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A century and a half o^^ 
Pittsburg 8< her people 



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A CENTURY AND A HALF 



OF 



PITTSBURG AND 
HER PEOPLE 



GENEALOGICAL MEMOIRS OF THE LEADING FAMHJES 
OF PITTSBURG AND VICINITY, COMPILED 
UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPER- 
VISION OF 

JOHN W. JORDAN, LL.D. 

OF THE mSTORICAL SOCIRTY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ILLUSTR AT E D 



VOLUME IV 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1908 



Copyright, 1908, 

BY 
LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



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PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



GEORGE E. REYNOLDS, who holds an (.-nviablc reputation anioni,^ the 
members of the legal profession, being considered one of the ablest attorneys 
now practicing at the bar in the city of Pittsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, owes his entire success to his own unaided efforts and the ambition 
which dominated him. He is a member of an honored family of the state of 
Pennsylvania, but having had the misfortune to lose his father when he was 
but one month old he was early obliged to take an active part in the struggle for 
existence, and is in the fullest sense of the word a self-made man. 

George P. Reynolds, father of George E. Reynolds, was a resident of 
Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, and after his marriage settled upon a 
farm and was actively engaged in agriculture. He was also engaged in thresh- 
ing for the neighboring farmers, and w^as considered a wide-awake business 
man. At the time of the building of the Philadelphia & Reading railroad he 
became one of the contractors to furnish the ties necessary for the building of 
the road in that section of the country. He was in the midst of these contract- 
ing obligations when he was killed, in March, 1876. The settling of these 
unfinished contracts left his widow and children in financiallv embarrassed 
circumstances, and they were all obliged to commence the battle of life at an 
early age. George P. Reynolds married Rebecca Dreisbach, daughter of a 
farmer near Turlx)tville, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, and they had 
children: Daniel H., a hardware merchant in Milton, Pennsylvania; Elizabeth, 
married Charles Moser, a merchant of Watsontown, Pennsylvania; William N., 
a hardware merchant in Turbotville, Pennsylvania ; Augustus, retired merchant 
of the same place, and George E., the subject of this sketch. 

George E. Reynolds, fourth son and fifth and youngest child of George 
P. and Rebecca (Dreisbach) Reynolds, was born in Turbotville, Northumber- 
land county, Pennsylvania, Eebruary 28, 1876. He was but a few weeks of age 
when his father met his death, and was compelled to assist to the extent of his 
childish ability in the support of the household almost from his infancy. At 
the age of nine years he was placed with his uncle, Daniel Dreisbach, a neigh- 
boring farmer, to assist in the work of the farm, remaining with him for two 
years, during w'hich time he received as payment his board and clothes. During 
the following year he worked for a man named Christopher Koons, from whom 
he received two dollars and fifty cents per month for a part of the year, and five 
dollars per month for the remainder. He next worked one year for William 
Seaman, and while there was offered a home by I. D. Gresh, a merchant of 

iv— 1 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Milton, Pennsylvania, with whom he subsequently resided. During the first 
two years of his residence with Mr. Gresh he received his clothes and schooling 
as an equivalent for the services he rendered, and during the following years 
fifteen dollars per month during the summer months until he was graduated 
from the high school in Milton, Pennsylvania. Young Reynolds was naturally 
thrifty and a good manager, and while residing with Mr. Gresh had saved the 
sum of one hundred dollars, which seemed a munificent one to him in those 
days. Mr. Gresh advised and encouraged him greatly, and it was in compliance 
with the wishes of that gentleman that Mr. Reynolds commenced a course of 
study in Ursinas College, in Collegeville, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 
During the summer following this course in college he went to Atlantic City, 
having obtained a position there as clerk in a hotel, and in the fall of the same 
year he went to Milton, Pennsylvania, where he obtained employment as a 
traveling salesman for Bear & Company, cigar manufacturers, his compensation 
being sixty-five dollars per month and all his expenses. He was very desirous 
of completing his collegiate education, but finding that his means would not 
permit this indulgence he determined to take a more hurried and necessarily 
shorter literary course in order the sooner to be able to engage in what he 
purposed at the time should be his life work, the profession of teaching. He 
accordingly entered the State Normal School at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, and 
at the end of one year of hard work was graduated with honor at the head of 
his class. The reputation gained for thoroughness and ability during his time 
of study was of service to him in securing his appointment as principal of the 
high school at Plill's Grove, Sullivan county, Pennsylvania. He was engaged in 
educational work during the next seven years, each year witnessing a rise to 
a more important position or increased salary. While engaged in teaching 
during his second year in Derry Station, Pennsylvania, the election for the 
principalship of the school was hotly contested, and. Mr. Reynolds resigned in 
order to accept a better position. It was at this time that he decided to with- 
draw from educational work and take up the study of law. He immediately 
entered into a business arrangement with C. G. Voris, of Milton, Pennsylvania, 
who became his preceptor, and he registered as a student of law in Sunbury, 
Northumberland county, Pennsylvania. He also studied in the office of Mr. 
Voris during the evenings, on Saturdays, and during the vacation time. While 
engaged in his legal studies he continued his occupation of teaching, the money 
earned in this way furnishing the means necessary to enable him to pursue his 
studies. He was admitted to the bar in Northumberland county in September, 
1902, but continued to teach until June of the following year. He was then 
admitted to the Allegheny county bar and to the supreme and superior court of 
the United States in the western district of Pennsylvania. He opened a law 
office in the Frick building. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August i, 1903, which is 
elegantly and commodiously furnished, and in which he employs six people. 
He ranks high among the attorneys of the city, and his success has been a 
pronounced one. He is a ready, eloquent speaker, with an easy flow of lan- 
guage, and his arguments are presented in a forceful, convincing manner. 
Politically his support is given to the Republican party, but he has never sought 
political preferment. He has many friends in the social as well as the legal 
and educational circles of his city, and he is a member of Jeannette Lodge, No. 
436, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Duquesne Lodge, Masonic 
order, and the Pittsburgh Country Club. Mr. Reynolds is unmarried. 



PITTSBURG AXD UF.R PEOPLE 



FRANCE OPAWSKI, proprietor of Hotel Ross, Duqucsne, Pennsylvania, 
and a man of skill and intellect. Iieinj^ the inventor of many valnable and useful 
devices, is a native of Austria. Schleseii. born September 17. i8()4, a son of 
Carl and Caroline (Herman) L)pa\vski. 

Carl Opawski ( father ) was born in \\'af|;stat, Austria, Schlesen, about the 
year 1834. and died in 1898. ajjed sixty-four years. He was the s<:)n of France 
Opawski. who attained the remarkable aije of one hundred an<l five years, and 
who during all these years had never had a tooth extracted, which is indeed a 
remarkable fact. Carl C)pawski was a waj4:()n maker by trade, and for many 
years conducted a wagon making establishment in addition with the lumber 
business. He was successful in his undertakings, ami accjuired a com[)etence 
for his declining years. Pie married Caroline Herman, of Wagstat. .\ustria, 
Schlesen. who bore him four children: Carl, b'rance. of whoui later; Albert 
and Amiel. They had a step-sister named Marie. Mr. and Mrs. Opawski 
were members of the Roman Catholic church. 

France Opawski emigrated to the United States in the year 1882, landing 
in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania. ?klay 7, 1882. He worked in his father's shop in 
his native land, and his first employment in this country was in the wood work 
department at K. Lang's shop in Pittsburg. His next employment was in the 
shops of the Pittsburg & Fort Wayne Railroad Company, where he was em- 
ployed in the coach department for eleven years. The following four years 
and one month were spent in the employ of the Pleasant Valley Electric road, 
after which he moved to McKeesport. Pennsylvania, where he conducted a 
wagon making shop for eight years. He then purchased the Hotel Ross, at 
Duquesne, Pennsylvania, of which he is now the proprietor and which enjoys 
the patronage of many people, being in all respects first-class. In addition to 
this line of work he is the inventor of the automatic signal switch, the Spoke 
Tennant machine, an electric heater and several other articles not completed, 
from which he derives an income. ^Ir. Opawski is independent in politics, 
casting his vote for the man best qualified for ofiice. irrespective of party 
affiliation. He has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
for the past twenty-three years. 

Mr. Opawski married, June 9, 1887, Elizabeth Leofiler. born in Werten- 
berg, Oberand Heidenheimer. She came to the United States in 1880, at the 
age of thirteen years, and located in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. Twelve 
children were born of this marriage, nine of whom survive, as follows : Charles, 
Katharine, Flora, Frank. Jr., Margaret, Marie. Helen, Eleanor and Herman. 



AXDREW JOSEPH PIRHALLA. one of the leading real estate and 
insurance men of Duquesne. Pennsylvania, was born .September 2^. 1865, in 
Austria liungary, the son of George and Julia (Reisteter) Pirhalla. George 
Pirhalla was born in Austria. Hungary, where he lived all of his life and fol- 
lowed farming for his livelihood. He died in 1899. He was married to Miss 
Julia Reisteter, born in Bohemia, but was of German parentage. She died in 
1898. The issue by this marriage was nine children, as follows: i. .Andrew, 
who died at the age of nineteen years. 2. Mary L., who lives in Rome. Italy. 
3. John, who met his death on the Pennsylvania Railroad at liraddock, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Stephen, lives at Oliphant. Pennsylvania, where he follows coal 
mining. The next four children died young. 9. Andrew Joseph, the subject. 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OP 



Andrew Joseph Pirhalla attended the pubHc schools of his native country 
at Hethars, Hungary, and came to America February lo, 1886, first stopping 
at Cresson, Pennsylvania, where he visited a brother, John Pirhalla. From 
there he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he worked at the trade of a cabinet 
maker, which he mastered in the old country. He next went to Bakersville. 
Kentucky, where he secured a position as time-keeper on a new railroad then 
being constructed through that section of the south. He next went to Morgan- 
town, West Virginia, remained but a short time, and returned to Pennsyl- 
vania, locating at Port Royal, where he worked in the mines until he met with 
an accident, caused by an explosion in the mines of gas and fire-damps, when 
he was badly injured." He was confined in the Homeopathic Hospital at Pitts- 
burg for eight months as a result, and when able to be employed was given a 
position as an elevator man and clerk in the hospital, where he remained five 
years, never being absent 'a day in all that time. After this he paid his native 
country a visit to see his parents, and remained there five weeks, but having 
once seen the advantages of a free country like America he returned here, 
locating in Pittsburg, where he secured employment with Dr. Blair, at No. 
406 Penn avenue, as clerk and office man. He continued at that work for two 
years, after which he came to Duquesne and started a billiard parlor, which 
he conducted two years. He then became general agent and manager for 
Ross & Stiner, wholesalers of Duquesne. With them he remained for five 
years or up to 1900, when he purchased the lease and fixtures of the Hasiba 
Hotel, which he conducted five years. In 1905 he built the Hotel Comfort in 
Duquesne, and conducted that until 1907, when he sold his interest and opened 
a real estate office at No. 11, North First street, Duquesne, where he now does 
a successful real estate and insurance business. 

On October 28, 1894, he married Catherine Brindza, daughter of Andrew 
and Catherine Brindza, of Austria-Hungary. His wife came to America in 
1891. By this union were born five children: i. Julia Mary, born June 15, 
1897. 2' Josephine. 3. George. 4. Frank. 5. Andrew M., born April 2, 
1904. The subject and his family belong to Holy Trinity church of Duquesne. 
On Mav 20, 1906, he was elected supreme president of the Slavook Catholic 
Union of America at their convention held in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, on 
that date. 



JAMES KANE, of the blast furnace department of the Carnegie Steel 
Company at Duquesne, Pennsylvania, was born January 24, 1867, in Ren- 
frewshire, Scotland, at a place called Inkerman, named after the battle of 
Inkerman. He is the son of Edward and Margaret (Dolan) Kane. The 
father, Edward Kane, was born in March, 1841, in county Armagh, Ireland. 
He is a miner by occupation, which work he still follows, although sixty-six 
years of age. He married Margaret Dolan, daughter of John and Mary 
bolan. of county Mayo, Ireland, and to them were born thirteen children, 
as follows: i. Ann. '2. Mary. 3. James. 4. John. 5. Patrick. 6 and 7. 
Died in their infancy. 8. Teresa. 9. Eddie. 10, 11 and 12. Died in 
their infancy. 13. Thomas. The family are all of the Roman Catholic faith. 
John Dolan, the father of Mrs. Kane, was a soldier in the Crimean war, 
where he was severely wounded, and died shortly after his return home. 

James Kane, the subject of this notice, attended the St. Margaret School 



FITTSIWKC .1X1) ni-.K riiO/'Lli 



in Airdrie, Lanarkshire, and went to work in the mines before lie reaehed his 
twelfth year, continuing: at this kind of eniploNiiient until 1H93, when he came 
to America, first locating- in Turtle Creek. Allej^heny county. Pennsylvania, 
where he secured employment with the New York and Cleveland Cias and Coal 
Company. Duriiifj the ijreat labor strike in 1894 he was engaged with the 
Edgar Thomson Steel Works, of the Carnegie system, as fireman of boilers 
at the blast furnaces, where he was engaged t»iie year and the following three 
years worked as pipe titter's liel])er. serving under John L. Lewis, who at that 
time was a master-mechanic. James Kane came to l)u(|uesne in iS(;S. and has 
since that date been employed at the blast furnace department of the Duciuesnc 
works of the Carnegie Steel Company. 

Mr. Kane is a Republican in politics, and has served as school director 
of the Third ward of Duquesne Iwrough. being elected in I'ebruary. njo6. 
He is a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and belongs to the Holy 
Name Catholic church of Duquesne. Rev. Father David Shannon, jiastor. 

He was united in marriage, December 31, 1888. to Miss Mary, daughter 
of John and Margaret ( Tobin ) Norton, of liro.xborn. Scotland. Mrs. Kane 
was born in April, 1866. P,y this union were born the following children: 
I. Edward, born May 23, 1890. died August 13. 1890. 2. John, born I'eb- 
ruary 17. 1892. 3. ]Margaret. born July 21. 1894. 4. Edward- Patrick, born 
June 20, 1896. 5. Mary, born ]May 10, 1899. 6. Teresa, born August ii, 
1901. 7. Ellen, born September i, 1903. 8. James, Jr., born September 5, 
1906. 

HENRY FREDERICK CROFF, of Swissvale, foreman for the L'nited 
States Steel Company, was born July 4, 1849, "^ Hanover, Germany, a son 
•of Henry and W'ilhelmina Cropp. 

Henry Frederick Cropp came in 1868 to the United States and settled in 
Pittsburg, where for nineteen years he followed the calling of a teamster. 
He then entered the service of the Carrie T^irnace Company, now the l'nited 
States Steel Company, with whom for the long period of twenty years he has 
held the responsible position of foreman, the long duration of his service 
testifying to his efficiency and fidelity. He belongs to the Royal Arcanum and 
in the sphere of politics affiliates with the Republican party, lie is a member 
of the Presbyterian church of Swissvale. 

Mr. Cropp married. March 17, 1874, Ida Permilla Perkins, and they 
have been the parents of the following children : I'>ederick William, born 
April 16. 1876; Elizabeth, born March i, 1877, wife of Dr. Charles C. Rinard. 
of Homestead; Elmer A., born April 28. 1879: Paul X'incent. Ix^rn June 
15. 1 88 1, machinist, married. September 12. 1905. Oindarah. daughter of John 
and Eugenia Flickinger. of Braddock. Pennsylvania ; and Carrie. lx)rn Sep- 
tember 5. 1886, died March 12. 1895. aged eight years and six months. Fred- 
erick William Cropp, the eldest of the family, is paymaster for the United 
States Steel Company at Mingo Junction. He married December 19. 1900. 
Allabella. daughter of Albert F^rice. of Irwin, Pennsylvania, and they have two 
children. Frederick and Albert. Paul Vincent Cropp has one child. Elizabeth 
R.. born September 17. 1907. Elmer A. Cropj) married September 12. 1(^7. 
Ella Watkins, of Swissvale, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Cropp is a daughter of Aflam A. and Lucinda ( Paker ) Perkins, of 
\\'ebster. Westmoreland countv. Pennsvlvania. Mr. Perkins, who is bv trade 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



a miller, owns a large grist mill at Webster, which he has successfully operated 
for the last forty-two years. 



CARL WILHELM LITTLER, one of the machinists and inventors con- 
nected with the Edgar Thomson Works of the Carnegie Steel Corporation, 
is a native of Switzerland, born December ii, 1879, at Zurich. His parents 
were natives of Switzerland. The father was John Littler, born in 1858, and 
is a shoe manufacturer in Zurich. He married Amelia, daughter of George 
and Katherine Kamerer, of Switzerland, and they are the parents of three 
children: i. Carl Wilhelm, born December 11, 1879. 2. Heldwig, born 
April 16, 1884. 3. Lillie, born January 29, 1902. 

Carl Wilhelm Littler, the subject, attended the public school and the 
University of Zurich, Switzerland, graduating from that most excellent insti- 
tution as a mechanical engineer. He then came to America in 1892, and spent 
a short time with an uncle residing at Morgantown, West Virginia, before 
coming to Pittsburg. He is the inventor of a useful caliper employed by 
machinists in measuring their work; it is a combination tool and of great 
utility. At first he was employed by Brown, Bowerie & Company, of Baden, 
Switzerland, and then for the Oerlikon Machine Company of the same city. 
He was next engaged by the Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing Company, 
the National Tube Company, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and is now 
with the Edgar Thomson Company. He is the owner of several valuable 
properties in Pittsburg and Swissvale. He is a member of the Technical 
Society of Switzerland, and the German Benevolent Union, of Swissvale. In 
his political belief he is a firm supporter of the Republican party. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Reformed church at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Concerning his domestic relations it may be stated that Mr. Littler on 
October 18, 1904, married Margie Blossom, daughter of William J. and 
Nellie (Show) Britner, of Swissvale, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Littler's father is 
a prominent contractor and builder. To Mr. and Mrs. Littler were born the 
following children: i. Thelma Von, born August 7, 1905. 2. Charlotte 
Gertrude, born April 11, 1907. 

Mrs. Littler's father, William J. Britner, is a member of the Reformed 
church at Wilkinsburg, and politically is a Democrat. The children born to 
William J. and Nellie (Show) Britner are: i. Margie, born July 26, 1886, 
wife of the subject. 2. Hortense, born October 13, 1893. 3. Jack, born 
October i, 1896. 



CHARLES GEHLERT, proprietor of the Hotel Gehlert, of Duquesne, 
Pennsylvania, was born July 4, 1867, in Bavaria, Germany, where he attended 
the public schools of Aschaffenburg. He is the son of Adam and Eva (Hegg) 
Gehlert. The father was born in Aschaffenburg, Bavaria, and was the father 
of fourteen children: i. Baldasar. 2. Margaret, deceased. 3. George. 4. 
Adam, who died at his home in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 5. August, de- 
ceased. 6. Charles, of this sketch. 7. Katie. 8. Anna. The remaining 
children all died in infancy. The father, Adam Gehlert, served as a body 
guard to King Maxamillian. He died in November, 1900, his wife dying in 
1869. 



PlTTSinKC AM) lll:l< I'liOriJ: 



Charles Gchlcrt, of this notice, came to America in 1883, locating in 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he secured employment in the bar depart- 
ment of Wood's mills, and worked there constantly for fourteen years, and at 
the National Tube Works two years, and then came to Duquesne in September, 
1899, to engage in the hotel business, where he has been engaged for the last 
eight years. He was married September 9, 1888, to Mina, daughter of Carl 
Osterwase and wife, of Saxony. Germany. She came to the United States in 
1885, and made her home at McKeesport until married. By this union was 
born seven children: i. Eva, born in 1889. died in 1891, aged two years. 2. 
George A., born April 22. 189 1. 3. Katie Sadie, born Sci)tembcr 20, 1892. 4. 
Charles George, born December 23, 1894. 5. John Charles, born Decemljer 
13, 1896. 6. Harry, born November 21, 1901. 7. Maxamillian Carl, born 
November 21, 1904. 

Charles Gehlcrt is a member of the Elks' lodge, No. 75, of Duquesne, and 
of Lodge No. 1087. of the Eagles, of Duquesne. He was for three years vice- 
president of the Turners' German Beneficial Union ; belongs to St. Mary's 
Lodge ; to the St. Joseph's Catholic church, and in politics votes the Repub- 
lican ticket. 



JOHN BIESEL, a wholesaler in Duquesne, Pennsylvania, was born 
January 24, 1863, in Rhem. Prussia, where he attended the public schools 
and came to America in 1881, locating in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. After 
coming to this country he attended the Indiana State Normal School. Mr. 
Biesel has been engaged in the wholesale liquor trade at Duquesne since 1902. 
He is a member of the Duquesne lodge of Eagles, No. 1087: belongs to the 
Roman Catholic church, and votes the Democratic ticket, except in local 
offices, when he votes independent of party lines. 

He was united in marriage, May 8, 1893. to Martha Luetke. of Posen, 
Prussia. She died ]\larch 2;^, 1907, and they were the parents of three chil- 
dren: I. Seigford Joseph, born January 31, 1894. 2. Barthold Hieronimus, 
born October 6, 1895. 3. ]^Iargaret Catherine, born July 5, 1899. 

Concerning the parentage of ^Ir. Biesel it may be said that his father. 
Jacob Biesel, Sr., was born in 1829 in Germany, and followed farming and 
stock-raising. He served four years in the German army and died in 1892, 
aged sixty-three years. He married Catherine Teil, of Germany, and she was 
the mother of five children, as follows: i. John, who died in infancy. 2. 
Mathias, who died in infancy. 3. John, of whom an account has been given 
above. 4. Jacob, Jr., of Germany. 5. Annie, wife of Mr. Steffen, of (iermany. 

Mrs. Catherine (Teil) Biesel. was born October 22, 1822, and died in 
1905? aged eighty-three years. The son, Jacob Biesel, Jr., served three years 
in the German army and is still counted a soldier if called upon for service. 



ANDREW SHEPHARD, JR.. who resides at No. 2420 Woodstock 
avenue, Swissvale, Allegheny county. I'ennsylvania, has been in the employ 
of the Rankin W^ire Mill for the past seven years, and is a representative of 
the third generation of his family in this country, they tracing their ancestry 
to France. 

Joseph Shephard, grandfather of Andrew .Shephard, Jr.. was a native of 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



France, and emigrated to the United States about the year 1820. He located 
in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, where he made his home for some years, 
removing to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1843. He was a stone cutter by 
trade. He died in 1849. He and his entire family were members of the 
Catholic church. He married Mary Ann Dice, born in Alsace, Germany, and 
died March 12, 1888, and they were the parents of children: i. Joseph, who 
was in active service during the Civil war, having been confined in Libby 
prison for two weeks and in Belle Isle six months, and he now (1907) resides 
in Ohio. 2. John, who lives in retirement in Allegheny City. 3. Andrew, see 
forward. 4. Michael, a brick manufacturer of Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. 
He also was a soldier in the Civil war. 5. Katherine, who died June 20, 
1906, was the wife of Peter Dressier, a county detective for many years. 6. 
Charles, a farmer and stock raiser in Ohio. 7. Mary, who died at sea at the 
age of two and a half years. 

Andrew Shephard, third son and child of Joseph and Mary Ann (Dice) 
Shephard, was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, December 21, 1834. 
He came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, with his parents in 1843, where he 
worked in brick yards and coal mines from his earliest years. By industry, 
thrift and energy he rose step by step until he was the proprietor of a brick 
yard of his own, and amassed a considerable fortune. He and his family are 
members of the Christian church of Wilkinsburg. He is a man of very inde-' 
pendent views as far as politics are concerned, and invariably votes for 
whomever he thinks the man best fitted for the office in question, irrespective 
of party considerations. 

He married, April 29, 1862, Sarah Jane Oyler, daughter of Michael and 
Catherine (Walnut) Oyler, of Braddock, Pennsylvania, and they have had 
children: i. Mary, born March 28, 1863, died in infancy. 2. David, born 
September 19, 1864, is a member of the Woodmen of the World. 3. George, 
born December 21, 1865, married Pauline Day, of Boston, Massachusetts. 4. 
John, born February 17, 1867, served three years in the Philippines during 
the Spanish- American war. 5. Joseph, born December 21, 1870, died August 
27, 1896. He married Ada Keller, of Swissvale, and had children": Harry, 
Samuel and Joseph. 6. Michael, born September 29, 1872, died December 29, 
1902, from injuries received in the Homewood yards. 7. Andrew, Jr., see 
forward. 8. Susan, born March i, 1876. 9. Harry, died in infancy. 10. 
Peter, born May 5, 1885, is a member of the Woodmen of the World. 

Andrew Shephard, Jr., sixth son and seventh child of Andrew and Sarah 
Jane (Oyler) Shephard, was born April 29, 1873. He acquired his education 
in the public schools of North Braddock, Pennsylvania, and those of Swiss- 
vale, and later commenced his business life in the brick yard of his father, 
where he was employed for a period of eighteen years. He then accepted a 
position in the Rankin Wire Mill, in which he has now been employed for 
seven years. He is a member of. the Woodmen of the World. 

WILLIAM MONROE BENHAM, an attorney of Pittsburg, was born 
in Auburn, New York, on April 8, 1866, a son of DeWitt C. and Cynthia 
(Arne) Benham, both natives of New York state. His forefathers were early 
settlers in this continent, his ancestor, John Benham. coming to America from 
England in 1630 on the ship "Mary and John," and making his home in New 




Oi>^^^^:<-^^ yrv^^£^,zJL>^. 



PITTSBi'RC: AM) UliK I'liOl'Ll: 9 

Eng^laiul. The parents of the subject of this sketch removed fntni Xcw ^^>^k 
to Beaver county. Pennsylvania, about 1871. where the father became a coal 
operator, or^e^anizint^ and bein^ president of the Auburn Coal Company. He 
died in 1892. leavin^^: to survive him his wife and the followiui; three children, 
all of whom are still living;: 1. Rev. DeWitt M.. who was pastor of the Toint 
Breeze and Tabernacle Presbyterian churches of this city, in 1898 he received 
an uri^ent call to become the i)astor of the Central Presbyterian church of lialti- 
more. Maryland, where he is now located. 2. Mary A., wife of |. Duncan 
Dithridge. who descends from an early Pitt.sburg; family, but at the present time 
they are residing^ in Xew York city. 3. William M. 

William M. Benham. third child of DeWitt C. and Cynthia (Ariie) Ken- 
ham, received his preliminary education in the public schools of Xew Brigditon, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and was g;ra(luated from Geneva Collega-. Penn- 
sylvania, in the class of 1887. beings awarded the g^eneral excellency prize for 
tiie highest grade of the year, and having pursued the classical course the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon him. In the autumn of i88<; he 
entered the law department of Columbia University, Xew York citv. where 
he remained during the prescribed time of three years, being graduated there- 
from in June, 1892, with the degree of Bachelor'of Laws ami hindc. .At the 
commencement exercises the Committee on Awards presented him with the 
first prize of two hundred and fifty dollars for the greatest knowledge and 
highest attainments in his law studies. During his first year at Columl)ia he 
was elected president of his class, consisting of two hundred and fifty members, 
and upon the resignation of Dr. Theodore Dwight as warden of the law de- 
partment in June, 1891, he was selected by his classmates to present to Dr. 
Dwight a liandsomely embossed memorial. 

While at Columbia Mr. Benham read law in the office of Messrs. Carter, 
Hughes & Kellogg, of Xew York city, the Mr. Hughes of this firm being now 
governor of the state of Xew York. At a general term of the supreme court 
of the state of Xew York, held in the city of Xew York, he was admitted on 
December 7, 1891, to practice in the several courts of that state. Mr. Benham. 
after receiving his diploma from Columbia in June. 1892. returned to I'itts- 
burg, where he took the prescribed examination, and on September 17, 1892, 
was admitted to the Allegheny county bar. He at once commenced the prac- 
tice of law in Pittsburg, and in due time was admitted to the suj)reme and su- 
perior courts of Pennsylvania, and the United States circuit and district courts. 
He has been highly successful in his profession, and has established a large and 
remunerative practice. Mr. Benham enjoys the trial of cases, and before the 
jury is a forcible and effective speaker. 

He is unmarried. He is a member of the Ma^onic I'raternity. during 1(^)7 
being worshipful master of Fort Pitt Lodge. Xo. 634, Free and .Accepted 
Masons, and is also connected with the Pennsylvania Consistory, making him a 
thirty-second degree Mason. He is exalted ruler of Pittsburg Lodge, Xo. 11. 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, having been elected to that office for 
two successive terms, this being unusual, as the lodge during the thirty years 
of its existence has only re-elected to that office two of Mr. l>enham's prede- 
cessors. He was one of the organizers of the Colonial Republican Club of 
Pittsburg, and has been on its board of trustees since its formation. The first 
two years of the club's existence he was vice president, and then was chosen 
president, in which capacity he served during 1907. He is a member of the 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Allegheny County Bar Association, acting upon the committee on narrative 
during the years of 1896 and 1897, and is also a member of the University Club 
and the Pittsburg Board of Trade. In the year of 1901 he was supreme sena- 
tor of the Knights of the Ancient Essenic Order, the highest office in the coun- 
try. 

Politically Mr. Benham is a Republican. In the Blaine campaign of 1884 
he was corresponding secretary of the Young Men's Republican Club of Beaver 
Falls, Pennsylvania, and was president of the same organization in the Harri- 
son campaign of 1888. He has been president of his district organization, 
county committeeman, ward committeeman, city committeeman, and in the 
years of 1905 and 1906 was first vice chairman of the Republican city executive 
committee of Pittsburg. He has been a delegate to various state and county 
conventions. 



JACOB STRAUB, who is an expert blacksmith and scientific horse shoer, 
residing in the borough of Duquesne, Pennsylvania, is the son of John and 
Elizabeth (Routh) Straub. The father was born in Elzasse, Germany, where 
he served as game warden for a period of thirty-two years at one place. 
Elizabeth Routh, whom he married, was of Kosswieler, Germany, and died 
in 1905. John Straub and wife were both members of the German Lutheran 
church. Their children are: i. John, Jr. The next four children died in 
infancy. 6. Sophia. 7. Caroline. 8. Charley. 9. Emily. 10. Alice. 11. 
Louise. 12. Jacob, subject, of whom later. Of this family Alice is the wife 
of Joseph Shirley, of Duquesne. Pennsylvania ; Caroline married Cliarles Buck, 
a farmer of Davenport, Washington ; Emily was first the wife of Valentine 
Blatter, born in Hasslen, Germany, and came to America in 1898, and was 
married the same year of his arrival. They resided in Dravosburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he died, and later the widow married Louis Muller, of Strausburg, 
Germany. 

Jacob Straub (subject), the twelfth and youngest of his parents' children, 
was born July 17, 1876, in Kasswieler, Germany, and attended the public 
schools at Kosswieler. Coming to America in 1890, he first locating in 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he was employed by the National Tube 
Company for about six months, and then came to Duquesne, Allegheny county, 
where he mined coal for six months, after which he resumed work at the 
National Tube Works at Duquesne, remaining for the same period of time. 
He then had become thoroughly convinced that a man nowadays was more 
independent if he was master of a good trade, hence he apprenticed himself 
to A. Inblume, of West Grant street, Duquesne, where he learned the trade 
of a blacksmith and up-to-date horseshoer. After he served for three years 
he went with John Kerr, of Homestead, where he was employed a year, then 
went to Butler, Pennsylvania, where he conducted a shop of his own for six 
months, but sold it, and the following day went to work for Wilson Brothers, 
on Rebecca street, Allegheny City, where he remained two years, and then 
returned to Duquesne, where he was employed in the shop of Fred W. Pirl 
for one year. His next position was with Thomas Minford, of California. 
Pennsylvania, with whom he continued a year and until the breaking out of 
the Spanish-American war, when he enlisted in Company I, Fourteenth Penn- 
sylvania Regiment of Infantry, under Captain Hamilton, of Elizabeth, 



PlTTSBl'RG AM) II UK PJiOriJ: 



Pennsylvania, and served two years, bcinj^ lionorably discliar^ed at SDnier- 
ville. South Carolina. He then returned to Duquesnc, where he resumed his 
trade aj^^ain, this time eno;a^injj: with I'Ved W. I'irl, for whom he had 
previously worked. He continued there a year, then opened a shop for himself 
at Clarin.ijton. Pennsylvania, which he ran a year and S(jld mit and was em- 
ployed next with the firm of Pirl. Krunj^n-r & Company, with whom he re- 
mained a year, and then started a shop at IMum Alley, Duquesne, which he con- 
tinued for another year, and then moved to the old stand of I'Vcd W. Pirl, where 
he is at present. 

Mr. Straub married, July 31, 1901, Mary P. Snyder, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth (Heilman) Snyder, of Duquesne. They have three children: 
I. John William, horn March ii, 1902. 2. Mary f^lizabeth, lx>rn July 3. 
1904. 3. Melvin Guss, lx)rn November 16, 190^). 

Mr. Straub is a member of the Knights of Malta, the Maccabees and the 
Home Guards, and in church relations is a member of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church at Duquesne. I'oliticallv he has alwavs cast a Rei)ul)lican 
ballot. 

JAMES LAWRENCE WALSH, a prominent steel wcjrker and the 
owner of a valuable business block at the corner of West Grant and Xorth 
Second street, Duquesne, is the son of Lawrence Walsh and wife, Margaret 
(O'Dea) Walsh, of county Galway, Ireland, where the subject was born in 
1854. He attended the National School of Tullokyne, Ireland. After gaining 
his education he spent three years in his native land engaged in the grocerv 
and liquor trade. In June, 1874, he came to America, landing at Boston 
harbor, and in that neighborhood worked on a farm for one year, and in the 
following August came to Port Perry, Pennsylvania. He followed lalx)r with 
the Edgar Thomson Iron Works, then in course of construction. After 
working two years at this he with about twenty other workmen were laid off. 
and during the years of 1875 and 1877 Mr. Walsh traveled through the states 
of West Virginia and Ohio, working at odd occupations at numerous places. 
In ]VIarch, 1877, he returned to the Carnegie Steel Company, where he was 
employed constantly in various capacities for twenty-five years, with the 
single exception of a short time he was in Bellaire. ( )hio. He is at this time 
wdiat he has been for several years, a tried and trusty steel pourer or "ladle 
man." where only skilled men can fill the position. 

Politically Mr. \\'alsh is an indejK'ndent voter. lie with the family are 
members of Holy Name Catholic church, l""ather David Shannahan. pastor. 
He was married May 22. 1879, to Adelia Conley. of Brinton. Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Lawrence and Mary (Cosgrove) Conley. The ten children by 
this union were as follows: i. Margaret, deceased. 2. Lawrence, born Sep- 
tember 23, 1 88 1, a graduate of ihe Pennsylvania State College and St. 
Vincent's College : he is a civil engineer and employed with the Devoe Com- 
pany. 3. Mary, born September 30. 1883, attended the jniblic schools of 
Duquesne and Grove City College ; she is now a teacher in the schools of 
\'ersailles township, Allegheny county, Temisylvania. 4. Jane Piernadette, 
born October 23, 1885, deceased. 5. Margaret, born December 26. 1887. at- 
tended the public schools of Duquesne and graduated from the Duquesne high 
schools, and is now an instructor in the Duquesne public schools. 6. Lenora 
E., born April ii, 1890, died in infancy. 7. James, Jr., born Se|)tember 11. 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



1 89 1, now attending St. Francis College at Loretto, Pennsylvania. 8. Walter 
Michael, born September 17, 1893, attending the same school as the last 
named. 9. Thomas Francis, born January 31, 1899, died in infancy. 10, 
Bertille Antony, born September 17, 1900. 

Mr. Walsh's parents were blessed with the following six children : Mark, 
Margaret, Adelia, Jane, Hanorah and James Lawrence, the subject. 



THOMAS EDGAR VENTRESS, who holds the responsible position of 
foreman in the United States Steel Corporation at Swissvale, Pennsylvania, 
was born September 7, 1850, in Elizabeth, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, a 
son of Michael and Isabella (Garrett) Ventress. His father was born on 
"the ninth day of the ninth month of the ninth year of the nineteenth cen- 
tury" — September 9, 1809, near Whitley and Scarboro, England. He came 
to America in 1835, locating at Elizabeth, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where he followed ship building. He served as captain of the State Militia, 
but when the Civil war broke out he was too aged to enter the service of his 
country. He belonged to the West Elizabeth Presbyterian church and was 
a Democrat in political views until Lincoln's second election, when he cast a 
Republican ballot and did so ever afterwards. His death occurred in August, 
1894. He married Isabella Garrett, near Frederick, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of eight children as follows,: i. 
Anna. 2. Mary. 3. Adaline. 4. George. 5. Hannah Jane, 6. Michael, 
who died in infancy. 7. Thomas Edgar, of this notice. 8. Adelia. Anna, 
the eldest child, married James Elliott, of Elizabeth, Pennsylvania ; Mary 
married Andrew McKinley, of the same township; and Adaline, married John 
F. Blair^ of Jefferson township. 

Thomas Edgar Ventress, the seventh in order of birth in the family of 
Michael and Isabella (Garrett) Ventress, was educated in the Elizabeth public 
schools, in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and from the autumn of 1863 to 
the spring of 1866 he was employed as an errand boy by Joseph Home & 
Company, the dry goods merchant of Pittsburg fame. He was but thirteen 
years of age at the date of his leaving this mercantile establishment, and at 
once went onto the People's line of packet-boats, which ran from Pittsburg 
to Morganstown, continuing from 1866 to 1869. when he abandoned the life 
of a boatman, for a short time engaging in the feed business in Elizabeth, 
which enterprise he sold out and again sought his fortune on the river, work- 
ing on the packet boat "Elizabeth," plying between Elizabeth and Pittsburg, 
from 1869 to 1873, at the termination of which time he engaged with the 
Jones Brothers' Coal Works as weighmaster ; here he served from 1873 until 
1879. and then came to Swissvale, near Pittsburg proper, and there embarked 
in the grocery business, conducting the same until 1884, when he sold his 
store and in 1885 was employed as tax-collector's clerk in the county treas- 
urer's office of Allegheny county. After one year's service in that position 
and in 1886 he was employed in the rail mills of the Homestead Steel Works 
for a short time, but during the same year went with the United States Steel 
Corporation, where he has been constantly employed as a foreman at 
Swissvale. 

Mr. Ventress was married September 3, 1874, to Florilla Appelgate, 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (Biggere) Appelgate, of Elizabeth, where 



piTrsHiJ^L: .i\n nr.R rr.orij-. 13 

James Appclij^atc carried on ship-buiUlino. TIk- children Ixini to Thomas 
Edgar aiul Morilla ( A])pe]!;ate ) \eiUres>. three in iuiml)er, were named as 
follows: I. Adlie Charlotte, bom July 28, 1875. 2. lilizabeth. born August 
30. 1877. 3. Frank Iul.t;ar. born May 20. 1884. The last named is now with 
the Allegheny Light Company. 

Mr. \'entress is a. member of the Masonic fraternity, the I'.lue lodgt' ; 
is a member of the Swissvale I'resbyterian church, and in |)oIitics is an 
independent Republican. 



ROBERT PARK DICKSOX. (I) The first of this Dickson family to 
settle in this country was Thomas Dickson and family, who emigrated from 
the parish of Tamlet. county Tyrone. Ireland, in April. 1832. and located in 
the Webster avenue district of Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, where he became a 
coal operator. 

(II) John Dickson, son of Thomas Dickson, the emigrant, was born 
March 21, 181 1. in the parish of Tamlet, county Tyrone. Ireland. He accom- 
panied his parents to this country and attended the public schools, and after 
finishing his schooling he engaged in the coal business with his father. Tiieir 
mines were located at Oak Hill. Swissvale. Ireland Station (now Wildwood ), 
on the Allegheny X'alley Railroad. John Dickson shipi)ed the first car of coal 
ever shipped to Pittsburg over the Pennsylvania Railroad. He married. May 
23. ^^53' Mary Ann Hopkins, widow of James Iloi)kins. and the daughter of 
John and Mary (Kelly) McConnell, of. Donegal. Ireland. Mrs. McConnell 
was born in 1807 and died in 1839. in Scotland. John McConnell emigrated 
to the United States in 1866, locating at Swissvale, where he foUowed garden- 
ing for a livelihood. He died March 17, 1884. John and Mary (Kelly) 
■McConnell were the parents of five children as follows: i. Mary Ann. l)()rn 
September 29. 1828, in Lanarkshire, Scotland. 2. John McConnell, Jr., born 
November 22*, 1830, at the same place, died July 30. 1844. 3- Patrick, born 
September 22, 1832, served in the Civil war, where he was last heard of. 4. 
William, born August 4. 1834, met his death in a railroad accident in .Aus- 
tralia. 5. Katherine, born September 4, 1836. died from the effects of a fall 
in 1848 in Scotland. 

John Dickson was a large property owner in Allegheny county. In 
politics he was a Republican and in church relations was identified with the 
Swissvale Presbyterian church. He died June 4. 1880. The children born 
to John Dickson and wife were as follows: i. Margaret Carson, born I'^eb- 
ruary 28, 1854. 2. Eliza Jane, born June 13. 1855. 3. John Xcgley, born 
April 24, 1857. 4. William Wallace, born December 12, 1858. 5. Rachel 
Blair, born August 23. 1861. 6. Robert Park, Ixirn September 19. 1863, and 
of whom later. 7. W'illiam Brown, born November 6, 1865, now vice- 
president of the United States Steel Corj)oration. 8. Annie Crant. born 
August 13, 1867. 9. Catherine, born July 2T„ 1869. 10. Joseph Henderson, 
born January 25. 1871. 11. David S.. born Jime 20. 1874. 

(III) Robert Park Dickson, sixth child of John Dickson (ID and wife, 
was born September 19, 1863, at what w\as then known as Ireland Station, 
but now Wildwood, on the Allegheny X'ailey Railroad, in .Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. He attended the public .schools at Swissvale and Duff's Mer- 
cantile College. When thirteen years of age he was employed by Dr. Dwyer 



14 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



of Penn avenue, Pittsburg, as an office boy. Later he was engaged with the 
C, D. & P. Telephone Company as an operator, but in 1880 he went with the 
Edgar Thomson Steel Works as a pupit boy. In 1881 he engaged with the 
Homestead Mills, and worked continuously there as stock clerk and assistant 
superintendent of transportation until 1903, when he resigned his position 
there to engage in the newspaper business in Swissvale, with John E. Lee, 
under the firm name of Lee & Dickson; this continued from September, 1903, 
to October, 1904, when he went with the Duquesne Steel Works of the Car- 
negie Steel Company, where he is now serving in the capacity of stock 
clerk, etc. 

He was united in marriage October 27, 1886, to Miss Jennie Dunn Long- 
more, daughter of James and Isabella (Nelson) Longmore, of Allegheny 
City. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson are the parents of the following children: i. 
Robert Evans Reno, born October 2, 1887. 2. Frank Oilman, born November 

9, 1888. 3. Thomas Hopkins, born January 28, 1891. 4. James Neglie, born 
April I, 1893. 5. Isabella Ramsey, born May 3, 1895. 6. Mary McConnell, 
born March 10, 1899. 7. Henry Fulton, born September 6, 1900. 8. Charles 
Loomis, born June i, 1903. 

Mr. Dickson was elected a member of the council at Swissvale, being 
elected for the three-year term, but resigned after serving one year. He is 
a Republican in politics, but aims to vote for the best man regardless of party 
lines. He and his wife are members of the First United Presbyterian church 
of Swissvale and are highly respected citizens. 

(Ill) Eliza Jane Dickson, second child of John and Mary Ann Dickson, 
married, June 16, 1881, Charles May Loomis. Mr. Loomis was born October 

10, 1847, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and attended the Old South School. He 
is now employed in the time department of the Carnegie Steel Company's 
plant at Homestead. He is a member of the Presbyterian church at Swissvale, 
belongs to the Royal Arcanum and in politics is a supporter of the Republican 
party. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Loomis are as follows: 
I. Margerie Dickson, born March 26, 1882. 2. John Neglie, bom February 
12, 1883. died April 27, 1886. 3. Annie Grant, born November 27, 1885. 4. 
Elizabeth, born February 8, 1889. 5. Charles Lindeman, born March 14, 
1893. 6. Mary Louise, born March 7, 1895. 

Mr. Loomis' father was Luke Loomis, born January 8, 1794, at East 
Windsor, Connecticut. He was a book merchant and came to Pittsburg. 
He was first married December 10, 1818, but his wife died May 29, 1830, and 
February 1,1831, he married Louise Lee. By his first marriage was born: 
Sarah Frances, June 20, 1820, died March 4, 1822; Henry Hudson, born 
August 6, 1824, died January 10, 1827. By the second marriage were born 
the following children: i. Elizabeth, born November 11, 1831. 2. Robert 
Augustus, born January 13, 1834. 3. Samuel Thompson, born April 12, 
1836. 4. Luke, Jr., born April 17, 1838, married Ella Fowler, August 26, 
1861. 5. Sii-rteon Rosseter, born January 28, 1841, married Mary L. Alter, 
February 15, 1866. 6. Reuben Neil, born December 18, 1843. 7- Charles 
May, born October 10, 1846, married Eliza Jane Dickson, June 16, 1881. 



WILLIAM HENRY FERGUSON, department foreman at the Home- 
stead Mills of the Carnegie Steel Company, was born February 19, 1867, at 



piTTsiuiu: .1X1) ni:i< rnoriJi 



Moiiroevillc. Alletjhcny county, a son of Jolin IVrj^u^on. wlio \va> Ix.rn in 
Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 

John Ferguson attended the puhHc sehiM»ls of his district and learned the 
blacksmith's trade, which he made the occupation of his life. He serveil as a 
soldier in the Civil war. He married, in 1865. IClizaheth, dauj^diter of James 
and Mart;:aret Jordan, of I'atton township, Allegheny county, the former a 
farmer and a veteran of the Mexican war. Mr. and Airs. Fe'rj^nison were the 
parents of four children: William Henry, of whom later; Thomas lioyd ; 
Mamie, deceased; and jean, wife of l-:ili(')tt lashdollar. The death of .\lr. 
]'\TiiUSon occurred in 1S73. He and his family were members of the 
Tresbyterian church. 

William Henry I'ery;ust)n. son of John and IClizabeth (Jordan) I'"ergus(jn, 
received his education in the common schools of Patton township and in 
Jackson's school in Plumb township. In I-'ebruary, 1X87, he entered the serv- 
ice of the Carnegie Steel Company, by whom he has been employed ever 
since, his present {xxsition being that of foreman of a* department in the 
Homestead Mills. For four years he was school director of Swissvale. and 
he is now serving a three-years' term as borough councilman. He belongs to 
Braddock's Field Lodge. Xo. 510, Y. and A. M.. and in politics has always 
affiliated with the Republicans. He is a member of the Presbyterian church 
of Swissvale. 

Mr. Ferguson married, August 11, 1893. Susan, daughter of Michael and 
Xancy (Soles) Zimmerman, of Xew Texas. Allegheny county, the former a 
l)utcher and farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson have been the parents of four 
children: Richard Lee, born May 8, 1895; Elizabeth, born August 6, 1896. 
died Decemfcer 14, 1896; Nancy, born September 22. 1897; and Michael 
Zimmerman, born December 21, 1899. 

Mr. Ferguson is quite a six)rtsman, and during one of his hunting e.\i)edi- 
tions. September 26, 1907. killed an exxeedingly fine moose, of more than 
ordinary size, tlie head of which now decorates his home. The moose was 
killed on the north fork of the .southwestern part of the Miramichi river, Xew 
l,>runswick. 

OTTO HARSCH, one of the later German citizens of I'ittsburg. and 
one of the stalwart workmen in the great Westinghouse Electric Manufac- 
turing Plant at East Pittsburg, was born October 5. 1872, in Wurtemberg, 
Germany, a son of Anthony and Teresa (Stehle) Iljirsch. His father was a 
plasterer in Germany and was the father of ten children, as follows: i. 
Ilernard. 2. Waldberg. 3. Joseph. 4. Wilhelmena. 5. Agnes. (\. Karl. 
7. Alax. 8. Otto, of wdiom later. 9. Caroline. 10. Teresa. 

On June 28, 1888, Otto Harsch landed in America, at the age of fifteen 
years, and located at Pittsburg, where he worked in a barber shop on Grant 
street for two and a half years, and then joined his brother. Max, who then 
had a bakery in Sharpsburg. He remained with his brother two years, and 
was employed then with J. R. McKee, who operated a bakery business at 
Etna, where he worked one year, and then shifted to the bakery of H. R. 
Gilfus, of Pittsburg, where he remained three years. His next experience in 
this line was with I'Vanklin Wentzel of P)raddock, where he remained three 
years more. He then sought out other emj)loyment than baking, and was 
employed in the foundry of Mc\'ey & Walker at Piraddock, remaining there 



i6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



one year, when he was employed by the Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing 
Company at East Pittsburg, where he has continued for the past seven years. 

Mr. Harsch married, June 20, 1901, Miss Lena Probst, daughter of 
William and Annie (Langwetz) Probst, of Braddock. Her parents came from 
Germany in 1867 in a sailing ship and settled in Braddock, where Mr. Probst 
conducted a merchant tailoring shop. He died March 31, 1893. They were 
the parents of the following children: i. Dora. 2. Louisa. 3. Margaret. 
4. Charles. 5. Annie. 6, Anna. 7. William. 8. Mamie. The last fottr 
named died in infancy. 

To Mr. Harsch and his wife has been born one child, Lillian Emma, bom 
March 23, 1902. The parents are members of the First German Protestant 
Presbyterian church of Braddock. He belongs to the Foresters and the German 
Benevolent Union, District No. 33, of Braddock. 



FREDERICK GUSTAVUS SCHEIBLER, JR., an architect of more 
than common ability, residing at Swissvale, was born May 12, 1872, in Oak- 
land, Pittsburg, a son of William Augustus Scheibler. The father, a retired 
merchant of Pittsburg, was born in Pittsburg, and married Eleanor Amelia 
Seidel, daughter of Frederick William (Neil) Seidel, of Pittsburg, by whom 
were born four children: i. Eleanor Amelia. 2. Frederick Gustavus, Jr., of 
whom later. 3. Anna Vera. 4. William Edward, who is connected with the 
Diamond National Bank of Pittsburg. The family are members of the Pres- 
byterian church, and in politics Mr. Scheibler is a supporter of the Democratic 
party. 

Frederick G. Scheibler attended the public schools of Bellfield and the 
academic department of the high schools. He then took architecture for a 
profession and has succeeded remarkably well, and has drawn the plans and 
specifications for many important structures in western Pennsylvania. His 
office is in Wilkinsburg, in the Carl building, on the corner of Ross and Wood 
streets. 

He was united in marriage, June 29, 1898, to Miss Antonie Oehmler, 
daughter of Rudolph and Eliza (Foerster) Oehmler, of Craig street, Pitts- 
burg. They are the parents of two children: .1. Harold Edward, born April 
17, 1899. 2. Mildred Martha, born February 20, 1901. In politics Mr. 
Scheibler reserves the right to vote an independent ticket. He belongs to the 
Swissvale Presbyterian church and is connected with the Knights of Malta, 
the Architects' Club, the Automobile Club, the Architectural League of 
America, and is a member of the Pittsburg Board of Trade. 



EDGAR MARCELLUS BOYER, of Swissvale, chemist in the laboratory 
department of the Carnegie Steel Company at Braddock, was born October 
27, 1869, in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, a son of Emmanuel Boyer and grandson 
of Henry Boyer, wh^ was born in 1796, in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, and 
operated a saw mill in connection with farming. He married Margaret Hellen, 
also of Cambria county, and their children were: John, Henry, George, Eva, 
Hettie, Martin, Barney, Joseph, Mary, Reuben, Emmanuel, of whom later ; 
and two others who died in infancy unnamed. Martin and Barney served 
during the Civil war. Henry Boyer, the father, died February 25, 1878. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



Emmanuel Boyer, son of Henry and Margaret (Ilcllen) Beyer, was born 
near Johnstown, and attemled the neighboring country schools. For several 
years he was employed at the rolls by the Cambria Steel Company, and in 
1880 came to Braddock, where he accepted a similar iK)sition at the Edgar 
Thomson Steel Works. He is now in the service of the Union Switch & 
Signal Company at Swissvale. He belongs to the Junior Order of I'nited 
American Mechanics and the Royal Arcanum, and in jxditics affiliates with the 
Republicans. ?le and his wife are members of the Disciple church of Johns- 
town. 

Emmanuel Boyer married, in May. 1868, Sarah Jane, daughter of John 
Roberts, whose grandfather Roberts served in the war of the Revolution. John 
Roberts lived near Johnstown and served one term as sheriff of Cambria 
county. In politics he was a Republican. He and his wife were members of 
the I'nited Brethren church. 

John Roberts married Susan Singer, and the following were their chil- 
dren : Robert, who served in the Civil war, married Jennie Riddle ; Lucinda. 
who died in infancy; Jacob, who died in March, 1900, married Sarah Drum- 
field; Oliver; Sarah Jane, wife of Emmanuel B.oyer ; Emma, wife of John 
Helbig, of Johnstown; Elizabeth, who died January 23, 1889; Augusta, wife 
of Isaac Foust, of Johnstown; Lee; and Jessie, wife of the Rev. John Gourley. 
Mrs, Roberts, the mother of the family, died in 1873, and the death of Mr. 
Roberts occurred January 23, 1906. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyer are the parents of the following children : Edgar 
Marcellus, of whom later; Minerva, born November 20, 1871 ; Percy, Imrn 
July 3, 187;^; Cameron, born February 25, 1878; George, born May 18. 1879; 
James, born October 19, 1881 ; Jessie, born October 23, 1883; and P'rancis, 
born March 26, 1885. 

Edgar Marcellus I'oyer, son of Emmanuel and Sarah Jane (Roberts) 
Boyer, received his primary education in the Fourth ward school of liis native 
city, and in the autumn of 1880. being then eleven years old, was brought by 
his parents to Swissvale. He attended the public schools of that borough, 
and afterward completed his education by taking a course in the Scranton 
Correspondence School. He is now, as has been stated, employed in the 
laboratory department of the Carnegie Steel Company at Braddock. having 
made chemistry his profession. 

He belongs to the Junior Order of United American Mechanics and the 
I. O. G. T. of Braddock. His political allegiance is given to the Republican 
party. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Swissvale. 



THOMAS DAXTSOX TURXER. deceased, for a (|uarter of a century 
the leading funeral director of Wilkinsburg, was born in that lK)rough June 21, 
185 1, on the corner of Penn avenue and Center street, and lived in that house 
until his death, which occurred January 25, 1905. His grandfather. .Adam 
Turner, who died in 181 5. was one of the pioneers in the vicinity of Wilkins- 
burg. He married May Quigley, and they had three children : Hugh : Rebecca, 
wife of Thomas Davison, of East End; and another son, William, unmarried. 

Hugh Turner, born in 1809, eldest of the family of .Adam Turner, was a 
resident all his life of Wilkinsburg. He married Catherine Dufif, and they had 
the following children : i. Rev. James, who married Rebecca Murdock, and the 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



issue b}' that union was : Genevieve, a practicing physician ; Minnie, Howard, 
Laura, George and Harry. 2. Mary, unmarried. 3. WilHam, married Mary 
Swank, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, by whom the issue was : George Quigley, 
Genevieve, WilHam, Howard and Catherine. 4. Isabel, unmarried. 5. Hugh, 
a soldier in the Civil war, who died shortly after that conflict. 6. John, who 
married Martha Duff, and had children: Charles, Kate, Liberty (deceased), 
Hugh, Martha (deceased), Alice and Alma (deceased). 7. George, died in 
infancy. 8. Thomas D. (subject), who married Eliza Beatty, daughter of 
Richard and Eliza (Wilson) Beatty. Their children are as follows: Mary E., 
Laura B. and Thomas D., Jr. Mary and Isabel still live in the old homestead. 

Thomas Davison Turner, born, reared and died on the same lot in the 
borough of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, was educated in the public schools of 
his native place and early in life engaged in the grocery business, continuing 
until 1880, wdien he embarked in the undertaking business. He was one of 
the best known funeral directors in Western Pennsylvania, his place of busi- 
ness being at Nos. 720 and 722 Penn avenue, Wilkinsburg. His whole life was 
identified with Wilkinsburg, where, in 1877, he erected for himself and family 
the fine mansion at 1015 Center avenue in which his widow now resides. From 
its organization he was connected with the First United Presbyterian church, 
of which Dr. M. M. Patterson was pastor. From the beginning he was a mem- 
ber of the session. He was the first and with the single exception of one year 
was the only superintendent of the Sabbath-school of that church. Although 
that congregation has been exceptionally favored in the interest taken in its 
work by men of affairs in its early history, Mr. Turner was helpful and con- 
stant in his devotion and was accorded preeminence. He was in the early 
eighties a justice of the peace, which was the only public office he ever held. 
In his political views, though reared under Democratic influences, he became 
an ardent Prohibitionist. He was the first vice-president of the First National 
Bank of Wilkinsburg, and served as vice-president and director up to the time 
of his death. At the time of his death the board of directors of the bank and 
the Wilkinsburg Real Estate and Trust Company adopted the following reso- 
lutions : 

"In His wisdom God has removed from the directorate of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Wilkinsburg and of the Wilkinsburg Real Estate and Trust 
Company our beloved vice-president, Thomas Davison Turner. 

"Death for the first time has entered our boards and broken the social 
and business ties formed and cemented by years of intercourse around the di- 
rectors' table. 

"As a trusted friend, a wise counsellor and honored citizen and Christian 
gentleman our departed fellow director brought strength and stability to our 
institutions, helping to form and rear them on the confidence and good will of 
our community. 

"His chair at our council board will be vacant, but his mature wisdom and 
character have been built into the structure, in the erection of which he has 
taken such an honorable part. As a board we desire to enter this minute testi- 
fying of our appreciation of his unswerving integrity, his fidelity to the best 
interests of our institutions and the profound personal esteem in which he was 
held by each one of us." 

The high esteem in which he was held in the borough was shown by the 
closing of places of business during the hours of his funeral. He was an un- 



PITTSBURG .1X1) Ill-.R riiorLE 19 



assuniinix. rctiriiii^ s:ontk-nian. but of exceptionally allractive and confidencc- 
imposing face and manner. He was a man holding strong convictions and 
consistent behavior as a true Christian. P>y his goodness and integrity he had 
won a place in the esteem of the entire community that is given to few men to 
enjoy. His sterling uprightness and warm-heartedness endeared him to an un- 
usually wide circle of friends who deeply mourned his demise. 



THE DEXISTOX E.\^HEV. The fir.st of this family to settle in the 
vicinity of Pittsburg was Samuel Deniston, who was born in 1798, at Green- 
castle. Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and died September 13. 1856. He came 
to Pittsburg when yet a young man and married Letetia Sturgeon, daughter 
of Jeremiah and (Kuhn) Sturgeon, of Pittsburg, who owned consider- 
able property on Wood street, between Fifth and Diamond streets. They were 
the parents of eleven children, as follows: i. Jereiuiah. born March 17, 1817, 
died ]\Iay 10, 1838. 2. Mary Ann, who was tirst the wife of Hugh P>oyd and 
after his death she married Joseph Hunter, who was a minister in the Cov- 
enanters' church, and he died in 1887. They were the parents of two children. 
Letetia and Elizabeth, the latter is the wife of Alexander S. Hunter. 3. Agnes, 
who died in 1852, the wife of Jacob Goehring. and they were the parents of 
three daughters and one son. 4. Susan, was the wife of Samuel Shaimon, and 
both have been deceased many years. Their issue was three children. John, 
Mary and Samuel, Jr. 5. Robert Berlin, of wdiom later mention will be made. 
6. Elizabetn, who was the wife of Andy Goehring ; their children were : Lete- 
tia, Laura. Ella, and Andrew J. 7. James R.. born March 17. 1834. on Squirrel 
Hill, attended the Rankin and Wilkinsburg schools, and now resides on a part 
of the old homestead with his brother Ilenry. 8. Amanda, was the wife of 
Henry Washington Harbaugh, and their child was Deniston. who lives in 
Salt Lake City.' Utah. 9. Ellen, was the wife of Captain Peter Donaldson, an 
old steamboat captain. 10. Henry, born April 10, 1839. 11. Letetia, born in 
1842. 

Samuel Deniston, the father of this family, was the owner of two hundred 
and thirty acres of land where X'orth Homestead and Swissvale now stand. 
He conducted a hotel at Petersburg, now Addison. Somerset county. Penn- 
sylvania, in an early day, and had teams hauling goods from Pittsburg and 
\\'heeling. West Virginia, to Baltimore. Maryland. His eldest son, Jeremiah 
Deniston, was an elder in the P'irst Presbyterian church on Wood street, 
.Pittsburg. 

Robert Berlin Deniston, fifth child of Samuel and Letetia (Sturgeon) 
Deniston, was born in 1827 on the old farm where Swissvale now stands, and 
died August i, 1893, aged sixty-six years. He followed truck-gardening for 
his occupation. He married, March 16, 1868, Miss Laura Levina Funk, daugh- 
ter of Jacob and Mary (Myers) Funk, of Franklin. Pennsylvania. She was 
born at Franklin, Pennsylvania, October 21, 1851, and was educated in the 
public schools of Franklin. Her parents were born and reared in ILarrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and were the parents of the following thirteen children : Eliza- 
beth. Martha, August, Moses. James, Lydia, William, Laura Levina, of whom 
later; Sarah and four who died in infancy, unnamed. 

I\Ir. Robert Berlin Deniston and wife, Laura Levina (Funk) Deniston, 
were the parents of the following children: i. Levina, deceased. 2. Robert, 



20 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



deceased. 3. Harry, deceased. 4. Mary, who married James Flemming. 5. 
Jeremiah. 6. James, who died aged twenty-five years. 7. Letitia. 8. India, 
who died aged eight years. 9. Samuel. 10. John. 11. AHce. 12. Laura L. 
One of the youngest died in infancy unnamed. Of this family of sons and 
daughters, Letitia became the wife of James McNulty, of Swissvale, who died 
May 10, 1906, leaving one child, Laura May, born December 12, 1903. August 
and Moses Deniston were veterans in the Civil war. 



ROBERT McKIM, JR., a son of Alexander and Jane (McKinney) 
McKim, was born October 13, 1872, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and attended 
the public schools at Duquesne Heights, and also the schools of Swissvale, 
after which he went to work with his father in the Twin City Forge, later 
going to Rankin. At present (1907) he is employed as hammerman with the 
Union Switch & Signal Company of Swissvale. He is a member of the Knights 
of Malta of Braddock; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Pittsburg, 
and is a member of the United Presbyterian church of Braddock. Politically 
Mr. McKim is a Republican. 

He was united in marriage, September 26, 1891, to Miss Hattie Virginia 
Welsh, daughter of Alexander Welsh (a cooper by trade), and wife, Patience 
Virginia (Hammond) Welsh, of Wheeling, West Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert McKim are the parents of the foUowing children: i. Jennie, born 
August 5, 1902. 2. Patience Virginia, born May 9, 1904, died July 6, 1904. 
3. James Alexander, born February 7, 1906. 

Alexander McKim, the father of Robert McKim, was born in 1843, in 
Donegal, Ireland, of Scotch extraction, and came to America in 1859, locating 
in Pittsburg, where he worked for the Miller Forge as a hammerman. Aside 
from two years he resided in St. Louis, Missouri, he has lived continually in 
Pittsburg. He was married first to Jane McKinney, of New York City. She 
was born in Donegal, Ireland, and was the daughter of Mathew McKinney. 
Alexander McKim and Jane, his wife, were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Robert, Jr., born October 13, 1872, the subject above mentioned. 2. 
Mathew. 3. Samuel John. 4. James Henry. 5. Mary Jane. 6. Elizabeth. 

Mathew McKim is a machinist and married Sarah Paisley, daughter of 
Joseph and Lillian (McQuatters) Paisley. Joseph Paisley died March 31, 
1884. Lillian Paisley was born in Ayrshire, town of Kilwining, Scotland; her 
father's name was Thomas M. McQuatters, and her mother's maiden name v/as 
Anna Greenshield. Mathew and Sarah (Paisley) McKim are the parents of 
two children, Alexander Paisley and Mathew. 

Samuel John McKim, third son of Alexander McKim, is a member of the 
Pittsburg bar. His brother, James Henry, is the manager of a large store at 
Union Hill, New Jersey. 

The mother, Mrs. Jane McKim, died July 30, 1886, and Alexander 
McKim, her husband, married April 16, 1889, Mrs. Lillian (McQuatters) 
Paislev, widow of Joseph Paisley. By her former marriage the issue was: i. 
Margaret, wife of Charles E. Hill, of Swissvale, and their child is named Lil- 
lias. 2. Sarah, wife of Mathew McKim, and their children are: Alexander 
Paisley and Mathew McKinney. 3. Elizabeth McQuatters. Mr. and Mrs. 
McKim are members of the United Presbyterian church of Braddock, and in 
politics he is a staunch Republican. 



PITTSHL'RG AND IIHR I'liOPLE 



FRANCIS iMACVEY CRAIG, better known as Frank Craig, of the 
firm of J. H. Van Meter & Company, ji^eneral contractors at Swissvale. Penn- 
sylvania, was born June 21. 1876. in Preston county. West N'irj^Muia. a son of 
Charles Christian and l-Ilizabeth I-'. (Castle) Crai^^ 

Charles Christian Crait^ was a farmer and auctioneer, witii a considerable 
knowledge of the law. He resides in Preston county, West X'irginia. He 
married and reared a family of thirteen children. Politically he was a Repub- 
lican, and in religious faith a Methodist Episcopal. He married Miss Elizabeth 
E. Castle, and their children were as follows : i. John William. 2. James L. 
3. Mary Alice. 4. Charles .Arnold. 5. Thomas D. 6. Sarah Florence. 7. 
Amanda Ellen. 8. Richard Edward. 9. Francis Mac\'ey, of whom further 
mention. 10. Arzansa Maud. 11. Hertha May. 12. Lulu. 13. Xora Jarnsia. 

yivs. Craig, the mother of this family, was the daughter of John Castle 
and wife, and the date of her birth was September 15, 1843. She was a native 
of Alaryland. Before the Civil war her father was a large slave owner. 
Charles Christian Craig, the subject's father, was a wagon-master in the I'nion 
army in the Civil war. 

Francis MacX'ey Craig attended the jniblic schools of Preston county. 
West Virginia, and followed farm life and teaming until he came to Pittsburg 
in 1906, when he. with his brother-in-law, John H. \'an Meter, formed a 
partnership which is known as J. H. \'an Meter & Company. Mr. Craig was 
united in marriage June 27, 1906, to Elizabeth, daughter of Peter and Cath- 
erine (Breslaham) McElwee. of Swissvale, Pennsylvania. Mr. Craig affiliates 
with the I^idependent political party and in church relations he and his wife 
are member.^ of the Roman Catholic church at Swissvale. 



RALPH WARREX HAMBLIX. of Swissvale, foreman of a department 
of the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company, was Ixirn July 6, 
1876. in Greenville. Pennsylvania, a son of Samuel Hamblin, who was lx)rn in 
fiercer county, Pennsylvania, and is a machinist, residing in Cireenville. He 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, both of Greenville, and the Methodist Episcopal church of the same 
borough. 

Samuel Hamblin married Elizabeth Kile, daughter of John Kile, a farmer 
and stock-raiser of Mercer county, and their children were : Mary Catharine, 
James Garfield, who is a merchant of Turtle Creek; Maud, wife of Dr. D. S. 
Cossitt. of Conneaut, Ohio ; and Ralph Warren, of whom later. 

Ralph Warren Hamblin, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Kile) Hamblin, 
received his education in the public schools of LTnionville, and after leaving 
school learned the machinist's trade at Greenville. In the autumn of 1897 
he came to Pittsburg and secured employment with the Westinghouse Electric 
& ^Manufacturing Company, with whom he now holds the position of head of 
a department. 

His political allegiance is given to the principles indorsed by the Repub- 
lican party. He and his wife are members of the Christian Science church of 
Pittsburg.' 

Mr. Hamblin married, August 24. 1899, Madeline, daughter of J. H. and 
Julia Elizabeth (Kutrufif) Banser, of Greenville, and they are the parents of 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



three children : WiUiam Kenneth, born July 5, 1902 ; Henry Banser, born 
January 20, 1905, and Ralph Paul, born August 14, 1907. 



JOHN C. REILLY. The late John C. Reilly, president of the Washing- 
ton National Bank of Pittsburg, and of the Freehold Real Estate Company of 
Fourth avenue, was born in 1845, i" Pittsburg, a son of Owen Reilly, then 
engaged in the grocery business in that city. 

John C. Reilly received his education in the Roman Catholic parochial 
schools of his native city, which he attended until his fifteenth year, and then 
secured employment as a messenger boy in the auction store of J. McCartney. 
He subsequently entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
remaining eight years, during which time he worked in the different depart- 
ments, thus gaining the knowledge which proved of great advantage to him in 
after years. His next venture was as partner in the livery and undertaking 
firm of O'Neill & Reilly, which some years later became Burns, O'Neill & 
Reilly. Four years later Mr. O'Neill retired, the firm then becoming Burns & 
Reilly, with headquarters in Grant street. While in the livery and undertaking 
business Mr. Reilly became interested in the traction business, and with the 
foresight which was always characteristic of him, saw the great future prom- 
ised for Pittsburg and the large population which that city was to have in a 
few years, knowing that it must spread over the unoccupied lands toward the 
eastern section and over the western portion bordering on the Ohio river. 
The firm first started a line of omnibuses, which ran from Second avenue to 
Glenwood, near the present site of the Pittsburg Gas Works, to accommodate 
the people who had begun to populate that section of the city. Later the line 
was extended to Hazelwood, and the firm also established a line of omnibuses 
to run from Pittsburg to the West End. As these districts became more settled 
the omnibuses were converted into horse car lines, which were the beginning 
of the Second avenue traction line and the old Southern Railways Company, 
better known as the West End line. In this enterprise James D. Gallery and 
the late Thomas M. Bigelow joined with Mr. Reilly, in association with whom 
they built the new horse car lines and for many years controlled them. When 
electric traction lines were introduced the Second avenue and West End lines 
were converted into electric lines, and later when traction companies in that 
city consolidated the Second avenue and West End lines were taken into the 
United Traction Company, thus assuring the fortunes of Mr. Reilly and his 
partners. The West End line proved to be one of the greatest investments in 
this city for the men who had built it up from an omnibus line to the modern 
traction road which opened a wide stretch of territory and gave the people a 
quick mode of travel to the West End and the country districts beyond. Mr. 
Reilly was made a director of the Pittsburg Railways Company, retaining the 
position to the time of his death. 

When the Washington National Bank was organized, in 1903, Mr. Reilly, 
who was one of the founders and one of the original stockholders, as well as 
one of the first directors, was elected president, and held that position until the 
close of his life. He was also president of the City Insurance Company, and a 
director in the Colonial Trust Company, being likewise connected with several 
other financial concerns a»d industrial enterprises in his native city, in which 
his whole life was passed. 



PJTTSBLRa AM) llliK I'JiOriJi 



For one term Mr. Reilly served as alderman of the Fifth ward. He 
belonged to the Duquesne and Union Clubs of Pittsburg. Bishop J. S. Regis 
Canevin, recognizing his zeal for the welfare of the Roman Catholic church, as 
a member of St. Paul's Cathedral, placed him on the building committee of the 
new edifice, and his business acumen was of great assistance in the erection ai 
the present structure. 

Mr. Reilly married in I'Y-bruary. 1872, Ursula, daughter of David O'Con- 
nor, and they became the parents of the following children, all of whom survive 
their father: luigene S., Phillip J 5., Cilbert. Joanna M.. wife of John J. Hart. 
of New York; Bertha, and Ursula. All the sons, as well as the daughters, 
Bertha and Ursula, reside in Pittsburg. 

In November, 1906, Air. Reilly was seized with cardiac trouble, and was 
unable to attend to his business afifairs. though not confined to his home. (Jn 
February i, 1906, he went to Camlen, South Carolina, to recuperate, and for 
a time seemed benefited by the change. Soon, however, he became worse, his 
death occurring March 20, 1907. His remains were taken to Pittsburg, where 
funeral services were held at St. Paul's Cathedral. Mr. Reilly is survived not 
only by his children, but by his wife. Airs. Ursula Reilly, and also bv a brttther, 
P. B. Reilly, alderman of the Fifth ward, as well as by two sisters. Misses 
Elizabeth and Theresa Reilly, of Pittsburg. He was a brother-in-law of Mrs. 
Eugene Reilly, also of that city. Air. Reilly 's death caused deep and wide- 
spread sorrow throughout the city, being mourned as that of a good man, a 
public-spirited citizen, and a benefactor to the communitv. 



EDWIX KEITH CALLAHAN, a prominent and successful business man 
of Pittsburg, who enjoys the acquaintance of a large circle of people, by whom 
he is highly esteemed for his many excellent characteristics, is a native of 
Salem. Ohio, born Alay 19, 1864. He is a son of John Callahan, who was 
a prominent shoe merchant of Salem, Ohio, a man of considerable jjrominence, 
and an active member of the Alethodist Episcopal church. His death occurred 
at the age of sixty-six years. 

Edwin K. Callahan obtained his early education in the ])ul)lic schools of 
his native town, and this was supplemented by attendance at the Iron City 
Business College. He began his business career in the express business at 
Salem, which he followed with considerable success for a number of years. 
Later he embarked in the shoe business, conducting a shoe store in Salem, 
which proved a highly remunerative enterprise. He subsequently disposed of 
this business and turned his attention to clerical work, serving in the capacitv 
of bookkeeper for a number of years in his native city. In K)oo he removed 
to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he secured empk)yment as bookkeeper in 
the office of the AIcKinney Alanufacturing Company, and later he filled a 
similar position with another corporation. Deciding to once more engage in 
business on his own account Air. Callahan on Alay i, 1907, opened a wholesale 
liquor store on Penn avenue, Pittsburg, which he is profitably conducting at 
the present time. He casts his vote for the candidates of the Republican partv, 
the principles of which he believes to be for the best form of government. He 
is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 11, 
of Pittsburg, and of the Heptasophs. 

Air. Callahan married Adelaide Tescher, of Salem, Ohio, daughter of John 



24 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Tescher, and three children were born to them. Mrs. Callahan died in January 
1900, aged thirty-two years. 



WILLIAM JACKSON GRIFFITH, founder and sole owner of the firm 
of W. J. Griffith, dealer in wholesale and retail household specialties, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, with branch stores in all the principal cities in Ohio, West Vir- 
ginia and Pennsylvania, also president of the Land Trust Company, Pittsburg, 
was born in Missouri township, Howard county, Missouri, February 2, 1869, 
a son of Fleming E. and Mary A. (Via) Griffith, and grandson of Samuel 
Griffith, a native of Virginia, a farmer by occupation, a Democrat in politics, 
and a Baptist in religion. 

Fleming E. Griffith (father) was born in Patrick county, Virginia, on a 
farm. He followed the occupation of farming until the Civil war broke out, 
when he enlisted under Stonewall Jackson in 1861, and was a captain under 
him when Jackson was killed. He was wounded twice during the war, but 
reentered the service when recovered, and was in Lee's army at its surrender 
at Gettysburg. He then returned to Virginia, was married at Stuart, Virginia, 
in 1867, to Mary A. Via, a native of Stuart county, Virginia, after which he 
went to Missouri, cleared land and built a log cabin, where all the children 
were born. He followed tobacco and stock-raising until his death in 1879. 
He was a Christian and a Democrat. His children were : William Jackson, 
born February 2, 1869, see forward. Charles L., born October 21, 1871. 
Arthur T., born March 14, 1874. 

William J. Griffith attended the county schools until ten years of age, and 
then the Salisbury public school until thirteen years of age, and afterwards was 
a graduate of the Salisbury (Missouri) Academy. At the age of ten years 
he entered a drug store, where he was employed until eighteen years of age, 
and from that to twenty-one years of age was a collector for an installment 
house at St. Louis, Missouri. He went to Rochester, New York, in 1892, and 
was manager for the American Wringer Company, serving until 1895. He 
then came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, as manager for the same company, and 
in 1898 bought out their business and now has eleven stores, as follows: 
Wheeling, West Virginia; McKeesport, Washington, Altoona, Johnstown, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; Cleveland, Lorain, Akron, Canton, Elyria, Ohio. His 
general offices are at 418 Third avenue, Pittsburg. All the stores are under 
his own personal control and ownership. He is an energetic, alert, business 
man, and aside from his large private business is actively connected with many 
financial and business institutions. He is president of the Land Trust Company 
of Pittsburg, office, 315 Fourth avenue; vice-president of the Mutual Trading 
Company of New York; and a stockholder in several Pittsburg banks and 
industries. Mr. Griffith is a member of the Duquesne Club; the Masonic 
Country Club; McKinley Lodge No. 318, Free and Accepted Masons; Alle- 
gheny Chapter No. 217, Royal Arch Masons; Mt. Moriah Council No. 2, Royal 
and Select Masters; Pittsburg Commandery No. i, Knight Templars; Syria 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; and a thirty- 
second degree Mason of Pennsylvania Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite. He is either an officer or past officer in all bodies of the Masonic 
order. Mr. Griffith is a Democrat in politics, but has held no office, pre- 
ferring to devote his time to business. 



PITTSBL-RC AXD lll-R riiOl'LLi 25 



Mr. Griffith married, in l'\'l)ruar\ , iSSS. at I luntsvilk'. .Mi»(iuri. Ollie 
B. lUirton, born October 14, i8()8. (laui;htcr <>f James M. and Annie li. 
Burton, the former of whom was a farmer and stock raiser, was in the Rebel 
army during Civil war, and served as sheriff and assessor of Randolph county, 
Missouri. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Burton were: ( )llie B., Fanny, 
Thomas J., Quantrel A., John .\.. Annie E.. IClla W. and Mary E. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. (iriffith were: iCdith May. born December 14, 
1889. a student at Washington Seminary; William J., jr.. born .September 
23. i8q7: Mildred E.. born ( )ctol)er 25. i8()(). .Mr. ( Iriffith's family are 
memliers of the rresb\tcrian church. 



THE BRADFORD FAMllA'. John J. !;radf..rd. <leceasc-d. who was 
a worthy representative of the Bradford family, members of which arc promi- 
nently identified with the history of Crafton borough and other ])arts of 
Greater Pittsburg, was a native of Belfast. Ireland, born December 25. 1830, 
and died April 4, 1883. 

He was educated in his native land, and when a youth of about fifteen 
or sixteen years of age came with his uncle, a brother of his mother, to the 
United States. John J. located in Hampton township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, where he worked among the farmers. He subsequently pur- 
chased a farm of sixty-five acres in Hampton township and erected a house, 
one of the old type, with the large fireplace built on the outside, which stood 
until 1904, when it was torn down. He brought the land up to a high state 
of cultivation, and derived therefrom a comfortable livelihood. Ten years 
prior to his death he moved to Sharpsburg, where he led a retired life, 
enjoying to the full the consciousness of years well spent. He was the owner 
of valuable property in the borough of Crafton. He was a man of strict 
integrity, of a kind and loving disposition, and his aim in life was to make 
others happy. He was a regular attendant of the Sharpsburg Presbyterian 
church and contributed liberally to its support, and also to outside charitable 
appeals. He cast his vote for the candidates of the Republican party, but 
never sought or desired public office, preferring to devote his time to his hoiue 
and family. The mother of John J. Bradford, whose maiden name was 
Price, died about the year 1883, aged eighty-one years. She was the mother 
of several other children, namely: David, a resident of Belfast. Ireland, who 
paid a visit to his brother, John J., many years ago; Mrs. Burnside, Mrs. 
Bovd and Margaret Bradford, unmarried. Tradition says that the father of 
John J. Bradford was a merchant in Belfast, and the family were of the old 
Presbyterian stock. 

John J. Bradford married, in'Chartiers township, now Crafton, September 
16, 1857, Nancy Dinsmore, born in Crafton, in the old log house, which is 
still standing, the oldest in the place, December 28, 1840, and died May 21, 
1907. She was a daughter of Henry and Margaret (Crum) Dinsmore. Mrs. 
Bradford was a devoted Christian woman and was a member of the Haw- 
thorne Avenue church of Crafton, having been identified with the Presbyterian 
church from earlv life. She was a very liberal contributor to the church, 
and, with a sister, Mrs. William Creighton, and a niece. Miss Ida McMunn. 
donated the organ to the Hawthorne Avenue church. Mr. and Mrs. John J. 
Bradford were the parents of nine children: i. Margaret, married Henrv 



26 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Sutter, a blacksmith, and they are the parents of five children: Nelson, Ethel, 
Anna/lennie and Olive. The family resides at Allison Park, Pennsylvania. 
2. John C, died unmarried, aged thirty-four; he is buried in Greenwood 
cemetery, at Sharpsburg, beside his parents; he was by occupation a steel 
melter, and was in the employ of the Carbon Steel Works. 3. Elizabeth, 
married John C. A. Stein and has three children : Clarence, John and Norman ; 
the family resides at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 4. David, died at the age 
of thirty. He was a foreman of the Marshall Foundry; married Anna Sheriff 
and had three children: Lillian, Irene and Marion; the family reside at 
Lawrenceville. 5. Jennie, wife of Joseph A. Saint. Children: Lawrence, 
James, Hazel, Lucy, Harold. 6. William Dinsmore (see forward). 7. Anna, 
died in infancy. 8. Anna, a resident of Crafton. 9. Rachel, who with her 
sister Anna resides on Creighton avenue. Crafton, having lived there since 
their removal from Pittsburg, May 3, 1896. 

William Dinsmore Bradford, son of John J. and Nancy (Dinsmore) 
Bradford, was born in the old home in Hampton township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania (as were all his brothers and sisters), October 28, 1869. He 
received his education in the public schools of the township and Sharpsburg. 
His first beginning in earning a livelihood was as an office boy in the Wilcock 
Foundry and Machine Company at Sharpsburg; his next position was that of 
threading pipe in the plant of Spang, Chalfont & Company, at Etna, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained for two years. In November, 1888, at the age 
of nineteen, he entered the employ of the Carbon Steel Works, beginning as 
stoker on the furnaces ; he was afterward promoted to helper, subsequently 
to melter, and after gaining a thorough knowledge of the various branches of 
the work was made foreman on July 10, 1894. The duties of this onerous 
position were discharged in so satisfactory a manner that in 1905 he was 
appointed superintendent of the open hearth department of this works. In 
addition to the confidence reposed in him by the company Mr. Bradford has 
the esteem and good will of the men under his supervision, to whom he is 
ever considerate and helpful. He is interested in the Pittsburgh Axle Com- 
pany at Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, one of the important industries of that 
place. Mr. Bradford has been a resident of Crafton since 1896, and his resi- 
dence, purchased at that time, is on the old Dinsmore estate, one of the fine 
locations in Crafton. He is a prominent member of the First Methodist 
Episcopal church of Crafton and a member of the official board. He is a 
member of Crafton Lodge No. 653, Free and Accepted Masons, and is a 
Republican in politics. 

Mr. Bradford married, September 19, 1893, Tillie Ida Thomas, born in 
Hampton township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 19, 1868, a 
daughter of Christopher and Jeannette (Scott) Thomas. The ceremony was 
performed by the Rev. N. M. Crow, pastor of the Presbyterian church. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Bradford are : John Christopher, born in Crafton 
April 8, 1903; Jeannette Dinsmore, born in Crafton April 23, 1906. 



HENRY GRAFF HUGUS and EDWARD REED HUGUS, two well- 
known residents of Greater Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, are among the most enter- 
prising men of that city, and have done much to further the commercial inter- 



PITTSHUKC .-L\I) lUiR riiOI'lJi 



27 



csts of the same. The name Hugus was <)ri,q;iiially lluj^o. and the family are 
kin to \ ictor Hugo, the late author. 

Paul Hugus. granilfather of the two men mentioned ahove, married Susan 
Margaret Swartz. and had children : William ; John ; Paul, see forward : Jacob; 
Henry and Daniel, twins; Maria anil Sarah. 

Paul Hugus. son of Paul and Susan (Swartz) Hugus. was lx)rn in West- 
moreland county. Pennsylvania, and at an early age came to Pittsburg for the 
jnirpose of engaging in business. He accepted a position with David Lloyd, a 
dry goods merchant, with whom he remained for a number of years. He then, 
in association with his brother William, bought out the business in which he 
had so long been employed, and they carried on successfully for forty years 
what was at that time one of the most important dry goods establishments in 
the city of i'ittsburg. Mr. Hugus finally sold out his interest to his brother 
Daniel and Paul Hacke. and established a stove manufactory under the firm 
name of Graff, Hugus & Company, the enterprise being also known as The 
Western Stove Company. During the remainder of his life Mr. Hugus was 
actively identified with this, being a typical business man of the old school. 
He held several important offices in the community, among them being that 
of head of the board of directors of the German National Bank. He married, 
May II, 1846, Pristilla Sophia Graff, and they were the parents of: Henry 
Graft", see forward; Edward Reed, see forward; John C, died at the age of 
five years; and Anna ^I., who married R. Heberton Xegley, and has chiUlren : 
Paul H. and Edward C. Jr., who married Sarah Margaret Gerst, Eebruary 1 i, 
1904, and has two daughters, Anna Priscilla, born April 23, 1905. and luigenie 
Elizabeth, born October 27, igo6. 

Henry Graff Hugus, eldest child of Paul and Priscilla Sophia (Ciraff) 
Hugus, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, April 3. 1847. His preparatory 
education was received in Oberlin, Ohio, and he then attended Oberlin Col- 
lege, afterward becoming a student at the Western University. He is also a 
graduate of Eastman's National Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. 
Shortly after the completion of his collegiate course he sought employment 
with the firm of Graff & Company, manufacturers of stoves, ranges, etc., as a 
collector. He advanced rapidly and soon had charge of the sales department. 
.\bout this time his father became a member of the firm, and the name was 
changed to that of Graft", Hugus & Company. Henry G. Hugus left this firm 
in 1881 and established a retail store in Smithfield street under his own name. 
At this time he was the sole agent for the John \"an range for Allegheny 
county. With this range was introduced the first broiler by which natural gas 
could be utilized. He carried on this business very successfully for a period of 
four years and then sold it. In the same year he and his brother Edward Reed 
commenced the manufacture of steel hollow ware, organizing the firm known 
as The Hugus Wrought Steel Hollow Ware Company, with their works at 
Chiswick. Pennsylvania. They were very successful in this undertaking and 
soon controlled the patents for the manufacture of hollow ware throughout the 
United States, they being the first to manufacture this ware in this country. 
They were afterward known as The Pittsburg Gong Works, being the first 
successful manufacturers of steel gongs in this country. The gtnigs were noth- 
ing more than the Hugus skillet, nickel plated, and mounted without the handle. 
After a time Mr. Hugus and his brother sold their interests in this enterprise 
and established a cold and dry storage business at No. 1235 Liberty street. 



28 A CENTURY AND A HALF OP 



known as The Hugus Central Storage House. Mr. Hugus sold his interest m 
this in 1895, retiring from active business at the time, and devoting nis tirt!** 
and attention to the management of his estate. He has never taken an active 
part in politics or public enterprises of any description with the exception of 
being a life member of the board of trustees of the Pittsburg Hospital, in 
which institution he takes a great interest. He is a member of the Grace 
Reformed church, with which various members of his family are connected. He 
has been a member for thirty years of Hailman Lodge, No. 321, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons ; he is also a member of the Pittsburg Country Club, Pittsburg 
Board of Trade, Gentlemen's Driving Club of Pittsburg and Allegheny, and 
the Schenley Matinee Club. Mr. Hugus is a man devoted to his family and 
home life. He is liberal minded in his opinions and entertains most original 
ideas. 

He married, December 29, 1880, Sarah Ann Harrison, daughter of James 
and Ann (Seager) Harrison, the former of Scotch-Irish descent, and the lat- 
ter of English birth. James Harrison was the largest general contractor on 
this side of the Allegheny mountains. He built the Allegheny arsenal wall, 
the Kittaning jail and courthouse and had contracts for many of the court- 
houses of the state. Among other contracts was the construction of the old 
Allegheny Valley Railroad. He also did a great deal of cemetery work, being 
the originator of the stone burial cases. Both he and his wife were ardent 
workers in the interests of religion, the Thirty-third Street Presbyterian church 
being organized in the library of their old home in Thirty-third street. Among 
the maternal ancestors of Mrs. Hugus were many sea captains, one of whom 
fitted out one of the first fleets for the Russian government, at which time he 
was presented with a jeweled snufif box with the Russian coat of arms by the 
emperor. Mr. and Mrs. Hugus have had children: i. James Harrison, born 
in Pittsburg, August i, 1883. His early education was acquired in the schools 
of Mercer, Pennsylvania, and in 1900 he entered the East Liberty College for a 
preparatory course ; he then attended Dufif's Mercantile College, and after a 
thorough course in this institution engaged in business for himself in the coal 
and coke brokerage line. Two years ago he established himself in the real 
estate and fire insurance business, with offices at Penn and South Negley ave- 
nues. East End, Pittsburg. He is a member of the Pittsburg Country Club and 
the Pittsburg Board of Trade. 2. Priscilla, died in infancy. 3. Mary Appleby, 
born in Pittsburg, June 2, 1890. She is a student at the Ogontz School for 
Young Ladies, at Elkins Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Edward Reed Hugus, second son and child of Paul and Priscilla Sophia 
(Graff) Hugus, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 22, 1848. He 
received his primary education in the public schools of Pittsburg, later becom- 
ing a student in a private institute in West Chester, Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and finally taking a business course at the Western University of Penn- 
sylvania. He began his business career in the factory of his father, remaining 
with him for a period of twelve years, and then went into business for himself, 
buying out the Atlas Works, a foundry and machine business, from William 
Coleman, at that time the leading spirit among the iron and steel men of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He conducted this business successfully for fifteen years, 
eventually selling out and taking up the business of real estate, with which he 
is still identified. During his connection with the machine and foundry busi- 
ness he constructed the rolling mills for some of the large steel owners, among 



PITTSBi'Ka AM) HER riiOPLh 29 



them beiiiy- such tirms as Edgar Thomson. Millvalc, and (IrafF & Bennett, tho 
latter hrni being- the j)ioneers of the iron and steel industry of I'ittshurg. Mr. 
Hugiis is a life member of the Pittsburg Country Club, the ( )akmont L'lub and 
the Pittsburg- Board of Trade. 

He married, February 11, 1890. Xancy C. Doak. daughter of William D. 
and Emily (Trovilla) Doak, and they have one daughter: Emily Trovilla, b;)rn 
in Pittsbijrg, April i, 1891. 



\\TLLL\:\I HEXRV BROOKS, a trusted employe of the I'nion Switch 
& Signal Company of Swissvale, was born July 2>^. iSr)i, in Baltiiuore. Mary- 
land, a son of John Brooks, who was born in liath. h'ngland. and about 1856 
came to the United States, settling in Philadelphia, where he worked as a 
gardener and florist. He belonged to the John B. Nicholas Lodge, I. O. O. P., 
and in politics was a staunch Democrat. He and his wife were members of 
Calvary Protestant Episcopal church. East End, Pittsburg. 

John Brooks married Elizabeth Bowen, of Swansea, Wales, and their 
children were: Alary, who died at the age of one year; William Henry, of 
whom later; John Hart; Thomas James, who died January 28, 1895; Robert; 
Edward, who died in October, 1899, aged twenty-nine; and Martha. Mrs. 
Brooks died April 22, 1883, and the death of Mr. Brooks occurred March 6, 
1886. 

William Henry Brooks, son of John and Elizabeth (Bowen) Brooks, was 
brought to Pittsburg by his parents in 1870, and attended the Deniston avenue, 
the Lincoln and the Oakland i)ublic schools. After leaving school he was 
employed for a time as a landscape gardener by Colonel John B. Guthrie, 
father of ]\Iayor Guthrie. He then learned the moulder's trade with S. Jarvis 
Adams & Company, by whom he was employed for fifteen years, during which 
time he built up an enduring reputation for faithfulness and ability. He has 
now been for seven years in the service of the Union Switch & Signal Com- 
pany of Swissvale. 

He belongs to the Junior Order of L'nited American Mechanics and the 
Knights of the Mystic Chain. Politically he is a Republican. He is a member 
of Calvary Protestant Episcopal church. 

Mr. Brooks married, June 15. 1886, Emma Coral, daughter of Daniel 
Webster and Elizabeth (Stoops) Putt, of Wellsville, Ohio, and they have been 
the parents of the following children: Alice Emeline, born May 19, 1887; 
Cora Elizabeth, born August 16, 1888, died ALirch 12, 1893; Marie Antoinette, 
born April 10, 1890, died May ii, 1893; Daniel \\'ebster, born July 30, 1891 ; 
William Henry, born May 29, 1894; Robert Marshall, born June 6, 1897; 
Allen Lee, born April 5, 1899; Charles Edwin, born February 5, 1901 ; Boyd 
Vincent, born January 6, 1905 ; and George Wells, born August 24, 1907. 



OTIS A. GILL, one of the enterprising wholesale leaf tobacco dealers of 
Pittsburg, is a native of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, born ]\Iarch 7, 1868, 
and was educated in the public schools and at Duff's College, Pittsburg. In 
1894 he engaged in tiie wholesale tobacco trade, in which he has been highly 
successful in his operations. He is an honored member of Duquesne Lodge 
No. 546 and Pittsburg chapter- in the Masonic fraternity. He married Minnie, 



30 A CEXTCRV AXD A HALF OF 

daughter of Cyrus E. and Sophia Dumm, of Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
and tliey are the parents of: Sarah, born September 21. 1894, and died Sep- 
tember 22. 1895 : Emma M.. born November 7, 1896. 

Mr. Gill's father, John A. Gill, was bom in Butler county. Pennsylvania. 
April 21, 1822, and was a farmer. He took much interest in public affairs 
and was a justice of the peace for forty-eight consecutive years in Wo\i 
Creek, Mercer county. Pennsylvania. He married Sarah E. Russell, and they 
were the parents of children as follows : Otis A, Samuel S., Hugh R.. William 
J.. Xeade G.. Xewton C. Ira H. and Harry L. The father died ^^lay 28. 1906. 

Cyrus E. Dumm, ^Irs. Gill's father, was born in Indiana count}-, Penn- 
sylvania, and was by trade a carpenter. He married Sophia Rose and had 
children — ^linnie. Sadie. ^Nlaesrie, Xellie. Alice. Wallace and Leo. 



CHARLES STROUD. The late Charles Stroud, for thirty-five years a 
respected citizen of Pittsburg, was bom in 1849. in Readi^ig. Pennsylvania, 
and received his education in the schools of his native city. After leaving 
school he entered the service of the Pittsburg, \'andalia & Cincinnati Railroad 
Company, and for twenty-five years held the position of conductor. In 1868 
he became a resident of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Stroud m.arried, in 1872. Clementine Dillon, and the following are 
their children: Charles E., born in 1874. died in 1903; Garber D., born in 
1875: William S., bom in 1877: Alfred L.. bom in 1880: John R.. of whom 
later: and Stewart, born in 1889. 

Mr. Stroud died May 21, 1903, passing away in the prime of life, to the 
sincere sorrow of his family and friends and of all who had been in any way 
associated with him. 

Mrs. Stroud is a daughter of John Dillon, who was born in 1813. in Ire- 
land, and was brought to the L'nited States as a boy. receiving his education 
in the public scliools of Boston. In 1844 he came to Pittsburg, where he was 
employed as an iron worker. He married Esther \'illa Linday and the fol- 
lowing children were bom to them: August; ;Mar\- C. ; William J., killed 
in the battle of Fredericksburg: Garber C. : Anna E., married William Carr : 
Clementine, \vidow of Charles Stroud : Hester, married J. S. Scott, Pittsburg : 
John R. : Alfred L. ; and Marilla. married E. E. Franke, Pittsburg. Mrs. 
Dillon, the mother of these children, passed away in 1893. and the death of 
Mr. Dillon occurred in 1899. 

John R. Stroud, son of Charles and Clementine (Dillon) Stroud, was 
bom in 1882. He married Xora Gaddis and their children are Barton and 
Charles ^^"ilham. 



HEX'RY GESTIEHR. who has been for nearly half a century- numbered 
among the esteemed German-American citizens of Pittsburg, was born X'o- 
vember 20, 1833, in Sanwendel, Prussia, a son of Joseph Gestiehr. who was a 
tailor and all his life followed his trade. Joseph Gestiehr was twice married, 
and by his first wife was the father of the following children: Elizabeth. 
Man,-, Barbara and Magdalena. All these are deceased with the exception of 
Magdalena, who lives in Germany. The second wife of Joseph Gestiehr was 
Elizabeth Sheerer, who bore him one son and two daughters : Henry, of 
whom later: Katrina. who died in Germany, wife of Ludwig Winterblower ; 



PITTSBLRG AXD HER PEOFUi 31 



Marijarita. living in Germany, widow of Henry llolir. The mother of these 
chiUlren died at the age of fifty-one, and the death of Joseph Ciestiehr. the 
father, occurred in his native place when he was ninety-two years old. 

Henry Gestiehr. son of Joseph and Elizabeth ( Sheorer) Gestiehr. attended 
the schools of his native place from the age of six to that of thirteen, and 
then learned glass-blowing in the factories of the same town. In 1854. Ix-ing 
then twenty-one years old. he left home and traveled somewhat extensively, 
visiting Mentz-on-Rhine and Dresden, as well as different part> of Westphalia. 
Switzerland and I'avaria. and in all these places maintaining himself by working 
at his trade. In 1863. accompanied by his wife and children, he embarked at 
Havre on a sailing vessel, landing in Xew York, whence he proceeded to 
Pittsburg. His first home >vas at Frankstown. where he lived ten years, work- 
ing as a glass-blower. In 1873 he moved to the Twenty-fifth ward and entered 
the glass factory of the D. O. Comeger Company, remaining until 1884. 
when he opened a saloon on the comer of Twenty-eighth and South streets, 
retiring in 1899. He has not since been engaged in business, and for forty 
years has resided in the neighborhood of Twenty-eighth and South streets. 

Mr. Gestiehr married (first) April 10. 1857. in Mentz-on-Rhine, Mary 
Kourt. and the following children were born to them: i. Magdalena, wife 
of Christian Classon, of Bonair. 2. Mary, widow of Joseph Duchene. 3. Au- 
gust, of Milwaukee, married (first) Emma Frederick, (second 1 Katharine, 
widow of Henry Snyder. 4. Kate, wife of Joseph Sharkey, of Pittsburg. 
5. Minnie, deceased. 6. Joseph, deceased. 7. Henry, born September 26. 
1867. in Frankstown, attended St. Peter's parochial school, married Elizabeth 
Aubele : children : William. Marie. Henr>- and Alfred. 8. Philip, deceased. 
9. Jacob, of Carrick, married ]\Iary A. McKenna. 10. Joseph, machinist, 
died unmarried in 1906. aged thirty-two. Mrs. Gestiehr. the mother of this 
family, died April 16. 1887. at the age of fifty-one. She was a loving mother 
and a devout member of St. Peter's Roman Catholic church. She is buried in 
St. Peter's cemetery. 

Mr. Gestiehr married (second). August 6. 1893. Caroline, widow of 
Robert Cunningham and daughter of Conreid Matthew, who was bom in 
Gestweiler. Germany, and was a coal miner by occupation. In 1848 he came 
to the United States and was employed in the coal mines in the vicinity of 
Pittsburg until 1865, when he opened a saloon on Carson street. He married 
Margarita Holzer, sister of Mrs. Charles Melling. of Pittsburg, and their 
daughter Caroline was born December 16. 1851. on Third avenue in that city. 
In 1876 she married Robert Cunningham, a glass-blower, who died May 22. 
1892. and she afterward became the wife of Henry Gestiehr. as stated above. 
Mr. Matthew died in January. 1876. and is still survived by his widow, who ha? 
attained to the advanced age of eighty-two. 



HUGH R. McKEL\'EY. former merchant and machinist of Pittsburg, 
was born in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania. May 18. 1846, son of Colonel Samuel and 
Anna B. (Pride) McKelvey. and grandson of Hugh and Xancy (McGowan) 
McKelvey. Hugh McKelvey (grandfather) was a brick maker by trade: his 
wife died at the age of eighty-four years. They were the parents of two 
children. Samuel and Jane. Hugh McKelvey located and owned a farm at 
Sixteenth street, Pittsburg. 



32 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Colonel Samuel McKelvey (father) was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
in 1814, and died, suddenly, March 24, 1889. He succeeded his father in 
business, was one of the founders of the steel industry in the place of his 
nativity, and was also engaged in the manufacture of pig iron in Western 
Virginia. He established the McKelvey & Blair Cast Steel and File Manufac- 
ture of Pittsburg and was largely interested in other business enterprises. 
In 1855 he possessed a tract of land consistmg of thirteen thousand acres in 
western Virginia, on which he had three blast furnaces, two in operation. 
When the Civil war broke out he abandoned his business and volunteered as 
a soldier. He was early connected with the Duquesne Greys, of which organi- 
zation he was for a time captain. Later he was commissioned and appointed 
to the commissary department, and was chief of the commissary of the Third 
Army Corps on the stafif of General Heintzelman. After the second battle of 
Bull Run he was placed in command of convalescent camp near Washington, 
D. C, where he did duty until the war was nearly over, when he was appointed 
chief of the commissary of cavalry under General Sheridan. He resigned, 
but Edwin M. Stanton', secretary of war, would not accept it. He was a 
pronounced Democrat, active in politics, took part in conventions, and was at 
one time chairman of the Democratic county committee. He served three 
years as United States marshal for the western Pennsylvania district. He 
was also president of the city council. 

Colonel McKelvey married Anna B. Pride, who died in 1889, the same 
year as her husband. Their children were: Marian Pride, Hugh R. (see 
forward) ; Samuel, Jr., who died in 1881 ; Juha ; James P.; Anna P., who died 
in 1890; David P.; Dr. William A., and William H. S. 

Hugh R. McKelvey was educated at Pittsburg up to the time he was 
about fifteen years of age, when he accompanied his father as his clerk in the 
commissary department of the United States army in front of Washington 
in 1865. After the war had ended he returned to Pittsburg, where he learned 
the machinist trade, which he followed for quite a number of years. For four 
years he was engaged with his brother Samuel in the manufacture of McKelvey 
Stomach Bitters, and later was engaged in the tobacco trade. He married, 
in 1868, Josephine, daughter of Colonel Patrick Kerr and wife. Children: 
Samuel A., born in 1872; William R., born in 1874. 



THE McKELVY FAMILY, with which the Pittsburg McKelvys are 
connected, was founded in America by James McKelvy (sometimes spelled Mc- 
Kalvey), who was born in county Down, Ireland, and with his wife Elizabeth 
emigrated to America in 1802, settling in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
At first they rented a farm, now owned and occupied by John S. McKelvy, the 
grandson. They remained on this farm but a short time when they purchased 
a place adjoining, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, which at that 
date was mostly wooded heavily, but by dint of industry known to the Penn- 
sylvania pioneer he succeeded in clearing up a good farm from out the dense 
forest, and there spent the remainder of his days, dying aged about sixty-six 
years. His wife died in 1818. They were members of the Protestant church. 
Their family consisted of the following children: i. James. 2. WilHam, 
late of Pittsburg. 3. Hugh, late of Pittsburg, and an oil merchant. 4. John, 



PITTSBL'RC .1X1) lIliR riiOI'Lli 33 



a farmer. 5. Elizal)cth, deccasecl, wlu) was the witc di John r.owors. 
6. Sarali, wife of Adam Walters. 7. Mary A., wife of Daniel .\rm.stronj;. 

(II) James McKelvv. son of the emit;rant, was about two years of atje 
when his ])arents came to this country. He remained at hduie until he was 
married, and three years later purchased the farm on which John S. McKelvey 
now resides. The first habitation on these premises was an old-fashioned Iojj: 
cabin. Through his energy and jiersistence he brought this place to a high 
state of cultivation, and was noted far and near for the excellent quality of 
stock which he there raised, including heavy draft horses, short-horned cattle 
and sheep. In 1839 ^^ built one of the best brick houses in the entire county, 
and so well was it constructed that with some repairs and remodeling it still 
serves well the purpose of a good farm house. lie also erected a spacious 
barn and made many substantial improvements. In his political belief Mr. 
McKelvy was an old line Whig and later joined the ranks of the Republican 
party which succeeded it in power. In local affairs he was ever foremost in 
his township. He was of strict integrity, and in church faith a follower of 
Methodism, and aided in the erection of the first Methodist Episcopal church 
in Wilkinsburg, where he took much interest in church work. 

In 1824 he married Rosanna Swisshelm, who was born on the old Swiss- 
helm homestead, near Swissvale Station, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
( W'onderly ) Swisshelm. Her father fought in the Revolutionary struggle; 
he had a brother in the same war, who was killed ; John then took up his arms 
and joined the ranks, remaining until the war ended. He was a native of 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, where his people resided at the time. Their 
house was one of that peculiar type known in those days, and possessed the 
numerous look-out holes as a precaution against Indian invasions. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth McKelvy lived to a ripe old age, being ninety-four years old when she 
died in 1874. It was her good pleasure to relate the interesting early-day 
stories to four generations ; she was a wonderfully kind old lady. James and 
Rosanna (Swisshelm) McKelvy were the parents of nine children: The first 
three children died young. 4. John S., spoken of hereinafter. 5. Dr. William 
H., of Pittsburg. 6. Wilbur T., of Pittsburg. 7. Martha J., wife of Henry 
Wintersmith, of Lowville. Kentucky. 8. Hon. James M., deceased, late judge 
of Stearns county. Minnesota. 9. Elizabeth, deceased, wife of John W. Hagen. 

(HI) John S. McKelvy, son of James and Rosanna (Swisshelm) Mc- 
Kelvy, was born on the homestead where he still resides. April 22, 1841. He 
was educated in the public schools, at Wilkinsburg Academy and Allegheny 
College. He always has had a liking for the freedom and real independence 
of rural and agricultural life and still maintains his home part of the year on 
the farm, hardby the sprightly borough of Wilkinsburg, in which place he 
owns a handsome residence property at Xo. iioo Wood street. He has in- 
vested much money and built several fine paying business blocks in the place. 
He is a firm believer in the public school system, and has served on the Wil- 
kinsburg school board for eighteen years and more. His -chief aim in life 
seems to have been to give each of his children a college education, which he 
has accomplished. The members of this family are much devoted to one an- 
other, and seldom does a Sabbath go by without they all meet at the old home 
and take Sunday dinner together. In political tendencies he is a Republican, 
and among other local offices held by him may be named that of borough 
councilman in Wilkinsburg. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, con- 

iv— .-! 



34 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



tributing largely of both time and means in building and afterward supporting 
the churches of the place in which he lives. He is identified with the Masonic 
order, belonging to Braddock Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. 

He was married, September i6, 1863, to Eleanor Horner, born in Wilkins- 
burg, Pennsylvania, December 6, 1840, daughter of John and Mary (Davis) 
Horner. (See sketch of James Horner.) Mr. and Mrs. McKelvy are the 
parents of seven children: i. Rose, wife of Marshall D. McWhinney, and 
their issue is Eleanor H., Clifford D. and Raymond S. ; this family reside at 
Edgewood. 2. A son who died in infancy. 3. James P., of whom later. 
4. Mary H., deceased wife of Louis A. Raisig. 5. Elizabeth H., wife of Dr. 
W. A. Sanderson, of Wilkinsburg, and their issue is Eleanor M. 6. Eleanor 
G., wife of H. W. Mcintosh, of Wilkinsburg, whose sketch appears elsewhere 
in this work. 7. John Semple, of whom later. 

(IV) James P. McKelvy, M. D., son of John S. McKelvy, a prominent 
member of the medical profession, was born December i, 1869, on the well 
known old homestead of his ancestry, near Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, and 
attended the public schools of that place and also the Pittsburg high schools 
three years, after which he took up chemistry and attended Columbia College. 
For three years he followed his profession as a chemist and was in the employ 
of Mclntire & Hemphill. Subsequently he took up medicine and graduated 
from the medical department of Columbia College in 1901. He then spent 
two years in the Roosevelt Hospital, New York city. In 1904 he opened an 
office in Pittsburg, on North Highland avenue, among the wealthy class, and 
has built up a large practice. His office apartments are among the best to be 
found in the East End. 

Dr. McKelvy was married in December, 1894, to Sarah McKinney, born 
at Bessemer, Pennsylvania, daughter of Robert and Catherine McKinney. 
The issue by this marriage is one son, William M., born May 10, 1896. 

(IV) John S. McKelvy, Jr., son of John S. McKelvy, was born on the 
old homestead near Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. He attended the common 
schools and in the autumn of 1898 entered Yale College, where he pursued a 
four-year course, graduating from that excellent institution in 1902, after 
which he took up the study of law, taking a regular course in the law depart- 
ment of the Western Pennsylvania University, from which he was duly gradu- 
ated and admitted to the bar of Allegheny county in 1906. He entered the 
law office of Langfith & Alclntosh, with which firm he still continues. Mr. 
McKelvy's home is at Wilkinsburg ; he is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. Politically he is a Republican, and in 
church relations is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Wilkinsburg. 



FREDERICK BRETCH. The late Frederick Bretch. for eighteen years 
general manager of the shops of the Pittsburg & Lake Erie Railway Com- 
pany, and during the latter years of his life a resident of Sheridan, was born 
November 12, 1850, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, a son of Lawrence and Melvina 
(Sprung) Bretch, both natives of Germany. 

Mr. Bretch was one of the first settlers of Sheridan, coming hither in 
1887 and making his home here during the remainder of his life. In the 
sphere of politics he assisted with his vote and influence the Republican party. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 35 

12912G6 

Mr. Bretch married, September 12, 1871, the Reverend Father Donahue 
officiating-, Elizabeth D. Schafer, and the following children were born to 
them: i. Lillian. 2. Gertrude A. 3. Harry L., who died, aged twenty years, 
December 31, 1896. 4. Edwin, in Pennsylvania Railroad office, married 
Edith Mays; children, Virginia and John. 5. Blanch, born in 1881 ; married, 
in 1903, John Dillon, a produce dealer of Pittsburg, and died in June, 1907. 
6. Benjamin, employed by Lake Erie Railroad Company. 7. James, born 
March 24, 1892, died in May, 1907. 8. Alma, born in 1896, deceased. 
9. Frederick, born in 1898, died July 9, 1899. 10. Walter Earl, born in 1901, 
deceased. The death of Mr. Bretch occurred September 21, 1901. He was 
an affectionate husband and father, an upright business man and in all respects 
a worthy citizen. 

Mrs. Bretch is a daughter of Benjamin Franklin Schafer, who was born 
in 1840, and resided in Allegheny county. He is a Republican and his sons 
also belong to that party. The family are members of the Presbyterian and 
Methodist Episcopal churches. 

Mr. Schafer married Elizabeth, born 1833, daughter of George Drake, 
of Pittsburg, and their children were : Sarah, wife of Andrew Young, of 
Pittsburg ; Henry, married Mary Bradley, of this city ; Susan, wife of John 
McConnell, of Pittsburg; John, died unmarried; George; and Elizabeth D., 
born August 24, i860, in West End, Pittsburg, is the widow of Frederick 
Bretch. 

PAUL S. RANDOLPH, of the firm of Randolph & McClements, and 
one of Pittsburg's most enterprising and successful business men, was born 
October 2, 1850, at McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, son of Na- 
thaniel Randolph and grandson of Ichabod Randolph, who was a native of 
Virginia, whence he migrated to Allegheny county and engaged in farming -at 
Tarentum. He served in the war of 1812, losing one leg and receiving other 
serious injuries. 

Ichabod Randolph married a Miss Legget, who bore his fourteen children, 
four sons and ten daughters. The sons were : John, Paul S., Joseph and 
Nathaniel, of whom later. Of these sons, Joseph served in the Civil war 
with the rank of captain and was severely wounded. He had three sons 
in his own company, all of whom gave their lives for their country. Ichabod 
Randolph, the father, died at an advanced age. He was a man who com- 
manded the respect of the entire community. 

Nathaniel Randolph, son of Ichabod Randolph, conducted a general 
store at Fort Perry, Pennsylvania. He married Elizabeth Kier, and the 
following children were born to them : Cornelia, widow of Leslie Beaty, 
two sons, Harold and Vernon ; Margaret, died at the ag-e of fourteen ; Paul 
S., of whom later; Ella, wife of Chester A. Robie ; children, Frederick, 
George, Elizabeth and Sarah; and Elijah N., of Pittsburg, chief clerk in the 
county comptroller's office. These children were deprived of their father 
while the latter was still a young man, his death occurring when he was about 
thirty-six years old. 

Paul S. Randolph, son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Kier) Randolph, 
received a very limited education in the public schools, and at the early age 
of eleven, having lost his father, left home and began to earn his livelihood. 
At fourteen he besran to learn the business of a florist in the establishment 



36 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

of John R. & A. Murdock, with whom he served nine years, at the end of 
that time becoming superintendent of the business of Highland & King in 
Allegheny. After holding this position three years he entered the service 
of E. H. Bachman, of Turtle Creek, by whom he was employed two years at 
the Knox fruit farm. In 1878 he embarked in business for himself, leasing 
a greenhouse on the Charles Armstrong place and having an office on Penn 
avenue. East Liberty. The enterprise prospered, and for about eight years 
he conducted a successful business. He then purchased the business of R. 
C. Patterson on Ellsworth avenue, and after conducting it ten years bought 
out his first employers, John R. & A. Murdock, on Forbes street, carrying 
on the business successfully for twelve years. He next became the owner of 
the business of Charles Seibert, from whose estate he purchased it. Mr. 
Randolph's plant, which is one of the largest in western Pennsylvania, is situ- 
ated on Stanton avenue, in the Eighteenth ward of the city. He has over 
one hundred and fifty thousand square feet of glass and is in every way 
equipping and using his plant to meet the demands of his trade. He has sev- 
eral stores in the city, his main place of business being at the corner of Baum 
and Beaty streets. He gives employment in all to eighty men and has eighteen 
wagons on the road. 

He is interested in several other enterprises, including the Crown laundry, 
and has found the buying and selling of real estate extremely profitable. He 
is a stockholder in the East End Savings & Trust Company. Bfis present 
residence, the building of which was recently completed, is on the corner of 
Stanton avenue and McKee street. In politics he is a Republican, but 
takes no active part in public affairs, his extensive business interests demand- 
ing his entire time and attention. He was brought up in the Presbyterian 
faith. Every cause having for its object the advancement of the welfare of 
the community finds in him a liberal supporter. 

Mr. Randolph married, in August, 1891, Anna, daughter of Frederick 
and Louisa (Hartman) Ortman. Mrs. Randolph was born in Pittsburg, but 
both her parents are natives of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Randolph are the 
parents of two sons : Paul S., Jr., born July 28, 1892, and Stewart N., born 
May 12, 1895. 



McMUNN FAMILY. The pioneer ancestor of this family came to this 
country at an early date, and was actively and prominently identified with the 
agricultural interests of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, settling near Turtle 
Creek, where he owned and conducted a large farm. He married and reared 
a family of five children, three sons, George, David and John, and two daugh- 
ters. 

John McMunn, son of the pioneer, was born near Turtle Creek, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 12, 1825, died at Crafton, same state, September 16, 1883. He 
received a good education for those days, and chose for his life work the occu- 
pation of farming. His boyhood was spent on the farm of his uncle, and the 
greater part of his manhood was spent in the vicinity of Crafton. Being a 
man of the strictest integrity, kind and amiable in disposition, he won and 
retained the esteem of all with whom he was brought in contact. He was a 
devout Christian, a member of the Mt. Pisgah Presbyterian church, to which 




MRS. JANE McMUNN. 




JOHN McMUNN. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 37 

he contributed liberally both of time and money. After his marriage he set- 
tled on a part of the old Dinsmore farm, and erected a house which is standing 
at the present time ( 1908). His portion of the estate consisted of about twenty 
acres, which he brought under a high state of cultivation, and it is now a part 
of Crafton Borough and contains many buildings. 

John McMunn married, J\Iarch 22, 1855, Jane Dinsmore, born December 
I, 1834, and died January 3. 1899, daughter of Henry and Margaret (Crum) 
Dinsmore. Mrs. McMunn was an earnest church worker, and contributed gen- 
erously to all appeals for the aid of the sick and suffering. She was for many 
years a member of Alt. Pisgah Presbyterian church, but after the death of her 
husband united with the Hawthorne Avenue Presbyterian church. Mr. and 
Mrs. McMunn are buried in Chartiers cemetery. Their children were: i. 
Margaret, wife of John Limbaugh, children: John, George, William, Fred, 
Charles, Mary and Irvin ; the family reside in Crafton, in the old home of John 
McMunn. 2. Nancy Elizabeth, resides at her home in Crafton, where she has 
built two fine residences. She is an active working member of the Hawthorne 
Avenue Presbyterian church. 3. Harry Dinsmore, see forward. 4. Ida S. J., 
educated in the schools of Crafton, Pittsburg, and Curry's Institute, and after- 
wards taught six years in the school of Crafton ; she has built a fine residence 
in Crafton at 66 Dinsmore avenue, where she resides. She is a member of the 
Hawthorne Avenue Presbyterian church, and takes an active interest in the 
Sunday-school work of the church, where she is a teacher. 5. Mary, died in 
infancy, as did an infant unnamed. 6. John D., born October 30, 1868, died 
October 13, 1892, buried in the family lot in Chartiers cemetery. He attended 
Duff's College, and at the time of his demise was a clerk in the office of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He was unmarried and resided at home with 
his mother. He was an earnest Christian, member of the First Presbyterian 
church of Crafton, and active in the affairs of the Sunday-school, of which he 
was treasurer. 7. David, born March 31, 1871, died November 11, 1878, buried 
in the family lot in Chartiers cemetery. 

Harry Dinsmore McMunn, eldest son of John and Jane (Dinsmore) 
McMunn, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, May 9, i860. He 
attended the public schools and completed his studies at Duff's College. At 
the age of sixteen he engaged in trucking on his own account, continuing the 
same until he attained his majority. He then learned the trade of polisher 
with the Idlewood Novelty Works, at Idlewood, Pennsylvania, and after 
serving for a period of six years relinquished the same and turned his attention 
to truck farming, which he followed with success for seven years. He then 
engaged in the business of contracting and hauling, which has proved exceed- 
ingly profitable. He has served as a street commissioner and as assessor five 
years for the borough of Crafton, having been elected on the Republican 
ticket. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, to the building of 
which edifice he was a liberal contributor. He is a member of Crafton Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Heptasophs. 

Harry D. McMunn married, October 28, 1885, Mary Blanche Brackney, 
daughter of Benjamin S. and Jane (Phillips) Brackney. Children: Margaret 
Blanche, Clarence Edward, deceased ; Harry Dinsmore, Jr., Jane D. The 
family resides at No. 12 Johnson street, Crafton, in a residence built by Mr. 
McMunn in 1893. He has other real estate interests in Crafton. 



38 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

WILLIAM C. HEINS, one of the largest property owners and real 
estate dealers in the Pittsburg suburb known as Homewood, was born in 
East Liberty, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 29, 1864, the son 
of Conrad and Margaret (Rapp) Heins. The father was a native of Ger- 
many, born February 20, 1801. He came to America in 1856, from Darm- 
stadt, Germany, and was among the pioneers to settle at East Liberty, Penn- 
sylvania. He followed farming, and later was employed by the railroad com- 
pany. He died July 2, 1874. He married Miss Margaret Rapp, born August 
7, 1825, and they were the parents of: Theodore, born September 19, 1856; 
Philip, born March 24, 1859; Margaret, born June 6, 1861 ; and the subject, 
William C. Heins, born February 29, 1864. Mrs. Conrad Heins died July 
17, 1907. 

William C. Heins received his education at the public schools of the 
Twentieth ward of the city of Pittsburg, after which he entered the employ 
of the Carnegie Steel Works and continued there for twenty-seven years. 
In 1887 he moved to Homewood, where he is now doing an extensive real 
estate business and owns many pieces of valuable property. 

Politically Mr. Heins is a supporter of the Republican party and in re- 
ligious faith is a Lutheran. He belongs to Lodge No. 11 of the order of 
Elks, and is a member of the Homewood Board of Trade. He has been 
prominent in the building and financial circles of Pittsburg and has been active 
in advancing any measure which tended to the improvement of the city ; 
notably in the building up of Homewood, where he erected one of the finest 
business blocks in that part of the city. 



WILLIAM BEGGS DESHON, prominent in the building and financial 
circles of Pittsburg, has been active in advancing any measure which tended 
to the improvement of the city. He resides at No. 7218 Race street, Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and is also closely identified with the hotel life of that 
city, associated with his father in the conduct of a hotel. 

Charles B. Deshon, father of William Beggs Deshon, was born in Calais, 
Maine, January 2, 1830. His education was acquired in the public schools, 
but he was only able to attend the winter sessions. He was, however, am- 
bitious and determined and made the most of his opportunities. He removed 
to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1858, where he established himself in the iron 
business, with which he was connected for three years, at the end of which 
time he received a government appointment. Since the close of the Civil 
war he has been identified with the hotel business and is at present proprietor 
of the Hotel Kenmawr. He married Ellen J. Beggs and has had children: 
William Beggs, of whom see forward; Charles B., born July 26, 1875; Ellen 
R., born April 29, 1871 ; Rachel; and Sarah J., born April 10, 1877. Mrs. 
Deshon died April 27, 1899. 

William Beggs Deshon, son of Charles B. and Ellen J. (Beggs) Deshon, 
was born in Chicago, Illinois, June 6, 1863. He acquired a good education 
in the public schools of that city, and the first step in his business career was 
the acceptance of a position with the Phoenix Glass Company, with whom he 
remained for some time. Later he became associated with his father in the 
hotel business, and is still associated with him in the management of the Hotel 
Kenmawr. His enterprise and progress have displayed themselves in other 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 39 



fields as well — notably in the building up of Belmar, where he erected seven- 
teen houses at a cost of one hundred and twenty thousand dollars, and the 
first business block in that section, at a cost of sixty-five thousand dollars. 
He married Seba Revolt, daughter of John and Caroline Revolt, of Piqua, 
Ohio. 

JOSEPH B. KEARNEY, the present teller in the Mellon & Son's bank- 
ing institution of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, was born in Hempfield township, 
Westmoreland county, near Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He is the son of 
Daniel Francis and Sabilla (Smith) Kearney. 

(I) John Kearney (grandfather) was born in 1818, in county Tyrone, 
Ireland. He came to America in 1840 with his wife, whom he had married 
in England. They settled near Salem, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
where they were industrious and well-to-do farmers. John Kearney died in 
August, 1901. He was a Democrat in politics and both were Catholic in 
their religious faith. Their children were : Michael, Daniel Francis, John 
Peter, James, Annie and Bridget. 

(H) Daniel Francis Kearney, the subject's father, was born May 17, 
1844, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and received his education at 
the old, well known "Huckleberry school house," in Unity township in his 
native county. He is a farmer and in politics a Democrat. He has served 
as one of the road supervisors in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, 
for a term of four years. He is a member of the Catholic church at Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

He married, October 26, 1867, Miss Sabilla, daughter of Jacob and Mary 
(Rugh) Smith, who were well-to-do farmers of Hempfield township, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
F. Carney are as follows: i. Emma. 2. John. 3. Charles. 4. Mary. 
5. Joseph B., the subject. 6. Daniel Francis, Jr. 7. Regis Canevin. 8. Lu- 
cien Doty. 

(HI) Joseph B. Kearney, fifth child of Daniel F. and Sabilla (Smith) 
Kearney, was educated at the public schools of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and 
at that most excellent institution, St. Vincent's Monastery, of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. He became the teller at the Mellon bank in Pittsburg, 
which place he still holds with much credit to himself and the management of 
this banking house, so well known in western Pennsylvania. • 

Air. Kearney is a member of the Catholic church at Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and in politics is a Democrat. 



CAPTAIN JOHN P. SUTER was born February 25, 1837, in Hagers- 
town, Maryland, and died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on Easter Sunday, April 
10, 1887. His father was Peter Suter, born in same place July 17, 1806, and 
died in Cumberland, Maryland, June 8, 1897. He was a tailor and a member 
of the German Lutheran church. He was of German parentage. His mother 
was Amelia Renner, a daughter of Jacob and Mary Creager Renner. She 
died in Cumberland, Maryland, November 7, 1895. Her great-grandfather 
was a soldier in the American army during the Revolutionary war, said to be 
in a German regiment. Her marriage took place May 9, 1833. Peter Suter 
was the great-grandfather of Captain Suter and was born in Germany. He 



40 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

also became a soldier in the Continental army. He married Catherine Irvin. 
The brothers and sisters of Captain Suter were: Amelia, born March 4, 
1834; Mary Anne, September 3, 1835; Caroline, September 29, 1838; Marie, 
January 5, 1840; Emma, July 24, 1841, died October 15, 1842; Jacob A., 
April 9, 1843; Adline, October 10, 1844; Sarah, April 13, 1846, and Emma 
Suter, July 17, 1848. 

Captain Suter was married to Emma Augusta Vickroy August 30, 1864, 
at Ferndale, near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, by the Rev. B. L. Agnew, while 
on a few days leave of absence from the Army of the Shenandoah, under 
Major General P. H. Sheridan. Mrs. Suter was the seventh daughter of 
Edwin Augustus Vickroy and Cornelia Harlan Vickroy, and granddaughter 
of Thomas Vickroy, who served as an ofificer under General George Clark in 
Kentucky and the west in the Revolutionary war. The father and grand- 
father were by occupation land surveyors. Their children were: i. PhiHp, 
born August 27, 1865, at Ferndale, married Ida May Oliver, March 11, 1896, 
at Braddock, Pennsylvania, and now resides in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 
2. Eugene, who died in his infancy, in 1868. 3. Cornelia Vickroy, born in 
Pittsburg, February 11, 1870, died there May 17, 1889. 4. Frederic John, 
born in Pittsburg, November 19, 1871, died there May 21, 1896. 5. Rufus 
Orlanda, born in Pittsburg, January 25, 1875, there married Mary Clarine 
Beatty, January 4, 1904, and now resides in Pittsburg. 6. Francis Leon, 
born in Pittsburg, January 9, 1877, there married Mary Metcalf Barr, October 
21, 1903; resides there. 7. Herman Alexander, born in Pittsburg, November 
25, 1880, married Anna Smart, July 14, 1903, at same place, and resides there. 
8. Jean Augusta, born in Pittsburg, April 7, 1884, died there April 6, 1888. 

Captain Suter was engaged prior to the Civil war as a telegraph operator. 
He was first lieutenant in Captain John M. Power's company, known as the 
Johnstown Zouaves, when the war began. His company was tendered and 
accepted by Governor A. G. Curtin, and left Johnstown for Harrisburg on 
April 17, 1861, within forty-eight hours after President Lincoln's call was 
made known. His company and that of Captain Lapsley were the first to 
enter Camp Curtin, On April 20 it was mustered in as Company K, Third 
Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, under the command of Colonel 
Francis P. Minier, for three months' service. At that time Captain Power 
was elected lieutenant colonel, and Lieutenant Suter was made captain. His 
company served in Maryland, Virginia, and on the border of Pennsylvania 
for the term, and was mustered out July 30, 1861. He immediately raised 
another company in Johnstown, which became Company A in the Fifty-fourth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, under the command of Colonel J. M. Camp- 
bell. He was mustered in at Harrisburg August 6, 1861. On February 27, 
1862, his regiment was taken to Washington city for the defence of the capital 
and entered camp near Bladensburg. On March 29 it was ordered to Harper's 
Ferry, Virginia, and his company was located at the South Branch bridge, on 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to guard that great military highway. It 
continued along this line until January 5, 1864, when it was taken to the de- 
fense of Cumberland, Maryland, where it remained in that vicinitv until May 
2, 1864. 

On that day, in pursuance of the broad and energetic plan of General 
Grant for a movement of all the armies all along the line for the campaign of 
1864, his regiment being in the Third Brigade, Third Division of the Depart- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 41 



ment of West Virginia, under the command of Major General Franz Sigel, 
entered the Shenandoah Valley. He was succeeded by Major General David 
Hunter, who was also succeeded by Major General George Crook, when his 
regiment was transferred to the Third Brigade of the Second Division. 

Captain Suter participated in all the engagements of his company and 
regiment while in the service, as follows, all in Virginia : Battle Creek, Sep- 
tember II, 1862; North Mountain, September 12, 1862; Back Creek Bridge, 
September 21, 1862; Purgitsville, April 4, 1863; New Market, May 15, 1864; 
New Market, IMay 26, 1864; Piedmont, June 5, 1864; Lexington, June ii, 
1864; Lynchburg, June 17 and 18, 1864; and the terrible retreat across the 
mountains to Camp Piatt; Snicker's Gap, July 18, 1864; near Winchester, 
July 19, 1864; Kernstown, or Island Ford, July 23, 1864; Winchester, July 
24, 1864; Martinsburg, July 2'5, 1864; Berryville, September 3, 1864; Opequon 
Creek. September 19, 1864; Cedar Creek, or Winchester, October 19, 1864; 
and Fisher's Hill, October 19, 1864, in Sheridan's brilliant victory. 

Owing to the casualties at and in the vicinity of Winchester, July 23-25, 
he was the senior officer and commanded the Third Brigade in the Third 
Division. He also commanded the Fifty-fourth Regiment at the battles of 
Cedar Creek and Fisher's Hill, under Major General Sheridan. 

Captain Suter was a gallant officer and a superb tactician, and for these 
and other gentlemanly qualities Major General George Crook, under whom 
he served, gave him this document : 

Headquarters Department West Virginia. 

Cumberland, Md., Feb. 3, 1865. 

His Excellency A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania. 

Governor : I take pleasure in recommending to your consideration John 
Suter, late captain Company A, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, who 
served under my command through the entire campaign in the Shenandoah — 
commanding his regiment at the battle of Opequon — Fisher's Hill and Cedar 
Creek. 

He is a worthy and a gallant officer. I commend him to your Excellency 
— any position you may see fit to give will be worthily bestowed. 

I am, Governor, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

George Crook, 
Major General Commanding. 

Captain Suter was honorably discharged on the expiration of his enlist- 
ment on December 15, 1864, and at the solicitation of Andrew Carnegie, who 
was then superintendent of the Pittsburg Division of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, he entered the train master's office in February, 1865, and in October 
following he was appointed chief operator of the telegraph department of that 
division, where he served until his death. 

He was connected with the New Jerusalem church of Allegheny City, 
Pennsylvania, and a member of McPherson Post No. 117, Grand Army of the 
Republic, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

In his view of fidelity to his country and the railroad company, he as- 
sumed a prominent part in the suppression of the revolution in Pittsburg, 
known as the railroad riots, in July, 1877, which was the most trying incident 



42 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



of his life. The horrible acts and scenes which he saw and passed through 
produced a partial collapse of his mind, which caused his death. 

For further military particulars, see the history of the Fifty-fourth Regi- 
ment and other military organizations from Cambria county, and the graphic 
war letters of Captain Suter in another volume of this work. Also in the 
Century edition of the "Battles and Leaders of the Civil War," volume 4, 
pages 489 and 531, and elsewhere therein. 



EDWIN TOBIAS McGOUGH, recently appointed captain of the city 
detective force in Pittsburg, was born at Chest Springs, Cambria county, Penn- 
sylvania, July 8, 1869, a son of Silas A. and Mary R. (Wharton) McGough. 
The first of this family to come to America on the paternal side was Arthur 
McGough, a native of Ireland, who came about 1790. He was a merchant in 
Philadelphia, later came to Westmoreland county, and thence to Cambria 
county. His wife was a native of Scotland. 

(II) James McGough was born in 1796 and died November 25, 1870. He 
was a son of the founder of the family in this country ; settled in Clearfield 
township, near Loretto, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, where he was one of 
the early pioneers ; was well known as a hardworking, honest man, greatly 
respected, and was a man of means. His elder brother, John McGough, was 
the first sheriff of Cambria county, and was a member of the first board of 
school directors of that county. James McGough married, November 1, 1822, 
Margaret Glass, to whom were born ten children: i. Ellen (Mrs. Mathew 
Ivory). 2. George Chrysostom. 3. Susan (Mrs. Joseph Dodson). 4. Charles. 
5. Ann. 6. James Edward. 7. Silas Augustine, subject's father. 8. An- 
drew Tobias. 9. Demetrius Augustine. 10. Margaret (Mrs. Jacob Buck). 
Charles was a soldier in the Civil war, serving in the One Hundred and Twenty- 
fifth and Eighty-second Pennsylvania Regiments of Volunteers. Andrew T. 
was a second lieutenant in the same company with his brother. 

Margaret Glass, the mother of this family, was the daughter of George 
and Susan (Daugherty) Glass, and was born near Munster, Cambria county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1801. Her father, George Glass, was born April i, 1770, 
and died January 18, 1821. Susan Daugherty was born January 14, 1781, 
and died May 10, 1863. She was probably born in New Jersey and has many 
prominent relatives living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, descendants of her 
brother. George Glass and Susan Daugherty were married by the Prince 
Priest of Loretto, Demetrius A. Gallitzin, and their children were baptized 
by him. 

(III) Silas Augustine McGough, son of James and Margaret (Glass) 

, McGough, was born at the old McGough homestead, Clearfield township, near 
Loretto, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, July 25, 1836. By profession he was 
ii civil engineer, but on account of injuries received in the Civil war, in which 
he was a soldier, he could not follow it longer. For many years he was a 
hotel keeper. He also served two terms as chief of police at Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania, the first time under Mayor Breth (Democratic) and the second term 
■under Colonel Burchfield (Republican). He was educated in the public schools 
of his home neighborhood, was politically a Democrat and in religious faith a 
Roman Catholic. He married Miss Mary Rosalia Wharton, eldest daughter 
of Joseph and Catherine (Bender) Wharton. She was born near St. Angus- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 43 



tine, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, April 14, 1849. She is a descendant of 
the old English family of Whartons which dates back to the fifteenth century. 
Her father was a farmer. His ancestors came to this country before the 
Revolutionary war, but the papers containing the family record were destroyed 
by fire at the home of Miss Alice Wharton, sister of Joseph Wharton, several 
years ago. 

Joseph Wharton was a son of Stanislaus Wharton and wife Mary Mc- 
Connell, and was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania about 1818. Stanislaus 
Wharton's mother was Ann Knopp, and is said to have been the daughter of 
a prime minister of England to Poland. Mary McConnell was a native of 
Ireland, and was brought to this country by her parents when a few months 
old, probably about 1793. 

Catherine Bender was the daughter of Americus "Emmerick" Bender and 
Mary Magdalene Yost, and was born in Carrolltown, Cambria county, Penn- 
sylvania, November 12, 1821. .When about eighteen years of age she married 
Joseph Wharton. Five children were born to them: i. James, who was a 
soldier in the Civil war, a veteran, and was a prisoner at Libby prison, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, for nearly one year. 2. Charles. 3. Mary R. 4. Alice. 
5. Ellie. Shortly after the youngest child was born, Joseph Wharton was 
kicked by a horse, which caused his death, and Catherine (Bender) Wharton 
then married in about three years Thomas Wilt, by whom three children were 
born. She died February 20, 1904, at Ashville, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 
and was buried at St. Augustine, Cambria county, having been all her life a 
faithful member of St. Augustine Catholic church. 

Americus Bender was the son of John Jacob Bender, a poor gunsmith of 
Westphalia in Holland. The latter longed to come to this country to better 
his condition and that of his family, but being so poor he could not come 
unless he sold himself and family as slaves, as was customary in those days 
for immigrants to sell themselves on landing in this country in order to pay 
their fare. In the year 1795 he set sail with his wife and four children for 
Philadelphia, and on their arrival there each one was sold for their individual 
fare and were purchased by different masters, the Quakers being the buyers. 
After the parents had served their time they came to Cambria county and 
settled between Buck's Mills and Loretto, where they lived until the death of 
Mr. Bender in 1829, he then being eighty-nine years of age. He made a clock 
which served as a timepiece for the family until his death. This was no doubt 
blie first clock made west of the Allegheny mountains. Mrs. Bender, notwith- 
standing all the hardships which the early pioneers were subject to, lived to 
the ripe old age of one hundred years. As the children served out their time, 
which was when they reached twenty-one years of age, they followed their 
parents to Cambria county, with the exception of William, who settled in 
Maryland. Americus, or "Emmerick," the oldest of the children who came to 
this country, was set free by his master at the funeral of George Washington, 
whither he had taken him. His master was Colonel Caleb Davis, of Philadel- 
phia. The same year, 1799, he came to Cambria county, and in 1808 married 
Mary Magdalene Yost and settled on the farm known as the Henry Bender 
farm. In 1810 Americus walked to Philadelphia to get his sister, Mary Ann, 
whose time had expired. The next year she was married to John Byrne. 

When the war of 1812-14 broke out Americus formed a party of hardy 
mountaineers and was chosen lieutenant. They marched through the forest to 



44 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Lake Erie, where they assisted in freeing the American soil, from British sol- 
diers. He later became known as "Old Squire Bender." He was one of the 
commissioners at the erection of the old court house ; served as a juryman at 
the first court held in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, and also served as county 
auditor, and in 1827 as county commissioner. 

John Jacob Bender was born January 31, 1740, and died December 6, 
1829. Americus Bender was born November 13, 1784, and died January 26, 
1868. 

(IV) Edwin Tobias McGough, son of Silas A. and Mary R. (Wharton) 
McGough, was educated in the public schools and at the parochial schools of 
Altoona, Pennsylvania. He entered the detective force for the city of Pitts- 
burg April 6, 1903, and was appointed captain of detectives June.i, 1907. 
Politically Captain McGough is independent and in the church faith he is a 
Roman Catholic, holding membership with the Holy Rosary Catholic church 
at Homewood. He belongs to the Brotherhood of Elks. 

Pie was united in marriage, June 20, 1896, to Anna Elizabeth Haggerty, 
of Bay City, Michigan. Mr. Haggerty was born in Vermont and Mrs. Hag- 
gerty in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The former was a steamboat captain. 
Mr. and Mrs. McGough are the parents of two children — Charles Wharton, 
born at Altoona, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1898; Thomas Francis, born in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, December 4, 1906. 



ROBERT J. MACRORY, one of the younger generation of Pittsburg 
business men, was born October 4, 1863, in county Down, Ireland, a son of 
Rev. David Macrory and grandson of David Macrory, a prosperous farmer 
and land owner of that county. 

David Macrory, Jr., son of David Macrory, Sr., was born in 1820, in 
county Down, and worked on the farm until attaining his majority, when 
he entered Belfast University and prepared for the ministry. After his ordina- 
tion Mr. Macrory was assigned to the Baptist congregation at Derryneil, 
where he remained two years. This was a small charge, and during his 
pastorate a new church was built, the first in that vicinity. For two months of 
each year Mr. Macrory traveled through England, Ireland, Scotland and 
Wales, preaching the gospel and interpreting the particular faith of the Baptist 
church. In this missionary work he was specially gifted and very successful, 
being an unusually pleasing and eloquent speaker. In 1878 he was assigned 
to the church at Coleraine, county Antrim, where he remained until 1880, coming 
in that year to the United States and proceeding directly to Pittsburg. After .a 
trial sermon before the Baptist church of Mount Washington he was elected 
its pastor and served most acceptably until the close of his life. He had 
received some time before coming to this country the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from the University of Belfast. He frequently appeared on the lecture plat- 
form, generally speaking in behalf of the cause of temperance. He supported 
with his vote the candidates of the Republican party. 

Dr. Macrory married many years before coming to the United States. 
Adjoining the farm of his father was that of another prosperous Irish farmer. 
Robert Jones, and it was his daughter Susan who became the wife of David 
Macrory. Dr. and Mrs. Macrory were the parents of seven daughters and 
two sons : James Boyd, principal of a Presbyterian educational institute at 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 45 



Belfast; Susan, wife of James Gibson, of Minnesota; Eliza, wife of Dr. J. B. 
Ritchie, of California ; Ellen, Avife of David McBride, of Chicago ; Jennie, wife 
of James J. Wallace, of Bridgeville, Pennsylvania; Margaret, wife of Robert 
H. Kearns, of Alount Washington ; Anna B., widow of Hugh White, of Mount 
Washington ; Sarah W., wife of William J. Love, of Mount Washington ; and 
Robert J., of whom later. 

Dr. Macrory died in 1887. He was a wonderfully forceful and magnetic 
orator, convincing and charming all hearers. His discourses were carefully 
prepared, but always delivered without notes. As an extemporaneous speaker 
he had few equals, and as a pastor he was greatly endeared to his people, by 
whom he is still held in loving remembrance. 

Robert J. Macrory, second son and youngest child of David and Susan 
(Jones) Aiacrory, was educated in the Model and high schools of Coleraine. 
and at the age of sixteen obtained a position in the office of Alexander Gribbon, 
one of Belfast's largest manufacturers of the famous Irish linen. In this 
office he remained until 1880, when the family came to the United States. In 
Pittsburg he entered the service of the Joseph Home Company as bookkeeper, 
remaining twelve years. In 1892 he embarked in business for himself, estab- 
lishing a produce commission line on Liberty street. At the end of two years 
he became secretary and treasurer of the Alexander Beggs & Son Company, 
makers of granite and marble monuments, mantels and similar articles. In 
1903 Mr. Macrory established his present real estate and fire insurance business 
on Shiloh street. Mount Washington, which he has since conducted very 
successfully. In April, 1906, the firm of Macrory & Macrory was established, 
Mr. Macrory admitting his son, Harry B., to partnership with him. 

R. J. Macrory is a notary public, having been appointed by Governor 
Samuel Pennypacker, and is secretary of the Mount Washington and Duquesne 
Heights Board of Trade, and of the Prospect Building and Loan Association. 
He belongs to the Royal Arcanum and the Order of the Iroquois. Politically 
he is a Republican. He is a member of the Fourth Avenue Baptist church, 
which he has served both as clerk and deacon. 

Mr. Macrory married, in 1881, Mary R., daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
M. (Howe) Williams, the former a merchant tailor of Pittsburg. Mr. and 
Mrs. Macrory have two children : Llarry B. and Vida Jeannette. Mrs. 
Macrory received a musical education, and is a pleasing concert singer and a 
merhber of the Alozart Club. 



DANIEL HILF, for a quarter of a century prominently identified with 
the business life of Mount Washington, was born April i, 1861, in Bavaria, a 
son of Leonard Hilf, also a native of that country, where he was a successful 
contractor and builder. In July, 1880, he came to the United States, settling, 
at the suggestion of his son Daniel, who had preceded him by some months, 
on Mount Washington, where he passed his remaining years in retirement. 

Leonard Hilf married, in his native land, Barbara Brummer, also born in 
Bavaria, and their children were : Elizabeth, widow of Jacob Liebolt, of 
Mount Washington ; Andrew, died in 1890, leaving a widow, Barbara, and 
familv ; Cora, widow of Frederick Foster, resides in West Liberty ; Margaret, 
wife of George Wimmer. of Mount Washington; Barbetta, widow of John 
Geib ; Barbara, wife of George Spies, living in the west ; one who died in 



40 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



infancy ; John, of Pittsburg ; and Daniel. Leonard Hilf, the father of the 
family', died in 1884, at the age of seventy-two. 

Daniel Hilf, a son of Leonard and Barbara (Brummer) Hilf, was educated 
in German schools, attending until his fourteenth year, when he began working 
at the carpenter's trade with his father, becoming an expert mechanic and also 
a draughtsman of considerable skill. In March, 1880, he emigrated to the 
UnitedStates, and in the ensuing July was followed, as mentioned above, by 
the remainder of the family. For two months he worked in the mills and 
mines, being unable to obtain employment at his trade. During the ensuing two 
years he worked as a journeyman carpenter, and then began contracting in 
his own name. For twenty-five years he was one of the leading contractors 
and builders of Mount "VVashington, acquiring an enviable reputation for 
honesty and fair dealing and a considerable share of this world's goods. In 
connection with his other business he operated a planing mill, getting out his 
own mill work. He has now retired, the business being conducted by his son 
Philip, a most worthy successor. 

In 1889 Mr. Hilf erected his present brick residence on Norton street. 
Mount Washington. In addition to his building operations he has promoted 
and carried to success other business enterprises of Mount Washington. He 
was the organizer and first president of the Mount Washington Savings and 
Trust Company, and he is now president of the Mount Washington German 
Building and Loan Association and of the Hilf & Richardson Construction 
Company. He is also president of the Acre Land Company, in which, as far 
as possible, his interest has been closed and turned over to others. He is a 
Republican and a member of the German Lutheran church. 

Mr. Hilf married, June 18, 1882, Katrina Vork, of Allegheny, and the 
following children have been born to them : Leonard, who died when three 
years old ; Philip, Mary, Fritz, Albert and Clara. All these are at school with 
the exception of the eldest, Philip, who received his education in the public 
schools and at the Pittsburg Academy. He learned the carpenter's trade and 
succeeded to the business established by his father. He married Grace Reet, 
and they have one child, Grace. 



JAMES ALLEN, a well-known contractor of Pittsburg, was born in 
1843, 11"^ county Armagh, Ireland, a son of Thomas Allen, a native of the same 
country, who passed his life as a tiller of the soil. He married Ann Murray, 
who bore him the following children : Mary Jane, Sarah, Lucinda, Eliza, 
James, of whom later; Margaret, William, John, Matilda and David. Mrs. 
Allen died in 1881, and Mr. Allen survived her but two years, passing away in 
1883. 

James Allen, son of Thomas and Ann (Murray) Allen, received his 
education in the public schools of his native place, and at the age of seventeen 
went to England, remaining eleven years. In 1871 he emigrated to the LInited 
States and settled in Pittsburg, where he has since conducted a successful 
business as a contractor. In the sphere of politics he has always adhered 
staunchly to the doctrines and principles of the Republican party. He is a 
member of the United Presbyterian church of Homewood. 

Mr. Allen married, in 1871, Jane Berry, and they became the parents of 
the following children : David Alexander, born October 16, 1878, the only 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 47 



one now living; and two older sons, both of whom died in early childhood. 
These were: William J., who was born in 1873, and died September 6, 1879; 
and Thomas J., who was born in 1875, and died October 18, 1879. 



THE BAUR BROTHERS. Among the branches of industry in Greater 
Pittsburg which furnish one of the daily used commodities of the household 
and a necessity of life is the wholesale baking establishment known as the 
Baur Brothers Company (incorporated), which plant is situated in the East 
End, Pittsburg. The members of this company are the brothers, August, 
John and Fred Baur, and Henry Stocke. The three first named gentlemen 
are natives of Wurtemberg, Germany, who came to America in 1881, and are 
now recognized as leaders in their trade, which extends throughout Allegheny 
county and beyond. This business was originally established in 1885 by 
August Baur, on Grant street, and in 1886 the brothers, John and Fred, were 
taken into the firm, which was styled Baur Brothers until January i, 1896, 
when it was consolidated with that of Henry Stocke, who at the time was 
operating a bakery in the East End. Under the name of Baur Brothers & 
Company the business was continued until January i, 1905, at which date it 
was incorporated under the state laws of Pennsylvania as the "Baur Brothers 
Company," with the following officers : August Baur, president ; John Baur, 
vice-president ; Fred Baur, treasurer ; Henry Stocke, secretary ; S. S. Watters, 
assistant secretary. The present plant was built in 1894-95, but on account of 
the growth of the business the company has been compelled to build more 
extensive buildings, now about completed, at Nos. 6452 to 6464 Penn avenue. 
The new building consists of a four-story, re-inforced concrete bakery, cov- 
ering a ground space of one hundred and seventy by one hundred and eighty- 
five feet, with a re-inforced concrete barn on Aurelia street covering a ground 
space of sixty-five by one hundred and ten feet. This plant, like the present 
one, will be operated by electricity, and fully equipped with the most improved 
modern ovens and other bakery appliances. No expense is being spared to 
make it second to none in the country, both as to capacity and sanitary regula- 
tions. No other bread-making place in this community will outrank it for 
capacity, for bread alone ; and besides the bread department, where the favorite 
loaf, "Aunt Hannah's" brand of bread, which is known far and near, is baked 
daily in immense quantities, there is the pie and cake department. These 
excellent goods are consumed year in and year out by private families and the 
hotels and better grades of restaurants in Allegheny county. 

The present place of business (1907) is at Nos. 5711-13-15 Penn avenue, 
Pittsburg, where their name has long been established for honest made bakery 
goods. 



LAFAYETTE WINEBIDDLE MENOLD, who for many years was an 
active business factor in Pittsburg but now leading a retired life, was born De- 
cember 14, 1845, in East Liberty, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in his grandfather's 
house near the present railroad bridge on Pennsylvania avenue. His grand- 
father, George Menold, emigrated from either Germany or France (near the 
line) in the last years of the eighteenth century and settled in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania. Among his children were : Rose, who married a Mr. 



48 . ■ . A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Caldwell and still resides in Illinois ; George, deceased ; Andrew, deceased, 
and Henry, deceased. 

Henry Menold, the last named child of Georo-e Menold, and the father 
of Lafavette W., was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1812', and 
died October 30, 1887. He was reared and educated in his native county and 
there learned the carpenter's trade. Subsequently he came to Pittsburg and 
settled in the East End, where he engaged in the contracting business, taking 
a contract for grading the Pennsylvania railroad, then in course of construction. 
During the Mexican war he made military wagons for the United States 
government. Later he embarked in the manufacture of sash and doors, his 
location being at the corner of Penn avenue and Whitfield street, which 
business he continued until 1875, when he sold to his son and retired from 
active labors. In his political affiliations he was a Democrat and he served 
as a member of the state legislature from 1858 to i860. He married, Novem- 
ber 18, i860, Mary Ann Winebiddle, born April 11. 1814, and by her had 
three children : Susanna M., born in June, 1839, married Henry C. Teeters, 
now deceased ; Lafayette Winebiddle, and Rachel M., born in 1849. married 
Charles A. Warmcastle, and their issue was Mary M., wife of C. P. Thompson ; 
Grace W., Laura W., Frances F. and Jennie N. 

Lafayette W. Menold was reared in the East End and educated in the 
local schools and at the old academy which formerly stood at the corner of 
Penn avenue and Highland. His first work in a business way was as a clerk 
in a grocery store at the corner of Penn avenue and Sixteenth street. Later 
he learned the carpenter's trade and went to Illinois and as far west as Kansas. 
He' soon after returned to East Liberty and carried on his trade with a shop at 
the corner of Penn avenue and Whitfield street. In 1875 he purchased his 
father's business, and two years later engaged in the coal business on Penn- 
sylvania avenue, near the Allegheny cemetery. He continued in the business 
six or seven years, and then retired from active life and removed to Wilkins- 
burg, purchasing the property where he now resides. 

Mr. Menold was reared in the Presbyterian faith and in politics is a 
supporter of the Democratic party. He belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Brotherhood of Elks. He was united in marriage first 
to Mattie Covert, daughter of Allison Covert, of New Orleans, by whom he 
had three children: Aline, Harry and Lafayette. His second wife was Emma 
Thompson, of New Castle, Pennsylvania. 

For Mr. Menold's descent on the maternal side the reader is referred to 
the Winebiddle sketch, found elsewhere in this work. 



HERMAN H. ADAM, one of Pittsburg's enterprising business men, was 
born in 1862, rin Hanover, Germany, a son of Herman H. Adam, a native of 
the same country, where he was born in December, 1828. He was a farmer 
of some means and gave his children the advantages of a hberal education. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church. Herman H. Adam married Ade- 
laide Schwarberg, and they became the parents of the following children: 
Caroline, deceased, married Frederick Schliiter, and resided in Germany : 
Charlotte, wife of Rudolph Quebbeman, of Allegheny county ; two who died 
in childhood ; and Herman H., of whom later. The father of the family died 
in 1885, and the death of the mother occurred in 1877. 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE . 49" 

Herman H. Adam, son of Herman H. and Adelaide ( Schwarberg ) Adam, 
learned the cabinet maker's trade, and in September, 1884, emigrated to the 
United States. He settled in Pittsburg, where for eleven years he held the 
position of clerk in the grocery store of which his uncle was the proprietor. 
In June, 1895, he purchased a store and dwelling in Dithridge street where he 
now resides and carries on a thriving grocery business. He is a member of 
the Lutheran church, in which he serves as deacon, having been elected in 
1902. 

Mr. Adam married, in 1895, Alollie Bergerding, and they have been the 
parents of the following children : IMollie A., born November 6, 1895 ; Herman 
W. R., born April 16, 1897; and Bertha C, born June 7, 1898, died Alarch 2. 
1899. Mrs. Adam is a daughter of William and Mollie (Kuhlman) Bergerd- 
ing, natives of Germany residing in Pittsburg. They were the parents of two 
daughters: Louisa, born September 15, 1862, wife' of F. H. Kreimeier ; and 
Alollie, boru December 8, 1863, wife of Herman H. Adam, as mentioned above. 



BENJAMIN B. WOOD, M. D., one of the well-known of the younger 
generation of physicians and surgeons in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
has his finely equipped offices at No. 21 18 Fifth avenue, in that city, where he 
is in the enjoyment of a lucrative and constantly increasing practice. He is 
a descendant of families which were among the early settlers of this country. 

John Wood, grandfather of Dr. Benjamin B. Wood, was born in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, about the year 18 10. He was a farmer by occupation, 
and he raised his family in Fayette county. He married Mrs. Shank, nee 
Dills, and they had children: John K., of whom more hereinafter: William, 
who was a soldier during the Civil war ; Philip, who was killed while serving 
in that conflict ; Jane, married George Everhart ; Ella, married Miner Provance ; 
and Rebecca, married Perry O'Neil. 

John K. Wood, son of John Wood, was born in Fayette countv in 1844. 
His first step in his business career was to enter the grocery business at Port 
Perry, and in this he was engaged for a period of twenty-five years. He then 
sold out his interest and removed to McKeesport, where he established himself 
in the newspaper business, with which he has been occupied for the past thir- 
teen years. Since the death of his wife in 1899 he has made his home with his 
son John. His political affiliations are with the Democratic party, and he 
served as postmaster of Port Perry from 1885 to 1889. , He is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. He married Martha Black, who died in 1899, daugh- 
ter of P. F. and Elizabeth (Reitz) Black. The Black family came from 
^Virginia and settled in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, about 1800. The children 
of John K. and Martha (Black) Wood were: i. Frank, born in 1864, married 
Mary Bearer and has three children : Martha, Margaret and Catherine. 2. 
William, born in 1871, married Jennie Menges, and has children : Eliza, 
William and Jessie. 3. John H.. born in 1873, married Zora Hay, and has 
children: Paul and Marian. 4. Benjamin B., the subject of this sketch. 

Benjamin B. Wood, M. D., youngest child of John K. and Martha (Black) 
Wood, was born in Port Perry, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 9, 1877. 
He was reared in Port Perry and he attended the public schools of that town. 
This was supplemented by a course of study in the Park Institute, from which 
he was graduated in 1895. He matriculated at the Western University of 



50 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Pennsylvania the same year, and was graduated from this institution with 
honor in 1899. He then entered the South Side Hospital, where he was 
appointed resident physician and served in this position for one year. The 
year following he opened an office for the practice of his profession at No. 
21 18 Fifth avenue, Pittsburg, where he is still located, and he enjoys a large 
and lucrative practice, having the confidence and respect of his patients as well 
as of the medical profession. He is a member of Alpha Kappa Phi, and also 
of the medical staff of St. Joseph's Hospital. His religious affiliations are with 
the Catholic church, and he is an adherent of the Democratic party. 

Dr. Wood married Mary Sullivan, daughter of Jeremiah and Prudence 
(Fitzsimmons) Sullivan, and they have children: Francis B., born April 25, 
1903, and Eugene, born April 29, 1906. 



JOSEPH BIALAS, one of Pittsburg's rising young lawyers, was born in 
that city September 10, 1879, a son of R. F. Bialas, who was born January 
13, 1850, in Germany, and left his native land at the age of twelve years. On 
arriving in this country he settled in Pittsburg, where he received his education 
in the school of experience. For some years he was employed in the florist's 
establishment of William and James Murdock, and subsequently engaged in 
the flour and feed business, conducting a flourishing trade until 1896. At the 
same time he speculated largely in real estate, being the first man to introduce 
the building of flats in Pittsburg. His transactions as a builder were exten- 
sive, and by steady industry and thrift he accumulated the fortune which he 
now enjoys at leisure, having retired from business in 1896. He is a Democrat 
and a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Bialas married Magdalena, daughter of Henry and Margaret (Heyl) 
Schnelbach, both of German extraction, and three children were born to them : 
Joseph, May A. and Albert. 

Joseph Bialas, son of R. F. and Magdalena (Schnelbach) Bialas, received 
his preparatory education in the public and high schools of Pittsburg. In 
1901 he entered the Western University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1904 
from the law school of that institution. On January 2 of the same year he 
entered upon the practice of his profession in his native city, where he has 
already won for himself an honorable position. With his vote and influence 
he aids and supports the men and measures advocated by the Republican 
party. He is a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Bialas married, April 30, 1906, Adele, daughter of Julian and Kate 
D. (Skeen) Bixby, and granddaughter of William and Katherine Skeen and 
of Brooks Earl and Lucv Ann Bixbv. 



CHARLES C. KELSO, principal of Sharpsburg public school, was born 
February 5, 1870, in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, a son of William P. 
Kelso, grandson of James Kelso, and great great-grandson of George Kelso, a 
native of Allegheny county, whither his father migrated from either Bucks or 
Berks county. 

James Kelso, son of George Kelso, was born about 1810, in Lawrence 
county, where he led the life of a farmer. He was a Democrat and a member 
of the L'nited Presbvterian church. James Kelso married Nancv Patterson, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 51 

and their children were : George, deceased ; John, also deceased ; Alexander 
G., commissioner of Lawrence county ; Mary, Jane, William P., of whom later ; 
and Josephine. James Kelso died in 1874, and his widow survived him twenty 
years, passing away in 1894. 

William P. Kelso, son of James and Nancy (Patterson) Kelso, was born 
in 1844, in Lawrence (then Beaver) county, where he is now living as a farmer 
on the homestead, and is known as a very progressive man, both in theory and 
practice. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he served nine months. In 1863 
he reenlisted'in the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, and was subsequently transferred to the Pennsylvania Heavy 
Artillery, stationed at Fortress Monroe, where he remained until the close of 
the war. He is a Democrat and a member of the United Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Kelso married Nancy J., daughter of Robert and Eliza (Wilson) 
FuUerton, and aunt of Judge Fullerton of Beaver county. The following chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kelso : Charlts C., of whom later ; Mary, 
born 1874; Robert M., born 1878, manager of the Vulcan Steel Company, 
Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, married Rachel, daughter of David and Catharine 
Gilmore, children, Rachel and William; and James, born 1882, married Iva, 
daughter of William and Mary Kyle. 

Charles C. Kelso, a son of William P. and Nancy J. (Fullerton) Kelso, 
received his preparatory education in the public schools of Lawrence county, 
and in 1896 graduated at Geneva College. For five years before entering 
college he had been engaged in teaching, and ever since his graduation has 
practised that profession. In 1896 he was elected principal of the Turtle Creek 
school, and in 1897 was chosen to fill that ofifice in the Tarentum high school, 
serving one year. He then served two years as principal of the common school, 
and in April, 1900, was elected principal of the Sharpsburg public school, a 
position which he still retains. 

Mr. Kelso married Margaret J., daughter of Alexander S. and Elizabeth 
(Houston) McKinley, and they are the parents of the following children: 
Charles S., born August 7, 1888; Willis A., born October 15, 1891 ; George 
W., born June 2, 1902 ; and Daniel M., born January 36, 1906. 



ANDREW YERKINS, late of Sharpsburg, was born in that borough 
November 24, 1848, and there passed his entire life, identifying himself 
prominently with the commercial, social and religious interests of his native 
place. His father and grandfather both bore the name of Andrew. 

Andrew Yerkins, the elder, was by birth a Frenchman, and about 1800 
emigrated to the United States, settling on land where the city of Reading 
now stands. In 181 1 he moved to Allegheny City, becoming one of the pioneers 
of that place, where he opened the first inn and owned and operated the first 
ferry-boat plying between Allegheny and Pittsburg. He also owned and con- 
ducted the first market ever established in the place, and to this the. farmers- 
for miles around resorted to sell their produce. The building stood on what is 
now River avenue, near the railroad bridge. This business Mr. Yerkins 
conducted until his death. He was a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Andrew Yerkins married Nancy Springer, a native of Switzerland. The 
marriage was opposed by the Springer family, and in order to avoid bloodshed 



52 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Andrew emigrated to this country. His betrothed fohowed, and on her 
arrival they \vere married. Their children were : Elizabeth, wife of George 
Farmerie ; Fanny, wife of James Farmerie ; Nancy, wife of Nicholas Farmerie ; 
and Andrew, of whom later. Andrew Yerkins, the father, died in 1852. 

Andrew Yerkins, son of Andrew and Nancy (Springer) Yerkins, was 
born in 1826, in Allegheny City, and learned the cabinet maker's trade under 
the instruction of his father, afterward following it in connection with the 
cooper's trade. He was subsequently employed for a number of years by the . 
McCormicks as superintendent of their mill, called the Hope Cotton Mill, at 
Allegheny City, and later held a similar position in the rolling mill of Lewis, 
Bailey, Dalzel & Company, of Sharpsburg, with whom he remained twenty- 
four years. In 1883 he retired from business and passed the remainder of his 
life on a small farm near Sharpsburg. He was a Republican and a member 
of the First Baptist church of Sharpsburg, in which he served as deacon for 
twenty years. 

Mr. Yerkins married Caroline, daughter of and Sarah (Snyder) 

Clark, and they became the parents of three children : Andrew, of whom later ; 
Stephen, born in May, 1850, married Mattie Tyler, children, Hettie, George. 
Henry, Leon and Irene ; and Mary E., born March 5, 1852, widow of John A. 
Weichel, children, May, Homer, Carrie, Richard, Bessie "and Frank. Mrs. 
Yerkins died in April, 1852, and Mr. Yerkins married in 1854, Hetty, daughter 
of Arunah Bassett, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. By this union he 
became the father of four children : Henry, Arthur, died at the age of twenty- 
two, unmarried ; Carrie, deceased, wife of William J. Dickey, of Glenshaw, 
Pennsylvania, and mother of six children ; and Lydia, who died at twenty-two, 
unmarried. The death of Mr. Yerkins occurred in 1885. He was a genial, 
kind-hearted man, and his many friends still hold in grateful remembrance his 
acts of benevolence and words of- encouragement. 

Andrew Yerkins, son of Andrew and Caroline (Clark) Yerkins, learned 
the cooper's trade, which he followed for eighteen years. In 1876 he pur- 
chased two mills in Sharpsburg and established a lumber business in partner- 
ship with George L. Walters, but in 1881 sold his interest to him and James 
R. Darraugh. He then established a coal and feed business which he conducted 
until 1885, when he sold out to the LTnion Feed & Coal Company. He after- 
ward opened a real estate and fire insurance office, where he afterward carried 
on a prosperous business. In 1897 he was elected a justice of the peace, and 
served one term. He has held the office of councilman for three terms, served 
one term as school director and the 'same length of time as assessor. He was 
one of the two surviving original members of the Sharpsburg Fire Company. 

From 1870 he was a member of Lodge No. 752, I. O. O. F., of Sharps- 
burg, and also belonged to the P. McGee Encampment, now called the Arsenal. 
He was a Republican in politics and a Protestant in religious belief. 

Mr. Yerkins was twice married. His first wife was Sarah A., daughter 
of John and Jane (Saint) Terrell, and the following were their children: 
Charles W., born in 1870, a contractor and builder, married Minnie Phillips, 
children. Alary, deceased; Myrtle and John; Myrtle, born 1874, died at the 
age of eighteen : Walter, born in 1876, a painter, married Nellie Patterson, one 
child, Roy; Harry J., born in 1878, assistant superintendent of the Crescent 
Steel Works, married Bessie Yahres, children, Florence and Paul ; Albert G.. 
born in 1880; and William N., born in 1883, a painter and paper hanger of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



53 



Sharpsburg. The mother of these children died in 1900. and in 1905 Mr. 
Yerkins married Mrs. E. M. Seaman, of Reading, Pennsylvania. Mr. Yerkins 
died July 14, 1907. 



CHARLES W. YERKINS, one of Sharpsburg's prominent contractors 
and builders, was born in that borough June 14, 1870, a son of Andrew and 
Sarah (Terrell) Yerkins. Mrs. Yerkins was a daughter of John and Jane 
(Saint) Terrell. The Terrells came from Somersetshire, England, in 1831, 
and after spending a short time in Baltimore went to Pottsville, later removing 
to Sharpsburg. 

Charles W. Yerkins was educated in the public schools of Sharpsburg, and 
after leaving school secured his first employment in the plate mill department 
of Morehead's Iron Mills. He learned the carpenter's trade and also worked 
as a millwright. Since 1898 he has carried on a successful business as a 
contractor and builder. 

He belongs to the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, Vesuvius 
Council, No. 116, of Sharpsburg, and the Knights of the Maccabees, Wash- 
ington Tent, 'No. 57. His political principles coincide with those of the 
Republican party. 

Mr. Yerkins married Minnie J., daughter of Samuel and Lydia (Alford) 
Phillips, and they have been the parents of three children : Myrtle G., born 
May 28, 1897; John C, born February 3, 1899; and Mary E., born November 
5, 1903, died November i, 1905. Mr. Yerkins takes great interest in memorials 
of the past, and is the owner of a very fine collection of relics. 



ROBERT McFARLAND LAMONT, an enterprising contractor of Pitts- 
burg, was born at Clarksburg, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, July 2;^, 1846, 
a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Anderson) Lamont. 

(I) The first known American ancestor of this family was Archibald 
Lamont, of Scottish birth. It appears that he landed first at New Orleans, 
and was a ship captain by occupation. The first direct information of him is 
contained in a letter which he wrote in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January 3, 
1794, written to his brother, and in which he gives a very pathetic account of 
having lost his wife and youngest son, a sister and a friend whom he calls 
"Robert." All died within a few hours of each other, October 17, 1793. He 
adds: 'T cannot give you a description of my situation on that morning when 
I had three corpses in my home and not one mortal to give assistance." He 
further stated that the plague had carried off five thousand of the best people. 
It is believed from this communication that he was a consistent Christian man. 
Nothing is known of his wife. It is known that they had five children who 
reached manhood and womanhood, as follows : i. Nancy McMillin. 2. Mary 
McDonald, who married and had children : Thomas, Josiah. Willson. John, 
James and Calvin. This James McDonald was the father of three children: 
David, Miller and Boston. David McDonald had one son, Lamont McDonald. 
3. Jane Irwin, wife of Dr. Irwin, of Allegheny City — no issue. 4. Archibald, 
of whom later. 5. Robert, father of the subject of this notice, of whom see 
later. 

(II) Archibald Lamont, son of the progenitor in this country, was born 



54 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1788, and died in Allegheny City, 
Pennsylvania, November 20, 1852. By occupation he was an edge tool manu- 
facturer and conducted a business for a number of years on the corner of Craig 
and Lacock streets, Allegheny City. He was the inventor of the vise commonly 
used by blacksmiths and other mechanics, but never secured a letters patent 
on his' invention. He took much interest in educational affairs and was a 
director in the First ward of Allegheny City for many years. He gave his 
children a good education. His daughter, Hannah Hay, taught in his district 
for ten years, and his daughter Agnes devoted most of her life to the cause of 
education; she was principal of the ward schools in which her father was a 
director for twenty years. He was the father of the following seven children : 

1. Susan Knox. 2. Jane Gray. 3. Lydia, died in infancy. 4. Catherine 
Warnock, whose husband was mayor of New Castle one term. 5. John. 6. 
Hannah Hay. 7. Agnes, remained unmarried. Hannah Hay resides with her 
son at New Brighton, Pennsylvania, where he is a popular United Presbyterian 
minister. 

(H) Robert Lament, son of Archibald (I), was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, January 25, 1792. He was by trade a tailor. The date of his 
first coming to Pittsburg is not clearly known, but the second time was in the 
spring of 1855. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, in the United States 
army. He made his home in Pittsburg until his death, which occurred January 

2, 1861. He married about 1822 Miss Elizabeth Anderson, of Pennsylvania 
Dutch extraction, and who was a woman of great firmness of character. 
Through her persistent efforts and good example finally saw her husband 
converted to the religious faith to which he ever afterwards lived in a con- 
sistent manner. They were members of the Wesleyan Methodist church. Mrs. 
Elizabeth (Anderson) Lamon't father's family consisted of the following: 
Michael, Isaac, David, Joseph, Susan (Wyatt) and Mary Anderson, who in 
marriage did not change her name. Mr. Wyatt was engaged in the salt 
business at Saltsburg, Pennsylvania. His son, Aaron B., was an officer in the 
Civil war and was killed in battle. Joseph Anderson kept a public house at 
Saltsburg. "Granny" Anderson, as she was called, was credited with the 
discovery of coal while washing clothes along a stream at some point in 
Pennsylvania. It is related that she observed what she supposed to be a black 
stone, on which her kettle was placed, on fire, and it led to the discovery of 
coal, which was found in abundance in the hillside near by. Robert Lamont 
and wife were the parents of eight children, as follows: i. Mary, wife of John 
Zigler, a stonecutter by trade, who helped to construct the locks in the Monon- 
gahela river. 2. Jane, married James Tuthil, of Warren, Pennsylvania, by 
whom she had five children : Elizabeth, Jannet, Eliza, Synthia, James. James 
served in the Union army during the Civil war; is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and is postmaster at Warren, Pennsylvania. 3. Eliza 
Anderson, wife of Thomas Anderson, and they were the parents of thirteen 
children, with numerous grandchildren. At the death of the husband a few 
years since, there were seventy-two children and grandchildren. It was the 
first death in the family for over fifty years. 4. Susan, married William 
Campbell, of Saltsburg, Pennsylvania, by whom she had five children : Mary, 
Eva, Albert, Charles and Sue. 5. Ann, married John Laughlin, by whom she 
had two children. After his death she married William R. Akeright, by whom 
she had three children, Margarett, Ella and Ann. The last husband was a 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



55 



locomotive engineer, first for the Fort Wayne Railroad, then on the Nashville 
& Chattanooga. During the Civil war he was employed by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, and lastly on the Hannibal & St. Joseph road. He was a 
member of the Odd Fellows' order, and also a Mason. 6. Sarah, married 
David Campbell, by whom she had children : Robert, Mary, Laura and William. 
Mr. Campbell enlisted during the Civil war in the Union cause ; was in Colonel 
Black's regiment and was discharged before the end of the war for disability. 
After recovering his health he was employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company for a period of forty-two years. He never met with an accident 
during the whole time, and was pensioned by the company ; at that time he was 
the oldest employe of the road. 7. Thomas, was born in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, July 5, 1838. He was engaged in the sand business, and at the 
breaking out of the Civil war, on August ii, 1862, enlisted in Company D, 
Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment, in which he served until May 28, 
1865, receiving an honorable discharge. He took part in some forty engage- 
ments, was with Sheridan at Winchester, Virginia, and was wounded at 
Sulphur Springs. In 1874 he removed to Kansas, and now resides at Law- 
rence. He has always been a Republican in politics. He is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. He married j\Iary Shade, who bore him three 
children. Ida, Edwin and Effie. All reside in different sections of Kansas. 8. 
Robert McFarland Lamont, the subject, was born at Clarksburg, Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, July 23, 1846. 

(Ill) Robert McFarland Lamont, son of Robert Lamont (H), married 
Emma Rosborough, born at Clarksburg, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, January 
9, 1853. After ^ period of twenty-six years they met in Pittsburg and were 
united in marriage May 2, 1871. To them have been born the following eleven 
children : Three died in infancy, the two eldest at the age of twenty years. 
Bertha, the eldest at the time of her death, was a student at the Pittsburg High 
School. Laura, the second at the time of her death, was a student at the Pitts- 
burg Conservatory of Music. ^lilton, after attending the public schools, was 
set to learn the carpenter's trade, and worked as a journeyman some ten years, 
and in 1904 commenced the business of contracting and building with his 
father. The business is now incorporated as R. Lamont & Sons Company. 
They carry on a lumber and manufacturing business at No. 3109 Penn avenue, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Homer, the fourth child, died in infancy. Archibald, 
the fifth, was educated at the Lincoln public schools of Pittsburg, Adrian Col- 
lege, Michigan, and is now a student at the Carnegie Technical Institute, in the 
architectural department. Edgar, the sixth child, was educated at the Lincoln 
school and Call's Commercial College, Pittsburg, and is the present secretary 
of R. Lamont & Sons Company. Frederick, who was the seventh child, died in 
infancy. Emma Mae, the eighth in the order of birth, is now a student at 
Adrian College, Michigan. Lillian is a student at the same place. Blanche 
Alda died in infancy, and Marie, the eleventh child, is now attending the 
Lemington public school in East End, Pittsburg. 

The subjoined is relative to Mrs. Lamont's people: Her great-grand- 
father, Alexander Rosborough, married Mary Denny ; they were both of Irish 
extraction, and their home was near Elder Ridge, Indiana county, Pennsylvania. 
Their children were: Charles, Nellie, Elizabeth, James and A. Alexander. 
It is thought the father, Alexander, Sr., returned to Ireland, taking his eldest 
son, Charles, with him, but he was never heard of afterwards. Nellie, the 



56 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

second child, married William Miller, by whom were born : Robert and William 
Miller. Elizabeth never married. James, the subject's wife's grandfather, 
was a mason by occupation, also a model farmer. He owned one of the most 
finely improved farms in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, at Elder Ridge, where 
he and his family resided. He enjoyed the confidence and esteem of his neigh- 
bors and was a justice of the peace for some twenty years. His wife's maiden 
name was Mary Deamer, and to them were born fifteen children. The first 
^nd second, Alexander and Rebecca, died in early childhood; afterward they 
named two of their later children after them ; Charles, John, Frederick, Lydia, 
Isabell, Maria, James, Alexander, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Thomas, Violet, Julia, 
were the names of the other children. James and Thomas served in the Civil 
war. Alexander remained a bachelor, was a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, and died in Omaha, Nebraska, at the Soldiers' Home. He was 
there buried from his nephew's home. James Rosborough, after serving his 
term in the army and being honorably discharged, returned home and was 
killed in a coal mine on his father's farm while mining coal for the use of the 
family. Thomas and his youngest sister, Julia, lived on the old farm at Elder's 
Ridge for a number of years after their father's and mother's death, and then 
sold the homestead to a coal company and purchased a small farm in the 
suburbs of Indiana, Pennsylvania, where they still reside. The entire family 
subscribed to the Westminster confession of faith. The male members of this 
family, with one exception, were Democrats. Frederick Rosborough, who is 
the father-in-law of the subject, is a Republican, and at the age of eighty- 
two years enjoys good health. He has never used intoxicating liquors. 



JOHN JACOB FETZER, who has been for nearly forty years a resident 
of Pittsburg, was born February 24, 1836, in Wurtemberg, Germany, a son 
of John Jacob Fetzer, also a native of the fatherland, where he was born in 
1 80 1. He was engaged in mercantile business, and in 1847 emigrated to the 
United States, making his way to Butler county, Pennsylvania, by the canal. 
Scarcely, however, had he and his wife become settled in their new home when 
death removed them from their children, the mother dying October 8, 1847, 
and the father November 3 of the same year. 

John Jacob Fetzer married Mary B. Reiber, and the following were their 
children, all of whom were born in Germany: Mary B., born in 1832, died in 
1874, wife of H. L. Westerman; Katharine M., born in 1834, wife of J. G. 
Myers; John Jacob; Gottlieb F.. born in 1838; Andrew M., born in 1840; 
Charles F. G., born in 1843 ; and Dora, born in 1844, wife of H. L. Westerman. 

John Jacob Fetzer, son of John Jacob and Mary B. (Reiber) Fetzer, was 
eleven years old when brought by his parents to this country, and he received 
his education in the public schools o'f Butler county. After leaving school he 
worked on a farm for a number of years, and in 1869 came to Pittsburg, where 
he engaged in the grocery business in Butler street, in the Seventeenth ward. 
He continued the business for twenty-five years, and in* 1894 retired, having 
since resided on his farm. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Fetzer married Elizabeth Kiefer and they have been the parents of the 
following children: Edmund B., born April 8, 1885; John Jacob, born Sep- 
tember 26, 1886; Herbert C, born July 5, 1888; Leah Berta, born December 




ci^cAhS^c.^^^, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 57 

30, 1890; Gustave Frederick, born August 3, 1895, died July 12, 1896; and 
Alice Elizabeth, born June 13, 1898. 



ISAAC NEWTON BUNTON. The late Isaac Newton Bunton, one of 
Pittsburg's best-known river captains and coal operators, was born in that 
city June 28, 1841, son of James F. and Elizabeth (Speer) Bunton, the family 
having been for about three-quarters of a century resident in Pittsburg. 

Isaac Newton Bunton was educated in the old Duquesne school and at the 
high school. At the outbreak of the Civil war. with others of the high school 
boys, he enlisted, serving throughout the greater part of the conflict. He was 
a member of a regiment called the Friend Rifles, which was fully recruited 
in Pittsburg, but the Pennsylvania quota being full, was credited to New 
York. All through the war he kept a full daily diary of events that is still pre- 
served by Airs. Bunton. At the close of the war he returned to his native citv 
and entered the service of Joseph Walton, coal miner and river shipper. Thence- 
forth, until Mr. Walton's death, Mr. Bunton was associated with him in the 
coal business, succeeding in course of time to the position of head of the firm. 

When the Monongahela River Consolidated Coal & Coke Company was 
formed Captain Bunton (as he was generally called) sold out to the new- 
company, assuming the position of superintendent of its land department, 
which he held during the remainder of his life. A large towboat bearing his 
name and now operating on the local rivers was owned by him before the 
consolidation. He was Jioted for untiring energy and industry, and for many 
years prior to his death held a foremost rank in river affairs. He was active 
in forming the Citizens' party and was one of the early fighters in the reform 
movement. He was a member of the G. A. R. and the Union Veteran Legion, 
taking a leading part in the work of both organizations. Among other 
admirable traits of character Mr. Bunten was noted for his strict habit of total 
abstinence from all intoxicating liquor. 

Captain Bunton married, October 11, 1866, Jennie Hendrickson, and of 
their children the following survive: i. R. W^alton, assistant in the auditor's 
ofiice of the Monongahela Coal Company, married Grace Rambler. 2. Charles 
C, superintendent of the local business of the Monongahela Coal Company, 
married Miss Morton Riddell and has two children, Berryman and Nan 
Henderson Bunton. 3. Elizabeth, married H. G. Henderson. 4. Harry R., 
graduate of Princeton College, class 1901, of the Harvard Law School, 1904, 
was admitted to the Allegheny bar in 1906 and is now practicing his pro- 
fession in Pittsburg. 5. Jean L. 6. \N . Kennedy, general bookkeeper for the 
Duquesne Bank. 

The death of Captain Bunton, which occurred June 8, 1907, was widely 
and sincerely mourned as that of a public-spirited citizen, an upright business 
man and warm-hearted and steadfast friend, the loss to his family being 
indescribably great. Many tributes were paid to his memory, and on the day 
of his death every flag on the boats in the harbor and all that could be reached 
on the local rivers were placed at half-mast. He was survived, not only by his 
widow and children, but also by a brother, William Bunton, of Pittsburg, and 
three sisters : Mrs. Sarah Russell, of Kittanning, Pennsylvania ; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Goodwin, of Weedsport, New York, and Mrs. Mary Burker, of the same place. 

Mrs. Bunton is a daughter of David L. Hendrickson, grandson of Colonel 



58 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



David Hendrickson, a Revolutionary soldier, and fifth in descent from the 
founder of the American branch of the family who emigrated to this country 
from Holland. 

David L. Hendrickson was for twenty years captain of boats plyingf on 
the lower rivers, and for two years during the Civil war commanded a boat 
in the government service. In early life he resided for a number of years in 
McKeesport, later moving to Pittsburg, where he was regarded as a very 
wealthy man in the days when one hundred thousand dollars (the amount of 
his fortune), or even seventy -five thousand, was sufficient to constitute riches. 
In politics he was a strong Republican. He and his wife were members of the 
old Third United Presbyterian church on Diamond street, Pittsburg. 

David L. Hendrickson married Margaretta Park, and they became the 
parents of seven children, four of whom died before reaching their majority. 
The survivors are : Jennie, widow of Isaac Newton Bunton ; Albert, and 
Emma, widow of Senator William Fulton, of Denver, Colorado. David L. 
Hendrickson died February lo, 1891, aged seventy-one years. He commanded, 
by his irreproachable life, the highest respect of all who knew him, and it may 
truly be said of him that he never gave any member of his family an unkind 
word. His widow passed away January 18, 1895, at the age of seventy-one. 

Mrs. Hendrickson was a daughter of Alexander Park, who emigrated from 
the north of Ireland about 1808, settling in Chester, Pennsylvania, where 
several of his children were born. He served in the war of 18 12, and after- 
ward moved with his family to Pittsburg, being one of the early settlers of that 
city. He owned a large amount of property, some of which was situated on 
Diamond street, near Wood street. He held the office of collector of the 
Pittsburg markets and for many years served as overseer of the poor. For 
forty years he was a member of the Second United Presbyterian church on 
Sixth street, and during a considerable portion of that time served as elder. 

Alexander Park married Jane Wright, who bore him thirteen children, of 
whom the following grew to maturity: Nancy, Rachel, Eliza, Joseph, who 
served in the Mexican war and died at the age of thirty years, and Margaretta, 
who became the wife of David L. Hendrickson. 



WILLIAM J. MOORE, a well-known resident of Oakland, Greater Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, who conducts the largest horseshoeing establishment in 
that section and who has been prominently identified with all public movements 
for the advancement of the city for more than a decade, is of Scotch-Irish 
descent. 

John Moore, father of William J. Aioore, was a native of Ireland, where 
he married Catherine Henderson and had eight children, of whom four came 
to America and settled in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania: i. William J., of whom 
see forward. 2. Samuel, married Mary Little, daughter of James Little. 3. 
Joseph H., married (first) a Miss Comfort and had two children; married 
(second) Jennie Gordon and had six children. 4. Hamilton, who is unmarried 
and resides in Pittsburg. 

WilHam J. Moore, son of John and Catherine (Henderson) Aloore, was 
born near Belfast, Ireland, May i, 1863. He emigrated to the LTnited States 
in 1880, and immediately went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he served 
his apprenticeship to the blacksmithing trade with his brother. He was in his 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 59 

employ for a period of ten years, and then commenced business for himself at 
No. 115 Oak avenue, a property which he subsequently purchased and in which 
his business is now (1906) located. He has one of the most completely 
equipped horseshoeing establishments in Greater Pittsburg, and has the reputa- 
tion of being one of the leading men in his trade. He is one of the foremost 
business men in general in Oakland, has been a prime mover in all plans for its 
advancement, and is a firm believer in a brilliant future for the place. He was 
one of the promoters and organizers of the Master Horseshoers' National 
Protective Association, and was elected secretary and treasurer for his first 
term of office in Cleveland, Ohio, July 23, 1892, and held this office for eight 
consecutive years. He has been secretary of the Masters' Horseshoeing Asso- 
ciation of Pittsburg and Allegheny for fourteen years ; has been secretary and 
president of the Journeymen Horseshoers' Association of the United States ; 
and is president of the Oakland Board of Trade. Mr. Moore is a Republican 
in politics and takes an unusually active part in matters of public moment, 
especially in the reform movement in Pittsburg during the last ten years. At 
the time of the organization of the Citizens' party he was elected chairman of 
the Fourteenth ward and led the party through three successive victories. He 
was the chairman of the joint movement that elected John B. Larkin to the 
office of controller in 1905, and chairman of the Civil party in the recent cam- 
paign, which elected the full ward ticket and gave five hundred majority to Mr. 
Guthrie. His religious affiliations are with the United Presbyterian church. 
He is a man of enterprise, progress and executive ability, and may be styled 
a born leader. 

Mr. Moore married, in 1895, Belle H. Hainer, daughter of John and 
Frances (Ruple) Hainer, and they have had four children: William H., born 
in 1896; Belle F., born in 1898; Catherine M., in 1899; and John Hainer, in 
1903. Mrs. Moore's ancestors were residents of Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and were among the early settlers who cheerfully gave up life and 
property in defense of the land of their adoption. 



ALBERT JAMES CAYWOOD, merchant and broker, was born in Mar- 
ietta. Ohio, May 20, 1849. He is the son of William Caywood, born in 1812. 
In the early part of William Caywood's life he was a tiller of the soil, but later 
was engaged as a contractor and builder. He served in the Civil war in the 
One Hundred and Forty-eighth Ohio National Guards. He married Anne 
Henton, of Liverpool, England, by whom was born these children : John W., 
Sarah A., Hattie S., George W., Maggie H., Albert James (subject), Elizabeth 
F. and Henry T. The father died in 1882 and the mother the same year. 

Albert J. Caywood was educated at the common schools and then taught 
school for three terms. He graduated from Marietta College in 1875, and that 
year came to Pittsburg as the manager of a commission house, and remained 
with it for fourteen years. In 1893 he engaged in business for himself as a 
merchandise broker. He is a member of Grace Presbyterian church, and was 
made an elder in 1906. In 1887 he married Elizabeth L. Brown, daughter of 
William P. Brown and wife of Allegheny, and to them have been born : Alberta 
B., born June 3, 1888; William P., born May 30, 1891, and Lindsay P., born 
February 19, 1900. 

Mrs. Caywood's father, William Parks Brown, was born in Kittaning, 



6o A CENTURY, AND A H^LF OF 



Pennsylvania, in 1829. He enlisted in Company E, Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Regiment of Volunteers, during the Civil war, made a brave soldier in the 
cause of the Union and received an honorable discharge. He was later a mem- 
ber of the Grand Army of the Republic, Allegheny Post, No. 128. He was 
engaged in the manufacture of carriages. He married Ellen Lindsay, and they 
were the parents of children as follows: Robert J., Elizabeth L. and Charles 
P. Mrs. Brown died March 6, 1861, and afterwards he married Mary B. 
McLain, by whom three children were born: Sadie M., Minnie B. and Wil- 
liametta. The father died November 22, 1902, and the mother August 15, 1892. 



WILLIAM C. WALLY, a well-known contractor of Etna, was born 
March 26, 1871, in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, a son of Thomas Wally, 
a native of the same county, where he followed the calling of a farmer. 

William C. Wally grew up on the farm, receiving his education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native county. At the age of eighteen he entered the oil 
fields of Pennsylvania, serving first as tool-dresser and later working at drill- 
ing rigs. In 1897 he left the oil fields and went into the contracting and drill- 
ing business, in which he has since been engaged, having holdings of his own 
about Sharpsburg, to which he also gives his attention. 

He affiliates with Lodge No. 448, F. and A. M., of Sharpsburg, and Lodge 
No. 932, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Etna. He is a Democrat 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Wally married Emma Kneis, and they are the parents of the following 
children: William, born February 7, 1895; Marian, born March 16, 1897; 
Harry, born October 9, 1900; and James, born October 31, 1905. 

Mrs. Wally is a daughter of Peter Kneis, who was born in Germany, and 
in 1857 came as a young man to the United States, settling in Allegheny 
county. He was a wagon maker, owning and operating a shop at Millvale. 
He voted with the Republicans and was a member of the German Lutheran 
church. Mr. Kneis married Elizabeth Hassinger, and their children were : 
Jacob, George, Harry, Catharine, Nancy, Julia, Anna, Mary and Emma, wife 
of William C. Wally. Mr. Kneis died in February, 1907, and is survived by 
his widow. 



DR. JAMES K. M. PERRINE, of Pittsburg, was born November 20, 
1870, at Idlewood, Pennsylvania, and is a representative of an ancient family 
of French origin, the history of which is traced through the following genera- 
tions : 

(I ) Daniel Perrine, founder of the American branch of the family, came 
from France about the middle of the seventeenth century. It is not known 
with certainty in what part of the colonies he found a home, but from the fact 
that his grandson was a resident of New Jersey it seems not improbable that 
the race was first planted there. He married Maria Thorel. 

(II) Peter Perrine, son of Daniel (I) and Maria (Thorel) Perrine, was 
born in 1667, and presumably lived in New Jersey. He married Ann Holmes. 

(III) Henry Perrine, son of Peter (II) and Anna (Holmes) Perrine. 
was born in 1700, and was a resident of Cranljerry, New Jersey. He married 
Martha Jabs, of that province, by whom lie had two sons : Joseph, born in 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE. 6i 



1/33, married :\Iargaret McFaron ; and William. Henry Perrine died at Cran- 
berry in 1753. 

(IV) William Perrine, son of Henry (HI) and Martha (Jabs) Perrine, 
was born in New Jersey and was killed at Valley Forge while serving in the 
Continental army under Washington. He married Ann van Rensselaer. 

(V) Richard Perrine. only surviving son of William (IV^) and Ann (van 
Rensselaer) Perrine, was born in Baltimore and there passed his life. He 
married Ann Edmundson, and died in 1822. 

(VIj Benjamin Perrine, son of Richard (V) and Ann (Edmundson) 
Perrine, was born in 18 17, in Baltimore. He possessed interests in the mining 
industry which obliged him to make business trips to the west. In 1849 he set 
out on one of these journeys and is supposed to have been killed by the Indians, 
as he was never again heard from. He married Louisa C. Bateman, of Balti- 
more, and they were the parents of one child, Thomas C. 

(VII) Thomas C Perrine, only child of Benjamin (VI) and Louisa C. 
(Bateman) Perrine, was born December 30, 1848, in Baltimore, and received 
his education at Newell's Institute, after which he took a course of bookkeeping 
at Duff's College. He then engaged in the oil and lamp business in Phila- 
delphia, but after a time sold out and became a partner in the firm of Edmund- 
son & Son, of Pittsburg, the style being altered to Edmundson & Perrine. 
Later he became the senior member of the firm. From 1892 until his death he 
was president of the Beelington Steel & Iron Company of Mrginia. He was a 
director in various business enterprises. His political principles were those 
advocated and supported by the Republican party. He was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church and for seventeen years served as 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

Mr. Perrine married Sally J., daughter of J. K. and Susan S. Morange, 
and they became the parents of two children : Catherine E., born December 31, 
1868, in Pittsburg, wife of Samuel N. Xease, children, Sarah J. and Catharine; 
and James K. M. The death of Mr. Perrine, which occurred in Alarch, 1904, 
deprived the community of a most estimable man and worthy citizen, devoted 
to his- family and faithful in every duty. 

(Mil) James K. M. Perrine, son of Thomas C. (VII) and Sally J. 
(Morange) Perrine, received his primary education in the public schools of 
Pittsburg, and was fitted for college at W^illard's Preparatory School. From 
the Western University of Pennsylvania he passed to Hahnemann Medical 
College, Philadelphia, graduating in 1893 with the degree of Doctor of Med- 
icine. For six months he engaged in general practice in Pittsburg, and then 
entered the Philadelphia Polyclinic, and after graduating there took a special 
course, in 1894, in diseases of the eye, nose and throat. He afterward took 
special courses in Berlin, Heidelberg and Gottingen. After his return home he 
opened an office in Pittsburg, where he has since practiced as a specialist in 
diseases of the eye, nose and throat. He was appointed eye surgeon on the 
ophthalmological staff and a member of the Medical Board of the Homeopathic 
Medical and Surgical Hospital of Pittsburg. He belongs to the Allegheny 
County Medical Society, and for one year held the office of president of that 
body. He is a member of Franklin Lodge, No. 221, F. and A. M., of Pitts- 
burg. In 1898 he was first assistant surgeon in the Seventeenth Regiment, 
National Guard, state of Pennsylvania, and later became second lieutenant of 
Company H, Eighteenth Regiment, National Guard, state of Pennsylvania. In 



62 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



1900 he was promoted to first lieutenant, and in 1902 to captain, from which 
rank he resigned in October, 1904. In the sphere of poHtics he is identified 
with the RepubHcans. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Perrine married, in 1903, Laura Broadhead, daughter of Dr. Clarence 
C. and Laura V. (Broadhead) Rinehart, of Pittsburg. Their children are: 
I. Clarence R., born September 4, 1903, and 2. Virginia B., born September 
9, 1906. 



OTTO F. FREEBING, who has been identified with the drug business for 
almost twenty years in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, is a descendant of an honored 
family of Germany. 

John Freebing, father of Otto F. Freebing, was born in the Black Forest, 
Germany, and died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1897. He emigrated to 
America and moved to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, about 1870, which he thence- 
forth made his permanent home. He was engaged in the iron business. He 
married Augusta Specht, who was born in Rossdorf, Germany, and died in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1897, and they had children: Otto F., see forward; 
Charles, Bertha, Frederick, William, Emma, Edward, Anna and Laura. 

Otto F. Freebing, third child of John and Augusta (Specht) Freebing, 
was born in Newark, New Jersey, September 16, 1865. He was but a few 
years of age when his parents moved to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and he 
acquired his preparatory education in the public schools of the latter city. At 
the age of fourteen years he accepted a position as clerk in a drug store, and 
by diligence and faithful application to his duties, combined with earnest 
study, rose rapidly in this profession. He commenced in this line of business 
for himself in 1890, at the corner of Park and Frankstown avenues, and two 
years later built the store in which he carries on his business at the present 
time. He has more than a merely local reputation for reliability and excellent 
service, as well as being noted for the pure quality of the drugs he handles. He 
has taken an active interest in social and fraternal affairs, and is a member of 
the following organizations: Ben Hur Lodge, No. 107, Knights of Malta; J. 
B. Nicholson Lodge, No. 585, Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; Protective 
Home Circle ; Masonic Mutual Aid Association ; Leamington Council, No. 
1073, National Union ; Lincoln Tourist Club, and Western Pennsylvania Retail 
Druggists' Association. He is a member of the Leamington Presbyterian 
church, having been one of the six organizers of this institution. Mr. Freebing 
married, in 1892, Rebecca Hofer, a daughter of Michael Hofer, and they have 
children: Marion, born in 1898, and Kenneth, born in 1902. 



HENRY HOWARD KETTERING. The subject of this sketch, Henry 
Hov/ard Kettering, proprietor of the elegantly equipped New Rush House, 966 
Liberty avenue, is a descendant from one of the oldest and most respected of 
the pioneer families, who by their skill and downright integrity have con- 
tributed a mite at least toward making and developing Pennsylvania into the 
great commonwealth it is to-day ; its descendants have, by the liberal use of 
brawn and skill, developed its pristine wilderness into rich fields of waving 
grain, where corn and cereals grow in abundance over a wealth of mineral 
substance that has made his native county a household word : it has helped 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 63 



develop its wonderful mines and figured occasionally in a dignified manner in 
its politics. 

Mr. Kettering was the fifth son and seventh child of Adam and Eliza 
(Motz) Kettering, having been born and reared in Westmoreland county, his 
natal day being October 14, 1864. His education was obtained in the university 
of the common people, the Cope and Cemetery schools of Hempfield township 
being his alma mater. This historic township is the place of his nativity, and 
over its broad acres he, in childhood's happy days, delighted to roam. School 
days over, he returned to work on the farm of the parental ancestor who had 
reared him. Upon attaining his majority, however, guided presumably by the 
star of genius, he forsook the plowshares, applying for and subsequently enter- 
ing the employ of the Pennsylvania Railway Company, first as stationary 
engineer, road fireman on an engine, and eventually into the service of the 
Pullman Car Company as conductor on a swift train plying between New 
York, Chicago and St. Louis ; following in the path of rectitude, he 
developed an aptitude which, coupled with a stern and rugged honesty, brought 
him the highest and worthiest compliments the company has ever given to one 
of its retiring employes. Tiring of the long trips over the multiplied highway 
of steel, he sought and found employment in a leading Pittsburg hotel, to which 
his broad experience and knowledge of men so justly entitled him. His first 
venture in this line was in 1890, when he secured and filled to the satisfaction 
of his various employers the position of second clerk at the Seventh Avenue 
Hotel, later at Newell's in Fifth avenue, and finally as proprietor of the Old 
Rush House, the latter apparently bringing out his true merit and worth and 
undeniably laying the cornerstone for the future successes that have crowned 
his life's work. 

As previously stated herein, Mr. Kettering is sole proprietor of the 
New Rush House, the incumbency of which hallows many pleasant memories 
even to the oldest and newest of many of the most prominent downtown 
business men, and is substantial in the commercial firmament. It is quite 
unnecessary to say that the New Rush House caters to the best of trade, for its 
cuisine, invariably par excellence, with its lobby always inviting, the furnish- 
ings of which are embellished with Mexican onyx, oak and mahogany, 
together with hand paintings and decorations of the highest type of art, render 
it attractive to its legions of patrons. 

Fraternally speaking, and by way of pardonable digression, it is to be said 
Mr. Kettering is affiliated with the Masonic order, being a member of Milinor 
Lodge, No. 287, F. & A. M. In 1893 he received the honor of being a member 
of the Pennsylvania Consistory, Thirty-second degree. 

"Harry," as he is familiarly known, is a most popular boniface, having 
among other things the happy faculty of making and maintaining friends as 
his word, invariably a bond, has made his character irreproachable. 

Lewis O. Kettering, manager, and a brother, is unqualifiedly a success. 
His hearty greeting and warm hand shake, coupled with his acquaintance with 
men and his broad knowledge of them, and his wide experience are each a 
formidable asset. The lore of his travels, never tirelessly, but pleasantly 
related, is refreshing to his many friends and the guests of the house as well. 

Herman P. Kettering, by his 3'ears of faithfulness as clerk, has hundreds 
of acquaintances who applaud his consistent work. He is the only one of the 
three brothers mentioned that has met his affinity. He is the proud father of 



64 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Richard Adam and Herman P. Kettering, Jr., and has a pretty home in 
Carrick borough. 



CONRAD G. SCHAUM, a thrifty, energetic business man, and a leading 
merchant of Sheridan, Pennsylvania, was born at Troy Plill, Allegheny, Penn- 
sylvania, October 4, 1866, a son of Conrad and Catherine Schaum. 

Conrad Schaum (father) was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, Jan- 
uary I, 1827. He received the usual seven years' schooling in his native place, 
and performed service in the German army, as is the custom of young men in 
that country. When twenty-one years of age he came to the United States, 
settling in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. He accepted the position of fireman in 
the iron mills of Lindsay & McCutcheon, where he remained for some time. 
He then took up his residence in Pittsburg, and was employed in the same line 
of work in Painter's Iron Mills, which position he held for the long period of 
thirty years, which fact is an eloquent testimonial of his faithfulness to duty. 
He is an active member of the German Evangelical church, and up to the year 
1906 served as a member of its board of trustees. 

Conrad Schaum married, in England, in 1856, Catherine Luh, who bore 
him the following children : Catherine, wife of John Smith, of Hazlewood, 
Pennsylvania ; Mary, wife of Caspar Miller, a resident of the Thirty-ninth 
ward ; Elizabeth, wife of Lewis Callahan, of Tyrone, Pennsylvania ; Conrad 
G. ; Ann, wife of William Miller, a resident of the Thirty-ninth ward ; Lydia, 
wife of John Helwick, of Osage, Iowa ; Frank A. W., of Sheridan, secretary 
of the Pennsylvania Savings Fund & Loan Association of Fourth avenue ; 
he married Rebecca Plunket. Mr. and Mrs. Schaum celebrated their golden 
wedding in 1906. Mr. Schaum, despite his age, is hale, hearty and vigorous. 

Conrad G. Schaum was six years of age when his parents moved to the 
borough of Elliott, now the Thirty-ninth ward. His first teacher in the schools 
of Elliott was Mrs. Mattie Edwards, who is now the wife of W. FI. Speakers, 
one of the well-known business men of Pittsburg. He left school at the age of 
thirteen, at which time he became self-supporting, becoming a bottle boy in a 
glass factory, his wages being three dollars per week. He worked in the 
various departments of the factory until seventeen years of age, at which time 
he was an oven tender. He then accepted a position as clerk in the grocery 
store of W. H. Speakers, under whose preceptorship he obtained a thorough 
knowledge of the business. He served in this capacity for nineteen years, and 
at the expiration of this period of time, with the capital saved from his earn- 
ings, embarked in the grocery business in the building he now occupies. At 
the beginning he had but one room, but his business has increased so rapidly 
that he now occupies three large rooms. Last year (1906) his business 
amounted to thirty-five thousand dollars, and this year the prospects are that it 
will reach a much higher figure. The success which has attended his efiforts 
has been directly due to his enterprise, energy and determination to succeed. 
He has steadily advanced, step by step, and now ranks among the prosperous 
and influential men of his city. He is a staunch adherent of the principles of 
the Republican party, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, Heptasophs and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

Mr. Schaum married, January 9, 1892, in the West End Methodist Epis- 
copal church, Mary E. Hofer, daughter of Michael and Sarah (Nolder) Hofer, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 65 



who celebrated their golden wedding in 1904. The ceremony was performed 
by the late Rev. H. C. Beacon. The children of this union are: Edna Bernice, 
Nellie Vera, Charles Earle, Mary Elizabeth, Conrad Glen and Clyde Franklin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schaum are members of the Sheridan Methodist Episcopal 
church, and when the present edifice was erected in 1904 he served as a 
member of the building committee. 



HON. FREDERICK HILL COLLIER, LL. D. Among the deceased 
citizens of Pittsburg whose lives and conduct were of such high value that all 
classes held them in honor and esteem, was the late Judge Frederick H. Collier. 
He was born at Millerstown, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, February 25, 

1826, and died October 29, 1906. He was the son of Rev. William Collier, 
D. D., born in Hagerstown, Maryland, May ii, 1803, who married Miss Sarah, 
daughter of Frederick H. and Margaret (Buckius) Hill, born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, January 2, 1798. By this union were born the following 
children: i. Frederick H., of this notice. 2. Charles W., born November 4, 

1827, at Millintown, died aged twenty-one years, soon after he had graduated 
from Columbia College, Washington, District of Columbia, on board a ship 
from California to Central America. 3. Ann M. E., born October 26, 1836, 
at Alexandria, Virginia, married James Scott, of Steubenville, Ohio. 4. William 
S., born July 15, 1859, at Brookville, Alaryland, died in Washington, District 
of Columbia, in 1886. 

William Collier, Sr., the subject's grandfather, was born about 1773, in 

Berks county, Pennsylvania, and married Elizabeth . They were the 

parents of eight children: William, Daniel, Joseph, John, George, Mary, 
Elizabeth and Rebecca. John and George were in the Civil war and George 
was killed in that conflict. 

Joseph Collier, the great-grandfather and father of William, Sr., married 
Miss Mary Marx, whose father and seven sons were in the Revolutionary war 
and the most of them were killed in battle engagements. Joseph Collier and 
wife were the parents of three children : William Collier, Sr., Daniel and 
Mary. The Colliers were of English descent, while the Marx family were 
from Germany originally. 

Judge Frederick H. Collier, subject, son of Rev. William Collier, was 
born February 25, 1826, and received his education at Brookville Academy, 
near Washington, District of Columbia, graduating from Columbia College of 
Washington with the class of 1849. He then studied law, was admitted to the 
bar in the District of Columbia, and removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where 
he was admitted to the Allegheny county bar, January 11, 1851, on motion of 
William M. Shinn. He was elected district attorney in 1856, served three 
years, and when the Civil war came on he raised the One Hundred and Thirty- 
ninth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was elected its 
colonel. He picked some of the flower of Pittsburg families, who became 
members of Companies D, G and I, which companies were chiefly made up of 
Pittsburg and Allegheny county men. The regiment was organized at Camp 
Howe, near Pittsburg, September i, 1862, when the government was still 
attempting to recover from the first Bull Run disaster. Judge Collier was 
elected colonel, James D. Owen, lieutenant colonel, and W. H. Moody, major 
of the regiment. After being ordered to the front they received their arms at 



66 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Harrisburg, and at once reported at Washington, where they were assigned, 
September 3, 1862, to the painful duty of burying the dead upon the recently 
fought battlefield of Bull Run, where they first saw the real horrors of war. 
The regiment was then sent to join the Third Regiment, Third Division, Sixth 
Army Corps, at the battle of Antietam. It was at Gettysburg, however," that 
Colonel Collier and his brave men from Pittsburg distinguished themselves, 
especially when they marched thirty miles and on July 2, and under General 
Sedgewick, were led into the relief of the Union left, which had all day been 
repelling Longstreet's entire force in the celebrated Peach Orchard, defended 
by General Sickles, and Little Round Top, held by General Sykes. At the 
head of his men Colonel Collier was accidentally wounded by himself at the 
close of the engagement. He took part in many fierce battles, along the Rap- 
pahannock, at Mine Run, Spottsylvania Courthouse, Cold Harbor, Petersburg 
and Richmond. He was under General Sheridan at Winchester, Fisher's Hill 
and Cedar Creek. L.ater he was under Grant in the army of the Potomac, 
and breveted brigadier general for gallantry while in action. 

His eminent fitness later called him to be detailed for special duty in pre- 
siding over important court martial cases, where his services were invaluable 
to the government at Washington. His reports, which according to military 
rule, had to be reviewed by the President, passed Mr. Lincoln, and without a 
single exception the justice was so marked that they all received approval. He 
was a most intimate friend of Secretary Edwin M. Stanton, then secretary of 
war, having known him in Pittsburg as a member of the bar, which acquaint- 
ance was renewed at Washington, where he was intimately associated with that 
great cabinet officer. 

When Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, General Collier's regi- 
ment was in front of Petersburg and participated in the great events which 
closed the Civil War. The following article is an extract from the "History 
of Pennsylvania Volunteers" : "While the army was lying in front of Peters- 
burg, Lieutenant General Grant had received from patriotic citizens the sum 
of four hundred and sixty dollars, to be presented to that soldier who should 
be the first to plant the LTnion flag on the ramparts of Richmond upon its 
downfall. As Richmond was not taken by assault, but fell without resistance, 
as the result of the successful assault on Petersburg on the 2d of April, Gen- 
eral Grant deemed that the donors' wishes would be best met by dividing the 
sum among the three color sergeants most conspicuous for gallantry in the 
three corps of the army most warmly engaged in the final struggle. He accord- 
ingly called in the corps commanders to designate the men who should be the 
recipients of this coveted honor. General Wright, who commanded the Sixth 
Corps, reported the name of Sergeant David W. Young, of Company E, One 
Hundred and Thirty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment, as most deserving in his 
corps." Sergeant David W. Young was a member of General Collier's regi- 
ment. 

Judge Collier returned to Pittsburg when his military duties were ended 
and resumed the practice of law. H^e was of the firm of Collier, Miller & 
McBride, and enjoyed a large practice until 1869, when he was elected the 
judge of the court of common pleas for the term of ten years, and at the end 
of that period was reelected in 1879, 1889 and 1899. Under the Constitution 
of 1874 this court was designated "Court of Common Pleas No. i," and so 
remains. On the first Monday in January, 1903, Judge Collier having been 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 67 



duly commissioned, was qualified as president judge, in which capacity he 
served until his death. He succeeded Judge Edwin H. Stowe. Judge Collier 
received the degree of "Doctor of Laws" in 1886 from the Adrian (Michigan) 
College. Collier township in Allegheny county was named in honor of him. 

In religious affiliations Judge Collier was a Methodist Protestant and very 
many years was an active church worker. He directed the music of the church, 
and in September prior to his last sickness he conducted rehearsal and sang 
in the choir. He was an honored member of the Loyal Legion and the Union 
Veteran Legion, No. i, which body passed befitting resolutions over his demise 
and took their old flag to his home to cover his form in death. 

No judge in the civil or criminal branches of the courts had a better 
reputation for study and learning on the rules of evidence, of which he was a 
recognized master. Patience, urbanity, grace, dignitv of deportment on the 
bench, he displayed in a most marked manner. To the younger members of 
the bar he was most considerate and affectionate, thus earning the title of 
"Pap Collier," because of his fatherly treatment. To no lawyer, old or young, 
was Judge Collier ever known to forget the dignity of his profession, but to 
no class of the community did he endear himself more than the old comrades 
of the Civil war. He retained his membership in the Grand Army Post and 
Union Veteran Legion, and until prevented by age and illness never failed to 
march with the ranks on the annual Memorial Day occasions and to strew the 
graves of his departed comrades with rich garlands of flowers. During the 
last National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic at Pittsburg 
he marched the entire long route of the great and imposing parade. 

In his last years on the bench he was particularly fond of his old army 
associations, and in his appointments of court officers always favored the old 
soldiers. One of the largest camps of Sons of Veterans in the county was 
named for him. During the last decade of his life he took great delight in 
entertaining visitors at his beautiful home at Rose Hill, where he used to have 
one special seat, which overlooked the surrounding country. On the hillside 
about his natural park-home he produced some of the finest varieties of grapes 
grown in Pennsylvania. 

Judge Collier died at five o'clock and fifteen minutes, on the 29th day of 
October, 1906. He had been stricken with paralysis and had been confined to 
his house several weeks. He is survived by three grandchildren, Rebekah 
Lindsey, only child of Charles W. and Eleanor ]\IcCutcheon Collier, and Fred- 
erick Collier and Catherine King, children of his daughter. Elizabeth, and 
James H. McCutcheon. 

Of his domestic relations, it may here be stated that he married Catherine 
King, of Georgetown, District of Columbia, in 1849. She was the daughter 
of William and Christena (Goszler) King. By this union the following chil- 
dren were born. i. Kate. 2. Sarah Christine, who married W. W. McBride, 
of Pittsburg ; she died in 1887. 3. Charles W., of whom further mention is 
made. 4. Elizabeth, married James H. McCutcheon, and their children are : 
Frederick C, Eleanor, Catherine (deceased), and Elizabeth (deceased). 5. 
Frances K., died in 1897. 6. Frederick, died in 1859. 7- Dasie. died in 1887. 
Mrs. Catherine (King) Collier, the mother, was born in 1825, and died in 
1905. 

Charles Wesley Collier, son of Judge Collier and wife, was born in 
Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, and graduated from the W^estern LTniversity of 



68 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Pennsylvania, with the class of 1875. He registered as a lawyer April 22, 
1874, on motion of Jacob H. Miller. His preceptors were his father, Jacob H. 
Miller, and Archibald McBride. He died in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
November 18, 1882. The Bench and Bar of a recent date has the following 
tribute to his character: 

"His death was announced in court on the day of its occurrence by Jacob 
H. Miller and Marshall Swartzwelder. The death of this young man was a 
sad stroke to his family in many ways. The only son of a distinguished lawyer, 
soldier, citizen, judge, he was looked upon as the legitimate heir of at least 
much of his father's merits and good name. He was happily married and had 
entered upon the work of his profession with all things bright and promising. 
He had a charming personality, was a thorough gentleman, had a just sense of 
honor and full of true manly love. Few deaths have been more deplored than 
that of "Charlie' Collier, young in years but ripe in goodness." 



ALVIN FREDERICK STONER. a retired merchant of Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsvlvania, and who' was closely identified with commercial interests for 
manv vears, is a representative of an old family of the state, whose pioneer 
ancestors came from Germany. 

Frederick Stoner, grandfather of Alvin Frederick Stoner, was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1769, and when still very young came to 
Penn township, where in the early part of the nineteenth century he purchased 
a farm. He was a blacksmith by trade, but abandoned that occupation in favor 
of agriculture, in which he was actively engaged until his death in 1835. He 
married Barbara Whitmore, also of German descent, born in 1775 and died in 
1861, and they had children: Christian, married Mary Stoner; John, married 
Elizabeth Sto'tler ; Frederick ; Martha, married David Stotler ; Jacob ; Joseph, 
married Nancy Stotler ; David ; Susan, married Samuel Bush ; Abraham ( see 
forward). 

Abraham Stoner, youngest child of Frederick and Barbara (Whitmore) 
Stoner, was born on the Stoner homestead in Penn township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsvlvania, in the fall of 181 1. His early life was spent on the home farm, 
and he had the adyantages of as good schooling as the public schools of that 
day and section afforded. He assisted his father in the cultivation and man- 
agement of the home farm until 1839, at which time he removed to Wilkins- 
burg and associated himself in the general mercantile business with Hugh 
Boyd. This business was carried on very successfully until 1846, when the 
partnership was dissolved and Mr. Stoner went to Jacksonville, Westmoreland 
countv, Pennsvlvania, where he was in mercantile business and postmaster for 
a period of four years. He then returned to Wilkinsburg and resumed his old 
line of business in 1853, in which he w^as engaged very profitably until his 
death, which occurred March 26, 1891. Upon his return to Wilkinsburg he 
had erected a store building, and in the following year the house at No. 732 
Penn avenue, which is in an excellent state of preservation, and in which his 
son and daughter are residing at the present time. He was appointed post- 
master of Wilkinsburg by President Van Buren in 1840 and served five years. 
He was reappointed postmaster of Wilkinsburg in 1864 by President Lincoln 
and held this office for twenty years. He was also at one time treasurer of 
Sterrett township, and was one of the most prominent men in that section of 




i 



MRS. REBECCA STONER. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 69 

the state, having always given his active support to the principles of the 
Republican party. He was an attendant of the Presbyterian church, which 
represents his faith, and enjoyed the esteem and respect of the entire com- 
munity. He married November 16, 1848, Rebecca Little, born in Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsylvania, December 16, 1821, and died December 6, 1905, a daughter of 
David and Christina (Stattenfield) Little, who were married January":, 1806, 
and had children as follows: i. Sarah Ann, born March 5. 1807; married! 
August 18. 1 83 1, George Johnson. 2. James Denison, born December 2g, 
1808, was drowned as the result of an accident to the steamer "Citizen," March 
10, 1831. 3. Melvina, born November 29, 1810; married, September 4, 1832, 
Charles Reynolds. 4. Eliza, born November 19, 1812; married, December 15, 
1835, Lot b. Reynolds. 5. Margaret Jane, born August 9, 1816; married! 
April 6, 1830, Rev. John Bonner. 6. David, born October 16, 1819; died 
January 3, 1820. 7. Rebecca, mentioned above. ■ 8. David, born September 16, 
1823. Abraham and Rebecca (Little) Stoner's children are: i. Eulalia, who 
died February 2y, 1905, married Jonas R. Johnson, and left children : Frederick 
W. and Everett Reed Johnson. 2. James Whitmore, died December 19, 1884. 
3. Marion, died September 10, i860. 4. Alvin Frederick, see forward c. 
Lillian M. 

Alvin Frederick Stoner, third «on and fourth child of Abraham and 
Rebecca (Little) Stoner, was born in the house on Penn avenue, Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsylvania, in which he is at present residing with his sister, Lillian AL He 
vvas educated in the public schools of the township and upon the completion 
■of his education entered the business of his father, in due course of time, in 
1884, assuming the responsibility of a partner. Upon the death of his father 
lie assumed entire control of the business, and under his able management it 
jiourished until January, 1902, when he retired from active work in the mer- 
cantile field and devoted his entire time and attention tO' the management of the 
family estate, which had grown to large proportions. He has erected a num- 
ber of private residences and business blocks in the borough, among them being 
a large building at No. 738 Penn avenue, which is rented in apartments and 
for business purposes. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church of 
Wilkinsburg, in which he has been an elder since 1887. He is a Republican 
in politics. 

THE RIGHT REVEREND CORTLANDT WHITEHEAD, S. T. D.. 
Second Bishop of Pittsburg of the Protestant Episcopal Church, was born in 
New York, October 30, 1842. He prepared for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, where he was graduated in 1859; he entered Yale the same year, and 
took his A. B. in 1863. His theological course was taken at the Philadelphia 
Divinity School, where he was graduated in 1867. He received Deacon's Or- 
ders from Bishop Odenheimer, in Trinity church, Newark, New Jersey, June 
21, 1867, and was ordained priest in St. Mark's chapel, Black Hawk, Colorado, 
August 8, 1868, by Bishop Randall. Devoting his early ministry to the western 
mission field, he served for three years in Colorado. Returning to the east he 
"became rector of the Church of the Nativity, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
187 1 -1882, and was a deputy to the general convention from the same diocese 
in 1877 and in 1880. He received his doctorate in divinity from Union, 
Schenectady, New York, in 1880; from Hobart, Geneva, New York, in 1887; 
and from St. Stephen's, Annandale, New York, in 1890, S. T. D. 



yq, A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Bishop Whitehead was consecrated bishop of Pittsburg in Trinity church, 
Pittsburg, January 25, 1882', by Bishops Stevens, Bedell, M. A. DeWolfe 
Howe, Scarborough, Peterkin, and the Bishop of Huron, Ontario, Dr. Helmuth. 

He was married on July 29, 1868, to Charlotte Burgoyne King, of Rox- 
borough, Massachusetts. He has five adult children, one son and four 
daughters. 

ANTHONY SCHILLO, a well-known citizen of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
who is now living in retirement at No. 3803 Penn avenue, in the Fifteenth 
ward, after many years spent in active business life, is a representative of a 
German family, as the name would indicate. 

Anthony Schillo, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Prussia, 
Germany, in the Rhine province of Preusen, in 1813. In his youth he was 
apprenticed to the trade of moulding, which he learned thoroughly in all its 
details, and in which he was engaged in his native land until he emigrated to 
America in 1850. His first place of residence was in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
but at the expiration of one year he removed to Chicago, Illinois, where for a 
time he followed his trade, but later established a foundry which was known 
as Schillo, Cassman & Company, and of which he was the leading spirit and 
head until his retirement from business in 1871. The business, however, is 
still conducted under the old firm name. Mr. Schillo was a self-made man in 
the truest sense of the word, for by his industry and close attention to all the de- 
tails of the business he had succeeded in building up he amassed a fortune. He 
and his family were members of the Catholic church. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican, and he cast his first vote for General John C. Fremont. His death 
occurred in 1884, and that of his wife two years later. He married, in 1836, 
in Prussia, Gertrude Kloman, born in 1816, a sister of Andrew Kloman, who 
was prominent in the early history of the iron and steel industry in Pittsburg, 
and they had nine children, six of whom lived to maturity : Katherine, 
deceased ; Margretta, Anthony, of whom later ; Elizabeth, Peter, deceased, and 
Mary. 

Anthony Schillo, eldest surviving son of Anthony and Gertrude (Kloman) 
Schillo, was born in the province of Rhine, Prussia, Germany, September 9, 
1842. He was about eight years of age when he came to this country with his 
parents, and his education was acquired in the public schools of Chicago, 
Illinois. He went to Pittsburg in 1859, where he entered the employ of his 
uncle, Andrew Kloman, and with him served an apprenticeship of three years, 
and then worked for him as a journeyman for a period of ten years. The 
firm has now become merged into the Carnegie Steel Company, and Mr. 
Schillo has worked for it for thirty-six and one-half years. His service was in 
a variety of fields — as puddler boss, assistant manager and roller boss. He 
retired from business in 1892, having amassed a competency by his years of 
toil, and is now enjoying his life retired from all active business interests. He 
has always been actively interested in educational matters, and served on the 
school board of Pittsburg for six years. He is a staunch supporter of the 
Republican party and was elected assessor of tne Fifteenth ward of Pittsburg 
in 1903, and still (1906) holds the position. He and his family are members 
of the Roman Catholic church, in which Mr. Schillo has been the tenor singer 
for forty-three years. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 71 



He married, in 1863, Elizabeth Kalchthaler, born in Pittsburg, a daughter 
of John Kalchthaler, who came to America in 1837, and was a butcher for 
many years, and was prominently identified with the history of the old Adams 
market. The children of Mr. and ]\Irs. Schillo are: i. William A., who 
succeeded to the position of his father in the steel works, married Theresa 
Eichenlaub. 2. Albert J., a clerk, married Mary Dietz, and has three children: 
Anthony, Paul and Mercedes. 3. Theodore J., a member of the Raweston 
Engraving Company, married Lucy Dauer, and has one child, Gertrude. 4. 
Bertha, married John J. Dauer, cashier of the Metropolitan Trust Company, 
and has children : Leo Anthony, John Perre, Earl Theodore and Louisa 
Elizabeth. 



SAMUEL CLYDE SCOTT, of Sheridan, serving in the capacity of sec- 
retary, treasurer and manager of The John Wade Lumber Company, is a native 
of Burgettstown, Washington county, Pennsylvania, born June i, 1879. He is 
a son of John Lindley and Sarah Elizabeth (McNary) Scott, and a grandson 
of Samuel Gordon Scott, whose birth occurred in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

John Lindley Scott (father) was born in Burgettstown, Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1847. He attended the schools of Pittsburg, and the 
knowledge thus gained was supplemented by attendance at a business college 
in that city. His first venture in business life was in the meat trade, which he 
abandoned in order to engage in the lumber business in Burgettstown, in which 
he achieved a well merited degree of success. He married Sarah Elizabeth 
McNary, of Burgettstown, born in 1849, a daughter of William McNary, also 
of Burgettstown, who was a carpenter and builder, and whose family consisted 
of four other children, namely: Samuel, a resident of Denison, Ohio, married 
a Miss Simcox ; they were the parents of three children. Amanda, married a 
Mr. Davies for her first husband, and a Mr. Stottlemeyer for her second hus- 
band ; she had two children, now deceased. Emma, unmarried, is a milliner 
in Burgettstown. Mary Ellen, died in early life. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott were as follows: Willa Amanda, born in 1870, married (first) 
Harry McGregor, one child, Elizabeth, born in 1890, married M. L. Skipps, of 
Pittsburg; married (second) AL H. McCIinik. three children: Mary Blanche, 
born in 1898; Warren Ford, in 1900; Archibald Scott, in 1902. Emma Elfrida, 
born in 1872, died unmarried, December 20, 1906, in Sheridan. Annie Drucilla, 
born in 1874, died unmarried, ]\Iay 8, 1904, in Sheridan. William Clare, born 
June I, 1879, unmarried, a carpenter by trade, residing in Sheridan. Samuel 
Clyde, twin of \\'illiam, of whom later. Mrs. Scott, the mother of these 
children, resides with her son, Samuel C. Scott. 

Samuel C. Scott received a very meager education in the schools of his 
native town. At the age of sixteen he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad as assistant agent, and continued as such until he attained the age of 
nineteen years. He then removed to Sheridan and entered the employ of the 
John W^ade Lumber Company as a clerk, in which capacity he served until a 
new company was formed, known as the McPeak, Wade & Scott Lumber Com- 
pany, and he was then elected secretary, treasurer and manager of the 
company, which offices he is filling in a creditable manner at the present time 
(1907). The company also have a branch in West Liberty, over which ]\Ir. 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Scott has control. His career is an example of what can be accomplished by 
perseverance and energy, and it is well worthy of emulation. He is a member 
of the First Presbyterian church of Sheridan, and his political allegiance is 
given to the Democratic party. 

Mr. Scott married, December 20, 1904, in Pittsburg, Edna B. Van Kirk, 
daughter of Samuel and Isabelle (Jackson) Van Kirk, the former of whom 
was an engineer and resided in Millvale, Pennsylvania, and the latter a native 
of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Scott only lived a short time after her 
marriage, passing away June 9, 1905, in Millvale, Pennsylvania. 



THE FETTERMAN FAMILY were originally from Germany, owning 
large mills in Hessen-Darmstadt. The American ancestor came to this country 
prior to the Revolution and settled on the Susquehanna river, above Harris- 
burg, at or near Lock Haven, acquiring property and mills in that section. 
The Fetterman homestead in Scott township has now been in the possession 
of the family for more than one hundred years. Members of this family have 
attained prominence in the various professions, notably that of law, and have 
rendered signal service in defense of the rights of their adopted country. 

(I) Washington Wilfred Fetterman married Hannah Plumer, daughter 
of Nathaniel Plumer and granddaughter of Jonathan Plumer, whose ancestors 
came to Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1633. Jonathan Plumer came across 
the country early in the eighteenth century and settled near where the old 
Allegheny arsenal stood. He was commissary to General Braddock in 1755; 
accompanied General Forbes when Fort Duquesne was taken in 1758; and was 
then with General Bouquet. Toward the latter part of the century his son 
Nathaniel purchased a large tract of land south of Pittsburg, which became 
the Plumer homestead, and on which the three sons of Washington W. and 
Hannah (Plumer) Fetterman were born. Mrs. Fetterman lived with her 
father for some years after her marriage. The old house is still standing and 
is now occupied by John Anderson. The house occupied by Nathaniel Plumer 
Fetterman and afterwards by his son. Judge Charles Sylvester Fetterman, 
stands on the opposite side of the road just above the Plumer homestead. It 
is called the Fetterman homestead, and is now occupied by the Mount Lebanon 
Country Club. The children of Washington W. and Hannah (Plumer) Fet- 
terman were: i. Washington Wilfred, born in 1802. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1822, and was very prominent not only in Pittsburg, but through- 
out western Pennsylvania. He became a convert to the Catholic faith after 
his marriage, and donated the site of old St. Paul's Cathedral in Fifth avenue, 
Pittsburg. He owned from two to four thousand acres of land in West Vir- 
ginia, and founded the town of Fetterman in that state. His death occurred 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 12, 1838. He married, in 1822, 
Sarah de Bulan, granddaughter of Baron de Bulan, who, until the death of 
Joseph the Second of Austria, was ambassador to the United States. They 
had two daughters and three sons : Colonel Fetterman, a member of Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, died from the effects of wounds received in three years 
of active service. Gilbert Lafayette Bulan had General La Fayette Bulan for 
godfather, he being an intimate friend of the elder Fetterman and on a visit 
to America at the time of the birth of this child, in 1824. He received his 
classical education in Mount St. Marv's College, studied law in the office of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 73 

Judge Baldwin, and was admitted to the bar in 1850. He was in partnership 
with his uncle. Nathaniel Plumer Fetterman, for some years, was prominent 
in his profession and noted for his ability as a speaker. He died in 1883. 
He married M. Augusta Gloninger, of Baltimore, Maryland, and their daugh- 
ter, Alice Grace, married John Leo Walsh, of Pittsburg. Wilfred B. resides 
in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. 2. Nathaniel Plumer, see forward. 3. George 
Plumer, born in 1807, was a graduate of West Point. He was a captain in 
the regular army. He married and had a son — William— who was also a 
captain in the regular army, and who was massacred by the Indians at what 
is now called Fort Fetterman. Wyoming. Both father and son died voung. 
4 and 5. Daughters, both deceased. 

(H) Nathaniel Plumer Fetterman, second son and child of Washington 
W^ilfred and Hannah (Plumer) Fetterman, was born February 4, 1804. He 
w-as born in the Plumer homestead and acquired his preliminary education 
preparatory to entering upon the study of law. This he undertook in the 
office of his brother, Washington Wilfred, and for many years was a leading 
member of the bar of western Pennsylvania. Upon attaining his majority 
he was admitted to the bar August 14, 1825, and subsequently removed to 
Bedford. Pennsylvania. After a residence there of several vears he repre- 
sented Bedford county in the lower branch of the legislature for three suc- 
cessive years, about 1828. To him may be accredited the origin of the 
present common school system, while through his ability and perseverance 
the first law inaugurating ij in this state was passed through the legislature. 
At the expiration of his third term he was urged to become a candidate for 
congress from the Bedford district ; he, however, declined the honor, and 
devoted his time and attention exclusively to the fulfilment of his professional 
duties. He removed to Beaver. Pennsylvania, in 1830, residing there until 
1849. then returned to Pittsburg and entered into a partnership w^ith his 
nephew, Gilbert L. B. Fetterman. under the firm name of N. P. & G. L. B. 
Fetterman. this association continuing for several years. Mr. Fetterman 
was subsequently a member of the Pittsburg bar, and attended also the courts 
of the neighboring counties, participating in almost every case of importance, 
both civil and criminal. In the celebrated case of the Commonwealth versus 
Montgomery et al., for the murder of Dawson in Washington county, and 
also in the case of the Commonwealth versus Sheets, for murder in Beaver 
county, he was retained by the commonwealth and distinguished himself by 
his learning, patient research and shrewdness. Until the outbreak of the 
Civil war he was a member of the Democratic party and one of the leading 
political orators in western Pennsylvania. During the presidency of Jame.«5 
Buchanan he was repeatedly solicited to accept various positions of trust 
and honor, but he invariably declined both public office and emolument. 
During the war he was a warm advocate of the cause of the Union, acted 
as a war Democrat, later joining the Republican party, of which he became 
an active and influential member. He was active in equipping soldiers for 
the army, and gave two of his sons as volunteers in the service of the country, 
they being members of the One Hundred and First Pennsylvania Regiment. 
He served as chairman of the examining committee of Pittsburg to pass 
judgment upon all applicants for admission to practice law, and in this re- 
sponsible position acted with admirable judgment and impartial discretion. 
He was continually consulted by attorneys from all parts of the state for his 



74 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

opinion on points of law. He married, December 28, 1828, Anna Dillon, 
daughter of Humphrey Dillon, of Bedford. Pennsylvania, and granddaughter 
of Lord Dillon, and they had ten children. 

(HI) Hon. Charles Sylvester Fetterman, son of Nathaniel Plumer and 
Anna (Dillon) Fetterman, was born in Beaver, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1840. 
He was eight years of age when his family removed to Allegheny county, 
and attended the common schools of the South Side. This was supplemented 
by an academical course, during which he was frequently commended for 
his originality of thought. He then took up the study of law under the pre- 
ceptorship of his father, completing his studies in 1864, and was examined 
and admitted to the Allegheny bar. His industry and powers of concentra- 
tion of thought were remarkable. His rise was so rapid as to excite much 
comment from older members of the profession. His record was that of a 
man of well balanced mind and great intellect. He was noted for clearness 
and accuracy and for the impartiality of his rulings. During his career on 
the bench his rulings were never reversed by the supreme court. He was 
appointed to fill a vacancy on the bench of common pleas court No. i, caused 
by the elevation of Judge James P. Sterrett, afterward chief justice, to th'e 
supreme court. Fie was nominated on the Republican ticket for the ensuing 
term, but was defeated. He was again a candidate for the bench in 1891, 
on the "Straight out" Republican ticket, and was defeated, although he polled 
twenty thousand votes. Judge Fetterman was assistant city attorney for 
Pittsburg for a number of years, but declined a reappointment, as he wished 
to give his entire attention to his private practice. The first vote of Judge 
Fetterman was cast for Lincoln, and from that time he was a faithful and 
active worker for the Republican interests. The Economite Society owed 
much of its prosperity to the efl:'orts of Judge Fetterman. He was the legal 
adviser of the famous Father Henrici for many years, and named one of his 
children for him. He was president of the Western Pennsylvania Historical 
Society for some years, and for a portion of that time member of the law 
examining board. His death, which was due to heat prostration, occurred 
August 17, 1900. 

He married (first), in 1863, Mary Douglass, who died in the course of 
a few years, leaving one child, Charles D., now in the internal revenue de- 
partment in Pittsburg. He married (second), November 17, 1870, Eliza 
McElroy, who died in 1896, a daughter of J. M. McElroy, then superintendent 
of the county home. They had six children: Emilie Blake (Mrs. James 
Ernest Fulton) ; Dr. James McElroy, of Hawthorn, Pennsylvania; Agnes M., 
who married Thomas McCleary ; Valeria J. ; Robert D., who died July 4, 1902 ; 
and Jacob Henrici. 



LOUIS HOBE, a well known German-American citizen of Pittsburg, 
was born August 19, 1865, in Luneburg, Germany, a son of Karl Hobe, a 
native of the same country, who came to the United States in 1879 and settled 
in Pittsburg, where he engaged in business as a butcher. Mr. Hobe, Sr., 
was twice married, his first wife being Mary Rancher, who bore him eight 
children, three of whom are living, Mary. Charles and Louis, of whom later. 
Mrs. Flobe died in 1865, and Mr. Hope, Sr., subsequently married Dora 
Miller, by whom he became the father of eight more children : Elanora, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 75 



Bertha, Herman and Rudolph living, and four deceased. The death of Mr. 
Hobe, the father, occurred in 1891. 

Louis Hobe, son of Karl and Mary (Rancher) Hobe, received his edu- 
cation in the schools of his native town, and about 1881 came to Pittsburg, 
where he has since conducted a successful business as a butcher. He is a 
member of the Maccabees and of East Liberty Lodge No. 369. 

Mr. Hobe married Catharine Pfeil, of Pittsburg, January 28, 1892, and 
they are the parents of the following children : William E., born April 25, 
1893; Louis C., born July 22, 1894; Walter, born January 6, 1897; Leonard, 
born March 26, 1898; Carl B., born October 16, 1899; Fredia S., born August 
9, 1901 ; Albert L., born June 22, 1903; Catharine J., born March 16, 1905; 
and Helen R., born April 27, 1907. During his residence in Pittsburg of 
more than a quarter of a century Mr. Hobe has not failed to identify himself 
with the best interests of the community. 



THE BUHOUP FAMILY. The head of this widely known family, 
John Buhoup, was a native of Hesse Cassel, Germany. The German spelling 
of his name was Beauchoupt, which in time has become anglicized into the 
present spelling and pronunciation, Buhoup. In 1776, although only fifteen 
years of age, he was drafted into the army and was among the Hessians sold 
to the English and sent to America to assist in subduing the American col- 
onists. However, young Buhoup did not favor the English cause and soon 
deserted, but was captured and sentenced to be executed. By some oversight 
his name was not called. He again deserted, was caught and again sentenced 
to death, but on account of his extreme youth was pardoned. December 25, 
1776, he deserted a third time; shooting an English officer in his effort to 
escape, and arming himself with the sword of the slain man he made his way 
to the Continental army and joined its ranks, serving under Washington until 
the close of the struggle for independence. He also took an active part in 
the war of 181 2, enlisting from Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, and was wounded 
and lost a leg. He died at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, at the^age of ninety-eight 
years. He married about the year 1800 — his wife's maiden name being now 
unknown. 

The offspring of this union was but one child, a son — John Buhoup — 
born May 4, 1802, at Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, and died in 1866. He 
was a man of good education, well versed in both the German and English 
languages, and attained a position of influence and prominence in the com- 
munity. He was a carpenter by trade, following that occupation through the 
greater part of his life, engaging in many contracts. He migrated west of 
the Allegheny Mountains in 1837, coming to Pittsburg and residing on Liberty 
street, near the present site of Union Station. In 1848 he moved to Duquesne 
Borough, which later became the Eighth ward of Allegheny City, where he 
spent the remainder of his life. He served as burgess, and was three times 
elected justice of the peace. He was also German interpreter at the .Allegheny 
county court. He was a man of strong religious convictions and a member 
of the Winebrenarian denomination. His political affiliations were with the 
Republican party, in the organization of which he took an active part. 

In 1824 Mr. Buhoup married Anna M. Barklow, born in 1806, and died 
in 1881. She was a granddaughter of Nancy Frey, whose maiden name was 



76 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Howard.- and who was abducted when a child from her home at Bristol, 
England, by an English sea captain. He brought her to America and sold 
her to servitude in Philadelphia. She later married Michael Frey,. of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. John and Anna M. Barklow Buhoup had children as 
follows : 

(i) Jonathan W., born 1825; married, October 4, 1848, to Jane Dick, of 
Allegheny; died 1862. At the breaking out of the Mexican war he joined 
an Arkansas cavalry regiment, marched overland to the seat of war, was in 
several battles, was' taken prisoner, escaped through the friendly offices of a 
Catholic priest and rejoined his regiment, serving until the end of the war. 
Returning to Pittsburg he published an account of his campaign. Later he 
engaged m steamboating on southern waters and also ran a cotton plantation. 
He is survived by his wife and two daughters. 

(2) John L., born 1827, now living in Kansas City, Kansas. He was 
raised and educated in Pittsburg, served three years in the Civil war in the 
One Hundred and Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was or- 
dained a minister of the Methodist Protestant church. He married Susan 
Andrews, now deceased, and has five children living. 

(3) Margaret Ann, born August i, 1830, died February 2, 1905. She 
married Samuel D. Lindsay. (See sketch of Homer J. Lindsay elsewhere in 
this work.) 

(4) Solomon W., born January 30, 1833, died in infancy. 

(5) Katherine S., born in 1835, died in 185 1. 

(6) Elizabeth J., born in 1838, the wife of George Abel, resides in Pitts- 
burg and has three children living-. 

(7) Lucinda, born November 15, 1840, was educated in Pittsburg. 

(8) Henry C., born in 1845, educated in Pittsburg. He enlisted at the 
early age of sixteen years in the One Hundred and Second Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, in the same company with his brother, John L. He 
served three years, and was wounded at Chancellorsville. After the war he 
returned to Pittsburg and engaged as secretary of the Citizens' Street Railway 
Company, and afterward became connected with the McConway-Torley Com- 
pany. Later he became resident Chicago agent for this firm. Mr. Buhoup 
is well known in railroad circles through his inventions, among which are 
improvements in car couplers, platforms and brake beams. He is president 
of the Pacific Sugar Company, owning and operating extensive farms and 
mills producing beet sugar in Tulare and Kings counties, California. He 
married Miss Virginia Abdill, of Chicago. Mr. Buhoup is a member of 
Duquesne Club, Pittsburg. 

Lucinda Buhoup, the seventh child, was married in 1858 to Henry Logan 
Hershman. At the commencement of the Civil war Mr. Hershman enlisted 
as a private in the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteers. By gallant conduct he earned promotion to the rank of orderly 
and later to sergeant. He was killed at the battle of Fort Harrison, Chapin 
Farm, Virginia, September 29, 1864. Mrs. Hershman had two children, 
Oliver S. and Anna E. 

Mrs. Hershman's son, Oliver S., was born in Pittsburg in 1859. He was 
educated in the public schools, supplemented with home study and reading. 
He began his business career in the employ of the Pittsburg Evening Tele- 
graph. So well and faithfully did he discharge the duties assigned him that 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE y-j 



his advancement from rank to rank was rapid until he had successively at- 
tained the positions of secretary, treasurer and manager of the paper. He 
gradually acquired a controlling interest and was in sole charge when it was 
consolidated with the Chronicle and was thenceforth known as the Pittsburg 
Chronicle Telegraph. In 1900 Mr. Hershman sold his interest in this paper 
and purchased the Pittsburg Press; a little later, having bought the Daily 
Mezcs, the two papers were merged and published under the title of the Pitts- 
burg Press, of which Lieutenant-Colonel Hershman is the leading spirit. Dur- 
ing his many years" connection with the public press, Colonel Hershman 
never sought public office; his appointment as aide-de-camp on the staff of 
Governor Edwin S. Stuart was tendered him without any effort on his part. 
His appointment was viewed with great satisfaction by his numerous friends 
and citizens of Pittsburg, irrespective of party. He succeeded his late cousin, 
Colonel Homer J. Lindsay, just one day after he had finished thirty- four years 
of consecutive newspaper work. Colonel Hershman is truly a self-made man. 
His energy, determination and executive ability have enabled him to make 
his way unaided. He is a member of Duquesne, Union, University. Country 
and Automobile Clubs of Pittsburg. He is also a member of Grace Reformed 
church. Pie married Belle C. Boyd, a daughter of William and Orpha Boyd. 

Mrs. Hershman's daughter, Anna E., was born and educated in Pittsburg. 
She is now Mrs. Holman, of California. Her husband is a prominent real 
estate dealer of Los Angeles. 

Mrs. Hershman, mother of Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver S. Hershman, is a 
remarkable woman. Eor more than thirty years she resided on Mt. Wash- 
ington, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of that place. 
Since coming to East End, however, she attends services at the Presbyterian 
church. She is most liberal minded and is ever ready to assist the needy to 
the full extent of her power. She is an entertaining talker, and has a fund 
of interesting reminiscences at her command. She is greatly loved by young 
and old and is the life of a large circle o"f friends. In July of this year (1907) 
she made a trans-Atlantic trip, accompanied by her daughter-in-law, Mrs. O. 
S. Hershman, spending some considerable time in England and on the conti- 
nent, visiting London, Paris and Berlin and spending some time in Switzer- 
land. She also visited Hesse Cassel, in Germany, the home of her ancestors. 



PHILIP PAUL, an honored and esteemed resident of Sheridan, Penn- 
sylvania, is a native of Cambria county, Pennsylvania, born December 23, 
1832. His parents were Lewis and Mary (Pringle) Paul. 

Lewis Paul (father) was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania. He was 
a farmer by occupation, deriving therefrom a comfortable livelihood. He re- 
mained in Cambria county throughout his entire lifetime, passing away in 
1859, aged over eighty years. He married Mary Pringle, a member of one 
of the oldest families of Cambria county, a descendant of Philip and George 
Pringle, who were bbrn in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, but at an early 
day settled in the wilderness near what is now known as "Pringle Hill." The 
Pringles are of Scotch extraction. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Paul were : 
Samuel, who remained at home ; Mrs. Settmyers, of Johnstown ; Sallie, wife 
of A. D. Carpenter, now residing in Knoxville ; Susie, who married a Mr. 
Berkheimer, now deceased, in Cambria county, in 1880; Polly, married Ernst 



78 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

George, and both are now deceased; Lydia, married John Brown, proprietor 
of the Commercial Hotel at Cresson, Pennsylvania ; Philip, of whom later. 
Polly Paul, aunt of Philip Paul and sister of Lewis Paul, was murdered for 
money at her home in Cambria county; this was known as the Houser-Bowser 
murder trial. 

Philip Paul spent his life, up to the time of his marriage, in Cambria 
county, residing in an old log cabin. He then settled at Smithfield street and 
Calvin avenue. For many years he worked as a flagman on the railroad with 
Andrew Carnegie, the well known capitalist. During the Civil war he took 
up his residence in Pittsburg, entering the employ of the government, working 
at breaking mules and driving supply teams between Pittsburg and Wilkins- 
burg, and after the war he was employed in teaming in the city of Pittsburg. 
He removed to Sheridan, same state, March lo, 1879, ^"d there erected a 
house for his own use, in which he now resides. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, a Democrat in politics, active in the affairs of his 
party, although he has never held office, and is respected by all who have the 
honor of his acquaintance. 

Mr. Paul married, April 9, 1857, Annie Stahl, born and reared in Somer- 
set. Somerset county, her birth occurring in the year 1844. When quite young 
she came to Pittsburg. She is a daughter of John Stahl, a native of Somerset 
county, whose parents came from Berlin, Germany. Mrs. Paul was one of a 
family of fifteen children. The issue of this marriage was four children, 
namely: i. Mary, married a Mr. Tidball, of Remington, Pennsylvania. 
2. Annie, married Victor Oltman. 3. William, married Nellie Clark and re- 
sides with his mother at the old home. 4. George W., of Ingraham, Penn- 
sylvania, born August 15, 1869, received his education in the schools of the 
Fifth ward of Pittsburg, and also in Sheridan. He is a manufacturer of 
awnings and tents on Washington street, Pittsburg. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Ingraham, and a Republican in politics. He 
married Laura Gass, of New Brighton, Beaver county. Pennsylvania, and they 
have one child, Lewis, now (1907) in this third year. 



DAVID FRANKLIN LANE, who has been connected with the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad for the past twenty years and now fills the responsible posi- 
tion of conductor on the passenger service, is a representative of the fourth 
generation of his family in this country, they tracing their earlier ancestry 
to Germany. 

Richard Lane, great-grandfather of David Franklin Lane, was the son 
of John Lane, who came from Germany. (Fifth generation.) Richard Lane 
was born January 12, 1759. in Pennsylvania, ancl died June 19, 1838. He 
was of German parents. Hannah Morris, his wife, was born May 14, 1765. 
in Pennsylvania, and died February 12. 1840. They were married November 
9, 1784. and their children were: Elizabeth, born March 19, 1786, died March 
6, 1826; i;)utton, born May 14, 1788, died in 1858; Charlotte, born November 
29, 1790; Mary, born April 30, 1793; Hannah, born February 19, 1796, died 
July 28, 1822; Jane, born September 10, 1797; Abraham, born April 8. 1800, 
died July 29, 1822, having been accidentally killed by the falling of a bridge ; 
Susanna, born October 29. 1802, died November 14. 1885; she" married John 
Cutchall; Richard, born August 25, 1805, died May 16, 1807; Presochia, born 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 79 



October 22, 1807, died August 8, 1884. Presochia married Robert Madden, 
celebrated in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, as a bridge builder. He was 
one of the first, if not the first, to build covered bridges in Pennsylvania. 

Button Lane, son of Richard Lane, was born in 1788 and died about 
1858. At the time of the death of his father he inherited, and obtained by 
purchase from the other heirs, a large share of the family estate. In order 
to have this legally accomplished he w^as obliged to ride all the way to Iowa 
on horseback, a trip full of many dangers and hardships in those early days. 
He became one of the most prominent and influential farmers in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. In politics he was a staunch Whig, and he was a 
consistent member of the old school Baptist church, and a conscientious and 
earnest worker in the interests of that institution. He married (first) Eliza- 
beth Ramsey and had children : William Lane, who was killed by a falling 
tree ; Richard ; John ; Jennie ; Hannah ; and Abraham, who was killed by acci- 
dent. His second wife was Sarah Stains, and they had children : Button, 
Jacob, Baniel, Alary Ann, Sarah, Thompson and Lemuel. Button died young, 
killed by the falling of a bridge ; he was unmarried. Baniel Lane, born in 
1828, married Belle Kiler and had children: An infant, deceased; Barton, 
married a Miss Starr ; Bavid, married Alice Lane ; W^illiam, deceased ; infant 
twins, deceased ; Ninnie, single ; Edward, married ; Earl, married. Alary Ann, 
born in 1832, married Professor James Xorris, a native of Rocksdale, England, 
who was in active service during the Alexican war, and they had children : Alice^ 
married John Kraus ; Samuel, married Amand Gutshall ; Olive, deceased, un- 
married ; Sarah, deceased, unmarried; Benjamine, married Ann Bolinger; Her- 
bert, married Nin Lane; Hiram Brook, married Clemma Rider. Thompson 
Lane, born in 1830, married Elizabeth Stevens and had children : Francis, 
Herbert and Wesley, all married. Sarah, born in 1834, married James Cowan. 
a celebrated violinist, and had children : Jacob, married Alalissa Gutshall ; 
Sarah, deceased, unmarried ; Alary Ann, deceased, unmarried ; Rodah, mar- 
ried Hyat Edwards ; James, unmarried ; Effie, married John Troy ; Samuel, 
deceased, married Aliss Flasher ; Perdeda, married Alartin Walter. Lemuel 
Lane, born in 1836, married Alary Ann Parks and they had children : Alex- 
andra, married Aliss Hooper ; Jearldine, married John Hooper ; Jane, mar- 
ried a Air. Ramsey ; and Walter and Charles, unmarried. 

Jacob Lane, second son and child of Button and Sarah (Stains) Lane, 
was born in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, on the 
old homestead, October 25, 1826, and died Becember 28, 1902. His educa- 
tion was acquired in the local schools, and at the death of his father the family 
estate passed into his hands, partly as a matter of inheritance and partly by 
purchase from the other heirs. This consisted of one hundred and thirty-two 
acres, and he cultivated it as his father had done before him. He was very 
successful as a farmer, and attained prominence in the public afifairs of the 
township and the county. His interest in educational matters was manifested 
by his having served as a member of the school board for many years and 
until his death. He filled the office of constable for twenty years, and also 
served as supervisor for a long period. He was a man greatly respected by 
all his townsmen for his unfailing integrity and fair dealing with all with 
whom he had business connections. It is said of him that there never was a 
lawsuit against him and that he never brought suit against any one throughout 
his life. He was a staunch Republican in his political affiliations, and a mem- 



8o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



ber of the Church of God. He married Rachel Wible, born in 1836 and 
died February 26, 1899. She bore him the following named children: 
I. Sarah Jane, died in childhood. 2. David Franklin, see forward. 3. But- 
ton A., born August 8, 1863, married Elizabeth Ferrenburg and had children: 
Delmar F., married Miss Locke; Minerva, married a Mr. Lynn, and Jacob 
Brince, Dessa, Mary, Ira, Fannie, Lester, Gertrude, Myrtle, Rufas and Corbet. 
4. James R., who was an employe of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
and was killed in a railway accident on Jacks Run Cut, a branch of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, March 26, 1899. He married Catherine Wilkins and had 
one child, Mary Martha. 5. Elizabeth, married Frank Starr, and they had 
children: Maizy, Ruth, Wilmer, Edith, Minerva, James, Loyd and Pauline. 
6. Professor Jacob Grant, married Ettie Cromwell ; has had children : Clyde, 
James, deceased, and Louis. 7. Jennie Bell, married Wilson Brown ; has 
children : Arthur James, Onetta, Martha and Sheldon. 8. Dr. Henry Clay, 
married Lottie Smith ; has children : Wilber and Robert Don.' 

David Franklin Lane, eldest son and second child of Jacob and Rachel 
(Wible) Lane, was born in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 30, 1861. He was reared on the old homestead, receiving his 
education in the public schools of that section, and in select schools at Orbi- 
sinia and Shippensburg, 1885. He taught school for six years, at the same 
time carrying on his studies during the summer months, and closed his last 
term as a teacher at Scaffersville, Huntingdon county, in 1887. He then ob- 
tained a position as special accountant and overseer for Hoover, Hughes & 
Company, while they were engaged in the construction of the Catholic Col- 
lege of Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He entered the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company October 25, 1887, as brake- 
man in the passenger service, retaining that position until May 10, 1896, when 
he was. advanced to the position cf conductor, a position he has filled to the 
satisfaction of the company for the past twenty years. He is a strong sup- 
porter of the principles of the Republican party, and a member of the Trinity 
Reformed church of Wilkinsburg. He is connected with the following fra- 
ternal organizations : Orient Lodge No. 590, P>ee and Accepted Masons, of 
Wilkinsburg ; Council No. 760, Royal Arcanum ; is past officer of the Order 
of Railway Conductors, R. B. Hawkins No. 115. 

He married, January 19, 1888, Cora May Harnish, born October 27, 1863, 
a daughter of Peter K. and Celina (Wilson) Harnish, the former born in 
1834 and died in 1897. He was educated at Mercersburg College and was a 
man of considerable literary attainments. 'He taught school for a time near 
Wilkinsburg and subsequently became a farmer in New Valley. He had 
children : Cora May, mentioned above ; Hayes, died young ; Blair ; Samuel,, 
died young; Sue; Ida Bess; Rachel M., a trained nurse by profession. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lane have had children: Norman Harnish, born June 19, 1899; 
Paul Vincent, born May 30, 1901 ; David Olin, born August 5, 1905. 



HARRY CLARKSON WESTERVELT, M. D.. one of the prominent 
and successful medical practitioners of Pittsburg, was born April 14, 1867, ^o" 
of Abraham, Jr., and Hannah (McClatchey) Westervelt. 

He was educated in the F.'ittsburg schools and. University of Pennsylvania. 
For a number of years he was connected with the Northwestern Mutual Life 




ABRAHAM WESTERVELT. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 8i 



Insurance Company, of iVIilwaukee, Wisconsin, he being the assistant manager 
of the Pittsburg branch of that company. At the same time he was educating 
himself for the medical profession. He graduated from the Pennsylvania Uni- 
versity with the class of 1898. During the years of 1898-99 he was resident 
physician and surgeon of the Cooper Hospital of Camden, New Jersey, after 
which he of)ened an office in Pittsburg and is now located in the Liberty Bank 
building, at the East End. Dr. Westcrvelt is a member of the Alumni Society 
of the Universit}^ of Pennsylvania; the Allegheny County Medical Society; 
Pennsylvania ^Medical Society ; Pittsburg College of Physicians, and the 
American ^Icdical Association. In his church faith he is Episcopal and 
affiliates with the Calvary Episcopal Church, at the East End. where during the 
erection of the new and magnificent edifice he donated liberally in both time 
and means toward furthering- the work. 

fTe was united in marriage November 7, 1900, to Erederica Ballard, 
daughter of Frederick L. and Alice (Walker) Ballard, who arc also the parents 
of Ellis A. Ballard, an attorney of Philadelphia. The two children born to Dr. 
and Mrs. Vv'estervelt are : Harriet Clarkson, torn February 10, 1902 ; Fred- 
erick B.. July 30. 1903. 



JAMES RITCHIE, senior member of the firm of James Ritchie & Son, 
of Pittsburg, was born in Ireland, a son of William John Ritchie, wdio was 
born in Magherafelt, county Derry, whence he emigrated with his family to 
the United States. He first spent three years in Philadelphia, being engaged 
in the grocery business, and then came to Pittsburg, where he turned his 
attention to the manufacture of packing boxes. 

William John Ritchie married Rachel McCutcheon and their children 
were : George ; James ; William ; Sarah, deceased, wife of Wilkins Lenhart ; 
Mary A., deceased, wife of James Garrity ; and Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
Nelson. The mother of these children died on the voyage to this country and 
was buried at sea. The father died in 1855 in Pittsburg. The sons all be- 
came useful and capable business men of Pittsburg, and during the Civil war 
all served with distinction in the Union army. George was lieutenant of the 
Hampton Battery, and went through the entire conflict, finally dying of 
wounds received at the battle of Gettysburg. William is manager for Wey- 
man & Company, tobacco manufacturers, a position he has held for twenty- 
eight years. 

James Ritchie, son of William John and Rachel (McCutcheon) Ritchie, 
was born in Ireland, and was six years old when 'brought by his parents to the 
United States. He was educated in the public schools of Philadelphia and 
Pittsburg, receiving instruction in those of the Third, Fifth and Sixth wards. 
Deciding to be a printer, he apprenticed himself to J. McMillan, a job printer 
of Pittsburg, for whom he worked six years, when failing sight forced him 
to abandon his chosen trade. Since 1887 he has been actively engaged in the 
lumber business in Mount Washington, the present style of the firm being 
James Ritchie & Son. They have offices and yards on Virginia avenue, where 
they deal in a complete line of lumber and building supplies. 

In 1864 he enlisted in Company K, Forty-ninth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
V^olunteers, and served until the close of the war, when he received an honor- 
able discharge. For two terms he held the office of mercantile appraiser. He 



82 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



is a Republican and a member of the United Presbyterian church of Mount 
Washington. 

Mr. Ritchie married Anna EUza Neely, and of the seven children born to 
them three died in childhood: Alma, Florence and Elizabeth. Those living 
are : Jonathan, with the Penn Salt Company at Natrona, Pennsylvania, mar- 
ried Margaret Taggart, of Allegheny ; Jennie Glenn, wife of William Sherman, 
of Carrick, bookkeeper for D. L. Gillespie; Mary Emma, wife of William 
McGahan, of Mount Washington, government postal clerk; children, James 
and Helen ; and William, of the firm of James Ritchie & Son, married Nellie 
Martin, of Pittsburg. 

Mrs. Ritchie is the only child of Jonathan Neely, who was born in Chartiers 
township, son of Watson and Martha Neely, natives of Ireland. Jonathan 
Neely in early life was a farmer, but later became actively identified with 
Pittsburg politics, particularly in Mount W^ashington, his home for the greater 
part of his long life. For many years he was tipstaff at the court house, and 
for a long time held the office of tax collector. He served three terms as 
county commissioner of Allegheny "county, and in politics was an ardent Re- 
publican. He was an active member of the United Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Neely married Jane Glenn, daughter of James Henry, of Pittsburg, 
and they were the parents of one daughter, Anna Eliza, who became the wife 
of James Ritchie. Mrs. Neely at the ti'me of her death was seventy"-one. 
Mr. Neely lived to the advanced age of eighty-six, passing away in the home 
which he had built for himself manv vears before on Virginia avenue. 



JOHN PAUL. The late John Paul, a resident of Mount Washington 
and a successful merchant of Pittsburg, was of Irish birth and parentage. 
His mother died when he was very young, and he was afterward brought to 
the United States by his father. 

John Paul was brought up in the family of the grandfather of Christopher 
Magee, by whose father he was instructed in the hatters' trade. Mr. Paul 
followed his trade for several years, and then established himself in the hat 
and furnishing business, his store being situated on Smithfield street, and noted 
as the leading one of its class in Pittsburg. Mr. Paul owned and personally 
conducted the business until his death. He served in the common council 
of Mount Washington and held various other local offices. He stood high in 
the Masonic fraternity, affiliating with Lodge No. 45, Pittsburg, and was an 
active worker in the ranks of the Republican party. For many years he was 
a member and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal church of Mount Washing- 
ton and a liberal supporter of its various departments. 

Mr. Paul married, November 9, 1871, Elizabeth, widow of Judge Boggs, 
of the noted family so prominent in the earlier history of Mount Washington. 
Judge Boggs died in middle life without issue. 

Mr. Paul rounded out his full three score and ten years of usefulness, 
his death occurring in September, 1902. He was an able and upright man, 
of high principle and unblemished honor, an earnest and devoted Christian. 
He is buried in the South Side cemetery. He left no children. 

Mrs. Paul is of English birth, a daughter of John and Catharine Holmes, 
who came to Pittsburg many years ago. They were the parents of four 
children : Hannah, who married Thomas Hawkins ; Elizabeth, widow of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 83 

John Paul; Catherine, who married Leonatus Hunter, of Boggs avenue; and 
John, of West Liberty. The beautiful residence on Boggs avenue which was 
purchased by Mr. Paul has been since his death the home of his widow, bv 
whom it is maintained in all its original comfort and attractiveness. 



JOHN HOWARTH, a long-time resident of Pittsburg, and a man who 
has worked his way up to a position of comfort and to a place in the govern- 
ment of his adopted city, was born November 13, 1840, in Lancashire, Eng- 
land, a son of James Howarth, a silk weaver who was brought up in the 
Protestant Episcopal church, but later joined the Methodist Episcopal. 

James Howarth married Martha Battersby, and the following children 
were born to them : Mary, Alice and John. Both the daughters always 
remained in their" native land. The mother of the family died in 1842, and 
the father in August, 1845. 

John Howarth, son of James and Martha (Battersby) Howarth, was 
but two years old when he lost his mother, and had not completed his fifth 
year when death deprived him of his father also. He was adopted into the 
home of his uncle, James Heeley, an ironworker of Staffordshire, where he 
learned to be an expert machinist and millwright. The building of a new 
railroad demolished the works where he was employed, and he came with his 
uncle and the latter's family to the United States. October 23^ 1863, they 
landed in New York, and thence proceeded to Pittsburg, he and his uncle 
securing employment in the shipyards where gunboats were being built for 
the United States government. There Mr. Howarth remained two years, 
being employed in the construction of two gunboats, the "Manyunk" and the 
"Umpqua," both of which became famous in river warfare during the Civil 
conflict. He then took a trip west, and for two years was employed in rail- 
road shops. 

With two exceptions of three months each, he was for the next eight 
years with the Crescent (now the Pennsylvania) Tube Company, after 
which for another eight years he was employed in the nut and bolt depart- 
ment of Jones & Laughlin. He was next appointed engineer on the Monon- 
gahela Inclined Railway, and there for twelve years he was continuously 
employed. A cool head and steady nerves are necessary qualifications for 
the post, and sufficient evidence of Mr. Howarth's competence is found in 
the fact that during his twelve years of service he never had an accident. In 
1892 he left the Incline to become an active member of the firm of Minsinger 
Brothers & Company, in which for some years he had had a silent interest. 
The firm operated stone quarries on Mount Washington and were manu- 
facturers of building-brick, also doing some constructing. Mr. Howarth 
was in charge of the office until 1902, when he retired from active life, and 
now devotes his time exclusively to his own private property and to his duties 
as one of the directors of the South Hills Trust Company. 

In his hours of leisure he has renewed his acquaintance with books, and 
has a mind well stored with information gleaned therefrom as well as from 
his experience of men and things, being an original thinker and careful 
observer. Leisure has also afforded him an opportunity to travel, and he 
has visited the home of his boyhood in England, also visiting the western 
states of this country. He is now serving a term of three years in the select 



84 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

council of Pittsburg, having been elected in 1905 to represent the Thirty- 
second ward, which he does faithfully and in the interests of good govern- 
ment. For thirty-three years he has been a member of St. John's Lodge, 
No. 219, F. and A. M., and he also affiliates with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, No. 113. Politically he is an ardent Republican. He and his 
family are members and attendants of Grace Protestant Episcopal church. 

Mr. Howarth married, January 3, 1870, Elizabeth Caroline, born Jan- 
uary 13, 1848, in Pittsburg, only daughter of Gottlieb and Caroline Minsinger, 
the familv being then and now prominent in the business circles of that city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howarth have been the parents of the following children: 
William John, draughtsman in the office of the registrar of deeds, Pittsburg; 
Mary Alice, who died at the age of two years ; James Heeley, with Jones & 
Laughlin, married Elizabeth Weinman, of Detroit, Michigan ; Caroline, wife 
of Samuel Dyer, one daughter, Helen ; Samuel Harper, bookkeeper for the 
Philadelphia Company; George M., with the Wigman Lumber Company. 
Such of these children as are unmarried reside with their parents. 



WILLIAM BOEHMER. The late William Boehmer, for many years 
one of Pittsburg's merchants, was born September 6, 1854, a son of Fred- 
erick and Sophia Boehmer, and descended, as the name of Boehmer would 
indicate, from German ancestors. 

William Boehmer had built up a prosperous commission business on 
Liberty street, Pittsburg, where he had for a number of years occupied a 
foremost place among the merchants of the city. For twelve years he served 
his ward as school director, being always deeply interested in educational 
matters and giving freely of his time to the duties of the ofifice. He belonged 
to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics. His political affiliations were with the Republicans. 
He was a member of the Mount Washington Presbyterian church, and for 
six years served as superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Boehmer married, March 26, 1891, Tillie S. Mankedick, and they 
became the parents of one son. William F., born August 25, 1893. Mrs. 
Boehmer is a member of the German Lutheran church. 

The death of Mr. Boehmer occurred January 16, 1903, at Aiken, North 
Carolina, whither he had gone in search of relief from the dread disease, 
consumption. He was a man of sterling integrity and of a genial, lovable 
disposition, which endeared him to a large circle of friends. On the day of 
his funeral the schools of Mount Washington were closed as a mark of respect 
to a valued friend. 

Mrs. Boehmer is a daughter of Christopher Mankedick, who was bom 
near Minden, Germany, and for many years was a merchant tailor in Pitts- 
burg, having his store on Carson street. He later became a cutter for Jones 
& Laughlin, with whom he remained until old age overtook him. He was a 
Republican and a member of the Lutheran church. 

Christopher Mankedick married Wilhelmina Haslage, who was, like him- 
self, a native of the vicinity of Minden, but whom he met and married in 
this country. Their children were: Louisa, deceased; Emma, who married 
John W. Peters, of Alonongahela City; Tillie S., born September 26, 1856, 
widow of William Boehmer; Ida M., born July 11, 1859, lives with her sis- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 85 

ter, Mrs. Boehmer; and Clara, deceased. Two other daughters died in 
infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Mankedick, in their old age, were tenderly cared for 
in the home of their daughter, Mrs. Boehmer, where they passed away, Mrs. 
Mankedick dying April 12, 1904, and the death of Mr. Mankedick occurring 
December 29 of the same year. The age of the former was seventy-four and 
tkat of the latter seventy-seven. 



JULIUS G. WILD, the present representative of a name which for 
more than forty years has been a leading one among the business men of 
Mount Washington, was born October 12, 1859, in Carson street, Pittsburg, 
a son of Rudolph Wild, who was born in Germany, and in 1865 established 
a grocery business on the corner of Virginia and Shiloh avenues, Pittsburg. 
He subsequently removed the business to Cuthbert and Virginia avenues, 
where he conducted it until his death. 

Rudolph Wild married Sophia Pollar, and the following are their chil- 
dren, all of whom were born in Germany with the exception of the youngest : 
August, deceased ; Sophia, widow of Matthias Weinman, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this work ; Louisa, wife of Jacob Datz ; Albert, of Haw- 
thorne, Nevada; Rudolph, of Parkersburg, W^est Virginia; Kate, wife of 
Henry Dietrich ; and Julius G. 

Julius G. Wild, son of Rudolph and Sophia (Pollar) Wild, received his 
•education in the public schools and early began to assist in his father's store, 
becoming in a few years a most valuable helper. After the death of his father 
he conducted the business for several years as his mother's representative, 
and then purchased the interests of the heirs, thus becoming sole proprietor. 
The store was then situated on the corner of Cuthbert and Virginia avenues, 
but in 1903 Mr. Wild purchased land at the corner of Shiloh and Virginia 
avenues, on which he built a brick store and dwelling. There he has since 
remained, his home and his place of business being situated on the same corner 
on which his father, Rudolph Wild, established a grocery almost half a cen- 
tury ago. Mr. Wild conducts a prosperous general grocery. 

He is a Master Mason of St. John's Lodge. No. 19, F. and A. M., of 
Pittsburg, and a member of the German Evangelical Protestant church. 

Mr. Wild married, December 29, 1893, Lotta. born January 29, 1872, 
daughter of William and Louisa Haas, of West Liberty. Mr. and Mrs. Wild 
are the parents of two sons: Paul, born August 5, 1896; and Glenn, born 
April 25, 1 90 1. 



MATTHIAS WEINMAN. Among the old Hill families there are none 
held in higher esteem than the descendants of the late Matthias Weinman^ 
one of the early settlers and for more than forty years a resident of Pittsburg. 
He was of foreign birth, but held in united devotion and loyalty the land of 
his nativity and the country of his adoption. 

Matthias Weinman was born in 1827, in Wurtemberg, Germany, and 
in 1855, being then twenty-eight years old, he emigrated to the United States, 
settling on Mount Washington, where he passed the remainder of his life. 
He was by trade a butcher and was the proprietor of a meat market on 
Virginia avenue, which he conducted until 1880. In that year he retired and 



86 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



thereafter devoted his time to the cultivation of some eighteen acres of land 
situated in the town. This is now largely built up, Southern avenue running 
through the property. Mr. Weinman was a hard-working, frugal man, and 
by his industry and economy acquired a competence. He was a Republican 
and a member of the German Presbyterian church. 

Matthias Weinman married, September 28, 1856, Sophia Wild, and they 
became the parents of the following children: Charles, born September 16, 
1857, a meat dealer of Avalon, married Lizzie Leitner, children, Otto, Lillian, 
Norma, Valeria, Rence and Clarence; August, born March 31, 1859, pro- 
prietor of a m.eat market on Grand View avenue, Duquesne Heights, married 
Nettie Cook, one son, Charles; Rudolph, born October 6, 1865, a butcher of 
Merced, California; William, born October 2, 1867, of Mount Washington, 
married Mollie Klein, one child, William; Frederick, born January 21, 1869, 
of Mount Washington; Mary, born August 21, 1871 ; Rosa, born December 
25, 1874, wife of Charles Mautz, plumber of Duquesne Heights, two children, 
Sophia and Helen; and Jacob, born May 28, 1877. William, Frederick and 
Jacob compose the firm of Weinman Brothers, brick manufacturers and con- 
tractors of Mount Washington. One daughter, Lizzie, became the wife of 
August Floto and died aged thirty-four. Another daughter, Emma, died at 
the age of sixteen, and five children died in infancy. 

Mr. Weinman ended his long, busy and useful life August 2t^, 1897, 
leaving behind him the memory of a good man and a worthy citizen. His 
widow is still a resident of Pittsburg, _her unmarried children making their 
home with her. 

Mrs. Weinman was born May i, 1840, in Germany, a daughter of 
Rudolph and Sophia Wild, and at the age of fifteen came with her parents 
to the Cnited States. In 1855 they landed in New York, but settled in 
Pittsburg, where Mr. Wild conducted a grocery on Mount Washington. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wild were the parents of the following children : August, who 
died in Parkersburg, West Virginia ; Sophia, widow of Matthias Weinman ; 
Louisa, wife of Jacob Datz ; Albert, of Nevada ; Rudolph, of Parkersburg, 
West Virginia ; Kate, wife of Henry Dietrich, of Mount Washington ; and 
Julius G., a grocer of Mount Washington. 



CHRISTIAN WILBERT, one of the oldest residents on -The Hill" 
(Mount Washington), where he has resided and been actively engaged in 
business of various kinds during his entire life, was born in Bavaria, Germany, 
September 19, 1841, and was but nine months old when his parents emigrated 
to the United States. He is a son of Peter and Katherine (Ott) Wilbert, 
who were married in Bavaria, where five of their children were born : P^eter, 
Jr., John, Jacob, Elizabeth and Christian. 

Peter Wilbert, Sr., was a weaver, and in 1842 came to America, landing 
in New York on July 4 of that year. He came directly to Pittsburg and 
settled on the Merry farm, on the Washington road, Mount Washington town- 
ship, where he found employment in the coal mines. He soon moved to 
Mount Washington, where he died in 1845. ^^^ son, Adam, and a daughter, 
Katherine, were born to Peter and Katherine (Ott) Wilbert after coming 
to this country. Mrs. Wilbert died in 1858. Of their children, the eldest son, 
Peter, was a miner, and died in Mansfield (now Carnegie), Pennsylvania, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE ' 87 

in 1882. He married Katherine Rumph and had children: Katherine 
(Mrs. Harry Hymes), Minnie (Mrs. John Freifold), Peter, Jr., and George. 
John, the second son, was a contractor and proprietor of the Washington 
Hotel; he died in 1889; he married Katherine Haas, and their living children 
are Mrs. Fred Berg, Mrs. Robert Stinson and Mrs. Samuel Barker. Jacob, 
the third son, was a commission merchant; he married Elizabeth Oilman and 
had live sons: Charles, Frank, David A. (now state senator from Hazlewood, 
Twenty-third ward of Pittsburg, and the father of the bill creating "Greater 
Pittsburg"), Harry and Albert, and one daughter, Mrs. Samuel' Dalley, of 
Sewickley. Elizabeth, the first born daughter, married William Dryer and 
reared a large family. Christian, the fourth son, will have further mention. 
Adam, the first born in America, was a hotel proprietor; he married Regina 
Zeiler and died in 1888; his children were John, deceased; Stella, Mrs. Jacob 
Soffell, Jr. ; Margaret, Mrs. Thomas GrifQn ; and Katherine, who resides with 
her widowed mother at 26. Natchez street. Mount Washington. Katherine, 
second daughter and last child of Peter and Katherine (Ott) Wilbert, is 
deceased; she married Frank C. Wiggins, and left one son, Frank, and other 
children. 

Christian Wilbert, fourth son and fifth child of Peter and Katherine (Ott) 
Wilbert, as before stated, was but nine months old when the family came to 
Mount Washington, where he grew up and obtained his early education in 
the township schools. When quite young he began to work in the coal mines, 
first as a mule driver, but advancing until he became a miner. He left the mines 
to work in the Sligo Rolling Mills, and from there became a riverman, serving 
as firem.an on the steamboats used for towing purposes. Leaving the river, 
he next engaged in the hotel business at the corner of Wyoming and Sycamore 
streets. Mount W^ashington, and later at 21 Carson street. In 1882 he erected 
the Hotel Wilbert, at the corner of Shiloh and Sycamore streets, which he 
conducted until 1900, when he transferred the business to his son, William C. 
Wilbert, and retired from active life. 

In 1 86 1 Mr. W^ilbert answered President Lincoln's first call for troops 
and enlisted in Company F, Seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania "Volunteers, for 
three months' service. He returned home on the expiration of this term of 
enlistment, remained about one year, and re-enlisted in Company G (Captain 
Guard), Eighty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Irvon com- 
manding. The regiment was attached to the Army of the Potomac, and Mr. 
Wilbert saw three years of very hard service with that hard-fighting, sorely 
punished but never discouraged' and finally victorious army. He was under 
AlcClellan during the seven days' battles before Richmond, at Antietam, and 
in several others of the famous battles in V^irginia and Maryland. He was 
never wounded or taken prisoner. He holds membership in Post No. 155, 
G. A. R.; with the Odd Fellows, the Order of Red Men and with United 
Workmen. He is a member of the German Protestant church of Mount 
Washington. 

Mr" Wilbert married, April 12, 1862, Mary Margaret Seip, born in Pitts- 
burg, June 22, 1840, a daughter of George and Barbara Seip, of Pittsburg. 
Her father was a veteran of two wars, and finally gave up his life in his 
country's service. He was a soldier in the Mexican war and a captain in 
the Union armv during the Civil war. He was captured by the Confederates 
in battle and taken to Libby prison, Richmond, where he died of starvation 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



and neglect. To Mr. and Mrs. Christian Wilbert was born one son, William C, 
xA.ugust 12, 1863. He was educated in the Mount Washington schools and at 
Duff's Business College, Pittsburg. He was for some time a clerk in the 
office of the city treasurer, but in 1900 became proprietor of the Hotel Wilbert, 
which he still conducts. He married, October 21, 1900, Emma Schlag, of 
Allegheny. He is a member of the Order of Odd Fellows; and is financially 
interested in the South Hills Trust Company, Mount Washington. 



C. FREDERICK VALLOWE, a well known resident of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, who traces his ancestry to Germany, was prominently identified 
with the ice industry in the above mentioned city until his retirement from 
active business labors in 1901. 

He was born in Hanover, Prussia, Germany, November 21, 1841, and 
after attending the schools of his native country for some years came to the 
United States in i860, when he was nineteen years of age. At that time he 
resided with his uncle, B. H. Succop, who was a tailor by trade, on Sixth 
avenue, on the site of the present Nixon theater. Mr. Vallowe was appren- 
ticed to learn the cooper's trade with the Worderlich Company, and followed 
this occupation for nine years. He then established himself in the ice business, 
under the style of the Monongahela Ice Company, then on the South Side, 
but in 1884 the name was changed to that of the Chautauqua Lake Ice Com- 
pany, and later to the Consolidated Ice Company, as it is today, and of which 
Mr. Vallowe was the general manager. This was the largest ice company in 
the city of Pittsburg, and he acted in the capacity of general manager of the 
company until 1901, when he retired to private life. He is still one of the 
largest stockholders, however, of the company. He had a beautiful home 
built for himself in Knoxville, and in this he now (1907) lives and enjoys the 
fruits of many useful and well employed years. He and his family are 
members of St. Paul's Lutheran church. South Side, and he has for many 
years been an ardent supporter of the principles of the Republican party. He 
cast his first vote for Lincoln, and for nine years was assessor of the Twenty- 
fifth ward of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Vallowe married, in September, 1865, Dorothea Langkamp, born in 
Hanover, Germany, April 11, 1845, and came to this country with her parents, 
who settled in Riceville, Pittsburg. She was the, daughter of Henry and 
Bernardina Langkamp, the former a shoemaker. Mr. and Mrs. Vallowe have 
had children: i. G. Henry, born in the South Side, Pittsburg, July 30, 
1866. He was graduated from Duff's College, and for some years was head 
bookkeeper in the ice company of which his father was general manager. 
He is now with one of his brothers in the wholesale feed and supply business 
in Homestead. He married Margaret Baxmeier, also of South Side, and they 
are the parents of Clara E., Wilhelmina, Margaret and Ruth. 2. Frederick, born 
November 23, 1868, died July 12, 1876. 3. William, born March 28. 1872, 
was also graduated from Dufl's College. He was for many years engaged in 
the drug business and now lives retired with his father. 4. George R., 
born February 5, 1874, was graduated from Duff's College, and is a partner 
of his brother, G. Henry. He married Catherine Strickel and they have two 
children, Frederick and Johanna Louise. 5. Johanna F., born January 21, 
1876, married John H. Slater, an undertaker, and they reside with her father. 




JOHN B. SANDERSON, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



They have children:. Dorothea, born July i8, 1902; Herbert William, No- 
vember 23, 1903; and John Henry, January i, 1907. Mrs. Vallowe died on 
July 3, 1907, and was buried in the South Side cemetery July 6. 1907. 



JOHN BROWN SANDERSON, deceased, of the firm, Lare & Sanderson, 
Pittsburg-, Pennsylvania, was born in county Down, Ireland, in 1820. His 
parents lived and died in Ireland. He came to the United States after receiv- 
ing his educatioft and when he had reached his majority. He settled in Pitts- 
burg;, where he taught school for several years, being principal of the schools 
in the Fifth ward of the city and in other schools also. Subsequently he 
formed the firm of Tate & Sanderson and they engaged in the plumbing busi- 
ness on Fourth avenue, continuing for a number of years, after which he dis- 
posed of his interest in that line of business and with E. Lare formed the firm 
of Lare & Sanderson. They conducted the roofing business on Smithfield 
street, where the Duquesne Hotel is now located, and followed that until his 
death, which occurred at his home in Allegheny City June 11, 1890. He was 
successful in his business operations and was held in high esteem by his 
associates and the community in which he lived. He served as school director 
in Allegheny City for many years, being well qualified in an educational point 
of view and as to his executive abilit}-. 

Mr. Sanderson was united in marriage April 20, 1854, in Kinsman, Trum- 
bull county, Ohio, to Elizabeth E. King, a native of that place and who was 
the daughter of William and Sarah (McConnell) King. Her paternal and 
maternal grandparents were pioneers of that section of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sanderson had no children. They were both members of the Third Presby- 
terian church of Pittsburg. The wife remained in Allegheny a short tmie aiier 
the death of her husband and 1895 built her present residence on South Negley 
avenue. East End, Pittsburg, where she still resides. 



THOMAS WARD, of Knoxville, who three years ago retired from 
business after more than forty years of active service in the glass industry 
of Pittsburg, was born February 22, 1848, in East Birmingham, South Side. 
Pittsburg, son of Michael Ward, who was born in 1820, in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and when a young man came to Pittsburg, settling on the South Side. 
On his arrival he secured a position as driver of P. Mulvany's furniture 
wagon, the place of business being situated on Third avenue, opposite the 
old Pittsburg Bank and next door to the postoffice, which at that time was in 
Mr. Mulvany's buildings. Mr. Ward served in the capacity of driver for 
five vears, at the end of which time Mr. Mulvany purchased the interest of 
Henderson & Gains, leading glass dealers of New Orleans. In this enterprise 
Mr. Mulvany took as a partner William O'Leary, the firm being known as 
O'Leary & Mulvany. The glass-house, which was situated between Sixteenth 
and Seventeenth streets, is now known as the Mulvany plant. 

Mr. Ward entered this factory as an apprentice and remained almost con- 
tinuously for twenty-five years, advancing from place to place until he became 
foreman of the factory and a skilled workman. He was held in the highest 
esteem by Mr. Mulvany during this long period of service, and when the 
latter died Mr. Ward was present at his bedside. He then associated himself 



90 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



with the firm of Pkmkett & Ulam, whose factory was situated at the head of 
Fourteenth street, and produced a general Hne of blown ware. They continued 
in business about ten years, when reverses caused the closing of the factory 
and the partnership was dissolved. Mr. Ward then went to Chicago and 
entered the service of Evans & Hogan, with a view of ultimately getting con- 
trol of the factory, but after a short time came to the conclusion that on 
account of the scarcitv of fuel and the difficulty in securing skilled workmen 
glass could not be manufactured at a profit, and returned to Pittsburg. 

The plant in this city with which he had formerly been connected had 
been purchased by Voigt, Ward & Company, and Mr. Ward bought an interest 
therein. The firm continued in business five years, at the end of which time 
the plant was again seized by the sheriff. From that event Mr. Ward had 
no connection with a glass-house beyond the management of a furnace hi 
Maclunery Hall in the Exposition building during the first years it was in 
operation. 

During his long career in the glass business, both as manufacturer and 
workman, he was always thorough and exact, his good judgment as a worker 
and his fair dealing as a manufacturer winning for him the esteem of all with 
whom he came in "contact. In the great affliction of blindness, which he was 
for some time called upon to endure, he had the sympathy of thousands. The 
cause of his blindness he believed to be the intense heat and severe strain 
to which the eyes of a glassworker are subjected. Neither advancing age 
nor the loss of sight had in the slightest degree weakened his force of char- 
acter or diminished his cheerfulness. He felt that in his affliction he had 
many causes for thankfulness, the greatest of which was his ability to look 
back upon a stainless record. 

Mr. Ward married, February 6, 1844, Elizabeth O'Neal, who was born 
in 1825, near Dungannon, county Tyrone, Ireland, and they became the parents 
of fifteen children, ten sons and five daughters. The following survived him : 
John, a glass manufacturer of EUwood, Indiana; Michael A., employed by 
Joseph Home & Company; Thomas, of whom later; Patrick, a jeweler of 
Pittsburg; Mary, wife of James Thompson, of Mount Oliver; Ahce, wife of 
George Good, of McKeesport ; Katharine, a singer; and Edward A., super- 
intendent of the city horses of Pittsburg. Mr. Ward closed his long life of 
usefulness and endeavor October 16, 1896, aged seventy-six years. He was a 
member of St. John's Roman Catholic church. 

Thomas Ward, son of Michael and Elizabeth (O'Neal) Ward, received 
his education in the public schools of his native city, and at the age of twelve 
years began to work in Mulvany's glass-house, remaining until 1861. From 
that year until 1863 he was employed at the Adams Glass Works on Tenth 
street, after which he worked two years for his father as night manager. 
From 1865 to 1877 he worked at glass-blowing and then entered the service 
of Hogan, Evans & Company in the capacity of a glass-blower. He was sent 
by the firm to Chicago, but at the end of thirteen months returned and went 
to work for Hogan & Shallmer, glass manufacturers. He had been but ten 
months with this firm when he left them in order to associate himself with 
his father and Henry Voigt, who had formed a partnership. After Mr. Ward 
had worked for them six years the firm failed, and he again entered the 
service of Hogan & Evans, with whom he remained nine years. At the end 
of that time Mr. Hogan sold his interest to MacEetli, the firm becoming 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 91 



MacBeth, Evans & Company. Mr. Ward remained with them four years 
and in 1904 retired from business. 

He belongs to the American Flue Glass Union of Pittsburg, and in politics 
is a Democrat. He is a member of St. Canice's Roman Catholic church of 
Knoxville. 

Mr. Ward married, April 22, 1877, Mary, born April, 1850, daughter of 
Frank Fisher, a shoemaker of the South Side, and they have been the parents 
of the following children: i. Joseph, born January 30, 1878, glass-blower 
for MacBeth, Evans & Company, lives with his parents. 2. Edward Francis, 
born August 2, 1879, salesman at the Boston Store, Pittsburg, also lives with 
his parents. 3. Mary Teresa, born August 4, 1881, wife of Lawrence 
Greenawalt, of Allentown, Pittsburg, bookkeeper for the Independent Brewing 
Company. They have two children, Elizabeth and MerCetis. 4 and 5. Felix 
and Elizabeth (twins), born June 10, 1883, of whom the latter died February 
14, 1884. The former is an electrician for the Nernest Lamp Company and 
lives at home, but makes business trips to different parts of the country. 
6. Florence Cornelia, born October 20, 1887, died June 2, 1888. 7. Charles, 
born February 18, 1889, employed by the Bell Telephone Company, lives with 
his parents. 8. Elizabeth Josephine, born February 4, 1891, attends school. 



BENJAMIN PRITCHARD, of Knoxville, who was for half a century 
identified with the glass industry of Pittsburg, and is now enjoying in retire- 
ment the fruits of his energy and thrift, was born December 25, 1838, in 
North Wales, and when but two years old was brought by his parents to the 
United States. They settled first in St. Louis, and it was there that Mr. 
Pritchard received his early education. In 1848 they moved to Pittsburg, and 
in the course of time he entered the glass works of the Hailrammon Com- 
pany, where he was employed until 1877. He was then for two years foreman 
in the glass works situated on the corner of Water and Ross streets, North 
Side, after which he became a stockholder in the Ripley Company, retaining 
his interest until the company consolidated with the United States Glass 
Works. In these works he held the position of foreman until his retirement in 
1905, and he is still a stockholder in them. 

In 1863 he enlisted in the Two Hundred and Second Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, and served till the close of the war. Fle is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic and adheres to the Republican party. He 
was one of the founders and is now a member of the Baptist church. 

Mr. Pritchard married Elizabeth, born in 1844, daughter of Henry and 
Elizabeth Watkins, of Pittsburg, and they have been the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : George Chase, of whom later ; William, born September 23, 
1866, and died in 1894, was a graduate of public schools and bookkeeper in 
the United States Glass Factory; Anna, born September 19, 1869, and a 
graduate of public schools, is the wife of William E. Clark, stenographer and 
assistant superintendent at the locomotive works of H. K. Porter; Benjamin, 
born in 1872, a graduate of public schools, and purchasing agent for the 
Quaker City Cut Glass Company, of Philadelphia, married Mabel Jack, of 
that citv, one child, Mabel ; and Henry Clifton, died in youth. 

George Chase Pritchard, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Watkins) 
Pritchard, was born May 5, 1865. in Pittsburg. He was educated in the 



92 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

public schools, and has now been for sixteen years manager of the Ripley 
Company, which sold to the United States Glass Company, of which he is 
manager of Factory F. He is a Republican, and a member of the Fourth 
Avenue Baptist church. 

Mr. Pritchard married Jessie M., daughter of David and Mary (Albert; 
Brown, of Pittsburg, and they have two children: Jessie Mearl, born April i8, 
1900, at school; and Grace, born September 25, 1903. 



LOUIS KUEHNEISEN, of Knoxville, who has for twenty-three years 
lived in well-earned retirement after a career of more than thirty years as a 
prominent manufacturer of Pittsburg, was born January 14, 1829, in Ger- 
many, where he received a limited education and learned hat and cap making. 
After serving his time at his trade he made a tour of his native land, and in 
1849 emigrated to the United States, settling in New York city, where he 
followed his trade for two years. In 185 1 he came to Pittsburg, taking up 
his abode on the South Side, then called Birmingham, and now the Twenty- 
eighth ward of the city. After working there one year he established a 
manufactory of his own, which shortly became the leading one in the hat and 
cap industry of Pittsburg. He conducted the enterprise until 1884, when he 
retired, turning the business over to his son Louis, who carries on the enter- 
prise in Carson street. 

Mr. Kuehneisen has held the office of assessor, and for fifteen years 
served as school director of the Twenty-eighth ward. His political convictions 
are in accordance with the principles of the Republican party. He is a mem- 
ber of the German Lutlieran church, and for five years was treasurer of the 
Ruster church of Birmingham. 

Mr. Kuehneisen married Anna McGrata Walker, a native of Pittsburg, 
and they have been the parents of the following children, all of whom, with 
the exception of the eldest, were born in Pittsburg: Adolph, born in New 
York city, formerly in the retail hat and furnishing business, now retired, mar- 
ried Etta Walker; Carrie, died in youth, wife of Jacob Nusser; Edmond, 
also died young; Louis, who succeeded his father in business, lives in Car- 
rick, married Bertha Deulenberg, of Pittsburg; and Laura, became the wife 
of Frederick Hampe. Both she and her husband. are deceased. 

THE REVEREND FREDERICK MARSH GORDON, pastor of the 
Christian church of Knoxville, was born August 2, 1878, in West Virginia, a 
son of John E. Gordon, who was born in 1844, in Virginia, and received a 
common-school education. He came to Pennsylvania, and while still a youth 
enlisted in the Union army, becoming a member of the Fifty-third Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers. After the war he went to West Virginia, where 
he was employed as steward by Thomas Marsh, who was the owner of a 
large estate, and had, in his earlier life, been a fellbw laborer of Alexander 
Campbell, one of the founders of the Christian church. 

Mr. Gordon married Mr. Marsh's youngest daughter and settled on a 
part of the Marsh farm, becoming in a few vears steward of the whole estate. 
Ten years after his marriage he moved to Steubenville, Ohio, in order to 
secure for his children greater educational advantages, and from 1882 to 



PITJSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



93 



1892 was engaged in mercantile business at that place. In the latter year he 
became superintendent of the Street Railway Company, a position which he 
retained until 1896, when he removed to Bridgeport, Ohio, and assumed the 
superintendency of the Bridgeport, Martinburg & Bellaire Street Railway 
Company, which position he still holds. He was at one time chief of police 
of Steubenville, and is a strong Republican. 

John E. Gordon married Mary, youngest daughter of Thomas Marsh, 
and the following children were born to them: Louella, wife of John H. 
Linderman, of Steubenville; Eva, wife of H. J. Searman, of Albany, New- 
York; Allen T., clergyman, of Beaver, Pennsylvania; Frederick Marsh; 
Ira Howard, a student at Bethany College, West Virginia; and Lydia E., 
who lives with her parents at Kirkwood, Ohio, their present place of abode. 

Frederick Marsh Gordon, son of John E. and Mary (Marsh) Gordon, 
graduated from Stanton School, Steubenville, in 1894, and in 1900 graduated 
from Bethany College, West Virginia. During his college course he had a 
charge at Brilliant, Ohio, being then the youngest licensed preacher in the 
United States. After graduating he received a call from Knoxville, Pitts- 
burg, and came hither to take charge of a congregation numbering about 
fifty. The church then stood on Jacunda street, but in 1903, under the leader- 
ship of Mr. Gordon, the erection of a new edifice was planned, the following 
year the corner-stone was laid and in 1905 the structure was completed. The 
congregation now numbers five hundred and is one of the largest in Knoxville. 

Mr. Gordon, in 1905, matriculated in the Divinity School of Yale Uni- 
versity, and graduated in the class of 1907. In the first half of 1908 he vis- 
ited Egypt and Palestine. He served one year as president of the Ministerial 
Association of Pittsburg and has been for the last six years secretary of the 
Christian Church Missionary Society of Pennsylvania. He is a member of 
jMontooth Camp, No. 104, Sons of Veterans, and is chaplain of the Fourth 
Regiment, Sons of Veterans Reserves. He also affiliates with Commandery 
No. I, Knights Templar, of Pittsburg. In the sphere of politics he aids with 
his vote and influence the principles indorsed and advocated by the Repub- 
lican party. 



JAMES ANTHONY GRIFFITH, a well-known real estate agent of 
Pittsburg, and one who has contributed much toward the building up of 
Knoxville and the adjoining boroughs, was born September 20, 1872, in the 
city of which he is now a resident, a son of Thomas Griffith, who was born 
in 1837. He was the son of Welsh parents who, when Thomas was two 
years of age, came to the United States from France, of which country their 
son was a native. 

The parents of Thomas Griffith settled in Albany, New York, and it was 
there that he received his education. His brothers subsequently went to 
Richmond, Virginia, where he joined them at the beginning of the Civil war 
and engaged in the manufacture of nails. At the close of the war he came to 
Pittsburg, which was his home for the greater portion of his after life. His 
political adherence was given to the doctrines of the Greenbackers. He was 
a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Thomas Griffith married Margaret, born January 17, 1845, ^^i Cincinnati, 
OJiio, daughter of John and Jane Mitchel, who came from County Tyrone, 



94 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Ireland. After the death of Mr. Mitchel his widow married Jacob D. Gue, 
who came from Brownsville, Pennsylvania, with George Jones, founder of 
the Jones-Laughlin Steel Company. Mr. Gue was employed by the company 
for a period of thirty-one years. Thomas and Margaret (Mitchel) Griffith 
were the parents of seven children, of whom three died in youth. The living 
are: Catharine M., Ida, Chester C. and James Anthony. The death of Mr. 
Griffith occurred in 1903, at Leazerville, West Virginia, and his widow now 
resides at Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. 

Tames Anthony Griffith, son of Thomas and Margaret (Mitchel) Griffith, 
was educated in the public schools of Bellaire, Ohio, and of Pittsburg, finish- 
ing at Duff's Business College. When a child he went to live with his grand- 
mother, Mrs. Jane Gue, with whom he made his home until he grew to man- 
hood. In 1890 he was employed by E. T. Schaffner in the real estate business, 
the association remaining unbroken for ten years. In 1900 he opened an office 
for himself, and has since devoted his time and energy to the building up of 
the borough of Knoxville and the adjoining boroughs and wards of Pitts- 
burg. He h'as an extensive and lucrative business. 

He belongs to Milnor Lodge, No. 287, F. and A. M. ; Zerubbabel Chap- 
ter, No. 162, R. A. M.; Pittsburg Commandery, No. i, Knights Templar, and 
the Mystic, Shrine; also Elite Lodge, I. O. O. F., the Protective Home Circle, 
the Royal Arcanum and the Foresters of America. His political affiliations 
are with the Republicans. He is a trustee of the Maple Avenue Baptist 
church, in which he also holds the office of treasurer. Of this church his 
grandmother, Mrs. Gue, was a founder and always a liberal contributor to 
its work. 

Mr. Griffith married, November 8, 1906, Eliza Jane, born in Pittsburg, 
daughter of the late Joseph Faloon, who was a native of Ireland. 



JAMES AUGUSTUS DORAN. The late James Augustus Doran, a 
lifelong resident and respected citizen of Pittsburg, was born in that city 
December 31, 1849, a son of Michael Doran, who was born November 11, 
1810, in London, England, and received but a limited education. As a boy 
he was brought to the LTnited States by his parents, who settled in Pittsburg, 
making their home on Washington avenue. His father went into the coal 
business, employing as a teamster the boy Michael, who always continued to 
work for him. In politics Michael Doran was a strong Democrat. He was 
one of the founders of St. John's Roman Catholic church, Pittsburg, serving 
as a member of the first board of trustees, and continuing to hold the office 
of trustee for many years. 

Mr. Doran married Miriam Theresa Lafferty, who was born February 
16, 181 1, on Lafferty Hill, Baldwin township, Pittsburg, Lafferty Hill having 
been named in honor of her parents, who were among the first settlers of 
that part of the city. She died in 1903. aged ninety-two years. Mr. and 
Mrs; Doran became the parents of the following children: i. John, born 
April 10, 1843, in Pittsburg, as were all his brothers and sisters. He received 
a good education and was clerk in the steel works of Oliver & Phillips. He 
married Helen Hartzell, of Pittsburg, and they had one son, James. John 
Doran died June 8, 1875. 2. Mary Anna, born' December 19, 1844, died July 
19, 1847. 3- Sarah, born August 8. 1846, died December 6, 1865, wife of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



95 



Charles _ Murray. 4. Margaret, born January 8, .1848, died in November, 
1903, wife of Valentine Kneib, of Pittsburg, a' heater in iron works. He and 
his wife were members of St. John's Roman CathoHc church. 5. James 
Augustus, of whom later. 6. Agnes, born May 7. 1852, wife of Casper 
Werner, a glass-blower in the Pittsburg Glass Works. 

James Augustus Doran. son of Michael and Miriam Theresa (Lafferty) 
Doran, received his education in the schools of Pittsburg, and after leaving 
school obtained employment in Dillworth & Porter's nut and spike mill in his 
native city. ^ After working there for a few years he left in order to learn 
the moulder's trade. This was in 1869, and after serving his apprenticeship 
he was employed one year at the iron works of Jones & Laughlin. in Browns- 
town. South Side, Pittsburg. He then worked for a short time in the foundry 
of Robinson Rhea, after which he went to Lewis' foundry, where he followed 
his trade for the remainder of his life. 

He belonged to Company No. 14. Pittsburg Volunteer Fire Department, 
South Side, and the Machinists and Moulders^ of Pittsburg, also affiliating 
with the Knights of Labor and St. John's Beneficial Society. His political 
principles coincided with those of the Democratic party. He was a devoted 
member of St. George's Roman Catholic church. Allentown, Pittsburg. 

Mr. Doran married. January 10, 1875, Mary Ann O'Hara, and the fol- 
lowing are their children, all of whom were born in Pittsburg: i. Francis 
Michael, born October 26, 1875, received a good education in St. George's 
■Roman Catholic school, and at fourteen entered the Oliver Iron Works, where 
he was employed for three years. He has since worked at boiler-making 
and at different branches of iron work. 2. James Augustus, born April 7, 
1879, educated in St. George's Roman Catholic school, and afterward served 
five years as office boy in the office of Drs. Robeson. Day and Herrod. He 
\vas then for four years clerk in the Hotel Henry, and has since been with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, first as a freight brakeman. and for 
some time served as assistant passenger conductor. He is a member of St. 
George's Roman Catholic church. 3. Aliriam Elizabeth, born August i, 1881, 
educated at St. George's Roman Catholic school, and now a dressmaker by 
occupation. These three children reside with their widowed mother. 

The death of Mr. Doran, which occurred May 6, 1889, deprived his wife 
and children of an affectionate husband and father, his associates of a faith- 
ful friend and comrade, and the community of a worthy citizen. - 

Mrs. Doran is a daughter of Francis O'Hara, who was born in 1816, 
in County Antrim, Ireland, where he obtained his education. He was early 
left an orphan and was brought up by two aunts who, after his school days 
were over, started him in life as the manager of a linen mill, which he con- 
ducted until about the age of twenty-five. He then sold the mill and emigrated 
to the L^nited States, settling in Pittsburg, where he opened a confectionery 
on Smithfield street, next to the building of the Duquesne Fire Department, 
his home being on the corner of Fifth avenue and Smithfield street. He car- 
ried on the business until 1862, when he moved to South Side, where he was 
for three years employed by the city to oversee the street lights. He then 
served as watchman in a cooper's shop for the remainder of his life. 

Mr. O'Hara married Rose Maguire, of County Antrim, Ireland, and 
their children were: i. James, born November 10, 1850, in County Antrim, 
was brought to the United States by his parents and worked in a nut and 



96 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

spike factory. He lived with his parents until his death, in February, 1873. 
2. Mary Ann was born November 8, 1852, on Penn avenue. First ward, 
Pittsburg, her younger brother and sister being also natives of that city. 
She is t"he widow of James Augustus Doran, is a member of St. George's 
Roman Catholic church, and resides with her three children in the Thirty- 
eighth ward of Pittsburg. 3. Frank, born November 2, 1854, received a 
good education and worked as a moulder at the Rosedale foundry. He mar- 
ried Ella Maginley, of Pittsburg ; children : Frank, Anna May and Gilbert. 
4. Tille, born June 30, 1856, lived with her parents until they died, and then 
learned the dressmaker's trade. She has now retired and lives in Pittsburg. 
She has traveled extensively, having several times made the tour of the old 
country, and has visited every part of the United States. Mr. O'Hara, the 
father of the family, died December 19, 1881, and is buried in St. Mar> s 
cemetery, Pittsburg. 

JOHN NUSBAUMER, one of Pittsburg's enterprising 3'oung business 
men, was born November 17, 1880, in Pittsburg, a son of Jacob Nusbaumer, 
who was born in 1821, in Switzerland, and received a limited education. He 
followed the carpenter's trade, and also sold timber which he purchased from 
the government. In 1864 he came to the United States and settled on the 
South Side of Pittsburg, where for fifteen years he worked at his trade and 
also engaged in contracting. In 1884 he moved to Beltzhoover, now the 
Thirty-eighth ward, and for the remainder of his life was engaged in the 
dairy business. In politics he was a strong Republican. He and his wife 
were members of the German Roman Catholic church of Allentown, Pittsburg. 

Jacob Nusbaumer married Amanda Glasser. born in March, 1840, in Ger- 
many, and they became the parents of two sons, both of whom were born in 
Pittsburg: John, born November 7, 1870, died at the age of three years; 
and John (2). Jacob Nusbaumer died January 28, 1895, and is survived by 
his widow. 

John Nusbaumer, son of Jacob and Amanda (Glasser) Nusbaumer, was 
given a good education, and, although but a boy at the time of his father's 
death, took charge of the dairy business and conducted it until his sixteenth 
year. He then sold out, learned the butcher's business, and when twenty 
years old established himself in that line of industry in Chalfont street. He 
now conducts a grocery store and butcher's shop combined. 

As a citizen he is energetic and public-spirited, and in politics he is an 
earnest advocate of the principles of the Republican party. He is a member 
of St. George's Roman Catholic church. In 1906 Mr. Nusbaumer made an 
extended tour o"f Europe. His home is with his widowed mother. 

THE MITCHELL-ALEXANDER FAMILY. Among the early mem- 
bers of the Pittsburg bar was John J. Mitchell, whose son, John M. Mitchell^ 
was also prominent among the attorneys-at-law in Allegheny county until his 
death. This sketch will treat more especially of the Mitchell and Alexander 
family history, the former having intermarried with the latter. 

(I) The first of the Alitchell family to reside in Pittsburg was Laurent 
Camille Michel (as the name, which is French, was then spelled). This 
family is of pure French origin — Michel — and was spelled with a soft "c" 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 97 

sound and the accent placed on the last syllable. The name was changed, or 
Americanized, rather, at the close of the War of 1812, when Laurent Camille 
IMichel first came to Pittsburg. He did not intend to remain here long, 
hence paid no attention to being called "Mitchell," by which name he was 
ever afterward known. His great-grandfather was Louis Michel, of Mar- 
seilles, France. His grandparents were both of French nobility. The grand- 
father was named Lauzare Rommuel Michel, who married Lady Geniveve 
Ferandy, of France. Laurent Camille Michel's father was Jacques Lazure 
Romel Michel, born in Marseilles, France, August 31, 1763, and married Lady 
Marie Adelaide Robare, born in the town of Cape Francis on the western 
part of the Island of San Domingo, near what came to be her own plantation, 
August 15, 1780. She married Mr. Michel in Baltimore, Maryland, Novem- 
ber 17, 1794; a cousin of the bride, Apuline Bonaparte, was in attendance at 
the wedding of Lady Marie Adelaide. The children of this union were: 
I. Emelie Jacques, born in Baltimore, Maryland, October 18, 1795; died in 
Charleston, South Carolina, in 185 1. 2. Camille Laurent, born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, July i, 1797; died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 14, 1878. 
3. Apouline, born in Baltimore, Maryland, February 17, 1800; died in that 
city November 2, 1801. 4. Candede Louis, born March 4, 1802; died in 
Mexico. 5. Alphonso Lauzre, born in Charleston, South Carolina, July 23, 
1804; died in San Francisco, California. 6. Edmonde A., born in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, July 26, 1807; died in New Orleans January 12, 1872. 

Laurent Cammille Alichel (now spelled Lawrence Mitchell), the first to 
locate in Pittsburg, at the close of the War of 1812, was with his father, who 
was the commander of the French vessel "Atlanta" when it was wrecked ofif 
the coast of Florida, the entire crew perishing except Laurent and his father. 
Later, and after Laurent had left college, he entered the marine service, and 
at the breaking out of the War of 1812 between this country and Great Brit- 
ain, he served with much distinction under Commodore Isaac Chauncey, of 
the United States service, participating in the engagements at Fort George 
and Little York. He was an eye-witness to the death of General Pike. Hav- 
ing received an honorable discharge, he left the city of Buffalo for New 
Orleans to visit his parents, going by the way of Erie, thence to Meadville, 
and down French creek in a flatboat to Franklin. From that point he came 
down the Allegheny river in a barge, paying his passage by helping run the 
boat. All was then new and wild in this region. Mr. Mitchell used to relate 
one incident of this trip, in which he was much interested : At a point nearly 
opposite the Forty-third street of the city of to-day, a large deer was observed 
swimming across the river. It became frightened at the men and his huge 
antlers became entangled in the brush, and in this manner the- buck was cap- 
tured. It was some time before Mr. Michel was permitted to complete his 
trip, and while here formed the acquaintance of one who caused his return 
to this section. He finally visited his parents in the south and returned to 
Pittsburg and subsequently married Miss Mary Elizabeth Smythe, whose 
affections he had won while on his first visit to the town of Pittsburg. She 
was the daughter of a learned Scotch-Irishman, who had a classical education 
and was at one time a professor in the College at Sheffield, England. His 
wife was Anna Margaretta, daughter of Simon Ruffner, the well-known pio- 
neer of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, of whose history further mention 
will be made. 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



After his marriage, Laurent C. Michel purchased much property in the 
vicinity of Pittsburg, and at one time had three large clothing stores on Wood 
street. His residence was on Penn street, while he had a summer place at 
Perryville. His city residence was in what was then the choicest portion of 
Pittsburg. After a few years' residence here he was commonly spoken of as 
Lawrence C. Mitchell, and was indeed one ,of the city's most highly esteemed 
citizens ; he was associate judge at one time. He died in the eighty-second 
year of his age. He was the father of eleven children, four of whom survived 
him: John Joseph, of whom later; Mary Amelia, wife of Domenic Ihmsen; 
Katherine Gold, a widow; and Mrs. Annie E. (Mitchell) Alexander, wife of 
William Davidson Alexander, of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 

(H) John J. Mitchell, eldest son of the first Mitchell to settle in Pitts- 
burg, was born June 9, 1819, and always remained a resident of Pittsburg, 
dying at the age of eighty-three years in 1902. In many ways he was a 
remarkable man. He was educated at Mount Saint Mary's College (Catho- 
lic) of Emmitsburg, Maryland, and chose law for his profession; he was 
admitted to the bar of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1837, and followed 
his profession for sixty-five years at Pittsburg, outranking all other attorneys 
in point of years. When but five years of age he was one of the boys who 
stood in line and was patted on the head by General Lafayette on his visit 
to this city in 1824. This was one of the pleasant recollections of Mr. Mitch- 
ell's life. For many years he was a law partner of Judge Samuel Palmer, 
and Attorney Charles F. McKenna read law with him in the Judge's ofifice. 
He resided in one house for a period of forty-two years. This house stood 
where now stands the great Frick Building. He was concerned in many 
important law cases and his judgment was sought by many, especially the 
younger members of the bar, all of whom found in him a fast friend. His 
word was as good as his bond and he took the same care of unimportant cases 
as he did the more weighty ones entrusted to him. He had not touched liquor 
since young manhood, and seldom smoked a cigar, as is noted in the hand- 
some diary which he kept of each day's doings, and in which he made an entry 
whenever he bought him a cigar. He kept a copy of all letters and date of 
mailing, which in those days was uncommon. 

He was twice married, first to Miss Mary Agnes Von Casinove, of Swit- 
zerland. At the date of her marriage she made her home with her uncle, 
Archbishop Hennie, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. By this union were born 
three children: i. John M. Mitchell, who became a prominent lawyer in 
Pittsburg, and who died seven years prior to his father. 2. Lawrence, who 
died in infancy. 3. Mary Caroline, who married Attornev John Francis 
O'Malley, of Pittsburg, and their daughters are Mary Agnes and Helen Mer- 
cides. For his second wife Mr. Mitchell married Miss Marv E. Noble, of 
Sharpsburgh, Pennsylvania, who survived him, as did some of the sixteen chil- 
dren born of this second marriage; they are as follows: i. Annie. 2. 
Charles. 3. Agnes. 4. Lawrence. 5. James. 6. William. 7. Nellie. 8. 
Augusta. 9. Frank. 10. Amenia. 11. Harry. 

The venerable father of this family was' a devout Roman Catholic and 
was an early altar boy at the time of the death of Reverend Charles B. 
McGuire. and about forty years ago made the address at the dedication of the 
monument m St. Mary's cemetery to the deceased priest. The honorary pall- 
bearers at the funeral of J^Ir. Mitchell included Judge Thomas Mellon, Hon. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 99 

Christopher C. Magee and the late Judge M. A. Atcheson, of the United States 
circuit court. 

(Ill) John M. Mitchell, son of John J. Mitchell by his first wife, and 
the grandson of Lawrence C. Mitchell, who was the first to settle in Pitts- 
burg, was born in that city and became an attorney-at-law, as was his father. 
He died after he had practiced about ten years, in 1895. 

The late Mrs. Annie E. (Mitchell) Alexander was the daughter of the 
progenitor of the family of Mitchells in Pittsburg, Laurent (commonly 
known as Lawrence) Camille Mitchell. She married William Davidson 
Alexander, and died at her home in Crafton, Pennsylvania, February 24, 
1906. The following is concerning the Alexander family into which 'she was 
intermarried : 

This Alexander family are direct descendants from William Alexander, 
Earl of Sterling, and cousin of Sir William Alexander, of England. Upon 
coming to this country they settled in several places : one located in Virginia ; 
another in Kentucky, and one in Pennsylvania. The historical city of Alex- 
andria, Virginia, was not, as some suppose, named after Alexandria in Egypt, 
but in honor of the original owner of the land on which it was laid out, in 
1748, and soon incorporated as ''Alexandria," it having first been called Belle 
Haven, however, before this change was made in favor of the Alexander 
family, who first claimed the land. The place was incorporated in 1799. 

(I) William Alexander settled in Carlisle, Cumberland county, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1800 he went to Sharon, Beaver county. His wife was Eliza- 
beth Davidson. One daughter of his was Esther, who married Hamilton 
Stuart, of Lawrence county. Pennsylvania ; another daughter, Margaret, mar- 
ried Robert Beacon, of Beaver. 

(II) James Alexander, son of William and Elizabeth (Davidson) Alex- 
ander, was born in Sharon, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in 1804. James 
Alexander was the first white child born in that section of the country. The 
log cabin in which he was born was the second one erected west of the mouth 
of Beaver creek; it stood near the mouth of Brady's Run, an historical spot 
in the annals of Pennsylvania. He came to Pittsburg when but sixteen years 
of age, and was with Isaac Harris, a publisher of directories, etc., which 
industry grows in value and interest as the years go by. He married Caroline 
Tuck in the month of May, 1833, in the parlors of the old hotel that stood 
where the Hotel Anderson now stands. Brazilla Alexander, of Kentucky, 
was present at the wedding. Caroline Tuck was the daughter of Hon. Wil- 
liam Hallam Tuck, L^nited States senator of Maryland, and a sister of the 
venerable William Hallam Tuck of that state. Caroline Tuck's mother was 
Cave Alulliken, and the latter was a daughter of Richard and Mary Williams. 
Four of the Williams brothers were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. 

James Alexander (II) was chosen a bookkeeper for the Western Peni- 
tentiary, which position he ably filled for more than thirty years. He resigned 
to become cashier in the Pittsburg postoffice, which position he relinquished 
to accompany his family to Alexandria, Virginia. Subsequently he was 
employed in the navy department at Washington, District of Columbia, but 
finally declined further appointments to public positions. In Allegheny City 
he was especially known in Alethodist Episcopal church circles. He held the 
position of recording steward in the old South Commons church from the date 
of its organization until his removal to Alexandria, Virginia. He died at his 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



home ill that city in October, 1880. He married Miss Caroline- Tuck, who 
died in Washington, District of Columbia, in December 1898, aged ninety- 
five years. His surviving children were: William Davidson Alexander, of 
whom further mention is had; Mrs. Lydia Gillis, wife of Commander H. C. 
Gillis, of the United States Navy, now retired with the rank of rear admiral ; 
Mrs. Julia Crump ; James Alexander, of the navy department ; Carrie T., a 
missionary to Japan, who later married Reverend Theodore McNair ; Mary of 
Washington city, wife of Captain Sawyer, now of Boston, Massachusetts. 

(HI) William Davidson Alexander, son of James Alexander (H), was 
born April 24, 1834, and died October 6, 1881. He obtained his education 
at the common schools and at the Western University of Pennsylvania. He 
read law and studied medicine, but never practiced either profession, and 
was for many years a clerk or treasurer of the Pittsburg postoffice. After- 
ward he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in its 
transfer department, in which he continued until his death. He was reared 
in the Methodist faith and in politics was a Democrat. He married Miss 
Annie E. Mitchell, daughter of Laurent C. Mitchell, September 2, 1857, 
and they were the parents of the following children: i. Caroline, died in 
infancy. 2. Hallam Dale, of whom later. 3. Grace Caroline, deceased at the 
age of thirteen years, in May, 1878. 4. Edith Marie Apouline, at home in 
Grafton, Pennsylvania. 5. Annie Michel Veronica. 6. 'Blanche Adelaide 
Robare (the last three named were educated in St. Mary's Academy at Alex- 
andria, Virginia, under the Sisters of the Holy Cross). Blanche married 
George Kerby, of Alexandria, Virginia, and they have two children : Grace 
Elizabeth Fielding, born in Grafton, baptized in St. Philip's church, by Rev- 
erend James Keeney, September, 1892; Alexander Spottswood, baptized in the 
same church, by Reverend Regis Canevin (now Bishop), August, 1894. 7. 
William Davidson, of whom later. 8. James Henry, at home, an invalid from 
a street car accident. The last named was educated at St. John's Military 
College, Alexandria, Virginia. 

The mother of this family, Mrs. Annie E. (Mitchell) Alexander, was 
born February 18, 1838, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and died February 24, 
1906, and was the last of the direct line of one of the oldest Catholic families 
in Pennsylvania. She was the granddaughter of Ann Margaretta Ruffner, 
and the great-granddaughter of Simon Ruffner, Jr. The latter named had 
the glory of giving to the church the first piece of property west of the Alle- 
gheny mountains. It was donated in March, 1787, to Father Carroll, after- 
ward Bishop of Baltimore. When Father Couse and Father Bowers took up 
the missionary work the first masses were celebrated in Christian Rufifner's 
house, the latter a brother of Simon Ruffner. 

Simon Ruffner came from Mayence, Germany, and was doubtless the 
Pennsylvania ancestor of the family. He had four sons : Simon, George, 
Christian and Philip. Simon settled in the valley of the Virginias and was a 
noted hunter and pioneer character. Ruffner's Cave, in the beautiful Shenan- 
doah valley, was named for him, as he was lost in the cave at one time and 
rescued in a half-starved condition. He settled in Pennsylvania between 1745 
and 1755, about the time Father Farmer had charge of the missions in the 
colonies. He had a son named Simon, who, about 1787, with his brothers. 
Christian and George Ruffner, crossed the Alleghenies and settled in West- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



moreland county, Pennsylvania. This Simon Ruffner served with Washing- 
ton at Valley Forge. 

Mrs. Annie E. (Alitchell) Alexander's grandfather, John Smythe, brought 
the Scotch blood into the family. One of his ancestors, having been dispos- 
sessed of his estate by Cromwell, learned the trade of a blacksmith, and after 
the battle of Culloden shod Prince Charlie's horse with the shoes backward 
and thus contributed to his escape. Mr. Smythe came to America about 
1791, and was very particular that his name be spelled Smythe and not 
"Smith." He married Anna Margaretta, daughter of Simon Ruffner, Jr., 
who lived to a good old age and died in the odor of sanctity. They were 
both true Catholics and had children: i. Mary, who became the wife of Law- 
rence Michel. 2. Catherine, who married Nathaniel McCalley. 3. John, the 
only son. 4. Susanna, who married James Blakely. 

James Blakely came from England in 1821, settling near Pittsburg. He 
came from Anglo-Danish stock. They were land owners in Lancashire, and 
while not Catholics, were still loyal to the Stuarts ; they lost much property 
and life in the wars of those times. James became a Catholic through much 
reading and conviction at the age of seventeen years, and brought his chil- 
dren up in that faith and to be loyal to their own country. He was a devoted 
friend of Bishop O'Connor, of sainted memory. Together they started the 
"Brotherhood of St. Joseph," of which Mr. Blakely was the first president, 
and continued until his removal to St. Mary's, where he died June 19, 1882', 
and is buried there. The date of his birth was June 15, 1804. His wife, 
Susanna Smythe, was born September 15, 1804, and died November 12, 1835. 
They were married at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1827, each being 
twenty-three years of age. 

Mrs. Annie E. (^Mitchell) Alexander was educated by the Sisters of 
jMercy at St. Xavier's Academy, Beatty, Pennsylvania, and later took private 
instructions at home in both music and languages, she being very apt at each 
of these branches. She was an excellent conversationalist and spoke several 
languages correctly. Even to the last years of her life she kept up with her 
music and devoted much time to writing. She possessed much literary talent 
and was a frequent contributor for papers and high class magazines. She, 
too, was a devout Catholic, belonging to St. Philip's, at Crafton. Her funeral 
was the first held in the new edifice. Although on account of her illness the 
last years of her life she was not permitted to attend mass, yet she took much 
interest in the work of the church. 

(Ill) Hallam Dale Alexander, deceased, son of William D. and Annie 
E. (]\Iitchell) Alexander, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, April 
21, 1859. In his early youth he entered the employ of the Union Freight line 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and rose from one station to another 
until eighteen years of age. In 1877 he enlisted in the United States navy 
as clerk to Rear Admiral (then Captain) James H. Gillis, commanding the 
United States steamer "Franklin," and served until April, 1879, when he 
was appointed clerk to the paymaster, James A. Ring, with whom he remained 
until December, 1884, serving until 1881, on board the "Portsmouth" in 
Alaskan water, and later on the "Enterprise" on the North Atlantic and 
Asiatic waters. In March, 1885, he was appointed to the United States 
steamship "Omaha," under Paymaster George H. Griffing, and upon the 
.arrival of the vessel at Hong Kong, China, was appointed acting paymaster 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



and ordered to the United States steamship "Ossipee," serving on that vessel 
until August 6, 1886. In October of that year he joined the United States 
steamer "Lancaster" on the South Atlantic station. In November, 1887, he 
returned with Paymaster Thompson on the "Trenton," which vessel had car- 
ried out a new detail of officers and men for the "Lancaster," and bringing 
home those whose time had expired. Upon their arrival in the New York 
harbor, Mr. Alexander was advised to take a cruise on the "Trenton," the 
boat so well known in naval history as being one of the United States boats 
which met their awful fate in 1889. He sailed on the "Trenton" for the 
Pacific station, in January, 1888, and it proved to be his last voyage. He was 
stricken with yellow fever in mid-ocean, while doing his duty in caring for 
one of the fellow-crew. He had been on the flagship with Captain Farquhar 
and Admiral Kimberley. He received two appointments in the pay corps, 
both under Rear Admiral John Lee Davis, who held him in high esteeni. 
Ability, promptness and faithfulness in his every known duty marked his 
noble career, as was attested by every officer, including his superiors in rank. 
In the language of one of his superiors. "Socially, he was a gentleman of the 
rarest type of manhood ; his soul was keyed to a commendable high sense of 
honor."' In his home life he shone in the brightest coloring. No mother ever 
claimed a nobler son ; no brother could be truer and more thoughtful for the 
care and comfort of his brothers and sisters. 

He died at 8:15 p. m., January 15, 1889, and was buried that night at 
midnight in the waters of the Pacific ocean. Under the burning sun of the 
torrid zone, off the coast of Panama, far from loving hands of a tender 
mother, in whom he seemed wrapped up, with a grave marked only by the 
chart of the ocean, in latitude 3' 25" north, and longitude 82' 10" west, rests 
his mortal remains. 

(Ill) William Davidson Alexander, son of William D. and Annie E. 
(Mitchell) Alexander, was born in Pittsburg and educated in the public 
schools of his native place, after which he entered the offices of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company, and there remained until about 1893, when he 
received the appointment of assistant paymaster in the United States navy, 
first going to South American stations. He was through the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war, and after that ended was sent to Manila. On account of his ill 
health he came back to the hospital at San Francisco, after which he resigned 
his place in the navy. Subsequently he was made superintendent of the 
Pennsylvania Malleable Iron W^orks at Pittsburg, but is at present residing 
in Buffalo, New York, where he is the metallurgist for the Pratt-Lechty Steel 
Company. He was united in marriage to Clara Quadling, daughter of an 
English navy officer. They have two children: i. Helen Elizabeth, born 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and baptized by Reverend Father Coyne. 2. 
Lucille Blanche, born in Crafton, Pennsylvania, baptized by Reverend Wil- 
liam Kelty. 



PROFESSOR SAMUEL ANDREWS, superintendent of the Pittsburg 
public schools, was born in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, May 25, 1847, the fourth son of William and Margaret (Phillips) 
Andrews. The father, William Andrews, whose father was Joseph Andrews, 
was born in Antrim county, Ireland, in 1806, and emigrated to America in 1822. 




^^x^^^:^^-;^^-^^^ ^^^^i^-^^t:^^^^-^^^-^-^/ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 103 

He and his brother James were among the earHest firms to engage in the con- 
struction of railroads in Pennsylvania, their principal contract being the grading 
of the Pennsylvania Central line from Philadelphia to Pittsburg. During the 
latter years of his life he resided upon his farm in Robinson township, which is 
now owned by his son Samuel. The father died on this farm in 1890. He 
married Margaret, daughter of James and Hannah Phillips, of Robinson town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. The latter was born in the south of 
Scotland or north of Wales, and died at the age of ninety-eight years. Their 
seven children were as follows : Hannah, Helen and Mary, who died in their 
childhood; Mark, James Phillips, Joseph Phillips and Samuel, the subject of 
this notice. Mark Andrews, the eldest son in the family, spent his entire life 
on the old homestead farm which belonged to his father, and there he died in 
1901. 

James Phillips, the second son, was educated in Easton, Pennsylvania, and 
followed teaching for a number of years ; he became associated in business at 
Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, with Asa Packer, formerly the governor of 
Pennsylvania, but at the outbreak of the Civil war he became a member of the 
Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and died from the effects of 
wounds received at the battle of the Wilderness. 

Joseph Phillips Andrews, third son of William and Margaret (Phillips) 
Andrews, received his education in Curry Institute of Pittsburg, and was a 
teacher in the public schools in Moon township and in what is now the Four- 
teenth ward, Pittsburg, for twenty-one years. He resigned this position to 
become superintendent of highways and sewers in Pittsburg, where he died in 
1893. 

Samuel Andrews, the subject of this sketch, the youngest son in his 
father's family, was educated in the schools of his native township until thirteen 
years of age, when he entered Curry University, then under the supervision of 
the late Robert Curry. After graduating from this institution he taught school 
in Robinson township until 1868, when he was called to the principalship of the 
schools of Chartiers township, now the Thirty-ninth ward of Pittsburg. He 
held that position until 1872, when he took charge of the Thaddeus Stevens 
school in Pittsburg, remaining there for fifteen years, when he became the 
principal of the Howard schools, where he remained until elected to his present 
position of superintendent of the Pittsburg schools in 1899. 

Politicallv Professor Andrews is a Republican, and in his church relations 
is a consistent member of the United Presbyterian church. He is prominent 
in the Masonic fraternity and numerous other societies. He now resides in the 
Twentieth ward in Pittsburg, but represented the Thirty-sixth ward in both 
branches of the council for over a period of fifteen years. As an advanced 
educator he ranks high among the instructors of the state. 

He was united in marriage in 1870 to Anna Mary, daughter of James and 
Elizabeth (McCurdy) Bell, of Robinson township. The issue by this union was 
Frank Leo Andrews, who married Jennie, daughter of Reuben and Katharine 
(Obey) Reese, of Chartiers township, and by this union is : ( i ) Samuel Reese 
Andrews, (2) Katharine Obey Andrews, and (3) Jean Reese Andrews. 



• JOSEPH ALBERT HAYS, one of the competent clerks at the offices 
of the Union Switch and Signal Corporation, was born October 19, 1870, in 



104 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. He attended the Fourth ward public schools, 
and later the Curry University. He usually votes with the Republican party, 
except in borough matters, when he takes an independent stand, voting for 
the candidate he thinks is best suited to fill the office. In church membership 
he is identified with the Baptist denomination at Wilkinsburg. He is a mem- 
ber of the Blue Lodge, Masonic order, and seeks to do his share in the various 
societies to which he belongs. 

Mr. Hays was united in marriage February 27, 1898, to Miss Jennie 
Estella. daughter of George and Hannah (Sherwin) Van Horn, of Braddock, 
Pennsylvania. Two children bless their home: i. Margaret Blanch, born 
Ma> 27, 1902. 2. Miriam Estella, born May 23, 1904. 

JOHN R. HAYS, treasurer of the Potter Title & Trust Company of 
Pittsburg, was born June 23, 1875, at Allegheny City, a son of John and 
Miriam (Wilkins) Hays. John Hays, the father, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, in January, 1827, and accompanied his parents from county 
Antrim, Ireland, when but a small boy. The family settled in Allegheny City, 
Pennsylvania, where young Hays was reared and educated in the schools 
common to that period. While still a youth he learned the tobacco manu- 
facturing trade and subsequently established himself in that business in his 
home city, where he became a successful tobacco merchant. He built up an 
extensive wholesale trade in tobacco and kindred goods and also conducted 
a retail business as well. In his political choice he was a Republican, while in 
his religious faith he was of the Universalist belief. Mr. and Mrs. John Hays 
were the parents of the following children : 

I. Mary Ida, born August 5, 1859, died in childhood. 2. Jane, born 
November i, 1861, married Joseph Herron and now resides in Montana; 
she has had three children — Earl, Miriam and John. 3. James Grant, born 
January 11, 1864, now an attorney, married Charlotte Gallagher, and they have 
children— Blanche G. and James, Jr. 4. Edmund Wilkins, born July 13, 
1866. 5. IMiriam Emily, born August 4, 1868, married William Scott, and 
to them have been born daughters — Clara and Mary. 6. Joseph Albert, 
born October 19, 1870, married Jennie Van Home, and their children are — 
Margaret and Miram. 7. Clara Bell, born August 31, 1872, married Frank 
Hartley, and their children are : Collin H., Clara Esther and Grace. 8. John 
R., subject. 9. George William, born July 25, 1878. 

John R. Hays, of this notice, the eighth child in his parents' family, was 
reared and educated in Allegheny City. After leaving the schoolroom he 
first found employment at the Homestead Steel Works, but later went to 
Montana, where he spent about two years on his sister's ranch. He then 
returned to his native county and entered the employ of the Potter Title & 
Trust Company, in which he now holds the responsible position of manager. 



LEWIS FUNDIS, one of the pioneer merchants of the East End district 
of Pittsburg, is another of the Gennan emigrants who has executed well the 
part of a good citizen and successful business man since his coming to our 
shores to build for him a home, surrounded with prosperity and plenty. 

Lewis Fundis was born January 14, 1832, at Baden, Germany, and came 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 105 

to this country in 1848, landing at New Orleans, and from there came direct 
to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where his first employment >vas as an errand boy 
for Major Davis, with whom he remained for four years at the small wage's 
of two dollars a month, finding his own clothing. Though well grounded in 
his studies before coming to America, he found time while in Major Davis' 
employ to gain further knowledge by attending the public schools during the 
winter seasons. He next found employment with Luke P. Davison, who then 
conducted a general store at East Liberty, where the Liberty National Bank 
now stands. The business was, however, soon removed to the corner of 
Penn and Frankstown avenue, and here Mr. Fundis received his first lessons 
in the mercantile business. He was employed in that business for five years, 
the last year acting as manager. In 1857 he returned to Germany to visit 
his parents. His father, who did all in his power to aid his children, gave 
him and another brother and a sister then living in this country the sum 
of three htmdred dollars, with which they united their energy and started 
in the general mercantile business in a small way. Notwithstanding they had 
for their competitors three large general stores at East Liberty, they were in no 
sense discouraged, but continued by hard and able management to build up 
their business to one of good proportions. From this small beginning they 
forged their way to the front and gained the confidence and credit of the 
community, who saw the young Germans were possessed of the true spirit of 
business enterprise, and soon they were placed on a good financial footing 
with others at East Liberty. This business they carried on for seventeen 
years and in 1871 his energy and good management placed him where he 
could retire from active business relations, which, owing to ill health, he 
decided to do. But after four years, and when his son, John L. Fundis, had 
completed his education, Mr. Fundis concluded to re-engage in business, 
taking his son in with him. They opened a gentlemen's furnishing store, 
which was successfully carried on for thirty years. In 1906 they retired from 
active business on accoimt of old age and ill health, since which time Mr. 
Fundis has led a life of leisure. 

In politics Mr. Fundis is an independent voter, seeking to ever support 
the most suitable man. In his religious faith he is connected with the Pres- 
byterian church. 

Lewis Fundis, his father, was a prosperous farmer and by trade a black- 
smith at Baden, Germany; he was the son of John and Elizabeth Fundis. 
Lewis Fundis, Sr., married Sophia Maiers, and they were the parents of the 
following children: John, Lewis (subject), Frederick, deceased; Daniel, 
deceased ; Katharina, deceased ; Jacobina, deceased ; Fredericka, married 
Christopher Strahley ; and Annie, married Frank Hartman. 

Lewis Fundi?, of this notice, married, first, Katharine, daughter of John 
Stark, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, born 1840 and died in 1868. 
In 1869 he married his first wife's sister, Annie EHzabeth Stark, who died in 
1905. By his first marriage he had four children — John, Annie, Katharine and 
Rebecca Sophia. Annie married Frank Hartman, who have one son, William. 
John married Ida Caldwell, and they have one son, John Louis. Katharine 
married George P. Wilkinson, and Rebecca Sophia married A. L. Watson, 
and they have two children — Helen and June. 

By Mr. Fundis' second wife two daughters were born— Emma Jane, who 
married R. M. Richards, and Ida, who died young. 



io6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



JAMES SCOTT, general superintendent of the Lucy and Isabella fur- 
naces of the Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburg, is an example of the rise of 
a practical man fitted by early environment and education to the industry 
with which he is associated. For more than a quarter of a century he has 
been connected with the famous furnaces, of which he has been the general 
superintendent, and as such is regarded as an expert and a very valuable man 
in one of the leading industries of the city. 

Mr. Scott was born near Edinburgh, Scotland, at Dalkeith, in 1850, son 
of James Murray and Jessie (Brown) Scott. On his maternal side he comes 
of most distinguished ancestors. His grandmother, Margaret Murray, was 
the only daughter of James Murray and Elizabeth Stevenson. James Murray 
was born in the parish of Newbattle, in the county of Midlothian, Scotland, in 
1738, and died December, 1822. He was the son of James Murray and 
Marion Rice or Ryce. This James Murray was the second son of the Duke 
of Athol. In the Rebellion of 1745 he joined the Athol clan, under Murray 
of Tullicharden, and followed the fortunes of Charles Stuart until the field of 
Culloden, when with others he fled and found refuge in France. 

James Scott, the subject of this sketch, came from his native land in 
1873. His apprenticeship was served under his father at the blacksmith's 
forge and later as a machinist at the Paragon Works at Dundas at South 
Queens Ferry. Upon his arrival in this country he secured employment in 
New York as a machinist for the first year and from there went to Ohio, 
where he was employed by the Port Washington Iron & Coal Company. 
Two years later, 1877, he was employed at the Lucy Furnaces at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, first as chief engineer. In 1886 he was promoted to assistant 
superintendent and in 1888 was made its general superintendent, which position 
he still holds. Politically Mr. Scott votes the Republican ticket and in his 
church faith is a Presbyterian. 

In 1876 he married Miss Helen E. Johnston, of Sterling, Scotland. She 
is the daughter of Captain George Johnston and wife, and was born in India in 
1854. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Scott are as follows: Jessie B., 
married to Dr. Alric Garland ; Fannie Maxwell, married to Dr. Mller, one 
daughter ; James Murray, deceased ; Margaret Murray ; Helen E., married to 
Mr. Frederick Fairbanks ; Elizabeth B. ; and George J. 



WILLIAM JEFFERY SPAHR, one of the leading grocers of East 
Liberty, a part of "Greater Pittsburg," is a native of the Twentieth ward of 
this city, born October 24, 1858, son of Lemuel and Elizabeth (Alexander) 
Spahr. The Spahrs are from old Revolutionary stock, the subject's great- 
grandfather having been a soldier in that struggle for our national indepen- 
dence. The grandfather, Peter Spahr, was born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 
early in the nineteenth century, and moved from Carlisle to East Liberty in 
April, 1826. He married Mary Elizabeth Longsdorf, and their children were 
as follows : i . Jesse, who married twice and reared a family ; two of his 
children, Edward and Dr. Clarence Spahr, of Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, still 
survive. 2. Joseph. 3. Lemuel, of whom more later. 4. Ephraim, mar- 
ried Mary Woods, and their children are Joseph H. H. and John B. McFadden. 
5. Mary Elizabeth, married Jacob Doolittle, of Carnegie ; they have one child. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 107 



Jacob Miller Doolittle, born February 26, 1866. 6. Anna, married a Mr. 
Scott, of Washington, D. C. 

Lemuel Spahr, the father, was born March 17, 1823, on Ferry street, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He learned the tanner's trade and followed it several 
years on Penn avenue, East Liberty. He sold the tannery business and 
returned to the old homestead on Ellsworth avenue, between Highland and 
College avenues, which consisted of about twenty-one acres. Here he engaged 
in truck-gardening, continuing in the same for twenty-one years. He married 
Miss Elizabeth Alexander, daughter of Joseph and Agnes (Fife) Alexander, 
of Bridgeville, Pennsylvania. They were the parents of the following children : 
I. Amelia A., unmarried. 2. Elmira, unmarried. 3. A. Josephine, who 
married Albert H. Ritscher, and they have children: Ethel Spahr, William 
J. S., Elizabeth W., Albert Hutter and Robert Coleman. 4. William Jeffery. 

William Jeffery Spahr was educated at the common and high schools of 
Pittsburg and graduated from the commercial department of the last named 
school in 1877. Having thus well equipped himself for the duties of a 
business man he at first worked in a coal yard, after which he found better 
employment in a grocery store at No. 6225 Penn avenue. After being 
employed there two months, in the Dennison grocery, he, in company with 
Thomas E. Milliken, March 8, 1880, bought out the business, which they 
conducted successfully for six years. At that date Mr. Spahr took the entire 
business himself and continued to operate it for eleven years longer. In 
1897 he moved to more commodious quarters at No. 61 17 Penn avenue, where 
he now has one of, if not the largest grocery store in East Liberty. He is also 
interested in the firm of Spahr & Ritscher, of which he is a partner. The last 
mentioned business is with his brother-in-law, Albert H. Ritscher, and was 
organized in 1893. Mr. Spahr has been largely interested in other affairs of 
the city, being at one time a director in the East End Savings & Trust Com- 
pany, director of the Board of Trade, and connected with the Lincoln Avenue 
Building & Loan Association. Politically, Mr. Spahr is an independent voter, 
and in religious faith is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

He was married, January 2y, 1887, to Miss Martha R. Wattles, daughter 
of W. Warren and Martha Washington Wattles. 



JAMES CLARENCE ADAMS. The secretary and treasurer of the 
well known D. J. Kennedy Coal Company, James C. Adams, was born 
November 25, 1871, at Worthington, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, son of 
Joseph Shields and Mary Emily (Blaine) Adams. The father was born 
March 15, 1840, on his father's farm in Richland township, Venango county, 
Pennsylvania. The subject's grandfather, William Adams, was born about 
1802, and his wife, Mary Shields, was born in 1805. William Adams, with 
his brother James, came from Kishacoquillas. in Eastern Pennsylvania, 
and settled in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. William, however, 
remained there but a short time and then went to Venango county, where 
he engaged in farm pursuits. His brothers and sisters were: i. James, 
before mentioned. 2. John, removed to Indiana. 3. Samuel, married a 
Nesbit. 4. Nancy, married William Donaldson. 5. Rachel, married 
David Joy. 

The issue of William and Mary (Shields) Adams was: i. Margaret, 



io8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



who married William Patton, and they had — Mary Katharine, who mar- 
ried Elliott Robb. 2. Sarah Ann, married Charles McClatchey, and their 
children were: Mary Elizabeth, wife of Hiram Bricker ; Emma, wife of 
Levi Wilson ; Albert, Olive, deceased ; Rose, unmarried. 3. Nancy, 
married Edward Blaine, and their children were : Oda, William, Shields 
and Walter. 4. Rachel, married William Hamilton Noble, and their 
children were : Ella, Rose, Myrtle, Jennie, Nancy and Robert Shields. 
5 and 6. Elizabeth and Mary, died young. 7. Joseph Shields, who is the 
subject's father. 8. James F., married Miriam Robinson, and their children 
are : Lula, Carrie, Edward, Laura, Howard and Emma. 

Joseph Shields Adams, the seventh child of William and Mary (Shields) 
Adams, made farming his life occupation. Politically, he is a Republican. 
In his religion he is of the Presbyterian faith. He married Mary Emily, 
daughter of James and Mai'garet (Morrison) Blaine. Her father, James, 
was the son of James and Deborah (Baird) Blaine. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Shields Adams are the parents of : i. William Edward, single. 2. James 
Clarence, subject. 3. Frank Burton, single. 4. Walter Howard, married 
Janett Ferguson, and their issue is one daughter, Marion Blaine. 5. Albert 
Leslie. 6. John Milton. 

James Clarence Adams, son of Joseph Shields Adams and wife, was 
educated in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and has eng-aged in the coal 
business continuously since starting out in life. Politically he votes the 
Republican ticket and in religious faith is a Presbyterian. 

He married, in 1898, May, daughter of Professor L. P. Greves, of 
Pittsburg, and by this union two children were born: i. Gertrude Dale, 
born in 1899. 2. Russell Blaine, born in 1903. 



NATHAN FLEMING HART, one of the prominent iron men of the 
Pittsburg district in his lifetime, was born in Uniontown, Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, January 8, 1814, and died April 7, 1883. He came to Pitts- 
burg in 1833, his father removing from Uniontown that year. 

Nathan F. Hart entered the firm of Pennock, A'litc'hell & Company 
in 1842; in 1847 he, with the late Joseph Pennock, formed a partnership 
under the firm name of Pennock & Hart ; later Samuel L. Pennock came 
into the firm, the name being changed to Pennock, Hart & Company, 
located at what is now Twenty-fourth and Railroad streets, where they 
carried on a general foundry business. In 1859 Mr. Hart became the silent 
partner in Mackintosh, Hemphill & Company, lending them his financial 
aid. In 1862 the firm of Pennock, Hart & Company was dissolved, and 
after this he devoted his time to the interests of Mackintosh, Hemphill & 
Company, retiring from active business in 1878. 

He was a devout Christian gentleman, charitable and patient in all of 
his dealings with men, and, was not ready to believe ill of his fellow-kind. 
He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and at one time 
taught in its Sabbath-school. He was the son of Joshua and Rachel 
(Fleming) Hart, and had one brother and three sisters, who were: 
Miranda, died unmarried; Martha, married Dr. W. S. Mackintosh: Wil- 
liam K., married a daughter of Dr. George McCook: and Elizabeth B., 
wife of Henry Hays. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 109 

Nathan F. Hart married, September 30, 1852, Sarah Walter Pcnnock, 
of the old and well known Pennock family of Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania. By this union one son was born, Pennock Hart, treasurer of the 
old firm of Mackintosh, Hemphill & Company, who survives his father, 
and is now residing with his mother on Highland avenue, East End, 
Pittsburg. 

iSIrs. Sarah Walter (Pennock) Hart was born July 19, 1829, a daughter 
of Joel and Phebe (Walters) Pennock. Phebe Walte'rs was born August 8, 
1807, and she married Mr. Pennock in the old London Grove Ivfeeting 
House, Chester county, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1828. Joel Pennock, 
father of Mrs. Hart, was born January i, 1801, and came from old Quaker 
stock. He was engaged in the iron business many years near Coatesville, 
Pennsylvania (Laurel Iron Works) ; also at the Chester Furnace, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania. He died in 1875, leaving two children: 
Sarah, who married Nathan Hart, and Samuel, born June 19, 1834, who 
married Annie Hampton, daughter of Judge Moses Hampton. Joel Pen- 
nock was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth Underbill, nee Johnston Pen- 
nock. Samuel was born April 4, 1763, and Elizabeth, February 2, 1763. 

The American ancestor of the Pennocks was Christopher Pennock, 
a native of Ireland, who settled in the vicinity of Primative Hall, near 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1685; married Mary Collett, daughter of 
George Collett, oi Ireland; he died in Philadelphia, 1701. He was an officer 
in the service of King William of Orange, and was at the battle of the 
Boyne, 1690. He had a son Joseph, who was born in Ireland, 1677, and 
was eight years of age when his people emigrated to America. Lie moved 
to Chester county, Pennsylvania, married Mary Lewis, and from them the 
present Pennocks of this part of the country descended. 



SAMUEL GALEY was the second child of Robert Galey and Margaret 
Rodgers, who were among the first settlers of Clarion county, Pennsylvania. 
He was born on August 23, 1852, in the old log house at Red Bank on the 
Allegheny river, seventy-five miles above Pittsburg. He was named for his 
grandfather, Samuel Rodgers, who was a member of the Irish Cavalry. In 
1865 the family moved to a larger and better, farm located near the Clarion 
creek and back of Perrysville, Pennsylvania. The farm was secured by the 
foreclosure of a mortgage. 

There were ten children in the family, three of them, John, Tom and 
Robert were step-brothers. The other children were William, James, Rachel, 
David, Daniel and Laura. They each received the best education the com- 
munity afiforded. while attending to the numerous duties of the farm. The 
clothes were made by the mother of rough homespun, the flax for which she 
raised in her garden, and the shoes, which were only used on special occasions, 
were the handiwork qf the father. 

Shortly after the family had settled on this farm the first great oil excite- 
ment came. Business men of Pittsburg sent out their agents or came in 
person to lease the lands of the farmers. Robert Galey, who had become 
prosperous from the products of his farm, drilled several wells on his property 
along the Clarion creek, and they proved to be good producers. The drilling 
operations were kept as secret as possible. One well in particular, known as 



xio A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



the Mellon well, is still pumping. Another, known as the Dexter, is still 
pumped once a week by horse power and produces several barrels of fine 
quality of oil. It is an interesting old relic, with its squatty derrick almost 
overgrown with weeds and trees. Good coal was discovered on the farm and 
the mining of this, together with the care of the wells and the farm duties, 
kept the whole family very busy, the boys working night shift on the wells. 
The Standard did not exist then with its pipe lines, and the oil, which at first 
sold from ten to sixteen dollars a barrel, was shipped down the river to the 
refineries in Pittsburg on a flatboat. The high prices for oil soon fell as the 
number of wells increased throughout the country. 

About 1875 Samuel came to Pittsburg to receive a better education. 
He made his home with Judge Mellon, on Negley's lane, now known as Negley 
avenue, in the East End, and attended the old public school on Margaretta and 
Beatty streets for several years. He was of a powerful build and delighted to 
wrestle. Next door lived Thomas A. Mellon, the oldest son of the Judge. 
Here he ijiet Mary E. Drake, who was visiting her cousin, Mrs. Mellon, while 
attending the school on Margaretta street. She was three years his junior 
and their acquaintance ripened into marriage in June, 1880, the ceremony 
being performed in the home where she was visiting. 

About this time there came a report that oil had been struck at Bradford, 
Pennsylvania. There was a great rush to the new field, and Samuel Galey 
started thence with his wife. He had saved several thousand dollars and bor- 
rowed some more from his father. He and his three brothers were among the 
first in the new field. He secured some timber land in a wild valley at a little 
place later known as Haymaker and about ten miles from Olean, New York. 
. Here he built three little houses, in one of which he started housekeeping. 
He drilled several wells in the vicinity in partnership with his brothers, one 
almost at his front door, and they all produced richly. With the profits thus 
made more v/ells were drilled until seventy-five or more wells were producing. 
He lived in this place about three years and had one son, Thomas. There 
were many fortunes made in this strike, but many lost it through gambling and 
other causes. With the business start secured here he extended his operations 
into the Beaver county fields, moving his home to the town of Beaver Falls, 
Pennsylvania. Here a son Frank was born. After a year here he again 
moved to Negley avenue, in Pittsburg, and built a house just opposite to the 
one in which he had met his wife. 

His operations in the oil business extended into the opening and develop- 
ing of all the important fields of the country, notably the Turkeyfoot, Cora- 
opolis, Butler, W^est Virginia and Ohio fields. With two of his brothers, 
William and James, he was a member of the firm of Galey Brothers. They 
opened up a particularly valuable field near Woodsfield, Ohio, where they 
drilled a large number of wells. He was a very hard worker and exposed 
himself to the elements, which caused the breakdown of his strong constitu- 
tion. His health first began to fail on returning from the Pan-American 
Exposition in 1900. His trouble was diagnosed as Bright's disease, and real- 
izing he was doomed, his firm decided to sell out their Ohio properties. He 
put all his business afifairs in good shape, made his will and awaited the end, 
which came, after much suffering, early Christmas morning of 190T at the 
age of forty-nine years and four months. Interment took place in Beaver 
/cemetery, where three of his children had preceded him. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



He was a member of the East Liberty Presbyterian church and is sur- 
vived by his wife, sons, Thomas and Frank, and 'a daughter, Dorothy. In 
his prime he was about five feet ten and one-half inches in height and 
weighed one hundred and eighty-eight pounds. His shoulders were broad 
and heavy and his build stocky. His affection for his family was unbounded 
and his greatest delight was to play with children. One of his favorite amuse- 
ments was to play a joke on a friend. He returned several times a year with 
his sons to the old farm in Clarion, which was still the home of his brother 
Daniel, and they all three turned loose in the fields to help harvest or shock 
the wheat. The walk from the station to the farm was about six miles, and 
as the boys generally gave out long before the journey was finished, the 
remamder was finished on his back. He always went around to see the old 
wells just as though they were old friends, climbed up on the tank, smelled 
the oil or turned the dead engine over a few times. 



DANIEL GALEY was the founder of this family in this country. He 
was married to Peggy Fulton and had one son, Robert, born 1812. He was 
a prosperous Protestant Irish farmer, and a native of Lower Casteltown, 
parish of Cappaigh. Kin Kitt. county Tyrone. Ireland. On an adjoining farm 
lived Andrew Mellon, the father of Judge Thomas Mellon, who was "then a 
small lad. In 1819 the two families emigrated to America, the voyage in a 
small sailing ship consuming twelve weeks, very severe storms having been 
encountered. Daniel Galey was very ill during the trip and almost died. 
They finally landed at St. Johns, New Brunswick, and later shipped for Balti- 
more, Maryland, arriving at that port October i, 1819. Here the two families 
parted, the Mellons going west and Daniel obtained work from a widow lady 
in Maryland as the superintendent of her plantation and an overseer of her 
slaves. After a few years in Maryland he died, and his wife and son moved 
to Pittsburg, the journey being made over the old canal so far as it had been 
built and the remainder finished in one of the old-fashioned Conestoga wagons. 
The}- arrived in Pittsburg about 1820-1 and bought a little house on Wiley 
avenue. Robert renewed his acquaintance with Judge JMellon, who had come 
to the city from Plum township to stay with him while he studied law at the 
Western University. Robert became a fine practical blacksmith, learning his 
trade at the Morrison foundry, where now stands the Park Building, mean- 
while snatching a fair education. 

In the early thirties the family landed in the wilderness, traveling by 
wagon, and settled on Cherry Run, Clarion county. After two years here they 
moved to Red Bank, on the Allegheny river, where he continued to live, 
Robert having married, and his mother died shortly after moving here. They 
obtained the land for three dollars an acre, the owner having received it by 
grant. The land was rich and soon bore fruit, but the forest first had to be 
cleared off and a cabin built. There were deer and bear in the woods and it 
was not uncommon for Indians, who had come down the river in canoes, to 
call to beg or buy grain. The bitter border warfare between the red and white 
man was still fresh in the minds of the middle-aged inhabitants. Peggy Fulton 
w^as small of stature and very active and intelligent. 

Robert Galey was married to Rachel Spahar. Their children were as 
follows: I. John PL, who married first Jennie Smith. Their child was 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Helen. After her death he married Lillian Tebbetts. Their children were 
Tebbetts and Harry. 2. Thomas married Olive Yingling. Their children 
were Jesse and Clara. 3. Robert married Mary E. Banks. Their children 
were George and Anna. 

After the death of his first wife, Robert Galey was married to Margaret 
Rodgers, in March, 1848. Their children were as follows: i. William, mar- 
ried Ida Nicholas, died October 4, 1907. Their children were Etta and 
Charlena. 2. Samuel, married Mary E. Drake; died December 25, 1901. 
Their children were: Thomas, Frank and Dorothy. 3. James, married 
Caroline Snyder. Their children were: Jean, Florence and Helen. 4. 
Rachel, married Thomas Grant. 5. Laura, married Charles Farnsworth, died 
1892. Their child was Robert. 6. Daniel, married Huldea Neeley. 7. David, 
married Elsa Dunkel, died, and their children were Laura, Ruth and Rodgers. 

Robert Galey was a good and industrious farmer and educated his chil- 
dren to thrift and saving habits. Oil and coal were discovered on his property 
back of Perrysville, Clarion county, whence he had moved after fourteen or 
fifteen years' residence in Red Bank. The oil he sent down the river in 
flatboats to Pittsburg, realizing a very high price for it. By this means, 
together with the products of his farm, he accumulated a considerable fortune. 
He passed his last days in Bellevernon, on the Monongahela river, where he 
died at the age of eighty-four in the year 1896. His wife, who is eighty-seven 
years of age, still survives him. 

The following are the dififerent ways the name has been spelled : Gayley, 
Gayly, Gealy, Gailey and Galey. 



THE RODGERS FAMILY, with a sketch of the life of Margaret Rodg- 
ers, wife of Robert Galey, and dictated by her. 

My great-grandfather, Oliver Rodgers. came from England into Ireland 
at the time of the French war. His occupation was that of a calico inspector. 
He was light complected and was known as the largest man physically in 
England, being over seven feet in height and broad in proportion. He married 
Christina Johnson in Ireland. Both he and his wife died young, about the 
time powder was put under the Parliament House in the reign of King Wil- 
liam. His children were William, Nancy, Molly and George, who was my 
grandfather. 

George Rodgers was fair complected and a finely built man. He was a 
farmer in county Donegal, Ireland. One of his duties was to help row a big 
six-oared life boat out to sea during a storm. Both he and his brother William 
died young by overdoing themselves by hard work. His wife was Susan 
Howard, and she lived to the age of eighty-nine, her death occurring at the 
old farm in Red Bank, Clarion county, just after we had settled there and 
six months after our arrival in America. Their children were : Tom, Susie, 
Jennie, Lettie and Sam, who was my father. 

Sam Rodgers was born and baptized at Linsforth Episcoplier in November, 
1786. He was an industrious farmer and a dealer in cattle, by which means he 
saved considerable money. He was a member of the Irish Cavalry. For 
thirty years he suffered with dyspepsia and as a result was very weak. He 
died November 2, 1852, having been under the care of old Dr. Wallace. He 
v^as buried in Lawrenceburg, Clarion county. His wife was Margaret Cook,, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 113 

who was small of stature and healthy. She was born in Ireland in 17 — , and 
died at the age of sevent5^-two in the old log house on farm back of Perrys- 
ville. Their children were Elizabeth, Susan, Jane, Sally, ]\Iary, William, 
Letilda, Rebecca and myself. 

I was born December 15, 1821, at Faum, Ireland, and was baptized there. 
This place is on the coast and distant seven miles from Derry. My twin sister 
died at an early age. I went to school in Ireland and can remember well the 
country and incidents of my life there. In 1831-2, when I was eleven years 
old, we emigrated to America, where I attended school for one month more. 

Our ship was named the Syrus Butlow. She was perhaps one hundred 
feet long and had three masts, the middle one about as great as a linseed 
hogshead. We were towed out of the harbor by a small steam tug which did 
not dare venture out to the big waves. W^e children soon became very ill, 
but after a week recovered. We all brought our own provisions, which con- 
sisted of meal and potatoes. A fire was built under a great kettle mounted 
in a swinging crane on the deck and in this we cooked all our food. Each 
family had a net, to which a long string was attached. The potatoes were 
held in the net until boiled, while the children took turns at holding the string. 
The captain had a goat to furnish him with milk, but the crew and ourselves 
used warm sweetened water on our mush. 

We encountered two storms, one being especially severe. Three helms- 
men were knocked from the helms in succession. The fourth man was chained 
to it and during that operation the ship got in the trough of the sea and we 
shipped three seas. The water flooded the cabins and we thought all was lost, 
but the ship each time righted herself and the crew finally got her head on to 
the wind. We pitied the poor sailors, who had to climb all over the rigging 
and reef in or put out sail accordingly as the captain ordered. They would 
come down almost frozen to death and while they pulled on the ropes they 
would sing. One young sailor named Isaac Cruso was very kind to me and I 
took him up some warm brandy now and then which my father had brought 
along. When nearing the end of the journey he pierced my ears and placed 
in them a pair of gold earrings which, with two exceptions, when they were 
broken, I have not had out for over seventy years. Our first sign of land 
was the sight of birds and we were each in turn permitted to look through 
the captain's spy glass and we saw far in the distance a narrow brown strip. 
One night my father noticed that the crew were constantly on the move and 
the next morning on questioning the captain he was informed that if he had 
known the conditions he would not have slept much. The ship was sailing 
between two dangerous Newfoundland sandbanks and had she struck all 
would have been Tost. We sailed south and finally landed near Philadelphia, 
where we remained a week until a canal boat transported us west. Our 
journev from Ireland had taken fifty-two days, but a few years before it had 
taken more than double that time. We received word many months later 
that our ship had encountered a storm on her return journey and had gone 
down with all aboard, including the sailor who gave me the earrings. 

V/e came over the old canal from Philadelphia to Hollidaysburg, which 
was the farthest point to which it had been built. There we hired a big covered 
wagon pulled by six horses and drove to Wayne tOAvnship, where we stopped 
six" months. We children all ran along barefoot behind the wagon. Father 
traveled around seeking to select a final home for us, and we finally located 

iv— 8 



114 ^ CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

in Clarion county. We were greatly discouraged and lived in a sheep house 
until we had constructed a log house at the mouth of the Clarion creek, near 
Freedom. All was wilderness. The land we bought from Sam Graham for 
five dollars and twenty cents an acre, the money having been saved in Ireland. 
Mr. Graham was one of the very first settlers and had received the land by 
grant twelve years before. Deer and bear were plentiful and Mr. Graham, 
who was a good hunter, kept us supplied with meat. We bought and planted 
some wheat, but it proved to be very poor and we had a hard time. Our 
threshing was all done with a flail, with great labor, and it would take all 
winter to thresh out the grain one small barn held. We borrowed fire from 
Mr. Graham's house, carrying it in a shovel, or started the flame ourselves by 
snapping the flint of an old flintlock musket on flax. No roads existed except 
tree clearings. We sowed flax, while father made us a loom. We thus made 
our own clothes and besides sent tow cloth and linen to Pittsburg for sale. 
We raised our own madder in the garden with which to die the cloth and 
made quilts, table cloths, blankets, etc. Our dresses were made of wool we 
sheared from the sheep and the boys' trousers were made from flax. When 
I was married I had five homespun dresses of different colors. 

I was married in February, 1848, to Robert Galey. His father, Daniel 
Galey had been a most intimate friend of my father and family while still in 
Ireland. The ceremony was very simple and the honeymoon was nothing but 
hard work, fixing up my new home. We first lived in a cabin on Cherry 
Run, Clarion county. Here my first child. Will, was born. In April, 1-851, 
we moved to Red Bank, now township, and this was our home for the next 
fourteen or fifteen years. The following children were born here : Samuel, 
James, Rachel, Daniel, David. My mother died in this house at the age of 
seventy-two. Ten days after Sam was born word came that my father was 
very ill at the old home twenty miles away. My husband drove over at once 
and contrary to his orders I harnessed up a horse and drove over in a buggy, 
taking the child with me. I arrived soon after my husband and my rashness 
caused him to be a little angry. My father was still alive and he blessed us 
all, including the baby. The boys slept up under the roof, crawling up a 
ladder. In 1865 we moved to a new farm back of Perry sville, which we had 
secured by the foreclosure of a mortgage. An incident happened in this con- 
nection which caused me much anxiety. We had saved nine hundred dollars 
in cash with which to pay off this mortgage and I had hidden the money in 
an old pair of shoes. One morning one of the boys found these shoes and 
was not able to put them on because of the obstruction. He was shaking 
them violently over the fire when I recognized the shoes, but fortunately the 
money did not fall out. I made all the cloth to clothe my family from the 
products of my own garden. For fifty cents I would make a calico dress for 
a neighbor or would sew hard all week until ten at night for one dollar. 
Laura was born in this home. 

About this time came the great oil excitement. My husband put down 
several wells which produced first rate. The boys worked on them in shifts 
and I was kept busy preparing enough to eat. Times became easier now 
and we were able to save considerable money and the boys were starting into 
business and getting married. In April, 1882, we decided to leave this farm 
in charge of Dan, and accordingly we purchased a fine farm in Washington 
countv near Eellevernon. It was underlaid with valuable coal. Our house 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 115 

was a comfortable brick structure and it was here that our last child, Laura, 
was married in 1889. 

We moved to Bellevernon a few years later and spent most of our time 
visiting among our children, but we never failed to return to the old farm in 
Clarion county several times a year. My husband died in 1896, at the age of 
eighty-four years, having been in poor health the last few years of his life. 
He was conscious up to the end and endured no suffering, and was buried in 
the Beaver cemetery. 

I would not care to live my life over again if I had to endure so much 
hardship and hard work as I have done. 

Mrs. Galey is still in fair health, though eighty-seven years of age. She 
has possession of all her faculties and visits yet among her children. She 
spends her winters in Florida with some of her children and says she is 
awaiting her call with complacency. She has outlived four of her children 
who reached maturity — Laura, Dave, Samuel and William. She is a member 
of the Presbyterian church in Bellevernon and makes her home with her 
daughter, Rachel Grant, in Charleroi, Pennsylvania. 



THE HERSHEY FAMILY. George H. Hershey, a prominent retail 
grocer of the East End, Pittsburg, and an active member of the Board of 
Trade, was born in Circleville, W^estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 
1867, a son of Jacob and Mary E. (Ashbaugh) Hershey. The Hersheys are 
originally from Germany and the first representative of the family in this 
country was the Hershey who emigrated from Germany and settled in Adams 
county, Pennsylvania. He was the great-grandfather of the subject of this 
notice. Among his children was a son named Jacob, who married Anna Mc- 
Creary. Jacob Hershey. the grandfather, was born July 19, 1803. He followed 
the occupation of a farmer throughout the active years of his career. He was 
a member of German Reformed church and a Republican in politics. He was 
twice married. His first wife's maiden name was Catherine Wolet and she 
bore him four children: Rachel, born October 5. 1825, married Daniel Beck 
and they had two children. Louis, born May i, 1827, married Eliza Cunning- 
ham; he died October 9. 1872, and his wife passed away September, 1904. 
Elizabeth, born April 4, 1829, married David Sanders and they reared a large 
family. Christopher C, born March i, 183 1, married three times, and was the 
father of a large family. The second wife of Jacob Hershey, whose maiden 
name was Ann McCrearv, of York county, Pennsylvania, bore him the follow- 
ing children: Rebecca,'bom March 23, 1833, married (first) James Saam, 
and (second) William Ford. Catherine, born November 20, 1834, married 
Robert Fisher. Marv, born October 3, 1836, became the wife of Absalom 
Bowser. Jacob, born' February 11, 1839, mentioned hereinafter. Sarah, born 
August I,' 1 84 1, became the vvife of John Fulton, and they reside at North 
Irwin, Pennsvlvania. Lydia, born June 25, 1843, died December 27, 1865. 
Joseph, born August 24. 1845, died October 26, 1845. John, born November 
24, 1846, died January 7, 1853. William, born February 12, 1849. Theresa, 
born March 5, 1852, died September 19, 1854. Jacob Hershey, the father of 
this family, died May 10, 1872'. 

Jacob Hershey, eldest son of Jacob, and the father of the subject, was 
born in Penn township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 



ii6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



1839. He chose the occupation of a firmer for his Hfe work and has followed 
the same in a successful manner. He is a staunch supporter of the principles 
of the Republican party and has held the office of township supervisor for a 
number of terms with satisfaction to his township. He belongs to the German 
Reformed church and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He has been married twice, first to Mary Ashbaugh, born in 1847, married in 
November, 1863, died in 1880. By this union were born the following children 
to Mr. Hershey : Ida May, born April 27, 1865, wife of Charles Vial. George 
H., born March 10, 1867, subject of this notice. Charles B., bom February 18, 
1869, died November 3, 1881. Frank B., born February 17, 1871, married Eva 
Detrich. Jojin C, born February 19, 1873, married Sana Hammerly. Mar- 
garet O., born December 25. 1875, became the wife of Thomas Hutchinson. 
Wilbur F., born May 29, 1877, married Linna Dougherty. For his second 
wife Mr. Hershey married, April 19, 1883, Rebecca Naley, born December 30, 
1845, daughter of John and Delitha Naley, and one child was born of this 
union, Jacob Samuel, who died in infancy. 

George H. Hershey, the fifth in genealogical line from the German emi- 
grant, and the son of Jacob and Mary (Ashbaugh) Hershey, was reared on his 
father's farm at Irwin borough, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, to which 
place his parents removed when he was about five years of age. He attended 
the common schools of that town, after which he began to master the carpen- 
ter's trade, serving an apprenticeship with Robert Fulton for three years and 
then came to South Pittsburg and entered the employ of Scheutte & Company, 
with which firm he remained for seven years, doing carpentering work in their 
planing mill. In 1895 Mr. Hershey abandoned his trade and engaged in the 
grocery trade. He purchased a lot at the corner of Graham and Claybourne 
streets, and there erected a store building. He continued in this business and 
at this location up to 1904, when he had completed his ninth year as a successful 
groceryman. In 1903 he had bought a business lot on the corner of Center 
avenue and Graham street, and there he erected a fine four-story brick building, 
fifty by one hundred feet. On the first floor he has his grocery store, and there 
is also one of the most fully up-to-date drug stores on the same floor, while the 
upper floors are arranged for apartments. Mr. Hershey built his present com- 
modious residence, on Graham street, at No. 539, in 1902. He also has real 
estate interests — residence property — throughout the city. 

He is a member of the Friendship Methodist Episcopal church, and 
formerly belonged to old Smithfield Methodist church, down town. He has 
always given his full share towards the upbuilding of the church of his choice, 
and has served as both steward and trustee. Being much interested in the 
growth arid development of Pittsburg, he is numbered among the members of 
the East End Board of Trade. He was united in marriage, February 27, 1894, 
to Miss Kate M. New, born in Pittsburg March 14, 1872, daughter of John A. 
and Mary (Beltz) New. (A history of the New family appears elsewhere in 
this work.) Mr. and Mrs. Hershey are the parents of one daughter — Florence 
N., born September 23, 1897, and is now a student of the Liberty public school. 



THE NEW FAMILY. John A. New, a retired business man of Greater 
Pittsburg, was born in Hesse Kassel, Grossenmohr, Germany, February 22, 





£:t^,;4v4^^^£^<^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 117 

1840, a son of John and Katherine E. (Lindner) New. The father spelled 
the name Neu, but the later generations spell it New. 

John Neu (as he spelled it), the father, came to America a year later 
than his son, John A., or in 1858, with his wife and son Christian. John Neu 
had served in the German army for a period of twelve years. Upon arriving 
here he rented a farm and followed agricultural pursuits. After the death of 
his wife he went to Canada, and there purchased a farm upon which he put 
many substantial improvements. He married again in Canada, a widow with 
children, but the particulars are not now known. . He died at the advanced 
age of eighty-five years. He was of the Lutheran religious faith and a very 
energetic, painstaking man. By his first marriage he had three children: i. 
Anna Margaret, who married John H. G. Harmeier, and they were the parents 
of ten children. 2. John A. New, subject of another section of this sketch. 
3. Christian, deceased, born in Germany and died in 1891 ; he served three 
years in the Union army during the Civil war in America ; he married and was 
the father of seven children. The widow nov/ resides in South Pittsburg. 

John A. New came to America in the month of April, 1857, and at once 
took up the trade of a baker, serving two years with Frederick Frankenbach. 
He followed his trade, and in 1866 engaged in business for himself on the 
South Side, Pittsburg. He became the leading baker and caterer in that 
section of the city, and there laid the foundation for his fortune, which now 
consists of good property in both South Pittsburg and elsewhere throughout 
the city. He continued in the bakerv trade until 1893, when he retired and 
now spends his time mostly in looking after his real estate interests. He 
■erected his present residence in 1897. Politically Mr. New is a Republican, 
while in church relations he is a member of the Evangelical Association church 
at the corner of Center and Graham streets, to which he has been a liberal 
giver. He is now a member of the registration board of the city in the 
Twentieth ward. 

Mr. New was united in marriage. May 18, 1865, to Mary Beltc, born in 
Austria, and came to America with her parents, who located in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. Her father was a miller by trade. She was one of five children 
in the family. The father died aged forty-five years, in 1868, and the mother 
passed away in 1895, aged seventy-two years. Mr. and Mrs. New are the 
parents of nine children: Lizzie L., Emma M., Dr. Grant J. A., Kate M., now 
the wife of George H. Hershey ; William E., deceased; Anna May, deceased; 
Harry G. A., deceased ; Walter F. B., employed by Jones & Laughlin for the 
past five years since graduating from commercial department of the city high 
school ; Hilda S., deceased. 

Dr. Grant J. A. New, son of John and Mary A. (Beltc) New, was born 
in South Pittsburg and educated in the public schools on the South Side, at 
Curry's University and the Western University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 
1895. He was employed in the South Side Hospital for a period of sixteen 
months, since which time he has been attending to his general practice on 
Carson street. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 
221 ; a member of the Junior Order United American Mechanics; and is 
medical examiner of the Knights of the Maccabees, No. 62. Politically he is 
a Republican. He is a mem'ber of the city physicians in the department of 
charity and correction. Dr. New is a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and an upright, enterprising citizen. 



ii8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

He was united in marriage August 22, 1900, by Rev. Warren, to Mary A., 
daughter of James and Winfred (Richard) Griffith. The issue is John A. 

New (III). ,,.-., 

It may here be stated that the first member of this family to come to this 
country was Anna Margaret Neu, daughter of John Neu, and the wife of the 
late John H. S. Harmeier. She came some time prior to 1857. She now 
resides at 5510 Claybourn street, Pittsburg, and is the mother of ten children. 

CHALFANT FAMILY. John Chalfant, the first, came over in the ship 
"Welcome" with William Penn and was given a deed for six hundred and 
fortv acres of land in Chester county. This was in about 1682. He after- 
ward, in 1699, settled on a tract of land of two hundred and fifty acres in 
Rockland Manor, Chester county, Pennsylvania, obtaining a warrant for it 
October 22, 1701. John Chalfant died in August, 1725. The sons were John 
Chalfant, Jr., the second, and Robert Chalfant. 

John Chalfant, Jr., the second, married and among other children had 
three sons : John, Solomon and Robert. 

Robert, son of John Chalfant, Jr., the second, married Ann Bentley, 
daughter of John and Mary of Newton, Chester county. Their issue was John, 
the third, Marv, Jane, Ann, Robert and Elizabeth. 

Henry Chalfant, son of John the third, married Eliza Jackson, August 5, 
1740, and'had nine- children, the eldest of whom, Jonathan, was born April 8, 
1743, and on December 24, 1777, married Ann Barnard. 

Ann Barnard was the daughter of Thomas Barnard, or Burnard, or 
Bernard, who was first mentioned in 1701 as of West Marlborough, and the 
said Thomas, the father of Ann, died at Chester in 1732. He had married, 
first, Eliza Swain, of Newark, New Jersey, but on her death married Sarah 
Carter, and his daughter Ann, by the said Sarah Carter, became the wife of the 
said Jonathan Chalfant, on December 24, 1777. Of this marriage of Jonathan 
Chalfant and Ann Bernard were born nine children, viz : Thomas, born 
November 2, 1778; Ann, born May 11, 1780; Jonathan, born May 15, 1783; 
Jacob, born November 3, 1786; Annanias, born August 24, 1788; Henry, 
born May 13, 1792', and died December 14, 1862; Eliza, born October 8, 1794, 
and died October 15, 1794; Eliza, born August 25, 1797; Amos, born Decem- 
ber 9, 1799. 

The said Henry, the sixth child of Jonathan, was married by the Reverend 
George Dufiield, at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on March 27, 1827, to Isabella 
Campbell Weakley. Isabella Campbell Weakley was the daughter of Samuel 
Weakley and Hetty Lusk, and was born January 12, 1801, and died March 4, 
1885. Henry Chalfant and Isabella Campbell, his wife, settled at Turtle Creek, 
in the county of Allegheny, about 1827, and there founded the Pittsburg 
branch of this family. He conducted a general store and kept the postoffice 
and relay station for the Pittsburg and Philadelphia stage coach line which 
traversed the old Greensburg Turnpike. About 1840 he moved to the hills 
above Turtle Creek on the Greensburg Turnpike and settled on a farm of sev- 
eral hundred acres about half way between Wilkinsburg and Turtle Creek, 
on the said turnpike, where he resided until his death, and where also his 
widow lived with her son, Henry Richard, and his family until her death in 
1887. Of this marriage of Henry Chalfant and Isabella Campbell Weakley 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 119 

were born the following children: John Weakley Chalfant, bom December 
13, 1827, and died in Allegheny City December 28, 1898; William Barnard 
Chalfant, born July 8, 1829, and died August i, 1830; Sidney Alexander 
Chalfant, born May 14, 1831, and is now living on Walnut street, Twentieth 
ward, Pittsburg; Ann Rebecca Chalfant, born August 8, 1833, married Albert 
G. Miller in 1874, and died October 17, 1896; Hetty Isabella Chalfant, born 
April 4, 1835, and died January 30, 1840; Henry Richard Chalfant, born July 
25, 1837, and died September 30, 1887; James Thomas Chalfant, born May 
18, 1839, and died April 20, 1901 ; George Alexander Chalfant, born March 
13, 1841, and died August. 1904; William Lusk Chalfant, born August- 3, 
1843, and died April 20, 1895 ; Albert McKinney, born October 6, 1846, and 
is now living on Castleman street. Twentieth ward, Pittsburg. 

William Lusk Chalfant married, on November 4, 1874, Elizabeth Ashley 
Pirtle, and had by her three children: John Weakley Chalfant, Jr., born 
September 9, 1875 ; Lewis Rodgers Chalfant, born in 1876, and died' in early 
infancy; and Ashley Pirtle Chalfant, born December 31, 1882, and died on 
May 15, 1895. 

Elizabeth Ashley Pirtle was a daughter of the Honorable Henry Pirtle 
and Ann Rodgers, of Louisville, Kentucky. Henry Pirtle was judge of the 
court of chancery of Jefferson county, Kentucky. 

John Weakley Chalfant, Jr., was married on October 2, 1901, to Elizabeth 
Gerry Briggs, who was a daughter of Charles Calvin Briggs and Mary Gerry. 
Charles Calvin Briggs was born in Freeport, Maine, and Mary Gerry was 
born in South Waterford, Oxford county, Maine. Charles Calvin Briggs 
moved to Pittsburg in the early 70s and resided there, and Elizabeth Gerry 
Briggs was the first child of Charles Calvin Briggs and Mary Gerry. Charles 
Calvin Briggs died July 19, 1901, and Alary Gerry Briggs, his wife, died 
February 18, 1906. 

John Weakley Chalfant, Jr., and Elizabeth Gerry Briggs have one child, 
Charles Briggs Chalfant, born June 26, 1902, and resides in the Borough of 
Edgewood, a suburb of Pittsburg. John Weakley Chalfant, Jr., is a member 
of the bar of Allegheny county and a practicing attorney in the city of Pittsburg. 



THE HEMPHILL FAMILY. Among the men of native genius and 
laudable ambition, whose name will long be referred to in all parts of the 
world, is the late James Hemphill, whose family history forms the subject of 
this notice. He descended from one of the old Pennsylvania families, whose 
paternal ancestors were of the sturdy Scotch-Irish stock which has accom- 
plished so much for western Pennsylvania with the passing of more than two 
centuries. On his mother's side Mr. Hemphill came from "Pennsylvania Ger- 
man" ancestry, and on both paternal and maternal sides he was from families 
of Revolutionary fame. He was born at Mechanicsburg, Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, July 22, 1827, a son of John and Ann (Longsdorf) Hemphill. 
As a great mechanical engineer, steam engine inventor and builder, discoverer 
and constructor of numerous steel and iron furnace processes, as well as the 
original maker of railroad baggage checks, his name will always have a promi- 
nent place on the pages of commercial and industrial history. 

His father, John Hemphill, was a tailor by trade, and followed this for his 
livelihood. He removed from Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1846, to 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Tarentum, Allegheny county, this state, where he died June i, 1859. His 
wife, Ann, died in 1879. Their children included: Sarah Cox, of Oil City, 
Pennsylvania; Dorcas Aker, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania; James, 
of this sketch; Lydia Ann, Mrs. Rhine, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Mar- 
garet, Mrs. Kennedy, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania ; and John W. Hemphill, 
of Tarentum, who learned the tailor's trade of his father and followed the 
same until the opening of the Civil war, when he enlisted as a member of 
Company A, Seventy-fourth New York Volunteers, under General' Sickles, 
brigade commander. 

James Hemphill accompanied his parents to Allegheny county in 1846, 
and came to Pittsburg in 1850, where he died August 7, 1900. His early life 
was spent on the farm, and when very young he drove a horse and cart used 
in the construction of the Cumberland Valley Railroad. He often was pleased 
to relate in after years that while thus employed he believed himself the "big- 
gest man on the job," but added that "as a matter of fact, the well-trained 
horse he drove was doing the whole business." In 1847 he was apprenticed 
to Samuel Black, later of McKeesport, to learn the blacksmith's trade. He 
worked at the forge for about three years and subsequently acquired a good 
knowledge of machinery and mechanics in general. When he first made his 
advent into Pittsburg he had a fine, robust constitution, a clear, active mind, 
coupled with a laudable ambition, and practiced frugal economy. He had a 
natural liking for mechanics and kindred branches, and his superior ability 
was soon appreciated, and he was made assistant engineer of the Pittsburg 
waterworks, under Joseph French, one of the best hydraulic engineers of those 
times, and who was later made superintendent of the waterworks system, and 
young Hemphill then became engineer. He followed this about eight years, 
and during this period put in his spare time studying mechanical engineering, 
with such success that later in his life he was quoted as authority as an expert 
in such matters all over this country. 

It was while engaged in the waterworks that he conceived the idea of 
providing baggage checks for use by the railroads of this country. He finally 
perfected his plans and manufactured them on a large scale for the various 
railroad companies, thus realizing his first money upon which he built up his 
goodly fortune. He was kindly assisted and greatly encouraged by Thomas 
Scott, of Pennsylvania Railroad fame, who at that date was but the division 
superintendent of the Pittsburg division. He always gave Mr. Scott the 
credit of giving him his first real financial start by what he did in the way of 
helping him to introduce the little brass baggage check, now so universally 
used in all parts of the world. 

In 1856-57 Mr. Hemphill invested some money with others in a small 
machine shop business, which was conducted in the tool house of the then 
abandoned steel works of Messrs. McKelvy and Blair, one of the pioneer 
steel plants of Pittsburg. Within a few years, however, he withdrew from 
this firm and in 1859 entered into partnership with Messrs. W. S. Mcintosh 
and N. F. Hart, at the corner of Twelfth and Pike streets, Pittsburg, devoting 
his whole attention to that enterprise, which from the small beginning came 
the "Ft. Pitt Foundry" of Mcintosh, Hemphill and Company, which concern 
was incorporated later and became one of the gigantic enterprises of Pittsburg. 
The steel business of Greater Pittsburg indeed owes much to the pluck and 
genius possessed by Mr. Hemphill, for it should be remembered that he forced 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



to the front the "blooming mill," by installing one mill of this type at the 
Pittsburg Bessemer Works, which small plant grew in time to be the exten- 
sive Homestead works, so well known the world over as being a part of the 
vast Carnegie steel interests. He was part owner in the famous "Carrie" 
furnaces also. He became an acknowledged expert in furnace building and 
designing, doing such work for nearly all of the great plants in this country 
in his time. The United States patents covering his claims of invention of 
blast furnaces were numbered by the score, while his patents along other valu- 
able lines were very numerous. He was the first person to design and build 
the massive type of steam engines now so common. On these he employed 
his patent slide valve, the superiority of which has not been excelled in more 
than the half century which they have been in actual daily use. For the same 
length of time has his name stood at the head of designers and builders of 
blast furnaces and rolling mill machinery, all the offspring of his truly inventive 
brain. 

Unlike a majority of men of such genius and zeal in matters with which 
they have been connected, Mr. Hemphill realized fully that as age advanced 
no man could perform the same tasks as in youth ; hence he gave way to 
vounger men to carry out the details of his work, he merely advising and sug- 
gesting as to the best means to be employed. So the last years of his eventful 
career he spent in approving and improving on the plans and ideas conceived 
by younger men, thus saving his own strength of both mind and body. His 
was a many-sided character, as was shown by his success in lines entirely 
foreign to the business for which he had been trained in his youth. In 1893, 
as an example, when the Western Pennsylvania National Bank was established, 
he became its president, and no little strength was given that institution by 
his being at the helm. His sense of justice and business honor was ever as 
greatlv manifest in his make-up as were his inventive and mechanical gifts, 
and to this has been ascribed the fact that in all his years of business, in the 
employment of hundreds of men. he was never hampered by reason of a strike 
among his own workmen. 

As has well been remarked by one of his contemporaries : 

"He was a man of strong principles and excellent judgment, which 
caused him to be sought after as an arbitrator and appraiser in many important 
controversies and adjustments. He was at all times much interested in young 
engineers, and was never so happy as when advising and materially aiding 
them to develop their original ideas and perfect their inventions. His nature 
was kindly and domestic and all of his love centered in his home circle. He 
was retiring, never seeking praise or distinction, and his kindly social qualities 
brought him many close friends who have reason to long remember his sterling 
qualities of character." 

He was public-spirited and was good counsel on the city board, where he 
served with distinction. After a painful illness he died of neuritis on Tues- 
day, August 7, 19CK), and was buried in Home wood cemetery. 

Mr. Hemphill was united in marriage, in 1849, to Elizabeth Frink, of 
Rome, New York, who died in January, 1879, ^"d was survived by the follow- 
ing children: i. Newton A., born March 9, 1853; married, in 1874. Mary 
McMillen, daughter of Hugh and Jennie (Nicholson) McMillen. and they are 
the parents of: James, Elizabeth B. and Marie N. Hemphill. 2. William A. 



122 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

married Annie Marshall of Pittsburg. 3. Katherine, Mrs. W. A. Hoeveler 
(see Hoeveler sketch). 4. Alice, Mrs. George R. W. Baum (see Baum 
sketch. 5. Horace F., married, and is living in Philadelphia. 

FREDERICK M. JOHNS. Among the business men who are promi- 
nently identified with the hardware trade in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, we may 
mention the name of Frederick M. Johns, whose store is located at No. 7242 
Mount Vernon street, in that city. He is of the first generation of his family 
to have been born in this county, his ancestors having been of an old and 
honored family of Wales. 

Richard Johns, father of Frederick M. Johns, was born in Cardiff, Wales, 
and emigrated to the United States. Here he very successfully followed the 
blacksmith's trade, which he had learned in his native land, until his death, 
which occurred in 1894. He married Hester Brown, who died in 1896, and 
they had children: EHzabeth, deceased; Katherine, married a Mr. Marquis; 
Mary, married an Augermyer ; Laura, married a Mr. Wallace ; Grace, married 
Mr. Brown; Harry; NelUe,' married Mr. Miller; Frederick M. (see forward). 

Frederick M" Johns, son of Richard and Hester (Brown) Johns, was 
torn in Pulaski, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, September 23, 1873. He 
was educated in the public schools and in Mount Academy, Ohio, and upon 
the completion of his education taught school for one year. He went to Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, in 1890, having obtained a position in a hardware store, 
and retained this for a period of seven years. He then went to Homewood 
and established himself in the same line of business, and has carried this on 
verv successfully since that time. He is noted throughout the city for his 
sterling integrity and reliable business qualities. He married Gertrude Armi- 
tage, daughter of James Armitage, of Coltsville, Ohio, and they have children : 
Russell, born October 30, 1899; Victor V., born March 28, 1902; Gladys G., 
born November 16, 1903. 



OSWALD WERNER. Oswald Werner, head of the dyeing establish- 
ment of Oswald Werner & Sons, which is the largest and oldest concern of 
its kind in the western part of the state of Pennsylvania, is a son of Lebrecht 
and Elinora Christiana (Emerich) Werner, both natives of Saxony, Germany. 
The Emerichs are counted among the wealthiest families of that section of 
Germany. 

Oswald Werner was born in Saxony, Germany, October 16, 1835, and 
emigrated to the United States in 1853. He settled in Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and, being enterprising and ambitious, took the first employment that 
came to his hand. This was on a farm not far from the city, and during the 
three months he was employed there he acquired a fair working knowledge of 
the English language. He then obtained a position in the finishing department 
of a tannery. He had served an apprenticeship to the dyeing trade in his 
native country, and his next position was in the dyeing establishment of W^il- 
liam W.. Neeper, where he remained for a period of nine years. He then 
determined to establish himself in this line of business, and in 1864 opened an 
establishment on Fourth avenue, between Market and Ferry streets, where 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 123 



he carried on a successful business until 1869. His reliable and excellent 
work had brought him such an increased trade that it was necessary for him 
to seek larger and more commodious quarters, and he purchased a large plot 
of ground in Penn avenue, erected suitable buildings thereon, and removed his 
business to that place. Thirty years later he removed to Bryant street. East 
End, where he now has extensive working space, between St. Clare and Mellon 
streets, and in addition has a large stable. Although Mr. Werner has retired 
from active participation in the actual work of the concern, he still retains 
his connection with it. It is now carried on under the firm name of Oswald 
Werner and Sons, and by his two sons, John and Oswald H., and gives 
employment to eighty-five hands. 

]\Ir. Werner married, in 1859, Katrina Stadler, and they have had nine 
children, seven of whom grew to mature years: i. Augusta A. 2. John. 3. 
Emma K. 4. Oswald H. 5. Katrina R. 6. Anna. 7. Stella B. 



WILLIAM FLINN. Ex-State Senator William Flinn, of Pittsburg, 
was born May 26, 185 1, in Manchester, England, son of John Flinn, who emi- 
grated the same year to the United States and settled in Pittsburg. From the 
time of his arrival until 1896 he was a resident of the Sixth ward, but in the 
year mentioned moved with his family to the Nineteenth ward. 

William Flinn received^ common-school education and after leaving school 
learned the trades of brass finisher and gas and steam fitter. He is now a 
member of the firm of Booth' & Flinn, Limited, general contractors, and 
belongs to the board of directors of the Colonial Trust Company. In 1877 he 
was elected a member of the board of fire commissioners of Pittsburg. He 
was elected to the house of representatives for the sessions of 1879 ^"d 1881. 
and in the years 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896, 1900 and 1902 he served as a dele- 
gate to the Republican national convention. For eighteen years he was chair- 
man of the Republican city executive committee. 

In 1890 he was elected to the state senate, was re-elected in 1894, and in 
November, 1898, was honored with a third election. He was the author of 
the first Greater Pittsburg bill ever introduced in the legislature, and was one 
of those largely instrumental in bringing about the consolidation of the cities 
of Pittsburg and Allegheny. Nor is it only as a legislator that he has served 
his home city, but as a private citizen his active interest and his influence have 
ever been devoted to its welfare and advancement. On March 7, 1892, he 
resigned public office and retired to private life, intending thenceforth to 
devote his time to the management of his business interests. 

Mr. Flinn married Nancy Galbraith, of Pittsburg, and they are the par- 
ents of the following children: George H., Ralph E., W. Arthur, A. Rex, 
Mary S. and Edith G. 

George H. Flinn, eldest child of William and Nancy (Galbraith) Flinn, 
is actively connected with many of the business enterprises of- Pittsburg, 
among them the Beechwood Improvement Company. He is secretary and 
treasurer of the Booth-Flinn Company, Limited, contractors, and is a member 
of the board of directors of the Colonial Trust Company. George H. Flinn 
married Clara Louise, daughter of D. C. Negley, and their family consists of 
two children: Clara Louise and George H. 



124 ^ CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

EDWARD ACKER, at present one of Pittsburg's enterprising- business 
men, was born June 4, 1840, at Phillipsburg (now Monaca), Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, a son of Edward Acker, who was born at Fulta, Saxony, Ger- 
many, and came to this country in the ,first half of the nineteenth century. 
He settled at Phillipsburg, where he practiced medicine and established a 
water-cure sanitarium which for many years was known as the Phillipsburg 
Water-Cure. 

Dr. Acker married Mary Ann, born at Freeport, Pennsylvania, daughter 
of David Hoover, and their children were: Emil, married in Cincinnati; 
Edward, of whom later; Josephine, wife of Plenry Bimber, has children; 
George, Marie, Karl and Edward; Armine, went to Indiana and there mar- 
ried;^ Henry; and Robert, who died in infancy. Dr. Acker, the father, died, 
aged forty-one years, in Phillipsburg, where he had resided continuously 
since his arrival in this country. 

Edward Acker, son of Edward and Mary Ann (Hoover) Acker, came to 
Pittsburg in 1859, at the age of nineteen, and began his business career by serv- 
ing an apprenticeship to the tinner's trade. Upon the expiration of his time 
he entered the service of a Mr. Dorflinger, and later became connected with 
John Demler, with whom he remained one year. 

Upon the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in the Seventy-seventh 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until after the termination of 
the conflict. His regiment, being attached to the Army of the Cumberland, 
participated in all the great battles and engagements except Chickamauga. 
He was twice wounded and once taken prisoner, being confined for five months 
with many others at Parole Camp Chase until finally exchanged. His regi- 
ment, being ordered to Texas at the close of the war, in anticipation of trouble 
with Erance over Mexico, was one of the last to be disbanded, and he served 
in all fours years and three months. At the end of that time has was hon- 
orably discharged with the rank of sergeant. 

At the close of the war he again worked at his trade, being employed by 
John Demler and the firm of Brown & Graham. In 1871 he moved to East 
Liberty and established, in partnership with Peter Forsythe, a house-furnish- 
ing and hardware business. After the dissolution of his connection with Mr. 
Forsythe he was successively associated in this enterprise with Harry Crozer 
and Henry Carr. Eventually he took charge of the whole business and has 
successfully conducted it up to the present time. Although now sixty-seven 
years of age, he is to be found every day at his office. As an instance of the 
frugality which has formed a large element in his financial success may be 
mentioned the fact that he was one of the few who served through the Civil 
war and saved money from their pay, the compensation in Mr. Acker's case 
never amounting to more than twenty dollars a month. 

He is a member of Union Veteran Legion, Camp No. i ; Duquesne 
Lodge, No. 546, F. and A. M. ; Pittsburg Chapter, No. i. Knights Templar; 
Consistory, Scottish Rite and Shrine (Syria Temple). In poHtics he is an 
ardent Republican and was a member of the Blaine or Americus Club. 

Mr. Acker married Mrs. Alice EHzabeth (Kleinf elder) Leslie, and the 
following children have been born to them : Lotta, deceased ; Edward C. ; 
Frances, deceased ; and Alice G. Edward C. Acker, the only son. is in busi- 
ness with his father. He married Grace Davis, by whom he has one son, 
Edward James Potter Acker. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 125 



THE ALLERTON FA^IILY. Among the Pittsburg families who have 
the distinction of being able to trace their ancestry in a clear, undisputed, 
direct line to the band of Pilgrims who came over in the "Mayflower," is the 
Allerton family, whose male descendants have been prominent in the affairs 
of the city for many years, and one of whom, Orville Hurd Allerton, is still 
a resident of the place. The genealogical line is as follows : 

I. Isaac, who was the American ancestor. 2. Isaac. 3. Isaac. 4. John. 
5. Isaac. 6. Reuben, the subject's great-grandfather. 7. Samuel W., the 
grandfather. 8. Orville Hurd, Sr., the father. 9. Orville Hurd, Jr., the 
subject. 

(I) Isaac Allerton, who came in the "Mayflower," left but one son, who 
remained in New England, viz.: Isaac (11), and he in turn left Isaac (HI), 
born in New Haven, Connecticut, and Willoughby, born in Virginia. Isaac 
(I) was born in New Haven, 1655, ^^^ became the progenitor of all the 
Allertons of later generations. His descendants may be embraced into three 
branches: those of Rhode Island being one branch, from John (V); the 
New York branch descending from Isaac (V), and the New Jersey branch, 
from Zachariah (V). 

The exact time and place of the birth of Isaac (I) is not at this time 
known to his descendants in this country. He was of an old and honorable 
family of mixed Saxon and Danish descent that had been for many centuries 
located in the southeastern part of England. He was certainly born between 
the vears of 1583 and 1585, and resided in London for some time prior to his 
removal to Holland, in 1609, when he was about twenty-six years old, and 
was thirty-seven when he came to Plymouth, Massachusetts. It is supposed 
that he was the son of Edward and Rose (Davis) Allerton. He is generally 
admitted to have been the wealthiest of all the Pilgrims, and was among the 
few who had the prefix of "Mr." attached to his name, which at that day indi- 
cated that he was of a superior family, or respectability. No one in the whole 
Leyden colonv was more efficient and eminently useful in all their preparations 
for departure to America than he. When he sailed he had four children, all 
born in Holland: Bartholomew, Remember and Mary came with their par- 
ents in the "Mayflower," while Sarah remained behind to come later with 
an aunt. 

Isaac Allerton was the fifth to sign his name to the celebrated "Compact," 
John Carver, William Bradford and two more only preceding him. His son- 
in-law, Degory Priest, was the twenty-ninth to affix his signature to the docu- 
ment, which had but forty-one names attached to it. 

In September. 1621, a party of ten men went by water to view and 
explore the countrv at what is now known as Boston harbor; also to get 
acquainted with the' Indians in that locality. The first headland at Nantucket 
was named "Point Allerton," which name it still retains. In the autumn of 
1626 Mr. Allerton was sent by the colony to England for the purpose of obtain- 
ing supplies upon which to subsist. By a contract made, the entire trade of the 
colonv was bound to William Bradford, Edward Winslow and Isaac Allerton 
for the period of six years. The men named assumed the little colony's indebt- 
edness of twenty-four hundred pounds, they also agreeing to furnish the 
colony with "fiftv pounds worth of hoes and shoes." 

Like most of his descendants, Isaac Allerton (I) was a man of quick 
temper and apt to resent an afifront, and acted largely on his impulses. He 



126 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



was just and fair at all times, however. In 1634 his trading house was taken 
bv the p-rench and Indians and burned, as was also its contents. In 1635, 
on account of the liberality of his religion, he was notified to leave Marble- 
head, which he did. From 1636 to 1646 he lived at New Amsterdam, where 
he engaged in coasting and dealing in tobacco, having a warehouse at East 
River, near the present Maiden Lane, New York city. He made many voy- 
ages to Virginia and the West Indies. Governor Winthrop wrote of him 
in 1643: 

"Three ministers which were sent to Virginia were shipwrecked on Long 
Island. Mr. Allerton, of New Haven, being there took great pains and care of 
them and provided them with a very good pinace and all things necessary." 

In 1646 he became a permanent resident of New Haven, Connecticut, 
where he spent the remainder of his days, having built for himself "a grand 
house on the Creek with Four Porches," as the record reads. He died aged 
about seventy-five years, in 1659, and was buried in the old burying-ground 
at New Haven, Connecticut, but no monument ever marked his grave, as was 
the case in many other instances of the worthy Pilgrims, the reason ascribed 
being that at that time all gravestones had to be shipped from the Old World 
and were, necessarily, expensive. 

He was thrice married, first to Mary Norris, of Newbury, England, 
November 4, 161 1 ; she died February 25, 1625. He married his second wife, 
Fear Brewster, in 1626, and she died December 12, 1634. She was the daugh- 
ter of Elder William Brewster, who came over on the ship "Ann" in 1623. 
She was a woman of pleasing appearance and of a pious disposition. For his 
third wife he married Johanna (maiden name unknown), and she died at 
New Haven, Connecticut, in 1682. By his first marriage he had children, 
born at Leyden, Holland : Bartholomew, Remember, Mary and Sarah. By 
his second wife he had Isaac (H), born 1630. 

(II) Isaac Allerton was born at Plymouth, Massachusetts, 1630 ; gradu- 
ated at Harvard College, 1650, being in the seventh class to graduate from 
that institution. He accompanied his father on his numerous sea voyages to 
the West Indies and Virginia. He married "Elizabeth," and resided at New 
Haven. His wife died in about 1660. He then settled in Westmoreland 
county, Virginia, where he was a justice of the peace and held other offices. 
He was a major in 1675, second in command to John Washington, of V^ir- 
ginia, against the Indians ; was also a member of the house of burgesses. He 
died in Westmoreland county, Virginia, in 1702. The children born to Mr. 
Allerton were: Elizabeth, born September 27, 1653; Isaac, born July 11, 
1655; and Sarah, born about 1660. By his second wife he was the father of 
two daughters, one named Frances, and a son named Willoughby. 

(III) Isaac Allerton was born in New Haven, Connecticut, July 11, 
1655. He finally located at or near Norwich. Connecticut, but he died in 
Rhode Island, where his son John had settled. He was a farmer all his days 
and also handled produce. He was a quiet man, not caring for publicity. He 
served in some of the New England Indian wars. His children were : John, 
born 1685; Jesse, born 1686; Isaac, born a few years later, as was his brother 
Thomas. 

(IV) John Allerton was born at New Haven, Connecticut, in 1685. He 
married and moved to Norwich, Connecticut, in 1712; was a selectman in 
1 72 1, removed to Rhode Island in 1739 and in 1741 resided in Coventry, 



PITTSBURG AXD HER PEOPLE 127 



Rhode Island, where he died in 1750. He married "EHzabeth," by whom was 
born the following children : Esther, Sarah, Mary, John, Richard, Isaac, Eliza- 
beth, Anna and Jonathan. 

(V) Isaac Allerton was born at Norwich, Connecticut, August 15, 1725. 
But little is known of his history besides that he was a farmer. He was a tall 
man and had some local prominence as an athlete. Before the Revolutionary 
war he was possessed of much wealth, but by exchanging his produce to supply 
the Continental army, taking his pay in paper money, he lost nearly all he 
had accumulated. Seeking to retrieve his fortune, he moved to Amenia, 
Dutchess county, New York, in 1792, and died there December 26, 1807. He 
had in his possession many relics of the war for national independence, includ- 
ing a broad-axe with which was hewed the logs for the first building erected 
by the Pilgrim fathers ; also a fuzee-gun captured from an old Indian warrior. 
He married .Lucy Spaulding, by whom was born: Jonathan, AHce, Sarah, 
Daniel and Reuben. The wife died in 1813, aged eighty-six years, and was 
buried beside her husband at Amenia, Dutchess county. New York. 

(VI) Reuben Allerton was born at Canterbury, Connecticut, December 
25. 1753- He received an excellent education; studied medicine and became 
a noted physician and surgeon, beginning his practice about 1777. He entered 
the colonial army as surgeon of Colonel Hopkins' regiment in 1777. The 
instruments which he used are still in the possession of the family. He died 
at Amenia, New York. In Sharon. Connecticut, in 1778, he married Lois 
Atherton, born 1757, at Newton, New Jersey. Their children were: Cor- 
nelius, Polly, Lucy, Samuel Waters, Amaryllis, Mira, Milton Barlow. 

(VH) Samuel Waters Allerton was born in Amenia, Dutchess county. 
New York, December 5, 1785. He studied medicine and intended to take the 
practice in which his father had been so successful, but he soon abandoned 
the notion and engaged in the tailoring trade, vv-hich he learned, and became 
a merchant tailor and conducted a country store. In 1828 he was one of the 
promoters of a woolen factory, but with the Democratic reduced tariff measure 
enacted in 1833, he with nearly all others engaged in like business was finan- 
cially ruined. The mills once prosperous stood as so many monuments to the 
folly of such a political party measure. He then went to Dubuque county, 
Iowa, hoping to regain what he had lost, but after two years in that new 
country he was smitten with dumb ague and returned to his former home. 
He was deputy "sheriff" of Dutchess county. New York, for three years, and 
in 1842 moved to Yates county of that state, where he rented a farm, and in 
1848 purchased one in Wayne county. New York, where he died. He w^as a 
very industrious man — never let a moment slip by idly. He reared his 
children to believe that true religion consisted in "Love to God and good will 
to all men." Lie was a Universalist in his religious faith, although a trustee 
in the Presbyterian church at Amenia at one time. He was a man of sterling- 
qualities, full of good deeds and integrity. He died like a ripened sheaf when 
aged ninetv-nine vears and eight months. The date of his death was August 
10, 1885. ' ' ■ . 

March 26, 1808, he married Hannah Hurd, born 1788. at South Dover. 
She was the daughter of Ebenezer and Rebecca (Phillips) Hurd. Her father 
was an extensive cattle drover and was known widely throughout New York 
state as "Uncle Eb." He took large droves of cattle overland to the New 
Y^ork markets, returning with the pay for them packed away in his huge 



128 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

saddle-bags. He had many business dealings with Henry Astor, brother of 
the New York dry goods prince, John Jacob Astor. He was the son of Daniel 
Hurd, of Connecticut, who married Betsy Allen, of Vermont, a cousin of 
Colonel Ethan Allen. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Waters 
Allerton were: Cornelia, born March 26, 1809; Amaryllis, born January i, 
1812; Henry Reuben, born December 25, 1814; Orville Hurd, born April 17, 
1817; Amanda H., born July 15, 1818; Byron, born September 20, 1822; 
Rebecca H., born September 28, 1824; Lois J., born January 26, 1826; Samuel 
Waters, born May 26, 1828. 

(Vni) Orville Hurd Allerton, the subject's father, was born at Amenia, 
Dutchess county, New York, April 17, 181 7. At the age of ten years he began 
life's active career by working in a comb factory, which trade he designed to 
learn, but a few months later his life was turned in another channel by his 
employer selling out and moving away. He. then worked lor a time on a 
farm, 'doing what a lad of his tender years could, for which he received the 
sum of three cents a 'day. He had an uncle, who was chiefly engaged in buying 
and driving to the New York markets large droves of fat cattle, and when 
Orville was but eleven years old he had him leave school and help him drive 
his droves the distance 'of one hundred miles to New York City, but on the 
first trip, and when only out about twenty miles, he became very homesick 
and could not be induced to go farther on the long journey. He turned face 
homeward and covered the whole distance following behind two men on horse- 
back who were going part way. He hurried on and arrived at home the same 
evening, having averaged five miles an hour for the four hours. This trait of 
his character was always a predominating one in his life — he dearly loved his 
own home and its hallowed influences. 

From time to time he assisted "in driving stock to New York, always 
having to trudge along on foot. He received twenty-five cents a day for his 
services and his steamboat fare to Poughkeepsie, thirty miles from his home, 
and this distance on his return trips he always walked, unless fortunate enough 
to find teamsters going his way. Up to fourteen years of age he was educated 
at the district schools, at the select school of Dr. Leonard and the Amenia 
Seminary. 

At the age of thirteen he commenced to clerk in a store at Nassau, New 
York, and later at Dover Plains, New York. Subsequently he went to Elmira, 
New York, and clerked in a drug store. In 1839 he went to Dubuque, Iowa, 
where he had a brother, Henry Allerton, who was a farmer, living out but 
twenty miles. He made his way by a fearful perilous voyage over the great 
lakes to Chicago, Illinois, and by stage two hundred miles to Dubuque, and 
from there made the twenty miles on foot. There he was to clerk in a store 
in which the chief stock of merchandise was plug tobacco, clay pipes and 
whisky. Five weeks was a sufficient time for him 'midst such surroundings, 
and at the end of that period he retraced his steps to his native state. He 
went to Elmira, New York, and was engaged as clerk and bookkeeper for 
about twelve years, this giving him a practical business schooling, which was 
the real foundation for the success he finally achieved. 

In 1842 he went to Newark, New York, where he began the rnercantile 
business in earnest and continued for twenty-five years. After thirty-seven 
years of indoor work he found it necessary to change on account of his health, 
and so, in 1868, he accepted a position tendered him by his brother, Samuel W. 




€) 



^^Z^^^-^^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



29 



Allerton, as superintendent of the Pennsylvania Central Stock Yards at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. It was a place of more than ordinary responsibility, but 
the compensation was equal to the labor and so he continued for seventeen 
years, when he retired, after having been fifty-four years engaged in active 
business pursuits. He retired to a beautiful home at Newark, New York, 
where he also owns a well improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 
This is but a fragment of the sum he was enabled to accumulate in his long 
career. He made many good investments, including western railroad stocks, 
and numerous deals of a purely legitimate nature. His measure of success in 
life was mainly due to his order, care, promptness, and integrity of character. 
He is an able writer and speaker, always being logical in his conclusions and 
concise in his expression. 

On January 15, 1845, Air. Allerton married Eliza Adelaide Dean, of 
Dresden, Yates county, New York, who was a natural self-taught painter of 
portraits and landscape scenes, although she never cultivated her artistic tend- 
encies to any great extent. It has been said of her: "As a wife, no more true, 
noble or trustworthy heart ever beat in human breast." The children which 
came to bless this union are as follows: Clarence, born in 1849, ^^^^ aged nine 
months; Orville Hurd, born October 3, 185 1. 

(IX) Orville Hurd Allerton, subject, was born October 3, 1851, at 
Newark, New York, and received his education at the Newark Academy and 
a business training at Poughkeepsie, New York, and Elmira, of that state. 
From 1873 to 1884 he was a live stock shipper from points in the west to the 
New York markets. During the last named year he succeeded his father as 
live stock agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He resigned this 
position in 1904. In 1886 he made a tricycle tour extending through England, 
Scotland, Wales and France. 

Politically Mr. Allerton is a supporter of the Republican party. In 
January, 1907, he was elected president of the Board of Trade of Pittsburg. 

He was married, June 3, 1874, to Miss Ida C. Leggett, daughter of 
John T. and Susan (Cronise) Leggett, of Newark, New York. The children 
by this union are: Ida Mav, born April 17, 1882; Edith Marie, born January 
II, 1887. 



WILLIAM PORE, now retired from active business life, but for many 
years connected with the firm of GrafT, Hugus & Company, foundrymen of the 
city of Pittsburg, was born in W^estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, October 4, 
1832, the son of Adam and Margaret (Lobingier) Pore. Adam Pore was 
born in 1783, and was a farmer of Westmoreland county, where he was the 
owner of several large farms. This was one of the pioneer families of the 
county. Adam's sons, with the exception of William, the subject, all followed 
agricultural pursuits. 

William Pore received his education in the common schools of his native 
county up to the year he was ten years of age, when he went forth into the 
world to do for himself. He began his successful career by working in a store 
at Weaver's old stand. Mount Pleasant township, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. He remained there about two years, when he went to the county seat 
town, Greensburg, where he was employed by Louis Trauger for three years. 
In February, 185 1, he came to Pittsburg, taking a situation in the dry goods 
iv— 9 



130 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

house known as the Bee Hive, where he was employed one year, after which he 
entered the large dry goods house of W. & D. Hugus, at Fifth avenue and 
Market street. In 1856 he took a position as bookkeeper in the foundry business 
of Graff & Company, successors to Grafif, Reiseinger & Graff. This was later 
changed to Graff & Hugus, and in 1863 Mr. Pore became one of the partners 
in the concern, when the firm name was changed to Graff, Hugus & Company. 
He continued there until 1879, when he severed his connection with the firm and 
retired from active business life. Since that date he has occupied his time at 
managing his estate and buying and selling property. 

Mr. Pore has for a dozen or more years been very active in church work 
in the Lutheran church, holding at this period the office of treasurer of the 
Pittsburg Lutheran Synod, G. S. He is the only surviving member of the firm 
of Graft', Plugus & Company, which was among the pioneer concerns of this 
line of industry in Pittsburg. 

He married Anna Mary Graft', daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Graff, 
who was born March 12, 1837. (See Graff sketch.) She died June 29, 1891. 



JOSEPH ROBB, who was the American ancestor, emigrated from County 
Down, Ireland, in the year 1730, and settled in Pennsylvania, together with 
his wife and three sons : John Robb, Sr., William and Andrew Robb. 

(II) John Robb. Sr., son of Joseph Robb, bought a farm about six miles 
from what is now called Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on Octorara creek. He mar- 
ried Miss Barbara McKnight, a young woman of that vicinity. To them were 
born ten children : William, John, James, Andrew, David, Joseph, Samuel. 
Moses, Isabella and Nancy. They were all members of the Reformed Presby- 
terian church. In 1775 John Robb, Sr., and his son John came to Pittsburg, 
which was then a mere village, intending to buy a farm near by and remove 
to western Pennsylvania. They examined several farms on Chartier's creek 
and finally viewed a farm belonging to Andrew Walker on Robinson's Run, 
a tributary to Chartier's creek, about a mile north of what is now McDonald, 
on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad. They did not 
purchase the farm at this time, but sometime later went back to. the farm and 
entered into articles of agreement with Mr. Walker for the purchase of the 
farm, containing about four hundred acres, and commenced, among many 
trials and tribulations on account of the depredation of the Indians, to build 
a home and clear and fence a portion of the land. So dangerous were the 
Indians at that time, especially at night, that they were compelled to return 
in the evening after their day's work to one of the two forts in that part of the 
country, one of which was located at what is now Gregg's Station on the 
Panhandle railroad, then called Fort Riddle, and the other one. called Fort 
Little, near Venice, in what is now Washington county, then Monongahela 
county, Virginia. 

Many times the Indians were in the woods upon this farm while the two 
Johns were at work preparing to remove their family there. All of this farm, 
although divided into three parts, is in the Robb name to this day, and there 
has never been a mortgage or a judgment against any portion of it since the 
original purchase money mortgage was paid off, about the year 1800. 

(Ill) John Robb, Jr., son of John Robb, Sr., was born in 1758 and died 
in 1849. I'"' Ji-^ne, 1776, he enlisted in the army of the Revolution and was 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 131 

an ensign under Washington. He was with the army when they crossed the 
Delaware and pushed on to Trenton, where they had a very important battle 
and returned upon the night of the same day. We do not know how long he 
was in the service, but it was at least a year. Returning home, the family pro- 
ceeded to make themselves a fairly comfortable home and farm where there 
was little but woods and Indians when the family first moved west of the 
Alleghenies. John Robb, Sr., divided his farm into three parts, one of which 
he gave to his son John, containing one hundred and seventy-six acres, another 
to his son James, containing one hundred and fifteen acres, and another to his 
son Joseph, containing one hundred and twenty acres. Each of these men 
remained upon the portions of the farm allotted to them during their lives. 
Aside from the three sons of John Robb, Sr., among whom his farm was 
divided, their other brothers and sisters married and went to other parts of 
the state of Pennsylvania and into Ohio to seek their fortunes. John Robb, 
Jr., about the year 1790, married Jane Kelso, who prior to that time, with a 
young lady cousin of hers, had ridden on horseback all the way from Big 
Spring in the eastern part of the state and took up their abode at Rev. Dr. 
Riddles, of Fort Riddle, mentioned heretofore. Jane Kelso was born in 1766 
at Big Spring and died in 1866 on the farm allotted to her husband, John 
Robb, Jr. To these parents were born eleven children, eight boys and three 
girls — John, "George, William, James, Andrew, David, Mark, Joseph, Jane, 
Elizabeth and Isabella. 

By the will of John Robb, Jr., the farm given him by his father was de- 
vised to Mark Robb, who was born in 1807, and lived there his entire life, 
until his death in 1892. Mark was married to Jane Scott Donaldson, in 1838, 
and to these parents were born four sons : John S. Robb, attorney at the 
Allegheny county bar; Andrew D. Robb, a merchant: Joseph K.. Robb, a 
farmer, and James McB. Robb, a clerk. Upon the death of Mark Robb, his 
farm descended to his two sons, John S. Robb and James McB. Robb, and 
the sons of Andrew D. Robb,* Joseph having died without issue prior to the 
death of his father. The farm is now owned by John S. Robb, James McB. 
Robb, Harry W. Robb and John S. Robb, Jr., who bought the interest of 
Mark A. Robb, son of Andrew D. Robb, shortly after the death of Mark Robb. 
James Robb, the third son of John Robb, and he to whom his father devised 
a portion of the farm which he had bought from Andrew Walker, married 
Elizabeth Kelso. They had three sons and one daughter. This James Robb 
devised to his son James the portion of the old farm which his father had 
given him. This James Robb married Ellen Henry. They had three sons 
and three daughters. The farm was willed by him to his three sons, James 
H., William and George. James and William and the heirs of George (de- 
ceased) still own all of their grandfather's farm except thirty acres which was 
bought by Joseph W. Robb, son of Ebenezer Robb, who was a son of Joseph 
Robb, to whom about one hundred and twenty acres of the original farm was 
willed by John Robb, Sr. 

(IV) Joseph Robb, son of John Robb, Jr., was born in 1776 and lived 
his entire lifetime, until his death, aged ninety, on the farm before mentioned. 
He married Mary Sturgeon, born in 1778, and died October 14, 1832, and 
they had a family: Ebenezer, William, Joseph, Robert S., Joseph W. and 
Mary E. 



132 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

ROBERT S. ROBB, secretary and treasurer of the Hostetter Company 
of Pittsburg, forms the subject of this sketch, but much concerning the Robb 
family, from which he has descended, will also appear in this connection. 
From the American ancestor down to the subject the genealogical line is as 
follows : 

(I) Joseph Robb. 

(II) John Robb, Sr. 

(III) John Robb, Jr., son of the founder. 

(IV) Joseph Robb, son of John Robb, Jr. 

(V) Ebenezer Robb, son of Joseph Robb. 

(VI) Robert S. Robb, son of Ebenezer Robb. 

William Penn having obtained a grant from Charles II, in i68i, for the 
land now known as Pennsylvania (Penn's Woods), founded the city of Phila- 
delphia in 1682, which city was practically all of Pennsylvania during the 
colonial period. The inducements offered by Penn to attract settlers upon this 
grant were of such a character as to attract the attention of emigrants from 
England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and the Continent generally, and especially 
Scotland and the north of Ireland, and it is not surprising to find the Robbs 
coming in families consisting of fathers and sons and in groups of families, 
seeking new homes in the new land. 

It should be remembered at the outset that Philadelphia was the only city 
in Pennsylvania of any importance in the early years of 1700, and that all 
emigrants would probably, after landing at that point, diverge toward the 
most available and most attractive places open for settlement. Consequently 
we find a number of settlements by the Robbs in Chester, Lancaster and Cum- 
berland counties. The earliest mention of the Robb fam.ily in Pennsylvania 
is under the date of 1725, when Henry Robb, of Germantown (Philadelphia), 
a weaver "by trade, in 1738 appeared as a witness to the signing of a will of 
one of his neighbors ; he seems to have removed to Cheltenham, Philadelphia, 
now Montgomery county, where he resided in 1746, where an executor of the 
will of one George Trout executed a deed for some property in this capacity. 

(V) Ebenezer Robb, son of Joseph and Mary (Sturgeon ) Robb, was born 
on the old homestead in 1810. and died in 1884. Squire Robb, as he was 
always addressed, possessed more than ordinary attainments. He served as 
a justice of the peace for many years, and took great interest in the affairs of 
his community. He had a strong will and a positive character, with a high 
sense of honor, and was noted for his great integrity. He was a devout and 
zealous member of the United Presbyterian church, serving many years as an 
elder, both in the Robinson and McDonald churches. Politically he was an 
old-line Whig. The old farm consisted of one hundred and fifty acres, upon 
which stood a log house, but in his day he built a new one and materially 
improved the place. It is still in the family. He married Eliza Wallace, born 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was about sixty-seven years of age 
at her death. She was the daughter of Robert Wallace. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ebenezer Robb were the parents of the following children: i. Joseph, died 
young. 2. William, died young. 3. Robert S. (subject). 4. Joseph W., of 
Washington, Pennsylvania. 5. Mary E., wife of Joseph Reynolds, of Mc- 
Donald, Pennsylvania, whose daughter is Mary. 

(VI) Robert S. Robb, son of Ebenezer and Eliza (Wallace) Robb, was 
born August 24, 1841, and received his education at the public schools of his 




(kd^, /2/J/;a> 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 133 

native township in Washington county, Pennsylvania. At the age of seven- 
teen years he went to Mansfield, Pennsylvania, and attended the Carnegie 
Academy, where he took a preparatory course, and in 1861 entered Jefferson 
•College, graduating in 1864. He then came to Pittsburg and read law in the 
office of Kirkpatrick & Mellon, and was about to be admitted to the bar when 
his eyesight failed and he was totally blind for three months. Having to 
abandon the cherished notion of pursuing his profession, he returned to his 
•old home in Washington county and remained on the farm. Prior to this, and 
during his college term in 1863, he was drafted and was mustered into the 
Union army, but paid three hundred dollars for a substitute and returned to 
college, and after he completed his college course he volunteered, serving on 
detached duty with the rank of orderly sergeant with a corporal's guard, and 
was stationed at the Union Station of the Pennsylvania railroad on Liberty 
street, Pittsburg, to take charge of the Rebel prisoners being sent to Dayton, 
Ohio. After serving six months the regiment to which he belonged was hon- 
orably discharged at Camp Howe. He came to Pittsburg about 1866 and 
followed mercantile pursuits a few years, and in 1872 entered the employ of 
Hostetter & Smith as a clerk, and has been constantly in the employ of the 
company (now the Hostetter Company) ever since. He is now secretary and 
treasurer. Politically Mr. Robb is a supporter of the Republican party, but 
has never aspired to official position. He is of the United Presbyterian church 
faith and profession. When a youth he walked four miles to attend the old 
Robinson church, and after he came to Allegheny City he united with the 
Third United Presbyterian church, known as Ridge Avenue church. He was 
a trustee and superintendent of the Sunday school for over ten years. He was 
appointed a member of the general assembly and was secretary of a committee 
to revise pastoral and Bible songs of both the church and Sunday school. 
About 1889 he severed his connection with this church and became a member 
of the Westminster Presbyterian church, and was chosen treasurer of the 
building committee for the erection of the new church on Buena Vista street. 
He was also a member of the session and board of trustees. In 1894, on 
account of his removal to North Craig street, Pittsburg, he became a member 
of Bellfield Presbyterian church, where he is a member of the board of trustees, 
as well as interested in the work of the Sunday school. Mr. Robb is a mem- 
ber of the Sons of the Revolution, being eligible through both the paternal 
and maternal branches of the family. 

He was married first to Miss Emma S. Boyd, daughter of Alexander 
Boyd and wife. Mrs. Robb was born about 1842 and died September 2, 1904. 
By this union were born children, but none lived to maturity. For his second 
wife Mr. Robb married Mrs. Mary Persohn, whose father was the master 
mechanic of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's shops at Steubenville, Ohio. 
The Persohn familv are of old Huguenot stock. 



JOHN VALENTINE STOER, an honored and respected citizen residing 
at No. 309 Edgewood avenue, Edgewood Park, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and an honorably discharged veteran of the Civil war, descends from an 
lionored family of Germany. 

Peter Stoer, grandfather of John Valentine Stoer, was a resident of 
Nuremburg, Bavaria, and had a number of children. Three of them, who 



134 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



emigrated to America, bore the names : John J.,, see forward ; Margaret, mar- 
ried Henry Senft; and Sophia, married John Lang. 

John J. Stoer, son of Peter Stoer, was born in Nuremburg, Germany, m 
1811, and came to this country in 1839, settHng in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
He was by trade a carpenter and his first position was with George A. Berry, 
and later he took charge of the powder magazine on Black Horse Hill, where 
he was employed until 1845. In the great conflagration of that year the build- 
ing in which he resided was the one in which the fire originated, and he lost 
everything. He then went to Riceville, where he resumed his work as a car- 
penter, and the following year built a house at the corner of McGee and 
Gibbon streets and started in the grocery business, which he later sold. He 
then purchased a plot of ground consisting of one acre and a half at Oakland, 
and erected the building which is now ( 1908) occupied by the Keely Institute. 
Soon afterward he retired from active labor and took up his residence on 
Squirrel Hill, where he had acquired a property of fourteen acres, and on 
which he resided until his death in 1896. He was a member of the city council 
for two terms, and was a strenuous opposer of the water bond bill. During 
the Civil war he was a member of the sanitary commission organized to care 
for the widows and orphans of the soldiers who fell during the struggle. He 
was also president of the school board for two terms. In politics he was a 
stalwart Republican. His religious affiliations were with the German Lu- 
theran church, and he was for many years a trustee and active worker in the 
interests of that institution. He married Charlotte Sophia Grau, and they 
had children: i. John F., of Philadelphia, who married Susanna, maiden 
name unknown, and has two sons, Walter and Frederick. 2. John Valentine, 
see forward. 3. Louisa, married Charles T. Ebdy and has children: John, 
Lottie and Charles. 4. George, deceased. 5. John J., Jr., married Margaret 
Mugle ; has children, Frederick and Herbert, the latter a naval cadet at An- 
napolis. 6. Charlotte Sophia, married J. H. Launer, 

John Valentine Stoer, second son and child of John J. and Charlotte 
Sophia (Grau) Stoer, was born in the old Eighth ward of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, December 28, 1846. His early years were spent in his native city 
and he was there educated in the pubHc schools. While still a mere lad, in 
1861, he enlisted in Company K, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Colonel E. C 
Williams and Captain Jones commanding. He was wounded at Bacon Creek, 
Kentucky, after a service of twelve months, and spent three months in the hos- 
pital. As soon as he was sufficiently recovered he re-enlisted, this time in the 
Negley Cavalry, under Colonel Negley. After considerable active service with 
this troop he again enlisted in Company F, Captain Graham. With the excep- 
tion of the time spent in the hospital Mr. Stoer was in active service through- 
out the progress of the war, and was an active participant in some of the 
most important engagements, among them : Chickamauga, Pittsburg Landing, 
Nashville and Fort Donelson. He received an honorable discharge Septem- 
ber 15, 1865, and returned to Pittsburg, where he was engaged in the grocery 
business until 1876, when he started in the hotel business on Fifth avenue. He 
made a very successful venture of this line of business, from which he retired 
in 1903 and removed to Edgewood, where he has since resided. He has served 
three terms as a member of the school board of the city, and is at present a 
member of the board of health of Edgewood. He gives his strong support to 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 135 



the Republican party, and is a member of the J. C. Hull Post No. 157, G. A. 
R., of Pittsburg. 

He married, in the fall of 1867, Caroline Hauch, daughter of Nicholas 
Hauch, of Pittsburg, and they have one daughter, Annie, born June 2, 1868, 
widow of August Giesemann. She resides with her father and is the mistress 
of his beautiful home. 

Another member of the family is Miss Clara Gartner, who came into the 
family when she was fourteen years of age. She was born in Westphalia 
Dortmund, Germany, September 27, 1871, a daughter of Herman and Fred- 
erika (Von Apen) Gartner. Her mother came to Pittsburg from Germany 
with her five children — Clara, Herman, Lizzie, Emma and Freda — September 
26, 1882. After the death of her mother in 1885, Clara came to the Stoer 
home, and ever since has been a loved and cherished inmate. Mr. Stoer is a 
great traveler, both in America and abroad, and is frequently accompanied by 
his daughter and Miss Gartner. 



THE PEABODY FAMILY. This ancient family, which numbers among 
its representatives George L. Peabody, of Pittsburg, traces its origin from 
John Paybody (as the name was originally spelled), who was born about 1590, 
in England, and about 1635 emigrated to the American colonies. From him 
are descended all in this country who bear the name of Peabody, however 
varied in orthography. 

(I) John Paybody married, in England, Isabel , and their chil- 
dren were: Thomas, of whom there is no record; Francis, born 1614, married 
Mary Foster, of Ipswich, died February 19, 1697-8; William, of whom later; 
and Annis, who became the wife of John Rouse, who is mentioned, with 
William Paybody, as one of the original proprietors of Little Compton (orig- 
inally Seaconet). John Paybody, the emigrant, died in 1667, in Bridgewater, 
and was survived by his wife. 

(II) William Paybody, son of John (I) and Isabel Paybody, was born 
1619-20 and married Elizabeth Alden, who was the first white female child 
born in this country after the landing of the Pilgrims. She was the daughter 
of John Alden and Priscilla Mullins, the story of whose courtship and mar- 
riage has been imperishably embalmed by Longfellow in "The Courtship of 
Miles Standish." William Paybody and Elizabeth Alden were the parents 
of the following children: John, born October 4, 1645, died November 17, 
1669; Elizabeth, born April 24, 1647, wife of John Rodgers; Mary, born 1648, 
married, 1669, Edward Southworth; Mercy, born January 2, 1649, married, 
1671, John Simmons; Martha, born February 24, 1650, married, 1677, Samuel 
Seabury; Priscilla, born January 15, 1653, wife of the Reverend Ichabod Wis- 
wall; Sarah, born August 7, 1654, married, 1680, John Coe; Ruth, born June 
2"^, 1658, wife of Benjamin Bartlett, Jr.; Rebecca, born October 16, 1660, 
married, 1680. William Southworth; Hannah, born October 15, 1662, married, 
1683, Samuel Bartlett; William, of whom later; and Lydia, born April 3, 1667. 
William Paybody, the father, died in Little Compton December 3, 1707. 

(III) William Paybody, son of William (II) and Elizabeth (Alden) 
Paybody, was born November 24. 1664, and was twice married. His first 

wife was Judith , born 1669, and their children were : Elizabeth, born 

April 18, 1698, married, ]\Iay 9, 1716, Edward Gray; John, born February 7, 



136 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

1700, married, February 7, 1723, Rebecca Gray, and died January 12, 1766; 
William, of whom later; Rebecca, born February 29, 1704, wife of the Rev- 
erend Joseph Fish, died October 27, 1783; Priscilla, born March 4, 1706, wife 
of Gideon Southworth, died 1727-8; Judith, born January 23, 1708, married, 
May 21, 1728, Benjamin Church; Joseph, born July 26, 1710; and Mary, born 
April 4, 1712, died September 14, 1766. The mother of these children died 
July 28, 1714. By the second wife of William Paybody he had one son, 
Benjamin, born November 25, 1717, probably died young. The death of 
William Paybody, the father, occurred September 17, 1744. 

(IV) William Paybody, son of William (III) and Judith Paybody, was 
born February 21, 1702, and between the years 1741 and 1744 moved to North 
Stonington, where he purchased a farm of two hundred and fifty acres, on 
which he and many of his family are buried. William Paybody married, in 
Little Compton, July 30, 1724, Jerusha Star, and their children were: Rachel, 
born June i, 1725, wife of Stoddard; Thomas, of whom later; Han- 
nah, born December 3, 1729, wife of Chester; William, born April 

16, 1733; Lydia, born January 7, 1735, wife of Lodowick Miner; Samuel, born 
August 31, 1738; Lemuel, born July 12, 1741, died August 16, 1759; James 
and Mary (twins), born December 14, 1745, died single 1826. 

(V) Thomas Paybody, son of William (IV) and Jerusha (Star) Pay- 
body, w^as born November 3, 1727, and married, August 16, 1761, Ruth Bab- 
cock, born 1735, by whom he was the father of the following children: Ruth, 
born February 7, 1762, wife of Daniel Smith; Jerusha, born April 28, 1763; 
William, born July 22, 1764, married, December 17, 1795, Polly Holmes; 
Lydia, born February 28, 1766, wife of ■. — - Williams; Rebecca, born Janu- 
ary 29, 1768, wife of Elijah Wattles; Thomas, born April 12, 1769, died May 
3, 1853; Susannah, born April 12, 1770, wife of Jonas Chapman; Benjamin, 
of whom later; Amy, born February 22, 1774, died June 6, 1775; John, born 
August 28, 1775, died April 14, 1803; Lucy, born June 26, 1777, wife of John 
Coates ; Lemuel, born December 20, 1778; Joseph, born April i, 1781 ; and 
(perhaps) Mary, wife of Ebenezer Williams. Mrs. Paybody, the mother of 
this family, died October 6, 181 3, and the death of Thomas Paybody, the 
father, occurred March 24, 18 15. 

(VI) Benjamin Paybody, son of Thomas (V) and Ruth (Babcock) 
Paybody, was born April 29, 1772, and was the owner of the farm in North 
Stonington, Connecticut, on which is situated the old Peabody cemetery where 
his great-grandfather and the following generations are interred. This estate 
is still in the possession of the Peabodys. Benjamin Paybody married, Novem- 
ber 13, 1796, Abigail Holmes, born 1779, and their children were: Ben- 
jamin, born June 16, 1797; George Washington, of whom later; Abigail, born 
February 17, 1801, died August 22, 1830; John, born May 24, 1803; William 
Pitt, born July 24, 1805 ; Giles Henry, born September 25, 1807 ; Rebecca, born 
in 1810. Mrs. Paybody died November 30. 181 1, and Mr. Paybody subse- 
quently married Martha Packham, born 1789, who bore him the following 
children: Francis S., born April 29, 1815; Martha E., born April 24, 1819; 
Mary, born May 2, 1822 ; Fanny A., born June 29, 1825 ; Nancy, born Septem- 
ber 5, 1827; and James Alden, born May 30. 1830. The death of Mrs. Pay- 
body occurred May 13, 1848, and Mr. Paybody survived until January 7, 1867, 
when he passed away, in his ninety-fifth year. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 137 



(VII) George Washington Peabody, son of Benjamin (VI) and Abigail 
(Holmes) Paybody, was born January 25, 1799, and in 1823 removed to 
Ohio, where he passed the remainder of his Hfe. He married Cynthia, born 
1805, daughter of Ohver Hehiie, of Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, and their 
children were: Sarah Delia, born March 10, 1824, married, May 10, 1845, 
Timothy Banning, and died January 25, 1865; Benjamin Holmes, of whom 
later, and Melinda Eunice, born April 10, 1833, married, December 27, 1854, 
Newton J. Swezey. Mrs. Peabody died July 27, 1853, ^"d the death of Mr. 
Peabody occurred August 27, 1858. Both are buried in East Gustavus ceme- 
tery, Ohio. 

(Vni) Benjamin Holmes Peabody, son of George Washington (VH) 
and Cynthia (Helme) Peabody, was born September 21, 1825, and received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine from what is now the Cleveland Medical 
College. He married, May 25, 1849, Mary Anna, daughter of Asahel and 
Dency (Crosby) Banning, of East Gustavus, Ohio, and they were the parents 
of two children, George Lee, of whom later, and Mary. 

(IX) George Lee Peabody, son of Benjamin Holmes (VIII) and Mary 
Anna (Banning) Peabody, was born July 21, 1851, has engaged in several 
business enterprises, and is chiefly occupied in paving and building, being a 
pioneer in the erection of tall re-enforced steel concrete fireproof structures. 
Since his marriage he has resided in Pittsburg. 

Mr. Peabody married Marion, daughter of George A. and Mary Augustus 
(Sperry) Griswold, of East Gustavus, Ohio, and their family consists of 
the following children : Mary Louise, Helen A., and George Lee, of whom 
later. 

(X) George Lee Peabody, son of George Lee (IX) and Marion (Gris- 
wold) Peabody, received his preparatory education at Shady Side Academy 
and is now (1907) pursuing a course of study preliminary to entering Cornell 
University. 

Mary Louise Peabody. eldest daughter of George Lee and Marion (Gris- 
wold) Peabody, is the wife of Earle R. Marvin, and has three children: Mar- 
ion, Sylvester S. and Martha. 



McCLURE FAMILY. The progenitor of this family in America was 
James jNIcClure (I), who was born in Antrim county, Ireland, and emigrated 
to this country, settling in Snowden township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1839, and there followed farming for an occupation. In his native 
country he had married Eliza Thompson, born in that country and by whom he 
had seven children, five born in Ireland, and who accompanied their parents 
to America. They were as follows : 

(I) John, who died unmarried, aged fifty-seven years. 2. Robert, who 
married and moved to the state of Washington, where he died in 19c 5. 3. 
Margaret, who married John McQuiston, of Pittsburg, and had two children : 
John, a physician of Pittsburg, married Miss Ida Wadsworth ; Marion mar- 
ried Joseph Bowman, and to them has been born — Genevra and Charles. 4. 
Martha, who married William Shaw, and they had two children — Ida G., who 
married J. P. Bailey, by whom she had Annaclare, Martha, Addison and James. 
The other child is William James Shaw, an architect of Pittsburg. 5. Wil- 
liam lames, born March 22, 1836, died March 9, 1878, married. May i, 1868, 



138 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

in Venango county, Pennsylvania, Margaret Zuver, born in New Wilmington, 
Lawrence county,' Pennsylvania, April 4, 1844, the daughter of Joseph and 
Nancy (Blair) Zuver. He was born in New Jersey in 1804 and died in 1882. 
Nancy Blair was born near Wilmington, Pennsylvania, in 1806, and died Au- 
gust 2, 1888. They were the parents of nine children, and Margaret (Mrs. 
William James McClure) was the seventh child. Joseph Zuver was a car- 
penter and bridge builder and built many bridges in and near Lawrence 
county. 

(II) William James McClure and his wife, Margaret (Zuver) McClure, 
were the parents of the following children: i. Eliza, born January 21, 1869, 
now assistant principal in the Twenty-seventh ward schools. 2. Joseph, born 
September 29, 1870, unmarried. He attended law school at Michigan Univer- 
sity and is now practicing law in the city of Pittsburg. 3. James, born May 
23, 1872, married Edith, daughter of W. E. and Robina (Lindsay) Duncan, 
whose only child is Robina Margaret. James McClure (II) is a graduate 
of Princeton College with the class of 1897, and is now engaged in the gen- 
eral insurance business at Pittsburg, of the firm of Little & McClure. 4. 
William C, born June 7, 1874, attended law school at the Michigan Univer- 
sity, and now practices at Pittsburg. He married Elizabeth N. Woodside, and 
their child is Elizabeth N. 5. John B., born March 9, 1880, at McKeesport; 
he married Jennie G. Scott. 6. Blaine, born September 10, 1881, at Pittsburg, 
is unmarried and resides in Oklahoma, where he is engaged in the mercantile 
business. 7. Margaret, born in Pittsburg. April 16, 1884, now a teacher in 
ward Twenty-three of Pittsburg, being in the department of domestic science. 
8. Helen, born in Pittsburg, April 3, 1890, now attending Pittsburg high 
school. The first four of this family were born in Venango county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

William James McClure, father of this family, was reared on a farm, ob- 
tained his education at the public schools and at an early age began teaching 
school, continuing for some time. He went to Venango county during the oil 
excitement and there taught for a short period at Oil City. He also served 
as county superintendent of schools in Venango county for one term of three 
years. Subsequently he removed to McKeesport, where he taught, and from 
there he came to Pittsburg, where he was made principal of the Morse Schools 
in the Twenty-fifth ward. He continued there for eighteen years, giving 
the best of his time and talents towards the work of education. He resigned 
in 1897, one year before his death. 

Of the two children born to James McClure and wife (the American 
progenitors of the family), in this country — Isaac and Elizabeth — the follow- 
ing is an account : 

(II) Isaac McClure married Laura Baker and they now reside at Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio. They have three children — Mary, who married a Mr. Lansdale ; 
Florence, who married Frank Kirschner, of Chicago, and Robert, of Chicago. 

(II) Elizabeth McClure married Samuel J. Heath, and to them were born 
eight children, as follows: i. William S., who married Rebecca Guthrie, 
by whom was born four children — Helen, Earl S., OHve, Elizabeth. 2. Harry 
H., who married Martha Gilmore, whose children are — Edna, Margaret and 
Joe. 3. Malvern, who married W. B. Chamberlain, whose children are — 
Edith, May and Samuel. 4. Rev. Samuel, who married Belle McCormick. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



139 



5. Elizabeth Eleanor, who married Dr. J. M. Davis, by whom was born 
Wilder and Samuel Davis. 6. Alalcom, who married Mabel Mowry. 7. 
Estella, unmarried. 8. Dr. Edmund P., unmarried. 



LAWRENCE OEFFNER, a well known resident of Homestead, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, at present engaged in the real estate and in- 
surance business, and formerly identified with a number of business enter- 
prises, is a representative of the second generation of the Oeffner family in the 
United States, and traces his ancestry to Germany, where the family was 
highly respected. 

John Frederick Oeffner, father of Lawrence Oeft'ner, was born in Unter- 
winterbach, Bavaria, Germany, March 14, 1824. During the political disturb- 
ances of 1848 m that country Mr. Oeft"ner decided to come to America with his 
wife and infant daughter. They settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in what was 
then called Lawrenceville or Bayardstown, and for a time he was employed in 
a planing mill. He had the misfortune, however, to lose his hand while thus 
employed, and was obliged to abandon this occupation. He engaged in the 
newspaper business, which he followed for about a period of twelve years. 
During the Civil war he was the owner of the steamboat "Greenback," which 
plied for two years on the Monongahela and Ohio rivers, and was sunk shortly 
after the close of the war while hauling a fleet of coal boats. Mr. Oeffner mar- 
ried, in Germany, Anna Margaret Twentier, born in Shemsdorf, Germany, 
September 16, 1826, and they had children: i. Margaret, born in Germany, 
married William Farquhar, had children : John, Frank, Ellis, Allen, Nettie 
and Ross. 2. Lawrence, see forward. 3. John G., born in old Fort Pitt, 
was justice of the peace in Homestead for two terms. He died suddenly 
June 28, 1893. He married Laura Hawthorne and had children: Lawrence, 
Maud, Sadie, Laura, Eva and John. 4. Barbara, born in 185 1, died in infancy. 
5. Anna, who died January 2, 1889, married John Briggs. 6. Mary married 
Christopher Ross and had children : Edwin, deceased, Ellsworth and Walter. 

7. Lizzie married George Ross and had children : Edna, Carl and Llewella. 

8. Emma, who died January 25, 1895, married Harry Beck and has one child, 
Alargaret. 9. Peter J., born July 22, 1865, married Emma Evans, and had 
children : Joseph, Abiram. Ethel and Oliver. 10. William married and had 
children : Marie, Sherman and Clyde, now of Jefferson, Ohio. The father was 
killed by accident on the P. M. K. & S. Railroad track on March 13, 1893. The 
mother died October 19,1882. 

Lawrence Oeffner, eldest son and second child of John Frederick and 
Anna Margaret (Twentier) Oeff"ner, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
in what was then called Lawrenceville, May 18, 1849. -^^ ^ very early age he 
began assisting his father in selling and delivering papers at the corner of 
Smithfield street and Fifth avenue, at the same time working for Fleming 
& Brothers on Wood street, manufacturers of McLean's Liver Pills and 
Vermifuge. During the progress of the Civil war, when the rumor came of 
the approach of the Confederate army, 3-oung Oeffner assisted in the digging 
of trenches on the farm of Mr. Winebiddle and on Mount Oliver, but these 
precautions proved unnecessary. Subsequently Mr. Oeffner learned the irade 
of brass moulding, but ill health compelled him to abandon this. He then 
worked in succession at the following places and at these various occupa- 



T40 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



tions: With Lewis, Oliver & Phillips, and assisted John Phillips, a member 
of the firm, to place the cast-iron feather decorations on one of the large smoke- 
stacks, and also drape the building in black at the time of the assassination of 
President Lincoln, remaining with this firm for eight years ; for some time 
with the Atlantic Glass Company ; the Enterprise Glass Company, which failed, 
owing to the panic of 1873, and the works shut down ; Wormser, Meyers 
& Company, of Pittsburg, buying oil barrels and making contracts for the 
purchase of the same, and he then took up the selling of oil for himself, and 
continued this for twenty-two years, when he was given a six months' notice 
by the Standard Oil Company to quit. But he was in business seven years 
after this, then sold his interest to the Lytle & Pears Company. He then 
became general agent for the L. Hoster Brewing Company, a position he held 
until 1892, when he established himself in his present line of business, real 
estate and insurance, in Homestead, in which he has made a decided success. 
His political affiliations are with the Republican party and he has filled a 
number of public offices with credit to himself and advantage to the community, 
having been a school director in the early days of Mifflin township. He was 
school director in 1886-7; ]^^'^^^ of the election board, and delegate to Re- 
publican conventions. He is a member of Franklin Lodge No. 221, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Duquesne Chapter No. 193, and Pittsburg Com- 
mandery No. i ; Homestead Turn and Gesang Verein "Eintracht," a German 
singing society of which Mr. Oefifner was one of the incorporators ; formerly 
a member of the United American Mechanics ; Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows ; Ancient Order of United Workmen, and Fraternal Bankers of 
America, of St. Louis, Missouri. He and his family are members of the 
German Lutheran church. 

Mr. Oeft'ner married. May 30, 1873, Catherine Beam, born November 2, 
1851, daughter of John and Margaret (Weaver) Beam, of South Side, Pitts- 
burg, and they have had the following named children: i. Charles J., born 
March 15, 1874, resides in Alliance, Ohio. His wife was Margaret Aiken, 
of Alliance, Ohio, and they have one child, Margaret. 2. George W., born 
January 8, 1876, resides in Bergholz, Ohio. He married Mary Twaddle. 3. 
Nellie B., born October 31, 1877, married Myron Mason, deceased, resides 
in Homestead, and has children: Walter and Elizabeth Thelma. 4. Stella 
M. E., born December 11, 1879, married, October 28, 1898, Frederick Gluck, 
deceased ; resides in Homestead. 5. Elizabeth E., bom December 2, 1882, 
married George W. Fishell ; resides in Homestead. 6. Lawrence O., born 
October 17, 1886, resides in Homestead. 7. Nora E., born November 27, 
1889, resides in Homestead. 



THE GRAFF FAMILY. The earliest account of the ancestors of Henry 
Graff in possession of the family is near the opening of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. Jacob Graff, who lived near Mannheim, Germany, had three sons, the 
eldest of which came to America and settled near Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania. The second son was born in 1736, married February 23, 1762, and died 
in_ 1802. A daughter, Barbara, born May 31, 1744, married, March, 1767, 
Nicholas Grann, and their heirs ar« still living as small farmers near Neuwied. 
Germany. It is also known that Peter Grafif lived on the Unkerhap and 
married Elizabeth EUenberger, and that they had children as follows : James, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 141 



born 1764, died November 15, 1824; Daniel, born 1767, died 1809, unmarried. 

The Lancaster county (Pennsylvania) records mention a Sebastian Graff, 
who died in 1791 and had been prominent in the affairs of the city of Lancaster. 
He must have been the son of Jacob Graff, who came to America and settled 
near that place. In the same records are the names of Hans, Sebastian, George, 
Henry and John Graff, who must have been sons of Sebastian Graft'. On his 
way to Germany in 1816 Henry Graff, son of John, of Westmoreland county, 
was taken sick and remained with his cousin in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
until his recovery. This numerous and well-known family, which for three 
generations has been represented in Pittsburg, was founded in this country 
by Henry Graff, a native of Germany, whose home was at Neuwied, on the 
Rhine. During the latter half of the eighteenth century he emigrated to this 
country and was considerable of a property owner. He married Mary Frudt, 
born 1742, and their issue was: i. John, of whom later. 2. Paul, born 
1765, died young. 3. Katherine, born 1767. 4. Susannah, born 1768. 5. 
Elizabeth, born 1770. (All of whom died young.) 6. Jacob, born 1772, 
died 1849. at Neuwied. 7. Peter, born 1775, died 1842. 8. Elizabeth (sec- 
ond of this name), born 1778, died 1840. 9. Margaret, born 1784, died 1846. 

(H) John Graff, son of Henry and Mary (Frudt) Graff, was born in 
1763, in Germany, and in 1783 came to the United States, settling on a farm 
near Pleasant Valley, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He married Bar- 
bara Baum, and had issue: i. Henry, of whom later. 2. Mary, born Sep- 
tember 4, 1795, died December 4, 1833. 3. Sarah, born May 3, 1797, died Sep- 
tember 15, 1850. 4. William, born October i, 1798, died November 18, 
1882. 5. John, born August 3, 1800, died January 31, 1835. 6. Margaret, 
born May 3, 1802, died March 24, 1885. 7. Joseph, born October 13, 1804, 
died October 13, 1804. 8. Elizabeth, born January 7, 1807, died May 19, 
1888. 9. Peter, born May 27, 1808, died April 9, 1890. 10. Jacob, born 
September 5, 1810, died December 9, 1886. 11. Matthew, born August 23, 
1812. died July 22', 1902. 12. Paul, born May 31, 1815, died August 25, 1898. 
John Graft', the father of this family, died December 31, 1818. 

(HI) Henry Graff, son of John and Barbara (Baum) Graff, was born in 
1794, and died September 9, 1855. On September 19, 1820, he married Eliza- 
beth Lobinger, who was born April 3, 1800, and died July 19, 1869. Both are 
buried in the Allegheny Cemetery. The birthplace of this Henry Graff was on 
the old farm near Pleasant Valley, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. From 
the time he was old enough until he was twenty years of age he assisted 
his father on his farm. After the death of his grandfather, Henry Graff, of 
Germany, his father gave him power of attorney and sent him over there 
to receive his share of the estate. He returned just before his father's death, 
which occurred December 31, 18 18. Before leaving Germany he purchased 
a great number of farming utensils, including hay-forks, shovels, spades, cut- 
ting knives and scythes, these articles being then scarce and of high price in 
this country. He sold these at a good profit, thus giving proof of his innate 
business ability. 

Among the articles which came as heirlooms from the estate were tea 
and tablespoons of solid silver and a valuable clock, which played a number of 
tunes and struck the quarter, half hour and hours. It was the ''Grandfather" 
style of clock, and is said to have been ancient when purchased in 1760 by 
Henry Graff, the founder. It and the spoons still remain in the family. 



142 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

In 1822 Henry Graff began his business career by opening a country 
store in Pleasant Valley. His goods had to be hauled from Philadelphia and 
Baltimore, and as it took several weeks to transport them the shipment was 
both tedious and expensive. He remained eleven years at Pleasant .Valley, 
and while there taught the business to his brothers, Peter and Matthew. The 
business prospered, and in order to give his brothers an interest in it he ex- 
tended it and placed his brother, Peter, in the small village of New Derry, 
where he continued several years and met with success. He then sold out 
and located at Blairsville, Pennsylvania, in Indiana county. Henry then 
sold his Pleasant Valley store to John, his brother, and removed to Blairsville, 
where he and Peter formed a partnership and traded under the firm name of 
Henry and Peter Graff. This change was made about the year 1833, and they 
did a very extensive business and were prosperous ; they built a large grain 
house on the Conemaugh river, in the town. A year or two afterward 
Matthew was given an interest in the business. 

In 1836 Henry and Peter Graff commenced transportation by railroad and 
canal from Philadelphia and Baltimore to Pittsburg and the west. Their line 
was called the Union Transportation Line, the canal and railway being owned 
by the state of Pennsylvania. Merchandise was carried by rail to Columbia, 
then by canal boats to Hollidaysburg, then by rail over the Alleghany Moun- 
tains to Johnstown and from there by canal to Pittsburg, a distance of one 
hundred and three miles. 

About this time Peter Graff moved to Pittsburg, where he attended to 
the receiving of the merchandise. In a year or two the forwarding business 
increased so rapidly and Henry Graft" himself moved to Pittsburg, where, 
thenceforth, he and Peter gave their whole attention to the extensive business 
interests. A year later Henry Graff began the manufacture of iron, an 
instance of foresight which was justified by the success of the undertaking. 
He continued the transportation business until 1853, when the state sold the 
canal to the railroad company. A Pittsburg newspaper said he was the lead- 
ing citizen and most active and successful commission merchant and iron 
manufacturer of the city. He was also instrumental in starting all of his 
sons in business before his death, which occurred in 1855. He was a member 
of the Lutheran church and a most liberal giver to the same. He also gave 
a large contribution to the seminary at Gettysburg. 

He married, September 19, 1820, Elizabeth Lobinger, born April 3, 
t8oo, and their children were: i. John, born January 14, 1822, died un- 
married November 11, 1901. 2. Christopher L., born October 2, 1823, died 
February 15, 1898. 3. Priscilla Sophia. 4. William. 5. Alexander C, 
born November 10, 1828, died March 7, 1894, unmarried, at Craig, Colorado. 
6. Thomas J. 7. Matthew. 8. Anna Mary, born March 12, 1837, married, 
first, John Kirkpatrick; second, William Pore, by which union there was no 
issue and she died June 29, 1891. 9. Elizabeth, born April 29, 1842, died 
January 19, 1855. Henry Graft', the father, died in 1855, and his widow 
passed away July 19, 1869, and both were buried in the Allegheny Cemetery, 
Pittsburg. 

(IV) Christopher Graft, the second child of Henry and Elizabeth (Lob- 
inger) Graft, born October 2, 1823, married, May 15, 1858, Arabella Blackmore, 
born April 7, 1839. Mrs. Graft died April 16, 1866, and the death of Mr. 
Graft occurred February 15, 1897. Their children were: i. William Henry. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 143 



born August 7, 1859, married Lillian Imhofif. 2. John C, born August 18, 
1861. 3. Elizabeth L., born January 24. 1864, wife of Dr. William Mc- 
Kelvy, of Breckenridge, Colorado. Dr. and Mrs. McKelvy were the parents 
of the following children : James Boyd, born June 18, 1893 ; Mary, born 
October 28, 1895, died October 29, 1895 ; Mary Elizabeth, born July 26, 1897, 
and Grafif, born August 2t„ 1902, died August 27, 1902. 

(IV) Priscilla Sophia Graff, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Lobing- 
er) GraiT, born ]\Iarch 31, 1825, married Paul Hugus, and had the following 
children: Henry Graff, born April 3, 1847, married Anne Harrison, and has 
two children, James H. and Mary A.; Edward Reed, born August 22, 1848, 
married Nancy Coleman Doak, has one daughter, Emily Trevilla ; Anna Mary, 
born February 17, 1850, wife of R. H. Negley, has two sons, Paul H. and 
Edward C. ; and John C, born July 29, 1855, died young. Mrs. Hugus died 
January 14, 1901. 

(IV) William Graff, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Lobinger) Graff, was 
born December 27, 1826, married Missouri I. Coffin, and their children are: 
James Coffin and William (twins), died in infancy; Elizabeth B., Anna Mary 
and Isabell, born February 5, 1872, died October 24, 1874. 

(IV) Thomas Graff, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Lobinger) Graff, 
w-as born October 26, 1832: married, June 25, 1863, Agnes C. Dixon, born 
August 17, 1847. Mr. Graff' died April 21, 1890. His children were: i. 
John D., born June i, 1864, died January 28, 1902; he married Elizabeth Cam- 
eron Wray. 2. Henry L., born June 16, 1865, married Carrie Paisley; has 
one child, Louise, born May 3, 1895. 3. Bennet, born March 5, 1867, of 
Denver. 4. Paul Hugus, born June 29, 1869, married Sylvia Packard ; has 
two children. 5. Thomas Ewing, born August 21, 1871. 6. Joseph Way, 
born May 25, 1873. 7- Maud. 8. Matthew Addison, born August 2^, 
1876, deceased. 9. Agnes Dixon, born June 11, 1878, married, October 

18, 1899, Eugene Murray, and they have two children. 

(IV) Matthew Graff", son of Henry and Elizabeth (Lobinger) Graff, 
was born November 31, 1834; married, November 3, 1862, Jane Addison, 
born in 1839, and died January i, 1880. The death of Mr. Graff occurred May 

19, 1896. Their children were: i. Henry Addison. 2. Harriet IngHs. 3. 
Mary K. 4. William Addison. 5. Benjamin D. 6. Richmond. 7. Fran- 
cis Erskine. 

(V) Harriet Inglis Graff, eldest daughter of Matthew and Jane (Addi- 
son) Graff", married, April 30, 1889, Robert R. Singer, and they have two 
children, John Addison and Jane. 

Jane Addison, wife of Matthew Graff, was a granddaughter of Al- 
exander Addison, a descendant of the father of Joseph Addison, of the "Spec- 
tator." Alexander x^ddison was born in 1758, in Morayshire, Scotland, and 
although of English descent was most decidedly a Scotchman in his cast of 
mind. He received a very thorough education, in 1775 graduating from the 
University of Aberdeen, and in 1777 received the degree of Alaster of Arts. 
Studying^ divinity, he was licensed to preach in 1781. To his many attain- 
ment's he added a very perfect knowledge of Hebrew, French and Italian lan- 
guages. In 1787 he emigrated to America, and in 1791 was appointed a judge, 
which office he held until 1803, when he was deposed in consequence of an 
impeachment for high treason. This charge was due to the political intrigues 
of the times. So liighlv was Alexander Addison esteemed by his contempo- 



144 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



raries that Aaron Burr, when impeached for high treason, selected him for 
his counsel, a responsibility which Judge Addison was unable to assume. 
He married, at the home of General Gurney, September 25. 1786, Jean Grant, 
born July 24, 1763, and their children were: John, born July 19, 1787, died 
July 30. 1787; Elizabeth, born August 22, 1788; Ann, born February 2, 1791, 
died October 6, 1855; James, born January 10, 1793, died December 8, 1795; 
John (2), born January 24. 1795; Mary, born June 27, 1797, died April, 
1822' ; Alexander, born September 10. 1799, died February, 1822; William, 
of whom later; Jane, born January 4, 1804, and Francis, born February 7, 
1807, died young. Alexander Addison, the father, died in 1807, his death 
being an irreparable loss to his family and friends. 

William Addison, son of Alexander and Jean (Grant) Addison, was 
born December 28, 1801, and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
He married Harriet Inglis, and they were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Jane, born May 11, 1839, wife of Matthew Graff; Eliza, born Janu- 
ary 26. 1841 : Frances, born January 30, 1843; Alexander, born December 
24. 1844, died in Germany June 10, 1867; Emmeline, born October 23, 1846, 
and William, born October 13, 1849, died about 1888. The death of Wil- 
liam Addison, the father, occurred about March 26, 1862. 



WELLINGTON CHANCY MILLER, D. D. S., who has been engaged 
in the practice of dentistry for a number of years, resides in Homestead, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and is a descendant of a family which has 
been resident in the state of Pennsylvania for a number of generations. Its 
first settlement was in Adams county. 

John S. Miller, grandfather of Wellington Chancy Miller, was a farmer 
of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and was a stanch supporter of the Demo- 
cratic party. 

Peter Stearn Miller, son of John S. Miller, was born in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, and also followed the occupation of farming. He served in 
the Union army in the Civil war as a member of the Ninety-second Penn- 
sylvania Regiment, and while thus engaged contracted typhoid fever, from 
the effects of which he died in August, 1865. He married Mary Hammer, 
also born in Bedford county, and they had children: i. Rev. Rufus P., born 
August 3. i860. He resides at present in Philipsburg, Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, and was for thirteen years pastor of the Presbyterian church at 
Homestead, and since 1901 has been pastor of the church at Philipsburg. 
He was educated in the Soldiers' Orphan School at Andersonburg, Perry 
county, Pennsylvania ; the preparatory school in New Paris, Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania; was graduated from the Otterbein University, Westerville, 
Ohio, in 1884; attended the Dayton Theological Seminary; and graduated 
from the Western Theological Seminary of Allegheny in the spring of 1888, 
after which he located in Homestead. He married Lydia K. Ressler, of West- 
erville, Ohio, and had children : Alice Lillian ; Edwin, deceased ; and Mary 
Emily. 2. Wellington Chancy (see forward). 3. WiUiam Henry, born Octo- 
ber 31, 1863. was also educated in Andersonburg, and upon the completion of 
his education went to Johnstown, where he resides at the present time. He 
married Jessie Wagner, of Johnstown, and had children : George, deceased ; 
George Wagner ; Mary Frances ; Jessie, and Alfred. He has been variously 




}rz^<U^j~rL^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 145 



employed with the Cambria Iron Company and mercantile houses of that 
city, at present being manager of the Johnstown Baking Company. 

Wellington Chancy Miller, D. D. S., second son and child of Peter Stearn 
and Alary (Hammer) Miller, was born in Napier township, Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, October 11, 1861. He was educated at Andersonburg until 
he had attained the age of sixteen years, then spent two years working on a 
farm. He was in the employ of the Cambria Iron Company at Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, and of the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company at Atchison, 
Kansas, and in 1885 entered the University of Maryland in Baltimore, where 
he studied dentistry and was graduated in March, 1887. He immediately 
began the practice of his profession in Atchison, Kansas, in association with 
Dr. William H. Schulz, and remained with him until June, 1889, then for 
about one year was in the office of Dr. George T. Gay, of Peoria, Illinois. 
At this time he went to Homestead to pay a visit, and while there established 
himself in the practice of his profession. He remained until 1898, when he 
returned to Peoria and formed a partnership with Dr. George T. Gay, and 
remained with him until 1902, when the partnership was dissolved. He again 
took up the practice of his profession in Homestead in that year, and has con- 
tinued in it up to the present time, having acquired a .large and lucrative 
practice. 

Dr. Miller married, October 11, 1894, Mary Clarissa Means, daughter of 
Robert Shearer and Eliza Ann (]\IcRoberts) Means, of Miffiin township, and 
granddaughter of Nathan Means, of the same place. Nathan Means, deceased, 
was one of the early settlers of Mifflin township, coming from Paxtang, Penn- 
sylvania, with his mother and brothers, John, James and Joseph, and settled in 
Mifflin township, near Lebanon Church. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER HUDSON. The Hudson family in America 
has always been identified with the learned professions and the world of letters. 
Such is its history in A^irginia, New York and Pennsylvania, especially. 

Attorney William A. Hudson, of this notice, is an eminent lawyer of what 
may be termed the old school of gentlemen, whose broad, far-seeing intellec- 
tuality has none of the superficial in its makeup. He is a native of Virginia, 
and a direct descendant of that most celebrated character. Chief Justice Mar- 
shall, and is otherwise connected with some of the best families of the Old 
Dominion state, his direct ancestors having been identified with Virginia for 
more than two hundred years. _ 

William Alexander Hudson is the son of James W. and h.lizabeth (Abra- 
ham) Hudson. He was born in Staunton, Virginia, August 20, 1850. His 
parents were both natives of Virginia, and the father was an extensive planter. 
James W. Hudson and wafe were the parents of six children, as follows: (i) 
Theodosia A., wife of John E. Hamilton, of Staunton, Virginia; (2) Adella 
A., wife of Robert Hunter, of Staunton, Virginia; (3) MolUe, who died 
at the age of twenty-six years ; (4) Wyclifife Y., who died in youth ; (5) Eliza- 
beth, who died young, and (6) W. A., the subject. The father died in 1871, 
and the mother in 1855. 

William Alexander, the sixth child in his father's family, was carefully pre- 
pared for a higher education at the schools of his native locality. He selected 
law as his life profession, and in 1873 was graduated from the University 

iv— 10 



146 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

of Virginia with high honors, having also attended Roanoke College, Salem, 
Virginia. Immediately after his graduation, having been admitted to the bar, 
he began his active practice, which soon assumed large proportions. He saw, 
however, that it was wise to locate in a larger field than he was then in, hence, 
he came to Pittsburg in 1891, where his success has been all that any professional 
man could desire. The date of his admission to the Allegheny county bar was 
September, 1891, and later he was admitted to the courts of the state, the 
federal supreme and superior courts. Before leaving Virginia, and in 1883, 
his name was presented to the Legislature of his native state for election as 
judge of the common pleas court, which office was unsought by him, yet, al- 
though he had more than a dozen competitors, he received eighty-nine out of the 
ninety-one Democratic votes cast on the first ballot. He served with dignity 
and justice until his term expired, when he came to Pittsburg, where he has 
since taken a prominent position in the Pennsylvania bar. 

Wliile Judge Hudson has attended to a general law practice, his special 
attention has been turned toward commercial and corporation law cases. Many 
of the largest corporations have retained him for their counsel. By 1891 his 
practice had so increased that he deemed it wise to form a partnership, and 
selected Mr. Howley, of Pittsburg, as his partner, the firm being styled Hudson 
& Howley, who make a specialty of suits against corporations, in which role 
they have achieved much eminence. He devotes his whole energy to his pro- 
fession, and when not busily engaged in actual practice he spends his time 
largelv in the reading of legal publications, thus keeping abreast with the ever 
changing conditions of the profession to which he is so greatly attached. 

On May 12, 1875, Judge Hudson married Miss Ida Florence Rector, 
daughter of Samuel aUd Annie (Hatcher) Rector, of Loudoun county, Vir- 
ginia. Mrs. Hudson died May i, i8g8, aged forty-six years. The children by 
this union were: (i) Rector, (2) W. A., Jr., (3) James Percy, (4) Ida Flo- 
rence, (5) Welby, (6) Magill Fauntleroy, (7) Elizabeth, (8) John, and (9) 
Thomas Davis. 



. JOHN SCOTT WENDT, of the law firm of McCleave & Wendt, Pitts- 
burg, was born at New Brighton, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, March 29, 
1868, a son of Christian I. Wendt, M. D. His genealogical line is as follows : 

(I) Frederick Wendt, his great-great-grandfather, emigrated from 
Hanover, Prussia, after the Revolutionary war in this country and prior to 
1800, settling for a short time in New York, after which he came to Pitts- 
burg and was employed by James O'Hara in his glass works. Later he, 
with several other gentlemen, among them William Eichbaum and Christian 
Ihmsen, established the Birmingham Glass Company, at what was then 
Birmingham, now known as the South Side, Pittsburg. In this enterprise he 
was very successful and continued at the business until his death, acquiring a 
large amount of South Side real estate, and was identified in various enterprises. 
He first married Charlotte Eichbaum, a sister of William Eichbaum, and, after 
her death, Nancy Gates, of Hagerstown, Maryland, a niece of General Horatio 
Gates, by whom he had several children, including Frederick, Jr., the subject's 
grandfather. 

(II) Frederick Wendt, Jr., son of Frederick, Sr.'(I), was born in Bir- 
mingham (now South Side), Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1799, and died April 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 147 



22, 1848. He succeeded his father in the glass business and continued in the 
manufacture of glassware throughout his life. He married Miss Almira Tay- 
lor Brock, a relative of General Brock, of the English army, and to them were 
born two children, the place of their birth being South Side, Pittsburg, and 
their names are: i. Almira, who married John W. Patterson (see Patterson 
family sketch). 2. Christian I., the subject's father. 

(HI) Christian I. W'endt, M. D., was the son of Frederick Wendt, Jr., 
and was also born in Birmingham (South Side), Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 
1840. He practiced medicine in Beaver county, and represented his district 
in the state legislature, having been elected as the Republican candidate in 
1875. He was prominent in the affairs of Beaver county. He was united in 
marriage to Agnes Scott, daughter of John Scott, who was associate judge 
in Beaver county and quite prominent in his part of the state, and who was 
descended from James Scott, of Roxburghshire, Scotland, who emigrated to 
Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary war and settled in Pittsburg for a 
short time, and afterwards moved down the Ohio river and settled on land 
acquired by him on the Broadhead Road in Beaver county. He, John Scott, 
married Mary Walker, who was a granddaughter of William Ewing and 
Isaac Walker, both early settlers in Robinson township, Allegheny county. 
Christian I. Wendt died in 1883, aged forty-two years; his widow still sur- 
vives and resides at New Brighton, Pennsylvania. The children by this union 
were: i. John Scott. 2. Edwin F., assistant engineer on the Pittsburg & 
Lake Erie Railroad, who is tmmarried and lives in New Brighton, Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Charles I., M. D., a graduate of Hahnemann Medical College of 
Philadelphia, who is now a practicing physician in Pittsburg. 4. Almira, 
unmarried, resides at New Brighton with her mother. These children were 
all born at New Brighton, Pennsylvania. 

( I\^ ) John Scott Wendt, subject, after receiving a good education in 
the public high school at New Brighton, Pennsylvania, entered Geneva Col- 
lege, from which he graduated with the degree of B. A. in 1887. He then 
chose law for his profession and studied in Pittsburg under William R. Blair, 
Esq., and was admitted to the Allegheny county bar in 1890. Since then he 
has practiced in Pittsburg; from 1897 to 1904 he was associated with D. T. 
Watson and Johns McCleave, in the practice of law; in 1904 he formed a part- 
nership with Johns McCleave, under the firm name of McCleave & Wendt, 
which firm is counsel for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company and do a 
general law business at this date. Mr. Wendt is unmarried, is a member of 
the University Club, Union Club, Pittsburg Country Club, Oakmont Country 
Club, and in politics is an independent Republican. 



ADOLPH KOENIG, M. D. Dr. Adolph Koenig, of Edgewood, physi- 
cian and editor, was born October 30, 1855, at Wiggiswyl, canton of Berne, 
Switzerland, son of Christian Koenig and grandson of Bendicht Koenig. 

Bendicht Koenig (grandfather) was born in the canton of Berne, Swit- 
zerland, 1758, and died there in 1798. He was a landholder, and passed his 
life as a farmer. He met his death when the passage of Napoleon's armies 
across the Alps was heroically but vainly opposed by the valiant Swiss. He 
married Elizabeth Knuchel and their children were: Bendicht; Jacob; Nik- 
laus, a physician ; Christian, of whom later ; Elizabeth; Anna Maria. 



148 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

Christian Koenig (father), son of Bendicht and Elizabeth (Knuchel) 
Koenig, was born in 1796, in Wiggiswyl, canton of Berne, Switzerland. In 
1856 he emigrated to the United" States, settling at Tarentum, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania. In his native country he had been a prominent farmer 
and tile head man of his village, and after his emigration continued to devote 
himself to agriculture. When the old Brackenridge tract of land was broken 
upon into lots and sold, Christian Koenig made the first purchase, becoming 
the owner of one hundred and seventy-six acres, on which he erected a dwell- 
ing and farm buildings. In 1873, shortly before his death, he sold this prop- 
erty and moved to Colorado. On coming to this country he gave his allegiance 
to the Republican party, and during the war was a strong Abolitionist. He 
was a member of the Evangelical Reformed Lutheran church. 

Christian Koenig married Magdalena Iseli, who bore him the following 
children : i. Christian, died in infancy. 2. Jacob, the first of the family to 
come to this country; he settled in Pittsburg, and in i860 was killed by an 
accident in a stone quarry near Tarentum. He married Adaline Mullet, by 
whom he had one daughter, who became the wife of George E. Metz, of 
Brooklyn, New York, and the mother of three children : Maurice, Albert and 
Isabel Metz. 3. Nicholas, deceased. 4. Christian II, served throughout the 
Civil war, attaining the rank of second lieutenant. He moved west, married 
Mrs. Cecile Blanc,"and is now living in Golden, Colorado. 5. Anna, deceased; 
was wife of Jacob Baldinger, of Allegheny City; children: Emil Robert, 
married Clara Mutzig, one son, Allan; Louisa, wife of Julius Stayert, of Bal- 
timore, one daughter, Agnes ; Carl F., married Tillie Oesterle, one daughter, 
Janet; Eda. 6. Rudolph, deceased; married Emma Schuepbach ; children: 
Clara Elizabeth, Frank Rudolph, Edward Frederick, Harry Adolph, Charles 
Raymond, Mary Alice, deceased; Herman Walter and Ralph Albert. Mrs. 
Koenig resides in Colorado. 7. Frederick, deceased; married (first) the 
widow of his brother Jacob; married (second) Elizabeth Schuepbach. Chil- 
dren by first marriage : Louisa, Rosa, deceased ; by second marriage : Charles 
Alfred, John Albert, William Frederick, Emma Cecelia, George Christian, 
Frederick Herman, Elizabeth Ida and Samuel Adolph. 8. Mary, married 
Andrew Yost, two children : Carl and Anna ; they reside in Colorado. 9. 
John, deceased ; married Ida Willard ; children : Carl E., Anna E., Rose A., 
James V., Lena I., Catharine M. and Alfred A. 10. Rosina, deceased; was 
wife of James Coffield, also deceased ; children : Louise, John, George, Emma, 
Ahce, Roy, Elsa and Eunice. 11. Godfrey, married Kitty Parish; children: 
Laura, deceased; Arthur, Alfred Christian, Myrtle, Frederic, deceased; Clar- 
ence, Eva and Alice, deceased. 12. Adolph, of whom later. Christian Koenig, 
the father of this large family, died November 27, 1873. 

Adolph Koenig, son of Christian and Magdalena (Iseli) Koenig, was one- 
half year old when brought by his parents to this country, and until the age 
of eighteen lived on a farm near Tarentum, receiving his early education in 
the common schools and at the Tarentum Academy. After leaving school he 
entered the medical department of the University of Louisville, Kentucky, 
and subsequently studied at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, 
receiving from the latter institution in 1879 the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
In 1897 the honorary degree of Doctor of Pharmacy was conferred upon him 
by the Western University of Pennsylvania. After graduating he spent one 
year as interne in the Western Pennsylvania Hospital, and in 1880 went to 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 149 



•California with the intention of practicing in San Francisco, but at the end 
of two months returned to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he has been actively 
•engaged in practice ever since. He has no specialty, but devotes himself to 
the general practice of medicine. 

In December, 1886, Dr. Koenig aided in the establishment of the "Pitts- 
burg Medical Review," and for five years was one of its staff of editors. In 
1892 he became its sole editor and publisher, and in 1905 turned it over to the 
Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania, the periodical having been trans- 
formed, in June, 1897, into the "Pennsylvania Medical Journal," the official 
organ of the Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania. After his resigna- 
tion as editor in 1905 Dr. Koenig accepted the less arduous office of associate 
editor on the staff of "The Journal," which office he still holds. From 1885 
to 1905 Dr. Koenig was Professor of Materia Medica and Botany and is now 
Professor Emeritus in the Pittsburg College of Pharmacy, where he also fills 
the chair of physiology. From 1880 to 1895 he was one of the visiting physi- 
cians of the Pittsburg Free Dispensary, and since 1893 has been a director of 
that institution. For nearly twenty years he was visiting physician of the 
Roselia Alaternity Hospital and Foundling Asylum, and since 1904 has been 
a member of the medical staff of the Allegheny General Hospital. In 1897 
he was president of the Allegheny County JMedical Society; in 1905 president 
of the Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania, and has twice been presi- 
dent of the Western Pennsylvania Botanical Society. Since 1905 he has been 
a member of the advisory board of the Department of Health of the State of 
Pennsylvania. His office is in the Westinghouse Building, Pittsburg. From 
1880 to 1903 he lived and had his office in the Fourth ward of Pittsburg, but 
in the latter year moved with his family to the suburb of Edgewood, where 
he purchased the old Reiter residence, in which he now resides. While a resi- 
dent of the Fourth ward he held the office of school director, and is to-day a 
member of the school board of Edgewood. 

Dr. Koenig has been twice married, his first wife having been Fanny 
McFarland Low, daughter of Thomas and Frances (Sears) Low, of Charlton. 
New York, who died in 1890. His second wife is Mary Beatrice, daughter of 
John and Maria (Blakemore), Jeffcoat, of England, and they have been the 
parents of the following children: i. Adolphus, born September 6, 1896. 2. 
Eugene Jeffcoat, April 3. 1898. 3. Rhoda Victoria, June 29, 1899. 4. Beatrice 
Iseli, November 24, 1900. 5. Olivia, Februar}- 25, 1902. 6. Frances Mary, 
July 23, 1903. 7. Evangeline Angliae et Helvetiae, October 12, 1904. 8. 
Theodore Roosevelt, February 21, 1906. 9. Christian, February 23, 1907, 
died February 23, 1907. 10. Arthur Rudolph, January 23, 1908. 

WILLIAM DANIEL PETERSON. The late WiUiam Daniel Peterson, 
for many years a well-known farmer of the vicinity of Pittsburg, his native 
city, was born April 20, 1835, in what was formerly known as Limetown, now 
the South Side, son of John Peterson. 

John Peterson was born in Pennsylvania, and during a large part of his 
life was engaged in the sawmill and coal business. He afterward moved to 
Elizabethtown"^ where he purchased a farm of about two hundred acres and 
became a prominent and successful farmer, his farm being still in the posses- 
sion of his descendants. He was an active member of the Methodist Epis- 



150 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

copal church, and for thirty-five years served as superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. 

John Peterson married Mary Huston and the following children were 
born to them: i. John, deceased, married Elizabeth Corey, and had two sons, 
Harry and James. 2. James, died unmarried. 3. William Daniel, of whom 
later. 4. Elizabeth, widow of Mark Borland, merchant of Monongahela 
City." 5. Charles, married Helen Duer. 6. Kramer, whose wife's given name 
was Hetty. 

William Daniel Peterson, son of John and Mary (Huston) Peterson, was 
brought up on the South Side, receiving his education in the public schools, 
and after leaving school was for a time the assistant of his father in the man- 
agement of the home farm. At the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in 
Company C, One Hundred and Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, and on May 30, 1863, was made second lieutenant of the same com- 
pany and mustered into service. He participated in the following battles: 
Williamsburg, Virginia; Fair Oaks, Virginia; ChantiUy; Antietam; Fred- 
ericksburg; Chancellorsville ; Gettysburg; Rappahannock Station, Virginia; 
Mine Run, Virginia; battles of the Wilderness; Spottsylvania ; Cold Har- 
bor, and Petersburg. He was wounded at Williamsburg May 5, 1862. He 
was honorably discharged at Charleston, South Carolina, September 3, 1864, 
at the expiration of his term of service. 

After the war he lived for a time at Baton Rouge, moving thence to New 
Orleans, where for about twelve years he engaged in the coal business. He 
then sold out and returned to the vicinity of Pittsburg, purchasing a farm 
above McKeesport, and for the remainder of his life devoted himself to agri- 
culture. His political principles were those upheld by the Republican party, 
and he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Peterson married, August 22, 1867, Mary O. Packer, and they 
became the parents of the following children: Frank N., born August 30, 
1868; William Edgar, born December 9, 1869; Mary Electa, born February 
9, 1872, wife of James Wright ; John William, born September 3, 1873, ''tar- 
ried Lony Baker, children, Ella May and Clifford Wilson ; George Washing- 
ton, born September 24, 1874; Mark Borland, born October 30, 1877; Eliza- 
beth Corinne, born September 4, 1879, died January 3, 1905, wife of Ralph 
Albright; Seward Hays, born September 19, 1882; and Charles Hubert, born 
August 16, 1888. 

Mr. Peterson died February 6, 1892, in the prime of life, having not yet 
completed his fifty-seventh year. He left an honorable record, both as a 
soldier and a citizen, and was deeply and sincerely mourned by his family and 
friends. 

Mrs. Peterson is a daughter of Captain Wilson S. and Electa (Corbet) 
Packer, a granddaughter of Job Packer and a great-granddaughter of James 
and Charity (Bye) Packer, whose children were: Job, of whom later; Giul- 
ielma, wife of Robert Wilson ; Lydia, wife of George Wilson ; Levi, married 
Ann Crawford; Hannah, wife of Moses Packer; Hulda, wife of Issard 
Condon ; and Sarah, wife of Abel Green. 

Job Packer, son of James and Charity (Bye) Packer, married Orpha 
Wilson, and they became the parents of a son, Wilson S., and two other 
children. 

Captain Wilson S. Packer, son of Job and Orpha (Wilson) Packer, was 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 151 



born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and there received his education. For 
many years he was captain on a Mississippi river steamboat, afterward settling 
in Braddock as one of the pioneers of the place. 

Wilson S. Packer married Electa Corbet, and the following children 
were born to them : Sharpley, married Maria Such, children, William, Flora, 
Edna, John, James, Mary and George, deceased ; Mary O., born June 6, 1845, 
widow of William Daniel Peterson ; Loretta, deceased ; Olive, married, first, 
Bert Carvy, and second, Harvey Sampson, children by first marriage, Bert, 
Olive and Lily, by second marriage, J\Ierle, Hannah and George ; Lily, wife 
of Seward B. Hays, one son, Seward ; and Wilson, married Elmira McLaugh- 
lin, children, John and Electa. 



KENNEDY FAMILY. It is now about sixty years since this family 
was planted in Pittsburg, where at the present day it numbers among its 
representatives Thomas Alexander Scott Kennedy, train director at the Pitts- 
burg terminal of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Mr. Kennedy was born May 7, 
1868, at McKeesport, son of John Kennedy and grandson of Michael Ken- 
nedy, who was a native of the north of Ireland and by trade a blacksmith. 

Michael Kennedy emigrated to the United States at some period during 
the first quarter of the nineteenth century, and married Mary Balph, by whom 
he became the father of a son, John, mentioned below. 

John Kennedy, son of Michael and Mary (Balph) Kennedy, was born 
in 1831, in Armagh, near Blairsville. His mother dying while he was an 
infant, he was cared for until five years old by two maiden ladies of the 
name of Rice, and afterward lived one year with his father in Johnstown. 
From that time until the age of sixteen he was reared by an uncle, Michael, 
at Columbus, Ohio, part of the time being spent at school in Pittsburg. 

At sixteen he obtained work with the engineers who were then surveying 
for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, which was extending its lines west 
of the Alleghanies, and later was employed for a year as compositor by one 
of the Pittsburg daily papers. He was then again employed as rodman by 
Mr. Seabrook, during the latter's surveys for the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany near Pittsburg. 

In 1854 he obtained employment with that company as brakeman in the 
passenger service and worked in that capacity on the first through train from 
Pittsburg to Altoona, which ran in July of the same year. He was subse- 
quently promoted to the position of passenger conductor, in which capacity 
he served (with the exception of two years, when he was in the service of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company) until 1887. He was then moved to 
the trainmaster's ofifice, where he remained until he reached the age of retire- 
ment required by the company, withdrawing as one of the oldest and most 
valued men in their service. 

In earlv life he was a Democrat, but in later years became a Republican. 
He was baptized in the Roman Catholic faith, but never became a member of 
any church. 

Mr. Kennedy married, January 22, 1852, Priscilla, daughter of Joseph 
Allshouse and granddaughter of Henry AUshouse, who came, it is supposed, 
from a place on the banks of the Rhine and settled with his brother in North- 
ampton county some time prior to the Revolutionary war. Soon after the 



152 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

commencement of hostilities he enHsted in what was called the "Associators," 
and served in the battle of Long Island. He was numbered among the killed, 
wounded and missing, but was actually taken prisoner by the British and held 
in captivity for about a year and a half. He afterward re-enlisted in a com- 
pany from' the northern part of Northampton county. 

After the war he crossed the Alleghanies and settled just north of the 
present town of Jeannette, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, on a tract of 
three hundred acres, presumably a grant from the government in compensa- 
tion for his military services. At his death this land went out of the Alls- 
house name. In the 'tens and 'twenties he was a member of the Pennsylvania 
legislature, serving in all fifteen years and spending two terms in the senate. 
He was in his day one of the most prominent Democratic leaders of West- 
moreland county. It was said by his colleagues and constituents that he 
organized the Pennsylvania legislature, and further, that he was one of the 
founders of the Democratic party. His wife was Marie Kunkel, and their 
son Joseph was the father of Mrs. Kennedy. Henry Allshouse died in 1836. 

Joseph Allshouse, son of Henry and Marie (Kunkel) Allshouse, was born 
in 1795, and began life as a farmer, assisting his father in the management of 
the homestead near Greensburg. In 1843 he came to Wilkinsburg. where he 
opened a hotel known to old residents as the Seven Mile Run. This hostelry 
he conducted during the remainder of his life. He married Anna Marie 
Minuno, and their daughter Priscilla became the wife of John Kennedy. 
The death of Joseph Allshouse occurred in i860. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kennedy became the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Mary Balph, deceased. 2. Joseph, married Ida Kiehl ; children: 
Curtis, married Jennie Reed, one son, Reed Curtis Kiehl; and Charles Kiehl. 
Joseph Kennedy and wife are both deceased. 3. Annie, wife of Samuel 
McKelvy ; children : Russell, married Miss Beale ; Pauline ; and Harold, 
deceased. 4. Elizabeth, wife of Dr. J. C. Lemmer, one daughter, Mary. 5. 
Sarah W., wife of I. M. Porter, one son, John K. 6. Thomas Alexander 
Scott, of whom later. 7. Charles, died in childhood, 8. John V., married 
Annie Still. 9. Lottie K. 10. Clara, wife of J. Scott Beckwith. John Ken- 
nedy, the father died December 6, 1901. 

Thomas Alexander Scott Kennedy, son of John and Priscilla (Allshouse) 
Kennedy, was brought up in Wilkinsburg and received his education in the 
local schools. In 1885 he entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, beginning as a messenger boy. In the course of time he was 
advanced to the position of telegraph operator, and subsequently, through suc- 
cessive promotions, attained his present position of train director at the Pitts- 
burg terminal. In the sphere of politics Mr. Kennedy adheres to the Repub- 
lican party, aiding, to the best of his ability, the men and measures advocated 
by the organization. 



LEWIS H. McCROSKEY, for many years identified with the planing 
mill industry in the state of Pennsylvania, and at present the proprietor of a 
fancy goods store in Wilkinsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, is a repre- 
sentative of the third generation of his family in this country, they having 
come from Ireland. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 153 



The paternal grandfather of Lewis H. McCroskey was a native of Ire- 
land, and emigrated to this country about the beginning of the nineteenth 
century. He married Elizabeth Weise, who was a native of Germany. 

Henry McCroskey, their son, was born in Cumberland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1807, and died there in 1850. His education was acquired in the 
schools of his native county, and at a suitable age he was apprenticed to learn 
the carpenter's trade, a calling with which he was identified throughout his 
life. He was a stanch supporter of the Whig party, and shortly prior to his 
death was elected justice of the peace. He was a member of the Winebrene- 
rian church, known at the present time as the Church of God. He married 
Adeline McCann, and had children: Lewis H. (see forward); Calvin, died 
young ; Emma, married Henry Carpenter, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania ; Agnes, 
married Lee Croft, of Butler county. Pennsylvania ; Addie, married St. John 
Waddell, an attorney-at-law of Memphis, Tennessee. 

Lewis H. McCroskey, eldest child of Henry and Adeline (]\IcCann) 
McCroskey, was born at Lisburn, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, August 
24, 1836. He resided under the parental roof until he had attained the age of 
fifteen years, attending the public schools of the coufity, and then went to 
Philadelphia to pursue his studies still further. The crowded condition of the 
schools in that city and the limited facilities they possessed made it impossible 
to attain the object for which he had come, although he was unremitting in 
his endeavors in this direction for a whole year. He therefore abandoned his 
original design and found employment in the planing mill of his uncle, William 
A. McCann. There he remained for a period of six years, learning this busi- 
ness in all its details, and then went to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in the 
interests of his uncle, who had established a branch in that town. Mr. McCros- 
key was in charge of this until i860, when he came to Pittsburg, and two years 
later enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Clark commanding. He participated in a 
number of actions, among them being the battles of Antietam and Fredericks- 
burg. He received an honorable discharge at the expiration of nine months 
and returned to Pittsburg, where he engaged in the planing mill business. 
At first he was in partnership with James Douglas, and later with James A. 
Johnson. After many years of profitable business he sold his interests in 1894 
and removed to the borough of Wilkinsburg, where he established the fancy 
goods store in Franklin avenue which he is conducting successfully at the 
present time. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian denomination, and 
for nine years he was trustee and for two years treasurer of the East End 
Presbyterian church. He is commander of Post No. 117, Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

He married, in 1864, Isabella McKee, daughter of David and Frances 
McKee. 

JOSIAH JiVMES DLTER, president and general manager of the Duer 
Spring & Manufacturing Company, is a representative of an old family of this 
country. 

Josiah Allen Duer, father of Josiah James Duer, was born August 31, 
1817, and died December 12, 1889. His early business occupation was driving 
the stages between Baltimore, Maryland, and Wheeling, West Virginia, but 



154 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

later he engaged in farming, with which he was occupied successfully until his 
death. He was a member of the Presbyterian church in Murrysville, Penn- 
sylvania, and, although a stanch supporter of the principles of the Democratic 
party, took no active part in the political afifairs of his township or county. 
He married, March 27, 1845, Martha Glendenning, who died August i, 1904, 
and they had children: Catherine H., married Andrew Moore; William P., 
married' Emma R. McElroy ; John G., married Martha Long; Mary E., mar- 
ried Josiah Long; Jonathan, married Susan Ludwig; Margaret E., unmar- 
ried ; Jeremiah B., married Olive Summerhill ; and Josiah James, concerning 
whom see forward. 

Josiah James Duer, fifth son and eighth and youngest child of Josiah 
Allen and jMartha (Glendenning) Duer, was born near Murrysville, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1864. He was educated in the public 
schools of his native town, and also in the Laird Institute of the same place. 
Upon the completion of his education he assisted his father in the management 
and cultivation of the home farm until he had attained his majority, when he 
started out in the world to establish himself. His first occupation was that of 
teaching, but after a time he abandoned this in favor of a mercantile life. He 
held a position for a time in a general store in Murrysville, and from thence 
went to East End, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he commenced a grocery 
business. He sold this after a time very profitably and accepted a position 
with Carnegie Brothers & Company. He resigned this at the end of five years, 
and for some years was connected with various other iron and steel manufac- 
turing concerns. He then became the secretary and treasurer of the American 
Spiral Spring & Manufacturing Company, later disposing of his interests in 
this company, and, October i, 1905, organized the J. J. Duer Spring Works, 
and commenced operations at Twenty-sixth street and Liberty avenue, Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. This concern was incorporated December 31, 1906, under 
the name of the Duer Spring & Manufacturing Company, with office and 
works at McKee's Rocks, Pennsylvania. The success of this undertaking is 
mainly due to the energy and executive ability of the able president and gen- 
eral manager, whose name heads this sketch. Mr. Duer is Republican in his 
political affiliations, but has never sought to hold public office. He is a con- 
sistent member of the Homewood Presbyterian church, and also of Leetonia 
Lodge, No. 401, Free and Accepted Masons, of Leetonia. Ohio. 

He married, May 14, 1890, at Murrysville, Pennsylvania, Elnora Thomp- 
son, born September 21, 1865, at President, Venango county, Pennsylvania, a 
daughter of William McLain and Susanna (Haslett) Thompson, and grand- 
daughter of Margaret (Hays) Thompson, who was a cousin of General Alex- 
ander Hays. Susanna (Haslett) Thompson was a daughter of James Haslett, 
whose father and one brother were the only survivors of the Haslett family 
which was massacred by the Indians at their settlement near the present site 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Elnora (Thompson) Duer was educated in the 
public schools of Dempseytown, Venango county, Pennsylvania, and in the 
Laird Institute at Murrysville. Mr. and Mrs. Duer have had children: i. 
Lenna Romayne, born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1891. She 
married Robert Edgar Long, who is a press representative, and resides in 
Washington, District of Columbia. 2. Carrie Gail, born in Leetonia, Ohio, 
April 19, 1896, was educated in the public schools of Pittsburg. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE v 155 

JAMES G. STORER, auditor of the Pennsylvania Water Company in 
Wilkinsburg, and prominently identified with the public affairs of that com- 
munity, is a member of a family which has been resident in the state for some 
generations. 

Thomas Storer, grandfather of James G. Storer, was a farmer in Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, and owned a fine farm near what is now known 
as Coal Valley. He married Elizabeth Holcraft, daughter of that historical 
personage known as /'Tom the Tinker," who took a leading part in the famous 
Whiskey Insurrection. He was one of the farmers who operated a still, and 
so was a strenuous opponent to the increased tax placed upon whiskey by the 
government. The old Holcraft dwelling is still to be seen, but the still no 
longer exists, and the property has passed into other hands. Richard and 
Elizabeth (Holcraft) Storer had thirteen children, among them being: Rich- 
ard, Frank, William, Rev. Thomas (see forward), Jane and Elizabeth. The 
remains of Mr. and Mrs. Storer are buried on the old farm in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. 

Rev. Thomas Storer, son of Richard and Elizabeth (Holcraft) Storer, 
was born on the family homestead in 1825. He attended the public schools of 
that district and later went to the medical college in Cincinnati, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He practiced the med- 
ical profession for a time and then took up the study of theology and was 
ordained a minister in the Methodist church. He was at various times pastor 
of congregations in : Butler, Pennsylvania ; West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania ; 
Alliance, Ohio ; Freedom, Pennsylvania ; Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania ; and, 
lastly. Mount Pleasant, where his death occurred in 1891. During the prog- 
ress of the Civil war he was chaplain of the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Matthew Quay commanding, and he was 
a member of ]\Iount Pleasant Post, Grand Army of the Republic. He married 
Margaret N. Morgan, daughter of Captain Morgan, who was prominent in the 
militia, and lies in the old Mingo cemetery in Washington county. Their chil- 
dren were: James G. (see forward) ; Enos K., lives in Kansas; Dr. Frank, 
married Cora Strickler ; Elizabeth, and Ella. 

James G. Storer, eldest child of Rev. Thomas and Margaret N. (Mor- 
gan) Storer, was born at Gastonville. Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
3klarch 28, 1852. His early years were spent there and he received his educa- 
tion in the local public schools and the Mount Union College, Ohio. He was 
employed by the Adams Express Company in Pittsburg for a period of eighteen 
years, and in 1882 removed to Wilkinsburg. He was elected borough clerk of 
Wilkinsburg and held that office for four years. He then entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Water Company in Wilkinsburg, as secretary and auditor, 
and holds that position at the present time. He was elected justice of the 
peace in 1907, to take the place of Samuel Crechman, deceased. His political 
support is given to the Republican party, and he is a member of the Methodist 
church. He was one of the organizers of the Pennwood Club ; is a member 
of Beta Lodge, No. 647, Free and Accepted Masons ; member of the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs : and an honorary member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He married Ida Stattenfield, deceased, and they had one child, 
Eugene, who is a graduate of the medical department of the Western Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. Ida (Stattenfield) Storer was descended from Jacob 
Stattenfield, who was a son of Baron Stattenfield, and resided in Germantown 



156 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

at the time of the Revolutionary war. Jacob married, 1778, Christina Bretz, 
daughter of Jacob and Christina Bretz, and they had children: Christina, 
Mary Tacy, Lewis (see forward), John and x^nnie. 

Lewis Stattenfield, son of Jacob and Christina (Bretz) Stattenfield, was 
engaged in the tobacco business and migrated to Wilkinsburg, where he opened 
a tobacco store in Penn avenue. He married Elizabeth McClure, of Mifflin 
township, and had children: Joseph (see forward) ; Lewis, who married Miss 
Harlbaugh ; James, married Mary McClure ; Mary, married Samuel Chad- 
wick ; Catherine, died young ; Margaret, married James Jack ; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Ferdinand Miller ; and Synthetia, unmarried. 

Joseph Stattenfield, eldest child of Lewis and Elizabeth (McClure) Stat- 
tenfield, was born June 15, 1818, and died April 24, 1885. He was a carpenter 
by trade, but for many years was employed as engineer on the river steam- 
boats. He purchased the property of his father in Penn avenue, afterward 
selling it to Dr. Pershing. He was a Democrat in politics and a member of 
the Presbyterian church. He married Mary Jane Hamilton, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Betsey (Samson) Hamilton, who had other children: Frank deceased, 
and Katherine Ven. 



WALTER L. SMITH, a prominent business man of Wilkinsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, is of a family which has shown its patriotism and devotion to their 
country in war as well as in the gentler arts of peace. 

Joel Smith, grandfather of Walter L. Smith, was one of the early settlers 
in Preston county. West Virginia, and received a grant of five hundred acres 
of land from the government. He married Anna Snyder and reared a large 
family. 

Calvin C. Smith, son of Joel and Anna (Snyder) Smith, was born in 
Preston county. West Virginia, September 30, 1846, and acquired as good an 
education as the schools of that time and locality afforded. He was appren- 
ticed to learn the carpenter's trade, which he followed for some time, and then 
removed to Connellsville. Pennsylvania, where he engaged in business as a 
contractor and builder. Fie carried on this line of business very successfully 
until 1891, when he retired from active work. At the outbreak of the Civil 
war he enlisted in the Sixth Regiment, West Virginia Volunteers, served with 
distinction four years, and was honorably discharged with the rank of corporal 
at the close of the great struggle. He was an active participant in many of 
the important battles of the war: Piedmont, June 5, 1864; Lynchburg, June 
17. 1864; Monocacy, July 9, 1864; Sickles' Ferry, July 18, 1864; Winchester, 
July 20-24, 1864; Martinsburg, July 25, 1864; Halltown, August 24, 1864; 
Opequan, September 19, 1864; Fisher's Hill, September 22, 1864; and Cedar 
Creek, October 19, 1864. He was long held a prisoner of war, being captured 
at Oakland, Maryland, February 28, 1862, and was paroled at New Market. 
May 15, 1863. He was an orderly at headquarters for Lieutenant Meigs, chief 
engineer, Department of West Virginia, from August, 1863, until the death of 
that officer at Martinsburg, West Virginia, July 25, 1864. 

He married Mary A. Crawford, daughter of Colonel James G. and Rachel 
(Guthrie) Crawford, the former born in Philadelphia, and served in the Civil 
war with honor as an officer in the volunteer force. Calvin and Mary A. 
(Crawford) Smith had children: i. Virginia E., married J. E. Herbert, had 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 157 



children : Mary A., Ida M., Alverda, Alice, Gladys and Florence. 2. Albert 
J., married Mary Watson, had children : Clay, Elinor and Mary. 3. Walter 
L. (see forward). 4. Ida Mav, married Charles Shank, has children: Herbert, 
Earl and Mabel. 

Walter L. Smith, second son and third child of Calvin and Mary A. 
(Crawford) Smith, was born at Brandonville, Preston county, West Virginia, 
February 2, 1872. He was very young when his parents removed to Connells- 
ville, Pennsylvania, where he was educated in the public schools. The first 
step in his business career was as clerk in a drug store in Ligonier, Pennsyl- 
vania, where by strict economy and diligence he saved a sufficient sum of 
money to enable him to enter the pharmaceutical department of the Western 
University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated with the highest 
honors of his class in 1897. He then associated himself with F. D. Saupp, 
J. S. Anderson, H. L. Greer and William Hayden, and organized the Physi- 
cians' Supply Company, with business quarters at Penn avenue and Seventh 
street. jMr. Smith sold out his interest in this enterprise to F. D. Saupp in 
1900, and engaged in the drug business independently at No. 3705 Fifth ave- 
nue, Pittsburg, until his main store at Wood street and Franklin avenue, 
Wilkinsburg, should be finished. He then removed the first mentioned busi- 
ness to Tioga and Wood streets, and carried on business in both stores until 
1907, when he sold the Tioga store to E. J. Kelley. His business in the main 
store in Wilkinsburg increased so rapidly that the original space devoted to it 
was entirely inadequate, and to accommodate the increased demand upon his 
resources he associated with E. B. Milligan and C. H. Bangs, of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, forming a corporation. They purchased the adjoining property and 
added the space thus gained to the original store. Subsequently Mr. Smith 
took over the stock owned by E. B. Milligan, and is now the owner of more 
than two-thirds of the original capitalization of fifty thousand dollars. The 
store is equipped in the most modern and up-to-date style in every particular, 
and has special departments devoted to ice cream, soda water and confectionery 
and candies. The remarkable success attending this undertaking is largely due 
to the determination and executive ability of Mr. Smith. Although taking no 
active part in the political afifairs of the city, he is a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party. 

He married, October 19, 1897, Blanche Marie Ambrose, daughter of J. W. 
and Anna (Beltz) Ambrose, and they have one child, J. Ambrose. 



EDWARD REGINALD WALTERS. M. D. Dr. Edward R. Walters, 
among the leading general medical practitioners of the city of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, as well as prominent in the municipal affairs of the city, was born in 
King's Lane, Engiand. December 20, 1869, son of James Smith and Harriet 
Ann (Dov;) Walters, he being one of the three children born to them. This 
is a family of physicians, each generation for many before the subject having 
had its noted doctors among its members. 

(I) Edward S. Walters, the grandfather, was a prominent physician, as 
well as his ancestors for two hundred years preceding him, and are noted in 
medical works. 

(II) James Smith Walters, M. D., son of Edward S. and Sarah (Smith) 
Walters, was born in Stafifordshire, England, in 1844 and graduated from 



158 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Guy's Hospital, London, England. Following his graduation he practiced as 
an assistant to Dr. McKenzie in Cheadle, Staffordshire, also assistant to Dr. 
Woodward in King's Lane. In 1870 he emigrated to America, locating at 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he built up a large and very successful prac- 
tice. He died November 8, 1900. He was a Republican in his political views 
and in religion an Episcopalian. He married Miss Harriet Ann Dow, born 
in King's Lane, December 21, 1844. She is the daughter of Edward and 
Mary (Millington) Dow, still survives and resides with the subject of this 
notice. The issue by this union was : (i) Fanny H., now the wife of Dr. C. W. 
Moffitt, a prominent physician of Boston, Massachusetts; (2) Edward R., of 
this notice; (3) Harry G., deceased. 

(HI) Dr. Edward R. Walters received his education at the public schools 
and in a preparatory school directed by Professor Denniston. In the spring of 
1887 he went west, spending some eighteen months in the states of Nebraska, 
Colorado, Wyoming and Montana, during which time he was employed on 
horse and cattle ranches. After thus broadening his scope of knowledge he 
returned to Pittsburg, where for a short time he was in the employ of the con- 
tracting firm of Booth & Flinn. He then traveled abroad, spending a year and 
a half with an uncle, a paper maker, in Saint Gaudans, France, who is a manu- 
facturer of fine tissue and cigarette papers. While there the subject studied 
the art of making paper, but he finally determined upon the study of medi- 
cine and returned to Pittsburg, after a brief sojourn in England, arriving in 
his old Pittsburg home in the spring of 1891. He then took up the study of 
medicine with his father, and later entered the Hahnemann Medical College, of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1894, following his graduation, 
he formed a partnership with his father, practicing under the firm name of 
J. S. & E. R. Walters, which partnership existed several years, when the 
subject's increasing practice demanded all of his attention and he withdrew 
from the firm. He established an office in the Liberty National Bank building 
and subsequently located at his present office, No. 280 Shady avenue. He has 
been very successful as a practitioner, today enjoying an almost enviable pro- 
fessional reputation. 

Politically, Dr. Walters is a Republican and has long been active in party 
work and has held numerous official positions. In February, 1904, he was 
elected a member of the select council of Pittsburg, and April 2, 1906, was 
elected president of the select council. Prior to 1904, he had been a mem- 
ber of the executive committee for the twentieth ward of his city for ten 
years, and was its chairman for six years. 

He was united in marriage October 28, 1896, to Miss Katherine A., daugh- 
ter of Owen Brady and wife, of Philadelphia. Her father is president of 
the Easton McMann Transportation Company, of that city. Dr. Walters and 
wife are the parents of the following children: (i) John Edward; (2) and 
(3) twins Edward R., Jr., and Katherine A.; (4) Mary Harriett. 



GEORGE MEYER, JR., the present manager of the Brunswick-Balke- 
Collender Company, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
June 16, 1 86 1, a son of George and Rose (Huber) Meyer. George Meyer was 
born in Bavaria, Germany, and emigrated to this country about 1848, settling 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he engaged in the merchant tailoring business. He 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 159 



carried on this business for a number of years, becoming a prominent citizen 
of that city and financially interested in many business enterprises there. He 
finally retired from active business affairs, a wealthy man. In politics he was 
a stanch defender of Republican party principles, and became a leader of the 
German-American element of his adopted city. He never held but one public 
position, that of superintendent of markets, but was ever an active factor in 
his political party. He possessed a fine voice and was greatly interested in the 
singing societies of Cincinnati, belonging to the Pioneer Singer Society and 
the Central Turn Verein. During the Civil war Mr. Meyer served in the Ninth 
Regiment. Ohio \'olunteers, enlisting for three years. He served his term of 
enlistment and received his honorable discharge in 1864. He was a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, and died at the age of sixty-three years, 
in 1893. George and Rose (Huber) Meyer were the parents of three chil- 
dren: I. Emma, who married Frederick Cooke, now deceased, of California. 
2. Rose, unmarried. 3. George. Jr., was reared in Cincinnati, where he 
obtained his education at the public schools. He began his business career in 
a machine shop, but soon thereafter began clerking for James L. Haven & 
Company, manufacturers of agricultural implements and hardware goods. 
Later he was employed by Perrin, Gaft" & Company, dealers in hardware. In 
1879 he entered the employ of the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company, 
makers of and dealers in billiard room goods. With this company Mr. Meyer 
has been connected ever since, and is now the Pittsburg manager, having been 
promoted to this position in 1884. 

For many years he has been prominent in the Order of Elks of Pittsburg, 
holding for two years the office of exalted ruler in Lodge No. 11 ; also for 
four years was an officer in the grand lodge of the United States. He belongs 
to the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburg, the Heptasophs and Central Turn 
Societies. Politically he affiliates with the Republican party. In 1900 he 
removed to Edgewood Park, where he purchased a handsome property and a 
dwelling at the corner of Braddock and Hutchinson avenues. 

George Meyer, Jr., married Elizabeth Katherine Durr, daughter of Frank 
and Elizabeth (Fisher) Durr. The father of Mrs. Meyer was killed in the 
Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have had one son, George Meyer (third), 
who married Jean Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Miller, of Pittsburg. 



THE POLLOCK FA^IILY, of which Doctor William F. Pollock, of 
South Side, Pittsburg, is a descendant, is one well known in Pennsylvania his- 
tory. The ancestor of the family in America was Edwin Pollock, born in 
County Down, Ireland, and was educated for the ministry, but to avoid enter- 
ing the army in his native country his relatives smuggled him over in a vessel 
to America. He died here while his son James C. was but a small boy. 

(II) James C. Pollock was educated at the rate school common in the 
days before 1835, in Chester county, Pennsylvania. After his father's death 
his mother married Frank Aulthouse, of Chester county, and later young Pol- 
lock accompanied his stepfather to Washington county, Pennsylvania, coming 
over the Alleghany mountains in a covered wagon in which was the family and 
all of their household goods. The stepfather, Aulthouse, was a farmer, and 
died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. James C. Pollock began life's work 



i6o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



as a stage driver on the old National Pike, from Monongahela City to Robbs- 
town, Pennsylvania, and later was a teamster in Monongahela City. In 1834 
he married Eliza Carney, a native of Ireland, and they were the parents of 
Dr. William F., now a practicing physician of Pittsburg. The mother of this 
son died in 1841, and the father, February 23, 1843, married Julia Ann Croner, 
born June 7, 1817, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Abraham 
and Elizabeth (Brown) Croner, by whom was born the following children: 
Joseph H. ; Elizabeth L. ; James D. ; Margaret and Sarah M., deceased. In 
1844 the family moved from Monongahela City to Cross Creek township and 
then to Burgettstown, where the father conducted the old Keystone Hotel. 
From there they removed to Florence and conducted a hotel at that point, 
which was on the stage road from Pittsburg to Steubenville, Ohio. Subse- 
quently he purchased a farm in Hanover township, Washington county, Penn- 
svlvania, and in 1885 moved to a good residence a quarter of a mile out of 
the borough of Florence, while his two sons operated his farm. He began 
life's battle as a poor boy, but by his frugal management has accumulated a 
handsome property, including many fine houses. In his politics Mr. Pollock 
is a Democrat and has held such offices as jury commissioner, constable, regis- 
ter and assessor. He retired from the active labors of life in 1890. 

(Ill) Doctor William F. Pollock, eldest son of James C. Pollock, by his 
first marriage, was born at Monongahela City, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1840. 
His early life was passed mostly on the farm, and he was given his primary 
tuition in the township schools. He attended the Burgettstown Academy, and 
when he determined on the medical profession began his studies in the office 
of Dr. McCarroll, of F"lorence. He entered Michigan University at Ann Arbor 
and later graduated from the Cleveland Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Dr. Pollock began the practice of his profession at New Manchester, the county 
seat of Hancock county. West Virginia, where he remained two years. He 
then practiced for a time in Washington county, Pennsylvania, until 1872. 
In that year he settled in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, and here for thirty-five 
years he has been continuously with offices on Carson street, never having 
moved them from the block between Nineteenth and Twentieth streets. He 
pursues a general line of practice and has acquired great skill in relieving 
suffering. His practice is large and he has acquired in these thirty-five years 
hosts of friends, an unblemished reputation and substantial pecuniary reward. 
His term of service, thirty-five years of continuous practice, is only equaled 
by one other physician of the South Side. Dr. Pollock holds membership in 
various medical bodies, including the Allegheny and Pennsylvania Medical 
Societies and the American Medical Association. He is a member of Monon- 
gahela Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Duquesne Chapter, R. A. M., and Commandery 
No. I, K. T. 

He married, June 9, 1863, at Florence, Pennsylvania, Reuemah Jane, 
daughter of William J. and Margaret Potts. They had one child, who died in 
infancy. 

Dr. Pollock is chairman of the board of trustees of the South Side Pres- 
byterian church, wdiere he and Mrs. Pollock are regular attendants. During 
the later years of a busy and useful life, stirred by the conditions in his ward, 
the Doctor joined heartily in the cause of political reform. He aids greatly ia 
securing better conditions for his city. He is a lifelong Democrat. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE i6] 



MATTHEW SLINGER METCALFE, a well-known real estate agent 
of Pittsburg, was born December 25, 1857. in Iowa, son of William Metcalfe 
and grandson of John Metcalfe, who was born in 1789, in Wensley Dale, 
Yorkshire, England. He received but little education, and when a young man 
learned the trade of a stone mason, which he followed all his life. He was a 
man of independent character, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

John ]\Ietcalfe married Margaret Slinger, born in 1793, in Bishop Dale, 
Yorkshire, and they became the parents of the following children, all of whom 
were born in England: i. Anthony, born August 22, 1820, died at the age of 
sixteen. 2. Elizabeth, born December 2, 182 1, came in 1843 to the United 
States, and settled in Pittsburg, where her husband, Francis Robinson, of Eng- 
land, passed his life as a farmer. 3. John, born April 11, 1824, marble cutter, 
came in 1847 to the United States. He married Mary Hogue, of England, and 
they were the parents of six children. 4. William. 5. Edward, born Decem- 
ber, 1827, farmer, came to this country in 1845, and settled in Pittsburg, now 
lives in Boone, Iowa. 6. Mary, born January 13, 1830, fatally burned at the 
age of ten years. 7. Thomas, born May 5, 183 1, came in 1843 to the United 
States, and all his life followed the calling of a miner. He married Eleanor 
Jones, of Pittsburg, and died February 22, 1906, aged seventy-five. 8. Alice, 
born May 6, 1833, wife of James Hunter, of Pittsburg. 9. Mathew S., bom 
April 6, 1835, came in 1845 to the United States and settled with his brothers 
in Pittsburg. He was for years a miner, and is now janitor of Hazel wood 
school. He served two terms of enlistment in the army. He married Catharine 
Seeman, a native of Germany. 10. Jane, born July 17, 1838, came to Pitts- 
burg, and is now the wife of Edward Jones, a retired miner. John Metcalfe, 
the father of this large family, died at the age of seventy-five. 

William Metcalfe, son of John and Margaret (Slinger) Metcalfe, was 
born April 20, 1826, in Yorkshire, and enjoyed but few advantages of educa- 
tion. In 1843 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Minersville, 
now the Thirteenth ward of Pittsburg. For sixty years he followed the calling- 
of a miner, but has now retired, and makes his home with his son. For two 
years he was a councilman of Pittsburg and for four years served as school 
director of the Thirty-eighth ward. His first presidential vote was cast for 
Buchanan, but he has since been a strong Republican. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Washington avenue. 

Mr. Metcalfe married Sarah S., born November 19, 1824, on the shores of 
Long Island Sound, daughter of \Mlliam and Catharine Murray, of New York, 
the former born September 6, 1800, and the latter June 4, 1803. Mr. and Mrs. 
Metcalfe had the following children, all of whom were born in Pittsburg: 
Catharine, born October 22, 1854, died in youth; John, born March 7, 1856, 
died May 18, 1876; Matthew Slinger; Elizabeth, born October 9, 1859, wife of 
John Patterson, children, John, Harry and Annie; Francis G., born May 5, 
1863, carpenter, married twice, first wife Pearl Gregg, who died in 1891, sec- 
ond wife Hattie Duval, children, Myrtle and Francis ; and Penolla S., born 
March 22, 1865. died March 6. 1886. 

Matthew Slinger Metcalfe, son of William and Sarah S. (Murray) Met- 
calfe, was two years old when his parents moved to Pittsburg, and he received 
a good education in the schools of that city. At twelve years old he began 
to work at the coal shaft, and was employed there until the age of twenty, 
iv— 11 



i62 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



when he entered the plate and sheet department of the mills, where he worked 
steadily for twenty-two years. In 1900 he engaged in the real estate business, 
which he carries on at the present time, his office being situated in the Thirty- 
eighth ward. For seven years he has served as a school director of his ward. 
He belongs to Elite Lodge, No. 842, I. O. O. F., of Pittsburg. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has held for 
several years the office of steward, also serving as superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. 

Mr. Metcalfe married Sarah A., born February 4, 1862, daughter of George 
and Nancy A. Fisher, of Pittsburg, and they are the parents of two sons, both 
of whom live at home with their father and mother : George, born March 23, 
1883, clerk in the Pittsburg postoffice ; and ^Matthew Slinger, born September 
30, 1892, in school. 



GEORGE ROBINSON CREIGHTON. Prominent among the highly 
esteemed and enterprising business men of the city of Grafton, Pennsylvania, 
is George R. Creighton, a native of Shousetown, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, born August 2, 1854, son of John and Elizabeth (Harper) Creighton, 
and grandson of John and Nancy (MacMillan) Creighton. 

John Creighton (grandfather) was born in the north of Ireland in 1773, 
died at Shousetown, Pennsylvania. 1861, aged eighty-eight years. In early 
manhood he emigrated to the United States, locating for a short time at Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, but subsequently removed to Allegheny county, by way 
of the old stage and canal route, and was among the first settlers of Shouse- 
town. He purchased a farm on what was known as "Flaugherty's Run," near 
Shousetown ; the old homestead is still in the possession of his descendants, and 
the old log house is still intact. Fie was one of the most respected men of the 
community, his influence being always felt on the side of right and justice. 
He was of the old Scotch Presbyterian stock, and took an active interest in the 
affairs of the Old Scottsville church. His wife, Nancy (MacMillan) Creighton, 
born about 1779, and died 1863, aged eighty- four years, bore him the following 
children, all of whom are deceased: i. James, of Ohio. 2. John (see for- 
ward). 3. William, of Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 4. Martha, wife of 
Lewis McCartney. 5. Margaret, wife of Robert Morgan. 

John Creighton (father) was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
December 12', 1813, and died June 7, 1876. He was educated in the schools of 
Shousetown, Pennsylvania. In early life he gave his attention to agricultural 
pursuits ; later he served an apprenticeship at the trade of boat building in 
the boat yards at Shousetown, which he followed for a number of years ; he 
then moved on a farm near Clinton, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and 
after a residence of fifteen years there sold his farm and moved to Clinton, 
where he purchased the piece of property on which he resided for the 
remainder of his life. Mr. Creighton and his family were regular attendants 
of the United Presbyterian church ; their mode of traveling back and forth 
was on horseback, the older children riding at the back and the younger 
children in front of their parents. 

John Creighton married Elizabeth Harper, born March 5, 181 2, and died 
April 14, 1890, daughter of John and Margaret (MacMillan) Harper, of Scotch 
origin, John Harper being among the early settlers in this countr}^ from Scot- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 163 



land. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Creighton, namely: i. 
John, died in infancy. 2 and 3. Two infants, who died in infancy. 4. John 
T., a prominent carriage manufacturer of Canton, Ohio ; married Sarah 
Walkup has two children: John, Jr., and Luella, deceased. 5. David Harper, 
died June 12, 1900, aged sixty-two years; he was a carpenter and contractor 
in Clinton, Pennsylvania; married ]\Iissouri Vandivourt, four children: Ed- 
ward, Maud, Everett and Avilla. 6. Margaret, married (first) Dr. William 
Henry, two children: John H. and Nettie Henry; married (second) Jacob 
Ladshaw, deceased ; Mrs. Ladshaw and her children reside at Clinton, Penn- 
sylvania. 7. Andrew, resident of Allegheny City, is a dealer in horces; 
married Margaret Witherow, three children : James, Lyda and Alfreda, 
deceased. 8. Robert Pollock, of Ashtabula, Ohio ; married (first) Jennie 
Coates ; (second) Bianca Brown; one daughter, Blanche. 9. William, a 
farmer of Washington county, Pennsylvania; married (first) Bessie Johnston, 
who bore him three children: Ulysses, John and George; married (second) 
Mahala Custer, two children: Bessie and Mary. 10. Matilda, wife of Joseph 
Gordon, one daughter. Lyda ; family resides in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania. II. George Robinson, see forward. 

George Robinson Creighton spent his boyhood in Clinton, Allegheny 
county, and attended the public schools thereof, acquiring a practical education. 
In young manhood he went to Alliance, Ohio, and learned the trade of coach 
painter in the shops of his brothers, John and Robert P. Creighton. At the 
expiration of three years he came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and worked at 
his trade for the firm of Workman & Davis on Penn avenue. At the death of 
his father he went to Clinton in order to look after the interests of his mother, 
and there lived and followed his trade for three years. He then entered the 
employ of the Imperial Coal Company as a clerk in their store at Imperial, 
Pennsylvania, and three years later entered the employ of the firm of Joseph 
Walton & Company at Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, performing clerical work for 
two years. He then went to Cliff Mines, Allegheny county, where he engaged 
in mercantile business for two years, and during this time he secured the 
establishment of a postofifice and was appointed the first postmaster. In Feb- 
ruary, 1889, he sold his business and removed to Allegheny City, where he 
took the management of a mercantile business, conducting the same for two 
years. He then engaged in insurance business with the Metropolitan Insurance 
Company, as an agent, and later was appointed assistant superintendent and 
subsequently superintendent at Bloomington, Illinois. Accompanied by his 
family he moved thither and had charge of the office and business of the com- 
pany for seven months ; he was then transferred to Des Moines, Iowa, where 
he remained four years ; was then transferred to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
where he remained until 1904, when he tendered his resignation. He then 
accepted a position with the Real Estate Trust Company of Pittsburg, and a 
year later engaged in the real estate business on his own account. In addition 
to this line he represents many of the best fire insurance companies, including 
the Allegheny National and Philadelphia companies. Mr. Creighton has been 
a resident of Grafton borough since 1904, where he has erected an office build- 
ing in addition to his other interests. He is a member of the First United 
Presbyterian church of Grafton, a member of the session, treasurer of the mis- 
sionary funds and a teacher in the Sunday-school. 

Mr. Creighton married, April 18, 1877, Sadie E. Adams, born in Beaver 



i64 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

county, Pennsylvania, Fehruary 19, 1856, daughter of Alexander M'. and 
Harriet (Quinn) Adams. Their children are: i. Ella Virginia, born Feb- 
ruary 20, 1878. married Morton P. Wilson, a graduate of Leland Stanford 
University, California, and a mechanical engineer with the Westinghouse 
Company! They are the parents of one child, Marjorie, born February 20,. 
1905; the family reside at Crafton. 2. Beulah Lee, born May 5, 1882, wife 
of William R. Phillips, a graduate of Pennsylvania State College, now a civil, 
engineer, with headquarters at Youngstown, Ohio. They reside at Crafton. 

HIRAM EDMUND FRIESELL. Mathias Friesell, the American pro- 
genitor of the family, was born in Bohemia. When three years of age his 
family fled to Prussia, owing to persecution of Protestants in his native coun- 
try. In 1795 he came to America, settling near New Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
and in 1810 removed to Pittsburg. He was a man of remarkable physical 
strength, and served under Frederick the Great. He followed the occupation; 
of a stonemason, being an expert workman. He was a member of the Lutheran 
church. He married Mary Magdalena Shafer (spelling not certain), who 
came from Bavaria or Prussia to America in 1787; she was a member of the 

Evangelical Lutheran church. Their children were : Molly, married 

Hartman ; Peggy, married Jacob Gass ; William, see forward ; John, a moulder 
by trade; Mathias, a blacksmith by trade, died at Wheeling, West Virginia; 
Henry, a moulder by trade. 

William Friesell, son of Mathias and Mary M. (Shafer) Friesell, was 
born near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1803, and accompanied his parents to 
Pittsburg in 1810, living in what was known as Birmingham. He had the 
reputation of being the best shoemaker in Pittsburg, many customers coming 
from one hundred miles distant, which was certainly an evidence of his skill 
in that line. He was an elder in the First German church of Pittsburg, Sixth 
avenue and Smithfield street, in which he was marred in 1829 to Anna Eliza- 
beth Henrici, who was a daughter of Lewis Henrici, who came to America 
from Bavaria in 1825 owing to religious persecutions. She was a sister of 
Jacob Henrici, the leader of the Economite Society, which for many years 
prospered under his excellent management a few miles west of Pittsburg. 
Their children were : William, killed in the war of the Rebellion. John, died 
in 1893; was the owner of West Point Foundry, Penn avenue, near the Point, 
and together with his brother Jacob, see forward, enjoyed the reputation of 
being the most skillful iron moulders in Pittsburg. Jacob, of whom later, 
Peter, deceased ; was a moulder by trade. Mary, married Hiram A. Alter. 
Margaret, married Michael Kistler. W^illiam Friesell (father) died in 1877, 
aged eighty-four. 

Jacob Friesell, son of William and Anna E. (Henrici) Friesell, was born 
on Greensburg Pike, near Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1834. He received 
a country school education, was a moulder and musician, a Lutheran in re- 
ligion, a Republican in politics, and served three years and three months during 
the Civil war. He married Margaret Jane McClaren, born in 1840, in Alle- 
gheny county, near Sharpsburg, daughter of Hugh and Jane (Morrow) 
McClaren. Hugh McClaren was born in Ireland, 1807, was a farmer and 
machinist, and came to the United States in 1824. He was the son of John 
and Margaret (McClelland) McClaren; his father was a landowner and 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 165 



country gentleman in Ireland, and was killed by being thrown from his horse 
while riding to hounds about the year 1824. Jane (Morrow) McClaren, born 
1818, on the Morrow Farm, Westmoreland county, near Murrysville, was the 
daughter of John Morrow, born in 1780, in the north of Ireland, came to 
America in 1785, locating in Westmoreland county, near Murrysville, and 
Frances (Mc\\'illiams) Morrow, born at Alurrysville, Pennsylvania, 1788, 
daughter of John AlcWilliams, who kept the old hotel in Alurrysville. Mr. 
jNTcWilliams was one of the oldest settlers of Westmoreland county, coming 
there from Ireland prior to 1788. He died at the advanced age of ninety. His 
wife was Frances Moore, reputed in the family archives to be "a Scotch laird's 
daughter." Children of Mr. and Mrs. Friesell : Frederick Charles, born in 
1867 in Vancouver, Washington, graduated from Allegheny high school, and 
graduated from Western University of Pennsylvania, 1898, with the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery. He was professor of histology and bacteriology in 
the dental department of W^estern University of Pennsylvania. He married 
Elizabeth B. Patterson, of Murrysville, Pennsylvania. Hiram Edmund, of 
whom later. Clara Elizabeth, a graduate of Indiana State Normal, married 
James Dodds, electrical engineer, Indiana, Pennsylvania. Aimee Winifred, 
graduate of Pittsburg high school, received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Master of Arts at W'estern University of Pennsylvania; married Hugh 
Lee Fullerton, electrical engineer, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Frank McClaren, 
born 1880, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in Oregon University, 1906; he spent several years in travel and exploration 
in the western states and Mexico. His most noted trip was the exploration 
of the Grand Canon of the Colorado in Arizona, through which he and one 
companion passed in a boat, spending several months on the trip and facing 
death many times. 

Hiram Edmund Friesell, second child of Jacob and Jane (McClaren) 
Friesell, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, November 10, 1873. His educa- 
tion was secured in the public and high schools of Allegheny City and for a 
brief period at the Western University of Pennsylvania. He graduated from 
the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery (Philadelphia) in 1895, receiving 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Subsequently he practiced dentistry 
in Pittsburg. In 1903 he became connected with Western University of 
Pennsvlvania as professor of histology in the dental department, and in 1904 
was elected dean of the Dental College and professor of operative dentistry, 
which position he still occupies. At the time of his election to the deanship 
he was the youngest dean of a dental college. In 1906 he was elected to the 
professorship of operative dentistry and dental pathology 'in the dental depart- 
ment of the Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, and at the earnest 
solicitation of the authorities of that institution served also for that year in 
the office of dean, being for that period dean of two dental colleges. He is a 
member of the dental staff of the Pittsburg Free Dispensary, and is interested 
in numerous dental charities. He is the author of numerous papers of scien- 
tific and professional nature, and was for several years editor of a dental 
journal. He holds membership in Psi Omega Fraternity, of which he has been 
a supreme councilor and grand recorder for over twelve years; Pittsburgh 
Dental Society; Duquesne Alumni Chapter, Psi Omega; Odontological So- 
ciety of Western Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania State Dental Society; National 
Dental Association: American Medical Association, section of Stomatology; 



i66 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



National Institute of Dental Pedagogics; National Association of Dental 
Faculties ; The Archselogical Institute of America ; Duquesne Lodge, No. 546, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of which he was past master in 1906;' Pittsburg 
Chapter and Pennsylvania Consistory, in which he has attained the thirty- 
second degree. Dr. Friesell attends the United Presbyterian church. His 
political tendencies are Republican, but he has never sought or held office. 
The great physical strength of the founder of the family has been a noticeable 
characteristic of most of his descendants. Dr. Friesell and his brothers have 
maintained a foremost place in the amateur athletic history of Allegheny county 
for almost two decades, having won prizes in many national competitions. 

Dr. Friesell married, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1898, Esther 
Hutchison, born August 21, 1879, daughter of Daniel and Lily M. Hutchison. 
Children: Dorothy Marion, born June 12, 1899, in Pittsburg; Charles 
Edmund, born June 5, 1905, in Pittsburg. 



CHRISTOPHER PASSAVANT LINHART, of Wilkinsburg, passenger 
conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad, was born April 10, 1856, in Pittsburg, 
son of Wilkins Linhart, and grandson of Christopher Linhart, who was born 
at old Fort Duquesne, now Pittsburg, and was by trade a bricklayer and stone- 
mason. He subsequently engaged in business as a contractor, one of the 
buildings which he erected being the old "Brimstone" Methodist Episcopal 
church on the corner of Smithfield and Seventh avenues. He married Martha 
Brindle. and they became the parents of one son, Wilkins, of whom later. 

Wilkins Linhart, son of Christopher and Martha (Brindle) Linhart, was 
born May 9, 1833, near Whitehall, Allegheny county, and was for many years 
engaged in the wholesale flour business on Liberty street. He afterward 
turned his attention to contracting, building and real estate, purchasing consid- 
erable property on what is known as Duquesne Heights, on which he erected 
many residences, selling them at a profit. He is now real estate agent, expert 
and appraiser for the Pittsburg Bank for Savings, the People's Savings and 
Trust Company, and was elder in the Presbyterian church for years. He is a 
Republican in politics, and served as a school director for many years. 

Mr. Linhart married Sarah Richey, and they have been the parents of 
the following children : Christopher Passavant, of whom later ; George, mar- 
ried Alice Jackson ; Jennie, wife of James Bald, deceased ; William, married 
Bessie Johnson, of Tampa, Florida ; Harry Daggart, a physician, of California ; 
Arthur, deceased, judge of Porto Rico ; Margaret, deceased ; Nellie, deceased, 
wife of Frank Livingston, one son, Gilbert, the youngest ; Bessie, at home ; 
Wilkins, died in infancy; and Walter, married Hannah Young. 

Christopher Passavant Linhart, son of Wilkins and Sarah (Richey) Lin- 
hart, was educated in the public schools of Pittsburg and at Murrayville 
Academy. On completing his studies he went into business with his father, in 
connection with whom he later purchased a tobacco plantation which they 
successfully cultivated for three years. At the end of that time Mr. Linhart, 
junior, obtained employment with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Company, 
but not long after found work more to his taste in the construction of the Lake 
Erie Railroad, having charge of the stone construction bridge, under the 
direction of Mr. Quincy. When the work was completed he was employed on 
the railroad as fireman and engineer. In 1878 he entered the service of the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 167 

Pennsylvania Railroad as passenger brakeman, later becoming conductor, 
which position he has now held for many years. In 1890 he moved to 
Wilkinsburg. 

^e belongs to the Railway Conductors'. Veteran Association of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, the Old Reliable Association of Conductors, and Com- 
mandery No. 48, Knights Templar, also the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, affiliating with Lodge No. 546, 
East Liberty, treasurer of Chapter No. 285, a Shriner, Syrian Temple, and a 
charter member of the Eastern Star. He is a staunch Republican and a 
member of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Linhart married, April 7, 1886, Blanche, daughter of the later William 
H. and Margaret (McLean) De Vore. A sketch of Mr. De Vore appears on 
another page of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Linhart are the parents of one son, 
Lawrence, who is a doctor surgeon and a specialist. 



LEROY BERNHARDT MILLER, M. D. The branch of the Miller 
family of which Dr. Leroy B. Miller, of South Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, is a 

worthy representative, was founded in the United States by Miller, 

a native of Gresa, Germany, and died at the age of seventy-five years. He was 
a member of the Lutheran church, a staunch Republican, and a loyal citizen 
of his adopted country. His wife, Ernestina Miller, bore him five children, 
namely: Eli, deceased, was the wife of John Butte; Christina, wife of Benja- 
man Brosi ; Wilhelmina, wife of John Crouch ; J. Benjamin, of Washington, 
Pennsylvania ; John Ernest, see forward. 

John Ernest Miller was born in Germany August 31, 1840. He was five 
years of age when his parents emigrated to the United States, settling in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He attended the schools under the management of the 
German Lutheran church and the public schools of South Pittsburg. In early 
manhood he secured employment in the glass works, but later entered the 
employ of the firm of Jones & Laughlin, where he served an apprenticeship at 
the machinist trade, after which he returned to the glass works and was em- 
ployed in the mould and pattern department. He subsequently went to 
Steubenville, Ohio, where he was employed for a number of years. Upon his 
return to Pittsburg he entered the employ of George Duncan & Sons, serving 
as designer and pattern maker, and later became a member of the firm, and at 
the present time (1907) is a member of the Duncan & Miller Glass Company 
of Washington, Pennsylvania. Mr. Miller is a member of the Lutheran church, 
member of the order of Free and Accepted Masons, and a Republican in 
politics, serving as school director. He has taken an active interest in educa- 
tional affairs, using his influence to further its cause. 

John E. Miller, married, at Steubenville, Ohio, 1867, EHzabeth D. Bair, 
born at Steubenville, September 23, 1847, daughter of Charles and Margaret 
Bair. The children of this marriage were: i. Emma, died in childhood. 2. 
Edna, died at the age of twelve years. 3. Clarence M., of Washington, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Loretta D., wife of Thomas H. Lewis, mother of two children: 
Delorain and Alice. 5. Carl, died in infancy. 6. Zuleima E., wife of George 
B. McCutchen, mother of one daughter, Helen D. 7. Leroy Bernhardt, see 
forward. 8. John E., Jr., of Washington, Pennsylvania. 9. Victor D., of 



i68 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Washington. lo. Margaret E., died in infancy, ii. Catherine E., at home. 
12. Lora EHzabeth, at home. 

Dr. Leroy Bernhardt Miller received his preparatory education in the 
public schools of South Pittsburg and Washington, Pennsylvania. He then 
took a two-years' preparatory course in Washington-Jefferson College, enter- 
ing in 1898 and graduating therefrom in 1902. He then became a student in 
Jefferson Medical College, and received his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
the class of 1906. During his school and college days he had four years' 
experience in the drug business, thereby gaining a practical knowledge of that 
line. After his graduation he returned to South Pittsburg, spending about a 
year as resident physician of St. Joseph's Hospital, and April i, 1907, opened 
his present offices, which are equipped with the latest appliances for the prac- 
tice of his chosen profession. He is in receipt of a large and constantly 
growing practice, and is held in the highest esteem by patients and members 
of his profession, also by his fellow citizens. His office is located at 2120 
Carson street. South Pittsburg. He is a member of St. Mark's Episcopal 
church, Monongahela Lodge, No. 269, Free and Accepted Masons, and is a 
staunch Republican in politics. 

Dr. Miller married, January 22, 1908, Florence Huxley, daughter of John 
and Selina Huxley, of Vandegrift. 



THOMAS GRAHAM HAMILTON, an electrical engineer of Pittsburg, 
was born in Ireland December 21, 1871, son of John and Sarah Jane Hamilton. 
The father was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, in 1845, ^^^ ^^^^ i^i 1884, in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Moses and Jane (Hazelton) 
Hamilton, of the north of Ireland. 

Thomas G. Hamilton was educated in the public schools of Pittsburg and 
at the Lehigh University at South Bethlehem, where he took the electrical 
course and graduated therefrom in 1895. He then found employment with 
the Citizens' Traction Cable Company, of Pittsburg, with whom he remained 
until its consolidation and the founding of the Consolidated Traction Company, 
and continued with the new corporation until its completion of the electric 
system, when in company with the first chief engineer he went to Havana, 
Cuba, and superintended the construction of several trolley and steam rail- 
roads. He now occupies the position of assistant engineer of the New Castle, 
Pittsburg & Harmony Railroad, and the New Castle street railway. In politics 
he votes the Republican ticket. He is a member of the Episcopal church. He 
married Mildred, daughter of David L. and Frances (Hall) Davis, of Waynes- 
burg, Wayne county, Pennsylvania. By this union one child was born — John 
Leet Hamilton. 



MONONGAHELA HOUSE. Concerning the history of the Mononga- 
hela House it may be stated that this is one of the old landmarks in Pittsburg 
and all western Pennsylvania, and is known from one end of the land to the 
other, having a history running back to the "thirties," arid is, indeed, replete 
with historic events connected with it. 

The original hotel, built on the site of the present one, was erected in 
1839-40, and, as appears from the newspaper account of that day which carried 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 169 

its business card, it contained two hundred and ten rooms; covered an area 
of one hundred and twenty by one hundred and sixty feet, and was located 
at the foot of Smithfiekl street, corner of Front and Smithfield. It was built 
by James Crossan, who had been proprietor of the old Exchange hotel, of Pitts- 
burg. Its card announced that it was "beautifully located on the banks of the 
Monongahela river, convenient to the steamboat landing." It was a splendid 
building for those days and believed to be superior to any in Pennsylvania, 
and scarce equalled in the United States, outside New York. According to 
the Pittsburg Manufacturer, of that date, it was destroyed by fire at the time 
of the great conflagration of April 10, 1845, which devastated the heart of 
the city. It was rebuilt and opened again March 5, 1847, by Messrs. James and 
John McD. Crossan. It was reopened under the most favorable circumstances 
and has ever enjoyed the best of patronage. What is now the Monongahela 
wharf was then largely given up to the building and loading of flatboats, upon 
which floated the products of the country and carried to southern ports. Trav- 
elers on their way from the west and southwest to Philadelphia and other 
eastern cities rested at the Monongahela House before taking the stage coach 
across the Alleghanies. Here General George Rogers Clarke and old Hickory 
Jackson were both among the honored visitors in the early days, and have left 
reference to the activity of the community in their published letters. It was 
then one of a chain of a few finely equipped hotels in this country. This line 
of hostelries commenced with the Astor, of New York city, and included the 
Monongahela House, of Pittsburg ; the Gait, of Louisville, Kentucky ; the 
Planters, of St. Louis ; the St. Charles, of New Orleans, and old Continental, 
of Philadelphia. The marble floors of the Monongahela House have echoed 
to the tread gf many a celebrated personage, both home and foreign. Here 
Charles Dickens stopped, and mentions it in one of his books ; King Edward 
VII., when he visited America as the Prince of Wales, stopped here October 2, 
i860, and was escorted from the old Pennsylvania station and there made to 
feel at home. August i, 1849, President Zachariah Taylor visited Pittsburg 
and was met at Turtle Creek and escorted in twelve miles by Attorney General 
Cornelius Darragh and others, and finally conducted to the parlors of the Monon- 
gahela House, where a welcoming speech was delivered by the polished Pitts- 
burg orator, W^alter Forward. President Lincoln visited the city February 14, 
1 86 1, and, after a greatly belated train from the west, finally brought his family 
through a blinding rainstorm to the doorway of this famous old hotel, being 
carried through an almost irrepressible crowd of waiting people at nine o'clock 
in the evening. He went in at the Smithfield entrance, and was greeted as "Our 
New President," "Old Abe," "The Rail Splitter," etc. He made two speeches 
— one from a chair in the office and one from the balcony, midst a tumultuous 
applause. It was estimated that ten thousand people were present in and about 
the building to get a glimpse of the man from the west who had recently been 
elected president and who, as the sequel proved, was to be a rnartyred man 
within four years. 

The famous band of Abolitionists, which met in the old Shakespeare hall 
back in the early fifties to organize a new political party, were guests of this 
hotel, and in one of its rooms Salmon P. Chase and David N. White, then editor 
of the Gazette, met and decided to make a general call for a convention, look- 
ing to such an organization, which was accomplished; so, really, the birth- 
place of the Republican party was at this room within the Monongahela House. 



170 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Secretaries Edward M. Stanton, the Lovejoys and Horace Greeley stopped 
here, and the latter's scrawl of a signature can be found on its guest register 
today. In later years General U. S. Grant was a guest here, and in 1869, on his 
trip of September 14 and 15, being accompanied by his wife and two children, 
occupied the best rooms within this hotel, and upon being pressed to speak 
to the assembled throng, in his modest way merely came to the balcony and 
tipped his hat and smiled. He spent many hours in and about the office chat- 
ting with friends and admirers. Generals Sherman and Sheridan were also 
frequent guests. General Benjamin F. Butler was registered here when he 
came to Pittsburg to address the first reunion of the Civil war veterans, and 
a second time when in 1884 he was a presidential candidate. These, with 
such men as Hon. James G. Blaine, have all registered and been welcomed 
at the Monongahela House, and while all have passed from earthly scenes, 
the hotel has been improved and remodeled and is still the same — only much 
more modern and perfect — and is the headquarters for many great banquets 
and conventions of state and national character. It was here that in 1887 the 
National Bankers' Association met and for the first time got the proper con- 
ception of the great financial strength of Pittsburg and its giant banking in- 
stitutions. In the old banquet hall (which is now double the size) was held the 
National Convention of American Hardware Men in 1899, which brought to 
Pittsburg the leading men in this trade from all parts of the country, and at 
which was formulated plans, rules and phrases still employed in the hardware 
trade of America. A year later the Brickmakers' Association of the United 
States met within this hall of banqueting and formed their union. About the 
same date the leading coal producers met and transacted important business, 
bringing about the uniformity of scale prices in this country. The annual 
glass odiibit of America is held here, lasting many weeks and at which are 
displayed all the new designs in glassware to be sold by the wholesale trade 
the following year, prizes being offered for the finest specimen. Here the an- 
nual business meetings of great industries, such as iron, glass, coal, etc., are 
held, and the guests have the freedom of the house. The National Hotel Keep- 
ers' Association met here in May, 1888, in its ninth session. 

Since this hotel has undergone radical changes in its remodeling during the 
year 1907 it 'has come to be second to none in Greater Pittsburg. Its banquet 
hall is thirty feet wide by one hundred and sixty-eight feet long, and easily 
accommodates fully fifteen hundred persons. By the underwriters it is pro- 
nounced as near fireproof as it is possible to ci^nstruct a building. Besides, 
the cit\-* engine company has a station located near the rear of the hotel, and 
in case of emergency this could be brought into requisition, making the prop- 
erty absolutely safe. The ladies' parlors and ladies' and gentlemen's restau- 
rants on the first floor are models of exquisite taste and rare beauty, while 
the scenery along the river front, looking toward Mount Washington across 
the waters of the sweeping A^lonongahela, is indeed one of picturesque beauty. 
Tt matters not what state or city one chances to be in and talk of hotels the trav- 
eler always finds the popularity of the Monongahela House to be one and the 
same, and it is growing with the passing years. 

The property is now owned by D. F. Henry, who also owns the Hotel 
Henry, of Pittsburg. It has been recently remodeled and refurnished under 
the direction of the present manager, J. B. Kelley, a hotel man of much ex- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 171 



perience, who has made this noted old hostelry landmark a success in every 
particular and it ranks high among the best in Greater Pittsburg, sustaining the 
high reputation it has had for more than three score years. 



FRANCIS MORTIMER JOHNSTON, tax assessor for the Nineteenth 
ward of Pittsburg, was born December 4, 1843, i^^ Wilkins township, Allegheny 
county, a son of John Johnston and grandson of Charles Johnston, who was 
of Scotch-Irish stock and in 1795 emigrated to the United States. He settled 
first at what was known as the ''Neck," on the banks of the Monongahela river, 
where the Duquesne Steel Works are now situated. Pie became the father 
of one son, John. 

John Johnston, son of William Johnston, was brought to this country by 
his parents when a child, and on reaching manhood moved to the vicinity of 
WMlkinsburg, where he purchased land and engaged in farming. For many 
years he was the proprietor of a public house on the old Northern Pike, which 
in those days was the route traversed by the famous old Conestoga wagons. 
He became one of the prominent men of the township and county, and about 
1840 was elected county commissioner, having previously held other minor 
offices, among them that of school director. Politically he was a Democrat. 

John Johnston was twice married, his first wife being Margaret Long, by 
whom he had the following children: Charles Boyd, born January 21, 1815; 
James, born November 12, 1816; Matthew Long, born January 24, 1820; 
Rebecca Jane Carothers, born September 10, 1822; John McAfee, born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1824; Hannah Eliza, born February 14, 1826; William Kirkland, 
born August 20, 1828 ; Sarah Nancy, born October 31, 1831 ; and George, born 
February 5, 1834. The second wife of John Johnston was Anna Parkinson, 
whom he married in June, 1839, ^"^ who bore him two sons: Benjamin Hara, 
born July 28, 1840; and Francis Mortimer, of whom later. John Johnston, 
the father, lived to a ripe old age, passing away May 7, 1871. 

Francis Mortimer Johnston, son of John and Anna (Parkinson) Johns- 
ton, grew up in Wilkins township, receiving his education in the local schools. 
In youth and early manhood he assisted his father in the management of the 
homestead farm, becoming a skilled agriculturist. Later, upon the death of 
his father, he inherited the estate, which he cultivated until about 1887. In 
that year he sold the property and moved to East Liberty, Pittsburg, where 
he was for a few years engaged in the hardware business, after which he be- 
came associated in the capacity of treasurer with the Keystone Paint & Color 
Company. In 1902 he sold his interest in that concern and embarked in the 
real estate business. 

In 1904 he was appointed county ward assessor to finish an uncompleted 
term and speedily demonstrated his fitness for the office. When the board of 
assessment and revision of taxes was organized he was elected assessor for the 
Nineteenth ward of Pittsburg for a term of three years. In the sphere of pol- 
itics he staunchly supports the principles and interests of the Republican party. 
He is a member of the Sixth United Presbyterian church of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Johnston married Isabella J., daughter of Henry and Isabella (Pat- 
terson) Reiter, and they are the parents of two children, Sarah Isabella and 
Emma Roberta. 



172 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

REV. SAMUEL WESLEY DAVIS, a clergyman of the Methodist 
Episcopal denomination, and well known in the mission work among the for- 
eign population in the great coke regions of western Pennsylvania, was born 
November 9, 1839, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 

(I) John Davis, great-grandfather of Rev. Samuel W. Davis, was a 
resident of Bensalem township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, from whence, 
after several changes, he removed to Somerset county, Pennsylvania, near 
Salisbury where he died and was buried. He married Rebecca Davenport, 
September 24, 1769, and among their children were: Betsy, Benjamin, of 
whom later; John, a soldier of the war of 1812; William, a blacksmith in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania ; Reese ; Abner, went to Freeport, Ohio, and 
became a local Methodist preacher ; a daughter who married a Mr. Flick ; a 
daughter who married a Mr. Heaton ; Lorena, who married and moved to 
Chester countv, Pennsylvania ; Olivia, who also married and moved to Chester 
county. 

• (II) Benjamin Davis, second child and eldest son of John and Rebecca 
(Davenport) Davis, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, August 14, 1770. 
He was reared in that part of the country. He learned the trade of millwright 
and also conducted furnaces. He was married by the Rev. N. Greer, in Ches- 
ter county, Pennsylvania, to Elizabeth Barker, born April 15, 1774, daughter 
of Henry and Eleanor (Caldwell) Barker. Henry Barker was a resident of 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, was a captain in the Revolutionary war and 
served at the battle of Brandywine, and is buried at the Brandywine Manor 
meeting house. His wife, Eleanor (Caldwell) "Barker, was the daughter of 
Joseph Caldwell. Benjamin and Elizabeth (Barker) Davis were the parents 
of the following children: i. Rebecca, born December 22, 1800, married, July 
15, 1817, Matthew^ P. Brown, and their children were: Nancy J., born July 
25, 1818; Elizabeth, September 26, 1819; John W., November 4, 1821 ; Benja- 
min, March 7, 1823; Joseph, July 9, 1825; Ohvia, March 9, 1828; Henry, 
October 24, 1830; Rebecca, August 15, 1833; Mary K., November 11, 1835; 
W^illiam P., February. 4, 1837; Francis M., February 5, 1841. 2. Benjamin, 
born 1806, died in North Carolina, July 20, 1838. 3. Joseph B., of whom 
later. 4. John, born January 13, 1810. married (first) Catharine Shehee, chil- 
dren: George and INIargaret ; married (second) Margaret Brallier, children: 
Augustus C, a soldier in the Civil war ; Almira, Joseph, Elizabeth, Nora, Ellen 
and Jennie. 5. EHza, died young. 6. Nancy, died young. 

(Ill) Joseph B. Davis, second son of Benjamin Davis, was born in 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1808. He removed to Somerset 
county, where he engaged in farming and was a cattle merchant, sending stock 
over the mountains to eastern Pennsylvania. He owned land in Upper Turkey- 
Foot township, Somerset county, and was a prominent man in the community 
in which he resided. In the spring of 1861 he removed to Maryland, where he 
purchased a grazing farm near Oakland, Garrett county, whereon he resided 
up to his death, which occurred in Oakland, September 14, 1890. He was a 
devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a Whig and Repub- 
lican in politics. He married, June 5, 1830, Sarah McMillen, born October 4, 
1810, died November 28, 1905, at Oakland, Maryland, daughter of John and 
Nancy (Patrick) McMillen. John McMillen was born in Dauphin county. 
Pennsylvania, July 19, 1764. He located in Somerset county in 1790, was a 
prosperous farmer, a justice of the peace, and an official member of the Meth- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 173 



odist Episcopal church. He and his wife were the parents of children : John 
K., born May 26, 1795; James, December 19, 1798; Jane, December 30, 1800; 
Eleanor, July 23, 1802; William, December 24, 1804; Samuel E., November 
12, 1807; Sarah, October 4, 1810, mentioned above; Margaret, November 25, 
1813; Mary, April 15, 1820. John McA/Iillen died February i, 1856. and his 
wife March 25, 1854, aged seventy-seven years. The parents of Joseph B. and 
Sarah (McMillen) Davis were all professing Christians and members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Children of Mr. and Mrs. Davis: i. Ann, born 1831, married John 
Harned, had one son, Joseph, a pharmacist. 2. Simon, born October 4, 1832, 
died in childhood. 3. John M., born January 26, 1835, a merchant in Oakland, 
Maryland, a local Methodist preacher, and one of the founders of Mountain 
Lake Park, a noted Christian summer resort near Oakland. He married 
Eleanor Philson, of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and had children : Charles 
S., a merchant; William C, deceased, who was a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal church ; John Wesley, a merchant. 4. Elizabeth, born February 8, 
1837, died in childhood. 5. Samuel Wesley, of whom later. 6. Sarah Jane, 
married M. L. Scott, now deceased. 

(IV) Rev. Samuel Wesley Davis was reared in Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, and obtained his primary education at the common and select schools 
in that county, and received instruction in advanced studies from the Rev. 
T. H. Wilkenson. In 1856-57-58, during the regular school terms of four 
months, he served as teacher of adjacent public schools, and in 1859 was teacher 
for a term of five months in Bruceton, Preston county, Virginia. In 186 1 he 
was a student for two terms at Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsylvania. 
Favored with the instruction and influence of Christian parents and ministers 
of the gospel who were frequent visitors at his home, and impressed by the 
services of the sanctuary, he was converted in early youth and began to realize 
his call from God to the ministry. At the solicitation of the church he made 
application and July 19, 1862, received license as a local preacher in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. November 9, 1862, he became assistant of the Rev. 
Franklin Ball, preacher in charge of the Kingwood circuit, West Virginia 
conference, Methodist Episcopal church. In 1863 he became a member of the 
conference and was returned as junior to the same circuit with the Rev. Ash- 
ford Hall as preacher in charge. The circuit included Kingwood, the county 
seat, and other appointments, seventeen in all, which were increased to twenty, 
and during this period there were two hundred and seventy-five additions to 
the membership. 

His next appointment was in Marshall county. West Virginia, among the 
hills at Fish Creek. After one year at that place he was sent to Weston, 
county seat of Lewis county, and after two years was removed to Clarksburg, 
county seat of Harrison county, West Virginia. He remained there three 
years and was appointed at Wheeling, West Virginia, and stationed at the 
Thomson church. Wheeling Island. He was next transferred to the Pittsburg 
conference and stationed at Myersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. In 
the economy of the church after three years he was transferred and made 
pastor of the congregation in Uniontown. At the close of the pastoral term 
in Uniontown, in "1878, he accompanied Mr. E. J. Stone, his father-in-law, and 
sons, J. T. and E. L. Stone, and J. C. Thomas in a seven-months' tour in the 
east, which included various countries of Europe, also Egypt and the Holy 



174 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Land. His next charge was Bellevernon, in Fayette county, then Mount 
Pleasant, in Westmoreland county. Succeeding these he was pastor for two 
years at Homestead, five years at the Coursin Street appointment, McKeesport. 
two years at the Walton church, Pittsburg, and two years at the Jefferson 
Avenue church in Washington, Pennsylvania. 

He was then assigned to the Coke Mission in the interest of the foreign 
population in the coke regions of western Pennsylvania, of which he has been 
successful as pastor and superintendent for the last thirteen years. Property 
for the Mission was purchased in ]\Iount Pleasant, Westmoreland county, 
March 28, 1900, at a cost of $2,500. The building is a substantial brick of two 
stories, containing four large rooms. The location of this property is most 
favorable, on a fine elevation on a thoroughfare, near the railroad depots and 
adjacent to the Standard Coke Works. One room on the first floor is occupied 
by Mrs. Anna Xavratil, the first Bohemian convert, with her son and grandson, 
and her four orphan grandchildren, and thus under the care of this intelligent 
and worthy Christian woman there is already the germ of a self-supporting 
orphanage, suggesting an institution which in that place would surely accom- 
plish great and lasting good. Another room, tastefully decorated, seated with 
chairs and supplied with a vocalion by Andrew Carnegie, is devoted to public 
worship. It has an increasing and spiritual membership, and with more than 
one hundred adherents among adult men and women foreign born. The 
Sunday-school, organized in August, 1898, with an attendance now of one 
hundred, largely Bohemian, Slav and Polish, the girl's sewing school, devoted 
also to religious instruction, the Saturday Evening Bible class, and the class 
on Monday evening for instruction by the pastor, are all well provided for. It 
is free from debt. A comfortable parsonage also has been provided in the 
same locality and is the residence of the Bohemian pastor, Joseph Donat. A 
Home for Alissionaries and young women of foreign nationality in training 
for mission work is located in Uniontown, county seat of Fayette county. It 
was purchased October 13, 1906, for $5,500, A. J. Cochran contributing $500, 
Mrs. Sarah B. Cochran $500, and A. Gaddis $150, after which Lloyd G. 
McCrum assumed the mortgage indebtedness of $4,000. 

In spite of his advancing years and arduous labors during forty-five years, 
Rev. Mr. Davis is still earnestly at work and enjoys the prosecution of his 
noble Christian undertaking, saving the foreigners. During his terms of 
pastoral service churches have been erected in Clarksburg and Wheeling, West 
Virginia, and in Myersdale, Ursina, Uniontown, McKeesport and in Several 
other towns in the coke region in Pennsylvania. The self-sacrificing labors of 
this truly noble man have extended over nearly half a century, and the influ- 
ence for good cannot be estimated this side of the eternal world. 

Mr. Davis married, March 12, 1872, Mary C. Stone, daughter of E. J. and 
Elizabeth C. (Thomas) Stone, of Wheeling, West Virginia. They have been 
blessed with the following children: Anna May, who died young; Alfred 
Cookman, an official of the Pennsylvania railroad lines west of Pittsburg; 
Elizabeth Stone, a home missionary; James Edward, died young; Wilbur M., 
died young ; Mary Eleanor ; Sarah Blanche. 



JAMES HORNER, who has the distinction of being the oldest living 
inhabitant of the borough of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, was born there April 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 175 

I, 1833, in a house then standing on the present site of the First National 
Bank. This was the first frame house in the borough, which was at that time 
called McNairstown, after a great-uncle of Mr. Horner's mother, Colonel 
Dumming McNair, a member of the state senate, and at one time a candidate 
for congress. 

(I) The first Horner of which there seems to be any authentic account 
is James Horner, born in Allen township, Northampton county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1710, and died 1793. He married Jean Kerr, born in 1713 and died in 
1763, being killed by the Indians at the Craig settlement during the Selon 
massacre, and is buried in the Allen township burying ground. She was the 
first white woman killed in the settlement. 

James Horner was a member of Captain Bennett's company of Northamp- 
ton Light Dragoons in 1777, and fought in the Revolutionary war. Subse- 
quently he is mentioned as judge of the county, in 1782. His children were: 
James, the grandfather of the subject of this memoir; John; Hugh; and a 
daughter who married into the McNair family. 

(H) James Horner, son of James and Jean (Kerr) Horner, was born in 
Allen township, Northampton county, Pennsylvania, June 4, 1759. The 
Horner family are of Scotch-Irish ancestry, the first member, it is believed, 
having come to x\merica in 1706, landing at Chester, Delaware county, Penn- 
sylvania, and soon settled in Allen township, Northampton county of the same 
state. When nineteen years of age, James Horner went into the Revolution- 
ary service, and was made captain of the Mountain Rangers, serving from 
1778 to 1783. In 1786 he came to Pittsburg and became a justice of the peace 
for Allegheny county. Upon coming to Pittsburg he bought, for the sum of 
sixty guineas, a piece of property on Market street, extending along it from 
Second avenue to Third avenue for a distance of three hundred feet. This 
property today (1907), is worth a fabulous sum of money. Here pioneer 
Horner erected buildings and carried on a large tannery and harness-making 
establishment. This land was inherited by his children and subsequently sold. 
He retired from active business pursuits and moved to Wilkinsburg, where 
he purchased a tract of three hundred acres of land, situated on the Franks- 
town road, and on which land he built a substantial residence, and there re- 
mained with his family until 1800, when he removed to what is now the 
borough of Wilkinsburg, and there erected him a new house, the same being 
the first frame structure in the vicinity. It was situated on what is now the 
corner of Wood street and Penn avenue. The old homestead house on Frank- 
lin road stood until 1907, when it was demolished to make way for modern 
improvements. 

In this connection may be related an incident showing the supreme gen- 
erosity of Mr. Horner's character. Like many another land owner at that 
time he owned slaves — fifteen in all — one of whom, a big negro named "Jack." 
who had long been a faithful and trusted servant, and used to carry the farm 
produce to market to Pittsburg, was coveted by one of Mr. Horner's neigh- 
bors, a large land owner. Lie tried in many ways to entice him away from 
his master, and finally ofifered the large sum of seven hundred dollars to pur- 
chase him outright. When Mr. Horner found the negro wished to leave him 
he refused to sell him. saying he would rather not "traffic in human flesh," 
and gave him his freedom. The deed of his emancipation is now in the 
possession of his grandson, James Horner, of this sketch. The good slave 



176 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

did not enjoy his freedom long, however, for he was soon found dead and 
hidden in a dump of trees on an adjoining estate. His would-be purchaser 
was charged with the murder, but escaped from justice by removing from 
the country, but subsequently returned, not until the death of Squire Horner, 
however, which occurred May 20, 1824. 

Mr. Horner married Mary McNair, born in Cumberland county, Penn- 
sylvania, Tune 13, 1770, and died in Wilkinsburg September 16, 1818. She 
was the daughter of David and Annie (Dunning) McNair. Annie Dunning 
was 'a daughter of Colonel Robert Dunning, who was colonel of the Second 
Regiment in 1747-48, during the French and Indian war. He died in Cum- 
bertand August i, 1750. James and Alary (McXair) Horner w^ere the 
parents of the following children: i. David, unmarried. 2. John, of whom 
further mention is made. 3. Dr. James D. 4. Jane AlcCrea. 5. Sarah, wife 
of James Kellv. 6. Ann, who married William Davis, 

(HI) John Horner, second son of James and Mary (McNair) Horner, 
was born at the old family homestead on Frankstown road in 1793. He 
obtained his elementary education at home and later attended college at 
Washington and Canonsburg. Flaving completed his studies he learned the 
druggists business, and in 1820 engaged in business with Thomas Cleland. 
They conducted a store in a log cabin at the corner of Market and Third 
avenue, in Pittsburg. Here they continued to operate for a number of years. 
Later he engaged in the lime business, employing four four-horse teams to 
haul lime to the Pittsburg market. Upon his giving up the drug business he 
removed to Wilkinsburg and occupied the old homestead, his father then 
being deceased. In 1840 he was elected justice of the peace, which office, then 
one of much importance, he held for about fifteen years. In 1853 he was 
elected clerk of the courts of Allegheny county, in w^hich capacity, he served 
for two terms, being succeeded by General Thomas Rowley. About this date 
his health began to fail him and he was compelled to retire from all active 
labors, public and official. He possessed many sterling qualities of head and 
heart ; w^as the soul of integrity and zealous in every enterprise for the better- 
ment of society. In politics he was an uncompromising Republican. He died 
in 1867, aged' seventy-four years. June 7, 1832, he had married Mary M. 
Davis, born December 12, 1806, at Pittsburg, and died February 9, 1887. She 
was the daughter of John and Mary (McGonigal) Davis. Her father was 
born at Tinicum, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1764, and died at 
Meadville, February 27, 1839. Mary AIcGonigal was born at C^arlisle, Penn- 
sylvania, April 23, 1771, and died at Pittsburg in 1818. The children born 
to John and Mary (Davis) Horner, were as follows: i. James. 2. John 
Davis. 3. William Henry, who died young. 4. George Kennedy, died young. 
5. Mary G., died young. 6. Matilda Graham, unmarried. 7. Ellen McGon- 
igal, wife of John McKelvy. 8. Eliza McNair, who married Franklin M. 
Gordon, now deceased. 

Franklin M. Gordon, deceased husband of Eliza McNair (Horner) Gor- 
don, was born at Baltimore, JMaryland, about 1837, son of John and Maria 
Gordon. When a mere child he accompanied his parents to Pittsburg, w^here 
he w^as reared and educated. At the age of fifteen years he was employed as 
a clerk in a store in Pittsburg, and w4ien he reached his twentieth year was a 
partner in the same business house. Subsequently he engaged in the insurance 
business, and still later was tendered and finally accepted the position of cashier 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 177 



in the People's National Bank, which office he held with much credit for a 
term of eighteen years, and to the time of his death in 1883. He was a highly 
successful business man and at the date of his death was the owner of a fine 
home situated upon a charming fifteen-acre plot of ground near Swissvale. Mr. 
Gordon married Miss Eliza McNair Horner. 

(IV) James Horner, the eldest child of John and Mary M. (Davis) 
Horner, born April i, 1833, was reared in the borough of Wilkinsburg where 
he obtained his education in the first school house provided in the borough ; 
this house stood at the corner of Wallace and Center streets. Later he at- 
tended the Allegheny College at Meadville, Pennsylvania, the period being 
from 185 1 to 1853, inclusive. After completing his studies he acted as clerk 
for his father, who then was holding public office. In 1856 he went west and 
engaged in a general merchandising business in Minnesota, at the thriving 
city of St. Peter. In 1858, however, he returned to his native state for the 
purpose of marrying, after which he with his bride went back to Minnesota. 
While residing in that state he was elected and served three terms as county 
treasurer for Nicholas county. At the time of the great Sioux Indian up- 
rising and massacre in that part of Minnesota, in the month of August, 1862, 
Mr. Horner served well the part of a citizen-soldier in defending the little 
inland town of New Ulm, which was completely surrounded by the blood- 
thirsty Sioux. Four years later, in 1866, he returned to Pennsylvania and 
conducted an extensive mercantile business until 1898, when owing to ill 
health he retired from all active work. While his store was located in the 
city of Pittsburg, he continued to hold his residence at Wilkinsburg, of which 
borough in 1899 he was elected burgess, serving three years. 

He married Margaret S., daughter of John and Salome (Atkinson) Mc- 
Farland, of Meadsville, Pennsylvania. The issue by this marriage is: i. 

John McFarland, married to Minnie — . 2. Frank Kennedy, who 

died young. 3. Georgia Davis, who now resides with her parents, on Hill 
avenue, Wilkinsburg. 

Mrs. Horner's grandmother, Margaret Foster Stewart, made the flag that 
floated proudly from the masthead of Commodore Perry's flagship at the naval 
battle of Lake Erie. 



CHARLES A. MANNING, a retired hotel keeper of Pittsburg, was 
born in this citv, in what was then called Pitt township, on the Fourth street 
road, now Fifth avenue, March 13, 1840, son of William and Jane (Clair) 
Manning. The father was born in county Clare, Ireland, and emigrated to 
this country in 1837, settling in Pittsburg. By trade he was a nail-maker and 
forged the nails by hand. He continued this work many years. He com- 
menced with a Mr. Craig on Wood street. In the fifties he engaged in the 
grocery trade on Webster street, where he carried on a successful business 
until 1869, when he retired. The date of his birth was 1805 and of his death, 
1877. He married Miss Jane Clair, bv whom was born the following children : 

1. William, who married and had three sons— Albert, Charles and William. 

2. Charles A., subject. 3. James, who married Miss Downs and they had — 
Thomas. 4. Albert. 5. James. 6. Jennie. 

Charles A. Manning, second child of William and Jane (Clair Manning), 
began the active duties of life when a mere youth by working around a brick- 



178 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

yard, but as soon as he had the opportunity he learned the trade of a stove- 
plate moulder, continuing in such work until 1867, when he engaged in the 
oyster business, which he carried on with great success until 1875, when he 
opened the hotel known far and near as the Manning House, which he con- 
ducted in a successful manner and by which he was enabled to retire from 
active work in 1881, when he sold his hotel for a good figure. 

In politics he is an Independent and has served on both the common and 
select councils of the city of Pittsburg and is one of the charter members of 
East End Republican Club. In church faith Mr. Manning adheres to that of 
the Catholic faith. 

He was united in marriage in 1866 to Miss Maria Cuhn, by whom one 
son was born — Charles Allinder, deceased. 



GEORGE HENRY STOEBENER, the oldest retail shoe merchant in 
East Liberty, and one of the oldest in the City of Pittsburg, was born in Alle- 
gheny City September 8. 1853, a son of Henry and Annie C. (Miller) Stoe- 
bener. He comes of sturdy German ancestry. His grandfather, George 
Stoebener, came from the Eatherland in 1839 and settled at Pittsburg, where 
he engaged in the cabinet making business. Prior to the organization of the 
Pittsburg police force he served as night watchman for a time. He married 
and hadthree children: Henry, George, and a daughter who married- a Mr. 
Kreuder. both of whom are now deceased. 

Henrv Stoebener, the father, was a shoemaker, and was in the employ 
of Mr. Schmertz for some years, and was his foreman at his shoe store at No. 
505 Penn avenue. He later opened a shoe store of his own at No. 501 Penn 
avenue. In 1873, foreseeing the rapid growth of East End, he removed his 
business to No. 6222 Frankstown avenue, East Liberty, where the business is 
still conducted by his son, George Henry Stoebener, the subject of this notice. 
Henry Stoebener was a member of the Masonic fraternity and a Knight 
Templar. 

He married Annie C. Miller, by whom was born the following children: 
William, who lives on a farm near Tarentum, Pennsylvania; Emma F. and 
Anna M. (twins), and George Henry, mention of whom follows. 

George Henry Stoebener was educated at the public schools of Pittsburg, 
to which place his parents removed from Allegheny City soon after his birth. 
He also had good private instruction. He intended to gain a liberal education 
and entered the Western University of Pennsylvania, but on account of de- 
fective eyesight did not complete his studies. After leaving school he engaged 
in the shoe "business with his father, and in 1876 took entire charge of the 
business, which he is still successfully operating. 

January i, 1877, he was married to Miss Flora May, daughter of William 
and Rebecca Robinson, of Pittsburg. Their children are as follows : i. Henry 
William. 2. George Viock. 3. Edna Florence. 4. Dorothy Margaret. His 
two sons are associated with him in his business. 



IRVIN REDPATH, a retired business man and capitalist of Greater 
Pittsburg, was born June 20, 1827, on a farm near Gerty's Run, in what is 
now a part of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, son of Thomas ,and Jane 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 179 

(Woods) Redpath. His father, Thomas Redpath, was born in Ireland March 
6, 1789, and emigrated to America in 181 2, just at the outbreak of the war 
with England. The first work he obtained was helping to build the fortifica- 
tions which were then being erected for the defense of New York harbor. 
From New York he moved to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. As that was before 
there was any means of travel otherwise he walked the entire distance from 
New York to Pittsburg, and being a man of great strength he did not seem 
fatigued at the journey. He soon found employment in a grocery store, where 
he remained some time and saved enough from his earnings to engage in 
business for himself, which he did, and eventually owned two stores on Dia- 
mond street, where he handled large stocks of both dry goods and groceries. 

Soon after coming to Pittsburg he married Miss Jane Woods. By this 
union were born the following children: i. Robert, unmarried. 2. Ann Jane, 
married George Lee, and they reared a large family of children. 3. Thomas, 
Jr., who married Margaret Whitesides, and they have two daughters. 4. 
William, married Annie Fetter. 5. John W., married Annie Fullerton. 6. 
Irvin, the subject. 7. George, who died young. 8. Henry-Homer, married 
Sarah Marshall. 9. Lucinda Frances, who married John Kennedy, whose son 
is John R. Kennedy. The father died in 1867 and the mother in 1875. 

Irvin Redpath, subject, the sixth child in his parents* family, was reared 
in Pittsburg, receiving such education as was then obtainable, and when young 
went to work with his father in the store, where he continued for twenty vears. 
After this he led somewhat of an adventurous life. He went to CaHfornia 
when that country was yet in an unsettled condition. He joined a filibustering 
expedition, headed for Southern California, under the leadership of Colonel 
Walker, and went through many hair-breadth escapes and dangers untold. 
Much of the time they met with great hardship, especially for the lack of food 
— at times almost starving. On returning to Los Angeles he went in the butch- 
ering business. He was also deputy sherifi^. After a varied and, on the whole, 
a successful sojourn in the far west, he returned to his native state. While 
en route and at Philadelphia he was taken ill with that dread disease — cholera 
— but recovered after a mild attack. After he had finally gotten settled in 
Pittsburg, he engaged in the paper hanging and painting business, but not 
long after this he believed he saw a more rapid way to accumulate wealth and 
went into the diamond trade, in which he achieved great success. This, to- 
gether with more recent real estate dealings, has made him one of the foremost 
men of means in East Liberty. 

Mr. Redpath married his cousin. Miss Jane Woods, a daughter of WilHam 
Woods and wife. She was born January 14, 1829. and died March 15. 1897. 
By this union the following children were born : William Thomas, born March 
13, 1846; Henry Homer, born May 30, 1847; Lucinda Jane and Emma (twins), 
born December 3. 1848, died February 23, 1849. ^"d April 2y, 1850, re- 
spectively; Alice, born June 22, 1850, married Frederick Fisher and they have 
three children: Harry-Irvin (who is married and has one child), Howard 
and Winfield Scott. The youngest of Mr. Redpath's children was Lucinda 
F., who died April 4, 1853. 



JOSEPH Gx\NSTER, one of the oldest surviving hotel men of the city 
of Pittsburg, was born in Loraine, Germany, which was formerly a French 



i8o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



province, December 13, 181 7, and emigrating to this country, came direct to 
Pittsburg in 1838, at the age of twenty years. His first employment in this 
country was in a blacksmith's shop. He continued to follow the blacksmith's 
trade until 1847, when he opened a hotel in East Liberty, Allegheny county, 
called the "Johnson House." After remaining there one year he returned to 
Pittsburg and established himself in the hotel business on grounds where now 
stands the Pennsylvania station, and there continued until 1851, when he again 
opened a hotel on Penn avenue, East Liberty. In 1862 he purchased a piece of 
property situated on Penn and Frankston avenues, which in 1881 he sold for 
twenty-eight thousand dollars, and then retired from active business operations. 
Mr. Ganster was married in 1847 in Pittsburg and became the father of 
the following children: i. Nicholas. 2. John. 3. Peter. 4. Harry. 5. 
Lilly. 

CARL W. HENRY SCHWEITZER, PH. G., who is engaged in the 
retail drug business on Hamilton avenue, Pittsburg, was born in Pittsburg, 
November 2, 1882, being a son of Henry and Emilie (Hess) Schweitzer, of 
New Castle. He obtained his education in the public and high schools in this 
city, graduating from the former at the age of thirteen, and completed his 
academical and commercial courses at the Western University of Pennsylvania, 
from which institution he graduated as a pharmacist in 1905, at the age of 
twenty-two. His parents were humbly fixed and he worked his way through 
the college. He is a member of the Knights of Maccabees, Iron City Lodge 
No. 279, holding a high office in the same. In June, 1905, he was united in 
marriage to Agnes M. Geyer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George E. Geyer, of 
Elysian avenue, East End, Pittsburg. 

Mrs. Schweitzer's father, Henry Brandt Schweitzer, was born in New 
Castle, Pennsylvania, April 20, 1859, and came to Pittsburg in 1879, engaging 
in the drug business. In 1880 he was married to Emilie Hess, of New Castle, 
by which union were born the following children: i. Floyd L., born Novem- 
ber 21, 1888. 2. Ethel Catherine, born September 6, 1894. The father died 
at Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania, June 8, 1906. At one time he owned 
three stores, of which one is now owned by his son William. In 1903 William 
purchased the remaining store and the partnership of Hess & Schweitzer was 
formed and continued with success for two years. In November, 1905, he 
purchased the remaining portion of his partner and conducted it under his 
father's and own management until the death of his father in 1906. He has 
held several good positions, one as purchasing agent for Cruikshank Brothers 
Company, dealers in preserves and pickles, one of the largest firms in this part 
of the state. He left them to engage in the drug business. By faith he is a 
Lutheran, taking his letter at the age of fourteen. His father-in-law is a Ma- 
son, ranking among the foremost in this part of the state. Mr. Schweitzer has 
traveled a great deal, having visited the greater part of his own country and 
Canada. 

REV. MATHISON JAMES MONTGOMERY. The late Rev. Math- 
ison James Montgomery, who for nearly half a century ministered to Methodist 
Episcopal churches in Pittsburg and its vicinity, was born October 31, 1825, 
in county Tyrone, Ireland, son of William Montgomery and grandson of John 
Montgomery. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE i8i 



William Montgomery, son of John Montgomery, came in 1829 to the 
United States, settling in Armstrong county, where he acquired land near 
Manorville, and became one of the prominent farmers of the county. William 
Montgomery married, in Ireland, Mary Breden, and among their children 
were the following: William, deceased, married, second, Neil Beissinger; 
Hugh, died unmarried ; Thomas, deceased, married Mary Shumaker, children, 
Ellis, a physician of the East End, Ida, Lulu and Sarah ; Elizabeth, deceased, 
wife of John McLaughlin, children, John, William, Jennie, Mary; Mary, died 
unmarried ; and Mathison James, of whom later. 

Mathison James Montgomery, son of William and Mary (Breden) Mont- 
gomery, was brought up in Armstrong county, receiving his education- in the 
local schools. Later he studied for the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and for more than forty years was a preacher of the gospel, having 
various charges in the Pittsburg Conference. For three years he was pastor 
of the Methodist Episcopal church of Wilkinsburg,. and the last ten years of 
his life were passed in that borough, in the welfare and advancement of which 
he always took an active interest. 

Mr. Montgomery married Anna, daughter of Henry and Christianna 
(Heater) Kinter, of Indiana county, Pennsylvania, and granddaughter of John 
Kinter, a soldier of the Revolution and captain in the war of 1812. Mr. and 
Mrs. Montgomery were the parents of the following children : William Henry, 
physician, married Lola Owens, children, Mathison James and Emma Louise ; 
Bertie, died in childhood; Edward J., physician; Charles Thomas, married 
Mary Ludwick, of Wilkinsburg, children, Jane, Charles Thomas and Richard ; 
Anna; Mary, died in infancy; Martha Louise ; and Lillie Walter. 

Mr. Montgomerv died August 13, 1900, leaving the memory of a useful 
and self-sacrificing life. He. was an eloquent and gifted preacher, beloved by 
his congregation and sincerely respected by his fellow citizens. 

TAMES C. GROGAN, prominent in the commercial circles of Pittsburg, 
was born T"ne 8, 1852, in that city, which has been and still is his home and 
the scene of his business activities. 

His father, Thomas Grogan, was born near Dublin, Ireland, and after re- 
ceiving his education learned the blacksmiths' trade. He came to the United 
States, settling first in the east and subsequently removing to Pittsburg, where 
he lived an industrious and honorable life. He purchased a beautiful farm in 
Ohio, with the intention of making it his home, but never moved from Pitts- 
burg, He was a Democrat in politics, and an active member of St. Patrick's 
Roman Catholic church. He married, in his native land, Mary Collins, and 
they became the parents of eight children. Mr. Grogan at the time of his death 
was about fifty-eight vears of age. ^ „. ^ ^ . , 

James C. Grogan, son of Thomas and Mary (Collms) Grogan, received 
his education in parochial schools and in the high school, which was then 
conducted by the Roman Catholic church. He began his business career by 
entering the service of Henrv Richardson & Co., jewelers, with whom he ac- 
quired a thorough knowledge of the business in all its branches, mechanical 
and manao-eriar In the course of time Mr. Richardson died, and the firm 
became L." Mcintosh & Co., under whom Mr. Grogan still held the position 
for which his assiduity and ability had well fitted him. 



i82 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



In 1878, upon the death of Mr. Mcintosh, Mr. Grogan formed a partner- 
ship with A. Merz, which continued until 1886, when Mr. Grogan purchased 
his partner's interest and continued the business alone until 1892. In that 
year Mr. Grogan, associating with himself a number who had been among his 
employes, organized a company which was incorporated under the laws of 
the state of Pennsylvania, under the corporate title of J. C. Grogan & Co., with 
Mr. Grogan as president and manager. Since this organization was eitected 
the company has conducted the most extensive high class jewelry establish- 
ment in the state, and enjoys a peculiarly local prestige as probably the oldest 
house in its line in the city, tracing its history for a period of upwards of 
eighty years, and its success in recent days is acknowledgedly due in largest 
degree to the executive ability, as well as the practical qualifications, of Mr. 
Grogan, whose name is widely known and who is recognized as having con- 
tributed to a degree not to be estimated to the building up of the jewelry busi- 
ness in the country at large. The products of his house are known through- 
out the entire country, and are only of the highest types of the manufactur- 
ers' art. 

Mr. Grogan is the owner of a large tract of land in the Nineteenth ward, 
and upon which he built in 1880 his present residence. He is a member of St. 
Paul's Roman Catholic church and a liberal contributor to its support, as well 
as to many other worthy causes. 

He married ]\Iarie Juana, daughter of John and Rose (Gallen) Herry- 
man. Mrs. Grogan is a native of Cuba and of Spanish extraction. 



WILLIAM J. BAUGHMAN, deceased, was a well-known and enterpris- 
ing business man of .Pittsburg, and at his death was an extensive dealer in 
builders' supplies. He was a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
born in 183 1. His father, Peter Baughman, was a farmer and distiller in that 
county, and married Elizabeth Lenhart. They were both of Pennsylvania 
German stock, and came from one of the eastern counties of Pennsylvania. 
Their children were: i. Katherine. 2. William J. (subject). 3. Nathaniel. 
4. Isabella. 5. Sarah. 6. Annie. 7. Margaret. 8. Hiram. 9. Mary. 

William J. Baughman, after receiving what education he could in the 
schools of his county, w-as employed first as a driver on one of the Conestoga 
wagons and subsequently took a position at Pittsburg with one of the firms 
engaged in the lime business. In 1857 he embarked in the same line of business 
on his own account, being assisted by his wafe until his death, when she carried 
it on successfully until 1901, when she disposed of it. The date of Mr. Baugh- 
man's death was December 22, 1887. 

He married Miss Ann, daughter of John and Mary (Matthews) Mills, 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. John Mills was born in Buckinghamshire, England, 
and came to America in 1830, settling at Pittsburg. For many years he was 
engaged in the brick business, and after the great fire of 1845 furnished the 
brick for the rebuilding of the city, including the Monongahela House and 
many other large structures. In 1848 he removed to East Liberty, continuing 
the business at Dallas. While the Pennsylvania railroad was building its lines 
into Pittsburg he furnished the brick for the construction of the tunnels. In 
1871 he retired from all active business, and at his death in 1892 was the owner 
of considerable real estate in East Liberty. He was a man possessed of 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 183 

sterling qualities, "his word being as good as his bond." His wife, Mary, died 
in i860; by her he had two daughters and one son. The issue was as follows: 
I. Eliza, deceased, who married William Glew and had six children: William, 
Mary, Jennie, Martha, Thomas and Ida. 2. Ann. 3. John, died July 8, 1907, 
who married Nellie Mason, and they were the parents of Cora, married to 
Joseph Letzkiss ; Thomas and Charles. 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Baughman were the parents of the following 
children: i. Charles E., married Jennie Gash, whose daughter is Jeannette, 
and they live in Chicago. 2. Mary E., deceased, married C. E. Smith, and had 
issue: Charles, Anna M., Clara M., William, Cora and Virginia. 3. Ger- 
trude I., unmarried. 4. Clara E., deceased. 5. William O., married Nellie 
Cunningham. 6. Cora M., married Floyd L. House, and the issue by their 
union is Guy B., Harry A., Melvin, Curtis, Jeannette and Charles. 7. John 
M., single. 8. Augustus A., married Mrs. Fagan, by whom was born one child, 
Ann Mills. 9. Stuart M., single. 10. Roland H., single. 11. George. 

THE BIGHAM FAMILY. A notable character in the public life of 
Pittsburg, who with voice and pen was always active in the promotion and 
encouragement of any and every movement tending to develop the higher life 
or advance the material interests of the community, was the Hon. Thomas 
James Bigham, born near historic Hannastown, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, at the residence of his grandfather, James Christy, February 12, 1810. 
His parents, Thomas Bigham, born April 18, 1784, died October 31, 1809, 
and Sarah Christy, born October 27, 1785, died August 6, 181 1, who were 
married April 4, 1809, were farming people of Scotch-Irish ancestry and Rev- 
olutionary stock on both sides. 

The name of Bigham is a corruption or changed form of Bingham, and 
as far as known the Binghams and Bighams in this country are derived from 
the same north of Ireland family and supposed to be descendants of Sir John 
de Bingham, who came over with William the Conqueror, was knighted for 
his valiant services and allotted estates near Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. 
One of these Binghams (Thomas), according to tradition, about 1480 emi- 
grated from Sheffield to the north of Ireland, and there founded that branch 
of the family which seems so fully represented in this country. Be that as it 
may, the subject of this sketch, upon comparison of family histories, consid- 
ered himself akin to the Binghams of Philadelphia and Ohio, the Bighams of 
Adams and Mercer counties, Pennsylvania, and many other Bighams and 
Binghams throughout the country. 

His father having died before his birth and his mother so soon thereafter, 
Thomas J. Bigham was brought up by his maternal grandparents and went 
through the experiences common to farmers' boys at that period, without any 
educational advantages save the short-term country district school in the win- 
ter, and the long, all-day Sunday preaching which the Covenanters of that day 
so thoroughly appreciated. Naturally bright, ambitious, and possessed of an 
unusually retentive memory, he read everything that came within his reach, 
and what he read or heard rarely passed from his memory, so that he soon 
became locally noted for his fund of information and his ability in recital. His 
one great desire was a college education, and feeling himself qualified he en- 
deavored, before reaching his majority, to induce his grandfather to use for 



i84 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

this purpose a small sum of money left by his father, but without result, as the 
grandfather, a good, sensible man, considered the money much better expended 
m setting him up at farming, and absolutely refused to squander it upon edu- 
cation. Upon coming of age, however, he took his little patrimony, which, 
added to what he was able to earn by working during vacations, tutoring, etc., 
proved sufficient to carry him through a full course at Jefferson College, Can- 
onsburg, where he graduated with honors in the class of 1834. During his 
course at college he distinguished himself by a readiness of speech, quickness 
of wit, power of repartee, earnestness of purpose, and fund of general infor- 
mation which led to his frequently being called upon to uphold the honors of 
his college in debate, and in the course of events being dubbed "Thomas Jef- 
ferson Bigham," a sobriquet which stuck to him during life, and is supposed 
by a majority of his associates to have been his proper name. After gradua- 
tion he taught school at Harrisburg for a year, during the winter delivering 
a course of lectures upon scientific subjects. The following year he came to 
Pittsburg, where he continued to teach and lecture, and at the same time took 
up the study of law, was admitted to the Allegheny county bar, September 4, 
1837, and became associated in practice with Judges Veach and Baird, old 
time lawyers of distinction, later with W. O. Leslie, as Bigham and Leslie, 
and about 1870 with his oldest son, Joel L. Bigham, as T. J. Bigham and Son. 
In the disastrous fire of April 10, 1845, both office and lodgings were de- 
stroyed, and he lost his entire office furnishings, library of law, scientific and 
general works, notes, papers and memoranda. 

December 30, 1846, he married Maria Louisa Lewis, daughter of Dr. 
Joel Lewis, a member of one of the oldest and most prominent families of the 
state, and in 1849 '^uilt a substantial residence upon a wooded knoll on his 
wife's property on Mt. Washington, south of the city, where the family have 
resided ever since. Mrs. Bigham was a granddaughter of Major Abraham 
Kirkpatrick, a Virginia officer in the Revolutionary army, who was paymaster 
at Fort Pitt, located here permanently at the close of the war, and with Gen. 
John Neville, his brother-in-law, was a conspicuous figure in upholding federal 
authority during the so-called "Whiskey Insurrection" of 1794. Major Kirk- 
patrick purchased in March, 1794, from John Penn, Jr., and John Penn, heirs 
of William Penn, farms 10 and 11 in the Manor of Pittsburg, south of the 
Monongahela river, containing seven hundred and fourteen acres and com- 
prising the territory known locally as Mt. Washington and Duquesne Heights. 
After his death this property was divided among his three children, Eliza M., 
wife of Christopher Cowan, taking the easterly portion, Amelia L., wife of 
Judge Charles Shaler, the westerly portion, and Mary Ann, wife of Dr. Joel 
Lewis, the middle part, which subsequently was divided between her children, 
Abraham Kirkpatrick Lewis, who died November 10, i860, and Maria L. 
Lewis, later Mrs. Bigham. 

Mrs. Bigham was distinguished for her charm of manner, warm impulses, 
strong religious convictions and life-long efforts to uplift and improve the 
moral, intellectual and spiritual tone of all within the sphere of her influence. 
Her work among the young, in the various ladies' societies, the Sanitary Com- 
mission during the war, Grace church and Sunday-school, and in the estab- 
lishment and management of the Mt. Washington Free Library and Reading 
Room Association, which resulted finally in its place being taken by a Branch 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 185 



Carnegie Library, will not soon be forgotten by the community in which and 
for which she lived and labored. 

Mr. Bigham was prominent in the political affairs of the state, even more 
than he was as a lawyer, and soon became one of the most widely known citi- 
zens of Pittsburg. He had too much taste and aptitude for public affairs to 
be content in the narrower w^alks of professional life. His strong voice and 
clear annunciation made him easily heard, and his well-stored mind, genius for 
statistics, power of repartee, ready wit, unfailing good humor and sunshiny 
disposition added much to his popularity as an off-hand speaker, and brought 
him into constant demand at all public gatherings, where his presence, his 
voice, and his utterances combined to render him prominent among the men 
of his day and made him a leader in political affairs. His wonderfully retentive 
memory enabled him to carry and recall the history of political, financial and 
industrial affairs so readily that he earned the sobriquets "Old Statistics" and 
the "Sage of Mount Washington." Frequently he was compared to famous 
"Bill" Allen of Ohio, on account of his vocal powers. For so many years was 
he called upon to read the returns election nights to the crowds at Republican 
headquarters that he came to be regarded as one of the features of an elec- 
tion, and it was difficult for any one else to hold the stage. His announce- 
ments of returns w^ere always accompanied by a running fire of comments and 
comparisons from memory with former figures which gave a very fair idea 
of the trend of results. So earnest and emotional did he become that his very 
appearance, as he came forward with each report, would indicate its nature 
before it was read, and the crowd would take the cue accordingly. In politics 
he was a Whig, Abolitionist, original Fremonter, and steadfast Republican. 
He became widely known as an Abolitionist at a time when that cause was not 
popular, and not only aided with his tongue and pen, but for years maintained 
at his home on Mt. W'ashington a place of refuge for the footsore fugitive 
slaves escaping from their masters, called in the, vernacular of those days a 
"Station of the Underground Railway." The nurse for his two oldest chil- 
dren, born in 1847 and 1851, w^as a black girl, Lucinda by name, who never 
went outside the house by daylight and always fled to the attic whenever a 
stranger was reported in sight. 

In 1844 Mr. Bigham was elected to the House of Representatives and 
served from 1845 to "1848, 1851 to 1854, 1862 to 1864, and in the senate from 
1865 to 1869, serving upon the ways and means, railroads and canals, judi- 
ciary, and other important committees. He was always recognized as a sound, 
capable and judicious legislator, and was the author of some of our most im- 
portant laws. Among them may be named the married woman's act of 1848, 
the general railroad law of 1867, and the acts extending the municipal powers 
of the city of Pittsburg, known as the consolidation acts of 1867 and 1869. 
His attention was early directed to the financial and revenue system of the 
commonwealth, and he drafted and promoted the passage of many of the laws 
imposing taxation upon corporations to raise the needed revenue for the main- 
tenance of the state government and the removal of the tax for state purposes 
upon land. He was a member of many commissions appointed under state 
authority at dift'erent times to investigate and report upon matters affecting 
the public interest and welfare. The appointment of commissioner of statis- 
tics of the state of Pennsylvania, which office he filled from 1873 to 1875, was 



[86 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



tendered him by Governor Hartranft, not as a political reward, but as a recog- 
nition of his great ability and attainments especially directed toward the indus- 
trial, manufacturing, agricultural, mining and mercantile interests of this great 
state, and the reports made by him have always been considered of special 
value. Few citizens of the state have shown more devotion to its interests 
than has he. In 1851 he was elected to the board of managers of the Penn- 
sylvania Reform School, to which for many years he had been a contributor, 
and continued to act in that capacity until disabled by the infirmities of age. 
He was the founder and chief supporter of Grace Episcopal church, Mt. Wash- 
ington, which grew out of a mission Sunday-school started by him and his 
wife in 1849, ^^""^ ^'^^ carried on almost wholly at their expense for many 
years, until it became a flourishing congregation. He was the proprietor for 
years of the Commercial Journal, and one of the founders of the Pittsburg 
Commercial, both now merged with the Pittsburg Gasette, and was identified 
with all the public enterprises of his day. From 1878 to 1882 he was a mem- 
ber of the councils of the city of Pittsburg, where his industry and energy in 
looking after every measure introduced, that it might be strictly for the public 
good, made him a notable figure, and rendered many meetings of that body 
lively and interesting. Mr. Bigham devoted much time to scientific and his- 
torical studies throughout his entire life. His favorite historical researches 
were connected with the annals of the state of Pennsylvania, and especially of 
the western settlements. Many valuable contributions from his pen have been 
published and are familiar to those who have given attention to the subjects 
treated. His work is characterized by large natural ability, patient industry 
in research in the field to which his tastes attracted him, and sound and dis- 
criminating judgment in all matters, particularly those of public concern. 
Socially he was frank and entertaining, and very instructive in conversation, 
but decided in his views, into the expression of which he carried the enthu- 
siasm which attends thorough conviction and an earnest nature. Brusque in 
manner, with little regard for outward appearances, but of a generous nature 
and kindly disposition, with his wit and bright conversation, he was very 
companionable and always formed the center of an interested group. 

His death occurred November 9, 1884, and he was laid to rest in the Alle- 
gheny Cemetery, of which he was in 1844 one of the charter members, and 
the first secretary of the corporation. He was survived by his wife, Maria L. 
Bigham, who died October 14, 1888, and the following children : Joel L. Big- 
ham, born November 6, 1847; married Sarah Davis, November 14, 1872, and 
died January 20, 1892; was a lawyer of recognized, ability. He is represented 
by his two sons, Thomas J., in the Episcopal ministry, born March 23, 1875, 
and Joel Lewis, of the U. S. Navy, born February 28, 1877. Kirk O. Bigham, 
born March 17, 185 1, unmarried, is a member of the Allegheny County Bar 
and for many years represented the Thirty-second ward in city councils. 
Mary A., born March 29, 1854; was married April 7, 1885, to Melville L. 
Stout, and Eliza A., born January 31, 1857, died June 23, 1902, unmarried, 
who was noted for her warm-heartedness and love for children. 

Kirk O. Bigham and Mr. and Mrs. Stout, with their children, are still 
living in the picturesque old homestead among the forest trees, surrounded 
by the lands inherited through three descents from their great-grandfather, 
the greater part of which they still own. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE i8; 



EDMUND J. WILKINS, one of Wilkinsburg's retired business men. 
was born August i6, 1842, in Allegheny City, a son of Edmund Wilkins, who 
was born September 3, 1812, in Langport, England, youngest of a family of 
thirteen children. 

Edmund Wilkins was a marble-cutter by trade, and in 1833-34 came to 
the United States, settling in Pittsburg. With him came John Chislett, who 
afterward became a famous architect and first superintendent of the Allegheny 
cemetery. They formed a partnership and went into the marble business, 
which they made extensive and profitable for many years, the partnership 
being dissolved on Mr. Chislett's assuming charge of the cemetery. Mr. Wil- 
kins then took as a partner Matthew Lawton, who was at that time one of the 
most talented musicians of Pittsburg. The association lasted but a short time, 
and Mr. Wilkins thereafter carried on the business by himself. The old city 
directory of 1847 gives his marble-yard address as Wood street, between Vir- 
gin alley and Sixth street. So successful was he that in 1852 being then but 
forty years old, he was able to retire from all active business, after which he 
made frequent trips to his birthplace in England. 

In spite of his English origin, or rather because of it, he was pre-emi- 
nently an American in all things. In his earlier days he was a Whig in pol- 
itics, and in after years a staunch Republican, as well as an ardent advocate of 
abolition. In religious belief he was a Baptist, and at one time a member of 
the old Sandusky street church in Allegheny, in which he was an active 
worker, serving as superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

]\Ir. W'ilkins was twice married. By his first wife, Mary Ann Canter- 
bury, he bad the following children : Miriam, born May 25, 1836, widow of 
John Hays, children, James G., Jennie, wife of Joseph Herron, of Montana, 
Edward, Miriam, wife of William Scott, Joseph, Clara, wife of Frank Hartly, 
John R. and George; Josephine, born May 4, 1838, died May 13, 1871, wife of 
William C. Brown ; Alary, died in infancy ; Edmund J., of whom later ; and 
John Clarkson, died young. By his second wife, Mary Ann Wainwright, he 
became the father of three sons and one daughter : Joseph Wainwright, mar- 
ried Frances Kendall, children, Joseph, Mary, Henry and Francis; Harriet E., 
died young ; Reuben and James, both of whom died early in life. 

Edmund J. Wilkins, fourth child and eldest son of Edmund and Mary 
Ann (Canterbury) Wilkins, was reared partly in Allegheny City and partly 
in Lawrenceville, now within the limits of Pittsburg. He attended the public 
schools and later the Penn Institute. His first work was in the grocery busi- 
ness with William Smith, after which he was employed for a time by William 
France in the same line of business. When only sixteen years old he went to 
Iowa, and for several terms acted as the instructor of a school. Soon after 
the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted, October 8, 1861, in the Hampton 
Independent Battery F, and served for three years, receiving an honorable 
discharge October 24, 1864, with the rank of corporal. He was with his bat- 
tery in all the battles and engagements in which it participated, among which 
were the following: Winchester, Bull Run, Chancellorsville, South Moun- 
tain and Gettysburg. 

After completing his term of enlistment he returned to Pittsburg, and for 
the next eleven years engaged in the coal business. During this time he was 
deputy sheriff under John H. Herss, and clerk in the county comptroller's 
office under Henry Warner, later serving under George Alexander and for a 



CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



short time with Josiah Speer. In 1875 he moved to the Twenty-second ward 
and went into the grain business, which he carried on successfully until 1885, 
when he retired. In 1892 he moved to Wilkinsburg, where he has since con- 
tinued to reside. 

He is a member of Major Long Post, G. A. R., and the Veteran Legion, 
No. I, also affiliating with Davidge Lodge, No. 374, F. and A. M., of AUe- 

ghenv. 

Mr. Wilkins married Elizabeth Ross, daughter of Henry J. and Letitia 
(Waddell) Grenet, and they have been the parents of the following children: 
Mary, wife of Peter Young, children, Edmund W., Mary W., Elizabeth W. 
and Josephine W. ; Frank Samuel, died young; Elizabeth A., wife of William 
I. Erans, children, Erskine W., Alice L., Elizabeth and CorneUa; Edmund, 
•died young ; John H., married Catharine Clarey ; Letitia Josephine, and Alice 
Irene. 



WILSON J. RUGH, M. D., well and favorably known as a surgeon and 
general medical practitioner in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, who resides at No. 
Ill Park avenue in that city, is a representative of one of the old families of 
the state of Pennsylvania. 

John M. Rugh, father of Dr. Wilson J. Rugh, was born in Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, in 1812. He was prominently identified with the 
agricultural interests of that county during his entire life, and died in 1890. 
He married Mary B. Wilson, of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and they 
had children: Wilson J., see forward, Michael J., Benjamin F. and Martha 
Jane. Mrs. Rugh died 1901. 

Wilson J. Rugh, eldest child of John M. and Mary B. (Wilson) Rugh, 
was born in Bell township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 
1848. He received his education in the public schools and the Millersville 
State Normal School, and then taught school for three terms. He entered the 
Capital University for three years in 1869, then took up the study of medicine 
in Columbus Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1877. He 
immediately established himself in the practice of his profession in Westmore- 
land county, remaining there for eight years, and removed to Pittsburg in 
1885. Here he soon gained the confidence of a large class of patients, and he 
is highly esteemed in the medical fraternity as well. He has served as surgeon 
of the Pittsburgh Railway Company for a number of years. He is a member 
of the county, state and national medical associations, and is supreme treasurer 
of the Knights of Malta of the continent. 

He married (first) Nancy E. Hine, daughter of Simon Hine, and had 
■children : Frank E., Bertha May and Nancy E. Mrs. Rugh died in May, 
1884, and he married (second) Elizabeth Kuhns, daughter of John H. Kuhns. 



WILLIAM HAAS, for many years identified with the grocery business in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and now living retired from active business responsi- 
bilities, is a member of an honored family of Germany, and a representative 
of the second generation in America. 

Lewis Haas was born in Germany August 10, 1809, and emigrating to 
the United States in 1831, settled in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, where he found 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 189 

employment with Perry, the leading boot and shoe maker on Wood street. 
Later he established himself in the tin and hardware business on Penn avenue, 
which he operated successfully until 1868, when he retired from active business. 
He w^as a member of the Odd Fellows, William Tell and Redmen fraternal 
orders until his death, which occurred in 1895. His political support was given 
to the Democratic party, and he was a member of the old German Lutheran 
church. Smithfield street. He married Doretta Kehlbach, also a native of 
Germany, who died November 25, 1876, and they had children: I, Doretta, 
married George Haviser, later deceased, and had children: George, Henry, 
Caroline, wife of William Steinbach ; and Tilly, deceased. 2. Caroline, mar- 
ried Henry Herr, of Alliance, Ohio, formerly connected with the Morgan 
Engineering Company. 3. Lewis, born February 15, 1842, died in 1875, mar- 
ried Alary Till, and had children : George, and two who died in childhood. 
Lewis enlisted for three months' service under Colonel Rowley in the Thir- 
teenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and reenlisted in the One Hundred 
and Second Regiment, and served until the close of the war. 4. William, see 
forward. 5. Henry, born in 1848, died aged twenty-two years, unmarried. 

William Haas, second son and fourth child of Lewis and Doretta (Kehl- 
bach) Haas, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1845. His 
early education was acquired in the old Franklin school in the Sixth ward, and 
he was a young lad when he entered upon his business career, his first employ- 
ment being with the J. K. Moorehead Novelty Company. On August 31, 1869, 
he enlisted in Company E, Sixth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, which was 
recruited in Pittsburg, Colonel Barnes commanding, and at the end of one 
year's service he received an honorable discharge, June 13, 1865. He returned 
to Pittsburg, where he took a course at Duff's Business College, in order to 
better equip himself for his business career. For two years he held the position 
of clerk with Stamm & Illig, and after one year spent in traveling through the 
western states he entered the employ of Smith, Johnson & Colvin, wholesale 
grocers, as shipping clerk. Soon afterward he engaged in the grocery business 
for himself, taking a store in Forbes street. He conducted a profitable retail 
business for a number of years, retiring in 1888 and removing with his family 
to Wilkinsburg, where he resided for a period of two years. After two years 
of this inactivity his natural energy asserted itself and he returned to Forbes 
street, where he resumed the grocery business. At the expiration of four years 
he again retired, and since that time has devoted much time and attention to 
real estate matters, in which he has made many successful deals. He is a 
staunch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and represented 
the Sixth ward of Pittsburg in the common council in 1 880-1, when he made 
himself conspicuous by his strenuous opposition to the "Marginal road" meas- 
ure. He is a member of the Lutheran church, but since coming to Edgewood 
attends with his family the Presbyterian church of that place. The family 
reside at 130 Beech street. Edgewood. 

Mr. Haas married, December 2. 1869, Mary D. Poellot, a daughter of 
Peter and Barbara (Herschman) Poellot, both natives of Germany, and they 
have had children : Charles Z., a grocer in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, mar- 
ried Eugenie Boegel; Bertha E. and Nellie A., at home. He married, second, 
Anna B. Poellot, a sister of his first wife, and their children are: Walter E. 
and Ralph A. 



I90 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

WILLIAM DAVID LOW. As an example of steadfast and faithful 
devotion to the interests of those for whom he labors it would be difficult to 
find a name more suitable than that which heads this sketch. William David 
Low is a descendant of one of those sturdy old family of settlers in New. 
England whose habits of thrift and industry and conscientious performance of 
duty have been handed down to their posterity, and which have helped so 
materially in building up the prosperity of this country. 

James Humphrey Low. father of William David Low, was born in Lon- 
donderry, New Hampshire, in 1818. He was extensively engaged in the lumber 
trade and was a successful man of business. He married EHza Haines and had 
children: George A., born in 1844; Martha A., born in 1844, died in 1857; 
William David, see forward; Robert P., born in 1850, died in 1887; Mary, born 
in 1854, died in 1855 ; and Isabella H., born in 1857. 

William David Low, son of J. H. and Eliza (Haines) Low, was born in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, April 20, 1847. He received a good education in the 
public schools of his native city, and at a suitable age entered upon a business 
career. His first position was as clerk in the shoe store of George Albree, but 
for the last twenty-eight years he has been in the employ, as clerk, of the 
United States Steel Company, where his efficient work and faithful perform- 
ance of the duties which fall to his share meet with due appreciation. He has 
devoted much time and attention to military affairs, having been one of the 
organizers and the first lieutenant of Company F, Fourteenth Regiment, Na- 
tional Guard of Pennsylvania, for eleven years, and first lieutenant of Company 
E for three years. For many years he has been an honored member and active 
worker in St. James' Memorial church. 

He married Mary Fisher, daughter of John Fisher, and they have chil- 
dren : William D., Jr., Helen D., Vincent F., who died in 1889; Marian H., 
and Florence, who married a Mr. McGahan, and died December i, 1897. Mr. 
Low is a member of the following named lodges : Star of Liberty Castle, No. 
102, A. O. K. of M. C. ; Post Pitt Lodge, No. 170, K. of P.; C. D. Freeman 
Lodge, No. 1036, I. O. O. F. ; Homewood Lodge, No. 378, Knights of Malta ; 
Bruston Circle Lodge, No. 389, P. H. C. ; Martha Washington Lodge, No. i, 
D. of N. ; Adelaide Nicholson Lodge, No. 186, D. of R. ; Pittsburg Chapter, 
No. 268, R. A. M. ; Homewood Lodge, No. 635, F. & A. M., and Pittsburg 
Chapter, No. 39, O. E. S. 



ROWLAND ARMSTRONG BALPH, the well-known attorney-at-law 
of Pittsburg, was born in Allegheny City January 7, 185 1, son of Benjamin 
King and Sarah (Armstrong) Balph. The grandfather on the paternal side 
was James Balph, a soldier in the war of 181 2- 14, and a farmer of Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, his farm lying about five miles from the town of Butler. 
Here he erected the home in which his children were all born and which sub- 
sequently descended to his youngest son, Joseph Balph. James Balph married 
Mary King and their children were: i. Eli. 2. Margaret, wife. of Joseph 
Graham. 3. John. 4. James. 5. William. 6. Alexander. 7. Susan. 8. 
Benjamin K. 9. Joseph. 

Benjamin King Balph was born on the old homestead in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, and was reared on the farm. He obtained his education in the 
common schools of his township. Later he came to Allegheny City and be- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 191 

came a contractor and builder. He married Sarah Armstrong, by whom 
children were born: i. Emma, wife of Robert Ray, first, and secondly of 
Thomas W. McCune. 2. Harriet Newell, who married Austin M. Woodworth. 
3. Rowland A. 4. James, who married Mary Rose. 5. John, who married 
Martha Cassidy, both deceased. 6. Benjamin, deceased. 7. Elizabeth, de- 
ceased. 8. Lawrence, deceased. The last two died young. 

Rowland A. Balph was reared in Allegheny City, where he received his 
primary education at the public schools. Later he attended Westminster Col- 
lege, graduating in 1872, after which he began the study of law with the firm 
of Gill, Hall & Hay. He was admitted to t^he Allegheny county bar April 22, 
1874, and immediately began the practice of his profession, which he has fol- 
lowed ever since. He practices in United States courts and Pennsylvania su- 
preme court. In 1878 he formed a partnership with his brother, James Balph, 
for general practice of law, the firm being now known as R. A. & James 
Balph, with offices in the Park Building. In 1883 ^e removed to Wilkinsburg, 
where he built his present home at 901 Hill avenue. He was the prime mover 
and one of the organizers of the borough of Wilkinsburg. At first he met 
with much opposition from the older inhabitants, but after a long contest and 
tedious delays the borough organization was effected, after a decree had been 
handed down by the supreme court. He was one of the charter members of 
the Masonic lodge at Wilkinsburg, and the first master of Orient lodge, R. A. 
M. Politically Mr. Balph is a Republican and in religion is a member of the 
First Presbyterian church, of which he is an elder. He is chairman of the 
musical committee of the church and a teacher in the adult Bible class of the 
Sunday-school. He was one of the organizers and the first president of Penn- 
wood Club. 

• Mr. Balph has been twice married, first to Hester Rankin, daughter of 
Rev. James Rankin, deceased, by which union was born Jean A., Rowland 
Pollock and Hester Isabel. He married (secondly) Isabel W. Ewing, daugh- 
ter of William G. Ewing, of Dayton, Ohio. 



CHARLES SUMNER EVANS, D. D. S.. who has been a leader in the 
dental profession of Greater Pittsburg for the past twelve years, was born in 
Warren county, Pennsylvania, July 22,, 1868, son of Stephen Hadley and Eve- 
hn^ (Magill) Evans. This family is of Welsh descent, the founder coming to 
America as earlv as 1770, settling in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. The 
subject's father, Stephen H. Evans, furnishes the following sketch of the fam- 
ily, compiled from the best information he can obtain, coupling with it a sketch 
of his own career as found in a work on leading citizens of his judicial dis- 
trict : 

"Stephen Hadley Evans, among the capitalists of Warren county, Penn- 
sylvania, who have obtained their wealth not by inheritance, but by their own 
exertions alone, stands out prominently among the prosperous men of western 
Pennsylvania. He is a prosperous and thoroughly progressive farmer and a 
noted breeder of fine Jersey cattle, and a retired merchant. He was born De- 
cember 8, 1838, in Cochranton, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, a son of Peter 
Evans and a grandson of Walter Evans. 

"Walter Evans was of Welsh descent and the earliest facts known of him 
are that he was both a farmer and a cooper of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 



192 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

His children were: Jacob, William, Peter (the father of Stephen H. Evans), 
John, Samuel, George, Joseph, Henry, Elizabeth, Polly, Julia, Catherine and 
Susan. 

"Peter Evans was born October 5, 1804. in Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where when grown to manhood he learned the trade of a boat builder 
and followed his trade in Chautauqua county. New York. In 1830, in a large 
canoe which he had built, Mr. Evans brought his family, which consisted of his 
wife and one child, down the Allegheny river to Franklin, and then by pushing 
and pulling the canoe up French creek, he succeeded in getting to Cochranton. 
There he bought fifty acres of wild land covered with white oak timber and 
built a rude log cabin for the accommodation of his family. He then began 
the arduous task of clearing and cultivating the land, which cost him but three 
dollars per acre. After living there many years, engaged in farming and lum- 
bering, he sold his farm and retired to Tidioute in 1876, where his death oc- 
curred in 1882. He was united in marriage with Elsie Hadley, a daughter of 
Stephen Hadley, a well-to-do farmer of Chautauqua county, New York. Elsie's 
mother died young and she was reared by her mother's sister, Mrs. George W. 
Fenton, the mother of ex-Governor Reuben E. Fenton. Mrs. Evans was born 
in 1 8 10 and survived her husband but one year, passing away in 1883. The 
following are their children: Henry H., Elizabeth, George W., Walter C, 
Stephen H. and Ellen. 

"Stephen H. Evans attended the public schools of his native place, after 
which he was a student at the Meadville Academy. He then went to Tidioute 
in 1859, to study medicine with Dr. Charles Kemble. In the meantime he 
taught school in the Joseph Magee district ; also teaching classes in penman- 
ship. After closing his schools in April, i860, being desirous of taking a little 
trip and being offered a place on a raft down the Allegheny river to Pittsburg, 
he readily accepted the opportunity and was soon started on his journey. When 
at Pittsburg the raft was attached to three others to be run down the Ohio 
river to Cincinnati, Ohio, and he continued his journey to Maysville, Ken- 
tucky, where he visited his brother, Walter, who was a teacher there. His 
return trip was accomplished by a steamer to Cincinnati, by railroad to Erie, 
and thence by stage to Meadville and Tidioute. 

"In August, 1862, Air. Evans enlisted in the Union army, and was elected 
second lieutenant of Company F, One Hundred and Forty-fifth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Regiment, under Colonel H. L. Brown. The fourth day after being 
mustered into the regiment at Erie, Pennsylvania, the regiment was taken in 
box-cars to Chambersburg. Pennsylvania, thence to Antietam, where with the 
strength of one thousand men they supported a battery. The next day after 
the Antietam battle his regiment buried the bodies of five hundred Confeder- 
ates. After this they marched to Harper's Ferry, and there camped on Bolivar 
Heights for a month and afterward marched up the Shenandoah valley, where 
they were engaged in many battles and skirmishes. Among the most important 
battles in which Mr. Evans participated was the engagement of Fredericks- 
burg, Virginia, where the Union army met with heavy losses, his company and 
regiment losing over 50 per cent. After that with his company he did light 
services and picket duty until he was smitten with fever and was compelled to 
resign, receiving his discharge March 31, 1863. 

"Shortly after his return home President Lincoln appointed him post- 
master at Tidioute, in which capacity he served for ten years. During this time 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



193 



Tidioute received an oil boom and the office was changed from a fifth to a 
first class office, while a similar change took place in the salary. At first he 
was only paid three hundred and thirty dollars per year, but at the close of his 
administration three thousand two hundred dollars were paid and two addi- 
tional clerks required to dispose of the business. 

"In 1865 Mr. Evans became associated with W. R. Dawson in the mer- 
cantile business, continuing for eleven years. He then sold his entire interest 
to Mr. Dawson, Mr. Evans wishing an outdoor life for himself and also for his 
sons. He then purchased one hundred and fifty acres of woodland adjoining 
the town of Tidioute. After clearing about seventy-five acres, he built two 
tenement houses and two large, modern barns. Being a lover of fine stock, 
Mr. Evans next turned his attention to stock raising and purchased .for that 
purpose some fine registered Jersey cattle. Since then he has devoted nearly 
all of his time and attention to that line of business, and the reputation of his 
stock has spread throughout the United States. He has shipped over one hun- 
dred head of Jerseys to different parts of this country, having sent two car 
loads direct to Texas, and a similar shipment to West Virginia, realizing in 
return from fifty dollars to five hundred dollars a head. 

"Mr. Evans was twice married. His first wife was Emeline Magill, 
daughter of Rev. Arthur Magill. She died in 1864 at about the age of twenty- 
three years, leaving one son, Harry, now a resident of Liberal, Kansas, where 
he owns five thousand acres of land, and like his father raises fine cattle. For 
his second wife Mr. Evans married in 1865, Evaline Magill, daughter of 
Charles Magill, of Warren county, Pennsylvania. Five children blessed this 
union, but a son and daughter died in infancy and three sons have grown to 
manhood, and are named as follows : Charles Sumner, Arthur BHss and Wal- 
ter Clyde. Arthur B. graduated from the Meadville Commercial College and 
the Rochester Business University. Walter Clyde was formerly a student at 
Grove City College and afterwards a private in Company F, Fifteenth Penn- 
sylvania Infantry, during the war with Spain. 

"The father, Stephen H. Evans, among other enterprises has been an oil 
operator. Politically he is a staunch Republican and has served as city coun- 
cilman. He has been a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
since he was thirteen years of age. He has served as steward, trustee, etc., 
in that church. He is a member and also past grand of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and a past master of Temple Lodge, No. 412, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. He has served four years as adjutant of Colonel George A. 
Cobham Post. No. 311, Grand Army of the Republic." 

Dr. Charles Sumner Evans, son of Stephen H. and Evaline (Magill) 
Evans, began his education in the public schools of Tidioute, Warren county, 
Pennsylvania, and graduated from the high school with the class of 1885. He 
was chosen valedictorian of his class. For a time he worked on his father's 
farm, and when twenty-one years of age went to Springfield, Ohio, where he 
was engaged in the florist's business for about three years. He then closed out 
and in the autumn of 1892 went to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and entered the 
University of Pennsylvania, where he pursued a full course in dentistry and 
graduated from that institution in 1895, having been elected president of his 
class. Leaving college he came direct to Pittsburg and at once opened an of- 
fice at the corner of Center and Highland avenues, where he has built for 
himself a splendid professional reputation and enjoys a lucrative practice in 
iv— 13 



194 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



dental surgery. He belongs to the Pennsylvania State Dental Society ; is a 
member of the Odontological Society of Western Pennsylvania ; Hailman 
Lodge, No. 321, Free and Accepted Masons, and the Royal Arcanum. Po- 
litically he affiliates with the Republican party. He is interested in various 
business enterprises. 

He was married, December 22, 1898, by Rev. A. D. Carlisle, pastor of the 
Tabernacle Presbyterian church, to Miss Bessie I. Morton, of Pittsburg, born 
October 12, 1880. She is the daughter of William and Mary I. Morton. Dr. 
Evans and wife are the parents of two children: i. Charles Morton, born 
October 12, 1900. 2. Dorothy, born June 21, 1903, died December 7, 1905. 
The family reside at the corner of Baum street and Euclid avenue, East End, 
Pittsburg. 



ALEXANDER C. LOHR. a retired contractor and builder and for many 
years a resident of the borough of Wilkinsburg, was born April 8, 1835, in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, a son of Samuel and Hannah (Studebaker) 
Lohr. His paternal grandfather, Jacob Lohr, was a native of Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, and in the latter part of the eighteenth century moved 
to Somerset county, where he settled and became a prosperous and wealthy 
farmer, owning well improved farms in that county. In politics he was a 
Whig. He married Christena Coker and became the father of the follow- 
ing children : Samuel, Michael, who married a Miss Wilt ; Emanuel, who 
married a Miss Berkeybile; Valentine, who married a Miss Wolfert ; Joseph, 
George Daniel, who married a Miss Grissy ; Jacob, who married ^a Miss Fry. 

Samuel Lohr, eldest son of Jacob Lohr, was born on the old homestead in 
Somerset comity, Pennsylvania, Christmas day, 1803, and was reared on his 
father's farm, consisting of one hundred acres, and which later he inherited. 
He followed farm life like his forefathers. He was an enthusiastic Whig in 
politics. He married Hannah Studebaker, by whom the following children 
were born: (i) Jacob, who married Rosanna Berkey; (2) Eliza, died young; 
(3) Mary, wife of Joseph Plough; (4) Alexander C., of whom later mention 
will be made; (5) Elizabeth, who married Noah Myers; (6) Lovinia, wife 
of Benjamin F. Valentine; (7) Nancy, who married Matthew M. Roberts; 
(8) Samuel, Jr., who married Elizabeth Drury. 

Alexander C. Lohr was reared on his father's farm in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, acquiring his education at the local schools. Until he reached 
his majority he assisted his father on the farm. In 1858 he went to Ligonier, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he learned the carpenter's trade. 
He remained there four years and then moved to Allegheny county, where 
he worked two years at Braddock as foreman for Jacob H. Jones. On February 
14, 1864, he enlisted as a member of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers and was mustered out of the Luiited States service at Victoria, Texas, 
December 6, 1865, being finally and honorably discharged at Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, January 15, 1866. He then returned to Wilkinsburg, where he 
commenced operations as a builder and contractor, with office at No. 119 
Collins avenue. East Liberty. He continued in that business up to 189^, when 
he retired from active work. He was tax collector from 1877 to 1881 and 
constable for Wilkins township before it was organized into a borough. He 
is a staunch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and in his 




^//^an^c4x:4 ro ^-cT^^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



195 



earlier years was very active in all party work. He attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church, to which he has always been a liberal supporter. At one 
time Mr. Lohr was an extensive contractor and builder, operating in East 
End, Wilkinsburg and Pittsburg. In the last named place he erected manv 
of the fine residences and business houses. He was then one of the leaders 
in building in the city. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, being 
a member of AlcPherson Post Xo. 117. He is also a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows fraternity, J. B. Nicholson Lodge No. 585, East End. and has attained 
the highest degree in that order, that of High Chief Patriot; also a member 
of the order of Elks, Wilkinsburg Lodge, 577 ; of the Mystic Chain, East End, 
and was a member of Knights of Pythias five years and was treasurer of that 
body. 

He was united in marriage February 9, 1871, to Caroline Lacock, daughter 
of John and Margaret (McClean) Lacock. By this union two children were 
born — Lida and Eva, both of whom died young. 



ROBERT McKINLEY. Among the brick manufacturers of Pittsburg 
is Robert McKinley, who was born in Derry county, Ireland, February 2, 
1830, and came to Brownstown, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1833, with his parents. 
The father was John McKinley, born in Ireland, and came to America as 
above indicated in July, 1833. He engaged in brick making. He married 
Isabella Anderson, by whom was born: Margaret J., Martha, Samuel, Robert, 
Alexander and Eliza. The father died in 1834, and the mother in i860. 

Robert McKinley, of this notice, was educated in the comraon schools and 
then moved to what was called Croghanville (now Twelfth ward) and en- 
gaged in the manufacture of brick. In 1861 he moved to Bloomfield and later 
to Brushton, where he and his sons are still in the brick business. He was 
elected a member of the city council. Mr. McKinley married Margaret, 
daughter of Conrad Claver, of Pittsburg, and to them were born the follow- 
ing children: i. Samuel, was elected a select councilman in 1906. He has 
been secretary of the Odd Fellows Lodge No. 883 for fourteen years, and a 
member for twenty-five years ; for twenty-two years a member of Bainbridge 
Council 128, Junior Order United American Mechanics, and member of 
Crescent School Board of the Forty-sixth ward, formerly Sterrett tcwnship, 
for twelve years. 2. William C, an ex-sheriff of the county. 3. Robert, as- 
sistant chief of the Pittsburg fire department. 4. Isabella A. 5. Charles, 
all living, and Freemont, who died in -1856; James, who died in 1868; and 
Margaret, who died in 1870. 



LUKE BABE DAVISON. The late Luke Babe Davison, for many 
years one of the most prominent and influential citizens of Wilkinsburg, was 
JDorn October 29, 1819, in the old McMullen homestead, in Wilkins township, 
son of Thomas Davison, who was a native of the north of Ireland and of 
Scotch-Irish descent. 

Thomas Davison received an excellent education in the old country, and 
in 1819 emigrated to the LTnited States, landing in Philadelphia, whence he 
proceeded to Pittsburg. He engaged in teaching, also conducting a small 
general store, and became a highly respected citizen. He invested his money 



196 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

intelligently and soon found himself the possessor of what was at that time 
esteemed a considerable fortune in land and personal property. For twenty- 
five years he filled the office of justice of the peace. In politics he was a Whig, 
and later became an ardent supporter of the Republican party. He was an 
elder in the old Beulah church and an intimate friend and co-worker of its 
pastor, the Reverend James Graham. 

Thomas Davison was twice married, his first wife being Mary Babe, who 
was, like himself, a native of the north of Ireland, and the descendant of 
Scotch-Irish ancestors. They were married before coming to this country, 
and became the parents of five children, the only one who reached maturity 
being Luke Babe, of whom later. After the death of his wife Mr. Davison 
married Rebecca Turner, who bore him the following children : Mary A., 
died in infancy ; Rebecca J., wife of Robert Reed, of Newcastle ; Mary : Mar- 
garet R., wife of John Cochran ; John S., married Elizabeth Torrance ; Matilda 
C. ; Catharine T., and Thomas K., married Alice Clark. Thomas Davison, 
the father of the family, died in 1874. 

Luke Babe Davison, son of Thomas and Mary (Babe) Davison, was 
brought up in Wilkins township and at East Liberty, obtaining his education 
in the local schools and at the Western LTniversity of Pennsylvania. On com- 
pleting his studies he engaged in mercantile business in Pittsburg, in partner- 
ship with his father, and when the. latter retired carried on the business by 
himself until 1858. In that year he moved to Wilkinsburg and there opened a 
general store. 

During President Lincoln's first administration he was appointed post- 
master and filled that office until 1862, when he was elected justice of the 
peace, being re-elected in 1867 and 1872. In 1888, owing to impaired health, 
he retired from all active labor. In politics he was a strong Republican and 
an active worker for the interests of that party. While residing in East Lib- 
erty he was a member of the Presbyterian church, and on moving to Wilkins- 
burg joined the old Beulah church, later becoming a charter member of the 
First Presbyterian church of Wilkinsburg, of which he was always a liberal 
supporter and in which for many years he served as trustee. 

Mr. Davison married, in 1850, Nancy J., daughter of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Allison) McCosh, and the following children were born to them: 
Thomas, deceased; John Milton, (married, first, Caroline A. Myler, second, 
Emma B. Young, by first marriage, one daughter, Kathryn Myler) ; Elizabeth 
M. ; Clara Cary, and Samuel ]\IcCosh, deceased. 

Mr. Davison died May 19, 1893, at his home in Wilkinsburg. It might 
truly be said of him that his conduct was always marked by perfect upright- 
ness in all the relations of life and that his character was one of unblemished 
integrity. In all matters concerning the welfare of the community he was 
a prime and energetic mover. For instance — in the spring of 1874 when Wil- 
kinsburg was voted out of the city, Mr. Davison, in order to keep the school 
open until the end of June — himself paid the whole teaching force. While a 
business man he influenced largely and beneficially, by his discernment and 
enterprise, the commercial interests of the places in which he resided. Upon 
many occasions he manifested a praiseworthy willingness to assist by friendly 
counsel and pecuniary aid those less fortunate than himself. As a public offi- 
cer he was without reproach, seeking only the public good, regardless of profit 
or popularity. The loss of such a man to his family, his friends and the com- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 197 



munity at large, it is impossible to estimate, but his memory is an inspiration 
to those who come after him. 



MATTHEW HENRY HENNING, of Wilkinsburg, division superin- 
tendent of the People's Natural Gas Company, was born February 18, 1853, on 
the homestead in Wilkins township, son of Samuel Henning and grandson of 
John Henning, a native of Ireland who came to this country about the begin- 
ning of the nineteenth century. He settled in Wilkins township and pur- 
chased a tract of land one hundred and fifty acres, which he brought into a 
state of cultivation. This farm is still in the family name. 

John Henning was twice married, his first wife being Matilda Gill and his 
second Jane Deary. By the first wife he had two sons : Matthew and Samuel. 
Matthew was thrice married, and by his first wife had one son, John. By his 
second wife he had no children, and by his third, Martha Ross, he had the 
following : Eliza Ann, wife of Thomas Addenbrook ; Clara J., Mary, Martha 
E., Ida, Sadie, Alatthew, deceased, and Wilbert, married Belle Creighton. 

Samuel Henning, son of John and Matilda (Gill) Henning, was born in 
1810, and was reared on the farm, receiving his education in the schools of his 
day. For some time he assisted his father in the management of the farm, and 
on the latter's death inherited the estate. He continued to cultivate the soil 
until 1887, when he retired from all active labor and moved to Wilkinsburg, 
where he owned property. In politics he was a Republican and at one time 
held the office of tax collector of the township. For more than forty years he 
was a member and elder of the Reformed Presbyterian church, and was a 
charter member of the Wilkinsburg Reformed Presbyterian church. 

Samuel Henning married Elizabeth Ann, daughter of John and Jane 
Dodds, and the following were their children : Matilda Jane, who died Octo- 
ber 9, 1906 ; Annie E., married Dr. E. O. Anderson, children, Wilbur, William 
O., Frank E., Raymond H. and Helen A. ; John Dodds, married Mary Ster- 
ritt, children, Samuel, Carl and Helen ; Matthew Henry, of whom later ; Mary 
Margaret, Josiah Francis, married Stella Lysinger, one daughter, Dorothy; 
Melissa Belle, wife of S. R. Wills ; Olevia Alartha, wife of Hugh H. Hervey, 
one daughter, Elizabeth ; Emily S., wife of \N. A. Minteer, children, Elizabeth, 
Eleanor, Wendell H. and Stanley A., the two last named deceased. Samuel 
Henning, the father, died October 6, 1892, and the mother died March 28, 
1896. 

Matthew Henry Henning, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Ann (Dodds) 
Henning, was brought up on the farm, receiving his education in the public 
schools of the township and at the Newell Institute of Pittsburg, where he 
studied civil engineering. After completing his studies he was employed by 
John McHenry," city engineer of Allegheny City, and later returned to work- 
on the home farm, afterward purchasing an adjoining farm, which he culti- 
vated until 1885. In that year, when the People's Natural Gas Company was 
organized, he entered their service and has remained with them up to the pres- 
ent time, occupying various positions until he reached that of division superin- 
tendent, with headquarters at Wilkinsburg, which he still retains. He is a 
director in the Wilkinsburg Real Estate Trust Company. 

In politics he is a Republican, taking an active part in local affairs, having 
served for several years as a member of the county executive committee, and 



198 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

for the last fifteen years as a member of the school board, during which time 
he has served for six years as secretary of the board. He is a charter member 
of the Second United Presbyterian church and a member of the Session. He 
is an active worker in the interests of the church and for the last seventeen 
years has served as superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

Mr. Henning married, in 1876, Minnie E., daughter of Henry H. and 
Caroline (Clemson) Harman, and the following children have been born to 
them : Harry H. H., Ralph Romaine, Mary Belle and Reubent Vincent. 



PETER C. WAGNER, of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, was born February 
2, 1829, in Prussia, Germany. In 1849, while still a young man, he came to 
the United States, settling in Allegheny, where he began working at the trade 
he had mastered in his native country — shoemaking. He opened a shop and 
store for the sale of the product of his hand-made work and two years later, 
on account of room, was obliged to move, and then located in the brick build- 
ing at the corner of Main and Thirteenth streets, where he did a prosperous 
business, employed a large number of workmen, and continued there until 
187 1, when the machine-made goods of New England and the east drove hand- 
made work almost from the markets of the country. He therefore opened a 
regular shoe store. In 1883 he was obliged to seek larger quarters, moving 
this time to a point on ]\Iain, below Ninth street, where he remained until 
1890, when he retired. He died January i, 1892. 

He was a director of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank from its incep- 
tion, and was the treasurer and a director in the Sharpsburg and Etna Fire 
Insurance Company from 1873 to 1881. He helped with his own hands and 
spade to dig the trenches for fortifications at Morning Side Road when Gen- 
eral Robert E. Lee, Confederate leader, was expected to enter the city of 
Pittsburg during the Civil war period. Politically Mr. Wagner was a Dem- 
ocrat and espoused the Catholic faith. 

He was united in marriage, in 1852, at St. Mary's church, Allegheny, to 
Elizabeth Bourged, of Allegheny, a native of Germany, born January 10, 1831, 
and came to this country at the age of two years. She died April i, 1886. The 
children by this marriage union were as follows: i. Mary S., born in 1853, 
unmarried and at home. 2. John H., born March i, 1856, married Mary 
Schramm. 3. EHzabeth, born March 14, 1858; she entered the Sacred Heart 
Convent, Buffalo, New York, and is known to the world as Sister M. Brigitta. 
4. Peter C, the subject of this memoir. 5. Amelia, born October 5, 1862, is 
unmarried and at home. 6. Sylvester N., born February 25, 1865, married 
Catherine Glauber. 7. Leo J., born June 9, 1867, married Henrietta Jehle. 8. 
Martha R., born in 1872, unmarried and at home. 

Concerning the present whereabouts of members of this family it can be 
stated that Peter C, second son of Peter Wagner, the founder of the family in 
this country, was born at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, August 17, i860, and 
married Alice (Derby) O'Leary, November 8, 1888. Six children were the 
fruit of this union: i. Alice M., born January 18, 1891. 2'. Mercedes J., born 
December 18, 1892. 3. Mary E., born May 6, 1895. 4. Peter C, born Sep- 
tember 21, 1900. 5. Josephine A., born March 18, 1902. 6. Margaret A., 
born May 7, 1905. The father was educated at the parochial and public 
schools of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, and graduated from Duff's Business Col- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 199 



lege in 1878. He remained at home with his father until 1879, and then en- 
gaged with Mr. G. W. Tilghman in the clothing business. In 1881 he engaged 
with Spang, Chalfant & Company as assistant bookkeeper and shipping clerk. 
Later he returned to Mr. Tilghman's store, in which he had worked and re- 
mained two years, when he was appointed assistant postmaster under Mr. 
Casey at Sharpsburg. In 1887 he came to Homestead and opened a clothing 
store with Mr. Tilghman, the firm being Tilghman & Wagner. In 1888 he 
purchased the business and conducted it alone until 1895, when he took his 
brother, L. J. Wagner, as his partner, but in 1899 bought him out and has 
operated alone since that date. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
Duquesne Council, Pittsburg, No. 264, the C. M. B. A., Branch No. 70, of 
Homestead, and he has held the office of secretary of this branch for sixteen 
years. He also holds a membership in the Knights of St. George, No. 18, of 
Homestead, and belongs to the Brotherhood of Elks, No. 650, Homestead. He 
was one of the incorporators of the Homestead Savings Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, as well as one of the directors and the treasurer of the Ammity Land 
Company, and president of the Business Men's Association, both of Home- 
stead. He belongs to St. Mary Magdalene's Catholic church and in politics is 
an independent voter. 



ALFRED TOMKINS, a resident of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, engaged in 
the business of building heating furnaces and also concrete work, is known 
throughout the country for the reliability of his work, and is the first member 
of the Tomkins family to have taken up his residence in this country, his 
ancestry having been English. 

John Tomkins, father of Alfred Tomkins, was a native of England, in 
which country and in Wales his entire life was spent. For the greater part of 
his life he was engaged in contracting for the sinking of shafts for mines, etc., 
in England and Wales, and it was under his supervision that some of the most 
important mine shafts were sunk. Among them were the "Risker Mines," this 
name being given to them because of the great danger attached to the sinking 
of the shafts and the working of the mines. Explosions in them were numer- 
ous by reason of the accumulations of gas, and the loss of life attending them 
was great. Mr. Tomkins married Catherine Jones, also a native of England. 

Alfred Tomkins, son of John and Catherine (Jones) Tomkins, was born 
in Stockton, county Durham, England, February 27, 1868. He was a student 
at the public schools of that town until he had attained the age of twelve years 
and was then apprenticed to learn the trade of brick masonry. He followed 
this for a period of thirteen years, in the meantime attending night school in 
order to acquire a good education, for which he was very eager and which was 
an excellent equipment for his future business career. He emigrated to the 
United States in 1891, settling in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he took up 
his trade of brick masonry and followed this for about two years. Owing to 
a strike which was then in progress he abandoned this and accepted a position 
as engineer, and later became "foreman of the Linden Steel Company, a posi- 
tion he filled very efficiently and which gave him considerable insight into the 
deficiencies of the heating furnaces in use at the time. At the end of two 
years he established himself in business in a small way, and invented an im- 
proved heating furnace, a specimen of which he built in No. 3 mill of the 



20O A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Oliver Tin Mills. So satisfactory was this to the firm that they had all their 
mills equipped with the Tomkins Improved Heating Furnaces, and it was but a 
short time before other mills became aware of the decided advantages offered 
by this >style of furnace and it was generally adopted, not only in the state of 
Pennsylvania, but in West \'irginia and Canada, and its fame is constantly 
growing. The best testimonial to its excellence is the fact that Mr. Tomkins 
employs no solicitors to exploit his invention, but the orders come pouring in 
as the furnace becomes more generally known. In addition to building these 
furnaces Mr. Tomkins is engaged to a considerable extent in concrete work, 
and has erected more than one hundred dwelling houses. He is also the 
inventor of a machine for hoisting materials, which is intended for buildings 
to convey material to the different floors, such as brick, mortar, cement, 
beams, lumber, etc., and the engine can also be used to drive concrete mixers, 
circular saws, or other machinery before or after the elevator or conveyor are 
put in use; the engine having a large sized belt or pulley wheel for this 
work. He is also the inventor of a hot water car heating system for auto- 
mobiles, using the cooling waters from the water jacket of engines to heat 
car. His business is a prosperous and growing one, and he has the respect of 
the entire business communit} . He is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He married, April 19, 1886, Ellen Lings, daughter of 
Thomas Lings, of county Durham, England, and they have had a number of 
children, of whom six died in infancy. May died December 23, 1906, at the 
age of twelve years ; and those now living are : Beatrice, Violet, Elsie, Nellie 
and Alfred. 



WILLIAM CAL\'ERLEY. foreman of the brass department of the 
Ruud Manufacturing Company, is a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
born January 24, 1863, a son of Walter and Eleanor (Christie) Calverley. 
The father was born in Leeds, England, the great manufacturing city of that 
country, and was a merchant. He married Eleanor Christie, by whom were 
born these children: Mary (Calverley) Harris; Emma (Calverley) Yant, 
wife of N. D. Yant, Senior, member of the N. D. Yant & Company, structural 
iron manufacturers, of Allegheny, Pennsylvania ; Charles G. Taylor, who is 
a son by second marriage, and is at present assistant purchasing agent for the 
Westinghouse Manufacturing Works. The father died in 1863 and the mother 
in 1898. Walter Calverley enlisted in a Pennsylvania volunteer company 
during the Civil war and suft'ered the amputation of a leg, dying a few days 
after returning home from that cause. His widow afterward married Jackson 
Taylor, and their children were: Charles G., born in 1871, and Harry, born 
in 1869, and died in 1872. 

William Calverley, subject, was educated at the Allegheny public schools 
and learned the machinist trade in Pittsburg at the locomotive works. For 
a term of nine years he was employed by the Westinghouse Air Brake Com- 
pany's works and for ten years was with the Shook-Anderson Manufacturing 
Company. He is one of the promoters of the Steamboat Manufactory. In 
1903 he had charge of the Ruud Manufacturing Company and is now foreman 
of the brass department there. 

He has been identified with McKinley Lodge, No. 318, Free and Accepted 
Masons, for nineteen years. He has been elected a member of the Brushton 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



School Board, and in 1905 was elected president of the Board. Since 1903 
he has been a member of the city committee, a member of the ward executive 
committee for five years, and is now chairman of the district association. 

In 1889 Mr. Calverley married Ida Waechter, daughter of George 
Waechter. By this union two children were born — Walter Raymond, born 
July 31, 1890, and Emma Margaret, born August 18, 1905. Walter is at 
present attending the Pittsburg High School as a member of the third year. 



HARRY P. HARBAUGH, one of the four hundred traveling salesmen 
employed by the great pickling and preserve works of the H. J. Heinz Com- 
pany, of the North Side, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
November 5, 1869. After being thoroughly educated in the schools of Pitts- 
burg he was with the Vienna Yeast Company for about three years and in 
1890 went to work with the Heinz Pure Food Preserving Company, which 
is his present occupation. He is largely mterested in the building improve- 
ments of Brushton and has just completed five nice residences. 

He is a member of the .Masonic order, Dallas Lodge, No. 508. He was 
united in marriage to Elizabeth, daughter of W. L. Stewart, of Homestead, 
Pennsylvania, who was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and was a car- 
penter and contractor. He married Amanda Rankin, by whom were born 
Elizabeth (Mrs. Harbaugh), Mame, Jennie (Stewart) Hunter and Bart R. 
The father died in 1902 and the mother in 1907. 

(For an account of Mr. Harbaugh's parentage the reader is referred to 
the sketch of their son, John A. Harbaugh, in this work.) 



JOHN TOMER CYPHERS, who was the well known and faithful 
employe of the Pittsburgh Stock Yards for more than a third of a century, 
was born in Plumb township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 3, 
185 1, son of John and Emily (Tomer) Cyphers. The father was born Feb- 
ruary 9, 1821, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and for thirty-three 
years was the superintendent of the horse barns at the Pittsburgh Stock Yards. 
He died in February, 1898. He married, first. Miss Emily Tomer, by whom 
were born : lohn T.. subject : Sarah, deceased ; Nancy, who married a Mr. 
Denholm ; Adam H. ; Philip E. ; Maggie. The mother of these children died 
in 1867 and later he married Lizzie Borland, by whom he had the following 
children: George W. D., William B., Annie, deceased, and Charles. Lizzie 
(Borland) Cyphers died in 1888. 

John T. Cyphers, son of John and Emily (Tomer) Cyphers, received a 
common school education, after which he went into the Pittsburgh Stock 
Yards as an employe under his father, who was there for so long a time. 
But the subject proved a valuable man for the place and remained a year 
longer than his father had served. After leaving the stock yards Mr. Cyphers 
was collector for E. F. Rusch and came to East Liberty to reside in 1862. He 
removed to Homewood November i, 1902, and engaged in the hotel business. 

He is a member of the Pittsburg Brotherhood of Elks, Lodge No. 11; 
J. B. Nicholson Lodge, No. 585, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; 
and the Royal Arcanum Lodge. No. 276; also Pittsburg Encampment No. 2. 
Politically Mr. Cyphers is a Republican. 



202 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



September lo, 1872, he was married to Emma N., daughter of WilHam 
Woolslair and wife, of Pittsburg. Their children are : Cora May, born July 
19, 1874; Mildred, born October 11, 1875; William J., born February 16, 
1878; Laura, born October 3, 1879, and died in 1880; Harry S.. born 
December 20. 1882; and Dorothy L., born February 9, 1898. 



GEORGE WILLIAM KETTENBURG, deceased, for many years en- 
gaged in the plumbing business in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and who served 
his country faithfully and well during the Civil war, represented the second 
generation' of his family in this country, they tracing their ancestry to the 
old family of Kettenburgs in Hessen Cassel. 

William D. Kettenburg, father of George William Kettenburg, was born 
in Hessen Cassel, Germany, during the year 1800, and emigrated to the United 
States in 1832. He settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a 
piece of property in Penn avenue near Eleventh street. He is said to have, 
been the first locksmith of any experience in the city, and made the locks and 
keys for the old courthouse and jail. His business was an extensive one for 
those times, and he was noted for his strict honesty and for his liberality in 
church and secular matters. He was of a kind and genial disposition and 
greatlv respected in the community. In politics he was a Whig, but affiliated 
and was a staunch supporter of the Republican party when that body came 
into existence. His religious faith was that of the Methodist church, and 
he was a charter member of the First German Methodist church in Pittsburg, 
and a trustee for twenty years prior to his death, which occurred February 16, 
1870. He married Mary Hasenjaeger, of Pittsburg, born February 7, 18 15, 
died December 11, 1865, and they were the parents of children: (i) George 
William, see forward; (2) Henry, born about 1842, died July, 1874. He was a 
soldier during the Civil war and was a prisoner at Andersonville ; (3) Charles 
D.. born 1844. died March 14, 1889. He also served during the Civil war. Mar- 
ried Charlotte Myers and had children, Walter and William ; (4) William, 
died in childhood; (5) Mary Jane, married Charles Fisher, who was' killed 
during the railroad riots of 1877; (6) William, resides in the west; (7) Ma- 
tilda, married Henry Scheidler, deceased; (8) Emma, died in childhood; (9) 
Edward, unmarried; (10) Emma, married Philip Steuhler, has children — 
Myrtle, Minnie and Mary. 

George William Kettenburg, eldest child of William D. and Mary (Ha- 
senjaeger) Kettenburg, was born in the Ninth ward of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
August 21, 1840. Fle was educated in the public schools and supplemented 
his education by assiduous home study, as he was from his earliest years an 
eager reader of all good literature. He was apprenticed to learn the locksmith's 
trade, and at the outbreak of the Civil war enlisted, on his twenty-first birthday, 
from Beaver county. Pennsylvania, in Company C, Sixty-third Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Hayes commanding, First Division, Third 
Corps, Army of the Potomac. He served the full term of three years, was 
promoted to lieutenant, and received his honorable discharge in 1864 with the 
rank of captain. He took part in all the battles and engagements in which his 
regiment participated. L^pon the completion of his military service he trav- 
eled extensively through the eastern states and then returned to Pittsburg, 
where he engaged in the plumbing business in 1870, in Penn avenue, near 




^^^^^-^^t^^^^t^^<, ^^Az>t>-?--^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 203 

Eleventh street, and carried this on successfully until his death, which occurred 
March 24, 1892'. In January, prior to his death, he had removed to Edge wood 
with his family, where he had built the comfortable and commodious home at 
336 Locust street now occupied by his widow and children. Like his father, 
he was a stalwart Republican and an active worker in the interests of that 
party. He amassed a considerable fortune, which he invested very profitably 
in real estate holdings. He was a firm believer in the doctrines of the Meth- 
odist church, though he was not an active worker in religious affairs. He 
was a man of many sterling qualities and his death was deeply and sincerely 
regretted. 

He married, January 10, 1866. Mary Louisa Beinecke, daughter of William 
and Elizabeth (Wiethorn) Beinecke, and they had children: (i) Ida Elizabeth, 
unmarried ; (2 ) George W., electrical engineer. He married Amelia Eyth, and 
has had children: John E., deceased; George W., deceased; John R. ; George 
W. ; Julia, and Ella. (3) William, died in infancy; (4) Ella L., died in 1906, 
married Harry E. Giberson. 



WILLIAM F. PANKE, one of Pittsburg's enterprising and stirring con- 
tractors and builders, was born in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, June 9, 
1864, son of Charles L. Panke and wife, natives of Germany and America, 
respectively. The father was born in 1829 and by trade was a tanner. He 
emigrated to this country in 1856 and married Charlotte Schulte. Their 
children were, aside from the subject, Fred, Henry,. Minnie (Mrs. Lutz), 
Mary (Mrs. Scharria), John, Charles. George, x^nnie (Mrs. Hess) and Lottie. 

The subject of this notice obtained his education' in the public schools, 
after which he obtained employment in a woolen mill, where he remained for 
about six years. Fie then mastered the carpenter's trade, and in time became 
a contractor, which line of work he pursued for eighteen years in his native 
state. He moved to Pittsburg on Alarch 25, 1900, since which date he has 
followed the same business here and has met with merited success. 

Politically Mr. Panke is a supporter of the Republican party, while in 
his religious faith is of the Methodist Episcopal persuasion. 

July 16, 1891, he was united in marriage to Emma, daughter of John and 
Margaret Miller, of Louisville, Kentucky. By this union were born Emma 
May Panke, June 27, 1892, and Edith Margaret Panke, born April 11, 1896. 



REV. GEORGE WILSON CHALFANT, D. D., who has retired from 
the pastorate, is descended from a Quaker family which emigrated from 
Chalfant, St. Giles, England, with William Penn and settled in Philadelphia. 
He was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1836. He graduated 
from Jefiferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, in the year 1856. He 
took up the study of law for a short time, but resigned this in favor of theology, 
completing his course at the Western Theological Seminary. He was licensed 
to preach by the Presbytery of Saltsburg in i860, and his first pastorate was 
at Mechanicsburg, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, of which he took charge 
in April, 1861. One and a half years later he was appointed chaplain of the 
One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment, in which he 
served until after the battle of Fredericksburg. In 1863 he accepted a call 



204 A CEXTURV AXD A HALU OF 

to Bridgeport and Martins Ferry, Ohio, where he remained until called to 
Pittsburg in the spring of 1881, in order to organize the Park Avenue Presby- 
terian church, and continued in charge as pastor for twenty years, retiring in 
1901. In 1898 he and his wife visited Japan and China, spending several 
months with their children in the latter country. The following year he was 
elected moderator of the Synod, Pennsylvania. The honorary degree of Doctor 
of Divinity was conferred upon him by Lafayette College. In addition to 
the Park Avenue church he has been largely interested in organizing ten 
churches in the Pittsburg Presbytery and one in the city of Mexico, besides 
special work for two winters in St. Louis. He has also secured the education 
of some twenty young men, most of whom have entered the ministry. 

He married Sarah E. Moore, daughter of William Moore, of Saltsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and their children are as follows : 

1. Rev. William Parker Chalfant, graduated at Lafayette College, 1881, 
and Western Theological Seminary. For over twenty years he has been a 
missionary of the Presbyterian church in Shantung province. North China. 

2. Rev. Frank Herring Chalfant, D. D., graduated at Lafayette College, 
1881, engaged in legal ^^•ork for a few years and is now a missionary of the 
Presbyterian church in Wei Hsien, North China. He is the author of a 
volume on the History of the Chinese Language, published by the Carnegie 
Institute. 

3. George Newton Chalfant, Lafayette College, 1884, engaged as a 
civil and mining engineer for three years. He was admitted to the Allegheny 
county bar in 1889 and is now practicing law in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

4. Rev. Charles Latta Chalfant, graduate of Lafayette College, is a 
Presbyterian minister, pastor of the Madison Avenue Presbyterian church, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, of the Presbyterian church of Ashtabula, Ohio, and now 
pastor of Grace Presbyterian .church, St. Louis, Missouri. 

5. Mary B., wife of Rev. U. S. Greves, pastor of the Forty-third Street 
Presbyterian church, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

6. Edward Chambers Chalfant, graduate of Lafayette College and Pitts- 
burg Law School, was admitted to the Allegheny county bar in 1898. He is 
now practicing law in Pittsburg and is prominently identified with many public 
interests there. He married Frances O'Hara Barr. 



WILLIAM H. DUMBAUGH. a well known citizen of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, who resides at 628 Homewood avenue, in that city, is one of the 
most enterprising and progressive business men in that section, and is ever 
ready to take up his due share of public responsibility. His father was born 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1844. He was engaged in farming and 
was closely identified with agricultural interests throughout his life. He 
married Louise Stultz, who died in 1903,- and they had children: Jacob E., 
William H., of whom see forward, Christina, deceased, Manuel J., Harry N., 
Sidney J., deceased, Joseph, deceased, Clara A., Eva, Clarence and Arthur. 

William H. Dumbaugh, second son and child, was born near Harmony, 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, December 3, 1869. His education was acquired 
in the public schools of the district and in the academy at Petersville. His 
first venture in business life was as clerk in a general store in Harmony, and 
he then came to Pittsburg in 1889. Here he served in the capacity of clerk 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 205 

for six years, and in 1895 came to Home wood and established himself in his 
present business, in which he has been decidedly successful. He is very 
popular socially as well as in business circles, and is a member of the Home 
Circle, and of Homewood Conclave No. 601. He is also consistent member 
of the Homewood Avenue Presbyterian church. He married Sue E. Mc- 
Conaghey, daughter of William McConaghey, of Pittsburg, and they have 
children: Grace C, born November 9, 1898; Elizabeth L., born March 11, 
1900. 

CHARLES ALEXANDER WARFIELD, of Pittsburg, was born April 
27, 1854, in Howard county, Maryland, his father and grandfather having 
both borne the name of Charles Dorsey Warfield. His great-grandfather, 
in honor of whom he was named, was Dr. Charles Alexander Warfield, who 
is linked in the history of Maryland with one of the most thrilling and ro- 
mantic episodes in the annals of opposition to the tea-tax. The Warfield 
family was founded in this country by Richard Warfield, who came in 1660 
from Berkshire, England, and settled in the province of Maryland. His grand- 
son, Azel Warfield, married Sarah Griffith. 

Charles Alexander Warfield, eldest son of Azel and Sarah (Griffith) 
Warfield, was born December 14, 1751, in Anne Arundel county, Maryland, 
and it was in his young manhood (being but a year after his marriage) that 
the" incident which has rendered him historically famous occurred. Dr. War- 
field, who is also remembered as Major Warfield, during the memorable days 
of October, 1774, called the members of his club around him, and led them, 
on horseback, from the uplands which now constitute Howard and Mont- 
gomery counties through the lowlands of Anne Arundel county and into 
Annapolis. They rode by day and without disguise, although on their hats 
was engraved the legend, "Liberty or Death." On arriving at Annapolis 
they rode to the front of the residence of Anthony Stewart, who was the 
owner of the brig "Pegg\' Stewart," and who had paid the tax on the obnoxious 
tea with which his vessel was laden. Captain Hobbs, who was one of the 
party, has handed down the following account of Dr. Warfield's actions and 
words : 

Commanding his companions to draw up in line before the house, he ad- 
dressed JVIr. Stewart in the following words : "You will either go with me 
and apply the torch to your own vessel, or hang before your own door." His 
manner, though courteous, conveyed the impression that acceptance of the 
former proposition would be the safer course, and Dr. Warfield stood beside 
Mr. Stewart when the latter applied the torch. 

Dr. \\'arfield married Elizabeth, daughter of Major Henry Ridgley, and 
their children were : Ann, wife of Samuel Thomas ; Harry R., attorney-at- 
law of Baltimore ; Peregrine ; Gustavus ; Charles Dorsey ; Elizabeth, wife of 
Richard Snowden ; and Louisa, who, after the death of Elizabeth, became 
the second wife of Richard Snowden. Peregrine and Gustavus were physi- 
cians. 

Charles Dorsey Warfield was born April 4, 1780, in Howard county, 
Maryland, and was engaged in mercantile pursuits. He married, in January, 
1823, Ruth H., born February, 1794, widow of Caleb Dorsey and daughter 
of Philemon Griffith, colonel of the Maryland Rifles during the war of the 
Revolution. Mr. and Mrs. Warfield were the parents of the following chil- 



2o6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



dren : Sarah Ann ; Charles Dorsev. of whom later ; Alexander ; and Philemon 
Hammond. Charles Dorsev Warfield, the father, died May 30, 1852, and his 
widow passed away in August, 1854. 

Charles Dorsey Warfield, son of Charles Dorsey and Ruth H. Griffith 
(Dorsey) Dorsey, was born November 9, 1830, in Bushy Park, Howard 
county, Maryland, and for many years served as school director. He was a 
staunch Democrat and a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Charles Dorsey Warfield married. May 17, 1853, Isabella, born Febru- 
ary 21, 1832, daughter of Dr. Gustavus and Mary (Thomas) Warfield, of 
Long-wood, Howard county, Maryland, who were married in 1810. Dr. Gus- 
tavus Warfield died August 8, 1866, in his eighty-fourth year, and his wife, 
who was born March 15, 1793, died January 18, 1884. Mr. and Mrs. War- 
field were the parents of eight children: Charles Alexander, of whom later; 
Gustavus, born December 13, 1855; Mary Emma, born September 27, 1857; 
Henry Ridgley, born September 12. 1859, died May 19, 1865 ; Eugenia Grey, 
born August 4, 1861, died September 30, 1864; Peregrine, born January 16, 
1864; Harry Ridgley, born November 8. 1869; and Arthur, born October 
3, 1871. Mr. Warfield, the father, died August 19, 1896, and the death of 
Mrs. Warfield occurred October 9, 1904. 

Charles Alexander Warfield, son of Charles Dorsey and Isabella (War- 
field) Warfield, received his education in the public schools of his native 
county and at public school No. 15, Baltimore. He was engaged in the roll- 
ing mill industry until 1890, being successively employed in the mill of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company at Cumberland, in the Abbott Iron 
Works, Baltimore, and in the National Rolling Mill, McKeesport. Since 
1890 he has been connected with the Electric Hotel, of which he is now the 
owner and manager. 

He belongs to the Sons of the Revolution, the I. O. O. P., the Knights 
of Pythias, the Homeless Twenty-six and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and in politics is a Democrat. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. 

Mr. Warfield married, April 26, 1893, Minerva C. Borlin, and they are 
the parents of one daughter: Caroline Isabella, born December 3, 1894. 

Mrs. Warfield is a daughter of James and Hannah Borlin, of Greens- 
burg. James Borlin was born January 19, 1820, and in early life was a tanner 
and a dealer in live-stock, taking droves of horses and cattle to the eastern 
markets before the railroads which now. facilitate their transportation were 
built. He was proprietor of hotels in Greensburg, Chicago, McKeesport and 
Pittsburg. In 1877 he was elected sherifif of Westmoreland county. 'His 
death occurred September 26, 1899. 



JOHN DAVID SWEENEY, a leading contractor and builder of Pitts- 
burg, was born February 9, 1859, in Tyler county, West Virginia, son of 
Daniel Sweeney, who was also born in West Virginia, and combined the 
callings of miller, millwright and surveyor, also dealing extensively in lum- 
ber. He was a staunch Democrat. He married Mary Anna Wells, of West 
Virginia, and their children were: Laura, born in 1852, died December 31, 
1906, wife of William W. Patton, of Orange, California, children, Chalmers 
D., Lesta, Daniel C, Florence, Harry, Carl, Mabel and Olive; EH Absalom, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 207 



born March 19, 1854, married October 19, 1892, Anna Louise, daug-hter of 
Nicholas and Elizabeth (Bandi) Bandi, of New Martinsville, West Virginia; 
James N., born in 1856; Thomas, who died aged sixteen years; John David, 
of whom later; Oliver C, married Alice McCoy, of Pereley, Tyler county, 
West Virginia, children, Howard, Elsie, Pauline, Myron and Eli Absalom; 
and Amanda Ruffner. James N., third child and second son of this family, 
married Anna Smith, of West Virginia, children, Rodney, Mollie, Florence 
and Homer. Mrs. Sweeney died in 1891, and within a reasonable time Mr. 
Sweeney married Belle Barrett, of Tyler county, West Virginia, children, 
Louise Inez, Irene, Harry, Lillie and Ruby. Mrs. Sweeney, the mother, died 
May 2, 1901. 

John David Sweeney, son of Daniel and Mary Anna (Wells) Sweeney, 
received his preparatory education in the public schools of his neighborhood, 
passing thence to the Fairmont (West Virginia) Normal School, and after- 
ward entering the University of Morgantown, W>st Virginia. For twelve 
years he was principal of the normal school of Athens, Mercer county. West 
Virginia, and in 1901 came to Pittsburg, where he has since been engaged in 
the general contracting- and building business. For one term he represented 
the people of his native county in the legislature. He belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and in politics affiliates with the Demo- 
crats. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Sweeney married, December 25, 1893, Mary Maud Reid, and they 
are the parents of four children: Mary Louise, born October 12, 1894; Maud 
Ethel, born September 25, 1896; Anna Wilson, born July 22, 1901 ; and Vir- 
ginia Ruth, born September 18, 1903. Mrs. Sweeney is a daughter of Will- 
iam Albert Reid, who during the Civil war served as Captain of Company A, 
Seventeenth Virginia Cavalry, participating in many battles, among them 
those of Gettysburg and Lookout Mountain. He married Phoebe Louise 
Hare, and their children were : Walter Scott, married Catharine Hardy, 
children, Inez and Gladys ; Mary Maud, wife of John David Sweeney ; Rupert, 
died in infancy; and Minnie, wife of Edward French, of the vicinity of Paris- 
burg, Virginia, children, William Edward, John Reid, Harriet Louise and 
Frances. 

DAVID FOULK COLLINGWOOD, whose varied interests in the city 
of Pittsburg make him a leading representative man thereof, and who has 
been an earnest promoter of general improvements, encouraging any object 
which he considers to be for the public good, was born September 29, 1862, 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, son of William and Maria L. (Foulk) Colling- 
wood. 

William Collingwood (father) was born September 23, 1812, in the vil- 
lage of Addison, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. His parents removed to 
Pittsburg the following year, locating in the Seventh ward, where William 
attended the subscription schools. In 1853 he established a fire insurance 
agency at 307 Wood street, known as Loomis & Collingwood, which was in 
existence until September, 1885, when Mr. Loomis retired, and the firm name 
became Collingwood- & Son. William Collingwood continued in that busi- 
ness very successfully until his death, which occurred November 6, 1902, a 
period of almost half' a century. He served for several years as a director of 
the public schools of the Seventh ward, Pittsburg, rendering therein efficient 



2o8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



service. He was a staunch Republican in politics. He married, November, 
1861, Maria L. Foulk, daughter of David A. and Elizabeth (Hartman) Foulk, 
of Pittsburg, and ten children were the issue: David Foulk, see forward; 
Lewis W., Fannie R., Robert L., Clements B., George J., Anna D., deceased; 
Mary L., Howard D. and Loy H. Mr. and Mrs. Collingwood were mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian church of Wilkinsburg. 

David F. Collingwood attended the public schools of the Seventh and 
Eighth wards of Pittsburg, and upon the conclusion of his studies engaged 
in "the fire hisurance business with his father, being admitted to the firm in 
September, 1895, and this line he still continues, with offices at No. 248 Fourth 
avenue, Pittsburg. In politics he affiliates with the Republican party on na- 
tional issues. On November 4, 1902, Mr. Collingwood was elected treasurer 
of Allegheny county for a term of three years, on the Citizens' Fusion ticket, 
in which capacity he served with credit. He is a director in the Keystone 
National Bank of Pittsburg, director of the Union Electric Company, trustee 
of the Dollar Savings Bank, trustee of the Braddock General Hospital, presi- 
dent of the Pennsylvania State Association of Fire Insurance Agents, mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce and the Pittsburgh Club. He also attained 
great prominence in Free Masonry, being a member of Crescent Lodge No. 
576, Free and Accepted IMasons, of which he is a past master ; Shiloh Royal 
Arch Chapter, No. 257, of which he is a past high priest ; Tancred Command- 
ery, No. 48, Knights Templar, and a member of Pennsylvania Consistory, An- 
cient Accepted Scottish Rite, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree. 
He has also been honored with the thirty-second degree, September, 1906, 
and is a- Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the Supreme Council of the 
Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States. 

Mr. Collingwood married. September 23, 1890, Mary E. Kirkpatrick, 
daughter of the late Allen Kirkpatrick, who was one of the largest wholesale 
grocers of Pittsburg, and whose death occurred February 20, 1890. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Collingwood are Rebecca Bell and Allen Kirk- 
patrick. Mr. and Mrs. Collingwood are members of the Calvary Presbyterian 
church of Braddock. 



JOHN DOTTERWEICH, who has been for nearly a quarter of a cen- 
tury a resident of Pittsburg, and has long been numbered among the city's 
successful business men, was born June 24, 1862, in Vorra, Bavaria, Ger- 
many, son of John Dotterweich, also a native of Bavaria, where he was born 
in 1820, and where he followed the calling of a farmer. He married Kuni- 
gunda Soldner, and the following children were born to them : Kunigunda, 
Sebastian, Adam,, Thorathea, Margaret, George, Elizabeth, Wilhelm, John, of 
whom later; Michael, John Michael, and Anna. The mother of these chil- 
dren died in 1875, and the father passed away in August, 1896. 

John Dotterweich, son of John and Kunigunda (Soldner) Dotterweich, 
received his education in the public schools, and on reaching manhood emi- 
grated to the United States. In 1883 he came to Pittsburg, and in 1893 estab- 
lished himself in the baking business, which he still continues and in which 
he has been extremely successful. 

Mr. Doterweich married, in 1892, Fanny Spitzerberger, a native of Ba- 
varia, and they have been the parents of the following children : Maria, born 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 209 

in 1893, died in 1894; Paulina, born in 1895; John, born in 1897; George, 
born in 1899; Anton, born in 1901, died in 1903; Francis, born in 1904; and 
Maria Alagdalena, born in 1907. 

ANDREW HARCUM, justice of the peace and a member of the poHce 
force of Greater Pittsburg, was born in Liberty avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 12, 1846, son of Samuel and Hannah M. (Kane) Harcum. 
The father was born in Coal Lane, Pittsburg, in 1822, and was one of the 
pioneer glass manufacturers of the South Side. The children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel Harcum were as follows : John, Sarah J., Andrew, Elizabeth, 
Hiram and Samuel. The father died January 25, 1854. His wife died Janu- 
ary 18, 1905. 

The subject's grandfather, also named Samuel Harcum, was born in 
Alaryland and was a sailor in Commodore Perry's fleet during the battle of 
Orleans, and was discharged from service in 1825. 

Andrew Harcum, of this notice, the son of Samuel Harcum (second), 
was educated at the public schools of his native city and when but fourteen 
years of age he ran away from his home and accompanied the First Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry Reserves. He returned after the second fight at Bull Run and 
enlisted in 1863 in Knapp's Battery of Pennsylvania, served three months and 
then re-enlisted in the Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, from which he was 
discharged August 11, 1865. After his return home he entered the mills in 
Pittsburg as a "roller." In 1871 he was appointed on the city police force 
and reappointed for two terms. In 1902 he was elected a justice of the 
peace, which position he still holds. 

He married, in 1869, Sarah, daughter of John and Catherine Gosley, by 
whom was born the following children : Amelia A. Russell, Gertrude Shop- 
pener and Sarah, who died at the age of three years, in 1882. 



TPIOMAS CRONIN, president of the Thomas Cronin Company, general 
contractors of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, is a representative of the second gen- 
eration of his family in this country. 

Patrick Cronin, father of Thomas Cronin, was a native of county Cork, 
Ireland, and made his initial visit to this country about 1822. He lived in 
Vermont about twenty years, returned to Ireland, where he married and lived 
for four years, whence he came again to the United States. He lived in 
Boston. Alassachusetts, for a short time, then settled in Brighton, in the same 
state, where he resided until his death. He was a farmer and gardener by 
occupation, and he and his family were members of the Catholic church. He 
married Jane Linehan, and they were the parents of ten children, of whom five 
died in infancy. Those who lived to attain maturity were: Thomas, see 
forward ; John, who went west and was not again heard from, and it is pre- 
sumed that he is dead ; Mary, deceased, married Martin O'Hara ; Jane, married 
William Cashman ; Theresa, married Peter Dowding. 

Thomas Cronin, only surviving son of Patrick and Jane (Linehan) Cronin, 
was born in Brighton, Massachusetts, September 5, 1849. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native town and at the early age of fourteen years 
he commenced his business career. He accepted any employment that came 
to his hand that he was able to do and finally drifted into the business of 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



stock dealing, in which he met with considerable success. However, during 
the general financial depression which swept over the country in 1873 he 
abandoned this, and in the following year went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
where he found employment at the Keystone Bridge Works. Later he was 
appointed on the police force and made a gallant and honorable record for 
seven years. He then resigned and engaged in the business of teaming for 
a period of about eight years, then formed a partnership with M. O'Herron 
m the general contracting line, doing business under the firm name of Cronin 
& O'Herron. This partnership was dissolved at the expiration of eleven 
years, and Mr. Cronin then organized the contracting firm of which he is the 
president at the present time. His son John is the vice-president, and John 
Wallace is secretary and treasurer. They undertake all kinds of contract 
work and employ about three hundred hands. Mr. Cronin is also the sole 
proprietor of the Birmingham Supply Company, which deals in all kinds of 
builders' materials ; he is a stockholder in the South Hill Trust Company and 
the Iron Gloss & Savings Bank. He and his family are members of the 
Catholic church. He married, November 15, 1879, Julia McConnell, daughter 
of Nicholas and Alice (Cavanaugh) McConnell, and they had nine children, 
four of whom died in infancy. Those now living are: John, mentioned 
above ; Alice ; Harry, manager of the Birmingham Supply Company ; Nicholas ; 
Jane. 

THE VILSACK FAMILY. In the development of every city there 
are always some men who stand out more prominently, in some one or more 
role of activity, than others, and such was the character of Jacob Vilsack and 
his sons, who have been intimately associated with the growth of Greater Pitts- 
burg during all the years intervening since 1835, when the father came to thi> 
country from Germany. He was born in Carsruhe, Baden, and was a car- 
penter by trade. Lie came to Pittsburg while yet a young man. For a number 
of years he followed his trade successfully, but finally saw a more independent 
and congenial life as a farmer. He purchased a farm in Shaler township, 
Allegheny county, where he spent the remainder of his life, dying at the age 
of sixty years. He married a German woman, or rather, one born in Alsace, 
in what was then France, but now a part of Germany. Her name was Catharine 
Farmarie and she emigrated to this country when a young lady and here 
married Mr. Vilsack. Their children were as follows : ( i ) George, who mar- 
ried and left four children — Mary, Joseph, Lena and Annie. (2) Elizabeth, 
deceased, who married Wendal Kraus, of Shaler township. He was engaged 
in the ice business for a number of years, but is now a prosperous merchant 
at Etna, Pennsylvania ; their children are — Leopold, August, Catherine, Wil- 
liam, Lena, John and George. (3) Leopold, of whom a sketch will be found 
hereinafter. (4) Catherine, married Anthony Shoemaker, who for a number 
of years was one of the leading merchants of Woodsfield, Monroe county, 
Pennsylvania, but now leads a retired life on the old Vilsack homestead in 
Shaler township. Their children are — Elizabeth, Anthony, Jr., ]\Iichael, Bar- 
bara, Edward, Leo and Catharine. 

(II) Leopold Vilsack, third child of Jacob and Catharine (Farmarie) 
Vilsack, the American ancestors of the family, was born March 3, 1838, at 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and attended the public schools in Sharpsburg and 
Saint Philomena, at what was formerly known as Bayardstown ; the old 







//y ///■// 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



school building- is still standing- and in use. He commenced his active career 
in the Bennett Brewery, at the corner of Seventeenth and Liberty streets, in 
1855, and three years later had an interest in the business, being associated 
with Edward Frauenheim, John Miller and August Hoeveler. Later, Messrs. 
Frauenheim and Vilsack purchased the interest of the other partners, when 
the firm was styled Frauenheim & Vilsack, operating the Iron City Brewery, 
afterward incorporated and known as the Iron City Brewing Company. These 
gentlemen associated with them their sons, Aloysius, E. J. and A. A. Frauen- 
heim, and E. J. and J. G. Vilsack. The business was thus headed until merged 
with the Pittsburgh Brewing- Company, with L. Vilsack as president of the 
Iron City Brewing- Company, when the consolidation took place. At this date 
(1907) Mr. Vilsack is a large stockholder, vice-president and one of the 
directors in the company. He is also president of the Epping-Carpenter Com- 
pany, manufacturers of pumping machinery. He was one of the pioneers in 
this business at Pittsburg, having been connected with it since 1885. He was 
also associated with the Aliquippa Steel Company at Aliquippa, Pennsyl- 
vania, until it was merged into the Crucible Steel Company of America. His 
son, J. G. Vilsack, was president of the company when the merger took place. 
Leopold Vilsack is also president of the Vilsack-Martin Company, makers of 
ornamental iron work, situated on Thirty-second street and Penn avenue. He 
is one of the directors of the Allegheny Plate Glass Company, one of the 
modern-day enterprises of Greater Pittsburg, located on the Allegheny river, 
near Hite Station. He is also identified with numerous banking institutions 
and financial concerns. He is the vice-president of and leading stockholder 
of the German National Bank, and president of the East End Savings and 
Trust Company at Penn avenue, near Sheridan, East End. He is interested 
in insurance companies, being the director of the National Union Fire Insurance 
Company and the City Insurance Company, also a director of the Ohio River 
Improvement Company. He is one of the largest real estate holders in the city, 
having made extensive and numerous purchases within the last few years. 

Politically Mr. Vilsack is a supporter of the Democratic party, and in 
his religious faith is a Catholic. He is, a member of the board of trustees of 
St. Paul's Cathedral and was appointed by Rt. Rev. Bishop Regis Canevin 
as one of the building committee for the direction of the construction of the 
Cathedral at Bellfield. He is also on the boards of St. Paul's Orphan Asylum, 
at Idlewood, St. Joseph's Protectory for Boys at Wylie avenue and Vine street, 
Pittsburg, and St. Francis' Hospital. He was one of the originators of the 
Columbus Club and is still an honored member of the same. 

Mr. Vilsack has always taken a deep interest in all that would tend to ad- 
vance the financial, social and educational interests of his native city and the 
commonwealth in which it is situated. His successful business career has not 
made him sordid and unmindful of his fellow men. His charities and true 
benevolences have extended far and near. 

He was married in 1863 to Miss Dorothy Blank, of Etna, Pennsylvania. 
They were the parents of thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters, 
all born in Pittsburg and all surviving but one. They are as follows : 

I. Edward J., unmarried, and lives in Shaler township, this county, where 
he bought a one hundred and sixty-acre tract of land, which he has converted 
into a model farm and upon which he raises stock and carries on general 
farming pursuits. It is among the best farm properties, in point of value as 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



well as up-to-date improvements, within Allegheny county. It is located on 
the old Butler road. His maiden aunt, Miss Mary Blank, his mother's sister, 
resides with him. He is superintendent of the Iron City Brewery, one of the 
branch plants of the Pittsburgh Brewing Company ; a director of the Penn- 
sylvania National Bank ; director of the Sterritt-Thomas Foundry Company,, 
and a director of the East End Savings and Trust Company, and the Pennsyl- 
vania National Bank. 

2. Joseph G. Vilsack, second son in the family of Leopold Vilsack, was 
born in Pittsburg, and married Stella Brennen, a daughter of John Brennen 
and wife. By this union the issue was John Edward, Louise Marie, Dorothy 
Claire, Joseph G., Jr., and Kenneth Frank. The father of these children, 
Joseph G. \'ilsack, was also admitted as a partner in his father's brewing 
business, and after the companies were consolidated he continued for a time, 
but soon associated himself with the Aliquippa Steel Company, and was its 
president wiien it merged with the Crucible Steel Company of America, when 
he became the secretary of the Ohio River Improvement Company ; also asso- 
ciated as secretary of the Lutz & Schramm Company ; secretary of the Vilsack- 
Martin & Company, ornamental iron manufacturers ; and is also a director in 
the Sterritt-Thomas Foundry Company, and vice-president of the East End 
Savings and Trust Company. 

3. Nettie M. was born in Pittsburg and married Edward J. Frauenheim,. 
and they are the parents of Dorothy, Edward F., Walter, Regina, Norman^ 
William and Richard. (For Frauenheim sketch see elsewhere in this work.) 

4. Leopold W., born February 6, 1872, was educated at St. Vincent's 
College, and later was connected with the Marshall Kennedy Milling Com- 
pany, later known as the Pittsburgh Milling Company, as its salesman. He 
remained with them several years, and in 1893 engaged in the jewelrv business, 
establishing the firm of L. W. Vilsack & Company, located on Fifth avenue. 
Politically Mr. Vilsack is a Democrat. He married, October 6, 1895, in Pitts- 
burg, Nellie M. Vetter, daughter of John Vetter and wife. The issue by this 
marriage is Leo, Virginia, Pauline, Mercedes and Robert. 

5. William W. Vilsack was born in Pittsburg, is unmarried and is now in 
the wholesale liquor business at Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

6. August A. Vilsack, born February 11, 1876, is twin brother of Anthony 
J. He was educated in his native city and in the Canisius College, Buffalo, 
New York, and then entered the Pennsylvania National Bank as a messenger, 
which position he held until the German National Bank was organized, when 
he was made its teller. Later he became assistant cashier, which position he 
still retains. Some years ago he became interested in the Hobensack Drug 
Company, as a partner in the business. Later he purchased the whole business 
and took his twin brother in as his partner. In 1905 the business was incor- 
porated as the Vilsack Drug Company, of which August A. Vilsack is president 
and Anthony J. secretary and treasurer. He married, September 5, 1899, 
Annie Lauinger, by whom four sons were born — Hubert Anthony, Francis 
Lauinger, Augustine A., Jr., and Edward Eugene. Mr. Vilsack is a member 
of the Americus and German Club of Pittsburg, and of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

7. Anthony J. Vilsack, twin and brother of August A., was born February 
II, 1876, and is now his brother's, Edward J. Vilsack, assistant at the plant 
of the Iron City Brewing Company. He was educated at Canisius College, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 213 

Buffalo, New York, and at St. Mary's Institute, at Emmitsburg, Maryland. 
He then associated himself with the Aliquippa Steel Company, and was its 
secretary and treasurer up to the time of its merging with the Crucible Steel 
Company of America, when, in a short time, he became assistant superintendent 
of the Iron City Brewing Company, which position he still holds. He is also 
.associated with his twin brother, August A., in the drug business, incorporated 
in 1905 as the Vilsack Drug Company. He is the secretary and treasurer of 
the same, while his brother is president of the company. September 12, 1899, 
he married Veronia Lovingston, of St. Louis, Missouri. By this union the issue 
is one child, Howard J. Vilsack. 

8. Kathryne Vilsack, born in Pittsburg, is unmarried. 

9. Ollie Vilsack, born July 2, 1880, unmarried, and is now teller at the 
East End Savings and Trust Company. 

10. Mercedes Vilsack. married Robert Maloney, and thev have one child— 
Kathryne. 

11. Maurice Vilsack, born May 10, 1884, is now a clerk at the Epping- 
Carpenter Company. He is unmarried. 

12. Carl Vilsack, born April 27, 1887, attended Georgetown University 
at Washington, and graduated from the classical course in 1907. 



THE LAUGHLIN FAMILY of Greater Pittsburg has been from a 
very early day one of much importance in the industrial and social develop- 
ment of the city. They are of that sturdy Scotch-Irish people who have been 
noted in the early history of western Pennsylvania for their sterling qualities 
of both head and heart. 

The first member of this family to emigrate to America was Alexander 
Laughlin, whose father and brothers and sisters came about ten years later. 
Alexander will be mentioned at length later in the history of the family. 

(I) James Laughlin was the progenitor of the family which settled in 
America. He was a Scotch-Irishman, who was a well-to-do farmer near 
Belfast, Ireland, and after his wife died he was persuaded to emigrate to this 
country, where his son Alexander had made himself a home. He came to 
Baltimore, Maryland, with his son James and two daughters, and they soon 
found their way to Pittsburg. This was in 1829, and here he pursued farming 
on a place which he purchased in what is now East Liberty, until his death. 

(II) Alexander, eldest son of the progenitor of the American family, 
was born in county Down, Ireland, in November, 1790, and came to America 
in 1819, settling at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he formed a partnership 
with Francis G. Bailey, engaging in the provision and grocery business. 
Later Mr. Laughlin bought out his partner and conducted the business 
alone until about 1829, when his brother, with the remainder of the family 
except his mother, who had died in Ireland, came to America and became 
associated with Alexander, and they engaged in the pork-packing business 
T)oth at Pittsburg and at Evansville, Indiana. This business prospered and 
was thus conducted until 1835, when the firm was dissolved. Alexander then 
built a store and warehouse at Pittsburg at the corner of Canal and Etna 
streets. Later he added the lumber business to his other operations, and occu- 
pied the whole square bounded by Eleventh and Twelfth streets on the one 
side and Pike and Etna streets on the other. It was the most extensive 



214 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



establishment in Pittsburg at that date. He also acted as the agent for the 
Peach Bottom Slate Quarries, having control of all the territory west of the 
Allegheny mountains^ In 1850 Mr. Laughlin bought out the Stewardson 
Furnaces of Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and a firm known as Laughlin 
& Phillips was formed. In time Mr. Laughlin purchased his partner's interest, 
after which he conducted the business alone during the remainder of his life. 
He was connected with many of the financial enterprises of western Pennsyl- 
vania and the city of Pittsburg. He was a director of the Bank of Pittsburg, 
the old Ninth Street Bridge and the Western Hospital of Pennsylvania. He 
was a member of the F"irst Presbyterian church of Pittsburg, in which he 
served as an elder until his death in 1867. March 27, 181 7, he married Mary 
Ann Bailey, in county Down, Ireland. By this union the issue was ten 
children, all deceased. 

(II) James Laughlin, son of the emigrant and a brother of Alexander 
Laughlin, just mentioned, was born March i, 1806, near Portaferry, county 
Down, Ireland. He received his education at Belfast, Ireland, which was not 
far distant from his birthplace. After leaving school he assisted his father in 
taking care of his estate until his twentieth year of age was passed, when his 
mother died and the family came to America. Upon his arrival here James 
Laughlin entered into partnership with his brother Alexander, who had been 
here in advance of the remainder of the family several years. The two 
brothers conducted a provision store at Pittsburg, and a branch at Evansville, 
Indiana, of which James had charge. At that point they carried on a pork- 
packing house and James spent his winter months there, having to make the 
journey on horseback or by stage, it taking two or more weeks to make the 
trip, owing to the condition of the roads and the weather. This partnership 
was dissolved in 1835, and James Laughlin continued the business, the Indiana 
branch being in charge of his tried and fellow countryman, Samuel Orr, who 
later became his partner in the business of conducting a general merchan- 
dising store as well as the iron trade at Evansville. This business relation 
existed about two years. Mr. Laughlin was one of the organizers of the 
Fifth Avenue Savings Bank and in 1852 was elected its president. This 
institution was succeeded by the Pittsburgh Trust Company and organized 
under a charter from the State of Pennsylvania July 12, 1853. Five years 
later that charter was succeeded by the First National Bank of Pittsburgh. 
A charter under the new bank was obtained by them, but the old officers 
were retained. It was this association which took advantage of the national 
banking act of April 11, 1863, and was the fifth national bank to be estab- 
lished in the United States and the first one in Allegheny county. Mr. 
Laughlin was its first president. 

In 1857 he retired from the provision business and turned his attention 
toward the manufacture of iron, which had then become the most important 
industry of the city of Pittsburg. Mr. Benjamin F. Jones had a small mill 
on the present site of the Jones & Laughlin Steel Plant's works and Mr. 
Laughlin became associated with Mr. Jones, and the firm of Jones & Laughlin 
was formed. This firm soon took front rank in the production of iron. In 
i860 they formed the firm of Laughlin & Company and engaged in making 
pig iron, which was then a new industry for Pittsburg. They brought the 
rich ores from Lake Superior and this firm became the owners of the Eliza 
Furnaces. The steel and iron industry being treated in the general history 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 215 

volume of this work it will be sufficient to say that after many changes in 
the iron and steel business in 1900 the Jones & Laughhn Steel Company was 
formed and is one of the greatest commercial industrial powers in the world 
today. Mr. Laughlin remained a member of this firm until his death. He 
was president of the First National Bank of Pittsburgh, which he helped to 
organize, and was connected with it until his death. He was in point of 
service one of the oldest bankers of Pennsylvania. At a special meeting held 
by the bank directors soon after his death they declared in way of a resolu- 
tion that: 

"We bear testimony that in all of our personal and business relations 
with Mr. Laughlin, extending over a period of thirty years, we have found in 
him a true type of successful American bankers, readily grasping opportuni- 
ties, difficulties and dangers of extended financial operations, meeting all ques- 
tions with extraordinary freedom from all personal bias or prejudice, keeping 
pace, even in advancing years, with liberal and progressive principles of 
finance and business intercourse, yet always just in hTs business relations." 

While Mr. Laughlin had no natural liking for public office holding he 
did consent to serve on the select council of his city at one time, but repeatedly 
declined other places of public trust. 

His religious affiliations were with the First Presbyterian church of Pitts- 
burg, of which he was one of the oldest members and a most liberal supporter. 
In him the Western Theological Seminary ever had a warm friend, he serving 
as one of the trustees and was the president of the board of the same until his 
death. He was one of the incorporators of the Western Pennsylvania Institute 
for the Deaf and Dumb, located at Pittsburg, and was one of its trustees 
from its foundation until his death. He also took a deep interest in the higher 
education of women and founded the Pennsylvania Female College, and was its 
first president and gave generously toward its maintenance as long as he lived. 
Being in full sympathy with his hundreds of workmen, he never had trouble 
on account of labor strikes, he using his men even as though they were of 
his own household. 

At Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1837, Mr. Laughlin was 
united in marriage to Miss Ann Irwin, daughter of Boyle Irwin, Esquire, by 
which union there was born one daughter and four sons. 

Their second son, Irwin Boyle Laughlin, died at Nice, France, in 1871. 
He was born December 2r, 1840, and was associated with the firm of Jones 
& Laughlin until his death. He married, in 1870, Mary, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Bissell, Esquire, of Pittsburg, by whom the issue was Mary 
Irwin Laughlin. The other sons of James Lausfhlin and wife were: Henry 
Alexander, George McCully and James, all residents of Pittsburg, of whom 
mention will be made in this notice. The only daughter was Eliza Irwin 
Laughlin, who married, June 14, 1883, Major Duncan Clinch Phillips, -now 
of W'ashington, District of Columbia. 

(HI) Francis B. Laughlin, son of Alexander and Mary Ann (Baily) 
Laughlin, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 31, 1835, and there 
received his education at the public schools, after which he entered the 
employ of his father, and later became identified with him in all of his enter- 
prises. Upon the death of his father the Stewardson Furnaces were merged 
into the F. B. & A. Laughlin Company, which was continued for several 
years. Subsequently F. B. Laughlin helped to organize and incorporate the 



2i6 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Solar Carbon Company in Pittsburg, and this was later merged into the 
National Carbon Company, when Mr. Laughlin retired from active business. 
He was one of the founders of the Point Breeze Presbyterian church and a 
member at the time of his death. Politically he was always a Republican. 
He died August 9, 1905. Of his domestic relation it may be said that 
April 27, 1858, he was united in marriage, in Vincennes, Indiana, to Margaret 
Burtch, a native of that place and the daughter of William and Mary 
(Hannah) Burtch. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Laughlin were as 
follows: I. Mary B., died' young. 2. Alexander Baily, now deceased, left 
one child — Clothilda. 3. Margaret B., married first John Allison, by whom 
one child was born, John Allison, Jr., and secondly she married Robert 
Somers Marshall, by whom there was no issue. 4. P. Burtch, died young. 
5. Frank M., deceased, married Annie Jenkinson and had Richard J., 
Francis B. and William H. 6. Henry M., unmarried. 

(HI) Henry Alexander Laughlin, eldest son of James and Ann (Irwin) 
Laughlin, was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 12, 1838. He 
graduated from Brown University in i860 and the following year entered the 
firm of Jones & Laughlin, Limited, and Laughlin & Company, Limited, he 
being general manager and chairman of the last named company, which was 
a pioneer in the mining of rich ores in the Lake Superior district, and smelting 
the same with Connellsville, Pennsylvania, coke at Pittsburg. He has been 
identified with the marvelous growth of the iron and steel industry, which has 
made Greater Pittsburg famous the world over. He also became interested 
largely in the Pittsburg & Lake Angeline Iron Mining Company, of Michigan. 
Mr. Laughlin is a member of the Duquesne Club of Pittsburg and the New 
York Yacht Club. Fie is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
his maternal ancestors having served in the struggle for national independence. 

He married, first, September 10, i860, Alice Ben Denniston, who died 
in 1873. She was the granddaughter of the late John Thaw, Esq., of Pitts- 
burg. The surviving children of this union are : James B., Anne Irwin and 
Rev. Edward R. Laughlin. Mr. Laughlin married the second time, in 1876, 
Mary B. Reed, of Washington, Pennsylvania. No issue by this union. 

(Ill) Major George McCully Laughlin, son of James and Ann (Irwin) 
Laughlin, was borri October 21, 1842, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He 
received an excellent education at the private schools of his native city and 
then attended Washington-Jefferson College and was a member of the class 
which designed to graduate in 1863, but prizing peace and freedom higher 
than any educational or financial interest, Mr. Laughlin left his college studies 
at the close of his junior year and enlisted as a volunteer in the Union cause. 
He was mustered in as a private soldier, but was immediately commissioned 
by the governor of Pennsylvania as a second lieutenant of Company E, One 
Hundred and Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He began his 
military career August i, 1862, and continued without interruption, honorably 
discharging his duties until the surrender of Lee to Grant at Appomattox. 
He was promoted to first lieutenant and on the death of Captain Sackett suc- 
ceeded the latter in command of the company, receiving a commission as 
captain of the same. He was in all the engagements of the Army of the 
Potomac from Antietam to Appomattox. His last year of service was on 
detached duty as a member of the staff of Major-General Charles Griffin, who 
was placed in command of the Fifth Army Corps by General Sheridan during 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 217 

the battle of Five Forks, and continued on the staff until the close of the 
war. General Griffin was one of the three generals selected by General 
Grant to arrange the details of the surrender of Lee's army to Grant, and 
Captain Laughlin accompanied him as his personal aide. He was therefore 
present and witnessed the meeting of Lee and Grant at the McLean House 
at Appomattox, where the full terms of the surrender were made and agreed 
upon. Captain Laughlin was breveted major by the war department for 
distinguished services at the battle of Quaker Roads, Mrginia, and was 
mustered out at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Tn June, 1865. 

Without any delay he engaged with the house of Jones & Laughlin in the 
iron and steel industry at Pittsburg, which he continued to follow during all 
the years from that date until now. In recognition of his patriotism and 
his business ability no less than for his scholarship and personal character- 
istics, the trustees of Washington and Jefferson College conferred on him 
the degree of Master of Arts, the same as though he had completed his 
course and been a graduate instead of shouldering his musket when the 
nation was in need of brave, self-sacrificing men. 

Major Laughlin is a member of the Duquesne, the Pittsburg and L'nion 
Clubs, as well as the Pittsburg Golf Club. He is also connected with the 
Arts Club of New York City. At home he is numbered among the members 
of the Loyal Legion, the Sons of the Revolution, the Grand Army of the 
Republic and the Pittsburg Manufacturers' Club. In his religious belief he 
is a Presbyterian, belonging to Shady Side church of that denomination. 
He is connected with some of the most important financial institutions of the 
city in which he lives, being president of the Keystone Bank of Pittsburg and 
a director of the Pittsburg Trust Company. 

November 16, 1865, he was married to Miss Isabel B., daughter of Judge 
William McKannan of the L^nited States Circuit Court, of Washington, 
Pennsylvania. The children born of this union are: i. Irwin B. 2. 
George M., Jr., and Thomas K.. all of whom were associated with the Jones 
& Laughlin Steel Company until January i, 1904, when Irwin B. Laughlin 
was appointed secretary to the United States minister at Japan under Honor- 
able Lloyd Griscomb. Mrs. George M. Laughlin, the mother, died December 
5, 1891.^ 

(III) James Laughlin, youngest son of James and Ann (Irwin) 
Laughlin, and a brother to Major Laughlin, was born June 18, 1847, "^^ the 
city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and there graduated from the private school 
and from Princeton College in 1867. He became associated with the man- 
agement of the Laughlin Company and of the Jones & Laughlin Company, 
steel and iron works, of Pittsburg, with which industry he is still connected, 
the various companies having merged into one. i\side from his interests in 
this corporation he is a director in the First National Bank of Pittsburg and 
is a trustee of Princeton University. He belongs to Duquesne Club of 
Pittsburg, the University and Yacht Clubs of New York, and the Sons of the 
Revolution. 

Mr. Laughlin was united in marriage, February 10, 1870, to Sidney, 
daughter of John H. Page, Esq., of Pittsburg. Their children are: i. 
Martha Page. 2. Leila Irwin. 3. John Page. 4. Henry Hugart. 5. James. 

(IV) James B. Laughlin, son of Henry A. Laughlin, was born August 
20, 1864, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and there received his education, after 



2i8 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



whkh he entered the employ of Langhhn & Company at Eliza Furnaces, 
Pittsburg, where he remained until the firm was merged into the Jones & 
Laughlin Steel Company, when he became its treasurer, which office he is 
still holding. He is also a director in the South Side Trust Company and 
vice-president of the same. He married Clara Young, of Pittsburg. Their 
three children are: Ledlie, Henry and Alice. Mr. Laughlin is a member of 
the Duquesne Club and other societies. 

(IV) Reverend Edward R. Laughlin, son of Henry A. Laughlin (HI), 
was born November 6, 1870, and obtained his early education at the Shady 
Side Academy in Pittsburg, and prepared for college at Lawrenceville, New 
Jersey. He finally entered Princeton College and graduated from that insti- 
tution with the class of 1894. Shortly after his graduation he was ordained 
minister in the Presbyterian church and has had a charge in Philadelphia 
for several years. He married j\Iary Wilson, of Philadelphia, by whom one 
child is born — Ethel, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



WILLL\AI L. JONES, a well known citizen of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
now residing at No. 116 Lang avenue, in that city, was for many years 
closely identified with the wholesale drug business of the state, and served 
with braverv during the Civil war. He is descended from an old and honored 
family of Pennsylvania. 

Rees Jones, father of William L. Jones, was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1776. During the entire active years of his life he was extensively 
engaged in the tobacco business. His death occurred in 1850. He married 
Catherine Hubbard, deceased, and they had children : Paul, Catherine, Ellen, 
David, Lydia, William L., of whom see forward, Marcus, Mary and George. 

William L. Jones, third son and sixth child of Rees and Catherine (Hub- 
bard) Jones, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, March i, 1830, in the 
Frankstown Road, on the site of the present Pittsburg Hospital. His educa- 
tion was acquired in the public schools of his native city, and upon attaining 
a suitable age he engaged in farming. He was thus occupied until 1865, 
when he established himself in the wholesale drug business, which he con- 
ducted on an extensive scale until he retired from active business life in 1880. 
He enlisted in the Seventy-fourth Regiment of Missouri in 1861 and held the 
rank of captain of Company G. After serving with bravery he resigned in 

1863. He is a member of Hailman Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
also of Commandery No. i. Knights Templars. He is a man of intelligence 
and refinement, devoting much time to reading, and entertaining liberal 
minded views on all questions of the day. He married Mary Lang, daughter 
of Henry Lang, and has had children : Henry, William, Kate, Rees, Lydia, 
Edward, jMary, who married a ]\Ir. Armstrong, and Matilda, who died in 

1864. >\Irs. Jones died in 1888. 

^ GEORGE McCLELLAN HALL, whose sudden recent death was a great 
shock and a source of sincere regret in Homestead, Pennsylvania, was one of 
the foremost business men of the town, interested in many enterprises and a 
prominent member of the council. 

John Hall, grandfather of George McClellan Hall, the first of this branch 
of the Hall family of whom we have any definite record, w^as one of the first 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 219 

settlers at Poke Run, near New Texas, Pennsylvania. He was the owner of 
a large tract of land in that section which became the family homestead. He 
married and had children: James, see forward; William; Samuel; John; 
and two daughters, one of whom married a Mr. Crosier. 

James Hall, son of John Hall, was born at Poke Run, Pennsylvania, 
about 1806, on the homestead farm. He followed the occupation of farming 
all his life and later settled in Patten township. He died on the old home- 
stead January 18, 1886. He married Evelyn Brown, daughter of William 
and Evelyn (Hively) Brown, of Jersey, England, and they had children: 
I. William, resided in Turtle Creek. He married Agnes Giles and had chil- 
dren: Wilbert, Lewella, Carrie and Curtis. Both sons were in the United 
States army in the Philippines, were wounded and died there, and their bodies 
were brought to this country. 2. John, resided in Thompson's Run. He 
married (first) Margaret Martin, had children: Sadie, Jane and Frank. He 
married (second) Annie Parks, had children: Frank, Myrtle, George and 
Myrtle. 3. James, resided in Chicago, Illinois, where he died. He married 
Maria Martin and had children : ]\largaret, James, Thomas, Morris, William, 
Elmer and Harry. 4. Samuel, married Olive Smith and had one child, Harry. 
5. Henry, a steel worker, died from the effects of severe burns received in 
the mills, and is buried at Milton, Patten township. 6. Albert, married and 
had children : William, John and several others. 7. Robert, married Jennie 
Kilpatrick, and had several children. 8. George McClellan, see forward. 
9. Thomas, married Jennie Silvens and had five children. 10. Hiram, mar- 
ried Alary Riddle and had: Mamie, Harry, Walter, Ralph and others. 11. 
Ellen, married John Swissallen and had seven children. 12. Joseph, deceased. 

George IMcClellan Hall, eighth son and child of James and Evelyn 
(Brown) Hall, was born in Monroeville, Pennsylvania, September 15, 1862. 
He was educated in the public schools of that section and then commenced 
to assist his father in the cultivation of the home farm, with which work he 
was occupied until he had attained his seventeenth year. He then went to 
Turtle Creek, where he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade with 
Mr. Lenhart. At the end of three years he came to Homestead, where he 
followed his trade until he was twenty-five years old, and then branched out 
into the contracting business, with which he was associated for a period of 
ten years. He engaged in the lumber business and the operation of a planing 
mill in 1899, i-mder the firm name of George M. Hall, continuing this alone 
until 1905, when he took in as partners Messrs. Kinley, Morgan, Bridinger, 
Becker and Flecker, with the idea of relieving himself of some of the care 
and attention which the many details of his extensive business required. 
This partnership was in existence at the time of his death. Mr. Hall was 
also closely identified with a number of other important business enterprises, 
among which may be mentioned : President and treasurer of the Nonpareil 
Stone & Brick Company ; treasurer of the Empire Gold Mining Company ; 
stock and office holder and also director in the Homestead Supply Company ; 
member of the Lincoln Realty Company ; president of the Homestead Savings 
& Trust Company; formerly a director of the Homestead National Bank; 
member of the Board of Trade : borough treasurer for a period of seven 
years, and president of the school board. His political affiliations were with 
the Republican party, and he was a member of the common council at the 
time of his death. He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church 



220 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



and a liberal contributor to all church and charitable undertakings. He was 
a man of sound judgment and keen business foresight, and his counsel was 
sought by many. His fraternal connections were with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Royal Arcanum. His death, which occurred Feb- 
ruarv 25, 1906, was a sudden one, he being in his office attending to business 
matters when he was stricken. He was taken to his home, where he expired 
after a lapse of a few hours. 

He married, June i. 1887, Margaret Hursh, born in Westmoreland county 
in 1870, a daughter of L. B. and Agnes (Gibbons) Hursh. of Irwin, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, who were the parents of children: i. Mar- 
garet, mentioned above. 2. Albert, married Nora Colligan. had children : 
Audrey, Lebbish and George. 3. William, married Gallic O'Neil, had one 
son, Neil. Joseph Hursh, grandfather of Mrs. Hall, a resident of Irwin. 
Pennsylvania, was a soldier during the war of the Revolution. He was 
wounded, sent home, and died in Irwin six weeks thereafter. He married 
Christina McKelvy and they had children : L. B., see forward ; and Joseph, 
served in the army during the Civil war, L. B. Hursh, son of Joseph and 
Christina (McKelvy) Hursh, enlisted three times during the progress of the 
Civil war and served the full limit of time. Mr. and Mrs. Hall had children: 
Eva, born February 8, 1888; Olive Lacea, born December 2, 1890; Georgia, 
born September 7, 1894, died at the age of four years; Jessie, twin of Georgia; 
Clayton, born May 15, 1900. 



GEORGE W. GILES, a prosperous and influential citizen of Munhall, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, for many years holding the office of justice 
of the peace, and successfully engaged in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness, traces his ancestry to England. 

William Giles, grandfather of George W. Giles, was a native of Mon- 
mouthshire, England, whence he removed with his family about 1824 to Wales. 
Ten years later he emigrated with his family to the United States, settling 
at Six Mile Ferry, where he was engaged in coal mining. He married, in 
Monmouthshire. England. Edith, family name unknown, also a native of 
England, and they had children: i. John, deceased, was a coal operator at 
Braddock. Pennsylvania. He married and had children : John, Jr., deceased ; 
George, residing in Colorado ; Agnes, married William Hall and resides in 
Turtle Creek ; James ; Mary ; and Ella, deceased. 2. Thomas, deceased, resid- 
ed at McKeesport, Pennsylvania. He married and had children. 3. Maria, 
married John Zirckel and resides in Pittsburg. Pennsylvania. 4. Mary Ann, 
deceased. 5. George. Sr., see forward. 6. James, resides in Greene county, 
Pennsylvania. 7. William, Jr., resides in Mifflin township, Pennsylvania. 

George Giles, Sr., third son and fifth child of William and Edith Giles, 
was born in Monmouthshire, England, in 1824, and died in Haysboro, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, February 19, 1872. He is buried in Franklin, 
now Homestead, cemetery. He was about ten years of age when he came 
to this country with his parents, and at a suitable age was apprenticed to 
learn the blacksmith's trade, an occupation he followed all his life. He was 
a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and his religious affiliations were 
vvith the Methodist church, in which he held the office "of trustee. He mar- 
ried Harriet B. Dougherty, born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1824, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



daughter of John and Anna (Rhodes) Dougherty, who were the parents of 
the following named children: i. Anna, married Andrew Gardner, and 
they resided in California and are both deceased. 2. John, deceased. He 
was a blacksmith, married a Miss Rhodes, and resided in McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania. 3. Harriet B., mentioned above. 4. William, deceased, resided in 
AIcKeesport. 5. Margaret, married John Bishop, and in 1877 removed to 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where they were engaged in farming. 
Both are now deceased. George and Harriet B. (Dougherty) Giles were 
the parents of children: i. Charles C, was formerly right-of-way agent for 
the Central District Printing and Telegraph Company of Pittsburg, and is 
now superintendent of the electrical department of the Monongahela First 
Pool Gas and Coal Company. He resided for some years in Pennsylvania, 
West Mrginia and Ohio, and now has his permanent residence in Willock 
Station, Pennsylvania. 2. Emma J. ; married Frederick Lynch, a coal shipper 
on the ]\Ionongahela river, and resides at Glenvvood Station, Twenty-third 
ward, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. They have several children. 3. Margaret 
Ann was connected for many years with the Home Missionary Society in the 
Holy Land, Texas, etc., and now (1907) resides in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 4. Harriet Eva resides in Willock Station, Pennsylvania. 5. George 
W., see forward. 6. Ada A. married William Jack, foreman of the coal mines 
of the Monongahela First Pool Coal Company, and resides in Willock Sta- 
tion, Pennsylvania. They have children : Frank, who was graduated from 
the Pittsburg Academy and is at present employed in the store of the Monon- 
gahela First Pool Coal Company: and Ralph, a student at the Pittsburg 
Academy. 7. Laura L., married John Beam, an electrician, and resides at 
Hazelwood, Twenty-third ward of Pittsburg. They have children : Harry 
and Florence. 8. Ira H., born at Hope Church, Pennsylvania, October 30, 
1868. He was educated in the public schools, and at the age of fourteen years 
entered the grocery business of Joseph Mort, in his native town, remaining 
in this employment for a period of four years. He then entered the service 
of the Plomes'tead Steel Works, and was thus occupied until the strike of 1S92, 
when he abandoned this line of business. His next occupation was as station- 
ary engineer for the Harrison Gas Coal Company of Pittsburg, a position ne 
resigned at the expiration of two years in favor of one with the Central Dis- 
trict Printing and Telegraph Company as lineman. At the end of one year 
he was advanced to the" rank of chief locator, and when the engineering de- 
partment was organized he was transferred to this department as field en- 
gineer, and at the end of four years was advanced to the rank of chief field 
engineer, a position he holds at the present time. His political affiliations are 
with the Republican party, and when the borough was incorporated in 1902 
he was elected as councilman to serve a term of one year ; was re-elected in 
1903 to serve a term of three years, and upon the expiration of this in 1906 
^v-as again elected for another three years' term. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church of Haysboro. He is connected with 
the following organizations: Member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of Haysboro for about seventeen years, has been past grand master 
and representative to the Grand Lodge at Harrisburg and Williamsport ; mem- 
ber of the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers of Home- 
stead : member of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics of Home- 
stead ; member of the National Union of Allegheny; president of the Inde- 



222 A CENTURY AKD A HALF OF 



pendent Fire Company of Haysboro. He married, February 13, 1888, Anna 
Liippold, daughter of Matthias and Susan (Sembower) Luppold, the latter 
born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. Matthias Luppold was born in Ger- 
many, emigrated to America, and was employed as a construction foreman. 
He was killed at Munhall on the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1902, and was 
buried in Homestead cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Ira H. Giles were the parents 
of children: Edna; Charles; Howard; Mildred; Viola; Kenneth, deceased. 

George W. Giles, second son and fifth child of George and Harriet B. 
(Dougherty) Giles, was born at Six Mile Ferry, now Haysboro, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, December 24, i860. He was educated in the public 
schools of his native town, in the Twenty-eighth ward public school of Pitts- 
burg, and was graduated from the high school. At the age of fourteen years 
he entered upon his business career, in which he has been eminently success- 
ful. His first position was with I. D. Risher, in his native town, with whom 
he remained for two years, then held a position as clerk of the grocery store 
of Joseph Mort, of the same town, and at the end of nine years removed to 
Homestead. Here he established himself in the real estate and insurance 
business, in which his reliability and many sterling qualities have gained for 
him an enviable business reputation. He has always been a stanch supporter 
of the principles of the Republican party, and has done all in his power to 
further the interests of that body. Pie was appointed justice of the peace in 
1897 to fill a vacancy caused by resignation in Mifflin township, and in the 
spring of the following year was elected for a term of five years. In 1901 
Munhall borough was organized from a part of Mifflin township and Mr. 
Giles then held his commission of justice of the peace from that borough, and 
was elected to another term of five years in 1903. He and his family are 
members of the Methodist church and he is connected with the following 
named organizations : Was a member for fourteen years and is now past 
master of Homestead Lodge No. 582, Ancient Free and Accepted Order of 
Masons of Homestead; member of Pittsburg Commandery No. i, Knights 
Templar; past officer of Magdala Lodge No. 991, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; member of Magdala Encampment No. 228, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows: member of Boaz Council No. 814, Royal Arcanum. 

He married, March 24, 1891, Mary Frances McCurdy, born January 19, 
1866, daughter of Robert and ]\Iartha (Eicher) McCurdy, of Louden, Penn- 
sylvania. Robert McCurdy was a private during the Civil war, and while in 
service contracted a fever which caused his death shortly after the close of 
the war. His widow resides in Homestead. They had two children: Mrs. 
Giles, and a son who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Giles have 
had children : Ruth McCurdy, born August 4, 1897 ; George W., Jr., January 
28, 1900 : and Robert Hamilton, August 2, 1904. 



THE RE A FAMILY. Among the old time families of Greater Pitts- 
burg is that of the Reas. The first member of this family of which there 
is any definite account of in Pennsylvania, is General John Rea, who was born 
near Chambersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1775. Lamb in his 
Biographical Encyclopjedia states that, "John Rea was in the Revolutionary 
war ; served as a States representative in Pennsylvania several years, and was 
elected on the Democratic ticket from the Chambersburg district to the Eighth, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 223 

Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh Congresses — 1803-1811; defeated in 1810 and 
1812; elected to the Thirteenth Congress in 1813 and died at Chambersburg, 
February 6, 1829." It is also known that he served in the war of 1812-14. 
He married Elizabeth Culbertson, daughter of Colonel Samuel Culbertson, of 
Revolutionary fame. By this union were born the following children : 

1. Samuel, born in 1808, near Chambersburg, Franklin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, died in Pittsburg in 1878. He was one of the original members of 
the First Presbyterian church, Dr. Herron being the pastor. He was always 
interested and closely identified with the work of this denomination. In his 
early life he was connected with and helped to organize the Union Boat Line, 
which operated both canal and river boats before the Pennsylvania Railroad 
entered Pittsburg. He was from the organization of the Peoples National 
Bank of Pittsburg its president for many years. Was also identified with 
the Pittsburg City Life Insurance Company, and had other large business 
interests. He retired from the above lines of pursuit and engaged in the oil 
producing business with others, and as a result lost his goodly fortune by the 
fault of others, but was always held in high esteem for his personal integrity. 
He married Elizabeth McKee, of Blairs Gap, Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Guy Carleton McKee. By this union were born four children, 
who grew to maturity as follows : Anna, who married Professor J. E. Ayers, 
now residing near Denver, Colorado, and they have three children, Joseph H., 
Eleanor C. and Lucy E. ; John A., who lives in California and married Kath- 
erine Ford, by whom was born, Florence, James C. and Katherine E. ; Doctor 
James C, who died unmarried; Mary Laughlin, who married Henry Clinton 
Ayers. now deceased, leaving two children, Elizabeth Rea, who married Gra- 
ham C. Wells, and has one child, Clinton Ayers ; Eleanor Sharlurne. 

2. John Rea, ]\I. D., married Hannah Laughlin, daughter of Alexander 
Laughlin, whose family sketch appears elsewhere in this work. They were 
the parents of three children : Samuel, who married, and the issue is, Mar- 
jorie Dorothy; Mary Ann, who died unmarried; Elizabeth, who married 
Edward Simonds, of New Orleans, Louisiana. 

3. James D. Rea, who married Ruth Blair Moore, of Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania, and their children are: Jane M., who died unmarried; Thomas B., 
who married; Samuel Rea, who is the second vice-president of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company and married Mary Black of Pittsburg and has 
children. George and Ruth. 

4. William Rea, of whom later. 

5. Charles Rea (only surviving child) married Elizabeth Cochran and had 
children: Charles S., who married Irene Palmer; Louise, who married Rev. 
Walter Wilson, and thev have three children, Katherine E., Charles and 
Ruth R. ' 

(II) William Rea. fourth child of General John Rea, was born in Frank- 
lin county, Pennsylvania, in 1820, and married Matilda Robinson, daughter 
of William C. Robinson ; she was a native of Pittsburg. They had two chil- 
dren : William H., who married Mary Childs of Pittsburg, daughter of Col- 
onel James H. Childs and wife, Mary Howe. The issue by this union was. 
James Childs. Majorv and Marrianne. Henry Robinson Rea. who married 
Edith Oliver, daughter of Henry W. Oliver. They have two children, Edith 
Anne and Henrv Oliver. 

William Rea, the father, came to Pittsburg in 1837, and was first em- 



224 



A CENTURY AXD A HALF OF 



ployed with the Pennsylvania Canal Company in its transportation depart- 
ment, but subsequently he engaged in the commission business. Later he be- 
came a member of the firm of Robinson, Rea & Company, and was connected 
with their iron foundry until his death in 1892. He was also a director in 
the Merchants and Mechanics Bank, the Peoples Savings Bank and of the 
Homewood Cemetery. He was a member of the Presbyterian church. 



COLONEL FRANK K. PATTERSON, special agent for the Royal 
Insurance Company, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, was born in Fawn, now Har- 
rison, township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1848 ; son of John and 
]\Iary (Cowan) Patterson. He is the great-grandson of Robert Patterson, 
whose history, with that of his descendants, is traced below. 

(L) Robert Patterson, born in Ireland October 14, 1763, died August 14, 
1833 ; emigrated from the north of Ireland to America about 1785, and set- 
tled at what is now Munhall Station, on a farm. Later he purchased the land 
now known as the John Turner farm, on Squirrel Hill, Pittsburg; there he 
continued farming for a livelihood. He married Isabella Brisbin, born July 
10. 1768, and died December 3, 1832, daughter of Captain John Brisbin, who 
commanded Company B, of the Third Pennsylvania Line, during the Revolu- 
tionary war, and died in 1821, and was buried in the Paxtang burying-ground 
at Plarrisburg. Pennsylvania. Robert and Isabella (Brisbin) Patterson had 
nine children, as follows: i. Alary, born March 21, 1790, died May 13, 1855. 
2. John (subject's grandfather), born February 20, 1792, died at his home 
on Squirrel Hill, May 13, 1852. 3. Elizabeth, born March 18, 1794, died 
July 9, 1872, at the home of her niece, Mrs. Mary Chadwick, Squirrel Hill. 

4. James", born May 8, 1796, moved to Indiana, date of death unknown. 

5. Isabella, born December 18, 1798, died at home in East Liberty, September 
14, 1S89. 6. .Samuel, born June 24, 1801, died in Ohio in April, 1855. 7. 
Nancy, born December 4, 1804, died in July, 1870. 8. William, born June 8,. 
1806, no record of death. 9. Jane, born July 17, 1808, date of death unknown. 

(II) John Patterson, eldest son of the emigrant Robert Patterson (I), 
was horn on his father's farm before named as situated on Squirrel Hill, Pitts- 
burg, where he succeeded his father in farm pursuits, which he followed all 
his life. He married Mary Oldfield, born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, 
and they were the parents of three sons and four daughters, as follows : 
I. Robert. 2. John. 3. George, who is still hving (1907). 4. Eliza. 5. Isa- 
belle. 6. Mary, who is still a survivor and the widow of Joseph Chadwick. 
7. Nancy. 

(III) John Patterson, father of Frank K. Patterson and son of John 
Patterson (II), was born February 24, 1822, on the farm on which his grand- 
father had settled, and there he also followed farm life until the spring of 
1857, when he removed to a farm which he had purchased in Plum township, 
where he engaged in farming during the remainder of his life, dying in De- 
cember, 1903. He married Mary Cowan, daughter of Robert Cowan, whose 
farm was located near where the Schenley Hotel now stands, and where Mrs. 
Patterson was born. John Patterson and his wife, Mary Cowan, were the 
parents of five children, including the subject, three sons and two daughters, 
all born in Harrison township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, except the 
youngest, who was born in Plum township of the same county. These chil- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 225 

dren were: i. Alary, deceased (unmarried). 2. Frank K., of this notice. 
3. John H., of Los Angeles. 4. Robert W., deceased. 5. Belle M., wife of 
Robert Chesney, of Coraopolis. 

(IV) Frank K. Patterson, second child of John Patterson (III) and his 
wife, Mary (Cowan) Patterson, received his ediication in the country schools 
of Plum township, Allegheny county, and ^vhile still a youth entered upon 
the military career which forms an important part of the record of his life. 
The military records disclose the following facts concerning his' able service : 

He enlisted, February 12, 1864, at the age of fifteen years, in Battery 
H., Third Regiment of Pennsylvania Artillery; and was honorably discharged 
July 25, 1865. He became a private in Parson's Zouaves (afterwards Com- 
pany H, of Fourteenth Infantry Regiment), August 27, 1870; a private 
in punc Karns Rifles August 21, 1872; appointed captain and aide-de-camp, 
Third Brigade, Eighteenth Division, October 14, 1873; major and aide-de- 
camp. Ninth Division, August 19, 1874; to major and quartermaster. Ninth 
Division, December 2g, 1875 ; mustered out on the reorganization of guard, 
June 12, 1878; appointed brigade inspector. Second Brigade, April 6, 1887, to 
rank from February 19, 1887; re-appointed brigade inspector, February 6, 
1892 ; appointed captain and aide-de-camp. Second Brigade, November 26, 
1895; major and ordnance officer, June 13, 1896; re-appointed January 26, 
1897 ; commission expired, June 7, 1898; re-appointed, June 15, 1898; to general 
inspector of rifle practice, January 30, 1899; re-appointed, February 24, 1903, 
and again re-appointed, February, 1907. 

Upon reaching manhood Colonel Patterson engaged in the hardware 
business at Freeport, Pennsylvania, for a period of about three years, and 
then engaged in the insurance business until 1884, when he was appointed 
special agent for the Royal Insurance Company, which position he is still 
holding in a successful manner. 

He is a member of the Pittsburg Board of Trade, and belongs to the 
Sons of the American Revolution and the Grand Army of the Republic. He 
is identified with the East Liberty Presbyterian church. 

Colonel Patterson has been twice married. His first wife was Sadie E. 
Magill, born in Freeport, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Dr. Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Magill, and their children were: i. Mary E., for a number of years 
teacher of languages in the Pittsburg public schools, died in September, 1903, 
aged twenty-nine. 2. Hattie, wife of E. N. Gillespie, of Robertson, Illinois. 
3. Thomas Magill, unmarried, special agent for the Girard Insurance Com- 
pany, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The mother of these children died in Free- 
port in 1883, and Colonel Patterson subsequently married Alice Mahaffey, of 
Mahaffey, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Robert and Mary 
Mahafifey, to whom were born the following children: i. Catharine. 2. Mar- 
garet. 3. Frances, who died, aged five years. Colonel Patterson is now a 
resident of the Twentieth ward, Pittsburg, living at 432 Graham street. 



HENRY WISSER CORWIN, now one of Pittsburg's successful fire 
insurance agents, but for many years intimately connected with mechanical 
pursuits, was born at Mount Hope, Orange county, New York, January 2j, 
1827, and there attained his majority, coming to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
in 1844. He learned the pattern-makers trade with William J. Totten, an 



226 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



uncle. When Mr, Totten operated these works they were styled the Fort 
Pitt Works. Mr. Corwin remained with him a few years, went to Nashville, 
Tennessee, returning in i860, and in 1866 was engaged with what was then 
the Totten Company and was made superintendent of the pattern-making 
department, at which he continued until 1901. Mr. Corwin then retired from 
the business and at present (1907) is following the fire insurance business. 

He attends the Christ ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, corner of Liberty 
avenue and Center street. On May 10, 1851, he married (first) Sarah E. 
Brown, who died jNIay 11, 1854, the mother of two children: i. Ella, born 
April I, 1852; married Charles Lewis, both now deceased; their issue was 
one child, Etta, a teacher in the Seventeenth ward of Pittsburg. 2. Lydia, 
who died in infancy. For his second wife, Mr. Corwin married Martha Jane 
Beson, born in Tennessee. By this union, four children were born: i. Henry 
P., who died in infancy. 2. William Beson, now of Washington, District of 
Columbia, a patent attorney. 3. Carrie Robinson, married Harry E. Wilson. 
4. Harry McKendree, who has charge of the patent department in the office 
of Bakewell & Byrnes, attorneys, of Pittsburg; married Bessie Rosenberger. 

Of Mr. Corwin's ancestry it may be stated in this connection that the 
first of the family name to come to America was ]\Iatthias Corwin. 

(I) Matthias Corwin was probably born in England about 1590 or 1600, 
and died September 12, 1658. He married Margaret IMorton, by whom was 
born three children : John, Martha and Theoplus. 

(H) John Corwin, son of the English emigrant, is mentioned among the 
first families of New Haven, Connecticut. Later he settled in Long Island ; 
he was a prominent man of his day in public offices. He was born 1630 and 
died September 25, 1702. He married Mary, daughter of Charles Glover, 
February 4, 1658; she died prior to 1690. The issue by such union was: 
John, Matthias, Samuel, Sarah, Reuben, Hannah, Abigail and Mary. He 
bought land at Oyster Pond and Aquebougue. He was admitted as a freeman 
of Connecticut for Southold, 1662, and his name appears on the census list 
for the year 1698. 

(HI) John Corwin, son of John (II) and Mary (Glover) Corwin, and 
known as Captain John, was born in 1663 and died December 13, 1729. He 
married before 1698. Their children were six in number: Benjamin, John, 
David, Sarah, Elizabeth and Hester. 

(lY) David Corwin, son of Captain John (III), was born about 1705, 
not later than 1710, and died before 1782. He married Deborah Wells, 1732 ; 
she was born in 1717 and died November 24, 1798. Their children were six 
in number, named as follows : David, Joshua, Joseph, Phinneas, Eli, Annie 
and perhaps another daughter. He moved to Orange county. New York, 
probably before or at the opening of the Revolutionary war. He was buried 
at Middletown in that county. He was a freeholder of Southold in 1737 and 
his name was written "Curwin." 

(V) Joshua Corwin, son of David Corwin (IV), was born on Long 
Island, New York, Alarch 25, 1735, or March 26, 1733, and died July 6, 
1812. He married Anna Paine May i, 1755, at Southold; she was born 
September 6, 1733, and died April 4, 1781. For his second wife Joshua Cor- 
van married Rhoda Davis, widow of a Mr. Emerson. Joshua had the fol- 
lowing children: Joshua, Peter, David, Abner, Annie, Joseph, John, Jemima 
and Benjamin. In 1775 he signed .an engagement to support congress. In 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



227 



1776 his name appears on a census list. He lived near Mount Hope and re- 
moved to Orange county, New York, during or soon after the close of the 
Revolutionary struggle. 

(VI) Abner Corwin, son of Joshua Corwin (V), was born March 3, 
1760, and died in 1838. He married Sarah Overton, February 28, 1782. Their 
issue was : Seth, John, Joshua, David and Jemima. 

(VH) David Corwin, son of Abner Corwin (VI), was born at Mnunt 
Hope, New York, July 18, 1799, and died September 26, 1839. He married 
Hester Totten, of Mount Hope, October 4, 1817 ; she was born December 10, 
1799, a daughter of John Totten (born August 5, 1770, and died October 
13, 1864) and Lydia Jacks, born October 2, 1771 ; died March i, 1848, her 
home being at Morristown, New Jersey. Their children were: i. John T., 
died young. 2. Stephen O., born May 24, 1820, married Nancy Ann Hobart, 
August 10, 1844; their issue is, Atrvmette, James B., William Totten, Ellen, 
Henry Wisser. 3. Benjamin F., born ]May 26, 1822, was drowned February 
5, 1843. 4. Caroline, born June 3, 1824, married Dr. Alfred Bennett, October 
26, 1839; they have nine children: Francis, Eliza, Caroline, Ella, Harriett, 
Alfred, Alice, William Totten and Adolph. 5. Henry W., the subject of this 
memoir. 6. Andrew Jackson, born January 29 and died February 2, 1829. 
7. Jemima Jane, born March 8, 1830; married Adolph J. You, January 23, 
1851. He died August 17, 1853, aged twenty-five years. Their children were: 
Adolph Jackson and Sarah Elizabeth, twins, 8. Lydia Antoinette, born July 
16, 1832; married Peter Clark, October 14, 1852; he was born July 3, 1815. 
The children by this union were: Clinton Corwin, born April 6, 1855; Henry 
Porter, born December 11, 1857; Evan Peter, born April 15, 1859; Ella Sarah, 
born February 22, 1861 ; Jennie Antoinette, born May 12, 1862 ; Minnie Hes- 
ter, born June 14, 1865; Frank Totten, born April 21, 1867; Birdie, born De- 
cember 31, 1869. 9. Sarah Elizabeth, born April 12, 1836; married Evan 
Evans, March 27, 1855; he was born May 4, 1827. Their issue was: Charles 
Daniel, born February 24, 1856; Hester Kate, born March 17, 1858; Sarah 
Caroline, born May 28, i860; Evan Corwin, born November 13, 1863; Richard 
Jennings, born October 15, 1866. 10. David R. P., of whom later. The 
father of this family, David Corwin (VII), was a soldier in the War of 1812, 
in the coast guard of Long Island, New York. His widow received a land- 
bounty, but no pension, on account of not being married at the date of his en- 
listment. He lived for many years at New Vernon, Orange county. New 
York. In 1836 he removed to Buttermilk Falls, on the. Susquehanna, about 
twenty miles above Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. His children were all born 
at the last named place. 

(VIII) David R. P. Corwin, son of David Corwin (VII), was born July 
18, 1838. He married Susanna Irwin, no issue. He served in the railroad 
corps of the United States army during the Civil war, and was stationed at 
Chattanooga in charge of the forwarding department. He was honorably dis- 
charged on account of sickness, July 4, 1864. Later he became secretary and 
treasurer of the Pittsburg, Virginia and Charleston Railroad Company. 



DAVID J. THOMAS, son of the well known foundryman of Pittsburg, 
was born in Pittsburg October 13, 1832, son of David D. and Rachel (Jones) 
Thomas, both of whom were natives of Wales and who came to xA.merica 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



in 1832, bringing- one child, Daniel, with them. The other two children 
were born in this country. They settled in Pittsburg immediately upon their 
arrival in this country. Before coming here, in his native country he had 
been engaged at farming and also followed the butcher's trade, but upon 
coming here he with others engaged in mining at Minersville, Pennsylvania,, 
and subsequently at mines on the South Side, Pittsburg, where he was an 
operator in mines until 1861. 

Of his large family of children only three now survive. They are as 
follows: I. David J., of this notice. 2. Reese, who now lives in Texas; he 
was in the Civil war, a member of Company B, One Hundred and Second 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment. He volunteered as a private at the first 
call, serving in the "three months' men," then re-enlisted and remained 
throughout the war. 3. Mary, wife of John Stevens. 

David J. Thomas, son of David D. and Rachel (Jones) Thomas, learned 
the trade of a potter and followed the same until twenty-one years of age, 
when he engaged in the foundry business. In 1870 he engaged in this 
industry on his own account and is still pursuing it with much success. He 
has made all he possesses by unceasing toil, frugality and industry of the type 
which always succeeds in this country. 

He was united in marriage to Susana Edwards, born in 1833, and died in 
1882. By this union were born five children, as follows: i. Hannah, wife 
of Thomas D. Chantler, an attorney of Pittsburg ; their children are : Mary, 
Everett, Rachel and Drummond. 2. Margaret, wife of James G. Strain, a 
banker of Kansas City. Missouri, formerly of Washington, Pennsylvania; 
their children are Margaret and James. 3. Catherine, wife of Edward A. 
Spencer, and their children are : Edward Allen and Catherine Susanna. 4. 
Shalisha E., now a practicing physician in New York, unmarried. 5. Reba, 
wife of Joseph W. Adams, of South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania ; their two 
children are John and David. 



DR. HAMILTON SCOTT BURROUGHS, who has been one of the 
foremost physicians and surgeons of the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, since 
1891, was born at Rutan, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1852, a son of Thomas 
Talmage and Eliza Jane (Scott) Burroughs. His paternal grandfather, Sam- 
uel Burroughs, was born in England in 1806 and came to the United States 
when quite young. He finally located at Brownsville, Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he engaged in carriage and wagon making. Subsequently he 
removed to Amity, Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he followed farm 
pursuits until his death about 1886. He married Temperance Reeves, a member 
of an old New Jersey family. By this union was born the following children : 
I. John, who married Mahitable Dilli. 2. Thomas Talmage, the subject's 
father, of whom further mention is given. 3. Mulford, who married Parney 
Hendershot. 4. Samuel, married Maria Wood. 5. Dr. James, married Basha 
Gray. 6. Phineas, married and moved west. 7. Deborah, wife of Theodore 
Bryan. 8. Elizabeth, wife of Carroll Moore. 9. Ella, unmarried. 

Thomas T. Burroughs, the father, was by occupation a farmer. In re- 
ligious belief he was of the Presbyterian faith. In his politics he was a 
supporter of the Republican party. He married Eliza Jane, the daughter of 
John and Susannah (Neciwanger) Scott. The issue by this union was: i. 




Mj. ./i^i^^'^Trty^ M , ^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 229 

Hamilton S. (subject). 2. Belle, who married Frank Hedley and their issue 
IS— Emmett, Early, Robert and Dora Hedley. 3. Lotta, married Leroy Marsh, 
and their children are— Talmage, Mattie, Mont and Cora Marsh. 4. Ella, 
married Dr. T. M. Alilliken. 5. John, married Emma Throckmorton, and 
they have children— Edna and Etta. 6. James, married Amanda Knight. 7. 
William, single. 8. Bertha, single. 

Doctor Hamilton S. Burroughs was educated in the public schools of 
Greene county, Pennsylvania, and his early training was supplemented by a 
collegiate course in Waynesburg College, of Pennsylvania. He then chose the 
medical profession for his life's work, and attended Jefferson Medical College 
graduating with the class of 1879. Immediately upon his completing his 
course he opened an office in Greene county, Pennsylvania, where he continued 
for twelve years, during which period he broadened his knowledge of the science 
of medicine through the experience of his general practice. At the expiration 
of the twelve years of his Greene county practice he removed to the city of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where for the past fifteen years he has been identified 
with the medical fraternity of the place, being an active and highly successful 
physician. His association for organizations for the advancement of pro- 
fessional knowledge and the benefit of the members of his fellow-practitioners 
embraces a membership in the Allegheny County Medical Society, the Greene 
County Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. Doctor Burroughs is a member in high rank 
in the Masonic fraternity, being a Consistory Mason. Politically he is a 
supporter of the Republican party. 

June 28, 1882, he was married to Margaret Ann Hopkins, of Waynesburg, 
Pennsylvania, and to them has been born one son — Samuel Gross Burroughs, 
torn December 23, 1892. Mrs. Burroughs is a descendant of the Pilgrim 
stock of New England ; her father was Samuel Hopkins and her mother's 
maiden name was Martha Milliken. 



ROBERT DILWORTH. George Dilworth (V), son of Benjamin Dil- 
worth (IV), and grandson of Anthony Dilworth (III), was born in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, April 6, 1806, and died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 
July, 1865. He removed to Allegheny county while yet a young man, before his 
marriage, and engaged in the saw mill business and later in a planing mill, in 
which work he continued until his death. He married Mary Jane Robertson, 
born in Pittsburg, daughter of George and Jane (Mitchell) Robertson. Of the 
thirteen children born of this union four died young. The names of those 
growing to maturity are: i. George, who was a first lieutenant in Com- 
pany C of the One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment of Pennsylvania 
Volunteers (Colonel J. B. Clark's regiment). At the battle of Chancellors- 
ville he was wounded, and from which he died. He was unmarried. 2. 
Nancy, married George W. Faulkner, of Allegheny City, both now deceased. 
3. J. Lawrence, who was a member of Company C, Sixty-first Pennsylvania 
Regiment of Volunteers in the Civil war, was a sergeant and was accidentally 
shot and died from the eft'ects at Auburn, New York, after having his right 
arm amputated at the shoulder. He was unmarried. 4. William. 5. 
Mary A., married James Jackson, now deceased. 6. Rebecca, married T. C. 
Davis, and their issue is : Sadie, Stella, Flora, Olive, Samuel W. Cameron, 



230 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



all living in Milvale, Pennsylvania. 7. Samuel, unmarried, living in Alle- 
gheny City. 8. Irene, deceased, who married Charles D. Hamilton, who is 
living. Their children are : Florence, who married Morris Ironsides ; James 
and Mabel. 9. Robert, of this notice. 

Robert Dilworth (VI), son of George Dilworth (V), born May 26, 1843, 
in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, received his schooling at the public schools 
of his native city and at the Iron City Commercial College. Upon leaving 
school he learned the blacksmith's trade and upon the breaking out of the 
Civil war in 1861 he enlisted in the Sixty-first Regiment of Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, in Company C, for three years as a private soldier. At the 
battle of Fair Oaks he was seriously wounded, being shot through the left 
lung and his arm. the effects of which he has felt ever since. He was sent to 
the Philadelphia hospital, where he finally recovered, and received his honor- 
able discharge from the service of his country in August, 1862. After recov- 
ering from his serious wounds he entered the recorder's office in the Alle- 
gheny county court house, under Abner McClure, and there remained for 
three years, after which he was elected clerk of the common council of 
Allegheny City (1886), serving continuously up to April, 1907, having been 
there forty-one years. He is a man of unassuming ways, methodical in all 
of his methods and highly esteemed by all within the radius of his wide 
acquaintance. Politically he is a Republican. 

In Allegheny City, in 1863, Mr. Dilworth married Charlotte Kelly, born 
in that city, a daughter of Zacharia and Hannah Kelly. His wife died 
December 3, 1890. They were the parents of thirteen children, eight of 
whom still survive: i. George, married Mary Dubb, of Allegheny. 2. 
Frank, unmarried. 3. Mary O., married William A. Nye, Jr., of Allegheny 
City, and they have children : Grace, Elsie and Howard. 4. Robert, Jr., mar- 
ried Lillian Smith, of Allegheny City, and has one child — Mary L. 5. Lincoln, 
married Elsie Hill. 6. Elsie G., married S. W. Davis, of Allegheny City, 
and their issue is: Lillian, Ruth H., Helen, Walter and Robert (HI). 7. 
Charlotte, married Donald G. Macpherson, of Allegheny City, now of Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania, and has one child — Ethel. 8. Cora L., married Homer B. 
Neely, of Allegheny City. Of the five deceased children, four died in infancy, 
and one, Edwin A., died aged eighteen years, in 1903. 



JOHN HENRY VINCENT, chief clerk under the superintendent of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Sheridan, Pennsylvania, was born July 25, 
1862. ' 

He received his education at Alliance, Ohio, graduating from the high 
school, and then entered Rensselaer College, Troy, New York. After leaving 
college he was employed by the Adams Express Company as assistant agent 
and messenger in 1881, and remained in that position about six years, then 
went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the service of the Minneapolis, St. Paul 
& Sault Ste. Marie Railroad Company, as a general utility man, under the 
general manager. He continued there five years and resigned his position to 
accept one with the Southern Railway Company, which he held one year, and 
then came to Sheridan, Pennsylvania, in March, 1893, and entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as chief clerk, which position he still 
occupies. In his political belief he is an ardent Republican ; he was elected 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 231 



first as treasurer of the borough of Sheridan and has since been county com- 
mitteeman and member of the school board. In 1906 he was elected as chief 
burgess of his borough for a three years' term. He manifests much interest 
in local politics. He is a member of the Presbyterian church at Sheridan. 
In civic societies he is an advanced Mason, belonging to the Thirty-second 
degree of that' body; is also an Odd Fellow and a past exalted ruler of the 
Brotherhood of Elks. He is connected with the fraternal order of Maccabees, 
and member of the Loyal Legion (through descent). 

Mr. Vincent married, September 10, 1884, Edith Oberlin, of Massillon, 
Ohio. She is the daughter of Arnold Oberlin and wife. Her father is 
engaged in the wholesale grocery trade in Massillon. She has one sister, the 
wife of Adam Knablash, of Canton, Ohio. 

William H. Vincent, father of John H. Vincent, was born in Devonshire, 
England, in 1837, and came to America in 1848, settling at Cleveland, Ohio, 
where h'e remained until twenty years of age ; he then located at Massillon, 
Ohio, where he engaged in the hotel business, which he continues to follow. 
He married Rebecca Voeghan Ellerson, daughter of John Ellerson, of Alliance, 
Ohio. 

MICHAEL HUGH WITHERS, a prominent business man of Sheridan, 
who has contributed largely to the growth and development of his adopted 
city and state, is a native of Ireland, born June 6, 1865. He is a lineal 
descendant of j\lichael Withers, who was a native of Donegal, Ireland, a 
grandson of Charles and Mary (Sweeney) Withers, residents of Ireland, the 
former of whom followed agricultural pursuits near Derry, and son of Hugh 
and Kate (Logue) Withers. 

Hugh Withers (father) was born in Derry, Ireland, 1836. He received 
a common school education, and later learned the trade of a stone mason, 
which he followed for a number of years, now (1907) leading a retired life 
in his native land. He was united in marriage to Kate Logue, daughter of 
Michael Logue, and niece of a cardinal, and their children are: i. Michael 
Hugh, of whom later. 2: Bridget, married, in Ireland, a police officer. 3. 
Daniel, came to America in the year 1898, was a molder in the Baldwin 
Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, now a resident of Pittsburg, running an 
express through the village. 4. John, remained in Ireland, on the old home- 
stead. 5 and 6. Mary and Kate, also remained in Ireland on the old home- 
stead. 7. Charles, died young. 

Michael H. Withers obtained a practical education in the schools of his 
native land, and after his arrival in the United States supplemented this 
knowledge by attendance at a college in Pittsburg. He was twenty-two years 
of age when he sailed from Londonderry on the ship "Virginia," landing in 
Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. After his arrival here he spent a short period 
of time with an uncle, Judge Morris Francis Withers, a judge in the police 
court. His first occupation was in the employ of a coal dealer and he later 
run the mines for the company he was interested in. In 1896 he took up his 
residence in Sheridan, Pennsylvania, and there embarked in the coal business. 
He now deals chiefly in builders' supplies, and in addition has erected several 
houses, which are models of good workmanship. He is the owner of con- 
siderable land, and in many ways is an important factor in the afifairs of the 
town. He is a member of the Catholic church at Sheridan, and his political 



232 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



allegiance is given to the Republican party. He takes an active interest in 
politics, but has never sought or held public office. 

Mr. Withers was married in Pittsburg, South Side, October 21, 1896, by 
Rev. Father Wigley, to Kate Holland, of Pittsburg, whose parents emigrated 
to this country from Ireland. Three children were the issue of this union, 
as follows: Hugh Morris, born April 12, 1899. Donald and Catherine, who 
died in infancy. Mrs. Withers died June 28, 1906, and was buried from 
the Church of Holy Innocents, of Sheridan, Saturday, June 30, 1906. Solemn 
high mass was celebrated by the pastor. Rev. Father O'Shea, assisted by the 
Rev. John Brady, of Pittsburg, as deacon, and Rev. B. J. Hynse, of Braddock, 
as sub-deacon. The sermon preached by Father O'Shea was an exceedingly 
touching and well deserved tribute to the womanly virtues and christian char- 
acter of Mrs. Withers, who performed the duties of wife and mother in an 
exemplary manner, and was regarded as the greatest and most eloquent 
sermon ever delivered in this valley. Her remains were interred in Calvary 
cemetery, Pittsburg. 



JOHN M. McCONNELL, yardmaster for the Pan Handle Railroad 
Company at Sheridan, w'as born July 3, 1856, at Smithfield (or Fern wood) 
Station, Jefferson county, Ohio, son of James McConnell, who was born in 
the United States and passed the later years of his life at Holmes Mills. His 
wife was Susan (Magrue) McConnell, of Jefferson county, Ohio. 

John M. McConnell w^as educated at Powell's school house, and until his 
twentieth year remained at home with his parents. He then entered the 
service of the Pan Handle Railroad Company as section hand on section 
No. 20, Pittsburg division, and at the end of a few months was made freight 
brakeman, advancing in 1879 to the position of freight conductor. After 
holding this position for a few' years he was made yardmaster, serving in 
various local yards, and also at Collier, West Virginia, subsequently remaining 
for a period of ten years at Denison, Ohio, as night yardmaster. He was 
next made general yardmaster of the Pittsburg yards, which included Sheridan 
and Carnegie, and upon completion of the Sculley yards his jurisdiction 
extended from Ingram to Pittsburg as general yardmaster, which position he 
still holds. He belongs to the Junior Order of United American Mechanics ; 
Whitman Council, No. 20, Denison, Ohio ; the Masonic fraternity, and is a 
member of the Presbyterian church at Sheridan. 

Mr. McConnell married, January 3, 1883, Annie A., daughter of James 
and Annie Brown, of Pittsburg, and they are the parents of tw^o children: i. 
Lottie May, wdfe of Charles Henthorne, private secretary to General Super- 
intendent Andrews, of the W^abash Railroad ; Mr. and Mrs. Henthorne have 
one daughter, Lois Evelyn. 2. Walter E., an operator for the Pan Handle 
Railroad Company ; he is unmarried and resides at home. 



HENRY LEWIS SCHILPP, well known in business circles of Pittsburg, 
was born October 25, 1873, in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, a son of John 
and Amelia (Bear) Schilpp. He was educated at the common schools of 
his native county and at the age of twenty-one years was appointed tax 
collector in the City Hall, Allegheny City. He showed great adaptability for 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



233 



this position and was retained there twelve years, after which time he removed 
to the borough of Sheridan, where he was engaged in the real estate business, 
representing the Pittsburg Realty Company, known as the Keystone Plan. 
Mr. Schilpp was united in marriage in 1895 to Lydia Blair, of Allegheny City, 
the daughter of John K. Blair and wife; her father was one of the founders 
of the well known department store company of Boggs, Buhl & Blair, Alle- 
gheny City. Mr. and Mrs. Schilpp are the parents of four children: i. 
Henry Lewis, Jr.. born June 23, 1897, attending school in Sheridan. 2. 
Eliza, born 1899, died 1902. 3. Elizabeth Blair, born December, 1902. 4. 
John, born July 31, 1904, died in infancy. 

John Schilpp, father of Henry L. Schilpp, was born in Allegheny City, 
Pennsylvania, in 1853. He was by trade a tanner, which business he followed 
for several years. Subsequently he engaged in the brewing business and is 
now the secretary and manager of the Old Economy Brewing Company, of 
Allegheny. He married, in 1872, Amelia Bear, born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1855, and came to Allegheny when young. Mr. and Mrs. Schilpp 
are the parents of the following children: i. Henry Lewis, above mentioned. 
2. Charles W., born 1875, married Laura Johanson, in 1904; he is now 
engaged in the ice cream business in Allegheny. 3. Walter E., born 1876 ; he 
is now in the Diamond Bank building of Pittsburg, representing Charles Donley 
Coke Company. 4. John, Jr.. born 1883. now a clerk in the James Brown 
Controller Company, in Allegheny. 5. -Norman E., born 1885, now attending 
school in Allegheny. 

Anton Schilpp, grandfather of Henry L. Schilpp, born in Germany in , 
1806, came to America in 1846. He was a tanner and followed it in Alle- 
gheny City. He had thoroughly mastered his trade in the Fatherland and 
founded the business here, which his son took up later. He married Caroline 
Kopf, who also came from Germany. Their children are: i. John, above 
mentioned. 2. Louisa, married (first) George Herwich, and after his death 
she married Thomas Johnson. By her first marriage she was the mother of 
one child, George, Jr.. who was born in 1882. There was no issue by the last 
marriage. 3. Anna, married James A. Hammond, of Greenville, Pennsyl- 
vania, and he died in 1904. He was an architect and took an active part in 
politics, though never sought public office. 

THORNLEY URE WILLIAMS, cashier of the First National Bank 
of Sheridan, was born April 23. 1878, in Allegheny City, son of Harrison 
Graham Williams, who was born March 24. 1850, on a farm in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, and for many years served as engineer on the Pittsburg, Fort 
Wayne & Chicago Railroad. In 1873 he settled in Ohio, and the same year 

married , born in 1854, in Buffalo, New York. Mr. and Mrs. 

Williams became the parents of the following children: i. Nettie, died in 
infancy. 2. Ormsbv P., born March 2, 1876, conducts a large farm in Craw- 
ford countv, Ohio ; married, in 1900, Mary F. Breitweiser. 3. Thornley Ure, 
of whom later. 4. Harrison G., born in 1880, manager of Dupont Powder 
Company at Haver Station, Pennsylvania ; married, in 1903, Martha Vitt, one 
child, Katherine', born 1905, at Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 5. Margaret, born 
Januarv 25, 1883: married, in 1904, Joseph Ripper. 6. Louis F. F.. born 
April 28, 1887. died August — , 1901. 7. Ebenezer P. M., born May 15, 



234 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



1889. 8. Byard H., born December 25, 1890. 9. Ethel Kathryn, born August 
I, 1894. 

Thornley Ure Williams, son of Harrison Graham Williams, was six years 
old when his parents moved to Enon V'alley, Pennsylvania, where he attended 
the country school for about two years. At the end of that time the family 
returned to Allegheny and he became a pupil at the Fifth ward school. At 
the early age of nine years he went to work as cash boy in the dry goods store 
of Boggs & Buhl, at a weekly salary of one dollar and a half. After serving 
in this capacity about two years and a half he was employed for one year as 
office boy in the Pittsburg Railroad Coal Exchange, and during the next four 
years held a similar position with the Federal Street & Pleasant Valley Street 
Railway Company. He was then offered the position of messenger at the 
Third National Bank, Allegheny, where he served nine years, being made 
successively assistant individual bookkeeper, corresponding clerk, general book- 
keeper and teller. When the bank at Sheridan was being organized he was 
offered the position of cashier, which he has ever since retained. Although 
but twenty-three years old at the time he accepted the position and one of the 
youngest cashiers in the banking business, he has been very successful, having 
contributed largely toward building up the interests of the institution. He is 
the owner of several houses and many building lots in Sheridan, also a large 
farm in Crawford county, Pennsylvania. He holds the office of borough 
treasurer and supports the Republican party, having always taken an active 
part in forwarding the interests of the organization. 

]\Ir. Williams married, September 18, 1901, in Allegheny, Mary W. 
Fairley, and they are the parents of three children : Gladys, born July 29, 
1902; Dorothy Elizabeth, born June 16, 1905. Thornley Ure, born August 13, 
1906. Mr. Williams is a resident of the borough of Sheridan. 



ANDREW UHL, one of the best-known German residents of the South 
Side, was born May 28, 1839, in Austria, son of George and Mary (Winter) 
Uhl, the former a farmer. Both his parents died in their native land. 

Andrew Uhl received his education in the common schools, and from 
the early age of seven years was employed, after school hours and during vaca- 
tions, in working on the farm. At sixteen he left home, and for a time sup- 
ported himself by working for neighboring farmers. Later he served as driver 
of a stage carrying passengers through a number of towns, until the building 
of the railroad caused this means of traveling to be discarded. In 1866 he 
sailed from Bremen for New York, landing about June 28, and proceeding 
immediately to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he met friends. He obtained 
employment in Jones & Laughlin's mills, where he remained thirty-five years, 
this long period of service speaking volumes for his usefulness and integrity. 
Later he found employment at carpenter work and at building coal barges. 
He has served several times as a juryman, and in politics is a stanch Re- 
publican, having ever been ready to do all in his power to advance the cause 
of the organization. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Uhl married, December, 1867, Maggie Kinsel, who was born in 
Beron, Germany, and in 1866 came to the United States, making her home 
in Pittsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Uhl are the parents of three, sons: i. John, of 
Pittsburg, married Maggie Woltz. 2. Frederick A., also of Pittsburg. 3. 




(^a^i^^-^-Mru/ ^ 




PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 235 

Albert F., baker on the South Side, married , of Virginia. Mr. Uhl, 

the father, enjoys the distinction of having been the first of his name to settle 
in Allegheny county. Since 1901 he has lived in retirement, having then re- 
linquished all active labor. 



MARTIN LEWIS BARCHFELD, of Pittsburg, is a representative of 
one of the well-known families of the South Side, being a son of Henry and 
Mary (Newhagen) Barchfeld, and an elder brother of Congressman Barch- 
feld, of this district. 

Martin Lewis Barchfeld was born June 29, 1850, in Kensington, on the 
Allegheny river, one hundred miles above Pittsburg, and was an infant in 
arms when his father removed to that city and took up his abode on the South 
Side where, in 1857, he was the proprietor of a grocery store on Penn avenue, 
near "Little Market." The education of Martin Lewis Barchfeld began in a 
school conducted in Freeman's Hall, near what is now Union Station, where 
he studied German and English under Professor Rummel. About i860 his 
father returned to South Side, and Martin Lewis continued his studies in 
the St. Clair township school under Mr. Cunningham. His father was then 
a coal miner, and every day, before school, Martin Lewis would go to. the 
mines and render what help he could. At the age of twelve he left school and 
entered the glass works, where he was employed for several years. He next 
became a heater at Soho, where the Pennsylvania Tube Works are now 
situated. This was in 1864, and a firm was building two gunboats, the "Mor- 
iela" and the "Sandusky." Mr. Barchfeld helped to finish them, and then 
assisted in the construction of the gunboat "Monyunk." After spending some 
time in the bolt- works of Lewis, Oliver & Phillips (now the Oliver Steel Com- 
pany), he was employed in the nut-works of the Woods Company, and then 
learned moulding at the Monongahela foundry. This trade he followed for a 
number of years, after which he went to work in the Jones-Laughlin mills, 
and for a short time in the glass works. For the last eighteen years he has 
been employed in the machine shop of the Jones-Laughlin Company. Politic- 
ally he is a Republican. He and his wife attend the German Evangelical 
church. 

Mr. Barchfeld married, May 5, 1880, Carrie, daughter of Charles and 
Catharine (Annon) Schwarzach, the former deceased and the latter living at 
the age of seventy-six. Mr. and Mrs. Barchfeld became the parents of four 
sons, all of whom died young. 



CAMERON C. SMITH. Among the successful iron and steel captains 
in the great army of metal producers in Greater Pittsburg is Cameron C. 
Smith, son of Jos'eph S. and Mary A. (Watson) Smith. He was born on a 
farm in Clinton township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, April 24, 1861, and 
attended the district schools until he was 15 years of age, and then attended the 
old Third ward school in Allegheny City one year, after which he completed 
his education at Waynesburg College. During his college life he taught school 
and worked at farming a part of each year to earn money sufficient to further 
his education. When through college he studied shorthand and secured a posi- 
tion as an amanuensis in the office of Wilson Walker & Company, iron manu- 



236 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

facturers. He was employed by them ten years, during, which time it was 
merged into the Carnegie, Phipps & Company, and that into the Carnegie Steel 
Company. In 1893 he left their employ and engaged with the Reliance Steel 
Casting Company, a concern engaged in a smaller business. He continued 
there six years and withdrew and organized the Union Steel Casting Company, 
and built their plant. This company was organized in 1899 with a capital of 
sixty-two thousand five hundred dollars, but has now grown to the large sum 
of one million five hundred thousand dollars, and is at present, perhaps, the 
most successful plant of its kind in the country. Mr. Smith was secretary and 
general manager of the concern for the first year of its existence, when he 
was elected president, the position he still holds. It may be said that his 
knowledge of men and what they are best calculated to work at has made him 
wonderfully eflfective in the discharge of his duties. In the selection of his 
men for the various departments he makes but few mistakes, and it is this fact 
that causes him to successfully manage the extensive and successful business 
which this company now carries on. He is a member of nearly all of the lead- 
ing engineering societies in the country, and has made close friends of a legion 
of the leading business men in all sections of the country. 

Mr. Smith was united in marriage, in 1902, to Maud Forsaith, of Etna, 
Pennsylvania, and they now reside at No. 719 North Negley avenue, Pittsburg. 

Of his ancestry it may be said in this connection that he has descended 
from the German emigrant who came to America in 1700. Joseph Smith, for 
many years prior to his death one of Pittsburg's most highly respected and 
public-spirited citizens, was born in 1823, at Carlisle, Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, a son of Daniel Smith, who was born in 1799, at New Hill. 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and was by trade a blacksmith. 

In 1836 Joseph Smith moved to Pittsburg, where he worked at his trade 
until 1840, when he settled on a farm in West Deer township, Allegheny county, 
and then turned his whole attention to farming in its various branches. In 
1845, however, he returned to Pittsburg and retired from active labors and 
business. He was a Whig in politics and an elder in the German Lutheran 
church. His father was a Revolutionary soldier. Daniel Smith married 
Eleanora Shrom, whose father was also in the Revolutionary struggle, and 
their children were: George, Joseph, Frederick, David. Jacob, William, 
Harvey, Henry, Ann and three who died in childhood. The mother of these 
children died in 1847, the father surviving until 1873. 

Joseph Smith, son of Daniel and Eleanora (Schrom) Smith, was a mere 
boy when his parents removed to Butler county, and there he spent the greater 
part of his life. On reaching manhood he decided to become a farmer, and 
thenceforth became a successful agriculturist. Later he became possessed of a 
farm on which he made his home for a number of years, and was recognized 
as one of Butler county's best, most thoroughgoing farmers. In 1881 he sold 
his estate and moved to Sharpsburg, where he resided three years, and in 1884 
went to Tarentum, retiring the same year from all active business. At all times 
he took a keen interest in public affairs, and was ready to do all within his 
power to further the best interests and measures in local government. His 
political principles were those of the Republican party. He was a member of 
the L'nited Presbyterian church. 

He married Mary Ann Watson, and they became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Mary E., born 1848, wife of Anderson Hazlett; James C; 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 237 

born in 1850, married ^Nlary Ann Woods; Elizabeth, born in 1851, died in 
1862; John L., born in 1852, married Sadie Noel; David, born in 1854, died 
in 1862; Frank A., born in 1855, married Catherine Stepp ; Maria, born in 
1856, died in 1862; Sadie A., born in 1857, wife of W. P. Wood; Walter D., 
born in 1858, died in 1862; Cameron C. (subject), born in 1861, married Maud 
Forsaith; George W., born in 1862, married Ida Nease ; Alma, born in 1864, 
wife of A. N. Nevin, and Harry G., born in 1866, married Sarah Martin. Mr. 
Smith's death occurred in 1898, and was widely and sincerely mourned, not 
alone by his family, but by the many to whom he was known as a distinguished 
citizen and a man of marked integrity. 

Mary Ann (Watson) Smith, the mother of the family just enumerated, 
was the daughter of James Watson and a granddaughter of Thomas Watson, 
who was born in Ireland in 1759 and moved with his parents to Dauphin 
county, Pennsylvania, when a boy. He served in the Revolutionary war, being 
taken prisoner at the battle of Brandywine. He was confined at Wilmington 
one month and on a British prison ship two months. He was later detailed to 
herd cattle for the British army. On an occasion when the cattle stampeded 
he chased a two-year-old heifer so far into the woods that he was lost sight of 
and thus escaped. He served under Lieutenant Colonel Bicker in Captain Mc- 
Gowan's company and enlisted at Middletown, Pennsylvania. He married 
Sarah Culan, of Chester county, Pennsylvania, and they were the parents of 
one son and one daughter — James and Rebecca. Thomas Watson died in 
Butler county in 1845. 

James Watson, son of Thomas and Sarah (Culan) Watson, was born in 
1795, in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and in 1799 w^as taken by his parents 
to Butler county, where he became a farmer in Clinton township. He served 
in the war of 1812. He married Mary, the daughter of John and Deborah 
(Rosebury) Davis. John Davis was born in 1757, in New Jersey, and in 1798 
moved to Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he was one of the first settlers. 
He was a farmer by occupation. He enlisted in the Revolutionary army at 
Elizabethtown, New Jersey, under Colonel Oliver Spencer Holmes, in Captain 
Pierson's company, in December, 1776, and served throughout the entire war. 
He participated in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth. White 
Marsh, Connecticut Farms and Short Hills. He applied for a pension October 
2, 1820. which was granted (certificate 18,185, issued June 2-9. 1821, under Act 
of March 18, 1818, at the Pennsylvania Agency). His wife died in 1834, and 
he died in 1841. 

The Pennsylvania Archives, page 661, Volume XXIV, third series, show 
that he entered a land warrant on April 29, 1776, in Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, for twelve acres of land. Also on page 75, volume VI, fifth 
series, of the same archives, show that he served in the Seventh Class, Sixth 
Company, First Battalion of Cumberland county militia, and was ordered out 
in 1783.' 

Colonel John Davis (father of the John Davis mentioned) was born m 
New Jersey and moved to Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, locating near 
Carlisle about 1750. He reared four sons, Benjamin, Walter, Samuel and 
John, all of whom served in the Continental army. Pennsylvania Archives, 
page 661, volume XXIV, third series, state that he, John Davis, entered land 
by warrant for twenty-five acres September 7, 1753, in Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, and for three hundred acres, July 7, 1785. The same record 



238 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

shows on page 626, volume VI, fifth series, that he commanded the second 
class militia of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, serving- from 1780 to 1782, 
inclusive. 

The children born to James and Mary (Davis) Watson were as follows: 
Sarah; Deborah; Rebecca; Mary Ann, who was born in 1824, and married in 
1847 to Joseph Smith; Maria Phoebe; John; Thomas; James; and Joseph. 
The father, James Watson, died in 1868, and the mother, Mary (Davis) 
Watson, died in 1871. 



JOHN WILLIAM RUPILANDT, of Pittsburg, who has been for more 
than thirty years a factor in the political life of the twenty-sixth ward of that 
city, was born August 25, 1852, on Nineteenth between Sidney and Wharton 
streets, son of John William Ruhlandt, who was born in 18 17, in Prussia. 

John W. Ruhlandt (father) received the usual education of German 
boys in his rank of life, and was reared to agricultural pursuits. He served 
seven years in the German army as a member of the "King's Guards." That 
this body was composed of men of tall stature may be inferred from the 
fact that Mr. Ruhlandt, though six feet in height, was the smallest man in the 
regiment. In 1850 he came to the United States, landing in New York and 
thence proceeding to Pittsburg by way of the canal. His occupations were 
various, but during the greater part of the time he was employed in a saw 
mill. In politics he was always a Republican, casting his first vote in 1856 for 
Fremont. He was a member of the German Evangelical church on Jane 
street. Mr. Ruhlandt married, in 1850, in the old Presbyterian church, corner 
of Smithfield avenue and Sixth street, Margaret Boehm, a native of Prussia, 
who came that year to the United States. They made their home on Joseph 
(now Nineteenth) street, removing in i860 to another house in the same 
street, between Sarah and Jane streets, but always remaining in the twenty- 
sixth ward. Their children were: i. John William, of whom later. 2. Lizzie, 
wife of Gustav Espy, of Pittsburg. 3. Carolina, wife of John Smith, of Pitts- 
burg. 4. Charles J., clerk in county comptroller's office, married Sarah Lutz. 
Mr. Ruhlandt, the father, died September 10, 1905, and is buried in the Ger- 
man Presbyterian cemetery. 

John William Ruhlandt, son of John William and Margaret (Boehm) 
Ruhlandt, was a pupil in the schools of the twenty-sixth ward from the age 
of six to that of nine, being obliged, at that early period of life, in consequence 
of his father's straitened circumstances, to go to work in a glass factory. 
Later, however, he supplied his educational deficiencies by attending night 
school. He remained in the glass factory until 1874, when he engaged in the 
hotel business in Odd Fellows' Hall, on Eighteenth street. In 1885 he bought 
land on which he erected the hotel which he now conducts. In 1879 he helped 
to organize the Co-operative Flint Glass Company, of Beaver Falls, Pennsyl- 
vania, and for the last ten years has been president of that body. In 1874 
he entered politics, and has ever since taken an extremely active part in the 
afifairs of the twenty-sixth ward. During this whole period he has adhered 
unswervingly to the Republican party and has been connected with the or- 
ganization as a member of the city and county committees. In 1880 he was 
elected to the common council from the twenty-sixth ward and served until 
1889, when the new charter went into efifect. In 1896 he was made a mem- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 239 



ber of the select council from the ward, serving until January, 1907, when he 
was compelled to resign in compliance with a ruling of the judge. During 
his terms as councilman he served on the corporation committee, the police 
committee and the board of survey. He affiliates with Germania Lodge No. 
509, Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 11, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and the Oress and Americus clubs. He has been a Mason for 
twenty years. 

Mr. Ruhlandt married, February 16, 1874, in Pittsburg, Margaret, daugh- 
ter of the late Conrad Gang, of that city, and the following children have 
been born to them: i. William J., at home. 2. Henry, attended the public 
schools and graduated from the high school. He then served for a time as 
clerk in the comptroller's office, under Colonel Thompson, and in 1906 was 
elected to the Pennsylvania state legislature. 3. Clara, married Henry Kyle 
and died in 1903, leaving one child, Margaret, aged four years. 



GEORGE HOHMEYER, a successful merchant in Pittsburg, located 
at 2505 Jane street, was born November 18. 1866, son of Andrew and Annie 
Martha (Hahn) Hohmeyer, who at the time of his birth resided between 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets on Jane. 

When he \vas but five years of age he commenced going to school at 
the ]\'Iorris sub-district school in the twenty-fifth ward. His first teacher was 
Miss Ella Reed, now the wife of John McKane, and he attended this school 
for about three years, after which he began to work in the nut and bolt fac- 
tory of Oliver & Phillips, with whom he remained four years, attending night 
schools. Among his teachers in this school was a Miss Dyer, who did all in 
her power to encourage and advance him in his studies at night, after having 
worked hard all day in the shop. After four years in the nut factory he took 
employment in the chimney glass factory on Seventh street and later went 
with a similar factory of Thomas Evans. It was later that he found employ- 
ment in the flattening department of the window-glass factory of Pittsburg, 
belonging to Stewart, Estep and Company, with whom he served faithfully 
for four years and a half. He was then in his twenty-first year and 

went at the carpenter's trade, under Noll, with whom he served an 

apprenticeship of two years, after which he worked as journeyman for ten 
years. In October, 1897, he engaged in the grocery trade at his present place 
of business, where he carries a good stock of family groceries. Mr. Hohmeyer 
has made for himself a good home, and accumulated property by his own 
will power and labors, assisted by the help of his industrious wife. Mr. 
Hohmeyer and his family are all members of the German Baptist church, of 
which body he has been' a trustee two years and treasurer. In his national 
politics he is a stanch Republican, though never desires office at the hands of 
his fellow countrvm.en. He is numbered among the membership of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, including the Encampment; Junior Order of 
American Mechanics and the Protective Home Circle. 

He was united in marriage by the Rev. L. H. Donners, pastor of the First 
German Baptist Church, to Mary Noll, who resided in the twenty-sixth ward 
of the city; she is the daughter of Andrew and Mary (Kipp) Noll, both 
natives of Germanv and both now deceased. The children born to Mr. and 



240 



A CENTURY AND A HALF OP 



Mrs. Hohmeyer are as follows: i. Edna M., born July 14, 1892. 2. Nattie 
Emma, born March 5, 1894. 3. George Raymond, born November 4, 1906. 
Three are deceased, Hattie, Andrew and one unnamed. 



DAVID LEWIS, who for many years was employed as a "roller" in the 
steel mills of Jones & Laughlin, of Pittsburg, was born October 25, 1852, in 
Wales, son of William Lewis, of the same locality, born May 4, 1823, and 
Cecelia (Richards) Lewis, born February 14, 1823. 

William Lewis (father) began, after obtaining a common school educa- 
tion, to learn the iron business at Alurtha, Wales, and continued in it through- 
out his entire active life. With his wife and three children he emigrated to 
America in 1856, sailing from Liverpool, England, on a sailing vessel, land- 
ing in New York, having made the trip in thirty days. They came on directly 
to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and established a home in the sixth ward. In 
1861 they removed to the South Side into what is known as St. Clair town- 
ship, and later as the borough of Ormsby, but now the twenty-fourth ward of 
Pittsburg. Air. Lewis obtained work in the Jones & Laughlin iron mills, 
where he remained until his death in September, 1884. He was a member 
of the Baptist church, and in politics a Republican. He was highly esteemed 
by the community in which he lived for his upright character and daily walk 
among his fellow workmen. His wife died December 29, 1906. Their issue 
was as follows: i. Alargaret, born September 15, 1846, died in infancy. 
2. Elizabeth, born October 9, 1847, died an infant. 3. Margaret (second), 
born August 5, 1850, married John Koontz, a veteran of the Civil war who 
had his leg shot from his body at the battle of Vicksburg. 4. David, of whom 
later. 5. Mary, born December 27, 1854, married Thomas M , now de- 
ceased, and she resides in the twenty-fourth ward of Pittsburg. 6. Rachel, 
born May 26, 1857, died aged four years. 7. Ann Jane, born September 26, 
1859, married John E. Williams, now of Pittsburg. 8. William, born October 
20, 1861, deceased. 9. William (second), born January 3, 1864, attended 
public school in the twenty-fourth ward and became an assistant roller with 
his brother David, but later enlisted in Cleveland, participating in the Spanish- 
American war, serving throughout the Philippine campaigns, being in the 
service in all three years. After his return home he worked in the structural 
steel works. He died in Delaware, Ohio. 

David Lewis, of this notice, Avas but four years of age when his parents 
emigrated to this country. When he reached his sixth year he attended the 
sixth w^ard school, taught by Miss Coskey; he also attended the Wickersham 
school in the twenty-fourth ward until ten years old, when he left school 
duties to work in the iron mills as a "pull-up" boy. He was paid in the form 
of a blue ticket which he took home every night and gave to his mother, who 
received goods and generally provisions for it at the company's store, these 
being used in providing for the family. He was advanced from one position 
to another, beginning at twenty-five cents a day, and in the same mills he finally 
became an expert "roller" and received fifteen dollars a day. In 1898 he quit 
the iron and steel mills and has been an active builder of residences. 

Mr. Lewis has been a lifelong supporter of the Republican party, and 
has ever taken much interest in politics. He served nine years on the school 
board and two vears on the common council. In church affiliations he is a 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE ^41 

member of the Congregational church at South Twenty-second street, of which 
he has been chairman of the board of trustees for more than ten years. 

Mr. Lewis married, in the twenty-fourth ward, in May, 1878, Ehzabeth 
Morris, a native of Wales, but a resident of the city of Pittsburg at the date 
of her marriage. She died in 1884, leaving two children : David, who married 
a Miss Jones and they reside in Ohio ; and Elizabeth, now deceased. Novem- 
ber 12, 1885, Mr. Lewis married Winfred Griffiths, born in Jackson county, 
Ohio. By Mr. Lewis' second marriage the issue is : Mary, a school teacher 
in the Morris schools of the twenty-fifth ward of Pittsburg. Cecelia, at home, 
Edgar Jay, a pupil in the high school. 



HON. GEORGE M. HOSACK, a member of the Pittsburg bar and one 
of the younger leaders in the Republican party of Pennsylvania, was born in 
Dayton, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, October 7, 1866, a son of Alexander 
Blackburn and Eliza Wrigley Hosack, who are still living and recently cele- 
brated their fiftieth wedding anniversary. The Hosacks come of pioneer stock 
in Pennsylvania and of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Mr. Hosack's mother was 
born in England and accompanied her parents to this country more than fifty 
years ago, and a few years later located in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, near 
Connellsville. 

George M. Hosack attended the Dunbar and Connellsville public schools, 
graduating from the high school in Connellsville in 1886. Upon his grad- 
uation he entered the employ of Messrs, Wood, Morrell & Company, at 
Wheeler, with whom he served as a clerk until the autumn of 1887, when he 
entered the department of literature, science and the arts at the University 
of Michigan and spent several years in the special study of history and 
political science. Later he entered the law department of the same institution, 
graduating with the degree, of Bachelor of Laws in 1891, and was admitted 
thereon to the circuit and supreme courts of Michigan. The same year he 
went to LTniontown, Pennsylvania, and there entered the law office of Hon, 
S, Leslie Mestrezat, now a member of the supreme bench, finished his legal 
studies and was admitted to the Fayette county bar, where he practiced one 
year and then removed to Pittsburg for a wider field in which to follow his 
profession. He was then admitted to the Allegheny county bar, the supreme 
court of the state and the United States district and circuit courts. Prior to 
his entering the public schools at Connellsville his early years were spent in 
working on the farm during the summer months and attending school in the 
winter. He also clerked for a number of years in a store at Mt. Pleasant, 
Pennsylvania. The first money he remembers of earning was while acting 
as water-boy for Fred Gwinner, an Allegheny contractor, who was then build- 
ing the Atlas Coke Works at Dunbar. During Mr. Hosack's legal practice he 
has devoted his time and energy largely to the solution of corporate problems 
and has made a special study of corporate taxation. Unlike many another of 
his profession, he has sought the right, though often antagonizing the great 
railroad and other corporate interests of his commonwealth, but whom he 
has never feared, ever preferring to vindicate the rights 'of the people at large. 
In the case of the Clyde Coal Company against the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie 
Railroad Company, he secured a verdict in mandamus proceedings to compel 
the furnishing of cars to prevent discrimination. 



242 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



In his political views Mr. Hosack is an unbending Republican. Imme- 
diately after leaving- college he took an active part in politics, allying himself 
with the late Hon. Frank M. Fuller, former secretary of the commonwealth, 
and Hon. John R. Byrne, then chairman of the Fayette county Republican 
committee. He became secretary of that committee and held the same until 
his removal to Pittsburg, where he at once became active in political affairs, 
affiliating with the Allegheny county Republican committee, serving on city, 
ward and county committees at various times. Inside of three years after 
his removal to Pittsburg he was appreciated, in a political sense, sufficiently to 
receive the nomination for member of the house of representatives, to which 
office he was duly elected from the fifth district of Pittsburg by a majority of 
over thirteen thousand. He was subsequently re-elected, serving in the sessions 
of 1889-1901. During his first term in the legislature he was recognized as a 
useful and influential member. As chairman of the oleo investigation, he 
brought about a reorganization of the office of dairy and food commissioner, 
and added to his reputation by his courageous act in refusing to accept mileage 
from the state for serving upon a legislative investigating committee on the 
ground that the practice which had long been in use was unconstitutional, 
and further that he had been put to no expense, for while attending to the 
duties of the committee he was riding on a railroad pass. This act alone 
saved the state fifty thousand dollars that session and caused the discontinuance 
of the practice. 

In the session of 1899 he was appointed chairman of the ways and means 
committee, which position at that time was one very difficult to fill in a proper 
manner, for there was a deficit at the time of four million dollars and a 
movement was on foot to erect a new state capitol, the old one having been 
burned two years before. He introduced a number of measures, one of which 
is the bonus act relating to foreign corporations putting them on an equal 
footing wdth home corporations, which act has brought hundreds of thousands 
of dollars into the state treasury. His activity was honored by the passing of 
appropriate resolutions, including these : 

"Mr. Hosack has shown himself well equipped for the position, with a 
broad and comprehensive knowledge of the subject of taxation, and has been 
uniformly consistent and fair to all parties — that we, the Committee of Ways 
and Means of the House, tender him our thanks for his effort and the results 
accomplished at the present session." 

This resolution was signed by Quay, anti-Quay and Democratic members 
alike. During the same session, as we'll as that of 1901, Mr. Hosack was a 
member of the corporations committee and assisted in securing legislation of 
great importance to the industrial and corporate interests of this state and of 
lasting benefit to the people. 

Since his retirement from the legislature he has applied himself to the 
ever increasing legal practice which his ability has brought to him. While 
holding no political office he maintains an active interest in party affairs, his 
services ever being at the command of the Republican organization. In busi- 
ness affairs he is vice-president of the Carnegie Coal Company, a director in 
the Republic Bank Note Company and various other institutions of Greater 
Pittsburg. He is a member of the East Liberty Presbyterian church, a 
director in St. Francis Hospital, and always takes an interest in worthy chari- 
table works. In 1906 he w^as a candidate, subject to the state Republican con- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 243 

vention, for the office of lieutenant-governor of Pennsylvania, but Robert 
Murphy, of Johnstown, was chosen and elected. The platform upon which 
Mr. Hosack stood was one which advocated the abolition of the ten dollar 
excess charged upon thousand-mile tickets in Pennsylvania ; a uniform two- 
cent per mile fare ; the establishment of a state railroad commission ; that 
street railroads be allowed to carry small freight ; construction and maintenance 
of good roads, etc. 

Tn his social relations Mr. Hosack is deservedly popular, because genial 
and generous, to which may be added sincerity, and these traits have won for 
him a wide circle of friends and admirers throughout the state. He is a 
member of the Duquesne, University, County, Press, Americus, Tariff and 
Colonial Republican Clubs of Pittsburg, and of the Harrisburg Club. He is 
advanced in the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Knights Templar and 
Shriners. He belongs to the Alpha Tau Omega college fraternity, which he 
highly prizes. 

Mr. Hosack was united in marriage in 1893 to Delia G., daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Clark, of Connellsville, Pennsylvania. The children born 
of this union are : George M., Jr., and Margaret. 



CHARLES ALOYSIUS PAGAN, attorney, a descendant of the 
Celtic race, which has given New York and Pennsylvania, with some other 
states, so many noted citizens, has had transmitted to him in the fullest extent 
the sturdy combination of both mental and bodily strength and vigor. 

Mr. Pagan's paternal grandfather. James B. Pagan, was numbered 
among the early settlers of northwestern Pennsylvania, in which locality he 
served as a civil engineer of more than ordinary ability. Mr. Pagan's father, 

Pagan, was born in Erie. Pennsylvania, and remained in that 

section until 1839, when he came to Pittsburg, where Charles Aloysius was 
born July i, 1859, "^ the seventeenth ward. 

Charles A. Pagan was educated at St. Mary's parochial school and at 
Ewalt College. Shortly after his graduation he entered the law office of the 
then district attorney of Allegheny county, and after his admission to the bar 
in 1887 officiated as assistant district attorney under Judge W. D. Porter and 
the late Richard H. Johnson. The ability he there displayed brought for him 
a speedy recognition and directly led to his re-appointment to the same position 
in 1894 by the governor of Pennsylvania to fill the unexpired term of John C. 
Haymaker. Step by step he has gradually forged his way to the front in the 
legal profession. He has for his partner in the law business ex-Senator 
Magee, the firm being known as Pagan & Magee, who enjoy a large clientage, 
including a number of extensive corporations. Politically Mr. Pagan is a 
Democrat and up to 1896 took an active part in the politics of both city and 
state. In 1892 he was the presidential elector on the Democratic ticket for 
the twenty-second congressional district of Pennsylvania. He also filled the 
position of chairman of the Democratic committee of Allegheny countv for the 
years 1894-95. In 1896 he was unanimously chosen by his party at the state 
convention as delegate-at-large to the presidential convention of that year, 
but upon the adoption of the platform of that body he found it to materially 
differ with his views on the policy of the party and he withdrew and resigned 
his position as chairman of the county committee, at the same time retiring: 



244 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 

from active politics. Mr. Fagan is interested in numerous business enter- 
prises, including a directorship in the German National Bank, the Publishing 
Company, the Iron City Sanitary Manufacturing Company, the Zelienople 
Extension Company, the East End Savings & Trust Company, the Duquesne 
Fireproofing Company and the Fetterman Land Company. He is a member 
of the Duquesne CIuId, the Union Club, the Country Club and the Oakmont 
Country Club. He is the president of the board of directors of Charity 
Hospital. 

Fie was united in marriage February 9, 1887, to Mary A. Kane, daughter 
of P. C. Kane. Mrs. Pagan's father is a retired merchant of Pittsburg. 



ERNEST WHITWORTH MARLAND, attorney-at-law and an all-round 
modern business man, was born May 8, 1874, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, son 
of the well known iron worker, Alfred Marland, and his wife, Sarah (McLeod) 
Marland. The father was born in Ashton-Under-Line, Manchester, England. 
The family were residents of that town for six hundred years, and its numer- 
ous members are all buried in one burying place. He came to America in 
i860 and located at Mt. Washington, Pittsburg, and there built an iron mill 
on the South Side. The business was long known as Marland, Neely & 
Company, who manufactured nuts, bolts, etc. He represented his ward in 
select council ten years and served two terms in the state legislature. He was 
of pure Anglo-Saxon blood. In religion an Episcopalian. He maried Sarah 
McLeod, born in Scotland. 

Ernest Whitworth Marland, son of Alfred and Sarah (McLeod) Mar- 
land, was born and educated in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and later attended the 
Pond Institute, Rugby College, University of Michigan, graduating from the 
last named in 1893, with the degree of LL. B. He was admitted to the bar 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June i, 1895, when aged but twenty-one 
years. He became general counsel for the Pittsburgh Securities Company, 
after having first been its president. He organized the Pittsburgh & West 
Virginia Coal Company, and was made its president, which position he still 
holds. He has beCn the promoter of various other enterprises, all of which 
have been highly successful. He is a member of the University Club and of 
the Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce. In politics Mr. Marland is a Repub- 
lican ; in religion of the Episcopal faith. 

He was united in marriage at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 5, 
1903, to Mary Virginia Collins, daughter of Samuel Collins, clerk of the 
superior court. 



CAPTAIN HARRY STEVENSON DENNY, of Ligonier, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, was born in Pittsburg, February 16, 1854, and is 
a descendant of pioneer settlers of western Pennsylvania, who have left a 
noble record of service to their state and nation. 

Major Ebenezer Denny, tlie great-grandfather of Captain Denny, Avas 
born in Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1761, and was 
the eldest son of William and Agnes (Parker) Denny. The Denny family 
are descendants of an early emigrant from the north of Ireland who located 
in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in the first quarter of the eighteenth century, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 245 



but soon after became a pioneer in the settlement farther west. William and 
Walter Denny, brothers, removed to the Cumberland valley in 1745, and 
located near Carlisle. Walter became a large landowner there. He raised 
a company for the revolutionary struggle, entered the service and was at the 
battle of Crooker Billet, in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. William Denny 
lived in Carlisle. He was the first coroner west of the Susquehanna, and was 
a commissary during the revolutionary war. His wife, Agnes Parker, was a 
daughter of John Parker, and granddaughter of Richard Parker, who settled 
on the Cannadaguinnet, three miles west of Carlisle, in 1730. Three of the 
brothers of Mrs. Denny, Alexander, Richard and Andrew Parker, rendered 
distinguished service in the war for independence. At the close the former 
settled in western Virginia at the present site of Parkersburg, and the two 
latter in Kentucky. At the age of thirteen years Ebenezer Denny obtained 
the position of dispatch bearer between the Cumberland county posts and 
Fort Pitt, crossing the Allegheny mountains alone and traveling through a 
wilderness infested with savages, and won the confidence of the officers with 
whom he became later associated, by the intrepid and intelligent manner in 
which he performed his duties. He later returned to Carlisle and was em- 
ployed for a short time in his father's mercantile establishment, but after his 
stirring experience on the frontier, life behind the counter proved little to 
his taste, and he repaired to Philadelphia and shipped on board a privateer as 
a volunteer. , The piratical nature of the enterprise proved repulsive to him, 
and he again returned home, but was soon after (August, 1780) commissioned 
an ensign in the Seventh Pennsylvania Regiment, and joined the army at York, 
Pennsylvania. He followed Mad Anthony Wayne through the Virginia cam- 
paign which terminated at Yorktown with the surrender of Cornwallis. His 
regiment next participated in the South Carolina campaign until the close of 
the war, when Colonel Isaiah Harmar, being named as commander of a regi- 
ment for garrisoning the western posts, chose Ensign Denny as one of his 
officers and aide-de-camp. He served in this capacity until 1793, holding a 
commission as captain, but filling the position of adjutant and aide-de-camp 
to Colonel Harmar (later a brigadier-general), and was entrusted with many 
important missions to the Indians, and was with General Arthur St. Clair 
when he met his disastrous defeat November 4, 1791. He resigned his com- 
mission May I, 1792, and settling in Pittsburg, engaged in the mercantile 
business, largely that of a contractor to furnish supplies to the difi^erent army 
posts. On March i, 1794, he was commissioned captain of a company to 
be raised in Allegheny and especially appointed to the command of Presque 
Isle, now Erie, where he remained until May 3, 1795. Returning to Pittsburg, 
he resided on a farm six miles from Pittsburg during 1795 and 1796, and then 
removed to Pittsburg, becoming one of the most prominent men of the town, 
of which he was its first mayor on its organization as a city in 1816. He was 
commissioner of the county of Allegheny in 1797, and its treasurer in 1803 
and 1808. He was a director of the Pittsburg branch of the Bank of Penn- 
sylvania, and of its successor, the Bank of the United States, and filled 
many positions of trust and honor. He died July 21, 1822, in his sixty-first 
year. He maried in July, 1793, Nancy Wilkins, daughter of John Wilkins, 
who was a captain in the revolutionary war, and bratheiL of General John 
Wilkins, quartermaster-general of Pennsylvania. John Wilkins, Sr., father of 



246 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Mrs. Denny, was a delegate from Bedford to the constitutional convention 
of 1777, but later removed to Pittsburg-. 

The children of Major Ebenezer and Nancy (Wilkins) Denny were: 
Harmar, William St. Clair and two daughters. 

Hon. Harmar Denny, eldest son of Major Denny, received a collegiate 
education and had a distinguished record. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
of General James O'Hara, one of the pioneer business men of Pittsburg, who 
had first crossed the Alleghenies with pack horses to sell goods for a Philadel- 
phia trading house. He, in connection with Isaac Craig, established the first 
glass works in Pittsburg. 

James O'Hara Denny, son of Hon. Harmar and Elizabeth (O'Hara) 
Denny, Avas born in Pittsburg, and graduated at Dickinson Law School at 
Carlisle, and was admitted to the bar at Pittsburg, but at an early age took 
charge of the O'Hara glass works, the pioneer plant of that industry west 
of the Alleghenies, and was connected with the business and financial interests 
of Pittsburg. He served in the Mexican war as a captain of an independent 
company from Pittsburg known as the "Blues." He married, November 10, 
1852, Margaret Darragh Stevenson, daughter of Dr. Harry and Elizabeth 
(Darragh) Stevenson, of Pittsburg, and their children were: Harry Steven- 
son, of whom later. James O'Hara, born September 15, 1855. Francis Her- 
ren, born November 28, 1857. James O'Hara Denny, the father, died Febru- 
ary 4, 1859. 

George Stevenson, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Denny, belonged to a 
distinguished family in Ireland and was educated for the ministry at Trinity 
College, Dublin, but not taking kindly to an ecclesiastical life selected for him 
by his parents, he ran away from home and came to America, locating in 
York, Pennsylvania. He married a sister of General Thompson, the widow of 
a celebrated lawyer by the name of Clarkson, by whom he had one son, Dr. 
George Stevenson, who married Mary Holmes, and a daughter, Catherine, 
who married General John Wilke.fe, the brother of Mrs. Ebenezer Denny. 

Dr. Harry Stevenson, the father of Mrs. Denny, was a son of Dr. George 
and Mary (Holmes) Stevenson. He married Elizabeth (Betsy) Darragh, 
daughter of John Darragh, who was the second mayor of Pittsburg, succeed- 
ing Major Ebenezer Denny. Mrs. Elizabeth (Darragh) Stevenson, mother of 

Mrs. Denny, died February, 1883, in her eighty-fourth year, and Mrs. Har 
Denny, the mother of James O'Hara Denny, died January 19, 1878, in her 
eighty-second year. The Holmes family to which Mary (Holmes) Stevenson 
belonged were a distinguished family of Baltimore, Maryland. 

Captain Harry Stevenson Denny, born in Pittsburg, February 16, 1854, 
was educated at Newell Academy and the Western University of Pennsylvania 
at Pittsburg, taking a special course at the latter institution. Just prior to his 
death his father had planned a residence where Captain Denny now lives, on 
the property once owned by General Arthur St. Clair, and occupied by his 
family for many years. It was conveyed to Captain O'Hara Denny by Robert 
St. Clair. On arriving at manhood Captain Harry S. Denny decided to follow 
out the plans of his father, and has erected the dwelling and improvements, 
making it his home ever since. Captain Denny was a member of the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania, being elected captain in the Eighteenth Regiment in 
1875, and served for five years. In politics he is a staunch Republican, and 
stands high in the councils of his party. He was a delegate to the National 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 247 



Convention at St. Louis in 1896 and to Chicago in 1900, and has represented 
his district in a number of state conventions. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, being afifiHated with Duquesne Lodge, No. 546, of Pittsburg. Cap- 
tain Denny is warmly attached to Ligonier valley, and has devoted himself to 
the advancement of the community in every manner possible. In connection 
with Mr. J. H. Frank he organized the National Bank of Ligonier in 1903, 
and was elected vice-president of the institution. He married, October i, 1883, 
Irene Ashcom, daughter of Dr. John Ashcom. 



DR. FREDERICK BEATTY ELLIOTT, a leading practitioner of Pitts- 
burg, was born October 25, 1872, at Smith's Ferry, Beaver county, Pennsyl- 
vania, son of Laughlin and Matilda (Dawson) Elliott. 

Laughlin Elliott (father) was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1839, died in 1903. He received a public school education, and served an 
apprenticeship at the trade of millwright. He removed to Beaver county with 
his parents at the age of nineteen, they purchasing a farm. Here he learned 
his trade, which he followed until his marriage at the age of forty. At that 
time he turned his attention to farming, and it was on his farm that the first 
producing oil well was drilled in Beaver county. The farm comprised three 
hundred acres and is still in the possession of the family. He was a man of 
strict integrity, and a devout member of the strictest of sects, the Covenanters. 
He was an uncompromising Democrat, loyal and unflinching in devotion to 
his party. He married Matilda, daughter of Nicholas and Elizabeth Dawson, 
members of an old and substantial Beaver county family. Ten children were 
born to Mr. and Airs. Elliott: Infant, deceased; George B. McClellan, a 
physician of Millvale ; Harry, died in childhood; Mary, died in childhood; 
Laughlin, deceased ; Laura, twin of Laughlin ; infant, deceased ; Frederick 
Beatty, see forward ; Amos Laughlin ; infant, deceased. 

Frederick Beatty Elliott spent his boyhood days on the farm, and attended 
the public schools, graduating from the Beaver High School in 1891, after 
which he attended the Clarion State Normal School one term. Choosing med- 
icine as his profession, he began reading under his brother. Dr. George B. 
McL. Elliott. In 1892 he entered the Western University Medical College, and 
graduated therefrom in the spring of 1896. He served one year as resident 
physician of the West Pennsylvania Hospital. In 1907 he established his 
regular practice at 1007 Wylie avenue, later moving to 815 WVlie avenue, 
where he is now enjoying a very large and steadily growing general practice. 
He is popular with his patients and stands high in his profession. He is 
surgeon for the Pittsburg & Lake Erie Railroad Company, surgery being a 
branch of the profession in which he most delights and excels. He keeps in 
touch with the advanced thought of the day along professional lines by mem- 
bership in the Allegheny County Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. He is a member of the Second Presbyterian church of Pittsburg. 
He was one of the organizers of the Land Trust Company, of which he is a 
director, and is also director of the Great Eastern Building & Loan Associa- 
tion. He represented the seventh ward on the school board one term, being 
elected on the Democratic ticket. He is a member of St. John's Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Alasons ; Shiloh Chapter, Royal Arch Masters ; Tancred Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar ; Syria Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 



248 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Dr. Elliott married, January 30, 1900, Mary, daughter of James and 
Mary Egan, of Pittsburg. Four children were born of this union, two of 
whom died in infancy. The surviving members of the family are : Mary 
O'Mara, born January 4, 1905; Louisa Matilda, April 2, 1907. 



SAWYER AND O'BRIEN FAMILY. John Hamilton Sawyer, deceased, 
late of Pittsburg and one of the leading business factors of the city in his time, 
was born on Third avenue, Pittsburg, September 20, 1825. and died July 10, 
1877. He was the son of Benair Clement and Catherine (Brooks) Sawyer. 

(I) John Sawyer, the grandfather, was born near the city of Boston, 
Massachusetts. His wife's maiden name was Porter. Both the parents of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sawyer were among the Pilgrims who came to America and settled 
near Boston in 1620. John Sawyer was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and 
left Boston for Ohio, where he purchased a tract of land near Hockingsport. 
His name appears among the names of the Revolutionary soldiers on a large 
monument erected at Wooster, Ohio. He had two brothers who were ministers 
in the Baptist church, to which denomination he also belonged. He and his 
wife were the parents of eight children, and their names are as follows: i. 
Frances. 2. Eleanor. 3. Robert, a sailor, lost at sea. 4. Samuel. 5. Porter, 
who became a Methodist minister. 6. James. 7. Nathaniel. 8. Benair Clement, 
father of the subject now under consideration. 

(II) Benair Clement Sawyer, son of John Sawyer, was born in 1791, 
and died in i860. He came to Pittsburg in 181 2 and learned the printer's 
trade, which he followed for a short time, and later in life embarked in business 
for himself as a manufacturer of soap. He took an active part in the affairs 
of the city and helped to organize the Pittsburgh Volunteer Fire Company. He 
was an active member of the Trinity Episcopal church. He married Catherine 
Brooks, born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, who died at the age of fifty-two years. 
Her father, Mr. Brooks, was a native of England and her mother a native of 
Ireland. They were married in England and coming to America settled at 
Carlisle. He was a highly educated gentleman and the founder of a seminary 
in which he acted as one of the professors. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren : I. James Brooks Sawyer, an attorney in Pittsburg, died, aged thirty 
years, in 1854, unmarried. 2. Robert, died young. 3. Harry, died aged four- 
teen years. 4. Benair C, who was mayor of Pittsburg in the sixties, and now a 
resident of Los Angeles, California ; he is about eighty-four years of age. He 
married Catherine Aiken and they have one son and three daughters. 5. John 
Hamilton. 6. Nathaniel Porter, deceased, late of Pittsburg ; he was a member 
of the soap making firm of "B. C. and J. Sawyer," and was also extensively 
engaged in real estate transactions. He married Margaret O'Brien, and their 
children are: John H., of Denver; Henry C, of Pittsburg, and Mrs. Anna 
Cora Easton, of Pittsburg. 

(III) John Hamilton Sawyer was educated in a private school and com- 
pleted his education in the University of Western Pennsylvania. He studied 
and became a chemist. At the age of twenty-one years he was taken into the 
firm with his father and was engaged in the manufacture of soaps until 1865, 
when he retired from the firm and engaged in the real estate business, in which 
he continued until his death. He was one of the organizers of the Sharpsburg 
and Etna Bank, he being president of the same. He was married January 11, 




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PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 249 

1855, by Rev. Father McMullen, rector of St. Peter's Church of Allegheny, 
and later Bishop of Erie, Pennsylvania, to Miss Jane Frances O'Brien, born 
on Thirty-ninth street, Pittsburg, November 10, 1837, the daughter of John and 
Mary Elizabeth (Evans) O'Brien. 

John O'Brien, her father, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1792, aiid 
died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1886. He was the son of Michael and Mar- 
garet (Houck) O'Brien. John O'Brien received his education in a private 
school in Baltimore, Maryland, and accompanied his parents to Pittsburg in 
1806. 

Michael O'Brien, his father, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, but his par- 
ents returned to Ireland, where he was reared, and when twenty-three years 
of age he came back to Baltimore and embarked in the produce business, com- 
ing to Pittsburg in 1806. He died soon after coming to this city. Michael 
O'Brien married, in Baltimore, Maryland, Margaret Houck, born in Philadel- 
phia, and she was a noted singer of her day. She came to Baltimore in 1790, 
and sang the first mass ever rendered in the United States, Bishop Carroll offi- 
ciating. They were the parents of the following children: i. John. 2. 
Michael. 3. William. 4. James. 5. Joseph. 6. Samuel. 7. Thomas. 8. Mary, 
wife of John Hafi'ey, of Pittsburg. 

John O'Brien, of the family just mentioned, came to Pittsburg in 1806 
with his parents. His father soon died and his widow reared the family, re- 
siding on what was known on Fourteen Mile Island. John learned the carpen- 
ter's trade and was made a master carpenter at the age of twenty-one years. 
He helped build the U. S. Arsenal in Pittsburg and continued in the employ of 
the government for twenty-five years. Later he engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness and had .much valuable property in the city, besides being a large stock- 
holder in several of the banks. He was a member of the first Catholic church 
erected in Pittsburg. He built his residence in 1832, and there died at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-five years. He married for his first wife Catherine Leslie, 
and they had two children, James and Alargaret. For his second wife he mar- 
ried, in 1832, Mary Evans, born in Virginia in 1798, and died in 1881, daughter 
of David and Elizabeth (Chance) Evans, and to this union were born two chil- 
dren: I. John William, late of Pittsburg, born in 1834, and died in 1895, mar- 
ried Catherine J. Kearns, and they have two sons. Jay A'ick and Thomas H., 
both of Pittsburg. 2. Jane Frances, wife of John Hamilton Sawyer, whose two 
children are James Brooks and John O'Brien Sawyer. 

James Brooks Sawyer, born in Allegheny, November 12, 1856, received a 
collegiate education and read law with Biddle & Ward at Philadelphia. He 
was admitted to the bar, and now leads a retired life in Pittsburg. 

John O'Brien Sawyer was born in Allegheny. Pennsylvania, in 1857. He 
studied dentistry with Dr. Spencer. He married Mary A. Corbett, of George- 
town, and they have three children — Mary Frances, John Xavier and James Leo. 
The family resides in Pittsburg. 

Mrs. Sawyer's grandmother. ]\Iargaret Houck, had a brother in the Revo- 
lutionary war who lost a leg at the battle of Brandywine. The Houcks were 
an old German family of Philadelphia. 



BENJAAHN L. ADLER, M. D. Among the prominent and successful 
members of the medical profession in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, may 



:^50 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



be mentioned Benjamin L. Adler, a general practitioner, whose well equipped 
office is located at 2006 Carson street, South Pittsburg. He is a native of 
Pittsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, born October 18, 1880, son of 
Louis H. and Mary (Cohn) Adler. 

Louis H. Adler (father) was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, October 4, 
1840, son of Jacob and Clara (Ernstein) Adler. He was educated in his 
native land, and at the age of eighteen emigrated to the United States, He 
located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, but after a short residence there removed 
to Pottsville, Schuylkill county, same state, where he engaged in the wholesale 
liquor business. Later he returned to Pittsburg and engaged in the wholesale 
tobacco and cigar business, but subsequently returned to the aforementioned 
business and for many years has conducted an establishment on Pennsylvania 
avenue. He is one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of 
his adopted city, aiding to the best of his ability in promoting its growth and 
development. He is a member of Rodelph Shalom, member of Pittsburg 
Lodge, No. 45, Free and Accepted Alasons, and member of the Heptasophs. 
He married, at Millersburg, Ohio, Mary Cohn, born at Millersburg, Ohio, 
October 2, 1856, daughter of Benjamin and Hannah (Oppenheimer) Cohn. 
Their children: Jacob B., a resident of Pittsburg; Helen, wife of Moses L. 
Slock, of Pittsburg; Benjamin L., see forward. 

Benjamin Cohn, father of Mary (Cohn) Adler, was born at Frankfort- 
on-Main, Germany, August 10, 1827, died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, March 
27, 1879, aged fifty-two years. He was educated for the ministry in his 
native land, but it does not appear that he followed that profession. He 
emigrated to the United States about the year 1848, and for a short period 
of time resided in New York City. He then went to Ohio, locating at Millers- 
burg, where he engaged in the clothing business, attaining a large degree of 
success, accumulating considerable wealth, and becoming the owner of several 
pieces of real estate. At the close of the war he removed to Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and engaged in the same business at the corner of Liberty and Smith- 
field streets, continuing up to the time of his decease. He was a man of strict 
integrity, extremely conscientious in all his business dealings, liberal and kind- 
hearted, and was highly esteemed by all who had the honor of his acquaintance. 
He married, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Hannah Oppenheimer, a native of 
Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, who accompanied her brother to this country in 
early life. Five children were born of this marriage, as follows: Henry; 
William H., of Pittsburg; Bertha, of Pittsburg; Fannie, wife of Alexander 
Adler (no relation) ; Mary, wife of Louis H. Adler, and mother of Dr. 
Benjamin L. Adler. 

Dr. Benjamin L. Adler attended the public and high schools of Pittsburg 
and Pittsburg Academy, after which he spent one year at the West Pennsyl- 
vania Medical School, and then entered the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons at Baltimore, Maryland, graduating therefrom. He pursued a post- 
graduate course at Hopkins LTniversity, Baltimore, and then opened his present 
office in his native city, gaining during the intervening years a large and 
remunerative practice. He has not only the confidence of his patients, but the 
esteem and good-will of his fellow practitioners. He is a staunch supporter 
of the principles of the Republican party, to which he has given his allegiance 
since attaining his majority. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 251 

JACOB HARTMAN, an alderman of the city, representing the fifteenth 
ward, was born in South Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 19, 1861, son 
of Henry and Adaline (Graeser) Hartman. 

Henry Hartman was born in Darmstadt, Germany, in 1835, and died in 
1879, ^g^d forty-four years. After receiving a good common school educa- 
tion, he served in the German army, as is the regular custom in that country. 
While in the army his health began to decline and he was permitted to leave 
and travel for his health. Having a desire to visit America, he came to this 
country about the year 1856, locating in Pittsburg. Having served as an 
apprentice at shoemaking in his native land, he resumed his trade here and 
continued to follow it some years, but later engaged in the hotel business on 
the South Side, Pittsburg, at No. 68 Eleventh street. After conducting a 
successful hotel for a time, he finally sold the property and moved to East 
Palestine, Ohio, where he again engaged in the hotel business, but still later 
returned to Pittsburg, resumed at his old stand and continued in the hotel 
business to the time of his death in 1879. During the call for volunteers in the 
first year of the Civil war — 1861 — he displayed his true patriotism for his 
adopted country by enlisting twice. According to Bate's Civil War Record 
of Pennsylvania, he first enlisted in the one hundred day service, August 26, 
1861, in Company I, Third Regiment; was transferred to the Sixth United 
States regulars, October 25, 1862, ahd enlisted in Company C, One Hundred 
and Forty-seventh Pennsylvania Regiment, at its organization, and was mus- 
tered out with them July 15, 1865, having seen much service and soldier hard- 
ship. He was a member of the German Presbyterian church ; a staunch sup- 
porter of Republican party principles, and an honored member of the Order 
of Red Men of America. He was much interested in general and local his- 
tory and a man of considerable influence in his community. 

He married Adaline Graeser, which union was blessed by nine children 
as follows: i. Anna, wife of Henry Pleck, of South Pittsburg, the mother of 
six children. 2. Jacob, of whom later. 3. Catherine, deceased, was wife of 
William Colterjohn, of South Pittsburg, the mother of eight children. 4. 

Robert E., a merchant on Carson street, Pittsburg; married Catherine , 

and they have one daughter. 5. Harry, a farmer, married Catherine Young, 
and they have had two children. 6. Herman, of South Pittsburg, married 
and they have five children. 7. Otto, of Carrick, Penn- 
sylvania. He owns a store in Frankstown avenue, East End, Pittsburg. 8. 
Frederick, of South Pittsburg, married Annie Bohm and they have five 
children. 9. Walter, a merchant on Penn avenue, Pittsburg. 

Jacob Hartman, son of Henry Hartman and wife, has always been a 
resident of Pittsburg. He obtained his education on the South Side at the 
public schools. When nineteen years of age, he engaged in the baker's trade, 
serving an apprenticeship with George Jacobs, of Lawrenceville. Subsequent- 
ly he entered the employ of Carl Heberlin, whom he later bought out and 
conducted a very successful business until 1906, when he sold; his place of 
business was at No. 3609 Butler street, Pittsburg. In politics Air. Hartman 
is a Republican. In 1905 he was elected alderman from the fifteenth ward 
of his city ; he gave his whole time and attention to the duties of this office, 
except to look after the fire insurance and real estate interests with which 
he is connected. In 1902 he was elected a member of the school board and 
served three years with much credit, being president of the board. He has 



252 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



ever manifested much interest in educational matters as well as all that tends 
to build up the city and state. 

In 1881 he was married to Emma Heberline, daughter of Carl Heberline 
and wife. Mrs. Hartman was born in Ohio. They are the parents of eight 
children: i. Elma, wife of B. W. Campbell, of Pittsburg, whose child, 

Elvera, is the only grandchild. 2. Robert. 3. Clarence. 4. . 

5. Ralph. 6. Maria. 7. Gilbert. 8. Clayton. All reside at home but Elma. 



BERNARD BANNON, one of the oldest engineers on the Pan Handle 
branch, of the Pennsylvania railroad system, and an esteemed citizen of the 
borough of Crafton, was born in Ireland and came to this country when a babe 
with his parents. His early life was spent in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, where 
he obtained his education. He began life as a railroad employe when but six- 
teen years of age, gradually working his way up, and has for many years 
been a trusty engineer, operating fast passenger trains in the service of the 
Pennsylvania road. He has been in the employ of this company since about 

1862 and is at this date (fall of 1907) running between Pittsburg and — , 

Ohio. He is strictly a temperance man, and his greatest concern in life is the 
comfort and happiness of his family. Pie is a strong advocate of liberal 
educational training, and is giving his two sons the best educational facilities 
he can. He is a devoted member of St. Philip's Roman Catholic Church, and 
contributes liberally to the support of the same. Politically Mr. Bannon is 
a Democrat, but never allows partisanship to interfere with his 'good judg- 
ment in voting for the man he thinks best fitted to occupy official positions. 
His home at Crafton he erected himself and it is among the best in the 
borough. 

Mr. Bannon married, January 17, 1882, Elizabeth F. Mackin, born June 
12, 1850, a daughter of John and Ann (McDonald) Mackin. The ceremony 
was performed by Rev. Father Keeney. Children: i. Sella Elizabeth, born 
April 16, 1884, died June 23, 1893. 2. John Mackin, born September 4. 1885. 
3. Antonius, born May 10, 1888. Both of the surviving sons are stu- 
dents at Notre Dame College, of Indiana. 

Mrs. Bannon comes from an old and honored family of Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. Her father, John Mackin, was born in 1812 in Ireland, son 
of James and Margaret iMackin, and came to America in 1825, locating in 
New York, where he remained until 1836 and then came to Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and here followed the bakery business until 1850, during which time 
he was appointed flour inspector, serving under two governors. Porter -and 
Packer. After 1850 he became a contractor, taking large contracts on the 
Chartier Valley Railroad. He followed such work until 1876. He built the 
Pennsylvania railroad offices in Pittsburg, the retaining wall along the Alle- 
gheny river on Tenth street, the Pan-Handle railroad bridge, the City Hall 
in Pittsburg, besides numerous other public buildings. In 1876 he dislocated 
his hip by an accident, which caused him to abandon contracting work. For 
several years he was connected with the Franklin glue factory of Pittsburg. 
In 1866 he purchased eighty-five acres of land in Chartiers township, this 
county, to which he subsequently moved. He was twice married ; first to 
Ann McDonald in New York in 1836; she bore him ten children, including 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 253 

Elizabeth, now Mrs. Bernard Bannon. Mrs. Mackin died March 9, 1882, aged 
seventy-one years. March 10, 1883, Mr. Mackin married Mary L. Harper. 
Although not a soldier, Mr. Mackin was present at the battles of Fred- 
ericksburg and Chancellorsville. His son John enlisted in Company F, One 
Hundred and Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Regiment, for three years and was 
wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, which resulted in his death some 
time afterward at Washington. 



DR. GEORGE JOSEPH McKEE is a member of one of the best known 
and esteemed families of Greater Pittsburg. He was born at Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, February 7, 1880, son of John A. and Margaret (McCullough) Mc- 
Kee. His father was born in the north of Ireland and was of Scotch-Irish 
blood. After coming to this country he first resided in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a prominent man in his day, being interested in the 
oil business of Pennsylvania, and conducted an oil refinery in Pittsburg for a 
number of years and was also extensively engaged in real estate business, 
both in Pittsburg and Allegheny City. He died in Pittsburg about 1892. He 
had a brother named James B. McKee and a sister, Sarah, now Mrs. Thomp- 
son, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. John A. McKee was a devoted member 
of the Reformed Presbyterian church, in which he served a number of years 
as an elder. He married for his first wife a Miss Armstrong, by whom was 
born children, as follows: i. Joseph, deceased. 2. Mary, wife of John T. 
Morton, of Allegheny. 3. Hugh W\ 4. Ella, wife of N. W. Stephenson, 
Pittsburg. 5. Sadie, wife of Thomas H. Boyd, of Allegheny. 6. John C, 
deceased. 7. Thomas S., deceased. 8. Samuel S., deceased. 9. James R. 
For his second wife John A. McKee married ]\Iargaret iMcCullough, a native 
of Scotland, born in 1837, died, aged sixty-three, in 1900. By this union two 
children were born, as follows: i. Samuel Rutherford, died aged eleven 
years. 2. George^ J., of whom later. 

George J. McKee spent his boyhood days in Allegheny, and attended the 
public schools, where he gained his primary education. With his mother he 
removed to California, where he also attended the public schools for a time, 
residing there for eight years, when the family returned to the east and 
George J. entered college at Cambridge, ^lassachusetts, graduating from Har- 
vard College in 1906. He came back to Allegheny, where he was resident 
physician in the Presbyterian Hospital one year, after which he opened an 
office in Allegheny, where he still practices his profession. He is a member 
of the Allegheny County Medical Society. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, belonging to McKinley Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Allegheny. His present residence is at 2637 Perryville avenue, which he 
built in 1905. He also owns property in the East End, Pittsburg. Politically 
he affiliates with the Republican party, and in church relations is a member 
of the Eighth Street United Presbvterian Church. 



JOHN HOWARD CRAWFORD. D. D. S. Among the dental sur- 
geons of Pittsburg who is of the later school of this profession and whose 
skill is well known by the large practice he now enjoys is John H. Crawford, 
who was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1878, son of 



254 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Samuel Edgar and Lydia Ramsey (Coventry) Crawford. His line of descent 
is as follows: 

(I) Edgar Crawford, the great-grandfather, was a native of Ireland, 
came to America and settled near the village of Darlington, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a sturdy farmer, and of the old United Presbyterian 
stock from which have descended so many rugged characters in western Penn- 
sylvania. 

(H) Edgar Crawford, son of Edgar Crawford (I), was a farmer and 
owned and resided on the old homestead in Beaver county. He was a captain 
in the Civil war and received serious wounds. He died about 1883, in his 
eighty-fourth year. He and his wife, whose name was Mary Elizabeth, reared 
a family of children, among whom were: i. William A., of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, connected with the American Sewer Pipe Company. He married and 
has two children, Marie and Thomas. 2. Ella, deceased, was wife of Howard 
Barclay, of Iowa, and the mother of two sons, Harlan and Robert. 3. Samuel 
Edgar, born December 25, 1853. 

(Ill) Samuel Edgar Crawford, son of Edgar Crawford (II), was born 
on the old Crawford homestead in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He received 
his education in the public schools, and first learned the tinner's trade, which 
he followed for ten years. Subsequently he went to Sharpsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was superintendent for the Pittsburg Supply Company up to 
October, 1906, when he resigned on account of ill health and retired. He was 
a man of more than ordinary attainments and the inventor of many valuable 
patents, among which was the "Crawford's Gas Regulator" and "Crawford's 
Gas Meter." The improvements on gas appliances and fixtures were numerous. 
He had been in the employ of the latter company named about twenty-four 
years and has rendered them valuable service. From his many inventions he 
iiad accumulated sufficient means to live comfortably. He finally regained his 
health, and not wishing to remain idle he accepted a position with the National 
Metal Company, and in June, 1907, went to Hoboken, New Jersey, to take 
charge of their plant and there remained to the date of his death, which was in- 
deed a very sakl one. In trying to adjust a window shutter in his room, on the 
fourth floor of the building, he overbalanced and fell to the pavement, sustain- 
ing injuries from which he never recovered, dying in the hospital, August 19, 
1907. His remains were brought to Pittsburg and buried in the Uniondale 
cemetery, Allegheny. He had been a resident of Avondale for twenty-two 
years and was held in high esteem. He w'as a devout member of the United 
Presbyterian church, and in politics an active Republican. He married Lydia 
Ramsey Coventry, born in New Brighton, Pennsylvania. She died September, 
1895, aged forty-one years; she was the daughter of John and Anna (Arm- 
strong) Coventry. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford were the parents of five children: 
I. Earnest W., born December 31, 1876, now a constructing engineer for the 
Lewis Foundry and Machine Company; he was formerly with the Carnegie 
Company. He married Margaret Hutchinson, no issue. 2. Dr. John Howard, 
of whom later. 3. Helen, wife of Allen R. Gerbaum, of Mt. Washington. They 
have one son, Allen Edgar, born June, 1907. 4. Anna E., and 5. Agnes 
M., both residing with their sister, Mrs. A. R. Gerbaum, in Mt. Washington. 
For his second w'lie Mr. Crawford married Lydia Marquis, daughter of Cap- 
tain Marquis, of Rochester, Pennsylvania. She died August, 1904, without 
issue. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 



255 



(IV) Dr. John Howard Crawford, son of Samuel Edgar and Lydia 
Ramsey (Coventry) Crawford, spent his boyhood days in Sharpsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and at Avalon, attending the public schools, completing his primary 
education from the Avalon high schools. When eighteen years of age he 
entered the employ of the Equitable Motor Company, at Allegheny, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was apprenticed as a machinist. He remained there nine 
years, learning the various branches of the trade, and was made an assistant 
to his father and also represented the firm as its traveling salesman. While 
in the employ of this company, he took a liking to the profession of dentistry 
and entered the Pittsburgh Dental College, from which he graduated in 1905, 
after which he opened an office in the Nixon Theater building, practiced there 
two years and removed to Nos. 501 and 502 of the Diamond Bank building. 
He is a member of the Odontological Society of Western Pennsylvania ; Penn- 
sylvania Dental Society ; is secretary of the Alumni Association of the Western 
University of Pennsylvania ; a member of the Delta Sigma Delta of the Dental 
Fraternity. In his religious faith he is a Presbyterian, and in politics a Re- 
publican. 



ENOCH HARDERN. One of the oldest engineers in the service of the 
Pennsylvania railway system is Enoch Hardern, a prominent man of Pitts- 
burg. He is a native of Wellsburg, West A'^irginia, born November 15, 1850, 
a son of Robert and Mary (Turner) Hardern. The father was born in Man- 
chester, England, in either 181 1 or 1812. He was a mill spinner in the great 
cotton factories of Manchester, and in 1846, thinking to better his condition, 
emigrated to America, settling at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, where he was 
employed in the cotton factory up to the opening of the Rebellion, 1861, when 
he was among the first to respond to the call of President Lincoln for troops 
to preserve the Union. Notwithstanding this was his adopted country, he 
enlisted with the three months men, being a member of Company C, Sixty-first 
Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers. When his term of service had ex- 
pired, he re-enlisted as a member of the Seventy-seventh Regiment. On May 
12, 1864, at the fierce battle of Spottsylvania Court House, he was shot three 
times through the right leg and taken to Alexandria Hospital, near Washing- 
ton, where he was compelled to have his limb amputated. Later he came 
home. Among other sad experiences he had was that of being taken prisoner, 
robbed of his clothing and money and finally lodged in Libby prison, from 
which he was paroled. L^pon his return from the war, he opened a grocery 
store in Allegheny City, which he conducted up to the time of his death, in 
1869. This place of business was situated on the corner of Rebecca and 
Corry streets. 

He was united in marriage to Mary Turner, also a native of Manchester, 
England, and came to this country with her parents. She was the daughter 
of Richard Turner, who also located, lived and died in Allegheny City, Penn- 
sylvania. She died in August, 1877, aged fifty-seven years. This worthy 
couple are both buried in Allegheny City. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hardern were as follows: i. Joseph, who died young. 2. Thomas, died young. 
3. Robert, of West Newton, Pennsylvania, an engineer on the Pittsburg & 
Lake Erie Railroad ; married Mary Jones and they have one daughter, Mrs. 
Samuel Tucker. 4. Enoch, of whom later. 5. William, of Allegheny, who 



256 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



married Alary Friel and they are the parents of Joseph, William, Willis and 
Lizzie. 

Enoch Hardern came with his parents to Allegheny City when he was an 
infant, and when old enough attended the public schools and worked at what- 
ever he could make the most money at and gave all of his earnings to his wid- 
owed mother. At the age of twelve years he began to clerk in a store, and 
when seventeen commenced to work at the painter's trade. January lo, 1871, 
he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as foreman in 
the yards, which was but temporary, and in a short time he was given a regu- 
lar run between Pittsburg and Conemaugh. April 29, 1876, he was promoted 
to engineer on a passenger train. He ran the accommodation for a year and 
then took the freight service, continuing until 1901, when he went back to 
passenger service, continuing until 1907, when he asked the company to give 
him yard work on a switch engine, which they did, so he might be at home 
more. His last passenger train was what is known as the "New York Lim- 
ited," which train he pulled for three years. Twelve years he pulled the 
Youghenny Express. His record as a railroader is among the best. In all of 
his experience he has never met with accident; never injured a passenger; 
never wrecked or disabled his locomotive, and hence has the record which the 
company highly appreciates. He is a member of Duquesne Lodge, Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers, No. 325 ; belongs to the Free and Accepted 
Masons, Lodge No. 318. He belongs to the Episcopal church, and votes the 
Republican ticket. 

He was married April 12, 1876, to Alice Windram, born in Allegheny, 
Pennsvlvania. By this union was born four children: i. Olive E., wife of 
Dr. J. W. Walker, whose sketch appears in this work. 2. William J., of Pitts- 
burg, in the employ of the Westinghouse Electric Machine Company, who 
married Bessie E. Roberts, and they have one son, Enoch. 3. Harry R., a 
fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad. 4. Alice ]\L, at home. 



DR. JOHN WALTER WALKER, numbered among Pittsburg's suc- 
cessful dental surgeons, was born on Penn avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
January 9, 1875, a son of William and Amanda (Schoefield) Walker. 

William Walker (father) is one of Pittsburg's highly esteemed citizens. 
He is also a native of Pittsburg, and was left an orphan at the age of seven 
vears. His parents were both natives of the north of Ireland, from whence 
they emigrated to America. William Walker was educated at Pittsburg in 
the public schools; he then entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company as a fireman, and before he reached his majority was promoted to 
engineer. He is one of the most thoroughly reliable engineers in this great 
corporation's employ, having been with them over thirty years. He is identi- 
fied with the interests of the United Presbyterian church, of which he is a 
member of long standing. He now resides in the Twenty-second ward of the 
city of Pittsburg, where he possesses a handsome residence property. He was 
married to Amanda Schoefield, daughter of John and Sarah Ann (Morrow) 
Schoefield. By this union were born the following children: i. Mamie, died 
in childhood. 2. John Walter, of whom later. 3. Sarah E., wife of Harvey 
Stenger, the mother of four children : William, Samuel, Glenn and an infant. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 257 

deceased. 4. Charles, deceased. 5. Gilbert R., at home. 6. Ethel, at home. 
7. An infant, deceased. 

John Schoefield, maternal grandfather, came to America with his parents 
when he was but six months of age. He learned the blacksmith's trade and 
was one of the leading smiths of Pittsburg, conducting a machine and black- 
smith shop for many years, and made much iron work for the construction of 
early-day bridges. His shops were located on Twenty-seventh street. He was 
the patentee of one of the first car coupling devices known to be of any prac- 
tical value. He succeeded well in his operations and retired on account of old 
age. He married three times, his first wife being Sarah Ann Morrow, grand- 
mother of Dr. Walker. 

Dr. Walker was educated at the Pittsburg public schools in the Fifteenth 
ward, and at Iron City Business College. When seventeen years of age he 
entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as passenger 
brakeman, which role he followed until 1901. While in the employ of the 
railroad company he decided to enter the dental profession, and commenced 
to study while still attending to his duties on the passenger train. He later 
entered the Pittsburgh Dental College, from which he graduated in April, 
1902. At first he opened an office for the practice of his profession on Elysian 
avenue, but subsequently removed to the Vilsack building, his present quarters, 
where he is in possession of a rapidly increasing patronage. Possessing 
industry and intelligence in business affairs, he has accumulated a good property 
on Twenty-second street, Pittsburg. Politically Dr. Walker is a supporter of 
the principles of the Republican party. He attends the Calvary Episcopal 
church, of which he is a member. 

He was married January 8, 1903, to Olive E., a daughter of Enoch and 
Alice (Windram) Hardern (see sketch of this family elsewhere in this work). 
Dr. and Mrs. Walker are the parents of one child, Alice Virginia. The home 
of Dr. Walker and family is one he purchased on Hastings street, in the 
Twentv-second ward of Pittsbure. 



ROSS WILLIS ANDREWS, D. D. S., one of Pittsburg's skillful dental 
surgeons, is a native of Carroll county, Ohio, born December 22,, 1873, son of 
David Ross and Margaret Rebecca (George) Andrews. 

William Andrews (grandfather) was a native of Jeft'erson county, Ohio, 
and later came to Carroll county, Ohio, where he operated a fine farm and was 
a successful agriculturist. This tract of farm land is still held by his de- 
scendants. His ancestors were of Irish extraction and originally the name was 
spelled "McAndrews." William Andrews, the grandfather, died about 1873. 
He married Rebecca Whittle, whose people all lived in the western states, 
Iowa and Nebraska ; she was from an excellent family and lived to the ad- 
vanced age of eighty years. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. William 
Andrews were as follows : 

I. William, of Iowa, married and has a family. 2. David Ross, of wdiom 
later. 3. John, a successful farmer of Carroll county, Ohio, married and has 
a family, his wife now being deceased. 4. George, also a farmer of Carroll 
county, Ohio, married and has a family. 5. Ella, unmarried, resides in 
Minerva, Ohio. 6. Elizabeth, wife of Jacob Moorhead, mother of two chil- 
dren ; this family resides in Carroll county, Ohio, and are farmers. 7. Anna, 

iv— 17 



258 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



wife of James Russell, has two children; this family resides at Dellroy, Ohio. 

8. Hattie, wife of j a contractor of Minerva, Ohio. William Andrews 

and wife, parents, are buried at Harlem Springs, Carroll county, Ohio. In 
religious faith they were Presbyterians. 

David Ross Andrews (father) was born in Jefiferson county, Ohio, and 
was reared on the farm, attended the common schools and left home when a 
young man, working among the farmers of that section of the west. He also 
operated threshing machines, which was then a different business from that 
which now obtains, when such implements are common in all neighborhoods. 
About 1874 he moved to Indiana, where he farmed for a period of years, then 
returned to his old home in Ohio and now resides on his old farm. He is a 
man of much ability and public-spirited. He is. a thorough believer in educa- 
tion of the young ; has been school director and township supervisor for a 
number of terms each. As a farmer and stockman he is thoroughly up-to-date. 
His present farm consists of one hundred and sixty acres, well improved and 
upon which in 1905 he erected a commodious farm house. This farm is 
located three miles from the sprightly little village of Bergholz, which con- 
tains three thousand inhabitants, who live chiefly from off the coal mining 
interests. Originally Mr. Andrews was a supporter of the Democratic party, 
but of recent years has voted with the Prohibition party. In his church affilia- 
tions he is a Presbyterian, being a liberal contributor. He married, in 
December, 1872, Margaret Rebecca George, daughter of William and Rebecca 
(Golden) George, of Carroll county, Ohio. The children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Andrews are: i. Ross Willis Andrews, of this sketch, born December 
23, 1873. 2. Sadie Bell, born December 20, 1874, was educated at the public 
schools and at an academy. She married Henry B. Robinson, a hardware 
merchant, of Toronto, Ohio. This family are members of the United 
Presbyterian church. Their children are : Frances, Florence, Dorothy, Irene, 
David and . 

Dr. Ross W. Andrews spent his boyhood days on the farm, and had the 
advantages of the good public schools during the winter months. Later he 
attended the Normal school at Ada, Ohio, and chose dentistry for a profession. 
In the autumn of 1895 he entered the Western Reserve University at Cleve- 
land, Ohio, where he took a thorough course in dental surgery, graduating in 
June, 1899, passing the examination before the state board in December of 
the same year. In June, 1900, he opened an office at 6202 Penn avenue, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he practiced his profession for two years, then 
moved to his present location, 127 North Highland avenue. Dr. Andrews is 
unmarried ; is a member of the Pittsburgh Board of Trade ; Pittsburgh Dental 
Society ; Society of Western Pennsylvania. He belongs to the Presbyterian 
church, and in his political affiliations is a Republican. 



LOUIS J. VOGEL. Bassilius Vogel, the founder of the family in Amer- 
ica, was born at Sackingen, Germany, in 1800. He was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, and in the year 1850 disposed of his property and came with his entire 
family to the United States, settling in Birmingham, Pennsylvania, now known 
as the South Side of Pittsburg. He lived only two years after his arrival in 
this country, his death occurring in Pittsburg November 28, 1852, aged fifty- 
two years. In 1827 he married Regina Lutteck, born at Sackingen, Germany, 





co^-e/u^ (%. Ue^-(j(-e^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 259 

in 1809, and died in 1889 in Pittsburg, aged eighty years. Their children, all 
of whom were born at Sackingen, were: Ignatius, born in January, 1828; 
Sophia, February 5, 1832; Jacob, November 5, 1835; Joseph A., March 19, 
1838, of whom later; Frederick, March 7, 1840; Rosina, February 15, 1845; 
Bernard, November i, 1848. During the Civil war four of these sons, Igna- 
tius, Jacob, Frederick and Bernard, the latter only a lad, enlisted in the Union 
army. Joseph A. remained at home to care for the widowed mother. 

Joseph A. Vogel, third son and fourth child of Bassilius and Regina (Lut- 
teck) Vogel, born March 19, 1838, died October 12, 1903, in Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. He received a part of his education in the schools of Germany, but 
being required to work at an early age to help support his widowed mother, 
he was obliged to complete his education by attending the public night school 
in Birmingham, Pennsylvania. He followed his trade of window glass worker 
until the age of fifty-six years, when he was compelled to retire, owing to an 
injury to his hand. He was a member of St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church 
(on the South Side) until 1898, when he became a resident of the East End and 
a member of the Holy Rosary congregation. He was a man of integrity and 
honor, and in both public and private life faithfully performed all duties and 
obligations. 

Joseph A. Vogel married, December 30, 1869, Elizabeth Schmitt, daughter 
of Anton and Barbara Schmitt, early settlers in Birmingham, Pittsburg. She 
was born in New York city March 4, 1848, where her parents first settled when 
coming to the United States from Germany. Six children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Vogel, three sons and three daughters. The sons are : Anton F., 
born January 29, 1871, is a resident of Mt. Oliver, South Side, Pittsburg, and 
follows the trade of a glass worker. He married, January 12, 1898, Anna 
Welsbacher, a daughter of Anton and Elizabeth Welsbacher, of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and they have three children, a son and two daughters : Rich- 
ard J., born May 17, 1901 ; Elizabeth, born January 13, 1904, and Henrietta, 
born July 6, 1907. Frederick I. was born February 27, 1876. He resides with 
his widowed mother in East End, Pittsburg. Louis J., born August 27, 1881, 
is a resident of the East End, Pittsburg; engaged in the real estate business, 
and he is a member of the Pittsburg Board of Trade. He married, October 2, 
1906, Bertha L. Haberstroh, daughter of Amand and Anna Haberstroh, of 
Boston, Massachusetts ; and they have a son, Louis Frederic, born November 
3, 1907. The daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Vogel were: Mary, born August 31, 
1873, died November 8, 1877; Henrietta, born August 15, 1884, died December 
3, 1892; Lenora, born November 4, 1889, died November 21, 1892. 



HERMAN ELLSWORTH KRUMPE, D. D. S., one of Pittsburg's lead- 
ing dentists, was born November 19, 1879, at Sarversville, Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, son of William Krumpe, whose parents were born in Germanv and 
who was himself a native of Sarversville, where he was brought up on his 
father's farm. 

William Krumpe attended the public schools, learned the blacksmith's 
trade and all his life conducted a shop at Sarversville. He belonged to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was a devout member of the Lutheran 
church. William Krumpe married Mary A. Koegler, born in Winfield town- 
ship, Butler county, and the following children were born to them: i. Albert, 



26o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



died young. 2. Wesley, also died young. 3. Sarah, wife of C. E. Renick, 
ticket agent for the Bessemer Railroad Company at Albion, Pennsylvania; 
children : Herbert E. and Frederick W. 4. Herman Ellsworth, of whom 
later. Mr. Krumpe died in 1881, at the early age of thirty-five, and his widow 
married Frederick J. Doerr, by whom she had three children: i. J. Alfred, 
teacher in public school at Dubois, Pennsylvania. 2. Norman F., and 3. 
Clarence F., both at home. The family reside on a farm of one hundred and 
eight acres at Slippery Rocks, Butler county, and are active members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Herman Ellsworth Krumpe, son of William and Mary A. (Koegler) 
Krumpe, was six years old when the family moved to the farm at Slippery 
Rocks, where he passed his boyhood, receiving his education in the public 
schools and at the Normal school, graduating from the latter institution in 
the class of 1899. For three years thereafter he taught in the schools of his 
native township and in those of Boston, Pennsylvania, and in 1902 came to 
Pittsburg, where he attended the Pittsburgh Dental College, graduating in 
1904 with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. During his vacations he 
was engaged in civil engineering with E. E. Maurhofif, at Tarentum, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1904 he passed an examination by the state board, and in 
February of that year opened an office in the Geyer building, on Frankstown 
avenue, where he has since practiced successfully. He is a Democrat, and a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

Dr. Krumpe married, November 29, 1905, Cicely C. Balching, born 
January 5, 1883, in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and they are the parents 
of one child. Cicely Mildred. 



McCLEMENTS FAAHLY. The McClements family of Greater Pitts- 
burg is represented by the descendants of Hugh and Margaret (Burns) 
McClements (I). This name was first represented in America by Samuel 
McClements (H), the second child of Hugh and Margaret (Burns) McClem- 
ents, who arrived in America from Bedford, Ireland, March 20, 1884. The 
grandfather of Samuel was also a native of Ireland ; he was a sailor and fol- 
lowed the sea between Belfast and Liverpool, England. During a severe 
ocean storm he was washed overboard ; beyond this little else is now known 
of his history. His wife's name was Elizabeth, who died about 1903, aged one 
hundred and two years. She is said to have been a very remarkable woman 
and only a short time before her death, when the members of the family paid 
her a visit' from this country, she walked a long distance through the gardens 
to the depot and acted in all ways like a young woman. She was born on the 
sea coast and was an active worker in the Presbyterian church. She was the 
mother of five children: i. Hugh, of whom further mention will be made in 
this sketch. 2. Thomas, deceased. 3. John, of Belfast, Ireland. 4. Nancy, 
wife of Mr. Polly. 5. . 

Hugh McClements, son of and Elizabeth McClements, was born 

on a farm near Belfast, Ireland, and there educated. He owned a farm of one 
hundred acres. He remained at home, his father having died when he was 
young. After .Hugh's son Samuel came to America in 1884 he followed. Here 
he found employment with Reamer Brothers, confectioners, and has remained 
in- their employ ever since. He is their timekeeper and looks after other inter- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 261 



€sts for them. His special characteristic in Hfe is his home, in which he ever 
takes much dehght. His flower garden in summer time is also one of his 
objects of interest. He is a member of the Sixth Presbyterian church, and in 
early life took a great and active part in the work of the denomination. He is 
now (1907) past seventy years of age. He married Margaret Burns, now aged 
about sixty-two years; her mother died in 1905, ninety-six years of age. The 
Burns family in the old country resided in a beautiful home along the English 
Channel. Hugh and Margaret (Burns) McClements are the parents of eight 
•children: i. Jane, wife of John Potter, of Allegheny City. 2. Samuel, of the 
firm of Randolph & McClements, of the East End, Pittsburg. 3. Elizabeth, 
wife of Arthur Washington, of Sharon, Pennsylvania. 4. Thomas, of Pitts- 
burg. 5. James B., of whom later. 6. Margaret, of Pittsburg. 7. Hugh, 
of Allegheny City. 8. John, of Pittsburg. 

Samuel McClements, eldest son of Hugh and Elizabeth (Burns) McClem- 
ents, was born near Belfast, Ireland, May 26, 1866. He received a good 
education in the schools of his native land, and at the age of fifteen years 
taught school for one year. March 8, 1884, he sailed on the "City of Nebraska" 
for America, landing in New York the 20th of the same month. He then 
came direct to Pittsburg. He was a whole week in this city before he found 
any friends to greet him, but at the end of that time met John Miller. Soon he 
■commenced working for Joseph McKee, as his clerk, and continued with him 
for six months, after which he entered the employ of B. A. Elliott in his 
greenhouse and remained at that for seven years, after which he went with 
O. B. Patterson, florist, and remained in that position for five years. At the 
end of that period he engaged in business with Mr. Randolph, under the firm 
name of Randolph & McClements ; today they have one of the leading business 
places in their line in the East End, Pittsburg. A detailed account of this 
business appears in the sketch of Mr. Randolph in this work. Mr. McClements 
is a member of the United Presbyterian church, known as the Sixth church. 
He is one of the members of the board of trustees. Politically Mr. McClements 
is a Republican. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce ; to Hailman Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Pittsburg Chapter, Duquesne Commandery and 
Syria Shriners. He was united in marriage in April, 1888, to Ella Crozier, 
daughter of William J. and Minnie (Owens) Crozier. They are the parents 
of two children: i. Adah, born in April, 1889. 2. Samuel, born Alay 18, 
1895. The family reside at No. 5184 Liberty avenue, Pittsburg. 

James B. McClements, third child of Hugh and EHzabeth (Burns) 
McClements, was born near Belfast, Ireland, August 8, 1875. He obtained his 
education in the schools of his native land, taught by his brother, and after 
coming to Pittsburg attended the Allegheny City schools. Later he took a 
business course at Dufll's Commercial College of this city. He began his 
business career as an office boy for Horn & Ward, remained one year and then 
clerked for A. J. Rankin, druggist, with whom he continued for about one year; 
then engaged with Reymer Brothers, as a clerk, having charge of their soda 
fountain. Being faithful, he gradually worked himself up and in October, 
1906, was made manager of the wholesale cigar department, and is now one 
of the stockholders in the business. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
belonging to Dallas Lodge, No. 508, Free and Accepted Masons ; also is a 
member of Syria Temple of Shriners, No. 329. 

He was married June 11, 1899. by the Rev. F. L. Bullard, pastor of the 



262 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



Presbyterian church, to Gertrude Kiel, born at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, 
January lo, 1877, daughter of Edward A. and Dorothy (Boom) Kiel. The 
issue by this union was three children: i. Gertrude Virginia, born August 
13, 1901. 2. James Burns, born July 3, 1904. 3. William McGamery, born 
September 3, 1906. The family resides at Grafton, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
McClements is of the Presbyterian church faith, and in politics votes the 
Republican ticket. 

REUBEN HERROD, D. D. S., who has been practicing the dental pro- 
fession in Pittsburg since 1880, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on Van 
Bram street, March 12, 1855, a son of Thomas and Dinah (Taylor) Herrod. 
His education was obtained in the schools of Derry Station, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, primarily, but in 1875 he came back to Pittsburg to be 
taught the dental profession. He also attended the Dental School of Phila- 
delphia, graduating on February 28, 1880. The same year he opened an office 
in Pittsburg, the same being on Penn avenue. Here he has followed his calling 
for more than a quarter of a century with merited success. Politically Dr. 
Herrod is a Republican, while in church relations he attends the United Presby- 
terian church. He has always taken a deep interest in the public school system, 
and has served as school director in the Thirty-seventh ward of the city of 
Pittsburg for three years. 

He was married to Sallie, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Edgar, on 
January 26, 1882. They are the parents of these children: i. Walter Clyde, 
born in 1883. 2. Bertram Arthur, born in 1884. 3. Ralph Arden, born in 
1893. 4. Robert Chester, born in 1896. 

Thomas Herrod, the father of Dr. Herrod, was born in Nottingham, 
England, in 1821, and came to Pittsburg in 1852; he followed agricultural 
pursuits for a livelihood, and was also engaged in the lumber business quite 
extensively. He married Miss Dinah Taylor by whom was born: i. George 
T. 2. Dr. Reuben. 3. Nora (Herrod) Jackson. 4. Thomas T. 5. Frank. 
6. Margrates (Herrod) Smith. 7. Alice (Herrod) Crawford. 8. Agnes 
(Herrod) Gibson. 9. James C. 10. Harry F. The father died in 1890 and 
the mother in 1891. 

Dr. Herrod is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 360, I. O. O. F. ; 
Cap Chief Conclave, No. 159, L O. H., and the Protective Home Circle, 
No. 48. 

BRADEN AND CARLIN FAMILIES. The name Braden, Bredon, 
Bryden and Bredin, according to certain authorities, are the same and all 
have their origin in the old form Breton, which surname, or some of its 
representatives, figured in all the great battlefields, in the extermination of 
the Huguenots, the Irish troubles and the destruction of the Indians. "Braden 
is very old, dating back to 800 or 900 A. D." It appears in Domesday Book 
and has been continuous ever since as an English family title. It is supposed 
to represent the Danish form of the pronunciation of Breton, which was 
originally Brayton. There have been families by the name of Braden in 
England since 1000, and in America since 1650. 

During the Revolution in France (about 1790) Andie Bredin, who was 
a native of France, born June 24, 1759, died in the year 1842, at Gustavus, 
Trumbull county, Ohio, with other members of his family, came to America, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 263 

having fled first to England. He settled first in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, 
from whence he removed to Gustavus, Ohio, where he purchased a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, on which he resided the remainder of his life. 
His second wife, Mary (Morrow) Bredin, a native of Gustavus, Ohio, who 
died in 1840, bore him four children, as follows: i. James Noble, of whom 
later. 2. Martha, married a Mr. Smith. 3. Mary, married Samuel Middle- 
ton. 4. George Arner, of Gustavus, who resides in the old homestead ; he 
married Adeline Boone, who bore him four children : Lillie, Margaret, died 
December 27, 1897; James and Ephraim. A brother of Andie Bredin settled 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania, and he was the father of Judge Braden. 

James Noble Braden, eldest son of Andie and Mary (Morrow) Bredin, 
was born in Gustavus, Trumbull county, Ohio, October 16, 1834. He spent 
his early life on the farm, and at the age of sixteen years began teaching 
school, continuing at this occupation for about three years. Later he trav- 
eled as a salesman, and by careful management of his income saved sufficient 
capital to enable him to educate himself. He entered the Western Reserve 
College, at Cleveland, Ohio, and graduated thferefrom four years later. He 
then came to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and embarked in the merchant com- 
mission business at No. 329 Old Liberty street, continuing along this line up 
to his demise. May 23, 1890. He was also interested in real estate, and built 
and owned several properties in the East End of Pittsburg. He was a man 
of the strictest integrity, possessed more than ordinary attainments, and was 
esteemed and beloved by all who had the honor of his acquaintance. He was 
one of the active members of Calvary Episcopal church, and served as a 
vestryman for the long period of eighteen years, also as treasurer of the 
church. 

Mr. Braden married Caroline Cowden, born December i, 1858, at Gus- 
tavus, Ohio, daughter of Simpson and Amanda (Bergendorfer) Cowden. 
Five children were the issue of this union, namely: i. Harriet Amanda, born 
November 9, 1859, wife of William J. Carlin, of whom later. 2. Sarah, wife 
of Edward J\L West (see sketch of West family elsewhere in this work). 3. 
Alma, wife of Wilson Harper, of Landsdown, Pennsylvania, and mother of 
one child, Harold. 4. James Simpson, of New York City, married Jean 
Miller. 5. A daughter, who died in infancy. 

William James Carlin, son-in-law of the late James Noble Braden, was 
born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1856, son of Thomas Carlin, 
who was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1821, died in 1885. Upon his emigration 
to America Thomas Carlin located in Allegheny City. In i860 he founded the 
firm of Thomas Carlin & Son, and was one of the most prominent and public- 
spirited men of his adopted city. He was an active member of the United 
Presbyterian church, and was noted for his good deeds. His wife bore him 
four children, as follows: i. David, died in 1881. 2. Thomas, of Allegheny 

City. 3. Mary, wife of John , of Pittsburg. 4. William James, of 

whom later. 

William James Carlin was educated in the schools of Allegheny City. In 
early life he became connected with the firm of Thomas Carlin & Son, and 
in 1899 purchased the interests of his brothers and formed a stock company, 
of which he is now (1907) president. He is also president of the William J. 
Carlin Company, both of these large manufacturing concerns in the city of 
Pittsburg. He is a man of liberal ideas, extremely hospitable, and in his home 



264 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



and in the society of his family he finds his keenest pleasure. He is a member 
of Calvary Episcopal church, donating liberally both of his time and money ; 
he contributed largely to the erection of the new church. 

Mr. Carlin married, April 27, 1882, Harriet Amanda Braden, who bore 
him three children: i. David Noble, born November 4, 1884, was educated 
under a private tutor and at Western University, and is associated with his 
father in business, being a member of the firm of Thomas Carlin & Sons. He 
is a young man of exemplary habits, and his career is bright with promise. 
He is a member of Calvary Episcopal church, and a Republican in politics. He 
resides with his parents. 2. Alma Braden, born October 13, 1886, died De- 
cember 30, 1888. 3. William Douglas, born January 15, 1894, died March 4, 
1895. Mr. Carlin and his family reside at No. 380 South Highland avenue, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

THOMAS WIGHTMAN, one of the oldest and most highly esteemed 
residents of Greater Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, who has been prominently 
identified with a number of important business enterprises in that city, now 
(1907) almost ninety years of age, is a fine example of a life lived well and 
usefully. He is a representative of an honored family of Ireland, and has 
inherited the thrifty habits of the natives of that country. 

James Wightman, father of Thomas Wightman, was a prosperous farmer 
in county Down, Ireland, and was of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He emigrated 
to this country wnth his family in '1825 and settled in Pittsburg, which was 
his home for the remainder of his life. He purchased a large tract of land 
to which he devoted much of his time and attention, cultivating it very profit- 
ablv for fruits of all kinds- that could be raised in that section of the country. 
He was a man peaceably inclined, of strong intellectual powers, and possessed 
the courage of his convictions. He was a member of the Presbyterian church 
while living in Ireland, with which his family had been associated for more 
than two centuries, but upon coming to America he joined the Protestant 
Episcopal church. He died at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. He 
married, in Ireland, Martha Smiley, who died in America in 1830, and they 
were the parents of nine sons and two daughters. 

Thomas Wightman, youngest son of James and Martha (Smiley) Wight- 
man, was born near Newtownards, on Lough Strangford, county Down, 
Ireland, January 8, 1818. He was but seven years of age when he came to 
the United States wuth his parents, and his education was acquired in a small 
red brick school house in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, under the tuition of A. W. 
Campbell, at that time one of the most efficient teachers in the city. He devel- 
oped a decided aptitude and liking for mathematics and, after entering upon 
his business career, continued his studies in this direction in the evening schools, 
and supplemented this by assiduous home work. He was but fourteen years 
of age when he accepted his first business position, which was that of clerk 
in a grocery store, and he resigned this at the expiration of two years in order 
to accept a position in a glass manufactory of William McCully, this being 
at that time the leading industry of that section of the country. He was 
assigned to the packing department, and here his diligence and faithful and 
methodical attention to the duties of his position did not fail to attract the 
attention of Mr. McCully. So great was his confidence in the capacity and 
reliability of young Wightman that when he had occasion to go to New Or- 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 265 



leans for an extended period of time, he left the plant in his charge, feeling 
that he was fully capable of managing it to his entire satisfaction. This con- 
fidence was not misplaced, and upon the return of Mr. McCully, Mr. Wight- 
man, though but a mere youth, was advanced to the position of superintendent. 
This office he retained until he was twenty-two years of age when he was 
admitted to partnership in the firm, the name being changed to William 
McCuIly & Company. This connection was in force until 185 1, when Mr. 
Wightman formed a partnership with Frederick Lorenz, who died suddenly 
five years later, leaving- the business affairs in a very involved condition. It 
was assigned to Mr. Wightman for the benefit of the creditors, and at the 
same time he entered the employ of Alexander D. Chambers & Sons, in the 
same line of business. Shortly afterward Atwood Lorenz, a son of Frederick 
Lorenz, died, and Mr. Wightman resumed the personal management of the 
concern, conducting it for several years under the name of Lorenz & Wight- 
man, later changing the name to Wightman &: Company, and still later to the 
present firm name of The Thomas W^ightman Glass Company, under which 
title it has been favorably known in the business world since 1896. This 
company has an extensive plant, consisting of two factories in Pittsburg, one 
for the manufacture of window glass, the other for bottle manufacture, and 
factories at Parker's Landing and !Monongahela. The phenomenal success of 
this business is due in a great measure to the indomitable energy, executive 
ability and sound judgment of Mr. Wightman. In addition to this concern, 
Mr. Wightman is interested in a number of other business enterprises. He 
is vice-president of the First National Bank, and is a director of the People's 
Bank of Savings and of the Safe Deposit and Trust Company. He is the 
owner of a quantity of real estate in the city, including the ten-acre lot in 
Forbes street, on which his residence is located. Though now (1907) almost 
ninety years of age, Mr. Wightman goes to his office every day, attending to 
business matters until three o'clock. Early in life he acquired the habit of 
devoting at least a small portion of each day to the reading of good literature, 
and this habit he has carried through his life, and is now a man of wide and 
diversified knowledge. In politics he was formerly a member of the Whig 
party, but affiliated with the Republican party when that body was organized, 
and has been a staunch supporter of its principles since that time. He has been 
a member of the Presbyterian church for more than forty years and has been 
an elder in the Bellfield church for a third of a century. 

He married. July 30, 1845, Isabella Ruth Russell, daughter of John Rus- 
sell, who was a leading merchant of Pittsburg in his day. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Wightman were devoted to their family ties, and until the death of the wife 
and mother, the entire family were wont to gather in the old home at all 
holidays. Mrs. Wightman was born July 30, 1824. died March i. 1904. Thev 
had children: i. Rev. John R., archdeacon in the Protestant Episcopal church 
and identified with the missionary work in his native city. 2. James Smiley. 
3. Algernon. 4. Sidney. 5. William Henry. 6. Mary, died in 1890, aged 
twenty-eight. 7. Samuel Ralston. 8. Isabella Ruth. 9. Thomas, Jr. Four 
of the sons are associated with their father in business. 



FREDERICK JAMES IRWIN, one of Pittsburg's coal and coke 
operators, was born in Pittsburg, ]\Iay 31, 1866, son of Hugh F. and Harriett 



266 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



M. (Rogers) Irwin, and is descended from John Irwin, of Revolutionary 
fame, who was a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania. 

James Allison Irwin, grandfather, was a native of Washington county, 
but subsequently became a resident of Pittsburg and was a man of prominence 
in many things, especially in the literary role. For many years he had charge 
of the Presbyterian Book Rooms. He was among the leaders in this church 
and was an elder of the same. He was honored by the nomination for the 
office of mayor of Pittsburg, but respectfully declined the position. He died 
aged lixty-six years and was buried in the Allegheny cemetery. He married 
Martha Morgan, who was of Revolutionary ancestry and of a prominent 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, family. She was a literary woman and 
lived to the advanced age of eighty-two years. By her marriage to Mr. Irwin 
were born the following children: i. John M., deceased; he was the father 
of Dr. Robert J. Irwin, of Pittsburg. 2. James A., deceased, of Allegheny, 
who was connected with the Pittsburg Banner. 3. Hugh Finley, born in 
1837, ^ied in 1906, of whom later. 4. Margaret, deceased ; she was a teacher 
in the Eleventh ward schools of Pittsburg for many years, and died October 
6, 1905, aged sixty years. 5. Lloyd, died in infancy. 

Hugh Finley Irwin, father, was born on the old homestead on Bedford 
street in the Eleventh ward of Pittsburg. He received his education in his 
native city, attending a private school taught by Professor James Kelley. He 
entered the office of the Presbyterian Banner, where he learned the printer's 
trade. For many years he, with his brother, John Irwin, published the paper, 
he having in all been connected with the Banner for forty years. He was a 
devout member of the Presbyterian church, of which he was a deacon and to 
which he liberally donated in both time and money. Politically he was a 
supporter of the Democratic party. About 1898 he removed to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where he died in 1906 and is buried in the Allegheny cemetery, Pitts- 
burg. He married, about 1864, Flarriet M. Rogers, born in New York state, 
February 11, 1842, daughter of David B. and Nancy Rogers, both natives of 
New York state. j\Irs. Irwnn was educated at Yellow Springs College, Yellow 
Springs, Ohio, and finished at New Brighton Seminary, Pennsylvania. She 
was an accomplished vocal musician and sang soprano at St. Peter's Episcopal 
church in Pittsburg in her earlier years. Mr. -and Mrs. Irwin were the parents 
of two children: i. Frederick J., of whom later. 2. Nancy May, born 
January 21, 1868. educated in music, sang in Shadyside Presbyterian church, 
and married L. E. Aiken, of Cincinnati, Ohio, he being superintendent of 
music in the public schools of that city, as was also his father. 

Frederick J. Irwin, eldest child of Hugh F. and Harriet M. (Rogers) 
Irwin, obtained his education at the public schools of Pittsburg, graduating 
with high honors from the business department of the city high schools with 
the class of 1882. He then entered the abstract office of M. E. Cozad, where 
he read law and examined titles for a period of three years, after which he 
was title examiner in the law office of McKee & Koethen for five years. In 
1889 he was assistant real estate agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany. In 1893 h^ was made chief real estate agent for the company in Pitts- 
burg, serving until July, 1900, when he resigned to accept the position of real 
estate agent for the Pittsburgh Coal Company and president of the Pennsyl- 
vania Mining Company, continuing in the latter until October i, 1906, when 
he resigned to look after his own personal interests. His business is divided 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 267 



among several lines of industry and in these he has been quite successful. 
Politically Mr. Irwin is an independent voter, while in church choice he af- 
filiates with the Presbyterians. He was united in marriage February 15, 1892, 
to Elmeretta Louther, born at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, daughter of Valentine 
and Susan Louther. Her father was among the prominent merchants of 
Johnstown in his day and was highly influential in that locality, his name 
standing for the strictest integrity. Mr. and Mrs. Irwin are the parents of 
four children: i. Frederick J., Jr., born in Pittsburg, September 15, 1893. 
2. V. Louther, born May 8, 1895. 3. Susan, born May 16, 1901. 4. Har- 
riet, born January 31, 1906. 



JOHN IRWIN, deceased, was born at Newtown, Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, in May, 1807, and died in 1861. He was the son of William 
Irwin. He received his education in the schools common to that day, and 
was a well-educated man. For many years he followed boating on the Ohio 
river and made his residence at Cincinnati, Ohio. He boated from Pittsburg 
to New Orleans. After accumulating sufficient means to keep him the re- 
mainder of his life comfortably, he quit the boating business and located in 
Franklin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a 
farm of one hundred and fifty-two acres, on which he spent the remainder 
of his life. He was a prominent citizen and highly esteemed by all who knew 
him. He was a leading factor in the Masonic lodge, belonging to No. 45, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; also to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In church relations he was a member of the Presbyterian church and con- 
tributed largely to the support of the same. After his death his family 
removed to Allegheny City, where he owned a large amount of valuable 

property, much of which was destroyed in the great fire of July 4, . John 

Irwin was buried in Mount Union cemetery, Allegheny county. 

In 1834 he was married to Mary Newell, who was born at Newtown, 
Ohio, October 21, 1812, a daughter of Rezin B. and Susan Newell. The 
children born to John and Mary (Newell) Irwin were as follows: i. Mary, 
died aged three years. 2. Martha, died young. 3. Thomas, died at the age 
of twenty-one years. 4. Susan, wife of D. P. Coran ; he was secretary and 
treasurer of the P. V. C. Railroad Company at the time of their marriage. 

6. John, of Pittsburg, and his children are : Sallie, Fannie, Susie and John. 

7. Fannie, wife of Thomas M. Rees. 

Mrs. Mary (Newell) Irwin was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1812, and 
resided there until her marriage to Mr. Irwin. They then moved to Pitts- 
burg, in 1834, and her home has been here ever since. It is supposed that she 
is the oldest woman living in Pittsburg today. She resides with her daughter, 
Mrs. Thomas Rees, on Negley avenue. Upon coming to Pittsburg she united 
with the First Presbyterian church of Allegheny City, then under the pastorate 
of the distinguished Dr. Elisha Swift. Mrs. Irwin, during the present season 
(1907), said : 

"I well remember the visit of General Lafayette to Cincinnati. There 
was a great parade on Broadway, and all the Sunday-schools turned out to 
meet the distinguished Frenchman to show him honor. He walked at the 
head of the procession, and I ran up to shake hands with him when another 
girl pushed me aside and grasped his hands. I also saw General Jackson on 



268 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



three different occasions, and remember his appearance well. I saw Harrison. 
Tyler and Polk, and many other prominent men of the day, as they all visited 
Cincinnati." 

Mrs. Irwin is one of six sisters and a lauohable incident occurred when 
she was sixty-two years of age : She wanted to arrange for a group-picture 
of herself and sisters. She asked the cost of a group photo of six persons. 
The artist answered : 'Tt will depend on the amount of work I have to do. I 
have much trouble to keep the younger children from gig-gling and must often 
make several negatives." When the answer came back, "I am sixty-two and 
the youngest," there was a change of front. The first sister who died had 
reached the age of seventy. Mrs. Irwin has one sister living and is now 
eighty-two years of age. She herself is remarkably well preserved and her 
memory is excellent. She said recently : "I hope to live to be one hundred 
years old or longer. I enjoy life very much." She is now in good health and 
takes much interest in the affairs of life ; she is still very keen, alert and active, 
and goes about her home as if she were still in active control of all its interests. 

The facts herein narrated were taken from an article written in the 
JVcstmhister, her church periodical, in February, 1907. 



REES FAMILY. Among those of Greater Pittsburg who have been 
prominent factors in the great business world and whose name goes the 
world over for having been leaders in their special line of occupation, is 
that of the Rees family. Wherever steam navigation and steam power in 
general is employed, this name is favorably known, for some of the best 
products in both steamboats and engines have come from the Pittsburg works 
founded and still operated by members of the Rees family. 

(I) Captain James Rees, the founder of these immense works, came 
with his parents from Wales in 1827. when but seven years of age. He was 
one of nine children and was born December 25, 1821. The family settled 
near Wheeling, West Virginia, where the father died within one week after 
his arrival in this country. James, the son, above named, was put to work to 
learn the shoemaking trade, but soon abandoned that and went to farm pur- 
suits. Soon the family removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and it was here 
that youthful James Rees conceived the notion of accomplishing something for 
the world and make for himself a place among the busy men of his country. 
He first worked in a coal mine, pushing coal cars from the dingy pit ; later he 
entered the Bakewell g-lasshouse, where he worked industriously for the sum 
of one dollar and fifty cents a week. Each Saturday night he would place in 
his mother's hands his earnings, in triumphant glee and just pride. He was 
by nature a mechanic and soon obtained employment in the machine shops of 
Pittsburg, where he worked for fifteen months at three dollars a week. In 
the midst of steamboat building his young mind soon grasped new ideas of the 
possibilitv of steam power. Day and night did he w^ork with mind and hands 
to master his trade as machinist and solve the new problems ever confronting 
that day in the introduction of improved steam navigation. At the same time 
he. was giving over his scant earnings to aid his mother in the support of the 
family. As time went on he succeeded and received higher wages. He saved 
his money and by adding dollar to dollar became forehanded enough to pur- 
chase an interest in a shop of his own. He had been made foreman of the 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 269 



Rowe & Davis shops and later owned an interest in the same. In 1854 he 
bought the corner of Duquesne way and Fourth street, where the great plants 
were later built and where he operated until his death, yearly increasing in 
skill, popularity and wealth. Early in the fifties he established a line of steam 
freight and passenger packet boats, which he operated with success until 1865, 
when the railroad took the business. He then turned his whole attention 
toward the building of steamboats and steam engines. JNIost of the large 
steamboats which plied on the water courses of the west and south were built 
under his direction at Pittsburg. From i860 to the date of his death this 
work was his chief occupation. To James Rees & Sons must be ascribed the 
honor of having constructed the first steel-plate steamboat built in the United 
States. In 1878 the business assumed immense proportions and they sought 
business in South America and other foreign ports, where they sold many 
boats. The "Rees Stern-Wheelers" attracted the attention of the Russian gov- 
ernment and this concern sent the plans and specifications to that Empire, 
from which were constructed the numerous boats on the Volga and Dneiper 
rivers. 

Captain Rees was always public-spirited and active in local affairs in 
Pittsburg. He was an active member of the fire department ; member of the 
city council ; and his judgment was ever looked up to by those having the 
interest of the growing city at heart. Socially he was genial, affable and com- 
panionable. He had a wonderful fund of anecdotes which he used with much 
pleasing effect on all occasions. His fine home was situated at 5045 Fifth 
avenue. In manner he was thoroughly democratic. He knew the names of 
all of his many workmen and freely conversed with each. At the time of his 
death he was at the head of two large manufacturing plants — the James Rees 
& Sons, boiler makers, and the James Rees Duquesne Engine Works. These 
were incorporated into one and in 1898 the officers were : James H. Rees, 
president; Thomas M. Rees, vice-president; William M. Rees, treasurer; 
David A. Rees, secretary. Throughout the entire shipping world they became 
famous as leaders in their specialties — boats and engines. Up to 1898 they 
had constructed over six hundred steamboats, which plied on the waters of 
three continents. 

(11) Thomas j\I. Rees, son of Captain James Rees, was born in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1845. ^^ was educated at Lititz, Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, and spent his boyhood days in the city of his nativity, 
where he has always made his home. When but a young man he entered the 
shops of the Duquesne Engine Works, founded by his father. Here he was 
taught all the numerous branches of the industry and trade of engine building. 
After the death of his father he became the president of the company. He is 
at this writing (icjoy)- interested in many business enterprises, including 
banking, he being the vice-president of the Pittsburgh Savings Bank. He is 
also president of the Consolidated Ice Company, and is also largely interested 
in the Monongahela Iron Works. Aside from his interests at home, he has 
large financial interests in New York City. Air. Rees is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, being a Knight Templar. He is a member of the Ameri- 
cus Club and other organizations. 

He was united in marriage December 11, 1872. by Rev. Elliott Swift, 
pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Pittsburg, to Fannie Irwin, daugh- 
ter of John Irwin and wife, Alary (Newell) Irwin. The five children born 



270 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



of this union are as follows: i. Mary March, at home. 2. James Irwin, an 
iron broker of New York City ; he received a college education ; he married 
Mary A. Slinger. He served in the Spanish-American war in Company G, 
Nineteenth Pennsylvania Regiment, for two years. 3. Fannie I., wife of 
James D. Ayers, who is the assistant cashier of the Pittsburg Bank. 4. Sue 
Cenwin, died aged three years. 5. Thomas M., attending college at Troy, 
New York, at a polytechnic school. He is very active in the affairs of the 
East Liberty Presbyterian church. 

DAVID A. REES, the fourth son of Captain James Rees, was born ui 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1858, and obtained his education in the 
public schools of his native city, including the high schools, after which he 
took a course in mechanical engineering. When about twenty years of age 
he entered the drafting department of his father's extensive plant, continuing 
there for five years, at which time he entered the office as clerk. In 1895, 
when the firm of James Rees & Sons was incorporated, he was chosen secre- 
tary of the company. From 1887 to 1891 Mr. Rees was a resident of Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, where he was resident manager and secretary for the Milburn 
Machine Company, after which engagement he returned to Pittsburg, where 
he has been ever since connected with the James Rees & Sons Company. He 
is also interested in various other business enterprises in Greater Pittsburg. 

Mr. Rees is a member of the St. Andrew's Episcopal church, in which he 
is a vestryman. He belongs to the Tennessee Club of Memphis, Pittsburg 
Country Club, Duquesne Club, of Pittsburg, Pittsburg and Allegheny Driving 
Club and the Bellefield Club of Pittsburg. In politics he is a Republican and 
represented the Twentieth ward of his city on the Council from 1884 to 1885. 

He was married April 13, 1887, by Rev. David Sessums, now bishop of 
New Orleans, to Miss Maude Milburn, of Memphis, Tennessee, born at Lin- 
coln, Illinois, the daughter of Thomas and Mary Milburn. By this union 
three children were born: i. Mary R., deceased. 2. Frank Milburn. 
3. Charles Donald, deceased. 

HON. MARCUS WILSON ACHESON. Marcus W. Acheson, son of 
David and Mary Wilson Acheson, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, on 
June 7, 1828. In 1846 he graduated from Washington College, of Washington, 
Pennsylvania, which institution in later years united with Jefferson College, of 
Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, to form the Washington and Jefferson College. 

Having read law in his native town with his brother, Alexander W. Ache- 
son (later judge of the court of common pleas of Washington and Beaver 
counties, Pennsylvania), Marcus W. Acheson was in the year 1852 admitted to 
the bar of Washington county, Pennsylvania. He thereupon moved to Pitts- 
burg, and on June 18, 1852', was there admitted to the bar of Allegheny county. 
Pennsylvania, where he continuously engaged in the practice of the law until 
he went upon the federal bench in 1880. In i860 he and George P. Hamilton 
joined in the practice of law, and the firm of Hamilton & Acheson continued 
until Mr. Hamilton's withdrawal, on account of ill health, some years later. 

On June 9, 1859, Marcus W. Acheson and Sophie Duff Reiter, daughter 
of Dr. William C. and Eliza (Reynolds) Reiter, of Pittsburg, were united in 
marriage. 




y^. 



^^^ iZc^U^^^ 



cn-t^ 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 271 

On January 7, 1880, Mr. Acheson was appointed by President Hayes judge 
of the district court of the United States for the Western District of Pennsyl- 
vania. He discharged the duties of United States district judge until January 
2'3, 1891, when he was appointed by President Harrison United States circuit 
judge, to succeed Judge William McKennan, for the Third Federal judicial 
circuit, composed of the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. At 
that time he was the sole circuit judge of that circuit, holding court in Pitts- 
burg, Erie, Scranton, Williamsport, Philadelphia, Trenton and Wilmington. 

Upon the organization of the United States circuit court of appeals in 1891 
he became and until his death continued as presiding, circuit judge of that court 
for the Third circuit, the sessions of which are held in Philadelphia. He con- 
tinued also until his death to perform the duties of circuit judge, but there 
being two additional circuit judges for the Third district, his presence as circuit 
judge was only required at Pittsburg as a general rule. 

Judge Acheson was never in politics, and his entire career was at the bar 
and on the bench. He died suddenly in his seventy-ninth year at his home on 
Amberson avenue, Pittsburg, on June 21, 1906. He left no cases undecided and 
rto judicial duty unperformed. 



WILLIAM J. BURKE, superintendent of the machine and forge depart- 
ment of the Westinghani Machine Company, of Pittsburg, was born in that 
city July 10, 1866, son of Michael Burke, who was born in county Mayo, 
Ireland, and at the age of twelve years came alone to the United States. On 
landing he went immediately to Pittsburg, where he found his brother James, 
who was employed in the Baglaly foundry. Michael's first employment was 
that of an office boy for the Dickson Coal Company. He was afterward em- 
ployed for several years in the Bidwell Plow Works, and for the long period 
of thirty-nine years was continuously in the service of the Sable Iron Com- 
pany. He is a resident of the Fourteenth ward, his house on Fifth avenue, 
which he built for himself, having been the second building on the hill. In 
politics he is an Independent Democrat. He was one of the first members of 
St. Agnes' Roman Catholic church, with which he has been identified since 
the first services were conducted in a stable. 

Michael Burke married, in Pittsburg, Anna Mott, a native of that city, 
and the following were their children: i. William J., of whom later. 2. 
Michael H., born October 18, 1867, shoe merchant of Denver, Colorado, 
formerly in same business in East Liberty ; married Kate Hobouck, children. 
Naomi and Raymond, living, and Noel and Lois, deceased. 3. John W., died 
in childhood. 4. James T., machinist, with Westingham Electrical Manufac- 
turing Company, married, no children. 5. Harry Edward, accidentally killed 
at seventeen by being caught in machinery in shop w^here he worked. 6. Mary 
Elizabeth, wife of Clyde Cabith, one child, Harry. Mrs. Burke, the mother of 
the family, died February i, 1894, at the age of forty-eight. 

.William J. Burke, son of Michael and Anna (Mott) Burke, received his 
education in the public schools of the Fourteenth ward, graduating in 1881. 
After leaving school he worked for two years for the firm of John R. & A. 
Murdock, florists, and in June, 1883, entered the service of the Westingham 
Machine Company as an apprentice at the machinist's trade. After serving 
his time he remained with the company, being subsequently promoted to the 



272 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



position of assistant foreman and then to that of general foreman. On Janu- 
ary I, 1906, he was made superintendent of the machine and forge department. 
The position is one of great responsibility, involving the oversight of eight 
hundred men, but Air. Burke, during his comparatively brief incumbency, has 
given ample proof of thorough capability for its arduous duties. In 1900-02 
he purchased land and built thereon his present comfortable and attractive 
home. Politically he is an Independent Republican. He is a member of the 
Roman Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart. 

Mr. Burke married, April 28, 1892', Mary R., born May 11, 1867, in 
Pittsburg, daughter of Peter and Ellen (McVeigh) Casey, and they are the 
parents of the following children: i. Eleanor Anna, born August 17, 1895. 
2. William Melchior, born January 6, 1899. 3- ^lary Inez, born August 24, 
1901. 4. Veronica De Sales, born June 19, 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Casey, 
parents of Mrs. Burke, both natives of Ireland, are still living, being residents 
of Pittsburg. 

DR. WALTER F. EDT^IUNDSON, who has practiced medicine in Pitts- 
burg for over thirty-six years, is the son of Eli and Catherine A. (Batman) 
Edmundson, and was born at the corner of Smithfield street and Third avenue, 
Pittsburg. He is a descendant of one of seven brothers who emigrated from 
England with William Penn. These brothers were as follows : Caleb, 
Thomas, William, Isaac, Hugh, John and Joseph. The last named, Joseph, 
was the grandfather of Dr. Edmundson. 

Joseph Edmundson was among the first settlers in York county, Pennsyl- 
vania ; later he moved to Baltimore, Maryland, where he operated a tannery. 
In his religious faith he was a Quaker. In the time of the war of 1812 he 
furnished teams for the transportation of ammunition and supplies for the 
American army. He lived to be seventy-six years of age. He reared a family 
as follows: i. James, died at the age of thirty-three years, unmarried; he was 
an artist of considerable note. 2. Elizabeth, became the wife of a Mr. Perine, 
of Baltimore, and died aged eighty-seven years. 3. Hannah, died aged ninety- 
one years, unmarried. 4. Eli, of wdiom later. 

Eli Edmundson was born July 5, 1806, in Baltimore, and died aged eighty- 
five years, in 1892. He was about twelve years old when his father died, and 
he learned the trade of a wagon-maker, at which he worked, however, only 
three years, when he changed to the cabinet-making business and followed that, 
together with upholstering. He established a furniture and upholstering 
business on his own account in Pittsburg in 1832. Prior to this he had worked 
at his trade in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, New York and Buffalo, New York. 
His place of business in Pittsburg was at the corner of Second and Wood 
streets and was burned, causing him great loss, at the great conflagration 
which devastated Pittsburg April 10, 1845. He then located on Fifth avenue, 
from which stand he subsequently removed to Market street and then to Lib- 
erty, at which place he added upholstering to his furniture business. He 
retired and moved to Powhattan county, Virginia. He was a devout member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics a Republican. 



WILBERT McMILLIN, who since 1901 has been a resident of Home- 
wood, where he is engaged in the real estate business, was born January 23, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 273 

1873, in Beaver county. Pennsylvania, son of Josephus T. and Harriet M. 
(White) McMillin. His father was born also a native of Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, and was interested in farming and the dairy business. Children 
of Josephus T. and Harriet M. McMillin : Wilbert, Minnie J., Harry M., 
Edward W. and Mary M. 

Wilbert ]\IcMillin was educated at the public schools, and was for a num- 
ber of years engaged in the dairy business with his father. In 1901 he removed 
to Homewood, where he is engaged in the real estate business. He was mar- 
ried to Frances, daughter of James P. Pope and wife, of Pittsburg. 



DR. HARRISON D. BEST is a native of Edenburg, Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania, born August 31, 1869, a son of John I. and Sara (Tompson) 
Best. The father was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and was a mer- 
chant and farmer. Subsequently he engaged in the oil business. He held 
such local office as school director for a number of years. He married Sara, 

daughter of Thompson, of Clarion county, by whom was born the 

following children : Mary F., William T., Lucella, Plarrison D., Jennie and 
Sara. The father died in 1880. 

Dr. Best was educated in the public schools and at the State Normal. In 
1886 he taught school for one year, and was a clerk in the Clarion County Bank 
for some time. He then engaged in the hardware trade, continuing until he 
entered college. He entered the University of Pennsylvania, in 1892, and 
graduated from that institution (from the dental department) in 1895, after 
which he came to Pittsburg and began the practice of dentistry. He is a mem- 
ber of St. James' Episcopal church of Pittsburg, and is a citizen ever looking 
to the welfare and general upbuilding of the city in which he resides. He was 
united in marriage September 28. 1898, to Anna Elizabeth, daughter of Louis 
and Catherine Klein. The children of this union are : Daniel Harrison, born 
July 22, 1899; Katheryn E., September 28, 1901 ; Dorothy Anna, September 
19, 1904. 



GEORGE J. BORN, of Pittsburg, assistant pattern foreman for the West- 
inghouse Electric Company, w'as born November 17, 1852, in Pittsburg, son 
of John Born, who was born in Germany, and in 1835 came to Pittsburg. He 
was an artist by profession. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Forty-sixth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and in 1864 received an honorable dis- 
charge. He died in 1897, at the Soldiers' Home, at Dayton, Ohio. 

George J. Born, son of John Born, was educated in parochial schools and 
at Smith College and Iron City College. At eleven years of age he worked 
on the gunboats "Umqua" and "Manyunk," which were then in process of 
construction in this city. He afterward worked in a brush factory on Wood 
street, and is now in the service of the Westinghouse Electric Company, vvith 
whom he holds the position of assistant pattern foreman. 

Mr. Born married Victoria Altenbach, and the following are their chil- 
dren : John, Theckla. Alsie, Victoria, Alexander, William, George, Elnora, 
died May 16, 1903 ; and David Watson. Mrs. Born is a daughter of Alexander 
Altenbach, who was born in 1820, in France, and was by trade a cooper. He 
married Cynchia Holman, and they were the parents of the following chil- 



274 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



dren: Peter, born in 1854; Mary, in 1856, died in 1870; Victoria, wife of 
George J- Born; John, August 10, 1861 ; Elizabeth, September 16, 1864. The 
death of Alexander Altenbach, the father of the family, occurred in 1867. 

THOMAS F. HARTMANN, a well-known dairyman of Pittsburg, was 
born February 5, 1854, in the city of which he is now a resident, son of Jacob 
Hartmann, who was born in Germany, and in 1847 emigrated to the United 
States, settling in Pittsburg, where for fifty years he has been at the head of a 
flourishing dairy business. He has been twice married, his first wife being 
Mary Nunmacker, who bore him two sons: Thomas F., of whom later; and 
Frank W., whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Hartmann died 

in 1862, and a few years later Mr. Hartmann married Warke, by whom 

he became the father of two more sons : Christian W., whose sketch is found 
on another page of this work ; and George J. 

Thomas F. Hartmann, son of Jacob and Mary (Nunmacker) Hartmann, 
received his education in the public schools of Pittsburg, and since the begin- 
ning of his active life has always been associated with his father and brothers 
in the dairy business, their establishment being a leading one and in all respects 
a model. In 1895 he was elected common councilman from his ward, and for 
five vears served as quartermaster-general of the Military Bank of the state of 
Pennsylvania. He belongs to Lodge No. ii. Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks; J. B. Nicholson Lodge, No. 585, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
Star of Liberty Castle, A. O. K. of M. C. He has always been a Republican, 
and for three terms served as president of the East End Republican Club. 

Mr. Hartmann married, in 1880. Carrie, L. Moke, and they became the 
parents of two daughters : Carrie, born March 24, 1882 ; Mary Elizabeth, 
May 6, 1885. The mother of these children died June 4, 1885. 

WILLIAM BAXTER, a well-known contractor of Pittsburg, was born 
in 1869, in county Down, Ireland, son of William Baxter, a native of the 
same country, where he was born in 1839. He is now engaged in farming. 
William Baxter married Ellen Ritchev, and they have been the parents of the 
following children: James, John, Hugh, deceased; William, of whom later; 
Isaac, George, Samuel H., Mary E. and Ringland (twins). 

William Baxter, son of William and Elian (Ritchey) Baxter, received 
his education in the public schools of his native place, and afterward learned 
the carpenter's trade. In 1889 he emigrated to the United States and settled 
in Pittsburg, where he has since remained, following his trade and taking con- 
tracts, thus building up a profitable business. Mr. Baxter married, in 1894, 
Mary McMaster, and they are the parents of three children : William, born 
May 29, 1895; Hugh, born October 12, 1896; James A., born February 8, 
1898. Mrs. Baxter is a daughter of William McMaster, who was born in 
county Down, Ireland, and followed the calling of a farmer. He married 
Dorothea Morrow, and their family consisted of the following children : Isa- 
bella, born in 1871, died in 1872 ; Mary, wife of William Baxter; Isabella (II) ; 
Elizabeth ; Andrew ; William ; Gawn. 

THOMAS GRACE, well known among the older plumbers in the city 
of Pittsburg, was born in that city September 2, 1853, son of Richard Grace, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 275 

who was a contractor and conducted a general draying business. He married 
Johanna Kelly, by whom was born one son, Thomas. The father died Sep- 
tember 19, 1854, and the mother in 1856. 

Thomas Grace was educated in the public schools of his native city. After 
leaving school he decided upon learning the plumber's trade, which he followed 
for thirty-eight years, being in the employ of Bailey, Farrell & Company. In 
1903 he went to Lincoln avenue and established a plumbing business on his 
own account, which he still continues to operate in a most successful manner. 
Mr. Grace was united in marriage September 29, 1878, to Mary A. Dufify, 
daughter of James and Sarah Duffy, and are the parents of : Richard, Sadie 
(Grace) Powell, James, a clerk in the postofitice ; Elizabeth, Maria, deceased; 
Thomas Aloysius, deceased; Leo, deceased; Mary and Cecilia. Mrs. Grace, 
mother of this family, died September 13, 1902. 



SIEBERT FAMILY. Among the well-known families of Pittsburg 
is that of the Sieberts, the origin of which is traced from William Siebert, of 
Sieberthausen, Germany, where the family had resided for many generations, 
the men of the race being well-to-do farmers. The history of the descendants 
of William Siebert is traced through the following generations : 

John Siebert, son of William Siebert, and founder of the American branch 
of the family, was born in Sieberthausen of Rodenburgh, near Hesse Kassel 
city, Germany, and on June 4, 1836, embarked in a sailing vessel for the United 
States, landing in Baltimore September 3, whence he made his way with his 
sons. Christian and William "the grocer," to Pittsburg. They made the jour- 
ney in Conestoga wagons, accompanied by a number of others, some of whom 
also had teams for the transportation of their effects, and they averaged about 
twenty miles a day, arriving in Pittsburg October 3, 1836. On October 7 they 
began work on the Ashby farm, and during the next three years the father 
and two sons became farm hands, working in what was later known as Baldwin 
township, Allegheny county, and the father was for the remainder of his life 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in the vicinity of Pittsburg. In 1839 Mrs. 
Siebert arrived, accompanied by the other children. 

John Siebert was twice married. His first wife bore him one child, Barthel, 
who was born in 181 1, and eventually became a resident of Ross township, Al- 
legheny county. He was but six months old when his mother died, and 
did not know until after the family came to the United States that he was 
not the son of his stepmother, who was, in fact, his mother's cousin. She was 
Annie Kunigunde, born in Bebra, Germany, daughter of George Krapp. After 
her marriage to Mr. Siebert she became the mother of the following children : 
William, of whom later ; one who died in infancy ; George, who settled in Mill- 
vale borough, married Christina j\Ianns, children, Mary and Henry ; Christian, 
of whom later ; William, of whom later ; Susan, wife of Adam Brown, children, 
Mary, deceased, Emma, Henry, deceased, and Rebecca; Paul, settled in Pitts- 
burg, a partner of- his brother William, married but left no issue; Elizabeth, 
died young; Barbara, widow of John Devitt, lives in Philadelphia, where she 
owns a hardware store ; Barnard, died in Pennsylvania, aged ten years ; Sarah, 
wife of William Pfusch, and their only son is now deceased ; and John, born in 
1836, settled in Pittsburg, and during the Civil war enlisted in Company G, 
Second Regiment, West Virginia Volunteers, which regiment was later merged 



276 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



in the First Regiment, Virginia Artillery. He served three years and three 
months, the regiment doing raider's duty in West Virginia. After the close of 
the war he engaged in the retail grocery business in Pittsburg, and from 1867 
to 1906 lived in the Ninth ward of the city. He married in 1866, in Pittsburg, 
Annie G. Hultz, and their children were : Annie G. ; Clara M., wife of Henry 
H. Gearham, of Freedom, Pennsylvania ; Emma ; and Christian B., clerk in the 
Pennsylvania Railroad offices in Pittsburg. The only surviving members of 
this large family are William "the grocer,"' Barbara and John. The parents 
died in Pittsburg, the father in 1852 and the mother in 1854. 

William Siebert, eldest child of John and Annie Kunigunde (Krapp) Sie- 
bert, was born in 1813 in Germany, and was called William "the shoemaker," 
in distinction from his brother, William "the grocer." William the shoemaker 
was the first of the family to emigrate, coming to the United States in the early 
spring of 1836, a few months prior to the arrival of his father and brothers. 
He settled in Baltimore, where he followed his trade until his father and 
brothers had settled in Pittsburg, when he opened a shoe store in the Ninth 
ward, opposite the market-house, in what was then Bayardstown. Later he 
removed to Millvale borough, and there purchased a farm, on which is now 
situated the nunnery. He then went to Wilkinsburg, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his life. 

William Siebert was twice married. His first wife was Catherine Miller, 
by whom he had seven children : Susan, Annie, William, Mary, Amanda, Cath- 
erine, and one who died in infancy. On being left a widower he married Mar- 
garet Miller (no relation to the first wife), and by this union became the father 
of six children : Paul, David, Hannah, Emma, Sarah and Cora. Of these all 
are living with the exception of Paul and Cora. William Siebert, the father, 
died in 1899, and is survived by his widow. 

Christian Siebert, son of John and Annie Kunigunde (Krapp) Siebert, was 
born in August, 1820, in Germany, and when sixteen years old came to this 
country with his father and his brother, William "the grocer." Christian Siebert 
engaged in the dairy business in Pittsburg, and later in Allegheny county, where 
he purchased a farm, which is still in possession of the family. Subsequently he 
went into the shoe business, having a store and also a manufactory for shoes, in 
which he employed forty workmen. Still later he engaged in the leather trade 
on Penn avenue near Eleventh street. The firm was Siebert & Berg, and they 
continued the business with great success until 1885, when Mr. Siebert retired. 
He was at the same time engaged in the feed business, having established the 
firm of Siebert & Keil, from which he withdrew in 1880. Thenceforth he was 
extensively engaged in real estate, and as a result accumulated a fortune. 

He was one of the founders and incorporators of the German National 
Bank of Pittsburg, and was one of its directors to the time of his death. He 
also took an active part in furthering the erection of the Ewalt or Forty-third 
Street bridge, leading to Millvale borough, across the Allegheny river. This 
was built in 1868, and he was treasurer of the company from its inception to the 
time of his death. He w^as one of the incorporators and founders of the Ger- 
mania Savings Bank, and a director from its organization until his death. He 
was one of the originators of the Allemannia Fire Insurance Company, and for 
the remainder of his life a director and a large stockholder. He was also one 
of the incorporators of the German Fire Insurance Company, of which he was 
a director for manv years. 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 277 

In his politics he was an out-and-out RepubUcan, and for a number of 
years represented the Eighteenth ward of Pittsburg in the city council. He 
was a member of the Reformed church, and from the organization, in 1868, of 
St. Paul's church of Pittsburg, served as one of its elders. He was one of 
the prime movers in the erection of the church edifice, and was one of the 
promoters and for several years the treasurer of St. Paul's Orphan Home of 
Butler, Butler county, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Siebert married Magdalena M. Gruenagel, who was born in Alsace, 
France, and after her mother's death was brought to this country and reared 
by an aunt. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Siebert were : P. William, of whom 
later ; Robert, died young ; Charles Theodore, born in 1853, died March 7, 1905, 
many years a florist on Stanton avenue, married Olga I., born in London, Eng- 
land, daughter of Louis Coan, children, Magda, and Dorothy and Charles, 
twins; Clara, wife of WilHam Steinmeyer; Mathilda, wife of J. B. Carson, one 
child, John Stanton ; John C, died unmarried at the age of twenty-two ; 
Elmer E., of whom later; and Sarah, died at four years old. The death of 
Christian Siebert, the father, occurred in 1893. 

William Siebert, son of John and Annie Kunigunde (Krapp) Siebert, 
was born June 21, 1822, in Germany, and was but fourteen when he came with 
his father and his brother Christian from his native land. He was first em- 
ployed as a farm hand and in various other ways, including service in hotels 
in Pittsburg and work on the canal and river, on the express line running from 
Pittsburg to Johnstown. In the autumn of 1846 he established himself in the 
retail grocery business, being the first to open what was called a family gro- 
cery in Pittsburg and one wherein no liquors were allowed to be sold. From 
his identification with this business, and in distinction from his brother Wil- 
liam "the shoemaker," he was called William "the grocer." His store was 
situated in the Fifth (now the Ninth) ward, and after a time he took as a 
partner his brother, Paul Siebert, when the firm became known as W. & P. 
Siebert. The connection was maintained until 1863, when Paul retired and 
settled in Ross township, William continuing the business until 1872, when he 
also retired on account of having lost his hearing. He now leads a retired life, 
and since 1863 has resided on Mathilda street. 

Mr. Siebert married, in 1844, in Pittsburg, Mary, daughter of Joseph and 
Anna (Geschwindt) Zimmerman, and their children were: Albert, a Lutheran 
minister at Gerniantown, Ohio, married Emma Barnes, of Philadelphia, chil- 
dren, Caroline, Albert, Paul and Arthur; Fanny V., wife of W. W. Wattles; 
Catharine, wife of Joseph Lambie, children, Mary, Charles, Annie, William, 
Elizabeth, Helen and Allen ; Elizabeth ; and William P., of whom later. 

P. William Siebert, eldest child of Christian and Magdalena M. (Grue- 
nagel) Siebert, was born January 25, 1849, in Shaler township, Allegheny 
county, on the old Siebert homestead, and received his preparatory education 
in the schools of the Eighteenth and Ninth wards of Pittsburg, also attending 
the University of Western Pennsylvania and Witherspoon Institute, in Butler 
county. Upon the completion of his education he desired to enlist in the army, 
the Civil war being then in progress, but on account of his youth his father 
withheld his consent. The son thereupon ran away from home and enlisted, 
in company with others of his acquaintance from Pittsburg. This occurred 
three times, his father each time objecting and causing him to be sent home. 
On the last occasion the father followed him to Wheeling, West Virginia, 



278 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



where he had enlisted in the Gordon battery, and, using a habeas corpub pro- 
ceeding against him, compelled him to return once more, after having served 
fourteen months. Finally, however, the father relented, and decided that if 
his son was so full of patriotism he might become a real soldier. He therefore 
sent him to West Chester, Pennsylvania, where he served two years in the 
Military School, and was made a captain. Later he identified himself with 
the Duquesne Grays, of Pittsburg, of which he was a member for five years, 
becoming commander of Company B. 

After the close of the war he was for eight years in partnership with his 
father in the leather business, after which he became bookkeeper for the Third 
National Bank of Pittsburg, serving two years and a half, and then accepted 
the position of cashier for the Transverse Street Railway Company. He was 
connected with his father in the Ewalt bridge enterprise, and after the death 
of the latter succeeded him as treasurer, which position he still holds, together 
with the office of secretary, which he has held since the organization of the 
company. In 1874 he was elected councilman from the Eighteenth ward, and 
after his removal to the Seventeenth ward was elected to represent that ward, 
remaining in the council until 1887, and during his term of office was a mem- 
ber of both branches. In 1886 he was elected chief clerk of the county com- 
missioners, which position he retained fifteen years, and since 1901 has had 
charge of the deed registry office for Allegheny county. 

He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Royal Ar- 
canum and the Heptasophs. and for a number of years was supreme ruler of 
the Royal Society of Goodfellows. Politically he is a supporter of the Repub- 
lican party. He is a member of the Young Men's Republican Tariff Club, 
and one of the incorporators of the Colonial Republican Club and treasurer 
since its inception. He was one of the incorporators of St. Paul's Reformed 
church, has been for many years a member of the consistory and chairman of 
the board, and is the only one of the original number now surviving. He also 
helped to incorporate St. Paul's Orphan Home (of the Reformed church) of 
Butler, Butler county, Pennsylvania. For nine years he was a director of the" 
Orphans' Home of Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Mr. Siebert married Sarah O'Brien, and they have been the parents of 
the following children : William C, a contractor of Pittsburg, married Anna 
Kleppner ; John Franklin, died aged twenty-two years ; Paul T., in the real 
estate and insurance business, Pittsburg; George E. ; and Sarah M. 

Elmer Ellsworth Siebert, son of Christian and Magdalena M. (Grue- 
nagel) Siebert, was born July 6, 1861, in Pittsburg, and obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native city, after which he was for a short time 
engaged in bookkeeping. Feeling an exceptionally strong attraction toward the 
study of chemistry and electricity, he became chemist for the Lucy Furnaces, 
remaining three years. He then went west and installed the first electric plant 
west of the Mississippi river, at Atchison, Kansas. At one time, while making 
some electrical tests, he received a severe shock, and ever after abandoned 
all operations with electricity. For some time prior to his father's death he 
had charge of the estate, which responsibility he retained until the division was 
legally made. For one year he was superintendent of Highland Park. He 
served on the board of assessors of the city of Pittsburg, and in 1903 Mayor 
Guthrie, then newly elected, appointed him chief assessor, an office which he 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 279 

still holds to the satisfaction of all. He has always been closely allied with the 
local matters of his city, voting the Republican ticket. 

Mr. Siebert married, June 15, 1887, Emma W., daughter of Joseph and 
Louise (Reinhart) Ludewig, who was of noble birth, and they have one child. 
Christian, born August 13, 1888, a student at Lafayette College, Easton, Penn- 
sylvania. 

William P. Siebert, son of William "the grocer" and Mary (Zimmerman) 
Siebert, was born June 9, 1859, i^i Pittsburg, where he received his education 
in the public schools. From 1877 to 1880 he was connected with the engi- 
neering department of the Pennsylvania railroad, after which he served the 
McConway & Torley Company in a clerical capacity until 1890. He was then 
associated until 1892 with the Park Steel Company, in the sales department, 
Pittsburg, after which he had charge, until April, 1894, of the Denver, Colo- 
rado, sales department, with an office in that city. He then returned to Pitts-/ 
burg. He became manager of the sales department of the Ohio Steel Com- 
pany at Youngstown, Ohio, in 1895. W^hen this organization was absorbed by 
the National Steel Company he was made general manager of the sales de- 
partment, a position which he retained until 1898. In that year the United 
States Steel Corporation was formed, and ]\Ir. Siebert was stationed in New 
York until 190 1, when he returned to Pittsburg and became assistant general 
manager of the sales department of the Carnegie Steel Company, which posi- 
tion he now holds. 

He belongs to the Duquesne and Union Clubs, the Fort Pitt Athletic Club 
and the Edgeworth Club, of Sewickley. Since 1873 he has been a member of 
the First English Lutheran church on Grant street. 

Mr. Siebert has been twice married. He was first married, in 1888, to 
Callie Young, who bore him three children : Paul, Clarence and Haskell. On 
being left a widower he married Aeola Dickson, daughter of Albert and Cath- 
erine Dickson, becoming by this union the father of two children, Ralph and 
Willard. 

CHRISTIAN W. HARTMANN, a well-known dairyman of Pittsburg, 
was born in that city April 26, 1866, son of Jacob Hartmann, a native of Ger- 
many. In 1847 Jacob Hartmann emigrated to the United States, and for half 
a century has conducted a flourishing dairy business in Pittsburg. He married 
Alary Nunmacker, and they were the parents of two sons : Thomas, Frank W., 
whose sketch appears on another page of this work. The mother of these 

children died in 1862, and some few years later Mr. Hartmann married 

Warke, two sons being born of this marriage also: Christian W., of whom 
later, and George J. 

Christian W\ Hartmann, son of Jacob and (Warke) Hartmann, 

was educated in the public schools of his native city, and has always been 
engaged in the dairy business, which he has made his life-work. For ten 
years he has held the office of judge of election, and for three terms has served 
on the election committee. He belongs to the Mystic Chain, and is a member 
of the German Lutheran church. Mr. Hartmann married, April 16, 1891, 
Marv, daughter of John Deitch, and their children are: Carl, born March 3, 
1892; Elmer, born March 2, 1894. died in 1896; Clarence, born March 7, 1896, 
died in July, 1896; Walter, born in March, 1898; Helen, born May 30, 1900; 
Jacob, born in September, 1902. 



28o A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



HENRY H. HUBER, a prosperous plumber of Pittsburg, was born 
September 28, 1855, in Lancaster City, Pennsylvania, son of Henry H. Huber, 
who was born in 1826, in Lancaster county. Henry H. Huber, Sr., married 

Mary C. , and the following children were born to them: Henry H., 

of whom later ; Susan, Mary, Anna, Margaret and Lottie. Mrs. Huber died 
in 1 86 1, and her husband survived her many years, passing away in 1892. 

Henry H. Pluber, son of Henry H. and Mary C. Huber, received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native place, and then served four years 
learning the plumbing business. In 1888 he came to Pittsburg, where he has 
since been engaged m business for himself. Prior to this he had served a 
number of years as assistant superintendent of the Lancaster Gas Company, 
having been appointed July i, 1873. ^^ is a member of the Protective Home 
Circle. Mr. Huber married Ida J. Ackerman. 



DR. FRANK D. MURTO, a well-known and successful dentist of Pitts- 
burg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, whose office is located at No. 7039 
Frankstown avenue, traces his descent to an honored family of Ireland. 

William J. Murto, father of Dr. Frank D. Murto. was born in the city of 
Dublin, Ireland, in 1834, and died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1900. He 
settled in Pittsburg in 1854, and for many years was engaged in the steam- 
boat business, running boats from Pittsburg to Cairo. He became a manufac- 
turer of sheet iron ware in 1861, and was equally successful in this venture. He 
married Margaret Fulkerson, of New Castle, who died in 1872, and their chil- 
dren were : Florine, Elizabeth, William, Henry, James, Frank D., see forward. 

Frank D. Murto, fourth son and sixth and youngest child of William J. 
and Margaret (Fulkerson) Murto, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
November 12, 1867. His preparatory education was obtained in the parochial 
schools of his native city, and he then matriculated at Pittsburg College. He 
accepted a position as clerk in the general office of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company in 1883, and held this for almost seven years. He became a student 
in the department of dental surgery of the University of Pennsylvania in 1889, 
and was graduated from that institution with honor in the class of 1892. In 
the same year he came to Pittsburg, where he established himself in the prac- 
tice of his chosen profession, in which he has achieved a satisfactory degree of 
success, and has a large and lucrative clientele. He takes a great and active 
interest in social and fraternal work, and is a member of the following organiza- 
tions : James Truman Dental Society, Odontological Society of Western 
Pennsylvania, Duquesne Council, Knights of Columbus, Improved Order of 
Heptasophs, and member of the Holy Rosary of Homewood. 

He married Mary C. Casey, daughter of T. D. and Margaret J. (O'Han- 
lon) Casey, of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. The former was born in county 
Cork, Ireland, May 25, 1840, and died October 13, 1903. He came to Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, in 1856, and engaged in the wholesale liquor business, in 
which he amassed a considerable fortune. He was inspector of prisons for 
western Pennsylvania under the administration of Governor Patterson, and it 
is due to his influence and earnest efforts that the first mass was celebrated in 
the penitentiaries. He was also a member of the board of directors of the 
Mercy Hospital of Pittsburg. He married Margaret J. O'Hanlon, and they 
had children : James D., Mary C, mentioned above ; Edmund, William, Annie, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 281 



Pauline, Frank, Dora E., Frances, Leo and Charles J. Dr. and 'Mrs. Murto 
have had children: Margaret, born December 26, 1894; Kadiryn, Mav 18, 
1897; Helen, February 3, 1899; Elizabeth, jNIay 10, 1901. 



SAMUEL L BAKER, for many years prominently identified with some 
of the most important business interests of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and who 
resides at No. 7013 Monticello street, is a representative of a family which 
has borne its full share in the brave defense of the country in which they have 
lived. 

John Baker, father of Samuel I. Baker, was born July 15, 1847, and 
received his education in the public schools of his native township. He 
engaged in a mercantile line of business, and is at the present time stable 
superintendent for the Consolidated Ice Company. He took an active part 
during the Civil war. He married Leah Shaffer, who died in ]\Iay, 1905, and 
they had children: Samuel L, see forward; Susan, Elizabeth, George, Nancy, 
Francis, William, Mary, Hattie, Lucy, Theresa, James, Sadie, Savilla, John 
and Dora. 

Samuel L Baker, eldest child of John and Leah (Shaft'er) Baker, was 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 17, 1872. His education 
was acquired in the public schools of Westmoreland county, and he removed to 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1886. There he was engaged in business until 
1903, when he organized the United Planing Mill Company, of which he is 
now the president. He is a man of remarkable executive ability, and this, 
united with an unusual amount of business acumen, render him invaluable as 
the head of this important industry. He is a consistent member of the Lutheran 
Church of the Redeemer. 

He married in 1896, Annie Shaffer, daughter of Adam B. and Eliza 
Jane (Maurer) Shaft'er, the former of whom was born in 1846, and has been 
very successful as a farmer. He enlisted during the Civil war in the One 
Hundred and Forty-second Regiment of Pennsylvania \'olunteers. He mar- 
ried Eliza Jane ^laurer, and had children: Annie, mentioned above; Edmond, 

John, Etta, married Friedlin ; Agnes, married Barnett ; Charles, 

a successful physician ; James, George, Lillian, David and Mary. Samuel L 
and Annie (Shaft'er) Baker have had children: George Edward, born June 
10, 1898; Adam Paul, born January 19, 1904. 



HARRY BEAVER KLINE, train despatcher for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company at the Pittsburg Union Station, was born April i, 1867, at Hel- 
1am, York county, Pennsylvania, son of Ephraim Kline, who was born October 
13, 1836, near Landisville, Pennsylvania, and was a farmer, for thirteen years 
serving as school director of his town. Ephraim Kline married Mary Ann 
Beaver, and they were the parents of two sons : Harry Beaver, of whom later ; 
and Clifford, died in November, 1890. The death of Mrs. Kline occurred 
December 9, 1896. 

Harry Beaver Kline, son of Ephraim and ]\Iary Ann (Beaver) Kline, 
received his education in the public schools, and after leaving school took up 
the study of telegraphy, in January, 1886. On becoming proficient he entered 
the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and for one year was em- 



282 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



ployed as telegraph operator at Columbia, Pennsylvania. On May 13, 1889, he 
went for the company to Brandenville, Westmoreland county, remaining until 
April I, 1891. In July, 1903, he came to Brushton as telegraph operator, and 
later was made despatcher at the Pittsburg Union Station, which position he 
still retains. 

Mr. Kline married Myra Baker, and they have been the parents of the 
ff^lowing children: Charles S., born January 8, i8go, died January 25, 1890; 
Il'onier E., born June 17, 1894; Lee B., born November 14, 1896. Mrs. Kline 
is a daughter of David Baker, who was born March 20, 1838, and followed the 
calling of a farmer. He married Mary Witmer, and their children are : Emma, 

wife of Kaufifman ; Myra, wife of Harry Beaver Kline ; Phares W. ; 

David W. Mr. and Mrs. Baker reside at Landisville. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN FERREE, of Pittsburg, for a number of 
years asses"Sor of the twenty-first ward of that city, was born there, in 1839, 
son of George Ferree, who was born in 1794, in Peoples township, where he 
followed the calling of a farmer. For many years he held the office of justice 
of the peace. George Ferree married Mary S. Linn, of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and the following children were born to them : Elizabeth, 
James, Sarah, John, McDonough, Benjamin Franklin, of whom later; Agnes, 
Isabella, George. George Ferree, the father, died in 1856, and the death of 
Airs. Ferree occurred in 1870. 

Benjamin Franklin Ferree, son of George and Mary S. (Linn) Ferree, 
received his education in the public schools and at the Pittsburg Academy. He 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he combined with the business of a con- 
tractor, also engaging in farming, thus working along the lines of mechanics, 
commerce and agriculture. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company G, One 
Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, participating in 
the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. In 1863 he was honorably 
discharged. For a long period he filled the office of assessor of the twenty-first 
ward. Politically he is a Democrat. He and his family are members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Ferree married, in 1871, Martha Kennedy, and they have been the 
parents of the following children: Lizzie Leone, born April 9, 1873, died 
in 1883; Monna Elizabeth, born February 2, 1875, died February 16, 1876; 
McDonough J., born March 24, 1877; Edna G., born September 28, 1879; 
Delmont K., born October 13, 1888; Melva C, born August 26, 1893. 

Mrs. Ferree is a daughter of David Kennedy, who was born in Pitts- 
burg, and was by trade a carpenter. During the Civil war he enlisted in Com- 
p;my C, One Hundred and Third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and 
died in 1862, while in service. Mr. Kennedy married Elizabeth Jones, and 
the following children were born to them : Mary B., James J., Delmont D., 
Kate C, and Martha, who became the wife of Benjamin Franklin Ferree, as 
mentioned above. 



HUGH KIRK, a well-known business man of the borough of Brushton, 
was born March 5, 1859, in county Down, Ireland, son of Robert Kirk, a native 
ot the same country and all his life a farmer. He married Elizabeth Furrey, 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 283 

and the following children were born to them : James, Matthew, Joseph, Mary, 
Annie, Hugh, of whom later; William and Robert. The mother of these 
children died in 1877, and the death of the father occurred in 1889. 

Hugh Kirk, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Furrey) Kirk, was educated 
m the public schools, and for a number of years was the assistant of his 
father in the latter's agricultural labors. As a young man he emigrated to 
the United States, and in 1882 settled in Pittsburg, where for twenty years 
he held the position of clerk in the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany. June I, 1901, he took up his abode in Brushton, where he has since 
been engaged in the grocery business. He is a member of the Reformed 
Presbyterian church of Wilkinsburg. 

Mr. Kirk married Emily McBride, and they have been the parents of the 
following children: Eleanor, born December 22, 1877; Mary C, born May 22, 
1889, died in 1891 ; Elizabeth F., born February 14, 1891 ; William, born 
April 24, 1893; Emily M., born May i, 1896; Harry H., born April 28, 1900, 
died January 25, 1906. 

Mrs. Kirk is a daughter of William McBride, who was born in 1829, in 
county Down, Ireland, and followed the calling of a farmer. He came to the 
United States in 1870 and settled in Pittsburg. He married Eleanor White, 
and the following were their children : Mary R., died 1891 ; i\lexander, 
Thomas W., Emilv, wife of Hugh Kirk ; William, and David. The death of 
Mr. McBride occurred March 8, 1886. 

WILLIAM ROBERT COLE, a tried and trusty locomotive engineer of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
August 23, 1862, son of William and Eliza (Powell) Cole. William Cole 
^father) was born near Bath, England, November 23, 1823, and emigrated 
to this country in 1848, settling in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He 
became division foreman for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, serving 
faithfully until 1890, when he retired. He married Eliza Powell, by whom 
vvas born : William R., Flora A., Edwin, Jennie, Elizabeth, Caroline, James, 
Albert, Walter, Margaret, Lydia and Maude. The father died October 
16, 1899. • 

After receiving a good education in the public schools of his native 
county, William R. Cole, in 1882, commenced railroading with the Lake Erie 
Railroad, and after two years resigned; in 1884 he entered the service of the 
Pennsylvania system as a fireman. February 18, 1889, he was justly promoted 
to the important position of locomotive engineer, which place he still fills with 
safety to the public and with satisfaction to the officers of the railway. Mr. 
Cole was united in marriage to Mary E., daughter of John Rist and wife. 
They are the parents of these children: William E., Jsorn April 2, 188S; 
Clyde, born February 18, 1890; Mary, born July 8, 1892; Marie, born August 
: S, 1896; Catherine, born June 2, 1905. 

THE BOWN FAMILY. The name of Bown has been a familiar and 
honored name in Pittsburg commercial circles since the year 1832, as it had 
been in England for generations previous to the coming to this country of 
William T. Bown, the elder, in the year mentioned. A true Briton was he, 
but with him loyalty to the land of his birth and to the land of his adoption 



284 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



was not incompatible. He was a son of Jacob Bown, who conducted a bakery 
and grocery business in Cirencester, West of England, where he was married, 
April 7, 1790, to Mary Tytherleigh. The children of this marriage were: 
Theodosia, born May 23, 1791 ; Robert, April 21, 1793; Ann Mary, September 
28, 1794; William Tytherleigh; Jacob, April 23, 1798; Daniel, July 24, 1800; 
Joseph, June 11, 1802; David, June 21, 1806. Jacob Bown brought his boys 
up in his business, and they all later in life were in mercantile life. Theodosia. 
Joseph and Daniel remained in England, but the rest came at different periods 
to the United States. One son, Jacob, became a farmer in Ohio, where he 
reared a large family. The remainder of the family settled in and around 
Pittsburg. Jacob Bown departed this life in 1833. His widow, Mary (Tyther- 
leigh) Bown, survived him until 1837. 

William Tytherleigh Bown, second son and fourth child of Jacob and 
Mary Bown, Vv'as born April 3, 1796, at Cheltenham, England. He was given 
a good education and early taught those sound principles of honorable business 
dealing for which he was noted all his life. He started his business career 
after leaving his father as a baker and grocer in Cheltenham. During the 
agitation over the "corn laws" and the consequent business depression his 
attention was drawn to the United States and the wonderful opportunities 
there offered. He was greatly disturbed over the distracted condition of his 
own land, and joined and drilled with the yeoman cavalry recruited in his 
town. Finally he decided to leave England and become a farmer in the United 
States. With his two sons and two daughters he sailed from Bristol on the 
Severn river on the ship "Cosmo," Captain Gillespie commanding, August 20, 
1832. Before fairly leaving English shores one daughter died, and his courage 
failed him. He entreated the captain to allow him to land, but was refused. 
During the voyage the other daughter died. On October 5, 1832, he landed in 
New York with his two sons, William T., Jr., and George. They sailed up 
the Hudson to Albany, then by canal to Buffalo, by lake to Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, and thence by stage to Pittsburg. Here he found there was not a 
single good bakery in operation, and was persuaded to embark in that line of 
business. He built the necessary ovens and operated the first bakery in the 
city, near the old Toll Gate, then called Bayardstown, now about Nineteenth 
street. He was located here several years, then removed to Liberty street 
near the corner of Seventh street, and added confectionery to his line. He 
then bought a property near the corner of Liberty and Ninth streets, where 
he maintained a high-class bakery and confectionery store until his retirement 
from business in 1845. He had in the meantime operated a grist mill on the 
■old canal near Eyre's Island, where he made a high grade of flour. This was 
about 1842. Mr. Bown had also acquired considerable real estate. He had a 
farm on the Puckety road near Frankstown, and lots on Troy Hill, where 
he built his residence and where he lived until his death. December 25, 1848. 

Mr. Bown embraced with zeal and fervor the cause of abolition, and 
voted with the Whig party. He was a strong Calvinist in religious belief. He 
married, in 18 19, Elizabeth Ann Weston, at Malmesbury, England. She was 
of Welsh ancestry, born in 1795, and died June 24, 1830, aged thirty-five years. 
The children of William T. and Elizabeth Ann (Weston) Bown were four: 
Caroline, born in 1820; William T., Jr., January 10. 1822; Mary Elizabeth, in 
1824; and George, in 1826. Caroline and Mary Elizabeth died on the voyage 
to America in 1832. In 1838 Mr. Bown returned to England, and while there 




^(Lvd 



PITTSBURG AND HER PEOPLE 285 

married Sarah Bown, a cousin, and brought her to Pittsburg-. Four children 
were born of this marriage: Samuel, June 10, 1839; Albert, November 20, 
1840; Charles T., April 18, 1842; Alary, February 8, 1844. Charles T. and 
Albert are veterans of the Civil war, Charles serving in the army and Albert 
in the navy. They are both residents of Pittsburg. 

William Tytherleigh Bown, Jr., was born January 10, 1822. at Malmes- 
bury, Wiltshire, England. He was the eldest son of William T. and Elizabeth 
Ann (Weston) Bown. The family moved to Cheltenham, where William T., 
Jr., received his schooling. When a mere lad he helped in his father's store 
putting up packages and such other work as a boy can do. x^fter the death of 
his mother in 1830 the family, as stated, came to the United States, settling in 
Pittsburg, where William T. received further education. He remained con- 
stantly in his father's employment until his marriage in 1846. He thoroughly 
mastered the details of his father's business and was eminently qualified to 
operate on his own account. In 1846 the firm of Lease & Bown was formed, 
and started a bakery and confectionery store on Liberty street, next door to 
the Second National Bank. In 1848 the firm dissolved, Mr. Bown removing 
to St. Clair street, and later a branch store on Third street was formed, where 
he ran the business and remained until 1850. when he formed a partnership 
with George Parys and bought out the wholesale grocery business of his uncle, 
Benjamin Bown, who had been the first to introduce coffee-roasting machinery 
in Pittsburg. The firm of Bown & Parys was dissolved in 1866 by Mr. Bown 
purchasing the interest of his partner. Owing to ill health Mr. Bown retired 
from the grocery business and built a plant for the manufacture of salt near 
Georgetown, Virginia. The change of air and business restored his health 
and he returned to Pittsburg, where for three years he was with White Broth- 
ers, wholesale grocers of Philadelphia. He then went into the merchandise 
brokerage business and continued that line for twenty-five years. In 1869 the 
firm of W. T. Bown & Brother was established in the coffee roasting and pack- 
ing business on Cherry alley. They soon were compelled to seek more com- 
modious quarters, which they found by purchasing Numbers 9 and 11 Seventh 
street, where they remained until the buildings were destroyed by fire in 1891. 
For two years the firm found temporary quarters on Fourth street, when thev 
removed to their own handsome five-story brick building, corner of Thirteenth 
and Liberty streets, which they had fitted up especially for their business. 
The firm made a specialty of pure and cleanly goods, especially packed fruits, 
and had a ready sale for their brands. In 1900 Mr. Bown, after an active mer- 
cantile life as boy, clerk and proprietor of about sixty years, is a large owner 
of real estate on Mt. Washington, and here he built his residence at No. 525 
Grand View avenue, corner of Merrimac street, where he has resided for forty 
years. He is now (1907) eighty-five years of age, and is a wonderfully well 
preserved man. 

Mr. Bown joined the Sandusky Street Baptist church, Pittsburg, fifty 
years ago, where he served as deacon. After moving on the "Hill" he organ- 
ized a Sunday-school, which grew into a church organization, the Mt. Wash- 
ington Baptist church. In 1876 they erected their church edifice and Mr. 
Bown withdrew from Sandusky Street and joined the new congregation. Here 
too he has served continuously as deacon, and for twenty-five years was super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school, and trustee for many years, as well as helping 
greatly in the erection of the new building. Politically Mr. Bown is a Repub- 



286 A CENTURY AND A HALF OF 



lican. When the first pubhc school building was erected he was a member of 
the school board. He was largely instrumental in the success of this enter- 
prise; going to Harrisburg for the authority to build, and personally floating 
the bond issue of thirty thousand dollars necessary to erect the building. He 
was also a member of the building committee and treasurer of the school 
board. The cause of education has always had a warm friend in William T. 
Bown. 

Mr. Bown has been twice married. His first wife, for whom he went to 
England, was Ann Mary Hughes, a playmate of his youth in his English home. 
She was a daughter of James and Ann Mary Hughes, of Cheltenham, England. 
Ann Mary Hughes was born September 3, 1823, and was married to William 
T. Bown November 9, 1846. The newly wedded couple returned to Pittsburg, 
where Mrs. Bown died November i, 1866, leaving five children: i. Elizabeth 
Ann, born September 28, 1847, died April 8, 1886, unmarried. 2. William J. 
H., born June 25, 1849, is a member of