy, deceased, married George Pillow, a farmer of East 
Deer township, Allegheny county. 8. Susan, deceased, married Thomas Mont- 
gomery, and had nine children. 9. Robert, died at the age of twenty-four years. 
10. Dowling. Robert Norris married, second, Catherine Mackrell, but had no 
children by this marriage. 

Dowling Norris, fourth son and tenth and youngest child of Robert and 
Mary (Mackrell) Norris, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, in July, 
1823, and died August 12, 1858. He attended the public schools of the district 
and during his spare time assisted his father in the cultivation of the home farm. 
He was quiet and unassuming in his demeanor, and was a kind and loving 
husband and father. He received for his share of the paternal estate one hun- 
dred acres of land, upon which he was preparing to build a home at the time 
of his death. Later his plans were carried out by his widow. He was a mem- 
ber of the United Presbyterian church, and a regular attendant at the services 
in that institution. He married, October 4, 1848, Elizabeth K. Browne, born 
in Philadelphia September i, 1824, a daughter of James and Annie (Sim) 
Browne. I\'Irs. Dowling Norris since 1886 has made her home with her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Bryce, and though now in her eighty- fourth year is as bright and 
active as many women many years her junior. Her youthful appearance and 
cheerful spirit strengthen this impression. She is a devoted churchwoman and 
a member of the United Presbyterian church at the corner of Stanton and 
North Negley avenues. She takes a keen interest in all the topics of the day. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dowling Norris had children: i. Robert J., who died at the age 
of sixteen years. 2. Annie S., married Robert Gray, of West Deer township, 
and is the mother of children : Edna J., William Garfield, Russell Stanley and 
Paul Barton. 3. Mary N., v,'idow of David K. Bryce, as before stated. 4. 
David, died at the age of about thirty years. 5. William Henry, deceased. He 
was a bright young student, his aim being the study of law, but he was drowned 
at Cape May while trying to save the life of another young man. His body was 
never recovered. 

THE CARROLL-ROOK FAMILIES. The following sketch will treat 
of the families to which Alexander R. Carroll belongs, he being the son 



f 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 201 



of Charles A. and Helen E. (Rook) Carroll. He is one of Greater Pitts- 
burg's esteemed young business men and now the manager of the adver- 
tising department of the Pittsburg Dispatch. He was born in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, Alay 28, 1878. 

The father, Charles A. Carroll, was born in Allegheny City and after re- 
ceiving his education entered the office of the Dispatcli as advertising clerk, and 
subsequently was connected with the firm which published that journal and 
became its advertising manager. He was a staunch Republican, but in no sense 
an office seeker. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity. He was reared in the 
Episcopal church. He married ]\Iiss Helen E. Rook, daughter of Alexander 
William and Harriet Lucile (Beck) Rook. By this union were born: i. Al- 
exander Rook, born May 28, 1878. 2. Eugene O., born ]\Iarch 31, 1880, died 
Julv 18, 1890. 3. Alfred Howard, born April 4, 1882. 4. Harriett Alice, born 
July 9, 1886. 

Alexander Rook Carroll, eldest son of Charles A. Carroll and wife, ob- 
tained his education at the Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, and Trinitv Hall 
and Kiskiminetis preparatory schools. In 1898 he entered the office of the 
Pittsburg Dispatch as collector, and in a few months was promoted to manager 
of the advertising department, in which capacity he has been highly successful. 
Politically he is a supporter of the Republican party and in church faith an 
Episcopalian. 

April 21, 1903, he was married to JMiss Elizabeth Baggaley, born in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, April 3, 1881, a daughter of Ralph and Mary (Arthurs) 
Baggaley. Mr. and ]\Irs. Carroll are popular in the social circles of their part 
of the city. 

Concerning Mrs. Carroll's people it may here be stated that her father, 
Rudolph Baggaley, is a native of Allegheny City, born in 1846, a son of William 
and Elizabeth (Blair) Baggaley. When quite young he was sent to Germany, 
where he received a part of his education and after his return took up news- 
paper work for a short time. He was anxious to serve in the Civil war, and 
when yet young enlisted, but on account of his age and the objections of his 
parents he was discharged, after which he was sent to Germany. He remained 
abroad three years. He was one of the organizers of the George Westinghouse 
Company, with which he was connected for thirty years. He was also con- 
nected with the United States Glass Company, of which he was the president 
at one time. He is now interested in the industry of copper mining. He is 
interested in the Pittsburgh and Montana Mining Company, with offices in the 
Farmers" Bank Building. He is in church faith a Presbyterian. He was mar- 
ried, first, to Mary Arthurs, born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, ]\Iay 27, 1839, ^^d 
died December 19, 1890, and was buried in the Allegheny cemetery. She was 
of the Episcopal religious faith. The children born of this union were: i. 
Robert A., born August 18, 1876, died February 13, 1906. 2. Mary, born Sep- 
tember 3, 1878, wife of David K. Irwin. 3. Elizabeth, born April 3, 1881, wife 
of yiv. Carroll, of this notice. 4. Annabell Whitney, born October 16, 1885. 
wife of Walter R. Hine. 5. William B., born July 21, 1887. After the death 
of ^Irs. Baggaley, the mother of this family. Air. Baggaley married Effie K. 
Irwin, daughter of George M. and Euphemia ( King) Irwin. By this union two 
children were born: i. Euphemia, born May 24. 1898. 2. Ralph, Jr., born 
August 10, 1900. 



202 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Of the Rook family, from which Mr. Carroll descended, the following is 
the family history in brief: 

Alexander W. Rook was born in Pittsburg in 1826. His parents came to 
western Pennsylvania from Xew York state some years prior to his birth. He 
was given the best education then obtainable in Pittsburg, and early in life dis- 
played a bent of mind running to mechanics. While young he gained the con- 
sent of his parents to learn the printer's trade, and he entered the job office 
of Johnston & Stockson as a roller-boy and typesetter. At the same 
time he did not abandon his education. From the outset it was clear to be 
seen that he had made the correct choice of trades, for he soon showed a de- 
cided liking for the art and was apprenticed to the Pittsburg Post for a term 
of six years, a part of the term working on the Chronicle. At the end of his ap- 
prenticeship he was called one of the best printers in the city. But believing 
other larger cities afforded better facilities for advanced printing, he added to 
his fund of knowledge by working in the composing rooms of the Philadelphia 
Ledger and the New York Herald. In 1850 he returned to Pittsburg, where 
he became the first representative of the local typographical union, then just 
formed. Two years later he went to Greensburg and bought an interest in the 
Peiiiis\lvania Argus. This venture did not fully satisfy him, and in 1854 he 
returned to Pittsburg, where he took the foremanship of the Ez'ening Chronicle. 
This was the first opportunity he had really had to display his executive ability, 
and his success was marked. From that date up to 1864 the Chronicle was the 
best-managed paper in the country. In 1865 he formed a partnership with 
Daniel O'Neill and they were associated with J. H. Foster & Company, then 
publishers of the Dispatch. Mr. Rook took full charge of the mechanical end of 
the business, while his partner conducted the editorial part. It was a strong 
combination of natural abilities. In a short time the paper forged its way to 
the forefront. After the death of Mr. O'Neill, in 1877, Mr. Rook found' the 
task too great for his strength, and early in 1880 his health failed and the end 
came quickly. He died August 14, 1880. He was highly charitable and was 
noted for sending poor children from his city to the country on pleasant ex- 
cursions. Pie held high rank in Masonry and other orders. He married, in 
1858, Miss Harriett L. Beck, an alliance which had a marked influence over his 
after life. At his death he left a son, Charles A. Rook, secretary of the Dispatch 
Company ; Helen E., wife of C. A. Carroll ; Edwin M., who died May 28, 1906; 
and Harry C. Rook. Mrs. Rook died September 30, 1907. 



WILLIAM ELSWORTH CREADY, N. D., a physician and surgeon of 
eminence in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, who makes a specialty of eye and throat 
diseases, is a member of a family which has been closely identified with the his- 
tory of the county of Allegheny for some years. 

Peter W. Cready. father of Dr. Cready, was born at Cready's Hill, .Al- 
legheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1^29, and died in 1905. His education was 
acquired in the public schools of what was at that time Birmingham borough, 
but is now known as .South Pittsburg, and he then took up the trade of plaster- 
ing, which he followed with success until the outbreak of the Civil war, when 
he was one of the first to enlist in defense of the rights of his country. At the 
expiration of his first enlistment he re-enlisted and served until the close of 
the war. He enlisted as a private and was detailed to special service under 



I 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 203 

Colonel Ellsworth. His record shows that he served with gallantry and bravery 
and distinguislied himself on a number of occasions. Upon his return to his 
home at the close of the war he resumed his occupation of plastering, branching 
out into the contracting business under the firm name of Cready & Reed, and 
they were the leading firm in that line in South Pittsburg. They received con- 
tracts for all the finest work on the best buildings in the city, and for about 
thirty-five years he had charge of the repairs and general work of the Phillips 
Glass Company estate. He was a staunch upholder of the principles of the Re- 
publican party and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was also 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and of the Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics. 

He married, first, Margaret McKee, a descendant of the old family of that 
name, and they had children: i. Thomas Jeft'erson, who is a contractor and 
builder in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Johnson and has one 
daughter, Amanda. 2. Anna, married Watson Reed, of Irwin Station, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, and had children : Ida ; Daisy ; and Harry, 
deceased. 3. Harry, resides in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. He is a retired 
foreman of the Woods Russia Iron Works, and married Lizzie Hahn, by whom 
he had children : Walter : and Wilbur, deceased. Air. Cready married, second, 
about 1856, Jemima Graham, born in Pittsburg in 1836, and died April 18, 
1904, a daughter of William Graham, a native of Scotland. William Graham 
was a prominent merchant of the South Side for a number of years, was a 
member of the Presbyterian church, and died at the age of forty-six years, 
leaving a widow and four children. Peter W. and Jemima (Graham) Cready 
had children: i. Kate, married George Meckin, a member of the fire depart- 
ment of Pittsburg, and residing in the Thirty-eighth ward of that city. They 
have one child, Elmer. 2. Emma, married Clark Haines, who is auditor in the 
office of the Pittsburg Steel Company and resides in Knoxville, Pennsylvania. 
They have one child, Lillian. 3. William Elsworth, see forward. 4. Robert 
Stanton, deceased, was drowned at the age of fourteen years. 5. Jennie, mar- 
ried Albert Fisher, a glass blower, residing in St. Clair, Pennsylvania. They 
have children : Harry ; Bertha : Frank : William ; Albert ; Emma and Catherine, 
twins; and Fannie. 6. Walter, residing at Xo. 2109 Sarah street. South Side, 
married Gertrude Strock and has children : May, W'alter, Alice. Ruth and 
William. 7. A daughter who died in infancy. 

William Elsworth Cready, N. D., eldest son and third child of Peter W. 
and Jemima (Graham) Cready, was born in the South Side, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, October 12. 1863. His preparatory education was acquired in the 
public schools of W'hat was at that time the borough of Birmingham, now the 
Twenty-sixth ward of Pittsburg, and in the private school of Professor Bane. 
At the age of fifteen years he took up the trade of bricklaying, which he fol- 
lowed for a period of twenty years, at the same time working hard to increase 
his knowledge, in which later events have proved his determination and suc- 
cess. He was graduated from the Columbia College of Chicago, Illinois, in 
1898, then entered Duttins College, in the same city, in which he took a course 
in medicine and was graduated with honor and the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine March 25, 1903. He then entered McCormick"s Neurological College, 
from which he graduated in April. 1905, taking a postgraduate course. He 
then took a special course of study in the Thompsonian Medical and Oste- 
opathic College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He makes a specialty of disease 



204 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

of the eye and throat, and has attained more than a merely local reputation 
through his success in the treatment of these troubles, and his general success 
as a physician and surgeon. He has very finely equipped offices, containing X- 
ray machines and all other appointments that are known to medical science. He 
is a member of the American Medical Union and of the Nature Osteopathic 
Union, holding the office of treasurer in the latter organization. His political 
affiliations are with the Republican party, and he is a regular attendant at the 
services of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Cready married, September 21, 1906, in Pittsburg, Carrie Hochschwen- 
der, born in Pittsburg March 14, 1870, a daughter of John and Carrie (Heinz) 
Hochschwender, who have one other child, Amanda, who married Lewis Modis- 
patcher. John Hochschwender was born in Baden-Baden, Germany, and has 
been in the employ of the T. C. Jenkins Wholesale Grocery Company as sales- 
man for a period of thirty-five years. 



WILLIAM LEVI WOODSIDE, one of the leading undertakers of Pitts- 
burg, was born October 3, 1876, in Wilkinsburg, a son of Archibald Woodside 
and grandson of William Woodside, who was born in Ireland about 1800, being 
a native of the northern part of the country. In his early manhood he emi- 
grated to the United States and settled at Wilkinsburg, where he owned and 
cultivated a farm. On this land the best part of Wilkinsburg now stands.' He 
took no part in politics and was a member of the Reformed Presbyterian 
church. 

William Woodside married a lady whose given name was Sarah, a native 
of Scotland, and they were the parents of ten children, five sons and as many 
daughters. All the sons of this family, wonderful to relate, were deaf mutes, 
while the daughters were entirely normal. Following is the record of these 
children, who all lived to a good old age : Robert, of Doylestown, Pennsyl- 
vania, now eighty-nine, his wife having died in 1905, at eighty, no children; 
Samuel, died from an accident twenty-two years ago, aged sixty-seven ; James, 
died at seventy-eight, shoemaker, as was also his brother Robert ; William, 
killed in 1900 by accident on the Pennsylvania railroad, married, children. 
Thomas, Archibald, Sadie, William and Minnie; Archibald, of whom later; 
Jane, wife of Thomas Dougherty, children, James, Archibald, Sadie and Annie ; 
Rose, wife of John Ashwood, of St. Louis, Missouri, children, Walter, a clergy- 
man, and Annie ; Mary Ann, deceased, wife of Robert Woodside, of W'ilkins- 
burg, children, Robert, Samuel and Annie : Sarah, of Pittsburg : and another 
daughter, name not given. Among the descendants of these children there 
were no deaf mutes. William Woodside, the father, died in Wilkinsburg about 
1876, his wife passing away at the age of eighty. They are buried in Mononga- 
hela cemetery. 

Archibald Woodside, a son of William Woodside, was born in August, 
1838, at Wilkinsburg, and received his education at the institution for deaf 
mutes in Philadelphia, where he spent seven years, and where in addition to 
acquiring an education he learned the tailor's trade. After his return home he 
learned the plasterer's trade, at which he worked six years. At the end of that 
time he and his sister Sarah, in connection with others, organized a school for 
deaf mutes at Pittsburg, the first of the kind in that city. This school was 
subsequently absorbed by the Turtle Creek school, which later moved to Edge- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 205 

wood and is now the largest school of the kind in western Pennsylvania. ' About 
1877 he entered the service of the Armstrong Cork Company, and for fifteen 
years filled the position of foreman of the plant. He remained with the com- 
pany in all thirty years, and in January, 1907, was placed on the retired list in 
recognition of his long and faithful service. He erected his present home in 
1870, and also built three other houses, which he sold. He was one of the 
prime movers in the founding of the Home for Deaf Mutes at Doylestown. 
His church membership is with the Reformed Presbyterians. 

Mr. Woodside married, in 1868, Sarah E. Showalter (also a mute), born 
September 6, 1847, at Smithfield, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
Levi and Elizabeth Showalter, and sister of the Honorable J. B. Showalter, for 
several terms member of congress from Butler, Pennsylvania. Sarah E. Sho- 
walter was educated at the Philadelphia School for Deaf Mutes. Mr. and Mrs. 
Woodside have been the parents of the following children : Daisy, died at the 
age of three years ; Alaud, died at seven years ; William Levi, of whom later ; 
Annie, died aged four years; Samuel, born October 14, 1881, of Pittsburg, an 
engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad, Allegheny division, married Euphemia 
McAllister, one son, Melvin, born December 25, 1905 ; Sarah B., wife of Ira 
A. Wilson, of Wilkinsburg, one son, Joseph ; and Archibald G., born May 6, 
1887, at home. 

William Levi Woodside, son of Archibald and Sarah E. (Showalter) 
Woodside, received his education in the public schools of Wilkinsburg, and 
after leaving school was for four years employed by Thomas D. Turner, an 
undertaker of Wilkinsburg. He was then for one year in the service of the 
H. C. Frick Coke Company, being employed in the shipping department and at 
clerical work. During the following year he was employed at the undertaking 
business in Verona, Pennsylvania. At the end of that time he returned to Pitts- 
burg and went into business for himself, purchasing the livery establishment 
of J. M. Bigger and adding to it the undertaking business. He is among the 
leaders of his calling in the city, having graduated from the L^nited States 
School of Embalming, Chicago, and having also passed examination of the state 
board of embalming. He belongs to the Knights of Malta and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and in the sphere of politics affiliates with the Repub- 
lican party. He is a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Woodside married, July 11, 1895, Sarah Ruth, born August 23, 1880, 
daughter of Calvin and Laura B. Hibbets, and they have had one son, William 
Calvin, born April 6, 1897. and died July 23, 1897. Mrs. W^oodside is a gradu- 
ate of the Wilkinsburg high school. Her parents are now residents of Los 
Angeles, California, Mr. Flibbets having retired from business. 



JOHN O'DONNELL, of Pittsburg, now living in retirement, but during 
his active career of half a century identified with the railroad system and the 
coal industry of his native state, was born March 17, 1836, in Butler county, a 
son of Hugh O'Donnell and grandson of Connell O'Donnell, who was born in 
Donegal, Ireland, whence he came to the United States in the latter part of the 
seventeenth century. He settled first in Philadelphia, and when Ohio was made 
a state set out with a company for that then wild region, but, falling ill, was 
left behind in Westmoreland county. Thence he migrated in 1797 to Pitts- 



2o6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



burg, hiring a house on the corner of Third and Market streets at an annual 
rent of twenty dollars. 

He was a tailor and followed his trade during the winters, going in the 
summers to Butler county, where he had previously purchased land from the 
government for fifty cents an acre, ten cents down and the remainder payable in 
twenty years, at no interest. He cultivated this land, spending his winters in 
Pittsburg until 1801, when he settled permanently on his farm, where he had 
built a log cabin. It was there he passed the remaining years of his life, a 
period of more than twenty years, but was several times driven from his land 
by the Indians. He enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment. 
Pennsylvania Alilitia. and served in the war with the Greek Indians on the 
Columbia river. David Boyle being the captain of his company and James Gil- 
lespie the first lieutenant. He was a Roman Catholic, and when living in Pitts- 
burg, where there was no church of that faith, mass was celebrated in his 
tailor shop. 

Connell O'Donnell married Alice Dougan, also a native of Ireland, and 
the following children were born to them : Hugh, of whom later ; John ; 
Charles; Dennis; James; Bridget; Mary, and Ellen. Mr. O'Donnell died in 
1825. and his widow survived him nearly thirty years, passing away in 1854, 
the former being the first Catholic buried in the county. 

Hugh O'Donnell. son of Connell and Alice (Dougan) O'Donnell, was born 
January I. 1796. in Westmoreland county, and received a good education in 
Pittsburg, working on the farm during the summers. When a young man he 
helped to build the Pennsylvania canal from Pittsburg to Johnstown, and also 
assisted in the construction of the dam the breaking of which destroyed the 
latter city. He worked on the old portage road, the first road built in the 
county, until he became by inheritance the owner of his father's farm, on which 
thereafter he made his home. He served as teamster in the army during the 
war with the Creek Indians, and in politics was a Jackson Democrat. He was 
a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Hugh O'Donnell married. January 28. 1834, the Reverend Father Gal- • 
litzin officiating. Esther Pagan, born January 14, 1809, a daughter of Peter and 
Bridget Fagan, the former born August 15, 1773, in Conewago, Adams county, 
and the latter September 8, 1779, in York county. Peter Fagan was a shoe- 
maker, working at his trade in the winter and farming in the summer, in 
Cambria county. He died April 18, 1846, and the death of his widow occurred 
November 17, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh O'Donnell became the parents of 
the following children ; i. Charles, born November 14, 1834, died November 
14, 1894. He was a passenger engineer and a farmer of Butler county, and 
married Caroline Kuhns. of Pittsburg. Their children were : Albert, Harry 
and Carl._ 2. John, of whom later. 3. James, born November 5, 1837, a farmer 
of Butler county, and he served in the army, his death being the result of hard- 
ships then endured. He married, first. Belle Myers, and, secondly. Belle Hough, 
and left two sons, Charles and William. 4. Margaret, born November 30. 
1839, wife of Anthony Shroup, a farmer, and mother of four children, Charles, 
George, Francis and Mary. 5. Dennis, born August 24, 1841, in the oil busi- 
ness in Butler county, married Sarah Galagher, and has one child, Mary. 

6. Bridget, born August 18. 1843. ^^''^^ of Michael Gatens. a farmer of Butler 
county, and mother of five children, Ellen. Jane, Esther, Sophie and Mary. 

7. l''clix, born March 22, 1846, was in the oil business, married Mary Land- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 207 



graft', and has four children, ^Margaret, WaUer, Gerome and Edward. 8. Peter, 
born May 6, 1848, was an engineer and met an accidental death. 9. Mary, 
born January 20, 1852, wife of Thomas Ellsworth, who was in the oil business. 
Hugh O'Donnell, the father of this family, died June 13, 1879. 

John O'Donnell, son of Hugh and Esther (Pagan) O'Donnell, was edu- 
cated in the common schools of Butler county, and while still a boy assisted 
his father in the labors of the farm. He remained at home until the age of 
. sixteen, when he became a driver on the canal, but after serving for a short 
time obtained employment as driver on the old portage road between plains 4 
and 5.- In 185 1 he became car-hitcher on the incline, being afterward made 
fireman at the head of incline No. 7, serving in that capacity until 1853. He 
then entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as a car- 
buckler at the foot of plain No. 5, working under Levi McGuire, the despatcher. 
In 1854 he was made brakeman, a position which he retained until 1859, when 
he was promoted to that of fireman on freight. In 1861 he enlisted for three 
months in the Third Regiment, "Pennsylvania Volunteers, but was soon dis- 
charged on account of illness. From 1862 to 1864 he held the position of en- 
gineer, being employed on trains carrying soldiers and supplies for the army. 
In 1864 he re-enlisted in Company E, Two Hundred and First Regiment, and 
served until the close of the war, being mustered out at Harrisburg June 21, 
1865. 

On returning home he again entered the service of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company, and until 1881 was engineer on the passenger service for this 
company and also for the Baltimore & Ohio and Pan Handle Railroad Com- 
panies. In 188 1 he became superintendent of the coal works at Connellsville, 
holding the position sixteen years, at the end of that time moving to Home- 
stead, where for four years he had charge of the pressure pumps. He was 
then placed on the Carnegie pension list. He belongs to Post No. 236, G. A. R., 
and is a Republican, having cast his first vote for Lincoln. He is a member 
of St. Canice's Roman Catholic church of Knoxville. 

Mr. John O'Donnell married Lydia Noel, born January 6, 1837, in Adams 
county, and they have been the parents of the following children : Martha, 
born December 25, 1857, died in youth; Margaret, born July 17, 1859, wife of 
Thomas Barnard, of Brooklyn, New York; Josephine, born May 28, 1866. re- 
sides with her sister Alargaret; Elmer, born October 18, 1861, died in youth; 
John, born April i, 1870, a machinist of Connellsville, married Minnie Woods; 
Charles, born May i, 1872, a civil engineer for the Pittsburg Filtrating Plant; 
Irene, at home ; and Estella, at home. - 



THOMAS A. COLEMAN, one of the largest builders and contractors of 
the borough of Wilkinsburg, was born July 9, 1856, near Bennington, Ver- 
mont, a son of Thomas S. and Alice S. Coleman, the former a native of Ire- 
land, who came to the L'nited States in the early thirties of the nineteenth cen- 
tury and settled as a farmer and landowner in \'ermont. He and his wife were 
the parents of a large family. 

Thomas A. Coleman migrated in 1877 to western Pennsylvania, settling 
first in Braddock, where he engaged in the mill business. Later he moved to 
Wilkinsburg and began to work at his trade, which was that of a tinsmith. 
After following his trade for some years he went into the building and con- 



2o8 ■ .-:; CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



trading business, in which he is still engaged, he having been very successful 
from the beginning. He has already associated with him two of his sons, the 
firm being now known as Thomas A. Coleman & Sons, builders and contractors. 
They have erected many of the fine residences in the Liberty Valley and have 
built a great portion of the residences in the Third Ward of Wilkinsburg, and 
are recognized as one of the largest, if not the largest, building and contract- 
ing firms of residential properties in this region. In recent years they have 
built on an average from twenty to twenty-five dwellings annually. They 
make a specialty of houses, rarely taking contracts 'for other buildings, and 
employ a very large force of men. Mr. Coleman constantly handles a great 
deal of real estate, buying lots and improving them. In local politics, in which 
he has considerable influence, he is an independent voter, but in national aiifairs 
is a staunch Republican. 

Mr. Coleman has been twice married. His first wife was Mary, daughter 
of John and Alargaret (Shaup) Miller, of Mifflin township, the former super- 
intendent of the Lyall mines at Dravosburg and Camden. Mr. and Mrs. Cole- 
man had four children: Edward J., Thomas S., Alice May and Reuben An- 
drew. Mrs. Coleman died in 1895. The second and present wife of Mr. Cole- 
man was Elizabeth, daughter of John E. and Elizabeth A. Delaney. 

NORMAN FRANKLIN SAVAGE, who has for a number of years been 
prominently identified with the commercial and manufacturing interests of the 
city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and who resides at No. 7324 Kelly street, in 
that city, was born in Confluence, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, April ir. 
1873. His education was obtained in the public and high schools of Pittsburg, 
and he was then apprenticed to the plumbing trade. After following this for 
some time he turned his attention to the manufacture of brass specialties, mak- 
ing a decided success of this venture in business. He organized the company 
of Bingaman & Savage in 1904, for the purpose of manufacturing brass articles 
of every description. In 1907 he organized the Jackson Amusenient Company, 
which now operates Hague Park, Jackson, Michigan, and which has been a 
decided success. He has devoted much time and attention to affairs of public 
moment in the city, and was elected a member of the common council of the 
city in February, 1906. 

Mr. Savage married Charlotte Nicholson, daughter of George P. Nichol- 
son, of Pittsburg. 



WESLEY SIMPSON WAKEFIELD, one of the skilled civil engineers 
of Greater Pittsburg, was born in West Wheatfield township, Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, October 30, 1857. He descends from the following ancestral 
line : 

The founder of the Pennsylvania branch of the Wakefield family in the 
United States was David Wakefield (I), born on the family estate on the road 
between Aughrim and Ballinasloe, Galway county, Ireland. He was the son of 
Robert Wakefield, of the same estate, the son of Robert Wakefield (who died 
in England in the prime of his life from wounds received in battle), the son 
of Doctor Albert Wakefield, who was the son of John Wakefield, the emigrant 
from England to Ireland. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 209 



(I) David Wakefield, founder of the family in this country, married 
the daughter of Jeremiah Wade, a wealthy landed proprietor and neighbor of 
the Wakefields in Galway county, Ireland. He emigrated to America be- 
tween 1768 and 1773. Tradition says that he was implicated with his brothers, 
Robert, beheaded ; Gilbert, arrested with Robert and imprisoned for life, and 
Samuel, who escaped in a rowboat to Scotland, in the plot against Catholic 
rule in Ireland, and when detected David was hidden by his wife in a hogshead 
of clothes, with which she embarked to America and was three days out at sea 
before the captain of the ship knew he was on board. By this means it is confi- 
dently believed that he made iiis escape to this free country. Upon his arrival 
in Baltimore he first settled in Path Valley, situated between the Tuscaroras 
and Conecocheague mountains, in Perry county, then known as Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, where some of the younger of his children were born. 
After residing there for about sixteen years he settled on the north side of the 
Conemaugh river, opposite Squirrel Hill, now New Florence, then in Cumber- 
land, but now in Indiana county, at a point where now stands the village of 
Centreville. After remaining there some two years and finding the title to 
his land was defective they moved five miles to the northwest, to near the 
headwaters of Richard's Run in Wheatfield township, sometime between 1788 
and 1794, and there remained and where David died and was buried in the 
familv burying-ground on the farm site of the old homestead. After his death 
the widow went to reside with her eldest daughter, Joanna, who married Wil- 
liam Carroll, a nephew of Charles Carroll, of CarroUton, Virginia, who was 
one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and who lived in the 
\\olf Creek settlement, Mercer county, where she died and her remains were 
laid beside her husband's. The descendants of David Wakefield and wife were 
as follows: i. Thomas, born 1757, married Elizabeth Morton, niece of John 
IMorton, who signed the Declaration of Independence; died in 1844; was in the 
Revolutionary war and shared the hardships of the winter at Valley Forge with 
General Washington. 2. Rev. James, born November 11, 1767, married Mary 
Clark; died February 18, 1840; was the first Methodist minister in Indiana 
county. 3. John, married Elizabeth Newlon, 1803, who was his nurse while 
ill at a hotel on a visit to Dublin, Ireland. 4. Jeremiah, married Isabella Lynn. 

5. David, born in October, 1778, married Jennie C. Carnahan. 6. Joanna, 
married William Carroll. 7. Margaret, married Thomas Bracken. 8. !Mary, 
married her nephew, Robert Wakefield. 

(II) David Wakefield, the grandfather of the subject, was born October 
II, 1778, in Path \*alley. Perry county, Pennsylvania ; married Jennie C. Carna- 
han, also of Indiana covmty, where he lived and died September 16, 1844, and 
was buried by the side of his wife in the family burying ground, where tomb- 
stones mark their resting place. His wife was the daughter of Alexander and 
Elizabeth Carnahan. The issue of David Wakefield and wife (II) was as fol- 
lows: I. John W., born April 10, 1806; removed to Indianola, Iowa; married 
Fannie Byers : died January 13, 1873. 2. Elizabeth, born August 24, 1808; 
married Jacob Gamble ; died February 28, 1859. 3. Mary, born January 4, 
1812; married George Gamble; died May 21, 1880. 4. James, born June 8, 
1814: married Cynthia Palmer; was a farmer and surveyor; inherited a share 
of the Wakefield estate; died February 18, 1888. 5. Jane, born June 10, 1818; 
married William Palmer, and they moved West; died December 19, 1892. 

6. Jeremiah, born April 19, 1823; married Lucinda Palmer; died September 

iii — 14 



210 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



2y, 1887. 7. Caroline, born October 7, 1825, unmarried, died April 4, 1889. 
8. Thomas P., born September 10, 1829; married Ann Sides; served in the 
Civil war; died January 2J, 1865. 

(Ill) Jeremiah Wakefield, the subject's father and the son of David 
Wakefield (II) and wife, was born April 19, 1823, in the Wakefield home- 
stead, West Wheatfield township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, and was reared 
on his father's farm, having but a limited advantage for education, but by per- 
sonal application, however, he fitted himself for the duties and obligations of 
life. While vet but a mere lad he taught school in the country districts and 
became an important factor in promoting the best interests of the community. 
He was of a truly studious nature and enjoyed the good library which he gath- 
ered around him. July 2, 1844, he was married to Lucinda Palmer, daughter 
of Pater and Frances (Gafney) Palmer, a prominent farmer on the "Ridge" 
not far from the Wakefield farms. They lived on the farm that he inherited 
from his father's estate and followed the occupation of a farmer. He became 
an earnest advocate of the public school system, as well as every other enter- 
prise for the uplift of man and had the general endorsement of all about him. 
Being an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church, he organized the first 
society of that denomination, known as the "German Methodist Episcopal 
church" (because it was largely a German community). He was thoroughly 
good and had the interests of the church at heart ; his brothers in Methodism 
made him a local preacher of that denomination. Later he was an ordained 
minister of the Gospel, and a member of the Pittsburg Conference, where he 
served as a supply at Greenville, Diamondville, Strongstown and Belsane. 

Politically he was a Jefferson Democrat, and ever took an active part in 
public and political affairs. He was honored by his party by being elected 
county commissioner in 1885. His residence was at the county seat, Indiana, 
during his incumbency, where he died during the term for which he was 
elected, on September 27, 1887, of capillary bronchitis, the result of a severe 
cold. His remains were interred in the old family burying groimd on the 
Wakefield homestead. West Wheatfield township, Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Wakefield were as fol- 
lows: I. Mary J., born January 21, 1846, married Jacob Mack, a farmer of 
Indiana county, and died in April, 1906. 2. ]\Iartin L., born July 12, 1848, 
died September 3, 1852. 3. William E., born December 22, 1850, died Feb- 
ruary 5, 1868. 4. Caroline E., born February 21, 1853, married John H. Camp- 
bell, a farmer now residing in Indiana county. 5. Elizabeth M., born January 
I, 1855, married John H. Kissinger, a music teacher and composer, residing at 
Blairsville, Pennsylvania. 6. Wesley S., the subject, born October 30, 1857, 
of whom later. 7. Clara F., born P'ebruary 12, i860, died September 29, 1865. 
8. Martha Emma, born January 28, 1862, died October 10, 1865. 9. George 

Washington, born March 20, 1865, married Miss • Campbell, and is in the 

employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Blairsville. 

The subject's mother, Lucinda (Palmer) Wakefield, was the daughter of 
Peter and Frances (Gafney) Palmer, born May 4, 1823, and died January 13, 
1890, after suffering nine months from an operation for a tumor under her arm 
on the right side. She was buried with tlie other deceased members of the 
family in the old family burying ground on the Wakefield farm. She was a 
devoted member of the ^lethodist Episcopal church and always exemplified her 
Christianity by her daily walk. 



PITTSBURG AND HER' PEOPLE 211 



(IV) Wesley Simpson Wakefield (subject) was born on his father's 
farm in West Wheatfield township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, October 30, 
1857. He attended the public schools of the township and the higher schools 
of the county, among others the Indiana Normal, and took a private course of 
instruction in civil engineering. His first engagement at engineering work was 
in 1 881 as transit man in Kentucky on the Paris, Georgetown & Frankport 
Railroad, under George W. Luii'er, who located the famous Pack-Saddle Hol- 
low line of the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 1882 Mr. Wakefield was appointed 
assistant engineer by the chief engineer, O. W. Barnes, engaged in the survey 
of an opposition line to the Pennsylvania system. In the winter of 1882-83, 
when Air. LutYer was made division engineer in the location of a line in the 
Perkiomen \'alley in Montgomery and Lehigh counties from Norristown to 
Allentown, Pennsylvania, Mr. Wakefield was appointed assistant to the chief 
engineer in charge of the field operations. Having completed that work on 
May 5, 1884, he engaged in the engineering department of the city of Pitts- 
burg under the directorship of Edward M. Bigelow, serving continually until 
August I, 1903, when he resigned to engage in the private practice of his pro- 
fession, which he has since followed in Greater Pittsburg. Here his services 
have been a part of the work accomplished in her rapid advancement and sub- 
stantial development. When he was first employed by the city he had charge 
of the extension of the sewer system, and the first great efiforts along that line 
were under his direction. The first sewer in the now populous section of East 
Liberty Valley, on Collins avenue, was constructed under his immediate super- 
vision, where now there is scarcely an alley on which there is not a public 
sewer. The Two Mile Run, or Thirty-third Street Basin main trunk line, was 
built under his supervision. 

The Pittsburg charter of 1888 made it possible to extend the line of opera- 
tion in engineering accomplishments by gathering under one head all the mu- 
nicipal engineering divisions. In this Mr. Wakefield's work was no insignificant 
part, for many important enterprises were carried to a successful issue through 
his efiforts, some of which may be enumerated, as the location of Beechwood 
and Grant Boulevards, drives and walks in Highland Park ; location and esti- 
mate of supply main from Reservoir No. 2 to downtown district. He also had 
charge of the field work in the preparation of plans and estimated cost for the 
construction of a filter plant, besides other lines of work in the development 
and extension of Pittsburg. During the winter of 1893-94, "the hard times 
winter," so well recalled by the poorer class, when they received one dollar a 
day subscribed by the citizens of the municipality and augmented one hundred 
per cent by Andrew Carnegie for laboring in and beautifying the parks, Mr. 
Wakefield was placed in charge of the engineering in Highland Park. He 
commenced when all looked unpromising, but took the abandoned reservoir — 
now beautiful Lake Carnegie — cleaned it out and put it in its present condition. 
This with many more improvements were made by the direction of the sub- 
ject. 

Mr. Wakefield is a member of the Emery Methodist Episcopal church on 
Highland avenue, and is a member of the board of trustees, which built and 
dedicated, October 6, 1907, the new church. He belongs to the Masonic fra- 
ternity, including Washington lodge No. 253, F. and A. M., in which he has 
filled all the chairs : Pittsburg Chapter No. 268 ; Duquesne Commandery No. 
72 ; all Pittsburg ]\Iasonic societies. As a member of the Board of Trade he is 



212 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



serving on the committee on iMunicipal Affairs. Politically he is a supporter 
of the Republican party and takes great interest in all local movements. 

He was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Robinson, September 22, 1895, 
at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, her home. By this union the issue is as follows: 
I. Jessie \''irginia, born May 22, 1897. 2. Paul Vincent, born August 29, 
1899. 3. Weslev Simpson, Jr., born February 5, 1901. 

The American ancestor of this family of Robinsons was Irwin Robinson, 
a native of Enniskillen, county Fermanagh, Ireland. Being an English sub- 
ject when the revolution broke out in America, he was drafted into service and 
sent to this country to take part in that struggle. He was through the entire 
conflict, including the engagement at Yorktown. He carried a Bible in his 
pocket, and it was struck by a Yankee bullet, cutting quite a good sized hole in 
the book. At another time he was struck by a bullet in the arm, which ball he 
carried the remainder of his days. He was present at the surrender of Lord 
Cornwallis, captured by Washington, and after peace was declared returned 
to England. He soon found he had been fighting on the wrong side, and 
although entitled to a pension from the government he refused to accept it and 
later became one of the most loyal Americans. He studied medicine for three 
years and practiced his profession, especially in surgery. 

His love affair was indeed quite full of romance. At twenty-five years of 
age he was a manly fellow, five feet nine inches high, hair brown and straight. 
He "fell in love" with Catherine Elliott, a beautiful, slender figure. She had 
dark brown eyes and wore curls in ringlets. She was but fifteen years of age, 
and for this reason only they were forbidden to marry. Several times her 
parents locked her up in her bedchamber. The house was a cottage of one 
story. At the time of the elopement her parents had kept her fully a month 
in her room, her bed being pushed against the wall, which was made of stone ; 
but the girl was not to be outwitted, and silently worked her plans to com- 
pletion. She finally succeeded in getting a hole through the wall large enough 
to let herself out, and on one dark night she crept through the wall (the moon 
being invisible) and met her lover and they rode away on horseback and were 
married. They became the parents of George and John Robinson. These 
three, with the Elliott family, left England for America in 1792. They came in 
a sailing vessel and were on the ocean from May to September and encountered 
fearful storms. Mrs. Irwin Robinson brought plentv of flax along, thinking, 
it is related, that she could not get it in the "woods of America." They finally 
located in what is now Blair county, Pennsylvania, and purchased land of a 
Mr. Holliday, where now stands the city of Hollidaysburg. The Elliotts set- 
tled in the Ligonier Valley, between Fairfield and Ross Furnace. The daugh- 
ter's love of both parents caused them to settle in a less productive country 
four miles southwest of where Bolivar stands today. Chambersburg v^'as the 
nearest place from which to procure supplies. They followed a trail across a 
wild country on pack-horses midst numerous tribes of Indians. Land was 
cheap — four dollars an acre. 

Irwin Robinson was a Methodist but Quaker in habits and language. Mrs. 
Robinson's mother's name was Mary Woods. She had been a member of the 
Church of England, but became a Methodist, and three of her sons became 
^.lethodist ministers. The whole family was zealous in church work. Irwin 
Robinson and wife, the founders in this country, had twelve children: George, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 21? 



John, Jane, Hance, Irwin, Thomas, Alary, James, WilHam, Elhott, Christopher 
and Ehzabeth. 

George was born July 5, 1788, died November 3, 1869. He married 
Susanna Urinker, born May 23, 1895, and died August 7, 1887. They settled 
about four miles from Greensburg on a farm. Methodist services were fre- 
quently held at their house. They were parents of children as follows : Wil- 
liam, Susanna, Elizabeth, Margaret, Mary, John, Henry, Jacob, Daniel and 
James. The three latter always resided at Greensburg. 

(Hj William Robinson, of the above family, became the father of Mrs. 
Walsh of this sketch. He was born in Hempfield township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, Alarch 19, 1818, and died May 31, 1884. He was a 
merchant, owning a store in Greensburg for many years. He was possessed of 
much intelligence and was a devout Christian and a prominent member in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. For many years he served as class-leader. Politi- 
cally he was an ardent supporter of the Republican party and was an active 
member of the Masonic fraternity. He married Maria Margaret Kemp, daugh- 
ter of Solomon and JNIary Magdalena (Wentling) Kemp, March 3, 1847. She 
was born Xovember 24, 1825. Her father's family were natives of Germany. 
Their children were as follows: Emma, Homer C, Mary S., Anna M., Wil- 
liam, Lydia B., George F., Joseph Kemp and Jessie, wife of Mr. Walsh, of 
Pittsburg. 

REAMER FAMILY. This old Pennsylvania family, now represented in 
Pittsburg by Dr. Harry Black Reamer, a leading dentist of that city, is of 
German origin, the founder having emigrated from the Fatherland about 1790 
and presumably settled in Greene county, Pennsylvania. The succeeding gen- 
erations are traced below. 

(I) Jacob Reamer, the first ancestor of whom we have any authentic 
record, was a farmer in Monongahela township. He was of German descent, 
retaining the'German form of the family name, and it was his father who was 
the founder of this branch of the family in America, according to a well-founded 
tradition. Jacob Reamer married and became the father of a number of chil- 
dren. He w'as among the early settlers in Greene county, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Benjamin F. Reamer, son of Jacob Reamer (I), was a farmer and 
also an itinerant merchant, traveling with his wagon through the different por- 
tions of Pennsylvania. During the Civil war he served in Company F, Sev- 
enth Regiment, West Virginia \'olunteer Infantry, Captain Benjamin Morris 
and Colonel Thompson commanding. After two years of valiant service his 
regiment was consolidated into four companies by requisition of the War de- 
partment, the officers having been mustered out and -the privates formed into a 
battalion commanded by Lieutenant J. H. Lockwood. Benjamin Reamer served 
until the war ended and was honorably discharged. His son Jacob, Jr., served 
in the same company w-ith his father and died in the service. Benjamin Reamer 
married for his first wife Marion Minor, daughter of Noah Minor and wife, 
whose maiden name was Minks. The Minor family was also among the 
pioneer settlers in Greene countr, Pennsylvania. Their children were : Jacob, 
who served during the Civil war in the same company as his father ; John ; 
Minor Noah, of whom later ; Louisa, and another daughter. Benjamin F. 
Reamer was about seventy at the time of his death, which occurred soon after 
his return from the war. 



214 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

(III) Minor Noah Reamer, son of Benjamin F. (II) and Marion 
(Minor) Reamer, was born 1846 in Monongahela townsliip, Greene county, 
and grew up on a farm, receiving his education in the local schools. In Oc- 
tober, 1861, being then but fifteen years old, he enlisted at Greensboro, Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, in Company G, Eighth-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, Captain Abrams and Colonel Joshua B. Howell command- 
ing, and served two years and two months, being discharged May 9, 1863, at 
Hilton Head, South Carolina, by reason of physical disability. After his return 
home he studied dentistry with Dr. Kramer, subsequently establishing himself 
in business at Mount Morris, Greene county, where he prospered in his pro- 
fession and which he practiced during the remainder of his life, building up a 
reputation second to none. He owned his residence and was also the possessor 
of other town lots. He served on the borough council and on the school board 
and in politics was a Republican. He was a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 

Minor Noah Reamer married Fannie, daughter of John Gabler Black, 
whose grandfather, Jacob Black, came from Virginia and settled in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming, owning two hundred 
acres on Whitley creek. He was a prominent justice of the peace, and died at 
an advanced age. His wife was Margaret Brienschofif, and they were the 
parents of twelve children. 

Benjamin F. Black, son of Jacob and Margaret (Brienschoff) Black, was 
born in 1795, and was the owiier of two farms, comprising four hundred and 
seventy-five and one hundred and forty acres, respectively, also eighteen hun- 
dred acres in West Virginia. He was extensively engaged in cattle dealing 
and was interested in the manufacture of glass. He took a prominent part in 
the councils of the Whig party and represented his county in the house of rep- 
resentatives. He was actively interested in the public school movement, and 
for more than twenty-five years held the office of justice of the peace. Benja- 
min F. Black married Sophia, born about 1803, in Baltimore, Maryland, daugh- 
ter of John C. and Margaret (Kramer) Gabler. Mr. Gabler came to this coun- 
try from Germany about 1790, and became one of the original glass manufac- 
turers of New Geneva, Pennsylvania. The following children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Black: Folorest ; James A.; Margaret; Sophia; John Gabler, of 
whom later ; Francis K. ; Josephine B. ; Charles A., and Mary. Mr. Black, the 
father, died in 1843, and was survived twenty years by his widovi^ who passed 
away about 1863. 

John Gabler Black, son of Benjamin F. and Sophia (Gabler) Black, was 
born May 25, 1827, received a common school education, and after leaving 
school served for a time as clerk in the glass factory of Hall & Boughm. He 
afterward conducted a general store at Greensboro for ten years, and then 
served another ten years as traveling salesman for Hamilton & Company, 
stoneware manufacturers. His next venture was boating on the Monongahela 
river, and in 1890 he retired, having since been a resident of Greensboro. For 
ten years he served as burgess of Greensboro, and he has also held various 
minor offices. He belongs to Craft Lodge No. 329, F. and A. M., and has 
served as secretary of that body. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. Black married, in 1848, Rebecca A., born in 1827, daughter of 
^\ illiam Bowers, and they became the parents of two children: Fannie, wife of 



PITTSBURG JXD HER PEOPLE 215 

Minor Noah Reamer, and John C, a dentist of Greensboro. Mrs. Black died 
in 1873. 

Elinor Xoah and Fannie (Black) Reamer have been the parents of the 
following children : One who died in infancy ; Nellie E., wife of Dr. J. S. Ash- 
brook ; Harry Black, of whom later, and Emma D., wife of Robert B. Murray, 
one son, Harry Reamer. The death of Dr. Reamer, the father, occurred Febru- 
ary 5, 1895, and his widow has since resided with her daughter, Mrs. Ash- 
brook. 

(IV) Harry Black Reamer, son of Minor Noah (HI) and Fannie 
(Black) Reamer, was born June 15, 1874, at Greensboro, and attended the 
common schools of Mount Morris. While still a boy he began the study of 
dentistry under the instruction of his father, whose assistant he became at a 
very early age, displaying a natural aptitude for the profession and remaining 
with his father until the connection was dissolved by death. In 1895-1896 
he attended the Pennsylvania Denjal College, Philadelphia, and then came to 
Pittsburg, completing his course in the Pittsburg Dental College and receiving 
from that institution the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. In the spring 
of 1898 he established himself in the office which had been his father's, at 
Mount Morris, remaining until 1901. In that year he came to Pittsburg and 
opened an office in the Vilsack building, where he has since been in the enjoy- 
ment of a very large practice. 

On September 10, 1900, he was made a Mason in Waynesburg Lodge No. 
153, F. and A. M. In the sphere of politics he affiliates with the Republicans. 
He is a member of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Reamer married, October 17, 1906. Carolyn Priscilla, daughter of 
Newton Taylor, granddaughter of Edward Taylor and great-granddaughter of 
Jonathan Taylor, who was among the early settlers of Crawford count}-, Penn- 
sylvania, where he owned a farm of two hundred acres about nine miles south- 
west of Meadville. During the war of 1812 he served in the volunteer army, 
and was also a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

Jonathan Taylor was twice married, the issue of his first marriage being as 
follows : Sarah ; Rebecca ; Polly, and Edward, of whom later. After the death 
of the mother of these children, he married again, becoming by this union the 
father of eight children. He died about 1843 ''■^ the advanced age of ninety- 
one. 

Edward Taylor, son of Jonathan Taylor, was born in 1801, and was a 
farmer, owning a farm of ninety acres in Crawford county. He served as 
school director and in politics was an old-line Whig. He was a member of the 
Free- Will Baptist church, and helped to build an edifice for this denomination. 
Edward Taylor married Nancy Newton, born in 1812', and their children were: 
Abigail: Polly; Phoebe; Newton, of whom later; John: Rebecca: Amos; John: 
Ehzabeth : Henry H., and one who died young. Edward Taylor, the father, 
died in October, 1848, and his widow married Reuben Trace, by whom she had 
three children : Rillie, Julia and Jacob. After the death of the father of these 
children Mrs. Trace was a third time married, there being no issue of this mar- 
riage. She died in June, 1906. 

Newton Taylor, son of Edward and Nancy (Newton) Taylor, was bom 
July 9, 1833, in Crawford county, and received a limited education in the com- 
mon schools, being obliged at the early age of ten years to leave home and 
seek employment in the lumber woods on the Clarion river, afterward working 



2i6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



on different tracts and in various sawmills. Later he engaged in lumbering for 
himself, and carried on an extensive business in Clarion, Jefferson and Elk 
counties. He is at the present time (1907) lumbering on a tract of sixteen 
hundred and forty-four acres in Elk county, which he purchased seventeen 
years ago. For a number of years he conducted a planing mill at Corsica, 
Jefferson county, and was at different times the owner of several farms. Since 
1891 he has been a resident of Pittsburg. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and contributed to the building of several church edifices. 
In 1863, when the state was threatened with invasion by the Confederate anny, 
Mr. Taylor was among those who volunteered for its protection and served six 
weeks. 

He married, March 4, 1857, Sarah, born October 28, 1839, in Jefferson 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of David L. Moor, and they became the parents 
of the following children: Edward, of Pittsburg; Rose M., wife of Elmer 
Sloan, of Allegheny ; Harry, of Monaco, Pennsylvania ; David L., of Brookville, 
Pennsylvania; William, deceased; Charles, also deceased; Julia W., wife of 
Archie Rowand ; Carolyn Priscilla, wife of Harry Black Reamer; Belle, wife 
of James Garfield Armstrong, and Elizabeth, died young. 

JOHN P. WALKER, who has been a resident of Pittsburg for a half 
century, living on the South Side, at No. 2105 Sarah street, was born in Alsace. 
Lorraine, France, September 28, 1837, a son of Francis and Mary (Gerard) 
Walker. Mr. Walker's father was a native of the same place in which he was 
born, and was the son of Anton Walker. The family all followed agricultural 
pursuits. In 1842 the family came to America, landing in New York city, go- 
ing from thence by canal to Buft'alo, where they landed July 4, 1842. In the 
father's family were five brothers and three sisters. The father, Francis 
Walker, purchased a farm eighteen miles from the city of Buffalo, in Erie 
county, where he remained until i860. At that date he rented his farm and 
came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where four of his sons had preceded him. 
He made his home on West Carson street, where the Pittsburg & Lake Erie 
Railway station now stands, and there died January 29, 1872, at the age of 
seventy-six years and ten months. His wife survived until 1896, and died 
May 3 of that year, eighty-three years of age. Francis Walker was a Demo- 
crat in politics, and both he and his wife were members of the Roman Catholic 
church and were exemplary Christians. The issue of this worthy couple was : 
r. Catherine, who married Joseph Zook. and died in Pittsburg, on Twenty- 
eighth street. 2. Matthew (deceased), married Regina Gundy. 3. Mary, 
married Jacob Debolt, and he is now deceased and she resides at New Kensing- 
ton, Pennsylvania. 4. Lawrence, who died in Pittsburg, married Ellen Beard- 
man. 5. John P., the subject. 6. George, deceased, married, in West Home- 
stead, Mrs. Margaret Fix. 7. Margaret, now Mrs. B. Ranch, of Pittsburg. 
8. Frank, residing in Streator, Illinois. 

John P. Walker was but five years of age when the family emigrated to 
the United States. He was sent to school to a small log school house near his 
father's farm, and the teachers, as was the usual custom in those early days, 
boarded around from one farm home to another. He obtained his education 
at this class of schools and at the parochial schools in Buffalo, attending about 
four months each vear. After he reached his fifteenth vear he never had 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 217 

school advantages. In 1848, during the revolution in Germany, there was a 
great influx of emigration from Germany to the little settlement where his 
parents had located. He followed farm labor until he was seventeen, and then 
went to Durhamville, Oneida county. New York, where he found employment 
in a glass factory for a year, and in 1855 he went to Wheeling, West Virginia, 
and there learned the art of a window glass blower. In 1857 he came to Pitts- 
burg, arriving about August i, 1857. He obtained employment in the glass 
factory of Mr. McCullough, whose works were located where the Mount Wash- 
ington incline is now. During the panic which swept the whole countrv in 
Buchanan's presidential administration, commencing with 1857, Mr. Walker 
and his brother Lawrence returned to their home in New York state, where 
they occupied their time at cutting cordwood and hauling it and selling it to the 
New York & Erie Railroad Company. In the autumn of 1858 he returned to 
Pittsburg and resumed his work in the glass factory. The following year his 
right hand was severely cut, after which he was forced to abandon die trade 
of glass blowing and went back to the farm in New York state, where he was 
forced into idleness for several months. At the suggestion of his brother he 
returned to Pittsburg and again resumed work at glass blowing. After school- 
ing himself to it for a time he regained the use of his injured hand and could 
do as good work as before he met with the accident. He remained with the 
McCullough factory until 1861, when the opening of the Civil war caused the 
plant to close down, when he was thrown out of employment again. He with 
his brother went to Butler county, Pennsylvania, and found work in the har- 
vest field, and after two months returned to Pittsburg and broke stone on West 
Carson street for one dollar a day, being only too glad of the opportunity of 
earning an honest livelihood. He soon secured a position as weigher in the 
Woods roller mill at Saw Mill Run, where he received the same wages. In 
the winter of 1862 he worked in the glass factory of McKee and Company, by 
which he was enabled to earn sufficient means to put in a new front into the 
building he had previously purchased on Carson street, just above the Pan- 
handle depot. He then fitted up his place as a saloon, obtained his license and 
left it in charge of his father and sister, while he worked in the glass factory a 
short time, including a part of 1864. In that house he was united in marriage, 
November 11, 1862, to Aliss Paulina Schlernitzauer. In 1865 Mr. W^alker went 
to work in the Chambers glass house on Sixth street. South Side, and remained 
there one year, at which time he with fourteen other glass blowers established 
a glass factory of their own at the corner of Jane and Twenty-second streets. 
This firm took the name of Melling, Estep and Company. In 1871 the firm 
was reorganized and then took the name of Stewart, Estep & Company. Mr. 
Walker remained connected with the business until 1873, when he sold his 
interest and erected some residences on vacant lots which he owned on Twenty- 
sixth street. In 1874 he engaged in the grocery business at his present home, 
to which he moved in 1866. At first it was an old frame building, which in 
time was superseded by a modern brick building. Here Mr. Walker conducted 
a store in a successful manner until 1903: also had a branch at 115 Carson 
street, which he finally sold to his son. When the new town of Clareton was 
started he erected a store building there and conducted a store until the spring 
of 1907. %\hen he sold to the Crucible Steel Company. He has been an exten- 
sive builder, and among other structures he in 1890 bought the lot next to the 
Panhandle depot and with his sister, Mrs. Ranch, erected the first five-story 



2i8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



building which was ever buih on the South Side. He was a director in the 
German Savings Bank, corner Carson and Fourteenth streets, for twelve years, 
and also organized the Sarah Building and Loan Association and served as its 
president. He was one of the founders of St. Peter's Catholic church and 
served as its trustee for twenty years; also organized St. Peter's Society and 
was its president a number of years. As far back as the late sixties and early 
seventies Mr. Walker was a popular young man in the Twenty-fifth ward, 
and was against his will a candidate for city councilman. He assured the 
citizens that he would not spend money to be elected, as he had other business 
of more importance to attend to. He refused to furnish money to purchase 
beer for the voters in his ward, and hence was defeated by a few votes. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Walker are as follows: i. Frank F., 
born September 22, 1863, was educated at the public schools and attended the 
Western University of Pennsylvania and Dufif's Business College. He is now 
a resident of the Twenty-fifth ward. 2. Victoria, still at home. 3. John N., 
of Pittsburg. 4. Mary, Mrs. Thomas McCune, of Pittsburg. 5. Albert Ed- 
ward, deceased. 6. Theodore, a merchant at Clareton, Pennsylvania. 7. Leo, 
who is in partnership with his brother Theodore. He married Annie Stinor, 
nee Ruffing. 

FRANCIS E. McGILLICK, owner of one of the largest lumber and con- 
tracting firms of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, has risen to his present position in 
the business world by reason of force of character united to energy, perse- 
verance and enterprise. He is one of the first generation of the McGillick fam- 
ily to have been born in the United States, and traces his ancestry back to Ire- 
land. 

Peter McGillick, father of Francis E. McGillick, was born in county 
Meath, Ireland, in 1814, and died in this country in 1894. He was about 
twelve years of age when he came to this country and was a man of industry 
and respected by all who knew him. In Blairsville, Pennsylvania, by the ven- 
erable Rev. Michael Stillinger, he was married to Bridget Nolan, of county 
Wicklow, Ireland, and who is still living, aged eighty years. They had eight 
children, three of whom are living: Elizabeth, born February 11, 1862; Francis 
E., the subject of this sketch; Thomas J., born May 19, 1871. Mary, Julia, 
James, Peter and Sarah all died before their seventh year. 

Francis E. McGillick, second child and eldest living son of Peter and 
Bridget (Nolan) McGillick, was born in Blairsville, Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania, February 10, 1864. His education was received in the parochial schools, 
and after working several years at anything and everything he could get to do 
he was then apprenticed to the carpenter's trade. This he followed successfully 
for a number of years, and in 1885 established himself in the contracting busi- 
ness in Blairsville. In this his enterprise and reliability brought him such pros- 
perity that he decided to remove to Pittsburg and continue his business on a 
larger scale than he had hitherto done. He accordingly located in Pittsburg in 
1896, where he is now extensively engaged in the lumber and contract- 
ing business, as previously stated. He is an extensive real estate owner. He 
has always taken an earnest interest in public affairs, and was for three years 
a member of the common council of Blairsville. 

Mr. McGillick in September, 1891, by the Rev. E. ^I. McKeever, of Pitts- 
burg, was married to Margaret A. Botzem, a daughter of Lewis Botzem, of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 219 

Latrobe, Pennsylvania, and they are the parents of Francis E., Jr., born in 
October, 1892; Charles A., born in September, 1894; Lewis J., born in October, 
1897; Marie Elizabeth, born in April, 1900; and Thomas J., born in May, 1903, 
died in November of the same year. He is a charter member of Pittsburg 
Council No. 375, Knights of Columbus, and is a member of the Sacred Heart 
congregation on Centre avenue. 

PERRY ELLSWORTH OLIVER, for the past twenty years in the em- 
ploy of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and now filling the responsible 
position of conductor in the passenger service, is a representative of the third 
generation of his family in the United States, they having come from Scot- 
land. 

Thomas Oliver, grandfather of Perry Ellsworth Oliver, was born in Scot- 
land in 1786, near Newcastle-on-tKe-Tyne, and was the pioneer ancestor of the 
Oliver family in this country. He made the voyage in a sailing vessel in com- 
pany with his two brothers, who settled in Saginaw, Michigan, and there en- 
gaged in the lumber trade, with which their descendants are still identified in 
tliat section of the country. Thomas Oliver settled at Rainsburg, Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, and there followed the profession of a veterinary surgeon. 
He amassed considerable wealth and was considered one of the most in- 
fluential men of the county in his day. He was the owner of a comfortable 
residence in Rainsburg,_ and of a farm in the Cumberland vallev. He took 
a prominent part in local and state politics, giving his support to the Demo- 
cratic part}-. He lived to the advanced age of one hundred and three years, 
his death occurring in February, 1889. He married Fannie McCullough, and 
they had children: i. Patterson, married Susan Wertz : had children: Benja- 
min ; ATorgan ; George ; Owen : Hosea ; Annie, married Levi Hardinger ; Ida 
and Elizabeth. 2. Nathaniel W., see forward. 3. James, a soldier in active 
service during the Civil war, was killed at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, 
Georgia. He married Mollie Gross and had children : Sadie and Dr. George, 
a physician of Boston, Massachusetts. 4. John, married and had chil- 
dren : Harry and Frank, both deceased, the former an attorney. 5. Ellen, mar- 
ried Dr. Hosea Hudson, of Nebraska, a surgeon in the Civil war, and since 
that time a prominent physician in private practice. Their children were : 
Josephine ; Frances ; Ada ; Ruth, deceased ; Emma : Florence ; Grace and Laura, 
both deceased. 6. Jane, deceased, married John Wertz, and had children : 
Calvin, Oliver, John, William and Jennie. 7. Rebecca, married William Mor- 
gret, and had children : Oliver, Fannie and Newton. 

Nathaniel W. Oliver, second son and child of Thomas and Fannie Mc- 
Cullough, was born in Morrison's Cove in 1823. He followed the occupation 
of farming throughout his life and was the owner of a farm of one hundred 
and thirty-six acres in Colerain township, near Rainsburg. Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a stanch supporter of the Democratic party, and a 
member of the IMethodist Protestant church, in whose interests he was an active 
worker until his death, which occurred m 1880. He married (first) Mary 
Owens, and had children: i. William R., residing near Bedford, married 
Josephine Gump, deceased, and had children : George R. and Clara. 2. James 
P., deceased. I\Ir. Oliver married (second) Amy A. Cooper, born in Brush 
Creek \'alley, Fulton county, Pennsylvania, June 23, 1847, daughter of Nicholas 



220 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



and Rachel (Barton) Cooper, the former, who was a son of Joseph Cooper, 
was born May lo, 1791, and fougrht in the war of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. OHver 
had children': i. Effie. married Alick Kammorling; had children: Grace, 
Arthur E.. Perry G. and Ralph L. 2. Perry Ellsworth, see forward. 3. Mary 
R., tmmarried. 4. Laura J., deceased. 5. Ellen F., a telegraph operator in the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 6. Bertha A., engaged in the 
same occupation. 7. Flora E., a stenographer in the employ of the Blaine 
Coal Company. 8. Laura G., married (first) Ralph Beckley ; has children: 
Norman and Hazel; married (second) George Rush. 

Perry Ellsworth Oliver, second child and eldest son of Nathaniel and Amy 
A. (Cooper) Oliver, was born in Rainsburg, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
November 8, 1866. His early years were spent in his native town, attending 
the local schools until he was twelve years of age, when, upon the death of his 
father, he went to Altoona and found employment with his uncle William, 
with whom he remained for about four years. The next four years he had 
charge of an engine for the American Steam Laundry Company in that city. 
He then held the position of clerk in the Bee Hive Novelty store, and soon 
after attaining his majority, December 20, 1887, entered the employ of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company as a brakeman in the passenger service. Dur- 
ing the next nine years he held in succession the following positions : Brake- 
man, baggage master, flagman, and April 10, 1896, was advanced to the posi- 
tion of conductor in the passenger service, a position he is filling at the present 
time. His political affiliations are with the Republican party, and he is a 
member of the First Presbyterian church of Wilkinsburg. He is also a mem- 
ber of the following organizations : Order of Railway Conductors ; Old Reliable 
Order of Railway Conductors of the LTnited States and Canada ; Franklin 
Lodge No. 221, Free and Accepted Masons; Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of Wilkinsburg; Wilkinsburg Council No. 760, Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Oliver married, July 28, 1892, Bessie D. McConnell, of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. They reside at 1241 Franklin avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

ANTES SNYDER. Anthony Snyder, the great-grandfather of Antes 
Snyder, now of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, was born in the town of Plaginy, 
Germany, in November, 1725, where he was reared in the Lutheran religious 
faith. He emigrated to America in 1744. In 1750 he married the widow 
Kremer, who died April 25, 1776. He died in 1774. Upon reaching this coun- 
try he settled at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The children of the founder of the 
family in America were as follows: i. Peter. 2. Rosana. 3. John, born No- 
vember 15, 1755. 4. Simon, born November 15, 1756, in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Catherine, born October 12, 1758, married John Graft and 
had two sons, Frederick and Simon. 

(II) Simon Snyder, who became governor, was the second son and 
third child of Anthony Snyder (I), the founder. He was educated at Lancas- 
ter, and when seventeen years of age was apprenticed ,to learn the tanner's 
trade in York, Pennsylvania, where he soon became very skilful and was known 
far and near as an excellent workman in the tanning of leather. In 1784 he 
removed to Selin Grove, where he engaged in the mercantile business. In 
1798 he was elected as a member of the constitutional convention to frame the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 221 



state constitution of Pennsylvania. So generally were his opinions respected 
that there was seldom an appeal from his decisions. In 1787 he was elected to 
a seat in the state legislature and in 1802 was made speaker of the house, being 
chosen each time until 1805, when he was'a candidate for governor; but, de- 
feated, he was again elected to the legislature. In 1808 he was again a candi- 
date for governor and was elected, serving three terms. He died at Selin's 
Grove, November 9, 1819, and was buried in the Lutheran cemetery of that 
place, with but a simple marble slab to mark his resting place until 1885, when 
the state erected over his grave a monument more in keeping with the man. 
He married Catherine Michaels October 26, 1786, and two children .were born 
of this union: Amelia, born June 21, 1791, and John, born August 9, 1793, 
served in the state senate several terms. For his second wife he married 
Catherine Antes, daughter of Colonel Philip Antes; she died March 15, 1810, 
and five children were born of this union: i. Henry W., born July 20, 1797. 
2. George A., born ^larch 4, 1799. 3. Philip F., born January 3, 1801. 4. 
Antes, born January 23, 1803, died in 1803. 5. Antes, born January 12, 1805. 
For his third wife Governor Snyder married Mary A. Scott, born November 
5, 1785 ; they were married October 16, 1814. 

(III) George Antes Snyder, second son of Governor Snyder, was born 
March 4, 1799, he being a son of the Governor by his second wife. He became 
a prominent attomey-at-law in what was then known as Union county but 
now Snyder county, at New Berlin, where he continued to practice law until 
his death, February 23, 1866. In his church faith he was a Unitarian; in poli- 
tics a Whig. He married Anna Duncan, daughter of Stephen and Harriet 
(Elliott) Duncan. Their children were: i. Harriet. 2. Catherine. 3. Lucy. 
4. Henry F. 5. George S. 6. Ellen. 7. James, died in infancy. 8. Antes. 
9. Jessie D. 

(IV) Antes Snyder, grandson of Governor Snyder and son of George 
Antes Snyder (III) was born at Selin's Grove, Pennsylvania, December 9, 
1836. He was educated at Pottstown Academy, Lancaster countv, Pennsyl- 
vania, and entered the employ of the Reading Railroad under his uncle. Antes 
Snyder, a civil engineer. He remained with the railroad company until 1862, 
and was then employed on the Cape May Railroad, also on the Camden & Am- 
boy road as chief civil engineer. In 1863 he moved to Blairsville, and there 
surveyed the West Penn Railroad from Blairsville to Alleghenv City, which 
line was completed in 1866. Since that date he has been employed in the 
real estate department of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as an engineer 
and surveyor. He is a member of the Episcopal church. In political matters 
]\Ir. Snyder is a Republican. 

He married Emma F. Evans, daughter of Robert and Fanny (Hiestand) 
Evans, of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Six children blessed this union : 
Fannie, Ella, Henry, Antes, Robert, Emma. 

^Ir. Snyder's maternal great-grandfather. Colonel Antes, cast the first 
cannon on this side of the Atlantic ocean in 1764, and this was the cause of 
Lord Howe placing a price on his head. He had previously been a justice of 
the peace, or controller, under King George of England. 



CARMAN G. PAL^L. one of the enterprising and highly successful real 
estate operators of Greater Pittsburg, was born in 1857 at Cambridge, Massa- 



222 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



chusetts, where he received his education. His father's father was Scotch. 
His grandmother's family name was Burt, his mother's family name was 
Wheaton. 

Carman G. Paul, when aged nineteen years, became a traveling salesman, 
continuing until 1886, when he went to Detroit, Michigan, and there engaged 
in the real estate business and remained there thus employed until 1901. He 
was successful in his business ventures at that point, and during the }-ear last 
named he came to Pittsburg and engaged in the real estate business, making 
business blocks and manufacturing plants a specialty. He owns other valuable 
pieces of Pittsburg property, in all of which he made good investments. 

Mr. Paul was made a Mason in Pittsburg and now belongs to Crescent 
Lodge, A. F. and A. M., Shiloh Chapter and Tancred Commandery, No. 48. 
He was united in marriage, in Detroit, Michigan, in 1887, to Miss Estelle 
Knox, of Rome, New York, the daughter of John R. Knox, of Maine. 

Politically Mr. Paul affiliates with the Republican part)-, and in religious 
faith he is a Protestant Episcopal. 



THOMAS SCANDRETT GRUBBS, secretary and auditor of The 
Westinghouse Machine Company, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
February 27, 1873. His paternal grandparents, Adam and Rebecca (Young)- 
Grubbs, were both descendants of early settlers in Butler country, Penn- 
sylvania. Their children were: i. Barton. 2. Walter, who died in childhood. 
Barton Grubbs was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1850. He 
married Adaline A. Scandrett, February 27, 1872. He conducted a merchant 
tailoring business in Pittsburg for a number of years, thereafter becoming 
director of the Department of Charities in Allegheny City, which position he 
held for thirteen years, until 1903. Now retired. The maternal grand- 
parents were Thomas Scandrett, born in Ireland in 1818, a prominent 
Pittsburg merchant for thirty years, to 1878, and Sarah (Kimes) Scandrett, 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1824. Their children were: i. Henry Alexan- 
der, born in 1843. 2. Alfred Kimes, born in 1845. 3. Adaline Augusta, born in 
1847. 4. Elizabeth Ann, born in 1850. 5. Thomas, born in 1853, and 6. 
Sarah Ann, born in 1856. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Barton Grubbs were: i. Thomas 
Scandrett, born in 1873. 2. Alfred Kimes, born in 1875. He married Harriet 
James Glenn in 1904, to whom were born on December i, 1905, a son, James 
Parmlee. 

Thomas S. Grubbs was married July 22, 1896, to Caroline Foster Gas- 
away, born July 22, 1874, at Steubenville. Ohio, a daughter of John R. and 
Mary (Filson) Gasaway. The Filsons are descendants of the original family 
of that name which settled late in the eighteenth century in the vicinity of 
Steubenville, Ohio, one of the members being the schoolmaster, John Filson, 
who gave to Cincinnati its original name of Losanteville. The present-day 
I'llsons arc descended from John Quincy Adams. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Grubbs are: i. Mary 
Filson, born January 31, 1904, and 2. Barton, born September 24, 1906. Mr. 
Grubbs has been since 1900 a resident of Edgewood, a suburb of Pittsburg, 
seven miles east on the main line of the Pennsvlvania Railroad. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 223 



JAMES McKEE. The late James AIcKee, of Pittsburg, so well known 
to many as the expert watch-maker and jeweler, was born in county Down, 
Ireland, in 1852, and died September 24, 1901, at Pittsburg. He came to 
America when aged but six weeks, with his parents, George and Ella (Fergu- 
son) McKee. For many years the father was employed by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, but in advanced life was able to retire from active service, 
having accumulated a competency by industrious, frugal habits. The subject 
of this memoir, James McKee, was the only child in his parents' family who 
lived to maturity. He obtained his education in the schools of the Third ward 
of the city and Shadyside district. After his school days he learned the watch- 
maker's trade, and was engaged at that and the jewelry business on his own 
account on Fifth avenue, near Market street. Subsequently he gave up his 
business and followed his trade exclusively until his death. He was married 
in Pittsburg in 1875 to Margaret D. McCallin, daughter of James and Sophia 
(Findly) McCallin. Sophia McCallin was the daughter of William and Sophia 
(\'ance) Findley. 

James McCallin was born in county Armagh, Ireland, and his wife was a 
native of Alonaghan county, which adjoined the county in which he was born. 
In 1837 they came to America and settled for one year in New York, then 
resided at various places until 1845, when they came to Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, arriving on the day of the big fire (April 10), At first they stopped in 
Allegheny City, and later removed to Pittsburg. For the day in which he 
lived he was a man of means and purchased lands of the Dennys on the Hill. 
He never engaged in any commercial pursuits. The children born to him 
were nine in number, but the surviving are only three, as follows : Sophia, 
Mary Jane and Margaret D. One son, named William, deceased, was at one 
time the mayor of the city of Pittsburg and prominent in official duties. He 
^larried ^Marion F. Marshall, daughter of John Marshall, who had a foundry 
on Diamond alley. They had one child, Sophia. 

Concerning the surviving children of James and Sophia (Findly) 
McCallin, it may be added that: Sophia married the late Thomas B. Riter, 
whose issue was a son, Joseph ; Mary Jane McCallin and Margaret D., 
who married James McKee. subject of this sketch, by whom three children 
were born, Marian M., Ella F. and William J. 



DAVID R. McINTIRE, deceased, who was president of the Metropol- 
itan National Bank of Lawrenceville many years and of the grocery firm of 
Mclntire & Brand, doing business on Butler street, Pittsburg, was born in 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 1842, a son of James and Mary (Boyle) Mclntire. 
whose family sketch and ancestry appears elsewhere in this work. He died 
May 20, 1893. He was born in the old log cabin on the Mclntire homestead, 
the youngest of twelve children, nine being sons. He was of the firm of 
Mclntire & Brand, grocers, and the last ten years of his life was of the firm of 
Nillis, Mclntire & Company, located on the corner of Allegheny and Rebecca 
streets. From early youth he was a member of the United Presbyterian church 
and in later life was a member of the First United Presbyterian church. On 
June 2j, 1876, he was united in marriage to Letitia D. Brown, daughter of 
Thomas and Nancy (Dick) Brown. The father was born in Ireland and died 
in Pittsburg in April, 1893. aged seventy-nine years. The mother was a 



r 



224 ^ CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

native of Allegheny City, born in 1813, and died in December, 1893, aged 
eighty years. 

Mrs. Mclntire's father, Thomas Brown, came to America at the age of 
eight years with his mother, his father having died in Ireland. He learned 
the tin and coppersmith's trade, and during the Civil war made tin cans for 
the Union army. He was located between Sixth and Seventh streets, where 
he conducted a business under his own name later, but at first was of the firm 
of Brown & Mills. After the war he manufactured all kinds of tin and copper 
goods, such as kettles, etc., and w-as highly successful at his trade, retiring 
from active labors at the age of about fifty years. He was a self-made man of 
high character, his word being his only required bond. He was the second 
president of the City Deposit Bank of East Liberty, and held the position 
until death. He was a member of the Sixth United Presbyterian church, 
having united under Rev. Henry McFarland in early childhood. He was the 
father of five children who grew to maturity, four of whom still survive: i. 
Eliza Jane, who married James Graham. 2. Mary Ann, wife of David Blair, 
whose sketch appears elsewhere. 3. Walter Thompson, married Sarah Eliza- 
beth Barron, and they reside now in Boulder, Colorado. 4. Letitia D., wife 
of David R. Mclntire, of this memoir. 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Mclntire were the parents of six children, four 
now living. One died young and one died at the age of twenty-three years, 
named William B. He was a most exemplary 3'oung man and highly esteemed. 
At the date of his death he was clerk in the City Deposit Bank. He was a 
graduate of the Westminster College, of Philadelphia, and was unmarried. 
The living children are: i. David Blair Mclntire, M. D., a graduate of the 
Westminster College, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the class of 1905, and 
at this date (1907) is taking a post-graduate course in Berlin. Germany. 2. 
Mary Mclntire. 3. Thomas Brown Mclntire, a student at Cornell University. 
4. George Walter Mclntire. The surviving children reside in Pittsburg. 

Mrs. Mclntire, the mother, is much interested in charitable work and has 
been all her active life. She is a consistent member of Rev. William J. Reid's 
Fifth Avenue United Presbyterian church, and is actively engaged in the 
duties of that body. She is a member of the board of United Presbyterian 
C)rphans' Home and Infirmary, being a member of the board and purchasing 
agent ; also a member of various missionary societies. She is a devoted worker 
in all these societies, doing this both as a sense of duty and pleasure. 



CHARLES HENRY ZUG, who is at the head of the Zug Iron and 
Steel Company, located at Thirteenth and Etna streets, Pittsburg, was born at 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1832, the son of Christopher and Eliza (Bair) Zug. 
The parents were both natives of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and came 
to Pittsburg in 1835. Christopher Zug was descended from a sturdy German 
family which came to America in the early part of the Eighteenth century and 
settled in eastern Pennsylvania. Christopher and wife had five children, the 
subject of this notice, Charles Henry Zug, being the only son. The two 
daughters who now survive are: i. Margaret, wife of James H. Parker, of 
Chicago, Illinois, and they are the parents of one child, Emma, who married 
Thomas S. Blair, Jr. 2. Eliza, who married T. C. Clarkson (now deceased), 
of Pittsburg; they were the parents of Mrs. Frank N. Scwartz, who had 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 225, 



children : Ernest and Clarkson ; and ]\Ir.s. Carroll P. Davis. The deceased 
daughters of Christopher Zug are : 3. Alary, who married Harvey Childs, 
Jr., and had children : Jeannette, who married J. Ramsey Speer, had James H., 
who married Alice Walton ; Gertrude, who married Charles Foster. 4. Anna 
Zug (deceased), married Edward A. Burdett. 

The father, Christopher Zug, was an iron manufacturer, and was interested 
in the Pittsburg mills and later formed the firm of Graft", Lindsay & Company, 
which in 1844 was succeeded by Zug, Lindsay & Company, and by Zug & 
Painter in 1854, which was continued some years and then dissolved, after 
which Mr. Zug formed the firm of Zug & Company, which in igo6 was suc- 
ceeded by the Zug Iron & Steel Company, as it now exists. He thus operated 
for forty years, and up to the time of his death. 

Charles H. Zug, the subject, was educated in Pittsburg and at Browne 
L'niversity, in Providence, Rhode Island. After coming to man's estate he 
entered the iron business with his father and is still engaged in this industry, 
having succeeded his father's interest at his death. He was united in marriage 
October 12, 1864, to Sarah, the daughter of George Breed and wife (see 
sketch of Henry A. Breed), by which union were born the following children: 
I. Leila, widow of Lindsay King, who has one son, John King. 2. George 
B., who is an art critic and lecturer at the LTniversity of Chicago, and who 
married Clara Stearns, of Cleveland, Ohio. 3. Charles G., who is associated 
with his father as a member of the Zug Iron & Steel Company, and married 
Willa H. Forsyth. 4. Rhoda Edwards, who married W. M. Wherry, Jr., of 
New York City, and whose child is Margaretta Edwards. 5. Emma Zug. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Zug are members of the First Presbyterian 
* church of Pittsburg. They reside on the old homestead which belonged to 
Mrs. Zug's father, George Breed, and where she has lived for sixty-five years, 
or since 1842. It is among the beautiful 'sites on Fifth avenue. 

THOMAS BARNES. The late Thomas Barnes, the well-known fire- 
proof safe maker of Pittsburg, was bom in the city of Dublin, Ireland, Decem- 
ber 18, 1818, and died in 1894, aged seventy-six years. He came to America 
at the age of eighteen years with his mother, sisters and one brother, his 
father having died previously, and was at the date of his death a teller in the 
Bank of Ireland. After coming to this country the subject, with his mother, 
brother and sisters, was baptized in the Catholic religion. He learned the safe- 
making trade in Pittsburg, and soon began the manufacture of such articles 
on his own account. He began on Fifth avenue and later established himself 
on Third avenue, where the plant is still operated. At first he was connected 
in business with his brother-in-law, Edward Burke, under the firm of Burke & 
Barnes. Later Mr. Barnes purchased his partner's interest and continued the 
business as the Barnes Safe & Lock Company until his death. He began in a 
small way to produce this line of useful goods, but before he died had built 
up a large and profitable business. He forged his own way to the front rank 
of safe manufacturers and was known by his superior goods from ocean to 
ocean. The business thus established is continued by his daughter, Mrs. 
Francis (Barnes) Newell, in company with her two sons, Thomas Barnes 
Newell and John A. Newell. 

Mr. Barnes, when his sons attained manhood, took in William J. and 



226 . A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



George Barnes as partners in his business, but George died soon thereafter 
and Wilham J., not seeming to care for the business, withdrew, and later Mr. 
Barnes took in his son-in-law, John H. Newell, and they continued the business 
as the Barnes Safe & Lock Company until Mr. Barnes' death in 1894. Mr. 
Newell only survived him about one year, since which time Mrs. Francis B. 
Newell, Mr. Barnes' daughter, has carried on the business. Mr. Barnes was a 
highly successful business man — self-made and progressive in his business 
methods. He was a director of the City Deposit Bank and also of the Duquesne 
National Bank. He was a devout member of the old St. Paul Cathedral and 
a liberal supporter of the same. He was generous to a fault and highly 
esteemed for his many manly virtues and sterling traits of character. 

Mr. Barnes married Ann Curran, born in Ireland, and came to America 
with her brothers and sisters. She died aged seventy years, in 1893. They 
were the parents of eight children — four sons and four daughters. One died 
aged seven years, two more died young, and one died aged twenty-five years, 
unmarried. Another, William J., married Mary Byrker, of Pittsburg, and they 
have five children : George, William, Thomas, Alphonso and Marie. The 
living children of Mr. and Mrs. Barnes are: i. Mary Ann, unmarried. 2. 
Fannie, who married John H. Newell, who died in 1895, and was a partner of 
his father-in-law. Previous to his marriage he was engaged in the office of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as assistant cashier, beginning while yet 
a young man. They had three children, all born in Pittsburg : Thomas Barnes 
Newell, who married Irene Einstein, whose child is Ann Marie ; the father is 
associated with Mrs. Newell in the safe business. Anna Barnes Newell, 
unmarried : John A. Newell, unmarried, is also connected with the safe and 
lock company with his mother. 3. Ellen J. Barnes, unmarried. 



GEORGE H. GARBER. Among the deceased citizens whose lives were 
spent in the city of Pittsburg and whose influence for good as a temperance 
advocate in the state of Pennsylvania is yet felt, and will be for years to come, 
was George H. Garber, born in Pittsburg, May 16, 1851, and died at Thomp- 
sonville, Georgia, December 25, 1903, after several months' illness. At the 
time of his death and for several years previously he was conspicuous in 
Pennsylvania Prohibition party workings. He received a public school educa- 
tion, and the first business to which he turned his attention was conducting a 
china store on Wood street. He next embarked in real estate transactions, but 
soon connected himself with the pork-packing firm of Rea & Company, with 
whom he was associated for twenty-five years, being its secretary and treasurer 
at his death. From early manhood he was interested in the cause of tem- 
perance, and in 1884 became an active worker in the state Prohibition party 
in his native state. During that year he made many speeches and made the 
acquaintance of nearly all the state and national temperance leaders and orators. 
In 1898 he was a candidate on the Prohibition ticket for congressman-at-large. 
Locally he was a potent factor in such work as was being done bv the tem- 
perance people. He had been a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church 
many years, was an active worker in the Christian Endeavor Societv, and was 
chairman of the Good Citizens' Committee of Alleghenv countv. He was an 
elder in the church of his choice, as well as a member of all the boards of that 
church. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 227 



He married in 1877 Miss Josephine Rea, daughter of Henry Rea, Jr., and 
at his death left a widow and three children, Henry Rea, Emma J. and 
Evelyn E. 

The following tribute was paid Mr. Garber by the state executive commit- 
tee of the Prohibition party of Pennsylvania : 

'Tt is with genuine sorrow that every Prohibitionist in Pennsylvania who 
knew him heard of the death of George H. Garber, of Pittsburg, and it is with 
grief and a real sense of personal loss that the executive committee of the Pro- 
hibition party of Pennsylvania, at their first meeting since the mournful event, 
take occasion to give formal expression of their own bereavement and of their 
heartfelt sympathy for their deceased brother's family. 

"George H. Garber was for many years a most efficient example in his 
immediate community of those forces which make for purity in public as well 
as private life, and so pronounced had become his influence that the party of 
political purity in Pennsylvania soon availed itself of his services in its wider 
councils, and he became a member of the state executive committee, on which 
he served with untiring fidelity, wise counsel, conservative judgment and 
hopeful, helpful spirit. 

"His death leaves a wide gap not only in the work in which he was 
engaged, but in the hearts of his co-workers ; and while such work must not be 
hindered by indulgences in vain grieving this passing tribute is lovingly, ten- 
derly and sorrowfully paid upon the grave of this dead comrade. 

''And it is resolved that the above memorial minute be entered upon record 
of the committee and a copy sent with sincerest sympathy to the bereaved 
family of the deceased. 

(Signed) "L. L. Grumbine, 

"Chairman of Committee." 

Concerning the ancestry of Mr. Garber let it be said that he was the son 
of Jacob and Elizabeth (Volhardt) Garber, who was for many years a prom- 
inent undertaker on Smithfield street, in Pittsburg, and had three children, two 
daughters and one son, George H. Garber, subject. 

The grandfather's name was also Jacob Garber, and his wife was Louisa 
Dhiel : they resided in Baltimore, Maryland, some years before coming to 
Pittsburg. ' 

Mrs. Garber's parents were Henry and Jane E. (Burke) Rea. The 
father was born in Pittsburg, in 1831, and died March 31, 1906, aged seventy- 
five years. He was the founder of the pork-packing house of Rea & Company, 
of Pittsburg. He was very prominent in business circles, both for his ability 
and integrity of purpose. He was born in Minersville, now the Thirteenth 
ward of the city, and was engaged in business here forty years. He married, 
March 10, 1852, Miss Jane E. Burke, a native of Ireland, born March 10, 
1832, and died September 15, 1907, by whom were born the following children: 
Two are deceased. The living are: i. Henry B., who married Florence 
Moore, and they are the parents of four children, Emma, William. Guy and 
Henry. 2. Josephine W., who married the subject of this memoir, George H. 
Garber. 3. Margaret,, unmarried. 4. William M., who married Isabella 
Anderson, and they are the parents of one child, Katharine. 5. Franklin H., 
who married Catherine McKelvey, and they were the parents of John. Henry 
and Margarette Rea. 



228 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Mrs. Gerber's paternal grandfather was Henry Rea, Sr., who came from. 
Ireland with his parents when a mere boy, and his father's name was also 
Henry. 

Henry Rea, Jr., as Mrs. Garber's father was known, was a native of 
Pittsburg, and learned the cabinet making trade, and later engaged in the 
commission business, which he followed about a dozen years. Shortly after the 
Civil war he engaged in the pork-packing business, the firm being Rea, Hill 
& Kerr. Two years later Mr. Rea purchased his partner's interest and con- 
tinued alone with much success. His sons are now operating the business their 
father thus established. The business was first conducted on Liberty street, 
at the head of Smithfield. It soon outgrew those quarters, when land was 
bought on Second and Try streets, where the present plant was built. 



JEREMIAH MURRY GILCHRIST, deceased, was for many years of 
the then well-known firm of Gilchrist & O'Connor, coal dealers, and subse- 
quently in the same business on his own account. He was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, near Greensburg, and in what was then Salem township, 
in 1821. He died in 1882'. He was the son of John A. Gilchrist, who died 
when the subject was young. The first -of this Gilchrist family to settle at 
Pittsburg was John Andrew Gilchrist, who came here from Scotland ; he was 
the subject's grandfather and the father of Judge S. A. AlcClung's mother, 
whose maiden name was Nancy C. Gilchrist. 

After the death of the subject's father the mother moved to Plum Creek 
township, and it was there that Jeremiah M. received his education. After 
reaching manhood he learned the house painter's trade, but did not follow it 
long, becoming a river man on coal barges and later engaged in the coal busi- 
ness, the firm being Gilchrist & O'Connor, who operated several years, after 
which Mr. Gilchrist removed to Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and purchased a 
farm on which he resided for seven years. He then returned to Pittsburg, 
where he again engaged in the coal business, and was finally succeeded by his 
sons, who now carry on the business' under the firm name of J. M. Gilchrist 
Sons. 

Jeremiah AI. Gilchrist was the youngest son in a family of two sons and 
six daughters, and only one still survives — Mrs. Margaret Miller, of Canton, 
Ohio. On the maternal side Mr. Gilchrist descended from Squire Murry, for 
whom Murrysville, Pennsylvania, was named. He was united in marriage, 
October 9, i860, in Pittsburg, to Mary Ann Arthurs, a native of Ireland, who 
came to America in 1834 (the year of her birth) with her parents, Robert and 
Ann ( Piper ) Arthur, who first settled in Toronto, Canada, where the father 
was accidentally killed by the falling of a tree. His widow and children then 
removed to Pittsburg, where Mrs. Gilchrist was reared and educated and has 
resided all her life. Mr. Gilchrist was early in life a Democrat, but later voted 
the Republican ticket. Mrs. Gilchrist is a life-long member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church in Allegheny City. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gil- 
christ were as follows: i. Rebecca M., deceased. 2. James O'Connor, born 
in Pittsburg and is now of the firm of J. AL Gilchrist Sons, coal dealers. 3. 
Harry, born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and is unmarried. 4. John 
Andrew, deceased, unmarried, and of the firm just named. 5. Joseph Johnson, 
born in I'eaver county, Penns\lvania, married Laura Hammer, daughter of 




Jlf^^iiz^^ ,</t:^^l^L^^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 229 

G. W. Hammer, of Pittsburg, and he is another member of the firm founded 
by his father. 6. Alary, born, in Allegheny City. 

WALTER S. LOBINGIER, well known in and about Pittsburg both as 
a newspaper man and lawyer, is a descendant of one of the oldest and most in- 
fluential families of western Pennsylvania. He was born at Mt. Pleasant, 
Westmoreland county, June 11, 1869. Flis ancestors were among the earliest 
settlers of Pennsylvania and came from sturdy Huguenot stock. They were 
active participants in the events of pioneer times and in the material develop- 
ment of the section of the country with which they were identified. The Lo- 
bingier family is closely connected with many of the most estimable families 
in Pittsburg and Allegheny county, as well as western Pennsylvania, and the 
family roster includes statesmen, jurists, soldiers and ministers. The subject of 
this sketch traces his lineage through the following lines : 

(I) Christopher Lobingier, Sr. (the great-great-great-grandfather), was 
the founder of the family in this country. He with his brother Jacob emigrated 
from Wittenberg, Germany, prior to 1735, settling at Hummelstown, which was 
then in the territory embraced within Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, but 
which is now located in Dauphin county. The tradition in the family is that 
he was of French extraction, his forebears having been driven from France 
during the Huguenot persecution. They sought a refuge in Germany, and it 
was from that country that Christopher Lobingier and his brother started to 
found new homes in America. Soon after his arrival in this country Jacob dis- 
appeared while fighting the Indians and all trace of him was lost, the supposi- 
tion being that he was killed by the savages. Christopher became an influential 
citizen and died where he located on his arrival in this country. He was buried 
in the old churchyard at Hummelstown, where his grave is still to be found, 
together with other members of his family. 

(H) Hon. Christopher Lobingier, son of the German emigrant, and the 
great-great-grandfather of Walter S. Lobingier, was born in Lancaster, or 
rather Dauphin, county in 1740. He located at Laurelville in Mt. Pleasant 
township, Westmoreland county, in 1772. Between that year and 1789, by pur- 
chase a:nd grants of land made to him by the commonwealth, he became one of 
the largest land owners in Westmoreland county. He was a delegate to the 
first constitutional convention of Pennsylvania in 1776, and was a member of 
the committee of correspondence from that county. From 1791 to 1793 he 
was a member of the general assembly as Pennsylvania. He was married in 
1766 to Elizabeth Mueller, daughter of John Mueller, and who came to this 
country in 1752 from Switzerland with her father. They had nine children, 
one of whom was John. The death of Christopher Lobingier occurred in Mt. 
Pleasant township July 4, 1798. 

(HI) Judge John Lobingier, son of Christopher, just named, was the 
eldest son in his parents' family. He was born April 5. 1767, in Dauphin 
county, and was taken by his father when five years old to Westmoreland 
county. He became one of the prominent business men and political factors in 
that section of the Keystone state and took a very active part in its affairs. 
He served in the legislature and for many years was an associate judge of 
Westmoreland county. He engaged in the milling, salt and iron business and 
conducted a hotel at Laurelville on the Greensburg or National pike, which was 



230 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

then the thoroughfare between Pittsburg and Philadelphia before the time of 

railroads and when the Conestoga wagon was the principal means of freight 
transportation across the mountain. This place became noted as a stopping 
place for celebrated personages of that time. During the Whiskey Rebellion 
he was a strong supporter of the government, and while the Federal troops 
were quartered on his farm aided them materially, at the same time exerting 
himself by public speeches and otherwise in restoring order in the disaffected 
districts. He was one of the pioneer iron-makers of western Pennsylvania, 
erecting one of the earliest furnaces built west of the Allegheny mountains, 
the ruins of which still remain near his old home as a landmark of the early 
days. One of the oldest buildings in Westmoreland is a large stone mill erected 
by him in 1801 at Laurelville and which is still in an excellent state of preser- 
vation. He was married July 7, 1789, to Sophia Moyer, and after her death 
married, September 5, 1839, Elizabeth Cross. Judge Lobingier died at Mt. 
Pleasant February 26, 1859, one of the most respected men in that county. 

(IV) John Lobingier, son of Judge John Lobingier, was born August 21, 
1799, in Laurelville. He followed agricultural pursuits until 1882, when he 
built a splendid residence in Mt. Pleasant, where he lived until his death. May 
16, 1885. In religious faith he was a Presbyterian. He married, November 
25, i82'4, Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Jacob Smith, who was the son of Philip 
Smith, who came to this country from Germany and whose wife was Mary 
Armel, of Westmoreland county. John and Elizabeth (Smith) Lobingier had 
nine children, of whom J. Smith Lobingier, father of Walter S. Lobingier, was 
one. The family resided on a farm near Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania. 

(V) J. Smith Lobingier, father of Walter S. Lobingier, was born in Mt. 
Pleasant township, Westmoreland county, July 24, 1828, and died May 27, 
1907. He acquired his education in the select schools of his native county and 
at Washington College, which institution he attended for one year. Though his 
educational advantages were somewhat limited, through self-study, constant 
and good reading and an earnest desire to acquire knowledge he became well 
informed on a large variety of subjects. He always followed the independent 
and quiet life of a farmer, and for a number of years engaged in the successful 
operation of a coal mine, manufacturing coke and shipping it to Pittsburg in 
the early days of steel making. His home farm comprised one hundred and 
seventy-five acres of farming land, besides one hundred acres of excellent tim- 
ber land at another point in the same township. In his political affiliations he 
was a staunch Republican, but never aspired to public office holding. He en- 
joyed the confidence and esteem of his neighbors and not infrequently was 
called upon to act as executor, administrator and assignee. 

Mr. Lobingier was united in marriage December 25, i860, to Miss Mary 
Jane Cochran, born November 17, 1837. The children born to this union were: 
I. Edward, born September 6, 1861, died February 6, 1865. 2. John, born Au- 
gust 2, 1863, died July 30, 1895. 3. Walter Smith, the subject of this notice, 
born June 11, 1869, of whom later. 4. Chauncey, born July 30, 1873, gradu- 
ated in 1896 from Lafayette College, and he is now practicing law at Pittsburg; 
he married, October 31, 1901, Isabelle Danby, of Easton. Pennsylvania. 5. 
Charles D., born March 16, 1875. 6. Arthur McMillan, born December 14, 
1878. 7. Alice lona. 8. Hettie Lovinia. Mr. Lobingier was a member of the 
Reunion Presbyterian church of Mt. Pleasant, of which body he was an elder 
for twenty years. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 231 

Walter S. Lobingier was the fourth child of J. Smith and Mary Jane 
(Cochran) Lobingier. After attending the pubhc schools he took his prepara- 
tory college studies at the Alt. Pleasant Classical and Scientific Institute. He 
completed his freshman year at Washington and Jefferson College and gradu- 
ated from the University of Wooster, of Wooster, Ohio, in the class of 1892. 
Immediately on completing his college course he came to Pittsburg to engage in 
newspaper work. He was first employed on the Dispatch, and received his first 
experience in this avocation reporting the famous Homestead strike, and upon 
which he worked until the end of those exciting labor troubles. During the 
next few years he was employed in various capacities on different daily news- 
papers in Pittsburg, including that of New York correspondent for the Daily 
A'^cra's and city editor of the Times. He was also engaged for a time in news- 
paper work in Denver, Colorado. In 1897 he established the Pittsburg Index, 
first published in the East End, and which has become one of the best-known 
weekly publications in the city. His last newspaper work was as financial ed- 
itor of the Pittsburg Press. Having fitted himself for the legal profession, he 
was admitted to the Allegheny county bar in 1903, since which time he has been 
in active practice. . Politically, Mr. Lobingier is a Republican, with which 
party he has been actively identified. In church relations he is a member of the 
East Liberty Presbyterian church. He is also a member of the Ma.sonic fra- 
ternity, belonging to Duquesne Lodge No. 546, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Pittsburg Chapter No. 268, Royal Arch Masons; Mt. Moriah Council No. 2, 
Royal and Select Masters ; Duquesne Commandery No. ^2, Knights Templar ; 
Pennsylvania Consistory, thirty-second degree. Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, 
and Syria Temple, Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Alpha Tau 
Omega Greek letter fraternity and a charter member of the Colonial Republi- 
can Club. He enlisted and served for a time as a member of Company E, 
Tenth regiment, N. G. P., and from which he was honorably discharged. 

He was married, December 30, 1897, to Miss Rose Fulton, daughter of 
James and Alartha Morrison Fulton. Of this union has been born a daughter, 
Martha Fulton Lobingier. 

LOLTIS KABLE, who has been for more than thirty years numbered 
among the enterprising business men of Pittsburg, was born February 7, 1855, 
at New Derry, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, son of Martin Kable, who 
was born September 11, 1823, in Matzfeld, Germany, and whose name was 
originally spelled Goeble. 

Martin Kable learned the tailor's trade, and about 1849 emigrated to the 
United States, settling first at York, Pennsylvania, where he worked at his 
trade. He saved his earnings, and in 1853 moved to New Derry, Westmore- 
land county, where he opened a tailor's shop, which he conducted until 1865. 
In that year he came to Pittsburg and opened a shop on Penn avenue, at the 
East End, after a short time purchasing a lot on Collins avenue, on which he 
erected the dwelling which was his home for the remainder of his life. He 
was a fine workman and commanded high-class patronage. He was a Repub- 
lican and an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Martin Kable married. March 7, 1852, in York. Pennsylvania, Katharine 
Yaney. who was born in Germany, November 24, 1820, and when a child of 
six years was brought by her parents to the L'nited States. Her father was a 



232 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

gardener and nurseryman in the service of the late Judge Barnitz, of York, and 
Katharine was brought up in the Judge's family. Mr. and Mrs. Kable were the 
parents of three sons: Christian Kable, born March 26, 1853, died January 
II, 1902; Louis Kable, born February 7, 1855; and William K. Kable, born 
November 29, i860, died August 24, 1892. William K. Kable learned the 
trade' with his father and never married. After the death of the mother of 
these sons, which occurred May 10, 1874, Mr. Kable married Margaret (King) 
Ross, widow of John Ross, and they became the parents of one daughter. 
Hattie May, now the wife of Arthur Banker, of Pittsburg. The death of 
Martin Kable occurred November 11, 1903. 

Louis Kable, son of Martin and Katharine (Yaney) Kable, was ten years 
•old when his parents moved to Pittsburg, and it was in the public and high 
schools of that city that he received his education. He learned the tailoring 
business with his father, and at the age of twenty-one was admitted as a 
partner, the style of the firm being M. Kable & Sons. Three years later his 
father retired, and the business was continued under the firm name of L. Kable 
& Brother for another three years, when Louis Kable purchased his brother's 
interest. He has from time to time remodeled the building, and in 1903 
equipped the structure with all the modern improvements requisite for a high- 
class tailor shop. He employs sixteen of the best workmen in his line of 
business, but gives his personal supervision to everything done in the estab- 
lishment, which is excelled by none and commands the best patronage. In 
1893 he purchased his present residence in Grafton street, and is the owner of 
other property in the city. 

He is a member of the Board of Trade, and took a very active interest in 
municipal legislation, being once nominated for councilman. He is a Repub- 
lican and has taken a leading part in the political affairs of the Nineteenth 
ward. He belongs to Duquesne Lodge No. 546, F. and A. M., Pittsburg 
Chapter, Duquesne Commandery and the Consistory. He is a member of the 
Emory Methodist Episcopal church on North Highland avenue, and takes a 
prominent part in church work, serving as trustee and assistant secretary of 
the Sunday-school. He was one of those who contributed to the erection of 
the new church edifice in 1907. 

Mr. Kable married, June 11, 1878, Katharine L., born in Pittsburg, 
daughter of the late John W. and Elizabeth ( Shaffer ) Tim. A sketch of the 
Tim family appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Kable have been 
the parents of the following children: John Martin, born October 11, 1879, 
died July 2, 1880; Emma Florence, born April 30, 1881, died March 25, 1889; 
Edwin Louis, born April 27, 1884, died March 18, 1889; Warren Tim, born 
September 2, 1888; Charles Wesley, born July i, 1891 ; Mary Elizabeth, born 
May 15, 1894; Jane Katharine, born May 15, 1894; Louise Margaret, born 
September 9, 1893. 



EDWARD M. DIEBOLD, president of the E. M. Diebold Lumber Com- 
pany, of Pittsburg, was born in that city August i, 1873, ^ ^o" of Michael 
and Elizabeth ( Kril! ) Diebold. The father was born in Pittsburg and the 
mother in Germany ; she came to America when young w'ith her parents. 
Michael Diebold has for many years been engaged in the lumber business at 
Pittsburg, and at the present time (1907) is the president of the Diebold 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 233 



Lumber and Mamifactiiring Company, in which he has been highly successful. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Michael Diebold were born the following nine children: i. 
Edward M., the subject of this notice, of whom later. 2. Frank X., president 
of the Forest Lumber Company. 3. Alfred J., secretary and treasurer of the 
Forest Lumber Company. 4. Mathilda. 5. Clarence J. 6. Elmer A. 7. 
Howard. 8. Lee. 9. Beatrice. These children are all natives of the citv of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Edward ^L Diebold, subject, was educated in the public schools of his 
native city and at St. \'incent's College, Latrobe, Pennsylvania. After com- 
pleting his education he entered into the employ of Murphy & Diebold, with 
whom he continued about eight years, and then went with the Diebold Lumber 
and ^Manufacturing Company, being the secretary and treasurer of this com- 
pany for three years. In 1905 he organized the E. AL Diebold Lumber 
Company (incofporated), of which he is the president and treasurer. He is 
also a director of the Park Bank- and a member of the East End Board of 
Trade. Politically Mr. Diebold is independent, and in religious faith is a 
member of the Catholic church. On May 6, 1896, Air. Diebold was united 
in marriage to Clarion Hopper, born in Pittsburg, daughter of Frank A. and 
Margaret (King) Hopper. The six- children of this union, all born in Pitts- 
burg, are as follows: i. Earl Francis. 2. Edward J. 3. Helen Marion. 4. 
Frank J. 5. Marion Elizabeth, and 6. John F. 



ANTHONY DR.W'O ANDERSON. The late Anthony D. Anderson, 
so well known as an energetic business man of Pittsburg, was born in this city 
in 1844 and died in 1886. He was the son of John and Harriett (Dravo) 
Anderson. The father was a native of Ireland and married Harriett, daughter 
of Peter- Dravo and wife, by whom several children were born, including the 
subject. 

Anthony D. .Anderson was educated at the public schools of the Fourth 
ward in Pittsburg and at the Western L'niversity of Pennsylvania, after wdiich 
he engaged in the drug business, in which he was quite successful for a time 
and then engaged in the confectionery business as bookkeeper for the firm of 
Raymond & Anderson, in which he was successful and continued in a number 
of years. Subsequently he embarked in the oil business as a refiner. After 
following this for some time he entered the steel business, being in the employ 
of Woods & Anderson ; the last named member of the steel manufacturing 
firm was Robert Anderson, who was the subject's brother. Anthonv D. was 
the manager of the business up to the date of his death in 1886. 

In pwlitics he voted the Republican ticket and in religion was of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal faith and an exemplary Christian. He was connected with the 
Masonic fraternity and highly respected by his fellow^ men. 

He married Miss Martha Wightman, who was a native of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and the daughter of Robert and Margaret (Morrison) Wight- 
man, tioth natives of Ireland, who came to America when young with their 
parents, and were married in Pittsburg. Robert Wightman was the son of 
James and Martha (Smiley) Wightman, of Scotch-Irish descent. James 
Wightman upon coming to this country settled on a farm which was located 
near where the L'nion railway station now stands, and there became a suc- 
cessful farmer. (See Wightman sketch elsewhere in this work.) 



234 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

The children born to Mr. and ]\Irs. Anthony D. Anderson were Harriette, 
Isabelle and Grace. 



THOMAS M. BLAIR, deceased, who for the greater part of his hfe was 
bookkeeper and general accountant for the Pittsburg & Fort Wayne Railway, 
was born in the old log house erected by his grandfather on the old Morrow 
farm on the Perrysville road. The date of his birth was April 13, 1837. 
He was the son of John and Nancy (Morrow) Blair. The father was a native 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was a mill worker by trade, but became a 
teamster for the Fort Wayne Railway Company, and Was one of the first to 
carry on a transfer business in Pittsburg. The Blairs were all of the Methodist 
Episcopal church faith. 

Thomas M. Blair, subject, received a common school education in Alle- 
ghen^• City and at the' age of si.xteen years entered the employ of the Fort 
\\'ayne Railway Company, where he was advanced from one position to 
another, and at the time of his death was general bookkeeper of the Penn- 
sylvania lines, having been constantly in the employ of the company from his 
earliest manhood. He was a member of the old Allegheny Gentleman's Base 
Ball Club, and in politics he supported the Republican party. He died Decem- 
ber 26, 1875. He married, October 15, 1861, Mary Jane Burgess, who was 
born in the First ward of Allegheny City, July i, 1840, a daughter of John and 
Susan (Stubbs) Burgess. Her father was a native of Cooke Town, Virginia, 
and her mother was born in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. Thomas M. Blair 
and wife had one child, Anna, who married Albert J. Schroth, born in Alle- 
gheny City, a son of John and Philamenon (Dahlinger) Schroth, and the 
issue by such union was four children, all bom in Allegheny City, and named 
as follows: i. Thomas Blair Schroth, born September 26, 1882. 2. Mar- 
garet Davidson, born May 12, 1884, married November 15, iqo6, David H. 
Campbell, of Sewickley, born in Allegheny. 3. Jessie McCullough, born April 
29, 1888. 4. Albert Kenneth, born February 7, 1891. 

Concerning the Burgess family it may here be stated that the first of the 
family to come to America from England was the grandfather of John Burgess, 
Mrs. Blair's father. The English emigrant was a civil engineer who came to 
Mrginia for the purpose of surveying the lands in the state of Virginia, which 
he did. Among his children was one son named Francis. Francis married a 
woman whose Christian name was Martha, and in their family was a son, 
John Burgess. The last named, Mrs. Blair's father, was for many years a 
grocer on Ohio and other streets in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. At the 
time of the Civil war he with others fitted out and filled a vessel with provisions 
for the Union troops and after many hardships and great danger succeeded 
in running the blockade through to the southern states. He was a lover of 
music, having a special fondness for vocal music, which he used to teach, more 
for the liking he had for it than for the profit he received in a financial way. 
He died in 1884, aged sixty-nine years. His wife died aged seventy-three 
years, in 1896. 

JAMES GRAHAM CHALFAXT, recently elected county engineer of 
.\llegheny county, was born in Wilkins township, this county, .August 6. 
18/xj, the son of Flenry R. and Evaline R. (Graham) Chalfant. This family 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 235 

is of Frencli descent, the great-grantlfather being one of two brothers who at 
an early period left France and made for themselves homes in eastern Penn- 
sylvania, where they reared families. Henry Chalfant, the subject's grand- 
father, a son of one of these two brothers, came with his brothers to 
Allegheny county in 1827, settling in Turtle Creek, where he purchased a few 
acres oi land. He married Isabella C. Weakley, daughter of Samuel and 
Hester '\\'eakley, of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. Ten children were 
born of this union, eight of whom grew to maturity, including Henry R., the 
father of James G., of this notice. 

Henry R. Chalfant, third in line from the French emigrant, was born in 
1837, in the village of Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was 
educated at the common schools and academy. In 1868 he married Evaline 
R. Graham, daughter of James Graham. By this union the issue was eight 
children, as follows: 1. James Graham, the subject, of whom later mention 
is made. 2. Mary I. 3. Martha. ■ 4. Sidney A. 5. Henry R. 6. Frederick 
B. 7. Eva M. 8. George A. The father was a highly respected farmer of 
W'ilkins township. In politics he voted the Republican ticket. He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church and a director of the county poor of 
Allegheny county and a director and vice-president of the Braddock National 
Bank. He died September 30, 1887. 

James Graham Chalfant attended the public schools near his home and 
later attended the University of Wooster, at Wooster, Ohio, after which he 
secured employment with the Pittsburg & Western Railway Company, where 
he remained some time and then identified himself with the Westinghouse 
Electric & Manufacturing Company, at East Pittsburg, under the tutelage of 
Thomas Rodd, consulting engineer. He later returned to the employ of the 
Pittsburg & Western Railway Company, and remained with that corporation 
until he became connected with the county road department, where he 
remained for a time under the direction of Fred W. Patterson, the then 
county road engineer. After filling this position well for some time he accepted 
a position with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company on its lines west from 
Pittsburg. Subsequently he accepted the position of assistant engineer in the 
bureau of surveys of the city of Pittsburg, which position he held seven years 
and up to the time of his appointment, in April, 1907, to the position of county 
engineer. 

]\Ir. Chalfant was united in marriage in 1902 to Alva, daughter of Alfred 
GufTey and Amanda (Coyne) Guft'ey, who died in 1904 without issue. Mr. 
Chalfant is a Republican and a member of the Presbyterian church. 



WILLIAM A. HOE\'ELER and ERASMUS HOEVELER, prominent 
business men of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, are descendants of the well-known 
families of Hoeveler and Hoya, residing in Hanover, formerly a kingdom of 
northern Germany, but since 1866 incorporated with Prussia. There William 
Hoeveler and Clara Hoya, his wife, received the educational advantages of 
their day. William Hoeveler was actively identified with the woolen manu- 
facture in the city of Ankum. Clara, his wife, was exceptionally well educated, 
writing verse beautifully, and her grandchildren remember with pleasure her 
musicales. This couple surrounded their children with refining influences, and 
saw that they received liberal education. The children were: i. William, of 



236 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

wlioia further. 2. Clemence, who founded the German Fire Insurance Com- 
panv of Pittsburgh. 3. Clara, who married WilHam Hune. 4. Louise, who 
married Joseph Herman, teacher, and later banker. 5. Herman, who died in 
Kansas City, Missouri. 6. Augustus, of whom further. After the death of 
the father, and when emigration was decided upon, all business at home was 
settled up, and the famil)' brought with them to the United States sufficient 
means to establish the business later outlined in this narrative. 

William Hoeveler, eldest child of William and Clara (Hoya) Hoeveler, 
born in the then kingdom of Hanover, Germany, was the first of the family 
to come to this country, with a view to selecting a place of residence for all. 
After traveling over the greater part of the east, he decided upon Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, as the most promising location. In that embryo city, shortly 
after his arrival (in 1835) he engaged in the manufacture of chemicals, 
principally Prussian blue. Later he established himself in the grocery business 
in association with his brothers, Clemence, Herman and Augustus, in Penn 
avenue, near Fourteenth street. They set up three stores — one on the Greens- 
burg turnpike, now Penn avenue and Fourteenth street ; another on Wylie 
avenue, and the third on Fourth street road, now Fifth avenue. As an adjunct 
to the business the brothers established and operated a line of Conestoga 
wagons, and in order to provide trading stations numerous log-cabins were 
maintained on a route covering Butler and Westmoreland counties. Mr. 
Hoeveler died in his prime, in 1845, being only forty-two years of age. He 
married, in Germany, Gertrude Ussalman, and their first child died on the voy- 
age to America. All their other children were born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania : 
Aloysius, Bassileus, Clara, Dominica and Erasmus, and of whom Clara and 
Erasmus are the only ones now (1907) living. 

Augustus Hoeveler, youngest child of William and Clara (Hoya) 
Hoeveler, was born in Ankum, kingdom of Hanover, Germany, in 1820, and 
was seventeen years of age when he accompanied his parents and their other 
children to the United States. Becoming a member of the firm of Hoeveler 
Brothers, he was placed in. charge of the wagon routes, a most important 
branch of their btisiness. In time the partnership was dissolved, and he became 
owner of the Bayardstown store, conducting the business on his own account. 
In 1850 he disposed of this property and began the manufacture of glue, soap 
and candles in what is now the Twentieth ward of the city of Pittsburg. With 
other enterprising men, including Edward Frauenheim and Leopold X'ilsack, 
he was active in the establishment of the Iron City Brewery. Mr. Hoeveler 
also took an active part in the establishment of other manufacturing enter- 
prises. He was also one of the incorporators of the German Xational Bank, 
of which he was president until his death. He was a pioneer in laying out 
suburban property, and made very profitable real estate investments. He was 
most liberal and lenient with his customers. His judgment being good it never 
became necessary to sell out a lot or home buyer in order to satisfy unpaid 
claims for the purchase money. His plan was to buy large tracts of unimproved 
lands, in eligible locations, divide them into building lots, and sell them on 
reasonable terms as to consideration and time. He was sagacious in his loca- 
tions, and his sites soon developed into important sections of the city. St. 
Augustine's church (Roman Catholic) now stands upon one of these tracts. 
He served as a member of the borough council of Lawrenceville, and after 
thai borough was annexed to Pittsburg, he was elected to the citv council, but 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 237 



his death occurred before he could take his seat. He was a devout CathoHc 
in rehgious faith, and a Democrat in poHtics. He married EHzabeth O'Leary, 
daughter of Wilham O'Leary, a well-known glass manufacturer of Pittsburg, 
and established his residence on Black Horse Hill. The children of Augustus 
and Elizabeth (O'Leary) Hoeveler were eight in number, of whom three grew 
to maturity : William A., of whom further ; Stella, married Roger S. Kennedy, 
of St. Paul, Minnesota ; and Joseph .\., a resident of Pittsburg. 

William A. Hoeveler, eldest son of Augustus and Elizabeth (O'Leary) 
Hoeveler, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, May 14, 1852. His education 
was acquired in the parochial schools of his native city and at Newell's Insti- 
tute and St. Vincent's College. After completing his studies, in 1869, at the 
age of seventeen years, he engaged in the manufacture of glue, and continued 
in this occupation until 1887, when he established the storage business in which 
he is at present engaged, and in which his excellent judgment, executive ability 
and probity have brought him flattering and well deserved success. He has 
excellent mechanical abilities, and is an inventor of more than ordinary note. 
He has been actively and beneficially identified with the growth and general 
development of the city of Pittsburg, and has ever given public-spirited service 
to its welfare. He is a Roman Catholic in religion, and a member of the 
Knights of Columbus, and in politics is independent. He married, February 
17, 1885, Katherine Hemphill (see Hemphill sketch in this work), and they 
have had children : Genevieve, James Hemphill and William A. Hoeveler, Jr. 

Erasmus Hoeveler, son of William and Gertrude (Ussalman) Hoeveler, 
was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, May 31, 1844, and was there educated 
in the public schools. After the death of his father he accompanied his mother 
to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. She had previously married, in Pitts- 
burg, Clemence Zaun, by whom she had two children, one of whom, Herman, 
is now a resident of New York. Upon attaining manhood's estate, Erasmus 
Hoeveler returned to Pittsburg and engaged in various occupations. At the 
time of the Civil war he was engaged in making boxes for the government, 
and also worked on the construction of gunboats. Later he became interested 
in the glue business, and subsequently dealt in live stock, with which business 
he was identified for a period of twenty-five years in New York and Pittsburg. 
He is now living retired from business responsibilities and enjoying the fruits 
of his industry. He is a director in a number of financial institutions, among 
them the Humboldt Insurance Company and the East End Savings Bank. He 
married, in Pittsburg, in 1877, Katherine T. Kim, born in Pittsburg, a daughter 
of George Kim, and they had four children, two of whom are now living: 
Mary Gertrude and George A. 



DAVID BORLAND, deceased, who was connected with the Nimick Iron 
Works, Pittsburg, was born in this city May 26, 1830, and died March 3, 1884. 
He was educated in his native city and attended Prof. Meadi's private school. 
In his early life he engaged as a clerk in a dry goods store. Later he was in 
the commission business, after which he became a shipping clerk for Bailey & 
Brown in the iron business, located on Water street. LTpon the retirement of 
Mr. Bailey from the business the firm was kno.wn as Brown & Company, and 
the plant was removed to Ninth street, and later styled the Wayne Iron Works. 
Mr. Borland continued as the firm's shipping clerk until he was made book- 



238 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

keeper and still later a partner in the Nimick Iron Works, located on the 
South Side, near Carson street, and there he continued to operate until his 
death. He had made his home in the Shadyside district for forty years. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church, a devoted man in his family and 
greatly beloved and highly esteemed by the community. 

Mr. Borland's father was Moses Borland, born in Ireland, and came to 
this country when but sixteen years of age. He was a house-painter and 
followed this for some years, after which he was able from his earnings to 
retire and enjoy the comforts of life. He lived in Allegheny City, where he 
served as one of the school directors. His wife was Sarah Taggert, a native 
of Ireland, who came to America with her mother at the age of six years. Her 
father died in Ireland before her coming here. Their children were: David, 
the subject; Dr. William Borland, who now resides in Allegheny; Joseph H., 
and Jane, who died unmarried. The only surviving one is Dr. William Borland. 

David Borland married, September 12; 1854, in Allegheny City, Katherine 
Blatjche Snowden, born February 10, 1834, in Allegheny City, daughter of 
Samuel and Selina (Gilleland) Snowden. Mrs. Borland's mother was the 
daughter of David Gilleland, a farmer residing near Wilkinsburg, and was 
called Squire Gilleland ; his wife was Lydia Parker. The children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. David Borland were as follows: Selina, Sarah Elizabeth, Alexander 
Graff, Kate Blanche, Joseph H., who married Jane Kennedy, and they have 
one child, Katherine. 

Of the Snowden family history it may here be added that the family was 
an early one in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The American progenitor coming 
to this country in 1685 was named John, Sr., and it is believed he was the first 
Presbyterian minister ordained in Pennsylvania or the colonies, the date being 
1704. He had a son, Isaac, born in 1732 in Philadelphia, and died in 1809. 
He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and married Mary Cox. They had 
a son named John, Jr. John, Sr., signed the ''Concession" at Burlingto'n, New 
Jersey, and became judge of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1704. 

From the above line descended Judge John M. Snowden, who was a prom- 
inent figure in the city of Pittsburg at an early day. He was judge of the 
court of common pleas, appointed April 16, 1840, and reappointed or com- 
missioned March 31, 1841. He was one of the original directors in the Bank 
of Pittsburg, the first to be granted a charter in the city, the date being 18 14. 
Among other directors was Ephraim Blaine, grandfather of the late Hon. 
James G. Blaine. Judge Snowden was also mayor of Pittsburg at one time. 
He was a native of Philadelphia and a man of much influence. He married 
Elizabeth Moore, and among their children was Samuel Snowden, father of 
Mrs. Borland of this notice. He was a native of Pittsburg and was engaged 
in th^ wholesale drug business for many years. He was the first of the firm of 
Avery, Ogden & Company, located on Wood street. Later he retired from the 
drug trade and embarked in the manufacture of white lead. His factory was 
up the Allegheny river from Pittsburg. The firm was known as Ogden & 
Snowden. He was a successful operator in this industry until his death. 



JOHN M. WEBER, who has been in the employ of the Monongahela 
Watch Company and the Felkes & Wilson Company for a number of years, is 
a well- known resident of the South Side, Pittsburg-, Pennsylvania. He is a 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 239 



representative of the third generation of a family whose earlier members came 
to this country from Germany. 

John Weber, grandfather of John M. Weber, was a native of Germany, 
and was a stonemason by trade. He came from Germany and located on the 
South Side, Pittsburg, where he with his three sons engaged in the jewelry 
business at the corner of Tenth and Carson streets. He married Miss Neary, 
and they had children: William E., see forward; Charles and Albert. 

WilHam E. Weber, son of John Weber, was born in Hanover, Germany. 
He was educated in his native country and there also learned the trade of 
watch making, in which he became an expert. He came to the United States 
with his parents about 1855, and they became residents of Pittsburg, as above 
stated, occupying the house which is now (1907) the home of John M. Weber. 
He was one of the first pupils of the old Birmingham school, which was at 
that time under the direction of Miss Abrams, who is still living but retired 
from the labors of teaching many years ago. After he had completed his 
apprenticeship at the trade of watch making with J. M. Kenler he engaged in 
business for himself in connection with his father and brothers. He enlisted 
as a private in Company L, Sixty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, at the outbreak of the Civil War, and by merit was advanced to the 
rank of second lieutenant in his company, which presented him a medal for 
bravery and efficiency as an officer. He served in all four and one-half years, 
and was an active participant in many of the most important battles of this 
momentous struggle. At the close of the war he returned to Pittsburg and 
resumed work at his trade, being located at the corner of Tenth and Carson 
streets until the time of his death. He resided in the Twenty-eighth ward of 
Pittsburg for many years, and then removed to the Twenty-ninth, where he 
died in 1878. He was a member of the German Evangelical church, and gave 
his political support to the Republican party. He married (first) Mary Devlin, 
by whom he had one child: John M., see forward. He married (second) 
Lizzie Ulrich, and had children : William, Amanda and Edwin. 

John M. Weber, only child of William E. and Mary (Devlin) Weber, was 
born in the Twenty-eighth ward of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1867. He 
was also a student at the old Birmingham school, under the tuition of Miss 
McCutcheon, until he had attained the age of sixteen years, when he was 
apprenticed to learn the trade of watch making, an occupation with which he 
was identified for a period of nine years. Since that time he has been in the 
employ of the Monongahela W'atch Company and of the Felkes & Wilson Lum- 
ber Company, dividing his time between these two concerns. When the South 
Side Reservation Park was opened in 1892 he was appointed custodian. This 
was the first park opened in that section of Pittsburg. Mr. Weber resides in 
the old family home and is a member of the German Evangelical church. He 
is a stanch supporter of the Republican party. He has never married. 



DAVID BLAIR, vice-president of the City Deposit Bank of Pittsburg, 
was born September 3, 1841, in Ireland, a son of William Blair, a native of 
that country. In 1853 he came with his wife and six children to the United 
States, settling in Pittsburg. He was employed as a nurseryman in East 
Liberty by General Negley and T. A. Mellon. William Blair married Margaret 
Troop, also a native of Ireland, and they were the parents of twelve children. 



240 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



all of whom were born in that country. Of these two died young, a third died 
in Ireland, and three came to America before the parents. The following are 
living: Mary, Margaret, Robert, David, William and Edward. The parents 
of these children both lived to the age of eighty-five. 

David Blair, a son of William and Margaret (Troop) Blair, was twelve 
years old when brought by his parents to the United States, and finished his 
education at the old Birchfield school house, Pittsburg. In 1854, while attend- 
ing school during the winters, he found employment in the brickyard of the 
late Alexander Negley and continued to work there until 1866. He then 
engaged in the manufacture of brick for himself, and in 1868, having been 
successful, took his brothers William and Edward into partnership, the firm 
becoming D. Blair & Brothers. The enterprise has been extremely prosperous, 
and is still conducted under the same firm name, the organization having built 
up a very extensive business in the manufacture of building brick. For the 
last twenty-five years Mr. Blair has been one of the directors of the City 
Deposit Bank of Pittsburg, and at the present time is also vice-president of 
the institution. For three years he served on the school board of the Twentieth 
ward, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs, giving in all 
respects an example of good citizenship. His political principles and opinions 
are those of an Independent Republican. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian church on North Negley and Stanton avenues, and since 1873 
has held the office of elder, and is actively engaged in the work of the church. 

Mr. Blair married, in 1878. Mary A., daughter of Thomas Brown, a 
prominent citizen of Pittsburg, where he was engaged in the hardware business 
and was for many years president of the City Deposit Bank. i\Ir. and Mrs. 
Blair are the parents of four daughters, all of whom were born in Pittsburg: 
Mary, Nancy B., Margaret L., and Helen E. The youngest of these daughters 
is now attending the Penn College for Women on Fifth avenue, from which 
institution her sisters have graduated. 



HENRY BERGER. The late Henry Berger, a well-known cigar manu- 
facturer of Pittsburg, was born March 16, 1861, in the province of Lorraine, 
Geriuany, a son of John Berger, also a native of Lorraine and by trade a glass- 
blower. In 1863 John Berger emigrated to the L^nited States, landing in New 
York and thence coming" to Pittsburg, where he made his home on Carson 
street and there passed the remainder of his life. He was employed in the 
glass factories, and at the time of his death was working in D. O. Cunningham's 
factory. He and his wife were members of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. 
John Berger became the father of the following children : Henry, Elizabeth, 
wife of Andrew Rousher, of Pittsburg; Philomene, wife of John Kelly, of 
Pittsburg; Albert, and Stephen A., married Charlotte Barber, who recently 
died. Both Albert and Stephen A. reside in Pittsburg. John Berger, the 
father, died in 1873 aged forty-six. His widow, now sixty-six years old, resides 
in Pittsburg. 

Henry Berger, a son of John Berger, attended the parochial and public 
schools until the age of twelve years, when he was obliged by the death of 
his father to assist in the support of the family. For a number of years he 
worked in the Jones-Laughlin mill, and being studiously inclined laid by the 
little that he was able to save from his wages for the purpose of continuing 



I 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 241 



his education. At nineteen or twenty he entered Duff's Business College, 
graduating thence in due course of time, and then learned cigar-making with 
his uncle, John Berger, on the South Side. Soon after he engaged in the 
manufacture of cigars for himself on Carson street, at the corner of Twenty- 
eighth street, and from the beginning the enterprise prospered. He had 
purchased his place of business, but sold it to the Jones-Laughlin Company 
and bought another piece of property on Carson street, to which he removed. 
His factory was situated in the rear and the retail store in front. On this site 
he conducted business during the remainder of his life. He served several 
years on the school board and on the central board of education. He belonged 
to the Knights of St. George and many social orders, and in politics was a life- 
long Democrat. He and his wife were members of St. Peter's Roman Catholic 
church. 

j\Ir. Berger married, March 30, 1898, Mary Trager, and they became the 
parents of three children: John, born September 11, 1902; and two deceased. 
The death of Mr. Berger, which occurred December 17, 1905, removed from 
Pittsburg a good citizen, whose life from the age of two years had been passed 
in that city. He was a man of a kind, amiable disposition, sincerely esteemed 
and loved by all who knew him. 

Mrs. Berger is a daughter of Joseph Trager, who was born in 1827, in 
Bavaria, Germany, and as a young man came to the United States, settling in 
Pittsburg, where he was employed in D. O. Cunningham's glass factory. 
Joseph Trager married, in Bavaria, Mary Block, a native of that country, and 
thev brought one child with them to the United States. Their children were : 
Elizabeth, deceased ; and ]\Iary, who was born on Jane street, attended St. 
Peter's parochial school, and became the wife of Henry Berger. Mr. Trager 
died in 1877, aged forty-seven, and his widow passed away seven years later, 
at the age of fifty-four. After the death of Mr. Berger his widow continued 
to conduct the factory and the store until she sold the property to the Jones- 
Laughlin Company. 

JOHN SEMPLE, M.D., deceased, for many years one of the foremost 
physicians and surgeons of western Pennsylvania, a man devotedly attached to 
his profession, was a member of a family which has been honored in the annals 
of the state for a number of generations. 

James Semple, grandfather of Dr. John Semple, was born in Cumberland 
county. Pennsylvania, March 9, 1756, and died in Allegheny county, in the same 
state, November 13, 1830. He held the rank of captain in the Sixth company, 
Third Battalion of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania Militia, during the war of 
the Revolution, and at the close of the war removed to Allegheny county, where 
he took up a tract of land where Millvale is now located, this being divided 
at his death between his sons, and a portion of it consisting of four hundred 
acres, at Pine Creek, now Wildwood, is still in the possession of the Semple 
family. For a time he had lived in Maryland, but was still very young when 
he took up his residence in Allegheny county, where he attained a prominent 
position as a leader in the public affairs of the community, being the second 
sheriff ever elected in that county. He was engaged in farming as his business 
life work and amassed a considerable fortune in that field of industry. He mar- 
ried Christina Taggart, born May 12, 1755, and died November 10, 1829, and 

iii— 16 



242 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

they were the parents of: Mary, born August 30, 1780; James, bom March 
29, 1786; John, born June 24, 1788; Thomas, born January 27, 1791 ; Robert 
Anderson, see forward; Samuel, born June 19, 1795; Eliza, born January 2J, 
^797'- William, born July 28, 1800. 

Robert Anderson Semple, fourth son and fifth child of James and Chris- 
tina (Taggart) Semple, was born on the family homestead at Gertys Run, 
now (1907) a part of Pittsburg, December 10, 1793. He also followed the 
occupation of farming, and, like his father, with a great deal of success. He 
married Mary Simpson, and they had children: i. James, married Jane Ross. 
2. Dr. John, see forward. 3. William, who died at the age of twenty-two years. 
4. David, died in childhood. 5. Eliza, married William Hutchinson. 6. Mary. 
7. Sarah, married Robert Ferguson. 8. Robert, married Harriet Myers. 9. 
Silas, who married Eliza J. Steward. 

Dr. John Semple, second son and child of Robert Anderson and Mary 
(Simpson) Semple. was born on the family homestead at Wildwood February 
16, 1822. His early years were spent in the place of his birth, and his prelim- 
inary education was received from his father. Later he attended the college 
at Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated with 
honor. He then took up the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Drs. 
Brooks and Speir, subsequently becoming a student at the Jefferson Medical 
College in Philadelphia,, graduating from that institution in 1848. He then 
took up the active practice of his profession in Ebensburg, Cambria county, 
Pennsylvania, but at the end of one year was summoned to Wilkinsburg to take 
up the practice of Dr. James Crothers. He erected a fine residence in Penn 
avenue, in which he had his offices until the time of his death, October 9, igoi. 
He was one of the oldest physicians in the western part of Pennsylvania, a man 
of extraordinary ability in many directions, and with more than a local reputa- 
tion in the medical profession. While taking an active interest in the industrial 
and financial development of Pittsburg, he never allowed this to interfere with 
his profession, and his patients evinced a remarkable devotion to him as a physi- 
cian and a friend. A proof of this is to be found in the fact that he was the 
physician and counselor of grandparents, parents and children in a number of 
the most prominent families of the city. Toward the close of his life, when the 
impaired state of his health would not permit him to leave his home, his patients 
still insisted upon having the benefit of his experience, coming to him in his 
home and obtaining medical advice. He spent much of his leisure time in the 
study of botany and horticulture, and was a recognized authority in these 
branches of research. He was a great lover of animals, and always had a 
nuniber of pets about his home, notable among them being a macaw, which 
was twenty-six years of age. His heart was filled with kindness toward all 
living creatures, and his many acts of unostentatious charity were only discov- 
ered after he had departed this life, regretted by all who had known him. 
In politics he was an ardent and active Republican and served as burgess of 
Wilkinsburg from 1888 to 1890. His religious affiliations were with the Pres- 
byterian church, he being one of the charter members of the First Presbyterian 
ciiurch of Wilkinsburg, and holding the office of elder until his death. He 
took a great and beneficial interest in all matters connected with this institu- 
tion. He was one of the leading spirits of Wilkinsburg in medical, (xilitical, 
religious and charitable matters, and was universally esteemed and loved. He 
was a member of the Bedford Medical Association, for which he wrote many 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 243 

noteworthy papers, making a specialty of those having a bearing upon botany. 
He was also a member of the American Medical Association, the State Medical 
Association, and held a prominent place in Masonic circles. The interest he 
evinced in educational matters was of much benefit to the school system of the 
city, and one of the public schools of \^'ilkinsbnrg was named in his honor. 

Dr. Semple married, first, ]\Iarch 20. 1848, Isabella Smith, who died March 
22, 1852, and by her he had one child. Alary I. R. He married, second, June 
8, 1854, Nancy Thompson, who died in 1895, and they had one child, Alargaret 
J. S., deceased, who married and is survived by a son, John S. Semple. 

THE WINEBIDDLE FAMILY. The once numerous family of Wine- 
biddles of the vicinity of Greater Pittsburg are of German origin. The German 
emigrant was John Conrad Winebiddle, born in Germany, March 11, 1741. 
He was one of two sons that came to America, and was p>ossessed of much 
wealth, as fortunes were then counted. He came to America at the time of 
the Revolutionary war, attached to the English army, but was soon connected 
with the cause of freedom. Owing to his great wealth he was enabled to carry 
on large transactions with the Continental army. He came to Fort Duquesne, 
now Pittsburg, and began purchasing cattle and supplied the Continental army 
with beef. He also became a tanner and supplied the army with leather and 
shoes for the soldiers. His tannery was located at Lawrenceville, and for some 
years after the war closed he continued to operate this tannery with much 
success. After the close of the Revolutionary struggle he commenced to pur- 
chase land in what is now the East End of Pittsburg. He had about five 
hundred acres, and in time it grew to be very valuable. It is now contained 
in the Nineteenth and Twentieth wards of the city. This land was situated 
east of the Allegheny cemetery and included the town of East Liberty. It is 
all built up with fine, costly residences and business houses of great value. 

Mr. Winebiddle married, in 1761, Elizabeth Weitzel, born in Pennsylvania. 
He died, and his wife afterward married William Cunningham, of Scotland, 
by whom one son was born, William. The issue of the emigrant W^inebiddle 
and his wife Elizabeth were as follows; Anna Barbara, who married Jacob 
Negley (see the Negley family sketch.) Philip, born May 14, 1780, in Pitts- 
burg, died December 14, 1871. He married September 3, 1807, Susanna Roup, 
daughter of Jonas and Abagail (Horr) Roup (see Roup sketch). She was 
born March 26, 1786, and died October 21, 1873. They were the parents of 
seven children, as follows: i. Lafayette, born September 5, 1808, died August 
7, 1863. 2. Elizabeth, born February 18, 1810, died in June, 1896: she mar- 
ried Moses Philips, born in May, 1809, died in March, 1877; they were married 
May 10, 1832, and had these children: Sophia, Elizabeth J., \\'illiam W ., 
Mary, Susanna R. and John R. All died without issue except William W. 
Philips, who was born in January, 1848, and married Mrs. Annie Donohue, 
and they have Florence, Lillie and William. 3. Sarah Winebiddle was bom 
December 9, 181 1, and died May 18, 1875; married January 2, 1838, George 
McWilliams, who died in March, 1880, aged seventy years. He was the son 
of Richard McWilliams, of Scotch-Irish descent, and his wife was a Miss 
Dunn : they had a large family, George being one of six sons. ( For more 
concerning this man and his family see his section within this sketch herein- 
after.) 4. Alary Ann Winebiddle, born April 11, 1814: married Henry Menold, 



244 • A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



September 8, 1838, and their three children are Susanna M., born June 28, 
1839, married Henry C. Teeters, now deceased, without issue; Lafayette Wine- 
biddle, born in December, 1844, married Mattie Covert, whose children were 
Alline L., Henry L., Lafayette, Jr., the other two are deceased ; Rachel M., 
born in January, 1849, married Charles A. Warmcastle, and their children are : 
Mary AL, wife of C. P. Thompson ; Grace W., Laura W., Frances F., and 
Jennie N. 5. Rebecca R. Winebiddle, born January 31, 1819, died in 1896; 
married November 8, i860, Enoch Philips. 6. William C. Winebiddle, bom 
March 9, 1821 ; served in the Mexican war; unmarried; mentioned hereinafter. 
7. Olive M. Winebiddle, born June 13, 1826, married, April 12, 1855, William 
Y. Brown, whose only child, Susanna, married William Winebiddle Baum. 
(See their sketch.) 

(\\) Kittle Winebiddle, third child of John Conrad Winebiddle and wife, 
died October 21, 1877, aged eighty-seven years; she married, March 16, 1809, 
John Roup, son of Jonas and Abagail (Horr) Roup (see Roup family sketch). 
By this union two children were born — James, who died in infancy, and 
Rebecca, who married William Penn Baum (see Baum sketch). 

(H) John Conrad Winebiddle, Jr., son of the German emigrant and 
wife, married first, Olive Newton ; second, Harriet Fitch Ingalls ; by her first 
husband one child was born, Matilda, who married Dr. Augustus H. Gross. 

The following is relative to George McWilliams, who married Sarah 
Winebiddle, daughter of John Conrad Winebiddle and wife : 

Mr. McWilliams was educated in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
and mastered the carpenter's trade. When a young man lie came to East 
Liberty, where he followed his trade in a successful manner for some years. 
Later in life he engaged in the hardware trade on Penn avenue. East Liberty, 
and took as a partner his son, Philip Biddle McWilliams, and continued until 
his death. He was a prominent man in his day, was a director in one of the 
banks and always identified with church affairs, being a regular attendant at 
the Presbyterian church. His children were as follows: i. Susanna A., born 
October 13, 1838; married John R. Murdoch March 14, 1867, and they have 
children — John Robb, Sallie Winebiddle and William Howard. The last named 
married, November 21, 1906, Katherine Diskin. Mr. and Mrs. Alurdoch's 
eldest child, George Alexander, died January 27, 1905, aged thirty-seven years, 
unmarried. 2. Rebecca McWilliams, died aged twenty-six years, unmarried. 
3. George A., born September 29, 1843, married Mary L. Philips, of Johns- 
town, and their children are : Jennie, who married Frank E. Wilson, and 
Mary Louisa. 4. Philip B. 5. William H., born in June, 1858, unmarried. 



LEANDER TRAUTMAN, one of the best-known members of the bar 
now living in Pittsburg, was born February 17, 1865, at Canton, Ohio, a son 
of the Rev. Louis Trautman, who was born at Montpellier, France, although 
of German parentage, and was a minister of the Lutheran church. He married 
Catharine Wismer, who bore him three children, of whom the eldest died in 
infancy and the others were twins, Leander and Alexander L., the latter of 
whom married Emma May Reep, by whom he had three children : Louis L., 
Marion G. and Ralph E. The Rev. Louis Trautman died in 1865, at Canton, 
Ohio, where he was pastor of a Lutheran church. 

Mrs. Catharine Trautman, who subsequently married Mr. J. B. Nobbs, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE ' 245 

was the daughter of Solomon Wismer and the granddaughter of Jacob Wis- 
mer, who was twice married, his first wife being the motlier of all his children. 
Solomon Wismer was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and all his life was 
■engaged in agricultural pursuits. He died at the age of fifty-four and his wife, 
Catharine Keil, lived to be eighty-two. Their daughter Catharine became the 
wife of the Rev. Louis Trautman, as mentioned above. After the death of 
Mr. Trautman she removed in 1869 to Pittsburg, where, in February, 1871, 
she married Josiah Benjamin Nobbs. 

Mr. Nobbs was born in 1828, in London, England, and was brought to 
this country at the age of four years. He received his education in the schools 
of Pittsburg and then learned the tinner's trade. Later he became connected 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, serving for many years as foreman 
of their shops. In 1865 he engaged in business for himself in Pittsburg, having 
a hardware store and carrying on all kinds of tinning, sheet iron and metal 
work. This business, in which he was very successful, he conducted until his 
■death, and it is now carried on by his son. Grant C. Nobbs. Mr. Nobbs was at 
one time a director of schools and prominent in various societies. At the 
time of his death he was treasurer of the 0"Hara school. He was active in 
city affairs and once served as alderman of the Twelfth ward. 

Mr. Nobbs was twice married. His first wife was Mary McCurdy, by 
whom he had three children : Laura, wife of William Rankin, one child, Mary ; 
Dumars W., married Rose Harris,^ children, Charles, Benjamin and Harry; 
and Grant C, married Stella Shannon, children, Laura, Hazel and Grant C. 
Mrs. Trautman, the second wife of Mr. Nobbs, became the mother of seven 
children, five of whom died in infancy. Two daughters survive : Mabel, wife 
of William J. Hamilton, children, William James and Josiah Benjamin; and 
Myra L., wife of Hugh McKean Jones, children, Annie Lee and Mary 
Catharine. After the death of Mr. Nobbs, which occurred February 13, 1893, 
in Pittsburg, his widow moved to the East End, where she now resides. 

Leander Trautman, son of Louis and Catharine (Wismer) Trautman, 
was but six weeks old at the time of the death of his father and was four 
years old when his mother moved to Pittsburg. He received his education in 
the O'Hara school and the Pittsburg high school. On leaving the latter institu- 
tion he was obliged to go to work in a mill, but after earning sufficient money 
he applied himself to the study of stenography. He never entered college, but 
took a complete classical university course by private tutoring under the best 
professors in Allegheny county. As a stenographer Mr. Trautman has achieved 
a reputation, having kept up his speed all these years, and therefore ranks as 
one of the oldest stenographers in the county. It is claimed that he has 
reported as many conventions and speeches of famous men of Pittsburg during 
the last twenty-five years as any one man in the vicinity, having also reported 
in every court of the county as well as in the United States courts. While 
practicing stenography in the courts he read law under Judge Jacob F. Slagle, 
and early in 1893 was admitted to the bar. Ever since he has occupied the 
office in Diamond street in which he studied for his profession. 

In politics he is a Republican, but not a partisan. He has voted with and 
supported the Democrats and Citizens as well as the Republicans whenever 
he thought that by doing so he could serve the best interests of the community. 
He has made numerous political speeches throughout the county, but has 
always refused to become a candidate for any office. 



246 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF ' 

Mr. Trautman married Minnie, daughter of George Abel, and they have 
one child, Mary Catharine. He is very domestic in his habits, and is devoted to 
the study of history and science. He is the possessor of one of the finest 
libraries in Pittsburg, including works on history, science, constitutional law, 
constitutional history and general literature. 

LOUIS SCHNEIDER, of Pittsburg, for thirty-eight years a trusted em- 
ploye of the Jones-Laughlin Company of that city, was born April 30, 1835, in 
Saarunion, near the dividing line of Alsace-Lorraine, which at that time formed 
part of the kingdom of France. Mr. Schneider comes of an old race of farm- 
ers. His father, Henry Schneider, a native of Saarunion, received a common 
school education, and from boyhood was trained to agricultural pursuits, which 
he made the occupation of his life. 

Henry Schneider married Katrina Lackreiter, a native of the same place 
as himself, and their children were : Henry, who died in his native place ; 
Frederick, a brewer, from love of traveling made trips to dififerent parts of the 
world and died in Australia ; Charlotte, deceased ; Theobald, also deceased ; 
Carl, resides in Alsace ; Sophia, also living in Alsace ; Louis, of whom later ; 
George, a tanner, came to the L'nited States with Louis, settled in McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania, and died there ; and William, a shoemaker, came in 1856 to the 
United States and settled in Columbus, Ohio, where for many years he has 
been employed at the Union Station. The father of these children died at sixty- 
two, and the mother at the time of her death had nearly reached the age of 
seventy. 

Louis Schneider, son of Henry and Katrina (Lackreiter) Schneider, 
attended school until his fourteenth year, after which he assisted his father on 
the farm. In 1854 he came with his brother to the Lmited States, making the 
voyage from Havre to New York on the sailing-vessel 'Tron City." They 
went to Columbus, Ohio, where they had relatives, but the fever and ague, 
which were then raging there, forced them after a four years' sojourn to seek 
a more salubrious climate, which they found in McKeesport. 

During Mr. Schneider's residence in that city the war broke out, and in 
May, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company I, Ninth Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Reserves, Captain Lynch, Lieutenant-Coloned Guderson and Colonel 
Jackson commanding. His term of enlistment was for three years, or duripg 
the war. The regiment was organized at a camp in Wilkinsburg, and in June 
left for the front, joining the Army of the Potomac and participating first in 
a skirmish at Trainsville and afterward in the following battles: Seven days' 
fight at Richmond, second Bull Run, South Mountain, Fredericksburg, Antie- 
tam and Gettysburg. Thence the regiment marched to the Rappahannock 
and served with the Army of the Potomac until the expiration of Mt. Schnei- 
der's enlistment. He came to Pittsburg and here received his discharge in May, 
1864, having been in all respects an exemplary soldier, never in the hospital 
and never off duty. At White Oak, Virginia, he was promoted to the rank of 
corporal. 

After his discharge he settled in Pittsburg, going to work as a laborer for 
the Jones-Laughlin Company. In course of time he became boss of a gang in 
the polishing room, retaining the position until four years ago, when he retired. 
At the time of his marriage he invested the small amount of money which he 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 247 

had been able to save in a little home on Cary alley, between Twenty-fifth and 
Twenty-sixth streets. Eighteen years after he bought a house on Jane street, 
and in 1892 built his present residence on the adjoining lot. 

He belongs to Peter Fritz Lodge, No. 486, I. O. O. F., and in national 
politics affiliates with the Republicans. He is a member of the German 
Evangelical church. 

Mr. Schneider married, April 10, 1865, at the German Presbyterian 
church, Catharine Rhines, born September 18, 1838, in Monroe county, Ohio. 
She came to Pittsburg at the age of eighteen. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider became 
the parents of a son and two daughters : George Carl, of Pittsburg, married 
Lizzie Bitten; Annie G., and Louisa, married, November 7, 1890, John B. 
Holveck, of French descent, children, Amelia, Leona (deceased) and Catharine. 
Mrs. Schneider, the mother of these three children, died April 10, 1899, ^"d is 
buried in the German Evangelical cemetery. 



\\ ILLIAM A. STANDING, of Sharpsburg, well known as the inventor 
of the Sectional Compound Gas Heater, was born May 20, 1859, in Pittsburg, 
a son of William Standing, who was born in Sussex, England, and in 1844 
emigrated to the L'nited States, settling in Pittsburg. His occupation was that 
of a florist, and for a number of years he was employed in the greenhouse of 
Isaac Pennock. He subsequently worked for others in Pittsburg and Alle- 
gheny, and in 1874 moved to Sharpsburg, where in 1897 he went into business 
for himself, building the greenhouse on High street, which he still conducts. 
He is a Republican and a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Standing married, in his native land, Alary Gardner, and the following 
children were born to them : Charles H., married a daughter of William 
Bright; Albert, married Sophia Seal, of Niles, Ohio; Walter, married Mamie 
Schultz, and William A., of whom later. 

William A. Standing, son of William and Mary (Gardner) Standing, was 
educated in the public schools of Pittsburg and learned the plumber's trade in 
that city. He was employed until 1888, when he went to Sharpsburg and 
established a plumbing business for himself, which he still controls. Through 
his inventive genius he has revolutionized heating by gas, having designed the 
Sectional Compound Heater, on which he obtained a patent in 1906. This 
heater operates on the same principle as a radiator, giving as mild a heat as 
that obtained from hot water and by having a large radiating surface and 
utilizing the benefits of combustion uses from one-third to one-half less gas 
than an ordinary stove, an ordinary room requiring one hundred feet of gas 
each twelve hours. It extracts all the offensive odors and dampness from the 
heat, but does not destroy the oxygen in the air. 

In the sphere of politics, and also in that of religion, Mr. Standing follows 
in the footsteps of his father, voting with the Republicans and holding mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church. 

Air. Standing married Amelia, daughter of Joseph and Catharine (Colli- 
shaw ) Turner, of German lineage, and they have been the parents of the 
following children: Marion, born December 25, 1882, wife of Sample Cridge ; 
Alice, born July 21, 1884; Joseph, born January 7, 1886, died in 1892; Frank, 
born November 28, 1888; and Gertrude, born May 28, 1897. 



248 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



THE WEIBEL FAMILY. (II) August Weibel, son of the founder of 
the family in this countn', was educated at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried Katherine Snyder, sister of Governor Snyder, the second governor of 
Pennsylvania, elected first in 1807, reelected in 1810 and 1813. Eight children 
were born of this union : i. Elizabeth, born August 10, 1762, supposed to have 
married a Mr. Benson of Philadelphia. 2. John, born in 1764. died in child- 
hood. 3. Katherine, born August 10, 1766, died in childhood. 4. Andrew, 
born in 1769, married Mary Smith. 5. Margaret, born December 15, 1771, 
married Conrad Grubbs. 6. John, born May 23, 1774. 7. Barbara, born July 
17, 1776, married William Stable. 8. Charlotte, born in 1783, married John 
Carmichael. 

(III) John Weibel, son of August Weibel (11), was the sixth child in 
his parents' family. He married Katherine Douglass November 15, 1796. Her 
father was killed in the Revolutionary war. The children by John and Kather- 
ine (Douglass) Weibel were as follows: i. Anna, born October 2, 1797. died 
in 1877; she married John Miller, by whom she had the following children: 
Philip, Catherine A., Mary. John W., Andrew, Anna, Charlotte, Margaret and 
Eliza. Anna married John Miller, the grandfather of George A. Miller. 
(See his sketch.) Charlotte Miller, daughter of Anna W. and John Miller, 
married John Cowan, having two children, Angeline and Lenora M. 2. An- 
drew, born June 30, 1799. 3. John, born March 16, 1801. 4. William, born 
in 1803. 5. Charlotte, born in 1805, married James Young. 6. David, born in 
1806. 7. Katherine, born in 1808. 8. Mary A., born in 1815, married James 
Terrel. 

John Weibel, father of this family, came to Pittsburg in 1790 and settled 
at what is now known as East Liberty. After his marriage he removed to 
O'Hara township, Allegheny county, where he purchased land from the gov- 
ernment and developed an excellent and very extensive farm. He was a great 
advocate of the free school system, even long before it was a popular measure. 
In his descendants' possession is an article of agreement, dated 1823, in 
which, with Charles Abbott as teacher, John Weibel and some neighbors agreed 
to educate their children in the English language. John Weibel was a man of 
much importance in the count}- and one of the foremost agriculturists. He was 
from pure old Swabian German stock and a strong adherent to the faith of 
his fathers, the German Reformed, of Calvinistic principles. Politically he was 
an ardent Whig. 

(IV) Anna Miller, sixth child and third daughter of John and Anna 
Weibel Miller, married William Burns, by whom four children were born, as 
follows: I. James A., at home. 2. Anna M., at home. 3. Jean M., married 
David M. Kirk, of East End, Pittsburg, and they have children : Jean B. and 
Robina L. 4. William C, married Bessie V. Patterson, and they have had one 
child, Robert P., who died in infancy. 

John Miller, father of Anna (Miller) Burns, owned and operated an ex- 
tensive farm ; he was also a surveyor and surveyed a large portion of Alle- 
gheny county, together with many of the early roads. 

William Burns, of Scotch-Irish parentage, came to America in 1849, lo- 
cating at Sharpsburg. He was a contractor and builder and erected many of 
the best houses in his borough and also in other parts of the country. He re- 
tired in 1890. He served iiis borough as councilman, being elected by the Re- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 249 



publican party. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church at Homestead, to 
which place he removed in 1890. 

EVERSON C. HULBERT, city engineer of the borough of Sharpsburg, 
was born in Washington county. Ohio, in 1862. a son of Joseph P. and Sarah 
A. (Sherman) Hulbert. 

Joseph P. Hulbert, the father, was born in Ashtabula countv. Ohio, De- 
cember 24, 1834, and was educated in the public schools of Ohio. He came to 
Pittsburg in 1855 and engaged as a teacher in the public schools of the Fifth 
ward, where he taught one year. He then went to Portsmouth, Ohio, and re- 
mained one year, and moved to Phillipi, West Virginia, where he was em- 
ployed in a select school, and lemained there until the opening days of the Civil 
w-ar, when it became uncomfortably warm for him, he being of the true Union 
sentiment politically. He then went to Belpre, Ohio, continuing to teach school 
until 1875, when he removed to Marietta, Ohio, having been elected county 
surveyor for Washington countv, that state. He held this office six years and 
was then elected city engineer of Marietta. This position he held for nine 
years — three terms of office. He still resides there and follows engineering 
work in general. Politically he is a Democrat, and in church affiliations he is 
a Presbyterian, 

He was united in marriage in 1856 to Sarah A. Sherman, a cousin of 
General W. T. Sherman. Five children were born of this union: i. The first- 
born died in childhood. 2. Everson C, the subject. 3. Bradley H., born in 
1864. 4. Elizabeth, born in 1867, married Martin Wilson, and they are the 
parents of Bernard and Owens. 5. Alary, born in 1872, married Charles Mul- 
ler, and they have one child, Catherine, born in 1901. 

The grandfather of the subject was Ichabod Hulbert, born in 1800 in 
Littlefield county, Massachusetts, and went to Ohio in 1832, settling in Rome 
township, Ashtabula county. He was by trade a tanner and shoemaker, mak- 
ing boots and shoes from the leather he tanned himself. Later in life he sold 
his tannery and applied himself solely to shoemaking. He died in 1853. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church and an ardent abolitionist. He mar- 
ried Susan Wilder, by whom the following children were born : Rhoda, Joseph, 
Fredelia, Dwight and Everson. For his second wife he married Airs. Nancy 
(Muller) Ramsdale. Her children were Emma and Lucile. Everson Hulbert, 
son of Ichabod Hulbert, by his first wife, as well as another son, Dwight, 
served in the Union army in the time of the Civil war. The former entered as 
a private and came out as brevet colonel, and died three months after his dis- 
charge. 

Everson Hulbert, son of Joseph P. and Sarah A. (Sherman) Hulbert, was 
educated at the Alarietta College in Ohio, graduating in 1883. Having worked 
at civil engineering under his father, in 1883, after leaving college, he worked 
with the Parks Steel Company of Pittsburg for four years and then joined the 
W. C. Wilkins Company, an engineering firm, where he received the most 
practical part of his profession. He continued with them for seven years, and 
in 1894 began operating as a civil engineer on his own account, locating at 
Pittsburg. Since 1894 he has been city engineer of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 
While with the \\'ilkins company he was selected by them to superintend the 
construction of the Oliver Coke Plant at Uniontown, Fayette county, Pennsyl- 



250 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



vania. He is a member of the Improved Order of Heptasophs lodge of Sharps- 
burg, Conclave Xo. 187, and the R. A. Guyasuta Council No. 847 of Sharps- 
burg. In politics he is a Republican and in church relation is connected as an 
elder of Jhe Presbyterian denomination. 

Mr. Hulbert married Jennie A. Johnson, daughter of William and Doro- 
thy Allen, of English lineage. By this union three children were born: i. 
Bernard, born in 1888, died in 1891. 2. Allen, born in 1891, died in infancy. 
3. Dorothy, born in 1894. 



ANCEL ROSCQE DUNBAR, of Etna, now tilling the office of city clerk, 
was born January 12, 1878, at Bakerstown, Allegheny county, son of Carson 
S. Dunbar, grandson of Carson Dunbar and great-grandson of John Dunbar, 
who was of Scotch descent, and about 1800 went (presumably from the eastern 
part of the state ) to Butler county, where he took up a large tract of land near 
what is called Gademill. Of his politics and religion little is known. He was 
the father of the following children ; Moses ; Stephen ; and Carson, of whom 
later; also two daughters. John Dunbar died about 1825, and his land was 
divided among his sons. 

Carson Dunbar, son of John Dunbar, was born about 1807 in Butler 
county, where he passed his life as a farmer, inheriting a portion of the home- 
stead. His share being forest, he cleared the land and made a farm'. He filled 
in a highly creditable manner the various township offices. A truly honest 
man and generous to a fault, he made many friends. During the greater part 
of his life he was a Whig, but later joined the Republicans. He was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Carson Dunbar was twice married, his second wife being Matilda White, 
whose ancestors were among the first settlers of Butler county. By her he be- 
came the father of the following children : Nancy, wife of John Cowan ; Car- 
son S., of whom later; W'illiam, married Nancy Staley ; Bella, wife of Leland 
McKinney ; Matilda, wife of John Wise; Hiram, married Mary Brewer; and 
Thomas, married Mary Staley. Mrs. Dunbar, the mother of the family, died 
in 1887. and the death of Mr. Dunbar occurred in 1891. 

Carson S. Dunbar, son of Carson and Matilda (White) Dunbar, was born 
in 1850 in Butler county, where he received his education in the public schools 
and learned the carpenter's trade. After his marriage he moved to Bakers- 
town, where he carried on a large contracting and building business until in- 
capacitated by an injury. He was then for two years the proprietor of a tem- 
perance hotel at Bakerstown, retiring six months prior to his death. He 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Bakerstown, and the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He voted with the Republicans 
and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Dunbar married Catharine, daughter of Andrew Staley, and they were 
the parents of the following children: U. Byard, born in 1874, died in 1898; 
Andrew C, born in 1876, died at eleven years of age; Ancel Roscoe, of whom 
later; and Norman D., born in 1884. Mr. Dunbar, the father, died in 1891. 

Ancel Roscoe Dunbar, son of Carson S. and Catharine (Staley) Dunbar, 
was educated in the public schools of Bakerstown, and in 1887 engaged in the 
insurance business as solicitor, a position for which he proved himself admir- 
ably fitted. In 1900 he moved to Etna, still continuing the same line of busi- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 251 



ness. In 1903 he was elected by tlie council of Etna city clerk, which office he 
still holds. He affiliates with Temperance Lodge No. 453, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows ; Lodge No. 932, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; and 
Ethel Rebekah Degree Lodge No. 228. He also belongs to the Encampment 
Branch of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows No. 233, and the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics, No. 278, of Etna. He is a Republican 
and a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Air. Dunbar married, in 1899, Nettie H. Gray, and they have been the 
parents of the following children: Leila Floa, born June 5, 1900; Adah Fern, 
born March 7, 1902; Ellen C, born August 24, 1904; and Ancel E., born Sep- 
tember 7, 1906, died the same day. 

Mrs. Dunbar is a daughter of Henry Gray, who was born in 1850, a son 
of Thomas Gray, who was born in 181 7, and was a farmer in Butler county, 
a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His children 
were : Christina ; John ; Sarah ; Mary ; Thomas ; and Henry, of whom later. 
Thomas Gray died in 1889. 

Henry Gray, son of Thomas Gray, was a farmer in Allegheny county, and 
married Nancy Dobson, who bore him the following children: Sadie D., wife 
of Henry Bozett ; Ellen O., wife of Edward Cowan ; Matilda H. ; Rosa ; Nettie, 
wife of Ancel Roscoe Dunbar; Belle; Lloyd C. ; Harry T. ; Cameron; and 
Dewitt, who died in childhood. 



BREWER SCOTT. The late Brewer Scott, a lifelong resident and re- 
spected citizen of Pittsburg, was born in that city May 24, 1825, a son of 
Thomas Scott, who was born in 1773 in Ireland and about 1820 came with his 
father, brother and sister to Pittsburg, settling \vhere Smithfield street and 
F'ifth avenue are now situated. 

Thomas Scott was a shoemaker, and all his life followed his trade. In 
religious belief he was a Covenanter. His wife was a member of the Roman 
Catholic church, but in her later years joined the Methodist Episcopal, with 
which she was connected at the time of her death. 

Thomas Scott married Mary, daughter of Henry Bayner, of Baltimore, 
who was of German descent and served in the war of 1812. The following chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Scott: Jane; Thomas, a local preacher; John 
A. ; Brewer, of whom later ; Sarah ; Margaret ; Josephine ; and Walter. Thom- 
as Scott, the father, died in 1849. Mrs. Swisshelm, who is held in loving re- 
membrance by so many soldiers, was the daughter of his sister. 

Brewer Scott, a son of Thomas and Mary (Bayner) Scott, was educated 
in the public schools of Pittsburg, and early in life developed a taste for engi- 
neering, which he learned in Allegheny. He was subsequently connected for 
seven years with the old rolling mill of Allegheny, and for five years was em- 
ployed in the Fahnestock mill. He then became chief engineer in the iron mill 
of Graft, Bennet & Company, which position he held for thirty-five years. In 
1853 he settled in Millvale, thus becoming identified with the early history of 
the place, and also with its government, in which he served as burgess, council- 
man and school director. From 1890 to 1896 he held the appointment of post- 
master of Millvale, resigning in the latter year in consequence of failing health. 
He was a member of the Alethodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Scott married, in 1848, Mary Martin, and the following children were 



232 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



born to them : Winfield, Charles W., Mary E., Jennie and Annie. Mrs. Scott 
died in 1861, and Mr. Scott subsequently married her sister, Jane Martin, who 
died nine months later. On May 11, 1865, Mr. Scott married Martha Sample, 
and they became the parents of the following children : Martha, born Febru- 
ary 8, 1866, married, June 14, 1888, Dr. James McCann, of Pittsburg, who died 
June 13, 1893, one daughter, Alice M. ; William S., born December 7, 1867, 
married Katharine Edlefsen, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, children, Martha E., 
WiMiam E. and Margaret A. ; Sarah C, born November 7, 1869, wife of D. W. 
Cypher, children, Grace H., Scott and David ; Brewer, born June 14, 1872, 
died in 1873 ; and Daisy A., born August 25, 1874, wife of R. R. Shrimplin, 
one child, Robert L. 

Mr. Scott died June 17, 1896. His funeral services were attended by many 
friends of all denominations, several of whom spoke, paying touching tributes 
to his memory. His family has had placed in the church of which he was a 
member a beautiful memorial window. He was a man of strong convictions 
and deep thought, a faithful friend and a popular and honored citizen. 

Mrs. Scott is a daughter of William Sample and a granddaughter -of 
James Sample, who was born November 25, 1756, in Cumberland, whence he 
came in 1796 to Allegheny county, settling in Ross township, taking land in 
compensation for his services as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He built 
thereon a number of mills, among them the first grist mill ever erected north of 
the Allegheny river, and a distillery, also a snutif manufactory and saw mill, 
all these buildings being situated at Gertys Run. He was the second sheriff 
elected in the county and was a man of influence and popularity. He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church. James Sample married Christina Taggart, 
and their children were : Thomas ; Robert ; James ; John ; Charles ; William, of 
whom later ; Mary ; and Eliza. James Sample, the father, died at the age of 
seventy-six. 

William Sample, son of James and Christina (Taggart) Sample, was born 
July 28, 1800, and was by trade a miller, owning and occupying part of the 
land which had been a grant to his father from the government. This land he 
cultivated for fifty years. He served Shaler township in its various offices, 
among them that of school director, which he held for twenty-one years. He 
was a Republican and a staunch member of the Presbyterian church, in which 
he was an earnest worker. Mr. Sample married Jane Anderson, and their 
daughter, Martha, was born June 24, 1835, and became the wife of Brewer 
Scott. Mr. Sample attained a very advanced age, passing away in August, 
1892. 

JOSEPPI BARTON, one of Sharpsburg's most venerable citizens, was 
born in Pittsburg January 6, 1823, a son of Robert Barton, who was born about 
1779 in Dumfries, Scotland, where he received his education and was fitted for 
the profession of a civil engineer. After residing some time in England he 
came, in 1816, to the United States, settling in Pittsburg, near the spot where 
the courthouse now stands. Pie entered the service of James Ross, Jr., a law- 
yer of Pittsburg, attending the courts in the capacity of librarian. He retained 
this position until 1823. when he moved to what is now Harmarsville, and there 
for the remainder of his life followed agricultural pursuits on Deer creek, two 
miles from Harmarsville. He was a Democrat politically and was reared in the 
faith of the Presbvterian church. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 253 



Robert Barton married, in England, in 1816, Marv Perciva!, a native of 
that country, liaving been born in 17S7 in Cumberland. Her father accom- 
panied her to the United States, but soon returned to his native land. Her 
brother Robert, who was a millwright, remained in this country two years, and 
then went to Missouri, where he built by contract a large number of mills. In 
1849 he raised a company and crossed the Rocky mountains to California, but 
after remaining a few years returned to Missouri, where he raised another com- 
pany and prepared for a second passage of the Rockies, in the course of which 
he died on the mountains at Fort Laramie at the advanced age of seventv-eight. 
Robert and Mary (Percival) Barton were the parents of the following children: 
James, married Jane ^IcGregor ; William, married Mary Armstrong ; John, 
married Rebecca Leitner ; Joseph ; Edward, married Sarah A. Booth ; and 
Peter, who remained unmarried. The death of Robert Barton, the father of 
the family, occurred in 1849 on the Twelve Mile island, and he was survived 
by his wife ten years. 

Joseph Barton, son of Robert and Mary (Percival) Barton, received his 
education in such schools as his native township afforded, attending before the 
public school was instituted, when the teachers were hired by subscriptions. 
On reaching manhood he adopted agriculture for his life work. He resided on 
a farm near Harmarsville and also cultivated Twelve Mile island, of which he 
was the owner. In 1861 he moved to Unity Mills, Westmoreland county, six 
miles from Latrobe, which he owned in connection with a large farm, and car- 
ried on a milling business and dealt in live stock. He remained there five years, 
returning to Harmarsville. 

In 1890 he moved to Sharpsburg, where his time has since been occupied 
in building on his property and in otherwise developing its resources. In 1893 
he sold his farm. In 1842 he made a trip to Texas, and when the Lone Star 
state was battling for her independence served in the ranks of its defenders. 
When called upon by the authorities, as all men were entitled to vote, he voted 
for the annexation of Texas to the L'nited States. His first vote was cast for 
James K. Polk, the annexation of Texas being the issue, and he has since voted 
for every Democratic candidate for president. He is a Protestant in religious 
belief. 

Mr. Barton married, January 9, 1847, Ruth A., daughter of John and Sarah 
(Hickey) Cready, and granddaughter of John Cready, who settled at Six Mile 
ferry on the ]\Ionongahela river and was one of the pioneers of Allegheny 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Barton were the parents of the following children : 
Mary A., born October 19, 1847, wife of Frank P. Kohen ; Catharine, born 
May 9, 1849, married, first, Henry Wilson, second, John R. Hawkins ; John 
C, bom November 2, 1850, died November 18, 1862; Charles B., born May 
10, 1852, died October 28, 1862; Peter B., born March 6, 1854, died November 
9, 1862 : Ella A., born November 9, 1855, died December 31, 1882, wife of John 
B. Hawkins: Emma J., born April 25, 1857, died October 27, 1862; Elizabeth 
F., born June 29, 1859, wife of H. L. Hetherington ; Anna A., born December 
27. i860, wife of James L. Lowry; William R., born September 6, 1863, mar- 
ried Mary Glesencamp: Irene V., born ]\Iarch 14, 1866, wife of Cornelius 
Casey; and "Emma J., born January 8, 1869, died February 7, 1873. Mrs. 
Barton was a Roman Catholic, a member of St. Paul's Cathedral, Pittsburg. 
She died August 6, 1903. 



254 ^ CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



JAMES A. POTTS, M. D., a well-known physician and surgeon of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, who has been engaged in the practice of his profession for 
many years, is a representative of an old and honored family, the earlier mem- 
bers of which settled in America several generations ago. It is not positively 
known whether the family is of English or Welsh extraction, but the best au- 
thorities incline to the latter opinion. The grandfather, great-grandfather and 
great-great-grandfather of Dr. Potts all bore the given name of Jonas. The 
earliest records of the family show that three brothers of this name came to this 
country from England, one settling first at Philadelphia, and later at or near 
Pottstown, whence it is to be presumed that this town was named in honor of 
the Potts family. One brother went south. The third brother, who was the lineal 
ancestor of Dr. Potts, located in what is now Washington county, Pennsylvania. 
Little is known of the earlier members of the family except that they were en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and were members of the Presbyterian church. 

William Jackson Potts was a prosperous farmer of Washington county and 
a man of influence in the community in which he resided. In addition to farm- 
ing he was extensively engaged in the stock-raising line of business. He was 
a member of the Presbyterian church and died at the age of eighty-six years. 
He married Margaret A. Ward, who died at the age of seventy-six years, a 
daughter of James Ward, a weaver and dyer of Washington county. The 
Ward family is of English extraction and settled in Washington county many 
generations ago. Mr. and Mrs. Potts had children, i. Reuemah J., married 
Dr. W. F. Pollock, of Carson street, Pittsburg. 2. William Jackson, deceased, 
married, first, Mary Andrews ; second, Mary Plotts, both born in Washing- 
ton county. 3. Jerome, married Elizabeth Stevenson. 4. James A., see for- 
ward. 5. Thomas Albert, twin of James A., died in infancy. 

James A. Potts, M. D., fourth child and third son of William Jackson and 
Margaret A. (Ward) Potts, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
December 10, 1852. His preliminary education was obtained in the public 
schools of the county and under special instruction by a private tutor. He read 
medicine for a time with his brother-in-law, Dr. Pollock, then entered the Medi- 
cal College of Ohio at Cincinnati, Ohio, later taking a course in the Western 
Reserve Medical College at Cleveland, Ohio, and was graduated with honor in 
the spring of 1879. For a time he was associated in the practice of medicine 
with Dr. Pollock, mentioned above, and then established himself independently 
at Mount Washington, where he has been engaged in continuous practice since 
that time, and has acquired a large and lucrative practice. He is a man of wide 
reading and culture and keeps well abreast of the times in every detail in con- 
nection with the profession he has made his life work. He is a member of the 
Allegheny County Aledical Society, the State Medical Society, the Masonic 
fraternity, the Royal Arcanum and the Presbyterian church. He is highly re- 
spected by a large class of patients, as well as having won the esteem of his 
colleagues. 

Dr. Potts married, October 25, 1888, Frances Wilson McGahan, daughter 
of Thomas and Sarah (Craig) McGahan, and they had one child, Margaret 
Frances, a child of great promise, who died July 19, 1906, at the age of four- 
teen years, mourned by a large circle of sincerely sorrowing friends. She had 
just passed the examination entitling her to entrance to the high school, and 
her record had been an unusually brilliant one, her name standing high on the 
roll of honor. 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 255 

HOMER J. LINDSAY. Tlie late Homer J. Lindsay, one of the officials 
of the Carnegie Steel Company, whose business career was remarkable for its 
success, which he achieved solely through his own manly character, pluck and 
native ability, was born December 7, 1859, and died March 5, 1907. He was 
the son of Samuel D. and Margaret A. (Buhoup) Lindsay. Samuel D. Lind- 
say, the father of the subject, was born in 1823, and died September 22, igo6. 
By his wife, Margaret A. (Buhoup) Lindsay, he had six children, three of 
'whom attained maturity, as follows: i. Anna M., who first married John G. 
Young, by whom the issue was three children, one died young and the other 
two still survive — Margaret H., wife of Howard E. Jeffries (whose children 
are Margaret L. and Jane L.), and John Lindsay, unmarried. For her second 
husband Anna M. Lindsay Young married John W. Williams, by whom the 
issue is Homer Oliver and Robina ]\L 2. Homer J. Lindsay, subject, of whom 
later mention is made. 3. Robina S. Lindsay, who married, first, W. E. Dun- 
can, whose issue was Edith, wife 'of James ]\IcClure ; secondly she married 
William J. Sheraden, who had no issue. 

Of the maternal side of Mr. Lindsay's ancestry it may be stated that his 
mother, Alargaret A. (Buhoup) Lindsay, was the daughter of John L. and 
Mary Ann (Bartelow) Buhoup. Mary Ann Bartelow was the daughter of 
William and Christina (Frey) Bartelow. The last named was the daughter of 
Michael and Nancy (Howard) Frey. The records at the war department at 
\\'ashington show that Michael Frey served in the Third Regiment in the Penn- 
sylvania line in 1776 as a private soldier in the Revolutionary war. His name 
appears in the list of Captain Greydon's company. The records also show he 
served as private in the Eleventh Pennsylvania Regiment and was mustered out 
October 17, 1777. The Pennsylvania state records at Harrisburg, the Archives, 
Third series, volume 23, page 657, show that Michael Frey served as a private 
in James Young's company of the Eighth battalion from Cumberland county 
militia, 1779, under Colonel Abraham Smith. Another entry in the records of 
the war department shows that he was a private in Captain Jacob Shurtz's 
company. First Regiment of Riflemen (Humphrey, Pennsylvania), during the 
war of 1812. 

John L. Buhoup, the subject's maternal grandfather, was the son of Daniel 
or John Buhoup, who was a native of England and came to America at a verv 
early date. He was through the entire Revolutionary struggle, and his house 
was burned while he was in the Continental army, his wife and familv being 
turned out homeless. He also enlisted in the war of 1812-14, either from Lan- 
caster or Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. He was drafted into service by 
the British from Hesse Cassel, Germany, when but fifteen years old, and was 
brought to this country by the English, from whom he deserted December 25, 
1776, the third night on guard, and shot his pursuers. He escaped and enlisted 
in the Continental army under Washington, serving throughout the struggle 
for independence. He died at Lancaster. Pennsylvania, aged ninety-eight 
years. The date of Margaret A. (Buhoup) Lindsay's death was in 1905. 

Homer J. Lindsay took an unusual interest in his education, and whije 
pursuing his other studies he acquired a good knowledge of both stenography 
and typewriting, also telegraphy, which branches became very useful to him 
in his subsequent business career. AN'ithin the true sense of the term he was 
a self-made man, carving out, as he was compelled to, all of his attainments. 
He never let any seeming opportunity for advancement escape his notice. His 



256 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

truly pleasing, genial manner and general personality, combined with his nat- 
ural and keen business sense, won him friends on every hand, and thev were 
only pleased to give such aid as they were able. 

When eighteen years of age, with many others he applied to Thomas M. 
Carnegie, brother of Andrew Carnegie, the philanthropist, for a position as tele- 
graph operator, which position he filled so faithfully and well that he was soon 
given permanent employment and became Thomas ^I. Carnegie's private sec- 
retary. In this he proved his efficiency to that extent that he was further pro- 
moted. He remained in the Carnegie offices as long as Thomas M. Carnegie 
was connected with the Carnegie Steel Company, and upon this change he was 
placed directly under the direction of the president of the corporation. At that 
date the selling of steel rails was not handled, as now, by the regular salesmen, 
but by the president of the company, and Mr. Lindsay was sent out among the 
various railroads of the country as the repjesentative of the president in the 
business of selling steel rails. He was eminently successful, and one day 
brought into the office the largest order for steel rails ever received in the 
world up to that date. This masterly stroke was the cause of his being pro- 
moted and made a partner in the business, and he was also made the presi- 
dent's assistant. From that day on Mr. Lindsay was an important factor in 
the great steel manufacturing interests of the city of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Lindsay had other ambitions aside from business relations, and found 
time to be prominent in many civic and social societies. He was a member of 
the Pennsylvania National Guards at the age of nineteen years, being private 
in Company K of the Fourteenth regiment. In this he served for eight years. 
During Governor S. W. Pennypacker's administration he was appointed aide- 
de-camp on the governor's staff, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and was 
reappointed by Governor Stuart. 

Although burdened with the responsibilities of his business position, he 
had a reasonable interest in the several clubs of which he was a member. In 
Pittsburg he belonged to the Duquesne, Country, German and Oakmont Coun- 
try Clubs ; the Liberty Hunting and Fishing Club, the Americus Club, the 
Press Club, and the Young Men's Christian Association. In New York city 
he was a member of the New York Athletic Club, Transportation Club, the 
Strollers' Club and Lakewood Country Club. Like many another intelligent 
business man of his times he was much interested in secret societies, and was a 
member of the Free and Accepted Masons, No. 378, at Pittsburg ; Allegheny 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Allegheny Commandery and the Consistory of 
Scottish Rites of Pennsylvania. He also belonged to Syria Temple, A. A. O. N. 
of the Mystic Shrine, and Pittsburg Lodge, No. 13, Bewevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

Mr. Lindsay was happily married, June 25, 1890, to Miss Emma K., 
daughter of William and Margaret A. (Merriman) Knoderer. The father was 
a native of Alsace, France. He came here with his parents. Christian and 
Margaret S. (Wagner) Knoderer, when young. His father was a captain in 
Napoleon's army for seventeen years, and in the Russian campaign he went in 
with three hundred and eighty-six men and came out with five. He was an 
able swordsman, and was severely wounded in a hand-to-hand contest with 
three men armed with sabers. He came to this country in 1844, and pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and six acres in Ohio township. His wife was 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 257 

born in 1804, also in Alsace. He was born in 1792, and died at the age of 
eighty-five years. 

\\'illiani Knoderer attended the township schools. At the age of twenty- 
one >ears he married Margaret A. Merriman, the datighter of Samuel and 
Sarah (Merriman) Merriman, and they had four children, two of whom died 
when )oung. After marriage he followed river life for some time, but gave 
special attention to his farm later. In 1864 he began to work at the Dixmont 
Hospital for the Insane as a general carpenter, and in eight vears was made 
superintendent of the farm and all outside buildings. He was street commis- 
sioner; was a thirty-second degree Mason and much interested in the Knights 
Templar order; and politically he was a Republican. 

Mr. Lindsay was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
gained through his relation to his mother's ancestors — the Freys. Politically he 
was a Republican. In his position as assistant to the president of the steel 
corporation he had the management of five million dollars of the trust fund set 
aside by Andrew Carnegie for the benefit of employes who met with accidents 
in the steel works. 

The deceased battled manfully with the disease that could not be conquered 
for nine months, and finally passed from the scenes of this world, March 5, 
1907. 

GEORGE A. MILLER, of Sharpsburg, who has for the last twenty years 
been associated with the firm of Vaught Pliilips & Company, of that borough, 
was born November 24, 1S60, in Indiana township, Allegheny county, a son of 
John W. Miller and grandson of John Miller, who migrated about 1820 from 
the eastern part of Pennsylvania, perhaps from Lancaster county, to Allegheny 
county. He had a contract for building that part of the old Portage canal 
which passed Guarta on the Darlington estate, and after the canal was com- 
pleted purchased a farm in Indiana township, on which he lived until 1865. 
He then sold the property and moved to Sharpsburg, where he passed the re- 
maining years of his life. He was &. very prominent man in his day, a member 
of the Presbyterian church, in the doctrines of which he reared his family. 

John Miller married Ann, daughter of John Weibel, one of the pioneers 
of Alleghen}- county, and their children were : Philip, deceased ; Catharine, 
also deceased, wife of Joseph NeiT; Mary, died unmarried; John W., of whom 
later; Nancy, wife of James Burns, of Homestead; Charlotte, deceased wife 
of John Cowan ; Margaret and Eliza, twins, deceased ; and Andrew. The death 
of John Miller, the father, occurred about 1867. 

John W. Miller, son of John and Ann (Weibel) Miller, was born Novem- 
ber 20, 1823, and was by trade a carpenter. Soon after his marriage he moved 
on a farm owned by his father, situated in Indiana township, where he lived un- 
til 1865. He then moved to Sharpsburg, where for twenty-two years he worked 
as a carpenter and millwright, after which he retired to a small place near 
Sharpsburg and there spent the last twenty years of his life. He was a Re- 
publican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

^Ir. Miller married Ann, born in England, daughter of George and Ann 
Wragg, and they became the parents of eleven children, six of whom died in 
childhood. The living are: Ellen J., born in 1852, wife of Joseph Grubbs; 
Thomas E., born in 1854, married Annie E. Campbell; George A.; Benjamin 
N., born February 10, 1863, married Bella J. Bright; and Harry L., born 

iii— 17 



2S8 - A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



November 17, 1868. The father of these children died in November, 1906, 
and tlie mother survives him at the age of seventy-six. 

George A. Miller, son of John W. and Ann (Wragg) Miller, received his 
education in the public schools of Sharpsburg, and after leaving school learned 
the carpenter's trade. He is now running the machines in the planing mills 
of Vaught Philips & Company, having been -in their service since 1887. Like 
his father, he adheres to the Republican party. He is a member of Grace 
Methodist Protestant church. 

Mr. Miller married, October 11, 1883, Louisa M. Klinefelter, and they are 
the parents of two sons and a daughter: Harry VV., born January 23, 1885, 
married Nellie Mailey, two children, Marie and Thomas ; Thomas A., born 
November 15, 1886; and Grace L., born November 2, 1888. 

J\'lrs. Miller is a daughter of Thomas and Louisa (Overbeck) Klinefelter. 
The former was one of the oldest pilots on the Ohio river, having for forty- 
seven years followed his calling on boats running between Louisville and Pitts- 
burg. His father, Jacob Klinefelter, was also a pilot before him. 

GEORGE WHITEHILL MILLER, a popular hotel proprietor and man- 
ager of the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, has been a resident of that city 
since his birth, and is a representative of a family which has been settled in 
Pennsylvania for a number of generations. 

George W. Miller, father of George Whitehill Miller, was born in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania. He served his country in a number of public offices, 
among them being collector of internal revenues for four years under President 
Harrison, and nine years as clerk of the court of Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He is a man of influence and highly respected in the community. He 
married Belle Collins, daughter of John Collins, of Pittsburg, and they had 
children: Samuel S., born February 5, 1869: George W., see forward; 
Eugene, born June 15, 1874; Belle, 1876; Grace, 1878; Otlie, 1879; Hunt, 1881 ; 
Nellie, 1883; Gertrude, 1885; Charles, 1887; Theodore. 1890; Hazel, 1892'. 

George Whitehill Miller, second son and child of George W. and Belle 
(Collins) Miller, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 8, 1872. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native city and at an early age entered 
upon his business career. He was employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company in 1886, and by the city of Pittsburg as a telegraph operator in 1892. 
He was ambitious, enterprising and progressive, and in 1896 was appointed a 
detective. Five years later he established himself in the hotel business in Home- 
wood, and is successfully occupied in this line of work at the present time. His 
straightforward business methods and thorough reliability have made friends 
for him in the business world, and he has the happy faculty of retaining those 
whom he has once accjuired. He married Mary Laurie, daughter of Joseph 
Laurie. 

WILLIAM E. CARRINGTON, for many years identified 'with the brick 
masonry and contracting calling in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, is of 
the second generation of his family in this country, his ancestors having been 
English as far back as the family can be traced, among them being General 
Carrington of historical renown. 

William E. Carrington, father of William E. Carrington, was born and 
spent his early years in Cambryshire, England. He was educated in a private 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 259 



school in his native town and learned the trade of hedging and thatching. This 
avocation he followed until his departure for the United States in 185 1. For 
a time he resided in Woodbridge, New Jersey, from thence removing to Nor- 
ristown, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in various occupations. For a 
time he was a fireman on the Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown rail- 
road, and during the progress of the Civil war took up arms in defense of the 
rights of his adopted country. He enlisted August 25, 1864, in Company A, 
One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, partici- 
pated in many hard-fought battles, but was fortunate enough to escape with- 
out a wound. He was honorably discharged June 28, 1865, and returned to 
his more peaceful occupations. For a time he resumed work in the railroad 
service, was then employed for some time in a distillery, and finally engaged 
in the oil business. He was a staunch Republican, and died Jime 15, 1869. He 
married Lydia Golding, a noble-spirited woman, who supported her family by 
sewing on regimental garments while her father was in active service in the 
field. Their children were: William E., see forward; Anna Maria, who died 
at the age of six years ; Alary E., married Elder Macally ; Sarah J., married 
Charles A. Johnson ; Clara, unmarried ; Ella, married Charles E. Fell ; Ephraim, 
died at the age of eleven years ; George W., married Florence Young. 

William E. Carrington, eldest child of William E. and Lydia (Golding) 
Carrington, was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1853. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native city, and at the early age of eleven 
years commenced to work in a factory in order to contribute to the support of 
the familv while his father was serving his country on the field of war. At 
the age of fifteen years he was apprenticed to learn the trade of brick making, 
with which he has been identified since that time. He removed to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, in 1898, engaging in brick making and contract work, and he 
furnishes work for a number of skilled hands. He has acquired an enviable 
reputation in the business world for integrity and reliability, and his business 
is in a very flourishing condition. Like his father, he is an ardent supporter 
of the principles of the Republican party, and has taken an active part in the 
interests of that body. He was committeeman from the Thirty-second ward 
in 1906, and has served as school director. He and his family are consistent 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, March 25, 1871, Sarah J. Wilson, born in Valley Forge, 
Pennsylvania, and educated there at the Camp school, a daughter of John and 
Sarah (Maxwell) Wilson, of whom little is known, as they died when Mrs. 
Carrington was very young. She has one sister, Mary _Ellen, who married 
John L. McGinnis and resides in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
"Carrington have had children : William J., a telegraph operator ; Maud Ger- 
trude, who died in infancy ; Edward W., married Mary Cugley, has one child ; 
Edward W., Jr.; John M., died in infancy; George W., died at the age of five 
years ; Sarah, died in infancy ; \\'alter Haynes, a medical student ; Laura May, 
died in infancy; Stanley Merrill. All of the sons now living are Republicans. 

THOMAS GRUNDY, a well-known resident of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
for a period of almost half a century, and for the greater part of that time 
connected with real estate affairs, is a representative of the first generation of 
his family in this country. 



26o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



James Grundy, father of Thomas Grundy, was a native of England, and 
spent his entire life in that country. He was a hatter by occupation and the 
owner of a small hat factory. He married Hannah Sanders, and they had chil- 
dren as follows: Elizabeth, married Thomas Palin ; Mary; Ellen, married 
William Simpson ; Hannah, unmarried ; John ; James, died in infancy ; Robert ; 
Samuel ; Thomas, see forward ; William ; and Nathaniel. 

Thomas Grundy, seventh son and ninth child of James and Hannah (San- 
ders) Grundy, was born in Lancashire, England, December 22, 1834. When he 
was a very young lad he was entered as a student at a pay school, but was re- 
moved from this by his father when he had attained the age of seven and a 
half years, and placed at work in the hat factory of the latter. There he re- 
mained at work until he was twelve years old, when he commenced to attend 
night school. He continued these studies about four years, and it may be truly 
said that he owes his education to his own efforts in that direction. He soon 
became a member of a debating club, which' was of inestimable advantage to 
him in developing his latent powers of oratory and served him well in later 
years. At the age of eighteen years he commenced a course of theological 
studies preparatory to entering the university, and he passed his examination 
successfully, but was debarred from entering the regular ministry, as he con- 
tracted a marriage while still a student, and this was against the laws of the 
order. He was, however, for many years a local minister in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. While he was still a student at the night school he was ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of weaving, and upon the completion of his ap- 
prenticeship followed this occupation for a period of fifteen years. For about 
ten years of this time he held the position of foreman of the factory in which 
he was employed. He had read a great deal concerning America and Ameri- 
can customs and institutions and was gradually convinced that there was a bet- 
ter field for him in the new world than in the old. He accordingly emigrated 
to the United States in 1863, settling in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where for 
some years he was engaged in various occupations. For three years he was 
occupied with farming in Washington county, then returned to Pittsburg and 
opened a grocery store in Allegheny City, at the same time acting as general 
a.gent of the Merchants' Association of Allegheny City, and at the end of three 
years engaged in the real estate business, with which he has been identified 
since that time. He was one of the organizers and first stockholders in the 
Monongahela Inclined Plane Ra,ilroad Company, which runs up the hill to 
Mount Washington, and this has proved a very .successful and profitable un- 
dertaking, and it was largely owing to his individual efforts that this enter- 
prise was called into existence and maintained until its value became popu- 
larly known. He is a man of much progress and enterprise in every direction, 
and is noted for his sound judgment. 

Mr. Grundy married, first, in England, January i, 1857. -^larv Ann Peat- 
field, and had children : John H. ; Eliza, married William ^Iinsinger ; Robert ; 
Charles ; William ; Thomas ; Nathan. He married, second, Sarah Ann Grundy, 
who died in 1887, and was a widow of his brother. He married, third, 1889, 
Emma Myers, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

JAMES J. KENNEDY, who is known as one of the most enterprising 
and progressive of the business men of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, is a member 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 261 



of the well-known plumbing and gasfitting- firm of Stinson, Kennedy & Com- 
pany, which has accomplished some of the most important work in its line of 
business in the city. He is a representative of a family which has borne its 
full share in the defense of the rights of the country which it has adopted, and 
traces his ancestry through England to Ireland. 

Michael Kennedy, a son of James Kennedy, who was a native of Ireland 
and later made his home in England, was born in Ireland and then went to 
England with his parents as a young lad. He was apprenticed to learn the tai- 
lor's trade and followed this occupation throughout his life, becoming an expert. 
He emigrated to America, settling in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he established 
himself as a tailor, being celebrated for the excellence of his cutting, and mak- 
ing a specialty of custom work. He devoted particular attention to the making 
of garments for clergy, and his business in this line was second to none in the 
city. He was of a retiring disposition and took no active part in the affairs of 
the community. He married Mary Alakin, fourth child and eldest daughter 
of Patrick Alakin. 

Patrick Makin was born in county Sligo, Ireland, and emigrated to Eng- 
land, where he located in Manchester. Soon after his arrival in that city he 
was appointed market master, an office he held until 1855, when he resigned 
and emigrated to the United States. He settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, and en- 
gaged in the grocery business with Henry Layman, continuing in this line until 
he retired from active business life. He died in 1873 at the advanced age of 
ninety-eight years. Like his ancestors, he was a devout member of the Roman 
Catholic church. He married Hannah Hart, also a native of county Sligo, Ire- 
land, who died in 1871 at the age of seventy-three years, and they had children : 
I. John M., married Mary Shanley, of Manchester, England. 2. Thomas, mar- 
ried Ellen Farmer, of Cincinnati, Ohio. 3. James, unmarried. 4. Mary, mar- 
ried Mr. Kennedy, as mentioned above. 5. Ella, married John Madden, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 6. Maggie, married Thomas AlcCormick. John and James 
Makin, now deceased, and Thomas Makin, who is now living at the Soldiers' 
Home in Dayton, Ohio, at the outbreak of the Civil war enlisted in Company 
E, Tenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the 
war. This was an Irish regiment, commanded by Colonel Lytle, and was 
known as the "Bloody Tenth." They saw much hard service, and owing to 
the large list of killed and wounded in this regiment those remaining were 
transferred to the One Hundred and Eighty-first Regiment of Ohio, and served 
under General Rosecrans. 

Michael and Mary (Makin) Kennedy had children: i. James J., see for- 
ward.' 2. John, married Annie Conroy. 3. Martin, married Annie Hogan. 4. 
Michael, married Alary Larkins. 5. Sarah Ann, died in infancy. 6. Mary, 
married John Groth. 

James J. Kennedy, eldest child of IMichael and Mary (Makin) Kennedy, 
was born in Manchester, England, March 12, 1849. He was a very young child 
when he came to the United States with his parents, and his education was ac- 
quired in the public schools of Cincinnati, Ohio. Upon its completion he found 
emplovment with the old and well-known publishing house of Moore, INIillstack 
& Keys, located in Fourth street, Cincinnati, and remained in their employ for 
almost four years, receiving a salary of si.xteen dollars per week. He then 
accepted a position with McHenry & Carson, a leading plumbing and gasfitting 
•concern in the same city. He was in their employ until 1871, during which 



262 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



time he obtained a thorough and practical knowledge of this business in all its 
branches and details. He then became the traveling representative of this firm, 
covering the states of Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, and superintending the in- 
stallation of gasoline machines in opera houses, churches, public halls, etc., 
and various other important buildings, among them being Pike's Opera 
House. He finally severed his connection with this firm and came to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, April 15, 1871, and entered into a business connection with the 
firm of Halpin, Jarvis & Company, one of the best-known establishments in 
this line in the city. His first position with them was as manager, and this he 
retained until Mr. Jarvis, a member of the firm, retired, when Mr. Kennedy 
took his place, and the firm carried on the business under the style of Halpin, 
Kennedy & Company. It has been in continuous business for twenty-six years, 
and is one of the oldest and most reliable in that section of the state, having 
business connections throughout the western part of the state and the south. 
On an average they employ about one hundred men, and among the important 
buildings in which they have installed the plumbing may be mentioned : Wash- 
ington county courthouse and jail ; Fidelity Trust building; the Pittsburg Times 
building ; Lewis building ; State building at Polk, Pennsylvania, which is the 
state asylum for the insane ; and the jail which is now being erected in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Kennedy is also interested in a number of other busi- 
ness enterprises, among them a stockholder and director in the South Hills 
Trust Company. He is a member of the Catholic church, and has served as 
trustee for several years in that institution. He was one of the organizers and 
the first president of Branch No. 47, Catholic Mutual Benefit Association, of 
Mount Washington, was for years president of this corporation, and it is owing 
to his individual and strenuous eftorts that the membership has increased 
largely and much good has been accomplished. He takes an earnest and in- 
telligent interest in all matters that pertain to the welfare of the community, 
and gives his political support to the Republican party. 

He married, in September, 1872, Mary Nagle, daughter of Jerry and Mary 
(Hart) Xagle, of Ireland, and they have had children: i. Mary Belle, born 
February 5, 1874, married Alfred J. Fitzgivens. 2. Charles, born November 4, 
1877, is a plumber, and married Lillie Ryan. 3. James P., born January 19, 
1880, married Annie Smyth. 4. Jessie J., born April 9, 1882, married William 
Barr. 5. Eleanor B., born March 4, 1884, died April 19 of the same year. 6. 
Oliver L., born June 7, 1885, married Elizabeth Altman, of Greensburg. 7. 
William H., born April 10, 1887. 8. Blanche E., born September 2, 1889, died 
September 16, 1892. 9. Estella M., born January 20, 1891. 10. Clyde V., bom 
March II, 1894. 

ANDREW G. SMITH, a well-known attorney of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
with offices in the Berger building, and who has been prominently identified 
with some of the important financial enterprises in that city, represents the third 
generation of his family in America. 

John Smith, grandfather of Andrew G. Smith, was a native of Whitby, 
England. He was for many years engaged in the whaling business and had 
many exciting adventures while on and near tlie coast of Greenland, whither 
his trips were generally directed. He emigrated to America about 1800, and 
made his home in Scott township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1822. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 263 



There he purchased a fine farm, which property is still in the possession of the 
Smith family. He brought this to a high state of cultivation, making a spe- 
cialty of the nursery business and fruit growing, and also paying some atten- 
tion to general produce. He may be considered the pioneer in the establish- 
ment of nurseries in that section of the state of Pennsylvania. He was a man 
of influence in his time in many ways, and a staunch supporter of the principles 
of the Democratic party. He died in i860 and his wife in 1874, both at an ad- 
vanced age, and they were buried in the Bethel Presbyterian cemetery, of which 
church they had been members for many years. 

John Scott Smith, son of John and Margaret (Scott) Smith, was born 
March 27, 1839. He married Sarah Gilfillan, daughter of Andrew and Marga- 
ret (Caldwell) Giliillan, the latter born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
Andrew Gilfillan was also born in Allegheny county, and followed the occupa- 
tion of farming. He and his wife were members of the United Presbyterian 
church. They had children : Jane ; Martha ; Alexander ; Mary Ann ; William ; 
John : Boyd : Sarah, twin of Boyd, became the wife of Mr. Smith. 

Andrew G. Smith, son of John Scott and Sarah (Gilfillan) Smith, was 
born in Scott township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April 4, 1868. His 
preparatorv education was acquired in the public schools, Jefferson Academy 
and the Pittsburg Academy. He then took up the study of law under tlie pre- 
ceptorship of Hon. Thomas M. Marshall, and was admitted to the Pittsburg 
bar September 16, 1893. He immediately commenced the active practice of 
his chosen profession, which he continued alone until 1900, when he associated 
himself with Major E. L. Kearns, and this partnership continued until 1906, 
since which time Mr. Smith has again resumed practice for himself. He is one 
of the leading attorneys of the city, and has a large and constantly increasing 
practice. His presentation of a case is clear and forceful, and he is an exceed- 
ingly convincing pleader. In addition to his legal work he is prominently iden- 
tified with a number of financial enterprises. He was one of the organizers of 
the Castle Shannon Savings and Trust Company, and is one of the directors 
and attorney for the same ; is a director in and attorney for the Mount Wash- 
ington Savings and Trust Company, of which he was one of the organizers in 
1903: he is interested in the fruit trade of Florida, and is in partnership with 
his brothers in the cultivation of an orange grove in that state. His political 
affiliations are with the Democratic party, and he has served for a period of 
three years as a member of the Mount Washington school board. He is a mem- 
ber of the Royal Arcanum and also of a social club. 

Mr. Smith married, July 8. 1901. Anna Struss, daughter of Richard and 
Dorothea (Reuter) Struss, of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, and they have had 
children: John R., who died in infancy; Dorothea May; and Emerson. 



WILLIAM HENRY SIMMONS, of Pittsburg, head of the firm of W. 
H. Simmons & Company, prominently identified with other financial and com- 
mercial enterprises, was born March 30, 1866, at Cairo, West Virginia, a son of 
David Simmons and grandson of Aaron Simmons, and a representative of one 
of the old families of Bedford county. 

Aaron Simmons, grandfather of William Henry Simmons, was left an 
orphan at an early age and was brought up in West \'irginia. He was a well- 
known farmer at what is known as "The Cove." He and his wife were both 



264 A CENTURY AND A HALF 'OF 



of old Quaker stock. Aaron Simmons married Sarah Wilson, and their chil- 
dren were : William ; John, married Catharine Heckman, and died at Spring- 
field, West Virginia, in 1906; David; Mary, married, first, Simon Showalter, 
second, George Tate, of Bedford county; Barbara, married Calvin Brown, 
of Dawson, Pennsylvania ; and Ellen, wife of Harmon Clouse, of Confluence, 
Pennsylvania. The father of the family died at an advanced age in the old 
home where he had lived for more than half a century. 

David Simmons, son of Aaron and Sarah (Wilson) Simmons, was born 
December 18, 1842, at Whip's Cove. Fulton county, Pennsylvania, and his edu- 
cation, owing to the straitened circumstances of the family, was of the most 
meager description. He was twenty-two before he learned to write letters, 
which he did while serving in the army during the Civil war. At fourteen he 
ran away from home to Springfield, West Virginia, where he was emploved by 
farmers until the age of eighteen, when the Civil war broke out. He was draft- 
ed and assigned to the Thirty-third Regiment, West Virginia Volunteers, in 
v/hich he served until June, 1863, when he deserted and made his way north. 
While in the southern army he took part in many battles, among which were 
the following: First Bull Run, Strasburg, second Bull Run, Antietam, Chan- 
cellorsville and Gettysburg. He was thrice wounded, being shot in the hip at 
the second Bull Run, through the foot at Strasburg and through the hand at 
Chancellorsville. On the last occasion he was serving as mounted orderly to 
"Stonewall" Jackson, who on that day received his fatal wound. 

After escaping from the Confederate army he stopped for a time at Spring- 
field, West Virginia, and then went to Cumberland, Maryland, where he was 
employed in a canal-boat yard. His brother Thomas was serving in Company 
B, Third Regiment, Maryland Volunteers, Potomac Home Brigade, and on 
March 29, 1864, David enlisted in the same company as a private during the 
war. On May 29, 1865, he was mustered out and discharged at Baltimore. He 
then returned to West Virginia, settled at Simpson's Station, and for five years 
was employed as a laborer by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company. He 
was then transferred to Conncllsville, Pennsylvania, where he worked fifteen 
years, was then sent to Dickerson Run, Pennsylvania, and was foreman on the 
Lake Erie railroad until 1897, when he removed to Pittsburg, becoming fore- 
man in the coal yard of his son, William Henry Simmons. He is a member of 
Post No. 15, G. A. R., and in ixjlitics affiliates with the Republicans. 

Mr. Simmons married, in June, 1865, at Buchanan, West Virginia, Lavina, 
daughter of James Roche, and the following children were born to them : 
William Henry; Alice, wife of Calvin Kelly, of West Virginia; Lottie; Lloyd 
A., a blacksmith of Mount Pleasant : and Ira, of Wellsville, Ohio. The mother 
of these children died in 1892 at Dickerson Run. 

William Henry Simmons, son of David and Lavina (Roche) Simmons, 
enjoyed but limited advantages of education, his school attendance being re- 
stricted to six months in the public schools of Confluence, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. When eleven years old he began the study of telegraphy in the 
office of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company at Confluence, and at thir- 
teen was an operator at the same place. For three or four years he was em- 
ployed by the company in this capacity at various places, and at the end of that 
time went to Columbus, Ohio, where he remained until 1890 as operator and 
assistant agent on the Big Four and Scioto Valley Railroad and the Columbus 
and Eastern railroad. In 1890 he became agent for the Pittsburg and Lake 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 265 

Erie Railroad Company at Monongahela, Pennsylvania, remaining for one year, 
and at the end of that time entered the service of the late M. A. Hanna as' coal 
sales agent in Pittsburg, remaining another year. He next embarked in the 
coal business for himself, conducting it on both the wholesale and retail sys- 
tems, and establishing yards at Thirty-fourth and Carson streets. The business 
is carried on under the firm name of \\'. H. Simmons & Company. In addition 
to his coal interests he is identified with other concerns, being president of the 
"Colonial Ice Company, the largest independent ice manufacturing company in 
western Pennsylvania. He is also president of the Pittsburg Hose Connector 
Company, and of the Pittsburg and Parkinsburg Oil Company, and is now 
forming what will be known as the Tri-State Oil Company. 

He is essentially a self-made man, his early educational deficiencies liaving 
been amply supplied by a store of knowledge gleaned from the best books as 
well as by experience of men and things. He is a wide reader, possessing a 
well-stocked library and subscribing for the best magazines of the day. He is 
the owner of automobiles, finding in their use his chief pleasure and relaxation. 
He belongs to Lodge Xo. 11, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and to 
the Lotus Club. He is a member of the Walton Alethodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Simmons married, June 21, 1883, at Dawson, Pennsylvania, Margaret 
Inks, of that place, daughter of John and Alche Inks, of Connellsville, both of 
whom died in the early youth of their daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Simmons are 
the parents of one daughter, Alche Pearl, who is the wife of Raymond C. Pat- 
ton, and the mother of one child. William Simmons Patton, born April 19, 1905. 
Mr. and Mrs. Patton reside with Mr. and Mrs. Simmons. 



CHARLES MELLIXG, president of the Birmingham Fire Insurance 
Company of Pittsburg, and for fifty-six years a resident of the Twenty-fifth 
ward of that city, was bom March 9, 1826, in Grosweiler, Saarbrucken, Rhine 
province, Germany, the home of his ancestors for many generations. The 
family is of French origin, the race having been transplanted to Germany by 
a Huguenot driven by persecution from his native land. 

Peter ^Melling, father of Charles Melling. and son of a peasant, Johan 
Melling, received a good education in his birthplace, and served three years in 
the Prussian army while Germany was resisting the power of Napoleon. Peter 
Melling afterward became superintendent of large glass works in his native 
place, holding the position thirty years, and having a well-established reputation ' 
as an expert in the manufacture of glass. He married ^larie Ries, and their 
children were: Charles: Mary, deceased; Benjamin, a glass engraver, came 
to New York and died there ; George, a gardener, also died in New York ; and 
Bertha, residing in Germany. The parents of these children both died in their 
native place. 

Charles Melling, a son of Peter and Marie (Ries) Melling, was born 
IVIarch 9, 1826, in Germany. He attended the parochial school until the age of 
fourteen, after which he was for two years a pupil at a private school, at the 
same time taking a special course in drawing in order to prepare himself for 
the profession of a glass engraver. He was fitted for this calling * the works 
of which his father was superintendent. After learning what he could there 
his father allowed him to go to Baccarat, France, one of the largest glass man- 
ufacturing cities in Europe. In 1848 Louis Philippe was dethroned, and dur- 



266 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



ing the war that followed the furnaces were closed. Mr. Melling returned 
home, entered the Prussian army, and served three years, taking part in the 
revolution of 1848-49. After his discharge from the army he went home and 
persuaded his father to allow himself and his two younger brothers to come 
to the United States. They embarked from Havre, France, on a sailing vessel, 
and landed in New York, where his brothers remained. Mr. Melling proceed- 
ed to Pittsburg, where he found the times very dull, in consecjuence of which 
he was for some time unable to find work at his trade. He went to the South 
Side, where the last dwelling and business place were then owned by Mr. Mitler, 
who kept a tavern and small brewery. When business was dull and he could 
not afford a horse and wagon he peddled his beer in a wheelbarrow. This was 
the first place at which Mr. Melling stayed after coming to Pittsburg, and it 
was Mr. Mitler who helped him to obtain his first employment, which was at 
the Mulvaney glass works on the South Side. Later he was employed in the 
Fort Pitt Glass Works and afterward the glass works of Mr. O'Hara. In 
1856, when the company sold out, Air. Melling, with the money he had saved, 
opened a grocery store on the corner of Fifth and Carson streets. This store 
he conducted until 1866, when he sold out and became head of the firm of 
Melling, Estep & Company. 

in 1 87 1 he sold his interest in the company, and in 1873 became a director 
in the Birmingham Fire Insurance Company, an office which he has since con- 
tinuously held. Two years later he was elected president of the company and 
served ten years. Two years ago the president, Peter Snyder, died, and Mr. 
Melling was agam elected to his present position. He lias built considerable 
property on the South Side, and has aided in the advancement of the borough, 
not only financially but by serving as assessor and treasurer until its incorpora- 
tion in the city of Pittsburg. In politics he has always been a strong Democrat. 
He is a member of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Melling married, August i, 1853, in Allegheny City, Magdalena, 
daughter of Jacob Holtzer, a miner. Mrs. Melling is a native of the same place 
as her husband, having been born there July 25, 1830. In 1851 she came to 
the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Melling have no children. 



JAMES BISSET, JR., a member of an enterprising firm of real estate 
and insurance dealers in the city of Pittsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
is a representative of an old and honored family of Scotch ancestry. 

James Bisset, Sr., father of James Bisset, Jr., was born af Bell's Hill, Scot- 
land, and was employed as a worker in the mills in his native place. He emi- 
grated to the United States in 1888. and being an expert in his line of work, 
found it an easy matter to obtain employment in various rolling mills in and 
near Pittsburg. He married Jessie Pettigrew, also of Scotch parentage, and 
they had children : Nellie, married Robert Hazlett : David, married Jennie 
Jackson ; Mary, married Charles Reitz ; and James, Jr. 

James Bisset, Jr., second son and fourth and youngest child of James, Sr., 
and Jessie (Pettigrew) Bisset, was born in Bell's Hill, Scotland, May 18, 1883. 
His education was acquired in the public schools of Pittsburg, and when still 
a mere lad he was employed as an errand boy by a mercantile firm of his 
native city until he was strong enough to attempt more laborious work. He 
then obtained a position in the rolling mills, which he held for four years, saved 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 267 

his earnings, and being of a thrifty and economical disposition, they amounted 
to a sulificient sum to enable him to embark in a business of his own. He ac- 
cordingly associated himself with his brother in a business partnership in 1902 
for the conduct of real estate and insurance matters, the firm name being 
Bisset Brothers. This was changed to Bisset & Company in 1905, when they 
admitted to membership in the firm J. F. O'Donnell. The firm has an enviable 
reputation for enterprise and reliability, and is constantly increasing its business 
operations. They are the representatives of some of the most responsible in- 
surance companies in the country. Mr. Bisset is a man of keen foresight and 
sound judgment, and has frequently demonstrated his business ability. His 
political affiliations are with the Republican party, in whose interests lie is an 
active worker, and is one of the rising men of the Thirty-second ward. He is 
a member of the ]\Iasonic fraternity in its various degrees. 

Mr. Bisset married, December 31, 1903, Sarah J. Bishop, daughter of 
Frederick and Helen ( Alesser) Bishop, of Pittsburg, and thev have one child, 
Helen M. 



ALBERT YORK SJHTH, an attorney at law in Pittsburg, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, who is now filling a position of great responsibility, 
and who has taken a leading part in many important enterprises, is a repre- 
sentative of one of the oldest families in the United States. 

James York, the emigrant ancestor of this branch of the Smith family, 
was born in England and came to this country in 1615. He located in James- 
town, \'irginia, and removed to Barrington, ^lassachusetts, in 1635, and later 
to New London, Connecticut. He was a farmer by occupation, and possessed 
of great enterprise and ability, qualities which seem to have been transmitted 
to his descendants with undiminished vigor. He married and had a number 
of children, among them being a daughter who married Thomas Stanton, the 
first justice of the peace in New London, Connecticut. By other intermarriages 
this family is related to a number of the most prominent families in the coun-. 
try. 

Dr. Ebenezer Smith was born and reared near New London, Connecticut. 
He was a well known physician and surgeon of his day. 

Rev. Benjamin Smith, son of Dr. Ebenezer Smith, was a Presbyterian 
minister of note, and was for a number of years pastor of the Presbyterian 
church at \\'esterly. New York. He married Calista Terrill, also of English 
descent, and they had children: i. Curtis B. M., see forward. 2. James H. 
3. Elizabeth K., married Isaac Jones, a leading citizen of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, who was president of the Western Pennsylvania Hospital, and a stock- 
holder and director in several of the banks of Pittsburg. 4. Lucretia, married 
a Mr. Mncent, a farmer near Geneva, New York. 

, "^ Curtis B. M. Smith, eldest child of Rev. Benjamin and Calista (Terrill) 
Smith, received his preparatory education in a private school and then en- 
tered Amherst College, from which he received the degree of Master of 
Arts. He devoted himself earnestly to the study of law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1840, and remained in the active practice of his profession until 
his death in 1877. He was one of the foremost lawyers of his time in the city, 
and served two terms as city solicitor. He married Hannah J. ^^'ashburn, 
daughter of John Washburn, a farmer of Hancock, New Hampshire, and a 



268 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



relative of Governor Washburn, of Massachusetts, who was appointed to the 
United States senate to succeed Senator Charles Sumner. Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith were the parents of children as follows: i. Ada C, died in infancy. 
2. Francis Washburn, was a member of the Pittsburg bar and died June 14, 
1905. 3. Albert York, see forward. 4. Edwin W., born in 1857, is an attorney 
at the Pittsburg bar. 5. Ida A., born in i860, died May 29, 1907. 

Albert York Smith, second son and third child of Curtis B. M. and Han- 
nah J. (Washburn) Smith, was born at Mount Washington, Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, January 15, 1854. His preparatory education was acquired in Ayres 
Latin School, in Pittsburg, and he then entered Yale University, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1875. For a time he studied law under the 
preceptorship of his father, then under that of Major Samuel Harper, who was 
at that time register in bankruptcy of the Pittsburg district. Mr. Smith was 
admitted to the bar in October, 1880, and began the practice of his profession 
in the same month, associating himself with Major Harper, with whom he had 
studied. Upon the death of Major Harper he succeeded him in the office of 
Register in Bankruptcy, which was made a federal office by the act of 1867, 
and has filled this office capably since the time of his appointment. He served 
five years as secretary of the Allegheny County Bar Association, and is now 
filling his second term as president of the same body. He is secretary and 
director in the Pittsburg Banking Company and a director of the Mount Wash- 
ington Lebanon Cemetery Company. He is a member of the University Club, 
and has acted as a director in that association for the past nine years. He is 
also a member of the Royal Arcanum and of the Lnproved Order of Hepta- 
■ sophs. At present he is president of the Mount Washington Board of Trade. 
He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

He married, October 4, 1888, Amy L. Ayres, daughter of J. J. Ayres, of 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and they had one child : Jeffrey A., deceased. 



JOSEPH DUMONT, a well known business man of Pittsburg, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, whose place of business is located at No. 51 
Boggs avenue, is of French-German descent on the paternal side, and of Ger- 
man on the maternal. 

Adam Dumont, father of Joseph Dumont, was a native of Prussia, Ger- 
many, where his entire life was spent. He was a slater and roofer by occupa- 
tion, and followed this trade until his early death. He married Eva Hynes, and 
had children : Margaret, Kate, Mary, Barbara and Joseph. 

Joseph Dumont, only son of Adam and Eva (Hynes) Dumont, was born 
in Schweich, Trier-by-the-Moselle, Prussia, Germany, October 14, 1861, and 
was but nine years of age at the time of the death of his parents. His school 
education was a limited one, as he was early obliged to assist in the support of 
the family to the best of his ability. At the age of fourteen years he was ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of carpentering and cabinet making, and served 
an apprenticeship of three years. He then worked at his trade for an uncle 
for one year, and in September, 1880, emigrated to the L^nited States. He 
went to Chicago, Illinois, where he obtained work near the city on a farm, 
remaining thus occupied for a period of six months and acquiring a good 
working knowledge of the English language. He worked at his trade as a 
journeyman for a short time, and then removed to Pittsburg, where he worked 




/^. 




PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 269 

as a journeyman for three years. At the expiration of this time he estabhshed 
himself in business, forming a partnership with Frederick Metzer, and this 
continued for seven years. Air. Dumont then took charge of the business alone, 
the partnership being dissolved, and has since that time been the sole proprietor. 
Since then he has added glass and roofing branches, and now (1907) has a 
large and constantly increasing business. He has superintended the building 
of some of the most important structures in Mount Washington, and his work 
is noted for its thorough reliability. He erected a brick dwelling for his private 
residence in Boggs avenue, and has a general workshop on the same piece of 
property. He is a member and stockholder in the Mount Washington Manne- 
chor, and he and his family are members of the St. ]\Iary's Catholic church, in 
whose affairs Air. Dumont takes an active interest. Mrs. Dumont is a member 
of the Ladies' Catholic Benevolent Association. In 1903, Mr. Dumont paid a 
visit to the home of his birth, also traveling extensively through the other prov- 
inces, and of the original family found only one living representative, an uncle, 
who has since died. 

Air. Dumont married, September 17, 1884, Margaret Davis, daughter of 
Paul and Mary (Gannon) Davis, of New York city, both natives of Ireland, 
who came to America in i860 and settled in New York. Mr. and Mrs. Dti- 
mont have had children: i. Joseph, agent for the Adams Express Company, 
married June 12, 1907, Lena Wolfman, of Alount Washington. 2. Paul A., a 
carpenter. 3. Elmer, died at the age of four years. 4. Eva, died at the age of 
six years. These two children died on the same day as a result of diphtheria, 
and were buried side by side. 5. Frank W., a carpenter. 6. Leo P. 7 and 8. 
Agnes and Charles, died in infancy. 



JOHN WINSLOW JACKSON, of Pittsburg, for many years one of the 
city's active business men, but now enjoying the rest which belongs to those 
who have placed their names on the retired list, was born July 14, 1844, at 
Powersville, Alorris county, New Jersey, and is a representative of a family 
v,-hich in its different branches has been for nearly two centuries and a half 
resident on Long Island and in New Jersey. The history of his ancestral line 
is given below : 

(I) James Jackson, founder of the Jacksons of Pittsburg, was born in 
1679, on Long Island, New York, whence his children migrated to New Jersey, 
settling near Rockaway and Morristown, where they undoubtedly became 
farmers. 

(II) Joseph Jackson, son of James Jackson (I), was born in 1710, and 
was but nine years old at the time of his father's death. Joseph Jackson died 
in New Jersey. His son, Stephen Jackson (HI), born in 1744, also married 
and died in New Jersey. 

(IV) James Jackson, son of Stephen Jackson (III), was born in 1776, 
and was a charcoal and pig-iron manufacturer, owning property in different 
parts of New Jersey. He and his wife were members of the Alethodist Episco- 
pal church. James Jackson married Clarissa Hoff, and their children were: 
Sarah Elizabeth, wife of Josiah Canfield, died in 1842, at Rockaway, New 
Jersey, aged forty-three ; Charles H., a well-known physician of New York 
city, where he died in 1861, aged sixty years; Stephen, of whom later; and 
George W., went to California in 1849 '" quest of gold, and, after a visit home. 



270 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



was returning in 1852, accompanied by his nephew, Roswell I\I. Jackson, when 
he was taken with fever at Panama and died at Stockton, California. James 
Jackson, tlie father, died in 1848, at Danville, New Jersey, aged seventy-two 
years. 

(V) Stephen Jackson, son of James (IV) and Clarissa (Hoff) Jackson, 
was born June 17, 1803, in Rockaway, New Jersey, and attended the schools 
of that place with but scanty results, being mainly self-educated. He began 
life as a worker in the iron industry. In 1848 he moved v\'ith his family to 
Coopersville, South Carolina, remaining one year, and then going to Mount 
Savage, Maryland, where he was placed in charge of the Mount Savage Iron 
Works. These works were the first in the United States to manufacture rails, 
the machinery for the purpose being brought from England on sailing vessels. 
In 1857 Mr. Jackson went to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and there lived in re- 
tirement until October, 1865, when he removed to Allegheny City, there mak- 
ing his home for the remainder of his life. 

While a resident of Morris county. New Jersey, he was nominated for 
sheriff, but from motives of delicacy did not cast a ballot for himself, and lost 
the election by his own vote. In politics he was a Jackson Democrat, but voted 
for Abraham Lincoln, aind ever after was identified with the Republicans. He 
and his wife were devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Jackson married, in 1825, Maria Cooke, and their children were: 
Louisa Maria, deceased, born October 15, 1827; Roswell M., born June 22, 
1829, married Margaret Harmon, of Mount Savage, Maryland, and died in 
Stockton, California; Laura C, born in October, 1831, married Thomas H. 
Frost, of Frostburg, Maryland, and died in Pittsburg in January, 1900; Joseph 
R., born November 26, 1837, in Rockaway, New Jersey, married Winifred 
Peede ; Elizabeth A., born in 1842, died in infancy; John Winslow ; James S., 
born August i, 1846, at Rockaway, now of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, mar- 
ried, in 1872, in St. Louis, Missouri, Elizabeth Moneghan ; Alexander F., born 
January 10, 1849, at Mount Savage, Maryland; and Francis H., born June 3, 
1854, at the same place, married Mrs. Nearing, and lives at East Liverpool, 
Ohio. Stephen Jackson, the father of the family, died November 14, 1876, 
in Allegheny City, and his widow passed away November 14, 1898, in Pitts- 
burg. 

(VI) John Winslow Jackson, son of Stephen (V) and Maria (Cooke) 
Jackson, received his education in the public schools of Mount Savage, Mary- 
land, and Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and in i860 began to work in a rolling 
mill in the latter place, remaining two years. On August i, 1862', he enlisted 
as a private in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment, Penn-' 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, for nine months, and participated in the latter 
part of the battle of Antietam as well as the battles of Fredericksburg and 
Chancellorsville. June 9, 1863, he was discharged at Harrisburg. Returning 
to Johnstown, he re-entered the Cambria Iron Works, and in 1865 went to 
Pittsburg, where he was employed in the Superior Works, Allegheny. In 
1868 he moved to Reading, where he worked ten years in the mill of the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Railroad Company, returning, in January, 1879, to Pitts- 
burg. He was there emplpyed in the National Tube Works for sixteen years, 
after which he took charge of a portion of the rolling mill for the Shoenberger 
Company until July, 1900, when he retired. Twenty-three years ago he built 
the house which has been his home since the time of its completion. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



Since September, 1869, he has been a member of Lodge No. 62, Free and 
Accepted Masons, Reading. In politics he has always adhered steadfastly to 
the principles of the Republican party. He was brought up in the faith of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Jackson married, in October, 1878, in Reading, Mary A. Swartz, of 
that city. Mrs. Jackson died in Pittsburg March 16, 1887, leaving one son, 
John Winslow, who was bom February 17, 1887, and now lives in Sardinia, 
Erie county, New York. Mr. Jackson has never married again. 

CHARLES KOHLAIEYER. The late Charles Kohlmeyer, for sixty years 
a respected citizen of Pittsburg, was born September 3, 1820, in Ogenbaugh, 
province of the Rhine, Germany, son of John Kohlmeyer, whose calling was 
that of a coal miner. 

Charles Kohlmeyer attended school until the age of fourteen, when he 
went to work in the mines and labored there until the period of his emigration 
to the United States. In 1846 he landed in New York, whence he proceeded to 
Pittsburg, making the journey mainly by way of the canal. He obtained work 
in the coal mines near the city, and worked there until 1859, after which for a 
3'ear and a half he conducted a- small restaurant on Wood street. In i860 he 
moved to Alount Washington, where he had purchased three acres of land 
facing on Boggs avenue. On this land he built a house, and also erected a 
small frame structure which he used as a grocery store. In addition to this 
he hauled coal, being the owner of two horses. He worked hard, and in the 
course of time was able to buy a tract of four acres, which he laid out in lots. 
On these lots he built houses which he rented and sold, thus increasing his in- 
come and laying a solid foiuidation for future prosperity. In 1884 he, closed 
his grocery business, thenceforth devoting his time to his other interests. In 
1888 he built the house which was his home during the remainder of his life 
and which is now occupied by his widow. 

He was an organizer and director of the German Savings and Deposit 
Bank and of the Birmingham Fire Insurance Company. In national politics 
he was a life-long Republican, but in local matters an Independent. He was 
brought up in the Roman Catholic church, but after his marriage became a 
member of the Eighteenth Street Lutheran church, to which his wife belonged. 

Mr. Kohlmeyer married, August 7, 1859, Mary, born January 2y, 1834, in 
Prussia, daughter of Frederick Rohrkaste and sister of Ernest Rohrkaste, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Kohlmeyer came to the 
L'nited States in 1856, under the protection of Mrs. Stolte, a widow, who was 
coming to this country with her family. They landed in Baltimore from a 
sailing vessel after a voyage of six weeks and three days, Mrs. Kohlmeyer go- 
ing immediately to her brother in Pittsburg. Three years later she was married 
to Mr. Kohlmeyer, to whom she was ever a helpful and devoted wife. 

The death of Air. Kohlmeyer occurred July 19, igo6, when he had nearly 
completed his eighty-sixth year. Despite his advanced age and the fact that 
the greater part of his life had been spent in hard work and that for twenty- 
five years he had labored as a miner, he had the appearance of a much younger 
man. He was truly honest and upright, and withal of an extremely lovable 
character, kind in disposition and fond of home life. To his widow, his friends 
and the community at large his death involved a loss hardly to be estimated and 
one which was long and deeply mourned. He is buried in St. Paul's cemetery. 



272 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

HEREON G. BRIGGS, M. D., well known as a physician and surgeon in 
Pittsburg, Alleghen_v county, Pennsylvania, is a descendant of an honored 
family of England. 

William Briggs, grandfather of Dr. Herron G. Briggs, was born in York- 
shire, England, and came to this country many years ago. He was a man of 
means and education and made the voyage across the Atlantic seven times. He 
was the owner of the old McClung farm at Brownstown, and died at Webster, 
having attained an age of more than eighty years. He married Anne Irells, 
also a native of Yorkshire, England, and they were the parents of children : 
Thomas; Charles, who was a pilot and met his death by drowning; John, also 
a pilot, who met the same fate as his brother Charles ; Frederick ; and Alartin. 

Martin Briggs, youngest son of William and Anne (Irells) Briggs, was a 
carpenter by trade, but abandoned this in order to engage in the coal business. 
His business was largely with the southern states, where his main affiliations 
were with New Orleans. He married Caroline S. Snyder, born in Wilkes- 
Barre, Pennsylvania, daughter of Nicholas Snyder, a native of Germany, and 
they had children: i. Julia A., who married Theodore P. Painter, of San 
Francisco, California. 2. William H. 3. Elmer E., who was educated in the 
public schools of Pittsburg and the Western University of Pennsylvania, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Master of Philosophy. He took up 
the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. John C. Burgher, and 
attended a course of lectures in the medical department of the University of 
Michigan and two courses of lectures at the Homeopathic College of New York. 
He was graduated with honor in the class of 1883. He practiced for one year 
in the city of Pittsburg, and for one year was resident physician and surgeon 
of the Homeopathic Hospital of the same city. He then continued his practice 
in Pittsburg for a period of seventeen years, after which he removed to Watson- 
ville, California, where he is engaged in a successful practice. 4. Herron G., 
see forward. 

Herron G. Briggs, M. D., third son and fourth and youngest child of 
Martin and Caroline S. (Snyder) Briggs, was born in Carrick, November 11, 
1864. He attended the public schools of the Second ward in Pittsburg and 
entered the Western University of Pennsylvania in 1880, being graduated in 
the class of 1884 with the degree of Master of Philosophy. He took up the 
study of medicine under the preceptorship of his brother, Elmer E., and then 
entered the Hahnemann Homeopathic College of Chicago, Illinois, from which 
he was graduated in 1887. He was resident physician in the Homeopathic 
Hospital of Pittsburg for one year, then opened an office in Grandview avenue. 
Mount Washington, and has followed the practice of his profession very suc- 
cessfully since that time. He opened a branch office in the Bessemer Building. 
Pittsburg, where he has an extended office practice from two until four o'clock 
in the afternoons. He is a member of the following organizations : Allegheny 
County and State Homeopathic Medical Society ; American Institute of Home- 
opathy ; and has served as vice-president of the Allegheny County Anti-Vac- 
cination Society. He is also a member of the Ancient Order of Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

He married, December 12, 1895, Jessie N. Meskimen, daughter of Charles 
P. Meskimen, of Pittsburg. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 273 

JAMES HILL. Among the men who ranked high in his occupation in 
the city of Pittsburg for many years was James Hill, who was connected with 
the foundry business and who also became a large real estate holder, by reason 
of his frugal and industrious habits which began to develop early in life. He 
was born in England in 1836, and accompanied his father, John Hill, to Pitts- 
burg when but five years of age. The family located in Pittsburg, where the 
father was employed in a foundry for a number of years. Here the subject 
was permitted to attend the schools common to those days and when large 
enough entered the foundry of Mr. Faber, where he worked until he, with 
Frank and Edward Faber, organized the Faber Foundry Company, with which 
he was connected until his death in 1877. He had invested his earnings in real 
estate, which became quite valuable. He was possessed of great energj- and 
good business principles and was conservative in all his methods, saving his 
money and with it making good investments. 

He was united in marriage- in Pittsburg, May 4, 1854, to Mary E., 
daughter of Samuel and Mary (Sloan) Kenneday, both natives of Derry, 
Ireland. The subject and his wife were the parents of two sons, Harry E. 
and A. L. Thus James Hill made the most of his opportunities, and became a 
valuable man and produced staple goods, such as legitimate trade demanded, 
at a profit, which allowed him to rear a family who do honor to his name. 



WILLI AIM BARKER, JR. The late William Barker, Jr., of the firm 
of Bradley. Barker & Company, proprietors of the woolen mill industry of 
Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, died November 17, 1891. He was a native of 
England, born March 23, 1834, a son of John and Mary (Pierson) Barker, 
both of whom died in England, never having lived in this country. In 1850 
William Barker, the subject, came from his native land to Pittsburg alone. 
He had an uncle, his father's brother, William Barker, who had been in this 
country several years and was engaged in the wool business. William, Jr., 
remained with him in this business for a number of years, after which he 
was emplo}^d with Samuel Bradley in Allegheny City, and later became a 
partner in the business, the firm being styled Bradley, Barker & Company. 
They operated woolen mills which Mr. Bradley had established as the Bradley 
Woolen Mills. Mr. Bradley died in February, 1881, Mr. Barker continuing 
the business until his death, in 1891. 

Mr. Barker was a director of the Union National Bank for about twenty- 
five years, and also a director of the City Fire Insurance Company. He was 
a supporter of the Republican part}', and held the office of director in the 
public schools for many years, and was a member of the city council from the 
Twenty-third ward two terms. In religion he was a member of the Lutheran 
church. 

He married, March 12, 1863, Harriet, daughter of Samuel and Katherine 
(Anderson) Bradley, who still survives him. Of their seven children, six 
are now living, as follows: i. William Pierson, who married Eliza Bryant, 
connected with the Union National Bank for the past eighteen years. 2. 
John Anderson, unmarried, engaged in the hardware business in Pittsburg. 
3. Anthony Kilgore, unmarried, now secretary and treasurer of the Forter 
Miller Engineering Company. 4. Bradley J., unmarried. 5. Harriet May. 
6. Ella Margaret, married Arthur H. Masters. 

iii— 18 



274 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Mr. Barker was widely known and universally esteemed wherever known. 
He died at his home in Greenfield avenue, the cause being apoplexy. He left 
his office in seeming good health at five o'clock in the evening and died within 
an hour. 

J. LUTHER LONG, a leading contractor and builder of Wilkinsburg, 
was born April 15, 1855, at Freeport, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, a son 
of William A. Long, and grandson of John Long, whose children were William 
A., of whom later: Mary, died unmarried; John J., married Elizabeth Giles; 
Catharine, married first, Samuel Hosey, second, William Lowther ; Susanah, 
wife of Thomas Beach; Elizabeth, married Henry Bliss; Margaret, wife of 
John G. Townsend ; Andrew J., unmarried. The wife of John Long and the 
motlier of these children was Catharine Ashbaugh. 

William A. Long, son of John and Catharine (Ashbaugh) Long, was 
born June 2, 1820, near Leechburg, Pennsylvania, and received his education 
in the public schools. He learned the trade of carpenter, and moved to Free- 
port, Pennsylvania, with his father in the year of 1840, where he engaged in 
the business of contracting and building. He carried on a profitable business 
until about 1887, when he retired from active business. He was a charter 
member of the Lutheran church at Freeport, in which he filled a number of 
offices. He was always an active worker in politics, and was a Republican. 
He died October 10, 1907, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

Mr. Long married Elizabeth A. Cunningham, who died December 16, 
1869,. aged forty-nine years. The following children were born to them: Isaac 
Wayne, married Wilhelmina Schwietering ; John Henry, married Margaret 
Poundstone ; William Alonzo, married Melissa J. Meals ; Katharine A., mar- 
ried Morgan B. Irwin; Samuel H., married Elizabeth Cruikshank ; Andrew J., 
married Alelissa Smith ; J. Luther, married, Minnie Belle Craig. 

J. Luther Long was reared at Freeport, receiving his education in the 
public schools, and he learned the trade of carpenter with his father. When 
only seventeen years of age he engaged in the contracting and building business 
with headquarters at Freeport. In 1885 he built a planing mill, which he 
operated until September 23, 1890, when it. was destroyed by fire. In the fall 
of 1889 he built a saw mill and electric light plant, and also opened a feed 
store, all of which were successfully operated, and in 1890 he established a 
fine grocery and general store, which business was continued for several vears. 

In i8gg Mr. Long moved to ^Vilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, and continued 
in the business of contracting and building, with an office in the First National 
Bank Building, on Wood street. Fie has built many of the finest buildings in 
Pittsburg, East End and Wilkinsburg, including the Ross Avenue I^Iethodist 
Episcopal church and the \'\'allace Avenue Baptist church, Wilkinsburg, and 
is now engaged in the building of the fine new Methodist Episcopal church on 
South avenue, Wilkinsburg. He has just completed a handsome school build- 
ing in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 

I\Ir. Long is a Republican, and while at Freeport served several years as 
a member of the council, being president of the council three of these vears. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church and an elder for several years. 

Mr. Long was married in 1891 to Minnie Belle Craig. Three children 
were born to this union : Ruth Isabel, Helen Lucile and Luther Craig. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 275 

JAAIES GILMORE, for many years the representative of a business 
which formed one of the commercial landmarks of Pittsburg, but now living- 
in retirement on his farm at Ingram, was born March i, 1835, in the family 
home on the corner of Wood and Liberty streets, Pittsburg, son of ^^''illiam 
Gilmore, who was born in 1800, in Ireland, and was the son of a farmer. 

William Gilmore received an excellent education in his native country and 
learned thoroughly the trade of a jeweler. In 1828 he emigrated to the United 
States and settled in Pittsburg, where he established himself in business, having 
his dwelling and store under one roof. In addition to dealing in jewelrv he 
manufactured watches and old-fashioned eight-day clocks and also did repair- 
ing. In this line of industry Mr. Gilmore, John McFadden, \Mlliam Perkins 
and a few otli^rs were pioneers. In 1850 Mr. Gilmore turned the business 
over to his two sons. In 1842 he purchased a forty-acre farm, a part of which 
is now in the borough of Sheridan, and on this land he erected a beautiful 
home. In 1853 he transferred his place of residence from the city to this 
estate, making it thenceforth his permanent abode during the remainder of his 
life. 

He served as a member of the council and for many years was an old 
Jackson Democrat. At the outbreak of the Civil war he became a Republican, 
but in regard to this transference of allegiance always said : "I did not leave 
my party: my party left me." He was a devout member of the United 
Presbyterian church. 

William Gilmore married, in Ireland, Elizabeth Brooks, whose brothers 
came to this country and settled in Oxford, Ohio. Mr. and Airs. Gilmore were 
the parents of three children; John, died unmarried in 1861; Margaret A., 
died in 1902, the wife of William Corbett, of Sistersville. West \"irginia ; and 
James, of whom later. Mrs. Gilmore died in 1837, and her husband survived 
her many years, his death occurring in 1881. He was a man of sterling worth 
and sound judgment, ever ready to oblige his friends and abounding in acts 
of kindness toward all. 

James Gilmore, son of William and Elizabeth (Brooks) Gilmore, received 
his education in the old Third ward school on the corner of Cherry and 
Diamond alleys, his preceptors being Isaac Whittier and Air. Hector Suther- 
land. \\'hile still a boy he began to render assistance in his father's store, at 
the same time acquiring a thorough knowledge of the business. Upon the 
retirement of his father he and his brother became proprietors of the establish- 
ment, conducting it together for eleven years. In 1861 the death of his brother 
left Air. Gilmore sole proprietor, and under his skillful management the business 
not only maintained its former high standing, but advanced and increased. In 
1874 he retired to his farm. 

In the sphere of politics Mr. Gilmore adheres to the doctrines of the 
Republican party. He and his family are members of the Presbyterian church 
of Ingraham. 

Mr. Gilmore married, in 1866. Carrie. Ixirn in Buffalo, daughter of George 
Skinner, a pioneer cracker manufacturer of Pittsburg, whither he came when 
his daughter was still a child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore are the parents of the following children • W S.. 
clerk in the recorder's office ; Alargaret A., stenographer for the American 
Sheet Steel & Tin Plate Company ; Carrie J., wife of Andrew W. Strouss, of 



276 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Bellevue, Pennsylvania; Jessie A., wife of Frank M. Rinaman, of Pittsburg; 
and Mattie B., at home. 

ERNST OTTO PLANETZER, a leading baker of the South Side, was 
born March 13, i860, in Saxony, Germany, a son of David Frederick Planet- 
zer, also a native of Saxony, and a man of prominence in his town, conducting 
a store and operating a stone quarry. He died in 1866, leaving the following 
children: Frederick, who came in 1880 to the United States, worked in a mill 
at Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, married Carolina, Meuske, and died in 
1881 ; Ernst, who died in 1868, in Germany; Gustav, who died in Germany; 
Henry, who came to the United States but returned to his native land, where 
he now lives ; and Ernst Otto. 

Ernst Otto Planetzer, son of David Frederick Planetzer, was left an 
orphan at the age of six and was brought up by a family of the name of 
Yening, who sent him to school until the age of fourteen, and also gave him 
instructions in rope-making. He followed this trade until 1881, when he 
emigrated to the United States, making the voyage from Bremen to Baltimore 
on the ship "Frankfort." He settled at Turtle Creek, and being unable to 
obtain employment at his trade, worked one year in the steel works. At the 
end of that time, being dissatisfied with the condition of things, he decided to 
return to Germany, and purchased his return ticket but was persuaded by 
friends to remain. He came to Pittsburg and learned his present business in 
the bakery of Henry Meuske on Bingham street. South Side, serving two years 
and a half. In 1884 he went into business for himself on Penn street, between 
Eleventh and Twelfth streets, and at the end of a year moved to South street, 
where he rented a place for four years. In 1889 he erected his present place 
of business, a three-story structure, forty-eight by one hundred and twenty 
feet. He conducts the largest baking business in that part of the South Side, 
his success being entirely the result of his own imaided elYorts, enforced by 
indomitable perseverance and habits of thrift. He is held in esteem by his 
neighbors not only as a business man but also as a citizen. 

Mr. Planetzer married, in 1884, in the German Lutheran church on 
Eighteenth street, Eliza Eud, a native of Prussia, who died in 1892. leaving 
two sons : Ernst Otto, a student at St. Vincent's College, and Henry L., at 
home. In 1892 Mr. Planetzer married Elizabeth Appryl, of Pittsburg, who 
bore him four children : Aloisius, Marie, Clara and Loretto. Mrs. Planetzer 
died in 1902. The third and present wife of Mr. Planetzer was Margaret 
Fisher, by whom he has become the father of three children : Anthony, Mary 
and Margaret. Mr. and Mrs. Planetzer are members of St. Peter's Roman 
Catholic church. 

Mrs. Planetzer is a daughter of Andrew Fisher, who was born in Ger- 
many, and coming to the United States settled in Butler, Pennsylvania. He 
married, in 1870, Ellen Beck, a native of that place. Their daughter Margaret 
was born there, and was eight years old when her parents moved to Braddock, 
where she was educated in parochial schools and became the wife of Ernst 
Otto Planetzer. 

JOHN COWLEY, a native of Pittsburg, and thus far a life-long resident 
of that city, where he has been for many years actively engaged in business, 
was born May 22, 1848, a son af Samuel Cowley, who was born about 1800 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 277 



in Belfast. Ireland, and was by profession a civil engineer. About 1832' he 
emigrated with his wife and two children to the United States, taking up his 
abode in Pittsburg. Shortly after his arrival his sight became impaired, ip 
consequence of which he was forced to abandon his profession. He turned his 
attention to the draying and teaming business, beginning in a small way and 
achieving a fair measure of success. He was the first to adopt the old-fash- 
ioned, two-wheel, long-tailed dray, which came into vogue at that period, 
having at one time twenty or thirty such teams. He continued in the business 
until, the Civil war broke out, when he purchased a house on Troy Hill, and 
there passed the residue of his days. 

Samuel Cowley married Jane Thompson, who was born in 1806, in the 
townland of Eransdale, parish of Doumberbrong, county Down, Ireland, and 
they were the parents of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity: i. 
David, deceased, born in Ireland, graduated from the Philadelphia Medical 
College, practiced some years in' that city and the last twenty-five years of 
his life in Pittsburg, . where he was very successful. He married Maggie 
^lowry, also deceased, and of their eight children four are living: William, 
David, Alargaret and Eliza. 2. William, born in Pittsburg, as were his 
3'ounger brothers and sisters, was connected with the Pittsburg & Fort Wayne 
Railroad. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and 
Twenty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olunteers, and died of fever while in 
the service. 3. Margaret, deceased, married, first, Lyman Hacks, second, 
James Hamilton, now deceased. By her second marriage she left two children : 
Frederick and James. 4. Alexander, deceased, was professor of penmanship 
in the Iron City College for many years. He married Jennie Buchanan, also 
deceased, one child, Jennie. 5. Eliza, widow of A. Tedoux, three children : 
Amierl, Reta and Clementine. 6. Samuel, married a Miss Laturner and has 
one child, Maud. 7. John. The parents of these children both died in Pitts- 
burg, the father passing away about 1873, and the mother surviving to the 
great age of ninety-two. 

John Cowley, son of Samuel and Jane (Thompson) Cowley, received a 
common school education in Pittsburg, and then served an apprenticeship to 
the plumber's trade with the firm of Taite & Seville. At the expiration of his 
time he went west and spent two years in that part of the country, engaging in 
mining and other occupations. In 1872 he returned to Pittsburg and there 
followed his trade for one year, at the end of that time establishing himself in 
his present business, which he has conducted very successfully to this day. 

Mr. Cowley married, in January, 1875, Mary Carver, a native of England, 
and they have been the parents of seven children, three of whom are living, 
all having been born in Pittsburg: Mary, wife of Rolf Marthens, of Pittsburg, 
and they have one child, John Marthens Cowley; Earnest R. and Alexander T. 



FREDERICK NOLTE, who has resided sixty-four years on the South 
Side, and is to-day one of the oldest men living within the limits of the city 
of Pittsburg, was born May 31, 1817, in Essen, Germany, and passed the first 
twenty-six years of his life in his native land. In the spring of 1843 he emi- 
grated to the United States, taking passage on an old-fashioned two-masted 
ship which landed him in Philadelphia after a voyage of eight weeks. From 
Philadelphia he at once set out for Pittsburg, the journey occupying fourteen 



278 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

days. Mr. Nolte has a vivid recollection of the many difficulties encountered 
while making a trip across the country in those remote days. He came on a 
towboat up the Pennsylvania Central canal as far as the Allegheny mountains, 
where the boats were divided in tv^'O and hauled up and down inclines over the 
mountains and taken through tunnels until Johnstown was reached. There 
the boats were again launched to resume the water journey to Pittsburg. 

The first position Mr. Nolte obtained was on a farm owned by Joseph 
Lawrence, on Mount Washington. He remained there two years, during which 
time the Pittsburg fire occurred. In speaking of this event, he said : "I was 
ploughing up a pasture field when a man named William Obie came to the 
fence and shouted to me to put away the team as the town was on fire. I 
watched the fire for several hours. It was the greatest I ever saw or want to 
see." Shortly after the fire he left the farm and went to work in the coal mines. 
In the Blossomville mine, a short distance this side of Six-Mile ferry, where 
he was for a time employed, the vein was so thin that dogs had to be used 
to haul out the coal. He later worked in a mine at Williamsburg, near the 
city limits, operated by William Stone. In 1853 he was appointed street com- 
missioner for Birmingham borough at the time John Lautz was appointed 
burgess. After the expiration of his term he obtained employment in the 
Jones & Laughlin coal mine at the head of South Twenty-eighth street, where 
he worked until the mine was closed down in 1885. The last work he did in 
this mine was directly under the Agnus glass-house, which was situated on 
the Brownsville road and was razed some years ago. 

Mr. Nolte is not only one of the few remaining old Pittsburgers who 
remember the great fire of 1845 but he has watched the growth of the South 
Side almost from its rural infancy, and the many incidents which he still- 
retains in his memory in relation to its development are not only interesting 
but also very instructive. Despite his advanced age his faculties are not in 
any way impaired. His mind is clear and keen and his step is as vigorous as 
that of many men several years younger than he. So excellent is his sight that 
he can read a paper without glasses. 

JOHN GRIPP. The late John Gripp, who departed this life December 
14, 1898, was born in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, July 28, 1856, the 
son of John C. and Elizabeth Gripp, natives respectively of Prussia and Alsace- 
Lorraine. The father emigrated to America when a young man and followed 
the trade of a boilermaker, having charge of the Thomas Thorn's works for 
many years. At one time he was foreman of the Pennsylvania Railroad Car 
Works'. He died in 1873, and his wife died in 1893. Their family consisted of 
ten children: Catherine, who married David Brubach, of Allegheny City; 
Sophia, who married Henry Reismeyer, a grocer of Pittsburg ; Louisa ; Eliza- 
beth, who married John KJeppner; Jacob, a boilermaker; Charles, who had a 
twin sister, and was a brass finisher ; John, of this notice, and his twin sister, 
who died in infancy ; and Frank, who died of smallpox, aged ten years. 

John Gripp, the subject of this memoir, was educated in the German 
schools and in the graded and high schools of Pittsburg. He was first employed 
as a clerk in the office of Mr. Krueter, a magistrate of the Third ward. Later 
he served in the same capacity under Magistrate Burke. Subsequently he was 
a clerk in the registry department of the Pittsburg postoffice, from which posi- 




JOHN GRIPP. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 279 

tion he was promoted to superintendent. He relinquished this position to 
accept a clerkship with Mayor Andrew Fulton, and the following year was 
elected alderman. He served ably and was re-elected twice, being endorsed 
by all political parties at his last election, thus showing his popularity and true 
fitness for the position. While he was serving as alderman he was elected 
deputy mayor under Mayor Fulton, and after the passage of the new city 
charter he was appointed magistrate, which office he held for five years. Dur- 
■ ing the labor riots and disturbances he did much toward bringing about peace- 
ful settlement between the elements, and his disposal of the cases of many 
parties charged with rioting was fully sustained by the supreme court. Politi- 
cally Mr. Gripp was a staunch Republican, and was very active and prominent 
in that organization as a stalwart leader. He served as chairman and secretary 
of the executive committee in the city of Pittsburg and was delegate to numer- 
ous state and national conventions. He was register of wills and deeds of the 
orphans' court. On account of illness he tendered his resignation to Governor 
Hastings November 21, 1898. The dates of his various official terms were as 
follows: He began his first clerkship in 1874; commenced his term as alder- 
man in May, 1885; began as clerk of the orphans' court January i, 1897; and 
w-as member of the select council from 1883 to 1885. He belonged to the Pitts- 
burg Council, Order of American Mechanics ; the Royal Arcanum ; the Macca- 
bees, and the Protective Home Circle. He was a member of the German 
Lutheran church. 

May I, 1884, Mr. Gripp was united in marriage to Emma C. Wack, of 
Rochester, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. The children of this union were : 
Corenna W., Raymond and John. The last named died in November, 1892, 
aged seven years. Mr. Gripp was ill in all about two years, and finally died 
of heart failure, aged forty-two years. 

Of Mrs. Gripp's parentage it may be stated here that she is the daughter 
of Christian and Catherine (Strohecker) Wack, the father a native of Germany 
and the mother of Pennsylvania. The father was a member of the famous 
religious colony at a point on the Ohio river in Beaver countv, Pennsylvania. 
This society was founded by Father George Rapp in 1805, and was known 
as Harmony Society and sometimes called Economy. It was established by 
Germans as a colony. Here a goodly village was built and various manufactur- 
ing interests carried on extensively, including the manufacture of silk (the 
first made west of the Allegheny mountains), also cotton and woolen goods, 
wines, whisky and lumber. The tract of land owned by this colony comprised 
some four thousand acres. In 1831, "Count Maximilian De Leon" and his 
colony from Frankfort-on-the-Main united with this colony, but later withdrew 
and sought to establish a separate one, which failed in a year or so. These 
colonies were near the present town of Phillipsburg or Alonaca, in Beaver 
county. Christian Wack married Catherine Strohecker, and they were the 
parents of four children, including Mrs. John Gripp of this sketch. The grand- 
father Strohecker came from Germany when he was about ten years of age, 
and lived in Beaver countyf 

ROBERT MOLL. The late Robert Moll, of Pittsburg, a well-known boss 
steel melter in the service of the Singer-Nimick Steel Company, was born 
September 14, 1834, in Baden, Germany, a son of Lawrence Moll, and grandson 
of Lawrence Moll, who held the office of burgess in his native town. 



28o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Lawrence Moll was a brick manufacturer, and in 1847 emigrated to the 
United States, landing in New York and thence making the journey to Alle- 
gheny City by way of the canal, Buffalo and the lakes. He was taken ill 
during the voyage and died six weeks after his arrival in Allegheny City. He 
married Francesca Saladine, whose family were from the Rhine country, and 
the following children were born to them : Robert, Julianna, wife of John 
Linsler, of AlcKee's Rocks ; and Mary L.. who died at sixteen. 

Robert Moll, son of Lawrence and Francesca (Saladine) Moll, attended 
school in Germany until the age of thirteen, making good progress in his 
studies, for he was an apt pupil. After the death of bis father he was forced 
to seek work, and found employment in the brick-yard of Stephen Fisher, 
which was situated where the King pickle factory now stands. The wages were 
small, and after a time he went to work in the iron mills of the Schoenbergers, 
where he soon became an expert. In 1857 he entered the service of the Singer- 
Nimick Company, now included in the United States Steel Company, beginning 
as a helper to the steel melters. In 1858 he became boss steel melter, a position 
which he retained to the close of his life. Much of the success of the company 
was attributed to Mr. Moll's faithfulness and his steadfast devotion to the 
interests of his employers, who honored him with their high esteem. At the 
beginning of the Civil war he melted the metal for the first steel cannon for 
the Union army, being assisted in the work by twenty men. In 1869 he moved 
to the home on Sarah street, where he died and where his widow now resides. 
In addition to this house he built two adjoining and also erected a structure 
in the rear. 

He was always a staunch Democrat, and in one campaign, when a sign 
was put up in the mills giving notice of the discharge of old men who refused 
to take part in the parade of the opposite party, he, with a few others, left 
work. His employers sent for him and told him to go to work, adding that he 
was "made of the right stuff." He was at first a member of St. Mary's Roman 
Catholic church, Allegheny, but after his marriage joined St. Philomina's 
church, corner of Liberty and Fourteenth streets. 

Mr. Moll married, June 7, 1859, at St. Philomina's church, Caroline Hogl, 
and the following children were born to them: i. Joseph, died at thirty-nine, 
attended St. Michael's parochial school, and at thirteen entered college at 
Dayton, Ohio. After graduating he became bookkeeper for Attorney Lutty 
and Squire Milligan. At twenty-one he entered the service of the Singer- 
Nimick Steel Company, and remained there as bookkeeper until his death. He 
married Rose Hannen, and their children were: Norbert R., Laura Olivia, 
Caroline Grace and Mary Joseph. 2. John Lawrence, died at thirty-nine, 
unmarried, was employed in a glass factory. 3. Rosa Martha, born April 21, 
1867, was educated in parochial schools and in music, and taught music many 
years. She is the wife of Frank F. Walker and the mother of four children, 
Marcella Marie (deceased), Martha Margaret, Frances Cecilia and Clara 
Victoria. 4. Michael Alphonse, born 1869, was educated in parochial schools 
and is a prominent merchant on the South Side. He married Caroline Burk- 
hart, and they have had three children: Florentine (deceased), Catharine and 
Michael. 5. Robert M., born 1871. attended parochial and public schools and 
graduated from commercial college. Fie is now head bookkeeper for the 
Independent Brewing Company, Homestead. 6. Margaret, born 1873, <^'f<^ 
1903- ^ " ■ . 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 281 



Mr. Moll died in 1875, at the comparatively early age of forty-one. He 
was a man admirable in all the relations of life, and was deeply and sincerely 
mourned by all to whom he was known. He is buried in the cemetery of St. 
Michael's church, of which he was a member when living on the South Side. 

Jklrs. Moll is a daughter of Frank Hogl, who was born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, and became a brewer. About 1852 he came to the United States, 
embarking at Havre, France, on the sailing vessel "Hurlbut," the second 
■largest vessel then afloat, and landing in New York after a voyage of seven 
weeks. He settled in Pittsburg and was first employed in Bireline's brewery, 
afterward working in the Benitz brewery, of which the Iron City Brewery is 
an outgrowth. In i860 he established a brewery at the head of Eighteenth 
street. South Side, on the Brownsville road. 

Frank Hogl married Francesca Huber, and their children were: i. John, 
born in 1827, died in 1897, in Greensburg, where he was a prominent brewer. 
He married Anna Neumeyer. 2. Crezentia, born in 1830, died in 1-893, ™ 
Butler county, wife of George Fisher, one of the first brick manufacturers on 
the South Side. 3. Frances, born in 1833, wife of Caspar Riddle, of Wheeling, 
West \irginia. 4. Michael, born in 1834, died on the South Side, aged sixty- 
two, married Rosina Flick. 5. Joseph, farmer in Minnesota, married Mary- 
Thicken. 6. Caroline, born April 7, 1838, in Bavaria, was fourteen years old 
when the family came to the L'nited States. She became the wife of Robert 
Moll.' 7. Frank, deceased. The death of Mr. Hogl, the father, occurred in 
i860. He was succeeded in business by his sons. 



JOSEPH L. W'EST, of Pittsburg, a representative of that German- 
American element which has done so much for the upbuilding of the city, was 
born July 23, 1844, in Summit township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, a son of 
Ulrich West, who was born in August, 1816, in Wurtemberg, Germany, his 
parents being natives of the same place. 

The father of Ulrich West was a blacksmith and served in the German 
army. In 1824 he emigrated to the United States, landing in New York and 
thence proceeding to Clarion county, Pennsylvania, where he bought a farm in 
what was called the "Cap" settlement. Thenceforth he turned his attention to 
agriculture, but at the same time continued to work at his trade. His death 
was the result of an injur}- inflicted by an unrtily horse. He was the father of 
the following children, all of whom were born in Germany and brought by 
himself and wife to this country : Aldinger, Ulrich and Peter, who became 
the owner of a large farm and livery stable in Clarion county, where he died. 

Ulrich West, son of the emigrant, was eight years old when his parents 
landed in New York, and he grew up on the home farm in Clarion countv. 
He acquired from his father much knowledge of the blacksmith's trade, but 
made agriculture his life-work. When a young man he went to Butler county 
and settled in Summit township, the latter years of his life being spent in 
Butler, in the same county. He served several terms as constable and street 
commissioner of this town, and in politics was a life-long Democrat. He and 
his wife were members of the Roman Catholic church. 

Ulrich West married, in Butler county, Barnhart Ena Eyth, and their 
children were: Elizabeth, wife of Wallace AlcOuiston, died in Butler countv; 



282 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Joseph L., of whom later ; John, who served eighteen months in the Seventh 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, Army of the Cumberland, married 
Mary Bond and resides in Butler ; Jacob, married Mary Collins, and died in 
1907, in Bradford, Pennsylvania; and Margaret. The mother of these children 
died about 1892, and the death of the father occurred about '1901. 

Joseph L. West, son of Ulrich and Barnhart Ena ( Eyth ) West, received a 
limited education, being able to attend school only three months annually, and 
during that time being frequently kept at home on account of the distance and 
the inclemency of the weather. At the age of ten he left school and worked 
on his father's farm until the outbreak of the Civil war. On August 23, 1861, 
he enlisted at Butler as a private in Company I, Seventh Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Cavalry, Captain C. C. Davis and Colonel George E. Winecoop 
commanding. Plis enlistment was for three years or during the war, and he 
served in Wilson's Second Cavalry Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, 
fighting at Severden's Cove, East Tennessee, Perrysville, Kentucky, Stone 
River," Shelby ville Farm, Chattanooga, Reed's Bridge and throughout the 
Atlanta campaign. He also participated in the second battle of Nashville and 
in the engagement at Selma, Alabama. At the latter place the regiment 
received the news of Lee's surrender, and, in connection with the Fourth 
Michigan Volunteers, captured Jefferson Davis ninety miles from Macon. It 
will thus be seen that Mr. West served throughout the conflict, having 
reenlisted in 1863 at Huntsville, Alabama, in the same company and regiment. 
During the whole period of his service he had but one furlough, and that of 
thirty days, which he spent at home. In 1864 he was made sergeant of his 
conipanv at Macon, Georgia. He had many hair-breadth escapes, lost not one 
day by sickness, and missed but one roll-call, being in all respects an exemplary 
soldier. At the close of the war he returned home and shortly after went to 
Pittsburg, where he was employed as a laborer in the Jones-Laughlin mill, 
afterward being promoted to the position of puddler, which he retained until 
three year*, ago, since which time he has been employed in the rolling mill of 
the Republic Iron Works. He has always adhered to the Republican party 
and is a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. West married, September 28, 1867, in Pittsburg, Mary, born in 
1845, at Brownsville, daughter of Charles and Susan (Trussel) Gue, and the 
following children have been born to them: Gertrude Cecilia, wife of John 
Johnsonl^ of Sheridan borough ; Mary, wife of Thomas Low, of Canonsburg, 
Pennsylvania ; Stella C, wife of George Winwood, of Mount Washington ; 
Celesta B., wife of Thomas O'Laughlin, of Pittsburg; Maggie D., wife of 
Christopher Miller, of East Liberty; Joseph J., of Pittsburg, married Agnes 
Aultman ; Hazel, married P. M. Conway, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania ; Leah 
Elizabeth, wife of John Cumpton, of Pittsburg; and three who died in child- 
hood. Mrs. Johnson, Mrs. Low, Mrs. Winwood and Mrs. Conway are all 
the mothers of families. 

The prosperity which Mr. West now enjoys is the result not only of 
ability in his calling but of life-long habits of thrift. While in the army he 
saved money, and during the two years immediately following the close of the 
war was able to lay aside enough to make it possible for him at the time of his 
marriage to purchase a home on a partial payment. Now (1907) he can, if 
he wishes, lead a retired life. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 283 

BERXHARD SCHMID. The late Bernhard Schmid, a veteran of the 
Civil war and for more than forty years a resident of Pittsburg, was born 
May 12, 1829, in Bubenbach, Baden, Germany. He received the education 
usually given to German boys in his rank of life, and grew to manhood on a 
farm. On March 28, 1851, he embarked for the United States, and on May 
12 landed in New York, a poor young man. He went to the west, where for 
a time he worked on farms for a monthly compensation of a few dollars. He 
"afterward learned bottle-blowing and followed the trade at St. Louis, Missouri. 
Finally he came to Pittsburg, settling on the South Side, and securing work 
in the Cunningham glass factory. 

On September 27, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Seventy-fourth Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, for three years, or during the war. 
Captain Carl \'eitenhemies commanded the company, which participated in 
the following battles: One in \'irginia, June 8, 1862; Freeman's Ford, Vir- 
ginia, August 22, 1862; Sulphur Springs, \'irginia, August 24, 1862; Waterloo 
Bridge, August 25, 1862: Bull Run, Virginia, August 29-30, 1862; Chancel- 
lorsville, Virginia, May 2-3, 1863; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1-2-3, 1863; 
Jones's Island, South Carolina, February g-io-ii, 1864; James Island, South 
Carolina. ^lay 22, 1864; and another engagement at the same place July 
2-3-4, 1864. During this time he had many narrow escapes from death. A 
bullet pierced the tin cup which he carried, the fact being unknown to him 
until revealed by the leaking of the cup when next filled with water. His 
brother-in-law, Gustave ShafT, was severely wounded in battle, and Mr. 
Schmid led him into the river up to his neck, until finally forced to seek the 
bank, where he had to leave him on the approach of the Confederates. After 
laying Shaflf on the bank and telling him to feign death should the enemy 
draw near Mr. Schmid made good his escape. The Confederates came and 
ShafT heard them say in passing when they perceived him, that there was 
another dead "Yank." Mr. Schmid was taken prisoner in A'irginia and was 
confined in Andersonville prison until released in exchange. His sufi^erings 
as a prisoner were very great. When captured he had eighty-five dollars in 
his clothes, forty-five of which he had sewed into the lining of his trousers. 
In September, 1864, he was discharged at Harper's Ferry, having rendered 
faithful service. His rank was that of corporal. 

After his discharge he returned home and resumed work in the glass 
factory, but his health was so greatly impaired by exposure that a phvsician 
whom he consulted warned him to seek some other employment. He was then 
living on Sarah street, the property consisting of a vacant lot and a dwelling 
in the rear. About 1871 he erected the front part of the brick building now 
owned and used for business purposes by his son William. In this building 
he opened a saloon, continuing, however, to work in the glass factory until 
his business increased to such an extent as to demand his whole time and 
attention. He built an extension in the rear and also conducted a hotel, his 
good wife rendering valuable assistance in the enterprise. In 1901 he retired 
from business. 

He belonged to Post No. 151, G. A. R., and the Veteran Legion. In 
national affairs he was a life-long Republican, but in local politics was liberal. 
He and his family were members of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Schmid married Frances Mahler, who was born in 1831, in Buben- 
bach, Baden, Germany, and came in girlhood to the United States. They were the 



284 ^ CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

parents of two sons: William and Albert, both mentioned later. There was 
also a daughter, Frances, the eldest of the family, who was born in 1867 and 
died at the age of twenty-three. The death of Mr. Schmid, which occurred 
August 23, 1905, was widely and sincerely regretted. He had endeared him- 
self to all who knew him as well by his genial social qualities as by his just 
and upright character. His widow died in January, 1907, aged si.xty-nine. 

William Schmid, son of Bernhard and Frances (Mahler) Schmid, was 
born May 3, 1870, and attended St. Peter's parochial school and the Morris 
public school. At the age of fourteen he began working in the glass factory, 
first in the bottle and then in the window department, where he remained 
until his twenty-first year. He then assisted his father in the latter's business 
until 1901, when his father retired and he and his brother Albert continued 
to conduct the saloon. In 1903 William purchased Albert's interest and has 
since carried on the business alone. 

William Schmid married, June 24, 1903, Theresa A. Burgard, and they 
are the parents of one daughter, Frances Marie, born September 3, 1904. 
Mrs. Schmid is a daughter of Leonard Burgard, who was born in Alsace- 
Lorraine and came as a young man to the United States. He is a carpenter 
by trade, but is now engaged in business in Pittsburg. He married, December 
I, 1873, in St. Michael's church. South Side, Mary Schmitt, also a native of 
Alsace-Lorraine, and their daughter, Theresa A., was born October 29, 1879, 
in Pittsburg, and became the wife of William Schmid. 

Albert Schmid, son of .Bernhard and Frances (Mahler) Schmid, was 
born in the Twenty-fifth ward of Pittsburg, February 13, 1873, at the family 
home on Sarah street, and at the age of six years became a pupil at St. Peter's 
parochial school, later attending the Morris public school, which he left in 
his sixteenth year. He then found employment with the Wolfe-Lane Hard- 
ware Company, working in the capacity of errand-boy for nearly two years, 
after- which he learned the watchmaker's trade with a Mr. Weisser, of Pitts- 
burg, and L. L. Keller, of Allegheny. He then served for a time as clerk in 
his father's hotel, and afterward conducted the business for a year and nine 
months in partnership with his brother William. Since the dissolution of the 
partnership he has been engaged in business in Carson street. In politics he 
is an independent. He and his wife are members of St. Paul's Lutheran 
church. 

Albert Schmid married, February 18, 1903, Josephine, daughter of John 
and Josephine (Yellig) Seifert, of Pittsburg, and they have one daughter, 
Esther J. Mr. Schmid has been engaged in his present line of business since 
September 22, 1903. 

JOSEPH LEW, proprietor of the Hotel Lew, Pittsburg, was born 
November 15, 1859, on Carson street, in that city, a son of Philip Lew and 
grandson of John Lew, who was a native of Switzerland, and by trade a 
wagonmaker. John Lew became the father of two sons, Philip and John. 
John Lew, the father, passed his entire life in his native land. 

Philip Lew, son of John Lew, was born about 1824, in Switzerland, and 
although the family was in straitened circumstances obtained -a good common 
school education. He learned shoemaking, and about 1842 came to the United 
States, landing in New York, and going thence to Pittsburg, making a portion 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 285 



of the journey by way of the canal. He at once opened a shop on Carson 
street, where he plied his trade for many years. In 1858 he became carpenter 
for the Jones-Laughlin Company, retaining the position during the remainder 
of his life. In politics he was always a Democrat. He and his wife were 
members first of St. Michael's Roman Catholic church, and later of St. Peter's. 

Philip Lew married Louisa, born in 1826, in Germany, daughter of John 
and Louisa Bone, who. coming to the L'nited States, landed in New York, 
" and came thence to Pittsburg and settling in the Lawrenceville district, where 
they attended the old .St. Philomena Roman Catholic church. Mr. and Mrs. Lew 
were the parents of the following children : Philip, in the Jones-Laughlin 
mill, married Emma Watkins ; Mary M., wife of Jacob Wood ; Andrew, mar- 
ried Kate Miller: Margaret, wife of Jacob Sweitze ; Kitty, wife of Morgan 
McDonald, a detective of Pittsburg, and Joseph. Mr. Lew, the father, died 
in Xovember, 1880, and is buried in St. Michael's cemetery. The death of 
Mrs. Lew occurred in 1906, when she had reached the age of eighty years. 
Her grave is in St. Peter's cemetery. 

Joseph Lew, son of Philip and Louisa (Bone) Lew, received his educa- 
tion at St. John's parochial school and at the Wickersham public school. At 
the age of thirteen he left school and found employment in the mill of the 
Jones-Laughlin Company, working his way up through the different grades 
to the position of heater. In 1894 he left the mill, and in association with 
Thomas K. Davis took charge of a hotel on the corner of Twenty-seventh and 
Jane streets. In 1902 he dissolved the connection and purchased his present 
hotel on South Twenty-seventh street. Politically he is a Republican. He and 
his family are members of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Lew married, in Pittsburg, the Rev. Father Dutifner officiating, Mary 
]\Iagdalene Hirsch, born in i860, in that city, daughter of John and Mary M. 
(Lechler) Hirsch, the foi-mer now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lew are the 
parents of the following children, all of whom are at home with their parents : 
Marv Celeste, Mary Magdalene, Ellsworth J.. Lawrence J., Joseph E., Joseph, 
Raymond, Jolin Milton, \'alentine Robert and Selma. 



. GUSTAV HOHMANN, who has been for forty-seven years a resident 
of Pittsburg, and is to-day the oldest baker on the South Side and one of 
the oldest in the city, was born June 9, 1832, in Minden, Germany, son of 
Gottlieb Gottfried Hohmann, and grandson of Gottlieb Hohmann, who died 
in Germany. 

Gottlieb Gottfried Hohmann, son of Gottlieb Hohmann, was born in 
1792, in Minden, Westphalia, Germany, and all his life followed the trade of 
a baker. He was a member of the Lutheran church, and was twice married, 
having by his first wife two sons, Louis and Charles, both of whom died in 
Germany. The second wife of Mr. Hohmann was Charlotte Schultz, by 
whom he became the father of two more sons: Gustav and Edward, a baker, 
who landed in Xew York in 1858, came to Pittsburg, and for several years 
followed his trade, afterward engaging in the saloon business. He married 
Julia Kauffield. who died while on a visit to Germany with her husband, who 
has since resided in Berlin. Mr. Hohmann, the father, was seventy-two at 
the time of his death. His second wife died at sixty-two. Like her husband 
she was a member of the Lutheran church. 



286 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Gustav Hohmanii, son of Gottlieb Gottfried and Charlotte (Schultz) 
Hohmann, left school at the age of fourteen and learned the baker's trade, 
which he afterward followed for several years in Amsterdam, Holland. In 
185s he was obliged to go home and enter the Prussian army as one of the 
king's body-guard, serving three years. He was stationed in Berlin at the 
time of the marriage of the Crown Prince Frederick to the eldest daughter of 
Queen Victoria. In 1859, after his term of enlistment had expired, war broke 
out between Italy, France, Austria and Germany, and he was forced to re- 
enter the army, being discharged four months later, at the close of the conflict. 
After leaving the army he worked for a short time at his trade, and in i860 
embarked from Bremen on a sailing vessel, landing in Baltimore after a five 
weeks' trip. He came immediately to Pittsburg, where for a time he was 
employed in his brother's bakery. In 1861 he went into business for himself, 
and has since conducted one of the most successful bakeries in Pittsburg. He 
was an organizer of the Birmingham Fire Insurance Company and is now 
one of its directors. At the time of his marriage he went to housekeeping on 
Carson street, between Seventeenth and Eighteenth streets, four years later 
moving to the site of his present home, where he built a frame house, and in 
1900 erecting the brick structure which has since been his residence. He has 
also built other houses and is a somewhat extensive owner of real estate. 

In politics Mr. Hohmann is a Republican. He and his family are mem- 
bers of the German Lutheran church on Eighteenth street. He was one of the 
founders of this church, has always contributed liberally to its work and years 
ago served as one of its trustees. 

Mr. Hohmann married, January 24, 1861, the Rev. Gellert, pastor of the 
German Lutheran church, officiating, Dorothy Mankedick, and they have been 
the parents of the following children : Charlotte, wife of Bernard Fulk, of 
Knoxville, children. Otto and Clara ; Amelia, died in infancy : Emma W. ; 
Emil, died at eleven years; Theodore, died in childhood; Matilda, died at the 
age of sixteen ; Ida, died young ; Dorothy ; Adolph, died at three years old ; 
and Clara, died at the age of seven years. 

Mrs. Hohmann is a daughter of William Mankedick, who was a farmer 
in Westphalia, Germany, and alxiut 1854 came with his wife and children to 
the United States, making the voyage from Bremen to Baltimore on the ship 
"Johanna." They were nine weeks on the ocean and endured much suffering, 
the vessel being caught in icebergs and being three times in danger of sinking. 
They settled in Pittsburg, where Mr. Mankedick was employed during the 
remainder of his life in a glass factory. He married Christina Maria Ruetter, 
and their daughter, Dorothy, was born November 6, 1840, in Rohden, West- 
phalia, becoming, some years after their arrival in this country, the wife of 
Gustav Hohmann. Mr. Mankedick died at sixty-three, and his widow at the 
time of her death had attained to the advanced age of eighty-eight. 



THOMAS MALADY. The late Thomas Malady, for many years a 
worthy citizen of Pittsburg, was born in 1853, in Lancashire, England, a son 
of John Malady, who was a chemist. He brought his second wife and three 
.sons to the United States. They settled on Long Island and later came to the 
hard coal regions of eastern Pennsylvania, where John Malady was employed 
as a pit boss. He afterward removed his family to Pittsburg and settled in 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 287 



Brownstown, now the Twenty-fourth ward. There he was employed as 
puddler in the Jones-Laughhn works. 

John Malady was twice married, his second wife being Hannah Grattan, 
or Greten, who bore him three sons: John, deceased; Thomas, of whom later; 
and Robert, of Braddock. The mother of these children died while they were 
still young. The death of Mr. IMalady occurred in 1897, at the home of his 
son Thomas, who passed away five weeks before his father. 

Thomas Alalady, son of John and Hannah (Grattan or Greten) Malady, 
was a child when brought by his parents to the United States, and his educa- 
tion was received in the public schools of Pittsburg. When quite young he 
entered the Jones-Laughlin mills, and was employed there in various capacities 
to the close of his life, a fact which speaks volumes for his ability and integrity. 
He was an Independent in politics, and while a member of no church com- 
manded respect by his upright life. 

Mr. Malady married, about 1874, in the South Side, Mary Lewis, and 
made his home on the corner of Twenty-rrinth and Mary streets. Mr. and 
Mrs. Malady became the parents of two sons, William, born April 13, 1875, 
died in his third year, and John, born April 11, 1877, educated in public 
schools, and since the age of twelve employed in the grocery store presided 
over by his mother. He married Emma Maull, and they have one child, Alary. 

Air. Malady died at his home April 20, 1897, sincerely mourned by all 
to whom he was known. He was a deep thinker, an earnest seeker after 
truth, and a man of a kind and charitable disposition. 

Mrs. Malady is a daughter of William Lewis, who was born in Wales, 
where he worked as heater in the mills. About 1855 he came to the United 
States and settled in Pittsburg, where he followed the same calling. He was 
a member of the Baptist church. His death occurred in 1887, at his home on 
Mary street, when he had reached the age of sixty. Plis wife was Cecilia 
Richards, who died January i, 1907, aged eighty-four. She was the mother 
of ten children, three of whom are living, among them Mary, widow of 
Thomas Alalady, who was born December 26, 1854, in Wales, and was an 
infant when brought by her parents to the United States. She was educated 
in the public schools of the South Side, and became the wife of Thomas Mal- 
ady, as mentioned above. In 1886 she engaged in the grocery business in a 
room in her dwelling, which she moved back and about 1891 erected her present 
store and dwelling, a substantial three-story brick structure. Mrs. Alalady 
has shown herself in all respects a thoroughly capable business woman. 



BECKWITH FAMILY. This is one of those families of which the 
United States may justly be proud, as having borne their full share in the 
defense of the rights of their adopted country when necessity demanded. 

Captain Nicholas Beckwith lived in McConnellsburg, Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, in the early part of the nineteenth century, and was a man of 
prominence and influence in that section of the country. At the beginning of 
the war of 1812 he raised a company of volunteer riflemen which was made 
a part of the Fifth Battalion, Pennsylvania Militia, Major D. Nelson com- 
manding, and served vmder Brigadier-General Cook at Fort Niagara. It was 
in active service from October 12, 1812, until April 2, 1813. Captain Nicholas 
Beckwith married Sarah Scott, daughter of John Scott, of Gettysburg, Penn- 



288 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



sylvania. The children of John Scott were : Thomas, who married Rehecca 
Douglas ; Alexander, Margaret, William, married Rebecca Duffield ; Sarah, 
who married Captain Nicholas Beckwith, as previously stated ; and a daughter 
who married a Mr. Clingan. Captain Nicholas and Sarah (Scott) Beckwith 
had one 'son, James Scott. 

James Scott Beckwith, only child of Captain Nicholas and Sarah (Scott) 
Beckwith, was born in McConnellsburg, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, July 
12, iSio. He was brought up by an uncle and his aunt, Margaret Scott, and 
his education was acquired in the common schools of that period. As a young 
man he was engaged in the occupation of teaming at Conestoga, and frequently 
made the long journey between Pittsburg and Philadelphia. Later he 
embarked in the general merchandise business, and still later in the hotel 
business, at one time conducting the Rising Sun House, an historical inn at 
Bedford. He removed to Latrobe, Westmoreland county, in 1863, where he 
was employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as ticket agent for a 
period of several years, and then returned to the hotel business, with which he 
was connected until 1870, when he retired into private life. His death occurred 
at Latrobe, Pennsylvania, January 11, 1871, and he is buried in the old St. 
Clair cemetery, Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He married, 
June 9. 1840, Anna Gilchrist, a daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Snyder) 
Gilchrist, and they had the following named children: i. George N., engaged 
in the real estate business in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He married Elizabeth 
Swartzwelder, and has had children : Amelia L., deceased ; James Scott, 
married Clara Kennedy, and they have one child, George Nicholas Beckwith, 
born September 21, igo8; Marshall Stewart; and Anna M. 2. William H., 
in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, married Lida Rhoddy, 
and has one son, WiUiam. 3. Ridgely Scott, died January 26, 1889. 4. J. 
Frank, a real estate broker, unmarried. 5. Virginia, died in childhood. 6. 
Sarah Elizabeth, unmarried, resides at No. 429 South avenue, Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsvlvania. 



FRANK HOWARD ANDERSON, the well-known tobacco merchant 
of Wilkinsburg, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, April 25, 1864. His 
grandfather. William G. Anderson, and his wife, nee Sharp, were natives 
of Ohio, where William G. lived and died. The subject's grandmother, how- 
ever, removed to Pittsburg about 1840, bringing with her two children, William 
G., Jr., and Martha, who later became the wife of Joseph Askin. 

William G. Anderson, Jr., was born in 1835 and reared in Pittsburg 
and educated in the public schools. He chose the tobacco business for his 
occupation and was employed by one of the largest concerns in Pittsburg 
for a period of twenty-four years. Their place of business w^as at the 
corner of Smithfield and Sixth streets. For twelve years he was employed 
as manager. Subsequently Mr. Anderson engaged in business for himself, 
opening a tobacco and cigar store on Frankstown avenue, in East Liberty, 
which he carried on successfully for twenty years, being a leader in his line 
in that section of the city. He became one of the prominent citizens of the 
place. In Masonic circles he advanced to a high degree, and also belonged 
to the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias orders. He was a member of 
the Baptist church, in which he took an active part. In the advancement 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 289 



of the East End of Pittsburg he was always foremost and possessed of 
more than ordinary pubhc spirit. Ele died in 1887, a few years after his 
retirement from active business cares. He married Sally DeHaven. of an 
old Allegheny county family. Their children were as follows : Ella Vir- 
ginia, widow of John Woodrow, has one daughter. Grace; Harry, mar- 
ried twice, first, Nellie AlcShane, by whom he had one child, Lawrence ; 
Frank Howard (subject); Blanche Irene, deceased; Charles McClintock, 
married Josephine \\'oolslayer, and they have one daughter, Tlielma ; Mar- 
garet, widow of Harvey Shatow, whose two sons are Newton and Ralph; 
Kitty, wife of Gustavus Stitz, whose two children are Charles and Dorothy. 

Frank Howard Anderson was reared and educated in Pittsburg at the 
East End. He learned the cigarmaker's trade and worked in his father's 
extensive establishment until 1893, when he moved to Wilkinsburg and there 
embarked in the tobacco business on his own account. His first store was 
at No. 9 Wood street, and in 1895 he moved to No. 725 on the same street. 
He is today the leading tobacconist and perhaps the most popular business 
man